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Full text of "Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal"

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FOR THE PEOPLE 

FOR EDVCATION 

FOR SCIENCE 






LIBRARY 

OF 

THE AMERICAN MUSEUM 

OF 

NATURAL HISTORY 





i.H 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 



The Honorary pECf\ETAi\iEs, 



JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 

1890. 



CALCUTTA : 

PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 

AND PUBLISHED BY THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY, 57 PARK STREET. 

1891. 



CONTENTS. 

— ♦ — 



Proceedings for January 1890 

Ditto for February „ (including Annual Report 



Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 



for ]\Iarch 
for April 
for May 
for June 
for July 
for August 
for November 
for December 



Pages 
1—14 
15—134 
135—146 
147—158 
159—174 
175—188 
189—198 
199—218 
219—240 
241—248 



List of Members of the Asiatic Society on the 31st December 

1889 (Appendix to Proceedings for February) ... i — xvi 

Abstract Statement of Receipts and Disbursements of the 
Asiatic Society for the year 1889 (Appendix to the Pro- 
ceedings for February) ... ... ...xvii — xxvii 

LIST OE PLATES. 

V I. — Tibetan Zodiac... ... ... ... (p- 2) 

V II. — Inscription from a stone at Mudgal-Asrama, Mungir (p. 191) 
VlII. — Leaves from a birch bark manuscript found near 

Kuchar ... -.. ... ... (p. 223) 

\ IV. — The " Manik-Tham " monolith of the Puraniya dis- 
trict ... ... ... ... (p. 243) 



PROCEEDINGS 



OP THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For January, 1890. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Beno-al was 
held on Wednesday the 1st January, 1890, at 9 P. M. 

Colonel J, Waterhouse, President, in the chair. 

The following members were present : 

Babii Saratchandra Das, S. R, Elson, Esq., Babu Bhupendra Sri 
Ghosha, Dr. Hoernle, W. A. Lee, Esq., C. Little, Esq., Babu Asutosh 
Mukhopadhyay, L. de Niceville, Esq. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Sixteen presentations "were announced, details of which are given 
in the Library List appended. 

The following gentleman, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society, was ballotted for and elected an Ordinary 
Member. 

Thakur Suraj Buhksh Singh. 

The following gentlemen are candidates for election at the next 
meeting. 

A. Venis, Esq., M. A., Professor, Queen's College, Benares, proposed 
by Dr. G. Thibaut, seconded by Dr. Hoernle. 

A. Goodeve Chuckerbutty, Esq., B. C. S., proposed by J. Crawfurd, 
Esq., seconded by C. Little, Esq. 

The Secretary i^eported the death of Colonel Sir Heniy Yule 
R. E., K. C. I. E., an Honorary Member of the Society. 



2 Babu Saratc-handra Dk^-Tihefan Zodiac. U^^- 

XT „„ i,oa P^nrpssed a wish to withdraw irova 
The following gentleman has expiesseu 

the Society. 

J. W. Chambers, Esq. 

BXBI5 Sakatchakdka DXs exhibited two Tibetan -naments of soap- 
Stone with carved representation of the Tibetan s.gns of the Zodxac, 
fnd gave a descriptive account of the Zodiac. (Wxth a plate.) 

THE ORIGIN OF THE WORLD. 



AND 



the art of divination and the signs of the zodiac of the Tibetans. 



Text. 







PLATE 1. 




•oceedinga, As. Soc, Bengal, 1890. 




THE TIBETAN-ZODIAC. 



1890.] Babu Saratchandra Dag — Tibetan Zodiac. 3 

NO 

pj'^-2?|3^'if ^•:^':§Sv I a'y5'(^t=^%f^'Ygq I (Yaid{irya Karpo.) 

NO O NO 

Translation. 

In the beginning, what existed from eternity, in nothingness, was 
called the Tortoise. The Buddhas of the past, present and future 
sprang out of him. The three worlds, and all the animal beings also, 
originated from that eternal tortoise. Time, without the distinction of 
past, present, and future, was in him and the whole universe rested be- 
tween his head and tail. From the vapour of his mouth arose the seven 
atmospheric strata (which encompass the earth), and gradually the sphere 
of azure space, and thereafter Sivastika, the emblem of the divine cross, 
were formed. 

From the saliva of that primeval tortoise sprang forth the oceans ; 
and from his flesh were formed the lofty mountains, the islands, 
and the great continents having trees for their hair. 

His head pointed to tbe south, his tail to the north and his four 
limbs sti'etched towards the four corners of the world. His white back 
shaped the old father heaven, called Khen, wherein rested the Bevaloha 
(celestial regions) with the mansions of the gods :-Mahadeva, Brahma, and 
angels of pure habits, who j)ossessed the fourfold organs of sense. The 
celestial regions were formed above, and Birab, the sublime mountain, 
stood below, holding the mansions of the thirty- three Devas and of the gods 
of the Paranirmdnarataya on its top. On the flanks of liirab, there resid- 
ed the four guardian spirit-kings of the world, together with the sun 
and moon, the planets and stars. The sun and moon sprang from the 
eyes of the great tortoise. From the sound of his throat issued the 
dragon's peal of tbunder and from his outstretched tongue flashed 
forth lightning which, produced thunderbolts and hailstorms. From his 
breath originated the wind, the five internal essences, and the five 
physical elements. When he shook his body there was earthquake. 



4 Babu Saratchandra Das — Tibetan Zodiac. [Jan. 

From the yellow belly of the tortoise sprang the old mother earth, 
called Ehon, whose bowels held ndgaloha, the nether world. 

Explanations. 

The heaven and earth united together at the horizon and gave birth 
to three sons and three daughters : — 

1st son was called Gin, which means mountain. 
2nd son „ „ Bva „ „ iron. 

3rd son „ „ Kliam „ „ water. 

1st daughter was called Sson, which means wind. 
2nd daughter ,, „ Li „ „ fire. 

3rd daughter ,, ,, Ssin „ „ tree. 

Hence sprang forth the eight great elements of this world viz. : — 
Heaven, earth, mountain, iron, water, wind, fire and tree, which were 
called " Parkha hrgjad " and believed by the Tibetans to be the most 
potent factors of human destiny. 

The Tibetans evidently derived their knowledge of the origin of the 
world from the Chinese, who believed that heaven was the father, and 
earth the mother of the universe, though the latter may have had a 
diiferent version of the story of the great tortoise. 

The idea that the great tortoise was the primeval source from which 
the first parents — heaven and earth,' — originated was probably conceived 
from the semi- spherical appearance of the heaven, which appeared to 
the unthinking herdsmen of Tibet as resting on the earth at the horizon, 
and these, when combined together, resembled the body of a tortoise — a 
moving house with life inside. 

The earth was, therefore, called Sa-gishi, or the terrestrial basis. 
The art of divination is said to have been first discovered by the 
Chinese from some curious figures which existed on the breast of a 
certain yellow tortoise captured in the river of Honan. Whatever may be 
the Chinese mode and arrangement for calculating and drawing the for- 
tunes of individuals from these marks, thus far it is certain, that the 
Tibetans have shaped Nag-tse, their own art of divination, with Chi- 
nese materials, obtained from the archives of the great Tang dynasty, to 
suit their peculiar superstition, and borrowed religion which they had 
obtained from India at the same period. 

The manner in which they ascertain the auspicious and inauspicious 
periods of time, and directions for the purpose of setting out on a journey, 
and also for making offerings to gods and demons, is very simple. 

In the figures described on the breast of the great toi'toise, which 
is supposed to lie upon its back, there are eighty-nine mansions, inclusive 
of the central square which encloses the little tortoise. 



1890.] Babii Sai-atcliandra Das — Tibetan Zodiac. 5 

These eiglity-nine mansions are divided as follows — 

Eight Parkha, or factors of luck, which are distinguished by the 
technical names of Khen, KJwn, Gin, Dva, Kliain, 8son, Li, and Ssin, are 
supposed to exist at the eight points of the compass, beginning with 
the south, which is always placed at the top. 

A particular Parlcha is supposed to belong to every individual in 
every particular year, which may be determined by counting, in rotation, 
from right to left, always beginning with the top Parlcha called Li 1. 

For instance a person aged 5, 13, 21, 29, 37 or 45 will have 
Ivliam for his parkha in the present year 1890, another individual aged 4, 
12, 20, 28, 36, 44, 52, will have khen for his par^Tia in the year 1890. 

Each of these ^arA;7irt. is surrounded by eight sub-mansions situated 
in eight directions round it, which are sujDposed to contain four auspici- 
ous and four inauspicious articles — Svastilca (sacred emblem of cross), 
a gem, JDorje (thunderbolt), S'rwatsa (the emblem of love), \;ind a human 
limb, five circles, symbolical of five devils, a wedge and a club, respectively. 
When one has to start on a journey or expedition, he should avoid the 
directions of the four inauspicious mansions. If he has to propitiate any 
evil sj^irit he should throw the offerings intended for him towards the in- 
ausjaicious directions. If he has to worship a friendly spirit or tutelary 
deity he should place his offerings towards the mansion which contains 
one of the five auspicioiis objects. 

The sixteen mansions that surround the central square of the figure, 
are occupied by the four principal elements of the Tibetans, — fire, iron, 
water and air. They are placed at the four cardinal points of the com- 
pass, and have the twelve signs : — mouse, ox, tiger, hare, dragon, ser- 
pent, horse, sheep, monkey, cock, dog, and pig — called Lolchor chiiiii, 
or the animals by which the years of the cycle of twelve years are 
designated. 

The little tortoise (which is placed at the centre) represents the great 
tortoise in his celestial form. The nine divisions marked as, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, are called sme-wa dgi\ or the nine passages of exit. They 
are supposed to contain five spiritual beings in each, be they gods or 
demons — and are used to ascertain the state of existence an individual 
had in past, or will have in future life. 



The system of astronomy and chronology formed on the Indian 
principle is called " Kar-tsi." Astrological calculations, especially the 
black art, and the mode of reckoning years, in the Chinese manner, are 
denominated by, the Tibetans as " Nak-tsi." 

The most common method of reckoning time among the people at 
large in Tibet, generally in calculating the yeai-s or in determining the 



1. 


Tag-lo (tiger-year). 


2. 


3. 


Dug-lo (dragon-year). 


4. 


5. 


Ta-lo (horse-year). 


6. 


7. 


Te-lo (monkey-year). 


8. 


9. 


Khyi-lo (dog-year). 


10. 


11. 


Ohi-lo (monse-year) . 


12. 



G Babn SaratcLandra Das — Tibetan Zodiac. ■ [Jan. 

age of individuals, is the cycle of twelve years, in wLicli each year is 
denominated from a certain animal of the twelve signs in the following 
order : 

To-lo (hare-year). 

Dnl-lo (serpent-year). 

Lug-lo (sheep- year). 

Chya-lo (cock year). 

Phag-lo- (pig-year) . 

Lang-lo-(ox-year). 
These twelve signs, in combination with the twelve signs of the 
zodiac, are also employed in reckoning the twelve months of the year. 
Thas the new year of the Tibetans commences with the Tiger and is 
called JSorda-tang-po. The common saying with the people is Horda- 
tang-po Tag-gi-da, the first month of the year is Tiger's-month. 

Chyi-da-ra-wa (the Spring season). 
First month Tag-gi-da- wa (tiger-month). 

Middle „ Yo-gi-da-wa (hare-month). 

Last „ Dug-ki-da-wa (dragon-month). 

Yar-ra-wa (Summer season). 
4th month is Dul-ki-da-wa (serpent-month). 
5th „ Ta-da-wa (horse-month). 

6th „ Lug-da-wa (sheep-month). 

Ton-ra-wa (Autumn Season). 
7th „ Tel-da-wa (monkey-month). 

8th „ Chya-da-wa (cock-month). 

9th ,, Khyi-da-wa (dog-month), 

Gun-da-rawa (Winter season). 
10th „ Phag-da-wa (i^ig-month). 

11th „ Chi-da-wa (mouse-month). 

12th „ Lang-da-wa (ox-nionth). 

These signs are also used in reckoning every two hours of the day 
called " DH-c7J?oi" commencing from the dawn called " TJwrang." The 
time between 3 to 5 A. M. is called the hours of the Tiger. 

The time of the hours of the break of day is called Nam lang 
and that of Nivia shar, is called the hours of the hare which is really 
the beginning of the day. The dawn consequently comes at the end of 
these twelve divisions. They are as follows : 

1. Nam-lang, daybreak. 2. Nimashar, sun-rise. 

"Yo"-hare Dug, dragon. 



1890.] 


Dr. Hoernle— 


•Forged 


Sih 


ver Bamtinki. 


3. 


Ni-toi, morning. 
(Dul-serpent), 




4. 


]^i-chhe, noon, 
Ta, horse. 


5. 


Chhe-yol, afternoon. 
Lug, sheep. 




6. 


N'i-myur, evening. 
Tel, monkey. 


7. 


Ni-nub, sunset, 
Chya, cock. 




8. 


Sa-soi, dusk. 
Khyi, dog. 


9. 


Soi-khor, fore-night or 


■ what 


10. 


Nam-chhe, midnight, 




is called the devil's hour 




Chi-wa, mouse. 




Phag, pig. 








11. 


Chhe-yol, after-night. 
Lang, ox. 




12. 


Thorang, the dawn. 
Tag, tiger. 



The days of the month are also reckoned by means of these twelve 
signs, which occur in rotation. 

These twelve signs are also supposed to preside over the twelve 
directions or Chhog-cJmni, which correspond with the twelve points of 
the compass. 

These twelve signs are of the utmost importance to the astrologer 
in determining the auspicious hours, directions, and conjunctions of 
the Nakshatras, or stars for marriage, and in reckoning the age and 
pei-iod of longevity of individuals. 

The Philological Secretary exhibited a forged silver Eamtinki 
presented to the Society by Raja Sivaprasad of Benares, through Raja 
Rajendralala Mitra. 

Dr. Hoernle observed that the coin was undoubtedly a forgery, 
the surface showing clear traces of the rough surface of the mould in 
which it was cast. The obverse showed four figures in a line, placed on 
a platform, on the left Rama seated on a throne, beside him Sita, 
Lakshman, and an attendant holding an umbrella, all three standing ; 
round the margin the legend TW ^ ofR^t '^ ^W?«r ^. The 
Reverse showed the figure of Hanuman, cai-rying a club and standing 
on a platform ; by his side, to the right and left, two plants ; round the 
margin the legend '^^??T«r ^. The legends are in modern Nagai'i 
character and distinctly legible. The original gold coin must have 
been a modern piece. 

The following papers were read — 

1. Natural Historij notes from H. M.'s Indian Marine Survey 
Steamer '^ Investigator," Commander Alfred Carpenter, R. N"., D. S. 0. 
Commanding, — No. 14. Observations on the gestation of some Sharks and 
Bays. — By A. Alcock, M. B., Surgeon Nattiralist to the Marine Survey. 

The paper will be published in full in the Journal, Part XL 



8 H. James Rainey — Barisal Gtms. [Jan. 

2. Wote on the Barisal Guns, the existence of volcanic vents in the 
direction of those sounds. — By H. James Rainey. 

I find that Mr. Mansou, in his letter embodied in extenso in the 
Sub- Committee's initial Report on the aforesaid curious phenomena, 
states : — 

" At page 8 of the pamphlet of Col. Waterhouse I see a mistake made 
by Mr. Rainey there quoted concerning an ' active volcanic train ' which 
is supposed to run up and down this coast. There is nothing volcanic 
anywhere near, but no doubt Mr. Rainey is thinking of the burning 
springs in the Sita Kund range, and the so-called Mud Volcanoes of 
Ramri and Cheduba. These are nothing but the escape of marsh 
gas," etc. 

In one of my papers on the ' Barisal Guns,' communicated to the 
Society as far back as twenty years ago I think,* which in fact elicited 
the first regular discussion on the subject, I believe I stated that, " an 
active volcanic train " ran along the eastern coast of the Bay of Bengal, 
chiefly based on information derived from a Geological Map published, 
if I remember rightly, in Dr. M'Clelland's Cal. Jour. Nat. His. This 
statement is substantially correct, and it is evident that Mr. Manson is 
not aware of the fact, well-known to Geologists, that the ' great Sunda 
group of volcanic vents,' starting from the eastern islands there, passes 
throuo-h Java and Sumatra, and extends northward as far as Chittagong. 

The fact of Mr. Manson designating the veritable mud volcanoes of 
Ramri and Cheduba as " so-called Mud Volcanoes," shews that, he 
considers steam mud volcanoes as ' true ' mud volcanoes, and ' gas ' mud 
volcanoes as ' pseudo ' mud volcanoes, which is a distinction not re- 
cognised by the general body of Geologists. These mud volcanoes are 
by no means insignificant, as they are subject to fiery paroxysmal erup- 
tions, generally synchronous with seismic phenomena, when the flames 
rise to the height of several hundred feet, probably due to the pre- 
sence of volatile liquid petroleum hydrocarbons. But, whether the 
ejecting force is altogether different gases, — not solely marsh gas, or 
both gases and steam combined, — has not been conclusively established, 
as stated by Mr. Mallet in his Report on these mud volcanoes. Vide 
Records., G. S. L, Pt. II, 1878, p. 205. 

* I may here state that, I am labouring under the disadvantage of writing 
merely from memory and without the aid of books of reference, owing to the 
destruction by fire of my rather extensive Library of works on India, and all my 
manuscript notes on Natural History and other subjects, including my observations 
on the ' Barisal Guns ' and deductions drawn therefrom, extending over a period of 
nearly a quarter of a century. 



1890.] H. James Rainey — Barisdl Guns. 9 

The " burning springs" of, what Mi'. Mansou calls. " the Sita Kund 
range," is probably not produced by marsh gas, but most likely, as 
suggested by the learned Director of the Geological Survey of India 
-with regard to the " Sita Kund " near Monghyr, to " deep seated 
thermo-dynamic action." As regards the designation " Sita Kund," 
I may explain that, it is a sort of generic term applied to all natural 
hot springs in India, and it is derived from a well-known episode 
chronicled in the great Sanskrit Epic, " the Ramayana:" on the rescue 
of Sita from the clutches of Ravana, king of Lanka (Ceylon), her 
consort Rama jealous of her honour, caused her to undergo the ordeal of 
fire and to prove her chastity, after which she performed her ablution 
in a spring, which thenceforth became a hot spring. 

I may add that I have no desire to impugn the correctness of 
the conclusion arrived at by the Sub-Committee, — "that there is no 
evidence in favour of volcanic action having caused the sounds ;" 
and the scientific reputation of Colonel Waterhouse, the Rev. Father 
Lafont and Mr. Pedler, who are among the melnbers of the Sub-Com- 
mittee, is a sufficient guarantee that the enquiry will be carefully and 
cautiously conducted on strictly scientific lines. Bnt, I would suggest 
that, before finally discarding in foto all considerations of volcanic 
agency, sub-marine or otherwise, it might be worth while to enquire if 
similar sounds are heard any where in the proximity of mud volcanoes 
intimately associated with petroleum beds, scattered in various parts 
of the globe. I have read in some book, I think in a magazine, pub- 
lished in the beginning of the present century, that somewhat similar 
sounds are heard somewhere in China, and have been traced to subter- 
ranean origin. The mud volcanoes of Java are said to explode in,ost 
violently during the rainy season, and though Mr. Mallet found the con- 
trary to be the case as regards Ramri and Cheduba, in one of his 
Reports, yet it was admittedly on insufficient data. Captain Hannay, 
quoted by Mr. Mallet, writing of a gas mud volcano connected with 
petroleum beds in Upper Assam, in Jour. As Soc, B., 1845, says : — 

" This is indeed a strange looking place, and I am told by the 
Singphos that at times there is an internal noise as of distant thunder, 
when it bursts forth suddenly, with a loud report, and then for a time 
subsides." 

If sub-marine volcanic action produces explosions on the coast, 
would the sounds be readily carried inland along the course of the 
rivers that discharge themselves into the Bay ? Of course this is put 
forward as nothing more than a mere suggestion, and not advanced as 
an attempt to build any particular theoxy as to the sounds being of vol- 
canic origin. 



10 H. James Rainey — Barisdl Guns. [Jan. 

Note hy Dr. W. King. «i 

The eanse of the Barisal Guns still remains a mystery, and a not 
unnatural tendency in the enquiry has been to fall back on the line of 
active and partially quiescent volcanic vents occurring along the eastern 
coast of the Bay of Bengal, as possibly exhibiting phenomena which 
might account for these sounds. Any way, Mr. Rainey made no mis- 
take in referring to " an active volcanic train" along the Arracan Coast ; 
because the mud exhibitions in the form of cones raised partly by 
ejections of mud and other materials, with accompanying discharges 
of steam and luminous gas, must be classed in the categoi'y of volcanoes : 
while the evidence seems clear that they have extended as far northwards 
as Chittagong. 

Whether, however, the sounds accompanying certain features of 
this line of volcanic action have anything to do with the Barisal Gun 
sounds or echoes is so far extremely questionable : still a possible 
connection should not be let fall out of the discussion, and Mr. Rainey 's 
suggestion as to enquiry regarding sound accompaniment of volcanic 
phenomena in otter regions might be kept in view. 

The sounds reported so far as accompanying the paroxysmal dis- 
charges of the Arracan foci are not, however, so much explosive as 
rumbling or thunder-like ; which may be attributable to the escape 
of the conjested material or gases through vents already existing. It 
is, however, a question with me whether explosive sounds might not arise 
from the bursting forth of confined gases through sudden openings in a 
less active, though not necessarily less cumulative, region of this line 
of vulcanicity ; which region might lie to northward, or even north- 
westwards of Chittagong. At the same time, the Barisal Guns are 
perhaps too numerous and apparently rather too much confined to the 
south central part of the Delta, to fall in with this last suggestion. 

Mr. W. A. Lee suggested that Seismograph obsei-vations should be 
taken to decide whether the Barisal guns accompany earth tremors, or 
not. 



1890.] Library. 



11 



Library. 

The following additions have been made to the Libraiy since the 
meeting held in January last. 



Transactions, Proceedings and Journals, 

presented by the respective Societies and Editors. 
Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University, Circulars. Vol. IX, No, 76. 
Batavia. Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen, — 

Notulen. Deel XXVII, Aflevering, 3. 
. . Tijdschrift voor Indische Taal-, Land-en Volken- 

kunde. Deel XXXIII, Aflevering 3 and 4. 
Bombay. The Indian Antiquary. Vol. XVIII, Part CCXXIII, July 

1889. 
Calcutta. Geological Survey of India, — Records. Vol. XXII, Part 4. 

. Indian Engineering. Vol. VI, Nos. 23 — 26. 

. Photographic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. II, No. 6, De- 
cember, 1889, 
Havre. Societe de Geographic Commerciale du Havre, — Balletin. 

Septembre — Octobre, 1889. 
Ithaca. Cornell University, — Library Bulletin. Vol. II, No. 2. 
Kiew. Societe des Naturalistes de Kiew. — Memoires. Tome X. Li- 

vrais 1, J889. 
Leipzig. Der Deutschen Morgenlaadischen Gesellschaft, — Abhandlun- 

gen. Band IX, Heft. 3. 

. . Zeitschrift. Band. XLIII, Heft. 3. 

London. Nature.— Vol. XLI, Nos. 1047—1050, and Index to Vol. XL. 

. The Academy.— Nos, 916— 919, 

, The Athenaeum.— Nos. 3239—3241. 

Mendon. The American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal, — Vol. XI, 

No. 6. 
Mexico, Informes y Documentos relatives a Comraercio Interior y 

Exterior Agricultura, Meneria e Industrias. No. 49, Julio, 1889. 
Paris, La Societe D'Geographie, — Compte Rendu des Seances. Nos. 13 

et 14, 1889. 

EooKS and Pamphlets, 

presented by the Authors, Translators, Sfc. 
Petit, Hon, Framjee Dinshaw. Travels in Europe, America, Japan 
and China, being a compilation in the Guzrati language, of brief 



12 Library. [Jan. 

notes taken of his voyage to these places from April to Novembei', 
1887. 8vo. Bombay, 1889. 
Rot, Protap Chandra, C. I. E. The Mahabharata, translated into En- 
glish prose. Part 55. 8vo. Calcutta, 1889. 

M.ISCELLANEOUS Pl^ESENTATIONS. 

Nederlandsch-Indisch Plakaatboek, 1602 — 1811, door Mr. J. A. Van 
der Chijs. Deel VI, 1750—1754. 8vo. Batavia, 1889. 

Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kdnsten en Wetenschappen, 

Batavia. 
Report on the Administration of the Central Provinces for the year 
1888-89. Fcp. Nagpur, 1889. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Provinces. 
Catalogue of the Sanskrit Manuscripts in the Library of the India 
Office, Part II. — Sanscrit Literature : A. Scientific and Technical 
Literature, I. Gi^ammar, Lexicography, Prosody, Music. By Julius 
Eggeling, Ph. D. 4to. London, 1889. 
Comparative Dictionary of the Bihari Language. Part II, Compiled 
by A. F. Rudolf Hoernle and George A. Grierson. 4to. Calcutta, 
1889. 
Report on the Land Revenue Administration of the Lovrer Provinces, 

for the official year 1888-89. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 
Report on the Police of the Lovrer Provinces of the Bengal Presidency 

for the year 1888. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 
Resolution reviewing the Reports on the Working of Municipalities in 
Bengal during the year 1888-89. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 

Government of Bengal. 
Report on the Administration of the Meteorological Department of the 
Government of India in 1888-89. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 

Government of India, Meteor. Department, 
Annual Returns of the Civil Hospitals and Dispensaries in the Madras 
Presidency, for the year 1888. Fcp. Madras, 1889. 

Government of Madras. 
Monograph of Wood Manufactures in the Punjab, 1887-88. Fcp. 
Lahore, 1889. 

Government or Punjab. 
Annales del Ministerio de Fomento de la Republica Mexicana. Tome. 

VIII. 8vo. Mexico, 1887, 
Estudios de Meteorologia Comparada por Mariano Barcena y Miguel 
Perez. Tome, I. 8vo. Mexico, 1885. 

Observatorio Mbteorologico, Mexico. 



1890.] Library. 13 

Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada for the 
year 1888, Vol. VI. 8vo. Montreal, 1889. 

Royal Society op Canada. 
Tide Tables for the Indian Ports for the year 1890 (also January 1891), 
by Lt.-Colonel M. W. Rogers, R. E., and E. Roberts, F. R. A. S., 
F. S. S. 8vo. London, 1889. 

Survey of India, Tidal and Levelling Operations. 

Pei^iodicals Pui^chased. 

Calcutta. Indian Medical Gazette. — Vol. XXIV, No. 11, November, 

1889. 
Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles. — Tome XXII. 

No. 11. 
Leipzig. Annalen der Physik und Chemie. — Band XXXVIII. Heft 4. 
London. The Chemical News,— Vol. LIX, No. 1561 and Nos. 1565-67. 
. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVI, No. 154, December, 

1889. 

The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVII, No. 1927 and 



Nos. 1931—1933. 
Paris. Revue Scientifique.— Tome XLIV, Nos. 20—23. 

Books Purchased, 

RosENZWEiG, ViNCENZ RiTTER VoN. Der Diwau des Grossen Lyrischen 
Dichters Hafis in Persischen original herausgegeben ins deutsche 
metrisch ubersetzt, und mit Anmerkungen Versehen. Bands I and 
II. 8«o. Wien, 1858 and 1863. 



^-l 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For February, 1890. 



The Annual Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Bengal was held ou 
Wednesday, the 5th February 1890, at 9 p. m. 

Colonel J. Wateehouse, President, in the Chair. 

The following members were present : 

Dr. J. R. Adie, E. T. Atkinson, Esq., H. Beveridge, Esq., I. C. 
Bose, Esq., W. B. Colville, Esq., E. C Cotes, Esq., W. R. Criper, Esq., 
Babii Saratchandra Das, Babii Rajanikanta Gupta, Dr. Hoernle, A. 
Hogg, Esq., Prince Jahan Qadr Muhammad Wahid Ali Bahadur, W. A. 
Lee, Esq., C. Little, Esq., Kumar Rameshwar Maliah, Babu Asutosh 
Mukhopadhyay, L. de Niceville, Esq., J. D. Nimmo, Esq., M. H. Oung, 
Esq., H. M. Rustorajee, Esq., Pandit Haraprasad Shastri, Capt. R. C. 
Temple, J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Visitors : — C. H. M. Rustomjee, Esq., Lama Phun tshogs D Wan 
Man. 

According to the Bye-Laws of the Society, the President ordered 
the Voting papers to be distributed for the election of Office- Bearers 
and Members of Council for 1890, and appointed Messrs. de Niceville and 
Criper to be Scrutineers. 

The President then called upon the Secretary to read the Annual 
Report. 

Annual Report for 1889. 

The Council of the Asiatic Society have the honour to submit the 
following report on the state and progress of the Society's affairs during 
the past year. 



16 



Annual Report. 



[Feb. 



Member List. 

During tlie year under review 36 gentlemen were elected Ordinary- 
Members of the Society, 13 members withdrew, 7 died, 12 were re- 
moved from the list under Rule 40, being more than 3 years absent 
from India ; the election of one member was cancelled by request, as 
he was contemplating an early return to Europe, and one member was 
struck off on account of non-payment of his admission fee, by which 
his election became void under Rule 9 : of the 36 members elected 4 
were old members who rejoined. The total number of membei-s at the 
close of 1889 was thus 307 against 305 at the end of the preceding 
year : of these 108 were Resident, 135 Non- Resident, 13 Foreign, 22 
Life, 27 absent from India, and 2 special Non- Subscribing members, as 
shown in the following table, which also gives the fluctuations in the 
number of ordinary members during the past six years. 





Paying. 


Non- Paying. 




Year. 


a 
IS 

P5 


'53 


'S 

u 
o 


Is 
1 


6 


rQ 


Special 
Non-Sub- 
scribing. 




3 

o 

1 

f^^ 

o 


1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 


102 

105 

93 

98 

98 

108 


157 
161 
142 
137 
136 
135 


12 
13 
18 
15 
15 
13 


271 
279 
253 
250 
249 
256 


15 
16 
16 
17 
20 
22 


39 
34 

48 
44 
34 
27 


1 
1 
2 

2 
2 

2 


55 
51 

66 
63 
56 
51 


326 
330 
319 
313 
305 
307 



The seven Ordinary Members the loss of whom by death during 
the year we have to regret, were Mr. Otto MoUer, Shams-ul-Ulma 
Maulvi Kabir-ud-din Ahmad, Khan Bahadur, Hon. Rao Sahib Visva- 
nath Narayana Mandlik, C. S. I., Maharaja Isvariprasad Singh, C. S. I., 
of Benares, Dr. D. Waldie, Dr. Francis Day, and Mr. E. J. Jones. 

There was one death amongst the Special Honorary Centenary 

Members, and two among the Honorary Members ; viz., Dr. James 

Prescott Joule of the former, and Professor William Wright, LL. D., 

of Cambridge, and Colonel Sir Henry Yule, R. E., K. C S. I., G. B., 

of the latter. Their numbers now stand at 5 and 25 respectively ; so 

: nt>L of Honorary Members is now at its normal strength. 

i iiCi-e were no casualties among the Corresponding Members and 

w iftf-r "Members, their numbers remaining at 7 and 8 respectively, as 



1890.] Annual Report. 17 

Ttvo members compounded for their subscription as Resident Mem- 
bers, viz., R. D. Mehta, Esq , and J. D. Nimmo, Esq, 

Indian Museum. 

No presentations were made over to the Indian Museum. 
Raja Rajendralala Mitra, LL. D., 0. I. B., having been obliged to 
resign his post as a Trustee on behalf of the Society on account of ill 
health, Mr. C. Little was appointed in his place. 

The other Trustees on behalf of the Society were — 
Dr. A. F. R. Hoernle. 
E. Gay, Esq. 
A. Pedler, Esq. 
Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 

Finance. 

The accounts are shown in the appendix under the usual heads. 

Statement No. 8 contains the Balance Sheet of the Asiatic Society, 
and of the several Funds administered through it. 

The Budget for 1889 was estimated at the following figures — 
Receipts Rs. 14,000; Expenditure Rs. 15,757 (Ordinary Rs. 13,920, Ex- 
traordinary Rs. 1,837). Taking into account only the ordinary items of 
Receipts and Expenditure for the year 1889, the actuals have been, 
Receipts Rs. 18,539 and Expenditure Rs. 12,871, showing a balance in 
favour of the Society of Rs. 768 ; but against this small balance there 
has been an extraordinary expenditure of Rs. 1,850, mainly on account 
of the balance due for repairs to the Society's premises ; and Messrs. 
Triibner's account for books, &c., supplied has also to be considered. 
The invoices received during 1889 amount to £107-12-2, from which 
there will be some set off on account of sales of publications. The 
total expenditure of the year has therefore been considerably more than 
the income. 

Messrs. Triibner's previous invoices for 1888, not yet paid, amount 
to about £294, so that allowing the very favourable estimate of about 
£100 as a set off on account of sales of publications, there are now some 
£300 due to Messrs. Triibner and Co., a portion of which must be paid 
during the year. 

The fact is therefore evident that the ordinary income of the 
Society is not suflS.cient to meet present expenditure, and that measures 
must be taken to reduce the expenditure .within the limits of income. 
To be constantly meeting expenditure from capital mu.st seriously crip- 
ple the permanent income of the Society before long. 

The total receipts in 1889 have been Rs. 13,539 against an estimate 
of Rs. 14,000. There has been a slight falling off in subscriptions, also 



18 Annual Report. [FeB. 

in the income derived from investments, and, in the absence of Messrs, 
Triibner's account for 1888, the income derived from the sale of pub- 
lications cannot be fully given. 

Under Suhscriptions, the estimate was Rs. 7,300 and Rs. 7,263 were 
received, besides Rs. 810, on account of Compounding fees, and Rs. 
928 Admission fees, which have to be invested and do not form part of 
the working income of the year. Under sale of Publications the 
estimate was Rs. 400, but only Rs. 46 can be credited under this head, 
as explained above. Under Interest on Investments Rs. 6,200 were 
estimated, but only Rs. 6,169 received, the difference being due to In- 
come Tax deductions. 

The Miscellaneous Receipts were only Rs. 61 against an estimate of 
Rs. 100. 

The Ordinary Expenditure was estimated at Rs. 13,920, but the 
amount paid out was only Rs. 12,871. The principal items in excess 
were Salaries (due to an under estimate). Commission, and Municipal 
Taxes, owing to an increase in the rates, and the house rate for 5 
quarters being paid during the year. 

The actual expenditure on the Journal and Proceedings has been as 

follows : — 

, ( Part J.— Rs. 1,092 
Journal [p^^.^jj_^^ g^^^y 

Proceedings — ,, 878 



Total Rs. 4,977 



but a bill for £176-18-2, for plates illustrating the Journal Part II for 
1888 is still due to Messrs. Triibner and Co., and should have been paid 
during the year had the Agent's accounts for 1888 been received. There 
are other later bills of Messrs. Triibner, and Messrs. West Newman and 
Co., to bo paid also on account of plates for Journal, Part II, amount- 
ing £62-8-4. The expenditure on this part of the Jouxmal will have to 
be curtailed for the present. 

The Budget Estimate of ordinary Receipts and Expenditure for 
1890 does not differ materially from that for 1889, but both have 
been set at slightly reduced figures. The probable ordinary receipts 
are estimated at Rs. 13,900, and the expenditure at Rs. 13,840. On 
the receipt side the estimate under the head of Suhscriptions has been 
left at the same amount as last year. The amount to be recovered 
by Sale of Publications has also been left at Rs. 400, as it is estimated 
that Triibner's account sales should show an average of about £30. It 
IS probable also that the receipts under this head will be still larger on 



1890.] Annual Beporf. 19 

account of sale proceeds of the extra number of the Journal, Part T, 
containing Mr. Grierson's "Modern Vernacular Literature of Hindu- 
stan," but at present it is not possible to estimate how much this will be. 
The item of Rs. 6,100 allowed for interest is calculated on the actual 
present investment. 

On the expenditure side, the changes are on the whole slight. 
Salaries show an increase of Rs. 170, partly due to an under estimate 
last year, Municipal Taxes also show an increase owing to the increased 
rate of assessments. Reductions have been made of Rs. 50, in Postage, 
Rs. 50 for Binding, Rs. 200 for Journals, and Rs. 100 for Proceedings. 

Beyond the Auditors fee it is not anticipated that there will be any 
extraordinary expenditure this year, except that it may be necessary 
to draw upon capital again to pay off some of Messrs. Triibner's out- 
standings. 

The details of the Budget Estimate are as follows : — 

Receipts. 

Subscriptions ... ... ... Rs. 7,300 

Sale of Pubhcations ... ... ... ... 400 

Interest on Investments ... ... ... 6,100 

Miscellaneous ... ... ... ... 100 



Total ... 13,900 



Expenditure. 

Salaries ... ... ... ... Rs. 4,390 

Commission 



Stationery 
Lighting ... 
Petty Repairs 
Municipal Taxes 
Postage ... 
Freight ... 
Meeting ... 
Contingencies 
Books 

Local Periodicals 
Binding ... 



400 

100 

80 

10 

819 

600 

10 

90 

150 

... 1,610 

31 

450 

Carried over .,. 8,740 



20 Annual Beport. [Feb, 

Brought forward Rs. 8,740 



4,000 



Total ... 13,740 








Rs. 100 








Total ... 13,840 









Journal, Part I ... 

Journal, Part II ... ... ••• 

Proceedings ... ... ... ... 900 

Printing Circulars ... ... ... ... 100 



Auditors fee 



Messrs. Triibner and Co.'s delay in sending in their accounts for 

1888 has rendered it impossible to complete the account for the past 
year, and to frame a proper estimate for the current year. 

The amount of the invested funds now belonging to the Society is 
Rs. 1,35,400. 

London Agency. 

Messrs. Triibner's account with the Society for 1888 not having 
been received no correct information can be furnished as to the amount 
of the balance due to them, or the receipts from sale of publications 
effected during the year. 

The numbers of copies of parts of the Journals, of the Proceedings, 
and of the Bibliotheca Indica sent to Messrs. Triibner and Co. during 

1889 for sale were 362, 182, and 1,006 respectively, valued at Rs. 1,020, 
Nine invoices of books purchased, and of publications of various 

Societies sent in exchange, were received during the year. The value 
of books purchased amounted to £107-12-2. 

A remittance of £109-19-7 was made to the Agents at the begin- 
ning of the year in payment of the balance of their account for 1887. 

Library. 

The total number of printed volumes, or parts of volumes, added to 
the Library during the year was 2,098, of which 784 were purchased and 
1,314 pi-esented. 

The Catalogue of the Tibetan Manuscripts has been printed, and 
that of the Persian works in the Ox'iental Library is advancing towards 
completion. 

Publications. 

Ten numbers of the Proceedings were published during the year, 
containing 278 pages of letter press : two numbers of the Journal, Part 



1890.] Annual Report. 21 

I, containing 105 pages of letter press, 6 plates, and a synchronistic 
table of the reigns of the early Guptas, their contemporaries, and their 
immediate successors, also an extra number for 1888, consisting of 205 
pages, with 3 plates, being Mr. Grierson's History of the Modern Ver- 
nacular Literature of Hindustan ; of the Journal, Part II, there were 
four numbers, containing 440 pages of letter press, with 21 plates, and 
a supplement (No. 2) containing 15- pages of Colonel Watei'house's 
Tables of Metric weights and measures ; one number of the Journal for 
1888 was also issued, comprising 124 pages of letter pi'ess, with 14 plates. 

Building. 

The Society's house and out offices having so lately undergone 
thorough repairs, the only expenditure incurred was a small amount of 
Rs. 8-8 for stopping a leak in one of the gas pipes damaged by work- 
men in the course of the repairs. 

Coin Cabinet. 

During the year 111 coins were added to the Cabinet, of which 
8 were of gold, 66 of silver, 27 of copper, and 10 of mixed copper and 
silver. 70 of these coins were acquired under the Treasure Trove Act. 
The remainder were presentations, 29 being presented by the Bombay 
Government under the Treasure Trove Act, 11 by Mr. V. A. Smith, and 
one by Mr. W. Sandford. They comprise 62 Mu^al, 23 Pathan, 14 
Malwa, 5 Kabul, 3 Hun, 2 Varaha, 1 Gadhiya and 1 Persian coins. 
They all belong to well-known types, and detailed notices of them will 
be found in the Society's Proceedings for February, August and 
November. 

Ofa.ee of the Secretaries. 

Mr. J. Wood-Mason, Vice-President, edited the Journal, Part II, 
and Dr. Hoernle continued as Philological Secretary during the year. 
The duties of the General Secretary were carried on by Dr. Hoernle 
until March, when Mr. Little took over charge of the office. 

Dr. W. King was in charge of the Treasurership throughout the 
year. 

Mr. H. Ronaldson continued as Assistant Secretary during the 
year. 

Mr. J. H. Elliott was the Assistant Librarian until October, when 
he was granted leave of absence for six months without pay, and Babu 
Haranchandra Gupta, B. A. was appointed to act in his place ; the 
posts of Cashier, Pandit, and Copyist, were held throughout the year by 
the permanent incumbents, Babii Nritiya Gopal Bose, Pandit Hari 
Mohan Vidyabhiishan, and Babii Joges Chandra Chatterji respectively. 



22 Annual Beport. [Feb. 

Bibliotheea Indica. 

Thirty-five fasciculi were published during the year, of which six 
were in the Arabic-Persian, twenty-seven in the Sanskrit, and two in 
the Tibetan series. They belong to twenty-one different works, of 
which four are in the Arabic-Persian, fifteen in the Sanskrit, and two 
in the Tibetan series. There was one new publication, the Tiizuh-i- 
Jehdngiri, in the first series, and two in the second series, viz., Mdr- 
handeija Piirdna and Brihad-devatd : no new works were taken up in the 
Tibetan series. All these three works had been sanctioned for pub- 
lication some years ago, but had not been hitherto commenced. On 
the other hand four works have been completed during the year, viz.y 
two in the Arabic-Persian, and two in the Sanskrit series. The former 
are the Isdbdh and the MuntaMabu-t-TawdnJch, the latter are Manutika 
Sangraha, and the Sdnikhyd Sutra Vritti. To these may be added four 
works which were completed in the preceeding year, viz., the Zafar- 
ndmah in the Arabic-Persian series,and the AshtasdhasriM Prajnd Pdra- 
mitd, the Kdla Mddhava, and the Vdiju Purdna in the Sanskrit series. 

In the Annual Report for the preceding year (p. 29) it was stated 
that 50 fasciculi had been estimated as the annual out-turn for the 
ensuino- year, at a probable cost of Rs. 18,800 : the actual out-turn 
has been 35 fasciculi, as stated above. The expenditure out of the 
Oriental PublicatioQ Fund during the year amounted to Rs. 15,983, 
which includes printing charges for 44 fasciculi and editing charges for 
86 fasciculi, and gives an average of Rs. 399 for each fasciculus. For 
the year 1890 the out-turn may be reckoned at 44 fasciculi. These, at 
the average rate of Rs. 377 of the past two years, will cost Rs. 16,588. 
The averao-e annual income, calculated on the receipts of the last five 
years, is Rs. 12,912, which gives an excess of estimated expenditure 
over average income of Rs. 3,676, towards meeting which there is a 
balance of Rs. 3,695. At the end of the current year this balance will 
be practically used up, it being reduced to Rs. 19. It will therefore be 
impossible to devote, as it had at one time been contemplated, the sum 
of Rs. 3,000 out of the balance, for the purchase of a set of the Tibetan 
work " Tan-gyur," in block print. Nor will it be possible to sanction 
any new works to be published in the Bibliothpca Indica until a con- 
siderable portion of the works already sanctioned, is completed. 

Dr. A. Chattei'ji has been appointed to continue the translation 
of the " Sim-uta," Dr. R. Sen, who had undertaken the work, having 
been obliged to resign on account of the pressure of his official duties. 

It has been decided to abandon the further publication of the 
Prithvi Raj Rasau, the work not being historical, and there being grave 



1800.] Annual Beport. 23 

doubts as to its genuineness as a bardic composition, and it is also 
being published privately by a Pandit of Udayapur. 

Maulvi Abdul Rahim having been obliged to resign the editorship 
of the Ma\isir-id-Umdrd owing to ill health, Maulvi Mirza Ashraf Ali 
"was appointed to carry on the work. 

Of the following works of which fasciculi had appeared in previous 
years, no fasciculi were published during the year under review. 

1. Tabaq.\t-i-Nasir.i, (Index of persons and places) ; 2, Prakrita 
Lakshana (English translation and Notes) ; 3, Katantra (introduc- 
tion) ; 4, Susrtjta Samhit.( (English translation) ; 5, A'pastamba S'rauta 
Sutra (Text) ; 6, Manu Tika Sangbaha (Text) ; 7, Lalita Vistara 
(English translation). 

Of the following works sanctioned in previous years no fasciculi 
have as yet appeared. 

1. Prakritadhtata (Text and translation) ; 2, Charaka (English 
translation, with Notes) ; 3, Naqaid-ul-Farazdaq-Jerir (Text with. 
English translations in prose and verse) ; 4, Kala Viveka (Text) ; 5 
Vedanta SdxRA, Commentaries on, (Text) ; (two of these viz. Anubhashyam 
and S'r£bha8HTAM, have been commenced) ; 6, Yogini Tantra (Text) ; 
7, Karana Grantha (Text) ; 8, Muntakhabu-t-Tawarikh, Vol. I, 
(English translation) ; 9, Taj-ul-Maas[R (Text) ; 10, Tarikh-i-Wassap 
(Text) ; 11, Tarikh-i-Yamini (English translation, with Notes) ; 12, 
Jkatadharmaeatha and Vipaka Sutra (Text) ; 13, Saddharma Punda- 
RiKA (Text) ; 14, Al Tabrizi's Commentary (Text) ; 15, SvayambhiJ 
PuRANA (Text) ; 16, BaudhatanIya S'rauta SiJtra, and Hiranyakesi 
S'rauta Si5tra (Text); 17, Ain-i-Akbari (English translation) ; 18, 
RiAzu-s-SALATfN (Text and English translation) ; 19, Nyayavindu TfKA 
(Text in Sanskrit and Tibetan) ; 20, Bhattopala's Commentary on 
Vara'ha Mihira's Brihat Samhita'. 

No new works were sanctioned for publication during the year. 

The following is a descriptive list of the publications issued during 
1889. 

A. Arahic-'Persian Series. 

1. IsABiCH, or the Biographical Dictionary of Persons who knew 
Muhammad. It was compiled by Shaikh Sahabu-d-din Abu-1-Fazl 
Ahmad during the first half of the 9th century of the Muhammadan 
era with the object of giving more or less detailed accounts of the 
Sihabis, i. e., those who received their faith directly from their Prophet 
and are therefore considered men of superior sanctity than the Tdbi'ts 
who received their faith second hand from the Sihabis. It contains 



24 Annual Bepori. [Feb. 

accounts of 20,811 persons. The work has come to a close. This 
completes the Old Series of the Bibliotheca Indica publications. The 
edition was commenced in the year 1852 by the late Maulvi Muham- 
mad Wajih. The present editor, the distinguished Maulvi Abdul Hai, 
has added a short English preface which contains much interesting 
information. No 262, old Series, Vol. Ill, Fasc. XV. Total one fasci- 
culus. 

2. MA'AStJR-UL-UMAEA, Or Memoirs of Nobles, compiled by Nawab 
Samsamu-d-Daulah Shah Nawaz Khan who flourished during the first 
half of the 18th century and was in a position to speak with authority 
on the subject of the Mu gh al Court. It contains biographical accounts 
of the Umaras of the Mughal Court from the establishment of Mu gh al 
rule in India. Nos. 704, 708, 713. Vol. II, Fasc. VI, VII, VIII. 
Total three fasciculi. These complete the second volume. 

3. Muntakhabu-t-Tawarikh, by 'Abdu-1-Qadir Bin Malik Shah, 
otherwise called Al Badauni, translated into English by the Rev. W. 
H. Lowe, M. A. of the Cambridge University. The translation 
of the second volume only was undertaken, and it has now been 
brought to a close under the supervision of Professor E. B. Cowell. It 
contains an elaborate account of the Court of Akbar by one who had 
little sympathy with the new religious ideas of the Emperor. No. 721. 
Vol. II, Fasc. V. Total owe fasciculus. 

Tuzuk-i-Jahangiri. The autobiography of Emperor Jahangir. 
The Imperial author gives an account of his own reign from the day 
of his accession to the throne with the utmost ease and fluency and 
without vanity. Translated by the Rev. W. H. Lowe of the Cambridge 
University. No. 718. Fasc. I. Total one fasciculus. 

B. Sanslcrit Series. 

Advaita Brahma Siddhi, of Sadananda Yati of Kashmir, a dis- 
ciple of Bi'ahmananda, the commentator of the Advaita Siddhi of Madhu- 
Budana Saraswati, on the model of which it is written. Edited by Pandit 
Vaman S'asti'i Upadhyaya, with notes and explanations in Sanskrit. 
The chapters of the woi'k are called Mudgaraprahdra, or blows with a 
club on the head of the writer's opponents. No. 715. Fasc. III. Total 
one fasciculus. 

2. Brihad Dharma Purana, one of the latest works of the Puranic 
literature, edited by Pandit Haraprasad S'astri. It contains the 
Puranic explanation of the caste system. No. 703. Fasc. II. Total 
one fasciculus. 

3. Brihad-devata, edited by Raja Rajendralala Mitra, LL. D., 
C. I. E., is an important work bearing on the elucidation of the Vedic 
texts. It is a metrical work giving the devata or the deity praised, 



1890.] Anmial Report. 25 

i. e., the subject matter of the suTctas and riks of tlie Rig- Veda. No. 
722. Fasc. I. Total one fasciculas. 

4. Chaturvarga Chintamani, by Hemadri, belonging to the 
Yadava Court of Deva Giri in the Deccan, composed about a century 
before the Muhammadan conquest of that part of India, is a compre- 
hensive compilation of Hindu rituals. Any work quoted in this is 
presumably older than the thirteenth century, and the works quoted 
being very numerous, it affords a safe criterion for distinguishing works 
written before the Muhammadan conquest. Edited by Pandits Togesvara 
Smritiratna and Kamakhya Natha Tarkavagisa. Nos. 702, 709 and 734. 
Vol. Ill, Part II, Fasc. II, III, IV. Total one fasciculus. 

5. KuRMA-PURANA, a System of Hindu Mythology and tradition, 
written in the Vaishnava interest, edited by Babu Nilmani Mukho- 
padhyaya, M. A.. Professor of Sanskrit, Presidency College. No. 699. 
Vol. I, Fasc. VIII. Total one fasciculus. 

6. Madana Parijata, edited by Pandit Madhusiidana Smriti- 
ratna, Professor, Sanskrit College, is a digest of Hindu Law, belonging 
to a period subsequent to Hemadri, to whom the author acknowledges 
his obligations. Nos. 705 and 712. Fasc. V and VI. Total two 
fasciculi. 

7. Markandeta Purana, translated into English from the So- 
ciety's edition of the text, with Notes, by Mr. F. E. Pargiter, B. A. 
The work belongs to the early period of Puranic development and is 
written with the object of promulgating the worship of S'akti. It 
contains the GhancU, the standard work of S'akta worship, recited in 
every S'akta household of India. Nos. 700 and 706. Fasc. I and II. 
Total two fasciculi. 

8. NiRUKTA of Ya'ska, the most important work on Vedic phi- 
lology in Ancient India, edited by Pandit Satyavrata Samasrami. 
The text has been already completed with two of the best commen- 
taries. The editor is now engaged with the indices and the preface. 
The subjects treated in the preface, which is in Sanskrit, are — What is 
Nirukta ? What is the Veda ? What is Taska's age ? Is he a Rishi 
or not ? and so forth. Nos. 711 and 723. Vol. IV, Fasc. VI and VII. 
Total two fasciculi. 

9. Ntaya Kusumanjali, edited by Mahamahopadhyay Chandra- 
kanta Tarkalankara, is the prose work of Udayana, surnamed the A'charya, 
whose controversies with the Bauddhas are traditionally said to have 
led to their final expulsion from India. His woi'ks belong to the Nyaya 
school of Hindu philosophy, and are directed principally against the 
Buddhists. The work is accompanied with a commentary, entitled 
PraMsa, which again is copiously illustrated by extracts from a gloss 
entitled Maharanda. No. 725. Vol. I, Fasc. III. Total one fasciculus. 



26 Anvvnl Report. [Feb. 

10. Parasara Smriti, by the same Mahamahopaclliyaya, is accom- 
panied with the commentary of Miidhavacharya. Volume I, treating of 
the Achdra Kdnda, has come to aldose. The editor is now engaged with 
Volume II, the Prayaschitta Kanda. The first volume has been issued 
■without indices, which will be supplied at the end of the second volume. 
Wos. 717, 720, 727. Vol. I, Fasc. VIII. Vol. II, Fasc. I and II. Total 
three fasciculi. 

11. Samkhya Si5tra Vritti, edited by Dr. Richard Garbe, Pro- 
fessor of Sanskrit in the University of Konigsberg, was completed with 
indices. It contains the text in red type, Aniruddha's commentary, ex- 
tracts from Mahadeva's commentary and footnotes, all in black type. 
The text having been completed the editor is now engaged in publish- 
ino- an English translation. Nos. 724i and 731. Fasc. Ill and IV. Total 
two fasciculi. 

12. Samkhayana S'rauta Sutra, edited by Dr. Alfred Hillebrandt, 
Professor of Sanskrit in the University, Breslau. The first volume was 
issued last year with many indices and a preface. The editor is now 
engaged in publishing the commentaries of the work in a second volume. 
ISros.°716 and 732. Vol. I, Fasc. VII, Vol. II, Fasc. I. Total two 
fasciculi. 

VS. Varaha Purana, edited by Pandit Hrishikesa S'astri, is a 
Purana written with the view of furthering the cause of Vaishnava 
worship. The story is told to the goddess Earth by the Great Boar, 
an incarnation of Vishnu, while raising her from the midst of primordial 
water in which she had sank during the great flood. N'os. 710, 714, 
719 726, 733. Fasc. IX, X, XI and XII, XIII. Total y^ye fasciculi. 

14. Tattva Chintamani, edited by Pandit Kamakhyanatha Tarka- 
vao-isa, with the commentary of Mathuranatha, is the standard work of 
Nyaya philosophy in the schools of Mithila and Navadvipa. The 
second volume, with which the editor is now engaged, treats of the 
chapter on Inference. No. 707. Vol. IT, Fasc. 11. Total one fasciculus. 

Tibetan Series. 

1. Sher-Phyin, edited by Babu Pratapa Chandra Ghosha, is a literal 
translation in the Tibetan of the S'ata Sahasrika Prajfia Paramita, other- 
wise called the Raksha Bhagavati, the extent of which is estimated at 
100,000 slokas of 32 letters each. The work is written in prose, and 
contains so much repetition of the same matter, in words as well as in 
sentiments, that the editor has been obliged to omit them, giving only 
the catch- words of the matter repeated. The hundred thousand slokas 
will not, it is expected, take so many fasciculi as the bulk of the MSS. 
would indicate. No. 729. Vol. I, Fasc, II. Total o?ie fasciculus. 



i^->0.] Annual Beporf. 27 

2. AvADANA Kalpalata, by Kshemendra, a voluminous Hindvi 
writer of Kashmir, in standard Sanskrit as oiDposed to the verbose and 
ungrammatieal style of the Buddhists, is being issued with its literal 
Tibetan translation, Btogs brjod apag Ssam hkri sin, under the joint 
editorship of Babu Sarat Chandra Das, C. I. E, and Pandit Harimohan 
Vidyabhiishan, Oriental Librarian to the Asiatic Society. No. 730. 
Vol. I, Fasc. II. Total one fasciculus. 



List of all Societies, Institutions, ^"c, to iohich the Publications of the 
Asiatic Society have been sent during the year, or from tohich Publica- 
tions have been received. 

* Societies, &c,, which, have received the Asiatic Society's publications, and 
have sent their publicationa in return. 

t Societies, &c., which have received the Asiatic Society's publicationa, but 
have sent none in return. 

§ Societies, &c., whose publications have been received, but to which nothing 
has been sent in return. 

* Allahabad : — Editor, Pioneer. 

§ American Philological Association. 

* Amsterdam: — Royal Zoological Society. 

* : — Koninklijke Akaderaie van Wetenschappen. 

* Angers : — Societe d' E'tudes Scientifiques d' Angers. 

* Baltimore : — Johns Hopkins University. 

* Batavia : — Society of Arts and Sciences. 

* : — Kon Natuurkuudige Vereeniging in Nederlandsch- Indie. 

* Berlin : — Gesellschaft ]^aturforsch.ende Freunde zu Berlin. 
* : — Royal Academy of Sciences. 

§ : — Entomologische Verein. 

t Berne : — Societe Suisse d' Entomologie. 

§ Birmingham: — Birmingham Philosophical Society. 



Bombay 



— Anthropological Society. 

— Bombay Branch, Royal Asiatic Society. 

— Editor, Indian Antiquary. 

— Editor, Times of India. 

— Natural History Society. 

* Boston : — Natui'al Histoiy Society. 

* Bordeaux: — L' Academic Rationale des Sciences, Belles-Letti'os et 

Arts. 

* : — Societe Linneenne. 



28 



Annual Report. 



[Feb. 



* Brisbane : — Royal Society of Queensland. 



* Calcutta 

* 

* 

* 

* 



.—Royal Geographical Society of Australasia, Queensland 
Branch. 
Brookville : — Society of Natural History. 
Brunswick :— Verein fiir Naturwissenscliaft. 
Brussels : — L' Academie Royale des Sciences. 

: — Musee Royal d' Histoire Naturelle de Belgique. 

: — Societe Entomologique de Belgique. 

: — Societe Royale Malacologique de Belgique. 

: — Societe Royale des Sciences de Liege. 

§ Buda Pest : — Royal Hungarian Academy of Sciences. 

* Buenos Ayres : — National Museum. 
— Academia Nacional de Ciencias de la Republica Argentina. 
—Agri-Horticultural Society of India. 

— Geological Survey of India. 

— Editor, Englishman. 

— Editor, Hindoo Patriot. 

— Editor, Indian Daily News. 

— Editor, Indian Engineering. 

— Editor, Indian Mirror. 

— Indian Meteorological Reporter. 

— Indian Museum. 

— Mahommedan Literary Society. 

— Photographic Society of India. 

— Public Library. 

— Survey of India. 

— Tuttobodhini Shova. 

— University Library. 
Cambridge : — University Library. 
Cassel : — Der Verein fiir Naturkunde. 
Cherbourg : — Society Nationale des Sciences Naturelles. 

* Christiania : — University Library. 

* Clinton : — Editor, American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal. 

* Colombo : — Ceylon Branch, Royal Asiatic Society. 

* Copenhagen : — La Societe Royale des Antiquaires du Nord. 
t Cuttack : — Cuttack Library, 

* Danzig : — Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 

* Dehra Dun : — Trigonometrical Branch, Survey of India. 

* Dorpat : — Naturforscher-Gesellschaft der Uuiversitat. 

* Dresden : — Entomologischen Vereins " Iris." 

* Dublin : — Royal Dublin Society. 

* : — Royal Irish Society. 



1890.] Annual Report. 29 

§ Dublin : — Geological Society of Dublin. 

* Edinburgh : — Royal Society. 

* : — Royal Physical Society. 

* __^ . — Scottish Geographical Society. 

§ : — Botanical Society. 

* Florence : — Societa Italiana di Anthropologia, Etnologia e Psicologia 

Comparata. 

* " : — Societa Africana d' Italia. 

* Frankfurt : — Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 

* — — — - : — Naturwissenschaftlichen Vereins des Regierungsbezirks. 

* Geneva : — Societe de Physique et d' Histoire Naturelle. 

* Genoa : — Museo Civico di Storia Naturale. 

* Giessen : — Oberhessische Gesellschaft fiir Natur und Heilkunde. 

* Graz : — Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fiir Styria. 

§ Hague: — Koninklijk Instituut voor de Taal-Land-en Volkenkunde 
van Nederlausch-Indie. 

* Hamburgh: — IS^aturhistoi^iches Museum zu Hamburgh. 

* Halle : — Deutsche Morgenlandische Gesellschaft. 

f : — Kaiserlichen Leopoldinisch-Carolinische Akademie. 

* Hamilton: — Hamilton Association (Canada). 

* Harrisburgh: — Second Geological Survey of Pennsylvania. 

* Havre : — Societe de Geographic Commerciale du Havre. 

* Helsingfors : — Societas pro Flora et Fauna Fennica. 

* — :' — Societe des Sciences de Finlande. 

§ Ithaca (U. S. A.) : — Cornell University. 

§ Jassy: — Societatii Stiintifice Literare. 
t Kiev : — Societe des Naturalistes. 

* Konigsberg:— Die physikalische-Oekonomische Gesellschaft. 

* Lahore : — Editor, Civil and Military Gazette. 

* : — Agricultural Society. 

* Leipzig : — Deutsche Morgenlandische Gesellschaft. 

* Ley den : — Royal Herbarium. 

* Liege : — Societe Geologique de Belgique. 
* : — Societe des Sciences. 

* Liverpool : — Literary and Philosophical Society. 
— Anthropological Institute. 
— British Museum. 
— Editor, Academy. 
— Editor, Athengeum. 
— Editor, Nature. 
— Geological Society. * 
— Institution of Civil Engineers. 



* London 

* 

* 

# 



^0 Aminal Tiepnrf. [Feb, 



* London 



-Institaition of Illectrical Engineers. 



— Institution of Mechanical Engineers. ^ 

— Linnean Society. 

— Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. 
— Royal Astronomical Society. 
— Royal Geographical Society. 
— Royal Institution of Great Britain. 
— Royal Microscopical Society. 
— Royal Society. 
— Statistical Society. 
— Zoological Society. 

* Lyons : — La Societe d' Agriculture, d' Histoire Naturelle et des Arts 
Utiles. 
— Museum d' Histoire Naturelle. 
— La Societe d' Anthropologie. 
— La Societe de Geographic. 



§ 

* Madras : — Literary Society. 

* : — Government Central Museum. 

* Manchester : — Literary and Philosophical Society. 
§ Melbourne : — Royal Society of Victoria. 

* Mexico : — Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate". 

§ — ; — Observatorio Meteoroldgico-Magnetico Central. 

§ : — Estados Unidos Mexicauos. 

* Moscow : — Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes. 

* : — Imperial Society of Amateurs of Natural Sciences, Anthro- 
pology and Ethnology. 

* Munich : — K. Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften. 
* : — Editor, Repertorium der Physik. 

* Naples : — Societa Africana d' Italia, 
t Netherlands : — Royal Society. 

* New Haven : — Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences. 
§ : — American Oriental Society. 

* Newport (R. I.) : — Natural History Society. 

* Ottawa : — Geological and Natural History Survey of the Dominion of 

Canada, 
t Oxford : — Bodleian Library, 
t : — Indian Institute. 

* Paris : — Societe de Geographic. 

* : — Societe d' Anthropologie 

* : — Societe Asiatique. 

* : — Muaee Guimet. 

* : — National Library. 



1890.] Annual Report. 31 



* Paris : — Societe Zoologique. 

* Philadelphia : — Academy of Natural Sciences. 

§ : — American Philosophical Society. 

* :— Journal of Comparative Medicine and Surgery. 

* Pisa ; — Societa Toscana di Scieuze Naturali. 
§ Prague : — K. K. Sternwai-te. 

§ Rio de Janeiro : — Museo Nacional. 

* : — Imjierial Observatorio. 

§ Rome : — Societa degli Spettroscopisti Italiani. 

§ :— R. Accademia dei Lincei. 

§ Roorkee :— Indian Foi^ester. 

* St. Petei-sburgh : — Comite Geologique. 
* : — Imperial Library. 

* : — Russian Geographical Society. 

* ~~ : — Academic Imperiale des Sciences. 

* : — Jardin Imperiale de Botanique. 

* San Franciso : — Oalifornian Academy of Arts and kSciences. 

* Santiago: — Deutsche Wissenchaffcliche Vereines. 

* Schaffhausen : — Swiss Entomological Society. 

* Shanghai : — China Branch, Royal Asiatic Society. 

* Simla : — United Service Institution of India. 

* Stettin : — Entomological Society. 

* Stockholm : — Entomologische Tidskrift. 

* : — Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. 

* Sydney : — Royal Society of New South Wales. 

* : — Linnean Society of New South Wales. 

* Toronto : — Canadian Institute. 

* Tokyo : — Imperial University of Japan. 

* Trenton, N. J. — Trenton Natural History Society. 

* Trieste : — Societa Adriatica di Scienze Naturali. 

* Tui'in : — Reale Accademia delle Scienze. 
* : — Osservatio Regia Universita, 

t Ulwar : — Ulwar Library. 

* Vienna: — Anthropologische Gesellschaft. 

§ • : — K. K. Central-anstalt f iir Meteorologie und Erdmagnetismus 

* : — K. K. Akademie der Wissenschaften. 

* . : — K. K. Geologische Reichsanstalt. 

* : — K. K. Naturhistoriche Hofmuseums. 

* : — K. K. Zoologisch-Botauische Gesellschaft. 

* .— : — Ornithologische Verein. 

* Washington : — Commissioners of the Department of Agriculture. 

* ■ — : — Philosophical Society. 



32 Antmal Report. [Feb. 

* Washington : — Smithsonian Institution. 

* : — United States Geological Survey. • 

I : — U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 

* Wellington : — New Zealand Institute. 

* Wiirttemberg — Natural History Society. 
t Yokohama : — Asiatic Society of Japan. 

* : — German Oriental Society, 

* Zagreb : — Archaeological Society. 



Abstract of Council Proceedings during 1889. 
January Slst, Ordinary Meeting. 

An application from the Geographical Society of Berlin for an ex- 
change of publications was declined. 

It was ordered that Part I of the Society's Journal should be 
continued to the Geographical Society of Paris. 

Intimation was received from the Royal Academy of Sciences, 
Turin that tlie competition for the seventh Bressa prize of the value of 
12 000 Italian lire commenced on 1st January 1887 and would close on 
Slst December 1890, to be awarded to the scientific author or inventor 
of any nationality who should have made the most important and useful 
discovery, or published the most valuable work on Physical and Experi- 
mental Science, Natural History, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physiology 
and Pathology, as well as Geology, History, Geography and Statistics. 

The name of Pandit Chandrakanta Tarkalankara was added to the 
list of distinguished persons who receive the Bibliotheca Indica, in re- 
coo-nition of the services he has rendered to Sanskrit literature. 

Read a letter from the Government of India, Home Department, 
received through the Government of Bengal, requesting that a report on 
the progress made in the search for Sanskrit Manuscripts should be sub- 
mitted after three years. 

Sanction was accorded for the purchase of a copy of an annotated 
edition of the Padma Purana which was being published by the Hon. 
Rao Saheb Vishvanath Narayana Mandlik. 

On an application from the Trustees, Indian Museum, enquiring 
whether the Society would publish a list of Oriental Cicindelidoe, com.- 
piled by Mr. E. T. Atkinson, as well as other lists on the same plan 
from time to time, it was decided to publish them as a Supplement to 
the Joui-nal, Part IT, and to supply the Trustees with 100 copies of each 
list on poyment. 



1890.] Jminal Ueport. 33 

An application from the Beng-al Telephone Company for pei^mission 
to attach a stay for a telephone post to the wall of the Society's com- 
pound in Park Street, was referred to the Visiting Committee. 

Permission was given to the Microscopical Society to hold a Conver- 
sazione in the Society's roonis about the middle of next month. 

On the recommendation of the Philological Secretary the Society's 
Pandit was authorized to be paid for his services in editing the Sans- 
krit text of the " Avadana Kalpalafa," the rate of remuneration being 
referred to the Philological Committee. 

February 28tk, Ordinary Meeting. 

An application from Lieut. -Col. Court to subscribe to a translation 
of the Biistan of Sadi, which he proposed publishing, was declined. 

Mr. G. G. Palmer was allowed the loan of the two paintings, 
" Cupid asleep on a cloud," and " Sir William Jones," for the purpose 
of making a copy of them, he having promised to clean and varnish the 
paintings previous to returning them. 

Messrs. Meugens and King were appointed Auditors of the Society's 
accounts for the present year. 

Permission was granted to Mr. R. Knight to consult the Society's 
library for the collection of information in connection with a history of 
the Indian press which he was engaged in writing. 

Major H. G. Raverty was asked, in reply to a reference, to send his 
paper on the changes in the courses of the Indus and the Punjab rivers 
for publication in the Journal, and informed that the indexes to his 
translation of the Tahaqat-i-Ndsirt were in preparation, and, if necessary, 
would be submitted to him before publication. 

Mr. C. Little was appointed General Secretary, Dr. Hoernle, who 
had been conducting the duties, having resigned. 

Dr. J. Burgess was allowed to purchase some volumes of the 
Society's Joui*nal from 1854 to 186.3, of which there were 5 or moi'e 
copies in stock, in oi'der to complete his set. 

A proposal by the President that the Finance Committee should be 
termed the Finance and Visiting Committee, and meet monthly on the 
Monday before the Council meeting, was approved. 

The several Committees for 1890 were appointed. 

On the recommendation of the Philological Committee remunera- 
tion at the rate of Rs. 1/8 per page was sanctioned to the Society's 
Pandit for editing the Sanskrit portion of the Avadana Kalpalatd under 
publication in the Bibliotheca Indica. 

The Visiting Committee having reported that there appeared to be 
no objection to affix a stay for a telephone post belonging to the Bengal 



34 Annual Beport. [Feb. 

Telephone Company to the wall of the Society's componnd, the necessary 
permission was granted. 

March 28th, Ordinary Meeting. 

The thanks of the Council were conveyed to Mr. T. R. Munro for 
his presentation to the Society of two enlarged photographs of plans 
Calcutta ; one, taken in 1723 or 1724, showing the palisaded enclosure 
within which the Christian community resided, and the other taken 
from a survey made in 1753 by Lieutenant Wills, in command of the 
Artillery in Bengal. 

An application from the Ungarischer Karpathen Verein for an 
exchange of publications was referred to the Natural History Secretary. 

It was resolved on a letter from Count Landberg, asking the 
Society to delegate some of its members to the 8th International Con- 
gress of Orientalists to be held at Stockholm and Christiania in 
September next, that Mons. E. Senart should be invited to represent 
the Society. 

Authority was given to sell from the reserve stock of the Biblio- 
theca Indica publications certain Sanskrit works applied for by Dr. 
Lanman, Professor of Sanskrit in Harvard College, Cambridge, U. S. A. 

It was decided on a proposal made by the President, to issue as 
a Supplement to Part II of the Journal, a set of Metric Tables prepared 
for the use of the Survey of India offices, provided the sanction of 
Government could be obtained to the publication by the Society. 

The Secretary of the Theosophical Publication Fund Society at 
Bombay having agreed to accept the conditions laid down by Dr. Mitra 
for permission to reprint his translation of Patanjali's Yoga Sutra, was 
informed that the required permission would be given on receipt of an 
agreement duly signed. 

April 2bth, Ordinary Meeting. 

An exchange of publications with the Society of Naturalists, Kiev, 
was sanctioned. 

An offer from Maulavi Sakhawut Hossein to make an Urdu trans- 
lation of Beale's Oriental Biography, if the Society would publish the 
woi-k at its own cost, was declined. 

Dr. A. Crombie was appointed a Member of the Council in place 
of the Hon. A. Wilson, resigned, in consequence of leaving India on 
furlough. 

A presentation was announced from Mr. J. T. Gladstone of a 
photograph of the palm tree (Gorypha, sp. inc.) flowering in the 
Society's grounds. 



1890.] Anmcal Report. 35 

Mr. F. E. Pargiter was informed, in reply to an application that two 
Mauusci'ipts of the Markandeya Furdna might be consulted and a list 
of the various readings of importance be noted, that the Society would 
endeavour to get the Manuscripts, but that he must make his own 
arrangements for collating them. 

On the report of the Library Committee an offer of Rs. 40 was 
made for a copy of Seebohm's work on Snipes, Plovers and Sandpipers 
offered to the Society. The ofFer was accepted. 

It was decided, on a suggestion by the President, that a footnote 
should be added to the investment account showing the different funds 
to which the investments appertained. 

A copy of a Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts to be sold by 
auction at Allahabad was referred to Dr. Rajendralala Mitra. 

May '30th, Ordinary Meeting. 

An application from the Academy of Sciences, Cracow, for an ex- 
change of publications was declined. 

In reply to an enquiry by the Deputy Commissioner of Hurdui whe- 
ther the Society could give a donation of its publications to the Colvin 
Library lately opened at that station, it was ordered that a list of the 
publications in the Bibliotheca Indica should be forwarded to ascertain 
whether it contained any books that would be likely to be useful. 

A letter from Mr. F. E. Pargiter reporting that an old Muhammadan 
resident of Maldah, had written an interesting account of that district, 
with its ruins at Gaur and Panduah, and collected a number of rubbings 
of the inscriptions there, was referred to the Philological Committee. 

On the report of the Natural History Secretary, the application 
from the Ungarische Karpathen Verein for an exchange of publications 
was declined. 

An application was made to the Government of Bengal to place 
the name of the Strasburg University Library on the list of Institutions 
to whom the Notices of Sanskrit Manuscripts are presented. 

The loan from the library of Keith Johnston's Physical Atlas was 
authorized to a member for one week. 

J^^ne 27th, Ordinary Meeting. 

Read a letter from the Secretary, Theosophical Publication Fund 
Society, Bombay, stating that the intention of reprinting Dr. Rajendra- 
lala Mitra's translation of Patanjali's Yoga Sutra had been given up, 
and that a new translation of the work would be made for publication 
by the Society, 

An offer for the sale to the Society of a rare collection of Indian 
views ill water colours by Indian artists, was declined. 



3G Annual Beport. [Feb. 

It was decided on the report of the Philological Committee, with 
reference to a proposal to place on record a resolution expressive of 
the great loss the Society has sustained by the death of the late Hon. 
Rao Sahib V. N. Mandlik, C. S. I., of Bombay, that the usual notice 
should be taken in the annual report. 

In order to ascertain whether the report written by an old Maho- 
medan resident of Maldah contained any fresh valuable matter relating 
to the ruins at Gaur and Pandooah, it was resolved, on the recommenda- 
tion of the Philological Committee, that the report should be obtained 
for examination. 

A copy of the continuation of Hewitson's " Exotic Butterflies," now 
publishing in parts, was subscribed for. 

An application from the Societe TTeuchateloise de Geographie for 
an exchange of publications, was declined. 

August 1st, Ordinary Meeting. 

In compliance with a request made by the Government of Bengal 
a complete set of the notices of Sanskrit Manuscripts prepared by Dr. 
Rajendralala Mitra was supplied to the Library of the Indian Institute 
at Oxford. 

Enquiries were ordered to be made as to the cost of a complete set 
of the Muybridge Photographs of animal locomotion, and of the sets of 
100 plates, with reference to suggestions for purchasing a copy of the 
work for the Society's library. 

A list of the names of the governing body of the Society was 
ordered to be filed annually vrith the Registrar of Joint Stock Com- 
panies in order to meet the requirements of Act XXI of 1860. 

Mr. Beames was elected a Member of the Council in the vacancy 
caused by the death of Dr. Waldie. 

Arigiist 29th, Ordinary Meeting. 

An intimation was received from the Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, that the Asiatic Society had been placed on the list of 
Libraries to i-eceive the printed " Theses," or Dissertations, accepted 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University. 

In reply to a representation from the Trustees, Indian Museum, 
Dr. Rajendralala Mitra explained that his non-attendance at any of the 
meetino-s of the Trustees for the past twelve months had been due to 
his serious illness. Leave of absence was granted to Dr. Mitra till 
November, and he promised to resign his Trusteeship in December 
in the event of not being then able to discharge his duties as a Trustee. 

Read a letter from the Government of Bengal conveying the coi'- 



1890.] Atmual Eeport. 37 

dial approval of the Lieutenant-Governor as to the manner in which the 
Government Grants-in-aid of the Oriental Publication Fund, and the 
Conservation of Sanskrit Manuscript Fund had been administered 
during the year 1888. 

A letter from Monsieur A. Suchetet asking to be furnished with 
the names of Naturalists belonging to the Society, and others, to whom 
he could address enquiries concerning hybridity of bii'ds, reptiles insects, 
&c., was referred to the Natural History Secretary for disposal. 

A proposal from the Trustees, Indian Museum, to accept an offer 
made by Baron de Selys Longchamps to compile a catalogue of the 
Odonata, to be issued as a Supplement to Part II of the Journal, was 
approved, the Trustees agreeing to pay for the separate copies to be 
supplied to them. The catalogue to be distributed only to those mem- 
bei's who ask for it. 

It was resolved on the recommendation of Dr. Rajendralala Mitra, 
supported by the Philological Committee, that Dr. Agornath Chatterjee 
should be appointed to translate the Susruta, the present Editor, Dr. 
R. Sen, having been obliged to resign in consequence of the pressure of 
official duties. Dr. Chatterjee was informed that he would be required 
to engage a Vaidya Pandit to assist him in the work, whose name must 
be submitted to the Council for approval, and that he would be allowed 
remuneration at the maximum rate of Rs. 3 per page to enable him to 
secure the services of a really efficient person. 

The loan from the Society's Library of two books on Buddhism 
was sanctioned to Dr. Karl Marz, of the Moravian Mission in Leh, a 
Tibetan scholar ; also that he should be presented with a copy of each 
fasciculus of the Society's Tibetan publications in the Bibliotheca 
Indica. 

Read the prospectus of a work named the " Hellenistichen Relief- 
bilder," in course of publication, to cost about £11 : it was decided that 
the work was too expensive for purchase. 

September 2i6th, Ordinary Meeting. 

An application from the Librarian of the Natural Science Associa- 
tion of Frankfurt a, Oder to be furnished with a copy of the Journal in 
addition to the Proceedings, was declined. 

An exchange of publications from 1881 was sanctioned with the 
American Museum of Natural History, New York, the Journal, Part II, 
being given for the Museum Bulletins and Annual Reports. 

A proposal to purchase a copy of a work on " American Spiders 
and their spinning work " was referred to the Library Committee. 

Remuneration at the rate of Rs. 2/8 per page was sanctioned to Mr. 



38 Annual Bepurt. [Feb. 

F. E. Pargiter for his translation of the Markandeya Piirdm, publishing 
in the Bibliotheca Indica. 

The question of the cost of publishing Mr. Grierson's history of 
the " Modern Vernacular Literature of Hindustan " was referred to the 
Finance Committee. 

It having been reported to the Council that the tomb of the late 
Mr. Blochmann in the Circular Road Cemetery was in a dilapidated 
state and would cost Rs. 32 to restore to its original condition, Dr. 
Hoernle was asked to see the tomb, and in case of repairs being neces- 
sary to issue the necessary orders up to that amount. 

October 3lst, Ordinary Meeting. 

The Principal of the Agra College having applied for the return 
of the Manuscript of the Prithi Raj Rdsdu, by Chand, it was decided on 
the recommendation of the Philological Secretary to discontinue the 
further publication of the work in the Bibliotheca Indica, it not being 
historical, and there being grave doubts of its genuineness as a bai-dic 
composition. 

The prospectus of the Muybridge photographs of animal locomo- 
tion having been considered by the Council, it was decided not to pur- 
chase any of them for the library. 

The purchase of a copy of the woi-k on American Spiders and their 
Spinning work was sanctioned on recommendation of the Library 
Committee. 

Maulvi Abdul Rahim having been obliged to resign the editorship 
of the " Maasir-ul-Umara " on account of ill health, Maulvi Mirza 
Ashraf Ali, 1st Persian Teacher of the Calcutta Madrassa, was ap- 
pointed to carry on the work. 

An exchange of publications with the Queensland Branch of the 
Royal Geographical Society of Australasia was declined. 

November 28th, Ordinary Meeting. 

An application from the Natural History Association of Bonn, on 
the Rhine, for an exchange of publications, was declined. 

The presentation of some of the publications of the Bibliotheca 
Indica was sanctioned to the Colvin Library at Hardui. 

Dr. Rajendralala Miti^a resigned his place as a representative of 
the Asiatic Society on the Board of Trustees of the Indian Museum. 

Dr. Agornath Chatterjee was informed in reply to a request that 
he might be allowed to consult all the leading Vaidya Pandits in the 
translation of the " Susruta," instead of being confined to the entertain- 
ment of a single Vaidya Pandit, that the Council could not recede from 



ISyO.] Address. 39 

their condition that the Editor should employ a Vaidya Pandit, whose 
name must be submitted for approval. 

Babu Haran Chandra Gupta was appointed to act as Assistant 
Librarian during the absence on leave of Mr. J. H. Elliott. 

The lists of OfiBce Bearers and Members of Council for 1890 were 
ordered to be circulated to the Members of Council. 

Deceinher 19th, Ordinary Meeting. 

On the application of Pandit Chandrakanta Tarkalankara, the 
loan of a Manuscript of the Parasara Madhava-Vyavahara-kanda was 
obtained from the Benares College, to assist him in editing the Parasara 
Madhava for the Bibliotheca Indica. 

A Catalogue drawn up by Dr. Hoernle of a collection of coins 
formed by Captain De Lgessoe in Central Asia, submitted by the 
Trustees of the Indian Museum, was accepted for publication as a sup- 
plement to the Journal, Part I, the Trustees contributing two-thirds 
of the whole cost of printing, in return for 150 separate copies. 

The lists of Office Bearers and Members of Council for the ensui no- 
year were approved. 

Mr. C. Little was appointed a Trustee of the Indian Museum on 
behalf of the Asiatic Society in the vacancy caused by the resignation 
of Dr. Rajendralala Mitra. 



The Report having been read the President invited the meeting to 
put any questions or to offer any remarks which any member might 
think necessary in connection therewith. 

No remai'ks having been offered the President moved the adoption 
of the report. The motion was unanimously carried. 

The President then addressed the Meeting. 



^ 



DDRESS. 



It is unnecessary for me to say much more regarding the workino- 
of the Society after the report which has just been read. It is satis- 
factory to note that our member list showed a small increase and that 
the publications of the year have been unusually voluminous and, in point 
of interest and variety of the subjects treated on, compare favourably 
with those of previous years. Also that the Catalogue of Tibetan MSS. 
has been published and that of the Persian works in the Library is ap- 
proaching completion. The year has necessarily been one of quiet and 
as far as possible, of economy, in order to allow our finances to recover 



40 Address. [Feb. 

from the heavy expenditure of the previous year. We have good reason 
to be proud of the volumes forming our Journal for the past year and 
they bear the strongest testimony to the energy and industry of the 
editors and to the recognised value of the Journal as a medium of pub- 
lishing the work of our members ; but as we were hardly prepared for 
so heavy an expenditure on plates in bringing out those published during 
the last two years, coming so soon after the repairs to our building had 
exhausted our temporary reserve fund, some curtailment in this respect 
will be necessary to clear off our liabilities on this head. As I remarked 
last year, the ordinary income is scarcely sufficient to meet our annual 
requirements, and unless we desire to see our permanent vested fund 
dwindling steadily down, we must endeavour to keep our expenses well 
within our income, however much we may regret the necessity, and the 
consequent limitation of our publications and other useful work. There 
is no immediate pressure, but in order to guard, if possible, against a con- 
tingency that seems likely to occur if it is not checked at once, I think it 
my duty to give this word of warning, and I would very earnestly 
impress upon our members the necessity of ipcreasing the resources of 
the Society and of prompt payment of their subscriptions. There is, 
I am sorry to say, always a very large outstanding on this account which 
causes great inconveiiience and loss. 

I much regret that an unusually heavy pressure of work in connec- 
tion with the new Photographic and Lithographic Office buildings 
and the removal of the offices into them, as well as failing health, 
which obliged me to take a short change to Europe for three months, 
have made it impossible for me to devote so much time as I could have 
wished to the aifairs of the Society, or to do all that I had hoped to 
have done during my Presidentship. 

I have again to very warmly acknowledge the assistance given me 
by the office-bearers in carrying on the affairs of the Society and by our 
late President, Mr. Atkinson, who kindly acted for me during my 
absence. I would remind you that the valuable services of our officers 
are given to the Society voluntarily and at the sacrifice of their private 
time and leisure, and I would ask you for a very hearty vote of thanks 
to Mr. Wood-Mason, who, as Vice-President, continues to give the 
Society the benefit of his labours and long experience in editing the 
Natural History and Physical Science part of the Journal ; to our 
Honorary Secretaries, Dr. Hoernle, who continues so ably to carry on 
the work connected with the Philological and Historical part of our 
Journal, and Mr. Little, the General Secretary and editor of the Proceed- 
ings ; and to our Treasurer, Dr. W. King. {The vote was passed unani- 
mously.) I would also say a word in praise of the zeal and industry 
of Mr. Ronaldson, our Assistant Secretai'y, and of the subordinate staff. 



1890.] Address. 41 

Obituary. I grieve to say that the hand of death has removed from 
among us many of our valued Honorary and Ordinary Members during 
the year. 

Among the Honoraiy Members : — Colonel Sir Henry Yule, R. B. 
K. C. S. I., C. B., joined the Society as an Ordinary Member on the 
2nd July 1856, and was elected an Honorary Member in April 1876. He 
contributed several papers to the Journal, including " Notes on the Kasia 
Hills and People," and " an account of the ancient Buddhist remains 
at Pagan." In 1855 he was attached to Sir A. Phayre's mission to the 
Court of Ava and wrote a very valuable and graphic account of it. The 
Map of Burma which accompanied it was until quite recently almost the 
standard map of that country. He retired in 1862 and devoted his 
leisure to geographical and philological studies, resulting in his publish- 
ing several valuable works, the first of which was " Cathay and the way 
thither," an account of the attempts to reach China overland during the 
Middle Ages. This was followed by his well-known scholarly edition of 
the "Book of Ser Marco Polo." In 1886 he brought out a " Glossary of 
Anglo-Indian Terms," which was commenced in connection with 
Dr. Burnell, and is sometimes known as " Hobson Jobson." His last 
work was illustrating and annotating the " Diary of William Hedges," 
a work which contains much that is interesting regarding the early 
history of Calcutta and other early English settlements in India, and the 
third and last volume of which was published last year by the Hakluyt 
Society, of which he was for a long while President. 

Nominated a life member of the India Council in 1875 he did much 
to encourage geographical work in this country, both officially and pri- 
vately, by his readiness to assist any one interested in such woi-k by 
kindly help and support, as I can personally testify. I think I shall 
only faintly express the general sentiment when I say that in Sir Henry 
Yule, Indian, though I ought more properly perhaps to say Asiatic, 
Geography has lost one of its best friends and most able exponents. 

Dr. William Wright, Fellow of Queen's College, Cambridge, and 
Sir Thos. Adams' Professor of Arabic died on the 22nd May. He was 
elected an Honorary Member in December 1881, and enjoyed a cosmo- 
politan reputation as an Arabic scholar. Among his works may be 
cited an Ai'abic Dictionary ; Opuscula Arabica, collected from the MSS. 
in the University of Leyden, and the ^' Kamil" of El-Mubarrad. He 
had lately been preparing for the press the " Dewan ", of Jarir, and 
the " Nakaid ", of Jarir and al-Tarazdak. 

A man of genial nature and sterling character, always ready to 
assist his brother Orientalists, his loss is severely felt not only at 
Cambridge, where he was best known, but universally. 



42 



AJdress. [Per. 



Dk. J. Prescott Joule, F. R. S. wlio died in October last, was 
elected a special Honoraiy Member on the occasion of the Centenary of 
the Society in 1884. An expert and persevering experimentalist, he 
discovered, in 1841, the mechanical equivalent of heat, from which he 
deduced the law of the conservation of energy, and that energy is in the 
same degree as indestructible and uncreatable as matter. This law, 
now -universally recognised, has worked a revolution in science and 
led to many important discoveries in thermo-dynamics, electro-dynamics 
and the dynamical theory of gases, as well as in biology. He was for 
many years closely connected with the Literary and Philosophical 
Society of Manchester as Secretary, Vice-President and President. 

Among the Ordinary Members — 

Dr. Francis Day, C. I. E., was elected a member of the Society in 
April 1869, and is best known as the leading authority on ichthyology 
and fish culture generally, though more particularly in connection with 
the fish and fisheries of this country. His *■ Fishes of Malabar' appear- 
ed in 1865, and in 1875 he commenced the publication of his great work 
on the " Fishes of India ", which was completed in 1878, though a sup- 
plement was published last year. At the time of his death Dr. Day had 
completed the MSS. of two volumes on the " Fishes of India " to form 
part of the new " Fauna of British India " now being brought out under 
Dr. W. T. Blanford's supervision. These volumes have both been 
lately published. Dr. Day contributed several papers to our Journal 
and Proceedings, the principal being his " Monograph of the Indian Gy- 
prinidcB " and " Notes on Fish collected by Dr. Stoliczka in Kachh." 
He died on the 10th July, at Cheltenham. 

Dr. D. Waldie was elected an Ordinary Member in November 1865, 
and at the time of his death was a member of our Council. He had a 
considerable share in the discovery of the use of chloroform as an anaes- 
thetic, and was a sound chemist. He contributed several papers to our 
Journal and Proceedings, chiefly connected with the effective filtration 
of the Calcutta water supply. 

Mr. B. J. Jones, Deputy Superintendent of the Geological Survey, 
who died on the 15th October last, was elected an Ordinary Member in 
August 1884 and contributed papers to the Proceedings " on some 
nodular stones from the Bay of Bengal." He was a member of the 
Physical Science and Natural History Committees and promised to be 
a very useful member of the Society. His premature death is much 
to be regretted. 

Mr. Otto Christian Rehling Moller was elected an Ordinary 
Member in December 1883. He was born at Copenhagen in January 
1848, and was educated as a Civil Engineer, After being employed 



189U.] Address. 43 

for some years in the construction of the Danish railways, he came to 
India in December 1876, and took up the management of a tea-garden 
in the Sikkim Terai, but owing to ill-health he took the appointment of 
first assistant on the Tukvar tea estate near Darjeeling. In Europe, he 
had devoted much of his leisure to the study of Birds' eggs and Lepidop- 
tera ; in India he followed with ardour the same pursuits and in addition 
made a large collection of bird skins. He sent numerous notes on the 
nidification of Indian birds to Mr. Allan Hume, which will be found 
spread over the latter's works on the Avi-fauna of India. He made the 
most extensive collection ever got together of the Lepidoptera of Sikkim 
and Bhutan, of which the rhopalcerous portions alone numbered nearly 
600 species. In conjunction with Mr. J. H. Elwes, he wrote a paper on 
the Butterflies of Sikkim, published iu the Transactions of the Ento- 
mological Society of London, for 1888. He died on January 25th, 1889, 
at the early age of 41. 

