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Full text of "Proceedings of the Bostonian Society, annual meeting"



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PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



AT THE 



ANNUAL MEETING, JANUARY 18, 1916 




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PROCEEDINGS 



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BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



Annual Meeting, January 18, 1916. 




BOSTON : 

OLD STATE HOUSE. 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 

MCM XVI. 



F~ra 




CONTENTS 



Annual Report of the Directors. By The 
President ...... 



5 

II. Report of the Committee on the Rooms . 14 

III. Additions to the Society's Collections . 16 

IV. Report of the Committee on Publications . 18 
V. Report of the Committee on the Library . 23 

VI. Additions to the Society's Library . . 25 

VII. Report of the Committee on Finance . 27 

VIII. Report of the Treasurer . . . . 28 

IX. Report of the Committee on Memorials . 30 

X. Report of the Committee on Nominations . 31 

XL Special Funds ....... 32 

XII. Annual Meeting. " Benjamin Franklin, — 
an Appreciation," by Marshall Putnam 

Thompson ....... 33 

XIII. April Meeting. " A Boy's Memories of the 

Civil War," by Charles F. Read . . 54 

XIV. Form of Bequest . . . . . . 70 

XV. Officers since Organization . . . . 71 

XVI. Officers for 1916. . . . . . 72 

XVII. Membership List ...... 73 

XVIII. Charter 92 

XIX. By-Laws 93 



Committee on Publications 



John W. Farwell 
Albert Matthews 



Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
Ernest L. Gay 



The Clerk 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 



THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING. 




|HE Thirty-fifth Annual Meeting of the 
Bostonian Society was held in the Council 
Chamber of the Old State House, Boston, 
on Tuesday, January 18, 1916, at 3 P. M., 
in accordance with a notice mailed to every 
member. The President, Grenville H. Nor- 
cross, occupied the chair. 

The records of the last monthly meeting were read and 
approved, and the following Reports were presented. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS. 

To tlie Members of the Bostonian Society : — 

Your Directors have the honor of presenting their Annual 
Report for the past year : — 

MEMBERSHIP. 

At the close of the year 191 5 there were in the Society : 

Honorary Members .... 3 

Life Members ..... 644 
Annual Members . . . .461 



Making a total of 



1,108 



Comparing this with the record one year ago, the Society 
has gained six Life Members and lost nineteen Annual Mem- 
bers, — a net loss of thirteen members. 



An analysis of the Membership rolls shows the following 
changes : — 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of 1914 . . . 3 

Added by election ..... o 

Making the present number ... 3 



LIFE MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of 19 14 
Gain by election and transfer 

Making . . . . 

Loss by death . 

Making the present number \. 



638 
3i 

669 

25 

644 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of 19 14 . . . 480 
Gain by election . . . . . 37 

Making 517 

Loss by death, transfer, resignation, etc. . 56 

Making the present number . . .461 



MONTHLY MEETINGS. 

During the year the following papers have been read 
before the Society at its Monthly Meetings, in the Council 
Chamber : 

January 20 : Annual Meeting. Annual Reports of the 
President, the Treasurer, and the various Committees. Also 
" Daniel Webster, the Defender of the Constitution," by 
Melville C. Freeman. 

February 16: "The National Old Trails Road," illustrated 
with the stereopticon, by Miss Susan B. Willard. 



March 16 : "Old Boston," illustrated with the stereopticon, 
by Edwin M. Bacon. 

April 20 : "A Boy's Memories of the Civil War and the 
Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, together with Extracts 
from a Contemporaneous Diary," by Charles F. Read, Clerk 
of the Society. 

May 18: "The History of King's Chapel," by Rev. 
Howard N. Brown, D. D. 

October 19: "Acadia in History and Poetry," by Erving 
Winslow. 

November 16: "The Gardiner Greene Estate," from a 
manuscript by Francis Cabot Lowell ( 185 5-19 1 1), and " Rec- 
ollections of Mrs. Greene," a manuscript by Mrs. Robert C. 
Waterston ; edited and read by Winthrop S. Scudder. 

December 21: "Something about the Boston Museum," 
by John Bouve Clapp. 

NECROLOGY. 

During the year we have learned of the deaths of the 
following members of the Society : 

Died in 19 14. 

John Perry Wise, born in Boston, August 18, 1855, died 
in Brighton, November 30. 

Died in 19 15. 

Orlando Henry Davenport, born in Newton, May 17, 1830, 
died in Roxbury, January 1 1 . 

Mrs. Emeline Cheney, born in Boston, April 18, 1841, died 
in Boston, January 13. 

Horatio Newhall, born in Dorchester, May 2, 1838, died in 
Boston, January 13. 

Henry Warren Hunt, born in Dorchester, December 23, 
1 84 1, died in Dorchester, January 16. 

Charles Wallingford Parker, born in Framingham, June 27, 
183 1, died in Boston, January 24. 



8 

Charles Taylor Lovering, born in Dorchester, September 

23, 1846, died in Boston, February 9. 

Cornelius Ambrose Coleman, born in Boston, October 14, 
1850, died in Brookline, February 19. 

John Chipman Gray, born in Brighton, July 14, 1839, died 
in Boston, February 25. 

Mrs. Hannah Adams Pfaff, born in Medfield, November 16, 
1832, died in Boston, March 13. 

Charles Francis Adams, born in Boston, May 27, 1835, 
died in Washington, D. C, March 20. 

Frederick Clinton Fairbanks, born in Auburn, Me., No- 
vember 26, 1850, died in Worcester, March 23. 

Charles Walter Emerson, born in Newton, February 9, 
1856, died in Newton, April 4. 

Theodore Layman Nance, born in Brazil, Ind., December 

24, 1883, died in Hamilton, Ber., April 5. 

Curtis Guild, born in Boston, February 2, i860, died in 
Boston, April 6. 

William Grant James, born in South Boston, May 19, 1867, 
died in Boston, April 9. 

Miss Helen Collamore, born in Boston, January 15, 1836, 
died in Boston, April 17. 

Mrs. Mary Ellen Lowell, born in Boston, August 26, 1832, 
died in Boston, April 18. 

Mrs. Susan Kittredge Giddings, born in Beverly, August 
31, 1835, died in Boston, April 21. 

Frank Samuel Chick, born in Groton, December 10, 1855, 
died in Marion, April 22. 

John William Linzee, born in Boston, June 23, 1821, died 
in Boston, April 22. 

Alfred Jackson Mayo, born in Boston, November 7, 1839, 
died in Boston, April 26. 

Isaac Homer Sweetser, born in Charlestown, September 3, 
1846, died in Boston, April 30. 

Walter Jenney, born in South Boston, February 7, 1856, 
died in South Boston, May 3. 



Charles Follen Atkinson, born in West Roxbury, April 16, 
1844, died in Boston, May 6. 

Edward James Payne, born in Lowell, November 13, 1844, 
died in Newton Centre, May 28. 

George Atkinson, born in Boston, May 19, 1821, died in 
Boston, June 5. 

Mrs. Rosa Andrews Hale, born in Boston, December 26, 
1849, died in Boston, June 8. 

Watson Grant Cutter, born in Boston, December 31, 1837, 
died in Cambridge, June 18. 

Charles Warner Dexter, born in Medford, September 22, 
1827, died in Belmont, June 28. 

Mrs. Susan Brackett White, born in Boston, March 12, 
1836, died in Boston, June 30. 

James Pike Tolman, born in Boston, November 7, 1847, 
died in West Newton, July 28. 

Mrs. Florence Lemist Cruft, born in Boston, May 7, 1848, 
died in Manchester, July 29. 

George Nelson Faught, born in Sidney, Me., March 10, 
1834, died in Boston, August 27. 

George Brigham Livermore, born in Brighton, May 11, 
1836, died in Brighton, September 26. 

Alexander Sylvanus Porter, born in Colds Mouth, Va., 
August 25, 1840, died in Boston, October 1. 

Mrs. Ellen Davis Hutchings, born in Boston, February 8, 
1834, died in Stockbridge, October 8. 

Miss Madeleine Curtis Mixter, born in Newport, R. I., 
May 27, 1856, died in Beverly Farms, October 8. 

Nathaniel Cushing Nash, born in Boston, April 4, 1862, 
died in Cambridge, October 10. 

Arthur Theodore Lyman, born in Boston, December 8, 
1832, died in Waltham, October 24. 

Warren May Hill, born in Roxbury, October 28, 1863, 
died in Boston, October 26. 

Arthur Jeffrey Parsons, born in Boston, May 3, 1856, died 
in Dublin, N. H., November 5. 



IO 

Frank Huckins, born in Boston, August 7, 1858, died in 
Brookline, November 6. 

Benjamin Joy Jeffries, born in Boston, March 26, 1833, 
died in Boston, November 21. 

Benjamin Mitchell Jones, born in Boston, August 22, 1837, 
died in Boston, November 26. 

Miss Anna Rebekah Leonard, born in Southbridge, April 
8, 1849, died in Boston, December 2. 

Henry Dorr Dupee, born in Dorchester, June 21, 1848, 
died in Dorchester, December 2. 

Miss Mary Jane White, born in Charlestown, January 22, 
1846, died in Boston, December 3. 

Mrs. Caroline Susanna Underwood, born in New York, 
N. Y., September 12, 1828, died in Boston, December 4. 

Mrs. Eunice Wells Hudson, born in Hampton Falls, N. H., 
June 26, 1837, died in Boston, December 5. 

Henry Sumner Bean, born in Boston, March 5, 1847, died 
in Roxbury, December 9. 

Henry Edwin Warren, born in Framingham, June 2, 1846, 
died in New Boston, December 22. 

Mrs. Mary Thayer, born in Roxbury, March 12, 1824, died 
in Boston, December 23. 

Horace Perry Williams, born in Boston, March 16, 1836, 
died in Roxbury, December 25. 

George Elmer Hanscom, born in Poland, Me., March n, 
1854, died in Maiden, December 27. 

Charles Francis Adams, the eminent citizen and historian, 
a life member, had been for twenty years President of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society, and your President, Mr. 
Charles F. Read and Mr. Charles E. Goodspeed, as a delega- 
tion from this Society, attended the funeral at the Stone 
Church in Quincy, on March 23. 

Curtis Guild, a distinguished citizen of Boston, who had 
been Governor of the Commonwealth and Ambassador to 
Russia, was a life member and the elder son of the first Pres- 



1 1 

ident of this Society ; at his funeral in Arlington Street 
Church, on April 9th, this Society was represented by the 
President and Messrs. Manning, Read and Woodbury. 

John Davis Long, formerly Governor of Massachusetts and 
Secretary of the Navy, President of the Hingham Historical 
Society, died in Hingham, August 28th. Dr. Francis H. 
Brown and Mr. Charles F. Read represented this Society at 
the funeral in Hingham on August 30th. 

The Bay State Historical League has held four meetings, 
at all of which this Society has been represented by your 
President and one or more of the other delegates, Dr. Charles 
M. Green and Mr. George Kuhn Clarke. On January 16th, 
the Milton Historical Society entertained the League ; on 
April 10th, the Framingham Historical Society; on June 
1 2th, the Pilgrim Society, at Plymouth ; and October 30th, 
the Billerica Historical Society. At the annual meeting held 
in the vestry of the First Church in Plymouth, Mr. Frank 
Smith of Dedham, was chosen President, and your President 
was re-elected a member of the Executive Committee. The 
delegates to the League are now the President and Messrs. 
George Kuhn Clarke and William Rotch. 

On Sunday, May 9th, the President and Mr. Read repre- 
sented the Society at the services held by Old Colony Chap- 
ter, Daughters of the American Revolution, in the old First 
Parish Meeting-house at Hingham, in memory of the first 
minister, Rev. Peter Hobart, and the dedication of the Hobart 
room in the Memorial bell-tower ; and at the unveiling of a 
memorial boulder on Ship Street at the first landing-place of 
Rev. Peter Hobart and the first settlers of Hingham. 

On June 2d your President and other members attended 
the interesting and beautiful "Pageant of the Royall House" 
given under the auspices of the Royall House Association, 
in the grounds of the old Isaac Royall house at Medford. 

On June 4th the President and Messrs. Read and Corn- 
stock represented the Society at t he opening of the old Upham 



12 

house, by the Melrose Historical Society as its permanent 
home. 

Under the auspices of the Bangor Historical Society and 
the Piscataquis County Historical Society, historical field 
days were held at Castine, Maine, on July 14th and 15th; 
the Bostonian Society was invited to send a delegate, and Mr. 
Alanson H. Reed was so appointed. 

On October 19th, the President and Clerk attended the 
unveiling of the John Hancock tablet in the State House, 
given to the Commonwealth by the Massachusetts Society, 
Sons of the Revolution. 

On the evening of October 20th, the Cambridge Historical 
Society held a meeting in Sanders Theatre in memory of 
Richard H. Dana, on the one hundredth anniversary of his 
birth, at which Dr. Francis H. Brown represented this 
Society. 

On December 30th, Mr. Frank W. Bayley as delegate from 
this Society, attended the Conference of Historical Societies 
at the meeting, in Washington, D. C, of the American His- 
torical Association. 

At ten o'clock on the morning of the Fourth of July, 
W. K. Lennon, a pupil of the South Boston High School, 
read the Declaration of Independence from the State Street 
balcony ; and at noon of December 24th, on the same balcony, 
four trumpeters of the Boston Cadet Band, under direction of 
Adjutant John W. Decrow, First Corps of Cadets, played 
Christmas hymns and carols. 

The publication of the " Life of Sir Henry Vane, the 
Younger," by Rev. John Willcock, D. D., of Lerwick, Shet- 
land, Scotland, revived the interest in Vane, and a subscrip- 
tion was taken to place a marble tablet to his memory in the 
Church in Belleau Parish in Lincolnshire, England, for which 
the members of this society sent a substantial sum. The 
tablet was dedicated on October 1st, Rev. Canon Foster, 
D. C. L., preaching the sermon. The tablet bears the fol- 
lowing inscription : 



13 

TO THE MEMORY OF 

SIR HENRY VANE THE YOUNGER 

LORD OF THE MANOR OF BELLEAU 

DEFENDER OF CIVIL AND RELIGIOUS LIBERTY 

"THAN WHOM A BETTER SENATOR 
NE'ER HELD THE HELM OF ROME " 

GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS 

" A MAN OF NOBLE AND GENEROUS MIND " 

BORN 1613. BEHEADED l662. 

Last summer the 5 -mile stone was found, and by means of 
a subscription from members of this Society, steps have been 
taken to reset it close by its original location on Harvard 
Avenue in Allston. Our Committee on Memorials have 
charge of the matter, and hoped to report the work as done, 
but illness in the house where the stone has been located has 
delayed the completion of the work. 

Among the interesting additions to the Collections is the 
old fire-board with a painting on it of Park Street Church, 
Park Street, and that end of Boston Common, made between 
1 8 10 and 18 16 for Joseph Allen, who lived at 9 Winter 
Street. Attention was called to it in Plymouth by Arthur 
Lord, Esq., and it was bought by your President and given 
to the Society in October. A reproduction of this view in 
colors will be used as a frontispiece in the printed report of 
the Proceedings of this Annual Meeting. The additions to 
the Library and Collections and other matters will appear in 
the reports of the various committees. 

For the Directors, 

Grenville H. Norcross, 
Boston, January 18, igi6. President. 



14 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ROOMS. 

Among the many interesting relics placed in the Collections 
of the Society during the past year, the most important one 
is an ancient fire-board, depicting in oil, Park Street Church 
and a view of Beacon Hill, in which are to be seen the State 
House and other notable buildings. The fire-board has been 
given to the Society by President Norcross, and may be seen 
in the corridor which leads to the Council Chamber. As a 
reproduction in colors of this painting will form the frontis- 
piece of the Annual Proceedings of the Society for 191 6, a 
detailed description of it, and the Boston family who formerly 
owned it, will be found in the Report of the Committee on 
Publications in the forthcoming Annual Proceedings. 

Another interesting relic given to the Society during the 
year is a coffee urn of Sheffield ware, formerly in the Green 
Dragon Tavern, which stood on Union Street from 1697 to 
1832, and was a famous meeting place of the Patriots of the 
Revolution. It is globular in form and rests on a base, and 
inside is still to be seen the cylindrical piece of iron which, 
when heated, kept the delectable liquid contents of the urn 
hot until imbibed by the frequenters of the tavern. The 
Green Dragon Tavern site, now occupied by a business 
structure, is owned by the St. Andrew's Lodge of Free- 
masons of Boston, and at a recent gathering of the Lodge 
on St. Andrew's Day, the urn was exhibited to the assembled 
brethren. 

When the contents of the tavern were sold, the urn was 
bought by Mrs. Elizabeth Harrington, who then kept a 
famous boarding-house on Pearl Street, in a building owned 
by the Quincy family. In 1847 the house was razed and re- 
placed by the Quincy Block, and Mrs. Harrington removed 
to High Street and from there to Chauncy Place. Some of 
the prominent men of Boston boarded with her for many 
years. At her death the urn was given to her daughter, Mrs. 




SHEFFIELD PLATE COFFEE URN, 
Used in the Green Dragon Tavern 



i5 

John R. Bradford, and it has now been presented to the So- 
ciety by Miss Phebe C. Bradford of Boston, grand-daughter 
of Mrs. Elizabeth Harrington. 

A detailed list of the additions to the Collections follows 
this report. 

During the year the Custodians Room has ceased to be 
known as such, and has been renamed by the Directors the 
Curtis Guild Room, in memory of the late Curtis Guild, Sr., 
who was in his later life the First President of this Society 
for twenty-five years. The room is named with the approval 
of his son, Mr. Courtenay Guild, a member of the Board 
of Directors, and the oil portrait of our late President, painted 
by Jean Paul Selinger, which was in the Council Chamber 
for several years, now hangs in the Curtis Guild Room. 

The Society has derived, through the Committee, during 
the year, the sum of $145.44 from the sale of prints and 
souvenirs, and during the same time has expended the sum 
of $562.23 for the care and maintenance of the Rooms. 

For the Committee, 

Francis H. Manning, Joseph G. Minot, 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr., Henry W. Cunningham, 
Courtenay Guild, The President, 

The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December Jj, 1915. Clerk. 



i6 



ADDITIONS BY GIFT AND LOAN 
TO THE SOCIETY'S COLLECTIONS, 1915. 



DONORS. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Boston Public Latin 
School Associa- 
tion 

Bradford, Miss 
Phoebe C. 

Brown, Francis H. 



Cruikshanks, Mrs. 
Susan 



Estabrook, Arthur 
F. 



Fields, Mrs. James 
T., Estate of 

Guild, Courtenay 



Henshaw, Joseph 
P. B. 



Hollingshead, Mrs. 
R. Murdock 

Iconographic Soci- 
ety- 
Manning, Francis 
H. 



Nichols, Arthur H., 
M. D. 



Bronze medal. Inscribed, " Cond. M.D.C.XXXV 
Schola-Latina Bostoniensis." 

Coffee Urn of Sheffield ware, which was once used 
in the Green Dragon Tavern. 

Two Thanksgiving Day Proclamations, issued by 
the Governor of Massachusetts in 19 14 and 
1915. 

Photograph of an oil portrait of Col. Joseph Ward, 
"737-1 8 1 2, an officer of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

View of Boston, England ; reproduction of crayon 
drawing. View of Boston, Mass.; colored litho- 
graph. 

Photographs of Oliver Wendell Holmes, James 
Russell Lowell and William Morris Hunt. 

Commemorative bronze medal of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the organization of the 
Handel and Haydn Society. 

Engraved vote of thanks from the New York City 
Guards to the Boston City Guards and other 
military organizations, after a visit to New En- 
gland in August, 1855. 

Photograph of James E. Murdock, actor. 

Etching of Trinity Church. 

Group photograph of the Directors of Public In- 
stitutions of Boston, 1867. Photograph of the 
last horse car in Boston, Marlborough St., De- 
cember 24, 1900. Photograph of scissors 
grinder standing on Devonshire St. 

Truck of a two-masted flagstaff which surmounted 
the lantern of the State House. During the 
Civil War a blue State flag was flown from 
the staff daily by order of Gov. JohnA. Andrew 



17 



DONORS. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Norcross, Grenville 
H. 



Parker, James 



Purchased 



Taylor, Charles H., 
Jr. 



Ward, Joseph F. 



Wetherbee, Win- 
throp 

Whipple, Leland 



Winthrop, Thomas 
Lindall 



Fire-board, showing Park Street Church and Bea- 
con Hill. See description in report of Com- 
mittee on Publications. Photograph of a pencil 
drawing of the Boston City Hospital, 1909. 

Eleven commissions as Justice of the Peace and 
Notary Public issued to Matthew S. Parker 
and Charles H. Parker. Deed of land and in- 
vestigation of title of land in Boston, dated 
respectively 1836 and 1826. 

Photographs of houses and views in Boston. 
Lithograph drawing entitled " Whig Conven- 
tion in Boston, 1834." 

Map of Charlestown, 1848. Drawing of the in- 
terior of the Boston Opera House, showing in- 
serted portraits of Eben D. Jordan, Frederick 
S. Converse and Henry S. Russell. Photograph 
of the Boston Lancers on the Common, June 
14, 1864. 

Certificate of membership of Col. Joseph Ward in 
the Humane Society of Massachusetts, dated 
June 2, 1788. 

Group photograph of the President and Directors 
of the Blackstone National Bank, 1861. 

Fireman's hat inscribed " Presented to Capt. 
Thomas Whipple of Tiger Engine Co. No. 7 
by the Tiger Associates, 1858." Silver fire 
trumpet inscribed " Presented to Howard Engine 
Co. No. 7 by Portland & Co's circus, through D. 
S. Furber, Esq., the winners at the Firemens 
Foot Race at the Howard Athenaeum, January 
10, 1855." Book entiUed "Constitution of En- 
gine Co. No. 7. Motto, Firm to our Trust." 

Two canes made of wood of the " Charter Oak," 
Hartford, Conn. ; given to Thomas Lindall Win- 
throp (1 760-1841), Lt.-Gov. of Massachusetts, 
1826-1833. 



i8 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS. 

The Committee on Publications reports as follows for the 
year 1 9 1 5 : — 

Volume XII has been issued and the Committee believes 
that like its predecessors it contains much that is of interest 
and value relating to the history of Boston. 

The first paper, entitled "A Soldier of the Revolution, — 
General John Thomas," written by Arthur Lord, deals with 
the story of the life and services and death of the distin- 
guished officer who led the American troops in the important 
movement which resulted in the fortification of Dorchester 
Heights and compelled the Evacuation of Boston 140 years 
ago. The frontispiece of the volume is a portrait of the 
general. 

Two manuscripts " A History of the Gardiner Greene 
Estate " and the story of " A Long Life," make up the 
second article in the book ; they are from the pens of Judge 
Francis Cabot Lowell (1855—19 11), and Mrs. Robert C. 
Waterston, respectively, edited by Winthrop S. Scudder, and 
with a foreword written by him. This estate, once the "show 
place " of Boston, with its wonderful garden, and its gracious 
mistress, who lived to the advanced age of 95, were known 
and appreciated far beyond the limits of this city. 

The third paper, " Letters and Memoranda of Sir Archi- 
bald Campbell, Prisoner of War, captured in Boston Bay, 
June 17, 1776," is a part of a paper read before the Society 
by Archibald M. Howe, — the whole being too long to include 
in this volume. It narrates in a most interesting way the 
hardships undergone by this Scotch general, one of the most 
important officers who fell into our hands, the manner of his 
capture, and the negotiations which finally led to his exchange 
for Ethan Allen. The letters give an intimate view of the 
ideas and needs of a gentleman and officer of that time. 



19 

The series of original documents selected from the collec- 
tions of the Society is continued with the Indenture (17 17) 
of Thomas Hancock to Samuel Gerrish, a warrant dated 1707 
against Samuel and Hannah Adams, father and aunt of the 
patriot, a letter of Peter Lyon to Major Thomas Leonard 
dated April, 17 12, relating to a violation of a law for "the 
better observation and keeping of the Lord's day," and some 
interesting bills rendered to Governor Joseph Dudley. Notes 
have been added by Mr. Walter K. Watkins. 

The Committee has selected as a frontispiece to this issue 
of the Annual Proceedings, a reproduction in color of a fire- 
board painted for Joseph Allen more than a century ago and 
given to the Society by its President, Mr. Norcross, in Octo- 
ber, 191 5. The Society is indebted to Mr. William O. Com- 
stock, for the Brown Genealogy which furnished a clue to the 
ownership of the fire-board, and also to Mr. Walter K. Wat- 
kins, who has prepared the following notes upon the fire- 
board, its owners, and the locality shown in the picture. 



In the view of Park Street, a century ago, we have another 
addition to sketches of that locality in the past. It presents 
many features not found in other delineations. 

On the right is one of the Paddock Elms in Long Acre, 
and the rail fence to which horses were tied when wood and 
stoves were sold in that locality. The stone wall of the 
Granary Burial Ground also appears. 

Park Street Church, erected in 1 809, is shown in its origi- 
nal condition, which differs considerably from the picture of 
the church engraved by Bovven in 1828. 

It was at a town meeting of the inhabitants of Boston, 
25 May, 1795, that it was proposed to sell at auction the 
land on which stood the almshouse, workhouse and granary. 
Samuel A. Drake and others assert that in 1795 the town 
sold this land, except the granary or church lot. This is the 
exact opposite to the facts and the almshouse and workhouse 



20 

lots were advertised, 24 February, 1 801, to be sold at auction, 
as proposed in 1795. The sale was to be at 12, noon, on 
Monday, 23 March, 1801. It was to be divided into six lots 
fronting toward the Common, on Centry Street, with a front- 
age of 62 feet each. Four lots were to run back to the line 
of the burial-ground and the other two to run back about 160 
feet. One other lot to front Bacon, now Beacon Street, was 
to measure 46 feet from the line of William Phillips's estate 
and run back in increasing width. A few days before the 
sale the agents for the town, Thomas Dawes, Samuel Brown 
and George R. Minot, decided to enlarge the frontage of the 
lower lots from 62 to 78 feet, making five on Centry Street, 
and a commodious lot on Bacon Street with a frontage of 56 
feet and 80 feet in the rear. 

Lot One commenced 118 feet from the lower corner of the 
Granary and having a frontage of 78 feet on Centry Street, 
was sold to Arnold Welles. Number Two was sold to Peter 
C. Brooks, and Number Three to Thomas Handysyde Per- 
kins. The most western lot was sold to Thomas Amory. 
The eastern lot, the site of the Granary, was bought by 
Henry Jackson in 1795. 

The four buildings, adjoining the meeting-house, were the 
first erected and the first improvement of Park Street ; later, 
after the church was built, houses were erected by Christo- 
pher and John Gore at the west end of the block. In the 
fall of 1804, the residences at the corner of Beacon and Park 
Streets were erected. 

The new almshouse on Leverett Street was built in 1800, 
and occupied the next year, thus allowing the sale of the 
land, next the Common, in the spring of the year 1801. 

The street was known from 1801 up to 18 10 as Park 
Place. The earliest owners and occupants, going up from the 
meeting-house, were General Arnold Welles at No. 1 ; Dr. 
John Collins Warren, No. 2 ; John Langdon Sullivan, mer- 
chant ; Richard Sullivan, attorney ; Jonathan Davis, John 
Gore and Christopher Gore ; Thomas Amory. Later, Thomas 



21 

W. Ward, of Ropes & Ward, was at No. 3 ; Samuel R. 
Miller, of Thomas Lord & Co., No. 4 ; John Gore, No. 5 ; 
Chief Justice Artemas Ward at No. 6 ; Jonathan Amory at 
No. 7 ; and Andrew Ritchie, attorney, at No. 8. The build- 
ings and land in 18 10 were valued at $14,000 each. 

In the centre background, at the right of the State House, 
appears a house with a cupola. This is the Daniel Dennison 
Rogers mansion, which stood on the corner of Sumner, later 
Mount Vernon and Beacon Street. The house is shown more 
clearly in a view of the locality on a platter of Staffordshire 
ware manufactured in the early half of the 19th century. 

It was a three-story brick house, covering 1,725 square 
feet, and had seventy-one windows. The lot of land on which 
it stood, 30,448 feet, is now included in the east wing of the 
State House and the grounds about it. 

It was taken down in 1833, after the land and buildings 
had been sold at auction, on 12 June. The land between 
Mount Vernon and Bowdoin Streets, with a frontage of 116 
feet on Beacon Street, to the amount of 18,396 square feet, 
was sold in six lots. The frontages on Mount Vernon Street 
averaged 28 feet each. The amount realized was about 
$55,000. The Beacon Street lot brought $4.15 a square 
foot, while the upper lot brought just half that amount. 

One of five colored lithographic views of the Beacon Hill 
Monument, shows the south edge of the Rogers mansion and 
the wall about it. The absence of the Beacon Hill Monu- 
ment places the view after 181 1, when the monument was 
removed. The State House shows details also depicted in 
other views of the period. The Hancock House is shown, 
with its outbuildings from an unusual view point. The house 
shown on the left edge of the print is the Joy mansion, 
removed later to South Boston. 

In reference to the poplar trees as shown on the Mall, 
Shurtleff, in his "Topographical and Historical Description 
of Boston," says, "Since the year 1784, many trees have 
been set out upon the Common, forming the several malls 



22 



and avenues which now give ornament to it In 1826, 

through the energy of Mayor Quincy, the old poplar trees 
which used to disfigure the Park Street Mall were uncere- 
moniously cut down early one morning, and the beautiful 
trees set out in their place by his own hands." The poplars 
appear also in a water color ( 1804-18 11) in the Public 
Library. 

A water color of 1830, in the Bostonian Society's Col- 
lections, presents a row of young trees of not many years 
growth. A view of 1799 shows an absence of trees at that 
date, and in March, 1801, a permit was given to plant poplar 
trees. 

It is interesting to note the well worn path, from the Joy 
mansion, traversing the ancient parade ground, where were 
held all the military maneuvers on the Training Field previous 
to the middle of the last century. The view is one that was 
nearly the same as that presented from the windows of a 
house standing on the south side of Winter Street, next the 
corner of Tremont Street. 

It was in this house, 9 Winter Street, that the fireboard, 
from which the view was taken, did duty to its owner, Joseph 
Allen, a century ago. 

Allen was a trader in West India goods at 8 Merchants 
Row. He purchased the house in Winter Street in 1804, 
and died there in 18 17. He was born, probably in Boston, 
about the end of the Revolution, and was therefore com- 
paratively a young man at the time of his death. His father, 
Barnabas Allen, was born in 1744 and was married in 1767 
by Robert Sandeman, the founder of the Sandemanians, to 
Lydia, daughter of Francis and Mary (Atwood) Woodland. 
Barnabas was a soldier in Captain Frederick Pope's Com- 
pany, Colonel Paul Dudley Sargent's Massachusetts Regi- 
ment in 1775, and in Colonel Benjamin Symond's Regiment 
in 1777. His family was the Braintree family of that name, 
of which he was of the sixth generation (Barnabas, 6 Micah,* 
Joseph, 4 Joseph,* Samuel, 2 George 1 Allen). 



23 

On Joseph Allen's death his property was divided among 
his widow, widowed mother, sister and brothers. His brothers 
were Robert, John, James, Edward Foster, and Levi Hersey 
Allen. His only surviving sister was Abigail or Nabby Allen, 
born 1784, who married, in 1808, William Brown, postmaster 
at Plymouth, Mass., from 1822 to 1832. As part of her 
share in her brother's estate, she came into the possession of 
the fireboard. Later it became the property of her son, 
Johnston Brown. From his daughter, Mary S., the wife of 
Joseph S. Buckingham, the fireboard was procured by Gren- 
ville H. Norcross, President of the Society. Mr. Norcross 
has placed this interesting early picture in the collections of 
the Society. 

For the Committee, 

John W. Farwell, Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., 

Albert Matthews, Ernest L. Gay, 

The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, Treasurer. 
December JI, 1915. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY. 

The Committee on the Library reports as follows for the 
year 191 5 : 

During the year one hundred and six volumes and fifty- 
seven pamphlets have been added to the Library of the 
Society, and the Committee has expended the sum of $44.73 
for its maintenance. 

Thirty-two volumes and seven pamphlets have been pur- 
chased at book sales, and the biographical section has been 
especially benefited thereby. 

It is to be hoped that members of the Society and others 
interested in its welfare will aid in the development, to the 
fullest extent, of this important feature, for the history of a 
municipality is largely written in biographies of its distin- 
guished citizens. 



24 

Many volumes and pamphlets have been added by gift 
during the year, and among the contributors may be named 
President Norcross, and Charles H. Taylor, Jr. Edwin S. 
Crandon has also given three books which relate to the 
mother town of Boston, England. 

We have received from the Secretary of the Commonwealth, 
the Vital Records to 1850, of Amesbury, Cambridge, Chelms- 
ford, Rochester and Tyngsboro, all Massachusetts municipal- 
ities, and there have also been added the volume entitled The 
Famous Mather Byles, the History of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and The Life and Works of John Singleton Copley. 

The Society has acquired during the year several copies of 
Roxbury Directories issued between the years 1850 and 1866. 
It is desirable that this series shall be made complete. The 
Library should also have a full set of Charlestown Directo- 
ries, there being now two issues on its shelves. As is well 
known, these two cities, independent until 1868 and 1874, 
now form a part of Boston. 

The preparation of a card catalogue of the books and pam- 
phlets in the Library has been materially advanced during the 
past year, chiefly through the personal endeavors of the Chair- 
man. It is hoped that this important work will be completed 
during the coming year. 

The Committee expects soon to begin the purchase of 
books with the income of the James Lyman Whitney Library 
Fund. To perpetuate the features and memory of the gen- 
erous founder of this fund, there should be made a suitable 
book-plate to place in the publications so acquired. The com- 
ing year will undoubtedly see this feature carried into effect 

For the Committee, 

Francis H. Brown, E. Percival Merritt, 

Walter K. Watkins, John Woodbury, 

William G. Shillaber, The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, Clerk. 
December 31 , 1915. 



25 



ADDITIONS TO THE SOCIETY'S LIBRARY, 1915. 



Donors. 


Vol- 
umes. 


Pam- 
phlets. 


American Historical Association 


2 


1 


Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 




1 


Bayley, Frank W. ..... . 


1 




Boston Cemetery Department .... 




1 


Boston, City of . 


1 




Boston Public Library ..... 




5 


Boston Public Works Department 


1 




Boston Transit Commission .... 


1 






1 




Bunker Hill Monument Association . 




1 




1 




Clapp, William W., Estate of ... . 


4 


1 




1 











Essex Institute ....... 




5 


Fifth Avenue Bank of New York 


1 






2 




General Society of the War of 1812 . 




1 


Hill, Mrs. Theoda J. Hill 


1 




Lewis, Isaac Newton ...... 


3 




Massachusetts, Commissioner of Public Records 






of 


1 




Massachusetts General Hospital 




1 


Massachusetts Historical Society 


6 




Massachusetts, Secretary of State of . 






Matthews, Albert 




1 






1 


Medford Historical Society .... 




4 


Merritt, E. Percival ...... 




1 


New England Historic Genealogical^Society 




4 


Carried forward ..... 


3° 


28 



26 



Donors. 


Vol- 
umes. 


Pam 

PHLETS. 


Brought forward 








3° 


28 


Nichols, Arthur H., M. D. 




. 




i 




Norcross, Grenville H. 




. 




4 


2 


Old Colony Trust Company 




. 






I 


Pillsbury, Albert E. . 




. 




i 




Purchased 




. 




57 


IO 


Reed, Miss Helen Leah 








i 




Shumway, Franklin P. 




. 




i 




Smith, Frank 








i 




Smithsonian Institution 




. 




i 




Society of Colonial Wars in the 


Commonwes 


tlth 






of Massachusetts . 










I 


Society for the Preservation 


of 


New England 






Antiquities 




. 






I 


State Street Trust Company 




. 






I 


Taylor, Charles H., Jr. 




. 




7 


9 


Veteran Association, First Corps 


of Cadets 






4 


Wetherbee, Winthrop 




. 




i 




White, James C, M. D. . 








i 




Total 


106 


57 



27 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

At the beginning of the year 191 5 the Society had in its 
Permanent Fund the sum of $55,211.32, consisting of bonds 
amounting in value, at par, to $54,000.00, an uninvested 
balance of $1,031.60 deposited in the New England Trust 
Co., and the James Lyman Whitney Library Fund of $179.72 
deposited in the Franklin Savings Bank. 

The Fund has been increased during the past year by the 
fees of thirty-one Life Members, amounting to $925.00, in- 
terest on the fund, $2,219.15, a bequest of $2,000.00 from 
the estate of Joseph C. Storey, for many years a valued mem- 
ber of the Society, and an increase of $54.57 in the James 
Lyman Whitney Library Fund. 

The Committee has purchased during the year bonds of the 
Province of Manitoba to the value of $3,000.00 at a cost of 
$3,010.83. 

At the close of the year 191 5, therefore, the Permanent 
Fund of the Society amounted to $58,179.21, comprising 
bonds valued at par at $57,000.00, an uninvested balance of 
$944.92 on deposit in the New England Trust Co., and the 
James Lyman Whitney Library Fund of $234.29 deposited 
in the Franklin Savings Bank. 

For the Committee, 

Grenville H. Norcross, Francis H. Manning, 

COURTENAY GUILD, 

Charles F. Read, Clerk. 
December 31 , igiS- 



28 



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3° 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEMORIALS. 

The Committee begs to report as follows for the year 
1915: 

The Committee considered during the year a proposition 
to place two bronze memorial tablets, one on the building at 
109 Court Street where the telephone was "born," on June 
2, 1875 ; the other at the corner of Harrison Avenue and 
Exeter Place, to mark the site where, on March 10, 1876, 
in a dwelling house then standing there, Alexander Graham 
Bell transmitted to Thomas Augustus Watson the first intel- 
ligible spoken message by wire. The Committee reported 
further, that at the request of the New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, the name of that Company would 
be joined with that of this Society on the tablets. 

The Directors approved of the proposition, and the con- 
sent of the owners of the buildings has been obtained, and 
the Society expects to unveil these commemorative tablets on 
March 10th next, the fortieth anniversarv of the second of 
these events. 

The Committee now has in charge the replacing of the 
five-mile stone at Allston. 

For the Committee, 

COURTENAY GUILD, BOYLSTON A. BEAL, 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

Charles F. Read, 
December JI, 1915. Clerk. 



3i 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS. 

The Committee which was appointed to nominate Officers 
of the Bostonian Society for the ensuing year, begs to report 
that it has attended to its duty and proposes the following 
candidates : — 

For Clerk and Treasurer. 
Charles F. Read. 



For Directors. 



COURTENAY GUILD, 

Francis H. Brown, 
Joseph Grafton Minot, 
Henry W. Cunningham, 



Nominating 
Committee. 



Francis H. Manning, 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr., 
John W. Farwell, v 
Grenville H. Norcross, 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

Frederick B. Allen, 
Sarah Shurtleff, 
Charles Wells Hall 
Nathaniel J. Rust, 
James F. Bliss, 
January 5, 1 91 6. 

The Report of the Committee was accepted, and the Society 
then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year. 
The result as reported by the tellers — Messrs. Nathaniel W 
Ladd and E. Percival Merritt — showed the unanimous choice 
of those named on the ballot, as nominated. 

It was ordered that the President's Report, together with 
the reports of the several Committees as submitted at the 
Annual Meeting, and the Treasurer's Report, with the Mem- 
bership Rolls, etc., be printed in the Annual Proceedings. 

On motion, the Society then adjourned. 

Charles F. Read, Clerk. 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 



The Permanent Fund of the Society includes the following 



Boston Memorial Association Fund 

Robert C. Billings Memorial Fund 

Edward I. Browne Bequest 

George O. Carpenter Memorial Fund 

Benjamin H. Dewing Fund 

Curtis Guild Memorial Fund 

Otis Norcross Centennial Memorial Fund 

Catherine P. Perkins Bequest 

Samuel E. Sawyer Bequest 

Joseph H. Stickney Bequest 

Joseph C. Storey Bequest . 

William B. Trask Bequest . 

Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., Bequest 

James F. Hunnewell Memorial Fund . 

James L. Whitney Library Fund 



*i,i79 5 1 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

100 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

4,000 00 

4,610 87 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

500 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

234 29 



(32) 



33 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,— AN APPRECIATION. 

A Paper read before the Bostonian Society by Marshall Putnam 
Thompson, at its Annual Meeting January i8, 1916. 

Foreword. — This address was delivered without notes and after- 
wards written out from memory, at the request of the Society. It 
results that it may contain some matters that did not appear in the 
original address, and that some matters therein referred to have been 
omitted. 

Benjamin Franklin was born in the age when it was the 
fashion to believe and to obey. 

He was one of the pioneers of the age when it was the 
fashion to disbelieve and to disobey. 

The age that believed and obeyed did so because men 
thought they had attained the truth, the age that disbelieved 
and disobeyed did so because men sought the truth. When 
Franklin was born men obeyed Louis the Fourteenth, the 
Great Elector and Peter the Great. Southern Europe obeyed 
the Bourbons, Central Europe obeyed the Hapsburgs. Eng- 
land having disobeyed James the Second was settling down 
to a pretty thorough obedience to William the Third. Men 
believed at Notre Dame, at Canterbury, at Geneva and the 
churches of Boston, what they were told to believe. They 
also believed that light was light, that heat was heat or per- 
haps was the fluid phlogiston, that there were six planets ; most 
believed that comets emerged from the infinite, vanished into 
the unknown and were portents of divine wrath ; earthquakes, 
the punishments of God ; lightning, the finger of the Al- 
mighty, and matter only divisible by the saw or the chisel. 

Half the Christian nations believing one dogma, were fight- 
ing the other half believing another, in perhaps the last war 
in which nations were to be aligned because they were Cath- 
olic or Protestant. The Edict of Nantes had been revoked, 



34 

and while if men disbelieved, they were not burnt, they were 
ostracized. White men were serfs in Russia and Germany 
and black men slaves in America. 

Of the four great criminal beliefs of the world, — belief in 
witchcraft, belief in religious persecution, belief in slavery, 
and belief in war for conquest, — only the first had vanished, 
the second was alive but ill, and sometimes convalescent, the 
third remained, the last still apparently remains. 

During Franklin's life, he saw the worship at Notre Dame 
abolished, saw the great-grandson of Louis the Fourteenth on 
the way to the scaffold, saw critical philosophy established, 
saw Voltaire hailed as a prophet, and in the United States 
knew of at least two worthy men of the highest value to the 
State who did not conform to any recognized creed, and were 
yet religious men in the ordinary acceptation of the term, 
— himself and General Knox. 

The acting regent of Bavaria, the founder of the British 
Institution, the father of education for the poor of Germany, 
a vigorous and practical worker for the amelioration of pov- 
erty, — an American farmer's son born at Woburn, Massa- 
chusetts, had established the vibratory law of heat ; a protege^ 
was solving the mystery of optics ; Professor Winthrop of 
Harvard had established experimental physics and acquitted 
the Deity of the crime of earthquakes ; another planet had 
been added to the galaxy of heaven, comets had been found 
to be held by gravitation in measured courses ; Lavoisier was 
deducing the chemical constitution of matter, the small hold- 
ings of England were being united in large holdings, the 
spinning Jenny had founded Manchester and he, himself, if 
you will pardon the pronunciation which was taught at Dart- 
mouth twenty-five years ago — " Eripuit Fulmen Coelo, Scep- 
trumque Tyrannis." 

While the men of Lexington upset a political order, and 
three men of Massachusetts profoundly revolutionized men's 
conceptions of three great cosmic forces, the age of Franklin 
was also the age of recognized immorality. 



35 

France was ruled by prostitutes, every German princeling 
had his seraglio ; one wing of the palace of St. James sheltered 
the King's mistresses ; Tom Jones and Tristram Shandy, 
Joseph Andrews and Lovelace, their friends, acquaintances 
and companions travelled the high roads and infested the inns 
of old England, and the number of illegitimate births in New 
England still startles candidates for membership in heredity 
societies. Drunkenness was almost universal, the Tobacco 
Parliament sat at Potsdam, five hundred gallons of rum was 
part of the presentation of Dartmouth, and no minister was 
ordained, and no church raised unless the proceedings were 
preserved in alcohol. 

Individual ability was" publicly subordinated to money. 
Money openly bought a commission or a baronetcy, a Burke 
or a Mirabeau, the members of the Second Continental Con- 
gress were considered, and truly, a " pack of bought scoun- 
drels." 

Epitomizing this age was Benjamin Franklin, an age begin- 
ning in ignorance and baseness, ending in a new order of 
hope and progress. It was the age of social revolution, of 
intellectual revolution, of industrial, religious and political 
revolution, and Franklin was in and of himself all these revo- 
lutions, and his life is not only the life of a man but the 
history of an epoch. 

The man and not the epoch has for the greater number, 
the greater interest, the human interest. Victor Hugo has 
typified for all time the victory of character over environment, 
in " Les Miserables." Is it too far a cry to perceive moving 
through the eighteenth century in Benjamin Franklin, a figure 
like that of Jean Val Jean, starting in the mire, living a hero 
and dying a man ? 

Review the familiar story, written largely by himself, and 
uninfluenced by later fame and the wonderful literary style, 
see a poor boy, his schooling ending at ten, apprenticed to 
hard labor, harshly treated by an older brother, looked on 
askance by the respectable ; coarse, material, crudely skep- 



36 

tical. At sixteen he runs away, fills up with rum on his voy- 
age, is deceived by the highest social and political personage 
of his new home, by the Governor of Pennsylvania, " A man 
with a title," finds himself a poor working lad of the lower 
classes, penniless, friendless in the wilderness of London. 
He forgets his word to a girl in Philadelphia, is a companion 
of drunkards and prostitutes, haunts the low taverns, is cov- 
ered with filth and descends to the mire, his highest ambition 
to open a swimming school. True he had read for twenty 
times " Locke on the Human Understanding " and doubtless 
his mind was filled, or he afterwards thought it was, in such 
intervals as he had from brown jug and brown Betty, with 
plans inspired by Locke's "Projects," but objectively he was 
as dirty-minded and as coarse a prentice lad as could be found 
in Cheapside, he was just that, no more and no better than 
his class and condition. 

He makes a step out of the mire, as he had disbelieved the 
shibboleths of a Boston Sunday, and experience had made 
him disbelieve the shibboleth of the honor of "A man of title," 
he comes to a disbelief in the shibboleth of necessary drunk- 
enness, he becomes temperate, remains temperate, and be- 
comes a protagonist for temperance. He becomes less self 
indulgent, but less ethical, he devotes his energies to getting 
on ; it is, however, the proper age for that sort of energy. 

He is mean, calculating, later they call it wonderful shrewd- 
ness, acumen and perspicacity ; " Caveat emptor — Let the 
buyer beware," is good law but not altruism, he exemplifies 
" Caveat emptor." He returns to Philadelphia, engages in 
business, tries and fails to negotiate a sordid marriage. Sud- 
denly he does marry his old sweetheart, the girl he for- 
got in London. There is, however, little affection in the 
matter. She is a woman of doubtful position, has already 
had a husband who has deserted her, no one knows whether 
he is living or dead or whether she is wife or widow. She 
was, however, a good and true wife to Franklin for forty 
years, and the biographer Parton says Franklin was true to 



37 

her. As a wedding present Franklin brought home an ille- 
gitimate child, his son by a mother unknown to us. Was 
the marriage whim or atonement or calculation ? 

If the novel closes with marriage, here is a vulgar and 
common story. Browning makes Michael say to Festus in 
Paracelsus there are " two points in the adventure of the 
diver " 

One — a beggar when he prepares to plunge 
One — when a prince he rises with his pearl. 
I 

Benjamin Franklin was groping in the muck, we have his 
word he was seeking for the pearl, but where in all this is 
the " Noble " the " Benignant " Franklin of history, the 
" Philosopher," in whose noble face, said Abigail Adams 
"Appeared every Christian virtue " ? 

Where in Jean Val Jean, the thief, was Monsieur Made- 
lain e ? 

When did Franklin escape from the galleys ? 

I fancy no Bishop would have risked to Franklin the ad- 
monition to Jean Val Jean, " It is your soul I am buying for 
you. I withdrew it from dark thought and from the spirit of 
perdition " — had there been, I am afraid there would have 
been a quick answer of " Caveat emptor." 

He does change, he does grow, he appears in another phase, 
he maintains a high character for honesty and fair dealing, he 
teaches every farmer's kitchen in America that " Honesty is 
the best policy," and bribes the post rider to distribute his 
newspapers; esteemed of all men he becomes wealthy, he retires 
from business with a fortune at forty, he begins to think of 
others, his hand is ever in his own pocket and in every other 
man's pocket for charity and benevolence. He is Monsieur 
Madelaine, Capitalist and Philanthropist. He is useful. In 
a sense he is buying respect and is paying to the conscience 
fund. Self-indulgence possessed him ; self-interest has driven 
him ; now becomes dominant, intellectualism. He has become 
familiar with all literature. Plato and Aristotle possess him, 



38 

he acquires French, Italian and Spanish, he reasons mathe- 
matically, the mystery of natures forces attracts him, he is 
beyond the tavern and Cheapside, beyond the counting-room, 
beyond Philadelphia. 

It is now the fashion to think that a man devoting himself 
to many fields of endeavor must have slight acquaintance with 
any. It is the age of specialization. Franklin's theory was 
that the " true aim of the intellect was to attain to such an 
understanding that to it, all knowledge and all activity should 
be germane." That view is out of fashion, the German Goose 
Step drove it out. "The field of learning is too vast." 
"Stick to your last," have no clutter of Greek and Calculus 
near it or bury your nose in your books, take a minor and a 
major, come out a Ph. D., but keep away from the Forum, 
the Trinaculum, and the Areopagus. Sometimes, however, a 
Gladstone or a Henry Wilson appears, and you question 
whether the field is too vast for the ploughmen or the plough- 
men too small for the field. 

Philosophy and learning when coupled with Franklin mean 
to most of America, Poor Richard and flying a kite in a thun- 
der storm. Poor Richard does not measure Franklin nor 
entirely express him, " Take care of the pennies and the 
pounds will take care of themselves," " Be diligent in busi- 
ness, you will stand before kings," have doubtless started 
countless boys on the road to fortune and doubtless stifled 
the impulses of countless, generous lads, but when Franklin 
had come to himself, and indeed before, on the testimony of 
others, not on that of his biography, he was never able, or at 
least on notable occasions, such as the mission to France, did 
not keep business-like accounts, and it is a curious commen- 
tary that John Adams considered him slack and lazy. He 
always had both pence and pounds for any one in need, from 
a table companion to the United States of America and 
had a passion for entertaining. It is a pity that with his 
fame there is the impression that he was a sort of Scrooge 
on the day before Christmas, and only played the part of 



39 

the Justice, which part was that of wise saws and modern 
instances. 

The average man also wonders to-day in view of the great 
experiments of an Helmholtz, a Faraday, a Sir Oliver Lodge, 
an Edison, why all this pother about a kite, but in Franklin's 
day men had not got much beyond the old-fashioned theory 
that the hand of the rubber imparted a force to the amber 
that displayed itself as magnetism, and dully wondered or 
stupidly shut their eyes to electrical phenomena, the true 
solution was unknown, was at the most hinted at. 

Franklin apparently inductively arrived at the true solution 
of a mystery, and believed even before his experiments that 
electricity was a mighty force everywhere existent. The key 
at the end of the silken kite cord by its spark did unlock to 
the uses of the world a knowledge of the mighty, omnipres- 
ent, perhaps omnicient, apparently eternal energy, substance, 
force, whatever you call it that we know as electricity, and 
when his kite had made contact with the clouds he had proved 
a fact of stupendous and revolutionary import, that made his 
name resound throughout the world, it even startled Kant in 
Germany as he wrote that time and space were forms of our 
own intuitions, and at Louvain, now alas no more, the book 
of Job ceased to be quoted as a scientific text book. 

Most of us in this room are of the generation that saw 
the publication of the " Origin of Species " and have known 
the profound sensation it created. Write eighteenth, for 
nineteenth century, and Franklin for Darwin, and think a 
moment. 

Franklin was out of the mire. In Tyndall's " Belfast 
Address" of August 19, 1874, is this quotation which, with- 
out comment, elucidates my point, — " Mr. Buckle sought to 
detach intellectual achievement from moral force. He gravely 
erred, for without moral force to whip it into shape, the 
achievement of the intellect would be poor indeed." 

Now opens another phase, scientific men are not gregari- 
ous. " Faraday at a certain period of his career renounced 



40 

dining out, Darwin lived remote from the bustle of the world 
in his quiet home in Kent," — but Franklin at the height of 
his scientific fame, at fifty-four years of age, went to England 
and turned Cicero to plead the cause of a province against 
an English Verres, the cause of the people of Pennsylvania 
against the Penns, proprietors of Pennsylvania, over a matter 
of taxation, a legal question and to be argued by a man not 
trained to the bar, when Mansfield and Eldon were only 
" Principi inter pares." 

His arguments won the attention of educated England, 
ever attracted by that most difficult of intellectual exercises, 
open oral debate ; he was the friend of Robertson and Hume 
and Dr. Priestly ; without a college education he received the 
highest degree of Oxford University, at a period when Black- 
stone was giving his lectures that were embodied in his "Com- 
mentaries on the Common Law." He also received the 
degree of quaint and learned St. Andrews, the nursery of 
Scotch metaphysicians. After three years and a half he went 
home recognized as one of the strong men of the British 
Empire. 

Jean Val Jean had become " a man about fifty years of age, 
always preoccupied and always good natured," — "he was now 
« M. l'Maire.' " 

At home, fresh from the intellectual world, Franklin threw 
himself into active affairs, he had long been Postmaster, he 
became an army contractor for Braddock's army. He became 
nationalized, hating war as only an intellectual man can hate 
war, he urged the dignity and necessity of national defence, 
" Do not rely on England, we can do better for ourselves 
what she would do for us," and "there is no obligation to be 
repaid, by the surrender of local liberty." For a brief period 
he was a soldier, a colonel, and did well what the English had 
done ill or not at all, which was to establish three forts for 
the protection of the western frontier. These were little 
things, in a great thing he failed, the endeavor to unite the 
Colonies in a Continental Union. 



4i 

Miles Standish, who is reading Caesar's Gallic War, says 
to John Alden in Longfellow's poem, "I am a fighter and 
you are a writer, but this man was both writer and fighter." 
Monsieur Madelaine now M. l'Maire "Remained as simple 
as at first, he had a serious eye — and the thoughtful counte- 
nance of a philosopher, — he had all sorts of useful secrets he 
taught the peasants — the people would say ' There is a rich 
man who does not show pride.' " 

For Franklin's services in England and at home he made 
no charge, they ceased to speak of him as the " Shrewd " 
Franklin, doubtless they thought him a poor business 
man. 

Again he went to England, he went to argue against the 
return of Canada to the French, and he remained to argue 
what was apparently a sordid question of taxes. The latter 
question he could have easily argued as a squabble of pounds 
and pence, and as a matter of pounds and pence, the English 
were inclined to be generous. The taxed tea of Boston was 
thirty pence the pound cheaper than the taxed tea of Lon- 
don. The more one studies the question that brought on the 
Revolution, the more one appreciates that England had much 
as a matter of precedent in her contention, that she was not 
inclined to be tyrannical, that only a fraction of the English 
supported her own position, and that the same spirit of con- 
ciliation was shown as in the recent years of the Irish ques- 
tion, that her public men did not perceive a self-evident fact, 
the essential autonomy of America, and that America was not 
trying to save money but to stand for what she believed to be 
a principle, and that the head, not the heart, was at fault for 
the final rupture. 

Franklin lifted the issue to the plane of a great constitu- 
tional question and argued not as a Colonial seeking a rebate 
from the assessors, but as a member of the English race con- 
tending for the true interpretation of the British Constitution, 
not of England but of the British Empire, he was also ipso 
facto, a great English party leader. 



42 

The phrase "Taxation without representation," does not 
entirely or adequately characterize the issue, Lord Mansfield 
argued truly, early in the ten years' debate, that half the men 
of Lancashire were taxed but not represented, and reading 
closely we find on both sides a shifting of position which 
finally fairly defined the true question. The King's party 
came closer and closer to a contention which, if carried out, 
would have undone the work of the English Revolution and 
put George the Third in the position of Charles the First 
prior to Cromwell, and have established the fashion of abso- 
lutism that had prevailed on the continent, and with which 
George was familiar as King of Hanover. By the strength 
of the argument in regard to taxation and representation they 
were inclined to propose the sitting of Americans in Parlia- 
ment, which proposal Franklin avoided. They were also 
driven by Franklin's arguments close to the untenable posi- 
tion that Parliament complied with the requests of the Throne 
for taxes and had the right to collect the King's money any- 
where in the King's dominions, — Franklin took the unassail- 
able position that the people of England granted such taxes 
as they pleased by the vote of the representatives of the 
localities where they lived, that Massachusetts, Virginia, 
England and Ireland were separate States, all on the same 
footing in the Empire, and that the people of Massachusetts, 
by their representatives voted such money for the general 
purposes of the Empire, or their portion of the Empire, as 
they chose, precisely as did the people of England. The 
historical fact was with Franklin and his view of the Brit- 
ish Constitution, as epitomized in his speeches, rules the 
British Empire. Canada, Australia, South Africa, England 
herself unquestionably live under the theory of Govern- 
ment contended for by a great gentleman who finished his 
schooling at ten, spent his youth as a vulgar workman 
in the low taverns of Cheapside, was the son of an hum- 
ble man and born in a little frame house in the City of 
Boston. 



43 

It is also unquestionable that had there not been an Amer- 
ican Revolution, there would have been in London either a 
Louis XIV or an English Revolution, the chains of Yorkshire 
and Lincoln could be heard clanking on Boston Common as 
well as those of Patrick Henry's Virginia. 

He spent ten years in England, ten years obscured in pop- 
ular estimation by the greater dramatic interest of his years 
in France. 

In his character another phase 'appears, it was noticed that 
keenly as he debated that he fought without bitterness, he 
never descended to personality, he persuaded but did not 
antagonize. He had the rare ability infrequently granted to 
laymen of combining professional courtesy with professional 
courage ; his opponents in the ministry regarded him as a 
personal friend. To their credit it should be remembered 
that his salaried post as Postmaster, which was within the 
gift of the King, remained to him until almost the time when 
the rifles cracked at Lexington. Jean Val Jean had won the 
respect of Javart. 

The adjectives "practical," "shrewd," drop away in esti- 
mates regarding him. He is the persuasive Franklin, the 
learned Franklin. His ability was unquestioned. " He is 
smarter than all of you together," said King George who 
almost alone, sincerely and conscientiously hated him. 

In smaller things he was also recognized. In the age of 
Sheridan he was a famous raconteur. In the age of wits his 
name was coupled with that of Horace Walpole. In the age 
of polish he was a great social figure. He was winning argu- 
mentative England, he had won social and intellectual En- 
gland, — he was fast winning political England. Mercantile 
England, as represented by the merchants of London, was 
with him. He was opposed only by manufacturing England, 
by absolutist England and by the England of special privilege. 
He, not the King, really named Lord Dartmouth to head a 
cabinet, he was the inspiration of a large section, if not the 
whole, of the Whigs, but at all times he was pre-eminently 



44 

an American. The worth and dignity of America was on his 
lips, he did not assume, he was imbued with the essential 
greatness of America. To Europe Franklin became America 
and in him Europe saw not a remote and unknown colony 
nor an obscure colonial pleading with a master, but a great 
and growing nation arguing with England as an equal at the 
bar of the Empire. 

One may not in the scope of an address of this character 
devote much time or attention to details universally familiar, 
but as an example of a characteristic method of Franklin, of 
his ingenuity and his versatility, and of his ability to enlist 
public support, I would call attention to one of his famous 
jokes quoted by nearly all of his biographers, recently in the 
American Statesmen Series. Tired of that dullness which 
refused to see what was to him the self-evident fact of the 
essential autonomy of America, he caused to be published in 
an English newspaper what purported to be the views of the 
King of Prussia relative to a right of levying taxes in En- 
gland, putting into the King of Prussia's mouth the argu- 
ments of the ministerial party. England bit, took the bait, — 
hook and sinker, took the skit seriously and for three weeks 
fumed with wrath. Franklin's own host at a country house 
where he was visiting, a bluff English squire, entered the 
breakfast room with a paper in his hand on the morning of 
the publication of the article. " Have you seen this," he 
sputtered, "the King of Prussia says he can tax England. 
For aught we know he may have at this very moment a hun- 
dred thousand men on the march. Confound his impudence." 

Probably the majority of England, at least of thinking En- 
gland, was with Franklin in his contention, they began to see 
in the representative of Massachusetts, England herself fight- 
ing for English rights, and the King's party became terrified, 
lost its temper. In the current political phrase of to-day, 
they must " Get Franklin." 

The famous Hutchinson letters, so familiar that they need 
only to be mentioned, gave the opportunity. Franklin was 



45 

summoned, an old man verging on the seventies, to the bar 
of the House of Commons and made to stand through a long 
and trying day, while the mean and vitriolic Wedderburn, 
" The greatest rascal unhung in the kingdom " said King 
George, poured out upon him the caustic vials of personal 
and party wrath, endeavoring to break down and becloud the 
fame and character of the great American protagonist. He 
failed, the Ministry resolved on coercion, the colonies were 
ready to resist. 

Now Franklin loved England,' and, in spite of his long 
struggle, respected England. He did not believe in war. 
His mental conceptions had grown from pictures of self- 
indulgence to visions of wealth, from that to integrity of 
character, from that to the possibilities of mental accomplish- 
ment, from that to altruism, from that to the rights of states 
and nations, and at last reached the philosopher's attitude of 
regarding not the rights alone of nations but their interests, 
the interests of humanity, of the world, not alone the contem- 
porary interests but the future interests of humanity, — these 
to his mind were not academic, but the total of individual 
happiness and suffering, the life of a slim boy of the Suffolk 
or Middlesex Militia, outweighed the interpretation of the 
British Constitution. It was his letter to John Adams that 
contained the words, never was there a " Good war nor a bad 
peace." 

He had grown prophetic, he said Geography and events 
would shortly settle the dispute. There appeared to him as 
if actually in existence, the colonies expanding until an Amer- 
ican nation filled the continent, he saw vast cities rivalling 
London, he saw the growth of incalculable riches, he saw 
vast fields, where, to use Mr. Grady's striking description a 
few years ago before the Merchants' Association, the " sun 
was tangled in the tassels of the corn," the country white 
with cotton, "tobacco catching the soft aroma of the rain." 
He saw the force of mighty rivers harnessed to industry and 
saw three millions of men scattered along the Atlantic coast, 



4 6 

multiplying by birth and immigration till they equalled the 
population of Italy, France and England, and after that, prob- 
ably increasing beyond the population of any nation known 
to history. He did not see the precious metals that slum- 
bered in the ground, but he did foresee a wealth of energy, 
of industry, of hope and of ambition as the heritage of every 
barefoot boy that should follow in his own footsteps, and with 
this vision in mind he was all for peace, he was ready to yield 
the principle for which he had fought, ready to advise Massa- 
chusetts to pay for the tea in Boston harbor, ready to do any- 
thing to avoid the cutting of throats. The horrors of a civil 
war appalled him. The confession in the face of absolutism 
that Constitutional government was a failure, — because that 
was just what the war of the Revolution seemed to be, and 
that was the argument made, horrified him. " Wait," he 
pleaded, " It will settle itself." Perhaps he was right, but I 
think I remember that O'Connell once said of the Irish ques- 
tion something to the effect that, " It is not enough to con- 
sider Ireland's rights, you must regard her fears and her 
resentments," and fears and resentments ruled the hour that 
John Bright in 1876 said in perhaps the finest plea for uni- 
versal peace ever made, every Englishman had learned to 
deplore and to regret as the time of England's greatest 
blunder. 

Franklin arrived at home in May, the shot of Concord 
Bridge "had echoed round the world," still he urged concilia- 
tion. No property right was worth a murder, Concord, Lex- 
ington were regrettable incidents, the question still might be 
adjusted, but Bunker Hill was the last straw, at the news 
told by the dusty couriers to the Congress, Franklin flamed 
into wrath. From that hour 

Suffolk's stern voice was harsh and rough. 

Jean Val Jean hurried to the barricade. 
The extent of the peace party and its strength at the time 
of the Revolution is little appreciated. In Franklin's attitude 



47 

its attitude had been established, what may be believed to be 
the characteristic national attitude of America. America will 
not fight over a property right or over a purely academic 
question, however her rights are injured or her pockets 
picked, not from fear but from conscience. Attack her citi- 
zens wilfully and she will be angry but will argue. Commit 
murder, kill Americans, and sooner or later America fights, 
that sort of wrong she has never forgiven nor forgotten. She 
may be hampered by the party in power, it goes out of power 
and she fights. 

Neither orders in council nor impressment of seamen would, 
I believe, have resulted in the War of 1812 had it not been 
for the unhealed wound of the unprovoked attack on the 
Chesapeake. The Mexican War, the war that seems to dis- 
prove my statement, was preceded by the Alamo. Indecision 
vanished at the first death in Sumter's garrison. " Remem- 
ber the Maine." I am not here advancing an opinion that 
America ought, under such conditions, to fight, I am simply 
stating what is, I believe, an historical, psychological fact, 
and I believe Benjamin Franklin, epitomized America, more 
than any other figure in our history ; furthermore, when the 
clock has struck, when the murder has been committed, Amer- 
ica follows the man who says, " I will fight it out on this line 
if it takes all summer," and abandons that man who, like a 
certain Governor of Galilee nineteen hundred years ago, aban- 
dons an innocent victim and goes out and washes his hands 
in the face of the multitude. Again, this is not intended as 
an opinion, but as a view of a fact. 

Franklin was seventy-four years old, he was racked with 
pain, if he stood with the colonies he might expect an halter, 
if he accepted the English offers which were dazzling, to sup- 
port Britain or merely stand aside, he could expect for his 
few remaining years a life of elegant leisure for which he 
always longed and never attained. 

Some people divide all human lives into the doers and the 
dodgers, Franklin was a doer. It was apparently easier to 



4 8 

be a dodger. He turned his fortune into cash to the amount 
of forty thousand pounds and gave it to the Cause, he also 
said, " If there is any use for an old remnant such as I am, 
make use of me as you desire." He had dowered Cosette, — 
his Cosette was the country. 

There is not time in the space given me, to describe the 
greatest and most memorable period of his life, his mission to 
France. When the news of the mission first reached London, 
England thought he was running away, then said it was a 
greater blow to the English than would have been the loss of 
the Battle of Long Island. The details are familiar. For 
the purposes of this thesis it may be sufficient and not too 
fanciful to see in the Franklin of France an instrument ex- 
pressly adapted by all its preliminary forging, a man expressly 
prepared by all his experience for the purpose of obtaining 
the independence of this country by the aid of France, and 
joining in sympathy for all time the two great future re- 
publics. 

Franklin in France was an ambassador to humanity, dream- 
ing of a new dawn. To the sans-culottes he was the triumph 
of the sans-culottes, to the disobedient the triumph of dis- 
obedience ; to the unbelievers, unbelief justified as a search 
for truth ; to the Churchman, the defender of Christian 
ethics ; to the mystics, a Mason of unknown degree coming 
from the East through the West. To the Bourgeois, the 
successful business man ; to the professions, a profound con- 
stitutional lawyer ; to an Aristocracy, where brilliance was all 
that was left of power, the prince of wits ; to the scientists, 
his plain suit of spotted Manchester velvet was the mantle of 
Aristotle ; to the world, he was the triumph of Democracy, 
the first great Democrat who " diligent in his business was to 
stand before kings " — and, may I add, to a world dominated 
by women — a man of gallantry. 

The ale-house and brothel, the counting-room and the study, 
the field of war, the pages of Plato, the mystery of the un- 
known, the honors of Universities, the keenness of debate, 



49 

poverty, labor, riches, practicality, ideality, accomplishment, 
hope, energy, will, ambition, a continuous, a consistent, a tri- 
umphant progress made of this first of Americans to be 
known of the world, "the noble " Franklin, "the benignant " 
Franklin, the Franklin of " every Christian virtue " — Amer- 
ica herself. 

Mark Tapley in Dickens' " Martin Chuzzlewit " tells Mar- 
tin that if he were to paint the American eagle he would paint 
it like every mean and miserable bird he could imagine, from 
the bat to the ostrich. "And," adds Martin Chuzzlewit, 
" like a Phoenix, for its power of springing from the ashes of 
its faults and vices and soaring up anew to the sky." 

And France, in Franklin's day, followed the directions 
of the then unwritten Martin ; let us hope the picture will 
remain and not be changed to the bat, the magpie, the 
peacock and the others that flew before the eyes of Mr. 
Tapley. 

His actual services in France were incalculable. He was 
reckoned the greatest diplomat of the century, the theories 
of his old age which he developed at Paris of the rights of 
neutral nations and of the rights of non-combatants of bellig- 
erent nations, of international law, which we adopted, whose 
defence has been our one great service as a member of the 
family of nations, slowly, steadily have gained ground. Yes- 
terday the treaty negotiated with Prussia settled the quarrel 
of the " William Frye." Just now in danger of being ob- 
scured, these theories of Franklin still exist. They are a 
coral reef built up imperceptibly, a reef which mariner bellig- 
erents avoid though they claim it is uncharted. It is barely 
visible in the waves of war, the breakers burst over it, but it 
is there, is charted, is steadily rising, will continue to rise until 
within shall be a safe haven for every national vessel, her 
boats, tackle, apparel and furniture, her crew and passengers. 
For its protection in the past we have gone to war. By its 
assertion through many years, war has been avoided. It 
should be protected by us in the interests of the world by 



5Q 

every power at our present or future command. In it is the 
norm of the federation of the world. 

His activities did not cease when he returned. 

He became the first President, as they called it, of Penn- 
sylvania, at the beginning of the Revolution he had been one 
of the drafters of the Declaration of Independence, at its 
close was one of the framers of the Constitution. His last 
public act was the worthy close of the series, he drafted and 
signed a petition as President of the American Abolition So- 
ciety for the freeing of the slaves. 

The last words of this man of innumerable energies, who 
attempted everything, who did multitudinous things, who was 
never idle and always doing, was the whisper to his daughter 
who wished to change his position on his pillow, " My dear, 
nothing is easy for the dying." 

Characterized as a pioneer of unbelief, what did Franklin 
disbelieve, or what believe ? No one can say, nor can anyone 
put in his mouth a creed, and, after all, why should a man 
have to be labelled after death, when living no one asked the 
number of his pew. 

In his youth he was polygamous, early abstained from wine, 
was willing to admit Mohammed was a prophet and that if a 
God, then but one God, but he was not a Mohammedan. He 
spoke ill of no man's religion, he persecuted no one, was hos- 
pitable, magnanimous, he sought behind the phantasmogoria 
of the senses the reality of nature's phenomena, he shunned 
a diet of meat, saw in history a gradual unfolding of a plan, 
pondered reincarnation, perhaps thought of evolution, believed 
in gravitation, gave up desires but certainly was not a Bud- 
dhist. He disbelieved in hereditary privilege yet studied 
genealogy, he visited in England the graves of his ancestors 
and sought in them worthiness, but certainly did not believe 
in Confucius. He perceived in coal and vegetation, in man, 
clouds and animals, the sun, — but did not believe in Zoro- 
aster. He returned good for evil, regarded his neighbor, fed 
the hungry, clothed the naked, put all that he had at the dis- 



5i 

posal of his country — which was giving to the poor and 
lending to Robert Morris ; had opponents but not enemies, 
paid his debts promptly, attended church regularly, loved all 
mankind, had infinite charity, was humble and not arrogant, 
was a lover of peace on earth, showed good will to men, and 
was not considered a Christian. 

He would not affirm a belief in the Trinity, yet was not a 
Jew. He would not admit that in the dogma " Christ is the 
Son of God," the article the could not be replaced by the arti- 
cle a, still you can hardly call him a Unitarian. He was not 
an atheist, nor a deist, a Roman Catholic, a Baptist, a Meth- 
odist, a Church of England man, a Quaker, a Congregation- 
alist nor a Presbyterian. He was an optimist, believed mind 
was greater than matter, but was too early to be a Christian 
Scientist. 

Dr. Stiles, President of Yale, asked him shortly before his 
death if he believed in the divinity of Christ. Franklin re- 
plied that to answer that question would require a profound 
study of the evidence, which at his years was scarcely worth 
while, as he should shortly, in the natural course of events, 
know certainly. 

Much of the reputation over which many sincere people 
have grieved, came from a sort of impatience Franklin seemed 
to feel at the restrictions of all creeds, the limited intelligence 
of many men and from his own breadth of fellowship that 
could not be confined by any class, an impatience, however, 
that was not vented in spleen or criticism, but was cloaked 
with the broad tolerance of a wit and a gentlemen. Some- 
times intolerance objects to tolerance exhibited even toward 
itself unless that tolerance is refused to other intolerancies. 

A great man of the world, of this world. Was he too busy 
to choose a road to other worlds, thinking that any path or 
the open fields would lead to his destination, or did he have a 
secret trail of his own ? Many men of the revolutionary 
epoch were tinged with a mysticism which saw behind all 
ordinary religions, a single underlying esoteric religion, of 



52 

which other religions were but exoteric manifestations, fitted 
to the understanding of their particular adherents. They 
called themselves Theosophists, a sect which still exists and 
has to-day its adherents in Boston and elsewhere. It is said 
that to this sect belonged the charlatan or wise man Caglios- 
tro, Lavateur, John Paul Jones, Lord Fairfax, Weishaupt of 
Ingolstadt, Swedenborg, the mysterious St. Germain. These 
men did undoubtedly have a touch of mysticism. They were 
members of the Masons and of various secret societies. It is 
said that behind the smoke and confusion of the French Rev- 
olution can be seen their cool and calculating but mystic 
minds. General Knox was tinged with this belief. Frank- 
lin was a Mason. It is said by some that the wonderful 
organization of the Jacobins was modeled on his plan of the 
Philadelphia Junta, and that he himself belonged to this mys- 
terious band of mystics, but Franklin even when he became 
the noble, the benignant Franklin, ever remained the practi- 
cal Franklin. He apparently always wished to prove before 
he affirmed, and for the Theosophist explaining all faiths by 
his mysticism, a greater degree of faith is required for the 
explanation than for the matter he explains, and I doubt very 
much whether Franklin was a Theosophist. 

A curious little incident affirms this. While Franklin was 
in France one of the excitements of the day was the appear- 
ance of Mesmer with his tubs and rods and his claim of 
curing diseases. By order of the King the matter was inves- 
tigated, and Franklin was chairman of the committee, and 
reported that neither rods nor tubs nor incantations gave rise 
to the curious effects produced, but that it was the effect of 
one mind upon another. He analytically reasoned out the 
basis of what we now call hypnotism. Had he been a mystic, 
a Theosophist, his explanation would have been far different. 

Victor Hugo closes his account of the death of Jean Val 
Jean by saying, — " The night was starless and very dark. 
Without doubt in the gloom some mighty angel was standing 
with outstretched wings awaiting the soul." 



53 

For a closing word in regard to Franklin I prefer what 
Carlyle wrote of La Pdrouse, "The brave navigator sailed 
into the unknown, the seekers search for him on every shore 
of every sea, they return and find him not, only a sad, mys- 
terious memory of him remains in every head and in every 
heart." 

Since his death the world has missed Franklin. 



54 



A BOY'S MEMORIES OF THE CIVIL WAR AND 
THE ASSASSINATION OF ABRAHAM LIN- 
COLN; TOGETHER WITH EXTRACTS FROM 
A CONTEMPORANEOUS DIARY. 

A Paper read before the Bostonian Society at a regular meeting, 
April 20, 19 1 5, by Charles F. Read, Clerk of the Society. 

Fifty years ago the fourteenth day of the present month, a 
momentous event in the history of the United States of Amer- 
ica occurred in the capital of the nation ; Abraham Lincoln, 
Sixteenth President, was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, 
an actor, in the City of Washington, just as the American 
people realized that after four years of fratricidal warfare 
their country might again become one and inseparable. 

The month of April, 1865, had already been made memo- 
rable, for on its ninth day, the Army of Northern Virginia, 
the last hope of the crumbling Confederate States of Amer- 
ica, had been surrendered by its accomplished, but misguided 
leader, Gen. Robert E. Lee, to the great commander of the 
military forces of the United States of America, Gen. Ulysses 
S. Grant. 

The month of April is indeed an historic one in American 
annals, for in the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and the 
Spanish War, the opening events have occurred in this month. 

My interest in the history of the Civil War has been greatly 
increased by reading in the press each day for four years, a 
brief account of what had occurred fifty years ago. This 
newspaper history has certainly been of great educational 
value to the people at large, who probably would not read a 
more formal one. It has also served to revive the memories 
of thousands of civil war veterans who happily are still with 
us, half a century after the stirring days in which they had 
a part. 







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55 

Although but a lad at the time of the Civil War, my inter- 
est was then aroused by the fact that several of my relatives 
were serving in both the army and navy, and I was frequently 
hearing news of them from my parents. My oldest brother, 
who had made several voyages to foreign lands in the mer- 
chant service, had entered the United States Navy as master's 
mate in the latter months of the war, and was present on the 
frigate Wabash at the battle of Fort Fisher. I remember 
that he sent home several relics from the battle, notably two 
muskets and two shells, and also a flag, which, after hanging 
in the Boston Museum, was later placed in Ford's Theatre, 
Washington, where President Lincoln was assassinated. 

Two uncles served in important positions ; one was Chap- 
lain of the 23rd Massachusetts Regiment and was detailed 
several times from his ministerial duty to bring north on 
transports, from Southern battlefields and hospitals, wounded 
and sick soldiers. They were thence sent to their various 
New England homes to receive the tender care that was 
awaiting them. The other uncle was Surgeon of the 12th 
New York Artillery, and he was my relative who gave his 
life for his country. It is a satisfaction to see his name re- 
corded in Memorial Hall of Harvard Univefsity, his Alma 
Mater. His funeral took place in our home in 1863, and I 
remember the solemn event, although possibly I did not realize 
then that he was a hero of the Civil War. 

Two cousins also served ; one as Paymaster in the naval 
service, the other as Corporal in a Massachusetts regi- 
ment. 

It will interest you to know that a first cousin of my 
mother, he of the South land, and she of the North land, 
was Gen. Joseph Wheeler, who was prominent in the cavalry 
service of the Confederacy throughout the war. It was grat- 
ifying later to his New England relatives to know that he 
served his country with devotion in the Spanish War as a 
Major General in the United States Army. It was also a 
pleasure for my mother and myself to receive him at our 



56 

home, and he was a valued correspondent of our family until 
the close of his life. 

I would also speak of my father's diary, from which I 
quote freely in this paper. He kept it faithfully for many 
years, despite an active life as a Boston physician, yet I re- 
gret to say that his interest waned in the years 1862 and 
1863. He was a close observer and described in a graphic 
manner many important events in his day and generation. 
Moreover, as he visited almost daily for many years the inner 
sanctum of his friend, Daniel N. Haskell, Editor of the Bos- 
ton Transcript, he had abundant opportunity to watch the 
trend of national and local affairs. 

I must not forget also to speak of the large and interesting 
Colburn Collection of Portraits and Autograph Letters in 
the Collections of this Society, which are entrusted to my 
care. When we may read at will letters of the great men of 
a great national era, there is always the accompanying thought 
that we are approaching close to their personalities. 

I shall now read from the diary some entries made in the 
opening days of the war. At that time I was so young that 
the stirring events left no lasting impression on my memory, 
and yet I must have seen marching troops pass our house 
and perhaps have been taken to the Worcester Railroad Sta- 
tion, which was near our home, to see regiments of soldiers 
depart for Washington. 

I desire first, however, to read three entries made in the 
diary at dates before the beginning of the war. 

" November 6, i860. Election day. This is a day big with 
fate. To-day are to be elected a President of the United 
States, a Governor of this State and Representatives to Con- 
gress and to the Legislature. I went down to Faneuil Hall 
in the evening to hear the news. Alexander H. Rice, for- 
merly Mayor of the City, is elected to Congress in the Fourth 
District by six hundred majority over Erastus B. Bigelow, 
who was the Democratic and Opposition candidate. Returns 



57 

enough have come in to show that Abraham Lincoln is 
elected President of the United States for the next four 
years." 

