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Full text of "Proceedings of the Board of Regents of the State of Illinois"

PROCEEDINGS 
OF THE 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



OF THE 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 



JAMES R. THOMPSON 
Governor 




July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983 



(Printed by authority of the State of Illinois) 



PROCEEDINGS 
OF THE 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



OF THE 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 



JAMES R. THOMPSON 
Governor 




July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983 



(Printed by authority of the State of Illinois) 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



Officers 



David E. Murray, Chairman 

Carol K. Burns, Vice Chairman 

Franklin G. Matsler, Secretary 

Charles Brim, Treasurer 

William Gorrell, Assistant Secretary-Treasurer 



APPOINTED MEMBERS Term Expires 

Jerome R. Bender, Rockford 1985 

Carol Kristen Burns, Peoria 1989 

Clara S. Fitzpatrick, Chicago 1985 

L. Milton McClure, Beardstown 1987 

David E. Murray, Sterling 1987 

D, Brewster Parker, Lincoln 1989 

Harold Riss, Shirley 1987 

Harry L. Wellbank, Crystal Lake 1989 

James L. Wright, Chicago 1985 

NON-VOTING STUDENT MEMBERS (terms expiring June 30, 1983) 
Montel Gayles, Northern Illinois University 
Denise Orchowski, Illinois State University 
Janine Toman, Sangamon State University 



Dr. Franklin G. Matsler 

Executive Director 

616 Myers Building 

Springfield, Illinois 62701 






Date of Meeting 

July 22, 1982 
September 23, 1982 
October 21, 1982 
December 9, 1982 
February 17, 1983 
March 17, 1983 
April 20, 1983 
May 19, 1983 
June 23, 1983 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Location of Meeting- 



Pages 



Minutes Summary 



Sangamon State University 17-38 

Northern Illinois University 39-66 

Illinois State University 67-86 

Chicago, Illinois 87-115 
Sangamon State University 



1-2 
3-4 
5 

6-7 
116-143 8-9 



Northern Illinois University 144-175 10-11 



Illinois State University 
Sangamon State University 
Sangamon State University 



176-198 12 
199-215 13-14 
216-243 15-16 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/proceedingsofbo198283boar 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
July 22, 1982 

PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Adopted a revised calendar of meetings for FY 83. 

Accepted the Continental Assurance Company bid for health and acci- 
dent insurance and authorized the universities to publicize the prograi.i 
to enroll employees and dependents. 

Received for first reading proposed revisions of Board Regulations on 
Financial Exigency. 

Adopted FY 84 Operating Budget Request Guidelines. 

Directed Staff to explore the possibility of providing a statewide tuition 
waiver policy with the Board of Higher Education and report on the 
progress of that at the October meeting. 

Approved continuation of a Regency System liability insurance package 
with Estergard, Eberhardt, and Ackerman, Inc., Champaign, IL. 

PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Authorized a contract between the University and the Administrative 
Office of the Illinois Courts to provide in-service training to probation 
officers and detention workers. 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
Academic Calendar for 1983-84 and 1984 Summer Session; personnel 
transactions; and purchases. 

PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Authorized a contract with the State Board of Education, Division of 
Adult, Vocational and Technical Education for operation of an Adult 
Education Service Center for the northern region of the State. 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions, University Academic Calendar for 1983-84; 
purchases; award of contracts for Emergency Steam Line Replacement 
(Gable Hall to Reavis Hall and Manhole South of Field House to Gabel 
Hall) ; repair of roof on South Wing and Center Section of Swen Parson 
Hall; correction of ventilation deficiencies in Visual Arts Building; re- 
surfacing of Parking Lot F; and resurfacing of Parking Lot 21. 



PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; Academic Calendar for 1983-84; 
permission to engage Brown, Davis, Mullins & Associates, Consulting 
Engineers, to prepare bid documents and receive bids for installation 
of sprinkler systems in 7 existing trash chutes ; and approval to contract 
with the Town of Normal for improving and resurfacing a portion of Uni- 
versity Street between College Avenue and Dry Grove Street. 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
September 23, 1982 

PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Announced assignments to Committees of the Board. 

Approved Staff recommendations for revisions in the Board Regulations 
relative to financial exigency. 

Received for first reading a proposed amendment to Board Regulations 
relative to the entertainment allowance for presidents. 

Approved revision in Board Regulations governing procurement and 
bidding to conform with P. A, 82-905. 

Approved a FY 84 Operating Appropriations Request for the Regency 
System in the amount of $168,580,300. 

Approved a FY 84 Capital Appropriation Request for the Regency System 
in the amount of $26,294,100. 



PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Authorized the university to accept a grant from the U.S. Air Force/ 
Office of Scientific Research to support research activity in chemistry 
and physics. 

Authorized the university to accept a grant from the National Institutes 
of Health for research on enzymes. 

Approved the Report of the President of NIU, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; collective bargaining agreement with AFSCME repre- 
senting food service and building service employees; approval of account- 
ing entities as required by University Financial Guidelines; purchases; 
authorization to prepare plans and specifications, advertise and receive 
bids for remodeling and renovation of south terrace of Holmes Student 
Center; permission to hire Brown, Davis, Mullins & Associates, Inc. to 
develop plans and specifications for extension of the primary steam line 
to connect the East and West Heating Plants; award of contract for re- 
modeling of "The Barn" snack bar in Grant Towers; award of contract 
for roof repair of Center Core of Stevenson Towers; replacement of 
windows in Huskie Stadium Press Box; and replacement of doors in 
Lincoln Hall and Douglas Hall. 

PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; land acquisition for expansion of 
parking facilities; authorization to purchase outstanding revenue bonds; 



and approval of Local 399 of the International Union of Operating Engin 
eers as the exclusive bargaining representative for Building Mechanics 
at ISU. 



PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President which included: permission to 
execute Tower/Site and Supportive Mast Agreements with CONVOCOM; 
approval to institute an assessment fee for measuring and awarding 
upper-division credit for prior learning; personnel transactions; and 
purchases. 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
October 21, 1982 

PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Approved the FY 83 Internal Budgets for the Regency Universities. 

Accepted the Non -Appropriated Capital Requirements Plans of NIU and 
ISU, and approved requests of $2,303,900 for NIU and $1,410,000 for ISU. 

Authorized the Regency Universities and the Central Office to grant 
salary increases to faculty and administrative staff effective January 1. 

Received a Staff report on statewide tuition waiver policy for dependents 
of faculty and staff. 

Approved an amendment to Board Regulations relative to the entertainment 
allowance for each university president. 

Received a report on intercollegiate athletics. 

PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; and land acquisition for parking. 

PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions. 

PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; and a collective bargaining agreement 
with AFSCME representing food service and maintenance employees at 
Lorado Taft Campus. 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
December 9, 1982 



PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Adopted a Resolution directing the institutions and the Central Staff 
to defer the 3% salary increase which was authorized in October. 

Received a Staff report on student financial aid. 

Adopted a calendar of Board meeting's for 1983. 

Received a Staff report on economic development and higher education. 

Approved a 3% increase in the Administrative Salary Plan Ranges for 
1983, effective January 1, 1983. 

Authorized line item transfers for the Central Office. 

PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Ratified approval for NIU to contract with the U.S. Peace Corps for 
"Training Program for Peace Corps Trainees and Volunteers for Assign- 
ment to Honduras" . 

Authorized the university to employ Kessler, Merci and Associates as 
architects for the proposed recreation facility, and to engage bond counsel. 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; approval of labor agreements with 
AFSCME for building services and food services employees, and with 
FOP Lodge 86 for Police Officers I : permission to replace deteriorated 
portions of sidewalk systems; permission to enter into a contract with 
Energy Management & Engineering, Inc. to design and prepare construction 
documents, advertise and receive bids for replacement of air conditioning 
system and correction of ventilating deficiencies in Holmes Student Center 
and for correction of ventilating deficiencies in various bond revenue build- 
ings; permission to employ Kessler, Merci & Associates, Inc. to prepare 
plans and specifications, advertise and receive bids for waterproofing of 
wing foundation walls at Lincoln Hall, repair and reset slate panels at 
Grant Towers, repair and reset slate panels at Stevenson Towers, and for 
installation of new synthetic floor in handball courts in Huskie Stadium. 

PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; award of contracts for the orchestra lift in the 
Public Affairs Center Auditorium; and authority to increase the FY83 
contract authorization for Murphy, Downey, Wofford, and Richman, Archi- 
tects. 



PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; permission to hire Brown, Davis, 
Mullins & Associates to prepare bid documents and receive bids for 
Shelbourne Apartment air conditioning replacement work ; permission to 
engage Buchanan, Bellows & Associates for energy conservation retrofit 
remodeling of East Campus and West Campus residence hall complexes; 
permission to hire Mills/Lux, Associates, to prepare bid documents and 
receive bids for remodeling and renovation of Linkins Center Lounge 
Area; permission to increase the Student Health Service Fee and the 
Transcript Fee; and approval of working conditions provisions of labor 
agreement with Local 299, International Union of Operating Engineers. 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
February 17, 1983 

PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Adopted a Resolution supporting the Governor's recommendations to 
increase the State's revenue through an adjustment of various existing 
state taxes and the enactment of fair and equitable new taxes. 

Adopted the Legislative Audit Commission's University Guidelines 1982 
as operating policy of the Board of Regents and its universities, and 
also the Guidelines Exception pertaining to ISU 

Adopted a Resolution encouraging a continuation of present policy of 
funding fringe benefits for auxikiary enterprise employees from appro- 
priated funds. 

Authorized the Executive Director to prepare the FY84 appropriation 
bill at the Board of Higher Education level. 

Approved an amendment to Board Regulations relative to civil service 
employees' vacation usage during probation period. 

Approved a continuation of limitations on the use of the early retirement 
option. 

Approved a revised calendar of Board meetings for 1983. 

PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Authorized the university to contract with the U.S. Department of Edu- 
cation for a model Special Education program. 

Authorized award of contract to Chapman and Cutler to act as bond 
counsel on the recreation facility. 

Approved the Report of the President, which included: personnel trans- 
actions: purchases: permission to employ Raths, Raths & Johnson, Inc. 
to analyze extent of repair required on Grant Towers perimeter columns; 
permission to employ Raths, Raths & Johnson in connection with exterior 
soffit repair at Grant Towers; permission to prepare plans and specifi- 
cations, advertise and receive bids for tuckpointing and caulking the Holmes 
Student Center tower and the remainder of the building; permission to pre- 
pare plans and specifications, advertise and receive bids for replacement 
of windows and repair of plaster ceiling in dining room in Stevenson 
Towers Complex; permission to prepare plans and specifications, advertise 
and receive bids for renovation of 3 passenger elevators in Holmes 
Student Center: amendment of agreement with Kessler, Merci & Associates 
to provide for an architectural fee of 5% of construction cost budget for 
the recreation facility; award of contracts for remodeling of Huskie Stadium 
(University Box component) ; award of contracts for Steam Line to connect 
East and West Heating Plants. 



PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President which included: personnel trans- 
actions and January transactions. 



PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved a Sequence in Industrial Accounting - within the Major in 
Accounting 1 , and a change in degree designation for completion of 30 
semester hours of graduate work beyond the masters degree in two 
education fields from Certificate of Advanced Study to Educational 
Specialist. 

Approved the Report of the President which included: personnel 
transactions; purchases; and authority to award honorary degrees; 
and January transactions. 



10 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 

March 17, 1983 

i 

PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Approved Staff recommendations relative to the University Academic 
Plans, 1983-87, as amended. 

Authorized granting - a 3% salary increase to faculty and staff effective 
April 1, 1983. 

Approved an amendment to Board Regulations relative to telephone con- 
ference meetings. 

PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President which included: personnel trans- 
actions and purchases. 

PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Approved an Emphasis in Drawing within the B.F.A. Major in Art, 
and an Emphasis in Educable Mentally Handicapped /Learning Disabilities 
within the Major in Special Education. 

Adopted a Resolution directing the Executive Director to request Halsey 
Stuart & Company to designate an alternative co-paying agent for the 
November 1966 revenue bond series. 

Adopted a Resolution accepting a gift of real property from the NIU 
Foundation. 

Authorized legal counsel for NIU to proceed through Countryman & Asso- 
ciates to obtain recovery of the liability in connection with the yearbook 
publication dispute. 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; permission to increase the Graduate Colloquium 
Fee; purchases; permission to prepare plans and specifications, advertise 
and receive bids for repair of the gym roof in Anderson Hall, remodeling of 
the formal lounge in Stevenson Towers North, resurfacing of Parking Lot 
"L" and Williston Hall Service Drive, and the grading and resurfacing of 
the Recycling Center; permission to employ Servidyne, Inc. to design and 
prepare for bid electrical and steam controls for Anderson Hall; and per- 
mission to expend funds for emergency repairs to the granite panels on 
Holmes Student Center - Center Tower. 



11 



PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
deletion of the Division of University Relations and the transfer of its 
major administrative units and functions to the Division of Academic 
Affairs, the Division of Business and Administrative Services and the 
President's Office; personnel transaction; and purchases. 



12 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
April 20, 1983 

PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Approved amendments and additions to Board Regulations relative to 
Board Committees. 

Selected Franklin G. Matsler and William R. Monat to serve as directors 
of the Illinois Educational Consortium. 



PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; renewal of union agreements with 
Local 399, International Union of Operating Engineers, and Local 1110 
of AFSCME ; and approval of a new union agreement with Local 399, Inter- 
national Union of Operating Engineers on behalf of building mechanics in 
the residence halls. 



PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, which included personnel trans- 
actions and purchases. 

PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; permission to increase the commencement fee for 
graduate and undergraduate students; authorization to contract with 
NCHEMS to provide a needs assessment of private sector firms with com- 
mitments to high technology; approval of collective bargaining agreements 
with FOP Lodge 86, AFSCME Local 963, and International Union of Oper- 
ating Engineers Local 399; approval to proceed with an installment plan 
for payment of tuition, fees and room and board; purchases; permission 
to increase the project budget for center core roof replacement at Lincoln 
Hall; permission to contract with Raths, Raths and Johnson, Inc. for 
granite and limestone panel repair or replacement at Holmes Student Center 
Tower; award of contracts for sidewalk repairs, repainting of exterior 
steel and wood at Huskie Stadium, gym divider curtains in Evans Field 
House, minor rehabilitation and remodeling of Dorland Building, and tuck- 
pointing and caulking the Tower and the remainder of Holmes Student 
Center. 



13 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
May 19, 1983 

PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM: 

Approved Agreement for Professional Services with Giffin, Winning, 
Lindner, Newkirk, Cohen & Bodewes, P.C. 

Approved a proposal for an Evaluation of the Quality of Education in 
the Regency System, and referred the matter to the Program Committee. 

PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President which included personnel trans- 
actions and purchases. 

Approved the recommendations for award of tenure. 

PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Authorized the university to accept a grant from the Illinois Department 
of Rehabilitation Services to provide services to the deaf and hard-of- 
hearing. 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions ; authority to increase the fee for the University 
Health Service; approval to restore to the Stadium and Field House $1.08 
per credit hour of the total Bond Revenue Fee; purchases; permission to 
develop plans and specifications, advertise and receive bids for recaulking 
of A and B Towers of Stevenson; award of contracts for Anderson Hall 
gym roof repair, remodeling and renovation of Holmes Student Center South 
Terrace, renovation of elevators in Stevenson Towers and Holmes Student 
Center, replacement of air conditioning system and correction of ventilating 
deficiencies in Holmes Student Center and various revenue bond buildings 
deficiencies, resurfacing of Parking Lot Tt L" and Williston Hall Service 
Drive, repair and resurfacing of university streets, grading and resur- 
facing of Recycling Center, and construction of a steel catwalk in Huskie 
Stadium. 



PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Authorized establishment of a Minor in Gerontology at ISU. 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; purchases; authority to engage Mills-Lux Asso- 
ciates to prepare bid documents and receive bids for alterations and addi- 
tions to Bone Student Center and for the remodeling of the bowling and 
billiards building; permission to design and receive bids for installation 
of auxiliary hot water heaters in various residence halls ; permission to 



14 



prepare contract documents and receive bids for residence hall energy 
conservation work; permission to engage Brown, Davis, Mullins & 
Associates to prepare bid documents and receive bids for Horton Field- 
house and Hancock Stadium Electrical Renovation Work; permission to 
purchase an IBM 5520 Administrative System for Bone Student Center 
and an IBM Word and Data Processing System for the Office of Residen 
tial Life: and approval of a union agreement with FOP Lodge 67. 






15 



SUMMARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS 
June 23, 1983 



PERTAINING TO THE REGENCY SYSTEM 



Authorized the Executive Director to adjust in conference committee the 
amounts in the Income Fund in the Board's appropriation bill. 

Accepted the bid of Lanphier & Company to provide blanket crime insur- 
ance for a 3-year period commencing July 1, 1983. 

Adopted a calendar of meeting; for FY 84. 

Approved accounting entities for use by the Regency Universities when 
testing for excess funds, to be implemented no later than FY 84. 

Approved an expansion of cooperative purchasing through the Illinois 
Educational Consortium. 

Approved an amendment to Board Regulations relative to vacation. 

Approved an increase of 5.5% in the Administrative Salary Plan ranges 
for FY 84. 

Approved Staff recommendations relative to program review and academic 
plan follow-up reports. 

Approved Staff recommendations relative to the FY 85 RAMP New and 
Expanded Program Requests and Special Analytical Studies. 

Accepted the FY84 Non -Appropriated Capital Requirements Plans and 
approved the FY84 budget requests of NIU and ISU. 

Confirmed a Resolution which the Board adopted in Executive Session with 
respect to the matter of Andrew Edwards vs. Board of Regents, Sangamon 
State University, Alex B. Lacy, Jr., and Susan Dezondolet. 

Confirmed Board action in Executive Session with respect to settlement 
of Brue & Farrick vs. Board of Regents et al. and Textor vs. Board of 
Regents. 

Tabled until the next Board meeting a motion for review of the inter- 
collegiate athletics programs. 

PERTAINING TO SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
authorization for MICC to contract with IEC on behalf of the university; 
personnel transactions; purchases; and authority to execute agreements 
for FY 84 for professional services. 



16 



PERTAINING TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 

Authorized the university to accept a grant from the National Science 
Foundation for search . 

Authorized the university to enter into a master contract with the NIU 
Foundation. 

Approved the Report of the President, as amended, which included: 
personnel transactions; renewal of authorization for the International 
and Special Programs division to disburse funds without specific advance 
authorization for each disbursement; authority to transfer $700,000 in 
the Project Construction Fund to the Repair and Replacement Reserve 
Account ; approval for reorganization within the Graduate School of the 
Office of Research; purchases; award of contract for general work in 
connection with replacement or air conditioning system and correction of 
ventilating deficiencies in Holmes Student Center and minor deficiencies 
in various bond revenue buildings, and a revision of the project budget; 
award of contracts for waterproofing of wing foundation walls at Lincoln 
Hall, repair and resetting of slate panels at Grant Towers, repair and 
resetting of slate panels at Stevenson Towers, installation of new syn- 
thetic floor in handball courts at Huskie Stadium; and award of contracts 
for remodeling of Holmes Student Center Pow Wow Room. 

PERTAINING TO ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY: 

Approved the Report of the President, which included: personnel trans- 
actions; purchases; permission to hire Buchanan, Bellows & Associates 
for Energy Conservation, Phase I, in Watterson Towers and South Resi- 
dence Hall Complex; permission to hire Henneman & Raufeisen & Associates 
to prepare bid documents and receive bids for installation of the first 
phase of steam line replacement ; permission for the Office of International 
Studies to disburse funds during FY 84 without specific advance authority 
for each such disbursement ; permission to modify the Agreement for lease 
of space from the ISU Foundation; permission to enter into professional 
legal services contracts on behalf of the Students' Legal Services Program; 
permission to request line item transfer in the FY 83 GR appropriation; 
and permission to enter into a master contract with the ISU Foundation. 



17 



Minutes of the Meeting of the 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Sangamon State University - Springfield, Illinois 

July 22, 1982 

The regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 9:00 a.m 
on July 22, 1982 in Conference Room G of the Public Affairs Center, Sangamon 
State University, Springfield, Illinois. Mr. David E. Murray, presided. 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, roll was called, and the 
following Regents were present: 



Ms. Carol K. Burns 
Mrs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick 
Mr. Montel Gayles 
Mr. L. Milton McClure 
Ms. Denise Orchowski 



Mr. D. Brewster Parker 

Mr. Harold Riss 

Ms. Jan Simpson 

Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 

Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman 



Mr. Jerome R 
meeting. 



Bender and Mr. James L. Wright were not present for the 



Also in attendance were : 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 

Representing the Joint University Advisory Committee were: Dr. Virginia 
Crafts, Dr. Thomas Eimermann, Mr. Leon Toepke, and Mr. George Tuttle 
from ISU; Dr. James E. Lankford, Dr. Annette Lefkowitz, Dr. Antoinette 
Lotsof, and Dr. Jerry Meyer from NIU; Ms. Irene Allsop and Dr. Jack Van 
DerSlik from SSU. 

Others in attendance included staff from the Regency Universities and the 
Central Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the Board; 
and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

On motion made by Mr. Parker, seconded by Mr. Riss, the Board unanimously 
voted to recess for an executive session to consider certain personnel matters. 

The Board reconvened in public meeting at 11:00 a.m. 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF JUNE 17, 1982 

The attention of the Board was directed to the minutes of the meeting held on 
June 17, 1982, and the Chairman asked if there were any additions or correc- 
tions to be proposed. There being none, on motion by Mr. Parker, seconded 
by Dr. Wellbank, the minutes were approved as submitted. 

CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 



Chairman Murray thanked President Lacy, on behalf of the Board, for the 



hospitality extended to members of the Board the preceding evening. The 
President, he noted, had made some very favorable comments last evening 
regarding certain developments at Sangamon State and some awards which 
have been accorded members of the faculty. He then called upon the Presi- 
dent to address the Board. 

President Lacy noted that he had placed at each member's seat several publi- 
cations as an illustration of some of the work of the SSU faculty this year. 
The volume entitled Public Opinion and Interest Groups in American Politics 
was authored by Professor David Everson of the Political Studies faculty. 
Dr. Everson is also Executive Director of the Illinois Legislative Studies Center 
and is rapidly carving out a niche for himself among political scientists in the 
country who specialize in looking at political parties, interest groups and 
public opinion. 

President Lacy continued his remarks by indicating that at Sangamon State 
they characterize themselves as Mr. Lincoln's institution. They like to think 
that what they are doing in the latter part of the twentieth century is what 
Abraham Lincoln would be doing if he were a leader in our society today, and 
they try to stress as much as possible scholarship about Mr. Lincoln. The 
institution's senior scholar on Abraham Lincoln is Chuck Strozier, the President 
said, who had already carved out his niche as one of the country's leading 
Lincoln scholars, and has added further to that reputation with the publication 
of a volume entitled Lincoln's Quest for Union . The book has been out long 
enough to receive some critical acclaim and some very strong reviews nationally, 
including one in the New York Times book review section. 

Finally, President Lacy said, there is a lot of strength in the SSU faculty on 
a lot of subject matter, but probably if one were to look at the overall strength 
of the faculty, the great strength would be in 20th century studies. This 
ties to their public affairs mandate. They have strived to implement that man- 
date and that ties to all of the departments, including their literature program. 
Mike Lennon , who is better known to the Board as the editor of the Illinois 
Issues magazine, had a reputation before he became editor and publisher of 
that magazine, namely that he is probably the strongest person in the country 
on the work of Norman Mailer. He has published several pieces of critical 
work on Mailer and his work . The volume before the Board today , Piece s 
and Pontifications , has recently been published and will be followed this fall 
by a PBS distribution of a film which Lennon has worked on with Mailer. 
The President said unfortunately the publisher fouled this up a little bit and 
Mr. Lennon's name does not appear on the cover of the hardback, although it 
does appear on the paperback. 

President Lacy said in the next few weeks the university will be losing several 
very critical members of the university community who have been very important 
to the development of the institution. One of these individuals is Mrs. Betty 
Sorling, who along with Dr. Matsler and President Spencer, opened the uni- 
versity in 1969 and has been a mainstay of the university from that point to 
the present. She has tried to keep everyone on the right track. She has 
been Executive Secretary to the two Presidents of Sangamon State University. 
Dr. Lacy said Mrs. Sorling has been of absolutely immense help to him since 
he has been at the university, in introducing him to this Board and to the 
university community. She has saved him more mistakes, he said, than even 
he is aware of and a lot that he is aware of. Mrs. Sorling has been perhaps 



19 



the ideal example of what a staff member can do to improve the instruction, 
research and public service life of an institution. Dr. Lacy, said in his Presi- 
dent's Report later he would be asking the Board to add to Mrs. Sorling's 
title for the months that remain before her retirement , in addition to the title 
Executive Secretary, the title of Secretary to the University, which he had 
intended to ask for in the hope that she might be with the institution for one 
more year. However, he said, after the winter we had last year with a lot of 
ice and snow Betty decided that her new house in Florida is more attractive , 
and she will be moving there. 

President Lacy also noted that Dr. Stuart Anderson is retiring. Dr. Anderson 
has been with SSU for 12 years. He is a native of Minneapolis, has taught 
at the University of Wisconsin, the University of Oklahoma, the University 
of Chicago and Northwestern University before joining the faculty at Sangamon 
State. He has a lot of international experience through UNESCO in Peru. 
At Sangamon he has been a Professor of Educational Administration and has 
coordinated that program. He has served on many university committees and 
has helped through many tough policy decisions during his time at the institu- 
tion. More importantly, perhaps, he has been the university's lead person in 
relating to the superintendents of instruction and the principals of elementary, 
middle schools and high schools who are within driving range of the campus. 
He has coordinated for the past few years a regular forum of superintendents 
and principals which has become very important - the Sangamon Administrators 
Round Table. Dr. Lacy said he is pleased to say that Dr. Anderson is going 
to remain in Springfield, and it is hoped that he will continue to administer 
the Round Table again next year. 

Also announcing his retirement is Dr. Clarence Danhof, Dr. Lacy continued. 
Dr. Danhof has been most recently Associate Dean of Organization and Manage- 
ment as well as Professor of Political Economy. He has been with Sangamon 
State for 11 years, and taught previously at Tulane , Princeton and Lehigh 
Universities. Before coming to Sangamon he held a senior staff position at the 
Brookings Institution in Washington. Dr. Danhof held several administrative 
positions at SSU including being the founder of one of the public service centers. 
For the last 3 years he has been the inaugural Dean of the Organization and 
Management cluster, and has guided the work of that cluster which is of major 
importance to the future of the university. Dr. Danhof has published widely 
and is currently working on a volume on technological change in American life. 

Some people appear to not understand that Florida does not want more population, 
the President said, because Dr. Robert Zeller is also retiring and moving to 
Florida. Bob is Associate Dean of Health Science Professions. He has also led 
the development of the continuing education program in the university. Dr. 
Zeller joined the Human Development Counseling faculty as a full professor in 
1974. He served as coordinator of that program. He was the person who 
developed the very successful graduate program model which the university 
operates at Millikin University in Decatur, which has been a nationally recognized 
model of how a multi-university cooperative teaching program is delivered. 
Dr. Zeller was of much help , the President said, to both himself and Dr. Dezendolet 
and became the Vice President's faculty associate and helped her through many 
major policy decisions during her first months in office. He has also been an 
adjunct professor at the SIU School of Medicine, one more example of the leader- 
ship he has given in multi- university cooperative programs. 



20 



Concluding his remarks, President Lacy said it is something of a sad moment 
to see these people leaving the university because it shows that the institution 
is no longer as young as we like to think. We now have a decade behind us. 
He said he knows that these individuals are leaving with the good sense that 
they made outstanding contributions, not just to the university, but to the 
Board of Regents and to higher education. 

On behalf of the Board, Mr. Murray thanked all of the individuals for their 
service. The Board appreciates what they have given to the university and 
to the Board. He commented that he could not understand how Mrs. Sorling 
could trade a title like the President proposed for retirement, however. 
The Chairman also congratulated Professors Lennon, Strozier and Everson for 
their books and their scholarship. 

Seating of New Board Members 

Mr. Murray said he was pleased to present a newly appointed member of the 
Board of Regents, Mr. L. Milton McClure. Mr. McClure is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois and the U. of I. College of Law. He is a CPA as well 
as an attorney and resides in Beardstown where he also practices law. Mr. 
Murray welcomed Mr. McClure stating that he is sure he will be a valuable and 
conscientious member. 

The Chairman announced that today is also the first meeting for the three new 
student Regents: Ms. Jan Simpson from Sangamon State, Ms. Denise Orchowski 
from Illinois State, and Mr. Montel Gayles from Northern. 

The oath of office was administered to all new members by the Chairman. 

Mr. Murray said he must apologize to persons present for the public meeting 
for taking so much time in executive session. The Board heard the appeal of 
David Sanford, and after hearing a very effective and qualified presentation on 
Mr. Sanford's behalf, the Board deliberated and decided that no due process 
violation had occurred and therefore did not take further action . The Board 
also heard a rather extensive report from legal counsel concerning pending liti- 
gation matters, including a report on the telephone fraud matter at Northern 
Illinois University 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Ms. Burns said she would ask Dr. Matsler to comment on the Governor's decision 
relative to budgets, and then she would report on several issues before the 
Board of Higher Education at its last meeting. 

Dr. Matsler reported that the Governor has signed the appropriation bills for 
all of ' higher education, which included a 3% salary increase effective January 1 
based on a 90% base, however. This means that the institutions will have to 
search a little and do some reallocating to come up with this 3%. The Governor 
also reduced funding for retirement from 70% of the gross down to 62.5% in 
order to make up some of the money that will be necessary for the 3% salary 
increase. He also increased the maximums for ISSC scholarships by $50.00, 
which was in his original recommendations. The maximum is now at $2,000. 
It must be remembered, Dr. Matsler said, that we will have an annualization 
problem in terms of next year's budget, and we will have an automatic \\% 
that we will have to find. 



21 



Ms. Burns reported that two committee reports were given at the last meeting 
of the Board of Higher Education: one was the off-campus program committee 
report and the other was the medical education committee report . The medical 
education committee's report is not of major interest to our universities, she 
noted, although some members as individuals might have some interest in it. 
Mrs. Jane Rader, who chairs the committee, presented an excellent report on 
medical education in Illinois which attempted to identify some of the key issues 
facing the medical schools. The committee was an excellent one, Ms. Burns 
said, and will really help to provide some direction to the medical schools in 
solving some of the problems they currently have. 

In the area of off-campus programming, Ms. Burns said, the committee pre- 
sented a new set of guidelines in which it attempted to establish a process for 
developing off-campus programs. In the process of developing the guidelines, 
she said, there are just two points she would like to make about sensitizing all 
of the people involved - public, private and proprietary - to two major issues. 
One issue is the matter of "turf" , which ultimately borders on duplication of 
programs and resources, and the other issue is need. There was considerable 
discussion of the whole matter at the BHE meeting, which she would not repeat 
here, Ms. Burns said, but she said she thinks it is very healthy that everyone 
has now been sensitized to the issues and that the guidelines which have been 
established really put forward a process by which we will discuss up front 
and share up front information in the development of our off-campus programs. 
That means everyone, she said. This is a big step forward. 

President Monat said he would just comment briefly on this latter report. The 
BHE committee did a really remarkably effective job. To a considerable extent 
that was due to Ms. Burns' presence on the committee. As a major deliverer 
of off-campus programs in the State of Illinois, NIU is grateful to her for her 
influence on the committee, and the President said he thinks the committee 
recommendations are appropriate. 

Ms. Burns said she, too, was grateful for the considerable amount of input 
she received from both the Staff and the universities. 

Mr. Murray said he had neglected earlier to report that in executive session 
the Board decided to postpone the review of the goals statements of Presidents 
Monat and Watkins until the September meeting, due to time limitations. 

The Chairman then recognized Dr. Harry Wellbank, chairman of the Personnel 
Committee. 

Dr. Wellbank moved that the salaries of the three Presidents, the Executive 
Director, and members of the Central Office Staff be frozen at their present 
levels for the coming academic year. The motion was seconded by Mr. Parker. 

Dr. Matsler inquired if this motion would rule out the possibility of a change 
at some later date during the academic year if there is, indeed, some added 
money coming on January 1. 

Mr. Murray said the resolution would not rule out a change later on. In the 
event there are extenuating circumstances, the Board can always change its 
policy. He noted that it is with a certain amount of regret that we tell the 
Presidents and the Executive Director what a wonderful job they are doing 
and then freeze their salaries; but that is better than the alternative. 



22 



The question before the Board was called, and the motion carried unanimously. 

State Universities Retirement System 

In the absence of Mr. Bender, Dr. Matsler said he would simply report that 
Mr. Bender has been putting in a lot of time over the past few months dealing 
with matters of the retirement system . He did meet with the Joint University 
Advisory Committee after the last meeting. Mr. Bender has become quite an 
expert in the system and asked that everyone be told that we will really have 
to work to get the retirement funding away from the operating budgets. Somehow 
or other, we have to work to make sure that we deal with the funding liabilities 
in the university system. 

Finance Committee 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick, chairman, reported that the Finance Committee had met twice 
since the last Board meeting, and the good work of the staff will be reported 
during consideration of Sections IV and VI of the Executive Director's Report. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Before presenting the Committee report. Dr. Virginia Crafts, chairperson, 
introduced new JUAC members: Dr. James Lankford from NIU, Ms. Irene Allsop 
and Dr. Jack VanDer Slik from SSU; and Dr. George Gruendel, also from SSU, 
who was unable to be present today, and who will serve as Vice- Chairman of 
JUAC. 

Dr. Crafts requested that the Committee be recognized at the time the Board 
considered the matters of health insurance for dependents, the revisions of the 
Board Regulations relative to financial exigency, and the FY 84 operating budget 
guidelines. 

With respect to the State Universities Retirement System, Dr. Crafts reported 
that the committee has continued its investigation of the funding problems and 
since the last meeting of the Board Mr. Bender, as well as Staff members, have 
come to each of the campuses to meet with small selective groups to discuss the 
SURS situation. As a result of the meetings preliminary positions have been 
prepared, and they are an excellent background of information about SURS 
prepared by Dr. Floyd of the Staff who will prepare a final composite draft 
for the committee at its next meeting. The committee intends to present this 
paper to the Board, hopefully for approval and support, and then publicize 
it on the campuses and make it available to a number of persons and groups 
through various channels. Dr. Crafts said the Joint University Advisory Com- 
mittee wished to particularly thank Mr. Bender, Dr. Brim and Dr. Floyd for 
all of their help . 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 133 

Section I - Revised Board Meeting Calendar - July 1982/June 1983 

Dr. Matsler presented for information of the Board the revised Calendar of 
Meetings which reflects the action of the Board at the June meeting. He noted 
that two meeting dates had been changed: to December 9 from December 16, 
and to June 23 from June 16. The revised Calendar is as follows: 



23 



July 22, 1982 Sangamon State University 

August 1982 Subject to Call 

September 23, 1982 Northern Illinois University 

October 21, 1982 Illinois State University 

November 1982 Subject to Call 

December 9, 1982 Chicago 

January 20, 1983 Chicago 

February 1983 Subject to Call 

March 17, 1983 Sangamon State University 

April 21, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

May 19, 1983 Illinois State University 

June 23, 1983 Springifled 

Section II - Legislative Report 

Turning to the Legislative Report, Dr. Matsler said he would not repeat his 
comments on S.B. 1355 which is the Regency System appropriation bill. 

S.B. 1361, the funding bill for the State Universities Retirement System, has 
been reduced to provide 62.5% of gross payout rather than 70% as originally 
introduced, and now awaits action by the Governor. 

S.B. 1652, Dr. Matsler said, was amended in the House to specify the funding 
soi*rce for early retirement and designated the personal services line item as 
the source for such payments; however, the bill failed to win approval by the 
Senate. Therefore, we do not yet have authorization to pay for early retire- 
ment, but it is hoped that this can be cleared up, and there are some possible 
solutions. 

S.B. 2246 which would provide membership on the Board of Higher Education 
for two individuals who would specifically represent independent colleges and 
universities, was amended in the Senate Higher Education Committee to delete 
members of the governing boards of public universities from the BHE membership 
The bill failed in the Senate, Dr. Matsler advised, but it is in a committee and 
there will be hearings held on it this summer. Dr. Matsler said he is very much 
against this bill, but it is still very much alive. 

Dr. Matsler reported to the Board that Mr. Peter Lardner has been confirmed 
as the new Chairman of the Illinois State Scholarship Commission for a three 
year period commencing June 30, 1982. 

Section III - Semi-Annual Report of Investments 

Bond resolutions authorizing the University Facilities Revenue Bonds Series 
1970- 70A of Illinois State University require a semi-annual report of the 
market value of all investments held in the bond account , the bond reserve 
account, and the reserve account. Dr. Matsler presented a summary of such 
investments for the information of the Board. 

Section IV - Dependent Health Insurance 

Dr. Matsler said as indicated by Mrs. Fitzpatrick earlier, the Finance Committee 
considered the matter of dependent health insurance at its meeting yesterday. 
He called the attention of the Board to the Addendum to EDR No. 133 which 
contains information on the results of the bidding for this coverage. 



24 



Dr. Matsler called the attention of the Board to the summary sheet showing 
the monthly premiums for dependent health insurance for the proposed alterna- 
tive plan and the State plan (both high and low options). 

Staff recommends, he said, that the Continental Assurance Company bid for 
health and accident insurance be accepted and that the universities and the 
Central Office be authorized to publicize the program and to enroll employees 
and dependents in the program. He then asked Dr. Brim of the Staff, to 
briefly summarize the matter for the Board. 

Dr. Brim indicated that bids for an alternative dependent health insurance 
plan were opened on July 20th and of the 9 firms receiving bidding specifica- 
tions, only one firm, Continental Assurance Company submitted a bid. Four 
other firms had indicated "no bid", while four firms did not respond. Represent- 
atives of some of the companies indicated that the main reason they did not sub- 
mit bids was bacause of the lack of claims experience at our institutions. Staff 
was unable to get the information from the Blue Cross-Blue Shield State Plan and 
was advised that they could not provide it. 

Dr. Brim said the ad hoc committee believes that the bid they did receive will 
provide approximately the same coverage for dependents at a rather substantially 
lesser rate than we are currently paying for high option coverage through the 
State plan. They think that a major reason for this is because none of our 
three institutions is located in the Chicago area which has a high cost of health 
care. The proposed plan will provide substantially greater benefits than are 
currently provided by the State low option plan, but the charge of the proposed 
plan will be somewhat greater. Individuals currently taking the low option plan 
for dependents would have to pay somewhat more for this increased coverage. 
However, there are two provisions that are not available under the State plan: 
dental and vision care. 

Dr. Brim said the committee feels that it will not be easy to get the 70% parti- 
cipation which is required, and the only possibility of getting it will be if the 
plan is well publicized on campus and explained in such a fashion that individuals 
will have information on which to make a decision . It is hoped that not only the 
campus administrations, but also JUAC and others will get the word out on the 
proposal. 

Dr. Brim said he would also point out that there are some disadvantages to this. 
It will be much more difficult to get back into the State plan once you have 
dropped it . 

He added that because the proposed plan is the same type of plan as used by 
SIU we probably have a pretty good chance of getting the State's $7.00 per 
month contribution for dependents. That will be applied for tomorrow, he said, 
after Board approval of the proposal. He said he has been given verbal assur- 
ance that there is a good likelihood that we will get it, but there is no guarantee. 

Dr. Crafts of JUAC said they wished to commend the Staff who had major 
responsibility for putting this together. The committee supports the Staff recom- 
mendation, she said, and members of JUAC have committed themselves to inform- 
ing their colleagues about the proposal and publicizing it through appropriate 
channels on each of the campuses. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 



25 



seconded by Mrs. Fitzpatrick and it carried unanimously. 

The Chairman thanked Dr. Brim for his presentation, adding that he is pleased 
that we are doing something which will benefit our employees. 

Section V - Revisions of Board Regulations on Financial Exigency 

To provide a little background information, Dr. Matsler said it would be remem- 
bered that a Board Committee on Financial Exigency Regulations was chaired by 
Mr. Murray during 1975 and came up with recommendations in 1976. There were 
many meetings with faculty and staff, and the whole issue was discussed in 
public session on a number of occasions prior to the actual adoption of the Regu- 
lations. Campus procedures were developed after the Board adopted its Regula- 
tions, and these procedures really have not had much review or scrutiny until 
recently when Legal Counsel noted a number of inconsistencies with the Board 
Regulations. He brought this to the attention of the Board in May and in June, 
after reviewing them a little further, the Board agreed that the campus procedures 
should be declared inoperative, and decided that this would be a good time to 
review our own Regulations and change them if, indeed, they need revision. 

When Board Regulations were reviewed, it was found that there is not much 
need for revision, Dr. Matsler said, and as a matter of fact it may very well 
be that the campus procedures are not as important now as they would be at 
some later date, because we do not know yet whether or not there will be a 
financial exigency. However, we do want to have some kind of a properly 
constituted committee set up. 

What Staff is presenting today, Dr. Matsler said, are some rather minor changes, 
although several of them might be said to be substantive. These are presented 
for first reading, and there will be plenty of time for suggested changes to be 
submitted because the Regulations will not be presented for action by the Board 
until the September meeting. 

Dr. Matsler said he believes that each of the proposed changes has been pretty 
well discussed in the presentation presented by Dr. Groves in the Executive 
Director's Report, and he would briefly review them and if there were questions 
either he or Dr. Groves would attempt to respond. 

With respect to the proposed amendment of III. A. 14. f (Personnel Reduction Pro- 
cedures), Dr. Crafts stated that the Joint University Advisory Committee requests 
that the last paragraph, which has been deleted, be reinstated: "The President 
shall inform the Board of any such action and provide a full explanation of the 
reasons for it . The Financial Exigency Committee shall be provided an opportunity 
to indicate whether it supports or opposes the action of the President." 

Ms. Burns said she suspects that this would take place as a matter of course, 
and putting it back in would be just a formality. Mr. Murray said just on the 
surface he would see no problem with reinstating this language, but he asked if 
either Dr. Matsler or the Presidents wished to comment on this. Dr. Matsler said 
he agreed with Ms. Burns that it almost goes without saying that the communica- 
tions would be such that the committee would be talking with the president and 
the faculty senate, and it would seem a little like adding in something that isn't 
necessary. He asked Dr. Groves if he had any problem with the reinstatement. 
Dr. Groves said the only concern he would have is the matter of timing. It is 
somewhat difficult to convene a Board on very short notice, and if this were 



26 



read in any sense to provide for an automatic report back, clearance by the 
university administration of the procedures which were adopted that deal with 
financial exigency, it might lend itself to a degree of delay which would be 
unfortunate. 

Dr. Wellbank said it does not appear to him that the presidents would be asking 
for approval, they would be informing the Board after the fact. It reads, 
"The President shall inform the Board of any such action . . .", which means 
that it has already taken place, and he does not think that time is of the essence 
if that is true. 

Ms. Burns said it could be by letter, although she is sure that if this were the 
situation, we would be in touch with each other. Mr. Murray said he does not 
see any problem with this at all. He believes such information to the Board 
would be in writing in any event and that the committee would undoubtedly 
express itself whether it agrees with the action of the President or not. In a 
way, he added, that might be a good way to smoke out the committee. 

President Monat said he does not believe it important to delete the paragraph. 
It is a given, obviously, that the president would report to the Board and to 
the entire university constituency on this. He also sees nothing wrong with 
having an opportunity for the advisory committee to have their day in court if 
they should disagree with what is being done. However, the President stressed 
that when such a situation does occur time becomes very critical. 

President Monat said he would like to make a comment on III. A. 14. n. (University 
Implementation) which reads: "The Universities shall adopt such additional 
policies, procedures and plans as are necessary to make campus governance 
and personnel review policies consistent with this regulation and to insure that 
a condition of financial exigency will be dealt with responsibly and effectively 
at the University level." It seems to him, the President said, that the Board 
Policy is "the policy" for the university. Basically what the university is ad- 
dressing are procedures for implementing Board Policy. He would urge that 
the Staff consider this language so that there is no confusion on really what 
is at issue. The existing Board Regulations define the policies that the univer- 
sities will implement. Then, the Chairman said, it might be advisable to delete 
the word "policies" from this paragraph. Dr. Matsler said he thinks that this 
could be omitted. President Watkins said he would also prefer that the word 
be deleted because it makes clearer the problem Mr. Winning saw occurring. 

Mr. Murray asked Dr. Matsler if he was willing to accept this deletion as well 
as the other change proposed by JUAC. Dr. Matsler replied in the affirmative. 

Dr. Crafts said she would ask the Board one question: what would the Board 
do when the universities have developed their procedures? Will it receive them, 
approve them, endorse them, or what? The committee feels that unless something 
along that line is done we will be right back to the same problem we had previousl; 
and they would request that this be stated in some way. Mr. Murray said he 
thought this was a good suggestion, and perhaps the Board should review them 
as soon as they are ready to go. 

Dr. Matsler said he would like to comment on this and perhaps the Presidents 
might also. The procedures which are developed, or the statements that the 
institutions will want to make, he should think would be quite simple and not 
too involved. He said what he thinks we need primarily - and perhaps Mr. Winnini 



27 



could better speak to this - is for the Board to be assured that there is an 
appropriate committee constituted by representatives of the various parts of 
the university, that there is no problem as to the identity of the particular 
committee, and that the Presidents will have good advice when and if a finan- 
cial exigency should occur. To go much beyond that in determining priority 
programs or anything like that, Dr. Matsler said he did not think that should 
be done at this time. It would be better simply not to go into too much detail 
at this time. 

Mr. Winning said he would certainly concur with that because it seems to him 
that we are certainly not going to be able to anticipate the kind of financial 
exigency we might have, and if we have the structure prepared to formulate 
the procedures to fit the problem, we are going to be better off than if we had 
procedures which do not fit the problem when it arrives. Mr. Winning said he 
thinks it has been the experience of universities where this has occurred that 
they have had to change the procedures to fit the situation, and in many cases 
they have not actually had the procedures and had to develop them as a result 
of the explosion. Just as a practical matter, he said, it seems that that might 
be a better way to do it. Mr. Winning said he suggests this as a possibility 
and he has no basic quarrel with the suggestion in terms of reporting to the 
Board , but he would return to the concern he expressed initially - and that is 
timing. 

President Monat said he would give a "for instance", one of which is provided 
for in the revised definition of what a financial exigency is. Suppose there is 
a mid-year recision , say, in the first week in December, and a recision is made 
in the university budget of X% becoming effective January 1. Time becomes a 
very compelling element in that environment. It may take the university several 
weeks to reach a common conclusion of how it is going about meeting the mid- 
year recision, and there is no Board meeting until the end of January. Dr. 
Monat said he was not inventing a horror situation - that could well happen. 

Just to clarify what she had said, Dr. Crafts said she thinks that the policies 
that were referred to from the universities were to be those more general in 
nature rather than highly specific. Dr. Monat said if that is the case, then he 
thought that would be no problem. They might be both policies and procedures, 
so he had some concern about deleting the word "policy" because of that. But 
again, he said, he thinks the existing Board Regulations and the revised recom- 
mendation establish the very broad policy parameters within which the universi- 
ties function in financial exigency conditions, and what the universities are 
about is really the task of implementing procedures within that broad policy 
framework. Dr. Monat said he may be hung up on words, but he believes 
that if we understand what we are talking about, then we really have no basic 
disagreement; and he suspects that they do not disagree. 

President Lacy said he understands what President Monat is saying and he also 
sees no fundamental difficulty for any procedure to bring a matter of this import- 
ance to the Board, but he also thinks it should be noted that this would be an 
exceptional step for this Board . Ordinarily the universities do not bring to the 
Board and the Board does not specifically approve procedures on other important 
matters within the university. This one may be of sufficient importance that 
the Board should do that, but it would be an exception to normal practice, Dr. 
Lacy noted. 

Dr. Robert Crowley was then recognized by the Chairman to read a statement 



28 



on behalf of The Sangamon Chapter, Local 4100, Sangamon State University. 
Dr. Crowley said in his opinion, while legally attractive, the proposed changes 
are anti- faculty and inimical to the special relationship that the Board has 
attempted to maintain between itself and the governed. He said he would call 
attention in particular to (1) the manner in which the policy is being developed; 

(2) the changes from previous Board policy that are being recommended; and 

(3) the lack of positive alternatives to layoff, as indicators of the anti-faculty 
bias in the proposal. 

Dr. Crowley concluded his statement with a request that on behalf of the 
members of his organization and of those other faculty who may disapprove of 
the proposed changes but who are not represented here today, there be included 
in the Board policy: (1) a verifiable definition of a financial exigency; (2) a guar 
antee that tenure status will be given primary significance in determination of 
faculty layoff; (3) relevant criteria for making decisions as to where faculty 
layoffs should occur; (4) at least 12 months notice of dismissal for all tenured 
and tenure-track faculty; and (5) proper due process protections. 

The Chairman asked Dr. Crowley what definition he would attach to financial 
exigency. How much clearer could it be made than what is being recommended? 
Dr. Crowley said he did not have the language with him. The Chairman furnished 
him with a copy of the proposed definition: "A financial exigency is a condition 
affecting a whole university during- -a- -single- fiscal -year. It will be considered 
to exist when (1) the State operating appropriation for a Regency University, 
adjusted for any mandated salary increments and for the impact of inflation on 
non-personal service costs and excluding retirement is or -ean- reasonably- -b-e-- 
expected to be less than that of the previous year after- -adjustments -have- been- 
made -for- the- impact- -of- inflation -en- all- -costs- except- those- for- personal- serviees 
or when the funds made available to operate a University are reduced in the 
course of a fiscal year below the level of the appropriation authorized by the 
Governor and General Assembly , and (2) this- when either type of reduction 
m -the -appropriation- -when- if evaluated in relation to the major program and 
service commitments of the University can reasonably be expected to require 
a reduction in the number of authorized faculty positions and the emergency 
layoff of tenure-track or tenured faculty." 

Dr. Crowley said he was commenting on during a single financial fiscal year 
in the definition, and as he understands it, the way the language reads now 
this could be called any time. Anything could be a financial exigency if we 
met the other two things. There is no definite time period. 

Dr. Matsler said that is the reason - it is very likely that something like this 
could happen. It has happened in other states where along about November or 
December the Governor suddenly finds that he has perhaps 10% less money than 
he thought he was going to have. You have to expect this, and this proposal 
is nothing more than a way in which we can really deal with an emergency 
situation . 

President Monat commented that he thought the proposed additions in the 
definitional paragraph really expand in ways that should be viewed favorably 
by faculty with the insertion of "tenure-track". Chairman Murray agreed, 
adding that the one change really made, to more clearly define when a finan- 
cial exigency exists, he thought was a real improvement. He said he was 
somewhat disappointed to find that Mr. Crowley does not interpret it in that 
way. 



29 



The Chairman asked if there were any further comments to be made. 

Dr. Crafts, referring to II I. A. 14. j. (Notification of Layoff or Termination) 
advised that JUAC would like the following inserted after the first sentence 
of the paragraph: "In addition those persons who have direct teaching respon- 
sibilities shall not be terminated until the end of the academic term , but in no 
event not less than 60 days." She said this suggestion is made because the 
committee thinks the approach should be less disruptive to the courses that the 
students are taking and, in fact, would allow us to retain a higher level of 
program quality. 

Mr. Murray said that sounds reasonable to him. He asked Dr. Matsler what 
his reaction would be to this. Dr. Matsler said he thinks perhaps this could 
be inserted, but he would like time to think about it some because of the real 
problem in case of a recision, in case there is suddenly a time when there 
just isn't enough money for the rest of the semester. He suggested that this 
could be discussed further when the matter comes up for final action in Septem- 
ber. 

Finally, Dr. Crafts said, with respect to III. A. 14. m. (Benefits for Laid Off 
Employees), JUAC feels that the constituencies they represent would be very, 
very concerned about that item. They would like to ask Staff to bring back 
to the Committee at the next meeting information pertaining to the retention 
of benefits for laid off employees for a period of time at least, with particular 
concern for health insurance. The discussion along that line was that someone 
who was laid off would have not much of a chance of getting a job and there- 
fore able to protect families. The Committee is not sure what the regulations 
are in the State pertaining to that, and they are asking Staff to investigate 
the problem with some intent of trying to provide for benefits at least for a 
period of time while the individual may scramble for other employment . 

That is a good suggestion, Mr. Murray said, and he thinks it would be good if 
Staff would try to define this . 

This has been discussed some in Staff, Dr. Matsler said, and it is his under- 
standing that once you are laid off benefits will also cease unless we make 
some kind of provision. What we can look into, he said, is whether we can 
somehow or other provide for a certain length of time when hospital benefits 
could be continued, but he believes this would have to be through a special 
arrangement. Is that correct, he asked Dr. Brim. 

Yes, Dr. Brim responded, there would have to be some changes made. 

Could this be done whereby it would not necessarily cost the universities any- 
thing, but the employee could continue the coverage, Mr. Murray asked? 
Dr. Brim said they can convert to direct coverage; they do have that option 
within a 30 day period. There is a specific statute on this. 

Mr. Murray suggested that the Staff give the Board a report on what exactly 
will happen to an employee who is laid off. 

Mr. Winning suggested they might want to examine one other phase, that is, 
some policies permit the continuation of the laid off employee in the group for 
a period of 6 months at their expense. This does not violate the statute. 



30 



Dr. Crafts said these are the kinds of things they would like some information 
about to see what the options are. 

Dr. Crafts said the Committee would like to thank Dr. Groves for his assist- 
ance in this very difficult area. In fact, Staff in every respect has been 
most helpful. 

Dr. Crafts asked if she understands correctly that this matter will come back 
to the Board in September. That is right, Mr. Murray said. And Staff will 
consider the Committee suggestion relative to Notification of Layoff or Termina- 
tion and also give a report on Benefits for Laid Off Employees, Dr. Crafts 
asked? Staff will consider the suggestions made by JUAC , Mr. Murray said, 
and will give us a report on the benefits. 

Section VI - FY 1984 Operating Budget Request Guidelines 

Before presenting the guidelines to the Board, Dr. Matsler asked Mrs. Fitzpatrick 
if she wished to make any further comment on the meeting of the Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick said she would only like to mention the good work done by 
Staff in terms of background information and the rationale for recommended 
guidelines to be used in preparing the FY84 operating budget request. She 
also informed the Board that after action had been taken on this section of 
the EDR she would have a resolution to present to the Board for consideration. 

Dr. Matsler summarized the proposed budgetary guidelines for the FY 84 increases 
in operations as follows : 

Salaries : 6.5% plus 4.5% recovery on a 97.5% base plus 

annualization of the FY 83 mid-year 3% salary 
increases . 

General Prices : 8% increase. 

Library Materials : 10% plus 5% catch-up increase for books 
and other library materials. 

Equipment : 8% increase. 

Utilities : 15% increase. Each university is documenting 

increases by fuel mix and supplier. 

Retirement : 22.049% of the personal services base for FY 84 

as established by the State Universities Retirement 
System . 

Staff recommends, Dr. Matsler said, that these guidelines be approved by 
the Board to be used by the Regency Universities in developing the FY 84 
operating budget request for submission to the Board of Higher Education. 

Referring to the requested salary increase percentages, Dr. Matsler said Staff 
feels that this is entirely defensible. Perhaps it might be considered optimis- 
tic, nevertheless, Staff has no problems with requesting an increase of this size 



31 



In response to a request from President Watkins for clarification of the 15% 
increase to be requested for utilities, Dr. Matsler explained this 15% figure was 
plugged in to give the Board some idea as to what the increase would be, how- 
ever, there will be the flexibility for each institution to document its own per- 
cent of increase needed. 

Mr. Murray asked if it might not be a little unrealistic, perhaps even a little 
crazy, to ask for a 11% salary increase with the prospects for the coming year. 
Dr. Matsler's response was that he thinks it would be a mistake for the Board 
to ask for anything less, and in fact it had been thought that the increase 
should have been based on perhaps some added percentages, particularly since 
we got less than we had thought we would effective this coming January. It 
turns out that we will actually be getting a little bit less an 3%. Dr. Matsler 
said if we compare our institutions with what the AAUP calls Category I institu- 
tions, we are now at about 11% below the mean salary level of those institutions. 
He said this Board has through the years had the goal of at least trying to get 
up to that mean salary level. Obviously, he said, we are going to be subject 
to the economy and it might very well be that it will not get turned around by 
next session; however, he still believes that this is an appropriate request. 

Mr. Murray said he must compliment Staff for the justification of the request 
and he agrees with that justification, but he still has doubts about going public 
with a 11% increase when we know they reserve that kind of an increase only 
for the judges. 

Dr. Wellbank said at the last meeting we asked Staff to take a look at the 
salary structure, and this should be a part of it. This 11% is for the pool, 
and not everyone would get 11% across the board. 

But on a 97.5% base it would probably turn out to be more than that, Mr. Murray 
said. 

President Watkins disagreed, explaining that while 97.5% is more realistic in terms 
of a base, it still is not a totally realistic base. They did a study at ISU, he 
noted, and found that their turnover savings amounted to less than one-tenth 
of one percent of the total personnel budget. What we would have here, the 
President said, if it were possible to gain a 97.5% base would be a minimizing 
of the damage that a 95% or a 90% base does. These concepts of turnover which 
seem to be engained somehow in the thinking of Illinois are simply no longer very 
realistic, the President said. There are several reasons why this is so. First, 
every time we lose people in certain areas we hire replacement as cheaply as we 
can , but still have to pay them more than the person who left . It is simply a 
matter of musical chairs in certain areas. Secondly, the President said, suppose 
a full professor retires and leaves the institution. He takes with him legally 
mandated payouts with regard to vacation time and other things, and this 
totally knocks into a cocked hat the supposed savings that are accrued. They 
know that their turnover savings amount to less than one-tenth of one percent. 

President Lacy added that another new factor is in the cards now - we are 
probably going to have to take early retirement payments out of operating per- 
sonnel dollars. Secondly, in an economic situation as tight as what we are now 
in employees tend to accumulate their benefits more deliberately. They tend to 
watch vacation time and to accumulate the maximum as a safety valve. That 
may not be good personnel policy and it may be that we should discourage it 



32 



and have the employees take the vacations they need. We are facing a situation 
where a 97.5% figure or even a 100% figure is not going to truly reflect the cost 
that we have in the personnel system. 

Dr. Crafts said the Joint University Advisory Committee appreciates the fact 
that the Board has added a catch-up as part of the salary increase, even though 
they feel it is not adequate to truly allow us to catch up, Dr. Crafts asked if 
Dr. Gorrell of the Staff would bring back to the JUAC at the next meeting some 
information which would clarify the catch-up and regular increment ideas, based 
upon a number of ideas that were raised in the discussion today. 

Ms. Burns said her concern is what position it leaves us in to follow a strategy 
of asking for recovery money under the present economic conditions. She would 
rather more straightforwardly go in and ask for a percentage increase with no 
talk about recovery - in other words develop what we feel we need next year, 
what, we feel we are worth next year. She thinks that would be a more straight- 
forward way of dealing with it, and then we don't have the problem of the 
backup we might have if we go in with these extra numbers. 

President Monat pointed out that the Board of Higher Education really fought 
the concept of redressing a decade of erosion in faculty salaries with the catch- 
up concept. It took them a long time to come to that, and this Board was very 
instrumental in convincing the BHE that the catch-up concept made sense. For 
two years now, at least in the initial recommendations of the BHE, the catch-up 
concept was built into their recommendations. This past year it was 8% plus 2% 
catch-up. Dr. Monat said he would not like to see us back away from that 
concept since it took such a long time to sell it. 

As a matter of fact, Mr. Murray said, that was the strategy of the judges and 
it seemed to work. 

Ms. Burns said if everyone thinks that with the economy worsening this will 
continue to be good strategy, then it is fine in her opinion. She just wanted 
to see what the feeling of everyone was . 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick then moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The 
motion was seconded by Ms. Burns and it carried unanimously. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick was then recognized to present the following Resolution for 
consideration by the Board. 

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents recognizes the status of the 
federal and state economy ; and 

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents also recognizes that faculty 
salaries have suffered in part because of our recessionary economy ; 
and 

WHEREAS , the Board of Regents further recognizes that many 
dependent children of faculty and staff may not be able to attend 
higher education without outside financial assistance; 

NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved that the Board of Regents 
direct the staff to explore the possibility of providing a statewide 
tuition waiver policy with the Board of Higher Education and report 



33 



on the progress of that exploration at its October meeting. 

This would be for a statewide tuition waiver policy, asked Mr. Murray? Yes, 
Mrs. Fitzpatrick, for dependent children of faculty and staff. 

Dr. Matsler said he would be glad to explore this with the Board of Higher 
Education. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick moved for adoption of the Resolution. The motion was seconded 
by Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VII - Regency System Liability Insurance 

In August of 1981, Dr. Matsler said, the Board approved the bid of Estergard, 
Eberhardt, and Ackerman , Inc., Champaign, Illinois for a Regency System lia- 
bility insurance package. The insurance policies included in the package 
cover a three year period which commenced September 1, 1981. 

Staff recommends, he said, that the Board approve continuation of the liability 
insurance coverage for the second year of the three-year period covered by 
the original bids. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Mrs. Fitzpatrick and it carried unanimously. 

Section VIII - Grants and Contracts 

Dr. Matsler said Staff is recommending Board approval of two contracts. The 
first is a contract with the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts to allow 
Sangamon State University to provide in-service training to probation officers and 
detention workers. Under authority provided by Board Regulations, this contract 
was approved on a preliminary basis by the Executive Director because the Uni- 
versity had to accept the contract prior to the Board meeting, and Staff is 
recommending that the Board ratify this approval. 

The second contract is one for which Northern Illinois University is seeking 
approval. This is a contract with the State Board of Education --Division of 
Adult , Vocational , and Technical Education for operation of an Adult Education 
Service Center for the northern region of the State including Chicago and its 
suburbs. 

Mr. Riss moved for approval of both contracts as recommended. The motion 
was seconded by Ms. Simpson, and it carried unanimously. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Northern Illinois University - President's Report 

Dr. Monat said before presenting his Report he would call to the attention of 
the Board the summer commencement exercises at NIU on Saturday, August 14, 
and urge all members who could to attend. 



34 



President Monat distributed copies of three Addenda to his Report : Faculty 
Appendix; Purchases Appendix; and Capital Improvement Projects - Contract 
Approvals. He also asked that on page 21 of the Faculty Appendix a correction 
be made to show the correct monthly salary of Donald E. Luman as $2185. 

Information reports were presented on: 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Summer 1982 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall 1982 

Degrees Granted December 1981 and May 1982 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes and Studies) 

Gifts to Northern Illinois University 

International Programs Expenditures 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board: 

1. The University Academic Calendar for 1983-84. 

2. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees, including 
recommendations for faculty and twelve month salaries for 1982-83. 

A list of all reported transactions is appended to the President's Report 
and will be kept on file at the university and in the Central Office. 

3. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report. 

4. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Emergency Steam Line Replacement -Gabel Hall to Reavis Hall 

and Manhole South of Field House to Gabel Hall 

In June the Board authorized the University to engage an engineerii 
firm to prepare plans and specifications, advertise and receive 
bids for the emergency steam line replacement. In addition, the 
Board authorized the University to award contracts to the low, 
responsible bidders after consultation with Board Staff. The 
following contracts have been awarded: 

General Construction 

Mike Long Construction, DeKalb - $212,000 

Heating 

Nelson Piping, Rock ford - $10 3,408 

Board ratification was requested of the contracts awarded and 
also that the budget for the project be established as follows: 

General Construction $212,000.00 

Heating 103,408.00 

Total Construction $315,408.00 

Engineering Fee (10.6%) 33,433.00 

Engineering Fee (allowance for 

supervision) 4,500.00 

TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET $353,341.00 



35 



(b) Swen P arson Hall - Repair Roof on South Wing an d Center Section 
Bids received by the Capital Development Board were presented 
with a recommendation that the Board concur in the recommendation 
by the University that a contract be awarded to American Roofing, 
West Chicago, in the amount of $125,416.00; and approve the 
expenditure of $60,000 as the University's share of the total 
project cost. 

(c) Visual Arts Building - Correction of Ventilating Deficiencies 

A tabulations of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bids be accepted and contracts awarded as 
follows : 

General Construction 

Irving Construction Company, $14,200.00 

DeKalb, IL 

Electrical 

Jay Ward Electric, DeKalb, IL $ 6,007.00 

Heating 

Kallal's Sheet Metal, DeKalb, IL $12,494.00 

Plumbing 

G's & R Plumbing, DeKalb, IL $ 8,106.00 

Ventilating 

Kallal's Sheet Metal, DeKalb, IL $27,618.00 

and that the budget for the project be established as follows: 

General $14,200.00 

Electrical 6,007.00 

Heating 12,494.00 

Plumbing 8,106.00 

Ventilating 27,618.00 

Total Construction $68,425.00 



Contingency 3,475.00 

TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET $71,900.00 



(d) Resurfacing of Parking Lot "F" 

The single bid received on this project was presented with a 

recommendation that the bid be accepted and a contract awarded 

to Stahl Construction Company, DeKalb, in the amount of $31,603.35 

(e) Resurfacing of Parking Lot 21 

The only bid received on this project was presented with a recom- 
mendation that the bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Stahl Construction Company, DeKalb, in the amount of $12,820.04. 

Commenting on his Report , President Monat said he wished to highlight the 
appointment of Felix M. Padilla as the new Director of the Center for Latino 
and Latin American Affairs, and William Williams as Interim Director of the 
University Libraries. 



36 



Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern 
Illinois University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank. 

At the request of Mr. Parker, President Monat provided a further explanation 
relative to the requested purchase of a Mini- Computer for Geology. 

Chairman Murray said he would take this opportunity to report that the Law 
School at Northern has received word that the American Bar Association is 
going to recommend full accreditation one year early. This is due in no 
small part, he said, to the efforts of both the President and Dean Strickman. 
Both have dedicated body and soul to the excellence of the Law School, Mr. 
Murray noted, and he would like the congratulations of the Board to be 
included in approval of the President's Report. 

President Monat said he appreciates this statement by the Chairman. In exchange 
he would say that if it had not been for the constant and continuing support of 
this Board they never would have gotten there. 

It is quite an achievement, Mr. Murray said, and when he attends the ABA 
meeting in August it will be with a lot of pleasure that he will be able to vote 
on approval of the recommendation for accreditation. 

The question before the Board was called for a vote, and the motion carried 
unanimously. 

Sangamon State University - President's Report 

Before submitted his Report to the Board, President Lacy distributed copies 
of an Addendum to the section on Faculty and Administrative Staff and Civil 
Service Employees. He also noted that Dr. Stuart Anderson was now present 
in the audience, and he asked him to stand to be recognized by the Board. 
The President had earlier reported on Dr. Anderson's retirement from the uni- 
versity. 

Information reports were presented on : 

Degrees Awarded Fall 1981 and Spring 1982 

Grants and Contracts 

Report of Faculty Receiving More than 100% of Salary for the 

1982 Spring Semester 
Capital Improvement Projects 

The following items were then presented for action by the Board: 

1. The proposed Academic Calendar for the 1983-84 Academic Year and the 
1984 Summer Session. 

2. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative and civil service 
employees, which also included recommended salaries for FY 83. A 
list of all reported transactions is appended to the President's Report 
and will be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

3. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report. 



37 



Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked President Lacy is he could furnish a little more detail 
relative to the contribution by the university to the project for A Community 
Needs Analysis for United Way of Sangamon County sponsored by United Way 
of Sangamon County. The President said this is a fairly common thing. The 
university does have an equity question as to how it uses its public affairs money 
in that through its existence as an institution most of these monies have been 
used to conduct work with major interest to state agencies. Those agencies 
pay a very high percentage of the indirect costs that the institution incurs. 
More recently, Dr. Lacy said, they have come to believe that it was the proper 
public policy for the institution to also give greater attention to the needs of 
local agencies. They have tried to follow about the same policy for local agencies 
as they have followed with the state agencies, namely that they try to collect 
direct costs and do not try to collect the full indirect costs of the operation. 
So, he said, in most of the figures showing the SSU contribution, the figure 
reflects something less than 100% recovery of indirect costs. Ordinarily it does 
not reflect any cash output on the part of the institution, and in this case the 
SSU contribution does not represent any cash output. 