Shams-dl-Ulama Maulvi Kabir-ud-din Ahmad Khan Bahadur was 
first elected an ordinary member in June 1869, and had long been con- 
nected with the work of the Society in the Bihliotheca Indica. He was 
for many years Resident Munshi and Assistant Examiner of the Central 
Madrassa Examinations, and was afterwards appointed Munshi to the 
General Board of Examiners, which post he held till he died. He was 
oue of the Persian Editors of the Bihliotlieca Indica for upwards of twenty 
years. He also started a press and published a large number of Arabic 
and Persian works. He was made Khan Bahadur in 1875, and the title 
of Shams-ul-Ulama was conferred on him a year or two ago. 

MAHAR.4JA IsvARiPRAsHAD SiNGH, C. S. I., of Benares, was one of 
the oldest members of our Society, having been elected an ordinary 
member in 1853. 

The Hon. Rao Sahib Visvanath Narayana Mandlik, C. S. I. was 
elected a member in May 1880. He was best known for his ' Commen- 
taries on the Institutes of Mami,' and did not contribute to the Society's 
Journal or Proceedings. 

Annual Review. 

I propose now, as last year, to place before you a brief review of 
the progress of Science and Oriental Literature and Philology in India 
and its neai'er borderlands during the year, so far as I have been able, 
under the difficulties already mentioned, to collect them. I had, indeed 
at one time lately felt myself obliged, owing to j^ress of work, to give up 
the idea of giving you an address in this form ; but as I felt that it was 
most desirable, if possible, to keep up the sequence of these annual 
reviews I have endeavoured to do what I could, and trust that you will 
excuse any shortcomings. 



44 Address. [Feb. 

At the same time I must confess that the task imposed upon our 
Presidents of giving an annaal address is, as Mr. Medlicott remarked in 
his very practical address as President tea years ago, somewhat more 
or less of an incubus. Coming as it does at the busy season of the year, 
it is really very difficult to find time to put together anything like 
satisfactory resume of the literary and scientific work of the year and 
for the same reason, one feels disinclined to ask one's friends to share 
the labour, though I must gratefully acknowledge the kind assist- 
ance I have received in preparing my address last year and again this 
year. 

During the year steady and active progress seems to have been made 
in India in all branches of the subjects falling within our ordinaiy scope, 
thouo-h there is nothing exceptional to record. As usual, we have to 
look to the scientific departments of Government for the principal addi- 
tions to our knowledge of Indian geography, geology and mineralogy, 
meteorology, botany (scientific and economic), chemistry, archaeology, 
biology and, to a very great extent, of zoology, which seems to be the 
one subject that appeals moi-e than any other to the private worker. 
It is satisfactory to note the increasingly practical and remunerative 
tendency of the work done in the Glovernment scientific departments, 
though pure science is by no means neglected. There are few countries 
where so much scientific work is done by Grovernment as in India, as evi- 
denced by the many valuable publications that are yearly brought out in 
the branches of science above enumerated. When we contrast the state 
of Indian scientific literature now with what it was when I joined the 
service some 30 years ago, the value and amount of the work of this 
kind done by the Government will be clearly seen. There were then 
no Archgeological Surveys, no Meteorological Department, no Scientific 
Annals of any kind except, I believe, the Records of the Geological 
Survey, and the Reports of the Great Trigonometrical Survey. The 
principal Museum in the country was our own, and most of the scientific 
work done was by members of our Society. As I remarked last year, 
it is in many ways an advantage that scientific work in India should 
be centralised in departments under Government, still it is to be 
reo-retted that there are not more private workers in the field. I 
have been very much struck in going through the scientific literature 
of the year to see how little attention seems to be paid to India as 
a field for scientific work, especially considering the comparatively large 
number of travellers and visitors who now come to this country and 
often spend some time here. Of scientific works, either in English on 
the vei'nacularu, by native authors, there appear to be few or none 
beyond elementary school books. I am glad, however, to hear that more 



1890.] Address. 45 

attention is being paid to scientific pursuits among the natives of this 
countiy, though it must naturally be long before the scientific habit of 
investigation can be fully developed among them. Three Bengali 
students have just passed the M. A. examination in Zoology, and one 
in Geology. This is encouraging, and it is to be hoped that in time they 
will do good original work, and that their example will be followed by 
others. 

The opening of Technical Institutes in the Bombay Presidency and 
the Punjab is also an encouraging sign of advance, though I feel some 
doubt as to whether such Institutes are really the best means of 
thoroughly teaching handicrafts, and whether some such arrangement 
as appears to be followed in Europe of special schools attached to 
various guilds, would not be more successful. I speak, however, with 
an imperfect knowledge of the subject. The great thing, it seems to 
me, is to teach the youngster the use of his hands and eyes, and when 
this is once attained, the further development can be left to work itself 
out. A good training of the eye in drawing and of the hands in 
simple carpentry and smith's work would instil a habit of observation 
and exactness and be a very good foundation to begin upon for subse- 
quent technical or scientific education. 

Our Society. 

Of our Journal, Part I, devoted to philology, antiquities and litera- 
ture, two parts only were published during the year, with 6 plates. 
Mr. Grierson's valuable essay on the Modern Vernacular Literature of 
Hindustan, which was noticed in last year's address, has been published, 
after considerable revision, as a special number of the Journal, Part I, 
for 1888. Special attention may be drawn to the joint paper in No. 2 
by Mr. V. A. Smith and Dr. Hoernle on the inscribed seal of Kumara 
Gupta II, which is accompanied by a synchronistic table of the reigns of 
the Early Guptas and their contemporaries and immediate successors, 
and is illustrated by an excellent collotype plate. There are two 
papers on coins by Mr. Oliver and Dr. Hoernle ; a paper on the Antiqui- 
ties of Rampal, by Mr, Asutosh Gupta ; our whilom guest, Mr. Lanman 
bas contributed a note on the Namuchi-myth, and Babu Sarat Chandra 
Das, C. I. E. has given an account of the life of Sumpa Khan-po, the 
author of the Rehumig. 

The Journal, Part II, No. 4, of 1888, contains 9 papers, illustrated 
by 14 plates, including 3 coloured ones of butterflies illustrating Mr. de 
Niceville's paper on new or little known Butterflies from the Indian 
Region, and 6 to Mr. Blanford's List of Himalayan Ferns from about 
Simla. Babu Asutosh Mukhopadhyay contributes a paper on the Dif- 



46 Address. [Feb. 

ferential Equation of all Parabolas. There are two other Entomological 
papers, one by Mr. E. T. Atkinson on Indian Rhyncliota, and on the 
Butterflies of the Nilgiri District, by Mr. Gr. F. Hampson. Mr. S. A. Hill 
has a note on the Psychrometer and the condensing Hygrometer. Mr. 
Anderson describes a new ciliate Infusorian. General Collett, C. B. 
contributes a paper on the geological structure of the Myelat district in 
Burma and Mr. Wood-Mason has a note on some objects found by Mr. 
Driver in a neolithic settlement in Chutia Nagpur. 

The volume for 1889, of which four numbers and two supplements 
have already been published, contains no less than 23 papers, illustrated by 
23 plates. Our Vice-President, Mr. E. T. Atkinson, 0. 1. E., contributes 
several valuable entomological papers which will be noticed hereafter, 
and the Supplement No. 1, with 199 pages of letterpress, is devoted to 
his two Catalogues of the order Coleoptera, family Cincindelidce, and of 
the order Rliynchota, sub-order Hemiptera — Heteroptera, family Capsidce. 
These Catalogues form part of a proposed complete " Catalogue of the 
Insecta of the Oriental Region." The remaining papers deal with many 
branches of science : Mr. Hill has given a very full account of the Tor- 
nadoes and Hailstorms of April and May 1888 in the Doab and Rohil- 
khand. Babu Asutosh Mukhopadhyay contributes three papers on pure 
Mathematics — " On some applications of Elliptic Functions to problems 
of mean values " and on the " Geometi-ic Interpretation of Monge's Dif- 
ferential Equation to all Conies." Our Vice-President, Mr. Wood- Mason, 
has a short notice of a neolithic Celt fi'om Jashpur in the Chutia Nagpur 
District, besides a paper on the Ethiopian and Oriental representatives 
of the Mantodean sub-family Vatidoi. Dr. Alcock has given us a con- 
tinuation of the valuable papers on the results of the cruises of the 
Indian Marine Survey Steamer "Investigator" under Commander Car- 
penter, R. N., including an important paper on the Fishes of the Bay 
of Bengal. Of Botanical papers there are three — one by Dr. Gr. King, 
C. I. E., F. R. S., on the Flora of the Malayan Peninsula ; Dr. A. Barclay 
gives a list of the Uredinece of Simla, and Dr. Prain describes some new 
species of Pedicidaris. Mr. A. Pedler gives a paper on the Volatility of 
Mercury and its compounds, and Mr. Anderson a note on Indian Botifers. 

The second supplement is a reprint of some Tables of Metric 
Weights and Measures, prepared by myself with the assistance of Mr. 
T. A. Pope, and revised by Mr. W. H. Cole, M. A., at the Survey of 
India Office, Dehra Dun. They were mainly intended for use in my own 
office, but as they appeared likely to be useful for general purposes, they 
have been published separately, and Colonel Thuillier, the Surveyor 
General, was kind enough to obtain the permission of Government to 
their being printed as a siTpplemcnt to the Society's Journal before the 
type was liroken up. 



1890,] Address. 47 

Of tlie Proceedings, edited by the General Secretary, Mr. Little, 
10 numbers have been published. They contain, besides the interesting 
reports on coins by Dr. Hoernle, several short papers, among which 
may be noted Mr. W. L. Sclater's on a collection of Mammals from 
Shahpur in the Panjab ; a note on the use of Alizarin Blue in photo- 
graphing the red end of the Spectrum and of the new dye Rhodamine 
for orthochromatic photography ; notes on Jay Mangalagarh, by Mr. 
Asutosh Gupta, C. S., and on three new Hemoptera by M. L. Lathiery. 

Bibliotheca Indica. Good progress has been made in the publica- 
tion of the works in hand in the Arabic and Persian, the Sanskrit and 
the Tibetan series of the Bibliotheca Indica. Three new publications 
have been taken in hand, viz., — the Tazuk-i-Jehdngiri, in the Arabic- 
Persian, and the Mdrkandeya Ptirdna and Brihad-devata in the Sanskrit. 
The Igdbdh and the Mimtakhabic-t-Tawdrikh, in the Arabic-Persian series, 
and the Manu Tikd Sangraha and Sdmkhyd Sutra Vritti, in the Sanskrit 
series, have been completed. 

Barrisal Guns. The Sub-Committee of the Society which was ap- 
pointed in the previous year to investigate the causes of the mysterious 
sounds known as Barrisal guns have submitted their report which was 
published in the Proceedings for August. The Committee are of opinion 
that the evidence is very strongly in favour of the sounds being closely 
connected with the river banks. Mr. Manson's theory of echoes from the 
river banks is supported by strong circumstantial evidence, and explains 
many peculiarities noticed in connection with the sounds ; it at least 
deserves, therefore, that effoi^ts should be made to disprove it. By thus 
narrowing the enquiry it is more likely that some definite result may be 
arrived at. Great credit is due to Mr. Little, our General Secretary, for 
the labour he has devoted to this investigation and the working out of the 
various observations. It is to be hoped that further attention may be 
paid to the subject by skilled observers, and that we may now be able 
to ascertain something moi-e definite as to the actual origin of the 
sounds. 

Other Societies and Institutions. 

Microscopical Society. This Society has just published its second 
annual report and appears to be making good progress under the President- 
ship of Mr. Wood- Mason. Considerable additions have been made to 
the Society's cabinet and a very complete gas microscope has been pre- 
sented to the Society by Sir Henry S. Cunningham. Many interesting 
papers have been read at the meetings. Among them — a note on the 
sound-producing organs of Crustacea, with special reference to those of 
the Stomatopoda, by the President. Descriptions of new microscopic ap- 



48 Address. [Feb- 

paratus, by Mr. E. J. Jones, late Vice-President. On a species of Po- 
dophrya ionnd in water from the "Triangular Tank" in Park Street, 
by Mr. W. J. Simmons, the Secretary. On some Flosctiles found in 
Calcutta tank- water and Notes on Indian Rotifers, by our member Mr. 
H. H. Anderson. The latter paper has been published in our Journal. 

The Bombay Natural History Society, continues to flourish and 
increase its sphere of usefulness. When in Bombay last December, 
I was much pleased with the admirable little Museum of natural history 
curiosities the Society has got together under the care of Mr. Phipson, 
the energetic Secretary, who was kind enough to point out to me the 
principal objects of interest. Four numbers of the Journal have been 
published during the year containing several interesting papers which 
will be noticed under their respective heads. Among them may be 
specially mentioned Lieut. H. E. Barnes' papers on Nesting in Western 
India, illustrated with 3 coloured plates. Mr. Oates' paper on Indian 
and Burmese Scorpions, also illustrated with a plate. Mr. de Niceville's 
on new and little known Butterflies from the Indian Region, with two 
coloured plates. A note on man-eating Tigers, by Mr. Reginald Grilbert, 
and Mrs. J. C. Lisboa's short notes on the Odoriferous Grasses of India 
and Ceylon. 

Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. Fi'om the last pub- 
lished report this Society appears to be doing well and the member 
list is increasing. Papers have been read at the meetings by Mr. J. J. 
Modi — " The Karun River opened to trade by the Persian Govern- 
ment;" by Dr. P. Peterson, " Nyayabindhu of Dharmotavra, a Bud- 
dhist woi^k on Logic ; " by the Hon'ble Mr. Justice K. T. Telang, 
C. I. E., "The date of Pui^anawarma and Sankaracharya." Dr. Peter- 
son has been obliged to resign the Secretaryship after holding it for 6 
years and is succeeded by Mr. Tajnik. 

Turning now to the work done by our Indian Museum and kindred 
Institutions, it is satisfactory to observe that the various Museums 
in different parts of India seem to be exerting a great educational 
influence on the teeming masses in this country. It is reported 
more than once that the native visitors to the Museums are com- 
mencing to take a really intelligent interest in the collections and do 
not come only as mere sight-seers. Mr. Thurston, the Superintendent 
of the Madras Museum, has estimated the cost-rate of each visitor to the 
Museum to be between 1 and 2 annas, and following up the same idea 
and applying it to different other Museums in various parts of India, it is 
somewhat remarkable to find how close the cost-rates are for all of them, 
and at what a very small cost per visitor these Museums are maintained. 
In most cases it is little over an anna, or about one penny a head. 



1890.] Address. 49 

It may not be out of place to note the importance of the work of 
provincial and local Museums being confined, as far as possible, to the 
complete illustration of the products of their own particular provinces 
or localities. This should be their primary object, in order that students 
desii'ous of consulting the collections may at once feel sure that the 
exhibits belong to that locality, and to no other. This system, no doubt, 
entails some loss of educational power, but if objects from other localities 
are admitted, their place of production or origin should be very dis. 
tinctly marked upon them and, if possible, they should be kept quite 
apart from the local collections. 

Indian Museum. This great institution, with which our Society is 
so intimately connected, continues its work in the directions which have 
been noticed in previous addresses from this chair. You will be glad to 
hear that the new extension in Sudder Street, for the accommodation of 
the Ethnological, Economic and Art collections, taken over from the 
Government of Bengal, is making x'apid progress towards completion, 
and, it is hoped, may be ready for the reception of the collections in the 
course of a few months. 

The Museum was visited during the year 1888-89 by 393,311 per- 
sons, at a cost-rate per person of about 2*6 annas, inclusive of the 
Economic Section. 

The publications issued by the Trustees during the year have been 
almost exclusively entomological and include Part I. of a Monograph of 
Oriental Gicadidoi, by Mr. W. L. Distant. This work is illustrated by 
plates which will be of service to workers in India in the determination 
of their collections, while the account that is given of each species is in- 
tended to dispense with the tedious references to obscure publications 
hitherto required in studying this group of insects. The part deals with 
28 species. 

The first part of a ^^ Catalogue of the Mantodea," by Mr. Wood- 
Mason, has been issued. This work, which deals with 87 species, 
is illustrated with numerous woodcuts, and includes the results of the 
attention which its writer has for many years devoted to this small but 
interesting family of Orthojptera. The second part is making good 
progress. 

The Catalogue of the Moths of India, by Mr. E. C. Gotes and Col. 
Swinhoe, noticed in the addresses of the past two years, has at length 
been completed with the issue of parts V, VI and VII. with Index, which 
have appeared during the year. This Catalogue gives the synonymy and 
geographical distribution, so far as it is known, of the Moths that have 
been described as occurring in India and Ceylon. It includes some 5000 
species and is a valuable contribution to Indian Entomology. 



50 Address. [Feb, 

Mr. de Niceville has continued his work on the Butterflies of India, 
of which volume III, containing the Lyccenidce, lias just been published. 

To facilitate the study of Indian Entomology, the publication has 
been commenced, in our Journal of a series of Catalogues of the 
various groups of Oriental Insecta. Two of these Catalogues, compris- 
ing the Gicindelidcd and Gapsidce, have been compiled by our late 
President, Mr. E. T. Atkinson, C. I. E., and published as a Supplement 
to Part II. of the Journal. Mr. Atkinson's work has been taken as the 
model upon which the catalogues of other groups are to be constructed 
as entomologists can be found to undertake them. Mr. Atkinson has 
also commenced a similar catalogue of CarahidcB, while progress has 
been made with the catalogues of the OrtTioptera, Neuroptera, and Dip- 
tera, undertaken by Dr. Henri de Saussure, Mens, le Baron de Selys 
Longchamps, and Mons. J. Bigot respectively, whilst Mr. Cameron's 
" Catalogue of the Oriental Hymenoptera " provides for that group. 

Progress has been made with the classification of the general ento- 
mological collections of the Indian Museum, where large numbers of 
fresh specimens have been received and their determination in many 
cases effected with the aid of entomologists in different parts of the 
world. The object kept in view has been the formation of a complete 
and reliably identified series of Indian Insects, which shall be available 
for reference, so as to reduce the difficulty which has hitherto existed in 
obtaining the identification of species. An appeal has been made by 
Mr. Atkinson, as Chairman of the Trustees, to entomologists in Europe 
to assist in the determination of the unnamed portion of the Museum 
collections. A large number of English and foreign entomologists have 
agreed to work out certain groups, but aid is still required for portions 
of the Neuroptera, the Pseudo-neuroptera, and a few families of the Cole- 
optera, which it is hoped may be forthcoming. 

I last year noticed that the special attention of the Trustees had 
been given to the investigation of insect pests destructive to crops, and 
that arrangements had been made for systematic work on Indian Eco- 
nomic Entomology. Further progress has been made, under the editor- 
ship of Mr. E. C. Cotes, who has devoted himself most zealously to this 
question, not only in the investigation of the species which are of 
economic importance as pests destructive to crops, bat also to those 
which are producers of articles of commercial value, such as silk and 
lac. These practical applications of scientific entomology have been 
conducted by Mr. Cotes in cooperation with the Agricultural and Forest 
officers of the Government and with the aid which has been freely 
afforded by planters and other private persons in different parts of 
the country. The information collected is being published in a new 



1890.] Address. 51 

periodical entitled " Indian Museum Notes," which has taken the place 
of the '* Notes on Economic Entom,ology," mentioned in my address 
last year, of which only two numbers appeared. 

Two numbers of the new periodical, with notes on a large series of 
economic insects, have already appeared, and farther numbers, including 
detailed reports on Indian silk insects and locusts, by Mr. Cotes, and on 
the mosquito blight on tea and the ravages of Aphides in orchards, by 
Mr. E. T. Atkinson, are in progress. The periodical is illustrated with 
heliogravure plates taken from the original pencil drawings by the 
Museum artists. It is distributed to those who assist in the investiga- 
tion, and a medium of communication is thus established between work- 
ers in different localities. The investigation is a large and complicated 
one, but it is gratifying to know that steady progress is being made 
by the determination of most of the important species, while infor- 
mation is accumulating on the subject of their life-histories. In this 
work all can help, and with the general recognition of the importance 
of the subject, both as'a means of counteracting the ravages of injurious 
pests and of stimulating the production of valuable economic products, as 
well as by the introduction of entomological teaching into the courses of 
study at Cooper's Hill and the Forest School at Dehra Dun, the number 
of those who take an intelligent interest in the subject is gradually in- 
creasing in different parts of India. It should be mentioned that the 
whole expenditure connected with this publication is borne by the Go- 
vernment of India in the Revenue and Agricultural Department. 

A new Catalogue of the Books in the Museum Library compiled 
under Mr. Wood-Mason's direction, by Mr. R. L. Chapman, has just 
been issued. It contains several new features, especially in the way of 
copious cross-references. The bulk of the books is naturally zoological 
and the catalogue will be found of great value by students other than 
those consulting the Library. 

Mr. W. L. Sclater, the Deputy Superintendent, is continuing the 
Catalogue of Mammals^ commenced by Dr. Anderson, referred to in 
last year's Address. 

During the year a taxidermist has been employed to travel in 
various parts of the country with the object of teaching persons 
interested in zoology to prepare skins, on condition that they collect 
for the Museum ; in the hope that in this way a number of collectors 
will be spread all over the country and the Museum collections en- 
riched. The scheme was initiated by the Revenue and Agricultural 
Department of the Government of India, and has, I am glad to say 
worked well under the immediate superintendence of Mr. Sclater. Many 
new specimens have been received in the Museum collected by the 



52 Address. [Feb. 

travelling taxidermists or contributed by gentlemen who have had the 
benefit of their teaching or services. 

Under the energetic supervision of Dr. Alcock, the naturalist to 
the Marine Survey, the dredging operations carried out in connec- 
tion with the Survey work of the Indian Marine Survey Steamer 
" Investigator," under Commander Alfred Carpenter, R. N., continue to 
brino- in ffood harvests of results for the benefit of the Indian Museum 
and also of our Journal. Dr. Alcock has worked out the Fishes of the 
Bay of Bengal which had been brought together since the commence- 
ment of the Survey, and has published the results in two papers in our 
Journal and one in the Annals and Magazine of Nahtral History, which 
will be duly noticed hereafter. Dr. Alcock's investigations shew that 
the Museum collection of deep-sea Fishes is probably rivalled only by 
the great collections in the British Museum and United States National 
Museum. 

In the last published Report of the Trustees, 1888-1889, many very 
important contributions to the collections of Marine Zoology made by 
the Survey are noted by Mr. Wood-Mason, besides others in the In- 
vertebrate and Vertebrate collections, among which may be specially 
mentioned Dr. J. Scully's donation of no less than 2,765 skins of Birds, 
nearly all collected by himself in Turkistan, Nepal and Gilgit, and of 
about 200 specimens of Mammals collected in the same regions. 

The Journal of the Linnean Society, Vol. XXI, contains a further 
instalment of the Reports on the collections made in the Mergui Archi- 
pelago for the Trustees by Dr. J. Anderson, F. R. S., and this completes 
the work. The reports include Pennatulida, by Professor A. M. Mar- 
shall, F. R. S., and Dr. G. Herbert Fowler ; the Myriopoda, by Mr. 
R. J. Pocock ; the Comatulce, by Dr. P. H. Carpenter, F. R. S. ; the 
Echinoidea, by Professor P. Martin Duncan, F. R. S., and Mr. W. P. 
Sladen ; the Asteroidea by Mr. W. P. Sladen ; Mammals, Reptiles and 
Batrachians by Dr. J. Anderson, F. R. S. These will all be further 
noticed hereafter under " Zoology." 

The Economic Section has made good progress and much useful 
work has been done towards making a type collection of the most im- 
portant economic products. It is, however, difiicult to do much in this 
or other directions till the completion of the new buildings in Sudder 
Street. At the instance of the Grovernmentof India in the Revenue and 
Agricultural Department, an important collection of Indian Fibres has 
been undertaken. It is intended to distribute the specimens to the 
Imperial Institute and to various institutions in England. 

The LxicTcjiow Museum. Under charge of Dr. A. Fiihrer this Museum 
has made good progress during 1888-89. Large additions, chiefly zoo- 



1890.] Address. 53 

logical, were made to the collections ; among them, a nearly complete 
collection of the avi-fauna of the Himalayas, from Masuri, Darjil- 
ing and Native Sikkim ; a fairly representative collection of sea-fishes 
and marine invertebrates, and a collection of the moths and butterflies 
of the Kumaon Hills. Dr. Fiihrer reports that the country people, who 
come in crowds, display a real and intelligent interest in the zoological 
collections. 

In the Art section, also, several additions have been made to the 
collections, the greatest care being exercised to procure good old speci- 
mens of indigenous art-work and ornament, in order to keep up the 
standard by letting the native artist see only chefs d'oeuvres of his art. 
The archjBological collections and coin cabinet have also received some 
important additions which will be noticed hereafter. 

A valuable collection of fossils and other remains found at Benares 
during the sinking of the " wells " for the piers of the Dufferin Bridge 
have been presented to the Museum, 

The publications of the Museum comprise a collection of the Pro- 
ceedings of the Committee of Management from 1883 to 1888, with the 
Curator's monthly reports, and accompanied by a short history of the 
Museum, which has just been published. The revised editions of the 
Catalogue of Birds and the Coin Catalogue were in the press. A des- 
criptive essay on the Pathan and Mogul Coinage of the Sultans of 
Delhi, based on the Museum collection, has been published in Urdu by 
Munshi Chhoti Lai. 

The Museum was visited by 206,628 persons during the year, the 
cost per visitor admitted being about 1*1 anna. 

Government Central Museum, Madras. From the Report of Mr. 
Edgar Thurston, the Superintendent, for 1888-89 — it appears that the 
Museum was visited by 337,801 persons, or a much larger number of 
visitors than in any previous year, and the actual cost per visitor 
was nearly 1'25 anna. The " Catalogue of Batrachians of South India" 
referred to last year, was issued, and the " History of the Coinage 
of the East India Company " was in the press. Lists of the Butterflies of 
South India and of the Eggs of Indian birds contained in the Museum 
were printed for distribution. Several rare coins were acquired and 
are noticed elsewhere, A Catalogue of the Mineralogical collections 
and of Meteorites recorded to have fallen in Southern India, pre- 
pared by Mr. Bosworth Smith, was in the press. The Archseolo- 
gical collections received many valuable additions from Mr. A. Rea, of 
the Archaeological Survey of Southern India, including a quantity of 
pottery from cairns and cromlechs and sculptures from Amravati and 
other Buddhist sites. 



54 Address, [Feb. 

A report on a second collection of Sponges made by Mr. Thurston 
in the Gulf of Manaar was published by Mr. Arthur Dendy, in the 
Annals and Magazine of Natural History. Fourteen of the twenty-four 
determinable species forming the collection are new. In Mr. Thurston's 
report a list is given of butterflies, mostly from the Nilgiris, added 
during the year, the numbering corresponding with Mr. Hampson's 
monograph published in our Journal for 1888 ; also lists of Birds and 
of Eggs of Indian birds. A specimen of BJiinodon, measuring 20 feet 
in length, was cast on shore at Madras and has been added to the 
Museum. 

Mr. Thurston has now in the press and nearly ready for issue 
" Notes on the Pearl and GhanJc Fislieries and Marine Fauna of the Gulf 
of Manaar," dealing with the Tuticorin Pearl Fishery ; Pearls from 
Mytilus smaragdinus and Placmia placenta ; the Tuticorin Chank Fisheiy ; 
the Ceylon Pearl Fishery ; Rameswaram Island ; Marine Fauna of the 
Gulf of Manaar. 

The Jeypore Museum. From a memorandum with which Dr. Hendley, 
the Secretary, has kindly favoured me on the progress of the Jeypore 
Museum during the past year, it appears that the Museum has been 
visited by about 237,501 persons during the year, or some 10,000 more 
than the year before. The visitors are observed to begin to show a 
more intelligent interest in the exhibits, and to study them instead of 
regarding them merely as curiosities. On one night in the week the 
rooms are illuminated with gas, and arrangements are also made for 
reserving admission to purdah women on special application. 

The building has been completed during the year. A series of 14 
portraits in distemper of the Maharajahs of Jeypore since the time of 
Baber has been completed and adorns the entrance-hall of the Museum. 

New exhibits to the extent of Rs. 7,250 have been purchased and 
include typical collections of Indian shells and of Indian insects. Models 
illustrating the anatomy and physiology of the horse and of its dentition 
have been procured from Paris and are of use in teaching native farriers. 
A similar model of a man has been added and others illustrative of com- 
parative anatomy and zoology are expected shortly. Specimens of 
artificial flowers, cai'eful studies of nature by Miss C. Janch, of Breslau, 
have been added in the Botanical Section, also relief maps, models of 
Indian snakes, and of the head of a cobra dissected to shew the poisonou s 
glands and fangs. Analyses of 28 kinds of Indian foods and beverages 
are also illustrated. 

The total expenditure for 1889, all of which has been met by the 
the Durbar, has amounted to Rs. 17,549, so that the cost-rate per visitor 
has been about 1"14 anna. 



1890.] Address, 55 

Dr, Hendley lias published an illustrated work on " Ulwar and its 
Art Treasures. 

Colombo 3Iuseum. I learn from Mr. Haly that the only subject 
likely to be of interest is the acquisition of a skeleton of a whale found 
on the shores of the Gulf of Manaar. Unfortunately it is not complete, 
the jaw-bones being missing, but it is hoped that they may yet be re- 
covered. It seems to have been killed by a steamer, from the damage 
done to the head. It is evidently one of the Physeteridoe, Cachalots or 
Spermaceti Whales, and is a high-finned Cachalot. This find is of great 
importance because only one high-finned Cachalot, is known, viz., Phy- 
seter turio, Linn. ; and that only from a description by Sibbald of one that 
came into the Frith of Forth in 1859. There are no bones of any animal 
of this species in any Museum in the world, so that the present find may 
probably be what Dr. Gray called " the great desideratum of Zoology," 
an almost complete skeleton of Physeter turio. If it is not this, it must 
be entirely new to science. 

Sioyal Botanic Garden Calcutta. The chief improvement effected 
within the year 1888-89, was the extension and completion of the Palm 
House, which now forms a magnificent conservatory in the form of an 
octagon, the length of each side being 85 feet and the diameter of the 
whole 210 feet. The approaches to the garden have been much improved 
by the continuation of the road along the river bank from Howrah, which, 
when completed, will affoi'd a pleasant and convenient means of reaching 
the garden. A commodious landing-stage has also been constructed at 
the liver gate. 

The Herbarium collections have received considerable accessions, in- 
eluding a large collection from the Shan Hills, received from Brigadier- 
General H. Collett, C. B. From Kew, a third set of Mr. 0. B. Clarke's 
extensive collections in the Eastern Frontier countries, made during his 
last visit to India, has been received. The value of the collection is 
greatly enhanced by each specimen being accompanied by a note in 
Mr. Clarke's own hand. A large number of specimens were received 
from, the Perak Museum, also a set of the Dipterocarps of Penang from 
Mr. Curtis of the Forest Department of the Straits Settlements. Some 
interesting specimens from the N. W. Himalayas were received from 
Mr. Duthie. 

Zoological Garden Calcutta. From the last report of this garden for 
1888-89, it is satisfactory to learn that it continues to thrive and be a great 
source of amusement and instruction to the Calcutta public, as well as to 
the large number of strangers who flock to Calcutta, The income from 
visitors showed a large increase. Daring the year the new lying in den 
for the lioness was built, and the new sheltei'ed bird-house, referred to in 



56 Address. [Feb, 

last year's address, lias been completed. The report notices the educa- 
tional influence the gardens are beginning to have. In a recently pub- 
lished Bengali book on nursery education, the author gives a discussion 
on the instinct and habits of animals, as they may be studied in the 
course of a visit to the garden, with a view to stimulating the faculty of 
observation in the youthful mind. 

Oriental History, Literature and Linguistic Studies. 

The year seems to have been particularly fruitful in the results of 
literary activity and antiquarian research in this country. Greater atten- 
tion also seems to be paid to Oriental literature in Barope than former- 
ly, and as the first of Asiatic Societies founded for investigation within the 
limits of Asia, we must welcome the efforts now being made in London 
to extend the knowledge of Oriental Studies and Literature by the estab- 
lishment of the School of Modern Oriental Studies connected with the 
Imperial Institute in union with University College and King's College, 
London, of which the inaugural Address was delivered by Professor 
Mas Miiller last month. Similar schools have already been established 
in Russia, France, Austria and Germany, and their success has no doubt 
led to the institution of the present school in London. It is, of course, 
of hio-h importance that men destined for an Eastern career should, if 
possible, receive some preliminary training and knowledge of the lan- 
guages and people of the countries in which their future lot is to be 
cast. The East India Company fully recognised this, and as an alumnus 
of one of their training colleges, I must acknowledge with grateful pride 
the advantages I derived from my early training there. But after all, 
the best and most valuable knowledge is that acquii-ed by practical ex- 
perience and life, and as we go en we find that much of our preliminary 
teaching has to be unlearnt or is useless. The best of schools for India 
is India itself, and to this may be attributed the fact that the want of an 
Oriental training-school has not been felt so much in England as in 
other countries. That such institutions are of use is undoubted, but we 
must not, I think, expect too much from them. 

The eighth International Congress of Orientalists, held at Stock- 
holm and Christiania, in September last, under the presidentship of His 
Majesty, King Oscar II, of Sweden and I^orway, seems to have been 
a well attended and successful one. It may be noted that Norway is 
the fatherland of many distinguished oriental scholars of whom Lassen, 
Holmboe and Skrefsrud are perhaps best known in connection with India. 
It was hoped that Mr. Grierson would have been able to attend on the 
Society's behalf, and Mons. Senart was also asked to represent the 
Society, bvit was unable to be present. A full account of the meeting 



1890. ] Address. 57 

has been given in Triihner's Record, and among the papers of particular 
interest to us in India may be cited — Professor Jolly's on the Law 
Code of Harita : Professor Oldenberg's on the Upanishads : Mr. Johann- 
son's on the Shahbazgarhi version of Asoka's Edicts ; Professor Biihler's 
on the Mansehra version of the 13th Edict of Asoka ; Professor Leu- 
m.ann's on the Avasyaka commentaries of Jain literatare t Professor 
Peterson's on the Nyayavindu-tika, an ancient Buddhist woi'k on 
logic. Dr. Burgess read a paper ou Archceological researches in India. 
A proposition by Professor Kuhn in favour of a scientific investiga- 
tion of the languages spoken on the N.-W. Frontier of India was 
adopted. 

The State Council of Kashmir has sanctioned the publication of a 
systematic catalogue of the Maharaja's collection of Sanskrit MSS. 
at Jammu, under the editorship of Dr. Aurel Stein, Principal of the 
Oriental College, Lahore. This collection was mainly formed by the 
late Maharajah Ranbir Sing and contains over 4000 works ; among them a 
very considerable number of Sanskrit MSS. It is preserved in the 
Raghunath Temple, at Jammu, and has never previously been explored 
by a European scholar. 

Dr. Stein has also been engaged in researches relating to the Bdja- 
tarangi7n of Kalhana, the Royal Chronicle of Kashmir, with a view to a 
new edition of this work. Dr. Stein has been able to secure the Godex 
Arclietypus of all extant Kashmir MSS, of the Rajatarangini, written 
in the 17th centuiy. 

The most important paper of historical interest in our Journal, Part 
I, is a joint paper by Mr. V, A, Smith and Dr. Hoernle giving a de- 
scription and reading of an inscribed seal of Kumara Gupta 11. A 
photocollotype plate of the seal to full size accompanies the paper. The 
seal was found at Bhitari, in the Ghazipur district N.-W. P., and is made 
of a mixture of about 63 parts of copper to 36 of silver. Dr. Hoernle 
has discovered that this seal is of far greater imjoortance than was at 
first supposed, because it is of a Kumara Gupta II. ; the inscription on 
it gives for the first time a genealogy of the early Gupta dynasty that 
enumei'ates nine generations instead of only the seven hitherto known, 
and this genealogy throws light upon many unsolved problems regarding 
the early Gupta coinage and the general course of Indian history 
during the period of the dissolution of the Gupta empire. Dr. Hoernle 
has illustrated his remarks on the latter subject by the addition of a syn- 
chronistic table of the reigns of the early Guptas, their contemporaries 
and successors. This paper certainly forms a veiy valuable and im- 
portant contribution to early Indian history. 

Babu Saratchandra Das, C. I. E,, has contributed an interesting 



58 Address. [Feb, 

paper on the Life of Sumpa Khan-po, the autlioi' of the Re/iumig, a 
Tibetan chronological table, comprising 12 Vrihaspati cycles of 60 years, 
each commencing with A. D. 1026 and ending in A. D. 1745. A trans- 
lation of this table is given in the paper. He has edited Fasciculus 
No. 2 of the Avaddna Kalpalatd which has been issued in the Bibliotheca 
Indica, also for the same series, the Tibetan work Pagsan T'hi Shing, 
in prose, which will appear shortly. 

Mr. Grierson's valuable paper on Modern Veraacular Literature 
in Hindustan, noticed in last year's Address, has been much enlarged and 
published in book-form with collotype illustrations, as a special number 
of the Journal, Part I, for 1888. The Society is to be congratulated on 
having secured such an interesting and important work. From the 
scheme of the work the vernacular languages dealt with only include 
roughly, Marwari, Hindi and Bihari, with their respective dialects and 
Bubdialects ; consequently Sanskrit, Prakrit, Arabic, Persian and Urdu 
works are excluded. 

At the March meeting Babii Gaur Das Bysack read an interesting 
paper on a- Buddhistic Monastery at Bhot Bagan (Howrah), on two 
Tibetan MSS. found there, and on Puran Gir Gosain, the founder of the 
monastery. 

At the same meeting Mr. T. Munro exhibited some plans of old 
Calcutta, and read a note on the Founder and founding of Calcutta. 

Mr. V. A. Smith has presented a very valuable and suggestive 
paper on Grseco-Roman influence on the civilisation of Ancient India. 
In this ]3aper, which is now in course of publication, the author endeavours 
to trace the working on Indian soil of Greek ideas which resulted from 
the invasion of Alexander the Great, and which, though traceable in the 
fields of religion, poetry, science and philosophy, is most obvious in the 
domains of architecture and sculpture, with which the essay chiefly 
deals. Mr. W. H. P. Driver's paper on a tradition of Lohardugga also 
awaits publication. 

The works published in our Bibliotheca Indica have already been 
noticed. 

TJt.e Indian Antiquary, as usual, contains a large number of papers 
and notes of historical interest. Among which may be noted Dr. E. 
Hultzsch's collection of extracts from Kalhana's Bdjatarangini. Those 
from the 1st Taranga treat of the dynasty of Gonanda III, and a list is 
given of 24 kings of this dynasty. 

Pandit Natesa Sastri, continues his papers on Southern Indian 
Folklore, as does Putlibai D. H. Wadia his series on Folklore in Western 
India, and Taw Sein Ko commences a series on Folklore in Burma. 

Professor Kielhorn, C. I. E,, has a paper on the 60-year cycle of 



1890.] Address. 59 

Jupiter, and Mr. Fleet has a note on the same subject, as well as on the 
Coins and History of Toramana. In a paper on the country of Mala- 
kolta Dr. Hultzsch shows that this country is most probably Southern 
India beyond tlie Kaveri River. Dr. R. Schram gives a series of Tables 
for the conversion of Indian dates, which will be found of service in con- 
verting dates of our own calendar, or of the Hindii lunar-solar year or 
solar year into days of the Indian period and vice versa. 

Mr. J. F. Fleet, C. I. E., continues his notes on the calculation of 
Hindu dates. 

The Journal of tJie Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 
contains papers on a new Edict of A'soka, by Mons. E. Senart ; on 
Nyayabindhutika of Dbarmotara, by Dr. Peterson ; Purnavarma and 
S'ankaracharya, by the Hon. K.*T. Telang ; the Epoch of the Gupta era 
and Phonology of the Vernaculars of Northern India, by Dr. R. G. 
Bliandakar. 

The Madras Journal of Literature and Science, for the session 1888- 
89, contains several interesting papers. The most important is the 
second part of Dr. Oppert's exhaustive paper " On the Original In- 
habitants of Bharatavarsa, or India," in which he deals with the Gaudians, 
a term he derives from the root 7co, mountain. An account is given of 
the more important sections of the Gaudian population whose identification 
offered the least difficulty and who have from time immemorial occupied 
an acknowledged position among the inhabitants of India. The tribes 
specially treated of are the Kolis, Gaulis, Kulindas, Kois, Konds, Kands, 
Gonds, Kodagas, Todas, Kotas, Kuruvas, Kui-ubas or Kurumbas. The 
work is copiously annotated and will be very valuable to students of 
early life and language in India. The Rev. G. M. Rae gives a full 
investigation of the Legend of St. Thomas and comes to the conclusion 
that there is no evidence that St. Thomas ever did visit India, and that 
the traditions relating to him have their origin in the Persian founders 
of the Church of Malabar. M. Sethagiri Sastri has investigated the 
Etymology of some Mythological Names. Mrs. L. Fletcher gives a 
brief account of the life and travels in Southern India of Abu 'Abdullah 
Muhammad, or, as he is commonly known, Ibn Batutah, in Southern 
India, with a note by Mr. L. White King and Captain Tufnell on the 
coins of the kings mentioned by him. 

Mr. E. Rehatsek has contributed to the Journal of the Anthropolo- 
gical Society of Bomhay an interesting paper on Hindu Civilisation 
in the Far East, as represented by architectural monuments and inscrip- 
tions, dealing with the most recent discoveries of monuments and in- 
scriptions in Cambodia and Southern Annam, made by M. Aymonnier. 

In the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Mr. Cecil Bendall 



60 AJilress. [Feb. 

gives an account of the Tantrdkhydna, a collection of Indian Folklore, 
from a unique Sanskrit MS. Its date is Nepal Samvat 604, or A. D. 
1484, and it is closely allied to the Panchat antra, and is largely founded 
on tales in that collection. Mr. Bendall also contributes some notes 
on a collection of MSS. obtained by Dr. Gimlette at Kathmandu, 
now at Cambridge and the British Museum. Dr. Wenzel contributes 
to the same journal a paper on a Jataka tale from the Tibetan, forming 
the 6th chapter of a history of Tibet called Hgyal-rahs-gsal-vai-me- 
lon and corresponding to the Val&hassa Jataka. The history is the 
work of the 1 7th century A, D. 

The Journal of the American Oriental Society, contains a long and 
interesting paper by Mr. E. W. Hopkins on the social and military 
position of the Kuling caste in ancient India as represented by the 
Sanskrit epic. 

In the Journal Asiatique, M. Ryanon Fujishima has given a transla- 
tion of two chapters from the memoirs of I-tsing, one of the Chinese 
pilgrims, on his Travels to India. The chapters translated are 33 and 
84 of the Nan-hai-khi-koue'i-nei-fa-tchouen (Histoire de la loi interieure 
envoyee de la mer du Sud) written by I-tsing in the countries of the 
South Sea, where he lived several years after his return from the voyage 
he made in India with the object of studying the Buddhist doctrine 
and of bringing back the books containing it. The work is much more 
difficult to translate than Fa Hian or Hiouen Ts'iang, and has never yet 
been published in auy European language. The two chapters translated 
are entitled "the Service of Song" (Le Rite des Cantiques) and " The 
teaching of the Western Countries" (1' Enseignement des Pays Occi- 
dentaux). A short account of the life of I-tsing is also given, and in a 
subsequent paper the author gives an index of the Sanskrit- Chinese 
words occurring in the two chapters translated. 

This Journal also contains part of M. Abel Bergaigne's " Histoire 
de la Liturgie Vedique,^' which the author was finishing for the press 
when he died. 

In a paper, in the Bevue Linguistique, on ancient Tamul Literatui'e, 
Mons. Julien Vinson gives an account of the Sinddmani, one of the 
principal Tamul works of the first period, though largely borrowed from 
Jain and Sanskrit works. Translations of extracts from it are also 
given. 

In the Journal des Savants, Mons. Barthelemy de St. Hilaire treats 
at length on Hindu Legislation, in a series of reviews of Dr. Biihler's 
"Laws of Manu" and "the Sacred Laws of the Aryas " and Mons. 
Jolly's " Institutes of Vishnu." 

Professor Hermann Jacobi contributes to the Vienna Oriental Journal 



1800.] Address. 61 

a paper on Bharavi and Miiglia, in -which he endeavours to trace the 
relation between these great poets, by attentive study of their works 
Kirdtdrjuniya and the S'ihipdlavadha. Professor Hillebrandt, gives in 
the same journal the first part, on the word p2ira,7idhi, of a seines of 
papers entitled Vedica. There is also a Catalogue of the Zand and 
Pablavi MSS. belonging to Khan Bahadur Dr, Hoshangi J. Asa, Sirdar 
of the 1st class, Dastvir of the Parsis of the Deccan. 

The Giornale della Societa Asiatica Italiana, Yol. Ill, 1889, contains 
a paper on Persian poetry anterior to Firdusi, by Italio Pizzi. On the 
Arydclialaguhya dhdrani Sutra, by 0. Puini. A paper on the Jain 
story of king Papabuddhi and his minister Dharmabuddhi, giving Sans- 
krit text and translation ; by E. Lovarini. On some Italian words 
believed to be of Oriental origin, such as amuleto, lagaglio, etc., by F. 
Lasinio. 

In the Zeitschrift der Vergleichenden SpracJiforscJiung, 1889, (Journal 
for Comparative Linguistics), is a paper by Pi'of. Leumann on the Accen- 
tuation of the S' aptapatha Brdhmana. 

Professor A. Weber's paper " tjber die Samyaktvakaumudi, eine 
eventualiter mit Tausend und eine Nacht auf gleiche Quelle zuriick- 
gehende indische Erziihlung," published in the Sitzungsberichte der 
Konigl. Frenssischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, may be of interest 
to students of folklore. 

Among the works of philological interest published during the year 
may be noticed : — 

The 2nd edition of W. D. Whitney's Sanskrit Grammar. Kittel's 
Canarese Dictionary, published by the Basle Mission Press, Cannanore. 
A second edition of 8' abdaJcalpadruma, a new edition of the great 
Sanskrit Encyclopaedia — published by the brothers Barada Prasad and 
Hari Charan Basu. An Arabic-English Dictionary, by A. H. Salmone, 
Dr. Leitner's Hunza and Nagyr Hand-book, Part I. Prof. Eggeling's 
Catalogue of the Sanskrit MSS. in the Library of the India Office. Pai"t 
II, Sanskrit Grammar, Lexicography, Prosody and Music. Prof. R, 
Garbe's English translation, with notes, of the Samkhya-pravachana- 
hhdshya, the commentary of Vijfiaua-bhikshu to the Satnhhya Sutras. 

Part II of the Comparative Dictionary of the Bihdri Language, 
compiled by Dr. Hoernle and Mr. Grierson has appeared. The authors 
apologise for the long delay, due to various causes, that has occurred in 
issuing this part, but it will be none the less welcome to students. 

Mr. Grierson has also contributed a paper " on selected sjoecimens 
of the Bihari Language " to the Journal of the German Oriental Society. 

Vernacular Literature. The most complete review of current litera- 
ture in this country is given in the " Rej)orts on the Publications issued 



62 Address. [Feb. 

and registered in tlie several Provinces of India," and from them a very- 
fair insight may be gained as to literary progress in India and the direc- 
tion it is taking. The report for 1888 has just been issued, and though 
it throws us rather back, it may not be uninteresting to give a brief 
abstract of it. 

Bengal. In Bengal 2,693 works were registered, of which 365 
were English, 1,713 in provincial vernaculars, 214 in Indian classi- 
cal languages and 401 in more than one language. Mr, C. H. Tawney, 
in presenting the report of the Bengal Library, remai'ks on the re- 
markable paucity of historical works, and on the utterly uncritical 
character of most of the many religious works published. Fiction and 
poetry flourish, as they have ever done ; though it is doubtful whether 
the form or substance of Indian fiction has been improved by our occupa- 
tion of the counti'y. It is decidedly discouraging to find that, in the 
opinion of one who has had so much experience in education as Mr. 
Tawney, English education has not influenced the Bengali mind to any 
perceptible depth. He says — " The influence of English science is diffi- 
cult to trace in the report. Philology keeps in the old groove and 
medicine seems to be trying to return to it." 

In Arts, 68 works have been published, of which 31 are English. 
They are mostly educational treatises on mensuration. One of the 
most favourite subjects in this section, all over India, is Music. 
A work by Nanda Kumar Mukhei'ji, dealing with the harmonic 
ruusic of the Hindus, is noted by the Librarian. Biographies are not 
numerous, but they include lives of President Grarfield, Martin Lu- 
ther and of Harish Chandra Mukherji, the first editor of the Hindu 
Patriot. Dramatic literature flourishes, but is nearly all utterly bad 
and immoral ; though mythological dramas and melodramas continue to 
be written, and it is curious to remark, as an unexpected union of Church 
and Stage, that a devotional feeling for Hari, or Vishnu, has taken entire 
possession of the native stage in Calcutta. In Fiction, 126 works were re- 
gistered, of which 120 were in provincial vernacular. A tendency is noted 
on the part of the native authors of the present day to show an affectionate 
appreciation of everything Indian and to write regretfully of the former 
happy state of things which is passing away under the influence of 
Western civilisation ; and no doubt here, as elsewhere, there is much to 
be said for the old quiet studious days, as opposed to the ever- restless 
* progress ' of the present day. Two works of fiction of more than 
average merit are noticed as written by Hindu ladies — the ' Hughlir 
Imamhdri," by Swarna Kumari Devi, and the Laland MuJcur, by an 
unknown authoress, which gives a somewhat realistic picture of life 
in a great Hindu zemindar's family in the Mofussil. 



1890.] Address. 63 

lu History and Geography, 115 works were registered, of wliicli 34; 
were English. They inckide the first instalment of a History of Sans- 
krit Literature from the Vedic period to the present day, by Babu 
Troilokya Nath Bhattacharyya, which seems likely to be valuable, and 
an elaborate account, in a work entitled Bhdrab Prasanga, by liajani 
Kanta Gupta, of the English occupation of Bengal. A history of the 
Narayangarh familj', of Miduapur, for the last 900 years, is a valuable 
contribution to the local history of the Lower Provinces. Books on 
Languages are, after Religion, the most numerous, 582 having been 
registered, of which 86 were in English ; but a very large proportion 
are educational and too many are 'Keys' for examinations, the growth 
of which is remarked and deprecated in all the reports. The new 
edition of Barat's Bengali and English Dictionary made good progress, 
A Bengali-Garo Dictionary, by the Rev. M. Ramkhe is also noted. 

Law books in English or Bengali were few. An edition, in Sanskrit, 
of Madana-Pdrijdta, by Pandit Madhusudana Smritiratua, is the most 
important. In Medicine, 149 works were registered of which only 3 
were English, They are unimportant, except in so far that they show 
a tendency to revive the Ayurvedic treatment, as most suitable for 
natives of India. Songs here, as in other parts of India, and, indeed, 
all over the world, form a very large portion of the popular literature, 
and large numbers of collections of them were received of all kinds, 
religious and secular. The year was I'ich in miscellaneous works by 
female writers, one of which UslidcJiind, by Swarnamayi Gupta, a col- 
lection of essays on society, education &c., is specially noticeable. 

Sanskrit and philosophic literature received a good deal of atten- 
tion during the year, and there is marked evidence of a revival of literary 
activity among the pandits of this country. The poetical literature of 
the year was vei-y meagre. 

Of the non-educational works, religious treatises are by far the most 
numerous, 604 having been registered. They show considerable variety 
and richness. It is noticeable that several native Christian writers 
endeavour to show that the Hindus are a section of the great Israelite 
race, and that their I'ites and ceremonies are counterparts of Jewish 
festivals. Others again, consider them to be derived from a Christian 
origin. One of the most important works of the year was Babu B. 0. 
Chatter ji's Dharmatattwa in which an attempt has been made to bring 
about a union between Eastern and Western ideas of education, culture 
and religion, and to give the younger generation a system on which to 
base their moral conduct and a faith that suits their intellectual train- 
ing, in place of the moral and intellectual chaos which has followed the 
influence of Western ideas and teaching among the educated classes in 
Bengal, Science was unfortunately represented only by school books. 



64 Address. [Feb. 

Pundit Hai-aprasad Shastri, the Librarian of tlie Bengal Library, 
wLo has compiled this very interesting I'eport, considers that the literary 
activity of the periodical press in Bengal runs in cycles of seven or eight 
years and that the present is one of unwonted activity. 

Bombay. In the Bombay Presidency, 1,398 books and 526 periodi- 
cals vrere i*egistered daring the year ; of these 693 are Gujarati ; 443 
Marathi; 205 English; 174 Sanskrit. It is remarkable to notice that 
in the Western Presidency, Poetry bears the palm, the number of works 
devoted to Religion being comparatively small as compared with Bengal. 
Language takes a high place as to number, but the works under this 
head are chiefly school-books, and the same as regai'ds those under 
Science. The English books do not require any particular comment. 

Of ordinary literature in Marathi there is not much to be said. In 
Medicine, Mr. Vasudeo Cbintaman Bapat appears to be doing good work 
by making known a great deal of valuable information regarding the 
medicinal plants of India, their uses and properties. His latest work, 
the Sushena Ghikitsd, is highly commended by Dr. Dymock. The 
poetical works are mostly reprints of entire old Prakrit woi'ks, some of 
them beautifully printed. In Science the works published are all school 
books, either mathematical or small geographical tracts treating of parts 
of the Bombay Presidency. 

The Grujarati publications seem to be on a higher standard and to 
have more general interest than the Marathi. In Arts, I note treatises 
on cotton-ginning and screw-cutting, and five works on music. Of dra- 
matic works and novels many treat on social subjects, such as the evils 
of infant marriages, and of marriages between persons of disproportion- 
ate ages ; the desirability of widow marriages and of marriages of affec- 
tion and mutual selection ; the tyranny of step-mothers and of mothers 
in law ; the bad consequences of vice and happiness of virtue. The 
historical works sing the praises of Rajput heroes and heroines in de- 
fending their religion and land against the Muhammadan Emperors of 
Delhi. Among translations of English works are Bon Quixote, Shakes- 
peare's Cymbeline, and Valentine Vox. Irdvati is noted as the best 
Gujarati novel of the year and is based on historical incidents. 

The historical works, other than school-books, include two histories 
of the ancient Parsis. 

The miscellaneous publications include a translation of Self-Help 
and an adaptation of an English work, Hoiv to make Money, also treatises 
on mesmerism. In Philosophy, the tSuhodha Patrikd Bdjdyoga and the 
Bhdvdrtha Prahasha are noted, and there ai'e two well written works of 
Travels. 

The number of Urdu books shews a marked decrease, while those 
in Hindi are nearly doiiblcd, but many are reprints and translations. 



1890,] Aildress. 65 

The works iu Marvari, in poet-iy or prose, nearly all appertain to the 
Jain religion. The Kanarese publications are unimportant. Of four 
works in the Braj dialect, three are versions of the Biimiijana of Talsi 
Das. A large number of Sanskrit works were registered, chiefly reprints. 

Mr. Vyankatrao Ramchandra continues to pi'oduce his series of 
Marathi translations of the Gomnientaries on the Upanishad, with the 
original Sanskrit text and commentaries. The other bilingual publica- 
tions are chiefly of a religious and controversial tendency. 

Among the Marathi periodicals the Shilpa Kdld Vidnyd gives use- 
ful information on mechanical and other arts and industries. The Nare 
Elani is a literary and scientific periodical. The Strihodha is contributed 
to by Parsi ladies and contains tales and general information. Two 
periodicals are published iu Sanskrit containing unpublished poems by 
old Sanskrit poets— the Kdvya Mdld and the Oranth Uatna Mdld. 

Mi\ G. M. Sathe, tlie Registrar of native publications, who has 
drawn up the report, concludes with some very pertinent and valuable 
general remarks in which he gives the reasons for the paucity of books 
under the heads of Arts, Biograpliy, History, Politbcs and Science, which, 
I regret, space does not allow me to quote. With regard to works on 
Arts, the work- men are illiterate and as most of their callings are 
hereditary, they learn from their fathers and families, and do not re- 
quire to read or write books for instruction. With regard to Science 
the best books are in English, and as there is an abundance of such 
books and instruction is imparted in that language, students make them- 
selves acquainted with it and do not read or write books in the verna- 
cular, so that there is practically no demand for such works. 

Mr. Sath^ does not consider that vernacular litei^ature is making 
satisfactory progress. 

Madras. — -In the Madras Presidency, the number of works regis- 
tered was 1,169, of which 258 were in English or European languages, 
735 in local vernaculars, 74 in classical Indian languages and 102 in 
more than one language. Increased activity in original writing is in- 
dicated, and Sanskiit and other classical languages are I'egaining their 
former ascendancy. Mr. R. V. Krishnama Chariar, the Registrar of 
books, explains the want of vernacular works on native arts on much 
the same grounds as the Bombay reporter, but seems to think that prac- 
tical books on art will be created as soon as industrial or technical educa- 
tion, suited to the skill and talents of the country, shows the way. 

In Arts, treatises are noted on fireworks ; on native music and the 
symbolic movements of the hands and fingers in dancing ; cookery ; 
needlework, and examination of precious stones. 

The dramatic publications include a Marathi vei'siuu uf Shakes- 



6Q Address. [Frb, 

peare's Midsuinmer''s Niyht's Dream. It does not appear in any of the 
Repoi'ts whetber these translations of Shakespeare are for literary or 
dramatic purposes, or are merely ' ciibs ' for examinations. 

An enlarged edition of an English- Tamil Dictionary, originally 
compiled by some missionaries in Ceylon, has been published with near- 
ly 37,000 words more. Mr. Sitarama Charlu's Supplement to the Telegu 
Grammar will be valuable to teachers. The poetical works contain few 
orio-inal poems of real merit. Some of the songs are remarkable for 
their melody, sweetness and simplicity and the homeliness of their tune 
and language, the purity of their sentiment and the aptness of their 
similes. The number of religious works is very high, and amounts to 
about 42 per cent, of the total number of woi'ks registered. 
Science is, as usual, only represented by school-books. 
Mr. Grigg, the Director of Public Instruction, remarks, as has been 
done in other Presidencies and Provinces, that the evil of publishing 
' Keys ' and other helps for examinations seems to gain grotmd yearly ; 
that a general taste for vernacular prose literature seems gradually to 
be arising among some classes ; that there is an eager desire on the part 
of educated people for social and religious reforms ; that Muhammadan 
authors are increasing in number; and that the people appreciate more 
and more the education of their women. 

N.-W. Provinces and Oudh. — 1,362 works were registered during the 
year in the N.-W. Provinces and Oudh, but the Hon. Mr. White's report 
gives little or no information as to the contents or value of the works 
selected under various heads as noticeable. The number of translations 
from English and other languages seems very large, and includes Hamlet, 
Much Ado about Nothing, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as an English 
jfovel, — My First and Last, and Sir W. Scott's Progress of Givilisation. 

Books in Urdu, Hindi, Arabic and Persian show an increase, but 
Sanskrit a falling off. Most of the best works are in Urdu. 382 works 
were published on Beligion; 273 on Langttage ; 163 Miscellaneous ; 120 
on Poetry ; 77 on Medicine ; 71 Fiction, and all these heads show an in- 
crease, while Science shows a considerable decrease. The greatest 
number of publications has issued from Lucknow, and shows a lai'ge 
increase over last year. More than half have been published by Munshi 
Newal Kishore, CLE. 

Pti'tijah. — From the report of Lala Ram Kishan, the Registrar, it 
appears that 2, 301 works were registered during 1888, which is a large 
increase over the previous year, and the year was conspicuous for literary 
activity. The majority of the publications is in Urdu, but works in 
Punjabi, the language of the Sikhs, show a great increase, which indi- 
cates the intellectual advance of that community. In Sindhi there is 
also a large increase. 



1890 ] AiUress. 67 

By far tbe lai'gest number of the works j^iiblished are poetical, of 
wliicb there were 680 594; were on Religion; 308 Miscellaneous; 278 
on Language; 110 on Mediciiie ; 87 on Science; 14i on Laio. The 
Drama only shows 69 and Fiction 39. Arts, Biography, Politics, Philo- 
sophy, Voyag'es and Travels, are comparatively neglected. The pro- 
portion of Medical periodicals seems very large, and there is a great 
demand for them owing to the extension of the European mode of 
ti^eatment. 

Of the works under Drama and Fiction, only a small proportion 
are original, and those cited as the best deal with social questions. 

Among the historical works may be noted the ' JJmclat id Taivdrikh, 
by Lala Sohan Lai of Lahoi'e, a voluminous Persian work giving a 
history of Sardars Charat Singh and Mahan Singh, and a diary of the 
reign of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. It is being published in parts by 
Lala Harbhagwan Das, grandson of the author. 

The works on Science include a treatise on Book-keeping, as prac- 
tised by native bankers, and an Engineering Pocket- Book, by Rai 
Bahadur Gunga Ram, intended for the use of subdivisional officers of 
of the P. W. D., workmen and contractors. 

In the other minor Provinces of India, literature seems to be in a 
very backward state. 

In the Central Provinces only one work in Marathi and four in 
Hindi were registered. In Assam only 25 works were registei-ed, or 
more than double the figure of the previous year ; of these 17 are educa- 
tional, four on Religion, three on Poetry and one on Science. In Burma 
only 81 publications were registered, against 142 of the previous year. 
Twelve are in English, 51 in Burmese, five in Pali and Burmese, five 
in Karen and two in Shan. The majority of the works are relio-ious. 

In Mysore the total number of publications was 128, of which none 
were in English, 70 were in Kannada, two in Telugu, 30 in Sanskrit 
and 26 in more than one language, chiefly Sanskrit and Kannada'. 
Thirty-seven come under Religion, 25 under Language, 11 under Poetry. 

In Eyderahad (Berar) only 14 works were registered (13 Marathi 
and one English). They include two educational periodicals for the use 
of teachers. In Ajmere-Marwara only three works were reo-istered one 
of them being a translation, in Hindi, of a " Driver and Fireman's Com- 
panion and Handbook." 

N'UMISMATTCS. 

As usual, a very large number of coins, upwards of 3200, have come 
to the Society for report, under the provisions of the Treasure Trove Act 
and have been examined by Dr. Hoernle and reported on by him in the 
" Proceedings.'" Among the most important may be noticed the set of 175 



68 Address. [Feb. 

old silver coins of the so-called Indo-Sassanian class, which are described 
iu the August Proceedings. They are particularly interesting, because 
from their close imitation of the real Sassanian coins of Firiiz I (479-486 
A. D.) it becomes probable that they represent an issue of Toramana, 
the well-known leader of the Hunnic invasion of Persia and India in 
the last quarter of the 5th century. 

Among the additions to the Coin Cabinet of the Indian Museum the 
collection of Central Asiatic coins, made by Capt. de Lassoe and presented 
by the Government of India, deserve special notice. It consists of 2486 
coins (viz., 41 gold, 158 silver, 487 copper and 1800 of mixed metal). 
Prom the numerous duplicates among them, selections have been 
presented to the Lahore Museum and the British Museum. The collec- 
tion was rich in very rare coins ; not a few varieties were quite new, and 
some coins may even be unique. Among the new varieties may be 
especially mentioned several of 'Alau-d-dln Muhammad bin Takash, the 
Shah Khwarizm. They are of mixed metal, and show on the obverse the 
Shah mounted on a horse or an elephant, with or without a lance ; the 
reverse bearing his name and titles. A full descriptive catalogue, based 
on a preliminary examination by Mr. Oh. J. Rodgers, will shortly be 
published by Dr. Hoernle as a supplement to the Society's Journal. 

Part I of our Journal contains two very interesting papers on coins. 

Mr. B. E. Oliver gives a paper on the Coins of the Muhammadan 
Kings of GvTJarat (illustrated with three plates), and describes several 
hitherto undescribed coins which he found in a collection belonging to 
Mr. Furdoonjee of Bombay. 

Dr. Hoernle describes some new or rare Muhammadan and Hindu 
coins found in the Hoshungabad District. The most important of the 
*' Pathan" coins are a coin of Muhammad bin-Ta gh laq ; two gold coins of 
Ghiyasu-d-din Taghlaq II, of different types ; a gold coin of Abii Bakr 
who reigned from 791 to 792 A. H. ; a gold coin of Sikandar bin llyas, of 
Bengal, all of which are figured and believed to be unique. 

Two gold coins, from Khajuraha, of the Chandeltype, one of which is 
attributed by Dr. Hoernle to Vira Varma or Bala Varma, and the other 
to Paramarddi Deva, are also believed to be unique. 

The Lucknow Museum has received one unique gold Gupta coin of 
Virasena Kramaditya, bull type, besides other gold, silver and copper 
coins. 

In the Madras Museum the most important additions of coins have 
been 15 aurei, of Tiberius, Vespasian, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, Faustina 
senior, Marcus Aurelius, Oommodus. These were found by a native 
while digging in the old Fort of Vinukonda, and as he concealed them, 
they became forfeit. 



1890.] Address. fi9 

Mr. Edgar Thurston, Director of the Central Museum, Madras, has 
brought out No. 3 of his Catalogues of Corns in the Madras Museum, com- 
prising the Sultans of Delhi. It consists of an enumeration of 314 coins 
of various Sultans in chronological order, with references to Thomas' 
Chronicles of the Fathan Kings of Delhi, the British Museum " Catalogue 
of the coins of the Sultans of Delhi " and articles by Mr. C. J. Rodgers, in 
the Journal and Proceedings of our Society and in the Indian Antiquary . 

Mr. Thurston's " History of the Coinage of the East India Company 
in the Indian Peninsula, and Catalogue of Coins in the Madras Museum" 
with 20 plates, is nearly ready and will appear almost at once. 

The Madras Journal of Literature and Science contains a paper, 
by T. M. Rangachari and T. Desikachari, giving an account of the silver 
and copper Indo-Danish coins issued from the Tranquebar Mint under the 
Kings of Denmark, from Fred. Ill, A. D. 1648 to Fred. VI, A. D. 1819. 
Papers have also been read before the Madras Literary Society by Mr. 
T. M. Scott on Symbolism on Indian Coins, Part I. " Punch mark- 
ed, " and by the Rev. J. E. Tracy on the Coins of the Sethupatis. 

A " Catalogue of Mysore Coins in the collection of the Government 
Museum, Bangalore," by Capt. R. H. C. Tufnell, M. S. C, illustrated by 
five collotype plates, has been published under instructions from the 
Government of H. H. the Maharajah of Mysore. 

Mr. L. Dames has contributed to the Ntimismatic Chronicle a 
valuable paper on the Coins of the Durranis, from Timur Shah's acces- 
sion, in A. D. 1773, lo their final expulsion from Cabul by the Barakzais 
in A. D. 1842. 

Among the coin-papers in the Indian Anticptary may be noted 
Mr. J. F. Fleet's on the Coins and History of Toramana, in which he 
fixes the approximate date of A. D. 460 for the commencement of the 
reign of that king, at his own capital in the Pan jab; a short note on 
the Bodleian collection of coins by Mr. J. A. Smith, who has also de- 
scribed the Gupta coins of the collection in a paper entitled, " The 
Coinage of the Early or Imperial Gupta Dynasty of Northern India," 
published in the Journal of the Boyal Asiatic Society; also Dr. Hultzsch's 
paper on the names of the coins of Tipu Sultan. 

A paper has lately been read by Mr. T. J. Symonds before the 
Anthropological Society of Bombay, on some Indo-French and ludo- 
Dutch coins struck at Pondicherry and at Negapatam and Pulicat. 

Akch^ologt. 

A few papers of Archaeological interest appear in our Jou,rnal and 
Proceedings. 

Mr. Asutosh Gupta has contributed some notes on the ruins of Jay 



70 Address. [Feb. 

Mangala Garh, in the Monghyr District, vvliicli appears to have been a 
large ancient city. Two Buddhist copper coins were found there. 

Mr. Gupta has also given an account of the ruins and antiquities 
of Rampal, near Munshiganj, in the Dacca District, formerly the seat 
of the old Sen kings of Bengal, notably of Ballal Sen, the founder of 
Kulinism in Bengal. 

The work of the ArchiBological Survey has made good pi'ogress 
dulling the year, though it is to be feared that the retirement of the 
Director, Dr. James Burgess, C. I. E., may check the advancement of this 
important work. I believe, however, that good arrangements have been 
made for carrying on the surveys now in progress, and that Dr. Burgess 
will continue to edit the Reports. 

The first volume of the new series of Reports brought out in India 
under Dr. Burgess' superintendence, of the Archteological Surveys in 
the N.-W. Provinces and Oudh, containing Dr. Fiihrer's Report on the 
Sharqi Architecture of Jaunpur, which was alluded to in last year's ad- 
dress as under preparation, has been published. It is a very valuable con- 
tribution to the history of Muhammadan architecture, and in point of get 
up may fairly be said to compare well with similar publications printed 
in Europe. 

In a valuable paper read before the International Congress of 
Orientalists held at Stockholm, Dr. Burgess has given an account 
cf the rise and progress of Ai'chfeological studies in this country 
and of the work of the ArchiBological Surveys in Northern, Western 
and Southern India, and the publication of the results so far as issued. 
The materials on hand are very considerable and most important, and 
four volumes could be put in hand at once, were the means forthcoming, 
as it may be hoped they will be. From the paper it appears that with 
Dr. Burgess' retirement, the five survey circles for all India are to be 
reduced to three, under properly qualified Surveyors, with one or two 
specialists for epigraphy. The munificent aid rendered by the Maha- 
rajas of Baroda and Jeypote in bringing out illustrated works on the 
architectural remains in their territories, is specially noticed and the 
hope expressed that others may follow their good example. 

The Archseological Survey party in Western India, under Mr. H. 
Cousens, having completed the survey of Bijapur, moved to Palitana, 
in Kathiawad, and completed the survey of the Jaina temples which 
crown the sacred hill of Satrunjaya. There is very little that can be 
called ancient, but the vast congregation of temples and shrines, which 
crown the hill makes the place uniqu.e and worthy of attention. The 
whole ritual of Jaina worship may be seen on the hill, and a complete 
knowledge of its iconogi'aphy can be gained by a close inspection of its 



1890.] AMress. 71 

hundreds of images. During January and February last, a Baddhist 
stupa, situated in the forest near Junagadh, was opened by the Juna- 
gadh authorities under the guidance of Mr. James Campbell, 0. S., and 
the searchers were rewarded by the discovery, about the middle of the 
mound, of the relic with its enclosing caskets of atone, copper, silver and 
gold. The nature of the relic has not been decided — it is a small chip, 
or flake, about f of an inch long by j inch broad, of some brown hard sub- 
stance which closely resembles stone that has been under the action 
of fire. No inscription or coin was found that might have thrown some 
light on it ; but fragments of a Buddhist rail and umbrella in stone were 
unearthed during the excavation. Mr. Cousens has favoured me with a 
copy of the Report on this find, which, I hope, will be published in the 
Joimial. A considerable number of drawings, photographs and facsimi- 
les of inscriptions were made during the field season. 

The Guide-book to the Ruins of Bijipur, by Mr. Cousens, to which 
reference was made last year, has been published and is a handsomely 
got up little volume, which will be of great assistance to visitors to the 
ruins and to archaeological students. 

The party is now in (rujarat visiting outlying parts of the Baroda 
territory, in order to complete the material required for a second volume 
on the antiquarian remains in H. H. the Gaikwads dominions. 

A volume on the Chalukyan remains in the Kanarese country is now 
almost ready for the press, and the full accounts of Bijapur and Satrun- 
jaya are to follow, they being now in hand. 

The Rev. J. E. Abbot has quite recently discovered twenty-three 
ancient Buddhist Caves at Nadsur, eight miles to the north of Nenavali, 
about 20 miles south of Khandalla, in the Konkan. These caves have 
apparently never before been visited by any European and are unknown 
to scholars. They are cut in a rocky scarp about 800 feet above the 
villages of Nadsur and Thanal, facing the west, and are pi'obably as 
old as the Christian era, though in a state of perfect preservation. 

ArcJiceological Survey, Southern India. During the last field sea- 
son the party under Mr. A. Rea, after visiting Pulicat, Nellore, 
and Juvaludinne, resumed excavation at the Franguladinne stupa, 
near Pedda Ganjam, as noted last year. Proceeding thence, to Che- 
zarla, some very important and interesting remains of the early Bud- 
dhist period were discovered. These include some important inscrip- 
tions on marble and a Buddhist structural chaitya, the largest and 
most complete of the four yet found in India, of which three were 
discovered by Mr. Rea. The temple is quite complete and is used for 
worshijD by the Hindus. Some remains were inspected at Kamapalle 
and some mounds at Panidem. At Garikipad Agraharam a mound was 



72 AJilress. [Feb. 

excavated, and an early Buddhist stvipa was found, with a large number 
of archaic marble sculptures. It is one of the most ancient as yet dis- 
covered in the Madras Presidency, dating from about, or before, the 
Christian era. After visiting an old mound at Ochchampet, Mr. Rea 
returned to Amravati and resumed excavations at the stiipa. Remains 
of outlying buildings in connection with the great stupa were dug out, 
and a number of other marble sculptures, relic caskets, coins and other 
objects found. 

From Amravati — Odlamanu, Vaikanthapuram and Pedda Naddur 
were visited, and at each place unknown Buddhist remains were found 
on the hills. On a hill at the latter place, a most important discovery 
was made of the stupa and monastery which is mentioned by Hiuen 
Tsiang as being near Amravati and has hitherto been sought for in vain 
by archeeologists. 

Excavation was then resumed at Guntupalle. Some sculptured 
relics and a miscellaneous collection of objects were found. An ex- 
cavation in one of the largest of the mounds brought to light a large 
and very complete Buddhist chaitya with some unusual arrangements 
of plan and some curious brickwork in its construction. Some marble 
statues were found in it. It is a very important addition to the few 
Buddhist structural temples which have as yet been discovered. 

It is satisfactory to know that measures are being taken for the 
proper conservancy of the interesting remains in the Krishna District 
and a very complete report of them is under preparation. The mounds 
have been catalogued and orders issued for their conservation. 

In the Madras Journal of Literature and Science, the Rev. J. R. 
Hutchinson gives an account, in a paper entitled Pdndavula Metta, of 
the ruins situated on a hill of the Saitada range, in the neighbourhood 
of Chicacole, known as Pancha-PdndaviUa-NivesastJidna, or the "Habitat 
of the Panch-Pandavas." They consist of a gigantic cromlech and other 
smaller ones, all with the peculiarity of being surrounded with circular 
holes cut into the solid rock to a depth of about 10 inches. The holes 
are of three sizes, 12, 8 and 6 inches in diameter, and are always arranged 
in oblong circular or elliptical figures facing either east or south. 

The Architectural section of the ArchEeological Survey, N'orth- 
Western Provinces and Oudh Circle, under Mr. E. W. Smith, from 
January to April 1889, made a complete survey, including plans, eleva- 
tions, sections and details ; (1) at Orchha, near Jhansi, of the splendid 
temple of Chaturbhuj, Bir Singh Deo's tomb, the fine massive entrance 
gates leading to the palace, and a fine baoli on the banks of the Betwa, 
as well as of another at Chard vari, four miles distant from the city ; (2) 
at Lalitpur, of the Bansa Masjid, part of an old Hindu temple ; (3) at 



1890.] Address. 73 

Deogarh on the Betwa, iu the Lalitpur district, of the Gupta temple in 
the plain below the fort, and the extensive group of Jaiua temples inside 
the deserted fort. 

Since October 3889, the Architectural section has been at Fathpiir 
Sikri, and has at present fully illustrated the Panch Mahal, Mirijam's 
Kothi, and the Diwau-i-Kbas. 

Dr. Fiihrer, after having closed in the middle of February 1889, 
his excavations at Mathura, which yielded, amongst other valuable 
relics, some very important Jaina inscriptions of the Indo- Scythian 
period, joined the Architectural section and visited the Lalitpur Dis- 
trict. A careful search along the banks of the Betwa at Deogarh, brought 
to light several Gupta rock-inscriptions, hithei-to unknown. 

In the beginning of November, he started on a tour through the 
Farrukhabad, Mainpuri, Agra and Mathura districts, and is at pre- 
sent engaged in a complete excavation of the Kankali Tila at Mathura. 
To the east of the Svetambara temple of the fii-st century, whose 
foundations were disclosed last year. Dr. Fiihrer unearthed a well- 
preserved brick stupa of 18f feet diameter, some 25 feet below the pre- 
sent surface of the soil. This stupa — it appears fi'om an inscription 
found on the spot — is the relic stupa which was standing inside the 
Upagupta monastery, mentioned by Hiuen Tsiang. 

Vol. I of the Reports of the Arcbseological Surveys in the N. "W. P. 
and Oudh. — " The Sharqi Architecture of Jaunpur," already noticed, 
was issued in August last; Vol.11. — "The Monumental Antiquities 
and Inscriptions in the North-Western Provinces and Oudh," will be 
published in March next ; Vol. III. — " The Chandella Architecture of 
Bandelkhand," is in the press. 

Burma. — Dr. Forchhammer has given an account, in Trilhner's 
Record, of his exploration of the Ruins of Pagan, in Burma, in the cold 
season of 1888-89. One inscription he found, bore the date Sakkaraj 560 
(A. D. 1188), but he has also found older records. He has identified 
the caves and temples in which the chapter of five priests resided on 
returning from their ten years' visit to Ceylon (A. D. 1171). He pre- 
pared a map of the ruins on the scale of 12 inches to a mile, including 
the whole of Old Pagan, and considerably more than Major Hobday's 
map. 

Epigraphy. 

Parts III and IV of Dr. Burgess' new publication EpigrapMa Indica 
have appeared. 

In part III, the two Prasastis of Baijnath, by Dr. Btihler, are con- 
cluded, and there are two other papers by the same author, viz. ; " The 



74 Address. [Fkb, 

Jaina inscription on the Temple of Baijnath at Kiragrama," and " In- 
scription on an image of Parsvanatha, in Kangra." Professor Kielhorn, 
C, I. E., contributes papers on eight inscriptions from Khajuraho. Dr. 
Hultzsch describes two inscriptions from Gwalior, A plate is given of 
the 12th edict of Asoka from Shahbaz Garhi. 

Part IV contains seven papers and four plates. 

Dr. Hultzsch's paper, noted above, is concluded. Professor Kielhorn 
gives an account of the Siyadoiii stone inscription, which was first 
mentioned in our Journal, Vol. XXXI, by Professor Fitz-Edward Hall, 
as a " huge inscrijation " from some part of Gwalior of which a trans- 
cript had been made over to him by General Cunningham." In 
1887 Dr. Burgess discovered this inscription about 10 miles from 
Lalitpur. Although no definite date is given on the inscription, Dr. 
Kielhorn has been able to deduce from it the names of four kings of 
Mahodaya or Kanyakubja, with their known dates, viz., 

Bhoja, succeeded by Mahendrapala, A. D. 903-4 and 937-8. 

Kshitipala, succeeded by Devapala, 948-49. 

Professor Kielhorn also gives a description, with text, of the 
inscription found at Kudarkot, in the Itawa District, North-Western 
Provinces, now in the Luckuow Museum. The paper is accompanied 
by a photolithographed facsimile. Also of two Chandella inscriptions, 
and of a fragment of an inscription from Jhansi. 

Dr. Biihler gives descriptions of the Peheva inscription from tho 
Temple of Garibnath, in the Karnal District, edited from a paper im- 
pression fm-nished by Mr. C. J. Rodgers. Dr. Biihler has also edited 
the Kangra Jvdlamuhlii Prasasti from the temple of Bhavani, in Bha- 
v^-an, a suburb of Kot Kangra. 

The third volume of the Corpus Inscriptionum Indicartim, to which 
allusion was made in last year's address, has appeared and contains an 
account of the Inscx-iptions of the early Gupta Kings and their succes- 
sors, by J. F. Fleet, Esq., CLE. Both in point of exhaustiveness 
and accuracy it is a model of what a work of this kind should be. It 
is furnished with 45 photolithographic facsimile plates, prepared in the 
well-known establishment of Mr. W. Griggs, at Peckham. A paiticu- 
larly valuable feature of the book is Mr. Fleet's ' Introduction,' which 
takes up more than one third of the volume and exhaustively discusses, 
among other things, the much-debated question of the epoch of the 
Gupta era. This, Mr. Fleet now shows conclusively, must be the 
year 319-320 A.D., equivalent to S'aka Samvat 241 expired. 

In the Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenldndischen Gesellscliaft, Dr. 
Biihler, in a paper entitled " Die Mansehra Version der Felsenedicte 
A^ka's," gives the text of 12 edicts, in Roman and Sanskrit characters, 
with comments and comparisons with Dr. Seaart's and other versions.' 



1890.] Address. 75 

Dr. Biibler also contributes to the Vienna Oriental Journal a second 
paper on further proofs for the authenticity of the Jaina tradition, found- 
ed on four new Jaina inscriptions from the Kankali Tila, at Mathui'a, 
found by Dr. Fiihrer. 

In carrying out the excavations, Dr. Fiihrer found epigraphic proof 
that the temple buried under the mound belonged to the Swetambaras, 
as well as various votive inscriptions showing the well-known characters 
of the cuinous mixed dialect of the Indo- Scythians. The inscriptions now 
edited are four of the latter description, which mention the ancient Jaina 
Ganas, Kulas and S'akhas, and are dated No. 1, Samvat 22, or A.D. 100 ; 
No. 2, S. 84, or A.D. 1G2 ; and No. 3, S. 95, or A.D. 173. Also an 
undated fragment containing the name of the Varana Gana, and 
further mentioning one of its branches the Aryyakaniyasika Kula. 
Transcripts and translations are given. 

The Indian Antiqioary contains a large number of papers of epigra- 
phic interest. 

The Editor, Mr. J. F. Fleet, 0. I. E., continues his series of papers 
on Sanskrit and old Kanarese Inscriptions, dealing principally with 
copper-plate grants from Vizagapatam. He has also notes on the Kurta- 
koti spurious grant of Vikramaditya I, S'aka- Samvat 532, and on the 
Mahakuta inscription of Bappuvarasa, S'aka- Samvat 856. 

Professor Kielhorn, C. I., E., has a paper on the coppei^-plate grant 
of Trilochanapala, the (Vikrama) year 1084, belonging to our Society, 
edited from an ink impression made by Mr. Fleet. This inscription was 
noticed in the 17tli volume of the Asiatic Researches, but apparently has 
never been previously published. It was found at Jhansi. The same 
author has also papers on the Benares College coppei'-plate grant of 
Jayachchandra, the (Vikrama) year 1232. On the Sirpur Stone 
Inscription of Siva Gupta. Inscriptions of the kings of Chedi, and on 
Chandella Inscriptions. Mr. J. A. Smith describes a dated Grgeco. 
Buddhist statue of Buddha found at Hashtnagar, in the Peshawar 
District. Dr. Biihler gives the text and translation of the Bagamra 
Grant of Nikumbhallasakti. Mr. F. S. Growse describes an ancient 
insci'ibed terracotta seal found at Bulandshahr. Mr. Grierson continues 
his translations of Dr. E. Senart's papers on the Inscriptions of Piyadasi. 

Geography and Sdrvets. 

During the past year steady progress has been made in carrying on 
the various operations of the Survey of India in its various branches, 
both within and beyond our frontiers, and although there are no great 
achievements or discoveries to record, a good amcunt of useful work 
has been done and lai'gs tracts of new country brought under Survey. 



76 Address. [FeS. 

The operations in connection with the military expeditious in Upper 
Burma and the Eastern Frontier are important as paving the way for 
further explorations into the unknown country lying towards south- 
eastern Tibet and containing the upper waters of the great rivers of 
Burma, Siam and China from the Brahmaputra to the Yang-tse Kiang. 

In Central Asia, Turkestan, the Pamirs and Western Tibet, foreign 
explorers have been particularly active, and a great deal of valuable 
geographical information has been acquired, though nothing very spe- 
cially important has as yet been published. 

I have already referred to the loss that Indian geography has 
suffered by the death of Sir Henry Yule, and it is indeed a serious one. 
Though apparently not taking any very prominent part in working out 
the great problems of Asiatic geography, his vast range of knowledge 
and his peculiar power of geographical intuition enabled him to advise 
and suggest ways of attacking them for others to carry out, and this he 
was always ready to do.* 

It is a great pleasure to me to note that the Gill medal of the Royal 
Geographical Society has been awarded to Mr. M. J. Ogle, of the Survey 
of India Department, for his excellent survey work in Eastern Assam, 
in Manipur, and in Northern and Western Burma, partly with Colonel 
Woodthorpe, C. B., and partly independently. 

Geographical Exploration and Surveys. — Lushai Kills. A small 
Survey party accompanied the expedition to the Lushai Hills which 
took place in the cold season of 1888-89. The area of new country 
mapped on the j-inch scale amounted to 540 square miles, besides 
about 210 square miles roughly reconnoitred from long distances. The 
line of march taken by the troops from Demagiri to Lungleh was 
laid down by plane-table traverse and measured 43 miles. The work 
done, though not great in quantity, yields a fair amount of new know- 
ledge of the country. The principal fact ascertained is that there is 
no large stream or main feeder to the Kaladan River between the 
Blue Mountain (Mai Selai Mon) and Darjow Klang, as shewn in the 
old map of the country. The principal stream flows much further 
north, between Aitur Klang and Maliam Pui Klang. The Matt river 
joins the Kaladan further south than is shown in the old map. The 
sites of several new villages have been laid down and the positions 
of others corrected. Survey parties are also accompanying the columns 
of the Chin-Lushai Expeditionai-y Forces now operating in these hills, 

* I may mention ttat very complete and appreciative accounts of Sir Henry 
Yule's geographical work have appeared in the Proceedings of the Royal Geographi- 
cal Society and of the French Society de Geoyraphie. 



1890.] Adilress. 77 

and it is hoped that a large extent of new country will come under 
observation. 

Upper Burma. The reconnaissance survey of Upper Burma, (which 
was commenced immediately after the annexation of the country by a 
party working under the orders of Major Hobday,) has been steadily 
pushed on during the past year. All the military expeditions which 
were organised during the year were accompanied by one or more of 
the officers and surveyors attached to the party, and the total area map- 
ped on the \ inch scale amounted to 20,510 square miles, of which 
the greater portion lies in the Shan States, and Bhamo Disti-ict. 

An outbreak in the South Theinni State led to the despatch of au 
expedition to Maingye, the capital, and during the military operations 
which ensued Major Hobday was enable to traverse much new ground 
between Mogok and Thibau, and beyond Lolin towards Tangyan, which 
is within a mile of the Salwin. The triangulation was much strengthen- 
ed and eventually connected with that done by Captain Jackson last 
season between Mandalay and Maingye. 

Later in the season an expedition against the Ponkan Kachins, a 
tribe living in the hills south-east of Bharao, enabled Major Hobday to 
complete the circuit of triangulation brought from Mandalay across 
the Shan States to the Salwin river, round to Bhamo and thence down 
the valley of the Irawadi. 

Captain Jackson, with a sub-surveyor, accompanied the Karen Field 
Force from Mobye to Sawlon, including reconnaissances to Tonathit and 
Baw like, and subsequently succeeded in completing the detail survey of 
the Myelat from Pekon to Baw and extended the survey to Yotsauk and 
northwards, returning by the eastern road to the Enle valley. He then 
completed the survey of the small states of Kyauktat and Bawzein. 

The country traversed by the Chin Field Force was also surveyed, 
and a large area of useful and interesting geography of the distant 
regions inhabited by the Kachin tribes was obtained by Mr. Ogle during 
the Mogoung Expedition. Surveys were also carried on in the Myiugyan, 
Sagaing, Nimbu and Ruby Mines Districts. 

This year's operations in Upper Burma bring the total area mapped 
on the quarter-inch scale, since the annexation of the countiy, up to 
52,290 square miles ; and the credit for this large result is due to the un- 
tiring energy and zeal of Major Hobday and Captain Jackson. 

Captain Jackson, Mr. Ogle and Mr. Doran are now accompanying 
the Commission for settling the boundary between Siam and Burma, 
under Mr. Ney Elias, and it is hoped that a good deal of new country 
in this direction will be explored and mapped. The country is most 
difficult and unhealthy, but the people seem friendly and willing to 
assist. 



78 Address. [Feb. 

Trigotiomeirical Branch. — During the year the laying out of a princi- 
pal series of triangulation in Upper Burma on the meridian of 96° 30' was 
commenced, but no final work on the series was obtained. In addition 
to this work, the same party carried on operations for fixing beacons 
along the Burma coast for the Marine Department, points suitable by 
their conspicuous appearance being selected and their position deter- 
mined. 

Tidal and Levelling operations. — The recording of the tidal curves 
by means of self-registering tide-guages, their reduction and the publica- 
tion of predicted heights have been continued, and tidal observations 
have been carried on during the year at various stations round the coast 
of India and Burma and at Aden and Port Blair. 

In connection with the Tidal Observations, it is interesting to observe 
that in a paper by Dr. G. H. Darwin, F.R.S., in the Proceedings of the 
Boyal Society, it is pointed out that variation in the sun's temperature 
may possibly be a cause of variation in the mean-sea-level, and, if so, 
a periodicity with a period of 10 or 11 years may be expected. Obser- 
vations at Karachi, show that there was a minimum of sea-level in 1872, 
and again in 1882, but these observations are clearly insufiicient to do 
more than raise the question. 

Dr. Darwin speaks in the highest terms of the Indian observations, 
and it is to be hoped that as time goes on it will be possible to prove 
the correctness of the theory he now puts forward, by the observations 
at some of the permanent stations. 

A comparison of tide-registers at Karachi with those at Sydney, 
N. S. Wales, shows that the variation of mean-sea-level occurs simul- 
taneously at both these ports, but is more noticeable at the latter one. 
Endeavours are being made to establish a tidal observatory on the 
Island of Minicoy, as being especially valuable for the study of the 
oceanic tides, undisturbed by coast influences. 