"March 4, 1861. Inauguration Day. Guns are firing on 
the Common. This tells that Abraham Lincoln has been 
inducted into the office of President of the United States. 
Never since the confederacy was formed has so much inter- 
est been manifested to read the message." 

" March 23. Nothing of much interest has occurred to-day. 
Public expectation, that has watched for the news from the 
South, is almost tired with being so long cheated of its sen- 
sation and Fort Sumter does not create much talk, one way 
or another. I have not said much about secession in this 
journal, because in the first place, all I know of it I get from 
the papers which are full of it. And in the second place, 
the future historian will be better able to pick up his facts 
from contemporaneous newspapers than from surmises of 
people like myself, who know nothing personally about it." 

The record made at the beginning of the war reads as 
follows : 

"April 13, 1861. War! War! War! Sad news from 
Charleston, South Carolina. Bombardment of Fort Sumter 
begun by the Confederate forces. Expectation is on tiptoe. 
People are gathering in groups discussing the truth or falsity 
of the news received by telegraph." 

"April 14. More bad news. Sumter has surrendered. 
Two thousand shots fired and nobody killed. Can it be pos- 
sible ? " 

"April 15. More news from the South. To-day there came 
a requisition for two thousand troops to proceed at once to 
Washington, D. C, which is menaced by the Southern Con- 
federacy. Their success in the bombardment of Fort Sumter 
has made them bold, and they fancy they have but to show 
themselves at the North, and the white-livered Yankees as 
they call us, will run for their lives. There is news that Fort 



58 

Pickens has been reinforced. If so, there is hope that the 
onward wave of secession may be stayed. But as it looks 
now, the stoutest heart may well grow faint at the prospect 
before us. God grant that the storm of blood which now 
threatens to sweep over the land may be stayed." 

"April 16. Troops pouring into the city. Excitement 
raised to the highest pitch. There is now no middle ground. 
Those who are not for us are against us. I was told to-day 
that a party of gentlemen went to the office of the Courier 
yesterday and proclaimed that unless a different tone ap- 
peared in the papers for the future, the office would be gutted 
and the paper stopped, that was all. In obedience to this 
wholesome threat, it has become quite decent since then. 
The news to-day is a continuation of yesterday. War and 
rumors of war. The fear now is that the Southern forces 
may march on the City of Washington and then a desperate 
battle might be fought. The same sentiment seems to ani- 
mate the entire North so far as heard from. More than two 
hundred thousand men and one hundred million of dollars 
have been offered to the government to carry on the struggle. 
Can it be possible that the principle of slavery is to triumph 
and that that kind of civilization is to prevail ?" 

"April 17. Troops still come pouring in. This morning 
Governor Andrew received them at the State House and 
presented the regiment which was to go first with its flag. 
The regiment (the sixth) left by the Worcester Railroad for 
New York en route for Washington." 

"April 18. The excitement grows more intense. Troops 
are pouring in and the city resounds to the tramp of armed 
soldiery. Another regiment went this afternoon. The news 
came this afternoon that the State of Virginia has seceded 
and that the convention has ordered the seizure of the Nor- 
folk Navy Yard and Harper's Ferry. Well, we might as 
well know the worst sooner as later and better too. If she 
has seceded, God save Virginia, for man cannot ! She will 
furnish the arena in which will be fought the battles between 



59 

freedom and slavery. Excitement is spreading and all are 
thinking deep but say little." 

"April 19. The report comes by telegraph that the Sixth 
Regiment was attacked in passing through Baltimore and 
some of their number killed. I hope that this may prove not 
to be true." 

"April 20. The news of yesterday has filled the cup of woe 
to the last drop. It apparently was the one thing needed to 
enlist everybody in favor of Law, Order and Loyalty. A 
great oath, as it were, was taken that inasmuch as the mob 
had drawn the sword, they should have enough of it. Sol- 
diers are swarming at every corner. The horses for the light 
artillery, which starts for the war to-day, seventy-two in num- 
ber, were purchased of the Metropolitan Railroad Company. 
I have been uneasy and excited. I cannot sit still, and the 
news by telegraph is so uncertain that I cannot allay my fever 
by the news. I went to-day to the Tra?iscript office where I 
met Henry Wilson, one of our United States Senators. He 
was brimfull of fight. He thought that if the muskets of our 
soldiers had been loaded with buckshot instead of ball, they 
would have given the mob a fine peppering. Nothing can ex- 
ceed the enthusiasm of all classes in this city. Those who 
have been the most opposed to Republicanism in the past are 
now the most uncompromising in their feelings towards the 
South." 

" April 20. The ladies particularly are very busy in making 
clothing for the troops. The flannel is contributed by the 
firms down town and the garments are cut and made by the 
ladies. At my house there is to be a meeting next Monday 
of forty ladies for this purpose." 

"April 21. Sunday. Fletcher Webster announced yester- 
day that he would raise a regiment and proceed to the seat 
of war. The meeting was appointed at the Merchants Ex- 
change, but the crowd was so great that they adjourned to 
State Street. The street was full as far as could be seen ; 
ten thousand people answered the call. There were many 



6o 

patriotic speeches, and recruiting went on vigorously. Such 
a strange sight as this was in the streets of old, quiet, staid 
Boston ! On my way to church this morning I met a crowd 
from State Street. This afternoon, on going down town to 
learn the latest news, I met the City Guards riling down from 
their armory for a drill on the Common. On the Common 
also, the recruits of the new regiment that is being formed at 
Faneuil Hall were reviewed by Governor Andrew." 

" April 22. Ten years ago to-day, Daniel Webster made his 
speech in Bowdoin Square ; what a change from then ! To- 
day the regiment raised by his son* is rapidly filling up with 
recruits. 

" Reports to-day from the men of the band who went with 
the Sixth Regiment to Baltimore. From these accounts the 
soldiers stood up manfully and killed many of the rowdies. 
William B. Astor, of New York, offers to give four millions 
of dollars to the government and to loan the sum of ten 
millions of dollars." 

"April 23. A report to-day that the City of Baltimore has 
been shelled and is now on fire ; also that the mob is loose 
and in the possession of the city. God protect the inhabi- 
tants. No news from the troops. As yet Massachusetts is 
the only State in the field. Good for old Massachusetts ! " 

The response of Massachusetts to the call for troops as 
shown on the last entry of the diarist, seems to be the re- 
markable fulfillment of a prophecy made July 17, 1850, by 
Daniel Webster, in his speech on the " Compromise Bill," 
before the United States Senate, when he said : 

" I feel that when I, and all those that now hear me, shall 
have gone to our last home, and afterwards, when mould may 
have gathered upon our memories, as it will have done upon 



* Col. Fletcher Webster, to whom the diarist referred, went to 
the war with his regiment, the Twelfth Massachusetts Volunteers. He 
was killed in the second battle of Bull Run, on August 30, 1862. 
He was Surveyor of the Port of Boston from 1850 to 1861. 



6i 

our tombs, that State, so early to take her part in the great 
contest of the Revolution, will stand, as she has stood and 
now stands, like that column which, near her Capitol, per- 
petuates the memory of the first great battle of the Revolu- 
tion, firm, erect, and immovable. I believe, Sir, that, if com- 
motion shall shake the country, there will be one rock forever, 
as solid as the granite of her hills, for the Union to repose 
upon. I believe that, if disasters arise, bringing clouds which 
shall obscure the ensign now over her and over us, there will 
be one star that will but burn the brighter amid the darkness 
of that night ; and I believe that, if in the remotest ages (I 
trust they will be infinitely remote) an occasion shall occur 
when the sternest duties of patriotism are demanded and to 
be performed, Massachusetts will imitate her own example ; 
and that, as at the breaking out of the Revolution, she was 
the first to offer the outpouring of her blood and her treasure 
in the struggle of liberty, so she will be hereafter ready, when 
the emergency arises, to repeat and renew that offer with a 
thousand times as many warm hearts and a thousand times 
as many strong hands." 

" April 27. Good news. All the New York regiments, the 
Massachusetts Fifth and the Rhode Island troops are at 
Washington. This brings the effective force at that place 
now up to thirteen thousand men ; enough to hold it against 
any force the rebels are likely to bring into the field at 
present. I saw Charles Sumner in the Transcript office day 
before yesterday. He said that Massachusetts had won for 
herself great fame in the present emergency by the prompt- 
ness with which she had responded to the call for troops, and 
that to Governor Andrew most of it is owing. Jeff Davis is 
still at the seat of government at Montgomery, Alabama. 
There are plenty of rumors but little truth. The telegraph 
as a rule tells more lies than truths." 

"April 29. The Fourth Battalion, which was organized 
from the old New England Guards and now has two com- 



62. 

panies under the command of Major Thomas G. Stevenson,* 
went down to Fort Independence last Friday and are already 
under good discipline there. 

" By estimate there are now in the field awaiting transpor- 
tation and ready for orders, fifty-four thousand men. Pretty 
good this for fifteen days, for on the fifteenth of this month 
the first requisition came. Washington is safe, and by the 
end of the week there will be thirty-five thousand troops there 
who will hold the city in spite of all the South. Here in our 
midst the buzz and excitement that marked the first onset, 
has settled down in active and better understood preparation. 
Recruiting is going on rapidly, military stores are being got 
together in a business-like way and the whole community is 
hard at work for the cause. To-day we have another sewing 
bee at our house, making undershirts of cotton for our sol- 
diers, who are beginning to find their thick flannel shirts too 
hot and heavy. Reports come in that the men, who have 
been active instruments in creating this trouble among our 
Southern brethren, are beginning to appreciate the strength 
of the feeling at the North. They have been deluded into 
the belief that we have had no souls above trade, and as one 
of them is reported to have said, would do anything for a 
shilling and sell our souls for a quarter of a dollar. Before 
we get through they will probably be undeceived. Well, it 
may prove the only way in which the South will be made to 
respect us and give us credit for courage and chivalry." 

" April 30. The news to-day has a better complexion. 
Maryland is retreating from the secession line. She cannot 
toe the mark with the stake she is obliged to put up. If she 
will change her front and be true to her allegiance, much of the 
difficulty will be removed. By the news by mail the whole 
South is on the move, but no doubt much of this apparent 
bustle is on paper alone. As the New York Herald well says, 

* Major Stevenson was later Colonel of the Twenty-fourth Massachu- 
setts Regiment. Still later he was a Brigadier General and was killed 
near Spottsylvania Va., May 10, 1864. 



I 




O v 



z <t 



63 

' . . . the South has marvelously overrated its power and un 
derrated ours. Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Cincinnati 
and Chicago alone, without aid from a single State, could 
easily send forth men enough to whip the whole Southern 
Confederacy.' " 

Two more entries of local interest are as follows : 

On May i, 1861, we read : " The bodies of the soldiers who 
were killed in Baltimore on April 19th arrived in Boston 
to-day. They were received at the Worcester station by the 
Independent Corps of Cadets, who escorted them to the 
other depot. The stores on Washington Street where they 
passed were draped in black." 

On May 3rd, the diarist wrote : "The First Regiment were 
out on parade to-day and marched through Washington Street 
more than one thousand strong. They looked finely and 
marched well. The uniform is serviceable and not cumber- 
some. They will give a good account of themselves. Dr. 
Samuel A.Green and Dr. Zabdiel B. Adams go as surgeons." 

I have read selections from the diary to the end of April, 
1 86 1, which show the uprising of the North as exemplified in 
Boston, one of its chief cities. 

You will agree with me that the diarist believed, as did 
also so many of the North in the early days of the war, that 
the Southern Confederacy would collapse after a few months 
of hostilities. But the South, as well as the North, believing 
in the justice of its cause, buckled on its armor and four years 
of war followed, thousands of lives were sacrificed and billions 
of dollars were expended before it was learned that the nation 
"could not exist half slave and half free." 

The Civil War made little impression on me until near its 
close, on account of my youth, and yet I can recall incidents 
of my school days and can remember all of my teachers in 
whose classes I was a pupil during the four years of the 
war. 



6 4 

Two incidents of the war, however, remain in my memory. 
Of one, the funeral of my uncle, I have already spoken. The 
other occurred early in the war, while I was passing a few 
weeks with my maternal grandmother in Dorchester, now a 
part of Boston. One day I went to the Town Hall and saw 
a company of soldiers which was starting for the war. I 
remember the long line of uniformed men, with shining ac- 
coutrements, and I can recall the farewells of mothers and 
stalwart sons and loving husbands and wives. Probably some 
did not return to their New England homes, and to-day their 
memories are kept green by children and children's children. 

I little realized at the time that my grandmother, with 
whom I passed that summer, was a daughter of an officer of 
the Revolution. Her father was a trusted comrade and 
friend of Washington, was offered by him, but declined, the 
place of aide-de-camp on his staff, and was one of the group 
who formed with the Commander-in-chief the Order of the 
Cincinnati. If she repeated to me stories which she had 
heard from her father, of Lexington, Valley Forge and York- 
town, they no longer remain in my memory. 

When the war closed, I had arrived at an age when I could 
comprehend passing events and retain them in my memory. I 
remember well the rejoicing in Boston when news came of the 
surrender at Appomattox, and I can also recall the deep sor- 
row which filled all hearts when it was learned that President 
Lincoln had been assassinated. We heard the appalling news 
on that fateful April morning from our next door neighbor, 
who, holding a newspaper high in air, came into our quiet 
home greatly excited. Then came on apace the tolling bells 
and drooping flags, and we saw in the city streets the mourn- 
ing badges worn by all, and the draped shop windows, telling 
of a nation's grief. 

I will now resume my readings from the diary, beginning 
with the eventful month of April, 1865, which was to see the 
ending of the war. 



65 

"April 3, 1865. Great and glorious news. General Grant 
has routed the Rebels, whipping them all along the line and 
has taken Richmond, the capital of the Confederacy. The 
Confederates evacuated and the Union forces, in the shape of 
colored troops, marched in at 8.15 A. M. This is retributive 
justice. Here in Boston, the city is alive with enthusiasm 
and speeches, music and cheers filled up the day. In the 
evening there were numerous illuminations and everybody 
was jolly." 

"April 4. The news from the seat of war becomes better 
and better. This afternoon there was a meeting at Faneuil 
Hall to give an opportunity for a public expression of joy 
and gladness at the magnitude of the victories now oc- 
curring." 

" April 7. The news from the war becomes better and 
better. General Sheridan has whipped General Lee and cap- 
tured four or five of his generals." 

"April 10. The great news of to-day is the surrender of 
General Lee with his whole army to General Grant at Ap- 
pomattox Court House, Virginia. This practically ends the 
war, for with the Army of Virginia conquered, the bulwark of 
the Rebellion is broken down. The surrender was finally 
completed yesterday, although the exchange of letters was 
begun two days before. The news came after midnight and 
became generally known this morning. The city is alive 
with rejoicing. Unmindful of the rain, the people are out in 
processions with drums beating and flags streaming, and hur- 
rahing and shouting at the top of their voices. To the 
present generation, no such day has been seen before. The 
city has to-day literally fulfilled the recommendation of John 
Adams to celebrate the Fourth of July by bonfires and illumi- 
nations, with sounds of rejoicing and the pealing of bells. 
Long will the day be remembered. Impromptu meetings 
were organized in the streets and in the Old South Church, 
at which speeches were made, prayers and congratulations 
offered and every demonstration of joy that could find utter- 



66 

ance. I illuminated my house in the evening and the city 
was generally illuminated. Laus Deo ! At the meeting in 
Winthrop Square, in front of Mr. Beebe's store, Mr. G. S. 
H. undertook to speak, and when he attempted to ease the 
fall of General Lee, calling him magnanimous in surrender- 
ing, etc., the crowd hissed him, and finally drove him from 
the platform." 

"April ii. Chester Park carried off the honors last night. 
The citizens universally illuminated their houses. There was 
music, and fireworks made the Park as light as day. To- 
night Union Park is all ablaze. I went up with Charlie 
and called on several friends who had illuminated and kept 
open house. I heard to-day of the meeting held in the Old 
South Church day before yesterday. Two of each denomi- 
nation of the clergy were invited to speak, and thirty-four 
guns were fired from the belfry of the church. Well may 
the people celebrate the event and go crazy over it. Another 
such will never occur again." 

"April 13. Fast day. Everything in the city very quiet. 
People seem to have recovered from their craziness of the 
first of the week. Most of the churches held their services 
in the evening." 

"April 15. Yesterday was one of horror ; one long to be 
remembered as the dark day of the Republic. This morning 
the news came that President Lincoln, Secretary Seward, and 
two of his sons, together with a servant, had been attacked 
by an assassin. The President is dead, and one of Mr. 
Seward's sons ; and the others are lying in a precarious con- 
dition from their wounds. A blight like a mildew has fallen 
over the community. Such a change from three days ago ! 
Then the joyful peals of the bells told of a rebellion put down. 
Now the mournful tolling tells of the nation's loss. The as- 
sassin of the President is J. Wilkes Booth, son of Junius 
Brutus Booth, so widely known in the theatrical profession. 
Business has been generally suspended and emblems of mourn- 
ing are fast appearing in the streets." 



67 

"April 1 6. Sunday. The news from Washington is that 
Mr. Seward is comfortable, but his son is not expected to live. 
No trace of the assassins as yet, except that they crossed the 
Anacosta Bridge about half-past ten on the night of the mur- 
der. Evidence beyond doubt points to Booth as the assassin 
of the President. The event was suitably noticed in all of the 
churches. Our Church [the Central Congregational Church 
in Winter St.] was draped in black around the pulpit, and our 
minister [Rev. John E. Todd] preached a memorial sermon 
from the ninety-third Psalm, first verse, 'The Lord reigneth.' 
It is indeed a solemn season." 

"April 19. All the stores are closed and the streets are 
filled with a quiet concourse of people wending their way to 
the churches, where at twelve o'clock services are to be held 
in commemoration of the funeral of President Lincoln at the 
White House in Washington. It is like a Sabbath. Hardly 
a house but shows some signs of mourning. At noon a salute 
of one hundred guns was fired on the Common. In the after- 
noon a procession was formed and it marched to the Common 
where addresses were made from two stands. There was also 
music between times. The gathering on the Common was 
very great, but the utmost order prevailed." 

" April 24. I went into the Transcript office to-day and 
found sundry of the saints discussing the propriety of keeping 
in or taking out of the paper a squib aimed at Mr. G. S. H, 

" Edwin P. Whipple is a personal friend of the man who 
has brought on himself the just contempt of all loyal men at 
the present time. He went in for taking it out. The rest 
of those present voted to keep it in. All were agreed that 
it had better never have been said at all, but once in let it 
stand." 

The diarist's final reference to Abraham Lincoln was in 
connection with the memorial meeting held in this city. 

"June 1. The streets were cleared at 11 o'clock through- 
out the whole of the route of the procession, which started at 
12 o'clock. The display was very fine ; I did not however go 



68 

to Music Hall. Senator Sumner's address as published in 
the newspapers to-day was very fine. He gave a striking 
delineation of President Lincoln's character and disposition, 
although the address was more political than eulogistic. As 
Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Sen- 
ate, Charles Sumner has had a better opportunity of knowing 
the true actions of foreign governments than almost anyone, 
and his address was full of this knowledge. The day passed 
without an accident." 

Later, in the diary, are to be found references to the visits 
to this city of Major General Robert Anderson, Vice Admiral 
David G. Farragut and Major General George G. Meade. 
With the latter general the diarist was not evidently im- 
pressed, for he described him as a very ordinary individual. 

Of the visit of General Ulysses S. Grant, he wrote at 
length on July 30, 1865: "General Grant came to town 
last evening by the Worcester Road. He left Albany in the 
morning and arrived here at 7 P. M., in a special train, stop- 
ping at two or three places en route. He was received by 
the First Corps of Cadets and escorted to the Revere House. 
As was to be expected, great crowds followed him every- 
where. Frederick turned out with the Cadets and had a 
good view of him, and Charlie went to the United States 
Hotel and saw him there. In the evening the General held 
a levee at his rooms, at which Governor Andrew and other 
distinguished men were present. To-day, being Sunday, he 
attended service at the Old South Church, and walked on 
the Common." 

" July 3 1 - General Grant held a public reception at Faneuil 
Hall at which there was an immense gathering. The crowd 
at last became so great that the General bade the audience 
good-bye and left the hall. He also visited the Navy Yard 
and Bunker Hill Monument and other places of interest in 
the vicinity." 

"August 1. General Grant left for Portland to-day." 



69 

Will not Walt Whitman's poem commemorative of Abra- 
ham Lincoln make a fitting conclusion to this paper ? 

O Captain ! my Captain ! our fearful trip is done, 
The ship has weathered every rack, the prize we sought is won, 
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting, 
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring ; 
But O heart ! heart ! heart ! 

O the bleeding drops of red, 
Where on the deck, my Captain lies, 
Fallen, cold and dead. 

O Captain ! my Captain ! rise up and hear the bells ; 

Rise up — for you the flag is flung — for you the bugle trills, 

For you banquets and ribbon'd wreaths — for you the shores-a- 

crowding, 
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning; 
Here Captain ! dear Father ! 

This arm beneath your head ! 
It is some dream that on the deck, 
You've fallen cold and dead. 

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still, 
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will, 
The ship is anchored safe and sound, its voyage closed and done, 
From fearful trip, the victor ship comes in with object won. 
Exult O shore, and ring O bells ; 

But I with mournful tread 
Walk the deck, my Captain lies 
Fallen, cold and dead. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I give and bequeath to the Bostonian Society, in the 

City of Boston, the sum of dollars, 

for the general use and purposes of the said Society. 



OFFICERS 



BOSTON1AN SOCIETY 



SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION 



Presidents 

♦CURTIS GUILD, 1881-1906 *JAMES F. HUNNEVVELL, 1907-1910 

GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS, 191 1 

Vice-President 
Francis H. Manning, 1907 

Clerks and Treasurers t 

♦Samuel M. Quincy . 1881-1884 I *William C. Burrage . 1886-1890 

James M. Hubbard . 1884-1885 *S. Arthur Bent . . 1890-1899 

*DanielT. V. Huntoon 1885-1886 [ Charles F. Read . . 1899 



Directors 



*Thomas J. Allen . 
*Thomas C. Amory . 

♦William S. Appleton 



1386- 
1884- 
1884- 
1890- 
1884- 

1S82- 



*William H. Baldwin 

♦S. Arthur Bent . . 

'Robert R. Bishop . . 

Joshua P. L. Bodfish . 1885- 

Francis H. Brown . . 191 1 

*George O. Carpenter 1888- 

*Benjamin C. Clark . 1890- 

*David H. Coolidge . 1S95- 

Henry W. CUNNINGHAM1913 



*Jacob A. Dresser 
John W. Farwell 

♦Albert A. Folsom 
Courtenay Guild 

♦Curtis Guild . . 

*John T. Hassam . 



1891- 
1907 
1S97- 
1908 
1S81- 
1S81- 



1894 
1886 
1890 
1884 
1914 

1896 
1906 
1907 

1894 

1907 

1906 



♦Hamilton A. Hill . . 1S83-1895 
*James F. Hunnewell . 1S94-1910 
*John Lathrop . . . 1887-1899 
♦Abbott Lawrence. . 1882-1884 
William H. Lincoln . 1 899-1903 

Francis H. Manning . 1904 

♦William T. R. Marvin 1900-1913 

Joseph Grafton Minot 1912 

♦Thomas Minns . . . 1881-1885 

Grenville H. N0RCROSS1908 

*Edward G. Porter . 1896-1900 
♦Samuel H. Russell . 1882-1894 
♦Samuel E. Sawyer . 1889 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 1915 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 1906 

*William W. Warren . 1886-1890 
♦William H. Whitmore 1883-1886 
♦Levi L. Willcutt . . 1894-1912 



* Deceased. 
t The offices of Clerk and Treasurer are held by one person. 



OFFICERS FOR 1916 



President 
GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS 

Vice-Presiden t 
Francis H. Manning 

Clerk and Treasurer 

Charles F. Read 

P. O. Address, Old State House, Boston 

Directors 
Francis H. Manning Courtenay Guild 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr. Francis H. Brown 

John W. Farwell Joseph Grafton Minot 

Grenville H. Norcross Henry W. Cunningham 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

Committee on Finance 
Grenville H. Norcross Francis H. Manning 

Courtenay Guild 

Committee on the Rooms 
Francis H. Manning Joseph Grafton Minot 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr. Henry W. Cunningham 

Courtenay Guild The President and Clerk 

Committee on the Library 



Edward Percival Merritt 
John Woodbury 
The Clerk 



Francis H. Brown 
Walter K. Watkins 
William G. Shillaber 

Committee on Papers 
Henry W. Cunningham William O. Comstock 

Edwin D. Mead The Clerk 

Committee on Publications 
John W. Farwell Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

Albert Matthews Ernest L. Gay 

The Clerk 



Committee on Membership 

Alexander W. Longfellow 
Allan Forbes 
The Clerk 



Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
William L. Allen 
Louis Bacon 

Committee on Memorials 
Courtenay Guild Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr, 

Boylston A. Beal The Clerk 

Delegates to the Bay State Historical League 
George Kuhn Clarke William Rotch 

The President 



CUSTODIANS 

James W. Robinson Robert B. Smith 

John W. Kennington Thomas M. Hutchinson 

Charles B. Brooks 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



MAY 1. 1916 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



♦Bent, Samuel Arthur 
Bodfish, Joshua Peter Langley 
♦Chamberlain, Mellen 
Eley, James 



* Guild, Curtis 
Matthews, Nathan 
♦O'Brien, Hugh 
•Smith, Samuel Francis 



LIFE MEMBERS 



Abbe, Henry Thayer 
Abbot, Edward Stanley 
Abbot, Edwin Hale 
*Abbot, Francis Ellingwood 
♦Abbott, Marshall Kittredge 
Abbott, Samuel 
♦Adams, Alexander Clinton 
♦Adams, Charles Francis 
Adams, Mrs. Isabella Hortense 
Adams, James 
Addicks, John Edward 
Alden, Henry Bailey 
Allan, Mrs. Anna 
Allen, Miss Clara Ann 
Allen, Crawford Carter 
♦Allen, Elbridge Gerry 
Allen, Francis Richmond 



Allen, Frank Gilman 
Allen, Gardner Weld 
Allen, Herbert McClellan 
♦Allen, James Woodward 
Allen, Thomas 
♦Alley, John Robinson 
Ames, Mrs. Anna Coffin 
*Ames, Charles Gordon 
♦Ames, Frederick Lothrop 
Ames, Miss Mary Shreve 
♦Ames, Oliver 

♦Ames, Mrs. Rebecca Caroline 
♦Amory, Arthur 
Amory, Francis Inman 
Amory, Frederic 
Amster, Nathan Leonard 
♦Andrews, Frank William 



* Deceased. 



74 



Andrews, John Adams 
*Angell, Henry Clay 
•Anthony, Silas Reed 
*Appleton, Mrs. Emily Warren 
Appleton, Francis Henry 
•Appleton, Nathan 
*Appleton, William Sumner 
Appleton, William Sumner 
*Armstrong, George Washington 
*Atherton, Joseph Ballard 
Atherton, Miss Lily Bell 
*Atkins, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Atwood, David Edgar 
*Austin, James Walker 
*Ayer, James Bourne 
Bacon, Charles Francis 
Bacon, Mrs. Louisa Crowninshield 
Badger, Arthur Campbell 
Badger, Daniel Bradford 
Badger, Erastus Beethoven 
Badger, Wallis Ball 
•Bailey, Joseph Tilden 
Baker, Charles Morrill 
•Baker, Miss Charlotte Alice 
•Baker, Mrs. Ellen Maria 
Baker, Ezra Henry 
•Baker, Richard 
•Baldwin, William Henry 
*Ballister, Joseph Fennelly 
•Ballister, Miss Minetta Josephine 
Bancroft, Cornelius Cheever 
Barlow, Charles Lowell 
Barnes, Charles Benjamin 
Barney, Mrs. Mabel Fairchild 

Wheaton 
♦Barrett, Edwin Shepard 
Barron, Clarence Walker 
Barry, Charles Stoddard 
Barry, George Thomas 
*Barry, John Lincoln 
Barry, John Lincoln 
*Bartlett, Francis 
Bartlett, Miss Mary Foster 
Batcheller, Robert 
Bayley, Frank William 



•Beal, James Henry 
Beal, William Fields 
Beatty, Franklin Thomason 
Beebe, Edward Pierson 
•Beebe, James Arthur 
Beech, Mrs. Ruth Adelaide 

* Benson, George Wiggin 
Benton, Everett Chamberlin 
Bigelow, Alanson, Jr. 
Bigelow, Albert Smith 

* Bigelow, George Brooks 
Bigelow, Joseph Smith 
Bigelow, Melville Madison 
Bigelow, William Sturgis 
Binney, Henry Prentice 
Black, George Nixon 
Blake, Clarence John 

Blake, Mrs. Frances Greenough 

* Blake, Francis 
Blake. George Baty 
Blake, Hallie Collins 
*Blake, Mrs. Sara Putnam 
*Blake, Stanton 

Blake, William Payne 
*Blanchard, Samuel Stillman 
Blanchard, Miss Sarah Harding 
Blaney. D wight 
•Blume, Mrs. Susan Eliza 
•Boardman, Samuel May 
Boardman, Waldo Elias 
Bodwell, William Pearle 
Bordman, John 
Bowditch, Alfred 
Bowditch, Ernest William 
*Bowditch, William Ingersoll 
Bowdlear, William Henry 
•Bradford, Martin Luther 
Bradford, William Burroughs 
•Bradlee, Caleb Davis 
Bradlee, Frederick Josiah 
Bradlee, Frederick Wainwright 
*Bradlee, Josiah Putnam 
Bradley, Jerry Payson 
Brayley, Arthur Wellington 
Bremer. John Lewis 



Deceased. 



75 



Bremer, Mrs. Mary Rice 
Bremer, Samuel Parker 

* Brewer, William Dade 
Bridge, Frederick William 
Briggs, Lloyd Vernon 
*Brimmer, Martin 
Brooks, Gorham 
♦Brooks, John Henry 
Brooks, Peter Chardon 
Brooks, Shepherd 

Brown, Miss Elizabeth Bowen 
Brown, Francis Henry 
Brown, George Washington 
Brown, Harold Haskell 
Brown, Harry Webster 
*Brown, John Coffin Jones 
Brown, Thomas Hassall 
♦Browne, Charles Allen 
*Browne, Edward Ingersoll 
*Browne, William Andrews 
Bullivant, William Maurice 
Burbank, Alonzo Norman 
Burdett, Fred Hartshorne 
*Burnham, John Appleton 
Burr, Miss Annie Lane 
Burrage, Albert Cameron 
Burrage, Charles Dana 
♦Burrage, William Clarence 
Burroughs, George 
Byrnes, Timothy Edward 

* Cabot, Arthur Tracy 
Candage, Mrs. Ella Marie 
Candage, Robert Brooks 

* Candage, Rufus George Frederick 
*Candler, John Wilson 

Carlin, William Joseph 
♦Carpenter, George Oliver 
Carpenter, George Oliver 
♦Carpenter, Mrs. Maria Josephine 
♦Carr, John 

Carruth, Charles Theodore 
Carstein, Lawrence William 
Carter, Fred Louis 
Carter, Herbert Leslie 
♦Center, Joseph Hudson 



♦Chamberlin, Charles Wheelwright 

Chandler, Cleaveland Angier 

♦Chapin, Nahum 

♦Chase, Caleb 

♦Chase, George Bigelow 

Chase, Sidney 

Chase, Stephen 

♦Chase, Theodore 

Cheney, Benjamin Peirce 

♦Cheney, Mrs. Emeline 

Child, Dudley Richards 

Church, Herbert Bleloch 

♦Clapp, Mrs. Caroline Dennie 

Clapp, Clift Rogers 

♦Clark, Charles Edward 

Clark, John Spencer 

♦Clark, Miss Nancy Joy 

Clark, Nathan Freeman 

♦Clarke, Mrs. Alice de Vermandois 

Clarke, Henry Martyn 

♦Clay, Thomas Hart 

♦Clementson, Sidney 

Cleveland, Mrs. Corinne Maud 

Cobb, John Candler 

♦Codman, John, 2d 

Codman, Miss Martha Catherine 

♦Codman, Mrs. Martha Pickman 

Codman, Ogden 

Coffin, Frederick Seymour 

♦Colburn, Jeremiah 

♦Collamore, Miss Helen 

Colley, William Edgar 

Comer, Miss Josephine Sarah 

♦Converse, Elisha Slade 

Coolidge, Algernon, Jr. 

Coolidge, Charles Allerton 

♦Coolidge, David Hill 

Coolidge, Mrs. Helen Whittington 

Coolidge, Joseph Randolph 

Coolidge, Mrs. Julia 

♦Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson, Jr. 

Cooney, Charles Lawrence 

Corbett, Alexander, Jr. 

♦Cordis, Mrs. Adelaide Elizabeth 

Cory, Charles Barney 



* Deceased. 



7 6 



Cotting, Charles Edward 
•Cotting, Charles Uriah 
*Crafts, John Chancellor 
Crandon, Edwin Sanford 
Crawford, George Artemas 
Crocker, David 
*Crocker, George Glover 
Crocker, Miss Sarah Haskell 
•Crosby, Charles Augustus Wilkins 
Crossett, Lewis Abbott 
Crowell, Horace Sears 
•Crowninshield, Benjamin William 
Crowninshield, Francis Boardman 
Cruft, George Theodore 
*Cruft, Miss Harriet Otis 
*Cummings, Charles Amos 
Cummings, Thomas Cahill 
Cunningham, Henry Winchester 
*Curtis, Caleb Agry 
*Curtis, Charles Pelham 
*Curtis, Mrs. Eliza Fox 
♦Curtis, Hall 
Curtis, Mrs. Harriot 
* Curtis, Henry Pelham 
Curtis, Horatio Greenough 
Curtis, John Silsbee 
Curtiss, Frederick Haines 
Cushing, Livingston 
Cutler, Charles Francis 
•Cutler, Samuel Newton 
*Cutter, Abram Edmands 
*Cutter, Benjamin French 
Cutter, Mrs. Elizabeth Finley 
Cutter, Leonard Francis 
*Cutter, Watson Grant 
Daily, Edward Bernard 
Damon, Frank Herbert 
Dana, Edward Percy 
Dana, William Franklin 
*Daniell, Moses Grant 
Danker, Daniel Joseph 
Darling, Charles Kimball 
Davenport, George Howe 
•Davenport, Orlando Henry 
Davis, Arthur Edward 



*Davis, Ephraim Collins 

Davis, George Henry 

•Davis, James Clarke 

•Davis, Joseph Alba 

Davis, Mrs. Mary Cheney 

Davis, William Henry 

Day, Hilbert Francis 

•Day, William Francis 

•Dean, Benjamin 

•Dean, John Ward 

•Dean, Luni Albertus 

•Deblois, Stephen Grant 

•Denny, Daniel 

Devlin, Edward 

Dewey, William Richardson 

•Dewing, Benjamin Hill 

•Dexter, Morton 

•Dexter, William Sohier 

•Dill, Thomas Bradford 

Dillaway, William Edward Lovell 

Dodd, George Davis 

•Dorr, Francis Oliver 

Dorr, George Bucknam 

Dow, Richard Sylvester 

•Draper, Eben Sumner 

Draper, George Albert 

Dresel, Ellis Loring 

•Dupee, Henry Dorr 

•Dupee, James Alexander 

Dutton, Harry 

•Dwight, Edmund 

•Dyer, Mrs. Julia Knowlton 

Dysart, Robert 

Eaton, Albert 

•Eaton, Miss Georgiana Goddard 

•Eaton, Walter David 

Edes, Henry Herbert 

•Edmands, John Rayner 

Edmonds, John Henry 

Edwards, Miss Grace 

Edwards, Miss Hannah Marcy 

Eliot, Christopher Rhodes 

•Eliot, Samuel 

Elliot, George Buxton 

Emerson, Abraham Silver 



• Deceased. 



77 



•Emerson, George Robert 
*£mery, Francis Faulkner 
•Endicott, William 
Endicott, William 
Endicott, William Crowninshield 
Ernst, Mrs. Ellen Lunt 
Ernst, Harold Clarence 
Estabrook, Arthur Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick Watson 
*Estes, Dana 

Eustis, Miss Elizabeth Mussey 
Eustis, Henry Dutton 
Eustis, Joseph Tracy 
Eustis, Miss Mary St. Barbe 
*Fabyan, George Francis 
•Fairbanks, Frederick Clinton 
Farnsworth, Edward Miller 
Farnsworth, William 
•Farrington, Charles Frederick 
Farwell, John Whittemore 
Fay, Dudley Bowditch 
Fay, Henry Howard 
•Fay, Joseph Story 
•Fay, Joseph Story, Jr. 
•Fay, Sigourney Webster 
•Fearing, Andrew Coatsworth, Jr 
Felton, Frederic Luther 
•Fenno, John Brooks 
*Fenno, Lawrence Carteret 
•Ferris, Mortimer Catlin 
Fish, Frederick Perry 
Fiske, Andrew 
Fiske, Mrs. Charlotte Morse 
*Fiske, Miss Elizabeth Stanley 
Fitz, Mrs. Henrietta Goddard 
*Fitz, Reginald Heber 
Fitzgerald, William Francis 
Floyd, Charles Harold 
*Fogg, John Samuel Hill 
•Folsom, Mrs. Julia Elizabeth 
•Ford, Daniel Sharp 
Foss, Eugene Noble 
Foss, Leon Frederic 
Foster, Miss Harriet Wood 



•Foster, John 

•Foster, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
Fowle, Seth Augustus 
•Fowler, Mrs. Laura Wentworth 
Fowler, Robert 
Fowler, William Plumer 
•French, Miss Caroline Louisa Wil- 
liams 
French, Miss Cornelia Anne 
•French, Mrs. Frances Maria 
•French, Frederick William 
•French, Jonathan 
•Frothingham, Thomas Goddard 
Frye, James Albert 
•Fuller, Charles Emerson 
•Fuller, Henry Holton 
Gagnebin, Charles Louis 
Gallagher, Hugh Clifford 
•Gallivan, Timothy Aloysius 
•Galloupe, Charles William 
•Galloupe, Mrs. Sarah Augusta 
Gardiner, Robert Hallowell 
Gardner, Augustus Peabody 
Gardner, George Peabody 
•Gardner, John Lowell 
Gaugengigl, Ignaz Marcel 
•Gay, Edwin Whitney 
Gay, Ernest Lewis 
•Gay, Frederick Lewis 
George, Elijah 

•Giddings, Mrs. Susan Kittredge 
Gilbert, Shepard Devereux 
•Gill, James Seel 
Gill, Mrs. Matilda 
•Gill, Mrs. Rachel Maria 
Gilman, Osmon Burnap 
•Glasier, Alfred Adolphus 
Gleason, James Mellen 
Glines, Edward 
Goddard, George Augustus 
Goddard, Miss Julia 
•Goodhue, Francis Abbot 
•Goodrich, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
•Gould, Benjamin Apthorp 
I Gould, George Lambert 

Deceased. 



78 



Gould, Marshall Hopkins 

*Grandin, John Livingston 

*Gray, Reginald 

Gray, Rowland 

Gray, Russell 

Green, Charles Montraville 

Green, Samuel Abbott 

*Greene, Francis Bunker 

*Greenough, Francis Boott 

Grew, Edward Wigglesworth 

*Grew, Henry Sturgis 

*Griggs, John Hammond 

Grozier, Edwin Atkins 

Guild, Courtenay 

*Guild, Curtis 

*Guild, Mrs. Sarah Crocker 

Guild, Miss Sarah Louisa 

Gurney, Frank Pierce 

Hagar, Eugene Bigelow 

*Haigh, John 

*Hale, Mrs. Ellen Sever 

Hall, Mrs. Ellen Page 

Hall, George Gardner 

Hall, Henry Lyon 

Hall, Prescott Farnsworth 

*Hall, Thomas Bartlett 

Hammer, Charles Dunkel 

* Hammond, Mrs. Ellen Sarah 

Sophia 

* Hammond, Gardiner Greene 

* Hammond, George Warren 

* Hancock, Franklin 
*Hapgood, Warren 
Hardy, John Dudley 
Harrington, George 
Harrison, Walter James 
Hart, Thomas Norton 
*Hart, William Tennant 
*Hartt, John F 
Haskell, William Andrew 
*Hassam, John Tyler 
Hastings, Henry 
Hathaway, Charles Francis 

* Haven, Franklin 
Haven, Miss Mary Eliza 



Hayford, Nathan Holbrook 
*Haynes, James Gilson 
*Haynes, John Cummings 
*Hayward, George 
Hay ward, James Warren 
*Head, Charles 
*Hecht, Jacob Hirsch 
Hemenway, Alfred 
Hemenway, Augustus 
*Henchman, Nathaniel Hurd 
Henry, William Linzee 
Henshaw, Samuel 
Herrick, Robert Frederick 
Hewins, James 
Hickok, Gilman Clarke 
Higginson, Francis Lee 
Higginson, Mrs. Ida Agassiz 
Hill, Donald McKay 
*Hill, Hamilton Andrews 
Hill, Henry Eveleth 
*Hill, James Edward Radford 
*Hill, Warren May 
*Hill, William Henry 
Hills, Edwin Augustus 
Hinckley, Frederic 
Hodgkins, Joseph Wilson 
Hoffman, Mrs. Rebecca Russell 
*Hoitt, Alfred Demeritt 
*Holden, Joshua Bennett 
*Hollingsvvorth, Amor Leander 
*Hollingsworth, Sumner 
Hollingsworth, Valentine 
Hollingsworth, Zachary Taylor 
*Holman, Charles Bradley 
Holmes, Edward Jackson 
*Homans, Charles Dudley 
*Homans, George Henry 
*Homans, John, 2nd 
Hooper, Mrs. Alice Perkins 
Hooper, Mrs. Mary Davis Beal 

* Hooper, Robert Chamblet 
Hooper, William 

* Hopkins, Amos Lawrence 
Hornblower, Henry 
*Horsford, Eben Norton 



* Deceased. 



79 



Houghton, Clement Stevens 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth Good- 
ridge 
*Hovey, Henry Stone 
Howard, Herbert Burr 
Howe, Elmer Parker 
Howe, Mark Anthony DeWolfe 
Howe, Octavius Thorndike 
Howes, Daniel Havens 
Hubbard, Charles Wells 
Hubbard, Orrin Calvin 
Hubbard, Paul Mascarene 
Hughes, Miss Laura Ann Cleophas 
Hunneman, William Cooper 
Hunnewell, Francis Welles, 2d 
♦Hunnewell, James Frothingham 
Hunnewell, James Melville 
Hunnewell, Mrs. Sarah Melville 
Hunter, Herbert Forester 
Hurd, Edward Pavson 
Hurlbut, Mrs. Eda Adams 
♦Hutchings, George Sherburne 
Iasigi, Mrs. Amy Gore 
*Jackson, Mrs. Mary Stuart 
*Jackson, William 
Jacobs, Mrs. Garrie 
James, Arthur Holmes 
James, George Abbot 
♦Jeffries, Benjamin Joy 
Jenks, Henry Fitch 
Jenney, Bernard 
*Jenney, William Thacher 
Johnson, Arthur Stoddard 
Johnson, Mrs. Fanny Betts 
*Johnson, Wolcott Howe 
*Jones, Daniel Wayland 
Jones, Jerome 
Jones, Nathaniel Royal 
Joy, Franklin Lawrence 
*Keith, Benjamin Franklin 
Kellen, William Vail 
Kelly, Miss Elizabeth Farley 
Kelly, Fitzroy 
Kemp, Clarence Charles 
*Kennard, Martin Parry 



Kennedy, George Golding 
Kennedy, John Joseph 
Kent, Mrs. Alice 
Keyes, William Herbert 
Kidder, Charles Archbald 
Kidder, Nathaniel Thayer 
Kilburn, Warren Silver 
Kimball, Miss Augusta Caroline 
Kimball, Mrs. Caroline Sampson 
Kimball, Mrs. Clara Bertram 
Kimball, David Pulsifer 
Kimball, Lemuel Cushing 
♦Kimball, Mrs. Susan Tillinghast 
Kitson, Henry Hudson 
Knight, Arthur Stearns 
♦Kuhn, Hamilton 
Ladd, Babson Savilian 
Ladd, Nathaniel Watson 
Lamb, Mrs. Annie Lawrence 
*Lamb, George 
Lamb, Henry Whitney 
♦Lambert, Thomas Ricker 
♦Lamson, Artemas Ward 
♦Lane, Jonathan Abbott 
♦Lawrence, Amory Appleton 
♦Lawrence, Amos Adams 
♦Lawrence, Charles Richard 
Lawrence, Harris Hooper 
Lawrence, John 
Lawrence, John Silsbee 
Lawrence, Robert Means 
♦Lawrence, Samuel Crocker 
Lawson, Thomas William 
Lee, James Stearns 
Lee, Joseph 
Lee, William Henry 
Leman, John Howard 
Leonard, Amos Morse 
♦Leonard, Miss Anna Rebekah 
♦Leonard, George Henry 
Lesh, Henry Frederick 
Leverett, George Vasmer 
Lewis, Edwin James 
Lewis, George 
♦Lincoln, Beza 



Deceased. 



8o 



Litchfield, William Elias 

Little, Arthur 

'Little, George Washington 

* Little, James Lovell 
Little, John Mason 
♦Lockwood, Philip Case 
Lockwood, Thomas St. John 
Lodge, Henry Cabot 
Long, Harry Vinton 
Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth 
Longley, James 

Longley, Mrs. Julia Robinson 

*Lord, George Wells 

Loring, Augustus Peabody 

♦Loring, Caleb William 

Loring, Miss Helen 

Loring, Miss Katharine Peabody 

Loring, Miss Louisa Putnam 

Loring, Thacher 

Loring, William Caleb 

•Lothrop, Daniel 

♦Lothrop, Thornton Kirkland 

Loud, Charles Elliot 

Loud, George Deshorn 

Loud, Joseph Prince 

Loveland, Timothy Otis 

Lovering, Ernest 

Lovett, Arthur Trevitt 

♦Low, George Doane 

♦Low, John 

* Lowell, Francis Cabot 
Lowell, Miss Georgina 
Lowell, John 
Lowell, Miss Lucy 
•Lowell, Mrs. Mary Ellen 
Lowell, Percival 

* Lucas, Edmund George 
Luke, Arthur Fuller 
Lunt, William Wallace 

* Lyman, Arthur Theodore 
♦Lyon, Henry 
*MacDonald, Edward 
Mace, Mrs. Martha Jane 
♦Mack, Thomas 
*Macleod, William Alexander 



Mandell, Samuel Pierce 

*Mann, Arthur Elisha 

*Mann, George Sumner 

Manning, Francis Henry 

♦Marion, Horace Eugene 

Marrs, Mrs. Laura Norcross 

♦Marsh, Mrs. Julia Maria 

♦Marshall, James Fowle Baldwin 

Marston, Howard 

Marston, John Pitts 

♦Marvin, WilliamTheophilus Rogers 

Matthews, Albert 

May, Miss Eleanor Goddard 

May, Frederick Goddard 

♦May, Frederick Warren Goddard 

Mayer, Richard 

Mayo, Miss Amy Louisa 

McDonough, Charles Andrew 

♦Mead, Mrs. Anna Maria 

Means, John Hamilton 

Melville, Henry Hulmes 

Merriam, Frank 

Merriam, Olin Lane 

♦Merrill, Mrs. Amelia Grigg 

Merrill, Sherburn Moses 

Merritt, Edward Percival 

*Metcalf, Albert 

Meyer, George von Lengerke 

♦Minns, Thomas 

Minot, Joseph Grafton 

♦Minot, William 

Minot, William 

Mitchell, Sidney Adelbert 

♦Mitton, Edward John 

♦Mixter, Miss Madeleine Curtis 

Monks, George Howard 

♦Moore, Frederic Henry 

♦Moore, George Henry 

♦Moore, Miss Mary Eliza 

Moors, Francis Joseph 

Moriarty, George Andrews 

Morison, Samuel Eliot 

Morrison, Barna Thacher 

♦Morse, George Henry 

♦Morse, Lemuel Foster 



* Deceased. 



8i 



Morse, Lewis Kennedy 
*Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Everett 
Morss, John Wells 
*Moseley, Alexander 
Moseley, Miss Ellen Frances 
*Motley, Edward Preble 
*Munro, John Cummings 
Murdock, Harold 
Murdock, William Edwards 
Murphy, James Smiley 
*Nash, Nathaniel Cushing 
Newman, Miss Harriet Hancock 
Nichols, Arthur Howard 
Nickerson, William Emery 
Norcross, Grenville Howland 
*Norcross, Mrs. Lucy Ann 
Norcross, Otis 

Norman, Mrs. Louisa Palfrey 
*Norwell, Henry 
Noyes, James Atkins 
Nutting, George Hale 
O'Brien, Walter Augustine 
*0 , Callaghan, Denis 
*01msted, Frederick Law 
*Osgood, Mrs. Elizabeth Burling 
*Page, Mrs. Susan Haskell 

* Paige, John Calvin 
Paine, James Leonard 
Paine, Mrs. Mary Woolson 

* Paine, Robert Treat 
Paine, William Alfred 

* Palfrey, Francis Winthrop 

* Palfrey, John Carver 

* Palmer, Benjamin Sanborn 
Palmer, Ezra 

* Parker, Charles Wallingford 
Parker, Miss Eleanor Stanley 
Parker, Frederick Wesley 
Parker, Harrison 

Parker, Herman 
Parker, James Phillips 

* Parker, Mason Good 
Parker, Moses Greelev 



*Parker, Miss Sarah 
Parker, William Stanley 
Parkhurst, Lewis 
*Parkman, Francis 
Parlin, Albert Norton 
Parmenter, James Parker 

* Parsons, Arthur Jeffrey 
Parsons, William Edwin 
*Payne, James Henry 
Peabody, Charles Breckenridge 
Peabody, Charles Livingston 
Peabody, Frank Everett 
Peabody, Mrs. Gertrude 
Peabody, John Endicott 
Peabody, Philip Glendower 
Pearce, Arthur Paul 
Pearson, Arthur Emmons 
Peirce, Mrs. Elizabeth Goldthwait 
Peirce, Silas 

Pelletier, Joseph Charles 
♦Perkins, Augustus Thorndike 
*Perkins, Mrs. Catherine Page 
*Perkins, Edward Cranch 
Perkins, John Forbes 

* Perkins, William 

* Perry, Charles French 
Perry, Edward Hale 
Perry, Thomas Sergeant 
Pfaff, Charles 

*Pfaff, Mrs. Hannah Adams 

* Pfaff, Jacob 
Phelan, James Joseph 
Phillips, Mrs. Anna Tucker 
Phillips, Henry Ayling 
Phillips, John Charles 
Phinney, Horatio Augustus 
*Pickering, Henry 
Pickering, Henry Goddard 
*Pierce, Henry Lillie 
*Pierce, Nathaniel Willard 
Pillsbury, Albert Enoch 
♦Piper, William Taggard 
Playfair, Edith, Lady 
Pond, Virgil Clarence 
*Poole, Lucius 



Deceased. 



82 



Porter, Alexander Silvanus 
♦Porter, Edward Griffin 
*Porter, William Killam, Jr. 
Potter, Henry Staples 
Powell, William Beverley 
*Prager, Philip 
Prager, Mrs. Rachel 
♦Prang, Louis 
Prang, Mrs. Mary Dana 
Pratt, Mrs. Fannie Barnard 
Pratt, Laban 

Prendergast, James Maurice 
Prescott, Alfred Usher 
Prescott, Walter Conway 
Preston, George Marshall 
Pridee, William Henry 
*Prince, Charles John 
Proctor, Mrs. Abby Shaw 
*Pulsifer, William Henry 
Pushee, George Durant 

* Putnam, Mrs. Mary Lowell 
♦Putnam, William Edward 
Ouinby, Winfield Scott 
Quincy, Charles Frederic 
Quincy, George Gilbert 
♦Quincy, George Henry 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Adams 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Caroline 

* Quincy, Samuel Miller 
*Radclyffe, Herbert 
Ratshesky, Abraham Captain 
Rawson, Edward Lincoln 
♦Raymond, Freeborn Fairfield, 
*Read, Mrs. Lucy Richmond 
♦Read, Miss Sarah Elizabeth 
Reed, Brooks 

Reed, Mrs. Grace Evelyn 

♦Reed, Henry Ransford 

Reed, James 

Reed, John Sampson 

♦Reed, William Howell 

Reynolds, John Phillips 

Rhodes, James Ford 

Rice, Edward David 

Rich, William Ellery Channing 



Richards, Francis Henry 
♦Richards, Henry Capen 
♦Richardson, Albert Lewis 
Richardson, Benjamin Heber 
Richardson, Edward Bridge 
Richardson. Edward Cyrenius 
♦Richardson, Maurice Howe 
♦Richardson, Spencer Welles 
Richardson, William Lambert 
Richardson, William Streeter 
Richmond, Joshua Bailey 
♦Riley, James Madison 
♦Ripley, George 
Rivers, Miss Mary 
Robb, Russell 
Robinson, Edward 
♦Roby, Mrs. Cynthia Coggeshall 
♦Rodocanachi, John Michael 
Rogers, Robert 
Root, Henry Augustus 
♦Ropes, John Codman 
♦Ross, Alphonso 
Rotch, William 
Rothwell, James Eli 
Ruggles, Charles Albert 
Runkle, John Cornelius 
Russell, Joseph Ballister 
Russell, Mrs. Margaret Pelham 
♦Russell, Samuel Hammond 
Rust, Nathaniel Johnson 
♦Rutan, Charles Hercules 
Saltonstall, Richard Middlecott 

2d Sampson, Charles Edward 

♦Sampson, Edwin Holbrook 
Sands, Mrs. Florence Josephine 
Sargent, Charles Sprague 
Sargent, Miss Louisa Lee 
♦Sawyer, Henry Nathan 
Sears, Alexander Pomroy 
Sears, Harold Carney 
Sears, Henry Francis 
Sears, Herbert Mason 
Sears, Horace Scudder 
♦Sears, Joshua Montgomery 
Sears, Mrs. Mary Crowninshield 

* Deceased. 



83 



Sears, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Sears, Richard Dudley 
Seaver, William James 
Sederquist, Arthur Butman 
Sewall, Atherton 
Shattuck, Frederick Cheyne 
Shattuck, George Brune 
Shattuck, Henry Lee 
Shaw, Mrs. Annie Whipple 
Shaw, Charles Nason 
Shaw, Mrs. Cora Lyman 
*Shaw, Henry 
*Shaw, Henry Lyman 
Shaw, Henry Southworth 
Shaw, Henry Southworth, Jr. 
Shaw, Robert Gould 
*Shepard, Willis Stratton 
Sherry, Frank Eaton 
Shillaber, William Green 
*Shimmin, Charles Franklin 
Shultis, Newton 
Shuman, Abraham 
Shumway, Franklin Peter 
*Sigourney, Henry 
Simpson, Frank Ernest 
*Skinner, Francis 
*Skinner, Francis 
*Slafter, Edmund Farweli 
* Slater, Andrew Chapin 
*Slocum, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
*Slocum, William Henry 
Smith, Miss Ellen Vose 
Smith, Fitz-Henry, Jr. 
Smith, Frank Ernest 
*Smith, Joseph Warren 
Smith, Miss Mary Almira 
Smith, Robert Boynton 
Snow, Franklin Augustus 
Sohier, Miss Elizabeth Putnam 
Sohier, William Davies 
*Sortwell, Alvin Foye 
Soule, Miss Sarah Marden 
Spalding, Philip Leffingwell 
*Spaulding, Mrs. Emily Steward 
Spaulding, John Taylor 



Spaulding, William Stuart 
Sprague, Francis Peleg 
Sprague, Isaac 
Sprague, Phineas Warren 
Squire, Frank Orvis 

* Stafford, George Lewis 
*Stanwood, James Rindge 
Stearns, Foster Waterman 
Stearns, Frank Waterman 
Stearns, Harris Brackett 

* Stearns, Richard Hall 
Steinert, Alexander 
*Stetson, Amos William 
Stetson, James Henry 
Stetson, John Alpheus 
Stevens, Miss Helen Grenville 
*Stevens, Oliver 
Stockford, Hugh Johnston 
Stodder, Charles Frederick 
Stone, Charles Augustus 
Stone, Charles Wellington 
Stone, William Eben 
*Storey, Joseph Charles 
Storey, Mrs. Mary Ascension 
Stowell, Edmund Channing 
*Stowell, John 

Stratton, Solomon Piper 
Strauss, Ferdinand 
Strauss, Peter Ernest 
Streeter, Edward Clark 
Sturgis, John Hubbard 
Sturgis, Robert Shaw 
*Sturgis, Russell 
*Sumner, Alfred Henry 
*Suter, Hales Wallace 
*Swan, William Willard 
*Sweetser, Mrs. Anne Maria 
*Sweetser, Isaac Homer 
Swift, Henry Walton 
Sylvester, Edmund Quincy 
*Taft, Edward Augustine 
Taggard, Henry 
Talbot, Miss Marion 
Taylor, Amos Leavitt 
Taylor, Charles Henry 



* Deceased. 



8 4 



Taylor, Charles Henry, Jr. 
Taylor, William Herbert 
Taylor, William Osgood 
•Thacher, Henry Charles 
Thacher, Mrs. Julia Edgar 
Thacher, Louis Bartlett 
Thacher, Thomas Chandler 
Thayer, Bayard 
Thayer, Charles Irving 
*Thayer, David 

* Thayer, Eugene Van Rensselaer 
Thayer, Frank Bartlett 
Thayer, John Eliot 
*Thayer, Mrs. Mary 
Thorndike, Albert 
Thorndike, Alden Augustus 
•Thorndike, George Quincy 
Thorndike, Townsend William 
•Thornton, Charles Cutts Gookin 
*Tileston, James Clarke 
*Tinkham, George Henry 
Todd, Thomas 
Todd, Thomas, Jr. 
•Tompkins, Arthur Gordon 
•Tompkins, Eugene 
Tompkins, Mrs. Frances Henrietta 

Viles 
Towle, Loren Delbert 
Traiser, Richard Ernest 
Tripp, Guy Eastman 
•Tucker, Alanson 
Tucker, George Fox 
•Tucker, James Crehore 
•Tucker, Lawrence 
Tufts, Bowen 
Tufts, Leonard 
•Turner, Alfred Rogers 
Turner, Mrs. Cora Leslie 
•Turner, Edward 
•Turner, Job Abiel 
Tyler, Charles Hitchcock 
Tyler, Edward Royall 
*Underwood, Mrs. Caroline Susanna 
Underwood, William Lawrence 
•Upham, George Phinehas 



•Upton, George Bruce 
Vail, Theodore Newton 
Van Nostrand, Alonzo Gifford 
•Vose, James Whiting 
•Wadsworth, Alexander Fairfield 
Wadsworth, Eliot 
Wales, William Quincy 
Walker, Charles Cobb 
•Walker, Francis Amasa 
Walker, Grant 
Wallace, Cranmore Nesmith 
•Ward, Francis Jackson 
Wardwell, Jacob Otis 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee 
•Warner, Bela Hemenway 
Warren, Albert Cyrus 
Warren, Edward Ross 
Warren, John Collins 
•Warren, Samuel Dennis 
•Warren. Mrs. Susan Cornelia 
Warren, William Fairfield 
•Warren, William Wilkins 
Waterman, Frank Arthur 
Waterman, Frank Sturtevant 
•Waters, Edwin Forbes 
Watkins, Walter Kendall 
Watters, Walter Fred 
Webber, Franklin Roscoe 
Webster, Edwin Sibley 
Webster, Frank George 
•Webster, John Haskell 
Weeks, John Wingate 
Welch, Francis Clarke 
Weld, Mrs. Caroline Langdon 
•Weld, Daniel 
•Weld, John Davis 
•Weld, Otis Everett 
Weld, Richard Harding, Jr. 
Wellington, Miss Anna Colburn 
Wells, Wellington 
Wendell, Barrett 
•Wentworth, Alonzo Bond 
Wesson, James Leonard 
•West, Mrs. Olivia Sears 
Westbrook, John Beekman 



* Deceased. 



85 



♦Western, Mrs. Frances Erving 
Wetherbee, Winthrop 
Wheeler, Horace Leslie 
♦Wheelwright, Andrew Cunning- 
ham 
♦Wheelwright, Edward 
♦Wheelwright, Mrs. Isaphene Moore 
♦Wheelwright, Josiah 
♦Wheildon, William Wilder 
Whidden, Stephen Hampden 
♦Whipple, Joseph Reed 
Whipple, Sherman Leland 
Whitcher, Frank Weston 
♦Whitcomb, Henry Clay 
♦White, Charles Tallman 
White, George Robert 
White, Harry Kent 
♦White, John Gardner 
White, McDonald Ellis 
♦White, Mrs. Sarah Brackett 
♦White, Miss Susan Jackson 
Whitman, Allan Hiram 

Whitman, William 

♦Whitmore, Charles John 

♦Whitmore, Charles Octavius 

♦Whitney, Mrs. Caroline Abbe 

♦Whitney, Henry Austin 

♦Whitney, James Lyman 

♦Whittington, Hiram 

♦Wigglesworth, Edward 

Wigglesworth, George 

Willcomb, Mrs. Martha Stearns 

♦Willcutt, Francis Henry 

♦Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 

Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 

♦Willcutt, Mrs. Mary Ann Phillips 

Willcutt, Miss Sarah Edith 

♦Williams, Benjamin Bangs 

♦Williams, Edward Henry 

♦Williams, Henry Dudley 

♦Williams, Henry Willard 



Williams, Holden Pierce 
Williams, Horace Dudley Hall 
Williams, John Davis 
♦Williams, Miss Louise Harding 
Williams, Ralph Blake 
♦Williams, Samuel Stevens Coffin 
Williams, Stillman Pierce 
♦Wilson, Davies 
♦Winchester, Daniel Low 
♦Winchester, Thomas Bradlee 
Winslow, Arthur 
Winslow, William Copley 
Winsor, Miss Mary Pickard 
Winsor, Robert 
Winthrop, Frederic 
♦Winthrop, Robert Charles, Jr. 
Winthrop, Mrs. Robert Charles, Jr. 
Winthrop, Robert Mason 
♦Wise, John Perry 
Withington, Charles Francis 

Wolcott, Mrs. Edith Prescott 

Woodbury, John 

* Woodbury. John Page 

♦Woodman, Cyrus 

Woodman, Walter Irving 

Woods, Frank Forrest 

Woods, Frederick Adams 

♦Woods, Henry 

Woodworth, Herbert Grafton 

♦Woolley, William 

Woolson, Mrs. Annie Williston 

♦Woolson, James Adams 

Worcester, Elvvood 

Wright, Albert Edwin 

♦Wright, Albert Judd 

♦Wright, Charles Francis 

♦Wright, Miss Esther Fidelia 

♦Wright, John Gordon 

♦Wright, William James 

♦Young, George 



* Deceased. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



Adams, Henry Sewall 
Aiken, Henry Merk Smith 
Ainsley, John Robert 
Allen, Charles Willard 
Allen, Frederick Baylies 
Allen, Herbert Dupee 
Allen, William Lothrop 
Alley, Arthur Humphrys 
Ames, Oliver 

Anderson, Elbridge Roberts 
Andrews, Edward Reynolds 
Appleton, Samuel 
Atkins, Edwin Farnswortb 
*Atkinson, Charles Follen 
♦Atkinson, George 
Austin, Charles Lewis 
Avery, Charles French 
*Bacon, Edwin Munroe 
Bacon, Louis 
Bailey, Hollis Russell 
Barbour, Edmund Dana 
Barrus, George Hale 
Barter, William Henry 
Bartlett, Stephen Long 
Bates, John Lewis 
Batt, Charles Richard 
Baylies, Walter Cabot 
Beal, Boylston Adams 
Beal, Mrs. Louisa Adams 
♦Bean, Henry Sumner 
Beebe, Franklin Haven 
Belden, Charles Francis Dorr 
Bemis, Frank Brewer 
Benton, Josiah Henry 
Bigelow, Alanson 



Bigelow, Prescott, Jr. 

Binder, William 

Blackall, Clarence Howard 

Blake, Arthur 

Blake, Mrs. Mary Lee 

Blinn, George Richard 

Bliss, Elmer Jared 

Bliss, James Frederick 

Blodget, William 

Boit, Robert Apthorp 

Bond, Mrs. Isabella Bacon 

Bond, Lawrence 

Bowditch, Charles Pickering 

Bowen, Henry James 

Bowen, Walter Eugene 

Bradlee, Edward Chamberlin 

Braley, Henry King 

Bray, William Claxton 

Bremer, Theodore Glover 

Brewer, Daniel Chauncy 

Brewer, Edward May 

Brewer, George Clark 

Brewer, John Howie 

Brown, Arthur Eastman 

*Brown, Miss Augusta Magee 

♦Brown, Charles Henry Calhoun 

Brown, Mrs. Hannah Davenport 

Brown, Howard Kinmouth 

Brown, Howard Nicholson 

Brown, Joseph Taylor 

Brown, Willard Dalrymple 

Brown, Winfield Martin 

Bruen, John Albert 

Burbank, Charles Osborne 

Burbeck, Edward 

* Deceased. 



87 



Burgess, Mrs. Zaidee Palmer 
Burlingame, Howard Benjamin 
Burnett, Robert Manton 
Burr, Heman Merrick 
Burton, Hiram McKnight 
Bush, Samuel Dacre 
Butler, William Morgan 
Byrne, Harry Carroll 
Carr, Albert Eaton 
Carr, Samuel 
Carr, Walter Dinsmoor 
Carroll, Francis Michael 
Carter, Clarence Howard 
Carter, George Edward 
Chamberlin, Miss Abby H. 
Champney, Walter Redfern 
Chase, Frank Eugene 
Cheney, Mrs. Elizabeth Stickney 
Chester, Charles Edward 
Child, John Howard 
Chittenden, Harley Wheeler 
Chute, Arthur Lambert 
Clapp, John Bouve 
Clapp, Mrs. Susan Prescott 
Clapp, Mrs. Vanlorajoann 
Clark, Charles Storey 
Clark, Miss Elizabeth Hodges 
Clark, Ellery Harding 
Clark, Isaiah Raymond 
Clark, Joseph Horace 
Clarke, Arthur French 
Clarke, George Kuhn 
Clarke, Thomas William 
Clough, Samuel Chester 
Cobb, William Henry 
Cochrane, Alexander 
Codman, Charles Russell 
Coffin, Charles Albert 
Comstock, William Ogilvie 
Connolly, Arthur Tracy 
Conrad, Sidney Smith 
Cook, Charles Sidney 
Cook, Frederick Sargent 
Cook, William Grafton 
Coolidge, Harold Jefferson 



Coolidge, Louis Arthur 

Cox, Edwin Birchard 

Crane, Walter Sanger 

Crane, Winthrop Murray 

*Cruft, Mrs. Florence Lemist 

Cummings, Henry Havelock 

Cummings, Mrs. Margaret Kimball 

Currant, John Francis 

Curtis, Joseph Henry 

Cushing, Arthur Percy 

Dana, Arthur Payson 

Daniels, John Alden 

Davis, George Peabody 

Davis, Harrison Merrill 

Dean, Charles Augustus 

Dewick, Francis Augustine 

*Dexter, Charles Warner 

Dexter, George Blake 

Dexter, Gordon 

Dodd, Horace 

Dolliver, Watson Shields 

Dowse, Charles Francis 

Dowst, Henry Payson 

Driver, William Raymond 

Dumaine, Frederic Christopher 

Dunne, Frank Lysaght 

Dupee, William Arthur 

Durell, Albert Benjamin 

Edwards, Francis Marshall 

Elder, Samuel James 

Eliot, Amory 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe 

Ellis, Augustus Hobart 

Ellis, Benjamin Peirce 

Emerson, Robert Leonard 

Emmons, Mrs. Helen Brooks 

Everett, Arthur Greene 

Everett, Franklin Chester 

Fairbank, John J. Mitchell 

Fales, Herbert Emerson 

Farley, William Thayer 

Farnsworth, Miss Alice 

Farrar, Frederick Albert 

*Faught, George Nelson 

Fay, Mrs. Margaret Welch 

Deceased. 



88 



Fay, William Rodman 

Fisk, Everett Olin 

Fisk, Otis Daniell 

Flagg, Elisha 

Fletcher, Ernest Boynton 

Fobes, Edwin Francis 

Forbes, Allan 

Forbes, James Murray 

Foss, Granville Edward, Jr. 

Foster, Charles Henry Wheelwright 

Foster, Frederick 

Foster, John McGaw 

Francis, Nathaniel Atwood 

French, Wilfred Augustus 

Frenning, John Erasmus 

Fuller, Alfred Worcester 

Gardner, George Augustus 

Gary, Frank Ephraim Herbert 

Gaskins, Frederick Alfred 

Gaston, William Alexander 

Gay, Warren Fisher 

Goldsmith, Warren Henry 

Goodnow, Daniel 

Goodspeed, Charles Eliot 

Grafton, Harrie Craig 

Grant, Alexander Gait 

Gray, Miss Harriet 

Gray, Joseph Phelps 

Greene, Mrs. Charlotte Nichols 

Greenough, Malcolm Scollay 

Grew, Mrs. Jane 

Gulesian, Moses Hadji 

Hale, Philip 

*Hale, Mrs. Rosa Andrews 

Hall, Charles Wells 

Hall, Mrs. Evelyn Ames 

Hall, Thomas Hills 

Hallett, Daniel Bunker 

Hallett, William Russell 

Halsall, William Formby 

Hamlin, Charles Sumner 

*Hanscom, George Elmer 

Harrington, George Sumner 

Hart, Francis Russell 

Haskell, Alfred Tracy 



Hastings, Clifford Bicknell 
Hatch, Edward Augustus 
Hatfield, Charles Edwin 
Hathaway. Horatio 
Hayward, Charles Latham 
Henderson, James Dougald 
Hersey, Charles Henry 
Hill, Oscar 

Hinckley, Henry Hersey 
Hitchcock, Edward Francis 
Hitchcock, Frank Tenney 
Hockley, Mrs. Amelia Daniell 
Hodgkin, William Heath 
Hogg, John 
Holman, Dudley Moor 
Homans, Robert 
Hood, Frederic Clarke 
* Hopewell, John 
Hopkins, Mrs. Maria Theresa 
Hosmer, Jerome Carter 
Houston, Francis Augustine 
Howard, Alfred Henry 
*Howe, Archibald Murray 
Howe, Henry Saltonstall 
Howe, Walter Clarke 
Howes, Mrs. Alice Maud 
Howland, Shepard 
Hubbard, James Mascarene 
*Huckins, Frank 
Huckins, Harry 
! *Hudson, Mrs. Eunice Wells 
Humphrey, Henry Bauer 
Hunneman, Carleton 
*Hunt, Frederick Thayer 
Huntoon, Edward James Baker 
*Hutchings, Mrs. Ellen 
Hutchinson, Henry 
Iasigi, Miss Mary Vitalis 
Inches, George Brimmer 
Jackson, Robert Tracy 
James, George Barker 
Jaques, Henry Percy 
Jenkins, Charles 
Jenney, Bernard, Jr. 
Jernegan, Holmes Mayhew 



Deceased. 



8 9 



Jewell, Edward 
Johnson, Edward Crosby 
*Jones, Benjamin Mitchell 
Jones, Fred Kinsman Mudge 
Jones, Ichabod Howland 
Jones, Mrs. Sarah Gavett 
Jones, Stephen Rosseter 
Jordan, Mrs. Helen Lincoln 
Judd, Mrs. Sarah Ann 
Kearns, William Francis 
Kelley, James Edward 
Kendall, Mrs. Harriott Magoun 
Kennedy, Miss Louise 
Kent, Prentiss Mellen 
Keyes, George Shepard 
Kimball, Edward Adams 
Kimball, Miss Helen Frances 
King, Daniel Webster 
Knapp, George Brown 
Knight, Clarence Howard 
Knight, Henry Francis 
Knowles, Winfield Scott 
Larcom, George Francis 
Larkin, William Harrison, Jr. 
Lauriat, Charles Emelius 
Lawrence, Amos Amory 
Lawrence, William 
Learned, Francis Mason 
Leatherbee, Charles William 
Lemon, Edward Rivers 
Lincoln, Albert Lamb 
Lincoln, William Edwards 
Lincoln, William Henry 
*Livermore, George Brigham 
Locke, Charles Augustus 
Locke, Isaac Henry 
Logue, Charles 
Longfellow, Miss Alice Mary 
Loomis, Elihu Goodman 
Lord, Charles Edward 
Lord, Samuel Crane 
Lothrop, Lewis Waterbury 
Lovett, Augustus Sidney 
Lyman, George Hinckley 
MacFarland, Mrs. Calista Anna 



Macurda, William Everett 
Mann, Frank Chester 
Manning, Miss Abby Frances 
Mansfield, Henry Tucker 
Marcy, Charles De Witt 
Marvin, George Ritchie 
Marvin, Thomas Oliver 
Mason, Miss Fanny Peabody 
May, John Pierpont 
Maynard, Herbert 
*Mayo, Alfred Jackson 
McGlenen, Edward Webster 
Mclntire, Frederic May 
McKissock, William 
McLellan, Edward 
Mead, Edwin Doak 
Means, Charles Johnson 
Means, James 
Merriam, John McKinstry 
Merrill, Albert Brown 
Meyer, Miss Heloise 
Miller, John Ferdinand 
Minot, Laurence 
Monks, Frank Hawthorne 
Montague, David Thompson 
Moody, Mrs. Elizabeth Dana 
Morse, Robert McNeil 
Moseley, Charles William 
Moseley, Frank 
Moseley, Frederick Strong 
Munroe, James Phinney 
Murphy, Gardner Ellsworth 
Nash, Mrs. Bennett Hubbard 
Newell, James Montgomery 
Newhall, Charles Lyman 
Newhall, George Warren 
Nichols, Charles Eliot 
Nichols, Chester Wellington 
Nichols, Leonard Bailey 
Noyes, Frank Albert 
Nute, Herbert Newell 
O'Brien, Edward Francis 
OBrion, Thomas Leland 
O'Connell, Patrick Augustine 
O'Connell, William Henry 

Deceased. 



90 



O'Meara, Stephen 
Osgood, Charles Edward 
Otis, Herbert Foster 
Paine, Charles Jackson 
Palmer, Bradley Webster 
Park, Charles Edwards 
Parker, George Francis 
Parker, John Nelson 
Parsons, Miss Charlotte 
*Payne, Edward James 
Peirson, Charles Lawrence 
Perkins, George Grindley Spence 
Perry, Mrs. Olive Augusta 
Peters, William York 
Phillips, Alexander VanCleve 
Pierce, Roscoe 
Pierce, Wallace Lincoln 
Piper, Henry Augustus 
Pollard, Frederick Henshaw 
Poor, Clarence Henry 
Poor, James Ridgway 
Porter, Alexander Sylvanus, Jr. 
Porter, John Lyman 
Powers, Walter Averill 
Pratt, Louis Mortimer 
Prince, Mrs. Lillian 
Putney, Henry Marshall 
Rand, Arnold Augustus 
Rand, Waldron Holmes 
Read, Charles French 
Read, William 
Reed, Alanson Henry 
Reed, Henry Beecher 
Reggio, Andre Carney 
Remick, Frank Woodbury 
Remick, John Anthony 
Remick, William Gordon 
Rice, Mrs. Abbie Elizabeth 
Rice, David 
Rice, Fred Ball 
Rich, Mrs. Pauline Babo 
Rich, William Thayer 
Richards, Mrs. Ann Rebecca 
Richards, George Edward 
Ripley, Alfred Lawrence 



Ripley, Ebed Lincoln 
Robbins, Royal 
Robinson, Thomas Pendleton 
Rogers, Miss Susan Snow 
Ross, Mrs. Caroline Emily 
Rugg, Frederic Waldo 
Ruhl, Edward 
Russell, Andrew LeBaron 
Russell, Mrs. Frances Spofford 
Sanborn, Mrs. Caroline Frances 
Sanford, John Edward Menemon 
Sargent, Mrs. Aimee 
Saunders, Daniel 
Savage, William Bowler 
Sawyer, Miss Mary Cummings 
Schaefer, Henry Thomas 
Schouler, James 
Schrafft, William Edward 
Scudder, Winthrop Saltonstall 
Searle, Charles Putnam 
Sears, Richard 
Sears, William Richards 
Sergeant, Charles Spencer 
Shannon, George Thomas 
Sharp, George Henry Loring 
Shaw, Francis 
Shuman, Samuel 
Shurtleff, Miss Sarah 
Skillings, David Nelson 
Smith, Benjamin Farnham 
Smith, Charles Card 
Smith, Charles Francis 
Smith, Edward Ephraim 
Snow, Charles Armstrong 
Somes, Dana Barry 
Soule, Horace Homer 
Sparhawk, Edward Epps 
Sprague, Mrs. Emeline Martha 
Sprague, Henry Harrison 
Staniford, Daniel 
Stearns, Albeit Henry 
Stearns, Albert Warren 
Stearns, Charles Henry 
Stearns, James Pierce 
Stevens, Francis Herbert 



* Deceased. 



9i 



Stevenson, Robert Hooper 
Storey, Moorfield 
Stratton, Charles Edwin 
Strong, Mrs. Mary Baker 
Sturgis, Richard Clipston 
Sullivan, Mrs. Mary Emma 
Swan, George Arthur 
Sweet, Henry Nettleton 
Sylvester, Joseph Smith 
Tapley, Henry Fuller 
Thompson, Marshall Putnam 
Thorndike, Augustus Larkin 
Throckmorton, John Wakefield 

Francis 
Tobey, Rufus Babcock 
*Tolman, James Pike 
Trask, William Ropes 
Tuttle, Charles Henry 
Tuttle, Julius Herbert 
Underwood, Henry Oliver 
Vaughan, Henry Goodwin 
Vialle, Charles Augustus 
Vincent, Miss Susan Walker 
Wait, William Cushing 
Walker, John Ballantyne 
Walworth, Arthur Clarence 
Ward, Joseph Frederic 
Warren, Bentley Wirt 
Warren, Fiske 
Warren, Franklin Cooley 
Warren, George Copp 
*Warren, Henry Edwin 
Warren, Lucius Henry 
Warren, Mrs. Mabel Bayard 
Warren, Mrs. Rebecca Bennett 
Webster, Mrs. Lizzie Florence 



Weeks, Warren Bailey Potter 
Wendte, Charles William 
West, Charles Alfred 
Weston, Thomas 
Wetherbee, Frederic Adolphus 
Wheeler, George Henry 
Wheeler, Henry 

White, Miss Gertrude Richardson 
*White, Miss Mary Jane 
Whitney, Richard Skinner 
Whittemore, John Quincy Adams 
Whittier, Albert Rufus 
Wilder, Frank Jones 
Wiles, Thomas Linwood 
Willett, George Franklin 
Williams, Arthur, Jr. 
Williams, David Weld 
Williams, George Gorham 
*Williams, Horace Perry 
Williams, Moses 
Williamson, Robert Warden 
Winthrop, Thomas Lindall 
Wolf, Bernard Mark 
Wood, Arthur Goodwin 
Wood, Irving 
Woods, Joseph Fitz 
Woodward, Frank Ernest 
Woodworth, Elijah Burghardt 
Wright, Charles Pierce 
Wright, George Sumner 
Wyeth, Edwin Augustus 
Wyeth, Herbert Francis 
Wyman, Frank Wheelock 
Wyman, Henry Augustus 
Young, William Hill 



* Deceased. 



No. 1441. 



€ommotu»£alt!) of MdBsatl)mttt& 



■33c it J&noton that whereas Thomas C. Amory, Curtis Guild, 
John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, Samuel M. Quincy, Wil- 
liam S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, Henry F. Jenks, John 
T. Hassam, and Dudley R. Child, have associated themselves 
with the intention of forming a corporation under the name of 



for the purpose of promoting the study of the history of Boston, and 
the preservation of its antiquities, and have complied with the pro- 
visions of the Statutes of this Commonwealth in such case made 
and provided, as appears from the certificate of the President, 
Treasurer and Directors of said corporation, duly approved by the 
Commissioner of Corporations and recorded in this office ; 

JftotD, Cfocretore, %, Henry B. Peirce, Secretary of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, Uo hercbp certtfp that said Thomas C. 
Amory, Curtis Guild, John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, 
Samuel M. Quincy, William S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, 
Henry F. Jenks, John T. Hassam and Dudley R. Child, 
their associates and successors, are legally organized and estab- 
lished as and are hereby made an existing corporation under the 
name of 

Cljc 25o£tonian J>ocietp, 

with the powers, rights and privileges and subject to the limitations, 
duties and restrictions, which by law, appertain thereto. 