Mr. Riss moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon State 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Mrs. Fitzpatrick, and it 
carried, with Mr. Parker abstaining. 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

President Watkins said he knows that he also speaks for Presidents Lacy and 
Monat when he says that none of them would have been comfortable had the 
Board taken any other action on presidents' salaries than it did. They are 
going to have to be in the trenches with the people who work at the institutions 
and they are not going to receive salary increases, then he thinks none of the 
presidents would have been comfortable had they received an increase. They 
do not feel that they should be treated any differently. 

President Watkins distributed copies of an Addendum to his Report (Non-Recurring 
Items: Contract with Town of Normal). 

Information reports were presented on : 

Degrees Awarded December 1981 and May 1982 (as corrected on p. 7) 

Bond Redemptions 

Capital Improvement Projects 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board : 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and civil 
service employees, including salary recommendations for FY 83. A list 
of all reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and 
will be kept on file at the university and in the Central Office . 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report. 

3. The proposed 1983-84 Academic Calendar. 

4. Capital Improvements Projects 



38 



(a) Trash Chute Sprinkler Systems in South and West Campus 

Residence Halls 

Permission was requested to engage the firm of Brown, Davis, 
Mullins & Associates, Consulting Engineers, of Champaign, Illinois, 
to prepare bid documents and receive bids for installation of 
sprinkler systems in the 7 existing trash chutes. 

5. Permission was requested to contract with the Town of Normal for 

improving and resurfacing a portion of University Street between 
College Avenue and Dry Grove Street. The cost of the project is 
not to exceed $30,000 

Referring to the contract with the Town of Normal, President Watkins advised 
that this would provide a left-turn lane on University Street at the intersection. 
This is important because there is a bad traffic bottleneck there. The Town, 
at the request of the university really, is undertaking the whole resurfacing 
of several blocks of streets , and since the university requested this they feel 
they should pay for it . 

Dr. Watkins said he wished to take special note of the retirement of Dr. 
Charles Hicklin who has served Illinois State University and the Board in a 
variety of capacities. He has been a veteran and an excellent faculty member. 
The President said the Board would note a number of resignations of faculty 
and while he would not talk about individuals, he would simply say that included 
in this list are some of the people who were the best. This, he believes, high- 
lights more than anything else the problem. The very able people who are 
leaving are going to be very hard to replace. In most instances, he said, they 
are leaving because they got offers they could not refuse. Dr. Watkins said 
he would hate to see this sort of thing continue into the future if we can do 
anything about it. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois State 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Burns, and it carried 
unanimously. 

Mr. Murray said he would make just one comment to add to what President Wat- 
kins said about salaries. In all seriousness, he said, the one thing that having 
served on this Board has done for him is to give an appreciation to him for the 
dedication of faculty, administrators and others who work at the universities. 
As a trustee, he said it is disappointing that we cannot recognize competitively 
certainly what these people are worth. He said he appreciates the President's 
comments, and he and other members of the Board are concerned that we can't 
continue salaries in a competitive manner. However, we do hope for better days. 

There being no further business before the Board, on motion duly made and 
seconded the meeting was declared adjourned. The next regularly scheduled 
meeting of the Board will be held on September 23, 1982 at Northern Illinois 
University, DeKalb , Illinois. 



David E. Murray 
Chairman 

Franklin G . Matsler 
Secretary 



39 



Minutes of the Meeting of the 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Northern Illinois University - DeKalb , Illinois 

September 23, 1982 

The regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 9:00 a.m. 
on September 23, 1982 in the Sky Room of the Holmes Student Center at Northern 
Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois. Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman, presided. 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, roll was called, and the 
following Regents were present: 

Mr. Jerome R. Bender Ms. Denise Orchowski 

Ms. Carol K. Burns Mr. D. Brewster Parker 

Mrs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick Mr. Harold Riss 

Mr. Montel Gayles Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 

Mr. L. Milton McClure Mr. James L. Wright 

Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman 

Also present were: 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy. President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Leon Boothe, Vice President and Provost, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 

Representing the Joint University Advisory Committee were: Ms. Linda Andrejek, 
Dr. Virginia Crafts, Dr. Thomas Eimermann , Mr. Leon Toepke , Mr. Joe Koch, 
Dr. James Lankford, Dr. Annette Lefkowitz, Dr. Tony Scaperlanda, Dr. Jerry 
Meyer, Ms. Irene Allsop , Mr. George Gruendel and Dr. Jack VanDerSlik. 

Others in attendance included staff from the Regency Universities and the 
Central Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the Board; 
and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Mr. Parker moved that the Board recess to hold an Executive Session to discuss 
land acquisition, land use, and certain personnel matters. The motion was 
seconded by Mr. Gayles, and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public meeting at 11:15 a.m. 

Mr. Murray noted that today is one of the few times in his recollection that 
we have had perfect attendance at a Board meeting. He said that he under- 
stands that Ms. Jan Simpson has resigned as student Regent from Sangamon 
State University and that there is a new election in process. 

MINUTES OF JULY 22, 1982 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the meeting 
held on July 22, 1982, and he asked if there were any additions or corrections 
to be proposed. 



40 



Dr. Matsler said that Illinois State University had requested one insertion in 
the minutes to reflect a correction in the ISU President's Report for July: 
on page 7 a correction should be made under College of Education to indicate 
that 9 masters degrees had been awarded on May 8, rather than none. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick pointed out that several members of the Board were lacking 
pages 3 and 4 in their copies of the minutes, and Dr. Matsler advised that 
replacement copies would be forwarded. 

Mr. Parker then moved that the minutes be approved as amended and subject 
to a review of the missing pages. Ms. Burns seconded the motion, and it 
carried unanimously. 

CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 

Mr. Murray said that everyone was saddened to learn of Dr. Watkins' eye surgery 
however, they understand that things are going well and everyone wishes him 
a speedy recovery. He asked Dr. Boothe if he would bring everyone uptodate 
on the President's condition. Dr. Boothe said the President is hopeful that he 
will be allowed to go home by the end of the week. The doctors are quite opti- 
mistic that the surgery performed to date will be successful. The President 
will, however, have to remain isolated from university business for another couple 
of weeks, if all goes as originally projected. 

Mr. Murray announced that some additional committee assignments have now been 
made, and he then read the membership of each of the Board's committees. He 
said if anyone is unhappy or wished to have his or her assignments changed, 
the Chairman should be so advised. 

Executive Committee: Mr. Murray, Ms. Burns, Dr. Wellbank, Dr. Matsler 
Facilities Committee : Ms. Burns, Chair, Mr. Riss, Mr. Wright, Mr. Parker 

Mr. Gayles , Mr. Beahringer (staff) 
Program Committee : Mr. Parker, Chair, Mrs. Fitzpatrick, Ms. Burns, 

Dr. Wellbank, Mr. Gayles, Dr. Groves (staff 
Finance Committee : Mrs. Fitzpatrick, Chair, Mr. McClure, Ms. Orchowski, 

Mr. Riss, Mr. Wright, Dr. Brim (staff) 
Personnel Committee: Dr. Wellbank, Chair, Ms. Orchowski, Ms. Burns, 

Mr. Bender, Mr. Wright, Dr. Matsler (staff) 
Audit Committee : Mr. Murray, Chair, Ms. Burns, Mr. Parker, Mr. McClur 

Dr. Matsler, Dr. Brim, Mr. Beahringer (staf 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Board of Higher Education Meeting 

Mr. Murray said neither he nor Ms. Burns had been able to attend the last 
meeting of the Board of Higher Education. Mr. Parker agreed to represent the 
Board of Regents at the meeting, and he asked him to report on the actions of 
the BHE. 

Mr. Parker reported that the BHE did take some action on one matter which 
does not really affect the Regency System - the staff recommendations relative 
to medical education . This centered primarily around the problem of minority 
students as well as retaining graduates as practicing physicians in Illinois. 



41 



The BHE also took action on the report to study off-campus programs, which 
has been an ongoing matter. Ms. Burns is a member of that committee, Mr. 
Parker said, and she will be happy to know that they will continue to have 
further meetings throughout the year. Generally, he said, the action was the 
result of a considerable amount of discussion and hearings providing ways in 
which new programs offered off-campus can be coordinated so that duplication 
is minimized. Although private institutions do not have to undergo the same 
procedures in getting approval for off-campus programs, it is the intention of 
the committee to urge that legislation be changed so that the BHE staff will 
have some authority over private universities and their program requests. 

Dr. Wagner established a new committee, Mr. Parker reported, which he thinks 
will be of special interest to the Regency Universities. It will be very important 
to the whole State of Illinois. The committee is being established to study high 
tech and economic development in Illinois and will consist of industrialists from 
various parts of the State, and it is hoped that the universities will be able to 
cooperate in working toward establishing high tech industry in various oarts of 
Illinois. He said that he certainly hopes that NIU, ISU and SSU will be able 
to take part in that study and that we have adequate representation from our 
universities. 

Mr. Murray said he would depart from the Agenda for a moment to report 
generally on what was done in the executive session of the Board. He said he 
apologizes for keeping everyone waiting for so long for the public session to 
resume, but the Board did have some important matters to discuss and took 
appropriate actions. There was a land acquisition matter at Illinois State, a 
land use matter at Sangamon State, and the Board also had a lengthy discussion 
of the goals of President Monat and evaluated his performance. The Board also 
discussed certain personnel matters at Sangamon State University. As to the 
evaluation of the President of NIU, Mr. Murray said the Board is reassured 
by the leadership demonstrated by Dr. Monat. They all share his concerns for 
adequate funding and adequate salaries in the future, and share with him the 
challenges that face him and the university in the future. The Board also 
shares in the successes and achievements, particularly the accreditation record 
the university has established in the past year. The Board feels very confident 
in his leadership abilities in the coming years, it is pleased with the job Dr. 
Monat has done as President, and with the stature that Northern Illinois Uni- 
versity has attained under his leadership. 

Mr. Murray said he would be remiss if he did not thank the people at the 
social science research center for last evening's activities. The Board was 
very pleased with the improvements which have been made in the Rice Hotel and 
it was delighted that everyone in the center seems pleased with the improvements 
and with the fact that the center is now together in one location. Mr. Murray 
said we can publicly thank and commend Mr. Rosenow for the job he has done, 
and the attractive and functional way the building has been completed. The 
Board is pleased that the university apparently got a nice facility at a reasonable 
price, the City of DeKalb benefits in some downtown restoration and activity, 
and he assumes that Mr. Rosenow in addition to his contribution on our behalf 
is satisfied with his investment. It looks like a good deal for all parties. 

Returning to the Agenda, the Chairman called for the report of the Facilities 
Committee. 



42 



Facilities Committee 

Ms. Burns said a more complete report on the meeting of the committee would 
be made in conjunction with the Executive Director's Report. The bulk of the 
committee's discussion was concerned with the FY84 capital budget request which 
is detailed in the EDR , and a system -wide priority list which Staff has put to- 
gether and which the committee will recommend for approval to the Board. 

Executive Committee 

Mr. Murray reported that because no regular meeting of the Board was scheduled 
during the month of August, the Executive Committee did meet. In addition to 
himself, Ms. Burns and Dr. Matsler attended the meeting, but Dr. Wellbank was 
unable to be present. The agenda consisted of the items which had been submitte 
by the Presidents. All of the Illinois State matters were approved by the Commit- 
tee. All of the items submitted by NIU were approved with the exception of the 
request for purchase of computer equipment and related equipment for the Psychol 
ogy Department, which was deferred. At Sangamon State, the Committee raised 
a couple of questions with regard to personnel matters. This was taken care of 
in Executive Session this morning, Mr. Murray reported, and will be discussed 
further when the President's Report is under consideration today. 

Finance Committee 

The Committee met on Wednesday, Mrs. Fitzpatrick reported, and considered 
several items, the most important of which was the operating request for FY 84. 
The percentages on pages 31-39 of the Executive Director's Report were dis- 
cussed at length by the Committee, as well as the advisability, in this kind of 
economy, of asking for at least a part of what we need. The Committee discussed 
the salary increase that we are requesting, knowing perhaps that we won't get 
all of it, but the Committee thought it prudent to put out on the table exactly 
what our institutions need in order to continue to operate at a level of excellence. 
What is seen in the Executive Director's Report, Mrs. Fitzpatrick said, is what 
the Committee recommends that we request from the IBHE. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick said a second item discussed in Finance Committee was the 
dependent health insurance program, and she is pleased to report that CNA has 
accepted us, and some faculty and staff will begin participation on October 1st. 

Dr. Brim added that the enrollment period is being extended through the end of 
October, so that those faculty and staff who are interested in joining but did not 
get signed up yet can have the effective date of November 1st. Quite frankly, 
Dr. Brim said, he had been quite discouraged about the possibility of having 
this program go because the enrollments were not coming anywhere close to the 
70% that was specified in CNA's proposal. Actually, he said, on Monday of this 
week we had a little over 700 participants signed up , which is only slightly over 
30% of those eligible. CNA has said that because of the timing and the pattern 
of enrollments they believe that if enrollments are extended another month , and 
as turnover occurs, we will gradually reach 70%, and they are willing to accept 
us. Dr. Brim said this pleases him because he feels that this is a very viable 
alternative to the State health plan, and perhaps it will be even more attractive 
in the future, depending upon what the rate changes are for the State plan. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick said the Committee also reviewed the revisions for procurement 



43 



and bidding, which will be an action item in the Executive Director's Report. 
The Committee recommends approval of this item. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick also reported that the Committee received from Mr. Winning- a 
resolution providing for the application of certain surplus bond revenues estab- 
lished pursuant to bond indentures heretofore adopted by the Board of Regents 
or its predecessor entities, for improvements at Illinois State University. She 
said this resolution would be presented to the entire Board for consideration in 
conjunction with the President's Report for Illinois State University. Dr. Matsler 
added that the item in the ISU Report relative to the purchase of bonds would 
then be changed to an action item. 

State Universities Retirement System 

Mr. Bender took note of the fourth draft of the JUAC report on the State Uni- 
versities Retirement System, stating that considerable work has been done on this 
document which has now been presented to the Personnel Directors Advisory Com- 
mittee. Dr. Floyd did an extremely good report, Mr. Bender said, and he under- 
stands that this has been delivered to the universities and to the members of 
JUAC. Mr. Bender said he did take exception to the last paragraph. First of 
all, he said, he felt - but this was only his opinion - that this was not Dr. 
Floyd's ooinion, but that there was some direction given to her. He said he does 
not feel this is necessary at this time, but that is merely his opinion. However, 
he said, he thinks the report is an excellent one. 

Dr. Brim was a great help, Mr. Bender continued, in putting together a paper 
which was presented to the Personnel Directors Advisory Committee, and they 
are taking it back to their campuses. Mr. Barber from the annuitants group 
attended this meeting as well as Mr. Hoffmeister of SURS, and the paper was 
very well received. He said the paper has also been given to Dr. Crafts of 
JUAC, and it will be delivered to other groups as well. He said his whole 
thrust in this is that the only way we can correct the situation is at the ballot 
box, and he would hope that the people involved in and interested in the State 
Universities Retirement System's problems - which are considerable - will find 
out from the people who represent them in the House and in the Senate, and 
from the Governor, exactly how they stand on this issue. The system is actu- 
arially unsound and for two years in a row has been tremendously underfunded; 
and there is no indication that this could not happen again. If those involved 
in SURS do not become a large voting majority, then they have only themselves 
to blame, Mr. Bender said. 

Dr. Matsler said that he for one truly appreciates the work that Mr. Bender 
has done on behalf of the faculty and staffs of the Regency Universities in 
the area of the retirement system. He is probably now the most knowledgeable 
of the members on that committee. He has some ideas as to how we might be 
able to rectify the situation we are in. It is very complicated, Dr. Matsler 
said, and Mr. Bender has only outlined it very sketchily to him. The situation 
is not going to be solved quickly, but it will be solved if we can get the parti- 
cipation of the faculty and staffs of not only our own institutions, but others 
as well. 

Mr. Murray said he wished to compliment Dr. Floyd on preparation of the docu- 
ment. He said he has seen terms such as "gross payout" and "net payout", 
and he asked if someone could explain the difference between the unfunded 



44 



accrued liability and the total accrued liability. How are these figures deter- 
mined, he asked? 

Basically, Dr. Brim said, what the actuaries at the retirement system will be 
doing when they calculate these is to take the present individuals who are in 
the system and how much commitment has been made in terms of years of ser- 
vice, salaries, etc., and how much they would have to pay out if all of the indi- 
viduals were to receive their benefits. They then determine basically how much 
money they have on hand, including employers' contributions - which from the Stat 
is very small although federal grants and others pay the full cost - and the inte- 
rest that has been earned. The difference, really, between the amount of money 
they have on hand and the accrued liabilities is the unfunded amount. This is 
the amount the State ultimately owes. These figures change from time to time, 
Dr. Brim said, not only because the number of participating employees changes, 
but also as the actuaries use different assumptions. For 1981 the unfunded 
liabilities jumped rather tremendously over the previous year. That was because 
the actuaries revised their estimates of the long term average salary raise and 
interest rates. When they revised this the unfunded liability amount and the 
total liability amount changed. It can change either way, depending on how the 
rate changes are made. Frankly, Dr. Brim said, in his opinion they do not need 
to have all of the unfunded liability because there are many people who will never 
use the State's share, for example, they might quit and withdraw their money. 
Many actuaries have said that for most public pension systems perhaps 67% is a 
rough rule of thumb as a very good actuarial level for the pension system to be 
in, depending on turnover and dropout rate. Our system, however, is currently 
quite a bit below the 50% level, and actuaries consider anything below about 60% 
as really getting quite dangerous. While we do not need to have 100% funding, 
we do need much better funding than what we have had over the last 10 or 15 
years. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Dr. Virginia Crafts, chairperson, introduced to the Board Dr. George Gruendel 
who serves as vice chair of JUAC, and Dr. Tony Scaperlanda, a new member of 
the committee from Northern Illinois University. 

Dr. Crafts said she wished to comment on two items now and then ask to be 
recognized when Sec III of the EDR was presented. As to the State Universities 
Retirement System, Dr. Crafts said the committee spent a considerable amount of 
time last evening discussing, reviewing and editing the fourth draft of the back- 
ground paper prepared by Dr. Floyd. She said she knows Mr. Bender would 
be pleased to know that the committee deleted from the paper everything following 
the sentence: "Such a PAC would need to carefully develop a strategy for getting 
the legislative and gubernatorial support necessary for funding increases for SURS 
and the other state retirement systems." 

The Joint University Advisory Committee, she said, does plan to review the docu- 
ment again and hopes it will be reviewed by other key groups. They then have 
plans for distribution of the finalized copies to the different university campuses. 
They request a Board Staff member be assigned to help expedite that plan. 

Dr. Crafts said it also seems important that the document not be distributed 
widely until there is a finalized form. If those who presently have copies of the 
draft would refrain from distributing it and work with their representatives on 
JUAC, we can insure that there is only one copy which gets out. 



45 



With regard to the salary increases that are planned for January 1983, Dr. 
Crafts said the committee understands that there were some guidelines for the 
salary increase made in January of 1982, and they therefore assume that there 
will be guidelines for the January 1983 increases, and they request that these 
be distributed to JUAC before their next meeting. 

President Monat noted that the presidents apparently did not receive a copy 
of the draft report which is under discussion. Dr. Crafts said it is in the 
process of being refined which is why it has not been distributed as yet, and 
the committee does not think it should be floating around in its fourth draft. 
When the final document is prepared it will be shared at that point. 

SPECIAL REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Illinois Educational Consortium 

Dr. Matsler said there had been distributed to the Board a report prepared by 
the campuses, together with Dr. Gorrell and the staff of IEC. This is not an 
action item for the Board today, he said, 

The term "onslaught of the computer age" has almost become a cliche, Dr. 
Matsler said, and we have heard it compared with even the Industrial Revolution. 
The realities of this will become so very soon. Our System spends about $6.5 
million a year on computers and related activities, he said, which are easily 
defined. It is probably more than that. With the very rapid proliferation of 
the microcomputers, we think that this figure will rise even further. This 
report divides the uses of the computer, the two general categories, one of 
which is academic and the other is administrative. It gives us an inventory of 
the mainframe hardware at our institutions and gives a summary of the budgets 
that we use in the three computer centers. It also gives a short description of 
how the Illinois Educational Consortium fits in with the higher education community 
generally. It will be remembered that the IEC is a consortium of all of the public 
universities in the State of Illinois, working together with a shared network 
called ECN, which is headquartered down in Edwardsville and which has a huge 
computer, a CYBER, which many faculty on all of our three campuses work with. 
There are funding problems with this organization, Dr. Matsler said, and Staff 
will be bringing back to the Board these problems to share and to make decisions 
on later. He said he does hope that all members of the Board will look over 
this report to get an idea of what our institutions are doing, and he would at 
a later date bring back a further analysis of the whole problem. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 134 

Section I - Status Report: Appropriations for FY83 Higher Education Operations 
and Grants 

This section, Dr. Matsler said, simply summarizes the current budget that we 
are living with today, and tells us, summarily, how we are doing. It will be 
seen that we have a total of $1.5 million to finance a 3% mid-year salary increase 
for faculty and staff. It could be a little more or a little less for some. Some 
may not get any increase because our Board regulations state that salary increases 
will be allocated on the basis of merit. We also have funding in the amount of $.9 
million to annualize the mid-year salary increase granted for FY 82. We have 
funding of $1 million or 80% of the projected utility costs, which means that the 
remaining 20% will have to come from other lines during the current year. We 



46 



have an allocation of $1.3 million in revenue from tuition increases above the 
10% which was allocated by the BHE, Dr. Matsler said. We also took some decre- 
ments, however: $1.7 million or 1£% in the Personal Services line, and $1.2 
million to improve what the BHE calls an improvement in productivity. It is simpl; 
another base cut to our budgets. 

Table 1 of the Report shows the amounts given to all segments of higher educa- 
tion, Dr. Matsler said, with the percents of increase or decrease shown also. 
All of these were rather small. For instance, the public universities received 
a total increase of only 1.5%. The Board of Regents received 1.2%, the Board 
of Governors 2.0% (because they increased their tuition by a total of 17 or 18%), 
SIU took a cut of .1%, and the University of Illinois received an increase of 2.1%. 

Dr. Matsler said one of the things which bothers him and others in the public 
sector is the State Scholarship Commission which received a 13.8% increase for 
a total of $134 million. Of the $16 million increase, roughly two-thirds of it goes 
to the private institutions even though they get only about one-third of the stude 
So, the ISSC was protected to a certain degree, and should be, he supposes, but 
the problem as he sees it is that there is a disproportionate share of the money 
going to the private institutions, and that increase could have been somewhat less 
by reducing the maximum amounts of scholarships made available to the private 
institutions. 

Table 2, Dr. Matsler continued, shows the funding differences, and it can be 
seen what the tuition increase has done to our percent of increase on the total. 
For instance, he said, in the case of the Income Fund for the Board of Governors 
it was 17.9%. The increase in the Board of Regents Income Fund was only 9.8%. 
There are a lot of variables that go into this, but the main reason is that there 
was a higher percent of increase in tuition at the Board of Governors. 

How is the big cut for the BHE explained, Mr. Murray asked? Dr. Matsler said 
this is primarily in the loss of federal funds. A large amount of their support 
in the past has been from the federal funds. Are they reducing staff, Mr. Murre 
inquired? No, Dr. Matsler said, only to the extent that those funds were sup- 
porting consultants or staff members who were paid out of federal money. 

Table 3 shows the retirement fund. The minimum statutory amount is shown on 
the bottom line, $142,971,900, while for FY83 we have $41,415,800, which is 
much less than what the statutes provide for. 

Referring to the $1.0 million in FY83, or 80%, for utility cost increases, Mr. 
Gayles asked from what other lines the difference would come. This will differ 
from institution to institution, Dr. Matsler said. Staff is trying to show here, 
he said, that although we will have to meet 100% of the utility needs, they have 
only, given us as a new increment, 80%. We still have to pay the bills, we don't 
know exactly what they will be, but we are quite sure that they will be consider- 
ably higher, particularly gas, for the coming year. The difference will probably 
come from other line items in Contractual Services. 

Legislative Report 

Dr. Matsler said he would not go into a lot of detail on H.B. 1108 except to 
say that it provides a different procedure for buying up service from years 
gone by. It used to be that we could take the first year's salary, multiply it 
by roughly 8%, and then pay 6% interest on it now. That will be raised to 8% 
as of September 1, but we will have to pay that 8% only from September 1 on, 



47 



and 6% prior to that date, 

H.B. 2504 expands coverage primarily for doctors having malpractice suits 
being brought against them. 

Dr. Matsler then called upon Mr. Phil Adams to comment on the recent hearings 
which were conducted by Rep. Hallstrom and by a sub-committee headed up by 
Rep. Hastert . 

Rep. Hastert's sub-committee of the House Higher Education Committee met on 
September 14, Mr. Adams reported, to discuss intercollegiate athletics. As 
many know , most of the colleges and universities in the State have been asked 
to complete rather extensive questionnaires concerning their participation in 
intercollegiate athletics. This information was put together by various people 
on the campuses and sent into the representative's staff who did a brief analysis 
in preparation for the hearing. Rep. Hastert is now holding public meetings 
and asking various schools to give testimony. The first meeting was held at 
ISU, and both ISU and NIU participated. Two of the major areas in which the 
sub-committee is interested are the processes that were gone through when most 
of the universities recently reduced the level of participation in terms of numbers 
of sports; and the decisions that are made and the benefits that are accrued, based 
on the level of participation in NCAA levels, whether it be Division I, II, IA, etc. 
Illinois State and Northern testified for approximately two hours, Mr. Adams said, 
and the hearing went exceptionally well. He said he must also mention that Dr. 
Adams and Mr. Pembroke did an outstanding job in front of the committee. The 
next hearing is next Tuesday at the Urbana campus, and at that time Sangamon 
State will give testimony, along with U. of I-C and some other institutions. 

Rep. Hallstrom's subcommittee, Mr. Adams reported, is also one of the House 
Higher Education Committee dealing with membership on the Board of Higher 
Education. As reported in the past, Rep. Hallstrom did introduce a bill guaran- 
teeing specific representation for two people on the BHE to represent the private 
colleges. The bill passed the House and went to the Senate, where it was held 
in the Senate Higher Education Committee. She then went back to the House 
and had a sub -committee established which held a meeting this past month at 
Northwestern University, which was attended by representatives from the Board 
of Governors, the Board of Regents, SlU-Carbondale , the U. of I., and repre- 
sentatives of the private colleges and universities as well as the Board of Higher 
Education. Testimony was given by all of the groups, and no actions were taken. 
The major line of testimony from those not in the private sector, Mr. Adams said, 
was "Where is the bill of particulars? What is the problem that the private sector 
feels is out there which the current organization, structure and system is not 
dealing with?" There was nothing particularly brought out at this meeting, he 
said, which had not surfaced in the Senate committee, and at this time it is his 
opinion that Rep. Hallstrom will probably not hold any more hearings prior to 
the election. But we can expect another bill next year. Mr. Adams reported 
that Dr. Wagner in his testimony brought up some points to consider such as 
an expanded role for the BHE in terms of program approval for private institu- 
tions should some change be made in the structure of the BHE membership. 
That pretty much brought the meeting to a close, he noted, but we can probably 
expect another bill next year. 

On the federal scene, Dr. Matsler said, the tuition tax credits bill in Congress 
probably will fail this year. The balanced budget constitutional amendment is 
also probably dead for this year. Also, the President's veto of the supplemental 
funding bill was overridden. 



48 



Section III - Revisions of Board Regulations on Financial Exigency 

Dr. Matsler noted that the proposed revisions in Board Regulations relative to 
financial exigency have been discussed by the Board at considerable length over 
a period of years, because the genesis of this occurred, he believes, in 1975 
and 1976. There are three matters, he said, which he would bring to the atten- 
tion of the Board which have been addressed in Staff since the last meeting. 
He said that Dr. Groves who worked with the original committee in the 1970's 
has been working with the institutions on the revisions which are really very 
minor and need very little further explanation since they were discussed on 
first reading. 

With regard to the revision of III. A. 14. f. (Personnel Reduction Procedures), 
the second paragraph of that section has been changed to read: "The President 
shall inform the Board of any such action and explain the reasons for it. The 
advisory financial exigency committee shall be provided an opportunity to record 
its support or opposition to the action of the President." This change was put 
in, Dr. Matsler said, at the request of the Joint University Advisory Committee 
and Staff feels that it is appropriate. This change was pretty well agreed upon 
at the last meeting of the Board. 

Relative to III. A. 14. i. (Notification of Layoff or Termination), there was a 
request last month which suggested that if a financial exigency were to occur 
we crank in some kind of a safeguard to be assured that there will be no lay- 
offs during a semester. Dr. Matsler said he feels that we really cannot do that. 
If we have a financial exigency and the money is not there, something must be 
done; and to put in any such guarantee which would not treat the entire insti- 
tution quite equitably probably would be inappropriate. Staff does not feel 
it would be advisable to change this wording, and is recommending that this 
be left as proposed. 

There was a slight change in III. A. 14. n. (University Implementation), Dr. Matsler 
said, and the paragraph would now read: "The Universities shall adopt such 
additional procedures as are necessary to make campus governance and personnel 
review process consistent with this regulation and to insure that a condition of 
financial exigency will be dealt with responsibly and effectively at the university 
level." 

Dr. Matsler said Staff is recommending that the Board take action on these revi- 
sions as proposed today. 

Dr. Crafts, Chair of the Joint University Advisory Committee, said with regard 
to III. A. 14. n., the Committee is interpreting this to mean that the campuses 
could develop directional statements of a general nature as well as implementing 
statements. Of course, she said, these statements would have to be consistent 
with Board policy, and the Committee understands that. JUAC feels this ap- 
proach would allow campuses to better interpret and implement policy set by the 
Board and at the same time recognize the differences in the universities. They 
are, therefore, requesting that they be allowed to use this interpretation. There 
are differences in the universities, Dr. Crafts noted, and some of them stress 
various aspects more than others and therefore there is a need to have some 
leeway in providing general statements as well as very specific implementing 
statements. The Committee feels that if they were permitted that leeway they 
could be consistent with Board policy and yet serve the individual differences 
as far as the universities are concerned. 



49 



With regard to III. A. 14. i. (Notification of Layoff or Termination), Dr. Crafts 
said the Committee would request that the following sentence be inserted in the 
sixth line after the word "effect.": "Completion of instruction in the semester 
underway shall be given the highest priority." This suggestion is made to 
clarify and stress the need for universities to meet and fulfill their obligations 
to students who are enrolled in academic courses that are underway. They also 
feel that this is broad enough to allow each institution to consider all of the 
factors that would affect the situation and yet be aware of the need to maintain 
quality programs and serve their obligations to the students. 

President Monat said, speaking for himself, he find this latter suggestion to 
be acceptable and he has no problems with it . President Lacy said he would 
have no difficulty with it either. 

Mr. Murray asked the Presidents if they had any problem with the interpretation 
suggested by JUAC of III. A. 14. n., and the indication was that they would have 
no problem with this. 

Dr. Matsler said he does not have a great deal of a problem with the insertion 
proposed for III. A. 14. i. However, he would warn the Board that there are many 
priorities such as utilities and other activities. We do recognize that we have 
a contract with the student as he or she enrolls and goes through the particular 
semester, and obviously we are going to try to complete the semester as best we 
can. But what would this do to us? Does this mean then that it might not be 
possible to combine classes or give an overload? There are so many things 
involved, he said, that he is a little afraid that this might provide more problems 
than it would solve in terms of meeting our commitments to students. He said he 
does not believe the clause is a necessary one, but he would not argue it to the 
death because obviously it gives some special consideration to what we are all 
here for - teaching. Of course, there are other things which are important, too - 
research and community service that we are providing. If the Board wants to put 
this in, it will be making a decision early on, when this decision could easily be 
made at a later date. 

Mr. Murray said it would seem to him that we would be effectively changing the 
60 days to the end of a semester. He said he worries about the wording "highest 
priority" because that is covered under III. A. 14. g. (Personnel Reduction Criteria). 
Mr. Winning agreed, saying that he does not think that this is the appropriate 
place to insert that language if it is to be considered. 

Mr. Gayles said he thinks that we should be considered with the completion of 
a semester with regard to the students' careers. Not only do we have faculty 
that we need to be concerned with, but we have students who have scheduled 
their graduation dates and their possible careers on a number of classes that 
could possibly end after the mid-point of a semester. 

Mr. Murray said he thinks this is just a tempest in a teapot because he feels 
that we are going to always be able to get through a semester, although this 
does not mean that we will be able to get through a semester with every employee. 
That is what Dr. Matsler's point is. 

Ms. Burns said maybe if we are going to insert such a statement it should be 
under Personnel Reduction Criteria in some way. It has already been stated, 
Dr. Matsler said, under III. A. 14. g. (1) (Personnel Reduction Criteria. Program 
Needs) . That states that program needs are our highest priority. Dr. Wellbank 
said this is really just another interpretation. 



50 



The Chairman said the Board would hold this question in abeyance for the 
moment and hear from Ms. Margaret Schmid of the University Professionals of 
Illinois . 

Ms. Schmid distributed copies of her prepared remarks to members of the Board. 
She said she would comment that UPI oftentimes finds itself working in the same 
direction as the Board, and she pointed out that at the hearing on the Hallstrom 
bill, which Mr. Adams reported on earlier, the UPI also testified by invitation of 
the committee and said basically the same kinds of things that Mr. Adams and 
Dr. Wagner said. The UPI shares many things in common with the Board of 
Regents and with all the administrations in terms of goals. 

However, she said, this matter under discussion is an area in which they find 
themselves in considerable disagreement. She would not read her prepared 
statement, she said, but would like to review some of the points contained there- 
in . The statement indicates specific proposals which they believe the Board 
should adopt which will protect the faculty, which will protect tenure, protect 
academic freedom, and which are consistent with the viable functioning of the 
universities. They do exist now in university policy, in university collective 
bargaining agreements, in particular, and they are workable. The first point 
she would like to make, Ms. Schmid said, is that they recommend and ask that 
in the very first sentence of III. A. 14, the word "demonstrable" be inserted before 
"financial exigency". By establishing this test of fact, which in essence is what 
it would be, Ms. Schmid said the Board could do two things. It could insure 
confidence among the faculty that the Board does intend to only declare financial 
exigency if essential. This is in fact a test that would be met and in reality, 
of course, it would allow a challenge which current language does not. Current 
language which the Board is considering for adoption would allow it to do pretty 
much what it wants. This is not insured to guarantee confidence among any of 
the employees of the university, and faculty are rightly alarmed at the implica- 
tions of what the Board is proposing to do. 

Secondly, Ms. Schmid said, UPI proposes that in order to protect tenure and 
again to insure that the threat of layoff does not erode academic freedom, 
section g. needs to be re-done rather considerably (Personnel Reduction Criteria). 
They would recommend that the first sentence read: "If the Board decides it is 
necessary to lay off faculty, faculty will be laid off in the following order: 
temporary and part-time faculty first; full-time faculty on probationary appoint- 
ments but without tenure second; and tenured faculty last." Tenure is crucial 
to the functioning of the university, she said, tenure needs to be protected, 
and the Board's policy does not protect tenure. 

Further, along those lines, Ms. Schmid said they recommend the adoption of a 
sentence which reads: "In the event of faculty layoff, the factors which will be 
considered in determining the order of layoff in addition to tenure status will 
be: length of full-time service at the University, including approved leaves; 
educational qualifications; professional training; and experience." This would 
not tie the hands of the administration and it does not prohibit administrative 
judgments, but it would insure that faculty would be protected on the basis of 
objective and professional characteristics, and that there cannot be arbitrary 
layoffs, that faculty will not fear layoff which is definitely the case under the 
proposed language. And there are fears, and justified, Ms. Schmid added. 

Finally, Ms. Schmid said, with regard to the proposed section i., the point 



51 



that JUAC was raising is not, in fact, addressed by talking about the highest 
priority being given to program needs. That section talks about the order of 
layoffs among faculty once it has been decided that faculty are going to be laid 
off. It has nothing to do with how quickly faculty will be laid off, whether 
the continuation of instruction will be more important than any other activity. 
It is a different point , not the same point , which is to say : what kind of notice 
will there be? What kind of disruption of university programs are you making 
possible by your language? UPI proposes this sentence: "Except in the event 
of extreme and immediate financial exigency, a faculty member with a probationary 
appointment shall be given the same notice in the event of a layoff as would be 
given in the event of nonrenewal of his/her appointment. A tenured faculty 
member shall be given notice of layoff of at least one academic year." 

In conclusion, Ms. Schmid said she would note that the protections which such 
language would afford faculty, tenure, and academic freedom are consistent 
with the orderly and effective functioning of universities, and that identical or 
comparable language is found in a number of academic collective bargaining agree- 
ments. 

Mr. Murray asked Ms. Schmid if she distinguishes between tenure and seniority. 

Ms. Schmid said there is a difference. Seniority is length of service, how long 
people have been at the university. Tenure is a status which people attain 
after going through the process which has been established. Tenured faculty 
is a much broader category. 

Mr. Murray asked how they would relate seniority to the Personnel Reduction 
Criteria. Ms. Schmid had not mentioned seniority in the language proposed 
under paragraph g. 

UPI proposes that seniority be considered along with educational qualifications, 
professional training, and experience, Ms. Schmid said. Obviously there needs 
to be some consideration given to what the program needs of the institution are. 
All reasonable people would agree to that, Ms. Schmid said, and that is why they 
are proposing educational qualifications, professional training, and experience 
as factors they also recognize need to be looked at. 

UPI is suggesting that we delete program needs as any criterion in this, Mr. 
Murray asked? 

Ms. Schmid said she would be happy to sit down and write out a tentative policy 
for the Board, but she thinks what this amounts to is UPI's proposing that 
section g. should be basically totally stricken and that instead they could go to 
the few sentences as proposed by UPI. The first one specifies that tenured 
faculty would be laid off last , and the second one specifies that in addition to 
tenure status, the factors which would be taken into consideration are length 
of full time service , and so forth . 

Mr. Murray said the only reasonable way he can interpret what she is saying 
is that we lay off faculty without any concern for the program needs, according 
to their status. 

Ms. Schmid said she would stress that when they use the terms "educational 
qualifications; professional training; and experience", these things are clearly 



52 



related to the ability of the faculty to teach particular courses, to do particular 
kinds of research, to do the assignments which would remain to be done in the 
event of some severe cut in the economic base. So, this would allow considera- 
tion, it is essential to allow consideration of the programmatic needs of the insti- 
tution. They are not proposing that the Board should not consider the program- 
matic needs of the institution. What they are proposing instead is a policy, 
language which will protect tenure and which will insure that any layoffs, if we 
come to that, will be made on the basis of something which is objective. 

Mr. Murray asked Ms. Schmid how she feels about affirmative action. 

Ms. Schmid said that she thinks basically what they would hope - and she must 
state that she is not familiar enough with the Board's hiring record in the past 
years to know precisely how successful it has been in hiring minority and women 
faculty, but if the university's record has been a relatively reasonable one - 
obviously this would not impact negatively. The only problems that ever come 
up with affirmative action, she said, are when the hiring records have been such 
or so inadequate that minorities and women faculty have all been hired in the last 
several years. 

Let's assume, Mr. Murray said, that we have done a very poor job and so we 
have added a lot of minorities and women in the last year or two who are way 
down on the seniority list. So, when we lay off shall we just willy-nilly lay 
all of them off, he asked? 

Ms. Schmid said she would be glad to work with the Board to develop alternative 
language which would meet that particular concern, although she thinks that it 
would be necessary to look at what the record has been. 

Dr. Matsler said the Board did have one of the UPI representatives speak at the 
last meeting of the Board, and it is really unfortunate that we should work on 
this wording today. Perhaps there should be some changes in the future, perhap 
not, but the essence of this whole policy statement is that programs must be pro- 
tected, tenure must be protected, affirmative must be protected, and we do think 
in terms of seniority. We have laid out some broad policies. Dr. Matsler said he 
does not think that the Board should be getting into the detail that has been 
spoken to at this time. He said he would like very much to have action today 
on what we have, with a commitment that as time goes on these policies can be 
changed. But at this late date to revise our whole philosophy of this policy 
which does protect programs and tenured faculty as best we can, and to get 
into the detail of perhaps the qualifications of faculty, would be a mistake. 
Those are things, he believes, which can be handled on the campuses. The Boar 
does not want to get into that as long as the broad policies are followed. Dr. 
Matsler said he is appreciative of Ms. Schmid's input here, but on the other hand 
to come in at this late date, and after the presentation that UPI made last month 
but which did not address specifically these things so well, it is simply too late 
for that today; but it would not be too late for it as time goes on. 

The Chairman asked if there were any further questions or comments. 

Dr. Crafts said she would only like to reiterate what JUAC had said about 
inclusion of the sentence in section i.. From the discussion she has heard it 
would seem that we are coming back to focus on the fact that the major mission 
of the institutions has to do with the academic classes and the education of the 



53 



students attending. Putting in that statement is general enough in nature so 
that it does not tie the hands of the institution's administration, they still would 
consider the other factors, but it does emphasize the major mission of the higher 
education institutions. Therefore, Dr. Crafts said, the Committee is suggesting 
again and recommending strongly that the Board insert the sentence she proposed 
earlier: "Completion of instruction in the semester underway shall be given 
highest priority." This would not rule out consideration of other factors. 

Ms. Burns said we have so many highest priorities that we are having trouble 
sorting them out. She asked if it would be acceptable to JUAC to state that 
this would be given a high priority, or that it would be given consideration. 

Dr. Crafts said she had received from her colleagues a strong feeling that we 
may need to identify what is the highest priority in institutions of higher educa- 
tion, or indeed in any educational institution. It would seem that this does not 
rule out consideration of operational detail, but it does say that the mission of 
it is, indeed, focused toward the education of students who attend and, there- 
fore, even though there are high priorities that would seem to be the highest. 
Dr. Crafts said she has been urged to ask what the Board would identify as 
the highest priority, or if that can be done, given the reservations. 

Dr. Matsler said he would try to respond to that to this effect: obviously, 
there will be some programs that are not as important as others. There may 
very well be some courses and some programs that have very few students 
and the institution may very well still want to protect those programs and they 
have the opportunity to protect them if they so wish. But to insert this particu- 
lar phraseology, with the 60-day statement which we already have, would seem 
to run counter to what we are trying to accomplish. Dr. Matsler said he feels 
that faculty is protected by our criteria - programs, tenure, etc. - and he 
would hope that we would not change the wording from the way we have it now. 

Ms. Burns said under the area of Program Needs, it seems to her that JUAC is 
saying that the Board failed to communicate that all programs are of the highest 
priority, and particularly to complete them in the semester that is underway. 
That is only fair to a student. However, Ms. Burns said, we may not have that 
luxury if we get into this position. Is there some way of stating that which 
would satisfy JUAC? Or is it implicit in Program Needs (g.(l))? Dr. Crafts 
said it seems to be the feeling of her group that there needs to be a reiteration 
of this in Notification of Layoff or Termination, relating to the previous item in 
Program Needs. They feel that their suggested statement would do this. 

Would this statement protect the employee from lay off, Mr. Murray asked? 
No, Dr. Crafts said. Well, then, the Chairman said, he does not think that 
it should go into the section on Notification of Layoff or Termination - it should 
be over in Program Needs, and he thinks we would be asking for trouble to 
insert this, with all due respect to the Committee. 

Mr. Wright said he has problems with trying to correct or insert language now, 
and he believes that a small committee should be established, with the presidents 
involved, to work on the language. He said he does not believe that this whole 
group today can work this out and come out with anything constructive. 

Ms. Burns said her feeling is that we have left enough room for this to happen 
on the campuses, without the Board trying to define it. She said she would 



54 



prefer it that way. We can always amend it, Mr. Murray said, and he would 
be in favor of taking a vote on it today. 

Ms. Schmid said she would just like to reiterate what the proposed policy does 
is to destroy tenure protection for faculty. How, Ms. Burns asked? By making 
program needs more important than tenure in determining layoffs, Ms. Schmid 
responded, and because the proposed policy does not give defensible criteria 
for determining program needs. Ms. Schmid said the UPI way has been demon- 
strated to work in other places, and is an attempt to combine what they recog- 
nize as the need to maintain programs with the need to protect the rights which 
faculty have earned over the years. If the Board wants a faculty which is going 
to be happy, she said, which is not frightened and which does not feel demoralizec 
this is an important factor to keep in mind . 

Mr. Murray said while he did not wish to disagree with Ms. Schmid, he would 
point out that this language has been in effect since 1975. and no one has ever 
raised it as being demoralizing in the last seven years. 

Dr. Wellbank then moved for Board approval of the Staff recommendations for 
revisions in the Board Regulations relative to financial exigency. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Riss, and it carried unanimously. 

Dr. Crafts said JUAC would like to request that the university guidelines be 
reviewed by Legal Counsel to the Board and the Staff of the Board, and that 
any difficulties would be resolved with the universities ; and that at the point 
where they are deemed consistent with the Board's policy and acceptable to the 
universities, the Staff would assert for the record at a Board of Regents meeting 
that the guidelines are acceptable and consistent with Board policy. 

Mr. Murray said he thinks this is an excellent suggestion and would insure that 
we do not get into the same situation as we did the last time. Dr. Matsler said 
he would agree, and would suggest also that the less detailed and the shorter 
these campus documents, the better, because we cannot anticipate everything 
that might come up. 

Mr. Wright said he would like for the record to show that he is opposed to what 
happened because he still thinks that people should sit down and try to work out 
through a sub -committee this language and get it straightened out. 

Section IV - Intercollegiate Athletics 

Dr. Matsler said now that the Hastert sub-committee hearings have been held, 
Staff will be bringing some of the results into the October meeting along with 
the Regency System intercollegiate athletics study. 

Section V - Grants and Contracts 

Dr. Matsler advised that Northern Illinois University is seeking approval of two 
grants which support research activity in chemistry and physics : 

1. Grant for Research on Superconducting Materials, which is a continuation 

of Department of Physics research on the causes of superconductivity. 
The award from the U.S. Air Force /Office of Scientific Research is for 
the amount of $85,000 which brings the multi-year support of the activity 
past the $250,000 level where Board approval is required. 



55 



2. Grant for Research on Enzymes, from the National Institutes of Health 

in the amount of $64,575 which brings the multi-year support of the 
activity past the $250,000 threshold. 

Staff has evaluated both proposals, Dr. Matsler advised, and recommends appro- 
val by the Board. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Burns and it carried unanimously. 

Section VI - Collective Bargaining Agreement - NIU and AFSCME 

Dr. Matsler advised that negotiations have been completed relative to a two-year 
agreement between Northern Illinois University and AFSCME pertaining to food 
service and building service employees. There are no immediate wage increases, 
he said, but the agreement does contain provisions for further negotiations as to 
wages in January 1983 and again in August 1983. The agreement has been re- 
viewed by Staff and legal counsel, he said, and approval is recommended when 
the agreement is considered with the NIU President's Report. 

Section VII - Board Regulation Amendment: Entertainment Fund 

Dr. Matsler presented for first reading a proposed amendment which would permit 
the entertainment allowance for each university president to be used at locations 
other than the President's residence. It is anticipated that this amendment will 
be presented for action at the October meeting of the Board. 

Section VIII - Additions and Deletions of Units of Instruction, 
Research and Public Services 

A report was presented of units of instruction, research, and public services 
added or deleted by the universities from July 1, 1981 to June 30, 1982. 

Sect ion IX - Revision in Regulations Governing Procurement and Bidding 

Dr. Matsler reported that Senate Bill 423, enacted as Public Act 82-905, amends 
the Illinois Purchasing Act, primarily by raising the bidding threshold from 
$2500 to $5000 for most purchases, and from $5000 to $10,000 for certain types 
of repair, remodeling or maintenance contracts. The first step in implementing 
the changes, he said, is adoption by theBoard of the changes contained in the 
legislation. 

Staff recommends that the Board (1) adopt the Purchasing Act revisions contained 
in P. A. 82-905, (2) authorize the necessary revisions of the Regulations Governing 
Procurement and Bidding at State Systems Universities in Illinois , and (3) declare 
the changes to be effective as soon as legally possible. 

Dr. Matsler advised that the proposed changes will have to go to the Joint Com- 
mittee on Administrative Rules for publication in the Illinois Register , and the 
changes cannot be implemented before that Committee completes its action. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The motion was 
seconded by Mr. Gayles, and it carried unanimously. 



56 



Mrs. Fitzpatrick requested that the Board Staff explore with the State Comp- 
troller the impact of this action on his guidelines on the use of amounts of funds 
charged to contractual services. Dr. Matsler said he thought this would be most 
appropriate and Staff will explore this. 

Sectio n X - FY 1984 Operating Appropriations Request 

Our FY 84 Operating Appropriations request has been discussed publicly and in 
committee for several months, Dr. Matsler noted, and he would just quickly sum- 
marize major features of the recommendations : 

A total Regency System operating budget request (excluding retirement 
and IBA rentals) of $168,580,300, an increase of $19,123,000 or 12.8% 
over the FY 83 adjusted appropriation. 

Requests for price increases to minimize the impact of inflation on uni- 
versity operations. This includes: $1,826,900 for general price increases 
of 8%; $1,446,500 for utilities orice increases; and $518,000 for library 
materials price increases. 

A total request of $2,534,000 based on Special Analytical Studies (SAS's): 
$ 912,300 for ISU , $1,276,400 for NIU , and $345,300 for SSU. Major 
SAS requests are for equipment replacement and computer systems. 

New and expanded program requests (NEPR's) approved in June total 
$800,500 for NIU. 

Dr. Matsler noted that there is one slight change to be made which was discus- 
sed in the Finance Committee meeting. In the Special Analytical Studies for 
Northern Illinois University, NIU has requested $650,000 for Replacement of Ob- 
solete Equipment, and the university would like that amount reduced to $550,000, 
and would also request the insertion of the category, Permanent Improvements 
Supplement, in the amount of $100,000. Dr. Matsler said Staff has agreed to 
this change. 

Staff recommends, he said, that the Board approve of the FY84 operating- 
appropriations request for the Regency System in the amount of $195,965,400 
as summarized in his Report. Such approval is granted subject to any subse- 
quent arithmetic or clerical adjustments which may be required, and the Executive 
Director would be authorized to approve such adjustments and report them to the 
Board at the next meeting. 

Referring to the change requested by Northern, Mrs. Fitzpatrick said she has no 
problem with leaving the bottom line exactly as it is, but she also thinks that 
we should explore further the need for this item. If there is a need for it, it 
should be added permanently for all three of our institutions. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendations relative to the FY84 
Operating Appropriations request. The motion was seconded by Mr. Riss and it 
carried unanimously. 

Section XI - FY84 Capital Appropriation Request 

Before presenting the Staff recommendations for the capital request, Dr. Matsler 
advised that Ms. Burns, Chair of the Facilities Committee, wished to present 



57 



the recommendations of the committee. 

Ms. Burns reported that the total figure which the Facilities Committee discussed 
on Wednesday and which it approved and recommends to the Board of Regents 
is $26,294,100. She called attention to a revised Board of Regents FY 84 Capital 
Budget System Priority List which had been distributed, noting that the committee 
did not change the bottom line, but did make a change in priority in category 
for the Northern Steam Line Replacement from the Energy Conservation section, 
and preferred instead to submit this project as System Priority 4, which is also 
the first priority for NIU. The dollar amount, or recommended project cost, 
remains the same. Ms. Burns said she is sure that everyone is well aware that 
the steam line has become somewhat of a news item. This will be seen again in 
the President's Report, which also contains another item which the committee dis- 
cussed - the steam line to connect the East and West Heating Plants. The total 
dollar figure on that is $1.7 million. The President might wish to comment fur- 
there on this later in the meeting, however, it is not a part of the FY84 capital 
request . 

Since there were no capital monies appropriated last year, Ms. Burns said, it 
will be seen that there are very few new additions to the list of projects. We 
have seen most of the projects before and have used the same criteria to develop 
the systemwide priority list. The first three priorities appeared and were ap- 
proved by the Board last year and they are still of ongoing concern. The com- 
mittee recommends that they be left in the same order for FY 84. 

Dr. Matsler noted that Mr. Beahringer of the Staff has worked with the campuses 
on the request, and he was pleased that the list has been made up as it now ap- 
pears without disagreement. 

Dr. Matsler said he must comment on one matter, one of the most important facing 
the System, and that is that we are not getting sufficient funds to maintain our 
buildings. We have literally hundreds of millions of dollars worth of buildings 
in the Regency System and yet we got practically nothing in the way of capital 
last year for maintenance of the buildings. There has to be something done, 
he said, and new buildings must take a lower priority than maintenance and 
operation of these facilities. That is all there is to it. Dr. Matsler said he thinks 
as time goes on we are going to have to be developing some procedures such as a 
new policy in the State to have a bond issue for maintenance, perhaps. Something 
on this order must be done or our buildings will, indeed, deteriorate further. 
The roofs are beginning to leak, the steam lines are beginning to leak, and the 
deterioration is very noticeable. It is a very serious situation that we are facing. 

Ms. Burns said she would underscore these comments. As the Facilities Commit- 
tee went down the priority list, they realized that everything on the list was 
maintenance and repair projects, and that generated considerable discussion about 
the deferred maintenance problem that is obviously underway and getting worse 
each year that we do not receive funds to maintain our buildings properly. With 
an eye toward that, the Committee did ask Dr. Matsler and Staff to come up with 
some suggestions as to how we might separate this problem out from the capital 
budget or perhaps isolate it as a separate section in the budget so that we could 
not only emphasize it more, but perhaps secure funding in a different manner. 

Dr. Matsler said Staff recommends that the Board approve the FY 1984 Capital 
Budget Request of the Regency Universities in the following amounts, as 
detailed in the Executive Director's Report (Tables 1, 2 and 3): 



58 



Northern Illinois University $10,149,800 

Illinois State University 14,087,500 

Sangamon State University 2,056,800 

Total $26,294,100 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Mr. Gayles, and it carried unanimously. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Northern Illinois University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board, President Monat distributed copies 
of an Addendum (Repair of Bleachers - Evans Field House). He asked that on 
page 4 of the Report (Grants and Contracts), the item relative to the Chemistry 
grant from the Department of Health and Human Services /Public Health Service/ 
National Institutes of Health, be deleted as an action item inasmuch as action 
by the Board took place in conjunction with the Executive Director's Report. 

Information reports were presented on : 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall 1982 

Enrollment by Headcount, Summer 1982 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 

Gifts to Northern Illinois University 

Presidential Research Professors 

Report of Depositaries for Year Ended June 30, 1982 

The following items were then submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees. A list of the 
reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and will be 
kept on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

2. Collective bargaining agreement with the American Federation of State, 
County and Municipal Employees representing food service and building 
service employees on the DeKalb campus. The two year agreement, effec- 
tive August 15, 1982 through August 14, 1984, provides for wage negoti- 
ations to be effective on or after January 1, 1983 and August 15, 1983. 

3. As required by the University Financial Guidelines adopted by the Board 
in 1978, the University had defined its accounting entities into groupings 
that were "substantially similar and rationally related". After several 
years' experience, it is now proposed that the following modifications of 
the entities be approved by the Board: 

A . Student Programs & Services 

Graduate Activities 

Student Activities 

Orientation 

CHANCE (Orientation) Program 

B . Field Trip & Foreign Study Activities 

Field Trip Activity 
Foreign Study Activities 



59 



C . Sales & Service 

This group of accounts provides services to the 
various University departments on a charge-back 
basis. The service departments include Printing, 
Telephone, Transportation, Computing Services 
and other services on a break-even basis. 

4. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report. 

5. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Holmes Student Center - Remodeling & Renovation of South Terrace 
Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for the remodeling and renovation of 
the south terrace of Holmes Student Center. 

(b) Steam Line to Connect East and West Heating Plants 
Permission was requested to engage the firm of Brown, Davis, 
Mullins & Associates, Inc., Champaign, to develop plans and speci- 
fications for the extension of the primary steam distribution system 
from the Evans Field House to the West Heating Plant, to advertise 
and receive bids for the project. 

(c) Grant Towers - Remodeling of "The Barn" Snack Bar 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommendation 
that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to Irving Con- 
struction, DeKalb, in the amount of $17,400.00, and that the pro- 
ject budget be established as follows: 

Construction $17,400.00 

Contingency 1,700.00 

Total Project Budget $19,100.00 

(d) Stevenson Towers - Roof Repair of Center Core (North Section ) 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommendation 
that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to Freeport 
Industrial Roofing Company, Freeport, in the amount of $41,774.40, 
and that the project budget be established as follows: 

Construction $41,774.40 

Contingency 4,125.60 

Total Project Budget $45,900.00 

(e) Replacement of Windows in Huskie Stadium Press Box 
Lincoln Hall - Replacement of Doors (Exterior ) 
Douglas Hall - Replacement of Doors (Exterior) 

A tabulation of combined bids for the above projects was presented 
with a recommendation that the combined low base bids within the 
approved budgets be accepted and a contract awarded to Flagg 
Construction Company, Rochelle, in the amount of $94,004.00, and 
that the total budgets for the projects be established as follows : 



60 





Lincoln / 








Douglas 






Press Box 


Doors 




Combined 


(Base Bid B) 


(Base Bid 


A) 




$27,500 


$66,504 




$94,004 


2,200 


5,320 




7,520 


1,870 


5,870 




7,740 


2,730 


6,606 




9,336 


$34,300 


$84,300 




$118,600 



Construction 

Architect's Fee (8%) 

Allowance for on-site 
observation & reproduc 
tion of bid documents 

Contingency 



President Monat noted that he had distributed to the Board copies of the Master 
of Arts in Public Affairs Alumni Information Directory. This program has been 
recognized, the President said, this year by receiving the Stephen B. Sweeney 
Award from the International City Management Association. Glancing through 
the directory will show just how widely spread the alumni are within the country 
and the level of responsibility of the positions they hold. The President said 
he had also distributed copies of the latest album recorded by the NIU Jazz 
Ensemble, which has been nominated for a "Grammy Award", and the university 
is very pleased about this. 

The President said Ms. Burns had earlier referred to the university's request 
to move forward with authorization to proceed with a steam line replacement 
to connect the East and West Heating Plants, a project which will be funded out 
of revenue bond sources. This project will be presented again to the Board 
when the university is ready to proceed with work on the project. 

Dr. Monat took note of his recommendation for the appointment of Mr. George 
M. Shur as University Legal Counsel, effective May 1, 1983. Mr. Shur is cur- 
rently a partner in a law firm in Portland Maine, which has represented the 
University of Maine System during the last 14 years. Mr. Shur has been the 
leading partner in that firm. The President said he is also recommending the 
reassignment of Mr. Norden Gilbert who has been Contracts Administrator in 
the office of Business Affairs, to the position of Acting Associate Legal Counsel 
effective September 1, 1982. This is recommended because it would make it 
possible to consolidate within the Legal Counsel's Office all of the legal respon- 
sibilities of the University, and Mr. Gilbert in moving into that role will take 
with him his responsibilities as Contracts Administrator. 

The President called the attention of the Board to recommendations to appoint 
Mr. George R. Kenney as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political 
Science, and Sun Tianyi as Visiting Professor in Foreign Languages and Liter- 
atures in the International and Special Programs. Mr. Kenney comes to NIU 
this year as a Diplomat -in- Residence. This is a program that the U.S. Departmen 
of State has sponsored for a number of years, and each year four senior foreign 
service officers are assigned to universities in the country. Northern feels very 
privileged to have one of them this year. Professor Sun, Dr. Monat said, is 
Chairman of the Language Department at Xi'an University in the Peoples Republic 
of China, and is this year the Chinese counterpart in the university's exchange 
program with that university. This is the second year for the program and 
Professor Sun will make a significant contribution to the campus. 



61 



Dr. Monat took note of the recommendation in the Purchases Appendix for the 
purchase of a Computer System and Related Equipment for Psychology. Last 
month the Executive Committee of the Board deferred this item. This is really 
a part of a grant received by a member of the faculty in the Psychology Depart- 
ment, the President advised, and unless he has the equipment he most likely 
will have to turn back the grant because the equipment is essential to the per- 
formance of the commitments made under the grant. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern Illinois 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank and it car- 
ried unanimously. 

Dr. Matsler said he would call the attention of the Board to the position which 
Norden Gilbert will be moving into. That position, he said, he does not believe 
has been approved by the Board, and he thinks that in addition to asking for 
Board approval to move Mr. Gilbert into the position, the university should also 
be requesting approval of the position itself. Our Regulations do provide that 
these positions be brought to the Board prior to making any commitments to hire 
and fill the positions. Dr. Monat said he agrees with this; however, this is not 
an initial hire, it is the transfer of a person from one responsibility to another. 
Had there been a Board meeting in August, this would have been forwarded to 
the Board. It was an oversight on his part, the President said. 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

Acting for the President, Vice President and Provost Leon Boothe advised that 
he had distributed a replacement page 4 to be inserted in the President's Report. 
The page contains some slight change in wording relative to the union representa- 
tion of Building Mechanics. Dr. Boothe advised that the item concerning Bond 
Redemptions on pages 2 and 3 of the Report has been changed to an action item, 
and this would be addressed by Mr. Winning with the presentation of a resolution 
for consideration by the Board. 

Information reports were presented on: 

Enrollments for Summer Session 1982 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Training, Service) 

Annual Report on Depositories 

The following items were then submitted for action by the Board : 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for civil 
service employees. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the 
President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and in the 
Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report. 

3. Land Acquisition for Expansion of Parking Facilities 

The following Resolution which had been presented to the Board in 
Executive Session was presented for action by the Board : 



62 



RESOLUTION 

AUTHORIZATION FOR LAND ACQUISITION 

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 



WHEREAS, the Board of Regents has reviewed a campus plan demon- 
strating' the need for expansion of parking facilities; and 

WHEREAS, implementation of said plan requires additional land in 
the central area of the campus; and 

WHEREAS , a parcel of land is available to the University which 
would enable the University to expand its parking according to said 
plan ; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the State 
of Illinois, acting for and on behalf of Illinois State University, does 
hereby authorize the President of Illinois State University to take 
such actions as may be reasonably necessary to obtain merchantable 
title to the following described property from the present owner of 
said property by warranty deed conveying the property to the Board 
of Regents for and on behalf of the people of the State of Illinois 
for consideration as shown : 

The South 44 r of Lot 2 in Block 4 in the Normal 23rd 
Addition to the Town of Normal, McLean County, 

Illinois . 

219 North University Street, Normal. McLean County, Illinois 

Amount of Consideration - $54,100 (Fifty-Four Thousand One 

Hundred Dollars) 

FURTHER RESOLVED, that Illinois State University is authorized to 
expend said specified amount from Parking Reserves. 

4. Bond Redemptions 

The following Resolution was presented by Mr. Winning for consideration 
by the Board : 

Resolution Providing for the Application of 

Certain Surplus Bond Revenues 

Established Pursuant to Bond Indentures Heretofore 

Adopted by the Board of Regents, or its Predecessor 

Entities, for Improvements at 

Illinois State University 

WHEREAS, there are currently outstanding bond issue indentures dated 
July 1, 1954, April 1, 1959, March 1, 1961, December 1, 1961, June 1, 
1963, April 1, 1965, May 15, 1967, September 17, 1970, and December 20 
1970, pursuant to each of which there are outstanding bonds, and 



63 



WHEREAS, in each of the foregoing bond indentures, authority was 
retained to use surplus bond revenues to repurchase bonds prior to 
maturity ; 

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the President of Illinois State 
University, or his designee, is authorized by and on behalf of the Board 
of Regents, to purchase outstanding revenue bonds issued pursuant to 
any of the aforesaid bond indentures, so long as such purchases are 
made with surplus revenues available in the bond fund of any such issue 
after payment of all operating expenses and funding of all indentured 
reserves in such issue as of the end of the fiscal year preceding the 
year of purchase and so long as the bonds offered for repurchase are 
offered at a price which is less than face value . 

RESOLVED FURTHER that in the event of any such purchase, a report 
thereof shall be made to the Board of Regents at the first meeting of 
the Board following such purchase. 

5. Union Representation 

Dr. Boothe reported that on August 17, 1982, Illinois State University 
conducted a secret ballot election in accordance with the regulations of 
the Board to determine whether Building Mechanics of Illinois State Uni- 
versity were entitled to be represented by Local 399 of the International 
Union of Operating Engineers. Of 17 employees, there were 16 votes in 
favor of Local 399, and 1 employee not voting. Thus, he said, the 
Union has been selected as the exclusive bargaining representative, and 
subject to the Board's acceptance of this report, the University may pro- 
ceed with negotiations. 

Commenting on the President's Report, Dr. Boothe took special note of the resig- 
nation of Dr. Fritz Schwalm who is going to become Chair of the Department of 
Biology at Texas Women's University. Dr. Schwalm has served as Acting Chair 
of the Department of Biology at ISU with distinction and has given the university 
many good years of service . 

The Vice President said he also regrets to note the death of Dr. LaVerne Cox, 
Professor of Finance and Law. Dr. Cox came to ISU after a distinguished career 
at St. Cloud State. Even though he was with ISU only briefly, he will be missed. 

It should also have been noted in the President's Report, Dr. Boothe said, that 
Dr. Merritt Chambers is beyond retirement age and is being renewed on an annual 
basis in accord with Board practices. Dr. Chambers is nationally renowned in 
the field of educational finance, and the university feels fortunate to retain his 
services . 

Mr. Winning noted that for a good many years he has been a little troubled by 
the fact that bond purchases have been made at the university level and then 
brought to the Board, in effect, for confirmation retroactively. What has 
troubled him about this, he said, is that the Board has never expressed itself 
in terms of setting some standards within which bonds should be purchased, 
because the original indentures, of course, authorize the purchase of bonds 
and all prior purchases have been confirmed by being reported in the university 
reports. It seems to him, Mr. Winning said, that the Board should have a formal 



64 



authority which sets some general standards within which the university should 
operate and an express delegation of authority for the president or his designee 
to purchase. That is why the Resolution was prepared, he explained. There 
were some questions in the Finance Committee about the language of the Resolu- 
tion, he noted, but since we have in effect confirmed and ratified all purchases 
previously reported by approving the President's Reports, it does not seem to 
him that we will be troubled by using the language proposed because it does 
authorize future purchases within the standards. All prior purchases have been 
within these standards. Mr. Winning said the only thing he would point out is 
that the Resolution was drafted to apply to Illinois State University, and probably 
if he had had more time to reflect on this, he would have prepared a broader 
Resolution to apply to all three institutions. Perhaps, he said, at the next meet- 
ing we can have a Resolution of general authority. As a matter of fact, he said, 
the Board might even postpone adopting this one today if that is the pleasure 
of the Board. However, he added that we should have in the minutes the auth- 
ority with the standards within which the universities should operate. 

Mr. Murray said it would be his suggestion that the Board act on this Resolution 
today. 

Are we acting on it with no change in language, Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked? 

Mr. Winning said he was of the opinion that no change was needed because of 
the fact that the Board has ratified all prior purchases. 

Mr. McClure then moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois 
State University, as amended, and including the Resolution relative to the pur- 
chase of outstanding bonds. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski and 
it carried unanimously. 

Sangamon State Univesity - President's Report 

President Lacy called attention to the elections publication from Illinois Issues 
magazine which had been distributed to the Board. This is a volume which is 
published every two years, he advised, in connection with elections in the State. 

On October 14, 15 and 16, Dr. Lacy said, there will be on campus a major sym- 
posium on Illinois government and politics called "Crossroads 82". This symposiunr 
is also becoming a custom every two years to take a look at issues that are facing 
the State at about the time of the election. He invited all Regents to attend. 
It is expected that both Governor Thompson and Adlai Stevenson will be present, 
as well as other leaders of the State. 

Information reports were presented on : 

Enrollments for Summer Session 1982 

Annual Report of Depositories for FY 82 and Statement of Investment Policy 

Articulation Agreement Between Sangamon State University and Lincoln 

Christian College 
Grants and Contracts 

The following items were then submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Approval was requested for the execution of the Tower/Site and Supportive 



65 



Mast Agreements, whereby the Board of Regents acting on behalf of 
Sangamon State University leases to the West Central Illinois Educational 
Telecommunications Corporation (familiarly referred to as CONVOCOM) 
limited access to (1) the University's existing Tower /Site and (2) the 
Public Affairs Center for the purpose of installing required CONVOCOM 
microwave equipment, with no monetary consideration involved, for a 
period of ten years beginning September 24, 1982, contingent upon 
approval of these agreements by the Board's Legal Counsel. 