Spirit-levelling operations were carried on during the year from 
the Bangalore base to Mangalore, and from Bidar to Hyderabad 
(Deccan). 

Latitude operations. — It found was necessary, owing to paucity of 
officers, to abandon temporai-ily the electro-telegraphic longitude opera- 
tions, which require two trained officers to superintend them, in favour 
of the latitude operations for which only one is necessary. Seven stations 
were observed, situated between the latitudes of 19° 49', and 16° 26', 
and near the meridian of 80°. It is worthy of note that at six out of 
the seven stations the same excess of geodetic over astronomical latitude 
still appears as in the previous year, averaging nearly 6". In other 
words a deflection of the plumb-line to the north is in operation through- 



1890.] AJdres.^. 79 

out the whole of the region where the observations have been made, 
the effect being that the plumb-line deviates from the normal to the 
theoretical spheroid at the stations occupied. Evidence of this kind 
is gradually being collected which will, when the whole scheme of the 
Trigonometrical Survey is completed, be all discussed simultaneously, 
and will without doubt enlarge immensely our knowledge of this 
abstruse question of local attraction, and may also not improbably lead 
to some amendment in the adopted elements of the earth's figure. 

Solar Photography. — Tlie two photo-heliographs at the Trigono- 
metrical Branch Office at Dehra-Dun, one giving eight-inch pictures and 
the other 12-iuch, have been employed, as usual, during the year in record- 
ing the spots and faculae visible on the face of the sun. Two negatives 
have been taken with the smaller instrument on each day that the sun was 
visible, the larger instrument being only used for recording special 
phenomena. 656 silver prints of the 8-iuch and 13 of the 12-inch 
photographs were prepared and despatched to the India Office for com- 
parison with, and completion of, the Grreenwich observations. The sun- 
spot minimum still continues and is abnormal in its duration. 

Topographical Surveys. — In addition to the reconnaissance surveys 
described above, topographical operations have been continued in Balu- 
chistan, the Himalayas and in the Guiarat district and the South Mahiatta 
coiintry, Bombay. Forest surveys were carried on in the Hoshungabad 
and Betul districts, Central Provinces ; the Satara, Nasik, Poona and 
North Kanara districts, Bombay ; the Madura, Tintievelly and Salem 
districts, Madras ; and the Prome, Tounghoo, and Thayetmyo districts, 
Burmah. 

Cadastral Surveys. — Cadastral Survey operations have been con- 
tinued in the Bilaspur District, Central Provinces; in various Govern- 
ment and Wards' Estates in Bengal ; in the Tarai, N,-W. Provinces ; 
in the Nowgong and Sibsagar districts, Assam and in the Thongwa 
district, Burma. The Cadastral Surveys of Gorakhpur and Basti dis- 
tricts of the N.-W. Provinces were completed during the year, and new 
surveys were instituted in the Jalpaigiiri and Chittagong districts and 
the Burdwan Khas Mehals, Bengal, as well as in the Jhansi district 
N.-W. Provinces. Traverse surveys were executed by six parties in 
various districts in the Punjab and Central Provinces. 

The report of the Explorations in Sikkim, Bhutan and Tibet, 
noticed in last year's address, has been published and contains the 
detailed accounts of the journeys of five explorers : — 

(1). An account of the Lower Tsangpo, by the Mongolian Lama 
Serap Gyatsho, 1856-68. 

(2). Narrative of a journey from Darjiling to Gyala Sindong, 
Tsari, and the Lower Tsangpo, ))y K. P-, in 1880-84. 



80 Address. [Feb. 

(3). Explorations in Tibet by Lama U. G., in 1883. The Lama 
started from Darjiiing and went to Lhassa via the Donkya Pass, Shi- 
.^atse and the Yamdok Tso Lake, returning via the Bam Tso Lake, 
Tangha Pass and Chumbi Valley. 

(4.) Explorations in Sikkim, Bhutan and Tibet, by R. N., in 1885 
86. He gained a good deal of information about Bhutan. 

(5.) Exploration in Tibet and Bhutan, by P. A., in 1885-86. He 
accompanied R. N. and has contributed the route along the range to the 
west of the Wong-chha to the vicinity of Baxa Duar. 

The volume is a very valuable contribution to the knowledge of 
these little-known regions and a testimony to the arduous labours of 
these intrepid explorers. 

The appendices to the General Report on the operations of the 
Survey of India Department, for 1887-88, contain much interesting in- 
formation on the Electro-telegraphic Longitude oj)erations carried on 
by Colonels G. Strahan and W. J. Heaviside, R. E. ; on the Tidal ob- 
servations, by Col. M. W. Rogers, R. E., including values of the Tidal 
Constants for various Stations ; a very interesting account, by Capt. H. 
M. Jackson, R. E., of the Survey operations in the Southern Shan States, 
containing a good deal of information about the country and people ; 
also a note by Col. H. C. B. Tanner on Trans-Himalayan geography, iu 
which he discusses our present knowledge of Nepal geography, and of 
the geography of Bhutan and Assam and the settlement of the much- 
vexed question of the course of the Sangpo river. 

PuhlisJnng Offices. During the year the Photographic and Litho- 
graphic Offices, which have hitherto been accommodated in three dif- 
ferent private houses, were brought together in a handsome new build- 
ing. No. 14 Wood Street, and the whole of the Survey of India Offices 
are now housed in a suitable and efficient manner. As usual, a very 
large number of maps and various other subjects have been produced 
during the year by lithography and photography. A new edition of 
the map of India on the scale of 32 miles to the inch, which was much 
wanted, has been published and a third edition is in hand. A new 
general map of Burma, on the same scale, has also been completed. New 
Railway maps have been prepared. The helio-gravure process is making 
good progress and is being largely utilised in various ways. 

Trans. -Frontier and other Geographical worh. The year has been 
comparatively uneventful in geographical work in the countries border- 
ing India, though several parties of explorers have been busily engaged 
about the Pamir and eastwards towards Tibet. 

French Gochin- China, &c. The Proceedings of the French Geographi- 
cal Society contain an account of the results of the mission of Mr. Taupin 



1890.] Address. 81 

in Lowei- Lao8, iu 1888. He studied the language and written works 
hitherto almost unknown. He surveyed over 600 miles of roads and 
rivers, and made several corrections on the maps. He found the climate 
suitable for the growth of Eui'opean vegetables, and believes that 
coffee, cocoa, pepper and even the vine, would do there well, the climate 
being drier than Lower Cochin- China. 

Father Guesdon has prepared a general map of Cambodia, also a 
Dictionary of French and Cambodian. 

M. Pavie, who has for three years been exploring the north of Siam 
and the Laotian provinces, with the object of finding the easiest route 
from these regions to the sea, has discovered a route, that caa be tra- 
versed in nine days — four in boat and five on horseback, thus connecting 
the commercial centres in Siam with the French possessions in Tonquin. 

Several interesting works have been published regarding these 
French possessions in Further Asia — among them — Mens. J. L. de Lanes- 
san's " L' Indo-Chine Frmicaise," which gives a useful general account 
of the French possessions in Cochin-China, Cambodia, Annam and 
Tonquin, and more particularly of the expedition sent for rectifying 
the boundary between Anuam and Siam. Mons. J. Silvestre's " L' 
Empire d' Annam et le peiiple Annamite," with map; Mons. Paul Brandas' 
"ie haut MeJcong ou le Laos oiivert," with new maps. 

A new map of Fi-ench Cochin China, prepared by Commandant Al. 
Koch, has been published on the scale of 1 : 400,000, or about 5'5 geogra- 
phical miles to the inch. 

Burma and Siam. Mr. Holt S. Hallett has published under the title 
oi " A Thousand Miles on an Elephant in the Shan States," an account of 
his journeys in Burmah, Siam, and the Shan States, in search of the best 
railway route between Burmah, China, and Siam. The work is well illus- 
trated with maps of Southern China, and Indo-China, showing the 
railway lines projected by English and French engineers between 
Burma and China and from the Shan States to Tonquin. Mr. Hallett 
has contributed a good deal that is new to the geography of this little 
known region and to our information regarding it. 

The Asiatic Quarterly B.evieio contains papers by Major- General 
A. R. Macmahon on Karenni and the Red Karens, and by Mr. J. G. 
Scott on the British Shan States. 

Upper Burma and S. E. Frontier. The Proceedings of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society contain a very valuable and interesting paper by Colonel 
R. G. Woodthorpe, R. E., C. B., on his exploration on the Chindwin 
River in Upper Burma, in which he gives an account of the whole tract 
beetween Manipur, the Kubo valley, and down the Chindwin River to 
Alon. The paper is illustrated by a map. 



82 Address. [Feb. 

With reference to the question of the hydi-ography of S. E., Tibet, 
which was briefly discussed in last year's address, I may note that Mr. 
Needham writes in the Proc. B. G. 8., that the idea that the soui-ce of 
the Dibong lies very far north of Sadiya is erroneous, and that from 
information he has received from many Mishmis, the source is near the 
Tibetan town of Aliipo, which lies ou the northern slope of a high 
range known as Taseni and about 11 marches, or some 130 to 140 miles, 
from Nizamghat. 

In the " Transactions and Proceedings of the JRoyal Geog^-aphical Society 
of Australasia" Mr. Gr. S. Streeter has given an interesting sketch of the 
country and people and of the mineral and vegetable products of the 
tract of country in the vicinity of the Ruby Mines and Northern Shan 
States. 

Tibet. The impenetrable has ever an irresistible attraction, and 
Lhassa is more than ever the point de mire of ardent explorers. At 
least three parties have been on their way towards it during the year, 
but, so far as present information goes, without success ; though it may 
be noted that rumours were current in the Eastern parts of Tibet that 
the Russians had reached Lhassa in Februai'y last, but of the fact there 
has been no confii-mation. 

The journey of which we have fullest accounts, is that undertaken 
by Mr. W. W. Rockhill, formerly Secretary to the American Legation 
in Pekin, who set out from that place in December 1888 and has given 
a short but interesting narrative of his travels up to August last, which 
will be found in the Proc. R. G. 8. for December last. He travelled 
disguised as a pilgrim in Tibetan dress and explored some new country 
about the Kuen Lun Range, in the neighbourhood of the Arumye-Kor 
Pass, near the Tosu Nor, and the Nomoran Ala Pass, near the Alang Nor. 
At Barong Dsassak he heard that the Russian expedition to Tibet had 
reached Lhassa and decided to go through East Tibet via Ohamdo, 
Batang and Litang. At Jye Kundo (Kegido of Pandit A. K), his 
troubles with the Lamas commenced, and he had to abandon his luggage 
and make for Tachienlu, and thence to Chungking in Ssuchuan. He 
made surveys of all routes and has apparently gained a considerable 
amount of knowledge of hitherto unexplored country, where his route 
diverged from those followed by Prjevalski or the Pundit A. K. It is 
satisfactory to find that he speaks in high terms of the correctness of 
the latter's survey, though he finds fault with his spelling of names of 
places. It is to be hoped that the fuller account of his travels, which 
he offers to the Royal Greographical Society, may be given hereafter. 

From Globus we leai'n that Joseph Martin left Pekin for Lanchow 
and Sin-ning, with the intention of reaching Tibet, via the Kuku Nor. 



1890 ] AJdress. 83 

The object of his journey is to make observations on the physical 
geography and geology of the tract. 

Mons Dutreuil de Rhins has lately brought out a work entitled 
" Asie Centrale." It comprises a volume of text and an atlas of 23 maps, 
besides a general map of the true Central Asia, i, e., Tliibet and the 
adjacent regions, from Lake Lob 'Nov to British India, and from Kashgaria 
to the -western provinces of China, between the latitudes of 27° and 41° 
north, and longitudes 78° and 102° east of Paris. The author professes 
to have reconstituted the cartography of Central Asia by making a fresh 
critical analysis of all the original documents ancient and modei-n, 
European and Chinese. 

The Abbe Desgodins, who was for so many years at Bathang, has 
returned to France and has taken with him the MS. of a great 
Dictionary of the Tibetan language, in which the meaning of each word 
is given in English, French and Latin. He has worked at it for the last 
25 years and now proposes to have it printed in France. 

Tnrlcestan and Central Asia. Tliere has been unwonted activity 
in exploring in the neighbourhood of the Pamir and other parts of 
Central Asia during the year. At least three Russian expeditions, 
one Austrian and one French were so engaged, besides private and 
official explorers fi'om our own side. 

The princij^al of the Russian expeditions was that which was to 
have started for Tibet in 1888 under Prjevalski, and after his death 
was placed under charge of his companion, Colonel PevtzofP. The ex- 
pedition, composed of Col. Pevtzoff and two other companions of Prje- 
valski, Lieuts. Roborovsky and Kozloff, left Prjevalsk (Karakol) about 
the middle of May last, crossed the Tian Shan by the Baraskaunski and 
Bedel Passes and then made their way by the Dungaret-ma Pass to 
the Tarkand River by a route hitherto untraversed by any European. 
They found the Sart inhabitants friendly. This type shows an Aryan 
descent and both men and women are good looking. From the Yarkand 
River they went to Aksak Moral. In the desert of Takla Maklan to 
the right bank of the Yarkand River, they found many buried remains 
of ancient cities. They reached Yarkand on the 3rd July, where the 
geologist, M. Bogdanovitch, joined them, and then went on to Khotan and 
Nia, where they propose to winter and in the spring to go into Tibet 
over the Toguz Daban Range, by a pass discovered by M. Roborovsky, 
at Youngilik-Khanym, leading to a desolate and uninhabited plateau 
at 12,000 feet elevation but well watered and cultivated more to the 
south. This pass is about 80 miles to the east of the pass across the Kuen 
Lun Mts. from Southei'n Khotan to Lake Zashi Kul. The expedition 
has already collected a good many new geographical and ethnographical 



84 Address. [Feb. 

particulars about Kasligaria, besides astronomical and magnetic observa- 
tions and topographical surveys over an itinerary of nearly 1,100 miles. 
M. Bogdanovitch lias explored geologically the valleys of the Raskem, 
or Yarkand, River and of its affluent the Tiznaf, and also the the 
country in the neighbourhood of the Mustagh Ata, or Tagharma moun- 
tains, west of Yarkand. 

Petermann^s Mittheihmgen contains a full account of Prjevalski's 
fourth journey in Central Asia, by Dr. Carl Diener, of Vienna, with a 
map showing the course of Prjevalski's four journeys. 

Captain Grrombtchevski, whose exploration over the Pamir to Kan- 
jut was noticed in last year's address, left Margilan on the 13th July last 
on another expedition to the south of the Hindu Kush. He passed 
through Karategin and Darwaz to Kila Khumb on the upper Oxus, 
intending to proceed to Shignanand Lake Shewa, if possible, and then to 
Kafiristan. After following the course of the Panjah to the junction of 
the Wanj River, he explored the valley of the latter, and then proceeded 
by the Syr-Artchi Pass to Khin-i-ab, in Wakhan. The passage of the 
Syr-Artchi was very difficult over more than 7 miles of ice, and at the 
commencement of September deep snow covered the country. Being 
refused admission into Afghanistan, he decided upon marching towards 
the sources of the Ak-Su and the Taghdumbash Pamir, where he ar- 
rano-ed for crossing the Ili-su-Pass to the valley of the river Raskem. 
In October he was at Kaindyn Aouzy, on the Ili-Su, and proposed to 
visit the sources of the Raskem river, in the Karakoram Mountains, 
and thence explore the basin of the upper Khotan river. He claims 
to have discovered two new passes, the Kilinj and the Kadarpur, the 
first is, however, well known, having been visited by Col. Woodthorpe. 

Another important Russian exploring party is that under M. Grum- 
Grjimailo, who started from Vernyi, in April last, in company with 
his brother, to explore the Eastern Tian Shan, where he will endeavour 
to connect Prjevalski's surveys with those of Potanin and also com- 
plete the botanical and zoological work of Prjevalski and other tra- 
vellers in this part of Central Asia. From the Tian Shan, he was 
to travel by way of Turf an to Lake Lob Nor and thence explore the 
Altyn Tag range. The latest accounts from these explorers inform us 
that they have found that the existing maps of the Eastern Tian Shan are 
quite incorrect. They have gathered very rich collections of vertebrates 
and insects. It may be of interest to Indian meteorologists that the 
spring was very late in Dzungaria, and that in the month of May, the 
lower limit of snows on the Ala Tau range, in the latitude of 43° JN"., 
was 7,874 feet. The winter of 1888-89 in Trans-Caspia is said to have 
been unusually severe. M. Bogdanovitch reports heavy rain and floods, 
in May and June last, in the mountains to the west of Yarkand. 



1890.] Address. 85 

Mods. Bonvalot, whose account of his expedition to the Pamir was 
noticed last year, is again in Central Asia, in company with Prince 
Henry of Orleans, and wrote from Kuldja, last September, that he was 
starting for Lob-Nor with the intention of crossing the Tsaidama and 
going by the Mur-Usu to reach Bathang, and thence, if all went well, 
they would go towards Yunnan and Tonquin. From later accounts 
received from Kurla, near Lake Bagratch-Kul in Eastern Turkestan, the 
party had been joined by M. de Decken, a Belgian missionary, from 
Kuldja. From Lob-Nor they proposed to make for the upper Yang-tse- 
kiang. They had already made good collections of birds and mammals. 

Major Cumberland and Lieut. Bower have been travelling towards 
Yarkand, Maralbashi and the Pamirs. 

The Austrian traveller. Dr. J. Troll, passed last winter in Chinese 
Turkestan and made a journey to Khotan in May last, and thence crossed 
the Karakoram into Ladak. 

M. Dauvergne, of Srinagar, has made a remarkable journey along 
the northern slopes of the Hindu Kush, to the Taghdumbash and Baro- 
ghil Pass, and thence, along a hitherto unexplored path by the Gazkul, 
or Karambar Sar, to Gakuch, on the Gilgit River. He finds that instead 
of one lake there are two, the Gazkul and the Karambar Sar, separated 
by a narrow rocky watershed. From the former, the Yarkhun river 
flows and from the latter the Karambar or Ashkaman River. 

Kanjiit and Hunza have been visited by the British Political Agent, 
Capt. Durand, and Lieut. Manners Smith. 

The Founder's Medal of the Royal Geographical Society has been 
awarded to Mr. A. D. Carey, C. S., for his journey through Central 
Asia in 1886-87. 

Captain F. E. Younghusband, whose adventurous journey from 
China via the Mustagh Pass to India was noticed in last year's address, 
has again been exploring in the same regions. He crossed the Karako- 
ram Pass and turning to the west explored in the neighbourhood of the 
two Mustagh Passes. He then went northwards to the Yarkand River 
and thence to the Taghdumbash Pamir where he met Grombtchev- 
ski, the Russian explorer. He examined the hill country to the south 
and the Khunjarab Pass, and then crossing the main range by the Mintaka 
Pass, well to the east of the Baroghil, made for Hunza by way of Gircha 
and Gulmit, and thence returned to India, via Gilgit and Kashmir. 

A new Russian map of the Pamir, on the scale of 1 : 1, 260,000 has 
been published privately in M. Romanoff's Memoires des Goleopteres. 

Among new works on Central Asia that have appeared during the 
year may be noted V. P. Nalivkine's Histoire du Khanate de Khokand 
translated from the Russian by Aug. Dozen. It is illustrated with a 
map, and contains a geographical and ethnographical introduction. 



86 Address. [Feb. 

The Scottish GeograpJiical Magazine contains a very interesting ac- 
count of the Andaman Islands and their Inhabitants, by Colonel T. 
Cadell, V. C, and the Mitheilungen der K. K. Geographisch Gesellschaft, 
of Vienna, gives a paper by Dr. Svoboda on the Nicobar Islands and 
the Nicobarese, dealing with the geography of the islands and the 
customs of the people, including a full account of their funeral cere- 
monies. 

Our former valued member and contributor, Mr. V. Ball, has pub- 
lished a translation of Tavernier's " Travels in India," with copious 
notes, specially relating to the mineralogy of the diamond mines of 
Golconda and other parts of India. 

Marine Surveys. — Commander Carpenter's Report on the Marine 
Survey of India, which forms Appendix IX of the Annual Adminis- 
tration Report of the Indian Marine for 1888-89, gives a very interesting 
account of the operations of the survey and of the zoological work con- 
nected therewith. 

It appears that during the seven years which had elapsed since 
H. M. I. M. S. " Investigator " made her first surveying trip, she has 
run some 44,0U0 nriles, and that, inclusive of boat-work, a total of 33,500 
miles of close soundings have been run, but as on the 4-inch scale there 
are 12 to 15 lines of soundings to a square mile, the total linear mileage 
of survey completed sufficiently for safe navigation round the coast of 
India is only 1,715 miles out of 5,000, or just one-third. 

The work of the season commenced in April in the neighbourhood 
of the Andamans and about 100 miles west of these islands, a submarine 
elevation was found of 1,370 fathoms standing a plateau of about 1,700 
fathoms, which difference represents a submerged peak, 2,000 feet high. 
Subsequent investigation shewed a continuation of this I'idge or plateau 
of 1,700 fathoms. Between this ridge and the islands there is a groove 
or valley of 1,900 to 2,000 fathoms, which appears to stretch up from 
Acheen ; and on the west side of the valley the water appeared to be 
slightly colder than the normal temperature of those depths. 

After recessing at Poona, the party left Bombay in October, and 
some further soundings made between the Northern Lakadivh banks and 
the coast bank proved that the Lakadivh group form a chain of peaks 
rising from a bed of 1,100 fathoms, and are in themselves 6,600 feet 
above the bottom, or about the height of the Western Ghats in the same 
latitude. Some of the islands and banks are reported out in position, and 
will have to be examined. From Colombo, the ' Investigator ' proceeded 
to the Andamans and the soundings round South Sentinel Island were 
completed. Several fine specimens of the robber crab, " Birgus latro," 
were secured here. 

Observations shewed that the little Andaman had to be moved 



1890.] Address. 87 

about 1^ mile to the eastward, and that the Table Island Light was 
quite correctly placed on the chai'ts. 

A course was then laid for False Point, in Orissa, and deep-sea 
soundings made. A map attached to the report, shews that the Bay of 
Bengal has a regular decline towards its mouth : the Andaman and 
Nicobar Range form its eastern boundary (the sea east of the Andamans 
being a separate basin) ; the water nearer the coasts is slightly deeper 
than in the centre ; the depth falls off very suddenly from the 100 fathom 
line off the Sunderbands to the 900 fathom line. The most rapid fall 
is really from 100 fathoms to 650 fathoms, where the slope is 1 in 13. 

A light-house is reported to be much required at the mouth of 
the Devi E/iver. 

It was found that several of the river mouths, viz., False Point, the 
Jotador River, the Devi River, and the Chilka Lake entrance have all 
shifted their positions about 3 miles to the north-east, in the last 40 
years by the extension of their sandy sj^its. 

A comparison of the soundings in Coconada Bay, with those taken 
in 1882 shows a similar noi'therly movement of the estuary, amounting 
to half a mile in 7 years, or three miles in 42 years. In another 40 years 
Coconada will be unapproachable by water. The erosion or transfer 
of sand, by the continuous southerly swell and the predominant 
southerly wind, are working vast changes along the immediate seaboard, 
which certain preventive measures may guide and modify, though they 
will be powerless to arrest them. 

In Appendix XII of the same report, Dr. Alcock has given a full 
and highly interesting account of the zoological operations of the survey 
from November 1888 to March 1889, at the Andamans and Cocos and 
on the Orissa coast, with a list of Fishes found off the latter, and also 
notes on the newly-hatched larval forms of Thenus orientalis and Hippa 
asiatica ; on the gestation of some Elasmo branch Fishes, and on those 
Fishes taken off the Orissa coast which are believed to be new. 

Dr. Alcock regrets that nothing has hitherto been done by the 
Survey in the way of botanical collection, but now that the necessaries 
have been furnished, he proposes to begin. 

In another Appendix (XIII) Commander Carpenter gives a memo- 
randum on the unsurveyed condition of portions of the coast line of 
India and Burma, showing what has been done, what remains to be 
done and when it might probably be undertaken by the present staff. 

Geology. 

The work of the Geological Survey of India, under the direction 
of Dr. William King, has during thclast year been mainly devoted to 



88 Address. [Fer. 

the practical exploration of mineral products, the call for which, owing 
to the larger extension of the railway system, the interest evinced by 
private enterprise, and the desire of the Government of India to place 
the conditions of the resources of India as clearly as possible before 
the public, has become most urgent. 

Reports of the greatest economic interest and value have been pub- 
lished, in the Records of the Survey, on the Auriferous rock series 
(Blidrtvdrs), and the Diamond exploration in South India, by Mr. Foote ; 
on Tin-mining in Tenasserim, by Mr. Hughes ; on Indian steatite and 
materials for pottery manufacture in the neighbourhood of Jabalpur, 
by Mr. Mallet, who gives notes of trials of steatite from various parts of 
India as to capability of being cut into small pieces without breaking and 
freedom from grit, for the purpose of making gas-burners. The best 
specimens were from Kurnool, the Anantapur District and Jaipur, but 
many others were promising. Dr. Noetling has also given a very in- 
teresting and valuable Report on the Oil-fields of Tenangzoung, in 
Burma, in which he shows that under the native system of working the 
greater part of the oil-bearing sandstone is untouched and the oil 
industry would not be developed more than it is at present; but if 
■worked according to the European style, by bores, these oil-fields 
are capable of considerable development in the future, but cannot be 
expected to compete vpith American or Russian oil. 

The first part of a provisional " Iiidex of the Local Distribution 
of important Minerals &c. in the Indian Empire" has been compiled 
by Dr. W. King, the Director of the Survey. Such an Index has been 
much wanted and will be of great value. It is ai-ranged ; first, by Pre- 
sidencies, Provinces, Agencies, or Native States, in alphabetical order, 
and gives the mineral products found in each under the heads of im- 
portant minerals, miscellaneous minerals, gem-stones and quarry-stones. 

Professor the Ober-Bergrath, Dr. W. Waagen, of Prag, continues 
his admirable memoirs on the Salt-range fossils, in the Falceontologia 
Indica, of which Part I, Vol. lY., Geological Results, was issued by the 
Survey in December last. Succeeding parts of this volume will be 
issued as volumes II and III, are completed, the part now issued having 
reference mainly to the first volume, The Salt-range geology is, 
however, continually receiving great attention from explorers and per- 
haps the most interesting observation yet made is that of Dr. Wavth, 
who was fortunate enough early in the year to make the remai-kable 
discovery of trilobites in the Neoholus beds, which had long been looked 
upon as of Silurian age. Dr. Waagen confirmed the discovery by 
recognising two determinable species ; one a Conoce])lialites, very nearly 
related to Con. formosus, Hartt. from the St. John's grouji, and the, other 



1890.] AMress. 89 

probably an OJenus; tlius giving a lower Cambrian, or by priority, Taconic 
age to the Neobolus beds. Messrs. Middlemiss and Datta have since 
made considerable additions to this lowest palseozoic fauna, recognising 
two fossiliferous zones in the upper of which a decidedly clearer and 
somewhat larger form of Gonocephalites occurs. 

Mr. Griesbach, on his I'eturn from deputation with the Amir of 
Cabul, in July last, reports that during his journey up the Logar 
Valley to the Khurd Kabul Valley, he recognised at least three horizons : 
the RhjBtic, with Litlwdendron (in Kharwar) ; the Upper Jurassic (or 
possibly Neocomian) plant-beds (near the Shutargardan), and well 
developed nummulitics (in Kharwar and Shilgar). 

Mr. Middlemiss has completed his memoirs on the Physical Geology 
of the Sub-Himalaya of Garhwal and Kumaon, which will be issued 
by the Survey almost immediately. It should form an excellent addition 
to the literature and study of the geology of the outer Himalaya, which 
was so ably initiated and carried on by Mr. Medlicott, the previous 
Director of the Survey. 

Some interesting new information regarding the geology of the 
Pamir border-ridge, in the neighbourhood of the Mustagh Ata, or 
Tagharma Peak, and the adjoining valleys, whi^h had already been 
explored by Dr. Stoliczka, has been obtained by M. Bogdanovitch, the 
geologist of the Russian expedition to Tibet under Colonel Pevtzolf. 
He finds no trace of mountains running north and south on the eastern 
edge of the great Pamir plateau. The Kashgar mountains are an 
upheaval of gneisses, metamorphic slates and tertiary deposits running 
from north-west to south-east. The limestones which Stoliczka sup- 
posed to be Triassic, proved to be Devonian. Several very characteristic 
Upper-Devonian fossils were found, together with the corals described 
by Stoliczka. The tertiary sandstones are broken through by dolerites 
of volcanic origin, at the very border of the plateau, on the slope towards 
Kashgaria. 

Among the geological papers in our Journal may be noted, Mr R. 
Lydekker's on the Tortoises described as Chaibassia, in which he shows 
that the genus Chaibassia should be included in Nicoria, and that the 
one species of the former should be known as N. tricarinata. Brigadier- 
General Collett's very interesting note on the geology of the Myelat 
District, in Bui-ma, noticed last year, has been published. He draws 
attention to some curious features in tlie drainage of the country, by 
which the streams dizain into crater-like holes, from a few feet diameter 
to areas of 3 or 4 square miles, formed by the washing down of the clays 
overlying weatherworn limestones into the rock below, so that the 
country is practically without rivers. 



90 Address. [Feb, 

Captain A. W. Stiff e recently read before the Geological Society 
oJ; London a paper on the Glaciation of parts of the Valleys of the Jhelam 
and Sind rivers in the Himalayan mountains of Kashmir ; in which he 
gives an account of some observations he made, in 1885, which appeared 
to indicate signs of former glaciation on a most enormous scale. 

Among the books on Indian Geology, published during the year 
Mr. Medlicott's Sketch of the Geology of the Pnnjah merits notice. 
Under the heads — Aravali Region ; the Plains ; the Salt-range and 
its west extension ; the Himalayan district ; the Afghan region ; the 
Suleiman range — considerable light is thrown on the geological struc- 
ture of the whole Punjab region. 

Mr. R. D. Oldham's Bibliography of Indian Geology, which sliould 
have been noticed in last year's address, is a very valuable aid to the 
Indian Geologist and meets an urgent want. 

I also note a pamphlet by Mons. J. Marcou, on the Taconic in the 
Salt-range in the Punjab. 

A Report by Mr. P. Bosworth- Smith, on the Kolar Gold-field and 
its extension from Mysore into the Madi-as Presidency, has been pub- 
lished at Madras. 

Meteorology. 

There is, on the whole, loss to record on the work of the Meteoro- 
logical Department during the past year than during the previous two 

years. 

The most important event was the retii-ement of the head of the 
department, Mr. H. P. Blanford, at the end of two years' furlough. 
Mr, Blanford has been a most active member of the Society for many 
years and was for some time before he went on furlough in May 1886, 
President of the Society. His services to the Society have been already 
fully acknowledged in the annual address of the year. 

Mr. Blanford's attention was first directed to the subject of Indian 
Meteorology by the great Calcutta cyclone of October 1864, of which 
he and Col. Gastrell drew up a full and interesting account. The 
storm and subsequent inquiry led to the introduction of a system of 
storm-signals for the Port of Calcutta and River Hooghly. A Meteoro- 
logical Committee was formed in 1865 and subsequently this led to the 
establishment of the Bengal Meteorological Department in 1867, and 
Mr. Blanford was appointed head of that department as Meteorological 
Reporter to the Government of Bengal. He wrote a series of valuable 
annual reports on the Meteorology of Bengal and various papers on 
meteorological matters, some of which were published in the Transac- 
tions of the Hoyal Society and othci'S in the Journal of our Society. 



1890.] Address. 91 

His experience soon showed him that the system of independent pro- 
vincial Meteorological Departments was veiy unscientific and that rapid 
progress in the investigation of the Meteorology of India could only be 
made by combining the provincial departments into a single system. 
In that way only could the Meteorology of India be dealt with and 
studied as a whole. His efforts in this direction finally brought forth 
fruit. In 1875, he was asked by the Government of India to report 
upon the provincial systems and to propose a scheme for their unifi- 
cation and the establishment of a Meteorological Department for the 
whole of India. He submitted the report called for, in July 1875, and 
the scheme he projiosed was adopted. He was appointed Meteoro- 
logical Reporter to the Government of India, in order that the scheme 
he proposed might be carried out, and the objects realized in the most 
effective manner. From that time to the date of his retirement he 
laboured most earnestly and energetically to realize his idea of a tho- 
roughly efficient department which should deal with the Meteorology of 
India from a practical as well as a scientific stand-point. The storm- 
signal duties of the department were rapidly extended and before the 
termination of his service, a system was in force for warning all the 
more important ports of the Empire. Daily reports for the whole of 
India, similar to those published by Meteorological Bureaus in Europe, 
are, as a result of his labours, issued at Simla, and local reijorts at 
Calcutta and Bombay, to give early weather information to the mercan- 
tile and seafaring communities of these two ports. A valuable series 
of annual reports dealing with the Meteorology of India as a whole, and 
of monographs on various Indian Meteorological subjects, in the " Indian 
Meteorological Memoirs,'^ have been published during this period. Pro- 
bably the most valuable of all is the monograph on the " Rainfall of 
India," based on the whole of the available information up to date. 
Since his retirement he has written a very valuable jiopular treatise on 
the " Climates and weather of India." It is based on the whole of the 
materials and researches of the department to the time of his retirement. 
It is not only very interesting reading, but gives later and more complete 
information on Indian Meteorology than is to be found elsewhere. It 
. will, it is to be hoped, awake a livelier interest in the pi'oblems of Indian 
Meteorology amongst European meteorologists and induce them to assist 
investigations. The number of scientific meteorologists engaged in the 
investigation of the problems of the weather of Western Europe (no 
larger than India) are to be numbered probably by hundreds, whilst 
it is doubtful whether there are as many as a dozen who devote them- 
selves to the elucidation of the meteorological problems of India. 

An important feature of the work of the year 1889 in Meteorology 



92 Address. [Feb. 

in India was the permanent introduction of the series of changes which 
wei-e referred to in last year's address as being in part tried temporai'ily. 
The following is a brief summary of these changes : — 

1st. — The substitution of 8 A. M. for 10 A. M. as the chief hour of 

observation in India. 
27id. — The introduction of a uniform system of registering rainfall 
throughout India and the adoption of the same hour, viz., 
8 A. M., at all the revenue rainfall recording stations. 
3rd. — Grreater prominence to observations during storms. This is 
effected by assigning separate and special payments for these 
observations, the amount being determined by the value of 
the observations. 
4:th. — Increased inspections by the emploj^ment of Native Inspectors. 
Their services are especially utilized for inspection during 
the hot weather and rains. They are also employed to 
train new observers or observers imperfectly aquainted with 
their work and to inspect any observatory, the observations 
of which from some cause or other become vitiated by fre- 
quent or constant error, the nature of which it is impossible 
to determine by correspondence with the Superintendent. 
bill. — The systematic and regular collection of meteorological data 
respecting the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal from ships 
entering the ports of Bombay and Calcutta, with a view to 
the publication, for a period of two years at least, of daily 
charts of the whole Indian land and sea area. 
6th. — The occasional employment of European meteorologists to 
discuss completed series of observations such as, for exam- 
ple, forest rainfall data, for a number of years in order to 
determine the influence of forests on rainfall &c. 
These large changes necessitated a number of smaller changes in 
the work and pay of observers and in the office establishments, but 
these do not need further notice. 

The great majority of these changed were made permanently on the 
1st of January 1889, and the remainder during the year. 

Another important advance was the commencement of the publica- 
cation of a daily report and chart at Bombay for the use of the mer- 
cantile and seafaring community of that port. This was urged on the 
Government of India both by the Port Trust and the Chamber of Com- 
merce in the year 1888. Both bodies were consulted as to whether they 
would contribute to the increased expenditure. The Chamber of Com- 
merce offered a liberal contribution as an experimental measure for one 
year and the Bombay Government undertook to print the chart and 



1800. J Address. 03 

rejiort at the Secretariat press. This local assistance made the publica- 
tion of a suitable repoi-t possible, and practicable, and a report and chart 
embodying observations from upwards of 40 stations, situated not only 
in the Bombay Presidency, but in the large wheat and cotton-producing 
districts in the Central Provinces and North-Western Provinces, which 
supply these products to Bombay for use or for export, has been issued 
from May 1889. It has been most useful and is so much appreciated 
in Bombay that its establishment on a permanent basis next year is 
practically certain. 

Another important step in advance in the practical work of the 
Department was the adoption of an extended and improved system of 
storm signals for the Bombay or West coast of India ports. It may, in 
the first place, be premised that it is evidently more difficult to warn the 
Bombay than the Bay of Bengal coast. The Bay of Bengal is sur- 
rounded on all sides except the south by a battery of observing stations 
and is of such limited extent that a large cyclonic storm in it always 
gives certain indications of its existence at the coast stations some time 
before it reaches land. The Arabian Sea has, so far as the work of the 
Indian Department is concerned, stations at only one side viz., the east, 
and it is quite possible for cyclones to form in it and cross to the north 
or west without giving any indication to the Bombay coast stations. 
It is hence practically possible to wai^n steamers at any of the Bay of 
Bengal ports of the existence of any cyclonic storm they are likely to 
meet with in the Bay if they leave port. Sucb a thing is only partially 
possible for vessels leaving Bombay or Kurrachee, and it has hitherto 
not been attempted at all. The system adopted was suggested by Sir 
Henry Morland, Port Officer of Bombay, and is similar to that used to 
warn British coasts. Its aim is to warn the ports of any approaching 
storm likely to give a gale to the port and also to intimate to shipping 
in the ports the position and course of any cyclonic storm in the Arabian 
Sea, the existence of which is shewn by the coast observations. 

Several minor improvements have been effected in the Bengal or 
Calcutta storm-warning system. Arrangements have been made for 
obtaining early weather information from the pilot- vessels at the Sand- 
teads. Telegrapliic communication to Diamond Island (the most im- 
portant station for indicating the first existence of storms forming near 
the Andamans) has been much improved. 

Mr. Pedler some time ago drew my attention to the meteorological 
interest of the fact noticed at the time of Mr. Spencer's first balloon 
ascent, of his first travelling in a northerly direction and then in a south- 
easterly, and he has kindly given me the following note on the subject. 

" In connection with the subject of Meteorology, it may be mentioned 



04 Address. [Feb. 

tliat there were two balloon ascents made in Calcutta in the year 1889, 
and tlie observations made on these occasions point to the fact that 
extremely valuable information might be obtained from a series of 
such ascents. 

" It is well known that during the hot- weather months, Bengal forms 
a kind of focus to which three converging wind systems blow. There is 
the north-westerly current, blowing down the Gangetic valley, which 
spreads over Behar, parts of Chutia Nagpur &c. ; the second is an 
easterly current blowing down the Assam valley, and the third is the 
strong southerly current which blows at the head of the Bay of Bengal, 
and for some distance inland. The strength of these southerly winds, 
as judged by the wind velocity, is greater in the hot- weather months, 
when very little rain is brought up by them, than it is in the actual 
soutli-west monsoon season, when, as is well-known, extremely heavy 
rain is brought up by the southerly current. It has been surmised that 
the southerly winds of the hot- weather months are confined to a shallow 
belt near the eartli's surface and do not extend to considerable altitudes 
like the south-west monsoon current, and hence, though strong on the 
surface of the land, they do not penetrate far into the interior of the 
province of Bengal. 

" On the first occasion when Mr. Spencer ascended in his balloon, on 
19th March 1889, from the Calcutta Maidan, there was a moderate south 
south-westei'ly wind blowing near the surface. The balloon was at first 
carried rapidly towards the north-north-east, slowly rising also in its 
course. When the balloon, so far as could be judged, was about 1,500 to 
2,000 feet high, it ceased to have any northerly movement, and shortly 
afterwards drifted very rapidly in a south-easterly direction, proving 
clearly that there was a strong north-westerly wind-current blowing 
only a short distance above the earth's surface, say at an altitude of 
2,000 to 2,500 feet, notwithstanding the strong southerly current blowing 
below it. 

The second balloon ascent was made by Mr. Spencer accompanied by 
Lieut. H. J. Coninghani, who very kindly consented to take a series of 
meteorological observations which will be published in the Report of 
the Meteorology of India for 1883. Mr. Coningham writes in connec- 
tion with the direction of winds experienced in this ascent as follows : — 

" The balloon started with an almost direct southerly wind (i. e., 
south to north), and continued in this direction until an altitude of 
about 3,500 feet was reached, when there was a tendency for the balloon 
to go towards the south-south-east, and above this height there was 
a north-north-westerly wind blowing ; but on coming near the earth 
again (about 2,800 feet), the balloon took a north-westerly course, 



1800.] Address. 95 

showing that the wind was from south-east, until it reached eavth at 
6*5 p. M., a few miles to the east of Baraset." 

" This would appear to shew that in the middle of April the souther- 
ly current was deeper than in the middle of March by about 1,000 feet, 
and that in April its depth is at least 3,000 feet. 

" It is clear, therefore, that a series of balloon ascents, during which 
proper meteorological observations were made, would yield most valuable 
results in extending our knowledge of the air-currents in India." 

Two papers by Mr. S. A. Hill, Meteorological Reporter to the 
Government of the N.-W. P., have been published in our Journal since 
my last address. In one of them he gives a number of observations 
with a Regnault's psychrometer and draws from them the practical 
conclusion that Regnault's modification of August's pSychrometric 
formula is not likely to be improved upon, and that if we want the diy 
and wet bulb thermometers to indicate the humidity correctly at times 
when there is no wind, they ought to be ventilated artificially at the 
time of observing. The other paper, on the Tornadoes and Hail- 
storms of April and May 1888, iu the Doab and Rohilkhand, was 
noticed in last year's Address. 

At the December meeting, an interesting paper was presented by 
Mr. J. Eliot on the occasional inversion of the tempei'ature relations 
between the hills and plains of the Northern India. The paper deals 
with a peculiar feature of the minimum cold-weather night-temperature 
in Northern India, which is often higher in the hill-stations than it is in 
the plains below. The occui'rence of the phenomena and its causes ai'e 
fully entered into by Mr. Eliot. It may briefly be said that a flow of 
cold air from the hills to the plains after sunset causes a corresponding 
displacement of warm air towards the hills. 

Part VI, Vol. IV of the Indian Meteorological Memoirs, is devoted 
to a very interesting and suggestive paper by Mr. S. A. Hill, on tem- 
perature and humidity observations made at Allahabad at various 
heights above the ground. The principal point proved confirmed the 
results given in Mr. H, F. Blanford's paper on the temperature at different 
heights above the ground at Alipore, among which was the very curious 
fact that for some distance above the ground, the mean temperature of the 
air increases on ascending instead of decreasing, as it should do under 
the ordinary course of events. At Allahabad on the average of the 
whole year, the temperature increases up to about 155 feet from the 
ground, and the increase amounts to about 1'5° F. 

The third chapter of the revised edition of Dr. Loomis' Contri- 
butions to Meteorology is devoted to a consideration of the mean annual 
Rainfall for different countric.'; of the globe, and of the conditions 



96 Address. [Feb. 

favourable and unfavourable for rainfall. Attached are several excel- 
lent maps showing the mean annual rainfall of the whole world and of 
various countries. The rainfall of India and contiguous countries is 
fully considered, and tables of rainfall at Cherra Punji, the Khasi 
Hills and at mountain stations are given. 

An elaborate atlas of twenty-two charts, containing the results of 
observations in the Indian Ocean for the months of December, January 
and Febi'uary, published by the Royal Meteorological Institute at 
Utrecht, is noticed in Nature. No less than 51,199 observations have 
been used in the construction of the wind-chart for December. The 
atlas includes charts of temperature, currents, atmospheric pressure, 
speciiic gravity, rain, and percentages of storms. 

Chemistry. 

Considering the enormous and almost unworked field for chemical 
research that lies open in India, it is remarkable that so attractive a 
science should find so few votaries in this country, so far, at any rate, as 
may be judged by the paucity of published papers. The idea that a 
quantity of delicate and expensive apparatus is required, no doubt 
deters many, and the pursuit is not as yet a sufficiently remunerative 
one to tempt the chemical students of our Colleges to take it up as a pro- 
fession. One cannot, however, help contrasting the slow progress in 
practical science made in this country with the rapid advances made 
in Japan, and especially in applied chemistry. 

The only chemical paper in our Journal is by Mr. A. Pedler — on 
the Volatility of some of the compounds of Mercury and of the metal 
itself. In it he notices a case of slow distillation of mercury in the 
tube of a barometer at Buxar (Behar), and points out that with instru- 
ments of this kind, on the Kew principle, the sublimation of the mer- 
cury would entirely vitiate the accuracy of the reading. He also de- 
scribes the results of experiments on various mercuric compounds and 
on the mercurous chloi-ide. He found that mercuric chloride is very 
decidedly volatile at ordinary air temperatui'es, but the volatility is in- 
creased by the direct action of light. The paper concludes with a word 
of warning against the indiscriminate use of corrosive sublimate for pre- 
serving books and for other similar insecticide and preservative purposes. 

From Dr. G. King's last report on the Government Cinchona 
Plantations in Sikkim, we learn that the new oil-process for making 
sulphate of quinine, referred to in my last address, was in use throughout 
the year 1888-89, and no less than 2,191 lbs of that drug were pre- 
pared by it. Arrangeraents have also been made for its application 
to the manufacture of cinchona febrifuge. The new process is found 



1890.] A,hlre)is. 97 

•lo work perfectly; the bark is exhausteJ of tlie wliole of its alkaloid ; 
and the quinine produced is professionally reported to be as pure 
in quality and as satisfactory in appearance as quinine of the best 
European brands. The report contains an interesting note on the 
process by Mr. C. H, Wood, formei-ly Government Quinologist, to whom 
the original conception of it is due. 

Pure sulphate of quinine is also manufactured at the Nadavatara 
Cinchona Plantation in the Nilgiris, by the same process. 

The Monatsh. (77ie)?t. contains papers on the constitution of the Cin- 
chona alkaloids by Z. H. Skraup., H. Schniderschitsch, and J. Wiirstl. 

In the Gomptes Benclus, Mons. E. Landrin descx-ibes his method of^ 
analysis of Cinchonas and ascertaining the solubility of their active 
principles in water, alcohol, and dilute hydrochloric acid. 

Mr. David Hooper has published in the Chemical News, further notes 
on the chemistry of Gymnecic acid, the active principle obtained from the 
leaves of the Gymnema sylvestre, which has the peculiar property of 
destroying the power of the tongue to appreciate sweet substances. He 
gives it the empirical formula Cg^H.^s^n- ^^^^ same acid is con- 
tained in other species of Gymnema ; G. Jiirsnta contains a considerable 
quantity and G. montana a smaller proportion. 

Mr. John Tsawoo White, of Rangoon, has published in the same 
Journal papers on the estimation of Tea Tannin and on an analysis 
of Indigo-stem ash." 

The Proceedings of the Royal Society contain a valuable investiga- 
tion, by Drs. Sydney Martin and R. N. Wolfenden, into the physiolo- 
gical action of the active principle of the seeds of Ahrus precatorius 
(Jequirity) ; also a paper by Dr. Martin on the toxic action of the 
albumose from the same seeds. 

The authors of the first paper find that the globulin of the seeds 
of Ahrus has the same physiological action as the watery extract of the 
seeds, and as the proteid body ' Abrin ' described by Drs. Warden and 
Waddell. Its poisonous action is completely destroyed by momentarily 
heating a solution to a temperature of 75° or 80° C, at which the glo- 
bulin coagulates. 

The first author concludes that the Abrus poison is of the nature 
■ of a fei'ment attached to the proteids globulin and albumose. 

That the proteids develope by contact with living tissue a body or 
bodies which are poisonous. The poisonous activity of the seeds re- 
sides in the two proteids, a paraglobulin, and an albumose. Warden and 
Waddell's " Abrin" being a mixture of both. 

Both of these proteids have practically the same toxic action on the 
human economy, and their activity is destroyed by moist heat. In 



98 Adaress. [Feb. 

solution the activity of the globulin is destroyed between 75° and 80° 
C, and of the albumose between 80° and 85° C. Abrus poison resem- 
bles snake-poison in the local lesions, in producing a fall of body-tem- 
peratnre, fluidity of the blood and in the effect of heat upon it, but it 
is less active. 

Messrs. K. Hazura and A. Griissner, have examined castor-oil and 
have found (ZeitscJirift fiir angetvandte Chemie) that this oil is not a 
single compound, as hitherto supposed, but a mixture of two isomeric 
acids of the composition C^g Hg^ O3, one of which, ricinoleic acid, 
yields on oxidation trioxystearic acid, whilst the other, ricinis oleic acid, 
is a trioxystearic acid. The proportion of these acids is about one 
of the formei" to two of the latter. As no dioxystearic acid has been ob- 
tained from the oxidation of the liquid acids of castor-oil, it may be 
concluded that of all the fatty oils hitherto examined, castor-oil is the 
only one which contains no oleine. 

Messrs. Benedikt, Ehrlich and XJlzer, in the same journal, shew 
that lac is a substance of the nature of the fats, and by successive 
oxidations with permanganate is converted almost entirely into azelaic 
acid and certain inferior fatty acids. 

Herr Stillmark has investigated the poisonous principle in castor- 
oil seeds (Arbeit, d. pharmakol. List. Dorpat.) and comes to the con- 
clusion that it is an albumenoid body, identical with " ^-phytalbumose," 
separated from the dried juice of the Carica papaya by Dr. Sidney 
Martin and belonging to the class of unform.ed ferments. This sub- 
stance, which has been termed ' ricin,' is intensely poisonous and exer- 
cises a remarkable power of coagulation of the blood. Experiments were 
made with seeds of nine other species of Ricimis as well as with those of 
Croton tigluim and Jatropha curus and in each case similar poisonous 
albumenoid substances were obtained. 

In the Archives des Sciences Physiques et Nattirelles, Mons. M. C. 
Grasbe has published an account of his examination of Indian yellow 
(piuri or puri-ee of this country). From a memorandum drawn up, 
after personal inspection and enquiry, by Babu T. 'N. Mukharji, the 
present Assistant- Curator of the Economic Section of the Indian Museum, 
quoted by the author, it appears that this substance is obtained from the 
urine of cows fed on mangoes, and one of the principal seats of the 
manufacture is Monghyr. As is already well known, the colouring 
principle of this dye is a compound of euxanthinic acid with magnesium, 
with some free euxanthone, and several experiments had been made 
without success to prepare euxanthone by synthesis. The author has, 
however, by means of a combination of hydroquinone and resorcin suc- 
ceeded in obtaining an artificial euxanthone, in every respect identical 
with that obtained from Indian yellow. 



1890.] Address. 99 

The Journal of the Society of Ghemical Industry contains an interest- 
ing account of the Opium industry in the N.-W. Provinces and Oudh, by 
Dr. P. A. Weir. 

In the Zeitsclirift fur angeioandte Gliemie M. Honig gives a method 
for the determination of indigotin in commercial indigo, based on the 
fact that aniline and nitro-benzeue in a boiling state are moderate 
solvents for indigotin, the whole of which under certain conditions may 
be completely dissolved and crystallised out. 

Messrs. J. Bertram and E. Gildemeister have investigated (Journ. 
Prakt. Chemie), betel-oil obtained from the dried leaves of Piper 
hetle and found an entirely different phenol from the Ghavicol obtained 
by Eykman from the fresh leaves. This phenol the authors call Betel 
phenol. They have also prepared other derivatives. 

In the Ghem. Berichte, E. Jahns has published an investigation of 
the alkaloids of the Areca nut. 

Anthropology and Ethnology. 

So far as can be judged from the publications, anthropological 
science has not made much way in India during the year. The re- 
sults of the valuable work done by Mr. H. H. Risley, in Bengal, which 
we hoped to have seen published during the year, have not yet appeared. 

In our own Jotirnal or Proceedings, there are but few papers of 
anthropological or ethnographical interest. In Part II, N'o. 2, Mr. 
Wood-Mason has described a neo-lithic celt found near the village of 
Bagicha, near Jashpur, in the Chota-l!fagpore District. Papers on the 
Savaras and on the Pohiras of the Lohardugga District, by Mr. W. H. P. 
Driver, were read at the November and December meetings and will 
be published in the Joiirnal. 

The Journal of the Anthropological Society of Bombay, contains 
several interesting papers, among which may be cited : — A Note on 
Anthropology in India, by Mr. H. H. Risley, C. S., in which he points 
out the lines on which organised anthropological observations in India 
should run. On Pitars or Tanks, by Mr. K. Ragunathji. Mr. E, 
Rehatsek continues his Statistics of Suicides in Bombay, and Mr. J. de 
Cunha has a note on the same subject. Mr. Kedarnath Basu gives a col- 
lection of 232 superstitions in Bengal. Purushotam Balkhrishna Joshi 
describes the Gondhalis, a class of Maratha bards, and their special 
dance, the gondhal, performed in honour of the goddess Amba Bhavani. 
Dr. J. G. de Cunha contributes an interesting paper on Amulets. 
Surgeon Major K. R. Kirtikar gives an account of the ceremonies ob- 
served among Hindus during pregnancy and parturition. Lt.-Col. 
Gunthorpe's note on the Bhande Kumars contains some interesting in- 



100 AJdress. [Feb, 

formation about tliis wandeinng tribe of potters wlio originally came from 
Guzerat. Mr. F Fawcett describes a curious custom obtaining among the 
Berulu Kodos, a subsect of the Morasu Vokaligaru, of the Mysore Pro- 
vince, consisting in a symbolical deformation of the right hands of women, 
in place of the actual amputation of the last phalanges of the third and 
fourth fingers of the right hand, formerly in vogue, of which and the 
attendant ceremonies, a full account is given. Until this ceremony has 
been performed the women are not considered marriageable. The same 
author contributes a paper on a mode of obsession, which deals with the 
belief in a part of Bangalore, in the possession of women by the spirits 
of drowned persons, and another on a custom followed by the Mysore 
" Gollavalu," shepherd-caste people, of absolutely isolating a parturient 
woman in a hut by herself for three months. Babu. Kedarnath Basu gives 
an account of the minor Vaishnava sects of Bengal. Mr. H. A. Acworth, 
B. C. S., has recently read a paper on the worship of the Tulsi plant, 
Ocymum sanctum, the sacred basil. 

The Indian Antiquary contains papei^s on Folklore in Southern and 
Western India and Burma, already referred to ; also notes on social 
CListoms connected with Pregnancy in Bombay ; Death, in Bombay and 
Kashmir, and with Parturition in Madras. 

The Taprohanian contains a paper, by Mr. H. Nevill, on Sinhalese 
Folklore, Nursery rhymes and sayings. 

In the Journal of the Anthropological Institute Mr. Arthur Thomson 
has a valuable paper on the osteology of the Veddahs of Ceylon, tending 
to show that if the Veddahs be not of the same stock as the so-called 
aborigines of Southern India, they, at least, present very strong points of 
resemblance, both as regards stature, proportion of limbs, cranial capa- 
city and form of skull. If physical features alone be taken into account, 
their affinities with the hill-tribes of the Nilgiris and the natives of the 
Coromandel Coast and of the country near Cape Comorin are fairly well 
established. Mr. E. H. Man gives a brief account of the Nicobar Is- 
landers and their inhabitants, with evidence for their affinity to the 
Malays and Burmese. The paper is illustrated with plates. In another 
very interesting paper, Mr. Man describes the funeral rites and cere- 
monies of these islanders. 

Sir Lepel Griffin has given an account of the Bhils of Central India 
in the Asiatic Quarterly Review. 

The Revue d' Anthropologie contains the continuation of an interest- 
ing paper, by Dr. Seeland, on Kashgaria and the Passes of the 
Tian Shan, in which he shows that the ethnic type of the Kash- 
garians is clearly that of a deteriorated mixed race, in which the original 
Aryan or Turkish character has been nearly obliterated by repeated 
admixture with different Mongol races. 



1890.] Address. 101 

In the MittTiellungen der AnthropologiscJien Gesellschaft in Wien, in a 
paper entitled " Ueber tulapurusha der Inder ", Dr. M. Haberlandt 
discusses the practice of Tulpurusha, Tulddhdna or Tuldbhara, or weigh- 
ment of royal personages or notabilities against precious metals, or other 
commodities, for purposes of alms-giving or atonement in cases of sick- 
ness &c., formerly and even recently practised in India, both by Hindus 
and Muhammadans, as well as in other countries. 

The Revue Scientifique contains an interesting account of the Siah 
Posh Kafirs and other inhabitants of Chitral, by Mons. G. Capus, in a 
paper " Les Kafirs et le Kafiristan." 

In a paper on the Sonthals of N. E. Bengal, published by Dr. S. 
Kneeland in the Bulletin of the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., he brino-s 
forward evidence pointing to the pro-Malay origin of these tribes. 

Professor Dr. Aurel von Toiok, has described, in the Internationale 
Monatschrift fiir Anatomie und Physiologie, a new universal Craniophor, or 
machine for measuring skulls, by the aid of which accurate drawino-g 
of different sections of the skull can be laid down on paper. 

In Mr. Holt S. Hallett's recent work on Burma and Siam, already 
noticed, he has given a most interesting account of the races found in 
Indo-China. The aborigines of Lower Indo-China appear to have been 
Negritos, probably akin to those of the Andaman Islands, and the hills 
of the Malay Peninsula. Other dwarf races of Negrito origin were met 
with, belonging to the tribes about Luang Prabang. The Ban Lawa 
tribes of the Shan States, the Mon race of Lower Burma, and the Chams 
or Cambodians are mongoloid tribes of a race with Malaysian affinities. 
This Mon race is represented in Western Bengal and Central India by 
Kolarian tribes. 

Although beyond the limits, I have necessarily confined myself to, 
it seems desirable to mention a very elaborate work presented to the 
Society by the author, Signor Elio Modigliani, entitled " Un viaggio a 
Nias." Nias is an island of some size, lying to the south of Sumatra and 
the work is an account of the author's travels and scientific exploration. 
He seems to have paid particular attention to the people of the country 
and discusses fully their social constitution, the social and domestic 
position of women, their arts and industries, agriculture and commerce 
. their superstitions and religious beliefs and language. The work is 
copiously illustrated with collotype plates of the people and their dwell- 
ings and with wood-cuts of their clothing, weapons, domestic utensils 
&c. Vocabularies in Italian and Nias are also given. Judo-ino" from 
the photographs the inhab itants seem to be of the Malay type, resem- 
bling the Nicobarese, but their costumes are much more elaborate 
The Zoology of the Island is also discussed and coloured plates are given 
of birds and other fauna. 



102 Address. [Feb". 

Zoology. 

Dui'ing the year unusually large and interesting additions have 
been made to our knowledge of the Zoology of the Indian, Oriental 
and Central Asian regions. 

In Indian Zoology, the principal event of the year has been the pub- 
lication of three volumes of the Fauna of British hidia, Geylon and 
Burmah, edited by Mr. W. T. Blanford, of which the commencement was 
referred to in last year's address. The new volumes are : — The first 
volume of ' Birds,' by Mr. E. W. Oates, and two volumes completing the 
"Fishes," by the late Dr. F. Day. 

The Marine Survey Department, under Comiiaander Carpenter, R. N"., 
has acain, by the dredging operations carried out on board the " In- 
vestigator " by Dr. Alcock, added greatly to our knowledge of the Marine 
fauna of the Indian Seas. Papers on this subject have been contributed 
by Mr. Alcock to our Journal and others have appeared in the Annals 
and Magazine of Natural History. 

An account of the Zoology of the Afghan Delimitation Commission, 
by Dr. J. E. T. Aitchison, has been published as Part 3, Vol. V, of the 
Transactions of the Linnean Society (Zoology), and is illustrated with two 
maps and nine plates. The collections have been worked out by various 
zoologists, as noted hereafter under the different heads. 

It is satisfactory to learn that the zoological results of Col. Prje- 
valsky's travels in Central Asia are being worked out and published. Of 
the "Mammals," under charge of Dr. Buchner, which forms the first 
volume, three parts have already been published, and Mr. S. Herzenstein 
has boo'un the publication of the " Fishes," which will foi*m the second 
part of the third volume. The " Birds " have been entrusted to Hevr 
Theodor Pleske. Russian scientific exploring parties have been busily 
eno-aged in continuing the zoological investigations commenced by 
Prievalsky in Central Asia and it is to be hoped that some results of 
their labours will soon be forthcoming. 

The collections made in Transcaspia by Drs. Walter and Radde are 
also being woi'ked out and many papers on them have been published. 

Mammals. — Mr. W. L. Sciater has described in our Journal the 
head of a stag allied to Cervtis dybowshii, purchased in the Dai*jiling 
Bazar; and if, as seems probable, it came from Tibet it shows that 
this animal has a very extensive range from Tibet to Ussuri. He 
has also contributed a paper to our Proceedings, on a small collec- 
tion of Mammals from Shahpur, in the Punjab. Several specimens 
of the somewhat rai'e bat, described by Dobson as ScotojyJiilus jxillidus, 
were contained in the collection. 



1890.] AJJress. 103 

In the Journal of the Natural History Society of Bombay, a paper ou 
Mau-eating Tigers, by Mr. R. Gilbert, and a continuation of Mr. J. H. 
Steel's papers on the Camel may be noticed. 

In the Proceedings of tlie Zoological Society of London, Mr. Oldfield 
Thomas has described anew species of Mantjac (Gervulus feoi), obtained 
by Mr. Fea, the collector of the Genoa Civic Museum on Mt. Mulait, in 
Teuasserim. Mr. Thomas has also published some preliminary notes on 
the characters and synonymy of the different species of otter, a subject 
which has hitherto been in great confusion. Messrs. Beddard and 
Treves contribute to the same Journal a valuable illustrated paper on 
the anatomy of Rhinoceros sumatrensis. 

In the Annals and Magazine of Natitral History Fr. Sav. Montcelli 
proposes a modification of the synopsis of the species of the genus 
Taphozous in accordance with the size of the feet instead of the greater 
or less development of the radio- metacarpal pouch, as proposed by 
Dobson. 

Mr. P. S. Hutchinson has published, in the Zoologist, a paper on 
the suborbital pits of the Indian Antelope. 

The Mammals collected by Dr. Aitchison with the Afghan Delimi- 
tation Commission have been described by Mr. Oldfield Thomas, in the 
Transactions of the Linnean Society, and comprise 16 species, belong- 
ing to 13 genera, the most interesting of which is Eilobius fuscicapillus, 
the original specimens of which were obtained many years ago near 
Quetta. The geographical range of Felis tigris in Afghanistan is ex- 
tended, as far east and north as Bala Murghab, and that of the hunting 
leopard {Felis jubata) to the valley of the Hari Rud, while the Egyptian 
Fox (Vulpes famelica) was obtained, as far north and east as Kushk-Rud 
and Kin in the basin of the Harut River. 

Dr. J. Anderson gives an account in the Journal of the Linnean 
Society, of the Mammals collected by him in the Mergui Archipelago. 
Twenty-three species belonging to nineteen genera are enumerated in 
this paper. With the exception of two bats, Emhallonura semicaudata 
and Pteropus edulis, which are new to the Malayan Peninsula, and 
Rhizomys erythrogenys, they are all well-known forms on the neighbouring 
mainland. 

Mr. E. Buchner, the Dii'ector of the Zoological Museum at St. Peters- 
burgh, has begun the publication of the zoological results of the travels 
of Col. Prjevalsky. The work is admirably illustrated by the muni- 
ficence of the Grand-Duke Nicolai Alexandrowitz, and will give a 
complete description of the large collections made in Central Asia. The 
first part contains descriptions of the Rodents, which all present the pale 
buff or drab colour of the pelage, common to mammals and birds inhabit- 
ing sandy deserts. 



104 Address. [Feb. 

In the Zoologische Jahrbilcher, Dr. S. Radde and Dr. A. Walter give 
an elaborate account of the Mammals of the Transcaspian region. Sixty 
species, referable to thirty-seven genera, are comprised in the list ; 
notes are added on the domesticated mammals of the region, and the 
Mammal fauna of the country is compared with the species of Mammals 
recorded from Persia, Afghanistan, North-West Kashmir, and 
Turkestan. 

Birds. — The publications treating of this popular branch of Zoology 
which have appeared during the year are more than usually numerous 
and important. Of general works on Ornithology, the first that claims 
notice is the first volume (556 pages) of Mr. Eugene W. Oates' " Birds" 
in the "Fauna of British India," edited by Mr. W. T. Blanford. In 
this portion of the work a concise description, brief sj'uonymy and notes 
on habits and distribution of 556 species of birds are given. The classi- 
fication adopted by Mr. Oates is wholly in accordance with the latest 
researches on the anatomy of birds, and is a great improvement on the 
one adopted by Dr. Jerdon in his well-known work. Mi*. Oates begins 
with the Passeres and gives very useful keys to the families, sub-families, 
genera, and species treated of; some essential notes on anatomy precede 
the detailed descriptions, and the work is throughout excellently illus- 
trated by wood-cuts mainly illustrating the heads of the typical species, 
but occasionally full-view pictures of species of the principal groups are 
sriven. The limit to the number and size of the volumes allowed, to Mr. 

o 

Oates has obliged him to give only brief notes on the habits and folklore 
of the diiferent species of Indian birds, but this is decidedly the section 
in which compression was most allowable. On the whole Mr. Oates 
must be congratulated on having produced such a satisfactory x-esume of 
the mass of information accumulated about Indian birds since the pub- 
lication of Dr. Jerdon's work. 

Mr. Oates has also published the first volume of a revised edition 
of Mr. A. 0. Hume's " Nests and Eggs of Indian Birds." This is a 
volume of 397 pages, illustrated with four excellent portraits of famous 
Indian ornithologists, namely Mr. A. O. Hume, Dr. Jerdon, Mr. Brian 
Hodgson, and Col. Tickell. The work is mainly a reprint of the original 
edition, greatly enriched by many notes on nests and eggs which had 
become available since the original publication. The classification and 
numbering of the species is precisely the same as in Mr. Oates' general 
work noticed above, so that the information here supplied to ornitholo- 
gists admirably supplements the information given in the " Fauna of 
India " series. When the three volumes of description and the like 
number treating of nests and eggs are completed, we shall have in 
moderate compass a source of information on the birds of the Indian 



1890.] ■ .'^/J;v,s^«. 105 

Empire probably unrivalled by that in existence for any other portion 
of the world of similar extent. 

Mr Hume has published another volume of his " Stray Feathers," 
containing his long-looked-for accou.nt of the birds of Manipur and 
Assam : a completion of this important memoir is promised in the last 
part that will ever appear of " Stray Feathers." 

Mr. Menzbier has commenced the publication of a woi'k entitled 
" Ornithologie du Turkestan," which is expected to extend to six quarto 
volumes illustrated by 90 coloured plates. The notes and descriptions 
in this work are mainly founded on material accumulated by the late 
N. A. Severtzoff. 

Mr. Seehohm has published a handsomely illustrated quarto work 
on the Family Charadridce, which is characterized by that author's 
original treatment of his subject, and which necessarily notices many 
Plovers, Sandpipers and Snipes of interest to Indian Ornithologists. 

Mr. F. H. Waterhouse has published " a list of the Genei-aof Birds " 
which cannot fail to be of great assistance to every one w^orking at Or- 
nithology, and the third part of the second volume of the " Avifauna of 
India," by Mr. J. A. Murray, has appeared during the course of the year. 
The Ibis has, as usual, a large number of articles bearing more or 
less directly upon Asiatic Ornithology. Mr. Dresser gives notes on 
the birds of the Transcaspian region, collected by Dr. G. Radde, and de- 
scribes a new Shrike comprised in the collection, under the name of 
Lanins Raddei. Mr. Ogilvie Grant contributes two papers dealing with 
revisions of the genera Flatalea, or Spoonbills, and Turnix, or Bustard- 
quails. Col. Sir 0. St. John publishes a paper on the Birds of Southern 
Afghanistan and Kelat, in which he enumerates 237 species observed 
by him in the Afghan Province of Kandahar and the Bi'itish Provinces 
of Pishin and Thai Chotiali, with Quetta and Kelat proper. In conti- 
nuation of his notes on the Woodpeckers, Mr. E. Hargitt describes 
a new species, Ghrysophlegma humii, from Malacca and Salangore. 
Mr. Gates gives a note on the European Cuckoo and its Indian allies, 
and points out how they may be most certainly discriminated. Mr. 
Seebohm continues his important studies on the classification of birds, 
and deals with the Ardeino-anserine and Pico-passerine groups of birds. 
He also famishes a list of the birds of the Bonin Islands. Messrs. Sharpe 
and Whitehead have published five parts of a valuable contribution 
to the Ornithology of Northern Borneo, with illustrations of new species 
described by Mr. Sharpe. Mr. Whitehead also gives a paper on the 
birds of Palawan. 

In the Tramactions of the Linnean Sociehj, the Birds of the Afghan 
Boundary Commis.sion are enumerated by Mr. Sharpe. Only three 



j iK> A duress. [ F B B. 

species are described as new, and these ai-e figured. They are, a 
Woodpecker, (Gecinus gforii, Hargitt) ; a Sparrow (Passer yatii, Sharpe) ; 
and a Pheasant (Phasiaiius principalis, Sc\?iter). 123 species belonging 
to 82 genera are catalogued, the birds observed being, with few excep- 
tions, migratory. 

In the Proceedings of the Zoological Society, Mr. Seebohm com- 
inunicates a note by Herr Theodor Pleske on examples of Phasianus 
shawi, collected by Prjevalsky in the valley of the Tarim river, and on 
an example of a new species of Pheasant from Lob-Nor. 

In the Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society, Lieut. H. E. 
Barnes publishes four papers on " Nesting in Western India " illustrated 
•with coloured plates. Mr, Newham furnishes notes on the Birds of 
Quetta, and Mr. J. 0. Anderson contributes ornithological matter in his 
*' Sporting rambles about Simla." 

Mr, H. Nevill gives notes on Scops sunia, Hodgson, and Scops 
minutus, Legge, in the third volume of the " Taprobanian." 

Turning now to foreign sources, we have to notice Herr Theodor 
Pleske's revision of the Avifauna of Turkestan, published in the Memoires 
de V Academic Imperiale de St. Petersburg. According to this memoir 
the known species of birds found in Russian Turkestan amounts to 419. 
The first part of an illustrated quarto work by the same author, entitled 
" Ornithographica Rossica ", has appeared and it contains plates of three 
species of birds found in India, 

In " Ornis " Drs, Radde and Walter publish an important contri- 
bution to Palaearctic Ornithology entitled " Die Vogels Trans-Caspiens." 
A few species of birds from Northern India are included in the list of 
297 species enumerated, and almost the on\j noxelty is Lanius raddei 
already alluded to, as having been described by Mr. Dresser in the Phis. 

Reptiles and Batrachians. — The Taprobanian contains notes by Mr. 
Haly, of the Colombo Museum, on new Ceylon Snakes, Dendrophis gregorii 
and Odontomus fergusonii. 

The Reptiles and Batrachians collected by Dr, Aitchison with the 
Afghan Delimitation Commission are described, by Mr. G, A, Boulenger, 
in the Transactions of the Linnean Society of London, and comprise 35 
species, including a Tortoise, 21 species of Lizards, of which three are 
new, and 13 species of Ophidians of which one is new. Among the 
latter there are fine specimens of the little-known Naia oxiana, hereto- 
fore only recognised from young and undeveloped specimens. Of 
Batrachia, there are two species — Rana esculenta and Bufo viridis. 

The Reptiles and Batrachians collected by Dr. J. Anderson, F.R.S., 
in the Mergai Archipelago have been described by him, in the Journal 
of the Linnean Society, and comprise 53 species of Reptilia and 12 of 



1890.] Address. 107 

Batrachia. The occurrence of Crocodilus porosns in the neighbourhood of 
almost all the islands is noted. Of the snakes, Tropidonotiis clirysargus, 
from Elphinstone Island, and Dipsas carinata, from Sullivan Island, are 
apparently new to the Tenasserim Province. Twenty specimens of 
Bana dorice, recently described by Boulenger from North Tenasserim, 
were found on the Islands, and it is probably widely distributed over 
the province of Tenasserim. 

The new edition of Mr. Boulenger's " Catalogue of the Chelonians, 
Rhynchocephalians and Crocodiles in the British Museum (N. H.)" is 
mainly devoted to the Chelonians and will be of great use to students of 
existing and fossil forms. 

Mr. Boulenger has also described, in the An7i. Mns. Civic, di Storia 
Naturale di Genova, the Beptilia obtained in Burma, north of Tenasserim, 
by Signer L. Fea, completing the lists of the herpetological collections. 
The new forms described are Simotes torquatus, from Bhamo ; S. plani- 
ceps, from Minhla; new genus Gyclophiops. — G. dorice, from the Kakhyen 
Hills ; Dendrophis subocidaris, from Bhamo ; Pareas andersonii, from 
Bhamo and the Kakhyien Hills A new genus Azemiops — A. fece, 
from the Kakhiea Hills, is very interesting, as its nearest ally is Dino- 
dipsas, a snake described by Peters from I'aerto Cabello, in Venezuela. 

In the Proceedings of the Zoological Society, the same author has 
published a paper on the species of Frogs confounded under the name 
of BhacopJiorits maculatus : he shows that several Ceylonese and Indian 
species have been included under that name and proposes to distinguish 
as species the three following forms of which the character, synonomy 
and distribution are given viz : — (1) Bhacophorus leucomystax, from 
China, the Himalayas, and Burmese countries ; (2) B. 7naculatus, from 
India and Ceylon and (.3) B. cruciger, confined to Ceylon. 

The British Museum Catalogue of Fossil Beptilia and Amphibia, 
Part II., Ichthyopterygia and Sauropterygia, by our former member Mr. 
R. Lydekker, contains several Indian and Asiatic forms, and is a valu- 
able addition to knowledge. Mr. Lydekker's paper in our Journal, on 
Chaibassia, has already been noticed. 

A very important and valuable paper is contributed by Surgeon 
L. H. Waddell, M. B., to the Scientific Memoirs of the Medical Officers of 
the Army in India, in which he gives the results of some most carefully 
conducted enquiries into the effect of cobra-poison hypodermically in- 
jected upon the snakes themselves from -which the poison had been 
extracted, and also upon other cobras and other kinds of innocent snakes. 
The experiments demonstrate unequivocally that the cobra is practically, 
if not wholly, insusceptible to the toxic action of its own venom, whether 
from the same snake or from another. 



108 A^hlrefif;. [Feb. 

Cobra-poison was injected in the same way into other venomous 
snakes (three specimens of two species of tree- vipers) with the effect 
that they all died within an liour ; and in 16 other trials of cobra-poison 
on innocent snakes and otliei'S on frogs, the result was uniformly fatal. 

Dr. Waddell also notes the results obtained by previous enquirers ; 
further discusses the cause of the immunity of snakes from their 
own poison and pats forwai-d the apparently well-founded hypothesis 
that it may be attributed to a toleration of the venom, established 
through frequent imbibition of small quantities of venom in the modi- 
fied or attenuated forms which it assumes when mixed with salivary and 
gastric juices and is absorbed thi'ough the alimentary canal. 

Dr. A. E. Feoktistow contributes to the Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St. 
Petersburg, a preliminary paper on the working of snake-poison on animal 
life. 

In the Bijdragen tot de Dierhunde of the Royal Zoological Society, 
Amsterdam, Dr. J. F. Van Bemmelen has given a full account of 
the anatomy of the throat-regions of the Saurian reptiles, crocodiles, 
tortoises and snakes. 

Fishes. — I have already adverted to the loss which Indian ichthyo- 
logical science has suffered in the death of our late member Mr. F. 
Day. Fortunately he had completed the MS. of the work on the 
Fishes of India, forming part of the series of volumes on the " Fauna 
of Bxntish India," now being brought out under the editorship of Mr. 
W. T. Blanford, and it has recently been published in two volumes. It 
is an abridgment of the author's larger work bearing the same title, 
with the additions and alterations published in the supplement to the 
latter and elsewhere, and is well illustrated with photographic reduc- 
tions from the plates of the larger work. It contains the characters of 
over 1,400 species of Fishes belonging to the Indian and Oriental 
region, comprising forms ranging from the Red Sea to the Pacific, be- 
sides a lai'ge number of Indian Fresh-water Fishes, and on this account, 
as well as its portable form, will be of great value to the student of 
Indian Ichthyology. 

The principal contributions to the knowledge of ladian Fishes 
during the year, have been from the pen of Mr. Alfred Alcock, the Sur- 
geon-Naturalist to the Marine Survey, who seems to be making a special 
study of the subject. He has contributed to our Journal, two papers on 
Fishes. In the first he gives a list of the shallow-water and deep-sea 
forms of Pleuronectidm, obtained from the commencement of the survey 
to date, containing the names of 29 species of which 11 appear to be 
new, 3 are rare and not previously recorded from Indian watei^s. In the 
second paper ten species representing 7 different families are described, 



1890.] Aildress. • 109 

of which seven are new, while the remaining three appear for the first 
time as Indian Fishes. With one exception they were obtained in 
depths ranging from 25 to 68 fathoms, generally at the deeper. 

Mr. Alcock's report on the natural history work of the ' Investiga- 
tor ' for season 1888-89, already alluded to, contains a list of 95 Fishes 
found on the Orissa coast, and some interesting information as to the 
localities in which certain fishes are found. He also gives preliminary 
notes on the Fishes taken off the Orissa coast which are believed to 
be new, and on the gestation of some Elasmobranch Fishes (Trygon 
bleekeri, Carcharias melanopterus, the black-finned shark, and Zygcena 
blochii, the long hammer-headed shark). He has contributed to our 
Journal a paper on the same subject, not yet published, containing 
some interesting and novel observations. 

In a paper published in the Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 
" on the Bathybial Fishes of the Bay of Bengal and neighbouring 
■waters, obtained during, the seasons 1885 to 1889," Mr. Alcock has 
given an account of the Hydrography of the Region and a jDreliminary 
list of all the Deep-sea Fishes that have been obtained to date by the 
Marine Survey, with descriptions of the new species. 

The ' Fishes ' of the Afghan Boundary Delimitation Commission, 
collected by Dr. Aitchison, have been described by Dr. Giinther in the 
Transactions of the Linnean Society, and comprise only seven species 
belonging to six genera, three of which prove to be new. The most 
intei-esting species, owing to its geographical distribution, is Schizo- 
thorax intermedins, first found by Grifiith in the Cabul River, and ao-ain 
by the second Yarkand Mission in the great eastern drainage of Eastern 
Turkestan at Yangi-Hissar. Dr. Aitchison's specimens were found in 
the tributaries of the Bala-Murghab River, which drain to the north 
and west towards the Caspian. The new species of this genus describ- 
ed by Dr. Giinther (8. rauUnsii), was collected in the Hari Rud and its 
tributaries only. 

In the Annals and Mag. Nat. Hist. Dr. Giinther has described a new 
fish of the characteristically Central Asiatic genus Biptychus from the 
Issik Kul. It was collected by Dr. Lansdell and has been named after him. 

Vol. Ill, part 2 of the " Scientific Results of Prjevalsky's Travels in 
Central Asia," containing the first part of the ' Fishes,' by S, Herzen- 
stein, has been published in Russian and German. It treats of the 
Gyprinidce, genus Nemachilus, v. Hass, and is illustrated with 8 plates 
containing well-executed drawings of many of the sjjecies described. 

The Taprobanian, Vol. Ill, contains a note by Mr. Haly, of the 
Colombo Museum, on Novacula pavo. 

A Catalogue of Fossil Fishes in the British Museum, Part I. Elas- 
mobrancliii, by H. S. Woodward, has appeared during the year. 



110 ' Address. [Feb. 

In the Proceedings of the Zoological Society is an account of some 
Fishes from Muscat, by Mi*. G. H. Boulenger. 

Mollusca. — The A7171. and Mag. of Nat. Hist, contains a description 
of a new genus of mollusca from the Indian ocean, parasitic upon an 
Echinus; also an account, by Col. H. H. Godwin- Austen, of a sup- 
posed new Helix from Tenasserim — Helix {^gista) mitanensis. Mr. 
E. A. Smith contributes some notes on the genus Lobiger, containing a 
synonymy of all the described species, and notes on the genus Melapitim. 

In the Proc. Zool. 80c. Lond. IV, 188S, Mr. G. B. Sowerby de- 
scribes 14 new species of shells, chiefly collected by Dr. Hungerford. 
Three species of Mitra, of which two (M. exquisita and M, hrionce) are 
new, were found at Port Blair, in the Andaman Islands. 

Vol. VIII, No. 13 of Martini and Chemnitz,' Systematisches Conchy- 
lien Cabinet contains descriptions of Chama fi'om the Red Sea and 
Indian Ocean. In the Journal of Conchology Mr. J. Cosmo Melvill 
has described a new shell, Goralliophila andamana, from the Andamans. 

In SpengeVs Zoologische Jahrbilcher, IV. 5, Dr. 0. Boettger has de- 
scribed the land and fresh-water shells collected by Drs. Radde and 
Walter in Russian Trans-Caspia and the neighbourhood of the Persian 
and Afghan Frontiers. 41 species of snails and 6 of bivalve shell-fish 
are described, of which 18 land and fresh- water snails were found only 
in N. Persia and not in Trans-Caspia. Among the remaining Trans- 
Caspian species only two tropical Asiatic forms were found. The 
author has carefully tabulated the distribution. 

Mr. W. Theobald has prepared an " Index of the Genera and 
Species of Mollusca in the Hand-list of the Indian Museum, Calcutta," 
which has been printed by the Trustees, and will be of great service to 
Indian conchologists. 

Entomology. — As usual, by far tlie greater propoi-tion of the zoolog- 
cal work of the year has reference to entomology. 

The work done in connection with the Indian Museum relating to 
this subject, has already been noticed. 

Our Journal contains several valuable entomological contributions. 
Mr. E. T. Atkinson describes a new species and genus of Coccid {Pseudo- 
pulvinaria sikkimensis) , found at Mungphu on an oak and chestnut 
trees. He also continues his notes on Indian Rhynchota, Heteroptera, 
and communicates a note by Mons. Lethierry giving descriptions of 
three new homopterons of the genus Idiocerus, found on mango-trees in 
the neighbourhood of Calcutta. His Catalogues of the Oriental Cicin- 
delidoi and Capsidce, published in the Supplement, already noticed, will 
be of great value to workers in this section. Mr. W. Doherty's notes 
on Assam Butterflies contain interesting remarks on seasonal dimor- 



1890.] Address. Ill 

phisra and breedi'ig, with descriptions of several new species, and ia 
another paper he gives a list of 105 species of Lijcamidce collected in 
Lower Teuasserim, with remarks on the classificatiou of tlie family. 
Mr. Wood-Mason's paper on the Ethiopian and Oriental rej^resentatives 
of the Mantodean sul3-family Vatidoi contains descriptions of some new 
genera and species from the Indian, Himalo and Malayan sub-regions of 
the Oriental Region. 

In the Joiornal of the Boinhay Natural History Society, Mr. L. de 
Niceville has described some new and little-known Butterflies from the 
Indian Region, with a revision of the genus Flesioneura of Felder and of 
authors. The paper is illustrated with two coloured plates. Mr. R. 0, 
Wroughton gives an interesting paper on Indian Hymenoptera. 

The Transactions of the Entomological Society of London contain a 
monograph of the genera of Micro-lepidoptera connecting Tincegeria, 
Wlk. with Eretmocera 7i., by Lord Walsingham. Two new Indian 
species, Snellenia coccinea, from Sikkim, and S. tarsella, from Darjiling, 
are described. Also a valuable paper by Mr. G. A. J. Rothney on 
Indian Ants, recording many new and interesting observations on dif- 
ferent kinds of ants, most of which are to be found in the neigh- 
bourhood of Calcutta. Mr. A. G. Butler's synonymic notes on the 
moths of the earlier genera of Noctuites, has reference to many Indian 
species. Mr. W. F. Kirby notices a few new Indian species of Scoliidoi 
in the collections of the British Museum, including Scolia imiviacidata, 
and S. tyriantJiiiia, from the Andamans ; Elis rudaba, from Chaman ; 
Campsomeris ceylonica, from Ceylon and Bombay. Mr. H. J. Elwes has 
a note on an undescrited Ghrysophanus from the Shan States, Upper 
Burma, which is remarkable on account of the low elevation and latitude 
at which it was found. Its nearest ally appears to be Polyoviviatus Li, 
Oberthur, from W. Szechuen, but no species of the genus is known in 
the Eastern Himalayas or anywhere in the Eastern tropics. Mr. Elwes 
also has a paper on a revision of the genus Argijnnis. Mr. G. T, Baker 
discusses the distribution of the Charlonia group of the genus Antho- 
cliaris, and Mr. L. de Niceville notes on a new genus of Lyccenida;, and 
on Bellas sanaca, Moore, a Western-Himalayan butterfly. Mr. C. J, 
Gahan describes some new or little-known species of Glenea, in the col- 
lections of the British Museum, among them several Indian and Burman 
species. In a note on Aulacophora and allied genera, Mr. J. S. Baly 
criticises Mons. Allard's synopsis of the group. 

In the Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, we find papers 
by the Rev. H. S. Gorham describing new species and a new Indian 
genus (Lycocerus) of Coleoptera of the family Telephoridoi from the 
Indian Museum collections, Tibet and Southern India, and by Mr. 



112 Address. [Feb. 

H. W. Bates on new species of the Coleopteroua family Carahidcc, from 
Kashmir and Baltistan. 

The Transactions of the Linnean Society contain descriptions of the 
Insects collected by Dr. Aitchison with the Afghan Boundary Commission. 
The Goleoptera are described by Mr. C. O Waterhouse, and comprise 
50 species, of which 12 are new. The Diptera, described by the same, 
include nine species of which four are undetermined. The Hymenoptera 
and Orthoptera are described by Mr. W. F. Kirby. Most of the former 
exhibit well marked African affinities, several being apparently identi- 
cal with Algerian insects ; 15 species are described, of which four are 
new, viz., Ammophila mandihulata, Stizus terminus, 8. tages and 
Grocisa hidentata, all from the Hari Riid Valley. The Orthoptera 
also belong principally to distinctly Mediterranean types and few 
exhibit affinities with the Indian fauna ; 18 species are described. A 
gall insect. Pemphigus cocciis, found by Dr. Aitchison on Pistachia vera 
is described and figured by Mr. G. B. Buckton. 

In the volume for 1888, Lord Walsingham has described a remark 
able new Indian Pyralid which he terms Gosnodomtis hochingii. 

The Journal of the same Society contains papers by Mr. J. S. Baly 
on new genera and species of Galerucince, also diagnostic notes on some 
of the older described species of Aulacophora. Most of the species 
referred to are from the Eastern Archipelago, but some are from India 
and the Andaman Islands. 

In the Annals and Magazine of Natural History, Mr. W. L. Distant 
continues his descriptions of new genera and species of Oriental Cica- 
didse, including Gceana atkinsoni, Dundubia amicta and D. emantura 
from Karwar. Mr. Wood-Mason contributes a monograph, illustrated 
with woodcuts, of Phyllothelys, a curious genus of Mantodea peculiar to 
the Oriental Region. 

In the Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, Mr. E. E. Green has 
described two new species of Lecanium from Ceylon — L. viride, one of 
the most destructive coffee-pests, and L. mangiferce, which attacks the 
leaves of the mango tree. Mr. W. L. Distant describes new species of 
Goreidce, mostly from the collections of the Indian Museum. 

The Mem. and Proc. Manchester Lit. and Phil. Society contains two 
papers by Mr. P. Cameron. One entitled " A decade of new Hymenop- 
tera,'' contains a notice of a new Indian species of Grahronida — Bhopalum 
Buddha, from Poona ; also a new species of Larrida from Ceylon, Pia- 
getia fasciatiipennis. The other " Hymenoptera Orientalis, or contribu- 
tions to the Hymenoptera of the Oriental Zoological Region," notices 29 
new species. 

The Notes from the Leyden Museum contain, as usual, several papei'S 



1890.] Address. 113 

of intei'est to Indian entomologists, chiefly by Mr. C. Ritsema, among 
them a description of a new species of the longicorn genus Zonojjteras, 
Hope, Z. consanguineus, from the Himalaya, resembling Z. Jlavitarsis. 
Also " On an overlooked East Indian species of the coleopterous genus 
Chelonarium, Fabr. of the family Byrrhidce.^^ The author shows that 
G. villosum was described by Macleay in 1825 as occurring in Java, while 
the genus is supposed to be peculiar to America. Mr. Ritsema also 
describes a new species of the longicorn genus Pachyteria, Serv., P. 
vandepolli, from Malacca, and gives preliminary descriptions of new 
species of the coleopterous genus Helota, Macleay. Four new Indian 
species are described from Darjiling, and a list is given of the 25 hitherto 
described species of the genus. Mr. W. L. Distant describes new 
Malayan Cicadidoi belonging to the Leyden Museum. There are also 
many notices of new zoological specimens from the Dutch East 
Indies. 

In the Tijdschriff voor Entomologie Mr. Ritsema has a paper entitled 
" Chronologische Naamlijst der beschreven soorten van de Cerambyciden 
genera Zono]jterus, Hope, Pachyteria, Serv. en Ajihrodisium, Thoms," 
including many species from India and the Oriental Region. 

The Bijdrageit. tot de Pierlcunde of the Zoological Society of Amster- 
dam contains a paper by Dr. J. T. Oudemans on Thysanura and Col- 
lembola. 

A paper by Dr. G. Horvath, in TermSsz Filzeteck, is a noteworthy 
contribution to the knowledge of the little-known Hemipterous fauna of 
the Himalayas and several new species are described. 

A very valuable monograph on Bees of the genus Evania, by A. 
Schletterer, appears in the Annalen des K. K. Naturhistorischeii Hof 
Museums in Wien, and has references to Indian and Oriental species. 

In the Verhandlungeyi der K. K. Zoologisch-hotanischen Gesellschaft 
in Wien, Messrs. Kohl and Handlirsch give descriptions of several 
genera of Transcaspian Hymenoptera from the neighbourhood of the 
Murghab, Amu Darya and Askabad. A. Rogenhofer, in a paper on Lepi- 
doptera from India and Ceylon, describes a sack-bearing caterpillar 
found in Ceylon, to which he gives the name Fumea ? limulus. 