(iMttrieeSfi my official signature hereunto 
subscribed and the seal of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts hereunto affixed, this second 
day of December, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and eighty one. 

[Signed] 

HENRY B. PEIRCE, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. 




THE BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 



ORGANIZED TO PROMOTE THE STUDY OF THE HISTORY OP BOSTON 
AND THE PRESERVATION OF ITS ANTIQUITIES. 

BY-LAWS. 

I. 

OBJECTS. 

It shall be the duty of members, so far as may be in their power, to 
carry out the objects of the Society, by collecting, by gift, loan, or pur- 
chase, books, manuscripts, and pictures, and by such other suitable means 
as may from time to time seem expedient. 

II. 

MEMBERS. 

The members of the Bostonian Society shall be such persons, either 
resident or non-resident in Boston, as shall be elected to membership. 
Election shall be made by ballot by the Board of Directors at any regular 
or special meeting. 

III. 

HONORARY AND CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

Honorary and Corresponding members shall be nominated by the 
Directors, and shall be elected by ballot by two-thirds of the members 
present and voting. They may take part in the meetings of the Society, 
but shall not be entitled to vote. 

IV. 

ADMISSION FEE AND ASSESSMENTS. 

Each member shall pay five dollars at the time of his or her admission, 
and five dollars each first day of January afterwards, into the treasury of 
the Society for its general purposes ; provided, however, that no person 
joining the Society on or after the first day of October in any year shall be 
required to pay an additional assessment for the year commencing on the 
first day of January following. 

If any member shall neglect to pay his or her admission fee or annual 
assessment, for three months after the same is due, he or she shall be 
liable to forfeit his or her membership at any time when the Directors shall 
so order. 



94 

The payment of the sum of thirty dollars in any one year by any mem. 
ber of the Society shall constitute him or her a life member of the Society ; 
life members shall be free from assessments, and entitled to all the rights 
and privileges of annual members. The money received for such life mem- 
bership shall constitute a fund, of which not more than twenty per cent., 
together with the annual income, shall be spent in any one year. 



CERTIFICATES. 

Certificates, signed by the President and the Clerk, shall be issued to 
all persons who have become life members of the Society. 

VI. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be held on the third Tuesday 
in January, and regular meetings shall be held on the third Tuesday of 
every month, excepting June, July, August and September, at such time 
and place as the Directors shall appoint. Special meetings shall be called 
by the Clerk, under the instruction of the Directors. 

At all meetings ten members shall be a quorum for business. All Com- 
mittees shall be appointed by the Chair, unless otherwise ordered. 

VII. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers of the Society shall consist of a President, Vice-President 
and seven other Directors, a Clerk and a Treasurer. 

The Directors, Clerk and Treasurer shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meeting in January, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
others are duly elected in their stead. The President and Vice-President 
shall be elected by the Board of Directors from their number. The offices 
of Clerk and Treasurer may be held by the same person. 

VIII. 

VACANCIES. 

Any vacancies in the offices of the Society may be filled for the re- 
mainder of their term by the Board of Directors at any regular meeting, to 
serve until the next annual meeting of the Society. In the absence of the 
Clerk at any meeting, a Clerk pro tempore shall be chosen for that meeting. 

IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

At the monthly meeting in December, a Nominating Committee of five 
persons shall be appointed, who shall report at the annual meeting a list of 
candidates for the places to be filled. 



95 
x. 

PRESIDING OFFICER. 

The President, or in his absence the Vice-President, shall preside at all 
meetings. In the absence of both, a President pro tempore shall be chosen 
from the Board of Directors. 

XI. 

DUTIES OF THE CLERK. 

The Clerk shall be sworn to the faithful discharge of his duties. 

He shall notify all meetings of the Society. He shall keep an exact 
record of all the proceedings of the meetings of the Society and of its 
Directors. 

He shall conduct the general correspondence of the Society, and place 
on file all letters received. 

He shall enter the names of members systematically in books kept for 
the purpose, and issue certificates of life membership. 

The Clerk shall have such charge of all property in the possession of the 
Society as may from time to time be delegated to him by the Board of 
Directors. 

He shall acknowledge each loan or gift that may be made to and 
accepted in behalf of the Society. 

XII. 

DUTIES OF THE TREASURER. 

The Treasurer shall collect all moneys due to the Society, and pay all 
bills against the Society, when approved by the Board of Directors. 

He shall keep a full account of the receipts and expenditures in a book 
belonging to the Society, which shall always be open to the inspection of 
the Directors ; and at the annual meeting in January he shall make a 
written report of all his doings for the year preceding. 

The Treasurer shall give bond in the sum of one hundred dollars, with 
one surety, for the faithful discharge of his duties. 

XIII. 

DUTIES AND POWERS OF DIRECTORS. 

The Directors shall superintend and conduct the prudential and execu- 
tive business of the Society ; shall authorize all expenditures of money ; 
fix all salaries ; provide a common seal ; receive and act upon all resigna- 
tions and forfeitures of membership, and see that the By-Laws are duly 
complied with. 

The Directors shall have full power to comply with the terms of the 
lease of the rooms in the Old State House, made with the City of Boston, 
and to make all necessary rules and regulations required in the premises. 



9 6 

They shall annually, in the month of April, make a careful comparison 
of the articles in the possession of the Society with the list to be returned 
to the City of Boston under the terms of the lease, and certify to its 
correctness. 

They shall make a report of their doings at the annual meeting of the 
Society. 

The Directors may, from time to time, appoint such sub-committees as 
they deem expedient. 

XIV. 

MEETINGS OF THE DIRECTORS- 

Regular meetings of the Directors shall be held on the day previous to 
the regular meetings of the Society, at an hour to be fixed by the President. 
Special meetings of the Directors shall be held in such manner as they may 
appoint; and a majority shall constitute a quorum for business. 

XV. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint two 
Directors, who, with the President, shall constitute the Committee of 
Finance, to examine, from time to time, the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer ; to audit his accounts at the close of the year, and to report 
upon the expediency of proposed expenditures of money. 

XVI. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint six 
standing committees (of which the Clerk of the Society shall be a mem- 
ber ex-officio), as follows : — 

Committee on the Rooms. 

A committee of seven members, to be called the Committee on the 
Rooms, of which the President of the Society shall be a member ex-officio, 
who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the Rooms (except 
books, manuscripts, and other objects appropriate to the Library, offered 
as gifts or loans) ; the hanging of pictures, and the general arrangement 
of the Society's collections in their department. 

Committee on Papers. 

A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Papers, who shall have charge of the subject of Papers to be read, or 
other exercises of a like nature, at the monthly meetings of the Society. 



97 

Committee on Membership. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee on 
Membership, whose duty it shall be to give information in relation to the 
purposes of the Society, and increase its membership. 

Committee on the Library. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee on 
the Library, who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the Library, 
including the acceptance or rejection of all books, manuscripts, and other 
objects appropriate to the Library, offered as gifts or loans, and the 
general arrangement of the Society's collections in their department. 

Committee on Publications. 

A committee of four or more members to be called the Committee on 
Publications, who shall have charge of all the Publications of the Society. 

Committee on Memorials. 

A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Memorials, who shall have charge of such Memorials as the Society 
may vote to erect. 

These six committees shall perform the duties above set forth, under 
the general supervision of the Directors. 

Vacancies which may occur in any of these committees during their 
term of service shall be filled by the President 

XVII. 

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS. 

Amendments to the By-Laws may be made, at any annual meeting, by 
vote of two-thirds of the members present and voting. They may also 
be made by the like vote at any regular meeting, provided notice of the 
same be contained in a call for such meeting issued by the Clerk, and 
sent to every member. 



Am up JKqy 




PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



AT THE 



ANNUAL MEETING, JANUARY 16, 1917. 



PROCEEDINGS 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



Annual Meeting, January 16, 1917. 




BOSTON: 

OLD STATE HOUSE. 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 

M C M XVII. 



.ft*' 




c+U 



CONTENTS 



I. Annual Report of the Directors. By The 
President ...... 

II. Report of the Committee on the Rooms 

III. Additions to the Society's Collections 

IV. Report of the Committee on the Library 
V. Additions to the Society's Library 

VI. Report of the Committee on Publications 

VII. "The Melvill House in Green Street," by 
Walter K. Watkins .... 

VIII. Report of the Committee on Finance . 

IX. Report of the Treasurer 

X. Report of the Committee on Memorials 

XL Report of the Committee on Nominations 

XII. May Meeting. " Dorman Mahoone alis 
Mathews, — an Early Boston Irishman," 
by John H. Edmonds 

XIII. Form of Bequest 

XIV. Officers since Organization 
XV. Officers for 1917 . 

XVI. Membership List 
XVII. Charter . 
XVIII. By-Laws .... 



5 
14 

J 9 

21 

2 3 

25 

26 

38 

40 
42 

43 



44 
7 2 
73 
74 
75 
95 
96 



Committee on Ptiblications 



John W. Farwell 
Albert Matthews 



Fitz-Henrv Smith, Jr. 
Francis H. Brown 



The Clerk 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING 




)HE Thirty-sixth Annual Meeting of the 
Bostonian Society was held in the Council 
Chamber of the Old State House, Boston, 
on Tuesday, January 1 6, 19 17, at 3 P. M., 
in accordance with a notice mailed to every 
member. The President, Grenville H. Nor- 
cross, occupied the chair. 

The records of the last monthly meeting were read and 
approved, and the following Reports were presented. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS 

To the Members of the Bostonian Society : — 

Your Directors have the honor of presenting their Annual 
Report for the past year : — 

MEMBERSHIP. 

At the close of the year there were in the Society : 

Honorary Members .... 3 

Life Members 659 

Annual Members .... 474 



Making a total of . . 1,136 

A comparison of this record with that of one year ago, 
shows that the Society has gained twenty-nine members. 



An analysis of the Membership Rolls shows the following 
changes : — 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of the year 191 5 3 
Added by election o 

Making the present number . . 3 

LIFE MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of the year 191 5 644 
Added by election and transfer . -33 



Making ...... 6yj 

Loss by deaths . . . . .18 



Making the present number . 659 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



There were at the close of the year 191 5 461 
Added by election .... 47 



Making 508 

Loss by deaths, transfers, resignations, etc. 34 



Making the present number . . 474 

MONTHLY MEETINGS. 

During the year 1916 the following papers have been read 
before the Society at its Monthly Meetings, in the Council 
Chamber : 

January 18: Annual Meeting. Annual Reports of the 
President, the Treasurer, and the various Committees. Also 
" Benjamin Franklin, An Appreciation," by Marshall P. 
Thompson. 

February 15:" The Birth and the Babyhood of the Tele- 
phone," by Thomas A. Watson. 



March 21: "Substitute Currency in Boston during the 
Civil War," by Harry A. Gray. 

April 18: "Old Boston," written by the late Edwin M. 
Bacon and read by the Clerk of the Society. 

May 23: " Dorman Mahoone, alis Mathews; an early 
Boston Irishman," by John H. Edmonds. 

October 17: "The Arlington Street Church, with special 
reference to the Ministry of the Rev. William Ellery Chan- 
ning, D. D.," by Miss Eva Channing. 

November 21 : "The Howard Athenaeum," by John 
Bouve Clapp. 

December 19 : " Storms and Shipwrecks in Boston Bay 
and the Record of the Life Savers of Hull," by Fitz Henry 
Smith, Jr. 

NECROLOGY. 

During the year we have learned of the deaths of the fol- 
lowing members of the Society : 

Died in 191 5. 

Miss Amy Louisa Mayo, born in Boston, January 23, 1851, 
died in West Newton, March 30. 

James Madison Riley, born in Newry, Me., January 24, 1837, 
died in Medford, August 25. 

Died in 191 6. 

Archibald Murray Howe, born in Northampton, May 20, 
1848, died in Cambridge, January 6. 

Timothy Aloysius Gallivan, born in Boston, June 21, 1858, 
died in Jamaica Plain, January 12. 

Charles Henry Calhoun Brown, born in Portsmouth, N. H., 
March 16, 1839, died in Brookline, January 19. 

Mrs. Lucy Ann Norcross, born in Boston, October 13, 
1 8 16, died in Boston, February 13. 

Edwin Munroe Bacon, born in Providence, R. I., October 
20, 1844, died in Boston, February 24. 



Miss Augusta Magee Brown, born in Boston, July 13, 1822, 
died in Boston, March 2. 

Henry Pelham Curtis, born in Boston, July 24, 1847, died 
in Boston, March 3. 

Frederick Lewis Gay, born in Boston, October 28, 1856, 
died in Brookline, March 3. 

Frederick Thayer Hunt, born in East Weymouth, Septem- 
ber 11, 1857, died in East Weymouth, March 8. 

John Hopewell, born in Greenfield, February 2, 1845, died 
in Washington, D. C., March 28. 

Mrs. Susan Eliza Blume, born in Eliot, Me., April 25, 1836, 
died in Boston, May 3. 

James Longley, born in Boston, January 13, 1840, died in 
Boston, May 9. 

Frank Ernest Simpson, born in Boston, February 5, 1859, 
died in Boston, May 2 1 . 

Mrs. Mary Emma Sullivan, born in South Acton, April 4, 
1856, died in Manchester, July 2. 

John Francis Currant, born in Boston, June 27, 1828, died 
in Somerville, July 19. 

Mrs. Rebecca Bennett Warren, born in Billerica, June 1, 
1 8 19, died in Boston, July 31. 

George Augustus Gardner, born in Boston, September 30, 
1829, died in Boston, August 6. 

Edward Reynolds Andrews, born in Boston, December 22, 
183 1, died in Putney, Vt., August 6. 

Charles Jackson Paine, born in Boston, August 26, 1833, 
died in Weston, August 12. 

Charles Lewis Austin, born in Boston, April 17, 1845, 
died in Rye Beach, N. H., August 13. 

Warren Fisher Gay, born in Swampscott, July 24, 1866, 
died in Boston, August 26. 

McDonald Ellis White, born in Boston, June 1 1, 1863, died 
in Etna, Me., October 12. 

Albert Cyrus Warren, born in St. Louis, Mo., March 18, 
1852, died in Brookline, November 10. 



Percival Lowell, born in Boston, March 13, 1855, died in 
Flagstaff, Ariz., November 12. 

Miss Helen Grenville Stevens, born in Boston, November 
29, 1851, died in Boston, November 15. 

Livingston Gushing, born in Boston, June 29, 1856, died in 
New Haven, Conn., November 25. 

Ernest Lewis Gay, born in Boston, December 14, 1874, 
died on a New Haven-Boston train, November 25. 

Bayard Thayer, born in Boston, April 3, 1862, died in Lan- 
caster, November 29. 

Charles Richard Batt, born in Fall River, May 24, 1842, 
died in Newton, December 9. 

Charles Henry Hersey, born in Jamaica Plain, July 27, 
1831, died in Roxbury, December 9. 

Mrs. Mary Rice Bremer, born in Boston, August 26, 1841, 
died in Boston, December 12. 

Jerome Jones, born in Athol, October 13, 1837, died in 
Brookline, December 13. 

Herbert Jaques, born in Framingham, January 23, 1857, 
died in Boston, December 21. 

Messrs. Curtis, dishing, Gallivan, E. L. Gay, F. L. Gay, 
Jones, Longley, Lowell, Riley, Simpson, Thayer, Warren and 
White, Mrs. Blume, Mrs. Bremer, Mrs. Norcross, Miss Mayo 
and Miss Stevens were life members. Messrs. Andrews, Aus- 
tin, Bacon, Batt, Brown, Currant, Gardner, W. F. Gay, Hersey, 
Hopewell, Howe, Hunt, Jaques and Paine, Mrs. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Warren and Miss Brown were annual members. 

Henry Pelham Curtis was a regular attendant at our meet- 
ings as long as his health permitted, and showed his interest 
in the Society by his gift several years ago of the Curtis 
Collection of Photographs of Boston about the middle of the 
nineteenth century. 

The three brothers, Frederick Lewis Gay, Warren Fisher 
Gay and Ernest Lewis Gay, have all died during the past 



10 

year ; all were members of the Society, and Ernest Lewis 
Gay had served for four years as a member of the Committee 
on Publications. At his funeral at St. Paul's Cathedral on 
November 28, the Society was represented by the President 
and Messrs. John H. Edmonds and Charles F. Read. 

Three of our deceased members had each passed her nine- 
tieth year — Miss Augusta M. Brown, 93, Mrs. William Wil- 
kins Warren, 97, and Mrs. Otis Norcross, 99. On the one 
hundredth anniversary of the birth of Mrs. Norcross, October 
13, 19 1 6, the Society received the sum of one thousand dol- 
lars to form the Lucy Ann Norcross memorial fund. 

Mr. Charles J. H. Woodbury, President of the Lynn His- 
torical Society and Vice-President of the Bay State Historical 
League, died in that city on March 20, 19 16, and your Presi- 
dent with Messrs. Henry F. Tapley, John Woodbury and the 
Clerk represented this Society at the funeral services at his 
late residence in Lynn on the 23rd. 

There have been two changes this year in the custodians 
of the Society. Mr. John W. Kennington who had served us 
faithfully and efficiently for seven years, after several weeks 
illness died at his home in Dedham on June 19, and the 
President, Messrs. Manning and Read attended the funeral at 
Dedham on June 22d. Mr. James W. Robinson, an intelli- 
gent and faithful custodian for nine years became unable on 
account of illness to continue his work and after a month's 
vacation, ended his services here in November. The places 
so made vacant have been filled by Messrs. Herbert E. Bur- 
rage and Henry M. Nourse. 

On Monday, March 1 3th, two tablets erected by this Society 
and the New England Telephone & Telegraph Company, 
were unveiled by Prof. Alexander Graham Bell, one at Court 
Street, marking the place where the telephone was discovered, 
the other at Exeter Place, where the first spoken sentence 
over the telephone was transmitted forty years before. Mr. 
Courtenay Guild, Chairman of the Committee on Memorials, 



1 1 



introduced Professor Bell, and many of our members were 
present. In the evening the Clerk, Mr. Read, was a guest 
at the dinner to Professor Bell at the Boston City Club and 
spoke in behalf of this Society ; he also attended the dinner 
to Mr. Thomas A. Watson at the same Club on April 20th. 

On March 31st, Mr. Read represented the Society as its 
delegate at the Centennial Anniversary of St. Matthew's 
Parish at its church on Broadway, South Boston ; — this is 
the oldest religious organization in that part of the city. 

On Wednesday, June 14th, the new buildings of the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge were dedi- 
cated and the Society was represented by the President, 
Messrs. Charles F. Read and Babson S. Ladd. 

Saturday, June 17th, Colonial Wars markers were unveiled 
in the cemetery in that town by the Dover Historical Society, 
and a meeting was held in its building at which your President 
spoke for the Bostonian Society. Messrs. Watkins, Noyes, 
and Dr. Charles M. Green also attended. 

On June 17th, Mr. Read attended the dedication of the 
new building of the Framingham Historical Society and ex- 
tended the greetings of our Society. 

On Monday, June 26th, your President spoke for the So- 
ciety at the dinner of the Boston Old School Boys Associa- 
tion at the Atlantic House, Nantasket Beach. 

Tuesday, June 27th, the President, Mr. George K. Clarke, 
Mrs. Marrs, Dr. J. Collins Warren and others attended a re- 
ception by the Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities at the Samuel Fowler house in Danversport. 

On Friday, August 4th, a tablet erected by the lawyers of 
Boston at the birth-place of Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw in 
West Barnstable was unveiled, your President, Messrs. Bab- 
son S. Ladd, William V. Kellen and others of this Society 
being present. 

On Monday, September 25th, the Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce held a meeting in the Council Chamber of the Old 
State House in commemoration of the two hundredth anni- 



12 

versary of the lighting of Boston Light, at the entrance of 
Boston Harbor. Your President was asked to preside and 
addresses were made by Governor McCall, Hon. William C. 
Redfield, Secretary of Commerce in the Cabinet of President 
Wilson, and Dr. Edward M. Hartwell of the Boston Statistics 
Department. In the morning a tablet at the Lighthouse 
had been unveiled by Secretary Redfield in behalf of the 
United States, and the afternoon meeting adjourned to the 
Old Beacon Club House on Point Allerton from which the 
company watched the lighting of the lantern of Boston Light 
at the beginning of the 201st year, and enjoyed a Cape Cod 
clambake afterwards. 

On Monday, October 16th, the President attended the 
exercises of Ether Day at the Massachusetts General Hospi- 
tal and the dedication of the Moseley Administration Build- 
ing — a memorial to William Oxnard Moseley, M. D., who 
lost his life on the Matterhorn in 1879. 

On Thursday, October 19th, the President and Messrs. 
Read and Watkins, represented the Society at the flag raising 
by the John Adams Chapter, Daughters of the Revolution at 
their building in Quincy, — the birthplace of President John 
Adams. 

On Friday, November 3d, your President attended the un- 
veiling of a tablet by the Rhode Island Historical Society in 
memory of Major Samuel Appleton of Ipswich, on the island 
in the Great Swamp at South Kingston, R. I., the site of the 
fort of the Narragansett Indians. 

On Friday, December 22d, the Curtis Guild Memorial steps 
on Boston Common opposite Joy Street were dedicated and a 
bas relief of Governor Guild in the State House was unveiled, 
— the Society was represented at these exercises by Messrs. 
Courtenay Guild, Charles F. Read and others. 

Monday, December 31st, your President attended the ser- 
vices at the First Parish meeting-house (Unitarian) in Bed- 
ford in celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the 
erection of the present building. 



13 

The thirty-fifth anniversary of the incorporation of this 
Society took place on Saturday, December 2d, and was 
noticed by a luncheon at the University Club given by the 
President to the Board of Directors and members of the 
Committees. 

During the year the old six-mile stone spoken of in the last 
report has been reset on Harvard Avenue in Allston, at the 
expense of a number of our members. 

On the petition of the Society the Commonwealth appro- 
priated the money and the Governor appointed a commission 
of which Mr. Courtenay Guild, of our Committee on Memo- 
rials is Chairman, to erect a monument in memory of the 
Chevalier de Saint Sauveur at or near King's Chapel ; this 
monument will soon be ready for unveiling. 

The Bay State Historical League has held three meetings 
this year; on Saturday, March 28th, with the Bostonian 
Society at the Old State House, one hundred and twenty-five 
being present. Frank Smith, President of the League and of 
the Dover Historical Society presided, and after a welcome 
from your President, Mr. Worthington C. Ford of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society read a paper on " The Functions 
of Local Historical Societies," which was discussed by Messrs. 
Parmenter, Clarke, Mann, and others. After the meeting 
those present were invited to Young's Hotel for afternoon 
tea by your President who was assisted at the tables by Mrs. 
Marrs, Miss Comer, Miss Manning and Miss Kelly, all mem- 
bers of this Society. 

On Saturday, June 10th, the annual meeting was held with 
the Canton Historical Society at its building in Canton. Mr. 
Smith of the Dover Historical Society was reelected Presi- 
dent and your President was reelected a member of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

On Saturday, October 24th, the fall meeting of the League 
was held with the Mendon Historical Society in the Town 
Hall at Mendon, visiting between luncheon and the meeting, 
" Founders Field " and Nipmuc Lake. At all these meetings 



14 

this Society was represented by your President and delegates 
and other members. The delegates from this Society are 
now Messrs. William Rotch and George Kuhn Clarke with 
your President. 

The reports of the various committees will give more in de- 
tail the activities of each department of the Society. 

Respectfully submitted for the Directors, 

Grenville H. Norcross, 
Boston, January 16, igij. President. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ROOMS. 

The most interesting relic which has been placed in the 
Collections of the Society during the past year is the wooden 
figure known to several generations of Bostonians as the 
" Little Admiral." The sign of the " Little Admiral " has 
been displayed on State Street for nearly a century and a 
half. 

The following facts concerning the figure have kindly been 
contributed by Mr. Walter K. Watkins, a member of the 
Society : 

It was first placed in front of the Crown Coffee House in 
1770. This resort was at Number One, Long Wharf, now 
the corner of State and Chatham Streets, the site of the new 
building of the Fidelity Trust Company. It designated the 
shop of William Williams, mathematical instrument-maker. 
His advertisement can be seen in the Boston Gazette of 12 
March, 1770. In the same issue appears an account of the 
Boston Massacre. Among the victims of the affray was 
Samuel Maverick, who was Williams' half-brother, his mother, 
Mary Williams, a widow, having married as his second wife, 
20 January, 1748/9, Jotham Maverick. The father of William 
Williams was Captain John Williams, a shopkeeper of Bos- 
ton, who died 22 March, 1748, at the age of forty-one, and 
is buried in the King's Chapel Burial Ground. He left a 
substantial estate of ^66575, of which ,£4544-9-4 was for 




THE LITTLE ADMIRAL 



15 

goods in his shop. One of the appraisers of the estate was 
Jotham Maverick who married the widow. Besides his estate 
he left five children: Mary, born, 1734; John, born 1736; 

William, born ; Robert, born 1739, and Elizabeth. 

William Williams obtained the Crown Coffee House estate 
by his marriage in 1773 to Joyce, daughter of Robert Shill- 
cock, the owner. This was not till 1782, however, as Shill- 
cock's widow, Hannah, did not die till that year. 

During the Revolution Williams saw active service as a 
private in 1777-9 in Capt. Mills' company, Col. Jeduthan 
Baldwin's regiment of artificers. In 1780 he was in Capt. 
Pattin's company, Gen. Henry Knox's artillery, stationed at 
West Point. 

Williams died 15 January, 1792, aged forty-four. In set- 
tling his estate, by order of the Supreme Court, his store, 1 
Long Wharf, was sold at public auction. It was not the orig- 
inal building of the Crown Coffee House, but a building 
erected after 1780 when the Coffee House was burnt. 

In 1755, Mary, sister of William Williams, married Joseph 
Helyer, blockmaker, of Boston. 

14 June, 1792, six months after the death of William 
Williams, Polly, the daughter of Joseph and Mary (Williams) 
Helyer, married Samuel Thaxter, a native of Hingham. Thax- 
ter succeeded to the business of Williams at 1 Long Wharf. 
A month after the sale of the property at auction, the follow- 
ing notice appeared in the Columbian Centinel, 22 May, 
1793 = 

i: Samuel Thaxter 

Mathematical Instrument Maker 

Respectfully informs the Public and his Customers, that 

he has removed from No. 1 Long Wharf to No. 9 Butler's 

Row 

Where he has for Sale 
A very neat Sextant, and a large assortment of Hadley's 
Quadrants, Davis' do., sea Books, and Charts, Scales 
and Dividers, guaging and surveying Instruments pocket 



i6 

Compasses, binnicle and cabin Compasses, Spy Glasses, 
among which are some very neat pocket ones — all of 
which may be had at the lowest price. N. B. Quadrants 
and Compasses repaired at short notice." 

9 Butler's Row (in the rear of the north side of State, 
running from Merchants Row to the water) was a wooden 
store on the north side of the Row, owned by Andrew Hall 
and Eunice Fitch in 1798. 

By 1796 Thaxter had removed to the north side of State 
Street at No. 49, a brick store owned by Joseph Lovering & 
Sons, tallow chandlers, opposite to Broad Street. He con- 
tinued on the north side of the street up to 181 5. He then 
moved to the opposite side of the street to the store num- 
bered 27 State Street. This was the brick dwelling house of 
William Clough, housewright, opposite Merchants Row. Pre- 
vious to 1825, 1 State Street was the south corner of Wash- 
ington and State. The numbers ran consecutively to Long 
Wharf and then up State to the north corner of Washing- 
ton Street. After 1825 the numbers were even on the north 
side and odd numbers on the south side. 

About this last date Thaxter removed to 125 State Street, 
the east corner of Broad. The building 125 State was occu- 
pied also by Charles Stimpson, Junior, a stationer, who was 
one of the publishers of the " Boston Annual Advertiser " 
annexed to the Boston Directory of 1826. In the cellar of 
the building was Augustus Adams, victualler. The building 
was owned by Jonathan Phillips. 

Porter, in his " Rambles about Boston," connects the statue 
with the Admiral Vernon Tavern on the east corner of Mer- 
chants Row. The sign of that tavern was a bust portrait of 
the admiral and it was known as the Vernon Head Tavern 
for half a century, even after the Revolution. 

The effigy has now come into a snug harbor in the Council 
Chamber through the generosity of several members of the 
Society. 




VASE PRESENTED TO THE BOSTONIAN SOCIETY BY THE 
DESCENDANTS OF GEN. SAMUEL ANDREWS 



17 

The Committee is glad to announce that the ancient wood 
panel oil painting of the Hancock House which has been 
loaned to the Collections for many years by Mrs. Louisa C. 
Bacon, a member, has now by her generosity, come into the 
possession of the Society. Relics of the Hancock House and 
its famous owner, John Hancock, are always interesting to 
Bostonians. When the publishing firm of Ginn & Co. re- 
moved after several years occupancy of the Brewer house, 
which with the Beebe house, was built in 1865 on the site of 
the Hancock House, the firm gave to the Society a valuable 
collection of Hancock documents and steel portraits which 
it had acquired from time to time. These have now been 
grouped in the Patriots' Room in close proximity to another 
Hancock Collection and are worthy of inspection. 

A silver pitcher, notable for historic interest and beautiful 
workmanship, has recently been placed in the Collections. 
The pitcher, which was made of three hundred Mexican dol- 
lars was given to Samuel Andrews on July 4, 1844, at the 
time he relinquished the captaincy of the militia company 
known as the Boston Tigers. General Andrews was well 
known for his long service in the Massachusetts Militia, and 
his descendants have placed this relic among the treasures 
of the Old State House. The donors are Charles Stanley 
Andrews, Katherine H. Andrews, Anson McLeod, and 
Miriam McLeod Christie. 

An interesting relic of the Webster family has come to us 
from Mr. Otis Norcross, a member. This is a pair of gold 
link cuff buttons which were owned by Daniel Webster. At 
his death in 1852 they came into the possession of his son, 
Col. Fletcher Webster, and were worn by him when he fell 
at the second battle of Bull Run in 1862 in the Civil War. 
Mrs. Fletcher Webster gave them to Mrs. John P. Healy 
of Boston and she gave them to Mr. Norcross. 

Mr. Henry B. Kelley of Dorchester gave to the Society an 
oil painting by him of the first church edifice of St. Matthew's 
Protestant Episcopal Parish on Broadway, South Boston. 



The church was built in 1816 and taken down in 1868. This 
parish which celebrated its centennial anniversary during the 
past summer, is the oldest religious organization in South 
Boston. 

There has been added to the Collections a bust of James 
Savage, 1 784-1 873, a well known Bostonian of his time ; and 
also from the same source, the Savage family cradle in which 
several generations of the family have been rocked. 

During the past year the Society has received, through the 
Committee, the sum of $190.17 from the sale of prints and 
souvenirs, and there has been expended the sum of $738.23 
for the purchase of prints and souvenirs, and for the care and 
maintenance of the rooms. 

For the Committee, 

Francis H. Manning, Joseph G. Minot, 

Charles H. Taylor, Henry W. Cunningham, 

courtenay guild, the president, 

The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December SI, igi6. Clerk. 



19 



ADDITIONS BY GIFT AND LOAN 
TO THE SOCIETY'S COLLECTIONS, 1916. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Andrews, Gen. Sam- 
uel, Descendants 
of the late 

Bacon, Mrs. Louisa 
C. 

Blake, Henry S. 



Brown, T. Hassall 

Calumet and Hecla 
Mining Co. 

Ellis, Arthur B. 

Ginn and Co. 



Goodspeed, Charles 
E. 

Holland, Miss E. 



Jordan, William 
Thayer 



Kelley, Henry B. 

Marrs, Mrs. Laura 

N. 



Norcross, Grenville 
H. 



Silver pitcher given to Capt. Samuel Andrews by 
the Boston Light Infantry, July 4, 1844. 

Oil painting, on wood, of the Hancock House, 
loaned to the Collection for many years. 

Fire hose nozzle given by James H. Blake to the 
Associated Engine and Hose Companv, No. 7 
(B. F. D.), June 9, 1834. 

Photograph of a portrait, by Badger, of Col. Joseph 
Jackson (1707- 1790). Captain of the A. & H. A. 
Co., 1752. 

Copper medal commemorative of the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the foundation of the Calumet and 
Hecla Mining Co. 

Photograph of Rev. Rufus Ellis, D.D., 1819-1885, 
Minister of the First Church, 1 853-1 885. 

Miscellaneous collection of portraits, prints and 
documents relating to John Hancock and the 
Hancock House. 

Collection of Civil War photographs. 

Photograph of the interior of Harvard Church, 
Charlestown. 

Lustre pitcher taken from the Captain's quarters 
on the British brig " Boxer " after its defeat by 
the U. S. brig "Enterprise" in Portland (Me.) 
Harbor, in the War of 181 2. (A loan.) 

Oil painting of St. Matthew's Church, South Bos- 
ton, built 1 8 16, taken down 1868. 

Sachet made of a piece of the dress worn by Mrs. 
Nathaniel P. Banks at the Prince of Wales Ball 
in Boston in i860. Her husband was then 
Governor of Massachusetts. 

Photograph of Boston City Hospital, 1865. Mis- 
cellaneous collection of photographs of Bosto- 
nians. 



20 



DESCRIPTION. 



Norcross, Otis 



Peabodv, Robert S. 



Pendergast, Mrs. 
Ella W. 



Porter, Mrs. Alex- 
ander S. 

Purchased. 

Rogers, The Misses 
Catherine L. and 
Clara B. 

Shillaber, William 
G. 

Stratton, Charles E. 



Taylor, William 0. 

Whitman, Mrs. Jas. 
and Allan H. 

Women's City Club 



From Members of 
the Society. 



Pair of gold link cuff buttons owned by Daniel 
Webster, and worn by Col. Fletcher Webster, 
when killed at the Second Battle of Bull Run. 
1862. 

Water color drawing entitled "Beacon Hill and 
the Mill Dam," showing the old tavern opposite 
Parker St., about i860; attributed to Vautin. 

Photograph of a crayon drawing of James Walker, 
D.D. (1 794-1 874), Minister of the Harvard 
Church, Charlestown, 181 8-1 839; President of 
Harvard College, 1853- 1860. 

The Savage family cradle. (A Loan.) Bust of 
James Savage, 1 784-1 873. 

Photograph of William Warren, actor, 18 12-1888. 

Franklin medals, city medals, and other articles. 



Two photographs of the store of George E. Little- 
field, 1 844-1 9 1 5, antiquarian. 

Photograph of a drawing of the Stratton house on 
Waverly PI. The drawing, made in 1855, ' s 
entitled " 'Tis fifty years since." 

Photograph of the Boston City Hospital. 

Collection of wood engravings of Charlestown, in 
portfolio. 

Gravestone of Joseph Browne, 1718, dug up in the 
yard of the club house, 40 Beacon St. 

Wooden figure " The Little Admiral," 1770, a store 
sign in Boston for many years. 




THE JAMES LYMAN WHITNEY LIBRARY BOOKPLATE 



21 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY. 

During the past year 80 volumes and 52 pamphlets have 
been added to the Society's Library. 

Under the supervision of the Chairman of the Committee 
material progress has been made on the preparation of a card 
index, and many pamphlets have been suitably labeled and 
classified. Collections of invitations to and programs of Bos- 
ton events, covering many years, have been gathered in books. 
A perusal of these will carry the reader into a fertile field of 
Boston history. 

The Committee is glad to announce that a James Lyman 
Whitney book plate has been made for the Society. It 
was designed by Elisha B. Bird of Boston, and is reproduced 
herewith. A copy has been recently placed in the first book 
purchased from the income of the James Lyman Whitney 
Library Fund. It is entitled "The Financial History of 
Boston from 1822 to 1909," and the author is Charles Phillips 
Huse, Ph. D. The income of the Fund will doubtless place 
many books in the Library in the future, and they will per- 
petuate the memory of its founder. 

The children of Julia Ward Howe have given to the Li- 
brary the work entitled "Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910," and 
it has also acquired the book entitled " Charles Francis 
Adams, an Autobiography, 1 835—191 5." It is a satisfaction 
to place among our Boston biographies these portrayals of 
two eminent Bostonians. 

Dr. Robert M. Lawrence, a member, has given a copy of 
his book, recently published, " The Site of St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral." It has a permanent value for it tells us the history of 
an important part of Boston, and also contains brief bio- 
graphies of Boston worthies who walked its streets many 
years ago. 

The President of the Society has given to the Library a 
full set of the Harvard Graduates Magazine, covering the 
years from 1892 to 19 16. These twenty-four volumes form 



22 

an acceptable gift, for they not only record much history of 
the university, but contain many biographies of graduates who 
were Bostonians. 

The Penn Publishing Company of Philadelphia has given 
us the newest work on our city entitled " The Book of Bos- 
ton," by Robert Shackleton, which is full of interest. 

We have received from the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, through the office of the Secretary of State, the Vital 
Records, to 1850, of Boxboro, Bridgewater, 2 volumes, Bur- 
lington, Cambridge, volume 2, New Ashford, Richmond, Salis- 
bury, and Westford, and from the town of Weston its pub- 
lished Vital Records from 1707 to 1850. 

The Technology Review for October, 19 16, added to the 
Library, contains an exhaustive and profusely illustrated ac- 
count of the dedication on June 12th, 13th and 14th, last, of 
the new buildings of the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy on the Charles River embankment in Cambridge. The 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts has given us the seven- 
teenth volume of its attractive series of publications. 

The Committe has expended the sum of $117.11 during 
the past year for the preparation of the James Lyman Whit- 
ney book plate, the purchase of books and the maintenance 
of the Library. 

For the Committee, 

Francis H. Brown, Percival Merritt, 

Walter K. Watkins, John Woodbury, 

William G. Shillaber, The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December JI, igi6. Clerk. 



23 



ADDITIONS TO THE SOCIETY'S LIBRARY, 1916. 



Donors. 



Vol- 
umes. 



Pam- 
phlets. 



Allen, George E. 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co. 

Appleton, Francis H. 

Baker, Ezra H. ... 

Boston, City of ... 

Boston Public Library 

Boston Public Works Department 

Boston Transit Commission 

Brookline Historical Society 

Bunker Hill Monument Association 

Burrage, Herbert E. . 

Cambridge Historical Society 

Colonial Society of Massachusetts 

Edes, Mrs. Henry H. 

Essex Institute .... 

Howe, The Children of Mrs. Julia Ward Howe 

Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Massa 

chusetts ...... 

Hyde, Rev. William ..... 

Kimball, Miss Helen F. . 
Lawrence, Robert M., M. D. . 
Massachusetts, Commissioner of Public Records 

of 

Massachusetts Historical Society 
Massachusetts, Secretary of State of . 

Matthews, Albert 

Medford Historical Society 
Milton Historical Society 
Nantucket Historical Society 

Carried forward .... 



1 

1 

1 1 



12 

5 



2 7 37 



24 



Donors. 



Brought forward . 

National Society : Sons of the American Revol- 
ution ....-•• 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 

Norcross, Grenville H. 

Norcross, Mrs. Lucy A. 

Purchased 

Read, Charles F. 

Read, Burrage & Co. 

Robbins, Ezra H. 

Rotch, William 

Smithsonian Institution 

Society for the Preservation of New England An 
tiquities 

Sons of the Revolution in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 

State Street Trust Co. 

Veteran Association, First Corps of Cadets 

Watson, Thomas A. . 

Weston, Mass., Town of 

Total . 



Vol- 
umes. 



27 



37 
1 
6 

2 
1 
1 
1 



Pam- 
phlets. 



37 

1 
5 



52 



25 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS. 

The Committee on Publications announces the issue of 
Volume I, Second Series of the Bostonian Society Publica- 
tions. The first article which is entitled "Bits of Old Boston," 
was read before the Society by Curtis Guild, its President at 
the time, and surely no one was more fitted than he to por- 
tray the business life of Boston in the second quarter of the 
1 8th century ; a native of our city keenly loyal to its tradi- 
tions, it was a pleasure to him always to impart his know- 
ledge to his fellow members. 

The author of the second paper "The First Inauguration 
of John Hancock," also brings experience to his subject. 
Having served in the important office of a governor's private 
secretary, it was natural that he should make a study of the 
distinguished man who first filled the gubernatorial chair. 

The third paper is one entitled "Acadia in History and 
Poetry." The author is well fitted by descent and ability to 
tell us of the sad romance which was a result of the Treaty 
of Utrecht in 171 3. 

Mr. Walter K. Watkins, a member, has added interesting 
information on the Boylston Hotel, which formerly stood on 
School Street, giving the history of the estate on which it 
stood from the earliest days of the town to the present day. 
He has also contributed the information in the Report of 
the Committee on the Rooms, concerning the statue of the 
"Little Admiral." 

Reprints of several documents from the Society's Collect- 
ions conclude the volume. 



26 

The Committee has selected as a frontispiece for the re- 
port of this Annual Meeting the painting given to the 
Society's collections in 1901 by the great granddaughters of 
Thomas Melville, which shows the Melville House in Green 
Street. The following account of the site, Thomas Melville, 
and the event depicted, is furnished by Mr. Walter K. 
Watkins. 

For the Committee, 

John W. Farwell, Fitz Henry Smith, Jr., 

Albert Matthews, Francis H. Brown, 

Charles F. Read, 

Clerk. 

THE MELVILL HOUSE IN GREEN STREET 

In the early days of Boston that portion of the town, now 
known as the West End, north of Beacon Hill and west of 
Bowdoin Square, was given up to fields. On the marshy 
portion, the vicinity of the Massachusetts General Hospital, 
hay was cut, while cornfields and pastures were allotted to 
the inhabitants on other parts of the section. It was first 
known as the New Field and as early as 1641 a road led to 
it. About 165 1 a windmill was erected on the eminence 
where now stands the West Boston Branch Library. This 
gave it the name of the new mill field. 

These fields were fenced in and the entrance near the site 
of Bowdoin Square was known as the Field Gate. By the be- 
ginning of the 1 8th Century the tract of land between Bow- 
doin Square and Chambers Street was owned by Samuel 
Lynde and was known as "Justice Lynde's Pasture." The 
way from the head of Sudbury Street past these pastures on 
the south and running westerly to the river, was Cambridge 
Street. 

North of a stable in Lynde's pasture a road ran to the farm 
house on the twenty acre farm of Rev. James Allen. The 



27 

site of this house was near the head of Allen Street on what 
is now Chambers Street. Another branch road ran to the 
ropewalks and a shipyard at Barton's Point. This is now 
Leverett Street. Leading to these, past Lynde's pasture, 
was the road called Green Lane, a name formerly given to a 
portion of Salem Street. 

In 1 718 Lynde sold his pasture, some six acres, to John 
Staniford, from Essex County. Staniford bought for a land 
speculation this large tract, 855 feet on Green Lane, 546 feet 
on what is now Chambers Street and 677 feet on Cambridge 
Street. At the apex of this triangular piece, on Bowdoin 
Square it was 66 feet. To develop the property Staniford 
laid out two streets through it, Lynde and Staniford Streets. 
In 1736 the first building of the West Church was erected on 
the windmill site of the century previous. Other portions of 
the land had been sold by that time mainly to artisans, masons, 
housewrights and the like class. 

Shortly after the 1745 Rebellion, in Scotland, there came 
from Leven, in Fifeshire, a young Scottish man, Allan Mel- 
vill. He was of a branch of the family of that name of Strath- 
kinness and Craigtoun. Of this family was Sir Andrew 
Melvill of Carnbee, knighted by Charles II in 1683, and Gen. 
Robert Melvill, governor of Grenada in the West Indies, 
1 763- 1 770. The father of General Melvill was Rev. Andrew 
Melvill of Monimail, Fife. The father of Allan Melvill was 
Rev. Thomas Melvill minister of Scoonie, Fifeshire. Doug- 
las in his Baronage of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1798, in his 
account of the Strathkinness and Craigtoun family adds — 
" Before we conclude this title, we think proper to observe, 
that it appears, that the Melvills' of Boston in New England, 
also John Melvill, Esq., a member of his majesty's council at 
Grenada, are descended of the same branch of the Melvill 
family with this." John, brother of Allan Melvill, came from 
Leven, Fife, in 1757 to Boston and became a partner with 
his brother. They both became members of the Scots Char- 
table Society. 



28 

In 1750 Allan Melvill married, in Boston, Jean, daughter 
of David and Mary (Abernethy) Cargill. Captain David 
Cargill married Mary, sister of Rev. John Abernethy of An- 
trim, Ireland. The Abernethys' were born at Brigh, Tyrone, 
Ulster, where their father was a Presbyterian minister. Their 
mother was a daughter of Walkinshaw, of that ilk, in West 
Renfrewshire, Scotland. Rev. John Abernethy wrote several 
religious works, but is noted as an Irish dissenter and the 
cause of a division, by his opposition, in the Irish Presbyte- 
rian Church. This gave him the title of " father of the Free- 
thinking school of Irish Presbyterians." In this connection 
it might be of interest to state that the church of which he 
was minister, in Strand Street, Dublin, is now Unitarian. 

Captain David Cargill was of Sheepscot, Maine, in 1730, 
and commanded the garrison there in 1745. He died in Bos- 
ton in 1752, and was survived by his widow, Mary, and three 
children. Of his children, Abernethy Cargill died young, and 
David Cargill went to Bristol, England, and was not heard of 
afterward. Another son, Major James Cargill, was of New- 
castle, Maine, where he was in trouble for killing Indians in 
1755. The father owned Cargill's Island on the coast of 
Maine at Newcastle. 

In 1724 John Staniford sold to James Scollay, baker, a 
piece of land fronting 40 feet on the south side of Green 
Lane. Scollay was from the Orkney Islands, and two of 
his grand-daughters later married Melvills. 

It was in 1760 that Allan Melvill purchased the estate near 
the east corner of Staniford Street and Green Lane, having 
a frontage of about one hundred feet on Green Lane, which 
included the property formerly belonging to James Scollay. 
His residence must have been like the small house shown 
next to the church, as it had but a front room, back room 
and kitchen on the ground floor. On the second floor were 
front chamber, back chamber and kitchen chamber. Above 
were the garrets. It was probably a part of the large house 



2 9 

shown. The business done by the two brothers was consid- 
erable, both with Great Britain and her colonies. He resided 
in the house but a short time as his death occurred before the 
last of January, 1761. 

His brother, John, as surviving partner, was administrator 
to his estate of nearly ^5000. The grandmother, Mary 
(Abernethy) Cargill, was made the guardian of the only child, 
Thomas, ten years of age. The boy's education was at Proc- 
tor's school, which stood opposite the head of what is now 
Cornhill, and at Holbrook's South Writing School, near the 
site of the Lawrence Building, Tremont, corner of West 
Street. He then had Rev. James Thompson as a tutor. The 
latter acted in the same capacity at Princeton College, from 
1762 to 1770, and in 1767 occasionally supplied the pulpit of 
the Presbyterian Church at Trenton. Thomas Melvill grad- 
uated at Princeton, in 1769, in the same class with John 
Beatty, of Trenton ; William Blair Lawrence, of Kentucky ; 
William Channing, of Newport; Gov. John Henry, of Mary- 
land; Rev. Elihu Thayer, of New Hampshire; and Rev. Sam- 
uel Standhope Smith, of Princeton. 

After graduation he visited relatives in Scotland and is said 
to have received the freedom of the boroughs of St. Andrews 
and Renfrew. He returned to Boston in 1773, where he re- 
ceived an honorary A. M. from Harvard. He became a mer- 
chant, continuing the business of the partnership of his father 
and uncle, carried on by the uncle during the boy's minority. 

In 1768 we find the uncle, John Melvill, located as a mer- 
chant at Grenada. From 15 to 27 November 1774, Thomas 
Melvill was ill and ten visits at three shillings a visit were 
made by Dr. Joseph Warren, medicines to the amount of 
thirteen shillings were given. The bill of ^2-3- was collected 
after the war by Dr. Warren's brother, Ebenezer Warren of 
Foxboro. 

In 1762, John Melvill married Deborah, daughter of John 
and Mercy ( Greenleaf ) Scollay. Twelve years later (1774) 



30 

Thomas Melvill married her younger sister, by twenty years, 
Priscilla Scollay, and had eight children. During the period 
previous to the Revolution, Thomas Melvill was active as a 
patriot. He was a member of the Long Room Club, on 
Court Street, and of the Boston Tea Party. Tea found in 
his shoes after the affair is still preserved by the Bostonian 
Society. In 1776 we find him a captain in Colonel Thomas 
Crafts' Artillery Train. The next year he was appointed 
major in this regiment and served in the Continental service. 
In November 1778, he resigned after three years service, as 
the inadequate pay prevented him supporting his large family. 
In 1779 he commenced his service as fireward of the town, 
which was to be a continuous service of nearly half a century. 

In 1789 there were eleven water engines located in different 
parts of the town. That at the west end was Number Six, 
foreman George Ridgeway, housewright, of Lynde Street. 
Thirteen men comprised his crew. Ten years later there 
were twelve engines and "Success", No. 6, was located on 
Cambridge Street. In 1800, Engine 13 had been added, 
named "President Adams" and housed on Leverett Street. 

In 18 16 Engine 13 was condemned and a new one ordered 
to be called "Rapid." In 1820 it was voted to procure a 
piece of land for a house for engine 13. At the same time 
plans were being made for a new prison on Leverett Street 
just west of Causeway Street. A brick engine house was 
built in the southwest corner of the lot next the stone court 
house erected there at this time. 

Thomas Melvill retired as fireward on 22 June 1825. He 
had served forty-six years and twenty-five years as Chairman. 
As an appreciation of his services he was given a silver 
pitcher valued at $70. 

A description of his person as he is depicted in the picture 
holding the hosepipe, appeared in the Boston Newsletter, 8 
April 1826. "A man of honesty, sobriety and correct moral 
habits. ... In height, he is about five feet, seven inches stoops 



3i 

a little, but walks with energy and strength. His face is 
strictly Roman, I should call it ; his nose is not only large but 
aqualine, and his general expression, calm and amicable, .... 
a man who consults his own personal comfort and conve- 
nience, in preference to the distortions in dress, which are the 
great objects of solicitudes in modern circles. " 

The Columbian Centinel, under date of Thursday, 21 June 
1832, recites : — "The new engine Mellville, was yesterday 
brought out for the first time and manned, by company 13, 
formerly of the Rapid. With but little exertion water was 
thrown over the vane of the City Hall.* She will be a valua- 
ble addition to our excellent fire department. " 

On this occasion the company visited the late fireward for 
whom the engine was named. The picture, of which the 
frontispiece is a reproduction, shows that visit on the white 
placard in the rear of the right rank of men appears " Rapid 
13," the other reads Melvill 13. The figure of a daughter, 
in the doorway, holds his staff used by him as fireward. The 
hats worn by the fire company are similar to some of those 
still preserved by the Bostonian Society. The hat worn by 
Major Melvill on this occasion can also be seen at the Old 
State House, as well as the portraits of himself and wife 
by Francis Alexander the artist, who painted Dickens, Web- 
ster and other noted people. 

In 1852 Mellvill 13 became Mellvill 6, and in 1853 removed 
to the new brick house in Wall Street. Tuesday afternoon 
17 June, 1834, The Boston Fire Department paraded in Bos- 
ton. " At the head of No. 1 3 The Melvill walked a member 
wearing ' The last of the Cocked Hats ' and bearing the 
good old fashioned staff, used at fires by the veteran Fireward 
Thomas Melvill. The Major's Cocked Hat was for many 
years the only one worn in the city, and the one he used for 
so many years of his life at fires, was worn by him for the 
last time, in his capacity of Fireward, at the Kilby Street fire 

♦Old State House. 



32 

in 1826 when a large hole was burnt in the side by a cinder 
which lodged upon it, and was retained by the broad upturned 
brim, much to the danger of the whole gentleman's head. 
The individual who wore the hat, had a prominent Roman 
nose resembling the Major's, and it was supposed he was 
selected to bear the relicts on that account. We understand, 
however, that the choice was made without regard to that 
circumstance, and was purely accidental. 

The Staff was presented to the Company by Maj. Melvill 
himself, when they took possession of their Engine, and the 
Hat was given to them by the family after his death. They 
are precious relics and highly prized by the company." {Bos- 
ton Transcript I g June 1 834.) 

In 1786 Thomas Melvill was appointed Naval Officer for 
the port of Boston for the Federal government with his office 
in Market Square (Faneuil Hall Sq.) In 1789 he was made 
Surveyor of the port and Naval Officer of the Commonwealth. 
Later he was made Federal surveyor and inspector and in 
1 8 14 again made Naval Officer, and held that office till 
removed by President Jackson in 1829. 

The large three story house shown in the picture must have 
been built or enlarged by Thomas Melvill after the Revolu- 
tion, and perhaps previous to 1798. In the latter year he 
resided in a two story house covering 12 16 square feet. The 
large house in the picture had a frontage of sixty feet and a 
depth of twenty. On the south west corner was an ell on 
the south side of the house twenty by twenty-five feet. This 
would be a larger structure than the house just this side of 
the church which probably covered 600 or 800 square feet, 
and was evidently not standing in 1798, but built shortly 
after. The house next beyond the church was occupied in 
1798 by David Peirce and covered 780 square feet. Mr. 
Peirce was located at 35 Long Wharf as a merchant. Be- 
yond the large tree was a small house occupied by Benjamin 
Hall. Next came a small house occupied by E. Saunders. 



33 

Beyond another small wooden house, was the residence of 
Philip Merritt, a crockery ware dealer at 88 Newbury (Wash- 
ington St.) The last house facing Bowdoin Sq. was a large 
wooden one in 1798 occupied by Andrew Spooner, a mer- 
chant who married Eliza Sparhawk a great granddaughter of 
Sir William Pepperell. In the next century the house stand- 
ing on the site was the residence of Robert Gould Shaw, a 
merchant, whose place of business was on Central Wharf. 
The brick house, shown on the east corner of Gooch Street, 
stood on the site of a two story wooden dwelling, occupied in 
the last years of the 18th century, by Mrs. Deborah Snow, 
as a boarding school for young ladies. In 1829 the house 
and land was purchased by Cushing Nichols, a mason. The 
next year he erected brick houses on the site. The one 
shown in the picture was purchased by William Thwing, 
merchant, in 1832. He was a ship owner and located on 
Central Wharf. He was the first occupant of the house. He 
died in Arques, France 1880. 

In April 1825, Thomas Melvill sold to Thomas Tilden, 
mason ; George Carpenter, housewright ; Ebenezer Nichols, 
mason ; Daniel Colby, housewright, and Richard Bond, house- 
wright, a piece of land with a 93 foot frontage on Green Street, 
and in the rear 109 feet on a passage leading to Staniford 
Street. On the lot was the house shown between the Mell- 
vill house and the church. It had been built since 1800. 
The house with a frontage of twenty feet was sold by the 
church to Isaac Davis, trader. It was numbered 16 and had 
as tenant in 1830, Mrs Phebe, widow of Titus Harris. In 
1834 Mrs. Anna Bowman, milliner, lived there. 1832 Nath- 
aniel Colesworthy, printer and Isaiah J. Bacon, painter, were 
residents. A five foot passage ran between the house and 
church. On the balance of the lot was built the brick meet- 
inghouse shown in the picture. The cornerstone was laid, 8 
April 1826, and a silver plate had the following inscription: — 



34 

" For the Worship of the Almighty Jehovah. Father, Son 
and Holy Spirit and for the accomodation of a Congregational 
Church of Christ organized Dec. 30th, 1823 and of the Relig- 
ious Society connected with it incorporated June 15th, 1825 
this edifice is erected: — the cornerstone being laid April 8th, 
1826 the building committee consisting of T. Tilden, G. Car- 
penter, E. B. Nichols, D. Colby and R. Bond, architect. 
Arise, O Lord, into thy Rest ; Thou and the Ark of thy 
Strength. " 

While the roof was being raised, the fastenings gave way, 
the roof fell and knocked down part of the front wall and 
staging. Two men lost their lives and several were hurt. 

A very full description of the exterior and interior of the 
building can be found in Bowen's Picture of Boston (1833) 
pp. 169-172. 

The builders conveyed the edifice to the " Congregational 
Church in Green Street. " This society was formed in 18 19 
at Parkman's Market in Cambridge Street. In 1821 they 
erected a house in Butolph ( Irving ) Street known as the 
Mission House. In the rear of the Green Street Church 
was a chapel which was entered from the passage from Stam- 
ford Street. 

In 1845 the Green Street Society conveyed the church 
property to the Leyden Chapel, a society under Rev. Joseph 
H. Towne, which had been located in Tremont Temple. 

In 1844 the Church of the Advent was formed at 13 
Merrimac Street, and afterward worshipped in the chapel hall 
on the north corner of Causeway and Lowell Streets. In 
Dec. 1848, they purchased the church in Green Street from 
the Leyden Chapel. In 1864 the Advent Church sold their 
building and bought the Gothic stone church on Bowdoin 
Street, built for the Hanover Street Society in 1831. 

It was not till 1830 that numbers were given to the houses 
on Green Street. Hale's 18 14 map shows five houses on the 
north side of Green Street and eight on the south side. 



35 

In 1830 Pitts Street lead from 1 Green Street, Crescent 
Court from 5 Green, and Gooch Street from n Green. 
Major Melvill's residence was Numbers 20 and 24, occupied 
by Mrs. Mary Martin, dressmaker, for several years. In 
1 820/1, 24 had been occupied by Mrs. Susanna, widow of 
Nath'l F. Thayer. 

In 1832 number 24 was occupied by Emanuel Chisole, 
housewright. 

After the death of the widow of Major Melvill in 1833 
number 20 was the residence of Samuel B. Doane, a sugar 
refiner on Gooch Street. 

By Melvill's inventory the portion of the house he occupied 
had on the first floor a parlor, sitting parlor and breakfast 
room. On the second floor were chambers over these three 
rooms and a chamber in the third story. 

The house next west of Melvill's on Green Lane was 
occupied the last years of the 18th century by Captain Samuel 
Nicholson. A native of Maryland he was a lieutenant of 
John Paul Jones, and the first captain of the Frigate Consti- 
tution. The house was bought in 1800 by Thomas Melvill. 
It was a small two story wooden house, but there were over 
ten thousand feet of land, which added nearly double to the 
Melvill estate. 

Thomas Melvill died on Sunday evening, 16 September 
1832, at nine fifteen. His funeral was from his residence at 
3.30 p. m. Wednesday 19 September. Engine 13 wore 
mourning for thirty days. He was a member of the General 
Court at the time of his death. He was buried in Tomb Six, 
which is in the rear of King's Chapel marked Allan Melvill. 
He left a good estate with land, in three counties. In Pitts - 
field he had land purchased of Rev. William Allen and the 
Van Schaack farm, he had purchased in 18 16, from Elkanah 
Watson. This he left to his son Thomas junior, who resided 
there as did his children after him. At one time it was a 
boarding house, the resort of Longfellow, Hawthorne and 



36 

other celebrities. The son Thomas married as a first wife 
Franchise Marie des Douleurs Lami Fleury, a native of 
Cadiz. 

At Havre, Paris and Pittsfield a child was born to them. 
The children all died young at Pittsfield. The mother, of a 
Parisian family, died at the age of thirty-three and young 
Melville married Mary Ann Augusta Hobart a granddaughter 
of Gen. Henry Dearborn. Thomas Melvill junior ended his 
life at Galena, Ills, in 1845. 

Another son, Allan, lived in Pittsfield and married in 
Albany, Maria, daughter of Gen. Peter Gansevoort. Allan 
died in 1832 before his father. Among their children was 
Herman Melvill, the writer, who lived at " Arrow Head, " the 
old Bush inn, near Melvill Lake in Pittsfield. Herman 
married a daughter, Elizabeth Knapp, of Chief Justice Lem- 
uel Shaw. Judge Shaw had been engaged to his aunt, Nancy 
Melvill, who had died at the age of twenty. Shaw was also 
one of the executors of Major Thomas Melvill's will. The 
property besides the real estate included shares in several 
Boston banks and insurance companies. The total being 
over $77,000. The widow, Priscilla ( Scollay ) Melvill, had a 
life interest in the house and she lived less than a year after 
her husband's death. 

A daughter, Mary, had married Captain John D'Wolf, 
who was for many years a master in the Russian-American 
trade and who died in 1872 in Dorchester, aged 93. He also 
was one of the executors, who, on Tuesday 27 May 1834, at 
noon sold at auction the estate of Major Melvill. It con- 
sisted of a lot of land and two dwellings. It amounted to 
12,000 square feet and fronted on Green and Staniford Streets. 
After the sale the materials of the large dwelling house were 
to be sold. The purchasers of the land were Adin Hall, 
broker, and Lewis Dennis, mason. On the Green Street 
site of the Melvill house and lot a block of six brick houses 
was built. 



37 

A stable, which stood on the site of the Davis house, next 
west of the church, was built about 1855. In 1854 Ephraim 
L. Byam and Amos R. Nickerson had a stable at 5 North 
Russell Street. In 1856 they had a livery stable at 16 Green 
Street the number given the new stable. In 1861 they had 
been succeeded at 16 Green Street by Abijah L. Wright and 
Otis Vinal, junior. Mr. Wright had formerly had his stable 
at 27 Green Street, on the north side near Leverett. Wright 
and Vinal also had a stable at 26 North Russell Street, the 
corner of Vine Street. In 1864 they were succeeded on 
North Russell Street by Horace L. Cilley and Martin W. 
Stimson. In 1866, Wright went to 99 Green Street and 
Cilley and Stimson had the 16 Green Street stable, which 
had become 40 Green Street, by renumbering. They occupied 
it as a livery and hack stable up to 1879. 

In 1855, George H. Dickerman and Charles F. Barker, 
began the manufacture of paper boxes in Gore Block, between 
Chardon and Pitts Streets. When the Church of the Advent 
removed to Bowdoin Street, Mr. Dickerman moved into the 
Advent Building as it was called, and which was given the 
numbers 30 to 36. Later the factory was numbered 32 to 
36, and after the removal of the stable it was 32 to 40. 

The brick block has had several tenants well known in 
their day. At 48 lived Rev. Paul Dean, and at 52 lived the 
Rev. A. A. Miner. At 50, then 26, lived in 1836 Henry 
Dean, grocer, who was succeeded in 1840 by Samuel Still- 
man Pierce. Mr Pierce had his grocery shop at the corner 
of Tremont and Court Streets. He resided at 26 Green 
Street till 1862, when he removed to the South End. 

Walter K. Watkins. 



33 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

The Committee on Finance herewith reports for the year 
1916. 

The Permanent Fund of the Society amounted to $57,234.29 
at the close of the year 191 5 and the Committee is pleased to 
report that the invested funds of the Society have been largely 
increased in a three fold manner during the past year. 

First, the Life Membership fees, which are always added to 
the Permanent Fund, have amounted to $925. 

In addition, we have profited by the generosity of Messrs. 
Grenville H. Norcross, President of the Society, and John W. 
Farwell, a member of the Board of the Directors. The Presi- 
dent gave to the Society on October 13th, last, the sum of 
$1,000. This day was the one hundredth anniversary of the 
birth of his mother, a member of the Society, who died on 
February 13th, last, in the one hundredth year of her age. 
This gift constitutes the Lucy Ann Norcross Centennial 
Memorial. Mr. Farwell gave to the Permanent Fund the 
sum of $500 during the past year. 

The Society appreciates these generous gifts which increase 
its financial strength and enables it to prosecute with even 
more vigor its work in the study of the history of Boston and 
the preservation of its antiquities. 

During the year the Committee has invested the sum of 
$2,967.19 in one United Electric Security 5 per cent, bond 
at a cost of $994.44, and two Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland 5 per cent, bonds at a cost of $1,972.75. 

The James Lyman Whitney Library Fund has been in- 
creased during the year by the sum of $55.90 and now 
amounts to $290.19. 



39 

By the changes the Permanent Fund amounted to $60,637.91 
at the close of the year 19 16. Of this amount $59,800 is in- 
vested, the sum of $547.72 is deposited in the New England 
Trust Co., and the James Lyman Whitney Library Fund, 
amounting to $290.19, is deposited in the Franklin Savings 
Bank. 

For the Committee, 

Grenville H. Norcross, Francis H. Manning, 

COURTENAY GUILD. 

Charles F. Read, 
December JI, ip/6. Clerk. 



40 



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42 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEMORIALS. 

The Committee on Memorials reports as follows for the 
year 1916 : 

During the opening months of the year the Bostonian So- 
ciety and the New England Telephone & Telegraph Company 
co-operated in placing two bronze tablets, one on Court 
Street and the other on Exeter Place, to commemorate the 
fortieth anniversary of the discovery of the telephone in this 
city. 

The occasion was made doubly interesting by the presence, 
at the unveiling of the tablets, of Dr. A. Graham Bell, the 
inventor of the telephone and it was regretted that Mr. 
Thomas A. Watson, Dr. Bell's co-worker in the great inven- 
tion was prevented from being present by reason of absence 
from the city. Dr. Bell was accompanied at the unveiling by 
his wife, and the Bostonian Society and the New England 
Telephone & Telegraph Company were represented by many 
of their leading officials. 

The Committee also reports that the six-mile stone, for the 
replacing of which members of the Society generously con- 
tributed the necessary amount of money, has now been placed 
in a suitable position so that the passers-by may read the 
inscription. The stone is located on the easterly side of 
Harvard Avenue, between Commonwealth and Brighton Ave- 
nues, Allston. 

For the Committee, 

Courtenay Guild, Fitz Henry Smith, Jr., 

Boylston A. Beal, The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December 31, I gib. Clerk. 



43 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS. 

The Committee which was apppointed to nominate Officers 
of the Bostonian Society for the ensuing year, begs to report 
that it has attended to its duty and proposes the following 
candidates : — 

For Clerk and Treasurer. 
Charles F. Read. 



For Directors. 



Francis H. Manning, 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr., 
John W. Farwell, 
Grenville H. Norcross, 



Courtenay Guild, 
Francis H. Brown, 
Joseph Grafton Minot, 
Henry W. Cunningham, 



Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

Winthop S. Scudder, \ 

Elizabeth F. Kelly, I Nominating 

Arthur H. Nichols, / Committee. 

Ezra H. Baker, J 

January 5, I^IJ- 

The Report of the Committee was accepted, and the Society 
then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year. 
The result as reported by the tellers — Messrs. Winthrop S. 
Scudder and William O. Comstock — showed the unanimous 
choice of those named on the ballot, as nominated. 

It was ordered that the President's Report, together with 
the reports of the several Committees as submitted at the 
Annual Meeting, and the Treasurer's Report, with the Mem- 
bership Rolls, etc., be printed in the Annual Proceedings. 

On motion, the Society then adjourned. 

Charles F. Read, Clerk. 



44 



"DORMAN MAHOONE ALIS MATHEWS" 
AN EARLY BOSTON IRISHMAN 

A Paper read before the Bostonian Society May 23, 191 6, by 
John H. Edmonds 

In my paper on the Romance of Records read before 
the Bay State Historical League Oct. 19, 19 12, by Charles 
F. Read Esq., I mentioned the finding of a " Dermin 
Mahoonne " in the Boston Town Records from 1646 to 1661, 
whom I identified as the " Dierman Mathew " of the Essex 
County Records of 1641 and the "Dierman oMahonie " of 
the same in 1643 wno na d a son " Tege " who could not read 
the English tongue. As read several times in 191 3, further 
light was thrown upon him. Since then Michael J. O'Brien 
Esq., Historiographer of the American Irish Historical 
Society in his " Dermot, or Diarmuid, O'Mahony " has endea- 
voured to shed light on him and find his descendants among 
the Mahonys of New England. {Journal, American Irish 
Historical Society, 14: 167-175). 

While there is no question but what he was Irish, it is well 
to remember that not all the people who came to New 
England from Ireland were Irish and also that many whom 
we would consider Irish did not so consider themselves. As 
early as 15 18, a by-law of the Town of Gal way, declares that 
none of the inhabitants should admit any of the Burkes, 
Mc Williams, Kelleys or any other sept into their houses, to 
the end "that neither O ne Mac should strutte ne swagger 
through the streets of Galway. " (Prendergast, John P., 
The Cromwellian settlement of Ireland, p. 302). In Decem- 
ber 1 64 1, Richard Martin, one of the principal inhabitants of 
Galway, in announcing to Lord Ormond the outbreak of the 
neighboring Irish, says " We are very unfortunate to be hated 



45 

by some powerful neighbours for being all English ; and to 
have our four hundred years constant and unsuspected loy- 
alty . . . forgotten and buried. " (Ibid, p. 302). 

On Oct. 23, 1652 the Massachusetts General Court took 
action as follows — " Martha Brenton desiring an Irish boy 
& girle, about the age of 12 yeares, for servants, hath her 
request granted, so as the p-ties are p-ved before two magis- 
trates to be born of English parents. " (Mass. Bay Records, 
3 : 294). The simple explanation of this apparent contradic- 
tion is that children born of English parents in Ireland, were 
according to law Irish. Martha Brenton, was the wife of 
William Brenton, (Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 
9 : 51), later Governor of Rhode Island, who up to the 20th 
of August 1 66 1 owned land adjoining the Mahoones, which 
he then sold to Hannah Munnings, (Suffolk Deeds, 8 : 254), 
and daughter of Thomas Burton of Hingham. (Savage 
Genealogical Dictionary). 

In the beginning of the Colony, men from Ireland as well 
as ships and stores were welcome. In July 1634, word was 
received " from a godly preacher, M r . Levenston, a Scotchman 
in the north of Ireland, that there were many good Christians 
in those parts resolved to come hither if they might receive 
satisfaction concerning some questions. " (Winthrop's Jour- 
nal, p. 135). This evidently called forth the order of Sept. 
25 1634, "that the Scottishe & Irish gentlemen w ch intends 
to come hither shall have liberty to sitt downe in any place up 
Merimacke Ryver not Possessed by any. " (Mass. Bay 
Records, 1 : 129). In the winter following John Winthrop 
the Younger and Rev. John Wilson, returning to England 
were driven by foul weather " upon the coast of Ireland, not 
known by any in the ship " but finally arrived at " Galloway. " 
Mr. Winthrop taking his journey overland to Dublin, Mr. 
Wilson by sea, and coming in sight of the mouth of the 
Severn was forced by the tempest to Kinsale. Mr. Wilson, 
being in Ireland, gave much satisfaction to the Christians 



4 6 

about New England. Mr. Winthrop went from Dublin to 
Antrim and arrived at the house of Sir John Clotworthy the 
evening before the day divers godly persons were to meet at 
his house to confer about their voyage to New England, by 
whom they were thoroughly informed of all things and re- 
ceived encouragement to proceed in their intended course. 
(Winthrop's Journal, p. 172). Incidently Sir John Clotworthy 
in a speech in the House of Commons about this time, de- 
clared that the conversion of the " Papists of Ireland was only 
to be effected by the Bible in one hand and the sword in the 
other." (Mooney, Thomas, A history of Ireland, 1 : 725). 

In 1639 Irishmen who refused to take an Oath of Alle- 
giance to Charles I, submitted to them by the Earl of Strafford 
then Deputy of Ireland, were transported to the Colonies. 
(Journal, American Irish Historical Society, 14 : 174). Rev. 
Cotton Mather apparently refers to this when in 1700 he says 
that " At length it was proposed that a Colony of Irish might 
be sent over to check the growth of this country ; an Happy 
Revolution spoiled that plot." (Colonial Society of Massachu- 
setts, 1 : 409). On the 13th of May 1640 the General 
Court " ordered, that the goods of the persons come from 
Ireland shal bee free from this rate " which was levied that 
day of ;£i20O. (Mass. Bay Records, 1 : 295). Just thirteen 
days after it was voted " that the Towne of Dedham shall 
entertayne m r . Samuel Cook . . . and also mr Smith & mr 
Bacon all from Ireland and afford to them such accomadacons 
... as their estate shall requer, & y e Town . . . can afford." 
(Dedham Town Records, 1 : 68), although they did not 
avail themselves of such permission until after the 23d of 
June, 1640. (Ibid 1 : 69). On the 6th of July following 
John Downes of Bandon Bridge, in the County of Cork, mer- 
chant, gave bond in Boston, for the payment of ^80 to 
George Luxon et al, within ten days after the arrival of the 
ship John and Francis of Youghal, in England or Ireland. 
(Lechford, Thomas, Note Book 151/288). Of 1640, Gov. 



47 

Winthrop says " This year there came over a great store of 
provisions, both out of England and Ireland and but few pas- 
sengers (and those brought very little money). ..." (Win- 
throp's Journal, 2 : 7). On Jan. 30th 1642/3 the assessment 
of John Smith Gent, of Boston in the last country rate, "is 
remitted unto him upon considerations of the great losses that 
of late have befallen him in Ireland. " (Boston Record Com- 
missioners Reports, 2:71). 

Prior to the Irish Rebellion of 1 641, an occasional Irishman 
was apparently welcome in New England, but after, based 
probably on such mis-statements as that it had commenced 
with the massacre of from 40,000 to 300,000 English and 
Scotch protestants without warning (Prendergast, John P. 
Cromwellian Settlement of Ireland, p. 61) and. others of sim- 
ilar calibre, they were no longer. If the feelings of the Rev. 
Nathaniel Ward of Ipswich was any indication of what was 
generally thought here, he was indeed a brave man who came. 
In the " Simple Cobler of Aggawam " written in Ipswich in 
1645 (Jamestown Catalogue, p. 39) and sent to England 
where it was published Jan. 29, 1646/7, (Thomason Catalogue 
1 : 490) followed by four more editions in that year, he has 
appended : — 

" A word of Ireland, not of the Nation universally, nor of 
any man in it, that hath so much as one hair of Christianity 
or Humanity growing on his head or beard, but only of the 
truculent Cut-throats and such as shall take up Armes in 
their defence. 

" The Irish anciently called Antropophagi, maneaters, 
Have a Tradition among them That when the Devill shewed 
our Saviour all the Kingdomes of the Earth and their glory, 
he would not shew him Ireland but reserved it for himselfe ; 
it is probably true for he hath kept it ever since for his own 
peculiar ; the old Fox foresaw it would eclipse the glory of all 
the rest ; he thought it wisdome to keep it for a Boggards for 



4 8 

himselfe, and all his unclean spirits imployed in this Hemis- 
phere, and the people, to doe his Son and Heire, I mean the 
Pope, that service for which Lewis the eleventh kept his 
Barber Oliver, which makes them so bloodthirsty. They are 
the very Offall of Men, Dregges of Mankind, Reproach of 
Christendome, and the Bots that crawle on the Beasts taile, I 
wonder Rome itself is not ashamed of them. 

" I begge upon my hands and knees that the Expedition 
against them may be undertaken while the hearts and hands 
of our Souldiery are hot, to whom I will be bold to say briefly ; 
Happy is he that shall reward them as they have served us, 
and Cursed be he that shall do that work of God negligently. 
Cursed be he that holdeth his Sword from blood ; Yea, 
Cursed be he that maketh not his Sword stark drunk with 
Irish blood, that doth not recompence them double for their 
hellish treachery that maketh not heaps upon heaps, and their 
Country a dwelling place for Dragons, an Astonishment to 
Nations ; Let not that eye look for pity, nor that hand be 
spared, that pities or spares them, and let him be accursed 
that curseth them not bitterly. " 

On Oct. 15, 1652, " M r David Sellake, craveing pardon for 
his offence in bringing some Irish men on shoare, hath his 
fine remitted [by the Massachusetts General Court] so as the 
first opportunitie be taken to send them out of this jurisdic- 
tion. P consilium. 

"The s d M r Sellake, on his request, hath libtie for the 
bringing of another Irish man on shoare to endeavour his re- 
covry, pvided he give bond to send him out of this jurisdiction 
when he is well." (Mass. Bay Records, 3 : 291). 

This explains where the " Irish boy & girle about the age 
of 12 yeares for servants" came from, that Martha Brenton 
(whose husband William, was partner of Sellick in 1649) 
petitioned for leave to have, only 8 days later, (Mass. Bay 
Records, 3 : 294) and further light is thrown on the subject 
by the following under date of Oct. 25, 1653. 



49 

" Whereas Captain John Vernon being employed from the 
said Commissioners [for Ireland] into England, hath by an 
engagement under his hand, bearing date the 14th September 
last, promised to Mr. David Sellick and Mr. Leader that they 
should receive an order upon their application to the said 
Commissioners, for receiving (by themselves or their agents) 
250 Irish women, above the age of 12 and under the age of 
45 years, and also 300 men above the age of 12 and under 
the age of 50 years, in the several parts of Ireland, within 
twenty miles of the towns of Youghal, Cork, Kinsale, Water- 
ford and Wexford, to transport them into New England, 
thereupon they have appointed their shipping to repair to 
Kinsale. And whereas the said Commissioners are advertised 
by the Lord Broghill that the said number of Irish persons, 
both men and women, may probably be had in the County of 
Cork, who now live like beggars and vagabonds, and follow no 
lawful vocations, these are therefore to authorize the said 
Roger Lord Broghill to cause search to be made within the 
said County of Cork for all persons of the Irish nation, that 
are rogues, vagabonds, idlers and wanderers, and such as have 
no means to get their livelihood by labour and otherwise, or 
such as being able to labour shall refuse so to do, and such 
persons to cause to be apprehended, taken and delivered unto 
the said Sellick and Leader, or their agents, according to the 
said engagement, and as may answer the same for transport- 
ing the said Irish into New England as above said ; provided 
that no person be taken or molested by colour hereof that 
hath any means by himselfe or friends to support and main- 
tain himself, or that is a labourer or husbandman, or by any 
lawful ways and means is able to provide and maintain him- 
self ; provided that no person, being once apprehended, be 
discharged, but by special order in writing under the hand of 
the said Lord Broghill. The said Mr. Sellick and Leader 
being at all charge for providing for them and conducting 
them to the waterside, and maintaining them well from the 



50 

time of receiving them, and the Commonwealth to be freed 
from all charge therein." (Dunlop, Robert, Ireland under 
the Commonwealth, 2:375). 

This contract was made pursuant to an order of the Council 
of State,. Sept. 6, 1653, upon petition of David Sellick of 
Boston N. E. merchant, for license to the Ships Goodfellow 
of Boston, George Dalle, Master, and Providence of London, 
Thomas Swanley, Master, to pass to New England and Vir- 
ginia, where they intend to carry 400 Irish children ; which 
was granted on security that they sail to Ireland within two 
months and transport 400 Irish children to those parts, 
though the advice of Edward Winslow (then in London) was 
first asked with regard to the facts in said Sellick's petition. 
On Oct. 28, 1653, the vessels were licensed to proceed. 
(Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 1574- 
1660, pp. 407, 408, 410). 

The proof that such a contract was carried out, in part at 
least, is found in the writings of Cotton Mather, Drake's His- 
tory and Antiquities of Boston, p. 342, and in a Bill of Sale, 
dated May 10, 1654, from George Dell, Master of the Ship 
Goodfellow to Mr. Samuel Symonds of Ipswich, Mass., for 
" two of the Irish youthes I brought over by order of the state 
of England ; the name of one of them is william Dalton ; the 
other Edward Welch " to serve him for the space of nine 
years, in consideration of ,£26. in merchantable corn or live 
cattle payable before the end of October which was witnessed 
by George Maning. On May 17, two years were added to 
Welch's service on account of his youth and fears that he 
would assume the cares of a family too soon, and a correction 
was made in his name, who in " the said writing is called Ed- 
ward, and upon his arrivall at Ipswich such as doe well under- 
stand his language say he owneth his name to be Philip." 
(Records and files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, 
Massachusetts, to be hereinafter referred to as Essex Quar- 
terly Court Records, 2 :29s). 



5i 

It is a curious fact that prior to the Irish Rebellion of 1641, 
the English of Ireland, except in the neighborhood of Dublin, 
had adopted the Irish language, dress and manners (Prender- 
gast, John P., Cromwellian Settlement of Ireland, "p. 31), so 
this would not prove the presence of earlier Irish in Ipswich. 

