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Full text of "Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of the State of Illinois Ancient Free and Accepted Masons"

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 

v.QZ 



. UiJRAHY 

OF Tr,E 




DANIEL G. FITZGERRELL 

M.W.Grand Master 1919-1921 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



Most Worshipful Grand Lodge 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 




STATE OF ILLINOIS 



JAN i '^ 



EIGHTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING 

HELD AT 

CHICAGO, OCTOBER 11, 12, 13, 1921 




OFFICERS 






OF ILLINOIS 

1921 - 1922 



Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 

Bro. 
Bro. 

Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 



Elmer E. Beach. . . 
Arthur E. Wood. . . 
E. C. Davenport. . . 

David D. King 

Leroy a. Goddard. 



. M.W. \Grand Master Chicago 

111 W. Washington St. 

.E.W. Deputy Grand Master Chicago 

6254 stony Island Ave. 

.E.W. Senior Grand Warden . .Harrishurg 

.B.W. Junior Grand Warden Chicago 

3002 Lake Park Ave. 

. E.W. Grand Treasurer Chicago 

State Bank of Chicago 



E.W. Grand Chaplaiii Chicago 

5614 S. Green St. 



Owen Scott E.W. Grand Secretary Decatur 

E. Keene Eyan 

Frank O. Lowden E. W. Grand Orator Oregon 

EOY Adams E.W. Deputy Grand Secretary. . .Decatur 

Wm. Elmer Edwards. . . 
John K. Platner 



... IF. Grand Pursuivant Chicago 

5223 Race Ave. 
. . .W. Grand Marshal Chicago 

4227 Cottage Grove Ave. 
J. A. Provoost W. Grand Standard Bearer. . .Pecatonica 



W. W. Egberts W. Grand Sivord Bearer Chicago 

4837 N. Albany Ave. 

Harry W. Harvey W. Senior Grand Deacon Chicago 

7211 University Ave. 

David S. Mellinger W. Junior Grand Deacon Chicago 

6729 Langley Ave. 

H. S. Albin W. Grand Steward Chicago 

514 S. Francisco Ave. 
D. E. Bruffet W. Grand Steivard Urbana 

Geo. W. Cyrus W. Grand Steward Camp Point 

Geo. W. Tipsword W. 'Grand Steward Beecher City 

George T. Scrivner Grand Tyler Chicago 

1827 Chase Ave. 
R. C. Peck , Assistant Grand Tyler Decatur 



TbeMosx^ '' 

or 

A.F.c^ A.M. 

OF ILLINOIS 





In compliance with the provisions of the Constitution and 
By-Laws of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Illinois, the eighty- 
second annual meeting was held in the City of Chicago, at 
Oriental Consistory Bldg., commencing on Tuesday, the nth 
day of October, A. D. 192 1, A. L. 5921, at 9 o'clock a. m., 
and was opened in ample form by Bro. Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, 
most worshipful grand master. 

The Grand Master appointed the following brethren to 
fill vacancies : 

Eev. Bro. J. G. Wright, grand chaplain, Greenville, in place of Eev. 
Bro. J. N. Elliott. 

Bro. George W. Cyrus, grand steward. Camp Point, in place of Bro. 
John W. Baugh. 

Bro. Harry C. Murch, grand steward, Carbondale, in place of Bro. H. S. 
Albin. 



Musical Entertainment 

Previous to the opening of grand lodge the Boys' and Girls' 
Band of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home at LaGrange 
gave a delightful musical entertainment which was thoroughly 
enjoyed by every member of the grand lodge. A vote of thanks 
was given them which was indulged in by every member at- 
tending the session. 



4ST202 



Proceedings of the [October 11, 



Prayer 

Rev. Bro. J. G. Wright, grand chaplain, Greenville, led the 
devotions. 

The grand marshal, with the grand stewards, retired and 
returned with the flag, and presented it to the grand master 
who placed it in the grand East while the brethren sang 
"America." 

Tribute to Brother Isaac Cutter 

Brother Alexander H. Bell delivered the following tribute 
to our late grand secretary, Brother Isaac Cutter. 

To those of you who have attended sessions of this grand lodge at any 
time within the last fifteen years, this platform from which I now address 
you presents a most unusual appearance. Our brother, Isaac Cutter, whose 
continued presence upon this platform for so many years, gave to our open- 
ing sessions so much of welcome and good cheer, is not with us this morning. 
This distinguished and beloved brother, after many years of faithful service, 
was called from us by our Supreme Grand Master whom he had served so 
faithfully. 

When the information flashed over the wires that Isaac Cutter was no 
more, every heart was bowed in mourning and every Mason in Illinois 
joined in the universal grief. 

Brother Cutter was chosen grand secretary at the session of this grand 
lodge in 1906, and at each succeeding annual session he was re-elected to 
that position. He died in the harness. He had served as a member of the 
Board of Grand Examiners several years before he became grand secretary. 
In whatever place he served, his worth was recognized by all. As grand 
secretary he had formed a wider Ma.sonic acquaintance in this state and 
beyond its borders, than any man in this grand jurisdiction. 

Brother Cutter was a most likeable man. He possessed that invaluable 
and indescribable charm of personality, individuality, presence and manner 
which brought him a cordial welcome wherever he went. Jovial and whole- 
hearted, sincere and dependable at all times, he became endeared to our 
great brotherhood in such measure that his death brought a profound and 
painful shock to us all. 

It is impossible to specify and with precision to define those traits, 
qualities and personal attributes which win and hold our affection. They 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 5 

elude all effort at definition. They cannot be segregated and scrutinized. 
Whatever they may be, Brother Cutter possessed those qualities in well- 
rounded measure. He brought into this grand lodge and into all of its 
constituent lodges which he visited, and diffused among our brotherhood 
generally, a genial and fraternal spirit. He breathed the atmosphere of 
genuine brotherhood, and radiated from his personality an aura of warmth 
and light that charmed and enriched all who came within its radiance. 
Everybody liked our Brother Cutter. Many loved him, and his generous 
heart with warm embrace held us all in abiding affection. 

Brother Cutter's remarkable work and the acute sense of loss which 
now broods over all, are not to be attributed wholly to his kindliness of 
heart and urbanity of manner. Back of all this, and forming the rigid 
framework upon which these more graceful and engaging qualities were 
supported, were a stern integrity, and an earnest, persistent purpose to do 
each minute of his life the very test that he could in the service of his 
fellow men. To do his duty fully and to leave nothing undone that prompt- 
ness and fidelity could accomplish, were the dominant thoughts with him 
and guided and inspired him every moment of his life. 

Brother Cutter was a faithful and efficient grand secretary. His work 
was well done, completely done, promptly done. We have grown so much 
accustomed to his kindly presence and to his zealous interest in our work, 
that we feel that his loss, if not irreparable, is indeed deeply afflictive. 
This brother stood among us as a great leader and as an inspiration to all 
who sought more light. We need not mourn for him. While we deplore 
our own loss, and wonder how we can get along without him, we must re- 
member that he has lost nothing. Death to him was not obliteration but 
change; not extinction but exaltation. While we mourn for the loss we 
have all sustained, he no doubt exults that he has shaken off the earthly 
tenement which so long confined him, and has risen in immortal glory to 
realms beyond the skies. All earthly attachments are transient. The most 
desolating thing about this life and this world is that the warmest attach- 
ments of friendship and brotherly love, the fondest love for dear ones, must 
soon be sundered. We can be together only a little while and then the 
parting comes. Like vessels passing on the sea, we hail and answer and 
are gone. 

Had Brother Cutter been permitted to remain in this life, we would 
have enjoyed his society and would have profited by his service. But what 
had he to gain by longer life? He was ready to go. He had fought a good 
fight. He has finished his course. He had served his fellow men faithfully 
and long. He had at all times sought to do the will of his Supreme Grand 
Master. He had earned his eternal reward. He is honored and respected 
by all who knew him, and loved by thousands of his brethren in Free- 



Proceedings of the [October 11, 



masonry. No member of his family, no friend, no Mason, need offer ex- 
planation or apology for any act of his. He left us at the very acme of 
his career. His work was done. His race was run. His day was finished. 
His rest was earned. When he lay himself down to rest, weary of the 
burdens which he bore, his soul emancipated, disenthralled, radiant with 
light from above, rose in joyous exaltation to take its place as a just and 
upright Mason in the grand lodge above. 

Isaac Cutter was my close friend. I knew him well. I was intimately 
associated with him during my services as your grand master. He was 
then grand secretary. I have been intimately associated with him ever 
since. I learned to appreciate his worth and God knows how I miss him. 
Brethren, we may be comforted and sustained by the unfaltering convic- 
tion that he has gone to his eternal home; that he is waiting for us there 
with welcoming smile ready to vouch for j-ou and me when we knock at 
Heaven's gate. 

Isaac Cutter is dead 'tis true. There is none to take his place here, 
'tis true. But his life, his teachings, his example, are an open book before 
us. We can best honor him by steadfastly keeping in the paths along which 
he led us. Doth any man conceive that the voice of Isaac Cutter shall be 
heard here no more? Nay, verily I say unto you, that here, now, and 
hereafter, in every season of stress, he shall speak unto us like a voice 
crying out in the wilderness to make darkness light before us and crooked 
things straight. Brethren, a great and good brother has gone on before. 
He stands upon the heights beyond with hands outstretched in loving 
benediction on us all. 



Committees 

The right worshipful grand secretary read the names of 
the brethren appointed by the most worshipful grand master 
to serve on the committees during this session. 

Jurisprudence — Wm. B. Wright, Chester E. Allen, Henry T. Burnap, 
Ralph H. Wheeler, N. B. Carson. 

Appeals and Grievances — Alexander H. Bell, Elmer D. Brothers, 
Chas. H. Martin, W. B. Hadley, Robert N. Holt. 

Chartered Lodges — ^Phil C. Barclay, W. W. Watson, Lindorf Walker, 
J. Huber Allen, Willis McFeely. 

Lodges U. D.— Wm. H. Beckman, E. 0. Lorton, B. D. King, Albert 
Pickel, Nimrod Mace. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 7 

Mileage and Per Diem — ^W. F. Beck, H, T. Goddard, T. S. Browniug, 
Chas. H. Thompson, H. W. Harvey, J. L. Klemme. 

Finance — Edward H. Thomas, E. Edwin Mills, S. O. Spring. 

New Legislation — Geo. M. Moulton, Wm. "Williartz, Joseph J. Shaw. 

Correspondence — D. D. Darrah. 

Grand Examiners — Geo. E*. Carlson, Wm. H. Zarley, B, L. Ten Eyck, 
Harry Lee Howell, Harry H. Milnor. 

Credentials — Emmett Howard, Wm. W. McKnight, Chas. W. Walduck, 
W. D. Abney, C. H. Lefler. 

Petitions— J. E. Jeffers, J. H. Mitchell, S. C. D. Eea. 

Obituaries — James K. Lambert, Hez. G. Henry, John C. Crawford. 

Grand Master's Report — Chas. H. Spilman, Harry M. Palmer, Wm. 
Fairlee. 

Board of Managers, Masonic Homes- — Illinois Masonic Orphans' 
Home, LaGrange — Eobert C. Fletcher, Robt. J. Daly, Wm. D. Price. Illinois 
Masonic Home, Sullivan — James McCredie, Alonzo Dolan, Chas. C. Davis. 

Ex-Officio, Both Boards — Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, Elmer E. Beach. 

Transportation — L. L. Emnierson, John B. Aiken, Frank J. Burton. 

Advisory Council — Elmer E. Beach, Arthur E?. Wood, R. C. Davenport, 
Leroy A. Goddard, Geo. M. Moulton, Owen Scott, Alexander H. Bell, Edward 
H. Thomas, Wm. H. Beckman, Eobert J. Daly. 

Committee to Compile the By-Laws and Eevise the Code — Owen 
Scott, Alonzo Dolan. 

Report — Committee on Credentials 

Bro. Emmett Howard, chairman of the Committee on Cre- 
dentials, announced that representatives from a constitutional 
number of lodges were present, and asked further time to 
complete their report. The request was granted. 



Proceedings of the [October il, 



Report of Grand Master 

The grand master, Bro. Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, presented 
his annual report. 

To THE Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

' ' One ship drives East, Another drives West, 
While the self -same breezes blow; 
'Tis the set of the sails and not the gales 
That bids them where to go." 

Billows of discontent have rolled over the ocean of human society during 
recent years while the world has been struggling to reach normal condi- 
tions. Avarice and selfish aggrandizement have wrought havoc and brought 
misery to many millions. In other lands vast numbers of human beings are 
crying for bread. Appealing hands are held out across the sea to America, 
the land of opportunity and plenty. Our people are ever responsive to 
the cry of distress. It is very significant that human distress is greatest 
in all countries that are most devoid of the spirit of fraternity. In these 
lands a negative answer comes to the question, "Am I my brother's 
keeper?" "Where Masonry prevails brotherhood makes men responsive to 
each other 's needs. Masonry flourishes in Anglo-Saxon countries and the 
English-speaking people are steadily advancing toward higher ideals of 
humanity. In America our great fraternity continues its marvelous growth 
and progi'ess. Few dared to hope that the immense net increase of last 
year could be maintained. But it has been exceeded. Many thought the 
depression in business would seriously curtail the growth of former years. 
In the 49 grand jurisdictions of the United States there are more than 
2,000,000 of the best men enrolled under the banner of the Ancient Fra- 
ternity. Mere growth in numbers, however, is not all or even most to be 
desired. Careful scrutiny of the character and the proper use of the ballot 
are vital. There have been 19 new lodges instituted during the past year, 
making a total of 902 when charters are issued. 

Before proceeding, however, to report the transactions in the ordinary 
affairs of the year let us bow in solemn consideration of the losses we have 
sustained in death 's depletion of our ranks. 

Isaac Cutter 

On June 15, 1921, at Blessing Hospital at Quincy, the great soul of 
Isaac Cutter took its flight. For years he had been afflicted with a disease 
which proved to be incurable. After twelve weeks of suffering in the hos- 
pital, ho passed peacefully over the river into the new life in the Silent 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 9 

Land. Few men touched the hearts of the Masons as did Brother Cutter. 
He was universally beloved and no one will be more missed than ' ' Uncle 
Ike," as he was affectionately called by his brethren. Tor 15 years he 
had filled the office of Grand Secretary. His work had been so successful 
that he was each year re-elected without opposition. As a man and a loyal 
American citizen he stood very high in the estimation of all people who 
came in contact with him. From the first step he took in Masonry in 
1892 to the end of his career he was intensely devoted to the fraternity. 
No man ever was more loyal to its principles and teachings than Brother 
Cutter. On Sunday, June 19th, his funeral took place at his home in 
Camp Point, Brother Kichard C Davenport, Junior Grand Warden, con- 
ducting the ritualistic ceremonies. Owing to a death in my own family 
I was prevented from being present to pay my tribute to his memory. 
Brother Arthur E. Wood, Senior Grand Warden, had charge on behalf of 
the Grand Lodge. Further details of his great work will be left to the 
Committee on Obituaries. 

Brother Cutter's Successor 

The death of Brother Cutter came at the most critical time of the 
year in the business of the Grand Lodge. From July 1 to August loth 
the annual reports and remittances from all the lodges of the State were 
to be made. This involved the collection of almost $300,000.00. In order 
that the vast amount of work involved might be done without serious in- 
convenience, I looked the field over for a successor to Brother Cutter who 
was able to take up the work where he laid it down. From his long service 
and activity and general knowledge of all phases of Masonic activitj', my 
first thought turned to Brother Owen Scott, Past Grand Master. He was, 
therefore, appointed on June 15th and has continued in active service. 
It is not possible to overstate my obligation to him in giving up his personal 
affairs and giving his entire time to the office of Grand Secretary. He 
has performed the duties without hesitation and to my entire satisfaction. 

American Language Only 

Petitions have come to me from lodges formerly working in the German 
language asking that they might be permitted to resume the use of their 
mother tongue. Twice the Grand Lodge has passed on this question and 
answered in no uncertain tone. It does not appear to me that any change 
in conditions will warrant consideration of this proposal. Few members 
of these lodges are confined to the German language. They under- 
stand our national tongue and can speak it as well as most of those who 
are native to our land. We live in America, and all Masons, whether 
born here or abroad, should be full Americans and speak the American 
language. In view of this I declined to entertain these petitions. 



10 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

Epidemic of Organizations 

One year ago I found it necessary to call attention to action of bodies 
other than Masonic who make as a pre-requisite membership in the Ancient 
Craft. Since then there has appeared almost an epidemic of other societies 
being formed on similar lines. At least two organizations for boys, and 
even of girls, under the age required in Masonry, axe being formed. Con- 
sidering all this the question is, where is it going to end. In one Grand 
Jurisdiction legislation has been enacted prohibiting Masons from becoming 
members of so-called "higher bodies" for a period of one year. It no doubt 
has come to j'our notice that the Grand Master of Pennsylvania has issued an 
edict forbidding Masons to become members of the Order of the Eastern 
Star. He has also ordered all Masons to sever their membership with the 
Order of the Eastern Star within sis months from the date of his edict. 
Some self-styled Masonic thinkers have questioned the power of the Grand 
Lodges to interfere with the membership of Masons in the so-called "higher 
bodies." Such a contention is chUdish. Every Mason is subject to the 
discipline of the Grand Lodge and its legally constituted authority. 

Fraudulent Concealment of Eejection 

During my term of office as Grand Master many instances have come 
to my attention where persons had been rejected and aftenvard petitioned 
another lodge for the degrees. In the second petition they remembered 
everj-thing with great minuteness, except the fact that they had previously 
been rejected. When charges are preferred for fraudulent concealment of 
rejection, they are found guilty and very properly expelled. An appeal 
comes to this Grand Lodge and on some technicality or plea of ignorance the 
action of the lodge is often set aside. These petitioners go on and enjoy the 
stolen fruit and are honored members of the fraternity. Presumably at least 
only the unworthy and the unlit are rejected. The fact that a man was 
rejected for the degrees in Masonry is something he can never forget. When 
he signs his petition and makes a false answer to the question of a previous 
rejection, he is a fraud and a deceiver and has no place in Masonry. This 
Grand Lodge cannot afford to pass lightly over that which is fundamental to 
the Craft. It has occurred to me that the blank petition prescribed by this 
body should be revised, so that there can be no excuse for such fraudulent 
actions. I, therefore, recommend that the committee on Appeals and Griev- 
ances be requested to make necessary changes in the prescribed form and 
submit them for approval. 

Short Form of Opening 

Permission to change to the short form of opening under certain con- 
ditions has been most acceptable to all lodges. It has saved time and 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 11 

has been a great help in the busy work that has crowded upon the Craft 
in the past few years. In looking over the results and observing this de- 
sirable change I am constrained to advise that the short form of opening 
be permitted at all meetings of all lodges. Under Section 572 of our Code 
this can be done by a two-thirds vote of the Grand Lodge. 

Our Homes 

Not since the establishment of our Homes have conditions been better 
than during the past year. The change in the law one year ago providing 
a separate board of managers for each Home has worked with great sat- 
isfaction to all. Never in the history of the Grand Lodge has there been 
better team-work and a higher degree of efficiency among the men who 
constitute the two boards. The brethren have worked incessantly and un- 
selfishly for the good of the children at LaGrange and the aged and infirm 
at Sullivan. The Grand Lodge is fortunate to find six men of such high 
standing as citizens and Masons who are willing to devote their time and 
talents to this work. 

In connection with the reports on the Homes, it is fitting to record the 
bequest of our late Brother John H. Millen, member of St. John's Lodge 
No. 13, F. and A.M., of Dayton, Ohio, to the Illinois Masonic Orphans' 
Home at LaGrange. The property consisted of bonds, bank stock, etc., and 
amounted to approximately $30,000.00. The gift is most liberal and the 
spirit of Fraternity which prompted our brother to remember the orphans 
is magnificent. Details will appear in the report of the Board of Managers 
of the Home. 

Bonds for All Officers 

After mature consideration it is my judgment that this Grand Lodge 
should take the necessary steps to have a bond by some reliable bonding 
company, covering the secretary and treasurer of each lodge in the State 
as well as the Grand Lodge officers. To determine this, I suggest that a 
special committee of three be appointed to investigate this matter. Upon 
the report of this committee, I recommend that the Grand Master be 
authorized to enter into such a contract if he deems advisable. The 
fees for this bond shall be paid out of the funds of the Grand Lodge. 

Masonic Schools 

Little can be said to add to the good work done by our Board of Grand 
Examiners during the year. Schools were held in six different places, the 
last in Chicago. Each vied with the others in reaching a higher degree 
of efficiency. All were well attended. At Springfield there were many 
past grand officers. Three of these were past grand masters, neither of 



12 Proceedings of the [October U, 

whom lived there. Sometimes there exists the feeling that brethren after 
filling places of honor and distinction have little further interest in the 
affairs of the Craft. This impression is not true as to past grand officers 
in Illinois. 

Masonic Lotteries Forbidden 

Masonry does not look with the least degree of allowance upon raffles, 
lotteries or gift enterprises. The law as given in Section 325 is so simple 
and positive that no one needs to err. Yet, in a lodge in the State during 
the year past a regular lottery for the benefit of a building fund was pro- 
moted. An automobile and a number of other valuable articles were offered 
to those who were the fortunate possessors of the proper tickets. The Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand Master very properly reported the case to me. I ordered 
all money returned and the whole scheme suppressed. If lodges cannot 
provide themselves meeting places without resorting to plans and schemes 
which violate the Masonic as well as the laws of the State and nation they 
should be content to rent lodge rooms indefinitely. 

Charter Arrested 
It became my unpleasant duty to arrest the charter of Ilendei-son Lodge 
No. 820, located at Kenney. The facts will be fully disclosed in the 
record in the case. Charges of a serious nature were preferred and 
accepted by the lodge against a member. A commission was appointed to 
hear the case. When the time for trial came it was found that legal notice 
had not been sent to resident members. The Commission reported and fur- 
ther action was deferred. In the meantime new charges, or a modification 
of the original ones, came again before the lodge and were by vote refused. 
After a conference with the Master and Secretary I ordered that proper 
notice be again sent and charges accepted. Among other things, I directed 
that no dimit should be issued to the accused until the charges were dis- 
posed of. Later I went to Kenney and proposed in open lodge to extend 
the time in which thcj could receive the charges, give the legal notice and 
place the accused on trial. It developed that my orders had been disobeyed 
and that a dimit had been issued and sent to the accused. I found that 
instead of complying with the law, the lodge was trying to evade it. The 
authority of the Grand Lodge had been openly defied. In view of the 
flagrant and wilful violations of the law after every opportunity had been 
given for compliance, I arrested the charter and suspended the functions of 
the lodge. I submit this case with the records for the disposition of the 
Grand Lodge. 

Master Deposed 

Serious complaint was made against F. J. Newton, Worshipful Master 
of Meteor Lodge No. 283, located at Sandwich. The charges were 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 13 

of such a nature as to bring the institution of Masonry into disrepute in 
the community. In order to get the facts in the case, I appointed a com- 
mission consisting of Paul A. Neufer, Chairman, Edgar J. Phillips, and 
Grover C. Niemeyer who went to Sandwich and after a thorough investiga- 
tion the majority of the commission recommended that the Master be de- 
posed. One member of the Commission dissented from this decision. There- 
upon I referred the case to the Jurisprudence Committee which after re- 
viewing the evidence as reported by the commission unanimously decided that 
the Master should be deposed. In line with the findings of the Jurispru- 
dence Committee I appointed Brother Elmer E. Beach, Deputy Grand Mas- 
ter, as my proxy whO' went to Sandwich on Friday, September 9th and 
carried out the orders deposing the Master and placing the lodge in charge 
of the Senior Warden. This was a very aggravated case and required 
drastic action. I submit the record in the case that it may go to the com- 
mittee for further investigation and action by the Grand Lodge. 

In connection with the decision by the Committee on Jurisprudence the 
question of who should pay the fees was involved. I held that the accusers 
should pay the costs of the case. The Jurisprudence Committee took the 
other view. I still feel that under the law and the reason for it, my holding 
was correct. However, as the Jurisprudence Committee decided differently 
I submitted to their decision and ordered the lodge to pay the costs. 

Must Still Be Eeported 

Code 146 K regarding the publication of rejections, suspensions, ex- 
pulsions and reinstatements, repealed at the 1920 session of the Grand 
Lodge, did not affect Code 410 D, which reads: 

' ' The secretary shall transmit promptly to the Grand Secre- 
tary notice of all rejections for degrees, expulsions, and reinstate- 
ments with the date of same. * * * 

There is an excellent reason why the requirements of Code 410 D should 
be complied-with. The complete card index system in the Grand Secretary's 
office should contain this information in order that those making inquiries 
may be supplied with the facts. 

In Conclusion 

It has been my ambition to be worthy of the commendation "Well done 
good and faithful servant. " I have had no personal aims or ends to achieve. 
My sole purpose has been to servo the craft to the extent of my ability. I 
have rejoiced at the wonderful growth and progress of Masonry during the 
time I have been Grand Master. In yielding the gavel of authority to my 
successor, I do so feeling that, though my mistakes may have been many, 
I have had an eye single to the welfare of the Craft. I leave the great 



14 Proceedings of tJie [October 11, 

office of Grand Master with no feelings of bitterness or resentment toward 
any one, but with a heart full of good will to everyone. Depths of grati- 
tude go out to all who have so well and willingly answered every call for 
service. No man ever had more loyal co-operation than has been cheerfully 
accorded me. My two and one-half years of service as Grand Master will 
be the high-water mark of my life. 

' ' Not what we have, but what we use 
Not what we see, but what we choose — 
These are the things that mar or bless 
The sun of human happiness. 

The things nearby, not things afar, 
Not what we seem-, but what we are — • 
These are the things that make or break 
That give the heart its joy or ache. 

Not what seems fair, but what is true. 
Not what we dream, but what we do — 
These are the things that shine like gems, 
Like stars in fortune's diadems. 

Not as we take, but as we give. 
Not as we pray, but as we live — 
These are the things that make for peace. 
Both now and after time shall cease." 



The following is a detailed report of the Grand Master 's office : 
Vacancies Filled 

Brother Bert Uebele, right worshipful district deputy grand master 
of the 2nd District having died, on June 24, 1921, I appointed Brother 
Grover C. Niemeyer, 79 W. Monroe St., Chicago, to fill the vacancy. 

Brother J. H. Grimm, right worshipful district deputy grand master 
of the 25th District having resigned on January 22, 1921, I appointed 
Brother J. C. Eenwick, Warren, 111., to fill the vacancy. 

Brother David C. Wray, right worshipful district deputy grand master 
of the 33rd District having resigned on August 15, 3921, I appointed 
Brother A. E. Burress, Walnut, 111., to fill the vacancy. 

Brother Thomas A. Doherty, right worshipful district deputy grand 
master of the 94th District having resigned on June 24, 1921, I appointed 
Brother J. E. Gibbs, Clay City, 111., to fill the vacancy. 



1921J 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



15 



Dispensations and Fees 



Lodge Amount 

Cosmopolitan No. 1020 $2.00 

Dearborn No, 310 2.00 

Blaney No. 271 2.00 

Toulon No. 93 2.00 

Ben Franklin No. 962 2.00 

Bohemia No. 942 2.00 

Welfare No. 991 2.00 

Vitruvius No. 81 2.00 

" 2.00 

Martinton No. 845 2:00 

Welcome No. 916 2.00 

Emblem No. 984 2.00 

A. H. Scrogin No. 1034. . . . 2.00 

Old Glory No. 975 2.00 

Bradford No. 514 2.00 

Braidwood No. 704 2.00 

Rock Island No. 658 2.00 

Plainville No. 529 2.00 

Lake View No. 774 2.00 

Honor No. 1010 2.00 

Trowel No. 981 2.00 

Sandoval No. 932 2.00 

North Shore No. 937 2.00 

Tarbolton No. 351 2.00 

Raleigh No. 128 2.00 

Vienna No. 150 2.00 

Abingdon No. 185 2.00 

Kensington No. 804 2.00 

Tadmore No. 194. 2,00 

Omaha No. 723 2.00 

Piper No. 608 2.00 

Hopedale No. 622 2.00 

Hillsboro No. 51 2.00 

Red Bud No. 427 2.00 

Parkway No. 1008 2.00 

Maplewood No. 964 2.00 

Gil. W. Barnard No. 908. . . 2.00 

Stark No. 501 2.00 

Van Meter No. 762 2.00 

Gilham No. 809 2.00 

Westfield No. 1046 2.00 

Grand Crossing No. 776. .. . 2.00 

Logan Square No^ 891 2.00 

Enfield No. 677 2.00 

Crescent No. 895 2.00 

Universal No. 985 2,00 

St. John's No. 13 2.00 

Providence No. 711 2.00 

Goodwill No. 1038 2.00 

Levi Lusk No. 270 2.00 

Apollo No. 642 2.00 



Lodge Amount 

Portage Park No, 270 2.00 

Milton No. 275 2.00 

East Gate No. 923 2.00 

Glen Ellyn No. 950 2.00 

Adelphi No. 1029 2.00 

Dahlgren No. 467 2.00 

Jeffersonville No. 460 2.00 

Full Moon No. 341 2.00 

Lake View No. 779 2.00 

Herder No. 699 2.00 

Mt. Erie No. 331 2.00 

Hiram No. 1009 2.00 

Fairfield No. 206 2.00 

Hyde Park No. 989 2,00 

Humboldt Park No. 813 2.00 

Wheeler No. 883 2.00 

Mount Clare No. 1040 2.00 

Mithra No. 410 2.00 

Ideal No. 1036 2.00 

Pleasant Hill No', 565 2.00 

Gothic No. 852 2,00 

Milton No. 275 2.00 

Chicago No. 437 2.00 

Germania No. 182 2.00 

Herder No. 669 2.00 

Apollo No. 642 2,00 

Lambert No. 659 2.00 

Piasa No. 27 2.00 

Maplewood No. 964 2.00 

Equity No. 878 2.00 

Niagara No. 992 2.00 

Smyth Crooks No. 1035 2.00 

Bohemia No. 943 2.00 

Bethalto No. 406 2.00 

Albany Park No. 974 2.00 

Sheridan No. 735 2.00 

Anchor & Ark No. 1027 2.00 

Columbian No. 819 2.00 

Loyal No. 1007 2.00 

Columbus No. 227 2.00 

Keystone No. 639 2.00 

Harbor No. '731 2.00 

Aeeordia No. 277 2.00 

Wyanet No. 231 2.00 

Lakeside No. 739 2.00 

D. C. Cregier No. 643 2.00 

Fortitude No. 1003 2.00 

" 2.00 

Ogden Park No, 897 2.00 

Wayne No. 172 2.00 

Niagara No. 992 2.00 



16 Proceedings of the [October 11, 



Lodge Amount Lodge Amount 

Park Manor No. 899 2.00 Atkinson No. 433 2.00 

Cedar No. 124 2.00 Boulevard No. 882 2.00 

Perry No. 95 2.00 Jetfersonville No. 460 2.00 

Creal Springs No. 817 2.00 Eed Bud No. 427 2.00 

Xenia No. 485 2.00 Lake Shore No. 1041 2.00 

Levi Lusk No. 270 2.00 

New Lodges 

Glenview $100.00 Grcsham 100.00 

Stonington 100.00 Great Light 100.00 

Eadiant 100.00 South Shore 100.00 

Northern Lights 100.00 Omega 100.00 

Level 100.00 Merit 100.00 

Laurel 100.00 North Evanston 100.00 

Cissna Park 100.00 Wood Eiver 100.00 

Forest Park 100.00 Eiver Forest 100.00 

Cardinal 100.00 Ogle 100.00 

Oglesby 100.00 St. Anne 100.00 

Grand Eepresentatives Appointed 1920-1921 

Brother Eobert Treat Payne having died, Brother Eiehard E. Bird 
of Wichita, Kansas, was appointed on December 9, 1920, to represent 
Illinois near the Grand Lodge of Kansas. 

Brother J. W. Iredell having died. Brother Harry S. Johnson of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, was appointed on January 27, 1921, to represent Illinois near 
the Grand Lodge of Ohio. 

Brother I. J. Foster having died. Brother Canon G. F. Davidson of 
Eegina, Saskatchewan, was appointed on July 8, 1921, to represent Illinois 
near the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan. 

Lodges Constituted 

At the grand lodge session of 1920 charters were issued to the follow- 
ing lodges and they were constituted as follows: 

Trestle Board Lodge No. 1032, on October 18, 1920, by E.W. Ira J. 
McDowell. 

Goodfcllowship Lodge No. 1043, on October 19, 1920, by E.W. E'lmer 
E. Beach. 

Mayfair Lodge No. 1045, on October 20, 1920, by E.W. George Ef. 
Moore. 

Perfection Lodge No. 1033, on October 21, 1920, by E.W. Bert Uebele. 

Monroe C. Crawford Lodge No. 1042, on October 22, 1920, by E.W. 
David S. Davidson. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 17 

Lake Shore Lodge No. 1041, on October 23, 1920, by R.W. Bert Uebele. 

Legion Lodge No. 1037, on October 26, 1920, by R.W. Paul A. Neuffer. 

Austin H. Scrogin Lodge No. 1034, on October 28, 1920, by M.W. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell. 

Montclair Lodge No. 1040, on October 30, 1920, by R.W, Bert Uebele. 

Ziegler Lodge No. 1048, on November 3, 1920, by R.W. Isaac Cutter. 

Royaltou Lodge No. 1047, on November 4, 1920, by R.W. Isaac Cutter. 

Shadrach Bond Lodge No. 1044, on November 5, 1920, by R.W. Harry 
H. Milnor. 

Advance Lodge No. 1039, on November 6, 1920, by R.W. George E. 
Moore. 

Smyth Crooks Lodge No. 1035, on November 8, 1920, by R.W. Paul A. 
Neuffer. 

Good Will Lodge No, 1038, on November 10, 1920, by R.W. George E. 
Moore. 

Ideal Lodge No. 1036, on November 25, 1920, by R.W. T. M. Avery. 

Westfield Lodge No. 1046, on November 26, 1920, by R.W. Richard C. 
Davenport. 

Dedications 

On November 22, 1920, Right Worshipful Brother Elmer E. Beach, 
deputy grand master, dedicated the Cicero Masonic Temple at Cicero, 
Illinois, for Cicero Lodge No. 955, A.F. & A.M., of Cicero. 

On February 9, 1921, I dedicated the Masonic Hall at Odell, 111., for 
Odell Lodge No. 401, A.F. & A.M. 

On April 16, 1921, Right Worshipful Brother Arthur E. Wood, senior 
grand warden, dedicated the Masonic Hall at Elmhurst, Illinois, for Elm- 
hurst Lodge No. 941, A.F. & A.M. 

On May 7, 1921, I dedicated the Masonic Hall at Herrin, Illinois, for 
Herrin's Prairie Lodge No. 693, A.F. & A.M. 

On June 16, 1921, Brother David D. King dedicated the Masonic 
Temple at Kedzie and Fullerton streets, Chicago, 111., for Ben Hur Lodge 
No. 818, A.F. & A.M. 

On July 22, 1921, Right Worshipful Brother Arthur E. Wood, senior 
grand warden, dedicated the Masonic Hall, Palestine, 111., for Palestine 
Lodge No. 849, A.F. & A.M. 



18 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

On September 7, 1921, Eight Worshipful Brother Owen Scott, Grand 
Secretary, dedicated the Masonic Hall at Herrick, 111., for Clover Leaf 
Lodge No. 990, A.F. & A.M. 

On September 14, 1921, I dedicated the Masonic Temple at Beardstown, 
111., for Cass Lodge No. 23, A.F. & A.M. 

On September 21, 1921, I dedicated the Masonic Hall at Murphysboro, 
111., for Murphysboro Lodge No. 498, A.F. & A.M. 

On September 28, Eight Worshipful Brother Ekner E. Beach, deputy 
grand master, dedicated the Northwest Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111., for 
Fortitude Lodge No. 1003, A.F. & A.M. 

Corner-stones Laid 

On October 30, 1920, I laid the corner-stone of the Midway Masonic 
Temple in Chicago, 111. 

On November 30, 1920, Eight Worshipful Brother Elmer E. Beach, 
deputy grand master, laid the corner-stone of the Humboldt Park Com- 
mandery Asylum at 2410 N. Kedzie Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

On October 1, 1921, Eight Worshipful Brother Elmer E. Beach, deputy 
grand master, laid the corner-stone of the Logan Square Masonic Temple at 
Kedzie Blvd. and Albany Ave., Chicago, 111, 

Lodges Instituted 

After careful investigation I have issued dispensations to the following 
lodges: 

Stonington Lodge, instituted by Brother A. A. Bauer, right worshipful 
district deputy grand master of the 72nd District, on December 8, 1920, 
to meet at Stonington, Illinois. 

Eadiant Lodge, instituted by Brother William Tinsley, right worship- 
ful district deputy grand master of the 3rd District, on December 16, 1920, 
to meet in St. Jobn's Hall, Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 

Northern Lights Lodge, instituted by Brother George B. Moore, right 
worshipful district deputy grand master of the 14th District, on January 3, 
1921, to meet at 1619 N. California Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Level Lodge, instituted by Brother Paul A. Neuffer, right worshipful 
district deputy grand master of the 15th District, on February 11, 1921, 
to meet at St. John 's Hall, Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 

Laurel Lodge, instituted by Brother Bert Uebele, right worshipful 
district deputy grand master of the 2nd District, on March 2, 1921, to 
meet 810 N. Parkside Ave., Chicago', 111. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 19 

Ogle Lodge, instituted by Brother E. W. E. Mitchell, right worshipful 
district deputy grand master of the 27th District, on March 22, 1921, 
to meet at Forreston, Illinois. 

Forest Park Lodge, instituted by Brother William Tinsley, right wor- 
shipful district deputy grand master of the 3rd District, on April 21, 1921, 
to meet in Oak Park, 111. 

Oglesby Lodge, instituted by Brother Charles E. Morgan, right wor- 
shipful district deputy grand master of the 41st District, on April 26, 1921, 
to meet at Oglesby, 111. 

Cardinal Lodge, instituted by Brother Isaac J. Smit, right worshipful 
district deputy grand master of the 19th District on April 26, 1921, to 
meet at 58 W. Eandolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Cissna Park Lodge, instituted by Brother E. C. Vanderpoorten, right 
worshipful district deputy grand master of the 46th District, on April 29, 
1921, to meet at Cissna Park, 111. 

Gresham Lodge, instituted by Brother David S. Davidson, right wor- 
shipful district deputy grand master of the 11th District, on April 29, 
1921, to meet at 7832 Union Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Great Light Lodge, instituted by Brother George A. Stadler, right 
worshipful district deputy grand master of the 61st District, on May 4, 
1921, to meet in Decatur, 111. 

South Shore Lodge, instituted by Brother Bert Uebele, right worship- 
ful district deputy gi-and master of the 2nd District, on May 6, 1921, to 
meet in the Woodlawn Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 

Omega Lodge, instituted by Brother Francis H. Bradley, right wor- 
shipful district deputy grand master of the 34th District, on May 6, 1921, 
to meet at Alpha, Illinois. 

Merit Lodge, instituted by Brother Bert Uebele, right worshipful dis- 
trict deputy grand master of the 2nd District, on May 10, 1921, to meet in 
Corinthian Hall, Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 

North Evanston Lodge, instituted by Brother George E. Moore, right 
worshipful district deputy gi-and master of the 14th District on May 27, 
1921, to meet in Evanston, 111. 

Wood River Lodge, instituted by Brother E. S. Mclntyre, right wor- 
shipful district deputy grand master of the 84th District, on June 18, 1921, 
to meet at Wood Eiver, 111. 

Eiver Forest Lodge, instituted by Brother Eobert A. Lees, right wor- 
shipful district deputy grand master of the 16th District, on June 24, 1921, 
to meet in River Forest, 111. 



20 



Proceedings of the 



[October 11, 



Glenview Lodge, instituted by Brother W. W. M. Bending, right wor- 
shipful district deputy grand master of the 4th District, on November 16, 
1920, to meet in Glenview, 111. 

The report of the grand master with official papers and 
other documents were referred to the Committee on Grand 
Master's Address. 

Report — Grand Treasurer 

Bro. Leroy A. Goddard, grand treasurer, presented his 
report and asked that it be referred to the Committee on 
Finance. It was so referred. 



October 4, 1921. 

Leeoy a. Goddard, Grand Treasurer, 

In account with M.W. Grand Lodge, A.F. d: A.M., of Illinois. 

General Fund 

DEBIT 

Balance in bank $186,762.59 

From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary 3,000.00 

From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary 1,000.00 

From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary 3,000.00 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 6,186.02 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 8,540.00 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 21,050.40 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 7,836.00 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 11,007.20 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 9,000.90 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 7,072.00 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 7,424.00 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 9,392.80 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,079.20 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,355.20 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 10,844.00 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 6,776.80 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 2,704.80 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 4,465.60 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 6,425.60 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,468.80 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 20,710.90 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,746.40 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,020.00 

From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 6,843.50 



19; 


20 


Oct. 


7 


1921 


Mar. 


1 


Mar. 


21 


May 


2 


June 


23 


July 


9 


July 


11 


July 


11 


July 


13 


July 


14 


July 


18 


July 


18 


July 


20 


July 


21 


July 


25 


July 


26 


July 


27 


July 


28 


July 


29 


Aug. 


1 


Aug. 


1 


Aug. 


2 


Aug. 


3 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


8 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 21 



Aug. 11 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 7,204.80 

Aug. 16 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 2,931.20 

Aug. 18 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 6,236.00 

Aug. 30 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 2,787.50 

Aug. 31 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 1.60 

Sept. 2 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary, Loan to Charity Fund . . . 50,000.00 

Sept. 22 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 526.95 

Sept. 28 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 13.85 

Sept. 29 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,262.59 



Total $437,677.20 

CREDIT 

By mileage and per diem paid officers and com- 
mittees since last report, as per vouchers returned 

herewith $ 6,255.30 

By mileage and per diem paid representatives since 

last report, as per vouchers returned herewith 21,949.96 

By miscellaneous vouchers paid since last report, 
as per vouchers herewith Nos. 1503, 1509 to 1559 
both inclusive, 1562 to 1565 both inclusive, 1570 
to 1572 both inclusive, 1574 to 1596 both inclusive, 
1601 to 1620 both inclusive, 1625 to 1643 both 
inclusive, 1648 to 1667, both inclusive, 1669 to 1674 
both inclusive, 1679 to 1705 both inclusive, 1710 to 
1726, both inclusive, 1731 to 1736 both inclusive, 
■ 1738 to 1746 both inclusive, 1748, 1752 to 1760 both 
inclusive, 1766 to 1790 both inclusive, 1795 to 1798 
both inclusive, 1800 to 1832 both inclusive, 1837 to 
1857, both inclusive, 1859, 1860, 1865 to 1877 

inclusive 147,447.49 

By salaries paid Grand Officers since last report, 
as per vouchers returned herewith, Nos. 1566 to 
1569 both inclusive, 1597 to 1600 both inclusive, 
1621 to 1624 both inclusive, 1644 to 1647, both 
inclusive, 1675 to 1678, both inclusive, 1706 to 1709 
both inclusive, 1727 to 1730 both inclusive, 1747, 
1749 to 1751 inclusive, 1761 to 1765 both inclusive, 
1791 to 1794 both inclusive, 1833 to 1836 both 

inclusive, 1861 to 1864 both inclusive 9,100.00 

184,752.75 

Oct. 4, 1921 Balance in bank 252,924.45 



Total ." $437,677.20 

Charity Fund 

DEBIT 

1920 

Oct. 7 Balance in bank $64,289.51 

Oct. 27 From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary 50,000.00 

Nov. 4 Transferred from National Defense Fund, balance 

cash on Fund 57,172.47 

Dec. 20 From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary 15,000.00 



22 



Proceedings of tJie 



[October 11, 



1921 

Jan. 25 From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary, borrowed from 

General Fund 50,000.00 

Mar. 1 From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary 2,000.00 

May 2 From Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary 2,000.00 

June 23 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 1,560.18 

July 9 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 4,803.75 

July 11 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 11,840.85 

July 11 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 4,407.75 

July 13 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 6,191.55 

July 14 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,063.85 

July 18 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,978.00 

July 18 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 4,176.00 

July 20 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,283.45 

July 21 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 1,732.05 

July 25 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,012.30 

July 26 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 6,099.75 

July 27 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,811.95 

July 28 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 1,521.45 

July 29 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 2,511.90 

Aug. 1 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,614.40 

Aug. 1 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,076.20 

Aug. 2 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 11,649.60 

Aug. 3 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,232.35 

Aug. 4 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 2,823.75 

Aug. 8 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,849.75 

Aug. 11 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 4,052.70 

Aug. 16 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 1,649.80 

Aug. 18 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 3,507.75 

Aug. 30 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 1,568.25 

Aug. 31 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary .90 

Sept. 22 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 296.55 

Sept. 28 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 7.65 

Sept. 29 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,685.07 

Sept. 30 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 5,675.65 

Total $357,146.13 



CREDIT 

By vouchers herewith paid since last report, Nos. 221, 223 to 

232 inclusive, 234 to 304 inclusive $330,207.45 

Oct. 1, 1921 Balance in bank 26,938.68 

Total $357,146.13 



National Defense Fund — 1920-1921 

DEBITS 

1920 

Oct. 7 Balance cash in bank $ 55,887.64 

Oct. 18 Received from National Defense Committee 1,284.83 

Total Debits $ 57,172.47 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 23 

CREDITS 
Nov. 4 Voucher No. 136 transfer to Charity Fund and account closed. $ 57,172.47 

Permanent Fund, 1920-1921 

DEBITS 

1920 
Oct. 7 Balance in bank $ 11,540.14 

1921 

June 23 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 889.59 

Sept. 29 From Owen Scott, Grand Secretary 476.00 



Total $ 12,905.73 

CREDITS 

1920 

Nov. 5 Voucher, C. F. Childs & Company $ 11,317.50 

Oct. 1 Balance in bank 1,588.23 



Total $ 12,905.73 

'In addition to the cash balances as reported, the M.W. grand lodge owns the 
following securities, all of which are now in my possession as grand treasurer and are 
deposited in safety vault specifically designated as the property of the M.W. grand 
lodge. 

Charity Fund 

Certificate No. 203 for eight shares of stock of Masonic Temple trust from 

National Lodge No. 596, defunct $ 800.00 

Received from War Relief Fund : 

Three 4%% gold bonds of the United States of America dated May 
9, 1918, and due September 15, 1928, numbered 18517 to 18519 
inclusive, for $100.00 each, and one 4^4% bond No. 27080 for $50, 
interest payable March and September each year, contribution from 
Friendship Lodge No. 7, Dixon, Illinois 350.00 

Five Twenty year 4%% gold bonds of the United States of America, dated 
October 24th, 1918, numbered C00063073, D00063074, E00063075, 
F00063076, G00063077, for $10,000.00 each, interest payable April 
and October of each year 50,000.00 



$ 51,150.00 



Home for Aged Fund 

One Wabash Railroad Company first mortgage 4% gold bond, Toledo and 
Chicago Division, due March 1, 1941, interest March and September, 
numbered 1722, gift of I. M. H. for Aged, dissolved $ 1,000.00 

Seven City of Chicago Harbor Construction bonds, numbered 3531 to 
3537, both inclusive, all due January 1, 1927, interest at 4%, 
January and July, for $1,000.00 each, gift of I. M. H. for Aged, 
dissolved 7,000.00 

$ 8,000.00 



24 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

Illinois Masonic Orphans Home Fund 

Fifteen registered Illinois Central Railroad Company 4% gold bonds, due 
November 1, 1953, |1,000.00 each, numbered 7133 to 7144 both 
inclusive 13060, 13086 and 13089, interest due May and November, 
gift of I. M. O. H $ 15,000.00 

Ten Town of North Chicago 4% Lincoln Park bonds, due May 1, 1924, 
$1,000.00 each, numbered 401 to 410, both inclusive, interest May 
and November, gift of I. M. O. H 10,000.00 

Five Illinois Central Railroad 4% gold bonds due April 1, 1952, $500.00 
each, numbered 14218, 14219, 14220, 15418, 15592, interest April 
and October 1, gift of I. M. O. H 2,500.00 

One County of Cook 4% infirmary bond. Series J. due June 1, 1928, 

interest June and December 1, numbered 2293, gift of I. M. O. H. 500.00 

One County of Cook 4% infirmary bond. Series M., due June 1, 1929, 

interest June and December 1, numbered 794, gift of I. M. O. H. 1,000.00 

One City of Chicago Harbor Construction bond, numbered 4593, due July 

1, 1932, interest January and July 1, $1,000.00, gift of I. M. O. H. 1,000.00 

Certificate No. 119 for 47 shares of the capital stock of Western Lime & 
Cement Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, bequest under will of Chas. C. 
Bishop, deceased 4,700.00 

Certificate No. 57 for 204 shares of the capital stock of Union Lime Com- 
pany, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, bequest under will of Charles C. Bishop, 
deceased 20,400.00 

Ten City of Chicago Harbor Construction Bonds, numbered 4597 to 4606, 
both inclusive, all due July 1, 1932, interest January and July 1, for 
$1,000.00 each, bequest under will of Charles C. Bishop, deceased 10,000.00 

Ten County of Cook 4% Forest Preserve Bonds, Series B, due September 
1, 1932, $1,000.00 each, numbered 1654 to 1663, both inclusive, 
coupons due March and September, gift of I. M. O. H 10,000.00 

One 4:Vi% Gold bond of the United States of America, dated May 9, 
1918, and due September 15, 1928, No. 27079, for $50.00; interest 
payable March and September each year, gift of Fellowship Club of 
Crane Company 50.00 

Certificates Numbered 1, 3 and 4 for 50, 10 and 10 shares respectively 
of Drexel-Western Investment Company, par value $100.00 per 
share, bequest under will of John H. Millen, deceased 7,000.00 

Certificates Numbered 181 and 182 for ten shares each of stock of West 
Englewood-Ashland State Bank, par value $100.00 per share, bequest 
under will of John H. Millen, deceased 2,000.00 

Three New Columbus Theatre Building 6% bonds numbered 88, 110 and 
127 for $200.00 each, due June 15, 1925, interest payable June 15, 
and December 15, bequest under will of John H. Millen, deceased 600.00 

Twelve New Lyric Theatre Building 6% bonds numbered 11 to 22 both 
inclusive, for $200.00 each, due January 20, 1922, interest payable 
January 20 and July 20, bequest under will of John H. Millen, 
deceased 2,400.00 

Eight United States of America Third Liberty Loan 4^/4% bonds, num- 
bered 127949 to 127956, both inclusive, for $500.00 each, due Sep- 
tember 15, 1928, interest payable March 15 and September 15, 
bequest under will of John H. Millen, deceased 4,000.00 

Threo United States of America Third Liberty Loan 4^4% bonds, num- 
bered 575989 to 575991 both inclusive, for $1,000.00 each, due Sep- 
tember 15, 1928 ; interest payable March 15 and September 15, 
bequest under will of John H. Millen, deceased 3,000.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illiyiois 25 



Five United States of America Fourth Liberty Loan 4%% bonds, num- 
bered E04580935, P04580936, G04580937, H04580938 and 
J04580939 for $100.00 each, due October 15, 1938, interest payable 
April 15 and October 15, bequest under will of John H. Millen, 
deceased 500.00 

Three United States of America Fourth Liberty Loan 4%% bonds, num- 
bered G00183807, H00183808, and J00183809, for $500.00 each, due 
October 15, 1938, interest payable April 15 and October 15, bequest 
under will of John H. Millen, deceased 1,500.00 

Five United States of America Fourth Liberty Loan 4^/4% bonds, num- 
bered E01188865, F01188866, G01188867, H01188868 and 
J01188869 for $1,000.00 each, due October 15, 1938, interest payable 
April 15 and October 15, bequest under will of John H. Millen, 
deceased 5,000.00 

Four United States of America Victory Liberty Loan 4%% bonds, num- 
bered A102046, A102047, A102048 and 0349,422 for $500 each, due 
May 20, 1923, interest payable June 15 and December 15, bequest 
under will of John H. Millen, deceased 2,000.00 



$103,150.00 
We also hold certificate No. 50 for 100 shares of stock of the Cyclone 
Mining and Milling Company, issued in the name of Frank C. 
Falbisaner, and received from his estate. Par value of stock $1.00 
per share, but considered by us as worthless. 

Masonic Home Fund 
One bond of City of Chicago (4% Police Department Building Bond) due 
January 1, 1922, numbered D-108, coupons due January and July 1, 
bequest under will of Harry C. Hughes, deceased $ 500. CO 

General Fund 

Four County of Cook Infirmary Bonds, Series J, 4%, due June 1, 1926, 
interest payable June and December 1, for $1,000.00 each, Nos. 1478 
to 1481 inclusive 4,000.00 

Ten bonds of Cook County Infirmary, Series M., 4%, due June 1, 1928, 
interest payable June and December 1, for $1,000.00 each, Nos. 
716 to 725 inclusive 10,000.00 

Three bonds. County of Cook, Series 1, 4% Court House Bonds, due 
September 1, 1923, interest payable March and September 1, for 
$1,000.00 each, Nos. 4482 to 4484 inclusive 3,000.00 

Two City of Cleveland, 4% bridge bonds, due April, 1925, interest payable 

April and October 1, for $1,000.00 each, Nos. 24803 and 24805. . . . 2,000.00 

Five County Hospital 4% bonds, Series N., County of Cook, due July 1, 
1930, interest payable January and July 1, numbered 736 to 740 
Inclusive 5,000.00 

Twenty County Hospital 4% Series N., County of Cook bonds, due July 
1, 1929, interest payable January and July 1, numbered 676 to 
694, both inclusive, and 696 20,000.00 

Twenty-five Health Department for construction of Municipal Garbage 
Reduction Works bond of City of Chicago, due January 1, 1935, 
interest payable January and July 1, for $1,000.00 each, numbered 
M-471 to M-495 inclusive 25,000.00 



$ 69,000.00 



26 



Proceedings of tJie 



[October 11, 



Permanent Fund 

Seven United States of America Third Liberty Loan 4%% bonds Nos. 
304931, 309922, 416799, 612400, 656153, 667051 and 667052 for 
$500 each, due September 15, 1928, interest payable March 15 and 
September 15 of each year $ 3,500.00 

Nine United States of America Third Liberty Loan 4%% bonds, Nos. 
224456, 371544, 371545, 499562, 499563, 1291460, 1451083, 
1493981 and 1504898, for $1,000.00 each, due September 15, 1928, 

interest payable March 15 and September 15 of each year 9,000.00 

$ 12,500.00 

Summary 

Securities on hand, all funds $244,300.00 

Cash on hand, all funds 281,451.36 

Total Assets in Treasury $525,751.36 

Fraternally submitted, 

Leroy a. Goddakd, Grand Treasurer. 

I hereby certify that at the close of business on October 4, 1921, the State Bank 
of Chicago held on deposit the following balance due the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M., 
of Illinois: General fund, $252,924.45; Charity fund, $26,938.68; Permanent fund, 
$1,588.23. 

Gaylord S. Morse, Asst. Cashier. 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER 

George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association 

receipts 



1920 

Oct. 8, Cash in bank $56,764.14 

Dec. 6, Received of Grand 

Royal Arch Chapter, 

Peoria 500.00 

Dec. 8, Received of Grana 

Lodge General Fund, 

D. G. Fitzgerrell, Grand 

Master 5,000.00 



1st 
5th 
7th 
11th 
13th 
14th 
17th 
19th 
22nd 
23rd 
29th 
34th 
36th 
38th 
39th 
40th 
41st 



District. 



473.00 

3.00 

1,013.00 

810.20 

50.00 

5.00 

4.00 

627.00 

26.00 

15.00 

13.00 

98.00 

25.00 

50.00 

57.00 

5.00 

102.00 



42nd District. 

43rd 

47th 

49th 

52nd 

53rd 

54th 

55th 

57th 

58th 

60th 

61st 

62nd 

64th 

65th 

66th 

67th 

73rd 

79th 

80th 

82nd 

86th 

91st 

97th 

99th 



10.00 

703.50 

1.00 

204.00 

10.00 

37.00 
150.00 

50.00 
684.50 

50.00 

58.00 
300.00 

17.50 
333.00 
330.00 
109.00 

74.50 

109.00 

5.00 

61.50 

25.00 
373.50 

74.00 
106.00 
353.00 
,340.24 



Interest received on daily balances from October, 1920, to September, 1921 1 

Total receipts $71,209.58 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 27 



CREDITS 
1921 

Feb. 18 Voucher to Owen Scott herewith returned $ 100.00 

Oct. 1 Balance cash in bank 71,109.58 

Total $71,209.58 

In addition to the cash balance reported, the Grand Treasurer holds for the 
George Washington Memorial Fund, the following described Liberty Loan Bonds: 

Third Issue No. 1522792 received from 47th District $ 100.00 

Third Issue Nos. 1174974 and 3788840 for $100.00 each, received from 

72nd District 200.00 

Fourth Issue No. 3708794 received from 63rd District 50.00 

Total $ 350.00 

Summary 

Securities on hand $ 350.00 

Cash on hand 71,109.58 

Total Assets for Above Fund $71,459.58 

Fraternally submitted, 

Leroy a. Goddard, Grand Treasurer. 

I hereby certify that at the close of business on October 1, 1921, the State Bank 
of Chicago held on deposit for the George Washington Masonic National Memorial 
Association, $71,109.58. 

Gaylord S. Morse, Asst. Cashier. 



Report — Grand Secretary 

Bro. Owen Scott, grand secretary, presented the report of 
Isaac Cutter, deceased, together with his cash book and ledger, 
and asked that they be referred to the Committee on Finance. 
They were so referred. 

Dispensation Fees Received 

Stonington, U.D $100.00 Oglesby, U.D 100.00 

Glenview, U.D 100.00 Cardinal, U.D 100.00 

Northern Lights, U.D 100.00 Forest Park, U.D 100.00 

Radiant, U.D 100.00 Cissna Park, U.D 100.00 



Level, U.D 100.00 

Laurel, U.D 100.00 

Omega, U.D 100.00 

South Shore, U.D 100.00 

Great Light, U.D 100.00 

Gresham, U.D 100.00 $1,748.00 



North Evanston, U.D 100.00 

Merit, U.D 100.00 

Miscellaneous 148.00 



28 Proceedings of tlie [October 11, 



Receipts from All Sources 

GENERAL 

Balance, 1920 $186,739.34 

Accounts receivable 7,435.60 

Donations 1,000.00 

Interest on balances 1,272.42 

Interest on investments 1,700.00 

Mileage and per diem 30.00 

Dispensations 1,748.00 



$199,925.36 



Disbursements 

Orders have been drawn on the General Fund since the last annual meeting for 
the following amounts: 

Mileage and per diem, officers $ 6,255.30 

Mileage and per diem, representatives 21,949.96 

Order 

Number 

1509 D. D. Darrah, committee on correspondence $ 500.00 

1510 C. S. Gurney, salary and expenses, grand tyler 202.00 

1511 Oriental Consistory, rent for annual meeting 300.00 

1512 Phil C. Barclay, committee on chartered lodges 150.00 

1513 Chas. G. Palmer, stenographer, grand lodge 50.00 

1514 Western Union Telegraph Company, Anthony Doherty funeral. .. . 72.86 

1515 E. J. Phillips, expense D.D.G.M., 6th Dist 2.20 

1516 F. E. Covalt, expense D.D.G.M., 21st Dist 9.00 

1517 A. J. Winteringham, expense D.D.G.M., 22nd Dist 28.63 

1518 J. H. Grimm, expense D.D.G.M., 25th Dist 40.30 

1519 M. R. Nelson, expense D.D.G.M., 26th Dist. . 40.00 

1520 R. W. E. Mitchell, expense D.D.G.M., 27th Dist 11.00 

1521 Charles W. McCray, expense D.D.G.M., 32nd Dist 6.94 

1522 Theodore Ward, expense D.D.G.M., 33rd Dist 10.00 

1523 F. H. Bradley, expense D.D.G.M., 34th Dist 20.50 

1524 R. D. Tinkham, e.xpense D.D.G.M., 38th Dist 6.50 

1525 Hugh Mallett, expense D.D.G.M., 40th Dist 35.68 

1526 Chas. E. Morgan, expense D.D.G.M., 41st Dist 19.55 

1527 E. E. Mull, expense D.D.G.M., 42nd Dist 32.50 

1528 B. J. Metzger, expense D.D.6.M., 43rd Dist 3.40 

1529 Harry C. Reser, expense D.D.G.M., 44th Dist 8.81 

1530 Charles H. Ireland, expense D.D.G.M., 49th Dist 19.78 

1531 H. E. Lance, expense D.D.G.M, 51st Dist 5.00 

1532 Paul G. Duncan, expense D.D.G.M., 52nd Dist 11.82 

1533 H. M. Lawton, expense D.D.G.M., 54th Dist 5.00 

1534 Chas. H. Wood, expense D.D.G.M., 63rd Dist .91 

1535 H. M. Wood, expense D.D.G.M., 64th Dist 10.00 

1536 H. C. McLoud, expense D.D.G.M., 65th Dist 6.50 

1537 S. J. Wilson, expense D.D.G.M., 67th Dist 23.51 

1538 C. Clemmons, expense D.D.G.M., 69th Dist 42.50 

1539 F. F. Munson, expense D. D. G. M., 74th Dist 24.20 

1540 T. S. Wright, expense D.D.G.M., 75th Dist 10.31 

1541 A. E. Ellis, expense D.D.G.M., 70th Dist 28.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 29 

1542 E. J. Scarborough, expense D.D.G.M., 76th Dist 10.23 

1543 Orville Rice, expense D.D.G.M., 78th Dist 6.13 

1544 Douglas Dale, expense D.D.G.M., 79th Dist 33.80 

1545 N. C. Gochenour, expense D.D.G.M., 80th Dist 58.83 

1546 D. L. Wright, expense D.D.G.M., 83rd Dist 11.60 

1547 A. W. Carter, expense D.D.G.M., 85th Dist 23.53 

1548 S. B. Gwin, expense D.D.G.M., 87th Dist 3.00 

1549 C. F. Stoll, expense D.D.G.M., 90th Dist 21.85 

1550 Thos. A. Doherty, expense D.D.G.M., 94th Dist 6.00 

1551 Charles V. Clark, expense D.D.G.M., 95th Dist 18.39 

1552 "W. T. Cable, expense D.D.G.M., 97th Dist 12.00 

1553 R. R. Helm, expense D.D.G.M., 98th Dist 20.35 

1554 H. P. Behrensnieyer, engrossing charters 81.80 

1555 Frank Groves, printing quarterly circular 160.00 

1556 Underwood Typewriter Company, machine repairs 11.75 

1557 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master 67.27 

1558 Isaac Cutter, expense of grand secretary 23.78 

1559 Hudson Rainier, office expense of grand secretary 2.00 

1560 Void. 

1561 Void. 

1562 C. H. Vorkeller, serving summons 3.00 

1563 iPantagraph Printing & Stationery Company, miscellaneous printing 393.58 

1564 George Catto, auditing grand lodge accounts 303.31 

1565 Charity Fund, order of Grand Lodge 50,000.00 

1566 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary of grand master, October 208.33 

1567 Isaac Cutter, salary of grand secretary, October 250.00 

1568 L. A. Goddard, salary of grand treasurer, October 125.00 

1569 Roy Adams, salary of deputy grand secretary, October 175.00 

1570 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer for grand master, October 135.00 

1571 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, grand secretary, October 125.00 

1572 Isaac Cutter, office rent, grand secretary, October 45.00 

1573 Void (see permanent fund). 

1574 Joseph Lustfield, Ideal Lodge No. 1036, refund, error in grand 

lodge dues 109.60 

1575 Robinson Coal Company, order charity committee 9.05 

1576 John H. Cowles, 34 life memberships, George Washington Memorial 3,400.00 

1577 S. D. Childs & Co., ledger leaves and ledgers 71.40 

1578 George Catto, expense installing books, office grand secretary 40.00 

1579 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 49.00 

1580 Roy Adams, expense attending grand lodge 37.82 

1581 Isaac Cutter, expense grand lodge, Bloomington & Chicago 109.25 

1582 Brooks L'>.undry, laundering and repairing aprons 83.52 

1583 S. Almberg, ballots for election at grand lodge 6.50 

1584 O. M. Jones, expense attending grand lodge 19.00 

1585 Washburn & Sons, Anthony Doherty funeral 25.00 

1586 S. E. Huenerfauth, trial Siloam Lodge vs. J. Ruehl 15.00 

1587 James W. Thorpe, trial Siolam Lodge vs. J. Ruehl 15.00 

1588 Wm. K. Steele, trial Siloam Lodge vs. J. Ruehl 16.00 

1589 Underwood Typewriter Co., new machine and repairs 117.50 

1590 Isaac Cutter, office expense of grand secretary 133.37 

1591 D. G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master 65.05 

1592 Pantagraph Printing & Stationery Co., monitors and printing.... 609.51 

1593 Frank R. Berg, expense grand tyler 46.47 

1594 Owen Scott, expense Silvis and return 27.65 



30 Proceedings of tJie [October 11, 



1595 Edward H. Cass, trial Siloam Lodge vs. J. Ruehl 67.43 

1596 George McFatrich, freight and drayage, pool table to Sullivan.... 15.89 

1597 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, November 208.33 

1598 Isaac Cutter, salary grand secretary, November 250.00 

1599 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, November 125.00 

1600 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, November 175.00 

1601 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer for grand master, November 135.00 

1602 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, grand secretary, November 125.00 

1603 'Isaac Cutter, office rent, grand secretary, November 45.00 

1604 Todd Protectograph Company, check writer 58.80 

1605 George T. Scrivner, expense grand tyier 140.64 

1606 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 105.00 

1607 George Washington Memorial Ass'n, order grand lodge 5,000.00 

1608 A. D. Spence, premium on insurance, office grand secretary 97.20 

1609 Robinson Coai Company, order charity committee 17.05 

1610 LaSalle Hotel, expense annual meeting .84 

1611 H. P. Behrensmeyer, engrossing commissions 135.10 

1612 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 36.81 

1613 R. C. Davenport, expense Westfield and return 21.50 

1614 Wm. R. Schroeder, expense D.D.G.M., 62nd Dist 6.55 

1615 D. G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master 135.55 

1616 Isaac Cutter, expense of grand secretary 154.96 

1617 Pantagraph P. & S. Co., printing proceedings, monitors, receipts, 

and miscellaneous printing 5,118.11 

1618 Edward H. Thomas, record ribbons and carbon paper 2.45 

1619 George T. Scrivner, expense grand tyler 70.31 

1620 H. H. Mitchell, paving Goodman Ave., LaGrange 195.55 

1621 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, December 208.33 

1622 Isaac Cutter, salary grand secretary, December 250.00 

1623 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, December 125.00 

1624 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, December 175.00 

1625 Aug. Torpe & Company, premium on insurance, Sullivan 2,292.66 

1626 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer, grand master, December 135.00 

1627 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, grand secretary, December 125.00 

1628 Isaac Cutter, office rent, grand secretary, December 45.00 

1629 H. H. Mitchell, sewer on Bluff Avenue, LaGrange 1,617.59 

1630 D. G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master, December 29.40 

1631 Isaac Cutter, expense of grand secretary, December 111.25 

1632 Dalton Adding Machine Company, machine repairs 36.25 

1633 H. P. Behrensmeyer, engrossing charter 3.50 

1634 Robinson Coal Company, order charity committee 3 7.05 

1635 Pantagraph P. & S. Company, monitors, blue books, receipts 2,237.95 

1636 Pantagraph P. & S. Company, binding proceedings 2,062.02 

1637 H. H. Mitchell, paving at LaGrange 207.37 

1638 George Carlson, state school at Mt. Vernon 86.80 

1639 Wm. H. Zarley, state school at Mt. Vernon 73.00 

1640 B. L. Ten Eyck, state school at Mt. Vernon 70.00 

1641 H. L. Howell, state school at Mt. Vernon 67.00 

1642 H. H. Milnor, state school at Mt. Vernon 68.00 

1643 Charity Fund, transferred as a loan 50,000.00 

1644 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, January 208.33 

1645 Isaac Cutter, salary grand secretary, January 250.00 

1646 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, January 125.00 

1647 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, January 175.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 31 



1648 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer grand master, January 135.00 

1649 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, January 125.00 

1650 Isaac Cutter, office rent, grand secretary, January 45.00 

1651 Geo. A. Gilbert & Son, bonds for grand officers 343.75 

1652 Geo. Carlson, examination and state school, Chicago 91.65 

1653 Wm. H. Zarley, examination and state school, Chicago 81.75 

1654 B. L. Ten Eyck, examination and state school, Chicago 86.50 

1655 H. L. Howell, examination and state school, Chicago 80.30 

1656 H. H. Milnor, examination and state school, Chicago 47.60 

1657 Geo. Carlson, state school. Rock Island 31.70 

1658 Wm. H. Zarley, state school. Rock Island 64.25 

1659 B. L. Ten Eyck, state school. Rock Island 52.50 

1660 H. L. Howell, state school, Rock Island 66.00 

1661 H. H. Milnor, state school. Rock Island 64.25 

1662 H. P. Behrensmeyer, engrossing commissions 3.25 

1663 Dust-All-Mfg. Company, lOu lbs. sweeping compound 3.25 

1664 Isaac Cutter, office and miscellaneous expense 80.39 

1665 D. G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master 75.00 

1666 Pantagraph P. & S. Company, monitors, misc. printing and uniform 

receipts 775.59 

1667 John H. Cowles, 13 life memberships, Geo. Washington Memorial 1,300.00 

1668 Void. 

1669 Owen Scott, Geo. Washington Memorial expense 79.76 

1670 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 11.40 

1671 A. H. Bell, expense Springfield and return 3.74 

1672 Owen Scott, revising blue books 200.00 

1673 F. C. Funk, expense Jacksonville and return 4.00 

1674 L. A. Goddard, expense Springfield and return 21.31 

1675 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, February 208.33 

1676 Isaac Cutter, salary grand secretary, February 250.00 

1677 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, February 125.00 

1678 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, February 175.00 

1679 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer grand master, February 135.00 

1680 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, February 125.00 

1681 Isaac Cutter, Office rent, grand secretary, February 45.00 

1682 Geo. Carlson, state school, Springfield 12.1b 

1683 Wm. H. Zarley, state school, Springfield 68.60 

1684 B. L. Ten Eyck, state school, Springfield 63.45 

1685 H. L. Howell, state school, Springfield 54.20 

1686 H. H. Milnor, state school, Springfield 69.25 

1687 Geo. Carlson, state school, Danville 80.20 

1688 Wm. H. Zarley, state school, Danville 61.30 

1689 B. L. Ten Eyck, state school, Danville 57.75 

1690 H. L. Howell, state school, Danville 51.70 

1691 H. H. Milnor, state school, Danville 61.25 

1692 Owen Scott, expense Alexandria and return 128.18 

1693 D. G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master 55.32 

1694 Isaac Cutter, office and miscellaneous expense 49.46 

1695 A. W. Joerndt, expense Ogle.sby and return 7.00 

1696 F. W. Brown, expense Oglesby and return 7.00 

1697 H. P. Behrensmeyer, engrossing charter and commissions 9.85 

1698 Brooks Laundry, expense grand tyler 2.93 

1699 C. E. Morgan, expense Oglesby and return 2.86 

J700 Robinson Coal Company, order Charity Committee 15.75 



32 



Proceedings of tJie 



[October 11, 



1701 Pantagi-aph P. & S. Company, uniform receipts and miscellaneous 

printing 251.11 

1702 F. H. Bradley, expense Alpha and return 8.42 

1703 L. C. Johnson, expense Alpha and return 5.00 

1704 C. C. Sawyer, expense Alpha and return 5.00 

1705 A. Torpe, Jr., & Company, premium on insurance 864.40 

1706 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, March 208.33 

1707 Isaac Cutter, salary grand secretary, March 250.00 

1708 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, March 125.00 

1709 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, March 175.00 

1710 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer grand master, March 135.00 

1711 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, March 125.00 

1712 Isaac Cutter, office rent, grand secretary, March 45.00 

1713 F. K. Berg, expense grand tyler 12.76 

1714 Geo. Carlson, state school, Princeton 52.10 

1715 Wm. H. Zarley, state school, .Princeton 61.15 

1716 B. L. Ten Eyck, state school, Princeton 49.85 

1717 H. L. Howell, state school, Princeton 47.60 

1718 H. H. Milnor, state school, Princeton 53.50 

1719 D. G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master 70.13 

1720 Isaac Cutter, expense of grand secretary 114.82 

1721 Roberts & Downing, coal for office of grand secretary 33.85 

1722 S. B. Gwin, expense lola and return 5.00 

1723 Robinson Coal Company, order Charity Committee 15.75 

1724 Pantagraph P. & S. Company, monitors and misc. printing 555.50 

1725 S. E. Grigg, expense Wood River and return 6.88 

1726 E. S. Mclntyre, expense Wood River and return 5.00 

1727 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, April 208.33 

1728 Isaac Cutter, salary grand secretary, April 250.00 

1729 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, April 125.00 

1730 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, April 175.00 

1731 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer grand master, April 135.00 

1732 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, April 125.00 

1 733 Isaac Cutter, office rent, April 45.00 

1734 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 10.50 

1735 Monitors 640.00 

1736 Pantagraph P. & S. Co., receipts and printing 170 89 

1737 Void. 

1738 Isaac Cutter, expense grand secretary 4.68 

1739 A. H. Kellums, taxes lola Lodge No. 691 (defunct) 6.17 

1740 Chas. E. Morgan, expense Oglesby and return 3.70 

1741 Masonic Relief Ass'n, U. S. and Canada, Per Capita Tax, 203447 

members @ % c for 1920 508.61 

1742 D. G. Fitzgerrell, expense grand master 114.82 

1743 F. H. Bradley, expense Alpha and return 9.00 

1744 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 41.55 

1745 Geo. T. Scrivner, expense grand tyler 22.05 

1746 R. C. Davenport, expense Marion and return 6.70 

1747 D. G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master. May 208.33 

1748 D. G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer grand master 135.00 

1749 Isaac Cutter, salary grand secretary. May 250.00 

1750 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, May 125.00 

1751 Roy Adams, salary as deputy grand secretary. May 175.00 

1752 Isaac Cutter, clerk hire, May 125.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 33 



1753 Isaac Cutter, office rent, May 45.00 

1754 iPantagraph P. & S. Company, monitors and printing 1,161.43 

1755 Pantagraph P. & S. Company, receipts and printing 495.80 

1756 Glenn Robinson, expense D.D.G.M. 47th Dist 20.46 

1757 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, expense grand master, May 90.46 

1758 H. P. Behrensmeyer, engrossing charters 3.50 

1759 Frank Berg, expense Herrin and return 30.75 

1760 Isaac Cutter, expense grand secretary 105.64 



$175,237.99 



Summary of Orders Drawn 

GENERAL 

Blue books $ 1,150.00 

Monitors 4,338.18 

Expense D.D.G.M 755.54 

Expense grand master 703.00 

Stenographer (grand master) 1,080.00 

Expense grand secretary 769.15 

Clerk hire (grand secretary) 1,000.00 

Office rent (grand secretary) 360.00 

Mileage and per diem 28,205.26 

Printing proceedings 5,826.29 

State schools 1,790.10 

Salary grand officers 6,066.64 

Miscellaneous printing 1,555.65 

Miscellaneous expense 10,164.16 

Donated to George Washington National Memorial Association 5,000.00 

Refund grand lodge dues overpaid, 1920 109.60 

Uniform receipts 1,664.42 

George Washington Memorial Certificates 4,700.00 

Transferred to Charity, order grand lodge 50,000.00 

Transferred to charity, a-c loan 50,000.00 



$175,237.99 

Receipts from All Sources 

Charity 

Balance, 1920 $ 64,289.51 

Transferred from general fund, order grand lodge 50,000.00 

Transferred from general fund, account loan 50,000.00 

Transferred from National Defense fund, order grand lodge. . ." 57,172.47 

Interest on balances 1,250.23 

Interest on investments 3,891.48 

Sale bonds 37.50 

Balance appropriations returned to grand lodge 9,819.43 

Donations, Grand Royal Arch Chapter 5,500.00 

Receipts, account defunct lodges 61.54 

$242,022.16 



34 Proceedings of the [October 11, 



Disbursements 

CHARITY 

Order 
Number 

221 Chas. L. Brooks, order charity committee $ 200.00 

222 Void. 

223 C. C. Davis, maintenance Sullivan 10,000.00 

224 \Vm. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 20,000.00 

225 Wm. D. Price, maintenance LaGrange 4,000.00 

226 Wm. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 20,000.00 

227 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 15.00 

228 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

229 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

230 E. L. Charpentier, order grand lodge 100.00 

231 C. F. Childs & Co., accumulated interest on bonds purchased 73.78 

232 Joseph Lustfield, Ideal Lodge No. 1036, refund, error in grand 

lodge dues 61.65 

233 Void. 

234 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 7.000.00 

235 Wm. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 20,000.00 

236 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 15.00 

237 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

238 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

239 Wm. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 10,000.00 

240 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 8,000.00 

241 C. C. Davis, moving picture outfit, Sullivan 1,000.00 

242 C. C. Davis, covering pipes, Sullivan 1,000.00 

243 C. C. Davis, painting, Sullivan 1,000.00 

244 Wm. D. Price, laundry equipment, LaGrange 3,490.50 

245 Wm. D. Price, minor repairs, alterations and equipment 2,500.00 

246 C. C. Davis, mattresses, Sullivan 1,500.00 

247 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 15.00 

248 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

249 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3, ,5,00. 00 

250 C. C. Davis, weatherstripping, Sullivan 500.00 

251 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan ■ 8,000.00 

252 G. B. Wilde, order grand lodge 50.00 

253 Wm. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 20,000 00 

254 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

255 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 15.00 

256 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

257 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 5,000.00 

258 C. C. Davis, furnishings, Sullivan 2,700.00 

259 Wm. D. Price, refrigeration plant, LaGrange *. 2,500.00 

260 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

261 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 15.00 

262 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

263 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 10.000.00 

264 Wm. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 10,000.00 

265 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 25.00 

266 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

267 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

268 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 6,000.00 

269 G. B. Wilde, order grand lodge 50.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 35 



270 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

271 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 25.00 

272 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

273 Wm. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 16,000.00 

274 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 2,500.00 

275 Jas. McCredie, G.R.A.C. donation 5,000.00 

276 .Tas. McCredie, new plumbing, original building 500.00 

277 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

278 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

279 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 25.00 

280 Jas. McCredie, G.R.A.C. donation 500.00 

281 Wni. D. Price, new building, LaGrange 4,281.52 



$232,057.45 
Summary of Order.s Drawn 

CHARITY 

LaGrange: 

Maintenance $ 32,000.00 

New buildings 120,281.52 

Repairs and alterations 2,500.00 

Laundry machinery 3,490.50 

Refrigerating plant 2,500.00 

Sullivan : 

Maintenance 56,500.00 

■Painting 1,000.00 

Replace plumbing 500.00 

Moving picture machine 1,000.00 

Covering pipes 1,000.00 

Mattresses 1,500.00 

Weatherstripping 500.00 

Furnishing hospital and administration building 2,700.00 

Grand Royal Arch Chapter donation 5,500.00 

Miscellaneous 950.00 

Accrued interest, bonds purchased 73.78 

Refund, grand lodge dues overpaid last year 61.65 



$232,057.45 

Receipt.s from All Sources 

permanent 

Balance, 1921 - $ 11,540.14 

Donations 889.59 



$ 12,429.73 

Disbursements 

permanent 

C. F. Childs & Co., purchase Liberty Bonds $ 11,317.50 



36 Proceedings of the [October 11, 



Recapitulation 

general fund 

Receipts from all sources $199,925.36 

Orders drawn 175,237.99 

Balance June 15, 1921 $ 24,687.37 

CHARITY FUND 

Receipts from all sources $242,022.16 

Orders drawn 232,057.45 

Balance, June 15, 1921 ....$ 9,964.71 



PERMANENT FUND 

Receipts from all sources $ 12,429.73 

Orders drawn 11,317.50 



Balance, June 15, 1921 $ 1,112.23 

Brother Owen Scott, right worshipful grand secretary, suc- 
cessor to Bro. Isaac Cutter, deceased, presented his report, be- 
ginning June 1 6, 192 1, together with his cash book and ledger, 
and asked that they be referred to the Committee on Finance. 
They were so referred. 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



37 



Owen Scott, Grand Secretary, in account with the M. W. Grand Lodge 
of Illinois, A. F. & A. M. 

DUES EECEIVED FEOM LODGES 



LODGES. 


NO. 


DUES. 


LODGES. 


NO. 


DUES. 


Bodley 


1 

2 
3 
4 

7 
8 
9 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
19 
20 
23 
24 
25 
27 
29 
31 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
55 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
69 
71 
72 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
84 


500 . 00 
87.50 
401.25 
461.25 
625 . 00 

1273.75 

216.25 

226.25 

93.75 

1133.75 
191.25 
317.50 
246.25 
236.25 
432.50 
493.75 
491.25 
651.25 
262,50 
380 . 00 

1023.75 
160,00 
372.50 
120.25 
478.75 

1046.75 
313.75 
452 . 50 

1183.75 

1041.25 
193.75 
115.00 

1933.75 
103.75 
253.75 
190.00 
230.00 
291.25 
100.00 
342.50 
188.75 
775 , 00 
238,75 
166,25 
522.50 
152.50 
262 . 50 
265.00 
275.00 
138.75 
318.75 
150.00 
622 . 50 
111.25 
192.50 
207.50 
240.00 
415.00 

1007.50 
112.50 
173.25 
140.00 
368.75 


Mitchell 

Kaskaskia 

Mt. Pulaski 

Havana 

Fellowship 

Jerusalem Temple 

Metropolis 

Stewart 

Toulon 


85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
108 
109 
110 
111 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 


173.75 
58.75 


Harmony 


162.50 
178.75 




288.75 


Macon 


1051.25 
215.00 


St. Johns 


232 . 50 
201 25 




Perry 

Samuel H. Davis 

Excelsior 

Taylor. . 


115.00 




171.25 


Macomb 


753.75 
181.25 




290.00 






175.00 


St. Clair 




2020.00 




Magnolia 


145.00 


Piasa 

Pekin . . . 


Lewistown 


207.50 
172.50 






207.50 






97.50 






163.75 






82.50 






117.50 






196.25 




Marcelline 


88.75 




173.75 




Vermont 


102.50 




1025.00 






162.50 






161.25 




Mound 


275.00 






105.00 




Cedar 


311.25 


Unity 




151.25 






390.25 






141.25 


Mt. Moriah 




103.75 






151.25 






328.75 






140.25 


Trio . . . 




112.50 




Marshall 


211.25 






293.75 






101.25 






65.00 




Polk 


155.00 






163.75 






166.25 






282.50 






2445.00 






138.75 


Central 




111.25 




DeKalb 


367.50 






148.75 






85.00 


Mt. Nebo 




130.00 






276.25 






157.50 


Scott 




148.75 


Whitehall 


Bunker Hill 


126.25 




Fidelity 


110.00 


DeWitt 


Clay 


182.50 



38 



Proceedings of tTie 



[October 11, 



LODGE DUES RECEIVED FOR THE YEAR 1921. — Continued. 



LODGES. 


NO. 


DDES. 


LODGES. 


NO. 


DUES. 




154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
164 
165 
166 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
182 
183 
185 
187 
188 
189 
190 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
199 
200 
201 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 


216.25 
481.25 
173,75 
696.25 
177.50 
388 . 75 
1172.50 
236.25 
172.50 
241,25 
160.00 
1718.75 
148.75 
188.75 
467.50 
198.75 
103.75 

81.25 
118.75 
893.75 
206.25 
405.00 
211.25 

58.75 
186,25 
607 , 50 
107,50 
167.50 
175.00 
193.75 
141.25 
260.00 
188.75 

53.75 

75.00 
222.50 
121.25 

90,00 
150.00 
106.25 
476.00 
146,25 
178,75 
121.25 
252.50 

80,00 

198,75 

1326.25 

342.50 

1562,50 

87.50 
111.25 
221.25 
149.00 

76.25 

57.50 
197.50 
120.00 
170.00 
258 . 75 
353 . 75 

62,50 
190.00 
102.50 
112,50 

70,00 
131,25 
156.25 
227.50 


Dallas City 


235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
257 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
282 
283 
285 
286 
287 
288 
291 
292 
293 
294 
295 
296 
297 
298 
301 
302 
303 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 


172.50 




Charter Oak 


200 . 00 






390 . 00 




Black Hawk 


180 00 


McHenry 


Mt. Carmel 


487.50 






891 25 


Waubansia 




446.25 


Virden 


Galva 


220 . 00 


Hope 


Horicon 


278.75 


Edward Dobbins 




281.25 


Atlanta 


El Paso 


303 75 


Star in the East 




178.75 


Milford 




• 87 . 50 


Nunda 


Hibbard 


71.25 






248.75 


Girard 




133.75 


Wayne 


Aledo ... 


258 . 75 


Cherry Valley 




00.25 


Lena 




796 , 25 


Matteson 


Donnelson 


100.00 


Mendota 




120.00 


Staunton 




568 . 75 






63.75 


Wabash 




53.75 


Moweaqua 




1088.75 


Germania 




77.50 


Meridian 




101,25 


Abinsdon 




81.25 


Mystic Tie 

Cyrus 

Fulton City 




96.25 




432.50 




328 . 75 






32,50 






647.50 






215.00 






262.50 






160.00 




Milton 


61.25 




Elizabeth 


80.00 






486.25 


Sheba 




242.50 






177.50 






132.50 


Flora 




101.25 


Corinthian 




198.75 


Fairfield 


Catlin 


205.00 






117.50 




De Soto 


192.50 






172.50 


Logan 




40.00 






196.25 






172.50 


Ipava 




352 . 50 


Gillespie 


Dills 


90.00 






365.00 


Mason 

New Salem 


Benjamin 


163.75 
87.50 


Oakland 




172,50 




Durand 

Raven 

Onarga 

Wm. C. Hobbs 

T. J. Pickett 


116,25 


Leroy 

Geo. Washington. 

Pana 

Columbus 


120,00 
115,00 
145.00 
212.50 
1190.00 






381,25 


New Haven 

Wyanet 


Dearborn 


1593.75 
1157.50 




1132.50 




York 


135.00 


DuQuoin 


Palatine 


197.50 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



39 



LODGE DUES RECEIVED FOR THE YEAR 1921. — Continued. 



LODGES. 



NO. 



DUES. 



NO. 



DUES. 



Abraham Jonas. 
J. L. Anderson. . 

Doric 

Creston 

Dunlap 

Windsor 

Harrisburg 

Industry 

Altona 

Mt. Erie 

Tuscola 

Tyrian 

Sumner 

Schiller 

New Columbia. . 

Oneida 

Saline 

Kedron 

Full Moon 

Summerfield ... 

Wenona 

Milledgeville. . . - 
N. D. Morse. . . . 

Sidney 

Flat Rock 

Sublette 

Fairview 

Tarbolton 

Groveland 

Kinderhook. ... 
Ark and Anchor 

Marine 

Hermitage 

Orion 

Blackberry .... 

Princeville 

Douglas 

Noble 

Horeb 

Tonica 

Bement 

Areola 

Oxford 

Jefferson 

Newman 

Livingston 

Chambersburg . 

Shabonna 

Aroma 

Payson 

Liberty 

Gill 

LaMoille 

Waltham 

Mississippi .... 

Bridgeport 

El Dara 

Kankakee 

Ashmor 

Tolono 

Oconee 

Blair 

Jersey ville 

Muddy Point. . 

Shiloh 

Kinmundy 

Buda 

Odell 

Kishwaukee. . . 



316 
318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
325 
327 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
339 
340 
341 
342 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 
368 
369 
371 
373 
374 
378 
379 
380 
382 
383 
384 
385 
386 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
396 
397 
398 
399 
401 
402 



81.25 
151.25 
858.75 

88 . 75 
208 . 75 
120.00 
460.00 
118.75 
106.25 

42.50 
280 . 00 
551.25 
161.25 
265 . 00 
132,50 
126.25 

91.25 

93.75 
121.25 

33.75 
108.75 
187.50 

83 . 75 

96.25 
195.00 

25.00 
123.75 
247 . 50 

83.75 

71.25 
181.25 

72.50 
151.25 

97.50 
172.50 
165.00 

73 . 75 

92 . 50 
221.25 

80.00 
210.00 
216.25 

95.00 

96 . 25 
161.25 
197.50 

38.75 
145.00 
116.25 
125.00 

63 . 75 

51.26 
125.00 
101.25 
346 . 25 
276.25 

68.75 
597 . 50 
115.00 
155.00 
101.25 
898.75 
267.50 

51.25 

87.50 
202 . 50 

75.00 
112.50 
106.25 



Mason City. . . . 

Batavia 

Ramsey 

Bethalto 

Stratton 

Thos. J. Turner 

Mithra 

Hesperia 

Evening Star . . 
Lawn Ridge . . . 

Paxton 

Marseilles 

Freeburg 

Reynoldsburg. . 

Oregon 

Washburn 

Landmark 

Lanark 

Exeter 

Scottville 

Red Bud 

Sunbeam 

Chebanse 

Kendrick 

Summit 

Murrayville. . . . 

Atkinson 

Makanda 

Philo 

Chicago 

Camargo 

Sparland 

Casey 

Hampshire. . . . 
Cave-in-Rock. . 
Chesterfield. . . . 

Watseka 

S. D. Monroe. . 
Yates City .... 

Mendon 

Loami 

Bromwell 

New Hartford. . 

Maroa 

Irving 

Nokomis 

Blazing Star . . . 
JefTersonville. . . 

Plainview 

Tremont 

Palmyra 

Denver 

Huntsville 

Cobden 

South Macon . . 
Cheney's Grove 

McLean 

Rantoul 

Kendall 

Amity 

Gordon 

Columbia 

Walsh ville 

Manito 

Rutland 

Pleiades 

Wyoming 

Momence 

Lexington 



403 
404 
405 
406 
408 
409 
410 
411 
414 
415 
416 
417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
4.34 
436 
437 
440 
441 
442 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 
453 
454 
455 
456 
458 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
481 
482 



207 . 50 
273 . 75 
118.75 

82.50 

110.00 

762.50 

397.50 

1002.50 

82.50 

76.25 
242.50 
206.25 
126.25 

40.00 

265.00 

145.00 

1057.50 

135.00 

47.50 
141.25 

60.00 
153.75 

80.00 

70.00 
147.50 

83.75 
135.00 

91.25 
106.25 
822 . 50 

91.25 

66.25 
221.25 
167.50 

87.50 

78.75 
298 . 75 

75.00 

95.00 
106.25 
107.50 
168.75 

73 . 75 
193.75 
147.50 
288 . 75 
101.25 

91.25 

68.75 

66.25 
115.00 

55.00 

81.25 
110.00 
163.75 

62.50 
162.50 
221.25 
162.50 
258.75 

77.60 
182.60 

32 . 50 
103 . 75 
112.50 
2388.75 
195.00 
207 . 50 
122.50 



40 



Proceedings of tJie 



[October 11, 



LODGE DUES RECEIVED FOR THE YEAR 1921. — Continued. 



LODGES. 


NO. 


DUES. 


LODGES. 


NO. 


DUES. 




484 
485 
488 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
495 
496 
497 
498 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
508 
509 
510 
512 
514 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
544 
547 
550 
552 
554 
555 
556 
557 
558 
559 
560 
562 
564 
565 
566 
567 
569 


81.25 

77.50 

125.00 

62.50 

142.50 

103.75 

88.75 

75.00 

322.50 

181.25 

96.25 

136.25 

122.50 

425.00 

755.00 

41.25 

98.75 

66.25 

1243.75 

201.25 

115.00 

842.. 50 

52.50 

50.00 

786.25 

105.00 

161.25 

221.25 

242.50 

163.75 

225.00 

150.00 

892 . 50 

112.50 

847.50 

1491.25 

211.25 

111.25 

75.00 

87.50 

157.50 

78.75 

91.25 

127.50 

151.25 

227.50 

80.00 

275.00 

82.50 

1397.50 

70.00 

80.00 

152.50 

82.50 

111.25 

85.00 

336.25 

341.25 

93.75 

320 . 00 

110.00 

65.00 

75.00 

187.50 

97.50 

71.25 

100.00 

203.75 

46.25 




570 
572 
573 
574 
575 
576 
577 
578 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
587 
588 
590 
591 
592 
595 
600 
601 
602 
603 
604 
607 
608 
609 
610 
611 
612 
613 
614 
616 
017 
618 
620 
622 
623 
627 
630 
631 
632 
633 
634 
635 
636 
639 
641 
642 
643 
644 
645 
646 
647 
048 
651 
653 
655 
656 
657 
658 
659 
660 
662 
664 
005 
666 
667 


316 25 






62.50 




Gardner 


275.00 




Pera 


78.75 


Claj' City 




157.50 




O'Fallon 


142 50 




Viola 


117.50 


Martin 




50.00 




Hazel Dell 


78.75 


Tower Hill 




145.00 






102.50 






197.50 






450.00 






71.25 


St. Paul 




278.75 


Stark 


Troy 


92.50 


Woodhull 




137.50 


Odin 




163.75 






58.75 




Miles Hart 


90.00 


0. H. Miner 




206 25 






108.75 






63.75 


J. D. Moody 


Clark 


198.75 


Wade-Barney 




137.50 






500 . 00 






113.75 


Litchfield 


Sheldon 


160.00 






1845.00 






1067.50 


Anna 




547 . 50 






101.25 






161.25 




Wadley 


143.75 


Evans 


Milan 


97.50 


Covenant 




48.75 


Rossville 




52.50 






70.00 






57.50 






55.00 






110.00 






67.50 






160.00 


Cuba 


E F W. Ellis 


490.00 






57.50 


Plainfield 




132.50 






167.50 






1022 . 50 






128.75 


Oak Park 




1152.50 


Stewardson 


D C. Creiger 


1270.00 




Oblong City 


242.50 






71.25 


Valley 




165.00 




Blueville 


187.50 


Long Point 




73.75 






158.75 






157.50 






125,00 






231.25 






57.50 






843.75 






718.75 


Trinity 


Grand Chain 

South Park 


36.25 




715.00 


Pleasant Hill 




83.75 


Albany 




78.75 


Frankfort 




116.25 


Time 


Erie 


173.75 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



41 



LODGE DUES RECEIVED FOR THE YEAR 1921. — Continued. 



LODGES. 


NO. 


DUES. 


LODGES. 


NO. 


DUBS. 




668 
669 
670 
672 
673 
674 
675 
676 
677 
679 
680 
681 
682 
683 
684 
685 
686 
687 
688 
690 
692 
693 
695 
696 
697 
698 
700 
701 
702 
704 
705 
706 
709 
710 
711 
712 
713 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 
719 
721 
722 
723 
724 
725 
726 
727 
728 
729 
730 
731 
732 
733 
734 
735 
737 
738 
739 
741 
742 
743 
744 
745 
746 
747 
748 


98.75 
487.50 
106.25 

48.75 
272.50 
645.00 
261.25 
460.00 
133.75 
146.25 
116.25 
147.50 
182.50 
146.25 
111 25 
138.75 
1753.75 
107.50 
116.25 
1497.50 
148.75 
481.25 

68.75 

78.75 
1002.50 

75.00 
142.50 

42.50 
135.00 
276.25 

78.75 
123.75 
388.75 
128.75 
782.50 
293.75 

71.25 
155.00 

35.00 

640 . 00 

1316.25 

86.25 

48.75 

68.75 
233.75 

70.25 

148.75 

168.75 

1321.25 

53.75 

50.00 

210.00 

258.75 

1108.75 

66.25 
2.30 . 25 
506.25 
176.25 

91.25 
131.25 
883.75 

70.00 
128.75 

93.75 
151.25 
121.25 
121.25 

85.00 
122.50 




749 
750 
751 
752 
754 
765 
756 
757 
758 
759 
761 
762 
763 
764 
765 
766 
767 
768 
769 
770 
771 
772 
773 
774 
776 
777 
778 
779 
780 
782 
783 
784 
786 
787 
788 
789 
790 
791 
792 
793 
794 
795 
796 
797 
798 
799 
800 
801 
802 
803 
804 
805 
806 
807 
808 
809 
810 
811 
812 
813 
814 
815 
816 
817 
818 
819 
820 
821 
822 


131.25 

93.75 

177.50 

88.75 

152.50 

148.75 

151.25 

115.00 

1721.25 

107.50 

83 75 


Herder 








Eddyville 




Normal 




Waldeck 








A. 0. Fay 




Enfield 




Buffalo Prairie 


Orel 


Clement 




Morrisonville 


Van Meter 


146 25 






152.50 
303 75 


Burnside 




Galatia 




82'> 50 


Rio 




47.50 
1010 00 


Garfield 




Orangeville 


Mizpah 


1651 25 


Clifton 




157 50 






718 75 


Raymond 


Bay City 


47 50 


Herrin's Prairie 

Shiloh Hill 


New Burnside 


42.00 
77 50 


Belle Rive 




1631 25 


Richard Cole 




1073 75 






1127 60 






68 75 


Temple Hill 




1230 00 


Alexandria 




1102 50 






168 75 


EwinK 




563 75 






250 00 


Star 




142.50 
188 75 










81 25 


CoUinsville 




1222 50 




Pittsfield 


185 00 






135 00 






96 25 




A. T. Darrah 


96 25 


Arcana 




30 00 


May 


Myrtle 


1177 50 


Chapel Hill 


E. M. Husted 


218 75 




1763 75 


Walnut 


Sidell . . . 


147 60 




Colfax 


130 00 


Chandlerville 




1247 50 






140 GO 


Golden Rule 




236 25 






80 00 


Waterman 




717 50 


Lake Creek 


S. M. Dalzell 


217.50 

78 75 






80 00 


Carman 




100 25 






95 00 






535 00 


Sheridan 




111 25 


Arrowsmith 


DeLand 


65 00 




Humboldt Park 


1767 50 




Ohio 


40 00 


New Holland 


688 75 




Ridgeway 


96 25 


Scott Land 


105 00 


Goode 


Ben Hur. . 


965 00 


Winnebago 




1141 25 


Weldon 




126 25 






143 75 


Alta 


Belknap 


118.75 



42 



Proceedings of the 



[October 11, 



LODGE DUES RECErv'ED FOR THE YEAR 1921. — Continued. 



LODGES. 



NO. 



DUES. 



NO. 



Pearl 

Grove 

Arthur 

Mazon 

Sequoit 

Edgar 

Rockport 

Findlay 

Harvey 

Dean 

Toledo 

Triple 

Windsor Park. . . . 

Hindsboro 

Charity 

Berwyn 

Alto Pass 

Woodlawn Park . . 

Fides 

Park 

Martinton 

Bluffs 

Stronghurst 

Loadon 

Palestine 

Austin 

Chicago Heights. . 

Gothic 

Latham 

Brighton Park . . . 

King Oscar 

West Gate 

Boyd D 

Utica 

Apple River 

Metropolitan .... 

Sorento 

Riverside 

St. Andrews 

Olympia 

St. Ceciha 

West Salem 

Chadwick 

Cornell 

May wood 

Lostant 

Argenta 

Free Will 

Standard 

Nifong 

Cornerstone 

William McKinley 

Granite City 

Equity. 

Composite 

John B. Sherman. 

Marissa 

Boulevard 

Wheeler 

Bethany 

Villa Grove 

Hooppole 

Pyramid 

Damascus 

America 

Des Plaines 

Logan Square. ... 
Constellation. ... 
Loraine 



823 
824 
825 
826 
827 
829 
830 
831 
832 
833 
834 
835 
836 
837 
838 
839 
840 
841 
842 
843 
845 
846 
847 
848 
849 
850 
851 
852 
853 
854 
855 
856 
857 
858 
859 
860 
861 
862 
863 
864 
865 
866 
867 
868 
869 
870 
871 
872 
873 
874 
875 
876 
877 
878 
879 
880 
881 
882 
883 
884 
885 
886 
887 
888 
889 
890 
891 
892 
893 



140 
405 
175 
175 
157 
152 

90 
131 
643 

95 
130 
228 
838 
180 

82 
478 

97 
1183 
422 
965 

81 

82 
123 

77 

161 

1938 

450 

1087 

86 

783 

1441 

65 
118 

82 

123 

1011 

91 
385 



792 
103 
126 
48 
776 
92 
143 
138 

1166 
66 
712 
980 
503 
950 
718 

1095 
121 

1711 
45 
117 
236 
63 
156 
976 

1180 
300 

1538 

1390 
102 



Utopia 

Crescent 

Kosmos 

Ogden Park . 

Silvis 

Park Manor 

Carnation 

Edge water 

Alto 

Elkhart 

Carlock 

Hanover 

Coffeen 

Ancient Craft 

Gil. W. Barnard . . 

Bee Hive 

Hull 

Bellflower 

Stellar 

Aaron 

Republic 

Jackson Park 

Welcome 

Concord 

Sessor 

Ehvood 

Cottonwood 

Avondale 

Compass 

East Gate 

Banner Blue 

Molenna 

Veritas 

Candida 

Grant Park 

Ashland 

Jos. Robbins 

vVilmette 

Sandoval 

Manlius 

Hinsdale 

LaMoine 

Rock Falls 

North Shore 

Circle 

Table Grove 

Pleasant View 

Elmhurst 

Maple Park 

Bohemia 

John Corson Smith 

Buffalo 

Joy 

Kenmore 

R. F. Casey 

Justice 

Glen Ellyn 

Depue 

Donovan 

Stone Arch 

Progressive 

Cicero 

Washington Park. . 

Prospect 

Prudence 

Warrensburg 

Algonquin 

Federal 

Ben Franklin 



894 
895 
896 
897 
898 
899 
900 
901 
902 
903 
904 
905 
906 
907 
908 
909 
910 
911 
912 
913 
914 
915 
916 
917 
918 
919 
920 
921 
922 
923 
924 
925 
926 
927 
928 
929 
930 
931 
9.32 
933 
934 
935 
936 
937 
938 
939 
940 
941 
942 
943 
944 
945 
946 
947 
948 
949 
950 
951 
952 
953 
954 
955 
956 
957 
958 
959 
960 
961 
962 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



43 



LODGE DUES RECEIVED FOR THE YEAR 1921. — Continued. 



NO. 



DUES. 



NO. 



DUES. 



Broughton 

Maplewood 

Cisco 

Exemplar 

Dahlgren 

South Gate 

East Moline . . . . 

St. Joe 

Fernwood Park . 

Rainbow 

Perseverance. . . . 
Albany Park. . . . 

Old Glory 

Melrose Abbey. . 

Parian 

Square 

Stephen Decatur 

Anchor 

Trowel 

Sincerity 

Glencoe 

Emblem 

Universal 

Brotherhood. . . . 

Cyrene 

Park Ridge 

Hyde Park 

Clover Leaf 

Welfare 

Niagara 

Leyden 

True Blue 

Lawndale 

Sunrise 

Integrity 

Paul Revere .... 
Morgan Park . . . 

Bay lis 

Wayfarers 

Portage Park . . . 

Fortitude 

Hurst 

Community 

Fair Oaks 



963 
964 
96.5 
966 
967 
968 
969 
970 
971 
972 
973 
974 
975 
976 
977 
978 
979 
980 
981 
982 
983 
984 
985 
986 
987 
988 
989 
990 
991 
992 
993 
994 
995 
996 
997 
998 
999 
1000 
1001 
1002 
1003 
1004 
1005 
1006 



62 
461 

86 
417 

46, 
332, 
228, 

93, 
203, 
700. 
477, 
630. 
857. 
330. 
508, 
327. 
788. 
460. 
442. 
1006. 
312. 
516. 
466. 
1071 
315 
285 
532 

45 
493 
417 
161 
475 
563 
268 
732 
496 
320 

68 
231 
488 
550 
111 
727, 
673. 



Loyal 

Parkway 

Hiram 

Honor 

Woodson 

Birch wood 

John Paul Jones. . . . 

.Moline 

Paramount 

Christopher 

Arts & Crafts 

Pythagoras 

Victory 

Cosmopolitan 

iVauvoo 

Theodore Roosevelt. 

Edward Cook 

Triangle 

C^rystal 

Lake Forest 

.\nchor & Ark 

Proviso 

.\delphi 

j^meth 

Drexel 

Frestleboard 

Perfection 

.\ustin H. Scrogin. . 

Smyth Crooks 

Ideal 

Legion 

CJoodwill 

.Advance 

Montclare 

Lake Shore 

Monroe C. Crawford 

Goodfellowship 

Shadrach Bond 

Mayfair 

Westfield 

Royalton 

Ziegler 

Total 



1007 
1008 
1009 
1010 
1011 
1012 
1013 
1014 
1015 
1016 
1017 
1018 
1019 
1020 
1021 
1022 
1023 
1024 
1025 
1026 
1027 
1028 
1029 
1030 
1031 
1032 
1033 
1034 
1035 
1036 
1037 
1038 
1039 
1040 
1041 
1042 
1043 
1044 
1045 
1046 
1047 
1048 



417.50 
571.25 
187.50 
393 . 75 
56.25 
507 . 50 
362 . 50 
293.75 
253.75 
113.75 
497.50 
250.00 
396.25 
466.25 
65.00 
422 . 50 
347.50 
275 . 00 
215.00 
146.25 
321.25 
181.25 
401.25 
217.50 
295.00 
142.50 
261.25 
240.00 
146.25 
248.75 
146.25 
177.50 
180.00 
122.50 
197.50 
608.75 
198.75 
1 88 . 75 
228 . 75 
55.00 
60.00 
70.00 



$287,367.00 



Dues for Preceding Years. 



4 Springfiekl .SI . 25 296 

37 Monmouth 2 . 50 406 

71 Central 3.75 417 

91 Metropolis 2. .50 477 

93 Toulon 1.25 479 

115 Rising Sun 2.50 491 

133 Marshall 2 . 50 523 

158 McHenry 2.00 534 

212 Shipman 2.25 565 

226 Pana 1.25 572 

236 Charter Oak 1 . 25 696 

246 El Paso 2 . 50 752 

265 Vermilion 1 . 25 805 

268 Paris 2.50 952 

275 Milton 1 . 25 979 

280 Kansas 2. .50 1012 

285 Catlin 2. .50 1014 

295 Dills 2.50 



Quincy 6 . 25 

Bethalto 1 . 25 

Marseilles 7 . 25 

Rutland 2.50 

Wyoming 1 . 25 

Martin 1.25 

Chatham 2.25 

Cuba. .- 5.00 

Pleasant Hill 1.25 

Bardolph 2.50 

Belle Rive 2.. 50 

Allendale 2.50 

S. M. Dalzell 2.50 

Donovan 1 . 25 

Stephen Decatur 1 .25 

Birch wood 3 . 25 

Moline 1.25 

83.25 



44 Proceedings of tJie [October 11, 



Dues Received from Lodges U. D. 