The Wiener Entomologische Zeitung contains papers by Dr. G. Hor- 
vath, on the Hemiptera of Turcomania ; V. von Roder on a new Timia 
f. (T. pulohra) from Shahrud ; and Jos. Mik, on some Ulidime from the 
Tekke Turcomania. 

Dr. C. Fickert's paper, in SpengeVs Zoologische Jahrhiicher, " Ueber 
die zeichnungsverhaltnisse der Gattung Ornltlioptera " refers to several 
Indian and Asiatic siiecies. 

lu the Entomologische Nachrichten Herr Joh. Schmidt has described 



114 Address. [Feb. 

two new species of Hister (H. opticus and H. injirmus) from India or 
borders. Dr. F. Karscli describes new Aeschnidm of the Indo- Australian 
region. 

The De^itschen Entomologischen ZeUschrift contains several papers 
relating to the entomology of the Oriental region, among which may be 
cited — a description of a new species of Lucanus (L. gracilis) from 
Sikkim, and a pa^^er on the Lncanidce of Sumatra, by G. Albers. 

Central Asian entomology has been treated on in several papers in 
the Horce. Societatis Entomologiccs Hossicce. Among them, — A. Semenow's 
diagnoses of new (Joleoptera from Centi^al and Eastern Asia ; E. Konig's 
descriptions of the Elateridce collected by Prjevalsky in Central Asia ; 
descriptions of the Insects collected by Potanin in China and Mongolia 
by various authors ; also papers by B. E. Jokowleff on the Hemiptera, 
Heteroptera and by G. Mayr on the Forrnicidce from Tibet, collected by 
Prjevalsky. Mr, A. Wilkins proposes a method of preserving insect 
cases from the ravages of insects by stretching slips of India-rubber 
round the line of separation of the box and lid, so as to close it herme- 
tically. 

Mons. Ch. Kerreman's monographic essay on the genus Sternocera : 
Eschscholtz, presented to the Entomological Society of Brussels, contains 
descriptions of several Indian varieties, the Asiatic species being practi- 
cally confined to India. Several of the species described are from the 
Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

The Annali del Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Genova contains 
descriptions by various authors of the entomological collections made in 
Tenasserim and Burma by Signer L. Fea. Mr. J. S. Baly describes the 
Btspute, of which three-fourths prove to be new; Sig. K. Gestro, the 
Coleoptera, and he also gives an itinerary ; Mons. E. Ollivier, the Lam- 
pyridce, or glowworms, including a new species (Luciola hirticeps) ; Mons. 
A. do Bormans, the JDermaptera ; Mr. W. L. Distant, the Cicadidoe ; 
Mons. A. Leveille, the Trogositidce ; Mons. Regimbart, Dytiscidce and 
Oi/rinidce ; Mons. A. Grouvelle, the Cucujidce ; Mr. G. Lewis the His- 
teridce, among which a fine Flatijsoma (P. maculatum) is remarkable as 
the first maculate species of the genus discovered; Mons. E. Candeze 
describes the Elateridce. A very large proportion of all these insects 
are new to science, and the Genoa Museum is entitled to high credit for 
the enterprise and completeness with which this new field has been 
worked. 

In the Annales de la Societe Entomologique de France, Messrs. L. de 
Joannis and E. L. Ragonnot give descriptions of several new Indian and 
Oriental species and genera of Lepidoptcra. Professor G. Macloskie has 
given an account of the poison-apparatus of the Mosquito in the American 
Naturalist. 



1890.] Address. 115 

Mons. J. B. Gehin's '' Catalogue synonomique et systematique des 
Coleopteres de la tribu des Carahides," with plates by Ch. Haury, may 
be noticed, but it contains few Oriental species. 

As already noticed, the third volume of de Niceville's " Butterflies 
of India, Burma and Ceylon " has been published. It deals with the 
LyccenidoB and appears to be almost entirely the work of Mr. de Nice- 
ville himself. It consists of over 500 pages of closely printed matter 
in small type, and is illustrated by six plates, of which two are coloured. 
The work represents an immense amount of painstaking labour and 
will be a welcome aid to Indian entomologists. A fourth volume, 
dealing with the Papilionidce, is under preparation. 

Part VII of " Illustrations of Typical specimens of Lepidoptera 
Heterocera in the collection of the British Museum," by Mr. A. G. 
Butler, contains an account of a collection of Macro -LejDidoptera Hetei-o- 
cera made in the district of Kangra by the Rev. J. H. Hocking. The 
number of species amounts to upwards of 780, and a nominal list is given 
of them, as well as descriptions of new species. The work is illustrated 
with 18 coloured plates. 

The fifth volume of " Memoires sur les Lepidopteres," edited by 
N". M. RomanofE, has been published and contains a complete enumera- 
tion and descriptions, by S. Alpheraky, of the 27 species of Lepidoptera 
found in Tibet by Prjevalsky, in 1884-85, and of the Noctuelites of the 
Pamir, of which 150 are enumerated. 

Economic Entomology. — The good progress of the systematic inves- 
tigation of Indian insect-pests by Mr. E. C. Cotes, under the direction 
of the Trustees of the Indian Museum, and the esiablishment of the new 
*^ Indian Museum Notes, '^ have sdresidy been noticed. Two numbers of 
the Notes have been published. No. 1, " Notes on Indian Insect Pests " 
contains papers by Mr. E. T. Atkinson, on Bhyncliota, including the Rice- 
sapper; " chora poka," the larvae of insects inieshing 8esa7num, irom 
Balasore ; Greenbug ; Gapsidoe ; Jassidm ; Aphidae and Goccidce. Mr. 
De Niceville contributes papers on a butterfly injurious to rice and on a 
Ceylon Cardamom-pest. Mr. Cotes gives notes on a variety of pests 
borers and moths, and on insecticides. No. 2, contains a previously un- 
published paper, by the late Dr, E. Becher, on Trycolyga bombycis and 
Chalcis criculce, also several notes by Mr. Cotes on the Bengal silk-worm 
fly, Sal girder beetle, opium cut worm, coffee- scale and other pests. Mr. 
E. T. Atkinson contributes further notes on Ehynchota. 

The Keiv Bulletin, for 1889, contains a note on Beetles destructive 
to rice-crops in Burma. 

The Indian Forester contains an accoixnt of the experiments in Silk- 
rearing conducted at Berhampur under Mr. Nitya Gopal Mukharii 



116 Address. [Feb. 

M. A., and the author deals with the whole question of the different 
kinds of worms and their diseases. 

The Report of the Committee which was formed, in 1888, to inves- 
tigate the mango-weevil, has been published in the Journal of the Agri- 
Horticultural Sociehj of India. The Committee found no less than four 
insects, all belonging to widely different orders, which pass their larval 
existence, or part of it, in the mango. 

In the Bulletin de la Societe Zoologique de France, Dr. R. Blanchard 
discusses the cause and frequency of double cocoons in different races of 
the Bomhijx mori. 

Myriopoda. — The Myriopoda of the Mergui Archipelago, collected 
by Dr. J. Anderson for the Trustees of the Indian Museum, have been 
reported on by Mr. R. I. Pocock, in the Journal of the Linnean Society. 
The Chilopoda comprise one new specimen. The Biplopoda are of greater 
interest and all are figured : one new species of Glomeris ; two of 
Panidesmiis ; two of Spirostreptus, and one of Spiroholus are noted. 

Mr. Pocock has also described the Chilopoda of the Afghan Delimita- 
tion Commission, including two species, of which one — Scolopendra 
truncaticeps, is new. 

Araclmida. — Mr. E. W. Gates has conti'ibuted to our Journal a 
valuable paper on the species of Thelyphonus, or whip-scorpions, inhabit- 
ino- Continental India, Burma, and the Malay Peninsula ; and Mons. E. 
Simon the first part of a study of the Himalayan Arachnida, collected 
by Messrs. Oldham and Wood-Mason, in the collections of the Indian 
Museum. 

The Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society contains a paper, 
by Mr. E. W. Gates, on the Indian and Burmese Scorpions of the genus 
Isometrus, with descriptions of three new species — I. slwplandi, found only 
at Palone in Burma; I. pMpsoni, from Tenasserim, and I. assamensis, 
from Dhubri. 

The Arachnida of the Afghan Delimitation Commission have been 
reported on by Mr. R. I. Pocock, who finds that they are more nearly 
I'elated to Mediterranean forms than to the fauna of any other area. 
Six spiders are described, of which three, viz., Tarantula medica, found 
between Tirphul and Meshed ; Nemesia tubifex, from Gulran ; and 
Bhax aurea, found between Hari Riid and Meshed, are new. The 
scorpions include Buthus parthorum, sp. n., found between Hari Rud 
Valley and Meshed, which appears to be allied to Tunisian forms ; 
Buthus afghanus, sp. n., from the same neighbourhood, which is closely 
allied to B. europoeus, the well-kaown S. European and N. African form ; 
and Orthodactylus schneideri (L. Koch), which also has allies in the 
Mediterranean area. 



1890,] Adlress. 117 

Mr. Pocock has also described, in the Ann. awl Mag. Nat. Hist., a 
new species of BJiax, found by Lieut. Graeme Batten at Kohat. His 
notes on scorpions of the genus Duthus has also an interest to Indian 
students of this archaic group of animals. 

Mons. E. Simon has described the Arachnida found by Drs. 
Radde and Walter and A. Conchin, during the years 1886-87, in Central 
Asia and Turkestan, in the Verhandl. d. K. K. Zool. Bot. Gesellsch. 
in Wien ; and, in Spengel s Zoologische Jahrbiicher, Dr. A. "Walter has 
described the species of Galeodes found in the same expedition, compris- 
ing seven species of three genera — Galeodes, Rhax, and a new genus, 
Karschia. 

In the Proceedings of the Zoological Society, the Rev. 0. P. Cambridge 
describes some new Araneidce, among them Idiops colletti, from Meik- 
tila in Burma, collected by General Collett, C. B., whose interesting 
account of the nests of these spiders is given in the paper. The planting, 
as it were, of the lids of these nests with lichen and pieces of grass 
resembling those growing round the nests, is specially noticeable. 

Griostacea. — The Crustacea of the Afghan Delimitabion Commission 
have been described by Mr. Pocock. They comprise only two forms, 
Hemilepistus klugii and Gammarus pulex, which appear to have been also 
found by Dr. Walter among the Trans- Caspian land and fresh- water 
Crustacea he has described in SpengeVs Zool. Jahrhilch. He remarks 
that of Isopods his collection contains only land forms, of which six 
species are mentioned, and notes that the otherwise so widely distributed 
fresh-water genus Asellus is not found east of the Caspian — also that 
Telphiisa finds its extreme northern limit in Turcomania. Dr. J. G. 
de Man describes a number of new or rare species of Brachyura from all 
parts of the Indo-Pacific ocean region, but not many are from Indian 
Seas. 

Chmtopoda. — Dr. A. G. Bourne has described in our Journal some 
Earthworms from Dehraand Mussooree, including a new species, Typhceus 
masoni. 

In the Annals of the Genoa Museum, Dr. D. Rosa describes certain 
Indian Perichcetidce found by Sig. L. Fea in Burma ; including two new 
species, P. fece, from Tenasserim, and P. birmanica, from the Irrawaddy. 

Botifera. — In a paper in our Journal, communicated by the Micros- 
copic Society, Mr. H. H. Anderson has given some intei'esting notes on 
some of the Rotifers inhabiting tanks about Calcutta, includino- several 
new species, the most remarkable of which is B. mento, which lives in a 
tube, whether its own or of some other ci-eature the author was unable 
to discover. 

Trematoda and Nematodea. — SpengeVs Zool. Jahrhilcli, contains a 



118 AddvPfis. [Feb. 

description, by Dr. Kai-l Fiedler, of Heterotrema sarasinorum, a new 
sj-nascidian genus of the family Disfomidce, found among the sponges 
obtained by Drs. P. and F. Sarasin at Trincomali, Ceylon, and in' the 
Annals of the Genoa Museum, Dr. L. Camerano has described a new 
species of Gordius found at Bhamo, on the upper Irrawaddy, by Sig. Fea. 

Echinodermata. — In the P. Z. S., Profe.ssor JeSvej Bell notes the 
names of some species of Echinoderms not yet known from the Bay of 
Bengal, collected by Mr. Thurston, and in a collection by Mr. E. W". 
Gates from the Gulf of Martaban. 

Herr. J. Brock's collections of Ophiurids from the Indian Archi- 
pelago have been described by Prof. H. Ludvvig, in the Zeitschrift fur 
Wissenscliaftliclie Zoologie, and an account is given of a very remarkable 
new, probably natatory, form of ophiurid, or brittle-star, found near 
Amboyna. The most striking peculiarity of it is that each joint of the 
arm bears a pair of large fins, which can hardly have any other purpose 
than to confer upon the animal the power of swimming, a mode of 
locomotion hitherto unknown in the class or even in the phylum to which 
the animal belongs. In allusion to its probable mode of locomotion it 
has been appropriately named Ophioptero7i elegans. 

In the Zoologisclie Jahrhilcher, Dr. Ludwig also reports on 41 
species of Holothurians from the same collection, of which 5 are new. 
Dr. L. Doderlein gives an account of the Asteroidea, Ojpliiuroidea, and 
Echinoidea collected in Ceylon by Drs. P. and F. Sarasin. 

The report on the Echinoidea collected by Dr. J. Anderson in the 
Mergui Archipelago, already referred to, contains an account of six 
species whose association in such a limited area is remarkable ; and the 
fact tliat the regular echinids all belong to the family Temnopleuridce is 
especially striking and noteworthy, because in a collection from the 
Andaman Islands, described by Prof. J. Bell, this family is quite unre- 
presented. The collection presents other intei'esting peculiarities and 
the occurrence in the Indian Ocean proper of the Australian form 
Arachnoides placenta has only once before been recorded. 

The Asteroidea of the same collection have been described by Mr. 
W. P. Sladen, who finds that they also are particularly interesting — not 
only from containing new and rare forms, but because some of the 
specimens show characteristic variations which indicate the action of 
special local conditions, which with more plastic types might probably 
result in new morphological developments. Mr. Sladen also notes the 
rarity of Andamanese forms in the collection. 

Dr. P. H. Carpenter's report on the Mergui Comatulo} (Feather 
Stars) contains an account of five species of Antedon, one of which is 
new, and of a new and remarkable type of Actinometra, which was found 



1890.] Address. 110 

to be the Lost of a 23a,rasitic Myzostoma, wliicli also infested some of the 
Antedon. 

Cit'leiitera. — Prof. A. M. Marshall and Mr. G. H. Fowler report that 
the Mergui collection of Pennatulida is also an interesting one, con- 
taining representatives of five genera and ten species, of which two are 
new and five others very rare. 

In SpengeVs Zoologische Jahrhiicher, Dr. O. Ortmann remarks on 
some Rock-Corals from the south coast of Ceylon, chiefly from the 
collection of Prof. Haeckel. 

In the Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist., Mr. Arthur Dendy reports on a 
second collection of sponges made by Mr. Thurston of the Madras 
Museum, in the neighbourhood of the Tuticorin pearl-banks and the 
Gulf of Manaar. It contains 14 new species and two new varieties, 
among them a new species of Aidetta, a genns which has hitherto 
only been found in the Atlantic and Arctic oceans. The author 
remarks on the value of the colours of living sponges as a means of 
distinguishing' species. 

In SpengeVs Zool. Jahrbuch. there is a vahiable paper, by R. von 
Lendenfeld, on the Horny Sponges. 

Protozoa. — Bamulina parasitica, a new species of fossil Foraminifera 
infesting OrhitoUtes ManteUi, from strata on the west bank of the Irra- 
waddy, just below Thayet Myo, is described by the veteran Indian 
geologist and zoologist, Mr. H. J. Carter, in the Annals and Mag. Nat. 
Hist., with compai'ative observations on the process of reproduction in 
the Mijcetozoa, freshwater Uhizopoda and Foraminifera. The same 
writer's further observations on Orbigny's genus Orhitoides, have also 
an interest for the Indian zoologist. The same journal contains Mr. 
H. B. Brady's paper on the Reticularian new genus Masonella, with 
descriptions of two species, from the " Investigator " dredgings in the 
Bay of Bengal. 

I must not omit to mention Prof. Haeckel's grand monograph of the 
Badiolaria, of which Part IV has lately been presented to the Society 
by the author. 

Botany. 

Our Journal contains several valuable botanical papers. Mr. 
H. F. Blanford's List of the Ferns of Simla, referred to in last year's 
address, has been published, with 6 plates, and should prove a useful 
guide to the Himalayan fern-collector. The list includes 101 species 
and varieties. Dr. Barclay continues his descriptive list of the Uredinece 
occurring in the neighbourhood of Simla, and has described sixteen 
species of Pvxcinia occurring on hosts other than grasses and sedges, 



120 Address. [Feb. 

among wliicli three are new, and nine species occurring on grasses and 
sedges. Dr Prain has contributed the first instalment of a series of papers 
entitled Novicice Indicce, containing diagnoses of some additional species 
of Pedicularis new to India. Dr. G. King's paper on " Materials for 
a Flora of the Malayan Peninsula " is the first part of a systematic 
account of the Malayan plants indigenous to British India, including 
Burma, the Malay Peninsula, the Straits Settlements and the Andaman 
and Nicobar Islands, and includes the Bammculacece, MagnoUacece, 
Menispermacece, NympJiceacece, Gapparideoe and Violacem. 

Of the new " Annals of the Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta " 
brouo-ht out by Dr. King, the two volumes mentioned last year as under 
preparation have been completed and published. One is an Appendix 
to Vol. I, dealing with new species of Ficus from New Guinea and 
containing an account of the phenomena of fertilisation in Ficus 
Roxhiirgliii, by Dr. D. D. Cunningham. The volume is illustrated with 
lithographed plates and a heliogravure plate of Ficus Roxhurghii, from 
Dr. Cunningham's photograph. The other. Vol. II, contains descriptions 
of the species of Artocarpus, or Bread-Fruits and Jacks, indigenous to 
British India, within the geographical limits noted above, and of the 
Indo-Malayan species of Quercus and Gastanopsis, Oaks and Chestnuts, 
and is also largely illustrated with lithographed plates. 

The principal botanical papers in last year's volume of the Scientific 
Memoirs by Medical Officers of the Army of India, were noticed in my 
last address. The foi'thcoming number, now almost ready for issue, 
will contain papers by Dr. D. Prain on the Laccadive plants collected 
by Mr. Alcock in the "Investigator," in 1888-89, and by Mr. A. 0. 
Hume, in 1875 ; by Dr. A. Barclay on the life-history of a Himalayan 
Qi/vinosporangium, (G. Gunningliamianum, n. sp.), on Pyrus PasJiia and 
Cupressus torulosa ; also on a Ghrysomyxa on Rhododendron arboreum, 
(C. Mmalense, n. sp.) ; and on the life-history of a Uredine on Rtibia 
cordifolia (Puccinia Gollettiana, n. sp.) ; also a valuable and important 
paper, by Dr. D. D. Cunningham, on Milk as a medium for Choleraic 
Comma-bacilli, in which he shows that milk as ordinarily supplied for 
consumption in this country, from the high degree to which it is nor- 
mally contaminated by schizomycetes whose gi'owth is associated with 
processes of acid fei'mentation, is not a favourable medium for the 
development or continued existence of the Comma-bacilli or other 
schizomycete organisms which require an alkaline or neutral envi- 
ronment. A curious and striking fact brought out in the course of these 
observations was the difference in the phenomena presented by portions 
of milk from one and the same sample according to the level in the 
fluid from which they were taken — and it is shown that specimens 



1890.] Aihlress. 121 

derived from the nppei' strata have a much greater tendency to undergo 
acid fermentation and coagulation than those derived from the lower 
strata. 

The Journal of the Nat. Hist. Soc, Bomhay, contains some interest- 
ing notes, by Mrs. J. 0. Lisboa, on the odoriferous grasses (Andropo' 
gons) of India and Ceylon, with a description of a supposed new species 
(A. odorafns), from Lanowli, of which a plate is given. Mr. G. Car- 
stensen contributes a paper on facilitating the study of Botany and 
proposes the use of a simple English terminology. Mrs. W. B. Hart 
communicates some notes on Branching Palms, illustrated with two 
plates. 

The Supplement to the late Edmund Boissier's Flora Orientalis, 
published at the end of 1888, contains Dr. Aitchison's additions to the 
Afghan flora, except the most recent, and a valuable index to all the 
collector's numbers cited throughout the work. 

In the Journal of the Linnean Society, Mr. C B. Clarke has a 
valuable paper on the Plants of Kohima and Mauipur, with descriptions 
of several new species, illustrated with 44 plates and containing 
notices of 1,050 species of flowering plants or ferns, or probably less 
than one-fifth of the flora of the district, traversed from Gola Ghat 
via Kohima and Manipur to Cachar. 

The Journal of Botany contains a systematic and structural account 
of the genus Avrainvillea, Deene, by G. Murray and L. A. Boodle ; 
also a note, by Col. R. H. Beddome, on two new ferns, from the N. W. 
Himalaya. — Asplenium (Athyrium) Duthei, from Kumaon, 12 — 1.3,000 
feet ; and A. (A) MacdonelU, from Chumba valley, 5,000 feet. Dr. 
Trimen contributes additions to the Flora of Ceylon, 1885 to 1888. 

In the Acta-Horti-PetropoUtani, are several important papers ou 
Central-Asian botany, among which may be noted, a continuation of 
C. Winkler's Lists of new Gompositoi of Turkistan ; descriptions, by 
E. A. Wainio, P. A. Karsten and V. F. Brotherus, of the Turanian plants 
collected by Dr. Walter and Radde F. v. Herder gives an account of 
the geographical distribution of the apetalous plants collected by Dr. 
Radde, many of which are Indian. Mr. C. J. Maximovicz contributes 
a memoir of Prjevalsky, with a portrait ; and in the Bulletin de I ' Aca- 
demie Imperials des Sciences de St. Petersburg he has continued his 
Diagnoses of new Asiatic plants. 

In the Bihang till Kongl. Svensha Vetensk-Akad. Handlingar, is a 
paper by G. Lagerheim on Desmidiacea from Bengal, with remarks on 
the geographical distribution of the order in Asia. 

Economic Botany. Under the direction of Sir E. Buck, in the 
Revenue and Agricultural Department of the Government of India, a 



122 Address. [FeH. 

new series of papers relating to Indian Products lias been instituted. 
It is edited by Dr. G. Watt, and Vol. I contains notes on Manilla Hemp ; 
Adhatoda vasica ; Coix grain or Job's tears ; Fodder Grasses, and on 
several descriptions of Indian Fibres. In No. 2 of Vol. II, an account 
is given of JPodophyllum emodi, or the Himalayan Podophyllum, which 
Dr, Watt found growing in Kulu. Analyses by Drs. Dymoclc and 
Hooper have shown that it is capable of yielding 12 per cent, of resin, 
or podophyllin, whereas the North American plant P. peltatum, from 
which this drug is usually obtained, only yields 4 per cent. The indi- 
genous drug has been fou.ud to possess all the medicinal properties 
of the exotic one and it seems likely therefore that a profitable trade 
might be carried on in this product if it is obtainable in sufficiently 
lai'ge quantities. 

Volumes I and II of the long-expected " Dictionary of the Eco- 
nomic Products of India," prepared by Dr. G. Watt in the Revenue 
and Agricultural Department of the Government of India, have been 
completed during the year. The arrangement of the Dictionary is 
alphabetical and based upon the scientific names of the various pro- 
ducts, and in the margin a number for each product or object has been 
given. The object of these numbers, which commence afresh with 
each letter of the alphabet, is to serve for reference to type collections 
in various "Museums and also as a convenient clue for correspondence. 
The Index will contain the European, vernacular and scientific names 
with references to the type niimbers. The work when completed will 
contain a vast amount of valuable information, brought together in 
a convenient form, regarding Indian vegetable and other products and 
cannot fail to be of very great use to commercial and scientific enquirers. 
The Kew Bulletin, as usual, contains papers relating to vegetable 
products, either indigenous to this country or suitable for cultivation 
here ; among them — notes on Coca ; a memorandum by Mr. Cameron on 
the fruits of Mysore; on the Persian dye plant Zalil (Delpliinmm zalil), 
collected by Dr. Aitchison in Afghanistan ; a reprint of an article on 
Patchouli by Mr. L. Wray, of the Government Museum, Pei-ak, which 
was published in the Journal of the Agri-Horticultural Society in Cal- 
cutta ; on Flowers of GalUgonum as an article of food in N.-W. India ; 
Ramie or Rhea ; Food-grains of India {Deiidrocalaimis strictus). 

In the Report of the Government Botanical Gardens at Saharanpur 
and Mussoorie, Mr. GoUan, the Superintendent, has given some inter- 
esting information regarding the successful acclimatisation of several 
exotic food and fodder plants — among them, the American " Dew- 
berry ;" Persian Date-palms ; Malacca apple, {Eugenia 'malaccensis) ; 
Otaheite apple {Spondias dulcis) and Vines, of which the Black Hamburgh 



1890.] Address. 123 

appears to bo the most suitable foi' general cultivation in India. Some 
interesting experiments are being made in the gardens with foreign 
varieties of sugarcane and wheat, and with huskless barley, for malting' 
purposes. The paper-mulberry continues to be found useful for plant- 
ing on usar and reh-covered tracts. The cultivation of the Mesquit 
bean {Prosopis juliflora) has also been a success, but the Carob bean has 
not done so well. An improved method of cultivating the Jalap plant 
has been tried and pi'omises well. 

The results of the working of the G-oveimment Cinchona planta- 
tions in Sikkim have already been noticed. The red-bark trees are 
being replaced by yellow bark ones, which yield only quinine, and thus 
the alkaloidal value of the plantations has been very much increased. 

The Indian Forester contains a number of notes and papers which 
are of interest in connection with economic botany. From a note by 
Mr, Gamble it appears that Prof. Beccari of Florence, to whom Sir J. 
Hooker had entrusted the descriptions of the Indian Palms, has given 
a list of 6 species of Phcenix indigenous to India, while a seventh 
P. Sylvestris, is only admitted as an introduction. 

Mr. W. Coldstream's " Grasses of the Southern Punjab " and Dr, 
Bonavia's " Cultivated Oranges and Lemons of India and Ceylon " ai'e 
both valuable contributions to Indian Economic Botany. 

There are other subjects with which I should have liked to have 
dealt, as last year, but, owing to the vast extent of the field over which 
I have had to take you and my desire to show you something more 
than mere indications of the work done, I have already far more than 
exceeded the limits I had proposed to set myself, and must perforce 
bring this review to a close. All imperfect as it necessarily must be, 
it will serve to show that the workers in the field, both in this country 
and out of it, have not been inactive, and that considerable and valuable 
additions have been made to our knowledge of things Indian and 
Asiatic during the year.* 

The time has also come when I must vacate this chair in favour of 
our friend Mr. Beveridge. He is well-known to you as taking a lively 
interest in our meetings, and with his extensive literary and historical 
acquirements I feel sure that the well-being of the Society will be safe 
in his hands, and that he will do much to further it. 

* I have again to record my acknowledgments for the assistance kindly given 
me by friends and others in preparing this review and passing it through the press — 
among them : — Dr. A. F. R. Hoernle, Pandit Hari Prasad Sastri, Messrs. E. T. 
Atkinson, Wood-Mason, Sclater, Cotes, Haly and Thnrston, Drs. Hendley and 
Fiihrer, Colonel Thuillier, R. E., Mr. T. A. Pope, Dr. W. King, Messrs. Eliot and 
Pedler, Drs. G. King, Scully, Cunningham and Barclay and Mr. H. M. Phipson, 



12t Election of Ojfh'e-Bearer.s and Menthers of Council [Feb. 

The President announced that the Scrutineers reported the result 
of the election of Office-Bearers and Members of Council to be as fol- 
lows : — 

President. 
H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S. 

Vice-Presidents. 
Col. J. Waterhouse, B. S. C. 
Raja Rc4jendralala Mitra, C. I. E., LL. D, 
J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Secretaries and Treasurer. 
Dr. A. F. R. Hoernle. 
C. Little; Esq., B. A. 
W. King, Esq., B. A , D. Sc. 

Other Memhei's of Council. 
Dr. J. Scully. 

Pandit Haraprasad Shastri, M. A. 
Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 
Hon. Sir A. W. Croft, K. C. I. E., M. A. 
Pi'ince Jahan Qadr Muhammad Wahid All, Bahadur. 
Babu Gaurdas Bysack. 
Dr. A. Crorabie. 

E."T. Atkinson, Esq., C. I. E., B. A., C. S. 
Babu Pratapachandra Ghosha, B. A. 
Capt J. H. Sadler, S. C. 
C. H. Tawney, Esq., M. A. 
L de Niceville, Esq , F. E. S. 
W. L Sclater, Esq. 

The meeting was then resolved into the Ordinary Monthly General 
Meeting. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S., President, in the chair. 

The Minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Twenty-eight presentations were announced, details of which are 
given in the Library List appended. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society were balloted for and elected Ordinary Members : 
A. Venis, Esq., M. A. 
A. Goodeve Chuckerbutty, Esq., B. C S. 



1890.] Monthly Meeting. 125 

The following gentlemen are candidates for election at the next 
meeting : — 

Brigade Surgeon J. G. Pilcher, px'oposed by L. de Niceville, Esq., 
seconded by J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Maharaja Girijanath Roy, Dinajpur, proposed by Babii Gaurdas 
Bysack, seconded by Colonel J. Waterhouse. 

The Secretart reported the death of the following member : 
Kumar Isvariprasad Garga. 

Babu Saratchandra Das exhibited a Tibetan drawing of the golden 
Chaitya of Lhasa. 

The following papers were read : — 

1. A descriptive list of the Uredinece occurring in the neighbourhood 
of Simla {Western Himalayas), Part III. — By A. Barclay, M. B., Bengal 
Medical Service. 

2. Materials for a Flora of the Malayan Peninsula, Part II. — By 
GeorCxE King, C. I. E., M. B., LL. D., F. R. S., F. L. S., Superintendent 
of the Boyal Botanic Garden, Calcutta. 

3. Description of a new Genus of Bamboos. — By J. S. Gamble, 
Esq., M. a. 

These papers will be published in the Journal, Part II. 

4. The account of a Bengali Brdhmana who obtained a high position 
in the Singhalese Buddhist Hierarchy in the 11th Century, A. D. — By 
Pandit Harapeasad S'astri, M. A. 

A short treatise entitled Bhalcti Shataha was published in 1885, in 
Ceylon, by F. CJooray. It was sent to me by a friend, Mohattibatte 
Guminanda, the high priest of the Dipadattama Vihare in Colombo. 
The work is a short one of 107 verses. But it is an exceedingly interest- 
ing work for a variety of reasons : 

(1) It is a Sanskrit work though published in the Singhalese char- 
acter. 

(2) It is a Buddhist work. 

(3) It is written in standard Sanskint and not in that verbose 
difficult, obscuie and ungrammatical idiom which goes by the name of 
Buddhist Sanskrit. 

(4) It was written by a Brahmaua who became a Buddhist from 
conviction. 

(5) It was written by a Bengali in the eleventh century. 

(6) It evidently shows that the Brahmana was persecuted, and ex- 
commuuicated for his faith, and that he became a voluntary exile in 



1'2G H. P. Shastri — A Bengali Bnihinana ivho obtained a high position [Feb. 

Ceylon where a reforming Baddhist king appreciated him, raised him to 
a high place in the Buddhist hierarchy and conferred on him the 
title of Bauddhagama Chakravartti. 

I purpose in this paper to give some account of the author. 

In the 107th verse he says that he is a good Buddhist, and his title 
is Kavihlidrati, that he is a Kshitisura or Brahmana, and that his name is 
Ramachandra. In the colophon, which generally has some authority, 
he is described as a devoted woi-shipper of S'akya Muni the Lord, a 
Bauddhagama Chakravartti, i. e., master of the whole range of Buddhist 
scriptures, si.bhiisiira, i. e., a brahmana, an achdryya, a teacher, and a 
great pandit, and as a native of Gaur. 

Sumangala, the disciple of Rahula, who explains this work by 
means of a x'unning commentary in the Singhalese Sadhubhasha, com- 
menting upon the word Gauradesiya, says that Gaur is a place of great 
learning where Kavya, Vyakarana, Tarka and other branches of know- 
ledge are extensively cultivated. There is a Rarha mandala in Gaur and 
in that mandala there is a Janapada, or locality, named Varendra where 
the author was born. From this one may be led to conclude that Rama- 
chandra was a Varendra Brahmana. But no. The Rarhi and Varendra 
Brahmanas have only five gotras, viz., Sandilya, Bharadvaja, Kasyapa, 
Vatsya and Savarna, while Ramachandra is said to be a Brahmana of 
the Katyayana gotra. Where can we get a Br.ihmana of that gotra in 
Bengal ? This is a question not to be answered easily. The Rarhiya 
and Varendia Brabmans are certainly the most influential in Bengal. 
But there are two other classes of Brabmans here, viz., the Paschatyas 
and the Dakshinatyas. The Chief Justice of Lakshana Sena in his 
well known work the Brahmana Sarvasva recognizes these two classes also, 
but names them Paschatya and Utkala. And so these classes are as an- 
cient as the Sena Rajas of Bengal. I will not speak of the Utkalas because 
they have no Katyayana gotra among them. The Paschatyas are settlers 
from the west either before or after the settlement of the five brah- 
mans whose descendants the Rarhiyas and Varendras claim to be. The 
Paschatyas are not a homogenous community like the Rarhiyas, having 
settled at and from different parts of the country at different times and 
from a variety of motives. They do not intci'marry with each other, 
and there are brahmans of almost all the gotras among them. I have 
asked many Pcischatyas whether they have the Katyayana gotra among 
them. In this part of the country they have not. Some informed me 
that brahmans of this gotra will be found in North Bengal, {. e., Varendra 
Janapada. This appeal's to be very probable, because the Maithils have 
this gotra among them. Many Maithils have become incorporated with 
the Paschatyas. Riimachandra may have been one of these Maithil 



1890.] in the Singhalese Buddhist Hierarehi/ in the llth Gcnturij, A. D. 127 

Paschatyas who owing to the proximity of Mithila to Varendra might 
have settled there from a very ancient time, and owing to Bengal 
being then a country full of Buddhists, may have conceived a liking for 
that religion. 

The commentator further says in a Sanskrit verse that the Brah- 
mana Ramachandra Kavibharati was made Bauddliagatna Chakravartti 
by Raja Parakram Bahu of Ceylon. The author also says that he 
wrote the work during the reign of that monarch. 

This settles the question of the age of Ramachandra because Para- 
kram Bahu reigned about the middle of the eleventh century and his 
was a long reign. 

His contemporary in Bengal was Ballal Sena the father of Laksh- 
mana Sena whose era was discovered some years ago to be still in use in 
Mithila. Ballal is said to be the organizer of the present Bengal Hindu 
society. He established Kulinism among the Rarhiya and Varendra 
' Brahmans, he raised the dignity of some of the non- Aryan and semi- 
Aryan tribes by giving them brahmans to officiate in their ceremonies. 
He degraded the wealthy Sonar Benias and the influential Jogis, and 
made them something like outcasts. He was the king of a country 
where Buddhist kings had long held their sway, and where Buddhism, 
was the prevailing religion, and it may be supposed that he did not look 
upon Buddhism with favour. 

It appears to be certain, however, that Ramachandra was excom- 
municated and persecuted. For why should he otherwise say from 
Ceylon : — 

" Let kings punish, let leai'ned men deride, and let relations for- 
sake me, yet father Jina, I cannot live a moment without thee ? " 

Why otherwise should he say, " Whether I live in heaven or in 
hell, whether among birds or among the Asuras, whether in the city of 
ghosts or of men, let my mind I'emain fixed in thee, for there is no other 
happiness for me ? '' 

'" You are my father, mother, brother, sister, you are my fast friend 
in danger, dear one, you are my lord, my pi'eceptor who imparts to me 
knowledge as sweet as nectar. You are my wealth, my enjoyment, my 
pleasui'e, my affluence, my greatness, my reputation, my knowledge and 
nay life. You are my all, O all-knowing Buddha." 

The whole tenor of the verses from 24 to 30 shows that the author 
was oppressed with a strong feeling of personal injury but that he had 
resigned himself to his fate, and had determined to suffer oven the worst 
for his faith. 



128 Lihrary. [Feb. 

Library. 

The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
Meeting held in January last. 



Transactions, Proceedings and Journals, 

presented hy the respective Societies and Editors. 
Amsterdam. Der Koninklijke Akademie van Wetenschappen, — Jaar- 

boek, 1888. 
_ — . . Verslagen en Mededeelingen, Afdeeling Let- 

terkunde, 3de Reeks, Deel 5. 
— . . . Afdeeling Natuurknnde, 3de Reeks, 



Deel 5. 
Birmingham. Birmingham Philosophical Society,' — Proceedings, Vol. 

VI, Part II, Session 1888-89. 
Bombay. Anthropological Society of Bombay, — Journal, Vol. I, Xo. 8. 

. The Indian Antiquary,— Vol. XVIII, Parts 224—226, 

August — October, 1889. 
Brisbane. Royal Geographical Society of Australasia, Queensland 
Branch, — Proceedings and Transactions, 5th Session, 1889-90, 
Vol. 5, Part 1. 
Budapest. La Societe Hongroise de Geographie, — Tome XVII, Fasci- 
culi 9—10. 
Calcutta. Geological Survey of India, — Memoirs, (Palaeontologia Indica), 

Ser. XIII, Vol. IV, Part 1. 
.. — , Indian Engineering, — Vol. VII, Nos. I — 5. 

. — . Photographic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. Ill, Nos. 1 — 2, 

January-February, 1890. 
Christiania. Videnskabs-Selskabet i Christiania, — Forhandlinger. Nos. 
1—13, Aar, 1888. 

.-, . Oversigt i 1888. 

Edinburgh. Royal Physical Society, — Proceedings, Session 1888-89. 

__.. .. The Scottish Geographical Society, — Magazine, Vol. V, 

Nos. 11 — 12, November- December, 1889, and Index to Vol. V. 
Florence. La Societa Africana d' Italia.^ — Bullettino, Tome V, Fasci- 

colo 7°. 
Frankfurt, a. M. Der Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft, — 

Bericht, 1889. 
Hamburg. Naturhistorisches Museum zu Hamburg, — Mitteilungen, 
Jahrgang, 1888. 



1890.] Library. 129 

Helsingfors. Societas pro Fauna et Flora Feunica, — Meddelanden, 
Haftet 15, 1889. 

, . _. . Acta,— Vol. V, Pars. 1. 

London. Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, — 
Journal, Vol. XIX, No. 2, November, 1889. 

■ Geological Society, — Quarterly Journal, Vol. XLV, Part 4. 

. . List of Fellows, 1889. 

■ . Institution of Electrical Engineers, — Journal, Vol. XVIII, 

No. 82. 

'. Nature,— Vol. XLI, Nos. 1051—1055. 

- Royal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. XLIX, 

No. 9, Supplenient number. 

— — — --. Royal Geographical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XI, Nos. 
11—12, November-December, 1889. 

. Royal Microscopical Society, — Journal, Parts 4 — 5, 1889. 

. Royal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. XLVI, No. 283. 

. Royal Statistical Society, — Journal, Vol. LII, Part 3, Septem- 
ber, 1889. 

■ . The Academy,— Nos. 920—924. 

. The Athena3um,— Nos. 3242—3246. 

Zoological Society of London, — Proceedings, Part III, 1889. 



Mexico. Observatorio Meteoroldgico-Magnetico Central de Mexico, — 

Boletin Mensual, Tomo II, Num 2. 
■ . ■■ . Informes y Documentos Relatives a Commercio 

Interior y Exterior Agricultura, Mineria e Industrias, — No. 50, 

Agosto, 1889, und Indice de Julio de 1888 a Junio de 1889. 
Moscow. La Societe Imperiale des Nataralistes de Moscou, — Bulletin, 

No. 2, 1889. 
Paris. Journal Asiatique, — Tome XIV, No. 1. 
— — — . La Societe de Geograi^hie, — Bulletin, Tome X, No. 2. 
. . Compte Rendu des Seances de la Commission 

Centrale, Nos. 15—17, 1889. 
- - La Societe Zoologique de France, — Bulletin, Tome XIV, No. 8. 
. . Memoires, Tome III, No. 4. 



Philadelphia. The Journal of Comparative Medicine and Surgery, — 

Vol. XI, No. 1. 
Rio de Janeiro. Imperial Observatorio do Rio de Janerio, — Revista 

do Observatorio, Anno 4, Nos. 10 — 11. 
Rome. La Societa Degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Vol. 

XVIII, Disp. IK 
Schaffhauseu. La Societe Entomologique Suisse, — Bulletin, Tome VIII, 

No. 3. 



180 Lihranj. [Feb, 

St. Petersburg. La Societe Iraperiale Russe de Geograpliie, — Proceed- 
ings, Tome XXV, Heft Nr. 4. 

Stockholm. Societe Entomologique de Stockholm — Entomologisk 
Tidskrift,— Arg X, Haft 1—4. 

Sydney. Royal Society of New South Wales, — Journal and Proceed- 
ings, Vol. XXIII, Part 1, 1889. 

Taiping. Government of Perak — The Perak Government Gazette, — 
Vol. Ill, Nos. 1—2, 1890. 

Tokyo. Imperial University of Japan, — Journal of the College of 
Science, Vol. Ill, Part III. 

Vienna. Der Kaiserlischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Almanach, 
1889. 

. . Archiv fiir Osterreichische Geschichte, 

Band LXXIV, Halfte 1—2. 

. . Denkschriften (Mathematisch-Naturwis- 

senschaftliche classe), Band LV. 

"~ . . Sitzungsberichte, (Mathematisch Natur- 

wissenschaftliche classe). Abtheilung I, Band XCVII, Heft 6 — 10 ; 
Band XCVIII, Heft 1—3 ; Abtheilung II a., Band XCVII, Heft 
8—10; Band XCVIII, Heft 1—3; Abtheilung II b. Band XCVII, 
Heft 8—10 ; Band XCVIII, Heft 1—3 ; Abtheilung III, Band 
XCVII, Heft 7—10 ; Band XCVIII, Heft 1—4. 

. . Register, Band XCI, bis XCVI. 

■ . . (Philosophisch-Historische classe). Band 

CXVII— CXVIII. 

. Des K. K. Naturhistorischen Hofmuseums, — Annalen. Band 

IV, Nrn, 2—3. 

Der K. K. Zoologisch-botanischen Gesellschaft io Wien, — 



Verhandlungen. Band XXXIX, Heft 3 und 4. 
Zagreb. Hrvatskoga Arkeologickoga Druztva, — Viestnik. Godina 
XI, Br. 4. 

^ooKS AND Pamphlets, 

presented by the Axithors, Translators, S,''C. 

BlanfORD, W. T. The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and 

Burma. Birds, Vol. I. 8vo. London, 1889. 
Hayter, Henrt Heyltn, C. M. G. Victorian Tear-Book for 1888-89. 
Vol. I. 8vo. Melbourne, 1889. 

Miscellaneous Presentations. 

Illustrations of Typical Specimens of Lepidoptera Heterocera in the 
collection of the British Museum. Part VII. By Arthur Gardinei' 
Butler. 4to. London, 1889. 

British Museum, London. 



1800.] Library. 131 

The Faana of Briiisli India, including Ceylon and Burma. By Francis 

Day, C. I. E., LL. D. Vol. I, Fishes. 8vo. Loudon, 1889. 
General Report on Public Instruction in Bengal for 1888-89. Fcp. 

Calcutta, 1889. 
Report on the Administration of the Government of Bengal, 1888-89. 

Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 
Report on the River-borne Traffic of the Lower Provinces of Bengal, 

and on the Inland Trade of Calcutta, and on the Trade of Chitta- 

gong and the Orissa Ports, with notes on Road Traffic for tho 

year 1888-89. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 
Retui-ns of the Rail-borne Trade of Bengal for the quarter endino- the 

30th September, 1889. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of Bengal. 
Chirographovum in Regia Bibliotheca Pavlina Monasteriensi Cataloo-ns. 
Editus studio et opera Josephi Staender. 4to. Breslau, 1889. 

Government of Germany. 

A Comparative Dictionary of the Bihari Language, Part II. Compiled 
by A. F. Rudolf Hoernle and George A. Grierson. 4to. Calcutta 
1889. 

The Diary of "William Hedges, Esq., during his agency in Bencral as 
well as on his voyage out and return overland (1681-1687.) Vol. 
III. By Colonel Henry Yule, R. E. (Hakluyt Society). 8vo. 
London, 1889. 

Indian Antiquary, Vol. XVIII, Parts 221-225. May to September, 1889. 
4to. Bombay, 1889. 

Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Home De- 
partment, No. CCLXIII. Reports on publications issued and 
registered in the several Provinces of British India during the 
year 1888. Fcp. Calcutta, 18S9. 

Tractatus de Globis et eorum nsu — A Treatise descriptive of the Globes 
constructed by Emery Molyneux, and published in 1592, by Robert 
Hues. Edited by Clements R. Markham, C. B., F. R. S. 8vo. 
(Hakluyt Society). London, 1889. 

Government of India, Home Department. 
Epigraphia Indica and Record of the Archaeological Survey of India, 
Part IV, July, 1889. 4to. Calcutta, 1889. 

Government of India, Rev. and Agricultural Department. 
Minutes of the Managing Committee of the Provincial Museum, Luck- 
now, from August 1883 to 31st March 1888, with an introduction. 
8vo. Allahabad, 1889. 

Government of N.-W. P. and Gudh. 



132 Library. [Feb. 

Report on the Administration of the Punjab and its dependencies for 
1888-89. Fcp. Lahore, 1889. 

Government of the Punjab. 
Notes on Indian Economic Eatomology, Vol. I, No. 2. 4to. Calcutta, 
1889. 

Indian Museum. 
Physiological and Pathological Researches, being a reprint of the prin- 
cipal scientific writings of the late T. R. Lewis M. B., arranged and 
edited by Sir William Aiken M. D., G. E. Dobson, M. B. and 
A. E. Brown, B. S. C. 8vo. London, 1888. 

Lewis Memorial Committee. 
Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, 1889. 8vo. London, 1889. 

Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Catalogue of the Scientific Books in the Library o'f the Royal Society of 
New South Wales, Part I. General Science. 8vo. Sydney, 1889. 
Royal Society of New South Wales. 
Herbarium Musei Fennici. Editio Secundo, I, Plantse Vasculares. 8vo. 

Helsingfors, 1889. 
Notae conspectus Florae Fennicae. 8vo. Helsingfors, 1889. 

SociETAS pro Fauna et Flora Fennica, Helsingfors. 
Verses in Sanskrit, with English translation, written as an expression 
of loyalty to Her Majesty the Empress Victoria on the occasion of 
the Heir-Apparent Prince Albert Victor's visit to Calcutta — 2 
Cards, 4to. size. 

MAHAMOHOPADHYAfA ChANDRA KaNTA TaRKALANKAR. 

Pei\iodicals Pui^chased. 

Berlin. Deutsche Litteraturzeitung. — Jahrgang X, Nrn. 41 — 48. 
. Journal fiir die reiue und angewandte Mathematik, — Band 

CV, Heft 4. 

. Orientalische Bibliographie, — Band III, Heft 8. 

. Zeitschrift fiir Ethnologic,— Heft 4, 1889. 

Braunschweig. Jahresbericht iiber die Fortschritte der Chemie und 

verwandter Theile anderer Wissenchaften, — Heft 3, 1887. 
Calcutta. Calcutta Review, — Vol. XC, No. 179. 

. Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XXIV, No. 12. 

Cassel. Botanisches Centralblatt, — Band XL, Heft 1 — 9. 

Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, — Tome XXII, 

No. 12, et Appendix a No, 11. 
Gottingen. Der Konigl. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, — Gottin- 

gische Gelehrte Auzeigen. Nru. 19 — 23, 1889. 



1890.] Lihranj. 133 

Gofctingen. Der Kouigl. Gesellscliaft der Wissenscliaften, — Nach- 

richten. Nrn. 18, 1889. 
Leipzig. Aunaleu der Physik und Chemie, — Band XXXIX, Heft 1. 
. . Beiblatter,— Band XIII, Stuck 11—12. 



-^ Literarisches Centralblatt, — Nrn. 42 — 49. 



London. Mind,— Vol. XV, No. 57. 

. Rhopalocera Exotica, — Part 10, October, 1889. 

• . The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. IV, 

(sixth Series), Nos. 28 — 24, November- December, 1889. 

. The Chemical News,— Vol. LX, Nos. 1568—1573. 

. The Entomologist,— Vol. XXII, Nos. 318—319, November- 
December, 1889. 

. The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, — Vol. XXV, Nos. 

306—307, November-December, 1889. 

. The Ibis,— Vol. I, (sixth Series) No. 4, October, 1889. 

. The Journal of Botany,~Vol. XXVII, Nos. 323—324, No- 



vember-December, 1889. 
. The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 

—Vol. XXVIII, Nos. 174—175, November-December, 1889. 
. The Messenger of Mathematics, — Vol. XIX, Nos. 5—6, 

September-October, 1889. 
. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVII, No. 155, January, 

1890. 
. The Numismatic Chronicle,— Vol. IX, (3^^ Series). No. 35, 

Part 3. 

The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 



1934-1939. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science, — Vol. XXXVIII (3»'i 

Series), No. 227, November, 1889. 
Pai'is. L' Academic des Sciences, — Comptes Rendus des Seances,— 

Tome CIX, Nos. 15—22. 
. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, — Tome XVII (6"^<' Serie), 

Novembre-Decembre, 1889. 
— — . Journal des Savants, — Octobre-Novembre, 1889. 
. Revue Scientifique,— Tome XLIV, Nos. 24—26, Tome XLV, 

Nos. 1—2. 
. Revue de Linguistique et de Philologie Comparee, — Tome 

XXII, Fascicule 4. 
. Revue Critique d' Histoire et de Litterature, — Tome XXVIII, 



Nos. 41—48. 
Philadelphia. Manual of Conchology,— Vol. XI, Part 3, Vol. V, (2ud 

Series) Part 3. 
Vienna. Vienna Oriental Journal, — Vol. Ill, No. 4, 1889. 



134 Library. [Feb. 1890.] 

■Books Pui\chased, 

Herklots, G. a., M. D. Qanoon-e-Islam, or tlie customs of the Mus- 
sulmans of India, comprising a full and exact account of the 
various rites aud ceremonies, from the moment of birth, till hour 
of death, by Jaffar Shurreef. 2nd Edition. 8vo. Madras, 1863. 

Report of the Scientific Results of the voyage of H. M. S. " Challenger " 
—Zoology, Vol, XXXII. 4to. London, 1889. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For M.ARCH, 1890. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Beno-al was 
held ou Wednesday, the 5th March 1890, at 9 P. M. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S., President, in the chair. 

The following members were present : — 

Babii Saratchandra Das, E. Gay, Esq., Babu Bhupendra Sri Ghosha, 
Dr. Hoernle, "W A. Lee, Esq., R. D. Mehta, Esq., Babu Asutosh 
Mukhopadhyay, Captain R. C. Temple, J. Wood- Mason, Esq. 

Visitors — Captain T. E. Younghusband, King's Dragoon Guards. 
Lama Phun tshogs D Waii Zdan. 

The Minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Thirty-one presentations were announced, details of which are 
given in the Library List appended. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society, were balloted for and elected Ordinary Mem= 
bars : — 

Brigade Surgeon J. G. Pilcher. 

Maharaja Girjanath Roy, Dinajpur. 

The following gentlemen are candidates for election at the next 
meeting : 

Philip Lake, Esq , B. A. (Cantab.), proposed by Dr. W. King, second- 
ed by E. C. Cotes, Esq. 



136 Appointment of Gommittees. [MarcH, 

F. G. Hickson, Esq., proposed by H. Beveridge, Esq., seconded by 
Dr. W. King. 

Dr. W. H. Solf, proposed by H. Beveridge, Esq., seconded by 
Dr. Hoernle. 

The following gentleman lias intimated bis wish to withdraw from 
the Society : 

Sir John W. Edgar, K. C. I. E., C. S. I. 

The Pkesident announced that the Council had appointed Messrs. 
Meugens and King to be Auditors of the Society's Accounts for 1890. 

The Secretary read the names of the gentlemen who had been 
appointed by the Council to serve on the various Committees for the 
present year. 

Finance and Visiting Committee. 

E. T. Atkinson, Esq. Dr. J. Scully. 

Hon. Sir A. W. Croft. Pandit Haraprasad Sh<4stri. 

Babu Pratapachandra Ghosha. Colonel J. Waterhouse. 

Raja Rajendralala Mitra. J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 
Captain J. H. Sadler. 

Library Committee. 

Nawab Abdul Latif, Bahadur. Mahamahopadhyay Pandit Mahesa- 

E. T. Atkinson, Esq. chandra Nyayaratna. 

Babu Gaurdas Bysack. L. de Niceville, Esq. 

Hon. Sir A. W. Croft. Captain J. H. Sadler. 

Dr. D. D. Cunningham. Hon. Dr. Mahendralal Sarkar. 

Babu Pratapachandra Ghosha. W. L. Sclater, Esq. 

Prince Jahan Qadr Muhammad Dr. J. Scully. 

Wahid All, Bahadur. Pandit Haraprasad Shastri. 

J. Mann, Esq. C. H. Tawney, Esq. 

Raja Rajendralala Mitra. Colonel J. Waterhouse. 

Babii Asutosh Mukhopadhyay. J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Philological Committee. 

Nawab Abdul Latif, Bahadur. Babii Nilmani Mukerji. 

E. T. Atkinson, Esq. Mahamahopadhyay Pandit Mahe^a- 

J. Beames, Esq. chandra Nyayaratna. 

Babu Gaurdas Bysack. Captain D. C. Phillott. 

Dr. A. Fiihrer. Babu Rajkumar Sarvadhikari, 



1890.] 



Appointment of Committees. 



137 



G. A. Grierson, Esq. 

Babii Pratiipachandra Gliosha. 

Maulvi Kuda Bakhsh Khau, 

Baliadui*. 
C. J. Lyall, Esq. 
J. Maun, Esq. 
Raja Rajeudralala Mitra. 



Sir Say id Alimad. 
Pandit Haraprasad Shastri. 
C. H. Tawney, Esq. 
Captain R. C. Temple. 
Captain J. H. Sadler. 
Dr. G. Thibaut. 
Colonel A. C. Toker. 



Coins Committee. 



Dr. A. Fiihrer. 

Raja Rajendralala Mitra. 

C. J. Rodgers, Esq. 



Dr. J. Scully. 

J. H. Rivett-Carnac, Esq. 

V. A. Smith, Esq. 



History and Arch^ological Committee. 



Hon. Justice Amir AH. 

J. Beames, Esq. 

Babu Gaurdas Bysack. 

W. H. P. Driver, Esq. 

Dr. A. Fiihrer. 

Babii Pratapachaudra Ghosha. 



F. S. Growse, Esq. [raaldas. 

Mahamahopadhyaya Kaviraja Shya- 
Raja Rajendralala Mitra. 
J. H. Rivett-Caruac, Esq. 
Captain R. C. Temple. 
J. Wood- Mason, Esq. 



Natural History Committee. 



Dr. A. W. Alcock. 

H. H. Anderson, Esq. 

E. T. Atkinson, Esq. 

Dr. A. Barclay. 

E. C. Cotes, Esq. 

Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 

J. F. Duthie, Esq. 

Dr. G. M. Giles. 

Dr G. King. 

C. S. Middlemiss, Esq. 



L. de Niceville, Esq. 
Dr. Fritz Noetliug. 
R. D. Oldham, Esq. 
S. E. Peal, Esq. 
Dr. J. Scully. 
W. L. Sclater, Esq. 
Colonel C. Swinhoe. 
Dr. J. H. Tull Walsh. 
J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 



Physical Science Committee. 



Dr. A. W. Alcock. 
P. N. Bose, Esq. 
Bcibii Gaurdas Bysack. 
Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 
J. Eliot, Esq. 
S. R. Elson, E,5q. . 
Dr. G. M. Giles. 



Babii Asutosh Mukhopadhyay. 

Dr. Fritz Noetliug. 

R. D. Oldham, Esq. 

A. Pedler, Esq. 

Captain E. W. Petley. 

Dr. D. Praiii. 

Hon. Dr. Maheudralal Sarkar. 



138 L. de Niceville — On the Ptipce of tico Indian [March, 

S. A. Hill, Esq. Dr. J- Scully. 

Dr. G. Kino-. Dr. W. J. Simpson. 

Rev. Father E. Lafont. Colonel H. Thuillier. 

J. J. D. La Touehe, Esq. Colonel J. Waterliouse. 

C. S. Middlemiss, Esq. J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

The Philological Secretary announced the presentation to the 
Society by the Government N.-W. Provinces and Oadh of a gold coin 
of Gungeya Deva. 

Captain R. C. Temple, B. S. C. exhibited and explained his collec- 
tion of past and present Burmese Currency. He also explained and 
illustrated a peculiar method of Burmese Arithmetic. 

The following papers were read : — 

1. Ancient Barbaria Customs among the Hitidus. — By Pudmanay 
Ghosal. Communicated by Dr. Hoernle. 

2. Description of a Dipterous Insect found in Simla on the flower 
of Commelyna obliqua, Barclay. — By MoNS. J. BiGOT. Gommtmicated by 
E, T. Atkinson, Esq., C. S. 

Ommatius lividipes, 5 nov. sp., 

Long. 7 mill. ^. 

Niger, vix nitens. Antennis, palpis, haustello, et mistace parva, 
nigris ; facie obscure cinerea ; pleuids et conis cinereo-pulverulentis ; 
abdomine parce et breviter albido villosulo ; halteribus lividis ; pedibus 
flavido-livido, parce nigro-setoso, incisuris tarsoram geniculisque posticis 
infuscatis ; alis omnino hyalinis. 

Hab. Simla (on the flower of Commelyna obliqua, Barclay.) 

3. Note on the Pupce of tivo Indian Butterflies of the subfamily 
Nemeobiinse. — By L. de Nice'ville, Esq., F. E. S., C. M. Z. S. 

Mr. Samuel H. Scudder in " The Butterflies of the Eastern United 
States and Canada " (p. 776 et seq.) has admirably summed up all that 
is known regarding the transformations of the butterflies of the sub- 
family Nemeobiince, and shews that all the information we possess of 
the Old World species is confined to the European Nemeobius lucina, 
Liungeus, and to the Asiatic Abisara prunosa, Moore. I am now able to 
supplement this by some particulars of two pupee of two other species 
of the subfamily. Mr. G. C. Dudgeon, of Darjiling, procured a single 
pupa last autumn of Zemeros flegyas, Cramer, of which he has com- 
municated to me a water-colour drawing, with the following descrip- 



1890.] Butterflies of the suh-family Nemeobiinge. 139 

tion : — " Pupa very flat. Head rounded, bifid ; abdomen broad in the 
middle ; thorax rounded, flat. Colour pale green marked with blue on 
the back. Fastened by the tail and round the thorax with a whitish 
web. Found on a leaf of Mcesa montana, D. C." Shortly afterwards 
Mr. A. V. Knyvett sent me an empty pupa-case of the same species 
from the same district. From these two sources of information I am 
able to draw up the following notes. 

Mr. Dudgeon's drawing shews the pupa attached to the surface of 
a leaf, but whether to the upper or underside 1 am unable to say, though 
probably the latter. The leaf appeal's to be rather a small one, and the 
pupa occupies about the middle third of half the surface between the 
m.idrib and one margin of the leaf, the long axis of the pupa being 
parallel with the midrib, and the head directed towards the apex of the 
leaf. Mr. Knyvett's example is attached to the underside of a small 
leaf, and lies between two of the lateral ribs, with the head touching 
the midrib, the tail directed towards the edge of the leaf. Both pupae 
are fixed to the leaf by the cremastral hooks at the end of the abdomen, 
and by a silken girdle across the body at about the junction of the 
thorax with the first abdominal segment. To allow the imago to escape, 
the thorax has split down the dorsal line, but the case covering the 
abdominal segments remains intact. The pupa is distinctly fusiform in 
shape, being broadest at about the middle, the abdominal segments 
rapidly increasing in width to the junction of the second and third (to 
judge from the empty pupa-case), and then more gradually decreasing 
to the last, which is bluntly rounded. The whole pupa appears to be 
much depressed. The wing-cases are very small, and hardly visible 
from above. The constrictions between the abdominal segments are 
well marked, and the posterior segments are not turned under as in the 
typical pupge of the family Lyccenidce. The ventral surface of the pupa 
is very flat, and lies in close contact with the surface of the leaf. In 
general shape the pupa is very similar to that of Abisara prunosa, Moore, 
fi'om Ceylon, but the terminal segment of the abdomen (tail) is much 
blunter (less pointed) ; it appears, however, to differ widely in not 
having the surface furnished with long hairs ; none being shewn in 
Mr. Dudgeon's drawing, or mentioned in his description, and none being 
visible in the empty pupa-case. I may note also that the pupa of the 
European iV. lucina appears to be quite naked. The pupa of Z.flegyas 
lies fully exposed on the surface of the leaf, there being no attempt to 
make a cocoon of any sort. The surface of the leaf on which the pupa 
lies, and for a little distance around, is covered with a coating of fine 
white silk evidently spun by the larva before fixing itself in position for 
pupation. 



140 L. de Niceville — On the Pupoe of hoo Indian [March, 

Of the other pupa I have long possessed a single example from 
which the imago has escaped, obtained by Colonel G. F. L. Marshall, R. E., 
at Simla. The species is Dodona diirga, Kollar, a butterfly which is some- 
what similar to N. lucina in the imago state. This pupa is also attached 
to the underside of a small leaf near the tip, the long axis of the pupa being 
parallel to the midrib, over which it partly lies, with the head directed 
towards the tip of the leaf. It is fixed in position by the tail, and by a 
median girth as in Z.Jiegyas, from which it only differs (as far as I can 
judge from empty shells only) in being less flattened and narrower 
throuo-hout, the abdominal segments especially being much attenuated 
and ending almost in a point as in A. prmiosa. It does not appear to 
have been covered with hair. 

As far as the pupae go, the Old World species would appear to 
shew that the subfamily Nemeobimce would be better placed with the 
family Lyccenidoe than with the family Nymphalidce, agreeing with the 
former also much more closely in the larva stage. But some of the 
New World Nemeohiince have the pupse suspended by the tail only with 
no median girth, while some of the Old World Lyccenidce also (Poritia 
hartertii, Doherty, of which I have seen the empty pupa-case, for in- 
stance) have the pupse similarly suspended, so that the position assumed 
by the piTpa cannot be taken as an infallible guide in defining the 
families of butterflies. On the ground chiefly of the extreme shortness 
and hairiness of the forelegs of the Indian species in the imago stage, 
the much larger average size and stouter build, as well as the invariable 
presence of a prascostal nervure to the hind wing, I am of opinion that 
Bates is more correct in placing the subfamily Nemeohiince with the 
family Nymphalidce than Scudder is in claiming it as a subfamily co- 
ordinate with Lyccenince in a family Lyccenidce. 

P. S. Since the above was placed in type, I am able to supple- 
ment the information regarding the transformations of Z. flegyas, by the 
following description of its larva by Mr. O. C. Dudgeon : — " Larva. 
Length when full-grown "75 of an inch. Ovate, extremely flattened, 
inconspicuous. Coloration pale green, head and anal segment slightly 
lighter, all the segments laterally rounded, covered with a whitish down, 
especially at the sides ; an indistinct doable longitudinal dorsal darker 
green line throughout, enclosing a minute orange-rod spot on the 
seventh and eleventh segments ; middle segments more than twice as 
broad as they are long. Legs pale green, set well beneath the animal, 
and rather close together. Full grown at the end of March. Feeds on 
Mcesa montana, D. C, as kindly identified by Dr. George King, C. I. E., 
Superintendent of the Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta. The larva 
when about to change into the pupal stage, attaches itself to a patch 



1890.] Butterflies of the suh-famihj Nemeobiinte. 141 

of silky web by the last see'ment to the underside of a leaf of the food- 
plant, and is girt about the middle with another web. The double 
dorsal line in the larva becomes rather more bluish before the insect 
changes." 

Six empty pupa-cases, Mr. Dudgeon informs me, have recently been 
found by him on the food-plant, all attached to the under surface, with 
the head of the pupa turned towards the apex of the leaf. All were 
found at 2,000 feet elevation in the Darjiling district, where the butterfly 
swarms. Another butterfly of the subfamily Nemeohiincs, Bodona ado- 
nira, Hewitson, probably feeds on Mcesa chisia of Don in Darjiling, a 
pupa having once been found by Mr. A. V. Knyvett on that bush (also 
one of the plants on which Z. flegijas feeds), " attached to the leaf in 
exactly the same way as is Z. flegijas, i. e., by the tail and with a median 
silken girth." 

I append a full description of the pupa of Z. flegyas obtained at 
Badamtam near Darjiling, 3,400 feet elevation above the sea, by Mr. 
Dudgeon. 

Pupa, '55 to '70 of an inch long.* Shape fusiform, broadest in the 
middle, tapering towards both ends, with the anterior end truncate- 
rounded, distinctly broader than the posterior ; the whole pupa extra- 
ordinarily flattened, and consequently of very slight depth even in the 
thickest part ; the divisions between the segments well-marked ; the 
posterior segment bluntly rounded ; the head also rounded, divided in the 
middle line at the apex into two lobes by a shallow notch, the sides of 
which are parallel to one another and at right angles to the bottom ; 
colours light bright yellowish-green throughout, above marked with rich 
emerald-green narrow lines arranged in an arabesque-like pattern on 
the two outer thirds, a sei-ies of round spots along the middle of the 
back on the abdomen only, and a subdorsal line on either side interrupt- 
ed at the segmental constrictions. The under surface is pale yellowish- 
green throughout, entii'ely unmarked. Owing to the extremely depressed 
form of the pupa, the wing-cases are almost entirely invisible fi'om 
above ; they show only by a very narrow emerald-green line on each side 
of the thorax and two anterior abdominal segments. The whole surface 
of the pupa is entirely smooth, without any hairs or shagreening whatever. 
Owing to its beautiful coloration and curious markings this pupa is one 
of the prettiest I have seen, and far surpasses anything known to me in 
the family Lyccenidcs. 

* This latter measnrement is taken from an empty pupa-case. 



142 Lihranj. [MARCH, 

The following additions have been made to the Librai-y since the 
meeting held in February last. 



TRANSACTIONS, Pl^OCEEDINGS AND jJoUI\NAL, 

p7-esented by the respective Societies and Editors. 
Berlin. Der Gelleschaft NaturforschenderFreunde zu Berlin. — Sitzungs- 

berichte, Jahrgang, 1889. 
Brussels. La Societe Royale Malacologique de Belgique, — Annales, Tome 

XXIII. 
. . Proces- Verbaux des Seances. July 1888 — June 

1889. 
Calcutta. Indian Engineering. Vol. VII, Nos. 6 — 9. 
Edinburgh. The Scottish Geographical Society, — Magazine, Vol. VI, 

No. 1, January, 1890. 
The Hague. Kouinklijk Instituut voor de Taal,- Land-en Volken-kunde 

van Nederlandsch- Indie, — Bijdragen tot de Taal- Land-en Volken- 
kunde van Nederlandsch-Indie. Deel V, (Sg Volgr.) Aflevering 1. 
Havre. Societe de Geographic Commerciale du Havre, — Bulletin, No- 

vembre — Decembre, 1889. 
Jassy. Societataii Stiintifice si Literare din lasi, — Arhiva, Nos. 2 — 3, 

Septemvrie — Decembrie, 1889. 
London. Nature. Vol. XLI, Nos. 1056—1058. 
. Royal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. L, No. 1, 

November, 1889. 
■ . Royal Geographical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XII, No. 1, 

January, 1890. 

. Royal Microscopical Society, — Journal, Part 6, 1889. 

— — . Institution of Electi'ical Engineers, — Journal, Vol. XVIII, 

No. 83. 

. The Academy. Nos. 925—927. 

• . The Athenseum. Nos. 3247—3250. 



Mexico. La Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate," — Memorias. Tomo 
II, Num 12, Tomo III, Num 1—2. 

Naples. La Societa Africana D'ltalia, — Bollettino, Tome VIII, Nos. 
5—10. 

Paris. La Societe de Geographic, — Bullettin. Tome X, No. 3. 

. — — . . Compte Rendu des Seances de la Commis- 
sion Centrale, Nos. 1 et 2, 1890. 



]890.] Library. 143 

Paris. La Societe Zoologique cle France, — Bullettiu. Tome XIV, 

No. 9. 
Prague. Der K. K. Stern-o'arte zu Prag, — Astronomisclie Beobaclitun- 

gen, 1885—1887. Apijeudix zum 46, 47, nnd 48 Jalirgang. 
Rome. La Societa Degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Vol. 

XXXIII, Disp. 12^ and Indice, Volume XVIII. 
Stockholm. Konigliga Svenska Vetenskaps-Akademiens, — Biliang 

(supplement aux Memoii^es), — Vol. IX, Nos. 1 — 2 ; Vol. X, Nos. 

1—2 ; Vol. XI, Nos. 1—2 ; Vol. XII, Nos. 1-4 ; Vol. XIII, Nos. 

1—4. 
. . . Forteckning (Table des Matieres), 1826 

—1883. 

Handlingar (Memoires), — Vol. XX, Nos, 



1—2 ; Vol. XXI, 1—2 and Atlas. 

Lefnadsteckningar (Biographies des 



Membres),— Vol. II, No. 3. 

. . . Meteorologiska lakttagelser I Sverige. 

(Observations Meteorologiques, Suedoises) Vols. XXII — XXVI, 
1880-84. 

-. . Ofversight (Bulletin),— Vols. XLI— XLV, 



1884-88. 

St. Petersburg. La Societe Iraperiale Russe de Geographic, — Proceed- 
ings. Tome XXV, No. 5. 

Taiping. Government of Perak — The Perak Government Gazette, — 
Vol. Ill, Nos. 3—5, 1890. 

Turin. La R. Accademia delle Scienze di Torino, — Atti Vol. XXV, 
Disp. 1^— 2a. 

Vienna. Der Anthropologischen Gesellschaft in Wien, — Verhand- 
lungen. Nos. 13—17, 1889. 

^ooKS AND Pamphlets, 

presented by the Authors, Translators Sfc. 
CuLiN, Stewaet. Chinese Games with Dice (Read befoi'e the Oriental 

Club of Philadelphia, March 14th, 1889). 8vo. Philadeli^hia, 1889. 
Cunningham, D. D., M. B., F. R. S., F. L. S. On the Phenomena of 

Fertilization in Ficus Roxburghii, "Wall. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 
Haeckel, Ernst. Monographic die Radiolarien, (Rhizopoda Radiaria) 

Vierter Theil. Die Phaeodarien oder Cannopyleen Radiolarien. 

4to. Berlin, 1888. 

. Natiirliche Schopfungs-Geschichte. 8vo. Berlin, 1889. 

' . Report on the Deep-Sea Keratosa, (Report on the 

Scientific results of the Voyage of H. M. S. Challenger, Zoology, 

Vol. XXXII, Part LXXXII). 4to. London, 1889. 



144 Library. [March, 

King, George, M. B., LL. D., F. R. S., F. L. S. Annals of the Royal 
Botanic Garden, Calcutta, Vol. II. The species of Artocarpus indi- 
genous to British India ; The Indo-Malayan species of Quercus and 
Castanopsis. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 

— — . The species of Ficus of the Indo-Malayan and Chinese 

Countries. Appendix. Some new species from New Guinea. Fcp. 
Calcutta, 1889. 

MODiGLiANi, Elio. Un Viaggio A Nias. Svo. Milano, 1890. 

Rat, Pratap Chandra, C. I. E. The Mahabharata, translated into En- 
glish prose. Part LVI. Svo. Calcutta, 1889. 

M.ISCELLANEOUS Pl^SENTATIONS. 

Dagh-Register gehonden int Easteel Batavia vaut passerende daer ter 
plaetse als over geheel Nederlandts- India. Anno 1661, van Mr. 
J. A. Van Der Chijs. 4to. Batavia, 1889. 
Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en "Wetenschappen. 
Verzeichniss der Arabischen Handschriften. von "W. Ahlwardt. Zweiter 
Band (Die Handschriften- Verzeichnisse der Koniglichen Biblio- 
thek zu Berlin, Achter Band). 4to. Berlin, 1889. 
Verzeichniss der Tiirkischen Handschriften. von Wilhelm Pertsch (Die 
Handschriften- Verzeichnisse der Koniglichen Bibliothek zu Berlin, 
Sechster Band). 4to. Berlin, 1889. 

Der Koniglichen Bibliothek zu Berlin, 
Returns of the Rail-borne trade of the Central Provinces during the 
quarter ending 30th September 1889, Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Provinces. 
The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burmah. Fishes, Vol. 

II. By Francis Day, C. I. E., LL. D. Svo. London, 1889. 
Report on the Administration of Bengal, 1888-89. Relations with 
Tributary States, and Frontier affairs. Fcp. Calcutta, 1889. 

Government of Bengal. 

Copies of Government of India Despatch, dated the 22nd day of June 
1889, with its enclosures, including Reports by Mr. Tucker : and 
of Memorial of the Indian Association of Calcutta, dated the 12th 
day of April 1888, regarding land emigration from Bengal to 
Assam (in continuation of House of Lords' Return, (No. 14), 5th 
March, 1889). Fcp. London, 1889. 

Correspondence between the India Office, the Government of India, and 
the Treasury, on the Plate Duties since November 1888. Fcp. 
London, 1889. 



1890.] Libranj. 145 

Index to the Reports from the Select Committee on East India (Hydera- 
bad Deccan Mining Company). Fep. London, 1888. 

Report of the Committee appointed to enquii'e into the Pay, Status, and 
Conditions of service of Medical Officers of the Army and Navy. 
Fcp. London, 1889. 

Report of the Royal Commission on the Blind, the Deaf and Dumb &c. 
of the United Kingdom. Fcp. London, 1889. 

Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Home Depart- 
ment. No. 263. Reports on Publications issued and registered in 
the several Provinces of British India during the year 18S8. Fcp. 
Calcutta, 1889. 

. No, 265. Papers relating to Discipline and Moral Train- 
ing in Schools and Colleges in India. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Statement exhibiting the moral and material progress and condition of 
India during the year 1887-88 (No. 24). Fcp. London, 1889. 
Government of India, Home Department. 

Report on the Administration of the Madras Presidency during the year 
1888-89. Fcp. Madras, 1889. 

Government of Madras. 

Report on the Administration of the N.-W. Provinces and Oudh for the 
year ending 31st March, 1889. Fcp. Allahabad, 1890. 

Government op the N.-W. Provinces and Oudh. 

Catalogue of the Books in the Library of the Indian Museum, corrected 
to August, 1887. 8vo Calcutta, 1889. 

Indian Museum, Calcutta. 
Memoria presentada al Congreso de la Union por el Secretario de 
Estado Y del despacho de Fomento, Colonizacion, Industria Y 
Commercio, de la Republica Mexicana, General Carlos Pacheco. 
Corresponde a los aiios Trascurridos de Enero de 1883 a Junio de 
1885. Tome III— \^, et atlas Tome VI. 4to. Mexico, 1887. 
Observatorio Meteorologico Magnetico Central, Mexico. 
Register of climatic variations from the months of July to Decem- 
ber 1889, recorded at the St. Xavier's College Observatory. Sheet, 
Calcutta, 1890. 

St. Xavier's College, Calcutta. 

Periodicals Purchased. 

Berlin. Deutsche Litteraturzeitung, — Jahrgang, X, Nrn. 49 — 51. 
Calcutta. Indian Medical Gazette. — Vol. XXV, No. 1, and Index to 
Vol. XXIV. 



146 Library. [March, 1890.] 

Cassel. Botanisclies Centralblatt.— Band XL, Heft 10—12. 

Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Nafciirelles. — Tome 

XXIII, No. 1. 
Gottingen. Der Konigl. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, — Gottin- 

gische Gelehrte Anzeigen. Nrn. 24—25, 1889. 

— . . Nachrichten. Nr. 19, 1889. 

Leipzig. Annalen dei' Physik nnd Cheniie, Beiblatter. Band XIV, 

Stiick. 1. 
- — : . Literarisches Centralblatt.— Nrn. 50—52, 1889, nnd Nr. 1, 

1890. 
Leyden. Internationales Archiv-fiir Ethnographie, — Band II, Heft 5. 
London. The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. V, (6*^^ 

Series), No. 25, January, 1890. 

. . The Chemical News,— Vol. LXI, Nos. 1574—1576. 

. The Entomologist,— Vol. XXIII, No. 320, January, 1890. 

. The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 

—Vol. XXIX, No. 176, January, 1889. 
— >. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVII, No. 156, February, 

1890. 
. The Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, — Vol. XXX, 

(New Series), Part 3, December, 1889. 
. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 1940— 



1942. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science, — Vol. XXXVIII, (S'^'' 

Series), No. 228, December, 1887. 
Paris. L' Academie des Sciences, — Oomptes Rendus des Seances. — 

Tome CIX, Nos. 23—26, und Tables de Tome CVIII. 

. Revue Scientifique, — Tome XLV, Nos. 8 — 6. 

. Revue Critique d' Histoire et de Litterature, — Tome XXVIII, 

Nos. 49-51. 

EooKS Purchased. 

De Nice'ville Lionel. The Butterflies of India, Burmah and Ceylon. 

Vol. III. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 
Oppert, Gustav, Ph. D. On the original inhabitants of Bharatavarsa, or 

India. Part II. The Gaudians. 8vo. Madras, 1889. 
Report on the Scientific results of the voyage of H. M. S. Challenger. 

Physics and Chemistry, — Vol. II. 4to. London, 1889. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

jp'oR April, 1890. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Bengal 
was held on Wednesday, the 2nd April 1890, at 9-15 P. M. 

J. Wood-Mason, Esq., Vice-President, in the Chair. 

The following members were present : 

Babu Gaurdas Bysack, E. C. Cotes, Esq., S. R. Elson, Esq., C. L. 
Griesbach, Esq., Babu Rajanikanta Gupta, Dr. Hoernle, C. Little, Esq., 
Kumar Rameswar Maliah, L. de Niceville, Esq., Dr. D. Prain, Dr. P. K. 
Ray, Dr. J. R. Tull Walsh. 

Visitor — W. Connan, Esq. 

The Minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Forty-four presentations were announced, details of which are 
given in the Library List appended. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society, were ballotted for and elected Ordinary Mem- 
bers : 

Philip Lake, Esq., B. A. (Cantab). 

F. G. Hickson, Esq. 

Dr. W. H. Self. 

The following gentlemen have expressed a wish to withdraw from 
the Society : 

Rev. J. Muir Hamilton. 
H. H. Anderson, Esq. 



r^h 



148 Philological Secretaiy — Exhibition of livo Astrolabes. [April, 

The Philological Secretary exliibited two Astrolabes purchased 
for the Society, and read tlie following note from Raja Rajendralala 
Mitra forwarding the instruments : 

" I send herewith two astrolabes which will interest you. They 
have been purchased by Professor Mahesachandra Nyayaratna at Allaha- 
bad for us at a cost of Rs. 9 only. On referring to the Journal, Vols. 
X and XI, you will find that the large one is somewhat smaller than ths 
Pottinger plate, but the details are closely similar. I imagine that it 
is defective, wanting the central pivot and the tubular plumb-line index 
"which were necessary for determining the position of the stars and the 
use of the plate as an indicator of time. You know well that until 
very recently captains of native ships, who had no chrononietors nor 
quadrants, depended entirely upon their astrolabes. By men familiar 
with the handling of the instruments latitudes, longitudes and the 
progression of the equinoxes were all pretty accurately determined by 
the use of the astrolabe, and the astronomical and astrological calcu- 
lations for which it was employed were very various. 

" The second instrument is a pocket edition of the first. It is not 
so elaborate, but much more handy. If you have any Maulvi in the 
Madrasah, who is familiar with Arabic astronomy, you ean get from him 
a full description of the uses of these instruments. If you should 
remember the Kotah silver plate which we have in our library, you will 
find that it differs entirely from the instruments now under notice. Its 
details do not at all support the theory that the Hindus borrowed their 
astronomy from the Arabs." 

Dr. HoERNLE remarked that the larger astrolabe was an Indian 
one, made in Lahore. A similar astrolabe was described in the Journal, 
As. Soc. Beng. Vol. X, p. 759./", by J. Middleton. It was a Persian one, 
belonging to Major Pottinger, and was brought from Herat. It differed 
from the present one in size as well as the number of discs. The 
present astrolabe was about 5^ inches in diameter, and consisted of 
seven pieces, while Major Pottinger's was about 8 inches in diameter, 
and apparently consisted of only 5 pieces, with an index piece. The 
latter was wanting in the present one. As suggested by Raja R. Mitra, 
he had given the astrolabes to one of the Madrasah Maulvis for ex- 
amination by himself and others. But they had been unable to explain 
its use. 

On the interior face of the main piece were engraved two sets 
of three concentric circles. The middlemost circle of each set was in- 
scribed with the names of the best known towns of India, Persia, and 
Arabia; the outer and inner circles of each set gave the loiigitudes 



1890.] D. Praia — The nnn-indujenous species of the Andaman Flora. 149 

and latitudes of each town. The series of uames of the outer set 
commenced, where the handle was attached to the piece, with Mecca, 
Medinah, Taif, Jadah, etc., and concluded with Lahawai', Dehli, 
Agra, Benares. The series of the inner set contained only Indian names, 
commencing with Daulatabad, Ahmadnagar, and ending with Sonargara, 
Bangalah, Paaipatli (sic). On the back of the main piece was inscribed 
the name of the maker of the astrolabe. The space occupied by this 
inscription was vacant on Major Pottinger's sj^ecimen ; it is the small 
quadrant, shown in J. A. S. B., Vol. X, Plate I, inscribed simply with 
" circles of Sicmhaf:." The inscription on the present specimen is as 
follows : 

i. e., the work of the lowest of servants, Hamad, the son of Muham- 
mad Muqim, the son of 'Isa, the son of Allahdad, the astrolabist of 
Lahor, dated the 4th of Zi-1-Hijjah, in the year 1087 (= 1677 A. D.). 

The handle of the main piece showed, as part of its trellis work, 
the name of IMuhammad Sa'id ( >^>-*-^ ^♦=p'* ) 

The following papers were I'ead — • 

1. Natural History notes froyn H. M.'s Indian Marine Survey 
Steamer " Livestigator" Gommxnder R. F. Hosktn, R. N"., Commanding — 
No. 16. The non-indigenous species of the Andaman Flora. — By D. Prain. 

(Abstract.) 

This paper consisted of au enumeration of the palpably introduced 
species present in the Andaman Flora based on the information given 
in the Report on the Vegetation of the Andaman Islands by the late Mr. 
S. Kurz and on that obtained during a brief botanical visit to Port 
Blair in 1889. 

The following method was adopted in presenting the list : 

1. Cultivated species and weeds — enumerated together by Mr. 
Kurz — were dealt with separately. 

2. Species (of both kinds) given by Mr. Kurz as present in 1866 
(the date of his visit to the Audamans) were taken from an enumeration 
incorporated in his report — the synonymy being, however, made to con- 
form with that of the Flora of British India. 

3. Additional species (of both kinds) present in 1889 were species 
seen and collected in November of that year. 

The list was thei'efore subdivided into — 

1. Species under cultivation or obviously planted in 1866, 123 in 
all. 



150 D. Prain — The non-indigenous species of the Ajidaman Flora. [April, 

II. Species under cultivation, obviously planted, or intentionally- 
introduced seen in 1889, not present in 1866, 42 in all, bringing the 
total of voluntarily introduced species up to 165. 

[The species of these sub-lists consist of ; — 1, — such as probably 
never could become naturalised, (these were indicated in the lists as 
exotic by a distinctive mark) ; 2, — those that might be expected to hold 
their own in the struggle for existence if the settlement should happen 
to be abandoned; and 3, —those that are naturalised in the Andamans 
now. The second category cannot be limited from the first without 
individual differences of opinion arising as to its exact components ; it 
is, however, of necessity that from which the third is being steadily 
recruited.] 

III. S^Decies unintentionally introduced prior to 1866, 60 in all ; 
and 

IV. Species unintentionally introduced between 1866 and 1889, 
44 in all ; making a total of involuntarily introduced species up to 
Is'ovember 1889 of 104. But 5 of the species present in 1866 were 
not met with in November 1889, and 3 of those met with being 
cryptogams were omitted from the calculations which were confined to 
flowering plants only. 

The results indicated by the 4 sub-lists were : — 

1, — that, in 1866, 15 intentionally introduced plants and 60 weeds 
had actually or apparently become established in the Andamans and, 
though not indigenous plants, had become an integral portion of the 
Andaman flora. 

2, — that, in 1889, 14 more of the plants intentionally introduced 
but only seen under cultivation in 1866 had become naturalised ; that 
along with them 7 species intentionally introduced during the interval 
between 1866 and 1889 had begun to appear spontaneously ; also that 
during the same period 41 more weeds (phanerogamic) had become 
introduced. 

3, — that on the other hand one species that was appearing sponta- 
neously in 1866 was only seen cultivated in 1889, and 5 weeds that were 
seen in 1866 were not met with in 1889. But too great weight was not 
laid on the latter fact, which might well be the i"esult of the shortness 
of the 1889 visit (5 days only). 

The remaining portion of the paper was occupied with an enquiry 
into the rate of naturalisation and the nature of the naturalised speciea ; 
— the results may be briefly stated. 

1. The total number both of naturalised and of unintentionally 
introduced species constantly increases. 

2. The rate of naturalisation of intentionally introduced species 



1890.] Lihrary. 151 

has hitherto been lower than that of introduction of unintentionally 
introduced species. 

3. In both cases this rate has been lower for the period of 23 years 
between 1866 and 1889 than during the 11 seasons prior to 1866 during 
which a settlement had been in existence at Port Blair. 

4. This lower rate for the second period is more apparent than 
real, and is due as regards naturalized species to the survival of 
some cultivated species (left to their fate when the early settlement 
that existed between 1789-92 was abandoned) at the time of the 
second settlement in 1858,* and as regards weeds to the fact that the 
greater number of common weeds were necessarily introduced with 
earliest sowings of grain. 

5. That in both cases the rate has now probably become nearly 
uniform, but that whereas for naturalized species it is steady or uni- 
formly increasing, for weeds it is probably uniformly decreasing .\ 

The paper will be published in full in the Journal, Part II. 

2. The Buddhist Remains at Mount TJren in Hhmgir (Monghyr) 
district, and identification of the site with a celebrated hermitage of 
B^iddha ; illustrated with 'photographs, facsimile ink impressions of in- 
scriptions, Buddha's footprint, and a map. — By L. A. Waddell, M. B. 

The paper will be published in the Journal, Part I. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
meeting held in March last. 



Tl^NSACTIONS, Pl^CEEDINGS AND JOUI^NALS, 

presented by the respective Societies and Editors. 
Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University, — American Chemical Journal, 

Vol. XI, Nos. 1—5. 
■ . . American Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 

XI, Nos, 3 and 4. 

* In the papor various considerations were advanced which went to shew that 
such survival must be far less extensive than on a 'priori grounds alone might be 
expected under the circumstances. 

t Dr. King, Superintendent of the Royal Botanic Garden, is at present (April 
1890) paying a brief official visit to the Andamans and has kindly undertaken to 
collect any weeds that may be in flower now which were not in flower in Novem- 
ber ; it is therefore hoped that before it passes through the press the numbers in 
this paper may be brought quite up to the date of publication. 



152 Library. [April, 

Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University,-^American Journal of Philology, 

Vol. IX, No. 4 and Vol. X, No. 1. 
. . . Circulars, Vol. VIII, Nos. 69—73, Vol. 

IX, No. 78. 
Bombay. Bombay Natural History Society, — Journal, Vol. IV, Nos. 

3 and 4. 
. The Indian Antiquary, Vol. XVIII, No. 227 and Vol. XIX, 

No. 230. 
Boston. American Philological Association, — Transactions, Vol. XIX. 
Budapest. A Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, — E'rtekezesek, Kotefc 

XIV, Szam, 8—10. 
. . Ethnologische Mitteilungen aus Uugarn. Jahr 

I, Heft 3. 
. . Nyelvtudomanyi Kozlemenyek, Kotet XXI, 



Fiizet 1—2. 
. ' . Mathematische und Naturwissenschaftliche 

Berichte aus Ungarn, — Baud VI. 
. . Uugarische Revue,— Heft VII— X, 1888, Heft 



I— III, 1889. 
. . L' Academic Nationale Hongroise des Sciences, 



—Bulletin, Tome XVIII, No. 1. 
Calcutta. Geological Survey of India, — Records, Vol. XXIII, Part I. 

■ . Indian Engineering, — X^ol. VII, Nos 10 — 12. 

— — — -. Photographic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. Ill, No. 3. 
Cassel. Des Vereines fiir Naturkunde zu Kassel, — Bericlit XXXIV — 

XXXV. 
Florence. La Societa Africana d' Italia, — Bullettino, Tome V, Fasci- 

colo 8°. 
Hamburg. Naturwissenschaftlichen Verein in Hamburg, — Abhand- 

lungen aus dem Gebiete der Naturwissenschaften, Band XI, 

Heft 1. 
Leipzig. Der Deutschen Morgenliindischen Gesellschaft, — Zeitsclirift, 

Band XLIII, Heft 4. 
London. Institution of Electrical Engineers, — Journal, Vol. XIX, 

No, 84, and Index to Vol. XVIII. 

. Nature,— Vol. XLI, Nos. 1059—1062. 

. The Academy,— Nos. 928—931. 

, The Athenseum,— Nos. 3251—3254. 

Mendon, Illinois. The American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal, 

—Vol. XII, No. 1. 
Mexico. Estados Unidos Mexicanos, — Informes y Documentos Relativos 

a Comercio Interior y Exterior Agricultura, Mineria e Industrias, 

No. 51, Setiembre, 1889. 



1890.] Library. 153 

Moscow. La Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscoii, — Bulletin, 

No. 3, 1889. 
• — . . Meteorologiscbe Beobaclitungen. Das Jahr 

1889, Erste Hiilfte. 
Naples. La Societa Africaua D'ltalia, — BoUettino, Anno VIII, Fasc. 