Sellick & Company's activities evidently resulted in the 
following, extracted from a report made to the General Court 
on " sundry propositions " by Daniel Gookin, Richard Russell, 
Thomas Savage, Francis Norton and Roger Clap. 

" 9 That In all Elections wherein Freemen and non Free- 
men voate Its Conceved meet y t wheras Scotch servants Irish 
negers and psons under one and Twenty years have liberty to 
voate y* Freemen who undergoe all ye burdens of this Com5.- 
welth shall have a double voate. 

" 10 This Court Considering y e Cruel and malignant 
spirit, y* have from tyme to tyme byn manifest In y e Irish 
Nation against y e English Nation, doe hereby declare thyr 
phibition of any Irish men women or childrens, being brought 
Into this jurisdiction on the penalty of Fifty pound sterling 
to each Inhabitant yt shall [have] of any marchant ship m r . or 
other agent, any such pson or psons so Transported by y m , 
w ch fine shall bee by the Cuntry Marshall, on Conviction of 
some Magistrate or Court, leaveed and bee to the use of y e 
Informer one third and two thirds to y e Cuntry. This act to 
be In force six months after publication &c." (Massachusetts 
Archives, 10:338-339). 

From 165 1 to 1655, about 6400 Irish, men and women, 
boys and maidens, had been practically kidnapped in Ireland 
and shipped to the West Indies and the Colonies. On March 
4, 1655, all orders were revoked (though only temporarily), 
because the contractors employed persons " to delude poor 
people by false pretences into bypbees, and thence they 
forced them on board their ships. The persons employed 
had so much a piece for all they so deluded, and for the 
money sake they were found to have enticed and forced 



52 

women from their children and husbands, — children from their 
parents, who maintained them at school ; and they had not 
only dealt so with the Irish, but also with the English," — 
which last was the true cause, probably, of the Commissioners 
for Ireland putting an end to these proceedings." (Prender- 
gast, John P., Cromwellian Settlement of Ireland, p. 92). 

On the 1 8th of May 1680, Gov. Simon Bradstreet, of 
Massachusetts, wrote to the Commissioners of Trade and 
Plantations, in an answer to several heads of Inquiry as 
follows : — 

"17 There have been very few English come to plant in 
this Iurisdiction for Seven yeares past and more, few or no 
Scots Irish or Foreigners in the like space, they rather goe to 
Carolina or other places nor comodious and less inhabited. . . 
There have been no company of blacks or slaves brought into 
this Country since the beginning of this plantation for the 
space of fifty yeares, only one small Vessel about two yeares 
since after twenty months voyage to Madagascar brought 
hither betwixt forty and fifty Negroes most women and chil- 
dren Sold here for ten £15 and ^20 apiece, which stood the 
Merchants in neer ^40 apeice. Now and then two or three 
Negros are brought hither from Barbados and other of his 
Majesties plantations and sold here for about twenty pounds 
apeice. So that there may be within our Government about 
one hundred or one hundred and twenty, an it may be as 
many Scots brought hither and sold for Servants in the time 
of the War with Scotland [1652 Suffolk Deeds, 1 : 5-6] and 
now most married and living here and about half as many 
Irish brought hither at several times as Servants.", (Gay 
Transcripts, State Papers, 5 165), or in other words 50 or 60 
Irishmen resident in Massachusetts in 1680. Gov. Bradstreet 
seems to have forgotten the various voyages made from New 
England to the Guinea coast, between 1644 and 165 1, two of 
which, the contracts dated 13th Feb. 1645/6 (Mass. Archives, 
60:290) and the 16th of July 1650, specially stipulating 



53 

slaves and negroes. The latter was the Ship, Gift of God of 
London, Capt. John Thompson, chartered by Mr. John Parris 
of New England. (Aspinwall Notarial Records, p. 268). 

Sometime prior to the nth of June 1640, the following 
was drawn up to be presented to the Massachusetts author- 
ities ; — 

" Dermondt Matthew servant of George Strange gent com- 
plains against his master for that whereas the said Matthew 
was to serve the said George Strange from the 9th day of 
May 1639 for six yeares for the wages of foure pounds by the 
year and a pigg to be payd at every yeares end and in the end 
of the term to have a Convenient lot for his service. He 
promiseth also the said servant three suits of apparel & six 
shirts, all w ch appeares by an Indenture & sufficient witnesse. 

" The said George Strange hath not payd him any wages 
nor given him any clothes according to his bargaine, Also the 
said Dermondt Matthew did bind Teg Mathew his sonne a 
child of 9 yeares old apprentice to the said George Strange for 
ten yeares from the said 9th day of May w th Covenant to 
keepe him two yeares at school and the other eight he was to 
serve in the same house w th his Father the said Dermondt 
Matthew. But the said George Strange hath w th out the con- 
sent of the said Dermondt sold the said Tegg to one Mr. 
Browne of Salem to his the said Dermondt's great grief of 
heart & contrary to the said Covenant. And whereas the 
said Dermondt being an ignorant illittered man & trusting 
upon the faire promises of the said George Strange that he 
would ever use him well & shew him his Indentures as often 
as he would now the said Dermondt having no chest nor box 
to put the said Indentures in they were rotted & spoyled in 
his pocket before he was aware. Notwithstanding the said 
George Strange refuseth to let the said Dermondt or his 
friends see the said Indentures Therefore the said Dermondt 
Matthew humbly prayeth the Court that the said Indentures 
may be shewed to the Court by the said George Strange & 



54 

that they may be recorded or els that his wages may be ap- 
pointed by the Court & justice done him in the premises." 
(Lechford, Thomas, Note Book, 148/251). 

As "Dierman Mathew " he sued " Nathaneel Taylor" for 
slander in the Essex Quarterly Court at Salem, the 30th of 
March, 1641 (Essex Quarterly Court Record, 1:26). The 
General Court on the 14th of June 1642, "Ordered Dear- 
mondt Mathew to go home to his Master & if he can prove 
his M r did beat him when he came home with an order from 
M r Deputy [Governor Endicott] his Master to be punished, 
if not he is to recompense his Master for damage done him, 
& losse of his time, & his Master was willed for this time not 
to correct him." (Mass. Bay Records, 2 : 20). 

At the Small Court held at Boston the 28th of July 1642, 
it was " thought meet Dermondt Matthew should be set to 
worke by such as have occasion to imploy him, until his M r . 
shall appeare, & take co r se about him. " (Records of the 
Court of Assistants, 2 : 125). 

The George Strange, above referred to, was granted six 
acres of land by the Town of Dorchester, Nov. 22, 1634, at 
Neponset, betwixt the Indian field and the mill. (Boston 
Record Commissioners Reports, 4 : 8.) He was admitted 
Freeman, May 6, 1635. (Savage's Genealogical Dictionary.) 
He was of Hingham, the 21 of Feb. 1639/40, when as Gentle- 
man he sold to John Stow of Roxbury, for ^40, " all his 
Teniment and buildings w th Apertinances thereunto belong- 
ing. " (Suffolk Deeds, 1 : 14.) He consulted Thomas Lech- 
ford, the 8th of Oct. 1638, about search in England for his 
wife's lands. (Lechford, Thomas, Note Book 1/4.) On the 
4th of Dec. 1638, he purchased from James Cade and 
Margaret, his wife, of Boston, N. E., but late of Northam in 
Devon, their houses and lands there. (Ibid, 26/42.) On the 
9th of Oct. 1640, he received Power of Attorney from his 
nephew William James, of Boston, N. E., mercer, to sell lands 
&c. in London for him, (Ibid, 180/324,) and on the 19th of 



55 

March, 1640/1, from Thomas Foster, of Boston, N. E., Gun- 
ner of the Castle, and Abigail, his wife, daughter of Matthew 
Wimes, late of Ipswich, County of Suffolk, Old England, to 
recover lands &c. under the said Wimes's will, his reasonable 
charges & recompense being deducted, but the same was 
" vacat. " (Ibid, 209/377). 

At the Quarter Court at Boston, the 6th of Dec. 1642, 
" Dearmant Matthew is put to Thomas Dexter [of Lynn] for 
the rest of his time, Dexter promiseth to pay what wages 
Dearmant proveth to be due, and all is referred to Mr. Sadler, 
& goodman Armitage to heare & end all buisinesses & the 3 
attachments are discharged. " (Records of the Court of 
Assistants, 2 : 129). 

At the Quarter Court at Salem, the 27th of Dec. 1642, 
" Mr. Ad[am] Ottley, Mr. Walton and Dearman Mathew, 
alis Mahony, commissioners with power to produce witnesses, 
Farmer Dexter to undertake it. " (Essex Quarterly Court 
Records, 1 : 47). 

At the Quarter Court at Salem, the 27th of June, 1643, on 
" Petition of Dearman Omahone, Thomas Dexter, confessed 
judgment in favor of Derma Mathew alias Mahonie for wages 
due, Execution to Constable of Lynn. " (Ibid, 1:53). 

At the Quarter Court at Salem, the 27th of Dec. 1643, 
" John Poole and Joseph Armetag gave bond that Tege 
Omohoine, son to Dierman oMahonie, shall be taught to read 
the English tongue, which indenture was delivered again to 
Joseph Armetage. " (Ibid, 1 : 57). 

At the Quarter Court at Salem, the 9th of July 1644, 
" Goodman Wm. Harker and Dearman O'Mahone undertake 
to pay Mr. Ralph Woory [of Charlestown] money. " (Ibid, 

1 : 64). 

At the time of making the indenture with Strange the 9th 
of May, 1639, " Dermondt " was evidently a widower with a 
son "Teg" aged 9, but we now find him at Boston, as 
" Dermin Mahoonne " with a wife Dinah, to whom a son 



56 

Daniel, was born, the 4th of Dec. 1646, followed by a daughter 
Honour, born the 29th of October 1648, neither of whom 
were baptized at the First Church. (Boston Record Com- 
missioners Reports, 9 : 23 & 27). 

On the 6th of March, 1650/1, " Richard Sandford [a neigh- 
bor] aged about fifty six yeares deposed that he heard Matthew 
Colane say that Dermin Mahoone of Boston was his Cosen 
& only Cousen & that he had no more Kinsmen in the land " , 
which was taken before William Hibbins. 

On the 6th of Feb. 1650/1, "Samuel Carwithie saith that 
he hath heard Matthew Colane say that Dermin Mahoone was 
his owne Cosin & that he had no kinsman in the Country 
but him ", also before William Hibbins. 

On the 6th of March, 1650/1, "Matthew Dove saith that 
Matthew Colane and Dermin Mahoone had dealing together, 
& that the s d Colane both in the presence of the said Mahoone 
& at other times owned the s d Mahoone as his Cosin w th - 
whom also he used to lodge. By all w ch this attestant under- 
stood that their was some affinity betwixt them " , also before 
William Hibbins. (Aspinwall Notarial Records, p. 336). 

The purpose of these depositions, taken at Kittery before 
William Hibbins, husband of Ann who was later hung as a 
witch, leaving as heirs her sons John and Joseph Moore of 
Ballyhorick, County Cork, Ireland (Savage's Genealogical 
Dictionary) was to prove that " Dermin Mahoone " was next of 
kin and heir to his cousin Matthew Colane, who had died at 
the Isles of Shoals, about Christmas, 1650. On the nth of 
March, 1650/1, "Teague Mahonas" the son of Dorman, was 
appointed Administrator, by the Court at Kittery. (Savage's 
Genealogical Dictionary, Colane). 

"Dinah wife of Dorman Mahoon died" the 8th of Jan. 
1656/7. (Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 9:56). 
On the 25th of Jan. 1657/8, " Derman Mahoone is fined 
twenty shillings for entertaining two Irish women contrary to 
an order of the towne, and in that case provided is to quitt 



57 

his house of them forthwith att his perill." (Ibid, 2 : 141). 
This order of the Town made the 29th of March 1647 (Ibid, 
2 : 90) was aimed at all strangers and not specially at the 
Irish. On the 26th of July 1658, " Margaret Noris, an Irish- 
woman, is Admitted into the Town " on bond of £7. given 
by David Faulkner. (Ibid, 2 : 160). As shortly after Dor- 
man had a wife Margaret, who later resided in a house with 
David Faulkner, it looks as if they made a match of it. 
(Suffolk Deeds, 8 : 129). 

On the 27th of March, 1660, Capt. Thomas Marshall, 
assignee of Thaddeus Mathews, assigns to Dorman Mathews, 
an account due from Joseph Armitage of ^7-10-0 for services 
rendered by said Thaddeus Mathews in 1653. (Court Files 
Suffolk, 387:4). On the 14th of July, 1660, as "Dermond 
Mahoone alis Mathews " (so the record reads) he entered suit 
against Armitage, as assignee of Capt. Marshall, who was 
assignee of the said Dermond's son Thaddeus Mathewes. 
(Ibid, 387 : 1). On the 30th of Oct. 1660, at a County Court 
in Boston, the jury gave him a verdict of the same with costs, 
but Armitage appealed to next Court of Assistants. (Ibid, 
387 : 2). On the 25th of Feb. 1660/1, Joseph Armitage filed 
his Reasons of Appeal against "Dorman Mathews alias 
Mahonies " action as follows ; owed nothing to Marshall 
therefore nothing to Dorman ; settled accounts with Dorman 
& Thaddeus his son in 1656, by payment of £4; covenant 
with Thaddeus was conditional on its performance, no proof 
of same ; debt was never demanded after assignment to Dor- 
man. (Ibid, 387 : 3). This was duly answered by "Dorman 
Mahoone alis Mathews"', that Armitage had owned the 
bill in Court ; was not included in his particular account 
settled ; would have accepted £4. rather than wait, but the 
draft on Capt. Waldron was not honored ; covenants condi- 
tions were duly performed and " therefore he ought to pay 
the laborer his hire for his owne acknowledgement is better 
than many witnesses " ; the case was referred to arbitration 



58 

but Armitage avoided the same. The Answer closes as fol- 
lows : 

" All which I humbly leave unto the wise and godly con- 
sideration and determination of this honored Court and Jury, 
that I may have that which is my just due to releive mee and 
mine now in my ould age when I have hardly eyes to see nor 
abbilitie to labor nor indeed a tongue to speake for myself as 
evidently may appeare and therefore doe humbly beseech this 
honored Court that in a way of Justis and Right you would 
relieve the oppressed and dum 

Dorman Mahoone alis Mathews." (Ibid, 26764). 

" Dorman Mahoon deceased the 2 Aprill 1661." (Boston 
Record Commissioners Reports, 9:80). On the 12th of 
April following, " An Inventory of the goods & Chatties of 
Dorman Mathue Appraysed By Rich Sanford & James Haw- 
kins ", both neighbors, was duly made, totalling £\\2-\-o. 
Among the items are found : - house & garden £%o - one cowe 
^4 -one pig 5/ -two small trundle beds & bedstead £1 - 
one pike & two szvords £1-10-0 - 3 chests one box one knead- 
ing trough one p r of Gloves £2.- wampum ^i.-one spinning 
wheel, 3 p r Cards & a reele io/-two mattocks, one how, 2 
hatchets, one rake, one funell, one p r shoes, one p r boots, one 
hamer, 12 shovels & p cel of ould iron £ 1 . - 1 lader, a wood 
Beetell, a wheel barrow, 3 wedges, one axe, two brushes, one 
quishen ^1-4. (Suffolk Probate Docket, 266). " Att a 
County Court held at Boston on adjournment, the 17th 
of May 1 66 1, Administration to y e Estate of the late 
Dorman Mathue als Mahoone is granted to Margt his late 
wife ; she giving in a true inventory thereof to y e Court & 
abiding the order of y e Court. Edward Rawson Recorder." 
(Suffolk Probate Record, 4 : 88). The name " Margt " having 
been inserted in the Record in a blank left for it. The orig- 
inal in the files has the blank, without the insertion. (Suffolk 
Probate Docket, 266). 



59 

On June 3, 1661, "Margaret of Dorman & Margt Mahoone" 
was born, and on July 20, 1661, "Bryan Morfrey [otherwise 
Murphy] an Irishman & Margaret Mayhoone widow were 
married " by John Endicott, Governor, a near neighbor. 
(Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 9 : 79 & 82). Brian 
Murphy and his wife evidently remained sometime in posses- 
sion of the house and garden, but on Dec. 4, 1670, they were 
tenants with David Faulkner of the house which Anne Long, 
widow of Philip, sold to Benj. Briscoe, on the Street leading 
toward the Castle Tavern. (Suffolk Deeds, 8:299). The 
son Daniel, born in 1646, coming of age, the County Court 
in Sept. 1668, set off to him about one third of his father's 
estate, (County Court Record, p. 86) which he being un- 
married sold " with the tenement or dwelling house on part 
thereof" to William Towers of Boston, butcher, on Oct. 23, 
1668. Towers in turn sold it to Benj. Emons, cordwainer, 
on Feb. 23, 1668/9, an d for many years it was "Emons's Cor- 
ner ", though both deeds were not recorded until the 14th of 
July 1727. (Suffolk Deeds, 41 : 94 & 95). On Oct. 29th 
1672, the County Court appointed Mr Anthony Stoddard and 
Capt William Davis to divide the remaining part of the estate 
of Dorman Mahoone between his second son David and 
daughter Margaret, which was accordingly done, " provided 
if David possess the first Dividend hee must remove the frame 
to the other Dividend wherever they will have it Set." 
(County Court Record, p. 86 & 90). David Mathews was 
killed in 1677, (Suffolk Probate Docket, 943) and his share 
was set off to his brother Daniel Mathews, the 20th of Nov. 
1679, by the County Court on the payment of ^15 to his 
sister Margaret Mathews. (County Court Record, p. 621). 
On the 4th of Nov. 1680, Daniel Matthews of Boston, cord- 
wainer, and Mary his wife, sell the same to William Clough, 
mason, and Henry Messenger Jr., joyner, and John Usher, as 
guardian of Margaret Matthews, acknowledges the receipt of 
the said ^15. (Suffolk Deeds, 12:218). On the 26th of 



6o 

April, 1682, William and Lydia Clough sell their share to 
Henry Messenger. (Ibid, 12:218). On the 1 6th of June, 
1684, Margaret Matthews of Boston, spinster, sells to Henry 
Messenger, joiner, her share of her father's estate. (Ibid, 
I 3 : 343)- These deeds dispose of the three parts of the 
" house & garden " which " Dorman Mathue als Mahoone " 
died possessed, April 2, 1661, and place his holdings at what 
is now the corner of Sudbury and Court Streets, with a 
frontage of about 135 ft. on each street and running back to 
within about 50 ft. of Alden St., as shown on sketch. 

Of Dorman's children, Teig was aged 9, in 1639, when he 
was apprenticed to George Strange, gentleman, for ten years, 
to be kept 2 years at school, and to serve the other eight in 
the house with his father. Strange without his father's con- 
sent and to his " great grief of heart " sold him to Mr. Brown 
of Salem. (Lechford, Thomas, Note Book 148/251.) He 
next appears the 27th of Dec. 1643, when at the Quarter 
Court at Salem, John Poole and Joseph Armetag, "gave bond 
that Tege Omohoine, son to Dierman oMahonie shall be 
tought to read the English tongue. " (Essex Quarterly 
Records, 1 : 53.) On the nth of March 16 50/1, as "Teague 
Mahonas " he was appointed by the Court at Kittery, Admin- 
istrator of his father's "own Cosen " Matthew Colane, who 
had died at the Isles of Shoals about Christmas, 1650. 
(Savage's Genealogical Dictionary). 

On Sept. 2, 1653, as Thaddeus Mathewes, seaman, he 
agreed with Joseph Armitage to serve him in a shallop at sea 
for 3 months from Sept. 6th, for ,£7-10-0, finding himself 
diet and apparrell, to be paid .£3-15-0, in current money and 
the rest in current pay by James Oliver or out of the wood 
and other goods on the shallop. (Court Files Suffolk, 387 : 4). 
Thaddeus Mathewes signed with his mark, which leads one to 
think that while Armitage gave bond in 1643, that ne was to 
" be tought to read the English tongue " he lived up to the 
letter of the bond and did not include the writing of it. This 



6i 



-*. 



^ 



ov 







62 

contract was duly recorded in Boston, the 6th of Jan. 1653/4, 
by Nathaniel Souther, Notary Public. Thaddeus Mathews 
assigned the same to Thomas Marshall, who in turn assigned 
it to Dorman Mathewes on the 27th of March, 1660, who en- 
tered suit the 14th of July 1660, for the same as before noted. 
(Ibid, 387 : 1.) Thomas Rucke, aged 69, and Elizabeth, his 
wife, aged 62, testified that on the 26th of March, 1656, 
Dorman Mathews and Thaddeus Mathews, his son, and Joseph 
Armitage, came to their house to make up their accounts and 
that Armitage was found debtor to the Mathews £4, which 
they accepted of, in a draft drawn on Capt. Waldron by Ruck 
at Artimage's desire. (Ibid, 387 : 5.) On Oct. 13, 1658, 
Capt. Thomas Marshall closed his accounts with Joseph 
Armitage, who attempted, without success, to use the same 
as defence in the case with Dorman Mahoone. (Ibid, 387 : 6). 

The simple explanation of the matter of names, is that 
Dermot or Diarmuid O'Mahony, from either Cork or Kerry, 
(O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, pp. 121 & 524), whose Irish family 
name O'Mathghamhna, meaning " the beare of the plaine " 
was pronounced (though not spelled) O ' Mahowna, endeavoured 
to change his name to its English equivalent of Matthew, 
(Journal, American Irish Historical Society, 14 : 173,) but to 
have been consistent he should have changed his christian 
name to Jeremiah, as his son Teig did when he became 
Thaddeus. That the name Mahoone as finally evolved, was 
pronounced Mahowna seems to be proved by his wife's signa- 
ture about 1650 as " Dina Mahowna" to one of the many 
petitions for the release of M rs Alice Tilley, midwife, from 
Boston Gaol. (Massachusetts Archives 9 : 14). 

A rather curious parallel is found in Ireland in 1656, dur- 
ing the planting of Cromwell's Adventurers. In the mixed 
plantation, English landlords and picked Irish tenants, (com- 
monly called soupers) the tenants were bound to speak Eng- 
lish within a limited time ; teach their children no Irish ; 
observe the manners of the English in their habit or deport- 



63 

ment ; send their children to English Protestant schoolmasters ; 
attend the public preaching of Protestant Ministers ; abandon 
their Irish names of Teig and Dermot, and the like, and call 
themselves by the signifence of such names in English ; 
name their children with English names, especially omitting 
the (O') ; and (M') ; and lastly to build their houses with 
chimneys as the English in like capacity do and to demean 
themselves in their lodging and other deportment accordingly. 
(Lawrence, Richard — The great interest of England in the 
well planting of Ireland with English people discussed, 
Dublin, 1656, p. 3). 

" Daniel of Dermin & Dinah Mahoone " was born in Boston, 
the 4th of Dec. 1646. (Boston Record Commissioners Re- 
ports, 9 : 23.) As Daniel Mathews, he was witness with 
Benj. Bristo at the Quarter Court at Salem the 25th of June, 
1 66 1, against Richard Haven for striking John Langly at 
Lynn. (Essex Quarterly Court Records, 2 : 281 & 433.) 
About June 1662, he with others, witnessed Richard Havens 
violently laying his hands on William Longly of Lynn and 
abusing him in words and deeds. (Ibid, 3 : 32.) On the 
25th of Feb. 1662/3, "Daniel Mathees, " aged about 17 
years, deposeth, " that when I dwelt at lyn ; the last summer 
about the time that pease began to be near ripe ; I being in 
the field gathering a Broome " &c. before Edward Rawson, 
Com r . " Mary longley " testified as to Richard Haven break- 
ing a great cudgell, and that following him, she met " daniel 
Mathees " whom she requested to go with her and they ran 
until they came up with Heaven as he took her father " fast by 
the beard and said thow rogue I could find in my heart to 
spill thy blood upon the ground " and her father answered 
" Heaven there is witness above that sees all " &c. (Ibid, 
3 : 3 2_ 33-) The case was tried at Ipswich Mar. 31, 1663, 
and I sake Ong testified that he heard " goodman Heavens 
wife ax daniel Mathew ; whether he did heare her husband say 
y* hee would lay goodman Langleys hart blood upon y e 



6 4 

ground " &c. and daniell did answer " y l goodman Longlys 
folks did lie att him to say soe ; but for my part said hee 
I cannot for if I should I should sweare falsely. " In an en- 
deavour to break his testimony, Ezekiel Nedham deposed that 
when he lived with beniamine Briscoe in 1661, "ther came a 
man & fell out with my m r Briscoe & struck my m r Briscoe 
in his shope ... & daniell Mathew did profer to swere y* 
Brimmat did strike my m r when he was in another room with 
ye Child wher he could not see him stroke. " (Ibid, 3 : 32). 

At the Quarter Court at Salem, Nov. 1665, Thomas Newall 
sued George Keiser of Lynn and Rumney Marsh for the 
death of his child by drowning in Keiser's pitt at Lynn. 
" Daniell Mathews, " aged about 20 years, testified that he 
saw Ne well's son Thomas digging there with a hoe &c. The 
verdict was for Keiser. (Ibid, 3 : 283). 

Having become of age, the County Court at Boston, in 
September, 1668, set off to him as son of Dorman Mahoone, 
the corner portion of his father's estate now at Sudbury and 
Court Streets. (County Court Record, p. 86.) As Daniel 
Mathews, of Boston, cordwainer, unmarried, he sells the same 
to William Towers of Boston, butcher, bounding " Southerly 
on the broad Street leading from the Mill & the Pasture fields 
towards the Court House or Market Place. " (Suffolk Deeds, 
41 : 94) Towers and his wife Leah, on the 22d of February 
following, sell the same to Benj. Emons, as before noted, the 
deed having an endorsement dated Nov. 8, 1672, witnessed 
by Daniel Mathews. (Ibid, 41 :94). 

In the meantime Daniel had married Mary, one of the five 
daughters of James Neighbours of Conduit St. Boston. (Suf- 
folk Deeds, 9:442) and on Oct. 3, 1669, a daughter Mary 
was born to them. (Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 
9:111). On the 10th of Mar. 1670/1, Benjamin Brisco, with 
whom Daniel had been associated in Lynn in 1661, rather 
curiously buys the house, that Daniel's stepmother Margaret 
Murphy lives in, on the Street leading to the Castle Tavern, 



65 

and abutting on land formerly owned by Thomas Marshall, 
assignee of his brother Thaddeus Mathews's contract with 
Armitage. (Suffolk Deeds, 8:299). On June 30, 1674, a 
daughter Elizabeth was born to Daniel and Mary Mathews. 
(Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 9: 133). On July 
29, 1674, Daniel Mathews, as mariner and Mary his wife 
partake in the partition of James Neighbours's estate in 
Conduit St. among his five daughters, and for their share 
receive one great chamber over the Kitchin, also the middle 
garret over the said Chamber and one third of the great cellar 
with liberty &c. of the Alley from Conduit St. to the Sea and 
one fifth of the Conduit, Wharf and profits of the same. 
(Suffolk Deeds, 9 : 442). 

On April 25, 1675, "Daniel Mathews aged about 30 years 
testifieth [before John Leverett Gov r ] that he had heard 
Jn° Lowrin this day Say that Zachary Crisp, Henry Lawton, 
Simeon Messinger, Fathergone Dinely [baptized so as the 
"son of William Dyneley our gone brother" 6 Jan. 1638/9] 
John Taylor and Some others, had recourse to Lawton's 
Chamber in the prison and their plaid at Cards on Saturday 
nights." Lowrin practically confirmed the same but said 
they spent from ten at night till three in the morning drinking 
Sack and playing at checkers. (Court Files Suffolk 1374). 

Daniel Matthews enlisted in Capt. Samuel Moseley's famous 
company of Volunteers, which included privateers and pirates 
also, and saw good service in Philip's War. As he gives his 
occupation on July 29, 1674 as mariner, he may have been in 
reality one of Moseley's Privateers. He served with Moseley 
from June 1675 till at least March 1676, and was rated as a 
Serjeant in Dec. 1675. Among the claimants for Narragan- 
sett Township, no. 5, was Rebecca Hannan, as daughter of 
Daniel Mathews, which looks as if he left no male descend- 
ants. (Bodge, George; Philip's War, 3d ed., pp. 64, 71, 72, 
431, 437). She was probably the Rebecca Hannan, who as 
Rebecca Roberts was married to John Hannin, Nov. 21, 1723, 



66 

by the Rev. Samuel Miles of Kings Chapel. (Boston Record 
Commissioners Reports, 28 : 114). 

On Dec. 27, 1676, again as cordwainer, or rather "cord- 
winder," with Mary, his wife he sells to John Hunt, his 
brother in law, all interest in the flats before the dwelling 
house in their occupation. (Suffolk Deeds, 10:272). On 
Mar. 4, 1677/8, he was granted administration on the estate 
of his brother David Mathews, (Suffolk Probate Records, 
12 : 24) and gave bond for the same of ^100. with William 
Barthomes and Jn° Willimas as security, making return of the 
inventory on March nth. (Suffolk Probate Docket, 943). 
On the 20th of Nov. 1679, he was fined 10/ for non-attend- 
ance at the County Court, with regard to the same, and then 
had the estate set off to him on payment of £1 5. to his sister 
Margaret. (County Court Record, p. 621). On Jan. 6, 
1679/80, with Mary his wife, still as cordwainer, he sells his 
share in the Conduit St. estate to John Hunt, as above. 
(Suffolk Deeds, 11:293). On the 7th of October, 1680, 
with Mary his wife, he sells the estate inherited from his 
brother David Mathews as before noted. (Ibid, 12 : 219). In 
the mean time he had got into difficulties with Roger Brown 
over 21/6 Brown had loaned him, and undertook to reform 
Court procedure but with ill success. (Court Files Suffolk, 
1897). The case was first tried before Humphrey Davie 
Ass 4 , Jan. 29, 1679/80, and Mathews not appearing, Davie 
found for Brown with costs of 14/8. On Mar. 1, 1679/80, 
an Aeon of Review was heard by Davie who again found for 
Brown, with additional costs, and Mathews appealed to the 
County Court on bond of 40/ with Thomas Norman & Jn° 
Williams as sureties. On Apr. 4, 1680, Thomas Norman as 
Attorney for Mathews submitted what he considered Reasons 
of Appeal, but the Court considered only as Lines. The 
County Court, April 27, declared Mathews's bond forfeited 
for not prosecuting his appeal according to law, giving no 
Reasons of Appeal. Thomas Norman, as his surety, appealed 



67 

to the Court of Assistants, giving what he considered Reasons 
of Appeal, in which he " humbly conceives that, that a partie 
cast by any Magistrate or Inferior Court must appeal without 
any reflection on the Judge is insufferable, and therefore asks 
that it be tried and confirmed or altered." The Court of 
Assistants Sept. 7, 1680, declared the case non-suited and 
the bond forfeited on the grounds that no reason had been 
rendered but that he was unsatisfied. (Records of the Court 
of Assistants, 1 : 167). 

Early in 1680 Daniel Matthews was made Deputy Searcher 
of Customs by Edward Randolph and was " warned with his 
family out of doors by some of their Townsmen, who are 
traders and men of public authority in Boston. " (Prince 
Society, Edward Randolph, 3 : 71.) In June 1680, he seized 
the Ketch Newbury and brought her to Boston for triall. 
(Calendar State Papers, America & West Indies 1681- 
5; 17 1 5.) In Aug. 1680, he was sent with six men in an 
open boat, under the Kings Jack to arrest Capt. Peter 
Lawrence and his Ship the St. John of Dublin, which lay out 
to sea, for illegal trading. He was fired upon by Capt. 
Lawrence, who claimed he did not see the Jack, but neverthe- 
less was held in bond of ^1000 sterling, though eventually 
left off with a fine of ^20. (Court Files Suffolk 1928 & 
Court of Assistants, 1 : 170-172.) On July 25, 1682, with 
Capt. Reevely, Mathews was sued by Isaac English, master of 
the Ketch Newbury, who accused them of Piracy and recov- 
ered judgment of £,Z°7- They were committed to prison in 
execution and there was a "threat to sell them out of the 
Country " (Prince Society, Edward Randolph, 3 : 184-5.) 
Mathews was kept there from Aug. 2, to March 10, 1682/3, 
thirty two weeks at a cost to Randolph of 10/ per week. 
(Ibid, 3 : 348.) Randolph wrote to Gov. Bradstreet in an 
endeavor to secure their release, Sept. 16, 1682, on his per- 
sonal security, as " Capt. Reevely had been extraordinary sick 
& Mathews is very much disenabled by his close confine- 



68 

ment. " (Ibid, 3 : 206.) On Sept. 29th Daniel Mathews 
tried his hand with the King, petitioning from the Prison at 
Boston, as Daniel Mathews Deputy Searcher, declaring he 
was " committed to close prison in the common goal ... to 
the ruine of myself and family until the Ketch now under 
seizure be restored." (Calendar State Papers, America & 
West Indies 1681-55715.) On his release he served as 
Deputy Searcher till July 20, 1683, at 10/ per week. (Prince 
Society, Edward Randolph, 3 : 349). 

Then a man of his name and character appears in New 
Hampshire, February, 1683/4, as Marshall's Deputy under 
Gov. Cranfield, where he arrested about every one of prom- 
inence and not always gently. Among them was the Rev. 
Joshua Moody who he arrested for refusing to give the Gov- 
ernor the Sacrament. (New Hampshire Province Papers, 
1 : 521-533.) In May 1684 as Sheriff he served the Gov- 
ernor's warrants for Town Meetings to elect Representatives 
for the General Assembly in order to pass a Law for punish- 
ing Privateers and Pirates. (Ibid, 1 : 501.) He was con- 
stantly in trouble in New Hampshire and was finally driven 
out by the inhabitants in the most approved style. 

"Honour of Dermin & Deiner Mahoone born 29 Oct. 
1648 " (Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 9 : 27.) in 
Boston, evidently died young. 

David Mahoone, her brother, born about 165 1, came of age 
and on Oct. 29, 1672, the County Court at Boston appointed 
Mr. Anthony Stoddard & Capt. William Davis to divide the 
remainder of the estate of Dorman Mahoone between his 
second son David and daughter Margaret, which they accord- 
ingly did in two equal portions, one on the " Street " now 
Sudbury St., and the other on the " lane towards the field " 
now Court St., with the proviso that " if David possess the 
first dividend hee must remove the frame to the other Divi- 
dend where they will have it set up. " (County Court Record, 
p. 86 & 90.) In the meantime Daniel Mathews had sold his 



6 9 

corner lot to William Towers, Oct. 23, 1668 and Towers had 
conveyed the same to Benj. Emons, on Feb. 23, 1668/9, m ~ 
eluding a gore of David's land, with a frontage of 13 feet on 
the Street. Appended to the latter deed under date of Nov. 
8, 1672 is a grant of the said gore to Emons by David 
Mathews of Block Island in New England, witnessed by 
Daniel Mathews and John Haywood, Scrivener, and acknow- 
ledged in Boston, before Edward Ting, Assistant. (Suffolk 
Deeds, 49 : 94-95.) On the " 27th of Feb. 1677/8 Thomas 
Yow doth testifie and say [before Thomas Clarke Commissioner] 
that David Mathews the brother of Danill Mathews is by 
providence killed by the fall of a tree in verginia which was 
ther belonging to a Ship Abraham Blage the M r and Com- 
pany did relate it to me and the inquire whither I did not 
know him or not. " (Suffolk Probate Docket 943). 

On March 4, 1677/8 administration was granted to his 
brother Daniel Mathews in right of himself and others con- 
cerned, on surety of ^100. On the same day James Meres 
and Jn° Williams " prized ... a piece of land . . . that did be- 
long to the said David Mathews as we were Informed by 
Daniell Mathews " at ,£45. (Suffolk Probate Records, 
12 : 24.) On the 20th of Nov. 1679, Daniel Matthews was 
fined 10 shillings for non-attendance at the County Court 
with regard to the said estate, then valued at^50, and it was 
duly set off to him on payment of -£ 1 5 to his sister Margaret 
Mathews, leaving the estate in Block Island for later con- 
sideration. (County Court Record, p. 62 1.) David Mahoone 
had a namesake in Virginia, who in 1656 was admitted to 
Gloucester County, having been brought out by William and 
Hancock Lee. (Greer's Early Virginia Emigrants). 

"Margaret" the posthumous daughter of " Dorman and 
Margaret Mahoone" was born in Boston on June 3, 1661. 
(Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 9 : 79). On the 
20th of July following " Bryan Morfrey [otherwise Murphy] 
an Irishman and Margaret Mayhoone widow were married by 



70 

John Endicott Gov r ." (Ibid, 9:82). Bryan was not much 
to boast of and his wife Margaret soon followed in his foot- 
steps. (County Court Records, p. 32, etc.) At first they 
were resident of Dorman's house but in 1670 they were living 
with David Faulkner on the Street leading to the Castle 
Tavern. (Suffolk Deeds, 8:299). On March 22, 1672, the 
Governor and others at Boston " ordered that notice be given 
to the severall psons under-written that they within one 
moneth after the date hereof dispose of their severall Chil- 
dren (herein nominated or mentioned) abroad for servants, to 
serve by Indentures for some terme of yeares, accordinge to 
their ages and capacities w ch if they refuse or neglect to doe 
the Magistrates and Selectmen will take theire said Children 
from them, and place them with such Masters as they shall 
provide accordinge as the lawe directs. And they that doe 
accordinge to this ordr dispose of theire Children doe make 
returne of the names of Mastrs & Children soe put out to ser- 
vice, with their Indentures to the Selectmen at their next 
monethly Meeting being the last Monday in Aprill next." 
(Boston Record Commissioners Reports, 7 :6j). Among the 
children mentioned is Bryan Morphews Daughter in law 
Martha Dorman about 12 years, otherwise step-daughter. As 
Bryan Murphy was still possessed of his wife Margaret on 
Apr. 30, 1672, (County Court Records, p. 52) and had a 
step-daughter Margaret Mahoone alias Mathews daughter of 
Dorman, who was almost 1 1 years of age, it looks as if some 
one was careless. In Oct. 1672, the remaining portion of 
Dorman Mahoone's estate was set off to the second son 
David and the daughter Margaret, as before mentioned. 
(Ibid, 86 & 90). David having died in 1677, his portion was 
granted to his brother Daniel, on payment of ^15 to 
Margaret. (Suffolk Probate Docket 943). On the 7th of 
October, 1680, Daniel Mathews sells David's share of their 
father's estate to William Clough and Henry Messenger Jr, 
who make payment of the ^15 to John Usher as guardian of 



7i 

Margaret Mathews, Oct. 15, following. (Suffolk Deeds, 

12 : 218-219). 

On the 1 6th of June 1684, Margrett Matthews of Boston, 
spinster, sells to Henry Messenger, her share of her father's 
estate she now being now 23 years of age, and unmarried, a 
rather unusual condition at that period. (Suffolk Deeds, 

13 : 343)- 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I give and bequeath to the Bostonian Society, in the 

City of Boston, the sum of dollars 

for the general use and purposes of the said Society. 



OFFICERS 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION 



Presidents 
1-1906 *JAMES F. HUNNEWELL, 1907-1910 



*CURTIS GUILD, 1 

GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS, 1911 



Vice-President 
Francis H. Manning, 1907 



Clerks and Treasurers t 



'Samuel M. Quincy . 1881-18S4 
James M. Hubbard . 1S84-1885 
•DA.NIEL T. V. Huntoon 1 885- 1 886 



*\VlLLIAM C. BURRAGE . 1886-189O 

*S. Arthur Bent . . 1890-1899 
Charles F. Read . . 1899 



Directors 



*Thomas J. Allen . . 1886- 

*Thomas C. Amory . . 1S84- 

( 1884- 

*\VlLLIAM S. APPLETON \ „ 

I 1S9O- 

*\Villiam H. Baldwin 1884- 
*S. Arthur Bent . . 
*Robert R. Bishop . . 1882- 

JOSHUA P. L. BODFISH . 1885- 

*Francis H. Brown . . 191 1- 
*George O. Carpenter 1888- 
*Benjamin C. Clark . 1890- 
*Uavid H. Coolidge . 1895- 
Henry W. CUNNINGHAM191 j 
1891 
1907 
1897 
1908 
1881 
1S81 



*Jacob A. Dresser 
John W. Farwell 

* Albert A. Folsom 
courtenay guild 

*Curtis Guild . . 

'John T. H ass am . 



1887 
1889 
1889 
1894 
1886 
1S90 
1884 
1914 
•1917 
■1896 
1906 
■1907 

-1894 

-1907 

-1906 
-1890 



*Hamilton A. Hill . . 18S3- 

*James F. Hunnewell . 1894- 

*John Lathrop . . . 1887- 

*Abbott Lawrence. . 18S2- 

William H. Lincoln . 1S99- 

Francis H. Manning . 1904 

*William T. R. Marvin 1900- 

Joseph Grafton Minot 1912 

*Thomas Minns . . . 1881- 

Grenville H. N0RCROSS190S 

*Edward G. Porter . 1896- 

*Samuel H. Russell . 1882- 

*Samuel E. Sawyer 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 1915 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 1906 

*YVilliam W. Warren . 1886- 

*William H. Whitmore 1883- 

*Levi L. Willcutt . . 1894- 



1895 
1910 

1899 
1884 
1903 

i9!3 
1885 

1900 
1894 



1890 
1886 
1912 



* Deceased. 
t The offices of Clerk and Treasurer are held by one person. 



OFFICERS FOR 1917 



President 
GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS 

Vice-President 
Francis H. Manning 

Clerk and Treasurer 

Charles F. Read 

P. O. Address, Old State House, Boston 

Directors 



Francis H. Manning 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
John W. Farwell 
Grenville H. Norcross 



Courtenav Guild 
Francis H. Brown 
Joseph Grafton Minot 
Henry W. Cunningham 



Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
Committee on Finance 
Grenville H. Norcross | Francis H. Manning 

COURTENAY GUILD 

Committee on the Rooms 



Francis H. Manning 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
Courtenay Guild 



Joseph Grafton Minot 
Henry W. Cunningham 
The President and Clerk 
ex officiis 
Committee on the Library 



Edward Percival Merritt 
John Woodbury 
The Clerk 



Francis H. Brown 
Walter K. Watkins 
William G. Shillaber 

Committee on Papers 
Henry W. Cunningham William O. Comstock 

Edwin D. Mead The Clerk 

Committee on Publications 
John W. Farwell Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

Albert Matthews Francis H. Brown 

The Clerk 

Committee on Membership 



Alexander W. Longfellow 
Allan Forbes 
The Clerk 



Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
William L. Allen 
Louis Bacon 

Committee on Memorials 
Courtenay Guild Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr 

Boylston A. Beal The Clerk 

Delegates to the Bay State Historical League 
George Kuhn Clarke William Rotch 

The President 



CUSTODIANS 

Robert B. Smith Charles B. Brooks 

Thomas M. Hutchinson Herbert E. Burrage 

Henry M. Nourse 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



JUNE I, 1917 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



*Bent, Samuel Arthur 
Bodfish, Joshua Peter Langley 
* Chamberlain, Mellen 
Eley, James 



*Guild, Curtis 
Matthews, Nathan 
♦O'Brien, Hugh 
*Smith, Samuel Francis 



LIFE MEMBERS 



Abbe, Henry Thayer 
Abbot, Edward Stanley 
Abbot, Edwin Hale 
♦Abbot, Francis Ellingwood 
♦Abbott, Marshall Kittredge 
Abbott, Samuel 
*Adams, Alexander Clinton 
*Adams, Charles Francis 
Adams, Mr:. Isabella Hortense 
Adams, James 
Addicks, John Edward 
Alden, Henry Bailey 
Allan, Mrs. Anna 
Allen, Miss Clara Ann 
*Allen, Crawford Carter 
*Allen, Elbridge Gerry 
Allen, Francis Richmond 
Allen, Frank Gilman 



Allen, Gardner Weld 
Allen, Herbert McClellan 

* Allen, James Woodward 
Allen, Thomas 

* Alley, John Robinson 
51 Ames, Mrs. ADna Coffin 
♦Ames, Charles Gordon 
♦Ames, Frederick Lothrop 
*Ames, Oliver 

"Ames, Mrs. Rebecca Caroline 
*Amory, Arthur 
Amory, Francis Inman 
Amory, Frederic 
Amster, Nathan Leonard 
♦Andrews, Frank William 
Andrews, John Adams 
*Angell, Henry Clay 
♦Anthony, Silas Reed 

* Deceased. 



7 6 



* Appleton, Mrs. Emily Warren 
Appleton, Francis Henry 
*Appleton, Nathan 

* Appleton, William Sumner 
Appleton, William Sumner 
'Armstrong, George Washington 
*Atherton, Joseph Ballard 
Atherton, Miss Lily Bell 
*Atkins, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Atwood, David Edgar 
•Austin, James Walker 

*Ayer, James Bourne 

Bacon, Charles Francis 

Bacon, Mrs. Louisa Crowninshield 

Badger, Arthur Campbell 

Badger, Daniel Bradford 

Badger, Erastus Beethoven 

Badger, Wallis Ball 

* Bailey, Joseph Tilden 
Baker, Charles Morrill 

* Baker, Miss Charlotte Alice 

* Baker, Mrs. Ellen Maria 
Baker, Ezra Henry 

* Baker, Richard 

* Baldwin, William Henry 
*Ballister, Joseph Fennelly 
*Ballister, Miss Minetta Josephine 
Bancroft, Cornelius Cheever 
Barker, Frederic Rutherford 
Barlow, Charles Lowell 

Barnes, Charles Benjamin 
Barney, Mrs. Mabel Fairchild 

Wheaton 
*Barrett, Edwin Shepard 
Barron, Clarence Walker 
Barry, Charles Stoddard 
Barry, George Thomas 

* Barry, John Lincoln 
Barry, John Lincoln 
*Bartlett, Francis 
Bartlett, Miss Mary Foster 
Bartlett, Ralph Sylvester 
Batcheller, Robert 
Bayley, Frank William 
*Beal, James Henry 



Beal, William Fields 
Beatty, Franklin Thomason 
Beebe, Edward Pierson 
*Beebe, James Arthur 
Beech, Mrs. Ruth Adelaide 
Bennett, Henry Dexter 

* Benson, George Wiggin 
Benton, Everett Chamberlin 
Bigelow, Alanson, Jr. 
Bigelow, Albert Smith 

* Bigelow, George Brooks 
Bigelow, Joseph Smith 
Bigelow, Melville Madison 
Bigelow, William Sturgis 
Binney, Henry Prentice 
Black, George Nixon 
Blake, Clarence John 

Blake, Mrs. Frances Greenough 

* Blake, Francis 
Blake, George Baty 
Blake, Hallie Collins 

* Blake, Mrs. Sara Putnam 

* Blake, Stanton 
Blake, William Payne 
*Blanchard, Samuel Stillman 
Blanchard, Miss Sarah Harding 
Blaney, Dwight 

*Blume, Mrs. Susan Eliza 
*Boardman, Samuel May 
Boardman, Waldo Elias 
Bodwell, William Pearle 
Bordman, John 
Bowditch, Alfred 
Bowditch, Ernest William 

* Bowditch, William Ingersoll 
Bowdlear, William Henry 

* Bradford, Martin Luther 
Bradford, William Burroughs 
*Bradlee, Caleb Davis 
Bradlee, Frederick Josiah 
Bradlee, Frederick Wainwright 
*Bradlee, Josiah Putnam 
Bradley, Jerry Payson 
Brayley, Arthur Wellington 
Bremer, John Lewis 



Deceased. 



77 



* Bremer, Mrs. Mary Rice 
Bremer, Samuel Parker 

* Brewer, William Dade 
Bridge, Frederick William 
Briggs, Lloyd Vernon 

* Brimmer, Martin 
Brooks, Gorham 
*Brooks, John Henry 
Brooks, Peter Chardon 
Brooks, Shepherd 

Brown, Davenport 
Brown, Miss Elizabeth Bowen 

* Brown, Francis Henry 
Brown, George Washington 
Brown. Harold Haskell 
Brown, Harry Webster 
*Brown, John Coffin Jones 
Brown, Reginald Woodman Plum- 

mer 
Brown, Thomas Hassall 

* Browne, Charles Allen 

* Browne, Edward Ingersoll 

* Browne, William Andrews 
Bullivant, William Maurice 
Burbank, Alonzo Norman 
Burdett, Fred Hartshorne 
*Burnham, John Appleton 
Burr, Miss Annie Lane 
Burrage, Albert Cameron 
Burrage, Charles Dana 
Burrage, Herbert Emory 
*Burrage, William Clarence 
Burroughs, George 
Byrnes, Timothy Edward 
*Cabot, Arthur Tracy 
Cabot, Francis Elliot 
Candage, Mrs. Ella Marie 
Candage, Robert Brooks 
*Candage, Rums George Frederick 
*Candler, John Wilson 

Carlin, William Joseph 
*Carpenter, George Oliver 
Carpenter, George Oliver 
*Carpenter, Mrs. Maria Josephine 



*Carr, John 

Carruth, Charles Theodore 

Carstein, Lawrence William 

Carter, Fred Louis 

Carter, Mrs. Helen Burrage 

Carter, Herbert Leslie 

■"Center, Joseph Hudson 

*Chamberlin, Charles Wheelwright 

Chandler, Cleaveland Angier 

*Chapin, Nahum 

*Chase, Caleb 

* Chase, George Bigelow 
Chase, Sidney 

Chase, Stephen 
*Chase, Theodore 
Cheney, Benjamin Peirce 
*Cheney, Mrs. Emeline 
Child, Dudley Richards 
Church, Herbert Bleloch 
*Clapp, Mrs. Caroline Dennie 
Clapp, Clift Rogers 

* Clark, Charles Edward 
Clark, John Spencer 
*Clark, Miss Nancy Joy 
Clark, Nathan Freeman 
*Clarke, Mrs. Alice de Vermandois 
Clarke, Henry Martyn 

*Clay, Thomas Hart 
*Clementson, Sidney 
Cleveland, Mrs. Corinne Maud 
Cobb, John Candler 
*Codman, John, 2d 
Codman, Miss Martha Catherine 
*Codman, Mrs. Martha Pickman 
Codman, Ogden 
Codman, William Coombs 
Coffin. Frederick Seymour 
*Colburn, Jeremiah 
*Collamore, Miss Helen 
Colley, William Edgar 
Comer, Miss Josephine Sarah 
"■Converse, Elisha Slade 
Coolidge, Algernon, Jr. 
Coolidge, Charles Allerton 



* Deceased. 



7§ 



"Coolidge, David Hill 
Coolidge, Mrs. Helen Whittington 
Coolidge, Joseph Randolph 
Coolidge, Mrs. Julia 
*Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson, Jr. 
Coolidge, William Henry 
Cooney, Charles Lawrence 
Corbett, Alexander, Jr. 
*Cordis, Mrs. Adelaide Elizabeth 
Cory, Charles Barney 
Cotting, Charles Edward 
*Cotting, Charles Uriah 
*Crafts, John Chancellor 
Crandon, Edwin Sanford 
Crawford, George Artemas 
Crehore, Charles Lemuel 
Crocker, David 
*Crocker, George Glover 

* Crocker, Miss Sarah Haskell 
*Crosby, Charles Augustus Wilkins 
Crossett, Lewis Abbott 

Crowell, Horace Sears 
*Crowninshield, Benjamin William 
Crowninshield, Francis Boardman 
Cruft, George Theodore 
*Cruft, Miss Harriet Otis 
*Cummings, Charles Amos 
Cummings, Thomas Cahill 
Cunningham, Henry Winchester 
*Curtis, Caleb Agry 
*Curtis, Charles Pelham 
*Curtis, Mrs. Eliza Fox 
*Curtis, Hall 
Curtis, Mrs. Harriot 

* Curtis, Henry Pelham 
Curtis, Horatio Greenough 
Curtis, John Silsbee 
Curtiss, Frederick Haines 
*Cushing, Livingston 
Cutler, Charles Francis 
*Cutler, Samuel Newton 
*Cutter, Abram Edmands 
"Cutter, Benjamin French 
Cutter, Mrs. Elizabeth Finley 
Cutter, Leonard Francis 



•Cutter, Watson Grant 
Daily, Edward Bernard 
Damon, Frank Herbert 
Dana, Edward Percy 
Dana, Harold Ward 
Dana, William Franklin 
*Daniell, Moses Grant 
Danker, Daniel Joseph 
Darling, Charles Kimball 
Davenport, George Howe 

* Davenport, Orlando Henry 
Davis, Arthur Edward 

* Davis, Ephraim Collins 
Davis, George Henry 
*Davis, James Clarke 
*Davis, Joseph Alba 
Davis, Mrs. Mary Cheney 
Davis, William Henry 
Day, Hilbert Francis 
*Day, William Francis 
*Dean, Benjamin 
*Dean, John Ward 
*Dean, Luni Albertus 
*Deblois, Stephen Grant 

* Denny, Daniel 
Devlin, Edward 

Dewey, William Richardson 

* Dewing, Benjamin Hill 
*Dexter, Morton 
*Dexter, William Sohier 
*Dill, Thomas Bradford 
Dillaway, William Edward Lovell 
*Dodd, George Davis 

*Dorr, Francis Oliver 
Dorr, George Bucknam 
Dow, Richard Sylvester 

* Draper, Eben Sumner 
Draper, George Albert 
Dresel, Ellis Loring 
*Dupee, Henry Dorr 
*Dupee, James Alexander 
Dutton, Harry 
*Dwight, Edmund 
Dwinnell, Clifton Howard 
*Dyer, Mrs. Julia Knowlton 



* Deceased. 



79 



Dysart, Robert 
Eaton, Albert 

•Eaton, Miss Georgiana Goddard 
Eaton, Miss Lucy Houghton 
*Eaton, Walter David 
Edes, Henry Herbert 
*Edmands, John Rayner 
Edmonds, John Henry 
Edwards, Miss Grace 
Edwards, Miss Hannah Marcy 
Eliot, Christopher Rhodes 
•Eliot, Samuel 
Ellery, William 
Elliot, George Buxton 
Emerson, Abraham Silver 
*Emerson, George Robert 

* Emery, Francis Faulkner 
*Endicott, William 
Endicott, William 

Endicott, William Crowninshield 
Ernst, Mrs. Ellen Lunt 
Ernst, Harold Clarence 
Estabrook, Arthur Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick Watson 
*Estes, Dana 

Eustis, Miss Elizabeth Mussey 
Eustis, Henry Dutton 
Eustis, Joseph Tracy 
Eustis, Miss Mary St. Barbe 
Everett, Henry Coffin 
*Fabyan, George Francis 

* Fairbanks, Frederick Clinton 
Fales, Herbert Emerson 
Farnsworth, Edward Miller 
Farnsworth, William 
*Farrington, Charles Frederick 
Farwell, John Whittemore 
Fay, Dudley Bowditch 

Fay, Henry Howard 
•Fay, Joseph Story 
•Fay, Joseph Story, Jr. 
*Fay, Sigourney Webster 
•Fearing, Andrew Coatsworth, Jr. 
*Felton, Frederic Luther 



•Fenno, John Brooks 
*Fenno, Lawrence Carteret 
•Ferris, Mortimer Catlin 
Fish, Frederick Perry 
Fiske, Andrew 
Fiske, Mrs. Charlotte Morse 
•Fiske, Miss Elizabeth Stanley 
Fitz, Mrs. Henrietta Goddard 
•Fitz, Reginald Heber 
Fitzgerald, William Francis 
Floyd, Charles Harold 
•Fogg, John Samuel Hill 
•Folsom, Mrs. Julia Elizabeth 
•Ford, Daniel Sharp 
Foss, Eugene Noble 
Foss, Leon Frederic 
Foster, Miss Harriet Wood 
•Foster, John 

•Foster, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
Fowle, Seth Augustus 
•Fowler, Mrs. Laura Wentworth 
Fowler, Robert 
Fowler, William Plumer 
•French, Miss Caroline Louisa Wil- 
liams 
French, Miss Cornelia Anne 
*French, Mrs. Frances Maria 
•French, Frederick William 
•French, Jonathan 
Frothingham, Mrs. Mary Shreve 
•Frothingham, Thomas Goddard 
Frye, James Albert 
•Fuller, Charles Emerson 
•Fuller, Henry Holton 
Gagnebin, Charles Louis 
Gallagher, Hugh Clifford 
•Gallivan, Timothy Aloysius 
•Galloupe, Charles William 
•Galloupe, Mrs. Sarah Augusta 
Gardiner, Robert Hallowell 
Gardner, Augustus Peabody 
Gardner, George Peabody 
•Gardner, John Lowell 
Gaugengigl, Ignaz Marcel 
•Gay, Edwin Whitney 



* Deceased. 



8o 



*Gay, Ernest Lewis 
♦Gay, Frederick Lewis 
George, Elijah 

*Giddings, Mrs. Susan Kittredge 
Gilbert, Shepard Devereux 
♦Gill, James Seel 
Gill, Mrs. Matilda 
*Gill, Mrs. Rachel Maria 
Gilman, Osmon Burnap 
♦Glasier, Alfred Adolphus 
Gleason, James Mellen 
♦Glines, Edward 
Goddard, George Augustus 
Goddard, Miss Julia 

* Goodhue, Francis Abbot 
♦Goodrich, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 

* Gould, Benjamin Apthorp 
Gould, George Lambert 
Gould, Marshall Hopkins 
*Grandin, John Livingston 
*Gray, Reginald 

Gray, Roland 
Gray, Russell 

Green, Charles Montraville 
Green, Samuel Abbott 
*Greene, Francis Bunker 
♦Greenough, Francis Boott 
Grew, Edward Wigglesworth 
*Grew, Henry Sturgis 
♦Griggs, John Hammond 
Grozier, Edwin Atkins 
Guild, Courtenay 

*Guild, Curtis 

♦Guild, Mrs. Sarah Crocker 

Guild, Miss Sarah Louisa 

Gurney, Frank Pierce 

Hagar, Eugene Bigelow 

♦Haigh, John 

*Hale, Mrs. Ellen Sever 

Hall, Mrs. Ellen Page 

Hall, George Gardner 

Hall, Henry Lyon 

Hall, Prescott Farnsworth 

♦Hall, Thomas Bartlett 

Hammer, Charles Dunkel 



♦Hammond, Mrs. Ellen Sarah 

Sophia 
♦Hammond, Gardiner Greene 
♦Hammond, George Warren 
♦Hancock, Franklin 
♦Hapgood, Warren 
Hardy, John Dudley 
Harrington, George 
Harrison, Walter James 
Hart, Thomas Norton 
♦Hart, William Tennant 
♦Hartt, John F 
Haskell, William Andrew 
♦Hassam, John Tyler 
♦Hastings, Henry 
Hathaway, Charles Francis 
♦Haven, Franklin 
Haven, Miss Mary Eliza 
Hayford, Nathan Holbrook 
♦Haynes, James Gilson 
♦Haynes, John Cummings 
♦Hay ward, George 
Hayward, James Warren 
♦Head, Charles 
♦Hecht, Jacob Hirsch 
Hemenway, Alfred 
Hemenway, Augustus 
♦Henchman, Nathaniel Hurd 
Henry, William Linzee 
Henshaw, Samuel 
Herrick, Robert Frederick 
Hewins, James 
Hickok, Gilman Clarke 
Higginson, Francis Lee 
Higginson, Mrs. Ida Agassiz 
Hill, Donald McKay 
♦Hill, Hamilton Andrews 
Hill, Henry Eveleth 
♦Hill, James Edward Radford 
♦Hill, Warren May 
♦Hill, William Henry 
Hills, Edwin Augustus 
Hinckley, Frederic 
Hodgkins, Joseph Wilson 
! Hoffman, Mrs. Rebecca Russell 



* Deceased. 



8i 



*Hoitt, Alfred Demeritt 
*Holden, Joshua Bennett 
*Hollingsworth, Amor Leander 
*Hollingsworth, Sumner 
Hollingsworth, Valentine 
Hollingsworth, Zachary Taylor 
*Holman, Charles Bradley 
Holmes, Edward Jackson 
*Homans, Charles Dudley 
*Homans, George Henry 
*Homans, John, 2nd 
Hooper, Mrs. Alice Perkins 
Hooper, Mrs. Mary Davis Beal 

* Hooper, Robert Chamblet 
Hooper, William 
*Hopkins, Amos Lawrence 
Hopper, Ralph Waldo Emerson 
Hornblower, Henry 
*Horsford, Eben Norton 
Houghton, Clement Stevens 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth Good- 
ridge 

*Hovey, Henry Stone 
Howard, Herbert Burr 
Howe, Elmer Parker 
Howe, Mark Anthony DeWolfe 
Howe, Octavius Thorndike 
Howes, Daniel Havens 
Hubbard, Charles Wells 
Hubbard, Orrin Calvin 
Hubbard, Paul Mascarene 
Hughes, Miss Laura Ann Cleophas 
Hunneman, William Cooper 
Hunnewell, Francis Welles, 2d 
*Hunnewell, James Frothingham 
Hunnewell, James Melville 

* Hunnewell, Mrs. Sarah Melville 
Hunter, Herbert Forester 
Hurd, Edward Payson 
Hurlbut, Mrs. Eda Adams 
*Hutchings, George Sherburne 
Iasigi, Mrs. Amy Gore 

* Jackson, Mrs. Mary Stuart 
*Jackson, William 
Jacobs, Mrs. Garrie 



James, Arthur Holmes 
James, George Abbot 
""Jeffries, Benjamin Joy 
Jenks, Henry Fitch 
Jenney, Bernard 
*Jenney, William Thacher 
Johnson, Arthur Stoddard 
Johnson, Mrs. Fanny Betts 
"Johnson, Wolcott Howe 
*Jones, Daniel Wayland 
*Jones, Jerome 
Jones, Nathaniel Royal 
*Joy, Franklin Lawrence 
*Keith, Benjamin Franklin 
Kellen, William Vail 
Kelly, Miss Elizabeth Farley 
Kelly, Fitzroy 
Kemp, Clarence Charles 
*Kennard, Martin Parry 
Kennedy, George Golding 
Kennedy, John Joseph 
Kent, Mrs. Alice Cotting 
Keyes, William Herbert 
Kidder, Charles Archbald 
Kidder, Nathaniel Thayer 
Kilburn, Warren Silver 
Kimball, Miss Augusta Caroline 
Kimball, Mrs. Caroline Sampson 
Kimball, Mrs. Clara Bertram 
Kimball, David Pulsifer 
Kimball, Lemuel Cushing 
*Kimball, Mrs. Susan Tillinghast 
Kitson, Henry Hudson 
Knight, Arthur Stearns 
*Kuhn, Hamilton 
Ladd, Babson Savilian 
Ladd, Mrs. Mary Stowell 
Ladd, Nathaniel Watson 
Lamb, Mrs. Annie Lawrence 
*Lamb, George 
Lamb, Henry Whitney 
*Lambert, Thomas Ricker 
*Lamson, Artemas Ward 
*Lane, Jonathan Abbott 
Lang, Mrs. Frances Morse 



* Deceased. 



82 



* Lawrence, Amory Appleton 

* Lawrence, Amos Adams 

* Lawrence, Charles Richard 
Lawrence, Harris Hooper 
Lawrence, John 
Lawrence, John Silsbee 
Lawrence, Robert Means 

* Lawrence, Samuel Crocker 
Lawson, Thomas William 
Lee, James Stearns 

Lee, Joseph 
Lee, William Henry 
Leman, John Howard 
Leonard, Amos Morse 

* Leonard, Miss Anna Rebekah 

* Leonard, George Henry 
Lesh, Henry Frederick 
Leverett, George Vasmer 
Lewis, Edwin James 
Lewis, George 

* Lincoln, Beza 
Litchfield, William Elias 
Little, Arthur 

♦Little, George Washington 

* Little, James Lovell 
Little, John Mason 
♦Lockwood, Philip Case 
Lockwood, Thomas St. John 
Lodge, Henry Cabot 
Long, Harry Vinton 
Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth 
♦Longley, James 

Longley, Mrs. Julia Robinson 

♦Lord, George Wells 

Loring, Augustus Peabody 

♦Loring, Caleb William 

Loring, Miss Helen 

Loring, Miss Katharine Peabody 

Loring, Miss Louisa Putnam 

Loring, Thacher 

Loring. William Caleb 

*Lothrop, Daniel 

*Lothrop, Thornton Kirkland 

Loud, Charles Elliot 

Loud, George Deshorn 



Loud, Joseph Prince 
Loveland, Timothy Otis 
Lovering, Ernest 
Lovett, Arthur Trevitt 
*Low, George Doane 
*Low, John 

* Lowell, Francis Cabot 
Lowell, Miss Georgina 
Lowell, John 
Lowell, Miss Lucy 
*Lowell, Mrs. Mary Ellen 
♦Lowell, Percival 

* Lucas, Edmund George 
Luke, Arthur Fuller 
Lunt, William Wallace 

* Lyman, Arthur Theodore 
*Lyon, Henry 
*MacDonald, Edward 
Mace, Mrs. Martha Jane 
*Mack, Thomas 
♦Macleod, William Alexander 
Mandell, Samuel Pierce 
*Mann, Arthur Elisha 
*Mann, George Sumner 
Manning, Francis Henry 
*Marion, Horace Eugene 
Marrs, Mrs. Laura Norcross 
*Marsh, Mrs. Julia Maria 
*MarshalI, James Fowle Baldwin 
Marston, Howard 

Marston, John Pitts 

*Marvin,WilliamTheophilus Rogers 

Matthews, Albert 

May, Miss Eleanor Goddard 

May, Frederick Goddard 

*May, Frederick Warren Goddarci 

Mayer, Richard 

♦Mayo, Miss Amy Louisa 

McDonough, Charles Andrew 

Mclntire, Charles John 

*Mead, Mrs. Anna Maria 

Means, John Hamilton 

Melville, Henry Hulmes 

Merriam, Frank 

Merriam, Olin Lane 



* Deceased. 



Merrill, Albert Rowe 
♦Merrill, Mrs. Amelia Grigg 
Merrill, Sherburn Moses 
Merritt, Edward Percival 
*Metcalf, Albert 
Meyer, George von Lengerke 
♦Minns, Thomas 
Minot, Joseph Grafton 
*Minot, William 
Minot, William 
Mitchell, Sidney Adelbert 
*Mitton, Edward John 
*Mixter, Miss Madeleine Curtis 
Monks, George Howard 
*Moore, Frederic Henry 
*Moore, George Henry 
•Moore, Miss Mary Eliza 
Moors, Francis Joseph 
Moriarty, George Andrews 
Morison, Samuel Eliot 
Morrison, Barna Thacher 
*Morse, George Henry 

* Morse, Lemuel Foster 
Morse, Lewis Kennedy 
*Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Everett 

Morss, John Wells 
*Moseley, Alexander 
Moseley, Miss Ellen Frances 

* Motley, Edward Preble 
•Munro, John Cummings 
Murdock, Harold 
Murdock, William Edwards 
Murphy, James Smiley 
♦Nash, Nathaniel Cushing 
Newman, Miss Harriet Hancock 
Nichols, Arthur Howard 
Nickerson, William Emery 
Norcross, Grenville Howland 
*Norcross, Mrs. Lucy Ann 
Norcross, Otis 

Norman, Mrs. Louisa Palfrey 
*Norwell, Henry 
Noyes, James Atkins 



Nutting, George Hale 
O'Brien, Walter Augustine 
♦O'Callaghan, Denis 
♦Olmsted, Frederick Law 
♦Osgood, Mrs. Elizabeth Burling 
♦Page, Mrs. Susan Haskell 
•Paige, John Calvin 
Paine, James Leonard 
Paine, Mrs. Mary Woolson 
♦Paine, Robert Treat 
Paine, William Alfred 
♦Palfrey, Francis Winthrop 
♦Palfrey, John Carver 
♦Palmer, Benjamin Sanborn 
Palmer, Ezra 

♦Parker, Charles Wallingford 
Parker, Miss Eleanor Stanley 
Parker, Frederick Wesley 
Parker, Harrison 
Parker, Herman 
Parker, James Phillips 
♦Parker, Mason Good 
Parker, Moses Greeley 
♦Parker, Miss Sarah 
Parker, William Stanley 
Parkhurst, Lewis 
♦Parkman, Francis 
Parlin, Albert Norton 
Parmenter, James Parker 
♦Parsons, Arthur Jeffrey 
Parsons, William Edwin 
♦Payne, James Henry 
♦Peabody, Charles Breckenridge 
Peabody, Charles Livingston 
Peabody, Frank Everett 
Peabody, Mrs. Gertrude 
Peabody, John Endicott 
Peabody, Philip Glendower 
Pearce, Arthur Paul 
Pearson, Arthur Emmons 
Peirce, Mrs. Elizabeth Goldthwait 
Peirce, Silas 

Pelletier, Joseph Charles 
♦Perkins, Augustus Thorndike 
♦Perkins, Mrs. Catherine Page 
Deceased. 



8 4 



*Perkins, Edward Cranch 
Perkins, John Forbes 
*Perkins, William 

* Perry, Charles French 
Perrv, Edward Hale 
Perry, Thomas Sergeant 
Pfaff, Charles 

*Pfaff, Mrs. Hannah Adams 

* Pfaff, Jacob 
Phelan, James Joseph 
Phillips, Mrs. Anna Tucker 
Phillips, Henry Ayling 
Phillips, John Charles 
Phinney, Horatio Augustus 

* Pickering, Henry 
Pickering, Henry Goddard 
Pickman, Dudley Leavitt, Jr. 
*Pierce, Henry Lillie 
*Pierce, Nathaniel Willard 
Pillsbury, Albert Enoch 
*Piper, William Taggard 
Playfair, Edith, Lady 
Pond, Virgil Clarence 
'"Poole, Lucius 

* Porter, Alexander Silvanus 

* Porter, Edward Griffin 
*Porter, William Killam, Jr. 
Potter, Henry Staples 
Powell, William Beverley 
*Prager, Philip 

Prager, Mrs. Rachel 

* Prang, Louis 

Prang, Mrs. Mary Dana 
Pratt, Mrs. Fannie Barnard 
Pratt, Laban 

Prendergast, James Maurice 
Prescott, Alfred Usher 
Prescott, Walter Conway 
Preston, George Marshall 
Pridee, William Henry 
*Prince, Charles John 
Proctor, Mrs. Abby Shaw 
*Pulsifer. William Henry 
Pushee, George Durant 
Putnam, Mrs. Harriet Lowell 



* Putnam, Mrs. Mary Lowell 
*Putnam, William Edward 
Quinby, Winfield Scott 
Quincy, Charles Frederic 
Quincy, George Gilbert 
*Quincy, George Henry 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Adams 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Caroline 
*Quincy, Samuel Miller 
Rackemann, Charles Sedgwick 
*Radclyffe, Herbert 
Ratshesky, Abraham Captain 
Rawson, Edward Lincoln 
*Raymond, Freeborn Fairfield, 2d 
*Read, Mrs. Lucy Richmond 
*Read, Miss Sarah Elizabeth 
Reed, Brooks 
Reed, Mrs. Grace Evelyn 
*Reed, Henry Ransford 
Reed, James 
Reed, John Sampson 
*Reed, William Howell 
Reynolds, John Phillips 
Rhodes, James Ford 
Rice, Edward David 
Rich, William Ellery Channing 
Richards, Francis Henry 

* Richards, Henry Capen 
*Richardson, Albert Lewis 
Richardson, Benjamin Heber 
Richardson, Edward Bridge 
Richardson, Edward Cyrenius 
*Richardson, Maurice Howe 
*Richardson, Spencer Welles 
Richardson, William Lambert 
Richardson, William Streeter 
Richmond, Joshua Bailey 
*Riley, James Madison 

* Ripley, George 
Rivers, Miss Mary 
Robb, Russell 
Robinson, Edward 
*Roby, Mrs. Cynthia Coggeshall 
*Rodocanachi, John Michael 
Rogers, Robert 

* Deceased. 



85 



Root, Henry Augustus 
*Ropes, John Codman 
*Ross, Alphonso 
Rotch, William 
Rothwell, James Eli 
Ruggles, Charles Albert 
Runkle, John Cornelius 
Russell, Joseph Ballister 
Russell, Mrs. Margaret Pelham 
*Russell, Samuel Hammond 
*Rust, Nathaniel Johnson 
*Rutan, Charles Hercules 
Saltonstall, Richard Middlecott 
Sampson, Charles Edward 
*Sampson, Edwin Holbrook 
Sands, Mrs. Florence Josephine 
Sargent, Charles Sprague 
Sargent, Miss Louisa Lee 
♦Sawyer, Henry Nathan 
Sears, Alexander Pomroy 
Sears, Harold Carney 
Sears, Henry Francis 
Sears, Herbert Mason 
Sears, Horace Scudder 
* Sears, Joshua Montgomery 
Sears, Mrs. Mary Crowninshield 
Sears, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Sears, Richard Dudley 

*Seaver, William James 

Sederquist, Arthur Butman 

Sewall, Atherton 

Shattuck, Frederick Cheyne 

Shattuck, George Brune 

Shattuck, Henry Lee 

Shaw, Mrs. Annie Whipple 

Shaw, Charles Nason 

Shaw, Mrs. Cora Lyman 

*Shaw, Henry 

*Shaw, Henry Lyman 

Shaw, Henry Southworth 

Shaw, Henry Southworth, Jr. 

Shaw, Robert Gould 

Sheldon, Frank Merritt 

*Shepard, Willis Stratton 

Sherry, Frank Eaton 



Shillaber, William Green 
*Shimmin, Charles Franklin 
Shultis, Newton 
Shuman, Abraham 
Shumway, Franklin Peter 
*Sigourney, Henry 
*Simpson, Frank Ernest 
*Skinner, Francis 
*Skinner, Francis 
*Slafter, Edmund Farwell 
* Slater, Andrew Chapin 
*Slocum, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
*Slocum, William Henry 
Smith, Miss Ellen Vose 
Smith, Fitz-Henry, Jr. 
Smith, Frank Ernest 
*Smith, Joseph Warren 
Smith, Miss Mary Almira 
Smith, Robert Boynton 
Smith, Walter Edwin 
Snow, Franklin Augustus 
Sohier, Miss Elizabeth Putnam 
Sohier, William Davies 
*Sortwell, Alvin Foye 
Soule, Miss Sarah Marden 
Spalding, Philip Leffingwell 
*Spaulding, Mrs. Emily Steward 
Spaulding, John Taylor 
Spaulding, William Stuart 
Sprague, Francis Peleg 
Sprague, Isaac 
Sprague, Phineas Warren 
Squire, Frank Orvis 

* Stafford, George Lewis 
*Stanwood, James Rindge 
Stearns, Foster Waterman 
Stearns, Frank Waterman 
Stearns, Harris Brackett 
*Stearns, Richard Hall 
Steinert, Alexander 
*Stetson, Amos William 
Stetson, James Henry 
Stetson, John Alpheus 
*Stevens, Miss Helen Grenville 

* Stevens, Oliver 



Deceased. 



86 



Stockford, Hugh Johnston 
Stodder, Charles Frederick 
Stone, Charles Augustus 
Stone, Charles Wellington 
Stone, William Eben 
*Storey, Joseph Charles 
Storey, Mrs. Mary Ascension 
Stowell, Edmund Channing 
*Stowell, John 
Stratton, Solomon Piper 
Strauss, Ferdinand 
Strauss, Peter Ernest 
Streeter, Edward Clark 
Sturgis, John Hubbard 
Sturgis, Robert Shaw 
*Sturgis, Russell 
♦Sumner, Alfred Henry 
*Suter, Hales Wallace 
*Swan, William Willard 
*Sweetser, Mrs. Anne Maria 
*Sweetser, Isaac Homer 
Swift, Henry Walton 
Sylvester, Edmund Quincy 
*Taft, Edward Augustine 
Taggard, Henry 
Talbot, Miss Marion 
Taylor, Amos Leavitt 
Taylor, Charles Henry 
Taylor, Charles Henry, Jr. 
Taylor, William Herbert 
Taylor, William Osgood 
*Thacher, Henry Charles 
Thacher, Mrs. Julia Edgar 
Thacher, Louis Bartlett 
Thacher, Thomas Chandler 
*Thayer, Bayard 
Thayer, Charles Irving 

* Thayer, David 

* Thayer, Eugene Van Rensselaer 
Thayer, Frank Bartlett 
Thayer, John Eliot 

*Thayer, Mrs. Mary 
Thorndike, Albert 
Thorndike, Alden Augustus 
Thorndike, Augustus 



""Thorndike, George Quincy 
Thorndike, Townsend William 
*Thornton, Charles Cutts Gookin 
*Tileston, James Clarke 
*Tinkham, George Henry 
Todd, Thomas 
Todd, Thomas, Jr. 
*Tompkins, Arthur Gordon 
"Tompkins, Eugene 
*Tompkins, Mrs. Frances Henrietta 
Towle, Loren Delbert 
Traiser, Richard Ernest 
Tripp, Guy Eastman 
*Tucker, Alanson 
Tucker, George Fox 
*Tucker, James Crehore 

* Tucker, Lawrence 
Tufts, Bo wen 
Tufts, Leonard 

* Turner, Alfred Rogers 
Turner, Mrs. Cora Leslie 

* Turner, Edward 
•Turner, Job Abiel 
Tyler, Charles Hitchcock 
Tyler, Edward Royall 
*Underwood, Mrs. Caroline Susanna 
Underwood, William Lawrence 
*Upham, George Phinehas 
*Upton, George Bruce 

Vail, Theodore Newton 
Van Nostrand, Alonzo Gifford 
*Vose, James Whiting 
*Wadsworth, Alexander Fairfield 
Wadsworth, Eliot 
Wales, William Quincy 
Walker, Arthur Willis 
Walker, Charles Cobb 
*Walker, Francis Amasa 
Walker, Grant 
Wallace, Cranmore Nesmith 
Walsh, David Ignatius 
*Ward, Francis Jackson 
Wardwell, Jacob Otis 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee 
*Warner, Bela Hemenway 



* Deceased. 



87 



*Warren, Albert Cyrus 
Warren, Edward Ross 
Warren, John Collins 
*Warren, Samuel Dennis 
*Warren, Mrs. Susan Cornelia 
Warren, William Fairfield 
♦Warren, William Wilkins 
Wasgatt, Herbert Preston 
Waterman, Frank Arthur 
Waterman, Frank Sturtevant 
*Waters, Edwin Forbes 
Watkins, Walter Kendall 
Watters, Walter Fred 
Webber, Franklin Roscoe 
Webster, Edwin Sibley 
Webster, Frank George 
♦Webster, John Haskell 
Weeks, John Wingate 
Welch, Francis Clarke 
Weld, Mrs. Caroline Langdon 
*Weld, Daniel 
♦Weld, John Davis 
♦Weld, Otis Everett 
Weld, Richard Harding, Jr. 
Wellington, Miss Anna Colburn 
Wells, Wellington 
Wendell, Barrett 
*Wentworth, Alonzo Bond 
Wesson, James Leonard 
*West, Mrs. Olivia Sears 
Westbrook, John Beekman 

* Weston, Mrs. Frances Erving 
Wetherbee, Winthrop 
Wheeler, Horace Leslie 

* Wheelwright, Andrew Cunning- 

ham 

* Wheelwright, Edward 

* Wheelwright, Mrs. Isaphene Moore 
♦Wheelwright, Josiah 
♦Wheildon, William Wilder 
Whidden, Stephen Hampden 
♦Whipple, Joseph Reed 
Whipple, Sherman Leland 
Whitcher, Frank Weston 
*Whitcomb, Henry Clay 



White, Austin Treadwell 
♦White, Charles Tallman 
White, George Robert 
White, Harry Kent 
♦White, John Gardner 
♦White, McDonald Ellis 
♦White, Mrs. Sarah Brackett 
♦White, Miss Susan Jackson 
Whitman, Allan Hiram 
Whitman, William 
♦Whitmore, Charles John 
♦Whitmore, Charles Octavius 
♦Whitney, Mrs. Caroline Abbe 
♦Whitney, Henry Austin 
♦Whitney, James Lyman 
Whittemore, Horace Alan 
♦Whittington, Hiram 
♦Wiggles worth, Edward 
Wigglesworth, George 
Willcomb, Mrs. Martha Stearns 
♦Willcutt, Francis Henry 
♦Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 
Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 
♦Willcutt, Mrs. Mary Ann Phillips 
Willcutt, Miss Sarah Edith 
♦Williams, Benjamin Bangs 
♦Williams, Edward Henry 
♦Williams, Henry Dudley 
♦Williams, Henry Willard 
Williams, Holden Pierce 
Williams, Horace Dudley Hall 
Williams, John Davis 
* Williams, Miss Louise Harding 
Williams, Ralph Blake 
♦Williams, Samuel Stevens Coffin 
Williams, Stillman Pierce 
♦Wilson, Davies 
♦Winchester, Daniel Low 
♦Winchester, Thomas Bradlee 
Winslow, Arthur 
Winslow, William Copley 
Winsor, Miss Mary Pickard 
Winsor, Robert 
Winthrop, Frederic 
♦Winthrop, Robert Charles, Jr. 