Stoninglon $ 15.00 South Shore 36.25 

Cardinal 26.25 Great Light 31.25 

Forest Park 48.75 Level 31.25 

North Evanston 51.25 Northern Lights 120.00 



Cissna Park 16.25 

Wood River 12.50 

Gresham 50.00 



Merit 41.25 

Ogle 10.00 

Laurel 120.00 

Omega 2.50 

Radiant 63.75 Glenview 23.75 

Oglesby 18.75 

River Forest 38.75 $757.50 



Dispensation Fees Received Since June 15, 1921 

Wood River, U.D $100.00 St. Anne, U.D 100.00 

River Forest, U.D 100.00 Miscellaneous 86.00 

Ogle, U.D 100.00 



$486.00 
Receipts from All Sources 

GENERAL 

Balance, June 15, 1921 $ 24,687.37 

Accounts receivable 1,347.90 

Interest on balances 368.69 

Interest on investments 1,060.00 

Dispensations 486.00 

Dues, 1920-1921 183,929.00 

Dues, former years 52.20 

Dues, lodges U.D 484.80 

Returned from charity fund, account loan 50,000.00 



$262,415.96 



Disbursements 

Orders have been drawn on the general fund since June 16, 1921, for the 
following amounts: 
Order 
Number 

1761 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, June $ 208.33 

1762 M. E. Cutter, salary grand secretary 125.00 

1763 Owen Scott, salary grand secretary 125.00 

1764 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, June 125.00 

1765 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, June 175.00 

1766 A. C. Boger, office rent grand secretary, June 45.00 

1767 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer for grand master, June 135.00 

1768 Owen Scott, cl6rk hire grand secretary, June 125.00 

1769 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand tyler 44.00 

1770 L. A. Watres, life membership certificates, George Washington 

Memorial 600.00 

1771 Owen Scott, expense Homer and return 11.87 



1921] Grand Lodge of IlliTiois 45 



1772 R. H. Wheeler, expense Camp Point and return 34.30 

1773 H. E. Hamilton, expense Camp Point and return 39.76 

1774 R. C. Davenport, expense Camp Point and return 35.00 

1775 C. E. Allen, expense Camp Point and return 7.14 

1776 Wright Brothers, premium on insurance, Sullivan 339.00 

1777 Stollery Brothers, account funeral Isaac Cutter 20.00 

1778 H. A. Genteman, account funeral Isaac Cutter 20.00 

1779 H. T. Burnap, expense Camp iPoint and return 27.99 

1780 Wm. B. Wright, expense Camp Point and return 32.88 

1781 Owen Scott, expense grand secretary 24.19 

1782 F. L. Dudley, expense D.D.G.M., 26th Dist 19.00 

1783 R. H. Cutler, expense D.D.G.M., 29th Dist 14.00 

1784 F. W. Soady, expense D.D.G.M., 56th Dist 7.38 

1785 G. H. Stephens, expense D.D.G.M., 59th Dist 28.50 

1786 Wm. E. Day, expense D.D.G.M., 89th Dist 15.44 

1787 Owen Scott, office expense of grand secretary 22.41 

1788 H. Rainier, office expense of grand secretary 8.50 

1789 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, expense of grand master 70.68 

1790 Kirby-Cullen & Company, auditing books of grand secretary 233.19 

1791 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, salary grand master, July 208.33 

1792 Owen Scott, salary grand secretary, July 250.00 

1793 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, July 125.00 

1794 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, July 175.00 

1795 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, stenographer, grand master, July 135.00 

1796 Owen Scott, clerk hire, July 125.00 

1797 A. C. Boger, office rent grand secretary, July 45.00 

1798 Pantagraph Printing & Stationery Company, printing 106.79 

1799 Cancelled. 

1800 A. J. Winteringham, expense D.D.G.M., 22nd Dist 14.08 

1801 C. L. Snyder, expense D.D.G.M., 24th Dist 16.52 

1802 W. C. Darling, expense D.D.G.M., 28th Dist 15.30 

1803 0. H. Mangold, expense D.D.G.M., 35th Dist 7.01 

1804 E. E. James, expense D.D.G.M., 51st Dist 13.81 

1805 Paul G. Duncan, expense D.D.G.M., 52nd Dist 15.93 

1806 F. C. Funk, expense D.D.G.M., 66th Dist 35.90 

1807 A. A. Bauer, expense D.D.G.M., 72nd Dist 21.15 

1808 E. S. Mclntyre, expense D.D.G.M., 84th Dist 26.72 

1809 John Armstrong, expense D.D.G.M., 99th Dist 19.20 

1810 H. L. Howell, examination at Normal 20.00 

1811 B. L. Ten Eyck, examination at Normal 39.75 

1812 George E. Carlson, examination at Normal 47.20 

1813 Wm. H. Zarley, examination at Normal 42.00 

1814 Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, expense grand master 34.30 

1815 Owen Scott, expense grand secretary 27.74 

1816 Owen Scott, George Washington Memorial expense 29.80 

1817 Pantagraph Printing & Stationery Company, printing 76.14 

1818 George T. Scrivner, expense grand tyler 38.75 

1819 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 33.25 

1820 S. J. Wilson, expense D.D.G.M., 67th Dist 36.20 

1821 George T. Scrivner, expense grand tyler 74.46 

1822 C. C. Sawyer, expense D.D.G.M., 39th Dist 26.00 

1823 Chas. E. Morgan, expense D.D.G.M., 41st Dist 14.08 

1824 F. W. Brown, expense D.D.G.M., 45th Dist 17.51 

1825 E. C. Vanderpoorten, expense D.D.G.M., 46th Dist 27.00 



46 Proceedings of the [October il, 



1826 A. O. Poff, expense D.D.G.M., 48th Dist 20.88 

1827 J. A. Coleman, expense D.D.G.M., 50th Dist 13.45 

1828 Paul G. Duncan, expense D.D.G.M., 52nd Dist 2.50 

1829 B. S. Blaine, expense D.D.G.M., 60th Dist 12.25 

1830 George A. Stadler, expense D.D.G.M., 61st Dist 21.35 

1831 W. T. Cable, expense D.D.G.M., 97th Dist 19.00 

1832 W. F. Gibson, expense D.D.G.M., 100th Dist 9.25 

1833 Daniel G. Pitzgerrell, salary grand master, August 208.33 

1834 Owen Scott, salary grand secretary, August 250.00 

1835 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, August 125.00 

1836 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, August 175.00 

1837 Daniel G. Pitzgerrell, stenographer, grand master 135.00 

1838 Owen Scott, clerk hire, grand secretary, August 125.00 

1839 A. C. Boger, office rent, grand secretary, August 45.00 

1840 J. C. Davis, expense D.D.G.M., 32nd Dist 38.95 

1841 P. H. Bradley, expense D.D.G.M., 34th Dist 20.50 

1842 J. R. Dick, expense D.D.G.M., 38th Dist 35.62 

1843 H. M. Lawton, expense D.D.G.M., 54th Dist 18.98 

1844 E. J. Scarborough, expense D.D.G.M., 76th Dist 12.32 

1845 W. W. Rothrock, expense D.D.G.M., 81st Dist 12.50 

1846 H. C. Liggett, expense D.D.G.M., 82nd Dist 5.00 

1847 W. D. Walters, expense D.D.G.M., 86th Dist 12.10 

1848 P. I. Mills, expense D.D.G.M., 88th Dist 19.99 

1849 S. E. Grigg, expense D.D.G.M., 92nd Dist 20.41 

1850 ,T. E. Gibbs, expense D.D.G.M., 94th Dist 17.33 

1851 P. D. Thomas, expense D.D.G.M., 96th Dist 31 85 

1852 R. R. Helm, expense D.D.G.M., 98th Dist 14.50 

1853 Wm. B. Wright, expense, account Newton case 28.19 

1854 Albert Bauer, expense, account Goodfellowship U.D 3.10 

1855 C. E. Allen, expense jurisprudence committee 22.30 

1856 B. S. Blaine, expense Homer and return 2.50 

1857 H. .p. Behrensmeyer, engrossing commissions 4.70 

1858 Cancelled. 

1859 Owen Scott, expense grand secretary 139.37 

1860 Daniel G. Pitzgerrell, expense grand master 54.07 

1861 Daniel G. Pitzgerrell, salary grand master, September 208.37 

1862 Owen Scott, salary grand secretary, September 250.00 

1863 L. A. Goddard, salary grand treasurer, September 125.00 

1864 Roy Adams, salary deputy grand secretary, September 175 00 

1865 Daniel G. Pitzgerrell, stenographer, grand master, September. . . . 135.00 

1866 Owen Scott, clerk hire, grand secretary, September 125.00 

1867 A. C. Boger, office rent, grand secretary, September 45.00 

1868 Pantagraph Printing & Stationery Co., monitors and printing. . . . 873.73 

1869 C. C. Morris, account Campbell-Morris case 810.48 

1870 E. B. Beach, expense deputy grand master 54.80 

1871 Owen Scott, expense Herrick and return 20.91 

1872 Edward H. Thomas, one half dozen typewriter ribbons 1.80 

1873 D. G. Pitzgerrell, expense grand master 59.47 

1874 Phil C. Barclay, expense Camp Point and return 46.00 

1875 W. W. Watson, expense Camp Point and return . 27.00 

1876 Wm. H. Bied, expense grand marshal 115.83 

1877 Geo. T. Scrivner, expense grand tyler 83.35 

$ 9,491.51 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 47 



Summary of Orders Drawn 

GENERAL 

Monitors ? 709.99 

Expense D.D.G.M 749.46 

Expense grand master 218.52 

Stenographer (grand master) 540.00 

Expense grand secretary 303.00 

Clerk hire, grand secretary 500.00 

Office rent, grand secretary 180.00 

Salary grand officers 3,033.36 

Miscellaneous printing 476.15 

Miscellaneous expense 2,066.61 

George Washington Memorial Certificates 600.00 

Uniform receipts 114.42 



$ 9,491.51 



RECEirrs FROM All Soitrces 

CHARITY 

Balance, June 15, 1921 $ 9,964.71 

Dues, 1920-1921 103,459.50 

Dues former years 31.05 

Dues, lodges U.D 272.70 

Interest on balances 259.11 

Interest on investments 1,012.96 

Defunct lodge dues 6.25 

Donation 4,406.75 

Appropriations returned — Sullivan : 

Moving picture machine 1,000.00 

Maintenance 2,866.56 

Covering pipes 392.83 

Mattresses 739.89 

Changing windows 281.47 

Furnishings 244.90 

Grand chapter donation — solarium 150.00 



$125,088.68 



Disbursements 

Orders have been drawn on the charity fund since June 16, 1921, for the 
following amounts: 

Order 
Number 

282 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge $ 50.00 

283 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 25.00 

284 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 5,000.00 

285 Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 3,500.00 

286 Wm. D. Price, water softener 5,500.00 

287 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 25.00 

288 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 



48 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

289 M. E. Cutter, order grand lodge 300.00 

290 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 5,000.00 

291 Wm. D. iPrice, maintenance, LaGrange 5,500.00 

292 "Wm. D. Price, maintenance, LaGrange 5,000.00 

293 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 25\00 

294 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

295 Transfer to general, account loan 50,000.00 

296 Grace Blair Wilde, order grand lodge 50.00 

297 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 6,000.00 

298 Mrs. Andrew Orme, order grand lodge 25.00 

299 H. S. Albin, order grand lodge 50.00 

300 C. C. Davis, new plumbing, Sullivan 7,000.00 

301 C. C. Davis, changing windows, Sullivan 1,000.00 

302 C. C. Davis, maintenance, Sullivan 2,500.00 

303 C. C. Davis, painting, Sullivan 500.00 

304 C. C. Davis, covering pipes, Sullivan 1,000.00 



$ 98,150.00 



Summary of Orders Drawn 

CHARITY 

LaGrange: 

Maintenance $ 14,000.00 

Water softener 5,500.00 

Sullivan: 

Maintenance 18,500.00 

New plumbing 7,000.00 

Changing windows 1,000.00 

Painting 500.00 

Covering pipes 1,000.00 

Miscellaneous (order charity committee) 650.00 

Transferred to general fund, account loan 50,000.00 



$ 98,150.00 



Receipts from All Sources 



PERMANENT 



Balance, June 15, 1921 $ 1,112.23 

Donations 476.00 



$ 1,588.23 



Recapitulation 



GENERAL FUND 



Receipts from all sources $262,415.96 

Orders drawn 9,491.51 



Balance $252,924.45 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 49 



CHARITY FUND 

Receipts from all sources $125,088.68 

Orders drawn 98,150.00 

Balance 26,938.68 

PERMANENT 

Receipts from all sources $ 1,588.23 

No orders drawn 

Balance 1,588.23 



Balance State Bank, Chicago, October 1, 1921 $281,451.36 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Owen Scott, 

Grand Secretary. 



Report — Committee on Correspondence 

Bro. Delmar D. Darrah presented the following report as 
Committee on Correspondence. It was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Your Committee on Fraternal Correspondence would report that a com- 
prehensive review of such proceedings of other grand lodges as have been 
received has been made and the same is now in the hands of the printer. 

On account of contention about hours of work and wages, it was nec- 
essary for the company, which holds the grand lodge printing contract, to 
suspend active operation for a number of weeks. Hence, it is impossible to 
present the report on foreign correspondence in printed form at this session 
of the grand lodge. 

Several grand lodges have not been reviewed due to the fact that the 
proceedings of these grand bodies were not received in time to be included 
in the report for 1921. 

Your committee, therefore, requests that the report be received and 
printed with the annual proceedings. 

Fraternally sutmitted, 

Delmar D. Darrah, 
Committee on Foreign Correspondence. 



50 Proceedings of the [October li, 

Report — Committee on Grand Master's Annual Report 

Bro. Charles H. Spilman, chairman of the Committee on 
Grand Master's Report, presented the report of that com- 
mittee. On motion, it was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

The story of Freemasonry is never a completed narrative. It is written 
day by day through each jurisdiction and is developed from hour to hour 
in the lives of men. But there must be occasional summing up of the 
doings of the craft, and in his formal annual report the grand master comes 
before you Avith a review of some of the accomplishments in Illinois during 
the past twelvemonth. 

He finds that a glance around the troubled earth reveals a potent fact, 
which is that the nations where distress greatly prevails, now and at other 
times, are the ones where brotherhood does not exist; that in the Ehiglish 
speaking countries where fraternities flourish, there is the spirit of tolera- 
tion, of mutual regard and contidence, and of the desire to be helpful one 
to another. No stronger argument has ever been presented than this ex- 
pression of Grand Master Fitzgcrrell. In it Masonry is justified in a prac- 
tical way and our old theory that to know each other is to render the nation 
safe, is fully proven. 

The reference to the loss of the right worshipful grand secretary, Isaac 
Cutter, who was a personal friend of every officer and member of this grand 
lodge, is committed to the attention of the Committee on Obituaries; and 
the action of the grand master in promptly meeting the emergency by filling 
the responsible post with an experienced brother is approved. 

On two occasions the actions of the grand master in regard to lodges 
in other language than that of the country, have been reviewed by com- 
mittees and formally endorsed by this grand lodge. The English language 
is the only language recognized within this grand lodge. Therefore the 
action in the present instance, which presents no phases that are new, but 
just the same old question, is approved without reference. 

The principle, "It is for Masonry to know its own," has long ago 
been definitely established. The constitution of the Illinois grand lodge 
defines clearly the question of Masonic recognition. The fact that there 
are constantly being created" groups of individuals who proclaim some con- 
nection with Masonry, who seek in some measure to trade upon that fra- 
ternal designation, or who produce in the public mind an unfortunate idea 
of Masonry through their machinations, does not affect the fundamental 



1921J Grand Lodge of Illinois 51 

truth enunciated by the grand master. The grand lodge powers have never 
been abridged and they shouhl never be questioned. 

Lodges are frequently troubled with the petitioner who neglects to 
mention a previous application and rejection. It is a fruitful source of 
trouble between lodges and between individual members. Anything which 
will be helpful in preventing such situations arising is welcome and the 
suggestion concerning the possibility of amending the petition form is 
referred for primary consideration to the Committee on Appeals and 
Grievances. 

The grand lodge should have opportunity to avail itself of the views 
of the Board of Grand Examiners on the possible application of the sugges- 
tion concerning short foim opening, and the subject is so referred. 

The sjilendid condition of the Masonic Homes, due to highly efficient 
management and supervision is pleasing to all, and the generous gift to 
their cause is deserving of the special mention made of it. 

Much embarrassment to subordinate lodges and to individual officers 
may be prevented, and the good of the order conserved if a plan such as 
is advocated for the general bonding of officers handling lodge finances 
may be worked out and this consideration is assigned to a special committee 
to be named by the grand master. 

The Schools of Instruction are growing in strength and usefulness, 
owing to the mutual participation in their advantages by the novices in the 
craft and by those who may give to them the results of years of experience. 

Masonry, in its operations, never comes in conflict with any of the 
civil laws, and the action of the grand master in putting a stoj) to a lottery 
carried on in the name of the Masonic fraternity is cordially approved. 

Actions relative to Henderson Lodge No. 820 and Meteor Lodge No. 
283 are directed to the attention of the Jurisprudence Committee. In this 
connection your committee does not concur in the position of the grand 
master in regard to the fees attaching to a case of discipline. We believe 
that any broth'^r who knows of any matter which involves the rights, dignity 
or honor of a member, a lodge, or this grand lodge, should be privileged to 
set in motion the proper inquiry without being in any way penalized, such 
as by the assessment of costs. We approve the action thus far reported 
from the Jurisprudence Committee in this regard. 

All other matters of detailed action contained in the report, such as 
appointments, instituting and constituting, corner-stone laying, etc., have 
been carefully examined into and are herewith approved, being thoroughly 
in line with Masonic usage and custom in every instance. 

It was decreed by Fate that Brother Daniel G. Fitzgerrell should wield 
the gavel of authority in the Grand East of Illinois for a longer period 



52 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

than any other grand master in its eighty-two years of existence. The 
greatest number of lodges have been instituted and constituted this year 
that are of record for a similar period. The greatest prosperity of a ma- 
terial kind has been experienced. 

And with these records has come the greatest demand upon the time, 
the patience and the wisdom of the one whom you selected to direct these 
affairs. The transactions of the oflS.ce of grand master show that in all 
things he has kept the faith, has upheld the ancient landmarks and has so 
administered the laws as to assure the dignity and standing of Freemasonry 
undiminished and untrammeled. He deserves to be remembered among the 
great upholders of the fraternity. 

Fraternally submitted, 

C. H. Spilman, 
Wm. Faiklee, 
H. M. Palmer, 

Committee. 

Report — Committee to Compile By-Laws 

The committee to compile the by-laws and revise the code, 
presented their report, and it was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
of Illinois: 

Your committee appointed to compile the by-laws and revise the code 
respectfully report that their duties were completed very shortly after the 
session of grand lodge, 1921, closed, the new codes printed and distributed 
as ordered. Fraternally submitted, 

Owen Scott, 
Alonzo Dolan, 

Committee. 

Report — Committee on Chartered Lodges 

Bro. Phil C. Barclay presented the report of the Committee 
on Chartered Lodges. It was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Your Committee on Chartered Lodges having carefully cheeked the 
annual returns of the constituent lodges for the year ending June 30, 1921, 
present the following report: 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 53 

Increase 

Number raised 28,352 

Number reinstated 663 

Number admitted 2,138 

Number added for errors in secretary 's previous reports 160 

Total increase 31,313 

Decrease 

Number suspended 730 

Number expelled 23 

Number dimitted 3,604 

Number died 2,111 

Number deducted for errors in secretary's previous reports. . . 2S3 

Total decrease 6,751 

Net gain in membership of Chartered Lodges 24,562 

Total membership of Chartered Lodges 229,982 

Number of Chartered Lodges 902 

Number of members residing in Illinois 204,034 

Number of members residing outside Illinois 25,948 

Amount received for dues for year ending June 30, 1921 $287,388.50 

Amount contributed to members, their widows and orphans 89,927.04 

Amount contributed to those not members 57,810.12 

Amount contributed to Home at LaGrange 16,255.94 

Amount contributed to Home at Sullivan 5,538.32 

Total contributions to charity $169,531.42 

We found the reports presented in very good shape, but we again 
recommend to the secretaries more care and accuracy in making up their 
summary on the back cover of the report. 

We are glad to report there was not a single lodge delinquent. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

Phil C. Barclay, 
W. W. Watson, 
LiNDORF Walker, 
J. HuBER Allen, 
Willis McFeely, 

Committee. 



54 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

Report — Committee on New Legislation 

Bro. Geo. M. Moulton made the following report for the 
Committee on New Legislation. The report was adopted. Also 
the proposed amendment by the requisite two-thirds vote. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Your Committee on New Legislation, to whom has been referred the 
report which it made to the grand lodge concerning the decision of Grand 
Master Wheeler, made at the annual meeting in 1916, having reference to 
the manner in which a brother may change his name, submits the following 
for consideration of grand lodge: 

"419. When a brother has legally changed his name according to the 
laws of the State of Illinois, he shall be required to notify the Secretary of 
his Lodge promptly thereof, accompanying such notification with doc- 
umentary evidence showing conclusively that his name has in fact been 
changed in conformity with the civil laws. Upon receipt of such notifica- 
tion the Secretary of the Lodge shall change the name accordingly on the 
Lodge records and shall promptly notify the Secretary of the Grand Lodge 
of such change. ' ' 

Your committee recommends that this be adopted as an amendment to 
the grand lodge by-laws. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Geo. M. Moulton, 
William Wilhartz, 
Jos. J. Shaw, 

Committee. 



Report — Committee on Petitions 

Bro. J. E. Jeffers presented the report of the Committee 
on Petitions. The report was adopted. 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

To your Committee on Petitions have been referred the following, to 
which we shall refer by number. 

Xo. 1. Paramount Lodge No. 1015, Chicago, to change the name of 
Edward Julian Barkoske to Edward Julian Barr. 

No. 2. Damascus Lodge No. 888, Chicago, to change the name of 
Edward H. Baumgartner to Edward H. Gardner. 



^921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 55 

Ko. 3. Cosmopolitan Lodge No. 1020, Chicago, to change the name 
of Herman M. Schwartz to Herman M. Morton. 

No. 4. Carnation Lodge No. 900, Chicago, to change the name of 
Russell F. Scheffler to Eiissell F. Lahl. 

No. 5. Mizpah Lodge No. 768, Chicago, to change the names of Alfred 

E, Isen to Alfred E. Lower, and Charles Gustav Kotzenberg to Charles 
Gustav Kay. 

No. 6. Lake View Lodge No. 774, Chicago, to change the name of 
William G. Gricshaber to William G. Grice. 

No. 7. Cicero Lodge No. 9.55, Cicero, to change the name of Charles 

F. Eosenberg to Charles F. Hcrold. 

No. 8. Brotherhood Lodge No. 986, Chicago, to change the name of 
Eugene M. Schnutt to Eugene M. Smith. 

No. 9. Arcana Lodge No. 717, Chicago, to change the name of Philip 
E. A^asasky to Philii) E. Vance. 

No. 10. Ancient Craft Lodge No. 907, Chicago, to change the name 
of Maurice Blinkinstine to Maurice Blink, and the name of Morris A. 
Milkewitch to Morris A. Mills. 

No. 11. Brotherhood Lodge No. 986, Chicago, to change the name of 
Henry J. Heidbrecht to Henry J. Heide. 

No. 12. Lakeside Lodge No. 739, Chicago, to change the name of 
Samuel William Junker to Samuel William Younker. 

No. 13. Mystic Star Lodge No. 758, Chicago, to change the name of 
Arnold H. Peterson to Arnold H. Petterson. 

No. 14. Washington Park Lodge No. 956, Chicago, to change the name 
of Louis Widranovitz to Louis Widran. 

No. 15. Parian Lodge No. 977, Chicago, to change the name of 
William C. Pegalowski to William C. Pegalow. 

No. 16. Parkway Lodge No. 1008, Chicago, to change the name of 
John Arthur Bobraske to John Aj-thur Blake, and the name of Otto Einaldo 
to Eeynold Oeschler. 

No. 17. Cicero Lodge No. 955, Cicero, to change the name of Frederick 
Pauschutz to Frederick Pausch. 

No. 18. Washington Park Lodge No. 956, Chicago, to change the name 
of Isaac Joseph Goldberg to Irwin Joseph Goldie. 

No. 19. Progressive Lodge No. 954, Chicago, to change the name of 
All)crt B. Bodenlos to Albert B. Bodee. 



56 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

No. 20. Welcome Lodge No. 916, Chicago, to change the name of 
Edward Francis Eonschke to Edward Francis Eons. 

No. 21. Fortitude Lodge No. 1003, Chicago, to change the names of 
Harold W. Gutkowsky, Isadore Gutkowsky, and Maurice Gntkowsky to 
Harold W. Good, Isadore Good, and Maurice Good, respectively. 

No. 22. Garden City Lodge No. 141, Chicago, to change the name of 
Myron Etamett O'Hanly to Eobert Emmett O 'Hanly. 

No. 23. Apollo Lodge No. 642, Chicago, to change the name of Samuel 
J. Eoscnstein to Samuel J. Boss. 

No. 24. Damascus Lodge No. 888, Chicago, to change the name of 
Joseph Francis Bogj-nska to Joseph F. Francis. 

No. 25. William McKinley Lodge No. 876, Chicago, to change the 
name of Frank Joseph Bourscheidt to Frank Joseph Burd, aud Harry 
La Salle Johnson to Harry La Salle. 

No. 26. Composite Lodge No. 879, Chicago, to change the name of 
Maxmillian Gajewski to Maxmillian Gayes, and Solomon Gansco to Sol Gans. 

No. 27. Oriental Lodge No. 33, Chicago, to change the name of Kost 
L. Slonecker to Jack L. Slonecker, 

No. 28. Universal Lodge No. 985, Chicago, to change the name of 
Sampel Liebowitz to Samuel Lebow. 

All the above brethren having met the requirements, your committee 
recommends that the several changes of names be made on the records of 
their several lodges and the records of the grand lodge. 

No. 29. Bro. Mark Ashworth, residing at Mattoon, 111., was formerly 
a member of Elmwood Lodge No. 589, located at Humbolt, 111., which lodge 
is now defunct. On or about May 26, 1877, Bro. Ashworth was suspended 
for non-payment of dues, the amount being $14.50. He now asks this grand 
lodge to restore him to good standing in the fraternity and presents a check 
for the amount for which he was suspended. Accompanying this request is 
the recommendation of Mattoon Lodge No. 260 that his request be granted. 
Your committee recommends that Bro. Ashworth be restored to good stand- 
ing in the fraternity. 

No. 30. Wright's Grove Lodge No. 779, requests the restoration of 
Bro. Earle Accola who was expelled from that lodge on October 1, 1908, 
his offense being defrauding the U. S. Government mails. An investigation 
by a duly appointed committee of the lodge reports that Brother Accola 
was influenced in his offense by men much old«r than himself who were 
really responsible for his fall. The vote of the lodge upon the recommenda- 
tion of his restoration was imanimous. Your committee recommend that 
Bro. Accola be restored to good standing in the fraternity. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 57 

No. 31. Bro. E. D. Foulkes, residing in Chicago, but formerly at Bath, 
m., at which time he was a member of Bath Lodge No. 494. On or about 
July 7, 1885, Brother Foulkes was suspended for non-payment of dues in 
the amount of $12.00. He now asks this grand lodge to restore him to good 
standing in the fraternity, accompanies his request with a check for the 
amount of which he was suspended, and the recommendation of several 
Master Masons in good standing that his request be granted. Your com- 
mittee recommends that Brother Foulkes be restored to good standing in the 
fraternity. 

No. 32. Makanda Lodge No. 434, Makanda, recommends the restora- 
tion of Bro. Frank Hagler, expelled by that lodge on or about August 30, 
1917. It would seem that the principal offense of Brother Hagler was the 
disobedience of a summons to appear and answer charges, which summons 
Brother Hagler claims was not served. The petition for the recommendation 
by Makanda Lodge was regularly presented and regularly acted upon. Your 
committee recommends that Bro. Frank Hagler be restored to good standing 
in the fraternity. 

No. 33. Bro. J. F. Maxey, residing at Pomona, Kansas, but formerly 
at Humbolt, 111., at which time he was a member of Elwood Lodge No. 
589, located at Humbolt, but now defunct, was on or about August 10, 
1878, suspended for non-payment of dues in the amount of $6.00. He now 
asks this grand lodge to restore him to good standing in the fraternity and 
accompanies his request with the amount for which he was suspended. He 
also presents a recommendation by McKinley Lodge No. 41, A.F. & A.M., 
of Pomona, Kansas, that his request be granted. Brother Maxey has lived 
at Pomona for the last forty years and the lodge at that place recommends 
him as being of good morals, good reputation and an upright citizen. Your 
committee recommends that Bro. J. F. Maxey be restored to good standing 
in the fraternity. 

No. 34. Cosmpolitan Lodge No. 1020, Chicago, requests the restoration 
of Bro. Abe Solomon who was expelled from that lodge in November, 1920. 
Brother Solomon was charged with falsely claiming a residence in Chicago 
in order to secure the degi'ees in Cosmopolitan Lodge. Later investigation 
proves conclusively that Brother Solomon could technically claim his resi- 
dence in Chicago and was so advised by those whom he considered authority 
on such matters. Your committee recommends that Brother Solomon be 
restored to good standing in the fraternity. 

No, 35. Chicago Heights Lodge No. 851, Chicago Heights, requests the 
restoration of Edwin O. Gord, who was expelled from that Lodge on Sep- 
tember 8, 1908. His offense was withholding a petition and the fee. His 
request was regularly passed upon by Chicago Heights Lodge and your 
committee recommends that Brother Gord be restored to good standing in 
the fraternity. 



58 Proceedings of the [October ii, 

No. 36. Seneca Lodge Xo. 532, Seneca, requests the restoration of 
Edward L. Griffith, who was expelled from that lodge on December 1.5, 1905. 
The request of Brother Griffith was regularly acted upon by Seneca Lodge, 
and your committee recommends that Bro. Edward L. Griffith be restored 
to good standing in the fraternity. 

No. 37. Eome Lodge No. 721, at Dix, requests the restoration of 
George H. Fyke, who was expelled from that lodge on or about November 
20, 1912. The request of Brother Fyke was regularly acted upon by Eome 
Lodge and your committee recommends that Bro. George H. Fyke be restored 
to good standing in the fraternity. 

No. 38. St. Andrews Lodge No. 863, Chicago, requests the restoration 
of Frank U. Plopper, who was suspended from that lodge on or about Sep- 
tember 20, 1920. His offense being as follows: On June 6, 1916, Bro. 
Frank U. Plopper petitioned Manitowoc Lodge No. 65, A.F. & A.M., located 
at Manitowoc, Wis., and was rejected. On December 10, 1918, he petitioned 
St. Andrews Lodge No. 863 of Chicago, signing a petition which contained 
the usual qualification that the candidate had never before petitioned a 
Masonic lodge for the degrees. He also answered the usual interrogatory 
of the secretary, in the negative, when asked if he had ever before petitioned 
a Masonic lodge for the degrees. He also stated in his petition to St. 
Andrews Lodge that he had been a resident of Illinois for six years next 
preceding the date of said petition, when in point of fact he had been 
rejected in Manitowoc Lodge only two and a half years previous. Your 
committee is of the opinion that the offense of Brother Plopper is of such 
magnitude as to merit a longer term of expulsion (ban from September last 
to the present date. We, therefore, recommend that the request of St. 
Andrews Lodge for the restoration of Bro. Frank U. Plopper be not granted. 

No. 39. Thirty or more Master Masons, residing in or near the town 
of St. Anne, Iroquois County, having secured the permission of the Most 
Worshipful Grand Master to take the neeessaiy steps toward organizing a 
Masonic lodge at that place, regularly petitioned the three nearest Masonic 
lodges for their recommendations. Two of the three lodges readily recom- 
mended the organization of the new lodge at St. Anne. The lodge at Aroma, 
by a close vote, refused to give its recommendation. The brethren of St. 
Anne, having met all other requirements, presented their petition to the 
Most Worshipful Grand Master, and he in turn, has referred it to this 
committee. Your committee is of the opinion that (he organization of a 
Masonic lodge at St. Anne will not seriously handicap or cripple the interests 
of Aroma lodge. We, therefore, recommend that the brethren cf St. Anne 
be granted a dispensation to organize a Masonic lodge at that place. 

No. 40. Galatia Lodge No. 684, Galatia, requests the restoration of 
Jei-se B. Sprague, who was expelled from that lodge on September 13, 1919. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 59 

Your committee is assured that Brother Sprague has, by good resolution and 
proper conduct, made amends for the oft'ense for which, he was sentenced. 
We therefore recommend that the request of Galatia lodge be granted and 
that Bro. Jesse B. Sprague be restored to good standing in the fraternity. 

J. E. Jeffers, 
J. H. Mitchell, 
S. C, D. Eea, 

Committee. 



Report — ^Committee on Appeals and Grievances 

Bro. Alexander H. Bell presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on Appeals and Grievances. The report was adopted. 

To the Most TVomhipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
of the State of Illinois: 

The undersigned, as your Committee on Appeals and Grievances, re- 
spectfully report that a number of cases have been submitted to us on 
appeal to the grand lodge, as follows: 

Parian Lodge No. 977 

vs. 



Your committee is of the opinion that the findings of the commission 
were in all respects justified by the evidence and we recommend, therefore, 
that the action of the commission, in finding the brother guilty and indefi- 
nitely suspending him from all the rights and privileges of Masonry, be 
sustained. 

Mt. Veknon Lodge No. 31 
vs. 



We recommend that the action of Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 31 in finding 
the brother not guilty of the charges and specifications preferred against 
him be sustained. 

Shekinah Lodge No. 241 
vs. 



We recommend that the action of the trial commission in finding the 
brother guilty and fixing his punishment at expulsion, be set aside^ and that 



60 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

he be restored to all the rights and privileges of Masonry. We further 
recommend that the case be remanded and that the grand master appoint 
a new trial commission to take charge of and try the case. 

Peoria Lodge No. 15 Temple Lodge No. 46 Temple Lodge No. 46 
vs. vs. vs. 



Your committee has examined the record with much care. We are 
clearly of the opinion that all three of these brethren are guilty as charged. 
We recommend that the action of the commission in finding Brethren S. 
and B. guilty and in recommending their expulsion be sustained and they 
be expelled from all the rights and privileges of Masonry. We recommend 
that the action of Peoria Lodge No. 15 in finding Brother P. guilty be sus- 
tained; that the action of that lodge in fixing the punishment of Brother 
P. at reprimand be set aside and that he be expelled from all the rights 
and privileges of Masonry. 

Mt. Veknon Lodge No. 31 

vs. 



Your committee has carefully examined this case and are much im- 
pressed with the consideration that the brethren of Mr. Vernon Lodge who 
were familiar with everything appertaining to the charges and specifications 
were fully qualified to judge as to the guilt of the accused. We recommend 
therefore that the action of Mr. Vernon Lodge No. 31 in finding Brother 
C. not guilty be sustained. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 
A. H. Bell, 
Charles H. Martin, 
William E. Hadley, 
Egbert N. Holt, 
Elmer D. Brothers, 

Committee. 



Report — Committee on Lodges XJ. D. 

Bro. Wm. H. Beckman presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on Lodges U. D. The report was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Your Committee on Lodges under Dispensation has had presented to it 
for consideration the dispensations, records and returns of nineteen (19) 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 61 

lodges which have been granted Dispensations to work since the last annual 
meeting of the most worshipful grand lodge, and after a careful and 
thorough examination of all the books and records connected therewith beg 
leave to submit the following report: 

EivER Forest Lodge, U. D., Eiver Forest. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge June 22, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted June 28, 1921, by Bro. Robert A. Lees, 
D. D. G. M. for the 16th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 42 ■ 

Number elected 36 

Number rejected 2 

Number initiated 30 

Number passed 24 

Number raised 24 

Number not acted on 4 

Number named in dispensation 151 

Number named in disjjensation not signing petition for 
charter 

Number signing petition for charter 174 

Whose names are as follows: 

Charles Peal Molthrop, Nels Bernard Benson, Harry Garfield Stewart, 
George Leonard Meyer, John Ferdinand Grosvenor, Thomas Stanley Oadams, 
Grant Oliver Barber, Alexander Norman Holt, Edward Henry Steffelin, 
Eoy Foster Nix, Arthur Phillips Doran, Alexander Emery, E'dwin William 
King, Edward Harrison Case, Frank Wentworth Swett, Louis Alan Heil, 
Clair Andrew Erdal, John Merril Bundscho, John Henry Pine, William 
Paul Trebilcock, William Aiken Lally, William Martin Clark, Edward 
Probst, *Edwprd Eugene Probst, George Werner Mackness, Brevet Charles 
Emery, William Sylvester Adams, John Hansen, Arthur Thomas Havell, 
Patrick Henry Sullivan, Percy William Grcnfell, George Leonard Meyer, Jr., 
Albert Gloor, Jesse Sanford Smith, Otto Max Dannenberg, Harold Harcourt 
Williams, Henry Vernon Gressang, Edwin Silas Wells, Oscar Theodore 
Hegg, Chris Emil Peters, Arthur Cyril GriflSn, Warren Kirkham Dickerson, 
Otto Kretzer, William Gustav Wicse, E'wald August Balgemann, William 
Charles Valentine, Albert Charles Hilkcr, Jolm Henry Cossitt, Frederic 
Shields Kochendorfer, William Martin Knourck, William Baumrucker, 
Alexander Miller Mair, Harvey Walter Underwood, William Lohrer, Paul 

*Deceased since signing petition for charter. 



62 Proceedings of tJie [October 11, 

Henry Davenport, Frank Edmund McCall, George Hoyt Whaple, Jay Bert 
Eush, John Davis Jones, Eichard Fischer, Henry Charles Arch, Frederick 
Statler Bremer, Wallace Andrew Bowman, Frederick Joachim Asbjorn 
Schlotfeldt, Albert Hugh Millen, James Selden Eobinson, Arthur Selden 
Robinson, Charles Willard Shoemaker, LeEoy Wilbur Earl, Joseph Barthol- 
omew Hanzel, Harry Maxwell Thompson, Leonard Eugene Moore, Charles 
Walter Seehler, John Scarth Johnson, Allan Letcher Dhonau, Charles Eush 
Baldwin, Edwin Lindmeier, Frank Gardner Clark, Oscar James Shields, 
Edmund George Johnson, Charles Euthven Hamsley, Ellwood Vandevere 
Matlack, John Wheldon Williams, Harry Fred Eldredge, Eaymond Hugh 
Eushton, Darius Eobert Leland, Eobert Carlos Leland, LeEoy Edward 
Huxhani, Harold Hanniford Huxham, Frank Squires, Albert Herman Bro- 
mann, Ealph Leonard Doran, Vincent Malcolm Huntington, Eobert Douglas 
Mclhtosh, William Edward Sehultz, Wilfred Eoy Killinger, Ezra Jacob 
Bundscho, William Henry French, Albert Jonas Hage, Andrew Eowc Guil- 
ford, Adolph Eichard Kcssler, Alfred John Austin, Allen Eugene Pickett, 
Louis Peter Nissen, Walter Miller Oliphant, Frank Emil Bowgrcn, Oscar 
Owen Mertz, Eichard Godfrey Waskow, Thomas Eobert Williams, August 
Kubec, Ealph McNaughton West, Eeuben Thornton Johnston, Harry 
Millard, Allen Bennett Gates, Herman Charles Sievers, Samuel William 
Kempster, Ignaz Dohnal, James Albert Whitchurch, Eobin LeEoy White, 
Victor Kunzer, Jr., E'dward John Kunzer, George James Visokey, Ernest 
John Sander, Arthur Silloway Hatch, LeEoy Allen Knapp, *George Milton 
Wyman, Charles Henry Burr, John Edward Baumrucker, Henry Frank 
Kunzer, Wilbur Hoyt Wright, John McClintock, Jr., Elmer William Arcli, 
Charles Ottis Montague, Percival Edward Francis, George Harry Baber, 
James Hutchinson Hammill, *James Thomson, Charles Henry Colt, Charles 
Free Durland, Otto Eeinholt Haas, Fred William Schmidt, Eobert Hosea 
Good, Henry Struble, Allen Peter Grant, Parmer Eossman, Euben Frederick 
Locke, David Henry Thatcher, Joseph Luther Thalmau, Lewis Kossuth 
Amsden, Lucian Octave Goyette, Edward Carson Waller, Donald Philip 
Jones, Charles Hutchison Gabriel, Francis Christopher Pilgrim, Charles 
Allen Griffith, John Eanstead Britton, John Luther Batdorf, Hope Emerson 
MacNivcn, LeEoy Gould, Harry Bennett Castle, Louis Joseph Kunzer, 
Charles Kunzer, Edward Webster Iverson, Gustave Eobert Waskow, Charles 
Diedrich Oetjen, Emil Anderson, Victor Kunzer, Edgar Kiugsley Brashears, 
John Matthews, Walter William Turner, Lewis Clark Brown, Charles 
Frederick Wilson, Marvin George Probst, Victor Martin Mickelsen, Francis 
George Kingsbury. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as ' ' Eiver 
Forest Lodge No. 1049." 



*Deceased since signing petition for charter. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 63 

t'ALiAXT Lodge, U. D., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge December 11, 1920, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted December 16, 1920, by Bro. Wm. Tinsley, 
D. D. G. M. for the Third District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 104 

Number elected 72 

Number rejected 15 

Number initiated C4 

Number passed 43 

Number raised 43 

Number not acted on 17 

Number named in dispensation 102 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 145 

Whose names are as follows : 

Adler, Arthur; Abrams, Sanford Dewey; Abrahamson, Eobert; Abra- 
hamson, Paul; Atz, Michael A.; Ash, David Maurice; Ash, Harry Alex- 
ander; Blair, Abraham; Bloom, Samuel; Bernstein, Samuel; Blair, Maurice 
I; Bernstein, Joseph; Blair, David; Beitscher, Edward F. ; Berns, Hyman 
E. ; Berns, Philip; Bierman, Leo S. ; Britton, William; Brown, Edwin 
Julien; Bernstein, Aaron D.; Bonem, James; Bloom, Jacob Ben; Bern- 
stein, William; Barker, Henry Herbert; Chutkow, Bernhard; Cohen, Louis 
G. ; Crocker, Joseph A.; Chase, Sylvan S. ; Davis, Joseph M. ; Dinkelman, 
Henry; Deutsch, Samuel; Dry, Frank; Dry, Samuel; Deitchman, Harry; 
Deitehman, Morris; Darling, William J.; Elman, Meyer; Etteli-on, Leo; 
Ettelson, Jonas; Ettelson, David; E'lfman, Bernard J.; Eichcnbaum, 
Eobert; Fremmel, Harry J.; Fried, Walter J.; Friedman, Max; Frankel, 
Morris; Frankel, Gustave A.; Fox, Samuel; Greenwald, David; Greenwald, 
Jacob; Golby. Philip D. ; Glick, Samuel; Goldenberg, Tobias; Hirsch, 
Jacob; Knee, Jacob C. ; Hoffman, Isidore; Hirschfeld, Leo S. ; Jacoby, 
Eobert ; Jacoby, Eoy Mory ; Klee, Solomon ; Kraeckman, William J. ; 
Kimmel, Nathan; Kabus, William E.; Kersten, Morjis; Koplo, Albert M. ; 
Konefsky, Albert; Kretschmer, Henry W. ; Langert, Samuel; Levinson, 
Joe; Licberman, Nathan; Levy, Noah; Levy, Max; Levy, Isidore; Levy, 
Benjamin J.; Lichtenstein, Julius; Lowitz, Samuel; Lew, Samuel W. ; 
Leserman, Jacob; Lionheart, William E.; Meyers, Ben; Posner, Herman 
Harry; Pedersen, Emil B.; Pokorny, E'dward; Parisek, Maurice; Provus, 
Isidore; Pohlman, William J.; Paul, Samuel; Pierce, David B.; Eosenthal, 
Samuel IT.; Eosenthal, Irving P.; Eobinson, Joseph H.; Baclin, Abraham 



64 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

J.; Ehodes, Eichard; Eedner, Adolph; Eeinauer, Philip; Eobinson, Herman 
L. ; Eosenberg, Meyer ; Eickersberg, Simon ; Eoth, Alexander ; Eeinitz, 
Arthur L.; Ratner, Isaac D.; Silver, Harry; Singer, Felix; Sacks, Leon A.; 
Steiner, Lewis H.; Swarts, Benno; Sobel, Carl; Schwartz, Jonas; Schwartz, 
Samuel; Samels, Louis; Stone, Edward B. ; Simon, Fred I.; Simon, Samuel 
H.; Seamans, Jos.; Spronz, Alexander; Smit, Emanuel; Samuels, Irving; 
Schoenbrod, Harry; Sugar, Samuel; Smith, Sydney J.; Tauber, Gerhardt; 
Thielen, Arthur L.; Tupler, Abraham; Tiltz, Chas. ; Towbin, Elias; Urdang, 
Sol.; Urdang, Moe; Voigt, Alfred H.; Wilson, Samuel J.; Weiss, Nathan 
H. ; Wallman, Louis ; Wolf, William ; Weicensang, Chas. ; Wolf, William ; 
Weinstein, Adolph; Woolf, Harold A.; Wolf, Michael; Young, Eobert; 
Cadiz, John; Bosley, Nathan; Becker, Louis Lionel; Levin, Julius Eli; 
Eay, Solomon Louis; Cahn, David; Gates, Jack; Forster, Edgar Clarence; 
Eisenberg, Harold; Hurwitz, Ezra. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Eadiant 
Lodge No. 1050." 

Merit Lodge, U. D., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge May 4, 1921, by Bro. Daniel 
G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted May 10, 1921, by Bro. Bert E. Uebele, D. D, 
G. M. for the Second District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 46 

Number elected 34 

Number rejected 3 

Number initiated 33 

Number passed 28 

Number raised 28 

Number not acted on 9 

Number named in dispensation 101 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 3 

Number signing petition for charter 126 

Whose names are as follows: 

Meyer M. Arkin, Joseph H. Cohn, Philip W. Vehon, Joseph Harrison, 
Benjamin Iglowitz, Harry A. Freeman, Charles Stolerow, Samuel H. Good- 
man, Max M. Cohn, David J. Siskin, Samuel P. Gurman, Louis A. Ginsburgh, 
Jacob C. Mann, Daniel H. Levinthal, J. Charles Hackland, Simon Os, David 
Mendelsohn, Albert Silverman, William M. Weinstein, Morris E'srig, Ben- 
jamin Goltz, Michael Eose, Joseph Katz, Isidore Eoy Cohn, Samuel Charles 
Klugman, A. J. Blumenthal, Harry I. Star, Jacob Smith, Maurice Eisen- 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 65 

berg, Gilbert Kuppin, Fred Herzon, Sam Dreyfuss, Louis Kohn, Herman 
Lazerus Alexander, Harry L. Weinstein, David Goldstein, Simon B. Wax, 
S. Y. Fierman, Charles H. Trotcky, Joseph P. Hirtenstein, Abe Segal, 
Michael Edelheit, Samuel L. Harris, Jacob A. Kohn, Isidore Lerner, Samuel 
Litz, David Samuels, Samuel I. Weinstein, Sol Greenberg, Abraham J. 
Abeles, Eudolph Kaplan, Isaac Siskin, Clarke C. Cutler, Hynian L. Minkus, 
Harry W. Solomon, Samuel Siskin, Irving H. Freedman, Max Weisman, 
Albert Gelbard, Harry Brown, Henry H. Eubenstein, Jacob Kraus, Walter 
J. Gottstein, Jacob Baron, Samuel Schwartzman, Jacob Samuels, Benjamin 
Hubschman, Felix B. Conheim, Max Rogoflf, Irving Sklare, Jacob Bloom- 
enthal, Leo A. Weisskopf, Michael Clemage, Sam C. Euhstadt, Abe Pawlan, 
Joseph Pearson, Herman Busch, Herman C. Klugman, William Levenson, 
Jacob Epstein, Harry L. Heifetz, Jacob Schwartz, Harry Edelheit, Philip 
Selzer, Charles Weisel, Joseph Goldberg, Benjamin Sideman, David Eogoff, 
Jacob Hubschman, Abner Martin Hirschfield, E'dward A. Perlmutter, Eugen 
A. Hamburg, Nathan K. Aranoff, S. Manuel Sandor, Newman Kohn, Otto 
Klinenberg, Abe Berman, William Diamond, Abraham M. Hubschman, 
Jacob Iglowitz, Eaymond Braunstein, Joseph Appelbaum, Louis Shapiro, 
Sidney Goldsmith, Martin Stanley Ex, Peter Sherlock Gurwit, Eugene Jarvis 
Brown, Gordon Lewis Bazelon, Eichard Isaacson, Edward Levin, Pinkus 
Markovitz, Samuel Schwartz, Charles Goldstein, Morris Harris, Adrian 
Tabachnik, Frank Kemp, Aleck Goldberg, Abraham Ostrowsky, George 
Chill, Jacob Gordon, Abraham Kahn, Leonard Ginsburgh, Samuel Eufus 
Deutsch, Max Eubin Trebow, Joseph Levine, Herman E. M, Brownstein. 
We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Merit 
Lodge No. 1051." 

Gresham Lodge, U. D., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge April 22, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted April 29, 1921, by Bro. David S. Davidson, 
D. D. G. M. for the 11th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 51 

Number elected ,. 41 

Number rejected 8 

Number initiated 40 

Number passed 35 

Number raised 35 

Number not acted on 2 

Number named in dispensation 105 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 
charter 



66 Proceedings of tlie [October 11, 

Number signing petition for charter 140 

Whoso names are as follows: 

James Strain, Carl Fred Sieg, James Hanna Forsyth, Waldemar 
Madsen, Paul Henry Karow, George Hill Wells, Murdock Edward Bruce, 
William Irven Nelson, Carl Victor Carlson, Bernard Joseph Hebner, Samuel 
Garfield Barrow, Frank Waldenian Madsen, Thomas Cammack, William 
Emeory Owen, Martin Douglas Sorenson, Daniel Johnson, Walter Carl Hart- 
man, Eandolph Pearson Ellerbeck, Oscar Godfrey Verkler, Eldridge Well- 
ington Fisher, Stephen Lamparter, E'dw"ard Douglas O 'Conor, Eobert Harold 
Johnson, Montie Albert Davies, William Marvin Kerr, Arthur Albert Meyer, 
John Eobert Collins, Harry Herbert Cawley, William Balthasar Hornung, 
Arthur Timothy Bell, Henry Clyde Hill, William Mariucus Byl, Arthur 
William Kruso, Armistead Lindsay Hightower, Eaymond Hobart Meyer, 
Alexander Allen Bowman, Christen Andersen Christensen, John Husted 
Baumgartner, Anthony Hutchinson, Jr., Oscar Elmer Anderson, Edward 
Faber, Vernon Henry Kuhn, Charles Isaac Briggs, August August Elling, 
Walter Frank Schoulda, Alfred Victor Poehner, Hal Newton Calhoun, 
Arthur Christian Eden, Miles Hutchinson, William Charles Allen, Maurice 
Daniel Weld, Joseph Muntwyler, Eichard Joseph Schoulda, Harley Yinger, 
John Elmer Turner, John E'mcory Owen, Eugene Mathew Owen, Hial Cook 
Wiley, Albert Joseph Heitman, Fred Eugene Maxwell, James Walter Eeiner, 
August Panzegrau, Eobert Henry Penn, George Nicholas Pedersen, William 
Albin Hohmberg, Elmer Alexander Wilson, Elijah McClure Evick, Fred 
Wesley Dayton, Walter John Gratz, Goorgo Henry Sauerbier, Arthur August 
Biallas, Julius Yedor, Herbert Spencer Eose, Fred Cliarles Blaekmore, 
George Edwin Sunderland, William Ponberthy Davies, Chas. Wosley Briggs, 
Edmund Andrew Euseell, Gilbert Ernest Olson, Lawrence David Olson, 
Gustave Julius Dahlke, William Henry Brinkman, E. Keene Eyan, Eobert 
Holzhauser, Don Boughner, George Bonitzer, William Harry Moore, Edwin 
Dana Norton, Eichard Kinion Freeman, Guyles Emerson Bower, George 
Elmer Carlson, Chas. John Geijer, Nels Christensen, Eush Cobb Alexander, 
Eobert Eadats, Frank Habberton Byl, Charles Frederick Moss, Sherman 
Columbus Wilson, Albert Spenle, Valentin Hargesheinier, Clifford Marion 
Huncryagcr, Benjamin Eugene Lathrop, Lon Boughner, Walter Charles 
Haffner, Allison Alexander McCracken, Edward Henry Elliott, Albert 
Eleder, John Henry Tuohy, Frank David Schell, George Berry Betts, Fayette 
Fleming Parsons, William Desmond Kane, Mathew McBeath, Mathias 
Wenzel, Anton Seholl, William Henry Klenk, Earl Bjorson Gale, Thomas 
Henry Upton, Cornclis Kclfkens, Joseph Kyle Fagin, Paul Andrew Hansen, 
Edward Hawkins Eickards, Erwin Herman Horstman, Arthur Einar Fern- 
leaf, Wm. Otto Zingelman, Albert Eipkey, Will Howe Eipley, John Efraim 
Johnson, Frank Lawrence Hassett, James Wilkinson, Walter Harrison 
Davies, Walter Steven Frederickson, Gabriel Silcox, George Martin Geller, 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 67 

Henry Emiel Watterlohn, William James Law, Isaac Newton McCurdy, 
Eobert L. Glancy, Paul Bernhardt Headland, Alphonso Leskie. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Gresham 
Lodge No. 1052." 

Cakdinai, Lodge, U. D., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge April 20, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted April 26, 1921, by Bro. Isaac J. Smit, D. D. 
G. M. for the 19th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 26 

Number elected 22 

Number rejected 

Number initiated 20 

Number passed 18 

Number raised 16 

Number not acted on 4 

Number named in dispensation 168 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 4 

Number signing petition for charter 164 

Whose names are as follows: 

Abraham George Schwab, Raphael Nathan Friedman, Eobert Sachs 
Harris, Rudolph Gustave Meyer, Louis Ladewick, Menz. I. Rosenbaum, 
Harry Louis Canmann, Charles Barnett, Alex J. Stein (Dimit), Kalman 
Trilling, Milton Maxwell Friedman, Otto H. Fellinger, Paul Henry Bush, 
Arthur Solomon Schwartz, Jerome Schuster, Meyer Joseph Ccrf, Harold 
Sol Guthman, Samuel Bernard Schreiber, Bederick F. Porges, Gustavus 
Adolphus Kohny, Max Schiff, Max Herz, Moses Ullmann, Hugo Maurice 
Goodman, Adolph Baron Clarence Edward Schaar, William Bernhard Guth- 
mann, Abraham Stolofsky, Adolph Pfaelzer, Bert Emanuel Wertheimer, 
Myron Moses Pfaelzer, Siegfried Strauss, Ernest Lincoln Wetzler, Harry 
Raymond Jess, Albert Avner Marks, Benjamin Jacob Kanne, Lester 
Carlyle Rothschild, Julius Rudolph Eichberg, Abraham Shuhnan, Jesse 
Samuel Jacobson, Orville Bunnell, Isadore Sidney Blumenthal, Frank S. 
Mandel, Walter Joseph Rubens, Albert Cohen, Joseph William Grossman, 
Henry Schwab, Max Wolff (Dimit), Solomon Henry Hess, Louis A. Schwab, 
Louis Friedmann, Merril Liebenstein Israel, Rudolph Wolfner, William 
Louis Rosenthal, Henry Posner, Frank Emanuel Rubovits, Jerome Louis 
Pfaelzer, Louis Charles Smith, Harry Marcus Moses, Albert Lincoln Ell- 
bogen, Joseph Sigmund Stein, William Harrison Kalis, Charles Gustave 



68 Proceedings of the [October ii, 

Brown, Morris Walter Silverberg, Edward Bernard Grossman, Abraham 
Harry Weinstein, Gustav Mayer, Samuel H. Frank, Joseph Samuel Wein- 
stein, Moses Stone, Meyer Thomas Horwich, Jacob Walter Sharff, Samuel 
Goldstein, Elmer Wedeles, Joseph Wadeles, Eichard Wedeles, Gustave 
Moritz Posner, Harry Emanuel Grossman, Samuel Grossman, David S. Levi, 
Adolph Goodman, Samuel Heifetz, Frank Wendell Lenhoflf, Julius Irving 
Cone, Ira Israel Fisher, Abraham Sydney Barnett, Leopold David Billstein, 
Julius Ascher, Henry Strasberg, Albert Strasberg, David Benj. Felsenthal, 
Joseph Weinfeld, Joseph Bobbe, Hugo Edward Marienthal, Samuel Mark 
Kaplan, Nathan Kassal, Herman Schreiber, Eichard Frank, Milton Jerome 
Sabath, Lawrence Gatzert Leopold, Julius Freehling, Lester Jay Dernburg, 
Julius Goldenberg, Harry Salvat, Herbert Strauss, Paul Eobert Simon, 
Isadora Simon, Edward Gustav Eosenfeld, Norman Mortimer Oberndorf, 
Meyer Barr, Jerome Nathan Goldstein, Joseph Kulcsar Newman, Albert 
Sabath, Louis Milton Nathan, Milton Daniel Levy, Edward Eueb, Isaac 
Leo Marienthal, Harry Walter Knudsen, George Halson Brown, Francis 
Ernst Matthews, Harry Bernard Balkin, Louis Balkin, Wm. Loewy, David 
Herz, Ealph Peter Simmons, Max Louis Wolff, Stanley Meyer Schwab, 
Elmer William Stengel, Gustave Albert Weinfeld, Isadore Julius Kusel, 
Gustav Goldman, Milton Maurice Cohen, Maurice Arthur Barnett, Sidney 
Fred Jarrow, Harry Walter Jarrow, Henry Eosenbaum, Isidor Eosenbaum, 
Maurice Cohn (Dimit), Solomon Jonas Drielsma, Sal Frank, Albert Frank, 
Sidney Mitchell Kaufman, Charles Donald E'llbogen, Gordon Daniel Nuss- 
baum, J. Burt Jacobi, Louis Jess, Hiram N. Shaw (Dimit), Albert Joseph 
Bergman, Nathan Herman Eosenthal, Paul Powell, Oscar Bernard Marien- 
thal, Aaron Eebert Heiman, Henry Joseph Bobbe, Jeffery Felsenthal, 
William Wolf Grossman, James Julius Arnsfield, Walter James Simons, 
Charles Morris, Louis L. Joseph, John J. Eosen, Jack Moes, Alexander 
Marks, Isaac Freehling, Lyle H. Kaufman. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Cardinal 
Lodge No. 1053." 

Forest Park Lodge, U. D., Oak Park. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge April 13, 1921, by Bro. 
Da;niel G. Filzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted April 21, 1921, by Bro. Wm. Tinsley, D. D. 
G. M, for the Third District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received • 80 

Number elected 55 

Number rejected 19 

Number initiated 37 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 69 

Number passed 37 

Number raised 36 

Number not acted on 6 

Number named in dispensation 145 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 181 

Whose names are as follows: 

Harry James Vickery, Charles Treder, George Forest Hartley, Henry 
Charles Eieck, Henry Jacob Mohr, John Henry Thorsen, William Eoss Craw- 
ford, Gustavo Adolph Johnson, James Nye Losee, William Konigsfeld, 
Edward Henry Blatter, Fred Jacob Burkart, John Herbert Mueller, Niels 
Frederick Bjamstad, Henry Martin Bohde, Harry Louis Franzen, Fred 
Emil Schoenfeld, Eric Carson, William George Meyer, Frank Bernhard 
Johnson, John Breivogel, Paul Albert Nelson, Leo August Stiegart, Fred 
Jake Schelp, Eobert Slavik, Henry Eudolph Heileman, William Julius Eein- 
hold, Alfred H. Mancey, Charles Alfred Peterson, Nicolas Schank, Herman 
August Kluessner, Henry A. Schlupp, William Joseph Eall, Aloysius Edward 
Ehrhardt, William Otto Bossmann, William N. Thiede, Charles Henry 
Knickrehm, Edward Hochmuth, Louis Edward Meyer, Harvey Fred Eeese, 
William Fred Kimmel, Adolph Christian Loeek, George Wied, E'rnest August 
Schreiber, Frank Thomas Edson, John Hoellerich, Eichard Eeinholt Soehle, 
Edward Julius Misch, Fred Conrad Preuser, Joseph Steinbach, Eeginald 
Charles Scholl, Frank Hannon Overmeycr, Charles Philorman Bates, Arnold 
Sosnik, Andrew Koschinsky, William Ellsworth Campbell, William H. 
Asmus, Charles Fred Wallrodt, Henry Dietrich Schumacher, Edward Garfield 
Kocmieh, William Charles Kreino, Jacob Schwab, Frank Wendell Horn, 
John Lambert Vos, Milton John Heegn, Herman Percy Eeading, Frank 
Joseph Bender, Samuel David Mclntyre, Henry Frank Gosch, Charles 
Joseph Wolk, William Charles Miller, Eudolf Burkart, Harry Louis Glos, 
Eobert Eobert John, Edmund Fred Bartling, Carl Christian Ekelund, August 
Thode, William Eobert Latzel, Herman Ferdinand Jacob, Govert Philip 
Bron, Herman Lindemann, Harold Hosier, Frank Joseph Smith, Fred 
William Licht, Fred Adam Hoffman, Frederick August Koenig, E'dwin John 
Lenis, Albert Carl Stange, John Carl Weissert, Joseph James Saracino, 
Frederick J. Schlund, John Schreder, Ernest Martin Eieck (Deceased), 
Walter L. Jensen, Edward P. Eamsay, Andrew E. Block, John Boerina 
Bock, Arthur Theodore Dannenberg, William D. Taylor, Albert Carl 
Skon, Edward Holub, Frederick Bernhardt Eoos, David Melville, Bernard 
Banner Ashley, William Fred Schmucker, Alfred Bodo Schweinsberg, 
Albert August Kapp, William E. Eamsay, Willard Henry Shurtleflf, John 
S. Hermansen, George Andrew Kunz, Otto August Feigner, Ernest G. 
Otto, William Edward Dryer, John Daniels, Charles W. Heller, William 



70 Proceedings of ilie [October il, 

Henderson Malcolm, Otto Gustav Windeguth, George William Keller, 
Charles Troester, William E'dward Archer, Andrew J. Koeppel, John Frank 
Chleboun, William Ernst, Bernard Hess, Arthur Fred Ninow, Alfred Edward 
Winterroth, Albert Gordon McNeil, George James Sehaefer, Eay Cleveland 
Hain, Arthur Finley McXaughton, John Lauterbach, Martin Lauterbach, 
Max Goldstein, Anton John Gadcn, Taylor Eushton, J. C. Eogers, Adolph 
C. Rojahn, Nicholas Wallenta, John Frank Bowbin, George William Warner, 
Elmer C. Warner, Edward Eobert Heller, Oscar Emil Gohr, Eobert Gustave 
Zander, Frank Joseph Marousek, Walter Dominiek Ginter, Harry Arthur 
NewTnan, Eobert Bernard Hoffman, James Howard Williams, John Fred 
Christ Fietsch, Harry Edward Misch, Otto Eobert Misch, Arthur Charles 
Misch, Walter Herman Misch, Lester James Parris, George Eobert Weissert, 
William E'dward Percival Crowe, Eaymond Charles Walters, Edward John 
Coventry, Henry Nevill Smith, Edward Nielsen, Henry Seegers, Elmer 
Foster, George Madison Pittman, George William Otto Mieling, Albert 
Milton Thompson, Walter Max Langless, Charles Belkow, Charles Frederick 
Ernst, Arthur William King, George John Schlachter, Walter Cole Yunker, 
Harry Henry Gaden, Eudolph August Eoeber, Walter Emmet Hermann, 
John Herman Miller, Charles William Lindsay, Lorence Frederick Olilman, 
George Christian Kautz, Ernest William KoUey. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Forest 
Park Lodge No. 1054." 

Northern Lights Lodge, U. D., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge December 30, 1920, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted January 3, 1921, by Bro. Geo. E. Moore, 
D. D. G. M. for the 14th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 128 

Number elected 102 

Number rejected 15 

Number initiated 100 

Number passed 92 

Number raised ; 92 

Number not acted on 11 

Number named in dispensation 139 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 2 

Number signing petition for charter 229 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 71 

Whose names are as follows: 

Otto A. George, F. W. Klank, George T. Krneger, Martin E. Bock, 
Theodore S. Arvidson, John E'. Coyle, Herbert W. Bye, Walter A. Beyer, 
Clarence J. Oberg, Cornelius Paulsen, Walter E. Wiberg, W. R. Slingerland, 
Adolph M. Wang, Alfred L. Wallace, John L. Krueger, Arthur H. Bunge, 
John A. Walter, Howard C. Hohmann, Plarry L. Knabe, Frederick W. 
Knopf, Henry C. Schrocder, Harold F. Easniusscn, Carl E. Kjerulff, George 
W. Gilbertson, John F. Elliott, Garnet D. Thompson, Harry A. Becker, 
Claude L. Prish, Archie T. Strom, Edward S. Anderson, Louis E. Hanson, 
Geo. E. Beckman, Harold Jespersen, Carl A. Arnesen, Carl R. Schmidt, 
Wilhelm C. Ottemann, Marcus Jorgensen, Fred Schultz, Horatio M. 
Frederickson, William J. Peske, Fred W. Williams, Elmer J. Weber, Eobert 
Lemley, Eussell E. Easmussen, Albin L. Arvidson, Harry M. Christen, Lnd- 
wig E. Ottemann, Fred Petersen, Andrew S. Ladegaard, Jens C. Jorgensen, 
Bennett E. Paulson, Eaymond L. EUiugsworth, Carl C. Hinding, Leroy F. 
Hintz, Otto C. Christen, Wm. A. Jespersen, Henry Henert, Andrew Arnesen, 
Wallo E. Hanson, Gordon F. Ericson, Charles 0. Olin, John A. Jacobson, 
Louis P. Leistikow, Arthur M. Behm, Herbert L. Addie, Harry G. Jensen, 
Melville K. Soper, Peter Person, Howard P. Brenn, Francis C. M. Mason, 
Harry H. Johnson, Carl J. Eang, E. E. A. Hansen, Arnold Nelson, Joseph 
J. Koeppel, Axel Paulsen, Gunnard Svenson, John D. Jorgensen, Eobert 
A. Wallace, Frank L. Courtney, Erviu Kolar, Eoy 0. Thompson, David M. 
Thompson, David J. Thompson, George A. Tuck, Walter Anderson, Joseph 

A. Kolar, Harry J. Iverscn, George Thompson, Edward O. Stotts, Lawrence 

B. Brockmeyer, Wm. A. Weinberg, Arthur H. Zoch, Henry J. Kaad, E'lmer 
E. Cook, Henry I. Kretz, Lawrence L. Applehans, Paul C. Braun, Philip 
G. Bock, Joe Jacobson, Harry G. Semmler, Alfred J. Boult, Bruno A. 
Nitschke, Walter Spietz, Malvin L. Larsen, Martin Buehlcr, Jr. Evar 
Christell, Clarence O. Leibundguth, Aubrey 0. Cookman, Evans H. Hanson, 
Warren G. Hintz, Joseph Galetti, Weldon Cloak, William A. Habeger, 
Edward J. Miller, Ernest C. Gnadt, Eobert J. Larocca, August G. Waak, 
Chas. R. Waak, Arthur E. Bruhn, Eobert D. Foster, Lorcn H. McBride, 
Joseph John Larocca, John M. Pedersen, Harry L. Strom, Alexander J. 
Plenies, Edmund P. Edmonson, Walter H. Luecht, David F, Milne, M. 
Alfred Michaelson, Walter C. Kikkebusch, Otto Paul Sachs, Paul A. Swen- 
ingson, Thorwald A. Christensen, Ernest H. Wctterhahn, Ea]])h L. Shaw, 
Edward Ohnesorge, Ftcd Cyriel Benoodt, Frederick Peter Dossing, Arthur 
Emil Waldsehmidt, Clarence LeEoy Nelson, Eichard Evertsen, George E. 
Best, Anker Severine Andersen, George William Lewis, Dauphin Henry 
Kellogg, William Gustav Bjick, Kye William Johnson, Edwin Nordgren, 
Alfred Henry Marshall, Henry Christopher Johnson, Einar Neerup, Jennings 
Nelson, John Napier, John W. Thompson, Eobert James Scollay, Charles 
Milo Eudolph, Paul Meyer, Jr., William John Zils, Anthony De John, Leroy 
Julius Sachs, Ealph Wjn. Arvidson, James Henderson, Sanford Larrabee 



72 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

Bcckwith, Harry Francis Mortimer, James McKay Urquhart, Lars Peter 
Skau, Walter Nels Degeuhart, E'rnest Gustav Larson, Harry Cikanek, Albert 
Swen Nelson, Julius Baclene, Louis Marzahl, Howard E. Weinberg, Hans 
Christian Peter Christensen, Francis Martin Kohlman, Carl David Martin, 
Eudoljib Riser, Walter Campbell Miller, Fred Wm. Kuhfiiss, Wesley 
Franklin Rics, Walter William Johnson, Harold Waide Lorenz, Charles 
AVilliam Peckham, Gerhard David Carlson, William St. John, Thor Alex- 
ander Thorscn, David Albert Larson, Harry Jensen, Svend H. Oksnee, 
William Joseph Schneider, Henry Gromer Schoening, Otto H. Pavel, Wm. 
Walter Winkler, Herman Carl Joers, Henry Fred Eahn, Arthur Jensen, 
Oscar Manuel Nelson, Oscar Ralph Poison, Florent Edward Robert, Hans 
Emill Stuewe, Frank Kent, Charles Emil Larson, Harry Cameron Richards, 
Earle Alfred Cookman, Edward Clarence Richter, George William Devoe, 
Harry Rudolf Holmberg, Albin Charles Nelson, William Frank Kaage, 
Mvinus Iversen, Clarence Adolph Olsen, Edward Clarence Magnor, Charles 
Nelsen Collin, Walter Scott La Scelle, Sigurd Woxvold, William Parsons 
Blair, John Bictor Gabrielson, Roy Malcolm Strom, Nicholas Jacob Schaack, 
Howard Wallace George, Syver Martin Syversen, Arbie Harold Baxter, 
Charles Henry Brandeau, Ernest Julius Swanson, James Hermann, William 
Taylor Thompson, Arnold Meiehe, Alfred J. Meiche. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as ' ' Northern 
Lights Lodge No. 1055." 

South Shore Lodge, U. D., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge April 28, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted May 6, 1921, by Bro. Bert E. Uebele, D. D. 
G. M. for the Second District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 23 

Number elected 20 

Number rejected 

Number initiated 20 

Number passed 17 

Number raised 16 

Number not acted on 3 

Number named in dispensation 125 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 141 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 73 

Whose names are as follows: 

Wallace Herman Anderson, EoUa Spencer Pribble, Frank Norris Brown- 
ing, Richard Christian Nongard, George Wilbur Miller, Edgar Sherman 
Perkins, George Sidney Middleton, William Clarence Garnhart, George Given 
MacDonald, Edwin Frank Eeplinger, Eobert Leslie Kaufman, Carl Bert 
Johnson, Harlan W. Brown, Miley Elias Hotchkiss, Walter Bruce Cochran, 
Albert Ludwig Bonner, Leland Stanford Johnson, William Elver Bolay, 
George E'dwin Kidd, Paul Henry Harder, Walter Henry Shryock, William 
Raymond Loveless, Harry Eobert 'Mahoney, Henry Grapen, Bert Louis 
Eeinhard, John Franklin Boehm, Neil Biz Bergen, Stuart Forrest LaChance, 
Bruce Malon Angle, George Lawi'ence Davidson, James Henry Forsyth 
Tramel, George Henry Muthert, Rowland Eawson, Otto Peterson, Thomas 
John Healey, John Hubbard Cummings, Howard Heagle Smith, Jesse Max 
Harris, Eobert Hugh Jones, Albert Larkin, James Barnes Hilton, Gilmore 
Nicholas Herman, Lowry Goode George, Louis Johnson, Harold Griffin Elder, 
Eaymond Guylo Cundy, Cephas Burlaw Adams, William Eandolph Logan, 
Joseph LeEoy Bricker, Harry Allen Chamberlain, George Kress Garside, 
Calvin Mitchell George, Osborne Elmer Quinton, Clifford Stanley Swan, 
Henry Nelson Lorish, Eoy Taylor Lorish, Carl Arvid East, Eaymond Thomas 
Davis, William Bunker Edman, Joseph Albert Mosser Eobinson, James F. 
Brush, Evan Arthur Jones, Howard William Tully, Albert Davis Bierman, 
Peter Lang, Chester Frederick Crowley, Thomas Edy Callahan, Edward 
Taber Alniy, Nels William Strale, Nelson Strong Spencer, Archibald Mc- 
Dougal Hamilton, Grover Francis Mulvaney, Walter Augustus Day, Rhine- 
hart William Harms, Albert Franklin Beecher, Bruce Anderson Young, 
Dennis Burdette McGehee, Wade W. Reece, William Arthur Freeman, 
Arthur Chester Irons, Charles Blakely Spencer, Guy Northrup St. Clair, 
Samuel Bernard Davies, John E'dward Sandmeyer, Lewis Conrad Davies, 
Leon Gaston Selby, Judson Henry Gougler, George Johnson, Clarence LeEoy 
Horn, Henry Clay Horn, David Stock, Carl Fred Leonard Nelson, George 
Bernhard Waage, Jesse Earl Midkiff, Samuel Dextor Bingham, Chauncy 
DePew, Francis Edmond Davidson, George Gillespie Bell, George Earl 
Wallis, Frederick McKibben Lorish, Ealph Woolverton Gould, William Ben- 
jamin Eatner, Eoscoe Conkling Morrison, William James Wisdom, Harry 
Sedgman Atkinson, Sophus Blicker Hansen, E'dward Julian Barr, Carl 
Richard Reynolds, William Glen Darst, Lawrence Edward Diedrich, Frank 
Wallace Manning, Edward Lewis Fiske, Paul Nelson Mitchell, Frank 
Shepperd Jones, Otto Earl Goltz, William James Mitchell, Albert Edward 
Peterson, Osmond Smith, William Gottfried Peterson, Charles Baker Barron, 
Maurice Louis Bluhm, Harry Benner, William John Pooley, Thomas Edward 
Foggett, Joseph William Curnutt, Nels Albert Carlson, James Lester Kearns, 
George Walfred Anstrand, W^altcr Victor Benson, Charles Eudolph Thors- 
berg, Harvey Eugene Newman, Harold Axel Anstrand, Elmer Walter Borch, 
George Wagner, Clifford Listen Burnham, Eichard Gordon Arner, Eobert 
Plowe, Howard Hill Wanzer, Loy Newman Mcintosh, John August Johnson. 



74 Proceedings of tlie [October 11, 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as ' ' South Shore 
Lodge No. 1056." 

Laurel Lodge, U. J)., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge February 21, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted March 2, 1921, by Bro. Bert B. Uebele, D. D. 
Gr. M. for the Second District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 117 

Number elected 98 

Number rejected 7 

Number initiated 95 

Number passed 92 

Number raised 92 

Number not acted on 12 

Number named in dispensation 116 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 1 

Number signing petition for charter 207 

Whose names are as follows: 

Harry Walker DeJarnette, Joel A. Allen, Alfred C. Anderson, Edward 
C. Grimes, Robert E. Eeinke, Eaymond W. Freed, Albert H. Pleickhardt, 
Claude Nathan Mangan, William M. Schneider, Joseph A. Geilen, Andrew 
Olsen Ha^a, Harvey S. Christensen, Fred Heidenfelder, George B. Long, 
George W. Long, Alfred P. Eeiehert, Harry N. Abitz, Ernest S. Fredell, 
Herman O. A. Heideman, John George Schindehuette, Edward J. Treutelaar, 
John J. Surbeck, Edward J. Tubbs, Louis J. Schultz, Eaymond C. Morrison, 
Henry Thiele, William E. Thele, Theodore A. Fett, Henry P. Doornbosch, 
Henry Kellner, Kolben Skutley, Louis J. Lange, Charles W. Klank, Matt 
Bernard, Jr., George D. Stumpfhaus, Seth Harry, Eobert MeConkindale, 
George H. Fairley, Charles Przirembel, Curtis H. Goebel, Eichard Milne, 
William W. Everitt, O. Edward Pederson, A. F. Bush, Stewart W. ©ourley, 
William E. E'nglund, John W. Taylor, Theo. C. Behl, Charles L. Schneider, 
Lee Charles Schneider, David J, Fehlberg, Carl A. Mueller, Howard A. 
Schlaeger, Harvey C. Schlaeger, Samuel Butler, George B. Anys, Henry F. 
Antes, Oliver C. Doe, Ernest C. Cameron, Edward H. Clemenson, William 
C. Tragnitz, Eobert H. Colmey, Emil B. Gran, Herman Horstmann, Carl 
Herman Eedlich, Henry Marius Vogt, Emil Eobert Johnson, William C. 
Ncmitz, Otto G. Nemitz, Otto C. Dobbenstein, Edward J. Euhnke, Amos 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 75 

E. Dixon, Frank Sevcrin Sorenscn, Daniel Webster Mallory, Ernest D. 
Hughes, Frederick A. Anderson, E'dward Egebrecht, Ole N. Clcmenson, 
William P. Hoyt, Arthur A. G. Land, Harvey B. Evans, Henry W. E. Kerr, 
Robert Emmet Keating, Clarence J. Samuelson, Henry V. Huff, Leonard 
James Lange, George N. Frost, Charles Schlaeger, George H. Munns, Charles 
L. Jurs, Harold O. Carlson, Hugo E. Maerz, Otto A. Maerz, William E. 
Belke, Archie S. Frey, Mandel B. Molbo, Olof J. Peterson, Adill G. Berg, 
James Banning, David Alexander, William H. Clemenson, George E. Peter- 
son, Harry H. Clemenson, William J. Gourley, Herman C. Eeinier, Arthur 
Hempe, Herman C. Sicvers, Axel E. Lind, John P. Bennett, Alfred Edge- 
combe, Edward J. Neuffer, John T. Petersen, Harry F. Doering, Leslie 
Williams, W. J. Stevenson, Carl August Ostling, Louis Edward Eeichmann, 
Bert Henry Jeffers, Herbert Louis Klank, Arvid Emmanuel Erickson, Alex- 
ander Milne, Vlastinal Jelinek, Marshall Victor Wheeler, Paul Carl John 
Tews, Harold Soderborg, William Dean, Jr., Joseph Nyles Kuzel, Eoy Axel 
Nelson, John Anderson, Harold Severson, Charles Eobcrt Holter, Bert 
Edward Holmes, Adolph Mellblom, George Joseph Norris, Eobcrt Martin 
Hildreth, Charles Arthur Rose, William C. Greiss, Beruhard Frank Maerz, 
Louis Clarence Bobbitt, Carl Emil Eosene, Charles Dean, Plerbert Newton 
Buckley, Irving William Welker, Viggo Louis White, Martin Siddons, 
Clarence Wm. Pries, Walter Howard Stedman, Joseph John Peters, Charles 
Burdette Carter, Harry G. Elmstrom, Gustavo Gottfrit Heurlin, Hugh W. 
Jones, Fred Korngiebcl, Ingwald Bransdorph E'id, Ernest Arthur Magnuson, 
Fred J. Miller, Charles Stock, Jr., Eaymond E. Decker, George H. Meilinger, 
Harry Eogers, George Gammic, Harry Herman Herbst, Harry Victor Ander- 
son, Millard Fillmore Lloyd, Raymond Allen Church, Charles E'lmer Ely, 
Albert Drummond Fielding, Joseph Wilfred Limoges, Raymond Albert 
Heintz, Harry Edward Sawyer, John Sweuscn, John Fred Ciske, Harold 
Richard Carpenter, Ridgway Hampton, William AVatson, Clarence Henry 
Nelson, Walter William Socrgel, Homer Norman Knight, Lewis Watson 
Shepard, Roy Louis Welker, William John Johnson, Ora Anson Eawlins, 
Frank Victor Gilbert, Guy Thayer Ferguson, Clyde L. Lucas, David E. Van 
Natta, Fred Dean, William H. Maerz, Mathew H. Davie, Walter H. Treu- 
tclaar, Peter M. Schoeuenbcrger, Alexander H. Gillespie, Charles F. Kruger, 
George E. Fisher, Sigmund Dziadulewicz, Arthur A. Keevil, George Mc- 
Neills, Eoy William Drommerhausen, Andrew Julius Anderson, Arthur 
Alluri, Edward Carl Bcckman, Charles Sherman, Jr., Charles Emil Carlstadt, 
Joseph Robert Berndtson, Gustavo Werner Anderson, Isaac Withers Petti- 
grew, Maurice Howard. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Laurel 
Lodge No. 1057." 



76 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

Glenview Lodge, U. D., Glenview. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge October 28, 1920, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted November 16, 1920, by Bro. Wm. Bending, 
D. D. G. M. for the Fourth District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 29 

Number elected 18 

Number rejected 6 

Number initiated 18 

Number passed 17 

Number raised 17 

Number not acted on 5 

Number named in dispensation 50 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 
charter 1 

Number signing petition for charter G7 

Whose names are as follows: 

George Kehle, Mathias A. Greuning, William B. Carr, Edwin F. Eugen, 
Herman Meier, Joseph W. Morton, John H. Gaetje, Alfred H. Eugen, Louis 
E'. Voelk, Otto J. Lamberg, Louis S. Cole, Harry H. Hoffman, John Dwight, 
Mathias Grenning, Charles D. Bartling, Vern V. Hipsley, William C. Frecse, 
Nels A. Swenson, Harry Gerhardt Soeffker, Cornell W. Vansteenberg, Nels 
Theodore Petersen, William H. Buchardt, Eudolph Lauer, Bert E. Gould, 
William B. Hagen, Walter Meng, Herman P. Eugen, Frank Moeller, Frank 
J. Bartleme, John McLachlan, Henry H. Dilg, Edward Bleimehl, John W. 
Cooksy, August C. Kaukee, William H. Lorenz, Burt H. Kress, Edward E. 
Gutzler, Felix Junge, Charles S. Cole, John Dilg, Harold Grenning, Walter 
C. Gehrke, Herman Eugen, Jacob Simonsen, Henry Glos, Clarence M. 
Bartelme, William P. Melzer, Herbert S. Scharemberg, Christian Willman, 
Fred A. Eugen, Louis Eugen, John W. Dewes, Martin J. Fouquette, Charles 
A. Bartling, Max K. Appleyard, August C. Clavey, Edward S. Scott, William 
W. Sonne, Henry A. Wille, Oscar H. Benz, Lyle B. Tripp, William J. Smeal, 
Guy W. French, Charles D. Eugen, Gns A. Olson, John B. Meier, Harvey 
I. Brewer. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as ' ' Glenview 
Lodge No. 1058." 



1921] Gra7id Lodge of Illinois 77 

Level Lodge, U. D., Chicago. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge February 9, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted February 11, 1921, by Bro. Paul A. Neuffer, 
D. D. G. M. for the 15th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 28 

Number elected 25 

Number rejected 1 

Number initated 24 

Number passed 19 

Number raised 19 

Number not acted on 2 

Number named in dispensation 80 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 1 

Number signing petition for charter 99 

Whose names are as follows: 

William W. Scragg, James Sherman Talbott, William Brownson, Wil- 
helm Carolius Olson, Arthur W. Dixon, Edward Emil Curlieux, Knute Tor- 
gersen Skjeveland Knudtzon, Roger Kerwin, Fred Floyd Kennedy, Philip 
Gillett Wheeler, Fred Elum Cutter, Henry Jacob Dinkmeyer, Maurice John 
Clarke, Ludwig Paus, Earle Henry Smith, Alfred John Smith, Thedore 
Anthony Hartmann, Ehea Etamett Crockett, William Henry Goetz, Walter 
Ralph Kohler, William John Gross, Erik Dahlberg, Knute Marselius Nelson, 
Fred Richard Lakins, Jeremiah Merritt Cox, Richard Hugo Hausse, Clarence 
Arthur Beutel, Oscar Charles Leason, Irwin Adelbert Gardner, Charles 
George Essig, John Anton Conrad, Harry Andrew Englebaugh, Guy Edwin 
Farley, Don Porter Hayn, Carl John Trexler, Emil Oscar Martin Lindow, 
E'ugene Byron Beach, Frederick Leason, Andrew Lawford, Frank Drebing, 
Jr., Hiram Kinnaird Rightmire, Albert Sloan, Edmond Horn Miller, Her- 
man Julius Friese, James Bradley, Harvey Julius Carlson, Joseph Saples 
Bull, Henry George Ernst, George Benjamin William Ernst, Milo Verl Sims, 
George Arthur Parker, Thomas Robert Bonner Teasdale, Norman Mac- 
Kenzie, Louis Weinberg, John Edward Day, William Costello Fyfe, Arthur 
Edmund Gorvett, Axel Peterson Burg, William Christian Keinath, William 
Thompson Carrigan, Steve Olsen Delgardo, Wilmer Frederick La Barge, 
Ernest Douglas Potts, William Robert Gundlach, John Vacca, Wade Cam- 
eron Worrell, Arthur Stanley Brown, Thomas Brown, Orville Heckman 
Tousey, Henry Gustaf Rhode, Frank James Harskey, Harold Butterfus 
Johnson, Edward Ullmicher, William Edward Wiseman, Andrew Ladegaard 
Pedersen, Richard Otto Helwig, Charles Henry Mann, Leo Albert Steffens, 



78 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

Russell Dow Skerrett, Andrew Hay Crawford, Leonard Edwin Hosier, John 
Wesley Coghill, George Louis Peulausk, Edward James Strycek, Edward 
George Mihaliak, Arthur Otto Fcuer, William Hovey Orme, Harry Graham, 
Earl Albert Martin, Emil August Beckman, Joseph Zoach Cahill, George 
Otto Jurgensen, Edward Chauncey Harris, Axtel Joseph Wingblade, George 
Laurimer Paterson, James Garfield Hickman, John Albert Schoeneman, 
Bion Jones, Clifford Sherman Moore. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Level 
Lodge No. 1059." 

North EVanston Lodge, U. D., Evanston. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge May 24, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted May 27, 1921, by Bro. Geo. E. Moore, 
D. D. G. M. for the 14th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 36 

Number elected 28 

Number rejected 5 

Number initiated 20 

Number passed 18 

Number raised 18 

Number not acted on 3 

Number named in dispensation 160 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 178 

Whose names are as follows: 

William Henry Molter, George Mertou Hubbard, Melvern Smith 
Humphryes, John Fowler Watt, Victor Ernest Eussum, Howard Ehrlich, 
Charles John Schmidt, George Henry Manlove, William Franklin Gamble, 
Hubert Dillwyn Jordan, Jr., Don Albert Jones, Samuel George Grubb, 
Ferdinand Weichmann, Jesse Kinder Snyder, William Nelson Buchanan, 
Joseph Whitley Motherwell, Edward O. Williams, Horace Edward Bent, 
Harry Glick, Herbert Johnson, Joseph Edward E'nerson, John Peter Moos, 
Frederick Osborn Blackman, Charles Otto Larson, John Willis Green, Jacob 
Charles Yoeum, William George Todtleben, Howard George Moore, Eoy 
Wiles Pervier, Edward August Skaer, Herman Francis Malott, Albert 
Frank Jacob Weichmann, Malcolm Buchanan. Sterrett, Fritz Albin Lind- 
berg, Harold Godfrey Peterson, Edgar Allen Clark, Carl Ferdinand Schlundt, 
John August Lorch, Frank Eoyal Atwood, Carlos Edgar Cook, Walter 
William Steiner, Horatio William Dring, Augie Louis Hansen, George 
Sidney Thomas, William Cassidy Holmes, Oscar LeNeve Foster, Eobert 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 79 

Oatman Vandereook, William Victor Eake, Frederick Charles Stokes, Charles 
Henry Gyger, Harry Hoof, Ealph Nicholas Butow, Herbert Spencer Simp- 
son, George Washington Harris, William Stinson Hanna, Carl Perry Hub- 
bard, Ernest Wilmonte Kramer, Julian Eugene Smith, James Duncan Nield, 
Thomas Franklin Torkilson, Hubert Addison Meade, Peter Arthur Lemoi, 
Leonard Aswell Gesler, Charles Thomas Beall, Lew E'arl Davis, William 
Edmond Brochon, Milton Irving Stone, Joseph Henry Bristle, George Erhart 
Balluff, Jacob Jidius Steffens, Harry Philip Tuscher, Konrad George Baur, 
William Raymond Sheckler, Charles Norris Mann, Frederick Watson 
Moore, John Peter Eandlev, Maxmilian Christian Euehl, James Allen Cren- 
shaw, Jasper Eay Woltz, Horace Dyer Bent, John Eussell Bent, Ernest 
Emil Anderson, Benjamin William Thurtell, David DeWitt Cooke, Launcelot 
Todd Biddle, LeEoy Parker Branch, John William Branch, Charles Lincoln 
Burlingham, Eobert August Sonnen, Cliflford Warren Lyon, Leroy Mathias 
Nilles, Edwin Otto Eabe, Sterling Louis Eedman, Frederick Ernest Keighley, 
Frank Eugene Atkins, George Henry Coleman, Jr., Harry Clyde Darger, 
William Balhatchet, Albert Charles Sydell, Herbert George Graves, Harry 
George Garrett, Charles Albert Gale, George Wellington Clark, Harry Edson 
Blood, Hugh Orr, Bruce Vickroy Hill, Joseph Perry Brownlee, Foster Burr 
Steward, Carson Childs Eemington, Joseph Michael Host, William Brown 
Little, Justin Fulton Barbour, Leon C. Pelott, Henry Herman Koenig, 
Edward Monson, Carl Martin Mohr, Ernest Jason Ford, William Marshall 
Gale, Charles Philipp Hirth, Eobert Maxwell Brown, Carl Clifford Griggs, 
Charles Eoy Morrison, John Hollingsworth Eowland Jamar, Timothy 
Lorenzo John Klapp, Jr., Oscar Edward Lindgren, Chester Arthur Legg, 
Manley Hard Simmons, William Harvey Wyckoff, William Mason Sherrill, 
Maxson Porter Merrill, Norton LeDroit Woodward, Gustav Eobert Paul 
Gehrandt, Eobert Eugene Keeley, Albert Holle Homrighaus, Frank Peter- 
son Brock, Elmer E'dward Nilles, William David Knowlton, Alfred Paul 
Roamer, Louis Frederick Kunstman, Eoyal Calvin Wise, Marshall Victor 
Palm, Harold Alfred Chirhart, Peter Eowland Shoemaker, Mild Eoutledge 
Williams, Eoy Earl Fuller, Eoss Henry Welch, Eobert Strong Corlett, 
Eobert Fulton, James Eoy Ozanne, Sidney Earl Scholes, Bentley Smith 
Handwork, Wilbur Jerome Carmichael, Eoseoe Edward Doolittle, Eichard 
John Eyerson, John Jacob Stadtler, Samuel Harvey Gilbert, William Brace, 
Harry Theodore Swanson, Harry Austin Pryde, John Kuerten, Harry Web- 
ster Hadley, William Guthrie McMillan, William Axel Franzen, Stanley 
William Franzen, John Wordsworth Stephenson, William Joseph Sonnen, 
Daniel Franklin Comstock, Edward George Wilcox, Addison Elmer Yauger, 
Paul Newton Dale, Claude Egerton Hill, Bennison Franklin Bartcl, Eobert 
Kendall Lewis, Warden Tannahill Blair, Harry Lawrence Malcher, William 
Eugene Lape, Eaphael De Clereq, William Norton Hall. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as ' ' North 
Evanston Lodge No. 1060." 



80 Proceedings of tlie [October 11, 

Ogle Lodge, U. D., Foncston. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge March 4, 1921, by Bro. Daniel 
G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted March 22, 1921, by Bro. E. Mitchell, D. D. 
G. M. for the 27th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 13 

Number elected 11 

Number rejected 2 

Number initiated 11 

Number passed 8 

Number raised 8 

Number not acted on 

Number named in dispensation 33 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 2 

Number signing petition for charter 41 

Whose names are as follows: 

John Hay, Martin H. Eakle, Bernard B. Postel, B. J. Fritze, N. Hunt- 
ley, Samuel W. Mumma, Eiley M. Garnian, William W. Speedie, Leonard 
G. Koberts, Nathaniel D. Eakle, Jacob E. Fisher, Justus DeGraff, Holden 
H. Miller, W. R Meyers, Earl C. FitzGerald, Uffie DeGraff, Eobert Huntley, 
Orrin W. McBride, Colman T. Bruce, Harry E. Lentz, Jacob Eugene Ains- 
worth, Eugene A. Pyfer, Percy S. McLain, James W. Bruce, Bertram G. 
Wood, John F. Shafer, Darwin G. Allen, Fred G. Deuth, Lewis E. Lowery, 
Daniel J. Hoffman, W. J. Burner, Edward Petrie, Oliver O. Hedrick, Bert 
E. Walb, Ben F. Harmon, Howard E'. Eakle, John F. Deuth, Fred Huntley, 
Herbert L. Eakle, Theodore G. Becker, T. G. Schoon. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Ogle Lodge 
No. 1061." 

Wood Kiver Lodge, U. D., Wood Eiver, 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge June 11, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted June 18, 1921, by Bro. E. S. Mclntyre, 
D. D. G. M. for the 84th District, 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 7 

Number elected 3 

Number rejected 4 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 81 

Number initiated 3 

Number passed 3 

Number raised 3 

Number not acted on 

Number named in dispensation 105 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 108 

Whose names are as follows: 

Richard Carlton Wilson, Gary Eichard Wagner, Carl Monroe Fox, 
William Bacheldor, George Gerald Guker, Fred Francis Berry, George 
William Buck, Herman Martin Wuestenfeld, Harry Everal Camfield, John 
Wesley Eeynolds, William Aaron Miller, Charles Hall, John Edward Perrin, 
Irvin Clifford Hatridge, Louis Edgar Eoberts, Theodore Walter Hermeling, 
Harry Mann, Joseph Griffith Eigg, Peter Anthony Geibel, William O 'Neil, 
Henry John Kahney, Jr., Frank Floyd Milton, Chester Ewald Miller, Max 
Nissenholtz, George Elmer Schilling, Henry August Loarts, Albert Eeid 
Montgomery, Loyal DeWitt Palmer, Maurice E'dward Calahan, Lemuel 
Leroy Tuley, George William Thompson, George William Gunnison, Edwin 
Milton Harris, Charles Edwin Graves, Fred Crandall, Eaymond Francis 
Buck, John Dudley Weaver, Hudson McBain Gillis, Marx Edward Hartwig, 
Henry Schnaufer, William Edward Atkin, Julius Gamer, Harry Dee Scott, 
William E. Stoneham, Joseph Frank Traband, Charles Enmiett Benner, 
William Andrew Grove, Otto Joseph Hoffmann, Bayard Watson Lemonds, 
Charles Milton Shook, Orville Morgan, T. Simpson McCall, Hilbert Alfred 
Juhlin, Bert Melva Smith, Charles E'dward Burris, Thomas Calvin Finley, 
Alfred Juhlin, Joseph Everson, William Henry Witthoflft, Tiry Hubor 
Harrod, Henry Wesley Ballard, Horace E. Scarborough, Eoy J. McMillan, 
J. H. Peters, L. G. Osborn, Samuel Fred Leflfler, Charles Ealph Baughman, 
George McClellan McGaw, Tancred Paul Eggmann, George Armstrong 
Smith, George William Pilcher, Herb Malcolm Powell, John Francis Mc- 
Credie, Amiel Oscar Brummer, Ealph Eichmond Matthews, William Asa 
Cook, Andrew W. Helser, Thurman Corey, George Leslie Nelson, Elmer 
Henry Payne, Fenton William Soliday, John Henry Gartenbach, Julius 
Kocher, Jr., John William Elliott, Charles Cason, Eector H. Eeynolds, 
George Alviu Oetken, Everett Earl Endicott, John, Email Frick, Eichard 
P. Thompson, August Wuestenfeld, Frederick David Owen, Eobert Parks, 
William Gustavo Couvion, Eobert Vernon Ford, John Stoneham, Walter 
Joshua Vaughn, Amiel Harting, Arthur Eaymond Creeling, Edward B. 
Garrett, Fred N. Brett, Arthur Carl Slater, Maurice Kurlander, Herman 
Jacob Hillbrand, Earl Joesting McNely, Ernest Graham Lowe, Edwin 
Woodside Lasbery, James Arthur Eankin. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Wood 
•River Lodge No, 1062." 



82 Proceedings of tlie [October 11, 

CissNA Park Lodge, U. D., Cissna Park. 

A dispensation Avas issued for this lodge April 1, 1921, by Bro. Daniel 
G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted April 29, 1921, by Bro. E. C. Vanderporten, 
D. D. G. M. for the 46th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 13 

Number elected 12 

Number rejected 

Number initiated 12 

Number passed 12 

Number raised 12 

Number not acted on 1 

Number named in dispensation 26 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 1 

Number signing petition for charter 37 

Whose names are as follows: 

John Fred Smith, Guy Brown, John H. Crist, Harold C. Geiger, Edwin 
Scott Judy, H. G. Pendergrast, H. B. Harvey, William Walder, Loayl F. 
Steiner, Eugene C. Eiehoz, Eobert E. Pendergrast, Phil Kibler, John E. 
Beeson, Fred Wustholz, J. C Sailor, B. Fittinger, Ira S. Judy, A. F. 
Ziegenhorn, Ira Sailor, Maurice L. Ziegenhorn, W. D. Benjamin, Eoy E. 
Doan, Ernest A. Lindner, Wm. E. Roberts, Henry Verkler, Alva E. Pitzer, 
David Gingerich, Lloyd D. Hollingsworth, Phil Kibler, Jr., Benjamin E. 
Weidner, Arthur W. Strauss, Ernest Odell Spelbring, William E. Malott, 
Charles W. Verkler, Carl Erickson, Frank L. Carman, Eaymond E. Staubus, 
Louis W. Carman. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Cissna Park 
Lodge No. 1063." 

Great Light Lodge, U. D., Decatur. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge April 26, 1921, by Bro. Daniel 
G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted May 4, 1921, by Bro. Geo. A. Stadler, D. D. 
G. M. for the 61st District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 11 

Number elected 10 

Number rejected 1 



1921] Gra7id Lodge of Illinois 83 

Number initiated 8 

Number passed 6 

Number raised 6 

Number not acted on 2 

Number named in dispensation 132 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 138 

Whose names are as follows : 

Guy C. Knickerbocker, Samuel Morthland, Samuel O. Kennedy, Daniel 
H. Crawford, John B. Morton, Arthur F. Goodyear, George E. States, Harley 
R. Gregory, John L. Klump, William A. Dorr, Emil E. Myers, Eoy M. Ham- 
ilton, Walter D. Stilabower, William L. Huflf, Jeremiah M, Duncan, Henning 
H. Nottelmann, John B. Nottelmann, Walter J. Hampton, Homer W. Marx- 
miller, Edward A. Mitchell, Fred H. Johns, Harry P. Baehman, W. Thomas 
Coleman, Egbert L. Beall, James C. Fisher, James A. Hedrick, Samuel A. 
Smock, Grant Windsor, James E. Wasem, Calvin L. Bunting, William E. 
Eehm, Eawley E. Williams, Frank G. Kauerauf, Eugene Linxweiler, D. M. 
Cash, Thurman E. Hammau, Benjamin H. Gullett, Irving H. Neece, Eobert 
W. Heady, Victor W. Dalton, John McK. Booth, Archie E. West, Virgil 

B, Stimmel, Samuel Morthland, Jr., Charles Willis, Charles W. Kunz, John 
K. Gumpper, William C. Peplow, Homer Ellis, Walter E. Eugh, Charles A. 
Kughler, Carl G. Greenfield, George W. Doerr, James T. Cloyd, Eoger W. 
McGee, Edwin F. Arnold, Lee E. Cantwell, Albert E. Mullen, Arthur J. 
Schaub, Justus V. White, Porter B. Simcox, Walter W. Anderson, Virgil 
A. Payne, George F. Hess, Frank Eemley, Jr., Eobert E'. Henry, Bert A. 
Dickerson, John T. McDonald, William N. Hodge, George W. Weeks, Edwin 
Adamson, Fred S. Knothe, Eobert J. Hankins, William C. Chambers, Louis 
F. Boss, Harry L. Bechtel, Clyde E". Mathias, Ealph Jester, Frank M. 
Pumphrey, Eufus G. Peabody, Eobert C. Eentfro, Henry L. LeGrand, 
Lawrence C. Wheat, John E. Pogue, Harry E. Calef, George E. Hook, John 
Moll, Jesse M. Corzine, James M. Coon, George W. Barham, James E. 
Hinton, Gro\3r C. Patton, Charles W. Vest, Dawson K. Cannon, Edward 
F. Telling, Martin P. Sweet, Wilford W. Miller, Arthur E. Fehlber, Eoscoe 

C. Osborne, Kenneth Duncan, James A. Vent, Solomon M. Schmink, James 
E. Burcham, Arthur W. Wyckoff, Alexander J. Pierde, Charles W. McCulley, 
Clement J. Appleman, J. Nelson Armentrout, Edwin E. Waggoner, Calvin 

E. Harsh, James P. Dace, Martin A. Foltz, Gustav H. Peterson, Preston 
T. Hicks, Eufus J. Thieil, Charles A. Wiley, William H. Snyder, Joseph 

F. Nientker, Augustus C. Duncan, Lcmont Doan, Russell C. Appleman, 
John C. Calhoun, Ashley P. Clark, Archie E. Greenfield, Biness F. Johnson, 
Otis B. Boyd, Andrew E. Barton, Enos C. Nally, Louis V, Lanum, Lee J. 
Johnson, William L. Davis, Woodford W. Miller, Lynn Kennedy, Charles 



84 Proceedings of the [October il, 

A. Swarm, Clarence L. Eazer, Harry D. Payne, Frank N. Grimsley, James 
D. Cook. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Great 
Lights Lodge No. 1064." 

Oglesby Lodge, U. D., Oglesby. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge April 22, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted April 26, 1921, by Bro. Chas. E. Morgan, 
D. D. G. M. for the 41st District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 14 

Number elected 12 

Number rejected 1 

Number initiated 12 

Number passed 11 

Number raised 11 

Number not acted on 1 

Number named in dispensation 26 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 1 

Number signing petition for charter 37 

"VNTiose names are as follows: 

John Myles Gould, W.M., Otto Julius Heilstedt, S.W., Kobert Harkis 
Pryde, J.W., Samuel Allison Kidd, Treas., Noah Morgan Mason, Secy., 
William Easton, William Henry Welch, Alexander Malcolm Kidd, Alof 
James Peterson, James Eobert Pryde, John Hamilton, William Thomas 
Ealey, John Corgiat, Isaac Weaver, John Clydesdale, Frank Henry Downs, 
Alexander Stewart Jones, Josiah Eaymond Bent, Charles Ely Coleman, 
Joseph Smith HoUingsworth, John Young, Carl James Herrick, Harvey 
George Deibert, Archie Furguson Miller, James Franklin Baumgardner, 
John William Henderson, Victor Herbert Lundberg, Clarence William 
Ealey, Hugh Eichard Kerrick, John Henry Pryde, Archie M. Frew, Isaac 
Josiah Hatton, Evan Batty, Andrew Cummins Kidd, Joel Eagiiar Paulson, 
Edward Mortimer Macdonald, William David Eoss. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as "Oglesby 
Lodge No. 1065." 

Stonington Lodge, U. D., Stonington. 

A dispensation was issued for this lodge November 29, 1920, by Bro, 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 85 

This lodge was instituted December 8, 1920, by Bro. A. A. Bauer, 
D. D. G. M. for the 72nd District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 22 

Number elected 16 

Number rejected 6 

Number initiated 16 

Number passed 12 

- Number raised 12 

Number not acted on 

Number named in dispensation 25 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 37 

Whose names are as follows: 

Opal Hamilton Lowder, Jesse Bell Owen, Harry Chamberlain Hurlbutt, 
I?oy Allen Corzine, Eugene Brooks Shrout, Elmo Samuel Drake, Julius 
Jacob Eing, Roy Alma Eobinson, Carl Clyde Nebold, Albert Eex Kincaid, 
Charles William Monson, Joseph Virgil Lynn, James Hyslop, Chester Alvin 
Peabody, Thcophihis Carl Ponting, William Kenneth Zeigler, John Emil 
Koch, Irvin William Larrick, John Erwin Shields, Ernest Ward, Frank 
William McChristy, Hans Hansen, Olen Crow Markwell, John Henry Coffey, 
Philip Jones Wright, Waldo Hiram Drake, Clarence Adelbet Hurlbutt, 
Ealph Alfred Briggs, William Edward Nothdurft, Ober William Livergood, 
Stephen Elesworth Luster, Abraham Marion Buflfington, Frank Elmer Leach, 
William Tecumseh Short, Andrew Livingston Pollock, Elmer Franklin 
Gebhart, Clarence Webster Tilley. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as ' ' Stonington 
Lodge No. 1066." 

Omega Lodge, U. D., Alpha. 

A dispensution was issued for this lodge April 29, 1921, by Bro. 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, grand master. 

This lodge was instituted May 5, 1921, by Bro.. Francis H. Bradley, 
D. D. G. M. for the 34th District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 3 

Number elected 3 

Number rejected 

Number initiated 3 

Number passed 1 



86 Proceedings of the [October 11, 

Number raised 1 

Number not acted on 

Number named in dispensation 29 

Number named in dispensation not signing petition for 

charter 

Number signing petition for charter 30 

Whose names are as follows: 

Weldon Lawrence Elker, Harold George Wirt, Charles Augustus Eoss, 
Alfred Clark Eiker, John Cord Dunker, Chaunccy Thurston Shearer, Clinton 
Clyde Cox, Lyle Roy Cox, Eeubon Gus Bohman, Joseph Frank Cox, James 

E. Ammcrman, Marc Eex Wood, Fred Oliver Wood, Earl Arnold Stanley, 
Paul Arthur Benson, Eobert Harland Willett, Albert Allen Stromquist, E, 
Earl Knox, John Edward E'pperson, Chester Theodore Peterson, Clarence 

F. Jones, Walter K. Cox, Joe Fifer Snodgrass, Eeuel Theron Gustus, T. 
Lyle Cox, Ellis Bryan Kirk, Cleo Edward McLaughlin, Eolland Frenell, 
John T. McCurdy, Lonie Oscar South. 

We recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge as ' ' Omega 
Lodge No. 1067." 

The committee desires at this time to convey to the district deputies 
and officers of these lodges under dispensation a word of commendation 
for the care, neatness and accuracy of the records of these lodges. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

W. H. Beckman, 

F. O. LORTON, 

A. L. Picket, 
NiMROD Mace, 
D. D. King, 

Committee. 



Election of Officers 

The grand master appointed the district deputy grand 
masters as distributing and collecting tellers and twelve 
brethren as counting tellers. The tellers having counted and 
collected the several ballots reported that the following 
brethren had received a majority of votes cast, and they were 
declared elected : 

Bro. Elmer E'. Beach, grand master. 

Bro. Arthur E. Wood, deputy grand vmster. 



1921-] Grand Lodge of Illinois 87 

Bro. Richard C. Davenport, senior grand warden. 
Bro. David D, King, junior grand warden. 
Bro. Lkroy A. Goddard, grand treasurer. 
Bro. Owen Scott, grand secretary. 



Called Off 

At 12 o'clock, noon, the most worshipful grand lodge was 
called from labor to refreshment until 9 o'clock Wednesday 
morning. 



88 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

SECOND DAY 

WKDNE;SDAY, OCTOBER 12, A.D. I92I 

The grand master called the grand lodge from refreshment 
to labor at nine o'clock a.m. The grand officers and repre- 
sentatives were present same as the preceding day. 

Report — lUmois Masonic Orphans' Home 

Bro. Robert J. Daly, presented the report of the Board of 
Managers of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Horhe at La- 
Grange. So much of the report as related to appropriations 
was referred to the Finance Committee. The remainder of 
the report was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Your Board of Managers in charge of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' 
Home fraternally submits the following report of its administration for 
the year ending September 30, 1921. 

Pursuant to the action at the last meeting of the grand lodge placing 
the supervision of the Masonic Homes under separate boards, the grand 
master appointed the Board of Managers for the Illinois Masonic Orphans' 
Home as follows: Brethren William D. Price for one year, Kobert J. 
Daly for two years, Eobert C. Fletcher for three years, with the grand 
master, Daniel G. Fitzgerrell and the E.W. deputy grand master. Brother 
Elmer E. Beach, as members ex-officio. 

Immediately following the closing of the grand lodge meeting, the new 
board met and effected its organization as follows: Brethren Robert J. 
Daly, President, Robert C. Fletcher, Treasurer, William D. Price, Secretary. 

By action of the board, Brother and Mrs. George L. Hilliker were 
continued as superintendent and matron and Brother Arthur E. Higgins, 
M.D., as physician for the home. 

Official Bonds 

The bond of the treasurer was fixed at twenty thousand dollars, 
($20,000) and that of the superintendent at five thousand dollars, ($5,000). 



3921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 89 

Surety company bonds for these amounts have been furnished by these 
officers. 

The board has held four called meetings during the year. The ap- 
pointive members of the board have met regularly on the second Monday 
of each month at the home and following the established custom of former 
years, the supervision of the home has alternated month by month among 
the appointive members. 

There is nothing unusual to report about our family during the past 
year. Except for the minor ills incident to childhood, the health conditions 
have been excellent. We believe that in a great measure this is a conse- 
quence of the improved playground facilities made possible by the splendid 
gift of Oriental Consistory. The school reports of our children show 
steady progress in their studies. 

Manual Training 

Full use has been made of the facilities provided by the addition of 
the manual training building which embrace rooms for the print shop, the 
woodworking shop and domestic science. The print shop, under the super- 
vision of Bro. A. E. Harvie, has furnished excellent instruction for the 
boys and has been self-sustaining. As in previous years, instruction in 
woodworking and domestic science has been given during the summer 
months. 

The management of the home has sustained a severe loss in the death 
of the matron, Mrs. Hilliker, which occurred on Saturday evening, Sep- 
tember 17. She was a woman of rare qualifications for her work and dur- 
ing her five years' residence in the home has made a permanent place for 
herself in the affections of the children. 



Improvements 

At the grand lodge meeting of 1919, the Board of Managers of the 
Masonic Homes recommended the construction of an addition at the south 
end of the home building for girls' dormitories and one at the north end 
for boys' dormitories and also of a separate building for heating and power 
plants, laundry and manual training, for which an- appropriation of one 
hundred thirty-five thousand dollars, ($135,000) was made. 

After having plans made for these buildings, including an extension 
of the south dormitory wing for hospital purposes and securing estimates 
of their cost, it was found that the appropriation was not sufficient owing 
to the very high costs of building construction. Accordingly after con- 
sultation with the grand master, it was decided to proceed with the con- 
struction of the power plant and manual training building, together with 



90 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 

the tunnel connecting it with the main building. This work has been com- 
pleted at a cost of eighty-seven thousand, three hundred thirty-seven dol- 
lars and twenty- three cents, ($87,337.23), and the building is in use. 

In 1920, by recommendation of the Finance Committee and action of 
the grand lodge, the balance remaining in the National Defense Fund 
amounting to fifty-seven thousand, one hundred seventy-two dollars and 
forty-seven cents, ($57,172.47), was made available for additional con- 
struction at the home. It was then decided to proceed with the construc- 
tion of the south dormitory and hospital section which has been completed 
at a cost of ninety-seven thousand, nine hundred forty-four dollars and 
twenty-nine cents, ($97,944.29), and is now occupied. 

The total cost of additional buildings including architect's fees has 
been one hundred eighty-five thousand, eight hundred sixty-eight dollars 
and eleven cents, ($185,868.11). 

The total appropriations by the grand lodge for building purposes 
have been one hundred ninety-two thousand, one hundred seventy-two dol- 
lars and forty-seven cents, ($192,172.47) to which must be added the 
Millen hospital building bequest of thirty-two thousand, four hundred six 
dollars and seventy-five cents, ($32,406.75), making the total amount of 
the building fund two hundred twenty-four thousand, five hundred seventy- 
nine dollars and twenty-two cents, ($224,579.22), and leaving unexpended 
in the building fund a balance of thirty-nine thousand, two hundred ninety- 
seven dollars and seventy cents, ($39,297.70). 

From the foregoing statement it will be seen that the building pro- 
gramme as outlined in 1919 is not yet complete. Owing to the steady in- 
crease in the number of our children, especially boys, the need for the 
north dormitory wing is more pressing than ever. 

With the increase in numbers, our dining room is inadequate to its 
needs and additional space for this purpose is an imperative necessity. AVe 
recommend an addition to the present dining room. 

Bequest of John H. Millen 

By the will of Bro. John H. Millen, a member of St. John's Lodge 
No. 13 F. & A. M. of Dayton, Ohio, and for a time a resident of Chicago, 
thirty-two thousand four hundred six dollars and seventy-five cents 
($32,406.75) was given to the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home for "the 
construction of a building to be used preferably for manual training or for 
educational, amusement, sleeping, or hospital purposes." This bequest has 
been received by the board and turned over to the grand treasurer to be 
credited to the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home building fund and has 
been used for the construction of the hospital. A suitable bronze tablet. 




JOHN H. MILLEN 

Born October 7, 18G1, at Alton, 111. 
Died June 4, 1921, at Sacramento, Cal. 



mi' 



OP"T E 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 91 

commemorating this bequest, has been placed at the entrance to the 
hospital. 

Other Bequests 

The will of Bro. Edward F. Toomey, a member of Old Glory Lodge 
No. 975, bequeaths approximately twenty-five thousand dollars, ($25,000) 
to the Masonic Orphans' Home. The will of Bro. Robert T, Wilbank, be- 
queaths an amount not yet known. The will of Bro. George R. Hoadley 
bequeaths an annuity of one hundred dollars, ($100) per year to the Illi- 
nois Masonic Orphans' Home for a number of years as yet undetermined. 

We expect that during the coming year the probates of these wills will 
be completed and that in our next report the exact amounts derived from 
these bequests can be definitely reported. 

We have received from the Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Commandery 
No. 19 K.T., the sum of eight hundred sixteen dollars and thirty cents, 
($816.30) for gymnastic equipment which has been placed at interest. We 
hope to provide in the proposed new north addition, gymnasium facilities 
at which time this sum will be expended for the purpose designated. 

Furnishing Fund 

The grand lodge having made no appropriation for furnishing the new 
buildings and as many bodies and individuals had expressed a desire to 
contribute for this purpose, your board, after consultation with and the 
approval of the grand master, received many contributions for this purpose, 
the total amount being twenty thousand, four hundred ninety dollars and 
thirty-nine cents, ($20,490.39). 

A tablet giving the names of all these bodies and individuals is placed 
in the south building. A list of these names is appended hereto. These 
generous contributions have enabled us to furnish and equip the new 
buildings in a complete and satisfactory manner. 

Disbursement of Appropriations 

At the last meeting of the grand lodge, the following appropriations 
were made: 

For refrigerating plant $ 2,500.00 

For laundry equipment 3,450.00 

For repairs, minor alterations and additional equipment. 2,500.00 

For new water softening plant 5,500.00 

For maintenance 46,000.00 

These several amounts have been expended for the purposes indicated 
excepting an unexpended balance of two hundred seventy-seven dollars, and 
thirteen cents, ($277.13), of the amount appropriated for maintenance 



92 Proceedings of tlie [October 12, 

which has been returned to the grand secretary, and three thousand three 
hundred thirty-two dollars and twenty cents, ($3,332.20), remaining in the 
water softener fund. The water softener has been completed but according 
to the contract the final payment is not yet due. We, therefore, recom- 
mend that this amount be left in the hands of the board. 

Kecommendations 

Your board respectfully recommends the appropriation of the following 
amounts : 

For maintenance $46,000.00 

For new north dormitory wing, dining room extension and 

for Sundry alterations and repairs consequent thereto 56,000.00 
Furnishings 6,000.00 

The reports of the treasurer, secretary and superintendent are ap- 
pended hereto, all of which is respectfully submitted, 

Robert J. Daly, 
Egbert C. Fletcher, 
William D. Price, 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, 
Elmer E. Beach, 

Committee. 



TREASURER'S REPORT— 1920-1921 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home 
LaGrange, Illinois 

To the, Bo<ard of Managers, Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home: 

Brethren : 

Herewith please find report of the receipts and disbursements of the 
Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home, LaGrange, Illinois. 

Maintenance 

Received of William D. Price, secretary, grand lodge checks Nos. 

225, 229, 238, 249, 256, 262, 267, 272, 277, 285, 291 and 292. 

Received interest $ 1.67 

Totaling $ 46,001.67 

Paid on vouchers Nos. 1, 6, 13, 18, 29, 41, 62, 75, 92, 105, 110 

and 118. 

Total 46,001.67 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 93 

Laundry Equipment 

Eeceived from William D. Price, secretary, grand lodge check 

No. 244 $ 3,490.50 

Paid on vouchers Nos. 17, 20, 21 and 43 3,490.50 

Befrigeration Equipment 

Eeceived from William D. Price, secretary, grand lodge check 

No. 259 $ 2,500.00 

Paid on vouchers Nos. 38, 49, 72, 99, 104, 113 and 114 2,500.00 

Repairs and Alterations 

Eeceived from William D. Price, secretary, grand lodge check 

No. 245 $ 2,500.00 

Paid on vouchers Nos. 44, 70, 85, 88, 91, 102, 116 and 125 2,500.00 

Buildings 

Eeceived from C. C. Davis, treasurer $ 4,735.00 

Eeceived from sale of old boilers 250.00 

Eeceived from Kewanee Boiler Co 1,775.00 

Eeceived from interest on treasurer 's balances 192.06 

Eeceived from William D. Price, secretary, grand lodge checks 

Nos. 224, 226, 235, 239, 253, 264, 273, 281 120,281.52 

$127,233.58 
Paid as per vouchers Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 19, 
22, 23, 25, 26, 31, 32, 37, 48, 51, 55, 56, 57, 58, 66, 68, 
76, 77, 80, 87, 95, 100, 101 and 123. 
Total $127,233.58 

Furnishing Fund 

Eeceived from lodges, chapters, commanderies, consistories, 
shrines. Eastern Star chapters and individuals for furnish- 
ings and equipment for the new buildings $ 20,214.70 

Paid as per vouchers Nos. 16, 24, 27, 2-6, 30, 33, 34, 35, 36, 39, 
40, 42, 45, 47, 52, 53, 54, 59, 60, 61, 63, 64, 65, 67, 71, 
73, 74, 76, 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 90, 93, 94, 96, 97, 98, 103, 
106, 107, 108, 109, 111, 112, 115, 117, 122, 124, 126. 
Total $ 20,214.70 



94 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

John H. Millen Estate 

Eeeeived for sale of right to buy stock $ 500.00 

Received from executor on final report 4,155.01 



Total $ 4,655.01 

Paid out as per vouchers Nos. 119 and 120 $ 4,655.01 

Water Softener Fund 

Received from William D. Price, secretary, grand lodge check 

No. 286 $ 5,500.00 

Paid out as per vouchers Nos. 46, 50, 69, 89, 121 2,167.70 



Balance unexpended $ 3,332.30 

Toomey Estate 

Received from executors, six months rent of garage $ 900.00 

None o'f the above has been expended. 