2. Request for Assessment Fee Approval 

President Lacy advised that the university in recent months has experi- 
mented in developing an instrument for measuring and awarding upper- 
division credit for prior learning. The complexity of the process entails 
considerable effort and, therefore, requires an assessment fee. Approval 
was requested of the following schedule based on the amount of credit 
requested : 

Credit Hours Requested Fee 

1-4 $ 80 

5 - 8 $140 

9 - 12 $210 

13 - 16 $300 

17 - 24 $400 

25 + $400 plus $9.50 per 

hour over 24 

3. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative and civil service per- 
sonnel. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the President's 
Report and will be kept on file at the University and in the Central 
Office. Included was a request for approval of a change in the assign- 
ment of Library faculty members' locus of tenure from the Innovative and 
Experimental Studies Cluster to the Library. 

4. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report. 

Taking note of the agreements with CONVOCOM, President Lacy noted that he 
would be bringing in additional contracts which will describe other arrangements 
of this partnership. 

With regard to the credit for prior learning program, Dr. Lacy said this is an 
experimental program which is now being conducted on a very small basis on 
campus. They are now at the point in this experiment where some students 
have gone through the necessary preliminary stages last year and this summer 
to now be at the point of being admitted into credit programs. They do need 
to have the fee structure adopted, the President said. It has been discussed 
with Staff. The structure is a moderate one compared to the structures they 
have evaluated at other public universities and private universities around the 
country. It comes in solid in the middle of the road compared to other fee 
structures which they have seen. This evaluation is for portfolios, and not 
for examination, Mrs. Fitzpatrick inquired? That is correct, the President said. 

Dr. Lacy said as an open access institution in the past SSU has not brought 
to the Board a good many articulation agreements, although they have had 



66 



understandings with community colleges and others about transfer credits. Now, 
the President said, he believes they will be bringing in more articulation agree- 
ments because the community colleges in particular feel more comfortable when 
they have these understandings in writing. The agreement with Lincoln Christian 
may be the first of a number to be brought to the Board over the course of the 
next year . 

Mr. Gayles said he is sure he speaks for Ms. Orchowski as well as for himself 
in wishing Ms. Simpson the best of luck in bringing in new students to Sangamon 
State. 

The President said he knows that Ms. Simpson regrets very much that she is 
unable to continue as a member of the Board because she was looking forward to 
the service, but she feels that this particular project is perhaps more important 
for the university. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon State 
University. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business to come before the Board, on motion duly made 
and seconded, the meeting was adjourned. The next regularly scheduled meeting 
of the Board will be held at Illinois State University on October 21, 1982. 



David E . Murray 
Chairman 



Franklin G. Matsler 
Secretary 



67 



Minutes of the Meeting- of the 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Illinois State University - Normal. Illinois 

October 21, 1982 



The regularly scheduled meeting* of the Board of Regents convened at 9:00 a.m 
on October 21, 1982 in the Circus Room of the Bone Student Center at Illinois 
State University, Normal, Illinois. Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman, presided. 



The meeting was called to order by the Chairman 
following Regents were present: 



Ir. Jerome R. Bender 

Is. Carol K. Burns 

Irs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick 

Ir. Montel Gayles 

Ir. L. Milton McClure 



Ms 
Mi- 
Mr 
Mr 
Mr 



rolJ was called, and the 



Denise Orchowski 

D. Brewster Parker 

Harold Riss 

James L. Wright 

David E. Murrav. Chairman 



Dr. Harry L. Wellbank was not present for the meeting. 

Also present were : 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director. Board of Regents 

Representing the Joint University Advisory Committee were: (ISU) Ms. Linda 
Andrejek , Dr. Virginia Crafts, Mr. Leon Toepke and Dr. George Tuttle; (NIU) 
Mr. Joe Koch, Dr. James E. Lankford, Dr. Annette Lefkowitz, Dr. Tony 
Scaperlanda, and Dr. Jerry Meyer; (SSU) Ms. Irene Allsop , Dr. George Gruendel 
and Dr. Jack VanDer Slik. 

Others in attendance included staff from the Regency Universities and the 
Central Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the Board; 
and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Mr. McClure moved that the Board recess the meeting to convene in Executive 
Session for the purpose of discussing matters relating to land acquisition, 
litigation, and the evaluation of President Watkins. The motion was seconded 
by Mr. Gayles and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public session at 10:15 a.m. 

Mr. Murray expressed the svmpathies of the Board to Marcella Murphy who 
was absent from the meeting because of the death of her mother-in-law. He 
advised that Mrs. Val Witten from ISU would serve as secretary for the meeting. 

Mr. Murray said he must note that although Mr. Wright had been up all night 
working on the Chrysler contract with the United Auto Workers, he was still 
present at the Board meeting today. He expressed his appreciation xo Mr. 
Wright for taking the time in spite of the great inconvenience to attend the 
meeting. 



President Watkins advised that the memento from Illinois State University had 
been furnished by Mr. Ted Wood, the manager of the bookstore located in the 
Student Center which the Regents had an opportunity to tour last evening. 

The President introduced Dr. Edward L. Schapsmeier, Distinguished Professor 
of History at ISU, who with his brother, Frederick, co-authored a two-volume 
history on former Vice President Henry Wallace, which was nominated for a 
Pulitzer Prize. A copy of Dr. Schapsmeier's most recent book, Political Parties 
and Civic Action Groups, had been placed at the place of each Regent. Dr. 
Watkins advised that this is a reference book which provides concise histories of 
important political and civic action organizations. His next book will be a bio- 
graphy of the late Senator Everett Dirksen entitled Senator Everett Dirksen of 
Illinois and the Politic s of Minority Leadership which will be published by the 
University of Illinois Press. 

President Watkins said another book placed on the table for the Board is an 
interesting collaboration by Dr. Willard J. McCarthy, Dr. Victor Repp and Mr. 
Oswald Ludwig. Metalwork Te chnology and Practice , he said, has been a 
leading text in the field of metalwork for many years. The first edition came 
out in 1943, and this is the seventh edition, which has been associated with 
ISU's teacher preparation mission as it is intended for secondary and community 
college programs. Dr. McCarthy retired in 1980 from the Department of Indus- 
trial Arts, although he is still teaching on a part-time basis at ISU. The 
President said this textbook is a reflection of both the roots and history of 
the university as well as the dedication of the faculty members. Dr. McCarthy 
and his wife were introduced to the Board. 

One very interesting thing about this text, Dr. Watkins commented, is that 
it was published by a local company which has a national reknown - McKnight 
Publishing Comoany. The chairman of the Board of the company donated the 
copies for distribution to the Board. He then introduced Mr. Bill McKnight 
who has contributed so much to ISU through the years, having served on the 
ISU Foundation board of directors, and who in 1978 was named Distinguished 
Alumnus of ISU. 

Chairman Murray thanked Dr. Schapsmeier and Dr. McCarthy for the autographec 
copies of their books. He noted that his relationship with Mr. McKnight goes 
back to the time when he served on the Foundation board with him, and he 
thanked him for his many contributions to Illinois State University. 

Mr. Murray noted that Regent Harold Riss had recently been recognized by 
the Normal Chamber of Commerce by being named the Citizen of the Year. He 
congratulated Mr. Riss and complimented the Chamber of Commerce on their 
selection. President Watkins said he had been present at this event which 
filled the ballroom of the Union, and Mr. Riss joins a list of very distinguished 
leaders of the community. 

The Chairman said that the preceding evening the Board had dinner here in 
the Student Center with members of the Normal city government and all of the 
new vendors located in the facility. Everyone is pleased with the changes that 
have taken place in the Union and excited about the future. He said it is just 
great to see students in the building again. The President said he was pleased 
to accept these acclamations on behalf of those people who were responsible for 
the changes. They really put their shoulders to the wheel and created what 
is seen here today. 



69 



MINUTES OF SEPTEMBER 23, 1982 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the meeting 
held on September 23, and he asked if there were any additions or corrections 
to be proposed. There being none, on motion by Mr. Parker, seconded by 
Ms. Burns, the minutes were unanimously approved as submitted. 

Mr. McClure said he wished to comment that the secretary does an outstanding 
job of preparing the minutes, and Mr. Murray said he was sure that Mrs. 
Murphy would appreciate hearing this. 

CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 

Seating of New Student Regent 

Mr. Murray said he had been advised that Sangamon State University was 

selecting a new Student Regent today or later this week. 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Facilities Committee 

Ms. Burns, committee chairman, reported that their primary discussion centered 
around the non- appropriated capital requirements plans for FY83 through FY85. 
This is the first time the committee has addressed the issue, and the plans will 
give the Board a better idea of future planning as it relates to non -appropriated 
facilities. She said she would just briefly summarize the plans, and Dr. Matsler 
might wish to elaborate further in his Executive Director's Report. 

The FY83 non-appropriated budget requests for Northern Illinois University, 
Ms. Burns reported, include Dorland Roof Replacement ($156,000), Steam Line 
Replacement ($1,700,000), and Exterior Soffit Repair on Grant Towers ($100,000), 
as well as various projects under $100,000 ($347,900), for a total of $2,303,900. 
She noted that the Extension of the Building Automation System ($250,000) had 
been deferred at the request of the university. 

Illinois State University's FY 83 requests total $1,410,000, and include Energy 
Conservation in various residence halls with a payback of five years or less 
($600,000), Replacement of Central Air Conditioning in Shelbourne Apartments 
($350,000, which represents an increase of $150,000 over the original estimate), 
providing sorinkler systems for the trash chutes in two residence halls ($60,000), 
and various projects under $100,000 ($460,000). 

Ms. Burns reported that Sangamon State had no projects and therefore did not 
submit a non-appropriated capital requirements plan to the Committee. 

Ms. Burns advised that the Committee recommends that the Board accept the 
FY83 plans. 

The Facilities Committee also discussed a project at Northern - the recreation 
facility which was first presented about a year and a half ago to the Board. 
This will be reviewed again, Ms. Burns advised. A representative from Con- 
tinental Bank met with the Committee yesterday, and if the bond markets 
remain favorable and the climate is desirable to go ahead with the project, 
more plans will be detailed to the Board within the next six months. 



70 



Referring to the recreation facility under consideration. President Monat said 
that he and Mr. Gayles had discussed the Student Association referendum for 
a fee increase to support the bond issue which was held about two years ago. 
If they do proceed with the project, the fee will remain at the level which was 
authorized by the referendum - $20.00 a semester. However, the President 
advised, Mr. Gayles does want to go back to campus and discuss with his 
colleagues and with the SA whether they feel that the referendum is still binding. 

Mr. Gayles advised that he had supported the project in the Committee meeting 
yesterday and he thinks that the referendum does still stand. He added that 
he is confident when he returns to campus and reports on the progress that 
has been made, he will see a lot of happy faces. 

Finance Committee 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick said inasmuch as she had been unable to attend the entire 
meeting of the Finance Committee, she would ask Mr. Riss to report to the 
Board . 

Mr. Riss reported that the Committee had no problems with Section III of the 
Executive Director's Report (January 1983 Salary Increases), and recommends 
approval by the Board. The matter of differential tuition was discussed, and 
the Committee is to receive more information on this question from the Staff. 
The Committee also considered the FY 83 internal budgets prepared by the 
institutions and recommends their approval by the Board. Staff also presented 
to the Committee an analysis relating FY82 Internal Budget allocations to expendi- 
tures. 

Dr. Matsler said he would add that although the matter of differential tuition 
was discussed only preliminarily by the Committee, there was really no feeling 
one way or the other on the part of the Committee, and Staff has made no 
decision as to whether or not this is an appropriate concept. Recommendations 
relative to tuition probably will not be made before the end of the year, and 
perhaps not until January. There are too many things which must fall into 
place before a decision is made on the level of tuition. Some input will be needed 
from the Student Regents also. 

Mr. Murray inquired what is going on in the other systems in Illinois and 
throughout the country with regard to differential tuition. Is there a move 
toward this? 

Dr. Matsler responded that there was some movement about two years ago, 
but if there is any movement toward this now it is probably in the area of 
professional schools - engineering, law, and medicine. There are not very 
many institutions which have a differential between upper and lower division, 
although there has been some movement in that direction. It is a problem that 
will be Unique to the Regency System, Dr. Matsler said, and we simply should 
face it, and if it is appropriate we should be moving in that direction - perhaps 
not this year, but in other years. He said he is reluctant to move in that 
direction before we know a little more about what we are going to receive in 
the way of recommendations from the Governor's Office and from the legislature. 

State Universities Retirement System 

Mr. Bender said he could report that the assets of the funds of the State 
Universities Retirement System for the first time in many years now exceed the 
book value. Hardly anyone remembers when that was true. Mr. Bender said 



71 



if his figures are correct, this is a recovery in excess of $200,000,000. Also 
the income is really substantially higher than it has ever been because of the 
change in the use of the monies by the four money managers. 

Mr. Bender then read to the Board the text of a letter which had been sent 
by Mr. G. W. Howard III, President of the Board of the State Universities 
Retirement System, to Paul Stone. President of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Illinois; William Norwood, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
Southern Illinois University: David E. Murray, Chairman of the Board of Regents 
Dominick Bufalino, Chairman of the Board of Governors; and William Campbell, 
Chairman of the Illinois Community College Board. The letter concerned the 
status of the funding of the State Universities Retirement System, and urged 
all public governing boards to make retirement funding a major priority for 
FY 84, lest SURS again suffer from the state's failure to adequately fund this 
important aspect of compensation for services. (A copy of the letter is attached 
as a part of these Minutes.) So, Mr. Bender said, the problem is still with 
us and it is imperative that we continue our efforts to get the system into a 
better shape. 

Chairman Murray commented that Mr. Howard's letter is very thought-provoking 
and he could not agree more. He asked Mr. Bender to keep the Board informed 
as to what he believes should be done. 

Before hearing the report from the Joint University Advisory Committee, Mr. 
Murray said he would first report on the Executive Session of the Board. 
The Board took action on acquisition of real estate at Illinois State University. 
As to litigation, the Board discussed the suit at Northern Illinois University 
concerning the repairs to the parapet wall of the Holmes Student Center, as 
well as the matter involving NIU and the Continental Telephone Company. The 
bulk of the Executive Session was dedicated to the evaluation of President 
Watkins and a review of his goals and objectives. Mr. Murray reported that 
this was a routine review and the Board expressed real pleasure with the condi- 
tion of ISU at this time. He said while it is not fair to blame the President 
for any of the problems at ISU, it perhaps is not fair to give him all of the 
credit for all of the good things that are happening either. The Board thinks 
that administratively ISU is in excellent condition, and that certainly is a credit 
to Dr. Watkins and to the outstanding people who serve with him in guiding 
the university, both administratively and educationally. The Board is pleased 
with the President's leadership and looks forward to working with him and his 
administrative team indefinitely. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Dr. Crafts, Chairman of the JUAC, reported that the committee has two new 
student members from Sangamon State, although they were unable to be present 
for today's meeting - Sue Bussone and Cindy Stephenson. 

At its meeting, Dr. Crafts continued, the Committee spent most of its time dis- 
cussing the SURS background paper and its dissemination. Everything is pro- 
ceeding according to plans, she said, and it is hoped that the printing of the 
paper can be expedited for distribution. The Committee also had some discus- 
sion of the regulations relative to financial exigency which were approved by 
the Board last month. Dr. Groves did clarify the notice provisions for the 
temporary contracts as well as the tenure and tenure-track contracts. The 
Committee also discussed very briefly the guidelines for the 1983 salary increases 



72 



to make sure everyone understands them. With respect to the proposal for a 
statewide policy on tuition waivers for dependents of faculty and staff, JUAC 
is looking' forward to the report which will be forthcoming from the Board of 
Higher Education. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 135 

Before presenting his Report, Dr. Matsler informed the Board that he had 
received from Dr. Charles Brim a letter of resignation to be effective next 
August. He said he appreciates having that much time to find a replacement. 
Dr. Brim has been with the Central Staff since 1969, Dr. Matsler said, although 
he has been in the System for 25 years. He probably knows more about the 
Regency System than any individual and he will be missed tremendously. 

Dr. Matsler called the attention of the Board to the new "Board of Regents 
Directory" which had been distributed. Dr. Marcia Escott of Illinois State 
has helped compile the Directory for two or three years, Dr. Matsler advised, 
and her assistance is very much appreciated. The Directory is intended to be 
distributed by the institutions to faculty and staff to orient them to the Board 
of Regents system. 

Section I - Internal Budgets for FY 1983 

The internal budgets, Dr. Matsler said, are very important documents which 
indicate how the institutions will spend their funds. The Finance Committee 
spent a considerable amount of time yesterday reviewing these budgets, he 
said, which total $236,659,000 for the three institutions. A look at Table 1, 
he said, would show the summary of revenue sources for FY 83 operating funds: 
General Revenue, University Income Funds, Revenue Bond Operations, Auxiliary 
Enterprises, Gifts, Grants and Contracts and Local Funds. The ideal thing, 
he said, would be to present the internal budgets to the Board right after the 
Governor signs the appropriation bill in July. This is not feasible, he said, 
because after we find out what the final appropriations are, the institutions 
then must allocate to the hundreds of cost centers. While the Board would not 
wish to get into the details of how much each of the cost centers is allocated , 
it should be interested in some of the trends which are occurring over the years 
The Board should also be interested in seeing whether there are aberrations 
in the trends and if there are, receiving answers as to why. 

Tables 2, 4 and 6, Dr. Matsler continued, show the historical distribution of 
appropriated operating funds and the percent of total (excluding retirement) 
by functional activity, with Instruction being the most important of the primary 
functions which also include Organized Research and Public Service. Support 
functions include Academic Support and Institutional Support . Other functions 
include Student Services and Operation and Maintenance of Physical Plant. 

As to trends, Dr. Matsler said he would use as an example the functional 
activity of Instruction at ISU accounted for 58.6% of appropriated operating 
funds in 1979, 57.4% in 1980, 58.2% in 1981, 58.2% in 1982, and going back 
down to 57.2% in 1983. In other words this has remained quite stable. It 
will also be seen that in terms of these percentages, Northern's are quite 
close to those at ISU. 

Dr. Matsler said he would direct the attention of the Board to Table 9 showing 



73 



at NIU the historical distribution of appropriated operating funds by object 
classification, which uses the same line items that are used in writing the 
approoriation bill. It will be noted that Personal Services has gone up only 
27.4% from FY 79 to FY 83, Contractual Services (utilities, extra costs for gas- 
oline, etc.) has increased 34.9% during this period, and Commodities 105.2%. 
Dr. Matsler said he believes that this shows that the salaries in our institutions 
as well as all institutions in the State, have dropped behind other categories. 

An examination of Table 3 which breaks the Instruction function down into 
various components will give the Board an idea of where the load is occurring 
in the various colleges at ISU, and the changes that are being made. Arts 
and Sciences has increased only 24.4%, while Applied Science and Technology 
over the years has increased considerably (58.7%). This is significant. 

Staff recommends, Dr. Matsler said, approval of the FY83 Internal Budgets 
for Illinois State University, Northern Illinois University and Sangamon State 
University. Staff also recommends that the Board authorize the Presidents to 
make reasonable and moderate changes in the budgets as presented, subject 
to the availability of funds, statutory limitations and Board Regulations. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Burns, and it carried unanimously. 

Section II - Non-Apppropriated Capital Requirements Plans, FY1983-FY1985 

Dr. Matsler said inasmuch as Ms. Burns had reported on these plans earlier, 
he would simply draw attention to the summary of the requests and ask that 
appropriate corrections be made. The total for ISU should be changed to 
$1,410,000, and the amount for replacement of Central Air Conditioning in 
Shelbourne Apartments be changed to $350,000. The corrected total for NIU 
should also be changed to $2,303,900 to reflect deferral of the Extension of 
the Building Automation System ($250,000). 

Staff recommends that the Board accept the Non-Appropriated Capital Require- 
ments Plans of NIU and ISU and that approval be given to the requests of 
$2,303,900 for NIU and $1,410,000 for ISU. These budget recommendations 
include project approval only for those projects which exceed $100,000. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The motion was 
seconded by Mr. Riss, and it carried unanimously. 

Section HI - January 1983 Salary Increases 

Dr. Matsler said that this year the legislature and Governor provided funds 
which are not sufficient to cover a full 3% increase for faculty and staff, but 
the intent was to have the institutions provide a 3% raise beginning January 1. 
The institutions, therefore, have had to go into other lines to provide the needed 
funds. Since the 3% is only for one half a year, the total amount in the personal 
services line is, for the full year, 1.5%. It should be remembered, however, 
that we only received about 90% of that because we had been told to compute 
on a 90% base. The action being proposed today, Dr. Matsler said, is simply 
to authorize the institutions to provide the 3%. He said he would add that in 
some instances the 3% would be exceeded because the 3% does not include in 
some instances promotion money and adjustment money. 



74 



Dr. Matsler said Staff recommends that the Regency Universities and the 
Central Office be authorized to grant , subject to the availability of funds , 
salary increases to faculty and administrative staff (authorization is already 
provided for granting such increases to civil service employees) within the 
following limitations: 

1. The increases will be effective on January 1, 1983 or at the beginning 
of the pay period nearest that date. Increases shall not average over 

o o . 

2. Only faculty and staff (including laboratory school faculty at ISU) who 
were under contract in FY 1982 and who would have been eligible for 
merit salary increases in the summer or fall of 1982 (if funds had been 
available for such increases) are eligible for the proposed January 1, 
1983 salary increases. Temporary employees are not eligible to be con- 
sidered for the proposed increases. 

3. Total salary increase dollars granted to faculty, administrative staff, 
and civil service employees in FY 1983 shall not exceed the dollars 
included in the FY 1983 appropriations for such increases. The salary 
adjustments to be covered will include increases granted on or about 
January 1, 1983 or at any other time during FY1983 which are for merit, 
promotion in rank, equity adjustments, across-the-board raises, scheduled 
step plan increments or raises due to range changes for civil service 
employees, etc. The only changes which may be granted in addition to 
these increases would be: a) end-of-probationary-period raises for civil 
service employees who are ineligible for any other increases during 

FY 1983 and b) adjustments due to added responsibilities assumed as a 
result of changes in position. 

4. Increases granted on or about January 1, 1983 to faculty and admini- 
strative staff will be reported for information to the Board in the 
January 1983 Presidents 1 Reports. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Riss, and it carried unanimously. 

Section IV - Statewide Tui tion Waiver Policy for Dependents of Faculty and Staff 

In July, Dr. Matsler said, the Board adopted a resolution directing the Staff to 
explore with the Board of Higher Education the possibility of providing a state- 
wide tuition waiver policy for children of faculty and staff. Staff has gone to 
the BHE to determine what the impact of such a policy would be on the budgets 
of each of the institutions. Presently, he said, we can waive up to 2% without 
penalty, but if we go beyond that 2% the Legislature will not make up the dif- 
ference in general revenue monies. 

If the Board of Regents were to unilaterally instigate the policy, Dr. Matsler 
said, we would have to take a reduction in general revenue dollars the year 
the policy is instituted or the following year. That is why Regent Fitzpatrick 
suggested at the outset that we explore this as a statewide policy. 

Dr. Matsler said he could see this going two ways: (1) the policy would be 
for each institution to provide such waivers for just the children of faculty 
and staff at that particular institution; or (2) a statewide policy whereby 



75 



each institution would waive tuition for dependents of faculty and staff from 
any other institution. This latter way might be more difficult, he noted, and 
he is not sure which way would be better. As this unfolds, we will be looking 
at the proposal from the standpoint of how many students, for instance, would 
choose to go to the U. of I., and whether one institution might benefit more 
than others. It is estimated, Dr. Matsler said, that such a policy could cost 
the State between $3 million and $6 million, depending on how it is done. 

Dr. Brim added that the very rough estimates are from $2.5 million to $3.6 
million for waivers within the System whereby, for example, employees at 
NIU could send their dependents to ISU or SSU. The lower figure is the 
estimate if the dependents attend the home institution. It is believed that 
if students attend schools in other systems then it would run more, but whether 
it would cost $5 or $6 million is uncertain because they really do not have data 
on this. As a matter of fact, he said, even the $2.5 to $3.6 million is based 
on some very shaky assumptions. It will all depend upon how wide a choice 
is allowed . 

Dr. Matsler said if we take the position that there are only limited dollars 
available and we allow for tuition waivers for just the dependents of faculty 
and staff, then those faculty and staff who do not have children would be 
penalized . There is the problem of equity within the campus, and there is 
also the problem of compatibility with other institutions in the State. 

Ms. Burns inquired if we know what the experiences of other states have 
been. Is there some place where this does work? 

Dr. Matsler said they have found that most tuition waivers occur within one 
institution and also more within the private institutions who find that this is 
a good way to helo faculty on their own campuses. He said he does not have 
much information as to other states' experiences. Dr. Brim said that public 
universities typically do not grant waivers to dependents of employees. 
Dr. Matsler said waivers tend to be granted more by the private institutions, 
and some of them will grant reciprocal waivers for people in the same con- 
ference. For example, Knox College will probably grant waivers to faculty 
and dependents of faculty at Coe College. This whole area is being looked at 
more now because of the low salary increases for the last few years around 
the country, although thus far not too many have gone this route. 

President Monat commented that two of the universities with which he has been 
associated have such waivers. The City University of New York has a complete 
waiver, and Pennsylvania State University, he believes, there is a 2/3 reduction 
in tuition. 

Ms. Burns suggested it might be a good idea to talk with some of these other 
universities such as New York to find out what kinds of problems they have 
had, if any, and we might also be able to get a better handle on the costs, 
what percentage of faculty might take advantage of the waivers , etc . 

Dr. Matsler said the present estimates are based on the number of faculty and 
staff who have children of college age. The assumptions were made as best 
they could be with the data we have on our own campuses. Some of these 
assumptions are very difficult to get at. However, he believes this is still 
a very good idea to explore. Let's assume, he said, that it only costs $3 million 
for the State, which is not very much when it is figured down to what each 



76 



institution is going - to have, and when the morale booster effect is taken into 
consideration. If indeed our assumptions and estimates are correct, then it 
would not be a costly proposal. We will know more about this as we study 
this with the BHE staff. 

Mr. Gayles asked how this would affect the current percentage of tuition 
waivers that are given to non-children of faculty or staff. 

Dr. Matsler said this would have to be decided. One way to look at this would 
be simply to say that the policy of the State would be to allow the policy to 
exist and to let each institution waive tuition for children of faculty and staff. 
Let's assume that would cost about $3 million, so the Board of Higher Education 
would simply raise the 2% ceiling to some other figure which would be slightly 
higher. If we were to do that, he said, we would benefit a little bit more than 
would appear on the surface because in some instances, of course, we would 
still have our scholarship funds which would be saved and be available for even 
others. 

Staff will be returning with further information on this whole matter, Dr. Matsler 
advised. 

Section V - Collective Bargaining Agreement: Northern Illinois University 
and AFSCME (Lorado Taft) 

Dr. Matsler informed the Board that negotiations have been completed relative 
to a two-year agreement between NIU and Lorado Taft Campus Employees Local 
963-AFSCME (AFL-CIO) pertaining to the classifications of cook, kitchen 
laborer and maintenance worker repairman. There are no immediate wage 
increases, but the agreement is tied to the DeKalb campus agreement and 
contains provisions for further negotiations as to wages in January, 1983 and 
again in August 1983. There are no major policy changes reflected in the 
agreement. Staff recommends that when the agreement is presented in the 
NIU President's Report it be approved by the Board. 

Section VI - Board Regulation Amendment : Entertainment Fund 

This proposed amendment was presented for first reading in September, Dr. 
Matsler noted. The oroposed change would permit funds in the entertainment 
allowance for each university president to be used at locations other than the 
President's residence, which will allow for a little bit more flexibility. Staff 
recommends, he said, that the amendment be approved by the Board. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Burns, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VII - Intercollegiate Athletics 

Dr. Matsler said he would like to thank the staff at the institutions who pro- 
vided much of the data required to put this report together for the Board. 
Intercollegiate athletics, he said, has been a rather controversial matter 
because of the costs involved. There are some who feel that perhaps inter- 
collegiate athletics should be self-supporting, although he does not believe 
that this is possible at our institutions. He said he was pleased to find 
that our institutions are not out of line when compared with others in the 
State and with institutions in other conferences. He noted that the report 



77 



was being presented to the Board as an information item and Staff was not 
requesting any action, unless the Board should feel otherwise. 

Mr. Parker noted Dr. Matsler's comment about how our schools compare with 
others, however, he said he thought the basic idea when the study had been 
proposed by Mr. Henriksen was that all schools are out of line, and that a 
comparison among schools would not really be meaningful. 

Dr. Matsler said that was a good point, however, the real issue is whether 
our institutions would want to change their policies or continue to compete with 
these other institutions, and that is a policy question which the Board may or 
may not want to address. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick inquired into the status of the hearings by the Hastert sub- 
committee. 

Dr. Brim said as far as he knows they have finished their hearings. All 
schools have had an opportunity to make a presentation, and he understands 
that there will be a report forthcoming although it probably will not be made 
until after the election. The universities did present information to the com- 
mittee, he said, and in some instances hundreds of pages, consisting of data 
such as the names of coaches and other individuals involved in the programs. 
The committee staff summarized the data and some of this has been included 
in the report before the Board. The legislators on the committee were inte- 
rested in a variety of things such as the percentage of athletes who graduate, 
the advantages of being in a Class I organization, what are the criteria that 
may have been used when the decision was made to add or delete programs? 
Dr. Brim said the committee got into things which in many cases were more 
judgmental in nature than just data. In some cases where institutions had 
made revisions in their programs, questions were asked as to why this was 
done rather than just take across-the-board cuts. The committee did not dwell 
too much on the data which had been provided which, of course, was largely 
financial data, numbers of scholarships, number of participants, number of 
coaches, where the money comes from, etc. 

Since Dr. Brim has attributed some significance to the report, Mrs. Fitzpatrick 
asked what he thought might happen. Dr. Brim said he was the world's worst 
at guessing what legislators or boards might do. His opinion was that the 
general tone was not one of great antagonism or attempting to say that they 
had a pre-arranged agenda and that they want to eliminate athletics or reduce 
the programs. The hearings were as much as anything sort of fact-finding 
sessions. He said from the nature of the questions asked he would not feel 
that there would be any great recommendation for change; however, he could 
be completely wrong. 

Dr. Brim said the report does not answer or attempt to answer many of the 
questions that come up from time to time about intercollegiate athletics . It 
does not attempt to answer the questions which were raised in the beginning. 
We sometimes hear, but very rarely, if ever, in our System of recruiting 
violations or under the table payments. These sort of things are usually 
associated with the major powers and our schools are not , in spite of how some 
of them may like to be classified, major athletic powers in comparison with the 
Big Ten schools or other groups. What staff attempted to do was take a small 
portion of information that could be obtained from the RAMP documents and 



78 



data turned into the Hastert committee, and put it into a short report which 
could be fairly easily digested by the Boird without having to wade through 
literally hundreds of pages of material. Some of the information can be a little 
misleading, Dr. Brim warned, because of the nature of the data, the way ques- 
tions were asked, and perhaps the way it was summarized. For instance, he 
said, on the table showing the number of athletes participating in intercollegiate 
athletics, only one year is shown, although the following page shows an overall 
history for the last two or three years. The totals may not be completely cor- 
rect in the sense that there may be some duplication, Dr. Brim said. 

When you start looking into the dollars, Dr. Brim continued, you have problems 
with how they are reported and what is included. The different institutions in 
the state interpreted differently the questions concerning the full-time equivalent 
of students who were granted awards . 

Some of the schools said if a student got a full tuition waiver from appropriated 
funds, they would consider that one FTE student. If the same student got a 
full award including room and board, perhaps some books and waiver of fees, 
some institutions might consider that one FTE student, and this was the way 
that ISU reported, Dr. Brim said. He said he added them together and in 
many cases they were the same students, so he should not have done this for 
the number of students, although the dollars should have been added together. 
Incidentally, he said, the Hastert Committee made the same mistake in their 
interpretation of how ISU did this. So, Dr. Brim said, the Totals column in 
the upper portion of Table 2 should be deleted from the report. 

Illinois State and Northern are doing roughly the same thing in terms of 
waivers, Dr. Brim said, as can be noted in the tables. This varies from 
school to school depending on which sports they have and where the emphasis 
is, but at each of the two institutions they amounted to a little over half a 
million dollars, but Sangamon State, having just initiated some sports, has 
less than $38,000 in awards and grants. Waivers are extremely important in 
terms of dollars, Dr. Brim commented, but obviously they account for less 
than the majority of the funds used. He called attention to Table 3 (State 
Support for Intercollegiate Athletics), where according to RAMP documents in 
FY82 we spent a little over $1.3 million in our System. This includes such 
things as scholarship waivers, coaches' salaries, etc. We all know, Dr. Brim 
said, that if we buy equipment out of appropriated funds for intercollegiate 
athletics, our Regulations require that these expenditures will come from the 
Income Fund. These are still appropriated dollars and some will maintain that 
if these purchases come from appropriated funds in any manner - whether from 
General Revenue or Income - if the money is not used for this it could be used 
for other purposes. Looking at the information Staff was able to get from the 
other two systems in the State, it can be seen that we seem to spend a little bit 
more than the total spent by the Board of Governors, although two of their 
institutions have intercollegiate programs which are practically at zero. We 
also spend a little bit more than the SIU system. The U. of I. is not included 
in the report, he said, and one of the reasons is that in the RAMP documents 
the University of Illinois in past years has not been listing any appropriated 
funds. In future years they may include some. 

Dr. Brim then referred to Table 3- A (Non- Appropriated Support for Inter- 
collegiate Athletics), which shows that we spend quite a bit more from non- 
appropriated funds than from appropriated, about two and one-half times more. 



79 



These funds come from all kinds of sources, he said, and he was not able to 
get a good breakdown especially by sport. These non -appropriated amounts 
have gone up rather substantially over the years - from about $1.5 million in 
FY 79 to almost $3.4 million in FY 82. Some of this is because of added conference 
income, conference related income from gate receipts, student fees, etc. 

The usual question which comes up, Dr. Brim continued, is how much is spent 
and whether it is appropriate. He said he could not answer the question, and 
he thinks if a vote were taken, or if individuals just wrote down a figure without 
hearing what others think, we would come up with slightly different figures as 
to an appropriate amount for an institution such as one of ours to spend for 
intercollegiate athletics. Our institutions spend roug;hly 1% of their appropriated 
funds on intercollegiate athletics, and about 2% of our total expenditures. He 
said he has been assured by individuals on the campuses that some members of 
our own conferences spend quite a bit more than we do, and we also know that 
when you get into big time athletics, the amount of money which is spent is 
very substantial. What does all this mean? Dr. Brim said he thinks the answer 
to that question is really up to the Board. Is it interested in pursuing this 
further, or does the Board think that this report, plus whatever the Hastert 
Committee comes out with in terms of conclusions, is sufficient. Does the Board 
want other information? He said he realizes that this does not answer the ques- 
tions raised by Regent Henriksen in terms of what are appropriate levels of 
student fees. That usually is a decision made by the students when they vote, 
by the institutions when they present certain proposals to students for a vote, 
and then when the proposals are brought to the Board. In past years this 
Board has made the decision even though it might not have come up with the 
same figures unless the presidents recommended it and the students voted for 
it. The Board made the decision that a certain amount of money for student 
fees is appropriate. This is something which the staff cannot really help, Dr. 
Brim said, except tell the Board a little bit about what certain numbers are; 
and it is then up to the Board to determine where the emphasis should be, 
what is the right amount and what is not . 

Dr. Matsler thanked Dr. Brim for the report. Staff has no recommendations 
to make the Board. 

Mr. Parker said he hoped that the Board would be provided copies of the 
report of the Hastert Committee when it is published. 

Ms. Orchowski, noting Tables 3 and 3- A for ISU, said these show a decrease 
in state support dollars for the athletic program and yet we have a significant 
increase in non-appropriated support - which is student fees. She said she 
would like to know if the state is proposing that there is going to be a phase 
out of state dollars and that student fees will be compensating the budget cut. 

Dr. Brim said he could not give a definite answer as to what the state is pro- 
posing. He said that ISU and NIU have made decisions in the relatively recent 
past, largely because of budget crunches, that some changes had to be made 
In some cases they decided to phase out a number of sports. Some of the 
phase-outs occurred just this past summer and are not reflected in today's 
report. Consequently if a similar study were done next year we would see 
quite a difference in terms of sports being offered. He said he believes that 
NIU dropped 8 and ISU dropped some a year or so ago. Part of that has been, 
in his opinion , because of the financial bind from state appropriations and 
their priorities. They said we just cannot put that much money from state 



80 



appropriations into intercollegiate athletics with all the other needs. So they 
reduced it. Why the non-appropriated funds went up, Dr. Brim said, he 
could not say, except that some of that may be due to added gate receipts, 
changes in fees, student enrollments, etc. All of these things could be factors. 

Mr. Gayles asked if we know how much of non-appropriated money is derived 
from student fees themselves. Dr. Brim said he did not have the figures, 
but it is a fairly sizable amount. Mr. Gayles noted that Dr. Brim had said 
that a number of sports had been cut, but we are still working with the same 
base figure in non-appropriated funds, and he thinks this is a little alarming. 

Mr. Murray said he would like to play devil's advocate for a moment. We are 
apparently graduating about 60% of our scholarship athletes. We can see the 
dollars that we are spending. What would happen, he asked, if all the schools 
in the Mid America Conference decided they would not have full rides anymore, 
no scholarships, and just compete against one another? They would have the 
same basic programs which they now have, but without the funding of the 
scholarships. They would take the athletes that come to their schools without 
great recruiting campaigns . Mr. Murray said this has a sort of logical appeal 
to him. Student fees would no longer be used to fund the athletic scholarships. 
He suspects the competition would still be roughly the same. What would be 
wrong with adopting that type of a policy on a conference basis, he asked? 

President Monat said he believes Mr. Murray's assumption that the competition 
would be roughly the same was in error. He believes the competition would be 
dramatically changed in terms of the institution's ability to attract and maintain 
generally competitive athletes. We do play teams other than those in the con- 
ference, he noted. Mr. Murray said he realizes that, but suppose we changed 
that and just played conference opponents. The President said he thinks it 
would be a lower level of competition, it just would not be the same. What 
would happen, asked Mr. Murray? Dr. Monat said gate receipts would go down 
drastically, and TV revenue would disappear. But if all of this were discounted, 
Mr. Murray said, how would Northern for example end up financially? In terms 
of appropriated funds, about the same, the President said, because appropriated 
funds by and large are used to pay salaries. 

Mr. Murray said he would be interested in knowing how many of the letter 
persons graduate. He presumes these are the people who come on a scholarship 
initially. President Monat said not all athletes carry scholarships. Mr. Murray 
said he thought the figure in the report was for scholarship athletes, but perhaps 
that is not true. He said he was sure it hadn't changed - the first couple of 
months there is a big attrition in students, in athletes, etc., but after they 
get letters, how many of those tend to graduate? Dr. Monat said he did not 
have that information. Mr. Pembroke said he would speculate about two-thirds. 

Ms. Burns said Dr. Brim had reported that our universities spend roughly 1-2% 
of their funds on athletics. She would like to know what percentage of FTE 
students actually take part in intercollegiate athletics. Would it be about the 
same percentage? She thinks it would be interesting to know that number. 
President Monat said he thinks it would be about the same roughly. Dr. Brim 
referred to page 32 of the report where 507 athletes are listed for ISU. He 
said he does not know what the undergrad FTE is, but he would assume that 
we are talking about 16-17,000, since graduate students rarely participate in 
intercollegiate athletics. That particular year, Dr. Watkins said, ISU's enroll- 



ment was 19,500 (head count), of which 2100 were graduate students. He said 
he could not reduce that down to FTE. So, Dr. Brim said, we are talking about 
roughly 3%, and he would think that NIU would be about the same. But Dr. 
Watkins said if we add the number of young men and women on any campus with 
a reasonably full athletic program who are involved in some way through band , 
cheerleading, song-leading, that number could easily double. They are involved 
in a different way, but they are still involved. Can we justify this expense by 
saying that we are permitting young people who otherwise might not go to col- 
lege an opportunity to get a degree, Mr. Murray inquired? Dr. Monat said he 
thinks in some instances that happens. 

Mr. Gayles said there is a follow-up question. How many of those students that 
we go out and recruit and to whom we give scholarships actually graduate? How 
many lose or forfeit their scholarshios? We see these figures and statistics, 
and we think these are the people who finish from freshman year to senior year , 
but yet there is a drop-out there. Dr. Monat said his guess would be that in 
terms of the students who come to NIU as freshmen and ultimately graduate, 
there would be a higher percentage of student athletes graduating than regular 
students. Dr. Watkins said he thinks that is fairly true at all universities. 
That is probably because they have the scholarships and they are getting some 
assistance, Mr. Murray suggested. President Watkins said the grant-in-aid 
recipient, if that individual is a person of real need (and many are), he does 
not have as good a deal as a student with need who gets an ISSC or Pell Grant. 
The monetary value is restricted by the definition of grant-in-aid. These people 
are not eligible for other aid beyond this. It's not as easy a thing as it might 
look. Sometimes you will find that a student athlete actually makes a monetary 
sacrifice . 

Referring to the data relative to the percent of athletes enrolled during fall 
semesters 1975, 1976 and 1977 who earned a degree, Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked if 
it were correct that these were not just scholarship recipients. Dr. Brim said 
these figures supposedly would include some that did not receive scholarships , 
adding that it is his understanding that the Hastert Committee did not get 
these figures. One thing we have to be a little bit careful about in terms of 
drop-out or graduation rates, he said, is that typically now the undergraduate 
is more apt to drop out for a short time or change schools, particularly if 
he is a pre-professional student. Also, if we would go a few years longer 
and then go back to that same group we would probably find that more of them 
did graduate. It is rather rare for more than 50% of the students to graduate 
from most institutions within the typical four years. Dr. Brim said according 
to testimony given to the Hastert Committee, the rates of graduation for 
athletes is as good or better than the usual rate for non-athletes in practically 
every school in the State. 

Ms. Orchowski said she thought the tables were interesting in that they show 
a significant difference in the actual monetary allocations to women's sports 
and to men's sports. At ISU and NIU we are talking about a $900,000 difference, 
and a $60,000 difference at Sangamon State. She said she thinks this is some- 
thing that needs to be looked into a little bit more. 

President Monat said there is a very simple reason for the difference . Support 
is based upon participation in terms of the scholarships, certainly. And there 
are federal guidelines, Title IX, which are followed very, very faithfully. Ms. 
Burns asked what is the status of Title IX. She said she knows it has been 
challenged but does not believe that the status has changed. Dr. Monat said 



82 



there have been two circuit court decisions in different circuits and they both 
disagree with each other, so really nothing has changed. 

Chairman Murray said he detected from today's discussion that everyone prob- 
ably found the report to be about as he did - reassuring in some respects 
that we are not spending more than we are and that we are compatible with 
other institutions in the State and the country. His own decision is that the 
amount that we are spending is realistic and we are getting good programs 
for the amount of investment. There probably is not a big desire to change 
this. He said he found the report well done and kind of fascinating, and he 
wonders if we might continue the report on some sort of a yearly or bi-yearly 
basis, just as an information item. 

Mr. Gayles said he would like to see incorporated into the report more of the 
philosophies expressed by Mr. Henriksen. Mr. Murray asked what he understood 
those to be. To look more at the aesthetics, Mr. Gayles said, the programs 
themselves underneath the facade of the black and white issue, the politics, 
and the possible "back-doorness" of how the programs are set up and established. 
Personally, Mr. Gayles said, he would like to see a closer look at how we as 
institutions treat our athletes and the care we give them until graduation. 
Perhaps a tracking method would be a solution to that. 

Mr. Murray thanked Dr. Brim for the report. He reported that he and Mr. 
Parker attended a fascinating session at the recent AGB meeting on intercollegi- 
ate athletics. The one point that was made very clear is that the athletic pro- 
grams at universities should not be sold on the basis of providing jobs in pro- 
fessional sports. The figure for football, for instance, is way below 1% of all 
the football players who ever reach the pro ranks. It was stressed that we 
must not justify our programs or try and sell student athletes on professional 
careers arising out of participation at colleges. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board, President Watkins said he would like 
to thank Dr. Leon Boothe and the other vice presidents who handled the affairs 
of the University so well during his enforced absence for eye surgery. He said 
he was also grateful to all of the members of the Board and staff for the expres- 
sions of concern. He said he appears to be well on the road to recovery from 
the retinal problem. 

The President asked that a tyoographical error on page 3 of his Report be cor- 
rected. Also, on page 13, he asked that the spelling of the name of Edward 
Andreasen be corrected. Dr. Watkins referred to the request for purchase 
of the Video Educational Information System, noting that this had been reviewed 
by the Facilities Committee yesterday, and he had been informed that the com- 
mittee recommends approval by the Board. Finally, the President said, he would 
ask that two Resolutions relative to land purchases which had been approved in 
Executive Session be made a part of his Report . 

Information reports were presented on: 

Degrees Awarded on August 7, 1982 
Headcount of Students, Fall 1982 (On-Campus) 



83 



Grants & Contracts (Research, Training, Service) 

Bond Redemptions 

Capital Improvements Projects - Progress Report 

The following items were then submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for 
civil service emoloyees. A list of all reported transactions is appended 
to the President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and 
in the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report 

3. Land Acquisition 

The following Resolutions, as approved in Executive Session, were sub- 
mitted as part of the President's Report: 

RESOLUTION 

AUTHORIZATION FOR LAND ACQUISITION 

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents has reviewed a campus plan demonstrat- 
ing the need for expansion of parking facilities; and 

WHEREAS , implementation of said plan requires additional land in the 
central area of the campus; and 

WHEREAS, parcels of land are available to the University which would 
enable the University to expand its parking according to said plan; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the State 
of Illinois, acting for and on behalf of Illinois State University, does 
hereby authorize the President of Illinois State University to take such 
actions as may be reasonably necessary to obtain merchantable titles to 
the following described properties from the present owners of said 
properties by warranty deed conveying the properties to the Board of 
Regents for and on behalf of the people of the State of Illinois for con- 
sideration as shown : 

The north 55 feet of the west 100 feet of Lot 6, in 
Block 1 in the Normal Twenty Third Addition to the 
Town of Normal, McLean County, Illinois. 

302 Normal Avenue, Normal, McLean County, Illinois 

Amount of Consideration - $69,300 (Sixty-Nine Thousand 

Three Hundred Dollars) 

The West 50 feet, East 147 feet of Lot 3 and 4 in 
Block 2, Twenty Third Addition to the Town of Normal, 
McLean County, Illinois 

404 W. Locust Street, Normal, McLean County, Illinois 



84 



Amount of Consideration: $55,500 (Fifty-Five Thousand 

and Five Hundred Dollars) 

FURTHER RESOLVED, that Illinois State University is authorized to 
expend said specified amount from Parking Reserves. 



RESOLUTION 

AUTHORIZATION FOR LAND ACQUISITION 

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents has reviewed a campus plan demon- 
strating the need for expansion of parking facilities; and 

WHEREAS, implementation of said plan requires additional land in 
the central area of the campus; and 

WHEREAS, parcels of land are available to the University which would 
enable the University to expand its parking according to said plan ; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the State 
of Illinois, acting for and on behalf of Illinois State University, does 
hereby authorize the President of Illinois State University to take such 
actions as may be reasonably necessary to obtain merchantable titles 
to the following described properties from the present owners of said 
properties by warranty deeds conveying the properties to the Board 
of Regents for and on behalf of the people of the State of Illinois for 
consideration as shown : 

Lot 5 in Block 4 in the Normal Twenty Third Addition to 
the Town of Normal, McLean County, Illinois. 

213 N. University Street, Normal, McLean County, Illinois. 

Lot 4 in Block 4 in the Normal Twenty Third Addition to 
the Town of Normal, McLean County, Illinois. 

215 North University Street, Normal, McLean County, Illinois. 

Lot 3 in Block 4 in the Normal Twenty Third Addition to 
the Town of Normal, McLean County, Illinois. 

217 North University, Normal, McLean County, Illinois. 

Amount of Consideration - $310,000 (Three Hundred and Ten 

Thousand Dollars). 

FURTHER RESOLVED, that Illinois State University is authorized to 
expend said specified amount from Student Center Funds. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois State 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it 
carried unanimously. 



85 



Sangamon State University - President's Report 

President Lacy said Sangamon State is pleased again this year to welcome as 
a graduate student the former Student Regent from Illinois State University - 
Steve Henriksen who is in the legislative internship program. Dr. Lacy said 
interns who come to the SSU campus are an extraordinary group, and anyone 
who has an opportunity to come to campus to meet them will see that a good 
measure of the future leadership of the public sector of Illinois will very likely 
come from one of these fine students. 

The President distributed copies of an Addendum to the Faculty and Administra- 
tive Employees Appendix to his Report (Associate Dean/IES), noting that he is 
recommending the appointment of Leroy A. Jordan as Associate Dean of the 
Innovative and Experimental Studies Cluster. Dean Jordan has been with the 
university for a good many years and has directed the Applied Study Program. 
He has a strong background in the public affairs arena, and brings some strong, 
although not traditional, credentials to the deanship. 

Information reports were presented on : 
Enrollments for Fall 1982 
Degrees Awarded Summer 1982 
Reporting of a Gift 
Grants and Contracts 
Contracts with Visiting Performers 
Capital Improvement Projects 

The following items were then submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative and civil service 

employees. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the Presi- 
dent's Reoort and will be kept on file at the University and in the Central 
Office . 

Mr. Riss moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon State 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Mr. Gayles, and it 
carried unanimously. 

Northern Illinois University - President's Report 

President Monat , taking note of the reported retirement of Dr. Brim, said that 
before joining the Central Office Staff, Chuck was on the staff at Northern 
Illinois University, so their relationship goes back a good many years. Dr. 
Monat said Dr. Brim will be missed very much by the Board and certainly by 
the university staff who have worked with him . 

The President distributed copies of an Addendum to the Purchases Appendix 
(Color Camera System). 

Information reports were submitted on : 

Undergraduate Admissions for Spring 1983 

Undergraduate Admissions for Fall 1983 

Enrollment by Headcount , Fall Semester, 1982 

Degrees Granted, August 1982 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 



86 



Gifts to Northern Illinois University 
International and Special Programs Expenditures 

The following items were then oresented for action by the Board. 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees. A list of all 
reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and will 
be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

2. A collective bargaining agreement with the American Federation of State, 
County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) representing food service and 
maintenance employees at the Lorado Taft Campus. The two-year agree- 
ment, effective August 15, 1982 through August 15, 1984, provides for 
wage negotiations with such changes to be effective on or after January 1, 
1983 and August 15, 1983. 

3. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern 
Illinois University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski 
and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Murray announced that the next meeting of the Board of Regents will be 
held on December 9, 1982, in Chicago, and he noted that Dr. Matsler is making 
arrangements to hold the meeting at the Conrad Hilton, although it had been 
suggested that he also explore the Westin Hotel facilities. 

There being no further business to come before the Board, on motion duly made 
and seconded, the meeting was declared adjourned. The next regularly scheduled 
meeting of the Board will be held in Chicago, Illinois, on December 9, 1982. 



David E . Murray 
Chairman 



Franklin G. Matsler 
Secretary 



87 



Minutes of the Meeting of the 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

The Conrad Hilton, Chicago, Illinois 

December 9, 1982 



The regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 9:00 a.m. 
on December 9, 1982 in the Waldorf Room of The Conrad Hilton, Chicago, 
Illinois. Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman, presided. 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, roll was called, and the 
following Regents were present: 

Mr. Jerome R. Bender Ms. Denise Orchowski 

Ms. Carol K. Burns Mr. D. Brewster Parker 

Mrs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 

Mr. Montel Gayles Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman 

Mr. James L. Wright entered the meeting after the conclusion of the Executive 
Session . 

Not present for the meeting were Mr. L. Milton McClure and Mr. Harold Riss . 

Also present were : 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 

Representing the Joint University Advisory Committee were: (ISU) Dr. Virginia 
Crafts, Dr. Thomas Eimermann , Mr. Leon Toepke and Dr. George Tuttle; 
(NIU) Mr. Joe Koch, Mr. James E. Lankford, Dr. Annette Lefkowitz, Dr. Tony 
Scaperlanda and Dr. Jerry D. Meyer; (SSU) Ms. Irene All sop , Dr. George 
Gruendel, Mr. Jack VanDerSlik and Ms. Cindy Stephenson. 

Others in attendance included staff from the Regency Universities and the 
Central Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the 
Board; and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Ms. Burns moved that the Board recess to meet in Executive Session. The 
motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public meeting at 10:00 a.m. Mr. Wright entered 
the meeting at this time. 

Mr. Murray reported that in Executive Session the Board authorized Northern 
Illinois University to institute litigation against the publisher of the yearbook 
for violation of contract. Also discussed were the positions of Presidents, 
other administrative positions and salaries. Mr. Murray noted that in this 
regard the Board only wishes that it had money available to go along with 
its wishes. 



88 



MINUTES OF OCTOBER 21, 1982 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the meeting 
held on October 21, 1982 and asked if there were any additions or corrections 
to be proposed. There being none, on motion by Ms. Burns, seconded by Mr. 
Parker, the minutes were unanimously approved as submitted. 

CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 

Mr. Murray asked President Lacy to present to the Board the newly chosen 
Student Regent representing Sangamon State University, Ms. Janine Toman. 

Dr. Lacy said he was pleased to introduce Ms. Toman who is a graduate stu- 
dent at SSU, having completed her undergraduate work at the University 
of Illinois in Urbana where she was very active in a number of things including 
the racketball team, the Faculty- Student Senate and other activities. Ms. Toman 
was a member of the National Honor Society in her high school at Western Springs 

Mr. Murray administered the oath of office to Ms. Toman and welcomed her to 
the Board. 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Board of Higher Education Meeting 

Ms. Burns reported that among the items acted upon by the Board of Higher 
Education at its last meeting was approval of new units of instruction, research 
and public service for public universities. Included were the MFA in Theater 
Arts and the long-awaited Ph.D. in Biological Sciences at Northern Illinois 
University; and a new administrative unit at Illinois State, the Department of 
Military Science. The BHE also had some discussion about the FY84 budget 
and the current budgetary situation of the State. She said she would not 
go into the details of this discussion inasmuch as Dr. Matsler would take up 
this matter at the appropriate time in the meeting today. 

Joint Facilities /Finance Committee Meeting 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick reported that the Finance and Facilities Committees met jointly 
on Wednesday afternoon and considered three items: the recreation facility at 
Northern Illinois University, the Governor's budget recision and and the Regency 
System's response to that, and the University Guidelines 1982. This latter item 
will be presented to the Board for action in January, she advised. 

With regard to the Governor's budget recision, Mrs. Fitzpatrick said, a Reso- 
lution has been prepared, which she would read to the Board after some back- 
ground on this matter was presented by Dr. Matsler. 

Dr. Matsler said as probably everyone is aware there has been declared in the 
State of Illinois a financial situation which has resulted in the Governor recom- 
mending a cutback of $164 million for the current fiscal year. This $164 million 
has been allocated by the Governor in such a way that all of higher education 
in the State will have to provide $20.4 million. In other words, the Governor 
and the Legislature have come upon a way by which the $164 million shortfall 
can be impounded from appropriations made for this current fiscal year, and 
higher education's share of the shortfall is $20.4 million. Of the $20.4 million 



89 



the Regency institutions' share is $2.4 million - roughly 2% of the General Rev- 
enue dollars in the operating budgets and including IBA rentals and retirement 
for each of the institutions. Dr. Matsler said a breakdown of the amount is for 
ISU $938,000+, for NIU $1.2 million, for SSU $260,700, and for the Central 
Office $12,400. These are the funds which we will not have available for the 
current fiscal year. 

Dr. Matsler said we are also faced with the situation where the Board of Regents 
has already authorized the institutions to provide a 3% salary increase for faculty 
and staff effective January 1, 1983. When the Board passed that resolution, he 
said, we had been assured that there was no problem relative to the resources 
of the State of Illinois. Now we do have problems. Some of the institutions in 
the State wanted to go ahead and give the 3% and find the shortfall funds from 
other available lines, and this was discussed very carefully among the institutions 
and other systems. All systems have agreed now to recommend to their respective 
boards a compromise by which the 3% salary increase would be deferred until 
April 1. However, that is a deferral that is still a little bit up in the air, he 
said, because we are not quite sure but what there will be another recision. 
In meeting with the Governor last week, they discussed the possibility of a 
second recision , and his statement was that he is not sure but what maybe there 
will be another shortfall. As a matter of fact, Dr. Matsler said, some are saying 
that the shortfall is not $164 million as we now have it, but perhaps it could go 
as high as $300- $350 million. We must proceed as though the $164 million is the 
shortfall for now, but we cannot be sure but what the "other shoe will drop". 
Yesterday in the joint meeting of the Finance and Facilities Committees a resolu- 
tion was prepared for consideration by the Board, he reported. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick then presented the following Resolution to the Board and moved 
for its adoption : 

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents, at its October 21, 1982 meeting, 
authorized the Regency Universities and the Central Office to grant 
salary increases averaging not more than 3% to faculty and staff 
effective on or about January 1, 1983; and 

WHEREAS, at the time that authorization was made there was the 
expectation that all of the funds appropriated by the General 
Assembly to the Board of Regents would indeed become available 
as needed ; and 

WHEREAS, the Governor and the General Assembly have in effect 
rescinded approximately $2.4 million in the Board of Regents Fiscal 
Year 1983 appropriations; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents hereby direct the three 
institutions and the Central Staff to defer this 3% increase until 
further consideration by the Board at its March meeting; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED that wage provisions in the contracts with the 
various unions agreed upon by the institutions and awaiting approval 
by the Board of Regents be deferred. 



90 



Mr. Bender asked if it was not at the BHE meeting- in Mat toon that Dr. Mandeville 
assured the Board of Higher Education that the funds were available. Dr. Matsler 
said it was his understanding that the Executive Director of the BHE met with 
Dr. Mandeville a few days before the November meeting of the Board of Higher 
Education, and at that time it was thought that the situation was in pretty good 
shape. Was that before the elections, Mr. Bender asked? Dr. Matsler said he 
believes that it was. Mr. Bender said it certainly did not take them long to 
find this out after the election. Mr. Murray noted that Mr. Stevenson had 
pointed this out throughout his whole election campaign. Mr. Bender said he 
just thinks it is unfortunate that they said they had the money at that time and 
then shortly after the election find out that they did not have it . 

The motion for adoption of the Resolution was seconded by Mr. Parker. 

Mr. Wright said he must raise a couple of questions. He said he thinks right 
now we are headed down the same road that he has been on with the Chrysler 
situation. It is rather curious that this is happening now right after the elec- 
tion. We had this 3% increase put together, and now we are saying that it will 
be March before we can act on it again. These are the kinds of things he does 
not like, Mr. Wright said. He said he does not like the statement that this will 
be considered by the Board again in March, and thinks we should say that the 
increase will be effective in March. That is his personal opinion. Mr. Wright 
said he understands that the state will have difficulty in finding funds, but 
sometimes we do find things when we have to. He said he thinks we should be 
very careful about how we enter into these types of agreements to defer things. 
He thinks that things are happening that we do not know about. The next 
thing we know there will be a cut coming forth - that is what he sees in the 
future in March. Not only will we not get the 3% increase, but we will get a 
3% reduction, based upon the fact that they don't have the money. 

Mr. Murray said he did not wish to duplicate all the discussion that occurred 
during the committee meeting on Wednesday, but he would ask how much consider- 
ation was given to cutting back some programs in order to protect the salary 
increases. Are we going to just sidestep that issue and just keep on holding 
the line? Suppose we get another shot in March or April and get another cut- 
back? Are we going to keep all the programs, keep all the people, or are we 
going to start making some tough decisions protecting some of the salary 
increases? 

Dr. Matsler said he sympathizes very much with Mr. Wright's comments, but 
the problem he sees is that this Board cannot very well take action to give 
money that it does not have. The Legislature and the Governor have agreed 
that this money should be impounded, so we are probably boxed in on this. 
With respect to Mr. Murray's question as to whether or not we should be cut- 
ting back on programs, Dr. Matsler said he thinks we'll have to cut back on 
programs, but we want to remember that we are in mid-year and we have con- 
tracts with people, and it would appear to him to be a mistake to cut back on 
programs in mid-year if we can find the funds to protect the positions that we 
have. Mr. Murray's comments are very appropriate in terms of the new aca- 
demic year, Dr. Matsler said, and he believes that we are going to have to 
fact this problem in another year. We really should be looking to find ways 
that we can actually have the money in our appropriations. There is going 
to have to be a revenue enhancement program, and in his mind we should be 



91 



getting- behind a push to perhaps increase the income tax very slightly in 
order to assure the institutions that they can continue to offer programs to 
the number of students that they have. We must remember that if we drop 
back on programs we are going to be turning back students, Dr. Matsler 
said, and he does not think that we want to do that either. We are really 
caught up in a mid-year adjustment. As to Mr. Wright's suggestion that the 
Resolution should state that the increase will be effective in March, Dr. Matsler 
said he would prefer that it state that the increase would be favorably considered 
with the intention that we would actually provide the 3%. However, if the 
other shoe should drop and we have fewer dollars, then we would be in very 
bad shape to have taken action and then have to rescind it . 

Mr. Murray said he wishes he were as sure as Dr. Matsler that the state will 
adopt an increase in the income tax and that there is going to be a nice big 
increase for higher education. But he just believes that the universities would 
be well advised to have some contingency plans going for financial exigency 
before we are right up against the wall. Mr. Murray said he thinks it is mis- 
leading to keep promising that there is going to be a big tax increase, and it's 
time for some real hard planning in order to keep these salary ircr-jsaBes viable . 
He just does not believe that we are going to continue to get more and more 
money, and it seems pretty obvious that is what the Governor is saying. 

Dr. Matsler said in his view our institutions, as well as any of the other insti- 
tutions in the state, are prepared for a financial exigency if, indeed, it comes. 
We do have our Board Regulations, we have a procedure to follow. How are 
the plans of the institutions coming, Mr. Murray inquired? The point is, Dr. 
Matsler said, that we are not prepared today to say that in case we have fewer 
dollars we are going to eliminate this program or that program. Doesn't Dr. 
Matsler think that would be a good idea, Mr. Murray asked? Not at all, Dr. 
Matsler responded, because if we do that today that would put it on the block 
for anyone who wants to chop at it - any particular program. Perhaps the 
presidents could speak to this better than he, Dr. Matsler said, but we will 
come up with the cutbacks if, indeed, we have to. But the point he is trying 
to make is that we are not quite ready to say publicly what are the weak pro- 
grams, what programs are in disfavor; and he does not believe that we should. 

With regard to the program issue, Ms. Burns said, at the last meeting of the 
BHE there was an excellent approach which our Board might duplicate which 
does not single out programs in the way that the Chairman and Dr. Matsler 
just referred to, but rather identifies them in terms of shifts in student demand. 
Some very interesting conclusions came out of that report, she said, and she 
would like to see the Board duplicate this kind of an approach for our programs 
and be ready to make those announcements or decisions on a student demand 
basis when they occur. Ms. Burns said she did not want to go into the whole 
report, but there is an interesting conclusion in it that states that almost half 
the programs statewide show an increase in unit costs at the same time the 
level of resources available to support each program has declined. This might 
sound unusual, but there are certain reasons for it. She thinks that we should 
be able to identify these programs and be prepared to make changes. 

Mr. Murray said he, for one, would rather see us proceed with the salary 
increases and scale down programs if we have to. He thinks this would be 
a lot more honest as far as students are concerned if we do some planning ahead 
and tell them what programs are going to be cut in a year or two. There would 



92 



be a lot less trauma than if we wait right up to March or April and we get 
another cut and then all of a sudden just announce full-scale cuts. We would 
also be doing a good job of allocating our resources, Ms. Burns commented, 
which she thinks is one of the Board's primary goals in this whole exercise. 

President Monat said he would offer two observations. One has to do with the 
analysis done by the BHE staff, and he would point out that that analysis 
focused only upon majors in orograms. For example, he said, there has been 
a decline in English majors, yet he thinks English departments at universities 
are busier than they ever were because it is one of the major service departments 
in any university. We have had enrollment increases that are devastating in 
English at the same time we have a decline in English majors. The flaw of the 
BHE study was to focus upon majors, not upon enrollments. Take a look at 
English, History, Sociology, Mathematics and other departments, the president 
suggested, where there have been declining majors, and these departments have 
a greater teaching burden than they have ever had because majors of high 
student demand in Business and other areas rely upon these service departments 
to educate their students. So, to focus only upon those programs where there 
has been a decline in majors really leads us down a path which would be devas- 
tating to the integrity of the university, Dr. Monat said. Ms. Burns said she 
thinks that is a good suggestion, and no one mentioned that at the BHE meeting. 
President Lacy said he would point out also that the study covered, he believes, 
only 32 fields of study. It was not at all comprehensive and many of the fields 
of study that were left out are important ones in the universities. For instance, 
Medical Technology was not one that they had listed as well as a number of other 
professional fields. It is not really an adequate look at the total picture on 
student enrollment and program costs throughout public higher education in the 
state. Dr. Lacy said he wished the presidents had had an opportunity to speak 
to this at the BHE meeting, because these points were not covered. Another 
point which should be made, and he thinks it is true for the most part in our 
three institutions and in public higher education in the state in general, is that 
we do believe that roughly the mix of programs we currently have is indeed in 
the best interest of the state, and it is important to be preserved for the future 
economic development in this state. Dr. Lacy said the institutions believe we 
have a key role to play in turning this state around economically. If we start 
slashing programs very early then we are going to be passing the buck on our 
responsibility to play a key role in the economic turnaround. Finally, the presiden 
said, obviously we have to look at student enrollment as this study did, but that 
needs to be only one factor among a number of factors in the planning process. 
There are a number of other factors which need to be balanced when we get 
down to the final decision-making. He would argue that it is too early for us 
to be identifying specific programs at this time that we believe are not in the 
public interest, and that strategically we ought to wait until a little bit later 
in the budget process before we do that. 

President Watkins said he would make one additional observation. Demand is 
not constant. A program which is very hot at one point can cool off at another 
when the job possibilities begin to diminish because of the production of majors 
in that area. We want to be careful that we don't commit the error of dis- 
mantling programs that we might wish later we had just because they are maybe 
currently not as much in favor as something else. There are areas right now 
that are not as hot as they were two or three years ago, when everyone felt 
that they would continue being in high demand by students because there 
would always be jobs out there. President Watkins said he would submit that 



93 



the kind of planning which has been suggested must be done and to the best 
of his knowledge it is being done on the three campuses. 

Mr. Murray said that would satisfy him if he is assured that there is something 
going on. Dr. Watkins said that is why they have as a major university com- 
mittee one called the Needs and Priorities Committee, and he believes that the 
other two institutions have the same kinds of things. Planning goes on on an 
on -going basis, hours and hours are spent in setting priorities and goals and 
trying to decide which areas need enhancement and which can sustain reductions 
The system of quality programming is very much a part of the effort at ISU. 

Ms. Burns said she is sorry if her comments were misconstrued, because she 
does not believe she said anything about slashing programs. What she was 
talking about was allocation of resources and student demand, and she is sure 
we have the brain power to improve on the BHE staff report at the Board of 
Regents level. She found the report a most concrete and helpful one about 
programming and unit costs and how they shift, and they do shift all the time. 
Ms. Burns said she thinks it would be very helpful for the Board and all of 
us to know exactly what the program statuses are in our universities and where 
we do have to make shifts and changes. 

We are doing this all the time, President Monat said. We have in the Regency 
System the most rigorous, exacting program review process in existence, and 
we were a pioneer in Illinois in higher education at the state level. That is 
what program review is all about. Every five years each program is thoroughly 
examined and these questions are raised in that process - high priority , shifts 
in demand, reallocation. It is an on -going process and happens day in and 
day out. It becomes much more urgent now than it has been in the past and so 
the process itself has become more urgent and more exciting. The universities 
are not oblivious to the realities. Unfortunately, they are probably more 
engaged in these realities than the Board. This is their bread and butter, it 
is their business. 