11—12, Novembre— Decembre 1889. 
New York. American Museum of Natural History, — Annual Reports, 

1869, 1870, 1872, 1874-75, 1877—1888-89. 
. . Bulletin, Vol. I, Nos. 1—8, Vol. II, Nos. 

1 and 2. 
Paris. La Societe de Geograpbie, — Compte Rendu des Seances de la 

Commission Centrale, — Nos. 3 et 4, 1890. 
Philadelphia. Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, — Pro- 
ceedings, Parts 1 and 2, 1889. 
• The Journal of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary 

Archives, Vol. XI, No. 2. 
Pisa. La Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali, — Memorie, Tome X. 
. . . Processi Verbali, 7 Luglio 1889, (Tome 

VI)— 17 Novembre 1889, (Tome VII) 
Rome. La Societa Degli Spettrosco])isti Italiani, — Memorie, Vol. XIX, 

No. 1. 
San Francisco. California Academy of Sciences, — Memoirs, Vol. II, 

No. 2. 

• . . Proceedings, Vol. I, Parts 1 and 2. 

Sydney. Linnean Society of New South Wales, — Proceedings, Vol. IV, 

(2iid series,) Part 3. 
Taiping. Government of Perak. The Perak Government Gazette, — 

Vol. Ill, Nos. 6—8. 
Toronto. Canadian Institute, — Proceedings, 3rd series, Vol. VII, No, 1. 
Trenton. Trenton Natural History Society, — Journal, Vol. II, No. 1 

January, 1889. 
Vienna. Der K. K. Geologischen Reichsanstalt,— Jahrbuch. Band 

XXXIX, Heft 1 und 2. 

. . Verhandlungen, No. 18, 1889, Nos 1 and 2, 1890. 

. Osterreichischen Touristen-Club, — Mittheilungen, der Section 

fur Naturkunde. Jahr I, 1889. 
Washington. United States Geological Survey, — Bulletin, Nos. 48 — 

53. 
Yokohama. Der Deutschen Gesellschaft fiir Natur- und Volkerkunde 

Ostasiens in Tokio, — Mittheilungen, Heft 43, February 1890. 



154 Library. [April, 

M.ISCELLANEOUS PRESENTATIONS. 

Catalogue of the Persian, Turkish, Hindustani, and Pushtu Manu- 
scripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. Part I. The Persian 
Manuscripts. By Hermann Ethe, Ph. D., Hon. M. A. 4to. Oxford, 
1889. 

Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

North American Fauna, Nos. 1 and 2. 8vo. Washington, 1889. 

Department of Agriculture, U. S., Washington. 
Annual Report of the Department of Mines, New South Wales, for the 
year, 1888. Fcp. Sydney, 1889. 

Department of Mines, N. S. Wales, Sydney. 
Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Pennsylvania for 1887. 

Svo. Harrisburg, 1889. 
Catalogue of the Museum of the Geological Survey of Pennsylvania, 

Part III, O. 0. 0. Svo. Harrisburg, 1889. 
A Dictionary of the Fossils of Pennsylvania and Neighboui'ing States 
named in the Reports and Catalogues of the Geological Survey of 
Pennsylvania, Vol. I, A. to M. P4. 8vo. Harrisburg, 1889. 
Geological Survey of Pennsylvania, — Atlas to Northern Anthracite 

Field, Parts III and IV, A. A. 
, Atlas to Reports H. H. and H, H. H., with pamphlet of revi- 
sion and connection of the semi-bituminous coal section at Wellers- 
burg in Somerset county. Pa. and notes on the Geology of Cambria 
and Somei-set counties. 

, South Mountain Map, Sheets C 1, 2, 3, 4 ; D 2, 3, 4, 5. 

D6. 

Geological Survey of Pennsylvania. 
History of the Coinage of the Territories of the East India Company in 
the Indian Peninsula : and Catalogue of the Coins in the Madras 
Museum. By Edgar Thurston, Svo. Madras, 1890. 
Notes on the Pearl and Chank Fisheries and Marine Fauna of the 
Gulf of Manaar. By Edgar Thurston. Svo. Madras, 18S0. 

Government Central Museum, Madras. 
Annual Administration Reports of the Forest Department (Southern 
and Northern Circles), Madras Presidency, for the official year 
1888-89. Fcp. Madras, 1889. 
Progress Report of the Archaeological Survey of Southern India from 
October, 1889 to January, 1890. By Dr. E. Hultzsch. Fcp. 
Madras, 1890. 

Government of Madras. 



1890.] Library. 155 

Hand-Book of Cyclonic Storms in the Bay of Bengal for the use of 
Sailors. By John Eliot, M. A. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Report on the Meteorology of India in 1888. By John Eliot, M. A. 
Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of India, Meteor. Department. 

Catalogue of Mysore Coins in the collection of the Government Museum, 
Bangalore. By Captain R. H. Campbell Tufnell, M. S. C , F. Z. S. 
Svo. Madras, 1889. 

Government Museum, Bangalore. 

A Monograph of Oriental Cicadidfe. By W. L. Distant. Published by 
order of the Trustees of the Indian Museum. Part II. 4to. London, 

1889. 

Indian Museum. 

Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science, 
Seventh Series, II — III. The Establishment of Municipal Govern- 
ment in San Francisco. By Bernard Moses, Ph. D. Svo. Balti- 
more, 1889. 

. IV. Municipal History of New Orleans. By William 

W. Howe. Svo. Baltimore, 1889. 

. V — VI. English Culture in Vii^ginia. By William P. 



Trent, M. A. Svo. Baltimore, 1889. 
. VIT — IX. The River Towns of Connecticut : Wethers- 



field, Hartford, and Windsor. By Charles M. Andrews. Svo. 

Baltimore, 1889. 
Dissertations presented for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy to the 

Board of University Studies of the Johns Hopkins University : — 
The Copulative Conjunctions Que, Et, Atque, in the Inscriptions of 

the Republic, in Terence, and in Cato. By H. C. Elmer, Ph. D. 

Svo. Baltimore, 1887. 
A Contribution to the Arch^an Geology of Missouri. By Erasmus 

Haworth, M. S. Svo. Minneapolis, Minn, 188S. 
Paranitro-Sulpho-Benzoic Acid and some of its derivatives. By J. H. 

Kastle. Svo. Baltimore, 1888. 
Researches on the stability of the Alkyl Bromides. By Felix Lengfeld. 

Svo. Baltimore, 1888. 
The Atomic Weight of Zinc as determined by the composition of the 

Oxide. By William M. Burton. Svo. Baltimore, 1889. 
Oi'tho-Sulpho-Benzoic Acid and some of its derivatives. By A. R. L. 

Dohme. Svo. Baltimore, 1889. 
On Phthalic Sulphinide and some of its derivatives. By Chas. W. 

Moulton. Svo. Baltimore, 1889. 



156 Library. [April, 

Line Conoruences. By W, C, L. Gorton (Reprinted from American 

Journal of Mathematics, Vol. X, No. 4.) 4to. 
Some Effects of Electrically stimulating Ganglion Cells. By C. F. 

Hodge, (Reprinted from American Journal of Psychology). 8vo. 

Baltimore, 1889. 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. 

Memoria presentada Al Congreso de la Union por el Secretario de 
Estado y del despacho de Eomento, Colonizacion, Industria y Com- 
mercio, de la Republica Mesicana, General Carlos Pacheco. Corres- 
ponde a los anos Trascurridos de Enero de 188.3 a Juno de 1885. 
Tome I— II. 4to. Mexico, 1887. 

Obseevatorio Meteorologico Magnetico Central, Mexico. 
Twenty-fifth Annual Report of the Sanitary Commissioner with the 
Government of India, for 1888. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Sanitary Commissioner to the Govt, of India. 

A Grammar of the Arabic Language, translated from the German of 
Caspari, with numerous additions and corrections. By William 
Wright. 8vo. London, 1862. 

A Grammar of the Persian Language, with a selection of easy extracts for 
reading ; vocabulary and translations. Fourth edition. By Duncan 
Forbes, A. M. 8vo. London, 1869. 

Records of the Gupta Dynasty. By Edward Thomas, F. R. S. Fcp. 
London, 1876. 

A View of the History and Coinage of the Parthians, with descrip- 
tive catalogues and tables, and a set of engravings of coins. By 
John Lindsay. 4to. Cork, 1852. 

V. A. Smith, Esq., 0. S. 

Scientific Memoirs by Medical Officers of the Army of India, Part 
V, 1890. 4to. Calcutta, 1890. 

Surgeon General with the Govt, of India. 
Transactions of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia, 
Vol. II. 8vo. Philadelphia, 1889. 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia. 
The English Sparrow (Passer Domesticus) in North America, especially 
in its relations to Agriculture. (U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Division of Economic Ornithology and Mammalogy, Bulletin I). 
By Walter B. Barrows. Svo. Washington, 1839. 

J. M. Rusk, Esq. 
Monographs of the United States Geological Survey of Washington, 
Vol. XIII, Geology of the Quicksilver deposits of the Pacific slope. 



1890.] Library. 157 

By George F. Becker. Vol. XIV, Fossil Fistes aud Fossil Plants 
of the Triassic Rocks of New Jersey and the Connecticut Valley. 
By John S. Newberry. 4to. Washington, 1888. 

United States Geological Survey, Washington. 

Transactions of the Astronomical Observatory of Yale Univei'sity, Vol. 
I, Part II. 4to. New Haven, 1889. 

Yale University, New Haven. 

j-^ERioDicALS Purchased. 

Calcutta. Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XXV, No. 2, February, 1890. 
Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, — Tome XXIII, 

No. 2. 
Leeds. The Journal of Conchology,— Vol. VI, No. 4, October, 1889. 
Leipzig. Annalen der Physik und Chemie, —Band XXXIX, Heft 2. 

. . Beiblatter, Band XIV, Stiick 2. 

London. The Chemical News,— Vol. LXI, Nos. 1577-1580. 

. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVII, No. 157, March, 

1890. 
. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 1943— 



1946. 
Paris. Revue Scientifique, — Tome XLV, Nos. 7 — 9. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For M.AY, 1890. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Bengal 
was held on Wednesday, the 7tli May, 1890, at 9-15 p. m. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S., President, in the Chair. 

The following members were present: — 

Babii Saratchandra Das, Prince Jahan Qadr Muhammad Wiiliid 
All, Bahadur, W. H. Miles, Esq., Babii Asutosh Mukhopadhyay, L. de 
Niceville, Esq., Dr. P. K. Ray, Pandit Haraprasad Shastri, Dr. J. H. 
Tull Walsh, Colonel J. Waterhouse, J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Twenty-four presentations were announced, details of which are 
given in the Library List appended. 

The following gentlemen are candidates for election at the next 
meeting : 

Robert P. Heilgers, Esq., proposed by C. L. Griesbach, Esq., second- 
ed by J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Babii Man Mohan Chakravaiti, M. A., B. L., Deputy Magistrate, 
Puri, proposed by Babu Asutosb Mukhopadhyay, seconded by C. Little, 
Esq. 

The following gentlemen have intimated their wish to withdraw 
from the Society : — 

Lieutenant Eaton W. Petley. 
R. R. Bayne, Esq. 



\' 



160 Pliilological Secretary — Reports on old coins. [May, 

The Seceetary reported tlie death of the following member — 
Dr. N. K. Roy. 

The President announced that the Council had sanctioned the 
following amounts of subscriptions due by members being written oif, 
viz., Dr. J. E. T. Aitchison, Rs. 42. A. C. Carlleyle, Esq., Rs. 78-6-6. 
Major H. H. Cole, Rs. 68-13-6. 

The Philological Secretary read the following reports on finds 
of Treasure Trove coins. 

I. Report on 24 old coins, forwarded by the Deputy Commissioner 
of Shahpur, witli his No. 134, dated 7th February 1890. 

The coins are all of copper of various sizes and Aveights. They are 
stated to have heen found near the village of Hadali in the Shahpur 
District. 

Only three of the coins are recognizable, and even these are in bad 
preservation. The remainder are w^orn beyond recognition. 

Of the three coins which can be determined, two are Indo-Scythian, 
of king Kanishka, with the well-known N'ANA and OKPO reverses ; 
see Ariana Antiqtta, PL XII, tigs. 12, 17. The third appears to be a 
Kashmiri coin of Mahmud. 

II. Report on 108 old coins, forwarded hy the Deputy Com- 
missioner of Shahpur, with his No. 948, dated the 9th ISTovember 1889. 

The coins are stated to have been found at Sodhi in the Salt 
Range. 

They are all coins of precisely the same description as another set 
of 196 coins which were sent for examination some time ago, and have 
heen reported on by me on the 25th Sept. 1889. The two sets were 
found at the same place, and appear to have belonged to the same ti'ea- 
sure. They are small copper (mixed with silver) coins of ths Pathan 
Sultan of Delhi, Giiiyasu-d-din, described in Thomas's Chronicles of the 
Pathan Kings of Delhi, p. 135, No. 113 (pi. II, fig. 43). 

III. Report on 326 old coins, forwarded by the Subdivisional 
Ofiicer, Rajmahal, Sonthal Parganahs, with his No. 741, dated 19th 
December 1889. 

In the letter of the Secretary to the Govt, of Bengal, No. ^^^^ Misc., 
dated 26th October 1889, and addressed to the Commissioner of the 
Bhagalpur Division and Santhal Parganahs, with reference to this 
treasure, it is stated, that the coins were found in September 1889 on 
the banks of the river Ganges at Begamganj in the Rajmahal Sub- 
division of the Santhal Parganahs. Together with them were found 49 



1890.] Pliilological Sccr:'taiy — Reports on old coins. 161 

otlier coins wliicli were considered to be new and. of British mintage, 
and wliicli accordingly were returned to the finder. But the 326 pieces, 
now under report, being considered to be okl and not of British mint- 
age, were confiscated to Government, and forwarded to the Asiatic 
Society for examination. 

On examination, however, it was found, that these 326 coins, though 
appai'antly of an older description, are nevertheless coins of British 
mintage. They all belong to the species of the old standard sikka 
Rupees which were struck by the East India Company in the Calcutta 
Mint, in the name of Shah 'A'lam, under the regulations in force from 
1793-D818. They are distinguished by the oblique milling of their 
edges, and by showing on the reverse the 19th year of Shah 'A'lam. 
They have been fully described by Prinsep in his Useful Tables, and by 
Mr. Thurston, Superintendent of the Central Museum, Madras, in his 
History of the Coinage of the Territories of the East India Company in the 
Indian Peninsula, pp. 38-44', where see Plate II, 

IV. Report on 100 old silver coins, forwarded by the Deputy 
Commissioner of Buldana, with his N'o. 849, dated 28th March 1890. 

The Deputy Commissioner states in his N"o. 2038, dated 23rd July 
1889, that a copper vessel containing 560 specimens of a kind of native 
silver coin was found buried in the earth at Amrapur, a village in the 
Buldana District. The coins were estimated to be worth about Rs. 150. 
One hundred specimens were forwarded to me. 

These coins belong to the class commonly designated " Indo- 
Sassanian." Among the natives they are said to be known as Gadhid 
kd paisd. They show the crude forms, on the obverse, of a head, and 
on the reverse, of a fii-e altar, both ixuitated from the proper Sassanian 
coins. Their exact attribution is not yet known. It is probable, 
however, that they formed a local currency in Western India, after the 
downfall of the Gupta empire, i. e., after the 6th century A. D. Coins 
of this description have been found at various times and in more or lesa 
large quantities. 

V. Report on a gold coin and two gold ringlets, forwarded by the 
Offg. Collector of Murshidabad, with his No. 2128 G, dated 25th March 
1890. 

The Offg. Collector states in his No. 1442 G, dated the 19th Nov- 
ember 1889, that a little girl, while picking up snails on the side of a 
public road, found nine gold coins and tAvo gold ringlets. Probably 
they had been washed out of the soil by the rains, or exposed by other 
physical causes. Only one of the nine coins could be recovered, the 



162 Philological Secretary — Ueports on old coins. [M^Y, 

others having been already melted down, by the time the find became 
known to the police. This coin and the ringlets have been acquired for 
Government by the Collector, under sec. 16 of Act YI of 1878, under the 
Board's sanction No. 68 A of 8th February last; and have been forwar- 
ded to me for safe custody. 

With reference to the coin and ringlets I may repeat what I wrote 
to the Collector on the 11th December last. The coin is a barbarous 
imitation of the coinage of the Indo-Scythian king Vasu Deva; it is 
cast in a mould, not struck from a die ; it is also of short weight (113 
grains instead of 120 and upwards). It may not have been intended 
for a coin, but for an ornament. There can be no question, however, of 
its being of ancient manufacture. One of the ringlets is of a pattern 
which is unknown at the present day. (Both coin and ringlets are now 
deposited in the Indian Museum in Calcutta.) 

YI. Report on 40 old silver coins, forwarded by the Offg. 
Collector of the 24-Perganahs, with his No. 3475 G, dated the 26th 
March 1890. 

The coins are stated to have been found buried in the compound 
of a house in Rajkolah in Thannah Deyganga, Subdivision Baraset. 
They are said to weigh 37 tolahs and 9 annas, and to be worth Rs. 32/14, 

On examination, I found that they are coins of some of the indepen- 
dent Sultans of Bengal. They are, as usual with coins of this class, dis- 
figured and cut with " shrofE-marks," a circumstance which makes 
their identification sometimes a matter of difiiculty. In the present 
case, the coins belong to the following Sultans : — 

No. of specimens. 

1, XIYth Sultan, Shamsu-d-dIn Yusuf Shah, son of Barbak 

Shah, 879—836 A. H. = 1474—1481 A. D. There is 
only one specimen of his coin, as described and figured in 
Marsden's Nii,mismata Orientalia, No. DCCLXXYI ; and 
Journal, Asiat. Soc. Beng., Yol. XY, plate Y, No. 14. 
It is dated [8]83 1 

2, XYIIIth Sultan, Saifu-d-din Firuz Shah II, 892—895 A. 

H. =1487 — 1490 A. D. Only one specimen, as describ- 
ed and figm^ed in J. A. S. Bengal, Yol. XLII, p. 288. 
It is dated 892, which shows that the Sultan's reign 
■ must have commenced as early as that year 1 

3, XXIst Sultan, 'Alau-d-din Husain Sha'h, 899—927 A. H. 

= 1494 — 1521 A. D. Of his coinage there are 38 speci- 
mens belonging to several varieties ; viz., 
a. A common variety, described and figured in Marsden's . 



1890.] Philological Secretary — Beports on old coins. 163 

Ntimismnta Orienfalia, No. DCCXOIII. Of this variety 
there are nine of the date 899 and mint Fathabad ; 
fourteen of the date 914 and mint Husainabad ; and 

four of the date 912, mint illegible, total 27 

6. A rare variety, described and figured in Marsden's Num. 
Orient., Wo. DCCLXXIX ; of this there are thi^ee speci- 
mens, two of date 899, mint Fathabad ; and one of 
kliazanah72 (?) 3 

c. A rare variety, described and figured in Journal As. Soc. 

Beng., Vol. XLII, p. 292, plate IX, fig. 9. There are 
three specimens of this variety, but neither date nor 
mint legible on any 3 

d. A new variety, not published. There are two specimens, 

which read as follows : 2 

Obv. Rev. 

l^,<yh _} ^^'J-'lj ^^ aU( <i.l:i. ^i.^s'( 

e. A new variety, not published. There are two sj)ecimens, 

which read as follows : 2 

Ohv. Bev. 

f. A new variety, not published. There is only one speci- 

men, which reads as follows : 

Obv. Bev. 
All A>]>^ 

The second line is doubtful and the third is illegible ... 1 

Total ... 40 



1G4 D. Praia — List of Diamond Island Plants. [Mat, 

The following papers were read : — 

1. Natural History Notes from U. il/.'s Indian Marine SiirveTj Steamer 
** Investigator," Commander Hosktn, R. N. commanding. — No. 17. A 
List of Biamoyid Island Plants. — By D. Pkain. 

(Abstract.) 
This paper consisted of an introductory sketch of the vegetation of 
Diamond Island, off the coast of Arracan, followed by a list of 95 plants 
collected during a brief visit paid by the writer to the island in November 
1889. After the list a tabular view of the distribution of the species 
was presented, the distribution witliin Transgangetic India being sub- 
divided as follows : — (a) Arracan, Chittagong, Assam ; (5) Pegu, Tenas- 
serira, Malay Peninsula ; (c) Andamans, Nicobars, Sumatra and Java. 
This subdivision was found necessary in order to explain the peculiar 
features of the flora of the island which, owing to the situation, i-epresents 
very well the area where these three lines of distribution meet and their 
species intermix. An analytic study of these tables in order to estimate 
numerically the comparative amounts of the influences of these three 
adjacent areas concluded the paper. The method adopted consisted in 
giving the number of species in each of the possible distributional 
ari'angements within these areas, and using these in succession as 
numerators ; as denominator in each case the number of areas involved 
was employed ; the addition of the resultant fractions affecting one area 
yielded a number that appeared to the writer to be indicative of the 
proportional influence of each area in the composition of the floi'a of the 
island. The following results were stated ; the total number of coast 
species being 20, of inland species being 38. • 

General. 



1. Andamans — Nicobar 


Influence 


27|, 


or 


29-29 


7o. 


2. Pegu — Malayan 
8. Assam — Arracan 


ditto 
ditto 


34i, 
32|, 


or 
or 


36-14 
34-57 


7o. 

/o' 




95 


100 




Inland species. 

1. Andaman — Nicobar 


Influence 


n, 


or 


24-56 


%■ 


2. Pegu — Malayan 

3. Assam — Arracan 


ditto 
ditto 


13|, 


or 
or 


39-03 

66-41 

100 


/o' 




38 




Coast species. 

1. Andaman — Nicobar 


Influence 


7A 

' 3 


or 


38-34 


/o' 


2. Pegu — Malayan 

3. Assam — Arracan 


ditto 
ditto 


6^ 


or 
or 


CO CO 
00 00 

o o 

CO CO 


/o' 



20 1000 



1890.] M. Letliierry — Description of a new PsylUd. 165 

2. Novicice Indicce II. An additional sjjecies of Ellipaiithus. — By 
D. Peain. (With a plate.) 

3. Bust and Mildew in India. — By A. Barclay, M. B., Bengal 
Medical Service. 

These papers will be published in the Journal, Part II. 

4. Description of a new Psyllid. — By M. Lethiekrt. Communicated 
hy E. T. Atkinson, Esq. 

In December last, Mr. R. C. Wroughton sent a Psyllid that was 
found to be attended by ants of the genus Camponotvs (probably 
C sylvaticiis, Olivier). He wrote that he found a tree simply covered 
with these insects. " They were all along the midribs of the leaves 
(beneath), and all over the young twigs, and the ants were also swarm- 
ing over the tree. The eggs of the insect were fixed in clusters on each 
side of the midrib, and were of a bright yellow." M. Lethierry has 
kindly identified the insect as a new species of Biapliorina. — E. T. A. 

DiAPHORiNA GUTTULATA, Lethierry. 

Caput et thorax lutea ; vertex lutens, duabus raaculis rotundatis 
fuscis ; sternum et dorsum rubescentia, dorsulum et mesonotum maculis 
longitudinalibas fuscis ; abdomen flavescens, supra fasciis nigro-fuscis, 
segmento genitali scepissime fusco : coni frontales subglobosi, 2/3 
longitudinis verticis sequantes : autenufe latitudine verticis vix longiores, 
flavescentes, articulis basalibus fuscis, duobus terminalibus nigris : 
elytra 2| tarn longa quam lata, opaca, nigra, venis nigris, maculis 
numerosis albis conspersa, margine postico cellularum sex apicalium 
usque ad apicem clavi albo unimaculato : femora fusca, tibiis et tarsis 
flavis vel albidis, harum ultimo articulo nigro. — Long corjDoris 2 millim. 
cum elytris 3 millim. 6' 2 

Variat : elytris albis, subhyalinis, maculis numerosis opacis nigris, 
venis nigris. 

B. Butoni, Low et propinquce, Low similis, major, elytris obscuriori- 
bus, venis nigris distiucta. 

Hab. Poona, Bombay. 

5. 071 some Definite Integrals. — By Asdtosh Mdkhopadhyay, M. A., 
F. R. A. S , F. R. S. E. 

(Abstract.) 

1. If two concentric ellipses of equal size and shape intersect each 
other, their common chords intersect orthogonally at the common centre 
and bisect the angles between the major axes of the ellipses. 

2. The area of the curvilinear quadrilateral common to the two 
ellipses is 

1 (2ah 1 ) 

2ab tan < — -^— V 

i a'^ — b^ sin d ) 



166 A. Mukhopadhyay — On some Definite Integrals. [Mat, 

wliere a, b are the semi-axes and 6 the angle between the major axes of 
the ellipses. 

3. Noting that when z = I 

log z log r-— ^ = 0, 
I -r z 

it is shewn that 



I ' tan-i } r^^ -T^^ d9 



-1 ^ 2^ 1 > 

*^^ Jn^si^^s 

1 - z C z^ z^ > 

= log.log^ + 2 ^^+35+p+ ]■ 

4. The average value of the curvilinear area common to the two 

curves is 

4<ab 
. u 

IT 

where 

, h, a-h ^\ 1 /&\2'^-l 

^i = log - log + 'i } 77; 7—?, I - I 

* a ^ a-^ b / {2n - 1)~ \aj 

5, Remembering that 



■1 a sin 6 

tan"^ -cl6 

i + a COS o 



f 



it is shewn from (3) that if 

P = a2 (1 - a2) COS 29 + 2a (1 + a2) cos Q + a^ (a^ + 3) 
Q = a2 (1 - a2) COS 29 + 2a (1 + a2) COS 9 4(1 + 3a2) 

we have 



»/o 



tan-1 $ ^ cot 9 J cZ9 = 2 log a log ^ ?. 

( C^ > i + a 

Dve integrals vi 

c/o 



o 
The connection of the above integrals with Schaelfer's integral 



\ {x) = — \ - log (1 - a) da. 

is pointed out. (See Grelle, t. XXX, 277—295). 

Pandit Haraprasad Sbastri read a short account of an old gun 
recently dug up at False Point. 

On the completion of the light house at False Point, about 1838, 
three guns seem to have been removed fx'ora the Old Fort at Cuttack 
and buried in the ground there for the purpose of setting up the rigging 



1890.] Pandit H. P. Sbastri — On an old gtm from False Point. 167 

of the Flagstaff. Two of these guns are reported to have no inscription 
on them, and are still at False Point. The third, which contains an 
inscription, has been removed to Calcutta and placed in Cajatain Petley's 
compound in Hastings, where every care is taken that the inscription is 
not injured, I examined the gun and the inscription towards the end 
of April. The gun is made in the old fashioned method of welding 
together a number of large iron rings three inches thick with an opening 
in the middle with a diameter of three inches* It is in fact a unique 
piece of Artillery. 

The inscription is written in a character intermediate between 
modern Bengali and the old Kutila. Some letters are quite Bengali, but 
others retain their Kutila form. For instance J is written 5f, D is written 
Jf, but I is written ^ and not ^. The inscription is let into the breech of 
the gun in brass letters. In many places these brass letters have alto- 
gether disappeared, leaving the indentures in the iron ; in other parts of 
the inscription the indentures could not be distinguished from the surface 
of the gun, owing to large corrosions caused by neglect and exposure iu 
the open air. As far as it can be made out it runs thus :— 

ililn^^cTf^ ;§i?i50®if%s^ 5i^t?itcs^ ^^ i ^ i 

^\ + + + ^jT^JTTfJl tw^^3^£ftt3\ JTC^— ^b-o. 

Maharaja Jayadhvaja who is in heaven obtained this machine 
* * * a yavana in the year 4- 280. [^t^»T?3l with three letters lost 
before it, cannot be translated.] So, a Hindu chief obtained this gun 
from some European. The machine was new at the time as it had not 
got a specific name, and it was thought so strange that an inscription was 
placed upon it, and it was exhibited to the people. Who the Maharaja 
•was it is difficult to tell. He must have belonged to the large number 
of petty chiefs of Bengal who, after the Muhammadan conquest of this 
country, founded small States on the borders of Bengal and Orissa and 
became tributary to the latter. 

I have translated ^i{z'W<i as * the king who is in heaven.' It may be 
a patronymic of the family of chiefs. 

But the most important part of the inscription is the date. It is 
said to be in the saka year 280 with some letters lost before 2. If the 
first figure of the number is 1, it is 1280 S'aka; adding 78 we get 1358, 
twelve years after the battle of Cressy in which guns were first used in 
Europe. It seems impossible that guns should travel so far in such a 
short period of time. It has been suggested that the at the end is so 
small that it may not be taken into account at all, and the worn out socket 
hole before 2 may also represent 9. We would in that case come to 928 
Saka which in many backward places is used for any era. Taking this to 
be the ordinary Hijri era, as the Bengali year was not known then, we get 



168 Lihrcmj. [May, 

928 + 622 = 1550 minus a few years for the lunar calctilation of the 
Muhammadans. Thiis the year comes to abont 1525 A. D. when the 
Portuguese were anxious to make a settlement in Orissa and in Bengal. 
A petty chief might have been gained over to grant them land or priv- 
ileges of trading by presents not known in the country. 



LlBRAI^Y, 

The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
meeting held in April last. 



Transactions, Proceedings and Journals, 

presented by the respective Societies and Editors. 

Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University, — Circulars, Vol. IX, I^o. 79. 
Batavia. Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen,— 
Notulen, Deel XXVII, Aflevering IV. 

■ ■■ Tijdschrift voor Indische Taal-, Land-en Volken- 
kiTnde, Deel XXXIII, Aflevering 5 en 6. 

Berlin. Entomologischen Verein in Berlin — Entomologische Zeitschrift, 

—Band XXXIII, Heft 2. 
Bombay. Anthropological Society of Bombay, — Journal, Vol. II, No. 1. 
. The Indian Antiquary,— Vol. XVIII, No. 228 and Vol. XIX, 

No. 231. 
Buenos Aires. La Academia Nacional de Ciencias en Cordoba, — Boletin, 

Tome X, Entrega Z''. 
Buda Pest. La Societe Hongroise de Geographic, — Bulletin, Tome 

XVIII, Ease. 2. 

Calcutta. Indian Engineering, — Vol. VII, Nos. 13 — 18. 

■ Photographic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. Ill, No. 4. 
Edinburgh. The Scottish Geographical Society, — Magazine, Vol. VI, 

Nos. 2 and 8. 
Florence. La Societa Italiana di Antropologia, Etnologia e Psicologia 
Comparata, — Archivio per L' Antropologia e la Etnologia, Vol. 

XIX, Fascicolo3^ 

Havre. Societe de Geographic Commerciale du Havre, — Bulletin, 

Janvier — Fevrier, 1890. 

. . Annuaire, 1889. 

Ithaca. Cornell University,— Studies in Classical Philology, No. 1, 

Part 2. 



1890.] Lihrartj. 169 

Leige. Societe Greologique de Belgique, — Annales, Tome XVII, 1^'^ 

Livraison. 
London. Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, — 

Journal, Vol. XIX, No. 3. 

. Geological Societj, — Quarterly Journal, Vol. XLVI, Part I. 

■ Institution of Civil Engineers, — Minutes of Proceedings, Vol. 
XCVIII, and Brief Subject Index, Vols. LIX— XCVIII. 

. Institution of Electrical Engineers, — Journal, Vol. XIX, No. 

85, and List of Officers and Members corrected to January 31st, 1890. 
. Institution of Meclianical Engineers, — Proceedings, No. 3, 

1889. 
. Nature,— Vol. XLT, Nos. 1063—1068. 

■ Roj^al Astronomical Society, — 'Monthly Notices, Vol. L, Nos. 2 
and 3. 

— — — . Royal Geographical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XII, No. 2. 

. Royal Institution of Great Britain, — 'Pi'oceedings, Vol. XII, 

Part 3, and List of Members, 1889. 

■ Royal Microscopical Society, — Journal, Part 6a, 1889 and 
Part I, 1890. 

. Royal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. XLVI, Nos. 284—285 and 



Vol. XLVIl, No. 286. 

— . Royal Statistical Society, — Journal, Vol. LII, Part 4. 
— . The Academy,— Nos. 932— 937. 
— . The AtheuEeum,— Nos. 3255—3260. 



Mexico. Estados Unidos Mexicanos, — Informes y Documentos relatives 
a Comercio Interior y Exterior Agricultura, Mineria e Industrias, 
No. 52, Octubre, 1889. 

. Observatorio Meteoroldgico-Magnetico Central de Mexico, — 

Boletin Mensual, Tomo II, Nos 3 et 4. 

— — — . La Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate," — Memorias, Tomo 



III, No. 3. 
Montreal. Geological and Natural History Survey of Canada, — Annual 

Report, new series, Vol. Ill, Parts 1 and 2, and maps. 
Paris. Journal Asiatique, — Tome XIV, No. 2 ; et Tome XV, No. 1. 

. La Societe de Geographic, — Bulletin, Tome X, No. 4. 

-. . Compte Rendu des Seances de la Commission Centrale 

Nos. 5 et 6, 1890. 
> . La Societe Zoologique de France, — Bulletin, Tome XIV, No. 10 



et Tome XV, No. 1. 

Philadelphia. The Journal of Comparative Medicine and Veterinaiy 
Archives, Vol. XI, Nos. 3 and 4. 

Rio de Janeiro. Observatorio do Rio de Janeiro, — Revista do Observa- 
torio, Anno V, No. 1. 



170 Lihrary. [Mat, 

Roiiie. La Societa Degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Yol. XIX, 

Nos. 2 et 3. 
Roorkee. The Indian Forester,— Vol. XVI, Nos. 1—3. 
Taiping. Government of Perak. The Perak Government Gazette, 

Vol. Ill, Nos. 9—11, 1890. 
Toronto. Canadian Institute, — Annual Report, Session, 1888-9. 
Trieste. La Societa Adriatica di Scieuze Naturali in Trieste, — Bollet- 

tino, Tome XII. 
Turin. La R. Accademia delle Scienze di Torino, — Atti, Vol. XXV, 

Disp. 3" — 7^ et Eleuco Degli Accademici Residenti, Nazionali non 

Resident!, Stranieri e Corrispoudenti al 1° Gennaio, 1890. 
Vienna. Der Anthropologischen Gesellschaft in Wien, — Mittheilungen. 

Band XIX, Heft 4. 
• . Der K. K, Geologischen Reichsanstalt, — Verhandlungen, Nos. 

3—5, 1890. 
• . Des K. K. Naturhistorischen Hofmuseums, — Annalen, Band. 



IV, No. 4. 

Books and Pamphlets, 

presented hy the Authors, Translators, Sfc. 

Bonaparte, Prince Roland. Le Glacier de 1' Atelsch et le lao de 

Miirjelen. 4to. Paris, 1889. 
. ". Le premier etablissement des Neerlandais a Maurice. 4to, 

Paris, 1890. 
MiTRA, Sarat Chandra, M. A., B. L. The Indian Museum and Indian 

Archteology. 8vo. 
Rat, Prat^p Chandra, C. I. E. The Mahabharata, translated into English 

Prose, Part LVII. 8vo. Calcutta, 1889. 
TopiNARD, Dr. Paul. La Societe, L' E'cole, Le Laboratoire et le Musee 

Broca. (A la memoire de Broca). 8vo. Paris, 1890. 

Miscellaneous JPresentations. 

Report of the first meeting of the Australasian Association for the 
Advancement of Science, held at Sydney, N. S. W., in August and 
September, 1888. Vol. I, 1887. 8vo. Sydney, 1889. 
Australasian Association for the advancement of Science, 

N. S. Wales, Sydney. 

Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum, 
Part III. Containing the order Chelonia. By R. Lydekker, B. A., 
F. G. S. 8vo. London, 1889. 



■1890.] Lihrcmj. 171 

A Guide to the Mineral Gallery of the British Museum (Natural 
History,) Loudon. 8vo. Loudon, 1889. 

British Museum, London. 

Astronomical Observations made at the Observatory of Cambridge for 
the years 1866—1869, Vol. XXII. 4to. Cambridge, 1890. 

Cambridge Observatory. 

Rappoi-t du Couseil General des Facultes 1888-89 AM. le Miuistre 
de r Instruction Publique et des Beaux Arts. (Extrait de la 
Revue lutemiationale de 1' Enseignement, t. XIX.) 8vo. Paris, 
1890. 

CONSEIL Ge'Ne'rAL DES FaCULTe's DE PaRIS. 

The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma. Birds, Vol. I. 
By Eugene W. Gates. 8vo. London, 1889. 

Government of Bengal, 

The Avifauna of British India and its dependencies. By James A. 

Murray, F. S. A. L., Vol. II, Part IV. 8vo. Bombay, J 890. 
Despatches and Papers in 1889 relating to the testing of arms in the 

hands of the Troops in India. Fcp., London, 18s9. 
The Indian Antiquary, Vol. XVIII, No. 227, November, 1889. Vol. XIX, 

No. 230, January 1890. 4to. Bombay, 1890. 
Report of the Proceediogs of the Conference on Indian Wheat Impuri- 
ties, held at the India Office on the 8th May, 1889. Fcp. London, 

1889. 
Report of the Royal Commission on the Blind, the Deaf and Dumb of 

the United Kingdom. Vol. II, Aj)pendix. Fcp., London, 1889. 
. Vol. Ill, Minutes of Evidence, with list of witnesses. 

Fcp. London, 1839. 

Vol. IV, Alphabetical Digests to the Minutes of Evi- 



dence. Fcp. London, 1889. 
Return of Contract between the Secretary of State for India and the 

Bombay-Burma Trading Corporation referring to the Teak Forests 

of Upper Burma, and correspondence relating thereto. Fcp. London, 

1889. 
Statistical Abstract relating to British India from 1878-9 to 1887-8. Svo. 

London, 1889. 

Government of India, Home Department. 

Cyclone Memoirs, Part II. Bay of Bengal Cyclone of August 21st — 28th, 
1888. By J. Eliot, Esq., M. A. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of India, Meteor. Department. 



172 Library. [May, 

Indian Museum Notes, Vol I, No. 3, Silkworms in India. By E. C. 

Cotes. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Indian Museum. 

Triibner's Record, 3rd Series, Vol. I, Part 6. 8vo. London, 1890. 

Trubner & Co. 

JPeF^IODICALS Pai\CHASED, 

Berlin. Deutsche Litteraturzeitung, — Jalirgang X, Nr. 52, Jalirgang 

XI, Nrn. 1 — 8, und Mitarbeiter an Jalirgang X. 
— — — . Orientaliscbe Bibliograpnie, — Band III, Hefte 8 et 9. 

. Zeitscbrift fur Etbuologie,— Heft 5, 1889. 

Calcutta. Calcutta Review,— Vol. XC, No. 180. 

. Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XXV, No. 3. 

Cassel. Botaniscbes Centralblatt, — Band XL, Heft 13, Band XLI, 

Heft 1—7. 
Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, — Tome XXIII, 

No. 3. 
Gottingen. Der Konigl. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, — Gottin- 

gische Gelehrte Anzeigen, Nr. 26, 1889, Nrn. 1—3, 1890. 
. . Nachrichten, Nrn. 20—21, 1889, Nr. 1, 1890, 

und Register, 1889. 
Leeds. The Journal of Concbology, — Vol. VI, Nos. 5 and 6. 
Leipzig. Aunalen der Physik und Chemie, — Band XXXIX, Heft 3. 

. . Beibliitter, Band XIV, Stiick, 3. 

. Literarisches Centralblatt, — Nrn. 2 — 9, 1890 und Register, 

1889. 
Leyden. Internationales Archiv f iir Ethnographic, — Band II, Heft 6. 
London. Mind,— Vol. XV, No. 58. 
■ . The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. V, Nos. 

26 and 27. 

. . Tbe Chemical News,~Vol. LXI, Nos. 1581— 1586. 

. The Entomologist,— Vol. XXIII, Nos. 321 and 322. 

. The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 2nd Series, — Vol. I, 

Nos. 2 and 3. 

. The Ibis, 6th Series,— Vol. II, No. 5. 

. The Journal of Botany,— Vol. XXVIIl, Nos 325 and 326. 

.»__«. The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 

—Vol. XXIX, Nos. 177 and 178. 

. The Messenger of Mathematics, — Vol. XIX, Nos. 7—11. 

. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVII, No. 158. 

. The Numismatic Chronicle,— Vol. IX, (3«i Series), No. 36. 



1890.] Library. 173 

London. The Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, — Vol. XXX, 

Part 4. 
: The Quarterly Journal of pure and aj)plied Mathematics, — Vol. 

XXIV, No. 95. 

. Rhoijalocera Exotica, — Part 11 January, 1890. 

. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 1947— 



1952. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science, — 'Vol. XXXIX (3»''i 

Series), Nos. 229 and 230. 
Paris. L' Academie des Sciences, — Comptes Rendus des Seances,— 

Tome CIX, No. 27 et Tome CX, Nos. 1—7. 
. Annales de Ohimie et de Physique, — Tome XIX, (6™*^ Serie), 

Janvier et Fevrier 1890. 

. Joui^nal des Savants, — Decombre 1889 et Janvier, 1890. 

. Revue Critique d' Histoire et de Litterature, — Tome XXVIII, 

No. 52 et Tome XXIX, Nos. 1—6 et Tables, Tome XXVIII. 

. Revue Scientifique, — Tome XLV, Nos. 10 — 16. 

. Revue de Linguistique et de Philologie Comparee, — Tome 

XXIII, Fascicule 1. 
Vienna. Vienna Oriental Journal, — Vol. IV, No. 1. 

J300KS Pui\CHASED. 

Lagrange, Fernand, M. D. Physiology of Bodily Exercise (The In- 
ternational Scientific Series, Vol. LXVII.) 8vo. London, 1889. 

M iJLLEE, F. Max. The Sacred Books of the East, Vol. XXXIII. The 
Minor Law Books, translated by Julius Jolly, Part I. Narada. 
Brihaspati. 8vo. Oxford, 1889. 

. . . Voi. XXXIV. Tbe Vedanta- Sutras, with the 

commentary by S ankaraAarya, translated by George Thibaut, Part 
I. 8vo. Oxford, 1889. 

Tholuce, F. a. G. Bhiithensammlung aus der Morgenlandischen 
Mystik. Svo. Berlin, 1825. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For June 1890, 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Bengal was 
held on Wednesday that 4th Juno 1890, at 9-15 p. m. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S., President, in the chair. 

The following members were present : 

Dr. J. R. i^die, Dr. A. W. Alcock, Babu Gaurdas Bysack, Babu 
Saratchandra Das, 0. L. Griesbach, Esq., Dr. Hoernle, Dr. W. King, 
Rev. Father E. Lafont, T. H. D. La Touche, Esq., W. A. Lee, Esq., 
Babu Asutosh Mukhopadhyay, T. R. Munro, Esq., Major J. H. Sadler, 
Dr. J. H. Tull Walsh, Colonel J. Waterhouse. 

Visitors, Colonel P. Fitz G. Gallwey, R. A. H. Haward, Esq. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Nineteen Presentations were announced, details of which are given 
in the Library List aijpended. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society, w^ere balloted for and elected Ordinary Mem- 
bers. 

Robert P. Heilgers, Esq. 

Babu Man Mohan Chakravarti, B. A., B. L. 

The following gentlemen are candidates for election at the next 
meeting : — 

T. W. Arnold, Esq., M. A. 0. College, Aligarh, proposed by E. J. 
Kitts, Esq., seconded by C, Little, Esq. 



S 



176 Col. Waterlioiise — Photograph of a flash of lightning. [June, 

W. 0. Bonnerjee, Esq., (for re-election) Barrister at Law, proposed 
by Babu Gaurdas Bysack, seconded by C. Little, Esq. 

Babu T. N. Mnkharji, Assistant Cnrator, Economic Section, Indian 
Museum, proposed by Col. J. Waterhouse, seconded by C. Little, Esq. 

P. Donaldson, Esq. (for re-election), proposed by Col. J. Water- 
house, seconded by C. Little, Esq. 

The following gentlemen have intimated their wish to withdraw 
from the Society: — 

Colonel A. C. Toker. 

J. W. Parry, Esq., C. E. 
The Secretary reported the death of the following member : 

A. Grant, Esq., (Life Member). 

The President announced that a proposal had been made by the 
Calcutta Photographic Society to rent two rooms on the ground floor 
of the building for Rs. 60 a month, and that the Council had decided in 
favour of the arrangement. The details had not been settled yet, but it 
had been decided that the rooms should be let. They were not wanted 
by the Asiatic Society, and by letting them a desirable increase would be 
made to our monthly income. At present we had no fund for the 
repairs of the building, and the Rs. 60 a month would be useful for this 
purpose. 

Colonel Waterhouse exhibited a photograph of a flash of lightning 
taken on the evening of the 18th May by Mr. H. Haward, Head Assis- 
tant in the Photographic OflBce, Survey of India. He said — the principal 
interest attaching to the picture is the remarkable closeness of the flash 
which Mr. Haward says was within 25 yards of him, and is clearly seen 
to the left of the picture running between the camei-a and a house 
about forty yards away. x4iiiother peculiarity in the flash is the succession 
of bright points at intervals indicative of more intense electrical action 
at those points. The brighter flashes to the right were taken first and 
then the near flash took place, but the whole exposure was not more 
than two seconds. 

Colonel Waterhouse also exhibited a bottle of solution of silicate 
of soda from which the silica had separated out in agate-like layers at 
the lower part of the bottle. He said — I do not know exactly how 
long I have had this bottle, but most probably since 1881 and possibly 
earlier. It was lying for many years in a corner of a glass cupboard 
in No. 1, Wood Street, near a west window, where it would be ex- 
posed to light on one side during the time the office was open daily ; 



1890.] Col. "Wafcerhou.'?e — Agale-lllce furmatiuu in Silicate of Soda. 177 

but whether light has had anything to do with the decomposition of 
the solution and the formation of the deposit, it is impossible to say, 
and it is uncertain even whether the side of the bottle which shows 
the formation was continuously exposed to light. 

Towards the end of 1883 a fire took place in the room in which this 
bottle was kept, and it and other chemicals in the same place were 
exposed to a very gi'eat heat in a closed-up room. I did not at the time 
notice any change in the silicate solution — nor do I recollect when I 
first did notice the formation, but it was at least some three or four years 
ago : the deposit was then well formed, and no particular change has been 
noticeable since, except that the upper part of the solution, which then 
was clear, is now clouded and beginning to solidify. The bottle ap- 
pears never to have been opened since it came, but it is now cracked in 
the upper part and air might have access to the contents. The bottle 
may have cracked from the heat at the time of the fire. 

I am indebted to Dr. W. King and Mr. Lake of the Geological 
Survey for kindly helping me in looking up the literature of the sub- 
ject, and from a memo, by the latter, it appears that solutions of alkaline 
silicates are prone to deposit silica in a gelatinous form by keeping. 
In one somewhat similar case of deposit in a bottle, the deposit contained 
97-G Si Og and 2-4 Na Og in 100. 

The causes that bring about this deposition are : — 

(1.) Cooling of the solution. 

(2.) Evaporation. 

(3 ) Access of air containing COo. 

(4.) Contact with certain silicates (e. g., glass) in which the acid 
is not saturated and which therefore tend to remove alkali from the 
solution (?). 

(5.) Silica is also precipitated by almost all acids and many salts. 

Except in the case of the fire the solution has been exposed to no 
extremes of temperature, beyond the ordinary seasonal changes between 
60° and 94° ; so that cause (1) could not have had any very great effect 
in producing the change except at the time of the fire. 

The bottle having been closed there has been no sensible evapora- 
tion, nor except by the crack could air with COg have had access to the 
solution and then only in veiy small quantities. No acids or other re- 
agents have been added — so that the only remaining possible cause of 
the deposition of silica is the decomposition of the glass of the bottle 
itself, and this seems most probable. 

Herr 0. Maschke, who has particularly studied the separation of 
crystallised silica from watery solutions (see Pog. Annalen, cxlv), does 
not appear to have noted upon depositions by lapse of time, as in the 



178 Philological Secretary — Reports on old coins. [June, 

present case — but he says that by strongly heating a solution of sodium 
silicate in glass tubes the glass is attacked layer by layer and silica is 
dissolved, forming a more acid sodium silicate. This compound is 
changed again by cooling into a more basic silicate by the deposition 
of silica in the form of nodules. The glass by losing silica is converted, 
layer by layer, into a more basic silicate, which by taking up water is 
ultimately transformed into a stratified zeolitic substance. 

At about 180° and above, free silica sepai'ates from alkaline solu- 
tions in the form of quartz ; below 180° in that of tridyraite ; at still 
lower temperatures as crystallised, and finally as amorphous hydrate of 
silica. 

From this it would seem most probable that the fire may have 
been the original cause of the stratified deposit — but the origin of the 
curious pentagonal nucleus, clear in the centre and almost opaque white 
around within the first layer, with the broken strata and generally circular 
formation above is not apparent, unless it may possibly have been due 
to a small fragment of glass falling from the crack above into the solu- 
tion. Nor is it clear why the deposit should be almost entii'ely on one 
side of the bottle — unless that side was exposed to greater heat from 
the fire or to the light falling on it for years. I am very sorry that I 
have no more positive data to give towai'ds finding out the actual causes 
that have been at work in this instance — however, I thought it might 
be of interest to record it in the hope that other members better ac- 
quainted with the subject, might be able to throw some light upon them. 

The Philological Secretary read the following reports on finds 
of Treasure Trove Coins : 

I, Report on 25 old coins forwarded by the Deputy Commissioner 
of Rawal Pindi, with his No. 613, Gr, dated 7th March 1888. 

The coins are stated to have been found by a man, while grazing 
sheep and goats, buried in the village common land, in an earthen vessel 
near the hamlet Hashu of village Dhangdeo, Tahsil Gujar Khan, in the 
Rawal Pindi District. 

They are later Indo-Scythian coins of the Kida class, the issue 
probably of some chief of a Hunnic tribe, invading India. Many 
different varieties of this class of coins have been found, at various times, 
in different localities ; but a hoard of 62 coins of the very same variety 
as the present one, was found in the same year (1888) in the Bijnaar 
District, N.~W. Prov., a report on which is printed in the " Proceedings " 
of this Society for November 1888. The obverse shows the legends 
kula, kasha and kshaaatn, and the reverse has sola. Most of the 
specimens of the present find are in indifferent condition. They are 
a mixture of gold and silver. 



1890.] Philological Secretary — Reports on oil coins. 179 

II. Report on four old coins forwarded by the Secretary to 
Government N.-W. Prov. and Oudh, Financial Department, with his 

No. ^^ dated the 18th June 1889. 
x-25 

The coins are stated to have been found in the village of Mahlotah 
Pargana Sandi, in the Hardoi district. 

They are of gold and silver mixed, and belong to the class of later 
Indo-Scy thian coins of the " Kida " type, and are probably an issue of 
one of the Hunnic leaders who invaded India in the 5th and 6th cen- 
turies A. D. Numerous varieties of these kida coins have been found 
at different times and at different places. Some of them are described 
in the Indian Antiquary, Vol. XII, p. 6 ; and in Prinsep's Indian Antiq- 
uities, Vol. I. A specimen of the particular variety to which these four 
coins belong, is figured on plate XXX, fig. 19, and described on p. 376. 
The figurement of it, however, is not good. Unfortunately none of the 
present four specimens are sufiiciently good to allow of their legends be- 
ing fully read. The obvei^se shows, as usual, the standing figure of tlie 
king, with Icida under his left arm ; under his right arm can be read 
W^ hardhana or perhaps ^^ vardhana, as on the coin in the Indian 
Antiquities. The reverse shows, as usual, the crude form of a seated 
goddess ; along the right-hand mai'gin, to be read from within, is a 
legend of five aksharas, the first two of which are distinctly ^gj S'ri-Kri ; 
the last is probably ya or a compound of ya (sya ?) ; the two medial 
ones are mutilated beyond recognition. The legend is rather better 
preserved on the coin figured in tbe Indian Antiquities, and has there 
been read as Krigodlidya, though Krigodhiya would probably be more 
correct. The traces on the present coins do not go against this readino- • 
but it rests on too unsatisfactory materials to be accepted. So much 
however, seems clear that the legend gave the name of some prince 
S'ri-Kri[godhiya ] Vardhana. 

It was hoped, that more specimens of these coins may have been 

found. That, however, as appears from the letter of the Secretary to 

4143 
Government, No. — — , dated 10th July 1889, is not the case. 
X '^5 

III. Report on 33 old coins, forwarded by the Deputy Commis- 
sioner of Gurdaspur, with his No. 727 of the 31st March 1890. 

The Deputy Commissioner states that 25 of these coins were found 
in May 1888 in Sojanpur Tahsil, Pathankot, buried in a piece of cloth ; 
and that the other coins were found in Ratawal, in May 1889, buried 
in a brass pot. 

The coins are all rupees of Moghul mintage, except four which are 
of Sikh mintage, and one which is of Persian mintage. 



180 Philological Secroiary — Meports on old coins. [June, 

Those of Moghul mintage belong to the following Sultans of Delhi : 
I, AuRANGziB, A. H. 1068-1118 = A. D. 1658-1707; of the 
ordinary type ; dates 1094, 1095 and 1112; mint of one 
Ndrnol, of two others illegible. 3 

II, Farrukh Sitae, A. H. 1124-1131 = A. D. 1712-1719, type : 
Farrukli in top line; date illegible ; mint Bdru-l-Khildfat 
Shah Jahdndbdd. 1 

III, Muhammad Shah, A. H. 1181-1161 = A. D. 1719-1748, 

1, type: Sdhib Qirdn ; date incomplete on all ; mint of all 
Ddru- l-Khildfa t Shdh Jahdndbdd ; 7 

2, type: Bddslulh Qjidzi ; dates 1132, 1156, on othei's 
incomplete; mint on five Bdru-s-Saltanat Ldhor, on one 
Mursliiddbad, on one Akbardbdd ; 7 

IV, Ahmad Sha'h Bahadur, A. H. 1161-1167 = A. D. 1748- 

1754, type: Bahadur at top of first line; dates 1161, 1165, 
1164, two illegible ; mint of three Bdru-s-Saltanat Ldhor, 
of one Mnhammaddbdd-Banares, of one Etdiod. 5 

V, 'A'lamgir Za'ni', a. H. 1167-1173 = A. D. 1754-1759; ordi- 
nary type ; date incomplete; mint Bdru-s-Saltanat Ldhor. 

1 
VI, Sha'h 'Alam, A. H. 1173-1221 = A. D. 1759-1806. 

1, type, ordinary: date 1196, others illegible; mint of one 

Ldhor {?), of another Saharanimr. 3 

2, type, new : date [111]9, mint Tattah ; the verse on its 

obv. runs as follows : 

}$Liolj ^fei*/o ^^Iklw ^il'i ^[^ }(l«^ 1 

The coins of Sikh mintage belong to the following Maharajas : 
I, Maha Singh, father of Ranjit Singh, or of his time ; 
date 1839 Samvat = 1783 A. D. Mint Sr-i Amritsar. 
Like No. 4 in Mr. Rodgers' jiaper on the Sikh coins in 
Journal A. S. B., Vol. L, p. 81, (PI. V, 4) : but the 
reverse reads only 

(ArS A^-w 1 

II, Ranjit Singh, 1792-1839 A. D. Type: marked with a 
leaf on reverse, as published by Mr. Rodgers, ibid., pp. 
85, 86 (Plate V, 17); dates 1801, 1872, 1874 Samvat 
( = A. D. 1805, 1816, 1818) ; mint Sri Amritsar. 3 



1890.] Pliilological Secretary — Iteports on old coins. 181 

One coin of Persian mintage belongs to Nadir Shait, and was 
struck by hira after his invasion and conquest of India in 1151 
A. H (1738 A. D.). It bears date 1160, and mint Pasbawer. 
Similar coins have been published by Mr. Kodgers in the Numismat- 
ic Chronicle, Illd Series, Vol. II, p. 325. 1 



Total 33 

IV. Report on 1004 old copper coins, forwarded by the Deputy 
Commissioner of Jalandhar, with his No. 592, dated 7tli March 1889, 
No. 681, dated 21st May 1889, No. 1225 dated 14th October 1889, and 
No. 181, dated 5th February 1890. 

These coins are stated to have been found in a field about 30 or 40 
yards to the east of the old and ruined "' pacca " fort (hot 1) of Muhammad 
Amin, in the coux'se of levelling it for cultivation. Originally one coin 
was found by the diggers, which led to a police investigation, with the 
result that 8,950 coins were discovered in a loose condition. 

On examination, all the coins proved to belong to the three first 
members of the Imperial Suri family, Sher Shah, Islam Shah, and 
Muhammad 'Adil Shah, whose reign extended over a period of about 16 
years, from 1540 to 1556 A. D. All the coins belong to the species of 
copper coins called dthn, which are equal in weight to about 3 modern 
paisas. They were found to be of a very large number of types and 
varieties, as set out below : — 

A, Sher Shah, A. H. 947-952 = A. D. 1540-1545. 

Type I, square areas with marginal sections on both 
obverse and reverse : 

Variety 1, area inscinptions, as on Nos. 356, 357 in 
Thomas' Chronicles of the Pathdn Kings of Delhi. 
Sub-variety a, date on obverse area (No. 356) : 



Mint Gwaliyar, of 2 variations, 


... 94 


Agra, of do 


... 51 


Alwar ... 


... 44 


Shirgarh 


... 60 


Sambhal 


... 19 




Total 


th-variefy h, date on obverse margin 


(No. 35 


Mint Narnol, of 2 variations, 


... 128 


H iscir, of do. 


... 75 


Kalpi, of do. 


... 20 


Malot ... 


... 16 


Shirgarh 


... 3 



268 



Total ... 242 



182 Philological Secretary — Beports on old coins. [.Tune, 

Variety 2, obverse legend as on Variety 1, but 
reverse legend has &ii\ <yiL instead of the mint 
name; date on obverse margin ... ... 17 

Variety 3, obverse legend as on Variety 1 ; but 
reverse legends hasy^J^yl instead of the mint 
name; date on obverse area ... ... 3 

Variety 4, legend on obverse and reverse different 
from Variety 1-3 ... ... ... 3 

Variety 5, very crude ; apparently a forgery ... 1 



Total of Type I, ... 534 



Type II, lettered surfaces on obverse and reverse. 

Variety 1, legends exactly as on No. 355 in Thomas' 
Chronicles. Four varieties, differing only in the ar- 
rangement of the words of the reverse legend ; all 
have the date on the obverse : 

Sub-variety a, with 2 variations, ... 68 

Sub-variety b, ... ... ... 48 

Sub-variety c, ... ... ... 10 

Sub-variety d, ... ... ... 6 



Total ... 132 
Variety 2, in every respect like variety 1, except that the 
reverse legend has as- Sultan, instead of Sultan. Four 
varieties, differing only in the arrangement of the re- 
verse legend. All have the date on the obverse : 
Sub-variety a, ... ... ... 39 

Sub-variety b, ... ... ... 1 

Sub-variety c, ... ... ... 2 

Sub-variety d, ... ... ... 3 

Total ... 45 
Variety 3, with Fartdn-d-dtn in the reverse legend ; 
dotted margin. Three sub-varieties, all with date and 
mint on obverse : 

Sub-variety a, ... ... ... 7 

Sub-variety b, ... ... ... 10 

Sub-variety c, ... ... .... 2 

Total ... 19 



1890.] Philological Secretary — Reports on old coins. 183 

Variety 4, with Sultan al 'A'dil, mint Daru-z- 
zarh Qil'ah Shtrgarh, no date ... ... 6 

Variety 5, with as-Sultdn Abul Muzaffar, and 
mint and date ... ... ... 2 



Total of type II : 204 



Grand total of Sher Shah's coins ... 738 



B, Islam Shah, A. H. 952-960 = A. D. 154-5-1552. 

Type I, square areas, with marginal sections, both, on ob- 
verse and reverse 
Type 11, lettered surfaces on obverse and reverse ; legends 
exactly as on No. 363 in Thomas' Chronicles. Nine 
varieties, only differing in the arrangement of the words 
of the reverse legend. All have the date on the obverse. 
Variety 1, with 2 sub-varieties, ... ... 108 



Variety 2, with do. 

Variety 3, ... 

Variety 4, ... 

Variety 5, ... 

Variety 6, ... 

Variety 7, ... 

Variety 8, ... 

Variety 9, ... ... 



57 
15 

27 
5 
4 
1 
2 
3 



Total ... 222 

Ty23e III, lettered surfaces, but with different legends, ... 1 
Type IV, lettered surfaces, but with different legends, and 

crude execution ; with undetermined mint. ... 5 

Total of Islam Shah's ... 234 



C, Muhammad 'A'dil Shah, A. H. 960-964 = A. D. 1552-1556. 
Typ>e : lettered surfaces, with legends exactly as on No. 366, 
in Thomas' ChronicJes ... ... ... ... 32 



Grand total of all coins ...1004 



V. Repoi't on 6 so-called " double Rupees," forwai'ded by the Col- 
lector of Patna with his No. 2658 R, dated the 18th January 1889. 

The Collector states in his No. 2034 R, of the 8th November 1887, 
addressed to the Commissioner of Patna, that on the 23i'd June 1887, 
a treasure consisting of " 6 double sikka and 39 kalledar sikka " old 



184 Lihranj. [JuNE, 

silver coins, were found in the sudder sub-division vrhile breaking the 
walls of the houses acquired for railway purposes at Digha. 

Of this treasure only the 6 coins, designated as " double sikka 
rupees " were forwarded to me, at my request, for examination. On 
examination, however, they turned out to be common rupees of British 
mintage. Rupees, of this kind, i. e., with straight milling, were struck 
between the years 1818 — 1832, by the East India Company in the name 
of Shah 'A'lam. See Mr. Thurston's History of the Coinages of the East 
India Company, p. 42. 

The following papers were read — 

1. Some new and little knoivn Hot Springs in Sotith Bihar. — By 
L. A. Waddell, M. B. 

The paper will be printed in the Journal, Part II. 

2. An account of the different hierarchical governments ivhich pre- 
vailed in Tibet from 1045 to 1645 A. D. when the sxipremacy of the Dalai 
Lama tvas established by Oiishi Klian. — By Babu Saratchandba Das. 

3. 0)1 the Copper Coins of the Silri Dynasty. — By Dr. A. F. Rudolf 
HoEKNLE (with 3 plates). 

4. On some neiv or rare Hindi and Muhammadan Coins. No. II. — 
By Dr. A. F. Rudolf Hoernle (with 2 plates). 

5. A descriptive Catalogue of the Central Asiatic Coins in the Indian 
Museum collected by Capt. A. F. de Laessoe, — By Dr. A. F. Rudolf 
Hoernle, (with 2 plates). 

These papers will be printed in the Journal, Part I. 



LlBRAR,Y. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
meeting held in May last. 

Transactions, Pi^ceedings and Journals, 

•' presented by the respective Societies and Editors. 

BMtimore. Johns Hopkins University, — Circulars, Vol. IX, No. 80. 
Berlin. Konenklijke Natuur Kundige Vereeniging in Nederlandsch- 

Indie, — Natuurkundig Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsch-Indie, Deel 

XLIX. 
Calcutta, Geological Survey of India, — Memoirs, Vol, XXIV, Part 2. 



1890.] Library. 185 

Calcutta. Geological Survey of India, — Records, Vol. XXIII, Part 2. 

. Indian Engineei-ing, — Vol. VII, Is'os. 19 — 22. 

— . Photographic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. Ill, l^os. 5and 6. 

Florence. La Societa Africana d' Italia, — Bullettino, Tome VI, Fasci- 

colo 1° e 2°. 
Graz. Des Naturwissenschaftlichen Vereines f iir Steiermark, — Mitthei- 

lungen, Jahrgang, 1889. 
The Hague. Koninklijk Instituut voor de Taal- Land-en Volkenkunde 
van JSTederlandsch-Indie, — Bijdragen tot de Taal-Land-en Volken- 
kunde van Nederlandsch- Indie, Deel V, Aflevering 2. 
Ithaca. Cornell University, — Library Bulletin, Vol. II, No. 12. 
Leipzig. Der Deutschen Morgenlandischen Gesellschaft, — Zeitschrift, 

Band XLIV, Heft 1. 
London. Geological Society, — Address delivered at the Anniversary 
Meeting x)n the 21st February 1890. 

. Institution of Electrical Engineers, — Joui'nal, Vol. XTX, 

No. 86. 

. Nature,— Vol. XLI, No. 1069, Vol. XLII, Nos. 1070—1072. 

. The Academy,— Nos. 938—941. 

. The Atheneeum,— Nos. 3261—3264. 



Mendon, Illinois, The American Antiquai^ian and Oriental Journal, — 

Vol. XII, No. 2. 
Mexico, Observatorio Meteoroldgico-Magnetico Central de Mexico, — 

Boletin Mensual, Tomo II, No. 5 et 6. 
— . La Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate," — Memorias, Tomo 

III, No. 4—6. 
Pains. La Societe de Geographie, — Compte Rendu des Seances de la 

Commission Centrale, Nos. 7 et 8, 1890. 
Pisa. La Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali, — Atti, Vol. VII. 
Rio de Janeiro. Observatorio do Rio de Janeiro, — Revista do Obser- 
vatorio, Anno V, No. 3. 
Rome, La Societa Degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memoire, Vol, XIX, 

No. 4, 
St. Petersburg. Le Jardin Imperials de Botanique, — Acta, Horti Petro- 

politani, Tomus XI, No. 1. 
■ . La Societe des Naturalistes de Kiew,— Memoires, Tome 

X, No. 2. 
Sydney. Linnean Society of New South Wales, — Proceedings, 2nd. 

Series, Vol. IV, Part 4. 
Taiping. Government of Perak. — The Perak Government Gazette, Vol. 

Ill, Nos. 12—14. 



l86 Library. [June, 

Miscellaneous Pi^sentations. 

Taj-i-Farrokhi, by the N'awab of Rampur. 4to. 

E, T. Atkinson, Esq., C. S. 
Report on the Police Administration of the Central Provinces for the 

year 1889. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 
Returns of the Rail-borne trade of the Central Provinces during the 
quarter ending 31st December 1889. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Provinces. 
Las Aguas Minerales de Chile, por el Dr. L. Darapsky. 8vo. Val- 
paraiso, 1890. 

CoMisARiA General de la Exposicion Nacional, Santiago. 
Report of the Government Scientific Expedition to liellenden-Ker 
Range upon the Flora and Fauna of that part of the Colony. 8vo. 
Brisbane, 1889. 

Department of Agriculture, Brisbane. 
Report of the Central Park Menagerie for the year 1889. 8vo. New 
York, 1890. 

Department of Public Parks, New York. 

Returns of the Rail-borne trade of Bengal for the quarter ending the 
31st December 1889. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of Bengal. 
Army Estimates of effective and non-effective services for 1890-91. 

Fcp. London, 1890. 
Copies of, or Extracts from. Correspondence relating to the Numbers 
and Functions of the several Councils in India. Fcp. London, 
1890. 
The Indian Antiquary,— Vol. XVIII, Part 228, December 1889 and Vol. 

XIX, Part 232, March 1890. 4to. Bombay, 1890. 
Memorandum of the Secretary of State relating to the Army Estimates, 

1890-91. Fcp. London, 1890. 
Return of all Loans raised in England under the provisions of any 
Acts of Parliament, chargeable on the Revenues of India and 
outstanding at the commencement of the half-year ended on the 
30th September 1889. Fcp. London, 18.^0. 
Returns of all Loans raised in India, chargeable on the Revenues of 
India, and outstanding at the commencement of the half-year 
ended on the 30th September, 1889. Fcp. London, 1890. 

Government of India, Home Department, 
Progress Report of A. Rea, M. R. A. S. on the Archseological Survey 
of Southern India, ending January, 1890. Fcp. Madras, 1890. 

Government of Madras. 



1890.] Library. 187 

Catalogue of the Manuscripts in the Persian, Arabic and Turkish 
Languages to be found in the Public Library of Turkistan. 8vo. 
Turkestan, 1889. 

GovEKNOR General of Turkestan, 
Brief Sketch of the Meteorology of the Bombay Presidency in 1888- 
89. Fop. Bombay, 1889. 

Meteorological Reporter for Western India. 
Viridarium Norvegicum. Norges Visxtrige et Bidrag til Nord-Europas 
Natur-og culturhistorie af Dr. F. C. Schiibeler. 3 die Bind. -Ito. 
Christiania, 1889. 
Symbolae ad Historian! Ecclesiasticam Provinciarum Septentrionalium 
Magni Dissidii Synodique Constantiensis Temporibus Pertinentes. 
auctore, Dr. Ludovico Daae. 4to. Christianiae 1888. 

University of Christiania. 

Periodicals Puf^hased. 

Berlin, Orientalische Biblographie, — Band III, Heft 8. 

Calcutta. Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XXY, No. 4, April, 1890 

Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, — Tome 

XXIII, No. 4. 
Leipzig. Annalen der Physik und Chemie, — Band XXXIX, Heft 4 

und Band XL, Heft I. 

. . Beiblatter, Band XIV, Stiick 4. 

London. The Chemical News,— Vol. LXI, No. 1587—1590. 

. The Nineteenth Century ,— Vol . XXVII, No. 159, May 1890. 

. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 195.3— 

1956. 
Paris. Revue Scientifique, — Tome XLV, Nos. 17—20. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For July, 1890. 



The Monthly Genei'al Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Bengal 
was held on Wednesday the 2nd July, 1890 at 9-15 p. M. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S., President, in the chair. 

The following members were present : 

Nawab Abdul Latif, Bahadur, Dr. A. W, Alcock, J. H. Apjohn, 
Esq., E, T. Atkinson, Esq., Rev. A. W. Atkinson, Babu Gaurdas Bysack, 
W. B. Colville, Esq., Dr. A. Crombie, Babu Saratchandra Das, Babu 
Rajanikanta Gupta, W. H. Jobbing, Esq., Dr. W. King, Rev. Father E. 
Lafont, C. Little, Esq., Babu Asutosh Mukhopadhyay, T. R. Munro, 
Esq , A. M. Nash, Esq., L. de Nieeville, Esq., Dr. D. Prain, Major J. H. 
Sadler, Pandit Haraprasad Shastri, W. L. Sclater, Esq., Dr. J. Tull 
Walsh, Colonel J. Waterhouse. 

Visitors— W. Connan, Esq., F. D. Fowler, Esq., Colonel Gallwey, 
R. A., H. Haward, Esq., H. Holmwood, Esq., W. R. C. Jewell, Esq., 
W. H. Nightingale, Esq , G. 0. Ranger, Esq , F. N. Rushton, Esq., T, 
Traill, Esq., W. J. Williamson, Esq , J. Winterscale, Esq, 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Thirty-seven presentations wei'e announced, details of which are 
given in the Library List appended. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society, were ballotted for and elected Ordinary Members : 
T. W. Arnold, Esq. 
W. C. Bonnerjee, Esq., (re-elected). 
Babu T. N. Mukharji. 
P. Donaldson, Esq., (re-elected). 



(^' 



1 90 Philological Secretary — Report on old coins. [July, 

The following gentleman is a candidate for election at the next 
meeting : 

The Most Rev. Dr. Paul Goethals, S. J., Archbishop of Calcutta, 
proposed by Col. J. Waterhouse, seconded by J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

The Secretary reported the death of the following member : 

Professor Bapu Deva Sastri, C. I. E., of Benares (Honorary 
Member). 



The Philological Secretary read the following repoi-t on a find of 
Treasure Trove Coins. 

Report on 18 old silver coins forwarded by the Offg. Collector of 
Durbhanga, with his No. 201 G, dated 16th May 1890. 

The coins are stated to have been found on the 6th May 1889. 
The find place is not mentioned, but as the finder is said to have been a 
person belonging to Sonioul, Perganah Hati, it may be assumed that 
the coins were found in that locality. Their approximate value is given 
as Rs. 18. 

All the coins belong to different early Pathan Kings of Delhi. 
Numismatically they are in an indifferent condition, for in all of them 
the margin, giving the date and mint, is entirely or almost entirely 
wanting. They are attributed, as follows : 

Nasiru-d-dIn Mahmud Shah, A. H. 644 — 664 = 
A. D. 1246 — 126-5, mint and date lost on all four 
specimens: ... ... ... ... 4 

GhiYAsu-D-DlN Balban, A. H. 664—686 = 1265—1287 
A. D., mint and date wanting in all four speci- 
mens : ... ... ... ... 4 

Muizzcr-D-DiN Kaiqobad, a. H. 686 — 689 = A. D. 
1287 — 1290, one shows mint Delhi, another the 
date 687, a third appears to be double struck ; total 7 
Jalalu-d-din Firuz Shah, A. H. 589 — 695 = A. D. 

1290—1295; on both, mint Delhi; date lost, ... 2 
'Alad-d-din Muhammad Shah, A. H. 695 — 715, A. D. 

1295 — 1315; mint and date lost ... ... 1 

Total ... 18 



Rev. Father Lafont exhibited the new Phonograph of Th. A. 
Edison, and gave illustrations of the perfect manner in wliich the instru- 
ment reproduces all kinds of sounds from music to the human speech. 



Proceedings, As. Soc, Bengal, 1890. 



PLATE II. 



^W^ IS. 



<1 

1 

o 



3 



Eh 



o 



o 
o 

CO 



O 
p — I 

PL, 
I — I 

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Reg. No. 323, A3. Sdcy., Bengal.— 30-9-90.— 605. 



Photo., S.I. O., Calcutta. 



1890.] Dr. L. A. Waddell — Note on an old inscription from Mungir. 191 

The following paper was read— 

Note on an inscription in Kiitila characters, from a stone recently un- 
earthed at Mndgal-dsrdnia (Kashtaharani ghat) Mungir, ivith ink impres- 
sion of inscription. — By L. A. Waddell, M. B. 

The inscribed stone, from which is taken the accompanying ink 
impression, was found by me a few weeks ago lying at Kashtaharani 
Ghat, the dsrani, or hermitage, of the celebrated Saint Mudgahxputra, 
on the Granges at Mungir. The priest in charge of the ghat and temple 
infoi'med me that the stone appeared about three months ago at the side 
of the ghat on the receding of the flood-waters of the Ganges, and on 
being thus exposed it was carried up one or two steps of the ghat and 
there deposited, where I found it. 

The stone is a narrow oblong slab about 27 inches long, and about 
5 inches broad, and 3j inches deep, roughly chiselled on its upper and 
lower surfaces, and evidently had been originally built, or intended to be 
built, into a wall. The inscription extends along the smooth narrow 
lateral face of the stone, covering nearly the whole extent of that sur- 
face. The stone is in excellent preservation, as the ink impression 
attests : this excellent state of preservation is doubtless owing to the 
stone having remained buried in the mud for several centuries. The 
inscription is entire, and the date is distinctly engraved ' Samv. 13.' The 
relatively modern form of the letters suggests that the era here referred 
to may be that of Lakshmana Sena, which commenced in the first 
quarter of the twelfth century A. D. 

It will be interesting should the inscription, amongst other infor- 
mation, throw any light on the etymology of the name ' Mungir,' in 
regard to which opinion is divided. The recognized modern way of 
spelling the name of Mungir seems a sort of quasi scientific compromise 
between the sevex-al forms Mongir, Monghyr, Mungger, &c. The native 
mode of spelling the name is still the same as that recorded by Dr. 
Buch.ananin his Statistical Survey at the beginning of the century, viz., 
Mungger (<JCS?2r) Part of Dr. Buchanan's note on the etymology of the 
word I quote here, especially as the volume containing it* is not in the 
Society's library — " in an iuscriptionf seven or eight centuries old found 

at the place the name is written Mudgagira, the hill of Mudga, and 

not Mudgalpuri, or the abode of Mudgal. The existence of the saint 
and prince of that name is perhaps therefore problematical, as Mudga 
is the Sangskrita name for a kind of pulse, the Phaseolus mungo of 
Linnaeus, from whence also the vulgar name of the place (Mugger) is 
probably derived." 

* Eastern India, Vol. II, p. 45. 

t This is evidently the ' Mnngir Copper-plate grant ' described iu Vol. I of 
the Asiatic Researches, and now, I believe, in the casfcody of the Society. 



192 Dr. L. A. Waddell — Note on an old inscription from Mungir. [JuLT, 

As apparently favouring Dr. Buchanan's opinion as to the probable 
derivation of the name, it is to be noted that the modern Hindi name of 
the kind of pulse called mudga in Sanskrit is mung. But on the other 
hand the mung bean does not affect hilly or rocky sites, and its cultiva- 
tion is widespread throughout the Gangetic plain. It seems not unlike- 
ly that the vulgar name of the fort, viz., Mungger, is merely a Muham- 
madan perversion of the old name, somewhat like the change by which 
' Naba-dwip ' was converted into ' Nadiya.' 

The fact that the Sanskrit Mudga can become, in Prakrit, in the collo- 
quial mung, is almost equally favourable to a derivation from the Sage 
Mudgal; as in ordinary parlance many letters of the old names are 
elided, thus the classical Kastaharani Ghat close at hand is popularly 
called ' Katharni,' and the Chinese pilgrim Hiuen Tsiang in the 7th 
century also mentions the Sage Mudgalaputra in connection with this 
neighbourhood ;* and the hermitage of this Sage here is still a favourite 
place of Hindu pilgrimage. It seems therefore moi'e probable that the 
place derives its name from this Sage than from the sjDecies of pulse 
called ' mung.' 

It is somewhat remarkable in this regai'd to find that now-a-days 
what is locally known as Muu-pahar — a name which is synonymous with 
Mun-giri — is not Mungir itself, but the cluster of rocks presently in mid- 
channel of the Ganges, about Ij miles north of the Mudgalasrama and 
called in the Trigonometrical Survey maps the ' Beacon rocks.' These 
rocks are also called ' Mun pathar ' or the ' Sage's rock.' 

Translation. 
Om. Salutation to the holder of the trident, on whose head the 
fleeting Ganga, sporting like a piece of white cloud, appears like a 
garland composed of the Malatl flower. 

To the family of Mukuteshvara belonged the far-famed Kulanandi. 
He had a sou Vijayanandi by name. From him was born the son versed 
in politics named Dharetipaka. He had a wife named Amba who was 
as a second Arundhati. She became his beloved. By her he had a son 
Gopalitakrama. This man was like a bee in the lotus of the feet of 
Bhagiratha, i-he king. Having acquired money by honest means, he, 
afraid of the transmigration of the soul, constructed this building dedi- 
cated to S'ambhu for the increase of his own merit and that of his 

parents. t 

Samvat 13. 

* Si-yu-Ki translated by Beal, Vol. II, p. 188. 

f The inscription is in verse. The third verse is defective as the first foot 
contains one Syllable less and the fourth contains two Syllables less in the fourth 
foot. Hence there is some doubt as to the reading of proper names Dharetiparka 
and Gopalitakrama. 



1890.] Lihrary. Vy. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
ineetino- held in June last. 



Transactions, Proceedings and Joui^als, 

presented hij the respective Societies and Editors. 

Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University, — Circulars, Vol. IX, No. 81. 
Bombay. Bombay Natural History Society, — Journal, Vol. I, No. 4, 

and Vol. V, No. 1. 

. The Indian Antiquary, Vol. XIX, Part 234, May, 1890. 

Boston. Boston Society of Natural History, — Memoirs, Vol. XXIV, 

Parts 1 and 2. 
Brussels. La Societe Royale des Sciences de Liege, — Memoires, Tome 

XVI, 2e Serie. 
Calcutta. Indian Engineering, — Vol. VII, Nos. 23, 26. 
' Photographic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. Ill, No. 7, 

July, 1890. 
Colombo. Ceylon Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, — Journal, 

Vol. X. 
Edinburgh. The Scottish Geographical Society, — Magazine, Vol. VI, 

No. 4, April, 1890. 
Havre. Societe de Geographic Commerciale du Havre, — Bulletin, 

Mars— Avril, 1890. 
Liege. Societe Geologique de Belgique, — Annales, Tome XVII, 2^ 

Livraison. 
London. Institution of Electrical Engineers, — Journal, Vol. XIX, 

No. 87. 
. Institution of Mechanical Engineers, — Proceedings, No. 4, 

1889. 

. Nature,— Vol. XLII, Nos. 1073-1075 and Index to Vol. XLI. 

. Royal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. L, Nos. 4 

and 5, February and March, 1890. 
. Royal Geographical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XII, (new 



series), Nos. 3 and 4, March and April, 1890. 
— . Royal Microscopical Society, — Journal, Part 2, April, 1890. 
— . Royal Society,— Proceedings, XLVII, No. 287. 
— . The Academy,— Nos. 942-945. 



194 Library. [July, 

London. The Athenaeum, — Nos. 3265-3268. 

. Zoological Society of London, — Proceedings, Part 4, 1890. 

. , Transactions, Vol. XII, Part 10. 

Lyon. La Societe D 'Anthropologic de Lyon, — Bulletin, Tome VIII, 

Nos. 1 et 2. 
Mendon, Illinois. American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal, — Vol. 

XII, No. 3, May, 1890. 
Mexico. Estados Unidos Mexicanos, — Informes y Documentos relatives 

a Comercio Interior y Exterior Agricultura, Mineria e Industrias, 

Nos. 53-54. 
Naples. La Societa Africana d' Italia, — Bollettiuo, Anno IX, Ease. I 

—IV. 
New Haven. American Oriental Society,— Proceedings, October 1889. 

. . Journal, Vol. XIV. 

Paris. La Societe Academique Indo-Chinoise de France, — Memoires, 

Tome I. 
. La Societe D 'Anthropologic de Pai-is, — Bulletins, Tome XII, 

(IIP serie), 3^ Fascicule. 
. La Societe D'Ethnographie, — Bulletin, Serie 2^, Nos. 9 — 11, 

1887. 
■ La Societe de Geographic, — Compte Rendu des Seances, No. 

9, 1890. 
. La Societe Zoologique de France, — Bulletin, Tome XV, Nos. 2 



et3. 
Philadelphia. American Philosophical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. 

XXVI, No. 130. 
. Journal of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary 

Archives,— Vol. XI, No. 5. 
Pisa. La Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali, — Processi Verbali, 2 

Marzo, 1890. 
Rio de Janeiro. Observatorio do Rio de Janeiro, — Revista do Observa- 

torio. Anno V, No. 4. 
Rome. La Societa Degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Vol. XIX' 

Disp. 5^. 
Roorkee. The Indian Forester, — Vol. XVI, Nos. 4 — 6, April to June, 

1890. 
St. Petersburg. La Societe Imperiale Russe de Geographic, — Journal, 

Tome XXV, Nos. 6 et 7. 
Taiping. Government of Perak, — The Perak Government Gazette, Vol. 

Ill, Nos. 15-18. 
Turin. La R. Accademia delle Scienze di Torino, — Atti, Vol. XXV, 

Disp. 8^-10^ 



1890.] Libranj. 195. 

Turin. La R. Osservazioni Meteorologiclie fatte nell' anno 1888. 
Washington. United States National Museum, — Bulletin, Nos. 33-37. 
. . . Proceedings, Vols. X and XI. 

Books and PamphletSj 

presented by the Authors, Translators, ^c. 

ASHRA.F-TTD-DIN Ahmad, Moulvie Satid. Durdanai Khyal. 8vo. Luck- 
now, 1889. 

■ Tabaqa-i-Muhsinya, or the Persian History of the Hooghly 

Emambarah. 8vo. Calcutta, 1889. 

Bloomfield, Dr. Maurice. The Kau9ika-Sutra of tlie Atharva-veda, 
with extracts from the commentaries of Darila and Ke9ava. 8vo. 
New Haven, 1890. 

BuRAL, N. C. Free Masonry as allied to religion, — A Lecture delivered 
at the meeting of the Calcutta "Emulation" Lodge of Improve- 
ment, on the 28th March, 1890. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Hatter, Henry Hetltn, C. M, G. Victorian Tear-Book for 1888-89, 
Vol. II. 8vo. Melbourne, 1889. 

Manucha, Kaccoo Mal, Rai Bahadur. The Hindu Home-Life. 8vo. 
Lucknow, 1890. 

Ray, Pratapa Chandra, C. I. E. The Mahabharata, translated into 
English prose. Part LVIII. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

RosNY, Le'on De. L'Apologue a la Chine et dans I'lnde. 8vo. Paris, 
1876. 

Saussure, Henrico De. Prodromus CEdipodiorum Insectorum ex ordine 
Orthopterorum (Memoires de la Societe de Physique et d'Histoire 
Naturelle de Geneve, Tome XXVIII, No, 1) et Additamenta 
(Memoires de la Societe de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de 
Geneve, Tome XXX, No. 1). 4to. Geneva, 1884 and 1888. 

jVLlSCELLANEOUS Pl\ESENTATIONS. 

Tagore Law Lectures, 1886. The Law relating to the transfer of im- 
moveable property, inter vivos ; with an Appendix containing the 
Transfer of Property Act, being Act IV of 1882. By K. M. Chatter- 
jea, B. A. Svo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Calcutta University. 

Report on the Jails of the Central Provinces for the year 1889. Fop. 
Nagpur, 1890. 

Report on the Judicial Administration (Civil and Criminal) of the 
Central Provinces for the year 1889. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 



196 Library. [Jdly, 

Repoi't on the Lunatic Asylums of the Central Provinces for the year 
1889. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Resolution on the Revenue Administration of the Central Provinces 
for the year 1888-89. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Triennial Report on the working of the Government Charitable Dis- 
pensaries in the Central Provinces for the year 1889. Fcp. Nagpur, 
1890. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Provinces. 

Administration Report of the Marine Survey of India for the official 

year 1889-90. Fcp. Bombay, 1890. 

Commander R. F. Hosktn, R. N. 
Chartularium Universitatis Parisiensis. Tomus I, ab Anno MCC usque 

ad Annum MCCLXXXVI. 4to. Paris, 1889. 
Inauguration de la Nouvelle Sorbonne par M. le President de la Re- 

publique, le lundi 5 Aout 1889. 4to. Paris. 

CoNSEiL Ge'ne'ral des Faculte's de Paris. 
Annual Report on the Lunatic Asylums of Bengal for the year 1889. 

Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Reports of the Alipore and Hazaribagh Reformatory Schools for the year 

1889. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of Bengal. 

Catalogue of Minerals, Ores, and Rocks ; with a note of meteorites, of 

which the fall in Southern India has been recorded. 8vo. Madras, 

1890. 

Government, Central Museum, Madras. 

The Indian Antiquary,— Vol. XIX, Parts 233 and 234, April and May, 

1890. 4to. Bombay, 1890. 

Usha, Vol. I, Parts 1-4. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government op India, Home Department. 
Progress Report of Dv. E. Hultzsch, Government Epigraphist, on the 

Archseological Survey of Southern India from February to April, 

1890. Fcp. Madras, 1890. 
Report of Mr. A. Rea on the Archaeological Survey work of Southern 

India undertaken from February to April, 1890. Fcp. Madras, 

1890. 

Government of Madras. 

Handleiding tot de Kennis der Flora van Nederlandsch Indie. Bes- 

chrijving van de families en geslachten der Nederl. ludische 

Phanerogamen, door Dr. J. G. Boerlage. Eerste Deel. Dieotyledones 

Dialpetalse. Eerste Stuk. Thalamiflorae — Disciflorae. Fam. I, 

Rauuuculaceae — Fam. XLII, Moringaceae. 8vo. Leiden, 1890. 

Government of Netherlands India, Batavia. 



1890.] Lihranj. 197 

L'Asie Centrale, (Thibet et Rt%lons Limitroplies) Text et Atlas, par 
J. L. Dutrcuil cle Rliins. 4to. and fol. Paris, 1889. 
Ministe're de L'Instruction Pdclique et des Beaux-Arts, Paris. 
Den Norske Nordhavs-Expedition 187G-1878, XIX, Zoologi. Actinida 
ved D. 0. Danielssen. Fcp, Christiania, 1890. 

Den Norske Nordhavs-Expedition, Christiania. 

Results of the Magnetical and Meteorological Observations made at the 
Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in the year 1887. 4to. London, 
1889. 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, 
Seventh Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey for 
1885-86. 4to. Washington, 1888. 

United States Geological Survey, Washington. 

PeI^IODICALS Pai^CHASED. 

Berlin. Deutsche Litteraturzeitang, — Jahrgang, XI, Nrn. 9 — 15. 

. Journal fiir die reine und angewandte Mathematik, — Band 

CVI, Heft 2. 

Zeitschrift fiir Ethnologie, — Jahrgang XXII, Heft 1. 



Braunschweig. Jahresbericht liber die Portschritte der Chemie und 

verwandter Theile anderer Wissenschaften, Heft 6, fiir 1886, Heft 

4, fiir 1887. 
Calcutta. Calcutta Review,— Vol. XCI, No. 181, July, 1890. 

. Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XXV, No. 5, May, 1890. 

Cassel, Botanisches Centralblatt, — Band XLI, Heft 8 — 13 und Band 

XLII, Heft 1. 
Ceylon. The Orientalist,— Vol. IV, Parts 1 and 2. 
Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, — Tome XXIII, 

No. 5. 
Gottingen. Der Konigl. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, — Gottia- 

gische Gelehrte Anzeigeu. Nrn, 4 — 6, 1890. 

. . Nachrichten, Nrn. 2 und 3, 1890. 

Leipzig. Annalen der Physik und Chemie, — Beibliitter, Band XIV, 

Stuck 5. 

. Literarisches Centralblatt, — Nrn. 10 — 16, 1890. 

Leyden. Internationales Archiv-fiir Ethnographic, — Band III, Heft 1. 
London. The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. V 

(6th series), No, 28, April, 1890. 

■ . The Chemical News,— Vol. LXI, Nos. 1591-1594. 

— , The Entomologist,— Vol. XXII, No. 323, April, 1890. 



198 Library. [June, 1890. 

London. The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine,— Vol. I, No. 33 (2ud 

series) April, 1890. 

. The Ibis,— Vol. II, (Gth series), No. 6, April, 1890. 

. . The Journal of Botany,— Vol. XXVIII, Nos. 327 and 328, 

Ma;rch and April, 1890, 
. The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 

—Vol. XXIX, (5th series) No. 179, April, 1890. 

. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVII, No. IGO, June, 1890. 

'-^ — . Pali Text Society- Journal, 1889. 

. The Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, — Vol. XXXI, 

No. 71, April, 1890. 