Total of funds in my hand at this date $ 4,232.30 

Robert C. Fletcher, 

Treasurer. 



SECRETARY'S REPORT— 1920-1921 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home 
LaGrange, Illinois 

Charged to Disburse- 

Fund Treasurer ments Balance 

Maintenance $ 46,001.67 $ 46,001.67 

New buildings 127,233.58 127,233.58 

Water softening 5,500.00 2,167.70 $3,332.30 

Refrigeration 2,500.00 2,500.00 

Repairs and alterations 2,500.00 2,500.00 

Laundry equipment 3,490.50 3,490.50 

Furnishings fund 20,214.70 20,214.70 

Toomey estate 900.00 900.00 

Millen estate 4,655.01 4,655.01 



$212,995.46 $208,763.16 $4,232.30 

Treasurer's balance Oct. 1, 1921 $ 4,232.30 

Unexpended balance Oct. 1, 1920 $ 26,735.00 

Received from grand lodge 180,272.02 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 95 

Sale of old boilers 250.00 

Donation — Kewanee Boiler Company 1,775.00 

Contributions to furnishings fund 19,996.66 

Millen estate 4,655.01 

Toomey estate 900.00 

Discount and deductions 25.90 

Interest on treasurer 's balance 385.87 



$234,995.46 
Paid by C. C. Davis, Treas. of Old Board 22,000.00 



Balance, charged to R. C. Fletcher, Treas $212,995.46 

William D. Price, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR 

Mr. Robert J. Daly, President, Board of Managers, 
Illinois Masonic Home, La Grange, Illinois. 

Dear Sir: 

This certifies that I have examined the records of the Secretary and the 
Treasurer of the Illinois Masonic Home at La Grange, Illinois, for the year 
ending September 30, 1921, and that, in my opinion, the statements attached 
hereto are a correct exhibit of the period ended on that date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. R. Peters, 

Auditor. 
Dated at Chicago, Illinois, October 6, 1921. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF ILLINOIS MASONIC 
ORPHANS' HOME 

To the Board of Managers of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home: 
Dear Brethren: 

Herewith I submit my sixth annual report as Superintendent of this 
Home. 

At the date of this report, September 30, all of the children are well 
and healthy with the exception of one little girl who is recovering from 
an attack of pneumonia. On July 6, one of our little boys, Louis Cunning- 
ham, died very suddenly of meningitis. He was sick but a very few hours. 



96 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

Aside from these two cases, v>e have had practically no sickness during the 
past year. 

During the late winter and early spring, we had some twenty cases 
of mumps. None of the children were confined to their beds, but of 
course, it caused the usual loss of school privileges. 

Owing to the intensely dry summer, our garden was not as productive 
as we hoped it would be. We are, however, now having fresh vegetables 
from the garden, tomatoes, string beans, cabbages, beets and Swiss chard. 

In manual training not as much was accomplished as the year before 
for two reasons. First, the machinery placed in the manual training room 
was not ready for use until early in August. Second, the boys in the manual 
training class were all new to machine work and but two had previously 
had any manual training work. 

The domestic science course accomplished more. Each of the twelve 
girls in the class made themselves a gingham dress and a woolen dress, and 
did excellent work in cooking. 

With the printing plant, manual training and domestic science classes 
all at work, the vacation period passed rapidly and happily. 

Print Shop 

During the year the following gifts have been received for the benefit 
of the Print Shop: 

Integrity Lodge No. 997 $32.00 

Bohemia Chapter No. 763 O. E. S 5.00 

Square Lodge No. 978... 6.25 

Villa Grove Lodge No. 885 1.00 

James E. Dick 5.50 

Cleveland Chapter No. 696 O. E. S 15.00 

Elmhurst Lodge No. 941 2.50 

Total $67.25 

Our little shop has had a very successful year, particularly since 
Bro. A. E. Harvie has been placed in charge. Not only has it paid its 
running expenses, stock and salaries, but it has enlarged its equipment of 
type. It also purchased, at the expense of about $200.00, an addresso- 
graph for use in mailing out "The Gossip." 

There has been an added activity to the home in the last year. All 
of the children, large and small are given singing lessons Saturday after- 
noon of each week by one of the teachers in La Grange schools. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 97 

The value of these several activities, the print shop, manual train- 
ing, domestic science, band and singing lessons cannot be over-estimated. 
It is an immeasurable benefit to our home life, giving an interest that noth- 
ing can touch. "With our increase in membership, must necessarily follow 
an increase in the number of activities. At present our vocational train- 
ing is confined to woodworking, printing, cooking and sewing. The train- 
ing and the equipment for work is excellent but to meet the demand of 
our large and increasing family, a greater number of lines of vocational 
training should be installed. If we could provide something like kinder- 
garten work for those from five to nine and a higher grade of vocational 
training for those from ten years up who are not in the printing, manual 
training or domestic science classes, and continue this during the same 
period in the summer that we have our manual training, I am sure we 
would find that the benefits derived therefrom would far outweigh the ex- 
pense. Appended hereto is a detailed report of the membership of the 
home and the various gifts received during the year. 

Eespectfully subm.itted, 

G. S. HlLLIKEE, 

Superintendent. 

Entertainments 

During the year the following Masonic bodies have entertained the 
children : 

1920. 

Nov. 21. Somsox Club of Kosmos Chapter O.E.S. entertained with mov- 
ing pictures at the home. 

Dec. 5. Melrose Abbey Lodge entertained children with magician, 
music, contorsionist, etc., on home grounds. 

Candida Lodge entertained children with Punch and Judy and 
musicians on home grounds. 

Providence Lodge visited the home and gave gifts to each child. 
Printing Trades Craftsmen entertained in Chicago. 
Printing Trades Craftsmen entertained with St. Benardx Com- 
edy Band on home grounds. 

Congregational Church gave picnic on home grounds. 
Medinah Motor Club, auto ride. 

Monroe C. Crawford vs. Cleveland, ball game on home grounds. 
34th District Masonic Bodies, Punch and Judy, Sam Galbreth, 
Aryan Quartette and daughter, Scottish Dancers on home 
grounds. 
Sept. 16. Honor Lodge, show in assembly hall at the home. 



1921. 




April 


17. 


May 


1. 


May 


8. 


May 


15. 


June 




July 


9. 


July 


9. 


July 


17. 



98 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 



Statement of Maintenance Account 

Provisions $13,248.12 

Clothing 4,115.53 

Alterations 40.29 

Fuel 3,721.06 

Furnishings fund 424.13 

Garden 567.26 

Home furnishings 1,699.04 

Improvements 919.75 

Insurance 294.71 

Labor 54.08 

Laundry 804.33 

Light and power 1,480.68 

Machinery 50.00 

Manual training 911.67 

Medical 925.13 

Misc. H. H. Exp 1,373.57 

Printing, stationery and postage 311.19 

Refrigeration 52.15 

Repairs 1,421.89 

Salaries 10,828.67 

School 767.24 

Shoe repairs 783.15 

Telephone 150.17 

Tools 295.43 

Trav. exp 106.37 

Water 763.39 



$46,114.00 
Less discounts taken 326.13 



$45,787.87 



Cash on hand, October 1, 1920 $ 000.00 

Received from grand lodge 46,000.00 

Received from sale of old heater 65.00 

Total $46,065.00 

Disbursements since last report 45,787.87 



Returned to grand lodge 277.13 

Entertainment Fund Receipts 
1920 

Oct. 1 Cash balance $ 1,188.47 

Oct. 2 Ancient Craft Chapter No. 658, O.E.S 25.00 

Oct. 2 St. Paul Lodge No. 500 25.00 

Oct. 5 Cook Co. District Dep. G. M 12.78 

Oct. 7 Somsox Club, Kosmos Chapter No. 613, O.E.S 50.00 

Oct. 15 Jerusalem Temple Lodge No. 90 100.00 

Oct. 19 "A Friend" (anonymous) 2.00 

Oct. 19 Maplewood Lodge No. 964 15.00 

Oct. 31 Victory Lodge No. 1019 50.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 99 

Int. on one liberty bond 1-00 

Recd.band at fair 50.00 

Int. October 1-92 

Bro. S. M. Frankland 12.10 

Bro. Louis Steinberg 25.00 

Dongola Lodge No. 581 15.00 

Augusta C. Crohardt 5.00 

Bro. Chester L. Post, W.M. Edgewater No. 901 12.60 

Star of the "West No. 495, O.E.S 25.00 

Calumet Lodge No. 716 100.00 

Bro. Oldrich P. Harnach 5.00 

Circle Lodge No. 938 100.00 

Stewart Lodge No. 92 5.00 

Ladies' Auxiliary Chicago Commandery No. 19 75.00 

Sunshine Chapter No. 683, O.E.S 10.00 

Lawndale Lodge No. 995 50.00 

Bro. Nicholas D. Peffas 10.00 

Supt. fund, 1500 envelopes, 2c 33.60 

Old Glory Chapter No. 799, O.E.S 10.00 

Int. November 2.19 

Jepthah Chapter No. 340, O.E.S 25.00 

Cornerstone Chapter No. 726, O.E.S 10.00 

Temple Lodge No. 46 50.00 

Flora Chapter No. 734, O.E.S 10.00 

Emblem Lodge No. 984 35.00 

Arcana Lodge No. 717 50.00 

Bro. Robert H. Robinson 25.00 

Bro. Harry A. Boyd 10.00 

Bro. Frank E. Locke 10.00 

Carman Lodge No. 732 10.00 

Waldeck Lodge No. 674 25.00 

York Chapter No. 148, R.A.M 25.00 

Calumet Commandery No. 62, K.T 50.00 

Constellation Lodge No. 892 75.00 

Cicero Lodge No. 955 165.55 

Hopedale Lodge No. 622 15.00 

Prospect Star Chapter No. 773, O.E.S 50.00 

Providence Lodge No. 711 .- 25.00 

St. Cecelia Chapter No. 220, R.A.M 15.00 

Bro. H. E. Wills 5.00 

Cleveland Lodge No. 211 50.00 

Bro. Fled B. Shaeffert 25.00 

Myrtle Lodge No. 795 100.00 

Triple Lodge No. 835 6.00 

Sunrise Lodge No. 996 30.00 

Leland Lodge No. 558 10.00 

Boulevard Chapter No. 588, O.E.S 15.00 

Ft. Dearborn Chapter No. 245, R.A.M 50.00 

111. Central Lodge No. 178 5.00 

Antioch Lodge No. 127 5.00 

Auburn Park Lodge No. 789 25.00 

Boulevard Lodge No. 882 50.00 

Oak Park Chapter No. 244, R.A.M 25.00 

Auburn Park Chapter No. 201, R.A.M 35.00 



Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


1 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


4 


Nov. 


5 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


15 


Nov. 


18 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


27 


Nov. 


27 


Nov. 


29 


Nov. 


29 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


2 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


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8 



100 Proceedings of the [October 12, 



Centralia Lodge No. 201 10.00 

Lake Shore Lodge No. 1041 25.00 

Exemplar Lodge No. 966 50.00 

Mattoon Lodge No. 260 5.00 

1919 Class Sincerity Lodge 33.58 

Clay City Lodge No. 488 5.00 

Adelphi Lodge No. 1029 25.00 

Bro. Chas. B. Cone 100.00 

Cairo Commandery No. 13 5.00 

Golden Rule Lodge No. 726 25.00 

Pontiac Lodge No. 294 50.00 

Lake View Lodge No. 774 25.00 

Fellowship Club of Crane Co 10.00 

Madison Chapter No. 689, O.E.S 10.00 

Bridgeport Lodge No. 386 9.00 

Lambert Lodge No. 659 50.00 

Lincoln Park Chapter No. 177, R. A.M 25.00 

Oblong City Lodge No. 644 18.00 

Metropolis Lodge No. 91 10.00 

Hiram Lodge No. 1009 15.00 

Cairo Chapter No. 71, R.A.M 15.00 

Square Lodge No. 978 25.00 

Fortitude Lodge No. 1003 10.00 

Parkway Lodge No. 1008 15.00 

Edgewater Lodge No. 901 50.00 

Bro. B. Cottrell 10.00 

Wm. McKinley Lodge No. 876 25.00 

Murphysboro Lodge No. 498 10.00 

Edward Cook Lodge No. 1023 15.00 

Return of amount paid for Berwyn Lodge cake for 9.12 

Delta Chapter No. 602, O.E.S 50.00 

Pullman Chapter No. 204, R.A.M 10.00 

Olive Branch Lodge No. 38 10.00 

Progue Chapter No. 749, O.E.S 25.00 

Mrs. Emma S. Marks 5.00 

Circle Chapter No. 246, R.A.M 125.00 

Apollo Commandery No. 1, K.T 25.00 

Palace Lodge No. 765 25.00 

Wiley M. Egan Chapter No. 126, R.A.M 25.00 

Kankakee Lodge No. 389 10.00 

Irving Park Chapter No. 707, O.E.S 25.00 

Columbian Lodge No. 819 15.00 

Equality Chapter No. 770, O.E.S 20.00 

Bro. Edward H. Thomas 25.00 

Keystone Chapter No. 54, R.A.M 5.00 

Pyramid Lodge No. 887 5.00 

Waubansia Lodge No. 160 50.00 

Prospect Lodge No. 957 15.00 

St. Cecelia Lodge No. 865 20.00 

Grove Lodge No. 824 25.00 

Delta Chapter No. 191, R.A.M 50.00 

Temple Council No. 65, R.S.M 25.00 

Equity Chapter No. 767, O.E.S 10.00 

Ben Hur Chapter No. 401, O.E.S 10.00 



Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


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9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


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9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


10 


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10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


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10 


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10 


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10 


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10 


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10 


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11 


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11 


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11 


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11 


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11 


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11 


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11 


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11 


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13 


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14 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 101 

Dec. 14 Tonica Lodge No. 364 10.00 

Dec. 14 Libertyville Lodge No. 492 25.00 

Dec. 14 Members of Libertyville Lodge No. 492 2,5.00 

Dec. 14 Equity Lodge No. 878 50.00 

Dec. 14 Lake Forest Lodge No. 1026 25.00 

Dec. 14 Kensington Lodge No. 804 15.00 

Dec. 14 King Oscar Lodge No. 855 25.00 

Dec. 14 Prudence Lodge No. 958 50.00 

Dec. 14 Marine Lodge No. 355 5.00 

Dec. 14 Bro. Christopher Van Deventer 10.00 

Dec. 14 True Blue Lodge No. 994 25.00 

Dec. 14 Tyrian Council No. 78, R.S.M _. 10.00 

Dec. 14 Wilmette Chapter No. 753, O.E.S 15.00 

Dec. 14 Lawn Chapter No. 205, R.A.M 25.00 

Dec. 14 Bro. Harry E. Miller 25.00 

Dec. 15 Banner Blue Chapter No. 788, O.E.S 10.00 

Dec. 15 Hesperia Lodge No. 411 25.00 

Dec. 15 Wilmette Lodge No. 931 50.00 

Dec. 15 Leyden Lodge No. 993 10.00 

Dec. 15 Greenville Lodge No. 245 10.00 

Dec. 15 Sincerity Lodge No. 982 25.00 

Dec. 15 Oak Park Council No. 92, R. & S.M 25.00 

Dec. 15 .Peerless Chapter No. 620, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 15 Justice Lodge No. 949 50.00 

Dec. 15 Adelphi Chapter U. D., O.E.S 10.00 

Dec. 15 Bros. Mills and Heath 10.00 

Dec. 15 La Grange Chapter No. 207, R.A.M 5.00 

Dec. 15 Quincy Commandery No. 77, K.T 5.00 

Dec. 15 Raven Lodge No. 303 25.00 

Dec. 15 Union Park Lodge No. 610 50.00 

Dec. 15 Mizpah Lodge No. 768 25.00 

Dec. 15 Riverside Lodge No. 862 10.00 

Dec. 15 Trowel Lodge No. 981 10.00 

Dec. 16 Welfare Lodge No. 991 20.00 

Dec. 16 Bohemia Lodge No. 943 25.00 

Dec. 16 Imperial Chapter No. 846, O.E.S 5.00 

Dec. 16 Accordia Lodge No. 277 10.00 

Dec. 16 Apollo Lodge No. 642 50.00 

Dec. 16 Willard Chapter No. 349, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 16 Mont Clare Lodge No. 1040 10.00 

Dec. 16 Emma Danzinger 10.00 

Dec. 16 William O. Rutterer 10.00 

Dec. 16 Charles J. Retterer 10.00 

Dec. 16 Amalia Retterer 10.00 

Dec. 16 Oilman Lodge No. 591 25.00 

Dec. 16 Kankakee Chapter No. 78, R.A.M 10.00 

Dec. 16 Herman Lodge No. 39 25.00 

Dec. 16 Welcome Chapter No. 679, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 16 Chicago Chapter No. 161, O.E.S 10.00 

Dec. 16 J. T. Montague 20.00 

Dec. 17 Scott Lodge No. 79 15.00 

Dec. 17 Granite City Chapter No. 650, O.E.S 34.80 

Dec. 17 Crescent Lodge No. 895 50.00 

Dec. 17 Irving Park Chapter No. 195, R.A.M 25.00 

Dec. 17 Garden City Lodge No. 141 25.00 



102 Troceedings of fhe [October 12, 



Dec. 17 Normal Park Chapter No. 211, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 17 Lake View Chapter No. 149, O.E.S 50.00 

Dec. 17 Fellowship Chapter No. 235, R.A.M 10.00 

Dec. 18 Progressive Chapter No. 814, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 18 Lakeside Lodge No. 739 10.00 

Dec. 18 D. C. Cregier Lodge No. 643 15.00 

Dec. 18 Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 1022 25.00 

Dec. 18 Jackson Park Lodge No. 915 25.00 

Dec. 18 East Gate Lodge No. 923 150.00 

Dec. 18 Good Fellowship Committee of Oak Park Lodge No. 540 15.00 

Dec. 18 Constantia Lodge No. 783 25.00 

Dec. 18 Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 51 10.00 

Dec. 18 North West Chapter No. 224, R.A.M 10.00 

Dec. 18 Granite City Lodge No. 877 5.00 

Dec. 18 Piasa Lodge No. 27 10.00 

Dec. 18 Cyrene Commandery No. 23, K.T 10.00 

Dec. 18 Washington Park Lodge No. 956 25.00 

Dec. 18 Integrity Lodge No. 997 50.00 

Dec. 18 Thomas J. Turner Lodge No. 409 25.00 

Dec. 18 Bro. D. R. E. Munse 5.00 

Dec. 18 Kosmos Chapter No. 613, O.E.S 21.00 

Dec. 18 Park Ridge Chapter No. 797, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 18 Melrose Abbey Lodge No. 936 50.00 

Dec. 20 East St. Louis Lodge No. 504 10.00 

Dec. 20 Ivanhoe Commandery No. 33 5.00 

Dec. 20 St. Marks Lodge No. 63 15.00 

Dec. 20 Fides Lodge No. 842 10.00 

Dec. 20 St. Clare Council No. 61 5..00 

Dec. 20 Austin Lodge No. 850 50.00 

Dec. 20 Evanston Chapter No. 144 50.00 

Dec. 20 Pekin Lodge No. 29 5.00 

Dec. 20 A. O. Fay Lodge No. 676 130.00 

Dec. 20 Garfield Lodge No. 686 10.00 

Dec. 20 Paris Lodge No. 268 25.00 

Dec. 20 Lawn Lodge No. 815 25.00 

Dec. 20 Francis E. Willard Chapter No. 433, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 20 King Oscar Chapter No. 249, R.A.M 15.00 

Dec. 20 Compass Lodge No. 922 25.00 

Dec. 20 Composite Lodge No. 879 15.00 

Dec. 20 Richard Cole Lodge No. 697 25.00 

Dec. 20 Home Lodge No. 508 10.00 

Dec. 20 Rutland Lodge No. 477 5.00 

Dec. 20 Rutland Chapter No. 112, R.A.M 5.00 

Dec. 20 Murphysboro Lodge No. 498 14.20 

Dec. 20 Moline Lodge No. 1014 25.00 

Dec. 20 Felicity Chapter No. 387, O. E. S 5.00 

Dec. 20 Kosmos Lodge No. 896 25.00 

Dec. 20 Wrights Grove Lodge No. 779 10.00 

Dec. 20 Kendall Lodge No. 471 25.00 

Dec. 20 Cicero Chapter No. 180 25.00 

Dec. 21 Washington Chapter No. 43, R.A.M 25.00 

Dec. 21 Theodosia Married Women's Club 10.00 

Dec. 21 Bethel Commandery No. 36, K.T 10.00 

Dec. 21 Bethel Chapter No. 291, O.E.S 5.00 

Dec. 21 Germania Lodge No. 182 25.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 103 

Dec. 21 Austin H. Scrogin Lodge No. 1034 25.00 

Dec. 21 Humboldt Park Commandery No. 79, K.T 10.00 

Dec. 21 Honor Lodge No. 1010 25.00 

Dec. 21 Park Ridge Lodge No. 988 25.00 

Dec. 21 Mary Lincoln Chapter No. 837, O.E.S 5.00 

Dec. 21 Trinity Commandery No. 80 25.00 

Dec. 21 Sojourners Club 25.00 

Dec. 21 Cairo Lodge No. 237 15.00 

Dec. 21 Golden Rod Chapter No. 205 20.00 

Dec. 21 Candida Lodge No. 927 15.00 

Dec. 21 Sister Miriam Landau 2.50 

Dec. 21 Cosmopolitan Lodge No. 1020 25.00 

Dec. 21 Sister Louise Rosintrater 10.00 

Dec. 21 Sister Emma Gorse 10.00 

Dec. 21 Humboldt Park Lodge No. 813 10.00 

Dec. 21 Woodlawn O.E.S. Club 20.00 

Dec. 22 Forestville Chapter No. 177, O.E.S. Comfort Club 5.00 

Dec. 22 Henrietta Chapter No. 162, O.E.S 10.00 

Dec. 22 Quincy Chapter No. 5, R.A.M 5.00 

Dec. 22 Bro. Sam S. David 10.00 

Dec. 22 "A Mason" 15.00 

Dec. 22 Logan Chapter No. 196, R.A.M 50.00 

Dec. 22 East Moline Lodge No. 969 10.00 

Dec. 22 Aloha O.E.S. Social Club 8.00 

Dec. 22 Franklin Lodge No. 25 25.00 

Dec. 22 Bro. Capt. Walter E. Anderson 5.00 

Dec. 22 Bro. Gene T. Skinkle 25.00 

Dec. 22 Peotone Lodge No. 636 15.00 

Dec. 22 Union Park Chapter No. 573, O.E.S 5.00 

Dec. 22 Logan Square Chapter No. 56, O.E.S 10.00 

Dec. 22 Columbia Commandery No. 63, K.T 10.00 

Dec. 22 Elgin Chapter No. 212, O.E.S 5.00 

Dec. 22 Englewood Chapter No. 731, O.E.S 10.00 

Dec. 22 Gothic Lodge No. 852 15.00 

Dec. 22 Avondale Lodge No. 921 15.00 

Dec. 23 Radiant Star Chapter No. 808, O.E.S 10.00 

Dec. 23 Hyde Park Chapter No. 240, R.A.M 25.00 

Dec. 23 Harvard Lodge No. 309 50.00 

Dec. 23 Shabbona Lodge No. 374 10.00 

Dec. 23 Lincoln Chapter No. 147, R.A.M 5.00 

Dec. 23 Welco.ae Lodge No. 916 50.00 

Dec. 23 Macon Cliapter No. 21, R.A.M 25.00 

Dec. 23 Clinton Lodge No. 19 25.00 

Dec. 23 Delavan Lodge No. 156 5.00 

Dec. 23 Shannon Lodge No. 490 5.00 

Dec. 23 Oriental Lodge No. 33 25.00 

Dec. 23 Past Matrons and Patrons Club, Boulevard Chap. No. 588, O.E.S. 10.00 

Dec. 23 Banner Blue Lodge No. 924 25.00 

Dec. 23 Bethlehem Shrine No. 1, W.S.J 10.00 

Dec. 23 Glencoe Lodge No. 983 25.00 

Dec. 23 La Grange Lodge No. 770 25.00 

Dec. 23 St. Clare Lodge No. 24, collection 77.80 

Dec. 23 Lincoln Park Lodge No. 611 25.00 

Dec. 23 Grossman Chapter No. 155 5.00 

Dec. 23 A. Lincoln Lodge No. 518 10.00 



104 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 



Dec. 24 Brotherhood Lodge No. 986 80.00 

Dec. 24 Social Club, Chicago Chapter No. 161, O.E.S 16.00 

Dec. 24 Charleston Lodge No. 35 10.00 

Dec. 24 East St. Louis Commandery No. 81 5.00 

Dec. 24 East St. Louis Chapter No. 156 5.00 

Dec. 24 E. F. W. Ellis Lodge No. 633 10.00 

Dec. 24 Old Glory Lodge No. 975 55.93 

Dec. 24 Veritas Lodge No. 926 25.00 

Dec. 24 Metropolitan Lodge No. 860 25.00 

Dec. 24 John Paul Jones Lodge No. 1013 25.00 

Dec. 24 America Lodge No. 889 10.00 

Dec. 24 Grand Crossing Lodge No. 776 30.00 

Dec. 24 Anchor and Ark Lodge No. 1027 10.00 

Dec. 24 Chicago Lodge No. 437 25.00 

Dec. 24 Kilwinning Lodge No. 311 25.00 

Dec. 24 Nicholas Wallenta 20.00 

Dec. 24 Pleiades Lodge No. 478 25.00 

Dec. 24 Landmark Lodge Welfare Committee 25.00 

Dec. 24 Harmony Lodge No. 3 10.00 

Dec. 24 Logan Square Chapter No. 238, R.A.M 25.00 

Dec. 24 Officer.s and Companions of Logan Square Chapter 25.00 

Dec. 27 Palastine Council No. 66, R. & S.M 15.00 

Dec. 27 Ainad Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S 25.00 

Dec. 27 Evanston Commandery No. 58, K.T 50.00 

Dec. 27 White Shrine 17.50 

Dec. 27 Austin Commandery No. 84, K.T 25.00 

Dec. 28 Illinois Commandery No. 72 25.00 

Dec. 28 Corinthian Chapter No. 69, R.A.M 25.00 

Dec. 28 Perfection Lodge No. 1033 10.00 

Dec. 28 A. W. Gibson 5.00 

Dec. 29 William B. Warren Lodge No. 209 25.00 

Dec. 29 Mizpah Commandery No. 73 25.00 

Dec. 29 Interest on victory bonds 8.42 

Dec. .29 Pilgrim Chapter No. 804, O.E.S 25.00 

Dec. 30 Albany Park Lodge No. 994 10.00 

Dec. 31 Granite City Lodge No. 221 5.00 

Dec. 31 Brighton Park Lodge No. 854 25.00 

Dec. 31 Chester Lodge No. 72 25.00 

Dec. 31 Bro. Louis M. Selig 40.00 

Dec. 31 Int 5.91 

Dec. 31 Robert Morris Chapter No. 247 10.00 

1921 

Jan. 3 Euclid Lodge No. 65 10.00 

Jan. 6 Maranatha Shrine No. 19, W.S.J 15.00 

Jan. 7 Blair Lodge No. 393 50.00 

Jan. 11 Peoria Commandery No. 3, K.T 5.00 

Jan. 11 Int. on $1,000 Victory bond 23.75 

Jan. 18 Progressive Lodge No. 954 25.00 

Jan. 19 Hyde Park Chapter No. 240, R.A.M 5.00 

Jan. 19 John Corson Smith Lodge No. 944 25.00 

Jan. 21 Bro. James F. Sullivan, Vallijo, California 10.00 

Jan. 21 Certificate of indebtedness and interest 1,026.25 

Jan. 23 Lincoln Park Lodge No. 611 100.00 

Jan. 31 Interest 11.23 

Feb. 14 Otto W. Milling, S.D. (Blaney No. 271) 12.10 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



105 



Feb. 14 F. M. Mrisner, (Calabase, California) 2.00 

Feb. 14 Aryan Grotto 50.00 

Feb. 14 In memory of Mrs. Minnie Crawfoi'd 5.00 

Feb. 14 Fourth Thursday Club (C. J. Henning — Emma P. Henning) .... 15.00 

Feb. 14 Highland Park Chapter No. 226, R.A.M 20.00 

Feb. 20 Bro. T. L. Lobstein 5.00 

Feb. 21 Interest on victory bonds 95.00 

Feb. 28 Interest on balances 11.06 

Mar. 1 Mont Clare Chapter No. 845, O.E.S 25.00 

Mar. 31 Interest on balances 10.19 

April 5 Interest, two bonds 80.00 

April 5 Principal, two bonds 2,000.00 

April 5 Trinity Commandery No. 80, K.T 25.00 

April 16 Madison Lodge No. 560 20.00 

April 17 Bro. of Candida Lodge, name unknown 5.00 

April 21 Capt. Fred C. Gurney 25.00 

April 21 Bro. Harry B. Davis 10.00 

April 25 Park Manor Lodge No. 899 25.00 

April 25 Schiller Lodge No. 899 25.00 

April 25 Bro. and Sister A. H. Schultz, Austin Lodge and Chapter, O.E.S. 25.00 

April 30 Interest for April 12.60 

May 13 Printing Trades Craftsman — return of expense 19.50 

May 13 Morgan Park Lodge No. 999 25.00 

May 16 Civilian members of Candida Lodge 7.50 

May 21 Proviso Lodge No. 1028 20.00 

May 29 Bro. F. C. Gurney 10.00 

May 31 Interest 10.68 

June 1 Sincerity Social Bowling Clul) 12.00 

June 11 Mizpah Commandery No. 73 50.00 

June 12 Square Lodge No. 978 25.00 

June 12 Two pictures , 2.00 

June 15 Janesboro Lodge No. Ill 5.00 

June 12 Bro. J. C. Hilus 15.00 

June 17 South Shore Lodge U. D 25.00 

June 19 Bro. of Austin Lodge No. 850 5.00 

June 24 Loyal L. Munn Chapter No. 96, R.A.M 25.00 

June 24 St. Cecelia Commandery No. 83 15.00 

June 30 Interest 10.13 

July 12 Interest on bonds 328.43 

July 14 Warren Lodge No. 14 10.00 

July 16 Birchwood Lodge No. 1012 50.00 

July 24 Hun.boldt Park Lodge No. 992 25.00 

July 24 Bro. W. P. Fisson (Humboldt Park Lodge 5.00 

July 24 Bro. E. Glickauf (Crescent Lodge) 2.00 

July 24 Bond due 1,000.00 

July 24 Interest 5.75 

Aug. 5 Donnelson Lodge No. 255 10.00 

Aug. 5 Chatham Lodge No. 523 10.00 

Aug. 21 Perfection Chapter No. 829, O.E.S 10.00 

Aug. 26 Square Chapter No. 764, O.E.S 13.20 

Aug. 29 Bro. Fred C. Gurney 20.00 

Aug. 31 Savings account 4,222.51 

Aug. 31 Interest for August 1.70 

Sept. 1 Bro. Edward Johaning 10.00 



106 Proceedings of the [October 12, 



Sept. 11 Shriner (name unknown) 2.00 

Sept. 22 Olympia Lodge No. 864 25.00 

Sept. 25 Members of the Lawn Lodge No. 815 23.50 



Total $18,615.10 

Recapitul.\tion 

Oct. 1, 1920 Cash balance $ 1,188.47 

Received from Cook County Lodges 3,686.48 

Received from Cook County Chapters 837.80 

Received from Cook County Commanderies 335.00 

Received from Lodges outside Cook County 1,257.20 

Received from Chapters outside Cook County 185.00 

Received from Commanderies outside Cook County 45.00 

Received from Eastern Star Chapters 903.00 

Received from individuals and other sources 10,177.15 

Total $18,615.10 

Disbursements as per receipts $13,744.12 

Victory bond and interest .' 1,023.75 

Manual training machinery 2,995.64 

Total $17,763.51 

Cash balance $ 851.59 

Gifts and Donations 

Bro. W. H. Luecke, 50 lbs. candies. 

Summer Class Oriental Consistory, player piano, music cabinet and 100 

rolls of music. 
Mrs. Elenor E. Beach, candy for children. 
Hyde Park Lodge No. 989, cornet for band. 

Providence Lodge No. 711, bunch bananas, box apples and box oranges. 
Berwyn Lodge No. 839, ice cream and cake for all. 
Bro. H. W. Buckman, lot used shoes and clothing. 
Victory Lodge No. 1019, box oranges, 100 lbs. candy. 
Somsox Club, Kosmos Chapter, 25 lbs. candy. 
Golden Rule Lodge No. 726, set beautiful robes. 
Star of the West Chapter No. 495, O.E.S., 2 boxes apples, 5 boxes grapes 

and 1 box oranges. 
Maple Chapter No. 90, O.E.S., 1 box apples and 30 lbs. candy. 
Stella Biel (Star of the West), 18 doz. pencils. 
Mrs. J. M. Lloyd, suit of clothes and extra knickers. 
Bro. W. J. Taft, pair shoes and pair rubbers. 
Universal Lodge No. 985, case tangerines, case of apples, crate of grapes, 

bunch of bananas, home made butterscotch. 
Somsox Club of Kosmos Chapter, O.E.S., 50 lbs. candy. 
Damascus Chapter No. 744, bunch bananas, crate of oranges, 2 boxes 

apples. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Foreman, turkey dinner with all trimmings for all. 
Equity Lodge No. 878, 14 miscellaneous books, new and very instructive. 
iPark Ridge Chapter No. 797, O. E. S., 6 dolls and 16 large paper dolls. 



19 


20 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


23 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


27 


Oct. 


31 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


4 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


21 


Nov. 


21 


Nov. 


24 


Nov. 


25 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


5 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 107 

Dec. 6 Roseville Chapter No. 836, O.E.S., 50 presents of games, nuts, dolls and 

candies. 
Old Glory Lodge No. 975, 100 lbs. candy. 
Kewanee Boiler Co., 1 boiler, $1775.00. 
Chicago Commandery No. 19, 30 lbs. candy. 
Miss Harriet Phillips, member Lady Washington Chapter, O.E.S., 10 

dressed dolls. 
Bro. Edward C. Clark, 130 boxes of candy and 2 pairs boxing gloves. 
Bro. A. M. Mullens, 288 chocolate bars. 
Bro. F. M. Joseph, 100 lbs. candy. 

Estra Girls of Cicero Chapter, O.E.S., presents for 30 children. 
Mr. O. J. McAloon, Downers Grove, 300 lbs. candy and box of toys. 
Harbor Lodge and Lady Garfield Chapter, O.E.S., stockings filled with 

candy, nuts, fruit and 10c for each child. 
Ben Hur Chapter (Acacia Girls), box of apples. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Smith, 2 boxes of apples. 
Aryan Grotto, calf, pig and 3 boxes of apples. 
Mt. Joliet and Matteson Lodges, presents for all the children. 
Sherman Chapter No. 541, O.E.S., 150 boxes of cracker jack. 
Wm. Iden (Integrity Lodge), 10c for each child and string and ropes. 
Keystone Lodge, silk flag and standard, $1.00 for each child. 
Bro. Theodore Gatlman, 150 lbs. of chocolates. 
Mrs. Franklin D. Moore, box of cookies. 
Greenfield Lodge No. 129, bbl. apples. 
Evergreen Chapter No. 96, O.E.S., 2 bbls. of apples. 
Ideal Lodge No. 1036, 2 boxes of apples and 1 box of nuts. 
Girls Club of Adelphi Chapter, 130 stockings of candy. 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Peck, stockings of fruit, candy, etc., for all the 

children. 
Illinois Chapter No. 483, O.E.S., $1.00 for each child and cracker jack. 
Bro. Lee Bonheim, Christmas baskets for all. 
Bros. A. M. Anderson, Harry Ackerman, A. W. Kiemer and J. H. Mc- 

Masters, 120 lbs. of candy. 
Mark Shanks (Standard Ice Cream Association), 150 Santa Claus ice 

cream. 
Mizpah Aid Society, Christmas card and 10c for each child. 
Hyde Park Chapter, O.E.S., handkerchiefs. 
Bro. T. Nicol, Secretary Aurora Lodge, 3 boxes miscellaneous books. 

Lake View Lodge No. 774, 50 lbs. chocolates, 15 volumes new books. 

Brighton Park Lodge No. 854, 50 lbs. candy, oranges and cracker jack. 

Chicago Council No. 1, Trades Craftsman, 250 lbs. type. 

Bro. Henry Voclker (Old Glory), 50 lbs. candy. 

Mrs. Ernest W. Rich, lot of clothing. 

Windsor Park Lodge No. 836, pail of candy. 

La Grange Business Men's Association, ?00 doughnuts. 

Chicago Paper Co. (Rawley), dark oak sample cabinet for print shop. 

La Grange Business Association, doughnuts. 

Bro. Captain H. Fingerhuth, $127.00, being $1.00 for bank account of each 

child. 
Bro. F. M. Bucholz, magazines. 

Bro. L. M. Schroud, lot of fine clothes for small child. 

Cornerstone Chapter, O.E.S., Easter boxes for each child. 

Bro. A. A. Brandt, beautifully mounted large eagle. 

Dr. W. H. Bennet, miscellaneous books and magazines. 



Dec. 


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Dec. 


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Dec. 


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Dec. 


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1921 


Jan. 


5 


Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


11 


Jan. 


13 


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Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


25 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


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Feb. 


22 


Mar. 


11 


Mar. 


27 


Mar. 


27 


Mar. 


27 



108 



Proceedings of tJie 



[October 12, 



April 6 
April 7 
April 13 
April 17 
April 17 
April 22 
April 25 
May 2 
May 2 



May 15 
May 15 
May 15 
May 15 
May 16 
June 17 

June 17 
June 21 
June 26 
June 26 
June 29 
July 1 
July 7 
July 9 
July 9 
July 17 
July 20 
July 23 

July 24 
July 26 
July 28 
July 30 
Aug. 3 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 21 



Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept. 4 

Sept. 5 

Sept. 5 

Sept. 6 

Sept. 6 

Sept. 10 
Sept. 21 
Sept. 22 



Bro. H. E. Dezard, 25 lbs. honey. 

Prospect Star Chapter No. 773, O.E.S., popcorn, cookies and candy. 

Chas. E. Johnson & Co., 10 lbs. of ink. 

Integrity Lodge, printing press. 

G. W. Bomboid, 20 lbs. of candy. 

C. A. Sorg, child's bed. 

Bro. Lee Bonheim, 1 gross tooth brushes. 

Bro. W. P. Thorne, assortment of clothing and shoes. 

Mrs. C. P. Alford, subscription of Evening Post 1 year and assortment of 

childs' books. 
Laurie Ijodge U. D., 25 lbs. of candy. 

Printing Trade Craftsmen, candy, 3 cases of oranges and 10 gals, ice cream. 
Crescent Lodge, ice cream, cake, candy and presents. 
Crescent Lodge, $32.50 for band members. 
Mrs. Watson, presents for each child. 

Bro. Chas. T. Alford, year's subscription for the Evening Post. 
Bro. and Sister Richard B. Prendergost, 150 dimes for bank account of 

children. 
Logan Square Lodge, toys for children. 
Lawndale Lodge No. 995, cracker jack and toys. 
Bro. John B. Aiken, King cornet. 
Bro. T. J. Bonaker, box criskos. 
Bro. H. W. Mower, bats and books. 
Master Raymond Clark Ashbey, clothing and shoes. 
Ladies of Golden Rod Aid Society, O.E.S., 30 yds. white dress goods. 
Members of Monroe C. Crawford Lodge, $53.00 for boys. 
Capt. Fingerhuth, 3 bird houses. 

34th District Masonic Bodies, salted peanuts, candies, etc. 
Bros. Miller and McCullom, candy for all. 
Adelphi Lodge, ice cream, cookies, 3 bushels peaches, 3 bunches bananas 

and toys. 
Humboldt Park Lodge No. 813, base ball, foot ball and indoor ball and bat. 
Concord Lodge, 6 base balls. 

Ladies' Auxiliary (St. Cecilia Commandery), 50 yds. linen crash toweling. 
Logan Square Lodge, ice cream, balloons, prizes, toy ironing board, etc. 
Oscar S. Johnson, cornet for band. 

Emblem Lodge, indoor ball and bats, aeroplanes, toys, etc. 
John Corson Smith Lodge, indoor bat and ball, popcorn balls, crayolas, 

candy, toys, games and box of cigars. 
Bro. Lee Bonheim, 3 crates plums. 
Triangle Lodge, 22 sweaters for boys, 2 cases cracker jack, 2 doz. balls, 

dolls, toys and games. 
Leyden Lodge, 50 lbs. candy. 
Bro. M. L. Cromner, 50 volumes of books. 
Bro. Notham L. Pallast, 36 girls work aprons. 
Square & Compass Club, 13 rolls for player piano. 
Lake View Chapter No. 149, O.E.S., 10 gals, ice cream, home made cakes, 

toys, games, cracker jack, bottled lemonade, etc. 
Universal Lodge, 2 bunches bananas, pears, plumes and flowers for Ma. 
Herbert Hallsworth, B flat ballad horn. 
Crescent Lodge No. 864, pairs children's stockings. 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



109 



Donations to the Furnishings Fund 



A. O. Fay 676 

Albany 566 

Albany Park 974 

Alto Pass 840 

America 889 

Amity 472 

Anchor 980 

Apollo 642 

Arcana 717 

Ark & Anchor 304 

Ashlar 308 

Aurora 254 

Austin 850 

Avondale 921 

Batavia 404 

Beehive 909 

Belvidere 60 

Berwyn 839 

Bethalto 406 

Blair 393 

Bodley 1 

Bradford 514 

Brighton Park 854 

Brotherhood 986 

Cairo 237 

Calumet 716 

Carnation 900 

Casey 442 
Catlin 285 
Charter Oak 236 
Cheney's Grove 468 
Chicago 437 
Chicago Heights 851 
Cicero 955 
Cleveland 211 
Clifton 688 
Collinsville 712 
Collison 714 
Columbia 474 
Comet 641 
Community 1005 
Compass 922 
Concord 917 
Constellation 892 
Cornerstone 875 
Covenant 526 
Cregier 643 
Crescent 895 
Crystal 1025 
Damascus 888 
Dean 833 



lodges ^A.F. & A.M. 

Dearborn 310 
Dongola 581 
Donnellson 255 
Doric 319 
Du Quoin 234 
East St. Louis 504 
E. F. W. Ellis 633 
E. M. Husted 796 
Elgin 117 
Emeth 1030 
Empire 126 
Euclid 65 
Evans 524 
Excelsior 97 
Fairmount 590 
Fernwood Park 971 
Fides 842 
Fillmore 670 
Findlay 831 
Fraternal 58 
Freeburg 418 
Free Will 872 
Full Moon 341 
Garden City 141 
Garfield 686 
Geneva 139 
Gil. W. Barnard 908 
Glencoe 983 
Glen Ellyn 950 
Golden Gate 248 
Golden Rule 726 
Gordon 473 
Gothic 852 
Grand Crossing 776 
Granite City 877 
Grove 824 
Hancock 20 
Harbor 731 
Harmony 3 
Harvey 832 
Havana 88 
Hazel Dell 580 
Herder 669 
Hermitage 356 
Hesperia 411 
Hinckley 301 
Hinsdale 934 
Hiram 1009 
Home 508 
Hope 162 
Humboldt 555 



Hyde Park 989 

Hlinois Central 178 

Jeflfersonville 460 

Joseph Robbins 930 

Kenmore 947 

Kilwinning 311 

LaFayette 657 

LaGrange 770 

Lake Forest 1026 

Lake View 774 

Lambert 659 

Lancaster 106 

Lawndale 995 

Leyden 993 

Liberty ville 492 

Litchfield 517 

Lincoln Park 611 

Logan 210 

Logan Square 891 
Macomb 17 
Maplewood 964 
Marine 355 
Marissa 881 
Martin 491 
Martinton 845 
Mattoon 260 
May wood 869 
Mendota 176 
Meteor 283 
Mithra 410 
Moline 1014 
Monitor 522 
Mound 122 
Murphysboro 498 
Mystic Star 758 
McHenry 158 
Mt. Joliet 42 
Mt. Moriah 51 
Mizpah 768, in' memory of 
Bro. James A. McWilliams 
Bro. Carl J. Atkins 
Neponset 803 
New Hartford 453 
Niagara 992 
North Shore 973 
N. D. Morse 346 
Oblong City 644 
Occidental 40 
Ohio 814 
Olive Branch 38 
Oneida 337 



110 



Proceedings of tJie 



[October 12, 



Orel 759 
Oriental 33 
Paramount 1015 
Paris 268 
Patoka 613 
Paul Revere 988 
Pekin 29 
Perseverance 973 
iPiasa 27 
Plainview 461 
Providence 711 
Pyramid 887 
Quincy 296 
Raleigh 128 
Republic 914 
R. F. Casey 948 
Richmond 143 
Ridge Farm 632 
Rio 685 

Rock Island 658 
Rome 721 



Rossville 527 
Sam'l H. Davis 96 
Scott 79 
Sequoit 827 
Shekinah 241 
Sibley 761 
Sidell 798 
Silvis 898 
Sincerity 982 
Smyth Crooks 1035 
Standard 873 
Star 709 

Star in the East 166 
Stephen Decatur 979 
Stone Arch 953 
St. Andrews 863 
St. Cecelia 86a 
St. Clair 24 
St. Joseph 970 
St. Marks 63 
St. Paul 500 



Temple 46 
Thos. J. Turner 409 
T. J. Pickett 307 
Trestleboard 1032 
Triangle 1024 
Triluminar 767 
Triple 835 
Trowel 981 
True Blue 994 
Union Park 610 
Universal 985 
Victory 1019 
Vienna 150 
Viola 577 
Wayfarers 1001 
Welcome 916 
Whitehall 80 
Windsor Park 836 
Woodlawn Park 841 
Wright's Grove 779 



Grove 230 
Normal Park 210 



Royal Arch Chapters 

LaFayette 2 
Lincoln Park 177 
Sandwich 107 



Maywood 234 
York 148 



Apollo 1 
Chicago 19 
Montjoie 53 



COJIMANDERIES KnIGHT TeMPLAK 

St. Johns 26 Ladies Auxiliary Austin 

Ladies Auxiliary Chicago Commandery 84 K.T. 

Commandery 19 K.T. 



Danville 



Consistories S.P.R.S. 

Oriental, also Spring Classes of 1918 and 1921 of 
Oriental Consistory 



Edgewater 74^ 



Chapters O.E.S. 

Justice 690 

Somsox of Kosmos 613 



Queen Esther 41 



Medinah Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. 



T. M. Avery 
Jacob Benovy 
John W. Benton 
A. P. Bushnell 
R. A. Cummings 
A. E. Dale 
Mitchell Daniels 



INDIVIDUAL brethren 

T. C. Harrison 
Albert Jampolis 
R. C. Kiningham 
R. Kurman 
Geo. K. Lawton 
Larry Levy 
A. M. Miller 
E. Edwin Mills 



John Montgomery 
William Nolle 
Floyd Parrish 
I. M. Peters 
Edward H. Thomas 
August Torpe, Jr. 
R. A. Wright 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



111 



Membership 



Name 
Anderson, Roland 
Anderson, Kennat 
Adamson, Thomas 
Adamson, Herbert 
Ashley, George . . 
Asmussen, Harold 
Backe, Winnifred 
Backe, Norman . 
Backe, Duban . . 

Backe, Jarl 

Beenke, Albertus 
Bramblett, Regna 
Bramblett, Virginia 
Burris, Maxie . . 
Burris, Barton . 
Burris, Macie . . 
Campbell, Bruce 
Collinet, Albert . 
Collinet, Harold 
Cunningham, Leonard 
Cunningham, Mary 
Dahlstrom, Raymond 
Dahlstrom, Ruth . 
Daniels, Vivian . , 
Daniels, Christine 
Daniels, Catharine 
Darby, Fletcher . 
Darby, Walter . . 
Darby, John .... 
Darby, Harry . . . 
Dickson, James . 
Dickson, Dorothy 
Dickson, Marjorie 
Duncanson, May 
Duncanson, Lillian 
Durham, Charles 
Durham, Roxie . . 
Everette, Martha 
Eyer, Charles ... 
Eyer, Henry .... 
Forbes, Harry . . 
Forbes, Cedric . . 
Freeman, Arthur 
Friberg, Arline . . 
Friberg, Mildred 
Friberg, George . 
Fuetterer, Walter 
Fuetterer, William 
Gilpin, Edward . 
Gilpin, Mable . . . 
Gobleman, Grace 
Gobleman, Ronald 
Gobleman, Gerald 
Gobleman, Thurman 

Hall, Grant 

Hawk, Fred 

Harris, Neva .... 
Harris, Oscar .... 

Hesse, Elsie 

Hesse, Ellen .... 
Honeyman, Helen 
Honeyman, Edna . 
Honeyman, Ruth . 
Holzman, William 
Johnston, Dale . . . 
Johnston, Bernetta 
Johnston, Phyllis . 
Jones, Gertrude . . 



Admitted Age Now 

. 7-14-20 8 9 

. 7-14-20 2 3 

. 6-24-19 12 14 

. 6-24-19 10 12 

.10-25-13 5 13 

. 4-18 21 8 8 

.10- 8-16 4 9 

. 6-20-21 5 5 

.10- 8-16 3 8 

.10- 8-16 5 9 

. 6-26-10 3 14 

. 7-12-20 2 3 

. 7-12-20 7 8 

. 5-21-19 7 9 

. 5-21-19 5 7 

. 5-21-19 7 9 

. 4-14-15 5 11 

. 8-27-19 8 10 

. 8-27-19 8 10 

. 3- 7-21 3 4 

. 2- 6-21 8 8 

. 6-13-21 3 3 

. 6-13-21 9 9 

.11- 8-16 4 9 

.11- 8-16 7 11 

.11- 8-16 8 12 

. 7-18-19 5 7 

. 7-18-19 7 9 

. 7-18-19 12 14 

. 7-18-19 10 12 

. 5- 8-21 3 4 

. 5- 8-21 6 6 

. 5- 8-21 7 7 

. 3-25-21 12 13 

. 3-25-21 8 9 

.10-15-19 8 10 

.10-15-19 11 13 

. 2-20-19 5 7 

. 7- 1-21 6 6 

. 7- 1-21 3 4 

. 9- 7-20 7 7 

. 9- 7-20 8 9 

. 1-27-12 3 12 

. 6-29-19 10 12 

. 6-29-19 12 14 

. 6-29-19 6 8 

. 5-28-13 6 14 

. 5-28-13 5 13 

.12-23-18 8 10 

.12-23-18 2 5 

. 5- 3-21 5 5 

. 5- 3-21 9 9 

. 5- 3-21 10 11 

. 5- 3-21 7 7 

. 8-29-20 4 5 

. 7- 2-17 5 9 

. 5-28-15 5 10 

. 5-28-15 5 14 

.11-16-19 5 7 

.11-16-19 9 11 

. 3-26-17 6 10 

. 3-26-17 3 7 

. 3-26-17 9 13 

. 9-19-15 6 12 

. 9- 3-20 6 7 

. 9- 3-20 8 9 

. 9- 3-20 4 5 

.10-22-14 9 15 



Lodge Location 

Veritas No. 926 Chicago 

Veritas No. 926 Chicago 

Cicero No. 955 Cicero 

Cicero No. 955 Cicero 

Alma No. 497 Willisville 

Oriental No. 33 Chicago 

Covenant No. 526 Chicago 

Covenant No. 526 Chicago 

Covenant No. 526 Chicago 

Covenant No. 526 Chicago 

Kensington No. 804 Chicago 

Moweaqua No. 180 Moweaqua 

Moweaqua No. 180. ..,. .Moweaqua 
Cave in Rock No. 444. .Cave in Rock 
Cave in Rock No. 444 Cave in Rock 
Cave in Rock No. 444. .Cave in Rock 
Woodlavvn Park No. 841. . . .Chicago 

Justice Lodge No. 949 Chicago 

Justice Lodge No. 949 Chicago 

Paxton No. 416 Paxton 

Paxton No. 416 Paxton 

Square No. 978 Chicago 

Square No. 978 Chicago 

Casey No. 442 Casey 

Casey No. 442 Casey 

Casey No. 442 Casey 

Libertyville No. 492 Libertyville 

Libertyville No. 492 Libertyville 

Libertyville No. 492 Libertyville 

Libertyville No. 492 Libertyville 

Melrose Abbey No. 976 Chicago 

Melrose Abbey No. 976 Chicago 

Melrose Abbey No. 976 Chicago 

Union Park No. 610 Chicago 

Union Park No. 610 Chicago 

Eldorado No. 730 Eldorado 

Eldorado No. 730 Eldorado 

Russell No. 154 Georgetown 

Triluminar No. 767 Chicago 

Triluminar No. 767 Chicago 

Landmark No. 422 Chicago 

Landmark No. 422 Chicago 

Shekina No. 741 Carbondale 

Doric No. 319 Moline 

Doric No. 319.* Moline 

Doric No. 319 Moline 

Pleiades No. 478 Chicago 

Pleiades No. 478 Chicago 

Garfield No. 686 Chicago 

Garfield No. 686 Chicago 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Lockport No. 538 Lockport 

Mystic No. 758 Chicago 

Prairie City No. 578 Montrose 

Prairie City No. 578 Montrose 

Park Manor No. 899 Chicago 

Park Manor No. 899 Chicago 

Piasa No. 27 Alton 

Piasa No. 27 Alton 

Piasa No. 27 Alton 

Waubansia No. 160 Chicago 

Mizpah No. 768 Chicago 

Mizpah No. 768 Chicago 

Mizpah No. 768 Chicago 

Arcana No. 717 Chicago 



112 



Proceedings of the 



[October 12, 



Name 


Admitted 


Age 


Now 


Kleinow, John 


. ..10-24-20 


11 


11 


Kleinow, Mary 


. . .10-24-20 


6 


6 


Kolmodin, John .... 


. . . 7-24-20 


12 


13 


Kolmodin, Karl .... 


. . . 7-24-20 


7 


8 


Kronke, Fred 


... 7- 8-19 


11 


12 


Kronke, Edward . . . 


... 7- 8-19 


9 


11 


Landau, Helen 


. . . 4-17-16 


9 


14 


Larson, Allan 


. ..11-14-18 


9 


12 


Leubrie, Ada 


. . .11- 4-17 


10 


14 


Lierlie, Lucile 


. . .12- 6-20 


8 


9 


Lierlie, Maxine .... 


. . .12- 6-20 


6 


7 


Mansell, Charles . . . 


. . .11-19-18 


8 


11 


Mansell, Thomas . . . 


. . .11-19-18 


10 


13 


Marks, Hillard 


. . . 4-11-20 


10 


11 


Marks, David 


. . . 4-11-20 


12 


13 


Marks, Sherman . . . 


. . . 4-11-20 


7 


8 


Moisand, Earl 


. .. 4-17-15 


7 


13 


Moisand, Lester .... 


. . . 4-17-15 


5 


11 


MacNair, Leonard . . 


6-30-12 


4 


14 


Norris, Francis 


. ..10-24-17 


9 


13 


Older, John 


. . .10-16-16 


8 


13 


Older, George 


. . .10-16-16 


3 


8 


Older, William 


. ..10-16-16 


10 


15 


Ormiston, Orva .... 


. . .11- 3-20 


11 


12 


Ormiston, Adelaide . 


11- 3-20 


10 


11 


Ormiston, Lowell . . . 


. . .11- 3-20 


4 


5 


Ormiston, Orris .... 


11- 3-20 


7 


8 


Palmer, Hester 


... 9- 1-19 


6 


8 


Palmer, Ruth 


9- 1-19 


10 


12 


Palmer, Marion .... 


8- 5-20 


9 


10 


Palmer, Howard E... 


9-11-21 


6 


6 


Peterson, Alfred . . . 


... 8- 7-20 


10 


11 


Peterson, Lawrence . 


... 8- 7-20 


8 


9 


Pirrman, William . . 


5-22-17 


5 


10 


Popp, William 


. . . 7-12-21 


6 


6 


Popp, Arline 


... 7-12-21 


4 


4 


Popp, Dorothy 


. . . 7-12-21 


7 


7 


Rowley, Ralph 


5-12-17 


6 


10 


Rowley, Harold .... 


512-17 


9 


13 


Rowley, Richard . . . 


7- 5-17 


3 


7 


Sallade, Mildred 


5-15-21 


9 


10 


Sallade, Laura 


. . . 5-15-21 


7 


7 


Sallade, Georgia .... 


5-15-21 


6 


6 


Sallade, Thomas . . . 


5-15-21 


3 


4 


Sandy, Albert 


7-24-21 


10 


10 


Sandy, Edward .... 


7-24-21 


4 


4 


Schellenger, Harry .. 


6-23-14 


4 


11 


Seidler, Irma 


.'. . .12-22-17 


3 


7 


Seidler, Sarah 


12-22-17 


7 


11 


Shavs, Burton 


2-27-19 


10 


13 


Smith, Sydney 


12-17-19 


6 


8 


Smith, Lawrence . . . 


10-12-20 


10 


11 


Smith, Loydd 


10-12-20 


10 


11 


Smoke, Earl 


6-28-21 


12 


12 


Smoke, Mary 


6-28-21 


9 


10 


Strecker, Werner . . . 


9-27-16 


8 


13 


Strecker, Inez 


9-27-16 


10 


15 


Thuma, William 


5- 3-17 


9 


14 


Thuma, Myrtle 


8-12-17 


5 


9 


Thuma, Robert 


5- 3-17 


7 


11 


VoUmer, Daniel .... 


5- 2-20 


10 


11 


Williams, Albert .... 


10-30-20 


6 


7 


Williams, Eva 


10-30-20 


11 


12 


Williams, Frank . . . 


8-22-20 


10 


11 


Williams, Logan . . . 


10-30-20 


3 


10 


Williams, Kenneth . . 


10-30-20 


» 


9 


Wright, Olive 


9- 1-16 


3 


8 


Wrierht, Marv 


9- 1-16 


8 


13 


Wright, Pearl 


9- 1-16 


10 


15 


Zoll, Louis 


2- 7-21 


10 


10 


Sauter, John 


9-20-21 


11 


11 


Sauter, Otto 


9-20-21 


10 


10 



Lodge Location 

Leyden No. 993 Franklin Park 

Leyden No. 993 Franklin Park 

Austin No. 850 Chicago 

Austin No. 850 Chicago 

Oriental No. 33 Chicago 

Oriental No. 33 Chicago 

Wrights Grove No. 799 Chicago 

A. O. Pay No. 676. . .Highland Park 

Veritas No. 926 Chicago 

Wataga No. 291 Wataga 

Wataga No. 291 Watagn 

Kewanee No. 260 Kewanee 

Kewanee No. 260 Kewanee 

Chicago No. 437 Chicago 

Chicago No. 437 Chicago 

Chicago No. 437 Chicago 

Austin No. 850 Chicago 

Austin No. 850 Chicago 

Brighton Park No. 854 Chicago 

Composite No. 875 Chicago 

Banner Blue No. 924 Chicago 

Banner Blue No. 924 Chicago 

Banner Blue No. 924 Chicago 

Russell No. 154 Georgetown 

Russell No. 154 Georgetown 

Russell No. 154 Georgetown 

Russell No. 154 Georgetown 

Grand Crossing No. 776. .. .Chicago 
Grand Crossing No. 776 ... .Chicago 
Grand Crossing No. 776 ... .Chicago 
Grand Crossing No. 776. .. .Chicago 
Grand Crossing No. 776 ... .Chicago 
Grand Crossing No. 776 ... .Chicago 

Libertyville No. 492 Libertyville 

Albany Park No. 974 Chicago 

Albany Park No. 974 Chicago 

Albany Park No. 974 Chicago 

Concord No. 917 Chicago 

Concord No. 917 Chicago 

Concord No. 917 Chicago 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Standard No. 873 Chatham 

Standard No. 873 Chatham 

Alma No. 495 Willisville 

Utopia No. 976 Chicago 

Utopia No. 976 Chicago 

Tracy No. 810 Chicago 

Melrose Abbey No. 976 Chicago 

Bridgeport No. 386 Bridgeport 

Bridgeport No. 386 Bridgeport 

Grand Crossing No. 776 .... Chicago 
Grand Crossing No. 776. . . .Chicago 

D. C. Cregier No. 643 Chicago 

D. C. Cregier No. 643 Chicago 

Arcana No. 717 Chicago 

Arcana No. 717 Chicago 

Arcana No. 717 Chicago 

Integrity No. 997 Chicago 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

East St. Louis No. 504. .E. St. Louis 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

Lawn No. 815 Chicago 

Lawn No. 815 Chicago 

Lawn No. 815 Chicago 

Avondale No. 921 Chicago 

Germania No. 182 Chicago 

Germania No. 182 Chicago 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



113 



Admitted Since Last Report 



Name Admitted 

Anderson, David 9-23-21 

Anderson, Vernon 9-23-21 

Anderson, Jean 9-23-21 

Asmussen, Harold 4-18-21 

Backe, Norman 6-20-21 

Cunningham, Mary Adelle 2- 6-21 
Cunningham, Leonard . . 3- 7-21 
Cunningham, Lewis .... 3- 7-21 
Dahlstrom, Raymond .... 6-13-21 

Dahlstrom, Ruth 6-13-21 

Dickson, James 5- 8-21 

Dickson, Dorothy 5-8-21 

Dickson, Margorie 5-29-21 

Duncanson, Lillian 3-25-21 

Duncanson, May K 3-25-21 

Eyer, Chas. P 7- 1-21 

Eyer, Henry 7- 1-21 

Forbes, Harry 10- 7-20 

Forbes, Cedric 10- 7-20 

Freeman, Arthur 2-15-21 

Gobleman, Wm. T 5- 3-21 

Gobleman, Grace M 5- 3-21 

Gobleman, Donald 5- 3-21 

Gobleman, Gerald 5- 3-21 

Kier, Douglas 1-29-21 

Kier, Donald 1-29-21 

Kleinow, John 10-25-20 

Kleinow, Mary 10-25-20 

Lierle, Lucile 12- 6-20 

Lierle, Maxiue 12- 6-20 

Ormeston, Orva 11- 

Ormeston, Adelaide 11- 

Ormeston, Omar 11- 

Ormeston, Orris 11- 

Ormeston, Lowell 11- 3-20 

Palmer, Howard 9-11-21 

Popp, Wm. C 7-12-21 

Popp, Arline 7-12-21 

Popp, Dorothy 7-12-21 

Sallade, Tlios 5-15-21 

Sallade, Mildred 5-15-21 

Sallade, Laura 5-15-21 

Sallade, Georgia 5-15-21 

Sandy, Chas. Albert 7-24-21 

Sandy, Edward 7-24-21 

Sauter, Otto 9-20-21 

Sauter, John 9-20-21 

Smith, Lloyd 10-20-21 

Smith, Lawrence 10-20-21 

Smoak, Earl 6-28-21 

Smoak, Mary 6-28-21 

Williams, Albjrt 10-30-20 

Williams, Eva 10-30-20 

Williams, Logan 10-30-20 

Williams, Kenneth 10-30-20 

Zoll, Louis 2- 7-21 



3-20 
3-20 
3-20 
3-20 



Age 
7 
6 
4 
7 
5 
7 
3 
3 
3 
9 
3 
6 
7 
9 

12 
6 
3 
7 
8 

12 
7 
5 
9 

10 
7 

12 

11 



6 
11 

10 

8 

7 

4 

6 

6 

4 

7 

3 

9 

7 

6 

9 

4 

9 

11 

11 

11 

12 

9 

6 

11 

9 

8 

10 



Now 
7 
6 
4 
8 
5 



3 

9 

4 

6 

7 

10 

13 

6 

4 

7 

9 

12 

7 

5 



12 
12 

9 

7 

12 

11 

9 

7 

5 

7 

6 

4 

8 

4 

12 

7 

6 

9 

4 

9 

11 

12 

12 

12 

10 

6 

12 

10 

9 

10 



Lodge Location 

Ravenswood No. 777 Chicago 

Ravenswood No. 777 Chicago 

Ravenswood No. 777 Chicago 

Oriental No. 33 Chicago 

Covenant No. 526 Chicago 

Paxton No. 416 Paxton 

Paxton No. 416 Paxton 

Paxton No. 416 Paxton 

Square No. 978 Chicago 

Square No. 978 Chicago 

Melrose Abbey No. 976 Chicago 

Melrose Abbey No. 976 Chicago 

Melrose Abbey No. 976 Chicago 

South Park No. 610 Chicago 

South Park No. 610 Chicago 

Ti-iluminar No. 767 Chicago 

Triluminar No. 767 Chicago 

Landmark No. 422 Chicago 

Landmark No. 422 Chicago 

Shekinah No. 241 Carbondale 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Mt. Pulaski No. 87 Mt. Pulaski 

Thos. J. Turner No. 409 .... Chicago 
Thos. J. Turner No. 409. . . .Chicago 
Leyden Lodge No. 993 . Franklin Park 
Leyden Lodge No. 993. Franklin Park 

Wataga No. 291 Wataga 

Wataga No. 291 Wataga 

Russell Lodge No. 154. .Georgetown 
Russell Lodge No. 154 . .Georgetown 
Russell Lodge No. 154 . .Georgetown 
Russell Lodge No. 154 . .Georgetown 
Russell Lodge No. 154. .Georgetown 
Grand Crossing No. 776. . . .Chicago 

Albany Park No. 974 Chicago 

Albany Park No. 974 Chicago 

Albany Park No. 974 Chicago 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Chatham No. 523 Chatham 

Standard No. 873 Chicago 

Standard No. 873 Chicago 

Germania No. 182 Chicago 

Germania No. 182 Chicago 

Bridgeport No. 386 Bridgeport 

Bridgeport No. 386 Bridgeport 

Grand Crossing No. 776 ... .Chicago 
Grand Crossing No. 776. . . .Chicago 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

Saline No. 339 Goreville 

Avondale No. 921 Chicago 



Children Di.scharged Since Last Report 



Ashley, Sara 

Campbell, Robert . . 
Cunningham, Louis 
Freeman, Jesse . . . . 
Hannan, Marrella . 
Hefter, Irving . . . . 
Hefter, Gerald . . . . 
Heiss, Marcella . . . 



2- 8-12 Heiss, Edmo 6-3016 

4-14-15 Heiss, Leroy 6-30-16 

3- 7-21 Hunter, Georgene 12-15-18 

1-27-12 Hunter, Dorothy 12-15-18 

1- 1-17 Hunter, David, Robt 12-15-18 

6-15-20 Jahnel, Raymond 10- 8-18 

6-15-20 Jahnel, James 10-8-18 

6-30-16 Jones, Gladys 11-22-14 



114 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 



Jutting, Gwendolin 3-24-19 Larson, Howard 11-14-18 

Jutting, Kenneth 3-24-19 Leubrie, Roy 11- 4-17 

Kier, Douglas 1-29-21 MacNair, Sophie 6-30 12 

Kier, Donald 1-29-21 Nott, Richard 12-10-18 

Schellenger, Ruth 6-23-14 

Cause for Discharge 

Death 1 

Age limit 7 

Parent able ito support 12 

Parent married 4 

Taken by lodge 1 

25 

Recapitulation of Membership 

Membership, September 30, 1920 113 

Admitted since last report 56 

169 
Discharged since last report 25 

Membership, September 30, 1921 144 

Gain during year 31 



Resolution 

The following resolution was presented by Bro. James 
McCredie. It was referred to the Finance Committee. 

Whereas, the authorities in charge of the public schools at La Grange, 
Illinois, are engaged in erecting additional buildings for the use of the 
public schools in La Grange, Illinois, 

Now Therefore, inasmuch as the children in our Masonic Orphans' 
Home at La Grange, Illinois, are attendants at such public schools, and 
because of the interest of this grand lodge in the public schools at 
La Grange, Illinois, it is therefore, 

Eesolved, that this grand lodge as a voluntary contribution donate 
the sum of six thousand ($6,000.00) dollars to the Board of Education of 
the school district wherein La Grange, Illinois, is situated, to be used as 
a part of the building funds in the erection of such buildings. 

Eesolved, that the warrant of this grand lodge for the amount above 
named, be issued to the proper corporate body in charge under the laws 
of Illinois of the public schools of such school district. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 115 

Report — Illinois Masonic Home, Sullivan 

Bro. James McCredie presented the report of the Board 
of Managers of the IlHnois Masonic Home at Sullivan. So 
much of the report as related to appropriations was referred 
to the Finance Committee. The remainder of the report was 
adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Your Board of Managers in charge of the Illinois Masonic Home at 
Sullivan submit their report for the year ending September 30, 1921. 

Following the closing of the grand lodge meeting, the board met and 
elected the following officers: 

James McCredie, president. 

Charles C. Davis, treasurer. 

Alonzo Dolan, secretary. 

During the past year everything has been running along very smoothly 
and harmoniously for which reason we have nothing special to present for 
your attention. 

On December 1, 1920, Bro. J. B. Smith of Clay City, who had been 
superintendent, resigned, and Mr. A. E. McCorvie, of Belvidere, was ap- 
pointed to fill the vacancy. 

Mr. McCorvie is a very efficient superintendent and the board of man- 
agers feel that he has been and will be of very great value to the home. 

Appropeiations 
The following statement shows the appropriations made by the grand 
lodge in 1920, the amounts drawn, and the unexpended balances returned 
to the grand lodge at the close of business, September 30, 1921. 

Appropriation Drawn Keturned 

Covering pipes $7,500 $7,500 $ 392.83 

Tire pumps 1,000 (not drawn) 

Changing windows 1,000 1,000 281.47 

Power house chimney 4,000 (not drawn) 

Mattresses 1,500 1,500 739.89 

Furnishings 2,700 2,700 244.90 

Weather stripping 500 500 

Moving picture machine 1,000 1,000 1,000.00 

Maintenance 80,000 80,000 2,866.56 



116 Proceedings of the LOctober 12, 

Appropriation Drawn Returned 

Painting 1,500 1,500 

Solarium 10,000 500 150.00 

*Plumbing 7,500 7,500 7,000.00 

*Contract let recently; holding the balance $7,000.00. 

The contract for replacing the plumbing in the men's building was not 
let until September of this year. W]hile the work was needed badly we did 
not feel justified in letting the contract until prices had come down to what 
we thought was a reasonable figure. 

The appropriation for the fire pump and the power house chimney were 
not drawn because of a change in our plans which made it unnecessary 
at this time. 

The appropriation for the moving picture machine was not used as 
money to purchase it was provided in another way. 

We were unable to build the sun parlor on the hospital building with 
the generous sum of $10,000 appropriated by the Grand Chapter Eoyal 
Arch Masons on account of high prices of labor and materials. Only 
enough money was drawn from the fund to pay the architect for the plans. 
The sun parlor will probably be built the coming year inside the appro- 
priation. 

The unexpended balances left in the several funds were turned over 
to the grand secretary on the last day of September. 

The reports of the treasurer and the books of the institution have 
been audited by Bro. A. B. Steuban, of the Secretary of State's office, and 
may be found in the proceedings. 

A Gift 
Constantia Lodge No. 783 of Chicago, through their efforts, gave to 
the home a gift of $600 which was gratefully received. 

EoAD Fund 
There remains in the hands of the treasurer of the board a balance of 
$1250.25, of a special road fund appropriated severaV years ago for repairs 
and maintenance of the roadway between the home and Sullivan. The 
committee requests that this fund be allowed to remain in their hands to 
be used for the same purpose. 

Amounts Needed 1921-22 
For the coming year 1921-22 your board recommends the appropriation 
of $75,000.00 for maintenance. We further recommend the appropriation 
for the following purposes of the several amounts enumerated: 

Implement sheds $1,500.00 

Power line, etc 5,000.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 117 

Mattresses 600.00 

Painting 2,500.00 

Auto and truck 2,500.00 

Milking machine 600.00 

Dish Washing Machine 1,000.00 

Farm machinery 1,500.00 

Power vacuum cleaner 500.00 

Ventilating fans 400.00 

'Clothing, bed linen, towels, etc 5,000.00 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

James McCredie, 
0. C. Davis, 
Alonzo Dolan, 

Board of Managers. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Herewith find report of receipts and disbursements on account of the 
Illinois Masonic Home for year ending September 30, 1921. 

Receipts and Disbxjrsements 

Received Disbursed 

Maintenance fund $80,000 $77,133.44 

Lowering windows in hospital 1,000 718.53 

Covering pipes 2,000 1,607.17 

Mattresses 1,500 760.11 

Furnishings 2,700 2,455.10 

Weatherstripping 500 500.00 

Painting 1,500 1,500.00 

Solarium 500 350.00 

Plumbing 7,500 500.00 

The contract for the plunil)ing has been let, and we are keeping the 
$7000.00 in the bank at Sullivan, to pay for it. 

The unexpended balances in the other funds were turned back to the 
grand secretary and his receipts are on file. 

Fraternally yours, 

Charles C. Davis, 

Treasurer. 



118 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF ILLINOIS MASONIC HOME 

Sullivan, Illinois, September 30, 1921. 
To the Board of Managers of the Illinois Masonic Home: 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit a report of Home conditions since the first of Jan- 
uary, 1921, the date when I took charge. At the time I came here, there 
was considerable sickness, and we had many deaths during the months of 
January and February and in the early spring. Taken as a whole, health 
conditions have been very good considering the physical condition and the 
age of the members. 

The water in the wells and the reservoirs has been fairly good in 
quality, and we have an ample supply at this time. We discovered a leak 
in the sewer system, whereby the water was being syphoned from the 
reservoir into the creek in large quantities, and the same was immediately 
remedied. Some minor repairs are needed from time to time. 

Religious services are held every Sunday, with the exception of July 
and August, during which time we held five services in two months. 

Gil. W. Barnard Commandery of Sullivan held their Easter services at 
the Home, which was very much appreciated. Brother Mathers, of Chicago, 
gave a very interesting illustrated lecture one evening last spring. 

We are all very appreciative of the splendid entertainments given by 
a quartette from Danville Consistory, the Patterson Carnival Company, the 
Percy Singers and Players, the Bushart Concert Company and Goforth's 
Orchestra of Bloomington, all of which was gratis. We also have had 
two fine lectures and three concerts by outside talent, which was paid for 
out of the Entertainment Fund. 

On Decoration Day, the graves of the deceased members in the Home 
cemetery and the Sullivan cemetery were decorated. 

On the 4th of July we had a splendid band concert, both afternoon 
and evening, by the Sullivan Band, and a good display of fireworks at 
night, which was greatly enjoyed by the members and employees of the 
Home, besides the people of Sullivan and vicinity, there being about 2,000 
on the grounds and adjoining roads. 

All holidays were celebrated in true holiday fashion. During the 
Chautauqua season a goodly number of our people attended the afternoon 
program at Sullivan, and a few in the evening. 

A new cream separator has been purchased, and a new grain binder, 
and a ventilating system put in the main kitchen. The moving picture 
machine which was installed last January furnishes us with movies once 
a week, and is a fine innovation for the Home. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 119 

The crops on the farm were very good and we have a good timothy 
hay crop, having about 40 tons of the hay to sell. We have an abundance 
of good pasture. 

We sold a mixed car of cattle and hogs in May, and a couple of small 
bunches of hogs since. As there was no supply of feed on hand the first 
of January, we had to buy a good deal of hay and corn during the spring 
to tide us over. As we do not have a large amount of plow land, we can 
hardly raise enough to feed the amount of stock we keep. We have a 
nice bunch of Holstein heifers, besides the dairy herd, also a nice bunch 
of spring shoats and thirteen head of Durham and Shorthorn Steers, 
which we are feeding to butcher for the Home use. 

You will notice a considerable drop in the value of the farm in- 
ventory, which is due to the depreciation in market prices on grain and 
stock. The cattle and horses have been inventoried at a much lower value 
than last year. The inventory this year was taken by Brother Mclntire 
and Bay, both progressive farmers of Sullivan, and values made at what 
they considered a fair market price. 

A number of new flower beds were set out and they did very nicely 
this summer. This fall we are landscaping and getting ready to set out 
considerable shrubbery, etc., around the Home and hospital. 

The rooms and halls in the men 's building were painted last winter and 
spring, and all of the interior of the hospital. We are sorry to say that 
the plaster has been coming off quite badly in several of the hospital rooms. 

On the whole, conditions among the members and throughout the Home 
are very good. 

EespectfuUy submitted, 

A. E. McCORVIE, 

Superintendent. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Cash Statement 
receipts 

Farm Earnings $ 3,626.48 

Miscellaneous 688.27 

Loans — Special Funds 1,805.96 

Funerals 1,760.12 

Received from Secretary .' 80,200.00 

$88,080.83 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Vouchers 1 to 1679 inclusive $85,214.27 

Check No. 1678 — G. Treas., L. A. Goddard 2,866.56 

$88,080.83 



120 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 



Statement of Special. Funds 

window changing fund 

Receipts $1,000.00 

Disbursements $ 718.53 

Check No. 7 to L. A. Goddard 281.47 

$1,000.00 $1,000.00 
pipe COVERING FUND 

Receipts $1,000.00 

Disbursements $ 607.17 

Check No. 3 to L. A. Goddard 392.83 



$1,000.00 $1,000.00 



PAINTING FUND 



Receipts $2,500.00 

Disbursements, Checks 1 to 68 inclusive $ 2,395.64 

Transferred to General Fund 104.36 



$2,500.00 $2,500.00 



Statement of Bank Accounts 



GENERAL FUND 



Bank Balance $7,651.95 

Outstanding Checks 7,651.95 



window CHANGING FUND 

Bank Balance $ 281.47 

Outstanding Checks 281.47 



PIPE COVERING FUND 

Bank Balance $ 392.83 

Outstanding Checks 392.83 



PAINTING FUND 

Bank Balance $ 104.36 

Outstanding Check 104,36 



mattress FUND 

Bank Balance $ 739.89 

Outstanding Checks 739.89 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 121 



FURNISHING AND FLOORING FUND 

Bank Balance $ 244.90 

Outstanding Cheeks 244.90 



SPECIAL PLUMBING FUND 

Bank Balance $7,000.00 

Outstanding Checks 

Balance $7,000.00 

SOLARIUM FUND 

Bank Balance $ 150.00 

Outstanding Checks 150.00 



ENTERTAINMENT FUND 

Bank Balance $2,525.78 

Outstanding Cliecks 6.00 

Balance $2,519.78 

MATTRESS FUND 

Receipts $1,500.00 

Disbursements $ 760.11 

Check No. 4, L. A. Goddard 739.89 

$1,500.00 $1,500.00 

FURNISHING AND FLOORING FUND 

Receipts $2,700.00 

Disbursements $ 2,455.10 

Check to L. A. Goddard , 244.90 

$2,700.00 $2,700.00 

SPECIAL PLUMBING FUND 

Receipts $7,650.00 

Disbursements $ 650.00 

Balance 7,000.00 

$7,650.00 $7,650.00 

SOLARIUM FUND 

Receipts $ 650.00 

Disbursements $ 500.00 

Check No. 3 to L. A. Goddard 150.00 

$ 650.00 $ 650.00 



122 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

Trial Balance and Statement September 30, 1921 

general fund 

Provisions for Home $20,299.05 

Provisions for Hospital 9,586.44 

Coal 11,012.69 

Heat, light and power 3,178.27 

Salaries 17,534.29 

Furniture and furnishings for Home 537.72 

Furniture and furnishings for Hospital 250.51 

Farm Labor 5,769.57 

Farm Repairs and Equipment 1,456.83 

Stock and Feed 4,014.34 

Miscellaneous, Household and Home Repairs 4,938.05 

Medical and Hospital Salaries 10,050.85 

Sundries, including Postage, Stationery and Printing, etc.... 879.59 

Taxes and Insurance 591.42 

Annual Payment on Land 800.00 

Clothing 2,168.40 

Laundry 495.36 

Auto Repairs and Gasoline 1,167.74 

Machinery 814.00 

Funerals 1,749.87 

Loans from Special Funds Repaid 1,986.10 

Check No. 1678 to L. A. Goddard, Grand Treasurer 2,866.56 

$102,147.65 

Maintenance Appropriation $80,200.00 

Farm Earnings, Cash Sales 3,626.48 

Farm Earnings, Produce to Home and Hospital 14,066.82 

Miscellaneous 688.27 

Loans, Special Funds 1,805.96 

Funerals 1,760.12 



$102,147.65 



Hospital Expenses 

OCTOBER 1, 1920, to SEPTEMBER 30, 1921 

Provisions $ 9,586.44 

Furniture and Furnishings 250.51 

Medical, including Medicine, Doctor and Nurses Salary 10,050.85 

Laundry 197.44 

Light, Heat and Power 4,510.00 

Clothing 689.21 



$25,284.45 
The following produce was furnished the Home and Hospital from the Farm 
and Garden, for which credit has been given the Farm. 

Vegetables, Eggs and Meat $ 3,888.16 

Milk 10,178.66 

$14,066.82 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois ■ 123 



TARil STATEMENT 

Inventory October 1, 1920 $27,330.81 

Labor 5,769.57 

Repairs and Equipment 1,456.83 

Stock and Feed 4,014.34 

Decrease 7,762.77 



$30,808.78 



EARNINGS 

Produce furnished Home and Hospital $ 3,888.16 

Milk furnished Home and Hospital 10,178.66 

Cash Sales 3,626.48 

Inventory September 30, 1921 13,115.48 



$30,808.78 



Entertainment Fund 

Balance on hand October 1, 1920 $2,619.87 

Loan repaid from General Fund 1,000.00 

Receipts from October 1, 1920, to September 30, 1921 5,342.67 



,962.54 



Disbursements from October 1, 1920, to September 30, 1921 . .$6,442.76 
Balance on hand September 30, 1921 2,519.78 



1920 



Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


21 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


27 


Dec. 


2 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


6 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 



$8,962.54 

Entertainment Fund Receipts 
From October 1, 1920, to September 30, 1921 

St. Paul's Lodge, No. 500, A. F. & A. M $ 25.00 

Tyrian Lodge, No. 333, A. F. & A. M 33.17 

J. J. Gordan, donation 5.00 

Dongola Lodge, No. 581, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Christmas donation 100 

Lawndale Lodge, No. 995, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Temple Lodge, No. 44, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Emblem Lodge, No. 984, A. F. & A. M 35.00 

Arcana Lodge, No. 717, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

York Chapter, No. 146, R. A. M 25.00 

Harry A. Boyd, Cairo, Illinois 10.00 

Constellation Lodge, No. 892, A. F. & A. M 75.00 

Cleveland Lodge, No. 211, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Square Lodge, No. 978, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Exemplar Lodge, No. 966, A.- F. & A. M 50.00 

Lake Shore Lodge, U. D., A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Auburn Park Lodge, No. 789, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Auburn Park Chapter, No. 201, R. A. M 35.00 

Boulevard Lodge, No. 882, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Fort Dearborn Chapter, No. 245, R. A. M 50.00 

Havana Lodge, No. 68, A. F. & A. M 25.00 



124 Proceedings of the [October 12, 



Centralia Lodge, No. 201, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Cairo Commandery, No. 13, Knights Templar 5.00 

Murphysboro Lodge, No. 498, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Lake View Lodge, No. 774, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Adelphi Lodge, No. 1029, A. P. & A. M 25.00 

Lincoln Park Chapter, No. 177, R. A. M 25.00 

Mattoon Lodge, No. 260, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Clay City Lodge, No. 488, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Cairo Chapter, No. 71, R. A. M 10.00 

Greenville Lodge, No. 245, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Leland Lodge, No. 558, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Parkway Lodge, No. 100, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Jackson Park Lodge, No. 915, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Wm. McKinley Lodge, No. 876, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Fortitude Lodge, No. 1003, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Edward Cook Lodge, No. 1023, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Sunrise Lodge, No. 996, A. F. & A. M 20.00 

Oblong City Lodge, No. 644, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Olive Branch Lodge, No. 38, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Circle Chapter, No. 246, R. A. M 25.00 

Apollo Commandery, No. 1, Knights Templar 25.00 

Columbia Lodge, No. 819, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Cheney's Grove Lodge, No. 468, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Pullman Chapter, No. 204, R. A. M 10.00 

Kankakee Lodge, No. 389, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Pyramid Lodge, No. 887, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Waubansia Lodge, No. 160, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Wiley M. Egan Chapter, No. 126, R. A. M 25.00 

Cicero Lodge, No. 955, A. F. & A. M 116.85 

King Oscar Lodge, No. 855, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Tyria Council, No. 78, R. & S. M 10.00 

Prospect Lodge, No. 957, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Prudence Lodge, No. 928, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Marine Lodge, No. 355, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Equity Lodge, No. 878, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

True Blue Lodge, No. 994, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Melrose Abbey Lodge, No. 976, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Justice Lodge, No. 949, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Mont Clare Lodge, No. 1040, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Kankakee Chapter, No. 78, R. A. M 10.00 

Herman Lodge, No. 39, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Accordia Lodge, No. 277, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Bohemia Lodge, No. 943, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Oak Park Council, No. 93 25.00 

Sincerity Lodge, No. 982, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Union Park Lodge, No. 610, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

TroM-el Lodge, No. 981, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Mizpah Lodge, No. 768, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

St. Cecelia Lodge, No. 865, A. F. & A. M 20.00 

Garden City Lodge, No. 141, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

The Lawndale Chapter, No. 243, R. A. M 35.00 

Granite City Lodge, No. 877, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

London Lodge, No. 848, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Cyrene Commandery, No. 23, Knights Templar 10.00 

Fellowship Chapter, No. 235, R. A. M 10.00 



Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


10 


Dec, 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


11 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dee. 


13 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


17 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 125 

Crescent Lodge, No. 895, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Piasa Lodge, No. 27, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Welfare Lodge, No. 991. A. F. & A. M 20.00 

Wm. O. Retterer, Chicago, Illinois 10.00 

Amelia Retterer, Chicago, Illinois 10.00 

Lakeside Lodge, No. 739, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

E. St. Louis Lodge, No. 304, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

E. St. Louis Chapter, No. 156, R. A. M 5.00 

Washington Park Lodge, No. 956, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Albany Park Lodge, No. 974, A. F. & A. M 43.20 

Theodore Roosevelt Lodge, No. 1022, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Paris Lodge, No. 268, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Jeffersonville Lodge, No. 460, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Oak Park Lodge, No. 540, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Brotherhood Lodge, No. 986, A. F. & A. M 80.00 

Cicero Chapter, No. 180, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Wright's Grove Lodge, No. 779, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Compass Lodge, No. 922, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 33, Knights Templar 5.00 

Rutland Lodge, No. 477, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Rutland Chapter, No. 112 5.00 

Pekin Lodge, No. 29, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Hall of St. Clair Council, No. 61 5.00 

Molina Lodge, No. 1014, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Cairo Lodge, No. 237, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Fides Lodge, No. 842, A. F. & A. M 10. Oo 

Garfield Lodge, No. 686, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Home Lodge, No. 508, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Cosmopolitan Lodge, No. 1020, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Honor Lodge, No. 1010, A. F. & A. M 75.00 

Washington Chapter, No. 43, R. A. M 25.00 

Gothic Lodge No. 852, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Germania Lodge, No. 182, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Columbia Commandery, No. 63, Knights Templar 10.00 

E. St. Louis Commandery, No. 81, Knights Templar 5.00 

King Oscar Chapter, No. 249, R. A. M 15.00 

Tliomas J. Turner Lodge, No. 409, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Mount Joliet Lodge, No. 42, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Matteson Lodge, No. 175, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Avondale Lodge, No. 921, A. F. & A. M 15.00 

Mithra Lodge, No. 410, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

America Lodge, No. 889, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Metropolitan Lodge, No. 860, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Ainiad Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S 25.00 

Keystone Lodge, No. 639, A. F. & A. M 100.00 

Banner Blue Lodge, No. 924, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Oriental Lodge, No. 33, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Welcome Lodge, No. 916, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Franklin Lodge, No. 25, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

LaGrange Lodge, No. 770,. A. P. & A. M 10.00 

Delavan Lodge, No. 156, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Community Lodge, No. 1005, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Harmony Lodge, No. 3, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Old Glory Lodge, No. 975, A F. & A. M 55.93 

Austin Commandery, No. 84, Knights Templar 25.00 



Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 



126 



Proceedings of the 



[October 12, 



Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


31 


Dec. 


31 


Dec. 


31 


Dec. 


31 


Dec. 


31 


Dec. 


31 


1921 


Jan. 


1 


Jan. 


4 


Jan. 


6 


Jan. 


7 


Jan. 


11 


Jan. 


11 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


18 


Jan. 


19 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


22 


Jan. 


27 


Jan. 


28 


Feb. 


10 


Feb. 


26 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


21 


April 


25 


May 


10 


May 


13 


May 


27 


May 


24 


June 


20 


June 


20 


June 


30 


July 


5 


July 


17 


July 


17 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


4 


Sept. 


2 


Sept. 


3 


Sept. 


22 



E. F. W. Ellis Lodge, No. 633, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Shabbona Lodge, No. 374, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Integrity Lodge, No. 997, A. P. & A. M 25.00 

Chicago Lodge, No. 437, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Pleiades Lodge, No. 478, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Woodlawn Park Lodge, No. 841, A. F. & A. M 300.00 

Grossman Chapter, No. 155, R. A. M 5.00 

Chester Lodge, No. 72, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Park Ridge Lodge, No. 988, A. P. & A. M 10.00 

William B. Warren Lodge, No. 209, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Perfection Lodge, No. 1033, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Granite City Chapter, No. 221, R. A. M 5.00 

Brighton Park Lodge, No. 854, A. F. & A. M $ 25.00 

Republic Lodge, No. 914, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Crystal Lodge, No. 1025, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Blair Lodge, No. 393, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Ashlar Lodge, No. 308, A. F. & A. M 100.00 

W. D. Morse Lodge, No. 346 12.50 

John Paul Jones Lodge, No. 1013, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Trestle Board Lodge, No. 1032, A. P. & A. M 10.00 

Triangle Lodge, No. 1025, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Progressive Lodge, No. 954, A. P. & A. M 25.00 

John Corson Smith Lodge, No. 944, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

Hyde Park Lodge, No. 989, A. F. & A. M 100.00 

Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S 250.00 

Clifton Lodge, No. 688, A. P. & A. M 12.50 

Louis J. Link, proceeds of suit won by Albert Krick, Link, 
Constantia Lodge, No. 783, 1824 Blue Island Ave., Chicago, 

Illinois 600.00 

Aryan Grotto Lodge, No. 18, M. O. V. P. E. R 25.00 

Peru Chapter, No. 60, R. A. M 25.00 

Peru Chapter, No. 60, R. A. M 25.00 

St. John's Commandery, No. 26, Knights Templar 10.00 

Chicago, Illinois, Park Manor Lodge, No. 899, A. P. & A. M... 25.00 

Bee Hive Lodge, No. 909 100.00 

Morgan Park Lodge, No. 999, A. F. & A. M 25.00 

A. Dolan, insurance on damaged slides 9.37 

Jackson Park Lodge, No. 915 25.00 

South Shore Lodge, U. D., A. P. & A. M 25.00 

P. R. Tramp, of Rankin Lodge, No. 725, A. F. & A. M., Rankin, 

Illinois 1.00 

Jonesboro Lodge, No. Ill, A. F. & A. M 5.00 

Humboldt Park Lodge, No. 813, A. P. & A. M 35.00 

Warren Lodge, No. 14, A. F. & A. M 10.00 

Birchwood Lodge, No. 1012, A. F. & A. M 50.00 

Donnellson Lodge, No. 255, A. P. & A. M 10.00 

Chatham Lodge, No. 523, A. P. & A. M 10.00 

Jacob Hecht, Cosmopolitan Lodge, No. 1020, A- P. & A. M.... 20.00 

Mr. Paulson 2.15 

Olympian Lodge, No. 864, A. P. & A. M 25.00 



$5,342.67 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



127 



List of Newspapkrs and Magazinss Fiuknished from Entertainment Fund 



10 Chicago Tribunes 
8 Decatur Heralds 
2 Globe Democrats 
1 Moultrie County News 

1 Bloomington Pantagraph 

2 Saturday Evening Posts 
2 Literary Digests 

4 American Magazines 
1 Scientific American 
1 Leslie's Weekly 
7 Christian Heralds 
1 Travel 
1 Life 



1 Popular Mechanics 

2 Pictorial Reviews 

1 Etude 

3 Woman's Home Companions 

2 Needle Crafts 

1 Modern Priscilla 

1 Country Life 

1 Cosmopolitan 

1 Ladies' Home Journal 

1 Review of Reviews 

1 Breeders' Gazette 

1 Country Gentleman 

3 Everybodys 



Gifts and Donations other Than Money 
1920 
Nov. 2 Oriental Consistory, gift to Home; Player Piano, 24 Rolls, and Cabinet 

for records. 
Nov. W. K. Holzmueller, photographer, gift to Home of 150 souvenir booklets 

of the Home. 
Dec. 4 Mrs. Carrie Murphy, gift of two Overcoats. 
Dec. 4 Mr. Emmell Howard, gift of four bed spreads. 

Dec. 20 Greenfield Lodge, No. 129, A. P. & A. M., gift of 1 barrel of apples. 
Dec. 21 Richard Cole Lodge, No. 697, gift of 50 V2 pound boxes of candy. 
Dec. 20 Ideal Lodge, No. 1063, gift of 1 pail of mixed nuts. 
Dec. 20 Greenfield Lodge, No. 129, A. P. & A. M., gift of 1 barrel of apples. 
Dec. 20 McClelland Grocery Co., gift of 2 pails of candy. 

1921 
Jan. 5 Lake View Lodge, No. 774, Chicago, gift of 48 V2 pound boxes of candy. 
Feb. 16 Mr. Hurd and friends, gift of 1 case of oranges. 
Feb. 21 Mrs. Janet Kelly of Argyle, Illinois, gift of 1 case of oranges. 
Mar. 5 Mr. I. S. Williams, Savanna, Illinois, gift of 1 box of clothing. 
Mar. 30 Mrs. Janet Kelly of Argyle, gift of 1 case of oranges. 
April 26 William Phillips, 5177 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111., gift of two bundles 

of magazines. 
May 3 H. M. Grebilius, 2157 Ridge Ave., Wayfayers Lodge, Evanston, Illinois, 

igift of 6 books. 
May 3 Charles A. Foster, 457 West 69th Street, Englewood, Illinois, gift of 1 

package of magazines. 

Statement of Store Rooji Supplies 
Inventory of store rooms September 30, 1921, shows that we have on hand 
$2,208.40 general store room supplies.- 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Sullivan, Illinois, October 1, 1921. 
Bo'ard of Managers, Illinois Masonic Home: 
Gentlemen : 

I am pleased to report that I have examined the records at the Illi- 
nois Masonic Home, Sullivan, for the year ending September 30, 1921, and 
hereby certify that the appended statement is a true and correct exhibit 
of conditions of the funds, and that the cash balances, as shown by these 



128 



Proceedings of tlie 



[October 12, 



statements, agree with the bank balanoes; proper allowance being made 
for vouchers issued and not yet presented for payment. Letter from cashier 
of First National Bank, showing amount of balances, attached hereto and 
made a part of this report. 

Yours very truly, 

A. B. Steuben, Auditor. 

First National Bank, 
Sullivan, Illinois 

October 21, 1921, 
To Whom It May Concern: 

This is to certify that the Illinois Masonic Home, Sullivan, Illinois, 
had on deposit in this bank at the close of business, September 27, and 
September 30, accounts and amounts as follows: 

General Fund, at close of business, September 27 $7,651.95 

Special Furniture and Flooring Fund, September 30 244.90 

Special Pipe Covering Fund, September 30 392.83 

Mattress Fund, September 30 739.89 

Special Solarium Fund, September 30 150.00 

Special Plumbing Fund, September 30 7,000.00 

Lowering windows in Hospital Fund, September 30 281.47 

First National Bank, 

By C. E. Hill, Cashier. 



Present Membership at Illinois Masonic Home (Men) 



No. Name Date 

471 Abbott, L. C July 

400 Banvard, B. M Aug. 

746 Bartlett, Walter Aus. 

286 Berhaupt, Lewis .... May 

696 Britton, Markum M. . . Sept. 

406 Brooks, Martin Sept. 

683 Brush, J. B Tuly 

740 Bowers, Jerome Tune 

700 Clifford, A. C Dec. 

729 Carroll, John D May 

663 Dalton, Lafayette . . . Dec. 

618 Elliot, E. P Nov. 

512 Gowenlock, J. E Tan. 

699 Guthrie, James H. . . . Sept. 

390 Green, George "W. . . , May 

747 Foulk, Archibald Sept. 

579 Harvey, D. M Mar. 

409 Hoderkins, William . . . Aug. 

642 Hybarger, R. G Mar. 

637 Henderson, J. W. ...Mar. 

623 Hall, William H Dec. 

719 Harding, Solman M..Mar. 

661 Jackson, G. H Feb. 

457 Johnson, Thomas .... May 

336 Kennedy, Thomas . . . May 

720 Kerr. Norman J Feb. 

211 Lively, J. H Feb. 

704 Lade, Frank L Oct. 

217 Larson, Nelson May 

731 Luby, S. Z Apr. 



Admitted 


Age 


7 


1919 


73 


5 


1915 


72 


11 


1921 


66 


17 


1913 


86 


25 


1920 


82 


8 


1915 


84 


17 


1920 


61 


11 


1921 


72 


17 


1920 


63 


6 


1921 


67 


19 


1919 


72 


29 


1918 


63 


17 


1917 


66 


25 


1920 


72 


27 


1921 


7« 


7 


1921 


71 


9 


1918 


66 


19 


1915 


92 


30 


1919 


73 


3 


1919 


74 


3 


1918 


75 


2 


1921 


72 


15 


1921 


61 


4 


1916 


82 


14 


1914 


77 


17 


1921 


62 


29 


1912 


79 


7 


1920 


52 


12 


1912 


81 


18 


1921 


82 



Lodge No. Location 

Newton 216 Newton 

Peoria 15 Peoria 

Marshall 133 Marshall 

Pacific 66 Kno.\ville 

Mayo 664 Winterrowd 

Hardin 44 Mt. Sterling 

Lawn Ridge 415 Speer 

Auburn 789 Chicago 

Western 240 Champaign 

Lovington 228 Lovington 

Horeb 363 Elmwood 

Cairo 237 Cairo 

Mt. Vernon 31 Mt. Vernon 

Rutland 477 Rutland 

Wade-Barney 512 . . . .Bloomington 

Madison 560 New Douglas 

New Haven 230 New Haven 

Lambert 659 Quincy 

Prairie 77 Paris 

Henderson 820 Kenney 

Good Hope 617 Good Hope 

Virginia 544 Virginia 

Jerseyville 394 .Terseyville 

Bridgeport 386 Bridgeport 

Mystic Star 758 Chicago 

Kaskaskia 86 Evansville 

Oblong City 644 Oblong 

Veritas 926 Chicago 

Apollo 642 Chicago 

Miles Hart 595 Gays 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



129 



No. Name Date Admitted Age 

675 McElvoy, J. S June 5, 1920 84 

721 Myers, Henry L Mar. 7, 

465 Miller, S. B July 5, 

503 Miller, L. H Nov. 15, 

718 McNair, James Jan. 

560 Nelson, Andrew .... June 7, 

451 Nichols, J. H May 10, 

620 Phillips, J. T Dee. 6, 

587 Peterson, D. G Mar. 17, 

364 Quinlin, W. J Nov. 30, 

632 Rice, Albert Apr. 21, 

476 Roberts, C. G Tuly 26, 

585 Robinson, Archie ....May 10, 

429 Richardson, William. . Nov. 13, 

621 Sanders, Wm. C Dec. 6, 

549 Saunders, J. L Apr. 30, 

605 Smith, A. R Aug. 6, 

687 Stephenson, John June 22, 

114 Snell, W. H June 26, 

548 Schumaker, P. C June 5, 

307 Snyder, G. H Nov. 14, 

665 Soper, Melvin Tan. 20, 

538 Talbert, D. R Jan. 14, 

694 Taylor, F. W Au? 

347 Whitcomb, G. H Oct. 14, 

216 Withrow, J. J May 10, 

727 Wellman, Chas. Henry. May 5, 

742 Wallin, Charles June 21 

374 Young, William Nov. 10, 



1921 


72 


, 1916 


74 


, 1916 


73 


1921 


76 


, 1918 


73 


, 1916 


74 


1918 


58 


, 1918 


79 


1914 


86 


, 1919 


69 


, 1916 


81 


, 1918 


83 


, 1915 


68 


1918 


73 


, 1918 


78 


, 1918 


66 


, 1920 


76 


, 1908 


74 


, 1917 


69 


, 1913 


68 


, 1921 


80 


, 1918 


66 


, 1920 


65 


, 1914 


81 


, 1912 


81 


, 1921 


SO 


, 1921 


77 


, 1916 


79 



Lodge No. Location 

Kewanee 159 Kewanee 

Dearborn 310 Chicago 

Enfield 677 Enfield 

No Lodge 

Star in East 166 Rockford 

King Oscar 855 Chicago 

Fairfield 206 Fairfield 

New Haven 230 New Haven 

Gothic 852 E. St. Louis 

Ionic 312 ■ Decatur 

Fairmount 590 Fairmount 

Wade Barney 512 . . . .Bloomington 

Alma 497 Steeleville 

Lake View 774 Chicago 

New Haven 230 New Haven 

Triluminar Cliicago 

Bodley 1 Quincy 

Lafayette 657 Grand Tower 

Benjamin 297 Camp Point 

Constantia 783 Chicago 

Hancock 20 Carthage 

Landmark 422 Chicago 

Golden Rule 726 Chicago 

Lakeview 774 Chicago 

Meteor 283 Sandwich 

Occidental 40 Ottawa 

Marion 130 Salem 

Richard Cole 697 Chicago 

Lounsbury 751 Barrington 



PEE.'iENT MEltBERSIIir AT ILLINOIS MASONIC HOME (WOMEN) 



No. Name Date 

407 Brooks, Nancy A.... Sept. 
607 Coombs, Elizabeth . . . Feb. 

613 Cranson, Alta Dec. 

508 Grout, Mary R Aug. 

300 Haley, Julia E Oct. 

393 Hansen, Emily C....May 

408 Hodgkins, Alvina . . . .Aug. 

464 Johnson, Emilie Oct. 

336 Johnson, Rebecca ....Tune 

450 Hildreth, Christian ..Jan. 

462 Joice, Eliza G Apr. 

463 Joice, Anna D Apr. 

732 Luby, Sarah Jane.... Apr. 

166 Phillips, Ellen Apr. 

502 Pearsall. Harriet .... Oct. 

679 Poe, Alice V June 

586 Robinson, Sarah I . . . May 

713 Sandstrom, Mrs. Fred. Nov. 

282 Schnellbaoker, Anna.. Mar. 

705 Smith, Elizabeth Ann. Oct. 

599 Shanks, Alice E Tune 

335 Tatham, Harriet ....May 

362 Tedmon, Jennie M...Feb. 

499 Thompson, Mary A... Nov. 

346 Williams, Margaret. .. .Tan. 

677 White, Nellie H Apr. 



Admitted 


Age 


fl, 


1915 


77 


2, 


1918 


84 


9, 


1918 


73 


12, 


1915 


73 


13, 


1913 


69 


28, 


1915 


69 


19, 


1915 


83 


6, 


1916 


72 


23, 


1914 


82 


21, 


1916 


81 


27, 


1916 


78 


27, 


1916 


64 


18, 


1921 


73 


15, 


1910 


74 


28, 


1918 


85 


22, 


1920 


51 


20, 


1918 


76 


1, 


1920 


74 


19, 


1913 


69 


13, 


1920 


81 


1, 


1918 


68 


2, 


1914 


77 


18, 


1915 


66 


25, 


1917 


83 


3, 


1915 


72 


24, 


1920 


58 



Lodge No. Location 

Hardin 44 Mt. Sterling 

Sullivan 764 Sullivan 

Homer 199 Homer 

Garden City 141 Chicago 

Garfield 686 Chicago 

Lincoln Park 611 Chicago 

Lambert 659 Quincy 

Logan Square 891 Chicago 

Quincy 296 Quincy 

Vermillion 265 Indianola 

Covenant 526 Chicago 

Covenant 526 Chicago 

Miles Hart 595 Gays 

Murpliysboro 498 ... .Murphysboro 
No Lodge 

Homer 199 Homer 

Alma 497 Steeleville 

Richard Cole 697 Chicago 

Empire 126 Pekin 

Washington 55 Nashville 

Western Star 240 Champaign 

Greenville 245 Greenville 

Kilwinning 311 Chicago 

Lakeview 774 Chicago 

Oak Park 540 Oak Park 

Covenant 526 Chicago 



Present ME>tBERsiiip (Men) in RovAii Arch Memorial Hosi-ital 



No. Name Date Admitted Age 

689 Brown, L. G July 10, 1920 72 

436 Dodd, Richard Jan. 17, 1916 92 

539 Cox. J. W Nov. 15, 1919 57 

269 Dickson, L. J Aug. 15, 1913 82 

428 Detrick, Wm. G Oct. 27, 1915 77 

698 Earle, C. W Aug. 30, 1920 64 

619 Evans, Harry Dec. 4, 1918 83 



Lodge No. Location 

Siloam 780 Chicago 

Sumner 334 Sumner 

E. St. Louis 504 E. St. Louis 

Raymond, 692 RajTnond 

Beividere 60 Belvidere 

Arcana 717 Chicago 

Noble 362 Noble 



130 



Proceedings of tlie 



[October 12, 



No. Name Date 

711 FeathergUl, Edgar B . . Oct. 

682 Hathaway, C. B -Vug. 

«574 Hammond, T. F Mar. 

641 Holli.s, A. C Mar. 

419 Krick, Albert Sept. 

37 Kistlcr, J. S May 

730 Lahman, William D..Apr. 

72 Maroc, Wm. H Apr. 

738 McKenney, Wm. A. . . -Tune 

162 Mclntvre, G. W Mar. 

391 McDanicl, J. M July 

594 Olszewski, J. M Aug. 

739 Piatt, Major R June 

214 Pritchard, James ....Mar. 

305 Rouse, F Oct. 

736 Smith, Loui.s Newton.. May 

591 Stump, A. W Tune 

604 Wood, W. H Sept. 

524 AVells, J. E Mar. 

570 Whipple, S. C Feb. 

309 Watkins, C. F Dec. 

741 Watts, William W .June 

745 Wetherill, John R July 



Admitted 


Age 


21 


1920 


69 


14 


1920 


35 


24 


1920 


88 


8 


1919 


53 


15 


1915 


65 


12 


1905 


74 


14 


1921 


73 


10 


1908 


62 


1 


1921 


79 


9 


1920 


76 


27 


1915 


58 


21 


1918 


43 


1 


1921 


73 


28 


1912 


85 


17 


1913 


59 


28 


1921 


79 


6 


1918 


65 


7 


1918 


48 


21 


1917 


65 


7 


1918 


81 


30 


1913 


64 


3 


1921 


57 


22 


1921 


85 



Lodge No. Location 

Monitor 522 Elgin 

Hibbard 249 Brighton 

LeRoy 221 LeRoy 

Temple 46 Peoria 

Constantia 783 Chicago 

Preemption 755 Preemption 

Windsor 322 Windsor 

Kendrick 430 Timewell 

Barry 34 Barry 

Vesper 584 Galesburg 

Golden Rule 726 Chicago 

Herder 669 Chicaao 

Martin 491 E. Dubuque 

Morning Star 734 Canton 

Tyrian 333 Springfield 

Austin 850 Chicago 

Dearborn 310 Chicago 

Golden Rule 727 Chicago 

Maroa 454 Maroa 

Levi Lusk 270 Arlington 

Wm. B. Warren 209 Chicago 

Arcana 717 Chicago 

Metropolis 91 Metropolis 



Present MEMREnsmr at the Royal Arch Memori.^l Hospital (Women) 



No. Name Date 

472 Butler, Mary July 

477 Craig, Elizabeth R. . . Feb. 

588 Digby, Louisa Mar. 

627 Gibbs, Sarah E Dec. 

373 Henderson, Anna G...Tan. 

511 Hitchcock, Mary .... Sept. 

744 Ijawrence, Ella P Tuly 

20 Philhower, H. S Nov. 

564 Powers, Elenor E....Nov. 

717 Ruehl, Emanuela .... Feb. 

737 Smith, ]\l,argaret G...May 

523 Wade, Elizabeth Feb. 

589 Yocum, Nellie Feb. 



Admitted 


Age 


6, 


1916 


82 


1, 


1917 


84 


9, 


1918 


85 


27, 


1918 


77 


20, 


1915 


76 


11, 


1917 


71 


21, 


1921 


62 


23, 


1904 


81 


27, 


1917 


79 


^, 


1921 


60 


29, 


1921 


79 


27, 


1917 


69 


26, 


1918 


69 



Lodge No. Location 

Pontiac 294 Pontiac 

Tola 691 lola 

Barry 34 Barry 

Mattoon, 260 Mattoon 

Cairo 237 Cairo 

Garfield 686 Chicago 

Oriental 33 Chicago 

Mattoon 260 Mattoon 

Makanda 434 Makauda 

Herder 669 Chicago 

Austin 850 Chicago 

Belle Rive 696 Belle Rive 

Olney 140 Olney 



Date 




19 


20 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


17 


Oct. 


30 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


7 


1921 


Mar. 


1 


May 


24 


May 


28 


June 


9 


July 


30 


July 


31 


Aug. 


1 



Me.mdeks Terminated Other Than Death 

Name Lodge No. Cause 

Mrs. Annie Kelley Palace 765 Withdrew 

H. A. Gaskill Macon 8 Withdrew 

Mrs. Amanda R. Davis. . Jefferson villn 460 Withdrew 

Lewis Buchanan Edward Dobbins. . . .164 Discharged 

Murry R. Muuson Cedar 124 Withdrew 

Alexander J. Harper. . . . Ashlar 308 Removed 

Mrs. Alexander J. Harper .Vshhir 308 Removed 

Chester R. Funk Exeter 424 Withdrew 

Mary S. Fugate Doric 319 Withdrew 

Mrs. Lily McKee T>ebanon 110 Withdrew 

Mrs. Edna Larson Wright's Grove 779 Withdrew 

Lewis C. Buchanan. ... Edward Dobbins. .. .164 Discharged 

Edward Webb Jenks .... Ashlar 308 Withdrew 

Phillip Newton Frew. . . Murphysboro 498 Discharged 



Deaths 

Date of Death Name 'Place of Interment 

Oct. 17, 1920 Charles P. Swift Cremated and ashes seat to Los Angeles, 

California. 

Nov. 17, 1920 John Ray Morris, Illinois. 

Nov. 19, 1920 Mary Ray ^lorris, Illinois. 

Nov. 24, 1920 Anna Mary Alexander. .. Decatur, Illinois. 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illmois 



131 



Date 


of 


Death 


Dec. 


1, 


1920 


Dec. 


19, 


1920 


Jan. 


5, 


1921 


Jan. 


», 


1921 


Jan. 


21, 


1921 


Jan. 


27, 


1921 


Feb. 


s, 


1921 


Feb. 


10, 


1921 


Feb. 


15, 


1921 


Feb. 


16, 


1921 


Feb. 


24, 


1921 


Feb. 


27, 


1921 


Mar. 


8, 


1921 


Apr. 


9, 


1921 


Apr. 


21, 


1921 


Apr. 


28, 


1921 


May 


11, 


1921 


May 


14, 


1921 


May 


28, 


1921 


May 


31, 


1921 


July 


30, 


1921 


Aug. 


20. 


1921 


Sept. 


16, 


1921 


Sopt. 


23, 


1921 



Name Place of Internieiit 

William V. Whitney .... Areola, Illinois. 
William M. Chambers. . . Charleston, Indiana. 

Charles W. Wright Fairfield, Illinois. 

Nels. Anderson Masonic Home Cemetery. 

Sally Neer Champaign, Illinois. 

Fred Yunker Wilmington, Illinois. 

Jefferson Whittington . . . Benton, Illinois. 

Eliza Fenton Masonic Home Cemetery. 

Robert Morton Thompson. Bourbon, Illinois. 

Francis Barnes Albany, Illinois. 

Charles M. Hamilton .... Lovington, Illinois. 