President Watkins added that because of the tautness of funding they do not 
have the luxury of ignoring shifts in demand, they have to meet them. So, 
even if they did not agree philosophically (which they do), they would be 
doing it anyway, simply out of practicality. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick said she thinks it would be worth having the whole Board 
look at the BHE staff report, and Dr. Matsler said he would see that it is 
distributed, but he would also say, as pointed out by Dr. Monat, we have 
pioneered this in a way in which we are aware of these fluctuations and changes 
in demand. He asked Dr. Groves if he would comment on this for the Board. 

Dr. Groves said there are some serious methodological flaws in the BHE staff 
report, but it also deserves a very substantial analysis at both the institutional 
and staff levels. He would suggest that it would be an appropriate analysis 
to be done by staff. He would hate for the Board to look at the report without 
such an analysis going along with it which would point out the serious flaws 
he feels are in it, as well as the steps being taken in this direction by our 
institutions. This would be a useful exercise, and that sort of a report would 
be helpful. 

Mr. Murray said he would like for Staff to do this. 



94 

President Monat said all he had been trying to focus on was the incompleteness 
of the BHE analysis - not that the analysis was wrong - , because it did point out 
one dimension of the shift in demands. What it did not focus on was the other 
side of that analysis. It just focused on student majors and on that point it was 
a very useful document. The real bottom line right now. Dr. Lacy added, is 
whether the programs that we would probably cut from the three institutions are 
really more valuable to the people of Illinois than programs that might be cut from 
such departments as the Department of Transportation or the Department of Com- 
merce, or from other parts of state government. The real bottom line is compe- 
tition for available general revenue dollars between higher education and the 
various other units of state government. He said there is no doubt in his mind 
whatsoever that those of our programs which we view as those most likely to 
be cut are indeed more important to the people of Illinois than many other acti- 
vities of state government being funded entirely out of general revenue funds. 
President Lacy said while he agrees with the Chairman he would point out that 
the states which currently enjoy the recognition of being high technology 
states - Massachusetts, North Carolina and California - are states which made a 
commitment and have stayed with the commitment. Sure, they are having to 
tighten their belts too, but the commitment to higher education is still there. 
He said he would submit that if Illinois is in fact serious about getting into a 
leadership position in high technology, the one area in which it really had better 
not defer maintenance on or cut back on too much is higher education . 

Mr. Murray said he did not disagree with this, but surely the presidents are 
not saying that every program at the university is a high tech program. No, 
President Watkins responded, what they are saying is that a great many of them 
are not directly related to high tech but they do provide the basis for those 
programs which are - they provide the mathematical, grammatical and sociological 
bases for those programs. 

Ms. Burns said she would hope that as we do this exercise, we would keep an 
eye toward the future and toward arguments that we might make to direct 
resources in our direction when they are available for redirecting. She would 
rather not be past-oriented, but rather future-oriented, particularly right now. 

President Monat said the Chairman was present at and a part of a conversation 
which took place at his house about ten days ago with the Director of the 
Fermi Lab, who was most eloquent in pointing out that at least in terms of the 
developing quarter - Chicago westward - a critical link in his mind in the future 
of that part of Illinois are the institutions of higher education, and specifically 
Northern Illinois University. Yes, Mr. Murray said, and he also indicated that 
one of the big inducements was perhaps a scientific high school which North 
Carolina has, and New York also has a couple. 

Dr. Virginia Crafts said she had been instructed by the Joint University 
Advisory Committee to make some remarks about this subject, so she would just 
like to react to what she has heard this morning. She thinks there is a great 
appreciation of the supportive comments that have been made by various Regents, 
and in particular the comments by the presidents in regard to supportive reten- 
tion of programs in the Regency institutions through on -going, strenuous, 
extensive and systematic review of programs. It would be her hope that the 
Board would take note of those comments and give them real consideration. 
Secondly, the JUAC did discuss the programs that are associated with recent 
developments in the budgetary situation, and she would like to thank Dr. Brim 
for joining their group to explain and clarify the current and projected budgetary 



95 



situations. JUAC feels that the impact of projected budgetary cuts for higher 
education, and particularly for the Regency institutions, should be clearly 
recognized. Cuts in the budget will cause substantial negative effects upon 
the primary mission of the institution, quality education for students. It will 
thwart the development of human resources which elected public officials from 
all parties have emphasized as the basis for long-term recovery within the state. 
Personally, she would compliment the Board for the very sincere efforts to 
resolve a very sticky problem. JUAC is aware of the problem also, but is 
most appreciative of the Board's consideration of it. 

Mr. Murray said he had not discussed this with Mr. Wright, but he still feels 
that what is going to save the American economy is going to be an increase in 
productivity, and he would challenge the faculties and universities, as he did 
a year ago, that salary increases are a lot easier to sell if we give some indi- 
cation that there has been an increase in productivity on the campuses. He 
said he does not know whether it is happening or not, but it is happening all 
over American business and industry, and he does not believe that we are exempt 
Mr. Murray said he does not know if this means an extra hour of teaching or 
what, but we are just kidding ourselves if we stick our heads in the sand and 
say we are immune, just sit back and say we are going to have an increase in 
the income tax. He said he just does not think that is going to happen, and 
as close as he feels to higher education and recognizes the need to keep our 
universities great , we have to be realistic . 

The question before the Board for adoption of the Resolution was called for a 
vote, and the motion carried unanimously. 

Dr. Crafts said the Joint University Advisory Committee would like to go on 
record as strongly concurring with the suggestion made by Dr. Matsler at 
the November meeting of the Board of Higher Education, that a tax increase 
be sought as one means of helping to alleviate financial problems in higher 
education. The JUAC strongly urges the Board to exert every effort in working 
for a tax increase and enhancement of the financial support for higher education 
in Illinois. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick continued with her report on the joint meeting of the Finance/ 
Facilities Committee. 

The Committees discussed the University Guidelines 1982 at the meeting on 
Wednesday. She said Mr. Beahringer of the Staff has worked very hard on 
this matter, and while the matter would not be presented for action by the 
Board until January, she ask Mr. Beahringer to report briefly to the Board 
today. 

As most people know, Mr. Beahringer said, the Legislative Audit Commission 
and the universities developed guidelines for the handling of non- appropriated 
funds, and those guidelines developed in 1977 had a lot of faults. They have 
now been revised and approved by the Legislative Audit Commission on Novem- 
ber 30. The committee discussed many aspects of the Guidelines yesterday, 
particularly the exception for ISU. The unique situation of Illinois State is 
not mentioned in the Guidelines as written, but an exception has been formu- 
lated which will meet their needs in the bond revenue areas. The committee 
also discussed the proposal by the LAC that the Board of Higher Education 
and the universities explore the possibility of eliminating what they call sub- 
sidies - retirement, employee benefits in bond revenue areas. The BHE and 



96 



the universities are to present a plan to the Legislative Audit Commission 
by 1985 for the aopropriate funding of those benefits, with implementation 
of the plan by 1990. Mr. Beahringer said that the discussion yesterday was 
that hopefully the Board's sentiment in January would be that the Board feels 
it is appropriate to continue funding of these benefits from appropriated funds 
As Mrs. Fitzpatrick reported, he said, the University Guidelines will be pre- 
sented to the Board in January for action. 

Mr. Winning commented that he thinks the compromise worked out between 
Mr. Beahringer and members of the LAC is the best possible one that could 
be obtained, and he should be commended for doing an outstanding job. 
President Watkins said a lot of the work done by Mr. Beahringer was on 
behalf of ISU. The exception was rather difficult to work out and to secure 
approval of it by the Commission; and Illinois State is very pleased about this. 

The other item on the agenda of the joint committee meeting, Mrs. Fitzpatrick 
continued, was the proposed recreation facility for Northern Illinois University. 
She called attention to the addendum which had been distributed to members 
of the Board detailing the action which is being requested of the Board, and 
moved for approval by the Board. The motion was seconded by Mr. Parker. 

Dr. Matsler explained that what is being requested is: 

approval to employ Kessler, Merci and Associates as architects 
for an initial contract of $150,000 which will include preparation 
of all bid documents, final advertisement and receipt of bids and 
evaluation of same; 

approval to proceed in acquiring construction bids; 

preparation of recommendations to the Board of Regents relative 
to the construction of the project ; 

approval of Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Company 
of Chicago as manager and underwriter of the bond offer; 

authorization for requesting bond ratings; 

authorization for the preparation of draft documents and the 
initiation of other related activities necessary in preparation for 
a bond offering; 

directive to engage bond legal counsel on the recommendation of 
both James Winning, Legal Counsel of the Board, and the Continental 
Bank, with authorization to commence necessary legal activities 
related to the construction and financing of the project ; 

preparation of a summary report on financing to be presented at 
the January or February meeting, which shall include drafts of 
all offering documents, bond ratings, market analysis, disclosures 
and amended schedule. 

Mr. Murray asked Ms. Burns if, as chairman of the Facilities Committee, she 
had anything to add. 



97 



Ms. Burns said she thinks everyone at the meeting yesterday tried to come 
out of the meeting with two assurances: that the numbers, figures and data 
relative to the project have been thoughtfully and accurately collected, and 
that the project was still wanted by the students. She said she believes that 
everyone was assured of that, and the conclusion was to support the project. 

Mr. Murray noted that if this is approved today and then the Board decides 
in January or February not to go ahead with it, we will have wasted $150,000. 
President Monat said he would not term it a waste, but rather an investment 
in a future decision. 

Mr. Murray asked Mr. Gayles how he assessed the student desire for the 
project. Mr. Gayles said at the last Board meeting he asked for enough time 
to go back to the student body for a reaction as to whether the results of 
the earlier referendum were still valid and in effect. The Student Association 
which represents the campus population has given wholehearted approval to the 
project. This is something that is primarily funded by student fee dollars, 
Mr. Gayles pointed out, and student opinion is that this is a good bargain. 

President Monat added that he would like to read into the record the text 
of a memorandum which he had received from Jim Corbett, President of the 
Student Association : 

As you are aware, there has been strong student support for the 
proposed recreation facility since discussion on the facility first 
began. 

Since that time, students at Northern have consistently demonstrated 
their support for the facility. Over two years ago, the student body 
passed a referendum assessing themselves twenty dollars per semester 
to pay for the recreation facility. Since then, the Student Association 
Recreation Committee has been involved in many matters relating to 
the facility such as its design and the allocation of space to various 
activities. Most recently, at its meeting of November 21, 1982, the 
Student Association Senate voiced its support for the facility by 
overwhelmingly oassing a resolution extending the validity of the two 
year old referendum through the current fiscal year. However, the 
Senate attached a rider to the resolution stating that it would have 
no effect until the fee assessed students for usage of the racquetball/ 
handball and tennis courts was removed from the User Fee proposed 
for the facility. SARC also unanimously voted to reject any facility 
usage fee for students. 

As a result of these actions , the student user fee was removed 
from the proposal. In another show of support for the facility the 
S.A. and SARC have vowed to work with the administration in develop- 
ing alternate funding sources to account for the loss of revenue caused 
by removal of the student users fee . With the removal of that fee 
there now exists no barrier to wholehearted student support for con- 
struction of the recreation facility. 

As has long been recognized by students, there exists today, more 
so than ever before, the need for a facility offering comprehensive 
open recreation on campus. The actions of SARC, the S.A. Senate, 



and the entire student body, along with the growing interest in 
physical fitness, clearly demonstrate that the students of NIU 
wholeheartedly support the construction of the recreation facility. 

I ask that you convey this message to the Board of Regents. 

What does this provide for part-timers, Mr. Murray asked? Is the fee to be 
pro-rated? Yes, the President responded. 

Mr. Murray asked the President if it bothers NIU at all to announce this 
project at the same time the Governor is cutting back. Dr. Monat said there 
is a matter of sensitivity, but as he explained to the committee yesterday, 
they have to look at NIU not just next year and the year after, but what is 
going to be 30 - 50 years from now. In his judgment students are thinking in 
that time frame. We are all concerned about student recruitment and retention 
over the next half century. Dr. Monat said in their judgment the facility is 
needed, and he wishes they had it now. If the Board authorizes the university 
to move down this oath today, and the reports that come back in January or 
February with respect to bids and with respect to financing lead to the conclu- 
sion that the project cannot proceed, then he would not recommend to the Board 
that the project proceed. 

Ms. Burns said she thinks the university has used very good sense in waiting 
for the bond market rates to come down, and they will continue to do so. She 
thinks a strong point in our favor is taking very great care to plan this project 
for the appropriate time. There has been some element of good sense involved in 
the planning. It has been almost three years since this was first discussed. 

The question before the Board for approval of the NIU recreation facility 
project was called for a vote, and the motion carried unanimously. 

President Monat expressed his personal appreciation and that of the university 
to the Facilities Committee for its patience and assistance over the past three 
years, and to Mr. Beahringer and other Board staff who worked closely with 
the institution to make today's action a reality. 

As far as need is concerned, Mr. Murray said, he thinks this is long overdue; 
and he hopes we are not making a mistake in the amount of dollars. There is 
a reason why the bond market is coming down, he noted, and that is because 
dollars are more precious. But, let's all hope that we are doing the right 
thing. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick reported that the Merit Board did meet last week, and while 
she was unable to be present, Ms. Marsha Murray of the Staff did attend and 
furnished her with a report on the meeting, which she would like the Board to 
hear. 

Ms. Murray said that on a substantive level, the Merit Board has a joint bene- 
fits resolution which covers all civil service employees. That resolution is 
merely advisory to the Board of Regents and the other systems. The Merit 
Board did revise its policy so as to allow the use of earned vacation during 
probationary periods. In January Staff will be bringing to the Board an 
amendment to our Board Regulations which would allow - if the Board chooses - 
the incorporation of that change as an employee benefit. 



99 



In a related matter, Ms. Murray reported, the State Universities Civil Service 
System has an advisory committee, the membership of which is on an elected 
basis by the employees who are civil service status. The representative from 
Sangamon State, Ms. Jane Lauterbach, has announced that she will be resign- 
ing' from her position at the university, and Ms. Murray said she would simply 
like for the record to reflect that Ms. Lauterbach was an able representative 
of the civil service employees of SSU. 

President Lacy added that Ms. Lauterbach was indeed an extraordinary repre- 
sentative for all employees of the institution and did an exceptional job of 
reoresenting us on that committee. She resigned to join her husband in private 
business, and was a major loss to the university. 

Personnel Committee 

Dr. Wellbank, chair of the committee, said he would defer his report until 
the Executive Director's Report was made to the Board. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Dr. Virginia Crafts, chair, said she was pleased to introduce Ms. Cindy 
Stephenson as a new student JUAC member from Sangamon State University. 

At the meeting on Wednesday, Dr. Crafts reported, the Joint University 
Advisory Committee discussed the possibility that, as was done in the Spring 
of 1982, there might be in the Spring of 1983 some sort of a plan to have a 
get-together for the Board, Staff, JUAC and possibly other invited persons. 
The Committee recognizes that there are financial constraints which would 
impose limits on such a meeting, but they would like to present some ideas 
to the Board as to the nature of such a gathering should the Board be willing 
to support it. With this in mind an ad hoc committee has been formed to 
develop some program alternatives which the Committee will then review with 
Board staff and, hopefully, then bring the ideas to the Board. The ad hoc 
committee is composed of Irene Allsop from SSU, George Tuttle from ISU, 
and Annette Lefkowitz from NIU, who will serve as chair of the committee. 

State Universities Retirement System 

Mr. Bender said he merely wished to thank members of the Joint University 
Advisory Committee for the superior job they did on the issues paper relating 
to the State Universities Retirement System. Mr. Hoffmeister, Executive 
Director of SURS, has requested permission to make a copy of the paper avail- 
able to all employers covered by the system, and he understands that the 
employers will then distribute it to their employees. This issues paper has 
been most helpful, Mr. Bender said. Mr. Murray said he would agree that 
it was a very good paper. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 136 

Dr. Matsler reported to the Board that a few weeks ago he had the pleasure 
of visiting with Mr. Charles Shuman, a former member of the Board. Mr. 
Shuman is in good health and expressed his regret at not being on the Board 
anymore, but asked that his greetings be extended to everyone. Dr. Matsler 
said he also has had an opportunity to talk with Jim Patterson by telephone , 
and he also sent his regards to the Board. 



100 



Section I - Legis lative Report 

Referring- to the Congressional elections. Dr. Matsler said it is the consensus 
of most observers of Congress generally that there will be no great changes in 
the coming year with respect to the attitudes of Congress toward higher educa- 
tion. There will be some, but not a lot. With respect to the Illinois General 
Assembly, as is pointed out in the report there will be a new kind of legislature 
in the coming years, with the new single member House districts. The report 
also indicates a summary of some of the changes which will occur in the leader- 
ship which will have some effect on the way the General Assembly operates. 

At the federal level, Dr. Matsler said, it appears that the tuition tax credit 
issue is dead for this year, as well as the balanced budget amendment. The 
jobs training bill is still being developed and the results of that are not avail- 
able and will not be for a while. The Pell-Nickles bill is a very interesting 
one which would direct the institutions to determine whether or not recipients 
of Pell grants are maintaining a C average. Many institutions, of course, 
already have this provision in their own rules and regulations. 

Dr. Matsler reported that President Watkins was recently elected to a three 
year term on the board of directors of the American Association of State Colleges 
and Universities, and additionally, Dr. Monat will serve as chairman of the 
AASCU Committee on State Relations, Dr. Lacy chairs the Committee on Upper 
Level Colleges and Universities, while he will serve as chairman of the Federal 
Relations Committee. 

With reference to the Pell-Nickles bill, President Watkins said Senator Claiborne 
Pell has been an acknowledged leader in higher education and funding for it 
in the House and Senate, and when you oppose something on which he has put 
his name, you do not do it lightly. However, Dr. Watkins said, he did write 
to Senator Pell because of a hidden possibility in the bill which disturbs him 
a great deal. The President said he believes that every institution has 
designed a system of academic progress or grade necessities for a student to 
stay off probation. In other words, every university of which he is aware 
will eventually separate a student if the student continues to do badly. Those 
are institutional policies. His concern with the bill includes a concern for the 
massive amount of paperwork, but the most important thing is that Pell grants 
are intended to most help the disadvantaged students from poor families. Dis- 
advantaged students from poor families frequently come from disadvantaged 
educational situations where the high school has not adequately been able to 
prepare these young men and women, and sometimes it takes them a while to 
get on their feet. Many of them do that and are successful graduates and 
successful people. But to insist on a C average in the first year, the President 
said, seems to be counterproductive with reg'ards to the kinds of people that 
we are trying to mainstream into higher education and better lives in this 
country. He said he had written Senator Pell suggesting that this is not in 
the best interest of young men and women coming from disadvantaged back- 
grounds which Pell grants are designed to help. He urged others to also 
write to the senator. 

What is the rationale for this bill, Mr. Murray inquired? Dr. Watkins said 
he could not answer that, except to say that in times when there are restricted 
resources, there may be a feeling that this is one way of cutting down on the 
number of potential recipients; or maybe there is a rationale which says that 



101 



if you are going - to take money from the federal government you ought to have 
a C average. But his point, Dr. Watkins said, is that institutions have in 
place regulations which assure that students progress so that they can graduate. 

Section II - Collective Bargaining Agreements 

Dr. Matsler said a number of collective bargaining agreements would appear in the 
Presidents' Reports later in the meeting, and he would like the record to show 
that the Board would not be requested to approve these agreements in their 
entirety, but that the wage provisions in the agreements are being deferred 
in accordance with the Resolution earlier adopted by the Board. 

Illinois State and NIU will be presenting the following contracts, Dr. Matsler 
advised, and these have been reviewed by Staff: 

(1) Illinois State University, Board of Regents and Fraternal Order of 
Police (Mackinaw Valley Lodge #67) 

(2) Illinois State University, Board of Regents and International Union 
of Operating Engineers - Heating Plant Employees (Local Union 399) 

(3) Illinois State University, Board of Regents and International Union 
of Operating Engineers - Building Mechanics (Local Union 399) 

(4) Northern Illinois University, Board of Regents and International 

Union of Operating Engineers - Heating Plant Employees (Local Union 399) 

Additionally, Dr. Matsler reported, Northern Illinois University will be present- 
ing two AFSCME agreements (DeKalb and Lorado Taft Campuses), and a contract 
with the Fraternal Order of Police. These three agreements were not received 
in the Central Office prior to the report deadline and therefore no recommenda- 
tion can be made. 

Mr. Winning noted that the FOP contract at Northern and the agreement cover- 
ing Building Mechanics at ISU are new contracts, and the Board would be asked 
to approve the working conditions provisions of the agreements, but defer 
approval of the wage provisions. The other contracts are wage reopeners , 
and approval should be deferred. 

Section HI - Status Report: Student Financial Aid 

Dr. Matsler noted that this report had been prepared by Marsha Murray of the 
Staff to give the Board an understanding of the trends in financial aids which 
are occurring now. 

Ms. Murray said it is important to acknowledge that there has been an increase 
in total dollars, about 10%, however she would caution optimism about this 
because even the public tuition increase would have wiped out any beneficial 
impact of that. In addition we are finding that fewer students are receiving 
some kind of financial aid, and the gap between the resources available and 
the cost of higher education has continued to widen. In terms of types and 
sources of aid, as expected, the federal government's percentage share contri- 
bution has declined. The State of Illinois lost $5 million in direct student 
financial assistance from the federal government, Ms. Murray reported. Parallel- 
ing that, we have a situation in which although constant dollars have remained 



102 



the same in terms of the state's contribution to financial aid, indeed that 
represents the lowest percentage in at least 10 years. At one time the State 
of Illinois' direct contributions to students represented 40% of the money avail- 
able to help students. Now it is down to 20%, and Ms. Murray said she assumes 
we can expect for this to continue to decline. The resources that are available 
to keep the dollar amounts constant are primarily from the private sector as 
part of the State Guaranteed Loan Program, and we are finding far more students 
relying heavily on loans and the loan volume has doubled in the last two years. 
Although the National Direct Student Loan Program - the federal program - does 
not represent a significant percentage of aid that is available, Mrs. Murray said 
because the NDSL default rate seems to attract a great deal of media attention 
she had included the default rate information for our three institutions in the 
report . 

Given that fact, Mrs. Fitzpatrick said, and the statement that the NDSL may 
be cut if default rates exceed 25%, and the fact that Sangamon State has 
exceeded that rate consistently, what will happen? Mrs. Murray said there 
has certainly been a diminishment of the default rate at Sangamon State due 
to the responsible and competent effort on the part of Dr. Goins and his staff. 
There have also been many discussions with the Department of Education, the 
Central Staff, and others, and she said she feels confident that Dr. Goins is 
doing everything he can to bring the default rate down. Mrs. Fitzpatrick said 
she realizes they can use roll-over funds, but is there any threat of discon- 
tinuing new funds? Unfortunately, Mrs. Murray said, in an institution that 
is small and relatively new - just like a revolving credit balance - the amount 
of money that would be in that pool is much smaller proportionately than it 
would be at an older school that had a strong revolving fund. She said she 
knows that President Lacy addressed that issue before a sub-committee in 
Washington, and perhaps he might want to speak to this at a later time. 
Mrs. Murray said we do have the figures on the default rate as of July 1982 
but they have not been verified and confirmed by the Department of Education 
and, therefore, she did not feel comfortable including this in the report. She 
added that there has been no significant increase or decrease at any of our 
three institutions. 

President Lacy noted that two months ago he did go to Washington to testify 
before the House Education Committee on the question of collection of NDSL's. 
He said he thinks with the testimony of a number of university presidents 
and other individuals that the problem was pretty well put on the table. The 
heart of his testimony was that we did exactly what we believed the legislation 
intended with the use of these funds. We did make loans to high-risk students. 
That is what the Congress asked us to do, and therefore Congress could 
expect a somewhat stronger collection problem in this program than it has in 
other loan programs from the federal government. Having said that, Dr. Lacy 
said he would acknowledge that the university is also unhappy with the default 
rates, and they are doing everything they possibly can to collect these loans. 
They do have one step which they have not taken, but which they are about 
to take - take some students to court. That is the only step remaining for 
them. But the university has made exceptional efforts to collect the money 
but they believe the expectation that you would create a high-risk program 
and then not be prepared to take any risk was a false expectation. 

Mrs. Murray called attention to the table in the report relative to defaults, 
noting that this includes a default rate which is a calculation of the Department 



103 



of Education and also a "potential rate" , What that means is if the institution 
during that fiscal year had not referred or assigned back to DOE a certain 
amount of accounts they would have had the higher default rate. Mrs. Murray 
said she brings this up only because she believes the institutions are finding 
themselves in a very difficult position. The Auditor General's Office feels 
that since there a l/9th matching fund from the State of Illinois into the NDSL 
program that we are in a sense violative of state law by assigning and referring 
those loans; and yet that is the single, most dramatic way to keep default rates 
down, particularly on very old uncollectible loans. As noted in the report, 
Mrs. Murray said she has suggested that perhaps some legislation be introduced 
specifically excluding the NDSL from provisions of state law forbidding transfer 
of funds out of state. 

Ms. Orchowski asked if these accounts are just turned over to a collection 
agency to recoup the money. 

Mrs. Murray said there is really a two-step plan. We do have in-house collec- 
tion at all three campuses and this is done as part of the due diligence require- 
ments of the federal government. At some point, when you can no longer pursue 
that on a local level, the accounts are turned over to collection agencies - 
however, that is not the assignment referral about which she has been speaking. 
That collection effort, as it would be with any other kind of commercial collection, 
amounts to whatever is collected, a percentage of that remaining as a fee for the 
collection agency. The assignment referral is just like in regular banking or in 
a department store. When you have an uncollectible and very old account what 
you do is simply write it off your books. We have never had any kind of way 
to do that, and it is a commercially sound way of doing business. As a result, 
the Department of Education granted us the right to assign or refer those very 
old uncollectible accounts back to DOE. In some cases they will return to the 
institution a percentage of collections, in other cases they won't. 

Mrs. Murray said that the Illinois State Scholarship Commission which has been 
at times rather controversial is continuing to do everything it can, she thinks, 
to remain in the public spotlight. Like all of us, they are facing a gap between 
resources and need. They are being heavily monitored by all the public and 
private sectors to make sure that the allocation of those limited resources is 
fair and goes to students who have high need. The ISSC has made several 
changes which have been very positive. Unfortunately, at their last meeting 
on November 22, they announced that although the cutoff date for application 
for the monetary award program is March 15, the number of applications received 
has already exceeded their projected number through March 15. While this may 
not exactly put us into another "shortfall payback position", she said, certainly 
the Commission at the time they made this announcement indicated that they felt 
that for second term awards there would be a reduction in awards of up to 
perhaps $150.00. We know that they have taken their share of the budget 
slashing which was discussed earlier this morning, Mrs. Murray said, so all 
she can say is that we do not know what the impact will be. We do not have 
any idea from the State Scholarship Commission of how short they will actually 
be and how it will affect students. But is is certainly a very anxiety-provoking 
situation again. 

Has the Commission alleviated any of its administrative problems, Mr. Gayles 
asked? Mrs. Murray said from observing the Commission at work, her sense 
is that the members of ISSC as well as Director Matejka and his staff have 



104 



come a long - way in being sensitive to some of the administrative ripples that 
we feel out here in the field. These efforts should be commended. Certainly 
their formulas and their technical efforts have been much better in the course 
of this last year than we had seen before. She said she does not know what 
one does about projections and lack of resources, but she does appreciate the 
fact that they did announce the problem as soon as it appeared and are making 
attempts to notify the students that are affected. 

Is it a certainty that in the second semester students will have to take a reduc- 
tion of $150, Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked? Mrs. Murray said she does not think 
anyone can say the dollar figure at this time, but at the time of the Commission 
meeting the best guess was there would be reductions and that they would be 
no more than $150 per student. That would not be across-the-board; that 
is just the maximum they felt they were comfortable discussing. Since then 
the Commission has taken the same percentage cut that all other agencies have 
taken. 

Will there be some decision made at the next meeting, Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked? 
There will have to be, Mrs. Murray responded. When is the meeting, Mrs. 
Fitzpatrick asked? In January, Mrs. Murray said. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick, noting the statement in the report that it is likely that ISSC 
will continue to request higher appropriations, will support increases in the 
maximum award, and will continue to wrestle with need priorities, asked what 
we as representatives of public institutions will do. 

Marsha Murray said she would think we would have difficulty saying that 
an increase in a maximum award benefits us. How likely are we not to support 
this and give emphasis to the fact that there should be no increase in the 
maximum award, Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked? That is certainly the public university 
sector response, Mrs. Murray said, but on the other hand, the Commission and 
its statutory authority requires a certain maximum award calculated on public 
tuition vs. private tuition differentials. In all fairness to the private sector 
we have to admit that there has been an erosion of that gap. Many private 
institutions are feeling perhaps even more strongly than we do the impact of 
the federal cutback, state cutback and the fact that the maximum statutory 
maximum award is no longer sufficient. As resources get limited, people lobby 
harder, Mrs. Murray commented. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick said she does not see us doing much lobbying, and she thinks 
we should for the benefit of the institutions and the students in our institutions, 

Section IV - Board Meeting Calendar 

Dr. Matsler presented the following calendar of Board meetings for 1983 for 
consideration : 

January 20, 1983 Chicago 

February 1983 Subject to Call 

March 17, 1983 Sangamon State University 

April 21, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

May 19, 1983 Illinois State University 

June 23, 1983 Springfield 

July 21, 1983 Sangamon State University 



105 



August 1983 Subject to Call 

September 22, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

October 20, 1983 Illinois State University 

November 1983 Subject to Call 

December 8, 1983 Chicago 

Dr. Matsler noted that the schedule now calls for a meeting to be held in 
Chicago on January 20, with the February meeting subject to call. If agree- 
able with the Board, he said, he would propose that the January meeting be 
cancelled, and a meeting be planned for February 10. The reason for this 
is that we will be receiving from the Governor's office at the end of January 
his recommendations for the FY84 level of funding, and we must act on the 
FY 84 tuition rates sometime before the 1st of March so the appropriation bill 
can be written and submitted to the General Assembly. The BHE, he noted, 
has recommended a minimum of 10% increase in tuition, and he would like very 
much to stay at the level of no more than a 10% increase. If the Board agrees 
to meet in February Staff can present the background materials on tuition, as 
is done each year. However, he said, this would probably also mean that the 
Executive Committee would need to meet in January, although he would like to 
hear from the Presidents on this. 

Mr. Murray asked if Dr. Matsler would object to a February meeting being 
held on the 17th rather than the 10th; and Dr. Matsler said as far as he was 
concerned this would be agreeable. It would still give Staff sufficient time to 
prepare the appropriation bill. The consensus of the Board members was that 
February 17th would be acceptable. Dr. Wellbank asked where the meeting 
would be held. Mr. Murray noted that Dr. Matsler has been complaining a 
little about the cost of meeting in Chicago, although attendance is quite good 
today. Dr. Matsler said the location would be strictly up to the Board, although 
one difficulty might be securing a meeting place in Chicago at this late date. 
After a considerable amount of discussion as to the location of the various 
meetings, Mr. Parker moved for approval of the 1983 calendar of meetings as 
amended. The motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 
The calendar as adopted is as follows: 

January 20, 1983 Meeting Cancelled 

February 17, 1983 Sangamon State University 

March 17, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

April 21, 1983 Illinois State University 

May 19, 1983 Springfield 

June 23, 1983 Sangamon State University 

July 21, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

August 1983 Subject to Call 

September 22, 1983 Sangamon State University 

October 20, 1983 Illinois State University 

November 1983 Subject to Call 

December 8, 1983 Chicago 

Dr. Matsler said a meeting of the Executive Committee will be scheduled for 
January 20th, at a time and place to be announced later. 



106 



Section V - Report on Econo mic Development and High e r Education 

Dr. Matsler stated that this section of his Report was prepared by Dr. Groves 
to give the Board somewhat of an idea of what is going on in the area of eco- 
nomic development and the partnership between business and the universities. 

Dr. Groves said as the Report notes, there are a lot of actors in this area - 
so many that the play might be entitled "The Sound and Fury of Economic 
Development". The Governor and the Mayor of Chicago have both established 
task forces on high technology. We now have a Commission on Science and 
High Technology. The Board of Higher Education has a Committee on Economic 
Development and Higher Education; and, of course, both candidates for Governor 
as well as other candidates for public office discussed the subject extensively in 
the last campaign . 

The involvement of higher education, Dr. Groves said, is drawn in particularly 
through the concept of high technology. Where high technology economic 
development has taken place it has been probably uniquely associated with 
institutions of higher education, particularly those that have a heavy emphasis 
upon science and technological research. As noted earlier by President Watkins, 
those particularly prominent areas of the country where this has taken place 
are Massachusetts (the belt around Boston), North Carolina (the "research 
triangle"), California (the Silicon Valley), and also Texas. These areas have 
had the bulk of high technology development in this country, although it is not 
a stranger to Illinois. One of the things that has been uncovered by the various 
task forces is that there is a significant base of high technology industry in the 
State of Illinois. It is already up and going. Because of the association with 
higher education in various places, this has focused the attention of people who 
have directed their concern and consideration to the subject to the role of 
higher education. The two task forces were chaired by people who were drawn 
from higher education, and Dr. Groves said it is his understanding that the 
Commission on Science and High Technology will be co-chaired by Dr. Stanley 
Ikenberry of the University of Illinois. 

Dr. Groves said there are a number of factors to think about in the area of 
economic development and higher education. One is the process of planning - 
the whole concept of how you move forward with economic development, particu- 
larly high technology economic development . The two task forces have given 
thought to this, and the Commission is also going to give thought to this. 
The Committee of the BHE has looked more at broad policy dimensions, things 
like priorities of engineering education and support for it, priorities for tech- 
nology programs and occupational programs, the priority for science education in 
high schools. Another dimension is funding. The Governor's task force recom- 
mended $30 million be spent by the State over three years, but the Governor 
responded that he was not sure that was feasible. The difficult situation insofar 
as the state revenue is concerned would suggest that this may be even less than 
feasible. This is something that must be considered through the appropriations 
process and also through the budgetary formulation process involving higher 
education . 

Illinois is blessed, Dr. Groves continued, with two national research laboratories, 
both of them in the Chicago suburban area. One is the Fermi Lab, which is 
high energy physics, and the other is Argonne National Laboratory, which is 
more broadly focused. 



107 



Dr. Groves concluded his Report by stating- that the reason for bringing the 
matter before the Board at this point was to solicit input from the members of 
the Board and provide an opportunity for discussions involving the presidents, 
the universities and the Board as to the sort of response the System and its 
institutions ought to make on this score. In that regard, Staff will be develop- 
ing a report to be submitted to the BHE staff, to be combined with the report 
of its Committee on Economic Development and Higher Education , a report which 
will uniquely look at the role our institutions can play in this area and the ways 
in which that could be facilitated. Are there special contributions that our 
universities can make, given their location and their mix of programs? This 
is something we will be looking at. Should we be seeking special programmatic 
and budgetary authorizations to enhance that contribution? Do the current 
economic circumstances of the State suggest that our aspirations in this regard 
might be revised downward, or is this the time to push ahead with a particularly 
strong emphasis? These are all important questions, not just for the universities 
but for the Board as well. 

Section VI - Grants and Contracts 

Northern Illinois University is seeking Board approval of a contract with the 
U.S. Peace Corps entitled "Training Program for Peace Corps Trainees and 
Volunteers for Assignment in Honduras". He reported that under authority 
provided by our Board Regulations the contract was given preliminary approval 
by the Executive Director because the University had to accept the contract 
prior to this Board meeting. Consistent with the Board Regulations, Dr. Matsler 
said, the contract is now being submitted to the Board for final approval. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the contract. The motion was seconded by 
Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VII - Board of Regents Fund - Status Report 

Dr. Matsler reported that as of December 1, 1982 the Board of Regents Fund 
shows a balance of $4,451.42. Of this total, $2,280 represents gifts received 
and $2,171.42 reflects interest earned. Staff recommends, he said, that the 
money be reinvested and that its use be considered at some future date. 

Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Mr. Bender, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VIII - Dependent Health Insurance - Status Report 

Dr. Matsler reported to the Board that as of November 1, 1982, when the 
initial enrollment period ended, there were 994 dependent units enrolled in 
the alternative deoendent health insurance program, which is almost 50% of 
those eligible. 

Section IX - Administrative Salary Plan Ranges for 1983 

Dr. Matsler said Staff is recommending that the current ranges in the Admini- 
strative Salary Plan be increased by 3% for 1983, effective January 1, 1983. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Dr. Wellbank. 



108 



Dr. Matsler said he would emphasize that Board approval of an increase in the 
ranges would not provide any money or any percent of increase to any individual. 
He said that this proposed change is the result of work done by Dr. Wellbank 
with the staff. 

Mr. Murray said while we do not have the money now, if the proposal is approved 
by the Board and if we do get the money, this is an indication that we are going 
to adjust salaries upward, recognizing the fact that the brackets are presently 
too low. Those who would be affected, he said, can take cognizance of the fact 
that the Board recognizes they are worth more - whether or not we can afford 
to pay them . 

Mr. Gayles asked why we could not have a similar proposal for faculty, and 
Dr. Matsler explained that there is no salary schedule for faculty. They are 
given increases on an individual basis. 

Mr. Murray suggested for the benefit of those members of the Board who started 
their service after adoption of the Administrative Salary Plan that Dr. Matsler 
have a summary description of the Plan prepared for distribution. 

The question before the Board was called, and the motion carried unanimously. 

Section X - Report Schedule, Calendar Year 1983 

Dr. Matsler presented, as an information item, a schedule of reports which is 
prepared annually to assist the staffs of the universities and the Central Office 
to coordinate the various intra-system reports which are prepared. 

Section XI - Central Office Line Item Transfers 

Dr. Matsler asked for approval of the following transfers between FY83 appro- 
priation line items : 



From 



To 



Contractual Services 


$3,200 


Commodities 


Equipment 


300 




Operation of Automo- 






tive Equipment 


800 





$4,300 



$4,300 



$4,300 



Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the line item transfers. The motion was 
seconded by Mrs. Fitzpatrick, and it carried unanimously. 

Section XII - Legal Counsel Report 

Mr. Winning said his Report furnishes a summary of matters which involved 
litigation during the year of 1982, some of which have been resolved and some 
of which continue. The summary is self-explanatory, he noted, and therefore 
he would not comment further on it except to furnish a couple of updates. 
With respect to the matter of Yarger vs. Board of Regents, which was dismissed 
on a motion of the defendant based upon an investigation which indicated that 
the statute was not passed in accordance with the constitutional requirements, 
Mr. Winning pointed out a lawyer in his office went back to the journals of 



109 



the legislature and discovered that the act upon which the plaintiffs were relying 
to establish their case was not properly passed by the General Assembly. He 
said he believes that the attorney, Ms. Sue Myerscough-, took an imaginative 
initiative in this instance and should be commended. Mr. Murray agreed and 
directed that the Minutes of the Meeting reflect this. 

Mr. Winning also reported that since his Report was prepared the matter of 
Barbara Ford (EEOC) had been dismissed; and that the Richar d M ichael Ackley 
matter had been dismissed by the Court of Claims. With respect to the matter 
of Continental Telephone Company of Illinois vs. Board of Regents . Mr. Winning 
advised that our counsel, Doug Brown, filed a motion to dismiss, and received 
a telephone call from counsel for the plaintiff indicating that they would like 
to have an extension of time to file an amended complaint because they recog- 
nized that some of the elements of the motion to dismiss were sound. 

President Watkins commented that when reading the Legal Counsel Report one 
thing which comes out again and again is that under Jim Winning's leadership 
the university legal counsels representing the institutions are getting a number 
of these cases dismissed, or where a case does come to some action, 
the university is not held to be liable. This indicates that we have very 
competent legal representation and further that the universities are basically 
treating people fairly. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Sangamon State University - President's Report 

Because President Lacy had been unable to remain for the entire meeting, the 
Sangamon State University President's Report was presented by Dr. Cullom 
Davis, Vice President for Academic Affairs. 

Dr. Davis distributed copies of an Addendum to the Capital Improvements section 
of the President's Report (tabulation of bids for the orchestra lift in the PAC). 

An information report was presented on Grants and Contracts. 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative and civil service per- 
sonnel. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the President's 
Report and will be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office 

2. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Orchestra Lift - Public Affairs Center Auditorium 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that low bids be accepted and contracts awarded as follows: 

Montgomery Elevator, Peoria, Illinois, in the amount of $145,946 
for the orchestra lift ; 

Lawrence Rodgers, Ltd., Springfield, Illinois, in the amount of 
$24,845 for the General Work and Alternates A-l and A- 2; 



110 



Mansfield Electric, Springfield, Illinois, in the amount of 
$4,426 for the Electrical Work and Alternate E-l; 

and to establish a construction contingency of $5,000 for the 
entire project. 

3. Professional and Artistic Contracts 

(a) Murphy, Downey, Wo f ford , and Richman , Architects 

Approval was requested to increase the FY83 contract author- 
ization for consulting services provided by the Master Plan 
Architect, Murphy, Downey, Wof ford , and Richman, Architects, 
St. Louis, Missouri, from a total of $3,000 approved by the 
Board at its meeting on May 20, 1982, by $6,000 to a revised 
total not to exceed $9,000. 

Dr. Davis took note of the contract the university has with the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Public Health which calls for their services in the evaluation of the 
training and testing of emergency medical technicians in Illinois. This is a 
good example, he said, of the specialized services the public affairs centers 
can provide. 

With respect to the personnel transactions reported, Dr. Davis said he would 
highlight the fact that a relatively substantial portion of the transactions are 
ones involving the assignment of incumbent faculty for various staff and 
administrative services. This is a further example of a point made by President 
Lacy in the past that in these stringent times they are doing their very best 
to reassign internally faculty who are available for that sort of activity. 

Dr. Davis said he would remind the Board of the master plan review that is 
underway on the Sangamon State campus this year. It ties interestingly enough 
and significantly enough in with the economic development report presented by 
Dr. Groves. One of the major components of the master plan consideration is 
a feasibility study of the possibility of developing a research park on the campus 
Spearheading that study is a distinguished specialist in public administration, 
Mr. George Esser, who is present at the meeting today. Dr. Davis said Mr. 
Esser holds a law degree from Harvard, was a Professor of Public Law and 
Government at the University of North Carolina, has held in his career key 
advisory and executive assignments with the Ford Foundation, the North 
Carolina Fund and the Southern Regional Council. Until his recent retirement 
he was Executive Director and then President of the National Academy of Public 
Administration. Dr. Davis asked Mr. Esser to make a few remarks to the Board 
with respect to the early thinking concerning the research park. 

Dr. Esser said he had been on the faculty of the University of North Carolina 
when the research triangle was first a dream, then a feasibility study, and now 
is a very real part of the economy of North Carolina. The basic idea of any 
such undertaking, he said, is to attract to a research park at SSU organizations 
or parts of organizations concerned with governmental research and some of the 
subsidiary functions, such as publications. We know, he said, that government 
officials and units, like other elements in our society, are well organized, and 
while many of them were first in Illinois at the University of Chicago, most of 
them in the last 30 years have gravitated toward Washington. At this time in 
our economy, a Washington base is both expensive and not as relevant as it 



Ill 



was a few years ago. Their idea, he said, would be to invite national, 
regional and state organizations to come to a research park at SSU in which 
there would be a real support relationship between the organizations located 
there and the university itself - a mutual relationship in which both would 
gain. The organizations would gain the support of the university and the state 
in terms of services, faculty, libraries, and in terms of being in the heartland 
of the country rather than in Washington. The university would gain from the 
opportunities for higher education to assist in that research and a market for 
its students. They are engaged in a feasibility study, Mr. Esser continued, 
to determine first whether the organizations really see the value of a relation- 
ship with a university which has a mandate in public affairs - probably the 
only one with that kind of a mandate. If there is a critical mass of organiza- 
tions that would be interested in such a cooperative venture, then the university 
could proceed with plans for securing commitments and directing facilities in 
that kind of a research park. Any research park obviously takes time to 
develop, and President Lacy has secured the leadership of Mr. George Bunn, 
the President of the Springfield Marine Bank, to head a task force to review 
that feasibility. The task force will consist of members of the Board of Regents, 
the Legislature, the Governor's office, individuals from private business and 
others who are concerned with development of the State as a whole. The idea 
would be to first document the advantages that locations in Springfield and at 
SSU would bring the national, regional or state organizations, and then secure 
the cooperation of the Governor, key legislators and other public officials in 
Illinois who are members of the governing boards of many of these organizations. 
Mr. Esser said the tyoes of organizations they are speaking of are those of 
general purpose such as the National Governors' Conference, the National 
Conference of State Legislatures, etc. There are at least 25 or more in the 
general purpose category, and perhaps as many as 300-400 in the functional 
categories. Non-profit organizations concerned with government research might 
even be included, and even private organizations which do significant work in 
government research. The feasibility study will be carried out by the task 
force. Full information on both what Illinois and SSU can offer and what the 
market scenes will be and what steps will be necessary to move ahead will be 
presented to the task force; and the decision to go forward would then be up 
to the task force. Obviously, if the decision is made to go forward, it would 
require considerable commitment in time from the Board, the University and 
the State government. 

Mr. Parker asked what dollar amount is involved in this feasibility study. 

Dr. Davis said the University has engaged Mr. Esser's services for a period 

of time this winter and spring. He said he is not familiar with the details of 

the contract, but it is essentially a part-time personal services contract, 

relatively modest in magnitude, and it brings him here about once a month 

for a period of about six months to consult with us and to meet with the advisory 

committee. 

Mr. Murray thanked Mr. Esser for his report to the Board. 

Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon 
State University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and 
it carried unanimously . 



112 



Northern Illinois University - President's Report 

President Monat distributed revised copies of an Addendum to his Report 
with respect to the Recreation Facility project. (Board action on this item 
is recorded under Reports to the Board, Joint Facilities /Finance Committee.) 

Information reports were submitted on : 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Spring- 1983 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall 1983 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 

Gifts to Northern Illinois University 

International and Special Programs Expenditures 

M.B . A. - J.D . Joint Degree Program 

The following items were then presented for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees. A list of all 
reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and will 
be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report . 

3. The University has completed negotiations of Agreements with the Amer- 
ican Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) for 
building services and food services employees on the DeKalb and Lorado 
Taft campuses; and with the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 86 (FOP) 
for Police Officers I . Board approval was requested for the working 
conditions contained in the agreements. In accordance with the Resolution 
adopted earlier in the meeting, action on the wage provisions of the agree- 
ments was deferred. Because the agreement with the International Union 
of Operating Engineers (IUOE) was negotiated only with respect to wages 
for heating plant employees, no action was taken on this item. 

4. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Lincoln Hall - Repair of Sidewalks 
Douglas Hall - Repair of Sidewalks 
Grant Towers - Repair of Sidewalks 
Stevenson Towers - Repair of Sidewalks 

Authorization was requested to replace the deteriorated portions 
of the concrete sidewalk systems. Development of plans and 
specifications will be undertaken by university personnel as well 
as advertising and receiving bids for the projects. There will be 
no engineering fees charged to the projects. The total estimated 
budget is $75,000, payable from Auxiliary Enterprises and Acti- 
vities - Revenue Bond. 

(b) Holmes Student Center - Replacement of Air Conditioning System 
and Correction of Ventilating Deficiencies 

Correction of Minor Ventilating Deficiencies in Various Bond 
Revenue Buildings 



113 



The university requested permission to enter into a contract with 
Energy Management & Engineering-, Inc., Lombard, to design and 
prepare construction documents, advertise and receive bids for 
the projects identified above. The combined estimated total budget 
for all orojects is $91,700, payable from Auxiliary Enterprises and 
Activities - Revenue Bond . 

(c) Lincoln Hall - Waterproofing of Wing Foundation Walls 
Grant Towers - Repair and Reset Slate Panels 
Stevenson Towers - Repair and Reset Slate Panels 
Hu skie Stadium - Installation of New Synthetic Floor in 
Handball Courts 

Permission was requested to employ the firm of Kessler, Merci & 
Associates, Inc., Chicago, to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for these four projects. The combined 
total budget for the projects is estimated at $120,000, payable 
from Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities - Revenue Bond. 

(d) Recreation Facility 

(Board action on this item is recorded earlier in the minutes under 
Reports to the Board - Joint Facilities /Finance Committee.) 

Commenting on his Report, President Monat noted a rather significant number of 
vehicle replacement requests to keep their fleet uptodate, and the Board would 
recall that he had alerted members last month that these requests would be 
forthcoming. 

Dr. Monat said the M.B.A.-J.D. Degree Program is thought to be a major step 
forward in the College of Law, and next fall the program will be on line. 

The President said he wished at this time to acknowledge the assistance given 
by Dr. Matsler and Dr. Groves in working with the staff of the Board of Higher 
Education to bring about the approval of the Ph.D. program in Biological Sciences 
This was a difficult series of negotiations, he said, and he was pleased that Dr. 
Wagner and Dr. Wallhaus saw fit to recommend the proposal to the BHE. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern Illinois 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Mr. Gayles, and it carried 
unanimously. 

Before calling for the ISU President's Reoort , Chairman Murray said that if the 
Executive Committee meets in January it would only consider those matters which 
are absolutely necessary, and no controversial items would be taken up by the 
Committee. Dr. Monat inquired if room and board rates would be considered 
as non-controversial. If the increase is anything less than 5%, Dr. Matsler said 
they would probably not be considered controversial. Mr. Murray also asked 
that as much advance explanation of items as possible be furnished to the Com- 
mittee and all members of the Board. 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board, President Watkins said in accordance 
with the Resolution adopted earlier by the Board, he would defer seeking Board 
approval of the Union Agreements with Local 399, International Union of Operat- 



114 



ing Engineers and with Lodge 67 of the Fraternal Order of Police . 

Information reports were submitted on : 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Training, Service) 
Bond Redemptions 

The following items were Dresented for action by the Board : 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for civil 
service employees. A list of all reported transactions is appended to 
the President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and in 
the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as apoended to the President's Report 

3. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Shelbourne Apartment Air Conditioning Replacement Work 
Permission was requested to engage the firm of Brown, Davis, 
Mullins & Associates, Consulting Engineers, of Champaign, IL 

to prepare bid documents and receive bids for the installation of 
residential type, electric powered, compressor units and refriger- 
ant coils with temperature control for each apartment unit to re- 
place existing central chilled water system. The estimated cost 
of the work, including fees and contingencies, is $350,000, 
payable from Bond Revenue Series 1970- 70A Rehabilitation and 
Development Reserves. 

(b) Energy Conservation Retrofit Remodeling of East Campus and 
West Campus Residence Hall Complexes 

Permission was requested to engage the firm of Buchanan, Bellows 
& Associates, Consulting Engineers, Bloomington, to prepare bid 
documents and receive bids for the energy conservation retrofit 
remodeling of the East and West Campus Residence Complexes. 
Estimated cost, including fees and contingencies, is $600,000, 
payable from Bond Revenue Series 1970- 70A, Rehabilitation and 
Development Reserve. 

(c) Linkins Lounge 

Permission was requested to engage the firm of Mills /Lux, Associate! 
Architects, Bloomington, to prepare bid documents and receive bidsf 
for remodeling and renovation of Linkins Center Lounge Area. 
Estimated cost, including fees and contingencies, is $75,000, pay- 
able from Bond Revenue Series 1970- 70 A, Rehabilitation and 
Development Reserve. 

4. Student Fee Changes for 1983-84 

(a) Residence Hall Room and Board Rates 
No increase recommended. 

(b) Student Health Service Fee 
Permission was requested to increase this fee by $1.50 per semeste 
for all students registered for 9 or more hours per semester. 



115 



( c ) U ni versity Apart merits 
No increase recommended 

( d ) Bone Student Ce nter /Braden Auditorium Fee 
No increase recommended 

(e) Student Health and A cc ident Insurance Fee 
No increase recommended. 

(f) General Act ivity Fee 

No increase recommended . 

(g) Athletic and Service Fee 
No increase recommended. 

(h) Recreational Facilities Fee 
No increase recommended. 

5. Transcript Fees 

Preparation of transcripts will become a function of Computer Services 
effective July 1, 1983, at which time the cost of a transcript will increase 
from $1.00 to $3.00. 

6. New Union Agreement 

Approval was requested of the working conditions provisions only of 
an Agreement by and between Illinois State University and Local 399, 
International Union of Operating Engineers, for the period January 1, 
1983 through August 31, 1983/ This agreement is in behalf of 17 
Building Mechanics in the University's Residence Halls. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois State 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it 
carried unanimously. 

Mr. Bender said he had just learned today that the terms of three of our Board 
members are expiring, and he wonders if there is any procedure or process 
we can follow to insure that they are reappointed. Mr. Murray said he would 
suggest that individuals contact the Governor's office, their State Representative 
and State Senator. The members whose terms will expire in January are 
Ms. Burns, Mr. Parker and Dr. Wellbank, Dr. Matsler noted, and he would 
hope that all will be reappointed. However, the statutes provide that they con- 
tinue to serve until replacements are named or they are reappointed. Mr. Murray 
said he feels all three individuals are invaluable as members of the Board and 
he is doing everything he can to see that they are reappointed. 

There being no further business before the Board, on motion duly made and 
seconded, the meeting was declared adjourned. The next regularly scheduled 
meeting of the Board will be held on February 17, 1983, at Sangamon State Uni- 
versity. 

David E . Murray , Chairman 

Franklin G. Matsler, Secretary 



116 



Minutes of the Meeting - of the 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Sangamon State University - Springfield, Illinois 

February 17, 1983 

The regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 9:00 a.m. 
on February 17, 1983 in Conference Room G of the Public Affairs Center at 
Sangamon State University, Springfield, Illinois. Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman 
oresided . 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, roll was called, and the follow- 
ing Regents were present : 

Mr. Jerome R. Bender Ms. Denise Orchowski 

Ms. Carol K. Burns Mr. D. Brewster Parker 

Mrs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick Mr. Harold Riss 

Mr. Montel Gayles Ms. Janine Toman 

Mr. Milton McClure Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 

Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman 

Mr. James L. Wright arrived during the Executive Session of the Board. 

Also present were : 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 

Present and representing the Joint University Advisory Committee were: 
(ISUT Dr. Virginia Crafts, Chairman, Dr. Thomas Ei nermann, Mr. Leon 
Toepke, Dr. George Tuttle; (NIU) Mr. Joe Koch, Dr. James E. Lankford , 
Dr. Annette Lefkowitz, Dr. Tony Scaperlanda , Dr. Jerry D. Meyer; (SSU) 
Ms. Sue Bussone, Dr. George Gruendel, Dr. Jack VanDerSlik, and Ms. Cindy 
Stephenson . 

Others in attendance included staff from the Regency Universities and the 
Central Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the Board; 
and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Mr. Parker moved that the Board recess to meet in Executive Session for the 
purpose of discussing personnel matters and litigation. The motion was seconded 
by Mr. Gayles, and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public meeting at 10:00 a.m. 

The Chairman reported that in Executive Session the Board considered matters 
relating to the awarding of honorary degrees, personnel matters, pending liti- 
gation, and personnel matters at Sangamon State resulting from the financial 
reorganization cutbacks. 



117 



MINUTES OF DECEMBER 9, 1982 MEETING 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the meeting 
held on December 9, 1982, and he asked if there were any additions or correc- 
tions to be proposed. He added that the motion would also include the minutes 
of the meeting' of the Executive Committee held on January 20, 1983. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the minutes of the meeting held on December 9, 
and for the minutes of the meeting of the Executive Committee on January 20. 
The motion was seconded by Ms. Burns, and it carried unanimously. 

Ms. Burns said her recollection was that the Staff was to distribute to all mem- 
bers of the Board a copy of the BHE staff report on shifts in student demand, 
and she asked if this has been done. Dr. Matsler said Staff had suggested 
that it do an analysis of the BHE report before distributing the copies. What 
is the timetable for this, Ms. Burns inquired? Dr. Groves said it was the think- 
ing of the Staff that this should take place to serve as background information 
for the academic planning review this year. The analysis is finished and will 
be mailed out very quickly now . 

CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 

Mr. Murray said at this time he would like to formally appoint Janine Toman 
to serve on the Program and Finance Committees of the Board. All of the 
committees are now complete, he noted. 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Finance Committee 

Mrs. Fitzpatatrick reported that the Finance Committee met on Wednesday after- 
noon, and the bulk of its discussions pertained to items included in the Report 
of the Executive Director. For this reason she said she would defer any report 
until the items were reached on the agenda. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Dr. Crafts said on behalf of JUAC she would like to express appreciation to 
Linda Andrejek from ISU and Irene Allsop from SSU for their helpful contribu- 
tions while members of the Committee. JUAC wishes them well in their future 
endeavors. She reported that Bob Clement is serving as a substitute for 
Ms. Allsop at today's meeting. Dr. Crafts commented that a second member of 
the Joint University Advisory Committee has just been lost to "Jaws". The 
members who were terminated contributed substantially to the operation of the 
Committee, and they are dismayed to lose them in this way. 

Dr. Crafts reported that the Committee met last evening and again this morning. 
Among the items discussed was the projected retreat which, it has now been 
determined, will be held at ISU in April. President Watkins has indicated that 
he would accommodate this if the needed space arrangements can be made. 
Participating in the retreat, she said, will be members of the Board, the Executive 
Director and certain members of his staff, the Presidents, JUAC members, staff 
from the universities, and others by invitation. A keynote speaker will be 
invited to focus on quality education in higher education generally and in Illinois 
particularly. 



118 



Dr. Crafts advised that at yesterday's meeting-, the Committee had some good 
interaction with members of the Board Staff, Dr. Floyd, Dr. Brim and Mr. 
Adams. The Committee thanks Mr. Adams for his most informative presentation 
on the legislative picture and financial legislation. The JUAC also discussed 
the problems associated with funding for Regency institutions, including tuition 
charges. The Committee also wishes to indicate its strong, continued interest 
in achieving sound funding of the retirement system. In addition, JUAC 
requested BOR Staff assistance in investigating the various retirement models 
and related legislative models which are used in various institutions of higher 
education in numerous states, so that such information might be used in updating 
Illinois retirement models. Dr. Crafts advised that Dr. Brim had updated the 
Committee on the present situation concerning insurance bidding. 

Finally, Dr. Crafts said, JUAC wishes to express its appreciation to Chairman 
Murray for the strong position he exhibited at the January meeting of the Board 
of Higher Education in support of increasing taxes to be used to improve educa- 
tion . 

Mr. Murray thanked Dr. Crafts for the Committee report. 

Relative to the Committee membership from Northern Illinois University, Mr. 
Gayles asked why there are no student memberships on the Committee. Dr. 
Crafts said they had discussed some of those concerns this morning, and she 
advised Mr. Gayles that it is left to each institution to determine how they 
will have their JUAC comoonent made up. In the case of some institutions, 
they have more representation on their Senate bodies than in others, and there- 
fore they may feel that they do not need to have a student representative on 
JUAC as much as other institutions. This is taken care of at the institutional 
level. President Monat added that several years ago the issue came to the 
University Council, because it is the UC which determines the composition of 
NIU representation on JUAC. At that time the Council did have an operating 
staff representative but did not have a student. There are a limited number 
of members that a university can have, and in the case of NIU, the appropriate 
place for these decisions to be made would be at the University Council. 

Board of Higher E ducation Meeting 

Mr. Murray reported that the highlight of the January meeting of the Board 
of Higher Education was the adoption of a resolution to encourage the Governor 
and the Legislature to increase state revenues and to increase funding to edu- 
cation and higher education in particular. That apparently was unique for the 
Board of Higher Education , because it had never adopted that kind of a policy 
prior to that time. A lively discussion took place, and in the course of the 
meeting it was decided to ask for a private meeting of the board and the Governor 
or, rather, a separate meeting. Members of the BHE did meet with the Governor, 
and the results of that meeting were reported at the February meeting of the 
BHE - and it was a very dismal report, Mr. Murray advised. While he is not 
sure that he has all of the figures correct, his recollection is that even if the 
tax increase went through, the State has overspent to the tune of something 
like $450-600 million. We are not in very good shape, and even if the proposed 
tax proposals are enacted, it simply would fund us to the funding level recom- 
mended for FY 83. At any rate, Mr. Murray said, after that meeting with the 
Governor, Dr. Wagner made the statement that it appears that higher education 
is never going to be the same, and we have to prepare ourselves for cutbacks 



119 



which may even involve closing of institutions. Mr. Murray said he found that 
a little surprising. In view of the projected enrollment declines, Dr. Wagner 
cast a negative attitude on expansion in higher education and certainly indicated 
that the Board of Higher Education would be studying cutbacks that may be 
substantial. 

Also at the February meeting of the BHE, Mr. Murray reported, a report was 
received from the Committee on Higher Education and Economic Development . 
That report was interesting and led to further discussions involving the joint 
committee between the Board of Education and the IBHE on the various qualities 
of secondary education in Illinois and how that impacts upon higher education. 
Mr. Murray said he was rather outspoken about what he considers to be the 
inferior quality of our secondary education system and how much that increases 
costs and problems for higher education. Not everyone agreed with him on this 
matter, he noted. 

Dr. Matsler said this might be an appropriate time to report to the Board on 
one of the actions of the Finance Committee yesterday relative to support for 
higher education. He said Mrs. Fitzpatrick does have a resolution to present 
to the Board, but before this is done, he said he would like to comment on 
some of the statements made by a few people relative to giant cutbacks in 
higher education. Illinois, he said, is a very wealthy state, probably about 
the third or fourth richest state in the United States, if it is compared on a 
per capita income basis. Illinois has the third or fourth largest population, 
it has continually been a wealthy state, it has a diversified industry as well 
as farming. Dr. Matsler said when he hears statements made about the possi- 
bilities of tremendous cutbacks or the disestablishment of an institution , he 
thinks this would not be fair to the people of Illinois were this to happen. 
He said he would rather see us work very hard toward some tax increase if 
we really do need it, and work on a positive basis. He said he is really dis- 
appointed that some of these comments have been made because he just does 
not think that they are warranted at this time. He has great faith in this 
State and he is sure that the economy will be turning around. Whether we 
are talking about a college within a large university, or whether you are talking 
about a college or university, he does not think that this is the time to discuss 
disestablishmentarianism . 

Dr. Matsler said he would hope that the resolution to be presented by Mrs. 
Fitzpatrick, if approved, would indeed show that the Board of Regents is 
behind support for higher education. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick then presented the following Resolution for consideration by 
the Board : 

WHEREAS, higher education and other public services in 
Illinois have lost ground in comparison with other states in the 
Union with respect to the quality of services and the support of 
programs; and 

WHEREAS, both the Governor and members of the Legis- 
lature have recognized the need for increased tax revenues ; 
now, therefore, be it 



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RESOLVED that the Board of Regents support the Governor's 
recommendations to increase the State's revenue through an adjust- 
ment of the various existing state taxes and the enactment of fair 
and equitable new taxes. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick advised the Board that the Finance Committee voted unani- 
mously to recommend approval of the Resolution by the Board. She then moved 
for adoption of the Resolution, and the motion was seconded by Mr. Gayles. 

Mr. Gayles said he supports adoption of the Resolution and would like to read 
to the Board a letter addressed to Chairman Murray by Jim Corbett , President 
of the NIU Student Association. The letter advised Mr. Murray that on 
February 6th the NIU Student Association Senate passed a resolution stating 
that it supports an increase in the state's personal and corporate income taxes. 
The SA supports the increase for the dual purposes of generally shoring up 
state finances and particularly for increasing funding to higher education. 
The SA advised Mr. Murray that they are well aware of the courageous stance 
he took at the BHE meeting in January when he advocated increasing the state 
income tax, and they urge the Board of Regents to display that same courage 
over the next weeks by using ever means available to ensure the passage of a 
tax package of the type proposed by the Governor. It is their hope that 
when the Board acts on the tuition increases for next year, such action will 
reflect a strong commitment to increasing the state income tax. With no increases 
in income taxes and in funding for higher education, many citizens of the state 
will be denied access to a quality public post-secondary education. It is impera- 
tive that students, faculty, administrators and governing boards work together 
for higher education during the current financial crisis. Mr. Corbett advised 
the Chairman that if there is any way in which students at NIU can contribute 
to the common cause, he should not hesitate to contact the SA. 

Ms. Orchowski and Ms. Toman also reported that students at ISU and SSU are 
united in support of the stance taken by Chairman Murray at the BHE meeting, 
and in support of the Governor's recommendations for tax increases. 

Presidents Monat and Watkins reported that the councils representing the various 
constituencies on their campuses have also passed resolutions in support of the 
Governor's proposals. 

Dr. George Tuttle of JUAC also reported that the Academic Senate at ISU 
also is on record in support of Mr. Murray's stand before the BHE meeting. 

Mr. Murray said he had not intended to initiate all of these comments. He 
made his statement at the BHE meeting and would not repeat it today. He said 
he views with real dismay that in Illinois higher education has slipped so much 
percentage wise in monies given to higher education, from both the state and 
federal governments. He said he considers members of the Board to be trustees 
of the universities and we all have the obligation to do the best job we can to 
make sure that the assets under our trusteeship are maintained and that the 
status of higher education is maintained. Obviously, when salaries are slipping 
and we are in jeopardy of losing good people, and when we are not maintaining 
our libraries and our buildings, we are not really doing a very good job as 
trustees. 

Mr. Murray said he is happy to support the adequate funding of higher educa- 



121 



tion , but he wants to use the same opportunity to exhort - as he has done in 
the past - faculty and administrations that things are not going to be the same 
as they have been in the past. We are facing projections of decreased enroll- 
ments in Illinois (according to the Breneman report) of perhaps 20-25% over 
the next five years. This is what Dr. Wagner is saying. Mr. Murray said 
he disagrees with Dr. Matsler to some extent because he really thinks that 
higher education is no different than other segments of the economy. While 
he is not suggesting cutbacks in salaries, he certainly would suggest that we 
must do what we can to be more productive, just as the UAW workers are 
turning out a better quality automobile in the same amount of time. We can 
all do a better job, and that is why he is encouraged by what he hears from 
SSU - despite the projected cutbacks there are some attitudes of new coopera- 
tion and new productivity. Higher education is not immune, and we cannot 
just sit back and hope for an increase in income taxes so that we can continue 
exactly what we are now doing. 

Mr. Murray said this has to be a cooperative effort. Those who are not involved 
as professionals in the system feel strongly about doing what we can to make sure 
that the institutions are adequately funded and that they are as fine as they 
possibly can be. So, he said, let's all work on this project together because it 
will certainly be easier to put forth a product that we are proud of, and we will 
know that there is the kind of spirit on the campuses which justifies what the 
rest of us are doing on behalf of increased money for education. 

President Lacy noted that the three senates at Sangamon State had also passed 
resolutions similar to those noted by the other presidents. As to Mr. Murray's 
comments, the President said he believes that what legislators are saying to us 
is that while their minds are not closed to the question of new revenue and they 
understand our needs, we must understand exactly what Mr. Murray said. We 
are asking legislators in many cases to make the toughest political decision of 
their legislative careers. And they are not prepared to make those decisions 
unless we can demonstrate that we no longer have waste in higher education 
and that we are making our best effort with the dollars that we have available 
to us. Dr. Lacy said he believes that we have reached a point in these last 
several years of very thin funding where we now do not have difficulty demon- 
strating that there is no more fat in higher education. Mrs. Fitzpatrick's 
Resolution is a very important one, he said, and the timing element today is 
also important early in this legislative session. None of us underestimates the 
difficulty of getting a tax bill of this magnitude passed , the President said , 
and he thinks it will take the very best efforts of students , faculty and staff 
of all of our institutions, as well as trustees and other interested people in 
other state programs, to achieve the results that we must have. 

Chairman Murray said he thought we would be far more effective in encouraging 
members of the legislature if we can demonstrate a positive commitment of some 
type from the campuses which will be in the nature of more productivity. 