. Rhopalocera Exotica, Part 12, April, 1890. 

-. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 1957— 



1960. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science, — Vol. XXXIX, (5'"^. 

Series), Nos. 231 and 232, March and April, 1890. 
Pai'is. L' Academie des Sciences, — Coniptes Rendus des Stances, 

Tome ex., Nos. 8— 14<. 
. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, — Tome XIX, (G™" Serie), 

Mars, 1890. 

. Journal des Savants, — F^vrier et Mars, 1890. 

. Revue Scientifique,— Tome XLV, Nos. 21—24. 

-. Revue Critique d' Histoire et de Litterature, — Tome XIX, Nos. 



8—15. 

Philadelphia. Manual of Conchology,— Vol. XI, Parts 4 and 4 A, and 
Vol. V, (2nd Series), Part 4. 

Books Pui^hased. 

BoNAViA, E., M. D. The cultivated Oranges and Lemons etc. of India 

and Ceylon, Text, and Atlas of plates. 8vo. London, 1890. 
Davids, Prof. T. W., Ph. D., and Carpenter, Prof. J. Estlin. The 

Digha Nikaya, Vol. I (Pali Text Society). 8vo. London, 1899. 
MiJLLER, F. Max. The Sacred Books of the East, Vol. XXXV,— The 

questions of King Milinda, translated from the Pali. By J. W. 

Rhys Davids. 8vo. Oxford, 1890. 
Two Hieroglyphic Papyri from Tanis. 1. The Sign Papyrus (by 

F. LL. Griffith). 2. The Geographical Papyrus (by W. M. F. 

Petrie). (Extra Memoir of the Egypt Exploration Fund). 4to. 

London, 1889. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For y^uGusT, 1890. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Bengal was 
held on Wednesday the 6th August 1890 at 9-15 p. m. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C, S., President, in the chair. 

The following members were present : 

Babu Gaurdas Bysack, P. Donaldson, Esq., P. G. Hickson, Esq., 
Lieutenant General G. B. Mainwaring, Babu Asutosh Mukhopadhyay, 
T. R. Munro, Esq , Major J. H. Sadler, Pandit Hai^aprasad Shastri, 
Colonel J. WaterhoiTse. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Forty-one presentations were announced, details of which ai'e given 
in the Library List appended. 

The following gentleman, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society, was ballotted for and elected an Ordinary 
Member. 

The Most Rev. Dr. Paul Goethals, S. J., Archbishop of Calcutta. 

The following gentleman is a candidate for election at the next 
meeting : — 

Kumar Sarat Chandra Singh (for re-election), proposed by Babu 
Gaurdas Bysack, seconded by C. Little, Esq. 

The following gentleman has expressed a wish to withdraw from 
the Society : — 

I. C. Bose, Esq. 

The President announced that Mr. Wood-Mason had resigned the 



i^'' 



200 Be-investment of the Society's Funds. [AuG. 

Editorsliip of the Journal, Part II, and that Mr. W. L. Sclater had been 
appointed Natural History Secretary and Editor of that part of the Jour- 
nal. There had been no separate Natural History Secretary since 
Mr. Wood-Mason became a Vice-President in 1887. 

The President stated that the arrangement announced at the last 
meetino* for renting two rooms on the ground floor of the building to 
the Photographic Society of India had been completed and possession 
taken of the rooms. The rent is to be Rs. 60 a month, and the occu- 
pancy to be terminable at 3 months' notice on either side. 

The President congratulated the Society on the arrangement. It 
had converted a useless lumber room into a pleasant apartment, and 
had given the Society a very acceptable addition of Rs. 720 a year to 
their income. 

The President reported that the Government Securities belonging 
to the Society, amounting to Rs. 1,27,000 in the 4| per cent, loans of 
1878 and 1879, which mature on 15th September 1893, would have to 
be transferred to the 4 per cent, loan of 1854-55 under the terms of 
the Notification of the Government of India, Department of Finance 
and Commerce, dated 25th June 1890. The transfer will cause a per- 
manent annual reduction of Rs. 635 in the Society's income from in- 
terest. 

The President added that whatever might eventually be done 
with the Securities it had appeared to the Council necessary that the 
offer of Government should be accepted, and the transfer effected. 
There was no rule compelling the Society to invest its funds in Govern- 
ment Securities, and it might hereafter be advisable to invest them in 
other secui'ities which would yield a higher rate of interest, but before 
such a step could be taken all the Members of the Society had to be 
consulted and the votes of three-fourths of them to be obtained (Rule 
67). In the meanwhile the transfer had to be made, and it had this 
advantage that it gave the Society the command of over Rs. 1,900, for 
Government had agreed to pay the extra half per cent, interest in ad- 
vance. This money would be very useful as the Society had some 
debts to pay, and amongst others a sum of Rs. 1,400 on account of 
printing Mr. Grierson's book on the Modern Vernacular Literature of 
Hindustan, 

The President informed the meeting that the alteration of Rule 70, 
proposed by the Council, of which intimation had ali'eady been given 
by Circular to all resident membei-s in accordance with Rule 64, would 
now be brought forward for discussion. 



1890.] Col. Waterhouse — Reversal uf image on PliotograpMc plates. 201 

The object of the alteration is to admit of admission fees being 
made available for the genei'al expenditure of the Society : at present 
they have to be invested, and the interest only can be spent. 

No objection having been made, the President stated that the pro- 
posal would be circulated and brought up again at the November meet- 
ing on the votes of the members. 

Col. Waterhouse exhibited some photographic dry-plates showing 
a remarkable reversal or transformation of the image from a negative 
into a positive, caused by the addition to the developer of small quan- 
tities of thio-carbaniides or sulpho-ureas. 

He said : — These plates, though not so good as could have been 
wished, might perhaps be of interest from the fact of their being pro- 
duced in an entirely new and simple manner and with substances which, 
he believed, had never before been used in photography, though they 
exerted a very powerful reducing effect on the haloid salts of silver 
which apparently had not been noticed before and is not pi^oduced by 
any of the ordinary reducing agents. Apart from the scientific inter- 
est attaching to any new method of reversing the photographic image, 
by which light could be thrown on the still unsolved problems connec- 
ted with the formation of the developed photographic image, a practical 
process which would enable either positives or negatives to be taken in 
the camera by the ordinary methods would be of great value in many 
ways. 

In the course of some experiments, made early in July, with an 
eikonogen developer, to which a little phenyl-thio-carbamide had been 
added, he was astonished to find traces of reversal in the darker parts 
of the picture. Following up this indication he found that with suita- 
ble proportions of the phenyl-thio-carbamide he was able to produce, 
at will, more or less complete positive pictures in place of negative ones 
under otherwise quite normal conditions of exposure and development. 

Further experiments showed that similar results could be obtained 
with allyl-thio-carbamide, or thio-sinamine, and also, though not so 
regularly, with thio-carbamide, or sulpho-urea, but not by simple car- 
bamide, or urea. The latter fact tends to show that sulphur must exert 
an active influence in bringing about the reversal. 

The thio-carbamides of the alcoholic series are formed by the action 
of ammonia on the so-called " mustard oils ", or thio-carbimides. 

The phenyl and allyl-thio-carbamides when applied to precipitated 
bromide or chloride of silver, or to gelatine dry plates or films contain- 
ing these salts, have no visible action upon them, but if an alkali be 
added, a darkening and reducing action is set up, even in the dark. 
With the iodide the action is not so strong. 



202 Col. Waterliotise — Beversal of image on Photogra])7nc plates. [Aug. 

Thio-carbamide appears to have a more powerful reducing action 
on the bromide and chloride than the two alcoholic thio-carbamides, 
and in strong solution has been found to darken an ordinary gelatine 
dry plate in the dark even without the aid of alkali, though it does not 
visibly darken precipitated silver bromide. With iodide it is less 
active. 

Thio-sinamine and thio-cavbamide in watery solution, especially the 
former, seem to exert a solvent action on the silver haloids. 

Urea does not visibly darken or reduce the haloids in the dark, even 
with alkalis. 

Phenyl-thio-carbamide seems to reverse the image most satisfac- 
torily when used with the ordinary eikonogen developer in the propor- 
tion of from 20 to 25 parts of the saturated solution in 100 parts of 
mixed developer. The presence of sodium sulphite seems an advantage 
but may be dispensed with ; a little bromide of potassiam improves the 
result. With ferrous oxalate, pyrogallol and quinol developers the same 
reversino- effect has not been obtained as with eikonogen. 

Allyl-tJdo-carhamide appears to be a much stronger reversing agent 
than the phenyl salt, probably owing to its greater solubility, and rever- 
sals Lave been obtained by its means with the pyrogallol and quinol 
developers (containing sodium sulphite) as well as with eikonogen, but 
not with ferrous oxalate. About 1 part of the saturated solution in 100 
parts of developer is sufficient to produce the effect. 

Thio-carbamide has not yet been fully tried ; it evidently has strong 
reversing powers, but works irregularly and must be used in very minute 
proportions, otherwise no reversal is obtained. 

Urea used with the eikonogen developer shows no tendency to 
reversal, whether added in the same small proportions as the thio-carba- 
mides or in larger ones. It has not yet been tried with other developers, 
but the result will probably be the same. 

With the phenyl-thio-carbamide and thio-sinamine the image 
generally developes first of all quite normally and then gradually re- 
verses, and sometimes a positive image is visible on the plate before 
fixing. At others the action is more irregular and no image is seen 
until the plate is fixed. Some of the positive images thus obtained 
have a very rich brown or purple colour and are dense and full of detail, 
thouo-h not always perfectly reversed nor clear in the lights. They are 
quite different to the weak gi'ey images ordinarily produced by solari- 
sation or over-exposure, which, in this case has to be very carefully 
avoided. 

With regard to the cause of the reversal he had not been able to 
give this part of the question full attention, nor in any case would it 



1890.] Col. Waterhouse — Reversal of image on PliotograpMc plates. 203 

be possible in the present imperfect state of our knowledge of the phe- 
nomena connected with the formation and reversal of the invisible 
photographic image, to give any valid opinion — but, although in many- 
respects the i-esults he had obtained appeared to be in direct opposition 
to the ordinary conditions of reversal by over-exposure or otl-er abnor- 
mal action of light, he believed that these reversals were brought abont 
much in the same way and could be explained by the theories worked 
out by Capt. Abney some years ago, and generally accepted. 

Reversal in ordinary cases is caused by over-exposure or other 
abnoi'mal action of light, by the action of certain rays of the spectrum, 
or by oxidation of the gelatine film, but in this case there is no ques- 
tion of any of these causes or of any abnormal action so far as exposure 
to light is concerned. 

If an ordinary gelatine dry plate receive a normal exposm^e a ne- 
gative image is developed, but if the exposure be unduly prolonged, the 
light undoes its first action and reversal is produced. In the present 
instance there was in the developer a substance which Avas capable of 
liberating halogen by reduction of the haloid silver salt in the dark, and 
thus the film, although it might only have received a normal exposure 
to light, was really in the same state under the developer as if the 
exposure to light were being continued and halogen liberated all over it 
— as in the case of over-exposure — and the image was reversed by the 
halogen attacking the parts reduced by the normal action of the deve- 
loper, while the developer and the alkaline thio-carbaraide completed 
the reduction of the unexposed parts. During the process the thio- 
cax-bamide would probably become oxidised and lose sulphur which would 
m.ost likely combine with the silver and add to the density of the images. 
The subject, however, required further investigation. 

The only similar case of reversal he had been able to find was that 
recorded by Carey Lea as caused by the action of hypophosphite of soda 
on silver bromide films — but though he had tried this substance, and 
also alkaline solutions of glucose and manna en dry plate films or mixed 
with the developer, he had not been able to obtain any sign of a reversal, 
and the reducing action of these substances on the pure silver haloids 
or gelatine films containing them is not so strong as it is with the thio- 
carbamides. 

Among the plates exhibited were some of the s|5ectrum which 
showed reversal only in the ulti'a- violet rays, but he had not been able 
to fully work out the action of the spectrum with these new reversing 
agents. 

The results obtained at present left much to be desired in clearness, 
but he hoped to be able to bring the process to a practical issue. 



204 H. P. Shastri — 3Iap of Ancient Arydvarta. [Aug. 

The new method opened np a large number of veiy interesting collateral 
questions which would take some time to investigate. 

Pandit Haraprasad S'astri exhibited a Map of ancient A'ryavarta 
prepared by Nagendra Nath Basu, and said — • 

It contains much valuable information about the geography of 
India from a number of Puranas, among which the Vamana, the Brah- 
manda, the Matsya, the Markandeya Puranas may be mentioned, besides 
those contained in European works on the ancient geography of India. 
The writer has embodied in it the results of the most recent researches 
in the fields of Indian Archaeology. I will not take up much of your 
time by going into the details of the map, but will content myself by 
pointing out the route taken by the Cloud Messenger of Kalidasa's 
well-known work the Megha Duta. 

The Cloud commenced his journey from Ram-giri, which being in the 
Deccan does not fall within the scope of this map. From thence it 
came to Amra Kuta, which is the Amara Kantuk of the present day. It 
crosses over the Nai^buda, then comes over to Vidisha, the present Vilsa 
of the naaps. The hills and rivers about Vidisha have been faithfully 
put down. Then comes Ujjayini the great capital of the Kshatri- 
yas of Malava. The next place of importance is Dasapura which has 
been completely identified by Mr. Fleet in his excellent work the Corpus 
Inscriptum Indicaruvi, Vol. Ill, with Mandasar of the present day. 
The Cloud then goes to Kurukshetra which has been put down at its 
proper place. Kanakhal is the last place in the plains mentioned in 
Megha Duta, after which the Cloud enters the heights of the Himalayas, 
in which Hansadvara and Kailasa have been marked with care. The 
Cloud's passage is now complete, and can be gathered at a glance on 
the map. It is a valuable contribution to the geography of ancient 
India, and will help much in understanding the position of places cele- 
brated in Indian antiquity. 

The following papers were read : — 

1. Description de Gurculionides et de Brenthides, inedits faisant partie 
des collections du Musee Indien, Ire partie, par M. T. Desbrochers des 
JjOG^s.— Communicated by J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

2. Note on Poritia harterti, Doherty. By Ernst Hartert — Communi- 
cated hy J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Through the kindness of Mr. Wood-Mason and of my fellow travel- 
ler in Upper Assam, Mr. Doherty, I have received two copies of the latter's 
'* Notes on Assam Butterflies ", published in the Journal of the Asiatic 
Society, Vol. LVIII, Pt. 2, p. 118. Though more of aa ornithologist than 



1890.] Ernst Hartert— On Poritia harterti, Duherty. 205 

a lepidopterist, I may perhaps be allowed to make a few remarks on that 
interesting and valuable paper. 

1. On p, 123 it is stated that " the specimens described below are 
in Mr. Neumoegen's collection unless the contrary is stated ;" as some 
mistake might arise oat of this, 1 may say that all the specimens caught 
by me during that trip to Assam are in Dr. Staudinger's collection at 
Dresden. Amongst them are the only fine untorn specimens of Aemone 
amathusia, Hew. (A pealii, W,-M.), two fine males of Apatuua {Potamis) 
ulujpi, Doherty, Poritia harterti, Doherty, and many others. 

2. With regard to Poritia* harterti, the allied species Poritia 
phalena, Hew. has only been taken by Mr. A. R. Wallace near Singapore 
and has never been procured since, so that Doherty was certainly justified 
in considering that my specimen taken far away north in the Patkoi 
hills in Assam was a different species or at any rate a geographical 
race. Unfortunately, Mr. Doherty had no specimen of Poritia phalena 
with which to compare the Assam Poritia but only the very poor figure 
in Distant's Hhopalocera Malayana (PI. XXII, Fig. 8) and perhaps that 
in the Illustrations of Diurnal Lepidoptera (Lycaenidce, PI. LXXXIX) 
with the accompanying descriptions. 

I, however, was lucky enough some time after to secure in the Baltak 
hills in ISTorth East Sumatra, almost in the verandah of the house of my 
friend Dr. Martin, of Munich, another specimen of Poritia ; a comparison 
of this Sumatran, specimen with the Assamese one showed that the two 
were undoubtedly identical ; moreover, I found that my Sumatran specimen 
agreed entirely v?ith the description of Poritia phalena, Hew. ; the com- 
pai-ison was made by me with Dr. Staudinger, who is also of my opinion. 

It therefore seems to me that the species named by Doherty after 
me Poritia harterti must be relegated to the large and increasing class of 
synonyms. 

3. Coins of Sallakshana Pdia Deva, Madana Pdla Deva, and Pri- 
thivi Deva, by Vincent A Smith, B. S. C. 

The late Mr. Edward Thomas was a numismatist of such skill and 
experience that mistakes in his work cannot often be detected, but I 
observed long ago errors in the attribution of the coins of the princes 
named in the heading of this note, and should have pointed out the 
mistakes earlier, only that I supposed them to be so obvious as not to be 
likely to mislead any one accustomed to numismatic researches. 

Now, however, I perceive that so good a scholar as Dr. Hoernle has 

* This butterfly is placed by Doherty in the genus Messaga ; for my part I see 
no reason for retaining a genus distinguished by such slight differences. 



206 v. A. Smith — Corns of the Pdla Devas. [Aug. 

been misled by tlie authority of Thomas, and it is worth while to make 
the correction. 

At page 62 (Nos. 33 and 34) of the Ghronicles Thomas describes 
Bull and Horseman coins of Sallakshana Pala Deva, with revei*se legend 
S'rl Samanta Deva, and coins of Madana Pala Deva, with reverse legend 
Madhava S'ri Samanta Deva. 

At page 65 he assigns these coins in the following words : " It will 
be seen that I propose to assign the next coin, in the order of date, to 
Sallakshaxia Pala I, the Chandel monarch of Mahoba, who, we learn 
from inscriptions, extended his conquests into the Gangetic Doab ; and 
to his grandson Madana Varmma Deva I assign the coins bearing his 
leading name, in preference to the nearly contemporary Madana Pala of 
Kanauj, whose territory was supplied with a different description of 
coinao-e, as well as on account of the serial consistency, if the earlier 
pieces are rightly attributed to his grandsire, whose power he seems to 
have inherited in added stability." 

The last sentence is one of Mr. Thomas' numerous hard sayings, 
but it means that if the coins of Sallakshana Pala are rightly attributed 
to Sallakshana Varmma Chandel, then the nearly similar coins of 
Madana Pala should be ascribed to Madana Varmma Chandel. 

At page 55 Mr. Thomas observes that he " was originally under the 
impression that the coins of Anangpal and Sallakshanpal (Nos. 32 and 
33 infra) belonged to the sixth and seventh kings of Albiriini's con- 
secutive series \_scil. of kings of Kabul], supposing that, the one name 
being identical, the other might represent the designation of his suc- 
cessor, so strangely perverted by the Muslim writers into the many 
varying forms of M. Reinaud's ' Nardajanpal.' " 

Dr. Hoernle has recently described a large hoard of Bull and Horse- 
man coins, amounting to 538 in number, found in the Shahpur district 
of the Panjab in 1886. (Proc. As. Sac. Bengal for l^S, p. I'i.Q). This 
hoard mainly consisted of the well-known coins of Muhammad bin Sam 
alias Shahab-uddin, but included 22 specimens of the coinage of Madana 
Pala Deva, and three of that of Sallakshana Pala Deva. Dr. Hoernle 
refers to the Chronicles, and, without comment, accepts Mr. Thomas' 
attribution of these coins to the Chandel (Chandella) kings of Mahoba 
in Bundelkhand. 

But there can be no possible doubt that the attribution is wrong. 
It was simple perversity on Mr. Thomas' part to make it, for, in a foot- 
note to page 66 of the Chronicles, he quotes General Cunningham's 
description of the Chandel coins, as follows : — 

" The gold and silver coins are all of the well-known types of the 
Ratnors of Kanauj, which bear a seated figure of the four-armed goddess 



1890.] V. A. Smitli— (7w»s of the Pdla Bevas. 207 

Diirga or Parvati on the obvei'se,* and, on the reverse, the king's name 
iu three Hues of niediieval Nagari eliaracters. The copper coins bear 
on the obverse, a two-armed male iagure, whicli appears to be that of 
the monkej-god Hauuman, and, on the reverse, the king's name iu 
Nagari characters." 

Since this extract was written. Sir A. Cunningham has more fully 
described and illustrated the Cliandel coinage in Volume X of the 
Archfeological Survey Reports, pages 25 — 27, Plate X. 

He there shows that the Cliaudel coius, though extremely rare, are 
known to occur in gold, silver, and copper. The silver coinage is known 
by only one specimen. " The gold and silver coins are direct copies 
of the money of Ganggeya Deva, the Kulachuri Raja, of Chedi, who was 
a contemporary of ]\[ahmud of Ghazni. On the obverse is a figure of 
the four-armed goddess Dtirga, which was the cognizance of the Hai- 
haya, or Kulachuri, princes of Ohedi, and is accordingly found upon 

their seals In their copper issue the Chandel kings departed 

from the original type of Darga, and substituted the figure of Hanu- 
man." 

It requires no argument to show that the coins thus described 
have absolutely nothing in common with the Bull and Horseman series, 
but, clear though the distinction is, I may as well specify the leading 
points of difference. The Chandel coins are exceedingly rare, less than 
forty specimens in all metals being know^n. Some of these belonged to 
Mr. Fi'eeling, and, if not lost in the mutiny, as many of his coins were, 
may possibly be now in the Bodleian. Colonel Ellis' five specimens were 
lost in the mutiny. I possess three, one of which I bought in the 
HamirjDur District ; the other two were presented to me by Sir A. 
Cunningham. The British Museum has seven, and Sir A. Cunningham 
the rest. On the other hand the Madana Pala and Sallakshana Pala 
coius occur in considerable quantities. 

The metal differs, for the Bull and Horseman series are composed 
of billon, a mixture of silver and copper in varying proportions. The 
Chandel coins are of good gold, silver, or copper. The tyjies and 
legends differ in every respect, as shown above, and as any one can 
see by comparing plates of the two series of coins. So far as Mr. 
Thomas had any reason for his assignment of the Sallakshaiia Pala and 

* It is a iiity that the terms obverse and reverse are not used more carefully. 
Here Sir A. Cnnningham inverts the terms in a very awkward way. The king's 
name on the Chandel coins takes the jolace of the king's effigy on a Bactrian, ludo- 
Scythian, or Gnpta coin, and the side bearing it is the obverse. The figure of 
Durga or Hanumau corresponds to the goddess on the reverse of eai'lier types of 
coinage, and the side bearing it is, and should be called, the reverse. 



208 V. A. Smitli — C'uins of tlie Pcila Devas. [Ado. 

Mariana Pala coins to the Cliaudols, liis decision was based on tlio sup- 
posed identity of names. Bat the names are not really identical. The 
name Sallakshana does not occai' on the Ghandel coins at all. Tlte 
Chandella prince was named Hallakshana, and the legend on his coins 
is unmistakeably S'rimad Hallakshana Varma Deva. The common 
name Madana certainly does occur in the Chandel as well as the Bull 
and Horseman series, but no Chandel king ever assumed the cogno- 
men of Pala. The distinctive cognomen of the dynasty is Vai'ma 
(Varmma). 

Thus it is apparent that absolutely no reason whatever exists for 
the assignment of the Sallakshana Pala and Madana Piila coins to the 
Chandel dynasty of Bundelkhand, but that on the contrary the attribu- 
tion of them to that dynasty is demonstrably wi'ong. 

I am not prepared to decide the question as to who Sallakshana 
Pala and Madana Pala really were, but they were certainly not Chandel 
princes. 

On page 19 of the Chronicles Mr. Thomas has made an equally 
serious blunder by ascribing to Prithivi Varma Deva Chandel a gold 
coin with the legend S'rimat Prithivi Deva, and the usual seated 
Lakshmi reverse. This coin he says is common. On the other hand 
only 9 specimens of the Chandel king Prithivi Varma's coinage are 
known, namely six gold and one silver in the British Museum, and 
two copper in Sir A. Cunningham's cabinet (Arch. Bejp. Vol. II, 
p. 58). 

The gold coins of Prithivi Varma Chandel agree in type with those 
of the other princes of his dynasty, as above described, which type 
differs considerably from that of the coin described by Mr. Thomas. It 
seems evident that Mr. Thomas had never seen a Chandel coin. 

I have now disposed of the main subject of this communication, 
but may take this opportunity of remarking that I believe the supposed 
" appearance of the joint names of Muliammad bin Sam and Prithivi 
Raja on one and the same coin " {Chronicles, page 17, with ivoodcuf) to 
be purely imaginary. In the text Mr. Thomas says that " the imperfect 
and obscured reverse epigraph, in which is involved the whole question 
of novelty, leaves a doubt as to the finality of any opinion that may now 
be pronounced." 

But in the foot-note he calls the reading " obvious," and says that 
General Cunningham did not contest the " obvious reading of the letters 
still visible on the coin." I cannot see the name Prithivi in the wood- 
cut, and I do not believe that he and his opponent ever put their names 
together on a coin. 



1890.] Lieutenant- General Mainwariug — Oa the ' Barisdl Guns.' 209 

4. Theory on the origin of thesouwls Jcnoiun as the ' Barisdl Guns.' — 
By Lieutenant- General MAiNWARiNa, B. S. C. 

(Abstract). 

After enumerating the various theories hitherto given and stating his 
inability to accept any of them as conclusive. General Mainwaring formu- 
lated his theory as follows : " The vast river formed by the coalescence of 
the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Megna with the numerous large streams 
chiefiy meeting in the mouth of the misnomeued Megna, here resolves 
itself into a broad sea ere coromiugliug with and augmenting in no small 
degree the waters of the Ocean Bay. This mighty river and all the 
enormous and innumerable volumes of water-mouths of the Ganges 
which jjour southward into the Bay carry with them innumerable quan- 
tities of mud and fresh decaying and decayed vegetable and other 
oi-ganic matter. All this composes the bed of the Bay. In it are gei'- 
minated vast and ever accnmulatiug stores of gas. This, without 
doubt, partly escapes, gradually, by ebullition but a far greater portion 
is confined in the superincumbent mud. This when collecting in quan- 
tity too great and forcible to be restrained, bursts forth and discharges 
itself into the air thus occasioning the loud report." 

Though anxious to obtain evidence of the escape of gas in quantity 
sufficient to cause these sounds, Gen. Mainwaring failed because during 
the monsoon season the boatman refused to proceed to sea. The latter 
half of the paper was taken up with accounting for various peculiarities 
observed in the sounds— such as (1; the double sound so frequently 
heard (2) their occurrence during the monsoon season, (3) their beincr 
heard far inland. The first is explained by the gas not all escaping at 
once, being followed at a short interval by the remainder ; the second 
by the disturbed water in the rains stirring up the mud and relievino- 
the gas ; the third by the existence of lakes or marshes near the jilace 
wdiere the sounds are heard, and in which similar decomposition of vege- 
table matter occurs. 

Babu Gaurdas Bysack remarked that according to General Main- 
waring the sounds of the ' Barisal Guns' are pi-oduced by the action of 
.river Avater on the mud, bed or bank, aiid that of gas generated from 
vegetable matter, but these conditions were certainly nob confined to 
the rivers in Backerguuj, or in the eastern districts, where the myste- 
rious phenomenon occurs. They are equally, or perhaps with greater 
force, ajjplicable to the Hughly river which brought down much veo-e- 
table matter and yet no sound of the kind is ever heard at Diamond 
Hai'bour or in the vicinity of Calcutta. He has heard the sound at 
Tnmlook, but the fact that the river Rupnarain on which that town 



210 Library. [Aug., 

stands, carries greater quantities of vegetable matter than the river 
Hughly had yet to be established before the theory could be accepted. 

Colonel Waterhouse suggested that the sounds might be due to 
explosions in the Petroleum beds at Cheduba Island. 

The President urged further observations and suggested that the 
Government officers at Hattia, Manpura and Dakhin Shabazpur should 
be addressed. It was clear that in Backerguuge the sounds came from 
the South and the ' echo ' theory did not seem to account for them, as 
they were heard where there were no river banks, e. g., at Kukri Mukri. 



LlBI\AF\Y. 

The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
meeting held in July last. 



Transactions, Proceedings and Joup^als, 

presented by the respective Societies and Editors. 

Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University, — Circulars, Vol, IX, No. 82. 
Batavia. Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen, — 
Kotulen, Deel XXVIII, Aflevering 1. 

. . . Tijdschrift voor Indische Taal-, Land-en Volken- 

kunde, Deel XXXIV, Aflevering, 1. 
Berlin. Der Koniglich Preussichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu. 

Berlin,— Sitzungsberichte, XXXIX— LI [I, 1889. 
Bombay. The Indian Antiquaiy,— Vol. IX, Parts 235 — 236. 
Boi'deaux. La Societe Linneenne de Bordeaux, — Actes, Tome XLII. 
Budapest. Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, — Foldrajzi tvozlemenyek, 

Kotet XVIII, Fiizet 3—4. 
Calcutta. Indian Engineering, — Vol. VIII, Nos. 1—5. 

-. •. Photographic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. Ill, No. 8. 

Cherbourg. La Societe Nationale des Sciences Natiirelles et Mathe- 

matiques de Cherbourg, — Memoires, Tome XXVI. 
Copenhagen. K. Nordiske Oldskrift-Selskab, — Aarboger, Raekke II, 

Bind V, Heft 1. 
Dresden. Gesellschaft Iris in Dresden, — Deutsche Entomologische 
Zeitschrift, Jahrgang 1889, Ersfces Lepidopterologisches Heft. 

. Konigliches Ethnographischea Museum zu Dresden, — VII. 
Masken von New Guinea und dem Bismarck Arcliipel. 



1800.] Library. 211 

Dresden. Konigliclies Zoologisches Museum zu Dresden, — Abbilduu- 
gen von Vogel-Skeletten, Lieferung, XII — XIII. 

■ Konigliclien Zoologisclieu und Antliropologisch-Ethno- 
graphischen Museums zu Dresden, — Abhandlungcn uud Bericlite, 
1888-89. 

Edinburgh. The Royal Scottish GeogTaphical Society, — Magazine, 

Vol. VI, Nos. 5 and 6. 
Florence. La Societa Africana d' Italia, — Bullettino, Tome VI, Fas- 

cicolo 3°et 4°. 
Frankfurt, a O. Des Naturwissenschaft Vei-eins des Reg-Bez Frank- 
furt, — Monatliche Mittheilungen aus dem Gesammtgebiete der 

Naturwissenschaften, Jahrgang 7, Nr. 6 — 11. 
— , a. M. Der Senckenbergischen Naturforschenden Gesells- 

chaft, — Abhandlungen, Band XVI, Heft 1 . 
Halle. Der Kaiserliclien Leopoldino-Carolinischen Deutschen Aka- 

demie der Naturforschei', — Nova Acta, Tome LllI, und Katalog der 

Bibliotliek, Lief 1 und 2. 
Hamburg. Naturhistorisches Museum in Hamburg, — Mitteilungen VH, 

Jahrgang 1889. 
Ithaca. Cornell University, — Library Bulletin, Vol. II, 'No. 13. 
London. Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, — 

Journal, Vol. XIX, No. 4. 

■. Geological Society of London, — Quarterly Journal, Vol. XLVI, 

No. 182. 
— — — . Institution of Civil Engineers, — Minutes of Proceedings, 

Vol. XCIX. Sessions 1889-90, Fart 1. 
■■ ■ Institution of Electrical Engineei-s, — Journal, Vol. XIX, 

Nos. 87 and 88. 

. Nature,— Vol. XLII, Nos. 1076-1081. 

' Royal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. L. 

No. 6. 

■ Royal Geographical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XII, (new 



series) Nos. 5 and 6. 

. Royal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. LXVII, No. 288. 

. Royal Statistical Society, — Journal, Vol. LlII, Part 1. 

. The Academy,— Nos. 946—950. 

The Athen^um,— Nos. 3269—3272. 



Lyon. La Societe D' Anthropologic de Lyon, — Bulletin, — Tome VIII, 
No. 3. 

Mexico. Estados Unidos Mexicanos, — Informes y Documentos Rela- 
tives a Commercio Interior y Exterior Agricultura, Mineria e In- 
dustrias, No. 55. 



212 Library. [Aug., 

Mexico. La SociecTad Cieutifica " Autouio Alzate," — Memorias. Tome 

III, No. 7—8. 
. Obsei-vatorio Meteoroldgica-Magnefcico, — Boletin Mensual. 

Tome II, Nos. 7—9. 
Moscow, La Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou, — Bulletin, 

'No. 4, 1889. 
Munich. Der K. B. Akadamie der Wissenschaften zu Munchen — Ab- 

bandlungen, Historischen Classe. Band LX, Abth. 3. 
— — — . . . Pbilosopliisch-Philologischen Classe, 

Band LXI, AbtL. 2. 
. . -., . Sitzungsbericbte, Mathematiscli-Physi- 

kalische Classe, Heft 3, 1888 ; Heft 1, 1889. 

Plailosopliiscb-Philologisclien und His- 



torischen Classe, Heft 3, 1888 ; Heft 1 und 2, 1889, 
Paris. Journal Asiatique, — Tome XIV (VIII'^ serie), No. 3. 
— — — . La Societe de Geographie, — Bulletin, Tome XI, (VIP serie) 

No. 1. 

' . Compte Rendu des Seances, Nos. 10 — 13, 1890. 

. La Societe Zoologique de France, — Memoii'es, Tome II, No. 4. 

. Musee Guimet, — Annales, Tome XV, XVI, Parte l»'e et 2^, et 

XVII. 
. . Revue de I'Histoii-e des Religions, Tome XX, Nos. 



1—3 et XXI, No. i. 

Philadelphia. Journal of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary Ar- 
chives, Vol. XI, No. 6. 

Roorkee. The Indian Forester,— Vol. XVI, No. 7. 

St. Petersburg. L' Academie Imperiale des Sciences de St. Peters- 
bourg,— Memoires, Tome XXXVI, No. 17, Tome XXXVII, 
Nos. 1—7. 

. . Comite Geologique, — Bulletin, Tome VIII, Nos. 6 — 10. 

. ■ . Memoires, Tome IX, No. 1 et Tome XI, 

No. 1. 

-. La Societe Imperiale Russe de Geographie, — Proceed- 



ings, Tome XXV, Nos. 6 et 7. 
Stettin. Entomologische Vereine zu Stettin, — Entomologische Zeitung. 

Band L. 
Sydney. Linnean Society of New South Wales, — Proceedings, Vol. V, 

(2nd series) Part 1. 
Taiping. Government of Perak, — The Perak Government Gazette, 

Vol. Ill, Nos. 19—21. 
Turin. La R. Accademia delle Scienze di Torino, — Atti, Tome XXV, 

Disp. 11^ et 12^. 



1800.] Library. 213 

Turin. La Osscrvatovio della Regia Univcrsita di Torino, — Osserva- 

zioni Meteorologicho, Aimo 1880. 
Vienna. Der K. K. Geologischen Reichsanstalt, — Yerliandlnngcn, Nos. 

6—9, 1800. 
.■■ -. Der K. K. Zoologiscli-botanischen Gesellscliaft in Wien, — 

Vei'bandlungen, Band XL, Qaartal 1 — 2. 
Wellington. New Zealand Institute, — Transactions and Proceedings, 

Vol. XXII. 
Zagreb. Hrvatskoga Arkeologickoga Druztva, — Viestnik, Godina XI I, 

Br. 3. 

Books and Pamphlets^ 

presented hy the autliors, translators, S)'c. 

Henry, James. Aeneidea, or Critical, Esegetical, and Aesthetical re- 
marks on the Aeneis. Vol. IV. 8vo. Dublin, 1880. 

MiTBA, Sarat Chandra, M. A., B. L. The Parsuit of Natural History 
among the Natives of India. 8vo. 

R.(y, Pratapa Chandra, C. I. E. The Mahabharata, translated into 
English prose. Part LIX. 

Miscellaneous Pi^esentations. 

Nederlandsch-Indisch Plakaatboek, 1602 — 1811, door Mr. J. A. Van 
der Chijs. Deel VII, 1755-1764. 8vo. Batavia, 1800. 

Bataviaasch Genootsohap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen. 
The Thirty-second Annual Report of the Trade and Commerce of Chi- 
cago for the year ending December 31st, 1880, 8yo. Chicago, 1800. 

Board of Trade, Chicago. 
Report of the fifty-ninth Meeting of the British Association for the 
advancement of Science held at Newcastle upon-Tyne in Septem- 
ber 1880. 8vo. London, 1800. 

British Association for the Advancement of Science. 
Report on the working of the Registration Department of the Central 
Provinces for the year 1880-00. Fcp. Nagpur, 1800. 
' Returns of the Rail-Borne Trade of the Central Provinces during the 
quarter ending 31st March 1800. Fcp. Nagpur, 1800. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Provinces. 
A Synopsis of the Queensland Flora ; containing both the Phsenoga- 
mous and Ci-yptogamous Plants. Third Suiiplemeut. By Fredk. 
Manson Bailey, F. L. S. 8vo. Brisbane, 1800. 

Colonial Botanist, Brisbane. 



214 Lihrary. ' [Aug., 

Iiiformo de la Divcccion General cTe Estadisfcica, Guatemala, 1889. Svo. 
Guatemala, 1890. 

DiRECCiON General de Estadistica, Guatemala. 

Administration Report on tlie Jails of Bengal for the year 1889. By 
Surgeou -Major A. S. Lethbridge, M. D., Inspector-General of 
Jails, Bengal. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Annual Report on the Police Administration of the Town of Calcutta 
and its Suburbs for the year 1889. By J. Lambert, Esq., C. I. E., 
Commissioner of Police, Calcutta. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Twenty-second Annual Report of the Sanitary Commissioner for Bengal 
for the year 1889. By Surgeon-Major W. H. Gregg, M. B., Sanitary 
Commissioner for Bengal. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of Bengal. 

Copy of Minutes of Dissent from the Despatch addressed to the Go- 
vernment of India by the Secretary of State in Council, regarding 
the age of candidates for the Indian Civil Service. Fcp. London, 
1890. 

Copy of Treasury Minute, dated 17th March 1890, under Section IV, 
of " the Appropriation Act, 1889," authorising the temporary ap- 
plication of Surpluses on certain Army Votes for the year 1889-90, 
to meet Excesses on certain other Army Votes for the same year. 
Fcp. London, 1890. 

Copies of, or Extracts from, correspondence relating to the appoint- 
ment of Mr. Beames as a Member of the Board of Revenue, Bengal. 
Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Correspondence relating to the Report of the Indian Public Seryjce 
Commission, including the question as to the limit of age for the 
Indian Civil Service Competition. Fcp. London, 1890. 

An Estimate of the sum required in the year ending 31st March. 1891, 
to defray the expense of the Ordnance Factories, the cost of the 
productions of which will be charged to the Army, Navy, and 
Indian and Colonial Governments, &c. Fcp. London, 1890. 

The Indian Antiquary, Vol. XIX, Parts 235 and 236, June and July, 
1890. 4to. Bombay, 1890. 

Preliminai'y and Further Reports (with Appendices) of the Royal Com- 
missioners appointed to enquire into the Civil and Professional 
Administration of the Naval and Military Departments, and the 
relation of those Departments to each other and to the Treasury. 
Fcp. London, 1890. 

Return " of Information from Foreign Countries relative to the Assay- 
ing and Hall-marking of Gold and Silver Wares." Fcp. London, 
1890. 



1890.] Library. 215 

Return showing the date of establishment, under Act LXVII of 1861, 
(1) of the Viceroy's Legislative Council, and (2) the Legislative 
Councils of Madras, Bombay, Bengal, and. the North- Western 
Provinces and Ou.dh. Fcp. London, 1890. 
Statement showing, approximately, the sums provided in the Army 
Estimate for 1890-91 for each arm of the Service, and for various 
Miscellaneous Establishments, and the estimated cost of the Per- 
sonnel of the Army. Fcp. London, 1890. 

Government of India, Home Department. 
Epigraphia Indica and Record of the Archaeological Survey of India. 
Part V, October 1889. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government op India, Rev. and Agri. Department. 
South-Indian Inscriptions, Tamil and Sanskrit, edited and translated by 
E. Hultzsch, Ph. D., Yol. I, (Archaeological Survey of India 
new series. Vol. Ill: Southern India, Vol. II). 4to. Madras, 1890. 

Government of Madras, 
Max Miiller's Sacred Books of the East, Vol. XXXIIL The Minor 
Law Books, translated by .Julius Jolly, Part I. Narada. Brihaspati. 
8vo. Oxford, 1889. 

India Office, Lonpon. 
Indian Museum Notes, Vol. I, No. 4. Notes on Indian Economic En- 
tomology. Rhynchota. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Indian Museum. 
Gedachtnisi-ede auf Karl von Prantl, von W. v. Christ. 4to. Miiuchen* 

1889. 
Georg Simon Ohm's wissenschaftliche Leistungen, von Eugen Lommel. 

4to. Miinchen, 1889. 
tlber die historische Methode auf dem Gebiet des deutschen civilpro- 

zessrechts von Julias Wilhelm V. Planck, 4to. Miinchen, 1889. 
Ueber die Molekularbeschaffenheit der Krystalle, von Dr, Paul Groth. 
4to. Miinchen, 1888. 

K. Academie der Wissenschaften zu Munchen. 
Der Goldne Schnitt, von Dr. Adolph Zeising. 4to. Halle, 1884. 
Historisch-Kritische Studien iiber das Ozon, von C. Engler, 4to. Halle> 
1879. 

K. Leopoldinisch-Carolinischen Academie, Halle. 
Bericht uber die Verwaltung und Vermehrung der Koniglichen Samm- 
lungen fiir Kunst und Wissenschaft zu Dresden in den Jahren 1886 
und 1887. Dresden. 
Ill, Jahresbericht (1887) Der Ornithologischen Beobachtungstationen 
im Konigreich Sachsen, bearbeitet von A, B. Meyer und F. Helm. 
Royal 4to. Dresden, 1888. 

Koniglichen Museums, Dresden. 



216 Library. [Aug., 

Memorandum on the Snowfall in the mountain districts of Northern 
India and Afghanistan and the abnormal features of the Meteoro- 
logy of India during the period January to May 1890. Fcp. Simla, 
1890. 

Meteor. Reporter, Government of India. 

Return of Wrecks and Casualties in the Indian Waters for the year 

1888. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Port Officer, Calcutta. 
Schach dem Darwinismus ! Studien eines Lepidopterologen von Johan- 
nes Schilde. 8vo. Berlin, 1890. 

WiLiBALD Schilde, Esq. 
Compte-Rendu des Seances du Congres International de Zoologie, Paris 

1889. Svo. Paris, 1890. 

SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE. 

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University deceased during the 
Academical year ending in June 1890, and Supplement 1880-90. 
Svo. 

Yale University. 

Periodicals Purchased. 

Berlin. Deutsche Litteraturzeitung, — Jalii-gang XI, Nr. 16 — 20. 

. Orientalische Bibliographic, — Band III, Heft 8. 

Calcutta. Indian Medical Gazette, — Vol. XXV, No. 6. 

Cassel. Botanisches Centralblatt, — Band XLII, Heft 2 — 8. 

Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, — Tome XXIII, 

No. 6. 
Gottingen. Der Konigl. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, — Gofctin- 

gische Gelehrte Anzeigen, Nr. 7 — 9, 1890. 

. , . Nacb rich ten, Nrn. 4, 1890. 

Leeds. The Journal of Conchology, — Vol. VI, No. 7. 

Leipzig. Annalen der Physik und Chemie, — Band XL, Heft 2 und 3. 

. . Beibliitter,— Band XIV, Stuck 6. 



Literarisches Centralblatt, — Nrn. 17—23, 1890. 



London. Mind,— Vol. XV, No. 59. 

— — . The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. V, (5th 

Series), Nos. 29 and 30. 
. The Chemical News,— Vol. LXT, Nos. 1595 and 1596, Vol. 

LXli, Nos. 1597—1599. 

. The Entomologist,— Vol. XXIII, Nos. 324 and 325. 

. The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, — Vol. I, (2nd Series), 

Nos. 312-313. 



1890.] Library. 217 

Londou. The Journal of Botany,— Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 329 and 330. 
. The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 

—Vol. XXIX, (3th Series), Nos. 180 and 181. 
. The Messenger of Mathematics, — Vol. XIX, No. 12 and Vol. 

XX, No. 1. 

The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVIII, No. 161. 

. The Quarterly Journal of pure and applied Mathematics, — 

Vol. XXIV, No. 96. 
. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 1961— 



1965. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science, — Vol. XXXIX, (3rd 

Series), No. 233. 
Paris. L' Academic des Sciences, — Comptes Rendus des Seances, — 

Tome CX, Nos. 15—21, et Tables, Tome CIX. 
. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, — Tome XX, (6'"^ Serie), 

Mai et Juin, 1890. 

. Journal des Savants, — Avril et Mai, 1890. 

. Revue Scientifique,— Tome XLV, Nos. 25—26. Tome XLVI, 

Nos. 1—3. 
. Revue de Linguistique et de Philologie Comparee, — Tome XXIII, 

Fascicule 2. 
, Revue Critique d' Histoire et de Litterature, — Tome XXIX, 

Nos. 16, 17, 19—22. 

jBooKS Purchased. 

Report of the Fifty-ninth Meeting of the British Association for the 
advancement of Scieace held at Newcastlo-upon-Tyne in September 
1889. 8vo. London, 1890. 



L.. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For November, 1890. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society of Bengal was 
lield on Wednesday the 5th November 1890, at 9 p. m, 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S., President, in the chair. 

The following members were present : — - 

Rev. A. "W. Atkinson, Babu Sarat Chandra Das, Babu Bhnpendra 
Sri Ghosha, Dr. W. King, Tom D. La Touche, Esq., C. Little, Esq., 
Kumar Rameswar Maliah, Babu Asutosh Mukhopadhyay, Dr. W. H. 
Solf, Dr. J. H. Tull Walsh, Colonel Waterhouse. 

Visitors, T. H. Holland, Esq., Babu P. N. Dutta. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

One hundred and thirty-four presentations were announced, details 
of which are given in the Library List appended. 

The Secretary reported that the following gentlemen had been 
elected Ordinaiy Members of the Society during the recess, iu accor- 
dance with Rule 7. 

Kumar Sarat Chandra Singh (re-elected). 

Romesh Chandra Dntt, C. S. 

The following gentlemen are candidates for election at the next 
meeting : — • 

C- A. Samuella, Esq., C. S., Maldah, proposed by H. Beveridge, 
Esq., seconded by Colonel Waterhouse. 

Captain A. Brame, proposed by H. Beveridge, Esq., seconded 
by C. Little, Esq. 

Rev. H. B. Hyde, Chaplain of St. John's, proposed by H. Beve- 
ridge, Esq., seconded by Haraprasad Shastri. 

Rai iJ^alinaksha Bose, Bahadur, Chairman, Burdwan Municipality, 
proposed by Asutosh Mukerjee, seconded by Gaurdas By sack. 



^iH^ 



220 Death of Mr. E. F. T. Atkinson. [Nov. 

Babu Varada Cliaran Mitra, Jt. Magistrate, Begu Serai, Mongtyr, 
proposed by Pratapa Chandra Ghosha, seconded by R. 0. Dutt, Esq. 

W. Conuan, Esq., Public Works Dept., proposed by H. Beveridge, 
Esq., seconded by Colonel Waterbouse. 

The following gentlemen have expressed their wish to withdraw 
fi'om the Society : — 

A. Macdonald, Esq. 
T. A. Pope, Esq. 
Maulvi Abdur Rahman. 

The Secretary reported the death of the following Members : — 
E. P. T. Atkinson, Esq. 
S. A. Hill, Esq. 



The President observed that as this was the first meeting that 
had been held since the death of Mr. Atkinson, he took the oppoi'tunity 
of expressing the regret which they doubtless all felt at that event. 
Mr. Atkinson had come out to India in 1863, and had for many 
years devoted his spare hours to literary and scientific reseai^ch.. He 
had long been a member of their Society, and was for two years their 
President, and had as such delivered two able and interesting Ad- 
dresses. He had laboured two years under the disease of which he 
died, but had gone on uncomplainingly with his duties and his studies. 
It was supposed that his death was accelerated by a chill which he 
cauo-ht while attending the funeral of the late Mr. Montague Brad- 
ford. The President read an extract from the Pioneer of the 29th 
September last. It gave a fairly appreciative notice of Mr. Atkinson, 
but vpas rather stinted in its praise, and in particular it failed to 
mention the excellent work which Mr. Atkinson had done as Chair- 
man of the Trustees of the Indian Museum. The President stated 
that the Council had drawn up the following Resolution in which the 
Members expressed their regret at the death of their friend and 
colleague, and that a copy of it had been sent to Mrs. Atkinson, 
with a letter of condolence signed by the President and the Members 
of Council. 

" The Council desire to place on record their deep sense of the 
" vei'y great loss the Asiatic Society of Bengal and Indian Natural 
" Science have sustained by the u.ntimely death of their former Presi- 
" dent and Vice-President, Mi". E. F. T. Atkinson, and to express their 
" great sorrow at the sad event that has deprived the Society of one of 
" its most active and enthusiastic supporters, and the Council of a much- 
" esteemed colleague and friend." 



1890.] Col. Watcrliouse — Birch hark MS. from Kashgaria. 221 

Tlie President stated that tlie votes would now be taken on the 
proposed alteration of Rule 70, so as to allow of Admission Fees being 
treated as part of the income available for general expenditure, reported 
at the meeting in August last, and appointed Dr. J. H. Tull Walsh and 
Babu Asutosh Mukhopadhyay to be scrutineers, who reported that 
there were 74 Votes in favour of, 7 Votes against the proposed alteration, 
and 3 with qualifications, whereupoa the President announced that it had 
been duly carried. 

The President laid before the meeting a list of Members who were 
more than 2 years in arear of subscription, for sanction to the Council 
being empowered to take legal proceedings for the recovery of the 
amount due, under the provisions of Rule 48 (g.) 

The meeting approved of any action being taken by the Council 
that might be considered necessary. 

Colonel Watebhou-ie exhibited a birch bark manuscript, and some 
coins, found by Lieutenant Bower in Kashgaria. 

The following note by Lieut. Bower accompanied the exhibit: — 

" While at Kuchar a man offered to show me a subterranean town 
provided I would go there in the middle of the night, as he was 
frightened of getting into trouble with the Chinese if it was known 
that he had taken a European there. I readily agreed and we started 
off about midnight. The same man procured me a packet of old 
manuscripts written on birch-bark. They had been dug out of the 
foot of one of the curious old erections of which several are to be found 
in the Kuchar district ; there is also one on the north bank of the 
river at Kashgar. The one out of which the manuscripts were pro- 
cured is just outside the subterranean city." 

" These erections are generally about 50 or 60 feet high, broad in 
proportion and resembling somewhat, in shape, a huge cottage loaf : 
they are solid and it is difficult to conceive for what purpose they were 
erected. They are principally composed of sun-dried biicks with layers 
of beams now criimbling away. Judging from the weather-beaten 
appearance they possess, and taking into consideration the fact that in 
Tui'kestan the rain and snow-fall are almost nominal, they must be very 
ancient indeed. The natives attribute them to King Afrasiab, a con- 
temporary of Rustam, who ruled over a kingdom corresj^onding to the 
pi'esent Chinese Tui'kestan, but I found they had a habit of attributing 
everytliing ancient to King Afrasiab." 

The subterranean ruins of Mingai, to which my guide had promised 
to take me, are situated about 16 miles from Kuchar, on the banks of 



222 Col. Waterhouse— -BiVc^i harJc MS. from KashgaHa. [ISToT, 

the Shaliyar river, and are said to be the remains of Afrasiab's capital. 
The town must have been of considerable extent, but has been greatly 
reduced owing to the action of the river. On the cliffs on the left bank^ 
high up in mid-air, may be seen the remains of houses still hanging, 
on to the face of the cliffs." 

" One of the houses I entered was shaped as shown below. 




A. B. represents a tunnel, 60 yds. X 4 yds., through a tongue- 
shaped hill ; C and D are the entrances, the hill being almost perpendi- 
cular at A and B ; 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. are cells roughly 6 feet x 6 feet. The 
walls have been plastered, and what appear to be the remains of geo- 
metrical patterns can be made out," 

" I was told that the remains of other similar towns may be seen in 
the district. In Taqub Beg's time a lot of gold was dug up." 

" I believe the ruins and MS. to be Buddhist." 

Of the coins two were found in the ruins of Shahr i Bab8.r, one of 
the ancient towns of Takla Makan, now lying under the sands of the 
Gobi Desert." 

Babu Sarat Chandra Das said, the MS. was very ancient and of 
great interest, and kindly promised to try and decipher it. 

[He has since written to say that both Lama Phuntshog and he 
had failed in their endeavour to decipher this very ancient and rare 
MS. unearthed by Lieut. Bower in Eastern Tu.rkestan — the country 
which he had identified with the Liyul of the Tibetan and Ktimsa Besa 
of the Indians in his contribution on the antiquities of Khoten, {Journal, 
Part I, 1886). In that paper it was noticed that there existed in 
Khoten and the countries north of it numerous Buddhist works in a 
form of Sanskrit. The Chinese traveller Fa Hian also testified to that. 
He believes that tliis MS. is the only remnant (come to light after 



PLATE m 



Proceeoinos, ^s Soc B 








.I^^^Xr^-W 






I,E 



S. I OfEces, Calcutta, November 1890. 



CITY NEAR KUCHAR, EASTERN TURKESTAN. 












LS*- 






«i ..r-i.,. ...~».-.lrf-. .„— ninti rT i nS iii.iiiii M l . -■■ - I ti . ria f iili^ 



«ar> 




LEAVES FROM A BIRCH-BARK MANUSCRIPT FOUND IN AN UNDERGROUND ANCIENT, CITY NEAR KUCMAR, EASTERN TURKESTAN. 



1890.] Dr. J. H. Toll Wsilsh—Neio Trap-Joor Spider from Orissa. 223 

the lapse of so many centuries) of the Indo-Tartar Sanskrit, wbicli was 
current in Khoten and Kashgar during the early centuries after Christ. 

Most of the letters correspond partly with the ancient Newari and 
Wartula characters after the model of which the Tibetan characters 
were shaped by Thonmi Sambhota in the middle of the 7th century 
A. D. He had compared the MS. writing with some of the characters 
which were formed by the Locavas of Tibet and called Yig-sar, {vide 
Plate VII of Journal A. S. B. Vol. LVII, Part I, of 1888). Although he 
bad been able to trace some similarity of shape in the characters of the 
MS. to those of the Yigsar, he failed to make anything out of it, even 
with the help of some Buddhist IS'ewars of Nipal, now in Calcutta, and 
had abandoned the hope which he so long entertained of being able to 
interpret the MS.] 

It may be mentioned that the MS. consists of 56 leaves of birch- 
bark, some in single thickness and others from two to four thicknesses, 
for the most part written on both sides. The writing, which is entirely 
in black ink, seems to be in several different hands. Some of the leaves 
appear perfectly fresh and clear, others are much discoloured ; all are 
very brittle and tender. The leaves are enclosed between two boards 
and a string runs through them. As the MS. appears to be particu- 
larly rare and interesting, a facsimile of two leaves of it, reproduced in 
heliogravure at the Survey of India Offices, is given in Plate III in the 
hope that some of our members may be able to decijDher it or throw 
some further light upon its age and origin. 

The following papers were read : — 

1. Prelimmary list of the Butterflies of Madras. — By Lieutenant 
E. Y. Watson, B. S. C. 

The paper will be published in the Joui-nal, Part II. 

2. A neiu Trap-door Spider from Orissa. — By Surgeon J. H. Tull 
Walsh, Indian Medical Service. 

(Abstract.) 
Adelonychia, n. gen. 
Adelonycliia nigrostrata, $ , n sp. At present the following descrip- 
tion will be that of the genus also. 

The spider, which I think is not full grown, measures 10 mm. The 
falces are reddish-brown ; fangs long. Pedipalpi medium length, ter- 
minal joint furnished with a black pad of strong hairs. Eyes : anterior 
and centre pairs large and of a blackish-brown colour ; hind-centrals 
and hind-externals small and pearly white. Cephalothorax reddish- 



224 M. Clifikravarti — Tiny d mscrijitiojis of 15th ^- 16th centuries. [Nov. 

brown above, whitish yellow below ; fovea transverse with eight dark, 
shallow grooves radiating from it. Cephalo-thoiax markedly convex 
in front between the anterior dark markings and slightly convex over 
remaining part. Abdomen oval, truncated in front and more convex on 
the upper than on the under sui-face. The ground colour above is 
greenish-grey with a central black stripe and seven well marked black 
lateral strise directed downwards and slightly backwards from the 
central line. The entire upper surface of the abdomen is covered with 
fine light coloured hairs. Under surface of abdomen dull grey, the four 
lung sacs visible as small white spots ; 2 pairs of white spinnerets. 
Legs ; relative length 4. 1-2. 3, pale reddish-yellow above, almost white 
below. Tarsi without hooks (?) but terminating in brush -like black 
pads. Falces, pedipalpi and legs thickly covered with strong blackish- 
brown bristle-like hairs. 

Hab. Orissa (Khurda forest). 

[A fuller description will appear in the Journal, Part II.] 

3. On some Indian Psychidoe. — By F. Moore, F. Z. S. 

4. On a neio species of Diptera m the collections of the Indian Mu- 
seum. — By MoNS. J. M. F. Bigot. Communicated by J. "Wood-Mason, 
Esq. 

These papers will be published in the Journal, Part II. 

5. Uriyd Inscriptions of 15th and 16th Centuries, from the Temple of 
Jaganndth at Puri, and the Temple of Mahddev at Bhuvanesvar. — By 
Manmohan Chakeavarti. 

6. Chhatisgar : Notes on its Tribes, Sects and Castes. — By P. N. 
BosE, Geological Survey of India. 

These papers will be published in the Journal, Part I. 

7. Extracts from the Journal of a trip to the Glaciers of Pandini, 
Kabru, ^'c, in September 1889. — By P. N. BoSE, Geological Survey of 
India. 

It was resolved that this paper should be presented to the Geologi- 
cal Survey Department for publication in the " Records " of that 
Department. 



1890.] Library. ' 225 



The following additions have been made to tbe Library since tlie 
meetins' held in Auo'ust last. 



Transactions, Pi^oceedings and Jour^NALS, 

presented hy the respective Societies and Editors. 
Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University, — American Chemical Journal. 
Vol. XI, Nos. 6-8; Vol. XII, Nos. 1—5, and General Index of 
Vols. I— X. 

- ' — . . American Journal of Mathematics. Vol, 

XII, Nos. 1—4 ; and Index to Vols. I— X. 

American Journal of Philology, Vol. X, 



No. 4 ; and Vol. XI, N'os. 1—3. 

. Circulars, Vol. VIII, No. 75 and Vol. IX, 



No. 77. 
— — — — — . . Studies from the Biological Laboratory. 

Vol. IV, Nos. 5 and 6. 
Berlin. Berliner Entomologische Zeitschrift, — Band XXXV, Heft 1. 
— — . Der Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin. — 

Sitzungsberichte, I— XIX, 1890. 
Bombay. Bombay Natural History Society, — Journal, Vol. V, No. 2. 
. The Indian Antiquary. Vol. XVIII, No. 229 and Vol. XIX, 

No. 239. 
Boston. American Philological Association, — Transactions, Vol. XX. 
Brussels. La Societe Entomologique de Belgique, — Annales. Tome 

XXXIIL 
Budapest. A Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, — Foldrajzi Kozlemenyek. 

Kotet XVIII. Fuzet 5—6. 
Buenos Aires. Museo Nacional de Buenos Aires, — Anales. Tome III. 

Entrega 16. 
Calcutta. Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India, — Journal, 

Vol. VIII, Part 4. 
■' Geological Survey of India, — Records, Vol. XXIII, Part 3. 

• — . Indian Engineering, — Vol. VIII, Nos. 6 — 18. 

— — — — . Photograpliic Society of India, — Journal, Vol. Ill, Nos. 

9—11. 
Christiania. Norske Commission der Euroijaischen Gradmessung, — 

Geodiitische Arbeiten, Heft 6 — 7. 



226 Library. [Nov. 

Coi^enliagen. K. Nordiske Oldskrift-Selskab, — Aarboger, Raekke II, 

Band V, Heft. 2—4. 
— ■ • . La Societe Royale des Autiquaires da Nord, — Memoires 

1889. 
Dorpat. Der Naturforsclier-Gesellscliaft bei der Universitat Dorpat, — 

Sitzungsberichte, Band IX, Heft 1. 
Dublin. Royal Dublin Society, — Scientific Proceedings, Vol. VI, Part 

7—9. 
Edinburgh. Royal Society of Edinburgh, — Proceedings, Vols. XV and 

XVI. 
. . Transactions, Vol. XXXIII, Part 3 ; and Vol. 

XXXV, Parts 1—4. 
■■ — . The Scottish Geographical Society, — Magazine, Vol. VI, 



Nos. 7 and 8. 

Florence. La Societa Africaua d' Italia, — Bullettino, Vol. VI, Fasci- 
colo 5° e 6°. 

■ . La Societa Italiana di Antropologia, Etnologia e Psicologia 

Comparata, — Archivio per L' Antropologia e la Etnologia. Tome 
XX, Fascicolo 1° et 2°. 

Frankfurt, aM. Der Senckenbergischen Naturforschenden Gesells- 
chaft,— Bericht, 1890. 

■, aO. Des Naturwissenschaftlichen Vereins des Reg-Bez 
Frankfurt, — Monatliche Mittheilungen aus dem Gesammtgebiete 
der Naturwissenschaften, Jahrgang, VII, Nr. 12 und Jahrgang 
VIII, Nrn. 1—3. 

Geneva. La Societe de Physique et d' Histoire Naturelle de Geneve. — 
Tome XXX, Partie 1 et 2. 

Giessen. Der Oberhessischen Gesellschaft fiir Natur-und Heilkunde, — 
Bericht, Band XXVII. 

The Hague, Koninklijk Instituut voor de Taal,- Land-en Volkenkunde 
van Nederlandsch Indie, — Bijdragen tot de Taal- Land-en Volken- 
kunde van Nederlandsch-Iudie. Deel. V Aflevei'ing 3 und 4. 

Havre. Societe de Geographic Commerciale du Havre, — Bulletin, 
Mai— Aont, 1890. 

Konigsberg. Der Physikalisch-Okonomischeu Gesellschaft zu Konigs- 
berg, — Schriften, Jahrg. XXX. 

Liverpool. Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool, — Proceed- 
ings, Nos. 41 — 43. 

London. Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, — 
Journal, Vol. XX, No. I. 

. Geological Society, — Quarterly Journal, Vol. XL VI, Part 3. 

. Institution of Civil Engineers, — Minutes of Proceedings, Vol. C. 

1889-tO. Part II. 



1890.] * Lihmry. 227 

London. Institution of Electrical Engineers, — Journal, Vol. XIX, l^o. 

89. 
. Institution of Mechanical Engineers, — Proceedings, N"©. 1, 

1890. 
. Linnean Society,— Journal (Botany) Vol. XXV, Nos. 171—172. 

Vol. XXVI, No. 174 and Vol. XXVII, Nos. 181—182. 
. . . (Zoology). Vol. XX, No. 122—123, Vol. 

XXI, Nos. 133—135 and Vol. XXIII, Nos. 141—144. 

. . Proceedings, Sessions, 1887-88. 

. . Transactions (Zoology). Vol. V, Part 4. 

. . Ligt of Fellows, January, 1890. 

. Nature,— Vol. XLII, Nos. 1082—1094. 

. Royal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. L, Nos. 

7 and 8. 

■ . . Memoirs, Vol. XLIX, Part 2. 

. Royal Geograjjhical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XII, Nos. 7 

and 8. 

- •. Royal Microscopical Society, — Journal, Part 3, 1890. 

. Royal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. XLVII, Nos. 289—293. 

. . Philosophical Transactions, Vol. OLXXX, (A and B). 

. . List of Fellows, 30th November, 1889. 



. Royal Statistical Society, — Journal, Vol. LIII, Part 2. 

. The Academy,— Nos. 951—963. 

. The Athen^um,- Nos. 3273—3286. 

. Zoological Society of London, — Proceedings, Parts 1 and 2, 

1890. 

Madison, Wisconsin. Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Let- 
ters, — Transactions, Vol. VII. 

Melbourne. Royal Society of Victoria, — Transactions, Vol. I, Part 2. 

Mendon, 111. The American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal, — Vol, 
XII, Nos. 4 and 5. 

Mexico. Deutschen Wissenschaftlichen Vereins in Mexico, — Band I, 
Heft 1, 2. 

. Estados Unidos Mexicanos, — Informes y Documentos Relatives 

ii Comercio Interior y Exterior Agricultura, c Industrias, Nos. 56 
and 57. 

. La Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate," — Memorias, Tomo 



III, No. 9—10. 
Minneapolis. Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences, — Bulletin, Vol. 

Ill, No. 1. 
Moscow. La Socio te Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou, — Bulletin, 

No. 1, 1890. 



228 Librarij. [Nor. 

Mnnicb. K.B. Akademie der Wissensclmften zii Miinclien,— Abhaud- 
lungen, Hisfcorischen Classe, lUnd XIX, Abtlieilung 1. 

. . . . Mathematiscli-PhysikaliscLen Classe, 

Band XVII, Abtheilung 1. 

. . . Sitzuiigsbericbte, Heffc 2, 1889. 

Philosopbiscb-pliilologisclien uud 



Historischen Classe, Heft I, und 3, 1889. 

Nnples. La Societa Africaua d'ltalia, — Bollettimo, Anno IX, Fasc. 5 
et 6. 

New York. American Museum of Natural History, — Bulletin, Vol. II,- 
Nos. 3 and 4, and Annual Report of the Trustees for the year 1889 
-90. 

Paris. Journal Asiatique, — Tome XVI, No. 2. 

. La Societe de Geograpbie,— Bulletin, No. 2, 1890. 

. La Societe Zoologique de France, — Bulletin, Tome XV, Nos. 4 — 6 

. . Memoires, Vol. Ill, Nos. 2—3. 

Philadelphia. Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, — Proceed- 
ings, Parts 1 and 3, 1890. 

■ Amei'ican Philosophical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. 

XVI, No. 3. 

-. The Journal of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary 



Archives, Vol. XI, Nos. 7—10. 
Raleigh, N.C. Elisba Mitchell Scientific Society, — Journal, Vol. VI, 

Part 2. 
Rio de Janeiro. Imperial Observatorio do Rio de Janeiro, — Annaes, 

Tomo IV, Parts 1^ et 2^. 

. . . Annuario, 1888-1890. 

. Observatorio de Rio de Janeiro, — Revista do Observatorio. 



Anno V, No. 8. 

Rome. La Societa Degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Vol. XIX, 
Dispensa 6^ — 9*. 

Roorkee. The Indian Forester, — Vol. XVI, No. 8. 

Santiao-o. Deutsche Wissenchaftlichen Vereines za Santigo. — Verhand- 
lungen, Band II, Heft 2. 

Schaffhausen. La Societe Entomologigue Suisse. — Bulletin, Vol. VIII. 
Heft, Nr. 5. 

Sydney. Linnean Society of New South Wales, — Pi'oceedings, (1st 
series) Vol. VII, Parts 1—4, Vol. VIII, Parts 1 — 4, Vol. IX, Parts 
1—4, Vol. X, Parts 1—4. (2nd series) Vol. I, Parts 1—4, Vol. V, 
Part 2. 

• . Royal Society of New South "Wales, — Journal and Proceed- 
ings, Vol. XXIII, Part 2. 



1890.] Library. 229 

Stufcfgart. Des Vereins fiir vaterUiudisclie Naturkunde in Wiirttem- 

berg, — Jahresliefte. Jahrgang, l!^90. 
Taiping. Government of Perak, — The Perak Government Gazette, 

Vol. Ill, Nos. 22—28. 
Tokyo. Imperial University of Japan, — Journal of the College of 

Science, Vol. Ill, Part 4. 

, . Calendar, 1889-90. 

Toronto. Canadian Institute, — Proceedings, Vol. VII, No. 2. 

Turin. La R. Accademia delle Scieuze di Torino, — Atti, Vol. XXV, 

Disp. 13a, 14a. 

. , . Processi Verbali, 4 Maggio, 1890. 

Vienna. Der Anthropologischen Gesellschaft in Wien,— Mittlieilnngen. 

Band XX, Heft 1 nnd 2, 
. Der K. K. Geologisclicn Reichsanstalt, — Abhandlungen, Band 

XIII, No. 1 und Vol. XV, No. 1. 

. . Jahrbuch, Band XXXIX, Heft 344. 

. Des K. K. Naturhistorisclieu Hofmuseums, — Annalen, Band 

V, Nr. 3. 

-^ . Vienna Oriental Journal, — Vol. IV, No. 2. 

Wasliiugton. Smithsonian Institution, — Annual Report, 1886, Part 2, 

1887 Parts 1 and 2. 
» . . Smitksonian Contributions to Knovi^ledge, 

Vol. XXVI, 
Tokoliama. Der Deutschen Gesellschaft fur Natur-und Volkerkunde 

Ostasiens in Tokio, — Mittlieilungen, Heft 44. 
Zagreb. Hrvatskoga Arkeologickoga Druztva, — Viestuik, Godina XII, 

Br. 1—2. 
. Arkeologickoga Odjela Nar. Zem. Muzeja u .^agrebu, — Popis, 

Svezah I, Odsjek I— II. 

Books and Pamphlets, 

presented by the Authors, Translators, Sfc. 

DUTT, R. C. A History of Civilization in Ancient India, based on 
Sanskrit Literature. Vols. I— III. 8vo. Calcutta, 1889. 

= — . Rig Veda Sanhita, original Text in Bengali charac- 
ter. 8vo. Calcutta, 1886. 

.. . . Bengali translation. 8vo. Calcutta, 



1889. 
Fkitsche, Dr. H. On Chronology and the construction of the Calendar, 
with special regard to the Chinese computation of time compared 
with the European. 8vo. St. Petersburgh, 1886. 



230 Library. [Nov. 

NuRsiNGROW, A. v., Results of Meteorological Observations at the 
G V. Juggarow Observatory, Daba Gardens, Vizagapatam, 3889 
with an introduction. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Rat, Pratapa Chandra, C. I. E. The Mahabharata, translated into 
English Prose. Parts 60 and 61. Svo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Senart, E. Le Mahavastu, texte Sanskrit. Tome II. Svo. Paris, 
1890. 

Wateehouse, Col. J., B. S. C. Practical notes on the preparation of 
drawings for Photographic reproduction, with a sketch of the prin- 
cipal Photo-mechanical printing processes. Svo. London, 1890. 

Weber, Prof. Albrecht. Die Griechen in Indien (Sitzungsbcrichte 
der K. P. Akademie der Wissenschaf ten zu Berlin. XXXVII, 1890). 
4to. Berlin, 1890. 

Miscellaneous P^j;sentations. 

Inscriptions at S'ravana Belgola, a chief seat of the Jains. By B. Lewis 
Rice, C. I. E., M. R. A. S. 4to. Bangalore, 1389. 

Aech^ological Survey, Mysore. 

Catalogue of the Cuneiform Tablets in the Kouyunjik collection of the 
British Museum. By C. Bezold. Vol. L 4to. London, 1889. 

Catalogue of Oriental Coins in the British Museum. Vol. IX. 
Additions to the Oriental Collection 1876-1888, Part I. Additions 
to Vols. I — IV. By Stanley Lane Poole : edited by Reginald 
Stuart Poole. Svo, London, 1889. 

British Museum, London. 

The History of Education in North Carolina. By Charles Lee Smith. 
Svo. Washington, 1888. 

Bureau of Education, Washington. 

Bibliography of the Iroquoian languages. By James Coustantine 
Pilling. Svo. Washington, 1888. 

Bibliography of the Muskhogean languages. By James Coustantine 
Pilling. Svo. Washington, 1889. 

Fifth and Sixth Annual Reports of the Bureau of Ethnology. By J. W. 
Powell, 1883-84, 1884-85. 4to. Washington, 1887-88. 

Textile Fabrics of Ancient Peru. By William H. Holmes. Svo. Wash- 
ington, 1889. 

The Circular, Square, and Octagonal earthworks of Ohio. By Cyrus 
Thomas. Svo. Washington, 1889. 

The Problem of the Ohio Mounds. By Cyrus Thomas. Svo. Wash- 
ington, 1889. 

Bureau of Ethnology, Washington. 



1890.] Library. 231 

Tagore Law Lectures, 1889-90. The Law of AgeBCj in Brilish India. 
By T. A. Pearson. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Calcutta Uniyersitt. 

Administration Report of the Government Central Museum, Madras, 
for the year 1889-90. Fcp. Madras, 1890. 

Central Museum, Madras. 

Annual Report of the Sanitary Commissioner of the Central Provinces 
for the year 1S89. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Report on Education in the Central Provinces for the year 1889-90. 
Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Report on the Excise Revenue in the Central Provinces for the year 
1889-90. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Report on the Nagpur Experimental Farm in the Central Provinces for 
the year 1889-90, ending 31st March 1890. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Report on the Vaccine Operations in the Central Provinces for the year 
1889-90. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Resolution on the management by Government of private estates in the 
Central Provinces for the revenue year 1888-89, ending the 30th 
September 1889. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Chief Commissioxe-^, Central Provinces. 

Catalogue of the Indigenous and Naturalised Plants of Queensland. 
By Fredk. Manson Bailey, F. L. S. 8vo Brisbane, 1890. 

Colonial Botanist, Brisbane. 

Wattles and Wattle-Barks, being hints on the conservation and culti- 
vation of Wattles, together with particulars of their value. By 
J. H. Maiden, F. L. S., F. C. S. 8vo. Sydney, 1890. 

Department of" Public Instruction, Sydney. 

Atlas. Eastern Middle Anthracite Field, Part 3, A. A. 8vo. 

. Northern Anthracite Field, Part 5, A. A. 8vo. 

. Southern Anthracite Field, Part 2, A. A. 8vo. 

Geological Survey of Pennsylvania. 

Administration Report of the Meteorological Reporter to the Govern- 
ment of Bengal for the years 1887—90. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Annual Report on Emigration from the Port of Calcutta to British and 
Foreign Colonies, 1889. By Surgeon-Major D. W. D. Coniins. 
Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Annual Report on Inland Emigration for the year 1889. By Surgeon- 
Major D. W. D. Comius. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Flora of British India. By Sir J. D. Hooker, C. B., K. C. S. I., Vol. V. 
Chenopodiacege to Orchidece 8vo. London, 1890. 

Report on the Administration of the Customs Department in the Bengal 
Presidency for tho official year 1889-90. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 



232 Library. [Nov. 

Report on the Administration of the Salt Department for tlie year 

1889-90. Fcp. Calcntta, 1890. 
Report on the Calcutta Medical Institutions for tlie year 1889. By 

A. Hilson, M. D. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Report on the External Trade of Bengal with Nepal, Tibet, Sikkim and 

Bhutan, for the year 1889-90. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Report on the Legal Affairs of the Bengal Government for the 3'ear 

1889-90. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Report on the Police of the Lower Provinces of the Bengal Presidency 

for the year 1889. By J. C. Veasey. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Returns of the Rail-borne Trade of Bengal for the quarter ending the 

3 1st March 1890. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Summary of the Meteorology of the year 1889 in Bengal, Fcp. 1890. 
Triennial Report on the Administration of the Registration Department 
in Bengal for the official years 1887-88, 1888-89 and 1889-90. By 
H. Holmwood. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of Bengal. 
Excursions et Reconnaissances, XIV. 8vo. Saigon, 1890. 

Government op French Cochin China, Saigon. 
An Estimate of the sum required in the year ending .31st March 1891, 
to defray the expense of the Ordnance Factories, the cost of the 
productions of which will be chai'ged to the Army, Navy, and 
Indian and Colonial Governments, &c. Fcp. London, 1890. 
Copies of, or Extracts from. Correspondence relating to memorials from 
members of the Civil Service as to the Mamlatdars incriminated in 
the Crawford case. Fcp. London, 1890. 
Copies of, or Extracts from, Correspondence relating to the system of 
grading Royal Engineers with Civil Engineers on their first ap- 
pointment to the Public Works Department. Fcp. Loudon, 1890. 
Copy of, or Extracts from, Correspondence between the Government of 
India and the Secretary of State for India in Council in 1888-90, 
respecting proposed changes in the Indian Army system. Fcp. 
London, 1890. 
Copy of the Indian Financial Statement for 1890-91, and of the Pro- 
ceedings of the Legislative Council of the Governor-General thereon. 
Fcp. London, 1890. 
Estimate of Revenue and Expenditure of the Government of India, 
for the year 1 389-90, compared with the results of 1888-89. Fcp. 
London, 1890. 
Further correspondence respecting the Internationa] Labour Conference 

at Berlin. Fcp. London, 1890. 
Home Accounts of the Government of India, for 1888 — 89 and 1889 — 90. 
Fcp. London, 1890. 



1890.] Lihrory. 233 

Return giving- copies of, or Extracts from, Correspondence with the 
Governments of India and Bombay as to the Mamlatdars incrimina- 
ted in the Crawford case. Fcp. London, 1890. 

Return of all Loans raised in England under the provisions of any Acts 
of Parliament, chargeable on the Revenues of India, outstanding 
at the commencement of the half year ended on the 31st March 
1890. Fcp. London, 1890. 

Retmm of the nmnber of otuices of Gold and Silver Plate upon which 
duty was paid at each of the Goldsmith's Halls in London, Bir- 
mingham, Chester, Sheffield, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Dublin, in 
each year from 1887-88 to 1889—90. Fcp. London, 1890. 

Retixrn showing the Estimated Expenditure for the year 1890-91 on the 
Army and Navy, and the provision to be made for it. Fcp. Lon- 
don, 1890. 

Statement of the Trade of British India with British Possessions and 
Foreign Countries for the five years 1884-85 to 1888-89. Fcp. 
London, 3 890. 

The Indian Antiquary, Vol. XIX, Parts 337-339. August to October 
1890. 4to. Bombay, 1890. 

Government of India, Home Department, 

Report on the progress and condition of the Government Botanical 
Gardens, Saharanpur and Mussooree, for the year ending 31st March 
1890. Fcp. Allahabad, 1890. 

Government of N.-W. P. and Oudh. 

Final Report of revised settlement of the Hoshiarpur District, 1879-84. 
With Maps. By Captain. J. A. L. Montgomery. 8vo. Calcutta, 
1885. 

Report on the Administration of Civil Justice in the Punjab and its 
dependencies during the year 1889. Fcp. Lahore, 1890. 

Report on the Sanitary Administration of the Punjab for the year 1889, 
Fcp. Lahore, 1890. 

Report on Vaccination in the Punjab for the year 1889-90, Fcp. 
Lahore, 1890. 

Government of the Punjab. 

Prodromns of the Zoology of Victoria ; or figures and descriptions of the 
living species of all classes of the Victorian indigenous animals. 
By Frederick McCoy, CM.G. Decade XX. 8vo. Melbourne, 1890. 

Government of Victoria. 

A Monograph of Oriental Cicadidas. By W. L. Distant, Part 3, 4to. 
London, 1890. 

Indian Museum, 



234 Library. [Nov. 

Johns Hopkins UuivGrsii_y Studies in Historical and Political Science, 
Seventh series, X — XIT. Federal Government in Canada. By 
John G. BoTirinot, Hon. LL. D., D. C. L. 8vo. Baltimore, 1889. 

■ . Eighth series, I — II. The beginnings of American nationality ; 

The constitutional relations between the Continental Congress and 
the Colonies and States from 1774 to 1789. By Albion W. Small, 
Ph. D. 8vo. Baltimore, 1890. 

. . III. Local Government in Wisconsin. By David E. 

Si^encei*, A. B. 8vo. Baltimore, 1890. 

• '. . IV. Spanish Colonization in tlie South-West. By 

Frank W. Blackmar, Ph. D. 8vo. Baltimore, 1890. 

. Extra Volume VI. The Negro in Maryland, a study of the 

institution of Slavery. By Jeffrey R. Bi^ackett, Ph. D. 8vo. Bal- 
timore, 1889. 

On the Electro-magnetic effect of Connection-Currents. By Prof. 
Henry A. Rowland and Cary T. Hutchinson (from the Philosophi- 
cal Magazine for June 1889). 8vo. 

The Fragments of - the work of Heraclitus of Ephesns on Nature. 
Translated from the Greek text of Bywater. By G. T. W. Patrick, 
Ph. D. 8vo. Baltimore, 1889. 

Dissertations presented to the Board of University studies of The Johns 
Hopkins University for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy : — 

On the Ventricular Epithelium of the Frog's brain. By A. 0. Wight- 
man. 8vo. Baltimore, 1889. 

The Absolute Participle in Anglo-Saxon. By Morgan Callaway, Jr. 
Ph. D. 8vo. Baltimore, 1889. 

The Asuri-Kalpa: a witchcraft practice of the Atharva- Veda, with an 
introduction, translation, and commentary. By H. W. Magoun. 
8vo. Baltimore, 1889. 

The Relation of Hans-Sachs to the Decameron, as shown in an examina- 
tion of the thirteen Shrovetide Plays drawn from that source. 
By Archibald MacMechan, Ph. D. 8vo. Halifax, 1889. 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. 

Nordiske Foi-tidsminder udgivue af Dot Kgl. Nordiske Oldskriftselskab. 
1 Hefte. 4to. Copenhagen. 

KoNGELIGE KORDISKE OlDSKRIFTSELSEAB, COPENHAGEN. 

Brief Sketch of the Meteorology of the Bombay Presidency in 1889-90. 
Fcp. Bombay, 1890. 

Meteor. Reporter Government of Bombay. 
Dictionary of the language of the Micmac Indians. By Rev. Silas 
Tertius Rand, D. D., LL. D. 4to. Halifax, 1888. 

Minister of Finance, Ottawa (Canada). 



1890.] Library. 235 

Fortsetzung der Neuen Untersucliungen liber die Bessel'sche Formel 

und deren Verwendurg in der Meteorologie, von Prof. Dr. Karl 

Weihrauch. 8vo. Dorpat, 1890. 

Naturfoesher-Gesellchaft der Univkrsitat, Dorpat. 
Annual Report of the Lucknow Provincial Museum Committee for the 

year ending 31st March 1890. Fcp. 1890. 

Provincial Museum, Lucknow. 
Statistisches Handbuch der Kouiglichen Hauptstadt Prag und der 

Vororte Karolinenthal, Smichow, Kgl. Weinberge und Zizkow fiir 

die Jahre 1887 und 1888. 8vo. Prague, 1889. 

Stx\.tistischen Commission, Prag. 
Account of the Operations of the Great Trigonometrical Survey of 

India. Vol. XL Astronomical Observations for Latitude made 

during the period 1805 to 1885, with a general description of the 

operations and Final Results. 4to. Dehra Dun, 1890. 

Surveyor General of India. 
Bemerkungen zur Kriminalstatistik des Grossherzogthums Hessen, 

besonders zur statistik des Bettels und der Landstreicherei, von 

Dr. Hans Bennecke. 4to. Giesseu, 1889. 
Personal Bestand der Grossherzoglich Hessischen Ludewigs-TJniversi- 

tat, Geissen. Winter-Semester von Ottober 1889, bis Ostern 1890. 

8vo. Giessen, 1889. 
. Sommer-Semester, von Ostern bis ende September 1890. 

8vo. Giessen.. 1890. 
Verzeichnik der Vorlesungen welche aus der Grossherzoglich hessischen 

Ludewigs-Universitat zu Giessen im Sommerhalbjahre, 1890. 8vo. 

Giessen, 1890. 

. ImWinterhalbjahre 1890-91. 8vo. Giessen, 1890. 

Inaugural-Dissertation zur Erlangung der Doctor wurde der Hohen Me- 

dicinischen Facultat der Grossherzoglich Hessischen Ludewigs- 
Universitat zu Giessen : — 
Beitrage zur Histologic des Echinococcus multilokularis, Vorgelegt \on 

Hermann Marenbach, Approb Arzt aus Mehren. 8vo. Giessen, 

1889. 
Das Fibromyom des Collum Uteri, Vorgelegt von Hermann Frank, 

Appi'obirtem Arzt aus Giesseu. 8vo. Giessen, 1889. 
Die Grofshirnrinde in ihrer Stellung zur Speichelsecretion, Vorgelegt 

von Gisbert Fluck, approbirtera Arzt aus Oamberg. 8vo. Gissen, 

1889. 
Die Operationsmethodeu des Rectumcarciuoms, Vorgelegt von Carl 

Heinrich Heyder, Approbirtem Arzt aus Gei-nsheim a Rh. 8vo. 

Giessen, 1890. 



236 Library. [Nov. 

Die polifcische Stellung der deutschen Stadte von 1421 — 1431 mit be- 

sonderer Beriicksiclitigung ihrer Betheiligung an den Reform- 

bestrebungen dieser Zeit, Vorgelegt von Fritz Dietz, aus Uffhofen. 

8vo. Giessen, 1889. 
Drei BeobachtuDgen von Sarcoma Ovarii, Vorgelegt von Otto Fre- 

senius, Appr. Arzt aus Biidingen. Svo. Biidingen, 1889. 
Ein Fall congenitaler Atresie der A. pulmonalis, combinirt mit Tricus- 

pidalstenose, bei geschlossener Kammerscheidewand, Vorgelegt 

von Lndwig Wagner, Approb Arzt aus Darmstadt. Svo. Darmstadt, 

1889. 
Ueber die Beweglichkeit Pleuritischer Exsudate, Vorgelegt von Karl 

Nicolay, Approbirtem Artz ans Blofeld. Svo. Giessen, 1889. 
Tiber Verschiedene Darstellungen des korrespondierenden Kegelscbnitts 

einer Geraden in Bezug auf ein Kegelsclinittblischel, Vorgelegt 

von Otto Weimar, aus Darmstadt. 4to. Giessen, 1890. 
Zur Aetiologie und Symptomatologie der chronischen continurilichen 

Saftsecretion des Magens, Vorgelegt von Anton Vente, Approbir-- 

tern Arzt aus Lenhauseni W. Svo. Giessen, 1890. 
Zur Casuistik der Haematosalpinx, Vorgelegt von Heinrich Walther, 

Approb Arzt aus Giessen. Svo. Giessen, 1890. 
Zur Casuistik der vom Pharynx ansgebenden Aktinomykose, Vor- 
gelegt von Rudolf Hofmann, Approbirtem Arzt aus Planig. Svo. 

Giesseu, 1889. 
Zur Casuistik der Spina bifida, Vorgelegt von Adolph Wieber aus 

Brooklyn. Svo. Giessen. 1889. 
Zur Lelire vom Ulcus veutriculi rotundum und dessen Beziebungen zur 

Chlorose, Vorgelegt von August Griine. Approbirtem Arzt aus 

Meschede i. W. Svo. Amberg, 1890. 
Inaugural-Dissertation zur Erlangung der Doctorwiirde der Philosophis- 

cben Facultat zu Giessen : — 
Beitrag zur Kenntnis des Feineren Baues der Fruchtschale der Kom- 

positen, von Otto Heineck, aus Hungen. SvO. Leipzig, 1890. 
De Mutatis Centuriis Servianis, Scripsit Fridericus Schmidt, Darms- 

tadiensis. Svo. Gissse, 1890. 
De Particularum " Oti et ' flS apud Demosthenem Usu, Scripsit Gui- 

lelmus Reeb, Friedi-ichsdorfensis. Svo. Gissse, 1890. 
Die Forstliche Bedeutung der Vogel, Vorgelgt von Arthur Schonhutb, 

aus Leobschiitz, Provinz Schlesien. Svo. Giessen, 1890. 
Uber die Einwirkung von Schwefel Auf Glycerin, Vorgelegt von C. 

H. Keutgen, aus Manchester. Svo. Bei'lin, 1890. 
Ueber Eine Anwendung des Wasserdampfcalorimeters zur Bestimmung 

von Verdampfungswarmen. Vorgelegt von Karl Wirtz, aus Darm- 
stadt. Svo. Leipzig, 1S90 



1890.] Library. 237 

Ueber Eine reproduction der Sismens'schen Queck-silber-einheit, 

Vorglegt von Hermann Passavant, aris Darmstadt. 8vo. Leipzig, 

1890. 
Ueber Eine Transcendente Minimalflacbe, welcbe eine schar Algebrais- 

cher Raumcurven Vierten Grades Enthalt, von Wilhelm Thien- 

emann, aus Gotlia. Leipzig, 1890. 
UntersuchiTng der Fljiclie dritter Ordnang hinsichtlicli der projectiv 

verallgemeinerten Mittelpunkts-Eigenschaften, von Karl Stoltz, 

Realgymnasiallebrer zu Mainz. 4to. Mainz, 1890. 
Untersuchungen iiber zweites oder wiederholtes Bliihen, von Georg 

Jacob, aus Odernheim (Rheinliessen). 8vo. Giessen, 1889. 

Universitat, Giessen. 
The Geological Observer. By Sir Henry T de La Beche, C.B., F.R.S., 

&c. 8vo. London, 1853. 
Manual of the Birds of New Zealand. By Walter L. Bnller, C.M.G., 

Sc. D. F.R.S. 8vo. New Zealand, 1882. 

Colonel J. Waterhodse. 

Periodicals Purchased. 

Berlin. Deutsche Litteraturzeitung, — Jahrgang, XI, Nrn. 22 — 33. 

. Journal fiir die reine und angewandte Mathematik, — Band 

CVI, Heft 3-4, und Band CVII, Heft I. 

Zeitschrift fiir Ethnologic,— Heft 2, 1890. 



Calcutta. Calcutta Review,— Vol. XCI, No. 182. 

. Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XXV, Nos. 7—11. 

Cassel, Botanisches Centralblatt,— Band XLII, Heft 9—13, Band 

XLIII, Heft 1—7. 
Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, — Tome XXIV, 

Nos. 7—9. 
Gottingen. Der Konigl. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, — Gottin- 

gische Gelehrte Anzeigen, Nrn. 10 — 14, 1890. 

. . Nachrichten, Nrn. 5—6, 1890. 

Leipzig. Annalen der Physik und Chemie, — Band XL, Heft 4, und 

Band XLI, Heft 1—2. 

. . Beiblatter, Band XIV, Stiick 7—8. 

. Literarisches Centralblatt,— Nrn. 24—34, 1890. 