Amelia W. Howard Chicago, Illinois. 

William F. Hughes Bowen, Illinois. 

Peter Paulson Cliicago, Illinois. 

(Died while on furlough at Masonic Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 
Avoiulalo Lodge, No. 921 had charge of tlie remains.) 
Anthony Frank Cassin . . Cliampaign, Illinois. 
Fountain Winfield Young. -Teffersonville, Indiana. 

James C. McLean Paris, Illinois. 

Charles B. Gregory Sandoval, Illinois. 

George W. Alexander. .. Quincy, Illinois. 

James P. Rich Masonic Home Cemetery. 

O. C. Rizer Onarga, Illinois. 

Samuel Hyudman Masonic Home Cemetery. 

Mrs. Jennie Ray Pcarce. Masonic Home Cemetery. 
George McKissick Rock Island, Illinois. 



Ari'Lic.VTiON.^ Received Since Ootobek 1, 1920 



No. Name Lodge No. 

700 A. C. Clifford Western Star 240 

701 O. C. Rizer Star 709 

703 Chas. P. Swift Garden City .... 41 

704 Frank L. Lade Veritas »2tf 

705 Elizabeth A. Smith Washington 55 

706 John Ray Cedar 124 

707 Mary Ray Cedar 124 

708 Murry R. Munson Cedar 124 

709 Elnora Cummins New Columbia. . .336 

710 Geo. W. Alexander Lambert 659 

711 Edgar B. Feathergill Monitor 522 

712 Michael Hire Garfield 686 

713 Mrs. F. Sandstrom Richard Colo ...697 

714 S. E. Sines Clayton 147 

715 Robt. M. Thompson Areola 366 

716 Racheal Woodmanser Olive Branch ... 38 

717 Emanuela Ruehl Herder 669 

718 James M. McNair Star in the East. 166 

719 Solomon H. Harding Virginia 544 

398 Lewis C. Buchanan Edward Dobbins. 164 

720 Norman J. Kerr Kaskaskia 86 

721 Henry L. Meyers Dearborn 310 

722 William A. Corker Dahlgren 967 

723 Emily J. Corker Dahlgren 967 

724 Francis Marion Cox Franklin 25 

725 William Morris Story Wavno 172 

726 Edward Webb Jenks Ash'lar 308 

727 Chas. Henry Wellman Marion 130 

728 Mary S. Fugate Doric 319 

729 John D. Carroll Lovington 228 

730 William D. Lahman Windsor 322 

731 S. Z. Luby Miles Hart 595 

732 Sarah Jane Luby Miles Hart 595 

733 James M. Briggs Litchfield 517 

734 Mary L. Jarboe Kansas 1J80 

735 Mary Eliza Landy Kinderhook 353 

736 Louis Newton Smith Austin 850 

737 Margaret G. Smith ......... Austin 850 

738 Wm. Alexander McKenhey. . Berry 34 

390 George W. Green Wade-Barney . . .512 

739 Major R. Piatt Martin 491 



Location Action 

Champaign .... Approved 

Hoopeston Approved 

Chicago Approved 

Chicago Approved 

Nashville Approved 

Morris Approved 

Morris Approved 

Morris Approved 

Ganntown Rejected 

Quincy Approved 

Elgin Approved 

Chicago Withdrew 

Chicago Approved 

Clayton Rejected 

Areola Approved 

Danville Witlulraw.u 

Chicago Approved 

Rockford Approved 

Virginia Api)roved 

Lawrenceville ..Reinstated 

Evansvillo Approved 

Chicago Approved 

Dahlgren Withdrawn 

Dahlgren Withdrawn 

Upper Alton Pending 

Waynesvillo Died 

Chicago Approved 

Salem Approved 

Moline Withdrawn 

Lovington Approved 

Windsor Approved 

Gays Approved 

Gays Approved 

Litchfipld . . . .Withdrawn 

Kansas Rejected 

Kinderhook Rejected 

Chicago Approved 

Chicago Approved 

Berry Approved 

Bloomington .. . .Apjiroved 
E. Dubuque . . . .Approved 



132 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 

No. Name Lodge No. Location Action 

740 James Bowers Auburn 787 Chicago Approved 

741 William W. Watts Arcana 717 Chicago Approved 

742 Charles Wallin Richard Cole.... 6^7 Chicago Approved 

743 Lawrence O. Tegg Peoria 15 Peoria *Approved 

744 Ella F. Lawrence Oriental 33 Chicago Approved 

745 John R. Wetherill Metropolis 91 Metropolis Approved 

746 Walter Bartlett Robinson 250 Robinson Approved 

747 Archibald Foulk Madison 560 New Douglas . .Approved 

748 William E. Brew Sycamore 134 Sycamore Pending 

749 Henry A. Grass Oriental 33 Chicago Pending 

750 Milem R. Black Columbian .... 819 Chicago Pending 

*(But applicant did not come to Home). 

ArrLic.\TiONS Pending September 30, 1921 

No. Name Lodge No. Location Action 

748 William E. Brew Sycamore 134 Sycamore Pending 

749 Henry A. Grass Oriental 33 Chicago Pending 

750 Milem R. Black Columbian .... 819 Chicago Pending 

Recapitulation 

Membership October 1, 1920 135 Died during the year 29 

Admitted during the year 36 Withdrew 9 

Reinstated 1 Removed 2 

Discharged 3 

172 Membership October 1, 1921 129 

172 

Summary 

Men 89 

Women 40 

Total members 129 



Oration 

Bro. Leroy A. Goddard, grand orator, delivered the an- 
nual oration. A rising vote of thanks w^as given the orator 
and it was ordered printed in the proceedings. 

M.W. Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

The consequent chaotic conditions of the after effects of war and a 
resultant vibration of discontent environ us yet to a great extent, but it is 
tlie same world that a few years ago was enjoying prosperity and good will 
among men. While we have apparently passed through the night of destruc- 
tion, there is a pressing need for that guidance that will lead us aright on 
into the morning of reconstruction, and this is Masonry's opportunity; so 
my suggestions to you at this time are on the subject of 

Masonic Leadership 
Tto paramount value of Masonic Leadership is loyalty to God and to 
country, obedience to law and the constituted authorities, and fealty to 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 133 

the flag, not only as a Masouie obligation but as a zealous impulse, a prin- 
ciple of life, fundamental and sacred, incumbent upon every individual 
Mason. 

It is estimated that the world war exacted from all countries engaged 
over three hundred forty-eight billion dollars, and forty-tJiree million lives, 
the great majority of which were young men between the ages of .twenty- 
two and forty-four years. The war 's problems were so vital, so terrible and 
came so thick and fast that the slightest reflection now causes a shudder, 
but there were organized activities to meet them. The patriotic appeal was 
persistently made to our people. Our most eloquent orators were enlisted 
to inspire the incentive of loyalty. Organizations everywhere were working 
with zeal and energy, and back of all this was the real fear of losing our 
cause and probably seeing our Government perish from the earth. Let me 
add that the contributive help of the Masons in this conflict in time, labor, 
men and money can never be told nor known. 

Our problems did not cease, however, on the 11th day of November, 
1918, when the armistice was signed, after we had successfully met the 
adversary on the battlefield. This country never before faced peace prob- 
lems as serious and as important as it does today, and these must be met 
with cool, deliberative and sane judgment, and by the constructive work 
of the best there is in American manhood. Our ideals of Government and 
our obligations of loyal service are right now facing a supreme test in 
some respects more trying than in times of war. Now, we are literally 
infested by treacherous cliques, subtle and intriguing, working zealously 
and constantly to bring about political, social and industrial destruction. 

Let us sink it deep into our hearts that Masonry and patriotism are 
synonjnmous terms, and that fealty to Masonry recognizes no compromise 
with treason in any shape, form or fashion, but demands that spirit of 
patriotism not only of loyalty to the flag but loyalty also to the high ideals 
of individual citizenship. 

A necessary result of war is that society is very much disturbed and 
old traditions are being overthrown. We are in the midst of an effervescing 
state, a condition of unrest. Labor is restless and capital is guessing. 
Radicals are spreading the false doctrine among working men that frugality 
and industry as primary virtues are old fashioned and worn out, while con- 
scienceless profiteers and financial anarchists bring shame to honest business 
men seeking fair returns for their capital and energy through legitimate 
business methods. It is absolutely immoral to demand a full day's pay for 
less than an honest day 's work, and every free, law-abiding American citizen 
should be guaranteed his privilege to work to sustain his family and him- 
self and educate his children, piovided the work is honorable and the pur- 
pose is honorable and lawful. It is equally immoral for a corporation or 
trust to curtail the output of a commodity solely to harvest increased profits, 
and he is more guilty who refuses just and equitable remuneration for labor 



134 Proceedings of tlie [October 12, 

solely because the power is possessed to do so. If by some process we could 
unfold to view the extent of crooked leadership and graft by which honest 
labor and legitimate business are confronted, our amazement and our shame- 
ful surprise would know no bounds. 

Deplorable as are these conditions, their importance is really dwarfed 
by the proportion of brazen disloyalty,- treason, bolshevism, I. W. W.-ism 
and other like ' ' isms ' ' that exist all around us. These radicals arc per- 
mitted to pursue their activities of proj^aganda practically unmolested. 
They openly attack our form of Government and our American institutions. 
We are told that there are two million bolshevists or communists within our 
borders, a number equal to our American expeditionary force in the World 
War, the leaders of whom believe that they will succeed in time, not only 
in wrecking our Government, but in overthrowing practically all the present 
organized governments of the world. 

There is but one attitude for Masons to take toward these pernicious 
agencies, these fomentcrs of hatred. The loyal citizen must set his face 
against every loose-tongucd and traitorous agitator, against every con- 
spirator against our Government and against every organization that seeks 
to overthrow law and that defies constituted authority. Nor must there be 
any compromise with those who for financial or other gain will passively 
acquiesce in the activities of these perfidious schemers. You cannot afford 
to put on the soft pedal or to be non-committal. Don 't try to straddle. 
Don't be a bat. A bat is neither beast nor fowl, consequently it is the 
most hated by both and has no friend in either. I have as much respect 
for the outspoken bolshevist as I have for the man who for personal or 
political reasons or through fear fails to come out in the open on either 
side. 

Neither is this a question of wealth or of poverty. The injustice of 
wealth is a convenient excuse even for some of our college professors to 
preach bolshevism. Wealth is a crime if gained or used dishonorably. 
Wealth is honorable if acquired by honest industry and frugality and if it 
is used humanely. How could we have colleges, churches or libraries with- 
out such honorably prosperous men? In Chicago alone, multiplied millions 
are given annually to feed the hungry, house the poor and helpless, care for 
the sick and educate the youth. Shall these givers be condemned because by 
thrift and industry they are sueceessfulf 

Laudable ambition is not a crime; honorable success is not a curse. 

I did not accept this appointment as Grand Orator, and it was not my 
intention to try to respond until just recently a little incident gave me 
the theme. Consequently this is an eleventh hour production. I asked one 
of our leading lawyers, an active Mason, what he considered the foremost 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 135 

obligation of our Fraternity. His quick answer was that "Masons should 
be loyal." 

We are told that in this Chicago district there are more than fifty 
thousand Bolshevists, Anarchists and I. W. W. 's whose determination is 
to overthrow the Government, and not by the use of the ballot or other 
legal process. Their first drive apparently was to destroy not property 
alone, but life, if necessary, but finding such extreme radicalism was re- 
acting against them and their malicious purposes, they are now resorting 
to propaganda work, at least till their combative strength is increased. 

Onr Fraternity has a membership of more than two hundred and 
thirty thousand in Illinois, nearly one hundred and twenty thousand in Cook 
County; men of education and social influence, and men who have been 
taught loyalty to God and to Country in every step of their Masonic 
advancement. We cannot deny being fully aware of this danger lurking 
in our midst — we know it. Neither can we, like an ostrich, bury our heads 
and think we arc concealed from this peril. Then with law, truth and 
justice on our side, are we to sulk and do nothing? Or, shall we as Masons 
be true to our obligations, our Fraternity and our Country? 

We have two and one half million Freemasons in the United States who 
should not only themselves be loyal but who can be a tremendous power 
in offsetting pernicious propaganda by persistent constructive propaganda. 
In other words the call is for Masonic leadership to put in force our united 
co-operative strength against this danger that overhangs us, by our own 
individual acts and teachings, and by creating such a sentiment as will 
compel those in power to recognize the force and strength that we represent. 
It is a responsibility we ought to cmlirace, certainly not try to evade. It 
is not only a question of enforcing law, but more largely of moral leader- 
ship. A citizen may violate a law in an unguarded moment or by mis- 
guided judgment. He may commit a crime in a heat of passion. That does 
not mean that he seeks to destroy the law. Jean val Jean was a victim of 
circumstances, and not at heart a criminal. There can be no mitigating 
circumstances to the individual who deliberately seeks to destroy Gov- 
ernment. 

Legislation has no monopoly on the road to morality. The heart of 
the world is not wicked, and the intelligence of the world is not on the 
decline. I have always been an optimist on humanity. I believe men of 
intelligence, especially those who compose this great Fraternity, deep down 
in their souls desire the highest, the best and the purest there is in life. 
In other words, there is that divine spark within the soul of every sensible 
man that will respond to these suggestions if presented from true hearts 
with sincere motives. 

It is didicult to comprehend the responsibility of leadership. If I can 
only faintly impress upon the twelve hundred here today — leaders of the 



136 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

Masons in Illinois — the gravity of their position, it will be a well paid 
effort. The world is moved by leadership. Even that conscience which 
makes cowards of iis all can be molded by leadership. 

"\Miile travelling recently in the occupied territory of Germany I 
noticed right along the highways in the open miles and miles of fruit trees 
full of blossoms and of young fruit. I was informed that the trees were 
planted, cared for and protected by the Government for the benefit of the 
poor; that the people never disturbed the fruit but entered into cheerful 
co-operation in protecting it for the purposes intended. The fruit was 
apportioned to the poor according to their needs. Surely a beautiful spirit 
influenced by environment and constructive leadership. We are told that 
the German government even now is in advance of the rest of the world 
in making provision for disabled veterans. And yet, leaving Brussels for 
Paris, it was most depressing to see acres and acres of fruit trees that had 
been cut down at the very roots to prevent them ever again furnishing fruit 
even to feed the helpless widows and orphans that the war had made. Not 
only that, but railroads and depots had been blown up and some of the 
world's finest cathedrals shelled into rubbish. Will a civilized world ever 
forget such malicious vandalism, such infamous leadership? 

In my earlier life I superintended a Sunday School, and it was a good 
investment. Among the many lessons that were indelibly impressed on my 
mind, I remember one most distinctly. It was the story of the disciples at 
sea. It made a great point with me that they were ' ' at sea, ' ' an expression 
that has grown with the ages. Darkness came; they were at sea and in 
the dark. They didn't know what to do in the dark. And a heavy wind 
came, they were tossed about and they were afraid. Of course, they were 
afraid. Well, what happened. They heard, heard the still small voice of 
the Nazarene, still, small, but they heard it, — "It is I, be ye not afraid." — 
and they immediately landed in safety. 

A great portion of the world is at sea — ^the old boat is being storm 
tossed and badly rocked. Justice is receiving some hard jolts, and patriotism 
is almost caught up in the waves. Anxious, willing workmen are more or 
less in confusion, and legitimate labor organizations have their problems 
with crafty agitators and cunning schemers that invade their ranks. Lawful 
capital is nervous and on a tension. The wave of crime sweeping over the 
country, monopolizing the big headlines of the daily press, is appalling. 
But don't desert the ship, trust in the sanity of her leaders ^.nd be un- 
afraid. God reigns and our flag is yet the flag of the people. Listen to 
that still, small voice of conscience that comes from the brain of business 
sense and is prompted by the heart of Masonic justice, and obey its dic- 
tates. The responsibility is upon us, and we have never yet failed to 
make good. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 137 

When motoring through the battlefields of France we passed through 
several cities that had been almost totally demolished by German soldiers 
and occupied by them until our American boys arrived on the scene and 
retook them. Some of the places were so completely destroyed that there 
was not even a chimney left in some entire blocks. On the journey we were 
forcibly reminded that our own United States had given much tJiat was of 
more value than money. This reminder was contained in the American 
cemeteries, marked by the white crosses where the remains of our men 
were buried, and suspended in the centre would be the American flag. I 
shall always remember especially with patriotic emotion the cemetery at 
Belleaiii Woods where the names of twenty-eight hundred of our men are 
marked on the white crosses. I think it is the most beautiful cemetery I 
have ever seen. Here were evidences most convincing that had it not 
been for our forces in Prance or had their arrival been delayed even a few 
days, the result of the war might have been disastrous to us along with the 
other allied countries, and the American flag hauled down at the dictation 
of the Kaiser. 

Listen to this message from our wounded service men in their con- 
vention just held recently in Detroit; among other resolutions I quote as 
follows : ' ' Any attempt by force upon the institutions of our Government 
and the flag of our country will be met with force, if necessary, by all 
patriotic veterans. The government of this republic will be maintained at 
any cost, and there will be tolerated but one flag, our national emblem. ' ' 

It was this spirit of patriotic manhood of which General Foch spoke 
on July 4th last when he said : 

"In the long war that the free nations had to fight against 
the oppressors of the right, the direct participation of America 
lasted only a short period, but to the American nation is due the 
glory of having thrown herself wholly into the struggle at the 
decisive moment and, in order to insure victory, to have made in 
every branch of the national activity an unparalleled effort. 

' ' Her army, too, so quickly here from so far away, showed from 
the first incomparable qualities of spirit, courage and heroism. 

' * America rushed with all her youthful ardor into the vast 
turmoil of the battle, and thus contributed mightily to the victory 
of right and liberty. 

"She has generously given her blood to the common cause; 
75,000 of her children, dead on the soil of France, testify to this 
in an undying way. 

"Glory to these dead! Glory to the American army! Glory to 
the American people!" 

Now let me quote from Theodore Eoosevclt's "Last Plea for 
Americanism ' ' : 

"We have room for but one flag, the American flag, and this 
excludes the red flag. We have room for but one sound loyalty, and 
that is loyalty to. the American people. ' ' 



138 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

Civilization lias been dealt a terrible blow, and is yet in a restless 
unsettled state, more or less at sea, storm tossed and in the dark, but we 
are not lost. We need balance wheels, and it is incumbent upon the Masonic 
fraternity to maintain a leading part in that responsibility. My optimistic 
faith tells me that in time the consciences of our men and women will 
awaken to the call of unselfish endeavor and constructive effort, and that 
the great truths of civilization will prevail because they must prevail. Let 
us hold tenaciously to that faith which trusts in the fundamental righteous- 
ness of our people, and the pendulum of safety and sanity will again 
swing back to law, to justice and to loyal citizenship. 

Report — Committee on New Legislation 

Bro. Geo. M. Moiilton, chairman of the Committee on New 
Legislation presented the following report. It was adopted. 
Also the proposed amendment to Code No. 149 of Grand 
Lodge By-laws by the requisite two-thirds vote. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

The undersigned Committee on New Legislation to whom was referred 
the amendment "proposed by Bro. Wni. H. Beckman to code No. 149 of the 
Grand Lodge By-laws, fraternally recommends that the proposed amend- 
ment be adopted, so that when amended the code will read as follows: 

149. For the due performance of the duties hereinbefore prescribed, 
the grand secretary shall receive as full compensation, the sum of four 
thousand dollars per annum, payable in monthly installments: Provided 
that for payment of sums actually expended for postage, express charges, 
and incidental official expenses, the grand lodge may make appropriations, 
upon ])resentatioji of itemized bills approved by the Finance Committee. 
Provided, further, that the grand secretary shall employ an assistant who 
shall receive such compensation as shall be fixed by the Finance Committee 
and the grand master. 

Your committee further recommends that the proposed amendment to 
code No. 552 of the Grand Lodge By-laws, to strike out the words "seventy- 
five dollars" in the eighth line thereof, and to substitute the words "one 
hundred dollars," be not adopted. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Geo. M. Moulton, 
William Wilhartz, 
Jos. J. Shaw, 

Committee. 



1921] arand Lodge of Illinois 139 

Report — ^Committee on Jurisprudence 

Wm. B. Wright, chairman of the Committee on Jurispru- 
dence, presented the following report. It was adopted. 

To the Most Worsliipful Grand Master, Wardens and Brethren: 

Your Committee on Jurisprudeucc to ^Yllich have been referred several 
matters treated of in the report of the most worshipful grand master beg 
leave to report as follows: 

Charter Arrested 

In regard to arresting the charter of Henderson Lodge No. 820 — 

When certain charges were first preferred against a member of that 
lodge they were accepted by the unanimous vote of those present at the 
meeting. A commission was appointed to try the case. The commission 
found the preliminary steps specified in the code had not been taken and 
that jurisdiction had not been acquired, hence the charges were dismissed. 
New charges were at once jireferrcd, the preliminary steps were taken, and 
when the next vote was had the charges were rejected by unanimous vote. 
The matter was presented to the most worshipful grand master and after 
investigation he felt there should be a trial on the charges, and addressed 
the following letter of August 24, 1921, to the lodge through the secretary: 

"Referring to the case of Henderson Lodge No. 820 vs. Frank S. 
Stewart, I am informed that Brother Stewart has petitioned your lodge 
for a dimit. In view of the fact that another set of charges have been 
preferred against Brother Stewart which are now on file in this office you 
will not issue the dimit as applied for until further notice." 

On August 31, 1921, the most worshipful grand master again wrote 
the lodge as follows: 

"I am enclosing herewith charges preferred by Bro. Charles T. Sprague, 
Master Mason in good standing and affiliated with DeWitt Lodge No. 84 
of Clinton, against Bro. Franz Sigel Stewart, commonly known as Frank S. 
Stewart. You will send out notices to the lodge in this connection and it 
is ordered that the charges at the proper time be accepted by the lodge." 

Notwithstanding these explicit directions from the most worshipful 
grand master, the lodge met September 17, 1921, and as shown by the 
records, the letter of August 31, above cpiotcd, was read in full. The 
record continues — 

"The master gave notice that a secret ballot woidd be taken, on 
accepting the charges and Brother Stewart placed on trial. 

A vote was taken with the following result: three for accepting the 
charges and sixteen against accepting, and one blank ballot. The master 
ordered a second vote to be taken, with the following result: three for 



140 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

accepting the charges aud seventeen against accepting them. The master 
then declared the charges rejected by this lodge." 

In the minutes of the same meeting we find the following: 

' ' The application of Bro. Franz Sigel Stewart for dimit laid over 
from the last meeting, was taken np, and his dues being paid and no 
charges pending, the master directed the secretary to issue the dimit. ' ' 

In view of this record your committee is of opinion that the action of 
the most worshipful grand master in suspending the charter of the lodge 
was amply justified and should be sustained. This most worshipful grand 
lodge is sovereign and when it is not in session the most worshipful grand 
master exercises its executive functions. The function of an executive is 
to see that the law is enforced and obeyed. When the most worshipful 
grand lodge through its most worshipful grand master orders that charges 
against a brother be accepted by a lodge there is no occasion for any one 
to vote upon that question. A record should be made showing the charges 
accepted by order of the most worshipful grand master. 

If a constituent lodge has power by a vote of its members to set 
aside or defy the order of the most worshipful grand master; if through 
a spirit of rebellion or a mistaken or exaggerated notion of its rights a 
lodge can evade, ignore or set aside the orders and commands of the high- 
est officer of the most worshipful grand lodge, then this most worshipful 
grand lodge may as well surrender its sovereignty and dissolve, leaving 
every lodge and every individual member free to act without legal restraint 
or control. 

We recommend not only that the action of the most worshipful grand 
master in this case be sustained, but as a further measure of discipline 
the charter of Henderson Lodge No. 840, aud its functions remain suspended 
until June 1, 1922, and that during the period of suspension its affairs be 
administered as specified in Code No. 678. 

Master Deposed 

As stated by the most worshipful grand master, this committee re- 
viewed the record made by the trial commission and was of the opinion 
that the finding by a majority of the committee that the defendant was 
guilty was supported by the evidence. We so reported and the master was 
deposed. 

The facts were briefly as follows: The defendant while on the back 
porch of the house of an acquaintance located about one mile from his own 
house and while on or near a step-ladder directly under a bedroom window, 
was shot in the arm by some one in the bedroom above him, after which he 
fled, and carried the step-ladder with him and placed it in the barn some 
distance from the house. He attempted to conceal the incident and when it 
became known, confessed to being there and to being shot as above stated. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 141 

His attempted explanation that he came on the premises because he saw 
a prowler there who had escaped at his approach and that he was shot 
while standing near the ladder waiting to see if the prowler would re- 
turn, did not appeal to your committee as a credible explanation nor was 
it at all satisfying to the brother who acted as his counsel at the taking 
of the testimony. 

We recommend that the action of the most worshipful grand master 
in deposing said master be approved and that he be not restored as master 
during the time for which he was elected. 

Payment of Costs 

The most worshipful grand master requested this committee to con- 
strue Code No. 1009, and give an opinion as to who should pay the costs 
in above case. We were and are of the opinion that the lodge and not 
the accuser should be required to pay the costs. The accusers made a com- 
plaint to the most worshipful grand master regarding the worshipful mas- 
ter of Meteor Lodge No. 283. The most worshipful grand master, follow- 
ing the provisions of Code No. 1008, deemed the matter of a sufficiently 
grave character to warrant investigation, and he proceeded as in that code 
provided and sought, through a commission, an investigation of the facts 
and such report and such opinion as would enable him to make a final 
decision. 

We did not think the most worshipful grand lodge intended, by the 
adoption of Code 1009, to provide that any one who called attention to 
the delinquencies of a worshipful master should be required to pay the 
costs of any investigation ordered by the most worshipful grand master 
to enable him to make a final decision, nor did we think the language of 
this code could properly be so construed. 

If such was the intention or if the language bears such construction, 
masters of lodges would be immune from discipline no matter how culpable 
their conduct, because few Masons if any, can afford to make themselves 
personally responsible for a bill of costs in a matter in which they have 
no personal interest, different from or greater than the interest of every 
other Mason who desires that Masonic law be vindicated and its violation 
punished. 

This in substance was our opinion as given to the most worshipful 
grand master, and upon which he acted in ordering the lodge to pay the 
costs. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Wm. B. Wright, 
C. E. Allen, 

H. T. BURNAP, 

Ealph H. Wheeler, 
N. B. Carson, 

Commitiee. 



142 Proceedings of Ike [October 12, 

Report — Finance Committee 

Bro. Edward H. Thomas, chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, presented the following report. It was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

Your Committee on Finance, as in the past two years, have had the 
books, accounts, records, etc., of the right worshipful grand secretary and 
the right worshipful grand treasurer audited by a public accountant, Bro. 
George Catlo, wliosc report is as follows: 

To the Finance Comimittce of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient 

Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Illinois: 
Brethren : 

You have again afforded me the privilege of serving our grand lodge 
by examining the books, accounts, records and vouchers of the same in the 
offices of the grand secretary at Camp Point and the grand treasurer at 
the State Bank of Chicago, which were found to be correct and in accord 
with the conditions. All the funds are intact and the securities in the 
shape of bonds and stock certificates are in the possession of our grand 
treasurer whose assistant displayed them to me. I noted that all coupons 
for interest due had been detached and collected and those covering inter- 
est not yet due still attached to the bonds. 

Through the forethought of our grand treasurer's assistant, there 
arc no vouchers outstanding, all checks issued have been cashed, and the 
balances reported by him in his report are in accord with the balances 
shown by the liooks of our grand secretary. 

Attached to the report of our grand treasurer is a certificate from 
Bro. Gaylord T. Morse, Assistant Cashier of the State Bank of Chicago, 
and there was in that bank at the close of business October 4, 1921, the 
following balances due the grand lodge: 

General Fund $252,924.45 

Charity Tund 26,038.68 

Permanent Fund 1,588.23 

Total $281,451.36 

Under separate cover there will be delivered to you schedules covering 
in detail the receipts and disbursements for the year, and attached will be 
found a scheilulc of the cash, bonds and stocks, pertaining to the various 
funds of the grand lodge, for your information. 

General Fund 

DEBITS 

Cash balance Oct. 7, 1920 $186,762.59 

Cash received from grand sec- 
retary 250,914.61 



Total debits .$437,677.20 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 143 

CREDITS 

By mileage and per diem paid 

officers, committees and 

representatives since last 

report $ 28,205.26 

B'y salaries paid to grand 

officers 9,100.00 

By misccllancons voiicliors paid 147,447.49 



Total credits $184,752.75 



Total cash balance in general fund $252,924.45 

Charity Fund 

DEBITS 

Cash balance, Oct. 7, 1920 $ 64,289.51 

Cash received from grand sec- 
retary 292,856.62 



Total debits $357,146.13 

CREDITS 

By vouchers since last report $330,207.45 



Total cash balance in charity fund $ 26,938.68 



Total cash balance in both funds $279,863.13 

Permanent Fund 

DEBITS 

Cash balance Oct. 7, 1920 $ 11,540.14 

Cash received from grand sec- 
retary 1,365.59 



Total debits $ 12,905.73 

CREDITS 
By voucher since last report $ 11,317.50 



Total cash balance in permanent fund $ 1,588.23 

$ 1,588.23 



Total cash balance in all funds $281,451.36 



144 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 

Securities 
Basis Par Value 

General fund $ 69,000.00 

Illinois Masonic Orphans ' Home fund 103,150.00 

Masonic Home fund 500.00 

Home for the Aged fund 8,000.00 

Charity fund 51,150.00 

Permanent fund 12,500.00 

Total of all securities $244,300.00 

Total cash and securities in grand lodge treasury $525,751.36 

Thanking you for the privilege afforded me in this examination and 
the several brethren whose accounts were checked up for their continuous 
kindness while so engaged, I beg to continue. 

Faithfully and fraternally, 

George Catto, 

Public Accountant. 

Your committee recommend that appropriations from the charity fund 
be made as follows: 
Maintenance and support of Illinois Masonic Home, Sullivan, 

for the ensuing year $ 75,000.00 

Clothing, bed linen, towels, etc 5,000.00 

Mattresses 600.00 

Painting 2,500.00 

Dish washing machine 1,000.00 

Power vacuum cleaner 500.00 

Ventilating fans 400.00 

Line for electric power, etc 5,000.00 

Farm machinery 1,500.00 

Milking machine 600.00 

Automobile and automobile truck 2,500.00 

Implement shed 1,500.00 

Maintenance and support of Masonic Orphans' Home, LaGrange 46,000.00 

New dormitory building and dining room extension 56,000.00 

Furnishings for new dormitory building 6,000.00 

For continuation of appraisals of homes at Sullivan and La- 
Grange 150.00 

Your committee also recommend that appropriations from 
the general fund to defray the necessary expenses of the 
grand lodge for the ensuing year, be made as follows: 
For mileage and per diem of officers, representatives and com- 
mittees 29,000.00 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 145 

For printing and binding proceedings 5,500.00 

Miscellaneous printing 3,500.00 

For binding 1000 Blue Books from sheets owned by grand lodge 360.00 
For printing and binding 1000 books of Ceremonies from plates 

owned by grand lodge 480.00 

For salaries of grand officers 10,400.00 

For state school of instruction 2,000.00 

For expense of grand master 's office 1,200.00 

For expense of grand secretary 's office 1,500.00 

For district deputies ' expense 1,650.00 

For miscellaneous expense 7,500.00 

For stenographer grand master 's office 2,100.00 

For additional clerk hire, grand secretary's office 1,860.00 

For grand secretary 's office rent 1,200.00 

For moving grand secretary's office 300.00 

Your committee also recommend that orders be drawn on the 
general fund as follows: 

Bro. Delmar D. Darrah, committee on correspondence 500.00 

Bro. Phil C, Barclay, chairman of committee on chartered 

lodges, to cover office expense, clerk hire, etc 150.00 

Bro. George T. Scrivner, services as grand tyler 100.00 

Bro. George T. Scrivner, sundry expense 224.00 

Oriental Consistory, rent 300.00 

Bro. Charles G. Palmer, services as stenographer 50.00 

Your committee further recommend that an order be drawn 
on the general fund for $6,000.00 as a voluntary contribu- 
tion of this grand lodge to the public school building fund 
at La Grange, Illinois, and to be used in the erection of new 

public school buildings at La Grange, Illinois 6,000.00 

Your committee further recommend that the remaining sum of $3,332.20 
from the 1920 appropriation for new water softener plant still in the hands 
of the Board of Managers of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home, La- 
Grange, be left in their hands for final payment on contract covering the 
water softener plant. 

Your committee further recommend that th* members of the several 
committees and the past grand masters not otherwise provided for, in 
attendance iipon this annual meeting, be allowed and paid the sum of 
three dollars ($3.00) per day for each day's service rendered, in addition 
to the compensation provided in the by-laws, and that your committee be 
authorized to preserve the paid vouchers upon the grand treasurer for the 
past year until the next meeting of this grand lodge, for reference should 
occasion require. Edward H. Thomas, 

E. Edwin Mills, 
S. O. Spring, 

Committee. 



146 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

Amendments Proposed 

Bro. David D. King offered the following amendments to 
code numbers 348, 349 and 351 and moved that they be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Legislation. The motion was 
seconded by representatives of more than twenty lodges and 
were so referred. 

Amend code 348 by striking out the clause beginning in the third 
line "or make any change in its place of meeting that will effect lodge 
jurisdiction." 

Amend code 349 by striking it out. 

Amend code 351 to read code 349. 



Amendments Proposed 

Bro. A. F. Hooper, Utopia Lodge No. 894, presented the 
following resolution. It was referred to the Committee on 
Finance and the Board of Managers of the Orphans Home 
at LaGrange, with instructions to report at the next session 
of grand lodge. 

- Whereas, it is deemed advisable that action should be taken to assure, 
as far as possible, the retention of members of the Illinois Masonic Or- 
phans' Home in said Home until they respectively arrive at the age of 
eighteen years to enable them to receive such education and training as 
may best fit them to be self-sustaining and self-reliant; 

Now, Therefore Be It Hesolved, by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge 
of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Illinois, that the 
Board of Managers of the Illinois Masonic Orphans ' Home shall be and 
they are hereby authorized and empowered to make, pass or adopt such 
rules and regulations as in their judgment may be necessary, proper or 
advisable, in relation to the length of retention at said home of children 
therein or members thereof having in regard to their fitness to be self- 
sustaining and self-reliant, and that recommendation be and it is hereby 
made to said board that as far as j)racticable in the judgment or discre- 
tion of said board a child or member shall be retained until they shall 
have attained the age of eighteen vears. 



I'-^^iJ Grand Lodge of Illinois 147 

Report — George Washington Memorial 

Bro. Owen Scott, State Chairman of the George Washing- 
ton Masonic Memorial Association, made the following report 
and asked that it be printed in the proceedings. It was so or- 
dered. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

During the past year the Avork of soliciting for the George Wash- 
ington Masonic National Memorial Association has been practically com- 
pleted. From the grand treasurer, to whom all remittances have been made, 
it is learned that the amount in his hands credited to this fund October 1, 
1921, is $71,459.58. This is in keeping with other grand lodges, although 
many of them have exceeded this sum. A recent letter from Bro. Louis 
A. Watres, president of the association, says: 

"We have been most fortunte indeed that the brethren of your great 
jurisdiction have seen the vision of the deeply significant work we have in 
hand. Your most worshipful grand master, Brother Fitzgerrell, has been 
a real inspiration to our work, and enough cannot lie said of the great 
as-sistance which was given by our lamented Brother Scrogin. You, per- 
tonally, not only by your intelligent organization, but by your presence and 
counsel at our meetings, have been an inestimable help. ' ' 

From the sums paid and pledged by grand lodges. Brother Watres feels 
assured that the actual work of construction will begin early in 1922. The 
sum now actually in sight approaches One Million Dollars. The goal of 
$1.00 for each Mason in the United States will make about $2,300,000.00. 
It is confidently believed by those in charge of the campaign that this sum 
will be realized. 

Three different firms of architects have gone over the site separately 
and unanimously agree on the Colonial style of architecture. This seems 
fitting as the great Memorial is to stand on Virginia soil. It is now the 
purpose of the Memorial Association to let the contracts as early as pos- 
sible so that the corner-stone can be laid as soon next spring as weather 
conditions will permit. . It is hoped that the Grand Master of Virginia can 
secure the President of the United States, Bro. Warren G. Harding, as 
his proxy to officiate at the ceremonies of laying the corner-stone. 

The plan is to make this a great day for Masonry in America. Every 
Mason will feel a justifiable pride in this great achievement. As I close 
my work as chairman for Illinois, it is with much pleasure that I thank 
nil for their assistance. It is a real privilege to express my appreciation 
of the very valuable services of the district deputy grand masters through- 
out the state, without whom this work could not have been accomplished. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Owen Scott, 

State Chairman. 



148 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

Report — Committee on Obituaries 

Bro. Jas. K. Lambert presented the report of Committee 
on Obituaries. It was adopted by a rising vote. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 
Brethren : 

Life has been styled a pilgrimage, and perhaps no term is more ex- 
pressive of its trials, hopes and fears; its joys and sorrows. In its several 
stages — youth, manhood, and age — life is changing and uncertain. The 
pilgrimage leads through a region of varied aspects — over a way checkered 
with good and evil, under skies of sunshine and shadows, and along a 
pathway where lie in wait danger, disease and accident. 

Man is indeed a pilgrim in company with his fellows, differing in 
thought, customs and speech, yet all having in mind the same goal — eternity; 
separated by diverse opinions as to religion and all questions coming within 
the range of their daily lives, yet sharing the belief in a future life — 
the hope of immortality, God's sweetest gift to man. 

All plan to live many years. Some leave the pilgrimage at an early 
age; others in the midst of a busy practical life. A few reach the Scrip- 
tural limitation, and occasionally one by reason of strength attains to the 
age of four score years. In any event, the time of life is short. 

The journey is interesting and even joyous to many, wearisome at times 
perhaps to all; yet, however long or short, joyful or sad the journey may 
be, there are happy haltings along the travelway of life where people gather 
together to review the past and to plan for the future; to interchange 
friendly greetings and to resolve on new endeavors; to refresh themselves 
and renew their vigor for the journey onward. These are the waymarks 
along the highway of life, and to such a place are we gathered to-day for 
a brief period of conference. 

In our deliberations we have paused to pay loving tribute to the worth 
and work of our many brethren who since the last meeting of this grand 
lodge have quit the pilgrimage, laid down their working tools, and entered 
into life eternal. Let us for a time reflect upon their lives, and enjoy 
again — in recollection — the sweet fragrance of their characters. 

Isaac Cuttek 

Bro. Isaac Cutter was born at Elmwood, Illinois, January 20, 1854, 
and died at Blessing Hospital, Quincy, Illinois, June 15, 1921. He was 
made a Mason in Benjamin Lodge No. 297 at Camp Point, October, 1892; 
was commissioned grand lecturer in 1898; became a member of the Board 




ISAAC CUTTER 

R. W. Onind Secretiuy 1900-1921 
Died in Office June 15, 1921 



L' 



IBBAHV 

OFT 
ITV 



I wm 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 149 

of Grand Examiners in 1900, and was elected grand secretary in 1906. 
Brother Cutter received the Chapter degrees in Camp Point Chapter in 
1893, serving as High Priest in 1899, and the Council degrees in Bloora- 
ington Council in 1906. He became a Knight Templar in Delta Command- 
ery in 1910. He was a member of Quincy Consistory, and was made a 
33rd degree Mason in 1915. 

Brother Cutter was also a member of Acasia Fraternity at the Uni- 
versity, of Hlinois, the Masonic Veterans' Association, and of the Grand 
Secretaries' Guild of the United States. 

Perhaps the death of no Mason in the great State of Illinois could 
have been more keenly felt, more deeply and sincerely mourned, than that 
of Isaac Cutter. His passing is like the falling of a great tree in the forest 
of life. As a public school teacher, as a clerk in the railway mail service, 
as a prominent churchman and Mason, and as a man active in all civic 
matters of his Country and State, he came to know intimately many people. 
His spirit was made genial by real affection for his fellow beings and he 
became nobly sympathetic through his varied personal experiences. . He was 
generous, never failing to respond to every worthy appeal. Ho helped to 
build up his community, strengthening every good work with his energy and 
money. He steadied those about him who faltered; he lifted up those 
who fell; he went on in his own quiet way without boasting and without 
display; he shared unselfishly with all about him every rich gift of mind 
and heart with which he was endowed. He was, in heart, a true Mason, 
to whom "every child of sorrow was a brother; self was the only being 
that seemed by him forgot." 

' ' Calm on the bosom of thy God 
Fair Spirit, rest thee now! 
E 'en while with ours thy footsteps trod 
His seal was on they brow. 
Dust, to its narrow house beneath! 
Soul, to its place on high!" 

Berthold E. Uebele 

Berthold E. Uebele, District Deputy Grand Master of the Second Dis- 
trict, died June 6, 1921, aged fifty years. "Bert," as we have loved to 
call him, was a member of Dearborn Lodge No. 310, and of various other 
Masonic bodies. He was much interested in the Illinois Masonic Hospital 
Association, actively engaged in promoting its interests, and was at the 
time of his death first vice-president of that organization. 

In the death of Brother Uebele there passes from time to eternity a 
splendid Mason and a representative citizen. Capable and efficient in every 
detail of Masonic matters, he always did his work exceptionally well and 



150 Proceedings of the [October 12, 

in a most plcasiug manner. In all his dealings he was generous and kind- 
hoaitcd, ever ready to extend a helping hand. His genial personality won 
quickly the admiration of all who met him, and his never-ending interest 
in all those with Mhom he was associated endeared him to every one. Cut 
down in the prime of his days, his death is particularly sad; yet his life 
stands as an example of the truth that — 

"We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths; 
In feelings, not in figures on a dial ; 
We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives, 
"Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best." 

The writer know Brother Uebele intimately, and mourns his death as 
he would sorrow for the passing to the Better Land of one of his own 
kindred. 

Henry E. Hopkins 

Bro. Henry Eiddle Hopkins, while returning to his home from a Ma- 
sonic gathering on August 30, 1921, was struck by a truck and fatally 
injured. He passed away the following day — a forcerul reminder that 
' ' in the riiidst of life we are in death. ' ' 

Brother Hopkins was a member of Dearborn Lodge No. 310, and for 
a long time had been prominent in the activities of various Masonic bodies. 
For several years immediately preceding his death he was Chaplain of 
Van Rensselaer Lodge of Perfection, and for nineteen years he was Grand 
Chaplain of the Grand Council of Illinois. Although nearing his SSth 
birthday, he was a frequent attendant at Masonic meetings, and was ever 
ready and willing to render any service. Only an hour or two before the 
fatal accident he stood at the banquet table among his brethren and pro- 
nounced the invocation. He was in tine spirits, looking forward in happy 
anticipation to the several meetings of grand bodies of Masons this fall, 
and in his kindly way, remarked: 

"Grow old along with me! 
The best is yet to be. 
The best of life, for which the first was made." 

Clinton L. Sandusky 

Brother Clinton L. Sandusky, one of the most useful Masons of Illinois, 
passed away Friday, August 26, 1921. 

Clinton L. Sandusky was born in Catlin, Illinois, September 30, 1871. 
Was married to Miss Sarah Marble of Danville, Illinois, October 5, 1892, 
and died at his home 1009 North A^prmillion Street, Danville, Illinois, August 
2(), 1921, leaving his wife and son, Clinton L. Sandusky, Jr., age 11 years. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 151 

Brother Sandusky received the Symbolic degrees iu Fairniouiit Lodge 
No. 590 in 1892. 

He was elected Master of Olive Branch Lodge No. 38 in June, 1904, 
and served one year. Soon after he was appointed D. D. G. M. for the 
Masonic District and served eleven years, following that, he became a 
member of the Committee on Lodges under Dispensation. 

One of the chief characteristics of Brother C. L. Sandusky was force. 
He was a great organizer, consequently a great business man, and a great 
executive in any capacity. Once his mind was made up, he would follow 
a definite course regardless of the consequences. To this enthusiasm his 
large success was due. 

No man had a warmer heart, or a more cordial hand. Clint Sandusky 
loved his friends, and was never so happy as when entertaining them in his 
beautiful home. 

During the past year one hundred sixty-eight other masters and past 
masters of Illinois and twenty-six past grand officers of other grand juris- 
dictions have laid aside forever all the hopes and fears, all the sorrows and 
burdens of life. Their names appear on the memorial pages iu the ap- 
pendix. 

To their surviving relatives, we extend our deepest sympathy and most 
fraternal affection. 

Our departed brethren have gone from human sight; they have passed 
forever from association with us here. It is our duty to perpetuate their 
memories; to preserve and strengthen and glorify the institution for which 
they labored. 

Brethren, farewell; you have reached your journey's end; you have 
passed between the pillars, over the mosaic pavement into the presence of 
the Grand Lodge on High, where 

"Only the Master shall praise us, and only the Master shall blame; 
And no one shall work for money, and no one shall work for fame, 
But each for the joy of the Avorking, and each, in his separate star, 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees it for the Good of Things as they are." 

James K. Lambert, 
John C. Crawford, 
Hez G. Henry, 

Committee. 

For a list of the masters and past masters in Illinois and 
officers and past grand officers of other grand jurisdictions 
who died diu-ing the year see memorial pages in the appendix. 



152 Proceedings of tJie [October 12, 

Report — Committee on Transportation 

Bro. L. L. Emmerson, chairman of this committee, pre- 
sents the report. It was adopted. 

To the Most WorsJiipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 
Brethren : 

Your Committee on Transportation respectfully report that they ar- 
ranged for a rate of one and one-half fare for the round trip over all rail- 
ways in Illinois, members of the Western, Central, and South Passenger 
Associations. To enable brethren to make better connections arrangements 
were made for those living in that vicinity to travel via St. Louis, Mo., and 
still secure the reduced rate. 

"We have received, certified, and turned over to the joint agents of 
these passenger associations 667 certificates, which have been duly validated 
and will be returned to the brethren through the district deputy grand 
master of their respective districts with their mileage and per diem vouch- 
ers enabling them to buy their return tickets for one-half the regular fare. 

For next year arrangements have been made whereby representatives 
may purchase round trip tickets at their local ofiice at the one and one- 
half fare rate, thereby eliminating annoyance of procuring certificates. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Louis L. Emmerson, 
John B. Aiken, 
Frank J. Burton, 

Committee. 



Called Off 

At 1 1 130 o'clock the grand master called the grand lodge 
from labor to refreshment till 9 :oo o'clock Thursday morning. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 153 

THIRD DAY 

THURSDAY^ OCTOBER I3, A. D. I92I, A. I,. 592I 

The grand master called the grand lodge from refreshment 
to labor at 9 o'clock a. m. 

Report — Masonic Relief Association 

Bro. F, W. Bleike presented the following report : 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, Grand Master, 
Dear Sir and Brother: 

A brief report of the Fourteenth Biennial Meeting of the Masonic 
Belief Association of the United States and Canada, held at New Orleans, 
La., October 3, 4 and 5, 1921, is here submitted: 

It may be of interest to briefly review the organization and purpose 
of this association. 

The Masonic Eelief Association was organized in Baltimore thirty-six 
years ago with twelve relief boards, and meetings have been held biennially 
in practically every section of our Nation, except the western coast, and 
it was therefore most inspiring to meet and fraternize with our brethren 
of the South and in the jurisdiction of Louisiana: 

"Laud of the mocking bird, sunlight and beauty; 
Land where the willow bends over the stream 
Land where the odor of sweet scented flowers 
Enraptures the senses and nurtures a dream ; 
Land where the cypress majestic and solemn 
Enfolds in its shadows a silvery gleam; 
Land where the prairies are frosted with lilies 
And yellow-leafed jasmines are always in bloom." 

It is superfluous to add that the delegates were royally welcomed and 
entertained by our brothers there. 

The association has grown in membership until it now has the active 
cooperation and support of more than one hundred and sixty relief boards 
and employment bureaus in the Grand Jurisdictions of the United States 
and Canada! 

Its work has been most beneficial in protecting Lodges and the in- 
dividual Mason against the impostor, the fraud and the mendicant. It has 
apprehended and published in its warning circulars and names and de- 



154 Proceedings of the [October 13, 

t-criptioiis of about seven thousaud frauds and impostors whose chief voca- 
tion is to get their living from working Masonic charity. Action was 
taken at this convention to further organize such protection so as to be 
available to every good Mason in every location; personal conferences with 
grand jurisdictions not now represented will be arranged and it is ex- 
Ijccted that they will result in a CDmpleted organization so that every Ma- 
sonic jurisdiction ' ' may maintain for future generations some organized 
protection for its own members as well as for the fraternity at large. ' ' 

That this association has been beneficial also in promoting the or- 
ganization of Masonic Belief Boards and Service Bureaus is more and more 
evidenced at each succeeding meeting. The number of worthy distressed 
Masons and their families who have been materially assisted through this 
af-sociation and local boards is beyond computation, for of them no record 
has been kept in the books of the association. 

A reference to the work done by the Masonic Board of Eclief of 
Chicago, whose limits are Cook County, alone, shows that the board has 
handled over four thousand cases in the sixteen years of its operations and 
expended nearly $40,000 in relief, will indicate the scope of this great 
Masonic beneficence. 

Another important mis^siou of the association has been its publications 
of the activities relating to Masonic charities, such as homes, hospitals and 
educational. The circulation of such publications has been beneficial in 
stimulating and encouraging the further extension of this most noble 
benevolence. 

A compilation of the endowments, annual expenditures, the number of 
institutions, etc., maintained by Masons in all of the jurisdictions was read 
at the meeting and will be puldishcd and mailed to the members. It is so 
splendid a record, that if Masonry had no other meaning, no other purpose 
for its existence, this record, alone, should inspire us to greater service. 

Among the many valuable suggestions presented relating to Masonic 
practice of charity and benevolence, the Avorking out of a plan by which 
each lodge should set apart a fixed amount of all fees for Belief; a 
permanent fund, always available, was exemplified, and also that of keep- 
ing a card index of the widows and orphans of our members in order to 
keep alive the spirit of Masonry by inviting them to our lodge entertain- 
ments, etc., and for purposes of identification. 

I am pleased to report that the Grand Lodge of Illinois is highly 
esteemed, an evidence of which is the election of Bro. R. J. Daly to the 
office of 1st vice-president. 

Permit me, in conclusion, to recommend llie continuance of our mem- 
bership in the association and the appropriation for its share of the cost 
of maintenance. 

Eespectfully, 

F. W. Bleike. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 155 

Report — Committee on Credentials 

The Committee on Credentials presented a detailed report 
which was adopted. It will be found in the appendix. 

Report — Committee on New Legislation 

Bro. Geo. M. Moulton, chairman of Ccnnmittee on New 
Legislation, presented the following report. 

The proposed amendments to code Nos. 667, 348, 349 and 
351 submitted in writing, were seconded by more than twenty 
representatives and referred to the Committee on Legislation. 
The report of the Committee on Legislation recommended 
their adoption and by unanimous vote the proposed amend- 
ments were adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

The uiulcrsigiied Coniiiiitteo on New Legislation, to whom was referred 
a proposed amcndont to code No. 667 of the Grand Lodge By-laws, the 
effect whicdi would be to divide the annual per capita revenue equally be- 
tween the general and the charity funds, instead of in the proportion of 
eighty to forty-five as at present, fraternally recommends that the proposed 
amendment be adopted, so that when amended, code No. 667 of the Grand 
Lodge By-laws shall read as follows: 

667. Every lodge in this jurisdiction, on or before the fust day of 
August each year, shall pay into the treasury of the grand lodge, the sum 
of one dollar and twenty-five cents for each Master Mason belonging to 
such lodge at the time of making the annual returns. Of this one dt)llar 
and twenty-five cents, one-half shall be for the general fund and one-half 
for the charity fund, subject to such appropriations from time to time as 
the grand lodge may direct. 

Your committee further recommen<ls the adoption of the several ameiid- 
ments to the code as proposed by Brother D. D. King relative to procedure 
in changing the place of meeting of lodges, so that code No. 348 of Grand 
Lodge By-laws when amended will read as follows : 

348. A lodge cannot remove its place of meeting from the city, town 
or village named in its charter or dispensation, exeei)t by special authority 
of the grand lodge or grand master granted upon a written ]ietition con- 
curred in by a vote of three-fourths of the members of the lodge present 
at a stated meeting; of which meeting, and the proposition for such re- 



156 Proceedings of the [October 13, 

moval, all the resident members of the lodge shall have at least two weeks' 
previous notice; and such removal shall be consented to by the lodge or 
lodges whose jurisdiction may be abridged thereby. 

Also, that code No. 349 of the Grand Lodge By-laws be repealed as 
being surplusage; and that code No. 3.51 of the Grand Lodge By-laws be 
hereafter designated as code No, 349. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Geo. M. Moulton, 
William Wilhartz, 
Joseph J. Shaw, 

Committee. 



Amendment to Code Proposed 

Bro. Norwood Stratton of Grand Crossing Lodge No. yy6, 
presented the following amendment to code No. 667, and 
asked that it be referred to the Committee on New Legislation. 
The motion was seconded by representatives of more than 
twenty lodges and was referred to that committee. 

It is hereby proposed that code No. 667 of the By-laws of the Most 
Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the 
State of Illinois, which code reads as follows: 

"667. Every lodge in this jurisdiction, on or before the first day of 
August each year, shall pay into the treasury of the grand lodge, through 
the grand secretary, the sum of one dollar and twenty-five cents for each 
Master Mason belonging to such lodge at the time of making the annual 
returns. Of this one dollar and twenty-five cents one-half shall be for the 
general fund and one-half for the charity fund, subject to such appropria- 
tions from time to time as the grand lodge may direct." 

Shall be amended so as to read as follows: 

"667. Every lodge in this jurisdiction, on or before the first day of 
August each year, shall pay into the treasury of the grand lodge, through 
the grand secretary, the sum of one dollar and seventy-five cents for each 
Master Mason belonging to such lodge at the time of making the annual 
returns. Of this sum one-half shall be for the general fund and one-half 
for the charity fund, subject to such appropriations from time to time as 
the grand lodge may direct." 



Report — Committee on Appeals and Grievances 

The Committee on Appeals and Grievances offered the fol- 
lowing amendment to be known as code 661A. This amend- 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 157 

ment was . seconded by representatives of more than twenty- 
lodges and goes over till next year. 

Amend Grand Lodge By-laws by adding thorcto a section to be num- 
bered 461-A to read as follows: 

On the petition for the degrees there shall be printed or written the 
following: 

' ' We certify that the attention of the above named petitioner, before 
he signed the same, was particularly called to the statement therein that 
he had never previously x^etitioned any lodge for the degrees in Masonry, 
and said statement shall be signed by one or more of the brethren recom- 
mending such petitioner." 

Amendment to Code Proposed 

The following amendment to code 544 was proposed and a 
motion made that it be referred to the Committee on New 
Legislation. The motion was seconded by the representatives 
of more than twenty lodges and was referred to that com- 
mittee. 

544. Whenever objection is made by any member of a lodge to the 
advancement of a brother therein to the second or third degree the reasons 
therefor must be made known, and the matter shall be referred by the 
master to a committee with power to inquire into such reasons, who shall 
report thereon to the lodge as soon as practicable. Upon the reception of 
such report, if no cause for objection has been assigned, or if the reasons 
assigned be, in the opinion of the majority of the members present, in- 
sufKieient, the lodge may confer the degree in the same manner as if no 
objection had been made; but if the reasons assigned shall be deemed to 
l:e sufficient to stay the degree, the candidate shall be entitled, upon appli- 
cation, to trial upon the alleged objection. 

Report — ^Committee on Mileage and Per Diem 

The Committee on Mileage and Per Diem presented a de- 
tailed report of that committee. It was adopted. It will be 
found in the appendix. 



Report — Committee on Chartered Lodges 

The Committee on Chartered Lodges made the following 
report. It was adopted. 



158 Proceedings of t1ie [October 13, 

To the Most Worsliipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
of the State of Illinois: 

We, your Coinmittee on Chartered Lodges having checked over the re- 
ports of the district deputy giand masters on their official visits and in- 
spections, as called for by code No. ICJ, beg to present this special report: 

With 902 lodges, reports were received on 817, leaving 85 not visited 
or reported on. The average expense for those on ^vhich an expense was 
charged was $1.57 per lodge. 

From the reports on the 817 lodges we find that 379 own either in 
whole or jointly their meeting jjlaces; 71 carried no fire insurance; 376 
were not provided with fire proof safes or vaults for their records. In 8 
lodges the secretary was not provided Avith proper books and blanks for 
the discharge of his duties. In 58 lodges code No. 4G5 was violated by 
recording in the minutes the character of reports of investigating commit- 
tees. In 33 lodges the minutes did not show receipts of fees and dues 
as required by law. In 17 the minutes did not show time of opening and 
closing, and in 27 the minutes were not signed by both master and secretary. 

In 88 lodges the records were not kept in accordance with require- 
ments of the grand lodge, 12 lodges were not using proper form of peti- 
tions for degrees and affiliation and in 13 lodges the by-laws were not in 
harmony with Grand Lodge By-laws. Four lodges were not provided with 
roll of membership containing by-laws for members to sign; 114 never 
hold meetings for instruction and practice; 46 were not equipped with 
proper paraphernalia. In 57 lodges the books of secretary and treasurer 
are not audited each year; that 470 secretaries and 468 treasurers were 
not bonded. 

The reports showed that in over 20 lodges, lodge funds in bank were 
not kept in the manner provided for in code No. 409, and we recommend 
that legii-lation be enacted providing that lodge funds in bank shall be 
in the name of the lodge and not in the name of the treasurer. 

Of the 100 district deputy grand masters, 79 filed full and complete 
reports on their districts; 16 made partial reports and 5 made no reports 
at all. This committee has repeatedly called attention to the importance 
and benefit to the lodges of these reports and believe that no brother should 
accept this appointment of great honor unless he intends to make an honest 
eiTort to perform its duties as prescribed by law, and we trust that next 
years' report of this committee will show that each deputy visited, in- 
spected and reported on each lodge in his district and in using the worP. 
"lodge" we mean the lodge itself, and not a report based on information 
obtained olherwise than by a personal visit to the lodge in session. 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 159 

We heartily approve the plan proposed by the grand master for hav- 
ing all secretaries and treasurers bonded. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Phil C. Barclay, 
W. W. Watson, 
J. HuBEE Allen, 
LiNDOKp Walker, 
Willis McFeely, 

Committee. 

Report — Committee to Examine Visitors 

Bro. Geo. E. Carlson, chairman of the Board of Grand 
Examhiers, made the following report. It was adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand I^odgc Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
of the State of Illinois: 

The Connnittce to Examine Visitors respectfully report that they have 
examined all visitors, ivho have appeared before them and upon evidence 
of their proficiency, have vouched for them to the grand tyler. 

Ecspcctfidly sulimittcd, 

Geo. E. Carlson, 
Wm. H. Zarley, 
B. L. Ten Eyck, 
Harry L. Howell, 

ITARRY II. MlLNOR, 

Committee. 

Masonic Veterans' Association 

Announcement was made that the annual reception and 
entertainment of the IMasonic V^eterans' Association was ar- 
ranged for Thursday evening, Octoher 13, at 7 o'clock. 

Report — Grand Examiners 

Bro. Geo. E. Carlson, chairman of the Board of Grand 
Examiners, presented the following report, on questions re- 
ferred to them in the grand master's report. The report was 
adopted, 



160 Proceedings of the [October 13, 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois: 

The Board of Grand Examiners, to -n-hom was referred that part of 
the grand master's address, pertaining to permission to open any lodge 
meeting, in abridged form, beg leave to report, that, after considering the 
matter from the various angles, are of the opinion that the ritual and 
"work" should remain as adopted in 1913, and that no change should 
bo made. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Geo. E. Carlson, 
Wm. H. Zarlet, 
B. L. Ten Eyck, 
Harry L. Howell, 
Harry H. Milnor, 

Committee. 



Proposed Amendments 

A proposed amendment to code No. 321 was offered by 
Bro. Leo Mayer, master of Crescent Lodge No. 895. It was 
seconded by the representatives of more than twenty lodges 
and goes over until next year. 

Amend Code No. 321, uhen amended, to read as follows: 

321. Smoking in open lodge is prohibited during the conferring of 
any degree and the master is responsible for the strict enforcement of this 
by-law. 

Representatives 

The grand secretary called the role. The grand master 
presented and introduced representatives of other grand lodges 
to the Grand Lodge of Illinois. They were accorded grand 
honors. 

Chester E. Allen Alabama 

Chas. H. Spilman Arizona 

Jas. McCredie British Columbia 

Sylvester 0. Spring Canada 

E. F. Church Connecticut 

John W. Swatek Cuba 



1021] Grand Lodge of Illinois 161 

Dan G. Fitzgcncll Delaware 

L. A. Goddard Dit-trict of Columbia 

Cbas. H. Parkes Florida 

A. E. Wood Georgia 

C. M. Borchcrs Holland 

R. E. Jampolis Idaho 

W. B. Wright Tr.diana 

Robert J. Daly Ireland 

Geo. M. Moulton Kansas 

Godfred Langhenry Louisiana 

Amos Pettibone Maine 

Hugh R. Stewart Manitoba 

M. B. lott Maryland 

R. H. Wheeler Minnesota 

Franklin S. Catlin Mississippi 

George A. Stadler Missouri 

E. Edwin Mills Montana 

A. Jampolis Nebraska 

W. J. Hostetlcr Nevada 

S. C. D. Rea New Brunswick 

Henry E. Hamilton New Hampshire 

Joseph D. Everett New Jersey 

Robert C. Fletcher North Carolina 

D. D. Darrah Oklahoma 

Frank E. Locke Oregon 

E. D. Brothers Prince Edward Island 

L. L. Emmcrson Quebec 

Edward H. Thomas Queensland 

Albert B. Wicker Rhode Island 

Archibald Birso Scotland 

Elmer E. Beach South Carolina 

Rober'- N. Holt South Australia 

Harry N. McFarlanc South Dakota 

H. W. Harvey Tasmania 

Alexander H. Bell Tennessee 

Owen Scott Utah 

R. C. Davenport Vermont 

Frank W. Burton Virginia 

Wm. D. Fullcrton Washington 

II. T. Burnap Western Australia 

David D. King Wisconsin 



162 Proceedings of the [October 13, 

Bro. Alexander H. Bell responded for the representatives. 

On behalf of my distinguished associates who represent the various 
grand lodges named, and myself, we want to thank you for the very cordial 
reception which you have accorded to us. 

The functions of a representative of a foreign grand lodge are not 
very onerous. We haven't much to do. It is valuable only because it 
signifies the very cordial fraternal relations existing between our own 
grand lodge and other grand lodges. 

Until a few years ago they had no real thought about the appointment 
of representatives in foreign grand lodges, but a number of years ago the 
Grand Lodge of Tennessee was pleased to name me as its representative. 
That started a new movement. After that every foreign grand lodge 
looked about to find the best looking man to represent it, and since that 
day they have been in a very earnest but futile effort to find a man who 
could rival in looks the representative of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. 
But I can say to you, Brethren, that these distinguished brethren being 
our diplomatic corps representing foreign grand lodges are without ques- 
tion the best looking men who could be found in the State of Illinois. It 
is a very great pleasure to them and to me. Brethren, to bring to you the 
fraternal greeting of our several grand lodges. 



Vote of Thanks 

A unanimous vote of thanks was tendered Bro. Daniel G. 
Fitzgerrell for his services as grand master. 

Grand Officers 

The grand secretary read the list of elected and appointed 
grand officers. 

Bro. Elmer E. Beach M.W. Grand Master 

Beo. Arthxjr E, Wood E.W. Deputy Grand Master 

Bro. R. C. Ua\'Export B.W. Senior Grand Warden 

Bro. David D. King B.W. Jiinior Grand Warden 

Bro. Leroy A. Goddard B.W. Grand Treasurer 

Bro. Owen Scott B.W. Grand Secretary 

Bro. E. Keene Eyan B.W. Grand Chaplain 

Bro. Frank O. Lowden B.W. Grand Orator 

Bro. Eoy Adams B.W. Deputy Grand Secretary 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 163 

Bro. Wm. Elmer Edwards TV. Grand Pursuivant 

Bro. John K. Plainer W. Grand Marshal 

Bro. J. A. Provoost W. Grand Standard Bearer 

Bro. W. W. Egberts TV. Grand Sword Bearer 

Bro. Harry W. Harvey TV. Senior Grand Beacon 

Bro. David S. Mellinger W. Junior Grand Beacon 

Bro. H. S. Albin TV. Grand Steward 

Bro. D. E. Bruffet TV. Grand Steiuard 

Bro. Geo. W. Cyrus TV. Grand Steward 

Bro. Geo. W. Tipsword TV. Grand Steward 

Bro. George T. Scrivner Grand Tyler 

Bro. E. C. Peck Assistant Grand Tyler 



Installation 

Bro. Alexander H. Bell assisted by Bro. Geo. M. Moulton 
as grand marshal installed the officers, except Bro. Frank O. 
Lowden as grand orator, Bro. J. A. Provoost as grand standard 
bearer and Brothers Albin and Bruffet as stewards. These 
brethren were not present. 

Previous to the installation of the grand treasurer and 
grand secretary the grand master announced that their bonds 
had been approved. 

After installation, Grand Master Elmer E. Beach spoke 
as follows: 

Most TVorshipful Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

I desire to take this opportunity of saying jnst a ^vord to the repre- 
sentatives of this grand lodge and to the Masons throughout this state. 
It is my highest Masonic ambition to so conduct the affairs of the oflSce 
of grand master, as to win the approbation of the Masons of this state. 
I have distinguished examples to follow. The great men who in the past 
have filled this office have furnished a line of conduct for their successors, 
which it is well for any man to emulate and I shall endeavor while grand 
master, to win the esteem and approval of the great men who have filled 
this office before me, and to win the approval of the members of the craft. 
That is my one great ambition. I thank you, Brethren, for Ihe great honor 
you have conferred. 



1G4 Proceedings of tJie [October 13, 

Brother M. Bates lott presented a beautiful historical 
gavel to Grand Master Beach in the following words : 

Most Worshipful Grand Master: 

I expected to perform this little pleasure that I have now, some time 
right immediately after your installation, but I was a little late in ar- 
riving, and they were just giving you the grand honors when I came in. 

Some weeks ago a brother came to me and wanted to know if I would 
make what he called a presentation speech for him. I said, no. In the 
first place did not know what the presentation was to be, or whom it was 
to be to, and in the next place, I didn't feel capable of doing it, but after 
learning from him who it was and what it was, I was very glad to do it 
in my feeble way. The brother who requested me to present you with this 
gavel, is a very good friend of yours, and presents it to you on account of 
his friendship and love for you. You will see that it is large and plain, 
and like yourself, is made of the real stuff. And perhaps it would be of 
interest to you and the brethren of the grand lodge if I should give you 
some information regarding the history of the wood from which this gavel 
was made. 

This gavel was turned from wood, which came from the heart of a 
tree, which grew in Kentucky. A Kentucky coffee tree. It was grown on 
the grounds of Mount Vernon, Virginia, upon the home of George Wash- 
ington, the first President of the United States. This tree when quite 
small, was brought from Kentucky, by Thomas Jefferson, the third Vice- 
President of the United Stales, and was planted near the front door yard 
of Washington's home by General LaFayette of France. The tree there- 
fore, has a very technical masonic interest, insomuch as all three of these 
celebrated characters were members of the Masonic fraternity. 

This brother informs me, Most Worshipful Grand Master, that he per- 
sonally saw this tree a short time after it was destroyed by lightning, and 
procured a piece of this wood by strategy and had it made into a gavel 
in the shop of a past master of a Chicago lodge. The ornamentation hereon 
was placed by a manufacturing jeweler of Chicago, also a member of the 
fraternity. 

Now my dear Grand Master, I take great pleasure in placing in your 
hands this gavel, and I sincerely trust you will receive it, and that you 
will derive as much pleasure in receiving the same as he has in giving it. 

The grand master responded as follows : 

Brother lott and Brethren: 

I know you must appreciate just how I feel at this moment in re- 
ceiving a gavel of these historic associations. I am very glad that Brother 



1921] Grand Lodge of Illinois 165 

lott explained the history of the gavel, and I assure you and the brother 
^vho presents it, whose name Brother lott did not announce, that it will 
be a very choice possession, and as I understand it, I am not expected to 
turn this over to my succci-sor in office. It is a great pleasure to receive 
a gavel with such historic associations and significance as this, and I desire 
to again say to Brotlior lott, that I very greatly appreciate his kindness in 
presenting this gavel, which I shall always retain as a very dear keepsake. 

Bro. Leroy A. Goddarcl presented the past grand master's 
jewel to Bro. Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, retiring grand master, as 
follows : 

Most Worsliipful Grand Master, Most Worshipful Brother Fitsgerrcll, and 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

It is a surprise to me to be again called before you. I have been 
much in evidence in this annual communication, but not of my own choos- 
ing. I have submitted only from a willingness to serve while I am able 
to serve. I am well down the shady side of sixty and, doubtless, bordering 
on the evening of life. My hair is not white yet, but I have seen the 
snows of many winters. By the will of the All-Wise I stand before you as 
the dean of the past grand masters of this grand lodge. In my forty-six 
years in active Masonic life, I have met with many pleasant exp(>riences, 
and this sudden command to perform this act is another one of the real 
pleasures that liave come my way. 

I have known from his boyhood this long, lean, stubbornly courageous 
man who has so faithfully served us as grand master for the x^a.at two and 
one-half years. He is so stubliorn that he could not persuade himself to 
be anything but loyal to his convictions or to do less than his whole duty. 
ITe leaves the splendid record of a fine and strong administration. The 
pages are clean and bear evid(Micc of duty admirably performed. It is a 
genuine delight to present to him this past grand master's jewel, and with 
it go the affections and the gratitude not onlj' of the rciiresentatives here 
present but of the great Craft of Illinois." 

Bro. Fitzgerrell : 

Brethren : 

I know many of you have heard me say heretofore, that my business 
is not that of speaking but of listening. I happen to be the credit man 
for the institution which I represent, and I have become a good listeiier. 
I have listened to many stories of divers and sundry kinds, to beautiful 
stories, and to complaints, I have heard tales of woe such as I lielieve have 
not been poured into the ear of any other man. I have heard the most 



166 Proceedings of the [October 13, 

celebrated artists sing. I have heard my revered old mother croon the 
Evening Melody to me, as I went to sleep, but aside from that last named 
thing, I can remember no other music that has sounded so sweetly in. my 
ear as the words of my distinguished associate and brother and of the 
manifestation which I have just witnessed and heard. It has been my 
purpose to serve you well, equally, to treat every one of you as my equal. 
I would rather go down in history as your friend and brother, as plain, 
common everyday Dan Fitzgerrell, than to have written on my tombstone 
here lies the greatest orator or the greatest grand master that ever 
lived. I hope and trust Brethren, that I may have some small part in 
your affections, that I may live in your minds and hearts as you will ever 
live in my own. 

I shall lay this beautiful jewel away in my treasure house and keep 
it just so long as I shall live. When I look upon it I shall always remember 
this occasion with a heart filled with love and good will for each and 
every one of you. 



Committees 

The list of brethren comprishig the committees for the en- 
suing year was read by the grand secretary. 

Jurisprudence — 

Geo. M. Moulton, Masonic Temple, Chicago, Chairman. 

Chester E. Allen, Galesburg. 

Henry T. Burnap, Alton. 

Louis L. Emmerson, Springfield. 

H. L. Browning, East St. Louis. 

Appeals and Grievances — 

Alexander H. Bell, Carlinville, Chairman. 
Elmer D. Brothers, 39 S. LaSalle St., Chicago. 
Charles H. Martin, Bridgeport. 
W. E. Hadley, East St. Louis. 
John L. Brearton, Savanna. 

Chartered Lodges — 

Phil C. Barclay, Cairo, Chairman. 

W. W. Watson, Barry. 

W. D. Abney, Marion. 

Willis McFeely, 108 S. LaSalle St., Room 921, Chicago. 

George A. Stadler, Decatur. 



1921] Gra7id Lodge of Illinois 167 

Lodges, U. D. — 

Wm. H. Beckman, 24G8 Orchard St., Chicago, Chairman. 

F. O. Lorton, Auburn, 

Elmer Lee Cornell, 1957 Bradley Place, Chicago. 

W. T. Cable, Harrisburg. 

Andy Ziemet, 1773 Cullom Ave., Chicago. 

Mileage and Per Diem — 

W. F. Beck, Olney, Chairman. 

J. L. Klemme, Quincy. 

H. T. Goddard, Mt. Carmel. 

T. S. Browning, Benton. 

George L. Hager, 628 Cornelia Ave., Chicago. 

Ben L. Bervee, 411 Lincoln Highway, Eochelle. 

Finance — 

Geo. W. McFatrich, 9 E. Ohio St., Chicago, Chairman. 

Wm. L. Sharp, 245 W. 63rd St., Chicago. 

S. O. Spring, First National Bank Building, Chicago. 

New Legislation — 

Wm. B. Wright, EflSngham, Chairman. 

Edw. C. Mullen, 711-715 Fulton St., Chicago. 

William Wilhartz, Fort Dearborn National Bank, Chicago. 

Correspondence — • 

D. D. Darrah, Bloomington. 

Grand Examiners — 

Wm. K. Zarley, 6-25th Ave., Joliet, Chairman. 

B. L. Ten Eyck, Fairview. 
Harry Lee Howell, Bloomington. 

Harry H. Milnor, 518 N. Laramie Ave., Chicago. 
Albert Pickel, Springfield. 

Credentials — ■ 

Emmett Howard, Quincy, Chairman. 

C. O. Faught, Altamont. 
Charles C. Davis, Centralia. 



168 Proceedings of tlie [October ]3, 

Will. Faiilce, Jacksonville. 

"Win. IT. Bicd, 7159 St. Lawrence Ave., Chicago. 

rKTITIOXS — • 

J. E. Jcffprs, Springfield, Chairman, 

S. C. D. Eea, Beuton. 

W. A. Hoover, Gibson City. 

OlUTUARlES — • 

George E. Carlson, Moline, Chairman, 
David Eichards, 6325 S. Troy St., Chicago, 
J, H. Mitchell, Mt. Vernon, 

Grand Master's Eeport — • 

Charles H, Spilman, Edwardsville, Chairman, 
Amos Pettibone, 27 N. Desplaines St., Chicago, 
Harry M, Palmer, McLean, 

Board op Managers, Masonic Homes — 

Illinois Masonic Orphans Home, LaGrange — 

William D, Price, Harvester Building, Chicago, 3 years, 

Eobt, C. Fletcher, LaGrange, 2 years, 

Eobt. J, Daly, 205 W, Monroe St,, Chicago, 1 year. 

Illinois Masonic Home, Sullivan — 

Daniel G, Fitzgerrell, Normal, 3 years. 
James McCredie, Aurora, 2 years, 
Alonzo Dolan, Bloomington, 1 year. 

Ex-Officio — Both Boards — 

Tho Grand Master. 

Tho Deputy Grand Master, 

Transportation — 

Frank J, Burton, 3421 Fulton St,, Chicago, Chairman. 
John B. Aiken, Union Station, Chicago, 
Smith Hinman, Hindsdalc. 



1921] 



Grand Lodge of Illinois 



169 



District Deputy Grand Masters 

The grand secretary read the list of deputy grand masters 
appointed. They Avill l)e fomul in the beginning on page 172 
of the proceedings. 

The minutes of this meeting were then read and approved. 



Closed 

At 12 o'clock no further business appearing, the grand 
master closed the most worshipful grand lodge in ample form. 




Attest: 



^xT^/uj^^^-^f^^JLy 



CJrand Master 



Grand Secretary 



Address of Grand Master: 111 W. Washington St., Chicago. 
Address of Grand Secretary: Decatur. 



COMPLETE SUMMARY 
For 192 1 

Number Lodges working under Charter, - 902 



Number members June 30, 1920, - - 203,447 



INCREASE 


Number raised. 


28,352 


Number affiliated. 


2,138 


Number reinstated, 


- 663 


Add for error, - _ _ 


160 


Add members U. D. Lodges 




(1919) not otherwise 




accounted for 


1,973. 



Total, - - 33,286 

DECREASE 

Number dimitted, - - 3,604 

Number suspended, - - 730 

Number expelled, - - 23 

Number of deaths, - - 2,111 

Loss by error, . - _ 283 



6,751 

Net gain, ----- 26,535 

Number of members, June 30, 1921 229,982 

Members of Lodges U. D. 

not included in above 606 



Total membership Oct. 1, 1921 230,588 



APPENDIX 



172 



Appendix 



LIST OF LODGES BY DISTRICTS AND THE DISTRICT 
DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 

FIRST DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



33 Oriental 

608 Home 

731 Harbor 

810 Tracy 

869 Maywood , . . . 

901 EdKewater . . . 

947 Kenmore . . . . 

981 Trowel 

1003 Fortitude 

1032 Trcstleboard . . . 
1055 Northern Lights 



Location. 



Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Tracy . . 
Maywood 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Chicago. . . 
Chicago. . . 
Chicago . . 
Chicago . . 



Place of Meeting. 



29 W. Monroe St 

3120 Forest Ave 

2939 9lBt St 

Tracy 

Maywood 

4737 Broadway 

Terminal Hall, 1154 Wilson Ave 
2754 W. Diversey Ave 



Ira J. McDowell, 5235 W. Van Buren St., Chicago 
SECOND DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



81 

B24 

739 

813 

873 

907 

949 

982 

1005 

1033 

1056 



V'ltruvlus 

Evans , 

Lakeside 

Humboldt Park 

Standard 

Ancient Craft . 

Justice 

Sincerity 

Community 

Perfection 

South Shore . . . . 



Location. 



Wheeling 
Evanston 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Chicago. . . 
Chicago. . . 
Chicago . . 
Chicago . . , 



Place of Meeting. 



Wheeling 

810 Davis St 

3120 Forest Ave 

3638 Armltage 

Auditorium Hall 

51st and Michigan Ave 

W. Chicago Masonic Temple 
Robey and Byron Sts 



Grover C. Nlemeyer, 79 W. Monroe Street, Chicago 
THIRD DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



Location. 



141 Garden City 

626 Covenant 

761 Lounsbury 

815 Lawn 

875 Cornerstone , 

908 Gil. W Barnard. 

964 Progressive 

983 Glencoe 

1006 Pair Oaks 

1034 Austin H. Scrogin., 
1057 Laurel 



Chicago . . . 
Chicago . . . 
Harrington 
Chicago . • , 
Chicago . . 
Chicago . . 
Chicago. . . , 

Q-lencoe 

Oak Park. . . 
Chicago . . . 
Chicago . . . . 



Place of Meeting. 



Masonlo Temple 

Central Masonic Temple. 

Barrlngton 

Chicago Lawn 

Central Masonic Temple. 
7439 Ingleslde Ave... 
3349 W. North Ave. .. 
Glencoe 



William Tinsley, 618 Wrightwood Ave,, Chicago 
FOURTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



160 

640 

758 

818 

876 

909 

965 

984 

1007 

1035 

1058 



Waubansla 

Oak Park 

Mystic Star 

Ben Hur 

William McKlnley 

Bee Hive 

Cicero 

Emblem 

Loyal 

Smyth Crooks 

Glenview 



Location. 



Chicago . . 
Oak Park 
Chicago . . 
Chicago , . 
Chicago . . 
Chicago . . 
^icero . . . 
Chicago . . . . 
Chicago. . . . 
Chicago . . . 
Glenview . 



Place of Meeting. 



Masonlo Temple 

Oak Park. Ill 

6734 W^entworth Ave.... 

2408 W. North Ave 

Auditorium Hall 

Auditorium Hall 

Clyde 

Hyde Park Masonic Temple. 



Wm. W. M. Bending, 2939 E. 91st St., Chicago 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



173 



FIFTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



182 Qermanla 

657 Lessing 

765 Palace 

819 Columbian 

878 Equity 

913 Aaron 

956 Washington Park. 

085 Universal 

1008 Parkway 

1036 Ideal 

1059 Level 



Location. 



Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Clilcago. 

Chicago. . 

Chicago. . 

Chicago . 

Chicago . 



Place of Meeting. 



1500 North Clark St... 

1500 N. Clark 8t 

Pullman 

Millard Ave. and 23rd St. 

Masonio Temple 

1555 B. 63rd St 

51st and Michigan Ave. 
Masonic Temple 



Masonic Temple 



Wm. Rapp, 431 S. Dearborn St., Chicago 
SIXTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



209 

610 

767 

832 

879 

914 

957 

986 

1009 

1037 

1060 



W. B. Warren. 
Union Park . . . 
Trllumlnar . . . 

Harvey 

Composite . . . . 

Republic 

Prospect 

Brotherhood . . . 

Hiram 

Legion 

North Evanston 



Location. 



Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Harvey 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago. . 

Chicago. . 

Chicago . 

Evanston 



Place of Meeting. 



Masonio Temple 

W. Chicago Masonic Temple. . . 

2939 91st St 

Harvey, 111 

4229 Cottage Grove Ave... 
Blackstone Ave. and 65th.... 

23rd and Millard Ave 

Dearborn St. and Walton Place 



Geo. Meldrum, 1819 W. Madison St., Chicago 



SEVENTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



211 
611 

768 
836 
880 
915 
958 
987 
1010 
1038 



Cleveland 

Lincoln Park .... 

Mlzpah 

Windsor Park . . . 
John B. Sherman. 
Jackson Park . . . . 

Prudence 

Cyrene 

Honor 

Goodwill 



Location. 



Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago . . 

Chicago. . 

Chicago . 



Place of Meeting. 



Masonic Temple 

1500 N. Clark St 

5505 S. Halsted St 

75th St. and Cole Ave 

(5319 S. Ashland Ave 

1555 East 63rd St 

Central Masonio Temple. . . 
Woodlawn Masonic Temple. 



Henry Horner, 6th floor County Bldg., Chicago 



EIGHTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



271 
639 
770 
839 
882 
916 
961 
088 
1012 
1039 



Blaney . . . 
Keystone . 
LaGrange 
Berwyn . . 
Boulevard 
Welcome 
Federal . . 
Park Ridge 
Birch wood . . 
Advance . . 



Location. 



Chicago ., 
Chicago . , 
LaGrange 
Berwyn 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Chicago. . . 
Chicago. . . , 
Chicago. . . . 
Chicago . . 



Place of Meeting. 



912 LaSalle Ave 

1500 N. Clark St 

LaGrange 

Berwyn Masonic Hall... 

42nd and Halsted Sts 

Masonic Temple 

Englewood Masonic Temple. 
Park Ridge 



Welles W. LaMoure, 6200 Kenwood Ave., Chicago 



174 



Appendix 



NINTH DISTEICT 



No. 



Name. 



277 
642 
774 
841 
887 
917 
962 
989 
1013 
1040 



Accordla 

Apollo 

Lake View . . . . 
Woodlawn Park 

Pyramid 

Concord 

Ben Franklin . . 

Hyde Park 

John Paul Jones. . 
Mont Clare 



Location. 



Chicago . . 
Chicago .. 
Chicago . . 
Chicago . . 
Hegewisch 
Chicago . . 
Chicago. . . , 
Chicago . . , 

Chicago 

Chicago . . . 



Place of Meeting. 



Halsted St. and North Ave. 

3118 Forest Ave 

Central Masonic Temple. ... 
64th St. and University Av. 

Hegewisch 

H. P. Masonic Temple 

4-J40 Irving Park Blvd 

Fifty-first and Michigan Sts. . . . 
State and Lake Bldg 



Rol)t. R. Pegram, 5900 S. Halsted St., Chicago 



TENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


Place of Meeting. 


308 Aslilar 


Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 


Masonic Temple 

2403 W. North Ave 


643 n C. Cregier 


776 Grand Cro.ssing 

842 Fides 


Ingleside, near 75th St 

119th and Wallace 




64th St. and University Av. 
:n59 N. Kedzie Ave 


921 Avondale 


964 Maplewood 

991 Welfare 


Diversey and California Av. 


1015 Paramount 

1041 Lake Shore 


Auburn Park Masonic Temple 









Harry G. Wilson, Puljlic Library, Chicago 



ELEVENTH DISTEICT 



No. 



Name. 



310 
662 
777 
843 
889 
922 
966 
!92 
1018 
1042 



Dearborn 

South Park 

Ravenswood 

Park 

America 

Compaq's 

Exemplai" 

Niasara 

Pythagoras 

Monroe C. Crawford. 



Location. 



Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago . . 
(Chicago 
Chicago . . 
Chicaso. . 
Chicago. . 
Chicago . 



Place of Meeting 



S120 Foresi Ave 

Blackstone Ave. and E. 55th.. 
Montrose & N. Hermitage. 
N". Clark St. and Lunt Ave. 

:i9 W. Monroe St 

Boulvard Hall, 5505 S. Halsted 

Masonic Temple 

iVIasonic Temple 

159 N. State St 



David S. Davidson, 7309 S. Racine Ave., Chicago 



TWELFTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



311 
669 
779 
850 
890 
923 
968 
993 
1019 
1043 



Kilwinning ... 

Herder 

Wright's Grove 

Austin 

De.splalnes .... 

Fast Gate 

South Gate .... 

Leyden 

Victory 

Goodfellowship . . 



Location. 



Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Desplaines 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Franklin Park. 

Chicago 

Chicago 



Place of Meeting. 



Central Masonic Temple 

Monroe and Paulina 

Clark St. and Belmont Ave. . . 

241 North Central Ave 

Desplaines 

Masonic Temple 

Auburn Park Masonic Temple. 

Franklin Park 

Constellation Temple 



Alhert P. Bauer, 822 North Ave., Chicago 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



175 



THIRTEENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


Place of Meeting. 


?14 Palatine 

674 Waldeck 


Palatine 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago . . 


Heights*. 


Masonic Hall 

^\ZU Forest Ave. 


780 Siloam 


W. Chicago Masonic Temple. . . 

Chicago Heights, 111 

3111 JL/Ogan Blvd 


851 Chicago Heights 


9''4 Banner Bhie 


Englewood Masonic Temple... 
10243 Wallace St 


971 Fernwood Park 


99-1 True Blue 

1020 Cosmopolitan 

1044 Shadrach Bond 


Chicago.. 
Chicago. . 
Chicago . 




3636 Armit;ige Ave 

51st and Michigan Ave 









S. F. Odell, 3634 S. Robey St., Chicago 



FOURTEENTH DISTRICT 



.^iv ivaznto. 


Location. 


Place of Meeting. 


393 Blair 

686 Garfield 

783 Constantla 


Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 


29 W. Monroe St. - 

California Ave. and Madison 
19 W. Adams St 


854 Bright )n Park 


2456 W. 38th St 


892 Constellation 

926 Veritas 


3900 N. Robey 

W. Chicago Mas. Temple.. 


972 Rainbow 


79th and Lowe Ave 




2300 S. Millard Ave 


1 )22 Theddore Roosevelt 


Chicago 


VZOb N. L)earbi)rn 


1045 Mayfair 











Geo. E. Moore, 3809 W. Adams St., Chicago 



FIFTEENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


Place of Meeting. 


409 Thos J Turner 


Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 




690 Englewood 


6734 Wentworth Ave . . . 


784 Beacon Light 

855 King Oscar 




Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Cnicaeo 

Oak Park 




894 Utopia 


9231 Cottage Grove Ave... 

Masonic Temple 

Masonic Temple 


927 Candida 

973 Perseverance 


996 Sunrise 




Iii28 Kdward Cook 




1049 River Forest 


River Forest 











Geo. W. Banks, 317 S. Mozart St., Chicago 



SIXTEENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


Place of Meeting. 


410 Mlthra 


r"hicago 

f^hfcago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

'^hicago 


1710-12 Cornelia ."Vve 


697 Richard Cole 


2941 Archer Ave 


789 Auburn Park 

860 Metropolitan 

895 Crescent 


79th find 1/Owe Ave 

4035 W. Madison St 

Corner State and Randolph St. 


931 Wilmette 


974 Albany Park 


Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 


Diversey and California Ave.... 


997 Intf-grity 


1024 Triangle 




1050 Radiant 


Chicago 1 







Robt. A. Lees, 401 S. 16th Ave., Maywood 



176 



Appendix 



SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



411 Hesperla . . . 
711 Providence 

795 Myrtle 

862 Riverside .. 
896 Kosmos . . . . 
937 North Shore 
975 Old Glory ,., 
U98 Paul Revere . 



I0i5 Cry.stal. 
1051 Merit . 



Location. 



Chicago . 
Jefferson 
Chicago , 
Riverside. 
Chicago . 
Chicago . 
Cliicago . . . 
Chicago 



Chicago. 
Chicago , 



Place of Meeting:. 



29 W. Monroe St 

5418 Gale St 

4240 Irving Park Blvd 

Riverside Town Hall 

5505 So. Ashland 

Wilson and Broadway 

Austin Masonio Temple 

Templar Hall, Wilson and N. 

Ashland Ave 

Crystal Theatre Hall 



rrederick D. Ehlert, Devon Trust and Savings Bank, 
6353 N. Clarte St., Chicago 

EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



422 
716 
797 
863 
897 
938 
978 
999 
1028 
1052 



Landmark . . 
Calumet .... 
Normal Park 
St. Andrews 
Ogden Park 

Circle 

Melrose Abbey 
Morgan Park. . 

Proviso 

Gresham 



Location. 



Chicago . . . . 
Blue Island 

Chicago . 

Chicago .... 
Chicago . . . . 
Oak Park . 

Chicago 

Chicago 

May wood 

Chicago 



Place cf Meeting. 



4229 Cottage Grove Ave 

Blue Island. Ill 

6734 Wentworth Ave 

Masonic Temple 

6319 S. Ashland Ave . 

Circle Masonic Temple, Oak Park 

Monroe and Paulina 

Morgan Park 



B. W. Scholton, 3212 Altgeld St., Chicago 



NINETEENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


Place of Meeting. 


437 Chicago 


Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 


Auditorium Hall 




W. Chicago Masonic Temple 


800 Kenwood 


4229 Cottage Grove Ave... 


864 Olympla 


4229 Cottage Grove Ave... 


899 Park Manor 


Auburn Pk. Temp., 7832 Union 






943 Bohemia 

977 Parian 


W. Chicago Masonic Temple.. 
64th and University Ave 

810 Davis St 


1001 Wayfarers 




1(129 Adelphi 




333 N. Central Av 


1053 Cardinal 


Chicago 





Isaac J. Smit, 2010 Mailers Bldg., Chicago 



TWENTIETH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



478 Pleiades 

726 Golden Rule 

804 Kensington 

865 St. Cecelia 

900 Carnation 

944 John Corson Smith.. 

978 Square 

lOOi Portage Park 

1031 Drexel 

1054 Forest Park 



Location. 



Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago , 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago. . , 
Chicago... 
Chicago. . . 
Oak Park. 



Place of Meeting. 



W. Chicago Masonic Temple . . . 

State and Lake Bldg 

11037 Michigan Ave 

Masonio Temple 

4229 Cottage Grove Ave 

W. Chicago Masonic Temple 

1553 W. 69th St 

4240 Irving Park Blvd 

4229 Cottage Grove Ave 



John A. McCallum, 6209 Blackstone Ave., Chicago 



Districts and District Deputy Grand blasters 



177 



TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



115 
127 
143 
158 
298 
492 
604 
676 
827 
1026 
1027 



Waukegan 

Rising Sun . . . 

Antioch 

Richmond 

McHenry ... 

Wauconda , 

LibertyviUe . . . 

Hebron 

A. O Fay 

Sequolt 

Lake Forest 

Anchor and Ark. 



Location. 



Waukegan , 

Qrayslake 

Millburn 

Riclimond .... 

McHenry 

Wauconda .... 
T^ibertyville . . 

Hebron 

Higiiland Park 

Antioch 

Lake Forest . . . 
Waukegan 



County. 



Lake 

Lake . . . 
Lake . . . 
McHenry 
McHenry 
Lake . . . 
Lalie . . . 
McHenry 
Lake . . . 
Lake . . . 

Lak e 

Lake 



Roy Hill, Waukegan 



TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


63 St Mark's 


Woodstock 

Elgin 


McHenry 


117 Elgin 

138 Marengo 

169 Nunda 

190 Dundee 

309 Harvard 

358 Orion 

522 Monitor 


Kane 




McHenry 


Crystal Lake 


McHenry 

Kane 


Harvard 


McHenry 

McHenry 


pigin 


Kane 


Capron 


Boone 




McHenry 









A. J. Winteringham, Dundee 



TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



60 Belvidere 

74 Rockton 

75 Roscoe 

102 Rockford 

145 A. W. Rawson 
166 Star-ln-the-East 
173 Cherry Valley . 

302 Durand , 

414 Evening Star . . 
633 E. F. W. Ellis . 
745 Winnebago .... 



Location. 



Belvidere . . . . 

Rockton 

Roscoe 

Rockford . . . . . 
Pecatonlca . . . 

Rockford 

Cherry Valley 

Durand 

Davis ■ 

Rockford 

Winnebago . . 



County. 



Boone . . . . . 

Winnebago 

Winnebago 

Winnebago 

Winnebago 

Winnebago 

Winnebago 

Winnebago 

Stephenson 

Winnebago 

Winnebago 



J. R. Balliet, Belvidere 



TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



97 Excelsior . 
170 Evergreen . 

174 Lena 

188 Cyrus 

385 Mississippi 
423 Lanark . . . 
490 Shannon . . 
664 Wlnslovir . . 
687 OrangeviUe 

023 Ppflrl 

1061 Ogle 



Location. 



l<"reeport Stephenson 

Freeport Stephenson 



Lena 
Mt. Carroll 
Savanna . . 
Lanark . . . 
Shannon .. 
Wlnslow . . 
OrangeviUe 
Pearl City 
Forvcston . . . 



County. 



Stephenson 
Carroll ... 
Carroll ... 
Carroll . . . 
Carroll . . . 
Stephenson 
Stephenson 
Stephenson 
Ogle 



Roy Bray, Lanark 



178 



Appendix 



TWENTY-FIFTH DISTEICT 



No. 



Name. 



36 Kavanaugh 

273 Miners . . . . 

278 .io Daviess 

491 INTartin 

554 Plum River 

859 Apple River 

905 Hanover . . 



Location. 



Elizabeth 

Galena , 

Warren 

East Dubuque 

Stockton 

Apple River . . . . 
Hanover 



County. 



.To Daviess 

Jo Daviess 

To Daviess 

Jo Daviess 

Jo Daviess 

Jo Daviess 

Jo Daviess 



J. C. Renwick, Warren 



TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 




Fulton 

Prophetstown . . . 

Morrison 

Thomson 


Whiteside 


293 Prophetstown 

321 Dunlap 

559 Thomson 

566 Albany 

655 Yorktown 

667 Erie 

750 Lyndon 


Whiteside 


Whiteside 


Carroll 


Whiteside 


Tampico 

Erie 


Whiteside 


Whiteside 








Henry 









Frank L. Dudley, Prophetstown 



TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



96 Samuel H. Davis 

187 Mystic Tie 

345 Milledgeville 

420 Oregon 

612 Rock River 

867 Chadwick 

936 Rock Falls 



Location. 



Mt. Morris 

Polo 

Milledgeville 
Oregon .... 
Sterling . . . 
Chadwick . 
Rock Falls 



County. 

Ogle 

Ogle 

Carroll 

Oele 

Whiteside 

Carroll 

Whiteside 



R. W. E. MitcheU, Sterling 



TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


134 Sycamore 

144 De Kalb 

274 Byron 

288 Genoa 

402 Ki.shwaukee 

443 Hampshire 

505 Meridian Sun 

SK7 Rovd D 


Sycamore 

Dekiilb 


De Kalb 


De Kalb 


Ogle 




De Kalb 


Kingston 

Hampshire 

Holcomb 

Kirkland 


De Kalb 




Ogle 

De Kalb 







William C. DarUng, Sycamore 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Blasters 



179 



TWENTY-NINTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


48 Unity 

139 Geneva 


St. Charles 


Kane 


Kane 


269 Wheaton 


Wheaton 

Elburn 




359 Blackberry 

472 Amity 

941 Elmliurst 




West Chicago ... 
Elmhurst 




Dupage 


950 Glen Ellyn 


Glen Ellyn 


Dupage 



George N. Lamb, St. Charles 



THIRTIETH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



65 Euclid 

90 Jerusalem Temple 

254 Aurora 

301 Hincliley 

404 Batavla 

428 Sunbeam 

824 Grove 

934 Hinsdale 



Location. 



Napervllle .... 

Aurora 

Aurora 

Hincl<ley 

Batavia 

Piano 

Downers Grove. 
Hinsdale 



County. 



Dupage. . . 
Kane . . . 
Kane . . . 
De Kalb 
K:'ine . . . 
Kendall 
Dupage. . . 
Dupage. . . 



Henry D. Hamper, 508 Main St., Aurora 



THIRTY-FIRST DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


7 Friendship 

146 Lee Centre 






Lee Centre 




178 Illinois Central 




244 Horicon 

264 Franklin Grove 


Rochelle 

l''ranklin Grove . . 


Ogle 


320 Creston 


Ogle 


531 Ash ton 


Ashton 




902 Alto 











J. E, Barter, Rochelle 



THIRTY-SECOND DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


176 Mendota 


Mendota 

Earlvilla 


La Salle 


183 Meridan '. . . . 


La Salle 


205 Corinthian 




282 Brooklyn 


Compton 

Sandwich 

Sublette 




283 Meteor 


De Kalb 


349 Sublette 




374 Shabbona 


Shabbona 


De Kalb 


558 Leland 


La Salle 


646 Somonauk 


Somonauk 

Waterman 


De Kalb 


728 Waterman 


De Kalb 







Jas. C. Davis, Leland 



180 



Appendix 



THIETY-THIED DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


13 St. John's 


Peru 


La Salle 


67 Acacia 


La Salle 

Magnolia 

Arlington 

La Moille 

Walnut 


La Salle 


103 Magnolia 


Putnam 


270 Levi Lusk 


Bureau 


383 lid Moille 




722 Walnut 




805 S M. Dalzell 


Springvalley 

Ohio 




814 Ohio .... 




858 Utica 


Utlca 


La Salle 


961 Depue 


Depue 


Bureau 









A. E. Burress, Walnut, 111. 



THIETY-FOUETH DISTEICT 


No. Name. 


Location 


County. 


14 2 Ames 


Sheffield 

Ivewanee 


Bureau 


159 Kewanee 


Henry 


231 Wyanet 




399 Buda 


Buda 




550 Sharon '. 


Tiskilwa 

Princeton 

.Veponset 


Bureau 


587 Princeton 


Bureau 


803 Neponset 

933 Manlius 


Bureau 


Bureau 









Francis H. Bradley, Princeton, R. r. D. 



THIETY-FIFTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


57 Trio 


Rock Island .... 




92 Stewart 




319 Doric 


Moline 


Rock Island 


433Atklnson '.'.'.'.'.. 


.Vtkinson 

Port Byron 

Rock Island 

Calono 

Silvia 




436 Philo 


Rock Island 


658 Rock I.«?land '.'. 


Rock Island 


680 Clement 

898 Sllvis 


Henry 


969 East Moline 


East Moline 




1014 Moline 











Charles H. Mangold, 1418 5tli Ave., Moline 



THIETY-SIXTH DISTEICT 



No. 



Name. 



49 Cambridge . . . . 

69 Eureka 

516 Andalusia 

5.'?5 Sherman 

547 Valley 

679 Buffalo Prairie 
755 Preemption .... 



Location. 



Cambridge . , 

Milan , 

Andalusia . . , 

Orion 

(^oal Valley . 
Buffalo Prairie. 
Preemption. . . . 



County. 

Henry , 

Rock Island . , 
Rock Island . , 

Henry 

Rock Island . , 
Rock Island . , 
Mercer 



Thos. R. Lees, Coal Valley 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



181 



THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


59 New Boston 


New Boston 

Kelth.sburg 


Mercer 


113 Robert Burna 


Mercer 


123 Oqiiawka 


Oquawka 

Aledo 


Flpnderson 


252 Aledo 




867 Oxford 


.Yew Wlnd.<3or . . 




502 Woodhtill 


Woodhull 

Viola 




577 Viola '. . .■ 


Mercer 


838 Charity 


Seaton 


Mercer 


94B .Toy 


.Tnv 


Mercer 


1067 Omega 


Alpha 


Henry 



Chas. E. Duvall, Aledo 



THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


37 Monmouth 




Warren 


193 Herrick 


Pontoosiic 

Dallas City 

Kirkwood 

Rio 


Hancock 


235 Dallas City 




518 Abraham Lincoln .... 


Warren 


685 Rio 


Knox 


702 Alexandria 


Alexis 


Warren 


727 Rarltan 


Raritan 


Henderson 


732 Carman 


Carman 


t^enderson 


847 Stronghurst 


Stronghurst . . . 









James R. Dick, Monmouth. 



THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



66 Pacific 

155 Alpha 

185 Abingdon 

243 Galva 

291 Wataga 

330 Altona 

337 Oneida 

584 Vesper 

793 A. T. Darrah 



Location. 



Knoxvllle 
Galesburg 
Abingdon 
G'alva . . . 
Wataga . 
Altona .. 
Oneida . . 
Galesburg 
Victoria 



County. 



Knox 

Knox 

Knox 

Henry 

Knox 

Knox 

Knox 

Knox 

Knox 



Chas. C. Sawyer, Altona 



FORTIETH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


61 Lacon 




Marshall 


93 Toulon 


Toulon 


Stark 


119 Henry 




.Marshall 


360 Pripceville 

415 Lawn Ridge 


Princevllle 


Peoria 

Stark 


441 Sparland 

479 Wyoming 

501 Stark ... 


Sparland 

Wyoming 

La Fayette 

Bradford 


ATarshall 


Stark 


Stark 


514 Bradford 


Stark 







Hugh Mallett, Bradford 



182 



Appendix 



FORTY-FIRST DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


247 Rob Morris 


MInonk 


Woodford 


344 Wenona 






Tonlca 


La Salle 




Rutland 

I>ong Point 

Streator 


La Salle 


SB' Long Point 






La Salle 


868 Cornell 






La Palle 


1065 Oglesby 




La Salle 









Chas. £. Morgan, Minonk 



FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



40 Occidental 
194 Freedom 
303 Raven . . . 
384 Waltham 
397 Shiloh .. 
417 Marseilles 
471 Kendall .. 
555 Humboldt 
735 Sheridan 



Location. 



Ottawa .... 
Freedom . . 
Oswesro . . . 

Waltham 

Troy GVove 
Marseilles . 
YorkvlUe . . 
Ottawa ... 
Sheridan .. 



County. 



La Salle 
La Salle 
Kendall 
La Salle 
La Salle 
La Salle 
Kendall 
La Salle 
La Salle 



E. E. Mull, Ottawa 



FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


42 Mt Joliet 


JoUet 


Will 


124 Cedar 


Morris 






Joliet 


Will , . . . 


262 Channahon 

528 Mlnooka 


Channahon 

Mlnooka 


Will 


[^a Salle 


536 Plalnfleld 

538 LockDort 


Plainfield 

Lockport 


Will 

Will 







Benj. J. Metzger, 821 Oneida St., Joliet 



FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 




Waldron 

Kankakee 

Cliebanse 

Momence 




389 Kankakee 




429 Chebanse 






636 Peotone 


Will 


688 Clifton 


Clifton 




763 Crete 


Crete 


Will 


928 Grant Park 


Grant Park 









H. E. DeLavergne, Kankakee 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



183 



FORTY-FIFTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


208 Wilmington 


Wilmington 


Will 


294 Pontiac 


Livingston 


371 Livingston 

401 Odell 


Dwight 


Odell 


Livingston 


573 Gardner 


Gardner 

Braidwood 

Verona 




704 Braidwood 

757 Verona 


Will 


826 Mazon 




919 Elwood 




Win 









Frank W. Brown, Odell 



FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


168 Milford 


Milford 


Iroquois 


446 Watseka 


Watseka 

Iroquois 

Sheldon 


Iroquois 


506 O H Miner 




609 Sheldon 




845 Martlnton 


Martinton 




952 Donovan 


Troqnnis 


1063 Cissna Park 


Cissna Park 









George A. Reed, Watseka 



FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


305 Onarga 

316 A Jonas 


Onarga 


Iroquois 


Loda 

Paxton 


Iroquois 


416 Paxton 


Ford 


470 Rantoul 




574 Pera 






591 Oilman 


Oilman 




634 Buckley 

725 Rankin 




Rankin 









Glen Rotinson, Rantoul 



FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


351 Tarbolton 


Fairbury 

Chatsworth 

Piper City 




539 Chatsworth 




608 Piper 


Ford 


614 Forrest '. 




631 Norton 




Ford 


733 Gibson 


Gibson City 

Saunemin 

Sibley 


Ford 


738 Saunemin 




761 Sibley 

811 Melvin 


Ford 




Ford 









A. O. Poff, Gibson City 



184 



Appendix 



FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



IB Peoria 

46 Temple 

98 Taylor 

222 George Washington 

246 El Paso 

263 Illinois 

806 William C. Hobbs 

335 Schillor 

421 Washburn 

748 Alta 

930 Joseph Robblns • • , 



Location. 



Peoria . . . . 
Peoria . . . . 
Washington 
Chllllcotha 
El Paso . . . 
Peoria . . . . 
Eureka . . . . 

Peoria 

Washburn 

Alta 

Peoria . 



County. 



Peoria . . 
Peoria . . 
Tazewell 
Peoria . . 
Woodford 
Peoria . . 
Woodford 
Peoria. . . . 
Woodford 
Peoria . . 
Peoria . . 



John J. Crowder, Peoria 



FIFTIETH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


192 Farmlngton 

350 Falrvlew 

363 Horeb 

448 Yates City 

B30 Maquon 

534 Cuba 


Farmlngton 

Falrvlew 

Elmwood 

Yates City 


Fulton 


Fulton 


Peoria 


Knox 


Knox 


Cuba 


Pulton 


734 Morning Star 

848 London 




Fulton 


London Mills 


Fulton 





James Albright Coleman, Canton 



FIFTY-FIRST DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


195 La Harpe 

233 Blandinsville 


La Harpe 

Blandinsville 

Prairie City 




McDonough 


248 G'olden Gate 




253 Avon Harmony 

307 T J Pickett 


Fulton 


Bushnell 

Rosevllle 


McDonough 












Burnsida 









E. E. James, Prairie City 



FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT 



.Vo. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


1 Bodley 


Quincy 

Quincy 

Marcelline 










135 Lima 


Adams 


227 <~"olumbus 


Columbus 

Golden 


Adams 


267 Golden 




2;<fi C^iilncv 






207 Rpniamln 


Hamp Point 

Liberty 




380 Liberty 

449 Mendon 






659 Lambert 


Quincy 




893 I^oralne 











Paul G. Duncan, 1501 Broadway, Quincy 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



185 



FIFTY-THIKD DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


20 Hancock ... ... 


Carthage 

Hamilton 

Warsaw 

West Point 


Hancock 


238 Black Hawk . . • 


Hancock 




Hancock 


295 Dills 


Hancock 




Hancock 








618 Basco 


Basco 


Hancock 


715 Klvaston 


Elvaston 

Nauvoo 


Hancock 


1021 Nauvoo 


Hancock 



E, L. Charpentier, West Point 



FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 






McDonough 


286 Plymouth 


Plymouth 

Augusta 

Industry 

Huntsvllle 

Colchester 

Bardolph 

Camden 






327 Industry 

465 Huntsvllle . . 


McDonough 


Schuyler 




AIcDonough 


672 Bardolph 

648 Camden 


McDonough 


Schu j'ler 


766 Littleton ... ... 


Littleton 

Brooklyn 




935 La Molne 


Schuyler 







Howard M. Lawton, Plymouth 



FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 




Rushvllle 

Beardstown 

Havana 


Schuyler 




Cass 


88 Havana . . 


Mason 


Pulton 




Lewistown 

Vermont 


Fulton 


116 Vermont 

213 Ipava .. . 

939 Table Grove 


Fulton 


Fulton 


Table Grove 


Fulton 





Grier Hanson, Lewistovm 



FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


29 Pekln 

106 Lancaster 

126 Empire 


Pekin 




Glasford 

Pekin 






Mackinaw 


Tazewell 




Tazewell 


462 Tremont 

476 Manito 


Tremont 











F. W. Soady, 9 N. 4th St., Pekin 



186 



Appendix 



FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


43 Bloomlngton 

292 Chenoa 

468 Clieneys Grove 

482 Lexington 

512 Wade Barney 

B4 2 Towanda 


Bloomlngton .... 
Chenoa . . » 








Lexington 

Bloomlngton .... 

Towanda 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Arrowsmlth . . . 

Danvers 

r-olfax 








McLean 


673 Normal 




iMcLean 


742 Danvers 




McLean 




Bloomington 









N. B. Carson, Bloomington 



FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTEICT 



No. 



Name. 



220 Mahomet 

221 Le Roy 

261 Amon 

710 Farmer City 

746 Weldon 

773 Mansfield .. . 
801 Sangamon . . . 
812 De Land . . 
911 Bellflower . . , 



Location. 



Mahomet . . . 
Le Roy .... 

Dewitt 

Farmer City 
V/eldon .... 
Mansfield . . . 

Fisher 

De Land . . . 
Bellflower . . 



County. 



Champaign 
McLean - - 
DeWitt . . . 
DeWitt . . . 
DeWitt . . . 

Piatt 

Champaign 

Piatt 

McLean . . 



Artliur F. Gooch, Bellflower 
FIFTY-NINTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


38 Olive Branch 

154 Russell 


Danville 

Georgetown 

Indianola 

Catlin 








285 CatUn . 

527 Rossvllle 

590 Falrmount 

632 Ridge Farm 




Rossvllle 

Fairmount 

Ridge Farm . . . 
Hoopeston 






Vermilion -. j 


709 Star 




714 Collison 




782 Potomac 

798 Sidell 


Potomac 

Sidell 




Vermilion 


872 Free W'ili . . 


Oakwood 

Danville 






Vermilion 







G. Haven Stephens, 307 Temple Bldg., Danville 



SIXTIETH DISTEICT 



No. 



Name. 



157 Urbana 

199 Homer 

240 Western Star 

347 Sidney 

391 Tolono 

537 J. R. Gorln . 
747 Centennial . . 

754 Ogden 

970 St. Joseph . . . , 



Location. 



Urbana . , 
Homer . . . 
Cliampaign 
Sidney . . . 
Tolono . . 
Sadorous . 

Philo 

Ogden . . . 
St. Joseph . 



County. 



Champaign 
Champaign 
Champaign 
Champaign 
Cliampaign 
Champaign 
Champaign 
Champaign 
Ohampaiffn . 



Jos. P. Gulick, Champaign 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



187 



SIXTY-FIRST DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location, 


County. 




Decatur 


Macon 


58 Fraternal 


Monticella 

Moweaqua 

Decatur 


Piatt 


180 Mowequa 

312 Ionic 


Shelby 


365 Bement 


Bement 


Piatt 


467 South Macon 


Macon 




600 Cerro Gordo 


Cerro Gordo 


Piatt 


871 Argenta 




Cisco 


Piatt 


979 Stephen Decatur 

1064 Great Light 




Mkcon . 


Decatur 







L. J. Wylie, 313 Millikin Bldg., Decatur 



SIXTY-SECOND DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


84 De Witt 


Clinton 


DeWltt 


251 Heyworth 

431 Summit 


Heyworth 




Harristown 








621 Illiopolls 


Illiopolls 




DeWitt 


853 Latliam 


Latham 


Logan 




Warrensburg 









Louis O. Williams, Clinton 



SIXTY-THIRD DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


87 Mt. Pulaski 


Mt. Pulaski 


Logan 


165 Atlanta 


Logan 

DeWitt 


172 Wayne 

203 Lavely 

210 Logan 


Waynesville 

Williamsville . . . 










582 Shirley 

808 Cornland 


Shirley 

Cornland 

Elkhart 




Logan 


903 Ellthart 


Logan 









Charles H. Woods, Lincoln 



SIXTY-FOURTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


19 Clinton 












403 Mason City 

622 Hopedale 


Mason City 

Hopedale 
















Greenview 

.NTew Holland .... 
Ashland 


Menard 


741 New Holland 




929 Ashland 









Charles Wood, Delavan 



188 



Appendix 



SIXTY-FIFTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



4 Springfield . . . . 

71 Central 

333 Tyrlan 

450 Loami 

500 St. Paul 

556 l>awson 

700 Pleasant Plains . 

762 VanMeter 

78G Riverton Union 

904 Carlock 

945 Buffalo 



Location. 



Springfield .... 
Springfield .... 
Springfield .... 

Loaml 

Springfield .... 

Dawson 

Pleasant Plains 

Athens 

I^iverton 

Mechanlcsburg 
Buffalo 



County. 