President Watkins said he believes we all agree that the state in which we all 
live is a better one because we do have geographically and programmatically 
diverse systems of state universities. This has been extremely important in 
the economic development of the State, and we need to play increasing roles 
as the years go on in terms of the type of society which is evolving in Illinois. 
He believes the State values the state universities because they are an inherently 
important part of it because we produce education and people who are skilled in 



122 



the work that they do. We need to emphasize the important role that our uni- 
versities play in the quality of life in the State. He would submit that if 
these universities were absent, greatly weakened, or diminished in their pro- 
grammatic strength, the quality of life in Illinois would not be as good as it 
is today and certainly would not develop in the future. That is the case we 
can make. Statistics well bear out that we are good stewards of our public 
monies, and we must continue to be so, but we must never lose sight of the 
fact that we do contribute to the quality of life. Absent universities, the 
quality of life in Illinois would not be satisfactory. 

Mr. Murray said he did not wish to belabor this matter much longer, but he 
would like to pass on what a state representative said to him: if faculty 
would spend 8 hours on the campus a day, just as people do in regular jobs, 
he would support the increase. This is indicative of the feeling that we will 
be up against . Somehow , most representatives and taxpayers feel that in the 
universities faculty teach only 1 or 2 courses a week and spend most of their 
time at home. When we ask taxpayers for more money, Mr. Murray said, 
somehow we must work on our image from that standpoint. 

President Watkins said we should be open to any suggestions as to how we 
best might convey the truth of the work that we do to the public. He thinks 
most of us work awfully hard. 

President Lacy said in the case of SSU and also the U. of I. and other 
campuses, we do indeed have hard quantified data and the working hours of 
faculty members. He suggested it might be interesting if, at the next meet- 
ing of the Board, Dr. Munkirs or someone else presented a summary of that 
data to the Board. This comes in the form of faculty effort reports which 
are filed each year, and the public might be surprised at the number of hours 
these reports reflect the faculty working for the State of Illinois. 

Mr. Murray said this should be presented and publicized any way it can be. 

Ms. Burns commented that the Chairman's comments were good ones, and she 
had heard the presidents saying that there might be some common misperception 
about productivity in higher education in Illinois. We would all do well, she 
said, to exert a strong effort to correct those misperceptions, rather than not 
really talk about them and to continue to let legislators and others think that 
productivity has in fact not improved. She said she is sure that there are 
some facts that we can probably hear which would help with this problem. 

Mr. Wright noted that we have unemployment in the State right around 700,000; 
we have workers whose unemployment compensation has run out, with no 
prospect for jobs. He thinks that it would behoove faculty and staff of the 
universities to pay serious attention to what has been said here today. He 
said he serves on a committee with the Governor and labor groups in the State 
who will work for a tax increase. However, he does not want to lobby for 
that on the basis of a wage increase for faculty and other employees of the 
universities, because the workers out there just don't understand that. They 
are going to talk about a planned program, out of which will come wage increases 
etc., and that is the way he presents it to the workers. Mr. Wright said he 
talks with people in union halls and other places, and they tell him that he is 
on the Board of Regents and is promoting a tax increase and faculty all get 
big fat increases. His response is that faculty don't make much more than 
workers at General Motors, if they would work on Saturday. When it comes 



123 



to lobbying 1 members of the legislature in Springfield, Mr. Wright said, we must 
remember they are politicians and they only deal with what the voters in their 
districts talk to them about. Voters are negative, and are becoming- negative 
about higher education. Any kind of a program that can be put forth to say 
that faculty and staff are going to get an increase but that they are also going 
to increase production is what is needed. We are all smart enough, he said, to 
know how to improve our image of what we are doing in the educational institu- 
tions. Mr. Wright said he agrees that we have a tough fight here, and although 
it may appear strange, he does support the tax increase. 

Mr. McClure noted that it has always been difficult to quantify the subjective, 
and that is what we are asking our presidents to do. There is a general mis- 
conception among the general public. They think bankers work from 9:00 to 
3:00, and judges from 10:00 to 12:00 and from 2:00 to 3:00. He cited the 
instance of one judge in his area who has docket calls at 8:30 in the morning, 
and the general public learns very quickly that he is in his office before that . 
Perhaps this is something that we are talking about. Many comments have been 
made about the fine State that we have, Mr. McClure said, and he also believes 
that we have a very fine public educational system at the post -secondary level. 
However, we would be remiss if we didn't mention the fact that we have a 
chief executive and members of the legislature who are willing to take a strong- 
stance at a toug"h time on issues like this. 

Mr. Murray said he would agree, but he knows from talking - with representatives 
that when they went back to their districts they not only did not find much 
support for the Governor's strong stand, they did not engender much support 
themselves. So, the fight is going to be a tough one. 

The question before the Board for adoption of the Resolution as presented by 
Mrs. Fitzpatrick was called for a vote, and the motion carried unanimously. 

Before calling for the Executive Director's Report, the Chairman said he had 
been requested by Mr. Wright to recognize two individuals from Sangamon State 
who wished to address the Board about the changes or the reorganization diffi- 
culties there. He said Darryl Thomas and Ron Ettinger would be recognized 
when the Sangamon State University President's Report was under consideration. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 137 

Sectio n I - Annual Report - Board of Regents 

Dr. Matsler said he would not go through this Report in great detail, but rather 
would simply highlight some of the activities contained in the outline. 

With respect to federal and state matters, the report contains some of the changes 
in the leadership of the State Legislature relative to higher education, and also 
some changes at the federal level. The Board might be interested to know that 
last week, Dr. Monat , Dr. Watkins and he were in Washington, and can report 
that they believe federal support for the coming year will be fairly equal to 
support for last year in spite of the administration's proposal to cut back support 
in considerable amounts. There appears to be a lot of resistance in Congress 
to any changes at this time. Dr. Matsler said we still do not know what can 
be expected in the way of ISSC awards because this still has to be worked out 
in the Legislature. 



124 



The Regency System, Dr. Matsler continued, has collectively over 10 million 
gross square feet of space in residential and non-residential buildings, and 
the report points out the sad shape that our physical facilities are in. 

Other activities reported on include Revenue Shortfall and Budgetary Adjustments 
Personnel Matters (both civil service and faculty and staff), Retirement Funding, 
New and Expanded Programmatic Needs, University Guidelines - Legislative Audit 
Commission . 

Section II - FY83 Co ntingency Reserves for Higher Education Appropriations 

This section of the EDR , Dr. Matsler said, is rather pertinent to some of the 
earlier discussions, and summarizes what commonly has been called "Jaws I", 
or the recision which the Governor and the Legislature have imposed for FY83. 
The table shows that the 2% contingency reserve for all of higher education 
amounts to a little over $20 million. The Regency System's share of this amount 
is $2.4 million which must be given up from the budgets for the current year: 
at ISU, $938.2 thousand; at NIU $1.2 million; at Sangamon State $260.7 thousand; 
and in the Central Office $12.4 thousand. This is quite an adjustment in the 
budgets for the current fiscal year. 

Section III - FY 84 Operating Appropriations - Summary of IBHE Recommendations 

In September of 1982, Dr. Matsler said, the Board of Regents approved the 
FY 84 operating appropriations request for the Regency System in the amount 
of $169.4 million. The Board of Higher Education has now recommended to the 
Governor a total operating budget for the Regency System in the amount of 
$162.9 million, an increase of 10.1% over fiscal 1983, and this is the level at 
which our appropriations bill will be written. Tables in the report provide a 
breakdown of the BHE recommendations by institution, and also some information 
on what happened in the other systems in higher education. 

Section IV - FY 84 Capital Appropriations Requests - Summary of IBHE 
Recommendations 

The Board of Regents approved capital appropriations requests for the three 
institutions in a total amount of $26,837,600 for FY84. The Board of Higher 
Education has now recommended to the Governor a capital request for the 
three Regency universities in the amount of $11,375,600: $815,000 for Sangamon 
State, $3, 357', 600 for Northern Illinois, and $7,202,200 for Illinois State. The 
Board of Higher Education has developed FY84 priority lists for capital projects, 
and it will be noted that our institutions have fared rather well in that of the 
total dollars recommended for the first 16 projects, about half of these are for 
Board of Regents' projects. 

Section V - University Guidelines 1982 

The Board will recall, Dr. Matsler said, that in December Staff presented the 
University Guidelines 1982 to the joint meeting of the Facilities and Finance 
Committees and to the Board as a whole. These guidelines will replace those 
adopted in 1977 by the Legislative Audit Commission and all of the senior public 
higher education systems in the State. Staff is now recommending for adoption 
by the Board the following Resolution pertaining to the Legislative Audit Com- 
mission's University Guidelines 1982: 



125 



BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Regents of Regency Universities 
that the Legislative Audit Commission's University Guidelines 1982 
be adopted as operating policy of the Board of Regents and its 
universities with respect to matters contained therein ; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED that the Guidelines Exception, adopted by 
the Legislative Audit Commission on November 30, 1982 pertaining 
to retention of capital reserves for revenue bond entities be adopted 
as operating policy for Illinois State University; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED that implementation of the Guidelines be accom- 
plished no later than June 30, 1983; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED that the action of the Board of Regents on 
May 19, 1977, adopting guidelines and definitions with respect to 
handling of locally held funds, be rescinded; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED that the university foundations, alumni associa- 
tions and athletic associations which support functions of the Regency 
Universities be encouraged to adopt the provisions of Section VI of 
the University Guide lines 1982 as their respective operating policies; 
and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED that this Resolution remain in effect until 
modified or rescinded by the Board of Regents. 

Generally speaking, Dr. Matsler said, these guidelines are good ones, although 
there are still some problems which are not resolved. There is push on the 
part of some on the LAC and in the Auditor General's office to discontinue 
general revenue support for employees who work in bond revenue and auxiliary 
enterprise areas. If this support were to be withdrawn, Dr. Matsler said, it 
would mean literally millions of dollars which students in the state would have 
to provide out of their own pockets. So, he said, he thinks it important that 
we continue to follow the existing policy in this matter. 

Ms. Burns moved for adoption of the Resolution as recommended by Staff. 
The motion was seconded by Mr. McClure. 

President Watkins asked where we stand with respect to the questions which 
remain unresolved relative to payment of fringe benefits for our bond revenue 
employees. Mr. Murray advised that this was discussed in the meeting of the 
Audit Committee this morning and it was decided that a separate Resolution 
should be presented to the Board on the matter. 

The question before the Board for adoption of the Resolution pertaining to 
the University Guidelines 1982 was called for a vote , and the motion carried 
unanimously. 

Mr. McClure said as a member of the Audit Committee he thinks it should be 
clearly understood that if general revenue funding of benefits for bond revenue 
employees were to be eliminated - and there have been efforts legislatively and 
otherwise to eliminate this funding - it would mean that students in the state 
would have to pay about $8 million extra just for the same services they have 
today. 



126 



Mr. McClure then moved that the Board of Regents encourage a continuation 
of the present policy of funding fringe benefits for auxiliary enterprise 
employees from appropriated funds. The motion was seconded by Ms. Burns. 

President Lacy said as a point of clarification he would suggest that the motion 
should not simply encourage but state that it is this Board's interpretation of 
these Guidelines that that is the case. 

Mr. McClure pointed out that this is not in the Guidelines . We are not inter- 
preting what is there, but simply stating our position for subsequent discussion 
under the terms of the Guidelines. He asked Mr. Beahringer if he wished to 
comment on this. If the Board goes on record as stated, Mr. Beahringer 

said, our position can be transmitted to the Legislative Audit Commission. 
He said the Guidelines say we are to study, in conjunction with the Board of 
Higher Education, a plan for the appropriate funding of fringe benefits costs 
for group insurance and retirement contributions applicable to the auxiliary 
enterprise operations. The plan will provide for the elimination of the payment 
of these fringe benefits from appropriated funds or for the enactment of 
legislation setting forth the specific source of funds. If the motion is adopted 
we will be on record as saying that we feel the way to go is through appropri- 
ated funds, Mr. Beahringer noted. 

The question before the Board was called for a vote, and the motion carried 
unanimously. 

Section VI - Tuition for 1983-84 

Dr. Matsler said he would first state that he had a Staff recommendation pre- 
pared for the Board that tuition be increased from the present level to about 
$900, for fulltime undergraduates. As this matter had developed over the past 
few months, he said, Staff had expected a statement from the Governor which 
would give some idea as to how much support the Governor and the Legislature 
would be providing higher education for the coming year. This has not been 
received, he noted, and yesterday in the discussions of the Finance Committee 
it was felt that we would be better off simply to make no decision on the level 
of tuition at this time, and authorize the Executive Director to prepare the 
appropriations bill at the Board of Higher Education level, which would reflect 
a 10% increase in tuition for 1983-84. 

Ms. Burns moved that the Board authorize the Executive Director to prepare 
the appropriations bill for FY 84 at the Board of Higher Education level. The 
motion was seconded by Mr. McClure. 

President Monat said in the meeting of the Finance Committee yesterday, the 
presidents were very concerned that action on tuition not be postponed indefi- 
nitely. Going much beyond the March meeting in setting tuition levels creates 
almost an impossible administrative problem on the campuses, he said. 

Ms. Burns asked if Dr. Matsler thought the Governor would be on record by 
the time the Board meets again in March. Dr. Matsler said he could not guar- 
antee what the specifics would be, but he is confident that we will know a lot 
more than we do today. However, he does agree with the presidents that this 
decision cannot be deferred for ever and ever. 



127 



Mr. McClure said he is a little concerned that the rather short time spent by 
the Board on this matter today might be misinterpreted. He said he thinks 
that the record should state that the vast majority of the meeting of the Finance 
Committee yesterday was devoted to discussion of the tuition issue, with very 
substantial input from the student Regents, which everyone found very helpful. 
Mr. McClure said he did not want anyone to be misled in believing that because 
this discussion today took only a few minutes that it is not something that has 
not been considered very, very thoroughly. 

The question before the Board was called for a vote and the motion carried 
unanimously. 

Section VII - Board Regulation: Telephone Conference Meetings 

Dr. Matsler presented for first reading a new Board Regulation which would 
provide a means whereby public business can be transacted during periods 
when it is impractical to convene a quorum in person. The proposal is appli- 
cable to meetings of the full Board, the Executive Committee or other Commit- 
tees of the Board. 

Dr. Matsler noted that the Attorney General has given some guidelines on this, 
and what is being proposed is a way in which telephone conferences can be 
held. Press would be notified and would be able to listen to both sides of 
the telephone conversations. 

Dr. Matsler said there is one strong caveat, and he would hope that we would 
always abide by it - that controversial matters or very complicated matters would 
not be discussed by such a conference call. 

The proposed Regulation will be presented for action by the Board in March. 

Section V III - Board Regulation Amendment : Civil Service Employees 
Vaca tion Usage During Probation 

Dr. Matsler advised that the State Universities Civil Service System Merit Board 
recently amended the Uniform Benefits Resolution to allow use of earned vacation 
during probationary periods. Our current Board Regulations allow vacation usage 
only for "good cause". Since some classifications will now require a 12-month 
probationary period rather than 6 months, it is felt that the use of earned 
vacation should be allowed. 

The proposed amendment, Dr. Matsler said, is non- controversial and one that 
actually has been recommended by the Merit Board, and Staff recommends Board 
approval of the amendment. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Parker, and it carried unanimously. 

Section IX - Program s 

Dr. Matsler advised that Illinois State University is proposing a Sequence in 
Industrial Accounting within the Major in Accounting. Northern Illinois Uni- 
versity is seeking approval to change the degree designation for completion 
of 30 semester hours of graduate work beyond the masters degree in two edu- 
cation fields from Certificate of Advanced Study to Educational Specialist . 



128 



These are curricular decisions, Dr. Matsler said, and normally the Board does 
not go into these in much detail, however, this is the way that any changes 
can be promulgated, and Staff thought it appropriate to bring these to the 
Board for approval. Staff recommends approval of both requests. 

Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Mrs. Fitzpatrick. 

Mr. McClure said the request for approval of the Sequence in Industrial Account- 
ing states that it should be noted by deleting some accounting courses that 
students graduating with the Industrial Accounting Sequence will not be prepared 
to sit for the CPA examination. He wonders what, if any, information the uni- 
versity may be going to set forth other than the bulletin to perhaps warn these 
students that they will not be eligible to take such examinations. 

President Watkins said these students would be counseled when they go into 
this sequence that the intent of the sequence is to prepare them for quite 
another type of career, a career in Industrial Accounting. He said he thinks 
they will know, as people who now major in Accounting know, what they must 
have to prepare to sit for the CPA exams. There is nothing that would pro- 
hibit a student who desired to prepare him or herself for the CPA exam from 
extending the oeriod of study in order to include those courses. However, he 
said, it is incumbent upon the university to let the students know quite clearly 
when they move into the sequence that it prepares them for work as an indus- 
trial accountant. 

Mr. McClure noted that the program statement also sets forth the catalog copy 
which states that you have three fields of accounting, two of which have certi- 
fication through exams or otherwise, while the new one proposed does not. 
He said he wonders if perhaps in the catalog it might be mentioned that X 
number of additional hours taken in conjunction with the Industrial Accounting 
program might qualify a student to sit for the CPA exam. Both President 
Watkins and Provost Boothe agreed that would be included in the catalog. 

Mr. McClure said the program statement for the change in degree designation 
at Northern stated that there are four other CAS degrees. His recollection 
was that the university was going to change some of them in the future, but 
one was not going to be changed. Why is that, he asked? 

Dr. LaTourette, Provost at NIU, said this is a follow-up to the program reviews 
which were presented to the College of Education last year. In that review 
process and recommendations that derived from it, there were 4 other CAS's 
in Education which are now being reviewed in terms of consolidating three into 
one, and the fourth one which was in Physical Education was placed on probation 
with the explicit instructions that the degree program and its curriculum should 
be reexamined to determine whether or not this would be a viable degree for 
the future. The Department has completed that examination, he said, and has 
recommended the deletion of that CAS in Physical Education. Therefore, of 
the four that are not mentioned here, three will be consolidated in the future 
into one degree with a change in title to Educational Specialist, and the fourth 
will be deleted. They will all be a part of the Academic Plan presented to the 
Board at the March meeting. 

The question before the Board was called for a vote, and the motion carried 
unanimously. 



129 



Sect ion X - Grants and Contracts 

Dr. Matsler advised that Northern Illinois University is seeking Board approval 
of a contract with the U.S. Department of Education for a model Special Educa- 
tion program. 

Staff has evaluated the request and considers this activity to be consistent 
with the scope and mission of NIU, and recommends approval by the Board. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Burns, and it carried unanimously. 

Section XI - Option of Early Retirement Without Penalty - Percentage Limitation 

Dr. Matsler said the limitations being proposed on the use of an early retire- 
ment option would , in effect , simply continue the limitations currently in 
force. Staff recommends the following: 

1. For the period June 1, 1982 through June 1983 the maximum number of 
employees who may use this option shall be limited to 15% of the number 
of employees eligible for the program. 

2. Beginning with FY84 (July 1, 1983 through June 30, 1984), the maximum 
number of employees who may use this option within any one fiscal year 
shall be 15% of the number of employees eligible for the program during 
the period. 

3. The 15% limitation shall apply to each of the Regency Universities and 
to the Central Office. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The motion was 
seconded by Mr. Wright, and it carried unanimously. 

Section XII - Semi- Annual Report of Investments 

Dr. Matsler presented for the information of the Board a summary of investments 
as required by the Bond resolutions authorizing the University Facilities Revenue 
Bonds Series 1970- 70A, of Illinois State University. 

Section XIII - Revised 1983 Board Meeting Calendar 

In December the Board meeting calendar was revised to replace the January 
meeting with a February meeting, and these revisions necessitated changes in 
the locations of subsequent meetings. Dr. Matsler presented the revised calendar 
for 1983: 

January 1983 Subject to Call 

February 17, 1983 Sangamon State University 

March 17, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

April 21, 1983 Illinois State University 

May 19, 1983 Sangamon State University 

June 23, 1983 Springfield 

July 21, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

August 1983 Subject to Call 



130 



September 22, 1983 Illinois State University 

October 20, 1983 Sangamon State University 

November 1983 Subject to Call 

December 8, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Matsler noted that the Board had indicated a desire to meet in Chicago in 
December, and he would be willing to make this change if the members of the 
Board still want to do this. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the calendar of meetings as proposed. The 
motion was seconded by Ms. Burns. 

Mr. Gayles noted the 17th of March falls during Spring break at NIU, and it 
has been some time since the Board last met on that campus. He asked if it 
would be possible for the March meeting to be held at NIU on the 24th rather 
than on the 17th of the month. He said he understands that a number of 
schedules would have to be changed, but he asked the Board to keep in mind 
the importance of having student input during such a key time on campus. 

Why is it that students cannot be present on the 17th, Mr. Murray asked. 

Unfortunately, Mr. Gayles said, a great number of students would be sunning 
on a beach in Florida - although this would not include himself. 

Mr. Bender noted that he has a meeting of SURS on the 24th of March in 
Chicago. President Watkins said he appreciates Mr. Gayles' concerns, but 
he must point out that at ISU, as at other universities, they primarily build 
a great deal of their budgets around the announced dates of Board meetings. 
For example, he said, they have accommodated Board meeting dates in setting 
meetings of the Academic Senate and other groups, and he would encourage 
that the schedule as presented be maintained. Both Dr. Wellbank and Mr. 
McClure said the change might present problems for them as well. 

Ms. Burns asked if the matter of tuition would be considered by the Board in 
March, and Dr. Matsler responded affirmatively. Then, Ms. Burns said, 
maybe we should come up with some third option so that students can be present 
when the Board takes up this matter. That is a good point, Dr. Matsler said, 
and perhaps he could make the tuition report to be included in the EDR available 
to the presidents, so that those persons who wished to examine it could do so. 

President Monat noted also that the law school dedication will run from March 17 
through March 19, and they are hoping obviously that members of the Board 
would be able to participate in some of the activities. 

Ms. Toman noted that Sangamon State would also be on Spring break, but she 
and Cindy Stephenson are rearranging their personal schedules to accommodate 
the Board meeting. Personally, she added, she would like to be able to attend 
the meeting without having to miss classes, and she knows she speaks also for 
other students who will be there. 

After further discussion, the question before the Board was called for a vote, 
and the motion carried. Mr. Gayles recorded a Nay vote. 



131 



Mr. Winning 1 said he had been requested by the Board to secure bids from 
firms to act as bond counsel on the recreation facility at Northern Illinois 
University. This has been done, he said, and by a substantial amount the 
bid of Chapman and Cutler is the lowest bid received. Mr. Winning said he 
was requesting authority from the Board to award the contract to the lowest 
responsible bidder, Chapman and Cutler, if the recreation facility project 
proceeds. 

Mr. McClure moved for approval of the request by Legal Counsel. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Orchowski. 

Mr. Murray asked if it would be appropriate to tell the Board what the bids were. 
Mr. Winning reported that there were three potential bidders, one of whom he 
disqualified because that firm is also representing the plaintiff in the Continental 
Telephone Company suit against NIU. Of the other two, the higher bid was 
$20,000, while Chapman and Cutler's bid was $10,800. He noted that in previous 
bond issues, bond counsel fees have been in the neighborhood of $25,000, so 
by taking bids we have realized quite a savings. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

S angamon State University - President's Report 

President Lacy submitted information reports on: 

Grants and Contracts 

Purchases (Contracts with Visiting Performers) 

Capital Improvement Projects 

The following item was submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty, administration and civil service 

personnel. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the 
President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and in 
the Central Office . 

Dr. Lacy noted that there had been placed at each Board member's place at 
the table two publications. One is a series of articles on water resources in 
Illinois , and the other a report edited by Frank Kopecky , Director of the Center 
for Legal Studies and Dr. Wilkins on current Illinois legal issues. 

Noting the contract with Lorin Hollander for performances in October, Dr. Lacy 
advised that this will be the first use of a concert grand piano which has been 
given to the university and funded by a $25,000 gift from Mr. Paul Barker in 
memory of his brother, Robert Barker. 

With respect to the capital project for construction of an orchestra lift on the 
front stage of the Auditorium, this will be funded entirely by gift monies to the 
extent of more than $200,000, the President reported, a very substantial gift 
to the University. Dr. Lacy reported that two additional gifts had been received - 
$10,000 from Coca-Cola Company in support of the University's athletic program, 
and $12,000 from the Bunn Capital Corporation in support of the University's 
public relations programs. 



132 



President Lacy said although a lengthy written report would be furnished to 
the Board in the near future, he would report orally today on the leadership 
identification program which was run during the fall and early winter in the 
community colleges of the state. During the course of the project they visited 
all 52 community college campuses in the state. Forty -five community colleges 
have agreed to participate in the program to help identify young leadership for 
the public sector in Illinois in the future. Thirty-seven of the colleges have com- 
pleted all arrangements on how they would select students who would participate 
in the program and how they would conduct the program on the campus. Eight 
additional community colleges have indicated that they intend to participate in 
the program and are awaiting the next meeting of their board of trustees to 
approve the arrangements. Dr. Lacy said they are very pleased that 45 of the 
52 colleges have been able to respond this rapidly to the program which they 
believe will be very important to the future of the state. The Board will 
recall, he said, that the program involves each community college identifying 
on its campus during the end of its freshman year students that faculty believe 
have the most outstanding potential for public service, and give those students 
extra attention during the course of their sophomore year, with the idea being 
that at the end of that year they would then come into one of the baccalaureate 
programs in the public affairs areas at SSU. A second phase of the project 
involves also the identification of public service leadership potential among 
high school students, with the idea that extra attention would be given to those 
students near the end of their junior year and during the course of their senior 
year. 

Since community college districts in the state are based on high school boundaries 
the President continued, and our community colleges already have strong rela- 
tionships with high schools, it makes the community college faculty and admini- 
stration a strong pivot for this type of program. He said they are delighted 
that the program has come together as fast as it has and in addition to these 
responses from the colleges, they also have had lengthy conversations about 
the program with the community college faculty association and have received 
their support for the program. They have also begun the first efforts of 
achieving the necessary funding to make the program possible, since it is not 
likely in the near future that they will be able to achieve sufficient state funding 
to support the effort. 

The President took special note of the recommendations for appointment of 
James Nighswander as an Associate Professor in the Educational Administration 
area; and of George Stone to serve as Director of Development /Alumni Affairs. 
This latter appointment will pull together several functions that had been 
handled by different people in the past. One half of Mr. Stone's salary will 
be paid under contract with the Sangamon State University Foundation, and 
he will then also serve as the Executive Secretary to the Foundation. 

Dr. Lacy said he would like to bring to the attention of the Board the separations 
of Otis Bolden as Executive Assistant to the President and Affirmative Action 
Officer; Catherin Huther as Director of Communications in University Relations; 
and Gail Lutz as Director of University Relations. These actions are being 
brought to the Board, the President said, as a part of the general budget cut 
that they have had to take. In each case they represent very serious decisions 
and mean the separation from employment of very important and responsible 
people in the administration of the University, people who have served the Board 
and the University well for a number of years. The general budget decisions 



133 



which he has discussed with Board members individually and on campus at some 
length have been very tough decisions, and they have brought the University 
to the point that he does not now hesitate to say to the Board that they simply 
no longer have fat in the institution. They are now at a point where it is no 
longer at all accurate, fair or meaningful for anyone to refer to the university 
as an overfunded, rich institution compared to others across the state. The 
bottom line is that in the last 5 years they have taken a cut of $1.4 million in 
the base, and that is significant. 

Reference was made earlier to the loss of one of the JUAC members who was 
a member of the staff at Sangamon State. Ms. Irene Allsop served well on the 
campus for 8 years and was a representative to the Civil Service Employees 
Advisory Committee. However, she was in a category which has a very limited 
number of employees, and although she had 8 years of seniority, she simply 
did not have bumping rights. Dr. Lacy said they have had some sad and serious 
decisions in the past few weeks. They have done everything they could to see 
to it that as those decisions were made the essential functions of the university 
are going to be maintained as well as they possibly can maintain them with the 
remaining workforce. But 10% of the non-faculty workforce has been let go, 
and the institution has been through a very serious recision. 

As pointed out by President Lacy, Mr. Murray said, when we talk about cutting 
administration it is easy in the abstract, but when the cuts are affiliated with 
people, it is very painful. The Board has interacted with the people affected 
by these cuts and regrets the necessity for these painful decisions. 

The Chairman then recognized Darryl Thomas. 

Mr. Thomas said he is a member of the Science Department and also a member 
and chairperson of the Black Caucus at Sangamon State University, as well as 
a member of the UPI faculty union. He said he was speaking for the black faculty, 
staff and students who compose the Black Caucus and who are concerned about 
the status of affirmative action at Sangamon State. They believe that the school 
has made some great strides in that direction but also think there is still a lot 
of work that needs to be done. On January 27th, Mr. Thomas said, the Black 
Caucus passed a resolution which was distributed to the university community, 
copies of which were distributed to the Board. 

There is no doubt in our minds that Sangamon State University can 
ill afford to abolish the position of Affirmative Action Officer, nor 
can the university community benefit from the decision to move that 
position elsewhere in the institution to be carried out in "some 
different way." Such a decision is not only against the overall 
spirit of affirmative action, but it is also irreconcilable with the 
strong position taken by the Faculty Senate on how affirmative 
action should operate in an academic environment . This decision 
likewise retards the University's purported strong efforts to practice 
in a spirit , as well as in deed , those affirmative acts which give 
truth to rhetoric. The tasks yet to be done in the area of affirma- 
tive action at the University are many, indeed. 

Perhaps the most blatant example of the continuing need for a full- 
time functioning Affirmative Action Officer is the decision to eliminate 
that position when there is still so much work to be done . 






134 



The function of affirmative action in this institution means more 
than recruiting - and formulating - grievance procedures. It also 
has to do with fair and equal employment, equity in pay, career 
advancement, firings, negative tenure decisions, meeting minority 
students needs, and other "neutral" ways of getting rid of minority 
students, staff and faculty. It is still a fact of life that minority 
students, employees, faculty and candidates for employment continue 
to experience overt and covert discriminatory practices at the 
University . 

We cannot overemphasize the need for affirmative action input in all 
aspects of university life and this is particularly crucial during this 
period of financial retrenchment. To suggest that the duties of a 
full-time Affirmative Action Officer can be substituted by handing 
over affirmative action plans, rules and regulations to a "pool" of 
persons, or someone therefrom, is, in effect, to destroy affirmative 
action monitorin g . 

The elimination of the primary position charged with monitoring dis- 
criminatory practices at Sangamon State is not sound personnel 
policy and the decision is a disgrace to progressive educational policy. 

Mr. Thomas said they implore the Board, President Lacy and the administration 
to come up with an effective plan to continue affirmative action at the university 
and also identify, not just orally, but in writing, some type of plan to continue 
monitoring affirmative action. They also implore the Board and the university 
administration to come up with ways to at least identify how blacks, women 
and minorities have fared in recent cuts in this administration. As a member 
of the black faculty, he said, he is concerned because he knows that a number 
of black faculty members are coming up for tenure in the next two or three years 
and if they do not have an affirmative action process on hand they could find 
themselves receiving pink slips. 

Mr. Murray said that many members of the Board had questions of Dr. Lacy 
on this issue and he has answered them, but perhaps he would wish to respond 
to Mr. Thomas's statement also. 

President Lacy said he appreciated receiving the statement from the Black Caucus 
a few days ago. As to the description in the statement of the affirmative action 
work still to be done at the university, he fully agrees with this. He would like 
to add that the decision to do away with the position , one-half time of which 
has been devoted to affirmative action in the past , is in no way a decision to 
do away with the affirmative action program of the institution. The intent is to 
continue to pursue the program as effectively and progressively as they possibly 
can. There is a strong consensus for the program across the campus, much 
stronger than it has been in the past. He said he expects division heads, all 
search committees, and all of the supervisors of the university to take very seri- 
ously that affirmative action program. Dr. Lacy said he need not remind everyone 
that the affirmative action program has been one of the central programs of his 
administration, and he does not intend to back away from the affirmative action 
commitment of the institution. He said he would disagree with the statement 
from the Black Caucus where it refers to overt and covert discriminatory 
practices at the university. If there are such practices at the university, 
those people who are aware of them have a responsibility to bring them to the 
attention of the administration. When they are brought to the attention of the 



135 



administration, with or without a half-time affirmative action officer, every 
ounce of strength in the university will be used to deal with such overt or 
covert discrimination. The President said he would urge the Caucus or any 
of its members to bring any matter in that category to his attention, to Mr. 
Bolden's attentil while he is still on the payroll, or to the attention of any 
division head so that the matter can be dealt with. 

Mr. Murray said he assumes that the Caucus would like a statement from the 
President and a written affirmative action policy as to how this position will 
be handled in the future. 

President Lacy said as he has stated on campus and to the Board in Executive 
Session, his intention is to ask the Director of Personnel to take the responsi- 
bility of affirmative action officer for the institution. Additionally at this time 
on campus they are looking into the possibility that she might be assisted in that 
responsibility by a member of the faculty who would be released part-time to 
assist in carrying out the affirmative action policies and procedures of the 
institution. They have not yet had the time to assess the resources available 
in the faculty or reach a conclusion about that possibility, but clearly there are 
a number of members of the faculty who have the experience and capability to 
perform that role. Fortunately, Dr. Lacy said, the Director of Personnel also has 
the experience and capability to serve the institution well as affirmative action 
officer. He added that it is his intention to have Ms. Carey, the Director of 
Personnel, in her capacity of affirmative action officer, to report directly to the 
President in that capacity. 

Mr. Thomas noted that the Director of Personnel deals mostly with civil service 
employees, and he asked how this person can be involved with faculty and 
administrators. Will that create a problem for the person at some future date? 

Dr. Lacy said the question of conflict of interest has been discussed with the 
Merit Board at some length, and the response received from Mr. Ingerski, 
Executive Director, was that not only does he not see this as a conflict of 
interest , but he sees it as a pattern that he would like to see develop in the 
public institutions across the state. He would like to see other institutions begin 
to take the step of integrating the affirmative action responsibility in the personnel 
office. Dr. Lacy said he too is much concerned about the workload of the 
employees in the personnel office, and that is one of the reasons they will take 
the step of looking at the possibility that a faculty member might have released 
time from teaching to assist in that office. The personnel office is a very hard 
pressed office and it is pursuing a number of goals, ones that are difficult, in 
areas like retention, training, etc. It is not different from other offices in the 
university in that respect. He is asking a number of offices, particularly 
after this recision , to take on additional responsibilities at a time when they 
cannot be given the necessary resources which in past years they would have 
been given to carry out the responsibilities. The President said he will watch 
the workload as carefully as he possibly can . 

Mr. Murray said he could assure Mr. Thomas that the Board will from time to 
time be asking how the situation is working out, and he would assume that Mr. 
Thomas would not hesitate to let the Board know about anything in this area. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick said that since she was the one to commend Sangamon State 
for its affirmative action efforts, she would now be the one to condemn it, 
without faint praise. For the record, she said, she would read the affirmative 



136 



action efforts of the institution so far: there are 38 professors, none of whom 
is black; there are 87 associate professors, 4 of whom are black and one of whom 
is also serving as an administrator; there are 68 assistant professors, 8 of whom 
are black; 95 tenured faculty, two of whom are black; 9 instructors, one of whom 
is black; 16 new positions last year, one of whom is black. None of this, Mrs. 
Fitzpatrick said, reaches 12%, and she would like this to be on record so that 
we do monitor the watchdog. 

Ms. Burns asked if the job description for the Personnel Officer would be re- 
written to reflect the affirmative action responsibilities , and also if there is 
still an affirmative action plan in writing. 

Dr. Lacy said they will be rewriting the position description. The plan will 
not be rewritten. The affirmative action plan of the institution will remain as it 
is. It is subject to periodic review, and it will be reviewed, but it will not be 
rewritten as a result of this recision . The new job description and other changes 
which are necessitated by the recision will be brought to the Board for action 
at the March meeting. 

Mr. Murray thanked Mr. Thomas for bringing his concerns to the Board in a 
very responsible statement in a very responsible manner. 

The Chairman then recognized Professor Ettinger. 

Mr. Ettinger thanked the Board for allowing Mr. Thomas and himself to speak 
today. The particular problem brought to the Board by Mr. Thomas is primarily 
due to a financial crisis, he said, and he appreciates the position taken by the 
Board, as well as the antidisestablishmentarianism position taken by the Executive 
Director. This particular problem makes it even more important, he said, for 
us to take a look at the fiscal crisis and the efforts that we need to make. 
Mr. Ettinger said he represents the University Professionals of Illinois, which 
is a chapter of the AFT on the Sangamon State campus, and Dr. Thomas is also 
a member of the group. They have already distributed through the mail an 
endorsement, in essence, of the Black Caucus position, and he would ask the 
members of the Board to refer to this again and redouble their efforts to keep 
the university out of this financial crisis. On campus they will do their best 
to increase productivity. These kinds of crises are driven by the financial 
situation and we can make mistakes in a crisis like this. Mr. Ettinger said he 
thinks that a mistake has been made. He would hope that the Board would spend 
some time on this specific problem brought by the Black Caucus, knowing that 
their position has the endorsement of the UPI. He would hope that the Board 
would join them in their lobbying effort at the State House and see if we cannot 
make a better day for higher education. 

Mr. Murray thanked Mr. Ettinger for his statement. 

Ms. Orchowski then moved for approval of the Report of the President of 
Sangamon State University, including transactions during the month of January. 
The motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried, with Mrs. Fitzpatrick 
voting Nay. 

Northern Illinois University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report, President Monat reported on the events which 
are being planned in conjunction with the dedication of the Law School in March. 



137 



Information reports were submitted on: 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Summer 1983 

and for Fall 1983 
Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 
Gifts to Northern Illinois University 

The following' items were presented for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees. A list of all 
reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and will 
be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report. 

3. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Grant Towers - Repair o f Tower Perimeter Columns 
Permission was requested to employ the firm of Raths, Raths & 
Johnson, Inc., Willowbrook, to analyze the extent of distress 
of each column using the services of material technologists and 
metallurgists. Based on their findings recommendations will be 
made as to which columns require immediate repair, the extent 
of the repair and a budget to complete the work. Fees for the 
analysis and report will not exceed $35,000. 

( b ) Grant Towers - Exterior Soffit Repair 

Permission was requested to employ the firm of Raths, Raths & 
Johnson, Inc., Willowbrook, to inspect each panel for struc- 
tural attachment and for surface deterioration to determine which 
precast panels need replacement. Fees for the project will not 
exceed $7,000. 

(c) Holmes Student Center - Tuckpointing and Caulking the Tower 
and the Remainder of the Building 

Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for tuckpointing and caulking of the 
tower and the remainder of the building. No engineering fees 
will be charged to this project. 

(d) Stevenson Towers Complex - Replacement of Windows in Dining Room 
Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for replacement of the windows and 

the repair of the plaster ceiling below. No engineering fees 
will be charged to this project . 

(e) Holmes Student Center - Renovation of Elevators 
Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications , 
advertise and receive bids for renovation of the three passenger 
elevators. No engineering fees will be charged to the project. 



138 



(f) Recreation Facility 

The University recommended the amendment of the agreement 
with the architectural firm of Kessler, Merci & Associates, Inc., 
to provide for an architectural fee of 5% of the construction 
cost budget. If the project does not proceed beyond bidding, 
the architect will receive the flat fee of $150,000 authorized by 
the Board in December 1982. If authorization is given by the 
Board for the construction of the recreation facility, the architect 
would be entitled to a 5% fee for the total project. Credit would 
be given for all fees paid up to that point and 20% of the fee woulc 
be reserved for the construction phase of the project. 

It was also recommended that the architects be reimbursed for 
the printing of the construction documents. 

(g) Remodeling of Huskie Stadium (University Box Component) 

A tabulation of bids received for the project was presented with 
a recommendation that the low bids be accepted and contracts 
awarded as follows: 

General Construction 

Flagg Construction, Rochelle , IL $105,111.00 

Electrical Construction 

Mascal Electric, Inc., DeKalb, IL $ 11,200.00 

It was recommended that the total budget for the project be 
established as follows: 

Construction Contracts $116,311.00 

Architect /Engineering Fee 10,468.00 

Allowance for Reimbursables, Addi- 
tional architectural services and 

on-site observation 10,000.00 

Contingency 7,221.00 

Total Project Budget $144,000.00 

( h ) Steam Line to Connect East and West Heating Plant s 

A tabulation of bids received for the project was presented 

with a recommendation that the low bids be accepted and contracts 

awarded as follows : 

General Construction 

Mike Long Construction, DeKalb, IL $717,000.00 

Electrical Construction 

Manning Electric, Inc., Rochelle, IL $ 61,800.00 

Plumbing 

G's R Plumbing & Heating, DeKalb, IL $ 48,043.00 

Heating 

Carlson Park Mech., Rockford, IL $236,384.00 

It was recommended that the budget for the project be established 
as follows: 



139 



Construction Contracts $1,064,995.00 

A/E Fee 73,485.00 

Contingency 323,520.00* 
Allowance for additional engineering 

services, reimbursables and on-site 

supervision 38,000.00 

Total Project Budget $1,500,000700 

*The recommended project contingency includes funds for 
an extension of a new steam service to Douglas Hall. With 
the concurrence of the Board the University proposes to 
a) solicit prices for the Douglas Hall work from the respective 
contractors and to undertake that work via change orders 
providing the cost is considered to be reasonable by the 
project engineer, the University, the Board's Central Staff 
and the Capital Development Board, or b) if the prices are 
not considered acceptable, the University would direct the 
engineer to finalize plans and specifications and solicit bids 
for the Douglas Hall steam line connection to the primary 
distribution system. 

President Monat called attention to the project for Remodeling of Huskie Stadium 
(University Box Component), noting that this project has come to the attention 
of the Board on several occasions. In March of 1981, he said, a new budget 
was prepared because the original bidding exceeded the project budget. The 
estimated budget for this component was $185,388and the project has come in now 
at $144,000, about $40,000 under budget. 

Ms. Burns observed that in the report on Status of Undergraduate Admissions 
for Fall 1983, it is stated that the total number of applications is down by 12%, 
but yet NIU has accented a greater number of students by over 200. Does 
this mean our standards are staying the same, or what does this mean? 

The President said applications are down slightly and acceptances are up slightly, 
but they have not changed admission standards one bit. Ms. Burns said 12% 
would seem to be more than a "slight" drop; however, she was just curious 
about this. Dr. LaTourette said there appears to be a reduction in the number 
of multiple applications in the state, and most institutions are down somewhere 
between 7% to 15%. 

Ms. Burns inquired into the reason for the two studies for the repair of the 
tower perimeter columns and for exterior soffit repair at Grant Towers. Vice 
President Smith said the way these are constructed really takes expert opinion, 
and that needs to be done beforehand. Visual observation does not give them 
any type of conclusive evidence as to what needs to be done. Can't the univer- 
sity architect make this determination, Ms. Burns asked? Not in this type of 
construction, Dr. Smith said. We are talking about steel, how much of it might 
have lost its strength, what rust has done, erosion, a moving of the columns 
might have occurred and is not visible. They do not have this kind of expertise 
on campus, he said. 

Referring to the Remodeling of Huskie Stadium (University Box Component), 
Ms. Burns asked if someone could refresh her memory as to why we have 
held this project so long. 



140 



President Monat said it was held because when it was first bid the results of 
the bidding were way over budget. They went back to the drawing board 
and redesigned the project. It was put out for bids and these are the results 
of that bidding experience. 

Is this a stadium club for the university, Mr. McClure inquired? 

No, the President said. There is a university box and those who have been 
there, particularly when it is raining, are fully aware that it leaks. Right now 
it is an open box. The plan is to enclose it. It will not be posh. Practically 
every university stadium that he has been in has a facility like this, Dr. Monat 
said. Mr. McClure commented that $144,000 would buy an awful lot of blankets 
and umbrellas. Ms. Burns noted that Mr. McClure was not present on the 
Board for earlier discussions of this project, but her recollection was that it 
was narrowly approved by the Board. 

Mr. Murray asked for a brief review of the whole Huskie Stadium project. 
Dr. Monat said there were several pieces to this project. One was a major 
improvement in the Press Box, and that has been largely settled. The bleacher 
project was a part of the stadium size expansion. That was in two phases to 
meet the requirements of the NCAA with respect to stadium size for qualification 
as a division one football program. A significant part of the total project had 
to do with expansion of the stadium - the bleacher projects. Today's recom- 
mendation has to do with the University Box part of the project . 

Are student monies going toward this, Ms. Toman asked? 

No, the President said, this is part of the project construction fund that was 
created when they refinanced their outstanding indebtedness in 1978. This 
portion of the project was a part of the whole project when it was first brought 
to the Board in January of 1980. 

Well, Mr. Murray noted, indirectly the bonds are being paid from a variety of 
sources, including student fees. Yes, the President said, but the $6,000,000 
project construction fund was a result of the refinancing. Where would this 
money go if it were not used for this, Mr. McClure asked? The window for 
the project construction fund is closed, the President said. It was a three-year 
window, and it is closed, and this is the last project to be recommended out 
of that fund . . 

What are we getting in this project, Ms. Burns asked? The construction of an 
enclosed university box, Dr. Monat said, right where the existing university 
box is, right in front of and below the press box. Mr. Murray said he assumes 
that it will have glass and heat? It will have radiant heat, the President said. 

Dr. Matsler said these questions had been debated in Staff, and for that reason 
he had a chronology prepared. The Board would remember, he said, that there 
was a split vote on this project in the Facilities Committee , but when it was 
brought to the Board, it was approved. While the Board could now turn around 
and say it does not want to approve the project. Dr. Matsler said he suspects 
that really should have been done quite a while back rather than now. 

President Monat said he would remind the Board that all three student Regents 
voted for this project in the Facilities Committee. That's correct, Mr. Murray 
said, and other members of the Committee voted against it, although they all 



141 



supported the project on the floor. 

Mr. Murray said he was going to put the President right in the gun sights. 
When we are asking for an income tax increase and crying poverty in our uni- 
versities, is he still willing to endorse this wholeheartedly and ask the Board 
to approve this? Dr. Monat said the Chairman was asking for a subjective 
emotional commitment. That's right, Mr. Murray said. Would the university 
unravel with out this, Dr. Monat asked? Of course not. Does he think that 
in the long run it would be a valuable addition to the facilities? Yes, he does. 
Are there more important tasks ahead of us? Yes, there are, Dr. Monat said. 

But is this the right thing to do in February of 1983, Ms. Burns inquired? 
The Board will have to answer that question, the President said. It comes to 
the Board now because this is when the planning process reaches its culmination. 
And it would not be in his Report to the Board if he was not willing to recommend 
it. 

Mr. Murray asked Mr. Winning if any special vote needed to be taken if the 
Board wished to disapprove this now. No, Mr. Winning advised, the Board 
can change its mind. 

Mr. Murray inquired if anyone wished to move that this be separated from the 
President's Report. There was no motion. 

Mr. McClure, following up on Ms. Burns' earlier comment, said this discussion 
should at least let the Presidents and their staffs know that in these times the 
Board is going to look very carefully at non-essential capital improvements. 
He said he is inclined to go along with this project because apparently his 
predecessors on the Board felt it was a good idea, although it was a close vote. 
However, in the future when money is tight he thinks there may be more import- 
ant places to spend it. 

President Monat said he must agree with Mr. McClure. In his five years as 
President and participating in Board meetings, he has been impressed with how 
carefully the Board does scrutinize projects, particularly through the Facilities 
Committee. As a matter of fact, he said, it is unfortunate that there was not 
a committee meeting yesterday because many of these issues could have been 
thrashed out there. The Facilities Committee plays an extraordinary and useful 
role in this whole area, and this particular project had gone to the committee 
three or four times in one phase or another. 

Referring to the proposed recreation facility, Mr. Gayles said the Board would 
recall that some three and a half months ago, when questions were raised about 
the validity of the referendum held two and a half years ago, he brought to 
the Board a statement of reaffirmation from the student government at NIU at 
that time backing the validity of the referendum. Since that point in time 
they have had within their constitution 5% of the student body questioning 
that referendum, and a new referendum will be held on campus. Mr. Gayles 
said in March he will bring the results of the new referendum to the Board. 
He said he wants this to be as objective and upfront as possible, and he believes 
they will have a big turnout. From his own personal standpoint, Mr. Gayles 
said he believes in the recreation facility and the good things it can provide. 

Mr. McClure and Mr. Murray said they would encourage the NIU students to 
turn out en masse for the referendum. 



142 



After further discussion of the University Box project , President Monat said 
if the Board should so wish it could defer action on the project at this time. 

Mr. Murray said he did not detect a desire to do that. He just thinks that 
it is, in a way, a highly visible extravagance. It is not a lot of money in terms 
of budgets, but it is a policy matter that each of us is going to have to live with 
Ms. Burns agreed, adding that the timing is not as good as it could be, particu- 
larly the month before we consider tuition levels. 

Mr. McClure then moved that the Report of the President of Northern Illinois 
University, as amended, be approved, including the portion pertaining to the 
University Box project , and transactions acted on by the Executive Committee 
in January. The motion was seconded by Mr. Wright, and it carried unani- 
mously . 

Illinois S tate University - President's Report 

President Watkins presented information reports on: 

Purchases (Professional & Artistic Contracts, and Contracts with 

Visiting Performers) 
Capital Improvement Projects 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Training, Service) 
Bond Redemptions 

The following items were submitted to the Board for action: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for civil 
service employees. A list of all reported transactions is appended to 
the President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and in 
the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report. 

President Watkins took special note of changes in assignment listed in his 
Report. Dr. Carmen Richardson has decided to go back to full-time teaching, 
and Dr. Clayton Thomas has made the same decision. They will be missed. 
They are fine people and the university is glad that they will continue in 
teaching capacities. 

The President said that earlier in Executive Session he reported his nomination 
of two outstanding figures in American education for honorary degrees at Illinois 
State. Now, he would ask that the Board approve the granting of an honorary 
degree by ISU at its May commencement to Mr. Allan Ostar, the President of 
the American Association of State College and Universities, in which capacity 
he has served since 1965. Also recommended to receive an honorary degree 
is Dr. James Fisher, an alumnus of the university, former staff member at ISU, 
and now President of the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education 
These two outstanding leaders deserve the thanks of all of us and ISU is 
honored to present them to the Board as candidates for honorary degrees. 
The President asked that this request be made a part of his President's Report. 

Ms. Orchowski said in both the January and February Reports, she noticed 
the ISU Entertainment Committee has reported on concerts which have been 
held, and she asked why the Board requests an update on these since there 
are no appropriated funds involved . 



143 



It used to be, Dr. Matsler said, that the institutions came to the Board for 
approval of these items. The Board does control all appropriated funds, but 
also locally funds. The Board is the manager of all funds. However, because 
these concerts do not involve appropriated funds and also because lead time is 
often quite short, it was felt that the Presidents should make these decisions 
and then report them to the Board for information. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick inquired if President Watkins planned to fill the position that 
Dr. Richardson is leaving. Dr. Watkins advised they do not plan to fill the 
position, they plan to absorb it in the area of the Provost's Office. They feel 
this can be handled without additional staff members being appointed in that 
area, and is part of their attempt to reduce administrative costs as well. 

Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois State 
University, as amended, and including transactions acted upon by the Executive 
Committee in January. The motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried 
unanimously. 

There being no further business to come before the Board, on motion duly made 
and seconded, the meeting was declared adjourned. The next regularly scheduled 
meeting of the Board of Regents will be held on March 17, 1983 at Northern Illinois 
University, DeKalb, Illinois. 



David E . Murray 
Chairman 



Franklin G . Matsler 
Secretary 



144 



Minutes of the Meeting of the 
BOARD OF REGENTS 
Northern Illinois University - DeKalb , 

March 17, 1983 



Illinois 



The regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 9:00 a.m. 
on March 17, 1983 in the Sky Room of the Holmes Student Center at Northern 
Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois. Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman, presided 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, roll was called, and the 
following Regents were present: 



Mr. Jerome R. Bender 
Mrs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick 
Mr. Montel Gayles 
Mr. L. Milton McClure 
Ms. Denise Orchowski 



Mr. D. Brewster Parker 
Mr. Harold Riss 
Ms. Janine Toman 
Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 
Mr. David E. Murray, 
Chairman 



Ms. Carol K. Burns and Mr. James L. Wright were not present for the meeting. 

Also present were: 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 

In attendance from the Joint University Advisory Committee were: (ISU) Dr. 
Virginia Crafts, chairperson, Dr. Thomas Eimermann , Mr. Leon Toepke and 
Dr. George Tuttle; (NIU) Mr. Joe Koch, Dr. James E. Lankford , Dr. Tony 
Scaperlanda and Dr. Jerry D. Meyer; (SSU) Dr. Jack VanDer Slik. 

Others present included staff from the Regency Universities and the Central 
Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the Board; and 
representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Mr. Gayles moved that the Board recess to meet in Executive Session for the 
purpose of discussing matters in litigation. The motion was seconded by 
Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public meeting at 10:00 a.m. 

MINUTES OF FEBRUARY 17, 1983 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the meet- 
ing held on February 17 and asked if there were any additions or corrections 
to be proposed. Dr. Matsler noted that on page 28 6T the minutes the date 
of the next scheduled meeting should read March 17, rather than May 17. 
On motion by Dr. Wellbank, seconded by Ms. Toman, the minutes were approved 
as corrected. 



145 



The Chairman said he had received a request that the Board depart from the 
printed Agenda in order that the institutional reports might be presented 
early in the meeting. He said this would allow President Watkins to be excused 
from the meeting and leave for Tampa, Florida, where Illinois State University 
is competing in the NCAA basketball tournament, after winning the Missouri 
Valley Conference. Mr. Murray asked Dr. Watkins to convey the congratula- 
tions of the Board to the team and coaches and also the hope that they will 
be successful in the game tonight against Ohio University. 

President Watkins thanked the Board and added that in accepting the congratu- 
lations on behalf of Coach Donnewald and the men's basketball team, he must 
also note that ISU is one of the few universities in the country which also has 
a women's champion team. The women's team, he said, won the championship 
of the Gateway Collegiate Athletic Conference, and they too have qualified 
for an automatic bid to the NCAA's women's tournament and will compete against 
Kansas State University on Saturday. So, the President said, both teams are 
advancing and the university is very oroud of them. 

What does this mean in terms of financial return, Mr. Murray inquired? 
The President said he really could not say what the women's team participation 
would mean in terms of revenue, since this is one of the very first of the 
NCAA tournaments for women. There is not much of a history on this. As 
far as the men's team is concerned, Dr. Watkins said he has been told that 
if they survive the first round, it could mean something in the neighborhood 
of a quarter of a million dollars which would be paid to their conference , to 
be split among members on a predetermined basis, such as is done in all 
conferences. He said he does not know where this will come down finally, but 
it will be expenses plus a good deal more if the team survives the first round. 

President Watkins said that before presenting his Report to the Board he 
would note that he had placed at each member's place at the table a copy of 
an article which appeared in the Sunday Pantagraph . He said ISU took very 
seriously the comments and advice from the Chairman at the last meeting, 
and has instituted a series of articles to explain the critically important work 
of university professors to the public . He said everyone in higher education 
knows that America's professors are agents of change, they are creators of 
knowledge, and guardians of our civilized traditions. It is not unfair to say 
that no profession in America is more important to the country than being a 
professor in a college or university. It is further true, as pointed out, that 
many people have a misperception of what people in college and university 
work do, a misperception very similar, he supposes, to the misperception 
of a minister - that the only thing a minister does is to preach an hour or 
two on Sunday. 

Participating in the discussion for this first article, Dr. Watkins said, were 
Arlan Richardson, a Professor of Chemistry, and a renowned authority on 
the chemistry of aging; John Cragan , one of the most innovative communication 
professors in the country; Julian Dawson, an outstanding concert pianist and 
co-conductor of the Bloomington-Normal Symphony; and Bill Linneman, a 
Professor of English who has made quite a name for himself as an authority 
on American humor. 

Mr. Murray said he appreciates what has been done with this article, and 
the President has also sent him several pieces of correspondence indicating 



146 



what has been done by way of public relations on this subject since the last 
meeting of the Board. He said he has also received several very informative 
letters, particularly from people at ISU, concerning productivity. Mr. Murray 
said he believes the university is on the right track with the series of articles. 

Dr. Watkins said he and Mr. Godfrey had a very productive luncheon meeting 
with the news editor and the editorial page editor of the Pantagraph about 
other stories which will appear in the paper, including a series on the 1 inter- 
action of ISU faculty with the business community in the Bloomington-Normal 
area. He added that he had been told recently by the Executive Director of 
the ACI about the importance of the work that ISU professors are doing with 
them in market surveys and all sorts of things which they feel are critical for 
the economic development of the area. 

Mr. Murray said he feels there is no question but that misinformation or the 
lack of information contributes to reckless criticism about the universities. 
These are the kinds of stories that we must get across to the public. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

Information reports were presented on: 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Training, Service) 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for 
civil service employees. A list of all reported transactions is appended 
to the President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and 
in the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's Report 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois State 
University. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski. 

Mr. Parker asked President Watkins if he could comment on the wide discrep- 
ancies between the bids received on some of the items in the Purchases Section 
of his Report. He said he was just amazed that some of the bids were about 
300% above the low bid. He asked the President if he thinks accepting the low 
bid will get the job done that we need. 

Dr. Watkins said he, too, had noted some of these disparities. All of the bids 
are based , he said , on a very strict set of specifications . The university 
does check into the reliability of people who are proposing to perform a service 
for the university, he noted, and he would not accept or bring to the board 
a bid if it was felt that the individual or the company was incapable of perform- 
ing the service. The institution is convinced that what they are asking to be 
done can be done legitimately at the low bid price. 

Mr. Parker said he was glad to hear this. 

The question before the Board was called for a vote and the motion carried 
unanimously. 



147 



President Watkins thanked the Board for the courtesy of being* allowed to 
present his Report early on the Agenda. He said when he left the meeting 
Provost Leon Boothe would be available to speak for him . 

The Board returned to the regular Agenda. 

CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 

The Chairman said he had received requests from several individuals to address 
the Board. He recognized Ms. Nancy Mack to speak to the Board. 

Ms. Mack advised that she was speaking as Vice Chair of the Committee for 
Quality Education and also as a student at Northern Illinois University. Some 
of the priorities of the university, she said, have been vaguely presented 
to the students. They realize that there are budget cuts that will be made 
at the university, but they do wonder where the cuts will be made and why. 
Ms. Mack said that tuition is being raised, the library is only 60 percent 
completed and now is too small to accommodate the needs of the student popu- 
lation, classes are being cut in essential areas, and student referenda concern- 
ing fee increases are being ignored. At the same time a glass president's box 
costing $144,000 is being built, law school tuition is being lowered, the athletic 
program has become a top priority, and a recreation center may be built costing 
students $1.70 a credit hour even though a student referendum voted against 
the facility by a three to one margin. 

It appears, Ms. Mack said, that the administration's main commitment is to 
the athletic program and the law school while the rest of the university is 
in deep trouble. Students want the Board to recognize their concerns. 
The priorities of the university must be reassessed before the quality of their 
education deteriorates any further. It is really important, she said, that all 
of the Regents take into consideration how the students feel about what is 
going on, particularly now when~ there are so many financial problems. All 
of the students are scared and wondering if they will be able to come back 
next semester. She said what she would really like to ask is that when these 
monetary decisions come to the Board they be publicly announced in advance 
so that the students will have the chance to give some input about how they 
feel. 

Mr. Murray said Ms. Mack and other students should always feel free to bring 
any of their concerns to the Board through their student representative, Mr. 
Gayles. Mr. Gayles said he feels that it is important that students do occa- 
sionally come to speak to the Board , because sometimes the Board may get only 
one small perspective, and it is essential that it hear the counter-opinions also. 
The students do care about their education, and it is good to see this. 

Mr. Murray said the Board does appreciate the concerns expressed by Ms. 
Mack. The members try to do the best job they can, although this may not 
always be apparent to students or faculty or anyone, as a matter of fact. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked if the Committee for Quality Education is a permanent 
group on campus, and Ms. Mack said it is a nationally recognized organization. 

President Monat said he would like to point out that in terms of the athletic 
program, the appropriated budget this year is less than what it was last year. 



148 



Also, he said, in a very tight budgetary year as we have had this year, the 
funds allocated to the academic affairs division of the university were over a 
million dollars more than they were last year, despite the fact that there was 
no increase in an effective way in the university budget this year. Dr. Monat 
said he thinks the university is sensitive to and aware of the problems cited 
by Ms. Mack. There is no question but that there has been an increase in 
the burden in terms of what the faculty does. The student /faculty ratio has 
increased. There is no question that as more students have available fewer 
sections of classes in impacted areas, sometimes difficult decisions have to be 
made with respect to who is admitted to major in a subject. These are condi- 
tions that no one is happy about, but these conditions will continue until 
there is a realization on the part of the State of Illinois that more revenue 
needs to go to support the state universities. The 2% budget reduction that 
the institution had to accommodate mid-year had a dilatory impact on the quality 
of education on the campus, the President said. He said it is almost simplistic 
to say that many of these problems can be handled with more money , but the 
fact is that this is true. The library is crowded. Ms. Mack is correct. When 
the library was initially designed some 15 years ago, it was initially designed 
to be a third larger. The institution now has in the planning process as part 
of the capital budget development, a project which will be recommended to 
complete the library, to add the one-third that was dropped at the time the 
library was initially constructed. However, there is a process which must be 
observed, and sometimes it is very frustrating to students as well as to everyone 
else. 

Chairman Murray said he would add a further comment to Ms. Mack and the 
students she represents. Unfortunately, this Board does not levy taxes. 
This has to be done by the legislature and through the leadership of the 
Governor. There is, he pointed out, at least one legislator from this area 
who, he had just read in the Northern Star , has said that he will not support 
an income tax increase. He would urge the students to go home and talk to 
their parents, talk to other voters, and urge their legislators to change their 
minds, encourage them to appropriate more money, because there is not much 
we can do about getting more money. It has to come from above. Once we 
have the money then it is our responsibility to try and spend it wisely. But 
it is very difficult for the Board to face problems that simply require more 
money. The Board is on record as supporting the taxes and state revenues 
for education, and it will continue to support that. Students must concentrate 
their efforts right now on those people and convince the legislators that they 
won't be thrown out of office if they support an income tax increase. That 
is the message that must be gotten across. 

The Chairman then recognized Mr. Ed Gallagher, Speaker of the NIU Student 
Association Senate. 

Mr. Gallagher said he appears on behalf of the SA Senate, as a student at NIU 
and as a citizen of the State of Illinois, a concerned citizen who also pays taxes 
The subject of his address is what is referred to in "the minutes of the last 
Board meeting as the university box component - more popularly referred to 
on campus as the imperial box. He said he was amazed when he heard the 
news of the construction of this project. It is no secret that the state uni- 
versities are facing tough economic times. The fiscal crisis is evident to the 
students at NIU. Financial aid has been drastically reduced, forcing students 
to leave the university. Library hours have been reduced, forcing students 



149 



to compete for a less-than-sufficient supply of research materials. Large 
sections of classes have been cut, forcing students to prolong their college 
careers. The faculty is burdened with over-crowded classes and students 
are denied the personal attention that professors would otherwise be able 
to offer. The buildings on campus are plagued with leaky roofs and poor 
lighting. 

Mr. Gallagher said everyone is being asked to make sacrifices. Families 
are asked to increase support to their sons' and daughters' education. 
Students are asked to tolerate shorter library hours and over-crowded classes. 
The faculty is asked to accept increased workloads. The crisis demands that 
the citizens of Illinois sacrifice more of their valuable income. Almost everyone 
is making sacrifices except the NIU administration. It is ironic that the glass 
enclosure of the president's box be undertaken at a time when the university 
is faced with a fiscal crisis that may demand financial exigency be implemented. 

Students face substantial tuition and fee increases, Mr. Gallagher said. There 
are cost centers that demand fee increases. However, the construction of this 
glass enclosure will have a tremendous effect on students' willingness to tolerate 
future fee increases. The atmosphere is becoming tense. The construction of 
the president's box is creating a sense of exploitation among the students and 
giving the NIU administration an elitist reputation. In order to preserve a 
satisfactory atmosphere at NIU, he said, it is important that future construction 
projects of this nature be avoided. Capital instruction is important, however, 
it would be wiser to apply the $144,000 to the renovation of the Huskie Stadium 
raquetball courts or the repair of leaking roofs. 

Mr. Gallagher said he does not pay as much taxes as a lot of people, but he 
does pay his taxes, and it seems to him that if we are going to be going to 
the legislature and asking for a tax increase, we will have to present to them 
symbols of the way that the money is being spent. He thinks the fact that we 
need money at the university would not be effectively expressed when we are 
building something that is unnecessary, expensive and extravagant. Not only 
is this going to create a terrible impression in the minds of the taxpayers, but 
also a terrible impression in the minds of students. 

Mr. Gallagher said State Senator Patrick Welch is opposed to the tax increase, 
and he ran on a campaign saying there was going to be no tax increase. 
How can we expect anyone to increase their taxes when this is an example of 
the way money is being spent. What he finds more ironic is that the project 
is being considered at a time when the possibility of declaring a financial 
exigency is being examined. He said he realizes that there are rules and 
regulations concerning how this money can be spent, but it just seems to 
him that there are other ways to rechannel the money. There are people 
in the State who are suffering from poverty, they are unable to feed their 
children. Mr. Gallagher said he thinks that this is a blatant act of selfishness, 
and he would hope that the Board would reconsider the construction and use 
the money more wisely in other areas of the campus. 

President Monat said he would remind the Board that the project at issue was 
approved by the Board three years ago in March of 1980. What the Board did 
last month was to accept construction bids on the project. This is not tax 
money, it is not really money of the State of Illinois in the legal and technical 
sense. One can have a perfectly legitimate quarrel, and indeed there are 



150 



people who do question this particular project, the President said, but he 
thinks it is necessary to make very clear what the money is, where it comes from 
and for what it can be used. Could it have been used for other purposes? 
Of course it could have been. It was the judgment of the university three years 
ago - in fact it goes back further than that - that in the long run for university 
development purposes this kind of facility made sense. They plan to sell half 
of the seats, Dr. Monat said, in the university box; and according to their 
estimates (and they are conservative estimates) in six years the funds expended 
will have been returned to the university and to the university foundation to be 
used directly to support critical academic areas in the university. That is the 
reason the box was proposed in the first instance, the President said. While 
they do not have enough experience in terms of external fund raising to make 
even an educated guess concerning what the facility will help yield in terms 
of external support, he said, they do know that the funds raised by selling 
seats in the box will return the investment in less than six years; and that 
investment , unlike the funds from the project construction fund , will be put 
directly into support of academic programs at the university which cannot be 
done with bond revenue funds. 

Chairman Murray said he was glad to hear the President report on this. He 
would say to Mr. Gallagher and others who share his feelings and his criticisms 
that if the money had been general revenue money for university teaching, or 
other appropriations, he is sure that the Board would not have approved of it. 
The Board did have considerable reluctance in approving the project , he noted , 
and all he could say is that it would not have been done if it were general 
revenue money. But it has been done and we are going to live with it, he said, 
and he is confident that the judgment will look better in the future than it does 
right now. 

The Chairman then recognized Dr. Margaret Schmid to address the Board. 
Dr. Schmid asked that she be recognized later in the meeting when the matter 
of salary increases was being considered. 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Facilities Committee 

Mr. Riss reported that the committee met on Wednesday afternoon, and the 
only matters considered were those capital improvement projects contained in 
the Report of the President for Northern Illinois University, the proposed 
recreation facility at NIU, and ratification of emergency repairs to the granite 
panels on Holmes Student Center. 

President Monat passed out an Addendum to his Report which explained the 
damage to the granite panels on the exterior of the Center and the action 
taken to repair them. The panels have moved and create a potential danger 
to passersby. The Committee recommends that the Board ratify the emergency 
repairs in the amount of $10,500. 

Mr. Riss said the committee reviewed all of the projects requested for approval 
in the NIU Report , and contracts for the Anderson Hall Gymnasium roof repair 
will be awarded in two phases because funding will come from FY83 and FY84 
sources. Energy conservation controls will be installed in Anderson Hall as 
recommended by the consulting firm that recently completed an energy survey 
on the NIU campus. 



151 



President Mo-nat also explained to the committee the need for repairs to 
Parking Lot "L" and the Williston Hall Service Drive, and deterioration of 
these areas requires resurfacing. Also considered was the resurfacing of 
College Avenue, Castle Drive and Gilbert Drive; and for the first time Student 
Busing revenues will be used to pay a portion of the cost of resurfacing be- 
cause the bus traffic has been partially responsible for the deterioration. 