. Orientalische Bibliographic, — Band IV, Heft 8. 



Leyden. Internationales Archiv-fiir Ethnographic, — Band III, Heft 3. 
London. Mind,— Vol. XV, No. 60. 

. The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol, VI, Nos. 

31 and 32. 
. The Chemical News,— Vol. LXII, Nos. 1600—1612. 



238 Library. [Nov. 

London. The Entomologist,— Vol. XXXIII, Nos. 326 and 327. 
., The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, — Vol. I, (2id Series) 

Nos. 314 and 315. 

. The Ibis,— Vol. II, (6th Series) No. 7. 

. The Journal of Botany,— Vol. XXVIII, Nos. 331 and 332. 

. The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 

—Vol. XXX, Nos. 182 and 183. 

. The Messenger of Mathematics, — Vol. XX, Nos. 2 and 3. 

. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVIII, Nos. 162—164. 

. The Numismatic Chronicle, Vol. X, {3^^ Series), Nos. 37 and 



38. 
. The Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, — Vol. XXXI 

No. 122. 

. Rhopalocera Exotica, Part 13, July 1890. 

. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVUI, Nos. 1966— 

1978. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science, — Vol. XXXIX, (3^''^ 

Series), No. 234, and Vol. XL, Nos. 235 and ?36. 
Paris. L' Academic des Sciences, — Comptes Rendus des Seances, — 

Tomo CX, Nos. 22—26 et Tome CXI, Nos. 1—6. 
. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, — Tome XX, (6™« Serie), 

Jiiillet et Aout, 1890. 

. Journal des Savants, — Juin et Juillet, 1890. 

, Revue Scientifique, — Tome XLVI, Nos. 4—16. 

. Revue de Linguistique et de Philologie Comparee, — Tome 

XXIII, Fascicule 3. 

Revue Critique d' Histoire et de Litterature, — Tome XXIX, 



Nos. 23—27 et Tome XXX, Nos. 28—33 et Table, Tome XXIX. 
Philadelphia. Manual of Conchology, — Vol. XII, Part 45 and Vol. VI, 

(2'»d Series), Part 21. 
Vienna. Vienna Oriental Journal, — Vol. IX, No. 3. 

Books Purchased. 

Cameron, Peter. A Monograph of the British Phytophagous Hymen- 
optera. Vol. III. (Ray Society). 8vo. London, 1890. 

HoERNBi?, R., und AuiNGER, M. Die Gasteropoden der meeres-ablagerun. 
gen der ersten und zweiten miocanen Mediterran-stufe in der 
Osterreichisch-Ungarischen Monarchic. Leiferung 6. 4to. Wien, 
1890. 

The International Numismata Orientalia, Vol. II. Coins of the Jews. By 
E. W. Madden, M. R. A. S. 4to. London, 1881. 



1890.] Library. 239 

The International Numismata Orieutalia, Vol III, Part 2. Coins of 

Southern India. By Sir Walter Elliot, K. C. S. I., LL. D., F. R. S. 

4to. London, 1886. 
The International Scientific Series, Vol. LXVIII. The Colours of 

Animals. By E. B. Poulton, M. A., F. R. S. 8vo. London, 1890. 
. Vol. LXIX. Introduction to Fresh- Water Algae. By M. C, 

Cooke, M. A., LL. D., A. L. S. 8vo. London, 1890. 
McCooK, Henry C. American Spiders and their Spinning work. Vols. 

I— II. 4to. Philadelphia, 1889-90. 
Seventh Memoir of the Egypt Exploration Fund (Extra volume for 

1888-9). The Mound of the Jew and the City of Onias, by 

Bdouard Naville : and the Antiquities of Tele el Tahudiyeh, by 

F. LI. Griffith. 4to. London, 1890. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For December, 1890. 



The Montlily General Meeting of the Asiatic Sociefcj' of Bengal 
was held on. Wednesday the 3rd December 1890, at 9 p. m. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S., President, in the chair. 

The following members were present : — 

Babu Ganrdas Bysack, Hon. Sir A. W. Croft, Babu Saratchandra 
Das, Babu Jogendrachandra Ghose, W. H. Jobbins, Esq., 0. Little, Esq., 
C. J. Lyall, Esq., T. R. Munro, Esq., L. de Mceville, Esq., M. H. Oung, 
Esq., Pandit Haraprasad Sbastri, Dr. W. H. Solf. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, 

Nineteen presentations were announced, details of which are given 
in the Library List appended. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting of the Society, were ballotted for and elected Ordinary Mem- 
bers : — 

C. A. Samuells, Esq., C. S. 

Captain A. Brame. 

Rev. H. B. Hyde. 

Rai Nalinaksha Bose, Bahadur, 

Babu Varada Charana Mitra. 

W. Connan, Esq. 

The following gentlemen have expressed a wish to withdraw from 
the Society : — 

Rev. A. W. Atkinson, 
Babu Kaliprasana Ghosha. 



1^ 



242 Preyident — Facsiville of a Tuijlira inscriijt'wn at Maldah. [Dec. 

The President exhibited a facsimile, kindly lent by Mr. Samuells, 
of an inscription in the Tughra character which was on a jiiece of black 
basalt now in the Magistrate's compound at Maldah. 

The stone had been found in a jungle near Nawabganj on the Maha- 
nanda about twenty miles S. E. from Gaur. This, and some other 
stones and some Hindu carvings, had belonged to a faqir, and on his 
death they were sent to the Magistrate as unclaimed property in Decem- 
ber 1889. The king referred to in the inscription was an Abyssinian and 
"was known by the name of Sidhi Badr diwanah (mad). He killed 
the king of Gaur and then usurped the throne and called himself 
Shamsuddaniya Abul N'a9r Muzaifar Shah. He was a great tyrant and 
was apparently killed in 899 A. H. (Blochmann' Contributions, p. 81 and 
the Riyaz-us-Salatin, pp. 167-169.) The Riyaz says he built a mosque in 
Gaur and probably this inscription belonged to it. The Hiyaz makes 
him reign till 903 A. H. 

Translation. 

The Prophet (God's blessing on him,) says " He who builds a 
mosque for God, it will be the reason of purchasing a house like it in para- 
dise.' It was built in the reign of the great king Shamsuddunya waddin 
Abunnasr Muzuffar Shah, may God perpetuate his rule and kingdom. 
This Jarai mosque was built by Majlisul-moazzam walmakarram Majlis 
Ulugh. Khurshid — May his elevation be everlasting ! on the 10th Rabi- 
al-awal 898. (30th December, 1492). 

The President exhibited a cop]ier-plate inscription found at Ashraf- 
pur in the Dacca district, and read a translation of it by Raja Rajen- 
dralala Mitra. 

The copper-plate was found in 1884 or 1885 by a i^yot named Mir 
Khan while levelling a mound in Ashrafpur about 30m. S. E. of Dacca and 
about 5m. from the Sital Lakhya. It was 6 or 7 ft. underground. 
Another plate was found at the same time and was desciibed and figured 
in our Proceedings for March 1885. The existence of the copper- 
plate was brought to notice in the Statesman by Tarak Nath Roy, a 
Brahman residing at Lakarshi, and it was through him that the plate 
was acquired by the Society. The plate was in very good preservaLion, 



Proceeoinss, As. Soc. Bengai.. I89D, 



PLATE. IV. 



sC'"'^ 







ffht 



ir 



^-'ei 



<f S? 






Ground Levbl. 



if'-'^^t- 



j"^ 






L.A.Waodell Z?eZ- A L Paiw J^ii/i. 

The *Manik-tham Monolith of the Puraniya District. 



1890.] President — Fact^iviile inscription from a mosque at Snri. 243 

and the date on it was clear. The inscription related to a grant of land 
by a Jain. Raja Rajeiidralala Mitra's translation and remarks would 
be published in the Journal. 

The inscription is of interest as affording the names of 4 kings 
hitherto unknown to history who flourished in Bengal before the Pala 
kings who belong to the 9th century. 

The President exhibited a badly executed facsimile of an inscrip- 
tion from a mosque in the town of Suri. The inscription had originally 
no connection with the mosque, and was said to have lain for many years 
in the Collectorate before it was made over to the builder of the mosque 
and placed by him upon it. The inscription was dated 922 A. H. 
(1616) and related to tlie famous Hosain Shah of Gaur. Possibly it 
was the same inscription as that described in our Journal, XXX, 
389-390, The lacsimile was too imperfect to admit of its being read. 

Pandit Harapras.4D Shastra exhibited a copper-plate inscription of 
the last century from Oiissa. 

The Secretary read an invitation for the second Inter-Ornitho- 
logical Congress to be held at Budapest in May, 1891 forwarded by the 
Chancellor of the Imperial and Royal Austro-Hungarian Consulate, 
Calcutta, at the request of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Vienna. 

The following papers wei'e read — 

1. Some additional species of Labiatae, hy Dr. D. Prain. 
The paper will be published in the Journal, Part II. 

2. On place and river names in the Darjeeling district and Sikhiin 
hy Dr. L. a. Waddell. 

This and Raja Rajendralala Mitra's paper on the Ashrafpur inscrip- 
tion will be published in Part I of the Journal. 

< 3. Note on the ' Manik-tham ' monolith in the Puraniya (Purneah) 
district, (with a shetcli and coin). — By L. A. Waddell, M. B 

The only notice of this ancient monument which seems to be on 
record is a brief and admittedly vague note by Dr. Buchanan, in his 
report for the Puraniya district.* Lately having had an opportunity 
of examining the pillar with some care,t I beg to forward the follow- 
ing brief description of it. 

* Eastern India III, p. 55. 

t The existence of thia pillar was bronght to my notice by Dr. Picachy, the 
Civil Surgeon of Parneah. 



241! Dr. Waddell— ' Manik-tham ' monolith in the Pura.niya district. [Dec. 

The pillar is situated outside the N. W. corner of the old fort of 
Sikligai^h, ' the chain fortress ', on the western border of the district. 
It is of thick, inelegant shape, and has the same general proportions and 
appearance as the Ghazipur edict pillar, now in the grounds of the 
Benares College. The stone is a light reddish granite of such fine tex- 
ture as to appear almost like sandstone. It can scarcely be called a 
' rude ' cylinder, as it is perfectly cylindrical and its sui-face is smooth 
and almost polished. It is no longer erect, but is inclined at an angle 
of about G5° — this inclination, I am informed, was gi^en it about 3 years 
ago by the then Collector of the district who dug around the pillar and 
then tilted it over in this way to make sure his excavation had 
reached the base. 

As the appearance of the monolith was sug'gestive of its being 
probably an edict pillar, and its greater portion was buried under ground, 

I had it excavated. This operation showed that the pillar had originally 
been implanted for over half its length in a foundation of irregular 
layers of bricks and mortar. The appearance of the column on excava- 
tion is well seen in the annexed sketch.* The pillar retained its smooth 
and almost polished surface throughout its extent, except in a few por- 
tions where this surface has scaled off, and where about its middle third 
the west face of the pillar had been vei'y roughly chipped away to form 
an irregular oblong depression about 6 feet in length and about 2| feet 
in breadth. The most careful search all over the pillar, however, failed 
to find any trace of an inscription. The basal extremity of the pillar 
was sharply truncated across and rested in the sand, and here imme- 
diately under the pillar was found the gold coin of Indo-Scythic cha- 
racter which accompanies this note. 

The upper extremity of the pillar is perforated by a hole (12 inches 
deep, and in diameter b^ inches at the top and 3|" at the bottom) which 
evidently formed the socket for the stem or bolt of a drowning orna- 
ment ; and in forcibly wrenching out this latter the top of the shaft has 
been extensively fractured, (vide sketch). Local tradition alleges that 
the shaft was formerly surmounted by the figure of a lion, but that this 
was removed many hundreds of years ago, no one knows where. 

The dimensions of the pillar are as follow : — total length is 19 ft. 

II inches (of which 7^ feet are above ground) ; circumference at 3 feet 
from summit, is 112| inches. 

Regarding the purpose of this pillar there must still remain much 
doubt. The villagers in the neighbourhood call it ^ Manik tham ' or 
' the precious pillar ' of Hindu fable, and worship it. Dr. Buchanan 

* Plate IV. 



1890.] Dr. Waddell — ' ManiJ:-tham ' monuUth in the Puraniya district. 245 

failed to get any local history or tradition concei'ning the stone. No\v-a- 
days, the villagers assert that this was this scene of the Maluibharata 
episode of the Sivaic Hiranya Kans'* attempted slaughter of his sou 
Prahladha for devotion to the worship of Vishnu. King Hiranya Kans, 
it is alleged, lived in the adjoining fortress of Sikligarh and sent out his 
son to be bound to this pillar and put to death here, when on the appeal 
of Prahladha to his deity, the latter in the form of Nara Sinha appeared 
incarnate in the lion-ligui'e surmounting the capital and saved his 
devotee. 

In this legendary tradition it is remarkable that the pillar is 
associated both with a human sacrifice, and the presence of a surmount- 
ing lion : the former possibly suggestive of its being a sati pillar, while 
the latter indicates rather an edict (Asoka ?) pillar. Perhaps it may be 
the upper part of an edict pillar which has been utilized for sati pur- 
poses. The stone had originally been carefully fashioned, while the 
rudely chipped depression is evidently of more recent date. The coin 
too witli its Sivaic emblem on the reverse might imply the creed of the 
person who erected the stone in this locality, thus coinciding with the 
popular tradition. It is also curious to find that the river which flows 
past the further side of the fort is named the Hiranya nadi, thus lending 
local colour to the applicability of the Mahabharata legend. 

The coin is described on page 209 of Von Sallet, Die Nachfolger 
Alexanders des grossen. 

It is a coin of Vasudeva or Bazodeo (2nd century A. D.), 
Obverse. King standing to left hand, with a nimbus round his 
head ; he wears a peaked cap ; a sword by his side ; a trident in his 
left hand ; the right hangs over an altar, above which is a trident. 

Legend. PAO NANO RAO BAZOz^HO KOPANO (or more correctly 
KOPNO as the A seems to be omitted), which probably means — " The 
king of kings Vasudeva the king." But some suppose the last word not 
to be the Greek Koipdvov, but the name of a tribe. 

Reverse. OKPO (the Sanskrit Ugra) or S'iva with a humped bull be- 
hind him, with only one head. (On some coins of this king he has thi-ee 
heads.) He holds in his left hand a trident, in his right a garland, or 
perhaps a fillet, or a noose. 

See also Percy Gardner's Coins of Greek and Scythic kings, p. 160. 

* The name is so pronounced locally, not ' Hiranya Kashipu {f^VSS^WS 
as is nsual. A raja Kans is identified with several places in this and the adjoining 
district of Dinajpnr. Raja ' Kanis ' according to Stewart's History of Bengal, p. 94, 
was a Hindu king of Bengal from 1385 to 1393 A. D. This may be the same as the 
raja ' Qanss ' mentioned by Dr, Buchanan. 



^246 Library. [ Dec. 



h 



IBRARY. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
meeting: held in November last. 



Transactions, Proceedings and Journals, 

presented hy the resjyective Societies and Editors. 

Batavia. Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen,^ 
Notulen. Deel XXVIII. Aflevering 2. 

. . Tijdschrift voor Indische Taal-, Land-en Volken- 

kunde. Deel XXXIV. Aflevering 2. 
Bombay. Bombay Natural History Society, — Journal, Vol. V, No, 3. 
Calcutta. Indian Engineering, — Vol. VIII, Nos. 19 — 22. 
Liege. Societe Geologique de Belgique, — Annales, Tome XVII, 3 

Livraison. 
London. Geological Society, — Quarterly Journal, Vol. XLVI, Part 4. 

. List of Fellows, — November 1st, 1890. 

Nature,— Vol. XLII, Nos. 1095—1098. 
The Academy,— Nos. 964—967. 
The Athenaeum,— Nos. 3287—3290. 
Mexico, Estados Unidos Mexicanos, — -Informes y Documentos relativos 
a Comercio Interior y Exterior Agricultura e Industrias, Nrs. 58 — 60. 

. La Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate," — Memorias, Tome 

III, Nos. 11 y 12. 
. Observatorio Meteoroldgico-Magnetico Central de Mexico, — 



Boletin Meusual, Tomo II, No. 12. 

New Haven. American Oriental Society, — Proceedings, 7th May, 1890. 

Prague. Der K. K. Sternwarte zu Prag, — Magnetische und Meteorlo- 
gische Beobachtungen, 1889. 

Rio de Janeiro. Observatorio do Rio de Janeiro, — Revista do Observa- 
torio, Anno V, No. 9. 

St. Petersburg. Comite Geologique, — Bulletin. Tome IX, Nos. 1 — 6 
et Supplement au Tome IX. 

Taiping. Government' of Perak, — The Perak Government Gazette, 
Vol.111, Nos. 29—31. 

Zagreb. Hrvatskoga Arkeologickoga Draztva, — Viestnik. Godina XII, 
Br. 4. 



1890.] Library. 247 

^ooKS AND Pamphlets, 

presented by the Authors Translators, _SfC. 

Roy, Pratapa Chandra, C. I. E. The Maliabharata, translated into 
English prose. Part 62. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Miscellaneous Pi^esentations. 

Annual Report of the Trustees of the Australian Museum, Sydney, for 

1889. Fcp. Sydney, 1890. 

Australian Museum, Sydney. 
Returns of the Rail-borne traffic of the Central Provinces during the 

quarter ending 30th June, 1890. Fcp. Nagpur, 1890. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Provinces. 
First Triennial Report of the Sanitary Commissioner for Bengal on the 

working of the Vaccination DcDartment in Bengal during the three 

years 1887-88, 1888-89 and 1889-90. By Surgeon-Major W. H. 

Gregg, M. B. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Greneral Repoi't on Public Instruction in Bengal for 1889-90. Fcp. 

Calcutta, 1890. 
Report on the Land Revenue Administration of the Lower Provinces 

of Bengal for the official year 18s9-90. Fcp. Calcutta, 1S90. 
Report on the Rail-borne traffic of Bengal during the year 1889-90. 

Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Returns of the Rail-borne trade of Bengal for the quarter ending 30th 

June, 1890. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 
Triennial Report on the working of the Charitable Dispensaries under 

the Grovernmeut of Bengal for the years 1887, 1888 and 1889. By 

A. H. Hilson, Esq., M. D. Inspector-General of Civil Hospitals, 

Bengal. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of Bengal. 
Progi'ess Report of the Archfeological Survey of Western India from 

December 1889 to February 1890. Fcp. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of Bombay. 

Indian Antiquary,— Vol. XIX, Part 240. 4to. Bombay, 1890. 

Government of India, Home Department. 
Epigraphia Indica and Records of the Arch geological Survey of India. 
°Part VL 4to. Calcutta, 1890. 

Government of India — Rev. and Agri Depts. 

Annual Returns of the Civil Hospitals and Dispensaries in the Madras 
Presidency for the year 1889. Fcp. Madras, 1890. 



248 Lihranj. [Dec. 1300.] 

Progress Report of the Ai'cha?ology of Southei'ii India from May to 
September J 890, by Dr. E. Hultzsch. Fcp. Madras, 1890. 

Government of Madras. 

Report of the Land Revenue Settlement of the Gargaon District. By 
F. C. Chanuing, Esq. 8vo. Lahore, 1882. 

Government of the Punjab. 

Annual Report of the Trustees of the Indian Museum, April 1889 to 
March 1890. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 

Indian Musecm. 

Cyclone Memoirs, Part 3. Bay of Bengal Cyclone of September 13th — 
20th, and October 27th— 31st, 1888, and. Arabian Sea Cyclone of 
November 6th— 9th, 1888. 8vo. Calcutta, 1890. 
Report on the Administration of the Meteoi-ological Department of the 
Government of India in 1889-90. 4to. Calcutta, 1890. 

Meteor. Reporter to the Govt, of India. 
Veroffentlicbungen aus dem Kouiglichen Museum fur Volkerkunde. 
Band I. Heft 2-3. 4to. Berlin, L890. 

W. Spemann, Esq. 

Pei^odicals Puf^hased. 

Braunschweig. Jahresbericht uber die Fortschritte der Chemie und 

verwandter Theile anderer Wissenschaften, — Heft 5, 1887. 
Geneva. Archives des Sciences Physiques et JSTaturelles. — Tome XXIV, 

No. 10. 
Leipzig. Annalen der Physik und Cbemie. — Beiblattei% Band XIV, 

Stiick 9 u 10. 
London. The Chemical News,— Vol. LXII, Nos. 1613—1616. 

. The Nineteenth Century,— Vol. XXVIII, No. 165. 

. The Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Nos. 1979- 

1982. 
Paris. Revue Scientifique, Tome XLVI, Nos. 17—20. 



INDEX 



TO THE 

PROCEEDINGS, ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

FOR 1890. 



Page 
Abdul Latif (Navvab Bahadur), elected Member of Library Com- 
mittee ... ... 136 

„ „ elected Member of Philological 

Committee ... ... ib. 

Abdur Rahman (Maulvi), withdrawal of ... ... ... 220 

Admission fees to be used for general expenditure ... 201, 221 
Alcock, (Dr. A.), observations on the gestation of some Sharks 

and Rays ... ... ... 7 

„ ,, elected Member of Natural History Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... 137 

„ ,, elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... ib. 

Amex'icau Oriental Society, notice of papers in Journal of ... 60 
Amir Ali (Hon. Justice), elected Member of History and Archaso- 

logical Committee ... ... ... ... 137 

Andaman Flora, non-indigenous species of .,. ... 149 

Anderson, (H. H.) elected Member of Natural History Committee 137 

„ ,, withdrawal of ... ... ... 147 

Annual Address of President ... ... ... ... 39 

^, Meeting ... ... ... ... ... 15 

„ Report ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

,, Review ... ... ... ... ... 43 

Anthropology, progress in ... ... ... ... 99 

Archaeology, papers on ... ... ... ... 69 

ArcliKological Survey of Southern India ... ... ... 71 

Arichnida, papers on ... ... ... ... 136 

Arnold, (T. W.), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 189 

Aryavarta, ancient map of ... ... ... ... 204 

Asiatic Society, publications of . ... ... 450 

„ „ investments of, transferred to the 4 per cent, loan 200 



250 Index. 

Page 
Astrolabes, exhibition of ... ... ••• ••• 1^8 

Atkinson, (E. T.), elected Member of Council ... ... 124 

„ elected Member of Finance Committee ... 136 

„ elected Member of Library Committee ... ih. 

„ elected Member of Philological Committee ... ib. 
„ elected Member of Natural History Committee 137 
death of ... ... ... ... 2i0 

Atkinson, (Rev. A. W.), withdrawal of ... ... ... 241 

Auditors, appointment of ... ... ... ... J36 

Bamboos, description of a new genus of ... ... ... 125 

Barclay, (A.), list of tlie Uredince- in the neighbourhood of Simla ib. 

elected Member of Natural History Committee ... 137 
Rust and Mildew in India ... ... ... 16.5 

Barisal Guns, volcanic vents in the direction of the sounds of ... 8 

remarks on the report of Sub-Committee ... 47 

theory on the origin of the sounds ... ... 209 

BatracWans, papers on ... ... ... ... 106 

Bayne, (R. R.), withdrawal of ... ... ... 159 

Beames, (J.), elected Member of Philological Committee ... 136 

elected Member of History and ArchiBological Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... 137 

Beveridge, (H.), elected President ... ... ... 124 

Bibliotheca Indica, works undertaken in ... ... 22, 47 

Bhuvanesvar, Uriya inscriptions from the temple at ... ... 224 

Bi'>-ot, (Mons. J.), description of a dipterous insect at Simla ... 138 
on a new species of Diptera ... ... 224 

Birch bark manuscript and coins from Kashgaria ... ... 221 

Birds, papers on ... ... ••• ••. ••• lOt 

Bombay, Anthropological Society of ... ... 59, 69, 99 

„ Branch Royal Asiatic Society, ... ... 48, 59 

Natural History Society, work done by ... 48, 106, 116 

Bonnerjee, (W. C), re-elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 189 

Bose, (I. C), withdrawal of ... ... ... ... 199 

(P. N.), elected Member of Physical Science Committee ... 137 
Chhatisgar : notes on its Tribes, Sects and Castes 224 
extracts from the Journal of a trip to the glaciers 

of Pandim, Kabru, &c. ... ... ... 224 

(Rai Nalinaksha) elected an Ordinary Member .. ... 241 

Botanic Garden, Calcutta, notice of ... ... ... 55 

Botany, papers on ... ... ... ... ... 119 

Bower, (Lieut.), on a birch bark manuscript and coins found at 

Kashgaria ... ... ... ••• .•► 221 



Index. 251 

Page 

Brame, (Captain A.), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 241 

BrenthideSy description of ... ... ... ... 204 

Budapest, Inter-Ornitliological Congress in May 1891 ... 243 

Building .. ... ... ... ... 21 

Buldana, find of old coins in ... ... ... ... 161 

Burmese Arithmetic, a peculiar method of, explained and illus- 
trated ... ... ... ... ... 138 

„ Currency, past and present, exhibition of coins of ... ih. 

Butterflies of India ... ... ... ... 30 

,, ,, sub-family Nemeohiince, note on ... ... 138 

,, of Madras, preliminary list of .. ... ... 223 

Bysack, (Gaurdas), elected Member of Council ... ... 124 

,, ,, elected Member of Library Committee ... 136 

,, ,, elected Member of Philological Committee ... ib. 
,. „ elected Member of History and Archgeologi- 

cal Committee ... ... ... 137 

„ „ elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ib. 

Cadastral Surveys ... ... ... ... ... 79 

Choetopoda, papers on ... ... ... ... 117 

Goelentera, papers on ... ... ... ... 119 

Central Asian Coins, Catalogue of ... ... ... 184 

Chakravarti, (Man Mohan), elected an Ordinary Membei ... 175 
„ „ Uriya inscriptions of 15th and 16th 

Centuries ... ... 224 

Chambers, (J. W.), withdrawal of ... ... ... 2 

Chemistry, researches in ... ... ... ... 96 

Chhatisgar, Notes on its Tribes, Sects and Castes ... ... 224 

Chuckerbutty, (A. Goodeve), elected an Ordiuaiy Member ... 124 

Colombo Museum, notice of ... ... ... ... 55 

Committees, election of ... ... ... ... 136 

Coin Cabinet, report on ... ... ... ... 21 

Coins Committee, election of ... ... ... ... 137 

,, exhibited by Philological Secretary ... ... 7 

„ reports on find of old ... ... ... 160,178,190 

,, some new or rare Hindu and Muhammadan ... ... 184 

Congress, Intei'-Ornithological, to be held at Budapest in May 

1891 ... ... ... ... ... 243 

Connan, (W.), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 241 

Copper-plate inscription from Ashrafpur in Dacca ... ... 242 

„ „ inscription from Orissa ... ... ... 243 



252 Index. 

Page 

Cotes, (E. C), elected Member of Natural History Committee ... 137 

Council Proceedings, Abstract of during 1890 ... ... 32 

,, election of ... ... ... ... 124 

Croft (Hon. Sir A. W.), elected Member of Council ... ... ib. 

„ „ elected Member of Finance Committee ... 136 

,, ,, elected Member of Library Committee ... ih. 

Crombie, (Dr. A.), elected Member of Council ... ... 124 

Crustacea, papers on ... ... ... ... 117 

Cunningham, (Dr. D. D.), elected Member of Council ... 124 

,, ,, elected Member of Library Committee 136 
,, „ elected Member of Natural History 

Committee ... ... ... 137 

„ „ elected Member of Physical Science 

Committee ... ... ... ib. 

Curculionides, description of ... ... ... ... 204 

Darjeeling, place and river names in ... ... ... 243 

Das, (Saratchandra), description of the Tibetan Zodiac ... 2 
J, „ notice of papers by ... 67, 68 
^j „ exhibited a drawing of the golden Chaitya 

of Lhasa ... ... ... 125 

J, account of the different hierarchical govern- 

ments in Tibet from 1045 to 1645 A. D. 
jj on a birch bark manuscript found in Kash- 

garia ... ... ... 222 

Day, (Dr. Francis), notice on the death of ... ... 42 

Death of Members ... ... 1, 125, 160, 170, 190, 220 

Desbrochers, des Loges, (M. T.), description de Curculionides et 

de Brentliides ... ... •.. ... ... 204 

Diamond Island plants, list of... ... ... ... 164 

Biaphorina Guttulata ... ... ... ... 165 

Diptera, on a new species of ... ... ... ... 224 

Dipterous insect found in Simla, description of ... ... 138 

Donaldson, (P.), re-elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 189 

Driver (W. H. P.), elected Member of History and Archseological 

Committee ... ... ••• ••• ... 137 

Durbhanga, find of old coins at ... ... ... 190 

Duthie (J. F.), elected Member of Natural History Committee ... 137 

Dutt, (R. C), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 219 

EcUnodermata, papers on ... ... ... ... 118 

Eliot (J.), elected Member of Physical Science Committee ... 137 

ElUpanthus, an additional species of ... ... ... 165 



Index. 253 

Page 

Elson, (S. R.), elected Member of Physical Science Commifctoe ... 137 

Entomology, papers on ... ... ... 110, 115 

Epigraphy, notice of papers on ... ... ... 73 

Ethnology, progress in ... ... ... ... 99 

False Point, description of an old gun at ... ... ... 166 

Finance, notice of ... ... ... ... .. 17 

,, and Visiting Committee, election of ... ... 136 

Pishes, papers on ... ... ... ... ... 108 

Fiihrer, (Dr. A,), elected Member of Philological Committee ... 135 

,, ,, elected Member of Coins Committee ... 137 
,, ,, elected Member of History and Archaeological 

Committee ... ... ... ib. 

Gamble, (J. S.), description of a new genas of Bamboos ... 125 

Garga, (Isvari])rasad), death of ... ... ... 125 

General Secretary, election of ... ... ... .. 124 

Geography and Surveys, progi^ess in ... ... ... 75 

Geographical Exploitation and Surveys ... ... ... 76 

,, work, Trans-Frontier ... ... ... 80 

Geology, papers on ... ... ... ... 87 

Ghosha, (Kaliprasana), withdrawal of ... ... ... 241 

„ (Pratapachandra), elected Member of Council ., 124 
„ „ elected Member of Finance Committee 136 
„ „ elected Member of Library Committee ib. 
„ „ elected Member of Philological Com- 
mittee ... ... ... 137 

„ „ elected Member of History and Archseo- 

logical Committee ... ... ib. 

Ghosal, (Pudmanav), ancient barbaric customs among the Hindus 138 

Giles, (Dr. G. M.), elected Member of Natural History Committee 137 

„ elected Member of Physical Science Committee ib. 

Goethals, (Rev. Dr. Paul), elected an Ordinary Member ... 199 

Grant, (A.), death of ... ... ... ... 176 

Grierson, (G. A.), elected Member of Philological Committee ... 137 
Growse, (F. S.), elected Member of History and Archaeological 

Committee ... ... ... ... ... 137 

Gungeya Deva, presentation of a gold coin of ... ... 138 

Gurdaspur, find of old coins in ... ... ... 179 

Hamilton, (Rev. J. Muir), withdrawal of ... ... ... 147 

Hardoi, find of old coins in ... ... ... ... 179 

Hartert, (Ernest), Note on Poritia Harterti ... ... 204 

Heilgers, (R. P.), elected an Oi'dinary Member ... ... 175 



254 Index. 

Page 

Hickson, (F. G.), elected au Ordinary Member ... ... 147 

Hill, (S. A.), elected Member of Physical Science Committee ... 138 

„ death of ... ... ... ... 220 

History and Archaeological Committee, appointment of ... 137 

Hoernle, (Dr. A. F. R.), elected Philological Secretary ... 124 

„ ,, on a forged silver Ramtinki ... 7 

„ ,, description of an Astrolabe ... 148 

„ ,, on copper coins of the Siiri Dynasty ... 184 
„ ,, on some new or rare Hindu and Muham- 

madan coins .. ... 184 

„ ,, descriptive Catalogue of Central Asian 

coins collected by the Afghan Boundary 

Commission ... ... ... ih. 

Honorary Members, death of ... ... ... ... 441 

Hot Springs, some new and little known in South Behar ... 184 

Hyde, (Rev. H. B.), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 241 

Indian Antiquary, notice of papers in ... ... 58, 69, 75, 100 

Indian Museum .. ... ... 17, 4!^, 68 

Indian Museum Notes, publication of ... ... ... 51 

Integrals, on some Definite ... ... ... ... 165 

Jahan Qadr Muhammad Wahid All Bahadur, (Prince) elected Mem- 
ber of Council ... 124 
„ „ elected Member of Library Committee 136 
Jalandhar, find of old coins in... ... ... ... 181 

Jaunpur, Sharqui Architecture of ... ... ..70 

.lay Maugala Garh, ruins at ... ... ... ... 70 

Jeypur Museum, notice of ... ... ... ... 54 

Jones, (E. J.), notice on the death of ... ... ... 42 

Joule, (Dr. J. Prescott), notice on the death of ... ... 42 

Journal Asiatique, notice of papers in ... ... ... 60 

Journal des Savants, notice of papers in ... ... 60 

Kabir-ud-din Ahmad, (Maulvi), notice on the death of ... 221 

Kabru, extracts from the Journal of a trip to the glaciers of ... 224 

Kashgaria, birch bark manuscript and coins found in ... ... 221 

Khuda Bukhsh, (Maulvi), elected Member of Philological Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... .-. 137 

King, (Dr. G.), Flora of the Malayan Peninsula ... ... 125 

,, ,, elected Member of Natural History Committee ... 137 

„ ,, elected Member of Physical Science Committee ... 138 

,, (Dr. W.), note on the, ' Barisal Guns ' ... ... 10 

„ „ elected Treasurer ... ,., ... 124 



Index. 255 

Page 

Labiatce, some additional species of .. ... ... 2^3 

Lafont, (Rev. Fathei;), elected Member of Physical Science Com- 

f, mittee ... ... ... 138 

„ „ exhibited Edison's new Phonograph ... 190 

Lake, (Phillip), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 147 

Latitude operations ... ... ... ... 78 

La Tonche, (J. J. D.), elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... ... 138 

Lee, (W. A.), on the Barisal Gruns ... ... ... 10 

Lethierry, (M.), description of a new Psyllid ... ... 165 

Library ... 11, 20, 128, 142, 151, 168, 184, 193, 210, 225, 246 

,, Committee, election of ... ... ... 136 

Lightning, photograph of a flash of ... ... ... 176 

Linnean Society, Journal of ... ... ... ... 52 

Little, (C), elected Secretary ... ... ,,, ... J24 

London Agency ... ... ... ... ... 20 

Lucknow Museum, notice of ... ... ... ... 52 

Lyall, (0. J.), elected Member of Philological Committee ... 137 

Macdonald, (A.), withdrawal of ... ... ... 220 

Madras Central Museum, notice of ... ... ... 53 

Madras Journal of Literature and Science, notice of papers 

in the ... ... ... ... 59, 69, 72 

Mainwaring, (Lieut.-General), theory on the origin of the ' Barisal 

Guns' ... ... ... ... ... 209 

Malayan Peninsula, Flora of ... ... ... ... 125 

Maldah, Tughra inscription at ... ... .,, 242 

Mammals, Catalogue of ... ... ... 51, 102 

Mandlik, (Hon. V. N.), notice on the death of ... ... 43 

Manik Tham Monolith in the Puraniya district, note on the ... 243 

Mann, (J. H.), elected Member of Library Committee ... 136 

,, ,, Philological Committee ... ... ... 137 

Marine Survey ... ... ... ... ... 86 

Mantodea, catalogue of ... ... ... ... 49 

Member List, state of ... ... ... ... 16 

Members, death of ... ... 1, 125, 160, 176, 190, 220 

„ election of 1, 124, 135, 147, 175, 189, 199, 219, 241 

„ of Council, election of ... ... ... 124 

„ in arrear of subscription for over 2 years, proceedings 

against ... ... ... ... 221 

„ withdrawal of ... 2, 136, 147, 175, 189, 199, 219, 241 

Meteorology, progress in, ... ... ... ... 90 



256 Index. 

Page 

Microscopical Society ... ... ... ... 47 

Middlemiss, (0. S.), elected Member of Natural History Com- 
mittee ... ... ... 137 

,, „ elected Member of Physical Science Com.- 

mittee ... ... ... 138 

Milldew and Rust in India ... ... ... ... 165 

Mitra, (Raja R.), elected Vice-President, ... ... ... 124 

,, ,, elected Member of Finance Committee ... 136 

,, ,, elected Member of Library Committee ... ib. 

,, ,, elected Member of Philological Committee ... 137 

,, „ elected Member of Coins Committee ... ib. 
„ ,, elected Member of History and Archaaological 

Committee ... ... ... ib. 

„ (Varada Charana), elected an Ordinary Member ... 241 

Moller, (Otto C. R.), notice on the death of ... ... 42 

Mollusca, papers on ... ... ... ... 110 

Monthly General Meetings 1, 124, 135, 147, 159, 175, 189, 199, 219, 241 

Moore, (F.), on some Indian Psyohidce ... ... ... 224 

Moths of India, catalogue of ... ... ... ... 49 

Mukhai'ji, (T. N.), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 189 

Mukherji, (Nilmani), elected Member of Philological Committee 136 
Mukhopadhyay, (Asutosh), elected Member of Library Committee ib. 
„ „ elected Member of Philological Com- 
mittee ... ... ... 137 

,, ,, on some Definite Integrals ... 165 

Mungir, kutila inscription at Mudgal-Asrama ... ... 191 

Murshidabad, find of old coins in ... ... ... 161 

Myriojpoda, papers on ... ... ... ... 116 

Natural History Committee, election of ... ... ... 137 

J, ,, Secretary, appointment of ... ... 200 

Nematodea, -pSiTpers on ... ... ... ... 117 

Nemeobilnce, Pupae of two Indian butterflies of the subfamily of ... 138 

Niceville (L. de), elected Member of Council ... ... ]24 

elected Member of Library Committee ... J 36 

j^ „ elected Member of Natural History Committee 137 
,j ,, on the pupae of two Indian butterflies subfamily 
Nemeohiinre 

Numismatics, notice of papers on ... ... ... 61 

Noetling, (Dr. Fritz), elected Member of Natural History Com- 
mittee ... ... ... 138 

,, „ elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ib. 



Index. 267 

Page 
Nyayaratna, (Mahesacliaiidra), elected Member of Library Com- 
mittee ... ... 136 

„ „ elected Member of Philological 

Committee ... ... ib. 

Obituary ... ... ... ... ... 41 

Oldham, (R. D.), elected Member of Natural History Committee 137 

,, ;, elected Member of Physical Science Committee ib. 

Omatius Lividipes ... ... ... ... 138 

Oriental History, Literature and Linguistic studies, notice of ... 56 

Pala Devas, note on coins of the ... ... ... 205 

Pandim, extracts from the Journal of a tinp to the glaciers of ... 224 

Parry, (J. W.), withdrawal of ... ... ... 176 

Patna, find of old coins in ... ... ... ... 183 

Peal, (S. E.), elected Member of Natural History Committee ... 137 
Pedlei*, (A.), elected Member of Physical Science Committee ... ib. 
Petley, (Captain E. W.), elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

„ „ withdrawal of ... ... ... 159 

Phillott, (Captain D. C), elected Member of Philological Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... ... 136 

Philological Committee, election of ... ... ... ib. 

,, Secretary, election of ... ... ... 124 

„ „ exhibited a foi'ged silver Ramtinki ... 7 

„ „ exhibited two Astrolabes .. ... 148 

„ „ reports on find of old coins ... 160, 178, 190 

,, publications, notice of ... ... ... 61 

Photograph of a flash of lightning ... ... ... 176 

Photographic dry plates showing reversal of the image ... 201 
Photographic Society of India, two rooms rented to the 176, 200 

Physical Science Committee, election of ... ... ... 137 

Pilcher, (Brigade- Surgeon J. G.), elected an Ordinary Member ... 135 

Pope (T. A.), withdrawal of ... ... ... ... 220 

Poritia harterti, note on ... ... ... ... 204 

Prain, (Dr. D.), elected Member of Physical Science Committee 137 

„ ,, non-indigenous species of the Andaman Flora ... 149 

,, ,, list of Diamond Island plants ... ... 164 

,, ,, an additional sjiecies of EUipanthus ... ... 165 

,, ,, some additional species of Labiatae ... ... 243 

President, annual address of ... ... ... ... 39 

,, election of ... ... ... ... 124 

,, announced that two rooms would be let to the Photo- 
graphic Society ... ... 176, 200 



258 Lidex. 

Page 
President, reported the transfer of the Society's investments to 

the 4 per cent, loan ... ... ... 200 

„ remarks on the death of Mr. E. F. T. Atkinson ... 220 

„ exhibited facsimile of a Tugra inscription at Maldah ... 242 

,, exhibited a copper-plate inscription found at Ashrafpur ib. 
^, exhibited facsimile of an inscription from a mosque at 

Suri ... ... ... ... 24.3 

Presentations, announcement of , ], 7, 124, 135, 138, 147, 159, 175, 189, 191 

Protozoa, papers on ... ... ... ... 119 

Psycliidce, on some Indmn ... ... ... .. 224 

PsyJJid, description of a new ... ... ... ... 165 

Publications of the Society ... ... ... ... 45 

Puri, Uriya inscriptions from the temple at ... ... 224 

Rainey, (H. J.), note on the ' Barisal Guns ' ... ... 8 

Rajmahal, find of old coins in ... ... ... 160 

Rampal, ruins at ... ... ... ... ... 70 

Ramtinki, exhibition of a forged ... ... ... 7 

Rays, obsei'vations on the gestation of ... ... ... ib. 

Reptiles, papers on ... ... ... ... 106 

Bevue Linguistique, notice of papers in ... ... ... 60 

Rivett-Carnac, (J. H.) elected Member of Coins Committee ... 137 
„ „ elected Member of History and Archseolo- 

gical Committee ... ... ib. 

Rodgers, (C. J.), elected Member of Coins Committee ... ib. 

Uoift/era, paper on ... ... ... ... 117 

Roy, (Maharaja Girjanath), elected an Ordinary Member ... 135 

Royal Asiatic Society, notice of papers in Journal of ... 59 

Rule 70, alteration of ... ... ... 220, 221 

Rust and Mildew in India ... ... ... ... 165 

Sadler, (Major J. H.), elected Member of Council ... ... 1/4 

,, ,, elected Member of Library Committee ... 136 

„ „ elected Member of Philological Committee 137 

,, „ elected Member of Finance Committee ... 136 

Samuells, (C. A.), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 241 

Sanskrit publications, notices of ... ... ... 63 

Sai'kar, (Dr. Mahendralal), elected Member of Libi'ary Committee 136 
„ ,, elected Member of Physical Science 

Committee ... ... 137 

Sarvadhikari, (Rajkumar), elected Member of Philological Committee 136 

Sastri, (Bapu Deva), death of ... ... ... 190 

Sayid Ahmad, (Sir) elected Member of Philological Committee ... 137 



Index. 259 

Page 

Sclaty, (W. L.), elected Member of Council ... ... 124 

„ „ elected Member of Library Committee ... 136 

,, „ elected Member of Natural History Committee... 137 

„ „ appointed Natural History Secretary ... 200 

Scully, (Dr. J.), elected Member of Council ... ... 124 

„ „ elected Member of Finance Committee ... 136 

„ „ elected Member of Coins Committee ... 137 

„ ,, elected Member of Library Committee ... 136 

„ ,, elected Member of Natural History Committee ... 137 

„ „ elected Member of Physical Science Committee... 138 

Secretaries, election of ... ... ... ,„ 124 

Secretaries office, report on ... ... ... ... 21 

Secretaries, vote of thanks to... ... ... ... 40 

Shahpur, find of old coins in ... ... ... ... 160 

Sharks, observations on the gestation of ... ... ... 7 

Shastri, (^Haraprasad), elected Member of Council ... ... 124 

„ ,, account of a Bengali Brahmana in the 

Singhalese Buddhist Hierarchy of the 

11th Century, A. D. ... ... 125 

,, ,, elected Member of Finance Committee ... ih. 

„ „ elected Member of Philological Committee 137 

,, „ description of an old gun at False Point ... 166 

„ „ exhibited a map of ancient Aryavarta ... 204 
„ „ exhibited a copper-plate inscription from 

Orissa ... ... ... 243 

Shyamaldas, (Kaviraja), elected Member of Histoi-y and Archeeolo- 

gical Committee ... ... ... ... 137 

Sikkim, place and river names in ... ... ... 243 

Simpson, (Dr. W. J.), elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... ... 138 

Singh, (Kumar Sarat Chandra), re-elected an Ordinary Member... 219 

„ (Maharaja Isvariprasad) , notice on the death of ... 43 

„ (Thakur Suraj Bukhsh), elected an Ordinary Member ... 1 

Sivaprasad, Raja, presentation of a forged silver Ramtinki ... 7 

Smith, (V. A.), elected Member of Coins Committee ... 137 

„ „ coins of the Pala Devas ... ... ... 205 

Solar Photography, ... ... ••• ••• 79 

Solf, (Dr. W. H.), elected an Ordinary Member ... ... 147 

Spider, a new trap door, from Orissa ... ... ... 223 

Stockholm, International Congress of Orientalists at ... 56 

Suri Dynasty, on the copper coins of ... ... ... IS'A 



260 Index. 

Page 
Swiulioe, (Colonel C.)j elected Member of Natural History Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... ... 137 

Tawney, (C. H.), elected Member of Council ... ... 124 

,, ,, elected Member of Librai'y Committee ... 136 
,, ,, elected Member of Philological Committee ... 137 
Temple, (Captain R, C), elected Member of Philological Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ib. 

,, ,, elected Member of History and Archse- 

ological Committee ... ... ib. 

„ ,, exhibited Burmese coins and explained 

a peculiar method of Burmese arith- 
metic ... ... ... 138 

Thuillier, (Colonel H.), elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... ... ... tb. 

Thibaut, (Dr. G.), elected Member of Philological Committee ... 137 

Tibet ... ... ... ... ... ... 82 

Tibet, account of the different hierarchical governments in, from 

1045 to 1645 A. D. ... ... ... ... 184 

Tibetan Zodiac, description of ... ... ... 2 

Toker, (Col. A. C), elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... 137 

,, „ withdrawal of ... • ... ... 176 

Topographical Surveys ... ... ... ... 79 

Treasurer, election of ... ... ... ... 124 

Trematoda, papers on ... ... ... ... 117 

Turkestan and Central Asia ... ... ... ... 83 

Twenty-four Pergunnahs, find of old coins in ... ,,, 162 

Uredince, in the neighbourhood of Simla, list of ... ... 125 

Uriya inscriptions of the 15th and 16th Centuries ... ... 224 

Vernacular Literature, notice of ... ... ... 61 

Venis, (A.), elected an Ordinary Member... ... ... 124 

Vice-Presidents, election of ... ... ... ... ib. 

Vienna Oriental Journal, papers in ... .. 70, 75 

Waddell, (Dr. L. A.), some new and little known Hot Springs in 

South Behar ... ... ... 184 

„ „ on a kutila inscription at Mudgal Asrama, 

Mungir ... ... ... 19J 

„ ,, on jjlace and river names in the Dai-jeeling 

district and Sikhim ... ... 243 

,, ,, note on the " Manik-tham " monolith in 

the Pui"aniya district ... ... ib. 



Index. 261 



j^ 



Waldie, (Dr. D.), notice on the death of ... ... ,^^ 42 

Walsh, (Dr. J. H. TuU), elected Member of Natural History Com- 
mittee ... ... 237 

j> »» a new trap-door spider from Orissa ... 223 

Waterhouse, (Colonel J.), elected Vice-President ... ... 124 

>» » elected Member of Finance Committee 17G 

>• » elected Member of Library Committee ib. 
>» » elected Member of Physical Science 

Committee ... ... ... 133 

,. M exhibited photograph of a flash of light- 
ning ... ... ... 176 

}> » exhibited a bottle of Silicate of Soda 

from which the silica had separated ib. 
„ „ exhibited photographic dry plates show- 
ing reversal of the image ... 201 
M » exhibited birch bark manuscript and 

coins found in Kashgaria ... 221 

Withdrawal of Members ... ... 2, 136, 147, 159, 176 

Wright, (Dr. William), death of ... ... ... 41 

Wood-Mason, (J.), elected Vice-President ... ... 124 

„ „ vote of thanks to ... ... ... 40 

„ „ elected Member of Finance Committee ... 136 

„ „ elected Member of Library Committee ... ib. 
„ „ elected Member of History and Archaeological 

Committee ... ... ... 137 

„ „ elected Member of Natural History Committee ib. 
„ „ elected Member of Physical Science Com- 
mittee ... ... ... 138 

„ „ resigned Editorship of the Journal ... 200 
Yule, (Colonel Sir Henry), death of ... ... 1,41,76 

Zoological Garden, Calcutta, notice of ... ... ... 85 

Zoology, papers on ... ... ... ... 102 



LIST OF MEMBERS 

OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL. 

On the 31ST December 1889, 



LIST OF OFFICE-BEARERS AND MEMBERS OF 
COUNCIL FOR THE YEAR 1889. 



President. 
Co] . J. Waterhouse, B. S. 0. 

Vice-Presidents. 

E. T. Atkinson, Esq., C. I. E., B. A., C. S. 
Raja Rajendralala Mitra, C. I. E., LL. D, 
J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Secretaries and Treasurer. 

Dr. A. F. R. Hoernle. 

C. Little, Esq., B. A. 

W. King, Esq., B. A., D. Sc. 

Other Members of Council. 

H. M. Percival, Esq., M. A. 

E. Gay, Esq., M. A. 

H. Beveridge, Esq., C. S. 

A. Fedler, Esq., F. C. S. 

A. Simson, Esq. 

Dr. J. Scully. 

Pandit Haraprasad Sliastri, M. A. 

Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 

Hon. Sir A. W. Croft, K. C. I. E., M. A. 

Prince Jalian Qadr Muhammad Wahid All, Bahadur. 

Babii Gaurdas Bysack. 

Dr. A. Crombie. 

J. Beames, Esq. 



LIST OF ORDINARY MEMBERS. 



R. = Resident. N. R. = Non-Resident. A. = Absent. N. S = Non-Subscribino' 
L. M. = Life Member. P. M. = Foreign Member. 



N. B. — Members who have changed their residence since the list was drawn 
tip are requested to give intimation of such a change to the Secretaries, in order 
that the necessary alteration may be made in the subsequent edition. Errors or 
omissions in the following list should also be communicated to the Secretaries. 

Members who are about to leave India and do not intend to return are parti- 
cularly requested to notify to the Secretaries whether it is their desire to continue 
Members of the Society ; otherwise, in accordance with Rule 40 of the Bye-Laws, 
their names will be removed from the list at the expiration of three years from the 
time of their leaving India. 



Date of Election. 




1860 Dec. 5. 
1885 Mar. 4. 
1888 Feb. 1. 


R. 

R. 

N.R. 


1889 N"ov. 6. 
1860 July 4. 


R. 

N.R. 


1888 April 4. 


R. 


1872 April 3. 
1860 April 4. 
1888 Feb. 1. 


N.R. 
A. 

N.R. 


1884 Mar. 5. 


L.M. 


1874 June 3. 


R. 


1888 Feb. 1. 
1865 Jan. 11. 
1884 Sept. 3. 
1887 June 1. 
1887 May 4. 


R. 
F.M. 
R. 
R. 
R. 


1871 Sept. 6. 


R. 


1869 Feb. 3. 


N.R. 



Abdul-Latif, Nawab Bahadur, c. i. e. Calcutta. 
Abdur Rahman, A. F. M., Barristcr-at-Law. GalcAdta. 
Adamson, Major Charles Henry Ellison, M. s. c, 

Deputy Commissioner. Bangoon. 
Adie, J. R., M. B., Surgeon, Eden Hospital. Calcutta. 
Ahmad Khan, Bahadur, Hon. Sayid, K. c. s. i. 

Aligarh. 
Ahmud, Maiilvi, Khan Bahadur, Arabic Professor, 

Fresidancy College. Calcutta. 
Ashan-ullah, Khjin Bahadur, Nawab. Dacca. 
Aitchison, J. E. T., m. d., c. i. e. Europe. 
Alcock, Alfred William, m. b., Surgeon Naturalist, 

Marine Sui-vey Department. 
A'li, Sir Ali Qadr Syud Hassan, Nawab Bahadur, 

K. c. I. E. MnrsJieclabad. 
Amir Ali, Hon. c. i. e , m. a. Barrister-at-Lavy, 

Judge, High Court. Calcutta. 
Anderson, Henry H. Calcutta. 
Anderson, John, M. D., F. R S., F. l. s. Europe. 
Anderson, J. A. Calcutta. 

Apjohn, J. H , M. T. C. E., P. W. Dept. Calcutta. 
Atkinson, Rev. Augustus W., M. A., Principal, La 

Martiuiere. Calcutta. 
Atkinson, Edwin Felix Thomas, C. i. E., B. A., c. s. 

Acct.-General, Bengal. Calcutta. 
Attar Singh, Bahadur, Sirdar, Sir, K., c. r. e., 
M. u F., Chief of Bhadour. Ludiana. 



Date of Election. 



1889 Aug. 29. N.R Aziz-ud-din Ahmad, Deputy Collector and Magis- 
I trate. Jaunpur. 



1870 Feb. 2. L.M 



1865 Nov. 7. 
1889 May 1. 



1862 Aug. 1. N.R 



N.S. 
R. 



1869 Dec. 1. 

1877 Jan. 17. 

1885 Nov. 4. 

1885 Aug. 5. 
1881 Aug. 3. 

1887 Aug. 3. 

1886 June 2. 
1873 Feb. 5. 

1864 Sept. 7. 

1878 Sept. 25. 
1862 Oct. 8. 

1876 Nov. 15. 

1878 Oct. 4. 

1879 Mar. 5. 
1884 Jan. 2. 

1884 Feb. 6. 

1885 Jan. 7. 

1885 Mar. 4. 

1886 Aug. 4. 
1857 Mar. 4. 
1859 Aug. 3. 
1885 Mar. 4. 
1889 Sept. 26. 

1880 Nov. 3. 



L.M, 
N.R. 

R. 
A. 

A. 

R. 

F.M. 

R. 

R. 

N.R. 
A. 

R. 

R. 
A. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

A. 
N.R. 

N.R, 

L.M. 

L.M. 

R. 

R. 
N.R. 



Baden-Powell, Baden Henry, c. i. e., c. s,, Offg. 
Judge, Chief Court of the Panjab. Laliore. 

Ball, Valentine, M. A., F. u. s., p. G. s. Europe. 

Banerji, Hon. Dr. Gurudas, M. A., D. l., Judge, 
High Court. Calcutta. 

Barclay, Arthur, m. b., Surgeon Major, Sec. to Sur- 
geon General and Sanitary Commissioner with 
the Govt, of India. Simla. 

Barkei', R. A., M. D., Civil Surgeon. Serampore. 

Barman, Kishor Kumar Radha Dev, Juvraj of Hill 
Tipperali. TipperaJi. 

Barman, Damudar Das. Calcutta. 

Barnett, John, Bengal Pilot Service. England. 

Barstow, Henry Clements, C. s., Magistrate and 
Collector. Europe. 

Basu, Harichavan. Calcutta. 

Baumgarten, Casper Wilhelm. Batavia. 

Bayne, R. R., M. R. I., B. A., Chief Engineer's Office, 

E. I. Railway. Calcutta. 

Beames, John, c. s., Member, Board of Revenue. 

Calcutta 
Beighton, T. D., C. s., Judge. Dacca. 
Bernard, Sir Charles Edward, K. c. S. i., C. S. 

Europe. 
Beveridge, Henry, c. s., District and Sessions Judge. 

Alipur. 
Bhakta, Krishna Gopal. Calctitta. 
Biddulph, Col. J., B. S. C. Europe. 
Bidie, G., Surgeon- General C. i. E., F. L. S., M. b., 

Belmont, Ootacamvind. Madras. 
Bigg-Wither, Major A. C, b. a , A. i. c. B. Quetta. 
Bignold, T. E., c. S. Europe. 
Bilgrami, Syud Ali, B. A., A. R. s. M., F. a. s. 

Syderahad. 
Bingham, Major Charles Thomas, B. s. c, Deputy 

Conservator of Forests. Burmali. 
Blanford, H. F., A. R. s. M., F. R. s., F. G. S. 

England. 
Blanford, W. T., A. r. s. m., p. r. s., f. g. s., f. r. g. S., 

F. z. s. London. 

Bolton, C. W., c. s., Secretary, Board of Revenue. 
Calcutta. 

Bose, I. C, B. A., Financial Department, Govern- 
ment of India. Calcutta. 

Bose, Pramatha Nath, b. sc, f. G. S., Geological 
Survey of India. 



Date of Election. 

1876 NW. 15. 
1868 Jan. 15. 
1876 May 4. 

1860 Mar. 7. 

1887 May 4. 
1862 Feb 5. 

18 79 April 2. 

1880 Mar. 3. 

1881 Feb. 2. 

1885 April 1. 
1889 April 3. 
1881 Mar. 2. 
1880 Jan. 7. 

1861 Mar. 1. 

1880 N"ov. 3. 

1886 April 7. 
1885 Feb. 4. 

1889Sept. 26. 

1885 April 1. 

1877 Aug. 30. 

1880 Aug. 26. 

1881 May 4. 

1888 Nov. 1. 

1889 Nov. 6. 

1886 Aug. 26. 

1874 Nov. 4. 
1884 Aug. 6. 

1876 Mar. 1. 

1887 Aug. 25. 

1877 June 6. 



NR. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

L.M. 

R. 
L.M. 

R. 
N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 
R. 
A. 
R. 

NR. 

N.R. 

N.R. 
N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 
R. 

F.M. 
N.R. 

N.R. 

R. 
F.M. 

F.M. 

R. 
N.R. 

R. 

R. 



Bowie, Colonel, M. M. Inspector General of Police 

C P. JVagpiir. 
Boxwell, John, c. s., Commissioner, Patna Division. 

BayiMpuT. 
Bradsliaw, Deputy Surgeon- General A. F., M. D. 

Raioal Pindi. 
Brandis, Sir Dietrich, K. C. I. E., c. I. E., ph. d., f. l. S., 

F. R. s. Europe. 
Bural, Nobinchaud, Solicitor. Calcutta. 
Bjsack, Gaurdas. Calcutta. 

Calcutta, The Rt. Rev. the Lord Bishop of. Calcutta. 

Carlleyle, A. C, Archaeological Survey of India. 
Allahabad . 

Carter, Philip John, Deputy Conservator of Forests. 
Port Blair. 

Chambers, J. W. Narainganj. 

Chandra, Goneschandra, Solicitor. Calcutta. 

Channing, Francis Chorley, c. s. Europe. 

Chaudhuri, Govinda Kumar. Calcutta. 

Chaudhuri, Harachandra, Zemindar. Sherpur 
Mymensingh. 

Chaudhuri, Rai Khirod Chandra. Deputy Inspector 
of Schools, Sonthal Pergunnahs. Dumlca. 

Chaudhuri, Radhaballabha. Sherpur, Mymensingh. 

Chaudhuri, Raja Suryakanta, Bahadur. Mymen- 
singh. 

Chuckerbutty, Raja Ramranjan, Bahadur. Hitam- 
pur, Beerbhoom. 

Clai^k, H. Martyn, m. b. Amritsar. 

Clarke, Lieut.-Ool. Henry Wilberforce, R. E. Cal- 
cutta. 

Clerk, Colonel Malcolm G. Europe. 

Cockburn, John, Asst. Sub-Deputy Opium Agent. 
Karwi, Banda, N.-W. P. 

CoUett, Brigadier General, Heniy, c. b , f. l. s. 
Shillong, Assam.. 

Colville, W. B. Calcutta. 

Condenhove, Count H., Attache Austro-Hungarian 
Legation. Constantinople. 

Constable, Ai-chibald, M. i. c. E. England. 

Cotes, E. C. Indian Museum. Calcutta. 

Crawfurd, James, B, A., c. s., Barrister-at-Law, 
OfBg. District and Sessions Judge. Patyia. 

Griper, William Risdon, F. c. s., F. i. C.,A. R. s. M. 
Kasipur. 

Croft, The Hon. Sir A. W., K. c. I. E , M. A., Direc- 
tor of Public Instruction, Bengal. Calcutta. 



Date of Election. 




1874 Ifor. 4. 


R. 


1888 Dec. 5. 


N.R. 


1873 Aug. 6. 


R. 


1873 Dec. 3. 


N.R. 


1877 June 6. 


N.R. 


1865 June 7. 
1879 April 7. 


N.R. 
N.R. 


1885 May 6. 
1889 May 1. 
1862 May 7. 
]877 July 4. 


N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

R. 


1886 June 2. 

1887 Nov. 2. 
1889 Jan. 2. 


R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 


1879 Feb. 5. 


N.R. 


1877 Aug. 30. 


N.R. 


1870 Mar. 9. 
1863 May 6. 


L.M. 
R. 


1874 Dec. 2. 


A. 


1871 Dec. 2. 


N.R. 


1886 Jan. 6. 


R. 


1876 Jan. 5. 
1879 July 2. 


F.M. 
R. 


1869 Sept. 1. 
1886 April 7. 
1876 July 5. 


N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 


1880 April 7. 


N.R. 


1873 Dec. 3. 


N.R. 



Crombie, Alexander, m. d., Surgeon Major, Presi- 
dency General Hospital. Calctitta. 

Crooke, William, b. a., c. s.. Magistrate and Col- 
lector. Fatigliar. 

Cunningbam, David Douglas, Surgeon-Major. Ho- 
norary Surgeon to the Viceroy. Calcutta. 

Dames, Mansel Longwortb, c. s., Asst. Commis- 
sioner. Dera Ohazi Khan. 

Darbhanga, Sir Luclimessur Sing, Bahadur, 
K. c. I. K., Maharaja of. Darbhanga. 

Das, Raja Jaykrishna, Bahadur, c. s. I. Bijnor. 

Das, Ram Saran, m. a., Secy., Oudh Commercial 
Bank, Limited. Fyzabad, Oudh. 

De, Raja Baikuutanath, Bahadur. Balasore. 

Delawar Hosaen Ahmed, Meerza. Chja. 

Dhanapati Singh Dughar, Rai Bahadur. Azimganj. 

Diler Jang, Nawab S_yad Ashgar Ali, Khan Baha- 
dur, c. s. I. Calcutta. 

Doyle, Patrick, c. E., F. G. S., M. r. a. s. Calcutta. 

Driver, Walter Henry Parker. Ranchi, Lohardugga. 

Dudgeon, Gerald Cecil, Lebong Tea Company. JJar- 
jeeling. 

Duthie, J. P., Director, Government Botanical 
Survey, Northern India. Saharanpur. 

Dutt, Kedarnath, Depy. Collector. Cuttach. 

Edinburgh, H. R. H. The Duke of. Europe. 

Edgar, Sir John Ware k. c. i. e., c. s. i., c. s. Se- 
cretary, Government of Bengal. Calcutta. 

Egerton, The Hon. Sir Robert Eyles, K. c. s. i., 
C. I. E., C. S. Europe. 

Eliot, J., M. a.. Meteorological Reporter to the Govt, 
of India. Simla. 

Elson, Samuel R. Bengal Pilot Service. Calcutta. 

Feistmantel, Ottokar, M. d. Europe. 

Finucane, M. C. s.. Director of Agriculture, Bengal. 

Calcutta. 
Fisher, John Hadden, c. S. Azamghar. 
Fleet, John Faithfull, c. i. E., c. s. Bijapiir, Bombay. 
Foulkes, The Rev. Thos., f. l. s., m. r. a. s., f. r. g. s. 

Salem, Madras Presidency. 

Gajapati, Ananda Ram, k. c. i. e.. Raja of Viziana- 
gram. Vizianagram. 

Gamble, J. S., m. a., Conservator of Forests, North- 
ern Circle. Madras. 



bate of Klection. 

1883 A^g. 1. 
1859 Aug. 3. 
1867 Dec. 4. 

1889 Jan. 2. 

1883 Aug. 30. 
1889 Mar. 6. 
1871 May 3. 
1869 Feb. 3. 

1884 Dec. 3. 

1886Sepfc.30. 



1861 Feb. 5. 



1882 May 3. 
1881 Mar. 2. 
1877 Nov. 7. 
1876 Nov. 15. 
1885 Dec. 2. 



1861 Sept. 4. 
1861 Feb. 6. 

1886 Mar. 3. 

1888 July 4 

3889 May 1. 

1889 June 5. 

1883 Jan. 3. 
1875 Mar. 3. 
1883 May 2. 



1872 Dec. 5. 



1878 Mar. 
1886 June 
1884 Mar. 



1873 Jan. 2. 
1863 Jan. 15. 
1878 Sept. 25. 
1867 Auo-. 7. 



N.R. 

LM. 

R. 

R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
N.R. 

N.R. 



N.S. 

R. 

R. 

L.M. 
N.R. 
N.R. 

A. 
N.R. 

N.R, 

R. 

R. 
F.M. 

N.R. 
N.R, 
N.R. 



R. 

N.R. 
R. 

N.R. 

L.M. 

A. 

A. 
N.R. 



Garga, Kumar Isvariprasad, Zemindar. Maisddal. 

Gasfcrell, General James Eardley. Europe. 

Gay, E. M. A., F. E. A. s., Comptroller-General. 
Calcutta. 

Ghose, Jogendrachandra, M. A., B. L. Calcutta. 

Ghose, Manmolian. Calcutta. 

Ghosha, Biipendra Sri. Calcutta. 

Glioslia, Kaliprasanna. Calcutta. 

Ghosha, Pratapchandra, b. a. Calcutta. 

Giles, George, M. J., M. B., r. R. c. s., Civil Surgeon. 
Soshangabad. 

Gimlette, George Hart Desmond, Surgeon, Bengal 
Medical Service, M. r>., M. CH., M. r. c. s., l. s. a. 
Gooua Political Agency. Central India. 

Godwin- Austen, Lieut.-Colonel H. H., f. r. s., f.z. s., 
F. R. G. s. Europe. 

Golam Sarwar, Maulavi. Calcidta. 

Gosain, Hem Chunder. Calctitta. 

Grant, Alexander, M. i. C. E. Europe. 

Grierson, George Abraham, c. S. Gya. 

Griesbach, 0. L., c. l. B., F. G. s., Deputy Superin- 
tendent, Geological Survey of India. 

Griffin, Sir Lepel Henry, K. c. S. i., c. s. Europe. 

Growse, Frederick Salmon, c. i. e., m. a., c. s., Mag- 
istrate and Collector. Fatehgarh, N.-W. P. 

Gupta, Asutosh, c. s., Assistant Magistrate and 
Collector. Beguserai, Monghyr. 

Gupta, Rajanikanta. Calcutta. 

Hamilton, Rev. J. Muir, b. d. Calcutta. 

Hamilton, Rev. Walter A., Chaplain, Bengal Estab- 
lishment. Europe. 

Harding, Francis Henry, B. A., c. S. GMttagong. 

Hendley, Surgeon Major Thomas Holbein. Jeypore. 

Hill, Samuel, Alexander, b. sc, a. r. s. m., f. c. s., 
Prof, of Physical Science, Muir College and 
Meteor. Reporter to Govt., N.-W. P. and Oudh. 
Allaliahad. 

Hoernle, A. F. R., ph. d., Principal of the Cal- 
cutta Madrasa. Calcutta. 

Hoey, W., c. s. Banda. 

Hogg, Alexander. Calcutta. 

Hooper, John, c. s.. Settlement Officer. Basti, 

N.-W. P. 

Houstoun, G. L., p. g. s. Europe. 

Howell, Mortimer Sloper, c. s. Europe. 

Hughes, G., C. s. Europe. 

Hughes, T. W. H., A. R. s. m., f. g. s., Superinten- 
dent Geol. Survey of India. 



Date of Election. 

1S66 Jan. 17. 
1870 Jan. 5. 
1884- May 2. 



1872 Dec. 4. 

1866 Mar. 7. 
1884 May 2. 

1880 Dec. 1. 
1869 Aug. 4. 
1879 Mar. 5. 

1881 Feb. 2. 
1889 Mar. 6. 

1873 Dec. 3. 

1882 Mar. 1. 

1874 Dec. 2. 
1884 Nov. 5. 

1867 Dec. 4. 

1881 Mar. 2. 
1862 Jan. 15. 
1889 Mar. 6. 
1889 July 3. 

1887 May 4. 

1877 Sep. 27. 

1889 Mar. 6. 

1889 Nov. 6. 
1881 Mav. 2. 

1888 Feb. 1. 



A. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



N.R. 

F.M. 
N.R. 

N.R. 

R. 

A. 
N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

R. 

F.M. 

R. 

R. 
N.R. 
L.M. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

N.R. 



Hughes, Major W. G., M. s. C. Europe. 
Hume, Allan Octaviau, c. b., c. s. Simla. 
Hussein, Syud, b. a.. Secy, to Nizam of Hyderabad's 
Council. Hyderabad. 

Ibbetson, Denzil Charles Jelf, c. s. Deputy Com- 
missioner. Gujravwala, Panjab. 
Irvine, William c. s. Europe. 
Iskander Ali Mirza, Prince. Murshedabad. 

Jackson, William Grierson, c. s. Deputy Commis- 
sioner. Oral, Jalaun. 

Jahan Qadr Muhammad Wahid Ali, Bahadur, Prince. 
Garden Heach, Calcutta. 

Jarrett, Lt.-Col. H. S., B. s. c, Secy, to the Board 
of Examiners. Europe. 

Jenkins, Major Thomas Morris, m. s. c. Deputy 
Commissioner. Tavoy. 

Jobbins, William Henry, Pi-incipal, Government 
School of Art. Calcutta. 

Johore, H. H. the Maharaja of, K. c. S. I. New 
Johore, Singapore. 

Kennedy, Pringle, m. a. Mozuferpur. 

Khuda Baksh, Khan Bahadur, Maulavi. BanJcipur. 

Kitts, Eustace John, c. s. Banda. 

King, Brigade Surgeon G. C. i. E., M. B., F. L. s., 

Supdt., Royal Botanic Garden. Sibpur. 
King, Lucas White, B. A., ll. b., c. s.. Assistant Agent 

to the Governor General, Central India. Europe. 
King, W., B. a., d. sc, Director, Geological Survey 

of India. Calcutta. 
Khunnah, Jaganath. Calcutta. 

Lai, Pandit Brij Bukhan. Public Works Depart- 
ment. Kurnal, Punjab. 

Lanman, Charles R. Corresponding Secretary of 
the American Oriental Society, Professor of San- 
skrit in Harvard College. Cambridge, Mass. U. 
S. America. 

La Touche, James John Digges, B. A., c. s., Menbu, 
Upper Burma. 

La Touche, Thomas Henry Digges, M. A. Deputy 
Superintendent, Geological Survey of India. 

Lee, W. A. Calcutta. 

Lee, J. Bridges, M. A., f. g. s., f. c. s., f. z. s., 
Barrister-at-Law. Lahore. 

Lee, William Herbert, c. s. Ciittack. 



Date of Election. 

1880 jTly 7. 
1889 Feb. 6. 

1886 Sep. 30. 

1869 July 7. 

1870 April 7, 

1884 Dec. 3. 

1868 Dec. 2. 

1886 June 2. 

1879 Feb. 5. 

1848 April 5. 
1873 Dec. 3. 

1880 May 5. 

1881 July 6. 
1886 Jan. 6. 

1882 Aug. 2. 
18y8 July 4. 

1867 April 3. 

1889 Jan. 2. 

1869 Sept. 1. 
1889 Mar. 6. 

1869 July 7. 

1886 Aug. 26. 

1860 Mar. 7. 
1886 Mar. 8. 
1884 Nov. 5. 

■ 1871 Sept. 6. 

1884 Sept. 3. 

1870 July 6. 

1874 May 6. 
1856 Mar. 5. 



A. 

R- 

N.R. 

R. 
L.M. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

L.M. 

R. 

N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

R. 

N.R. 

R. 

R. 
R. 
R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

A. 
L.M. 
N.R. 

A. 

R. 
R. 

N.R. 
R. 



Lewis, Rev. Arthur, b. a., Europe. 

Little, 0., M. A., Bengal Education Department. 

Calcutta. 
Luson, Hewling, c. s.. Assistant Magistrate. Gya. 
Lyall, Charles, James, b. a., g. s. Calcutta. 
Lyman, B. Smith. Philadelphia, Pa., TJ. 8., America. 

McCabe, R. B., c. s.. Deputy Commissioner. Tezpur 

Assam. 
Macauliffe, Michael, b. a., c. s.. Judicial Assistant 

Commissioner. Siallcot. 
Macdonald, A., Editor, " Englishman." Calcutta. 
Macgregor, Lieut.-Col. C. R., f. r. g. s., 44th N. I. 

Manipur. 
Maclagan, General Robert, r. b., f. r. s. e., f. r. g. s. 

Europe. 
MacLeod, Kenneth, M. D. Brigade Sui'geon. Cal' 

cutta. 
MacLeod, Roderick Henry, c. s. Asst. Magte. 

Kasia, Gorakpur, N.-W. P. 
Mahomed Firukh Shah, Prince. Calcutta. 
Mahomed Latif Khan, Sayyid, Khan Baluidur. 

Jhang. Punjab. 
Mahomed Tusoof, Hon. Maulavi. Calcutta. 
Mahomed Zainool Abideen Khan Bahadur Fei-ozo 

Jung, Nawab Syud (Nizamut Family). Murshed- 

abad. 
Mainwaring, Major-Genei-al George Byres, s. c. 

Seramjiur. 
Maliah, Kumar Rameswar. Calcutta. 
Mallik, Yadulal. Calcutta. 
Mann, John, M. A. Bengal Education Department. 

Hughli. 
Markham, Alexander Macaulay, c. s., f. r. g. s., 

Collector. Banda. 
Meade, Capt. Malcolm John, s. c, Political Agent. 

Bliopawar. 
Medlicott, H. B., M. A., f. r. S., f. g. s. England. 
Mehta, Roostumjee Dhunjeebhoy. Calcutta. 
Middlemiss, C. S., A. B., Assistant Superintendent, 

Geological Survey of India. 
Miles, Colonel S. B., bo. s. c, Political Agent. 

Europ)e. 
Miles, William Harry. Calcutta. 
Miller, A. B., B A., Barrister-at-Law, Official Trustee. 

Calcutta. 
Minchin, F. J. V. Asha, Ganjam. 
Mitra, Raja Rajendralala, ll. d., c. i. e, Calcutta. 



i'ate of Election. 

1876 Dec. 6. 
1886 May 5. 

1881 May 4. 
1864 Nov. 2. 
1879 May 7. 
1867 Mar. 6. 

1885 July 1. 

1886 May 5. 

1887 May 4. 

1885 June 3. 

1887 June 1. 
1876 May 4. 

1881 Nov. 2. 
1889 Aug. 29. 
1887 April 6. 

3869 July 7. 

1885 Feb. 4. 

1879 Aug. 28. 
1883 Dec. 1. 
1883 Aug. 30. 
1885 Feb. 4. 
1887 July 6. 

1880 Aug. 4. 



1888 Feb. 1. 

1880 Jan. 7. 

1880 Jan. 7. 

1862 May 7. 



A. 
A. 

A. 

N.R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 



N.R. 

N.R. 
R. 

R. 

LM. 

R. 

N.R. 

R. 

N.R. 
N.R 
N.R. 
N.R. 
R. 

L.M, 



L.M. 
N.R. 
N.R. 

L.M. 



Mockler, Col. E, Eurojpe. 

Molesworth, Capt. E. H. Commandant, Police Levy, 
Dibrugarh. Europe. 

MoUoy, Lient.-Col. Edward. 5tli Goorkhas. Europe. 

Muir, J. W., M. A,, C. s. Azimgarh. 

Mukerjea, Bkudeva, c. i. E. Calcutta. 

Mukerjea, Raja, Tlie Hon. Fearimolian, c. s. I., M. A. 
Uttarpara. 

Mukerjea, Nilmani, Professor, Sanskrit College. 
Calcutta. 

Mukliopadhyaya, Asutosli, M. A., F. R. A. s., F. R. S. E. 
Calcutta. 

Munro, Thomas R., Port Commissioners Depart- 
ment. Calcutta. 

Naemwoollab, Maulavi, Depy. Magte. Buland- 
sha 7ir. 

Narain, Rao Govind Rao. Allahabad. 

Nasb, A. M., m. a., Inspector of European Schools, 
Bengal. Calcutta. 

Niceviile, L. de., F. e. S. Calcutta. 

Nimmo, John Duncan. Calcutta. 

Noetling, Fritz. Ph. D. Palseontologist to the Geo- 
logical Survey of India, Calcutta. 

Nursing Rao, A. V., Rao Bahadur., f. e. a. s. 
Vizagafatam. 

Nyayaratna, Pandit Mahamahopadhyaya Mahes- 
chandra, c. I. E. Calctitta. 

Oldham, Brigade- Surgeon C. F., r. r. g. s. Bhar- 
amsalla. 

Oldham, R. D., A. R. s. m., f. g. s.. Deputy Super- 
intendent, Geological Survey of India. 

Oliver, Edw. Emmerson, M. i. c. E., Under-Secy. to 
Govt. Panjab, P. W. D. Lahore. 

Oliver, James William, Forest Dept. Tharraivaddy, 
Burtnah. 

Oung, Moung Hla, Financial Department, Govern- 
ment of India. Calcutta. 

Pandia, Pandit Mohanlall Vishnulall r. T. s., Mem- 
ber and Secy,, Royal Council of Meywar. TJdai- 
pur. 

Pandit, Hon. Ajodhianath. Allahabad. 

Pargiter, Frederick E., B. A., C. s. Pubna. 

Parry, J. W., c. E. Assoc m, i. c. e., Asst. Engineer. 
Western Bengal Surveys. 

Partridge, Samuel Bowen, m. d., Surgeon-Major. 
Exirope, 



XI 



Date of Election. 

1873 Dec, 6. 
1873 Aug. 6. 

1888 June 6. 
1865 Sept. 6. 
1881 Aug. 25. 

1877 Aug. 1. 

1888 July 4. 

1889 Nov. 6. 

1887 Mar. 2. 

1889 Mar. 6. 

1889 Mar. 6. 
1889 Nov. 6. 

1881 Feb. 2. 



1880 April 7. 

1887 May 4. 

1889 June 5. 

1880 Aug. 4. 

1884 Mar. 5. 
1860 Jan. 3. 

1889 June 5. 

1888 July 4. 
1888 June 6. 

1881 Aug. 30. 
1888 June 6. 

1888 Sep. 27. 

1885 Mar. 4. 

1889 June 5. 

1880 Sep. 30. 
1887 June 1. 

1872 Dec. 4. 

1867 April 3. 



N.R. 
R. 

L.M, 

N.R. 

R. 

N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

R. 

R. 

N.R. 
N.R. 

N.R. 



N.R. 
R. 

R. 
N.R. 

A. 
N.R. 

A. 

N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

R. 

R. 

N.R. 
A. 

R. 

R. 



Peal, S. E. Slhsagar, Assam. 

Pecller, Alexander, p. c. s.. Professor of Chemistry, 
Presidency College. Calcutta. 

Pennell, Aubray Percival, B. A., c. S. Burma. 

Peppe, T. F. Tiril Tea Estate. Ranchi, Lohardugga. 

Percival, Hugh Melvile, M. a., Professor, Presi- 
dency College. Calcutta. 

Peters, C. T., M. B., Surgeon-Major. Bijapur, Bom- 
hay. 

Petley, Lieut.-Eaton W. R. n., f. r. g. s., Port Officer. 
Calcutta. 

Phillott, Capt. D C, Adjutant 3rd Panjab Cavalry. 
Bera Ismail Khan. 

Pope, T. Arcbdale, Assistant Superintendent, Sur- 
vey of India Department. Calcutta, 

Prain, David, M. A., M. B., L. R. c. s., i. r. s. e., i. l. S., 
Roj'al Botanic Garden. ISihpur. 

Prasad, Hanuman, Raes and Zemindar. CJiunar. 

Prasbad, Pandit Jwala, m. a.. Assistant Commis- 
sioner. Bai BareJi. 

Prideaux, Colonel William Francis, b. s. c , Resident. 
Jeypx(,r. 

Rai, BijDina Chandra, B. L. Banagliat, Nuddea. 
Ray, Prasannakumai', D. Sc, (Lond. and Edin.) 

Professor, Presidency College. Calcutta. 
Raye, Surgeon-Major O'Conuell, M. D. Calcutta. 
Reynolds, Herbert William Ward, c. s. Mirzapur. 
Risley, H. H., B. A., C. s. Europe. 
Rivett-Carnac, John Henry, c. r. E., f. s. a., c. s., 

Opium Agent. Gliazipur. 
Rowe, F. J. M. A., Bengal Education Department. 

Ettrope. 
Roy, Kiran Chandra, Zemindar. Narail, Jessore. 
Roy, Kumar Denendro Narayan. Calcutta. 
Roy, Nanda Kumar. Nepal. 
Roy, Peary Mohun. Calcutta. 

Roy, Upeudra Chandra, Zemindar. Narail Jessore. 
Rustomjee, H. M. Calcutta. 

Sadler, Captain J. Hayes, B. s. C, Secretary, Board 
of Examiners. Calcutta. 

Sage, E. M., Ex. Engineer, P. W. D. Tounghu. 

Sandberg, Rev. Graham, B. A., Barrister-at-Law, 
Inner Teniijle. Chaplain. Europe. 

Sarasvati, Pandit, Prannatb, M. A., B. l. Bho- 
ivanipur. 

Sarkar, The Hon. Dr. Maheudralal, C. i. e. Cal- 
cutta. 



Date of Election. 

1885 Mar. 4. 
1885 Feb. 4. 
1888 Feb. 1. 

1884 April 2. 
1874 July 1. 
1888 Sept. 27. 
18S6 Mar. 3. 

1885 April 1. 
1885 April 1. 
1879 Jan. 8. 
1879 May 7. 
1888 April 4. 



1882 May 3. 

1878 April 3. 
1887 April 6. 

1889 Nov. 6. 

1884 Sept. 3. 

1882 Jime 7. 
1878 Oct. 4. 
1882 Aug. 2. 
1880 June 2. 

1889 Aug. 29. 

1889 Nov. 6. 

1859 Aug. 3. 
1872 Aug. 5. 

1885 Nov. 4. 
1874 June 3. 

1872 July 3. 
1876 Aug. 2. 

1880 Nov. 3. 
1884 Mar. 5. 
1864 Aug.ll. 



R. 
R. 
R. 

N.R. 
F.M. 

R. 

R. 
N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

A. 
N.R. 



N.R. 

R. 
R. 

N.R. 

R. 

N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

R. 
N.R. 

F.M. 
N.R. 

N.R. 
N.R. 

A. 

N.R. 

R. 



Sarvadliikari, Rajakumar. Calcutta. 
Sastri, Pandit Harajirasad, M. A. Calcutta. 
Sclater, William Lutley, Deputy Superintendent, 

Indian Museum. Calcutta. 
Scotland, John Parry, c. B., Ex. Engineer. Midnapur, 
Scully, Dr. John. Eurojje. 
Sen Gupta, Kali Prasauna. Calcutta. 
Sen, Hii-alal, Excise Department. 24i-Pargunnahs. 
Sen, Yadunatb. Khurda, Ptiri. 
Sen, Narendranatb. Calcutta. 
Sewell, R., M. c. s. Madras. 
Sheridan, C. J., c. E. Europe. 
Shastri, Haridas Bbattacharya, Sankhya Sbastri, 

M. A. Director of Public Instruction, Jaypur 

State. Jaypur. 
Shyamaldass, Mahamahopadhyaya Kaviraj, Private 

Secy, to H. H. the JMaharaja of Udaipur. Udaipur. 
Simson, A. Calcutta. 
Simpson, Dr. W. J., Health Officer to the Municipal 

Corporation. Calcutta. 
Simpson, Edmund James, L. E. C. P., I. R. P. S. G., 

Civil Surgeon. Sai Bareli. 
Singh, Kumar Indrachandra, of Paikparah. Cal- 
cutta. 
Singh, Maharaja Kumar Harendra Kishore. Bettiah. 
Singh, Raja Lacliman. Bulandslialir, 
Singh, Narain, Raja Ram. Khyrah, Monghyr. 
Singh, Thakur Garuradhawaj-a Prasad, Raja of 

Beswan, Beswan Fort. Aligarh. 
Singh, H. H. Prabhunarain, Bahadur, Maharaja of 

Benares. 
Singh, Hon. Raja Ramesh.wara, Bahadur. Dar- 

bhanga. 
Sifiha, Balaichaud. Calcutta. 
Skrefsrud, Rev. L. O., Indian Home Mission to the 

Santhals. Bampur Hat. 
Smith, N. F. F. England. 
Smith, Vincent Arthui', c. S., Settlement Officer. 

Rai Bareli. 
Stephen, Carr, B. L., District Judge. Amritsar. 
St. John, Lieut -Col. Sir Oliver Beauchamp, E. E., 

K. c. s. I., Resident in Mysore and Chief Commis- 
sioner. Coorg. 
Sturt, Lieut. Robert Ramsay Napier, b. s. c, Panjab 

Frontier Force. Europe. 
Swinhoe, Lieut. -Col. C, b. s. c, Asst. Corny. Genl. 

Poona. 
Swinhoe, W., Attorney-at-Law. Calcutta, 



Date of Elei'tiou. 




1880 Nov. 3. 


A. 


1868 June 3. 


R. 


1865 Sept. 6. 


R. 


1884 May 5. 
1878 June 5. 


F.M. 
N.R. 


1875 June 2. 


N.R. 


1886 Aug. 4. 
1886 Jan. 6. 
1847 June 2. 


R. 

A. 

L.M. 


1889 Mar. 6. 


R. 


1883 June 6. 


N.R. 


1871 April 5. 
1861 June 6. 


F.M. 
L.M. 


1885 May 6. 


R. 


1886 Sep. 80. 


N.R. 


1889]:^'ov. 6. 


N.R. 


1865 May 3. 


R. 


1887 Oct. 6. 


N.R. 


1874 July 1. 


N.R. 


1869 Sept. 1. 
1880 Feb. 4. 


A. 
R 


1870 Jan. 5. 


R. 


1873 Aug. 6. 


N.R. 



Swynnerton, Rev. Charles. England. 

Tagore, The Hon. Maharjija Sir Jotendra Mohun, 

Bahadur, K. C. s. i. Calcutta. 
Tawney, C. H., c. i. E., M. A., Principal, Presidency 

College. Calcutta 
Taylor, W. C, Settlement Officer, Khurda. Eitrope. 
Temple, Capt. R. C, s. c. Falace, Mandalay, 

Burma. 
Thibaut, Dr. G., Professor, Muir Central College. 

Allahabad. 
Thomas, Robert Edmond Skyring. Calcutta. 
Thompson, Colonel, W. B., b. s. c. Europe. 
Thuillier, Major-Genl. Sir Henry Edward Landor, 

R. A., C. S. I., F. R S. Europe. 
Thuiillier, Colonel. H. R., E. B., Surveyor General 

of India. Calcutta. 
Toker, Lieut.-Col. Alliston Champion, c. B., B. s. C, 

Sec, Govt, of India, Mily, Dept. 
Trefftz, Oscar. Europe. 
Tremlett, James Dyer, M. A., c. s.. Judge, Chief 

Court. Lahore. 

Verdeau, Ivan. Calcutta. 

Waddell, Dr. Laurence Austine, M. b.. Superinten- 
dent of Vaccination. Darjeeling. 

Walsh, J. H. Tull, Indian Medical Service. Civil 
Surgeon. Pooree. 

Waterhouse, Col. James, B. s. C, Dy. Supdt., Sur- 
vey of India. Calcutta. 

Watson, Lieut. Edward Yerbury, Deputy Assis- 
tant Commissary General. Burma. 

Watt, Dr. George, c. i. E., Reporter on Economic 
Products. Simla. 

Westland, Hon. James, c. s. Europe. 

Wilson, The Hon. Arthur, Judge, High Court. 
Galc2i,tta. 

Wood-Mason, James. Superintendent, Indian Mu- 
seum. Calcutta. 

Woodthorpe, Col. Robert Gossett, c. B., R. E., De- 
puty Quarter- Master- General. Simla. 



XIV 



SPECIAL HONORARY CENTENARY MEMBERS. 



Date of Election. 

1884 sZi. 15. 
1884 Jan. 15. 
1884 Jan. 15. 
1884 Jan. 15. 

1884 Jan. 15. 



Dr. Ernst Haeckel, Professor in the University of Jena. 
Charles Meldrum, Esq., M. A., F. R. S. Mauritius. 
A. H. Sayce, Esq , Professor of Comp. Philology. Oxford. 
M. Emile Senart, Member of the Institute of France. 

Paris. 
Sir Monier Monier- Williams, Knt K. C. i. E., C. I. E., M, A., 

D. c. L., LL. D., Boden Prof, of Sanskrit. Oxford. 



1848 Feb. 


2. 


1853 April 6. 


1858 July 


6. 


1860 Mar. 


7. 


1860 Nov. 


7. 


i860 Nov. 


7. 


1868 Feb. 


5. 


1868 Feb. 


5. 


1872 May 


1. 


1872 June 


5. 


1875 Nov. 


3. 


1875 Nov. 


3. 


1876 April 5. 


1879 June 


4. 


1879 June 


4. 


1879 June 


4. 


1879 June 


4. 


1879 June 


4. 


1879 June 


4. 


1881 Dec. 


7. 


1881 Dec. 


7. 


1881 Dec. 


7. 


1883 Feb. 


7. 


1883 Feb. 


7 


1883 Feb. 


7 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Sir J. D. Hooker, K. c. s. i., c. b., m. d., d. c. l., f. r. s., 

F. G. s. Kew. 
Major- General H. C Rawlinson, K. c. B., D. c. L., f. r. s. 

London. 
B. H. Hodgson. Europe. 
Professor Max Milller. Oxford. 
Dr. Aloj's Sprenger. Heidelberg. 
Di'. Albrecht Weber. Berlin. 
Major-General Sir A. Cunningham, R. E., K. c. I. E., C. s. I., 

C. I. E. Europe. 
Professor Bapu Deva Sastri. Benares. 
Sir G. B. Airy, E. c. B., M. A., D. C. L., LL. D., P. R. S. London. 
Prof. T. H. Huxley, ll. d., ph. d., f. r. s., f. g. s., p. z. s., 

p. L. S. London. 
Dr. O. Bohtlingk. Leipzig. 
Prof. J. O. Westwood. Oxford. 
Dr. Warner Siemens. Berlin. 
Prof. E. B. Cowell, d. C. l. Camhridge. 
Dr. A. Giinther, v. P. R. s. London. 
Dr. J. Janssen. Paris. 
Prof. H. Milne-Edwards. Paris. 
Prof. P. Regnaud. Lyons. 
E. Renan. Paris. 