Sangamon 
Sangamon 
Sangamon 
Sangamon 
Sangamon 
Sangamon 
Sangamon 
Menard . 
Sangamon 
Sangamon 
Sangamon 



Hal C. McLoud, 913 S. 8tli St., Springfield 



SIXTY-SIXTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



3 Harmony 
105 Winchester . 
346 N. D. Morse 

382 Gill 

432 Murrayville 
644 Virginia ... 
570 Jacksonville 
724 Chandlervllle 
1011 Woodson 



Location. 



.Tacksonville 
Winchester . 
Concord .... 
Lynnville 
Murrayville. . . 
Virginia ... 
Jacksonville 
Chandlervllle 
Woodson 



County. 



Morgan 
Scott . 
Morgan 
Morgan 
Morgan 
Cass . . 
Morgan 
Cass .... 
Morgan . 



John S. Hackett, Jacksonville 



SIXTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT 



No 



Name. 



44 Hardin 

52 Benevolent . . , 

108 Versailles 

147 Clayton , 

373 Chambersburg 

424 Exeter 

4 30 Kendrick 

846 Bluffs 



Location. 



Mt. Sterling 
Meredosia . . 
Versailles . . 
Clayton . . . . 
Chambersburg 

Rxeter 

Tiraewell 

Bluffs 



County. 



Brown 
Morgan 
Brown 
.Adams 
Pike . . 
Scott . 
Brown 
Scott . 



C. A. Wever, Clayton 



SIXTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 



No Name. 


Location. 


County. 


34 Barry 


Barry 

G'riggsville 

Perry 


Pike 


45 Griggsvllle 


Pike 


95 Perry 


Pike 


218 New Salem 


New Salem 

Fairweather 


Pike 


266 Kingston 


Adams 


353 Kinderhook 


Kinderhook .... 

Payson 

Plainville 


Pike 


379 Payson 


Adams 


529 Adams 


Adams 


910 Hull 


Hull 


Pike 


1000 Bajlis 


Hay lis 


Pike 









Everett Lawrence, Hull 



Districts and District Deputy Grand blasters 



189 



SIXTY-NINTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


275 Milton 




Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 
Pike . 




388 El Dara 

453 New Hartford . ... 


El Dara 




New Hartford . . . 
Pleasant Hill . . . 
Time 




565 Pleasant Hill . . . 




669 Time 




790 Pittsfleld .... 


Pittsfleld 




806 Nebo *.V. . ' .'. 




New Canton 

Rockport 

Pearl 




830 Rockport 

940 Pleasant View 











Coston Clemmons, Milton 



SEVENTIETH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 




Wliite Hall 




118 Waverly 

229 Manchester 

426 Scottville 

463 Palmyra 

616 Wadley 

796 E M Husted 




Waverly 

Manchester 

Scottville 




Scott 

Macoupin 




Franklin 

Roodhouse 

Modesto 




Greene 


874 MIfnne' 




Macoupin 









John A. Turner, Palmyra 



SEVENTY-FIRST DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


76 Mt Nebo 


Carlinville 

Virden 

GIrard 


Macoupin 


161 Virden 




Macoupin 






Sangamon 


523 Chatham 




Sangamon 


635 Rochester 


Rochester 















Charles W. Kessler, Pawnee 



SEVENTY-SECOND DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


I^ocation. 


County. 


122 Mound 

310 Kedron 

585 Fisher 


Taylorvllle 

Mount Auburn . . . 

Grove City 

Edlnburg 

Morrisonvllle .... 
Rhio Mound .... 
Raymond 


Christian 


Ch ristlan 


Christian 


647 Bluevllle 


Oh ristlan 




Christian 










1066 Stonington 









A. A. Bauer, Blue Mound 



190 



Appendix 



SEVENTY-THIED DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


148 Bloomfield 


Chrlsman 


Edgar 




Newman 


Douglas 


440 Camargo 




Douglas 




Piatt 


743 Scottland 


Scottland 


Edgar 


791 Broadlands 

829 Fdgar ..•• . 

885 Villa Grove 


Broadlands 


Champaign 

Edgar 


Villa &'rove 


Douglas 







Charles A. Hawkins, Tuscola 



SEVENTY-FOUETH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


77 Prairie 


Paris 


Edgar 

Coles 


91Q OnUlnnd 




228 Lovington 

268 Paris 


Lovington 

Paris 


Moultrie 


Edgar 






Douglas 


408 Stratton 

825 Arthur 


Vermilion 


Edgar 


837 Hlndsboro 


Hindsboro 


Douglas 



James I. Lawrence, Arthur 



SEVENTY-FIFTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


35 Charleston 


Charleston 

Mattoon 


Coles 


260 Mattoon 


Coles 


280 Kansas 




Edgar 


322 Windsor . . . . 




Shelby 






Coles 


595 Miles Hart 


Gays 


Moultrie 




Sullivan 










1046 Westfield 


Westfield 


Clark 







T. S. Wright, Kansas 



SEVENTY-SIXTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 




.Shelby ville 

Pana 


Shelby 


226 Pana 


Ch ristian 


392 Oconee 


Oconee 


Shelby 




Assumption 

Tower Hill 


Christian 


4 93 Tower Hill 


Shelbv 


623 Locust 




Ch ristian 


706 Joppa 

R31 Findlav 




Shelby 




Shelby 


990 Clover Leaf 




Shelby 


• 





E. J. Scarborough, Shelhyville 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



191 



SEVENTY-SEVENTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


129 Greenfleld 

151 Bunker Hill 


Greenfleld 

Bunker Hill 

Medora 


Greene 

Macoupin 


152 Fidelity 


Macoupin 


212 Shipman 


Shipman 




214 Gllllsple 


Gillespie 




249 Hlbbard 


Brighton 


Macoupin 


445 Chesterfield 


C^esterfleld 

Plainvlew 


Macoupin 


461 Plainvlew 









W. J. Donaliue, Plainvlew 





SEVENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 


No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


50 Carrollton 

197 King Solomon 




Carrollton 

Kane 

Grafton 

Jerseyville 

Fleldon 

Harden 

Hamburg 


Greene 

Greene 


341 Full Moon .. 


Jersey 


394 Jerseyville . . . 


Jersey 


592 Fleldon 




792 Calhoun 

856 West Gate . . 


Calhoun 







T. I. McKnight, Carrollton 



SEVENTY-NINTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


25 Franklin 


Alton 


27 Piasa '.'. 


Alton 


51 Mount Moriah 

99 Edwardsville 

177 Staunton 

236 Charter Oak 


Hlllsboro 

Ii;dwardsvllle 

Staunton 

Litchfield 


406 Bethalto 


Bethalto 


455 Irving 


Irving 


456 Nokomls 


Nokomls 


475 Walshvllle 

517 Litchfield 

660 Madison 


WaNh villa 

Litchfield 

New Douglas 





County. 



Madison 

Madison . . . . 

.Montgomery 

Madison . . . . 

Macoupin 

Montgomery 

Madison . . . . 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Madison . . . . 



Douglas E. Dale, Edwardsville 



EIGHTIETH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


Cotrnty. 


16 Temperance 


Vandalla 


Fayette , 


255 DoniielLson 


Donnellson 

Ramsey 




405 Ramsey 




613 Patoka 


Patoka 




670 Fillmore 


Fillmore 

Mulberry Grove . . 
Sorento 




809 Gillham 


Bond 


861 Sorento 


Bond 


906 Coffeen 


Coffeen 


Montgomery 









N. C. Gochenour, Vandalla 



192 



Appendix 



EIGHTY-FIEST DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


125 Greenup 

179 Wabash ... .... 


Greenup 


Cumberland 




Coles 


279 Neoga 

396 Muddy Point 


Xeoga 




Trilla 


Coles 


Stewardson 


Shelby 


618 Hutton 






I^erna 


Coles 


834 Toledo 


Toledo 











Wm. M. Lovins, Toledo 



EIGHTY-SECOND DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


133 Marshall 




Clark 


136 Hutsonville 

313 York 


Hutsonville 

York 


Crawford 

Clark 


442 Casey 

580 Hazel Dell 


Ca'=!ev 


Clark 


Hazel Dell 

Martinsville 




603 Clark 


Clark 


620 Newhope 


Clark 







Harry C. Leggett, Casey 



EIGHTY-THIRD DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


149 Effingham 

533 Altamont 


E)ffingham 

Altamont 


Rfflngham 




578 Prairie City 




602 Watson 






664 Mayo 

605 Beecher City . 


Wlnterrowd 

Beecher City 

St. Elmo 


Effingham 

Effingham 


769 St. Elmo 




883 Wheeler 











David L. Wriglit, Effingham 



EIGHTY-FOURTH DISTRICT 



No. 



Name. 



245 

355 
473 
504 
583 
588 
712 
8:^5 
852 
877 
1030 
1062 



Greenville 

Marine 

Gordon 

East St. Louis. 

Higliland 

Troy 

Colllnsvllle 

Triple 

Gothic 

Granite City . . . 

Emeth 

Wood River 



Location. 



Greenville 

Marine 

Pocahontas 

East St. Louis. . . 

Highland 

Trov 

Collinsville 

Granite City 

East St. Louis. .. 

Granito City 

East St. Louis. . . 
Wood River .... 



County. 



Bond . . . 
•Madison 
Bond . . , 
St Clair 
Madison 
ATadison 
Madison 
Madison 
St. Clair 
Madi«;on 
St. Clair. 
Madison . 



E. S. Mclntyre, 510 Veronica Ave., East St. Louis 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



193 



EIGHTY-FIFTH DISTEICT 



Ho. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


24 St. Clair 


Belleville 

Nashville 

Carlye 


St. Clair 


55 Washington 

79 Scott 


Washington 


Clinton 


109 Trenton 


Trenton 


Clinton 






St. Clair 


342 Summerfleld 


Summerfleld 

Mascoutah 

Freeburg 

Fallon 


St. Clair 


361 Douglas 

418 Freeburg 

B76 O'Fallon 


St. Clair 

St. Clair 

St. Clair 



A. W. Carter, Trenton 



EIGHTY-SIXTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


130 Marlon 






153 Clay 


Ashley 


Washington 


201 Centralis 

503 Odin 


Centralis 

Odin 


Marion 


BIG J. D. Moody ". .' . . . 

721 Rome 


luka 


Marion 


Dix 




932 Sandoval 

948 R F Casey 


Sandoval 

Kell 


Marion 

Marlon 









W. D. Walters, Centralia 



EIGHTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


196 Louisville 

217 Mason 


Louisville 

Mason 


Clay 

Kfflngham 


398 Kinmundy 


Kinmundv 


Marion 


484 Edgewood 

485 Xenia 


Edgewood 

Xenia 




Clay 


601 Farina 




Fayette 









Samuel B. Gwln, Farina 



EIGHTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 




216 Newton 


.\"ewton 


Jasper 

Crawford 

Crawford 




250 Robinson 

348 Flat Rock 

447 S. D. Monroe 


Robinson 

Flat Rock 

Birds 

Willow Hill 

Oblong 

Katon 




489 Cooper 


Jasper 


644 Oblong City 


Crawford 




666 Crawford 




756 Hardinville 




Crawford 




849 Palestine 


Palestine 









Jas. T. Athey, Robinson 



194 



Appendix 



EIGHTY-NINTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


14 Warren 


Shawneetown 

New Haven 


Gallatin 


Gallatin 


272 Carml 

668 Burnt Prairie 

677 Knfleld 

718 May 

723 Omaha 

816 Rldgway 


White 


Burnt Prairie .... 

Enfield 

Norrls City 

Omaha 

Ridgway 

Cottonwood 


White 


White 


White 

Gallatin 


Gallatin 


Gallatin 







Thos. W. Hall, Carmi 



NINETIETH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 

164 Edward Dobbins 

200 Sheba 

239 Mount Carmel . 

334 Sumner 

356 Hermitage 

386 Bridgeport 

509 Parkersburg , . . 

752 Allendale 

866 West Salem . . . 
912 Stellar 



Location. 



Lawrencevllle 
Grayville . . . . 
Mount Carmel 

Sumner 

Albion 

Bridgeport . . . 
Parkersburg . 
Allendale .... 
West Salem . 
St. Francisville. 



County. 

Lawrence 

White 

Wabash 

Lawrence 

Edwards 

Lawrence 

Richland 

Wabash 

Edwards 

Lawrence 



Lewis Smitli, Bridgeport 



NINETY-FIRST DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


31 Mt. Vernon 

137 Polk 


Mt. Vernon 

McLeansboro 


Jefferson 


Hamilton 




Jefferson 




Walpole 


Hamilton 


696 Belle Rive 


Belle Rive 

Wayne City 

Broughton 

Dahlgren 


Jefferson 


759 Orel 




Hamilton 











Orlin J. Davis, McLeansboro 



NINETY-SECOND DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


72 Chester ... . 


Chester 


Randolph 


86 Kaskaskla .... 1 1 .... i 


Evansvllle 


Randolph 


162 Hope 




497 Alma 




Randolph 


4i!7 Ked Bud 


Red Bud 


Randolph 


474 Columbia 


Columbia 

Waterloo 

Marissa 




787 Morris 




St Clair 







Samuel E. Grigg, Jr., Sparta 



Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 



195 



NINETY-THIRD DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


287 De Soto 


Da Soto 




85 Mitchell 


Pinckneyville 

Tamaroa 

Du Quoin 

Campbell Hill 

Valier 


Perry . 


207 Tamaroa 


Perry 


234 Du Quoin 




695 Shiloh Hill 


Jackson 


744 Goode 


I'^ranklln 


833 Dean 


Ava 


Jackson 


1016 Christopher 


Christopher 




918 Sesser 


Sesser 


Franklin .... 


1004 Hurst 


Hurst 

Royalton 


Williamson 


1047 Royalton 


Franklin 


1048 Ziegler 


Ziegler 











W. H. Thomas, Jr., Benton 



NINETY-FOURTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


140 Olney 


Olney 


Richland 


204 Flora 


Flora 


Clay ; . . ; ; 

Wayne 


206 Fairfield 


Fairfield 


331 Mount Erie 


Mt. Erie 


Wayne 


362 Noble 


Noble 


Richland 


460 Jeffersonvllle 


Jeffersonvllle .... 

Clay City 

Johnsonville 

Gloldengate 


Wayne 


488 Clay City 


Clay 

Wayne 


713 Johnsonville 


925 Molenna 


Wayne 









J. E. Gibbs, Clay City 



NINETY-FIFTH DISTRICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 




64 Benton 


Benton 

West Frankfort 

Herrin 


Franklin 


567 Frankfort 


Franklin ....'.'. !!!!! 


693 Herria's Prairie 


Williamson 


705 Ewing 


Ewing 


Franklin 


729 Lake Creek 


Johnston City 

Tliompsonville 

(Jiirterville 




749 Aiken 


Franklin 


802 Williamson 


WilHamson 


807 Royal 




Franklin 


89 Fellowship 


Marion 


Williamson 









A. M. Edwards, Marion 



NINETY-SIXTH DISTRI0T 



No Name. 


Location. 


County. 


131 Golconda 




Pope 


419 Reynoldsburg 


Tunne! Hill 


672 Eddyville 




Pope 


778 Gurney 




276 Elizabeth 


Elizaboth Town 


(Tardln 


772 New Burnside 


Johnson 


495 Stone Fort 


Stone Fort 


Saline 







George Kelly, Stonef ort 



196 



Appendix 



NINETY-SEVENTH DISTEICT 



No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


2 Equality 

128 Raleigh 


Equality 


Gallatin 


Saline 


325 Harrisburg 


Harrisburg 


Saline 


Cave-in-Rock 

Carrier Mills 


Hardin 


458 Blazing Star 


Saline 




Saline 






Saline 




Karbers Ridge 


Hardin 




Williamson 









Geo. E. Anderson, Harristurg 



NINETY-EIGHTH DISTEICT 



N'o. Name. 


Location. 


County. 


91 Metropolis 






232 Farmers 




Mass ac 


339 Saline 






771 Bay City 


Hamletsburg 


Pope 


Toh nson 


817 Creal Springs 


Creal Springs 






701 Temple Hill 


Temple Hill 


Pope 



Roy Helm, Metropolis 



NINETY-NINTH DISTRICT 



No Name. 


Location 


County. 


Ill Jonesboro 

241 Shekinah 


•Jonesboro 


Union 






Jackson 


466 Cobden 




Union 












Union 


657 LaPayette 

840 Alto Pass 


Grand Tower 






719 Chapel Hill 


Wolf Creek . . . 


Williamson 









John Armstrong, Carl)ondale 





ONE 


HUNDREDTH DISTRICT 


No. Name. 


Location. 


County. 






Pulaski 




Vienna 




237 Cairo 








562 Trinity 


Mound City 


Pulaski 


581 Dongola 


Union 


660 Grand Chain 


Grand Chain 


Pulaski 


822 Belknap 


Johnson 


627 Union 




Union 









W. F. Gibson, Cairo 



Grand Lecturers 



197 



R.W. GRAND LECTURERS. 

FOE THE' YEAR 1921-1922 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



GEAND EXAMINERS 

Win. H. Zarley, Chairman Joliet 

320 Fifth Ave. 

B. L. Ten Eyck, Secretary . .Fairview 
Harry L. Howell Bloomington 

410 E. Front St. 

Harry H. Milnor Chicago 

616 N. Laramie Ave. 

A. L. Pickel Springfield 

420 S. Seventh St. 

PAST GRAND EXAMINERS 

H. T. Burnap Alton 

H. A. Snell Litchfield 

M. B. lott Chicago 

6636 Newgard Ave. 

S. S. Borden Chicago 

5168 Michigan Ave. 

Charles H. Martin Bridgeport 

Charles S. De Hart Carthage 

Emmerson Clark Farmington 

L. C. Johnson Galva 

J. M. Hannum Chicago 

J. E. Jeffers Springfield 

417 S. Fifth St. 

D. G. Fitzgerrell .Normal 

Elmer E. Beach Chicago 

111 W. Washington St. 

Arthur E. Wood Chicago 

6254 Stony Island Ave. 

Emmett Howard Quincy 

Wilson P. Jones Champaign 

Maxwell Levy Chicago 

845 Rees St. 

Henry S. Wiley Buffalo 

Spruel C. D. Rea Benton 

Albert Jampolis Chicago 

3738 Rokeby St. 

R. C. Davenport Harrisburg 

D. D. King Chicago 

3002 Lake Park Ave. 

George E. Carlson Moline 

417 15th St. 

GRAND LECTURERS 

C. E. Allen Galesburg 

714 Mulberry St. 

H. S. Albin Chicago 

514 San Francisco Ave. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



D. E. Bruffet Urbana 

J. M. Willard Decatur 

J. E. Wheat Sterling 

607 Second Ave. 

S. M. Shoeman McLeansboro 

C. N. Hambleton Cisne 

A. O. Novander Chicago 

11150 S. Hoyne Ave. 

J. B. Roach Beardstown 

1000 Jefferson St. 

Charles P. Ross Greenfield 

Archibald Birse Chicago 

1008 Schiller Bldg. 

Ralph H. Wheeler Chicago 

108 N. State St. 

H. W. Harvey Chicago 

7211 University Ave. 

I. A. Foster Zeigler 

12 Oak St. 

W. A. Dixon Decatur 

331 N. Edwards St. 

N. M. Mesnard Decatur 

613 W. Wood St. 

H. E. Van Loon Chicago 

4851 W. Monroe St. 

C. J. Wightman Grays Lake 

W. H. Bied Chicago 

7159 St. Lawrence Ave. 

D. W. Starr , Raymond 

Nimrod Mace Bloomington 

103 E. Front St. 

N. B. Carson Bloomington 

David Richards Chicago Lawn 

6325 S. Troy St. 
L. J. Frahm Chicago 

521 Bryant Ave. 

W. H. Rupe Morris 

Wm. W. Roberts Chicago 

4837 N. Albany Ave. 

M. T. Booth Atkinson 

C. L. Montgomery Blue Mound 

L. E. Rockwood Gibson City 

W. A. Hoover Gibson City 

L. B. Dyer Chicago 

740 S. Homan Ave. 
George N. Todd Mattoon 

1311 Wabash Ave. 



198 



Appendix 



K.W. GEAND IjECTJIREItS—ConUnued 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



W. G. Houjrhton Chicago 

P. O. Box 517 

P. O. Lorton Auburn 

Win. Elmer Edwards Chicago 

5223 Raco Ave. 

Z. S. Saylor Oakwood 

W. D. Price Chicago 

606 Michigan Ave. 

H. A. Dever Wilmette 

1506 Washington Ave. 

W. E. Marble Glencoe 

245 Hawthorn Ave. 

H. M. Robinson Chicago 

429 E. 48th St. 

C. H. Thomp.son Mt. Vernon 

Amos Ball Gibson City 

Otto Brail Chicago 

331-175 W. Jackson Blvd. 

J. F. Boyle Chicago 

8052 S. Throop St. 

A. B. C'ollom Marissa 

512 S. Park St. 

J. F. Glathart Olney 

B. S. Blaine Champaign 

305 N. McKinley Ave. 

W. N. Ewing McLean 

T. B. Strause Gibson City 

F. H. Bradley Princeton 

R. F. D. 

R. B. Prendergast Chicago 

2745 Madison St. 

George W. Flood Rock Island 

4221 6fh Ave. 

J. I. Brydon Martinsville 

Benjamin Bing Urbana 

304 W. Elm St. 

J. M. Foreman Casey 

I. J. McDowell Chicago 

4235 W. Van Buren St. 
W. E. Speckman Metropolis 

D. S. David.son Chicago 

7309 S. Racino Ave. 
A. A. Bauer Blue Mound 

C. L. Tanner Sannemin 

James Porter Martinsville 

T. S. Browning Benton 

T. C. Hambleton Geff 

C. W. Kessler Pawnee 

H. A. Flock Springfield 

2301 S. 10th St. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



R. C. Clark Chicago 

008 Harris Trust Bldg. 

C. O. Faught Altamont 

Charles H. Crowell Chicago 

4721 W. 20th St. 

Addison Hickox Chicago 

1515 West Monroe St. 

D. S. Mellinger Chicago 

6729 Langley Ave. 

R. C. Peck Chicago 

252 1^ W. Wood St. 

A. J. Winteringham Dundee 

S. B. Harvey Oak ParK 

247 Home Ave. 

H. D. Hamper Aurora 

508 Main St. 

T. W. Nixon Saybrook 

Nels. O. Johnson Chicago 

5252 N. Asliland Ave. 

Wm. Tinsley Chicago 

618 Wrightwood Ave. 

A. O. Poff Gibson City 

R. C. Cantelou Chicago 

700 Old Colony Bldg. 

B. T. Harley Elwood 

Edgar Zimmerman Chicago 

62 W. Ohio St. 

O. J. Davis McLeansboro 

Wainwright Davis Mt. Vernon 

S. S. Middleton Le Roy 

A. F. Gooch Bcllflower 

G. Haven Stevens Danville 

307 Temple Bldg. 

Henry P. Blose Danville 

110 Vermillion St. 

H. E. De Lavergne Kankakee 

J. A. Provoost Pecatonica 

Harry C. Reeser Peotone 

Aaron C. Koethe Chicago 

3313 W. North Ave. 
Wm. W. M. Bending Chicago 

2939 E. 91st St. 
Simon F. Odell Chicago 

3634 S. Robey St. 

Charles J. Weiskopf Chicago 

4631 N. Racine Ave. 

E. C. Mullen Chicago 

711-715 Fulton St. 

Marshal N. Shaw Decatur 

1505 W. Decatur St. 



Grand Lecturers 



199 



E. W. GRAND IjECTIJ'R.E'RS— Continued 



NAME ADDRESS 

A. M. Bassford Chicago 

11032 Esmond St. 

A. T. Peters New Holland 

Walter E. Felt Chicago 

4702 W. Congress St. 

J. O. Holland Springfield 

439 N. Fifth St. 
Fred Naumer Altamont 

E. K. Bennington Chicago 

3918 Cottage Grove Ave. 

James Cropper Chicatro Heights 

315 W. 14th Place 

Fred S. Schram Cliicago 

552 E. 51st St. 

John Mutter Chicago 

352 W. 63rd St. 

Elof Peterson Chicago 

714 Republic Bldg. 

W. A. Blessing Aurora 

105 Grace Court 

Marshall Osment Johnston City 

Gordon Pillow Johnston City 

James T. Athey Robinson 

709 Cross St. 

Frank J. Vernon Springfield 

1515 S. Lincoln Ave. 

Wm. M. Lovins Toledo 

Emory Edwards Springfield 

827 S. Douglas Ave. 

Wm. Grant Spurgin Urbana 

Masonic Temple 

Fred I. Mills Robinson 

Robert F. Davidson Decatur 

553 N. Edwards St. 

Julius L. Klemme Quincy 

1431 Kentucky St. 

Walter E. Long Decatur 

446 E. Grand Ave. 

John D. Charters Ashton 

Lincoln Highway 

George Zoller Quincy 

7th and State Sts. 

John L. Whiteside Marion 

Leslie W. Beebe Oak Park 

801 S. Boulevard 

James F. Barseloux Chicago 

39 N. Parkside Ave. 

F. V. Partridge Springfield 

209 E. North Grand Ave. 

E. R. Welch Springfield 

641 S. Glenwood Ave. 

H. L. Kelly Peoria 

1031 Peoria Life Bldg. 



NAME ADDRESS 

Paul G. Duncan Quincy 

1501 Broadway 

Jacob Swartz Chicago 

5033 St. Lawrence Ave. 

Everett Lawrence Hull 

R. V. McKee Washburn 

Edmond G. George Springfield 

1405 S. Fifth St. 

Lauren W. Coe Springfield 

524 S. State St. 

Hal C. McLoud Springfield 

913 S. 8th St. 

Wm. Cullen Bryant Aurora 

309 Evans Ave. 

Fred J. Jerden Granite City 

2158 C St. 

Frank L. Shaw Galesburg 

71 N. West St. 

Benjamin C. Nead Galesburg 

568 Cherry St. 

Edwin R. Hensley Kinmundy 

Wm. Collins Bradley Quincy 

703 N. 12th St. 

Charles Woods Lincoln 

Hiram John Rutherford Oakland 

Charles F. Eiohenauer Quincy 

7201/3 State St. 

Ben. L. Bervo Rochelle 

411 Lincoln Highway 

Julius G. Strawn Jacksonville 

1200 W. College Ave. 

Albert C. Metcalf Jacksonville 

425 E. State St. 

Benjamin W. Scholton Chicago 

3212 Altgeld St. 

Leopold Swartz Chicago 

1948 Humbolt Blvd. 

Benjamin S. Bingham Chicago 

6103 Woodlawn Ave. 

Wells W. I/a Moure Chicago 

6200 Kenwood Ave. 

Oscar L. Carson Chicago 

6841 La Fayette Ave. 

Leopold Apple Chicago 

5231 Indiana Ave. 

Charles H. Keppel Chicago 

7027 Eberhart Ave. 

Wm. Thomas Mummery Chicago 

1850 Kenilworth Ave. 

Willis McFoely Oak Park 

108 S. liaSalle St. 



200 



Appendix 



K. W. GEAND LECTUREES— ConiinMed 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Isaac J. Grass Chicago 

5833 Prairie Ave. 

Edwin F. Works N. Crystal Lk. 

Win. Butlrr Cochrane Chicago 

7952 S. Green St. 

Wm. H. Randall Morris 

R. F. D. 

Melville H. Leighton Chicago 

4601 Beacon St. 

O. E. Carpenter Evanston 

1505 Ashland Ave. 

Levi C. Cramer Chicago 

2623 N. Richmond St. 

Emanuel Weil Chicago 

39 S. La Salle St. 

Charles C. Sawyer Altona 

H. L. Weaver Galesburg 

326 Holmes Bldg. 

Bernard Remmer Chicago 

5158 Union Ave. 

Thomas E. Jones Chicago 

1514 W. 71st. Place 

Albert T. Thompson Chicago 

308 S. Sacramento Blvd. 

M. L. Downey Decatur 

261 Spring St. 

Wm. H. Pundt Danville 

514 Temple Bldg. 

O. J. Chapman Danville 

1226 Walnut St. 

Edwin W. Aplin Chicago 

Hotel Grace 

Paul A. Pabst Chicago 

5415 Giddings St. 

George E. Moore Chicago 

3809 W. Adams St. 

Robert H. Cutler St. Charles 

140 W. Fourth St. 

James 0. Anderson Belvidorc 

Albert C. McFarland Chicago 

1131 E. 62nd St. 

Emil P. Wenger Chicago 

3850 N. Avers Ave. 

David Martin Chicago 

7307 Vincennes Ave. 

Frederick D. Ehlert Chicago 

3142 Wilson Ave. 

Henry Feick Chicago 

2606 S. Halsted St. 

Evan P. Jones Chicago 

4712 N. Sawyer Ave. 

Ernest E. Stamp Chicago 

7244 Carpenter St. 
C. E. Olmstead Lanark 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Cyrus W. Rutherford Newman 

Charles H. Mangold Molinc 

1418 5th Ave. 

W. H. Thomas, Jr Benton 

Simon P. Odenweller Macomb 

323 E. Jefferson St. 

George L. Beal Verona 

Charles C. Fenn Verona 

James A. Shepard, Jr Paris 

Delbert I. Duck Paris 

George N. Lamb St. Charles 

Carroll W. Norris St. Charles 

J. L. Dawson Scotland 

Glen Robinson Rantoul 

Wm. T. Cable Harrisburg 

Charles Maddox Riverton 

Howard H. Grubb Riverton 

Clarence Harvey Lefler iPeoria 

911 Columbia Terrace 

John P. Sweitzer Collinsvillo 

Robert E. Hale Centralia 

Otto Schatzkis Chicago 

3006 Armitage Ave. 

Andrew J. Zimmerman Peoria 

210 S. Jefferson St. 

Earl G. Beard Chicago 

2038 Iowa St. 

Lyman N. Thurston Chicago 

7611 Cregier Ave. 

Gustave H. Schultz Danville 

48 N. Vermillion St. 

Arthur F. Johnston Danville 

840 Commercial St. 

B. J. Metzger Joliet 

821 Oneida St. 

Gustave Kohn Chicago 

4719 Forestville Ave. 

E. B. Funk Piper City 

George S. Palmer Chicago 

5323 Maryland Ave. 

James A. Zeller Chicago 

524 W. 118th St. 

Clyde Swartz Quincy 

1317 N. 6th Ave. 

Wm. H. Lundie Chicago 

1422 E. 75th St. 

Joseph A. Berkman Chicago 

5248 Calumet Ave. 

Wm. G. Jones Chicago 

539 E. 62nd St. 

Glen P. Coe Dixon 

123 Lincoln Way 



Grand Lecturers 



201 



K. W. GRAND hECTURE^S— Continued 



NAME ADDRESS 

Wm. Robertson Chicago 

7247 La Fayette Ave. 

Wm. Jedike Melrose Park 

No. 9 16th Ave. 

Carlos K. Eckhart Chicago 

1530 Lake Shore Drive 

Charles A. Stayart Chicago 

4424 N. Richmond St. 

Ralph D. Tinkham Kirkwood 

Looney McCormick Dorrisville 

John M. Armstrong Carbondale 

Wm. Douglas Abney Marion 

112 S. Holland Ave. 

James F. Rowley Chicago 

5709 Kenmore Ave. 

Edward J. Hunt Chicago 

722 N. Laramie Ave. 

J. H. C'ouden Chicago 

4139 Ellis Ave. 

Isaac J. Smit Chicago 

2010 Mailers Bldg. 

Dan De Baugh Chicago 

221 Institute Place 

John Cameron Chicago 

6037 Rhodes Ave. 

Demmitt C. Hutchins Chicago 

19 S. La Salle St. 

Samuel Perlee Reese Chicago 

336 S. Homan Ave. 

Charles Brinkman Chicago 

1753 N. Washtenau Ave. 

Albert F. Smyth Freeport 

222 W. Stevenson St. 

Charles D. Boyle Moline 

Reliance Bldg. 

Alfred W. Joerndt Odell 

Frank W. Brown Odell 

Samuel Faucett Robinson 

Robert A. Lees May wood 

401 S. 16th Ave. 

Arthur G. French Chicago 

31 N. State St. 

Robert Duthie Des Plaines 

135 Walnut Ave. 

Frank W. Koth Sterling 

302 W. 3rd St. 

Samuel F. Manning Chicago 

1067 Ainsley St. 

John W. Chri.stie Chicago 

3926 W. Monroe St. 

Fred Mickel Oak Park 

705 Clarance Ave. 



NAME ADDRESS 

Clarance W. Edwards Chicago 

31 N. State St. 

Samuel Wolf Chicago 

4756 Magnolia Ave. 

Frank N. Nickol Peoria 

610 5th Ave. 

Grant Sparrow Chicago 

4217 N. Lincoln St. 

George E. Anderson Harrisburg 

Wm. R. Wright Murphysboro 

2144 Spruce St. 

James B. Smith Herrin 

Edwin D. Dangerfield Herrin 

Guy Lawrence Carrier Mills 

Virgil Pucket Carrier Mills 

Wilbur I. Cox Chicago 

4031 Kenmore Ave. 

Gustavo N. Engstrom Chicago 

6325 Kenwood Ave. 

George W. Banks Chicago 

317 S. Mozart Ave. 

Robert Pettigrew Danville 

428 E. Main St. 

Leonard F. W. Steube Danville 

1330 W. Williams St. 

Timothy M. Avery Chicago 

4550 Beacon St. 

William Wood Chicago 

533 S. Millard Ave. 

Benjamin C. Holbrook . . . .Beardstown 

111 S. State St. 

John W. Johnson Chicago 

2644 N. Central Park Ave. 

Edward C. Swett Aurora 

275 W. Park Ave. 

Peter C. Peulecka Chicago 

3012 Jackson Blvd. 

Cornelius N. Gibson Chicago 

2703 N. Clark St. 

Barrett Black Joliet 

821 Oneida 

John L. Tombaugh Odell 

Harold R. Young Chicago 

6938 Union Ave. 

Herbert C. Bowen Chicago 

4918 Winthrop Ave. 

F. M. Pepper Joliet 

Chicago Telephone Co. 

Oscar MaJK Chicago 

2631 N. Harding Ave. 

George A. Bissell Joliet 

318 Herkimer St. 



202 



Appendix 



E.W. GRAND JjECTVUEIiS—ConUnued 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Art C. Acton Decatur 

363 W. Olive St. 

George B. Marshall Decatur 

835 N. Edwards St. 

Ledru Jean Wylie Decatur 

313 Millikin Bldg. 

John R. Rayburn Fairbury 

Wm. D. Lewis Forrest 

John T. Smith Harrisburg 

Wm. R. Schroeder Warrensburg 

James A. Coleman Canton 

1027 E. Chestnut St. 

Wm. J. Nevin Marissa 

Albert Edward Parker Chicago 

5319 Indiana Ave. 

Alonzo Brown Chicago 

12007 S. Union Ave. 

Bray ton Weeks Chicago 

928 Irving Park Blvd. 

Edwin Love Chicago 

141 W. 70th St. 

Frank S. Harvey Washington 

George Albrecht Waukegan 

811 N. Ave. 

John A. McCallum Chicago 

6109 Blackstone Ave. 

Gordon C. Hamilton Chicago 

442 E. 34th St. 

David W. Holt Paris 

1206 S. Main St. 

Francis B. Scent Chicago 

4522 N. Kostner Ave. 

Wm. H. Briggs Chicago 

5533 Emerald Ave. 

Leonard A. Tripp Assumption 

Frank M. Gandy Assumption 

Thomas E. Moore Chicago 

7853 Carpenter St. 

Ora L. Medsker Chicago 

10743 S. State St. 

G. C. Neimeycr Chicago 

79 W. Monroe St. 

David Morris Chicago 

708 Cornelia Ave. 

Walter Scott Litt Chicago 

4812 Winthrop Ave. 

David W. Isenhour Clinton 

308 N. Center St. 

Walter B. Nolan Chicago 

453 E. Ill St. 

Adolph G. Helmchen Chicago 

5238 S. Marshalfield Ave. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Wm. F. Doemland Chicago 

3838 N. Kenneth Ave. 

John Franknecht Chicago 

3917 N. Leavitt St. 

Frank Lewis Parsons ... .Park Ridge 

27 Grant Place 

Gustave Adolph Kiel Chicago 

7840 Lowe Ave. 

Henry Evans Blake Chicago 

6217 Kenwood Ave. 

George Meldrum Chicago 

26 S. Hamlin Ave. 

Frederick Moe Chicago 

1348 N. Paulina St. 

Julius Openheimer Chicago 

4931 Prairie Ave. 

Phillip Van Weston Chicago 

11347 Watt Ave. 

Harry James Lord Oak Park 

125 S. Kenilworth Ave. 

Maurice Ansel Frye Evanston 

813 Greenleaf St. 

George Edwards Chicago 

4043 Washington Blvd. 

Alexander S. Peters Chicago 

805 S. Kilbourne Ave. 

Glen F. Vivian Chicago 

4108 W. Jackson Blvd. 

Coy Albert Roberts Chicago 

542 N. LeC'laire Ave. 

Lee William Alder Chillicothe 

Clarance C. Hicks Colfax 

Charles Vernon Rice Chicago 

15 E. Washington St. 

Thomas H. Hooper Chicago 

5313 Maryland Ave. 

Herbert J. Framhein Chicago 

6530 Kirabark Ave. 

Walter Scott Mathews Danville 

938 N. Hazel St. 

Alfred Atwood Johnson Danville 

1502 N. Walnut St. 

Lewis Smith Bridgeport 

Andy Michael Zimet Chicago 

1773 CuUom Ave. 

Joseph Burgower Chicago 

564 E. 51st St. 

Harry A. Lassahn Chicago 

2037 Roosevelt Road 

Thomas Ernest Quincv Chicago 

6847 Yale' Ave. 

Wm. Jourdan Leacock Chicago 

5733 Ridge Ave. 



Grand Lecturers 



203 



E.W. GRAND LECTURERS— Co?i/i/iMed 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Wm. W. Hipgins Chicago 

1303 Washington Blvd. 
Samuel Wm. Corothers ... Dallas City 

John C. Moline Dallas City 

Isadore Hirschberg Chicago 

3408 Flourney St. 

Edward G. Bogardus Springfield 

822 N. 1st St. 

Walter H. Lauer Jolict 

2300 Cass St. 

Benjamin F. Cohn Chicago 

6533 Greenview Ave. 

Ray O. Roderick Rock Island 

1524 28th St. 

Wm. H. Voss Rock Islana 

2451 19th Ave. 

Jacob W. Houder Rock Island 

832 19th St. 

Wylie E. Keeley Rock Island 

1728 19th Ave. 

Charles F. Eldred Rock Island 

5112 9th St. 

Frank P. Green Colona 

Hamilton M. Custer Altamont 

Herschel T. O. Morris Decatur 

844 W. Grand Ave. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Lorenzo Charles Cloyd Decatur 

1110 E. Williams St. 

Arthur C. Lehman Decatur 

620 W. King St. 

George B. Weisiger Oakwood 

Benjamin F. Allen Raleigh 

Sol Rosenblatt Chicago 

309 E. 47th St. 

Prank E. Fierke Elgin 

632 Sherman Ave. 
Orien Perce Morse Minonk 

John Small Ilarrisburg 

132 W. College St. 

John B. Heathcrington . . . .Harrisburg 
217 W. Poplar St. 

Lloyd W. Wainright Woodhull 

Edward A. Tobias Normal 

311 North St. 

Leo E. Littell Danville 

103 W. Harrison St. 

Ralph L. Lanham Urbana 

411 Race St. 

Glen Dale Meneely Fisher 

Crandall Z. Rosecrans Champaign 

806 S. Third St. 



PERMANENT MEMBERS. 

Bro. Leioy A. Goddard, P.G.M Brotherhood No. 986 

State Bank of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

Bro. Owen Scott, P.G.M Macon No. 8 

Decatur, III. 

Bro. Geo M. Moulton, P.G.M Covenant No. 526 

Masonic Temple, Chicago. 

Bro. William B. Wright, P.G.M Effingham No. 149 

Effingham, 111. 

Bro. Chester E. Allen, P.G.M Alpha No. 155 

Galesburg, 111. 

Bro. Alexander H. Bell, P.G.M Mt. Nebo No. 76 

Carlinville, 111. 

Bro. Delmar D. Darrah, P.G.M Arts and Crafts No. 1017 

Bloomington, 111. 

Bro. Henry T. Burnap, P.G.M Franklin No. 25 

2602 College Ave., Alton, 111. 

Bro. Ealph H. Wheeler, P.G.M America No. 889 

108 N. State St., Chicago, 111. 

Bro. Henry E. Hamilton, P.S.G.W Lincoln Park No. 611 

817 Dearborn Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Bro. Dan G. Fitzgerrell, P.G.M Normal No. 673 

Normal, 111. 

Bro. Elmer E. Beach, G.M Exemplar No. 966 

111 W. Washington St., Chicago. 

Bro. Arthur E. Wood, D.G.M Gibson No. 733 

6254 Stony Island Ave., Chicago. 

Bro. Eichard C. Davenport, S.G.W Harrisbiirg No. 325 

Harrisburg, 111. 

Bro. David D. King, J.G.W Exemplar No. 966 

3002 Lake Park Ave., Chicago, 111. 



HONORARY MEMBER. 

Bro. Frank O. Lowdcn Oregon No. 420 



List of Grand Lodges 



205 



LIST OF GRAND LODGES. 

Recognized by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, together with Names and 
Addresses of Grand Secretaries. 



GRAND LODGE. 



Alabama 

Alberta 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

British Columbia 

California 

Canada 

Colorado 

Conneciicut 

Cuba 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. . 

Kngland 

Florida 

Georgia 

Holland 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Ireland 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Manitoba 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New South Wales 

New York 

New Zealand 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Nova Scotia 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Porto Rico 

Philippine Islands 

Prince Edward Island. 

Quebec 

Queensland 

Rhode Island 

Saskatchewan 

Scotland 

South Australia 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tasmania 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Victoria 

Virginia 

Washington 

Western Australia ... 

We.st Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



GRAND SEURBTAHT. 



Geo. A. Beauchamp 

S.Y.Taylor 

George J. Roskruge 

Fay Hempstead 

W. A. DeWolf Smith.... 

John Whicher 

W. M. Logan 

Wm. W. Cooper 

Geo. A.Kies 

F. V. Preval 

John F. Robinson 

A. W. Johnston 

P. Colville Smith .. 

W. P. Webster 

Frank F. Baker 

H. P. van Nieuwenberg. 

Geo. E. Knepper 

Owen Scott 

William H Swi tz 

Newton R. Parvin 

Richard Best 

Albert K. Wilson 

Dave Jackson 

John A. Davilla 

Charles B. Davis 

JamesA.Ovas 

George Cook 

Frederick W. Hamilton 

Lou B. Winsor 

John Fishel 

Edward L. Faucelte 

Frank R. Jesse 

Cornelius Hedges, Jr 

Prancis E. White 

E. D. Vanderlieth 

J. Twining Hartt 

Harry M. Cheney 

Isaac Cherry 

Alpheus A. Keen 

Arthur H. Bray 

Robert J Kenworthy .. 

Col. Geo. Barclay 

W. W. Wilson 

Waller L. Stockwtll .... 

James C. Jones 

J. H. Bromwell 

Wm. M. Anderson 

James F. Robinson 

John A. Perry 

Jose G. Torres 

Newton C. Comfort 

E.T. Carbonell 

W. W. Williamson. ... 

Chas. H. Harlev 

S. Penrose Williams ... 

W.B. Tate 

David Reid 

Chas. R. J. Glover 

O. Frank Hart 

Geo. A. Pettigrew 

John Hamilton 

Stith M. Cain 

W.B. Pearson 

Sam H. Goodwin 

Henry H. Ross 

Charles James Barrow. 

Chas. A. Nesbit 

Horace W. Tyler 

J. D. Stevenson 

John M. Collins 

Wm. W. Perry 

J. M. Lowndes ,.,... 



ADDRESS. 



Montgomery. 

Calgary. 

Tucson. 

Little Rock. 

New Westminster 

San Francisco. 

Hamilton, Ontario 

Denver. 

Hartford. 

Habana. 

Wilmington. 

Washington. 

London, Freemasons Hall. 

Jacksonville. 

Macon. 

The Hague, Holland. 

Boise. 

Decatur. 

Indianapolis. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Dublin. 

Topeka. 

Louisville. 

New Orleans. 

Portland. 

Winnipeg. 

Baltimore. 

Boston. 

Grand Rapids. 

St. Paul. 

Meridian 

St. Louis. 

Helena. 

Omaha. 

Reno. 

St. John. 

Concord. 

Trenton 

Albuquerque. 

Svdney . 

New York, 71 W. 23rd St. 

Dunedin. 

Raleigh. 

Fargo. 

Halifax. 

(Cincinnati . 

Oklahoma City 

Portland, Mult Monah Hotel. 

Philadelphia. 

Box .'isi, San Juan. 

Manila. 

Charloltetown 

Montreal. 

Brisbane. 

Providence. 

Regina. 

Edinburg. 

Adelaide. 

Columbia. 

.Sioux Falls. 

Hdbart. 

Nashville. 

Waco. 

Salt Lake Citj. 

Burlington. 

Melbourne. 

Richmond. 

Tacoma. 

Perth. 

Charleston. 

Milwaukee. 

Casper. 



206 



Appendix 



REPRESENTATIVES. 

OF THE M. W. GRAND LODGE OF ILLINOIS NEAR OTHER GRAND LODGES. 



GRAND LODGE. 



Alberta 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

British Columbia 

Canada 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Cuba 



REPRKSBNTATIVE. 



Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

England 

Florida 

Georgia 

Holland 

Idabo 

Indiana 

Ireland 

Kansas 

Louisiana 



iMelvin M. Downey 

William W. Daftin 

"William M. Watson 

Geo. Thornburgh 

W. W. Northcott 

A. Shaw 

William W. Cooper 

Geo. E. Parsons 

Francisco de P. 

Rodriguez 

Hariy Mayer 

L. Cabel Williamson.... 



Maine 

Manitoba 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New South Wales 

New York 

New Zealand 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Nova Scotia 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Porto Rico 

Philippine Islands 

Prince Edward Island. 

Quebec 

Queensland 

Rhode Island 

Saskatchewan 

Scotland 

South Carolina 

South Australia 

South Dakota 

Tasmania 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont , 

Victoria 

Virginia 

Washington.. 

Western Australia 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 



Joseph W. Gregg, Jr 



Earl D. Farmin 

B. M. Willoughby ... 
Dr. Wm. G. Ternan. 
Richard E. Bird . ... 
Ural W. McMillan.. 



Frederic O. Eaton 

Robert Thomas Hewitt 

J. A. McFavl, Jr 

Arthur M. Hume 

Alonzo T. Stebbins 

Paul H. Murphy 

Wm. F. Johnson 

O. F. Wasmansdorff — 
George H. Thummel... 

Chas. E. Mack 

William A. Dougherty. 

Sewell W.Abbott 

Richard C. Woodward. 

Walter Beavis 

Walter E. Frew 

Maurice Joseph Harris 

P. T. Wilson 

E. George Guthrie 

Donald F. Frazer 

Harrv S.Johnson 

Fred S. Walker 

Charles E. Minsinger... 

John D. Gillies 

Amos G. Bellis 



KBSIDENCE. 



F. W. Hearle 

Abijah Murray 

Frederick I.Dana 

Rev. C. G. F. Davidson . 



J. F. Ficken 

T. S. Poole 

Frtd H. Ruerg 

George L. Andrews 

Jesse T. Spaulding 

Ephraim B. Robertson. 
Parley L. Williams 



Frederick T. Hickford. 

W. L. Andrews 

John H. Shaw 

James M. Macfarlane.. 

Fred C. Steinbicker 

C. C. Rogers 



Calgary, 73'.) 19th Av. N. W. 

Grove Hill 

Tucson 

Little Rock 

Victoria 

Kingston, Ont. 

Denver 

Norwich 

Havana 

Dover 

Washington 



Atlanta 

Sandpoint 

Vincennes 

Dublin 

Wichita. 

Masonic Club. Masonic 

Temple, New Orleans 
Rumford 
Morden 
Baltimore 
Owosso 
Rochester 
Lexington 
Boonville 
Lewiston 
Omaha 
Reno 

West St. John 
Wolfeboro 
Bordentown 
Sydnev 

Corn Ex. Bank, New York City 
Paerod. Auckland 
Winston Salem 
Fargo 

New Glasgow, N. S. 
Cincinnati 
Claremore 

Portland, 1452 Floral Ave. 
San Juan 
Manila 

Beebe 

Spencer St , Cairns, N. Queens- 
Providence land 
1857 Mclniyre St., Regina, Sask. 

Charleston 

Flinders St., Adelaide 

Pierre 

Nashville 

Austin 

Salt Lake City 

Melbourne 

Roanoke 

Spokane 

Perth 

Wheeling 

Milwaukee 



Note: All commissions expire Jan. 1, 1931. 



Representatives 



207 



REPRESENTATIVES. 

OF OTHER GRAND LODGES NEAR THE GRAND LODGE OF ILLINOIS 



GRAND LODGE. 


RBPRESKNTATIVK. 


RKSIDKNCK. 


Alberta 


H. A. Snell 


Litchfield 


Alabama . 


C. E.Allen 


Galesburg 
Edwardsville 


Arizona 


Chas. H. Spillman 






British Columbia . 


Jas. McCredie 


Aurora 


Canada 

Colorado 


Sylvester O. Spring 


8U5 Westminster Bldg., Chicago 




R. F. Church 


Foot of Rush St., Chicago 

1514 Sunnyside Ave., Chicago 

Normal 

State Bank of Chicago, Chicago 


Cuba 


John W- Swatek 


Delaware 


Dan G. Fitzgerrell 

L. A. Goddard 


England 

Florida 




Chas. H. Partes 


1910 Lincoln Ave., Chicago 
6354 Stony Island Ave., Chicago 
Decatur 


Georgia 

Holland 


A. E. Wood 


C. M. Borchers 


Idaho 


R. R. Jampolis. 

W. B. Wright 


3838 Grand Ave., Chicago 

Effingham. 

205 W. Monroe St.. Chicago 

Masonic Temple, Chicago 

58 W. Washington St., Chicago 

37 N. Desplaines St., Chicago 

455 W. 60th St., Chicago 

511 Gas Bldg. Chicago 


Indiana 




Uobert J. Daly 


Kansas . 


Geo. M. Moulton 


Louisiana 


Godfred Langhenry 


Manitoba 


HughR. Stewart 

M. B. lott 


Maryland 


Michigan 




R. H. Wheeler 


108 N. State St., Chicago 
11 S. LaSalle St., Chicago 
Decatur 




Franklin S. Catlin 

George A. .Stadler 

E. Edwin Mills 


Missouri 


Montana 


2-i2N. State St., Chicago 
3738 Rokeby St., Chicago 
Decatur 


Nebraska 


A. Jampoli.s 

W. J. Hosteller 

S. C. D. Rea 


Nevada 


New Brunswick 


Benton 


New Hampshire 


Henry E. Hamilton 

Joseph D. Everett 

Chas. S. DeHart 


1856 N. Leclaire Ave., Chicago 
103 So. Market St., Chicago 
Carthage 


New Jersey 

New South Wales 


New York 




New Zealand 






North Carolina 


Robert C. Fletcher 

Geo. W. Warvelle 


La Grange 




Masonic Temple, Chicago 


Nova Scotia 




Ohio 






Oklahoma 


D. D. Darrah 

Frank E.Locke 

Seymour S. Borden 

Samuel M. Frankland... 
E D. Brothers 


Bloomington 


Oregon 


125 N. P< oria St., Chicago 


Porto Rico 

Philippine Islands 

Prince Edward Island . . 


SI68 Michigan Ave.. Chicago 
5310 S. Park Ave.. Chicago 
39 So. LaSallc St., Chicago 


Quebec 


L. L. Emmerson 


Springfield 


Queensland 


Edward H. Thomas 

Albert B. Wicker 

Wm. O. Butler. 


2431 S. Lincoln St., Chicago 


Rhode Island 


Franklin Grove 


Saskatchewan 


Wilkie, Sask. 


Scotland 


64 W. Randolph St , Chicago 


South Carolina 


Elmer E. Beach 


in W. Washington St., Chicago 




Robert N. Holt 


110 S. Dearborn, Chicago 


South Dakota 

Tasmania 


Harry N. McFarlane 

H. w: Harvey 

Alexander H. Bell 


105 W. Monroe St., Chicago 
7311 University Ave., Chicago 


Tennessee 


Carlinville. 


Texas 


411 International Life Bldg , 


Utah 

Vermont 


Owen Scott. 

R. C. Davenport 


St. Louis, Mo. 
Decatur. 
Harrisburg 


Victoria 






Virginia 


Frank W. Burton 

Wm D. Fullerton 

H. T. Burnap 


Carlinville 
Ottawa 


Western Australia 


300 Freemason's Hall, Alton 


West Virginia 


Thomas G. Kerwin 

David D. King 


315 So. Clinton St., Chicago 


Wisconsin 


3002 Lake Park Ave., Chicago 



The following Grand Lodges do not exchange Representatives: California, 
Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Pennsylvania and Wyoming. 



208 





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MASONIC LITERATURE. 

The Grand Secretary desires to thank the editors of the following 
magazines and papers for kindly supplying this office with their publi- 
cations during the past year, in exchange for our proceedings. We 
shall be hajipy to exchange with all Masonic publications and papers 
having a Masonic department: 

Bohemia Lodge Compass — 1817 Loomis St., Chicago, 111. 

Crane's Cirmdar — 29 E. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Light — Louisville, Ky. 

Masonic Iloine Journal — Louisville, Ky. 

Masonic News — Peoria, Illinois. 

Masonic Standard — New York, New York. 

Masonic Tribune — Seattle, Wash. 

Masonic Voice Eeview — 319-320 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Missouri Freemason — St. Louis, Missouri. 

Oriental Lodge Notes — 2121 N. Clark St., Chicago. 

Palestine Bulletin — 68 Griswold St., Detroit, Michigan. 

Square and Compass — Denver, Colorado. 

Square and Compasses— ^evf Orleans, Louisiana. 

Temple Topics — Masonic Temple, Englewood, Illinois. 

The American Freemason — Storm Lake, Iowa. 

The Builder — Masonic Eesearch Society, Anamosa, Iowa. 

The Duluth Calendar — Duluth, Minnesota. 

The Illinois Freemason — Bloomington, Illinois. 

The Illinois Masonic Beview- — L. Box 438, Springfield, Illinois. 

The Inter-State Freemason — 203 Hall Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

The Masonic Chronicler — 431 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, Illinois. 

The Masonic Observer — Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

The Masonic Beview — 4202 N. Cheyenne St., Tacoma, Washington. 

The Masonic Trotvel—ljiitle Eock, Arkansas. 

The New England Craftsman — Boston, Massachusetts. 

The Tennessee Freemason — Nashville, Tennessee. 

The Texas Freemason — Dallas, Texas. 

Masonic Trowel — Memphis, Tenn. 

The Master Mason — 404 Kidge Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

Cornerstone Call — 912 N. La Salle St., Chicago. 

The Masonic Beportcr — 55 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago. 

The Montan-a Mason — Great Falls, Montana. 



Detailed Report — Credential Committee 215 



Detailed Report Committee on Credentials 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
of the State of Illinois: 

Your Committee on Credentials fraternally report that the following 
brethren whose names appear in this report are present and entitled to 
seats in this grand lodge. 

GRAND OFFICE'ES 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell M.W, Grand Master 

Elmer E. Beach U.W. Deputy Grand Master 

Arthur E. Wood B.W. Senior \Grand Warden 

E. C. Davenport E.W. Junior Grand Warden 

Leroy A. Goddard E.W. Grand Treasurer 

Owen Scott E.W. Grand Secretary 

J. L. Wright E.W. Grand Chaplain 

Leroy A. Goddard E.W. Grand Orator 

Eoy Adams W. Deputy ^Grand Secretary 

Wm. E. Edwards /F. Grand Pursuivant 

W. H. Beid W. Grand Marshal 

Charles E. Clark W. Grand Standard Bearer 

Wm. N. Ewing \V . Grand Sword Bearer 

C. O. Faught W. Senior Grand Deacon 

J. L. Browning W. Junior Grand Deawn 

Geo. W. Tipsword W. Grand Steward 

George W. Cyrus W. Grand Steward 

Harry C. Murch, Pro Tem W. Grand Steward 

David W. Clark W. Grand Steward 

Geo. T. Scrivner Bro. Grand Tyler 

Frank R. Berg Asst, Grand Tyler 

PAST GRAND OFFICERS 

Raljah H. Wheeler Fast Grand Master 

H. E. Hamilton Fast Grand Senior Warden 

Geo. M. Moulton Fast Grand Master 

H. T. Burnap Fast \Grand Master 

L. A. Goddard Fast Grand Master 

A. H. Bell Fast Grand Master 

Owen Scott Fast Grand Master 

Wm. B. Wright Pa.sf Grand Master 

D. D. Darrah Past Grand Master 

C. E. Allen Fust Grand Master 



216 



Appendix 



E. W. DISTEICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTEES 



Ira J. McDowell 1st 

Geo. C. Nienieyer 2n(l 

\\%i. Tinsley 3rd 

Wm. N. Beiuling 4th 

T. M. Avery 5th 

Edgar J. Phillips 6th 

Emanuel Weil 7th 

W. W. La Moure 8th 

Nels O. Johnson 9th 

Harry G. Wilson 10th 

D. S. Davidson 11th 

Albert P. Bauer 12th 

S. F. Odell 13th 

George E. Moore 14th 

Paul A. Neuffer 15th 

Eobert A. Lees 16th 

Fred 'k D. Ehlert 17th 

Benj. W. Scholton 18th 

Isaac J. Smit 19th 

Herbert C. Bowen 20th 

Eoy Hill 21st 

A, J. Winteringham 22nd 

J. E. Balliett 23rd 

C. L. Snyder 24th 

J, C. Eenwick 25th 

Frank L. Dudley 26th 

E. W. E. Mitchell 27th 

Wm. C. Darling 28th 

E. H. Cutler 29th 

E. H. Cooley 30th 

J. E. Barber 31st 

James C. Davis 32nd 

A, E. Duress 33rd 

Francis H. Bradley 34th 

Chas, H. Mangold 35th 

Thos. E. Lees 36th 

Chas. E. Duvall 37th 

James E. Dick 38th 

C. C. Sawyer 39th 

Hugh Maliett 40th 

Chas. E. Morgan 41st 

B. E. Mull 42nd 



B. J. Metzgcr 43rd 

H. C. Eeser 44th 

F, W. Brown 45th 

E. C. Vanderpoitcn 46th 

Glenn Eobinson 47th 

P. H. Cutler 48th 

Frank C. DeGraff 49th 

James A. Coleman 50th 

Elden E. James 51st 

Paul G. Duncan 52nd 

E. L. Charpentier 53rd 

Howard M. Lawton 54th 

Grier Hanson 5.5th 

F. W. Soady 56th 

Lester H. Martin 57th 

A. F. Gooch 58th 

G. Haven Stephens 59th 

Benjamin Bing, Pro Tem....60th 

G. A. Stadler 61st 

Harry S. Macon 62nd 

Chas. H. Woods 63rd 

H. C. McLoud 65th 

F. C. Funk 66th 

Silvey J. Wilson 67th 

E. L. Lawrence 68th 

Coston Clemmons 69th 

Alonzo Ellis 70th 

Chas. W. Kessler 71st 

A. A. Bauer 72nd 

Chas. A. Hawkins 73rd 

T. S. Wright 75th 

E. J. Scarborough 76th 

Frank B. Bauer 77th 

Orvillc Eice 78th 

N. C. Gochenour 80th 

W. W. Eothrock 81st 

Harry C. Leggett 82nd 

David L. Wright 83rd 

E. S. Mclntirc S4th 

A. W. Carter 85th 

W. D. Wallers 86th 

F. I. Mills 88th 



Detailed Report — Credential Committee 



217 



Wm. E. Day 89th 

C. F. Stoll 90th 

Wainwright Davis 91st 

S. E. Grigg 92nd 

W. H. Thomas 93r(l 

J. E. Gibbs 94th 



C. V. Clark 95th 

Frank D. Thomas 96th 

W. T. Cable 97th 

Eoy E. Helm 98th 

John Armstrong 99th 

Wm. F. Gibson 100th 



EE-PBESENTATIVES OF OTHEE GEAND LODGES 



C. E. Allen Alabama 

C. H. Spilman Arizona 

James McCredie . British Columbia 

Sylvester O. Spring Canada 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell. . . .Belaivare 

Leroy A. Goddard 

District of Columbia 

Arthur E. Wood Georgia 

C. M. Borchcrs Holland 

Wm. B. Wright Indiana 

Eobt. J. Daly Ireland 

Geo. M. Moulton Kansas 

Godf red Langhenry .... Loidsiana 

Amos Pettibone Maine 

M. Bates lott Maryland 

Franklin S. Catlin Mississippi 

G. A. Stadler Missouri 

B. E. Mills Montana 



S. C. D. Eea New Brunswick 

H. E. Hamilton. . .Neiv Hampshire 
Eobt. iC. Fletcher.. .North Carolina 

Delmar D. Darrah Oklahoma 

Frank E. Locke Oregon 

Elmer D. Brothers 

Prince Edward Island 

L. L. Emmerson Quebec 

Edw. H. Thomas Queensland 

Albert B. Wicker. . . .Bhode Island 
Elmer E. Beach. . . .Houth Carolina 

Harry W. Harvey Tasmania 

Owen Scott Utah 

E. C. Davenport Vermont 

H. T. Burnap . . . W ester th Australia 
Thos. G. Kerv?in. . . .West Virginia 
David D. King Wisconsin 



COMMITTEES 

Masonic Jurisprudence — Wm. B, Wright, C. B. Allen, E. IL Wheeler, 
N. B. Carson, H. T. Burnap. 

Appeals and Grievances — Alexander II. Bell, Elmer D. Brothers, Chas. 
H. Martin, W. E. Hadley, Eobt. II. Holt. 

Charteked Lodges — Phil C. Barclay, W. W. Watson, Lindorf Walker, 
J. Huber Allen, Willis McFecly. 

Lodges Under Dispensation — David D. King, F. O. Lorton, Nimrod 
Mace, Albert Piekel. 

Mileage and Per Diem — W. F. Beck, H. T. Goddard, T. S. Browning, 
Chas. H. Thompson, Harry W. Harvey, J. L. Klemme. 

Finance — Edward H. Thomas, R E. Mills, S. O. Spring. 

Masonic Correspondence — Delmar D. Darrah. 



218 Appendix 

Trustees Masonic Homes — Robert C. Fletcher, Eobt. J. Daly, James 
McCredio, Alonzo Dolan, Chas. C. Davis. 

Credentials — Einmctt Howard, W. W. McKnight, Clias. W. Waldeck, 
W. D. Abncy, C. H. Lefler. 

Petitions— J. E, Jeffers, J. H. Mitchell, S. C. D. Eea. 

Obituaries — James K. Lambert, Hez. G. Henry, John C. Crawford, 

Grand Master's Annual Eeport — C. H. Spilman, Harry M. Palmer, 
Wm. Fairlee. 

Grand Examiners — George E. Carlson, Wm. H. Zarley, B. L. Ten Eyck, 
H. L. Howell, H. H. Milnor. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Transportation — L. L. Etamcrson, J. B. Aiken, Frank B. Burton. 

Grand Master 's Advisory Council — Elmer E. Beach, Arthur E. Wood, 
R. C. Davenport, L. A. Goddard, Geo. M. Moultou, Owen Scott, A. H. Bell, 
EVlw. H. Thomas, Wm. H. Beckman, Eobt. J. Daly. 

New Legislation — Jos. J. Shaw. 



Detailed Report — Credential Cortmiittee 



219 



Eepresentatives of Lodges 



NO. 



NAME 



1 


Frank F. Brinkoetter. . 


...W.M. 




Chas. H. Edgar 


. . . S.W. 




M. L. Thayer 


. . . J. W. 


2 


James McLain 


. . .W.M. 


3 


Wm. A. Crawley 


. ..W.M. 


4 


W. E. England 


. . .W.M. 


7 


Grauer W. Geliant. . . . 


. ..W.M. 


8 


Herscel 0. Morris.... 


. ..W.M. 


9 


Bruce Shindcl* 


. ..W.M. 


13 


Robert C. Hattenhaney 


. . .W.M. 


14 


C. H. Carney 


. . .W.M. 


15 


Frank C. DeGraff 


. ..W.M. 


16 


C. W. Leaves 


. ..W.M. 


17 


Wm. R. Harris 


. ..W.M. 


19 


Arthur W. Lilienstein. 


. . .W.M. 




Sam'l Watkins* 


S W 


20 


Baptist Hardy 


. . .W.M. 


23 


John E. McDonougli. . 


. . .W.M. 


24 


John P. Oldendorph. . . 


. . . W.M. 


25 


Fred'k T. Fulkerson . . 


. . . W.M. 


27 


Thos. W. Burns 


. . .W.M. 


29 


Walter Soady 


.. .W.M. 


31 


Frank Q. Thompson . . 


.. .W.M. 


33 


Geo. L. Hager 


. . . W.M. 


34 


J. H. Jones 


. ..W.M. 


35 


Frank M. Francis. . . . 


. . .W.M. 


37 


Wm. H. Torrance 


...W.M. 


38 


Earl R. Bean 


. ..W.M. 




Thos. A. Oakes 


.. .S.W. 




Robt. Pettigrew* .... 


. . .J.W. 


39 


Gerhard F. Bartelt . . . 


. . .W.M. 




Al. L. Koch 


. . . S.W. 


40 


Wm. H. Barnard*.... 


. . . W.M. 


42 


F. J. Conkling 


. . .W.M. 




F. C. Davidson 


. . . S.W. 




"V. N. Benson 


. . .J.W. 


43 


Hanson T. Mace 


. . .W.M. 


44 


E. E. McCoy* 


. . . W.M. 


45 


K. P. Skinner 


. . .W.M. 


46 


W. E. Pinkerton 


.. .W.M. 


47 


T. T. Turner 


. . . W.M. 


48 


Chas. Pike 


... .1 W. 


50 


F. J. McKnight 


. ..W.M. 


51 


Wesley Osborn 


. . .S.W. 


52 


Chas. G. Wegehoft. . . . 


. . . W.M. 


53 


John E. Crockett 


. . .W.M. 


55 


A. W. Thee 


. ..W.M. 


57 


W. H. Keeley 


. . .W.M. 


58 


J. R. Hefner 


.. .W.M. 


59 


C. L. Welch 


...W.M. 


60 


Frank A. Munger.... 


. . .S.W. 


61 


Holgar Brosk 


.. .W.M. 


63 


Edwin F. Meyer* 


. . .W.M. 


64 


N. S. Henn 


. ..W.M. 


65 


A. J. Goodge 


. . .W.M. 


66 


F E. Wilson 


. . . W.M. 


67 


W. C. Ferris* 


...W.M. 


69 


Elmer S. Lovett 


. . .W.M. 


71 


Thos. R. Strong 


. ..W.M. 




A. C. Hewitt 


. . .J.W. 


75 


W. S. Richardson 


. . .W.M. 


76 


Stanley N. Wilson . . . 


. . .S.W. 



^ Proxy 



NO. 



NAME 



77 
78 



79 
80 
81 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 

91 

92 
93 
95 
97 
98 
99 
100 
102 



103 
104 
103 
106 

108 
109 
110 
111 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
112 
123 
125 
120 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 



Homer W. Wood. . . , 
T. Arthur Simpson . . 
Wm. F. Kirkham . . . 
Howard A. Stuart . . . 

J. A. Means 

Harry R. Fry 

Otto Utpadel 

Riley R. Hollis 

Homer E. Gruner* 
Wiley J. Schuwerk . 

E. A. Downing. . . . 
Ralph Deckard .... 
Chas. H. Whitcomb. 
Norbert Breve .... 

Norbert Bene 

H. J. Wittman 

John L. Morrow. . . 
Harvey M. Wilson . 

Harvey Six 

Wm. J. Camerer. . . 

G. P. Burkey 

H. G. Keiser* 

Lou Banner 

Peter N. Anderson* 
Wm. A. Dennis. . . . 

A. W. Norell 

H. H. Frone 

Reed F. Cutter. . . . 

J. E. Coe 

Hiram Richmond . 

J. C. Firth 

A. A. Thuman. . . . 
G. W. Lowden. . . . 

F. R. Miller 

R. W. Karraker. . . 

Hugh Scott 

Ray Horley 

Irving O. Hood. . . 
J. L. Berresford. . . 

E. F. Gardner 

C. F. Morris 

O. H. Davis 

Cleveland Oats . . . 
Fred W. Scholtzhauer 

Roy J. Lyons 

Oscar Van Boring. 
Edw. A. Martin*. . 
Benj. T. Allen. . . . 
Meade E. Winter. . 

J. D. Telford, Jr.. . 
Geo. E. Trampe. . . 

A. L. Carey 

R. L. Hunt 

Elmer G. Crenshaw 

R. C. Lindley 

John B. Maulding. 

J. C. Tanner 

Oscar Wilson 

F. C. Flockon 

Leo J. Lunn 

C. A. Simington* . . 
Wm. G. Sandgren. 



.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.S.W. 
, .J.W. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
. S.W. 
.W.M. 
. .J.W. 
. .J.W. 
.S.W. 
..J.W. 



.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
. .J.W. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 

. S.W. 
, .J.W. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
..J.W. 
. W.M. 
. W.M. 
.W.M. 
. W.M. 

. S.W. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 

.S.W. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
, .S.W. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
. W.M. 
. W.M. 
. W.M. 
. W.M. 
. W.M. 
.W.M. 



220 



Appendix 



Represkntatives of Lodges 



NO. 



NAME 



144 James Darnell W.M. 

145 R. S. Wright J.W. 

147 E. O. Brown W.M. 

148 R. R. Sfhnitzker W.M. 

149 Paul Taylor W.M. 

150 E. F. Thugmorton W.M. 

151 Geo. H. Knibb W.M. 

152 Howard L. Warner J.W. 

153 Dewitt Dawkins W.M. 

154 E. B. Campbell J.W. 

155 Lloyd W. Wainwright . . . . W.M. 

156 John T. Culbertson, Jr.... W.M. 

157 Ralph L. Lanham W.M. 

158 En)ert A. Thomas W.M. 

159 Roy M. Paul W.M. 

160 Edw. A. Kuehn W.M. 

Max Goldfinger S.W. 

161 C. W. Timm W.M. 

162 C. A. Braden W.M. 

164 J. B. Stout W.M. 

165 J. A. King W.M. 

166 E. Brown Steel S.W. 

168 Edw. M. Spangle W.M. 

E. C. Vanderporten J.W. 

169 Grant E. McCollum W.M. 

170 Geo. F. Wachlin W.M. 

171 M. C. Robinson W.M. 

172 Matthew Connell W.M. 

173 Arthur H. Anderson J.W. 

174 D. M. DeGraff* W.M. 

175 'Ira N. Keck W.M. 

Walter G. Krohn S.W. 

Geo. A. Hanlin J.W. 

176 Chas. D. Powell S.W. 

177 Wm. C. Shannon W.M. 

178 F. C. Hegert W.M. 

179 J. M. Crawford W.M. 

180 D. C. Snyder* W.M. 

182 Otto A. Neubarth W.M. 

183 J. L. Hyde S.W. 

185 C. A. Babb* W.M. 

187 H. J. Donaldson W.M. 

188 A. J. Foster W.M. 

189 Folkert Kadyk* W.M. 

190 Orrin P. Morse W.M. 

192 C. W. Bolton W.M. 

Emerson Clark* S.W. 

193 George T. Arik J.W. 

195 Quintin Estes W.M. 

196 H. D. McCollum W.M. 

199 W. G. Spencer W.M. 

200 John C. Woodham W.M. 

201 H. E. Wilson W.M. 

203 Fred L. Taylor W.M. 

204 H. T. Patton W.M. 

205 Frederick J. Adams* W.M. 

206 Chas. C. Hill W.M. 

207 Mark Blanchard W.M. 

208 L. P. Weedling W.M. 

209 W. W. Miller W.M. 

210 R. J. Farris W.M. 

211 William Pasche W.M. 

212 G. G. Green W.M. 

213 Fred C. Smith W.M. 

214 H. T. Floyd W.H. 

* Proxy 



NO. 



NAME 



216 


Bert M. Howell 


. . S.W. 


217 


C. E. Mesnard 


..W.M. 


218 


C. C. Klemf elter 


. .S.W. 


219 


John Rutherford* 


..W.M. 


220 


Ira C. Abbott 


..W.M. 


221 


Wm. F. Storey 


..W.M. 


222 


A. M. Root 


..W.M. 


226 


A. C. Stanfield 


..W.M. 


227 


Derrick L. McNeall.... 


..W.M. 




H. B. Whitlock* 


. .S.W. 


228 


Ralph E. Bowers* 


. .W.M. 


229 


John C. Akers 


. .W.M. 


230 


C. G. Decker 


..W.M. 


231 


C. F. Winterberg 


. .W.M. 


232 


W. J. Weaver 


. .W.M. 


233 


J. L. Griggs 


. .S.W. 


234 


Arthur W. Daggett. . . . 


..W.M. 


235 


J. C. Moline 


. .W.M. 


236 


Logan W. Yowell 


..W.M. 


237 


Doss H. Reed 


. .W.M. 


238 


A. Hamrick 


..W.M. 


239 


C. A. Minnear 


..W.M. 


240 


C. Z. Rosecrans 


. .W.M. 


241 


Louis F. Renf ro 


. . W.M. 


243 


Wilber J. Lord 


..W.M. 


244 


L. C. Ward 


..W.M. 


245 


H. A. McLain* 


..W.M. 


246 


C. R. Burroughs 


. .W.M. 


247 


Edward H. Meierhofer. 


. .W.M. 


248 


Cary Fisher 


. . J W. 


249 


Wm. I. Gillham* 


. . S.W. 


250 


L. G. Palmer 


. .W.M. 


251 


Otto M. Claflin* 


..W.M. 


252 


Vigil H. Duvall 


..W.M. 


253 


R. W. Harrod 


..W.M. 


254 


Julius F. Miller 


..W.M. 


255 


Jud Dolan 


. .W.M. 


257 


H. E. Nelson 


..W.M. 


260 


Thos. M. McNutt 


..W.M. 




G. N. Todd 


..J.W. 


261 


H. K. Hooker* 


. .W.M. 


262 


Roval Dixon 


..S.W. 


263 


Carl A. Schmitt 


..W.M. 


265 


Wibun Gibbs 


. .W.M. 


266 


Alex H. Tikes 


. .W.M. 


267 


John Baird 


. .W.M. 




James Baird* 


. . S.W. 


268 


David W. Holt 


. .W.M. 




Ernest E. Grier* 


. .S.W. 


269 


Howard L. Fisher 


. .W.M. 


270 


Justin E. Larkin 


..W.M. 


271 


Chas. E. Peace 


..W.M. 


272 


Alfred Brimble Combe . . 


. .W.M. 


273 


C. W. Thompson 


..S.W. 


275 


A. L. Batley 


..S.W. 


276 


A. A. Miles 


. .W.M. 


277 


Ernest Warble 


..W.M. 


278 


E. R. Sherrard 


. .W.M. 


279 


Horace H. Kinnery. . . . 


..W.M. 


280 


H. W. Bucklin 


..W.M. 


283 


W. E. Dayton 


. .W.M. 


285 


Russel H. Taylor 


. .J.W. 


286 


F. B. Sivisigood 


..W.M. 


287 


C. D. Ragsdale 


..W.M. 


288 


A. C. Senska* 


..W.M. 



Detailed Report — Credential Committee 



221 



Eepresentatives of Lodges 



NO. 



NAME 



291 


Eli Nelson 


W.M. 


292 


Jacob Balbaeh 


W.M. 


293 


Geo. I. Poulter 


S.W. 


294 


W. E. Slyder* 


W.M. 


295 


F. L. Poling 


W.M. 


296 


J. Walter Meyer 


W.M. 


297 


J. D. Theilen 


. . . S W 


301 


Ray A. Bastian*. . . . 


W.M. 


302 


N. 0. Patterson 


W.M. 


303 


Rollin J. Wheeler 


W.M. 


305 


0. W. Madclin 


W.M. 


306 


Silas Jones 


W.M. 


307 


Chas. A. Duntley* . . . 


W.M. 


308 


Edward Hall* 


. . . .W.M. 


309 


W. H. Coburn 


W.M. 


310 


Cline C. Brosins. . . . 


S.W. 


311 


George Meldrum . . . . 


W.M. 


312 


A. C. Lehman 


W.M. 


313 


Chas. O. High.smith. . 


W.M. 


314 


Richard H. John.... 


W.M. 


316 


Fred J. Kemp 


J.W. 


318 


Sherman Alphin . . . 


S.W. 


319 


John U. Hickok 


W.M. 


320 


W. C. Kempson 


W.M. 


321 


Howard J. Torrence. 


W.M. 


322 


A. V. Wallace 


S.W. 


325 


John Small 


W.M. 


327 


Bain Sullivan 


W.M. 


330 


John Andrews, Jr.... 


W.M. 


331 


Jos. A. Van Fossan*. 


W.M. 


332 


Fred L. Renner 


W.M. 


333 


Chas. E. Boughner. . 


J.W. 


334 


D. W. Harbaugh . . . 


S.W. 


335 


Hugo Lucas 


S.W. 


336 


J. D. Warmack* .... 


W.M. 


337 


Owen F. Coleman... 


S.W. 


339 


Rolla E. Wiggins. . . 


S.W. 


340 


C. 0. Goodrich 


W.M. 


341 


Albert Spatz* 


W.M. 


342 


Clarence C. Lang. . . . 


W.M. 


345 


W. R. Clough 


W.M. 


346 


H. P. Joy 


W.M. 


347 


B. E. Lynch* 


W.M. 


348 


Guy Stimson 


W.M. 


349 


S. C. Leffelman 


W.M. 


350 


Ralph H. Ray 


W.M. 


351 


W. H. Bartlett 


W.M. 


352 


Lon D. Creasey 


W.M. 


353 


A. C. Bancroft 


W.M. 


354 


Geo. C. Bradley 


W.M. 


355 


Herbert Gelns 


W.M. 


356 


Morris T. Peters. . . . 


W.M. 


360 


J. G. Weaver 


W.M. 


361 


Curt L. Dauber 


W.M. 


362 


Henry W. Schilling* 


W.M. 


363 


L. 0. McKerrow. . . . 


W.M. 




H. L. Kelly* 


. . . .J W. 


364 


E. A. Boyie* 


W.M. 


365 


Beecher T. Bell 


W.M. 


366 


Wm. Todd 


S.W. 


367 


Wm. H. Veeder* 


W.M. 


368 


Geo. A. Golden 


W.M. 


369 


John E. Wax 


W.M. 


371 


0. B. Mickplson 


W.M. 


373 


Ira W. Hobbs 


W.M. 



NO. 



NAME 



374 
378 
379 
380 
382 
383 
385 
386 
388 
389 

390 
392 
393 
394 
396 
397 
398 
399 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
408 
409 



410 
411 
414 
415 
416 
417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
436 
437 

440 
441 
442 
443 

445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 



Geo. Lovering* W.M. 

Owen L. Day, Jr W.M. 

W. L. Hollenbeak* W.M. 

Loren B. Hessert S.W. 

Thos. Dodsworth W.M. 

P. V. Koepke W.M. 

J. P. Castle W.M. 

H. C. Rice . .W.M. 

A. M. Trautwein W.M. 

W. P. Hardgrove W.M. 

H. E. DeLavingue* S.W. 

J. W. Hogue W.M. 

Orvel W. Hinton W.M. 

Charles E. Hill W.M. 

R. E. Johnsen W.M. 

Melvin Bickel S.W. 

Charles E. Black S.W. 

I. D. Ingram W.M. 

C. W. Redebaugh W.M. 

A. W. Joerndt* W.M. 

H. Guy Powell W.M. 

John H. Stone W.M. 

William C. Spencer W.M. 

Henry L. Haynes* W.M. 

Herman E. Adden W.M. 

Barney C. Hall W.M. 

Hayes Replogle W.M. 

James H. Dare S.W. 

George Page J.W. 

Joe Maschek W.M. 

Herman A. Stock W.M. 

Frank H. Eilert W.M. 

Peter E. Phillips* W.M. 

Earl Henry J.W. 

S. D. Eppstein* S.W. 

Dan Barger W.M. 

H. C. McCoy W.M. 

Paul H. Bergner W.M. 

B. E. Patterson W.M. 

Alfred L. Johnston* W.M. 

C. E. Olmstead* W.M. 

Wade H. Sappington W.M. 

Wm. H. Neece* W.M. 

Ralph H. Davis S.W. 

L. R. Hadlock W.M. 

Geo. W. Lane* J.W. 

Fred F. Davis W.M. 

Jonas E. Winegarner . . . . W.M. 

Warren E. Wright S.W. 

Daniel Porter* W.M. 

Harry Crawshaw W.M. 

E. E. Schafer W.M. 

J. P. Blum S.W. 

I. Kaden J.W. 

Chas. V. Brown S.W. 

Tim Van Antwerp W.M. 

P. P. Slusser* J.W. 

Ed. T. Crock* W.M. 

R. H. Rigslev W.M. 

Geo. A. Reed* W.M. 

C. R. Rich* J.W. 

P. B. Tavlor* W.M. 

J. W. Bollew W.M. 

Richard A. Fisher W.M. 

Edwin Gray S.W. 



'Proxy 



222 



Appendix 



Eepresentati\'es of Lodges 



NO. 



NAME 



453 
454 
455 

456 
458 
460 

461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 
469 
470 
471 

473 

474 
476 
477 
478 



479 
481 

482 
484 
485 
486 
487 
488 
489 
490 
492 
493 
496 
497 
498 
500 

501 
502 
503 

504 

508 



509 
510 
512 



514 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 



Fred L. Winans W.M. 

C. F. Crum W.M. 

J. W. Crouch W.M. 

Wm. Swarbrick W.M. 

Everett N. Snead* W.M. 

T. B. Hambletou W.M. 

C. N. Humbleton* S.W. 

W. J. Douahue* W.M. 

Frank A. Blue* W.M. 

John A. Turner W.M. 

Blake B. Robertson W.M. 

Herman Bilderback W.M. 

H. B. Broadway W.M. 

W. L. Patterson W.M. 

L. E. Perkey* W.M. 

Varner Longworlh* S.W. 

Claude A. Pettibone W.M. 

Geo. Barkley S.W. 

Edwin Bulow S.W. 

Joseph S. Carson W.M. 

Albert W. Lepp W.M. 

Rudolph H. Rohlf.s W.M. 

U. G. Cusac -T.W. 

Wm. Ocasek W.M. 

E. C. Tubbs S.W. 

F. S. Moyer J.W. 

F. W. Imes* T.W. 

M. C. Astlc W.M. 

Lester J. Grimsley W.M. 

Charles R. Danks W.M. 

C. C. Morris W.M. 

John R. Veach W.M. 

J. W. Clark S.W. 

Chas. W. Mills T.W. 

L. C. Steuart W.M. 

Raymond G. Ziex* W.M. 

Chas. F. Smale, Jr.* T.W. 

E. E. Cannon W.M. 

H. E. Williams W.M. 

Arch Winning W.M. 

A. G. Schrader S.W. 

Selby E. Nelson W.M. 

Clarence S. Hodge S.W. 

Abel H. White W.M. 

A. A. Mackey* W.M. 

T. E. Fyke W.M. 

Geo. W. Blake* J.W. 

Geo. W. Niergarth W.M. 

Sandfield A. Ghent W.M. 

Elmer Martin S.W. 

Howard Alton J.W. 

Henry D. Talley W.M. 

M. T. Huddle W.M. 

Chas. J. Anderson W.M. 

T. O. White S.W. 

L. Spurgin* J.W. 

Otis Monloath W.M. 

John C. Baken W.M. 

Wm. N. Barry W.M. 

N. F. Akers W.M. 

Glen Adhisson W.M. 

E. E. Conyer W.M. 

O. T. Myers W.M. 

James M. Stewart W.M. 

J. W. Canhani W.M. 



NO. 



NAME 



524 Carl W. Winkler W.M. 

Andrew R. Park S.W. 

526 Everett B. Mann W.M. 

527 T. E. Maury W.M. 

528 Alex. Bill* W.M. 

529 Clifford L. McRae W.M. 

530 D. L. Grav W.M. 

531 John D. Charters* W.M. 

532 J. C. Lammey W.M. 

533 Hamilton Moore Custer. . .W.M. 

534 O. B. Stockbarger W.M. 

535 Harold Neville W.M. 

537 Austin Backert W.M. 

538 John M. Austin W.M. 

539 Geo. H. Cline W.M. 

540 Morris H. Prescott W.M. 

541 Elmer Dappert W.M. 

542 Rufus McKenzie* W.M. 

544 Robert Weaver Lacy W.M. 

547 James F. Spargo W.M. 

550 E. M. Wilson W.M. 

552 Harry R. Minard* W.M. 

555 Wm. R. Claus W.M. 

556 Wm. Walker Cravens. .. .W.M. 

557 Adolph Steidle* W.M. 

558 O. O. Moulton* W.M. 

559 R. L. Fuller W.M. 

560 A. L. Kinzer W.M. 

562 J. G. Ti-ampert W.M. 

564 Wm. Kundert W.M. 

565 John R. Galaway W.M. 

567 Elmer Dorris W.M. 

569 C. J. Wells W.M. 

570 H. H. Chapman W.M. 

573 David A. Holden W.M. 

574 L. R. Bear W.M. 

575 A. R. Montgomery W.M. 

576 John Seddon W.M. 

577 Dallas Smith S.W. 

578 L. Fearington W.M. 

580 John Gore S.W. 

581 Clyde Karraker W.M. 

583 C. W. Hirsch W.M. 

584 Lloyd L. Shafer W.M. 

585 Paul H. Peabody* W.M. 

587 J. L. Norman* W.M. 

588 B. W. Jarvis W.M. 

590 B. E. Black* W.M. 

591 E. S. Herron W.M. 

592 Geo. J. Kessler W.M. 

600 F. R. McLaughlin W.M. 

B. S. Chapman S.W. 

601 P. M. Maxfield* W.M. 

602 W. L. McCaw W.M. 

603 J. I. Brydon* W.M. 

604 G. M. Housholder W.M. 

607 R. T. Irwin* W.M. 

608 L. F. Sowers* W.M. 

609 F. W. Kee* W.M. 

610 George Edwards W.M. 

611 Chas. Zitzewitz W.M. 

612 Fred B. Frericlis W.M. 

613 H. G. Hudspeth W.M. 

614 James Scott Cass W.M. 

616 Chas. E. Darling W.M. 



■^ Proxy 



Detailed Report — Credential Committee 



223 



Eepresentatives of Lodges 



NO. 


NAME 




NO. 


NAME 




617 


Ross E. Noper 


W.M. 


701 


Clair Walter* 


...W.M. 


618 


Geo. A. Clere 


W.M. 


702 


F. H. Bloyney* 


...W.M. 


620 


AValter B. Lackey. . . 


W.M. 


705 


F. L. Whittington .... 


.. .S.W. 


622 


Fred R. Waldoii 


W.M. 


706 


Harold V. Jones 


. . .J.W. 


623 


J. H. Honef enger . . . . 


W.M. 


709 


Chas. M. Ray 


. ..W.M. 


627 


William J. Dauiron.. 


W.M. 


710 


T. J. Swigart 


.. .J.W. 


630 


G. W. Burnett 


W.M. 


711 


A. G. Petzold 


. ..W.M. 


631 


D. B. Keighiu* 


W.M. 


712 


Richard J. Eckart. . . . 


. . .W.M. 


632 


M. L. Larrance 

A. Dales 


W.M. 

W.M. 


713 
714 


T. L. B. Alvis 


T W. 


633 


E. A. Davis* 


.. .W.M. 


635 


John D. Hunter* . . . 


S.W. 


715 


C. B. Garard 


...W.M. 


636 


Albert H. Cowing* . . 


W.M. 


717 


Frank Sidlo 


. ..W.M. 




John C. Hoeuk* .... 


S.W. 


718 


Ira Shain* 


. ..W.M. 


639 


Emil L. Lederer . . . . 


W.M. 


719 


0. L. Reynolds 


. . .W.M. 


641 


James S. Sullivan... 


W.M. 


721 


P. E. Hawkins 


...W.M. 


642 


I. J. Grass* 


W.M. 


722 


Fred A. Perkins 


. ..W.M. 


643 


Robert Morten son . . . 


W.M. 


723 


Cyrus Sanders 


. ..W.M. 


644 


L. H. Barker 


S.W. 


724 


J. G. Peters* 


...W.M. 


645 


E. W. Seelye 


W.M. 


725 


C. A. Bell 


J.W. 


646 


Roy W. Cook 


W.M. 


726 


Arthur C. Saylor 


...W.M. 


647 


L. F. Ralph* 


W.M. 


727 


Geo. E. Brokaw 


...W.M. 


648 


Thos. Hester* 


W.M. 


729 


G. E. Ellis 


. . .W.M. 


653 


Whitten Day Stone. 


S.W. 


730 


Thos. J. Young 


. . .W.M. 


655 


J. W. Kelly 


W.M. 


731 


Henry Flear 


...S.W. 




L. B. Winchell 


S.W. 


732 


Archie Vaugh 


...W.M. 


656 


Ern.st Greeneberg . . . 


W.M. 


733 


0. G. Anderson 


. ..W.M. 


657 


T. W. Rowe 


W.M. 


734 


J. E. Caldwell 


. ..W.M. 


658 


Bert P. Record 


W.M. 


737 


H. A. Ball 


. . .W.M. 


659 


H. H. Slocum 


W.M. 


738 


C. L. Tanner 


. ..W.M. 


660 


J. M. Merchant 


W.M. 


739 


Frank A. Sehreiner . . 


.. .S.W. 


662 


Webster Hyre 


W.M. 


741 


.Tames Peters* 


...W.M. 


664 


J. A. McCorkle 


W.M. 


742 


Geo. AV. Cook* 


. ..W.M. 


665 


0. R. Maxfleld 


W.M. 


743 


W. H. Weinsett 


. ..S.W. 


6G6 


Everett G. Kendall. . . 


W.M. 


744 


Ernest Payne* 


. . .W.M. 


667 


M. B. Henwood 


W.M. 


745 


H. J. Waterstreet* . . . 


. ..W.M. 


668 


Geo. E. Jessup 


W.M. 


746 


Clyde E. Baker 


.. .S.W. 


669 


Harry A. Steinmeyer. 


W.M. 


747 


Chas. R. Stewart 


. ..W.M. 


670 


M. T. Mason 

W. R. S. Barger. . . . 


W.M. 

W.M. 


749 
750 


J. A. Patterson* .... 


. . .J.W 


672 


Walter E. Fox* 


...W.M. 


673 


E. A. Tobias 


W.M. 


752 


James Bernard Payne 


. . . S.W. 


674 


Carl A. Pfeuffer 


W.M. 


764 


Chas. Wagner 


...S.W. 


675 


Harry 0. Hudgins. . . 


W.M. 


755 


E. N. Johnston 


. . .W.M. 


676 


A. Abersiomby 


W.M. 


757 


Geo. L. Beal* 


. ..W.M. 




M. M. Kritzer* 


S.W. 


758 


David A. Wallace. . . . 


. . .W.M. 


677 


Millage C. Miller. . . . 


. . . .W.M. 


759 


W. W. Reid 


...W.M. 


679 


George Schriver . . . . 


W.M. 


761 


Wm. F. Braerdt 


.. .W.M. 


680 


C. E. Gainey 

F. C. Stalmuster. . . . 


W.M. 

S.W. 


762 
764 


Harold C. Mott 


. . .J.W. 




J. U. Pearson* 


. . . W.M. 


681 


E. C. Dey 


W.M. 


765 


Philip Van Weston... 


. . .W.M. 


682 


Daniel Zittrell 


W.M. 


76G 


David Little 


.. .W.M. 


683 


Ernest Siegfried . . . . 


. . . .W.M. 


767 


W. E. Nicolaisen 


. ..W.M. 


684 


Paul Gogue 


W.M. 


768 


.T. Oppenheimer 


. ..W.M. 


685 


E. J. Tye* 


W.M. 


770 


Roscoe C. Clark* 


. ..W.M. 


686 


Wm. M. Jcssen 


W.M. 


771 


J. H. Lewis 


. . .W.M. 


687 


J. T. Clark* 


W.M. 


772 


Paul Howerton 


...W.M. 


688 


F. R. Wilson 


S.W. 


773 


Alvin T. Smothers.... 


. ..W.M. 


690 


Austin Cole 


W.M. 


774 


Wm. H. Schmidt 


. . .W.M. 


692 


D. W. Starr* 


W.M. 


776 


Norwood Stratton . . . . 


.. .W.M. 


693 


Abram R. Heaton . . . 


W.M. 


777 


C. M. (iray 


...W.M. 


695 


H. F. Dudenbostel. . . 


W.M. 


778 


R. R. Evans 


...W.M. 


696 


Henry A. Wall 


W.M. 


779 


Frank S. Erickson... 


. ..W.M. 


697 


Donald McKenzie . . . 


W.M. 


780 


Clarence M. Parker... 


.. .W.M. 




E. P. Neumann.... 


S.W. 




Geo. M. Elworth 


. . . S.W. 


698 


J. E. Wade 


W.M. 




Ed. R. Shafer 


...J.W. 


700 


F. D. Huber 


W.M. 


782 


J. A. Blackford 


. . . W.M. 



''Proxy 



224 



Appendix 



Eepresentatives of Lodges 



NO. 



NAME 



783 


Louis Rixmann 


..W.M. 




Chas. Hoeflfner* 


. . . S.W. 




John Giese* 


. . .J.W. 


784 


George H. Leverett. . . . 


. .W.M. 




James Parel 


. . .S.W. 


786 


Charles Maddox* 


. . W.M. 


787 


Wm. Grosse 


. .W.M. 


788 


Perry Hardwick* . . . . 


. . .J.W. 


789 


John Woods 


..W.M. 




H. E. Benjamin 


...S.W. 


790 


Bert Whitten* 


..W.M. 


791 


Thomas B. Warten... 


. .W.M. 


792 


Carl Gordon 


. . W.M. 


793 


Milo Abernethy 


. ..S.W. 


794 


William Pyle 


. .W.M. 


795 


Willis H. Blackman. . . 


. .W.M. 


796 


Chas. D. Williams. . . . 


. .W.M. 


797 


Charles W. Hibbard* . 


. .W.M. 


798 


Ray McDowell 


. .W.M. 


799 


R. 0. Wills* 


. .W.M. 


801 


Glenn D. Meneely. . . . 


. .W.M. 


802 


Frank Hill 


..W.M. 


803 


Geo. W. Whaples* 


. .W.M. 


804 


George S. Ribal* 


. .W.M. 




Ed. H. Ribal 


. . .J W. 


805 


Edward Huwald 


..W.M. 


806 


Charles E. Swayne* . . . 


. .W.M. 


807 


Triten I. Boyles 


. . .S.W. 


808 


James H. Pierce 


..W.M. 


809 


Fred E. Martin 


. .W.M. 


810 


P. Clyde Perry 


..W.M. 




Henry C. Eldredge* . . . 


. . . J.W. 


812 


W. E. Leischer 


. .W.M. 


814 


Frank F. Anderson*.. 


. .W.M. 


815 


Fred J. Tenny 


..W.M. 


816 


S. M. Combs 


. .W.M. 


817 


C. R. Felts 


. .W.M. 


818 


Wm. H. F. Bach 


. . W.M. 


819 


Edwin F. Simons 


..W.M. 




George A. Golder 


. . .S.W. 




R. S. Pile 


. . . J W. 


821 


Jesse E. Foster 


. . W.M. 


822 


J. H. Taylor 


. . W.M. 


823 


John B. Jenkins 


. .W.M. 




D. Harry Jenkins 


... J W. 


825 


Jas. I. Lawrence* .... 


. .W.M. 




Chas. Ferris* ........ 


. . . S.W. 


826 


Arthur Tredennick" . . . 


. . . S.W. 


827 


Arthur Rosenfeldt . . . 


. .W.M. 




Horace R. Adams 


. ..S.W. 


829 


G. B. Boswell* 


. .W.M. 


830 


G. A. Praul 


. .W.M. 


831 


C. W. Francisco 


. . . S.W. 


832 


Chas. H. Johnsen .... 


..W.M. 




Geo. G. Ford 


. ..S.W. 




Bert. B. Anderson, . . . 


. . . J W 


833 


H. E. Parker 


. .w.m! 


834 


R. B. Grissom 


. .W.M. 


835 


H. C. Hahn 


. .W.M. 


836 


Herbert Tiff en 


. . W.M. 


837 


Bert Creviston 


S W 


838 


Royal G. Ranney 


.'.WM. 


840 


A. T. Landreth 


. .W.M. 


841 


John B. Seymour.... 


. .W.M. 




Wm. Rothmann* 


. . . S.W. 



NO. 



NAME 



Chas. H. Atwood J.W. 

842 L. B. Radkey W.M. 

843 N. A. Rollins W.M. 

845 Mr. Thos. Hathaway S.W. 

846 H. O. Killpatrick* W.M. 

847 Lawrence R. Duncan W.M. 

Chas. E. Fort J.W. 

849 Rov E. Nelson W.M. 

850 AVm. A. Purness W.M 

Burtin H. Williams S.W. 

John Berg J.W. 

851 W. H. Freeman W.M. 

852 Otto Fletcher W.M. 

Archie D. Manners S.W. 

853 Wm. D. Voile J.W. 

854 Floyd S. Trudean W.M. 

855 Hiriam H. Hartman W.M. 

857 A. W. Haller* W.M. 

858 Ray D. Wheeler W.M. 

859 Marvin W. Watson S.W. 

860 Albert J. Buerger, Jr W.M. 

James Watters S.W. 

Harry A. Road LW. 

861 H. Cowen W.M. 

862 A. E. Harvie* W.M. 

863 Gordon C. Hamilton W.M. 

Arthur H. Mayer S.W. 

David Young J.W. 

864 Jacob C. Nickel S.W. 

865 Chas. S. Ledyard W.M. 

866 C. L. Hainz W.M. 

867 Chas. Honherger W.M. 

868 Arthur Edward Tiffany* .W.M. 

869 M. Rasmussen W.M. 

870 Carl Henning* W.M. 

872 J. LeRoy Cannon* W.M. 

873 R. M. Hines W.M. 

874 Ralph R. Smith W.M. 

875 Josiah Givens W.M. 

876 G. W. Drehcr W.M. 

A. K. Boyd S.W. 

C. L. Johnson J.W. 

877 Chris. Hjclm W.M. 

878 John G. Stewart W.M. 

879 John C. Mackinson W.M. 

John G. Berger S.W. 

880 M. H. Frericks W.M. 

881 C. W. Mathews* W.M. 

882 A. Duncan W.M. 

883 J. V. Clagg S.W. 

884 Joseph L. Mathias* W.M. 

886 Rav H. Petty W.M. 

Frank H. Thompson .S.W. 

888 Henry E. Vanderlip W.M. 

889 Charles G. Frazier W.M. 

890 Josiah W. Bell W.M. 

891 Otto F. Nachtweth W.M. 

Oscar J. Fuchs S.W. 

892 E. C. Gratteau S.W. 

M. J. Grau J.W, 

893 Guy G. Roberts W.M. 

894 A. F. Hooper W.M. 

F. W. Klass J.W. 

895 Leo Mayer W.M. 

896 David L. Olson W.M. 



* Proxy 



Detailed Report — Credential Committee 



225 



Representatives of Lodges 



NO. 



NAME 



897 


E. W. Nauniann . . . . 


W.M. 




Wm. S. Leslie 


S.W. 




Ftirtin Do Fries 


. . . J W. 


898 


F. C. Ast '. . . 


W.M. 


900 


Chas. W. Close 


W.M. 


901 


Gr. H. Anderson 


W.M. 


902 


W. A. Foster* 


W.M. 


903 


J. W. Council 


W.M. 


904 


Harold E. Heiss 


W.M. 


905 


George A. Steele. . . . 


W.M. 


906 


H. H. Blackburn .... 


W.M. 


907 


Leopold Apple* 


W.M. 


908 


Clyde Gilmore 


W.M. 


909 


Wallace W. Bennett. 


W.M. 


910 


Harvey J. Adkins. . 


S.W. 


911 


J. M. Jordan* 


W.M. 


912 


C. A. Collison 


W.M. 


913 


W. W. Taylor 


W.M. 


914 


Ernest L. Kreamer.. 


W.M. 


915 


Roy P. Donovan 


W.M. 


916 


Glenn F. Vivian 


W.M. 


917 


A. F. Schultz 


W.M. 




C. P. Smith* 


S.W. 


918 


Dr. J. C. Brewner . . 


. . J W 


919 


Geo. C. Zattan 


W.M. 


920 


A. S. Lanham 


S.W. 


921 


Otto G. Haller 


. . . .J.W. 


922 


William Robert Swans 


on. .W.M. 


923 


C. F. W. Forberg. . . 


\yM. 


924 


F. H. Mathews 


W.M. 




R. F. Cram 


S.W. 




E. R. Duffin 


J.W. 


925 


Dan MeCollum* . . . . 


W.M. 


927 


James R. Piper 


W.M. 


930 


Albert J. Flessner. . . 


W.M. 


931 


C. H. Keith 


W.M. 


932 


Fred Hoff 


W.M. 


933 


Max P. Seibel 


W.M. 


934 


A. P. Lytle 


W.M. 




W. M. .Sheldon 


S.W. 




L. R. Myers 


.... J.W. 


935 


Wm. F. Irvin 


W.M. 


936 


E. F. Swab 


W.M. 


937 


E. R. Nelson 


W.M. 


938 


Wm. J. Unfried 


W.M. 




J. A. Maxwell 


S.W. 




A. G. Grin 


.... J W. 


939 


Samuel A. Clemens. . 


W.M. 


940 


A. Miller 


W.M. 


942 


Niels Chr. Peterson.. 


W.M. 


943 


Thomas A. Kosettka. . 


W.M. 




Frank E. Zajicek. . . 


S.W. 




Frank G. Duststy. . . 


J.W. 


944 


Milton Dubenstein .. 


T. W. 


945 


Charles H. Bell 


W.M. 


946 


John D. Carnahan* . . 


W.M. 


947 


Carl Ernest Suhr 


. . . .W.M. 




James Hall Meeks. . . 


S.W. 




Edward Paul Stein. . 


J.W. 


948 


Ira Dalton 


W.M. 


949 


David Don nan 


S.W. 




Jas. H. Murphy. . . . 


J.W. 


950 


W. J. Smardon 


W.M. 




A. N. Fox 


. . . . s w 


951 


F. W. Kruezer* 


W.M. 



NO. 



NAME 



952 
953 
955 
956 
957 
958 
959 
960 
962 
963 
964 
966 
967 
968 



969 
970 
971 
972 



973 
974 
975 



976 
977 
978 
979 
980 
981 
982 
983 
984 



985 
986 

987 



990 
991 
992 



993 

994 

995 

996 

997 

998 

1001 

1002 

1003 

1004 

1005 

1006 



J. E. Winslow 

W. T. George 

James I. Cerinka 

Samuel Salinger 

Wm. B. Pfister* 

Max Bloch 

John D. Watkins 

Geo. E. Bailey* 

Gustav J. Fleig 

S. J. Porter 

Robert R. Schoelzel 

W. H. Weakley 

A. E. Irvin 

Chas. A. Olson 

A. Paulson 

C. G. Ryerstrand 

David O. Johnson 

John H. Thompson'' 

J. R. Dalton 

Arthur Duncan Pacaud. . 
Cliarles Oscar Wright, Jr. 
Alfred Joseph La Jennesse 

F. H. Irvine 

Edgar R. Cobb 

Henry G. Conrad 

Wesley H. Westbrook. . . . 

Goodwin H. Miller 

George Catto* 

J. N. Thurston* 

Gustav A. Kiel 

I. N. Tomlinson 

G. H. Baum 

August H. Rahn 

John Franknccht 

Edward M. Gallup* 

Chas. Koekoek 

Edward C. Strohm 

Jacob Weinstein 

Philip E. Gilbert 

Chas. Edwards 

John L. O'Brien, Jr 

W. W. Emmons 

Geo. F. Swann 

Frank L. Parsons 

Henry E. Harridge 

Roscoe T. Clark 

Wm. N. Roloff 

F. L. Baldwin 

S. H. Morriss 

E. H. Gager 

A. W. Kuchhoff 

Billet Lawson, Jr.* 

Harold Christophcnsou . . 

Jerry O. Novak 

Oliver E. Beyler 

George A. Leebody 

John N. Barbee 

M. A. Frye 

Clarence W. Trick* 

Nathan S. Schoenbrod. . 

C. L. Stewart 

Robert Sampson 

Harry I. Lord 

Harry Blount 

Leland K. Landis. .'.... 



W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
.S.W. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
.S.W. 
.J.W. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
.S.W. 
.J.W. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
.W.M 
.S.W. 
.J.W. 

• W.M. 
.W.M. 
. W.M. 
. S.W. 
. W.M. 
,W.M. 
,W.M. 
.W.M. 

• W.M. 
.S.W. 
.J.W. 
.S.W. 
. J.W. 
.W.M. 

.J.W. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
. S.W. 
.W.M. 
,W.M. 
,W.M. 
.S.W. 
.J.W. 
.W.M. 
.S.W. 
,W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
,W.M. 
.W.M. 
,W.M. 
'W.M. 
,W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.W.M. 
.S.W. 
.J.W. 



'Proxy 



226 



Appendix 



Eepresentatives of Lodges 



NO. 



1007 
1008 
1009 
1010 
1011 
1012 
1013 
1014 
1015 
1016 
1017 
1018 

1019 
1020 
1021 
1022 



1023 
1025 
1027 
1028 
1030 

1031 



NAME 



James H. Howe W.M. 

Chas. R. John W.M. 

Walter A. Daley W.M. 

Edward F. Bredficid W.M. 

J. C. Colton W.M. 

M. E. Smith* W.M. 

Henry W. Gross W.M. 

Emil J. Johnson W.M. 

Charles E. Rank W.M. 

O. H. Lewis W.M. 

Arthur Graves W.M. 

Leon M. White* W.M. 

Albert W. Berg* S.W. 

August Davidson W.M. 

Gustav Kohn* W.M. 

Jesse R. LaCroix* S.W. 

Peter Bermger* W.M. 

Aug. Krohn* S.W. 

Chas. Nation J.W. 

Otto D. Ensminger W.M. 

Dennis E. Gass W.M. 

J. J. Bastian W.M. 

T. G. Van Gunten S.W. 

Mark L. Harris W.M. 

George E. Coles S.W. 

J. M. Ellis W.M. 



NO. 



1032 



1033 

1034 
1035 
1036 



1037 
1038 



1039 
1040 



1042 
1043 
1044 
1046 
1047 
1048 



NAME 



Rene C. Hansen W.M. 

Henry W. Dietrich S.W. 

Henry A. Behrens J.W. 

Walter S. Litt W.M. 

Edward I. Foch S.W. 

Wm. H. Grafe W.M. 

David Morris W.M. 

Charles F. Lowry W.M. 

Otto A. Fischnian S.W. 

Mat. Lurie J.W. 

Robt. R. Olney; W.M. 

William W. Higgins W.M. 

Geo. E. Weeks S.W. 

Magno A. Arnold J.W. 

Roland A. Sperry W.M. 

Henry J. Smith* W.M. 

Louis H. Cook S.W. 

Frank Dale* J.W. 

Irvin E. Korn W.M. 

George A. Wasserstrass. . . J.W. 

J. H. Woolnough W.M. 

Chas. Brock Jones J.W. 

C. M. Thornton W.M. 

I. A. Foster W.M. 

E. L. Berger J.W. 



'Proxy 



Eecapitulation 

Grand Officers 21 

Past Grand Officers not otherwise enumerated 10 

Eepresentatives of other Grand Lodges not otherwise 

enumerated 33 

District Deputy Grand Masters 96 

Members of Committees 68 

Eepresentatives of Lodges 957 

Total 1,185 

Number of Lodges represented 834 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Emmett Howard, 
w. w. mcknight, 
Charles W. Walduck, 
W. D. Abney, 
C. H. Lefler, 

Committee. 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 227 

DETAILED REPORT 
COMMITTEE ON MILEAGE AND PER DIEM. 

The following is a detailed report of the Committee on 
Mileage and Per Diem: 

GRAND OPFICKKS. 



Dan G. Fitzgerrell 
Elmer E. Beach. . 
Arthur E. Wood .. 
R. C. Davenport . . 
Leroy A. Goddard. 

Owen Scott 

J. G. Wright 

Roy Adams 

W. E. Edwards 

Wm. H. Bied 

Chas. E. Clark 

W. N. Ewing 

C. O. Paught 

J. L. Browning 

G. W. Cyrus 

Geo. W. Tipsword 
David W. Clark.... 

Harry C. Mertz 

(Jeo. T. Scrivner... 

Frank R. Berg 

H. E. Hamilton 



M. W. Grand Master 

R.W. Dep. Gi-. Master 

R. W. Sr. Gr. Warden 

R.W. Jr.Gr. Warden 

R. W. Gr. Treasurer 

R.W. Gr. Secretary 

R.W. Gr. Chaplain 

W. Dep. Grand Secretary. . . 

W. Gr. Pursuivant 

W. Grand Marshal 

W. Gr. Stand. Hearer 

W. Gr. Sword Bearer 

W. Sr. Gr. Deacon 

W. Jr. Gr. Deacon 

W. Grand Steward 

W. Grand Steward 

W. Grand Steward 

W. Grand Steward 

Bro. Grand Tyler 

Assistant Grand T\ ler . 
P.ist Senior Grand Warden 



9 
124 
301 
211) 
HO) 
211 
218 

6 
307 

1 
127 



80 

9 
13 40 
30 II 
SI 00 
30 0. 
24 lU 
21 8(. 

6 
30 71) 

10 
12 70 

lOl 



36 10 



12 80 
12 9i) 
24 40 
42 10 
:^.^ 00 
42 00 
3(5 10 
33 80 
12 6) 
42 70 
12 10 
24 70 
12 10 



R. W. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 



Ira J. McDowell 

Grover C. Nlemeyer 

Wm. Tinsley 

Wm. W. M. Bending 

T. M. Avery 

Edgar J. Philip.s 

Emanuel Weil 

W. W. LaMoure 

Nels O. Johnson 

Harry C. Wilson 

D. S Davidson 

A. P. Bauer 

S. F.Odell 

G-o. E. Moore 

Paul A. Neuffer 

Robt. A. r^ees 

Fred O. Ehiert 

Berg W. Scholton 

Isaac J. Smit 

H. C.Bowen 

Roy Hill 



DISTRICTS. 



1st Distr 

2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 
10th 
nth 
12th 
13th 
14th 
I5th 
IC.th 
17th 
18th 
19th 
20th 
21st 







n 










U) 




m 


ni 


« 


01 


<u 
















S 


s 


$12 


7 


$ 70 


1 


10' 1> 1 


1 


10 




12 


1 20 




2 


20 


12 


1 


10 


12 


8 


80 


12 


2 


20 


12 


7 


70 


12 


9 


90 


12 


9 


90 


12 


e 


60 


12 


7 


711 


12 


5 


50 


12 


1 


10 


12 


12 


1 20 


12 


10 


1 00 


12 


6 


60 


12 


1 


10 


12 


3 


30 


12 


50 


5 00 


12 



i 18 70 
12 10 

12 10 

13 20 
12 20 
12 10 
12 80 
12 20 
12 70 
12 90 
12 90 
12 60 

12 70 
li 50 
18 10 

13 20 
13 CO 
12 60 
12 10 
12 30 
17 00 



228 



Appendix 



A. J. Winteringham 

J. R. Balliet 

C. L. Snyder 

J. C. Rennick 

Frank L. Dudley ... 
R. W. E. Mitchell... 

W. U. Darling 

R. H. Cutler 

E. H. Cooley 

J. E. Barber 

James C. Davis 

A. E. Burres 

Francis H. Bradley , 
Chas H. Mangold . . 

Thos. R. Lees 

Chas. E. Duvall 

James R. Dick 

C. C. Sawyer 

Hugh Mallett 

Chas. E. Morgan 

E. E. Mull 

Ben. J. Metzger 

Harry E. Reser 

Frank W. Brown . . . 
E. C. Vanderporten 

Glen Robinson 

A. O. Poft 

Frank C. DeGraff... 
James A. Coleman 

Eldon E. James 

Paul G. Duncan 

E. Ij. Charpentier. . 
Howard M. Lawton. 
Grler Hanson 

F. W. Soady 

Lester H. Martin... 
A. F. Gooch 

G. Haven Stephens. 

Benj. Bing 

G. A. Stadler 

Harry S. Macon 

Chas. H. Woods 

H.C. McLoud 

F. C. Funk 

Sllvey J. Wilson.... 