* Deceased. 



88 



Winthrop, Mrs. Robert Charles, 
Winthrop, Robert Mason 
*Wise, John Perry 
*Withington, Charles Francis 
Wolcott, Mrs. Edith Prescott 
Wood, William Madison 
Woodbury, John 
*Woodbury, John Page 
* Woodman, Cyrus 
Woodman, Walter Irving 
Woods, Frank Forrest 
Woods, Frederick Adams 
*Woods, Henry 



Jr. Woodworth, Herbert Grafton 
*Woolley, William 
Woolson, Mrs. Annie Williston 
*Woolson, James Adams 
Worcester, Elwood 
Wright, Albert Edwin 
*Wright, Albert Judd 
*Wright, Charles Francis 
*Wright, Miss Esther Fidelia 
*Wright, John Gordon 
*Wright, William James 
Young, Edmund Sanford 
*Young, George 

* Deceased. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



Adams, Henry Sewall 
Adams, Norman Usley 
Aiken, Henry Merk Smith 
Ainsley, Mrs. Emily Louisa 
Ainsley, John Robert 
Aldrich, Edward Irving 
Allen, Charles Willard 
Allen, Frederick Baylies 
Allen, Herbert Dupee 
Allen, William Lothrop 
Alley, Arthur Humphrys 
Ames, Oliver 

Anderson, Elbridge Roberts 
*Andrews, Edward Reynolds 
Anthony, Arthur Cox 
Appleton, Samuel 
Atkins, Edwin Farnsworth 
* Austin, Charles Lewis 
Avery, Charles French 
Bacon, Louis 
Bailey, Robert Morris 
Barbour, Edmund Dana 
Barrus, George Hale 
Barter, William Henry 
Bartlett, Nelson Slater 
Bartlett, Stephen Long 
Bates, John Lewis 
*Batt, Charles Richard 
Bayley, Edward Bancroft 
Baylies, Walter Cabot 
Beal, Boylston Adams 
Beal, Mrs. Louisa Adams 
Beebe, Franklin Haven 
Belden, Charles Francis Dorr 
Bemis, Frank Brewer 



* Benton, Josiah Henry 
Bigelow, Alanson 
Bigelow, Prescott, Jr. 
Binder, William 
Bishop, George Lester 
Blackall, Clarence Howard 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Mrs. Mary Lee 
Blinn, George Richard 
Bliss, Elmer Jared 
Bliss, James Frederick 
Blodget, William 
Boit, Robert Apthorp 
Bond, Mrs. Isabella Bacon 
Bond, Lawrence 
Bowditch, Charles Pickering 
Bowen, Henry James 
Bowen, Walter Eugene 
Bradlee, Edward Chamberlin 
Braley, Henry King 
Bray, William Claxton 
Bremer, Theodore Glover 
Brewer, Daniel Chauncy 
Brewer, Edward May- 
Brewer, George Clark 
Brewer, John Howie 
Brown, Arthur Eastman 
Brown, Mrs. Hannah Davenport 
Brown, Howard Kinmouth 
Brown, Howard Nicholson 
Brown, Joseph Taylor 
Brown, Willard Dalrymple 
Brown, Winfield Martin 
Bruen, John Albert 
i Bryant, John 

Deceased. 



90 



Bugbee, John Brown 

Bullivant, William Malcolm 

Burbeck, Edward 

Burgess, Mrs. Zaidee Palmer 

Burgess, John Eustis 

Burlingame, Howard Benjamin 

Burnett, Robert Manton 

Burr, Heman Merrick 

Burrage, Mrs. Marguerite Kimberly 

Burton, Hiram McKnight 

Bush, Samuel Dacre 

Butler, William Morgan 

Byrne, Harry Carroll 

Carr, Albert Eaton 

Carr, Ashton Livermore 

Carr, Samuel 

Carr, Walter Dinsmoor 

Carroll, Francis Michael 

Carter, Clarence Howard 

Carter, George Edward 

Chamberlin, Miss Abby H. 

Champney, Walter Redfern 

Chase, Frank Eugene 

Cheney, Mrs. Elizabeth Stickney 

Chester, Charles Edward 

Child, John Howard 

Chute, Arthur Lambert 

Clapp, Miss Georgene Lillian 

Clapp, John Bouve 

Clapp, Mrs. Susan Prescott 

Clapp, Mrs. Vanlora Joann 

Clark, Charles Storey 

Clark, Miss Elizabeth Hodges 

Clark, Ellery Harding 

Clark, Frederic Simmons 

Clark, Isaiah Raymond 

Clark, Joseph Horace 

Clarke, Arthur French 

Clarke, George Kuhn 

Clarke, Thomas William 

Cobb, William Henry 

Cochrane, Alexander 

Codman, Charles Russell 

Coffin, Charles Albert 

Comstock, William Ogilvie 



Connolly, Arthur Tracy 

Conrad, Sidney Smith 

Cook, Charles Sidney 

Cook, Frederick Sargent 

Coolidge, Harold Jefferson 

Coolidge, Louis Arthur 

Cox, Edwin Birchard 

Cox, Raymond Benjamin 

Crane, Walter Sanger 

Crane, Winthrop Murray 

Cummings, Henry Havelock 

Cummings, Mrs. Margaret Kimball 

*Currant, John Francis 

Curtis, Joseph Henry 

Cushing, Arthur Percy 

Dana, Arthur Payson 

Daniels, John Alden 

Davenport, Charles Milton 

Davis, George Peabody 

Davis, Harrison Merrill 

Dean, Charles Augustus 

Dennison, Herbert Elmer 

Dewick, Francis Augustine 

Dexter, George Blake 

Dexter, Gordon 

*Dodd, Horace 

Dolliver, Watson Shields 

Dowse, Charles Francis 

Driver, William Raymond 

Duff, John 

Dumaine, Frederic Christopher 

Dunne, Frank Lysaght 

Dupee, William Arthur 

Durell, Albert Benjamin 

Edwards, Francis Marshall 

Elder, Samuel James 

Eliot, Amory 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe 

Ellis, Augustus Hobart 

Ellis, Benjamin Peirce 

Ellis, Emmons Raymond 

Emerson, Robert Leonard 

Emmons, Mrs. Helen Brooks 

Everett, Franklin Chester 

Fairbank, John J. Mitchell 



* Deceased. 



9i 



Farley, William Thayer 

Farnsworth, Miss Alice 

Farrar, Frederick Albert 

Fay, Mrs. Margaret Welch 

Fay, William Rodman 

Fisk, Everett Olin 

Fisk, Otis Daniell 

Flagg, Elisha 

Fletcher, Ernest Boynton 

Flye, Louis Edwin 

Fobes, Edwin Francis 

Forbes, Allan 

Forbes, James Murray 

Foss, Granville Edward, Jr. 

Foster, Charles Henry Wheelwright 

Foster, Frederick 

Foster, John McGaw 

Francis, Nathaniel Atwood 

French, Arthur Burrage 
French, Wilfred Augustus 

Frenning, John Erasmus 

Friedman, Lee Max 

Fuller, Alfred Worcester 

*Gardner, George Augustus 

Gary, Frank Ephraim Herbert 

Gaskins, Frederick Alfred 

Gaston, William Alexander 

*Gay, Warren Fisher 

Goldsmith, Warren Henry 

Goodnow, Daniel 

Goodspeed, Charles Eliot 

Grafton, Harrie Craig 

Grant, Alexander Gait 

Gray, Miss Harriet 

Gray, Joseph Phelps 

Greene, Mrs. Charlotte Nichols 

Greenough, Malcolm Scollay 

Grew, Mrs. Jane 

Gulesian, Moses Hadji 

Hale, Philip 

Hall, Charles Wells 

Hall, Mrs. Evelyn Ames 

Hall, Thomas Hills 

Hallett, Daniel Bunker 

Hallett, William Russell 



Halsall, William Formby 
Hamlin, Charles Sumner 
Harrington, George Sumner 
Hart, Francis Russell 
Haskell, Alfred Tracy 
Hastings, Clifford Bicknell 
Hatch, Edward Augustus 
Hatfield, Charles Edwin 
Hathaway, Horatio 
Hayward, Charles Latham 
Henderson, James Dougald 
*Hersey, Charles Henry 
Hinckley, Henry Hersey 
Hitchcock, Edward Francis 
Hitchcock, Frank Tenney 

Hobbs, Samuel 

Hockley, Mrs. Amelia Daniell 

Hodgkin, William Heath 

*Hogg, John 

Holman, Dudley Moor 

Homans, Robert 

Homer, Charles Savage 

Hood, Frederic Clarke 

Hopkins, Mrs. Maria Theresa 

Houston, Francis Augustine 

Howard, Alfred Henry 

Howe, Henry Saltonstall 

Howe, Walter Clarke 

Howes, Mrs. Alice Maud 

Howland, Shepard 

Hubbard, James Mascarene 

Huckins, Harry 

Humphrey, Henry Bauer 

Hunneman, Carleton 

Huntoon, Edward James Baker 

Hutchinson, Henry 

Iasigi, Miss Mary Vitalis 

Inches, George Brimmer 

Jackson, Robert Tracy 

James, George Barker 

Jaques, Henry Percy 

*Jaques Herbert 

Jenkins, Charles 

Jenney, Bernard, Jr. 

Jernegan, Holmes Mayhew 



Deceased. 



92 



Jewell, Edward 
Johnson, Edward Crosby 
Jones, Fred Kinsman Mudge 
Jones, Ichabod Howland 
Jones, Mrs. Sarah Gavett 
Jones, Stephen Rosseter 
Jordan, Mrs. Helen Lincoln 
Judd, Mrs. Sarah Ann 
Kearns, William Francis 
Kelley, James Edward 
Kendall, Mrs. Harriott Magoun 
Kennedy, Miss Louise 
Kent, Prentiss Mellen 
Keyes, George Shepard 
Kimball, Edward Adams 
Kimball, Miss Helen Frances 
King, Daniel Webster 
Knapp, George Brown 
Knight, Clarence Howard 
Knight, Henry Francis 
Knowles, Winfield Scott 
Larcom, George Francis 
Larkin, William Harrison, Jr. 
Lauriat, Charles Emelius 
Lawrence, Amos Amory 
Lawrence, William 
Learned, Francis Mason 
Leatherbee, Charles William 
Lemon, Edward Rivers 
Lewis, John Beavens 
Lincoln, Albert Lamb 
* Lincoln, William Edwards 
Lincoln, William Henry 
Locke, Charles Augustus 
Locke, Isaac Henry 
Logue, Charles 
Longfellow, Miss Alice Mary 
Loomis, Elihu Goodman 
Lord, Charles Edward 
Lothrop, Lewis Waterbury 
Lovett, Augustus Sidney 
Lyman, George Hinckley 
Lyon, Frederick 
Macurda, William Everett 
Mann, Frank Chester 



Manning, Miss Abby Frances 
Mansfield, Henry Tucker 
Marcy, Charles De Witt 
Marvin, George Ritchie 
Marvin, Thomas Oliver 
Mason, Miss Fanny Peabody 
May, John Pierpont 
Maynard, Herbert 
McCallum, William Shaw 
McGlenen, Edward Webster 
Mclntire, Frederic May 
McKissock, William 
McLellan, Edward 
Mead, Edwin Doak 
Means, Charles Johnson 
Means, James 
Merriam, John McKinstry 
Merrill, Albert Brown 
Meyer, Miss Heloise 
Miller, John Ferdinand 
Minot, Laurence 
Mock, Emanuel Elias 
Monks, Frank Hawthorne 
Montague, David Thompson 
Moody, Mrs. Elizabeth Dana 
Morse, Robert McNeil 
Moseley, Charles William 
Moseley, Frank 
Moseley, Frederick Strong 
Munroe, James Phinney 
Murphy, Gardner Ellsworth 
Nash, Mrs. Bennett Hubbard 
Nash, Samuel Young 
Newell, James Montgomery 
Newhall, Charles Lyman 
Newhall, George Warren 
Nichols, Charles Eliot 
Nichols, Chester Wellington 
Nichols, Leonard Bailey 
Noyes, Frank Albert 
Noyes, Increase Eldredge 
Nute, Herbert Newell 
O'Brien, Edward Francis 
*OBrion, Thomas Leland 
O'Connell, Patrick Augustine 



* Deceased. 



93 



O'Connell, William Henry 
O'Meara, Stephen 
Osgood, Charles Edward 
Otis, Herbert Foster 
* Paine, Charles Jackson 
Palmer, Bradley Webster 
Park, Charles Edwards 
Parker, George Francis 
Parker, John Nelson 
Parsons, Miss Charlotte 
Peirson, Charles Lawrence 
Perkins, George Grindley Spence 
Perry, Mrs. Olive Augusta 
Peters, William York 
Phillips, Alexander VanCleve 
Pierce, Roscoe 
Pierce, Wallace Lincoln 
Piper, Henry Augustus 
Pollard, Frederick Henshaw 
Poor, Clarence Henry 
Poor, James Ridgway 
Pope, Ralph Linder 
Porter, Alexander Silvanus, Jr. 
Porter, John Lyman 
Powers, Walter Averill 
Pratt, Louis Mortimer 
Prince, Mrs. Lillian 
Putney, Henry Marshall 
Rand, Arnold Augustus 
Rand, Waldron Holmes 
Read, Charles French 
Read, William 
Reed, Alanson Henry 
Reed, Henry Beecher 
Reggio, Andre Carney 
Remick, Frank Woodbury 
Remick, John Anthony 
Remick, William Gordon 
Rice, David 
Rice, Fred Ball 
Rich, Mrs. Pauline Babo 
Rich, William Thayer 
Richards, Mrs. Ann Rebecca 
Richards, George Edward 
Ripley, Alfred Lawrence 



Ripley, Ebed Lincoln 
Robinson, Thomas Pendleton 
Rogers, Miss Susan Snow 
Ross, Mrs. Caroline Emily 
Rugg, Frederic Waldo 
Ruhl, Edward 
Russell, Andrew LeBaron 
Russell, Mrs. Frances Spofford 
Sanborn, Mrs. Caroline Frances 
Sanford, John Edward Menemon 
Sargent, Mrs. Aimee 
*Saunders, Daniel 
Savage, William Bowler 
Sawyer, Miss Mary Cummings 
Schaefer, Henry Thomas 
Schouler, James 
Schrafft, William Edward 
Scudder, Winthrop Saltonstall 
*Searle, Charles Putnam 
Sears, Richard 
Sears, William Richards 
Seaver, Benjamin Frank 
Sergeant, Charles Spencer 
Shannon, George Thomas 
Sharp, George Henry Loring 
Shaw, Francis 
*Shuman, Samuel 
Shurtleff, Miss Sarah 
Silsby, T Julian 
Skillings, David Nelson 
Smith, Benjamin Farnham 
Smith, Charles Card 
Smith, Charles Francis 
Smith, Edward Ephraim 
Snow, Charles Armstrong 
Somes, Dana Barry 
Soule, Horace Homer 
Sparhawk, Edward Epps 
Sprague, Mrs. Emeline Martha 
Sprague, Henry Harrison 
Stafford, Morgan Hewitt 
Staniford, Daniel 
Staunton, William Standford 
Stearns, Albert Henry 
Stearns, Albert Warren 



Deceased. 



94 



Stearns, Charles Henry 
Stearns, James Pierce 
Stevens, Francis Herbert 
Stevens, William Studley Bartlett 
Stevenson, Robert Hooper 
Storey, Moorfield 
Stratton, Charles Edwin 
Strong, Mrs. Mary Baker 
Sturgis, Richard Clipston 
*Sullivan, Mrs. Mary Emma 
Swan, George Arthur 
Sweet, Henry Nettleton 
Sylvester, Joseph Smith 
Tapley, Henry Fuller 
Thompson, Marshall Putnam 
Thorndike, Augustus Larkin 
Throckmorton, John Wakefield 

Francis 
Tobey, Rufus Babcock 
Trask, William Ropes 
Tuttle, Charles Henry 
Tuttle, Julius Herbert 
Underwood, Henry Oliver 
Vaughan, Henry Goodwin 
Vialle, Charles Augustus 
Vincent, Miss Susan Walker 
Wait, William Cushing 
Walker, John Ballantyne 
Walworth, Arthur Clarence 
Ward, Joseph Frederic 
Warren, Bentley Wirt 
Warren, Fiske 
Warren, Franklin Cooley 
Warren, George Copp 
Warren, Lucius Henry 
Warren, Mrs. Mabel Bayard 
*Warren, Mrs. Rebecca Bennett 



Webster, Mrs. Lizzie Florence 
Weeks, Warren Bailey Potter 
Wendte, Charles William 
West, Charles Alfred 
Weston, Thomas 
Wetherbee, Frederic Adolphus 
Wheeler, George Henry 
Wheeler, Henry 

White, Miss Gertrude Richardson 
Whitney, Benjamin 
Whitney, Richard Skinner 
Whittemore, John Quincy Adams 
Whittier, Albert Rufus 
Whitwell, Frederick Silsbee 
Wiggin, Charles Edward 
Wilder, Frank Jones 
Wiles, Thomas Linwood 
Willett, George Franklin 
Williams, Arthur, Jr. 
Williams, David Weld 
Williams, Moses 
Williamson, Robert Warden 
Winthrop, Thomas Lindal! 
Wolf, Bernard Mark 
Wood, Arthur Goodwin 
Wood, Irving 
Woods, Joseph Fitz 
Woodward, Charles Francis 
Woodward, Frank Ernest 
Woodworth, Elijah Burghardt 
Wright, Charles Pierce 
Wright, George Sumner 
*Wyeth, Edwin Augustus 
*Wyeth, Herbert Francis 
Wyman, Frank Wheelock 
Wyman, Henry Augustus 
Young, William Hill 



* Deceased. 



No. 1 44 1. 



tHommontDcaltli of ittassacbusctte 



2fo it Clnobjn that whereas Thomas C. Amory, Curtis Guild, 
John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, Samuel M. Quincy, Wil- 
liam S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, Henry F. Jenks, John 
T. Hassam, and Dudley R. Child, have associated themselves 
with the intention of forming a corporation under the name of 

dje 2>c3toman ^odetp, 

for the purpose of promoting the study of the history of Boston, 
and the preservation of its antiquities, and have complied with the 
provisions of the Statutes of this Commonwealth in such case made 
and provided, as appears from the certificate of the President, 
Treasurer and Directors of said corporation, duly approved by the 
Commissioner of Corporations and recorded in this office ; 

J^Oh), (QtfytVZlQVt, 51, Henry B. Peirce, Secretary of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, bo fytvtbp tcrttfp that said Thomas C. 
Amory, Curtis Guild, John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, 
Samuel M. Quincy, William S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, 
Henry F. Jenks, John T. Hassam and Dudley R. Child, 
their associates and successors, are legally organized and estab- 
lished as and are hereby made an existing corporation under the 
name of 

(Qlfyz 2£o£tonian J>octetp 

with the powers, rights and privileges and subject to the limita- 
tions, duties and restrictions, which by law, appertain thereto. 



T©ltn£2>S> my official signature hereunto 
subscribed and the seal of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts hereunto affixed, this second 
day of December, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty one. 

[Signed] 

HENRY B. PEIRCE, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. 




THE BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 



ORGANIZED TO PROMOTE THE STUDY OF THE HISTORY OF BOSTON 
AND THE PRESERVATION OF ITS ANTIQUITIES. 

BY-LAWS. 

I. 

OBJECTS. 

It shall be the duty of members, so far as may be in their power, to 
carry out the objects of the Society, by collecting, by gift, loan or pur- 
chase, books, manuscripts, and pictures, and by such other suitable means 
as may from time to time seem expedient. 

II. 

MEMBERS. 

The members of the Bostonian Society shall be such persons, either 
resident or non-resident in Boston, as shall be elected to membership. 
Election shall be made by ballot by the Board of Directors at any reg- 
ular or special meeting. 

III. 

HONORARY AND CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

Honorary and Corresponding members shall be nominated by the 
Directors, and shall be elected by ballot by two-thirds of the members 
present and voting. They may take part in the meetings of the Society, 
but shall not be entitled to vote. 

IV. 

ADMISSION FEE AND ASSESSMENTS. 

Each member shall pay five dollars at the time of his or her admis- 
sion, and five dollars each first day of January afterwards, into the treas- 
ury of the Society for its general purposes ; provided, however, that no 
person joining the Society on or after the first day of October in any 
year shall be required to pay an additional assessment for the year com- 
mencing on the first day of January following. 

If any member shall neglect to pay his or her admission fee or annual 
assessment, for three months after the same is due, he or she shall be 
liable to forfeit his or her membership at any time when the Directors 
shall so order. 



97 

The payment of the sum of thirty dollars in any one year by any 
member of the Society shall constitute him or her a life member of the 
Society ; life members shall be free from assessments, and entitled to all 
the rights and privileges of annual members. The money received for 
such life membership shall constitute a fund, of which not more than 
twenty per cent., together with the annual income, shall be spent in any 

one year. 

V. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Certificates, signed by the President and the Clerk, shall be issued to 
all persons who have become life members of the Society. 

VI. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be held on the third Tuesday 
in January, and regular meetings shall be held on the third Tuesday of 
every month, excepting June, July, August and September, at such time 
and place as the Directors shall appoint. Special meetings shall be 
called by the Clerk, under the instruction of the Directors. 

At all meetings ten members shall be a quorum for business. All 
Committees shall be appointed by the Chair, unless otherwise ordered. 

Any business which has not been acted on by the Directors, shall be 
referred to them without debate, at the request of any member present. 

VII. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers of the Society shall consist of a President, Vice-Pres- 
ident and seven other Directors, a Clerk and a Treasurer. 

The Directors, Clerk and Treasurer shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meeting in January, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
others are duly elected in their stead. The President and Vice-President 
shall be elected by the Board of Directors from their number. The 
offices of Clerk and Treasurer may be held by the same person. 

VIII. 

VACANCIES. 

Any vacancies in the offices of the Society may be filled for the re- 
mainder of their term by the Board of Directors, at any regular meeting, 
to serve until the next annual meeting of the Society. In the absence 
of the Clerk at any meeting, a Clerk pro tempore shall be chosen for 

that meeting. 

IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

At the monthly meeting in December, a Nominating Committee of 
five persons shall be appointed, who shall report at the annual meeting 
a list of candidates for the places to be filled. 



9 8 



PRESIDING OFFICER. 

The President, or in his absence the Vice-President, shall preside at 
all meetings. In the absence of both, a President pro tempore shall be 
chosen from the Board of Directors. 

XI. 

DUTIES OF THE CLERK. 

The Clerk shall be sworn to the faithful discharge of his duties. 

He shall notify all meetings of the Society. He shall keep an exact 
record of all the proceedings of the meetings of the Society, and of its 
Directors. 

He shall conduct the general correspondence of the Society, and 
place on file all letters received. 

He shall enter the names of members systematically in books kept 
for the purpose, and issue certificates of life membership. 

The Clerk shall have such charge of all property in the possession of 
the Society as may from time to time be delegated to him by the Board 
of Directors. 

He shall acknowledge each loan or gift that may be made to and 
accepted in behalf of the Society. 

XII. 

DUTIES OF THE TREASURER. 

The Treasurer shall collect all moneys due to the Society, and pay 
all bills against the Society, when approved by the Board of Directors. 

He shall keep a full account of the receipts and expenditures in a 
book belonging to the Society, which shall always be open to the inspec- 
tion of the Directors ; and at the annual meeting in January he shall 
make a written report of all his doings for the year preceding. 

The Treasurer shall give bond in the sum of one hundred dollars, 
with one surety, for the faithful discharge of his duties. 

XIII. 

DUTIES AND POWERS OF DIRECTORS. 

The Directors shall superintend and conduct the prudential and ex- 
ecutive business of the Society; shall authorize all expenditures of 
money; fix all salaries; provide a common seal; receive and act upon 
all resignations and forfeitures of membership, and see that the By-Laws 
are duly complied with. 

The Directors shall have full power to comply with the terms of the 
lease of the rooms in the Old State House, made with the City of Boston, 
and to make all necessary rules and regulations required in the premises. 



99 

They shall annually, in the month of April, make a careful compar- 
ison of the articles in the possession of the Society with the list to be 
returned to the City of Boston under the terms of the lease, and certify 
to its correctness. 

They shall make a report of their doings at the annual meeting of 
the Society. 

The Directors may, from time to time, appoint such sub-committees 
as they deem expedient. 

XIV. 

MEETINGS OF THE DIRECTORS. 

Regular meetings of the Directors shall be held on the day previous 
to the regular meetings of the Society, at an hour to be fixed by the 
President. Special meetings of the Directors shall be held in such 
manner as they may appoint ; and a majority shall constitute a quorum 
for business. 

XV. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint two 
Directors, who, with the President, shall constitute the Committee of 
Finance, to examine from time to time, the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer ; to audit his accounts at the close of the year, and to report 
upon the expediency of proposed expenditures of money. 

XVI. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint six 
standing committees (of which the Clerk of the Society shall be a mem- 
ber ex-officio), as follows : — 

Committee on the Rooms. 
A committee of seven members, to be called the Committee on the 
Rooms, of which the President of the Society shall be a member ex-officio, 
who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the Rooms (except 
books, manuscripts, and other objects appropriate to the Library, offered 
as gifts or loans) ; the hanging of pictures, and the general arrangement 
of the Society's collections in their department. 

Committee on Papers. 
A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Papers, who shall have charge of the subject of Papers to be read, or 
other exercises of a like nature, at the monthly meetings of the Society. 



IOO 



Committee on Member ship. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Membership, whose duty it shall be to give information in relation to 
the purposes of the Society, and increase its membership. 

Committee on the Library. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee 
on the Library, who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the 
Library, including the acceptance or rejection, of all books, manuscripts, 
and other objects appropriate to the Library, offered as gifts or loans, 
and the general arrangement of the Society's collections in their depart- 
ment. 

Committee on Publications. 

A committee of four or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Publications, who shall have charge of all the Publications of the 
Society. 

Committee on Memorials. 

A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Memorials, who shall have charge of such Memorials as the Society 
may vote to erect. 

These six committees shall perform the duties above set forth, under 
the general supervision of the Directors. 

Vacancies which may occur in any of these committees during their 
term of service shall be filled by the President. 

XVII. 

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS. 

Amendments to the By-Laws may be made, at any annual meeting, 
by vote of two-thirds of the members present and voting. They may 
also be made by the like vote at any regular meeting, provided notice of 
the same be contained in a call for such meeting issued by the Clerk, 
and sent to every member. 



PROCEEDINGS 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 




VOLUME VIII. 



*•• 









V 



1918 — 1922 



BOSTON 

OLD STATE HOUSE. 

Published by the Society. 



\/flL., 8 ft- ( ) 







: 



10, 




\0\ v^ 






PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



AT THE 



ANNUAL MEETING, JANUARY 15, 1918. 




THE MONUMENT TO THE CHEVALIER DE SAINT-SAUVEUR. 
KING'S CHAPEL, BOSTON 



PROCEEDINGS 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



Annual Meeting, January 15, 1918. 




BOSTON: 

OLD STATE HOUSE. 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 

M C M XVIII. 



CONTENTS 



I. Annual Report of the Directors. By The 
President ...... 

II. Report of the Committee on the Rooms 

III. Additions to the Society's Collections 

IV. Report of the Committee on the Library 

V. Additions to the Society's Library 

VI. Report of the Committee on Publications 

VII. Report of the Committee on Memorials 

VIII. Report of the Committee on Finance. 

IX. Report of the Treasurer 

X. Special Funds ..... 

XL Report of the Committee on Nominations 

XII. " The Memorial to the Chevalier de Saint 
Sauveur," by Fitz- Henry Smith, Jr. 

XIII. Officers since Organization 

XIV. Officers for 1918 

XV. Membership List 

XVI. Charter . 

XVII. By-Laws . 

XVIII. Form of Bequest 



l 6 

17 

J 9 
2 1 

2 3 
2 5 
26 
27 
29 
3° 

3 1 
59 
60 
61 
81 
82 

87 



Committee on Publications 



John W. Farwell 
Albert Matthews 



Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
James M. Hunnewell 



The Clerk 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 




THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL MEETING 



■^HE Thirty-seventh Annual Meeting of the 
Bostonian Society was held in the Council 
Chamber of the Old State House, Boston, 
on Tuesday, January 15, 1918, at 3 P. M., 
in accordance with a notice mailed to every 
member. The President, Grenville H. Nor- 
cross, occupied the chair. 

The records of the last monthly meeting were read and 
approved, and the following Reports were presented. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS 

To the Members of the Bostonian Society : — 

Your Directors have the honor of presenting their Annual 
Report for the past year : — 

MEMBERSHIP. 

At the close of the year there were in the Society : 

Honorary Members .... 3 

Life Members ..... 663 

Annual Members .... 477 



Making a total of . . 1,143 

A comparison of this record with that of one year ago, 
shows that the Society has gained seven members. 



An analysis of the Membership rolls shows the following 
changes : — 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of 1916 . 
Added by election 

Making the present number 



LIFE MEMBERS. 




There were at the close of 19 16 . 


• 659 


Gain by election and transfer 


29 


Making ..... 


. 688 


Loss by death .... 


25 


Making the present number 


• 663 


ANNUAL MEMBERS. 




There were at the close of 19 16 . 


• 474 


Gain by election 


36 


Making ..... 


. 510 


Loss by death, transfer, resignation, 


etc. 33 



Making the present number 



477 



MONTHLY MEETINGS. 

During the year the following papers have been read 
before the Society at its Monthly Meetings, in the Council 
Chamber : 

January^: Annual Meeting. Annual Reports of the 
President, the Treasurer, and the various Committees. Also 
" In Whaling Days " ; by George Fox Tucker. 

February 20 : " How the Town of Boston grew in Three 
Centuries " ; illustrated by lantern slides, by Walter K. 
Watkins. 



March 20 : " The Career of a Charlestown Boy ; Thomas 
Starr King " ; by Rev. Charles W. Wendte, D. D. 

April 17: "The Eight Military Companies of Boston"; 
by Worthington C. Ford. 

May 15 : " The History and Fighting of Fires in Boston " ; 
illustrated by lantern slides ; by Deputy Chief Daniel F. Sen- 
nott and Captain John Galway of the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment. 

October 16 : " Selwyn's and the Old Globe " ; illustrated 
by lantern slides ; by John Bouv£ Clapp. 

November 20 : "The Very Beginnings of Boston " ; by Rev. 
Frederick B. Allen. 

December 18: "The Chevalier de Saint Sauveur " ; by 
Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

NECROLOGY. 

During the past year we have learned of the deaths of the 
following members of the Society. 

Died in 191 5. 

Charles Breckenridge Peabody, born in Zanesville, Ohio, 
September 24, 1840, died in Colorado Springs, Colo., De- 
cember 15. 

Died in 1916. 

Frank Herbert Damon, born in South Scituate, June 10, 
1854, died in Melrose, June 19. 

Died in 19 17. 

John Hogg, born in Milnathort, Scotland, August 8, 182S, 
died in Boston, January 3. 

Charles Francis Withington, born in Brookline, August 
21, 1852, died in Boston, January 7. 

William Edwards Lincoln, born in Boston, July 17, 1842, 
died in Brookline, January 8. 

Charles Putnam Searle, born in New Marlboro, July 21, 
1854, died in Boston, January 17. 



Crawford Carter Allen, born in Providence, R. I., June 20, 
1 861, died in Newport, R. I., January 18. 

George Davis Dodd, born in Boston, June 28, 1825, died 
in Boston, January 29. 

Nathaniel Johnson Rust, born in Gorham, Me., November 
28, 1833, died in Boston, February 5. 

Josiah Henry Benton, born in Addison, Vt., August 4, 
1843, died in Boston, February 6. 

Henry Hastings, born in Medford, December 31, 1857, 
died in Brookline, February 9. 

Horace Dodd, born in Boston, November 2, 1835, died in 
Brookline, February 12. 

Mrs. Frances Henrietta Tompkins, born in Boston, No- 
vember 13, 1824, died in Boston, February 24. 

Edward Glines, born in Somerville, August 1, 1849, died 
in Somerville, March 1. 

Edwin Augustus Wyeth, born in Philadelphia, Pa., No- 
vember 21, 1840, died in Boston, March 5. 

Mrs. Anna Coffin Ames, born in Nantucket, February 1 1, 
1840, died in Boston, March 11. 

William James Seaver, born in Boston, March 14, 1836, 
died in Brookline, March 19. 

Samuel Shuman, born in Schneidermuhl, Germany, Octo- 
ber 18, 1844, died in Pasadena, Cal., March 24. 

Miss Sarah Haskell Crocker, born in Boston, September 
8, 1840, died in Boston, March 31. 

Thomas Leland OBrion, born in Portland, Me., December 
10, 1843, died in Brighton, April 12. 

Daniel Saunders, born in Andover, October 6, 1822, died 
in Lawrence, April 19. 

Mrs. Sarah Melville Hunnewell, born in Boston, January 3, 
185 1, died in Boston, April 24. 

Frederic Luther Felton, born in Boston, September 9, 
1848, died in West Newton, April 25. 

Franklin Lawrence Joy, born in Boston, October 15, 1857, 
died in Boston, May 12. 



Francis Henry Brown, born in Boston, August 8, 1835, 
died in Boston, May 16. 

Holmes Mayhew Jernegan, born in Edgartown, August 3, 
1846, died in Boston, May 30. 

Herbert Francis Wyeth, born in Cambridge, June 27, 1878, 
died in Cambridge, June 11. 

Alfred Usher Prescott, born in Lexington, January 30, 
1841, died in Charlestown, June 22. 

Henry Lyon Hall, born in Dorchester, April 3, 1874, died 
in Boston, June 27. 

Charles Savage Homer, born in Boston, April 5, 1834, 
died in West Townsend, August 12. 

Charles Francis Smith, born in Charlestown, July 3, 1832, 
died in Brookline, September 7. 

George Gardner Hall, born in Bristol, R. I., November 16, 
1843, died in Portsmouth, R. I., September 21. 

Arthur Fuller Luke, born in Cambridge, June 29, 1853, 
died in Boston, September 29. 

Moses Greeley Parker, born in Dracut, October 12, 1842, 
died in Lowell, October 1. 

John Lincoln Barry, born in Boston, June 10, 1854, died 
in Newton Centre, October 1 1 . 

George Abbott James, born in Zanesville, Ohio, Sept. 13, 

1838, died in Nahant, October 13. 

George Vasmer Leverett, born in Charlestown, February 

16, 1846, died in Boston, October 18. 

Mrs. Susan Prescott Clapp, born in Boston, January 28, 

1839, died in Boston, October 26. 

Mrs. Lillian Prince, born in Roxbury, September 13, 1847, 
died in Boston, October 30. 

Prentiss Mellen Kent, born in Concord, N. H., August 

17, 1837, died in Boston, November 1. 

Arnold Augustus Rand, born in Boston, March 25, 1837, 
died in Brookline, December 23. 

John Bordman, born in Charlestown, October 27, 1845, 
died in Concord, December 27. 



IO 

Messrs. Allen, Barry, Brown, Dodd, Felton, Glines, George 
Gardner Hall, Henry Lyon Hall, Hastings, James, Joy, 
Leverett, Luke, Parker, Peabody, Prescott, Rust, Seaver 
and Withington, Mrs. Ames, Mrs. Hunnewell, Mrs. Tomp- 
kins and Miss Crocker were life members. Messrs. Benton, 
Damon, Dodd, Hogg, Homer, Jernegan, Kent, Lincoln, 
OBrion, Rand, Saunders, Searle, Shuman, Smith, Edwin 
Augustus Wyeth and Herbert Francis Wyeth, Mrs. Clapp 
and Mrs. Prince were annual members. 

Our Director, Dr. Francis Henry Brown, on his way to 
church on Sunday morning, May 13th, was struck by an elec- 
tric car in front of his residence, The Buckminster, on 
Beacon Street, and taken to the Boston City Hospital, where 
he died without recovering consciousness, on Wednesday, 
May 1 6th, in his 82nd year. He had taken great interest in 
this Society, serving as a Director since 191 1 and as Chair- 
man of the Committee on the Library since 19 10. Dr. 
Brown was graduated at Harvard College in the famous class 
of 1857, of which he was the Class Secretary, and he was 
greatly interested in many medical, charitable, historical and 
patriotic societies, especially in anything connected with 
Harvard College. Your President and Clerk and many of 
the Directors and members attended his funeral at the Second 
Church on May 19th. 

At the October meeting of the Society, the following res- 
olution, which had been adopted by the Directors on May 
22nd, was presented by Vice-President Manning, and was 
adopted by a rising vote : 

Whereas, Almighty God has called our friend and associate, Dr. 
Francis H. Brown, from this world ; and 

Whereas, we, The Directors of the Bostonian Society are assem- 
bled at a special meeting called by the President upon this 22nd 
day of May, 19 17, to take suitable action upon the death of our 
associate. 



1 1 

Resolved, That while we bow to the will of Divine Providence, 
we realize that in the death of Dr. Francis Henry Brown, the 
Bostonian Society has lost a wise counsellor and a sincere friend, 
whose work as a director and as the chairman of the Library Com- 
mittee for many years, has been a help and inspiration to the 
Society. We are grateful that his life was prolonged beyond the 
allotted threescore years and ten, active and vigorous to the last, 
and that he has left us sweet and tender memories. 

Dr. Brown was always courteous in manner, conscientious in his 
work, faithful and true as a citizen, filling many positions of trust 
with honor. His death is a distinct loss to the community. 

Resolved, That we tender to his family our heartfelt sympathy 
and forward them a copy of these resolutions ; that this action 
shall be spread on our records, and that the resolutions be read at 
the next meeting of the Society. 

The vacancy in the Board of Directors caused by the 
death of Dr. Brown, was filled by the election of Mr. Fred- 
erick Wesley Parker. 

Colonel Henry Hastings, who died on February 9th had 
given to this Society the contents of the Hastings Room in 
memory of his father; — a remarkable exhibit of old time 
Boston ships and shipping. 

Mrs. Hunnewell, who died on April 24th was the widow of 
James Frothingham Hunnewell, former President of the So- 
ciety, and with her son, the giver of the fund in his memory. 

The Bay State Historical League held three meetings dur- 
ing the year — at Brookline on February 24th, at West Med- 
way with the Med way Historical Society on June 23d, and at 
Roxbury, October 20th. At the annual meeting in June, 
your President was re-elected a member of the Executive 
Committee. 

On Wednesday, March 14th, the Harrison Gray Otis house 
on Lynde Street, near Cambridge Street, was opened as the 
headquarters of the Society for the preservation of New 
England Antiquities, and your President, Dr. Brown, Mr. 
Watkins, and many members were present. 



12 



On May 24th the monument in memory of the Chevalier 
de Saint Sauveur near King's Chapel was unveiled by Gov- 
ernor McCall and exercises were held in King's Chapel. The 
historical address was given by our Director, Fitz-Henry 
Smith, Jr., and remarks were made by the Governor, who 
presided, Mayor Curley, and Major Azan of the French 
Army. Our Director, Courtenay Guild was Chairman of 
the Commission appointed by the Governor to erect the mon- 
ument, the other members being your President and Messrs. 
Robert S. Peabody and J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr. Mr. A. 
W. Longfellow made the design and acted as architect for 
the Commission. Mr. Smith repeated his address with ad- 
ditions at the December meeting of the Society, and the ex- 
ercises are to be printed in the Proceedings of this Annual 
Meeting. 

On Monday, November 5th, a doorway in First Church 
in memory of Thomas Hutchinson, Provincial Governor of 
Massachusetts Bay, was dedicated by the Colonial Society 
of Massachusetts, Prof. James Kendall Hosmer making the 
principal address. This Society was represented by the 
President and Clerk and many other members. On Novem- 
ber 2 1 st your President was a guest at the Twenty-fifth 
Anniversary Dinner, of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 
at the Algonquin Club. 

On the anniversary of the birth of Bishop Phillips Brooks, 
December 13th, a memorial tablet at the site of his birthplace 
in High Street was unveiled by Bishop Lawrence. Mr. Minot 
and the Clerk represented this Society as delegates. 

In accordance with custom on the Fourth of July the Dec- 
laration of Independence was read from the State Street bal- 
cony by James M. Curley, Jr., and from 12 o'clock noon to 
half past twelve on Monday, December 24th, Christmas 
music, hymns and songs were played on the balcony by a 
quartette of trumpeters from the Boston Cadet Band. 
For the Directors, 

Grenville H. Norcross, 
December 31, igij. President. 



13 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ROOMS 

The Committee on the Rooms herewith reports for the 
year 191 7. 

By the following letter to the Clerk from Mr. George B. 
Dexter, a member, the Wyman Collection of Relics, which 
has been loaned to the Society for many years, became its 
property. 

Boston, Mass., Nov. 12, 19 17. 
Mr. Charles F. Read, 

Clerk of the Bostonian Society, 

Dear Mr. Read : 

The Wyman Collection of Revolutionary Relics at the Old State 
House, among which is the gun and the powder horn, with the 
original powder which Elijah Wyman of Woburn carried to the 
Battle of Lexington on April 19, 1775, I hereby give to the 
Bostonian Society as a memorial to James Gresham of Evansville, 
Indiana, the first United States soldier to fall in battle on the 
Field of France. 

Yours truly, 

George B. Dexter. 

The Wyman Collection, which is exhibited in Whitmore 
Hall, is probably the most celebrated one of Revolutionary 
relics in the United States and contains, besides the gun, 
powder horn and powder, already referred to, the blue home- 
spun swallowtail coat of Elijah Wyman and numerous hats 
and bonnets, as well as pewter, brass and china used by the 
Wyman family. 

By this generous gift, the heroic past is linked to the 
heroic present and it will be a reminder to all visitors in the 
future to the Old State House of James Gresham, the first 
soldier of the United States of America to give his life on the 
Field of France. 

Mr. Frank Gair Macomber, a member, has given to the 
Society five original copperplate engravings issued during the 
American Revolution. Their titles are : 



M 

i st. "A View of Boston, 1776, taken on the Road to 
Dorchester, drawn by W. Pierrie." 

2nd. " A Chart of the Harbor of Boston compiled from 
the different surveys but principally from that taken in 1776 
by Mr. George Callendar, late master of H. M. Ship Romney." 

3rd. " A reference to the foregoing chart, showing topo- 
graphical details." 

4th and 5th. Charts of Boston Harbor and Massachusetts 
Bay, respectively, made by J. F. Des Barries in 1781. 

An oil portrait of Benjamin Austin, of Boston, 1752-1820, 
has come to the Society by the will of Rev. James I. T. 
Coolidge, D. D., of Cambridge. It is attributed to Green- 
wood, proprietor of the New England Museum, and a copy 
was exhibited in the Museum in a collection of portraits of 
eminent Bostonians. The following letter was received from 
Mr. Walter Deane when the painting came into the posses- 
sion of the Society : 

In accordance with the will of Rev. James I. T. Coolidge, of 
Cambridge, Mass., dated June 28, 1907, the oil painting of Ben- 
jamin Austin by Greenwood, passes to the Bostonian Society. Dr. 
Coolidge died June 18, 1913. Benjamin Austin was his grand- 
father. The portrait passed to Dr. Coolidge's daughter, Marga- 
ret C. Deane (Mrs. Walter Deane), till her death, which occurred 
March 22, 1917. 

At my request Dr. Coolidge wrote the following statement in 
May, 1908 : 

"I have always understood that Mr. Greenwood, Proprietor of 
the Boston Museum, when it was located on Court Street between 
Brattle Street and Cornhill, undertook to paint the portraits of 
certain of the most prominent men of Boston — among them that 
of Benjamin Austin — to be placed in the Museum. This in my 
possession is the original, a copy of which hung in the gallery of 
the Museum for many years. What became of it I do not know. 
Mine has descended to me direct from my mother, Eliza Austin 
Coolidge, the daughter of said Austin." 

This painting was in the possession of Mrs. Benjamin Austin 
after her husband's death. She lived with her son-in-law, Charles 



15 

Dawes Coolidge, and his wife Eliza Austin, the father and mother 
of Dr. J. I. T. Coolidge, and Dr. Coolidge remembered the por- 
trait among his earliest recollections. On the death of Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Austin the portrait remained in the family of Charles Dawes 
Coolidge, and when they broke up house-keeping not long after 
Dr. J. I. T. Coolidge was married, Dr. Coolidge took the portrait, 
which remained in his possession till his death. 

I was able after considerable search to trace and finally to see 
the copy of this portrait. It hung for a good while, as before 
stated, in the old museum, and in time came into the possession 
of Hon. Arthur Williams Austin, first cousin, twice removed, to 
Benjamin Austin, the subject of the portrait. He was a graduate 
of Harvard College with the Class of 1825, and died in 1884. He 
willed the portrait to the City of Boston, and James Walker Austin, 
as administrator, presented it to the City. It now hangs in the 
Alderman's Room, City Hall, School Street, where I saw it on 
June 12, 1908. 

Walter Deane, 

Executor of the Estate of Margaret C. Deane. 

June 1, 19 1 7. 

We have received five silver school medals, of which inter- 
esting relics, the Society has a large collection. Two are 
inscribed respectively, "Maria Pratt, 1839" and "Emily G. 
Pratt, 1843" and are the gift of Miss Mindora Kennedy. 
From the Estate of Miss Helen G. Stevens we have received 
two medals : one heartshaped is inscribed on one side, "Wells 
School " and on the other side " C. W. to E. O. L." [Elizabeth 
Olivia (Lane) Stevens]. The other is in the shape of a Mal- 
tese cross and is inscribed on one side "Improvement" and on 
the other side " C. H. to E. O. L." [Elizabeth Olivia (Lane) 
Stevens]. The initials C. H. are for Miss Caroline Hastings 
who kept a private school early in the nineteenth century. 
Miss Katherine Kimball and Miss Maud O. Kimball have 
given a medal inscribed Catherine O. Fullam, 1849. 

Miss Ellen Bullard has given to the Society a plaster bust 
of Theodore Lyman, Mayor of Boston in 1834 and 1S35. 



i6 

The President has given us the book " Pickerings Reports" 
which was in the law library of Daniel Webster and bears his 
autograph. This is an interesting addition to the Webster 
Relics in the Collections of the Society. 

Miss Hetty B. Williams has loaned to the Collections an 
oil painting by the artist J. Wells Champney, showing the 
ruins of the Great Boston Fire. The scene depicted is on 
Washington Street at the head of Franklin Street, and it was 
painted on the Monday after the fire. 

During the present year, the Society, through the Com- 
mittee, has received the sum of $181.34 from the sale of 
prints and souvenirs, and there has been expended for the 
purchase of prints and souvenirs and for the care of the 
rooms $505.71. 

For the Committee, 
Francis H. Manning, Joseph G. Minot, 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr., Henry W. Cunningham, 

COURTENAY GUILD, THE PRESIDENT, and 

The Clerk, cx-officiis. 

Charles F. Read, 
December SI, 1917- Clerk. 



17 



ADDITIONS BY GIFT AND LOAN 
TO THE SOCIETY'S COLLECTIONS, 1917. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Anonymous. 
Brooks, Charles B. 

Bruce, Webster 

Bullard, Miss Ellen 

Comstock, William 
O. 

Dean, Mrs. Walter, 

Estate of 
Jenks, Miss Mary 

F. 

Kennedy, MissMin- 
dora 

Kimball, TheMisses 
Katherine and 
Maud O. 

Kimball, MissKath- 
erine 

Kneeland, Benjamin 
C. R. 

Macomber, Frank 
Gair 



Polished piece of elm wood, bearing the inscrip- 
tion on a silver plate, " The Old Elm, Boston 
Common, i860. " 

Ticket of admission to a Festival of the Sons of 
Liberty, Boston Common, August 14, 1773; 
printed on a playing card the Queen of Dia- 
monds. 

Gilt buttons showing the St. Memin head of 
Washington ; cast from the original die. 

Plaster bust of Theodore Lyman, Mayor of Bos- 
ton, 1833 and 1834. 

Steel portrait of Dr. John Warren, 1753-1815, 
inscribed under fac -simile of autograph, "sur- 
geon and physician directing the hospital, 1 783." 

Oil portrait of Benjamin Austin, 1 752-1 820. 

Lock of Charles Sumner's hair in a minature 
gold case made in the shape of a book ; once 
owned by Miss Caroline M. Fitch. 

Two Boston school medals : one awarded to 
Maria Pratt, 1839, the other to Emily G. Pratt, 
1843. 

Boston school medal awarded to Catherine O. 
Fullam, 1849. 

Brass knocker formerly on the Edward Carncs' 
Homestead, Bowdoin Square, once owned by 
Gov. James Sullivan. 

Photograph of an oil portrait of George Reed, 
"Old Reed" 17 — 1843; a Boston constable, 
1 809-1 839. 

Five original copper plate engravings of the Rev- 
olutionary period. 



i8 



DESCRIPTION. 



Norcross, Grenville 
H. 



Stevens, Miss Hel- 
en G., Estate of 



Taylor, Charles H. 
Jr. 



Taylor, William O. 
Wellman, Arthur H. 



Williams, Miss Het- 
ty B. (A Loan) 



Collection of photographs of the West Church 
and of Rev. Cyrus A. Bartol, D.D., 1 813-1900. 
Document relating to the excise on tea ; dated 
January 7, 1762. Letter recommending Capt. 
Samuel Derby as Naval agent, dated Novem- 
ber 22, 1824 and signed by one hundred and 
twenty-eight prominent citizens of Boston. Bel- 
gian war medal. Book from the law library of 
Daniel Webster and bearing his autograph. 

Heart shaped medal inscribed on one side "Wells 
School " and on the other side " C. W. to E. O. 
L." Maltese cross shaped medal inscribed on 
one side " Improvement" and on the other side 
» C. H. to E. O. L." 

Water color drawing of Engine 8, Boston Fire 
Department. Steel plate showing service of 
foremen of Prison Engine No. 7, Court St. 
Boston; described with illustration, in "Bray- 
ley's History of the Boston Fire Department," 
p. 42. 

Oil painting, view of Boston from Chelsea. 

Group photograph of the Winthrop Club ; com- 
posed of Boston Congregational ministers ; 
photograph made about 1865. 

View of the ruins of the Great Boston Fire, Nov. 
9, 1872; painted at the corner of Washington 
and Franklin Sts., by J. Wells Champney, Nov. 
11, 1872. 



19 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY. 

The Committee on the Library desires to express in this 
annual report the great loss it has sustained in the death of 
Dr. Francis H. Brown, who was for many years a member 
and for several years chairman of the Committee. 

At a special meeting of the Committee held on May 23, 
19 1 7, the following resolution, which was offered by Mr. 
Walter K. Watkins, was adopted by a rising vote : 

Francis Henry Brown, who was born in Boston, 8 August, 1835, 
and died in Boston, 16 May, 191 7, in the eighty-second year of 
his age, inherited an interest in the traditions and history of his 
native city. Educated in the Boston Public Latin School and 
Harvard College, he early engaged in literary pursuits, relating to 
the medical profession in which he was active both as a civilian 
and as a surgeon in the Civil War. 

His work in the Boston Public Library, the Boston Medical 
Library and the American Library Association enhanced the value 
of his membership in the Committee on the Library of the Bos- 
tonian Society during his service of twenty-one years as member 
and chairman. 

In his death the Committee realize a great loss to the Society, 
and will miss his experienced advice and genial presence. 

It is gratifying that the children of Dr. Brown have placed 
in the Library as a memorial, the publication entitled " Uni- 
versities and their Sons." This important work, in five vol- 
umes, contains the histories of Harvard, Yale, Columbia and 
Princeton Universities and biographies of their distinguished 
alumni. As Dr. Brown assisted largely in the compilation of 
the Harvard volume, the memorial is a fitting one. 

The Committee has purchased from the income of the 
James Lyman Whitney Library Fund, the book entitled 
" Historic Silver of the Colonies and its Makers." The au- 
thor, Francis H. Bigelow, is well qualified to tell us of the 
beautiful handicraft of the silversmiths of the American Col- 
onies. At the present time such silver is counted among the 



20 

chief treasures of many American households, not only for its 
beauty of form but for its ancestral value. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has given the Li- 
brary, through the office of the Secretary of State, the Vital 
Records to 1850 of the Massachusetts cities and towns of 
Chelsea, Gloucester, Granville, Greenfield, Salem and Ux- 
bridge. 

Among other books placed in the Library are " The Life 
and Works of Winslow Homer," the distinguished artist, the 
" Correspondence of William Shirley, Governor of the Prov- 
ince of Massachusetts Bay," and the "Records of the Church 
in Milton from 1681 to 1784," reproduced in fac-simile. 

During the year 75 volumes and 39 pamphlets have been 
added to the Library and the sum of $42.40 has been ex- 
pended for its maintenance. 

For the Committee, 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., Edward P. Merritt, 

Walter K. Watkins, John Woodbury, 

William G. Shillaber, The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December ^I, I 9 I 7- Clerk. 



21 



ADDITIONS TO THE SOCIETY'S LIBRARY, 1917. 





Vol- 


Pam- 


Donors. 








umes. 


phlets. 


Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co. 




1 


Baker, Ezra H. ...... 


1 




Boston Athenaeum ...... 


1 




Boston, City of ...... 


2 




Boston Public Library ..... 




4 


Boston Public Works Department 


1 




Boston Transit Commission .... 


1 




Brookline Historical Society .... 




1 


Brown, Francis H., Estate of ... . 


5 




Bunker Hill Monument Association . 




1 


Cambridge Historical Society .... 




1 


Charlestown Old Schoolboys Association . 




2 


Cobb, John C 


5 




Colonial Society of Massachusetts 


1 




Comstock, William O 


1 




Concord Antiquarian Society .... 




2 


Dedham Historical Society .... 




1 


Essex Institute ....... 




5 


Farwell, John W. ..... 


6 




Guild, Courtenay 




1 


Harvard University ...... 


1 




Kings Chapel Parish ..... 


9 




Lynn Historical Society ..... 




1 


Massachusetts, Commissioner of Public Recordsof 


1 




Massachusetts Historical Society 


1 




Massachusetts, Secretary of State of . 


11 




Massachusetts Society, Sons of the American Rev- 






olution ........ 


1 




Medford Historical Society .... 




4 


National Society, Sons of the American Revolu- 






tion ........ 




1 


Carried forward ..... 


48 


25 



22 



Donors. 


Vol- 
umes. 


Pam- 
phlets. 


Brought forward ..... 
New England Historic Genealogical Society 
Norcross, Grenville H. 


48 
10 


25 
5 


Penn Publishing Co. . . . . • 
Provident Institution for Savings 


1 


1 


Purchased ....... 


1 1 




Read, Mrs. Charles F 


1 




Sheerin, James H. ..... 




1 


Smith, Frank ....... 


1 




Society for the Preservation of New England 






Antiquities ....... 

Sprague, Francis W. ..... 

State Street Trust Co. ..... 




1 
1 
1 


Swan, Charles H. ..... 


1 




Tappan, Daniel L. ..... 

Veteran Association, First Corps of Cadets 


1 


4 


Walker, Mrs. Cyrus 


1 




Total 


75 


39 



23 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS. 

The Committee on Publications announces the issues of the 
Second Volume of the Second Series of the Bostonian Soci- 
ety's Publications, uniform with its predecessors. 

The Volume this year contains three interesting papers, of 
which the first is one on "Storms and Shipwrecks in Boston 
Bay and the Record of the Life Savers in Hull," by Fitz- 
Henry Smith, Jr., which was read by him before the Bosto- 
nian Society on December 19th of last year. The author has 
amplified the paper as then read, and has added two notes at 
the end giving data relating to dates, character and tides 
of principal storms, and the dates, names and locations of 
principal wrecks. These, with copious footnotes, and four 
illustrations, have considerably extended the paper, rendering 
it more valuable and interesting. 

The second paper is one on the ''Old Corner Book Store," 
by the late Frank E. Bradish. This was read before the 
Society, on March n, 1890. It is preceded by a reproduc- 
tion of a picture of the Old Corner Book Store, one of the 
issues of the Iconographic Society, which we reprint by their 
permission. The paper is a most readable one, written in 
Mr. Bradish's easy flowing style, combining narrative with 
historical data in a most happy fashion. As a result of his 
eminent career as a conveyancer, Mr. Bradish was thoroughly 
familiar with the property of which he wrote. 

"The New England Museum and the House of Art in 
Boston " is the title of the third paper, which was read before 
the Society by Walter K. Watkins on December 11, 191 1. 
It displays the fund of information and accurate data which 
the author has concerning Boston people and Boston prop- 
erty, and makes a most welcome addition to the publications 
concerning Boston's business district. 

The original documents which are customarily included in 
the Publications conclude the Volume, and are three in num- 
ber. The first, a rare one, being an application for a loan 



24 

from the Franklin Donation for the benefit of young married 
mechanics. It is dated 1819, and sets forth in an interesting 
way the conditions under which loans from the Franklin Fund 
were made in the first part of the 19th century. With this 
are given two letters from the Sewall papers in the collections 
of the Society. One from Paul Dudley to the Honorable 
Sam 11 Sewall, Esq, dated May, 1701, and the other from 
Lord Bellomont to Judge Sewall, dated 14th of August, 
1700. They are both of much interest. 

It has seemed advisable to the Committee that the usual 
colored frontispiece for the Annual Proceedings be omitted 
this year. In its place has been selected a very striking 
photograph of the St. Sauveur memorial which was unveiled 
this year and in the placing of which the Bostonian Society 
bore its part. The paper by Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., which 
accompanies this report, gives in detail the ceremonies which 
marked the unveiling, therefore a further description of the 
picture in this report is not needed. 
For the Committee, 

John W. Farwell, Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., 

Albert Matthews, James M. Hunnewell, 

The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December ^I, I 9 I 7- Clerk. 



25 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEMORIALS. 

The Committee on Memorials herewith reports for the 
year 19 17. 

During the year a new mercantile structure called the Tex- 
tile Building, has been erected on Exeter Place, where the 
Society dedicated on March 13, 1916, a tablet recording the 
historic fact that there the first spoken words by telephone 
were transmitted by Alexander Graham Bell to Thomas Au- 
gustus Watson, forty years before. In the new building the 
tablet is placed in a specially designed frame of granite on a 
first story pier at the corner of Harrison Avenue, and is 
thereby shown to great advantage. 

The Committee regrets to report that it will be necessary 
to change the location of the six mile Paul Dudley stone on 
Harvard Avenue, Allston. Its present position in front of a 
store window being considered unsatisfactory it will be placed 
on the edge of the sidewalk in the coming spring when 
weather conditions are favorable. 

The Society during the year has assisted in the erection 
and unveiling of the St. Sauveur Memorial in the portico of 
King's Chapel. A full description of this interesting occa- 
sion, written by Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., a member of the 
Board of Directors, will be printed in the issue of the Annual 
Proceedings for the current year. 

For the Committee, 

COURTENAY GUILD, FRANK E. WOODWARD, 

Boylston A. Beal, The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December 31 , igij. Clerk. 



26 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

The Committee on Finance reports as follows for the year 
1917. 

At the close of 19 16 the Permanent Fund of the Society 
amounted to $60,637.91. During the past year the fund has 
been increased by the fees of thirty-three new life members, 
amounting to $980, and the sum of $57.42 has been added 
to the James Lyman Whitney Library Fund. $7,000 of 
City of Boston Bonds also matured and with the proceeds the 
Committee purchased $7,000 of Dominion of Canada 5% 
Bonds at a cost of $6,701.38. The Committee also sold 
$4,000 of City of Boston Bonds, approaching maturity, and 
with the proceeds bought $4000 of American Telephone and 
Telegraph Co. 5% Bonds for $3,597. There has also been 
purchased two $500 Liberty, Bonds one of each issue, at a 
cost of $1,000. 

At the close of the present year the Permanent Fund 
amounted to $62,291.43. Of this amount $60,800 is in- 
vested, $1,144.02 is deposited in the New England Trust 
Co., and the James Lyman Whitney Library Fund, amount- 
ing to $347.41, is deposited in the Franklin Savings Bank. 
For the Committee, 

Grenville H. Norcross, Francis H. Manning, 

COURTENAY GUILD. 

Charles F. Read, 
December SI, I 9 I 7- Clerk. 



27 



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SPECIAL FUNDS. 



The Permanent Fund of the Society includes the following 



Boston Memorial Association Fund 

Robert C. Billings Memorial Fund 

Edward I. Browne Bequest 

George O. Carpenter Memorial Fund 

Benjamin H. Dewing Fund 

Curtis Guild Memorial Fund 

Lucy Ann Norcross Centennial Memorial Fund 

Otis Norcross Centennial Memorial Fund . 

Catherine P. Perkins Bequest 

Samuel E. Sawyer Bequest 

Joseph H. Stickney Bequest 

Joseph C. Storey Bequest . 

William B. Trask Bequest . 

Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., Bequest 

James F. Hunnewell Memorial Fund 

James L. Whitney Library Fund 



$1,179 5 1 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

100 00 

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1,000 00 

1,000 00 

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4,610 87 

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500 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

234 29 



30 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS. 

The Committee which was appointed to nominate Officers 
of the Bostonian Society for the ensuing year, begs to report 
that it has attended to its duty and proposes the following 
candidates : — 



Francis H. Manning, 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr., 
John W. Farwell, 
Grenville H. Norcross, 



For Directors. 

COURTENAY GUILD, 

Joseph G. Minot, 
Henry W. Cunningham, 
Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., 



Frederick W. Parker. 

For Clerk and Treasurer. 
Charles F. Read. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

William O. Comstock, 
Sarah L. Guild, 
Nathaniel T. Kidder, 
Chas. Wells Hall, 
John Lawrence, 

Nominating Committee. 
Boston, December 2J, Itylj. 

The report of the Committee was accepted, and the Society 
then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year. 
The result was reported by the tellers — Messrs. Winthrop S. 
Scudder and William O. Comstock — showed the unanimous 
choice of those named on the ballot, as nominated. 

It was ordered that the President's Report, together with 
the reports of the several Committees as submitted at the 
Annual Meeting, and the Treasurer's Report, with the Mem- 
bership Rolls, etc., be printed in the Annual Proceedings. 

On motion, the Society then adjourned. 

Charles F. Read, Clerk. 



3i 



THE MEMORIAL 

TO THE 

CHEVALIER de SAINT-SAUVEUR. 

An Account read by Request before the Bostonian Society, 
December 18, 1917, 

BY 

FITZ-HENRY SMITH, Jr., 
With Additions. 

" Few men can afford to wait a hundred years to be 
remembered." So spake Elihu Root at the unveiling of the 
monument to Major Pierre Charles L'Enfant, the engineer 
who made the plan of the City of Washington. L'Enfant 
died in 1825, and it was not until 1909 that there came 
public recognition of his great work. In the long interval 
his grave laid neglected — marked only by a tree — while the 
city rose in splendor about him. Then were witnessed these 
scenes : the remains of the forgotten man lying in state under 
the dome of the capitol, attended by the dignitaries of the 
nation ; after the ceremonies there, a procession to Arlington, 
the hearse, wrapped in the colors of America and France, 
escorted by one of the regiments to which the Major had 
belonged ; and — two years later, — the dedication of a 
monument over his grave, with addresses by the President 
of the United States and by the Secretary of State. Thus 
remembered and honored at last, the artist-soldier was placed 
in the great national cemetery on a slope overlooking the 
beautiful city that he had seen in his dreams more than a 
century before, and had planned for the mighty nation his 
vision told him the United States was destined to be.* 

* See J. J. Jusserand, With Americans of Past and Present Days (New 
York, 1917), pp. 137^'. 



32 

One hundred and thirty-nine years elapsed after the death 
of the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur before a monument was 
raised to his memory and dedicated with ceremonies as im- 
pressive in their way as those which were held in honor of 
the designer of the City of Washington. But the circum- 
stances which caused the monument to be erected in Boston 
were very different from those which led to the memorial in 
the federal city. L' Enfant died in poverty and obscurity, 
cared for only by the man who befriended him in his last 
days, and upon whose property he was buried. The death of 
de Saint-Sauveur, on the other hand, was of grave concern 
to the men in authority at the time, and the state voted him 
a monument the day following his death. 

Who, then, was the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur, and why 
was it voted that a monument be erected to his memory ? 
The answer is contained in a forgotten chapter of the history 
of the town of Boston in the American Revolution. 

The History of the Monument and of the 
Votes to Erect it. 

On the 6th of February, 1778, there was signed at Paris a 
treaty of alliance between France and the United States, the 
only treaty of the kind to which this nation has been a party, 
and the first visible evidence of the support which was to 
come from it was the sailing to America, two months later, 
of a fleet of twelve ships of the line and five frigates (one of 
which was subsequently sent back with despatches) com- 
manded by the Count d'Estaing and carrying as a passenger 
Gerard de Rayneval, the first ambassador of any nation to 
the United States.* 

The fleet took a long time crossing the Atlantic, so long, 
in fact, that news of its coming reached America in season 

* The fleet included the " Languedoc " of 90 guns, the " Tonnant " of 80. 
the 74s " Cesar," " Hector," " Zele," " Marseillais," " Protecteur" and " Guer- 
rier," the 64s " Vaillant," " Provence " and " Fantasque," the " Sagittaire," 50 
guns, and the frigates "Aimable," "Alcmene," " Chimere " and " Engageante," 
of 26 or 30 guns each. 



33 

for the British to prepare for it. They abandoned Philadel- 
phia and concentrated at New York, and when d'Estaing ar- 
rived at the Delaware, on the 8th of July, he found that his 
enemy had moved, and detaching a frigate (" La Chimere ") 
to take GeYard to Philadelphia, proceeded at once to Sandy 
Hook. At New York, we are told, the pilots balked at tak- 
ing the larger French vessels into the harbor and the fleet 
was sent on to co-operate with General Sullivan in the cam- 
paign about to be undertaken in Rhode Island. There, a 
greater misfortune awaited, for several of the French vessels 
were badly damaged by a storm,* and d'Estaing acting under 
explicit orders given him for just such an emergency, on 
August 23, 1778, sailed for Boston. 

The admiral said, on leaving, that if he found at Boston 
the material he so urgently needed he would be ready to 
start anew to fight " for the glory of the French name and 
the interests of America." But Sullivan felt that he had 
been left in the lurch and he did not hesitate to say so, and 
whereas he was happily able to withdraw in safety from the 
difficult position in which he found himself, the abrupt termi- 
nation of the Rhode Island expedition, from which much had 
been expected, was the cause of general disappointment and 
of some ill feeling among the people. What, if anything, this 
had to do with what afterwards took place in Boston, it is 
difficult to say.f 

It is to be remembered that under the Duke de Choiseul there was a tre- 
mendous revival of the French navy and that Frenchmen were the master 
builders of the ships of the period. 

" The hull of the ' Constitution ' was modeled after the best French prac- 
tice." Hollis, The Frigate "Constitution " (Boston, 1901), p. 38. 

* The " Languedoc " was completely dismasted and broke her bowsprit and 
tiller, the " Marseillais " lost foremast and bowsprit, and the " Protecteur " 
was otherwise crippled. " So fierce was the storm," says Fiske, " that it was 
remembered in local tradition as lately as 1850 as ' the Great Storm.' " The 
American Revolution (Boston, 1902), Vol. 2, p. 93. 

t See the interesting publication entitled Extrait du Journal d'un Officier 
de la Marine de TEscadre de M. le Comte d'Estaing (1782), p. 38, for a con- 
temporaneous French view of the effect of Sullivan's charges. 



34 

When he arrived at Boston, d'Estaing left his serviceable 
ships in Nantasket Roads arranged in such a way as to dis- 
pute the entrance of the British, should they attempt to fol- 
low, and brought his damaged liners into the inner harbor for 
repairs.* The exigency was considered so great that the 
French were permitted to work upon them on the Sabbath — 
"with as little Disturbance to the Inhabitants as possible, 
more especially during the time of divine Service," f and the 
visitors were well treated in Boston until, on the night of 
September 8th, there was an attack on the fleet bakery which 
had been established ashore, and in attempting to intervene, 
the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur and another officer, Pleville le 
Peley,J were wounded, the former by a blow over the eye 
which resulted in his death a week later. 

De Saint-Sauveur was a lieutenant on the "Tonnant," the 
second largest ship in the fleet, flying the flag of his brother- 
in-law, the Count de Breugnon, one of d'Estaing's two "chefs 
d'escadre." In addition, the Chevalier held the position of 
"aide-major" in the fleet, and at home was the first chamber- 
lain of Count d'Artois, the brother of Louis XVI. 

So serious an affront to the ally of the colonies, and its 
fatal ending to one so close to the family of the French king, 
greatly disturbed the men in charge of the cause of American 
independence. It was feared that the townspeople might be 
implicated, and how the French would take it was doubtful. 
Who were responsible has not been determined to this day, 
but some of the crew of a privateer, which was said to include 
British seamen, were suspected of a part in the riot, and d' 

* The " Marseillais" — " the Ship the nearest to the Town " — lay next to 
Governor's Island, where the French were given leave to land their sick. 
Mass. Archives, Documents, Vol. 169, p. 151. 

t Ibid., p. 1 58. 

\ Le Peley, who was attached to the " Languedoc " at the time, had an 
eventful history. Early in his career he lost his right leg, which was replaced 
by a wooden one, and twice thereafter the wooden leg was carried away. He 
retired from active service in 1788 and was Minister of Marine under the Di- 
rectory. Cf. Balch, The French in America during the War of Independence 
of the United States, Vol. 2 (Phil., 1S95), p. 200. 



35 

Estaing, with rare good sense, was quick to act on the as- 
sumption that the attack was excited by British sympathizers. 
September ioth he wrote General Heath that the common 
enemy of the allies " hesitated at nothing," and later told the 
general that he was fully satisfied the inhabitants had no 
hand in the affray — to the great relief of the local authorities. 

The American leaders for their part did everything possible 
to make amends, and thus it was that on September 16, 1778, 
the day following the death of the Chevalier, the General 
Court or Assembly of the State of Massachusetts Bay, out of 
respect to his memory, voted to " attend in Procession the 
Corps of the deceased to the Place of Interment " and to 
" provide a monumental Stone to be placed in the burial 
Ground where his Remains shall be deposited, with such in- 
scription as his Excellency the Count d'Estaing shall order." 

As there was yet some unrest, it was deemed wiser to 
forego a public funeral, and the young officer was buried 
quietly at night in the crypt of King's Chapel — in what has 
been thought to be the " stranger's tomb," so called, under- 
neath the porch of the church. But d'Estaing was much 
impressed and later when he wrote to his superior of the vote 
of the state and what he had done in consequence, he ex- 
pressed the hope that the king would " be satisfied by the 
public and sincere marks of the regret of the Americans," 
adding " they could not do more, and I must assure you that 
they have have liked to do far more." * 

After the burial the men in command of the allied forces 
gave public evidence of the friendship and understanding that 
existed between them. September 22d, d'Estaing and his 
officers paraded in Boston and attended numerous receptions, 
and on the 25th there was a grand love feast in Faneuil Hall, 
at which the following toasts were given :f 

* Letter of Nov. 5, 1778, printed in the Report of a Recess Committee on 
the monument. (May, 1906), Mass. Senate, No. 402, p. 5. 

t Lacour-Gayet, La Marine Militaire de la France Sous U regne de Lotas 
XVI. (Paris, 1905), p. 173, note. 



36 

i . America. 

2. The King of France. 

3. Congress. 

4. The French Fleet. 

5. Gen. Washington and the American Army. 

6. The Independence of America. 

7. The Alliance between France and America; may it never be 
broken. 

8. The French Minister to Congress. 

9. Franklin, the American Minister at the Court of France. 

10. Liberty and the Friendship of France. 

11. Commerce, Art, and Agriculture. 

12. M. d'Orvilliers and all his Army. 

13. The Count d'Estaing and all the Officers of the French Fleet in 
Boston Harbor. 

14. (By d'Estaing.) The President of the Council and all Americans 
here present. 

15. Monseigneur, the Duke de Chartres. 

16. The Queen of France. 

17. M. Du Chaff ault. 

18. The Marquis de La Fayette. 

19. American Ships and Sailors. 

20. All the Women and Young Girls who have lost their Husbands 
and Sweethearts in the Good Cause. 

21. The Duke de Choiseul. 

22. M. de Sartine. 

23. M. de Maurepas. 

General Washington, who had been informed of the riot, 
was well pleased when he learned that it had terminated in 
such a manner as to convince the French that no public insult 
was intended by the people of Boston, and he sagely advised 
that all possible means should be taken " to cultivate harmony 
between the people and the seamen " who, he apprehended, 
would "not be so easily reconciled as their officers, not having 
so much sense to direct them."* 

D'Estaing drafted the inscription for the monument — dated 
September 28th in the log book of the "Languedoc" — and 

* Letter of Sept. 22, 1778, in "Heath Papers," Vol. 1, p. 95 (Mass. Hist. 
Soc. Coll., 5th Ser., Vol. 4), printed in a Report of the Committee on Libraries 
(April, 1905), Mass. Senate, No. 3 6, p. 17. 



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•/&4<?^J 



THE VOTE OF THE GENERAL COURT OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY, 
SEPTEMBER 16, 1778. 
From the original in the State Archives. 



37 

caused copies of it to be distributed in the fleet that his 
men might know of the action taken. But the task of es- 
tablishing harmony between the seamen of the two nations 
proved, as Washington anticipated, more difficult to accom- 
plish, and no small part of the difficulty seems to have been 
due to the attitude of the American sailors. Rows are said 
to have occurred on the 26th and 27th of September, and on 
October 5 th there was a street fight between the French and 
" some American seamen " followed by secret hints that " a 
much greater disturbance " would take place on the next 
night. Whereupon the Council ordered Heath to call out 
the troops, and intrusted to the Sheriff of Suffolk County 
the not very enviable duty of attending the troops to "see 
that no unlawful measure be taken in Quelling the Riot." * 

That and like energetic action by the local authorities pre- 
vented further serious outbreaks.! Early in November, 
d'Estaing sailed away to the West Indies, and with the de- 
parture of the fleet the Saint-Sauveur incident passed into 
history. 

In 1903, the French government published a roster of all 
the French forces that fought in the war of the American 
Revolution, J and the same year there appeared in Paris a 
private work on the French sailors and soldiers in the war§ 

* Mass. Archives, Documents, Vol. 200, p. 132 and Vol. 169, p. 200. 

t On the evening of October 12th the American Brig " Hazard " came into 
the harbor and dropped anchor immediately alongside the Schooner " Dol- 
phin," commanded by M. Bouguier, an officer of the French fleet. Although 
hailed and requested to move, the Americans paid no attention except to reply 
in terms characterized chiefly by force. The matter was then called to the 
attention of the authorities by the French consul, who feared the outcome 
and the Council promptly told the commander of the " Hazard " to move her 
at once and to " order his men not to treat the men on board the ' Dolphin ' 
with any opprobrious language in time to come." Mass. Archives, Documents, 
Vol. 169, p. 217. 

t Les Combattants Francais de la Guerre Americaine. (Reprinted at Wash- 
ington in 1905 as a Senate Document. 58th Congress, 2d Session. Document 
No. 77.) 

§ De Noailles, Marins et Soldats Francaise en Ame'riquc Pendant la Guerre 
de V Independence des Etats-Unis, pp. 46 ff. 



38 

which told the story of the death of the Chevalier de Saint- 
Sauveur and quoted the account of his burial, as written by 
the secretary of the fleet, in the church " dite chappelle du 
roy." 

Col. Chaille Long, a founder of the French Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, had been one of the com- 
missioners appointed to search the archives for the material 
of the publication of the French government just mentioned. 
In the Records of the Marine he found what has been referred 
to as the log book of the " Languedoc," d'Estaing's flag ship, 
containing an account of the Chevalier's death and the inscrip- 
tion on his monument, and he inquired of Capt. Albert A. 
Folsom of Brookline in what cemetery in Boston the monu- 
ment was erected. The Captain knew nothing about it, and as 
a result of the inquiry Bostonians had a rude awakening. For 
whereas the riot seems not to have been wholly unfamiliar to 
local antiquarians, little appeared to be known about the vote 
of the assembly for a monument to the victim, and less could 
be told about the place of his interment. An investigation 
revealed that the vote had never been carried out. 

We can only speculate as to the reason. It is to be noted, 
however, that the resolve carried no appropriation and that 
the stone was to be erected in the burial ground where the 
Chevalier's remains should be deposited. The burial took 
place in a church.* It would seem that the interment there 
was only temporary, with the expectation that the body of 
the young Frenchman would later be removed to some ceme- 
tery in the town — if it were not shipped to France, a not 
unlikely disposition in view of the high family connections of 
the deceased. Whether anything further was done with it, 
we do not know. Col. Thomas Dawes, who was charged 
with the duty of erecting the monument, does not seem to 
have recalled the matter to the attention of the Court. Ap- 

* The church seems to have no record of the interment, and Foote's 
Annals of King's Chapel (Boston, 1882 and 1896), makes no mention of de 
Saint-Sauveur or of his burial. 



39 

parently the trying labors of the authorities during the re- 
maining years of the war, and in the critical period following 
when the nation was established, served but too well to cause 
them entirely to forget an affair which they had every reason 
to hope had been ended for all time. And it was not long 
before the Americans of 1778 found themselves at war with 
their late ally. 

But the reason why the vote was not carried out was not 
the issue. Massachusetts had said that it would erect a 
monument to the memory of the Chevalier and had failed to 
do so, and Capt. Folsom called the matter to the attention 
of the legislature of the Commonwealth through the Hon. 
Prentiss Cummings of Brookline, who filed a petition which 
was referred to the Committee on Libraries. The committee 
investigated the subject, and in April, 1905, made a report* 
relating how the question had arisen and publishing much 
of the available data about de Saint-Sauveur and his death, 
to which data I acknowledge that I am indebted. 

In closing the report, the committee said : " In war and in 
peace Massachusetts keeps her promises. Here is an event 
filled with uncertain and distressing possibilities at the time, 
which, in the more comprehensive view of the present, had 
the matter not been disposed of to the entire satisfaction of 
the French officers, might have ended the French alliance, 
and changed materially the subsequent history if not the re- 
sults of the war of the revolution. Yorktown might never 
have been a lustrous, historic name. The State had failed in 
its primal duty to keep the public peace ; the death of a French 
officer of distinction had been the result. All the reparation 
possible at the moment was made. The omitted or forgotten 
detail should be supplied, and to this end the committee 
recommend the passage of the accompanying resolve." 

The resolve called for the appointment of a recess commit- 
tee to report to the next General Court " such action as shall 
seem to them appropriate to carry out, at least in spirit, the 

* Senate No. 336. 



40 

promise implied" in the resolution of September 16, 1778. 
It was enacted as Chapter 72 of the Resolves of 1905, and 
under it a recess committee was appointed, which in its turn 
made a report* recommending legislation authorizing them 
" to cause to be erected, on behalf of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, a monument with a suitable inscription thereon 
in the cemetery of King's Chapel in Boston, subject to the 
grant of a site therein by the city of Boston," and for a sum 
not exceeding three thousand dollars. 

The Court indorsed the recommendation by passing a re- 
solvef granting the authority requested but cut the amount 
of the appropriation in two, which disarranged the plansj of 
the committee. Capt. Folsom thereafter died, the appropria- 
tion lapsed, and a second vote of the legislature of Massachu- 
setts for a memorial to the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur failed 
to be fulfilled. 

That was the situation when in 191 6 the Bostonian Society 
took up the matter and filed a petition in the General Court 
which resulted in a resolve§ signed by the Governor on the 
1st of June appropriating one thousand dollars " for the erec- 
tion, at some appropriate place in the City of Boston, of a 
monument with a suitable inscription, to the memory of the 
Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur " and for the appointment of a 
commission to carry the legislation into effect. The commis- 
sion was appointed June 14, 19 16, and consisted of Courtenay 
Guild, as Chairman, Grenville H. Norcross, J. Randolph 
Coolidge, Jr., and the late Robert S. Peabody.|| 

* May 1906, Senate No. 402. t Chap. 104 of the Resolves of 1906. 

t The monument planned was to consist of two bronze tablets embedded 
side by side in a granite block, with a suitable base, one tablet to have the 
French inscription as prepared by d'Estaing, and the other an English transla- 
tion, which was the Count's idea of the manner in which the inscription might 
appear on the monument, as appears from his letter of November 5th, printed 
in the committee's report. 