Mr. Riss said the Facilities Committee recommended approval of all the projects 
in the NIU Report. 

There was also a considerable amount of discussion of the proposed recreation 
facility. No action, however, is recommended on this by the Committee. 
Mr. Riss said he understands that President Monat will speak to this project 
when he presents his Report to the Board. 

With respect to the emergency repairs at Holmes Student Center, President 
Monat advised that initially the institution intended to come in with the proposal 
to approve a contract for $10,500 for the repairs. However, just yesterday 
it was found that there are areas of additional deterioration, so when he presents 
his Report, he will be recommending that we enter into a contract of up to 
$16,000 to take care of the additional repairs. 

Program Committee 

Mr. Parker, Chairman of the Committee, reported that in yesterday's meeting 
there was an exchange of thoughts and theories concerning the academic pro- 
grams of the Regency Universities. This was the annual preliminary discussion 
of academic plans and program reviews. More specifically, he said, the commit- 
tee discussed the mission statements of all the universities and the new program 
at Northern concerning the change in mission allowing for the introduction of an 
engineering school. Mr. Parker noted that in the Executive Director's Report, 
there was inadvertently omitted a Staff recommendation for the deletion of the 
C.A.S. in History at Northern Illinois University. The Board should be aware, 
he said, that this should be included as a Staff recommendation. 

Mr. Parker reported that the Committee, due to time constraints, did not dis- 
cuss the BHE report entitled "Educational and Economic Ramifications of Shifts 
in Student Demand". This will be taken up at a later date. 

Mr. Parker said that preceding the Committee meeting he assured the university 
representatives that any program deletion demand would come only in the event 
of financial exigency or through the program review process. Later in the 
meeting, he said, he would relay the Committee's decisions when the Executive 
Director's Report was under consideration. 

Mr. Parker said he would like to add that he believes the Committee meeting 
was an excellent example of the fine use of the committee system which the 
Board instituted only a few years ago. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Dr. Virginia Crafts, Committee Chairperson, said she would like at this time 
to recognize one of the JUAC members for whom this will be the last meeting 
in his current role. George Tuttle, she said, has served as Chair of the 



152 



Academic Senate at ISU and by virtue of their guidelines also served on JUAC. 
Senate elections occur in March at ISU, she said and the new Senate meets in 
April. George Tuttle has resigned from JUAC to permit a smooth transition 
in Senate assignments. He has served JUAC faithfully and well, and the Com- 
mittee recognizes his contributions. 

Dr. Crafts said the Committee received a report that possible pending legisla- 
tion related to the insurance package which BOR employees will receive would , 
in effect, reduce the quality of fringe benefits. This is distressing news. 
At their meeting Dr. Floyd distributed a report from the American Association 
of State Colleges and Universities entitled "Report on the States' Early Retire- 
ment", and the Committee thanks her for her initial work in gathering the 
information requested. This will be on the agenda for their next meeting. 

Dr. Crafts said JUAC has mixed reactions in regard to some of the uses of 
monies in the State. It is good to know that the small raises for faculty 
held in abeyance for several months may become a reality. On the other hand, 
they view with great alarm the fact that the retirement system is again being 
tapped for funds to provide the needed monies. All in all, these situations 
along with other events in various aspects of state operations point out vividly 
the need to increase state revenues. The tax increase is sorely needed. 

Working with Dr. Groves and Dr. Floyd, Dr. Crafts reported, JUAC has 
firmed up plans for the retreat to be held at ISU in April. The Committee 
appreciates the opportunity this will provide for an open , frank and informal 
discussion of issues and concerns in higher education generally in the Regency 
System particularly. They are especially pleased that James Furman will not 
only be the dinner speaker but will also be an integral part of the retreat. 

Mr. Gayles said last year he had the opportunity to attend the retreat as 
President of the Student Association, and this year he would like for consider- 
ation be given to inviting some of the student representatives from the campuses 
so that they can get a broader picture and perspective of what goes on in the 
educational communities. 

Dr. Crafts said this is a recommendation that should be considered by repre- 
sentatives of the Board as well as by JUAC. Mr. Murray asked Dr. Matsler 
to consider the request and make a decision. 

Mr. Murray asked Mr. Bender if he could report to the Board on what the 
Governor has proposed for the State Universities Retirement System appropri- 
ations. 

Mr. Bender said he received a letter from Mr. Don Hoffmeister which he would 
read for the record: 

To help balance the FY83 State budget, the Governor has proposed 
to reduce the FY 83 appropriation to the five State funded pension 
plans by $90 million. Our portion of this reduction would be $9.2 
million. Inasmuch as the other retirement systems' had been funded at 
the 70% of gross payout level most of the reduction will be from their 
appropriations. After the $90 million has been withheld, all of the 
systems will be funded at the rate of 51% of gross payout for FY83. 



153 



Our original FY 83 appropriation approved by the General Assembly 
was at the 70% of gross payout level and amounted to approximately 
$56.8 million. Through the use of his reduction veto, the Governor 
reduced that appropriation to approximately $51 million. After 
applying- this second reduction, our appropriation for FY83 will be 
approximately $41.8 million. If the General Assembly approves this 
latest reduction, our cash flow for the last three months will be 
negative by approximately $2.5 million per month. Thus, it will be 
necessary to use money in the Harris STIF Account; and thus, 
reduce or postpone our distribution to the investment managers. 

Our fiduciary responsibilities weigh heavily upon us during these 
days of retrenchment. Those of you who represent other governing 
boards carry a double burden as you witness the departure of 
esteemed faculty members and the reduction in programs. May the 
General Assembly in its wisdom provide the resources so that the 
Governor can deliver the carrot offered in his Budget message that 
would restore funding to the retirement systems at a 77.5% level 
for FY 85. 

Mr. Bender said the above letter was addressed to all members of the Board 
of Trustees of the State Universities Retirement System under date of March 7. 

Mr. Bender said he recommends that the Board authorize a statement to be 
sent to the Governor and to each member of the Legislature expressing deep 
concern about the second and most drastic underfunding of the State Univer- 
sities Retirement System. Mr. Hoffmeister's letter clearly defines the serious- 
ness of the actuarial liabilities that the participants now face. He would 
suggest that the statement include the mandate that no further cutbacks be 
allowed and that the underfunding of the past two years be replaced , and 
also that until the state's continuing contribution to the fund remains at 
the minimal gross payout no consideration be given to any social investing in 
the State of Illinois that might have the slightest element of risk. Mr. Bender said 
he would also recommend that JUAC consider such a statement as well as Mr. 
Hoffmeister's letter and that they get this information to every SURS partici- 
pant and annuitant in our System and urge them to write similar letters. 

Mr. Murray asked Mr. Bender if his recommendation was meant as a formal 
motion. Mr. Bender said he would so move. Would Mr. Bender be willing 
to sign the letter as the representative of the Board of Regents on the SURS 
board of trustees, Mr. Murray asked? Mr. Bender said he would not at all 
mind doing this. The motion was seconded by Mr. Parker, and it carried 
unanimously . 

Mr. Bender said if at all possible he would like to have the letter to present 
to other members of the board of trustees when they meet in Chicago next 
week. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 138 

Section I - Legislative Report 

This month's report is concerned with happenings at the federal level, Dr. 
Matsler said. By next month staff will have enough information on what is 



154 



occurring at the state level to give a full report. 

At the federal level, Dr. Matsler said, funding will probably be at about the 
same level as this year. Although the Administration has proposed consider- 
able changes which would mean a significant cut in financial aids, it is the 
thought of most people in Washington today that Congress will probably not 
go along with the proposed changes at least for this coming year, but that 
probably these cuts may be with us in the following year. The Administration 
proposals, however, do include some rather interesting changes, some of which 
he would just quickly highlight for the Board. The Administration is proposing 
that there will be no funds for the SEOG grants, which do not really affect 
our institutions as much as the private institutions. There is also a proposal 
to change the Pell Grants to include a 40% self-help clause. This would mean 
that a student participating in the Pell Grants program would have to provide 
40% in self-help. That self-help is available through work-study programs and 
loan programs, but it would still mean that there probably will be less govern- 
ment help than there has been in the past . The Administration proposes to 
increase the work-study programs. Categorical grants would be reduced some, 
and the President has proposed establishment of a new educational savings 
account, Dr. Matsler said, which he does not favor. It is a proposal whereby 
parents would be provided the opportunity to save $1000 a year. They would 
be required to pay taxes on that $1000, but the interest on it would be tax 
free. 

Mr. Gayles said he has heard that the Administration is also planning to dis- 
mantle the Education Department , and he wonders what that would do to us as 
a public institution. The talk in Washington, Dr. Matsler said, is that this 
will not be done, but rather staff within that department will be reduced. 
Most people in education object to the elimination of the department , he said , 
primarily because they fear that they will not have access to the people who 
administer the various programs in which they are interested. 

Section II - University Academic Plans, 1983-1987 

This is probably one of the most important items which is brought to the 
Board, Dr. Matsler said, and he understands that it received a great deal of 
discussion in the Program Committee on Wednesday, and for that reason he 
would just ask Dr. Groves to lead us very quickly through the recommendations 
which Staff has relative to the mission statements and the final recommendations 
for Board action . 

Dr. Groves noted that the Staff recommendations would be found on pages 20-22 
of the Executive Director's Report: 

With respect the new program proposals and mission changes, Staff recommends: 

that the Board approve the proposed expansion of the Northern 
Illinois University mission to include programming in engineering 
fields with the understanding that (1) the university will elaborate 
a ten-year implementation plan for Board consideration by June, 
1983, and, (2) that this approval does not constitute authorization 
of any related new program requests or budgetary requests since 
these would have to be considered separately when proposed in 
detail. 



155 



With regard to program reviews and follow-up reports of Northern 'Illinois 
University, Staff recommends that the Board: 

a. concur with the university's recommendations that the Major in 
Meteorology be placed on a three year's suspension with no students 
to be admitted after the Fall 1983 semester and that a review and 
follow-up report be completed in three years which emphasizes 
scientific currency of the curriculum and necessary new financial 
resources. 

b. concur with the university's recommendation that the Masters 
Degree in Geography be placed on three year's probation during 
which time it will continue to admit students and that a review and 
follow-up report be completed in three years' time which emphasizes 
student research competencies, degree completion, and faculty re- 
search productivity. 

c. concur with the university's recommendation that a follow-up report 
and recommendations be prepared on the need for a Major in the 
Social Sciences and, if justification exists, the most appropriate 
curricular structure to be developed. 

d. agree with the university's conclusion that the Latino Studies Minor 
and the Latin American Studies Minor should be consolidated and 
request the university to bring in a request for this program action. 

e. concur with the university's intention to study the status of both 
disciplinary and interdisciplinary minors and to present a follow-up 
report on this subject including implementation steps within one 
year's time. 

f. indicate its expectation that the consolidation of the Certificate 
of Advanced Study and Doctor of Education programs in Elemen- 
tary Education, Secondary Education, and Curriculum and Super- 
vision into a single Educational Specialist and Doctor of Education 
program in Curriculum and Instruction will be brought in for Board 
action in this academic year. 

g. support the university's decision to seek formal action deleting the 
C.A.S. degrees in Physical Education and Biological Sciences at 
the June 1983 Board meeting. 

Additionally, Dr. Groves said, as indicated earlier by Mr. Parker, Staff felt 
on review that the C.A.S. in History is another one that ought to be deleted 
and has recommended that to the Program Committee. That this was not 
included in the Staff recommendations as they appear in the Executive Director's 
Report, he noted, is simply inadvertent - it should be included among these 
recommendations . 

Dr. Groves said with respect to program reviews of Illinois State, Staff recom- 
mends that the Board : 

a. concur with the university's intention to follow-up on its program 

review of the Majors in Agriculture and Agribusiness by seeking a 
clarification of objectives , a revision of the curriculum , and better 



156 



faculty coverage of the curriculum; and ask for a follow-up report 
on progress in this regard in three years. 

b. support the university's recommendation that the masters degree 
curriculum in Physical Education be reviewed and revised to be 
more responsive to newer trends in the field and also recommend 
that it be simplified by downgrading the existing sequences within 
the degree. This too should be the subject of a progress report 
in three years. 

c. place the Major in Recreation and Park Administration on a three- 
year probation (not precluding the admittance of new students) 

to be followed up with an assessment of whether sufficient progress 
had been made in strengthening the curriculum and program staffing 
to warrant program continuation. 

d. concur in the university recommendations with regard to the bacca- 
laureate Major in Dance but request that a follow-up report be pre- 
sented next year evaluating the appropriateness of seeking accre- 
ditation and the implications of such a step for the orientation of 
the curriculum and for perceived concerns and deficiencies. 

e. place the Major in Environmental Health on a three-year probation 
(not precluding the admittance of new students) pending meaning- 
ful resolution of the curricular, staffing and enrollment problems of 
the program and a review by external consultants to determine if 
the program should be maintained, this to be reported upon as a 
follow-up report in three years. 

f. recommend that the university either consolidate the separate Majors 
in Home Economics Education and Industrial Education into sequences 
in the Majors in Home Economics and Technology of Industry respec- 
tively or present a rationale in a follow-up report for continuing 
the existing configuration. 

As regards the program reviews of Sangamon State University, Dr. Groves 
said Staff recommends that the Board: 

a. concur with the university intention to reach a decision on the 
program status of the masters degree in Gerontology within one 
year and to reflect this and its rationale in a follow-up report 
to be presented in next year's academic plan. 

b. direct that the baccalaureate major in Labor Studies be reevaluated 
within two years in order to determine if there is sufficient curri- 
cular and enrollment strength to warrant continuing the program, 
and present a follow-up report on this evaluation in the academic 
plan. 

Staff also recommends that the Board request all of the universities to present 
a comprehensive follow-up report to the Board in June 1983 on progress made 
in implementing the Board directive that campus policies be adopted on the 
maximum hours departments can require of their undergraduate majors con- 
sistent with a four-year baccalaureate. This report should include the policies 
adopted and further campus plans for implementation. 



157 



Finally, Dr. Groves said, Staff recommends that the Board approve the 1983-88 
academic plans of Sangamon State University, Illinois State University, and 
Northern Illinois University as modified by the above Staff recommendations 
for use in Regency System and University planning activities; and further 
that the Board commend the universities for their efforts in preparing these 
documents. It should be understood that such approval does not constitute 
a blanket endorsement of all of the specifics mentioned in the plans. 

Dr. Matsler said Mr. McClure had commented to him that as he went through 
the Staff recommendations it appears that Staff either concurs or agrees with 
the universities - although there are some expectations for changes, and he 
wonders why it is that we all get along so well. He said he would point out 
to Mr. McClure and others that we have through the years had some dis- 
agreements with the institutions and these matters have been brought to the 
Board for adjudication. However, for most of these matters that are very 
technical, it is probably better to do this in committee or to do it on the 
campuses. By the time these matters have gone through the committees, and 
by the time Dr. Groves and Dr. Floyd have been on campus to work things 
out, there is a great deal of concurrence, so that when we do go public with 
the recommendations we make a better case than if there were differences. 
Dr. Matsler said we like to keep differences to a minimum if at all possible. 
The Board's Program Committee has helped to do this, thanks to Mr. Parker 
and others who serve on the committee . 

President Monat said lest everything appear to be sweetness and light, he 
would like to state for the record that while there is no basic disagreement , 
NIU did not recommend the deletion of the CAS in History. This is a matter 
that Staff has raised. The institution will be examining the issue, but here 
is an instance where the Staff in a sense has raised an issue that did not 
come to the Board from the university, and he thinks that is appropriate 
as well. Dr. Monat said he would like to make one other observation. He 
came to NIU first in 1976 as Provost and worked with Dr. Groves and Dr. 
Floyd in that capacity, as has Dr. LaTourette during his time as Provost. 
He could say to Mr. McClure that what appears to be a "honeymoon" relation- 
ship exists because the Board staff comes to campus and goes over the recom- 
mendations on programs. Very often disagreements or misunderstandings are 
clarified at the staff level even before they get to the Program Committee. 
This is an on- going process of continuing discussion, continuing examination 
in which both the Board Staff and the people on campus are very active parti- 
cipants. He believes, he said, that both Dr. Boothe and Dr. Davis would 
concur in this. 

Dr. Groves said he would add that the program review process in the Board 
of Regents system was begun 9 years ago, it is a very effective one, and one 
that is frequently identified by people in higher education as being an example 
of an excellent program review process. It is actively engaged on all campuses 
taken very seriously, and the decisions which are reached represent a very 
significant amount of soul-searching and a significant amount of change. 
Things are not standing still in this system, they are moving, and he believes 
that a lot of the reason for that is the process that we go through of looking 
very carefully, in depth, at each program every five years. 

Mr. Parker said it was a kind of revelation to him yesterday how the BHE 
is able to come in and kind of usurp some of the powers that we, the Board 



158 



of Regents have, and since we do have such a good system of program review 
he did not quite understand how the BHE was able to pick certain programs 
out from our universities and then ask for their deletion or question their via- 
bility . 

Dr. Groves said on this score this is good news and bad news. The good 
news is that the Board of Higher Education which has the statutory authority 
to review programs has very substantially accepted the program review processes 
that each of the governing boards has established. They could have on their 
own simply usurped the whole process under the statutes. But they have not 
done that. Dr. Groves said he thinks that credit should be given to them in 
that regard. They have accepted the process that we have elaborated and 
have substantially gone along with us and worked with us on that. They do, 
under the statute, have the authority to conclude that programs require further 
attention and even to conclude that they are educationally and economically 
unjustified. Those are the words used in the statute. They do not, however, 
have the authority in the statute to delete programs. That is a governing board 
authority. But they can recommend and take formal action to find programs to 
be educationally and economically unjustified. Dr. Groves said we would hope 
that the spirit of cooperation that has prompted the BHE to accept a vigorous 
process of program review developed by the systems and the universities 
would carry through in resorting to a recommendation that things found to 
be educationally or economically unjustified would only be under the worst 
circumstances. We are working toward that end. It is a little unsettled in 
this regard, he said, and they are dealing with different prerogatives, pre- 
rogatives that are stated under the statutes. That relationship has yet to 
be worked out, and perhaps that is the bad news. However, the good news 
is that they have gone a long way in accepting the process. 

Mr. Parker then moved for approval of the Staff recommendations, as amended. 
The motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank , and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Murray thanked Dr. Groves for his work on the academic plans and Mr. 
Parker and other members of the Program Committee for all of the time and 
effort they have put in on them. 

Section HI - April 1983 Salary Increases 

Dr. Matsler said the Board would recall that in December we had just learned 
that there would be a 2% recision requiring that a certain amount of funding - 
$20 million for all of higher education - would have to be turned back to the 
Legislature and the Governor. There was uncertainty then that we would be 
able to provide any of the salary increases which had been promised - a 3% 
increase to be effective January 1, 1983. That increase was held up and the 
Board directed everyone to wait until the March meeting of the Board at which 
time it would be determined whether or not the increases could be given, 
depending upon the cashflow problems that each of the institutions had. 

At this time, Dr. Matsler said, Staff is requesting authorization to grant the 
3% increase beginning April 1. Although both ISU and NIU do have enough 
funding to provide for an extra two months' catchup on the 3%, this will 
not apply to the annualization . 

Dr. Matsler then presented the following Resolution for consideration by the 
Board : 



159 



RESOLVED that the Presidents of the Regency Universities and 
the Executive Director for the Central Office are hereby authorized 
to grant salary and wage increases to eligible employees, with such 
increases averaging 3% on a monthly basis when combined with any 
increases granted previously during FY 1983. These increases are to 
become effective April 1, 1983 or at the beginning of the pay period 
nearest that date. Eligible employees are those faculty (including 
laboratory school faculty at ISU), administrative staff, and civil 
service employees who were under contract in FY 1982, would have 
been eligible for increases in the summer or fall of 1982 (if such 
funds had been available for such increases), and are still employed 
as of April 1, 1983. Temporary employees are not eligible for these 
increases. Be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED that in the event no further recision is imple- 
mented during FY 1983 the Presidents and the Executive Director 
are authorized to grant additional increases averaging no more than 
3% per month for up to two months to such eligible employees. Such 
additional increases shall be in effect for no more than two months 
during FY 1983 and shall not be included in the employees' base 
salaries nor included in calculating FY 1984 salaries. 

Mr. Gayles noted that some people on campus are saying that the 3% is cal- 
culated on 90% of the base and that the increase actually will be only about 

2.7%. 

Dr. Matsler said this increase will not be exactly 3% for everyone - it might 
be a little bit higher or a little bit lower, and there may be some who receive 
no increase at all because the policy of the Board is that this is based on 
merit. He noted that 3% is not very much money to decide upon on the basis 
of merit. He said he would suspect that this will be pretty much an across- 
the-board increase at about 3%, give or take a tenth of a percent either way. 

President Monat noted that Mr. Gayles was correct in saying that this is 
calculated on a 90% base. The institution is still providing an average 3% 
increase which means that the university must eat the difference in terms of 
its base budget between what it gets and what is paid out. They have been 
doing this for a number of years, he added. 

Ms. Orchowski noted that the Resolution states that temporary employees are 
not eligible for the increase, and she asked if this includes temporary faculty. 

Mr. Murray said that under the terms of the Resolution temporary faculty 
are excluded. 

Mr. Riss then moved for adoption of the Resolution as presented. The motion 
was seconded by Ms. Toman. 

Dr. Wellbank proposed an amendment to the Resolution stating that the 
Executive Director and the three Presidents also be granted a 3% increase 
effective April 1. 

Mr. Riss and Ms. Toman accepted this as a friendly amendment to their 
motion . 



160 



Dr. Matsler said Sangamon State had indicated that there might not be funds 
available for this, but this amendment would authorize the increase should 
the funds become available. 

The Chairman then recognized Dr. Margaret Schmid to address the Board. 

Ms. Schmid said she is sure that everyone is aware of the fact that the dif- 
ferent systems in the State are treating this matter differently, and she 
would be happy to comment on that if anyone would care to hear her opinion . 
Ms. Schmid then read a prepared statement on behalf of University Professionals 
of Illinois indicating that they are pleased to see that the Board of Regents 
is now prepared to provide for almost all of the Board of Regents faculty 
almost all of the salary increase which by rights they should have received 
already. She said they are proud of the fact that it is the suit filed by their 
state organization, the Illinois Federation of Teachers, along with the American 
Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, which is largely respon- 
sible for the fact that the Board is now granting the salary increases. 

Mr. Murray commented that he does not believe that is necessarily true. 

Ms. Schmid continued her statement that that suit created a political climate 
which made further reductions in operating budgets this year very unlikely, 
and contributed heavily to Governor Thompson's plans to make up for remaining 
deficiencies in state revenues in other ways. 

However, she said, UPI urges the Board to grant the full faculty salary 
increase retroactive to January, not February, and to make the retroactive 
portion of the salary increase available to faculty on all Board of Regents 
campuses with an accompanying pledge that no faculty position will be placed 
in jeopardy. 

Ms. Schmid said the specific language of the Staff recommendation that 
"...Presidents and the Executive Director are authorized to grant additional 
increases" has been carefully drawn to allow inequitable treatment of Board 
of Regents faculty depending solely on the University at which they find them- 
selves. UPT can find no legitimate academic or professional reasons for making 
such an invidious distinction. Possible explanations such as inadequate student 
recruitment efforts or insufficient surveillance of administrative costs do not, 
they believe, constitute sufficient justification for inequitable treatment of faculty 
Such explanations for any differential salary treatment, furthermore, would 
appear to them to suggest areas in which inquiry might be warranted. 

In closing her statement, Ms. Schmid said she would reiterate their pleasure 
at the fact that the Board of Regents faculty are at long last going to receive 
salary increases for academic year 1982-83. She would reiterate as well their 
strong urging that all faculty on all Board of Regents campuses receive the 
full salary increase retroactive to January. 

Mr. Murray thanked Ms. Schmid for her statement. He noted that there was 
a motion on the floor, and asked if there was further discussion. 

The question before the Board was called for a vote, and it carried unani- 
mously. 



161 



The Chairman commented that the increase is just a token, but the Board is 
happy that at least it can give a token increase. He added that he is sorry 
that it appears that the increase for the President at SSU cannot be given. 
He said from the comment appearing in Ms. Schmid's letter he thinks she feels 
that an explanation of inadequate student recruitment does not justify treating 
Sangamon State differently, and he is not sure that he agrees with that. One 
of the reasons we had extra money at Northern, he said, was because an 
unexpected number of students enrolled. At Illinois State it was the weather. 
He said he thinks that message is fairly clear. If the faculty at Sangamon get 
involved in marketing and recruitment they might be able to enjoy that kind of 
a surplus, although he is not saying they have to. But that is where we have 
to get the salary increases. He noted that the biggest problem at Sangamon 
State is student enrollments, and if he were on the faculty he would work very 
hard to see if he couldn't do something about that. At NIU it paid off in salary 
increases. 

Mr. Murray commented that at an AGB meeting he heard at a program that 
admissions are too important to leave to Admissions, and he believes this is 
true. Admissions and enrollments have to be carried on by a marketing program 
of the whole faculty. Everyone on campus should become involved in this. 

President Lacy said the theory they have been following at SSU in trying to 
improve student recruitment is exactly the theory just stated by the Chairman. 
The faculty has been very active and very supportive in the recruitment effort . 
There are additional steps that individual faculty members can take and that 
individual programs can take to be more active in the recruiting process. 
They are now trying to take those steps, the President said. Obviously, it 
is important that each faculty member and each program be as active as they 
possibly can be in recruiting, especially at the graduate level. Dr. Lacy said 
he thinks, however, that it would be overly simplistic to say that the financial 
problems at SSU relate exclusively to student recruitment. It is a very big 
problem and a large element in the whole picture, but there are other elements 
as well, and they relate to problems that he has brought to this Board before. 
Those problems still exist. They are problems such as the IBHE's insistence 
on using an instrument which was not designed to be a budget instrument and 
make it a budget instrument - the unit cost study instrument. There are other 
problems relative to the evaluation of cost that also play a strong role in the 
current financial picture of the institution . However , he said , he fully agrees 
with what Mr. Murray said about faculty involvement in recruiting, and in many 
cases they have been very successful in doing that. 

Mr. Murray asked what effects the cuts in the University Relations staff will 
have on recruiting. President Lacy said he thinks they would have to assess 
that that impact has the potential of being significant. The deletion of Uni- 
versity Relations was made with that fully in mind, but they are trying to com- 
pensate for the possible negative impact through the use of volunteer profes- 
sionals in public relations. The project is not yet deep enough to tell them 
whether it is going to fully compensate for the loss of University Relations, 
but they are trying to watch this as carefully as they can. 

Mr. Murray said he believes that the Board shares his perception that there 
is a lot of really quality education going on at SSU, if we could just get the 
message out to the public and to the prospective students. 



162 



Section IV - Tuition for 1983-84 

Dr. Matsler said Staff had intended to bring in a recommendation for the 
tuition level for the coming year, but he simply does not know at this time 
what the level should be. He said Regents had been given a set of tables 
showing a comparison of the BHE recommendations and the BHE allocation 
of the Governor's budget for FY 84 operations and grants. Table 1, at the 
very bottom, shows that at the BHE recommended level our appropriation bill 
has been written to include $162.9 million in appropriated funds. However, if 
the Board of Higher Education reduces the budgets to the extent that the 
Governor has recommended, that figure will go down to $146 million, which 
represents a 10% cut, and we would have to orovide that much money just to 
hold our own. He called the attention of the Board to the difference between 
appropriations from the General Revenue Fund and the Income Fund, noting 
that if the BHE allocation of the Governor's budget were to prevail, there would 
have to be more monies coming from the Income Fund through added tuition if 
we are to hold our own with previous years. Right at this moment that would 
mean an increase very close to $500. Dr. Matsler said Staff feels that we simply 
cannot do this or we will lose students. There will be many, many students 
who would not be covered by ISSC, and that is the dilemma. So, he said, it is 
the hope that the Governor and the Legislature will increase taxes sufficiently 
to cover these losses. 

Mr. Gayles asked Dr. Matsler if he could give any indication of the timetable 
for setting tuition. 

Dr. Matsler said he is afraid that it might not be done before June and possibly 
not even then. It all depends on how fast the Legislature and the Governor 
act. If they do not act until June, then the Board cannot act until July. 

Mr. Murray asked about the appropriation for ISSC under the Governor's 
budget. Dr. Matsler said ISSC also took a 10% cut. 

Mr. Gayles asked how enrollments would be affected if we do not get the tax 
increase. It is anyone's guess, Dr. Matsler said, but he would suspect that 
we might lose perhaps 15-20%, but that is purely a guess. 

President Monat commented that the material which was distributed on the 
allocation of the Governor's budget and which assumes that a dramatic increase 
in tuition will not have an effect on enrollment puts us into an Alice in Wonder- 
land situation. It just is not realistic. This is an artificial allocation. So, 
Mr. Murray observed, if enrollments drop, obviously the Income Fund has to 
go up even more. 

Ms. Toman commented that she thinks it is important that students realize 
how effective it would be if they did contact their legislators and emphasize 
again the position we are in right now. We cannot let up on the push for the 
income tax increase, and the more times we come out and say this publicly, 
the better off we will be. 

Mr. Bender agreed, adding that he would again emphasize that we have to 
become a voting constituency, and we are now at the point where we have 
proven we can do that. Mr. Murray said as much as no one wants a tax 
increase , no one with any common sense can come up with any other conclusion 
after reviewing these figures. 



163 



Section V - Board R egulation Amendments and Additions: Board Committees 

Dr. Matsler said this Section of his Report is presented as a basis for dis- 
cussion and review of the committee structure of the Board as it now exists, 
and for codifying this structure in the Board Regulations. 

As to the Executive Committee, Dr. Matsler said, it would remain essentially 
as it now exists, except that it would meet at the request of two or more of 
the committee members. The Committee is comprised of the Chairman of the 
Board, the Vice Chairman, one other member of the Board appointed by the 
Chairman, and the Executive Director (non-voting). 

With regard to the Audit Committee, it is recommended that the references to 
the System Auditor be deleted inasmuch as we do not have one at this time. 
It is recommended that this Committee consist of the Chairman of the Board 
who would also serve as Committee Chairman , and two members of the Board 
selected by the Chairman of the Board. The Executive Director would also 
serve as an ex officio (non-voting) member of the Committee. 

Dr. Matsler said the recommendations relative to the Facilities Committee 
reflect what we have been doing in the past. This is also true of the Program 
Committee and the Finance Committee recommendations. 

With respect to the recommendations for the Personnel Committee, Dr. Matsler 
said the subparagraph relative to Membership needs some clarification , and 
this perhaps can be accomplished by indicating that the Committee shall be 
comprised of three or more members of the Board (selected by the Chairman 
of the Board) and the Chairman of the Board (ex officio). 

Staff is also recommending, Dr. Matsler said, that the Legislative Review and 
Coordinating Committee be deleted from the Board Regulations, and that new 
language be inserted to set forth the Board's policy with regard to participation 
in legislative matters. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked why the Deputy Director for Business Affairs is being 
eliminated from the membership of the Audit Committee, ex officio. Dr. Matsler 
said this was just for the sake of consistency. Is Mrs. Fitzpatrick suggesting 
that the Deputy should serve on the Committee? Mrs. Fitzpatrick said she 
does not know how the Audit Committee has functioned before , so she does not 
know whether he is needed or not. Dr. Matsler said he would be glad to dis- 
cuss this with her if she wished. 

Mr. Murray said he would also like open the option of the System Auditor, 
although not necessarily fill the position, because the reasons for appointing 
a System Auditor were good ones. He asked Dr. Matsler to reconsider deleting 
references to the System Auditor, and Dr. Matsler agreed that this would be 
done. 

Mr. Bender, referring to the Board Procedures, Legislative Affairs, asked if 
Dr. Matsler thought there would be any advantage to having a member of the 
Board participate in the review of proposed or pending legislation. Dr. Matsler 
said this activity is very time-consuming, and our Director of Legislative Affairs 
meets on a frequent basis with representatives from the institutions , particularly 
when the Legislature is in session. He said he believes a member of the Board 



164 



might find that he would be getting into a lot of detail that he might not 
be interested in. He said what Staff will be doing now that the Legislature 
is in session is reporting to the Board perhaps every week on what is going 
on . 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick, again referring to the Audit Committee composition, said it 
appears somewhat inconsistent for the Executive Director to be named to 
serve ex officio on this Committee and not on others. She thinks there 
should be some consistency to this. Dr. Matsler said Staff will be reexamining 
this and furnish a better rationale. Mrs. Fitzpatrick said that would be fine. 

Section VI - Board Regulati on: Telephone Conference Meetings 

Dr. Matsler said the proposed Regulation had been submitted for first reading 
in February and was recommended for adoption at this time. The Regulation 
will provide a means whereby public business can be transacted during periods 
when it is impractical to convene a quorum in person. The proposal is applicable 
to meetings of the full Board, the Executive Committee, or other Committees of 
the Board. 

Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion 
was seconded by Mrs. Fitzpatrick, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VII - New Programs 

Dr. Matsler said Northern Illinois University seeks approval of an Emphasis 
in Drawing within the B.F.A. Major in Art, and an Emphasis in Educable 
Mentally Handicapped /Learning Disabilities within the Major in Special Education. 

Staff recommends, he said, that the Board approve the Emphasis in Drawing 
for a two year period which will expire at the end of the 1984-85 academic 
year. 

Staff also recommends that the Board approve the Emphasis in Educable Mentally 
Handicapped /Learning Disabilities within the Major in Special Education, to be 
implemented when all necessary approvals have been obtained. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The motion was 
seconded by Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VIII - Legal Counsel Report 

1. ISU C ampus Financial Exigency Policies 

Mr. Winning reported that the financial exigency policies for Illinois 
State University, copies of which had been sent to the Board, have 
been reviewed by counsel and found to be consistent with Board Regu- 
lations on the same subject. 

2 . Co-Paying Agent, 1966 Bond Series, Northern Illinois University 

Mr. Winning said that the original bond issue was purchased by Halsey 
Stuart & Company and under the provisions of the documents the 
company was to name the paying agents for the bonds. Halsey Stuart 
& Company designated Chase Manhattan Bank of New York and Contin- 
ental Illinois National Bank of Chicago as bond paying agents. Last 



165 



fall, Mr. Winning said, Continental Illinois National Bank advised 
Chase Manhattan Bank that it no longer would act as bond co-paying 
agent for the 1966 Series. Because a substantial number of bond holders 
reside in the midwest, he said, it seems desirable that the Board of 
Regents request Halsey Stuart to designate an alternative bond paying 
agent in Chicago. He indicated that the LaSalle National Bank of Chicago 
has evidenced an interest to act. 

Mr. Winning said he recommends that the Board adopt a resolution 
directing the Executive Director to request Halsey Stuart & Company 
to designate an alternative co-paying agent for the November 1966 
revenue bond series at Northern Illinois University, located in Chicago, 
Illinois . 

Mr. McClure moved for approval of the recommendation of Legal Counsel. The 
motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

3. Northern Illinois University Foundation 

Mr. Winning reported that the NIU Foundation is prepared to make a 
gift to the Board of Regents of the property it acquired from John 
Boyle. He recommended adoption of the following Resolution: 

WHEREAS, the Northern Illinois University Foundation has acquired 
title to certain land in Ogle County, Illinois, by gift from John G. 
Boyle of DeKalb , Illinois ; and 

WHEREAS , the Foundation desires to convey title to said property 
to the Board of Regents of Regency Universities for the use of 
Northern Illinois University; and 

WHEREAS, the Board desires to accept a gift of said property; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that 

1. The Board of Regents of Regency Universities accepts the 
gift of the following described real property from the Northern 
Illinois University Foundation : 

That part of the Southwest Quarter and that part of the East 
Half of Section 21, Township 41 North, Range 2 East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, Ogle County, Illinois, described 
as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said 
Section 21: thence South (bearing assumed for descriptive 
purposes) along the East line of said Section 2141.48 feet; 
thence West, at right angle to said- East line, 805.48 feet; 
thence South 19°03'55' T West 429.61 feet; thence South 38° 
18'15" West 2048.73 feet; thence South 34°06 f 51" West 523.70 
feet; thence South 49°52'28" West 436.80 feet; thence South 
0°27'19" East 432.63 feet to a point on the South line of said 
Southwest Quarter that is 165.79 feet Easterly of, as measured 
along said South line, the Southeast corner of said Southwest 
Quarter; thence South 89° 26' 23" West along said South line 
649.66 feet to the Easterly line of property conveyed to the 



166 



State of Illinois for the right-of-way of Federal Aid Route 
412 (State Route 51); thence North 0°29'05 n West along said 
Easterly line 31.08 feet to a Northerly right-of-way line of 
said Federal Route 412; thence North 79° 10' 29" West along 
said Northerly right-of-way line 168.88 feet; thence North 
12°04'55" East 246.21 feet; thence North 63°45'22" East 
408.29 feet; thence North 52°5r27 n East 767.51 feet; thence 
North 2° 10' 33" West 509.53 feet; thence North 87°55'05" East 
357.29 feet; thence North 40°36'21" East 712.00 feet; thence 
North 0°05 f 46" East 216.24 feet; thence North 50°38'40" East 
970.44 feet; thence North 0°40 T 52" West 446.56 feet; thence 
South 49°31'32" West 150.70 feet; thence North 0°13 , 05" East 
669.46 feet; thence North 34°47 ? 14" East 170.59 feet; thence 
South 69°34 , 37" East 485.05 feet; thence North 14 52'33" West 
455.88 feet to the North line of said Section 21; thence North 
89°29'02" East along said North line 1012.54 feet to the point 
of beginning, containing 77.924 acres, all in Lynnville Town- 
ship, Ogle County, Illinois, hereby releasing and waiving all 
rights under and by virtue of the Homestead Exemption Laws of 
this State. 

2. The Chairman and Secretary of the Board of Regents be and 
are hereby authorized and directed to execute such instruments 
and to do such things as are necessary to acquire said property. 

Mr. Gayles moved for adoption of the Resolution as recommended by Legal 
Counsel. The motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

4. Northern Illinois University - Yearbook Publication Dispute. 

Mr. Winning said he had originally recommended that the students 
be represented by student counsel. However, since that time he 
has been furnished with a copy of the contract, and since that con- 
tract is with the Board of Regents, he now recommends that the action 
be brought in the name of the Board even though the recovery is for 
the benefit of the students. Mr. Winning said his recommendation is 
that the University Counsel proceed through Countryman & Associates 
to obtain recovery of the liability. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the recommendation of Legal Counsel. The 
motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

Dr. Matsler, referring to the gift of land by Mr. Boyle, said this is a gift 
that is most appropriate for use by the university, and he for one is very 
pleased that this has worked out the way it has. 

President Monat said he is also pleased about this. He said Mr. Boyle had 
intended to be present this morning, but he was called out of town. Mr. 
Boyle has also indicated that he is contemplating another gift to the university, 
and if that were to materialize, he will be in attendance at another meeting 
of the Board in the future. The President said Mr. Boyle is a very interesting 
man and very generous as far as the university is concerned. This particular 
property could not have come at a more propitious time because just last Decem- 
ber the BHE authorized the university to offer the Ph.D. in Biological Sciences, 
and one of the major fields is in Environmental Biology, and the land will pro- 
vide a natural research laboratory. 



167 



Is this primarily farm land, Mr. Parker asked? President Monat responded 
that it is natural prairie land. It has never been tilled, and it has a creek 
running right through the center of it. 

Mr. Murray asked the President to convey the thanks of the Board for the 

gift. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Northern Illinois University - President's Report 

President Monat distributed copies of an Addendum to the Capital Improvements 
Projects section of his Report (Emergency Repairs to Granite Panels on Holmes 
Student Center), noting that Mr. Riss had touched on this when he reported 
on the meeting of the Facilities Committee. 

Before presenting his Report, the President said that just last week he received 
a report prepared and distributed by the National Science Board identifying 
200 universities in the United States that meet the criteria established by that 
board as research and development universities. He said he is pleased to report 
that Northern Illinois University has been identified as one of the 200. There 
are two other universities in Illinois that are included in the list, the Univer- 
sity of Illinois and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. So, he said, 
NIU is traveling in very good company in that list and the institution is proud 
to have been so designated. 

The President said he wished to change the item on pages 6 and 7 (Revenue 
Bond Student Fees) to a matter of information at this time. Discussions on 
this matter are continuing with Board Staff, he noted, and he would be pre- 
pared to bring in a recommendation for action at the April meeting. 

The President also called attention to item B.2. in the Purchases Appendix, 
stating that the successful bidder, E & I Cooperative Service, Inc. had written 
to the university requesting that they be allowed to withdraw their bid because 
they themselves had made typographical and arithmetical errors in computing 
the bid and that they could not deliver on the bid which they used as their 
quotation. The President said he is requesting authorization to accept the 
bid of the next lowest bidder, Zirlin Interiors, Chicago, Illinois. 

Information reports were submitted on: 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Summer, 1983 
Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall, 1983 
Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 
Gifts to Northern Illinois University 
International and Special Programs Expenditures 
Acquisition of Boyle Land from the NIU Foundation 
Fee Increase for University Health Service 
Revenue Bond Student Fees 

The following items were presented for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees. A list of 

all reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and 
will be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office . 



168 



2. Permission was requested to increase the Graduate Colloquium Fee 
from $0.88 per credit hour to $1.63 per credit hour, effective with 
the Fall semester, 1983. 

3. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report. 

4. Capital Improvements Projects 

(a) Anderson Hall - Gymnasium Roof Repair 

Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for replacement of the roof over 
the gymnasium located in the north wing of the building. 
Because of the anticipated project cost and the University's 
limited funds available, it may be forced to split the funding 
between FY83 and FY84 funds for the award of the contract. 
No engineering fees will be charged to this project. 

(b) Anderson Hall - Energy Conservation Controls 

Permission was requested to employ the firm of Servidyne, Inc., 
Oakbrook, Illinois and Atlanta, Georgia, to design and prepare 
for bid electrical and steam controls for Anderson Hall pursuant 
to the energy audit conducted for the University by the firm . 
The total project cost is estimated at $37,650, including con- 
struction and fees, with a simple payback of $81,350 (six month: 
with an estimated additional saving of $40,000 during the next 
fiscal year) . 

(c) Stevenson Towers North - Remodel Formal Lounge 
Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for remodeling of the formal lounge 
for the 1000 students residing in Stevenson Towers North. 

No architectural fees will be charged to the project. The 
University will seek the necessary approval from the Board of 
Higher Education. 

( d ) Resurfacing of Parking Lot "L" and Williston Hall Service Drive 
Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for the resurfacing of Parking Lot 
"L" and Williston Hall service drive. No architectural fees will 
be charged to the project. 

(e) University Streets - Repair and Resurfacing 
Recycling Center - Grading and Surfacing 

Permission was requested to prepare plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for these projects. No engineering 
fees will be charged to these projects. 

( f ) Emergency Repairs to Granite Panels on Holmes Student Center 
Center Tower 

Permission was requested to expend funds in an amount not to 
exceed $16,000 to accomplish emergency repairs to the panels 
and brickwork. 



169 



President Monat said that yesterday the Facilities Committee spent a good deal 
of time discussing the proposed recreation facility. He* said he had indicated 
to the Board in advance that the university had no intention at this time to 
recommend that it be allowed to move forward with this project. In the informa- 
tion he had sent out to the Board, he also provided the results of the student 
referendum which was conducted , in the form of a memorandum he had re- 
ceived from the President of the Student Association. Dr. Monat said it is 
his feeling - one in which he feels the Facilities Committee concurred - that 
this is not the appropriate time to proceed to seek approval of the project. 
Earlier in this meeting, he noted, there was discussion about the uncertain- 
ties of state funding, and that we probably will not know until June at the 
earliest, and possibly as late as September, what the level of funding for 
higher education will be from the State. Dr. Monat said he could not, there- 
fore, in good conscience recommend a fee increase in the context of a massive 
tuition increase that is recommended in the Board of Higher Education budget 
which, he thinks, is an artificial budget - but nonetheless, it is there and it 
is a number which we have to at least acknowledge as a possible outcome of 
what is going to happen in the next several months. He and the Facilities 
Committee felt that given the bidding climate and given the construction 
climate at this time, the estimate that was provided two years ago by the 
architects probably is not realistic any longer, and we should try to get more 
uptodate information concerning what the probable cost of the project would be 
before asking the Board to consider the project again. So, President Monat 
concluded , he would urge the Board not to take any action at this time on the 
project . He said he probably will not be coming to the Board for this approval 
again until such time as there is greater clarity with respect to the funding 
support for higher education in FY 84. 

Mr. Riss said he thinks we should make clear that we are looking for a less 
expensive program, and we expect that. As a matter of fact, it was pointed 
out at the Facilities Committee yesterday, Dr. Monat said, that when they had 
a very professional estimate provided by the engineers on the steam tunnel 
replacement, the estimated costs were $1.7 million. However, when they went 
to bid, the bid was $1.2 million, which was about a 30% reduction. If that 
kind of climate continues, he said, we are looking at a project which will be 
considerably cheaper. 

Mr. Gayles noted with respect to the recreation facility, the Board has been" 
sent the results of the student referendum , and it is within the purview of 
the Board how it wishes to accept those results. 

Mr. Murray asked if Mr. Gayles had any recommendation on this. Mr. Gayles 
said he believes that student referenda should be given a great deal of weight 
at the Board level. He said he would suggest that since we are deferring 
action on this until July or September, that we lean more toward the September 
date when students will be on campus and able to show their approval or dis- 
approval. Secondly, he would like to suggest that if, indeed, the bids do 
come in considerably less than we have anticipated, that that figure be brought 
back to the students. Possibly with a cheaper price tag on the project, their 
liking for the product will increase a little bit. But right now there is the 
attitude on campus that even though we would be getting a good deal for the 
money, they cannot afford to pay for this particular item. He said he wanted 
to express this not only to fellow Board members, but also to let his student 
peers know that he is voicing their opinion on this matter, which has grown 
to be a very controversial one on campus. 



170 



Mr. Murray said the record should reflect this, and he would also suggest 
that the media gets this straight. 

President Monat said when Nancy Mack made her statement to the Board, 
and he concurs with the Board that it was a responsible and balanced state- 
ment, he would like to clarify for the record the matter of law school tuition. 
When the university and the Board negotiated through the Legislature the 
acquisition of the law school in 1979, we made a commitment at that time that 
until such time as the law school physically moved from the leased facilities 
in Glen Ellyn, the tuition would remain at the private law school level which 
was approximately $3300 a year. However, it was stipulated at that time - 
and he takes this almost as a mandate on the university - that that tuition 
would be reduced over a period of years once the law school moved to campus, 
using the monies that had been committed to the lease of the facility as a 
basis for reducing the tuition until it reached a point much closer to the 
tuition level at the other two state law schools, the U. of I. and SIU-C. 
Tuition right now for a full-time student is about $2400. Last week it was 
reported in the newspapers that SIU approved a tuition increase of 10% at 
the undergraduate level, but the recommended tuition for the SIU law school 
is just over $1000 a year. NIU is $1400 higher in law school tuition than 
is SIU, and probably as much as $900 higher than the University of Illinois. 

Mr. Murray asked Dr. Monat if he would be furnishing the Board some addi- 
tional information on the operational costs of the Holmes Student Center. 
Yes, Dr. Monat said, there is extensive backup material which the Board 
does not have, but which Staff of the Board does have. This can be reviewed 
and information furnished to the Board. 

Ms. Orchowski, noted that both student speakers earlier had said that the 
library is not comoleted, and she asked the President if he would explain 
this. 

Dr. Monat said when the library was designed some 15 years ago - although 
it was not completed until 1979 - it was designed to be one third larger than 
it is. When the realities of funding available through the capital budget had 
to be adjusted, the size of the library had to be adjusted. Mr. Murray asked 
if it had not been designed for 30,000 students. At that time they were think- 
ing of 30,000 students on the campus, but when construction started in 1974 
or 1975, the available funds really were the cloth to which the size of the 
library had to be fit, so the one-third was not constructed. At that time, 
he said, there probably could not have been a persuasive case made to enlarge 
the library. However, in the last 5 years there is no question that the case 
developed, because circumstances make that case that the library now is overly 
crowded not only in terms of seating space for students, but also in terms of 
stack space. Dr. Monat said one of the reasons NIU is designated as a researcl 
and development university is because of the size of the holdings in the library. 
They have every year increased the acquisitions budget to add to the holdings. 
As he had mentioned earlier, the President said, they have begun in their 
internal capital budget planning process a project which will at the appropriate 
time recommend the completion of the library by increasing by one-third the 
size of the building. 

At the suggestion of the Chairman, President Monat then described all of 
the functions which would take place on campus in connection with the dedi- 
cation of the law school. 



171 



Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern 
Illinois University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank 
and it carried unanimously. 

Sangamon State University - President's Report 

President Lacy said he is pleased to recommend to the Board today that an 
honorary doctorate degree be awarded by Sangamon State University this 
year to Mr. George Hatmaker. Mr. Hatmaker, he said, is a splendid example 
of the commitment that the business community has made and continues to make 
in nurturing and developing educational opportunities for future generations of 
students. His great efforts and work and his continuing and strong devotion 
and commitment to SSU, its mandate and its programs honor all of us who are 
involved in higher education, especially in Illinois. Sixteen years ago, the 
President said, Mr. Hatmaker became the President of the Committee for 
Higher Education in Central Illinois. It was that committee', working with 
Dr. Matsler and others, that did the "great bulk of the developmental work 
that led to the legislation establishing Sangamon State University. Once the 
institution was established, George Hatmaker maintained his very strong interest 
in it by serving first as President, and then for a number of years as Treasurer 
of the Sangamon State University Foundation. He still remains a member of the 
Foundation. Mr. Hatmaker is a native of St. Louis, but spent most of his life 
in Springfield. He is a graduate of Springfield High School and spent more 
than 30 years of his professional life as an employee of the Franklin Life Insurance 
Company, where he finally at the time of his retirement, was Chairman and 
President of the Board of the Franklin Life Insurance Company and all of its 
subsidiary companies. George Hatmaker has been an outstanding citizen of 
Illinois . He has been very active in the Presbyterian Church and served as 
President of the Illinois Presbyterian Home. He has had many other board 
and director memberships of corporations in Illinois and remains a very active 
citizen of the State. 

President Lacy asked that item B . of the Purchases Appendix be withdrawn 
from his Report (Two- Stage 40 mm Image Intensifier System). 

Information reports were presented on : 

Grants and Contracts 

Report of Faculty Receiving More than 100% Salary 

The following items were then presented to the Board for action: 

1. Approval was requested for the deletion of the Division of University 
Relations and the transfer of its major administrative units and functions 
to the Division of Academic Affairs , the Division of Business and Admini- 
strative Services, and the President's Office. 

2. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative and civil service 
personnel. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the 
President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and in 
the Central Office. 

3. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report . 



172 



President Lacy said he had indicated earlier in the meeting that the decision 
to eliminate University Relations as an administrative unit was a very serious 
decision, by far the most serious decision relative to meeting the budget demand 
that has been taken by the institution since he has been there. They have ver 
few options left, the President said, in cutting funds under the existing policy 
that they have been operating under for the past 3 years - to make cuts that 
do not have a direct impact on the teaching, research and public service activi- 
ties of the university, especially the instructional activities of the university. 
The President said they have now cut a very significant percentage of the 
total budget out of the university over the last 3 budget periods, and they 
have cut them in the non-academic arms and functions of the institution. 
Dr. Lacy said he thinks he now has the obligation, as he makes this recom- 
mendation to the Board, to say that they have very little cutting that they 
can do and still meet all the state laws and regulations and Board Regulations 
that they must meet in operating as a university of the State. 

Dr. Lacy said one of the reasons he makes this recommendation, as painful 
as it might be, is that these functions are not required by law, they are not 
required by Board Regulations. Most of the remaining administrative functions 
in the institution are now simply not a matter of good management or admini- 
strative convenience, they are a matter of meeting state law or Board Regula- 
tions. In many of the remaining administrative offices that they have to accom- 
plish those purposes , they are only one or two people deep , and they are very 
thin functions. In deleting University Relations they have deleted the admini- 
strative management function for a number of the public relations and public 
service type functions of the institution. However, they have not eliminated 
the functons themselves. As stated in his Report, Dr. Lacy said, they are 
recommending the redistribution of those functions to the academic affairs 
division of the university and the business and administrative services division. 
They are able to do this because at the moment they have two very able people 
to take over the direct administrative responsibilities - Vice President Goins , 
in the case of some functions, and Professor Mike Lennon who has been pub- 
lisher of Illinois Issues for other functions. In other words it must be under- 
stood that these two people and a number of others are taking on additional 
responsibilities to make it possible to have this cut . There are some savings 
here in the FY83 budget, they will be significant savings in the FY84 budget, 
but the full savings will not be realized until all contracts are over and met in 
FY 85. They are meeting all existing contractual obligations as they take the 
deletion step. 

President Lacy said they hope very much that by the time they initiate the FY8E 
budget the university may be in a position to once again do a stronger job 
in the area of public relations as well as in some other areas. In the meantime 
a group of public relations professionals has agreed to pull themselves together 
and, with the help of facilities in several businesses in Springfield, to help the 
institution continue to try to have a healthy public relations function at least 
until the beginning of the FY85 budget. 

Finally , the President said , he would add one comment on the performance of 
the Director of the Division of University Relations for the past two years. 
Gail Lutz has done an outstanding job in pulling this division together. In 
some ways she has been the first Director of the diviision , although there has 
been a public relations function for a long time, and a strong one under people 
like Chris Vlahoplus and Jim Turpin. In particular, he said, Gail Lutz had a 



173 



somewhat different responsibility from the previous directors, a broader respon- 
sibility. She has performed that in an outstanding fashion, and the fact that 
he brings this recommendation today is in no way a reflection of a failure on 
her part to do the job well. She has done it exceedingly well, and it is with 
deep regret that in spite of her efforts and the efforts of her staff they had 
to reach this conclusion. 

Ms. Toman noted the resignation of the Director of Financial Assistance, and 
she asked if that position will be filled by another individual or will this be 
moved to someone else in the course of the administrative structural changes. 

President Lacy said this is a very key position at the institution because a very 
high percentage of their students do receive some form of financial aid. Bob 
Clement is leaving to take a position with the Illinois State Scholarship Commis- 
sion and work as a liaison between that Commission and the institutions. The 
President said they intend to temporarily hold the position open until they know 
more about the kind of appropriations they will have for FY 84. He thinks it 
is unthinkable that they would not fill it for FY 84 because no one at the uni- 
versity has the technical knowledge to do the work as effectively as it needs 
to be done. They are following a policy in the institution right now on all 
administrative vacancies of delaying the filling of vacancies until they see what 
this legislative session is going to produce in the way of a budget. Associate 
Dean Roach will cover this work until May or June . 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked if the Office of Public Information was a part of 
the University Relations Division. It was, the President responded. 

What is the difference between "lay off" and "termination", Mrs. Fitzpatrick 
inquired. Vice President Goins said the term "laid off" was used when there 
was an actual incumbent in the position. Termination of positions sometimes 
occurred when there was no incumbent but the policy decision was made that 
there would be no filling of the position. The position would be terminated. 
Mrs. Fitzpatrick asked if "lay off" infers that there will be a recall. No, 
Dr. Goins responded, the use of the term laid off here is not the same as 
temporary lay off of civil service employees. The distinction between termina- 
tion and lay off is in the fact that there was an incumbent there who had to 
be laid off, but when a position is terminated there was not an incumbent. 
So, Mrs. Fitzpatrick said, this means that at some time the university expects 
to fill the position of Director of University Relations, Director of Communications 
and Affirmative Action Officer. Is that why "laid off" was used. No, Dr. Goins 
said, relative to all the positions on the list one should make the assumption 
that it is not the university's intent to fill them again. So, which way is it, 
asked Mrs. Fitzpatrick? Last month we voted to terminate people in these posi- 
tions, and now we are saying they are laid off. She really does not understand 
this. Dr. Goins said he had not prepared this particular section of the Report, 
but his understanding is that the words "laid off" was used here to connote 
the fact that there was still an incumbent in the position , and therefore the 
individual involved was being separated from the university. In the case of 
termination , it was a position which did not have an incumbent in it , but which 
was being terminated. He noted that these items are for the information of the 
Board, they don't require Board action to delete positions, but it did require 
Board action to terminate the individuals . 

Mr. Winning said in the process of job abolition, incumbents in those jobs 



174 



that are protected by civil service may be terminated , but if the position is 
reinstituted , they are then subject to recall, priority on recall. 

President Lacy said he wished they could furnish a better explanation, but 
they would check it out and if there is any more significance than has been 
indicated, they would get back to Mrs. Fitzpatrick. 

Ms. Orchowski said she notes that essentially the public safety function is 
being eliminated. The President said two of the full-time employees are being 
retained and some of the functions which they continue to carry out relate to 
public safety. They will no longer be patrolling the campus in the way the 
other two campuses are patrolled. They will continue to offer things like 
emergency services. They will continue to worry about and provide admini- 
strative services for the general safety of people on campus, but they will 
no longer be carrying out the kind of police function that we are familiar 
with at the other two campuses. This too was a difficult decision to make. 

Dr. Matsler said one comment might be appropriate at this time. He thinks 
Board members know what President Lacy have been going through in the 
last two or three years, particularly this past year. He has had to make up 
losses, he has had to cut back, he has a list of people that he has had to 
lay off. He has lived through a very, very difficult time, especially these 
last two months. Dr. Matsler said he thinks the President has done a good 
job in providing the essential services. He said he and Mr. Murray sat down 
with the President, Dr. Munkirs and Dr. Goins a month ago and went over 
the budget problems that they have, and he thinks he has done a masterful 
job in protecting the academic programs as best he can and yet meet the 
cutbacks that have been put on him by the Board of Higher Education, by 
the funding process itself. Dr. Matsler said he is hopeful that Dr. Lacy 
has seen the last of the big cuts he will have to deal with, and that we can 
do something to move ahead at SSU and not cut back any further because 
they are down to the bare bones now. Dr. Matsler said he is sure that this 
Board will support him in the months ahead. 

Dr. Lacy thanked Dr. Matsler for his remarks. He said he thinks the key 
message he has for the Board today is that it is important for the Board to 
understand that the next steps in the institution do basically involve the 
academic programs, and they simply do not want to have to reach that point. 
Maybe there is a slight silver lining and that is that he does not see anyway 
that anyone in this legislative session or later can say that this institution 
is overfunded. They can clearly demonstrate now that in terms of cost, 
the institution is in a very reasonable position, and in fact look better than a 
number of other institutions at the Graduate I level. In administration they 
certainly now look very healthy in terms of the economy and efficiency argu- 
ments. 

Mr. Murray asked how much they have cut back in terms of dollars. In 
terms of dollars it has now been more than 10% of the current general revenue 
fund dollars in the last three budgets, and they are still facing a recommenda- 
tion for another cut of $389,000 next year, the President said. Their general 
revenue fund is $12,800,000, and they have already been cut about $1.5 million 
really about 12%. Mr. Murray said he would not reiterate what Dr. Matsler 
said, but he knows this has been a wrenching experience and he sympathizes 
with those who have been affected by this difficult time. 



175 



Mrs. Fitzpatrick said she had one more question - although she had hoped 
that someone else might raise it. Referring to the changes in assignment listed 
on page 8 of the Report , she asked why there is no salary increase indicated 
for the female who is taking on additional responsibilities, and almost a $250 
a month increase for the male taking on additional responsibilities? President 
Lacy said they have not yet fully looked at the question of salaries relative 
to the new responsibilities. That one case simply progressed more rapidly 
than the other cases. It was a clearer case but in effect it got quicker atten- 
tion because of the mix of activity in it. The decision to allocate the affirma- 
tive action function to the Personnel Officer was made a good bit later in the 
process, he said, and he intends to look at adjustment of salaries across-the- 
board on all positions when this redistribution is finished. Their capability 
of doing that is limited, and in general it is his intention to take the limited 
funding that they do have available and use the great bulk of it to take care 
of positions at lower income levels, lower salary levels, that are impacted by 
the reorganization. But also a part of what he intends to look at is the question 
of the impact of affirmative action on that particular office, so one could view 
this at the moment as a still unanswered question. Dr. Goins also noted that 
this change does not take place until August 15. 

Ms. Orchowski asked what type of provisions have been made for Associate 
Dean Roach's absence to the student when she takes over responsibility for 
the financial assistance position. This is only going to be temporary, Dr. Lacy 
said. Mr. Homer Butler added that Dean Roach will be taking on the responsi- 
bilities but other members will be giving her more assistance in those areas. 

Mr. Riss moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon State 
University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and it 
carried unanimously. 

There being no further business before the Board, on motion by Dr. Wellbank, 
seconded by Ms. Toman, the meeting was declared adjourned. The next 
regularly scheduled meeting of the Board will be held on April 21, 1983, at 
Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois. 



David E . Murray 
Chairman 



Franklin G. Matsler 
Secretary 



176 



Minutes of the Meeting of the 
BOARD OF REGENTS 
Illinois State University - Normal, Illinois 

April 20, 1983 



The rescheduled meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 1:30 p.m. 
on April 20, 1983 in the Circus Room of the Bone Student Center at Illinois 
State University, Normal, Illinois. Ms. Carol K. Burns, Vice Chairman, 
presided in the absence of the Chairman. 

The meeting was called to order, roll was called, and the following Regents 
were present : 



Mr. Jerome R. Bender 
Ms. Carol K. Burns 
Mrs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick 
Mr. Montel Gayles * 
Mr. L. Milton McClure 

Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman, and 
for the meeting. 



Ms. Denise Orchowski 
Mr. D. Brewster Parker 
Mr. Harold Riss 
Ms. Janine Toman 
Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 

Ir. James L. Wright were not present 



Also present were : 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 

In attendance from the Joint University Advisory Committee were: (ISU) 
Dr. Virginia Crafts, Chair, Dr. Thomas Eimermann , Ms. Peggy Gerkin, 
Dr. Robert Ritt, Mr. Leon Toepke ; (NIU) Mr. Joe Koch, Dr. James E. 
Lankford, Dr. Annette Lefkowitz, Mr. Jerry D. Meyer; (SSU) Dr. George 
Gruendel, Ms. Pam Hammond-McDavid, Ms. Cindy Steohenson, Dr. Jack 
Van Der Slik . 



Others present included staff from the Regency Universities and the Central 
Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the Board; 
and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Mr. Parker moved that the Board recess to meet in Executive Session for 
the purpose of discussing personnel and financial matters. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public session at 2:45 p.m. 

MINUTES OF MARCH 17, 1983 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the 
meeting held on March 17, 1983 and asked if there were additions or correc- 
tions to be proposed. There being none, on motion by Mr. Parker, seconded 
by Ms. Orchowski, the minutes were unanimously approved as submitted. 



177 



CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 

Ms. Burns said the only item she had was to extend congratulations to Dr. 
Leon Boothe who has been selected as the new President of Northern Kentucky 
University, and on behalf of the Board she congratulated him and commended 
him for his work while Vice President and Provost at Illinois State University. 
Personally, she added, it has been a pleasure to work with Dr. Boothe, and 
she expressed confidence that all Board members share this feeling. 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Ms. Burns said at this time she would read to the Board the text of a speech 
which Mr. William Browder, Chairman of the Board of Higher Education, 
delivered to members of the General Assembly who attended a dinner the night 
before the BHE meeting. The speech was so clear and so eloquently stated 
the position of the BHE on the allocation of the Governor's budget that she 
feels it should be restated in the minutes of our meeting. 

The budget which the Board of Higher Education recommended in 
January to the Governor and to the General Assembly in accordance 
with the statutes of Illinois calls for one billion , one hundred and 
thirty-seven million dollars in General Revenue Funds. This is an 
increase of $130 million over 1983 appropriations from the General 
Revenue Fund. 

The Governor has reduced our recommended budget by $237.4 
million to a figure which is $107 million less than fiscal 1983's 
appropriations. As you know, his budget is based on income 
expectations without tax increases. 

It is our legal obligation to allocate the Governor's budget as he 
has requested and we will probably do so tomorrow, while reaffirm- 
ing our budget. The deficiencies resulting from the Governor's 
budget are so large, building on already existing shortfalls accu- 
mulated over the past several years, that we are all now thrust 
into the realm of major policy decisions. 

The people of Illinois must now decide what they want to do with 
higher education and what they want it to do for them. Time is a 
critical factor. Under existing circumstances delays will themselves 
constitute decisions, with serious substantive impacts. 

There is no overall law of God or man that I know of which says 
every person who wants a college education must be given one at 
State expense. Nor is there an inherent right to attend an institution 
of higher education of one's choice even when one has the money to 
pay the full cost of providing that education. It seems to me that 
the legislature is always free to make new policy --or reaffirm 
existing policy -- regarding higher education. 

There are numerous options open to the legislature (and the 
citizens you represent) in these times of financial crisis: 



178 



1. Some might take the extreme position and say that 
we can no longer afford to educate our people with 
State money - let them go to private schools or to 
other states-if they want higher education. 

2. Others might say that the number of students should 
be cut down to a total that can be educated with 
existing or declining State revenues and existing 
tuition levels. This option would obviously involve 
major cutbacks in staff, equipment, facilities, buildings, 
courses, programs, campuses, schools, and probably 
would necessitate the closing of some colleges and 
universities. Under this option many students would 
be denied higher education . 

3. Some others might say we should make up the existing 
shortage of funds by 'taxing' the students instead of 
all taxpayers. This option would involve enormous 
increases in tuition and fees, and the number of stu- 
dents surviving would undoubtedly be too few to support 
existing facilities and programs. 

4. A fourth option that might be considered is to propose 
numerous reductions across the board in programs, 
faculty and staff members and salaries, and utilize 
existing facilities without adequate maintenance; don't 
build anything new; don't remodel anything old; don't 
get any new equipment - just use what we have. And 
help meet the costs by raising tuition materially and 
reducing scholarships materially. In essence, this is 
virtually the option which our staff has proposed to 

the Board in its effort to allocate the Governor's budget. 
It is clear that under this option, as under the first 
three options, both the quantity and the quality of 
higher education in Illinois would decline precipitously 
and the institutions of higher education would no longer 
be able to serve the people of Illinois as they have in 
the past. 

5. There is a fifth option. The General Assembly could 
acknowledge that one of Illinois' greatest assets is its 
fine universities and colleges -- that these schools have 
made a tremendous contribution to the economic and 
cultural quality of the life of every citizens of this 
State, including those who have not matriculated. 

The legislators could realize that the best hope for the future progress 
of Illinois -- economically and culturally --is grounded in our educa- 
tional processes. It could be preceived that much of our well being 
today has come as a direct result of the education and the research 
and development done at our universities. Transistors, computers, 
hybrid corn, soybeans, photo-electric cells, sound movies, and count- 
less other medical and technical advancements that we take for granted 
today would not be available if it were not for the University of 
Illinois, for example. 



179 



I'm sure you are aware that our colleges and universities are being 
asked and expected to help in the training and retraining of our 
work force in the much needed economic development of Illinois to 
help us climb out of this recession. At tomorrow's Board meeting we 
are being asked to approve several new programs in our community 
colleges that will train several hundred people for jobs that are 
currently available. Money for economic development will not be 
available under the Governor's budget. 

In considering this fifth option, you should be aware that in the 
past few years all of Illinois' universities and colleges have been 
through the refiner's fire. Fat has been eliminated and efficiency 
has been improved. Faculty and staff have been reduced. Those 
of us who have been deeply involved in this process can see the 
good that has come from it, but we also see that financial resources 
from the State have been so curtailed in recent years that serious 
deficiencies have been building up which are beginning to weaken 
our institutions to the extent that they will be irreparably damaged 
unless the trend is reversed. For example, faculty salaries have 
not kept pace with inflation, with industry salaries, or even with 
the faculty salaries in schools in other surrounding states, for so 
long that we are losing outstanding people. Such a trend feeds on 
itself and will be virtually irreversible if it continues any longer. 
Our equipment is wearing out, our libraries are endangered, new 
courses in science, engineering, and technology, much in demand 
today, are more expensive to offer and are therefore being restricted 
And we can't get professors in some of these vital areas at present 
salaries. Utility costs have skyrocketed with no let-up in sight 
and they have not been fully funded by the State. Inflationary cost 
increases have amounted to 38 percent since fiscal year 1980. 
These difficulties have been compounded by another critical trend. 