E. L. Lawrence 

Gaston Clemmons.. 

Alonzo Ellis 

Chas. W. Kessler... 

A. A.Bauer 

Chas. A. Hawkins. . . 

T. S. Wright 

E.J. Scarborough.. 

Frank E. Bauer 

OrvIUe Bruce.. 

N. C. Gochenour 

W. W. Rothrock.... 
Harry C. Leggett.. 
David L.Wright ... 
E. S. Mclntyre 



f GRAND MASTERS. 


—Continued, 












i 




DISTRICTS. 


oi 


ei 


n 






<u 






rt 


















V 






1^ 


2 


^ 


H 


22d District 


43 


$ 4 30 


$12 


$16 30 


23d 


78 


7 80 


12 


19 80 


24th 


114 


11 40 


12 


23 40 


25th 


164 


16 40 


12 


28 40 


26th 


126 


12 6' 


12 


24 60 


27th 


110 


11 00 


12 


23 00 


28th 


52 


5 20 


12 


17 20 


29th 


32 


3 20 


12 


15 20 


30th 


37 


3 70 


12 


15 70 


31st 


75 


7 50 


12 


19 50 


32d 


66 


6 60 


12 


18 60 


33d 


92 


9 20 


12 


21 20 


34th 


111 


11 10 


12 


23 10 


35th 


179 


17 90 


12 


29 90 


36th 


193 


19 30 


12 


31 30 


37th 


193 


19 30 


12 


31 30 


38th 


128 


12 80 


12 


24 80 


39th 


147 


14 70 


12 


26 70 


40th 


128 


12 80 


12 


24 80 


41st 


92 


9 20 


12 


21 20 


43d 


85 


8 50 


12 


20 50 


43d 


37 


3 70 


12 


15 70 


44th 


39 


3 90 


12 


15 90 


45th 


82 


8 20 


12 


20 20 


46th 


77 


7 70 


12 


19 70 


47lh 


113 


11 .30 


12 


23 30 


48th 


109 


10 90 


12 


22 90 


49th 


1S9 


12 90 


8 


20 90 


50th 


193 


19 30 


12 


31 30 


5Ist " 


228 


23 80 


12 


34 80 


52d 


263 


26 30 


12 


38 30 


53d 


250 


25 00 


12 


37 00 


.Mth 


222 


32 20 


12 


34 20 


55th 


194 


19 40 


12 


31 40 


56th 


1.56 


15 60 


12 


27 60 


57th 


124 


12 40 


12 


24 10 


58th 


121 


12 10 


12 


24 10 


59th " 


12S 


12 30 


12 


24 30 


60th 


126 


12 60 


12 


24 60 


61st 


173 


17 30 


12 


29 30 


62d 


181 


18 10 


12 


30 10 


63d 


156 


15 60 


12 


27 60 


64th 










65th 


185 


18 50 


12 


30 SO 


66th 


214 


21 40 


12 


33 40 


67th 


388 


28 80 


12 


40 80 


68th 


313 


31 3'1 


12 


43 30 


69th 


310 


31 OO 


12 


43 00 


70th 


279 


27 90 


12 


S9 90 


7I.-t 


201 


20 10 


12 


32 10 


72d 


187 


18 70 


12 


30 70 


73d 


185 


18 50 


12 


30 50 


74th 










75th 


193 


19 30 


19 


31 30 


76th 


216 


21 60 


13 


33 60 


77th 


216 


24 60 


12 


36 60 


78th 


253 


25 30 


12 


37 30 


79lh 










80th 


231 


23 10 


12 


35 10 


8lst 


195 


19 50 


12 


31 50 


82d 


193 


19 .30 


12 


31 30 


83d 


19U 


19 00 


12 


31 00 


84th 


281 


28 10 


12 


40 10 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 229 



R. \V. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS.— 6'o/i/inMetf. 



A. W. Carter 

W. D. Waiters 

F. D. Mills 

Wm. E. Day 

C. P. Stoll 

Wainwright Davis 

Sam E. Qrigg , 

W. H. Thomas 

J. E. Giljljs 

C. V. Clark 

Frank J). Thomas . 

W. T. Cable 

Roy R. Helm 

John Armstrong .. 
W. F. Gibson 



DISTRICTS. 



«rith District 

S6th 

87th 

8Sth 

H'.ith 

siOth ' 

yist 

9L'd 

93d 

91th 

yoth 

9()ih 

97tti 

9Sth 

<J9Lh 

luoth " 







9. 




6 










m 


nj 


n 


1) 


0) 


u 








S 


2 


Ph 


2?7 


27 70 


\'i 


^51 


25 10 


12 


20.T 


20 50 


13 


•Zi-z 


XH 20 


12 


Zib 


%l 50 


\'i 


299 


29 9ij 


12 


a90 


29 01 


12 


300 


30 00 


12 


2(51 


26 10 


12 


29o 


29 50 


12 


368 


36 80 


12 


314 


31 40 


12 


3H6 


3(; (iu 


13 


30 r 


30 70 


12 


364 


36 40 


12 



39 70 

37 10 

32 50 

40 20 
31 50 

41 90 
41 00 
4 J 00 

38 ID 

41 50 
48 80 
43 40 
48 60 

42 70 
48 40 



COMMITTEES 



MASONIC JUHISPHUUENCK. 

Wm. B Wright 

C. E. Allen 

N. B. Carson 

Ralph H. Wheeler 

H. F. Burnap 



APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. 

AlexH. Bell 

Elmer D. Brothers 

Chas. H. Martin 

W. E. Hadlev 

Robt. N. Holt 

W. H. ivicFeeley 



CHARTERED LODGES. 



Phil C. Barclay.. 
W. W. Watson... 
J. Huber Allen... 
Llndorf Walker. 



LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION. 

David D.Klne; 

Albert L. Pickt t 

F. O. Lorion 

Nimrod Mace 



MILEAGE AND PER DIEM. 



W. F. Beck 

H. T. Goddard 

T. S. Browning 

C. H. Thompson . . . 
Harry W. Harvey. 
Julius L. Klemme . 







B 




IU 


<u 


m 




Q 


<u 


l> 


u 


^ 




<u 


2 


2 


Ph 


199 


$19 90 


■i!12 


163 


16 30 


42 


127 


12 70 


42 


2 


20 


42 


354 


25 40 


42 


e2i 


22 40 


49 


ti 


90 


49 


229 


22 90 


49 


277 


27 70 


49 


2 


20 


49 


10 


1 00 


49 


365 


36 50 


49 


304 


30 40 


42 


127 


12 70 


42 


322 


32 20 


42 


5 


.50 


49 


185 


18 50 


49 


201 


20 lO 


49 


127 


12 70 


49 


231 


23 10 


56 


249 


24 90 


42 


300 


30 00 


42 


276 


27 60 


42 


13 


1 30 


42 


263 


26 30 


42 



.$ ei 90 

58 30 
56 70 
42 20 
67 40 



71 40 
49 90 
71 90 
76 70 

49 20 

50 00 



85 50 
72 40 
54 70- 
74 20 



49 50 

67 ?0 
69 10 
61 70 



79 10 

m 90 

72 00 
69 60 
43 30 
68 30 



230 



Appendix 



COMMITTEES— Co7itinued. 



Edward H. Thomas. 

E. Edwin Mills 

S. O. Spring. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 

Delmar D. Darrah 



TRUSTEES MASONIC HOMES. 



James McCredie. 

C. C. Davis 

Alonzo Dolan 



CREDENTIALS 



Emmet Howard 

W. W. McKnigUt... 
Chas. VV. Walduck. 

W. D. Abney 

C. A. Leffler 



PETITIONS. 



James E. Jeffers. 
J H. Mitchell.... 
S. C. D. Rea 



OBITUARIES. 



James K. Lambert. 

Hez G. Henry 

Job n C. Craw ford . . 



GRAND MASTER'S ANNUAL REPORT. 

C. H. Spillman 

H. M. Palmer 

Wm. Fairlie 



GRAND EXAMINERS. 



W. H. Zarley 

H. H. Milnor 

B. L. TenEyck... 
Harry L. Howell . 
Geo. E. Carlson.. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES NEW LEGISLATION. 

Jas. E. Shaw 

Geo. M. Moulton 



TRANSPORTATION. 



Louis L. Emmerson. 

John B. Aiken 

Prank J. Burton 



ADVISORY COUNCIL. 



Elmer E. Bpach 

Arthur E. Wood 

K C. Davenport 

ORPHANS' 

Robt. J. Pa'y 

Hobt. C. Fletcher 

Wm. D. Price 



HOME.— LA GRANGE. 



9 
155 



37 
251 

127 



2H3 
241 



185 
276 
300 



241 
332 



265 
141 
216 



37 

7 

1?3 

127 

179 



276 
1 
2 



2 
110 
311 



90 



13 70 



3 

25 10 
12 70 



26 30 
24 10 
70 
31 70 
15 50 



18 50 
27 60 
30 00 



90 
24 10 
33 20 



26 50 
14 IC 
21 60 



3 70 

70 

12 30 

12 70 

17 90 



27 60 
10 
20 



20 
11 00 
31 40 



20 

1 00 

80 



28 



$ 49 91 
49 90 
64 50 



40 70 



45 70 
69 10 
56 70 



54 30 
52 10 
28 70 
59 70 
43 50 



46 50 
55 60 
58 00 



28 90 
52 10 
61 20 



54 50 
42 10 
49 60 


31 70 

28 70 
40 30 
40 70 
45 90 


28 20 
28 20 


55 60 
28 10 

28 20 



28 20 
39 00 
59 40 



42 20 

43 CO 
42 80 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 231 



REPRESENTATIVES. 



Bodley 

Equality 

Harmony 

Springfield. 
Friendship. . 

Macon 

Rushville 

St. John's 

Warren 

Peoria 

Temperance. 

Macomb 

Clinton , 

Hancock 

Cass 

St. Clair 

Franklin 

Piasa 

Pekin 

Mt. Vernon.. 

Oriental 

Barry , 

Charleston. . 
KavanauRh. . 
Monmouth. . 
Olive Branch 

Herman 

Occidental... 

Mt. Joliet 

Bloomington 

Hardin 

Griggsville. .. 

Temple 

Caledonia 

Unity 

Cambridge. . 

CarroUton 

Mt. Moriah. .. 
Benevolent... 

Jackson 

Washington.. 

Trio 

Fraternal 

New Boston.. 

Belvidere 

Lacon 

St. Mark's ... 

Benton 

Euclid 

Pacific 

Acacia 

Eureka 

Central 

Chester 

Rockton 

Roscoe , 

Mt. Nebo 

Prairie 

Waukegan.... 



1 
8 
3 
4 

7 
8 
9 
1.3 
14 
15 
16 
17 
19 
20 
S3 
24 
25 
27 
29 
31 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
55 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
69 
71 
72 
74 
75 
76 
77 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



F. F. Briokoetter 

Jas. McLain .. . 

Wm. A. Crawley 

W. E. Englund 

Granville Gehout 

H.T. O. Morris 

Bruce Shindel 

Robert C. Hottenhoues.. 

C. H. Carney 

F. C. DeGraff 

C. W. Lee vers 

Wm. R. Harris 

Arthur W. Lilienstein.. 

Baptist Hardy 

J. E. McDonough 

J. P. Oldendorph 

P. T. Fulkersim 

Thos. W. Burns 

Walter Soady 

Frank G. Thompson 

Geo. L. Hager 

J. H. Jones 

Frank M. Francis 



Wm. H. Torrence.. 

Earl R. Bean 

G. F. Birlelt 

Wm. H. Barnard... 

P. J. Conkling 

H.T. Mace 

E. E. McCoy 

K. T. Skinner 

Wm. E. Pinkerton. 

T. T. Turner 

Chas. Pike 



P. J. McKnight .. 
Weslev Osborn .. 
C. G. Wegehoft.. 

J. E.Crockett 

A. W. Thee 

W. H. Keeley .... 

J. R. Hefner 

C. L. Welch 

F. A. Munger 

Holgar Brosk 

Edwin F. Meyer. 

N. S. Helms 

A. J. Goodge 

F. E. Wilson 

W. C. Ferris 

E. S. Lovett 

Thos. R. Strong.. 



W. S. Richardson.. 
.Stanley N. Wilson. 
Homer W. Wood .. 
T. A. Simpson 



263 
313 
216 
185 
98 
173 
227 
100 
308 
155 
231 
202 
187 
238 
225 
295 
254 
257 
154 
276 
1 
304 
182 

179 
133 
263 
85 
37 
127 
288 
286 
155 
348 
32 

255 
237 
813 
194 
270 
181 
145 
184 

78 
132 

51 
301) 

29 
168 

99 
187 
185 



85 
824 
161 

36 



1> 


a 


rt 


p 




^1 




<u 


S 


0^ 


86 30 


>f\2 


31 30 


12 


21 60 


12 


18 50 


12 


9 80 


12 


17 30 


12 


22 70 


12 


10 00 


13 


30 80 


12 


15 50 


12 


23 10 


12 


20 20 


12 


18 70 


12 


23 80 


12 


22 50 


12 


89 50 


13 


25 40 


12 


25 70 


13 


15 40 


12 


27 60 


12 


10 


IS 


30 40 


12 


18 20 


12 


17 90 


12 


12 30 


12 


26 30 


12 


8 50 


12 


3 70 


13 


12 70 


12 


28 80 


12 


28 60 


13 


15 50 


12 


34 80 


\1 


3 20 


8 


25 50 


12 


23 70 


13 


24 30 


12 


19 40 


12 


27 00 


n 


18 10 


12 


14 50 


12 


18 40 


13 


7 80 


12 


12 20 


12 


5 10 


12 


30 00 


12 


2 90 


12 


16 80 


12 


9 90 


12 


18 70 


12 


18 50 


12 


8 50 


12 


22 40 


13 


16 10 


12 


3 60 


12 



$38 30 
43 30 

33 60 
30 50 
21 80 

29 30 

34 70 

23 10 
43 80 
27 50 

35 10 
32 20 

30 70 
35 80 

34 50 
41 50 
37 40 

37 70 
27 40 
39 60 
12 10 
41 40 

30 30 

39 90 

24 30 

38 30 

20 50 
15 70 
24 70 

40 80 
40 60 

27 50 
46 80 
11 20 

37 50 

35 70 

36 30 

31 40 
S9 00 
30 10 
26 50 
30 40 
19 80 
24 20 
17 10 
43 00 
14 90 

28 80 

21 90 
30 70 
30 50 



20 50 
34 40 
28 10 
15 60 



232 



Appendix 



REPRESENT ATIVKS— Continued. 



Scott 

White Hall 

Vlrtruvius 

DeWilt 

Mitchell 

Kaskaskia 

Mt. Pulaski 

Havana 

Fellowship 

Jerusalem Temple 

Metropolis 

Stewart 

Toulon 

Perry 

Samuel H. Davis... 

Excelsior 

Tavlor 

Ed'wardsville 

Astoria 

Kockford 

Magnolia 

Lewistown 

Winchester 

Lancaster 

Versailles 

Trenton 

Lebanon 

Joneslioro 

Robert Burns 

Marcelllne 

Rislne Sun 

Vermont 

Klgln 

Waverly 

Henry 

Mound 

Oquawka 

Cedar 

Greenup 

Empire 

Antioch 

RaleTgh 

Greenfield 

Marion 

Golconda 

Mackinaw 

Marshall 

Sycamore 

Lima 

Hutsonville 

Polk 

Marengo 

Geneva 

Olney 

Garden City 

Ames 

Richmond 

DeKalb 

A. W. Rawson. .. 

Lee Center 

Clayton 

Bloomfield 

Effingham 

Vienna 

Bunker Hill 



79 
80 
81 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
103 
103 
104 
105 
106 
108 
109 
110 
111 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 



HEPRESKNTATIVE. 



J. A. Means 

Harry R. Fry 

uito Atpadel 

HUey R. Hollis 

Hom^r E. uruner. ... 
Waller J. Schruweek 

E. A. Downing 

Ralph Dockard 

Chas. H. Whitcomb.. . 

Norbert IJene 

H. J. Wlttman 

John L. Morrow 

Harvey M. Wilson ... 
Harvey Six 

Wm. J. Camerer 

T. P. Burkoy 

H. G. Keiser 

Lou Danner 

Peter N. Anderson... 

H. H. Frond 

Reed F. Cutler 

J.E Coe 

Hiram Richmond 

A. A. Thurman 

G. W. Louden 

F R. Miller 

R. W. Karraker 

Hugh Scott 

Rav Worley 

I. O. Hook 

J. L. Berresford 

K. F. Gardner 

C. F. Morris 

O H. Davis 

Cleveland Oats 

F. W. Schlotzhauer .. 

Ray J. Ly. ns 

Oscar Van Baum 

E. A. Martin 

B. F. Allen 

M. E. Winters 

J. D. Telford 

Geo. E. Trampe 

O. L. Carry 

R. L.Hunt 

E. G. Crenshaw 

II. V. Lindley 

J. B. Maulding 

J. C. Tanner 

Oscar Wilson 

F. C. Flocken 

Leo J. Lunn 

C. A. Slm.ngton 

Wm. G. Sandgren 

Jas. Darnell 

R S. Wright 

E. O. Brown 

R. R Schnitker 

Paul Taylor 

E. F. Throgmorton.. . 
Geo. H. Knbb 







a 






0) 


1/1 


bo 
nj 





<u 


<u 


u 








"4 


S 


a. 

$12 


260 


$26 00 


279 


27 90 


12 


33 


3 30 


12 


147 


14 70 


12 


2»'8 


28 80 


12 


308 


30 80 


12 


109 


16 90 


12 


196 


19 60 


12 


317 


31 70 


12 


37 


3 70 


12 


366 


36 60 


12 


159 


15 90 


12 


151 


15 10 


12 


292 


29 20 


12 


114 


11 40 


12 


134 


13 40 


12 


265 


26 50 


12 


218 


21 80 


12 


87 


8 70 


12 


113 


11 30 


12 


194 


19 40 


12 


254 


25 40 


12 


164 


16 40 


12 


287 


28 70 


12 


277 


27 70 


12 


285 


28 50 


12 


330 


33 00 


12 


192 


19 20 


12 


277 


27 70 


12 


48 


4 80 


12 


211 


21 10 


12 


37 


3 70 


12 


220 


22 00 


12 


126 


12 60 


12 


201 


20 10 


12 


205 


20 50 


12 


195 


19 50 


12 


1.59 


15 90 


8 


58 


5 80 


13 


3t2 


31 20 


12 


291 


29 10 


12 


249 


24 90 


12 


368 


36 80 


12 


147 


14 70 


Vi 


176 


17 60 


12 


290 


29 00 


12 


196 


19 60 


12 


303 


30 30 


12 


66 


6 6) 


12 


36 


3 60 


12 


232 


23 20 


12 


1 


10 


12 


137 


13 70 


12 


76 


7 60 


12 


58 


5 80 


12 


102 


10 20 


12 


242 


24 20 


12 


147 


14 70 


12 


199 


19 90 


12 


348 


34 80 


12 


246 


24 60 


12 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 233 



REPRESENTATIVES— Cort<t"«««t/. 



Fidelity 

Clay 

Russell 

Alpha 

Delavan 

Urbana 

McHenry 

Kewanee 

Waubansia 

Virden 

Hope 

Edward Dobbins 

Atlanta 

Star in the East.. 

Milford 

Nunda 

Evergreen 

Girard 

Wayne 

Cherry Valley . . 

Lena 

Malteson 

Mendota 

Staunton 

Illinois Central . . 

Wabash 

Moweaqua 

Germania 

Meridian 

Abingdon 

Mystic Tie 

Cyrus 

Fulton City 

Dundee 

Farmington 

Herrick 

Freedom 

La Harpe 

Louisville 

King Solomon's.. 

Homer 

Sheba 

Centralia 

Lavely 

Flora 

Corinthian 

Falrfleld 

'1 amaroa 

Wilmington 

Wm. B. Warren.. 

Logan 

Cleveland 

Shipman 

Ipava 

Gillespie 

Newton 

Mason 

New Salem... .... 

Oakland 

Mahomet 

LeRoy 

Geo. Washington 

Pana 

Columbus 

Lovlngton 



152 
153 
154 
1.55 
156 
1.57 
158 
15.) 
160 
161 
162 
164 
165 
166 
168 
169 
170 
171 
173 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
182 
183 
18.1 
187 
lo3 
189 
190 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
199 

yuo 

201 
203 
204 
20.S 
•MG 
207 
208 
2i.9 
210 
311 
212 
213 
214 
316 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
322 
226 
227 
828 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



H. L. Warnef 

Dewitt Dawkins 

E. B. Campbell 

L. W. Wainwright.. 
J. T. Culbertson Jr.. 

K. L. Lanham 

E. A. Thomas 

Koy M. Paul 

Max GoldUnger 

C. W. Turner 

C. A. Braden 

J B. Stout 

J. A. King 

E. B. Steel 

E. M. Spangle 

Grant E. McCollum. 
Geo. P. Wachlin. ... 

M. C. Robinson 

Mattbew Connell... 
A. H. Anderson 

D. M. DeGraff 

J. N. Keck 

Chas. D. Powell 

Wm. C. Shannon ... 

P. C. Hegert 

J. M. Crawford 

D. C. Snyder 

O. A. Newbarth 

J L. Hyde 

C. A. Bable 

H. J. Donaleson 

A. J. Foster 

Talkert Kadyk 

O. P. Morse 

C. W. Bolton 

Geo. T. Auk 

Quinlin Estes 

H. D. McCollum .. . 

M. J. Spencer 

J. E. Woodham 

H. P:. Wilson 

F. L. Taylor 

H. T. Patton.. 

F. J. Adams 

Chas. C.Hill 

Mark Blanchard ... 

L. P. Weidling 

W. W. Miller 

R. J. Farris 

Wm. Pasche 

G. G. Green 

FredC. Smith 

H.T. Flovd 

Bert M. Howell 

n. E. Mesnard 

C C. Klinefelter.... 
John Rutherford .. 

Ira C. Abbott 

Wm F. Story 

A. M. Root 

A. C. Stanfleld 

Derrick L. McNeall 
A. Hamrick 














<u 




130 




w 


rt 


^ 


u 


i> 
















s 


g 


CL, 


241 


$24 10 


$12 


2(jS 


26 SO 


12 


134 


13 40 


13 


163 


16 30 


13 


157 


15 70 


13 


128 


12 80 


12 


50 


5 00 


12 


131 


13 10 


12 


1 


10 


12 


207 


20 70 


13 


299 


29 60 


12 


225 


22 50 


13 


146 


14 60 


12 


87 


8 70 


12 


88 


8 80 


12 


43 


4 30 


12 


114 


11 40 


12 


211 


21 10 


12 


146 


14 60 


12 


84 


8 40 


12 


127 


12 70 


8 


37 


3 70 


12 


83 


8 30 


12 


248 


24 80 


12 


94 


9 40 


12 


178 


17 80 


12 


128 


12 80 


12 


136 


13 60 


12 


44 


4 40 


12 


U9 


16 90 


12 


2. '7 


22 70 


13 


12S 


13 80 


12 


234 


2.? 40 


12 


228 


22 80 


13 


258 


25 80 


12 


H3 


14 30 


12 


234 


23 40 


12 


228 


22 80 


12 


143 


14 30 


12 


266 


26 60 


12 


251 


25 lO 


12 


173 


17 30 


12 


235 


23 50 


12 


75 


7 50 


12 


254 


25 40 


12 


278 


27 80 


12 


52 


5 20 


12 


1 


10 


12 


156 


IS 60 


12 


1 


10 


12 


238 


23 80 


12 


205 


20 £0 


12 


236 


23 60 


12 


213 


21 30 


12 


210 


21 00 


13 


2-13 


39 30 


13 


168 


16 8 1 


13 


•136 


13 60 


12 


134 


13 40 


12 


\<0 


13 00 


12 


202 


20 20 


13 


249 


24 90 


12 


168 


16 80 


12 



$36 10 
38 SO 
25 40 

28 30 

27 70 

24 80 

17 00 

25 10 

18 10 

32 70 
41 90 
34 50 

26 60 
30 70 
20 80 
16 30 

23 40 

33 10 
26 60 
20 40 
20 70 

15 70 

20 30 

36 80 

21 40 

29 80 

24 80 

25 60 

16 40 

28 90 

34 70 

24 SO 

35 40 

34 80 

37 SO 

26 30 

35 40 

34 80 

26 30 

38 60 
37 10 

29 30 

35 50 

19 50 

37 40 
3 80 

17 20 

12 10 

27 60 

13 10 
3- 80 

32 5) 
3. 60 

33 30 
3 5 00 
41 30 

38 80 

25 60 
25 40 
25 00 
32 20 

36 90 

28 80 



234 



Appendix 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



Manchester 

New Haven 

Wyanet 

Farmers 

Blandinsville... 

DuQuoin 

Dallas City 

Charter Oak.... 

Cairo 

Black Hawk.... 

Mt. Carmel 

Western Star.. 

Shekinah 

Galva 

Horicon 

Greenville 

El Paso 

Rob Morris 

Golden Gate 

Hibbard 

Robinson 

Heyworth 

Aledo 

Avon Harmony. 

Aurora 

Donnelson 

Warsaw 

Mattoon 

Amon 

Channahon 

Illinois 

Franklin Grove 

Vermilion 

Kingston 

La Prairie 

p. iris , 

Wheaton , 

Levi Lusk 

Blaney 

Carml 

Miners 

Byron 

Milton 

Elizabeth 

Accordia 

Jo Uaviess 

Neoga 

Kansas , 

Brooklyn 

Meteor 

Catlin 

Plymouth 

De Sota 

Genoa 

Wataga .^.. 

Chenoa 

Prophetbtown ., 

Pontiac 

Dills 

Quincy 

Benjamin 

Wauconda 

Hinckley 

D irand 

Raven 



BKPKKSENTATIVB. 



219 
23U 
!:31 
233 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
23 J 
2-10 
241 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
257 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
2-^9 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
282 
283 

sai 

286 
287 
288 
291 
292 
2y3 
294 
295 
296 
297 
298 
301 
302 
303 



John O? Akers 

C". G. Decker 

C. F. Winterberg 

W. J. Weaver 

J. L. Griggs , 

Arthur W. Dagget 

J. C. Moline 

L. W. Yowell 

Dors H. Reed 

Ralph E. Bowers 

C. A. Minniear 

C. J. Roseerans 

Louis F. Renfrs 

Wilber J. Lord 

L. C. Ward 

H. A. McLean 

C. R. Burrough 

Edward H. Melerhofer 

Gary Fisher 

Wm. I.Gillham 

L. G. Halmer 

Otto M. Cloftin 

Virgil H. Duvall 

R.W. Harrod 

Julius F. Miller 

Jud Dolan 

H. E. Nelson 

Thos. M. McNutt 

H. K. Haaker 

Koyal Dixon 

Carl A. Schmitt 

Wilbur Gibbs 

Alex H. Likes 

John Baird 

David W. Holt 

Howard L. Fisher , 

Justin E. Larkin 

Chas. E. Peace , 

Alfred Brumble Combe 
C. W. Thompson 

A. L. Batley 

A. A. Miller 

Ernest Warbel 

E R Sher.ird 

Horace H Kinney 

H. W. Bucklem 

W. E. Dayton 

Russell H. Taylor 

F. B. Syrisegood 

C. D.Ragsdale 

A. C. Seuska 

Eli Kelson 

Jacob Balbach 

Geo. I. Patter 

W. E. Slyder 

F.L. Poling 

J. Walt -r Meyer 

J. D. Ihrilen 

Ray A. Bostian 

N b. Patterson 

RoUin J. Wheeler 



231 
297 
111 
372 
228 
287 
222 
234 
364 
261 
249 
126 
3U7 
139 

75 
241 
118 
109 
186 
246 
205 
137 
193 
183 

37 
245 
266 
172 
138 

52 
155 

142 

314 

236 

161 

24 

93 

1 

282 

164 

310 
337 
2 
137 
183 
197 

56 
129 
222 
301 

60 
155 
102 
128 

92 
250 
263 
241 

55 
104 
44 



S 



$23 10 

29 70 
U 10 
37 20 
22 80 
28 70 

22 20 

23 40 
36 40 
26 10 

24 90 

12 60 

30 70 

13 90 
7 50 

24 10 

11 80 
10 90 

18 60 
24 61 
20 50 
13 70 

19 30 

18 30 

3 70 

24 50 
26 60 
17 iO 

13 80 
5 20 

15 50 

14 20 

31 40 

23 60 

16 10 
2 40 
9 20 

10 
28 20 
16 40 

31 00 
33 70 
20 
13 70 
IX 30 

19 70 

5 60 

12 90 
22 20 
30 10 

6 00 

15 50 
10 iO 
12 80 

9 20 

25 00 

26 30 

24 10 

5 50 
10 40 

4 40 



e I 

V j 

Q 



$% 10 

41 70 

23 10 
49 20 
34 8J 
40 70 

34 20 
3i 40 
48 40 
3,-( 10 
36 90 

24 60 

42 70 
2i 90 
19 .SO 
36 10 

23 80 
2; 90 

30 60 
36 60 
32 50 

25 70 

31 30 
30 30 

15 70 

36 50 
38 60 

29 20 

25 8J 
17 20 

27 5j 

26 20 

43 40 

35 60 

28 10 
14 40 

21 20 
12 10 
40 20 
38 40 

43 00 
45 70 
12 20 
2H 70 

30 30 

31 70 

17 60 

24 90 
34 20 
42 10 

18 00 

27 50 

22 20 
24 80 

21 20 

37 00 

38 30 

36 10 

17 50 

22 40 

16 40 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 235 



REPRESENTATIVES— 6'0/!<m««<f. 



Onarga 

William C. Hobbs 

T. J. Pickett 

Ashlar 

Harvard 

Dearborn 

Kilwinning 

Tonic , 

York 

Palatine 

Abraham Jonas . , 
J. L. Anderson .., 

Doric 

Creston , 

Dunlap 

Windsor 

Harrisburg 

Industry , 

Altona 

Mt. Erie 

Tuscola 

Tyrian , 

Sumner 

Schiller 

New Columbia. ... 

Oneida 

Saline 

Kedron 

Full Moon 

Summertield 

Wenona 

Milledgeville 

N. D.Morse 

Sidney 

l<'latRock 

Sublette 

Fairview 

Tarbolton 

Groveland 

Klnderhook 

Ark and Anchor. , 

Marine 

Hermitage 

Orion 

Blackberry 

Princeville 

Dougla.s , 

Noble 

Horeb 

Tonica 

Bement 

.Areola 

Oxford 

Jefferson 

Newman 

Livingston 

Chambersburg ... 

Shabbona 

Aroma 

Payson 

Liberty 

Gill 

LaMoille 

Waltham 



305 
30rt 
307 
3 8 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
316 
318 
319 
3>0 
321 
322 
325 
327 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
339 
340 
341 
342 
344 
345 
316 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 
3R8 
369 
371 
373 
374 
378 
379 
380 
3«2 
383 
384 



BBPBKSKNTATIVE. 



O. W. Maddin 

.>^ilas Jones 

Chas. A. Duntley 

Edmund Hall 

W. H. Corburn 

Alfred Willingham.. 

George Meld rum 

A. C. Lehman 

Chas. D. Highsmitb.. 

Richard H. John 

Fred J. Kemp 

Sherman Alphin 

John W. Hickok 

W. C. Kem pson 

Howard J. Ton ence 

A. V. Wallace 

JohnSmaU 

Bain Sullivan 

John Andrews, Jr. .. 
Jas. A. Van Fossen.. 

Fred L. Renner 

Chas. E. Banghner 

I) W. Harbaugh 

Hugo Lucas 

J. U. Warmack 

Owen F. Coleman 

Rolla E. Wiegins . . 

C. O. Goodrich 

Albert Sputy 

Clarance C. Lang 

W. R. Clough 

H. P. Joy 

B. E. Lynch 

Guv Stevenson 

S. C. Leffelman 

Ralph H. Ray 

W. H.Bartlett 

Lon D. Creasey 

A. C. Bancroft 

George C. Bradley .. 

Herbert Gal us 

Morris T. Peters 

J. G. Weaver 

Curt L. Dauber 

Henry W. Schilling.. 
L. O. McKerrow 

E. A. Boyle 

Beecher T. Bell.. .. 

William Todd 

Wm. H. Weeder 

Geo. A. Golden 

John E. Wax 

O. B. Mickelson 

Ira W. Hobbs 

George Lovering 

Owen L. Day. Jr. .. 
W. L. Hollenbeak.... 

Lorin B. Hessert 

Tbos. Doddsworth. .. 

F. V. Koepke 



83 

127 

191 

1 

63 

4 

1 

173 

191 

26 

97 
226 
179 

69 
124 
185 
314 
215 
147 
259 
148 
185 
235 
155 
3S3 
151 
329 
193 
268 
283 

122 
S26 
138 
212 

93 
193 

93 
150 
310 
201 
264 
265 



145 
305 
239 
162 
103 
1.53 
157 
I6i) 
284 
l&i 

74 
283 

67 

61 
280 
•:^83 
228 

93 



$ 8 30 

12 70 

19 10 

10 

6 30 

10 

10 

17 30 

19 10 

2 60 

9 70 

22 60 

17 90 
6 90 

12 40 

18 fO 
31 40 

21 50 
14 70 

25 90 

14 80 

18 50 

23 ^0 

15 50 
35 30 
15 10 
3^ 90 

19 30 

26 SO 
28 30 

IS 20 

22 60 

13 80 
21 20 

9 30 

19 30 
9 30 

15 00 
31 00 

20 10 
26 40 
26 50 



14 50 
30 50 
23 90 
16 20 
10 30 

15 30 

15 70 

16 00 
28 40 
16 20 

7 40 
28 30 

6 70 

6 10 
28 00 
28 30 
2i 80 

9 30 



16 30 
24 70 
31 10 
8 10 
1'^ 30 
12 40 
12 10 
89 80 
31 10 
14 60 
21 70 

34 60 

29 90 
18 90 
24 40 

30 50 

43 40 

33 50 
26 70 

37 90 

26 80 

30 5) 

35 50 

27 50 
47 30 
27 10 

44 90 

31 30 

38 80 
40 30 

24 20 

34 60 

25 80 
33 20 
21 30 

31 30 
21 30 
27 00 
43 00 

32 10 
38 40 
38 50 



26 50 
42 50 
35 90 
28 iO 
21 30 

27 30 

27 70 

28 00 
40 40 
28 80 
19 40 
40 30 
18 70 
18 10 
40 00 
40 30 
34 80 
21 30 



236 



Appendix 



REPBESENTATIVKS— 6'onitnMerf. 



Mississippi 

iiridgeport 

Kl Dara 

Kankakee 

Ashmore 

Tolono 

Oconee 

Blair 

Jerseyville 

Muddy Point.. 

Shiloh 

Kinmundy 

Buda 

Odell 

Kiswaukee 

Mason City. ... 

Batavia 

Ramsey 

Bethaito 

Stratton 

Thos. J. Turner 

Miihra 

Hc-peria 

BoUen 

Evening Star.. 

Lawn Ridge 

Paxton 

Marseilles 

Frt-eburg 

Reynoldsburg . 

Oregon 

Washburn . . . 

Landmark 

Lanark 

Exeter 

Scottville 

Red Bud 

Sunbeam 

Chebanse 

Kendrick 

Summit 

Murrayville 

Atkinson 

Makanda 

Philn 

Chicago 

Camargo 

Sparland 

Casey 

Hampshire 

Cave-in-Rock . . 

Chesterfleld 

Watseka 

S. D. Monroe. . . 

Yates City 

Mendon 

Loami 

Bromwell 

New Hartford. . 

Maroa 

Irving 

Nokomis 

Blazing Stir. .. . 
Jeffer-onville... 
Plainview 



38.T 
386 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
396 
397 
398 
h99 
401 
4(18 
403 
404 
405 
406 
408 
409 
410 
411 
412 
414 
415 
416 
417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
436 
4.37 
440 
441 
412 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 
453 
454 
455 
456 
<158 
460 
461 



BKPBESBNTATIVE. 



J. P. Castle 

H. C. Rice 

A. M. Trautwin., 
W. P. Hargrove. 
J. W. Hogue 



Orvil W. Hinton.. 
Charles E. Hill .. 

R. E. Johnson 

Melvin Bicktl 

Charles E. Black.. 

J. P. Ingram 

C. W. Redebaugh. 

A. W. Joerndt 

H. Guv Powell... 

.luhn H. Stone 

Wm. C. Spencer.. . 

H. L. Havnes 

H. E. Adden 

Barney C. Hall ... 
Huyes Replay le . . 

Joe Waschek 

Herman A. Stock. 



Frank H. Eilert 

Peter E. Phillips 

Earl Henry 

J. A. Kelso 

Dan Barger 

H. C. McCoy 

Paul N. Bergner 

B. E. Patterson 

Alfred L. Johnson 

C. E. Olmsted 

Wade H. Sappington . 

Wm. H.Neece 

Rali.h H. Davis 

h. R. Hadlock 

Geo W. J^ane 

Fred A. Davis 

Jonas E. Winegarner. 
Warren E. Wright.... 

Daniel Porter 

Harr V Crawshaw 

E E.'Schafer 

J. T. Blum 

Charles V. Brown 

Tim Vanantwerp 

F. F Slusser 

Ed. T. Clock 



R. H. Rigsbey 

Geo. A. Reed 

Charles I. Gerhart. 

F. B. Tavlor 

J. W. Bellew 

Richard A. Fisher. . 

Kdwise Gray, Sr 

Fred L. Wirions 

C. F. Crum 

J. W. Crouch 

Wm. Swarbrick 

Kverett N. Sneed... 
T.C. Hambleton.... 
W. J. Donahue 



143 

228 
310 
55 
19J 

214 

1 

252 

183 

86 

228 

117 

82 

63 

178 

38 

8-'3 

£61 

168 

1 

2 

1 

117 
163 
101 

77 
303 
338 

99 
129 
6 
120 
262 
262 
318 

52 

63 
848 
180 
222 
152 
315 
162 
1 
156 
135 
193 

51 



817 
164 
278 
199 
196 
304 
157 
233 
224 
323 
V51 
236 



$14 30 
22 80 
31 00 

5 50 
19 30 

81 40 
10 

25 80 
18 30 

8 60 

82 80 
11 70 

8 20 

6 30 

17 20 
3 80 

22 30 

26 10 
16 80 

10 
20 
10 

11 70 
16 30 
10 10 

7 70 

30 30 
33 80 

9 90 

12 90 
60 

12 00 
26 20 

26 80 

31 80 

5 20 

6 30 

24 80 

18 00 

22 20 

15 20 

31 50 

16 20 
10 

15 60 

13 50 

19 30 
5 10 

23 30 

7 70 

21 70 

16 40 

27 80 
19 90 
19 60 
30 40 
15 70 
23 30 

22 40 

32 30 

25 10 

23 60 



$12 
12 
12 
12 



$26 30 
34 80 
43 00 

17 50 
31 30 

33 40 
12 10 

37 20 
30 30 
20 60 

34 m 
2i 70 

20 20 

18 30 

29 20 
15 80 

34 30 

35 10 
28 80 
12 10 

18 20 
12 10 

23 70 
28 30 
22 10 

19 70 

42 30 
45 80 

21 90 

24 90 
12 60 
24 00 

38 20 

38 20 

43 80 
17 20 
14 30 

36 80 

30 VO 

31 20 
27 20 

43 50 
27 20 

8 10 

27 fiO 
85 50 
31 30 
17 10 

35 30 
19 70 

33 70 

28 i0 

39 80 
31 90 
31 60 
42 40 
27 70 
35 80 

34 40 

44 30 

37 10 

35 60 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 237 



REPRESENTATIVES— 6'on«nM«a(. 



Tremont 

Palmyra 

Denver 

Huntsville 

Cobden 

South Macon , 

Cheney's Grove ... 

McLean 

Rantoul ... 

Kendall 

Amity 

Gordon 

Columbia 

Walshvllle 

Manito 

Rutlaud 

Pleiades 

Wyoming 

Momence 

Lexington 

Edgewood 

Xenia 

Bowen 

Andrew Jackson ., 

Clay City 

Cooper , 

Shannon , 

Martin , 

Liberty villa 

Tower Hill , 

Stone Fort 

Colchester.. 

Alma 

Murphysboro ., 

St. Pauls 

Stark 

Woodhull 

Odin 

East St. Louis 

Meridian Sun 

O.H.Miner 

Home 

Parkersburg 

J. D. Moody 

Wade-Barney 

Bradford 

Andalusia 

Litchfield 

Abraham Lincoln , 

Roseville 

Anna , 

Illlopolls 

Monitor 

Chatham 

Kvans 

Covenant 

Rossville 

Minooka 

Adams 

Maquon 

Ashton 

Seneca 

Altamont 

Cuba 



462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 
469 
470 
471 
473 
473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
481 
482 
484 
485 
486 
487 



490 
491 
492 
493 
495 
496 
497 
498 
500 
501 
502 
5fi3 
501 
505 
506 
508 
509 
510 
512 
514 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Prank A. Blue 

John A. Turner 

Blake B Robertson. 
Hermon Bilderback 

W. P. Broadway 

W. L. Patterson 

L. E. Perkey 

Varner Longworth. , 
Claude A. Petiibone 

Geo. Barclay 

Edwin Bulow 

Joseph S. Carson.... 
Albert W. Lepp 

Rudolph H. Rohefs. 

W. G. Cusac 

William Ocasek 

F. W. imes 

M. C. Ostle 

Lester J. Grimsley. 
Charles R. Danks 

C. C. Morris 

John R. Veach 

J. W.Clark 

Chas. W.Mills 

L. C. Stewart 

Raymond G. Ziex..., 

E. L. DuBois 

E. E. Cannon 

H. E. Williams 

Arch Wenning 

A. G. Schrader 

Selby E. Nelson 

AbelH. White 

A. A. Mackey 

T. E. Fyke 

Geo. W. Niergarth 

Sandfleld W. Ghent. 

Henry D. Talley 

M. T. Huddle 

Chas J.Anderson.. 

Otis Montooth 

John C. Baker 

Wm. N. Barry 

N. P. Akers 

Glen Adhisson 

E. E. Conyer 

O. T. Myers 

James M. Stewart ., 

J. W. Canham 

Carl W. Winkler ... 

Everett B. IMann 

r. E. Murry 

Alex BeH. 

Clfford L. McRae.. .. 

D. L. Gray 

John D. Chartres ... 

J. C. Lanning 

Hamilton M. Custer 
O. B. Stockbarger.. . 



153 
219 
247 
2:^4 
322 
183 
118 
141 
113 
50 
30 
257 
291 

173 
124 
5 
137 
50 
110 
213 
271 
244 
326 
241 
220 
123 

36 
803 

209 
303 
315 
185 
145 
l.=)3 
2)3 
281 



4 
242 
258 
127 
128 
193 
234 
18.^ 
191 
327 
189 

37 
194 

12 

1 

106 

51 
319 
172 

84 

72 
210 
189 



$15 30 
21 90 

24 70 

23 40 
32 20 
18 30 
11 80 
14 10 

11 30 
5 00 
3 01) 

25 70 

29 10 

17 30 

12 40 
5) 

13 70 
5 ) 

11 00 

21 30 

27 10 

24 40 
32 60 
24 10 

22 00 

12 30 

3 60 
20 30 

20 90 

30 30 

31 .50 

18 50 

14 .50 

15 30 
24 30 

28 10 



40 

24 20 

25 80 
12 70 
12 80 
19 30 
23 40 

18 50 

19 10 
32 70 

18 90 
3 70 

19 40 
1 20 

10 

10 60 

5 10 

31 90 

17 20 
8 40 
7 20 

21 00 

18 90 



$27 30 
33 90 

36 70 

35 40 
44 20 
30 30 
23 80 
26 10 

23 30 
17 00 
15 00 

37 70 

41 10 

29 80 

24 40 
12 50 

25 70 
17 00 
19 lO 

33 30 

39 10 

36 40 
44 60 
36 10 

34 00 
24 30 

15 60 
32 30 

32 90 

42 30 

43 50 

30 50 

26 50 

27 30 
36 30 

40 10 



12 40 

36 20 

37 80 
24 70 
24 80 
31 30 
36 40 

30 50 

31 10 
44 70 
3) 90 
15 70 
31 40 

13 20 
12 10 
22 60 
17 10 
43 90 

29 20 
20 40 
19 20 
33 00 

30 90 



238 



Appendix 



RE PRESENT ATIVES—Co««m!/f(/. 



Sherman 

Plainfleld .... 
J. K. Gorin .. 

Lockport 

Chatsworth .. 

Oak Park 

Stewardson.. 

Towanda 

Cordova 

Virginia 

Valley 

Sharon 

Long Point. .. 
Plum River .. 

Humboldt 

Dawson 

Lessing 

Leland 

Thomson. ... 

Madison 

Trinity 

VVinslow 

Pleasant Hill 

Albany 

Frankfort . . 

Time 

Jacksonville . 

Bardolph 

Gardner 

Pera 

Capron 

O'Fallon 

Viola 

Prairie City.., 
Hazel Dell.... 

Dongola 

Shirley 

Highland 

Vesper 

Fisher 

Princeton ... 

Troy 

Faifmount ... 

Oilman 

Fieldon 

Miles Hart . .. 
Cerro Gordo . 

Farina 

Watson 

Clark 

Hebron 

Streator 

Piper 

Sheldon 

Union Park . 
Lincoln Park 
Rock River. .. 

Patoka 

Forrest 

VVadley 

Good Hope . . . 

Basco 

New Hope 

Hopedale 

Locust 



535 
556 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
543 
544 
547 
550 
558 
554 
555 
556 
557 
558 
559 
560 
5152 
564 
565 
566 
567 
569 
570 
57-J 
573 
574 
575 
576 
577 
578 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
587 
588 
590 
591 
592 
595 
6U0 
601 
602 
603 
604 
607 
608 
61)9 
610 
611 
612 
613 
614 
616 
617 
618 
630 
622 
623 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



Harold Neville 

Arthur Bachert 

John M. Ai stin 

Geo. H.ClIne 

Morris H. Prescott 

Elmer Uappert 

Rufus McKcnzie 

Robert W. Locy 

James F. Spargo 

E. M. Wilson 

Harry R. Minard 

Wm. R. Claus 

Wm. W. Cravens 

Adolph Steidle 

O. O. Moulton 

R.L. Fuller 

A. L Kinzer 

J G.Trampert 

William Kundert 

John R. Galloway 

Elmer Dorris 

C.J. Wells 

H. H. Chapman 

David A. Holden 

L. R. Bear 

A. R Montgomery 

John Seddon 

Dallas Smith 

L. Fearington 

John Gore 

Clyde Karraker 

C. W. Hirschi 

Lloyd L. Shafer '.'.'.' 

Paul H. Peabody 

J.L.Norman 

B. W. Jarvis 

R. E. Black 

E. S. Herron 

Gtorge J. Kessler 

F. R. McLaughlin 

P. M. Maxfried 

W. L McCaw 

J. I. Bry don \, 

G. M. Housholder 

R. T. Irwin 

L. F. Sowers 

F. W.Kee 

Geo. Edwards 

Chas. Ziizemtz 

Fred B Frerichs 

H.G.Hudspeth 

Jas. S. Carr 

Chas. K. Darling 

Ross E. Noper . 

Geo. A. Clete 

W. B. Lackey 

Fred R. Waldon 

J. H. Honeflnger 







s 




v 


(U 




bO 




CO 


rS 


P 


III 


01 


ii 












§ 


S 


Cli 


164 


$16 40 


$12 


141 


14 10 


12 


33 


3 30 


12 


95 


9 50 


12 


10 


1 00 


12 


2L0 


20 00 


12 


118 


11 80 


12 


218 


21 20 


12 


176 


17 60 


12 


123 


12 30 


12 


99 


9 90 


12 


85 


8 50 


12 


202 


20 20 


12 


1 


10 


12 


66 


6 fO 


12 


148 


14 80 


12 


257 


S5 70 


12 


358 


35 80 


12 


132 


13 20 


19 


260 


26 00 


12 


305 


30 50 


12 


305 


30 50 


18 


216 


21 60 


12 


64 


6 40 


12 


107 


10 70 


12 


70 


7 00 


12 


2H6 


29 60 


12 


167 


16 70 


12 


208 


80 80 


12 


195 


19 50 


12 


336 


33 60 


12 


277 


27 70 


12 


163 


16 30 


12 


195 


19 50 


12 


104 


10 40 


12 


287 


28 70 


12 


136 


13 60 


12 


80 


8 00 


12 


270 


27 00 


12 


161 


16 10 


12 


222 


22 20 


12 


204 


20 40 


12 


187 


18 70 


12 


73 


7 30 


12 


90 


9 00 


12 


91 


9 10 


12 


84 


8 40 


12 


5 


.50 


12 


2 


20 


12 


110 


11 00 


12 


247 


24 70 


12 


93 


9 30 


12 


229 


22 90 


12 


229 


22 90 


Vi 


245 


21 511 


12 


180 


18 00 


12 


149 


14 90 


12 


208 


20 80 


12 



$28 40 

26 10 
15 30 

21 ;o 

13 (10 

32 00 

23 80 

33 20 

29 60 

24 30 

21 90 

20 50 

32 20 
12 10 
18 60 
26 80 

37 70 
47 80 

25 20 

38 00 

42 50 

43 50 

33 60 

18 40 

22 70 

19 00 
41 60 
28 70 
32 80 
31 50 
45 60 

39 70 
28 30 

31 50 

22 40 
4 j 70 

25 61 » 

20 fO 
39 00 

28 10 

34 20 

32 40 

30 70 
19 30 

21 00 
21 10 
£0 40 
12 50 
12 20 

23 00 
36 70 
21 30 
34 90 
34 90 
36 50 
3" 00 

26 90 
32 80 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 239 



REPRESENTATIVES— Con<mM«d. 



Union 

Tuscan 

Norton 

Ridge Farm 

E F. W. Ellis ... 

B ickley 

Hochester 

Peotone 

Keystone 

Comet 

Apollo 

D. C. Cregier 

Oblong City 

San Jose 

Somonauk 

Blueville 

Camden 

Atwood 

Greenvlew 

Yorktown 

Mozart 

Lafayette 

Rock Island 

r>ambert 

Grand Chain 

South Park 

Mayo 

Beecher City 

Crawford 

Erie 

Burnt Prairie.. . 

Herder 

Fillmore 

Eddyville 

Normal 

Waldeck 

Pawnee 

A. O. Fay 

Enfield 

Illinois City 

Clement 

Morrisonville 

Blue Mound 

Burnside 

Galatia 

Rio 

Garfield 

OrangevlUe 

Clifton 

Englewood 

lola 

Raymond 

Herrin's Prairie 

ShilohHill 

Belle Rive ... 

Richard Cole 

Button 

Pleasant Plains. 

Temple Hill 

Alexandria . 

Braidwooa 

Ewing 

Joppa 

Star 

Farmer City 



627 
630 
631 
632 
63 i 
634 
635 
636 
639 
641 
642 
643 
644 
645 
646 
647 
648 

6r)l 

653 
655 
6.=.6 
657 
658 
6.59 
660 
662 
664 
665 
666 
667 
668 
669 
670 
672 
673 
674 
675 
676 
677 
679 
680 
681 
682 
683 
684 
685 
686 
fi87 
688 
690 
691 
61*2 
693 
695 
696 
697 
698 
700 
701 
702 
704 
705 
706 
709 
710 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



Wm. J. Damron . 
Geo. W. Burnett. 
D. B. Keigheu.... 
M. L. Larrance .. 
A. Dales 



Jno. D. Hunter 

Albert A. Cowing. 

R. L. Lederer 

Jas. S. Sullivan . 

I. J. Grass 

Robt. Martensen . 

Z H. Baiker 

K. W. See lye 

Roy W. Cook 

L P. Kalph 

Thos. Hestin 



W. D. Stone 

J. W.Ktlley 

Krnest Greeneberg . . . 
T. W. Rone 

B. R. Record 

H. H. Slocum 

J. M. Merchant 

Webster Hvre 

J. A. McCorkle 

0. R. Maxfleld 

E.G. Kendall 

M. B. Henwood 

Geo. E. Jessup 

Harry A. Sieinmeyer. 

M. T. Mason 

W. R. S. Harger 

E. A. Tobias.. 

Carl A. Pfeuffer 

Harry O. Hudgens 

A. Abercromby, Jr. . . . 

M. CM' Her 

Geo. Sch river 

C. E. (iainey 

E. C. Day 

Daul Zittrell 

Ernest Siegfried 

Paul Gegue 

E. J. Tye 

Wm. M. Jessen 

1. T. Clark 

F R. Wilson 

Austin C de 



D. W. Starr 

A. R Heaton 

H. F. Dudenbostel. 

H. A. Wall 

Donald McKenzie . 

J. E. Wade 

F. D. Huber 

Clair Walter 

T. H. Blayney 



P. L. Whittington. 
Harold V. Jones..., 

Chas. M. Ray , 

T. J. Swigart . ... 



330 
320 

78 
140 
87 

194 

39 

2 

144 

5 

4 

204 

163 

59 

803 

245 

180 
120 
127 
333 
181 
263 
361 

6 
222 
218 
2(5 
131 
271 

3 
233 
345 
124 

5 
810 
23 
275 
203 
170 
213 
187 
226 
317 
163 

4 
128 
68 



223 
.321 
311 
281 
6 
191 
200 
358 
172 

295 

207 

99 

129 



$33 00 

32 00 

7 80 
14 00 

8 70 

19 40 
3 90 

20 
14 40 

50 
40 

20 40 
16 3i 

5 90 
20 30 
24 50 

18 00 
12 00 
12 70 

33 30 
18 10 



26 30 


12 


36 10 


12 


60 


12 


22 -.0 


12 


21 80 


\-4 


2.1 50 


12 


13 10 


12 


27 10 


12 


30 


12 


23 30 


12 


34 50 


12 


12 40 


12 


50 


12 


21 (0 


12 


2 30 


12 


27 .50 


12 


20 20 


12 


17 00 


12 


21 30 


12 


18 70 


12 


22 60 


12 


31 70 


12 


16 30 


12 


40 


12 


12 80 


8 


6 80 


12 


90 


12 


22 30 


12 


32 10 


12 


31 10 


12 


28 40 


12 


60 


12 


19 10 


12 


20 on 


12 


35 80 


12 


17 20 


12 


29 50 


19 


20 70 


12 


9 90 


12 


12 9') 


12 



$45 00 

44 00 
15 80 
26 00 
2J 70 

31 40 
15 90 
12 20 
26 40 
12 50 
12 40 

32 40 

28 30 

17 90 

32 30 
36 50 

30 00 
24 00 

24 70 

45 30 
30 10 

38 30 
48 10 
12 60 

34 20 

33 80 
32 50 

25 10 

39 10 
12 30 

35 30 

46 50 
24 40 
12 50 

;^3 no 

14 30 

39 50 

32 20 

29 00 

33 30 

30 70 

34 60 

43 70 

28 30 

12 40 

20 80 

18 80 

13 gj 

34 30 

44 10 
41 10 

40 40 
12 fO 

31 10 

32 on 

47 80 

29 80 

41 50 
32 70 

21 90 
24 90 



2^0 



Appendix 



REPRESENTATIVES— Cow««M^d. 



LODGE. 


NO. 


REPRESENTATIVE. 


0) 


0) 

a 


E 

Q 
u 
<u 

Oh 


o 


Providence. 


711 
712 
713 
714 
715 
71fi 
717 
718 
719 
721 
722 
723 
724 
72.5 
726 
7a7 
738 
729 
730 
731 
732 
733 
734 
735 
737 
738 
739 
741 
742 
743 
744 
745 
746 
747 
748 
749 
750 
75) 
752 
754 
7.=i5 
756 
757 
758 
759 
761 
762 
763 
764 
765 
766 
767 
768 
769 
770 
771 

773 

774 

776 

778 
779 
780 
782 


A G Petzold 


8 

277 

247 

123 

16 

4 
283 
3-^5 
270 
109 
290 
210 
111 

I 
215 

311 
306 
12 
212 
109 
181 

124 
83 
5 
172 
136 
156 
292 
100 
155 
142 

316 
123 

2i0 
141 
193 

71 

9 

271 

104 

196 

176 
12 

221 
12 
6 

14 
378 
331 
132 

1 
10 

6 
357 

3 

4 
182 


$ 80 

27 70 
24 70 
12 30 

1 60 

40 

28 30 

32 50 
27 00 

10 90 

29 00 
21 00 

11 10 
10 

21 50 

31 10 

30 60 
1 30 

81 20 
10 90 

18 10 

12 40 
8 30 

60 
17 20 

13 60 
15 60 
29 30 
10 00 
15 50 

14 30 

31 60 

12 30 

24 00 
14 10 

19 30 

7 10 

90 

27 lU 

10 40 

19 60 

17 60 
1 20 

22 10 
1 30 

60 

1 40 
37 80 

33 10 

13 20 
10 

1 00 
60 

35 70 
30 
40 

12 20 


■m 

12 
12 
12 
13 

12 
12 
12 
12 
18 
13 
12 
13 
12 
18 

12 
12 
12 
18 
12 
13 

12 
12 
8 
8 
12 
12 
13 
12 
12 
13 

12 
12 

12 
13 
12 

12 
13 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 

12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
13 
12 
12 


S12 80 


CoUinsville 


R.J. Eckart 

T. L. B. Alirs 


39 70 




36 70 


Collison 


E. A. Davis 


24 30 


Elvaston 


C. B' Garard 


13 60 


Calumet 


Frank Sidlo 




Arcana 


13 40 


May 




40 30 


Chapel Hill 


O. L. Reynolds 

P. E. Hawkins . 


44 50 


Rome 


39 00 


Walnut 


Fred A Perkins 


22 90 


Omaha 




41 00 


Chandlerville 


J G. Peters 


33 00 


Rankin 


C. A. Bell . 


23 10 


Golden Rule 


A. C. Baylor 

Geo. E. Brokaw 

G. E. EUes . . . 


12 10 


Raritan 


33 50 


Waterman 




Lake Creek 


43 10 


Eldorado 


Thos. J. Young 

Henry Flear 


42 60 


Harbor 

Carman 


13 20 




33 20 


Gibson 




83 90 


Morning Star 


S. E. Caldwell 


30 10 


Sheridan 

Arrowsmiih 


H.A.Bali 


24 40 


Saunemin 


C L. Tanner 


20 30 


Lakeside 

New Holland 


Frank L. Schriener 


8 50 
25 20 


Danvers 


Geo. W.Cook 

W. H. Weinsett 

Ernest Payne 

H. J. Waterstreet 


35 60 


Scott Land 

Goode 


27 60 
41 20 


Winnebago 


22 00 


Weldon 


Clyde E. Baker 


27 60 


Centennial 


Chas. A. Stewart 


26 20 


Alta 




Akin 


43 60 


Lyndon 

Lounsbury 


Walter E. Fox 


24 30 


Allendale 


36 00 


Ogden 




26 10 


Pre-emption 

Hardinsville 

Verona 


E. N. Johnson 

Oeo. L. Beal 


31 30 
19 10 


Mystic Star 


D. A. Wallace 

W. W. Reid 

Wm. F. Brandt 

Harold C. Mott 


12 90 


Orel 


39 10 


Sibley 


82 40 


Van Meter 


31 60 


Crete 


J. N. Pearson 




Sullivan 


29 60 


Palace 


Philip Van Westen 

David Little 


13 20 


Littleton 


34 10 


Triluminar 


W. E. Nicolaisen 


13 20 


Miznah 

St. Elmo 


J. Oppenheimer 


12 60 


LaGrange 


13 20 


Bay City . 


J. H. Lewis 

Paul Haverton 


49 80 


New Burnside 


45 10 


Mansfield 


Alvin T. Smoothers 

Wm. H. Schmidt 

Norwood Stratton 

C. M. Gray 


85 80 


Lake View 


12 10 


Grand Crossing 


13 00 


Ravenswood 


12 60 


Gurney 


A . A. Evans 


47 70 


Wright's Grove 

Siloam 


Franks. Erickson 

Clarence M. Parker 

J A. Blackford 


12 30 
12 40 


Potomac 


24 20 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 241 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



LODGE. 


NO. 


BKPRESENTATIVB 


to 
V 


11 
to 
a 

s 


a 

5 

Oh 


o 




783 
784 
786 
787 
788 
789 
790 
791 
792 




1 

12 

192 
305 
177 
8 
298 
156 
275 
165 
325 

237 

9 

147 

119 

123 
316 
123 

13 
104 
255 
325 
176 
232 

13 

102 

11 

297 

326 

4 

291 
355 
120 

165 

66 

58 

156 

278 

185 

19 

329 

187 

278 

11 

167 

197 

331 
8 
13 
9 
68 
273 
209 

212 


$ 10 

1 20 

19 20 

30 50 
17 70 

bO 
29 80 

15 60 
27 50 

16 50 
33 50 

70 

23 70 

90 

14 70 

11 90 

12 20 

31 60 
12 30 

1 30 
10 40 

26 50 

32 50 

17 60 
23 20 

1 30 

70 

10 20 

1 10 

29 70 

32 60 

40 

70 

29 10 
35 50 
12 00 

16 50 
6 60 

5 80 

15 60 
37 80 

18 50 
1 90 

32 90 

18 70 

27 80 
1 10 

16 70 

19 70 

33 10 
80 

1 30 
90 

6 80 
27 30 

20 90 

21 20 


112 
12 
13 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
13 
12 
13 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
12 
13 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

8 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
8 

12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
13 
12 
13 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
13 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

13 


$12 10 


Beacon Lieht 


Geo. H. Leverett 


13 20 


Riverton Union 


Chas. Maddax 


31 20 




Wm. Grosse 


42 50 






29 70 






12 80 


Plttsfield 


Bert Whltlen 


41 SO 


Broadlands 


Thos. B. Warter 


27 60 




Carl Gordon 


39 50 


A T Darrah 


793 
794 
795 
796 
797 
798 
799 
800 
801 
802 
803 
804 
805 
806 
807 
808 
809 
810 
811 
812 
813 
814 
815 
816 
817 
818 
819 
830 
821 
822 
823 
824 
825 
826 
827 
829 
830 
831 
832 
833 
834 
835 
836 
837 
838 
839 
840 
841 
842 
843 
845 
846 
847 
848 
849 


Milo Abernathy 


28 50 




William Pyle 


44 50 


Myrtle 

E. M. Husted 


W. H. Blackman 

Chas. D. Williams 


12 70 
35 70 


Normal Park 


Chas. W. Hibbard 


12 90 


Sldell 




26 70 


Colfax 


R. O. Wills 


23 90 


Kenwood 


Glen D. Meneely 


24 20 




Prank Hill 


43 60 


Neponset 


Geo W. Whaples 


24 30 


Ed. A. Ribal 


13 30 


S. M Dalzell . . . 


Edw. Hubwald 


22 40 


Nebo 


Ch as. E. Sway ne 


3- 50 




Trusti n I. Boy les 


44 60 




Jas. H. Pierce 


29 60 




Fred E. Martin 


35 20 




P. Clyde Perry 


13 30 


Melvin 

De Land 


W E. Leichner 


8 70 


Frank Anderson 




Ohio 


22 20 




Fred J. Tenny 


13 10 




S. M. Combs 


41 70 




C R. Felts 


44 60 


Ben Hur 


W. H. F. Bach 


13 40 




Edw. F. Simons 


8 70 




Jesse E. Foster 






41 10 




J. H. Taylor 


47 70 


Pearl 


John B. Jenkins 


24 00 




Jas. I. Lawrence 






28 50 




Arthur Tredermick 

Arthur Rosenfeldt 

G. B. Roswell 


18 60 




17 80 


Edgar 


27 60 


G. A. Praul 

C. W. Fr anciso 


39 80 




30 60 




Chas. H. Johnson 


13 10 


Dean 


H. E. Parker 

R. B. Gi issom 


44 90 
30 70 


Triple 


H. C. Hahn 


39 80 




Herbert Tiffen 


13 10 




Bert Crevision 


28 70 


Charity 


Royal G. Ramsey 

A. T. Landreth 


31 70 




45 10 




Jno. B. Spymour 


12 80 




L. C. Radki'}"^ 


13 30 




N. 0. Ro:lius 


12 90 


Martinton 

Bluffs 




18 80 


H. O. Kirkpatrick 

Lawrence A. Duncan 

Roy E. Nelson 


39 30 




33 90 






Palestine 


S3 20 



242 



Appendix 



REPRESENTATIVES— Coftttnw«rf. 



Austin 

Chicago Heights.. . 

Gothic 

Latham 

Brighton Park .. .. 

King Oscar 

West Gate 

BoydD 

Utica 

Apple Kiver 

Metropolitan 

Sorento 

Riverside 

St. Andrews 

Olympia 

St Cecilia 

West Salem 

Chadwick 

Cornell 

May wood 

Lostant 

Argenta 

Freewill 

Standard 

Nifong- 

Cornerstone 

William McKinley 

Granite City 

Equity 

Composite 

John B. Sherman . 

Marlssa 

Boulevard 

Wheeler 

Bethany 

Villa Grove 

Hooppole 

Pyramid 

Damascus 

America 

Des Plaines 

Logan Square 

Constellation 

Loraine 

Utopia 

Crescent 

Kosmos 

Ogden Park 

Silvis 

Park Manor 

Carnation 

Edgewater 

Alto 

Klkhart 

Oarlock 

Hanover 

Coffeen 

Ancient Craft 

Gil. W. Barnard... 

Bee Hive 

Hull 

Bellflower 

Stelltr 

Aa'^on 

Republic 



850 
851 
852 
853 
854 
855 
8,i6 
857 
858 
859 
860 
861 
86a 
863 
864 
865 
866 
867 



870 
871 
872 
873 
874 
875 
876 
877 
878 
879 



884 
885 
886 
887 



890 
891 
892 
893 
894 
895 



899 
900 
9ii 
902 
903 
904 
905 
906 
907 
908 
909 
910 
911 
912 
913 
914 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



W. A. Turneso 

W. H. Freeman 

Otto Fletcher 

W. D. Valle 

Fioyd S. Treandean. 
Hiram H. Hartman . 

A. W. Haller 

Ray D. Wheeler 

Marvin W. Watson.. 
Albert J. Berger, Jr. 

iV. Cowe n 

A. E. Harnie 

Gordon C. Hamilton 

Jacob C. Nickel 

Cnas S. Ledyard... 

Ch. Hainz 

Chas. Honberger 

Arthur E. Tiffany... 

M. Kosmussen 

Carl Henning 

J. LeRov Cannon ... 

R. M. Hiner 

Ralph R. Smith 

Jo eph Givens 

Geo. W. Dreher 

Christ Hielm 

John G. Stewart 

John C Mackinson.. 
M. H. Frevichs 

C. W. Mathews 

A. Duncan 

J. V.Clagg 

Joseph L. Mathias... 

Ray H. Pelty 

Frank H. Thompson 
Henry E Vanderlp. . 
Charles G. Frazier.. 

Josiah W.Bill 

Otto F. Nach weih .. 

E. C Gratteau 

Guy G Roberts 

A. F. Hooper 

Leo Mayer 

David L. Olson 

E. W. Naumann 

F. C. Ast 

Chas. W. Close 

G. H. Anderson 

W. A. Foster 

J. W. Council 

Harold E Heiss 

Geo. A. Steele 

H. H. Blackburn 

Leopold Apple 

ClvdeGilmore 

Wallace W. Bennett 

Harry J. Adkins 

J. M. Jorden 

D. A. Colli.son 

W. W.Taylor 

E- n' St L. Krearaer . 












1) 


D 




U) 




7) 


a 


U 


V 


a 


1^ 












g 


S 


0, 


8 


$ 80 


$12 


27 


2 70 


12 


281 


!:8 10 


12 


174 


17 40 


12 


7 


70 


12 


1 


10 


12 


67 


6 70 


12 


94 


9 40 


12 


143 


14 30 


12 


6 


60 


12 


251 


25 10 


12 


12 


1 20 


12 


1 


10 


12 


6 


60 


12 


1 


10 


12 


247 


24 70 


12 


129 


12 90 


12 


102 


10 20 


12 


12 


1 20 


12 


113 


11 30 


12 


135 


13 50 


12 


1 


10 


12 


215 


31 50 


12 


1 


10 


12 


1 


10 


12 


275 


27 50 


12 


1 


10 


12 


6 


60 


12 


8 


80 


12 


318 


31 80 


12 


8 


80 


12 


£12 


£1 20 


12 


I^3 


18 30 


12 


133 


13 20 


12 


18 


1 80 


12 


8 


80 


12 


1 


10 


12 


17 


1 70 


12 


5 


50 


12 


5 


50 


12 


257 


25 70 


12 


12 


1 20 


12 


6 


60 


12 


8 


80 


12 


10 


1 no 


12 


162 


16 20 


12 


6 


60 


13 


6 


60 


12 


71 


7 10 


12 


167 


16 70 


12 


201 


20 10 


12 


1.50 


15 00 


12 


239 


23 90 


12 


6 


60 


12 


10 


1 00 


12 


1 


10 


12 


313 


31 30 


12 


121 


12 10 


12 


234 


23 40 


12 


9 


90 


12 


7 


70 


12 



$12 80 
14 70 
40 10 

29 40 
12 70 

12 10 

18 70 

21 40 

26 30 

13 60 
37 10 
13 20 
12 10 
12 60 

12 111 
36 70 

24 90 

22 20 

13 20 

23 30 

25 50 
13 10 
33 50 
12 10 
12 10 
39 50 
12 10 
12 60 
12 80 
4-i 80 

12 80 
33 20 

30 30 

25 20 

13 80 
12 80 

12 10 

13 70 
12 50 

12 50 
3? 70 

13 20 
12 60 

12 8i) 

13 00 
28 20 

12 60 
12 60 

19 10 
28 70 
32 10 

27 00 
35 90 

12 60 

13 00 

12 10 
43 30 

24 10 
35 40 

13 90 
13 70 



Detailed Report — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 243 



REPRESENTATIVES- Con/wMfrf. 


LODGE. 


NO. 


HEPRESENTATIVE. 


s 




a 

'3 
Q 

v 
Oh 


o 


Jackson Park 


915 

916 

917 

918 

919 

920 

9-21 

922 

933 

924 

9-5 

9^6 

927 

988 

929 

930 

931 

932 

933 

934 

935 

936 

937 

938 

939 

940 

941 

94J 

943 

944 

945 

946 

947 

948 

949 

950 

951 

952 

953 

954 

955 

956 

957 

958 

959 

960 

961 

962 

963 

961 

965 

966 

967 

968 

969 

970 

971 

972 

973 

974 

975 

976 

977 

978 

979 


Roy P. Donovan 


9 
1 
6 

283 
46 

302 
ft 
6 
1 
9 

C63 

1 

155 

15 

217 

113 

17 

234 

113 

5 

5 

206 

246 

51 

4 

200 
184 

263 

4 

23 

no 

76 

345 

4 

11 

6 

7 

1 

ISl 

49 

7 

314 

5 

1 

291 

10 

175 

137 

14 

11 

1 

6 
8 
3 

11 
173 


$ 90 
10 
60 

28 30 

4 60 

30 20 
50 
60 
10 
90 

26 30 

10 

15 .50 

1 50 

24 70 

11 30 

1 70 

23 40 
U 30 

50 

50 

20 60 

24 60 

5 10 
40 

20 00 
18 40 

70 
26 30 

40 

2 30 
11 00 

7 60 

34 50 

40 

1 10 

60 

70 

10 

18 10 

4 90 

70 

31 40 

5'J 

10 

29 10 

1 00 

17 50 

13 70 

1 40 

1 10 

10 

61 

80 

3J 

1 10 
17 30 


112 
Vi 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
13 
13 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
li 
12 
8 
12 
13 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
13 
12 

13 
13 
12 
13 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 


812 90 
12 10 

12 60 
40 30 
16 60 
42 20 

13 50 
12 60 

12 10 

13 90 
38 30 


Welcome 


Glenn F. Vivian 


Concora 

Sessor 


A. F. Schultz 

J. C. Brewner 


Elwood 

Cottonwood 


George C. Zatten 

A S. Lanham 


Avondale 


OttoG. Holler 


Comp;iss 


Wm. R. Swanson 

C. F. W. P^orberg 

F. H. Mathews 


East Gate 


Banner Blue 


Molenna 


Dan McCulum 


Veritas 


James R. Riper 


Candida 


12 IC 


Grant Park 


Albert J. Flessner. 


Ashland 




Jos. Robbing 


27 50 


Wilmette 


C.H. Keith. . 

Fred Hoff 


13 .50 


Sandoval 


36 70 
23 3) 


Manlius 


Max P. Seibel 

A. P. Lytle 

Wm. F. Irvin 

E F Swab 


Ainsdale 


13 70 
35 40 
23 30 
12 50 


LaMolne 

Rock Falls 


North Shore 


K. R. Nelson 


Circle 

Table Grove 


Wm. J. Unfried 

Samuel A. Clemmens 

A.Miller 


12 50 
32 60 

36 60 

17 10 




Elmhurst 


Niels C. Peterson 


Bohemia 


Thos. A. Kosatka 


12 40 




Charles H. Bell. 

John D. Carnahan 




Buffalo 


32 00 
30 40 


Joy 


Kenmore 


Carl E. Suhn. . 


12 70 


R. F. Casey 


Ire Dalton 

David Donnan 

W. J. .Smardon .... 


38 30 
12 40 
14 30 


Justice 

Glen Ellyn 


Depue 

Donovan 


F. W. Krueger 

J. E. Winslow 


23 00 
15 60 


Stone Arch 

Progressive 


W. F. George 

Orrin J. Loomis 


46 .50 
13 4i) 


Cicero 


•lames I. Cervinka. 


13 10 
12 60 




Samuel Salinger 


Prospect 


Wm. B. Rfis er 


12 70 

13 10 




Max Bloch 

John D. Watkins . 


Warrensburg 


30 10 


Algonquin 


Geo. E. Bailey 


16 90 


Federal 


Gustav J. Fleig 


Ben Franklin 


12 70 


Broughton 


S. J. Porter 

Robert R. Schoelzel 

W. H. Weakley 


43 40 




12 60 


Cisco 


Exemplar 


I" 10 


Hahlgren 


A. E. Irvin 


41 10 


South Gate 


Chas. A. Olson 


13 00 


I'last Moline 


David O. Johnson. . . 


29 .'0 


St. Joe 


John H. Thompson 

J. K. Dalton 


25 70 


Fern VFOod Park 


13 40 




Arthur U. Pacand. 


13 10 


Perseverance 


F. H. Irvine 


13 10 


Albany Park 


Edgar R. Cobb 

Henry G. Conrad 


]•) fio 


Old Glory 

Melrose Abbey 

Parian 

Square 


12 80 
12 30 


Gustav A. Kiel 


13 10 


Stephen Decatur 


J. N. Tomlinson 


29 30 









244 



Appendix 



REPRESENTATIVES— Conimwerf. 



Anchor 

Trowel 

Sincerity 

Glencoe 

Emblem 

Universal 

Brotherhood 

Uyrene 

Park Ridge 

Hyde Paris: 

Clover Leaf 

Welfare 

Niagara 

Levden 

True Blue 

Lawndale 

Sunrise 

Integrity 

Paul Revere 

Morgan Park 

Baylls 

Wayfarers 

Portage Park 

Fortitude 

Hurst 

Community 

Fair Oaks 

Loyal 

Parkway 

Hiram 

Honor 

Woodson — 

Birchwood 

John Paul Jones 

Moline 

Paramount 

Christopher , 

Arts and Crafts .' . 

Pythag.ras 

Victory 

Cosmopolitan 

Nauvoo 

Theodore Roosevelt. 

Edward Cook 

Triangle 

Crystal 

Lake Forest 

Anchor & Ark 

Proviso 

Adelphi 

Emeth 

Drexel 

Trestleboard 

Perfection 

Austin H. Scrogin. .. 

Smyth Crooks 

Ideal 

Legion 

Goodwill 

Advance 

Montclalr 

Lake Shore 

Monroe C. Crawford 
Qoodfellowship 



98U 
981 
982 
983 
981 
985 
986 
9S7 
988 
989 
990 
991 
992 
993 
991 
995 
996 
997 
9P8 
999 
lOUO 
1001 
1002 
1003 
1001 
1005 
1006 
1007 
lOOS 
1009 
1010 
1011 
1012 
1013 
1014 
1015 
1016 
1017 
1018 
1019 
1030 
1021 
1022 
1023 
1024 
1025 
1026 
1027 
1028 
1029 
1030 
1031 
1032 
1033 
1034 
1035 
1036 
1037 
1038 
1039 
1040 
1011 
1042 
1043 



G. H Baum 

August H. Rahn . .. 
John Franknecht . 
Edward M. Gallup. 
Charles Koekoek.. 
Philip E. Gilbert .. 
John L. O'Brien .. . 
George i\ Swann. . 
Frank L. Parsons . 



Roscoe T. Clark 

Wm. N. Roloff 

F. L. Baldwin 

A. B. KircQoff 

Harold Christopherson. 

Jerry O. Novak 

Oliver E. Beyler 

George A. Lee body 

John N. Barber 



REPaK.SENTATIVE. 



M. A. Frye 

Clarence W. Frick . . . 

N. S. Schoenbrod 

C. L. Stewart 

Robert Sampson 

Harry J. Lord 

James H. Howe 

Chas. R. Jahn 

Walter A. Daley 

Edward F. Bredfleld 

J. C. Colton 

M. E. Smith 

Henry W. Gross 

E. J. Johnson 

Chas. E. Rank 

O. H. Lewis 

Arthur Graves 

Leon M. White 

August Davidson 

Gustav Kohn 

J. R. LaCroix 

Peter Bermger 

O. D. Ensminger. . . . 

Dennis C. Gass 



J. J. Bastian 

T. G. VanGunten. 



Mark L. Harris. 



Rene C. Hansen 

Walter S.Litt 

Wm. H. Grafe 

David Morris 

Chas F. Lowy 

Robert R. Clegg 

Wil iam W. Higgins 
Roland A. Sperry ... 
Henry J. Smith 



Ivan E. Korn 

Geo. A. Wasserstrass 



123 
i 

7 
18 



12 
10 
5 

309 
5 
9 
6 
1 
1 
5 

S24 
7 
5 

179 
5 

333 

127 
5 
5 
5 

211 

10 

4 

36 
10 

281 

1 





B 


bo 

a 


4; 
Q 


(U 


u 




v 


S 


Qm 


$12 30 


$12 


40 


12 


70 


12 


1 80 


12 


70 


13 


20 


12 


10 


12 


80 


12 


1 20 


12 


21 50 


12 


10 


12 


10 


12 


1 00 


12 


70 


12 


70 


12 


10 


12 


50 


13 


70 


12 


1 20 


12 


1 00 


12 


50 


12 


30 90 


12 


50 


12 


90 


12 


60 


18 


10 


12 


10 


12 


50 


12 


22 40 


12 


70 


12 


.50 


12 


17 90 


12 


50 


12 


?3 30 


12 


12 70 


12 


50 


12 


50 


12 


50 


12 


24 10 


12 


20 


12 


1 00 


12 


40 


12 


3 60 


12 


1 00 


12 


28 10 


12 


10 


13 


20 


13 


6U 


12 


20 


12 


20 


12 


60 


13 


20 


12 


70 


12 


80 


12 


20 


12 


50 


12 



Detailed Eeport — Mileage and Per Diem Committee 245 



KEPRESENTATIVES— Co«JJ»Merf. 



Shadrach Bond 

Mayfair 

Westfield 

Royalton 

Zeiglt r 



1014 
1045 
1046 
1047 
1048 



KEPKESKNTATIVE. 



J. H. Woolnough. . . 

Chas. Brock-Jones. 

C. M. Thornton 

I. A. Foster 







a 




m 


a; 


oi 




Q 


0) 


(U 


. 














S 


s 


Oh 


6 


60 


12 


183 


18 30 


12 


S12 


Si 20 


la 


315 


31 50 


12 



12 60 

30 30 

44 20 
43 50 



Fraternally submittctl, 



W. F. Beck, 

C. H. Thompson, 

H. T. GODDARD, 

T. S. Browning, 
Harry W. Harvey, 

Committee. 



246 Appendix 



REPORT OF BOARD OF GRAND EXAMINERS 
1920 

JoLiET, III., November 3, 1921. 

(The report of the Board of Grand Examiners was inadvertently left 
out of the proceedings of 1920, and this short report is printed that the 
history of the Board shall be complete.) 

Schools were held as follows: 

Marion, January 6, 7, 8, 1920. Attendance 225 

Granite City, January 20, 21, 22, 1920. Attendance 252 

Decatur, February 3, 4, 5, 1920. Attendance 508 

Galcsburg, February 17, 18, 19, 1920. Attendance 386 

Rockford, March 2, 3, 4, 1920. Attendance 420 

Chicago, March 16, 17, 18, 1920. Attendance 838 

Total 2629 

The Board was organized as follows: 

R. C. Davenport, chairman. 

D. D. King. 

Geo. E. Carlson, secretary. 

Wm. H. Zarley. 

B. L. TenEyck. 

During the year Brother Davenport resigned and Bro. D. D. King 
was appointed chairman, and served as such until Brother Carlson was 
appointed chairman at the meeting of the grand lodge in 1920. 

Bro. Harry Leo Howell was appointed to fill the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Brother Davenport. 



Detailed Report — Grand Examiners 247 



REPORT OF BOARD OF GRAND EXAMINERS 

JOLiET, III., Sept. 14, 1921. 
Bro. Daniel G. Fitsgerrcll, M.JV. Grand Master, Normal, III. 
Dear Bro. Fitzgerrell: 

It has been our pleasing duty to serve you during the year and it 
now becomes our pleasing duty to report to you, our labors for the year. 

Pursuant to our appointment, at the meeting of the Most Worship- 
ful Grand Lodge, last October, we met and organized by electing \Vm. H. 
Zarley as secretary. 

At the same meeting we recommended, for commissions as grand 
lecturers, the brethern whose names were published in the proceedings 
of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge for 1920. 

In accordance with your orders, schools were held as follows: 

Mt. Vernon January 4, 5 and G, 1921 

Chicago January 18, 19 and 20, 1921 

Eock Island February 1, 2 and 3, 1921 

Springfield February 15, 16 and 17, 1921 

Danville March 1, 2 and 3, 1921 

Princeton March 15, 16 and 17, 1921 

Also examinations for commissions as grand lecturers were held at: 

Chicago January 21 and 22, 1921 

Normal August 1 and 2, 1921 

The total attendance at these schools was 3486, including 769 officers 
of lodges of whom 165 were worshipful masters. 

At the two examinations, we examined sixty-four brethren and recom- 
mended each of them to you for their commissions. 

Appended hereto is a detailed report of the several schools and 
exminations : 

Mt. Vernon School 

The first state school of the year 1921 was held at Mt. Vernon January 
4, 5 and 6. The school was well attended and the interest shown was all 
that could be desired. One very nice feature of the school was the banquet, 
served by the ladies of the Eastern Star, which was enjoyed by all present. 
The ticket of admission to the banquet was a card, on which was printed 
"OUR DAN." The explanation of the words "OUR DAN" is, that the 
members of Mt. A^'ernon Lodge No. 31 conferred the degrees upon him and 
started him on his Masonic career. 

Grand Officers: 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell M. W. Grand Master 

Richard C. Davenport Junior Grand Warden 

Isaac Cutter Grand Secretary 

C. O. Faught Senior Grand Deacon 

John Brownins Junior Grand Deacon 



248 



Appendix 



District Deputy Grand Masters: 



Wainwright Davis, 
Carl F. Stoll 
David L. Wright 
Win. E. Day 



Wm. T. Cable 
Wm. H. Thomas 
C. W. Kessler 
John ArnistronfT 



Grand Examiners: 

George E. Carlson, Chairman Harry L. Howell 

Wm. H. Zarlev, Sec'y Harry H. Mihior 

B. L. Ten Eyek 



Past Grand Examiners: 



Isaac Cutter 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrcll 



E. C. Davenport 
David D. King 
Spruel C. D. Eea 



C. O. Faught 
T. S. Browning 
Delbert I. Duck 
Guy Lawrence 
John L. Whiteside 
David W. Holt 
Gordon Pillow 
J. T. Smith 
Virgial Puckett 
E. B. Dangerfield 



Grand Lecturers: 

W. E. Speekman 
D. S. Mellinger 
I. A. Foster 
O. J. Davis 
W. R. Wright 
T. C. Hambleton 
W. D. Abney 
Ben Smith 
Geo. E. Anderson 
A. F. Gooch 
W. J. Nevin 



A. B. Collom 
Fred Naumer 
J. M. Foreman 
C. H. Thompson 
R. E. Hale 
Wainwright Davis 
John Armstrong 
C. W. Kessler 
W. H. Thomas 
W. T. Cable 



There were sixteen masters of lodges and thirty-eight officers other than 
masters. Sixty-one Illinois lodges and nine lodges from foreign grand juris- 
dictions were represented. Total attendance 306. 



Chicago School 

The second state school of the year 1921 was held at Chicago on the 
18th, 19th and 20th of January. The members of the Board of Grand Ex- 
aminers were especially pleased at the interest shown by those in attend- 
ance, also at the large number of offieers of lodges present, also the large 
number of brethren present, who expected to take the examination for com- 
missions as grand lecturers. Tlie usual masonic feeling of good-fellowship 
and brotherly love was an ever present quantity, at all times, during the 
Fchool. One of the pleas-ant parts of the school was the attendance of 
Brother Isaac Cutter at all three days of the school. The craft of Illinois 
have so learned to love our grand secretary that no Masonic meeting is 
considered complete without him. 



Detailed Report — Grand Examiners 



249 



Grand Officers: 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell M. W. Grand Master 

Elmer E. Beach Deputy Grand Master 

Arthur E. Wood Soiiior Grand Warden 

Leroy A. Goddard Grand Treasurer 

Isaac Cutter Grand Secretary 

Wm. H. Bied Grand Marshal 

Wm. Elmer Edwards Grand Pursuivant 

George T. Scrivner Grand Tyler 



District Deputy Grand Masters: 



G. Haven Stephens 
Harry 0. Eeser 
Glen Robinson 
Paul A. Neufer 
James R. Dick 
Harry G. Wilson 
LeRoy Hill 
Edgar J. Phillips 



Wm. Tinsley 
George E. Moore 
S. F. Odcll 
Benj. W. Scholton 
W. W. LaMoure 
Ncls N. Johnson 
Ira J. McDowell 
R. H. Cutler 
Frederick D. Ehlert 



Benj. J. Metzger 
Albert P. Bauer 
David S. Davidson 
Robt. A. Lees 
I. J. Smit 
Emanuel Weil 
H. C. Bowen 
F. H. Bradley 



Grand Examiners : 

George E. Carlson, Chairman B. L. Ton Eyek 

Wm. H. Zarley, Sec 'y H. L. Howell 

H. H. Milnor 



Past Grand Examiners: 



Isaac Cutter 
M. Bates lott 
D. G. Fitzgerrcll 
Elmer E. Beach 



Arthur E. Wood 
Maxwell Levy 
Alliert Jampolis 
David D. King 



Wm. W. Roberts 
A. O. Novander 
E. C. Mullen 
G. Haven Stephens 
Wm. H. Bied 
David S. Davidson 
Benj. J. Metzger 
Frederick D. Ehlert 
R. H. Cutler 
Ira J. McDowell 
Nels O. Johnson 
W. W. LaMoure 
Benj. W. Sf'holton 
S. F. Odell 
Geo. E. Moore 
Win. Tinsley 
Glen Robinson 
Harry C. Rescr 
James F. Boyle 



Grand Lecturers: 

Wm. G. Jones 
W. H. Lundie 
Leo A. Swartz 
C. W. Edwards 
Wm. W. M. Bending 
H. C. Bowen 
Carlos K. Eckhart 
Emanuel AVcil 
Walter E. Felt 
Jose]ih A. Berkuian 
O. L. Medskcr 
Otto Shaizkis 
Robert Duthie 
Samuel Wolf 
Oscar Marx 
Dimmilt C. Hutchins 
E. P. Wenger 
Glen F. Coe 
Bernard Remmcr 



I. J. Smit 
E. W. Aplin 
Leslie W. Beebe 
Wm. H. Randall 
Henry Feick 
E. C." Swett 
Chas. H. Crowoll 
Gustav Kohn 
Dan DeBaugh 
Lco]iold Apple 
Geo. E. Banks 
Francis B. Scent 
C. L. Tanner 
John G. Johnson 
G. L. Boal 
W. B. Cochrane 
S. P.. Harvey 
P. C. Peulecka 
Oscar L. Carson 



250 



Appendix 



Chas. Brinkniann 
James A. Zcller 
Wm. Kobertson 
H. R. Young 
John Mutter 
Robt. A. Lees 
Wilbur I. Cox 
John W. Christie 
Paul A. Pabst 
Fred Mickel 
Carroll W. Norris 
J. E. Rayburn 
W. D. Lewis 
Evan P. Jones 
Henry Friedman 
Wm. Elmer Edwards 
Wta. D. Price 
C. A. Stayart 
W. A. Blessing 
W. C. Bryant 
H. D. Hamper 
E. E. Stamp 
Samuel Perleo Reese 
Thos. E. Jones 
Grant Sparrow 



Gordon C. Hamilton 
Chas. H. Keppel 

A. M. Bassford 
Geo. S. Stover 
Walter E. Marble 
E. R. Hensley 
Lyman N. Thurston 

0. E. Carpenter 
David Richards 
E. K. Bennington 
Jacob Schwartz 
Melville H. Leighton 
S. F. Manning 
Brayton Weeks 

R. C. Clark 

B. S. Bingham 

1. J. Grass 
David Martin 
Chas. T. Weiskopf 
Thos. E. Moore 
G. N. Engstrom 
Wm. Wood 
Edwin Love 
Albert T. Thompson 



The total attendance was 815. 



Alonzo Brown 
Otto Brail 
D. S. Mellinger 
Fred S. Schramm 
C. N. Gibson 
H. W. Harvey 
Geo. A. Bissell 
J. F. Braceloux 
Wm. Jedike 
John A. MaCallum 
H. E. DcLavergne 
Louis J. Frahm 
Earl G. Beard 
H. M. Robinson 
Arthur G. French 
L. C. Cramer 
Harry A. Dever 
John Cameron 
Addison Hickox 
Geo. N. Lamb 
A. O. Poff 
Francis H. Bradley 
Albert C. INIcFarla'nd 
Albert E. Parker 



There were in attendance seventy-three masters of lodges and 258 offi- 
cers, other than masters. Two hundred and seven lodges and seven lodges 
of foreign grand jurisdictions were represented. 



EJXAMINATION AT CHICAGO 

An examination for commissions as grand lecturers was held, at the 
Central Masonic Temple, 912 Rorth LaSalle Street, Chicago, on the 21st 
and 22nd of January, 1921, at which the following brethren presented them- 
selves and after being examined, Avere recommended to you for their 
commissions: 

Grover C. Niemeyer 79 W. Monroe Street, Chicago 

David Morris 5540 Winthrop Ave., Chicago 

Walter Scott Litt 4812 Winthrop Ave., Chicago 

David W. Isenhour 308 N. Center Street, Clinton 

Walter B. Nolan 453 E. 111th Street, Chicago 

Adolph G. Helmchen 5238 S. Marshfield Ave., Chicago 

Wm. F. Doemland 3838 N. Kenneth Ave., Chicago 

John Franknecht 3917 N. Leavitt Street, Chicago 

Frank Louis Parsons 27 Grant Place, Park Ridge 

Gustav Adolph Kiel 7840 Lowe Ave., Chicago 

Henry Evans Blake 6217 Kenwood Ave., Chicago 

George Meldrum 26 S. Hamlin Ave., Chicago 

Frederick Moe 1348 N. Paulina St., Chicago 

Julius Oppenheimer 4931 Prairie Ave., Chicago 



Detailed Report — Grand Examiners 251 

Phillip VanWesten 11347 Watt Ave., Chicago 

Harry James Lord 125 S. Kenilworth Ave., Oak Park 

Maurice Ansel Frye 813 Greenleaf St., Evanston 

George Edwards 4043 Washington Blvd., Chicago 

Alexander S. Peters 805 S. Kilbourne Ave., Chicago 

Glen F. Vivian 4108 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago 

Coy Albert Roberts 542 N. Leclaire Ave., Chicago 

Lee Wm. Alder i Chillicothe 

Clarence C. Hicks Colfax 

Chas. Vernon Eice 15 E. Washington Street, Chicago 

Thos. H. Hooper 5313 Maryland Ave., Chicago 

Herbert J. Framhein 6530 Kimbark Ave., Chicago 

Walter Scott Mathews 938 N. Hazel Street, Danville 

Alfred Atwood Johnson 1502 N. Walnut Street, Danville 

Lewis Smith Bridgeport 

Andy Michael Zeimet 1773 Cullom Ave., Chicago 

Joseph Burgower 564 E. 51st Street, Chicago 

Harry A. Lassahn 2037 Eoosevelt Eoad, Chicago 

Thos. Ernest Quincy 6847 Yale Ave., Chicago 

Wm. Jourdan Leacock 5733 Eidge Ave., Chicago 

EocK Island School 
The third state school of the year 1921 -was held at Eock Island on the 
1st, 2nd and 3rd of February. The school was a remarkable one in many 
ways. Several attendance records were established. The members of the 
board think that this is the first time the attendance at a school outside of 
Chicago exceeded that of the Chicago school, the attendance at Chicago be- 
ing 815, that at Eock Island 863. The number of members from foreign 
grand jurisdictions was very large, being 133, representing 101 lodges, so 
that at this school the grand jurisdictions of thirty states of the United 
States, the District of Columbia and Canada were represented. Another rec- 
ord was that the number of Illinois lodges was eighty-seven as compared 
with the 101 foreign lodges represented. The number of officers of lodges 
in attendance was also large, there being 124, of which twenty were masters. 

Grand Officers : 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell M.W. Grand Master 

Isaac Cutter Grand Secretary 

William H. Bled Grand Marshal 

Chester E. Allen M.W. Past Gran(7 Master 

District Deputy Grand Masters: 

Chas. H. Mangold Thomas E. Lees 

C. C. Sawyer R. E. Mitchell 

E. E. James James E. Dick 
C. L. Snyder 

Grand Examiners: 

George E. Carlson, Chairman H. L. Howell 

Wm. H. Zarley, Sec'y. II. H. Milnor 

B. L. TenEyck 



252 



Appendix 



Isaac Cutter 



Past Grand Examiners: 

D. G. Fitzgerrell D. D. King 



C. E. Allen 
C. C. Sawyer 
Chas. H. Mangold 
B. C. Holbrook 
Ralph D. Tinkham 
Geo. S. Bissell 



Grand Lecturers: 

H. L. Weaver 
C. D. Bbvle 
B. C. Nead 
Frank H. Harvey 
S. P. Odenweller 
Thos. E. Jones 



C. E. Olmstead 
James F. Boyle 
L. A. Coleman 
N. B. Carson 
George W. Flood 
Wm. H. Bied 



Sprtngfield School 
The fourth state school of the year was held at Springfield on the 15th, 
16th and 17th of February, 1921. The members of the lioard were especially 
pleased at the number of the grand lodge officers and past grand masters 
who attended. While the number in attendance at this school was not quite 
as large as some of the other schools, the interest shown and the proficiency 
of the brethren present more than made up for the lack of numbers. 

Grand Officers: 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrcll M.W. Grand Master 

Elmer E. Beach Deputy Grand Master 

Leroy A. Goddard Grand Treasurer 

Isaac Cutter Grand Secretary 

William H. Bied Grand Marshal 

W. N. Ewing ' Grand Sword Bearer 

Past Grand Masters: 
Leroy A. Goddard Owen Scott Alexander H. Bell 

District Deputy Grand Masters: 

Wm. Tinsley Harry G. Wilson Hal C. MeLoud 

Silvey J. Wilson Fred I. Mills Frank W. Brown 

W. W. Eothrock A. A. Bauer T. M. Avery 

Ji. W. Mitchell Paul G. Duncan H. C. Bowen 

G. A. Stadler E. L. Lawrence 



Grand Examiners: 

George E. Carlson, Chairman H. L. Howell 

Wm. H. Zarley, Secretary H. H. Milnor, 

B. L. Ten Eyck 



Past Grand Examiners: 



Isaac Cutter 

D. G. Fitzgerrell 



J. E. Jeffers 
E. E. Beach 



H. S. Wiley 
D. D. King 



Detailed Report — Grand Examiners 



253 



H. C. Bowen 
T. M. Avery 
Frank W. Brown 
Hal 0. McLoud 

E. L. Lawrence 
Paul G. Duncan 
A. A. Bauer 

F. I. Mills 
Wm. Tinslcy 
W. N. Ewing 
C. H. Lefler 

G. I. Covalt 
H. L. Kelly 
George Zoller 
J, B. Roach 
Amos Ball 
L. W. Coe 

\Vl M. Mcsnard 
Julius G. Strawn 
W. C. Bradley 
E. B, Funk 



Grand Lecturers: 

Wm. M. Lovins 
J. L. Klemnie 
T. B. Straus 
E". G. George 
G. N. Todd 
A. O. Poff 
John P. Swoitzer 
M. L. Downey 
R. C. Peck 
P. J. Chapman 
R. V. McKee 
A. C. Acton 
Jas. T. Athey 
Samuel Faucett 
Albert C. Metcalf 
Henry E. Van Loon 
L. J. Wylie 
H. A. Flock 
R. F. Davidson 
Frank M. Gandy 
A. L. Pickel 
Emory Edwards 



Wm. H. Bied 
J. O. Holland 
G. N. Lamb 

F. O. Lorton 
Frank J. Vernon 

A. W. Joerndt 
E. E. Welsh 
Fred J. Jerden 
Elof Peterson 

G. B. Marshall 
Frank N. Nicol 
Howard H. Grubb 

B. 0. Holbrook 
W. H. Hoover 
L. A. Tripp 

C. L. Montgomery 
W. A. Dixon 

D. W. Starr 
W. D. Lewis 
Albert F. Smyth 
Frank W. Partridge 



There were in attendance eighty ofliccrs of lodges, of which twenty-one 
were Masters; fourteen lodges of foreign Grand Jurisdictions were repre- 
sented; 136 Illinois lodges were represented. 

The total attendance was 543, 



Danville School 

The fifth State School of the year was held at Danville on the 1st, 2nd, 
and 3rd of March, 1921. Brother Dolan, secretary of the Board of Man- 
agers of the Masonic Home at Sullivan, was present and gave an address 
as to the homes at Sullivan and LaGrange which was very instructive to 
the brethren and very interestingly given by Brother Dolan. 

One of the features of all Grand Lodge schools was missing at this 
school because Brother Cutter was unable to be present and deliver his 
usual interesting address. 

Grand Officers: 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell Most Worshipful Grand Master 

Arthur E. Wood Senior Grand Warden 

R. C. Davenport Junior Grand Warden 

Wm. H. Bied G rand Marshal 

Owen Scott Most Worshipful Past Grand Master 

District Deputy Grand Masters: 

G. Haven Stephens Boyd S. Blaine Herbert C. Bowen 

W. F, Gibson 



254 Appendix 

Grand Examiners: 

George E. Carlson, Chairman H. L. Howell 

Wm. H. Zarlcy, Secretary II. II. Milnor 

B. L. Ten Eyck 

Past Grand Examiners: 

D. G. Fitzgerrell E. C. Davenport 

A. E. Wood D. D. King 

Grand Lecturers: 

Herbert C. Bowen G. H. Schultz M. N. Shaw 

Boyd S. Blaine Leonard F. W. Stuebe James Porter 

G. Haven Stephens O. J. Chapman J. I. Brydon 

A. F. Johnston B. T. Harley S. S. Middleton 

Alfred A. Johnson J. A. Shepherd, Jr. N. M. Mesnard 

Walter S. Matthews Henry P. Blose Benjamin Bing 

J. L. Dawson Eobt. Pettigrew Z. S. Saylor 

K. C. Cantelou W. G. Spurgin Wm. H. Bied 
Wm. H. Pundt C J. Wightman 

There were in attendance 64 officers of lodges, of whom 14 were Mas- 
ters, 63 Illinois lodges and 22 lodges of foreign Grand Jurisdictions were 
represented. 

The total attendance was 456. 

Princeton School 

The sixth and last State School of the year was held at Princeton on 
the 15th, 16th, and 17th of March, 1921. The school was well attended and 
was a success in every way. Brother Bradley, the D.D.G.M. for the district 
in which the school was held, was very much pleased with the school as well 
as with his St. Patrick's party, which some of his visiting Masonic friends 
arranged for him. Brother Harry W. Hanson and his fellow Eotarians 
entertained the Grand Lecturers at the Eotary Club dinner on Tuesday, 
and Brother Hanson had one of his fancy Jersey cows in the dining room 
to furnish milk for the dinner. Everyone who attended the school at 
Princeton was of the opinion that Brother Bradley and the brethren of 
Princeton and vicinity deserve a lot of credit for the large attendance at 
the school, considering the comparatively small local membership, nearly 
the entire membership of Princeton lodge being in attendance. 

Grand Officers: 

Daniel G. Fitzgerrell Most Worshipful Grand Master 

Elmer E. Beach Deputy Grand Master 

Arthur E. Wood Senior Grand Warden 

Wm. Elmer Edwards Grand Pursuivant 

Wm. II. Bied Grand Mar^^hal 

Chester E. Allen Most Worshipful Past Grand Master 



Detailed Report — Gravid Examiners 



255 



District Deputy Grand Masters: 

Francis H. Bradley R. E. W. Mitchell A. J. Winteringham 

Hugh Mallett D. S. Davidson C. C. Sawyer 

F. L. Dudley J. A. Coleman 

Grand Examiners: 

George E. Carlson, Chairman B. L. Ten Eyck 

Wm. H. Zarley, Secretary H. L. Howell 

Harry H. Milnor 



Chas. DeHart 
Lawrence Johnson 



Past Grand Examiners: 

D. G. Fitzgerrell 

E. E. Beach 
D. D. King 



A. E. Wood 
Enimett Howard 



Grand Lecturers: 



C. E. Allen 

Wm. Elmer Edwards 

Wm. H. Bied 

C. C. Sawyer 

A. J. Winteringham 

D. S. Davidson 
F. H. Bradley 
J. A. Coleman 

E. P. Jones 
H. D. Hamper 
Chas. H. Crowell 

W. 0. Bry 



O. E. Carpenter 
John Hay 
J. O. Anderson 
C. C. Fenn 
Frank L. Shaw 
W. W. Roberts 
R. C. Cantelou 
W. H. Rupc 
Edwin Love 
Chas. H. Keppel 
Addison Hickox 
ant David 



Carroll W. Norris 
C. D. Boyle 
Geo. L. Beal 
Wm. H. Briggs 
M. T. Booth 
Edwin F. Works 
J. A. Provost 
George Meldrum 
Arthur G. French 
A. B. Hay 
John D. Charters 
Morrid 



There were in attendance 117 officers of lodges, of which 21 were Mas- 
ters. Bight lodges of foreign Grand Jurisdictions and 91 Illinois lodges 
were represented. 

Total attendance 503. 

The attendance at the six schools was as follows: Mount Vernon, 'M)G; 
Chicago, 815; Rock Island, 863; Springfield, 543; Danville, 450; Prince- 
ton, 503; total attendance, 3,486. 



Examination at Normal 

An examination for commissions as Grand Lecturers was held at the 
Masonic Temple at Normal, on the 1st and 2nd of August, 1921, at which 
the following brethren presented themselves, and after being examined, 
were recommended to you for tlicir commissions: 

Wm". W. Higgins 1301 Washington Blvd., Chicago 

Samuel Wm. Carothers Dallas City 

John C. Moline Dallas City 



256 Appendix 

Isadoro Ilirschlici-fj^ 3408 Flournoy St., Chicago 

Edward G. Boyardus 822 N. First St., Springfield 

Walter H. Laiicr 2300 Cass St., Joliet 

Benjamin F. Cohn 6533 Grcenvievv Ave., Chicago 

Ray O. Eodcriek ir)24 28th St., Rock Island 

Win. H. Yoss 2451 19th Ave., Rock Island 

Jacob W. Houdcr 832 19th St., Rock Island 

Wylie H. Kecley 1728 19th Ave., Rock Island 

Chas. F. Eldrcd 5112 9th St; Rock Island 

Frank P. Green Colona 

Hamilton M. Custer Altamont 

Herschel T. O. Morris 844 W. Grand Ave., Decatur 

Lorenzo Chas. Cloyd 1110 E. William St., Decatur 

Arthur C. Lehman 620 W. King St., Decatur 

George B. Weisiger Oakwood 

Benjamin F. Allen Raleigh 

Sol Rosenblatt 309 E. 47th St., Chicago 

Frank F. Fierke 632 Sherman Ave., Elgin 

OTien Perce Morse 224 Second St., Dundee 

John Small 132 W. College St., Harrisburg 

John B. Hethcrington 217 W. Poplar St., Harrisburg 

Lloyd W. Wainright WoodhuU 

Edward A. Tobias 311 North St., Normal 

Leo E. Littell 103 W. Harrison St., Danville 

Ralph L. Lanham 411 N. Race St., Urbana 

Glenn Dale Mencely Fisher 

Crandall Z. Rosecrans 806 S. 3rd St., Champaign 

During the year, the alarm of death has sounded in our midst, on two 
occasions. 

Early in the fall of 1920 Brother Carlton G. Taylor, of Rock Island, 
was summoned to the Grand Lodge above. Brother Taylor was a just and 
upright Mason and exhibited in his daily life the golden tenets of Brotherly 
Love, Relief, and Truth. 

The sad news of the death of Brother Isaac Cutter, came early in June, 
and caused the brethren of Illinois to feel that a very dark cloud was over 
them, but the sadness was somewhat relieved by the knowledge that he had 
ascended those serene heights of beauty and joy, to be seated at the right 
hand of the Supreme Grand Master, and to be pronounced a just and upright 
Mason. 

It is not meet that I here record the virtues of these brethren, "they 
have gone beyond our praise or censure," except to say, we all are aware 
that they had learned well the lesson "to be good men and true. ' ' 

In conclusion we desire to express our heartfelt appreciation of the 
honors conferred upon us at your hands, and that we desire to thank you 



Detailed Report — Grand Examiners 257 

for the many kindnesses and favors you have shown ns during our term of 
service as members of your Board of Grand Examiners. 

"We also desire to congratulate you on your successful term of office 
as Most Worshipful Grand Master. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Geo. E. Carlson, Chairman, 
Wm. H. Zarley, 
B. L. Ten Etck, 
Harry L. Howell, 
Harry H. Milnor, 

Board of Grand Examiners, 
Per Wm. H. Zarley, Secrctari/. 






258 Appendix 



AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS ADOPTED 

667. Evory loflf^c in tliis jurisdiction, on or before the first day of 
August each year, shall pay into the treasury of the grand lodge, through 
the grand secretary, the sum of one dollar and twenty-five cents for 
each master mason l)clonging to such lodge at the time of making the 
annual returns. Of this one dollar and twenty-five cents one-half shall 
be for the general fund and one-half for the charity fund, subject to 
such appropriations from time to time as the grand lodge may direct. 

149. For the due performance of the duties hereinbefore prescribed, 
the grand secretary shall receive, as full compensation, the sum of four 
thousand dollars per annum, payable in monthly installments; provided, 
that for payment of sums actually expended for postage, express charges, 
and incidental official expenses the grand lodge may make appropriations, 
upon presentation of itemized bills, approved by the finance committee. 
Provided, further, that the grand secretary shall employ an assistant 
who shall receive such compensation as shall be fixed by the finance 
committee and the grand master. 

419. When a brother has legally changed his name according to the 
laws of the State of Illinois, he shall be required to notify the secretary 
of his lodge promptly thereof, accompanying such notification with docu- 
mentary evidence showing conclusively that his name has in fact been 
changed in conformity with the civil laws. Upon receipt of such noti- 
fication the secretary of the lodge shall change the name accordingy on 
the lodge records and shall promptly notify the secretary of the grand 
lodge of such change. 

348. A lodge cannot remove its place of meeting from the city, 
town or village named in its charter or dispensation, except by special 
authority of the grand lodge or grand master, granted upon a written 
petition concurred in by a vote of three-fourths of the members of the 
lodge present at a stated meeting; of which meeting, and the proposi- 
tion for such removal, all the resident members of the lodge shall have 
at least two weeks' previous notice; and such removal shall be con- 
sented to by the lodge or lodges whose jurisdiction may be abridged 
thereby. 