§ Chap. 151 of the Resolves of 1916. 

|| Mr. Guild was Chairman of the Committee on Memorials of the Bos- 
tonian Society and Mr. Norcross President of the Society, and Mr. Coolidge 
and Mr. Peabody were the wardens of King's Chapel. 



4i 

Previously the project had been submitted to the proprietors 
of King's Chapel, who became greatly interested, and at a 
meeting on April 24, 19 16, voted "to permit the placing of 
a monument in memory of the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur 
on the north exterior wall of the church tower or in the plot 
between the tower and the church-yard." 

Mr. A. W. Longfellow, a member of the Bostonian Society, 
was employed as architect and in consultation with the com- 
mission worked out the design of the memorial. It was their 
aim to have the monument, so far as might be, of a form that 
was likely to be chosen in the period when the Chevalier died. 
There are monuments in this country, erected in the 18th 
century, of the general type of the memorial to the Chevalier- 
But it is an interesting circumstance that the design adopted 
was inspired by a monument in the Bunhill Fields Burial 
Ground, London, E. C, erected in 1725 in memory of 

"Joseph Collette, Esq., late of Hertford Castle, some- 
time President and Govenor of Fort St. George in East 
India, who lived and dyed in the firm Belief in the 
Resurection." 

The monument to de Saint-Sauveur is of concrete granite, 
fourteen feet high, and was made by Emerson & Norris of 
Boston. Standing on a base is a plinth, with tablets of green 
slate on all sides, which forms the pedestal and supports a 
dwarfed obelisk, with four cannon balls at the foot of the 
obelisk as appropriate emblems. 

On the tablet facing Tremont Street is the inscription in 
the main just as d'Estaing wrote it, the only changes being 
those made necessary by the fact that the monument was 
erected at a later time and by a different authority than was 
orignally contemplated, that the preface has been translated 
into English as is fitting on a monument in a country speak- 
ing that language, and that the name of the vessel to which 
the Chevalier was attached and the date of his death have 
been inserted in brackets, as was suggested by the recess 
committee of 1905. 



42 

Surmounting the inscription is a bas-relief of the arms of 
the Chevalier's family, flanked by dolphins indicative of his 
naval service, and upon the rear tablet appear the words : 

ERECTED IN CONSEQUENCE 

OF A RESOLVE OF THE 

STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY 

1 6 SEPTEMBER 1 778 

AND OF A RESOLVE 

OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

I JUNE I916. 

The inscription as d'Estaing wrote it was as follows : * 
Ce monument a 6t6 e'rige' en consequence d'une deliberation 
de Massachusetts-Bay, du 16 Septembre 1778, en memoire de 
M. le Comte de Saint-Sauv.eur, premier Chambellan de son 
Altesse Royale Monseigneur le Comte d'Artois, frere de Sa 
Majeste' le Roy de France. 

Cet officier, aide-major de l'escadre francaise et lieutenant 
de vaisseau apres avoir eu le bonheur de risquer sa vie pour le 
service des Etats-Unis, remplissait son devoir lorsqu'il a 6t6 la 
victime d'un tumulte cause" par des gens malintentionne's ; mort 
avec le meme attachement pour l'Amerique, les liens du devoir 
et de l'inclination qui attachent ses compatriotes a la ville de 
Boston en ont 6t6 plus resserre"s. Puissent etre ainsi infructueux 
a jamais tous les efforts qu'on oserait tenter pour separer la 
France et PAmerique. Telle est la priere que feront dans les 
siecles a venir au Dieu tout puissant, tout Francais et tout 
Americain qui jetteront les yeux sur le mausole"e d'un jeune 
homme enleve a des amis qui ne peuvent se consoller de Pavoir 
perdu, qu'en voyant de pareilles fleurs funeraires repandues sur 
son tombeau. 

Cette inscription, proposee selon Penoncd de la deliberation, 
par le Comte d'Estaing, Commandant de la premiere escadre 
francaise envoyde par le Roy de France aux Etats-Unis de 
PAmenque, ses allies, a 6t6 approuvee par (ici est e"crit le nom 
des officiers generaux et de tous les commandants des vais- 
seaux avec celui de leurs batiments et leur force), et a 6t6 
gravee sur cette pierre, sous la direction du Colonel Thomas 
Dawes, nomme' a cet effet par le Gouvernement. 



* See the Report of the Recess Committee, Senate No. 402 (1906), p. 7. 




In Memory of 

THE CHEVALIER DE SAINT SAUVEUR 

first Chamberlain of his Royal Highness, 

Count d' Artois, brother of his Majesty 

the King' of France 

" Cet officier, aide-major de 1'escadre franchise et 

lieutenant de vaisseau [sur le Tonnant] apres avoir 

eu le bonheur de risquer sa vie pour le service des 

Etats-Unis, remplissait son devoir lorsqu'il a etc la 

victime d'un tumulte cause' par des gens malintentionne's ; 

mort [le 15 Septembre 1778] avec le meme attachment 

pour l'Ame'rique, les liens du devoir et de l'inclination 

qui attachent ses compatriotes a la ville de Boston en 

ont ete plus resserre's. Puissent etre ansi infrucTueux 

a jamais tous les efforts qu'n oserait tenter pour separer 

la France et l'Amerique. Telle est la priere que feront 

clans les siecles a venir au Dieu tout puissant, tout 

FVancais et tout Americain qui jetteront les yeux sur 

le mausole'e d'un jeune homme enleve a des amis qui ne 

peuvent se consoller de l'avoir perdu, qu'en voyant de 

pareilles fleurs funeraires re'pandues sur son tombeau ". 

Cette inscription a etc prcparee par le Comte d' Estainc; 

VAmiral commandant de la premiere escadre francaise 
e/17'ovee par le Roy de France aux Etats-Unis d'Amerique 



43 

De Saint-Sauveur was in his 28th year when he died, as 
appears from the Records of the Bibliotheque Nationale, and 
his name is there given as "Gregoire Comte de Saint-Sauveur." 
The text of the inscription — quoted above — which Ambas- 
sador Jusserand obtained from the Records of the French 
Navy for the recess committee of 1905, also calls him the 
Count de Saint-Sauveur, and he is so titled in a letter of 
his brother-in-law, de Breugnon. Elsewhere he is usually 
referred to as the Chevalier* — including the inscription as 
contained in the log book of the " Languedoc, " and the com- 
pilation of the French government of 1903, where his name 
appears in the list of lieutenants on " Le Tonnant " with the 
words, "mort a Boston en septembre 1778." So the title 
Chevalier was used on the monument as that by which he was 
commonly known. 

The style " Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur " means that the 
bearer was a cadet or younger son of a family the designation 
of whose title was " de Saint-Sauveur." Only a scion of the 
older nobility could hold such a position as chamberlain to the 
king's brother, and the family of de Gregoire Marquis de 
Saint-Sauveur was of that nobility. " Comte de Saint- 
Sauveur" would be a natural courtesy form for the son of a 
marquis, which accounts for the use of the title Count in the 
French records and the letter of de Breugnon. 

The designation "de Saint-Sauveur" was a nom de terre, 
the name of an estate. The family name of the Chevalier 
was de Gregoire ; his Christain name we do not know. The 
family fief took its name from the Chateau de Saint-Sauveur 
which was a very famous mediaeval fortress, hence the castle 
on the arms, f the blazon of which is: "silver with chateau 

* Writing to the Council Sept. 19, 1778, d'Estaing speaks of de Saint- 
Sauveur as the Chevalier. Mass. Archives, Documents, Vol. 200, p. 103. But 
in his report to the Secretary of State for the Marine, dated at Sea, Nov. 5, 
1778, he calls him Count. Cf. H. Doniol, Histoire de la Participation de la 
France a V Etablissement des Etats-Unis, Vol. 3 (Paris, 1888), p. 460. 

t For the drawing of the arms and for much of the information as to the 
family of de Saint-Sauveur and his title we are indebted to Mr. Pierre de 
Chaignon la Rose of Cambridge, Mass. 



44 

gules, surmounted by three towers crenelated, the same color." 
The coronet is that of a French marquis. 

The monument was erected in the plot between the tower 
of King's Chapel and the burying ground, and thus nearly 
over the tomb where the Chevalier's remains are said to have 
been placed, and it was unveiled by Governor Samuel W. 
McCall, Thursday, May 24th, 19 17, with appropriate and in- 
teresting ceremonies. 

The Ceremonies at the Dedication of the Monument. 

The Governor's invitation to the dedication set the hour at 
eleven o'clock in the morning, and at that time a procession 
formed in front of the State House headed by the Governor 
and including the speakers and invited guests, among them 
J. C J. Flammand, Esq., the French Consul, at Boston, and 
a large delegation from the House of Representatives led by 
the Speaker, Hon. Channing H. Cox. It was intended to 
have M. J. J. Jusserand, the French ambassador, present to 
respond for France, but he was not able to leave Washington 
because of the arrival of the Italian War Mission, and his 
place was taken by Major, now Lieutenant-Colonel, Paul 
Azan, commander of the French mission to the Harvard 
regiment. 

Escorted by a detachment of bluejackets from the U. S. 
Battleship ''Virginia," with militiamen of the 5th and 8th 
regiments carrying the flags of the United States and France, 
of the Commonwealth, the Society of the Colonial Wars, the 
Sons of the Revolution, and the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, and preceded by buglers, the procession marched down 
Park to Tremont Street and thence to King's Chapel, where 
it was met by the building commission. Traffic on the street 
had been stopped and a large crowd gathered. With the 
members of the legislature and the passers-by standing with 
bared heads, and the monument draped with the flags of the 
two nations the Chevalier had sought to serve, there came a 
blare of bugles, the bluejackets presented arms, and the Gov- 



45 

ernor removed the covering from the monument and placed 
upon its base a wreath with the tri-color of France. 

The company then entered the church. After the flags 
had been placed in front of the chancel, prayer was offered 
by Rev. Howard N. Brown, D. D., minister of King's Chapel, 
and Mr. Courtenay Guild for the building commission formally 
reported to the Governor that the commission had completed 
its work and had erected the monument, which he said " not 
only represents a memorial to a gallant officer but in the 
hearts and minds of the people typifies their admiration for 
what France is doing for the cause of civilization." 

REMARKS OF HIS EXCELLENCY, GOVERNOR MCCALL. 

Governor McCall spoke of the erection of the monument 
as the fulfillment of a pledge of honor made by the state 
in the Revolution, and he referred to the enactment of the 
resolve for the monument, before the United States entered 
the present war, as demonstrating that the Commonwealth 
was not actuated by sentimental motives alone. "This 
occasion," he said, " serves to mark the love we have for 
France. When the event happened which the monument 
perpetuates we were the ally of France, and now, when the 
order of the General Court is carried out, we again find our- 
selves her ally." 

He then introduced the Mayor of Boston, Hon. James M. 
Curley. 

REMARKS OF HIS HONOR, MAYOR CURLEY. 

Mayor Curley referred to the monument as an addition to 
the many historical treasures which Boston possessed, and one 
which would cement the union between this country and the 
nation which made sure our freedom. Said the Mayor : 
" Were it not for the chivalry of France the colonies would 
not have achieved their independence. And in this hour of 
France's peril, when she is bereft of so many of her men and 
women, we try to repay a debt of one hundred and forty 



46 

years ago, not as an obligation, not through compulsion, nor 
through necessity, but through a sense of love. France is 
calling aloud, and we offer of our best to the end that liberty 
may be possible." 

The Governor next called upon Representative Fitz-Henry 
Smith, Jr., of Boston, for an historical address, and Mr. Smith 
spoke as follows : 

ADDRESS OF REPRESENTATIVE SMITH. 

Your Excellency, Major Azan, Fellow Americans : 

In the winter of the ever memorable year of 1776, there 
arrived in Boston a young Frenchman, Lewis — for he wrote 
his name here in the English fashion — Lewis Ansart de 
Maresquelle, and on December 6 of that year he made to the 
government of the State of Massachusetts Bay this proposal. 
Describing himself as an old captain of infantry who had 
been brought in the forges of France, his family having for 
many years furnished all the iron cannon in the service of 
the French king, he said that while at one time all cannon 
were cast with a cylinder which left little holes, often the 
cause of bursting, his father had adopted the practice of cast- 
ing cannon in a solid piece and boring them, and had invented 
a machine to do the boring. De Maresquelle then offered to 
disclose all his knowledge upon the subject, and agreed that 
if the state would supply the place and materials he would 
construct the furnaces, and when the mills were ready for 
boring would furnish one cannon ready for service every 
twenty-four hours out of the common iron ore within this 
state. 

In return, he asked from the state the expenses of his trip 
to America and one thousand dollars a year until the end of 
the war, and after that time the sum of six hundred sixty-six 
and two-thirds dollars yearly during his life. He also re- 
quested the honor of a colonel's commission to give him rank, 
but without pay or command as such.* 

* The text of this interesting " proposition " may be found in the State 
Archives, Court Records, Vol. 36, p. 298. 



47 

There was an imperative need for just such assistance as 
de Maresquelle was able to render, for we are told that the 
demand for cannon was so great at the time that they were 
taking up the old things that had been stuck in the ground 
as posts at street corners and restoring them to service. The 
General Court promptly accepted his proposition, and besides 
granting him a commission as colonel of artillery made him 
inspector of foundries. 

He entered at once upon his duties and carried out his 
part of the contract throughout the war. Notwithstanding 
that he had stated that he expected no command, he could 
not resist the longing for active warfare, and when the Rhode 
Island campaign was organizing he sought an opportunity to 
go to the front, and the Board of War recommended him 
to General Sullivan as a brave and worthy man, glowing with 
ardor to signalize himself in the expedition, who came to offer 
himself with cheerfulness to any service for which he might 
be thought qualified. He served as an aid to Sullivan, and 
when the French fleet arrived at Boston was sent to super- 
vise the construction of the works in the harbor which the 
French admiral desired to protect his anchorage. 

Before the close of the war he married a Boston girl, 
and afterwards moved with her to Dracut, Mass., where he 
brought up his family and lived out his life a prominent and 
respected member of the community. Some ten years before 
his death he petitioned for authority to drop the " de Mares- 
quelle " from his name, as he was about to take out naturaliz- 
ation papers and wanted to be naturalized as Lewis Ansart, 
" his Christian and family name," and over his grave in the 
" Old Woodbine Cemetery " at Dracut is a stone inscribed, 
" In memory of Col. Lewis Ansart." 

The state upon its side carried out the contract in spirit 
and letter, adding to de Maresquelle's salary, when the value 
of the currencey depreciated, in order that the sum paid him 
might be equivalent to what it was stipulated he should re- 
ceive, and paying him the amounts agreed, to the fraction 



4 8 

of a cent, until he died in 1804. In fact, the last payment 
(which was made to his legal representatives) was for eighty- 
seven dollars, three cents and two mills, in full of the bal- 
ance due him at his death. 

Lewis de Maresquelle was one Frenchman who came to 
the assistance of America, a compatriot of Lafayette in the 
employ of the State of Massachusetts, and later her adopted 
son, and thus did the state keep faith with one who served 
her truly in her hour of need.* 

Less than three years after the shots were fired at Concord 
and Lexington the French king entered the contest as an ally 
of the struggling colonies, and on April 13, 1778, a royal fleet 
of ships of war, under the command of the Count d'Estaing, 
set sail from Toulon for the coast of the United States. 
Arriving at New York the fleet was despatched to Narragan- 
set Bay to assist General Sullivan in an attack upon Newport. 
The English ships followed and d'Estaing put to sea to meet 
them, when, on the nth of August, there arose a violent gale, 
known for many years after as the " great storm," which dis- 
persed and damaged both fleets, and d'Estaing, assembling 
his ships as best as he could, headed for Boston to refit. 

In command of the vessels which then came into our har- 
bor were men bearing historic names. The captain of the 74 
" Zele " was Count Barras, who afterwards succeeded to the 
command of the squadron of Ternay, and who will ever be 
gratefully remembered by Americans for his timely arrival 
before Yorktown with the siege train of the French army. 
Another commander was Bougainville, who had served with 
Montcalm at Quebec, and who, quitting the army for the 
navy, left his name to posterity because of his celebrated 
voyage around the world. The captain of the " Fantasque " 

* Due to the fact that de Maresquelle was in the employ of the state, his 
name does not appear in the compilation of the French government of 1903. 
Nor have we found him mentioned in Stone's Our French Allies (Providence, 
1884), nor in Balch, or the other works on the French in America during the 
Revolution. For his portrait, see Bostonian Society Publications, Vol. 10, p. 34. 



49 

was Suffren, perhaps the greatest naval genius that the 
French nation has produced, whose fierce encounters with Sir 
Edward Hughes won for him the admiration of our Captain 
Mahan, and on the " Sagittaire " was d'Albert de Rions, in 
Suffren's estimation the foremost officer in the French navy. 

There was another captain, the Chevalier de Raimondis, 
commander of the 74 " Cesar," which, separated from its 
sisters by the storm, had a lively encounter with a British 
vessel, in which the French captain lost his right arm. When 
de Raimondis arrived in Boston General Heath, the American 
commander, went to see him, and expressed regret at the 
Frenchman's misfortune, to which the brave officer replied, 
though still weak from his wound, " I am ready to lose my 
other arm in the cause of the Americans." And thereupon, 
perhaps with prophetic vision, Heath wrote in his Memoirs 
these words, " Remember this, ye Americans, in future 
times." 

My friends, America has remembered. From the begin- 
ning of the present cruel war our hearts have beat for the 
French people who have withstood so bravely and so well 
the fierce onslaught upon their liberties and the freedom of 
Europe. Already the blood of American youth has been 
shed on the soil of France, and now we have entered the 
struggle as a nation. The call to arms has gone forth 
throughout this land, and were the question asked, " Are ye 
ready to fight that France may live ? " back would come but 
one reply, " Yes, for we remember." 

De Raimondis was a second Frenchman who came to us 
when we were fighting for independence, a " regular " in the 
naval forces of the French king, and Boston was to know yet 
one other. D'Estaing and his ships were received here with 
enthusiasm, and receptions were the order of the day. But 
there were British sympathizers and discontented persons in 
the community, and not long after the French arrived a riot 
occurred which ended seriously and threatened still more dis- 
astrous consequences. So far as can be found out it happened 



5Q 

in this way. The admiral set up a bakery for his fleet in the 
town, and on the night of the 8th of September, 1778, a 
crowd gathered there demanding bread, which being refused 
they attacked the bakers, and two officers of the fleet, one 
the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur, who attempted to intervene 
and restore order, were wounded. The American authorities 
were greatly troubled. It was felt that the very existence of 
the alliance with France might be at stake, for de Saint- 
Sauveur was not only an officer of rank in the fleet but a 
man of position in France and the first chamberlain of the 
king's brother. Guards were ordered to patrol the streets to 
prevent further disturbance and a reward was offered for the 
apprehension of the rioters, yet it never has been determined 
just who were responsible for the affray. 

De Saint-Sauveur's wound was mortal. Lingering a week, 
he died on the 15th of September, and the next day the 
General Court of Massachusetts, expressing its detestation of 
the perpetrators and abettors of the horrid deed which ended 
his life, and out of respect to his memory, voted to attend his 
body to the place of interment and to provide a monumental 
stone in the burial ground where his remains should be de- 
posited, with such inscription as the Count d'Estaing might 
order. 

The Count, who through all bore himself in a manner 
which will forever make the city of Boston and the whole 
country his debtors, was deeply grateful for the sentiment 
which the Court expressed, but it was thought advisable that 
the funeral be less public, and the unhappy young man was 
buried at night, it is believed beneath us in this church, and 
without display, exactly as he had wished it. 

Listen to the account of the burial as told by the secretary 
of the fleet : 

"Eight sailors of the ' Tonnant' bore the coffin on their shoulders. 
I preceded them with the sexton and grave digger ; the recollet M. 
M. de Borda, de Puyse'gur and Pierveres followed ; the servant of 
the deceased and perhaps two or three Frenchmen closed the pro- 



5i 

cession. We started in that order at ten o'clock, and arriving at 
the church called King's Chapel, found the basement of the church 
illuminated with many candles, without ostentation. The vault was 
opened and the Reverend Father deposited the remains without 
ceremony. The door of the vault having been closed and pad- 
locked, we returned to sign a certificate of interment which I had 
already drawn up. In fine, what we had been charged to do could 
not have been done with more precision and exactness." 

And so passed from this world — as d'Estaing wrote to the 
Council* — one who fell a victim to the desire he had of pre- 
serving the lives of others, and who expressed in his last 
moments, and with his last words, the hope that his mis- 
fortune might only serve to cement still further the union 
between France and America. 

The funeral having taken place, the allied leaders en- 
deavored so far as possible to forget the incident and to 
remove all traces of ill feeling which it may have left. 
D'Estaing and his officers appeared publicly in Boston in full 
dress. They were saluted in the harbor and were met upon 
their landing by a committee of both houses of the legislature 
and conducted to the Council chamber. After the reception 
there, they had breakfast with General Hancock and later 
took punch with Heath at headquarters. Tradition has it 
that the Common was resplendent with the gold lace of the 
visitors and that Madam Hancock, in order to meet the sit- 
uation with which she was confronted, had to send out and 
milk all the cows on the Common. 

A few days later there was a grand public dinner in Faneuil 
Hall, where but two short weeks ago the city entertained the 
great Marshal of modern France. f The dinner of 1778 was 
attended by upwards of five hundred guests, and twenty-three 
toasts were drunk to the accompaniment of the discharge of 

* Letter of Sept. 19, 1778, in the State Archives, Documents, Vol. 200, p. 
103, printed in the Report of the Committee on Libraries (1905), Senate No. 
336, p. 16. 

t Marshal Joffre and the French War Mission May 12, 191 7. 



52 

cannon. One of the toasts we may repeat in spirit today- 
"The Alliance between France and America; may it never 
be broken." 

Thus, through the wisdom exercised by both sides, was 
closed a most unfortunate affair. And too well was it for- 
gotten, for upon inquiry made one hundred and twenty-five 
years after the Chevalier's death as to where in Boston the 
monument to him was erected, it was discovered that the vote 
of the Court had never been carried out. Just why, is a 
mystery ; but now the promise of the state has been fulfilled ; 
the shaft bearing the inscription written by d'Estaing has 
been unveiled before us, and we are gathered together in this 
church to commemorate the event. 

Let me recite the inscription in English : 

" In memory of the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur, First Chamber- 
lain of His Royal Highness Count d'Artois, brother of his Majesty, 
the King of France. 

" This officer, Aide-Major of the French Fleet and a Lieutenant 
on the ' Tonnant, ' after having had the happiness of risking his 
life for the United States, was in the performance of his duty 
when he became the victim of a tumult caused by persons of evil 
intent ; dying with the same attachment for America, the ties of 
duty and sympathy which bind his compatriots to the City of Bos- 
ton have thus been drawn tighter. May all efforts to separate 
France and America be as unfruitful. Such is the prayer to Al- 
mighty God which in the centuries to come every Frenchman and 
American will offer whose eyes shall fall upon this monument to 
a young man taken from his friends, who can be consoled for his 
loss only by seeing such funeral flowers spread upon his tomb." 

Noble words and true. And what time more fitting than 
the present for this occasion, when we find ourselves once 
more allied with France, not for the independence of a single 
nation but in a great war for the independence of the nations 
of the world — to make the world " safe for democracy." For 
this stone which the Commonwealth has raised is more than 
a monument to one man, or evidence of the good faith of the 




THE GOVERNOR, LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR AND SPEAKERS 
IN FRONT OF THE MONUMENT. 



53 

state, it is a memorial to a time long since past; yes, — it is 
more than that, it is a perpetual reminder of the friendship of 
America and France, which has endured these hundred years, 
just as de Saint-Sauveur hoped that it might -and which, 
pray God, may endure forever. 

And so, the monument has been placed in the heart of 
this great and historic city of Boston, where so much has 
been done for human liberty, and where so much has been 
done to alleviate the sufferings of mankind, placed where the 
throngs passing daily upon the street may see and pause to 
consider, and where in future years the American father may 
come with his son, and when the son asks, " Father, what is 
that monument for?" may reply, " My son, that is a mem- 
orial to a young French officer who lost his life in Boston 
when France was helping us to gain our independence, 
erected by the State to show that we have not forgotten the 
sacrifice which he and other Frenchmen then made for us, 
and as a mark of our regard for France, liberty loving like us 
and one with us in the cause of humanity and civilization, a 
union which with God's help we shall neither of us sever." 

The last speaker was Major Paul Azan who spoke in 
French. 

ADDRESS OF MAJOR AZAN. 

Excellence, Mesdames et Messieurs : 

L'absence de M. Jusserand, qui compte de si nombreuses 
sympathies dans les villes de Boston et de Cambridge, me 
donne le grand honneur de representer aujourd'hui la France 
dans cette touchante ceremonie. 

Ainsi, par un etrange concours de circonstances, c'est un 
officier francais qui a le privilege, apres 139 ans, de donner le 
salut de la Mere-Patrie a une tombe presque oubliee. La 
"General Court" n'avait pas prevu, en 1778, que son voeu 
serait realise si tardivement, alors que d'autres officiers serai- 
ent venus en Massachusetts, apporter aux jeunes gens de 



54 

l'Universite Harvard le fruit d'une experience acquise sur les 
champs de bataille. 

Si le temps a passe, les sentiments affectueux qui unissaient 
nos deux nations au XVIII e siecle ne se sont pas att^nu^s ; 
ils se sont meme singulierement developpes depuis quelques 
annees. C'est aux jours d'epreuve qu'on reconnait les v6ri- 
tables amities. L'amitie americaine s'est revelee sous toutes 
ses formes : par une inepuisable charite, par une assistance 
morale de tous les instants, par une intervention militaire 
dont les effets etonneront le monde. 

Ceux qui ne connaissent pas suffisament l'ame fran9aise et 
l'ame americaine ne comprennent pas toute la profondeur de 
cette attirance mutuelle, basee sur la delicatesse de senti- 
ments, sur l'estime reciproque et surtout sur un amour com- 
mun de l'independance. 

Au temps du chevalier de Saint-Sauveur, un officier fran- 
cais, le capitaine de Raimondis, qui etait manchot, et dont on 
vous parlait tout-a-1'heure avec eloquence, disait qu'il don- 
nerait sans hesiter le bras qui lui restait pour la cause ameri- 
caine. Les officiers francais d'aujourd'hui pensent de meme ; 
et plus d'un, malgre les blessures revues, ne reve qu'a retour- 
ner au combat, pour faire triompher avec l'armee americaine 
le principe de la liberte des peuples. 

Toutes les rivalites, toutes les inimities qui pouvaient exister 
a l'epoque du chevalier de Saint-Sauveur ont disparu, laissant 
s'etablir une intimite complete entre les peuples amis de l'in- 
dependance. . . 

La legende rapporte que, si le chevalier de Saint-Sauveur 
fut frappe par la foule, c'est par suite d'une erreur qui l'avait 
fait prendre pour un Anglais. Aujourd'hui, les Anglais sont 
nos allies, nos amis ; nulle trace ne reste, dans notre esprit, 
des inimities d'autrefois, parce que les Anglais se sont tou- 
jours battus en gentlemen, avec des precedes loyaux. Nous 
marchons maintenant avec eux la main clans la main, comme 
avec les Americains. 

Aussi y a-t-il, dans la ceremonie de ce jour, un symbole 



55 

touchant de l'amitie entre nos trois peuples. Nous venons, 
devant ce monument, non seulement d^plorer le malheureux 
accident arrive naguere a un officier francais, mais encore 
celebrer la reconciliation des peuples americain et francais 
avec les Anglais, leurs ennemis d'antan. Tous sont unis 
aujourd'hui pour la merae cause, et dependent avec ardeur 
la civilisation menae.ee. 

Et vous, chevalier de Saint-Sauveur, qui avez eu jadis des 
funerailles modestes, avec une assistance restreinte, dans 
l'obscurite de la nuit, vous recevez aujourd'hui un hommage 
eclatant. C'est la population de Boston, ce sont les hauts 
dignitaires de l'Etat, ce sont les representants de la plus 
vieille Universite de l'Amerique qui viennent ici honorer votre 
memoire. 

Leur hommage va, par dessus votre monument, a la France 
heroique, a la France qui se bat, a la France qui a 6t6 incarnee 
recemment ici par un de ses plus illustres generaux, le mare- 
chal Joffre. II va au soldat des tranches, qui depuis bientot 
trois ans combat sans repit, mais sans faiblesse. II va enfin 
au soldat americain, qui partagera bient6t les souffrances et 
les dangers du soldat francos ; il va a cette armee en forma- 
tion dont l'entree en ligne decidera certainement la Victoire. 

TRANSLATION. 
By Professor Barrett Wendell of Harvard University. 
Your Excellency, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

The absence of Monsieur Jusserand, who has so many 
friendships in Boston and in Cambridge, brings me to-day the 
great honor of representing France in the touching ceremony 
for which we are gathered together. 

So, by a remarkable chain of circumstances, it is a French 
officer, who has the privilege, after 1 39 years, of bringing the 
benediction of the Mother Country to a tomb almost forgot- 
ten. In 1778, the General Court could never have thought 
that its purpose would stay unfulfilled until a time when 



56 

other French officers should have come to Massachusetts, 
bearing to Harvard Students the fruit of experience to be 
found only on the fields of battle. 

Yet, though time has passed, the bonds of affection which 
held our two nations together in the 18th century have no- 
wise weakened ; rather, in these latest years they have grown 
stronger than ever. It is in days of stress that we come to 
know what friendships are true. The friendship of America 
for France, in these days has proved itself in every way. In 
charity it has been boundless, in moral support it has been 
unfailing, in military aid it has begun a work of which the 
results will surprise the world. 

None but those who truly know the soul of France and the 
soul of America can understand the full strength of the mutual 
attraction which thus binds our countries together. It is a 
matter not only of tender feeling, not only of regard for each 
others' virtues, but most of all a matter of our common pas- 
sion for national independence. 

In the times of the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur, a French 
officer, Captain de Raimondis, who had lost an arm, said that 
he would eagerly give the arm that was left him for the cause 
of American independence. French officers of to-day are of 
the same mind ; in spite of wounds hardly healed they think 
only of when they may be allowed to rejoin the battle, to 
fight with Americans at their side for the great principle that 
peoples must be free. 

Every rivalry, every enmity which may have existed when 
the Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur was here is now a thing of 
the past. The peoples who love independence are now com- 
pletely one. 

There is a tradition that when the Chevalier de Saint- 
Sauveur was struck down by a mob, it was because by some 
blunder of their own, the mob fancied him to be English. At 
that time the English were at war with America, and with 
France too. To-day they are our friends, our allies, and those 
of America as well. In France there is no trace left of the 



57 

old feuds. From beginning to end the English have fought 
like loyal gentlemen. We are glad to march with them side 
by side, hand in hand, just as we are glad to grasp the hands 
of Americans. 

So the ceremony of to-day is a beautiful symbol of the 
friendship which now animates our three peoples. We come 
here, not only to lament the luckless accident which in olden 
time befell a gallant French officer, but more still to cele- 
brate the reconciliation of nations in his days at war with one 
another. All three are to-day united in a common cause ; all 
alike are arisen to defend and to preserve civilization, threat- 
ened by their common foe. 

So you, Chevalier de Saint-Sauveur, you whose funeral was 
so simple, with few mourners, and in the darkness of night, 
you receive to-day a tribute such as few have known. The 
people of Boston, the dignitaries of the state, the representa- 
tives of the eldest of American universities, are gathered to- 
gether here, in homage to your loyal memory. 

Their homage is rendered not only to you. For them your 
monument enshrines the ideal of France, heroic, at war — the 
France embodied here only a few days ago by that most illus- 
trious of our generals, Marshal J off re. Their homage is ren- 
dered as well to the French soldier in the trenches, where for 
almost three years he has fought incessantly, unfaltering. It 
is rendered also to the soldier of America who will soon share 
the hardships and the dangers of the soldier of France. It is 
rendered to that army, now gathering together, whose joining 
with ours will bring us all the certainty of Victory. 

During the ceremonies all joined in singing the " Star 
Spangled Banner " and the " Marseillais," and thus did 
Massachusetts keep as a pledge of love and honor a promise 
made in the Revolution. When it is considered that on May 
24, 1917, the General Court "attended in procession" to the 
place where, it is recorded, the Chevalier was buried, as the 
Court had voted to do one hundred and thirty-nine years be- 



58 

fore, and there dedicated a monument bearing the inscription 
which d'Estaing, acting under the vote of the Court, had 
written, the occasion is shown to be unique in the history 
of the City and the Commonwealth, and one that those 
present may well remember. 



NOTE 

A "communication" in the Independent Ledger of September 14, 1778. 

The riot which occasioned the issuing a proclamation by the Council of 
this State, offering an high reward for the discovery and apprehension of those 
concerned therein, was begun, it's said, by seamen captur'd in British vessels 
and some of Burgoyne's army who had inlisted as privateers just ready to sail. 
A body of these fellows demanded, we are told, bread of the French bakers 
who were employed for the supplying the Count d'Estaing's fleet ; being re- 
fused, they fell upon the bakers with clubs, and beat them in a most outrage- 
ous manner. Two officers of the Count's being apprized of the tumult, and 
attempting to compose the affray were greatly wounded ; one of them is a 

person of distinguished family and rank 

We are well informed that his Excellency the Count D'Estaing, upon hear- 
ing of the violence that had been committed though much grieved con- 
sidered the manner in the calmest and most prudent light, and was thoroughly 
satisfied that it was highly disagreeable to the inhabitants and that every 
proper method would be taken for finding out and punishing the offenders. 
Such prudence and moderation mark this great man and must disappoint the 
hopes of our enemies, who would be glad that every such incident might prove 
the means of creating dissentions of a more extensive and important nature. 

A correspondent observes, that there is a striking contrast between the 
behavior of the British military of this town, and that of the French. The 
former, though coming from what we formerly regarded as our mother country 
and with a professed design to support law, and protect us, yet in a wanton 
and butcherly manner fired upon the inhabitants of Boston, without any just 
provocation, before they received any assault that might afford even a pre- 
tence to so bloody a procedure ; the latter now become by the oppression and 
cruelties of Britain our allies and protectors when assaulted themselves by un- 
known ruffians, have left their protection and satisfaction entirely in the hands 
of the civil magistrate. Nay, we have it from good authority, that the General, 
the Count d'Estaing, has desired that should any inhabitant appear to have 
been concerned in this affray, he might not be punished, and the centuries at 
the French baking house were prohibited from using any violence in defending 
even so necessary an article as bread for their fleet. 



OFFICERS 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION 



Presidents 

♦CURTIS GUILD, 18S1-1906 *JAMES F. HUNNEWELL, 1907-1910 

GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS, 191 1 

Vice-Presiden t 
Francis H. Manning, 1907 



Clerks and Treasurers t 



*Samuel M. Quincy . 


18S1- 


1884 


James M. Hubbard . 


1884- 


1885 


*Daniel T. V. Huntoon 


1885- 


1 886 
Di 


♦Thomas J. Allen . . 


1886- 


1887 


*Thomas C. Amory . . 


1884- 


1889 


*William S. Appleton j 


1884- 
1890- 


1889 
1894 


♦William H. Baldwin 


1884- 


1886 


*S. Arthur Bent . . 




1890 


*Robert R. Bishop . . 


1SS2- 


1884 


Joshua P. L. Bodfish . 


18S5- 


1914 


*Francis H. Brown . . 


1911- 


1917 


*George O. Carpenter 


1S88- 


1896 


*Benjamin C. Clark . 


1890- 


1906 


*David H. Coolidge . 


1895- 


1907 


Henry W. CUNNINGHAM1913 




*Jacob A. Dresser . . 


1891- 


1894 


John W. Farwell . . 


1907 




*Albert A. Folsom . . 


1S97- 


1907 


Courtenay Guild . . 


1908 




♦Curtis Guild .... 


1881- 


1906 


•John T. Hassam . . . 


1881- 


1890 



*WlLLIAM C. BURRAGE . 1SS6-1S9O 

*S. Arthur Bent . . 1 890-1 S99 
Charles F. Read . . 1899 ■ 



ctors 
♦Hamilton A. Hill . 
*James F. Hunnewell 
♦John Lathrop . . 
♦Abbott Lawrence . 

William H. Lincoln 

Francis H. Manning 
♦William T. R. Marvin 

Joseph Grafton Minot 
♦Thomas Minns . . . 

Grenville H. Norcross 

Frederick W. Parker 
♦Edward G. Porter 
♦Samuel H. Russell 
♦Samuel E. Sawyer 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
* William W. Warren . 
♦William H. Whitmore 
♦Levi L. Willcutt . . 



* Deceased. 
t The offices of Clerk and Treasurer are held by one person. 



18S3 
1894- 
1887- 



-l89S 
-1910 
-1899 
-1884 
-1903 



1904 
1900- 
1912 — 
1881-1885 

1 90S 

1917 - 

1896- 

18S2 



-I9I3 



-1900 



I 9 I 5 

1906 

1886-1890 
i 883- i 886 
1894-1912 



OFFICERS FOR 1918 



President 
GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS 

Vice-President 
Francis H. Manning 

Clerk and Treasurer 

Charles F. Read 

P. O. Address, Old State House, Boston 

Directors 



Courtenay Guild 
Joseph Grafton Minot 
Henry W. Cunningham 
Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 



Francis H. Manning 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
John W. Farwell 
Grenville II. Norcross 

Frederick W. Parker 

Committee on Finance 

Francis H. Manning Courtenay Guild 

The President 

Committee on the Rooms 



Francis H. Manning 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
Courtenay Guild 



Joseph Grafton Minot 
Henry W. Cunningham 
The President and Clerk 
ex officiis 
Committee on the Library 



Edward Percival Merritt 
John Woodbury 
The Clerk 



Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
Walter K. Watkins 
William G. Shillaeer 

Committee on Papers 
Frederick W. Parker James P. Parmenter 

William O. Comstock The Clerk 

Committee on Publications 
John W. Farwell Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 

Albert Matthews James M. IIunnewell 

The Clerk 

Committee on Me?)ibership 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr. Alexander W. Longfellow 



William L. Allen 
Louis Bacon 



Allan Forbes 
The Clerk 
Committee on Memorials 
Courtenay Guild Frank E. Woodward 

Boyi.ston A. 1'eal The Clerk 

Delegates to the Bay State Historical League 
William Rotch | Miss Elizabeth F. Kelly 

The President 



CUSTODIANS 

Robert B. Smith Charles B. Brooks 

Thomas M. Hutchinson Herbert E. Burrage 

Henry M. Nourse 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 

MAY I, 1918 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



*Bent, Samuel Arthur 
Bodfisb, Joshua Peter Langley 
*Chamberlain, Mellen 
Eley, James 



*GuiId, Curtis 
Matthews. Nathan 
♦O'Brien, Hugh 
* Smith, Samuel Francis 



LIFE MEMBERS 



Abbe, Henry Thayer 
Abbot, Edward Stanley 
Abbot, Edwin Hale 
*Abbot, Francis Ellingwood 
♦Abbott, Marshall Kittredge 
Abbott, Samuel 
*Adams, Alexander Clinton 
* Adams, Charles Francis 
Adams, Mrs. Isabella Hortense 
Adams, James 
Addicks, John Edward 
Alden, Henry Bailey 
Allan, Mrs. Anna 
Allen, Miss Clara Ann 
*Allen, Crawford Carter 
*Allen, Elbridge Gerry 
Allen, Francis Richmond 
Allen, Frank Gilman 



Allen, Gardner Weld 
Allen, Herbert McClellan 
:i Allen, James Woodward 
Allen, Thomas 

* Alley, John Robinson 
*Ames, Mrs. Anna Coffin 
*Ames, Charles Gordon 
*Ames, Frederick Lothrop 
*Ames, Oliver 
*Ames, Mrs. Rebecca Caroline 

* Amory, Arthur 
Amory, Francis Inman 
Amory, Frederic 
Amster, Nathan Leonard 
*Andrews, Frank William 
Andrews, John Adams 
*Angell, Henry Clay 
*Anthony, Silas Reed 

* Deceased. 



62 



♦Appleton, Mrs. Emily Warren 
Appleton, Francis Henry 
*Appleton, Nathan 
*Appleton, William Sumner 
Appleton, William Sumner 
♦Armstrong, George Washington 
♦Atherton, Joseph Ballard 
Atherton, Miss Lily Bell 
♦Atkins, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Atwood, David Edgar 
♦Austin, James Walker 
*Ayer, James Bourne 
Bacon, Charles Francis 
Bacon, Mrs. Louisa Crowninshield 
Badger, Arthur Campbell 
Badger, Daniel Bradford 
♦Badger, Erastus Beethoven 
Badger, Wallis Ball 
♦Bailey, Joseph Tilden 
Baker, Charles Morrill 
♦Baker, Miss Charlotte Alice 
♦Baker, Mrs. Ellen Maria 
Baker, Ezra Henry 
♦Baker, Richard 
♦Baldwin, William Henry 
♦Ballister, Joseph Fennelly 
♦Ballister, Miss Minetta Josephine 
Bancroft, Cornelius Cheever 
Barker, Frederic Rutherford 
Barlow, Charles Lowell 
Barnes, Charles Benjamin 
Barney, Mrs. Mabel Fairchild 

Wheaton 
♦Barrett, Edwin Shepard 
Barron, Clarence Walker 
Barry, Charles Stoddard 
Barry, George Thomas • 
♦Barry, John Lincoln 
♦Barry, John Lincoln 
♦Bartlett, Francis 
Bartlett, Miss Mary Foster 
Bartlett, Ralph Sylvester 
Batcheller, Robert 
Bayley, Frank William 
♦Beal, James Henry 



Beal, William Fields 
Beatty, Franklin Thomason 
Beebe, Edward Pierson 
♦Beebe, James Arthur 
Beech, Mrs. Ruth Adelaide 
Bennett, Henry Dexter 
♦Benson, George Wiggin 
Benton, Everett Chamberlin 
Bigelow, Alanson, Jr. 
Bigelow, Albert Smith 
♦Bigelow, George Brooks 
Bigelow, Joseph Smith 
Bigelow, Melville Madison 
Bigelow, William Sturgis 
Binney, Henry Prentice 
Black, George Nixon 
Blake, Clarence John 
Blake, Mrs. Frances Greenough 
♦Blake, Francis 
Blake, George Baty 
Blake, Hallie Carroll 
♦Blake, Mrs. Sara Putnam 
♦Blake, Stanton 
Blake, William Payne 
♦Blanchard, Samuel Stillman 
Blanchard, Miss Sarah Harding 
Blaney, Dwight 
♦Blume, Mrs. Susan Eliza 
♦Boardman, Samuel May 
Boardman, Waldo Elias 
Bodwell, William Pearle 
♦Bordman, John 
♦Bowditch, Alfred 
Bowditch, Ernest William 
♦Bowditch, William Ingersoll 
Bowdlear, William Henry 
♦Bradford, Martin Luther 
Bradford, William Burroughs 
♦Bradlee, Caleb Davis 
Bradlee, Frederick Josiah 
Bradlee, Frederick Wainwright 
♦Bradlee, Josiah Putnam 
Bradley, Jerry Payson 
Brayley, Arthur Wellington 
Bremer, John Lewis 



* Deceased. 



63 



*Bremer, Mrs. Mary Rice 
Bremer, Samuel Parker 
Brewer, William Conant 

* Brewer, William Dade 
Bridge, Frederick William 
Briggs, Lloyd Vernon 
*Brimmer, Martin 
Brooks, Gorham 

* Brooks, John Henry 
Brooks, Peter Chardon 
Brooks, Shepherd 
Brown, Davenport 

Brown, Miss Elizabeth Bowen 
*Brown, Francis Henry 
Brown, George Washington 
Brown. Harold Haskell 
Brown, Harry Webster 
*Brown, John Coffin Jones 
Brown, Reginald Woodman Plu 

mer 
Brown, Thomas Hassall 
*Browne, Charles Allen 
*Browne, Edward Ingersoll 
*Browne, William Andrews 
Bullivant, William Maurice 
Burbank, Alonzo Norman 
Burdett, Fred Hartshorne 
*Burnham, John Appleton 
Burr, Miss Annie Lane 
Burrage, Albert Cameron 
Burrage, Charles Dana 
Burrage, Herbert Emory 
*Burrage, William Clarence 
Burroughs, George 
Butler, William 
Byrnes, Timothy Edward 
*Cabot, Arthur Tracy 
Cabot, Francis Elliot 
Candage, Mrs. Ella Marie 
Candage, Robert Brooks 
*Candage, Rufus George Frederi 
*Candler, John Wilson 
Carlin, William Joseph 
*Carpenter, George Oliver 
Carpenter, George Oliver 



*Carpenter, Mrs. Maria Josephine 
*Carr, John 

Carruth, Charles Theodore 
Carstein, Lawrence William 
Carter, Fred Louis 
Carter, Mrs. Helen Burrage 
Carter, Herbert Leslie 
""Center, Joseph Hudson 
*Chamberlin, Charles Wheelwright 
Chandler, Cleaveland Angier 
*Chapin, Nahum 
*Chase, Caleb 
Chase, Frank Ernest 
*Chase, George Bigelow 
Chase, Sidney 
Chase, Stephen 
*Chase, Theodore 
Cheney, Benjamin Peirce 
*Cheney, Mrs. Emeline 
Child, Dudley Richards 
Church, Herbert Bleloch 
*Clapp, Mrs. Caroline Dennie 
Clapp, Clift Rogers 
*Clark, Charles Edward 
Clark, John Spencer 
*Clark, Miss Nancy Joy 
*Clark, Nathan Freeman 
*Clarke, Mrs. Alice de Verniandois 
Clarke, Henry Martyn 
*Clay, Thomas Hart 
*Clementson, Sidney 
Cleveland, Mrs. Corinne Maud 
Cobb, John Candler 
*Codman, John, 2d 
Codman, Miss Martha Catherine 
*Codman, Mrs. Martha Pickman 
Codman, Ogden 
Codman, William Coombs 
Coffin, Frederick Seymour 
*Colburn, Jeremiah 
ck *Collamore, Miss Helen 
Colley, William Edgar 
Comer, Miss Josephine Sarah 
•Converse, Elisha Slade 
Coolidge, Algernon, Jr. 

Deceased. 



6 4 



Coolidge, Charles Allerton 
*Coolidge, David Hill 
Coolidge, Mrs. Helen Whittington 
Coolidge, Joseph Randolph 
Coolidge, Mrs. Julia 
*Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson, Jr. 
Coolidge, William Henry 
Cooney, Charles Lawrence 
Corbett, Alexander, Jr. 
""Cordis, Mrs. Adelaide Elizabeth 
Cory, Charles Barney 
Cotting, Charles Edward 
*Cotting, Charles Uriah 
*Crafts, John Chancellor 
Crandon, Edwin Sanford 
Crawford, George Artemas 
Crehore, Charles Lemuel 
Crocker, David 
*Crocker, George Glover 
*Crocker, Miss Sarah Haskell 
*Crosby, Charles Augustus Wilkins 
Crossett, Lewis Abbott 
Crowell, Horace Sears 
*Crowninshield, Benjamin William 
Crowninshield, Francis Boardman 
Cruft, George Theodore 
*Cruft, Miss Harriet Otis 
*Cummings, Charles Amos 
Cummings, Thomas Cahill 
Cunningham, Henry Winchester 
*Curtis, Caleb Agry 
*Curtis, Charles Pelham 
*Curtis, Mrs. Eliza Fox 
*Curtis, Hall 
Curtis, Mrs. Harriot 
* Curtis, Henry Pelham 
Curtis, Horatio Greenough 
Curtis, John Silsbee 
Curtiss, Frederick Haines 
*Cushing, Livingston 
Cutler, Charles Francis 
*Cutler, Samuel Newton 
*Cutter, Abram Edmands 
*Cutter, Benjamin French 
Cutter, Mrs. Elizabeth Finley 



Cutter, Leonard Francis 
*Cutter, Watson Grant 
Daily, Edward Bernard 
*Damon, Frank Herbert 
Dana, Edward Percy 
Dana, Harold Ward 
Dana, William Franklin 
*Daniell, Moses Grant 
Danker, Daniel Joseph 
Darling, Charles Kimball 
Davenport, George Howe 

* Davenport, Orlando Henry 
Davis, Arthur Edward 
*Davis, Ephraim Collins 
Davis, George Henry 

* Davis, James Clarke 
*Davis, Joseph Alba 
Davis, Mrs. Mary Cheney 
Davis, William Henry 
Day, Hilbert Francis 
*Day, William Francis 
*Dean, Benjamin 
*Dean, John Ward 
*Dean, Luni Albertus 
'Deblois, Stephen Grant 
"Denny, Daniel 
Devlin, Edward 

Dewey, William Richardson 
*Dewing, Benjamin Hill 
Dexter, George Blake 

* Dexter, Morton 

* Dexter, William Sohier 
*Dill, Thomas Bradford 
Dillaway, William Edward Lovell 
*Dodd, George Davis 

Dorr, Mrs. Edith Sprague 
*Dorr, Francis Oliver 
Dorr, George Bucknam 
Dow, Richard Sylvester 

* Draper, Eben Sumner 
Draper, George Albert 
Dresel, Ellis Loring 
*Dupee, Henry Dorr 
*Dupee, James Alexander 
Dutton, Harry 



* Deceased. 



65 



*D\vight, Edmund 
Dwinnell, Clifton Howard 
*Dyer, Mrs. Julia Knowlton 
Dysart, Robert 
Eaton, Albert 

*Eaton, Miss Georgiana Goddard 
Eaton, Miss Lucy Houghton 
* Eaton, Walter David 
Edes, Henry Herbert 
*Edmands, John Rayner 
Edmonds, John Henry 
Edwards, Miss Grace 
Edwards, Miss Hannah Marcy 
Eliot, Christopher Rhodes 
*Eliot, Samuel 
Ellery, William 
Elliot, George Buxton 
Emerson, Abraham Silver 
*Emerson, George Robert 
*Emery, Francis Faulkner 
*Endicott, William 
Endicott, William 
Endicott, William Crowninshield 
Ernst, Mrs. Ellen Lunt 
Ernst, Harold Clarence 
Estabrook, Arthur Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick Watson 
*Estes, Dana 

Eustis, Miss Elizabeth Mussey 
Eustis, Henry Dutton 
Eustis, Joseph Tracy 
Eustis, Miss Mary St. Barbe 
Everett, Henry Coffin 
*Fabyan, George Francis 
*Fairbanks, Frederick Clinton 
Fales, Herbert Emerson 
Farnsworth, Edward Miller 
Farnsworth, William 
*Farrington, Charles Frederick 
Farwell, John Whittemore 
Fay, Dudley Bowditch 
Fay, Henry Howard 
*Fay, Joseph Story 
*Fay, Joseph Story, Jr. 



*Fay, Sigourney Webster 
*Fearing, Andrew Coatsworth 
*FeIton, Frederic Luther 
*Fenno, John Brooks 
*Fenno, Lawrence Carteret 
*Ferris, Mortimer Catlin 
Fish, Frederick Perry 
Fiske, Andrew 

*Fiske, Mrs. Charlotte Morse 
*Fiske, Miss Elizabeth Stanley 
Fitz, Mrs. Henrietta Goddard 
*Fitz, Reginald Heber 
Fitzgerald, William Francis 
Floyd, Charles Harold 
*Fogg, John Samuel Hill 
*Folsom, Mrs. Julia Elizabeth 
*Ford, Daniel Sharp 
Foss, Eugene Noble 
Foss, Leon Frederic 
Foster, Miss Harriet Wood 
*Foster, John 

•Foster, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
Fowle, Seth Augustus 
*Fowler, Mrs. Laura Wentworth 
Fowler, Robert 
Fowler, William Plumer 
*French, Miss Caroline Louisa Wil- 
liams 
* French, Miss Cornelia Anne 
*French, Mrs. Frances Maria 
*French, Frederick William 
*French, Jonathan 
Frothingham, Mrs. Mary Shreve 
*Frothingham, Thomas Goddard 
Frye, James Albert 
*Fuller, Charles Emerson 
*Fuller, Henry Holton 
Gagnebin, Charles Louis 
Gallagher, Hugh Clifford 
*Gallivan, Timothy Aloysius 
*Galloupe, Charles William 
*Galloupe, Mrs. Sarah Augusta 
Gardiner, Robert Hallowell 
'"Gardner. Augustus Peabody 
Gardner, George Peabody 



* Deceased. 



66 



♦Gardner, John Lowell 
Gaugengigl, Ignaz Marcel 
*Gay, Edwin Whitney 
♦Gay, Ernest Lewis 
*Gay, Frederick Lewis 
•George, Elijah 

♦Giddings, Mrs. Susan Kittredge 
Gilbert, Shepard Devereux 
♦Gill, James Seel 
Gill, Mrs. Matilda 
♦Gill, Mrs. Rachel Maria 
Gilman, Osmon Burnap 
♦Glasier, Alfred Adolphus 
Gleason, James Mellen 
♦Glines, Edward 
Goddard, George Augustus 
Goddard, Miss Julia 
♦Goodhue, Francis Abbot 
♦Goodrich, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
♦Gould, Benjamin Apthorp 
Gould, George Lambert 
Gould, Marshall Hopkins 
♦Grandin, John Livingston 

Graves, Frank Neal 

♦Gray, Reginald 

Gray, Roland 

Gray, Russell 

Green, Charles Montraville 

Green, Philip Arthur 

Green, Samuel Abbott 

♦Greene, Francis Bunker 

♦Greenough, Francis Boott 

Grew, Edward Wigglesworth 

♦Grew, Henry Sturgis 

*Griggs, John Hammond 

Grozier, Edwin Atkins 

Guild, Courtenay 

♦Guild, Curtis 

♦Guild, Mrs. Sarah Crocker 

Guild, Miss Sarah Louisa 

Gurney, Frank Pierce 

Hagar, Eugene Bigelow 

♦Haigh, John 

♦Hale, Mrs. Ellen Sever 

Hall, Mrs. Ellen Page 



♦Hall, George Gardner 
♦Hall, Henry Lyon 
Hall, Prescott Farnsworth 
♦Hall, Thomas Bartlett 
Hammer, Charles Dunkel 
♦Hammond, Mrs. Ellen Sarah 

Sophia 
•Hammond, Gardiner Greene 
♦Hammond, George Warren 
♦Hancock, Franklin 
•Hapgood, Warren 
Hardy, John Dudley 
Harrington, George 
Harrison, Walter James 
Hart, Thomas Norton 
♦Hart, William Tennant 
♦Hartt, John F 
Haskell, William Andrew 
♦Hassam, John Tyler 
♦Hastings, Henry 
Hathaway, Charles Francis 
♦Haven, Franklin 
Haven, Miss Mary Eliza 
Hayford, Nathan Holbrook 
♦Haynes, James Gilson 
♦Haynes, John Cummings 
♦Hay ward, George 
Hayward, James Warren 
♦Head, Charles 
♦Hecht, Jacob Hirsch 
Hemenway, Alfred 
Hemenway, Augustus 
♦Henchman, Nathaniel Hurd 
Henry, William Linzee 
Henshaw, Samuel 
Herrick, Robert Frederick 
Hewins, James 
Hickok, Gilman Clarke 
Higginson, Francis Lee 
Higginson, Mrs. Ida Agassiz 
Hill, Donald McKay 
♦Hill, Hamilton Andrews 
♦Hill, Henry Eveleth 
♦Hill, James Edward Radford 
♦Hill, Warren May 



* Deceased. 



67 



*Hill, William Henry 
Hills, Edwin Augustus 
*Hinckley, Frederic 
Hodgkins, Joseph Wilson 
Hoffman, Mrs. Rebecca Russell 
*Hoitt, Alfred Demeritt 
*Holden, Joshua Bennett 
•Hollingsworth, Amor Leander 
•Hollingsworth, Sumner 
Hollingsworth, Valentine 
Hollingsworth, Zachary Taylor 
•Holman, Charles Bradley 
Holmes, Edward Jackson 
•Homans, Charles Dudley 
•Homans, George Henry 
*Homans, John, 2nd 
Hooper, Mrs. Alice Perkins 
Hooper, Mrs. Mary Davis Beal 

* Hooper, Robert Chamblet 
Hooper, William 

* Hopkins, Amos Lawrence 
Hopper, Ralph Waldo Emerson 
Hornblower, Henry 
*Horsford, Eben Norton 
Houghton, Clement Stevens 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth Good- 
ridge 

*Hovey, Henry Stone 
Howard, Herbert Burr 
Howe, Elmer Parker 
Howe, Mark Anthony De Wolfe 
Howe, Octavius Thorndike 
Howes, Daniel Havens 
Hubbard, Charles Wells 
Hubbard, Orrin Calvin 
Hubbard, Paul Mascarene 
Hughes, Miss Laura Ann Cleophas 
Hunneman, William Cooper 
Hunnewell, Francis Welles 
*Hunnewell, James Frothingham 
Hunnewell, James Melville 

* Hunnewell, Mrs. Sarah Melville 
Hunter, Herbert Forester 
Hurd, Edward Payson 
Hurlbut, Mrs. Eda Adams 



•Hutchings, George Sherburne 
Iasigi, Mrs. Amy Gore 
•Jackson, Mrs. Mary Stuart 
""Jackson, William 
Jacobs, Mrs. Garrie 
James, Arthur Holmes 
*James, George Abbot 
•Jeffries, Benjamin Joy 
Jenks, Henry Fitch 
Jenney, Bernard 
•Jenney, William Thacher 
Johnson, Arthur Stoddard 
Johnson, Mrs. Fanny Betts 
•Johnson, Wolcott Howe 
•Jones, Daniel Wayland 
•Jones, Jerome 
Jones, Nathaniel Royal 
•Joy, Franklin Lawrence 
•Keith, Benjamin Franklin 
Kellen, William Vail 
Kelly, Miss Elizabeth Farley 
Kelly, Fitzroy 
Kemp, Clarence Charles 
•Kennard, Martin Parry 
•Kennedy, George Golding 
Kennedy, John Joseph 
Kent, Mrs. Alice Cotting 
Keyes, William Herbert 
Kidder, Charles Archbald 
Kidder, Nathaniel Thayer 
Kilburn, Warren Silver 
Kimball, Miss Augusta Caroline 
Kimball, Mrs. Caroline Sampson 
Kimball, Mrs. Clara Bertram 
Kimball, David Pulsifer 
Kimball, Lemuel Cushing 
•Kimball, Mrs. Susan Tillinghast 
Kitson, Henry Hudson 
Knight, Arthur Stearns 
•Kuhn, Hamilton 
Ladd, Babson Savilian 
Ladd, Mrs. Mary Stowell 
Ladd, Nathaniel Watson 
Lamb, Mrs. Annie Lawrence 
•Lamb, George 



* Deceased. 



68 



Lamb, Henry Whitney 
♦Lambert, Thomas Ricker 
*Lamson, Artemas Ward 
♦Lane, Jonathan Abbott 
Lang, Mrs. Frances Morse 
* Lawrence, Amory Appleton 
♦Lawrence, Amos Adams 
♦Lawrence, Charles Richard 
Lawrence, Harris Hooper 
Lawrence, John 
Lawrence, John Silsbee 
Lawrence, Robert Means 
♦Lawrence, Samuel Crocker 
Lawson, Thomas William 
Lawton, Mark Anthony 
Lee, James Stearns 
Lee, Joseph 
Lee, William Henry 
Leman, John Howard 
Leonard, Amos Morse 
♦Leonard, Miss Anna Rebekah 
♦Leonard, George Henry 

Lesh, Henry Frederick 

♦Leverett, George Vasmer 

Lewis, Edwin James 

Lewis, George 

♦Lincoln, Beza 

Litchfield, William Elias 

Little, Arthur 

♦Little, George Washington 

♦Little, James Lovell 

Little, John Mason 

♦Lockwood, Philip Case 

Lockwood, Thomas St. John 

Lodge, Henry Cabot 

Long, Harry Vinton 

Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth 

♦Longley, James 

Longley, Mrs. Julia Robinson 

♦Lord, George Wells 

Loring, Augustus Peabody 

♦Loring, Caleb William 

Loring, Miss Helen 

Loring, Miss Katharine Peabody 
Loring, Miss Louisa Putnam 



Loring, Thacher 
Loring, William Caleb 
Lothrop, Mrs. Anne Maria 
♦Lothrop, Daniel 
♦Lothrop, Thornton Kirkland 
Loud, Charles Elliot 
Loud, George Deshorn 
Loud, Joseph Prince 
Loveland, Timothy Otis 
Lovering, Ernest 
Lovett, Arthur Trevitt 
♦Low, George Doane 
♦Low, John 
♦Lowell, Francis Cabot 
Lowell, Miss Georgina 
Lowell, John 
Lowell, Miss Lucy 
♦Lowell, Mrs. Mary Ellen 
♦Lowell, Percival 
♦Lucas, Edmund George 
♦Luke, Arthur Fuller 
Lunt, William Wallace 
♦Lyman, Arthur Theodore 
♦Lyon, Henry 
♦MacDonald, Edward 

Mace, Mrs. Martha Jane 

♦Mack, Thomas 

♦Macleod, William Alexander 

Mandell, Samuel Pierce 

♦Mann, Arthur Elisha 

♦Mann, George Sumner 

Manning, Francis Henry 

♦Marion, Horace Eugene 

Marrs, Mrs. Laura Norcross 

♦Marsh, Mrs. Julia Maria 

♦Marshall, James Fowle Baldwin 

Marston, Howard 

Marston, John Pitts 

♦Marvin, WilliamTheophilus Rogers 

Matthews, Albert 

May, Miss Eleanor Goddard 

May, P'rederick Goddard 

♦May, Frederick Warren Goddard 

Mayer, Richard 

♦Mayo, Miss Amy Louisa 



* Deceased. 



6 9 



McDonough, Charles Andrew 
Mclntire, Charles John 
*Mead, Mrs. Anna Maria 
Means, John Hamilton 
Melville, Henry Hulmes 
Merriam, Frank 
Merriam, Olin Lane 
Merrill, Albert Rowe 
♦Merrill, Mrs. Amelia Grigg 
Merrill, Sherburn Moses 
Merritt, Edward Percival 
*Metcalf, Albert 
*Meyer, George von Lengerke 
*Minns, Thomas 
Minot, Joseph Grafton 
*Minot, William 
Minot, William 
Mitchell, Sidney Adelbert 
*Mitton, Edward John 
*Mixter, Miss Madeleine Curtis 
Monks, George Howard 
*Moore, Frederic Henry 
*Moore, George Henry 
*Moore, Miss Mary Eliza 
Moors, Francis Joseph 
Morgan, Miss Emily Malbone 
Moriarty, George Andrews 
Morison, Samuel Eliot 
Morrison, Barna Thacher 
*Morse, George Henry 
*Morse, Lemuel Foster 
Morse, Lewis Kennedy 
*Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Everett 
Morss, John Wells 
*Moseley, Alexander 
Moseley, Miss Ellen Frances 
*Motley, Edward Preble 
*Munro, John Cummings 
Murdock, Harold 
*Murdock, William Edwards 
Murphy, James Smiley 
*Nash, Nathaniel Cushing 
Newman, Miss Harriet Hancock 



Nichols, Arthur Howard 
Nickerson, William Emery 
Norcross, Grenville Howland 
*Norcross, Mrs. Lucy Ann 
Norcross, Otis 

Norman, Mrs. Louisa Palfrey 
*Norwell, Henry 
Noyes, James Atkins 
Nutting, George Hale 
O'Brien, Walter Augustine 
♦O'Callaghan, Denis 

* Olmsted, Frederick Law 
*Osgood, Mrs. Elizabeth Burling 
*Page, Mrs. Susan Haskell 

* Paige, John Calvin 
Paine, James Leonard 
Paine, Mrs. Mary Woolson 
*Paine, Robert Treat 
Paine, William Alfred 

* Palfrey, Francis Winthrop 
*Palfrey, John Carver 
*Palmer, Benjamin Sanborn 
Palmer, Ezra 

Palmer, William Lincoln 
*Parker, Charles Wallingford 
Parker, Miss Eleanor Stanley 
Parker, Frederick Wesley 
Parker, Harrison 
Parker, Herman 
Parker, James Phillips 

* Parker, Mason Good 
*Parker, Moses Greeley 

* Parker, Miss Sarah 
Parker, William Stanley 
Parkhurst, Lewis 
*Parkman, Francis 
Parlin, Albert Norton 
Parmenter, James Parker 

* Parsons, Arthur Jeffrey 
Parsons, William Edwin 
*Payne, James Henry 
*Peabody, Charles Breckenridge 
Peabody, Charles Livingston 
Peabody, Frank Everett 
Peabody, Mrs. Gertrude 



* Deceased. 



7o 



Peabody, John Endicott 

Peabody, Philip Glendower 

Pearce, Arthur Paul 

Pearson, Arthur Emmons 

Peirce, Mrs. Elizabeth Goldthwait 

Peirce, Silas 

Pelletier, Joseph Charles 

♦Perkins, Augustus Thorndike 

*Perkins, Mrs. Catherine Page 

*Perkins, Edward Cranch 

Perkins, John Forbes 

*Perkins, William 

*Perry, Charles French 

*Perry, Edward Hale 

Perry, Thomas Sergeant 

Pfaff, Charles 

♦Pfaff, Mrs. Hannah Adams 

* Pfaff, Jacob 
Phelan, James Joseph 
Phillips, Mrs. Anna Tucker 
Phillips, Henry Ayling 
Phillips, John Charles 
Phinney, Horatio Augustus 
*Pickering, Henry 
Pickering, Henry Goddard 
Pickman, Dudley Leavitt, Jr. 

* Pierce, Henry Lillie 
*Pierce, Nathaniel Willard 
Pillsbury, Albert Enoch 
*Piper, William Taggard 
Playfair, Edith, Lady 
Pond, Virgil Clarence 
♦Poole, Lucius 

* Porter, Alexander Silvanus 

* Porter, Edward Griffin 
*Porter, William Killam, Jr. 
Potter, Henry Staples 
Powell, William Beverley 
*Prager, Philip 

Prager, Mrs. Rachel 

* Prang, Louis 

Prang, Mrs. Mary Dana 
Pratt, Mrs. Fannie Barnard 
Pratt, Laban 
Pratt, Walter Merriam 



Prendergast, James Maurice 
*Prescott, Alfred Usher 
Prescott, Walter Conway 
Preston, George Marshall 
Pridee, William Henry 
*Prince, Charles John 
Proctor, Mrs. Abby Shaw 
♦Pulsifer, William Henry 
Pushee, George Durant 
Putnam, Mrs. Harriet Lowell 
♦Putnam, Mrs. Mary Lowell 
♦Putnam, William Edward 
Quinby, Winfield Scott 
Quincy, Charles Frederic 
Quincy, George Gilbert 
*Quincy, George Henry 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Adams 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Caroline 
*Quincy, Samuel Miller 
Rackemann, Charles Sedgwick 
♦Radclyffe, Herbert 
Ratshesky, Abraham Captain 
Rawson, Edward Lincoln 
*Raymond, Freeborn Fairfield, 2d 
♦Read, Mrs. Lucy Richmond 
♦Read, Miss Sarah Elizabeth 
Reed, Brooks 
Reed, Mrs. Grace Evelyn 
*Reed. Henry Ransford 
Reed, James 
Reed, John Sampson 
*Reed, William Howell 
Reynolds, John Phillips 
Rhodes, James Ford 
Rice, Edward David 
Rich, William Ellery Channing 
Richards, Francis Henry 
* Richards, Henry Capen 
♦Richardson, Albert Lewis 
Richardson, Benjamin Heber 
Richardson, Edward Bridge 
Richardson, Edward Cyrenius 
♦Richardson, Maurice Howe 
♦Richardson, Spencer Welles 
Richardson, William Lambert 



* Deceased. 



7i 



Richardson, William Streeter 
Richmond, Joshua Bailey 
Riley, Charles Edward 
*Riley, James Madison 
* Ripley, George 
Rivers, Miss Mary 
Robb, Russell 
Robinson, Edward 
*Roby, Mrs. Cynthia Coggeshall 
*Rodocanachi, John Michael 
Rogers, Robert 
Root, Henry Augustus 
*Ropes, John Codman 
*Ross, Alphonso 
Rotch, William 
Rothwell, James Eli 
Ruggles, Charles Albert 
Runkle, John Cornelius 
Russell, Joseph Ballister 
Russell, Mrs. Margaret Pelham 
*Russell, Samuel Hammond 
*Rust, Nathaniel Johnson 
*Rutan, Charles Hercules 
Saltonstall, Richard Middlecott 
Sampson, Charles Edward 
*Sampson, Edwin Holbrook 
Sands, Mrs. Florence Josephine 
Sargent, Charles Sprague 
Sargent, Miss Louisa Lee 

*Sawyer, Henry Nathan 

Sears, Alexander Pomroy 

Sears, Harold Carney 

Sears, Henry Francis 

Sears, Herbert Mason 

Sears, Horace Scudder 

*Sears, Joshua Montgomery 

Sears, Mrs. Mary Crowninshield 

Sears, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 

Sears, Richard Dudley 

*Seaver, William James 

Sederquist, Arthur Butman 

Sewall, Atherton 

Shattuck, Frederick Cheyne 

Shattuck, George Brune 

Shattuck, Henry Lee 



Shaw, Mrs. Annie Whipple 
Shaw, Charles Nason 
Shaw, Mrs. Cora Lyman 
*Shaw, Henry 
*Shaw, Henry Lyman 
Shaw, Henry South worth 
Shaw, Henry Southworth, Jr. 
Shaw, Robert Gould 
Sheldon, Frank Merritt 
*Shepard, Willis Stratton 
Sherry, Frank Eaton 
Shillaber, William Green 
*Shimmin, Charles Franklin 
Shultis, Newton 
Shuman, Abraham 
Shumway, Franklin Peter 
*Sigourney, Henry 
*Simpson, Frank Ernest 
* Skinner, Francis 
*Skinner, Francis 
*Slafter, Edmund Farwell 
*Slater, Andrew Chapin 
Slater, Mrs. Mabel Hunt 
Slater, Miss Ray 
*Slocum, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
*Slocum, William Henry 
Smith, Miss Ellen Vose 
Smith, Fitz-Henry, Jr. 
Smith, Frank Ernest 
*Smith, Joseph Warren 
Smith, Miss Mary Almira 
Smith, Robert Boynton 
Smith, Walter Edwin 
Snow, Franklin Augustus 
Sohier, Miss Elizabeth Putnam 
Sohier, William Da vies 
* Sort well, Alvin Foye 
Soule, Miss Sarah Marden 
Spalding, Philip Leffingwell 
*Spaulding, Mrs. Emily Steward 
Spaulding, John Taylor 
Spaulding, William Stuart 
Sprague, Francis Peleg 
Sprague, Isaac 
Sprague, Phineas Warren 



* Deceased. 



7 2 



Squire, Frank Orvis 
^Stafford, George Lewis 
*Stanwood, James Rindge 
Stearns, Foster Waterman 
Stearns, Frank Waterman 
Stearns, Harris Brackett 
*Stearns, Richard Hall 
Steinert, Alexander 
*Stetson, Amos William 
Stetson, James Henry 
Stetson, John Alpheus 
*Stevens, Miss Helen Grenville 
* Stevens, Oliver 
Stockford, Hugh Johnston 
Stodder, Charles Frederick 
Stone, Charles Augustus 
Stone, Charles Wellington 
Stone, William Eben 
*Storey, Joseph Charles 
Stowell, Edmund Channing 
*Stowell, John 
Stratton, Solomon Piper 
Strauss, Ferdinand 
Strauss, Peter Ernest 
Streeter, Edward Clark 
Sturgis, John Hubbard 
Sturgis, Robert Shaw 
*Sturgis, Russell 
*Sumner, Alfred Henry 
*Suter, Hales Wallace 
*Swan, William Willard 
*Sweetser, Mrs. Anne Maria 
*Sweetser, Isaac Homer 
Swift, Henry Walton 
Sylvester, Edmund Quincy 
*Taft, Edward Augustine 
Taggard, Henry 
Talbot, Miss Marion 
Taylor, Amos Leavitt 
Taylor, Charles Henry 
Taylor, Charles Henry, Jr. 
Taylor, William Herbert 
Taylor, William Osgood 
*Thacher, Henry Charles 
Thacher, Mrs. Julia Edgar 



Thacher, Louis Bartlett 
Thacher, Thomas Chandler 

* Thayer, Bayard 
Thayer, Charles Irving 
*Thayer, David 

*Thayer, Eugene Van Rensselaer 
Thayer, Frank Bartlett 
Thayer, John Eliot 

* Thayer, Mrs. Mary 
Thorndike, Albert 
Thorndike, Alden Augustus 
Thorndike, Augustus 
*Thorndike, George Quincy 
Thorndike, Townsend William 
*Thornton, Charles Cutts Gookin 
*Tileston, James Clarke 
*Tinkham, George Henry 
Todd, Thomas 
Todd, Thomas, Jr. 
*Tompkins, Arthur Gordon 
*Tompkins, Eugene 
*Tompkins, Mrs. Frances Henrietta 
Towle, Loren Delbert 
Traiser, Richard Ernest 
Tripp, Guy Eastman 

* Tucker, Alanson 
Tucker, George Fox 
*Tucker, James Crehore 
*Tucker, Lawrence 
Tufts, Bowen 
Tufts, Leonard 

* Turner, Alfred Rogers 
Turner, Mrs. Cora Leslie 
*Turner, Edward 
*Turner, Job Abiel 
Tyler, Charles Hitchcock 
Tyler, Edward Royall 
*Underwood, Mrs. Caroline Susanna 
Underwood, William Lawrence 
*Upham, George Phinehas 
*Upton, George Bruce 
Vail, Theodore Newton 
Van Nostrand, Alonzo Gifford 
*Vose, James Whiting 
*Wadsworth, Alexander Fairfield 

* Deceased. 



73 



Wadsworth, Eliot 
Wadsworth, Mrs. Lucy Gardner 
Wales, William Quincy 
Walker, Arthur Willis 
Walker, Charles Cobb 
*Walker, Francis Amasa 
Walker, Grant 
Wallace, Cranmore Nesmith 
Walsh, David Ignatius 
♦Ward, Francis Jackson 
Ward well, Jacob Otis 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee 
*Warner, Bela Hemenway 

* Warren, Albert Cyrus 
Warren, Edward Ross 
Warren, John Collins 
Warren, Ralph Lambert 
♦Warren, Samuel Dennis 
♦Warren, Mrs. Susan Cornelia 
Warren, William Fairfield 
♦Warren, William Wilkins 
Wasgatt, Herbert Preston 
Waterman, Frank Arthur 
Waterman, Frank Sturtevant 

* Waters, Edwin Forbes 
Watkins, Walter Kendall 
Watters, Walter Fred 
Webber, Franklin Roscoe 
Webster, Edwin Sibley 
Webster, Frank George 
♦Webster, John Haskell 
Weeks, John Wingate 
Welch, Francis Clarke 

* Weld, Mrs. Caroline Langdon 
♦Weld, Daniel 

♦Weld, John Davis 
♦Weld, Otis Everett 
Weld, Richard Harding, Jr. 
Wellington, Miss Anna Colburn 
Wells, Wellington 
Wendell, Barrett 
*Wentworth, Alonzo Bond 
Wesson, James Leonard 
*West, Mrs. Olivia Sears 
Westbrook, John Beekman 



♦Weston, Mrs. Frances Erving 

Wetherbee, Winthrop 

Wheeler, Horace Leslie 

* Wheelwright, Andrew Cunning- 
ham 

♦Wheelwright, Edward 

♦Wheelwright, Mrs. Isaphene Moore 

♦Wheelwright, Josiah 

♦Wheildon, William Wilder 

Whidden, Stephen Hampden 

♦Whipple, Joseph Reed 

Whipple, Sherman Leland 

Whitcher, Frank Weston 

♦Whitcomb, Henry Clay 

White, Austin Treadwell 

♦White, Charles Tallman 

White, George Robert 

White, Harry Kent 

♦White, John Gardner 

♦White, McDonald Ellis 

♦White, Mrs. Sarah Brackett 

♦White, Miss Susan Jackson 

Whitman, Allan Hiram 
Whitman, William 
♦Whitmore, Charles John 
♦Whitmore, Charles Octavius 
♦Whitney, Mrs. Caroline Abbe 
♦Whitney, Henry Austin 
♦Whitney, James Lyman 
Whittemore, Horace Alan 
♦Whittington, Hiram 
♦Wigglesworth, Edward 
Wigglesworth, George 
Willcomb, Mrs. Martha Stearns 
♦Willcutt, Francis Henry 
♦Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 
Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 
♦Willcutt, Mrs. Mary Ann Phillips 
Willcutt, Miss Sarah Edith 
♦Williams, Benjamin Bangs 
♦Williams, Edward Henry 
♦Williams, Henry Dudley 
♦Williams, Henry Willard 
Williams, Holden Pierce 
Williams, Horace Dudley Hall 

Deceased. 



74 



Williams, John Davis 
*Williams, Miss Louise Harding 
Williams, Ralph Blake 
* Williams, Samuel Stevens Coffin 
Williams, Stillman Pierce 
*Wilson, Davies 
Wilson, Mrs. Mary Ascension 
*Winchester, Daniel Low 
•Winchester, Thomas Bradlee 
Winslow, Arthur 
Winslow, William Copley 
Winsor, Miss Mary Pickard 
Winsor, Robert 
Winthrop, Frederic 
*Winthrop, Robert Charles, Jr. 
Winthrop, Mrs. Robert Charles, Ji 
Winthrop, Robert Mason 
*Wise, John Perry 
*Withington, Charles Francis 
Wolcott, Mrs. Edith Prescott 
Wood, William Madison 



Woodbury, John 
*Woodbury, John Page 
*Woodman, Cyrus 
Woodman, Walter Irving 
Woods, Frank Forrest 
Woods, Frederick Adams 
*Woods, Henry 
Woodworth, Herbert Grafton 
*Woolley, William 
Woolson, Mrs. Annie Williston 
*Woolson, James Adams 
Worcester, Elwood 
Wright, Albert Edwin 
*Wright, Albert Judd 
*Wright, Charles Francis 
*Wright, Miss Esther Fidelia 
*Wright, John Gordon 
*Wright, William James 
Young, Edmund Sanford 
*Young, George 



* Deceased. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



Adams, Henry Sewall 
Adams, Norman Ilsley 
Aiken, Henry Merk Smith 
Ainsley, Mrs. Emily Louisa 
Ainsley, John Robert 
Aldrich, Edward Irving 
Allen, Charles Willard 
Allen, Frederick Baylies 
Allen, Herbert Dupee 
Allen, William Lothrop 
Alley, Arthur Humphrys 
Ames, Oliver 

Anderson, Elbridge Roberts 
Anthony, Arthur Cox 
Appleton, Samuel 
Atkins, Edwin Farnsworth 
Avery, Charles French 
Bacon, Louis 
Bailey, Robert Morris 
Barbour, Edmund Dana 
Barrus, George Hale 
Bartlett, Nelson Slater 
Bayley, Edward Bancroft 
Baylies, Walter Cabot 
Beal, Boylston Adams 
Beal, Mrs. Louisa Adams 
Beebe, Charles Philip 
Beebe, Franklin Haven 
Belden, Charles Francis Dorr 
Bemis, Frank Brewer 
Bicknell, Thomas Williams 
Bigelow, Alanson 
Bigeiow, Prescott, Jr. 
Binder, William 
Bishop, George Lester 



Blackall, Clarence Howard 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Mrs. Mary Lee 
Blinn, George Richard 
Bliss, Elmer Jared 
Bliss, James Frederick 
Blodget, William 
Bodwell, Albert Edward 
Boit, Robert Apthorp 
Bond, Mrs. Isabella Bacon 
Bond, Lawrence 
Bowditch, Charles Pickering 
Bowen, Henry James 
Bradlee, Edward Chamberlin 
Bradlee, Samuel 
Braley, Henry King 
Bray, William Claxton 
Bremer, Theodore Glover 
Brewer, Daniel Chauncey 
Brewer, Edward Adams 
Brewer, Edward May 
Brewer, George Clark 
Brewer, John Howie 
Brock, Elbert Hill 
Brown, Arthur Eastman 
Brown, Miss Eliza Otis 
Brown, Mrs. Hannah Davenport 
Brown, Howard Kinmouth 
Brown, Howard Nicholson 
Brown, Joseph Taylor 
Brown, Willard Dalrymple 
Brown, Winfield Martin 
Bruen, John Albert 
Bryant, John 
Bugbee, John Brown 

* Deceased. 