All during this time we have called upon our institutions of higher 
education in Illinois to serve an increasing number of student! 
The 750,000 students attending public and private institutions of 
higher education in Illinois this year represent an increase of 
250,000 in the past ten years. Enrollments are up 13.2 percent 
just since 1980. 

What this means is that State support per student in constant 

dollars has declined to a point that the amount of support in 1983 

is only 65 percent of what it was in 1971 --a drop of over one-third. 

In exploring what policies we should follow in dealing with higher 
education today, let's look at what the General Assembly has said 
in the past. Under the Statutes of Illinois, the Board of Higher 
Education is charged with the responsibility 'to recommend to the 
General Assembly the enactment of such legislation as it deems 
necessary or desirable to insure the high quality of higher education 
in this State. ' There is an underlying presumption here that the 
General Assembly's policy is to provide high quality higher education 
for the people of Illinois. 

As citizens of Illinois , responsible under the laws of Illinois for 



180 



submitting our higher education budget recommendations to the 
Governor and General Assembly, we have concluded that the long- 
standing legislative policy of insuring the high quality of higher 
education is still valid. We support it wholeheartedly, and there- 
fore feel we must tell you that high quality higher education cannot 
be insured in fiscal 1984 or thereafter with existing or projected 
revenues. We believe that our 1984 budget is minimal to prevent 
further inroads into the quality of higher education. It is not a 
growth budget. 

Therefore, we say to you that we believe we are speaking for the 
welfare of all of the people of Illinois when we urge you to adhere 
to your policy of insuring the high quality of higher education in 
Illinois. This high quality cannot be insured unless revenues alloted 
to higher education by the State are substantially increased. We 
don't presume to tell you precisely how to do this, but we do say, 
for the first time in our history, that we see no possible way of 
doing it without a tax increase. We stand ready to assist you in 
any way we can -- and to answer your questions. 

Ms. Burns said she could not add a whole lot to Mr. Browder's statement 
except to say that she believes it sums up very nicely a strong position that 
the BHE has taken to support not only the Board of Regents, but the other 
boards in the State whose budgets are not being met also. Ms. Burns said 
she thinks that the legislators who heard the speech were genuinely impressed 
and went away perhaps with a little more thoughtful attitude regarding the 
plight of higher education, so to speak. 

Mr. McClure asked Ms. Burns if she felt that constituents should still write 
to their representatives in the General Assembly. Yes, Ms. Burns responded, 
and as a matter of fact during the course of the evening several legislators 
mentioned the fact that they had received piles of mail from students and 
concerned parents - concerned that perhaps there might not be a place in 
Illinois higher education for their sons and daughters who have not yet applied 
and from students who are afraid that they will not be able to finish their 
programs if the budgets are cut. Therefore, any positions taken to our 
legislators from our areas would be helpful she is sure. 

President Monat said he believes that all of us have in various ways conveyed 
this message and will continue to do so. In the last week he had the occasion 
to address a large number of people from off-campus who had come to NIU. 
One group was the Women's Intercollegiate Athletic banquet, attended by 
some 300 people, most of them parents who were visiting. Dr. Monat said 
he spoke much longer than he should have on this issue, saying essentially 
what Chairman Browder did. He added that you could literally hear a pin 
drop while he was speaking. Yesterday, he said, they had on the NIU campus 
the College of Business Board of Visiting Advisors, a small but enormously 
influential group of business leaders from Northern Illinois. Dr. Monat said 
he and Chairman Murray delivered the same message and, again, to a very 
attentive audience. 

Ms. Burns noted that at the last meeting they had gone through a short 
exercise in trying to figure out exactly how great the shortfall was, and it 
was determined that we would have to close SSU, Governors State, and one 
other university in order to meet the shortfall. So, we are not talking about 



181 



small numbers any more. We are talking about large numbers. When there 
is a shortfall that is that great, it should be a cause of -concern to everyone 
as it is. 

Mr. Gayles said there is an attitude which is prevalent in the State - and 
he has heard it on the NIU campus as well, that since this is not occurring 
to us at this particular time, it need not concern us directly so why worry? 
Tuition does not bother some students, he said, and he does not know if 
this is an elitist group, but he also does not know what other approach to 
take. Mr. Gayles said maybe some of them are the elitists who can afford to 
pay that kind of tuition, but for the public record students cannot afford to 
pay it. He said if he were not so lucky as to be graduating in three weeks, 
he knows that he would not be able to afford to come back. 

Ms. Burns said she did not want anyone to misconstrue her statement and 
think that we were recommending the closing of any institutions, because that 
was just an example used to put a perspective on the extent of the shortfall. 
Mr. Gayles said his comment was based on an article in one of the campus 
newspapers. Ms. Burns said the article inferred, she believes, that Chairman 
Browder recommended closing universities; and for the record, he did not do 
that. 

President Watkins said he was pleased that the Chairman of the BHE publicly 
noted that we really cannot cut any more. During the last two or three years 
it has been the sorry duty of the administrations of the Regency Universities 
and the other universities in the State of Illinois to have to institute cuts 
simply to try to maintain essential programs. We now find that our salaries 
are not competitive, that our classes are too large in many areas, that our 
equipment is worn out or obsolete, and that we cannot meet what we consider 
our valid educational expectations of a great industrial state. We are being 
asked, the President said, and will probably be asked in committee on Thursday, 
what we are doing vis-avis technological advancement, what we are doing in 
the area of high technology. The answer is the best we can, but it is pretty 
hard to do that without the state of the art equipment that we need. Dr. 
Watkins said he, too, has been busy during the past months talking to differ- 
ent groups, hosting coffees for a wide-ranging group of community leaders, 
and pointing out the impact on the local economy. He said he believes these 
statements are making an impact, and we would be very unwise to rest on our 
oars at this time. He said he could tell the Board, and he believes his col- 
leagues will agree, that the time, the indecision, the lack of ability to plan 
because there are no parameters to use, they do not know what the budget 
is going to be, is having a very serious effect on morale on all campuses in 
the State. In the past perhaps they were not aware until July 1 whether the 
salary increase would be six or seven percent, or whatever, but now we are 
talking about jobs, talking about programming, things that are so vital, and 
people do not know how to plan their lives any better than the administrations 
and the boards know how to plan for the budgetary future. This indecision 
is one of the really deleterious facts of life which we now face. 

Ms. Burns commented that listening to the radio in her car on the way to the 
meeting, it seems to her that there is a growing support for an increase in 
taxes in Illinois. She said if it is any comfort, she also heard that the new 
Mayor of Chicago, Mr. Washington, is in Springfield today pleading his cause 
for the Board of Education in Chicago which has a shortfall much, much greater 
than ours. Collectively, she said, she thinks we all should be heard. 



182 



President Monat said he had sent copies to the Board of articles and an 
editorial which appeared in the Rockford Register Star last week , and he 
thinks it should be acknowledged publicly the strong support the newspaper 
gave editorially not only to a tax increase, but the absolute necessity of 
increased support for higher education funding. 

President Lacy noted that any way you cut the arithmetic, as was done at 
the last BHE meeting, or any way you look at the compromises that took place 
in Springfield among the Republican caucus last week, if higher education 
keeps the same percentage of the General Revenue Fund that it currently has, 
we simply cannot afford any additional deterioration in the Governor's position 
relative to the revenue that it might produce. Further compromises are going 
to have to be ones that do not cut the gross amount of revenue projected if 
we are going to be able to break even and have even a small number of new 
dollars to cover utility bills and other necessary increases for next year. The 
bulk of the fight is still in front of us, and we are going to have to endure. 
He thinks what President Watkins said about morale is very important, and that 
it is critical that the decision be made in the regular session of this legislature 
and not drag it out as long as the summer session. 

Mr. Bender inquired if Mr. Browder's statement had been distributed to all 
members of the General Assembly. Ms. Burns said she had requested that 
it be sent, but she would have to check on that. 

Mr. Bender commented that Gary Watson from the Rockford Register is a 
supporter of higher education. He is an NIU graduate. He would ask that 
a letter be sent to him in appreciation of the editorials he has been running. 
One other thing he would like to mention, Mr. Bender said, is that to add to 
the pain of the reduction in monies for higher education, they are also taking 
$85 million out of the retirement funds , which in good conscience they should 
return, at least in the amount taken. He said what higher education is. going 
to get out of any additional revenues is very doubtful. However, Mr. Bender 
said, the General Assembly is vulnerable to pressure at this point from all 
kinds of sources on just this subject, and we ought to be in touch with them. 

Ms. Burns said she would urge each member of the Board to obtain a list of 
the appropriate legislators or persons that they think need to hear personally 
from the members and make our position known. Also, she encouraged members 
to write to the Governor. 

Dr. Matsler said he perhaps would add some comments to this discussion at 
the time he presented his Report. 

There was another item brought up at the BHE meeting, Dr. Matsler said, 
relative the program review. He said he believes our System is to be com- 
mended for having probably as good a system of program review as can be 
found in the State. Our Program Committee, chaired by Mr. Parker, has done 
a good job of looking at the mission statements and looking at the program re- 
views themselves. Three programs at our institutions got some comment from 
the Board of Higher Education, and the comments were essentially that perhaps 
the programs were educationally and economically unjustified. We will not agree 
with all of this, he said, and it is up to the Board of Regents to decide whethe 
or not they are really justified . We may very well be making some changes be- 
cause of the BHE's suggestions, or they may be changes that we had already 



183 



implemented. Dr. Matsler said. 

Ms. Toman reported that on Tuesday the Illinois Student Association caucused 
at the State CaDitol, and she would like to commend each of the presidents of 
the student associations at the Regency Universities for their support and 
bringing students from all of the campuses to lobby their respective legislators 
and committees that will be appropriating funds to higher education. 

Ms. Burns said she was happy to hear this because is another perspective 
which legislators need to have. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Dr. Virginia Crafts, Committee Chair, introduced new members of the Joint 
University Advisory Committee: Pam Hammond-McDavid, a staff member at 
Sangamon State; Bob Ritt, the new chairperson of the Academic Senate at 
Illinois State; and Peggy Gerkin, who is also a student member of the Senate 
at ISU. 

Dr. Crafts reported that discussions by JUAC sounded a great deal like those 
the Board had earlier in terms of finances and tuition, and the Committee is 
very concerned about this. The students are particularly concerned about 
the possible tuition hikes that might occur. She said she is sure that the 
Board probably has some sense of discouragement as the does the Committee. 
They think the only thing they can do at this point is to hope that the final 
scenario is a positive one and try to convince the legislators that all of the 
fat has indeed been cut, and now muscles are pretty bruised and battered. 

Once again, she said, the Committee is dismayed and disappointed and dis- 
illusioned that the retirement plan has again been attacked to keep the State 
afloat literally. They are also upset that primarily it was the State employees 
and the State teachers who were hit hardest by this. They are also upset 
that there seems to be no plan to replace the funds, and to the Committee this 
is not wholly responsible. 

Finally, Dr. Crafts said, the Committee requests that members be furnished 
with the agendas for meetings of the Board's committees. They believe that 
this will increase their understanding of some of the concerns and allow for 
a more intelligent exchange. 

Ms. Burns agreed that this would be an excellent idea, and she would ask 
Dr. Matsler to see that the Committee members are included on the mailing 
list. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 139 

Section I - Legislative Report 

Dr. Matsler said all members of the Board now receive a digest of the bills 
which Staff is following, some of which will be of more interest to the Regents 
than others might be. Right at the moment, he said, there have been 3600 
bills introduced. The deadline for hearing substantive bills in committee is 
May 6, he noted, so there will be a few more bills coming up. Given the 
large Democratic majority in the House and the fact that many of the Democrats 



184 



are new members, it is likely that a very large percentage of the bills will 
pass out of the House, so it will be up to the Senate or the Governor if 
there is to be any weeding out. 

Dr. Matsler said there are at least a dozen bills which could be used as a 
vehicle for collective bargaining, however, probably the strongest bill is 
H.B. 1530 which is supported by Speaker Madigan and it is expected that 
this bill may very well be favorably reported out of the House. The bill now 
includes higher education. 

H.B. 83, introduced by Representative Mulcahey , restricts the use of text- 
books written by faculty members. The bill is currently in the Higher Edu- 
cation Committee, and it is unlikely that it will pass. It would affect faculty 
on our campuses considerably, and we do not believe it is an appropriate bill 
and have opposed it . 

Representative Keane has introduced H.B. 196 which would allow universities 
to remove federal student loans from their records when they are assigned to 
the federal government . This is a good bill and stands an excellent chance of 
passage. 

Representative Frederich has introduced H.B. 504 which would eliminate the 
present requirement that all agencies of government submit quarterly reports 
regarding non-bid ourchases of less than $5000. 

H.B. 700 is an interesting bill sponsored by Representative Ebbesen, which 
would remove Northern Illinois University from the Board of Regents System. 
The bill is scheduled to be heard this afternoon in committee, and Dr. Matsler 
advised that Chairman Murray has written a very strong letter in opposition to 
the bill. Phil Adams of the Staff will also testify against the bill. Dr. Matsler 
said he thinks that perhaps the bill will not pass this year, however, one of 
these years it may and then we will have a new system of systems of higher 
education in Illinois. This would be long after he has left the scene, President 
Monat commented. 

Dr. Matsler said he has asked Marsha Murray of the Central Staff to testify 
against another bill which would provide a vote for student Regents. Similar 
bills have been introduced with respect to the other governing boards, and 
he understands that they are being opposed by many. Dr. Matsler said he 
believes there is a split among students as to the desirability of providing 
student Regents with a vote. However, he has opposed the bill and has noti- 
fied the Board of this; and unless the Board were to notify him differently, 
he would continue with that policy. 

Mr. Gayles asked if Phil Adams would also speak to this particular bill in 
committee. Dr. Matsler said Mr. Adams would be present at the meeting, but 
he had asked Ms. Murray to testify on the bill. Is the Board going to take a 
stance against the bill, Mr. Gayles asked? In this particular instance, Dr. 
Matsler said, Staff will be speaking on behalf of the Executive Director or 
on an individual basis, rather than as a Board policy because the Board has 
not taken a stance on this particular bill. However, as he indicated before, 
he has always notified the Board how he intends to testify, and unless he is 
instructed differently, he will go ahead and do that. 



185 



Mr. Gayles acknowledged that there is a split among; students, but he would 
say that the vast majority of students throughout the State favor voting 
rights for their particular regents or trustees on the governing boards, and 
he wanted to state this clarification . 

Ms. Toman said she has researched this considerably, talking with other 
student trustees of institutions in the State, and has received both pros and 
cons on the question. To be objective, she said, among all of the issues that 
need to be kept in mind before any decision is made either at this Board 
level or in the Higher Education Committee, is that we need to keep in mind 
that there are various personalities on all of the governing boards; and while 
some may feel it is necessary, there are others that would feel it is not neces- 
sary. We need to keep in mind, she said, thatwe sit on a seat in a unique 
position, and ask whether this might open the floodgates for various other 
constituencies to seek a place on the boards. Ms. Toman said she recognizes 
that she and Mr. Gayles are of different opinions on the question, but she 
is trying to be objective about it. Mr. Gayles said he too is trying to be 
objective, and Ms. Toman is aware of his arguments. He would ask that the 
Board not take a stance on this matter at this time, since there are dissent- 
ing opinions among the students. However, he said, he wanted the Board 
to know that students will be watching this bill. 

Among the bills introduced in the Senate, Dr. Matsler said, is one supported 
by Senator Rock which would allow proprietary schools to participate in the 
ISSC scholarship funds. He said he is afraid that this would be most unfor- 
tunate. It may very well cost another $11 million per year, and perhaps more 
later. However, it is likely that the bill will pass both the House and Senate. 

Senator Davidson is the principal sponsor of our Regency appropriation bill, 
Dr. Matsler continued, and he will be testifying along with the three Presi- 
dents and the Executive Director on Thursday afternoon in Senate Appropri- 
ations Committee. 

Senator Lemke has introduced a controversial bill which would allow private 
colleges and universities to receive grants for construction projects, and we 
are not sure how far this will will go, but it is still of some interest to us. 

Finally, Dr. Matsler said, as reported in the papers recently, Senator "Pate" 
Philip has agreed to introduce the Governor's tax bills as he has proposed 
them. They are very controversial, and it will be some time before the dust 
settles and we know exactly where we are with respect to appropriations. 

Section II - FY 84 Operations Appropriations - Board of Higher Education 
Allocation of the Governor's Budget 

Dr. Matsler directed the Board's attention to the tables on pages 7 through 11 
of the Executive Director's Report and summarized the 1984 budget requests 
as they have currently been presented to the Legislature. He noted that 
the total request, including income derived from a 10% increase in tuition and 
incremental increases approved by the Board of Higher Education, was 
$162.9 million. Using charts prepared by the Central Staff he then projected 
what might be expected if the Governor's tax package were to be approved by 
the Legislature and if income from a 25% increase in tuition were to be insti- 
tuted by the Board of Regents. He stated that unless a larger proportion 



186 



of the total general revenue dollars is distributed to higher education, the 
Regency System would stand to gain perhaps no more than $2 million. 

President Monat commented that the projected income resulting from the 
tuition increase did not accurately reflect the fact that there would be 
reduced enrollments due to higher tuition. 

President Watkins suggested that perhaps students should look into the bill 
which would provide scholarships to students in proprietary schools, because 
this added expense is estimated to total as much as 11 million dollars and it 
would be taken from the ISSC appropriation. 

Section III - Board Regulation Amendments and Additions - Board Committees 

Dr. Matsler presented for action the Board Regulations which would formalize 
the Board Committee structure, and stated that it was the consensus of both 
Board and staffs of the institutions that the system is working very well. 
Mrs. Fitzpatrick noted that she thought it had worked very well, and moved 
for approval of the Regulations as stated in the Executive Director's Report. 
The motion was seconded by Mr. McClure, and it carried unanimously. 

The Regulations read as follows: 

I. BOARD PROCEDURES 

C. BOARD COMMITTEES 

1. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

a. Membership. 

The Executive Committee shall be comprised of the Chairman 
of the Board, the Vice- Chairman , and a member of the Board 
selected by the Chairman of the Board. The Executive 
Director shall act as a non- voting member of the Committee. 
The Chairman of the Board shall serve as Chair of the 
Executive Committee. 

b. Meetings. 

The Executive Committee shall meet upon the request of two 
or more of its members. 

c. Powers and Duties. 

The Executive Committee may discuss and act upon all matters 
pertaining to the Board of Regents and the Regency Universi- 
ties. It is intended, however, that the Committee will pri- 
marily address those routine items which require Board action 
when such action cannot be delayed until the next full meeting 
of the Board is convened. 

Although the Committee may make final determinations as to 
matters of the Board of Regents, the full Board may ratify 
the actions taken by the Committee. 



187 



Actions of the Executive Committee shall be reported to the 
full Board no later than at the next meeting' of the Board. 

2. AUDIT COMMITTEE 

a. Membership. 

The Audit Committee shall be comprised of the Chairman of 
the Board and two members of the Board selected by the 
Chairman of the Board. The Executive Director shall be a 
non-voting member of the Committee. The Chairman of the 
Board shall serve as Chair of the Audit Committee. 

b. Duties and Responsibilities. 

The Committee shall periodically review the internal control, 
accounting, and reporting practices of the Universities to 
assure that the practices provide for proper accountability. 
Specifically, the Committee shall 

(1) monitor the communications of audit information to 
external agencies and entities; 

(2) evaluate requests for special compliance or financial 
audits or investigations and assign such audits or investi- 
gations as the Committee deems appropriate; 

(3) review reports, findings, and recommendations and make 
such recommendations and /or reports to the Board as the 
Committee deems appropriate; and 

(4) meet annually with the Internal Auditor of each Univer- 
sity to receive a written audit plan for the fiscal year, 
and to discuss any appropriate items. 

3. FACILITIES COMMITTEE 

a. Membership. 

The Facilities Committee shall be comprised of three or more 
members of the Board selected by the Chairman of the Board. 
The Chairman of the Board shall act as ex officio member of 
the Committee. The Chairman of the Board shall designate 
one member of the Board to serve as Chairman of the Facili- 
ties Committee. 

b. Meetings. 

The Facilities Committee shall meet at the direction of its 
Chairman . 

c Duties and Responsibilities. 

The Facilities Committee shall be responsible for reviewing the 



following: capital budgets and requests, long-range 
development plans, and major capital projects including 
program statements. 

The Facilities Committee shall make recommendations to the 
Board of Regents. 



4. PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

a. Membership. 

The Program Committee shall be comprised of three or more 
members of the Board selected by the Chairman of the Board. 
The Chairman of the Board shall act as an ex officio member 
of the Committee. The Chairman of the Board shall designate 
one of the members of the Board to serve as Chairman of the 
Program Committee. 

b. Meetings. 

The Program Committee shall meet at the direction of its 
Chairman . 

c. Duties and Responsibilities. 

The Program Committee shall be responsible for reviewing 
the following: academic plans and mission statements, new 
and improved program requests, existing programs, and 
policies on tenure and academic rank. 

The Program Committee shall make recommendations to the 
Board of Regents. 

5. FINANCE COMMITTEE 

a. Membership. 

The Finance Committee shall be comprised of three or more 

members of the Board selected by the Chairman of the Board. 

The Chairman of the Board shall designate one of the members 

of the Board to serve as Chairman of the Finance Committee. 
The -Chairman of the Board shall act as an ex officio member of 
fhe Committee. 

b. Meetings. 

The Finance Committee shall meet at the direction of its 
Chairman. 

c. Duties and Responsibilities. 

The Finance Committee shall review the following: operational 
costs and budgets, tuition and fees, and internal budgets. 

The Committee shall make recommendations to the Board of 
Regents. 



189 



6. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

a. Membership. 



The Personnel Committee shall be comprised of three or 
more members of the Board selected by the Chairman of 
the Board. The Chairman of the Board shall act as an ex 
officio member of the Committee. The Chairman of the 
Board shall designate one of the members of the Board 
to serve as Chairman of the Personnel Committee. 



b. Meetings. 

The Personnel Committee shall meet at the direction of 
its Chairman. 

c. Duties and Responsibilities. 

The Personnel Committee shall coordinate the evaluations of 
the Executive Director and the Presidents and shall review 
pay plans, salary schedules and compensation data. 

The Committee shall make recommendations to the Board of 
Regents. 

I. BOARD PROCEDURES 

D. LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS (GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS) 

1. POLICY. 



In furtherance of its role as the governance body for the Regency 
System, the Board of Regents is desirous of participating in those 
legislative matters affecting the Regency universities and Illinois 
higher education. 

a. Review. 

Proposed or pending legislation shall be reviewed by the 
Executive Director, the Director of Legislative Affairs, and 
a representative from each Regency university selected by 
the university. 

b. Representation. 

No person shall take any position on behalf of the Board of 
Regents in any legislation proposed or pending in the General 
Assembly without the prior authorization of the Board of 
Regents or the Executive Director. 

c. Report. 

The Executive Director shall periodically report to the Board 
of Regents on the status of pending legislation. 



190 



Section IV - Illinois Educational Consortium 

Dr. Matsler presented the following - Resolution to provide for the election 
of the Directors of the Illinois Educational Consortium at its annual meeting-, 
with a recommendation that it be adopted by the Board: 

BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Regents in regular meeting- 
assembled : 

That Franklin G. Matsler and William R. Monat be and are 
hereby selected to serve as Directors of the Illinois Educational 
Consortium ; and 

That Franklin G. Matsler as Secretary of the Board of Regents 
be and is hereby authorized to consent and agree to the election 
of the above-named directors togetherwith two Directors named by 
each other member of the said Consortium as the act of and on behalf 
of this Board , and to do so in writing- and in lieu of election at a 
meeting of members. 

Mr. Riss moved for adoption of the Resolution. The motion was seconded by 
Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Winning noted that the Board had requested Dr. Matsler to ask Halsey 
Stuart & Company (now Prudential Bache Securities) to designate an alterna- 
tive bond paying agent in Chicago to replace Continental Illinois National 
Bank. The request was made and the LaSalle National Bank of Chicago was 
so named on April 1. 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

President Watkins reported to the Board that today students on the ISU 
campus are holding a referendum on whether or not planning and construction 
of a recreational building should proceed. He said he does not know how the 
voting might go, but that he intended to abide by the decision of the students 
which should be known late this evening. 

Ms. Burns asked if the President would be bringing a recommendation to the 
Board at the next meeting, and Dr. Watkins said at this point he did not know. 
Obviously, he said, if the students vote No, there would be no recommendation 
made by him . 

President Watkins yielded the floor to Ms. Orchowski who introduced to the 
Board Steve Bedingfield and Tim Houghton, newly elected President and Vice 
President of the ISU Student Association. 

President Watkins introduced Dr. Leon Boothe , Vice President and Provost, 
who will be leaving ISU shortly to take up his duties as President at Northern 
Kentucky University. 

Dr. Watkins distributed copies of an Addendum to his Report (Changes in 
Assignment for Dr. Vivian R. Jackson and Dr. JoAnn S. McCarthy). He 
advised the Board that the Capital Improvement Projects contained in his 



191 



Report were being withdrawn in order that the Facilities Committee might 
review them and make recommendations to the Board. 

Information reports were presented on : 

Students 

Grants and Contracts (Research, Training, Service) 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board : 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for 
civil service employees. A list of all reported transactions is appended 
to the President's Report and will be kept on file at the University 
and in the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as anpended to the President's 
Report. 

3. Renewal of Union Agreements 

(a) Approval was requested of an Agreement with Local 399, 
International Union of Operating Engineers, for the period 
April 1, 1983 through August 31, 1983. 

(b) Approval was requested of an Agreement with Local 1110, 
American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees 
for the period April 4, 1983 through June 30, 1983. 

4. New Union Agreement 

Approval was requested of an Agreement with Local 399, International 
Union of Operating Engineers, for the period April 4, 1983 through 
August 31, 1983. This Agreement is in behalf of 17 Building Mechanics 
in the University's Residence Halls. The language is essentially con- 
sistent with other Agreements and there are no departures from past 
practice. The wage settlement is in accordance with Board of Regents 
guidelines. 

Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois 
State University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank, and 
it carried unanimously. 

Ms. Orchowski said she would like to commend President Watkins and the 
University for supporting students in looking to fill the recreation needs at 
ISU, adding that she arid all of the students appreciate the fact that they will 
abide by the outcome of the referendum . 

Dr. Matsler noted that it was not just a matter of abiding by the referendum 
because the Board would also want to look into the feasibility studies and 
the fee schedules. President Watkins said if he does have a recommendation 
to make to the Board all of this would be brought in . 



192 



Sangamon State University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board, President Lacy asked that the 
name of Robert C. Spencer be deleted from the list of those individuals recom- 
mended for sabbatical leaves. Mr. Winning asked that the record show that 
action on this is continued. 

Information reports were submitted on: 

Enrollments, April ,1983 
Grants and Contracts 
Capital Improvement Projects 

The following items were then presented for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative and civil service 
personnel. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the 
President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and 
in the Central Office. 

2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report . 

Commenting on his Report, Dr. Lacy took note of the recommended appoint- 
ment of Jerold Gruebel as Executive Director of CONVOCOM, adding that 
this is the first of several steps which will be recommended over the next 
few months which will bring into actual service the television consortium 
composed of Bradley University, Western Illinois University, Blackhawk Com- 
munity College in Moline and Sangamon State University. The funds for the 
salary for this position and other costs of CONVOCOM will come from the 
consortium through a contract for the university to provide the administrative 
services to the consortium. Bradley is providing the engineering services to 
the consortium and they expect the first signals to be delivered which will 
cover almost one-half of the land area of the State beginning this Fall, with 
the full system in place about 12 months after that. Dr. Lacy said next month 
he would bring in for action a contract with CONVOCOM for the services which 
will be provided. The good news about the contract, he said, is that the 
operating cost of the particular system that has been engineered is a very 
modest cost compared to the kinds of broadcast systems - the only television 
transmission systems available to us just a few years ago. The energy cost 
of the microwave system which they are installing is a very bright picture 
for their budget next year. They expect within several years to be recovering 
through tuition charges and other fee costs for services that they deliver throug 
this television system a good bit more than the cost of operating the system. 

President Lacy said he would like to note in recommending the sabbaticals 
the continuing importance that their faculty and the administration attaches 
to the entire question of faculty development. In the young institution, with 
decisions which he will ask the Board to make at the May meeting, they will 
be approaching the 60% mark on tenured faculty. It is a young faculty, an 
excellent faculty, and one from which they will demand much in the decades 
to come. Dr. Lacy said he thinks one of the most urgent matters facing the 
university is how to secure the maximum potential from each of these faculty 
members. The sabbatical system which has been in operation for a number 



193 



of years is an excellent faculty development device and a very important one 
but they do need other comoarable type devices to help develop the faculty 
to the point where it can be of maximum service to the institution and to 
the Board in the future. He said he hopes that they will have an opportunity 
over the course of the next few months, no matter how tight the budget situ- 
ation may be, to give some attention to additional modes of providing oppor- 
tunity for development of the faculty. 

Mr. Winning said while he thinks the purpose of CONVOCOM is excellent 
and what they are doing is good, he also thinks that as these hybrids of" 
organizations develop, particularly when they are composed of both public 
and private agencies, there is going to need to be some legislative or other 
policy guidelines developed. We have a situation here now where the employee 
of the university is in fact a contract employee of the group of universities 
with both public and private companies, and he is enjoying all of the fringe 
benefits provided by the State, admittedly at the cost of CONVOCOM. He 
said he has not discussed this with President Lacy, but he does think that 
there has to be some guidelines developed for these joint organizations, as 
good as they may be, because there isn't any real legislative pattern. 

Ms. Burns asked if Mr. Winning had a recommendation to make to the Board. 

No, Mr. Winning responded, but down the line we will need to do something 
about these sorts of things. 

President Lacy said he fully agrees. They are pursuing, he said, policies 
which they believe the Board of Regents and the Board of Higher Education 
have endorsed to encourage individual institutions to become more cooperative 
with each other. That includes patterns of cooperation among the public and 
private institutions. Sangamon State now has more than a dozen major 
cooperative efforts with other institutions of higher education, and he believes 
they have reached the point in the development of these multi-university 
cooperative projects that they do need to give some attention to the structures 
by which they are being culminated. He said he thinks that will take not only 
the attention of this Board but also the understanding of other State agencies. 
It is interesting to note, Dr. Lacy said, that the CONVOCOM project itself 
was developed with funds from the HECA program of the BHE. He thinks 
there can be no question about the project being squarely within the education 
policy of the State, and yet they do face certain restrictions under existing 
law and regulations which make these kinds of cooperative efforts somewhat 
more difficult than they should be. 

Ms. Burns asked President Lacy to bring the Board uptodate on the status 
of the research park feasibility study. 

The President advised that the advisory committee conducting the research 
park feasibility study met a few weeks ago and endorsed the initial draft 
of the study which recommends that the University and the Board proceed 
to continue to test this matter by making some initial contacts with prospec- 
tive clients of the research park. The feasibility study outlines how those 
contacts might take place and a timeframe for the contacts to take place late 
this Spring and during the Summer. The report acknowledges that the pro- 
ject is a very complex one and it is likely to take a good bit of time for 
consultation between the university and the prospective clients, most of 



194 



which are public associations, have annual meetings, in many cases in the 
winter, and there are contracts which will have to be adjusted as they make 
moves from one place to another. But the board enthusiastically endorsed 
the project and gave some good guidelines to proceed. 

Dr. Lacy said in his Report today is the recommendation for the continuation 
of the contract with the consultant on this project to take him into the next 
phase of the project. Dr. Esser has done an excellent job in bringing the 
project through the first phase and they would like to retain his services for 
the next phase. The President said he would take the Board's approval of 
the recommendation today as a sign that the Board does not in any way dis- 
courage their continuing through the second phase of testing the feasibility 
of the project . The second phase will be more public and will involve at 
least the Chairman of the Facilities Committee of the Board, Governor Thompson 
and others in helping them make some of the contacts that need to be made. 

Ms. Burns said she personally feels this is an exciting idea and the President 
should keep the Board posted on an on- going basis. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon 
State University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and 
it carried unanimously. 

Nort hern Illinois University - President's Report 

President Monat , before presenting his Report to the Board, reported on the 
series of events which took place to celebrate the dedication of the College 

of Law. 

He also noted that shortly after the dedication, the threat to the continuation 
of the Law School was removed when Representative Tate, in an exercise of 
amazingly good judgment, withdrew his bill. 

Dr. Monat said he was proud to report to the Board that last week they 
received word from the American Assembly of the Collegiate Schools of Busi- 
ness that the accounting program at Northern has received accrediation at 
both the undergraduate and graduate levels by the ACSB. This makes the 
program one of 29 in the country to receive accreditation at this early stage 
and it puts Northern in very good company. 

President Monat distributed copies of an Addendum to his Report (Holmes 
Student Center - Tower - Granite and Limestone Panel Repair). 

The President , as a part of his Report , recommended to the Board for 
approval the awarding of its first honorary degree, an honorary degree of 
Doctor of Science to Dr. Leon M. Lederman, Director of the Fermi National 
Laboratory. Dr. Lederman is no stranger to the work of science, Dr. Monat 
noted, having published 170 scholarly papers in the most prestigious journals 
in the field of physics. Dr. Lederman has received his share of honors and 
awards. He has received the Ford and Guggenheim Fellowships, the Adams 
Foundation Fellowship and NSF Fellowships. In 1965 he was awarded the 
National Medal of Science by President Johnson and the same year he was 
elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Since 1972, simultaneously with 
his serving as Director of the Fermi Laboratory, he holds a Higgins Chair of 
Physics at Columbia University. Last year he was a co-recipient of the 



195 



prestigious Wolf Prize in Physics. Dr. Lederman's work in Physics has 
included landmark research leading to unprecedented discoveries of two 
fundamental particles. President Monat said it is with pleasure that he 
brings to the Board the NIU request to award the honorary Doctorate in 
Science to Dr. Lederman on May 14th. 

Information reports were presented on : 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Summer, 1983 
Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall, 1983 
Enrollment by Headcount, Semester II, 1982-83 
Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 
Gifts to Northern Illinois University 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees. A list of 
all reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and 
will be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

2. Approval was requested to increase the commencement fee from $10 
to $15 for undergraduate students, and from $15 to $20 for graduate 
students, effective for August Commencement 1983. The law student 
commencement fee remains at $35. 

3. Authorization was requested to enter into a contract in an amount not 
to exceed $65,000 with the National Center for Higher Education Manage 
ment Systems to provide a detailed needs assessment of private sector 
firms with major commitments to high technology. The survey would 
incorporate not only an assessment of potential for the establishment 

of cooperative research undertakings, but would also assess the edu- 
cational and training needs to meet current and future professional 
manpower requirements of the firms. 

4. Approval was requested of Collective Bargaining Agreements with the 
Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 86; the American Federation of State, 
County and Municipal Employees, Local 963 - DeKalb and Lorado Taft 
campuses; and the International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 
399 for wages to be effective April 1, 1983. 

5. Permission was requested to proceed with an installment plan for the 
Spring Semester, 1984, for payment of tuition, fees and room and 
board. A student would be able to exercise the option to make pay- 
ments in three installments. Approval was also requested of the follow- 
ing related fees: 

Reinstatement fee $25.00 

Housing Applications (applied 

to Spring Semester room 

and board charges) $50.00 

Service Fee Up to 1.5% per month on 

unpaid balance 



196 



6. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report . 

7. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Lincoln Hall - Center Core Roof Replacement 
Authorization was requested to increase the project budget 
from $40,000 as originally approved to $150,000. 

(b) Holmes Student Center - Tower - Granite and Limestone 
Panel Repair or Replacement 

Permission was requested to enter into a contract with the 
firm of Raths, Raths and Johnson, Inc., Willowbrook, to under- 
take additional investigative work; develop plans and specifica- 
tions ; advertise and receive bids for the repair of the granite 
and limestone panels. Because the engineering work for the 
project involves an unusual amount of investigative work prior 
to the development of plans and specifications, the University 
recommended a fixed engineering fee of $30,000, plus the 
usual provisions for reimbursables and full-time on-site super- 
vision be authorized for this project. 

A total preliminary budget for the project has been developed 
in the amount of $570,000. 

(c) Gabel Hall - Replacement of Roof Over Existing Gym Locker Rooms 
A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Freeport Industrial Roofing, Freeport , in the amount of $17,418. 

(d) Lincoln Hall - Repair of Sidewalks 
Douglas Hall - Repair of Sidewalks 
Grant Towers - Reoair of Sidewalks 



Stevenson Towers - Repair of Sidewalks 

Wirtz Hall - Installation of New Sidewalk for North Addition 
A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Oleson Construction Company, DeKalb, in the amount of 
$52,066. 

(e) Huskie Stadium - Repainting of Exterior Steel and Wood 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommendation 
that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to Western 
Waterproofing, Springfield, in the amount of $77,400. 

(f) Evans Field House - Gymnasium Divider Curtains 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Art Drapery Studios, Skokie, in the amount of $24,045.00. 

(g) Dorland Building - Minor Rehabilitation and Remodeling 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Jim Ward Construction, DeKalb, in the amount of $17,809.00. 



197 



(h) Holmes Student Center - Tuckpointing and Caulking the 
Tower and the Remainder of the Building 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Midwest Restoration, Paris, in the amount of $42,500.00. 

Referring to the contract with NCHEMS, President Monat said last summer they 
contracted in a consulting capacity with Dr. Frank Fradin of Argonne National 
Laboratories to conduct a comprehensive survey in the northwest and east- 
west reaearch and development quarters in the Chicago metropolitan area. 
That effort resulted in the development of individual corporate profiles of 
more than 200 firms, a very precise profile in terms of the research thrust 
of these firms, product lines, their scientific laboratory capacities, down to 
the number of Ph.D.'s in Physics, Biology, etc. Northern has entered into 
a continuing relationship with Fermi Lab, and along these same lines, Dr. Monat 
said he has had two meetings with Dr. Letterman over the past several months. 
NIU and Fermi are entering into what he believes will be a very fruitful 
collaboration leading to joint appointments, particularly in the areas of computer 
science and physics. They are asking NCHEMS, in a sense, to complete the 
survey and research that was started last summer to assist the university 
in assessing the requirements of these firms in the area of high technology 
and also to assess the potential for engineering education in that part of 
Northern Illinois . 

With respect to the installment plan for payment of tuition, fees and room and 
board, Dr. Monat said they think that within the next several years it will be 
increasingly important for parents as well as students to have the opportunity 
of meeting the cost of higher education on an installment plan rather than 
having to come up front immediately with the full payment at the beginning of 
each semester. 

Dr. Monat said the contract with Raths, Raths & Johnson was discussed in 
executive session within the context of potential litigation, and this will enable 
the firm to undertake additional investigative work on the panel problems in 
the Holmes Student Center, to develop plans and specifications, and to adver- 
tise and receive bids for the repair or replacement of the granite and lime- 
stone panels (he asked that the words "or replacement" be added in the action 
paragraph of the Addendum which was distributed). Dr. Monat said he fears 
that they will be coming back to the Board in May with recommendations that 
will involve extensive repair of the structure because of the deterioration 
that has occurred since the building was constructed some 16 years ago. 

In the Purchases section, Dr. Monat said, are a number of computer-related 
initiatives. All of these matters have been discussed with Board Staff on an 
extensive basis, and he understands that Staff is fully supportive of these 
proposals . 

Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern 
Illinois University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Mr. Gayles. 

Mr. Gayles complimented the President and his staff for proposing the install- 
ment plan for paying tuition, fees and room and board charges. He said he 
knows it will save a couple of students from having to complete their academic 
semester at Con Ed instead of NIU. 



198 



Ms. Burns commented that this does show a real responsiveness to student 
needs in the current economic conditions, and it is a super idea. She said 
she would also compliment the university on the accreditation of their account- 
ing programs. This is a real honor. 

The question before the Board was called for a vote, and the motion carried 
unanimously. 

There being' no further business before the Board, on motion by Dr. Wellbank, 
seconded by Ms. Toman, the meeting was declared adjourned. The next 
regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents will be held at Sangamon 
State University on May 19, 1983. 



Carol K. Burns 

Vice Chairman and Acting Chairman 



Franklin G. Matsler 
Secretary 



199 



Minutes of the Meeting of the 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Sangamon State University, Springfield, Illinois 

May 19, 1983 



The public meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 1:30 p.m. on 
Thursday, May 19, 1983 in Conference Room G of the Public Affairs Center 
at Sangamon State University, Springfield, Illinois. Mr. David E. Murray, 
Chairman, presided. 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, roll was called, and the 
following Regents were present: 



Mr. Montel Gayles 
Mr. L. Milton McClure 
Ms. Denise Orchowski 
Mr. D. Brewster Parker 



Mr. Harold Riss 
Ms. Janine Toman 
Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 
Mr. David E. Murray, 
Chairman 



Not present for the meeting were: 

Ms. Carol K. Burns 
Mr. Jerome R. Bender 



Mrs. Clara S. Fitzpatrick 
Mr. James L. Wright 



Also oresent were 



Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat, President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 



Attending from the Joint University Advisory Committee were: (ISU) Thomas 
Eimermann, Peggy Gerkin, Leon Toepke; (NIU) Joe Koch, James Lankford, 
Jerry Meyer, Tony Scaperlanda; (SSU) George Gruendel, Cindy Stephenson 
and Jack Van Der Slik . 

Other present included staff from the Regency Universities and the Central 
Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel to the Board; 
and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Dr. Wellbank moved that the Board recess to convene in Executive Session 
for the purpose of discussing litigation and personnel matters. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Riss, and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public session at 3:00 p.m. 

MINUTES OF APRIL 20, 1983 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the 
meeting held on April 20, 1983, and asked if there were any additions or 
corrections to be proposed. Dr. Matsler asked that on page 13 in the para- 
graph describing the membership of the Finance Committee, the following 



200 



sentence be inserted after the first sentence: "The Chairman of the Board 
shall act as an ex officio member of the Committee." 

Dr. Matsler also noted that on pages 19 and 20 the spelling of Dr. Leon 
Lederman's name should be corrected. 

President Watkins asked that on page 15 in the third paragraph under the 
ISU President's Report, the spelling of Tim Houghton's name be corrected. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the minutes as corrected. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unanimously. 

Chairman Murray reported that in Executive Session the Board discussed some 
matters of litigation, including the problems students are having with the 
Veterans Administration. The Board also discussed some tenure matters 
and some other personnel matters at Northern. 

Mr. Murray said unless there were some objection, the Board would depart 
from the regular agenda and consider the reports from the Universities and 
those items in the Executive Director's Report which require action, inasmuch 
as it was quite possible that Dr. Wellbank might have to leave the meeting 
early . 

RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Sangamon State University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board, President Lacy noted that at the 
last meeting the Board approved some purchasing contracts to permit the 
university to enhance the capabilities of the small observatory on campus. 
He said the astronomy program, which is a very low cost but high profile 
program, has been a very successful one for the university. He had distri- 
buted to members of the Board two publications from Professor Charles 
Schweighhauser which illustrate something of the nature of what is happening 
in the program. Mr. Parker noted that he has had the pleasure of attending 
Charlie Schweighhauser's classes for a number of years and is quite excited 
about his publications. He said he wished that Mr. Schweighhauser were 
present to accept the congratulations of the Board. 

Dr. Lacy said he would also like to bring to the attention of the Board the 
fact that the SSU medical technology student bowl team won the State cham- 
pionship competition a couple of weeks ago. The institution is especially proud 
of the members of the team, he said, who went on to the regional championship 
in Kansas City where they lost on a tie-breaker question 105-100. 

An information report was presented on Grants and Contracts. 

The following items were then submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative and civil service 

employees, including recommendations for promotion and tenure. 
A list of all reported transactions is appended to the President's 
Report and will be kept on file at the University and in the Central 
Office. 



201 



2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 

Report . 

Commenting- on his Report, President Lacy took note of the grant from the 
Joyce Foundation to Illinois Issues magazine to support the development of 
special attention to the question of the State's economic future. There are 
a number of programs at Sangamon State attempting to give the topic special 
attention, and they are pleased to have the support of the Joyce Foundation 
for the work Illinois Issues will devote to it. 

President Lacy said he believes the list of candidates being recommended 
for promotion is an exceptional group of people and he is proud to make these 
recommendations. Again, he said, the list of faculty members being recommended 
for tenure is an exceptional list, and he hopes that at some point in the future 
the Board will have an opportunity to meet these candidates personally. 

Referring to the request to purchase a refurbished HP3000 Series III Computer, 
Dr. Lacy noted that this purchase will permit the university to continue to 
enhance the Hewlett-Packard system on campus which has had to be developed 
in a piece- meal fashion with small expenditures each year because the institu- 
tion has been unable to come up with the amounts of money necessary to buy 
a large amount of computer equipment in any one year. This purchase will 
keep them relatively up to date for the future. 

Mr. Gayles moved that the recommendations for tenure be separated from the 
President's Report for consideration by the Board. Mr. Murray asked if Mr. 
Gayles wished to do this for all three institutions. Mr. Gayles said he was 
requesting this separation only for Sangamon State University. 

The motion was seconded by Mr. Parker, and it carried with Mr. McClure 
voting Nay. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon 
State University, with the exception of the recommendations for tenure. The 
motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Murray asked if someone wished to move for approval of the recommenda- 
tions for tenure contained in the SSU President's Report. 

Dr. Wellbank asked why the question had been separated, and the Chairman 
said he would surmise that someone wished to vote against the tenure recom- 
mendations. 

Mr. Parker then moved for approval of the tenure recommendations contained 
in the President's Report. The motion was seconded by Mr. Riss. 

Explaining his motion to separate the question, Mr. Gayles said he thinks there 
was enough deliberation in the Executive Session to warrant some doubt in the 
passing of this particular section of the President's Report. He would prefer 
that the Board wait until later - hopefully at the next meeting - until it can 
have a little bit more insight into what has taken place. 

Mr. Parker inquired if it was Mr. Gayles' intent to delay consideration of 
all of the tenure candidates. 



202 



Mr. Gayles said he did not wish to mention any names in this regard, but to 
just suggest that the overall issue as a whole be looked at at the next meeting 
of the Board. 

Mr. Murray said he might add that the Board received communcations from 
the Tenure Decision Committee at Sangamon State, and discussed at some 
length the considerations, the tenure decisions and the short and long-term 
needs of the university in accordance with our Board Regulations, and how 
the Regulations should be interpreted and implemented in tenure decisions. 
Mr. Murray said the Board is directing its Staff to meet with Sangamon State 
and the parties who make these decisions to implement the Board Regulations 
in some manner that is fair both to the applicants for tenure and the Tenure 
Decision Committee, as well as the administration. The Chairman asked the 
Executive Director if he wished to add anything to this. 

Dr. Matsler said, no, only that he would hope the Board would follow the 
recommendations of the President in recommending tenure all the way through. 
However, he said, he feels that there is some work that needs to be done on 
clarifying procedures, and Staff is certainly willing to work with President 
Lacy and the university in trying to tidy up things as best they can. He 
said he appreciates the problems that the university has relative to procedures 
in this whole area of tenure decision -making. 

President Lacy said the university welcomes the participation of the Staff of 
the Board in this particular matter. The tenure process is a complex and 
sensitive one, it is a young one, and it still has a lot of development maturity 
in front of it. The university welcomes the consultation opportunity with 
Staff. 

Mr. Murray said he is sure he expresses the sentiments of the entire Board 
in saying that the members welcome the communications from the Tenure 
Decision Committee. While they have taken the position, and correctly he 
thinks, that they do not intend to intervene into the substantive determinations 
of tenure, they are very interested in making sure that the due process aspects 
of tenure decisions are made very clearly and as equitably as possible. Unfor- 
tunately, he said, some of the lines between substantive and procedural due 
process become overlapping. The Board does feel that the process does 
need clarification at Sangamon State, and that it is very important that the 
university Tenure Decision Committee consider the long-range needs of the 
university. But this has to be done in a manner that is in conformity with 
procedural due process. 

The question before the Board for approval of the tenure recommendations 
for Sangamon State University was called, and the motion carried, with Mr. 
Parker voting Nay, and Student Regents Gayles, Orchowski and Toman register- 
ing Nay votes. 

Northern Illinois University - Presidents Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board, President Monat updated the 
Board on the matter of the student referendum conducted on campus with 
respect to funding of the Northern Star from activity fees. The referendum, 
he reported, was approved by roughly a two to one margin. The referendum 
would allocate 8.3$ per credit hour of student activity fees for the Northern 



203 



Star. The President's Fee Study Committee, which reviews all fee increase 
proposals or alterations in fees, reached its conclusion and recommended 7-2 
against accepting' the results of the student referendum. President Monat 
said that leaves them right now in a state where they are continuing discus- 
sions involving the Student Association, the Northern Star and the Publications 
Board to see if there cannot be some accommodation reached to provide some 
guaranteed continuity of funding for the Northern Star on a basis that is 
acceptable to all parties. These discussions have just started, and he would 
hope that at the June meeting he would be able to come forth with some kind 
of a recommendation. This would not involve any increase in student fees, 
but rather address the real problem of how to provide some continuity in funding 
for the paper so that it, in turn, can plan its operation from year to year. 
The funding pattern over the past ten years has been very erratic , the 
President said, ranging from zero funding this year to over $60,000 five, 
six or seven years ago. This is a vexing problem for everyone involved, 
Dr. Monat said, and they are really going to try their best to get some 
handle on this and hopefully be able to bring something to the Board in June. 

President Monat distributed copies of an Addendum to his Report (appointment 
of Stanley S. Madeja as Professor of Art and Dean of the College of Visual 
and Performing Arts). 

Dr. Monat said that on page 14 of his Report, Item 3, he was withdrawing 
the recommendation for award of contract for General work on the Holmes 
Student Center - Replacement of Air Conditioning System and Correction of 
Ventilating Deficiencies - to Flagg Construction Company. He explained that 
there were some problems and some reservations in the general contract of 
Flagg Construction Company, and that on the basis of their reservation he 
could not recommend the contract to the Board. The general construction 
portion will be rebid , he said, and he asked that the appropriate changes be 
made in the total amounts of contracts being awarded at this time. 

Information reports were presented on: 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Summer 1983 
Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall 1983 
Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 
Gifts to Northern Illinois University 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees, including 
recommendations for promotion and tenure. A list of all reported 
transactions is appended to the President's Report and will be kept 
on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

2. Approval was requested to increase the fee for the University Health 
Service by 50<t per credit hour to an upper limit of 12 semester hours, 
or $6.00 per semester. With approval of the increase, the Health 
Service portion of the consolidated student fee would be $2.40 per 
semester hour. 

Approval was also requested to restore to the Stadium and Field 
House $1.08 per credit hour of . the total Bond Revenue Fee. This 
$1.08 had in recent years been transferred to the support of the 



204 



Holmes Student Center which faced substantial cash deficits. This 
action will not change the Bond Revenue portion of the consolidated 
fee. 

A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report . 

Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Re- Caulking of Grant and Stevenson Towers 

Permission was requested to develop plans and specifications, 
advertise and receive bids for re-caulking- of A and B Towers 
of Grant and B and C Towers of Stevenson . There will be no 
fees for development of plans and specifications charged to the 
project. The total estimated budget is $500,000. 

(b) Anderson Hall - Gymnasium Roof Repair 

A tabulation of bids received was presented. It was explained 
that because of anticipated funding limitations, the University 
elected to bid the project in three parts : a base bid for the 
south one-third of the roof, an additive alternate No. 1 to 
include the middle-one-third of the roof, and an additive altern- 
ative No. 2 to include the north one-third of the roof. 

It was recommend that the Board accept the low qualified bids 
for the total project , and that the Board approve the award of 
contracts to the low bidders with the provision that the base 
bid and additive alternate No. 1 only be funded from FY 83 funds, 
with the remainder of the project funded from FY 84 funds, subject 
to the availability of funds in FY84. 

Roof Replacement 



r 






Freeport Industrial Roofing, Freeport 

Base Bid $ 53,900 

Add. Alt. No. 1 53,900 

Add. Alt. No. 2 53,900 

Total Bid $161,700 

Plumbing 

G's R Plumbing, DeKalb 

Base Bid $ 2,121 

Add. Alt. No. 1 1,991 

Add. Alt. No. 2 1,991 

Total Bid $ 6,103 

It was further recommended that the total budget for the project 
be established as follows : 

FY83 Funds 

Roof Replacement $107,800 

Plumbing 4,112 

Contingency 5, 588 

Total FY83 Funds $117,500 



. 



205 



FY84 Funds 

Roof Replacement $53,900 

Plumbing 1,991 

Contingency 2,809 

Total FY84 Funds $58,700 

(c) Holmes Stu dent Center - Remodeling' and Renovation of 
South Terrace 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Takoa Nagai Associates, Ltd., Glen Ellyn in the amount of 
$51,250.00. 

(d) Stevenson Towers - Renovation of Elevators 
Holmes Student Center - Renovation of Elevators 

Bids received for the projects were presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bids be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Mid -American Elevator Company, Inc., Chicago, as follows: 
for Stevenson Towers, $60,565.00; and for Holmes Student Center 
$23,495.00. 

(e) Holmes Student Center - Replacement of Air Conditioning 
System and Correction of Ventilating Deficien cies . 
Correction of Minor Ventilating Deficiences in Various 
Reven ue Bond Buildings. 

A tabulation of bids received was presented , with a recommenda- 
that the following low bids be accepted and contracts awarded: 

General 

(recommendation for award of contract withdrawn- to be rebid) 

Electrical 

Virgil Cook & Son, Inc., DeKalb $10,989 

Heating 

Kallal's Sheet Metal, Inc., DeKalb $22,440 

Ventilating 

Kallal's Sheet Metal, Inc., DeKalb $31,854 

and that the project budget be established as follows: 

Total Construction $65,283 

Eng. Fees 7,700 

Contingency 3,167 

Total Budget $79,300 

(f) Resurfacing of Parking Lot "L" and Williston Hall Service Drive 
University Streets - Repair and Resurfacing 

Recycling Center - Grading and S urfacin g 
A tabulation of bids received was presented. The base bid 
included resurfacing of Parking Lot "L" , resurfacing Williston 
Hall Service Drive and repair and resurfacing of Castle Drive 
and College Avenue. Additive Alternate No. 1 was for repair 
and resurfacing of Gilbert Drive; and Additive Alternate No. 2 
was for grading and surfacing of Recycling Center. It was 



206 



recommended that the low bids be accepted and a contract 
awarded to Stahl Construction Company, DeKalb, in the amount 
of $184,900.00. 

(g) Huskie Stadium - Construct Steel Catwalk 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
E. B. Inc., DeKalb, in the amount of $11,485.00. 

President Monat reported that the university has been involved for the last 
six months or so in a national search to fill the position of Dean of the College 
of Visual and Performing Arts. Dean Buggert, the first and only Dean of 
the College, will retire in August after 9 years in the position. He was 
Dean for three years of the predecessor college, the College of Fine and Applied 
Arts. The College has received national prominence in recent years, the 
President said, and as a consequence, this position was viewed nationally in 
the visual and performing arts field as the administrative position that attracted 
the most impressive candidates. The Search Committee recommended the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Madeja who currently is a distinguished professor of art in the 
School of Art at Arizona State University. The President said everyone is 
looking forward to Dr. Madeja's joining the university this summer and to 
great things from his leadership in carrying on the traditions that Dean Buggert 
has exemplified in his 13 years as a senior dean of the university. 

President Monat said he believes his recommendations for promotion and tenure 
are all for people who are extraordinary able and promising members of the 
faculty. Northern has a very rigorous tenure process, he noted, and those 
recommended today would not be in his Report if they had not measured up 
to the highest standards of excellence and performance. 

Mr. Riss moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern 
Illinois University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Mr. Gayles, 
and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Gayles introduced to the Board Mr. Ed Gallagher who will be the Presi- 
dent of the Student Association at NIU in the upcoming academic year. The 
Chairman welcomed Mr. Gallagher, stating that the Board will look forward to 
working with him. 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

President Watkins distributed copies of two Addenda to his Report: (Faculty 
and Administrative Staff - correct salary for Dr. Warren R. Harden), and 
Non-Recurring Items (Bone Student Center Food Service Lease). 

Information reports were presented on: 

Capital Improvement Projects 
Grants and Contracts 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for 

civil service employees. Included were recommendations for promotion 
and tenure. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the 
President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and in 
the Central Office 



207 



2. A list of purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report . 

3. Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Alter ations & Additions to Bone Student Center Dock Area 
Permission was requested to engage the firm of Mills-Lux Asso- 
ciates, Architects, of Bloomington, Illinois to prepare bid documents 
and receive bids for alterations and additions to provide dock 
space, receive new waste compactor, and drive access for large 
waste disposal dumpster vehicles. Estimated cost of the project 

is $70,000, payable from Bond Revenue Series 1970- 70A Rehabili- 
tation and Development Reserve. 

(b) Bowling and Billiards Building Remodeling 

Permission was requested to engage Mills-Lux Associates, Architects, 
Bloomington, Illinois, to design, prepare bid documents, and receive 
bids for remodeling of the bowling area to reduce lanes from 16 to 
10 and provide area for billiards. Estimated cost of the project is 
$80,000, payable from Bond Revenue Series 1970- 70A Rehabilitation 
and Development Reserve. 

(c) Residence Hall Remodeling, Auxiliary Water Heaters - Phase II 
Permission was requested to design and receive bids for the 
installation of 17 auxiliary hot water heaters to be installed in 
Fell, Walker, Wright, Haynie, Wilkins, Manchester, Hewett and 
Watterson Towers. Estimated cost of the project is $70,000, 
payable from Bond Revenue Repair and Maintenance Series 1967. 

(d) Residence Hall Energy Conservation Work 

Permission was requested to prepare contract documents and to 
receive bids to install necessary wiring and sensors to enable 
mechanical equipment in the South Residence and Watterson Towers 
complexes to be supervised and at times shut down in the interest 
of energy conservation. Cost of the project is estimated at $90,000, 
payable from Bond Revenue Operations and Maintenance. 

(e) Horton Fieldhouse and Hancock Stadium Electrical Renovation Work 
Permission was requested to engage Brown, Davis, Mullins & 
Associates, Consulting Engineers, Champaign, Illinois, to prepare 
bid documents and receive bids for the renovation of the electri- 
cal systems in Horton Fieldhouse and Hancock Stadium. Estimated 
cost of the project is $350,000, payable from Bond Revenue Series 
1961 Rehabilitation and Development Reserve. 

4. Non-Recurring Items 

(a) IBM 5520 Administrative System for Bone Student Center 

Permission was requested to purchase an IBM 5520 Administrative 
System for the Bone Student Center for the purpose of scheduling 
facilities and employees, maintaining budget and expenditure 
records and the capability of communicating with other IBM 
computer equipment and the host computer in Computer Services 
Probable cost is $53,644.55, payable from Bond Revenue Operation 
and Maintenance . 



208 



(b) IBM Word and Data Processing System 

Permission was requested to purchase for the Office of Resi- 
dential Life IBM word and data processing systems which can 
communicate with other IBM computer equipment and the host 
computer in Computer Services. Probable cost is $116,258.05, 
payable from Bond Revenue Operation and Maintenance. 

(c) Renewal of Union Agreement 

Approval was requested of an Agreement by and between 
Illinois State University and Lodge 67 of the Fraternal Order 
of Police for the period April 4, 1983 through June 30, 1983, 
on behalf of 15 Police Officers in the Office of Public Safety. 

President Watkins took special note of the appointment of Dr. David Strand 
to the position of Interim Vice President and Provost effective June 1, 1983; 
the appointment of Dr. Warren Harden as Interim Vice President for Business 
and Finance: and to the recommended appointment of Dr. Elizabeth Chapman 
as the new Dean of the College of Applied Science and Technology, effective 
July 1, 1983. Dr. Chapman is currently Assistant Provost at Western Illinois 
University. She received her baccalaureate degree from Michigan State, the 
masters degree from the University of Maryland, and a doctorate from the 
University of Southern California. 

Dr. Watkins also noted the retirement of Dr. Eleanor Dilks, Dr. Edward Jelks 
and Dr. Robert McAdam. All three have served ISU with extreme dedication 
and competence and they will certainly be missed, although the university 
will be fortunate enough, at least in a couple of the cases, to have the indi- 
viduals available from a consulting point of view. 

Referring to the recommendations for promotion and tenure. President Watkins 
said he would echo the same type of favorable comments as made by his col- 
leagues. One of the pleasures of having been on board about six years as 
President, he said, is that he knows almost every one of the individuals 
personally. They are a very strong group, and there is not a single indi- 
vidual that he has the least reservation about . 

Mr. Gayles moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois 
State University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Toman, and 
it carried unanimously. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 140 

Before presenting the action items in his Executive Director's Report, Dr. 
Matsler submitted for approval by the Board an Agreement for Professional 
Service between the Board of Regents and the firm of Giffin, Winning, Lindner, 
Newkirk, Cohen & Bodewes, P.C., of Springfield to provide legal services 
for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1983. He noted that the only change 
from the present Agreement is that services provided will be compensated at 
the rate of $60.00 per hour. 

Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the Agreement as recommended by the 
Executive Director. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it 
carried unanimously. 



209 



Section I - A proposal for an Evaluation of the Quality of Education in 
the Regency System 

Dr. Matsler said the questions posed on pages 5 and 6 of this Section are 
questions which the Staff would hope that the Board would consider as 
important matters to be studied over the next few months: 

1. Are the university admission standards adequate in assuring 
sufficient mastery of basic skills for success in college, 
particularly in the areas of science, mathematics and computer 
science? 

2. Are our general education requirements appropriate, given the 
technological trends of the present? 

3. Should we seek to foster "computer literacy" in all undergraduate 
students? What should be the definition of "computer literacy"? 

4. Is there too little emphasis on writing in our college curruclua? 

5. Should students be expected to go further in acquiring compe- 
tency in one or more foreigh languages? 

6. To what extent should higher education be involved in remedial 
forms of education to rectify the deficiencies in the preparation 
of new students or transfer students? 

7. How successful are our special assistance programs in recruiting 
and retaining disadvantaged students? 

8. What is the cause of the nationwide declines in test scores in 
entering freshmen and can higher education make a contribution 
to offsetting this? 

9. Should we introduce exit requirements in order to assure the 
basic competencies in our graduates? 

10. What incentives do we offer for high quality student performance? 
Do we provide sufficient recognition and rewards to encourage 
scholarship? 

11. What role does accreditation have in protecting appropriate 
standards of quality? Do we place too much or too little empha- 
sis on this? 

12. How do our graduates rank with major national and regional 
employers? Do our students fare well in a comparative sense on 
the job market? 

13. What role should the Regency institutions have in upgrading the 
skills of existing teachers? Are our teacher training curricula 
sufficiently demanding and relevant? 



210 



14. Should we upgrade admission and continuation requirements in 
our teaching 1 training programs? 

15. Can we do more to meet the growing need for teachers in areas 
of scarcity including mathematics and science? 

16. How do we attract and reward good faculty, particularly in areas 
of high demand? Can we do more to assist the universities in 
these efforts? 

Dr. Matsler said Staff is recommending that the matter be referred to the 
Program Committee and that the Program Committee report back to the Board 
at an early date as to the manner in which it feels the problem should be 
best dealt with. 

He said the Committee can decide how it wishes to operate, but he would 
hope that it could meet on campus at the appropriate times to assess the 
questions and to ask for input from the administrations, faculty and staffs 
of the institutions. 

Mr. Parker said he would take the matter up with the Program Committee 
and discuss the various forms they might take. 

Mr. Parker moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion 
was seconded by Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Gayles said he would request that the constituency group be enlarged 
to also include some student participation. This will be done, Mr. Murray 
said. 

As we proceed, Mr. McClure said, he believes that we should emphasize 
that we are simply trying to make something good even better, that we do 
have a good system and are just seeking to make it even better. Dr. Matsler 
agreed that this was a good point. Mr. Parker said he would take it more 
as a matter of improving the knowledge of perhaps the Board, rather than 
as any criticism of the System or the schools. 

Section V - Grants and Contracts 

Dr. Matsler said Northern Illinois University is seeking approval of a grant 
from the Illinois Department of Rehabilitation Services which will allow it to 
provide services (which are either pre- vocational or college prep) to the 
deaf and hard-of-hearing. Essentially, the agreement provides for IDORS 
to purchase services from NIU. 

Staff recommends approval by the Board, he said. 

Mr. Riss moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VI - New Program 

Illinois State University, Dr. Matsler said, is seeking approval to establish 
a Minor in Gerontology. Staff recommends that the Board approve the pro- 



211 



posed Minor for a four-year period and indicate its intention to review the 
program for regular approval in 1987. The program, if approved, will be 
initiated in Fall 1983. 

Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Gayles, and it carried unanimously. 

Dr. Wellbank was excused from the meeting. 

The Board returned to the Agenda as published. 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Board of Higher Education Meeting 

Of particular interest to the Board of Regents, Dr. Matsler said, at the 
last meeting of the Board of Higher Education approval was given to the 
establishment of two off-campus programs for Northern Illinois University: 
a Bachelor of General Studies at William Rainey Harper Community College 
District, and a Bachelor of General Studies in DuPage Community College 
District. This was rather controversial, he said, to the extent that some 
thought this was an infringement on the part of Northern with respect to 
courses offered by some private institutions. Dr. Monat did a fine job of 
defending this position to the Board of Higher Education, Dr. Matsler reported, 
and the programs were approved unanimously. 

Facilities Committee 

Mr. Riss reported that he had been asked to chair the Committee meeting 
in the absence of Ms. Burns this morning. At this time, he said, President 
Lacy gave the committee an update on the progress of the proposed research 
park at Sangamon State University. The President indicated that if the pro- 
ject proceeds as anticipated a new facility, constructed on the west end of 
the campus, will be necessary to house potential tenants. 

The committee, Mr. Riss continued, also recommended approval of the remodel- 
ing and rehabilitation projects requested in ISU and NIU Presidents' Reports. 

Finance Committee 

Mr. Riss reported that in the absence of Mrs. Fitzpatrick this morning, he 
had also chaired the meeting of the Finance Committee. The committee received 
a report from the Central Staff concerning student fees and authorized the 
Staff to coordinate a study of student fee assessment and allocation at each 
institution in the Regency System . A preliminary report is to be made to 
the Committee in December 1983. 

Mr. Riss reported that the Finance Committee also recommended approval 
of the fee increases being requested in the NIU President's Report. 

Joint University Advisory Committee 

Dr. Gruendel expressed the appreciation of the Committee to the Board for 
the highly productive seminar following the April meeting of the Board. The 



212 



Committee is looking forward to another seminar next year. JUAC this morning, 
he said, received an extensive report from Dr. Brim who brought everyone 
uptodate on the health insurance dilemma and the sought change in Social 
Security which may have an effect on some faculty and staff. With regard 
to the continuing saga of retirement system funding and the continuing efforts 
of Mr. Bender to bring this to the attention of the General Assembly, JUAC 
wishes to acknowledge his efforts toward the legislative resolution to restore 
these funds to the system. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 140 (continued) 

Section II - Board Committee Meetings. 1983-84 

Dr. Matsler said this Section of his Report simply lays out the schedule of 
Board committee meetings for the period May 1983 through December 1984 
as well as some of the agenda items for the meetings. Dr. Matsler said he 
would like at this time to suggest that two additional meetings be scheduled 
for the Facilities Committee, one in October and another in April. 

Mr. Murray suggested that this might be the appropriate time to discuss the 
format of Board meetings to see if everyone likes the procedure whereby 
committee meetings are scheduled in the morning before Board meetings. 

Mr. Gayles said he thinks it is a good idea, but he wonders if the Regents 
who are not here today found it to be an inconvenience. Dr. Matsler said 
he did not believe so - Mr. Bender is in Mexico and Mr. Wright is in Texas. 
Mr. McClure said he is a little concerned that it does not give the committees 
enough time, but this can be varied to see how it works. Mr. Murray said 
he feels that today we perhaps tried to cram in too many committees and 
they all fell behind schedule. Also there was a long excecutive session, which 
makes the public meeting a hurried one. However, he said he does not know 
the answer. What is the pleasure of the Board, he asked, shall we continue 
the format for at least the next meeting? Mr. Parker said he feels this would 
be fine, even though we did run a bit over in some committees. Maybe we 
could allow an hour and a half for the committee meetings rather than just an 
hour. Ms. Toman said she thinks the big question is whether or not we will 
lose time on the public meeting, and noted that the Board was now without 
a quorum. This is true, Mr. Gayles said, and right now the Board would be 
unable to take any action. 