349. Repealed. 

351. Hereafter designated as 349. 




: ; 



ISAAC CUTTER 

GRAND SECRETARY 

from October, 1906 

to June, 1921 

Died While in Office 



BORN JANUARY 20, 1854 
DIED JUNE 15. 1921 







^^ 



i 





BERTHOLD E. UEBELE 

D.D.G.M. Second District 

DIED JUNE 6, 1921 
AGE 50 YEARS 



HENRY R. HOPKINS 

DIED AUGUST 30, 1921 
AGE 88 YEARS 



CLINTON L. SANDUSKY 

Past D.D.G.M. 59th District 

BORN SEPTEMBER 30, 1871 
DIED AUGUST 26. 1921 




I 
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MASTERS AND PAST MASTERS OF ILLINOIS 

BODLEY LODGE NO. 1 

Homer M. Swope, W.M,, 1905 October 8, 1920 

SPRINGFIELD LODGE NO. 4 

William B. Reid, W.M., 1891 May 29, 1921 

FRIENDSHIP LODGE NO. 7 
Rodney Mason Ayres, W.M., 1908 April 10, 1921 

CLINTON LODGE NO. 19 

Anson Thompson, W.IM., 1875, 1884 April 23, 1921 

HERMAN LODGE NO. 39 
William Frederick Apenbrink, W.M., 1913.. March 19, 1921 

MT. MORIAH LODGE NO. 51 

Amos H. Clotfelter, W.M., 1885-1888, 1891, 1895, 1901, 

January 16, 1921 

BENEVOLENT LODGE NO. 52 

Henry Christopher Wegehoft, W.M., 1881 May 2, 1921 

TRIO LODGE NO. 57 

Carlton Gains Taylor, W.M.. 1911, 1912 .. December 9, 1920 

NEW BOSTON LODGE NO. 59 

Ed L. Willits, W.M., (No date given) April 10, 1921 

SAINT MARKS LODGE NO. 63 

Charles Henry Buckley, W.M., 1916 November 8, 1920 

George Levi Sherwood, W.M., 1877, 1878, 1879, 

December 16, 1919 

WHITE HALL LODGE NO. 80 

Joshua Hardin Winters, W.M„ 1908, 1909 .February 27, 1921 

METROPOLIS LODGE NO. 91 

James Albert Helen, M.W., 1904-1912 ... .December 11, 1920 
James L. Elliott, W.M., 1889-1899 April 29, 1921 




^ 



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EXCELSIOE LODGE NO. 97 

Luther A. Brigham, W.M., 1881 October 30, 1920 

LANCASTER LODGE NO. 106 

C. N. Kerdendall, W.M., (No date given) .. .October 9, 1920 

WAVEELY LODGE NO. 118 

Wyla A. Jones, W.M., (No date given) ... .October 21, 1920 

CEDAR LODGE NO. 124 

John Ray, W.M., 1902-1904 November 17, 1920 

ANTIOCH LODOE NO. 127 
Dave Murric, W.M., 1897, 1898 June 29, 1921 

SYCAMORE LODGE NO. 134 

Carl M. Arntzen, W.M.. 1913 April 4, 1921 

OLNEY LODGE NO. 140 
Gideon David Blanker, W.M., 1866-1869, 1872, 1875, 1879, 

February 2, 1921 

URBANA LODGE NO. 157 

John W. Kerrigan, W.M., 1916 June 25, 1921 

ATLANTA LODGE NO. 165 

Carter Henry Eldredge, W.M., 1902 April 12, 1921 

ABINGDON LODGE NO. 185 

Frank M. Williamson, W.M., 1894 December 28, 1920 

MYSTIC TIE LODGE NO. 187 

William T. Clofifer, W.M., 1913, 1914 November 9, 1920 

CYRUS LODGE NO. 188 

John Coleman, W.M., 1884 May 29, 1921 

LA HARPE LODGE NO. 195 

Isaac W. Cassell, W.M., (No date given) . .October 31, 1920 

CENTRALIA LODGE NO. 207 

Matthew Weaverling Blakely, W.M., 1916 June 16, 1921 



\^t;' 




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/y///y//////iili!U\\\\\\\\\\ 

TAMAROA LODGE NO. 207 

Albert H. Evans, W.M., 1888, 1889, 1892, 1893, 1895, 

1896, 1900, 1902, 1903, 1904 September 21, 1920 

WILLIAM B. WARREN LODGE NO. 209 

John F. Wolff, W.M., 1895 October 18, 1920 

George M. Aykroyd, W.M., 1879, 1884 ... .October 20, 1920 

Daniel A. Campbejl, / W.M., 1896 December 10, 1920 

CLEVELAND LODGE NO. 211 

Joseph H. Macauley, W.M., 1890 June 1, 1921 

John McKeown, W.M., 1904 November 1, 1920 

NEWTON LODGE NO. 216 

Fleming H. Robertson, W.M., 1899, 1900 . .February 15, 1921 

GEORGE WASHINGTON LODGE NO. 222 

John A. Titus, W.M., 1893, 1902 March 3, 1921 

PANA LODGE NO. 226 

Frank M. Brown, W.M., 1889 November 25, 1920 

COLUMBUS LODGE NO. 227 

Howard C. Weaver, W.M., 1913 May 23, 1921 

NEW HAVEN LODGE NO. 230 

William Calvin Williams, W.M., 1882-1884 .. March 4, 1921 

CAIRO LODGE NO. 237 
Paul G. Schuh, W.M., 1876 November 30, 1920 

GOLDEN GATE LODGE NO. 248 

George W. Hamilton, W.M., 1873, 1878, 1879, 1880- 

1893, 1897-1900 February 20, 1921 

HIBBARD LODGE NO. 249 

Thomas A. Jones, W.M., (No date given) .... April 23, 1921 

HEYWORTH LODGE NO. 251 

Charles E. Bishop, W.M., (No date given) ... April 21, 1921 




3 







AMON LODGE NO. 261 

Charles Wesley Cardiff, W.M., (No date given) . April 6, 1921 
Charles Grant Walters, W.M., (No date given), 

October 22, 1920 

FRANKLIN GROVE LODGE NO. 264 

Albert William Crawford. W.M., 1896-1898, 

November 15, 1920 

PARIS LODGE NO. 268 
Joseph E. Dyas, W.M., (No date given) .. September 2, 1920 

WHEATON LODGE NO. 269 

James Saunders, W.M., 1875 May 11, 1921 

BLANEY LODGE NO. 271 

Charles Clinton Buell, W.:M., 1896 July 13, 1920 

MILTON LODGE NO. 275 

John Thomas Thurmon, W.M., 1900-1902 July 8, 1920 

KANSAS LODGE NO. 280 

Joseph E. Hite, W.M., 1907, 1908 December 4, 1920 

BROOKLYN LODGE NO. 282 

Harry L. Fordham, W.M., (No date given) . .October 6, 1920 

DILLS LODGE NO. 295 

George W. Barnett, W.M.. 1899 September 10, 1920 

QUINCY LODGE NO. 296 

Henry Warren Mead, W.:M.. (No date given).. July 16, 1920 
Edward Starr Mulliner, W.;\I., (No date given) 

January 20, 1921 

BENJAMIN LODGE NO. 297 

Isaac Cutter, W.M., 1896-1898 June 15, 1921 

WM. C. HOBBS LODGE NO. 306 

Elijah W. Dickinson, W.]\I.. 1864, 1878, 1879, 1880, 

December 27, 1920 




2 




wwv 



DEARBORN LODGE NO. 310 

Iraneaus T. Crislev, W.M., 1906 April 29, 1921 

Bert E. Uebele, W.M., 1914 June 6, 1921 

PALATINE LODGE NO. 314 

Robert Mosser, W.M., 1899, 1900-1904 Inn.' 23, 1921 

DTJNLAP LODGE NO. 321 

Martin Van Buren, Smith, W.M., (No date given), 

February 11, 1921 
Edwin A. Worrell, W.M., (No date given) .. March 13, 1921 

WINDSOR LODGE NO. 322 

William Washington McKee Barber, W.M., 1880-1895, 

May 12, 1921 

HARRISBURG LODGE NO. 325 

Jared William Richardson, W.M., 1892, 1905, 

October 25, 1920 

TUSCOLA LODGE NO. 332 

Myron Elliot Bigelow, W.M., (No date given) . .April 30, 1921 

TYRIAN LODGE NO. 333 

Francis Hudson, W.M., 1874. 1875, 1889, 1890, 1891, 

March 5, 1921 
Jesse Orville Taylor, W.M., 1911 November 8, 1920 

SUMNER LODGE NO. 334 

Benjamin Franklin Hockman. W.M., 1902, 1903, 1916, 

October 8, 1920 

SIDNEY LODGE NO. 347 

William A. Robinson, W.M., 1881-1889 

TARBOLTON LODGE NO. 351 

John H. Conerus, W.M., 1892, 1893 August 24, 1920 

ARK & ANCHOR LODGE NO. 354 

Albert Perry Lorton, W.M., 1888, 1893, 1897. March 7, 1921 

BEMENT LODGE NO. 365 

Charles F. Tenney, W.M„ (No date given) .. August 31, 1920 




I 




vi 




€> t*AsO i$ 



/v<\ 





■/// 1 

LIBERTY LODGE NO. 380 

A. H. D. Buttz, W.M., 1902, 1903 April 11, 1921 

MISSISSIPPI LODGE NO. 385 

John R. Robinsdii. W.M.. lHt)7, 1868, 1876, 1877, 1878, 

1881 March 1, 1921 

JERSEYVILLE LODGE NO. 394 

Joseph G. Marston, W.M., 1875, 1876, 1882, 1883, 1884, 

1887, 1888, 1889 November 27, 1920 

Morris R. Locke, W.M., 1879 September 9, 1920 

BATAVIA LODGE NO. 404 

George B. Moberg, W.M., 1918 December 3, 1920 

Guy Rockwell Sperry, W.M., 1916 February 12, 1921 

RAIVISEY LODGE NO. 405 

Hugh Barr McKiiight, W.M., (No date given) 

December 10, 1920 

THOS. J. TURNER LODGE NO. 409 

William Lowe, W.M., 1876-1878 January 11, 1921 

MITHRA LODGE NO. 410 

Charles Hoffmann, W.M., 190.5, 1906 March 24, 1921 

RED BUD LODGE NO. 427 
Charles Thadeus Helber, W.M., 1902 May 13, 1921 

ATKINSON LODGE NO. 433 

Horace Edward Whitted, W.M., 1911, 1912.... July 30, 1920 

HAMPSHIRE LODGE NO. 443 
Frank E. Ball, W.M., (No date given) . .December 22, 1920 

JEFFERSONVILLE LODGE NO. 460 

William Bye Whitacre, W.M., 1902, 1911, 1915. July 20, 1920 

SOUTH MACON LODGE NO. 467 

Harold R. Woodcock, W.M., 1910 November 10, 1920 

Wil]iam Johnston. W.M., 1906 April 19, 1921 

CHENEY'S GROVE LODGE NO. 468 

John M. Crigler, W.M., 1892, 1893 February 15, 1921 







KENDALL LODaE NO. 4^l\ 
George F. Hoadley, W.M., (No .dfit^ given), 

j I i I September 

MANiTo Lodge no. 476 

Frederick Schoneman, W.M., 1874, 1878 .... March 

BOWEN LODGE NO. 486 

Charles C. Crossland, W.M., 1897, 1898 ., November 
William F. Hughes, W.M., 1910 March 

CLAY CITY LODGE NO. 488 

.4nthony Doherty, W.M., 1890 September 

STONE FORT LODGE NO. 495 

John A. Whiteaker, W.M., (No date given) .. March 

SAINT PAUL LODGE NO. 500 

Mervin B. Converse, W.M., 1877 January 

Henry B. Kane, W.M., 1883 November 

EAST ST. LOUIS LODGE NO. 504 

Paul W. Abt, W.M., 1885 August 

PARKERSBURG LODGE NO. 609 

Francis Marion Rash, W.M., (No date given). March 

WADE BARNEY LODGE NO. 512 

Richard William Phillips, W.M., (No date given), 

January 

LITCHFIELD LODGE NO. 517 

Charles Henry Stivers, W.M.. 1916 August 

ILLIOPOLIS LODGE NO. 521 

Lee G. Metcalf, W.M., 1898. 1910 January 

COVENANT LODGE NO. 526 

Edmund H. Spratlcn, W.M.. 1907 November 

ROSSVILLE LODGE NO. 527 

Hugh Harold Depler, W.M., 1893, 1894, 1896-1898, 
1902, 1919-1921 May 



17 



1921 



1920 
1921 



1921 

1920 



1920 



1920 



1920 



1921 




^ 





ADAMS LODGE NO. 529 
Stephen A. Benson, W.M., (No date given) .. August 5, 1920 

LESSING LODGE NO. 557 

Frederick Maas, W.M., 1914, 1915 February 5, 1921 

JACKSONVILI.E LODGE NO. 570 

S. H. Thompson, W.M., (No date given) .. December 18, 1920 

GARDNER LODGE NO. 573 

Nathan L. Miner, W.M., (No date given) .... April 10, 1921 

CAPRON LODGE NO. 575 

Alexander Vance, W.M., 1893 October 2, 1920 

SHIRLEY LODGE NO. 582 

Andrew Newton Williams, W.M., 1908, 1909, 

November 5, 1920 

FAIRMOUNT LODGE NO. 590 

Wilbur Teazel, W.M., (No date given) .. September 17, 1920 
William H. Goodwin, W.M., (No date given), 

February 4, 1921 

STREATOR LODGE NO. 607 

Davison E. Huggans, W.M.. 1905 July 27, 1920 

Hugh Hall, W.M., 1880-1882 August 22, 1920 

PIPER LODGE NO. 608 

John Augustus Montelius, W.M., 1884, 1885, 

October 13, 1920 

COMET LODGE NO. 641 

Robert C. Crihfield, W.M., (No date given).. May 19, 1921 

APOLLO LODGE NO. 642 

John Franklin Campbell, W.M,. 1896 July 14, 1920 

D. C. CREGIER LODGE NO. 643 

George H. Rittmiller, W.M., 1880 June 7, 1921 

OBLONG CITY LODGE NO. 644 

William S. Brown, W.M., 1897, 1898, 1915.. March 1, 1921 



^ 




r 



iiihi 

EOCK ISLAND LODGE NO. 658 

William Payne, W.M., 1910 May 9, 1921 

SOUTH PARK LODGE NO. 662 

John Jacob Zoller, W.M., 1897, 1898 June 11, 1921 

HEEDER LODGE NO. 669 

Charles Vietzen, W.M., 1910, 1911, 1912... March 23, 1921 

EDDYVILLE lodge no. 672 

John S. Barger, W.M., 1894, 1895, 1909-1911 .. June 13, 1921 

NORMAL LODGE NO. 673 

Robert Lincoln Fleming, W.M., 1895-1897 .. March 1, 1921 

WALDECK LODGE NO. 674 

Frank Dober, W.M., 1901-1903 March 28, 1921 

ORANGEVILLE LODGE NO. 687 

David A. Schoch, W.M., (No date given) May 12, 1921 

CLIFTON LODGE NO. 688 

Peter Wright, W.M., 1896-1899, 1912 August 16, 1920 

ENGLEWOOD LODGE NO. 690 

George Muirhead, W.M., 1887 January 7, 1921 

Benjamin Franklin Tarner, W.M., 1917 April 28, 1921 

BELLE RIVE LODGE NO. 696 

Jo-iathan Scott Cook. W.M., 1905-1906 ... January 10, 1921 

CALUMET LODGE NO. 716 

Thomas J. McGrath, W.M.. 1888 April 4, 1921 

AECANA LODGE NO. 717 

James Gray, W.M., 1895, 1896 April 13, 1921 

John Strening, W.M., 1885, 1886 June 20, 1921 

GIBSON LODGE NO. 733 

John M. Pendergast, W.M., 1910 June 9, 1921 






I 



A 




////iiiliimv 

LAKESIDE LODGX: NO. 7S9 

Joseph William Leverenz, W.M., 1909 August 29, 1920 

Eben Julian Beach, W.M., 1904 September 27, 1920 

Morris J. Moth, W.M., 1882 October 6, 1920 

CENTENNIAL LODGE NO. 747 

Robert E. Lee Jessee, W.M., 1917, 1918 July 3, 1920 

ALLENDALE LODGE NO. 752 

Harvey Wilkinson, W.M., 1914. 1915 January 21, 1921 

GRAND CROSSING LODGE NO. 776 

Leon Eugene Souillet, W.M., 1910 January 30, 1921 

SILOAM LODGE NO. 780 

Joseph S. Aston, W.M., 1906 October 7, 1920 

BEACON LIGHT LODGE NO. 784 

Frank Gilbert Barnard, W.M., 1892 July, 1920 

Fred Arthur Rich, W.M., 1893, 1894 October 4, 1920 

Frank Wellington McNally, W.M., 1906 . .November 25. 1920 

MORRIS LODGE NO. 787 

Isaac Newton Tolin, W.M., 1902 September 9, 1920 

AUBURN PARK LODGE NO. 789 

John Thomas Colvin, W.M., 1903 June 16, 1921 

TADMOR LODGE NO. 794 

James Harrison Shipp, W.M,, (No date given), 

January 1, 1921 

KENSINGTON LODGE NO. 804 

George E. Roberts, W.M., 1903 July 2, 1920 

LAWN LODGE NO. 815 
Spencer L. Davis, W.M., 1900, 1901 March 19. 1921 

COLUMBIA LODGE NO. 819 

George Henry Taylor, W.M., 1913 May 30, 1921 

BELKNAP LODGE NO. 822 
Addison Marion Kean, W.M., 1896 June 3, 1921 




1 






,.nninu m 

GOTHIC LODGE NO. 852 

William Claude Rogers, W.M., 1917 June 6. 1921 

LATHAM LODGE NO. 853 

Adoniram Judson Pease, W.M., 1905, 1918, 

\ \ \ December 18, 1920 
James H. Harris, W.M., 1917 ..;...'... 1 ... March 5, 1921 

MAYWOOD LODGE NO. 869 

John William Barker, W.M.. 1905 January 28, 1921 

LOSTANT LODGE NO. 870 

Richard William Phillips, W.M„ 1908 January 8, 1921 

ARGENT A LODGE NO. 871 

Edward H. Thomas, W.M., 1904 May 22, 1921 

Samuel B. Stewart, W.M., 1911 May 14, 1921 

VILLA GROVE LODGE NO. 885 

Martin Rhiley Jones, W.M., 1911 August 4, 1920 

DESPLAINES LODGE NO. 890 

Thomas Keates, W.M., 1887-1889, 1891-1897, 1902, 1903, 

October 4, 1920 

LOGAN SQUARE LODGE NO. 891 

William Herman Hadam, W.M., 1908 .. .December 31, 1920 

UTOPIA LODGE NO. 894 

Oliver Edward Jones, W.M., 1913 May 26, 1921 

REPUBLIC LODGE NO. 914 

Frederick Miller Kremer, W.M., 1917 April 9, 1921 

ST. JOSEPH LODGE NO. 920 
Henry Elmer Davis, W.M., 1915, 1916 ... November 20, 1920 

GRANT PARK LODGE NO. 928 

William Charles Unruh, W.M., 1917 July 26, 1920 

ROCK FALLS LODGE NO. 936 
W. Herbert Brown, W.M., (No date given) .. .July 19, 1920 



rf JBaiBifiTiifiimirta. 





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PROGRESSIVE LODGE NO. 954 

Frederick Ferdinand Schaefers, W.M., 1913.. March 23, 1921 

BROUGHTON LODGE NO. 963 
Inman Ira Hall, W.M., 1917, 1918 June 15, 1921 

NIAGARA LODGE NO. 992 

Leonard Linley, W.M., 1920 October 11, 1920 

WOODSON LODGE NO. 1011 

Earl Winfield Sorrells, W.M., (No date given). .May 7, 1921 




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OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS 

ALABAMA 

Russell McWhorter Cunningham ......June 6, 1921 

Past Grand Master \ \ \ \ 

ARKANSAS 

William Henry Harrison Clayton December 14, 1920 

Past Grand Master 

COLORADO 

Prank Church June 24, 1921 

Past Grand Master 
George Washington Musser August 7, 1921 

Past Grand Master 

CONNECTICUT 

Wallace S. Moyler September 10, 1920 

Past Grand Master 

GEOBaiA. 

Henry Banks June 3, 1920 

Past Grand Master 

IDAHO 

John D. Bloomfield April 5, 1921 

Past Grand Master 

MICHIGAN 

John Quincy Look October 22, 1920 

Past Grand Master 
Neal McMillan December 11, 1920 

Past Grand Master 

MISSOURI 

Jacob Lampert February 19, 1921 

Past Grand Master 
James W. Boyd April 19, 1921 

Past Grand Master 
Theodore Brace May 27, 192 1 

Past Grand Master 

NEBRASKA 

James Robert Cain November 29, 1920 

Past Grand Master 
Michael Dowling May 5, 1921 




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A 



NEVADA \ \ \ \ \ \ 
Merrill Pingree Freeman Aprir 11, 

Past Grand Master 
John Dempster Hammond December 4, 

Past Grand Master 
Herman Davis February 20, 

Past Grand Master 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Robert Morrison September 29, 

Past Grand Master 

NEW YORK 

Charles S'umner Burch December 20, 

Grand Chaplain 

OHIO 

Lewis Philip Schaus December 4, 

Past Grand Master 

OREGON 

Edward Elmer Kiddle December 28, 

Past Grand Master 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

John Hopwood McCord September 11, 

Grand Master 

TENNESSEE 
Archibald N. Sloan November 29, 

Past Grand Master 
Philip Neely Matlock March 25, 

Past Grand Master 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Thomas Wilbur Hennen November 26, 

Past Grand Master 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Edward Lindsey Elwood May 19, 

Grand Master 



1919 

1920 
1921 



1920 



1920 




APPENDIX PART I 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE 



FOREWORD 

In presenting the annual review for the year 192 1, the 
writer has endeavored to condense as much as possible and 
cover such of the grand jurisdictions as came under his notice 
in as brief a manner as possible. 

Comment has been very sparingly used and the effort made 
to set forth as briefly as possible the principal events which 
each grand lodge participated in. 

It is no easy matter to read the proceedings of fifty or 
sixty grand lodges and glean therefrom those items of interest 
which in the opinion of the writer will claim the attention of 
those who are to read them. 

The year which has just drawn to a close has not been 
characterized by any unusual procedure as the country is pass- 
ing through a period of readjustment and gradually settling 
down to old time procedures so the same may be said of 
Freemasonry. 

The war was responsible for a great many questions and 
innovations coming up in our Masonic lodges as well as un- 
usual procedures, but this period seems to have passed and 
we are now approaching a state which may be looked upon as 
stable and conservative. 

There are a number of proceedings which have not been 
reviewed this year which usually appear in this report. This 
is due to the fact that they have not been received due prob- 
ably to printers' delay. However, the review is offered for 
what it is worth and it is sincerely to be hoped that those who 
are interested in the affairs of other grand lodges may find in 
this resume, those salient facts which go to make up the pro- 
ceedings of each grand lodge. 

DELMAR D. DARRAH. 
Bloomington, 111., September i, 192 1 



IV 

POINT OF VIEW 
Group Work 

In reading the proceedings of the numerous grand lodges 
which came under notice of the writer, it is apparent that the 
thinking men of the fraternity are commencing to realize 
that there is too much time devoted to conferring degrees and 
too little to those other essentials of the fraternity which are 
so necessary for its success and prosperity. Not a few grand 
masters have recommended to their grand lodges that some- 
thing be done that will permit lodges to initiate more than one 
candidate at the same time. This writer long ago took up 
this subject and has urged a fair hearing upon the matter so 
far as his own grand lodge is concerned. It is not noticeable 
that any great harm is being brought to the fraternity in those 
grand lodges which permit group work. In fact, many of 
them are working out their destiny in a highly satisfactory 
manner and accomplishing much good for the benefit of the 
fraternity. It is hard to get men to understand that Free- 
masonry like everything else has undergone a wonderful evo- 
lution in the last one hundred years. Forty years ago it was 
a very unusual thing for a lodge to initiate a candidate. There 
was then some reason why each candidate should be given his 
degrees singly. Much of the essence of the fraternity is con- 
tained in the first degree and if it is given to a candidate 
singly there is no reason why a plan of group initiation should 
not be devised for the balance of the degrees. Because Ma- 
sonry did a thing fifty years ago is no argument why it 
should do it now. There is a wonderful awakening along 
Masonic lines and it is sincerely hoped that the time is not far 
distant when this subject of group initiating will receive 
proper attention at the hands of thoughtful men of the fra- 
ternity, thus relieving it of a burden which is today retarding 
its true progress. 



Group Bai,i,oting 

In reading the proceedings which the writer was com- 
pelled to do in order to make his report, it was noticeable that 
a new question is coming to the front, particularly that of 
group balloting on candidates. 

In a number of instances, grand masters have ruled that 
where committee reports have been unanimous that a group 
ballot be taken on all petitions. If a black ball appears it is 
up to the lodge to separate the petitions and ballot on them 
separately until the subject of the black ball is singled out and 
eliminated. This is exactly as it should be. When a lodge 
has fifteen, twenty or twenty-five petitions to ballot upon and 
the committee reports have been unanimously favorable there 
is absolutely no good reason in going through each petition 
singly. 

In several cases reports of grand masters show that as 
much as one and one-half or two hours were required by the 
lodge to pass the ballot simply because the number to be bal- 
loted upon was so great that a less amount of time could not 
be consumed. The lodge in the main depends upon the re- 
port of the committee on petitions. It is granted that in many 
instances these committees do not fulfill their functions as 
completely as they should but that does not excuse them from 
the duty imposed upon them. The lodge on the other hand, 
depends for its information upon the report of the committee 
and if the report of the committee is favorable, in nine cases 
out of ten the ballot is likewise favorable. 

The whole trouble is that there has grown up in Free- 
masonry too much technicality and to irradicate this and bring 
the fraternity to serious work is one of the purposes of the 
present age. No doubt, all this will be accomplished in time. 
As has been said before, "Great reforms move slowly." In 
group balloting there is an opportunity to save time and con- 
serve the energy and patience of the members. 



VI 

Too Many Laws 

One of the very best things that could possibly happen to 
the Masonic fraternity would be to eliminate all existing laws 
and regulations and return to Anderson's original Constitu- 
tions of Freemasonry. It cannot be doubted that there are 
entirely too many laws enacted for the regulation and govern- 
ment of the society. One grand master found in counting up 
the laws of his jurisdiction approximately three hundred. 
All this could be greatly simplified by the use of a little com- 
mon sense. 

It has been noticeable in recent years that in each meeting 
of some of the grand bodies, there have been a large number of 
laws and regulations presented and enacted. Many of these 
amendments have been offered by men not active in the work 
of the fraternity but who have set themselves up as saviors 
of the institution and who imagine that in order to keep the 
fraternity straight a certain number of amendments must be 
adopted each year. 

The writer is fully of the opinion that at the present time, 
we have all the laws, rules and regulations that the fraternity 
can possibly need for the next one hundred years and noth- 
ing can be gained by the enactment of any more. The great- 
est need of the times is a return of the fundamental principles 
of the society and less disposition on the part of certain mem- 
bers of the fraternity to throw restrictions around the work- 
ing elements of the institution. If the present tendency to enact 
laws keeps on, it is questionable just where the fraternity will 
end, and it is almost impossible to conceive what new legis- 
lation will be devised in order to safeguard the fraternity. 
It is sincerely hoped that the fraternity will soon pass the law- 
making stage and turn its attention to the stable things of 
the society. 



VII 

Incrdasing Costs of Homes 

Each year the proceedings of various grand lodges show 
that the Masonic homes maintained by them are gradually in- 
creasing in cost and as a result means have to be devised for 
raising additional revenue for the up-keep of these institutions. 
Of course, the world has been passing through a period of 
high prices and that has more or less, affected our various 
Masonic institutions but with the reduction in the general 
cost of living, there seems to have been no general lessening 
in the prices of maintaining our various Masonic institutions. 
The reason for this is obvious. At the present time, the Ma- 
sonic fraternity is doing more for its members than ever 
before. 

Masonic homes are being conducted on a much more lib- 
eral scale. Members of these institutions are given greater 
care and thought than ever before. They are not only clothed 
and fed but have the attention of the very best oculists, dentists 
and other specialists all of which costs money and causes the 
institutions to use up funds very rapidly. As a result there is 
a general scramble all over the United States for money for 
the maintenance of these institutions. 

When they were first inaugurated no one ever thought 
the maintenance would require an endowment fund. In fact, 
the fraternity went into the fraternal home business without 
any thought whatsoever of finding the means to maintain them. 
The result now is, that in nearly every state we have splendid 
institutions which are doing excellent work while the grand 
lodges behind them are taxed to the utmost for their support. 
The fraternity is not going to give up these homes. They 
are badly needed in our Masonic system and the fact that we 
have them is to our credit, but the society must look into the 
future and devise means for giving these institutions proper 
support. Just what system of taxation may be inaugurated 
remains to be seen but the facts are that something will have 



VIII 

to be done if these institutions are to be continued in their 
present sphere of glory and unselfishness. 

Cipher Rituai^s 

One question which the writer picked up in the review of 
grand lodge proceedings relates to cipher rituals. A number 
of grand masters reported they had considerable trouble with 
these books and in one or two jurisdictions they have been 
openly distributed by brethren. The Grand Lodge of New 
York took hold of the matter and found the cipher ritual was 
being openly sold among members of the fraternity. To 
counteract the whole matter the grand lodge decided to issue 
its own cipher ritual and to put a check on the sale of these 
books by various book sellers. Another grand lodge did the 
same and the outcome will be watched with much interest. 
When it comes to the question of cipher rituals the writer is 
firmly of the opinion that much of the trouble arising from 
this source has been due to the fact that too much stress has 
been laid in our lodges upon the subject of ritual. This seems 
to be the one great end toward which all lodges strive. The 
result has been that members of the fraternity who wanted 
to get into the limelight have bought cipher rituals fully ex- 
pecting them to measure up to their requirements. This writer 
firmly hopes that the time is not very far distant w'hen 
all grand lodges will adopt cipher ritiKils for the reason that 
it is the best method of combating the various spurious works 
now offered for sale and so promiscuously used. This may 
seem like a very bold statement but the writer happens to be 
in a line of business which places him in very close touch 
with this particular subject and knows to an absolute cer- 
tainty that in staid old Illinois with its matchless system of 
ritual and ritualistic instruction that the sale of spurious 
rituals goes on in a marvelous manner. 

Passing an ordinary book store in the city of Chicago 
the other day the writer not only noticed books of various 



• IX 

kinds, but was astounded to see a display of various Masonic 
rituals. It is a very noticeable fact that rituals of chapters, 
commanderies and the Scottish Rite are not offered for sale 
by venders of books for the reason that those rituals are con- 
trolled and distributed by the bodies themselves and any 
Ijrother wanting to learn the work knows exactly where he can 
go to get one. 

The cipher ritual question is an important one and sooner 
or later must receive the attention of the craft wheresoever 
dispersed. 

Taxing Initiates 

A study of the proceedings which have come under the 
attention of the reviewer shows that in nearly every quarter 
the tendency of grand lodges has been to increase their reve- 
nue. Many ways have been suggested but the most popular 
one is that of placing a tax upon each initiate for the degrees. 
This tax varies from $5.00 to $20.00 and is to be paid by the 
lodge itself. Of course, the lodge immediately gets even by 
amending its by-laws and increasing its fees. The prime cause 
for the need of additional revenue on the part of grand lodges 
is the heavy drain being made upon them by the Masonic homes 
and it is presumed that each grand lodge has the right to draw 
additional revenue from whatsoever source it may. 

The fees for the Masonic degrees have always been too 
low. It has been a hard matter to get lodges to realize this 
for the reason that each Masonic body has striven to increase 
its membership as much as possible. It has been noticeable 
that in a number of quarters where fees were increased there 
was no lessening in the number of petitions received the dis- 
position being rather toward an increase. So far as the writer 
has been able to check up there has been no let down in the 
number of petitions received where the fees were increased. 
This would lead to the belief that it is the popularity of the 



X 

institution which attracts men and they are wiUing to pay any 
fair price exacted for the degrees ratlier than deny themselves 
the privileges of the society. Whether or not the policy of 
taxing initiates is the right one will require time to prove. As 
has been before said nearly every grand lodge is looking to 
means that will increase its general revenue. Whether or not 
the candidate tax is going to accomplish the object desired is 
not known because the subject is a new one. The outcome will 
be awaited with much interest. 

PhYSICAI, QUAUFICATIONS 

During the year, a number of grand masters have referred 
to the subject of physical qualifications and asked that a more 
temperate and moderate interpretation be placed upon what 
today is the most rigid requirement of the society. Many of 
them point to the large number of soldiers who returned from 
France maimed and who are prohibited from partaking of 
the privileges of the society because of physical defects. 

Then again there is a growing feeling that the world is 
passing from the physical to the moral and intellectual status 
of the man and for that reason the fraternity should not ad- 
here to an old custom for which there is absolutely no war- 
rant other than long and established usage. 

What is the difference if a man goes around with a wooden 
leg providing he is otherwise all right? The question of the 
wooden leg merely enters into the subject of his initiation and 
the man himself so far as his infirmity is concerned is for- 
gotten just the moment he receives his degrees in Masonry. 
So much has been said by this writer on the subject of physical 
qualifications that it is useless to enter into any extended argu- 
ment at this time. The only object of this article is to call 
the attention of the craft to the fact that a number of thinking 
Master Masons who have done much for the fraternity in their 
respective jurisdictions have taken up this subject and made 



XI 

recommendations to their grand lodges looking toward a les- 
sening of the now rigid requirements upon this subject. 

Action of Coi^orado 

Every now and then some grand lodge pulls off a piece of 
legislation that is not only nonsensical but wholly without the 
pale of common sense. 

During the last year Colorado startled the Masonic world 
by passing a law that no Master Mason could receive the so- 
called higher degrees until after one year following his initia- 
tion. This action shows, in a measure, the general inconsist- 
ency of grand lodges. In one breath they will declare that the 
sum total of Ancient Craft Masonry is concerned in the three 
degrees conferred by the lodge. Then in the next breath they 
will commence to legislate against what are alleged to be the 
higher bodies of the fraternity. If grand lodges are disposed 
to hold that all there is to Masonry is confined to the three 
degrees then why the legislation against the Chapter, Com- 
mandery and Consistory which in a measure are declared to 
be clandestine? 

A good many Masons lose sight of the fact that Freema- 
sonry is a principle and not a group of individuals. If this 
fact could be realized, a great deal of trouble arising at the 
present time would be obviated and done away with. The 
spirit of the times demands co-ordination. If the fraternity 
is going to get anywhere, it means that not only Ancient Craft 
Masonry but those organizations associated with it must join 
hands and work together. 

For fifty years, we have had in our midst, the Chapter, 
Council and Consistory and we can see no reason why at this 
late date, legislation should be directed against these bodies. 
If any of their memljers are doing things which are disposed 
to reflect upon Ancient Craft Masonry, all it is necessary to 
do is call the attention of the proper authority to the sins of 



XII 

commission and it is believed everything will be rectified and 
straightened out. 

Masonic Service Association 

The proceedings of a number of grand lodges show they 
have withdrawn from membership in the Masonic Service 
Association. The principal cause assigned seems to be finan- 
cial more than anything else. Many of these grand lodges 
resent a tax of five cents per membership which has been levied 
upon them by the association for carrying on its work. 

The writer believes in co-ordination among all Masonic 
organizations and thinks there should be a general under- 
standing among all grand lodges and until this is accomplished 
Freemasonry will never come into its own. 

The whole trouble with the Masonic Service Association 
seems to be that it was organized to exploit individual ideas 
rather than adopt a general policy of Masonic welfare. One 
of the arguments which has been advanced by grand masters 
during the year has been that there is no particular need at 
the present time for the Masonic Service Association because 
there is no war, pestilence nor other calamity to require the 
immediate assistance of the society. 

Exceptions seem to have been taken to certain methods of 
the Masonic Service Association which have later been in- 
augurated and not set forth in the original document which 
led many lodges to join this assembly. At any rate the Ma- 
sonic Service Association may have a particular work to per- 
form in the matter of education of the members of the society 
but even then the task is a difficult one for all men differ as 
to what constitutes genuine Freemasonry and it would be im- 
possible for the Masonic Service Association to define a line 
of Freemasonry and say "This is correct." Just the moment 
they did that there would be a lot of thinkers and investigators 
dispute what had been set up and declare that the Service Asso- 



XIII 

ciation was assuming perrogatives which were not its inherent 
right. 

The idea of a central Masonic organization is correct but 
it can never be accompHshed so long as individualism and the 
exploitation of personal ideas is allowed to become paramount. 
Let it not be understood that the Masonic Service Association, 
by any means, is in its last throes because it has the cordial 
support of a number of grand lodges. When doulDt as to its 
advantages and the prejudice of men are laid aside the asso- 
ciation will develop into some real tangible direct service to 
the craft. 

Limitation of Work 

Among the legislation recommended by a large number of 
grand masters this year was one relating to limitation of work, 
that is to say, forbidding lodges from conferring more than 
a certain amount of degrees each year. If it is agreed that the 
fraternity is not able to properly function because it has too 
much work on hand, then the remedy lies in changing the 
manner and mode of conferring degrees. 

Every lodge has a right to confer as many degrees as it 
sees fit. This writer does not believe in restricted lodge mem- 
bership any more than he believes in interfering with the in- 
ternal affairs of the lodge. It is true that in the past two or 
three years there has been so much work in our various Ma- 
sonic bodies that but little time has been given to social and 
intellectual features and in many instances these have taken 
place after a degree has been conferred thus destroying the 
real purpose of the whole social and intellectual feature. If 
lodges were allowed to group their work there would come 
into the fraternity an entirely new interest but as long as ritual 
is exhalted above everything else, there can be very little rem- 
edy hoped for. 



XIV 

Each Masonic lodge has an inherent right to do all the 
work it wants to and no grand lodge should attempt to limit 
the number of degrees to be conferred during the year. 

It may assume that power, but fundamentally it is taking 
unto itself something which does not rightfully belong to it. 
If there are evils existing in the institution the way to cure 
them is not through the limitation of the amount of work done. 
The direct cause should be sought out and the remedy applied 
where it is most needed. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 
ON 

Masonic Correspondence 



NINFTEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 



DELMAR D. DARRAH 



ALABAMA. A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The annual communication, the one hundredth, opened in the city ot 
Montgomery, on the morning of Wednesday, December 1, 1920. The Com- 
mittee on Credentials, report the presence of the ambassador from Illinois, 
Wm. W, Daffin, and the representatives of three hundred ninety-eight lodges. 
The first important item was the annual address of the grand master, 
Percy B. Dixon. It is a document covering twenty-two pages and is a con- 
cise, readable resume of the principal acts of his office during the time he 
served as grand master. He reports the year to have been one of phenomenal 
growth among the lodges of the state and calls attention to the fact that 
the membership has passed the 40,000 mark. He pays a very high tribute 
to the institution and says that every Freemason should find in the lodge a 
home and in every Mason a true brother. He truly says a man to have 
friends, must himself be friendly. He speaks at length upon some of the 
objects and purposes of the fraternity and says some most excellent things 
concerning the functions of a Masonic body. 

Only one decision is rendered and that relates to a matter of local 
jurisdiction. Ten dispensations for the formation of new lodges were issued 
and one lodge had its charter returned to it. Three dispensations were 
issued to permit lodges to change their place of meeting. Several dispen- 
sations were issued to permit special elections to fill vacancies caused by 
either the death or removal of lodge officers. Eight dispensations were 
issued permitting lodges to sell or mortgage their property. The grand 
Master reports the sale of property of defunct lodges. One lodge received 
for its assets, the sum of $19.50, while another lodge disposed of a half 
interest in the hall where it met, for the sum of $12.50. Five dispensations 

15 



16 Apperidix — Part I 



were granted for the laying of corner-stones, only two of them were for 
Masonic edifices. 

Concerning the question of issuing dispensations permitting the initia- 
tion of maimed candidates, the gi-aud master referred the subject to the 
grand lodge with the suggestion that some action be taken to define the 
extent of loss of limb or other physical defects, to prevent the fraternity 
from being imposed upon. Thirty-two district lecturers were appointed. 
The grand master states that their reports to him show the wisdom of such 
action. 

Concerning the matter of corner-stones, the grand master asked that the 
Jurisprudence Committee bo instructed to prepare a resolution prescribing 
the minimum dimensions of a corner-stone, and defining just exactly what 
inscription shall be placed thereon, as well as stating at what place in the 
building operations the stone shall be laid. The grand master reports his 
approval of a contract for the erection of a Masonic home, to cost $50,000.00. 
Both the Masonic Service Association, as well as the George Washing-ton 
Memorial Association, received hearty commendation. A very interesting 
address to the grand lodge is printed in the proceedings. It was written by 
Brother James Bilbro, who was not able to bo present on account of sickness. 
It deals with the general purpose of the fraternity and its intent is appar- 
ently to bring the fraternity to a better understanding of the institution 
of which they are members. 

The grand treasurer reports receipts of $22,000.00 and expenditures of 
a like amount. The report of the grand secretary, Geo. A. Beauchamp, is 
largely statistical. 

Oliver D. Street, on behalf of the Special Committee on Foreign Cor- 
respondence, reported that during, the year much effort had been expended 
in ascertaining the status of Masons in Europe, Mexico, Central and South 
America, and that while much evidence had been accumulated, yet the 
information was not sufficient to permit the committee to arrive at any 
definite conclusion, and the whole subject was held over for another year. 

The Grand Lodge of Alabama has a special committee which is some- 
what out of the ordinary. At the close of the grand lodge session, the roll 
of representatives is called and any representatives who fail to answer to 
their names must make f-atisfaetory excuses with the Special Committee on 
Excuses. The grand lodge stopped long enough in its proceedings to receive 
the representatives of other gi-and lodges and to accord them a most fra- 
ternal greeting. 

Lodges in Alabama, which amend their by-laws, must submit their 
amendments to a Special Committee on By-laws for approval. It is appar- 



Masonic Correspondence 17 

ent from the proceedings that the Grand Lodge of Alabama is amending 
its constitution and by-laws, for a long report is submitted by a Committee 
on Eevision, which report was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. 
The report from the Masonic home in the state shows the total number 
under care of the grand lodge to have been two hundred one. There must 
have been considerable sickness among the members of the home for two 
hundred forty-six cases received medical attention. To operate the home 
cost the grand lodge $60,245.41. The grand lodge apparently conducts a 
farm in connection with the home. It cost the grand lodge $12,901.00 to 
operate the farm, dairy and hoggery, while the total receii^ts from farm 
products amovmted to $13,496.81, leaving a net profit to the grand lodge of 
$595.78. 

The Finance Committee made a report concurring in all of the grand 
master's recommendations. The Committee on Jurisprudence sustained the 
grand master in practically all of his acts and decided that a corner-stone 
must be at least 9x12 inches and that the inscription should embrace the 
name of the grand master, together with the date it was laid. The com- 
mittee, however, declined to set any special period in the construction of 
buililing when the corner-stone should be laid, deferring that such would be 
impractical. 

Arrangements were made for celebrating the one hundredth anniversary 
of the grand lodge during the annual session of 1921. For good and suffi- 
cient reasons the Committee on Excuses relieved twenty-two representatives 
from further attendance on the sessions of the grand lodge. The final busi- 
ness was the election and installation of officers. 

The report on Foreign Correspondence is prepared by Oliver Day Street, 
one of the real brilliant Masonic students of the present period. He gives 
Illinois four pages of discriminating review, prepared in topical form. He 
is very generous to the writer who prepared the review for Illinois last year 
and quotes generously from many things that " were said. He does not 
dissent in a single particular but endorses many of the positions that were 
taken. Brothe'' Day does not approve of the Grand Master 's Advisory 
Council for the s-ame reason held by this writer, that it creates a conflict of 
authority. 

Percy B. Dixon, G.M., Mobile. 

George A. Beauchamp, G.S., Montgomerj'. 



18 Appendix — Part I 



ARIZONA, F. «& A. M. 

1920 

The thirty-eighth annual communication was held in the city of Phoenix, 
opening on the 10th day of February, at 10:00 o'clock A. M. 

Six grand officers were absent and it was necessary for the grand 
master to fill the vacant stations by appointment. The report of the Com- 
mittee on Credentials does not show the representative of the Grand Lodge 
of Illinois to have been present. 

The first item of interest was the annual address of James H. Barrett, 
grand master. He opens by paying tributes of respect to the dead of his 
own and other grand jurisdictions. 

He reports the approval of the by-laws of three lodges and reports 
several decisions most of which apply to questions of jurisdiction. It is 
apparent that the Grand Lodge of Arizona had some trouble over Mexican 
affairs for the grand master reports some correspondence upon the subject 
which is referred to the Committee on Correspondence. 

Five dispensations were granted by the grand master, one of which 
was for the formation of a new lodge. 

The usual number of requests to confer degi'ees by courtesy is men- 
tioned but the grand master shows the good taste in omitting an enumeration 
of the details. 

It is apparent that the Grand Lodge of Arizona is about to embark 
in the matter of establishing a Masonic home for the proceedings under 
review contain numerous documents showing an effort to raise an endow- 
ment fund of $100,000.00. 

Among the grand representatives commissioned during the year was 
Chas. H, Spillman of Edwardsville, who was appointed to represent the 
Grand Lodge of Arizona near the Grand Lodge of Illinois. 

One Masonic hall was dedicated and nine lodges visited by the grand 
master. 

The grand secretary makes a report which goes into detail concerning 
the various affairs connected with his office. His record of disbursements 
shows that he received as compensation for his services the sum of $50.00 
per month. 

The grand treasurer gives his total receipts as $5,064.00 and expendi- 
tures as $5,852.00, The total resources of the grand lodge in all departments 
is given as $102,161.00. 



Masonic Correspondence 19 

The committee appointed to attend the Peace Jubilee given by the 
United Grand Lodge of England make a very long report in which they 
record the journey to England and the courtesy accorded them on this 
auspicious occasion. 

The Jurisprudence Committee confirmed all the grand master did and 
gave him a clear bill of approval. 

A committee appointed to prepare a history of Masonry in Arizona, 
opened by expressing regrets that it could only report progress backward. 
The committee state they experienced great difficulty in getting lodges to 
funiish such data as was apparently necessary in the preparation of the 
history of Masonry in the jurisdiction. 

The grand lodge voted to raise its quota for the George Washington 
Masonic Memorial Association and offered an additional subscription of 
$200.00. 

The matter of recognizing the Swiss Grand Lodge Alpina was brought 
up and on motion it was recommended that no action be taken. 

The grand lecturer was allowed the sum of $300.00 to cover his expenses 
in visiting and instructing lodges. 

The election and installation of officers together with the presentation 
of the customary jewel closed the session. 

There is no report on Foreign Correspondence. The grand lodge, how- 
ever, does print the names of all officers and members of lodges. 

Henry Gordon Glove, G.M., Nogales. 

George J. Eoskruge, G.S., Tticson. 



ARKANSAS, F. & A. M. 

1920 

The seventy-ninth annual communication was held in the Second Bap- 
tist Church in the city of Little Eock, on Tuesday, November 16. The 
Grand Eepresentative of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, Geo. Thornburgh, is 
accredited with being present. The opening ceremonies were very brief, 
after which the grand master, Louis Bauerlein, delivered his annual address. 
He refers to the discontent and restlessness of the year and makes a plea 
for the restoration of the old order of things and a return to sane living. 



20 Appendix — Part I 



Schools of instruction were held in the various counties of the state and 
accomplished much good. 

The Masonic Temple property owned by the grand lodge was sold for 
$150,000.00. Several appeals for assistance were authorized and permission 
given to circularize the lodges of the state. 

The George Washington Memorial Association is presented to the 
consideration of the grand lodge and attention called to the estimated 
amount to be raised by Arkansas, which is $25,000.00. The whole subject 
is referred to the grand lodge. 

During the year the grand treasurer resigned owing to age and ill 
health. 

A new digest of the laws of the jurisdiction was prepared by the grand 
secretary. Fay Hempstead, and he was given an extra compensation for his 
very valuable time and labor. 

Seven decisions are reported by the grand master. One decision de- 
clared that all Masonic corner-stones should be laid in the northeast corner 
of the structure and that no ceremonies should be conducted on Sunday. 
The grand master decided that a brother who signed a petition for the 
pardon of a self confessed bootlegger would be violating the Masonic code. 

One thing the grand master expresses is that the system of teaching 
the ritual in Arkansas is far from being a success, and a recommendation 
is made that the grand lecturer be placed on a salary and be required to 
devote his entire time to the work. 

One recommendation which the grand master made was that inasmuch 
as we display the American Flag in our lodges that in some part of the 
work something should be said concerning the history and meaning of the 
flag. 

Three corner-stones were laid during the year, none of them being for 
Masonic edifices. 

The grand master states that he granted many dispensations during the 
year and assigns as his reason the following : "I have granted many dis- 
pensations, perhaps too many. I have been free in the use of this authority 
because I am from a small lodge and realize that it is not always possible 
to meet and do work at the proper time. I, however, have been careful in 
granting dispensations to waive the year 's residence required by our edicts 
and granted only one dispensation to waive the time of residence required. ' ' 

The Grand Lodge of Arkansas had a lawsuit on its hands because a 
boy named Arthur Eay had been injured by a falling brick from the wreck 



Masonic Correspondence 21 

of the temple which had been burned. The amount of damages for which 
the grand lodge was being sued was $10,400.00. The trial resulted in a 
verdict in favor of the grand lodge. 

Nine dispensations were issued for the formation of new lodges during 
the year and two deeds executed for the transfer of lodge property. 

The list of degrees conferred by courtesy is given in full. It is quite 
a long one and shows that the lodges of Arkansas put forth every effort 
to oblige their brethren of other jurisdictions. 

In his conclusion, the grand master expresses himself as follows : ' ' That 
a person who joins every branch of the institution merely to wear jewelry 
is not benefitting himself. ' ' Visiting a certain lodge your grand master 
found the W.M. much troubled because he had a visitor who could not prove 
himself. At the request of the W.M. your servant went to the committee 
room and found a brother taking a cigarette from a silver case upon which 
was enameled the square and compasses. We remarked; "That is a nice 
case. ' ' The visitor replied : "It cost me seven dollars, I bought it when 
I took the Third Degree. I paid forty dollars for the degrees." Ques- 
tion after question was asked and no answer could he give that would prove 
he had received anything for his forty-seven dollars. We noticed a pair 
of cuff buttons on each of which was a keystone. We were informed they 
cost fifteen dollars and he had purchased them when he was made a Eoyal 
Arch Mason and further enlightened us that the Chapter Degrees had set 
him back twenty-five dollars. Seeing a beautiful Knights Templar Charm, 
your servant discovered that this charm together with the Commandery 
degrees had cost two hundred and fifty dollars more. Commenting upon 
a ring the visitor displayed as he lighted his cigarette brought forth the 
information that this ring and the Scottish Rite Degrees had separated the 
visitor from three hundred American dollars, and yet he could not work 
his way into a Blue Lodge. Seeing a button on his coat, we asked: "How 
much did that cost you ? ' ' With a face lighted up with a smile the decorated 
brother replied: "My wife gave me that when I joined the Shrine, but I 
paid seventy-eight dollars for the degree which included the Fez. ' ' We 
were glad to leam that the good brother had at least one piece of jewelry 
that cost him nothing, but the brother continued : ' ' The Shrine is the play- 
ground of Masonry and I am glad that I have all there is in Masonry and 
am at the top. ' ' 

The grand lodge, by motion, extended an invitation to the Eastern 
Star Grand Chapter of Kansas to be present and hear the address of the 
grand orator that was to be delivered on the evening of the first day. 

The grand secretary. Fay Hempstead, makes quite a long report. He 
speaks of the prosperity among the lodges and shows that the Grand Lodge 



22 Appendix — Part I 



of Arkansas has benefited very materially by the great wave of prosperity 
which has swept over the covmtry. He calls attention to the necessity of a 
proper office for the grand secretary. 

The Committee on Masonic Law and Usage did not hesitate to get after 
the grand master for several of his decisions for it disapproved a number of 
them. This committee recommended that the grand lodge appropriate 
$3,000.00 to the George Washington Memorial Association and that the 
lodges be asked to make liberal contributions. 

The proposition of constructing a new temple was presented and it was 
voted to accept the Albert Pike consistory proposition which offered to 
erect a building suitable for the grand lodge and enter into a lease for a 
period of time. According to the report of the board $17,500.00 per annum 
would be saved to the grand lodge. 

A resolution of congratulations was passed concerning Geo. Thornburg, 
who was celebrating his fiftieth anniversary as a Mason. 

One thing the grand lodge did was to abolish its Masonic Temple Board 
and to create thereof a Board of Finance to consist of five members. 

The report of the trustees of the Masonic Orphans Home is interesting 
and shows that institution to be highly prosperous and well conducted. 

The address of the grand orator delivered on the evening of the first 
day is a Masonic document which should have merited the close attention of 
the large audience which assembled to hear it. 

Immediately following the oration, the grand matron of the Order of 
the Eastern Star was introduced and spoke briefly. 

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence makes a brief report to the 
grand lodge declining to recognize a number of Foreign Grand Lodges, 
principally because they were unable to learn the exact status of these 
lodges and their relations to the craft. 

The election of officers and the traditional installation closed the session. 
There is no report on Foreign Correspondence. The Grand Lodge of 
Arkansas evidently believes that the members of its jurisdiction are not 
interested in the affairs of other states. 

W. W. Magee, G.M., Piggott. 

Fay Hempstead, G.S., Little Eock. 



Masonic Correspondence 23 



CALIFORNIA, F. & A. M. 

1920 

The seventy-first annual communication was held in the Masonic Temple 
in the city of San Francisco, commencing Tuesday, October 12, 1920. The 
roll call showed all the grand officers to have been present and the repre- 
sentatives of three hundred sixty-five chartered lodges. After a very appro- 
priate prayer by the gTand chaplain, the grand master delivered his annual 
message. 

He says in his opening lines that the Grand Lodge of California now 
has two hundred thirty-two constitutional provisions and four hundred 
ninety-two regulations and that the policy of the jurisdiction is to reduce 
the entire jurisprudence to hard and fast rules. He expresses the idea, 
which has long been held by this writer, that we have too much legislation 
and that instead of adhering to basic law, we have approved decisions of 
grand masters, which in fact are merely constructions of existing laws. 

Among the recommendations for new legislation, which Grand Master 
Adams makes, is one to the effect that it is unnecessary to keep both a 
minute book and a record book. He holds that the minutes may be ap- 
proved in a rough form and transcribed to the record book. He presents 
to the grand lodge, the subject of exempting members of lodges who have 
held continuous membership for fifty years, from the payment of dues, but 
he makes no recommendations. 

A most interesting recommendation is made on the question of balloting 
in groups and Brother Adams holds to the same ideas as this writer, that 
methods which prevailed fifty years ago, are not adapted to present con- 
ditions. 

One of the rulings made by the grand master, was that the twenty 
dollars for each petitioner, which the grand lodge collects for the use and 
benefit of the Masonic Home of California, must be paid by the petitioner, 
not by the lodge. 

The grand master was very sparing in the matter of rendering decisions 
and what he did present were merely constructions of local law. The usual 
number of dispensations for various purposes were issued and a long dis- 
sertation is made concerning lodges of the jurisdiction doing their work in 
the English language. 

The grand master reports a donation of $500.00 for the relief of the 
Masons of Austria. The grand master made a trip to Honolulu and visited 
some of the lodges in that jurisdiction, which hold their charters from the 



24 Appendix — Part I 



Grand Lodge of California. It would be very interesting to quote all that 
Brother Adams said on the subject of Masonry and politics but space will 
not permit; suffice it to say that he does not approve of Masons who are 
running for public offices, using lodge bulletins and Masonic newspapers to 
exploit their particular claims for preferment. The Grotto comes in for 
criticism because of a circular letter issued by certain members of the 
organization on behalf of a candidate for political office. 

The work of the Committee on Masonic Education is commended and 
quite a good deal is said concerning the Masonic Service Association. 
Brother Adams endorses much of the work of this society but he states 
that he is unable to recommend that the grand lodge become a member 
thereof. 

Then Grand Master Adams devoted nearly three pages to a discussion 
of the controversy which arose between Gothic Lodge of East St. Louis and 
El Centre Lodge of California, and states that the matter was amicably 
adjusted to the satisfaction of all parties. 

The idea is expressed, that the universality of Masonry ought to mean 
something more than an empty phrase, and the grand master is very free 
in expressing the idea that the Grand Lodge of California should be very 
liberal in recognizing the various Masons of the world. 

The grand master gets after the inspectors of the state because they 
devote too much time to exploiting the ritual and too little to upbuilding 
lodges and the real things of Masonry. 

Considerable is said concerning the public schools of the state and their 
work is unqualifiedly endorsed by the grand master. 

The social side of Masonry is taken up and freely discussed, and while 
Grand Master Adams did not make the lodge a playgi-ound, yet he expresses 
the thought that a certain amount of social endeavor should be put forth by 
every Masonic body. 

It required over eighty pages of closely printed matter to convey the 
grand master's message. It is a document of unusual interest and im- 
j)ortance. 

The report of the grand secretary is thorough and complete and shows 
that during the year 9,336 were raised to the degree of Master Mason and 
the net increase was 8,983. The present membership of the Grand Lodge of 
California is 76,873. The total amount of money collected by the grand 
secretary for the year amounts to $186,386.11. The expenses of running the 
grand lodge were $97,272.14. The Committee on the Grand Master's Mes- 
sage or Address brings in a report that strongly commends him for the 
very vigorous administration which he maintained. 



Masonic Correspondence 25 

From the report of the Trustees on Masonic Homes, the information 
is gleaned that those institutions are in a most excellent condition and are 
being operated at a minimum of cost. California may well feel proud of 
the charitable work which it is accomplishing. The report is embellished 
with a number of illustrations of the Home at Covina, which are very 
interesting. 

The reports of the various Boards of Eelief which are scattered 
throughout California, are intensely interesting and show the wonderful 
work which is being done in caring for those from other jurisdictions. 
California being the Mecca for tourists, for those seeking health and 
wealth, very naturally comes in for its full share of contributions to the 
relief of those who have been misguided, but it must be said to the credit 
of this splendid grand lodge, that it is doing work which is unequalled by 
any other grand body. 

Among the resolutions introduced, was one which, proposed that not 
more than twelve degrees shall be conferred by a lodge in any one month. 
Another resolution which was introduced, relates to group balloting on 
petitions. 

The annual oration was delivered by W. Albert E. Boynton and is 
a very able document and should have elicited very close attention on the 
part of the grand lodge. Another resolution which was introduced, per- 
mitted lodges to spend one-third of their gross income for social purposes. 

The Board of Managers of the Masonic Homes, received the endorse- 
ment of the giand lodge because they had moving pictures made of the 
various Masonic Homes of the State, the same to be exhibited for the 
benefit of lodges. 

A long report from the Committee on Masonic Education was pre- 
sented and shows that some excellent work is being done along the line of 
bringing to the craft a better understanding of the objects and purposes 
of the fraternity. 

The grand lodge adopted the idea of group balloting on petitions for 
the degrees but the matter of group initiation of candidates, failed to 
receive the endorsement of the representatives. 

The installation of officers closed a most interesting session at which 
much important business was transacted. The report on Correspondence is 
presented by Jesse M. Whited. He treats it in the topical form and quotes 
very liberally from the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Illinois. 

George F. Eodden, G.M., San Francisco. 

John Whicher, G.S., San Francisco. 



26 Appendix — Part I 



CANADA, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

Tlie sixty-siith annual communication was held in the city of Ottawa 
Ontario. The booklet under review says nothing concerning the opening 
ceremony and commences directly with the address of the Grand Master, 
F. W, Harcourt. He devotes some of his remarks to the early history of 
Masonry in Canada and comments on the prosperity of the Grand Lodge 
of that jurisdiction. 

The Grand Master states that there are on the register of the Grand 
Lodge, 500 lodges, nineteen of which are under dispensation. Fifteen dis- 
pensations were granted for the formation of new lodges, one of which was 
to be called War Veterans Lodge. 

The total membership on June 24, 1921, is given as 88,000. The 
Grand Master thinks the craft is growing too fast and that there is a tend- 
ency to build up large lodges all of which he seems to think does not work 
for the best interests of the fraternity. 

The total receipts are given as $133,508.00, and the expenditures 
$29,752.00. At this rate, the Grand Lodge of Canada should get rich at 
a very rapid rate. 

The grand master made the usual number of rulings and decisions. 
Some grand masters seem to think they have not fulfilled the functions of 
their office unless they issue several decisions covering matters which pass 
through their hands. 

One subject the grand master discusses is the publicity which is given 
to the various transactions of lodges. He states that no little criticism 
has been expressed because of the attitude of certain Masonic papers to 
exploit the affairs of the fraternity. 

The secretary of one lodge was suspended from office for refusing to 
make necessary returns to the grand secretary. 

The Grotto came in for action and very severe criticism. The grand 
master recommended the adoi^tion of the Colorado resolution in reference 
to the Grotto and seemed to think the actions of that organization were 
disposed to bring shame and reproach on Masonry. 

If anybody thinks for one moment that Masonry in Canada is prosaic, 
all he needs to do is refer to that portion of the Grand Master's report 
relating to the petition of two ladies who styled themselves Grand Master 
and Deputy Grand Master of the Honorable Fraternity of Ancient Free 



Masonic Correspondence 27 

and Accepted Masons, asking recognition. Well, this is a woman's age and 
if the dear ladies of Canada see fit to get up a little Grand Lodge of their 
own, — why not? But the Grand Lodge of Canada could not see it that way 
and made it very clear that any Mason who joined in this new propaganda 
might expect to he made the subject of disciplinary proceedings. 

One strange case is reported. That of a Canadian Mason residing in 
the states and soliciting assistance from various lodges. The Grand Mas- 
ter of Canada soon put a stop to the practice. 

Concerning the question of democracy, the grand master has the fol- 
lowing to say: 

"A great deal is being said about democracy, and for the most part 
it is simply eant. It is a much abused word. There is a true democracy and 
a pseudo-democracy. The latter, to the world's great sorrow, is now hav- 
ing too long an inning. Its leaders easily outvie Czars and other autocrats 
who aim at the restriction of universal rights. In a tme democracy every 
man is in himself a ruler in the best sense of the word, practicing the Golden 
Rule. Masonic ideals are essentially the ideals which stand for the true 
universality and the only true democracy. He that ruleth himself is better 
than he that taketh a city." 

One good suggestion is made by the grand master and that relates to 
the matter- of visitation on the part of that official. He states that many 
lodges have never seen a grand master and he thinks each grand master 
should leave a record with the grand secretary of the lodges he visited so 
that the next official coming into office may visit some lodges that have 
heretofore not been favored. 

It appears in the Grand Master's report that the colored Masons of 
Ontario have applied for a charter incorporating themselves under the name 
of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ontario. 
The matter is reported to the grand lodge for such action as it may desire 
to take. 

In his closing remarks the grand master makes an appeal on behalf 
of the Bible and thinks it should not only be introduced into the system 
of education employed but that it should find a place in the home of every 
Mason in Canada and that frequent recourses should be had to its pages. 

Immediately following the report of the grand master, the Committee 
on Fraternal Dead make a long report and paid tributes of respect to the 
deceased at home and abroad. It has always occurred to this writer that the 
Committee on Necrology should report immediately following the address 
of the grand master. There is too much tendency at the present time to 
forget the dead and the service they have rendered to the craft. 



28 Appendix — Part I 



The report of the grand secretary is made up almost altogether of 
figures and reiterates very much that appeared in the report of the grand 
treasurer. It cost $29,72().0.0 to operate the grand lodge for the year but 
this by no means represents all the money the grand lodge spent, for the 
item of $60,200.00 is charged up to Benevolences. There is one thing to be 
said in favor of our Canadian as well as English brethren and that is that 
they have been ever mindful to eare for the indigent members of the society. 

The Board of General Purposes, which appears to have been charged 
with much of the responsibility of administering the affairs of the society, 
make quite a long report. A great deal of this is devoted to the reports 
of the district deputy grand masters and the information gained therefrom. 
The Board are of the opinion that too many lodges are degenerating into 
degree factories and for that reason have no time to devote to social enter- 
tainments. The Board hold to the idea that when a lodge has attained a 
membership of 400 that certain restrictions should be placed upon the 
amount of work to be done. 

The brochure under review appears to be a sort of an advanced docu- 
ment sent out to acquaint the fraternity with the main transactions of the 
grand lodge session. 

There is no report on foreign correspondence connected with the docu- 
ment and very little that the reviewer can pick up that will be of use to 
the fraternity in Illinois. 

Wm. N. Ponton, G.M., Belleville. 

Wm. M. Logan, G.S., Hamilton. 



COLORADO, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The volume opens with a number of records, covering the pro- 
ceedings of special communications of the grand lodge, which were held 
for the purpose of performing various Masonic functions. The annual com- 
munication, which was the sixtieth, was held in the Masonic Temple in 
Denver, on Tuesday, September 21, at 10:00 o'clock A. M. The Com- 
mittee on Credentials report the presence of all of the grand officers, as 
well as the representatives of constituent lodges. The Grand Master of 
Utah, James L. Cattron, was introduced and accorded the grand honors 
of Masonry. The American flag was presented and America sung by the 
grand lodge. The roll of deceased grand masters was called, after which 



Masonic Correspondence 29 

the grand representatives were rounded up and duly welcomed by the grand 
master. Illinois was represented by Wm. W. Cooper. Frank L. Bishop, 
grand master, presented his address to the grand lodge, which proved to 
be a businessdike document in which he set forth the principal acts of his 
office. He states that he made no decisions, because no matters arose which 
could not be settled by reference to the book of constitutions. 

The grand master must have been very diligent in discharging the 
duties of his office, for the list of visitations which he m.ade to the lodges of 
his jurisdiction, is a long one. The by-laws of a large number of lodges 
were approved and dispensations issued for the usual Masonic purposes. 

Two lodges were constituted during the year, and five corner-stones 
laid, none of them being for Masonic buildings. 

The grand master made a very startling discovery, that the grand lec- 
turer had never taken a vacation in all the time he had been performing 
the duties of that office and he was officially requested to take such vacation 
but there was no evidence that the request had been complied with. 

A high trilnite is paid to the efficiency of the grand secretary, CTharlcs 
H. Jacobson. Brother Jacobson died a short time after the close of the 
grand lodge. Owing to the stress of work among the lodges of the juris- 
diction, the Masonic Temple was crov>ded to capacity. It appears that the 
managers of the Temple were in the habit of renting out certain banquet 
and social rooms to organizations outside the fraternity. This, the grand 
master did not approve and expressed the thought that the Temple should 
be remodeled and used exclusively for the benefit of the fraternity. 

The Masonic Service Association of the United States, comes in for 
some criticism by Grand Master Bishop, for the reason that the constitution 
and by-laws of the Association were change<l at its last meeting and are 
not now the same as when the Grand Lodge of Colorado joined. The grand 
master very boldly states that the constitution and by-laws may be changed 
again. He, therefore, recommends that the grand lodge pay the association 
the amount of one cent per capita and withdraw its membership. 

The Grotto comes in for severe grilling on the part of the grand master 
and the attention of the craft is called to the fact that it is still under the 
ban in that State. 

The grand master refers to the increase in membership as being the 
largest in the history of the grand lodge and intimates that there may 
have been some soliciting in the effort to procure candidates. He issues a 
warning that all solicitation is strictly forbidden. In his closing lines he 
declines to bid the grand lodge good-bye, but did say "Good luck and God 
speed to all." 



30 Appendix — Part I 



The grand treasurer gives his receipts as $24,779.00 and his disburse- 
ments as $36,935.00. The grand secretary, Charles H. Jacobson, now de- 
ceased, makes a long report in which he covers in detail all of the trans- 
actions of his office. He gives the total membership in Colorado as 23,790. 

The Committee on Correspondence makes a short address to the grand 
Lodge in which they state that they are still unprepared to advise the 
recognition of cither of the Grand Bodies of France. 

The grand lecturer makes a very complete report and submits much 
statistical matter, which he gleaned in his visits to the lodges of the 
jurisdiction. 

The oration was delivered by John H. Gabriel and was along Masonic 
lines. The following amendment was reported by the Special Committee 
on Amendments and was adopted by the grand lodge: 

' ' Provided, That such organizations within the State of Colorado 
shall, by duly enacted statutes, requii-e that no petition for the degrees 
conferred by them shall be received from one who has not been a Master 
Mason for at least one year; and provided further, that such organizations 
shall, by duly enacted statutes, prohibit their members from soliciting 
Entered Apprentices, Fellow Crafts, or Master Masons to petition for such 
degrees. If such organizations shall fail to enact or maintain such laws, the 
grand master of this grand lodge shall withdraw from them the recognition 
heretofore herein granted." 

Why in the world don't the committee make their amendment so as to 
prohibit Masons from joining the Eedmen, the Odd Fellows, the Daughters 
of Pocahontas, and a few more similar organizations? As a reason for 
the amendment, the following is given: 

' ' The cause prompting the presentation of the above amendment to 
our Book of Constitutions was such over-zealous and indiscriminate solicita- 
tion for "Higher degrees" as to become indirect, and often direct, solicita- 
tion for the degrees of the Blue Lodge. Drives have been organized and 
carried out like stock-selling campaigns. Master Masons have absented 
themselves from their lodges to evade such unseemly importunities. Entered 
Apprentices and Fellow Crafts have been solicited to "sign up." The 
beauties of "higher Masonry" have been unfolded to men not members of 
the Craft, with the explanation that the first three degrees were essential 
to admission thereto — a patent inducement to them to petition our lodges. 
Petitions have been sought on the ground that but a few more were necessary 
to enable the solicitor to secure certain alleged Masonic honors, presumably 
conferred in payment for such work. Circulars, addresses and newspaper 
stories and pictures, all to the same end, have brought reproach upon the 
Ancient Craft and threatened the subversion of one of its fundamental doc- 



Masonic Correspondence 31 

trines, the first of the internal qualifications of a man to be made a Mason, 
is, that he come of his own free will and accord, uninfluenced by mer- 
cenary motives or the improper solicitation of friends. We must protect 
this bulwark or abandon it. ' ' 

The report of the Committee on Masonic Study Clubs show there has 
been some activity along that line and that every effort is being made to 
stimulate Masonic education in the State. Some very excellent work is 
being done in the matter of relieving indigent Masonic soldiers and sailors 
and the Masons of Colorado are to be commended for what they are ac- 
complishing along this line. During the war the grand lodge collected from 
all sources, about $42,000.00 for war relief purposes. Of this amount only 
$752.00 was expended and it is proposed that the residue be used to assist 
such of the craft as served in the war and who are in need of assistance. 

The installation of officers and the presentation of the jewel closed the 
session. 

The report on correspondence which appears in the back part of the 
proceedings, is brief, covering barely seventy-five pages. The amendment 
adopted in 1919, by Illinois relating to physical qualifications of candidates 
is quoted in full as are also the remarks of this writer upon the same sub- 
ject in the point of view published in the correspondence report of that 
year. 

Haslett P. Burke, G.M., Denver. 



CONNECTICUT, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

The report under review covers the thirty-third annual meeting which 
was held in the Masonic Temple in the city of Hartford, opening on the 
second day of February. 

The report of the Committee on Credentials, which is the very first 
item to be presented, is offered in detail. The grand representative of the 
grand lodge of Illinois does not appear to have been present. 

Charles C. Perkins, grand master, presented a report covering sixty 
pages of printed matter. In his opening remarks, he thinks the custom of 
having the grand master serve but one year instead of two or three is 
absolutely beat and safest for the fraternity. 

Quite a long report on Necrology is made and mention made of those 
valiant craftsmen who answered the final summons and have gone on before. 



32 Appendix — Part I 



The grand master incorporates into his report, letters from the district 
deputy grand masters in which they set forth their various transactions. 
What they chronicle is purely of local color. 

Concerning physical qualifications, Grand Master Perkins says he issued 
two dispensations in favor of candidates with physical defects, whom he 
considered eligible to receive the degrees. He suggests to the grand lodge 
that the law on physical qualifications be modified and a more liberal inter- 
pretation placed upon it. He, however, declines to make any direct recom- 
mendation. 

He speaks of the land-marks of the fraternity showing that he belongs 
to the old school who have always held that there were certain established 
usages of the Society which have been passed down from time immemorial 
and that it is not in the power of any man to change them. The modern 
group of thinkers do not believe in land-marks and take a much more 
rational view of the Society. 

The list of dispensations reported by the grand master is in full. None 
of them are out of the ordinary, however, and relate purely to the waiving 
of local laws. 

The list of visitations to lodges is reported in detail. 

The grand master officiated jiersonally at the laying of corner-stones and 
the dedication of halls. This is as it should be. 

The Near East Belief matter comes in for consideration and the grand 
master sent circulars to the lodges of the state urging them to do their 
full share in this charitable work. 

Six questions were asked and answered. They were unimportant. 

The Masonic birthday of George Washington is thoroughly endorsed 
and a recommendation made that a committee be appointed to compile a 
standard Masonic funeral service for the grand lodge. The George Wash- 
ington Memorial Association is heartily endorsed. 

Eeport was made of the issuance of two dispensations for the forma- 
tion of new lodges. 

The grand master speaks at some length concerning the Masonic Ser- 
vice Association. Ho does not, however, recommend that the grand lodge 
become a member but that a careful study be made of the modus operandi 
of this society and if, after consideration, membership appears to be de- 
sirable, that the grand lodge shall then become a member. 

The deputy grand master makes a report covering various visitations 
made by him. There is nothing in the report, however, that shows that he 
in any way transgressed on the prerogatives of the grand master. 



Masonic Correspondence 33 

The grand treasurer gives his receipts as $55,000.00 and his disburse- 
ments as $55,500.00, 

Quite a long report is made by the grand secretary which goes much 
into detail concerning the affairs of his office. 

There are one hundred fourteen lodges in the state of Connecticut with 
a total membership of thirty-four thousand seven hundred three. The net 
gain in membership for the year 1920 was three thousand two hundred 
nineteen. 

This grand lodge requires all lodges to submit amendments of by-laws 
to a grand lodge committee for approval. A report from such a committee 
appears as part of the proceedings. 

The Committee on Correspondence presented a report recommending 
that the Grand Lodge of Connecticut withdraw fraternal relations with the 
Grand Lodge of Prussia. The resolution was adopted. 

A motion was made that the grand lodge purchase an American flag 
and that the same be disj^layed in the East of the grand lodge at every 
session. 

The Grand Lodge of Connecticut operates a system of fines imposed 
upon such lodges as do not pay their grand lodge dues within the time pre- 
scribed by the regulations. Six lodges were disciplined and proper fines 
assessed. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence did not altogether agree with the 
grand master in his decisions. They held to the old law on physical qualifi- 
cations and maintained the perfect limb theory. 

The Grand Lodge of Connecticut has been revising its laws and a mo- 
tion was made that the report of the Committee on Eevision be adopted 
and 25,000 copies of the law be printed and distributed. 

The George Washington Masonic Memorial Association received hearty 
endorsement and the lodges of the state directed to levy an assessment upon 
their members for this most laudable enterprise. 

The installation of officers was followed by the presentation of the 
customary jewel and apron. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by George A. Kies. 
It covers seventy-seven pages of printed matter and is short and pointed. 
Illinois is given two pages of review. The principal acts of our session of 
1920 arc briefly referred to, mainly without comment. Ecfcrence is made 
to the correspondence report of that year and two comments are taken. 

Charles Winthrop Cramer, G.M., 36 Pearl St., Hartford. 

George A. Kies, G.S., Hartford. 



34 Appendix — Part I 



DELAWARE, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The communication under consideration is the 115th, which was held 
in the city of Wilmington, October 6 and 7, 1920. The report of the 
Committee on Credentials, credits Harry Mayer, representative of the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois, with having been present. The total representation of 
the grand lodge is given at 196. 

The first business of importance, follov>fing the introduction of dis- 
tinguished visitors was the address of the grand master, Harry Mayer. The 
fraternal dead are paid tributes of proper respect and a record made of an 
emergent communication of the grand lodge for the purpose of dedicating 
a new lodge room. 

The grand master reports that during the year, he officially visited 
each of the twenty-two lodges of his jurisdiction and that he also had the 
pleasure of visiting the grand jurisdictions of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 

The Masonic Service Association is spoken of in a manner commenda- 
tory, although the Grand Lodge of Delaware is not a member of that society. 

The Maf^onie Home is highly conmiended and a new Masonic Temple 
in the city of Wilmington is urged as an absolute necessity if the fraternity 
is to prosper as it should. 

The George Washington Memorial Association is endorsed and the 
lodges of Delaware urged to raise their quota of $1.00 per capita. 

Six decisions are reported by the grand master, all of which appear 
to have been mere local constructions of law. 

It appears from the proceedings that it has been the custom of the 
grand lodge to serve dinners during the annual session. During the war 
this practice was discontinued but the grand master reports that it has 
been reinstated and that he believes that the same will meet with the gen- 
eral approval of the brethren. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence were very gracious to the grand 
master, for they approved all of his decisions and recommendations. 

The Masonic Home Board of Delaware presents a report showing that 
there was an increase in the cost of maintaining the home; the number of 
guests is given as twelve. The actual operating expenses were $1,570.00. 

The Grand Treasurer of Delaware gives his receipts from all sources 
as $7,500 and his expenditures $6,335,00. 



Masonic Correspondence 35 

The report of the grand secretary is largely statistical and gives the 
present number of Master INIasons in the State to bo 4,38G. 

Election and installation of officers, together with presentation of the 
jewel and the apron ended the session. 

The Gran-d Lodge of Delaware docs not appear to have done very much 
in the way of enacting new legislation or departing from beaten paths. 
Its transactions were largely routine. 

Thomas J. Day writes the report on Foreign Correspondence which is 
extremely brief; Illinois gets about one page of consideration, in which the 
principal transactions of our session of 1919 are briefly chronicled. There 
is neither commendation nor criticism attached to the report. 

William J. Highfield, G.M., Wilmington, 

John F. Robinson, G.S., Wilmington. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, F. A. A. M. 

1920 

The annual communication, which was the 110th, Avas held in the 
Masonic Temple at Washington, D. C, December 15. The Committee 
on Credentials report the presence of all of the grand officers and the rep- 
resentatives of nearly every lodge. A number of distinguished Masons, 
who were present, were received and accorded the grand honors of the fra- 
ternity. The grand master, J. Harry Cunningliam, read an address to his 
grand lodge of more than passing interest. He characterizes the year as 
one of great activity and the best in the history of the District of Columbia 
in point of accomplishment. He states that he made many decisions but 
only presents three to the grand lodge, deeming the others to be merely 
constructions of local law. He decided that a petition signed by a majority 
of the investigating committee should not be balloted on, but he left the 
matter to the discretion and good judgment of the masters of lodges. He 
states that he granted dispensations to shorten the time between the con- 
ferring of the degrees in the cases of army and navy applicants. The 
grand master reports some trouble with the Masonic Temple, due to the 
fact that certain tenants vacated the building and expresses the thought 
that there should be erected in the nation's Capitol a structure in keep- 
ing with the dignity and importance of the institution. 

Grand Master Cunningham complains of the enormous increase in cost 
of printing and shows that it costs almost 300 per cent more to take care 



36 Appendix — Part I 



of the gi-and lodge printing now than it did previous to the war. He states 
that the cost of the 1919 proceedings was $1.53 per page. The grand 
master found that the printing of the names of the members of the various 
lodges as a part of the proceedings, was quite an expensive habit and that 
by omitting the 18,000 names a saving of $552.08 might be effected. He 
also suggested the reduction of the number of copies printed and thereby 
conserve the cost as much as possible. 

The grand master reports that the endowment fund of the Masonic 
Home is growing rapidly and that the lodges of the State are making 
liberal contributions toward this most laudable enterprise. 

One thing which was done during the year, was the addition to the 
form of petition of a number of new questions relating to former residences 
and parties who were able to vouch for the general character of the 
applicants. 

The grand master reports a number of visitations to the lodges of his 
jurisdiction and indicates that he discovers quite a little laxity on the part 
of investigating committees. He urges greater diligence in this respect. 
He commends the custom of attending churches in a body and advises all 
lodges to make it an annual event. 

In the District of Columbia there is a Masonic Association and it is 
through this association that the gi'and master was able to communicate 
his ideas and secure co-operation of his brethren. 

One thing Grand Master Cunningham did was to prohibit non-Masonic 
organizations from canvassing Masonic lodges for funds. He states that 
he felt that the fraternity had been so thoroughly canvassed during the 
war period that it was not best to continue the practice at this time. 

Two dispensations for the formation of new lodges were granted and 
the schools of instruction conducted by the grand lecturer highly commended. 

The George Washington Memorial Association received commendation 
and the District of Columbia sent in $1.00 per capita as its contribution 
towards this laudable enterprise. 

The Masonic Service Association is approved by the grand master and 
/•epresentatives were sent from the District of Columbia. Both the Masonic 
emplojTuent bureau and the Masonic relief board received favorable men- 
tion for the work which they are doing. High tribute is paid to the effi- 
ciency of the grand secretary and the recommendation made that his salary 
be fixed at $2500.00 per year. 

The report of the grand secretary shows his total receipts to have 
been $28,619.00 and his expenditures $23,276.00. $340.06 was expended 
for maintenance of the library. 



Masonic Correspondence 37 

Thomas H. Young, grand lecturer, presents a report giving the list 
of lodges that he visited and instructed. The District of Columbia still 
has attached to it a barnacle in the way of the past masters degree which 
it is necessary that each newly elected master must receive before entering 
upon the duties of his office. 

Quite an interesting report is presented by the Committee on Corres- 
pondence relating to the recognition of the Grand Orient of Spain. The 
recommendation made is that the matter be held in abeyance for another 
year. 

A special committee appointed for the purpose of selling the Masonic 
Temple, made a report recommending that the present building be disposed 
of and the report was adopted. A committee appointed to consider the 
advisability of erecting a new Temple, submitted a report recommending 
that the Grand Lodge proceed with the enterprise. 

Nine hundred seventy applied to the Board of Belief in Washington, 
D. C, for assistance. Of this number 534 were male and 436 were female. 
Positions were secured for 770 of this number. Surely the Grand Lodge 
of the District of Columbia is doing a most excellent work in this respect. 

One thing the grand lodge did was to loan the sum of $1,000.00 to 
one of its constituents to be used in the completion of its new home. Here 
is an idea that other grand lodges might well emulate, and the conviction 
seems to be growing that grand lodges ought to^ de something towards 
helping their constituents in the matter of securing suitable places for 
meeting. 

At St. John 's Day communication, held on December 27, there was 
a large attendance of grand officers and representatives. Tlie business 
transactions at this meeting wore largely routine and several matters which 
were carried over from the previous session received approval. The grand 
master was presented with $310.00 as a token of the love and esteem in 
which he is held by his brethren. 

The election of officers and the usual installation of the ceremonies, 
together with the pi'esentation of the jewel closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is written by Geo. W. Baird. 
He gives Illinois two pages of most kindly consideration, quoting liberally 
from all that Grand Master MtzgerreJl said concerning solicitation to secure 
petitions for the higher bodies, as well as other matters reported at that 
time. A liberal paragraph is taken from the report of Le Roy A. Goddard 
on the Masonic Service Association. Brother Baird states that "Doctor" 
Owen Scott reported on the George Washington Memorial Association. 
This is the first time we ever heard Owen Scott called Doctor and the 



38 Appendix — Part I 



writer is much at loss as to whether the appellation means Doctor of 
Divinity or some other Doctor of the very numerous family of M. D. 's. 
Tho correspondence report of this writer is very highly commended by 
Brother Baird. Brief references are made to certain things which are 
said in the report of 1920 and he states that he found nothing to criticise. 
Brother Baird is a very able writer and is doing some most excellent work 
for the fraternity in his historical sketches which appear from time to 
time in the press. 

Charles J. O'Neill, G.M., Washington, D. C. 



Arvine W. Johnston, G.S., Washington, D. C. 



ENGLAND, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

The Grand Lodge of England holds quarterly eommunieations. It 
does not issue a regular book of proceedings but submits its transactions 
in pamphlet form covering the various details that received attention by 
the grand lodge. 

The first pamphlet under consideration relates to the quarterly com- 
munication held in the city of London on Wednesday, the first day of 
December, 1920. The grand lodge was opened in ample form, after which 
the pro grand master makes a very short address to the grand lodge. Eef- 
ercnce is made to a visit on the part of the grand master to India and a 
message of good wishes is forwarded to him. 

Concerning the nomination of grand master, notice was given by the 
pro grand master to the effect that at the next quarterly communication 
his Eoyal Highness the Duke of Connaught would be elected grand master 
for the ensuing year. 

The Board of Benevolence was elected at this communication, there 
being twelve of them. This board looks after the wants of the widows 
and orphans of such members of the fraternity as need assistance. The 
report shows that the grand lodge is by no means penurious in caring for 
those who need help. 

The Board of General Purposes call attention to a rule of the grand 
lodge to the effect that the grand master shall not be applied to on any 
business concerning Masons or Masonry except through the grand secretary. 

The provincial grand masters received commendation and some legis- 
lation was taken relating to their duties as well as defining the particular 



Masonic Correspondence 39 

jewel they were expected to wear in the discharge of the functions of their 
oflfice. 

The expulsion of three brethren is reported and two appeals are re- 
corded in full. 

From the report under consideration it is apparent that warrants were 
issued for the formation of forty-three new lodges. This number should 
not be startling for the reason that E'ngland's lodges are small in number 
and devote themselves in the main to social and charitable work. 

In the quarterly communication held on the second day of March, 
1921, a communication from the grand master concerning the felicitations 
extended him on his trip to India was read, and according tO' the usual 
formality of our English cousins, he was duly elected grand master. 

The Board of General Purposes make one of their characteristic reports. 

An invitation to join in an international congress of Freemasons of 
all countries was extended by the Swiss Grand Lodge, Alpina. This invi- 
tation was turned down. The report later on states that the project was 
abandoned because of the small number of acceptances. 

It seems that the Grand Lodge of England is having a great deal of 
trouble over the woman question. Numerous bodies unrecognized as Ma- 
sonic by the Grand Lodge of England and which admit women to member- 
ship are endeavoring to induce Freemasons to join in their assemblies. 
The grand lodge comes down very positively on this question and declares 
all such organizations to be clandestine and spurious. 

It is recorded that one organization alleged to be Masonic was even 
organized by women who sought the endorsement of the United Grand 
Lodge of England. 

The Board of General Purjjoses gives the total number of lodges in 
the register to be 3612. 

The Masonic Peace Memorial comes in for extensive consideration, 
showing that the grand lodge took this matter very seriously. 

An annual grand festival was held on Wednesday, April 27, 1921. 
The principal object of this meeting appears to have been largely social 
and the various officers of the grand lodge were duly installed into their 
respective places, followed by a grand feast which was largely attended. 

On Wednesday, the first day of June, a quarterly communication was 
held, at which time the Board of General Purposes was appointed and an 
election held to select members to represent Provincial lodges on the board. 



40 Appendix — Part I 



A grand lodge auditor was also elected at this particular time. 

There is the usual report of the Benevoleuce Board and a list of those 
who received aid from the grand lodge is quite a long one. 

The Board of General Purposes make one of their characteristic reports, 
exjjrcssing great gratitude at the return of the grand master from India 
and his resumption of Masonic work at home. 

The Board report that every lodge was notified of its attitude toward 
the admission of women to Freemasonry and the craft warned concerning 
irregular and clandestine bodies. 

The practice of advertising for Masons to join in the formation of 
new lodges is severely condemned while secretaries and almoners of lodges 
are urged to exercise great caution in giving relief to persons who travel 
over the country posing as poor and distressed Masons. It seems that many 
imposters have been infringing on the good will of the fraternity. 

The chain prayer seems to have invaded England, for attention is called 
to this nonsensical devise and all good Masons urged to do their utmost 
toward suppressing it. 

The grand master, the Duke of Connaught, presented himself at this 
quarterly communication and was received with the honors of the craft 
and escorted to his seat in the grand lodge. 

The Grand Lodge of England does not issue any report on foreign 
correspondence but confines its efforts very largely to the old time practices 
and customs of the society. 

Its meetings, while largely attended, are purely routine in character 
and there is shown little or no disposition to depart from the customs and 
practices which characterized the grand lodge in its beginning. 

Hon. Lord Ampthill, P.G.M., London. 

Colville Smith, G.S., London. 



FLORIDA, F. & A. M. 

1921 

The City of Jacksonville entertained the Grand Lodge of Florida, 
in its ninety-second annual communication, held January 18, 1921. The 
grand representative of the Grand Lodge of Illinois does not appear to have 
been present. About the first business of the session was a motion that 
the grand secretary cheek up the list of grand representatives and ascer- 



Masonic Correspondence 41 

tain who, if any, have not been in attendance for the past three years 
and to report same to the grand master. The address of the grand master, 
Reginald H. Cooper, followed after the usual preliminaries. It is a com- 
plete document and sets forth in a business-like way, the transactions of 
his office during the year that has just closed. Proper tributes of respect 
are paid the dead of his own and other grand jurisdictions. 

But two dispeusations were is-sued for the formation of new lodges 
and the charter of one lodge was revoked, for good and sufficient reasons. 

One lodge adopted a by-law to the effect ' ' it shall be the custom of 
this lodge that not more than one candidate be obligated at a time in 
any degree." The grand master refused to approve this by-law, stating 
that it was an infringement upon the prerogatives of the master. Five 
requests to lay corner-stones were received by the grand master. One of 
them was for a hotel building. All were denied with the exception of a 
Presbyterian Church and a Masonic Temple. Twenty-one decisions are re- 
ported by the grand master, quite a number of them relating to infringe- 
ment of jurisdiction and other matters concerning the initiation of can- 
didates. 

Brother Cooper found it necessary to issue an edict against the Ma- 
sonic chain prayer which gained wide circulation in the State of Florida. 
Such dispensations as were issued are recorded in full. 

The George Washington Memorial Association comes in for strong 
endorsement and the Masonic Service Association receives considerable 
notice. It appears that when the Grand Lodge of Florida joined the 
Masonic Service Association, a sum, equal to 1 cent per capita, was ap- 
propriated as its share of the expense, but the association made an addi- 
tional levy of 5 cents per capita and this being contrary to the under- 
standing of the association, the grand master recommended that the grand 
lodge of Florida withdraw from this society. The grand master reports 
twenty-eight visitations to lodges and states that wherever he went he 
was received wi+h great courtesy and accorded the honors of his official 
station. It appears from his report that there was considerable trouble 
during the year concerning the use of cipher codes, one lodge being very 
liberal in referring to them. Concerning the law on physical qualifications, 
the grand master recommends a modification permitting those who were 
maimed to apply for the degrees, provided they were possessed of artifi- 
cial appliances enabling them to comply with what the fraternity requires 
of them. 

The senior grand warden, who acted as deputy grand master during 
the absence of that official from the State of Florida, makes a complete 
report of his transactions, as well as decisions made by him. The deputy 



42 Appendix — Part I 



grand masters submit a very complete resume of their work which shows 
that the State of Florida is being well taken care of. 

For the George Washington Memorial Association it appears that the 
sum of $1,933.01 has been collected up to date and the work is still going on. 

The grand secretary makes a very complete report of all his transac- 
tions and the grand treasurer gives his receipts at $45,000.00 and his ex- 
penditures at $33,372.00. The grand lodge appointed a committee of five 
to visit the Eastern Star chapter which was in session at the same time 
of the grand lodge, and to formally acknowledge greetings from that body. 

The trustees of the Masonic Temple, owned by the grand lodge, made 
a report that is interesting because they are able to show profits of $7,000.00 
and congratulate themselves upon being able to retire $10,000.00 of their 
indebtedness as a result of the year's management. 

The report of the Masonic Home Board is quite long but nevertheless is 
interesting. It cost the grand lodge to operate the home, the sum of 
$24,193.60. The number of members in the home, however, is not given. 
In addition to the charitable work which the Grand Lodge of Florida does 
in connection with its home, it expended last year for emergency relief, 
the sum of $5,139.00. There were four schools of instruction held during 
the year, attended by representatives from one hundred and fifty lodges. 

The Jurisprudence Committee make quite a long report. Some of their 
findings are as follows: 

"Articles of jewelry that cannot be removed from the person of the 
candidate shall not be considered in the matter of his preparation to re- 
ceive any of the degrees. That it is proper for a lodge in Florida to sub- 
rent its lodge room to the Eebeeea lodge or other proper organizations for 
entertainments, including dancing. Such action to be taken by the lodge 
by majority vote." 

"Lodges may provide by by-law that any member who shall pass in 
open lodge a satisfactory examination in the lecture of the M. M. degree 
shall receive a certificate of proficiency, under seal of his lodge; and that 
no member of such lodge shall be eligible to an elective office in such lodge 
until he shall have obtained such certificate of proficiency in the work of 
the degrees." 

Pictures of the Masonic home were made and sold to the lodges of 
the state, the idea being to bring the brethren to a better understanding 
of the charitable work being done by the grand lodge. 

The election and installation of officers was the last act of the session. 



3Iasonic Correspondence 43 

Silas B. Wright prepared the report on foreign correspondence and 
gives Illinois three and one-half pages of kindly consideration. 

Concerning the amendment adopted by the Grand Lodge of Illinois 
relating to the physical qualifications of candidates, he says : 

"One year ago an amendment was made to the code regarding physical 
qualifications. This provided for investigation by the grand master, pre- 
liminary to granting a dispensation. There were so many applicants that 
it was impossible for the grand master to examine them all. After con- 
sultation with the advisory council he decided that it is safer and wiser not 
to issue any dispensations whatever as it was impossible to give them per- 
sonal examination." 

An extended comment is made concerning the action of the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois regarding the Masonic Service Association and we take 
it that Brother Wright is of the opinion that the Grand Lodge of Illinois 
was not far wrong in the position which it took. The correspondence report 
of this writer receives favorable mention and very generously commented 
upon. He passes the writer the following comment: 

"He is a genuine American Mason, all wool, yard wide." 

Charles H. Ketchum, G.M., Key West. 
Wilber P. Webster, G.S., Jacksonville. 



GEORGIA, F. & A. M. 

1920 

The 134th annual communication was held in the city of Macon, on 
October 26. There was considerable amount of preliminary work immed- 
iately following the opening, among which was a telegram of felicitation 
from the grand chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, which was ordered 
spread upon the records. A number of distinguished visitors were pre- 
sented and accorded the grand honors of Masonry. The Committee on Cre- 
dentials announced the presence of Joseph Gregg, Jr., grand representative 
of the Grand Lodge of Illinois. The address of the grand master, Charles 
L. Bass, covers thirty pages of closely printed matter and is a complete 
resume of the business transactions made by him during the time he was 
in office. He passed a high compliment to the efficient services of the grand 
secretary, Frank F. Baker, and calls him the right hand of the grand master. 

The financial condition of the grand lodge is reported to be better 
than ever before. The grand lodge is free from debt with the largest 



44 Appendix — Part I 



receipts in its history. The custodians of the ritual came in for hearty 
comment on the part of the grand master and their work is referred to in 
the very highest terms. It appears that in the larger cities of the State, 
Masonic clubs have been organized which are doing a most excellent work, 
in not only creating good felloAvship among the fraternity, but likewise 
spreading the gospel of Freemasonry. 

The Masonic Home is referred to as the special pride of the grand 
lodge, and the endowment fund of this most excellent institution is pro- 
nounced to be $123,000.00. It appears from the transactions of the grand 
lodge that an effort is being made to provide a home for the aged and 
infirm, for a special committee has this matter under consideration. 

The Scottish Rite Hospital maintained in Atlanta, Ga., for the care 
of crippled children comes in for hearty endorsement. Foreign relations 
are spoken of as being most harmonious and cordial. The grand master 
states that he granted a number of dispensations and justifies himself by 
saying there was sufficient necessity for granting them, owing to the 
enormous amount of work being done throughout the jurisdiction. Five 
dispensations for the formation of new lodges were granted, while three 
lodges surrendered their charters. The grand master makes no direct de- 
cisions although he presents the answers to sixteen questions which he thinks 
are of sufficient interest to claim the attention of the grand lodge. Among 
his conclusions are the following: 

"It is illegal to try a member of the Masonic Order who has been 
adjudged insane and is an inmate in the State Sanitarium, though the 
offense may have been committed previous to his having been adjudged 
insane. ' ' 

' ' A committee appointed and failing to discharge their duty and giving 
no satisfactory reason for such failure can be discharged at any time by 
order of the lodge or the worshipful master and a new committee ap- 
pointed." 

"The law forbidding the use of Masonic emblems for advertising pur- 
poses refers to Masonic emblems connected with symbolic Masonry." 

' ' Interpretation of Masonic law by the grand master when given 
officially has all the sanctity of law and the subordinate lodges must be 
governed and controlled by the same until this opinion or interpretation 
of the law is overruled or altered by the grand lodge." 

The Grand Lodge of Georgia permits change of venue in Masonic 
trials. Three instances are recorded wherein this privilege was granted. 

The list of visitations reported by the grand master is a long one and 
shows that he made every effort to meet with his brethren on Masonic 
occasions. The grand master delivered eleven sermons in churches for the 



Masonic Correspondence 45 

benefit of the fraternity. He laid six corner-stones during the year and 
conducted district conventions in the twelve congressional districts of the 
state. 

The Masonic Service Association of the United States is commended 
and the recommendation made to the grand lodge that it join the Associa- 
tion and pay five cents per capita as annual tax. The George Washington 
Memorial Association is likewise commended and the lodges of the state 
urged to contribute liberally toward this splendid undertaking. In con- 
clusion the grand master recommended that the grand secretary be author- 
ized to procure biographical sketches of all past, present, and future grand 
officers elected by the grand lodge and that these be made into a per- 
manent record. 

Thie grand secretary makes a report which is largely statistical. He 
gives the number raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, to have 
been 7,972. Present membership in the state is 61,555. The receipts from 
all sources were $75,100.00. The committee on correspondence made a report 
recommending that action on the request of the Grand Lodge of Vienna for 
recognition be deferred. 

The special committee on the Home for the aged recommended that 
a special committee be appointed with full power to devise plans and 
commends the erection of a building for the care of indigent Masons, their 
widows and orphans. 

A resolution was adopted by the grand lodge fully endorsing both the 
George Washington Memorial Association and the Masonic Service Asso- 
ciation. All of the grand master's answers to questions were approved 
except one. In this they dissented because of the construction which they 
placed upon local law. 

The committee looked over the dispensations which were granted by 
the grand master and approved all of them. During the last day of the 
session a resolution was introduced that action with reference to the Home 
for the Aged, be postponed for one year, and the grand lodge adopted the 
resolution. Th's action was followed by the following resolution, which 
was adopted: 

"Eesolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the grand 
master to investigate a system of pensions for aged and infirm Masons, 
that such a proposition be worked out and submitted at the next regular 
communication of the Grand Lodge of Georgia, in conjunction with the 
plan of the Home for the Aged now under consideration, and that the ques- 
tion shall at that time be definitely settled." 

It is apparent that the Grand Lodge of Georgia has in its membership 
some thinking men, for the idea of pensioning is one which every grand 



46 Appendix — Part I 



lodge, engaging in institutional charity today, must sooner or later con- 
sider. It is far better to care for an old couple in their own home among 
the friends and neighbors where they have dwelt a life time, than it is to 
compel them to dispose of their property and gO' into an institution among 
strangers. 

The Committee on Appeals and Grievances must have had something 
to do, for they report twenty-three cases as having been considered by them. 
In each case they briefly review the circumstances and their findings. The 
Grand Lodge of Georgia maintains a Committee on General Welfare. This 
committee makes a number of very valuable suggestions, all of which are 
no doubt of interest to the fraternity of that state. 

The Finance Committee fixes the salary of the Grand Secretary at 
$4500.00 and allows him $1560.00 for clerical help. The report on the 
Masonic Home came just before the close of the proceedings. It cost the 
Grand Lodge of Georgia $23,161.00 to maintain its home during the year. 
The amount paid to the matron, superintendent and secretary is $3,300.00. 
The installation of offieers and the presentation of the customary jewel 
were features of the closing hours. 

Eaymond Daniel prepared the correspondence report for 1920. He 
prefaces his report with a number of paragraphs in which he presents some 
very pertinent ideas concerning the craft in general. He gives to Illinois 
six and a half pages of liberal treatment. He opens with the following 
j)aragraph : 

"Our acquaintance with and admiration of Past Grand Masters Owen 
Scott and Alexander H. Bell, whom we met at the Cedar Rapids conference 
of the Masonic Service Association of the United States, November 11-13, 
make us feel thoroughly at home, as we open the Illinois proceedings. 
Brothers Scott and Bell stood out as two stalwart pillars of Freemasonry 
at the Cedar Eapids meeting, and if all the good Illinois brethren are of 
the same characteristics, then Illinois must indeed be a GEAND jurisdiction. 
Brothers Scott and Bell made two of the best addresses at the meeting. 
Brother Bell also intimately knows and loves our Grand Master Charles 
L. Bass and Past Grand Master ' ' Uncle Tom ' ' Jeffries, which is sufficient 
recommendation to our Georgia brethren." 

Liberal quotations are taken from the address to the grand lodge of 
Daniel G. Fitzgerrell. He quotes what Brother Fitzgerrell said concerning 
those Masons who feel aggrieved because the grand lodge insists upon them 
doing their work in the American language and concludes by saying: 
"Bravo Brother Fitzgerrell." 

A brief paragraph is taken from the oration of Edward J. Brundage 
and the correspondence report of this writer and he quotes liberally from 



Masonic Correspondence 47 

the preface to the correspondence report of 1919. He agrees with this 
writer that the publication of the names of defendants in Masonic trials 
as well as the details of the trial is unnecessary and unwise. Brother Daniel 
presents a most excellent report and it is a matter of regret that lack of 
space does not permit a more extended reference concerning his splendid 
review. 

Charles L. Bass, G.M., Georgia. 

Frank F. Baker, G.S., Georgia. 



IDAHO, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The 53rd annual comnninication opened in the city of Boise, Tuesday, 
September 14, at 10:00 o'clock A.M. The grand otficers appear to have 
been present, but the representative of the Grand Lodge of Illinois is not 
accredited with attendance. At this annual communication, the first busi- 
ness of importance was the annual address of the grand master, Arch 
Cunningham. He refers to the annual communication of the grand lodge 
as an appeal in the nature of a reunion where friendships are renewed and 
perpetuated. He reports the condition of Masonry in Idaho to be most 
gratifying and foreign relations cordial and hearty. He states that Idaho 
is enjoying its full share of activities and prosperity, and warns lodges to 
be more careful in the selection of the material which they accept. 

The grand master believes in Masonic education, for he emphasizes 
the necessity of a better understanding of the fraternity. 

The Masonic Service Association is commended and provision made 
for the payment of the pro rata assessment. By-laws of a. number of lodges 
were approved by the grand master, and dispensations issued for the for- 
mation of three new lodges. The grand master lists the dispensations 
which he issued, all of which were for legitimate Masonic purposes. 

He made six decisions; one was to the effect that a man blind in one 
eye was eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry. The grand master 
speaks of smoking in lodge and condemns the habit. He expresses great 
pleasure that in his visits to various lodges he found a strong disposition 
everywhere to prohibit smoking in the lodge room at any and all times. 

In Idaho, dues accrue against a member suspended from the fraternity 
and his lodge. The grand master thinks this law is wrong and recom- 
mends a change, providing that dues shall not accrue during suspension. 



48 Appendix — Par't I 



He advises the lodges in his jurisdiction to pay great attention to social 
features and believes them necessary in the upbuilding of the lodge. 

Some lodges of the state appear to have been guilty of abbreviating 
the work. These came in for a word of censure and warning. The gi'and 
master argues that because of the great amount of work being done, lodges 
cannot abbreviate in order to save time. In closing, Brother Cunningham 
refers to the visitations which he made to the lodges of his jurisdiction and 
expresses the regret that he could not have been more diligent in this 
matter. However, he accomplished much good through his visits. 

The grand treasurer gives his total receipts at $42,917.00 and expen- 
ditures $46,436.00. 

The report of the grand secretary is interesting because he goes into 
many matters of detail which passed through his hands during his term 
of office. An amendment to the by-laws was presented, permitting non- 
affiliates to have the privilege of the lodges for a period of six months 
after severing- their connections and requires them to petition within thirty 
days thereafter if they expect to participate in the privileges of the fra- 
ternity. The amendment goes to some length to define the status of those 
non-affiliates, who stay outside of the fraternity. 

The Committee on Appeals and Grievances report ten cases which 
came under their jurisdiction. Each case is cited very briefly, no details 
being given, but the name of the defendant is mentioned in each instance. 

The Jurisprudence Committee approved all that the grand master did 
and presented no matters out of the ordinary routine. The amendment 
defining the status of non-affiliates mentioned above, was after the three 
readings, duly adopted. 

Idaho seems to be taking up the matter of Masonic education, for it has 
a special committee at work, Revising plans for the dissemination of Ma- 
sonic information throughout the state. The committee on returns of lodges 
gives the number raised as 984 and a total memljership within the state 
of 6934. The net gain for 1920 is given at 954. 

On the third day the Committee on Unfinished Business presented a 
report in which it recommended that the grand lodge withdraw from the 
Masonic Service Association. The particular reason offered being the 
difficulty of raising funds to maintain its standing in that association. 

The installation of officers and the presentation of the sigTiet ring 
closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by Geo. E. Knepper. 
Illinois is given two and a half pages of very courteous consideration. Our 



Masonic Correspondence 49 

principal acts are chronicled and a liberal quotation taken from the oration 
of Edward J. Briindage. What was said by this writer on the subject of 
co-ordination is quoted, as well as other short extracts which appeared in 
that report. 

I. Edgar Meek, G.M., Caldwell. 

Geo. E'. Knepper, G.S., Boise. 



INDIANA, F. & A. M. 

1921 

The 104th annual communication convened in the grand lodge hall 
of the Masonic Temple in the city of Indianapolis at 10:00 o'clock on 
Tuesday, the 24th day of May. 

The record shows that there were present representatives of 537 of 
the 553 chartered lodges. 

The grand lodge was opened briefly and settled down to business with- 
out any tiresome preliminaries. 

The first item of interest is the report of the grand master, Richard H. 
Schweitzer. He states in his opening remarks that it has been his effort 
to administer the laws in moderation and in keeping with the principles of 
the order. 

He refers to the death of Calvin W. Prather, grand secretary, who 
died on August 1, 1920, The writer knew Brother Prather very inti- 
mately and counted him among his dearest friends. His death is a serious 
loss to the Masons of Indiana. 

The grand master states that he found it impossible to visit any great 
number of lodges. Such visits as he did make were of informal character. 
The George Washington Memorial Association is commended and Indiana 
pledged to do its full duty toward that enterprise. 

The Masonic Home is spoken of in the very highest terms and the 
general management commended for the efficiency with which it administers 
the affairs of that institution. 

The grand master pays very high triljute to Herbert A. Graham, gi-and 
instructor, who devoted the entire year to visiting and instructing lodges 
throughout the state. 



50 Appendix — Part I 



Brother Schweitzer states he received uumerous complaints from the 
lodges, all of which he was able to harmoniously adjust in a manner sat- 
isfactory to all concerned. The grand master is to be commended for 
taking time to expend in this noble work of the fraternity, that of con- 
ciliating differences between brethren. 

One recommendation made by the grand master is that the Committee 
on Eitual revise the Burial Ceremony, and the statement is made that this 
ceremony should not dwell so much upon death and the grave as upon life, 
the value of fraternity and the hereafter. The grand master is right and 
is to be commended for his wisdom in this respect. 

The grand master also recommends that the general regulations of the 
grand lodge be codified and brought up to date. 

A number of corner stones were laid and temples dedicated by the 
grand lodge during the year. 

Dispensations were also issued for the formation of five new lodges, 
one of which was named in honor of Calvin W. Prather, deceased grand 
secretary. 

The charter of one lodge was revoked for the reason that the lodge 
had not met for a period of two years and was unable to confer any of 
the degrees. 

The grand master states he found it necessary to suspend the charters 
of a number of lodges during the year, due mainly to the fact that many 
of these lodges were not properly functioning. Brother Schweitzer seems 
to think that in the rural districts there are too many small lodges located 
too near each other and that with the lack of material it is extremely diffi- 
cult for these lodges to exist. 

The list of lodges which were disciplined by the grand master is a 
long one, showing that he proposed to bring Masonry up to a high standard 
during the year, and such lodges as failed to meet this standard might pre- 
pare for their demise. One lodge in particular was disciplined for per- 
mitting the White Shrine to meet in its building. The statement is made 
that under the laws of Indiana none but legitimate Masonic organizations 
can meet in Masonic lodge rooms. 

The grand master refused to approve an amendment to lodge by-laws 
exempting the secretary and tyler from the pajTiient of dues. 

One decision rendered was that a lodge of instruction can only be held 
by a subordinate lodge. 



Masonic Correspondence 51 

The grand master very forcibly rules against degree teams not 
sponsored by some particular lodge and holds that all of the members 
of a degree team must be in good standing in one lodge. 

Concerning the matter of lodge dues, the attention of the grand lodge 
is called to the fact that over 100 lodges in Indiana charge annual dues 
of $2.00 or less. The grand master thinks the subject is one of sufficient 
importance to receive the recognition of the grand lodge and recommends 
the fixing of the minimum amount of annual dues that may be charged. 

The playing of card games as well as pool and billiards on Sunday 
is severely condemned and a recommendation made that all Masonic lodges 
operating club rooms be required to close them on the Sabbath day. 

Attention is called to the fact that subordinate lodges must retain and 
maintain complete jurisdiction over all rooms or quarters used or occupied 
by the lodge for business, ritualistic or social purposes. 

Begging and soliciting in Masonic lodge rooms and among Masons is 
severely condemned and a recommendation made that a larger number of 
rituals be given to each lodge in order that more brethren may have an 
opportunity to study the ritual of the fraternity. 

The grand treasurer gives his total receipts as $53,864.00 and expen- 
ditures as $40,788.00. The grand secretary's report goes largely into 
matters of detail and sums up the various matters vehich passed through 
his hands during the year. 

The year under review must have been a prosperous one for Indiana, 
for the number raised is given at 11,391 and the present membership 108,021. 

One of the pleasing features of the grand lodge was the presentation 
of a building at the Masonic Home erected by the Scottish Kite and which 
cost $150,000.00. This is a very forcible example of Masonic co-ordination 
and shows what may be accomplished when all Masonic institutions labor 
together for a common cause. 

The report made by the Board of Managers of the Masonic Home is 
interesting and shows Indiana is doing its full share toward caring for the 
helpless members of the fraternity as well as looking after the orphans 
of deceased Master Masons. The total number in the home is given at 205. 

Quite a long report is made by the grand lecturer, Herbert A. Graham, 
in which he gives a resume of his official acts as grand instructor for the 
Grand Lodge of Indiana. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence present a report which is pretty well 
split up. The committee are of the opinion, however, that the question 



52 Appendix — Part I 



of annual dues should be left entirely with the individual lodge. The ques- 
tion of furnishing additional rituals to each subordinate lodge was approved. 
The question of appointing a committee to prepare a new Masonic funeral 
service received approval. The question of closing Masonic club rooms on 
Sunday was endorsed by the committee. The grand master was sustained 
in the stand which he took forbidding lodges to use two lodge rooms at 
the same time. 

The Grand Lodge of Panama was formally recognized, after which 
the grand lodge adjourned for the annual dinner. 

The Grand Lodge of Indiana proposes to build up an endowment fund 
for the Masonic Home, for an amendment was adopted exacting a fee of 
$5.00 for each candidate initiated which amount is to be paid by the lodge 
which the candidate joins. 

A resolution endorsing the public schools of Indiana was adopted with 
great enthusiasm. 

The installation of officers and the presentation of the customary jewel 
closed this very interesting session. 

Elmer F. Gay, past grand master, writes the correspondence report, 
which is brief and to the point. He gives Illinois one and one-half pages 
of consideration, quoting all that Grand Master Fitzgerrell said concerning 
the Grotto and quotes a paragraph concerning the Jacob Euehl case, from 
which it is apparent the action taken by this grand lodge is thoroughly en- 
dorsed by Brother Gay. 

Omar B. Smith, G.M., Eochester. 

William H. Swintz, G.S., Masonic Temple, Indianapolis. 



IRELAND, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

On St. John's Day, December 27, the grand lodge appears to have 
held a stated communication. The deputy grand master delivered quite a 
long address in which he discusses various matters of interest to the craft 
in that jurisdiction, indulging largely in reminiscence and historical ref- 
erence. At the conclusion of his address a resolution was adopted endors- 
ing the work of Sir Charles Cameron, CJ3., who recently retired from the 
office of deputy grand master. 



Masonic Correspondence 53 

The deputy grand secretary submits a report covering numerous items 
which passed through his office during the year. He announces the publi- 
cation of a volume containing the names of 5600 brethren belonging to 
the lodges of Ireland who were engaged in the war. The grand secretary 
reports a number of amendments to the by-laws which had been adopted 
at the December communication of the grand lodge and pronounces the 
establishment of eighteen new lodges. 

The supervisors of the various jurisdictions make reports to the grand 
secretary which are printed in full in the proceedings and show the craft 
to be in a prosperous condition. The grand secretary announces that it is 
impossible for him to give the exact financial record of the grand lodge 
for the year of 1919, but that such figures as are available show that the 
income was greater than that of any preceding year. 

The Grand Lodge of Ireland does its full share of charitable work, 
for it maintains a splendid school for the education of the children of its 
indigent members. 

There is no correspondence report connected with the very brief 
pamphlet which is in the hands of the reviewer and a complete resume of 
the grand lodge is difficult from the very terse manner in which its trans- 
actions were recorded in the proceedings. 

The Et. Hon. the Barl of Donoughmore, K.P., M.W.G.M., Ireland. 

Eight Hon. Lord Dunalley, E.W. G.S., Ireland. 



KANSAS, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

The city of Wichita had the pleasure of entertaining the Grand Lodge 
of Kansas, assembled in the 65th annual communication. The sessions were 
held in the banquet hall of the Scottish Eite Temple. Immediately after 
the opening ceremonies, announcement was made of a ruling to the effect 
that no mileage would be allowed to anyone who was not present at all of 
the sessions unless excused for good and sufficient reasons. 

Albert K. Wilson, grand secretary, was seriously ill and unable to be 
present. The roll call disclosed the presence of the grand representative of 
Illinois, Eichard E. Bird. The total attendance on the grand lodge was 
799. The first business of importance was the annual address of the grand 
master, Alex A. Sharp. He said that the year had been a busy one fraught 
with bitter and sweet, the latter predominating. The net gain in mem- 



54 Appendix — Part I 



bership is given as 7,420 and the present membership 62,992. One recom- 
mendation made by the grand master was that all lodges that had photo- 
graphic copies of their charters be instructed to destroy them. Three lodges 
suffered losses of their entire property by fire during the year. 

The grand master laid five corner-stones, none of them, however, being 
for Masonic buildings. One Masonic lodge hall was dedicated according to 
the ancient ceremonies of the Craft. 

The grand master states that he issued a considerable number of dis- 
pensations to confer degrees out of time and collected $505.00 as fees 
therefor. The grand lecturers are commended very highly. They are 
spoken of as deliberate and accurate and that they display dignified 
courtesy. 

The grand master made quite a number of visitations to the lodges of 
his district but states that it was impossible to attend as many functions 
as he would have liked. One recommendation which the grand master made 
was that a copy of the Monitor be presented to every newly raised Master 
Mason. The necessity for Masonic trials is seriously deplored. 

The grand master states that the only thing in which he finds consola- 
tion is the fact that there are so few trials in proportion to the large mem- 
bership in the State. The writer likes what he said concerning the physical 
qualifications of candidates and takes the liberty of quoting: "It seems 
to me that during the generations of the recent past, there have been such 
changes in the world 's progress, in the occupations of man, that the reasons 
for the original rule of excluding all maimed petitioners no longer exists. 
That speculative Masonry with its beautiful lessons and ceremonies might 
well be broadened to include those that in a degree have been impaired in 
their usefulness for manual labor, and that those who work mentally, though 
physically impaired, may be privileged to commune with those who work 
manually, and that a defect in one's manual or physical qualifications may 
not be as serious as a defect in one 's mental and moral qualifications. ' ' 

The grand master reports a total of 156 in the Masonic Home during 
the year. Soon after his installation grand master Farreely issued a letter 
to the lodges of his jurisdiction in which he set forth very explicitly just 
what he expected from them in the way of the work and other details. The 
decisions which he submits are very few. 

The subject of dancing came up for consideration. One lodge which 
had erected a magnificent temple and was permitting dancing in the dining 
room, came in for the attention of the grand master with the result that 
the following decision was rendered: 

"There is no distinction or difference in the application of Masonic 
Law, between a lodge room and any other room of a Masonic Temple or 



Masonic Correspondence 55 

building, whether such other room is above, below or alongside of the lodge 
room, in such building owned or controlled in whole or in part by the 
Lodge and used exclusively for Masonic purposes. A part of a Masonic 
building cannot be erected and dedicated to God and a part to frivolous 
entertainment. It is therefore unlawful to use any part of such Masonic 
Temple or building, ' for dancing purposes ' or to form or maintain a 
' dancing department ' or ' headquarter dancing department ' in any part of 
such building, or to hold entertainments of any kind therein, to which an 
admission or other fee is charged or collected." 