7' 



Bullivant, William Malcolm 

Burbeck, Edward 

Burgess, Mrs. Zaidee Palmer 

Burgess, John Eustis 

Burlingame, Howard Benjamin 

Burr, Heman Merrick 

Burrage, Mrs. Marguerite Kimberly 

Burton, Hiram McKnight 

Bush, Samuel Dacre 

Butler, William Morgan 

Byrne, Harry Carroll 

Carr, Albert Eaton 

Carr, Ashton Livermore 

Carr, Samuel 

Carr, Walter Dinsmoor 

Carroll, Francis Michael 

Carter, Clarence Howard 

Carter, George Edward 

Carter, James Richard 

Chamberlin, Miss Abby H. 

Champney, Walter Redfern 

Cheney, Mrs. Elizabeth Stickney 

Chester, Charles Edward 

Child, John Howard 

Chute, Arthur Lambert 

Clapp, Miss Georgene Lillian 

Clapp, John Bouve 

*Clapp, Mrs. Susan Prescott 

Clark, Charles Storey 

Clark, Miss Elizabeth Hodges 

Clark, Ellery Harding 

Clark, Frederic Simmons 

Clark, Isaiah Raymond 

Clark, Joseph Horace 

Clarke, Arthur French 

Clarke, George Kuhn 

Clarke, Thomas William 

Cobb, William Henry 

Cochrane, Alexander 

Coffin, Charles Albert 

Comstock, William Ogilvie 

Connolly, Arthur Tracy 

Conrad, Sidney Smith 

Cook, Charles Sidney 

Cook, Frederick Sargent 



Coolidge, Harold Jefferson 

Coolidge, Louis Arthur 

*Cox, Edwin Birchard 

Cox, Raymond Benjamin 

Crane, Walter Sanger 

Crane, Winthrop Murray 

Cummings, Henry Havelock 

Cummings, Mrs. Margaret Kimball 

Curtis, Joseph Henry 

Gushing, Arthur Percy 

Dana, Arthur Payson 

Daniels, John Alden 

Davenport, Charles Milton 

Davis, George Peabody 

Davis, Harrison Merrill 

Dean, Charles Augustus 

Dennison, Herbert Elmer 

Dewick, Francis Augustine 

* Dexter, Alvin Shackford 

Dexter, Gordon 

Dolliver, Watson Shields 

Dowse, Charles Francis 

Driver, William Raymond 

Duff, John 

Dumaine, Frederic Christopher 

Dunne, Frank Lysaght 

Dupee, William Arthur 

Durell, Albert Benjamin 

Edwards, Francis Marshall 

*Elder, Samuel James 

Eliot, Amory 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe 

Ellis, Augustus Hobart 

Ellis, Benjamin Peirce 

Ellis, Emmons Raymond 

Emerson, Robert Leonard 

Emmons, Mrs. Helen Brooks 

Everett, Franklin Chester 

Fairbank, John J. Mitchell 

Farley, William Thayer 

Farnsworth, Miss Alice 

Farrar, Frederick Albert 

Fay, William Rodman 

Fisk, Everett Olin 

Fisk, Otis Daniell 

ec eased. 



77 



Flagg, Elisha 

Fletcher, Ernest Boynton 

Five, Louis Edwin 

Fobes, Edwin Francis 

Forbes, Allan 

Forbes, James Murray 

Foss, Granville Edward, Jr. 

Foster, Charles Henry Wheelwright 

Foster, Elmer George 

Foster, Frederick 

Foster, John McGaw 

Francis, Nathaniel Atwood 

French, Wilfred Augustus 

Frenning, John Erasmus 

Friedman, Lee Max 

Fuller, Alfred Worcester 

Gary, Frank Ephraim Herbert 

Gaston, William Alexander 

Gilchrist, George Edward 

Goldsmith, Warren Henry 

Goodnow, Daniel 

Goodspeed, Charles Eliot 

Grafton, Harrie Craig 

Grant, Alexander Gait 

Gray, Miss Harriet 

Gray, Joseph Phelps 

Greene, Mrs. Charlotte Nichols 

Greenough, Malcolm Scollay 

Grew, Mrs. Jane 

Gulesian, Moses Hadji 

Hale, Philip 

Hall, Charles Wells 

Hall, Edwin Adams 

Hall, Thomas Hills 

Hallett, Daniel Bunker 

Hallett, William Russell 

Halsall, William Formby 

Hamlin, Charles Sumner 

Harrington, George Sumner 

Hart, Francis Russell 

Haskell, Alfred Tracy 

Haskell, Edward Howard 

Hastings, Clifford Bicknell 

Hatch, Edward Augustus 

Hatch, James Lemuel 



Hatfield, Charles Edwin 
Hathaway, Horatio 
Hay ward, Charles Latham 
Henderson, James Dougald 
Hinckley, Henry Hersey 
Hitchcock, Edward Francis 
Hitchcock, Frank Tenney 
Hobbs, Samuel 
Hockley, Mrs. Amelia Daniell 
Hodgkin, William Heath 
Holman, Dudley Moor 
Holmes, Otis Worthington 
Homans, Robert 
* Homer, Charles Savage 
Hood, Frederic Clarke 
Hopkins, Mrs. Maria Theresa 
Houston, Francis Augustine 
Howard, Alfred Henry 
Howe, Henry Saltonstall 
Howe, Walter Clarke 
Howes, Mrs. Alice Maud 
Hubbard, James Mascarene 
Huckins, Harry 
Humphrey, Henry Bauer 
Hunneman, Carleton 
Hunt, Charles 

Huntoon, Edward James Baker 
Hutchins, Edward Webster 
Hutchinson, Henry 
Iasigi, Miss Mary Vitalis 
Inches, George Brimmer 
Jackson, Joseph Maddocks 
Jackson, Robert Tracy 
James, George Barker 
Jaques, Henry Percy 
Jeffries, William Augustus 
Jenkins, Charles 
Jenney, Bernard, Jr. 
*Jernegan, Holmes Mayhew 
Jewell, Edward 
Johnson, Edward Crosby 
Jones, Fred Kinsman Mudge 
Jones, Mrs. Sarah Gavett 
Jones, Stephen Rosseter 
Jordan, Mrs. Helen Lincoln 



* Deceased. 



78 



Judd, Mrs. Sarah Ann 
Kearns, William Francis 
Kelley, James Edward 
Kelly, Herbert Lawrence 
Kendall, Mrs. Harriott Magoun 
Kennedy, Miss Louise 
*Kent, Prentiss Mellen 
Keyes, George Shepard 
Kimball, Miss Helen Frances 
Kimball, Herbert Wood 
King, Daniel Webster 
Knapp, George Brown 
Knight, Clarence Howard 
Knight, Henry Francis 
Knowles, Winfield Scott 
Lamson, Jarvis 
Larcom, George Francis 
Larkin, William Harrison, Jr. 
Lauriat, Charles Emelius 
Lawrence, Amos Amory 
Lawrence, William 
Learned, Francis Mason 
Leatherbee, Charles William 
Lemon, Edward Rivers 
Lewis, John Beavens 
Lincoln, Albert Lamb 
Lincoln, William Henry 
Locke, Isaac Henry 
Locke, Wilbur Sargent 
Logue, Charles 
Longfellow, Miss Alice Mary 
Loomis, Elihu Goodman 
Lord, Charles Edward 
Lothrop, Lewis Waterbury 
Lovett, Augustus Sidney 
Lund, Joseph Wheelock 
Lyman, George Hinckley 
Lyon, Frederick 
Macomber, Frank Gair 
Macurda, William Everett 
Magrane, Patrick Byrne 
Mann, Frank Chester 
Manning, Miss Abby Frances 
Mansfield, Henry Tucker 
Marcy, Charles De Witt 



Marvin, George Ritchie 
Marvin, Thomas Oliver 
Mason, Miss Fanny Peabody 
May, John Pierpont 
Maynard, Herbert 
McCallum, William Shaw 
McGlenen, Edward Webster 
Mclntire, Frederic May 
McKissock, William 
McLellan, Edward 
Means, Charles Johnson 
Means, James 
Merriam, John McKinstry 
Merrill, Albert Brown 
Meyer, Miss H61oise 
Miller, John Ferdinand 
Minot, Laurence 
Mock, Emanuel Elias 
Monks, Frank Hawthorne 
Montague, David Thompson 
Moody, Mrs. Elizabeth Dana 
Morse, Robert McNeil 
Moseley, Charles William 
Moseley, Frank 
Moseley, Frederick Strong 
Munroe, James Phinney 
Murphy, Gardner Ellsworth 
Nash, Mrs. Bennett Hubbard 
Nash, Samuel Young 
Newell, James Montgomery 
Newhall, Charles Lyman 
Newhall, George Warren 
Nichols, Charles Eliot 
Nichols, Chester Wellington 
Nichols, Leonard Bailey 
Norris, Charles Sewell 
Noyes, Frank Albert 
Noyes, Increase El dredge 
Nute, Herbert Newell 
O'Brien, Edward Francis 
O'Connell, Daniel Theodore 
O'Connell, Patrick Augustine 
O'Connell, William Henry 
O'Meara, Stephen 
Osgood, Charles Edward 

* Deceased. 



79 



Otis, Herbert Foster 
Palmer, Bradley Webster 
Park, Charles Edwards 
Parker, George Francis 
Parker, John Nelson 
Parsons, Miss Charlotte 
Peirson, Charles Lawrence 
Perkins, George Grindley Spence 
Perry, Mrs. Olive Augusta 
Peters, William York 
Phillips, Alexander VanCleve 
Pierce, Roscoe 
Pierce, Wallace Lincoln 
Piper, Henry Augustus 
Poor, Clarence Henry 
Poor, James Ridgway 
Pope, Ralph Linder 
Porter, Alexander Silvanus, Jr. 
Porter, John Lyman 
Powers, Walter Averill 
Pratt, Louis Mortimer 
Prescott, William Hartsuff 
*Prince, Mrs. Lillian 
Prince, Miss Lucy Maria 
Putney, Henry Marshall 
*Rand, Arnold Augustus 
Rand, Waldron Holmes 
Read, Charles French 
Read, William 
Reed, Alanson Henry 
Reed, Henry Beecher 
Reed, Robert Crosby 
Reggio, Andre Carney 
Remick, Frank Woodbury 
Remick, John Anthony 
Remick, William Gordon 
Rice, David 
Rice, Fred Ball 
Rich, Mrs. Pauline Babo 
Rich, William Thayer 
Richards, Mrs. Ann Rebecca 
Richards, George Edward 
Ripley, Alfred Lawrence 
Ripley, Ebed Lincoln 
Robinson, Thomas Pendleton 

*De 



Rogers, Miss Susan Snow 
Ross, Mrs. Caroline Emily 
Rugg, Frederic Waldo 
Ruhl, Edward 
Russell, Andrew LeBaron 
Russell, Mrs. Frances Spofford 
Sanborn, Mrs. Caroline Frances 
Sanford, John Edward Menemon 
*Sargent, Mrs. Aimee 
Savage, William Bowler 
Sawyer, Miss Mary Cummings 
Schaefer, Henry Thomas 
Schouler, James 
Schrafft, William Edward 
Scudder, Winthrop Saltonstall 
Sears, Richard 
Sears, William Richards 
Seaver, Benjamin Frank 
Sergeant, Charles Spencer 
Shannon, George Thomas 
Sharp, George Henry Loring 
Shaw, Francis 
Shurtleff, Miss Sarah 
Silsby, T. Julian 
Skillings, David Nelson 
Smith, Albert Pratt 
Smith, Benjamin Farnham 
*Smith, Charles Card 
*Smith, Charles Francis 
Smith, Edward Ephraim 
Snow, Charles Armstrong 
Somes, Dana Barry 
Soule, Horace Homer 
Sparhavvk, Edward Epps 
Sprague, Mrs. Emeline Martha 
Sprague, Henry Harrison 
Stafford, Morgan Hewitt 
Staniford, Daniel 
Stanton, William Standford 
Stearns, Albert Henry 
Stearns, Albert Warren 
Stearns, Charles Henry 
Stearns, James Pierce 
Stevens, Francis Herbert 
Stevens, William Studley Bartlett 



8o 



Stevenson, Robert Hooper 
Stoddard, Chester Stillman 
Stone, Mrs. Minna Harris 
Storey, Moorfield 
Stratton, Charles Edwin 
Strong, Mrs. Mary Baker 
Sturgis, Richard Clipston 
Swan, George Arthur 
Sweet, Henry Nettleton 
Sylvester, Joseph Smith 
Tapley, Henry Fuller 
Thompson, Marshall Putnam 
Thorndike, Augustus Larkin 
Throckmorton, John Wakefield 

Francis 
Tobey, Rufus Babcock 
Trask, William Ropes 
Tuttle, Charles Henry 
Tuttle, Julius Herbert 
Underwood, Henry Oliver 
Vaughan, Henry Goodwin 
Vialle, Charles Augustus 
Vincent, Miss Susan Walker 
Wait, William Cushing 
Walker, John Ballantyne 
Walworth, Arthur Clarence 
Ward, Joseph Frederic 
Warren, Bentley Wirt 
Warren, Fiske 
Warren, Franklin Cooley 
Warren, George Copp 
Warren, Lucius Henry 
Warren, Mrs. Mabel Bayard 
Washburn, George Hamlin 
Webster, Mrs. Lizzie Florence 



Weeks, Warren Bailey Potter 
Wendte, Charles William 
West, Charles Alfred 
Weston, Thomas 
Wetherbee, Frederic Adolphus 
Wharton, William Fisher 
Wheeler, George Henry 
Wheeler, Henry 

White, Miss Gertrude Richardson 
Whitney, Benjamin 
Whitney, Richard Skinner 
Whittemore, John Quincy Adams 
Whittier, Albert Rufus 
Whitwell, Frederick Silsbee 
Wiggin, Charles Edward 
Wilder, Frank Jones 
Wiles, Thomas Linwood 
Willett, George Franklin 
Williams, Arthur, Jr. 
Williams, David Weld 
Williams, Moses 
Williamson, Robert Warden 
Winthrop, Thomas Lindall 
Wolf, Bernard Mark 
Wood, Arthur Goodwin 
Wood, Irving 
Woods, Joseph Fitz 
Woodward, Charles Francis 
Woodward, Frank Ernest 
Woodworth, Elijah Burghardt 
Wright, Charles Pierce 
Wright, George Sumner 
Wyman, Frank Wheelock 
Wyman, Henry Augustus 
Young, William Hill 



* Deceased. 



No. 1 44 1. 



dontmomocaltl) of iltassacljusetts 



25e it fcnoton that whereas Thomas C. Amory, Curtis Guild, 
John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, Samuel M. Quincy, Wil- 
liam S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, Henry F. Jenks, John 
T. Hassam, and Dudley R. Child, have associated themselves 
with the intention of forming a corporation under the name of 



for the purpose of promoting the study of the history of Boston, 
and the preservation of its antiquities, and have complied with the 
provisions of the Statutes of this Commonwealth in such case made 
and provided, as appears from the certificate of the President, 
Treasurer and Directors of said corporation, duly approved by the 
Commissioner of Corporations and recorded in this office ; 

JfttObi, ^TJjereforc, % Henry B. Peirce, Secretary of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, &0 fjcrebp certify that said Thomas C. 
Amory, Curtis Guild, John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, 
Samuel M. Quincy, William S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, 
Henry F. Jenks, John T. Hassam and Dudley R. Child, 
their associates and successors, are legally organized and estab- 
lished as and are hereby made an existing corporation under the 
name of 

with the powers, rights and privileges and subject to the limita- 
tions, duties and restrictions, which by law, appertain thereto. 



t©ltnC£>5 my official signature hereunto 
subscribed and the seal of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts hereunto affixed, this second 
day of December, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty one. 
[Signed] 

HENRY B. PEIRCE, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. 




THE BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 



ORGANIZED TO PROMOTE THE STUDY OF THE HISTORY OF BOSTON 
AND THE PRESERVATION OF ITS ANTIQUITIES. 

BY-LAWS. 

I. 

OBJECTS. 

It shall be the duty of members, so far as may be in their power, to 
carry out the objects of the Society, by collecting, by gift, loan or pur- 
chase, books, manuscripts, and pictures, and by such other suitable means 
as may from time to time seem expedient. 

II. 

MEMBERS. 

The members of the Bostonian Society shall be such persons, either 
resident or non-resident in Boston, as shall be elected to membership. 
Election shall be made by ballot by the Board of Directors at any reg- 
ular or special meeting. 

III. 

HONORARY AND CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

Honorary and Corresponding members shall be nominated by the 
Directors, and shall be elected by ballot by two-thirds of the members 
present and voting. They may take part in the meetings of the Society, 
but shall not be entitled to vote. 

IV. 

ADMISSION FEE AND ASSESSMENTS. 

Each member shall pay five dollars at the time of his or her admis- 
sion, and five dollars each first day of January afterwards, into the treas- 
ury of the Society for its general purposes ; provided, however, that no 
person joining the Society on or after the first day of October in any 
year shall be required to pay an additional assessment for the year com- 
mencing on the first day of January following. 

If any member shall neglect to pay his or her admission fee or annual 
assessment, for three months after the same is due, he or she shall be 
liable to forfeit his or her membership at any time when the Directors 
shall so order. 



83 

The payment of the sum of thirty dollars in any one year by any 
member of the Society shall constitute him or her a life member of the 
Society ; life members shall be free from assessments, and entitled to all 
the rights and privileges of annual members. The money received for 
such life membership shall constitute a fund, of which not more than 
twenty per cent., together with the annual income, shall be spent in any 
one year. 

V. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Certificates, signed by the President and the Clerk, shall be issued to 
all persons who have become life members of the Society. 

VI. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be held on the third Tuesday 
in January, and regular meetings shall be held on the third Tuesday of 
every month, excepting June, July, August and September, at such time 
and place as the Directors shall appoint. Special meetings shall be 
called by the Clerk, under the instruction of the Directors. 

At all meetings ten members shall be a quorum for business. All 
Committees shall be appointed by the Chair, unless otherwise ordered. 

Any business which has not been acted on by the Directors, shall be 
referred to them without debate, at the request of any member present. 

VII. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers of the Society shall consist of a President, Vice-Pres- 
ident and seven other Directors, a Clerk and a Treasurer. 

The Directors, Clerk and Treasurer shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meeting in January, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
others are duly elected in their stead. The President and Vice-President 
shall be elected by the Board of Directors from their number. The 
offices of Clerk and Treasurer may be held by the same person. 

VIII. 
VACANCIES. 

Any vacancies in the offices of the Society may be filled for the re- 
mainder of their term by the Board of Directors, at any regular meeting, 
to serve until the next annual meeting of the Society. In the absence 
of the Clerk at any meeting, a Clerk pro tempore shall be chosen for 
that meeting. 

IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

At the monthly meeting in December, a Nominating Committee of 
five persons shall be appointed, who shall report at the annual meeting 
a list of candidates for the places to be filled. 



8 4 
X. 



PRESIDING OFFICER. 

The President, or in his absence the Vice-President, shall preside at 
all meetings. In the absence of both, a President pro tc?>tp07'c shall be 
chosen from the Board of Directors. 

XI. 

DUTIES OF THE CLERK. 

The Clerk shall be sworn to the faithful discharge of his duties. 

He shall notify all meetings of the Society. He shall keep an exact 
record of all the proceedings of the meetings of the Society, and of its 
Directors. 

He shall conduct the general correspondence of the Society, and 
place on file all letters received. 

He shall enter the names of members systematically in books kept 
for the purpose, and issue certificates of life membership. 

The Clerk shall have such charge of all property in the possession of 
the Society as may from time to time be delegated to him by the Board 
of Directors. 

He shall acknowledge each loan or gift that may be made to and 
accepted in behalf of the Society. 

XII. 

DUTIES OF THE TREASURER. 

The Treasurer shall collect all moneys due to the Society, and pay 
all bills against the Society, when approved by the Board of Directors. 

He shall keep a full account of the receipts and expenditures in a 
book belonging to the Society, which shall always be open to the inspec- 
tion of the Directors ; and at the annual meeting in January he shall 
make a written report of all his doings for the year preceding. 

The Treasurer shall give bond in the sum of one hundred dollars, 
with one surety, for the faithful discharge of his duties. 

XIII. 

DUTIES AND POWERS OF DIRECTORS. 

The Directors shall superintend and conduct the prudential and ex- 
ecutive business of the Society; shall authorize all expenditures of 
money; fix all salaries; provide a common seal; receive and act upon 
all resignations and forfeitures of membership, and see that the By-Laws 
are duly complied with. 

The Directors shall have full power to comply with the terms of the 
lease of the rooms in the Old State House, made with the City of Boston, 
and to make all necessary rules and regulations required in the premises. 



35 

They shall annually, in the month of April, make a careful compar- 
ison of the articles in the possession of the Society with the list to be 
returned to the City of Boston under the terms of the lease, and certify 
to its correctness. 

They shall make a report of their doings at the annual meeting of 
the Society. 

The Directors may, from time to time, appoint such sub-committees 
as they deem expedient. 

XIV. 

MEETINGS OF THE DIRECTORS. 

Regular meetings of the Directors shall be held on the day previous 
to the regular meetings of the Society, at an hour to be fixed by the 
President. Special meetings of the Directors shall be held in such 
manner as they may appoint; and a majority shall constitute a quorum 
for business. 

XV. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint two 
Directors, who, with the President, shall constitute the Committee of 
Finance, to examine from time to time, the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer ; to audit his accounts at the close of the year, and to report 
upon the expediency of proposed expenditures of money. 

XVI. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint six 
standing committees (of which the Clerk of the Society shall be a mem- 
ber ex-officio), as follows : — 

Committee on the Rooms. 

A committee of seven members, to be called the Committee on the 
Rooms, of which the President of the Society shall be a member ex-officio, 
who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the Rooms (except 
books, manuscripts, and other objects appropriate to the Library, offered 
as gifts or loans); the hanging of pictures, and the general arrangement 
of the Society's collections in their department. 

Com/nit tee on Papers. 

A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Papers, who shall have charge of the subject of Papers to be read, or 
other exercises of a like nature, at the monthly meetings of the Society. 



86 

Committee on Membership. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Membership, whose duty it shall be to give information in relation to 
the purposes of the Society, and increase its membership. 

Committee on tJie Library. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee 
on the Library, who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the 
Library, including the acceptance or rejection, of all books, manuscripts, 
and other objects appropriate to the Library, offered as gifts or loans, 
and the general arrangement of the Society's collections in their depart- 
ment. 

Committee on Publications. 

A committee of four or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Publications, who shall have charge of all the Publications of the 
Society. 

Committee on Memorials. 

A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee 
on Memorials, who shall have charge of such Memorials as the Society 
may vote to erect. 

These six committees shall perform the duties above set forth, under 
the general supervision of the Directors. 

Vacancies which may occur in any of these committees during their 
term of service shall be filled by the President. 

XVII. 

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS. 

Amendments to the By-Laws may be made, at any annual meeting, 
by vote of two-thirds of the members present and voting. They may 
also be made by the like vote at any regular meeting, provided notice of 
the same be contained in a call for such meeting issued by the Clerk, 
and sent to every member. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

I give and bequeath to the Bostonian Society, in the 

City of Boston, the sum of dollars 

for the general use and purpose of the said Society. 



1 



f VOt..g-# 2. 




PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 



AT THE 



ANNUAL MEETING, JANUARY 21, 1919 




THE BRIMMER SCHOOL 
i 844-191 3 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



Bostonian Society 



AT THE 



Annual Meeting, January 21, 1919 




BOSTON 

OLD STATE HOUSE 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY 

MCMXIX 







</*/ 



CONTENTS. 



I. Annual Report of the Directors. By The 

President 5 

II. Letters from Boston in i 774-1 776 . . . . 12 

III. Report of the Committee on the Rooms . . 16 

IV. Additions to the Society's Collections . . 18 
V. Report of the Committee on the Library . 21 

VI. Additions to the Society's Library .... 23 

VII. Report of the Committee on Memorials . . 25 

VIII. Report of the Committee on Finance . . 26 

IX. Report of the Treasurer 27 

X. Permanent Fund . 29 

XI. Report of the Committee on Nominations . . 30 

XII. " The Brimmer School," by Charles F. Read . . 31 

XIII. Officers since Organization 47 

XIV. Officers for 1919 48 

XV. Membership List 49 

XVI. Charter 69 

XVII. By-Laws 70 



Committee on Publications. 



John W. Farwell 
Albert Matthews 



Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
James M. Hunnewell 



The Clerk 



BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL MEETING 




H E Thirty-eighth Annual Meeting of the 
Bostonian Society was held in the Council 
Chamber of the Old State House, Boston, 
on Tuesday, January 21, 1919, at 3 P. M., 
in accordance with a notice mailed to every 
member. The President, Grenville H. Norcross, occupied the 
chair. 

The records of the last monthly meeting were read and 
approved, and the following Reports were presented : 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS. 

To the Members of the Bostonian Society: — 

Your Directors have the honor of presenting their Annual 
Report for the past year: — 

MEMBERSHIP. 

At the close of the year there were in the Society : 

Honorary Members 3 

Life Members 666 

Annual Members 485 

Making a total of . . . . 1,154 

A comparison of this record with that of one year ago, 
shows that the Society has gained eleven members. 



An analysis of the Membership Rolls shows the following 
changes : — 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of 191 7 ... 3 
Added by election o 

Making the present number ... 3 

LIFE MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of 191 7 . . . 663 
Gain by election and transfer ... 32 

Making 695 

Loss by death 29 

Making the present number . . . 666 

ANNUAL MEMBERS. 

There were at the close of 191 7 . . . 477 
Gain by election 38 

Making 515 

Loss by death, transfer, resignation, etc. . 30 

485 

MONTHLY MEETINGS. 

During the year, the following papers have been read before 
the Society at its Monthly Meetings in the Council Chamber: 

January 14: Annual Meeting. Annual Reports of the 
President, the Treasurer, and the various Committees. Also 
"An Octogenarian's Rambling Recollections of Boston"; by 
the late William J. Seaver; read by the Clerk. 

February 19: "Glimpses of Early American Life as Sug- 
gested by Rare Prints"; illustrated by lantern slides; by 
Charles E. Goodspeed. 

March 19 : "Old Chauncy Street Days " ; by Miss Adeline F. 
Norcross. 



April 16: "The Genius of Charles Sumner"; by Sherwin L. 
Cook. 

May 28: "The Brimmer School, 1844-1911; comprising in 
part a paper on the History of the School to 1888 by the late 
Charles J. Prescott"; by Charles F. Read. 

November 19: "Roxbury, Old and New"; illustrated by 
lantern slides; by Augustus Bacon. 

December 17: "The Massachusetts State House; its His- 
tory"; illustrated by lantern slides; by Miss Ellen Mudge 
Burrill. 

The October meeting was not held on account of the epidemic 
of influenza. 

NECROLOGY. 

During the past year we have learned of the deaths of the 
following members of the Society: 

Died in 1916. 

Mrs. Abby Shaw Proctor, born in Boston, September 18, 
1837, died in Milton, September 29. 

Died in 1917. 

Harrison Parker, born in New York, N. Y., September 4, 
1843, died in Winchester, December 25. 

Died in 1918. 

Augustus Peabody Gardner, born in Boston, November 5, 
1865, died in Macon, Ga., January 14. 

Erastus Beethoven Badger, born in Boston, October 1, 
1828, died in Boston, January 15. 

Samuel James Elder, born in Hopedale, R. I., January 4, 
1850, died in Boston, January 22. 

William Edwards Murdock, born in Candia, N. H., Septem- 
ber 15, 1844, died in Boston, January 27. 

Nathan Freeman Clark, born in Boston, November 3, 1839, 
died in Roxbury, February 8. 

Elijah George, born in New Rochelle, N. Y., September 6, 
1850, died in Boston, February 12. 



8 

Alvin Shackford Dexter, born in Chelsea, May 8, 1873, died 
in Brighton, February 16. 

Mrs. Charlotte Morse Fiske, born in Mt. Vernon, Me., 
June 25, 1821, died in Boston, February 17. 

Alfred Bowditch, born in Boston, September 5, 1855, died in 
Boston, February 22. 

Edward Burchard Cox, born in Boston, January 31, 1859, 
died in Brookline, February 23. 

George von Lengerke Meyer, born in Boston, June 24, 1858, 
died in Boston, March 4. 

Miss Cornelia Anne French, born in Boston, March 18, 
1838, died in Boston, March 20. 

Charles Card Smith, born in Boston, March 27, 1827, died 
in Boston, March 20. 

Frederic Hinckley, born in Marston's Mills, April 1, 1832, 
died in Brookline, March 24. 

Edward Hale Perry, born in Boston, January 23, 1887, died 
in Picardy, France, March 30. 

George Golding Kennedy, born in Roxbury, October 16, 
1 841, died in Milton, March 31. 

Mrs. Caroline Langdon Weld, born in Brookline, May 30, 
1831, died in Boston, April 14. 

Mrs. Aimee Sargent, born in Paris, France, June 16, 1852, 
died in White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., April 15. 

Charles Jenkins, born in Boston, April 8, 1844, died in Win- 
throp, May 1. 

Charles Francis Hathaway, born in Mechanics Falls, Me., 
April 12, 1850, died in Cambridge, May 17. 

Ernest William Bowditch, born in Brookline, April 10, 1850, 
died in Milton, May 22. 

Benjamin Heber Richardson, born in Boston, August 17, 

1835, died in Brookline, May 22. 

Edward Boynton Fletcher, born in Roxbury, September 
10, 1872, died in Dorchester, May 23. 

William Sanford Stanton, born in Napoli, N. Y., September 
9, 1842, died in Boston, June 14. 

Alexander Pomroy Sears, born in Boston, February 12, 

1836, died in Brookline, June 18. 



9 

Abraham Shuman, born in Schneidermuhl, Germany, 
May 31, 1839, died in Boston, June 26. 

William Plumer Fowler, born in Concord, N. H., October 3, 
1850, died in Little Boars Head, N. H., July 3. 

Miss Mary Rivers, born in Providence, R. I., July 30, 1840, 
died in Milton, August 7. 

George Edward Glover, born in Boston, November 17, 1866, 
died in Newtonville, August 24. 

Cranmore Nesmith Wallace, born in Braintree, November 
6, 1844, died in Beverly, August 26. 

Charles Morrill Baker, born in Boston, March 27, 1857, 
died in West Falmouth, August 27. 

Henry Augustus Piper, born in Marlboro, December 29, 
1836, died in Cambridge, September 9. 

Bernard Jenney, born in Boston, February 28, 1827, died in 
South Boston, September 27. 

Frank Everett Peabody, born in Boston, February 29, 1856, 
died in Marblehead, September 28. 

James Mellen Gleason, born in Wardsborough, Vt., October 
6, 1833, died in Boston, October 15. 

Daniel Webster King, born in Danvers, March 31, 1833, died 
in Annisquam, October 21. 

Babson Savilian Ladd, born in Cambridge, September 6, 
1848, died in Boston, November 3. 

Emmons Raymond Ellis, born in Cambridge, May 12, 1850, 
died in Cambridge, November 25. 

Samuel Abbott Green, born in Groton, March 16, 1830, died 
in Boston, December 5. 

Stephen O'Meara, born in Charlotte town, P. E. I., July 26, 
1854, died in Boston, December 14. 

The following were life members: Messrs. Badger, Baker, 
Alfred Bowditch, Ernest William Bowditch, Clark, Fowler, 
Gardner, George, Gleason, Green, Hathaway, Hinckley, 
Jenney, Kennedy, Ladd, Meyer, Murdock, Parker, Peabody, 
Perry, Richardson, Sears, Shuman and Wallace and Mrs. 
Fiske, Mrs. Proctor, Mrs. Weld and Miss French were life 
members. Messrs. Cox, Dexter, Elder, Ellis, Fletcher, Glover, 



10 

Jenkins, King, O'Meara, Piper, Smith and Stanton, and Mrs. 
Sargent were annual members. 

Hon. Samuel Abbott Green, M. D., LL. D., who died on 
December 5, aged 88 years, a life member, was widely known as 
an antiquarian and historical scholar, served as surgeon in the 
Civil War and was Mayor of the City of Boston in 1882. 
At the funeral in the Old South Church, Mr. Courtenay Guild 
and Dr. Gardner Weld Allen, with the President and Clerk 
represented this Society. 

Two members of the Society died during the year while in 
the service of their country in the European War. Major 
Augustus Peabody Gardner died at Camp Wheeler, Macon, 
Georgia, and Lieutenant Edward Hale Perry was killed in 
action in Picardy, France. 

So far as has been ascertained, about twelve other members 
of the Society were in the military service of the nation during 
the war. 

The Bay State Historical League has had three meetings 
during the year; — at Hyde Park with the Hyde Park Historical 
Society on Saturday, April 27; the annual meeting at Dummer 
Academy in Byfield on June 22, as guests of the Historical 
Society of Old Newbury, when visits were made to the old 
Whipple house in Ipswich (the home of the Ipswich Historical 
Society), to the Governor Dummer mansion, now the residence 
of the head master of Dummer Academy, to several old houses 
in Old Newbury and to the house of the Historical Society of 
Old Newbury in Newburyport. The League's third meeting 
was on September 14 with the Framingham Historical Society 
at its home — the old Academy building — in Framingham 
Centre. At all of these meetings, this Society was represented 
by the President, by one or both the other delegates and by 
several members. 

The Society was invited to be represented at the celebration 
in Springfield, 111., of the Centennial of the Statehood of Il- 
linois, and our member, Joseph F. Ward, of Evanston, 111., 
was appointed as a delegate. 

The Scituate Historical Society held its second anniversary 
meeting on September 7, at its home, the James Cudworth 



II 

house in that town; this Society was invited and by appoint- 
ment of your President was represented by Babson S. Ladd as 
its delegate. 

On Tuesday, September 17, your President was a guest at the 
meeting of the Greater Boston Chapters of the Massachusetts 
Society of Sons of the American Revolution at the Parker 
House, in Boston, held in celebration of " Constitution Day,' ' — 
the anniversary of the adoption of the Constitution of the 
United States, — and on Sunday, December 29, he attended the 
services at Christ Church in Salem Street, Boston, on the 195th 
anniversary of the opening of the Church in 1723. Reverend 
William H. Dewart, the Rector, made a short Historical ad- 
dress and Mr. Walter Kendall Watkins read an interesting 
paper on "Boston 195 years ago." The old Bible and prayer 
books and communion silver — given in part by King George 
the Second — were used and shown. 

In accordance with custom, on the Fourth of July, Walter 
Whalem of the English High School read the Declaration of 
Independence from the State Street balcony, and at noon of 
the day before Christmas, four trumpeters from the Cadet 
Band played carols, hymns and patriotic airs on the same 
balcony for half an hour. 

The permanent fund of the Society, while receiving this 
year no bequest or gifts, has been increased by the life mem- 
bership fees, and further additions are much desired. Some 
increase of the funds available for current expenses is greatly 
needed on account of increased cost in many directions; gifts of 
large or small sums for this purpose will be gratefully received 
and will aid your Directors in adding to the interest and useful- 
ness of the Society. 

Reference is made to the reports of the various committees 
for detailed accounts of the work they have done. 

For the Directors, 

Grenville H. Norcross, 

President. 
Boston, January 21, iqiq. 



12 

The President, Mr. Norcross, read at the Annual Meeting 
three letters written by British Officers from Boston in 1774 
and 1775 to John Spencer (1718—1775) of Cannon Hall, York- 
shire, England, copied from "Annals of a Yorkshire House" by 
A. M. W. Stirling (London 191 1). The first letter is from 
Ashton Shuttleworth, Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery, son of 
William and Christina (Spencer) Shuttleworth of Horrocksford, 
Lancashire, to his uncle John Spencer. The other two are 
from Major I. R. Till (perhaps an error for Maj. Francis 
Bushill Sill, 63d. Regt. of Foot) who was killed later in the War 
in storming a fort under General Henry Clinton. Some errors 
have apparently been made in copying the letters from the 
originals, — they are given here as printed. The last letter did 
not reach Cannon Hall until after the death of John Spencer. 

Ashton Shuttleworth to John Spencer.* 

November 2nd, 1774. 
Dear Uncle: 

I received yr letter dated July 25th, latter end of September, am glad to 
hear you enjoy so good a state of health. 

Since I wrote to you last, we've been encamp'd on Boston Common, and 
a very disagreeable encampment it has been to me, having been ill most of 
the time. Since we came here, have had excessive heavy Dews fall both 
Mornings and Evenings, and I only a Marquee, without an inner tent, got 
a Prodigious Cold, which has laid me up so much as not to be able to walk 
without the assistance of a stick. The Doctor informs me it will be five or 
six months before I am able to stir out again. 

We are at present doing nothing with the Bostonians, but they are doing 
what they please with us, by enticing our people to desert, and abusing the 
Officers whenever they take a ride into the Country. They even went so 
far as to cut a running Centry (sic) on his Post with a Cutlass in the middle 
of the day, and cut one of his Ears off; but (the man who did it) is taken 
and in Custody, at Present. There is no Law to hurt him on our side, but 
enough (law) on theirs. They get in Bodys about the Dusk of the Evenings, 
and whenever they get one or two Officers by themselves, they will abuse 
and knock them down, if they can. We have had several Officers confin'd 
to their Beds by them, and no Notice taken of it by Gen'l Gage, though 
been reported to him frequently. Major Mitchellf of the 15th Regiment 
would have been kill'd the other day, had it not been for a Doctor and two 

*" Annals of a Yorkshire House" I— 341. 

tEdward Mitchell, Major 5th Reg't of Foot, of which Hugh, Earl Percy, 
was colonel. Mentioned in general orders for gallantry at Bunker Hill. 



13 

other Gen'ls* who happen'd to pass by at the same time. They seiz'd him, 
and on his calling out, his friends knew his voice, and rescued him from 
them. 

Your old friend Colonel Clevelandf had like to have departed his life 
the other day, upon the Neck, by one of the Yankies or Bostonians coming 
up to him and another Officer as they were walking, and asked of the other 
Gen'l if his name was Collonel (sic) Maddison,| he reply'd no, and immedi- 
ately drew Coll'l Cleveland's Hanger with a pistol in the other hand and 
cut him across the Head, Neck and Arm making another (cut) at the Coll'l 
a Townsman jump'd in between, and near got his Arm quite cut off. This 
was done in the middle of the day, between two Guards, and near three 
hundred men at work, close by, and taken no Notice of; (the man) even 
walked by the Guard with the Hanger drawn in his hand, and the Brace of 
Pistols he threw into a Shop as he went along; but he was taken by the 
Congress at Cambridge on suspicion of his having done some mischief, and 
is now in gaol. 

They talk greatly of starving us all out this winter, when the severe 
weather sets in. The 47th Regiment arrived here from New York the 27th 
of Oct. last. No other news at present, but in case anything should happen, 
will let you know, as a Man of War will be sent off Express immediately to 
England. 

I have a few brace of Wood Ducks by me now, but they are so shy, that 
I am oblig'd to keep them in a Dark Chamber, and the weather will be so 
cold that they would not live to England, therefore will keep them till next 
Summer, as I shall then have a better opportunity of sending them. My 
Compliments to Mr. Dutton if he is living, and am sorry to hear of his late 
illness. I remain, dear Uncle 

Yours dutiful nephew 

Ashton Shuttleworth. 

Major Till to John Spencer. § 

Boston Camp, 6th July 1775. 
My Dear Sir: 

I have just time to acquaint you of my safe arrival to this most unhappy 
shore, as such I shall not hesitate to call it, where nothing but a total Re- 
bellion and the horrid scenes of a Bloody War is spread through the whole 
province; and how these disputes will end, the great God only knows. 
Boston hath now the appearance of a place wrecked by the enemy or lost 
its inhabitants by the rage of a plague. 

*Probably an error for "gentlemen." 

fSamuel Cleaveland, Lt.-Col. (later Col.) of Royal Reg't of Artillery. 
He was accused of furnishing balls of the wrong size for the guns at Bunker 
Hill and of "making love to the schoolmaster's daughter. " 

JGeorge Maddison, Lt.-Col. Commanding 4th, or The King's Own, Reg't 
of Foot. 

§" Annals of a Yorkshire House" II— 13. 



14 

Immediately after the 19th of April, an account of which you must have 
had, most of the people, excepting a few who pretend to be friends of Govern- 
ment, have embraced General Gage's Indulgence and retired to the country. 
Those very people with many thousands are now intrenched up to the very 
Eyes in every Hill and advantageous pass, so that we are as totally block- 
aded as ever town was. Their advanced guards and sentrys are so close to 
ours as to admit of conversation. That brave and gallant soldier, General 
Howe, on the 17th of last Month, took possession of a Redoute the Rebels 
had erected on the heights of Charlestown, which hath the command of 
Boston. This attack costs us the prime of our army, the shocking carnage 
that day will never be erased out of my mind till the day of my death. As 
our Brigade march'd up I met your nephew, Ashton* and Frank Marsdenf 
retiring, both poundedj they have both behaved like soldiers; a few days 
will, I hope, enable them to return to their duty again. 

Our losses that day, kill'd and wounded, including officers, are one thou- 
sand and fifty-four. I don't see how it could be otherwise when both 
partys behav'd like veterans. Every soul throughout these four provinces 
are a sett of poor deluded people most strangely infatuated with an enthu- 
siasm that must end in such bloodshed as is not to be told. 

As this letter is very liable to be opened, I beg you will excuse by being 
particular on our situation. All I can say is I rub tolerable well through a 
very severe duty and monstrous distress for want of fresh provisions. 

I hope you will favour me with a happy account of your health. Adieu, 
my dear Spencer. 

Yours most affectionately 

I.R.T. 

The Same to the Same. 

Boston Camp, 5th Dec. '75. 
My Dear Sir: 

I have the pleasure to assure you that I am in perfect health and spirits as 
ever I was in my life which is saying a good deal considering our melancholy 
and distressed situation,— the want of almost every necessary article 
towards existence. 

The unhappy affairs in this country have the same gloomy appearance as 
when our last accounts went home, if possible worse, for their army and 
navy, if I may be allow'd to give that appellation, are becoming more 
powerful and various than ever was expected, the support'g and keeping 
together so large a body of people as they have against us, is as astonishing 
as their military notions. The enthusiasm which prevails thro'out the 
continent, added to their hostile Ideas, will give us a cruel and arduous 



*Ashton Shuttleworth, whose brother John also served in America and 
was captured. 

fFrancis Marsden, Capt. 5th Reg't of Foot. 
{Probably an error for "wounded." 



15 

task to bring them to a sense of their duty to the mother country, even to 
attempt that, we must have a larger reinforcement from Europe, or the 
cause must drop; for no terms, tho' ever so mild, will operate with them 
so as to cement that friendship which ought to subsist between Great 
Britain and her Colonies. . . . The losses already sustained by a 
foolish obstinacy of a set of deluded people, is gone so far as to make it a 
most miserable and melancholy circumstance to every individual; and 
without some sudden change in affairs, must inevitably end in a completion 
of their ruin. If we are obliged to act, this country will be left in a poor 
state to reimburse any part of it. If I may be allow'd to give my opinion 
from the present appearances, our people have hard cards to play to settle 
matters on such a footing as to be of real advantage, and a lasting security 
to trade and property. 

This very moment I have received intelligence from one of our armed 
vessels that the Rebels have got full possession of Canada . . . this 
fine country is fairly lost and our army in a most melancholy situation. 
The greatest part of us are encamp'd, and the rest in cold, bad churches 
without bedding, food or any fresh provisions — such are our distresses. 
The Rebels have an idea of attacking us, and have prepared both boats 
and floating batteries, from which they have fired shot into the centre of our 
camp and town. It's thought they have taken a store ship with mortars 
and shells on board, if so, we shall have a pretty winter of it. 

Your nephew is well and a clever young fellow. 

P. S. — We have lost Canada and six store ships, one with mortars, etc., 
on board. » 



16 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ROOMS. 

The Committee on the Rooms reports as follows for the 
year 1918: 

The Society has received as a gift from Mr. Charles H. 
Taylor, Jr., a Director, the original lease, whereby David 
Sears leased to Uriah Cotting on September 8, 1817, for one 
thousand years, a store situated on the south side of Market 
Street, now Cornhill, at the corner of Court Street at an annual 
rental of ten tons of Russia Old Sables Iron, payable in March, 
June, September and December; also, a subsequent agreement, 
whereby, for a consideration of one thousand dollars, the 
form of payment was changed to gold coin of a specified 
weight. 

The Boston Transit Commission, which closed its field office 
this year, has given a miscellaneous collection of articles which 
were found when excavations were made for the Boston 
system of subways. They came to the Society in an exhibition 
case. 

A banner has been loaned to the Society by the descendants 
of Freeman Pulsifer, a Veteran of the Revolution, who carried 
it in the procession in Boston in 1789, which was reviewed by 
President Washington when he visited New England in the 
first Presidential Tour. It is of interest that the Society owns 
a similar banner which was carried in the same procession. 

Newell A. Thompson, son of the well-known auctioneer, 
Col. Newell A. Thompson, who had an office in the Old State 
House when it was used for business purposes, has loaned to 
the Society two relics which formerly belonged to his father. 
One is an officer's sword which is inscribed "Semper Peratus. 
From the non-commissioned officers and privates of the 
Boston City Guard to Newell A. Thompson, their Commander, 
November 1, 1850." The other is a gold pin and attached 
pendant medal inscribed "The State Fencibles, Captain Page 
to the Boston City Guard, Captain Kinsman, as a mark of 
esteem and in commemoration of the visit of the latter to 
Philadelphia in June, 1831." 

A notable addition to the Collections is a series of three 



17 

photographs showing the War Buildings on Boston Common 
in 19 1 7 and 19 18 which were of such effective service to Amer- 
ican and foreign soldiers during the great European War. 
They were given to the Society by Charles H. Taylor, Jr., of 
the Boston Globe and Edwin A. Grozier of the Boston Post. 

George S. Mandell of the Boston Transcript has given us a 
set of photographs of the English tank "Britannia," which 
passed through the streets of Boston on April 5, 19 18. 

George B. Dexter, a member, has loaned an elaborate fan 
which was given by John Hancock to Dorothy Quincy before 
their marriage. Mr. Dexter purchased it at the sale of the 
effects in Josiah Quincy 's residence in Park Street. The 
President of the Society has given us an original crayon draw- 
ing of the Old State House, by Seaford, to add to our already 
large collection of pictures of this famous landmark. 

There has been expended for the care and maintenance of 
the rooms of the Society the sum of $597.94 and the Society 
has received from the sales of prints and souvenirs the sum 
of $223.07. 

For the Committee, 

Francis H. Manning, Joseph G. Minot, 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr., Henry W. Cunningham, 

COURTENAY GUILD, THE PRESIDENT and 

Clerk, ex-officiis. 
December ji, igi8. 



ADDITIONS BY GIFT AND LOAN 
TO THE SOCIETY'S COLLECTIONS, 191! 



Donors. 



Descriptions. 



Adams, Wilbur F. 

Allen, Charles W. 

Appleton, Charles B. 
(Loans.) 

Bailey, Alvin R. 



Boston Transit Com- 
mission. 

Burton, Hiram M. 



Clarke, William B. 



Davis, Charles L. 



Dexter, George B. 
(Loan.) 

Edith, Lady Playfair. 



Hoadley, Mrs. Cath- 
erine G. M. 



Section of a tree trunk from the town dock, Dock 
Sq. 

Colored lithograph of the "Old Feather Store," 
built 1680, taken down i860. 

Chauncy Hall school medal, awarded to Edward 
C. Brooks, December 31, 1844. Franklin 
school medals, not dated: awarded to Benjamin 
B. Appleton and Charles H. Appleton. 

Lithograph of Sewall, Day and Co.'s Cordage 
Manufactory on Parker St. Steel engraving of 
a later manufactory of the same firm in Allston. 
Photograph of the four-horse truck of the same 
firm filled with a car load of binding twine. 

Miscellaneous collection of relics found during ex- 
cavations for the Boston subways. 

Photographs of Peter Bent Brigham, 1 807-1 877, 
and Robert Brett Brigham, 1826-1900; founders 
of the hospitals which bear their names. 

Photograph of the book store of William H. Piper 
and Co., 133 Washington St., 1862-1874. 
Group photograph of Military Night of The 
Lodge of St. Andrew, May 14, 1908. Group 
photograph of the officers of the First Corps of 
Cadets, 1889. 

Collection of medals awarded to John B. Baker 
and Co., harness makers. Certificate of John 
B. Baker in the Association of Franklin Medal 
Scholars. 

A fan once owned by Miss Dorothy Quincy, later 
Mrs. John Hancock. 

Doorplate of Nathaniel P. Russell, Nos. 32 and 
later 72 Beacon St. 

Silver dinner fork, once owned by Major Thomas 
Melville; it bears the name Melville. 



19 



Donors. 



Descriptions. 



Mandell, George S. 



Monroe, Mrs. Adeline 
S. O. 

Osgood, George L. 

Osgood, Josiah A. 
descendants of Free- 
man Pulsifer. 
(Loan.) 

Merrill, Samuel A. 



Nicholson, Mrs. Kath- 

erine S. P. 
Purchased. 



Taylor, Charles H., 
Jr. 



Four photographs of the English tank " Britannia" 
which passed through the streets of Boston on 
April 5, 1918. 

Banner carried by Freeman Pulsifer, a Veteran of 
the Revolution, in the procession in Boston 
which was reviewed by President Washington 
on October 24, 1789. 



Bills of fare of the first dinner at the Tremont 
House on October 16, 1829, and a dinner given 
to Gen. Benjamin F. Butler on May 1, 1889. 
Program of opening performance at the Hollis 
Street Theatre, Nov. 9, 1885. 

Tablecloth, once owned by Mrs. John Hancock. 

Autograph list of subscribers to Bradford's History 
of Massachusetts. Photograph of the building 
erected in Park Square in 1874 for the triennial 
exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable 
Mechanic Association. 

Lease for one thousand years from David Sears to 
Uriah Cotting.of store situated on the south side 
of Market St. (now Cornhill), on the corner of 
Court St., for a yearly rental of ten tons of Rus- 
sia Old Sables Iron, payable March, June, 
September, December; dated September 8, 18 17. 
Agreement on the above lease, whereby, for a 
consideration of one thousand dollars, the rental 
of the store may be paid in a specified amount of 
gold coin; dated October 25, 1817. 

Deed of sale by Lewis Deblois of Washingon, Md. 
(now D. C), to Ann Deblois of Boston for a con- 
sideration of five shillings of two divided third 
parts of land and store situated on Cornhill 
(now Washington St.), dated November (blank) 
1796. Two pen drawings by Casimer Shea; 
Province St., showing the end of Montgomery 
PL; and Elm Street, showing Faneuil Hall and 
the Custom House Tower. 



20 



Donors. 



Descriptions. 



Thompson, Newell A. 



Thornton, James B. 



Officers sword. Pin and attached medal. De- 
scribed in Annual Report of the Committee on 
Rooms. 

Commission of James B. Thornton as Marshal of 
the District of Maine; signed by Thomas Jef- 
ferson, President, and James Madison, Secretary 
of State; dated January 9, 1807. 



21 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY. 

The Committee on the Library reports as follows for the 
year 191 8: 

During the past year sixty-three volumes and twenty-two 
pamphlets have been added to the Library. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has given, through 
the office of the Secretary of State, the vital records of the 
City of Salem, Volume 2, and of the following towns of Massa- 
chusetts: Carlisle, Claremont, Cohasset, Hardwick, Harvard, 
Milford, Shirley, Stoneham, West Newbury, Westbrook and 
Windsor. 

Other books acquired during the year, which are especially 
desirable in the Library of a Society which studies the history 
of Boston are: the "Journal and Letters of Samuel Gridley 
Howe," from his daughter, Mrs. Laura E. Richards; the 
autobiography of Frank B. Sanborn, entitled "Recollections 
of Seventy Years," from President Norcross; the "History of 
the Boston Medical Library," from the author, Dr. John S. 
Farlow, Librarian; "Daniel Webster in England," being the 
diary of Mrs. Harriette Story Paige, a relative of Mr. Webster, 
who accompanied him to England in 1839; "Notes on Music in 
Old Boston, " by William Arms Fisher; this is the record of the 
more than one hundred years service of the Boston music house 
of Oliver Ditson Co. The President of the Society has also 
given us two volumes of the Harvard Graduate Magazine for 
the years 1916-1918, which has much Boston biographical 
material, and we have received from Capt. Charles Hunt, a 
member, the "Annals of the Massachusetts Commandery of 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States 
from 1868 to 1918," a period of fifty years. 

The Society has acquired by purchase the interesting work 
entitled the "History of the Rise and Progress of the Arts of 
Design in the United States"; this history was originally 
published by William Dunlap in 1834 and has now been re- 
issued in amplified form by Frank W. Bayley and Charles E. 
Goodspeed, both members of this Society. 

The work of cataloguing the books in the Library has been 



22 



finished and now a similar course is being pursued with the 
pamphlets. The Committee believes that it would be desir- 
able to have a catalogue of the Library published when cir- 
cumstances warrant it; such a catalogue would be valuable 
to the student of the literary history of Boston. 

The principal of the James Lyman Whitney Library Fund 
amounted to $415.02 at the close of the year; from the in- 
come of this fund books of special merit are purchased, which 
find appropriate place on the shelves of the Society's Library. 

There has been expended from the Current Account of the 
Society, the sum of $15.75 f° r library purposes, and from the 
income of the James Lyman Whitney Library Fund the sum 
of $5.85 for the purchase of books. 
For the Committee, 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., E. Percival Merritt, 
Walter K. Watkins, John Woodbury, 

William G. Shillaber, The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December 31, igi8. Clerk. 



23 



ADDITIONS TO THE SOCIETY'S LIBRARY, 1918. 



Donors. 



Vol- 
umes. 



American Historical Association ..... 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co 

Bailey, Alvin R 

Boston Public Library 

Boston Public Works Department .... 

Brigham, William D 

Brookline Historical Society 

Clarke, William B 

Dummer Academy 

Essex Institute 

Farlow, Dr. John W 

Goodspeed, Charles E 

Independence Hall, Custodian of 

Ipswich Historical Society 

Johnson, Arthur S 

Kings Chapel Parish 

Marrs, Mrs. Laura N 

Massachusetts Historical Society 

Massachusetts, Secretary of State of ... 

Matthews, Albert 

Medford Historical Society 

Merritt, Edward Percival 

National Society, Sons of the American Revolution . 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 

Norcross, Grenville H 

Oliver Ditson Co 

Piper, Dr. Fred S 

Purchased 

Richards, Mrs. Laura E. 

Rogers, Henry M 

Roxbury Historical Society 

Runkle, John C. 

Smithsonian Institution 

Society for the Preservation of New England Antiq- 
uities 

Society of Colonial Wars in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 

Carried forward 



3 
2 
1 
1 
14 



9 

1 

17 
2 
1 



67 



24 



Donors. 


Vol- 
umes. 


Pam- 
phlets. 


Brought forward 

State Street Trust Co 

Sullivan, Mrs. T. Russell 

Veteran Association, First Corps of Cadets 

Winthrop School Association 

Wiswall, Clarence A 


67 
1 

1 


34 
1 

4 
1 


Total 


69 


40 



25 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEMORIALS. 

The Committee on Memorials report as follows for the 
year 1918: 

The Committee announced in its last annual report that it 
would be necessary to remove the Paul Dudley Six-Mile 
Stone on Harvard Avenue, Allston, from the inner to the 
outer edge of the sidewalk to safeguard travel. 

The removal has been made during the present year, and 
the sum of $67, necessary for the work, has been generously 
contributed by members of the Society. 
For the Committee, 

COURTENAY GUILD, FRANK E. WOODWARD, 

Boylston A. Beal, The Clerk. 

Charles F. Read, 
December 31,1918. clerk. 



26 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

The Committee on Finance reports as follows for the year 
1918: 

At the close of the year 1917 the Permanent Fund of the 
Society amounted to $62,291.43. 

During the year the Fund has been increased by the fees of 
twenty-five new life members and three annual members 
transferred to life membership, amounting to $825, and the 
James Lyman Whitney Library Fund has been increased 
$67.61. 

The Committee has purchased a $1000 Detroit Edison Co. 
7% Bond at a cost of $1048.33, a $500 Liberty Bond of the 
Third Issue and has paid $250 on account of a $500 Liberty 
Bond of the Fourth Issue. 

At the close of the present year the Fund amounts to 
$63,191.83. Of this amount $62,550 is invested, $226.81 is 
deposited in the New England Trust Co. and the James 
Lyman Whitney Library Fund, amounting to $415.02, is on 
deposit in the Franklin Savings Bank. 

The permanent fund has been increased during the year by 
the sum of $900.43. 

For the Committee. 

Grenville H. Norcross, Francis H. Manning, 

COURTENAY GUILD. 

Charles F. Read, 
December 31, igi8. Clerk. 



27 



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PERMANENT FUND. 

The Society has a Permanent Fund, made up from Life 
Membership Fees, gifts and bequests, well invested, which it 
is earnestly desired may be increased by additions to its Life 
Membership. The Permanent Fund of the Society includes 
the following special gifts: — 

Boston Memorial Association Fund $1,179 5 1 

Robert C. Billings Memorial 3,000 oo 

Edward I. Browne Bequest 1,000 oo 

George O. Carpenter Memorial 1,000 00 

Benjamin H. Dewing Bequest 100 00 

John W. Farwell Gift 500 00 

Curtis Guild Memorial 1,000 00 

James F. Hunnewell Memorial 1,000 00 

Lucy A. Norcross Centennial Memorial 1,000 00 

Otis Norcross Centennial Memorial 1,000 00 

Catherine P. Perkins Bequest 4,000 00 

Samuel E. Sawyer Bequest 4,610 87 

Joseph H. Stickney Bequest 1,000 00 

Joseph C. Storey Bequest 2,000 00 

William B. Trask Bequest 500 00 

James L. Whitney Library Fund 415 02 

Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., Bequest 3,000 00 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I give and bequeath to the Bostonian Society, in the 

City of Boston, the sum of dollars 

for the general use and purpose of the said Society. 



30 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS. 

The Committee which was appointed to nominate Officers 
of the Bostonian Society for the ensuing year, begs to report 
that it has attended to its duty and proposes the following 
candidates: — 

For Directors. 
Francis H. Manning, Courtenay Guild, 

Charles H. Taylor, Jr., Joseph G. Minot, 

John W. Farwell, Henry W. Cunningham, 

Grenville H. Norcross, Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., 

Frederick W. Parker. 

For Clerk and Treasurer. 
Charles F. Read. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

Henry F. Tapley, 
Josephine S. Comer, 
Eugene B. Hagar, 

T. JULIEN SlLSBY, 

Lucius H. Warren, 

Nominating Committee. 
January 2, igi g. 

The report of the Committee was accepted, and the Society 
then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year. 
The result was reported by the tellers — Mr. T. Julien Silsby 
and Dr. Arthur H. Nichols — showed the unanimous choice of 
those named on the ballot, as nominated. 

It was ordered that the President's Report, together with 
the reports of the several Committees as submitted at the 
Annual Meeting, and the Treasurer's Report, with the Mem- 
bership Rolls, etc., be printed in the Annual Proceedings. 

On motion, the Society then adjourned. 

Charles F. Read, Clerk. 



3i 



THE BRIMMER SCHOOL. 
1844-1911 

Comprising in Part a History of the School Written by Charles 

J. Prescott in 1888; a Paper Read Before the Bostonian 

Society on May 21, 1918, by Charles F. Read, 

Clerk of the Society. 

"Scenes of my youth! awake its slumbering fire! 
Ye winds of Memory, sweep the silent lyre! 
Ray of the past, if yet thou canst appear, 
Break through the clouds of Fancy's waning year; 
Chase from her breast the thin autumnal snow, 
If leaf or blossom still is fresh below! 

So, in remembrance of my boyhood's time, 

I lift these ensigns of neglected rhyme; 

O more than blest, that, all my wanderings through, 

My anchor falls where first my pennons flew!" 

So sang Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, just returned from 
Europe, in one of his early poems entitled, "Memory." In 
similar mood I approach today the subject of this paper. 

In the list of thirty-nine graduates of the Brimmer School on 
July 21, 1868, my name is recorded, and, as in a few days, half 
a century will have elapsed since that event, it seems appro- 
priate that at this golden anniversary, I should record the 
history of a famous Boston grammar school, named for a 
mayor of the city, and which, from its opening in 1844, to its 
closing in 191 1, has sent into the world a host of graduates, 
many of whom became in later life distinguished citizens of 
the city. 

A few words concerning my connection with the school may 
be said here. I became a pupil in the primary department 
at about six years of age, my teacher being Miss Elizabeth 
Goodridge. After finishing the primary course, I entered the 
grammar department and remained there until my graduation 
in 1868. 



32 

In the year 1861 when I entered the school, the following 
nine members of the Boston School Committee were in charge 
of the Brimmer School District: Samuel A. Green, physician, 
war surgeon, historian and Mayor of Boston; Augustus A. 
Gould, physician and naturalist; Enoch C. Rolfe, dentist; 
John B. Alley and William Read, physicians, the latter being 
my father; Rev. Dr. Ezra S. Gannett, minister of the Arling- 
ton Street Church; Messrs. Charles R. Codman, lawyer; 
Samuel T. Lamb, retired merchant and Otis Kimball, agent of 
the Great Western and Michigan Central Railroad. 

Of these representative citizens of the year 1861, two now 
survive, Dr. Samuel A. Green and Col. Charles R. Codman; 
both are venerable in years, both are veterans of the Civil 
War, and both are held in the highest esteem by their fellow 
citizens.* 

The teachers of the school in 1861 were as follows: Joshua 
Bates, master; William L. P. Boardman, sub-master; Wil- 
liam Reed, usher; Miss Rebecca L. Duncan, head assistant; 
the Misses Mary E. Beck, Harriet E. Howard, Augusta H. 
Farrar, Harriet N. Lane, Mercie T. Snow, Mary M. Knight, 
Amanda Snow, Mercie A. Davie, Susan P. Cunningham, teach- 
ers, and Edwin Bruce, music teacher. 

I was a pupil of several of these teachers while progressing 
from class to class in regular order. The names of the teach- 
ers which I have read reminds me of a poetical "skit" then 
in vogue in the school. Once learned, it has never been 
forgotten. 

"Old Master Bates 

Came to school one morning 

With a fresh bag of dates. 

Miss Beck took a peck, 

Miss Knight took a bite, 

And Miss Farrar 

Carried away the rest in a wheelbarrow." 

In writing the history of the Brimmer School, I thought it 
would be necessary to collect the various data and weave it 
into a narrative, but inquiry at the office of the Boston School 

*CoI. Charles R. Codman died October 5, 1918 and Hon. Samuel A. 
Green, M. D., died December 5, 1918. 



33 

Committee revealed the fact that its history from 1844 to ** 
had been written by Charles J. Prescott, first President of 
the Brimmer School Association. The paper was read by 
Mr. Prescott at the annual meeting of the Association on 
January 10, 1888. 

Charles J. Prescott, son of Edward and Catherine L. Pres- 
cott, was born in Boston on February 15, 1838. He was grad- 
uated at the Brimmer School in the Class of 1853, an d at the 
English High School in the Class of 1856. He was employed 
as a clerk in the coal and wood business; in 1862 he became a 
partner in the firm of W. L. and C. J. Prescott in the same 
line of business, and so continued until 1887. 

Mr. Prescott was a member of the Board of Directors of 
Public Institutions from 1876 to 1881, and a Commissioner of 
Public Institutions from 1889 to 1891. He was a member of 
the Boston School Committee from 1870 to 1875; an alderman 
in 1874 and 1875, and a member of the Massachusetts House 
of Representatives from 1877 to 1879, serving as Chairman of 
the Committee on Charitable Institutions. He died in Bos- 
ton on October 2, 1895. Mr. Prescott's paper follows: 



Mr. President and Members of the Brimmer School Association: 
When you did me the honor, some years since, of electing 
me the first President of this, the first Grammar School As- 
sociation formed in this city, I had neither the time nor the 
data to prepare a history of the Brimmer School. I will 
endeavor to supply the deficiency this evening. 

The Brimmer schoolhouse stands upon a lot of land, on 
what has been called since 1836, Common Street, but this street 
has borne the names of Walker's Lane, Walker Street and Tre- 
mont Street. It was again called Common Street in 1836, 
making it an uncommon street in the matter of name. What 
is now known as Tremont Street was not opened south 
of Common Street until 1836. Washington Street from Beach 
to Dover was formerly known as Orange Street. 

The old Franklin schoolhouse formerly stood upon part of 
the site of the present Brimmer School, the original lot having 
been deeded to the town of Boston, March 8, 1790, by Richard 
3 



34 

Gridley, blacksmith, for the sum of sixty pounds, the lot being 
80 x 53 feet, and containing 4,240 feet. 

In 1843, when the new Brimmer School was to be erected, 
the city bought of Henry Andrews additional land on Common 
Street, about 98 x 40 feet, for the sum of $5,500. This con- 
stituted the original Brimmer School lot. In 1859-60, the 
city purchased three dwelling houses, with the adjoining 
land on Warren Street, now Warrenton Street, for the sum 
of $13,000, and removed the houses to extend the school yard 
to that street. This constitutes the present lot, the area of 
which is 11,081 square feet, and with the building, was as- 
sessed last year at $96,000, $36,000 for the land and $60,000 
for the building. The Brimmer School, built in 1843, cost, 
including the land, $22,151 .23. 

The fire of 1787 laid waste the whole of the territory around 
Hollis Street, including the Hollis Street Church. Com- 
mencing in Beach Street, it extended to Common Street 
and destroyed one hundred buildings, sixty of which were 
dwelling houses. Marquis de Lafayette, with characteristic 
generosity, contributed the sum of £350 toward the relief of 
the sufferers. The Society in Hollis Street erected another 
wooden church the following year, which stood there till 18 10, 
when it was sold and floated down the harbor to East Brain- 
tree, where it still stands. Then came the present building, 
which a short time ago was sold to Robert Brigham, who 
converted it into the Hollis Street Theatre. 

There are no records to show when the old Franklin School- 
house was built on Common Street, but it was probably in 
the year 1 790 or soon after. On the corner of Common Street, 
now covered by the Nassau Hall building, stood Edward 
Johnson's Paint and Oil Shop, afterwards occupied by Stephen 
Sargent for a grocery store. On the other corner of Wash- 
ington Street lived Aaron Bean, who was a teacher in the 
old Franklin School, and in this house his son, Aaron H. Bean, 
now President of the Hamilton National Bank, was born and 
lived for many years. Lemuel Shaw, afterwards Chief Justice 
of the Supreme Court of this state, was an usher in this school. 
Other well-known residents upon the street were Thomas Vose, 



Commonwealth 




of Maflachufctts. 



By His EXCELLEN CY 



JAMES BOWDOIN, Efquire, 

Governour of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



A 




^ 



For a Charitable Contribution. 

T" H F. R E A S by the permiiTive Providence of G O D, a great number of Families in the town of 
Boston, have from (^ik and affluence been iuddenly reduced to extreme poverty and diftreis, by a de- 
ftrucrtve Fire, which took place on the evening of the twentieth inftant, and their diftrefled fituation 
having been reprefented to the Geneni Court by the Selectmen of that town, the Court have recuicftsd 

me to i<T"ue a Brief for the procuring a charitable ConttlDution to be made through the feveral towns and diftricts within 

this Commonwealth, for the relief of the fufferers : 

In pu'fuance, therefore, to the requeft of the General Court, fignified by 

their Refolution of this day, — I do mod earneftly recommend to the good People of this Commonwealth, to exercife 
their Chriftian benevolence, by contributing to the relief of thole who have fo greatly fuft'ered by that difafterous event, 
and whofe diltrefs mud excite the fympathetic feelings of every benevolent and humane hearts And agreeably to the 
laid Refolution, I do defire, that all turns of money, or other' charitv, which fhall be collected upon this occafion, ma y 
b. paid or delivered into the hands ol the Selectmen and Overfcers of the poor of the town of Boston, to be by them dirtri- 
buted, as they in their difcretion (hall judge proper. And the laid Selectmen and Overfeers, are by the laid Refolution 
required, to lay before the next General Court, an account of fuch Contribution, and of the manner ki which they 
have diltnbuted it. 

And I do requeft the Miniiters of the feveral Churches and religious Societies within this Commonwealth, to read 
this Brief to their refpective Co.i^regitious, upci the nrft Lord's day, after they lhall receive the fame, and to notify the 
next Lord's day following as the day ot Contribution. 

GIF EN at the COUNCIL-CHAMBER, in Boston, the twenty -eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord, one 
tbou/and Jeven hundred and eigbtf-Jeven, and M the eleventh year of the Independence of the United States of 
AM ERIC A. 



By his Excellency's command, 



JAMES BOWDOIN. 

JOHN AVERY, jun. Secretary. 



BOSTON : Punted by ADAMS and NOURSE. Printers to the GENERAL COURT, 
FROM THE ORIGINAL BROADSIDE IN THE COLLECTION OF THE BOSTONIAN 



SOCIETY 



35 

John Wheeler, John Tyler, auctioneer, Major Joseph Grafton, 
Surveyor of the Port, Benjamin Blaney, Mark Fisher, Payson 
Perrin and Leonard Ware. 

The schoolhouse was an oblong two-story wooden building 
with a small cupola. At the end of each room was an immense 
fireplace holding a small cartload of wood, a large box stove, 
a funnel running the entire length of the school room, and 
benches on either side of the main aisle in three rows rising 
one above the other. It was named the Franklin School in 
honor of Benjamin Franklin, and was the first school in Bos- 
ton to receive the name of an individual. The schools had 
formerly been designated North School, South School, East 
School, West School, according to their locations. 

This old school was a reading school solely until 1819, when 
the Writing School on Mason Street was removed to the second 
story of the building. The last master was Mr. Adams. 
The old Franklin removed to the new Franklin Schoolhouse on 
Washington, near Dover Street, January 13, 1826, the scholars 
marching in procession with Master Adams at their head. 
The building on Common Street was afterwards used for a 
primary school, watch house, ward room and engine house, 
and in the time of the terrible cholera scourge in 1832-33 was 
a depot for the free distribution of chloride of lime. On the 
site now occupied by the Hotel Pelham, corner of Boylston 
and Tremont Streets, was an old wooden house used at this 
time for a cholera hospital. Rev. Charles F. Barnard also used 
the building in part for Sunday services previous to the erection 
of his chapel in W 7 arrenton Street in 1835, ar >d other religious 
services were also held there. 

From 1830 to 1843 the number of pupils in the city had 
increased one hundred and fourteen per cent. The south part 
of the city was growing rapidly; that is, the part of the city 
as far south as Dover Street, for that was the extreme southern 
part of the city then. There were, in the latter year, only two 
hundred and fifty-three pupils south of Dover Street. The 
Adams School, on Mason Street, Samuel Barrett, master, was 
so full that an extra school room was hired in the Melodeon. 
The W'inthrop School then on East Street, Master Henry Wil- 



36 

Hams, the Johnson School on Tremont Street, Master Richard 
G. Parker, the Franklin School, Master Barnum Field, were 
all overflowing and the School Committee unanimously asked 
for a grammar schoolhouse for boys to be erected between the 
Adams and the Franklin Schools. 

The School Committee, in 1843, consisted of the Mayor, 
Martin Brimmer, the President of the Common Council, 
Peleg W. Chandler, and twenty-four others, two from each of 
the twelve wards into which the city was then divided. Sam- 
uel F. McCleary, Senior, was Secretary, at a salary of one 
hundred and fifty dollars. The English High School was then 
on Pinckney Street and the Latin School was on School Street, 
corner Chapman Place where the Parker House now stands. 

On the 4th of April, 1843, a Committee of the School Board, 
consisting of Rev. Otis A. Skinner, Dr. John Odin, Jr., and 
Rev. John T. Sargent, were appointed to confer with the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings in relation to the building of the 
new grammar school at the south part of the city and on May 
1, 1843 the Committee of the City Council, of which Mayor 
Brimmer was Chairman, reported the following: 

"Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings be and they are 
hereby directed and empowered to procure the land and erect a school- 
house thereon near the west boundary of Ward 10 without unnecessary de- 
lay, provided the same do not exceed the sum of twenty-one thousand 
dollars, and that said Committee be instructed to confer with such Com- 
mittee as may be appointed by the School Committee, upon the site to 
be selected." 

The order was passed and concurred in by the Common 
Council. The Committee were certainly faithful and prompt, 
for three days afterwards, May 4th, they purchased land ad- 
joining the Franklin School on Common Street, and proceeded 
to sell the old schoolhouse at public auction. The purchaser 
was Gaius W. Allen, and the price realized was $193.94. Mr. 
Allen had a few years previously bought of the city a lot of 
land which was described in his deed as "a lot containing 2,500 
square feet, on a new street not yet named at the extreme 
south part of the city for ten cents per foot, $250 in all, 
and had ten years in which to pay for the same." Much of the 



37 

old material he used in building there and he will be pleased to 
show it to Brimmer School boys at any time. This new street, 
not then named, is now West Canton Street, and the number 
of his house is 66, near Shawmut Avenue. The old school- 
house has pleasant memories for many an old Bostonian. 
Albert Day, Uriel H. Coffin, Joshua G. Gooch, George L. 
Brown, the artist, William J. Slade, John J. Loring, Thomas 
H. Tucker, George W. Abbott, William A. Holland, Thomas 
H. Dunham, W 7 illiam H. Ireland, George W. Robbins, John J. 
Saven, James Wyman and hosts of others went to school 
there. 

The old schoolhouse had no janitor, for such were not known 
in those days. Certain good boys took their turn in building 
the fires and doing the sweeping and were dismissed half an 
hour earlier than the others. In case of fire the boys of the 
first class were allowed to go, taking the buckets which always 
stood in the entry, and the boys never came back until the 
fire was all out. The school hours in the early days of the 
town were from 7.30 A. M . to 4 P. M . 

As the new building approached completion the School 
Committee were looking for a master or masters, for the schools 
were then carried on by a system called the double-headed 
system. 

On November 7, 1843, Joshua Bates, Jr., was elected gram- 
mar master and William A. Shepard writing master. Joshua 
Bates, Jr., was the son of Rev. Joshua Bates, D. D., pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Dedham, Mass., and was born 
in that town March 17, 18 10; he attended the common school 
there until eight years of age, when he went to Middlebury, 
Vt., where his father had been made President of Mid- 
dlebury College, and from there the young man was gradu- 
ated in 1832, having fitted for college at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover. He received the degree of LL. D. from his Alma 
Mater in 1880, the highest honor the college could bestow. 

In the autumn of 1832 he went to Springfield, Vt., and there 
taught a private school for six months. He came to Boston 
in 1833, and in the fall of that year was elected principal of 
the Winthrop Classical and Grammar School in Charlestown, 



38 

midway between the Monument and the Navy Yard. This 
school he took charge of when he was in his twenty-fourth year, 
and during his ten years' service there, developed those strong 
and manly traits of character which fitted him for the new 
work he was about to assume at the Brimmer School. 

The schoolhouse was completed, and was first occupied in 
December, 1843, when dedication services were held, and 
addresses were made by several distinguished gentlemen. 

The school really commenced January 1, 1844, witn lar & e 
numbers from the Adams, Franklin and Winthrop Schools. 
The Franklin School up to this time had been a mixed school, 
but on the opening of the Brimmer School, it became a girls' 
school, all the boys being transferred to Common Street. 

In the first story of the new building were located a ward 
room for Ward 10, and two primary and intermediate schools 
kept by Miss Taft and Miss Goodridge. Above were two 
large halls the whole size of the building, one for the writing, 
the other for the reading department, with two recitation 
rooms leading from each. The seats were so arranged that 
the boys sat with their backs to the masters, but this rather 
impolite and inconvenient style was changed in September, 
1845. The number of seats in the school was four hundred 
and eighty and two months after the school opened it com- 
prised four hundred and eight pupils. 

What was the the City of Boston at that time? 
Mayor Martin Brimmer, for whom the school was named, 
tells us in his inaugural address on January 1 , 1844, the day the 
school commenced, that the city had increased in population 
from 45,000 in 1822, when it became a city, to 110,000, 
and said "such is the peculiar position of our city and its nat- 
ural limits, the time must arrive when no spot of equal extent 
on this side of the Atlantic will number so dense a population ; 
a state of things by no means a subject of congratulation." 
A remark which will cause many to smile and some to think. 
John Tyler was then President of the United States, and 
John C. Calhoun, Secretary of State. George N. Briggs was 
Governor of Massachusetts, and held that office for a longer 
period than have any of his successors. Of the Boston City 



39 

Council, one alderman and four councilmen only survive. 
Abraham T. Lowe, Esquire, then in the Board of Aldermen, 
and for many years a very valuable member of that body, is 
still living at a very advanced age at his home in Union 
Park. No other alderman who served then, or in any previ- 
ous year, is now living. 

The day police in 1844 consisted of fourteen men. Officer 
Towle was one of them, and his rattan cane still lingers or 
tingles in the memory of some Brimmer School boys. The 
nightwatch under Captain James Barry was comparatively 
small, and was composed in part of men who performed their 
daily vocations and watched part of each or every other night. 
When they performed all night duty, they received the munifi- 
cent sum of sixty cents. 

William Barnicoat was Chief Engineer of the Fire Depart- 
ment and Peter C. Jones was one of his eight engineers. We 
had no fire alarm then, for the bells were not rung by electricity 
until January 1, 1852. Old Tremont 12, for this was the 
"tub" the Brimmer Boys "blowed for," had thirty-nine men 
and the engine house stood on a part of the lot now constitut- 
ing the Winthrop School yard. Steam took the place of 
muscle in the extinguishment of fires sixteen years after the 
Brimmer School was built. 

Dock Square and Canton Street omnibuses did notcommence 
running until two and a half years after the Brimmer School 
was built. Hourlies on King's line to Roxbury, and on Jip- 
son's line to South Boston, went trundling along with their 
long covered coaches with four horses and a big dinner bell. 

The Boston & Worcester Railroad ran only three daily 
trains to Newton, and the Providence Road only three trains 
to Dedham. The Fitchburg Road ran trains as far as Wal- 
tham and the Lowell Road ran an occasional train to the City 
of Spindles, but some of the railroads, now flourishing, were 
not then opened. 

We had no Cochituate water till 1848, when the monster 
water celebration procession passed by the head of Common 
Street on Tremont Street. 

Where is now the Boston & Albany and Providence Rail- 



40 

road Crossing, was the big basin, at Dartmouth Street, where 
the larger boys went swimming while the smaller boys went to 
bathe at the baby basin not far from the foot of Fayette 
Street. When we had a few coppers to spare, we went to 
Morey's or Braman's Baths, or hired a boat of Daddy Kane, on 
Tremont Street, about opposite Chapman Street and near Dr. 
Winslow Lewis' dissecting house, and rowed over to the Mill 
Dam near Beacon Street, or speared eels near the spot now 
occupied by the Hotel Vendome. The State Arsenal was then 
on land now covered by brick dwelling houses on Park Square. 
Their day of doom has now come, and one by one they fall or 
are remodelled into business structures. 

In the enterprising daily newspapers of that day we got the 
Congressional news of Thursday on the Tuesday following, for 
the telegraph was only opened to Springfield on January 15, 
1846. The cable to England gave us the first tick July 30, 
1866, and telephone communication astonished the world in 

1877. 

Some "toney" boys had velocipedes then, but bicycles and 
tricycles were unknown, and the word "polo" was not in the 
dictionary and lawn tennis and croquet were "Greek." We 
had no five thousand dollar base ball players then, and "home 
plate, " "hot grounders" and "dropped flies" we did not know. 
We did know, however, that Ned Hunt, now clerk in the 
United States Court at New Orleans, could knock a ball more 
"sky high" than any other Brimmer School boy. 