Professor Hermann L. E. Helmholtz. Berlin. 
Dr. Rudolph v. Roth. Tubingen. 
Sir William Thompson, Knt., ll. d., p. r. s., f. r. s. e., 

Glasgoio. 
W. T. Blanford, a. r. s. m., f. r. s., f. g. s., p. r. g. s., 

p. z. S. London. 
Alfred Russell Wallace, f. l. s., f. r. g. s. Godahmng. 
Prof. William Dwight Whitney. Newhaven, OomiecticfJ, 

U. S. 



XV 





CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 


Date of Election. 




1844 Oct. 2. 
1856 July 2. 
1856 „ 2. 

1860 Feb. 1. 

1861 July 3. 

1862 Mar. 3. 
1866 May 7. 


Macgowan, Dr. J. Europe. 

Kramer, A. von. Alexandria. 

Porter, Rev. J. Belfast. 

Baker, The Rev. H. E. Malabar. 

Gosche, Dr. R. Berlin. 

Murray, A. Esq. London, 

Schlagiutweit, Prof. E. von. Berlin. 



1874 April 1. 



1875 Dec. 
1875 „ 

1882 June 

1883 Feb. 

1884 Aug. 

1885 Dec. 

1886 Dec. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS. 

Lafont, Rev. Fr. E., s. J., c. I. E. Calcutta. 

Bate, Rev. J. D. Allahabad. 

Mavlavi Abdul Hai, Madrasah. Calcutta. 

Giles, Herbei't, Esq. Europe. 

Rodgers, C. J. Amritsar. 

Moore, F., F. R. s., F. L. s. London. 

Fiihrer, Dr. A. Luchnoiv. 

Babii Saratchandra Das, c. l. E. Darjeeliug. 



LIST OF MEMBERS WHO HAVE BEEN ABSENT FROM 
INDIA THREE TEARS AND UPWARDS.* 

* Bule 40. — After the lapse of 3 years from the date of a member 
leaving India, if no intimation of his wishes shall in the interval have 
been received by the Society, his name shall be removed from the List 
of Members. 



The following members will be removed from the next member list 
of the Society under the operation of the above Rule : 

Dr. J. E. T. Aitchison, c. I. E. 

J. Barnett, Esq. 

H. C. Barstow, Esq , c. S. 

Sir Charles Edward Bernard, K. C. s. I., C. s. 

T. F. Bignold, Esq., c. S. 

Hon. Sir R. E. Egerton, k. C. S. i., C. i. e., C. S. 

Sir Lepel Henry Griffin, k. c. s. I., C. s. 

Major W. G. Hughes, m. s. c. 



LOSS OF MEMBERS DURING 1889. 
By Retirement. 

General G. G. Pearse, R. H. A., C. B. 

W. Fiddian, Esq., c. s. 

H. M. Kish, Esq., c. s. 

Kumar Sarat Cbandra Singh. 

A. P. MacDonell, Esq., c. s. i., c. S. 

Babu Tara Prasada Chatterji. 

R. A. Sterndale, Esq. 

J. Wilson, Esq., c. s. 

R. Whittall, Esq. 

F. R. Mallett, Esq., F. G. s., F. c. S. 

Kumar Nilkrishna Deb, Bahadur. 

Kumar Vinaja Krishna Deb, Bahadur. 

W. Sandford, Esq. 



By Death. 

Ordinary Members. 

Otto Miiller, Esq. 

Maulvi Kabir-ud-din Ahmad. 

Hon. Rao Sahib V. N. Mandlik, c. s. I. 

Maharaja Isvariprasad Singh, c. s. i. Benares. 

Dr. David Waldie. 

Dr. Francis Day. 

E. J. Jones, Esq. 

Special Honorary Centenary Memhers. 

James Prescott Joule, Esq., lld., f. e. s. 

Honorary Members. 

Col. Sir Henry Yule, R. E., K. C. i. E., C B. 
Professor William Wright, ll. d. 



By Removal. 
Under _^liide 40. 

Col. G. E. Fryer, m. s. c. 

Major- Genl. J. Y. Go wan. 

S. Harraden, Esq. 

Lieut. J. W. Jarrad, r. n. 

Col. Sir James Johnstone. 

Major-Genl. C. C. Minchin. 

S. H. Robinson, Esq. 

Dr. W. Schlich. 

H. E. Sir Donald M. Stewart, Bart., G. c. B., C. C. S. I. 

Commander A. D. Taylor. 

Major-Genl. J. F. Tennant, r. e., c. i. e., f. r. s. 

Col. W. S. Trevor, R. e. 



[appendix.] 



ABSTRACT STATEMENT 



OF 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



OF THE 



Asiatic Society of Bengal 



FOR 



THE YEAR 1889. 



zvm 



STATEMENT 
Asiatic Society 



Dr. 



To Establishment. 



Salaries 
Commission 



Bs 



To Contingencies. 



Stationery 
Lighting 

Building, Ordinary 
Taxes ... 
Postage 
Freight 
Meeting 
Miscellaneous 



To Library and Collections. 
Furniture 
Books ... ... ... ... 

Local Periodicals ... 

Binding ... ... 

Coins ... ... ... ... 

Catalogue of Burmese MSS. ... 



To Publications. 



Journal, Part I 
Jt nrnal. Part II 
Proceedings 



To Printing charges of Circulars, Eeceipt forms, &c. . 
To Personal Account (Writes off and Miscellaneous) 

To Extraordinary Expenditure. 
Auditors Fee 
Repairs to House ... 
Barisal Guns 

To Balance 



4,221 7 


3 




421 7 


6 




4,642 14 


9 




113 11 


6 




86 8 







8 8 


6 




897 12 







569 8 







4 3 







82 8 







157 


6 
6 




1,919 11 




7 







660 8 


5 




31 







506 14 







3 6 







67 







1,275 12 


5 




1,092 1 


9 




3,006 12 


11 




877 9 







4,976 7 


8 




126 
) 





12,940 14 4 
306 3 


100 







1,619 4 


4 




60 10 


6 


1,779 14 10 




1,39,211 13 7 


Total , 


,.. 1,54,238 13 9 



Examined and found correct, 

Meugens & King, 

Public Accountants. 

The 30th January, 1890. 



No. 1. 
of Bengal, 



Cr. 



By Balance from last report 



... 1,38,032 4 10 



By Cash Receipts. 
Publications sold for cash 
Interest on Investments ... ..• 

Advances recovered ... 

Miscellaneous 



By Personal Account. 



Admission fees 
Compounding fees 
Subscriptions 
Sales on credit 
Miscellaneous 




6,276 



912 

810 

7,735 

404 2 

69 1 3 

9,930 3 3 



Total Income 



16,206 8 11 



Total 



1.54,238 13 9 



WiLi,. Kino, 

Honorary Secretary and Treasurer. 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, 



XX 

STATEMENT 
Oriental Publication Fund in Account 



Dr. 

To Cash Expenditure. 

Printing charges ... ... •■. Es- 

Editing cliargea ... ... ••• 

Binding 

Salaries ... ••• ••• ••• 

Advertising 

Freight ..• 

Stationery ... ••• ••• ••• 

Postage 

Contingencies ... _ ... 

Commission on collecting bills ... 



To Personal Account (Writes off and Miscellaneous) 

Total Expenditure 
To Balance 



9,260 9 











4,435 6 











12 











1,436 











130 











15 15 











29 2 











600 1 


3 








13 6 


6 








61 10 


4 








15,982 14 


1 




) 9 7 















15,992 


6 


1 




- 


3,695 


7 


6 


Total Rs. 


19,687 


12 


7 



Examined and found correct. 
Meugens & King, 

Vublio Accountants. 

The ^Oth January, 1890. 

STATEMENT 
Sanshrit Manuscript Fund in Account 



Dr. 

To Cash Expenditure. 



Salaries 

Travelling expenses 
Commission 
Printing charges ... 
Postage 
Contingencies 
Stationery 
Purchase of MSS.... 



Es. 


1,300 5 

175 4 

8 

683 12 

1 

19 5 

10 1 

1,175 4 


9 









3,372 
3,300 


9 
3 


o Balance ... 


Total Rs. 


- 




6,672 


1 



Examined and found correct. 

Mbugens & King, 

Vuhlic Accountants. 

The ZOth January, 1890. 



No. 2. 

with the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 



Cr. 

Balance from last report ... ,., ... jja^ 7 713 11 4 

By Cash Receipts. 

Government allowance ... ... Eg. 9,000 

Publications sold for cash ... ... ,., 612 14 

Advances recovered ... ... ... 98 15 6 



9,711 13 6 



By Personal Account. 
Sales on credit ... ... ... ... 2,244 7 9 

Miscellaneoua ... ... ... ... 17 12 



2,262 3 9 
Total Income ~ 11,974 1 3 



Total Rs. ... 19,687 12 7 



Will, King, 
Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

No. 3. 

with the Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

Cr. 

Balance from last report ... ... ... Rs. 3,442 1 

By Cash Receipts. 
Government allowance ... ... Rs. 3,200 

Publications sold for cash ... ... ... 400 



3,204 



By Personal Account. 
Pablications sold on credit ... ... ... 26 

Total Income 3,230 



Total Rs. ... 6,672 1 



Will. King, 
Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, 



STATEMENT 
Personal 



Dr. 

To Balance from last report ... ... ... Rs. 3,390 12 2 

To Cash Expenditure. 
Advances for purchase of Sanskrit MSS., postage of books to members 2,819 15 8 

To Asiatic Society ... ... ... 9,930 3 3 

To Oriental Publication Fund ... ... 2,262 3 9 

To Sanskrit MSS. Fund ... ... ... 26 



12,218 7 



Total Rs. ... 18,429 2 10 



Examined and found correct. 
Meugens & King, 

Fuhlic Accountants. 

The mth January, \mO. 



No. 4. 
Account. 



Cr. 



By Cash receipts ... 

By Asiatic Society 

By Oriental Publication Fund 



Ks. 



13,426 4 2 

306 3 

9 7 



By Balances. 


Due to the 
Society. 


Due by the 
Society. 


Members ... 

Subscribers 
Employea 
Agents 
Miscellaneous 


5,091 

71 

30 

269 

126 


9 
2 

2 

7 


8 


6 
4 


390 

59 

250 

200 


13 

9 


10 


4 
6 







5,588 


5 


6 


901 





10 



13,74,1 14 2 



4,687 4 8 



Total Rs. 



18,429 2 10 



Will. King, 
Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 



STATEMENT 
Invest 



To Balance from last report . . . 



Dr. 

Nominal. Actual. 

Rs. 1,46,300 1,45,923 2 2 

Total Rs. ... 1,46,300 1,45,923 2 2 



Examined and found correct. 
Meugens & King, 

PiMic Accountants. 

ZOth January, 1890. 





Actual, 








Funds.* 


Permanent. 


Temporary, 


Total. 


Asiatic Society 
0. P Fund ... 
Sanskrit MSS.... 
Trust Fund ... 


134,700 
1^200 




"6 




"6 


700 
2,415 
2,000 




1 




7 



136,400 
2,415 
2,000 
1,200 




1 






7 






1,35,900 








5,115 


1 


7 


1,41,015 


1 


7 



STATEMENT 
Trust 



Dr. 



To Balance (Servants Pension Fund) 



Rs. 1,207 3 10 



Total Rs. ... 1,207 3 10 



Examined and found correct. 
MsuGENS & King, 

Tuhlic Accountants. 

ZOth January, 1890. 



No. 5. 
ments. 



XXV 



By Cash 
By Balance* 



Cr. 



Total Rs. 



Nominal. Actual. 

Rs. 5,000 4,908 7 

... 1,41,300 1,41,015 1 7 

... 1,46,300 1,45,923 2 2 



No. 6. 
Fund. 



Will. King, 

Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 



Cr. 



By Balance from last report 
By Interest on Investments 



Total Rs. 



Rs. 1,161 8 10 

46 

1,207 3 10 



Will. King, 
Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 



STATEMENT 
Cash 



To Balance from last report 



To Asiatic Society 

To 0. P. Fund 

To Sanskrit Manuscript Fund 

To Personal Account ... 

To Investments 

To Trust Fund 



Dr. 



Eeceipts. 



Total Rs. 



Examined and found correct, 
Meugen & King, 

Public Accountants. 

30th January 1890. 



1,035 6 8 



6,322 5 8 

9,711 13 6 

3,204 

13,426 4 2 

4,908 7 

46 

38,653 14 7 



STATEMENT 
Balance 



Dr. 



To Casli ... 

To Investment 

To Personal Account 



1,712 2 11 

1,41,015 1 7 

4,687 4 8 



Total Rs. 



1,47,414 9 2 



Examined and found correct 
Meugen & King, 

Tulilic Accountants. 

30th January 1890. 



No. 7. 
Account. 



Cr. 



Expenditure. 



By Asiatic Society 

By 0. P. Fund 

By Sanskrit Manuscript Fund 

By Personal Account 

By Balance 



14,766 13 2 

15,982 14 1 

3,372 9 

2,819 15 8 

1,712 2 11 



Total Rs. 



38,653 14 7 



Will. King, 
Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 



No. 8. 
Sheet. 



Cr. 



By Asiatic Society 

By 0. P. Fund 

By Sanskrit Manuscript Fund 

By Trust Fund 



1,39,211 


13 7 


3,695 


7 G 


3,300 


3 


1,207 


3 10 



Total Es. 



1,47,414 9 2 



Will. King, 

Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 



«^/, .;, ■ r; 



Wf^'- 



l/r^ PROCEEDINGS 

I OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL. 

EDITEP BY 

JhE jiONORARY JSeCRETARI ES. 




No. I. JANUARY, 1890. 




" 1 he bounds of its investigation will be the geographical limits of Asia : and 
within these limits its inquiries will be extended to whatever is performed by 
man or produced by natui-e." — Sir William Jones. 

Annual Subscription, 3 rupees. 

Price per Number, 6 annas.' 

Postage in India (Additional),,., 1 anna. 

Price in England, 6i. 

1^° The publications of the Society consist — of the Proceedings, one num- 
ber of which is issued, as soon as possible, after every monthly meeting, and of 
the Journal, the annual volume of which is divided into two Parts : Part I beinc 
devoted to History, Philology, &c., Part II to Natural Science ; each part is 
separately paged and provided with a special index, and one number of each 
part is published quarterly. Single numbers for sale at the rates given on the 
last page of cover, 

*#* It is requested that communications for the Journal or Proceedings may be 
sent under cover to the Honorary Secretaries, Asiatic Soc, to whom all orders for 
these works are to he addressed in India ; or, in London, to the Society's Agents 
Messrs. Triihner and Co., 57 Sf 59, Ludgate Hill. 

N. B. — In order to ensure papers being read at any monthly Meeting of the 
Society, they should be in the hands of the Secretaries at least a week before 
the Meeting. 




CALCUTTA : 

PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 

AND PUBLISHED BY THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY, 57, PARK STREET, 

1890, 

Issued, May 1st, 1890. 



^l 



CONTENTS. 



Monthly General Meeting 

Presentations 

Election of Members 

Death of Members ... 

Withdrawal of Members 

Babu Saratohandra Das. Explanation on the Tibetan Zodiac (with a plate) ... 

Dr. Hoernle, On a forged silver Ramtinki 

Papers — 

1. Natural History Notes from H. M.'s Indian Marine Survey Steamer 
" Investigator," Commander Alfred Carpenter, R. N., D. S. 0. Commanding, 
No. 14. Ohservations on the gestation of some Sharks and Bays. — By A. 
Alcock, M. B., Surgeon Naturalist to the Marine Survey (Title only) 

2. Notes on the Barisdl Chins, the existence of volcanic ve7its in the diVec- 
tion of those sounds.— By B.. J xm'es'Rainry 

Library,... ... ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• 



JPage 
1 

ih. 

ib. 
ib. 

2 
ib. 

7 



11 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR SALE 

AT THE LIBRARY OF THE 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, 
wo. 57, park street, calcutta. 

AND OBTAINABLE FROM 

THE SOCIETY'S LONDON AGENTS, MESSRS. TRUBNER & CO. 

67 AND 59, LUDGATE HiLL, LONDON, E. C. 



BIBLIOTHECA INDICA. 
Sanskrit Series. 

Advaita Brahma Siddhi, Pasc. I— III @ /6/ each 

Agni Purana (Sans.) Fasc. II— XIV @ /6/ each 

Ann Bhashyam, Fasc. I 

Aitareya Aranyaka of the Rig Veda, (Sans.) Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each 

Aphorisms of Sandilya, (English) Pasc. I 

Aphorisms of the Vedanta, (Sans.) Fasc. VII — XIII @/6/.each 

Ashtasahasrika Prajnaparamita, Pasc. I — VI @ /6/ each ... 

Asvavaidyka, Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 

Avadana Kalpalata by Kshemendra, (Sans. & Tibetan) Vol. I, Fasc 

Bhamati, (Sans.) Fasc. I— VIII @ /6/ each 

Brahma Sutra, (English) Fasc. I 

Brihaddharma Pnranam, Fasc. I — II @ /6/ each 

Brihat Aranyaka Upanishad, (Sans.) Fasc. VI, VII & IX @ /6/ each 

Ditto' (English) Fasc. II— III @ /6/ each 

Brihat Samhita, (Sans.) Pasc. II— III, V— VII @ /6/ each... 
Chaitanya-Chandrodaya Nataka, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @ /6/ each 
(Continued on third page of cover.) 



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Chaturvarga Cliintaniani, (Sans.) Vols. I, Faac. 1 — 11 ; II, 1—25 ; III, 
Part I, Fasc. 1—18 ; Part II, Fasc. 1—4 @ /6/ each Fasc. Rs 

Chhandogya Upanishad, (EngHsli) Faso. II 
Dasa Rupa, Fasc. II and III @ /6/ ... 

Gobhiliya Grihya Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. I— XII (® /6/ each ... ".'. 

Hindu Astronomy, (English) Fasc. I— III @ /6/ each 
Kalamadhaba, Fasc. I-IV @ /6/ ... ... 

Katantra, (Sans.) Fasc. I — VI @ /12/ each ... .*.' ,[, 

Katha Sarit Sagara, (English) Fasc. I— XIV @ 712/ each ..." 
Kaushitaki Brahman Upanishad, Fasc. II ... ... " 

Kurma Pm-ana, Fasc. I — VIII @ /6/ each ... .,[ 

Lalita Vistara, Sans. Fasc. II— VI @ /6/ ... '."" "* 

Lalita Vistara, (English) Fasc. I — III @ /12/ each 

Madana Parijata, Fasc. I-^VI (a) /6/ each ... ... ."* 

Manntika Sangraha, Fasc. I — III @ /6/ each ... 

Markandeya Pnrana, (English) Faso. I — IT @ /12/ each ... .,, 

Markandeya Purana, (Sans.) Fasc. IV — VII @ /Q/ each 

Mimamsa Darsana, (Sans.) Fasc. II — XIX @/6/each 

Narada Pancharatna, Fasc. IV 

Narada Smriti, Fasc. I— III @/6/ ... ... [',', ''', 

Nayavartikum, Fasc. I ... 

Nirukta, (Sans.) Vol. I, Faso. 4 — 6; Vol. II, Fasc. 1 to 6 ; Vol. Ill 
Fasc. 1—6 ; Vol. IV, Fasc. 1—7 @ /6/ each Fasc. ... 

Nitisara, or, The Elements of Polif j, by Kamandaki, (Sans.), Fasc. II — V 

@ /6/ each ... 
Nyaya Darsana, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill 

Nyaya Knsnmanjali Prakaranam, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. I — III @ /Q/ each 
Parisishtaparvana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Pingala Chhanda Siitra, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @ /6/ each ... 
Prithii-aj Rasaii, (Sans.) Part I, Fasc. I; Part 11, Fasc. I — V@/6/each 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I ... 

Prakrita Lakshanam, (Sans.) Fasc. I 

Parasara Smriti (Sans.) Vol I, Fasc. 1 — 8, Vol, II, Fasc. 1 — 2 @/6/each 
Parasara, Institutes of, (English) ... ... "' 

Srauta Sutra of Apastamba, (Sans.) Fasc. I— -XII @ /6/ each 
Ditto Asvalayana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XI @ /6/ each 

Ditto Latyayana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IX @ /6/ each 

Ditto Sankhyayana, Vol. I, Fasc, 1 — 7. Vol. II, Fasc. 1—7, 

(Sans.) @ /6/ each 
Sama Veda Samhita, (Sans.) Vols. I, Fasc. 3 — 10 ; II, 1 — 6 j III, 1 — 7 • 

IV, 1—6 ; V, 1—8, @ /6/ each Fasc. 
Sahitya Darpana (English) Fasc. I — IV (%/6/each 
Sankhya Sutra vritti (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Saiikara Vijaya, (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each 
Sankhya Aphorisms of Kapila, (English) Fasc. I and II @ /&/ each ... 
Sankhya Pravachana Bhashya, Fasc. Ill (English preface only) 
Sarva Darsana Sangraha, (Sana.) Fasc. II 
S'ri Bhashyam, Fasc. I ... 

Busruta Samhita, (Eng.) Fasc. I and II @ /12/ each 
Taittiriya Ai'anya, Fasc. I — XI @ /lO/ each 

Ditto Brahmana (Sans.) Fasc. I — XXIV @ /6/each ... 
Ditto Samhita,' (Sans.) Fasc. IX— XXXIV @ /6/each... 
Ditto Pratisakhya, (Sans.) Fasc. I — III @ /6/each 
Ditto and Aitareya Upanishad (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /&/ each 
Tandya Brahmana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XIX @ /6/each 
Tatta Chintamani, Vol. I, Fasc. 1 — 9, Vol. II Fasc. 1— 3(Sans.) @/6/each 
Tul'si Sat'sai, Faso. I 

Uttara Naishadha, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill — XII @ /6/each 
Uvasagadasao, Fasc. I — ^V@/12/each 
Varaha Purana, Fasc. I— XIII @ /6/ each 
Vayu Purana, (Sans.) Vol. I, Faso. I— VI ; Vol. II, Fasc. I— VII, 

@ /6/ each Fasc. 
Vishnu Smriti, (Sans.) Fasc. I— II @ /6/ each 
Vivadaratnakara, Fasc. I— VII @ /6/ each .,. 
Vrihannaradiya Purana, Fasc. I — V @ 16/ each 

Yoga Sutra of Patanjali, (Sans. & English) Fasc. I— V @ /14/ each ... 

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Arabic and Persian Series. 
'A'lamgirnamah, with Index, (Text) Pasc. I — XIII @ /6/ eacla Bs. 

Am-i-Akbari, (Text) Fasc. I— XXII @ 1/ each 

Ditto (English) Vol.1 (Fasc. I— VII) ... 
Akbarnamali, with Index, (Text) Fasc. I — XXXIX @ 1/ each 
Badshahnamah with Index, (Text) Fasc. I — XIX @ /6/ each 
Beale's Oriental Biographical Dictionary, pp. 291, 4to., thick paper, 

@ 4/12 ; thin paper ... 
Dictionary of Arabic Technical Terms and Appendix, Fasc. I — XXI @ 

1/ each 
Farhang-i-Eashidi (Text), Fasc. I— XIV @ 1/each 
i'lhrist-i Tusi, or, Tusy's list of Shy'ah Books, (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ 

/12/each ... 
Futuh-ul-Sham Waqidi, (Text) Fase. I— IX @ /&/ each ... 

Ditto Azadi, (Text) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 

Haft Asm&n, History of the Persian Mansawi (Text) Fasc. I 
History of the Caliphs, (English) Fasc. I — VI @/12/ each... 
Iqbalnamah-i-Jahangiri, (Text) Fasc. I — III @ /6/ each ... 
Isabah, with Supplement, (Text) 51 Fasc. @ /12/ each 
Maasir-ul-Umara, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II, Fasc. 1—8 @ j&l each ... 
Mag-h&zi of Waqidi, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 
Muntakhab-ul-Tawarikh, (Text) Fasc. I— XV @ /6/ each ... 
Muntakhab-ul-Tawarikh (English) Vol. II, Fasc. 1—5 @ /12/each ... 
Muntakhab-ul-Lubab, (Text) Fasc. I— XIX @ /6/ each 
Mn'asir-i-'Alamgiri (Text), Fasc. I — VI @ /6/ each 
Nokhbat-nl-Fikr, (Text) Fasc. I ^ ••• 

Nizami's Khiradnamah-i-Iskandari (Text) Fasc. I and II @ /12/each... 
Snyiity's Itqan, on the Exegetic S'ciences of the Koran, with Supplement, 

(Text) Fasc. II— IV, VII— X @ 1/ each 
Tabaqat-i-Nasiri, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I— XIV @ /12/ each 

Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi, of Zia-al-din Barni (Text) Fasc. I— VII @ 

/6/each 
Tarikh-i-Baihaqi, (Text) Fasc. I— IX @ /6/ each 

Tari^-i-Firozshahi, of Shams-i-Siraj Afif (Text) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Wis o Eamin, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each ... 

Zafarnamah, Vol. I, Fasc. I— IX, Vol. II, Fasc. I— VIII @ /6/ each ... 
Tnzuk-i-Zehangiri (English) Fasc. I @ 1/ 

ASIATIC SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

1. Asiatic Researches. Vols. VII, IX to XI ; Vols. XIII and XVII, and 

Vols. XIX and XX @/10/each... 
Ditto Index to Vols. I— XVIII 

2. Proceedings of the Asiatic Society from. 1865 to 1869 (incl.) @ /4/ per 

No. ; and from 1870 to date @ /6/ per No. 

3. Journal of the Asiatic Society for 1843 (12), 1844 (12), 1845 (12), 

1846 (5), 1847 (12), 1848 (12), 1850 (7), 1851 (7), 1857 (6), 1858 
(5), 1861 (4), 1864 (5), 1865 (8), 1866 (7), 1867 (6), 1868 (6), 1869 
(8), 1870 (8), 1871 (7), 1872 (8), 1873 (8), 1874 (8), 1875 (7), 1876 (7), 
1877 (8), 1878 (8), 1879 (7), 1880 (8), 1881 (7), 1882 (6), 1883 (5), 1884 
(6), 1885 (6) 1886 (8) 1887 (7) @ 1/ per No. to Subscribers and @ 1/8 
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2^. B. The figures enclosed in brackets give the number of Nos. in each 
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4. Centenary Review of the Researches of the Society from 1784 — 1883 

General Cunningham's Archaeological Survey Report for 1863-64 (Extra 
No., J. A. S. B., 1864)... 

Theobald's Catalogue of Reptiles in the Museum of the Asiatic Society 
(Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1868) 

Catalogue of Mammals and Birds of Burmah, by E. Blyth (Extra No., 
J. A. S. B., 1875) 

Sketch of the Turki Language as spoken in Eastern Turkestan, Part II, 
Vocabulary, by R. B. Shaw (Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1878) 

Introduction to the Maithili Language of North Bihar, by G-. A. Grierson, 
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6. Anis-nl-Musharrihi ..." 

6. Catalogue of Fossil Vertebrata 

7. Catalogue of the Library of the Asiatic Society, Bengal ... 



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PROGEEDNGS 

OP THE 




ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

EDITED BY 

The Honorary Secretaries. 
No. II. FEBRUAHY, 1890. 




" Ihe bounds of its investigation will be the geographical limits of Asia : and 
within these limits its inquiries will be extended to whatever is performed by 
man or produced by nature." — Sir William Jones. 

Annual Subscription, 3 rupeea. 

Price per Number, 6 annas. 

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Price in England, 6d. 

^^ The publications of the Society consist — of the Proceedings, one num- 
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the Journal, the annual volume of which is divided into two Parts : Part I being 
devoted to History, Philology, &c.. Part II to Natural Science ; each part is 
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*^* It is requested that communications for the Journal or Proceedings may be 
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these works are to he addressed in India ; or, in London, to the Society's Agents, 
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N. B.— In order to ensure papers being read at any monthly Meeting of the 
Society, they should be in the hands of the Secretaries at least a week before 
the Meeting. 



CALCUTTA: 

PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 

AND PUBLISHED BY THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY, 57, PARK STREET. 

1890. 





Issued, 24th June, 1890. 



CONTENTS. 



Annual Meeting 

Annual Report for 1889 

Abstract of Proceedings of Council during 1889 

President's Address ... 

Election of Office Bearers and Members of Council 

Monthly General Meeting 

Election of Members 

Death of Members ... 

Papers — 

1. A descriptive list of the Uredinece occuring in the neighbotirhood of Simla, 
Fart III. — By A. Barclay, M. B., Bengal Medical Service. (Title only) 

2. Materials for a Flora of the Malayan Peninsula, Part II. — By George 
King, C. I. E., M. B., LL. D., F. R. S., P. L. S., Superintendent, Royal Botanic 
Garden, Calcutta. (Title only) ... 

3. Description of a new Genus of Bamboos.— By J. S. Gamble, Esq., M. A. 
(Title only) ... ... •• ••• *•••... — 

4. The account of a Bengali Brdhmana who obtained a high position in the 
Singhalese Buddhist Hierarchy in the llth Century A. D. — By Pandit Hara- 

PRASAD ShASTRI, M. A. 

Library,... 



Page 
15 
ib. 
32 
39 
124 
ib. 
ib. 
125 



ib. 



ib. 
ib. 



ib. 
128 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR SALE 

AT THE LIBRARY OF THE 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, 
No. 57, PARK STREET, CALCUTTA. 

AND OBTAINABLE FROM 

THE SOCIETY'S LONDON AGENTS, MESSRS. TRUBNER & CO. 

57 AND 59, LUDGATE HiLL, LONDON, E. C. 



BIBLIOTHECA INDICA. 
Sanskrit Series. 

Advaita Brahma Siddhi, Pasc. I — III @ /6/ each ... Rs. 

Agni Purana (Sans.) Pasc. II — XIV @/6/ each 

Anu Bhashyam, Pasc. I 

Aitareya Aranyaka of the Rig Veda, (Sans.) Pasc. I — V @ /6/ each 

Aphorisms of Sandilya, (English) Pasc. I 

Aphorisms of the Vedanta, (Sans.) Pasc. VII — XIII @ /6/ each 

Ashtasahasrika Prajnaparamita, Pasc. I — VI @ /6/ each ... 

Asvavaidyka, Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each 

Avadana Kalpalata by Kshemendra, (Sans. & Tibetan) Vol. I, Fasc. I' 

Bhamati, (Sans.) Fasc. I — VIII @/6/ each 

Brahma Sutra, (English) Fasc. I ... 

Brihaddharma Pnranam, Fasc. I — II @ /6/ each 

Brihat Aranyaka Upanishad, (Sans.) Pasc. VI, VII & IX @ /6/ each 

Ditto' (English) Pasc. II— III @ /6/ each ... - 

Brihat Samhita, (Sans.) Pasc. II— III, V— VII @/6/ each... 
Chaitanya-Chandrodaya Nataka, (Sans.) Pasc. II — III @ /6/ each 
(Continued on third page of cover.) 



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Chaturvarga Cliiiitamani, (Sans.) Vd. I, Fasc. 1—11 ; II, 1—25 ; III, 

Part I, Fasc. 1—18 ; Part II, Fas(h— 4 @ /6/ each Fasc. Rs. 

Chhandogya Upanishad, (English) Fie. II 
Dasa Rnpa, Fasc. II and III @ /6/ A 

GobhiKya Grihya Sutra, (Sans.) Fasti— XII @ /6/ each ... 
Hindu Astronomy, (English) Fasc. l4ll (S /6/ each 
Kalamadhaba, Fasc. I-IV @ /6/ ...\ ... 

Katantra, (Sans.) Fasc. I — VI@/12/Uh ... ... ... 

Katha Sarit Sagara, (English) Fasc. I-^IV @ /12/ each ... 

Kiushitaki Brahman Upanishad, Fasclfl 

Kn^-ma Purana, Fasc. I— VIII @ /6/ eak ... ... ..] 

I^lita Vistara, Sans. Fasc. II — VI @ /9 
Lalita Vistara, (English) Fasc. I — III (Wl2/ each 
Madana Parijata, Fasc. I — VI @ /6/ eaq 
Manntika Saugraha, Fasc. I — III @ /GAach ... 
Markandeya Pnrana, (English) Fasc. I— ll @ /12/ each 
Markandeya Purana, (Sans.) Fasc. IV — III @ /6/ each 
Mimamsa Darsana, (Sans.) Fasc. II — Xli @ /6/ each 
Narada Pancharatna, Fasc. TV ... 1 

Narada Smriti, Fasc. I— III @/6/ ... 
Nayavartikum, Fasc. I ... .. 1 .. 

Nirukta, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. 4—6 ; Vo« II, Fasc. 1 to 6 ; Vol. Ill, 

Fasc. 1—6 ; Vol. IV, Fasc. 1—7 @ /d each Fasc. 
Nitisara, or. The Elements of Polii y, by Kaliandaki, (Sans.), Fasc. II — V 

@/6/each... ... ... T 

Nyaya Darsana, (San.) Fasc. Ill ... \ 

Nyaya Kusumanjali Prakaranam, (Sans.) Tol. I, Fasc. I — III @ /&/ each 

Parisishtaparvana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 

Pingala Chhanda Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @ /6/ each ... 

Prithiraj Kasau, (Sans.) Part I, Fasc. I ; Part II Fasc. I — V @/6/each 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I ... 

Prakrita Lakshanam, (Sans.) Fasc. I 

ParasaraSmriti (Sans.) Vol I, Fasc. 1—8, Vol. II, -Base. 1—2 @/6/each 
Parasara, Institutes of, (English) ... 

Srauta Sutra of .Vpastamba, (Sans.) Fasc. I— -XII @/6/ each 
Ditto Asvalayana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XI @/5/ each 

Ditto Latyayana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IX@/6/each 

Ditto Sankhyayana, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—7. Vol II, Fasc. 1—7, 

(Sans.) @/6/each 
Sama Veda Samhita, (Sans.) Vols. I, Fasc. 3—10 ; II, 1—6 ; III, 1—7 ; 

IV, 1—6 ; V, 1—8, @ /6/ each Fasc. 
Sahitya Darpana (English) Fasc. I — IV @./6/each 
Sankhya Sutra vritti (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Sankara Vijaya, (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each 
Sankhya Aphorisms of Kapila, (English) Fasc. I and II @ /6/ each ... 
Sankhya Pravachana Bhashya, Fasc. Ill (English preface only) 
Sarva Darsana Sangraha, (Sans.) Fasc. II 
S'ri Bhashyam, Fasc. I ... 

Susrnta Samhita, (Bng.) Fasc. I and II @ /12/ each 
Taittiriya Aranya, Fasc. I — XI @ /lO/ each 

Ditto Brahmana (Sans.) Fasc. I — XXIV @ /6/' each ... 

Ditto Sanjhita, (Sans.) Fasc. IX— XXXIV @ /6/each... 

Ditto Pratisakhya, (Sans.) Fasc. I — III @ /6/each 

Ditto and Aitareya Upanishad (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each 
Tandya Brahmana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XIX @ /6/ each 
Tatta Chintamani, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II Fasc. 1— 3(Sans.) @/6/each 
Tul'si Sat'sai, Fasc. I 

Uttara Naishadha, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill — XII @ /6/ each ... 
Uvasagadasao, Fasc. I — V @ /12/ each 
Varaha Purana, Fasc. I — XIII @ /6/ each 
Vayu Purana, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. I— VI ; Vol. II, Fasc. I— VII, 

@ /6/ each Fasc. 
Vishnu Smriti, (Sans.) Fasc. I— II @ /6/ each 
Yivadaratnakara, Fasc. I — VII @ /6/ each 
Vrihannaradiya Purana, Fasc. I— V @ 16/ each 
Yoga Sutra of Patanjali, (Sans. & English) Fasc, I— V @ /14/ each 

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Aralic and Fers'^n Series, 

Xin-i-ikbari, (Text) Fasc. I-XXII @ leacn 

^'" Ditto EngKst) ^«;- 1 j,^^«ti -IxilX @ 1/ each 

Akbarnamah, with Inde-, ^^T^it^ W-S @ /6/ each 

S^oSarr^SiS^^^^^^^^ pp- ^^' ^-'..^^-^^^^:' 

Piftiot?; oriSTech.ieal Te^s nd Appendix, Fasc. I-XXI @ 

/12/each ... .-,/ >m„,f^ !!'„,» v-IX @ /V each ... 

rituh-ul-Sham y^f.^VTl^tAIsc i^IY @^^^ ^^«^ -, 
Ditto Azadi, (Text) 1 asc i /^ V^. (^ext) Fasc. I 

Haft Asm'an, History of the P^^^^J^^!!^} ^@/i2/ each... 
History of the Cal phs,_ (f-f^^f] J^^jinl @kl each .,. 
lQbdln4mah-i-Jahangm, (Text) i! asc i ,^2/ each -., , •• 

I,\bah, with Supplement, (Text) 51 ]asc- @ ^^^^_ ^_g ^ ^g^ ^^^ .. 
Taadsir-ul-IJmaxa VoL I Fasc. I-^v /'^.^^ 

Maph^zi of Waqid.,/Text Fasc J.^ ^/ / @ ^g/ ^^ch ... - 

MuStakhah.ul--Tawankh, (Text) Fa^ i ^^ ^^ @ /12/eaeh ... 

Muntakhah-ul-Tawarikh (EBghsh) y_l^i^ ^^^^ ... 

Mnntakhab-ul-Lubah (Text)lasc._i ^^^^^^ 

lIu'a9ir-i-'Alaingiri(Text),Fasc.I ViL./ / . 

Nokhbat-nl-Fikr, (Text) Fasc I ■• p^^^,. i and II @ /12/each... 
Kizaxni's Khiradn^maWska^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^,^ Supplement, 

Suyuty'sItqanontheExe|eticb|e ^^^^ _ 

(Text) Fasc. II-IT, Yii A^^ 
Tabaqat-i-Nasiri, (Text) Fasc. Jr- * K^ii . ^ . . 

^^^t°' ' iSf S^z'^jii-d^ Sri V-t> Fasc. I-TII @ 
Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi, ot Ai? di u 

Tarikh-i-Firozshahi, of Sha^s l^^^^^f . \ 

W^ VE4mn., (Text) Fasci Y @ /6^^ ^_^^, @ ^,, ^,^ ... 

Zafarnamah,Tol.I,*ascjL . , 

Tu2uk->Zehangiri (EDghah) £ asc^i^L^ 

AQTATlh SOCIBTY^S PUBLICATIONS. 

X V^T IX to XI • Vols. XIII and XVII, and 
1. Asiatic RESEARCHES. Y* Yols XIX,and XX @ /10/each... 

^'''^ . . • ^^toSely f rc>^?8S?o 1869 (inci".) @ /V P^r 

- -r^rSrl^BVro^^^^^^^^^^^^ ,344 (12). 1845 (12). 

Sfei^?^'(^@^^^ 

per No. to Non- Subscribers^ ^^^j,^^ ^^ jfos.. {„ eacJi 

I?- F TTie figures enclosed t^ brracfcers g^t 

Vocabulary, by R. B. Shaw (Extra J^^-' ^ „.^. ^ Q. A. Griergon, 

5, Anis-ul-Musharnhi ••• 

|:g:SSoirLlJS;tmeA.C.«oS«det,,B,ng.. ... 



3 
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1 

4 
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6 
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80 
5 




PROCEEDNGS 

OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL. 

EDITED BY 

JhE j^ONORARY JSeCRETARIES. 




No. III. MARCH, 1890. 




" Ihe bounds of its investigation will be the geographical limits of Asia • and 
■within these limits its inquiries will be extended to whatever is performed bv 
man or produced by nature." — Sir William Jones. 

Annual Subscription, 3 rupees 

Price per Number, " g a^^g^g ' 

Postage in India (Additional), .'..'.' 1 anna. " 

Price in England, ' g^' 

1^° The publications of the Society consist — of the Proceedings, one num- 
ber of which is issued, as soon as possible, after every monthly meetino- and of 
the Journal, the annual volume of which is divided into two Parts : Part I bein? 
devoted to History, Philology, &c.. Part II to Natural Science ; each part if 
separately paged and provided with a special index, and one number of each 
part is published quarterly. Single numbers for sale at the rates given on the 
last page of cover. 

*#* It is requested that communications for the Journal or Proceedings may be 
sent under cover to the Honorary Secretaries, Asiatic Sac, to whom all orders for 
these works are to he addressed in India ; or, in London, to the Society's Agents 
Messrs. Triihner and Co., 57 8f 59, Ludgate Hill. ' , 

N. B. — In order to ensure papers being read at any monthly Meetino- of the 
Society, they should be in the hands of the Secretaries at least a week before 
the Meeting. 



CALCUTTA : 

PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 

AJfD PUBLISHED BT THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY, 57, PAEK STREET. 

1890. 







Issued, 12th July, 1890. 



CONTENTS. 



Monthly General Meeting 

Election of Members 

Withdrawal of Members 

Appointment of Auditors 

Appointment of Committees 

Presentation of a gold coin to the Society by Government N.-W. P, 

Capt. E. C. Temple exhibited his collection of past and present Burmese 

Currency and explained and illustrated a peculiar method of Burmese 

Arithmetic 

Papers — 

1. Ancient Barlaric Customs among the Eindxis. — By Pudmanav Ghosal — 
Communicated hy Dr. Hoernle 

2. Description of a Dipterous Insect {Ommatius Lividipes) found in Simla 
on the fio%ver of Commelyna obliqua — By MoNS. J. Bigot. Communicated hy 
E. T. Atkinson, Esq., C. S. 

3. Iflote on the Pupce of tuo Indian Butterflies of the suh-family Nemeo- 
hiinse— By L. DE Nice'ville, Esq., F. E. S., C. M. Z. S. 

Library,... 



Page 

135 

ib. 
136 

ib. 

ib. 

138 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 
142 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR SALE 

at the library of the 
Asiatic Society of jBengal, 

No. 57, PARK STREET, CALCUTTA. 

AND OBTAINABLE FROM 

THE SOCIETY'S LONDON AGENTS, MESSRS. TRUBNER & CO. 

57 AND 59, LUDGATE HiLL, LONDON, E. C. 



BIBLIOTHECA INDICA. 
Sanskrit Series. 

Advaita Brahma Siddhi, Fasc.I— III @ /6/ each ... Rs. 1 2 

Agni Purana (Sans.) Ease. II — XIV @/6/ each .. ... 4 14 

Anu Bhashyam, Ease. I ... ... ... ... Q 6 

Aitareya Aranyaka of the Eig Veda, (Sans.) Ease. I — V @ /6/ each ... 1 14 

Aphorisms of Sandilya, (English) Ease. I ... ... ...0 6 

Aphorisms of the Vedanta, (Sans.) Ease. VII — XIII @ /6/ each ... 2 4 

Ashtasahasrika Prajnaparamita, Ease. I — VI @ /6/ each ... ... 2 4 

Asvavaidyka, Ease. I — V @ /6/ each ... ... ... 1 14 

Avadana Kalpalata by Kshemendra, (Sans. & Tibetan) Vol. I, Ease. I — 2 2 

Bhamati, (Sans.) Ease. I — VIII @/6/ each ... ... ... 3 Q 

Brahma Sutra, (English) Ease. I ... ... ... ... 12 

Brihaddharma Puranam, Fasc. I — II @ /6/ each ... ... 12 

Brihat Aranyaka Upanishad, (Sans.) Ease. VI, VII & IX @/6/ each ... 1 2 

Ditto' (English) Ease. II— III @ /6/ each ... ... Q 12 

Brihat Sanihita, (Sans.) Ease. II— III, V— VII @ /6/ each... ... 1 14 

Chaitanya-Chandrodaya Nataka, (Sans.) Fase. II — III @ /6/ each ... 12 
(Continued on third page of cover.) 



Chaturvarga Chintamani, (Sans.) Vols. I, Fasc. 1—11 ; II, 1—25 ; III, 

Part I, Fasc. 1—18 ; Part II, Fasc. 1—4 @ /6/ each Fasc. Rs. 21 12 

Chhandogya Upanisliad, (English) Fasc. II ... ... ... 6 

Dasa Rupa, Fasc. II and III @ /6/ ... ... .,' o 12 

Gobhih'ya Grihya Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. I— XII @ /6/ each ... ... 4 8 

Hindu Astronomy, (English) Fasc. I— III @ /6/ each ... 1 2 

Kalamadhaba, Fasc. I-IV @ /6/ ... ... ... 1 g 

Katantra, (Sans.) Fasc. I — VI@/12/each ... ... ..' 4 g 

Katha Sarit Sagara, (English) Fasc. I — XIV @/12/ each ... ...10 8 

Kaushitaki Brahman Upanishad, Fasc. II ... .. .06 

Kurma Purana, Fasc. I — VIII @/6/ each ... ... ... 3 

Lalita Vistara, Sans. Fasc. II — VI @ /6/ ... ... .'" 1 14 

Lalita Vistara, (English) Fasc. I — III @ /12/ each ... ... 2 4 

Madana Parijata, Fasc. I — VI@/6/each ... ... ... 2 4 

Manutika Sangraha, Fasc. I — III @ /6/ each ... ... ,,. l 2 

Markandeya Pnrana, (English) Fasc. I — II @ /12/ each ... ... 1 8 

Markandeya Purana, (Sans.) Fasc. IV — VII @ /6/ each ... ... 1 § 

Mimamsa Darsana, (Sans.) Fasc. II — XIX @ /6/ each ... ... Q 12 

Narada Pancharatna, Fasc. IV ... ... ... ... 6 

Narada Smriti, Fasc. I — 711 @ /6/ ... ... ... ... j 2 

Nayavartikum, Fasc. I ... ... ... q q 

Nirnkta, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. 4 — 6; Vol. II, Fasc. 1 to 6 ; Vol. Ill, 

Fasc. 1—6 ; Vol. IV, Fasc. 1—7 @ /6/ each Fasc. ... ... 8 4 

Nitisara, or, The Elements of PolK y, by Kamandaki, (Sans.), Fasc. II — V 

@/6/each.. ... ... ... ... ... l 8 

Nyaya Dar?ana, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill ... ... ... ... 6 

Nyaya Kusumanjali Prakaranam, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. T — III @ /6/ each 1 2 

Parisishtaparvana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each ... ... 1 8 

Pingala Chhanda Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @ /6/ each ... ... 12 

Prithiraj Rasau, (Sans.) Part I, Fasc. I; Part II, Fasc. I — V@/6/each 2 4 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I ... ... ... ... 12 

Prakrita Lakshanam, (Sans.) Fasc. I ... ... ... 1 14 

Parasara Smriti (Sans.) Vol I, Fasc. 1—8, Vol. II, Fasc. 1—2 @/6/each 3 12 

Parasara, Institutes of, (English) ... ... ... ...0 12 

Srauta Sutra of Apastamba, (Sans.) Fasc. I- -XII @/6/each ... 4 8 

Ditto Asvalayana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XI @ /6/ each ... 4 2 

Ditto Latyayana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IX@/6/each ,..3 6 
Ditto Sankhyayana, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—7. Vol. II, Fasc. 1—7, 

(Sans.) @ /6/ each ... ... 3 

Sama Veda Sauihita, (Sans.) Vols. I, Fasc. 3—10 ; II, 1—6 ; III, 1—7 ; 

IV, 1—6 ; V, 1—8, @ /6/ each Fasc. ... ... ...13 2 

Sahitya Darpana (English) Fasc. I — IV@/6/each ... ... 1 8 

Sankhya Sutravritti (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each ... ... 1 8 

Sankara Vijaya, (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each ... ... 12 

Sankhya Aphorisms of Kapila^ (English) Fasc. I and II @ /6/ each ... 12 

Sankhya Pravachana Bhashya, Fasc. Ill (English preface only) ... 6 

SarvA Darsana Sangraha, (Sans.) Fasc. II ... ... ... 6 

S'ri Bhashyam, Fasc. I ... ... ... ... ... 6 

Susimta Samhita, (Eng.) Fasc. I and II @ /12/ each ... ... 1 8 

Taittiriya Aranya, Fasc. I — XI @ /lO/ each ... ... ... 4 2 

Ditto Brahmana (Sans.) Fasc. I — XXIV @ /6/ each ... ... 9 

Ditto Sauihita, (Sans.) Fasc. IX— XXXIV @/6/ each... ... 9 12 

Ditto Pratisakhya, (Sans.) Fasc. I— III @ /6/ each ... ... 1 2 

Ditto and Aitareya Upanishad (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each 12 

Tandya Brahmana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XIX @ /6/ each ... ... 7 2 

Tatta Chintamani, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II Fasc. 1— 3(Sans.) @/6/each 4 8 

Tul'si Sat'sai, Fasc. I ... ... ... ... ... 6 

Uttara Naishadha, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill— XII @ /6/ each ... ... 3 12 

Uvasagadasao, Fasc. I — V@/12/each ... ... ... 3 12 

Varaha Purana, Fasc. I— XIII @ /6/ each ... ... ... 4 14 

Vayu Purana, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. I— VI ; Vol. II, Fasc. I— VII, 

@ /6/ each Fasc. ... ••• ••• ■•• ... 4 14 

Vishnu Smriti, (Sans.) Fasc. I— II @ /6/ each ... ... Q 12 

Vivadaratnakara, Fasc. I— VII @ /6/ each ... ... ... 2 10 

Vrihannaradiya Purana, Fasc. I — V@/6/each ... ... 1 8 

Yoga Sutra of Patanjali, (Sans. & English) Fasc. I— V @ /14/ each ... 4 6 

(Turn over.) 



Arabic and Persian Series. 

*AIamgimamah, with Index, (Text) Fasc. I — XIII @ /6/ each Ka. 

Am-i-Akbari, (Text) Fasc. I— XXII @ 1/ each 

Ditto (English) Vol. I (Fasc. I— VII) ... 
Akbarnamah, with Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XXXIX @ 1/ each 
Badshahnamah with Index, (Text) Fasc. I — XIX @ /6/ each 
Beale's Oriental Biographical Dictionary, pp. 29^1, 4to., thick paper, 

@ 4/12 ; thin paper 
Dictionary of Arabic Technical Terms and Appendix, Fasc. I — XXI @ 

1/ each 
Farhang-i-Kashidi (Text) , Fasc. I— XIV @ 1/ each 
J<'ihrist-i Tusi, or, Tiisy's list of Shy'ah Books, (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ 

/12/each ... 
Futnh-ul-Sham Waqidi, (Text) Fas©. I— IX @ /6/ each ... 

Ditto Azadi, (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ /6/ each 

Haft Asm an, History of the Persian Mansawi (Text) Fasc. I 
History of the Caliphs, (English) Fasc. I— VI @/12/ each... 
Iqbalnamah-i-Jahangiri, (Text) Fasc. I — III @ /6/ each ... 
I§abah, with Supplement, (Text) 51 Fasc. @ /12/ each 
Maasir-ul-Umara, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II, Fasc. 1— 8 @ /6/ each .. 
Magh&zi of Waqidi, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 
lIuntakhab-nl-Tawarikh, (Text) Fasc. I— XV @ /6/ each ... 
Muntakhab-ul-Tawarikh (English) Vol. II, Fasc. 1—5 @ /12/eaeh ... 
Muntakhab-ul-Lubab, (Text) Fasc. I— XIX @ /6/ each 
Mu'asir-i-'Alamgiri (Text), Fasc. I — VI @ /6/ each 
Nokhbat-nl-Fikr, (Text) Fasc. I 

Nizami's Khiradnamah-i-Iskandari (Text) Fasc. I and II @ /12/ each... 
Snyuty's Itqan, on the Exegetic Sciences of the Koran, with Supplement, 

(Text) Fasc. II— IV, VII— X @ 1/ each 
Tabaqat-i-Nasiri, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I— XIV @ /12/ each 

Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi, of Zia-al-din Barni (Text) Fasc. I — ^^''11 @ 

/6/each 
Tarikh-i-Baihaqi, (Text) Fasc. I— IX @ /6/ each 

TariWi-i-Firozshahi, of Shams-i-Sii-aj Afif (Text) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Wis o Ramin, (Text) Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each 

Zafarnamah, Vol. I, Fasc. I— IX, Vol. II, Fasc. I— VIII @ /&/ each ... 
Tuznk-i-Zehangiri (English) Fasc. I @ 1/ 

ASIATIC SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 
1 Asiatic Re&eabches. Vols. VII, IX to XI ; Vols. XIII and XVII, and 
Vols. XIX and XX @ /10/each... 
Ditto Index to Vols. I — XVIII 

2. Proceedings of the Asiatic Society from 1865 to 1869 (incl.) @ /4/ per 

No. ; and from 1870 to date @ /6/ per No. 

3. Journal of the Asiatic Society for 1843 (12), 1844 (12), 1845 (12), 

1846 (5), 1847 (12), 1848 (12), 1850 (7), 1851 (7), 1857 (6), 1853 
(5), 1861 (4), 1864 (5), 1865 (8), 1866 (7), 1867 (6), 1868 (6), 1869 
(8), 1870 (8), 1871 (7), 1872 (8), 1873 (8), 1874 (8), 1875 (7), 1876 (7), 
1877 (8), 1878 (8), 1879 (7), 1880 (8), 1881 (7), 1882 (6), 1883 (5), 1884 
(6), 1885 (6) 1886 (8) 1887 (7) @ 1/ per No. to Subscribers and @ 1/8 
per No. to Non-Subscribers. 
N. B. The figures enclosed in brackets give the number of Nos. in each 
Vohcme. 
4. Centenary Review of the Researches of the Society from 1784 — 1883 
General Cunningham's Archijeological Survey Report for 1863-64 (Extra 

No.,J. A. S. B., 1864)... 
Theobald's Catalogue of Reptiles in the Museum of the Asiatic Society 
(Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1868) ... ... ... . 

Cat alogue of Mammals and Birds of Burmah, by E. Blyth (Extra No., 

J't A. S. B., 1875) 
Ske eh of the Turki Language as spoken in Eastern Turkestan, Part II, 

Vocabulary, by R. B. Shaw (Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1878) 
Introduction to the Maithili Language of North Bihar, by G. A. Grierson, 
Part II, Clirestomathy and Vocabulary (Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1882) 
5 Anis-ul-Mnsharrihi 
6* Catalogue of Fossil Vertebrata 
7- Cfltalogue of the Library of the Asiatic Society, Bengal 



4 


14, 


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80 





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PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 




EDITED BY 



The ffoNORARY ISecretaries. 
No. lY. APRIL, 1890. 




" The bounds of its investigation will be the geographical limits of Asia : and 
within these limits its inquiries will be extended to whatever is performed by 
man or produced by nature." — Sib William Jones. 

Annual Subscription, 3 rupees. 

Price per Number, 6 annas. 

Postage in India (Additional), 1 anna. 

Price in England, 6d. 

I^g" The publications of the Society consist — of the Proceedings, one num- 
ber of which is issued, as soon as possible, after every monthly meeting, and of 
the Journal, the annual volume of which is divided into two Parts : Part I beinw 
devoted to History, Philology, &c., Part II to Natural Science ; each part is 
separately paged and provided with a special index, and one number of each 
part is published quarterly. Single numbers for sale at the rates given on the 
last page of cover. 

*#* It is requested that communications for the Journal or Proceedings may be 
sent under cover to the Honorary Secretaries, Asiatic Soc, to whom all orders for 
these works are to be addressed in India ; or, in London, to the Society's Agents, 
Messrs. Triibner and Co., 57 Sj" 59, Ludgate Rill. 

N. B. — In order to ensure papers being read at any monthly Meeting of the 
Society, they should be in the hands of the Secretaries at least a week before 
the Meeting. 



CALCUTTA : 

FEINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 

AND PUBLISHED BY THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY, 57, PARK STREET. 

1890. 





Issued, 19th July, 1890. 



CONTENTS. 



Monthly General Meeting 

Election of Members 

Withdrawal of Members 

Philological Secretary — Exhibition of two Astrolabes... 

Papers — 

1. Natural History notes from H. M.'s Indian Marine Survey Steamer 
" Investigator," Commandar R. P. Hoskyn, R. N., Commanding — No. 16. The 
non-indigenous species of the Andaman Flora. — By D. Pkain. (Abstract) 

2. The B^lddhist RemoAns at Mount Uren in Mungir (Monghyr) district, 
and identification of the site with a celebrated hermitage of Buddha ; illustrated 
wifh photographs, facsimile ink impressions of inscriptions, Buddha's footprint, 
and a map.— By L. A. Waddell, M. B. (Title only) , ... 
Library,... ... ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• 



Page 
147 

ih. 

ib. 
148 



149 



151 

ib. 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR SALE 

at the library of the 
Asiatic Society of Bengal, 

No. 57, PARK STREET, CALCUTTA. 

AND OBTAINABLE FROM 

THE SOCIETY'S LONDON AGENTS, MESSRS. TRUBNER & CO. 

57 AND 59, LUDGATE HiLL, LONDON, E. C. 



BIBLIOTHECA INDICA. 

SansJcrit Series. 

Advaita Brahma Siddhi, Fasc. I— III @ /6/ each ... Rs. 

Agni Parana (Sans.) Fasc. II — XI Y @ /6/ each 

Ann Bhashyam, Fasc. I 

Aitareya Aranyaka of the Rig Veda, (Sans.) Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each 

Aphorisms of Sandilya, (English) Fasc. I 

Aphorisms of the Vedanta, (Sans.) Fasc. VII — XIII @/6/each 

Asbtasahasrika Prajnaparamita, Fasc. I — VI @ jQj each ... 

Asvavaidyka, Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each 

AvadanaKalpalata by Kshemendra, (Sans. & Tibetan) Vol. I, Fasc, 1—2 

Bhamati, (Sans.) Fasc. I — VIII (g/6/each 

Brahma Sutra, (English) Fasc. I 

Brihaddharma Pnranam, Fasc. I — II @ /6/ each 

Brihat Aranyaka Upanishad, (Sans.) Fasc. VI, VII & IX @ /6/ each 

Ditto" (English) Fasc. II— III (g /6/ each 

Brihat Sauihita, (Sans.) Fasc. II— III, V— VII @ /6/ each... 
Chaitanya-Chandrodaya Nataka, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @ /6/ each 
(Continued on third page of cover.) 



2 

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■Chatm-varga (Jhintamatii, (Sans.) Vols. I, Pasc. 1—11; IT, 1—25 ; ITT, 

Part I, Fasc. 1—18 ; Part II, Fasc. 1—4 @ /6/ each Fasc. Es. 

•Chhandogya Upanisbad, (English) Faec. II 
Dasa Enpa, Fasc. II and III @ /6/ ... ..." '" [[ 

Gobhih'ya Grihya Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. I— XII @ /6/ each ... 
Hindu Astronomy, (English) Fasc. I — III (S) /6/ each 
Kalamaahaba, Fasc. I-IV @ /6/ ... ... 

Katantra, (Sans.) Fasc. I— YI @ /12/ each .:. 

Katha Sarit Sagara, (English) Fasc. I — XIV @ /12/ each .." 

Kaushitalii Brahman Upanishad, Fa^c. II 

Knrma Pnrana, Fasc, I — VIII @ /6/ eatfh 

Lalita Vistara, Sans. Fasc. II— VI @ /6/ 

Lalita Vistara, (English) Fasc. I— III @ /12/ each .'.".' ].'." 

Madana Pai'ijata, Fasc. I — VI@/6/each 

JIanutika Sangraha, Fasc. I — III @ /6/ each ... 

Markandeya Parana, (English) Fasc. I — II @ /12/ each 

Markandeya Purana, (Sans.) Fasc. IV — VII @ /6/ each 

Mimamsa Darsana, (Sans.) Fa«c. II — XIX @ /6/ each 

Narada Pancharatna, Fasc. JV 

Narada Smriti, Fasc. I— III @ /6/ ... 

Nayavartikum, Fasc. I .... 

Nirukta, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. 4—6; Vol. II, Fasc. 1 to 6 ; Vol. Ill, 

Fasc. 1—^ ; Vol. IV, Fasc. 1—7 @ /6/ each Fasc. 
Nitisara, or, The Elements of Polify, by Kamandaki, (Sans.), Paso. II — V 

@/6/each... 
Nyaya Darsana, (Sans.) Pasc. Ill ... 

Nyaya Knsumanjali Prakaranam, (Sans.) Vol. I, Pasc. I — III @ /6/each 1 
Parisishtaparvana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Pingala Chhanda Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @ /6/ each ... 
Prithii-aj Easau, (Sans.) Part I, Fasc. I; Part II, Fasc. I— V @ /6/each 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I ... 

Prakrita Lakshanam, (Sans.) Fasc. I 

Parasara Smriti (Sans.) Vol I, Fasc. 1—^8, Vol. II, Fasc. 1—2 @ /6/each 
Parasara, Institutes of, (English) ... 

Srauta Sutra of Apastamba, (Sans.) Fasc. I- -XII @ /6/each 
Ditto Asvalayana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XI @ /6/ each 

Ditto Latyayana (Sans.) Pasc. I — IX @ /6/ each 

Ditto Sankhyayana, Vol. I, Pasc. 1 — 7. Vol. II, Fasc, 1—7, 

(Sans.) @ /6/each 
Sama Veda Saruhita, (Sans.) Vols. I, Pasc. 3—10 ; II, 1-^ ; III, 1—7 ; 

IV, 1—6 ; V, 1—8, @ /6/ each Pasc. 
Sahitya Dariaana (English) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Sankhya Sutravritti (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Sankara Vijaya, (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each 
Sankhya Aphorisms of Kapila, (English) Fasc. I and II @ /6/ each ... 
Sankhya Pravachana Bhashya, Fasc. Ill (English preface only) 
Sarva Darsana Sangraha, (Sans.) Pasc. II 
S'ri Bhashyam, Fasc. I ... 

Susruta Samhita, (Eng.) Fasc, I and II @ /12/ each 
Taittiriya Aranya, Fasc. I — XI @ /lO/ each 

Ditto Brahmana (Sans.) Fasc. I — XXIV @ /6/each ... 

Ditto Saaihita, (Sans.) Fasc. IX— XXXIV @ /6/each... 

Ditto Pratisakhya, (Sans.) Pasc. I — III @ /6/each 

Ditto and Aitareya Upanishad (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each 
Tandya Brahmana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XIX @ /6/ each 
Tatta Chintamani, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II Fasc. 1— 3(Sans.) @/6/each 
Tul'si Sat'sai, Fasc. I 

TJttara Naishadha, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill — XII @ /6/ each 
Uvasagadasao, Fasc, I — V @ /1 2/ each 
Varaha Purana, Fasc. I — XIII @ /6/ each 
Vayu Purana, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. I— VI ; Vol. II, Fasc, I— VII, 

@ /6/ each Fasc. 
Vishnu Smriti, (Sans.) Fasc. I— II @ /6/ each 
Vivadaratnakara, Fasc. I— VII @ /6/ each 
Vrihannaradiya Purana, Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each 

Yoga Sutra of Patanjali, (Sans. & English) Fasc. I— V @ /14/ each ... 

(Turn over.) 



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Arabic ancC Persian Beries. 
•Al'amgi'mamah, witlEi Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XIII @ /6/ each Rs. 

iiin-i-Akbari, (Text) Fasc. I— XXII @ 1/ each 

Ditto (English) Vol.1 (Fase. I— VII) ... 
Akbarnamah, with Index, (Text) Fasc, I— XXXIX @ 1/ each 
Badshahnamah with Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XIX @ /6/ each 
Beale's Oriental Biographical Dictionary, pp. 291, 4to., thick paper, 

@ 4/12 ; thin paper ... 
Dictionary of Arabic Technical Terms and Appendix, Fiasc. I — XXI @ 

1/ each 
Fai;hang-i-Ilashidi (Text) , Fasc. I— XIV @ 1/ each 
Jj'ihrist-i Tusi, or, Tusy's list of Shy'ah Books, (Text) Fasc. I — IT @ 

/12/each ... 
Futuh-ul-Sham Waqidi, (Text) Fase. I— IX @ /6/ each ..^ 
Ditto Azadi, (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ /6/ each ... 

Haft Asm^n, History of the Persian Mansawi (Text) Fasc. I 
History of the Caliphs, (English) Fasc. I — VI @/12/ each... 
Iqbalnamah-i-Jahangiri, (Text) Fase. I — III @ /6/ each ... 
I§abah, with Supplement, (Text) 51 Fasc. @ /12/ each 
Maasir-uI-Umara, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II, Fasc. 1—8 @ [Ql each ... 
Magh&zi of Waqidi, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 
Muntakhab-nl-Tawarikh, (Text) Fasc. I— XV @ /6/ each ... 
J"Iuntakhab-ul-Tawarikh (English) Vol. IT, Fasc. 1—5 @ /iVeach ... 
Muntakhab-nl-Lnbab, (Text) Fasc. I— XIX @ /6/ each ... • ... 

Mu'asir-i-'Alamgiri (Text), Fasc. I— VI @ /6/ each 
Nokhbat-nl-Fikr, (Text) Fasc. I 

Nizami's Khiradnamah-i-Iskandari (Text) Fasc. I and II @ /12/each?.. 
Snyuty's Itqan, on the Exegetic Sciences of the Koran, with Supplement, 

(Text) Fasc, II— IV, VII—X @ 1/ each 
Tabaqat-i-lSTasiri, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I— XIV @ /12/ each 

Tarikh-i-Firua Shahi, of Zia-al-din Barni (Text) Fasc. I — VII @ 

/6/each 
Tarikh-i-Baihaqi, (Text) Fasc. I— IX @ /6/ each 

Tarikh-i-Firozshahf, of Shams-i-Siraj Afif (Text) Fasc. I — IV @ /ff/ each 
"Wis o Ramin, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each ... 

Zafarnamah, Vol. I, Fasc. I— IX, Vol. II, Fasc, I— VIII @ /6,'' each ... 
Tuzuk-i-Zehangiri (English) Fasc. I @ 1/ 

ASIATIC SOCIETT^S PUBLICATION'S. 
1 Asiatic Researches. Vols. VII, IX to XI ; Vols. XIII and XVII, and 
Vols. XIX and XX @ /lO/ each... 
Ditto Index to Vols. I— XVIII 

2. Proceedings of the Asiatic Society from 1865 to 1869 (incl.) @ /4/ per 

No ; and from 1870 to date @ /6/ per No. 

3 Journal of the Asiatic Society for 1843 (12), 1844 (12), 1845 (12), 

' 1846 (5), 1847 (12), 1848 (12), 1850 (7), 1851 (7), 1857 (6), 1858 

(5), 1861 (4), 1864 (5), 1865 (8), 1866 (7), 1867 (6), 1868 (6), 1869 

(8) 1870 (8), 1871 (7), 1872 (8), 1873 (8), 1874 (8), 1875 (7), 1876 (7), 

1877 (8), 1878 (8), 1879 (7), 1880 (8), 1881 (7), 1882 (6), 1883 (5), 1884 

(6), 1885 (6) 1886 (8) 1887 (7) @ 1/ per No. to Subscribers and @ 1/8 

per No. to Non- Subscribers. 

Jf . B. The figures enclosed in brackets give the ntmiber of Nos. in each 

4. Centenary Review of the Researches of the Society from 1784 — 1883 
General Cunningham's Archaeological Survey Report for 1863-64 (Extra 

No., J. A. S. B., 1864)... 
Theobald's Catalogue of Reptiles in the Museum of the Asiatic Society 

(Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1868) 
Cataloo-ue of Mammals and Birds of Burmah, by E. Blyth (Extra No., 

J. a! S. B., 1875) 
Sketch of the Turki Language as spoken in Eastern Turkestan, Part II, 

Vocabulary, by R. B. Shaw (Extra No., J. A, S. B., 1878) 
Introduction to the Maithili Language of North Bihar, by G. A. Grierson, 

Part II, Chrestomathy and Vocabulary (Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1882) 

5. Anis-ul-Musharrihi 

6. Catalogue of Fossil Vertebrata 

7. Catalogue of the Library of the Asiatic Society, Bengal ... 



4 


m 


22 


0' 


39' 


4 

a 


7 


2 


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21 





14 





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1 



w 

■/?^ PROCEEDINGS P^ 

OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL. 

EDITED BY 

JhE j^ONORARY jS ECRETARI ES. 



No. y. MAY, 1890. 




" The bounds of its investigation will be the geographical limits of Asia : and 
within these limits its inquiries will be extended to whatever is performed by- 
man or produced by nature." — Sib William Jones. 

Annual Subscription, 3 rupees. 

Price per Number, 6 annas. 

Postage in India (Additional), 1 anna. 

Price in England, 6(^, 

;^P° The publications of the Society consist — of the Proceedings, one num- 
ber of which is issued, as soon as possible, after every monthly meeting, and of 
the Journal, the annual volume of which is divided into two Parts : Part I bein" 
devoted to History, Philology, &c.. Part II to Natural Science ; each part is 
separately paged and provided with a special index, and one number of each 
part is published quarterly. Single numbers for sale at the rates given on the 
last page of cover. 

*^* It is requested that communications for the Journal or Proceedings may be 
sent under cover to the Honorary Secretaries, Asiatic Soc, to luhom all orders for 
these ivories are to be addressed in India ; or, in London, to the Society's Agents, 
Messrs. Trilbner and Co., 37 ^ 59, Ludgate Rill. 

N. B. — In order to ensure papers being read at any monthly IVIeeting of the 
Society, they should be in the hands of the Secretaries at least a week before 
the Meeting. 



CALCUTTA : 

PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 

AND PUBLISHED BT THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETT, 57, PARK STREET. 

1890. 







Issued August 18th, 1890. 



CONTENTS. 



.,. Pag 8 

Monthly General Meeting ... ... ... .. ... 159 

Election of Members ... ... ... ... ... ii- 

Withdrawal of Members ... ... ... ... .■• i^- 

Death of Members ... ... ••• ■•• ••• ••• 160 

Philological Secretary — Reports on old coins ... ... ... ii. 

Papers— 

1. Natural History Notes from E. M.'s Indian Marine Survey Steamer . 
" Investigator" Commander Hosktn, R. N. Commanding. — No. 17. A List of 
Diamo7id Island Plants.— By D.Pr Am. (Abstract.) ... ... ... 164 

2. NovicicB Indices II. An additional species of Ellipanthus. — By D. Peain. 
(Title only) ... ... .. ... ... ■•. 165 

3. Rust and Mildew in India. — By A. Barclay, M. B., Bengal Medical 
Serwce (Title only) ... ... ... ••• ... ... ^^• 

4. Description of a new Psyllid. — By M. Lethierry ... ... ih. 

5. On some Definite Integrals. — By Asutosh Mukhopadhyay. (Abstract.) ih. 

6. Pandit H. P. Shastri, on an old gun from False Point ... ... 166 

Library, ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• 168 



LIST OF BOOKS FOR SALE 

at the library of the 
Asiatic Society of Bengal, 

No. 57, PAKE STREET, CALCUTTA. 

AND OBTAINABLE FROM 

THE SOCIETY'S LONDON AGENTS, MESSRS. TRUBNER & CO. 

57 AND 59, LUDGATE HiLL, LONDON, E. C. 



BIBLIOTHECA INDICA. 
Sanskrit Series. 

Advaita Brahma Siddhi, Pasc. I — III @/6/ each ... Es. 1 2 

Agni Purana (Sans.) Fasc. II — XIV @/6/ each ... ... 4 14 

Ann Bhashyam, Fasc. I ... ... ... ... 6 

Aitareya Aranyaka of the Rig Veda, (Sans.) Fasc. I — V @ /&/ each ... 1 14 

Aphorisms of Sandilya, (English) Fasc. I ... ... ... 6 

Aphorisms of the Vedanta, (Sans.) Fasc. VII — XIII @ /6/ each ... 2 4 

Ashtasahasrika Prajnaparamita, Fasc. I — VI @ /6/ each ... ... 2 4 

Asvavaidyka, Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each ... ... ... 1 14 

Avadana Kalpalata by Kshemendra, (Sans. & Tibetan) Vol. I, Fasc. 1—2 2 

Bhamati, (Sans.) Fasc. I— VIII @ /6/ each ... ... ... 3 

Brahma Sutra, (English) Fasc. I ... ... ... ... 12 

Brihaddharma Puranam, Fasc. I — II @ /6/ each .. ... 12 

Brihat Aranyaka Upanishad, (Sans.) Fasc. VI, VII & IX @ /6/ each ... 1 2 

Ditto' (English) Fasc. II— III @ /6/ each ... ... 12 

Brihat Sauihita, (Sans.) Fasc. II— III, V— VII @ /6/ each... ... 1 14 

Chaitanya-Chandrodaya Nataka, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @/6/ each ,., 12 
(Continued on third page of cover.) 



1—11 ; II, 1—25 ; 

I j6/ each Fasc. Ks. 21 
... 

4 
1 
1 
4 
10 

3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
6 

1 




to 6 ; Vol. Ill, 



Chaturvarga Clxintamani, (Sans.) Vols. I, Fasc 

III, Part I, Fasc. 1 — 18 ; Part II, Fasc. 1—4 
Chhandogya Upanishad, (English) Fasc. II 
Dasa Enpa, Fasc. II and III @ /6/ ... 
Gobhiliya Gnhya Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. I— XII @ /6/ each 
Hindu Astronomy, (English) Fasc. I— III @ /6/ each 
Ealamadhaba, Fasc. I-IV @ /6/ ... ... 

Katantra, (Sans.) Fasc. I — VI @ /12/ each 

Katha Sarit Sagara, (English) Fasc. I— XIV @ 712/ each 

Kanshitaki Brahman Upanishad, Fasc. II 

Kurma Parana, Fasc. I — VIII @ /6/ each 

Lalita Vistara, Sans. Fasc. II— VI @ /6/ 

Lalita Vistara, (English) Fasc. I — III @ /12/ each 

Madana Parijata, Fasc. I — VI @ /6/ each 

Jlanutika Saugraha, Fasc. I— III @ /6/ each ... 

Markandeya Pnrana, (English) Fasc. I — II @ /12/ each 

Markandeya Purana, (Sans.) Fasc. IV — VII @ /6/ each 

Mimamsa Darsana, (Sans.) Fasc. II — XIX @ /6/ each 

Karada Pancharatna, Fasc. IV 

Narada Smriti, Fasc. I— III @ /6/ ... 

Kayavartikum, Fasc. I ... 

Kirukta, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. 4—6; Vol. II, Fasc. 1 

Fasc. 1—6 ; Vol. IV, Fasc. 1—7 @ /6/ each Fasc. 

Nitisara, or, The Elements of Poli< y, by Kamandaki, (Sans.), Fasc. II — V 
@ /6/eaoh... 

Nyaya Darsana, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill ... 

Nyaya Knsumanjali Prakaranam, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. I — III @ /Q/ each 

Parisishtaparvana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 

Piiigala Chhanda Sutra, (Sans.) Fasc. II — III @ /6/each ... 

Prithiraj Rasau, (Sans.) Part I, Fasc, I; Part II, Fasc. I — V@ /6/each 
Ditto (English) Fasc. I ... 

Prakrita Lakshanam, (Sans.) Fasc. I 

Parasara Smriti (Sans.) Vol Ij Fasc. 1 — 8, Vol. II, Fasc. 1 — 2 @/6/each 

Parasara, Institutes of, (English) ... 

Srauta Sutra of Apastamba, (Sans.) Fasc. I- -XII @ /6/each 
Ditto Asvalayana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XI @ /6/ each 

Ditto Latyayana (Sans.) Fasc. I — IX @ /6/each 

Ditto Sankhyayana, Vol. I, Fasc. 1 — 7. Vol. II, Fasc. 1—7, 

(Sans.) @ /6/each 

Sama Veda Samhita, (Sans.) Vols. I, Fasc. 3—10 ; II, 1—6 ; III, 1—7 • 

IV, 1—6 ; V, 1—8, @ /6/ each Fasc. • ... 
Sahitya Darpana (English) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/each 
Sankhya Sutravritti (Sans.) Fasc. I — IV @ /6/ each 
Sankara Vijaya, (Sans.) Ifasc. II and III @ /6/ each 

Sankhya Aphorisms of Kapila, (English) Fasc. I and II @ /6/ each ... 

Sankhya Pravachana Bhashya, Fasc. Ill (English preface only) 

Sarva Darsana Sangraha, (Sans.) Fasc. II 

S'ri Bhashyam, Fasc. I ... 

Susruta Samhita, (Eng,) Fasc. I and II @ /12/ each 

Taittiriya Aranya, Fasc. I — XI @ /lO/ each 

Ditto Brahmana (Sans.) Fasc. I — XXIV @ /6/ each ... 

Ditto Samhita, (Sans.) Fasc. IX— XXXIV @ /6/ each... 

Ditto Pratisakhya, (Sans.) Fasc. I — III @ /6/each 

Ditto and Aitareya Upanishad (Sans.) Fasc. II and III @ /6/ each 
Tandj'a Brahmana, (Sans.) Fasc. I — XIX @ /6/ each 
Tatta Chintamani, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II Fasc. 1— 3(Sans.) @/6/each 
Tul'si Sat'sai, Fasc. I 

Uttara Naishadha, (Sans.) Fasc. Ill — XII @ /6/ each 
Uvasagadasao, Fasc. I — V @ /12/ each 
Varaha Purana, Fasc. I— XIII @ /6/ each 
Vayu Purana, (Sans.) Vol. I, Fasc. I— VI ; Vol. II, Fasc. I— VII, 

@ /6/ each Fasc. 
Vishnu Smriti, (Sans.) Fasc. I— II @ /6/ each 
Vivadaratnakara, Fasc. I— VII @ /6/ each 
Vrihannaradiya Purana, Fasc. I — V @ 16/ each 

Yoga Sutra of Patanjali, (Sans. & English) Fasc. I— V @ /14/ each ... 

(Turn over.J 



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J radio and Persian Series. 



Rs. 



'Alamgfrnamali, witli Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XIII @ /6/ each 
Am-i-Akbari, (Text) Fasc. I— XXII @ 1/ each 

Ditto (English) Vol.1 (Fasc. I— Til) ... 
Akbarnamah, with Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XXXIX @ 1/ each 
Badshahnamah with Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XIX @ /6/ each 
Beale's Oriental Biographical Dictionary, pp. 291, 4to., thick paper, 

@ 4/12 ; thin paper ... 
Dictionary of Arabic Technical Terms and Appendix, Fasc. I— XXI @ 

Farhang-i-Eashidi (Text), Fasc. I— XIT @ 1/ each 

Fihrist-i Tusi, or, Tusy's list of Sliy'ah Books, (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ 

/12/ each ... 
Futuh-nl-Sham Waqidi, (Text) Fase. I— IX @ /6/ each ... 

Ditto Azadi, (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ /6/ each 

Haft Asman, History of the Persian Mansawi (Text) Fasc. I 
History of the Caliphs, (English) Fasc. I— VI @/12/ each... 
Iqbalnamah-i-Jahangiri, (Text) Fasc. I— III @ /6/ each ... 
Isabah, with Supplement, (Text) 51 Fasc. @ /12/ each 
Maasir-ul-Umara, Vol. I, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II, Fasc. 1—8 @ /6/ each ... 
Magh&zi of Waqidi, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each 
Muntakhab-nl-Tawarikh, (Text) Fasc. I— XV @ /&/ each ... 
Muntakhab-nl-Tawarikh (English) Vol. II, Fasc. 1—5 @ /12/each ... 
Muntakhab-nl-Lnbab, (Text) Fasc. I— XIX @ /&/ each ... 
Mn'asir-i-'Alamgiri (Text), Fasc. I— VI @ /6/ each 
Nokhbat-nl-Fikr, (Text) Fasc. I ... 

Nizami's Khiradnamah-i-Iskandari (Text) Fasc. I and II @ /12/each... 
SuyiitY's Itqan on the Exegetic Sciences of the Koran, with Supplement, 

(Text) Fasc' II— IV, VII— X @ 1/ each 
Tabaqat-i-Nasiri, (Text) Fase. I— V @ /6/ each 

Ditto " (English) Fasc. I— XIV @ /12/ each 
Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi, of Zia-al-din Barni (Text) Fasc. I — VII @ 

/(>/ f^&cTn ••• *•• '•' *'• "* '*' 

Tarikh-i-Baihaqi, (Text) Fasc. I— IX @ /6/ each 

TariMi-i-Firozshahi, of Shams-i-Siraj Afif (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ /6/ each 
Wis o Ramin, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each ... 

Zafarnamah, Vol. I, Fasc. I— IX, Vol. II, Fasc. I— VIII @ /6/ each ... 
Tuzuk-i-Zehangiri (English) Fasc . I @ 1/ 

ASIATIC SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 



1, Asiatic Researches. 



4. 



Vols. VII, IX to XI ; Vols. XIII and XVII, and 
Vols. XIX and XX @ /lO/ each. . . 
Ditto Index to Vols. I— XVIII 

Proceedings of the Asiatic Society from 1865 to 1869 (incl.) @ /4/ per 

No • and from 1870 to date @ /6/ per No. 
JournIl of the Asiatic Society for 1843 (12), 1844 (12), 1845 (12), 
1846 (5), 1847 (12), 1848 (12), 1850 (7), 1851 (7), 1857 (6), 1858 
(h 1861 (4), 1864 (5), 1865 (8), 1866 (7), 1867 (6), 1868 (6), 1869 
(8) 1870 (8) 1871 (7), 1872 (8), 1873 (8), 1874 (8), 1875 (7), 1876 (7), 
1877 (8), 1878 (8), 1879 (7), 1880 (8), 1881 (7), 1882 (6), 1883 (5), 1884 
(6), 1885 (6) 1886 (8) 1887 (7) @ 1/ per No. to Subscribers and @ 1/8 
per No. to Non- Subscribers. 
N B. The figures enclosed in hrachets give the number of Nos. in each 

Centenary Review of the Researches of the Society from 1784—1883 
General Cunningham's Archaeological Survey Report for 1863-64 (Extra 

No., J. A. S. B., 1864)... 
Theobald's Catalogue of Reptiles in the Museum of the Asiatic Society 

(Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1868) 
Catalogue of Mammals and Birds of Burmah, by E. Blyth (Extra No., 

J. A. S. B., 1875) ... ••• ••• 

Sketch of the Turki Language as spoken in Eastern Turkestan, Part II, 

Vocabulary, by R. B. Shaw (Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1878) 
Introduction to the Maithili Language of North Bihar, by G. A. Grierson, 

Part II, Chrestomathy and Vocabulary (Extra No., J. A. S. B,, 1882) 
Anis-ul-Musharrihi 
Catalogue of Fossil Vertebrata 
Catalogue of the Library of the Asiatic Society, Bengal ... 



4 


14 


22 





12 


4 


39 





7 


2 


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80 





5 






I 




PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL. 

EDITED BY 

Jhe J^onorary jSecretaries. 



No. VI. JUNE, 1890. 




" The bounds of its investigation will be tha geographical limits of Asia • and 
within these limits its inquiries will be extended to whatever is performed bv 
man or produced by nature." — Sir William Jones. 

Annual Subscription, 3 rupees. 

Price per Number, g annas." 

Postage in India (Additional), 1 anna 

Price in England, _" q^^ 

^W The publications of the Society consist — of the Proceedings, one num- 
ber of which is issued, as soon as possible, after every monthly meetino- and of 
the Journal, the annual volume of which is divided into two Parts : Part I beino- 
devoted to History, Philology, &c.. Part II to Natural Science ; each part is 
separately paged and provided with a special index, and one number of each 
part is published quarterly. Single numbers for sale at the rates given on the 
last page of cover. 

*#* It is requested that comnnmications for the Journal or Proceedings may be 
sent under cover to the Honorary Secretaries, Asiatic Soc, to luhom all orders for 
these loorJcs are to be addressed in India ; or, in Londori, to the Society's Agents 
Messrs. Triibner and Go., 57 Sf 59, Ludgate Hill. 

N. B. — In order to ensure papers being read at any monthly Meeting of the 
Society, they should be in the hands of the Secretaries at least a week before 
the Meeting. 



CALCUTTA : 

PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 

AND PUBLISHED BY THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETT, 57, PARK STREET. 

1890. 






Issued 26th August, 1890. 






Arabic ai'td Persian Series. 

'A'lamgirnamah, with Index, (Taxt) Fasc. I— XIII @ /6/ each Rs. 4 14 

A'l'n-i-Akbari, (Text) Fasc. I— XXII @ 1/ each ... ...22 

Ditto (English) Vol. I (Fasc. I— VII) ... ... ...12 4, 

Akbarn^imah, with Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XXXTX (a) 1/ each ... 39 

Badshahnamah with Index, (Text) Fasc. I— XIX @ /6/ each ... 7 2 

Beale's Oriental Biographical Dictionary, pp. 291, 4to., thin paper ... 4 8 
Dictionary of Arabic Technical Terms and Appendix, Fasc. I — XXI @ 

1/each ... ... ... ... ... ... 21 

Farhang-i-Eashidi (Text), Fasc. I— XIV @ 1/ each ... ...14 

Fihrist-i Tusi, or, Tusy's list of Shy'ah Books, (Text) Fasc. I— IV @ 

/12/each ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Futiih-nl-Sham Waqidi, (Text) Fase. I— IX @ /6/ each ... ... 3 6 

Ditto Azadi, (Text) F:tsc. I— IV @ /6/ each ... ... 1 8 

Haft Asman, History of the Persian Mansawi (Text) Fasc. I ... 12 

History of the Caliphs, (Englisii) Fasc. I— VI @/12/ each... ... 4 8 

Iqbahiamah-i-Jahangiri, (Text) Fasc. 1 — III @ /6/ each ... ... 1 2 

I?abah, with Supplement, (Text) 51 Fasc. @ /12/ each ... ... 38 4 

Maasir-ul-Umara, Vol.- 1, Fasc. 1—9, Vol. II, Fasc. 1-9 Vol. Ill, Fasc. 

1— 6@ /6/each ... ... ... ... .90 

Magh&zi of Waqidi, (Text) Fasc I— V @ /6/ each ... ... 1 14 

Muntakhab-ul-Tawiirikh, (Text, Fasc. I— XV @ /6/each ... ... 5 10 

Muntakhab-ul-Tawarikh (EnglJh) Vol. II, Fasc. 1—5 (g /12/each ... 3 12 

Muntakhab-al-Lnbab, (Text) F.-vr.c. I—XIX @ /6/ each ... ... 7 2 

Mu'asir-i-'Alamgiri (Text),Fasc. I— VI @/6/ each ... ... 2 4 

Nokh'bat-nl-Fikr, (Text) Jasc. 1 ... ... ... ... 6 

Nizami's Khiradndmah-i-iskandari (Text) Fasc. I and II @ /12/ each... 1 14 

Eiyazu-s-Salatin (Text) Fasc. I- -IV (S/n/ each ... ... 1 8 

Snyuty's Itqan, on the Exegetic Sciences of the Koran, with Supplement, 

(Text) Fasc. II— IV, VII— X @ 1/ each ... ... ,.,7 

Tabaqat-i-Nasiri, (Text) Fasc. I— V @ /6/ each ... ... 1 14 

Ditto (English) Fasc. I— XIV @ /1 2/ each ... ...10 8 

Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi, of Zia-al-din Barni (Text) Fasc. I — VII @ 

/6/each ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 10 

Tarikh-i-Baihaqi, (Text) Fasc. I— IX @ /6/ each ... ... 3 6 

Tarikh-i-Firozshahi, of Shams-i-Siraj Afif (Text) Fasc. I — V @ /6/ each 1 14 

Wis o Ramin, (Text) Fasc. I — V i^ /6/ each ... ... ... 1 14 

Zafarnamah, Vol. I, Fasc. I— IX, Vol. II, Fasc. I— VIII @/6/ each ... 6 6 

Tuzuk-i-Jahangiri (English) Fasc. 1 @ 1/ .. ... ... 1 

ASIATIC SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

1. Asiatic Rese.\bches. Vols. VII, IX to XI ; Vols. XIII and XVII, and 

Vols. XIX and XX @/10/each... ... 80 

Ditto Index to Vols. I— XVIII ... ... 5 

2. Proceeuings of the Asiatic Society from 1865 to 1869 (inol.) @ /4/ per 

No. ; and from 1870 to date @ /6/ per No. 
S. Journal of the Asiatic Society for 1843 (12), 1844 (12), 1845 (12), 

1846 (5), 1847 (12), 1848 (12), 1850 (7), 1851 (7), 1857 (6), 1858 

(5), 1861 (4), 1864 (5), 1865 (8), 1866 (7), 1867 (6), 1868 (6), 1869 

(8), 1870 (8), 1871 (7), 1872 (8), 1873 (8), 1874 (8), 1875 (7), 1876 (7), 

1877 (8), 1878 (8), 1879 (7), 1880 (8), 1881 (7), 18S2 (6), 188:i (5), 1834 

(6), 1885 (6) 1886 (8) 1887 (7) @ 1/ per No. to Sab.soriber8 and @ 1/8 

per No. to Non- Subscribers. 
N. B. The figures enclosed in hrackets give the number of Nos. in each 

Volume. 
4, Centenary Review of the Researches of the Society from 1784 — 1883 3 
General Ganningham's Archaeological Sarvey Report for 1863-64 (Extra 

No., J. A. S. B., 1864)... ... ... ... ... 1 8 

Theobald's Catalogue of Reptiles in the Maseam of the Asiatic Society 

(Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1868) ... ... ... ... 1 8 

Oatalo'^ne of Mammals and Birds of Barmah, by B. Blyth (Extra No., 

J. A. S. B., 1875) ... ... ... ... ^ ... 3 

Sketch of the Tarki Language as spoken in Eastern Tarkestan, Part II, 

Vocabulary, by R. B. Shaw (Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1878) ... 3 

Introduction to the Maithili Langaage of North Bidir, by G. A. Grierson, 

Part II, Chrestomathy and Vocabulary (Extra No., J. A. S. B., 1832) 

5. Anis-ul-Musharrihi 

6. Oatalogae of Fossil Vertebrata 

7. Catalogue of the Library of the Asiatic Society, Bengal 



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