After a further discussion, the consensus was that the format would be con- 
tinued for at least one more month, with committees meeting in the morning 
prior to the public meeting. 

Section III - Legislative Report 

Dr. Matsler reported that the Regency appropriation bill is on second reading. 
He said he understands that the Governor will be making public his recommenda- 
tions as to what he will do with the tax increase monies if they become available. 
Right now our bill is on the floor of the Senate at the BHE level, but of course 
we expect the bill to be amended downward. 

There are many collective bargaining bills pending at the moment, Dr. Matsler 
said, but there are two that are probably the most important ones. They 



213 



seem to be moving- right along with much support in both houses. With 
regard to H.B. 700 which would give Northern Illinois University its own 
governing board, that bill passed out of the House last evening and will 
now go to the Senate. 

Section IV - Rank and Tenure 

Dr. Matsler said as a result of joint efforts between the Central Staff and 
the universities, this report on rank and tenure has been revised in order 
to make its preparation less time consuming for the universities. The univer- 
sity reports provide historical data about rank and tenure as well as projections 
for the period 1983-88, and a Staff analysis of these reports is provided. 
It appears, he said, that we are in pretty good shape as far as the propor- 
tion of faculty that are in a particular rank or the proportion of faculty who 
have tenure is concerned. Dr. Matsler said there are probably some problems 
which might be appearing in the future, but right now he feels that he can 
assure the Board that the institutions are doing very well, and are much 
better off than many institutions with respect to having flexibility in the case 
of declining dollar support. 

Section VII - Amendment of Board Regulations 

At present, Dr. Matsler said, our Board Regulations determine how vacation 
benefits shall be conferred based upon the length of employment contract 
with only 12-month contract employees being allowed to accrue vacation bene- 
fits. He presented for first reading a proposed amendment to Board Regulations 
which would allow the universities to determine which of two approaches should 
be employed in calculating vacation benefits based upon whether or not the 
employee's work conforms to the academic calendar. 

Section VIII - April 1983 Salary Increases 

Dr. Matsler said this information is included in the Executive Director's Report 
because the Staff was able to take it off the tapes from the institutions and 
promulgate the information so that the public understands what the faculty 
salaries are . 

President Monat said he would add one footnote because Mr. McClure raised 
a question because he did not see any law faculty included in the listing. 
They are included, he said, although they are listed as faculty rather than 
law faculty. Mr. Parker said he was confused because everything came out 
as DA., as the highest degree earned. Dr. Matsler asked Dr. Brim if he 
could explain this to the Board . 

In the data received from Northern, Dr. Brim said, they coded all of the 
doctoral degrees as D.A.'s. Rather than go back and make the necessary 
corrections, he said, he had simply inserted a notation on page 35. Northern 
has promised that they will repatch that, Dr. Brim said. 

Mr. Murray said he understands that the NIU Law School did very well on 
their bar admissions passage at the last exam. Yes, Dr. Monat said, 98% 
of the last class passed their bar exam. Mr. Murray said he thinks this is 
an amazing statistic from what it was when NIU took over the school. 



214 



Mr. Winning reported that we have finally been certified with respect to 
our new purchasing rules by the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules. 
They are expected to be published two weeks from tomorrow in the Register , 
he said , and he suggested that the Board establish an effective date of June 1 
for the use of the new rules. 

Mr. Winning also reported that we did get a significant victory at Northern 
Illinois University in the reverse discrimination case earlier this month. 

OTHER MATTERS 

When the Board met last winter in Chicago, Mr. Gayles said, a report was 
given on the athletic programs at our institutions . At that point in time 
there was some questioning of if in fact that report was what had been asked 
for by Mr. Henriksen, last year's Regent from ISU. Mr. Gayles said at that 
time he had asked if the Board could receive a report that dealt more with 
the aesthetics of the athletes themselves, looking at the programs in terms 
of how they are treating the individual athlete and if those athletes are gradu- 
ating. He said he had been led to believe that a report would follow soon, 
and he asked what is the status of that report and when the Board might 
expect to see something of that order. 

Frankly, Dr. Matsler said, he had not taken that as a directive of the Board, 
and he is not quite sure he understands even now exactly what should be 
done. Some things will unfold, he noted, as we look into the fee structure. 
But if Mr. Gayles would put together a proposal of what it is that he wants, 
Staff would be willing to go ahead with it if the Board should wish this. 

Mr. Murray said he gathers that Mr. Gayles is asking for a report relative 
to the graduation of student athletes. Mr. Gayles said the impression he 
received last time was that the figures given in the report were the black 
and white figures of how many athletes graduated per year from our individual 
sports programs. It did not take into account how many years, or if these 
were the same athletes that came into the program originally. That is what 
he wanted to get into, to see if those were the same athletes over a period 
of years that are graduating. If not, we could attack it from another angle 
to see why these athletes were not graduating. 

Mr. Murray said he shares the desire for this and would like to see some 
figures or a breakdown between scholarship and non - scholarship , but particu- 
larly the scholarship athletes - how many graduate, how many drop out during 
the course of the program. He suggested that Mr. Gayles put together an 
outline of what he wants and share it with him. 

Ms. Toman said she would like to commend those members of the Board that 
took' part in the commencement activities. She said they were really encour- 
aged to see the particioation at the respective universities and would like 
to thank everyone for the show of support. Mr. McClure said he would second 
Ms. Toman's comments. He had only been able to attend two of the three, but 
could say that the exercises at ISU and SSU were extremely well coordinated. 
They were most impressive for the students and parents and the staff involved 
should be congratulated through the Presidents. 

Mr. McClure said he would like to follow up on an inquiry made by Regent 
Burns to the Central Staff on enrollments projected for the future. He said 



215 



he notes the ISU and NIU figures here, and while -he did not wish to start 
a lengthy discussion at this time, he thought it would be interesting to have 
such projections in order to compare them so that we are not too overly opti- 
mistic about student enrollments in the future. 

Mr. Murray inquired if Mr. McClure is saying that he is happy with the pro- 
jections, or that he would like to see SSU's also. Mr. McClure said he is 
simply saying that had we had projections available, we would have had some- 
thing with which to compare these. We received optimistic opinions, he said, 
and he is not sure they are warranted . 

The projections are included in the staffing reports, Dr. Matsler noted, 
Table I, page 20. Mr. McClure said what he is most concerned about is the 
fact that no one wants to believe their enrollments might go down. He thinks 
they may and believes that the Board should be aware of that. The figures 
to date as supplied do not show an overly optimistic picture on maintaining 
status quo. We should watch this as a Board. 

President Lacy noted that one unanticipated matter currently in the model 
for all three institutions is the prospect of a dramatic tuition increase, and 
should that happen we will all have to go back to the drawing board. 

Ms. Orchowski said she would like to extend congratulations to Janine Toman 
who was recently reelected as a student Regent from Sangamon State, and 
wish her the best of luck next year. 

Mr. Murray said all three members have been excellent additions to the Board 
this year, and certainly if a case could ever be made for voting student 
trustees, our three student Regents would certainly lead the field. They 
have been very responsible . 

There being no further business before the Board, on motion by Mr. Gayles, 
seconded by Ms. Orchowski, the meeting was declared adjourned. The next 
regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents will be held in Springfield 
Illinois, on June 23, 1983. 



David E . Murray 
Chairman 



Franklin G. Matsler 
Secretary 



216 



Minutes of the Meeting of the 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Sangamon State University, Springfield, Illinois 

June 23, 1983 



The regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 
11:00 a.m. on Thursday, June 23, 1983, in Conference Room G of the 
Public Affairs Center at Sangamon State University, Springfield, Illinois. 
Mr. David E. Murray, Chairman, presided. 

The meeting was called to order, roll was called, and the following Regents 
were present : 



r. Jerome R. Bender 
s. Carol K. Burns 

Clara S. Fitzpatrick 
Montel Gayles 
L. Milton McClure 



Mrs 
Mr. 
Mr. 



Ms. Denise Orchowski 
Mr. D. Brewster Parker 
Mr. Harold Riss 
Ms. Janine Toman 
Dr. Harry L. Wellbank 



lr. David E. Murray, Chairman 



Mr. James L. Wright was not present for the meeting. 

Also present were: 

Dr. Alex B. Lacy, President, Sangamon State University 

Dr. William R. Monat , President, Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Lloyd I. Watkins, President, Illinois State University 

Dr. Franklin G. Matsler, Executive Director, Board of Regents 

Present from the Joint University Advisory Committee were: (ISU) Virginia 
Crafts, Thomas Eimermann , Peggy Gerkin, Robert Ritt and Leon Toepke; 
(NIU) Joe Koch, James E. Lankford and Jerry Meyer; (SSU) Pam Hammond - 
McDavid, Cindy Stephenson and Jack Van Der Slik. 

Others in attendance included staff members from the Regency Universities 
and the Central Office of the Board; Mr. James M. Winning, Legal Counsel 
to the Board; and representatives of the student bodies and the news media. 

Dr. Wellbank moved that the Board recess to convene in Executive Session 
for the purpose of discussing litigation and personnel matters. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Parker, and it carried unanimously. 

The Board reconvened in public session at 3:00 p.m. 

The Chairman apologized for any inconvenience which may have been caused 
by the length of the Executive Session. He reported that the Board had 
discussed some litigation matters and personnel matters, as well as settlement 
proposals in several complicated matters . The Board also reviewed the goals 
statements of Dr. Matsler and President Lacy. 

Because the committees of the Board had met earlier this morning, he said, 
the Board would probably be able to proceed fairly rapidly through the 
balance of the meeting today. 



217 



MINUTES OF MAY 19, 1983 

The Chairman directed the attention of the Board to the minutes of the meet- 
ing held on May 19, 1983, and asked if there were any additions or corrections 
to be proposed. There being none, on motion by Mr. Parker, seconded by 
Ms. Orchowski, the minutes were approved unanimously as submitted. 

Chairman Murray advised that it would be necessary for Mr. Parker to leave 
the meeting early, and unless there was some objection, the Board would depart 
from the Agenda to hear the report of the Program Committee. 

Program Committee 

Mr. Parker reported that among the matters discussed with the Staff and 
university representatives were the new and expanded program requests and 
special analytical studies. Some of the more important matters included the 
recommended deletion of the Sociology and Anthropology program at Sangamon 
State, and the possibility of a new engineering school at Northern. These 
matters will be discussed in more detail in the Executive Director's Report, 
he noted. 

Mr. Parker commented that it was very disappointing that more members of 
the committee were not present for the meeting yesterday, because it is at 
this point that the committee system falls down. Mr. Murray agreed, stating 
that if the committee system is to function successfully , it must be with the 
participation of members of the committees. He would hope, he said, that 
poor attendance does not become a custom . 

CHAIRMAN'S ITEMS 

Mr. Murray said Dr. Matsler had been asked to prepare resolutions for those 
members of the Joint University Advisory Committee whose terms have expired, 
and for Student Regents Gayles and Orchowski whose terms expire on June 30. 

Dr. Matsler then presented the following Resolutions: 

WHEREAS, Montel Gayles was selected by his fellow students 
at Northern Illinois University to represent their interests and 
concerns to the Board of Regents for the term expiring June 30, 
1983; and 

WHEREAS, Mr. Gayles capably fulfilled the duties of the office 
of Student Regent of the Board and contributed to the delibera- 
tions of the Regents with an especial insight; now, therefore, be 
it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express to Montel Gayles 
its sincere appreciation for his service as a Student Regent and 
its wish for success in future endeavors. 



WHEREAS, Denise Orchowski was selected by her fellow students 
at Illinois State University to represent their interests and con- 



218 



cerns to. the Board of Regents for the term expiring June 30, 
1983; and 

WHEREAS, Ms. Orchowski capably fulfilled the duties of the 
office of Student Regent of the Board and contributed to the 
deliberations of the Regents with an especial insight; now, 
therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express to Denise 
Orchowski its sincere appreciation for her service as a 
Student Regent and its wish for success in future endeavors. 



Mr. McClure moved for adoption of the foregoing Resolutions. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Riss, and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Murray said he had spoken to Mr. Gayles and Ms. Orchowski individu- 
ally, but would say in public now that both had added real stature to the 
Student Regent positions. They have represented not only the other stu- 
dents but the universities and the taxpayers as well. Their participation 
next year will truly be missed. 

Dr. Matsler presented the following Resolutions: 

WHEREAS, George Tuttle has served as a member of the 
Joint University Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents, 
representing the various constituencies at Illinois State Uni- 
versity; and 

WHEREAS, his service on the Committee was rendered with 
dedication and a sincere effort toward continued excellence 
in the Regency Universities; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express its apprecia- 
tion and commend George Tuttle for service to the higher 
education community and particularly to the Regency Univer- 
sities System. 

WHEREAS, Linda Andrejek has served as a member of the 
Joint University Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents, 
representing the various constituencies at Illinois State Uni- 
versity; and 

WHEREAS, her service on the Committee was rendered with 
dedication and a sincere effort toward continued excellence 
in the Regency Universities; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express its apprecia- 
tion and commend Linda Andrejek for service to the higher 
education community and particularly to the Regency Univer- 
sities System. 



219 



WHEREAS, Annette Lefkowitz has served as a member of the 
Joint University Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents, 
representing the various constituencies at Northern Illinois 
University; and 

WHEREAS, her service on the Committee was rendered with 
dedication and a sincere effort toward continued excellence 
in the Regency Universities; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express its apprecia- 
tion and commend Annette Lefkowitz for service to the higher 
education community and particularly to the Regency Univer- 
sities System. 



WHEREAS , Irene Allsop served as a member of the Joint 
University Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents, 
representing the various constituencies at Sangamon State 
University ; and 

WHEREAS, her service on the Committee was rendered with 
dedication and a sincere effort toward continued excellence 
in the Regency Universities; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express its apprecia- 
tion and commend Irene Allsop for service to the higher edu- 
cation community and particularly to the Regency Universities 
System. 



WHEREAS, Cindy Stephenson has served as a member of the 
Joint University Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents, 
representing the various constituencies at Sangamon State Uni- 
versity ; and 

WHEREAS , her service on the Committee was rendered with 
dedication and a sincere effort toward continued excellence in 
the Regency Universities; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express its appreciation 
and commend Cindy Stephenson for service to the higher edu- 
cation community and particularly to the Regency Universities 
System. 



WHEREAS, Sue Bussone has served as a member of the Joint 
University Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents, repre- 
senting the various constituencies at Sangamon State Univer- 
sity ; and 

WHEREAS, her service on the Committee was rendered with 



220 



dedication and a sincere effort toward continued excellence 
in the Regency Universities; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the Board of Regents express its apprecia- 
tion and commend Sue Bussone for service to the higher 
education community and particularly to the Regency Univer- 
sities System. 

Mr. Parker moved for adoption of the foregoing Resolutions. The motion 
was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unanimously. 

Mr. Murray extended the thanks of the Board to all of the members of 
the Committee for their service. 

REPORTS TO THE BOARD 

Joint University Advisor y Committee 

Dr. Crafts, Chair of the Committee, announced the election of the new 
officers for the upcoming year: Dr. George Gruendel from SSU will serve 
as Chair, Dr. Tony Scaperlanda from NIU as Vice- Chair, and Mr. Leon 
Toepke from ISU as Secretary. 

On behalf of the Committee Dr. Crafts thanked Dr. and Mrs. Matsler for 
the enjoyable supper which they hosted last night and their appreciation 
for the thoughtfulness in being included. Dr. Wellbank added the thanks 
of the Board and the Presidents. 

Dr. Crafts reported that Dr. Brim had met with the Committee this morning 
to update them on the current status of the health insurance area and the 
prospects for the appropriation bill and the proposed revenue increases. 
It is quite obvious, she said, that we do need to have some sort of revenue 
increase. It is essential if we are to have only a reasonable increase in 
tuition , maintain quality education and have the faculty and staff to maintain 
that quality, if we are to avoid further tapping and impairment of the retire- 
ment funding, and if we are to provide for some salary increase. The Com- 
mittee is very concerned, she said, about the level of tuition increases and 
the ramifications that a substantial increase would have on access to education 

Other matters discussed by the Committee, Dr. Crafts reported, included 
the information provided by Dr. Floyd with regard to retirement options, 
and the proposal for evaluation of the quality of education in the Regency 
System. 

She said she would like to express, on behalf of JUAC, appreciation to 
Chairman Murray and other members of the Board, Dr. Matsler and his Staff, 
and the Presidents and their staffs for support and assistance over the past 
year. Everyone has been helpful and cooperative and the Committee thanks 
them for the efforts. The Committee feels that everyone has been genuinely 
concerned about what the JUAC had to say , and while there may not have 
been agreement on every issue, there was agreement on the purpose - to 
try to promote quality education in Illinois and in particularly in our institu- 
tions. Dr. Crafts said she would be remiss if she did not extend special 



221 



thanks to President Watkins for his support in putting on the annual Board 
seminar, and to Dr. Groves, Dr. Floyd and Dr. Brim who have been con- 
sistently helpful to the Committee. 

As outgoing Chair of the Committee, Dr. Crafts said she has found the job 
stimulating and enjoyable and she appreciates the help and support of all. 

Mr. Murray said he thinks this has been a productive year with Dr. Crafts 
chairing the Committee. The Board appreciates her service as well as all 
of those members who are leaving the Committee. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

The Chairman noted that it was necessary at this meeting to elect officers of 
the Board , and he called for nominations to fill the position of Chairman , 
Vice Chairman, Secretary, Treasurer, and Assistant Secretary-Treasurer. 

Mr. Riss placed in nomination the name of Mr. Murray as Chairman, Ms. Burns 
as Vice Chairman, Dr. Matsler as Secretary, Dr. Brim as Treasurer, and 
Mr. Gorrell as Assistant Secretary-Treasurer. The nominations were seconded 
by Mrs. Fitzpatrick. Dr. Wellbank moved, seconded by Ms. Orchowski, that 
the nominations be closed and a unanimous ballot cast electing the nominees. 
The motion carried unanimously. 

Mr. Murray thanked the Board, adding that he is very pleased at the way 
members of the Board are accepting responsibilities in committee matters and 
in their areas of expertise . He is gratified at the shared governance which 
is developing among members of the Board, he said, and believes that the 
Board appears to be more solid in many different areas. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT NO. 141 

Legislative Report 

Dr. Matsler said he would report briefly on several bills pending in the 
legislature. 

S.B. 258, the Regency System appropriation bill sponsored by Senator John 
Davidson and managed by Rep. Gordon Ropp in the House, is now awaiting 
amendment in the House. We are not sure whether it will be raised back to 
the Senate level, or whether it will be amended to some other level arrived 
at as the result of what is now going on between the legislative leadership 
and the Governor relative to the tax plan. Dr. Matsler said we are hopeful 
that the bill will get back to the Senate level, but this is uncertain at this 
time. 

Dr. Matsler said while he was at this time making no recommendation for 
Board action on the level of tuition for 1983-84 because we do not know what 
the level of support will be from the legislature, he would like authorization 
from the Board to adjust the amounts in the Income Fund , if this is possible 
to do in conference committee, allowing the Board to increase tuition at its 
July meeting. He noted that this action by the Board today would in no way 
increase tuition at this time. 



222 



Mr. Riss moved that authority be given to the Executive Director to adjust 
the amounts in the Income Fund as requested. The motion was seconded by 
Ms. Burns and it carried unanimously. 

With respect to collective bargaining legislation, Dr. Matsler said, there are 
now two bills - S.B. 536 and H.B. 1530 - one of which it is believed will 
eventually reach the Governor's desk. It is not known whether the Governor 
will sign the bill or whether he will amend higher education out of the bill. 
This is a possibility. 

Senate Bill 474, as introduced by Senator Bruce, provided that the Merit 
Board would issue uniform state- wide rules for negotiations with civil service. 
The bill has now been amended to provide that the governing boards will 
establish these uniform rules. 

H.B. 700, introduced by Rep. Ebbesen and managed by Senator Jack Schaffer 
in the Senate, has been amended to include not only Northern Illinois Univer- 
sity but also the Chicago campus of the University of Illinois and the Edwards- 
ville Campus of Southern Illinois University. Dr. Matsler said we are not sure 
where that bill is in terms of support, but he for one is hopeful that the bill 
will fail - as other Board members are, too. He said he thinks any expression 
of opposition to the bill would be most appropriate from members of the Board. 

Mr. Murray said he would like to address H.B. 700. He said it is hard to 
know whether or not a separate board is a mark of distinction or whether it 
is not ; but it seems to him that the system of systems was created in Illinois 
to preserve the balance in budgets and in students, and this has been work- 
ing satisfactorily. Mr. Murray said while it may be time for a study of the 
system of systems, he really does not think it is appropriate for one school - 
whether it be NIU, SIU or Chicago Circle - to break up the system and 
develop its own board. He thinks that in the long run it would really be 
non-productive for one institution to do that. He said he has talked with 
President Monat about this, and it is appropriate that he maintain a neutral 
position. However, Mr. Murray said he believes that this is a matter of 
public policy, and perhaps we should call for a study in the State to deter- 
mine whether the institutions should have their own boards. He simply does 
not feel that it is appropriate for one of our institutions to obtain its own 
board at the sacrifice of the Board of Regents. 

Dr. Matsler said he certainly concurs with what the Chairman has said. 

Section II - Blanket Crime Insurance Bids 

Dr. Matsler said Staff, in concurrence with the insurance managers of the 
three Regency Universities, recommends acceptance of the bid of Lanphier 
& Company (with Reliance Insurance Company of Philadelphia as the insurance 
company) to provide blanket crime insurance for the three-year period begin- 
ning July 1, 1983, at an annual premium of $5,563. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unanimously. 

Section HI - Board Meeting Calendar: July 1983- June 1984 



223 



Dr. Matsler presented the proposed calendar of Board meetings for the 
coming year: 

July 21, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

August 1983 Subject to Call 

September 22, 1983 Illinois State University 

October 20, 1983 Sangamon State University 

November 1983 Subject to Call 

December 8, 1983 Northern Illinois University 

January 26, 1984 Illinois State University 

February 1984 Subject to Call 

March 15, 1984 Sangamon State University 

April 19, 1984 Northern Illinois University 

May 17, 1984 Illinois State University 

June 21, 1984 Springfield 

Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the calendar of meetings. The motion 
was seconded by Mr. Gayles. 

Mr. Gayles asked if the Board would use the one day or two day meeting 
format. Dr. Matsler said he would like to hear how members of the Board 
feel about the one-day format as was used for today's meeting. Mr. Murray 
said he would suspect that most would say they don't care for it, but on the 
other hand, we cannot always foresee how much time will be required in the 
Executive Session. Dr. Matsler said Staff would be happy to go either way, 
depending upon how the Board itself feels. Mr. Gayles said he believes the 
two-day format is preferable. It gives the Board more opportunity to have 
a feel of what is going on on the various campuses. The one-day format 
makes it very difficult to see people, to visit areas on campus. If the com- 
mittee meetings are held on the Wednesday before the meeting of the Board, 
it would give members a little more time to become acquainted with some of 
the issues on campus. Ms. Toman said another thing she would like to see 
considered in setting the calendar is the fact that somewhere between March 15 
and the middle of April the institutions do have spring break and students 
may be away from campus. That is a reasonable request, Mr. Murray said, 
and said Staff would try to accommodate this if it is possible. It would be 
his suggestion that we adopt the calendar and have a subsequent discussion 
of whether or not to the Board wants the committees to meet the preceding 
afternoon or the morning of the Board meeting. This seems to him to work 
just fine, he said, if there is a commitment that we will work until perhaps 
4:00 if necessary to complete the public meeting. 

The question before the Board was called, and the motion carried unanimously. 

Dr. Matsler said he would be willing to suggest, in deference to Mr. Gayles, 
that the committee meetings in July be held on the afternoon preceding the 
Board meeting, and later decisions can be made at an appropriate time as 
to the format of any given meeting. Mr. Murray asked which of the com- 
mittees are scheduled to meet in July. Dr. Matsler said it appears now that 
the Finance Committee and Personnel Committee will meet , and possibly the 
Facilities Committee if President Monat should so request. 

Section IV - Interim Authorization to Obligate and Expend Funds 



224 



Dr. Matsler said that pending - approval of the internal budgets for FY 84, 
the Staff recommends that the Board authorize the universities to make 
tentative internal allocations for fiscal year 1984 within the available appro- 
priations, and to obligate and expend funds from these allocations, with 
such authorization to apply to obligations and expenditures made on this 
basis beginning July 1, 1983. All such obligations and expenditures must be 
in compliance with applicable statutes, bylaws, governing policies, Board 
Regulations and administrative decisions currently in effect. 

Mr. McClure moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion 
was seconded by Dr. Wellbank, and it carried unanimously. 

Section V - Accounting Entities - Locally Held Funds 

Dr. Matsler said that the Board has already adopted the "Uniersity Guidelines 
1982" to be used as operating policy of the Board and its institutions with 
respect to locally held funds. The Guidelines require each institution to 
maintain accounting entities which consist of undertakings that are substan- 
tially similar and rationally related. Financial statements for each entity will 
be prepared at the end of each fiscal year and used for all computations 
required by the Guidelines when testing for excess funds. Staff, together 
with representatives of the Regency Universities, has determined that the 
following entities are appropriate, logical and meet the intent of the Guidelines 

Indirect Cost Support 

Continuing Education and Public Service 

Sales and Services of Educational Activities 

Student Programs and Services 

Field Trip and Foreign Study Activities 

Service Departments 

Auxiliary B usiness Operations 

Campus Parking 

Revenue Bond 

Staff recommends, he said, that the Board approve the above entities for 
use by the Regency institutions when testing for excess funds and that these 
entities be implemented no later than fiscal year 1984. 

Dr. Matsler noted that the matter has been discussed extensively by the 
Audit Committee. 

Mr. McClure moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion 
was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VI - Cooperative Purchasing Through Illinois Educational Consortium 

Dr. Matsler said Staff is recommending that the Board take the following 
actions in order to expand the benefits and economies of joint and coopera- 
tive purchaseing through the Illinois Educational Consortium: (1) adopt the 
proposed amended Resolution presented in the Executive Director's Report ; 
and (2) approve the addition of the four generic commodities listed in 
Appendix V to the list of such commodities which may be purchased through 
IEC. 



225 



RESOLUTION 

WHEREAS, the several Illinois Public Universities have heretofore estab- 
lished a not-for-profit corporation under the laws of the State of Illinois 
known as the Illinois Educational Consortium (hereinafter referred to as 
n IEC' T ) and the Board of Regents (hereinafter referred to as the "Board") 
has, by motion adopted on July 20, 1972, joined the IEC as a participating 
member; and 

WHEREAS, the IEC has heretofore established a Purchasing Division tor the 
purpose of providing assistance in the cooperative and joint purchasing of 
commodities, equipment, and services by the several Illinois Public univer- 
sities ; and 

WHEREAS, the Board has, by resolution adopted on May 21, 1975 and amended on 
July 29, 1976, June 14, 1979, and May 22, 1980, indicated its desire to parti- 
cipate in the benefits and economies of joint and cooperative purchasing of 
commodities, equipment and services through the utilization of the services 
of IEC; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Regents that: 

(1) IEC is authorized, as agent and on behalf of the Board to 
prepare specifications , advertise , receive , open , tabulate 

and evaluate competitive bids for such commodities , equipment , 
and services as may from time to time be designated by 
Directors of Purchasing in the Regency System. In all such 
activities, the IEC shall identify the Board as its principal. 

(2) IEC shall report to the Board all of its activities as such 
agent, its evaluation of the bids received, and its recom- 
mendations for awards of contracts. Bids shall be accepted 
or rejected and contracts shall be awarded by and in the 
name of the Board in accordance with procedures heretofore 
or hereafter established by the Board except that generic 
commodities as listed on Appendix I dated July 29, 1976, 
Appendices II and III dated June 14, 1979, Appendix IV 
dated May 22, 1980, and Appendix V, attached to this 
resolution, purchased or contracted for in the IEC collective 
bid process shall be exempt from the requirement of specific 
Board approval and that Presidents of the Regency universities 
be authorized to accept or reject bids and award contracts on 
behalf of and in the name of the Board with the understanding 
and direction that all such purchases and contracts in the 
amount of $10,000 or more will be reported to the Board. 
Changes (additions or deletions) in the list of generic commo- 
dities may be made from time to time based on specific recom- 
mendation to and approval of the Board. 

(3) All advertising, receiving, opening, recording, and tabulating 
of bids by IEC and the award of any contract shall be in 
accordance with the Regulations Governing Procurement and 
Bidding at State Systems Universities in Illinois heretofore 
adopted by the Board, and in accordance with the provisions 



226 



of the laws of the State of Illinois, including the "Illinois 
Purchasing Act", as either of the same may be amended 
from time to time. 

(4) This Resolution shall remain in effect until modified or 

rescinded by the Board. 

Mr. Riss moved for adoption of the Resolution. The motion was seconded 
by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

Section VII - Amendment of Board Regulations: Vacation 

Dr. Matsler presented for approval by the Board a proposed amendment to 
Board Regulations (Section III: Faculty and Administrative Employees) 
which would allow the universities to determine which of two approaches 
should be employed in calculating vacation benefits based upon whether or 
not the employee's work conforms to the academic calendar. 

Ms. Orchowski moved for approval of the amendment as presented. The 
motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank. 

Mr. Murray asked how many working days are in a week for these employees. 
Five, Dr. Matsler responded. Mr. Murray said he could not help but comment 
how nice people in higher education have it to be able to accumulate this kind 
of vacation , particularly in the early part of their careers . He could see this 
after some years, but he just hopes that everyone appreciates the fact that 
they can accumulate two working days a month, and literally take off in excess 
of five weeks. This is not generally true in most businesses, he noted, so 
when people complain about such things as salary increases, they should re- 
member that there are a few nice things about their administrative occupations. 

The question before the Board was called, and the motion carried with Mr. 
McClure voting Nay. 

Section VIII - Administrative Salary Plan Ranges for 1983-84 

Dr. Matsler noted that this section of his Report contains a brief history of 
the Regency System Administrative Salary Plan which has been used since 
the 1973-74 fiscal year. 

At this time, he said, Staff is recommending that the Administrative Salary 
Plan ranges approved for 1983 be increased 5.5% for 1983-84, as shown in 
the table accompanying the report, to become effective July 1, 1983. 

Dr. Matsler said that the 5.5% figure was arrived at rather arbitrarily from 
the expectation that there would be perhaps a 5.5% increase in salaries for 
everyone this year. 

Mr. McClure said he thought it would be appropriate for Dr. Matsler to 
emphasize the statement in his Report that the increases in the ranges did 
not require corresponding increases for individuals who were covered by 
the plan but who were not at the minimum of their ranges. Salary increases 
for those individuals in the plan have been based on performance criteria. 
Dr. Matsler agreed, stating that we still have our merit criteria for granting 
salary increases . 



227 



From time to time, Dr. Matsler said, questions have been raised concerning 
the advisability of retaining the current structure of the Administrative Salary- 
Plan. Some of the features which have been questioned relate to grade range 
determinations, basis for grade placement, the positions which should be 
included, the midpoint limitation for new hires and institutional differences. 
Staff is making no recommendations at this time, he said, for changes in the 
basic structure of the Plan, but believes that a continued review of the Plan 
is appropriate. 

Mr. Murray said according to his calculations we have raised the midpoint 
55^%, and if we raise it another 51%, that will go to 61% since 1972. Has 
anyone gone back and compared faculty salaries with administrative increases 
since that time, he asked? Dr. Matsler said we did have a study like that a 
year or so ago. Dr. Brim added that he has done this from time to time, but 
he did not have the figures with him today, but generally if you look at 1972- 
1973 as the beginning year and 1982-83 as the last year, you would find that 
faculty salaries combined have increased slightly more than the midpoints of 
the ranges. There is not a whole lot of difference now, Dr. Brim said, not 
as much as four or five years ago. 

President Monat said he thinks it needs to be clearly understood, as Mr. 
McClure pointed out, that approval of this would not authorize a percentage 
increase of 51% for any individual. As a matter of fact, speaking from their 
experience at Northern, they have allocated for administrative salary increases 
for cost centers on the same basis as they have allocated funds for faculty 
salary increases. Dr. Monat said there is not a greater pool of money avail- 
able for administrative increases than there is for faculty increases, and he 
would suspect that is true for the other institutions also. 

Mr. Murray asked whether this matter has been considered by the Personnel 
Committee. Dr. Matsler said that it had not been, although he and Dr. Well- 
bank, Chair of the Personnel Committee, have discussed it and felt that with 
the 51% figure being low enough it really wasn't necessary to go into it in 
much detail. 

Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the Staff recommendation that the Admini- 
strative Salary Plan ranges be revised as shown in Table 3 of the Executive 
Director's Report, effective July 1, 1983. The motion was seconded by Ms. 
Burns, and it carried unanimously. 

Section IX - Program Review and Academic Plan Follow- Up Reports 

In March, Dr. Matsler said, the Board asked for a number of follow-up actions 
related to the university academic plans. In addition some similar actions have 
resulted from Board of Regents and BHE evaluation of program reviews. 
This section of his Report summarizes and evaluates the university responses 
in this regard and recommends Board action where appropriate. 

Staff makes the following recommendations for action by the Board : 

1. Illinois State University 

--That the Board approve in principle the concept of a consolidated 
masters degree program in Curriculum and Instruction that would 



228 



include a common core of studies and appropriate concentrations, 
and direct the University to prepare a proposal that would accom- 
plish this and lead thereby to the deletion of separate masters 
degrees in Secondary Education and Elementary Education. 

2. Northern Illinois Universi ty 

--That the Board approve the replacement of the Ed.D. and CAS 
degrees in Elementary Education, Secondary Education and Curri- 
culum and Supervision with an Ed.D. and Education Specialist 
degree in Curriculum and Instruction. 

--Deletion of the CAS degrees in Biological Sciences and Physical 
Education , and support in concept for similar action with regard 
to the CAS degree in History, a matter that is now in process on 
campus. 

--Approval of a change in the name of the Center for Minority 
Studies to Center for Black Studies. 

3. Sangamon State University 

--Deletion of the masters degree program in Sociology /Anthropology . 

--Suspension of the bachelors degree program in Environmental Studies 
for a period of five years. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendations. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Orchowski. 

Mr. McClure said he would point out to President Watkins that the Staff 
statement has not gone unnoticed - relatively little progress has been made 
by ISU in establishing a comprehensive university policy that university and 
major requirements should allow undergraduate students to complete their 
degrees in four years. President Watkins acknowledged that the university 
is aware of this and has accepted full blame, and this will not appear again, 
he said. Dr. Matsler said he would add that pressures from accrediting 
agencies on departments for adding courses to make them accreditable are 
really tremendous, and the process of reducing the number of courses neces- 
sary for a degree becomes a very difficult situation. Dr. Groves also said 
that Staff is satisfied that the institution is now fully committed to making 
progress in this area, and President Watkins and Dr. Strand have both 
indicated their strong support for this . 

Referring to the recommendation for change of name of the Center for 
Minority Studies at NIU to Black Studies Center, Mr. McClure asked whether 
we still have the Latino program . President Monat said they still have the 
program and several years ago they established a Center for Latino and 
Latin American Studies. This has not been deleted. 

The question before the Board for approval of the Staff recommendations 
was called, and the motion carried unanimously. 



229 



Section X - FY 85 RAMP New and Expanded Program Requests and 
Special Analytical Studies 

Dr. Matsler directed the attention of the Board to the tables on pages 50-55 
of his Report, listing the initial institutional requests made by the three 
institutions along with the Staff recommendations. 

The requests and the costs of these programs were gone over by the Program 
Committee, Dr. Matsler said. He understands that there was a good discus- 
sion of the requests and that there is concurrence on the part of everyone 
relative to the Staff recommendations. 

With regard to Illinois State University, Staff recommends that the Board 
approve a total FY 85 budgetary request of $2,219,600 for New and Expanded 
Programs and Special Analytical Studies as detailed in the tables. 

At Northern Illinois University, Staff recommends that the Board approve a 
total FY85 budgetary request of $2,657,400 for New and Expanded Programs 
and Special Analytical Studies as detailed in the tables. 

With regard to Sangamon. State University, Staff recommends that the Board 
approve the Off- Campus Program, B.A. in Management in Danville, for imple- 
mentation in the 1984-85 academic year. Staff also recommends that the Board 
approval a total FY85 budgetary request of $613,700 for New and Expanded 
Programs and Special Analytical Studies as detailed in the tables. 

Dr. Matsler said with regard to the recommendation for ISU, it is understood 
that the approved FY85 amount for Equipment Replacement will be reduced by 
any amount which the university receives in FY 84 appropriations which has 
been allocated by the BHE for this purpose. With respect to the NIU recom- 
mendation, it is likewise understood that the approved FY85 amounts for 
Equipment Replacement , Supplemental Funding for the Department of Industry 
and Technology, and Supplemental Funding for the Department of Computer 
Science will be reduced by any amounts which the university receives in FY 84 
appropriations which have been allocated by the BHE for these purposes. It 
is also understood that the approved amount for Equipment Replacement at SSU 
will be reduced by any amounts which are received in FY 84 appropriations. 

Referring to the NIU request for supplemental funding for the Department 
of Computer Science, Mr. Gayles asked what would be the dollar breakdown 
between faculty positions and upgrading of equipment. Dr. LaTourette, 
NIU Provost, responded that $199,000 is being requested for personnel 
(5 faculty positions and graduate assistant support), and the equipment 
request is for $192,000. He said he would point out that this is the fourth 
time that they have requested significant funding, and for the last three 
years the request has been supported by the Board Staff, the Board itself 
and also the BHE. Unfortunately they have never received the money. 
Dr. LaTourette said that while he did not have the exact figures in front of 
him , there has been a very substantial reallocation of funding toward the 
computer science program area, but they have reached the point where there 
is really very little left to reallocate. The cupboard is genuinely bare, and 
for the BHE to assume that we can meet these institutional needs by realloca- 
tion, he thinks, is unrealistic. 



230 



President Watkins said he would also comment that for the BHE to assume 
that reallocation can be accomplished once you have achieved an electronic 
data processing - approach to something - or a software approach to something 
and that this automatically saves a great deal of money, is simply not accurate. 
In part , he said , we have to have various software packages in order to 
respond to the ever increasing variety of information demanded of everyone 
and in order to provide better service. It may be that it will not save us 
anything, but it certainly is true that we can serve the public better. 
Nowhere is this more clearly noted right now than in the area of student 
financial aid. That has become an absolute nightmare in the last couple of 
years. 

President Monat agreed, stating that we are at a distinct disadvantage in 
this area, particularly in student financial aids, with respect to our sister 
institutions in the private sector who have really agressively pursued student 
financial aid routes as a means of garnering funds into those institutions. 
We are in a sense disadvantaged because we in some respects lack the insti- 
tutional capability of making the case as strongly as we can make it without 
this kind of support. 

With respect to the Off- Campus Program at Danville which Sangamon State 
is requesting, Ms. Toman noted that it is stated that the university intends 
to augment revenues by instituting a student fee to reimburse for instructor 
travel costs to off-campus sites. She asked if someone would explain this 
a little more. Dr. Ayers, Interim Vice President, said they have found that 
when a university takes its programs off-campus, it costs more than it does 
to offer the program on campus. He thinks universities across the state have 
also discovered this and there is a governing procedure, at just about 
every institution he knows of, to add a fee to the tuition costs which in 
part displaces the cost of having faculty travel to where the program is 
offered. President Lacy said this is not a full recovery, however, and in 
the university's discussions with Board Staff they focused at great length 
on the question of whether they were going far enough. Ms. Toman asked 
if this is being charged just to those students off-campus, or is it being 
absorbed by the total student population? It is only charged to those students 
who decide on this programming, Dr. Ayers responded. 

President Monat pointed out that one slight correction needed to be made on 
page 51 in the amount of the institutional request for Support for University 
Management Systems. Northern did revise its request, after consultation 
with the Board Staff, and the record should reflect that the amount of that 
request was revised to $195,000, rather than $591,100. 

Mr. Gayles moved for approval of the Staff recommendations relative to the 
FY 85 New and Expanded Program Requests and Special Analytical Studies for 
the three universities. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it 
carried unanimously. 

Section XI - Grants and Contracts 

Dr. Matsler said Northern is requesting approval of a grant from the National 
Science Foundation for research on the electronic structure of solids and 
surfaces. Staff has evaluated the proposed activity, he said, and recommends 
approval by the Board. 



231 



Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion 
was seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

Section XII - FY 1984 Non- Appropriated Capital Requirement Plans 

Dr. Matsler said that the non-appropriated capital requirement plans for 
Northern Illinois University, Illinois State University and Sangamon State 
University were given a good deal of attention in the meeting of the Facilities 
Committee. The plans include general planning information for FY 85 and FY 86 
The plans for NIU and ISU also include budget requests for FY84 in the 
amounts of $1,300,400 and $1,270,000 respectively. Dr. Matsler asked Ms. 
Burns if she cared to comment on any of the Committee's discussion. 

Ms. Burns said we have seen all of these projects before, and the Committee 
supports the Staff recommendations. 

Dr. Matsler said Staff recommends that the Board of Regents accept the plans 
and approve the FY 1984 budget requests of NIU and ISU. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Staff recommendation. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Toman, and it carried unanimously. 

Section XIII - Legal Counsel Report 

1. American National Bank & Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee 
et al vs. Board of Regents for Regency Universities 

Mr. Winning reported that this is an action filed in the Federal District 
Court for the Northern District of Illinois by representatives of owners 
of the beneficial interest of a trust which operates dormitory housing 
at DeKalb. It alleges an antitrust theory and condemns or seeks to 
condemn the policy of the University regarding its requirement that 
single freshman students must reside in University-owned residence 
halls as long as space is available. Mr. Winning reported that Mr. 
Shur, University Legal Counsel at NIU, has undertaken defense of the 
action . 

2. Andrew Edwards vs. Board of Regents, Sangamon State University, 
Alex B. Lacy, Jr., and Susan Dezondolet 

Mr. Winning requested that a motion be proposed to adopt the resolu- 
tion which the Board adopted in Executive Session with respect to this 
case. 

Ms. Burns so moved, seconded by Ms. Toman, and the motion carried 
unanimously. 

3. Brue & Farrick vs. Board of Regents et al. 
Textor vs. Board of Regents 

Mr. Winning recommended that the Board confirm the action taken in 
Executive Session with respect to the settlement of these cases at 
Northern Illinois University. Mr. Riss so moved, seconded by Ms. 
Burns, and the motion carried unanimously. 



232 



RECURRING INSTITUTIONAL MATTERS 

Sangamon State University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report, President Lacy distributed copies of two 
Addenda: substitute pages 7 and 8, Faculty, Administrative, and Civil 
Service Personnel Transactions; and Purchases. 

The President announced that Janine Toman had been re-elected to serve as 
Student Regent for the upcoming year. He said Dr. Matsler had noted that 
in his memory this is the first time in the history of the Board that a student 
has been elected to serve a second term. 

An information report was presented on Grants and Contracts. 

The following items were submitted for action by the Board: 

1. The Board was requested to authorize the Mid- Illinois Computer 
Cooperative to contract with the Illinois Educational Consortium 

on behalf of Sangamon State University to acquire computer services 
during FY 84 at a cost not to exceed $51,500 (an additional sum not 
to exceed $6,000 will be paid to IEC for services and for the use 
of proprietary software provided by the University to local institu- 
tions) . 

2. Personnel transactions for faculty, administrative, and civil service 
personnel. A list of all reported transactions is appended to the 
President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and in 
the Central Office. 

3. A list of Purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report. 

4. Approval was requested to execute agreements for FY 84 with the 
following consultants in amounts not to exceed those indicated : 

Murphy, Downey, Wofford, and Richman 

St. Louis, Missouri $5,000 

Brown, Davis, Mullins and Associates, Inc. $4,000 
Champaign, Illinois 

Collins and Rice, Inc. $6,000 

Springfield, Illinois 

Hormaz Vania $6,000 

Springfield, Illinois 

President Lacy said he was pleased to present to the Board at this time Dr. 
Michael Ayers whom he is recommending today to be Interim Vice President 
and Dean of the Faculty. Dr. Ayers has had a very distinguished career, 
most recently as the Associate Dean of the Organization and Management 
Cluster. His background is in both Business Administration and Economics 
with a doctorate in Economics from the University of Oklahoma. Prior to 
coming to Sangamon State, he served in the Treasurer's Division of the 



233 



Eastman Kodak Company. As a member of the SSU faculty he has served 
not only as a dean , but he has been an active faculty leader and served 
as Chair of the Faculty Senate. He was the coordinator of the Labor Studies 
Program at its initiation and has served both as the Chair of the University 
Personnel Committee and the Tenure Decision Committee. Most recently his 
impact on improving- the academic programs in the Business Organization and 
Management Cluster has been dramatic. 

The President also took special note of the recommended appointment of Mr. 
Gary Kombrink as Legal Counsel to the university. This comes at the end of 
a long search in which they looked at a large number of candidates. Mr. 
Kombrink has had a very distinguished career and one that is quite appropri- 
ate for the legal work of the institution. Most recently he has been the prin- 
cipal of the firm handling legal work for the Board of Governors System. 

Dr. Lacy said it will be seen in his Report that they are losing several very 
distinguished members of the faculty, and he would hope that the economic 
environment in the State and the ability to match payroll offers of other 
institutions will mean that we will not have very much in the way of these 
kinds of losses in the future. 

Ms. Toman, referring to the FY 84 Contracts for Legal Services, asked how 
much these services would be impacted by the appointment of the new Legal 
Counsel. Dr. Lacy said about 18 months ago the decision was made to go to 
in-house legal counsel. A careful study was done of what the cost implications 
of that might be. One of the major driving forces that led to the decision that 
they needed in-house counsel was the cost that they had accumulated over the 
previous several years, and the estimates at that time were fairly substantial. 
However, these outside contracts are still necessary, the President said. 
There are certain kinds of expertise which are needed which one person can- 
not have. There are some cases that will continue to need to be handled by 
Mr. Winning, they will continue to need to have the telecommunications attorney 
in Washington, and they will continue to have certain contract work done by 
Mr. Hoffmann. However, they do expect in-house counsel to have a major 
impact. Will there be enough work for him to be a positive asset to the uni- 
versity, Ms. Toman asked? Yes, the President responded, and in fact he 
thinks it is already clear that the question is one of setting priorities rather 
than not enough work. 

Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Report of the President of Sangamon 
State University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, 
and it carried unanimously. 

Northern Illinois University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board , President Monat distributed copies 
of two Addenda to his Report: Capital Improvement Projects, page 11; and 
Purchases Appendix, page 43, Item 14. 

President Monat said that before introducing to the Board the new student 
Regent, he would like to express his appreciation for the services rendered 
this past year by Montel Gayles as student Regent for Northern. He said 
it has been his personal pleasure to have worked with Montel over the past 
two years, first in his capacity as President of the Student Association, and 



234 



as a member of this Board. Montel has been just a remarkable member of the 
Board, the President said, and he will be missed not only on this Board but 
at Northern Illinois University . 

The President then introduced John Cline, the new student Regent for NIU. 
Mr. Cline is currently enrolled in the M.B.A. program at Northern. He did 
his undergraduate work in Political Science with a minor in History at NIU and 
has been very active in student government . He was deeply involved in the 
operation and development of the NIU Huskie Bus System and played a central 
role in the merging of the Huskie Bus Line with the City of DeKalb to provide 
a mass transit system for the city. Mr. Cline will make a very good replace- 
ment for Montel Gayles, Dr. Monat said, although he has a tough act to follow. 

Dr. Monat said that last week he had sent out to the Board a copy of the 
financial exigency procedures developed on campus and which have been ap- 
proved on campus. It is his understanding from talking with Dr. Matsler, 
he said, that Board Staff has reviewed and accepted the procedures. Dr. 
Monat said there is one part of the document which really has to be worked 
on more fully, and that is the appeals process, but the document states that 
this will be prepared and developed by October 1, 1983, and once that is 
done it will be brought to the attention of the Board. 

Mr. Winning said he must apologize for neglecting to include in his report 
a comment that he had reviewed the procedures and found them to be con- 
sistent with Board procedures for financial exigency. 

Information reports were presented on: 

Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Summer 1983 
Status of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall 1983 
Grants and Contracts (Research, Institutes, and Studies) 
Gifts to Northern Illinois University 
International and Special Programs Expenditures 
Repair and Replacement Reserve - Revenue Bond Funds 

The following items were then presented for action by the Board: 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and other employees. A list of 
all reported transactions is appended to the President's Report and 
will be kept on file at the University and in the Central Office. 

2. A request was made for renewal of authorization granted to the NIU 
International and Special Programs division for FY 83 to disburse up 
to $1,200,000 in connection with its foreign study programs without 
obtaining specific advance authorization for each disbursement which 
exceeds $10,000. For FY 84 the disbursement request is for $1,200,000. 

3. The following Resolution was presented for adoption by the Board: 

WHEREAS, under the terms and provisions of "AN ACT to authorize 
the Board of Regents to acquire, own, operate and maintain projects 
as herein defined, to issue its bonds therefor, to refund its bonds 
heretofore and hereafter issued, and to provide for the payment and 



235 



security of all bonds issued hereunder; and to define the powers 
and duties of said Board in reference thereto," approved July 7, 
1967, as amended, the said Board of Regents is authorized to issue 
bonds; and 

WHEREAS, in a special resolution entitled "RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING 
AND PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE OF $28,575,000 NORTHERN 
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY AUXILIARY FACILITIES SYSTEM REVENUE 
BONDS, SERIES A, OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS PRESCRIBING ALL 
THE DETAILS OF SAID BONDS, AND PROVIDING FOR THE SECURITY 
AND PAYMENT THEREOF," adopted and approved August 16, 1978, 
the said Board of Regents caused the issuance of bonds and authorized 
the establishment of several funds and accounts, including, among 
others, a Project Construction Fund and a Repair and Replacement 
Reserve Account , each more fully described in the Official Statement 
(Bond Indenture) and the aforesaid Resolution; and 

WHEREAS, the Project Construction Fund is defined in the aforesaid 
Resolution as "that fund established hereunder into which Bond 
proceeds in the amount of $6,550,000 will be deposited, and which 
will be used for repairing and improving certain of the Existing 
Facilities," as such Existing Facilities are more fully described in 
the aforesaid Resolution ; and 

WHEREAS, it has been determined that certain specific projects 
heretofore referred to in the Official Statement (Bond Indenture) 
and the aforesaid Resolution will not be undertaken and that funds 
in the Project Construction Fund will not be used for these purposes; 
and 

WHEREAS , the investment income earned by the Project Construction 
Fund is retained in such fund unless used for authorized projects or 
transferred to the Repair and Replacement Reserve Account as un- 
necessary for completion of the projects ; and 

WHEREAS , under these circumstances it is the obligation of the 
Board of Regents to transfer said unencumbered funds to the Repair 
and Replacement Reserve Account ; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED as follows: 

1. The Board of Regents directs that $700,000 in the Project 
Construction Fund unused and unnecessary to the comple- 
tion of the projects approved by the Board , together with 
the earned interest on the funds in the Project Construction 
Fund, be transferred to the Repair and Replacement Reserve 
Account . 

2. The Board of Regents further directs that the funds in the 
Repair and Replacement Reserve Account be maintained as 
required in the Official Statement (Bond Indenture) and 
the Board Resolution, dated August 16, 1978. 



236 



Approval was requested of the reorganization within the Graduate 
School of the Office of Research, effective August 16, 1983, as 
follows: 



FROM 

Office of Research 

Associate Dean for Research 
Director of Research Services 

Director of Resources Development 

Coordinator of Editorial Services 



TO 

Office of Sponsored Projects 

Director of Sponsored Projects 
Associate Director of Sponsored 

Projects 
Associate Director for Research 

Liaison 
Catalog" Editor and Curriculum 

Coordinator 



A list of Purchases for the month, as appended to the President's 
Report . 

Capital Improvement Projects 

(a) Holmes Student Center - Replacement of Air Conditioning 

System and Correction of Ventilating Deficiencies 
Correction of Minor Ventilating Deficiencies in Various 
Bond Revenue Buildings 

A tabulation of bids received for the projects was presented 
to the Board at the May meeting, at which time the Univer- 
sity recommended acceptance of bids for the electrical, heating 
and ventilating portions of the work. Because the single bid 
for the general work was not complete, the University elected 
to rebid that portion of the work. Again only one bid was 
received, but it was a complete bid. The University recom- 
mended that the bid be accepted and a contract awarded to 
Flagg Construction Company, Rochelle, in the amount of 
$12,604.00, and that the budget for the project be revised 
as follows : 



Construction 

General $12,604.00 

Electrical 10,989.00 

Heating 22,440.00 

Ventilating 31,854.00 

Total Construction $77,887.00 

Fees 

Engineering (fixed per contract) $ 7,700.00 
Allowance for reimbursables 

including on-site supervision 3, 150.00 

Total Fees $10,850.00 

Contingency $ 3,863.00 

TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET $92,600.00 



237 



( b ) Lincoln Hall - Waterproofing of Wing Foundation Walls 
Grant Towers - Repair and Reset Slate Panels 
Stevenson' Towers - Repair and Reset Slate Panels 
Huskie Stadium" 1 - Installation of New Synthetic Floor 

in Handball Courts 
A tabulation of bids received for the above projects was 
presented with a recommendation that the low bids be ac- 
cepted and contracts awarded as follows: 

Lincoln Hall - Waterproofing of Wing Foundation Walls 
Takoa Nagai, Assoc, LTD., Glen Ellyn , $21,120.00 

Grant Towers - Repair and Reset Slate Panels 
R. Rudnik & Company, Wheeling, $25,457.00 

Stevenson Towers - Repair and Reset Slate Panels 
R. Rudnik & Company, Wheeling, $31,113.00 

Huskie Stadium - Installation of New Synthetic Floor 

in Handball Courts 

Only one bid , which was not complete , was received for 
this portion. The University has instructed the architect 
to bid this portion of the project again, and the results 
will be reported to the Board at the July meeting. 

( c ) Remodeling of Holmes Student Center (Pow Wow Room) 

A tabulation of bids received was presented with a recommenda- 
tion that the low bids be accepted and contracts awarded as 
follows : 

General 

Flagg Construction, Rochelle $40,660.00 

Electrical 

Manning Electric, Rochelle $ 1,994.00 

Ventilating 

Kallal's Sheet Metal, DeKalb $ 1,492.00 

President Monat said he was pleased to announce that after a national search , 
a new Director of Financial Aids has been selected to replace Claude Kaczmarek 
who is retiring. Mr. Jerry Augsburger will be the new Director. 

Dr. Monat took note to the resignations of a number of members of the 
faculty and staff. A number of these people are leaving, he said, because 
of the competitive market within which NIU and the other Regency univer- 
sities function. Some are leaving to vastly improve their financial situations 
at other institutions. In some of the critical areas these are losses that will 
be hard to replace. This underscores the problem that we are all too familiar 
with. 

The President took note of the resignation of John M. Nagle who for the past 
three years has served as Assistant Dean of the College of Education. Dr. 
Nagle has accepted the position of Dean of the School of Education at William 
and Mary College in Virginia. 



238 



Ms. Burns, referring to the report of Undergraduate Admissions for Fall, 
1983, asked if the totals are comparable for 1982 and 1983. For example, 
she asked do these figures for Business indicate that there were 5049 
applicants by this date in 1983 and 3915 in 1983? Yes, Dr. Monat responded. 
He said he thinks that this reflects in many ways the limited enrollment pro- 
gram that was established in the College of Business several years ago where 
they had to put a ceiling on the number of majors that could be accepted 
because of resource constraints. As a consequence, he said, many students 
who would otherwise apply are taking a very careful look at what their chances 
might be if they do come to NIU and be admitted into the College of Business 
because admission really comes at the end of the sophomore year after the 
student has taken tool courses at the pre-business level. This decline, the 
President said, is a reflection of that, and this is a matter of concern to 
them. It is one of the reasons why they so urgently need funding* in the 
College of Business, because it is just a matter of not having the resources 
necessary to accommodate what is a genuine demand for students who want 
to enter that College at Northern. 

Mr . Gayles said he would like for the Board to direct its attention to the 
recommended appointment of Leon Miller as Administrative Associate in the 
Student Affairs area, not that he wished to draw attention to Mr. Miller, 
but rather to the position which he has vacated. As many know, he said, 
Leon Miller served as Ombudsman for NIU for the past six years. Mr. Gayles 
said he would like to draw attention to how that review process has taken 
place with some possible suggestions he might levy on university faculty 
members and Student Association members who originally designed the concept 

c Jjiementation of the position itself. He said we have created a very 
unfair process in the evaluation of this particular role. As it stands, one 
'articular constituency group eliminated an individual from the position upon 
voting process at the end of a two-year period. Mr. Gayles said he would 
like to suggest that the process be reviewed and a more equitable one estab- 
lished so that an individual entering the position can expect to retain his 
position with a simple majority and not a simple minority ousting the indi- 
vidual. On campus 87% of the constituency needed voted positively to keep 
Miller in the position, but the other 12-13% were able to oust him from 
be pi ;. He said he feels this is unfair and that the process needs to 

lie led. 

President Monat said he agrees with Mr. Gayles that the process does 
to be re-examined, and, indeed, it is on the agenda for re -examination 
the University Council in the Fall. The process for hiring and reviewing 
the incumbent Ombudsman is a very convoluted process, but U: ' :•-; .. 
ence long before he arrived on the scene, Dr. Monat said, and it remains 
in existence. The Ombudsman is appointed for a two-year term. It is a 
temporary contract which means that it is reviewed year by year. During 
the second year of the Ombudsman's service an Ombudsman Review /Search 
Committee is established according to the bylaws of the University. That 
committee asks the incumbent Ombudsman if he or she wishes to be considered 
for reappointment. If the incumbent decides not to be reconsidered, then 
the committee becomes a search committee to seek a new Ombudsman. If 
the incumbent decides that he or she wants to be reconsidered , then the 
functions as a review committee to determine the performance of 
ind whether or not, in the judgment of the committee, the 
should be recommenced for reappointment., Mr. Miller went 
through that process twice before, the President said, and in 1979 he was 



239 



reappointed as well as in 1981. 

President Monat said, as Mr. Gayles pointed out, the process is a cumbersome 
one. Once the review committee recommends reappointment, which the com- 
mittee did this time, the President can then accept or reject the recommenda- 
tion. Dr. Monat said he accepted the recommendation. Then the reappoint- 
ment must be referred to four constituency groups stipulated in the bylaws 
and policies of the University. One is the operating- staff council, one is 
the Student Association, one is the professional staff council, and the fourth 
is the faculty assembly. All four must concur in the reappointment, and if 
1, 2, 3 or 4 of the groups fail to do so, then a search must be conducted. 
And in this case, one of the four bodies did not concur in the reappointment 
and under existing university policy, he had no alternative but to accept this. 
So, Dr. Monat said, the whole process will be re-examined this Fall. 

Dr. Wellbank observed that it's easier to become President. 

Ms. Orchowski said there are three positions listed under Intercollegiate 
Athletics and all three individuals are receiving substantial pay increases. 
Are the responsibilities of these individuals also being increased, she asked? 

Dr. Monat said this is a result of their concern over salary equity. Over 
the past several years they have moved gradually to adjust salaries in an 
equitable manner so there are not really unjustified distinctions between the 
men's coaching staff and the women's coaching staff. This is the last step 
in the process of bringing that about. 

Dr. Wellbank moved for approval of the Report of the President of Northern 
Illinois University, as amended. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, 
and it carried unanimously . 

Illinois State University - President's Report 

Before presenting his Report to the Board President Watkins said he would 
like to comment on the excellent work all of us have observed by the ISU 
Regent during the past year. He said we have been blessed with excellent 
student Regents, but Denise Orchowski has certainly been among the most dis- 
tinguished that ISU has ever had. She has been hard-working and supportive 
and her work has been characterized by maturity that has made her really 
a very integral part of the Board. Everyone wishes her well. Ms. Orchowski, 
he said, will be continuing her graduate work at Illinois State. 

The President then introduced to the Board Mr. Mike Yashar, a senior major- 
ing in Biology and Chemistry, who will be the new student Regent from ISU. 
He also introduced the new SA President from ISU, Mr. Steve Bedingfield, 
a junior in Political Science and History. 

An information report was presented on Grants and Contracts. 

The following items were then submitted for action by the Board : 

1. Personnel transactions for faculty and administrative staff and for 

civil service employees. A list of all reported transactions is appended 
to the President's Report and will be kept on file at the University and 
in the Central Office. 



240 



2. A list of Purchases for the month as appended to the President's 
Report. 

3. Capital Improvement Projects 

( a ) Energy Conservation - Phase I (Watterson Towers and 
South Residence Hall Complex) 

Permission was requested to engage the firm of Buchanan, 
Bellows & Associates of Bloomington. Illinois, to prepare bid 
documents and receive bids for Retrofit remodeling to 
accomplish energy conservation measures to provide an 
estimated payback in 5 years . It is proposed to accomplish 
all work over a two year period at an estimated cost of 
$1,200,000. Payable from Bond Revenue Series 1970- 70A, 
Rehabilitation and Development Reserve. 

(b) Steam Line Replacement - Phase i 

Permission was requested to engage the firm of Henneman & 
Raufeisen & Associates, Consulting Engineers, Champaign, IL 
to prepare bid documents and receive bids for installation of 
the first phase of steam line replacement. Probable cost of 
this phase is estimated at $570,000, including contingencies 
and fees. Payable from Revenue Bonds. 

4. Authorization was requested for the Office of International Studies 
to disburse up to $475,000 during FY 84 in connection with the ISU 
Study Abroad Programs without obtaining specific advance authori- 
zation for each disbursement . 

5. Permission was requested for the University to modify its Agreement 
for the lease of space from the Illinois State University Foundation as 
that Agreement was originally approved and from time to time renewed 
from July 1, 1973 through July 1, 1982. Specifically approval was 
requested to amend the Agreement by increasing the rental payment to 
the Foundation by $20,250, the sum needed to permit the University 

to acquire additional support services attendance to the museum and 
cultural center operations. 

6. Permission was requested to enter into professional legal services con- 
tracts on behalf of the Students' Legal Services Program for the period 
commencing July 1, 1983 through June 30, 1984. The number of con- 
tracts to be issued shall not exceed three and the total sum to be 
expended shall not exceed $76,742. Payable from General Activity Fee 
only. 

7. Permission was requested to transfer $100,000 from contractual line 
in the FY 83 General Revenue appropriation to the Telecommunications 
line. 

8. In keeping with Guidelines established by the Legislative Audit Com- 
mission providing that the financial relationship of a university to an 
organization classified as a "university- related organization" be set 
forth in a written agreement, permission was requested to enter into 
a Master Contract with the ISU Foundation. 



241 



Ms. Burns moved for approval of the Report of the President of Illinois 

State University. The motion was seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried 

unanimously. 

OTHER MATTERS 

Mr. Gayles said in December of 1982 the Staff presented a report on athletics, 
and at that time he felt that some of the figures in the report could possibly 
be a bit misleading as they related to the graduates of our intercollegiate 
athletics programs. He said he questions if, indeed, the graduates that we 
saw in the report were the actual original athletes who signed letters of intent 
at the beginning of the schools years two, three or four years ago. 

With this in mind, Mr. Gayles said, he would move that the Staff of the Board 
review the intercollegiate athletics programs, with a special look being given 
to the graduates. This can be done through a backtracking method, and the 
period of time he would suggest is a four year period to see if, indeed, the 
graduates were the same individuals as those who signed letters of intent. 
The motion was seconded by Ms, Orchowski. 

Explaining his motion, Mr. Gayles said that after questioning the statistics 
in the report he had an opportunity to go back and speak to a few of the 
athletes involved in some of the programs on the campus at Northern - 
although this could possibly be a problem that is widespread not only at NIU 
but also at ISU. He said he questions the ethnical aspects of stripping of 
scholarships. While he is not headhunting in this regard, he thinks there 
may be enough of a problem here suggested by some of the athletes that 
there could be some problems with coaches intimidating athletes to give up 
their scholarships. Perhaps by seeing the statistics and seeing if, indeed, 
these are the actual athletes who signed letters of intent , or if an athlete 
has come into the program and picked up a scholarship which really wasn't 
even his. Perhaps we can get to the bottom of one problem that we are 
facing and oolice our system at the same time. 

Mr. Gayles said he is not sure that Staff will be able to do this simply by 
going through totals and verifying scholarships. It might be necessary to 
contact athletes on the team, to speak with them but leave their names un- 
mentioned in the report . 

This problem may very well exist, Dr. Matsler said, but he is not sure how 
best to get at it. Perhaps we should do this through the presidents' offices. 
They have much closer access to all the data than Staff does. Perhaps we 
know enough now to ask the presidents whether or not they could provide 
the information to Staff in two or three months time, rather than have someone 
on the Staff going to campus and attempting to interview athletes, for instance. 

President Watkins said if the Board wants the study, they can always do it. 
He would point out, however, that this is precisely the reason that he and 
the other presidents tried to point out that they need to have the funds to get 
student information on line. It is easy to say that the presidents can find 
this information, but we are talking about several hundred people a year if 
we are talking about both the full grants and the partial. To track that down 
over a four-year period sounds like a very innocent study - and he does not 
question that it might be an interesting one - but he thinks it would be a 



242 



massive study. He would like to suggest that he does not know where the 
funding would come from . 

Could we make this prospective, Mr. Murray asked, and keep track from now 

v about taking a look at the senior class that is leaving now, Mr. Gayles 
proposed. He said he has a couple of names that he could pass on. Dr. 
Catkins said he is - we could all name individuals who have had problems. 

Correction, Mr. Gayles said, there are no problems with the individuals he 
is talking about - these are individuals who have fared well in the programs, 
but who do have names and are willing to speak up in order to correct the 
problem down the road. 

President Watkins said if we have a problem we can now define it without 
going through a study that will take institutional research people away from 
all of the things they are now doing. What is the problem we are speaking 
of, he asked? 

The problem is pulling scholarships, Mr. Gayles said. 

If that problem exists, Dr. Watkins said, then he thinks the problem should 
be addressed on a campus-by-campus basis. They have awarded scholarships 
on a year-to-year basis although they have almost always kept their promise 
that if a student made an effort to maintain his/her academic standing, the 
scholarship would be maintained. He said he is not opposed to doing this, 
but it is just one of those innocent requests that come along at the end of 
a Board meeting, at the end of a long day, and it looks as though it ought 
to take about two or three hours. 

The Chairman asked if anyone wished to make a motion that the motion be 
tabled. 

Mr. Gayles said this has been on their collective minds since January when 
he commented on the report that was issued after Regent Henriksen made a 
request the year before. He thinks this is a pressing problem and the Board 
will be surprised by some of the results that we get in terms of the turnover 
in scholarships . What is done after that point will be up to the Board and 
whatever feelings or attitudes it lias at that time. 

Ms. Burns moved that the motion be tabled until the next meeting of the 
Board. The motion was seconded by Dr. Wellbank, and the motion carried, 
with Ms. Toman casting a Nay vote. 

Mr. Murray asked Dr. Matsler to consult with the universities to see if some- 
thing agreeable could be worked out for this type of a study. Dr. Matsler 
said he would at least try to have the problem defined as best he could by 
the July meeting. 

President Monat said that Mr. McClure had brought to his attention an over- 
sight , in that the Audit Committee this morning did review the foundation 
contract. He said he would request at this time that the Board approve 
the request of Northern Illinois University to enter into a master contract 
with the Northern Illinois University Foundation. 



243 



Mr. McClure moved for approval as requested by the President, subject to 
approval of the contract bv the Central Staff of the Board. The motion was 
seconded by Ms. Orchowski, and it carried unanimously. 

There being no further business before the Board, on motion by Dr. Wellbank, 
seconded by Ms. Toman, the meeting was declared adjourned. The next regu- 
larly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents will be held on July 21, I 1 . 
at Northern Illinois University . 



David E . Murray 
Chairman 



Franklin G. Matsler 

Secretary