Bunker Hill Monument was completed the year the Brim- 
mer School opened, and in the same year fireworks were dis- 
played on Boston Common on the east side, where the Brewer 
Fountain now stands, for the last time. 

We had 22,275 names in the Boston Directory in 1844, 
and all the "colored persons" were classed by themselves 
at the end of the book. In 1887, 184,517 names appear, 
and the volume is nearing the size of Webster's Unabridged 
Dictionary. 

Let us hurry back to the old Brimmer School, for the winter 
of 1844 was very cold. There was good skating in Boston 
streets. The harbor was frozen down to the Castle on Jan- 



41 

uary 5, and nine miles down on February 3, and an ice chan- 
nel was cut for the English steamer Britannia by John Hill. 

The Brimmer School started in good shape under Master 
Bates, and the year after it was opened it was called by the 
School Committee the model school. Having no boys to 
graduate the first year, its first exhibition was held August 13, 
1845. The medals awarded numbered six, and were given to 
the following: George T. Stoddard, Charles H. Hovey, Fred 
A.Tuttle, Irving I. Harwood, Horace W. Barry and Franklin 
Smith. 

Of the above, three are now living, and three have passed 
to the silent majority. Several of this class and of subsequent 
classes served in the Civil War, and one of the first class, 
L. Walter Buckingham, gave his life for his country at Aldie 
Station, Va. 

The school from the first took a very high rank, and as early 
as 1847 was complimented in the highest degree in the printed 
School Report of that year. 

The same year that Mr. Bates took charge of the Brimmer 
School, Mr. George B. Hyde was elected master of the new 
South School. He had been teaching at the Farm School, 
and when he first went to the South End, taught in the second 
story of John D. William's house on Washington Street, op- 
posite where the Cathedral of the Holy Cross stands. He was 
afterwards reading master of the D wight School, with James 
A. Page as writing master, and in i860 he was transferred to 
the new Everett School on Northampton Street where he 
continued till 1878. The first year that he served as master, 
the School Committee said in its report that it was hoped that 
he would be a success. Inasmuch as he was continued in 
service for thirty-four years, when he retired with the regret 
of everybody who knew him, it is fair to presume that the hopes 
of the Committee were realized. He and Mr. Bates were al- 
ways intimate as they are today, and well may be called the 
Damon and Pythias of our school masters. 

Mr. Bates taught the boys, in addition to their lessons from 
books, punctuality, thoroughness, development of mental 
power, self-reliance and manliness. 



4 2 

The city owes him a debt of gratitude which it can never 
repay. For more than thirty-two years he gave his best en- 
deavors to a faithful and conscientious discharge of the duties 
of his high trust and when, in the spring of 1876, he retired for 
a well-earned rest, the School Committee unanimously passed 
complimentary resolutions offered in that board by a Brimmer 
School boy, and two years later similar resolutions were passed 
in compliment to Mr. Hyde. 

Mr. Bates was succeeded in September, 1876 in the Brimmer 
School by E. Bentley Young, who had served two years as 
usher and eight years as sub-master. He well maintained the 
high standing of the school and was elected December 1, 1880 
to the mastership of the Prince School in the Back Bay where 
he now is. Well may he be proud of his five hundred grammar 
and two hundred primary pupils. 

Quincy E. Dickerman was his successor, and is at present 
master of the Brimmer School, and Miss Rebecca L. Duncan 
is head-assistant. She has most ably and devotedly filled 
that responsible position since 1855, a period of nearly thirty- 
three years. At present there are six hundred and twenty- 
three grammar pupils, and four hundred and twenty-seven 
primary pupils, a total of ten hundred and fifty in the Brimmer 
School district. 

The following gentlemen, who have distinguished themselves 
in the Boston schools as teachers, were ushers or sub-masters 
under Mr. Bates at the Brimmer School: Hosea H. Lincoln, 
now master of the Lyman School, East Boston; Daniel C. 
Brown, formerly master of the Bowdoin School, Boston; 
Percival W. Bartlett, formerly master of the Adams School, 
East Boston; William L. P. Boardman, now master of the 
Lewis School, Roxbury; John C. Norris, now master of the 
High School, Charlestown, and E. Bentley Young, now master 
of the Prince School, Boston. 

I have finished reading Mr. Prescott's paper, which gives 
the history of the Brimmer School from 1844 to 1888, but there 
remains to be told a successful service from 1888 to 191 1. 

We have learned of the long terms of the first and third 



43 

masters, Joshua Bates and Quincy Eliot Dickerman, the 
former for thirty-two and the latter for twenty-six years. 

Dr. Bates, after his retirement in 1876, resided in Boston 
until his death in Beverly, Mass., on June 26, 1888 in the 
seventy-ninth year of his age. During his active service he 
had become a leading figure in the Boston Association of Mas- 
ters, and upon his retirement, received from that organiza- 
tion, as well as from the Boston School Committee and the 
Brimmer School Association, eulogistic resolutions for his 
long and successful career as a teacher. His portrait was 
painted for the Brimmer School and a schoolhouse on Harrison 
Avenue was named in his honor by the School Committee. 

Mr. Dickerman retired from service in 1906, and died in 
the eighty-first year of his age. In addition to his long service 
as a teacher, he became a leading citizen of Somerville, Mass., 
serving as a member of the School Committee of that city for 
twenty-six years and at his death appropriate resolutions were 
passed by that board. He sat for his portrait for the Brimmer 
School and he has also been honored by having a school in 
Roxbury named for him. 

E. Bentley Young, master from 1876 to 1880, when he was 
transferred to the Prince School on Newbury Street, was re- 
tired in 191 1. He is now enjoying a merited rest after a long 
service, well and faithfully performed. 

Mr. George W. Ransom became master in 1906, upon the 
retirement of Mr. Dickerman, and continued in that position 
until 191 1, when the school ceased to exist. 

In 1909 the Boston School Committee decided to merge the 
Brimmer School and the Winthrop School for girls, near by 
on Tremont Street, in a new building, and the great school so 
obtained is situated on Ferdinand, Fayette andMelroseStreets. 
When the question arose of naming the new school, the School 
Committee, inasmuch as 1909 was the centennial year of the 
birth of Abraham Lincoln, voted that the school should bear 
the name of the great president and emancipator. 

A storm of protest against the giving up of the honored 
names of Winthrop and Brimmer immediately arose from the 
alumni of the schools, many organizations and the public at 



44 

large and the School Committee was overwhelmed with peti- 
tions and letters. But all to no avail; the Committee was 
obdurate and today the Abraham Lincoln School in its great 
and well-equipped building, which was designed by the archi- 
tect Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow, a member of this So- 
ciety, teaches a grammar course to hundreds of boys and girls. 
The principal is George W. Ransom, who was the last master 
of the Brimmer School. 

The Winthrop School was taken down to allow for the 
extension of Dix Place and its site is now covered in part by 
the Wilbur Theatre. 

The old Brimmer Schoolhouse, however, now within one 
year of being three-quarters of a century old, is still devoted 
to school purposes. It is called officially the Brimmer Build- 
ing, and is used by the boys' department of the Boston 
Continuation School, the girls' department being located on 
Lagrange Street, four streets northward. The Continuation 
School, the largest in the city, has six thousand pupils of both 
sexes, and they are taught useful trades so that in later years 
they may earn their livelihood, if necessary. 

Today the Brimmer Building, in which for many years the 
faithful teachers quietly taught thousands of boys the required 
grammar course, resounds with the hum of machinery, and 
it makes strange yet pleasant music for the ear. I recently 
visited the ancient schoolhouse and was courteously welcomed 
by Owen D. Evans, principal of the school. Sitting in his 
office, I saw the portraits of Joshua Bates and Quincy E. 
Dickerman, and also one of Martin Brimmer, for whom the 
school was named. I saw again the room in which years ago 
my father placed me in the primary department under the 
care of Miss Goodridge; with the principal I ascended the 
stairs, visiting on the way the rooms in which I had been a 
pupil, and finally stood again in the assembly hall which 
became filled with memories of Mr. Bates, Miss Duncan and 
my classmates of 1868. 

I saw on the walls of the hall the incomparable series of chalk 
drawings made sixty years ago by scholars, some of whom later 
became distinguished in the realm of art. Mr. Evans told me 



45 

that these drawings were the objects of his care and solicitude 
and would be while they remained in his custody. 

The School Committee contemplates erecting on the Brim- 
mer School land a building of mill construction covering the 
entire area. When the new school is erected, these remarkable 
drawings must be placed, covered with glass, in the assembly 
hall and, if necessary, Brimmer School boys must pay the cost 
of their removal and replacement. And also the three por- 
traits, of which I have spoken, must be placed in the new hall. 

The Brimmer School Association, the first of its kind in Bos- 
ton, was organized at the school on January 28, 1878; it held 
annual reunions until 191 5, since when owing to a decline of 
interest, caused largely probably by the closing of the school, 
there has been no gathering of the Brimmer boys. The 
association still exists, however, as an organization. At the 
reunions of the association, masters of the school, both in 
service and retired, have been honored guests and the inspira- 
tion of their presence has contributed largely to the success of 
these reunions. Governors, Mayors, Members of the School 
Committee and other distinguished guests have also attended 
and spoken words of appreciation, and the association has 
exerted a strong influence on school affairs in Boston. Prob- 
ably the most interesting and unique of the many re-unions of 
the association was held in the Brimmer School on April 26, 
191 1, from 4.30 to 11 P. M. By courtesy of the School Com- 
mittee, the building was temporarily lighted by electricity. 
More than three hundred and fifty Brimmer boys and friends 
visited the old schoolhouse during the afternoon and evening, 
and at seven o'clock, one hundred and sixty-eight persons par- 
took of a dinner in the assembly hall. 

There have been twenty-four presidents of the Brimmer 
School Association and I shall name them all, for they were 
worthy graduates of the school and earnest in preserving its 
traditions: Charles J. Prescott, William P. Jones, Frank E. 
Bundy, M. D., Col. Thomas R. Mathews, now President of 
the Old Schoolboys of Boston; William C. Ulman, Robert 
P. Gould, James G. Harris, Frank A. Drew, John H. North, 
Sol Bacharach, Alfred H. Gilson, D. D. S., Samuel H. Wise, 



4 6 

Godfrey Morse, Edwin M. Rumery, Edward L. Underwood, 
William A. McDevitt, Jr., George E. Richardson, Louis E. G. 
Green, Raphael Rosnosky, Adoniram J. Pickrus, Jr., William 
T. Russell, Christopher R. G. Spear, Edward E. Norton, 
John J. Keenan, Newell O. Parker, Frederick G. Roberts, 
and Major Patrick F. O'Keefe, who is now president. 

Several well-known graduates have served as treasurer of 
the Association from its beginning to the present time. 

There have also been five secretaries who served from 1878 
to 1 90 1. Since then Alfred H. Gilson, D. D. S., has filled the 
office, and he has not been allowed to resign. In fact his 
efficiency is so universally acknowledged that he is now the 
secretary of the English High School Association. 




THE BRIMMER SCHOOL 
1844-I9II 
From the Boston Almanac, 1849 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

BOSTONIAN SOCIETY 

SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION 



Presidents 

"CURTIS GUILD, 1881-1906 *JAMES F. HUNNEWELL, 1907-1910 

GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS, 191 1 

Vice-President 
Francis H. Manning, 1907 



*Samuel M. Quincy . 1881-1884 

James M. Hubbard . 1884-1885 

♦Daniel T. V. Huntoon 1885-1886 



Clerks and Treasurers] 

* William C. Burrage ii 

*S. Arthur Bent . . ii 

Charles F. Read . ii 



j-i ! 
5-1* 



"Thomas J. Allen 
*Thomas C. Amory . 

*WlLLIAM S. APPLETON 

* Willi am H. Baldwin 
*S. Arthur Bent . 
*Robert R. Bishop . 

Joshua P. L. Bodfish 
*Francis H. Brown . 
"George O. Carpenter 
*Benjamin C. Clark 
*David H. Coolidge . 

Henry W. Cunningham 
*Jacob A. Dresser 

John W. Farwell 
*Albert A. Folsom 

Courtenay Guild 
*Curtis Guild 
*John T. Hassam . 



Directors 

1886-1887 "Hamilton A. Hill . 1883-1895 

1884-1889 *James F. Hunnewell 1894-1910 

1884-1889 *john lathrop . . 1887-i899 

1890-1894 *Abbott Lawrence . 1882-1884 

1884-1886 William H. Lincoln 1899-1903 

1890 Francis H. Manning 1904 

1882-1884 "William T. R. Marvin 1900-1913 

1885-1914 Joseph Grafton M1NOT1912 

1911-1917 "Thomas Minns . . 1881-1885 

1888-1896 Grenville H. Norcross 1908 

1890-1906 Frederick W. Parker 1917 

1895-1907 "Edward G. Porter . 1896-1900 

1913 "Samuel H. Russell 1882-1894 

1 891-1894 "Samuel E. Sawyer . 1889 

1907 Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 1915 

1897-1907 Charles H.Taylor, Jr. 1906 

1908 "William W. Warren 1886-1890 

1881-1906 "William H. Whitmore 1883-1886 

1881-1890 "Levi L. Willcutt . 1894-1912 



* Deceased, 
t The offices of Clerk and Treasurer are held by one person. 



47 



OFFICERS FOR 1919 



President 

GRENVILLE H. NORCROSS 

Vice-President 

Francis H. Manning 

Clerk and Treasurer 

Charles F. Read 

P. O. Address, Old State House, Boston 



directors 
Francis H. Manning 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
John W. Farwell 
Grenville H. Norcross 

Frederick W. 



Courtenay Guild 
Joseph Grafton Minot 
Henry W. Cunningham 
Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
Parker 



Committee on Finance 
Francis H. Manning | Courtenay Guild 

The President 



Committee on the Rooms 



Francis H. Manning 
Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
Courtenay Guild 



Joseph Grafton Minot 
Henry W. Cunningham 
The President and Clerk 

ex-officiis 



Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
Walter K. Watkins 
William G. Shillaber 



Committee on the Library 



Frederick W. Parker 
William O. Comstock 



John W. Farwell 
Albert Matthews 



Edward Percival Merritt 
John Woodbury 
The Clerk 

Committee on Papers 

James P. Parmenter 
The Clerk 

Committee on Publications 

Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr. 
James M. Hunnewell 
The Clerk 



Charles H. Taylor, Jr. 
William L. Allen 
Louis Bacon 



Committee on Membership 



Alexander W. Longfellow 
Allan Forbes 
The Clerk 



Courtenay Guild 
boylston a. beal 



Committee on Memorials 

Frank E. Woodward 
The Clerk 



William Rotch 



Robert B. Smith 
Thomas M. Hutchinson 



Delegates to the Bay State Historical League 



Miss Elizabeth F. Kelly 
The President 



CUSTODIANS 



Henry M. Nourse 



Charles B. Brooks 
Herbert E. Burrage 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 

MARCH I, 1919 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



*Bent, Samuel Arthur 
Bodfish, Joshua Peter Langley 
*Chamberlain, Mellen 
Eley, James 



*Guild, Curtis 
Matthews, Nathan 
*0'Brien, Hugh 
*Smith, Samuel Francis 



LIFE MEMBERS 



Abbe, Henry Thayer 
Abbot, Edward Stanley 
Abbot, Edwin Hale 
*Abbot, Francis Ellingwood 
*Abbott, Marshall Kittredge 
Abbott, Samuel 
*Adams, Alexander Clinton 
*Adams, Charles Francis 
Adams, Mrs. Isabella Hortense 
Adams, James 
Addicks, John Edward 
Adie, Andrew 
Alden, Henry Bailey 
Allan, Mrs. Anna 
Allen, Miss Clara Ann 
* Allen, Crawford Carter 
*Allen, Elbridge Gerry 
Allen, Francis Richmond 
Allen, Frank Gilman 
Allen, Gardner Weld 
Allen, Herbert McClellan 
*Allen, James Woodward 
Allen, Thomas 
*Alley, John Robinson 



*Ames, Mrs. Anna Coffin 
*Ames, Charles Gordon 
*Ames, Frederick Lothrop 
*Ames, Oliver 

*Ames, Mrs. Rebecca Caroline 
*Amory, Arthur 
Amory, Francis Inman 
Amory, Frederic 
Amster, Nathan Leonard 
*Andrews, Frank William 
Andrews, John Adams 
*Angell, Henry Clay 
*Anthony, Silas Reed 
*Appleton, Mrs. Emily Warren 
Appleton, Francis Henry 
*Appleton, Nathan 
*Appleton, William Sumner 
Appleton, William Sumner 
*Armstrong, George Washington 
*Atherton, Joseph Ballard 
Atherton, Miss Lily Bell 
*Atkins, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Atwood, David Edgar 
*Austin, James Walker 



* Deceased. 
49 



5Q 



*Ayer, James Bourne 
Bacon, Charles Francis 
Bacon, Mrs. Louisa Crowninshield 
Badger, Arthur Campbell 
Badger, Daniel Bradford 
*Badger, Erastus Beethoven 
Badger, Wallis Ball 
*Bailey, Joseph Tilden 
*Baker, Charles Morrill 
*Baker, Miss Charlotte Alice 
*Baker, Mrs. Ellen Maria 
Baker, Ezra Henry 
*Baker, Richard 
Baldwin, George Storer 
*Baldwin, William Henry 
*Ballister, Joseph Fennelly 
*Ballister, Miss Minetta Josephine 
Bancroft, Cornelius Cheever 
Barker, Frederic Rutherford 
Barlow, Charles Lowell 
Barnes, Charles Benjamin 
Barney, Mrs. Mabel Fairchild 

Wheaton 
*Barrett, Edwin Shepard 
Barron, Clarence Walker 
Barry, Charles Stoddard 
Barry, George Thomas 
*Barry, John Lincoln 
*Barry, John Lincoln 
*Bartlett, Francis 
Bartlett, Miss Mary Foster 
Bartlett, Ralph Sylvester 
Batcheller, Robert 
Bayley, Frank William 
*Beal, James Henry 
Beal, William Fields 
Beatty, Franklin Thomason 
Beebe, Edward Pierson 
*Beebe, James Arthur 
Beech, Mrs. Ruth Adelaide 
Bennett, Henry Dexter 
*Benson, George Wiggin 
Benton, Everett Chamberlin 
Bigelow, Alanson, Jr. 
Bigelow, Albert Smith 
*Bigelow, George Brooks 



Bigelow, Joseph Smith 
Bigelow, Melville Madison 
Bigelow, William Sturgis 
Binney, Henry Prentice 
Black, George Nixon 
*Blake, Clarence John 
Blake, Mrs. Frances Greenough 
*Blake, Francis 
Blake, George Baty 
Blake, Hallie Carroll 
*Blake, Mrs. Sara Putnam 
*Blake, Stanton 
Blake, William Payne 
*Blanchard, Samuel Stillman 
Blanchard, Miss Sarah Harding 
Blaney, Dwight 
*Blume, Mrs. Susan Eliza 
*Boardman, Samuel May 
Boardman, Waldo Elias 
Bodwell, William Pearle 
*Bordman, John 
*Bowditch, Alfred 
*Bowditch, Ernest William 
*Bowditch, William Ingersoll 
Bowdlear, William Henry 
♦Bradford, Martin Luther 
Bradford, William Burroughs 
*Bradlee, Caleb Davis 
Bradlee, Frederick Josiah 
Bradlee, Frederick Wainwright 
*Bradlee, Josiah Putnam 
Bradley, Charles Henry 
Bradley, Jerry Payson 
Brayley, Arthur Wellington 
Bremer, John Lewis 
*Bremer, Mrs. Mary Rice 
Bremer, Samuel Parker 
Brewer, William Conant 
*Brewer, William Dade 
Bridge, Frederick William 
Briggs, Lloyd Vernon 
*Brimmer, Martin 
Brooks, Gorham 
*Brooks, John Henry 
Brooks, Peter Chardon 
Brooks, Shepherd 



* Deceased. 



5i 



Brown, Davenport 

Brown, Miss Elizabeth Bowen 

*Brown, Francis Henry 

Brown, George Washington 

Brown, Harold Haskell 

Brown, Harry Webster 

*Brown, John Coffin Jones 

Brown, Reginald Woodman Plum- 

mer 
Brown, Thomas Hassall 
*Browne, Charles Allen 
*Browne, Edward Ingersoll 
♦Browne, William Andrews 
Bullivant, William Maurice 
Burbank, Alonzo Norman 
Burdett, Fred Hartshorne 
*Burnham, John Appleton 
Burr, Miss Annie Lane 
Burrage, Albert Cameron 
Burrage, Charles Dana 
Burrage, Herbert Emory 
*Burrage, William Clarence 
Burroughs, George 
Butler, William 
Byrnes, Timothy Edward 
*Cabot, Arthur Tracy 
Cabot, Francis Elliot 
Candage, Mrs. Ella Marie 
Candage, Robert Brooks 
*Candage, Rufus George Frederick 
*Candler, John Wilson 
Carlin, William Joseph 
*Carpenter, George Oliver 
Carpenter, George Oliver 
*Carpenter, Mrs. Maria Josephine 
*Carr, John 

Carruth, Charles Theodore 
Carstein, Lawrence William 
Carter, Fred Louis 
Carter, Mrs. Helen Burrage 
Carter, Herbert Leslie 
*Center, Joseph Hudson 
*Chamberlin, Charles Wheelwright 
Chandler, Cleaveland Angier 
*Chapin, Nahum 
*Chase, Caleb 



Chase, Frank Eugene 

*Chase, George Bigelow 

Chase, Sidney 

Chase, Stephen 

*Chase, Theodore 

Cheney, Benjamin Peirce 

*Cheney, Mrs. Emeline 

Child, Dudley Richards 

Church, Herbert Bleloch 

*Clapp, Mrs. Caroline Dennie 

Clapp, Clift Rogers 

*Clark, Charles Edward 

Clark, John Spencer 

*Clark, Miss Nancy Joy 

*Clark, Nathan Freeman 

*Clarke, Mrs. Alice de Vermandois 

Clarke, Henry Martyn 

*Clay, Thomas Hart 

*Clementson, Sidney 

Cleveland, Mrs. Corinne^Maud 

Cobb, John Candler 

*Codman, John, 2d 

Codman, Miss Martha Catherine 

*Codman, Mrs. Martha Pickman 

Codman, Ogden 

Codman, William Coombs 

Coffin, Frederick Seymour 

*Colburn, Jeremiah 

*Collamore, Miss Helen 

Colley, William Edgar 

Comer, Miss Josephine Sarah 

*Converse, Elisha Slade 

Coolidge, Algernon, Jr. 

Coolidge, Charles Allerton 

♦Coolidge, David Hill 

Coolidge, Mrs. Helen Whittington 

Coolidge, Joseph Randolph 

Coolidge, Mrs. Julia 

*Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson, Jr. 

Coolidge, William Henry 

Cooney, Charles Lawrence 

Corbett, Alexander, Jr. 

♦Cordis, Mrs. Adelaide Elizabeth 

Cory, Charles Barney 

Cotting, Charles Edward 

*Cotting, Charles Uriah 



* Deceased. 



52 



*Crafts, John Chancellor 
Crandon, Edwin Sanford 
Crawford, George Artemas 
Crehore, Charles Lemuel 
Croker, David 
*Crocker, George Glover 
*Crocker, Miss Sarah Haskell 
*Crosby, Charles Augustus Wilkins 
Crossett, Lewis Abbott 
Crowell, Horace Sears 
*Crowninshield, Benjamin William 
Crowninshield, Francis Boardman 
Cruft, George Theodore 
*Cruft, Miss Harriet Otis 
*Cummings, Charles Amos 
Cummings, Thomas Cahill 
Cunningham, Henry Winchester 
*Curtis, Caleb Agry 
*Curtis, Charles Pelham 
*Curtis, Mrs. Eliza Fox 
*Curtis, Hall 
Curtis, Mrs. Harriot 
*Curtis, Henry Pelham 
Curtis, Horatio Greenough 
Curtis, John Silsbee 
Curtiss, Frederick Haines 
*Cushing, Livingston 
Cutler, Charles Francis 
*Cutler, Samuel Newton 
*Cutter, Abram Edmands 
*Cutter, Benjamin French 
Cutter, Mrs. Elizabeth Finley 
Cutter, Leonard Francis 
*Cutter, Watson Grant 
Daily, Edward Bernard 
*Damon, Frank Herbert 
Dana, Edward Percy 
Dana, Harold Ward 
Dana, William Franklin 
*Daniell, Moses Grant 
Danker, Daniel Joseph 
Darling, Charles Kimball 
Davenport, George Howe 
* Davenport, Orlando Henry 
Davis, Arthur Edward 
*Davis, Ephraim Collins 



Davis, George Henry 
*Davis, James Clarke 
*Davis, Joseph Alba 
Davis, Mrs. Mary Cheney 
Davis, William Henry 
Day, Hilbert Francis 
*Day, William Francis 
*Dean, Benjamin 
*Dean, John Ward 
*Dean, Luni Albertus 
*Deblois, Stephen Grant 
Denham, Edward 
*Denny, Daniel 
Devlin, Edward 
Dewey, William Richardson 
*Dewing, Benjamin Hill 
Dexter, George Blake 
*Dexter, Morton 

* Dexter, William Sohier 
*Dili, Thomas Bradford 
Dillaway, William Edward Lovell 
*Dodd, George Davis 

Dorr, Mrs. Edith Sprague 
*Dorr, Francis Oliver 
Dorr, George Bucknam 
Dow, Richard Sylvester 

* Draper, Eben Sumner 
Draper, George Albert 
Dresel, Ellis Loring 
*Dupee, Henry Dorr 
*Dupee, James Alexander 
Dutton, Harry 
*Dwight, Edmund 
Dwinnell, Clifton Howard 
*Dyer, Mrs. Julia Knowlton 
Dysart, Robert 

Eaton, Albert 

*Eaton, Miss Georgiana Goddard 
Eaton, Miss Lucy Houghton 
*Eaton, Walter David 
Edes, Henry Herbert 
*Edmands, John Rayner 
Edmonds, John Henry 
Edwards, Miss Grace 
Edwards, Miss Hannah Marcy 
Eliot, Christopher Rhodes 



* Deceased. 



53 



*Eliot, Samuel 
Ellery, William 
Elliot, George Buxton 
Emerson, Abraham Silver 
*Emerson, George Robert 
*Emery, Francis Faulkner 
*Endicott, William 
Endicott, William 
Endicott, William Crowninshield 
Ernst, Mrs. Ellen Lunt 
Ernst, Harold Clarence 
Estabrook, Arthur Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick 
Estabrook, Frederick Watson 
*Estes, Dana 

Eustis, Miss Elizabeth Mussey 
Eustis, Henry Dutton 
Eustis, Joseph Tracy 
Eustis, Miss Mary St. Barbe 
Everett, Henry Coffin 
*Fabyan, George Francis 
*Fairbanks, Frederick Clinton 
Fales, Herbert Emerson 
Farley, Arthur Christopher 
Farnsworth, Edward Miller 
Farnsworth, William 
*Farrington, Charles Frederick 
Farwell, John Whittemore 
Fay, Dudley Bowditch 
Fay, Henry Howard 
*Fay, Joseph Story 
*Fay, Joseph Story, Jr. 
*Fay, Sigourney Webster 
*Fearing, Andrew Cotesworth 
*Felton, Frederic Luther 
*Fenno, John Brooks 
*Fenno, Lawrence Carteret 
*Ferris, Mortimer Catlin 
Fish, Frederick Perry 
Fiske, Andrew 

*Fiske, Mrs. Charlotte Morse 
*Fiske, Miss Elizabeth Stanley 
Fitz, Mrs. Henrietta Goddard 
*Fitz, Reginald Heber 
Fitzgerald, William Francis 
Floyd, Charles Harold 



*Fogg, John Samuel Hill 

*Folsom, Mrs. Julia Elizabeth 

*Ford, Daniel Sharp 

Foss, Eugene Noble 

Foss, Leon Frederic 

Foster, Miss Harriet Wood 

*Foster, John 

*Foster, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 

Fowle, Seth Augustus 

*Fowler, Mrs. Laura Wentworth 

Fowler, Robert 

*Fowler, William Plumer 

*French, Miss Caroline Louisa 

Williams 
*French, Miss Cornelia Anne 
*French, Mrs. Frances Maria 
*French, Frederick William 
*French, Jonathan 
Frothingham, Mrs. Mary Shreve 
*Frothingham, Thomas Goddard 
Frye, James Albert 
Fuller, Alfred Cook 
*Fuller, Charles Emerson 
*Fuller, Henry Holton 
Gagnebin, Charles Louis 
Gallagher, Hugh Clifford 
*Gallivan, Timothy Aloysius 
*Galloupe, Charles William 
*Galloupe, Mrs. Sarah Augusta 
Gardiner, Robert Hallowell 
*Gardner, Augustus Peabody 
Gardner, George Peabody 
*Gardner, John Lowell 
Gaugengigl, Ignaz Marcel 
*Gay, Edwin Whitney 
*Gay, Ernest Lewis 
*Gay, Frederick Lewis 
*George, Elijah 

*Giddings, Mrs. Susan Kittredge 
Gilbert, Shepard Devereux 
*Gill, James Seel 
Gill, Mrs. Matilda 
*Gill, Mrs. Rachel Maria 
Gilman, Osmon Burnap 
*Glasier, Alfred Adolphus 
*Gleason, James Mellen 
Deceased. 



54 



*Glines, Edward 

Goddard, George Augustus 

Goddard, Miss Julia 

*Goodhue, Francis Abbot 

*Goodrich, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 

*Gould, Benjamin Apthorp 

Gould, George Lambert 

Gould, Marshall Hopkins 

*Grandin, John Livingston 

Graves, Frank Neal 

*Gray, Reginald 

Gray, Roland 

Gray, Russell 

Green, Charles Montraville 

Green, Philip Arthur 

*Green, Samuel Abbott 

*Greene, Francis Bunker 

*Greenough, Francis Boott 

Grew, Edward Wigglesworth 

*Grew, Henry Sturgis 

Grew, Joseph Clark 

*Griggs, John Hammond 

Grozier, Edwin Atkins 

Guild, Courtenay 

*Guild, Curtis 

*Guild, Mrs. Sarah Crocker 

Guild, Miss Sarah Louisa 

Gurney, Frank Pierce 

Hagar, Eugene Bigelow 

*Haigh, John 

*Hale, Mrs. Ellen Sever 

Hall, Mrs. Ellen Page 

*Hall, George Gardner 

*Hall, Henry Lyon 

Hall, Prescott Farnsworth 

*Hall, Thomas Bartlett 

Hammer, Charles Dunkel 

*Hammond, Mrs. Ellen Sarah 

Sophia 
*Hammond, Gardiner Greene 
*Hammond, George Warren 
*Hancock, Franklin 
*Hapgood, Warren 
Hardy, John Dudley 
Harrington, George 
Harrison, Walter James 



Hart, Thomas Norton 
*Hart, William Tennant 
*Hartt, John F. 
Haskell, William Andrew 
*Hassam, John Tyler 
*Hastings, Henry 
*Hathaway, Charles Francis 
*Haven, Franklin 
Haven, Miss Mary Eliza 
Hayford, Nathan Holbrook 
*Haynes, James Gilson 
*Haynes, John Cummings 
*Hayward, George 
Hayward, James Warren 
*Head, Charles 
*Hecht, Jacob Hirsch 
Hemenway, Alfred 
Hemenway, Augustus 
*Henchman, Nathaniel Hurd 
Henry, William Linzee 
Henshaw, Samuel 
Herrick, Robert Frederick 
Hewins, James 
Hickok, Gilman Clarke 
Higginson, Francis Lee 
Higginson, Mrs. Ida Agassiz 
Hill, Donald McKay 
Hill, George Sumner 
*Hill, Hamilton Andrews 
*Hill, Henry Eveleth 
*Hill, James Edward Radford 
•Hill, Warren May 
•Hill, William Henry 
Hills, Edwin Augustus 
*Hinckley, Frederic 
Hitchcock, Frank Tenney 
Hodgkins, Joseph Wilson 
Hoffman, Mrs. Rebecca Russell 
*Hoitt, Alfred Demeritt 
*Holden, Joshua Bennett 
*Hollingsworth, Amor Leander 
*Hollingsworth, Sumner 
Hollingsworth, Valentine 
Hollingsworth, Zachary Taylor 
*Holman, Charles Bradley 
Holmes, Edward Jackson 



* Deceased. 



55 



*Homans, Charles Dudley 
*Homans, George Henry 
*Homans, John, 2nd 
Hooper, Mrs. Alice Perkins 
Hooper, Mrs. Mary Davis Beal 
*Hooper, Robert Chamblet 
Hooper, William 
*Hopkins, Amos Lawrence 
Hopper, Ralph Waldo Emerson 
Hornblower, Henry 
*Horsford, Eben Norton 
Houghton, Clement Stevens 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth Good- 
ridge 
*Hovey, Henry Stone 
Howard, Herbert Burr 
*Howe, Elmer Parker 
Howe, Mark Antony DeWolfe 
Howe, Octavius Thorndike 
Howes, Daniel Havens 
Hubbard, Charles Wells 
Hubbard, Orrin Calvin 
Hubbard, Paul Mascarene 
Hughes, Miss Laura Ann Cleophas 
Hunneman, William Cooper 
Hunnewell, Francis Welles 
*Hunnewell, James Frothingham 
Hunnewell, James Melville 
*Hunnewell, Mrs. Sarah Melville 
Hunter, Herbert Forester 
Hurd, Edward Payson 
Hurlbut, Mrs. Eda Adams 
*Hutchings, George Sherburne 
Iasigi, Mrs. Amy Gore 
*Jackson, Mrs. Mary Stuart 
*Jackson, William 
Jacobs, Mrs. Garrie 
James, Arthur Holmes 
*James, George Abbot 
*Jeffries, Benjamin Joy 
Jenks, Henry Fitch 
*Jenney, Bernard 
*Jenney, William Thacher 
Johnson, Arthur Stoddard 
Johnson, Mrs. Fanny Betts 
*Johnson, Wolcott Howe 



*Jones, Daniel Wayland 
*Jones, Jerome 
Jones, Nathaniel Royal 
*Joy, Franklin Lawrence 
*Keith, Benjamin Franklin 
Kellen, William Vail 
Kelly, Miss Elizabeth Farley 
Kelly, Fitzroy 
Kemp, Clarence Charles 
*Kennard, Martin Parry 
*Kennedy, George Golding 
Kennedy, John Joseph 
Kent, Mrs. Alice Cotting 
Keyes, Charles Dexter 
Keyes, William Herbert 
Kidder, Charles Archbald 
Kidder, Nathaniel Thayer 
Kilburn, Warren Silver 
Kimball, Miss Augusta Caroline 
Kimball, Mrs. Caroline Sampson 
Kimball, Mrs. Clara Bertram 
Kimball, David Pulsifer 
Kimball, Lemuel Cushing 
*Kimball, Mrs. Susan Tillinghast 
Kitson, Henry Hudson 
Knight, Arthur Stearns 
*Kuhn, Hamilton 
*Ladd, Babson Savilian 
Ladd, Mrs. Mary Stowell 
Ladd, Nathaniel Watson 
Lamb, Mrs. Annie Lawrence 
*Lamb, George 
Lamb, Henry Whitney 
*Lambert, Thomas Ricker 
*Lamson, Artemas Ward 
*Lane, Jonathan Abbott 
Lang, Mrs. Frances Morse 
*Lawrence, Amory Appleton 
*Lawrence, Amos Adams 
*Lawrence, Charles Richard 
Lawrence, Harris Hooper 
Lawrence, John 
Lawrence, John Silsbee 
Lawrence, Robert Means 
*Lawrence, Samuel Crocker 
Lawson, Thomas William 



* Deceased. 



56 



Lawton, Mark Anthony 

Lee, George Cabot 

Lee, James Stearns 

Lee, Joseph 

Lee, William Henry 

Leman, John Howard 

Leonard, Amos Morse 

*Leonard, Miss Anna Rebekah 

*Leonard, George Henry 

Lesh, Henry Frederick 

*Leverett, George Vasmer 

Leveroni, Frank 

Lewis, Edwin James 

Lewis, George 

*Lincoln, Beza 

Litchfield, William Elias 

Little, Arthur 

*Little, George Washington 

*Little, James Lovell 

Little, John Mason 

*Lockwood, Phillip Case 

*Lockwood, Thomas St. John 

Lodge, Henry Cabot 

Long, Harry Vinton 

Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth 

*Longley, James 

Longley, Mrs. Julia Robinson 

*Lord, George Wells 

Loring, Augustus Peabody 

*Loring, Caleb William 

Loring, Miss Helen 

Loring, Miss Katharine Peabody 

Loring, Miss Louisa Putnam 

Loring, Thacher 

Loring, William Caleb 

Lothrop, Mrs. Anne Maria 

*Lothrop, Daniel 

*Lothrop, Thornton Kirkland 

Loud, Charles Elliot 

Loud, George Deshorn 

Loud, Joseph Prince 

Loveland, Timothy Otis 

Lovering, Ernest 

Lovett, Arthur Trevitt 

Tow, George Doane 

*Low, John 



*Lowell, Francis Cabot 

Lowell, Miss Georgina 

Lowell, John 

Lowell, Miss Lucy 

*Lowell, Mrs. Mary Ellen 

*Lowell, Percival 

*Lucas, Edmund George 

*Luke, Arthur Fuller 

Lunt, William Wallace 

*Lyman, Arthur Theodore 

*Lyon, Henry 

*MacDonald, Edward 

Mace, Mrs. Martha Jane 

*Mack, Thomas 

*Macleod, William Alexander 

Madden, Michael Lester 

Mandell, Samuel Pierce 

*Mann, Arthur Elisha 

*Mann, George Sumner 

Manning, Francis Henry 

*Marion, Horace Eugene 

Marrs, Mrs. Laura Norcross 

*Marsh, Mrs. Julia Maria 

*Marshall, James Fowle Baldwin 

Marston, Howard 

Marston, John Pitts 

*Marvin, William Theophilus Rogers 

Matthews, Albert 

May, Miss Eleanor Goddard 

May, Frederick Goddard 

*May, Frederick Warren Goddard 

Mayer, Richard 

*Mayo, Miss Amy Louisa 

McDonough, Charles Andrew 

Mclntire, Charles John 

*Mead, Mrs. Anna Maria 

Means, John Hamilton 

Melville, Henry Hulmes 

Merriam, Frank 

Merriam, Olin Lane 

Merrill, Albert Rowe 

*Merrill, Mrs. Amelia Grigg 

Merrill, Sherburn Moses 

Merritt, Edward Percival 

*Metcalf, Albert 

*Meyer, George von Lengerke 



* Deceased. 



57 



*Minns, Thomas 
Minot, Joseph Grafton 
*Minot, William 
Minot, William 
Mitchell, Sidney Adelbert 
*Mitton, Edward John 
*Mixter, Miss Madeleine Curtis 
Monks, George Howard 
*Moore, Frederic Henry 
*Moore, George Henry 
*Moore, Miss Mary Eliza 
Moors, Francis Joseph 
Morgan, Miss Emily Malbone 
Moriarty, George Andrews 
Morison, Samuel Eliot 
Morrison, Barna Thacher 
*Morse, George Henry 
*Morse, Lemuel Foster 
Morse, Lewis Kennedy 
*Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Charles Anthony 
Morss, Everett 
Morss, John Wells 
*Moseley, Alexander 
Moseley, Miss Ellen Frances 
*Motley, Edward Preble 
*Munro, John Cummings 
Murdock, Harold 
*Murdock, William Edwards 
Murphy, James Smiley 
*Nash, Nathaniel Cushing 
Newman, Miss Harriet Hancock 
Nichols, Arthur Howard 
Nickerson, William Emery 
Norcross, Grenville Howland 
*Norcross, Mrs. Lucy Ann 
Norcross, Otis 

Norman, Mrs. Louisa Palfrey 
*Norwell, Henry 
Noyes, James Atkins 
Nutting, George Hale 
O'Brien, Walter Augustine 
*0'Callaghan, Denis 
Odell, William Herrick Lovett 
*01msted, Frederick Law 
*Osgood, Mrs. Elizabeth Burling 



*Page, Mrs. Susan Haskell 
*Paige, John Calvin 
Paine, James Leonard 
Paine, Mrs. Mary Woolson 
*Paine, Robert Treat 
Paine, William Alfred 
*Palfrey, Francis Winthrop 
*Palfrey, John Carver 
*Palmer, Benjamin Sanborn 
Palmer, Ezra 
Palmer, William Lincoln 
*Parker, Charles Wallingford 
Parker, Miss Eleanor Stanley 
Parker, Frederick Wesley 
*Parker, Harrison 
Parker, Herman 
Parker, James Phillips 
*Parker, Mason Good 
*Parker, Moses Greeley 
*Parker, Miss Sarah 
Parker, William Stanley 
Parkhurst, Lewis 
*Parkman, Francis 
Parlin, Albert Norton 
Parmenter, James Parker 
*Parsons, Arthur Jeffrey 
Parsons, William Edwin 
*Payne, James Henry 
*Peabody, Charles Breckenridge 
Peabody, Charles Livingston 
*Peabody, Frank Everett 
Peabody, Mrs. Gertrude 
Peabody, John Endicott 
Peabody, Philip Glendower 
Pearce, Arthur Paul 
Pearson, Arthur Emmons 
Peirce, Mrs. Elizabeth Goldthwait 
Peirce, Silas 

Pelletier, Joseph Charles 
*Perkins, Augustus Thorndike 
*Perkins, Mrs. Catherine Page 
*Perkins, Edward Cranch 
Perkins, John Forbes 
*Perkins, William 
*Perry, Charles French 
*Perry, Edward Hale 
Deceased. 



58 



Perry, Thomas Sergeant 
Pfaff, Charles 

*Pfaff, Mrs. Hannah Adams 
*Pfaff, Jacob 
Phelan, James Joseph 
Phillips, Mrs. Anna Tucker 
Phillips, Henry Ayling 
Phillips, John Charles 
Phinney, Horatio Augustus 
*Pickering, Henry 
Pickering, Henry Goddard 
Pickman, Dudley Leavitt, Jr. 
*Pierce, Henry Lillie 
*Pierce, Nathaniel Willard 
Pillsbury, Albert Enoch 
*Piper, William Taggard 
Playfair, Edith, Lady 
Pond, Virgil Clarence 
*Poole, Lucius 
*Porter, Alexander Silvanus 
*Porter, Edward Griffin 
*Porter, William Killam, Jr. 
Potter, Henry Staples 
Powell, William Beverley 
*Prager, Philip 
Prager, Mrs. Rachel 
*Prang, Louis 
Prang, Mrs. Mary Dana 
Pratt, Mrs. Fannie Barnard 
Pratt, Laban 
Pratt, Waldo Elliott 
Pratt, Walter Merriam 
Prendergast, James Maurice 
*Prescott, Alfred Usher 
Prescott, Walter Conway 
Preston, George Marshall 
Pridee, William Henry 
*Prince, Charles John 
*Proctor, Mrs. Abby Shaw 
*Pulsifer, William Henry 
Pushee, George Durant 
Pushee, John Edward 
Putnam, Mrs. Harriet Lowell 
*Putnam, Mrs. Mary Lowell 
*Putnam, William Edward 
Quinby, Winfield Scott 



Quincy, Charles Frederic 
Quincy, George Gilbert 
*Quincy, George Henry 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Adams 
Quincy, Mrs. Mary Caroline 
*Quincy, Samuel Miller 
Rackemann, Charles Sedgwick 
*Radclyffe, Herbert 
Ratshesky, Abraham Captain 
Rawson, Edward Lincoln 
*Raymond, Freeborn Fairfield, 2d 
*Read, Mrs. Lucy Richmond 
*Read, Miss Sarah Elizabeth 
Reed, Brooks 
Reed, Mrs. Grace Evelyn 
*Reed, Henry Ransford 
Reed, James 
Reed, John Sampson 
*Reed, William Howell 
Remick, Timothy 
Reynolds, John Phillips 
Rhodes, James Ford 
Rice, Edward David 
Rich, William Ellery Channing 
Richards, Francis Henry 
*Richards, Henry Capen 
*Richardson, Albert Lewis 
*Richardson, Benjamin Heber 
Richardson, Edward Bridge 
Richardson, Edward Cyrenius 
*Richardson, Maurice Howe 
* Richardson, Spencer Welles 
Richardson, William Lambert 
Richardson, William Streeter 
Richmond, Joshua Bailey 
Riley, Charles Edward 
*Riley, James Madison 
*Ripley, George 
*Rivers, Miss Mary 
Robb, Russell 
Robinson, Edward 
*Roby, Mrs. Cynthia Coggeshall 
*Rodocanachi, John Michael 
Rogers, Robert 
Root, Henry Augustus 
*Ropes, John Codman 
* Deceased. 



59 



*Ross, Alphonso 
Rotch, William 
Rothwell, James Eli 
Ruggles, Charles Albert 
Runkle, John Cornelius 
Russell, Joseph Ballister 
Russell, Mrs. Margaret Pelham 
*Russell, Samuel Hammond 
*Rust, Nathaniel Johnson 
*Rutan, Charles Hercules 
Saltonstall, Richard Middlecott 
Sampson, Charles Edward 
*Sampson, Edwin Holbrook 
Sands, Mrs. Florence Josephine 
Sanford, John Edward Menemon 
Sargent, Charles Sprague 
Sargent, Miss Louisa Lee 
*Sawyer, Henry Nathan 
*Sears, Alexander Pomroy 
Sears, Harold Carney 
Sears, Henry Francis 
Sears, Herbert Mason 
Sears, Horace Scudder 
*Sears, Joshua Montgomery 
Sears, Mrs. Mary Crowninshield 
Sears, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth 
Sears, Richard Dudley 
*Seaver, William James 
Sederquist, Arthur Butman 
Sewall, Atherton 
Shattuck, Frederick Cheyne 
Shattuck, George Brune 
Shattuck, Henry Lee 
Shaw, Mrs. Annie Whipple 
Shaw, Charles Nason 
Shaw, Mrs. Cora Lyman 
*Shaw, Henry 
*Shaw, Henry Lyman 
Shaw, Henry Southworth 
Shaw, Henry Southworth, Jr. 
Shaw, Robert Gould 
Sheldon, Frank Merritt 
Shelton, Benjamin Homer 
*Shepard, Willis Stratton 
Sherry, Frank Eaton 
Shillaber, William Green 



*Shimmin, Charles Franklin 
Shultis, Newton 
*Shuman, Abraham 
Shuman, Edwin Arthur 
Shumway, Franklin Peter 
*Sigourney, Henry 
*Simpson, Frank Ernest 
*Skinner, Francis 
*Skinner, Francis 
*Slafter, Edmund Farwell 
*Slater, Andrew Chapin 
Slater, Mrs. Mabel Hunt 
Slater, Miss Ray 
*Slocum, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
*Slocum, William Henry 
Smith, Miss Ellen Vose 
Smith, Fitz-Henry, Jr. 
Smith, Frank Ernest 
*Smith, Joseph Warren 
Smith, Miss Mary Almira 
Smith, Robert Boynton 
Smith, Walter Edwin 
Snow, Franklin Augustus 
Sohier, Miss Elizabeth Putnam 
Sohier, William Davies 
*Sortwell, Alvin Foye 
Soule, Miss Sarah Marden 
Spalding, Philip Leffingwell 
*Spaulding, Mrs. Emily Steward 
Spaulding, John Taylor 
Spaulding, William Stuart 
Sprague, Francis Peleg 
Sprague, Isaac 
Sprague, Phineas Warren 
Squire, Frank Orvis 
*Strafford, George Lewis 
*Stanwood, James Rindge 
Stearns, Foster Waterman 
Stearns, Frank Waterman 
Stearns, Harris Brackett 
*Stearns, Richard Hall 
Steinert, Alexander 
*Stetson, Amos William 
Stetson, James Henry 
Stetson, John Alpheus 
*Stevens, Miss Helen Grenville 
Deceased. 



6o 



*Stevens, Oliver 
Stockford, Hugh Johnston 
Stodder, Charles Frederick 
Stone, Charles Augustus 
Stone, Charles Wellington 
Stone, William Eben 
*Storey, Joseph Charles 
Stowell, Edmund Channing 
*Stowell, John 
Stratton, Solomon Piper 
Strauss, Ferdinand 
*Strauss, Peter Ernest 
Streeter, Edward Clark 
Sturgis, John Hubbard 
Sturgis, Robert Shaw 
*Sturgis, Russell 
*Sumner, Alfred Henry 
*Suter, Hales Wallace 
*Swan, William Willard 
*Sweetser, Mrs. Anne Maria 
*Sweetser, Isaac Homer 
Swift, Henry Walton 
Sylvester, Edmund Quincy 
*Taft, Edward Augustine 
Taggard, Henry 
Talbot, Miss Marion 
Taylor, Amos Leavitt 
Taylor, Charles Henry 
Taylor, Charles Henry, Jr. 
Taylor, William Herbert 
Taylor, William Osgood 
*Thacher, Henry Charles 
Thacher, Mrs. Julia Edgar 
Thacher, Louis Bartlett 
Thacher, Thomas Chandler 
*Thayer, Bayard 
Thayer, Charles Irving 
Thayer, David 

*Thayer, Eugene Van Rensselaer 
Thayer, Frank Bartlett 
Thayer, John Eliot 
*Thayer, Mrs. Mary 
Thorndike, Albert 
Thorndike, Alden Augustus 
Thorndike, Augustus 
*Thorndike, George Quincy 



Thorndike, Townsend William 
Thornton, Charles Cutts Gookin 
*Tileston, James Clarke 
*Tinkham, George Henry 
Todd, Thomas 
Todd, Thomas, Jr. 
*Tompkins, Arthur Gordon 
Tompkins, Eugene 
Tompkins, Mrs. Frances Henrietta 
Towle, Loren Delbert 
Traiser, Richard Ernest 
Tripp, Guy Eastman 
Tucker, Alanson 
Tucker, George Fox 
Tucker, James Crehore 
Tucker, Lawrence 
Tufts, Bowen 
Tufts, Leonard 
Turner, Alfred Rogers 
Turner, Mrs. Cora Leslie 
Turner, Edward 
Turner, Job Abiel 
Tyler, Charles Hitchcock 
Tyler, Edward Royall 
*Underwood, Mrs. Caroline Susanna 
Underwood, William Lawrence 
*Upham, George Phinehas 
*Upton, George Bruce 
Vail, Theodore Newton 
Van Nostrand, Alonzo Gifford 
*Vose, James Whiting 
*Wadsworth, Alexander Fairfield 
Wadsworth, Eliot 
Wadsworth, Mrs. Lucy Gardner 
Wales, William Quincy 
Walker, Arthur Willis 
Walker, Charles Cobb 
*Walker, Francis Amasa 
Walker, Grant 

*Wallace, Cranmore Nesmith 
Walsh, David Ignatius 
*Ward, Francis Jackson 
Wardwell, Jacob Otis 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee 
*Warner, Bela Hemenway 
*Warner, Albert Cyrus 
Deceased. 



6i 



Warren, Edward Ross 
Warren, John Collins 
Warren, Lucius Henry 
Warren, Ralph Lambert 
*Warren, Samuel Dennis 
♦Warren, Mrs. Susan Cornelia 
Warren, William Fairfield 
*Warren, William Wilkins 
Wasgatt, Herbert Preston 
Waterman, Frank Arthur 
Waterman, Frank Sturtevant 
*Waters, Edwin Forbes 
Watkins, Walter Kendall 
Watters, Walter Fred 
Webber, Franklin Roscoe 
Webster, Edwin Sibley 
Webster, Frank George 
♦Webster, John Haskell 
Weeks, John Wingate 
* Welch, Francis Clarke 
*Weld, Mrs. Caroline Langdon 
*Weld, Daniel 
*Weld, John Davis 
*Weld, Otis Everett 
Weld, Richard Harding, Jr. 
Wellington, Miss Anna Colburn 
Wells, Wellington 
Wendell, Barrett 
*Wentworth, Alonzo Bond 
Wesson, James Leonard 
*West, Mrs. Olivia Sears 
Westbrook, John Beekman 
*Weston, Mrs. Frances Erving 
Wetherbee, Winthrop 
Wheeler, Horace Leslie 
*Wheelwright, Andrew Cunning- 
ham 
*Wheelwright, Edward 
*Wheelwright, Mrs. Isaphene Moore 
*Wheelwright, Josiah 
♦Wheildon, William Wilder 
Whidden, Stephen Hampden 
*Whipple, Joseph Reed 
Whipple, Sherman Leland 
Whitcher, Frank Weston 
*Whitcomb, Henry Clay 



White, Austin Treadwell 
*White, Charles Tallman 
White, George Robert 
White, Harry Kent 
*White, John Gardner 
♦White, McDonald Ellis 
♦White, Mrs. Sarah Brackett 
♦White, Miss Susan Jackson 
Whitman, Allan Hiram 
Whitman, William 
♦Whitmore, Charles John 
♦Whitmore, Charles Octavius 
♦Whitney, Mrs. Caroline Abbe 
♦Whitney, Henry Austin 
♦Whitney, James Lyman 
Whittemore, Horace Alan 
♦Whittington, Hiram 
♦Wigglesworth, Edward 
Wigglesworth, George 
Willcomb, Mrs. Martha Stearns 
♦Willcutt, Francis Henry 
♦Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 
Willcutt, Levi Lincoln 
♦Willcutt, Mrs. Mary Ann Phillips 
Willcutt, Miss Sarah Edith 
♦Williams, Benjamin Bangs 
♦Williams, Edward Henry 
♦Williams, Henry Dudley 
♦Williams, Henry Willard 
Williams, Holden Pierce 
Williams, Horace Dudley Hall 
Williams, John Davis 
♦Williams, Miss Louise Harding 
Williams, Ralph Blake 
♦Williams, Samuel Stevens Coffin 
Williams, Stillman Pierce 
♦Wilson, Davies 
Wilson, Mrs. Mary Ascension 
♦Winchester, Daniel Low 
♦Winchester, Thomas Bradlee 
Winslow, Arthur 
Winslow, William Copley 
Winsor, Miss Mary Pickard 
Winsor, Robert 
Winthrop, Frederic 
♦Winthrop, Robert Charles, Jr. 



* Deceased. 



62 



Winthrop, Mrs. Robert Charles, 
Winthrop, Robert Mason 
*Wise, John Perry 
*Withington, Charles Francis 
Wolcott, Mrs. Edith Prescott 
Wood, William Madison 
Woodbury, John 
*Woodbury, John Page 
*Woodman, Cyrus 
Woodman, Walter Irving 
Woods, Frank Forrest 
Woods, Frederick Adams 
*Woods, Henry 



Jr. Woodworth, Herbert Grafton 
*Woolley, William 
Woolson, Mrs. Annie Williston 
*Woolson, James Adams 
Worcester, Elwood 
Wright, Albert Edwin 
♦Wright, Albert Judd 
*Wright, Charles Francis 
*Wright, Miss Esther Fidelia 
*Wright, John Gordon 
*Wright, William James 
Young, Edmund Sanford 
*Young, George 

* Deceased. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



Adams, Henry Sewall 
Adams, Norman Ilsley 
Aiken, Henry Merk Smith 
Ainsley, Mrs. Emily Louisa 
Ainsley, John Robert 
Aldrich, Edward Irving 
Allen, Charles Willard 
Allen, Frederick Baylies 
Allen, Herbert Dupee 
Allen, William Lothrop 
Alley, Arthur Humphrys 
Ames, Oliver 

Anderson, Elbridge Roberts 
Anthony, Arthur Cox 
Appleton, Samuel 
Atkins, Edwin Farnsworth 
Avery, Charles French 
Bacon, Louis 
Bailey, Robert Morris 
Barbour, Edmund Dana 
Barrus, George Hale 
Bartlett, Nelson Slater 
Bayley, Edward Bancroft 
Baylies, Walter Cabot 
Beal, Boylston Adams 
Beal, Mrs. Louisa Adams 
Beebe, Charles Philip 
Beebe, Franklin Haven 
Belden, Charles Francis Dorr 
Bemis, Frank Brewer 
Bigelow, Alanson 
Bigelow, Prescott, Jr. 
Bishop, George Lester 
Blackall, Clarence Howard 
Blake, Arthur 
Blake, Mrs. Mary Lee 
Blinn, George Richard 
Bliss, Elmer Jared 
Bliss, James Frederick 
Blodget, William 



Bodwell, Albert Edward 
Boit, Robert Apthorp 
Bond, Mrs. Isabella Bacon 
Bond, Lawrence 
Bowditch, Charles Pickering 
Bowen, Henry James 
Bradlee, Edward Chamberlin 
Bradlee, Samuel 
Braley, Henry King 
Bray, William Claxton 
Bremer, Theodore Glover 
Brewer, Daniel Chauncey 
Brewer, Edward Adams 
Brewer, Edward May 
Brewer, George Clark 
Brewer, John Howie 
Brock, Elbert Hill 
Brown, Arthur Eastman 
Brown, Miss Eliza Otis 
Brown, Mrs. Hannah Davenport 
Brown, Howard Kinmouth 
Brown, Howard Nicholson 
Brown, Joseph Taylor 
Brown, Willard Dalrymple 
Brown, Winfield Martin 
Bruen, John Albert 
Bullivant, William Malcolm 
Burbeck, Edward 
Burgess, Mrs. Zaidee Palmer 
Burgess, John Eustis 
Burr, Heman Merrick 
Burrage, Mrs. Marguerite Kimberly 
Burton, Hiram McKnight 
Bush, Samuel Dacre 
Butler, William Morgan 
Byrne, Harry Carroll 
Carr, Albert Eaton 
Carr, Ashton Livermore 
Carr, Samuel 
Carr, Walter Dinsmoor 
* Deceased. 



6 4 



Carroll, Francis Michael 

Carter, Clarence Howard 

Carter, George Edward 

Carter, James Richard 

Chamberlin, Miss Abby H. 

Champney, Walter Redfern 

Cheney, Mrs. Elizabeth Stickney 

Chester, Charles Edward 

Child, John Howard 

Chute, Arthur Lambert 

Clapp, Miss Georgene Lillian 

Clapp, John Bouve 

Clark, Charles Storey 

Clark, Miss Elizabeth Hodges 

Clark, Ellery Harding 

Clark, Frederic Simmons 

Clark, Isaiah Raymond 

Clark, Joseph Horace 

Clarke, Arthur French 

Clarke, George Kuhn 

Clarke, Thomas William 

Cobb, William Henry 

Cochrane, Alexander 

Coffin, Charles Albert 

Comstock, William Ogilvie 

Conrad, Sidney Smith 

Cook, Frederick Sargent 

Coolidge, Harold Jefferson 

Coolidge, Louis Arthur 

*Cox, Edwin Birchard 

Cox, Raymond Benjamin 

Crane, Walter Sanger 

Crane, Winthrop Murray 

Cummings, Henry Havelock 

Cummings, Mrs. Margaret Kimball 

Curtis, Joseph Henry 

Curtis, Nathaniel 

Cushing, Arthur Percy 

Dana, Arthur Payson 

Davenport, Charles Milton 

Davis, George Peabody 

Davis, Harrison Merrill 

Dean, Charles Augustus 

Dennison, Herbert Elmer 

Dewart, William Herbert 

Dewick, Francis Augustine 



*Dexter, Alvin Shackford 

Dexter, Gordon 

Dolliver, Watson Shields 

Dowse, Charles Francis 

Driver, William Raymond 

Duff, John 

Dumaine, Frederic Christopher 

Dunne, Frank Lysaght 

Dupee, William Arthur 

Durell, Albert Benjamin 

Eaton, Robert Keller 

Edwards, Francis Marshall 

*Elder, Samuel James 

Eliot, Amory 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe 

Ellis, Augustus Hobart 

Ellis, Benjamin Peirce 

*Ellis, Emmons Raymond 

Ellis, Emmons Raymond 

Emerson, Robert Leonard 

Emmons, Mrs. Helen Brooks 

Everett, Franklin Chester 

Fairbank, John J. Mitchell 

Farley, William Thayer 

Farnsworth, Miss Alice 

Farrar, Frederick Albert 

Fay, William Rodman 

Fisk, Everett Olin 

Fisk, Otis Daniell 

Flagg, Elisha 

*Fletcher, Ernest Boynton 

Flye, Louis Edwin 

Fobes, Edwin Francis 

Forbes, Allan 

Forbes, James Murray 

Foss, Granville Edward, Jr. 

Foster, Charles Henry Wheelwright 

Foster, Elmer George 

Foster, Frederick 

Foster, John McGaw 

Francis, Nathaniel Atwood 

French, Wilfred Augustus 

Frenning, John Erasmus 

Friedman, Lee Max 

Fuller, Alfred Worcester 

Gage, Edwin Perley 



* Deceased. 



65 



Gary, Frank Ephraim Herbert 
Gaston, William Alexander 
Gilchrist, George Edward 
Gilman, Robert Prescott 
*Glover, George Edward 
Goldsmith, Warren Henry 
Goodnow, Daniel 
Goodspeed, Charles Eliot 
Grafton, Harrie Craig 
Grant, Alexander Gait 
Gray, Miss Harriet 
Gray, Joseph Phelps 
Greene, Mrs. Charlotte Nichols 
Greenough, Malcolm Scollay 
Grew, Mrs. Jane 
Gulesian, Moses Hadji 
Hale, Philip 
Hall, Charles Wells 
Hall, Edwin Adams 
Hall, Thomas Hills 
Hallett, Daniel Bunker 
Hallett, William Russell 
Halsall, William Formby 
Hamlin, Charles Sumner 
Harrington, George Sumner 
Hart, Francis Russell 
Haskell, Alfred Tracy 
Haskell, Edward Howard 
Hastings, Clifford Bicknell 
Hatch, Edward Augustus 
Hatch, James Lemuel 
Hatfield, Charles Edwin 
Hathaway, Horatio 
Hayward, Charles Latham 
Heath, Miss Eadith deC. 
Henderson, James Dougald 
Hinckley, Henry Hersey 
Hitchcock, Edward Francis 
Hobbs, Samuel 

Hockley, Mrs. Amelia Daniell 
Holmes, Otis Worthington 
Homans, Robert 
Hood, Frederic Clarke 
Hopkins, Mrs. Maria Theresa 
Howard, Alfred Henry 
Howe, Henry Saltonstall 
5 



Howe, Walter Clarke 
Howes, Mrs. Alice Maud 
Hubbard, James Mascarene 
Huckins, Harry 
Humphrey, Henry Bauer 
Hunneman, Carleton 
Hunt, Charles 

Huntoon, Edward James Baker 
Hutchins, Charles Lewis 
Hutchins, Edward Webster 
Hutchinson, Henry 
Iasigi, Miss Mary Vitalis 
Inches, George Brimmer 
Jackson, Joseph Maddocks 
Jackson, Robert Tracy 
James, George Barker 
Jaques, Henry Percy 
Jeffries, William Augustus 
*Jenkins, Charles 
Jenney, Bernard 
Jewell, Edward 
Johnson, Edward Crosby 
Jones, Fred Kinsman Mudge 
Jones, Mrs. Sarah Gavett 
Jones, Stephen Rosseter 
Jordan, Mrs. Helen Lincoln 
Judd, Mrs. Sarah Ann 
Kearns, William Francis 
Kelley, James Edward 
Kelly, Herbert Lawrence 
Kendall, Mrs. Harriott Magoun 
Kennedy, Miss Louise 
Keyes, George Shepard 
Kimball, Miss Helen Frances 
Kimball, Herbert Wood 
*King, Daniel Webster 
Knapp, George Brown 
Knight, Clarence Howard 
Knowles, Winfield Scott 
Lamson, Jarvis 
Larcom, George Francis 
Larkin, William Harrison, Jr. 
Lauriat, Charles Emelius 
Lawrence, Amos Amory 
Lawrence, William 
Learned, Francis Mason 
* Deceased. 



66 



Leatherbee, Charles William 
Lemon, Edward Rivers 
Lewis, John Beavens 
Lincoln, Albert Lamb 
Lincoln, William Henry 
Locke, Isaac Henry 
Locke, Wilbur Sargent 
Logue, Charles 
Longfellow, Miss Alice Mary 
Loomis, Elihu Goodman 
Lord, Charles Edward 
Lothrop, Lewis Waterbury 
Lovett, Augustus Sidney 
Lund, Joseph Wheelock 
Lyman, George Hinckley 
Lyon, Frederick 
Macomber, Frank Gair 
Macurda, William Everett 
Magrane, Patrick Byrne 
Mann, Frank Chester 
Manning, Miss Abby Frances 
Mansfield, Henry Tucker 
Marcy, Charles DeWitt 
Martin, Mrs. Minnie Anderson 
Marvin, George Ritchie 
Marvin, Thomas Oliver 
Mason, Miss Fanny Peabody 
May, John Pierpont 
Maynard, Herbert 
McGlenen, Edward Webster 
Mclntire, Frederic May 
Mclsaac, Daniel Vincent 
McKissock, William 
McLellan, Edward 
Means, Charles Johnson 
Means, James 
Merriam, John McKinstry 
Merrill, Albert Brown 
Meyer, Miss Heloise 
Miller, John Ferdinand 
Minot, Laurence 
Mock, Emanuel Elias 
Monks, Frank Hawthorne 
Moody, Mrs. Elizabeth Dana 
Morse, Robert McNeil 
Moseley, Charles William 



Moseley, Frank 
Moseley, Frederick Strong 
Munroe, James Phinney 
Murphy, Gardner Ellsworth 
Nash, Mrs. Bennett Hubbard 
Nash, Nathaniel Cushing, Jr. 
Nash, Samuel Young 
Newell, James Montgomery 
Newhall, Charles Lyman 
Newhall, George Warren 
Nichols, Charles Eliot 
Nichols, Chester Wellington 
Nichols, Leonard Bailey 
Noyes, Frank Albert 
Noyes, Increase Eldredge 
Nute, Herbert Newell 
O'Brien, Edward Francis 
O'Connell, Daniel Theodore 
O'Connell, Patrick Augustine 
O'Connell, William Henry 
*0'Meara, Stephen 
Osgood, Charles Edward 
Otis, Herbert Foster 
Palmer, Bradley Webster 
Park, Charles Edwards 
Parker, George Francis 
Parker, John Nelson 
Parsons, Miss Charlotte 
Pecker, Miss Annie Josephine 
Peirson, Charles Lawrence 
Perkins, George Grindley Spence 
Perry, Mrs. Olive Augusta 
Peters, William York 
Phillips, Alexander VanCleve 
Pierce, Roscoe 
Pierce, Wallace Lincoln 
*Piper, Henry Augustus 
Poor, Clarence Henry 
Poor, James Ridgway 
Pope, Ralph Linder 
Porter, Alexander Silvanus, Jr. 
Porter, John Lyman 
Powers, Walter Averill 
Pratt, Louis Mortimer 
Prescott, William Hartsuff 
Prince, Miss Lucy Maria 
* Deceased. 



67 



Putney, Henry Marshall 

Rand, Waldron Holmes 

Read, Charles French 

♦Read, William 

Reed, Alanson Henry 

Reed, Henry Beecher 

Reed, Robert Crosby 

Reggio, Andre Carney 

Remick, Frank Woodbury 

Remick, John Anthony 

Remick, William Gordon 

Rice, David 

Rice, Fred Ball 

Rich, Mrs. Pauline Babo 

Rich, William Thayer 

Rich, Willis Doane 

Richards, Mrs. Ann Rebecca 

Richards, George Edward 

Ripley, Alfred Lawrence 

Ripley, Ebed Lincoln 

Robinson, Thomas Pendleton 

Rogers, Miss Susan Snow 

Ross, Mrs. Caroline Emily 

Rousmaniere, Edmund Swett 

Rugg, Arthur Prentice 

Rugg, Frederic Waldo 

Ruhl, Edward 

Russell, Andrew LeBaron 

Russell, Mrs. Frances Spofford 

Sanborn, Mrs. Caroline Frances 

Sawyer, Miss Mary Cummings 

Schaefer, Henry Thomas 

Schouler, James 

Schrafft, William Edward 

Scudder, Winthrop Saltonstall 

Sears, Richard 

Sears, William Richards 

Seaver, Benjamin Frank 

Sergeant, Charles Spencer 

Shannon, George Thomas 

Sharp, George Henry Loring 

Shaw, Francis 

Shepard, Mrs. Marion Thompson 

Shurtleff, Miss Sarah 

Silsby, T. Julien 

Skillings, David Nelson 



Smith, Albert Pratt 
Smith, Benjamin Farnham 
Snow, Charles Armstrong 
Somes, Dana Barry 
Soule, Horace Homer 
Sparhawk, Edward Epps 
Sprague, Mrs. Emeline Martha 
Sprague, Henry Harrison 
Stafford, Morgan Hewitt 
Staniford, Daniel 
*Stanton, William Sanford 
Stearns, Albert Henry 
Stearns, Albert Warren 
Stearns, Charles Henry 
Stearns, James Pierce 
Stevens, Francis Herbert 
Stevens, William Stud ley Bartlett 
Stevenson, Robert Hooper 
Stoddard, Chester Stillman 
Stone, James Edward 
Stone, Mrs. Minna Harris 
Storey, Moorfield 
Stratton, Charles Edwin 
Strong, Mrs. Mary Baker 
Sturgis, Richard Clipston 
Swan, George Arthur 
Sweet, Henry Nettleton 
Sylvester, Joseph Smith 
Tapley, Henry Fuller 
Thompson, Marshall Putnam 
Thorndike, Augustus Larkin 
Throckmorton, John Wakefield 

Francis 
Tobey, Rufus Babcock 
Trask, William Ropes 
Tuttle, Charles Henry 
Tuttle, Julius Herbert 
Underwood, Henry Oliver 
Vaughan, Henry Goodwin 
Vialle, Charles Augustus 
Vincent, Miss Susan Walker 
Wait, William Cushing 
Walker, John Ballantyne 
Walworth, Arthur Clarence 
Ward, Joseph Frederic 
Warren, Bentley Wirt 
Deceased. 



68 



Warren, Fiske 
Warren, Franklin Cooley 
Warren, George Copp 
Washburn, George Hamlin 
Weeks, Warren Bailey Potter 
Wendte, Charles William 
West, Charles Alfred 
Weston, Thomas 
Wetherbee, Frederic Adolphus 
Wharton, William Fisher 
Wheeler, Frederick Lewis 
Wheeler, George Henry 
Wheeler, Henry 

White, Miss Gertrude Richardson 
*Whitney, Benjamin 
Whitney, Richard Skinner 
Whittemore, John Quincy Adams 
Whittier, Albert Rufus 
Whitwell, Frederick Silsbee 
Wiggin, Charles Edward 



Wilder, Frank Jones 
Wiles, Thomas Linwood 
Willett, George Franklin 
Williams, David Weld 
Williams, Moses 
Williamson, Robert Warden 
Winthrop, Thomas Lindall 
Wolf, Bernard Mark 
Wood, Arthur Goodwin 
Wood, Irving 
Woods, Joseph Fitz 
Woodward, Charles Francis 
Woodward, Frank Ernest 
Wood worth, Elijah Burghardt 
Wright, Charles Pierce 
Wright, George Sumner 
Wyman, Frank Wheelock 
Wyman, Henry Augustus 
Young, William Hill 



* Deceased. 



No. 1 44 1. 



CcmmoniDcaltl) oi iltaeeadjusette 



2fo it Clnoton that whereas Thomas C. Amory, Curtis Guild, 
John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, Samuel M. Quincv, Wil- 
liam S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, Henry F. Jenks, John 
T. Hassam, and Dudley R. Child, have associated themselves 
with the intention of forming a corporation under the name of 

Cf)e Sfostoman ^ocietp, 

for the purpose of promoting the study of the history of Boston, 
and the preservation of its antiquities, and have complied with the 
provisions of the Statutes of this Commonwealth in such case made 
and provided, as appears from the certificate of the President, 
Treasurer and Directors of said corporation, duly approved by the 
Commissioner of Corporations and recorded in this office ; 

Mo\JO, QtfytVttOVt, % Henry B. Peirce, Secretary of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, 1)0 fjerebp certify that said Thomas C. 
Amory, Curtis Guild, John Ward Dean, Dorus Clarke, 
Samuel M. Quincy, William S. Appleton, Thomas Minns, 
Henry F. Jenks, John T. Hassam and Dudley R. Child, 
their associates and successors, are legally organized and estab- 
lished as and are hereby made an existing corporation under the 
name of 

Cfje Sfoatoman ^octetp 

with the powers, rights and privileges and subject to the limita- 
tions, duties and restrictions, which by law, appertain thereto. 



t©ttneS>S> my official signature hereunto 
subscribed and the seal of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts hereunto affixed, this second 
day of December, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty one. 
[Signed] 

HENRY B. PEIRCE, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. 




THE BOSTONIAN SOCIETY. 



ORGANIZED TO PROMOTE THE STUDY OF THE HISTORY OF BOSTON 
AND THE PRESERVATION OF ITS ANTIQUITIES. 

BY-LAWS. 

I. 

OBJECTS. 

It shall be the duty of members, so far as may be in their power, to 
carry out the objects of the Society, by collecting, by gift, loan or pur- 
chase, books, manuscripts, and pictures, and by such other suitable means 
as may from time to time seem expedient. 

II. 

MEMBERS. 

The members of the Bostonian Society shall be such persons, either 
resident or non-resident in Boston, as shall be elected to membership. 
Election shall be made by ballot by the Board of Directors at any reg- 
ular or special meeting. 

III. 

HONORARY AND CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

Honorary and Corresponding Members shall be nominated by the 
Directors, and shall be elected by ballot by two-thirds of the members 
present and voting. They may take part in the meetings of the Society, 
but shall not be entitled to vote. 

IV. 

ADMISSION FEE AND ASSESSMENTS. 

Each member shall pay five dollars at the time of his or her admis- 
sion, and five dollars each first day of January afterwards, into the treas- 
ury of the Society for its general purposes; provided, however, that no 
person joining the Society on or after the first day of October in any year 
shall be required to pay an additional assessment for the year commenc- 
ing on the first day of January following. 

If any member shall neglect to pay his or her admission fee or annual 
assessment, for three months after the same is due, he or she shall be 

70 



7* 

liable to forfeit his or her membership at any time when the Directors 
shall so order. 

The payment of the sum of thirty dollars in any one year by any mem- 
ber of the Society shall constitute him or her a life member of the Society; 
life members shall be free from assessments, and entitled to all the rights 
and privileges of annual members. The money received for such life 
membership shall constitute a fund, of which not more than twenty per 
cent., together with the annual income, shall be spent in any one year. 

V. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Certificates, signed by the President and the Clerk, shall be issued to 
all persons who have become life members of the Society. 

VI. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be held on the third Tuesday 
in January, and regular meetings shall be held on the third Tuesday of 
every month, excepting June, July, August and September, at such time 
and place as the Directors shall appoint. Special meetings shall be called 
by the Clerk, under the instruction of the Directors. 

At all meetings ten members shall be a quorum for business. All Com- 
mittees shall be appointed by the Chair, unless otherwise ordered. 

Any business which has not been acted on by the Directors, shall be 
referred to them without debate, at the request of any member present. 

VII. 



The Officers of the Society shall consist of a President, Vice-President 
and seven other Directors, a Clerk and a Treasurer. 

The Directors, Clerk and Treasurer shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meeting in January, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
others are duly elected in their stead. The President and Vice-President 
shall be elected by the Board of Directors from their number. The offices 
of Clerk and Treasurer may be held by the same person. 

VIII. 

VACANCIES. 

Any vacancies in the offices of the Society may be filled for the re- 
mainder of their term by the Board of Directors, at any regular meeting, 
to serve until the next annual meeting of the Society. In the absence 
of the Clerk at any meeting, a Clerk pro tempore shall be chosen for that 
meeting. 



72 
IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 



At the monthly meeting in December, a Nominating Committee of 
five persons shall be appointed, who shall report at the annual meeting 
a list of candidates for the places to be filled. 



PRESIDING OFFICER. 

The President, or in his absence the Vice-President, shall preside at 
all meetings. In the absence of both, a President pro tempore shall be 
chosen from the Board of Directors. 

XI. 

DUTIES OF THE CLERK. 

The Clerk shall be sworn to the faithful discharge of his duties. 

He shall notify all meetings of the Society. He shall keep an exact 
record of all the proceedings of the meetings of the Society, and of its 
Directors. 

He shall conduct the general correspondence of the Society, and place 
on file all letters received. 

He shall enter the names of members systematically in books kept for 
the purpose, and issue certificates of life membership. 

The Clerk shall have such charge of all property in the possession of 
the Society as may from time to time be delegated to him by the Board 
of Directors. 

He shall acknowledge each loan or gift that may be made to and accepted 
in behalf of the Society. 

XII. 

DUTIES OF THE TREASURER. 

The Treasurer shall collect all moneys due to the Society, and pay all 
bills against the Society, when approved by the Board of Directors. 

He shall keep a full account of the receipts and expenditures in a book 
belonging to the Society, which shall always be open to the inspection of 
the Directors; and at the annual meeting in January he shall make a written 
report of all his doings for the year preceding. 

The Treasurer shall give bond in the sum of one hundred dollars, with 
one surety, for the faithful discharge of his duties. 

XIII. 

DUTIES AND POWERS OF DIRECTORS. 

The Directors shall superintend and conduct the prudential and exec- 
utive business of the Society; shall authorize all expenditures of money; 



73 

fix all salaries; provide a common seal; receive and act upon all resignations 
and forfeitures of membership, and see that the By-Laws are duly complied 
with. 

The Directors shall have full power to comply with the terms of the 
lease of the rooms in the Old State House, made with the City of Boston, 
and to make all necessary rules and regulations required in the premises. 

They shall annually, in the month of April, make a careful comparison 
of the articles in the possession of the Society with the list to be returned 
to the City of Boston under the terms of the lease, and certify to its 
correctness. 

They shall make a report of their doings at the annual meeting of the 
Society. 

The Directors may, from time to time, appoint such sub-committees as 
they deem expedient. 

XIV. 

MEETINGS OF THE DIRECTORS. 

Regular meetings of the Directors shall be held on the day previous to the 
regular meetings of the Society, at an hour to be fixed by the President. 
Special meetings of the Directors shall be held in such manner as they may 
appoint; and a majority shall constitute a quorum for business. 

XV. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint two 
Directors, who, with the President, shall constitute the Committee of 
Finance, to examine from time to time, the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer; to audit his accounts at the close of the year, and to report 
upon the expediency of proposed expenditures of money. 

XVI. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The President shall annually, in the month of January, appoint six 
standing committees (of which the Clerk of the Society shall be a mem- 
ber ex-officio), as follows: — 

Committee on the Rooms. 

A committee of seven members, to be called the Committee on the 
Rooms, of which the President of the Society shall be a member ex-officio, 
who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the Rooms (except books, 
manuscripts, and other objects appropriate to the Library, offered as 
gifts or loans); the hanging of pictures, and the general arrangement of the 
Society's collections in their department. 



74 

Committee on Papers. 

A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee on 
Papers, who shall have charge of the subject of Papers to be read, or other 
exercises of a like nature, at the monthly meetings of the Society. 

Committee on Membership. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee on 
Membership, whose duty it shall be to give information in relation to the 
purposes of the Society, and increase its membership. 

Committee on the Library. 

A committee of five or more members, to be called the Committee on 
the Library, who shall have charge of all the arrangements of the Library; 
including the acceptance or rejection, of all books, manuscripts, and other 
objects appropriate to the Library, offered as gifts or loans, and the general 
arrangement of the Society's collections in their department. 

Committee on Publications. 

A committee of four or more members, to be called the Committee on 
Publications, who shall have charge of all the Publications of the Society. 

Committee on Memorials. 

A committee of three or more members, to be called the Committee on 
Memorials, who shall have charge of such Memorials as the Society may 
vote to erect. 

These six committees shall perform the duties above set forth, under the 
general supervision of the Directors. 

Vacancies which may occur in any of these committees during their term 
of service shall be filled by the President. 

XVII. 

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS. 

Amendments to the By-Laws may be made, at any annual meeting, 
by vote of two-thirds of the members present and voting. They may 
also be made by the like vote at any regular meeting, provided notice of 
the same be contained in a call for such meeting issued by the Clerk, and 
sent to every member. 



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