The fraternal relations of the Grand Lodge of Kansas with the Ma- 
sonic world are represented to be most cordial. 

The grand treasurer gives his total receipts at $78,929.00 and disburse- 
ments $88,861.00. The report of the grand secretary, Albert K. Wilson, is 
quite a long one and goes much into detail concerning the affairs of his 
office. His report together with the various tables which he ijresents covers 
almost fifty pages. Kansas maintains a most creditable library, for the 
report of the librarian which was presented was that the work of that 
department is growing and is finding favor among the Craft. 

During the session of the Grand Lodge the children from the Masonic 
Home appeared on the platform where they executed a march and sang a 
patriotic song. They were given an enthusiastic reception. The oration 
was delivered on the afternoon of the second day, the grand orator being 
Clarence E. Pile. He delivered a most excellent address which no doubt 
found favor with the brethren. The Grand Lodge of Kansas held an eve- 
ning session on the second day at which the work was exemplified by the 
grand lecturer. In order to provide more money for the mairrtenanee of the 
Masonic Home, the grand lodge adopted an amendment requiring a fee of 
$5.00 on each candidate raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason. 

The report of the secretary of the Masonic Home is a long one in 
which there is detailed every matter connected with that institution. 

The Committee on Chartered Lodges make an interesting report show- 
ing that they are very careful in checking up the annual returns of lodges 
and arranging statistical matters. The Special Committee on Masonic 
Usages and Customs makes a report but fails to agree with the grand master 
that there should be any change in the law on physical qualifications. 

A recommendation from the grand secretary to change the time of 
the meeting of the grand lodge to one month later did not find favor with 
the Committee on Usages and Customs. They seem to think that such a 
change would be to favor the lodge in the matter of extending latitude in 
the matter of reports. 



56 Appendix — Part I 



The Committee on Jurispriulence brought in quite a long report in 
which they approve practically all of the decisions of the grand master and 
made several other recommendations. They could see no reason for chang- 
ing the present law on physical qualifications and expressed the belief that 
all members of the fraternity should be perfect in limb and body. 

The matter of joining the Masonic Service Association was referred 
to the council of administration with the request that a 'thorough investi- 
gation be made and a report presented at the next meeting of the grand 
lodge. 

The installation of officers and the presentation of the jewel were 
features of the closing hours of the session. 

The report on Foreign Correspondence is prepared by Albert K. Wilson. 
He treats Illinois very generously, giving it three and one half pages of 
kindly and courteous consideration. He quotes liberally from the address of 
Grand Master Fitzgerrell and seems to agree with a great deal that he said 
concerning the Grotto. Brother Wilson comments at considerable length 
one paragraph, which is reproduced herewith: 

' ' The action of the grand master was approved by the grand lodge and 
we feel justified in adding just one more stamp of approval from the Sun- 
flower State. The writer of this report was importuned and accepted an 
invitation a short time ago to attend an entertainment given by one of the 
ladies' organizations who hold their meetings in one of our Masonic Halls, 
and while the entertainment was not given in the Hall proper, but in the 
banquet room, it was advertised and kno-mi as a 'Masonic' circus and it 
certainly was even more than that, as the old 'midway' of the ancient 
days of the World's Fair for din and noise, could scarcely be used as a 
comparison and in the midst of the revelry, one of the tables which was 
used as a place for resting, gave way and two of the ladies were badly 
injured. And all of this was inipropeily credited to 'Masonry.' " 

He comments on one or two paragraphs in the correspondence report 
of 1920 and seems to think that the historical records as kept by the Grand 
Lodge of Kansas are beyond criticism and believes that the system of in- 
struction in vogue in that State cannot be surpassed. 

Ben S. Paulen, G.M., Fredonia. 

Albert K. Wilson, G.S., Topeka. 



Masonic Correspondence 57 



KENTUCKY, F. & A. M. 

1920 

The 120th annual communication was held in the Masonic Temi:)le at 
Louisville commencing Tuesday, October 19. The Committee on Cre- 
dentials reported a constitutional quorum present after which the grand 
master, Henry S. McElroy, delivered his annual address. He states that 
during the past twelve months only three cases of discord arose and none of 
them were of serious moment. 

The grand master reports the settlement of a law suit which arose 
because ice from the Masonic Temple broke and an adjoining structure 
received considerable damage. The owner sued for $800.00 and the matter 
was finally compromised by the payment of one-half the amount. 

The grand master reported approval of the bonds of the secretary and 
treasurer in the sum of $10,000.00 each. 

During the year, five corner-stones were laid, most of them being for 
structures other than Masonic and one Masonic lodge room was formally 
dedicated. 

The grand master stated that he granted 162 dispensations to confer 
the Entered Apprentice degree on more than five at one time. He recom- 
mends to the grand lodge that this regulation be repealed. Among the dis- 
pensations refused by him was one permitting a lodge to join in an 
Armistice parade, another dispensation refused was to permit a lodge to hold 
Masonic services at the grave of a Brother after he had been buried. 

The usual number of requests to confer degrees by courtesy were granted 
and likewise submitted to other jurisdictions. 

Masonry in Kentucky gives evidence of prosperity for seven dispen- 
sations for the formation of new lodges were issued. 

The grand master chronicles his visitations to lodges and gives in detail 
the various social events which he attended. 

He reports the sale of the Masonic Temple in Louisville for the sum 
of $300,000.00. 

The Grand Master finds some fault with the Masonic Service Associa- 
tion principally because it has not carried out its original ideas. The fact 
that the Association proposes raising the annual dues, leads the grand master 
to recommend that it withdraw from the Association. 

Nine opinions are rendered. All of them are of minor import and con- 
tain nothing unusual. 



58 Appendix — Part I 



The Widow and Orphans' Home comes in for strong commendation and 
the grand master states that they are approximating the goal of $1,000,000.00 
which soon is to be used in the building of an institution which will be a 
credit to the Grand Lodge of Kentucky. He warns the grand lodge, how- 
ever, not to act too hastily and before any final plans are agreed upon the 
grand lodge will consider both the institutional and the cottage plan. He 
states they have only one object in view and that is the interest of the 
widow and the orphan under their charge. 

The grand master states that during the year of his administration 
he declined for most part, invitations to banquets and meetings of pleasure 
and devoted his entire energy toward the administering of the affairs of 
his office as well as raising money to help augment the $1,000,000.00 fund. 

The Order of the Eastern Star comes in for some commendation and 
the grand master states that the organization proposes to raise $100,000.00 
for some specified building on the site of the new home. 

Grand Master McElroy thinks all grand masters should have some dis- 
tinctive badge whereby they may be known in the Masonic world and he 
suggested the lapel button and even goes so far as to recommend that a 
committee be appointed to select and purchase a button for each past grand 
master. 

The grand treasurer reports total receipts of $140,857.00 and disburse- 
ments of $141,196.00. 

The grand secretary, Dave Jackson, makes one of his characteristic 
reports and goes considerably into detail concerning the affairs of his oflice. 
He gives the total number of Masons in Kentucky at the present time to 
be 60,021. 

One of the pleasing features of the Masonic session was an entertain- 
ment given by the children of the Masonic Home at 2:30 o'clock P. M., 
on the first day. It is needless to say that the Brethren enjoyed this most 
delightful affair. 

The Masonic Employment Bureau of Louisville make a most interesting 
report. Two hundred eighty-nine applied for positions of which number 
231 were satisfactorily placed. It cost the grand lodge the sum of $1,078.00 
to carry on this good work. 

The Grand Lodge of Kentucky has a special committee known as the 
Educational Trustees. They are creating a fund to be used in the educa- 
tion of the children of deceased Masons. During the year of 1919 forty-four 
children were helped in the matter of education at a cost to the grand 
lodge of $7,569.00. 



Masonic Correspondence 59 

Brother Thomas E. Marshall, vice-president of the United States, was 
introduced to the grand lodge and delivered one of his characteristic ad- 
dresses. The grand secretary in preparing the proceedings, showed the 
bad taste to add after the name of Brother Marshall "33rd°''. The 
writer knows Brother Marshall intimately and believes that if he had his 
choice he would not wish to have Scottish Eite matters mixed up with the 
affairs of Ancient Craft Masonry. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence present a report covering two pages. 
They are very generous to the grand master and approve practically all of 
his actions. This Committee presents no new matter which may be consid- 
ered of unusual interest. 

The report from the Masonic Homes shows a total of 372 members. 
The Grand Lodge of Kentucky takes great pride in the charitable work it 
is doing and it has a right to do so. 

A resolution was adopted which should make the lodges of Kentucky 
very careful whom they recommend for admission to the Home. The reso- 
lution in substance provided that when an ineligible has been received in 
the Home and it has later been found necessary to dismiss him, the lodge 
which was responsible for recommending him be required to pay all expenses 
of his maintenance during the time he was a charge of the grand lodge. 

A proposition to increase the mileage and per diem of representatives 
was carried over to next year. Nine cases of appeal were presented to the 
Committee on Appeals. All of these are very briefly discussed by the 
Committee and their deductions submitted to the grand lodge. 

One rather unusual resolution was adopted just before the close of the 
grand lodge to the effect that a committee be appointed to visit the Grand 
Chapter of the Eastern Star at its forthcoming session and convey to them 
the sentiments of the grand lodge and at the same time formulate a more 
definite plan for mutual co-operation between these two bodies. 

The Masonic birthday of George Washington received hearty endorse- 
ment. The giand master was tendered a vote of thanks and Brother M. P. 
Molley who had paid dues for fifty consecutive years was made a free 
member of the fraternity. 

A resolution was presented and referred to the Jurisprudence Com- 
mittee : 

"No lodge shall initiate any candidate who has been rejected by an- 
other lodge without the recommendation of seven members of the lodge by 
whom the rejection was made, if it is in existence, of whom three shall be 
the master and wardens. ' ' 



60 Appendix — Part I 



The election and installation of officers together with the presentation 
of the jewel and niimcious trophies to the grand master closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is written by William W. Clark, 
past grand master. It is very brief, covering but seventy pages, 

Illinois is considered in one page of kindly review. The principal acts 
of our session of 1919 are briefly referred to and all that the writer said 
in his correspondence report concerning ' ' a new requirement ' ' is quoted 
in full. 

Frank Acker, G.M., Paducah. 

Dave Jackson, G.S., Louisville. 



LOUISIANA, F. & A. M. 

1921 

This grand lodge held its 110th annual communication in the Scottish 
Eite cathedral in the city of New Orleans, Monday afternoon, February 
14, opening at 3:30 o'clock. The Committee on Credentials record the 
presence of the grand representative from Illinois. 

The first business of importance was the annual address of the grand 
master, Wj-nne G. Eogers. In his opening remarks he refers to the general 
unrest throughout the country and seems to think that one of the great 
needs of the times is education such as the Masonic Fraternity is able to 
give. He says that every Masonic lodge must become the center of good 
intluenee and wise counsel. Extended tributes are paid to the dead of 
the jurisdiction and the state of the order is gone into at considerable 
length. The grand master seems to think that while there is much cause 
for congratulation due to the large increase in membership, yet the 
situation is fraught with danger, owing to the fact that carelessness 
is likely to creep into the general transactions of the lodge. The grand 
master recommends that a committee on education be appointed to furnish 
newly raised Master Masons with authentic information concerning the 
society. A total of 267 requests to confer degrees by courtesy were handled 
by the grand master. Eleven new lodges received dispensations and a large 
number of certificates of proficiency were issued to grand lecturers. 

The list of dispensations issued by the grand master is a very long one. 
In looking them over, the writer is unable to find anything out of the ordi- 
nary and assumes that the grand master, did nothing startling in his issu- 
ance of these papers. A full account of the official visitations of the 



Masonic Correspondence 61 

grand master is recorded and shows that he was diligent in his endeavor to 
accept the hospitality of the lodges of the State. 

The Masonic Service Association is endorsed by the grand master and 
is recommended to the favorable consideration of the grand lodge. Among 
the dispensations which the grand master refused to issue was one from a 
lodge which asked permission to tender the use of its lodge room to the 
Elks for an initiation. He also refused to grant dispensations to hold a 
joint installation of officers with Eoyal Arch Chapters as well as chapters 
of the Eastern Star. 

Thirty-three decisions are rendered by Grand Master Eogers, some of 
them relate to the construction of the law with reference to physical quali- 
fications, while others pertain to the general construction of existing regula- 
tions. One decision is rather out of the ordinary and was to the effect that 
a lodge had a right to circulate a petition to be presented to the governor of 
the State, asking that a convicted murderer sentenced to be hanged, be 
brought to immediate judgment. 

One of the things discussed by the grand master in his report relates 
to the new Masonic Temple to be erected in the city of New Orleans. It is 
expected to expend about $3,000,000.00 and the project is reported as well 
under way. The grand lodge contemplates building a mortuary chapel where 
it is supposed Masonic funerals will be held. The estimated revenue from 
the building is figured at $339,000.00. In his closing remarks the grand 
master passes a high tribute to the grand secretary, John A. Davilla, and 
refers to him as a tower of strength in his department. 

The grand treasurer gives his receipts as $106,485.00 and his expendi- 
tures $103,047.00. The report of the grand secretary is very largely statisti- 
cal. The total number raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason as 
reported by him is 3,378. The net gain in membership is given at 3,384 
and the present membership in the State 26,392. 

There is maintained in New Orleans a Masonic Belief Lodge which 
takes care of the wants of those who are in needly circumstances. During 
the year the sum of $3,866.00 was expended for this purpose. The Masonic 
hall directors make a report which is very interesting, showing that they 
are business men of acumen for they propose to proceed with the construc- 
tion of their new temple and offer a financial plan which seems thoroughly 
feasible and adapted to carrying the work through to its completion. 

The Committee on Masonic Law and Jurisprudence approved practically 
all of the decisions of the grand master. Two, however, came in for dis- 
favor and were not approved. The oration delivered during the session 
of the grand lodge was not long and was offered by Doctor Mendel Silver. 
It was Masonic in character and should have interested the brethren who 



62 Appendix — Part I 



were fortunate enough to hear it. A very interesting report is presented 
from the Committee on State of the Order. This committee takes into 
consideration everything pertaining to the growth and development of the 
fraternity within the State. 

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence submitted a report recom- 
mending that the rekxtious of the Grand Orient of France be suspended, 
owing to the fact that this grand lodge has established lodges in the city 
of New York, also in San Francisco. It seems disposed to invade the 
jurisdictions of the various grand lodges of the United States. 

A resolution providing for one ballot for all three degrees was pre- 
sented and went to the Committee on Jurisprudence. This committee re- 
ported they deemed it unwise to change our present law requiring separate 
ballots for each degree and recommended that the law remain as it now is. 

Quite a long report is made by the Committee on Jurisprudence con- 
cerning the status of the widow of a Master Mason who marries a profane. 
A resolution was introduced forfeiting all her rights to aid and assistance 
from the Fraternity. The conclusions of the committee are as follows: 

"Now if a widow of a Mason abandons the widowhood of her first 
husband and marries a profane, has she not forfeited that right to the 
extent that she cannot create an obligation on the Craft that would cause 
us to be considered as having violated our obligations? We believe not. 
We think we may owe her a duty the same as to common humanity in dis- 
tress, but she has forfeited her right as a Mason's widow, which status no 
longer exists, the same having been voluntarily abandoned. Of course, if 
this grand lodge sees proper to adopt a regulation, on the subject matter 
it has full power and authority to do so, and we are prepared to accept the 
judgment and wisdom of the brethren on this important question." 

A resolution was introduced that it be permissible to obligate as many 
as five candidates at one and the same time in the Master's degree. This 
resolution went to the Committee on Work "who verbally reported their 
approval. 

The election and installation of officers closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by John A. Davilla 
and covers about seventy pages. Illinois is given one half page of very 
brief consideration. Concerning the jurisdictions, the following comment 
is made: 

' ' Illinois is a Grand Masonic State. The statements of its membership 
and the figures involved in the reports of its finances exceed those shown 
in ours approximately ten times. The different charitable institutions are 



Masonic Correspondence 63 

splendidly maintained and supported and reflect credit upon the grand 
lodge. ' ' 

Hollace H. Bain, G.M., Shreveport. 

John A. Davilla, G.S., New Orleans. 



MARYLAND, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The Grand Lodge of Maryland holds two communications each year. A 
semi-annual session was held in the Masonic Temple at Baltimore on May 
11. The grand lodge was opened in due form by the deputy grand master. 
With considerable ceremony and pomp the grand master was formally intro- 
duced and after his reception distinguished visitors from other grand juris- 
dictions were accepted and accorded the grand honors of Masonry. The 
grand master, Charles C. Homer, then read an address to the grand lodge 
in which his discussed various matters of interest. He gives the total mem- 
bership of the State as 24,117, showing a net gi'owth for six months of 1,629. 
He recommends certain changes in the Masonic Temple in order to take 
care of the constantly increasing growth of lodges, and states that the 
board of managers have been able to secure additional ground for the future 
expansion of the present Masonic Temple. The total amount contributed 
by the Grand Lodge of Maryland to the George Washington Memorial 
Association is reported to be $13,075.00. The grand master states that if 
the jurisdiction is to reach its full quota it will be necessary to secure an 
additional amount of $11,040.00. 

The report of the grand secretary and grand treasurer shows the grand 
lodge to be in a most prosperous condition financially, with ample funds 
on hand to carry on the work of the grand lodge. 

The Board of Relief spent $705.73 in assisting Master Masons who 
were in want. An amendment providing for a committee of three past 
masters to review decisions and dispensations made by the most worshipful 
grand master was defeated. It appears that the State of Maryland believes 
in the infallibility of its grand master and does not propose to have his 
acts questioned. 

A resolution permitting the use of loose leaf ledgers by secretaries 
received the approval of the grand lodge. No other business of importance 
appears to have been transacted at this meeting. 

What is called the annual communication was held in the Masonic 
Temple at Baltimore on Tuesday, November 16. The grand officers were 



64 Appendix — Part I 



present aud reprcsontatives of constituent lodges. At this assembly the 
grand master delivered quite a long address, dealing with matters of 
interest in the jurisdictions. In his opening remarks he reiterates his 
intention to depart from the usual custom and to serve only two years as 
grand master. This is quite an innovation for the State of Maryland for 
the late Thomas J. Shryock served as grand master for a period of twenty- 
seven years. This writer is disposed to agree with Brother Homer for the 
reasons which he sets forth: 

"A longer term than two years would, in my judgment, enable the 
grand master to build an invincible machine were he so inclined, and, 
furthermore, a longer tenure in oiifice would deter the ambitious and active 
brother from seeking preferment in this grand body. Hence I do not feel 
that there is any real justification for a longer term of oflBce than two 
years, and particularly in the present case, when I feel that the grand lodge 
has practically determined upon, as my successor, a brother so capable 
aud well equipped to fill the office in an efficient and able manner." 

The growth in membership is commented upon and Brother Homer 
seems to rejoice in the fact that Masonry is prospering as it is. He says: 

' ' I recently heard a grand master state that he was ashamed of the 
fact that one lodge in his jurisdiction had raised 283 brethren in one year. 
Frankly, I see nothing in this record to be ashamed of, provided all of the 
initiates were good men and true. There is, however, grave cause for 
apprehension, as there is naturally great danger that this enormous influx 
into Masonry means that many of the brethren have become mere members 
of the body and not real Masons." 

The question of an addition to the Masonic Temple is presented and 
the grand master is very frank in stating that before this enterprise is 
undertaken the means of financing the same should be determined. One 
means of raising funds that he suggested is a charge of $10.00 upon each 
candidate initiated into the fraternity. A suggestion is made that a com- 
mittee be appointed to review the proceedings of the past year and to 
collate all of the decisions approved and resolutions adopted in times past, 
and indicate same by codification so that members might know just what 
the law is. 

Immediately following the address of the grand master a number of 
distinguished visitors from other jurisdictions were presented, each of 
whom addressed the grand lodge, expressing the pleasure that he felt in 
being able to attend the sessions of the Grand Lodge of Maryland. 

Lewis A. Wat res of Pennsylvania spoke to the grand lodge on behalf 
of the George Washington Memorial Association and reported the total 
amount in the treasury in February, 1920, to be $170,000.00. In speaking 



Masonic Correspondence 65 

of the Temple which is to be erected in memory of Washington the Mason, 
he has the following to say, and hopes that all Masons may be brought to 
grasp and understand the true Masonic sentiment which inspired his words : 
' ' Then too, the temple will be a rallying point for Masons of the 
United States. We have too long spoken as 49 voices instead of one voice. 
There should never be, in my opinion, a super-grand lodge, but there should 
be a rallying point in the United States, such as this temple will furnish. 
And I want to say that it will be a rallying place not only for Masons of 
the United States, but fo.r Masons of the whole world, and Masons from 
many lands will come here and see what Masonry has done to keep alive 
the memory of that great man and that great Mason, the Father of His 
Country. ' ' 

The report of the grand secretary and grand treasurer are extended 
documents in which the full financial transactions of their respective ofiBccs 
are set forth. 

The Board of Belief presents a report which is extremely interesting • 
for it shows that the Brethren of Maryland arc not neglecting their less 
fortunate brothers in times of distress. 

The Committee on Grievances report but one case which shows that the 
craft must have maintained a very happy condition and state of mind dur- 
ing the year. The report of the grand lecturer is of more than passing 
interest, because he calls attention to the fact that some of the brethren 
of the country lodges indicate to him that the work of the Baltimore lodges 
is by no means perfect. The grand lecturer seems to think that the city 
lodges ought to set an example that would be an inspiration to the smaller 
lodges in the rural districts. 

One amendment to the constitution was adopted, providing for a com- 
mittee on foreign relations to whom all questions affecting the relations of 
the Grand Lodge of Maryland with other jurisdictions shall be referred. 

At the election of officers, Warren S. Seipp was unanimously elected 
grand master, and the Grand Lodge of Maryland joined the other grand 
lodges in going on record for a short term for gi'and master. 

The election of oflicers closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by Henry Branch. 
Hlinois received two and one-half pages of very generous treatment. Brief 
comments are made relating to the principal transactions of our grand 
lodge session of 1919 and a generous extract is taken from the oration of 
Edward J. Brundage. The reviewer quotes what this writer said concern- 
ing physical qualifications in 1919 and concludes the quotations by saying 
' ' So say we all. ' ' 

Warren S. Scipp, G.M., Baltimore. 

George Cook, G.S., Baltimore, 



66 Appendix — Part I 



MASSACHUSETTS, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The proceedings of this grand lodge are voluniinous and highly inter- 
esting. They aVe illustrated with portraits of Masons, corner-stone layings, 
Masonic Temples and other events of vital interest to the Masons of that 
jurisdiction. 

This grand lodge holds quarterly communications. At the session held 
on March 10, 1920, there appears to have been a very large attendance. The 
grand master presents a report in which he refers to those who had passed 
bej-ond since the last annual communication. He calls attention to the 
George Washington Memorial Association and states that the Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts has not as yet contributed anything towards this enterprise 
and he asked that the matter receive consideration. He states that the year 
»1919 broke all previous records in the number raised to the sublime degree 
of Master Mason and warns the Craft that while our portals are open to 
all the good and true, we ask no man to enter. 

He has something to say about Masonic secrecy in the following: 
' ' WTiether it came there by design or accidental carelessness cannot 
be said, but it at once emphasizes the importance of keeping our lodge 
notices from the eyes of those who have no right to see them. Our mem- 
bers, and especially the younger Masons, should be admonished to guard 
the secrecy of our notices. It seems trite to dwell upon what are well known 
Masonic laws, but it is a fact that in recent years they have been honored 
almost more in the breach than the observance. Masonic matters are freely 
talked over on the street, in the trolley cars, and in the home. News of 
rejection is often heard of by the man affected and from the lips of non- 
Masons before he receives his official notice. Not many years ago I was 
present at a trial in another jurisdiction of a Mason on a charge of revealing 
the action of the lodge \^'ith respect to the ballot on candidates. He was 
found guilty and the penalty of indefinite suspension was imposed. ' ' 

Five dispensations were issued for the formation of new lodges and 
the subject of careless investigation of candidates is presented together 
with a form for eaeli candidate to fill out when he petitions for the degrees. 

Grand Master Prince does not believe in applause during ceremonial 
work and does not hesitate to condemn the practice. The general charities 
of the grand lodge are reported to be in a most excellent condition. 

Melvin M. Johnson from the committee on cipher rituals reported that 
the law had not 1)een changed and asked for further time for the committee 



Masonic Correspondence 67 

to complete their deliberations. The committee on size of lodges were 
likewise granted further time to complete their report, 

A number of items appeared in the proceedings concerning business 
transactions but all were of purely local interest. The second quarterly 
communication was held June 9, 1920. At this meeting the grand master 's 
address opened with tributes of respect to the dead of the jurisdiction. 
He refers to the foreign relations as being very unsatisfactory. He states 
that while some foreign grand lodges have been officially recognized, others 
have been refused recognition and in many cases no action has been taken. 
He asks that a committee be appointed to take up this question and to 
determine just what grand lodges should be recognized and which should not. 

He speaks of Masonic funeral ceremonies in the following paragraph : 
"The right of every Mason to be buried according to the rites and 
ceremonies of the Craft is well established. It is sad and sometimes shame- 
ful to witness the unwillingness of lodge officers to perform this service 
and to note the meager attendance of the brethren on such occasions. The 
officers of a lodge should consider it a solemn duty and sad privilege to 
officiate at the funeral of one of our brethren. They should consider attend- 
ance upon this duty as binding as any other and the brethren ought at 
least to show their respect for the institution by giving a few moments of 
their time in attendance on the last rites over one whom they have been 
pleased to call their brother. ' ' 

He commends the Samuel Crocker Lawrence Library and condemns the 
chain letter folly and reports various acts performed by him. Grand 
Master Prince believes that the fees and dues of lodges should be in accord- 
ance with the conditions of our times and presents a table in which he 
shows the amount of dues which are collected in each lodge as well as the 
fees exacted from candidates. He comments as follows: 

' ' Information has recently come to me of one lodge which has adopted 
these rules: Only ten petitions can be accepted in any year. Fees are 
placed at $150.00 and dues at $10.00 per year. None of the lodge funds 
can be used for banquets, which are paid for by individual members, ex- 
cepting only the Annual Members ' Night. This lodge is fortunate in having 
a very high percentage of attendance at communications. ' ' 

The grand master has been very liberal in the granting of dispensations 
for the formation of new lodges, because he states he believes that Masonry 
is better exemplified in the small lodge than in the large lodge. He says 
something about lax attention to the grand lodge communications and very 
l^ertinently asks: "Since when has the secretary become the judge of what 
matters shall be called to the attention of the master and the brethren, 
and by what official authority does he assume to smother grand lodge com- 
munications in his waste basket?" 



68 Appendix — Part I 



The committee on size of lodges presented the following amendment 
to the by-laws: 

"A lodge located within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and hav- 
ing over 200 members shall from its own candidates make not more than 
thirty-five Masons in any fiscal year (September 1st to August 31st, inclu- 
sive). Such a lodge having over 600 members shall not make more than 
thirty Masons; having over 1,000 members, not more than twenty-five." 

A number of cases of discipline came before the grand lodge from 
which it is apparent that those Masons who deserted their wives and children 
met with the wrath of the grand lodge for most of them were expelled. 
The third quarterly communication was held September 8, 1920. At this 
meeting, Charles C. Homer, Grand Master of Masons in Maryland was 
present and was duly received and accorded the grand honors of Masonry. 
The grand Master, Arthur D. Prince, again calls attention to the chain 
letter. He recommends that every lodge insert in its monthly notices a 
warning against chain letters of every description. Grand Master Prince 
makes the following comment in his address but just exactly what inspired 
the paragraph is not apparent: 

' ' Masonry in Massachusetts has recently taken a public stand in sup- 
port of sovereignty of law. Its prosperity has received a good deal of 
publicity. Hence it is jjossible that those who do not believe as we do are 
using underhand means to block our progress. Of course any such move- 
ment is bound to fail. It will defeat its own purpose in stimulating the 
minds of men and urging those who desire to unite with other men who 
believe in the rights of man to 'life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,' 
to present themselves at our doors for admission. Still, it is well that we 
should be warned of what is going on. The information was recently 
brought to me that the reputations of men, of whom it was known by some 
breach of Masonic secrecy that they had made application for Freemasonry, 
were being blackened by a systematic plan carried out by men unfriendly to 
the institution. It is therefore necessary that every applicant should have 
a careful investigation and that all stories against his character should be 
followed to their sources. It is also just as important for every member 
to scan the list of petitioners with care and if he has heard am-thing 
inimical to the petitioner at once to acquaint the master of the lodge. ' ' 

He believes that Masonic clubs should be treated in a broad spirit and 
where they show evidence of working out the real plan of Masonry, they 
should be encouraged. No business of importance appears to have been 
transacted at this session. 

The last quarterly communication was held December 8, in the city 
of Boston in the Masonic Temple. At this session the grand master makes 
one of his characteristic reports concerning the proposed amendment limiting 



Masonic Correspondence 69 

the amount of work which lodges in Massachusetts might do. The grand 
master states there has been a great deal of favorable and unfavorable com- 
ment on the question and recommends a public hearing be held on the sub- 
ject. He likes the idea of plural membership and says: 

"It is fortunate that our Massachusetts brethren who are now resi- 
dents in other states can, without breaking our regulations, join in the active 
work of Freemasonry in those communities where the circumstances of life 
have placed them. It would seem that the advantages of plural membership 
outweigh its disadvantages and that it furthers rather than hinders the 
interests of the craft in general. There must be thousands of Masons, 
scattered all over the world, who would like to keep up active and responsible 
interest in the Masonic work, but who arc prohibited by the exclusive mem- 
bership regulation. ' ' 

He says something about the district deputies and the importance of 
the stations which they hold. The Masonic Service Association is highly 
commended and masters of lodges are urged to make liberal use of the 
Speaker's Bureau. 

The financial tables which appear in the proceedings show that the 
Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is in a highly prosperous condition with 
numerous charitable, educational and trust funds, all of which are being 
administered in a way and manner that indicates that this grand lodge 
has for its leaders some very keen and alert business men. 

Grand Master Prince presents a long list of official visitations among 
which are the Grand Council Royal and Select Masters and the Grand Eoyal 
Arch Chapter of Massachusetts. At the election of ofiieers Grand Master 
Prince was unanimously re-elected and other officers were chosen in accord- 
ance with the traditions and customs of that grand jurisdiction. 

An appropriation for the Masonic Service Association equal to 5 cents 
per capita was made and the following amendment to the by-laws proposed: 

"All written or printed notices of lodge meetings containing any Ma- 
sonic information beyond the time and place of such meeting, must be sent 
out in sealed envelopes. ' ' 

The grand feast was held on St. John's Day, December 27. At this 
time there was a banquet with numerous addresses and from the proceedings 
it is apparent that everyone present enjoyed himself to the utmost. There 
was no report on foreign correspondence as the Grand Lodge of Massachu- 
setts does not exchange representatives with other grand lodges, neither 
does it appoint a Committee on Foreign Correspondence. 

Arthur D. Prince, G.M., Boston. 
Frederick W. Hamilton, G.S., Boston. 



70 Appendix — Part I 



MINNESOTA, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

The 78th aimual communication opened in the city of St. Paul on 
Wednesday, January 19. The representative of the Grand Lodge of 
Illinois, A. T. Stebbins, is accredited with being present. The first busi- 
ness of importance was the address of the grand master, E'. A. Montgomery. 
He opens by paying a tribute to the dead of his own and other jurisdictions 
and appealed to the lodges of the jurisdiction to assist the brethren of one 
lodge in building a Masonic Temple. The total number of contributions 
amounted to $2,534.00. The following report by the grand master seemed 
a little bit alarming: 

* ' Very soon after assuming the office of grand master I was informed 
from reliable sources that certain organizations which were hostile to our 
present form of American government and our social institutions were 
planning to have men from their own ranks petition our lodges for Ma- 
sonic degrees for the purpose, if elected of introducing and spreading 
their infamous and traitorous jjropaganda among the members of our fra- 
ternity. There is no doubt that such a scheme was not only planned, but was 
actually attempted to be carried out, and that men who were opposed to the 
fundamental principles and tenets of Masonry presented their petitions, 
falsely professing themselves as being qualified to be accepted as and to 
become Masons." 

The grand master states that he issued a waining admonishing lodges 
to be extremely cautious in the matter of investigating all petitions for the 
degrees. One lodge was constituted during the year and eight new lodges 
received dispensations. One Masonic hall was dedicated and the corner- 
stones of one Masonic building and two school houses laid during the year. 

The grand master stated that he esteemed it a great privilege to be 
called upon to lay the corner-stone of a school house. During the year the 
new Masonic Home was formally opened and the ceremonies are character- 
ized as being the greatest Masonic event in the history of Masonry in that 
jurisdiction. 

Brother Montgomery states that only two requests for schools of instruc- 
tion were made during the year and regrets that more lodges do not see 
the wisdom of holding these schools. He reports having visited thirty-three 
lodges of the jurisdiction. One hundred seventy-five requests for special 
dispensations were granted and nineteen lefused. Of this number 1-il 
were to permit lodges to hold more than one communication in the same day 
for the purpose of conferring degrees. Seven sets of new by-laws and 143 
amendments to by-laws were sulimittod to the grand lodge for approval. 



Masonic Correspondence 71 

He must have been extremely busy aud stayed up late nights in examining 
these proposed changes in law. It is noticed from his report that he was 
very diligent in this matter for the number of amendments to by-laws dis- 
approved cover two pages. Thirty-eight so-called decisions are rendered, 
none of them being of unusual importance. 

He did decide that it was not improper for lodges to send resolutions 
of respect to families of a deceased brother who had been suspended from 
the lodge. A long report is made upon the subject of physical qualifications. 
The grand master states he was besieged with requests for dispensations to 
initiate those who had been disabled but that he refused to take the re- 
sponsibility and held all masters strictly accountable for their actions, 
according to the provisions of law. 

The George Washington Memorial Association is commended and the 
Masons of Minnesota urged to resjiond with their quota of finances. The 
Masonic Service Association is also commended and a long report made of 
the scope of this particular society. Brother Montgomery states numerous 
requests reached the Grand Lodge of Minnesota for recognition from various 
grand lodges from all over the world. He makes the request that the Ma- 
sonic Service Association take up this subject thoroughly and investigate 
the character and standing of the several grand lodges desiring recognition 
and make a report to the grand lodges of the United States. 

He makes a report on the sul)ject of printing and refers to the high 
cost of publishing the proceedings. He says that the craft in Minnesota 
is prospering and is doing its full share of work. 

The grand treasurer gives his total receipts at $61,000.00 and dis- 
bursements $27,863.00. The report of the grand secretary is brief and does 
not trespass upon the functions of the other officials of the grand lodge. 
Two hundred seventy-two chartered lodges raised 6,259 during the year, 
giving the grand lodge 5,586 net increase. There are today in the State 
of Minnesota 45,593 Master Masons in good standing. 

The Jurisprudence Committee reported on an amendment which had 
been carried over from the preceding year, fixing the per diem of repre- 
sentatives at $5.00 per day and mileage equal to actual railroad fare from 
the location of the lodge to the place of meeting. This committee made 
another report amending the grand lodge by-laws so that lodges might 
initiate five candidates at the same time, under dispensation from the 
grand master but prohibited that official from issuing dispensations to 
initiate more than ten at the same meeting. 

The subject of physical qualifications came up for consideration and 
an amendment was made to the by-laws permitting' the initiation of those 



72 Appendix — Part I 



who were maimed, provided the person be possessed of physical appliances 
which would enable him to comply with what the several degrees require of 
him. 

The Grand Lodge of Minnesota maintains a Committee on Masonic 
Eesearch. It is apparent from the proceedings that this committee was 
very diligent and did everything that they could to bring the fraternity to 
a better understanding of the objects and purposes of the Society. 

Quite a long report is made on the Masonic Home. This is a new 
enterprise for the brethren of Minnesota and they seem to be taking hold 
of it in a way and manner which shows that they propose to maintain an 
institution that will be a credit to themselves and the fraternity. The 
report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances, while not long, gives 
the names of all defendants as well as the details of the charges which were 
made against them. All this does not speak well for the fraternity. For 
the proceedings of grand lodges are by no means confined to officers and 
members of lodges. 

A Committee on Ancient Landmarks made a report in which they 
approve certain acts of the grand master as being in keeping with the 
ancient landmarks. 

The Committee on Appropriations fixed the salary of the grand secre- 
tary at $2,400.00 per year and allowed him an assistant. The Committee 
on Foreign Grand Lodges concurred with the grand master in his recom- 
mendation that the Masonic Service Association be requested to give this 
subject consideration. 

The report on correspondence is from the pen of Irving Todd. He 
gives Illinois one page of vei-y brief consideration. He refers to the 
address of Grand Master Fitzgerrell as covering less than twelve pages and 
he briefly notes the principal items in our proceedings. He makes neither 
comment nor criticism, 

Frederick E. Jenkins, G.M., Faribault. 

John Fishel, G.S., St. Paul. 



MISSISSIPPI, F. & A. M. 

1921 

The proceedings under review cover the 103rd annual communication, 
which opened in the city of Jackson, Tuesday, February 22. Addresses of 
welcome were delivered to the grand lodge on the part of representatives of 
both the local fraternity and the Eastern Star Chapter. These were prop- 



Masonic Correspondence 73 

erly acknowledged. The grand chaplain opened the grand lodge with quite 
a long prayer, which was Masonic in character. The Committee on Cre- 
dentials report the presence of the grand representative of Illinois, P. H. 
Murphy. 

The first business to attract the attention of representatives was the 
annual address of the grand master, E. It. Taucette. It did not take him 
very long to tell the brethren what he had to say, for his address covers only 
ten printed pages. He declares the mission of Freemasonry to be one of 
love and enlightenment and its aim the promotion of human happiness. He 
states that the growth of the lodges has been unusual, the total number of 
degrees conferred have been more than 11,000, giving the State an increase 
in membership of 3,171. 

The financial condition of the grand lodge is reported to be splendid 
and mention is made of additional revenue derived from increased fees 
and dues. The grand lodge is very proud of what it calls its Murphy- 
Martin Educational Endowinent Fund, this sum having reached the grand 
total of $96,500,00. 

Some repairs were necessary to the Masonic Home and the amount 
expended was $4,725.00. This institution is highly commended for the 
excellent work which it is doing. 

During the year a meeting of the grand lecturer, district deputies and 
custodians of the work was held. At this meeting the degrees were exem- 
plified and the various officials went back to their districts with a new 
enthusiasm for the work of the jurisdiction. The grand master states that 
the schools of instruction which have been conducted in this State have 
resulted in bringing the work to a degree of proficiency in the ritual that 
is unsurpassed anywhere else. 

Brother Faucette showed the good judgment to render no decisions. 
He issued dispensations where the exigencies of the case seemed to warrant 
waiving the law but refused to waive the statutory time for the conferring 
of degrees, in order to enable some brethren to petition for higher degrees 
in Masonry, so called. 

But one corner-stone was laid during the year, that being of a Ma- 
sonic Temple. The grand master declined to lay the corner-stone of a sani- 
tarium erected by the Kings Daughters, for the reason that the walls had 
been completed. The new Masonic Temple at Hatticsburg was dedicated 
in the presence of a large representation of the craft. Two lodges of 
Mississippi decided to change their names and the grand master gave 
official consent. Five dispensations for the formation of new lodges were 
granted and the charters of four lodges were surrendered, causes not given. 



74 Appendix — Part I 



The Near East Relief matter was called to the attention of the grand 
lodge, and the whole subject placed in its hands. The Masonic Service 
Association received due commendation and its work is fully endorsed. 

The grand secretary, O. L. McKay, is referred to as an encyclopedia of 
Masonry, as well as a human machine of the most improved type. During 
the year the grand master visited fifty-two lodges and stated that he was 
besieged flith invitations to visit many more, but for business reasons could 
not do so. The grand secretary presented a report which goes much into 
detail and ?hows the present membership of the lodges of Mississippi tO' be 
26,978. 

According to the report of the Committee on Finance, several lodges 
paid dues and penalties for not complying with grand lodge regulations and 
in a number of instances the penalties were remitted. The sum of $250.00 
was contributed to the Near East Relief fund and the salary of the grand 
secretary fixed at $1800.00 per annum. The total receipts of the Grand Lodge 
of Mississippi as shown by the Committee on Audits, were $61,657.58, and 
the expenditures $36,942.74. 

One thing the grand lodge did, which was somewhat unusual, was to 
elect Melville E. Grant deputy grand master an honorary past grand master 
of the grand lodge. 

The American Legion received the endorsement of the grand lodge and 
recognition of the Grand Lodge of France was denied, quite a long report 
being made by the committee which investigated the subject. 

It appears from the proceedings that the Grand Lodge of Mississippi 
attempted to secure a permanent location, for a report from a committee, 
relating to that subject, was presented and the committee continued. A 
large portion of the proceedings is taken up with detail matters, relating 
to the Masonic Service Association. It would appear to the writer that 
much of this matter is irrelevant and of little interest to the casual reader 
of grand lodge proceedings. 

A Committee on Laws submitted a number of questions which had been 
answered by them. One was to the effect that the master of the lodge 
had a right to require an investigating committee to submit a report; 
another was that all deeds conve_ying property should be made direct to the 
lodge imder its proper name; another decision was that St. John's Day, 
December 27, cannot be considered a stated meeting of the lodge at which 
business may be transacted. 

One thing the Grand Lodge of Mississippi did was to adopt an amend- 
ment to its by-laws, providing for one ballot for all three degrees. The 
burial services received some attention during the year and the exclamation, 



Masonic Correspondence 75 

' ' Alas, My Brother ! ' ' was stricken out and the song ' ' Nearer My God to 
Thee ' ' was inserted as a part of the service. 

The installation of officers closed the session. The report on foreign 
correspondence is prepared by H. C. Yawn. He accords to Illinois, three 
pages of very generous consideration. He refers to the prayer of the grand 
chaplain, Eufus A. White, as being beautiful and soulful. Generous quo- 
tations are taken from the address of Grand Master Fitzgerrell. A liberal 
extract is taken from the oration of Wm. H. Beekman. One thing which 
Brother Yawn says is that the financial part of the grand secretary's re- 
port is very voluminous, in fact his cash book, journal, ledger, and auxiliary 
books, must have been copied in the proceedings. We are disposed to think 
that the reviewer has confused the report of the Finance Committee with 
the report of the grand secretary. 

John H. Johnson, G.M., Ackerman. 

Oliver Lee McKay, G.S., Meridian. 



MISSOURI, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The 100th annual communication was held in the city of Kansas City 
in the Masonic Temple commencing Tuesday, September 21. After the 
reception of the distinguished visitors and the sending of telegrams to two 
past grand masters, Julius C. Garrell read his annual ad<lress. 

He opens by referring to the dead of his own and other jurisdictions 
and gives a long list of lodges visited by him. He states that he had hoped 
to visit each of the fifty-nine Masonic districts but owing to business de- 
mands was not able to realize his ambition. Three corner-stones were laid 
during the year. All of them were for Masonic edifices. Dedications of 
five Masonic Temples took place, all of which were conducted by the grand 
master. 

Two dispensations for the formation of new lodges were granted. 

The George Washington Memorial Association was most heartily com- 
mended and the State of Missouri urged to laise its quota of $1.00 per 
member. 

Concerning the Masonic Service Association, the grand master recom- 
mends that a special committee be appointed to investigate the scope, merit 
and usefulness of this society and report to the grand lodge. 



76 Appendix — Part I 



At a meeting of the grand lodge previously, a committee was appointed 
to arrange for the centennial observance of the grand lodge of Missouri. 
It was found that a proper observance would cost approximately $5,000.00. 
This the grand master did not feel like authorizing and suggested to the 
committee that they cut their appropriation to $3,000.00. 

The Board of Relief and the Employment Bureau are heartily com- 
mended for the excellent work they are doing. The Masonic Home receives 
flattering comment and a recommendation is made that the grand lodge 
devise ways and means to secure a larger income for this most excellent 
institution. 

Among the dispensations refused by the grand master was one per- 
mitting a lodge to celebrate American Legion day. 

Brother Garrell also refused to grant authority to solicit funds to assist 
lodges in their building enterprise. 

It is apparent that the Grand Lodge of Missouri does not propose that 
its lodges shall run heedlessly into debt for five dispensations were issued 
permitting lodges to borrow money to complete edifices which they had under 
construction. 

Among the recommendations made was one making it a Masonic offense 
to solicit a Master Mason to take the so-called higher degrees until after 
he had been a member of the craft for three months. 

Four decisions were reported. All of them relate to local construc- 
tion of law. 

The charter of one lodge was arrested and the grand secretary and 
grand lecturer given encomiums which should make them very proud. The 
report of the grand secretary is a complete review of the affairs which 
passed through his office during the year. He gives the net gain in mem- 
bership as 10,650 and the present number of Master Masons in the juris- 
diction as 90,416. 

The total receipts of the grand treasurer from all sources were 
$160,000.00 and his expenditures $158,000.00 showing that the grand lodge 
is able to keep within its income. 

A resolution endorsing the public school system was presented and 
referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. 

On the evening of the first day, the grand lecturer held a school of 
instruction and exemplified the work of the first degree as well as the second 
section of the third degree. 



Masonic Correspondence 77 

The Committee on Necrology make quite a long report in which they 
pay tributes of respect to the dead of their own and other jurisdictions. 

The report of the grand lecturer goes into detail concerning what was 
accomplished in the way of instruction and shows that the craft of 
Missouri is placing a great deal of stress on the subject of ritual. 

Wm. F. Kuhn, chairman of the Committee on Foreign Grand Lodges, 
made quite a lengthy report recommending that the fraternal relations with 
the York Grand Lodge of Mexico be continued. The committee recom- 
mended fraternal recognition of both the Grand Orient of France and the 
Grand Lodge of France and that action looking to recognition of seven 
Grand Lodges of Germany be postponed. 

The election of grand officers was made a special order for the second 
day and resulted in advancement of the officers in line. 

One of the inspiring events of the occasion was the introduction of 
Doctor Edwards, ninety-four years of age who has been a Matjon for seventy- 
two years. 

The report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances was a long one. 
The names of all defendants are published together with a brief concerning 
the details of the case under consideration. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence approved an amendment to the by- 
laws exacting a fee of $20.00 from each petitioner for the degrees, same 
to be used for the benefit of the Masonic Home. 

The decisions of the grand master were approved and representatives 
and committeemen allowed per diem at the rate of $5.00 per day and mileage 
equaling 5 cents for each mile traveled. This committee also approved an 
amendment to the by-laws to the effect that every petition for affiliation 
coming from a petitioner from without the State of Missouri should be 
taxed the sum of $10.00, the money to be used for the benefit of the Ma- 
sonic Home. 

The Oversees Committee reported receipts of $15,000.00 and expendi- 
tures of practically $1,400.00. It was recommended that this money be 
returned to the donors except in such cases where said donors were willing 
to turn the amount contributed by them over to the Masonic Home. 

A new prayer to be used in the second section of the third degree was 
presented by the Eitual Committee and adopted. This prayer is quite a 
radical departure from what some of us have been accustomed to. The 
writer is disposed to look upon it as far more appropriate. 



78 Appendix — Part I 



It appears that the Grand Lodge of Missouri has been investigating 
its by-laws for a long report is made from a committee appointed for that 
purpose. 

The grand master is allowed a salary of $1,000.00 and traveling ex- 
penses not to exceed $500.00. The salary of the grand secretary is fixed at 
$3,600.00. 

A revision of the trial code of the Grand Lodge of Missouri was made 
during the year. This is submitted in full and adopted. 

A motion that the Grand Lodge of Missouri withdraw from the Masonic 
Service Association was presented and adopted. The principal reason 
assigned for withdrawal is that the Association appears to have changed 
its principal object to one of education and research instead of intelligent 
co-operation in matters pertaining to national or international disaster. 

The pay-roll of the Grand Lodge of Missouri amounted to $15,790.00. 

A supplemental report from the Committee on Grand Master's address 
recommends that the sum of $6,000.00 or as much thereof as many be neces- 
sary be set apart for the observance of the Centennial of the Grand Lodge 
of Missouri. 

The Employment Bureau or Board of Belief submitted an interesting 
report showing that during the year 1920, two hundred twenty-four appli- 
cants were placed in positions which enable them to earn a sustenance. The 
total cost of this work to the grand lodge was $4,556.00. 

The installation of the officers and the transmission of the grand mas- 
ter 's jewel together with the presentation of the past grand master's jewel 
closed the session. 

The report on fraternal correspondence is prepared by Eev. C. C. 
Woods. Illinois is given two pages of very brief consideration. There 
is no fault found with any of our transactions from which it is assumed 
that Brother Woods is satisfied with what we did. Two quotations are 
taken from the address of Grand Master Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, one relating 
to outside organizations and the other to German speaking lodges. 

Brother Woods thinks that the reviewer did very well to condense his 
report into 176 pages and remarks that the work is worthy of even more 
space than was used. 

William F. Johnson, G.M., Boonville. 

John E. Parson, G.S., St. Louis. 



Masonic Correspondence 79 



MONTANA, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The proceedings are prefaced with a numbei' of accounts of special 
communications which were held for the purpose of constituting lodges, 
dedicating Masonic Temples and laying corner-stones. 

The fifty-sixth annual communication was held in the city of Missoula 
and began at 9:30 A. M. on Wednesday, August 18, and concluded the 
following Thursday. 

The Committee on Credentials reported all the grand officers in their 
stations and places, but the list of grand representatives does not show 
Illinois to have been represented. 

The first business of interest was the annual address of the grand 
master, W. L. Parmelee. He states that the year has been one of great 
activity in the grand jurisdiction and that peace and harmony abound on 
every hand. He declares that Masonry should be a progressive science, 
and seems to think that indications point to an eft'ort on the part of the 
fraternity to serve mankind. He pays a tribute of respect to the fraternal 
dead and reports seventy-nine requests received by Montana lodges to 
confer degrees by courtesy, and says that Montana lodges made ninety-five 
requests to other lodges. Three lodge were constituted during the year and 
nine dispensations issued for the formation of new lodges. 

The grand master reports eighteen official visits to the lodges of his 
jurisdiction and reports the laying of corner-stones for two Masonic Temples 
and one Shrine Temple. He refused to issue a dispensation to a lodge to 
meet on Sunday and attend the corner-stone ceremonies of a deaconess 
hospital. 

The grand master reports one thing which the Grand Lodge of Mon- 
tana does which is somewhat out of the ordinary, in that it permits the 
grand master to assign an instructor to a lodge rather than allow the lodge 
to select whomsoever it chooses. The grand master recommends that per- 
manent quarters be selected for the office of the grand secretary. He also 
recommends that a building fund be created to assist w^caker lodges in 
constructing Masonic Homes of their own and that the sum of $1.00 per 
member be set aside each year to be placed in such a fund. Grand Master 
Parmelee rendered ten decisions, almost all of them were of local character 
and pertained princii)ally to the construction of existing laws. One de- 
cision which he made is sensible and logical, it being that the master may 
select any member of the lodge to confer any of the degrees. 



80 Appendix — Part I 



The grand master was not able to attend the George Washington 
Memorial Association when it held its meeting but he gives it favorable 
mention and states that he was represented by proxy. He endorses the 
Masonic Service Association and reports a long list of speakers who were 
selected to visit the lodges of the State in accordance with the plans of the 
Association. 

A splendid tribute is paid by Grand Master Parmelee to the grand 
secretary, Toby Hedges, and he states that he was under great obligations 
to that official, which he wishes to publicly acknowledge. Both the senior 
and junior grand wardens and senior grand deacon presented reports con- 
cerning visitations made by them. The grand treasurer gives his receipts 
for the year as $35,178.52, the expenditures being $29,487.78. The Trustees 
of the Masonic Homes make long reports of the receipts and disbursements 
made by them. The report is complete in every respect and shows the very 
careful manner in which the affairs of the Home have been administered. 

The Board of Eelief submitted a report which is more than interesting, 
from the fact that it contained an item of loans made to twenty-eight Ma- 
sonic farmers, the total being $6,700.00. 

Brother E'. M. Hutchinson who attended the annual meeting of the 
Masonic Service Association, presents a long report in which he sets forth 
the objects and purposes of that society. The grand lodge paused long 
enough in its proceedings to receive the representatives of the Supreme 
Council of the Scottish Eite, the Grand Master of Eoyal and Select Masons, 
the Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Eoyal Arch Masons and 
the Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar. 

A resolution was offered extending recognition to the Grand Bodies of 
France. This, however, was not adopted and the question of recognizing 
French Masonry was referred to a special committee of five, who were 
directed to report at the next session of the grand lodge. The recom- 
mendations of the grand master for the creation of a building fund to be 
raised by an assessment of $1.00 per capita for the assistance of the weaker 
lodges of the State in the matter of procuring Masonic Homes, did not 
receive the approval of the grand lodge. A motion was made that the matter 
be referred to a committee of five but a substitute motion was later made 
that the recommendation of the grand master be concurred in and the 
Committee on Jurisprudence be instructed to prepare suitable amendments 
to the by-laws covering this particular subject. 

One item of interest which is reported, is that of the initiation of 
Ham Kee Chin, the first Chinaman to receive the degree of Masonry in 
Montana. The installation of officers and presentation of the signet ring 
closed the session. 



Masonic Correspondence 81 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by H. S. Hepner, 
past grand master. He quotes all that Grand Master Fitzgerrell said con- 
cerning organizations, other than Masonic and pronounces the oration of 
Edward J. Brundage as a masterpiece of terse sentences, full of thought. 
Nearly two pages are quoted from the oration. He compliments the Illinois 
reviewer by saying that his reviews are well considered and worthy of 
perusal by all Masonic students. 

Dr. Eobert J. Hathaway, G.M., Glendive. 

Cornelius Hedges, Jr., G.S., Helena. 



NEW JERSEY, F. & A. M. 

1921 

The annual communication was held in the city of Trenton on April 
20 and 21. 

The representative of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, Eichard C. Wood- 
ward, is recorded among those present. Of the lodges of the State 209 
were represented while five were not, a most excellent showing. 

The grand lodge was opened in ample form and after the usual prelim- 
inaries such as the singing of Old Hundred and the introduction of dis- 
tinguished visitors from other jurisdictions, the grand master. Cooper H. 
Prickitt, delivered his annual address. His report is not long and he gets 
to the gist of matters in a very clear, concise and pointed manner. 

Among the first things reported by him was the issuance of a letter 
to the lodges of the state calling attention to certain practices which tend 
to impair the dignity of the work and he asks for the immediate abandon- 
ment of all frivolity, coarseness and ungentlemanly conduct. He states 
there has been very little occasion for the exercise of discipline during the 
year and refers to the affairs of the Masonic Home as being most prosperous 
and satisfactory. 

He reported the appointment of a committee to solicit funds for the 
George Washington Memorial Association and recommends the continuance 
of membership in the Masonic Service Association. 

Warrants were issued for the formation of six new lodges. The grand 
master refused to issue a dispensation to form a lodge in Atlantic City 
but the reasons are not given. 



82 Appendix — Part I 



The statement is made that 270 applications were presented to the 
grand master, relating to physical defects, 244 were waived, 16 refused, and 
10 are now pending. Several decisions are reported, two of which are of 
more than passing interest. 

One decision was to the effect that a lodge room dedicated to Masonic 
purposes may be used by the Chapter, Council and Commandery. 

Concerning the practice of the worshipful master and two brethren 
opening the lodge for the purpose of conducting a Masonic funeral the 
grand master decided that the ritual prescribes the number necessary to 
open a lodge and suggested a change in the digest making the required 
number for all purposes to be seven. 

One Masonic district was granted entire concurrent jurisdiction. 

The matter of restoring the charter of Schiller lodge which was revoked 
because of its strong German tendencies was presented to the grand lodge 
with the recommendation that the request be referred to a committee. 

Eleven petitions for the formation of new lodges were presented in 
open grand lodge and referred to the Committee on Dispensations and 
Warrants. 

The grand treasurer gives his total receipts as $195,000.00 and expen- 
ditures as $183,000.00. The report of the grand secretary goes much into 
detail in the matter of figures. 

The total number raised during the year was 7,794, giving the Grand 
Lodge of New Jersey a net gain of 7,170. The present membership 
is 62,253. 

Immediately following the report of the Committee on Necrology a 
special ode called the Necrology Ode was sung by the grand lodge. 

The Committee on Constitution and By-laws apparently had a busy 
year for they report the examination of 147 amendments to the by-laws 
of subordinate lodges as well as 12 new sets of by-laws. 

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence recommended the recognition 
of the Grand Lodge of Hayti. 

The Masonic Employment Bureau of New Jersey presented a report 
which is interesting as it goes much into detail. During the year under 
review, 257 applicants were placed in positions and the total earning ca- 
pacity of these same applicants Avas $674,320.00. 

The grand lodge went on record as thoroughly endorsing the George 
Washington Memorial Association as well as the Masonic Service Association. 



Masonic Correspondence 83 

On the second day the grand lodge was temporarily closed while the 
children of the Masonic Home were presented and received great applause 
on the part of the brethren. 

The report of the Committee on the Masonic Home is interesting as it 
goes much into detail concerning the activities of that institution. During 
the year, the home received bequests to the amount of $22,381.00. From 
the report it is apparent that the home is performing its work in a most 
admirable manner and is doing splendid work among the Masons of New 
Jersey. 

The decisions of the grand master were approved by the Committee 
on Jurisprudence. 

The installation and appointment of the various officers closed the 
session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is written by Robert J. Shirrifs 
and is brief and to the point. Illinois is given one and one-fourth pages of 
fraternal consideration. The principal acts of our session of 1920 are 
briefly mentioned and a liberal quotation is taken from the correspondence 
report of this writer, the paragraph quoted being that relating to the 
stabilizing of existing laws. Brother Shirrefs writes a most interesting 
report and it is a matter of sincere regret that he made it as brief as he 
has done in his document for 1921. 

Ernest A. Eeed, G.M., Trenton. 

Robert A. Shirrefs, D.G.S., Elizabeth. 



NEW MEXICO, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

The annual communication, the 43rd, opened in the city of Albuquerque, 
on Monday, February 21. The first act of the grand lodge was to receive 
an amendment to the by-laws, providing that electioneering for office in 
the grand lodge shall be deemed a Masonic offense. This resolution went 
to the Committee on Jurisprudence. 

The Jurisprudence Committee made a report that at the last meeting 
of the grand lodge they were directed to make a revision of the law, but 
they express the opinion that they are without authority to make any 
changes or innovations affecting the substance of existing by-laws. 



84 Appendix — Part I 



The grand master, Eichard H. Hanna, makes a report which is quite 
long and deals with the various affairs of his office. He takes up con- 
siderable space in chronicling the dead of his own and other grand 
jurisdictions. 

Three corner-stones were laid during the year, all of them being for 
church edifices. 

The list of requests to confer degrees by courtesy is an extremely long 
one. Twenty-four dispensations were granted permitting lodges of New 
Mexico to occupy Masonic Halls jointly with other orders and societies. 
Two dispensations were granted to confer the degrees on more than five 
candidates at one and the same time. But two decisions are mentioned, both 
of these relating to matters of jurisdiction. 

The grand master found time to visit eleven lodges of the jurisdiction 
and he states that on each of his visits he was accorded a most cordial 
welcome. 

Two new lodges were instituted during the administration of the grand 
master and one lodge duly consecrated and dedicated. 

The George Washington Memorial Association receives favorable com- 
ment as does the Masonic Service Association of the United States. 

The lodges of the jurisdiction are reported to be in a most excellent 
condition but the grand master thinks there is a tendency in too many 
of them to confine their activities solely to the conferring of the degrees 
and thereby degenerate into mere degree mills. 

The grand treasurer gives his receipts as $14,874.00 and his disburse- 
ments as $9,774.00. 

The report of the grand secretary shows the number raised during the 
year to have been 528 and the present membership of the lodges of the 
State 5,276. 

One thing the Grand Lodge of New Mexico does is to require that 
an amendment to the by-laws be read at least three times before final 
action is taken. This ought to insure everyone a full knowledge of the 
proposed changes in existing laws. 

The Committee on Ways and Means gave the grand secretary an in- 
crease in salary of $1,000.00. 

The Jurisprudence Committee reported adversely on a proposition that 
all business be transacted while the lodge was opened on the third degree. 



3Iasonic Correspondence 85 

The amendment relating to electioneering for office in the jurisdiction 
was adopted. Illinois has the same rule but it is quite noticeable that when 
some of the boys want to attack the grand lodge plum tree, they do not 
hesitate to enlist the assistance of their friends and go after the prize in 
a vigorous manner. 

It is believed that the Grand Lodge of New Mexico will have a hard 
time to enforce its action on the matter of electioneering. 

The grand patron of the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star of New 
Mexico was introduced and made an address. Grand Patrons may be 
popular in New Mexico but they are very much in disfavor in Pennsylvania. 

The Grand Lodge in New Mexico apparently administers its charity 
through the pension system, for there is an appropriation made for the 
widow of a deceased Master Mason. 

One thing the Grand Lodge of New Mexico is doing and for which it 
must be commended, is the fact that it is building up an endowment 
fund for the education of orphans of deceased Masons. 

The report of the grand lecturer is interesting because he states that 
he gave to the brethren of a proposed new lodge thirty-eight days of 
instruction. It took quite a long while to pound the work into their sky- 
chambers. 

A resolution endorsing the public school system of the United States 
was introduced and adopted. 

The installation of officers marked the closing of the session. 

The report on correspondence is prepared by John Milne and is con- 
sidered topically. From Illinois he quotes a paragraph from Grand Master 
Fitzgerrell 's report on the George Washington Memorial Association, also 
the report of the Committee on the Masonic Service Association, as well as 
what Brother Fitzgerrell says under the caption, "A Pernicious Practice." 

Francis E. Lester, G.M., Mesilla Park. 

Alpheus A. Keen, G.S., Albuquerque. 



86 Appendix — Part I 



NEW SOUTH WALES, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

This trrand lodge holds quarterly communications, dividing up its trans- 
actions during the year. The first one under consideration was held July 9, 
1919. Grand Master William Thompson, makes his customary report in 
which he condemns the practice of black-balling, and reports the presence 
of the grand representative of Illinois, William Deavis. No business of 
any importance apjiears to have been transacted at this communication. 

At a quarterly communication held September 10, the grand master 
addressed the grand lodge at some length, reporting various official acts 
and announcing that during the quarter he had issued 154 dispensations,- 
77 of them were to wear regalia. 

One suggestion which was made that the grand lodge erect a tablet in 
honor of those members of the fraternity who died during the war. 

The Grand Inspector of Workings makes quite an interesting report 
showing that this grand lodge through a system of visitation keeps in 
close touch with the lodges of its jurisdiction. 

The report of the grand treasurer made at this time, shows the treas- 
ury to contain over one-half million dollars. The roll of those killed in 
the war, which appears in the proceedings, is a long one. 

At the quarterly communication held December 10, 1919, the grand 
master reported the constitution of three new lodges, the laying of the 
corner-stone of a Masonic Temple and the dedication of one Masonic hall. 
A lodge which advertised a social evening with music, song and dance at so 
much per for admission comes in for considerable criticism on the part of 
the grand master who looks upon the act as one being undignified and not 
consistent with the high character of the fraternity. 

One lodge which initiated some candidates that were not physically 
perfect, received a light sentence but were admonished bj' the grand master 
that if the offense was repeated, the charter of the lodge would be 
arrested. 

At the quarterly communication held March 10, 1920, three new lodges 
were reported as having been consecrated and dispensations issued to the 
number of 124. 

The principal business transacted at this quarterly meeting appears to 
have been largely routine. Some discussion was manifest concerning con- 
structions of the work which had been made by the Eitual Committee and 
the grand lodge proceeded to get after that association of individuals. 



Masonic Correspondence 87 

The last communication under review is dated June 22, 1920. The grand 
master reports the consecration of three lodges, the dedication of two tem- 
ples and the laying of the corner-stone of one Masonic edifice. 

His country visitations were numerous as were his dispensations issued, 
which amounted to 148 for the three months passed. 

The grand master reports the extending of congratulations to the Prince 
of Wales because of his reception into the fraternity. 

No business in particular appears to have been transacted at this com- 
munication. A short resume of general Masonic conditions is given by the 
Committee on Foreign Correspondence. The regular report appears at the 
close of the proceedings. Illinois receives two pages of consideration, a 
liberal extract being taken from the address of Grand Master Fitzgerrell 
and the various transactions of our grand lodge chronicled in brief. 

Concerning the correspondence report of 1910, Brother S. Scott Young 
makes the following comment, for which this writer returns grateful 
thanks: 

' ' His reviews of the various grand lodge transactions are excellent, 
especially his criticisms, and anyone who cannot spare the time to go 
through them all can keep himself posted in all essentials by reading 
Brother Darrah's report." 

Arthur H. Bray, G.S., Sydney. 



NEW YORK, F. & A. M. 

1921 

The one hundred fortieth annual communication opened in the grand 
lodge room of the Masonic Temple in the city of New York, on the after- 
noon of May 3. The report of the Committee on Credentials shows the 
presence of all grand officers and representatives from nearly every lodge 
in the State. The grand representative of Illinois does not appear to have 
been present. It did not take the grand lodge long to get down to actual 
business. 

The first item of interest is the address of the grand master, Robert H. 
Robinson. He expresses the idea that Freemasonry has a great mission to 
perform at the present time in counteracting those forces which seem to be 
invading the peaceable and sane order of things. Tril)utos of respect are 
paid to a large number of distinguished Masons, who passed beyond during 
the year. 



88 Appendix — Part I 



Fourteen dispensations were issued for the formation of new lodges, 
showing that the Grand Lodge of New York is growing rapidly. Among 
the appointments announced is that of Walter E. Frew of the State of 
New York as representative of the Grand Lodge of Illinois. The grand 
lodge was assembled eleven times during the year for the performance of 
official functions and visitations to lodges. On June 26, the grand master 
assembled his district deputies at the Masonic Home in Utica and held a 
conference with them, discussing many matters of interest to the craft and 
much valuable information as to Masonic conditions was laid before the 
deputies and their duties made very clear. 

One matter which the grand master discussed in his address is what 
he calls congestion of work, due to the large amount of material that is 
waiting, and has been kept waiting, in order to consummate membership 
in the lodges. The grand master very plainly states to his grand lodge 
that while he does not approve of the wholesale initiation of candidates, yet 
he believes that a way can be found, whereby the burden may be lessened 
and the real purpose of the fraternity accomplished. 

Concerning cipher rituals, Grand Master Eobinson makes some very 
pertinent remarks. He calls attention to the fact that concerns in New 
York have grown rich in selling these books to Masons. As a remedy, he 
suggests that the grand lodge take over the matter and publish its ovm 
ritual for dissemination among the craft. The same condition that Brother 
Eobinson refers to, exists to a large degree right in the State of Hlinois, 
and this writer has always contended that the only way to beat the Cipher 
Eitual vender is for each grand lodge to take hold of the matter itself, 
and to issue its own rituals under certain restrictions. 

One thing the Grand Lodge of New York has done in the last eight 
years, has been to reduce the debt on the Masonic Temple from $2,400,000.00 
to $700,000.00. The War Eelief or Hospital Fund which the grand lodge 
established last year shows a total of $796,724.68. The grand master esti- 
mates that it will cost $150,000.00 per year to maintain and operate the 
hospital, providing 150 patients are cared for and if the number should 
go above that, the maintenance cost would be increased accordingly. 

The grand master recommended that the Committee on the George 
Washington Memorial Association be continued. Eeference is made to the 
inauguration of President Harding and the famous bible on which he took 
his oath, now the priceless treasure of St. John's Lodge of New York City. 

Brother Eobinson thinks that the Grand Lodge of New York is moving 
forward along energetic, constructive lines. Eeference is made to the work 
of the Committee on Social and Educational Service. During the year the 
following list of questions was submitted which are reproduced by the 



Masonic Correspondence 89 

grand master in his address with his comment thereon. The questions sub- 
mitted in the notice were as follows: 

"Do you believe that our fraternity should be a more active force for 
good in our community and in our Nation?" 

' ' Do you believe that Masonic principles could be well applied for our 
civic and national welfare?" 

"Are you in favor of an applied Masonic Service to God, to Country 
and to Humanity?" 

"When I read those questions, my brethren, I tested myself and my 
answer to each of them was unhesitatingly, yes. They do not violate any 
of the traditions or landmarks of the craft so often alluded to and which 
I fear are held more in the imagination than in the reality and to me they 
go back to the spirit of nearly a century and a half ago when the men of 
our craft who wrote the Declaration of Independence and proclaimed the 
Constitution of the United States of America, believed in, emulated and 
openly stood for all that these questions comprehensively command us to 
be and to do." 

The address of Brother Eobinson is a document of more than passing 
interest. There is an absence of time worn platitude and the whole shows 
a disposition to present the subject of Freemasonry in a plain, practical 
manner that will result in bringing members of the craft to realize that the 
institution is of far reaching consequence. 

The grand secretary reports the total number raised during the year to 
have been 22,914. He gives the present membership as 254,282. The grand 
treasurer gives his receipts as $470,333.00 and expenditures $464,993.00. 

The trustees of the Masonic Home and Asylum Fund made a report 
which is interesting because it shows the magnitude of the work that the 
Grand Lodge of New York is engaged in. 

The State of New York provides for five custodians of the work and 
it employs one grand lecturer, whose business it is to visit and instruct lodges 
without cost to the lodge. The grand lecturer has full charge of the work 
and is vested with full power to appoint assistant grand lecturers to act 
in the various Masonic districts of the State. 

All lodges working under dispensations were given their charters. The 
Committee on Grievances found something to do during the year, for they 
report a number of cases which come under their jurisdiction. 

The Committee on Appeals report several cases which were presented 
to them. In nearly every instance the action of the lodge in the premises 
was sustained. 



90 Appendix — Part I 



The grand historian, O. H. Lang, makes a very long report and goes 
much into detail concerning the history of Masonry in the State of New 
York. 

The Committee on Educational Service held eight conferences during 
the year which were largely attended and much benefit derived from the 
various discussions which took place. The total cost of the educational 
work was $8,561.26. A resolution was introduced, providing for the publi- 
cation of a cipher ritual, and the appointment of a committee to take charge 
of same. It is expected that this committee will make a report at the next 
session of the grand lodge. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence had very little to do for the grand 
master made no decisions. 

The Committee on Finance fixes the salary of the grand secretary at 
$9,000.00 and allowed him, for clerk hire, the sum of $10,600.00. It is 
apparent that the Grand Lodge of New York believes in properly compen- 
sating its officers. 

The election and installation of officers closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is written by Wm. Sherer. He 
gives Illinois one page of condensed review and very briefly mentioned 
some of the principal things in the address of Grand Master Fitzgerrell. 
There is absolutely no criticism offered concerning any of our transactions 
for the year of 1920, and the correspondence report of this writer is referred 
to as a remarkably fine report on Masonic correspondence, for which com- 
pliment Brother Sherer receives grateful thanks. 

M.W. Eobert H. Eobinson, G.M., New York. 

M.W. Eobert Judson Kenworthy, G.S., New York. 



NEW ZEALAND 

1920 



The city of Invercargill in Victoria Hall had the pleasure of enter- 
taining the grand lodge at its thirty-first annual communication held on 
Monday, May 3. 

The deputy grand master opened the grand lodge in the absence of the 
grand master who was unable to be present. He sent a letter to the grand 
lodge expressing his deep regret in not being able to participate in the busi- 
ness of the annual communication. 



Masonic Correspondence 91 

The election of officers was held early in the session and resulted in 
the re-election of the present grand master. 

The charity of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand appears to be ad- 
ministered through a Board of Benevolence. They make a detailed report 
to the grand lodge which shows that the jurisdiction is by no means remiss 
in its duty toward those members of the fraternity and their families who 
need its assistance. It is apparent that the grand lodge is vigilant in the 
matter of raising funds, for numerous tables appear which show that 
every effort is being made to increase the charitable holdings of the body. 

The Board of General Purposes appear to have supervision over the 
grand lodge and to exercise many of the functions which are accorded to 
the grand master in the United States. . They report three new lodges 
having been formed during the year and refer liberally to various peace 
celebrations held by Masonic lodges in the jurisdiction. The Board of 
General Purposes report unfavorably on the matter of recognizing Masonry 
of France. 

It was decided to place a tax upon each past master in order to cover 
charges for various papers and pamphlets which the grand lodge issued 
during the year. 

The condition of the craft was reported to be thriving so much so that 
the salary of the grand secretary was increased from $3,000.00 to $4,000.00. 

The installation of officers was made quite an elaborate affair and took 
place in the evening. The grand master, after his installation, made a 
lengthy address to the grand lodge, taking up matters of importance to the 
jurisdiction. 

He paid his respects to what he called the ' ' unattached Mason ' ' and 
seemed to be of the opinion that something should be done to bring this 
individual back into the Masonic fold. 

The balance of the business transacted at this communication was very 
largely routine, nothing unusual appearing, which shows clearly that the 
grand lodge was perfectly willing to let well enough alone. 

Thomas Eoss, G.M., Dunedin. 

Malcolm Niccol, G.S., P. O. Box 664, Dunedin. 



92 Appendix — Part I 



NORTH CAROLINA, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The one hundred thirty-third annual communication was held in the 
city of Raleigh on Tuesday evening, January 20, the grand lodge opening 
at 7:30 o'clock. The Committee on Credentials credit P. T. Wilson, the 
representatives of the Grand Lodge of Illinois with being present. 

The first item of interest, according to the usual program, is the 
annual address of the grand master. He opens by referring to the close 
of the war and the general eflfeet that must be expected in this country, 
as a result of the world turmoil. He is very caustic in the following 
paragraph : 

' ' Coming back to our own Order, we find that Masons are not satisfied 
with the divine truths inculcated in the symbolic degrees; but they wish to 
wear the purple of the so-called 'higher bodies.' The Arabic Fez, coupled 
with a foolish street parade, brings more joy to the modern Mason than all 
the beauties of the third obligation; and the resurrection of the body pales 
into insignificance when compared to the alcoholic elevation of the soul. 
And although we are taught that it is decidedly unmasonic to solicit can- 
didates, yet we find a large number of those 'elevated' gentry going 
about the State with petitions in their pockets, openly and notoriously beg- 
ging men to join; and I have no hesitancy in asserting that ninety per cent 
of the Knights Templar, Shriners and 32d degi'ce Scottish Eite Masons 
are unable to repeat the obligation of the Master 's degree as it is taught 
by the grand lecturers. I know that this statement will be challenged; 
but I stand ready for the test." 

The Masonic Service Association of the United States is commended 
and the per capita levy of five cents is suggested by the grand master. He 
also recommends a per capita tax of fifty cents for the benefit of the George 
Washington Memorial Association. He calls attention to the Oxford Orphan 
Asylum and Eastern Star Home and states that the cost of maintaining 
this institution has been gradually increased from year to year until it is 
difficult to secure ample funds to carry on the charitable work of this 
institution. He recommends a tax levy of $10.00 on each initiate, this 
sum to be used in connection with grand lodge appropriations for the 
benefit of the Home. 

Grand Master Grady seemed to think that some of the grand lecturers 
had not devoted as much time as they should to the duties of their offices 
and charged the remissness to the fact that proper per diem is not allowed. 
He recommended as follows: 



Masonic Correspondence 93 

"That no lecturer be allowed his expenses to the grand lodge unless 
he shall have lectured as much as thirteen full weeks during the year. I 
further recommend that each grand lecturer, who shall have lectured for 
thirteen full weeks be paid the sum of one hundred dollars ($100.00) by 
the grand lodge; and a similar sum for each additional ten weeks of work 
actually done by him." 

The grand secretary comes in for most hearty commendation and the 
recommendation is made that his salary be increased to $3,600.00 per 
annum. 

One case of discipline reported, involves a member of a lodge who 
had been guilty of selling cipher rituals. It appeared, however, that the 
lodge of which the miscreant was a member, made frequent use of these 
books so that the grand master found it quite difficult to secure the prosecu- 
tion of the culprit. In the trial he was acquitted and the grand master 
appealed the case to the grand lodge. 

He states that he made it a practice, before issuing a dispensation to 
form a new lodge, to require the employment of a lecturer, and recom- 
mends to the grand lodge that hereafter no charters be granted until the 
petitioning lodge shall present a certificate of proficiency from a grand 
lecturer. The grand master informs the grand lodge that in the State 
some lodges charge only forty-five cents per annum as dues. He thinks 
this should not be allowed and recommends that the minimum dues of all 
lodges be fixed at $2.50. The decisions reported relate to local constructions 
of law. 

The grand master is to be commended for taking a broad view of the 
subject of physical qualifications for he recommends the following amend- 
ment: 

"Amend Section 111 of the Code by striking out all of paragraph 
(2) thereof, and insert the following: "Maim or deformity shall not pre- 
vent a candidate from initiation and advancement, provided such candidate 
can, by artificial means, comply with the provisions of paragraph (1) 
hereof. ' ' 

One of the suggestions which Brother Grady made was the establish- 
ment of a Masonic Mountain Eesort: 

"The idea is to build in some suitable place in the mountains of 
North Carolina, a Masonic resort where lecturers can teach those who wish 
to learn at a nominal cost, and where the families of the Masons can find 
recreation at the least possible expense. ' ' 

The most interesting paragraph in the address of Grand Master Grady 
la his announcement of the gift of a beautiful Masonic Temple. The 



94 Appendix — Part I 



offer came from Isaac Emerson of Baltimore, a native of North Carolina, 
who offers to build the Temple as a memorial to his father and mother. It 
is proposed to have a grand lodge room in the temple where the grand 
lodge may meet and transact its business. This announcement is real 
refreshing for here is an example of one Mason who has grasped the inner 
meaning of the fraternity and has set an example which other wealthier 
men ought to emulate. The grand treasurer reports receipts of $40,886.00 
and disbursements of $46,890.00. 

The grand secretary 's report is quite extensive and deals with many 
matters which passed through his oflSce during the year. He announces 
that 2,053 were raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason and states 
the present membership of the State to be 30,912. 

The grand lodge paused long enough in its proceedings to listen to a 
splendid oration which was delivered by "Honorable" Geo. B. Cowper. 
The writer would have much preferred the word ' ' Honorable ' ' dropped and 
the word ' ' Brother ' ' substituted therefor. It would have been a little more 
in keeping with the democracy of the fraternity. 

The grand lodge seemed to find favor with the grand master 's recom- 
mendations for a Masonic retreat, a committee of seven being appointed to 
investigate the merits of the proposition and report to the grand lodge. 

Quite a long report is made by the Board of Directors of the Masonic 
Home. Incorporated therein is an itemized amount of work done by the 
dentist which shows that the Grand Lodge of North Carolina does not 
propose to have the teeth of its charges neglected. 

The Committee on the Masonic Burial Services reported a slight change 
by way of an addition of a paragraph which is word for word the same 
as used by the Grand Lodge of Illinois. 

One of the very long reports is that from the committee which attended 
the meeting of the Masonic Service Association. The grand lodge approved 
all that the committee presented. The grand lodge operates under the 
budget system, for the Finance Committee came in and assigned certain 
sums for the various departments of the grand lodge and it is assumed that 
they will be expected to keep within their appropriations. 

The election and installation of officers was the last act of the grand 
lodge. There is no report on foreign correspondence, other than a brief 
resume which was presented to the grand lodge during the proceedings. 

Dr. James C. Braswell, G.M., Whitakers. 

Wm. W. Willson, G.S., Raleigh. 



Masonic Correspondence 95 

NORTH DAKOTA, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

This grand lodge convened for the thirty-first time on Tuesday, June 
15, in the auditorium of the Masonic Temple at Fargo. The proceedings 
are reported to have been the most progressive and far reaching in recent 
years. The preliminaries consisted of singing America, presentation of 
the Stars and Stripes and singing of the Star Spangled Banner and the 
reception of distinguished visitors. The grand master, Amil P. Lanhart, 
presented his address and opened by saying that there never was a time 
in the history of our country when there was a greater need for Masonic 
influence and service than there is today. He states that misunderstanding 
and unrest exists everywhere and that Masonry can do one thing and that 
is to see that the principles of the Declaration of Independence are pre- 
served. He states that good citizenship is good Masonry. 

He reports no decisions, stating that nothing was presented to him 
of such importance to dignify them. The usual number of by-laws for 
constituent lodges were approved and four circular letters issued upon 
subjects Avhich the grand master desired to present to his lodges. He refers 
to the division of the State into districts and commends the splendid work 
of the district deputies. One lodge was constituted and the Masonic cot- 
tage which the grand lodge maintains at the North Dakota State Tubercu- 
losis Sanitarium is mentioned as plaj'ing a very important part in the care 
of those who are afflicted and are in search of help. The Masonic Service 
Association is presented to the grand lodge and two cents per capita 
membership levied. The George Washington Memorial Association receives 
favorable mention and earnest consideration of the grand lodge is asked for. 
An amendment, making the past masters members of the grand lodge and 
the payment to them of mileage and per diem was offered. 

The grand master seemed to think that the lodges of North Dakota 
were initiating classes which were entirely too large, stating that it was not 
unusual for a lodge to put through as high as forty candidates at one time. 
He recommends that the law be changed so that a lodge shall not be per- 
mitted to initiate more than five candidates at one or the same time. He 
also recommends that all candidates 'raised to the sublime degree of Master 
Mason be required to pass examination in the third degree. A recommenda- 
tion was also made that the grand lodge dues be increased from 75 cents 
to $1.00 per capita, and that the sum of $5.00 be levied as a tax upon 
each entered apprentice degree conferred. 

The grand treasurer gives his receipts as approximately $18,000.00 
and his disbursements $11,657.00. The grand secretary's report is quite a 



96 Appendix — Part I 



long one and goes much into detail concerning certain affairs that the grand 
secretary handled during the year. The number raised to the sublime degree 
of Master Mason was 760 and the net gain for the year 713. 

The grand lodge maintains a library and museum for a report waa 
made from the librarian which was quite interesting. The number of books 
circulated is given in detail and shows that the members of the fraternity 
were quite diligent in securing Masonic information. 

Quite a long report is made concerning North Dakota Military Lodge 
No. 2. This lodge operated during the war and accomplished a great deal 
of good among the soldiers who were overseas. 

The grand lecturer reports that he devoted a great deal of time to the 
work of revising the ritual, and that the matter is now in presentable shape 
to receive the attention of the grand lodge. The ritual as revised was 
ordered in 2,000 copies, to be printed in cipher form. 

The grand lodge also took up the matter of the monitor and made 
certain additions thereto which were deemed for the best interests of the 
lodge and the candidates. 

The Masonic Service Association is approved and report made to the 
grand lodge. In this report is a somewhat severe criticism by the grand 
secretary, which reads as follows: 

"North Dakota views with wonder the furious and unreasonable atti- 
tude of our brethren of Illinois and Washington. The persistence with 
which they dig up ghosts and skeletons of general grand lodges, which have 
been positively and finally laid to rest by the Masonic Service Association, 
would lead us to believe that there is no such thing in their minds as honesty 
of Masonic purpose. How any fair-minded man and Mason could desire 
to block the development of a unified Masonic spirit in America, passes 
comprehension, especially in the light of our war experiences and the per- 
sistent and unified efforts of the enemies of Freemasonry in America. The 
Masons of Illinois and Washington, that is the rank and file, feel just as 
the rank and file of Masons do everjTvhere in the United States and sooner 
or later their leaders will find it out." 

It is apparent that Brother Stoekwell is very much wedded to the 
Masonic Service Association idea. The George Washington Memorial 
Association comes in for favorable mention and the sum of $4,265.00 was 
collected for that enterprise. 

Quite a long report is made by Grant S. Hager, the fraternal corre- 
spondent. He has considerable to say about the second Cedar Eapids con- 
ference and it is apparent that he believes in the future of that organization. 



Masonic Correspondence 97 

The Thompson memorial prize was won this year by G. Jems Fraser of 
the University of North Dakota. From the Committee on Chartered Lodges 
the information is gleaned that the present membership of the lodges of 
North Dakota is 12,325. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence makes a report which is not at all 
long. This committee apparently handled cases that came up from con- 
stituent lodges on appeal, for in the report' is found decisions made by them 
along that line. The grand lodge increased the per diem from $2.00 to 
$3.00 per day, limiting the number of candidates to be initiated at one time 
to five, and required all newly made Master Masons to learn the lecture on 
that degree. 

The installation of officers closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by Grant S. Hager. 
He accords to Illinois a page and a half of consideration. He quotes from 
the address of Grand Master Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, and says: 

"We are convinced that as time goes on there mil a tightening of 
rules regarding membership in organizations other than Masonic. The 
institution in character, aims and aspirations is too high to be made the 
butt of jokes or pose as a buffoon in public places." 

The correspondence report of this writer is highly commended. He says 
in the following: 

"Delmar D. Darrah is the correspondent for Illinois. He is a man of 
discernment and discrimination and writes a most comprehensive review. 
His 1919 effort covers one hundred and seventy-five pages, each worthy a 
careful perusal. His "Prefatory" is a comprehensive digest of outstand- 
ing topical information, valuable alike to officers of the grand lodge for 
reference, or to the casual reader. His review of North Dakota touches 
the high lights of our proceedings. ' ' 

Allan V. Hnig, G.M., Devils Lake. 

Walter L. Stockwell, G.S., Fargo. 



98 Appendix — Part I 



NOVA SCOTIA, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The annual communication which was the fifty-fifth was held at Yar- 
mouth on Wednesday, June 9, 1920. 

The first thing the grand lodge did after the preliminary ceremony 
of opening was to form in solemn procession and march to Holy Trinity 
church where divine services were held. The sermon preached on this 
occasion is quoted in full and is a most excellent document. 

The grand lodge resumed labor at 2:15 P. M. and the first business 
was the address of the grand master, George D. Macdougall. The report 
goes into detail concerning various matters which claimed the attention of 
the grand master during the year. 

The Masonic Home is highly commended because of its excellent man- 
agement and the endowment fund for the maintenance of this institution 
has now reached the sum of $62,000.00. 

Two new lodges were formed during the year and one Masonic Hall 
was dedicated. 

One thing the grand master did was to call attention to the observance 
of St. John's day and all lodges of the jurisdiction were urged to par- 
ticipate in a proper observance of this Masonic occasion. 

The grand master states he was not able to visit as many lodges as 
he would like but he did meet with his brethren as often as occasion would 
permit. The list of visitations which he submits is a very long one. 

Fifteen questions are offered by the grand master together with 
answers to same. None of these questions are out of the ordinary and are 
along the line of the general queries submitted by lodges to grand masters. 
Nearly every question should have been answered by reference to existing 
regulations. 

In conclusion, the grand master reports the net gain in membership 
to be 699, a very good showing all things considered. 

The grand master shows the good taste to put a great deal of irrelevant 
matter in his report into an addenda, a practice which should be observed 
by more grand masters. 

The report of the grand secretary is purely statistical in character 
and relates to the acts which passed through his office during the year. 



Masonic Correspondence 99 

Tho grand secretary gives the present membership as 8,133 and his total 
receipts at $13,180.00. 

It is apparent that the grand lodge maintains a cemetery lot which 
appears to have been a gift to that organization. 

Tho trustees of the Masonic Home make a long report going much 
into detail concerning receipts and expenditures of that institution. 

One thing the grand lodge did was to report adversely on the petition 
of a number of brethren who asked for the restoration of their lodge whose 
charter had been arrested. 

The reports of the district deputy grand masters which are made di- 
rectly to the grand lodge are interesting and show that these oflficers have 
a well defined conception of their duty and have performed it to the best 
of their ability. These reports go much into detail concerning transactions 
of the year. 

The Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia did one thing and that was to fix 
the minimum fees at $3.5.00 of which $20.00 must accompany the petition 
and of this sum $10.00 is to be paid to the grand lodge for maintenance 
of the Masonic Home. 

The Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia is doing some excellent work in the 
matter of Masonic research and during the year a special committee which 
had this matter in charge, sent out large numbers of documents containing 
valuable information to the craft of that jurisdiction. 

Just before the close of the session the grand representatives were duly 
received and accredited. Don F. Fraser represented Illinois. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by James C. Jones, 
grand secretary. He considers Illinois in four and one-quarter pages quot- 
ing the principal transactions of our session of 1919. He takes the opening 
paragraph of the address of Grand Master Daniel G. Fitzgerrell and quotes 
all he said concerning German speaking lodges. Brother Jones is very 
frank in declaring that he docs not agree with very much this writer said 
in his preliminary paragi'aphs to the correspondence report but does him the 
honor to quote all that was said under the subject of physical qualifications. 
It would be very unusual if all men agreed upon all subjects. Probably 
Brother Jones belongs to the old school but no fault is going to be found 
with him for the opinion which ho holds. 

George Dewar Macdougall, G.M., New Glasgow. 

James C. Jones, G.S., Halifax. 



100 Appendix — Part I 



OHIO, F. & A. M. 

1920 

The coniinimication under review is the 11th. The officers and members 
of the grand lodge met in the Hotel Deshler, Columbus, Ohio, at 9:00 A. M. 
and under escort of two Commanderies of Knights Templar marched to the 
Masonic Temple. The first businesg pf importance was the annual address 
of the grand master, Mathew Smith. His opening remarks are quite long, 
dealing in general matters of felicitation. He speaks of proficiency in the 
ritual as necessary to success in our lodges. And he says that where stops 
the language of the ritual is the starting point for more personal applica- 
tion. Tributes of respect are paid to the dead of his own and other grand 
jurisdictions. 

One of the first acts of the grand master upon entering upon the 
duties of his office was the ai^pointment of a Committee on History of the 
Grand Lodge of Ohio. He states that 104 dispensations were granted dur- 
ing the year and lists these fully in the appendix. Among the dispensations, 
refused were those giving permission to lodges to appear in public parades. 

The craft in Ohio must be growing at a rapid rate for sixteen dis- 
pensations for the formation of new lodges were granted. 

The gi'and master presents a memorial from the Past Master's Associa- 
tion of Cleveland limiting the number of degrees which a lodge may confer 
during the year as well as the number of meetings that may be held for 
work. 

Tlie net gain in membership for the year is given as 16,427. This 
growth is phenomenal. The grand master speaks of his visitations to 
Lodges as the most cherished of his recollections as grand master. 

During the year a demand arose for the reprinting of the ritual and a 
special committee was appointed to consider the matter. The recom- 
mendation of the grand master is that the ritual be reprinted. Eitualistic 
efficiency is mentioned and the work of the schools of instruction highly 
commended. 

Grand Master Smith seems to think that the instruction relative to 
the apron is so brief in form that lodges have been led to select extended 
apron lectures from other jurisdictions. 

A recommendation is made that the subject of a longer dissertation be 
considered and recommends the subject for approval of the grand lodge. 

From the report it is apparent that improvements have been found 
necessary in the Masonic Home of Ohio, particularly an increase in hos- 



Masonic Correspondence 101 

pital facilities. However, owing to unsettled business conditions, the Board 
of Managers have deemed it inexpedient to proceed with the work at this 
time. The by-laws of a large number of lodges were suljmitted to the grand 
master for his approval. 

In conclusion the grand master pays a high tribute to the support given 
him by the grand secretary, J. H. Bromwell. The grand secretary gives his 
total receipts as $235,313.06, and his expenditures $166,684.00. 

It is apparent that the Grand Lodge of Ohio is prospering financially 
and making money, for a recommendation appears for the purchase of 
$50,000.00 worth of bonds. 

The report of the grand secretary is the usual document of this kind. 
The total number of members in Ohio is given as 148,480. 

The Committee on Grievances report but two cases as having been 
appealed to them. The Jurisprudence Committee submit quite an interesting 
report. 

In reference to the suggestion of the Past Master's Association of 
Cleveland that the amount of work done by lodges be limited, the Juris- 
prudence Committee seem to think it unwise and inexpedient to interfere 
with the work of these bodies and recommends that more work meetings 
be held and the ceremonies carried on by relays of trained workers. Those 
secretaries who make a practice of keeping their books and records at home 
instead of in the lodge hall, came in for some attention on the part of the 
Jurisprudence Committee, who held that these important documents should 
be retained in the lodge rooms. 

One amendment to the by-laws was adopted to the effect that no charter 
shall be granted to a new lodge which has not adopted a uniform code of 
by-laws. 

The committee to whom was referred the matter of an extended apron 
lecture asked for further time to consider the subject. The election and 
installation of officers were closing features of the session. 

The Grand Lodge of Ohio does not make a practice of presenting the 
grand master with his jewel during the session of the grand lodge, but 
generally appoints a special committee to visit the retiring grand master 
at his home and to make the presentation at that place. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by 0. P. Sperra. 
Illinois receives two and a half pages of comment. He makes a brief 
resume of the principal acts of Grand Master Fitzgerrcll and chronicles 
the more important transactions of our grand lodge. He makes no com- 



102 Apperidix — Part I 



incnt however, showing that what was done did not meet with disfavor. A 
generous extract is taken from the oration of Edward J. Brundage, and 
the correspondence submitted by this writer was given favorable mention. 

The writer has been very much impressed in reviewing the proceedings 
of the Grand Lodge of Ohio in noting the small amount of legislation 
enacted. This shows that the Grand Lodge of Ohio has become stabilized 
and docs not propose to be carried off its feet by various amendments pre- 
senting newfangled ideas on Freemasonry. The greatest need of the fra- 
ternity today is a fixed policy. We have enough laws, rules and regulations 
to last us for a long time and it is refreshing to find one grand lodge whose 
proceedings are not overburdened with changes of various sorts. 

The tremendous increase in membership in Ohio shows that Masonry 
is working out its real purpose and is accomplishing it in a far better 
manner than in many States where continual tinkering with existing customs 
and regulations is constantly in vogue. 

John E. Flotron, G.M., Dayton. 

J. H. Bromwell, G.S., Cinciniiati. 



OKLAHOMA, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

This young grand lodge observed its thirteenth annual communication 
in Oklahoma City, opening its transactions on February 22, There was 
an address of welcome which was properly responded to, after which the 
Committee on Rules and Order of Business presented the agenda which was 
duly adopted. 

The first item of interest was the annual address of the grand master, 
Frank A. Derr. It is a document covering thirty-eight pages and deals 
with the various transactions for which he should account. He speaks of 
the year as one of marvelous prosperity as well as peace and concord. He 
refers to tlie influx of new members coming from a world of conflicting 
thoughts, beliefs and ideals and says the fraternity has a great work to 
perform in leading these men along proper paths. 

The fraternal dead received tender tributes of respect. Twenty-four 
emergency communications of the grand lodge were held, of which twenty- 
one were for the purpose of laying the corner-stones of Masonic Temples, 
school buildings and churches. Four lodges were constituted and eight 



Masonic Correspondence 103 

dispensations issued for the formation of new lodges. Four consolidations 
of lodges took place during the year and the charter of one lodge was taken 
up for failure to transact bui^iness as required by the law. Seven dispen- 
sations were issued to lodges to attend church services and various other 
dispensations to waive existing laws. 

The grand master states that he refused many requests for dispensa- 
tions to confer degrees out of time because he did not consider the reasons 
given justified the action. Twenty-one decisions are reported. In decision 
number 2, he defines what is meant by dotage, s.aying: 

"Dotage, meaning 'Feebleness of understanding or mind, particularly 
in old age' cannot be determined by the age of the candidate alone. The 
lodge must determine for itself whether the applicant is qualified." 

A claim of the Masonic Belief Association of Los Angeles is referred 
to the lodge for such action as it may deem wise to take. The grand master 
says the observance of the Masonic birthday of George Washington should 
be considered and urges lodges to hold proper programs suitable for this 
occasion. 

The George Washington Memorial Association as well as the Masonic 
Service Association receives commendation and hearty approval. The 
Smith-Towner bill is approved by the grand master and the Masons of the 
State urged to give liberal support to this measure. He believes in Ma- 
sonic Education and says: 

' ' The most crying need of Freemasonry at the jiresent time with our 
rapidly increasing membership, is education in the fundamental principles 
of Masonrj^ No matter how ,f ar we may eventually go in the cultivation 
of the educational field, the immediate task is to bring home to all Masons 
those great fundamental principles which none deny and to which none 
should be indifferent. 'Knowledge is the most real and genuine of all 
human treasures, for it is light as ignorance is darkness.' " 

A proposition to move the Masonic Home, which was submitted to the 
grand lodge for ratification w^as defeated. The grand master reports that 
an experimental school of instruction would be held during the grand 
lodge session and asked that the grand lodge give this earnest considera- 
tion, with a view of either continuing the practice or eliminating it. 

Brother Dcrr reports the usual number of visitations and closes his 
address with some very appropriate remarks. Immediately following the 
address of the grand master, the grand representatives were duly received 
and accredited. 

The grand secretary, W. M. Anderson, makes quite a long report cover- 
ing financial matters, which is followed by the grand treasurer's report, 



104 Appendix — Part I 



which shows total funds to be accounted for by him, amounting to 
$250,286.00. 

For the George Washington Memorial Association, the total sum pledged 
and paid amounted to $21,260.00. The grand lodge adopted a motion mak- 
ing November 4 a Masonic holiday and authorizing the constituent lodges 
to observe this anniversary of the initiation of George Washington in an 
appropriate manner. 

Quite a long report is made by a special committee on the Masonic 
Service Association. The committee endorses the work of this society in 
very strong terms and asks the grand lodge to make the necessary appro- 
priation and to continue its membership. 

The report of the Masonic Home Board is complete in every detail and 
shows that institution to be well conducted and doing a most excellent work. 

The Near East Belief matter came in for consideration and the work 
was endorsed and the lodges of the State urged to contribute to the 
enterprise. 

A resolution endorsing the public school system of the country was 
presented and adopted by the grand lodge. The question of recognizing the 
Grand Lodge and the Grand Orient of France came up and a special com- 
mittee that had this matter in hand recommended that no action be taken 
at the present time. 

The Committee on Appeals and Grievances evidently had plenty to do 
for ten cases are reported together with their findings. An amendment was 
offered similar to that adopted by Colorado, prohibiting newly raised Mas- 
ter Masons from afSliating with other orders until after one year had 
passed. This amendment was ordered carried over for another year. 

The conclusion of the meeting was the installation of officers and the 
customary presentation of the jewel. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by Thomas C. 
Humphrey. He gives Hlinois two pages of commendation. He quotes what 
Grand Master Fitzgerrell said concerning solicitation for the higher degrees 
and quotes from Past Grand Master Owen Scott on the subject of the 
Masonic Service Association. He quotes briefly from the correspondence 
report of this writer. 

James Henry Patterson, G.M., Prague. 

William M. Anderson, G.S., Oklahoma City. 



Masonic Correspondence 105 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, F. & A. M. 

1921 

The ninth annual communication was held in the city of Manila in the 
Masonic Temple on Tuesday, January 25, opening at 4 o 'clock P. M. The 
deputy grand master performed the ceremony of opening after which he 
sent an escort out to bring the grand master into the grand lodge where 
he was tendered a most cordial reception. 

Brother Palma then read his annual address. His first act is to report 
the dead of his own jurisdiction and he enumerates all of those who have 
passed beyond during the year which has just closed. 

The increase in membership is mentioned as the greatest in the his- 
tory of the grand lodge. 

Twelve dispensations for the formation of new lodges were granted 
during the year. The grand master was quite liberal in his visitations to 
the lodges under him for he enumerates a long list that received recogni- 
tion from him. 

One thing the grand master did do was to recommend the adoption of 
the Pike Eitual. It appears from his address that previously the grand 
lodge had been using a ritual of the Scottish Rite. The grand master 
seemed to think that the grand lodge should take over the entire jurisdic- 
tion of the York Eite and recommended that a committee be appointed to 
investigate the merits of the Pike Eite in relation to its adoption by the 
grand lodge. 

Much effort was put forth during the year toward instructing the 
lodges of the jurisdiction and it is apparent from the report of the grand 
master that much good was accomplished. 

The grand secretary comes in for very high praise and it is recom- 
mended that his salary be substantially increased. The grand master made 
no decisions which were worthy of mention except two. One was that if a 
member of the investigating committee on a petitioner made an unfavorable 
report, there should be no ballot, the candidate being therc])y rejected. An- 
other decision was that a man who had lost his left arm was not eligible 
to receive the degrees. 

The George Washington Masonic Memorial Association is couiiuended 
and the recommendation made that the grand lodge contriI)ute $1,000.00 to 
the enterprise. 

The recommendation is also made that the grand lodge continue mem- 
bership in the Masonic Service Association. 



106 Appendix — Part I 



In concliuling the grand master indicates that considerable of the 
opposition to the fraternity which has been so apparent in times past is 
commencing to subside and even the fair sex is adopting a very tolerant 
attitude toward the society inasmuch as it is commencing to attend many 
public ceremonies. The grand master suggests that the institution of the 
Order of the Eastern Star in the Philippines might be a great help to the 
organization and even goes so far as to recommend that a committee be 
appointed to give the matter consideration. 

The roll-call of grand rejiresentativcs does not reveal the presence of 
the representative of Illinois. 

The report of the grand treasurer shows the grand lodge to be in good 
financial condition while that of the grand secretary, which, by the way, is 
very complete and goes much into detail, shows that the number of Masons 
on the Islands at the present time to be 5,126. The grand secretary advises 
the grand lodge of the necessity of employing an assistant grand secretary. 

The report of the grand lecturer is supplemented with reports from 
his deputies disclosing the visitations for instruction made by them and 
the general condition of the lodges visited. 

On the evening of the first day, an oration was delivered by Enrique V. 
Filamor. It is rather laborious in character but no doubt pleased the 
brethren who listened to it. The Custodians of the Work made a report 
concerning the Pike Ritual. The committee were of the opinion that the 
introduction of another ritual at this time, would increase many difficulties 
now existing and recommended that the Pike Eitual be not adopted. The 
grand lodge apparently thought the committee right because they voted to 
approve their report. 

It appears from the proceedings that the Grand Lodge of the Philippines 
is now about to establish a Masonic Home, for a special committee was ap- 
pointed to look up sites and devise ways and means of establishing a home 
for the care of indigent members of the fraternity. 

A resolution was endorsed and referred to the custodians of the work, 
relating to the use of cipher rituals. The custodians, however, could not 
see the wisdom of such a move and reported adversely. 

Concerning the special committee appointed to introduce the Eastern 
Star into the Philippine Islands, report was made that the members were 
not well enough acquainted with the general work of that organization and 
suggest that the incoming grand master appoint a committee to go very 
carefully into the matter and report at the next session of the grand lodge. 

A resolution was endorsed and adopted providing for a general con- 
vention of the Masons of the Philippine Islands for the purpose of getting 
better acquainted and discussing various matters of import to the craft. 



Masonic Correspondence 107 

The election and installation of officers together with the presentation 
of the customary jewel closed the ses^sion. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by George E. Harvey. 
Illinois received almost four pages of very generous consideration. Our 
proceedings for the year 1919 are very carefully gone into and the prin- 
cipal acts transacted at that time are briefly mentioned but without com- 
mendation or criticism. The oration of Edward J. Brundage is spoken of 
in very high terms and an extract is reproduced therefrom. The correspond- 
ence report for the year 1919 is favorably commented on and is called an 
excellent report and the review is referred to as among the best of the 
year. Brother Harvey has the thanks of this writer for his very compli- 
mentary reference to Illinois and its correspondent. 

Edwin B. Elser, G.M., Manila, P. I. 

Newton C; Comfort, G.S., P. O. Box 990, Manila, P. I. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The forty-fifth annual communication was held in the Masonic Temple 
at Charlottetown on Wednesday, June 25. 

The Grand Eepresentative of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, W. Samuel 
Lowe, was present. The first business was the annual address of the grand 
master, James MacDougall. His opening remarks partake very largely of 
the nature of a sermon and the text appears to grow out of general con- 
ditions resulting from the war. 

He is very liberal in the tribute which he pays to the dead of his own 
and other jurisdictions. 

The grand master was very generous in the matter of visiting lodges 
and states that while he was somewhat disappointed in the attendance yet 
he was pleased to know the ritual was being so well performed. He refers 
to the general condition of the craft and expresses a desire for a more 
liberal construction of the law on physical qualifications due to the fact 
that so many soldiers returning from the war maimed and otherwise unable 
to apply for the degrees of the fraternity. 

The grand master thinks that lodges do not attend divine services as 
often as they should and calls attention to a great deal of dissatisfaction 
among the lodges for the reason that the grand lodge wants them to attend 



108 Appendix — Part I 



divine services and then requires them to procure dispensations to appear 
in regalia. 

No official rulings are reported. 

Among the recommendations made is that every lodge present its by- 
laws for the approval of the grand lodge at its next annual communication. 
If this is done, some committee will certainly have their hands full. An- 
other recommendation made by the grand master is that no dispensation 
be required to allow a lodge to appear in regalia for the purpose of attend- 
ing church services. 

The financial condition of the grand lodge is emphasized and a recom- 
mendation made that a per capita tax be levied or some other means be 
made to j)rocure additional revenue. 

The deputy gi'and master makes a report very largely social in character. 

The total receipts reported by the grand treasurer are $951.10 and he 
gives the assets in his hands to be $1,447.65. 

The grand secretary in his report gives the total membership of the 
Grand Lodge of Prince Edward Island as 1,970. The net gain for the year 
was but forty-one. The number of lodges in the jurisdiction is only fifteen. 

It appears that the grand lodge is about to adopt a new ritual, for a 
committee report they have the matter under consideration but are not in a 
position to present their deductions at this time. 

The committee on physical qualifications which was appointed the pre- 
vious year asked to be continued and allowed to report at the next annual 
communication. Their request was granted. On the evening of the first 
day, the grand lodge assembled in solemn procession and marched to Zion 
Church where they attended divine services. 

The remainder of the business transactions appear to be largely rou- 
tine in character. 

The brother who preached the service to the grand lodge was voted 
the munificient sum of $10.00 and the church where the services were ren- 
dered received a vote of thanks while the organist received the sum of $5.00. 

There is no report on foreign correspondence. 

W. S. Steward, G.M., Charlottetown. 

E. T. Carbonell, G.S., P. 0. Box 104, Charlottetown. 



Masonic Correspondence 109 



QUEBEC, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

The fifty-first annual commmneation was held on the 9th day of 
February in the city of Montreal. According to the report of the Com- 
mittee on Credentials the ambassador representing Illinois does not appear 
to have been present. 

The deputy grand master opened the grand lodge after which, with 
considerable pomp, the grand master was duly received and accorded all 
the honors of his otficial position. 

Brother Arthur B. Wood then presented the annual address. In open- 
ing he lays great stress upon the ancient landmarks and refers to the 
absence of old familiar faces at every annual communication. He gives a 
long list of the dead of his own jurisdiction and pays to each a tribute of 
respect. 

He reports the condition of the craft to be most gratifying and states 
that the number of initiates has now reached the large total of 1,124, giving 
the province a net membership of 11,166. 

Seven new lodges received dispensations showing that the craft is 
growing at a rapid rate. 

A large number of visitations are reported in detail showing that the 
grand master was disposed to mingle with his brethren as much as possible. 

He states that for the first time in seven years the celebration of the 
Festival of St. John the Evangelist was observed by the lodges of the prov- 
ince. He commends the practice of holding annual church services and 
states that a much larger number of lodges than heretofore observed the 
ceremony. 

It is evident that the Grand Lodge of Quebec docs not propose to 
have the emblems of the fraternity made a travesty for the grand master 
recommends that all lodges desiring to j^rescnt a jewel in commemoration 
of some particular event, submit it to him before finally distributing same. 

Forty-five dispensations were granted during the year but none of 
them are of startling character. Brother Wood refused, however, to issue 
a dispensation to confer more than the customary degrees at one meeting, 
also to initiate candidates who were physically imperfect. 

Several rulings are reported, many of which refer to local interpretation 
of law. One recommendation which the grand master makes is that mas- 
ters of lodges shall so plan their work as to be able to present a clean sheet 



110 Appendix — Part I 



at the end of the year and leave nothing to be carried over. He also thinks 
that the amount of work which a lodge shall be permitted to do should be 
limited and no lodge should be permitted to do so much work that the can- 
didate fails to receive individual attention. 

The grand master had a table prepared of attendance at lodge meet- 
ings. The average as compiled by him is 21 percent. He seems to think 
that if lodges will quit overloading their meetings, that is to say, if they 
will avoid having too much work at their meetings, they will be attended 
more readily. Brother Wood believes in the social side of Masonry and 
urges lodges to take up the intellectual side, believing that in these features 
lies much of the future success of the fraternity. 

The report of the grand secretary is largely statistical. It would 
appear from his report that he issued dispensations for general purposes, 
subject of course, to the approval of the grand master. The total receipts 
from all sources were $15,192.00. The grand treasurer presented quite an 
interesting report and shows his general holdings in stock, bonds, etc., to be 
$142,760.00. 

A feature of the annual meeting was the address of the grand chaplain 
which was interesting in the extreme. 

Eeports of district deputy grand masters are very thorough and show 
that these oificers are very painstaking in the discharge of the duties of their 
office. They make suggestions and recommendations, all of which should 
prove beneficial and helpful to the grand lodge. 

Quite a long report is submitted from the Committee on the State of 
Masonry. This committee take all reports submitted to the grand lodge 
and from them they formulate a definite plan for the betterment of the 
society. 

Our brethren of Quebec are by no means remiss in the matter of 
administering relief to their distressed members. The report submitted 
to the grand lodge shows they did their full duty in this respect. 

The installation of ofB.cers closed the session. 

Hlinois for 1920 is reviewed by Brother E. T. D. Chambers, past 
grand master. He makes brief reference to the principal transactions of 
our session of 1920 and quotes liberally from the special Committee on the 
Masonic Service Association. 

In referring to the correspondence report of this writer he is very gen- 
erous and pays him the following comment, "His comments show thought- 
fulness and common sense judgment, and are admirably expressed." 

Chas. McBurney, G.M., Lachute. 

W. W. Williamson, G.S., Montreal. 



Masonic Correspondence 111 



RHODE ISLAND, F. & A. M. 

1920 

The Grand Lodge of Rhode Island meets semi-annually. What is called 
the semi-annual communication was held Monday, November 17 in Free 
Masons Hall, Providence. The brethren arose and sang the Star Sjjangled 
Banner, after which an extended report was presented, relating to Over 
Seas Lodge, No. 1, which originated and did the work of Masonry while 
located in Coblenz, Germany. The total number of members signing the 
by-laws of this lodge were four hundred eighty-six, of which number thirty- 
one were from the State of Illinois. The report of the activities of this lodge 
is interesting and no doubt it accomplished much good. The Masons of 
Ehode Island have had under consideration, the question of erecting a new 
Masonic Temple. At that semi-annual communication the committee made 
a report recommending the construction of a temple to cost $1,000,000.00 
and suggested as a means of helping to defray the expenses, a per capita 
tax of $10.00 to be placed on all candidates. 

The one hundred thirtieth annual communication was held in Provi- 
dence on May 17, opening at 10:00 o'clock Monday. The first item of 
interest was the address of the grand master. He reports the condition 
of the fraternity to have been the most prosperous in the Mafeonic history 
of the State. One thousand eight hundred fifty-one new members were 
added to the roll, giving the membership of the State at 12,414. 

Much is made of the cordial welcome extended to returned soldiers on 
the part of the lodges to which they belonged. Some of them received cer- 
tificates of life membership, while others had tablets in their honor placed 
in the lodge rooms. 

The grand master reports quite a number of dispensations to attend 
church services, but his dispensations for other purposes were limited 
in number. From the amendments to by-laws approved by the grand 
master, it is quite apparent that the lodges of the jurisdictions have been 
increasing their fees. 

The Masonic Service Association of the United States is endorsed as 
is also the George Washington Memorial Association. For this latter enter- 
prise the State of Ehode Island raised the sum of $3,700.00. 

The gr-and master visited a large number of lodges in his jurisdiction, 
which showed a desire on his part to keep in touch with the activities of the 
craft. One thing Grand Master Collins does is to take up the subject of 
the election of the grand master, which he says has become nothing more 
than a perfunctory affair. The brethren simply vote for the candidate in 
line and give little thought to the qualifications of those that are balloted 



112 Appendix — Part I 



for. He also takes a whack at what appears to be a system of political 
preferment which is in vogue in the grand lodge and seems to think that 
gi-and lodge officers should be chosen solely upon their merits and not be- 
cause they happen to hold the office of district deputy or some other minor 
position. 

Some very excellent things are said concerning the qualifications of 
candidates. This is a fruitful topic with all of the grand masters, but with 
all the preaching there is more or less carelessness in this respect. 

It is apparent from the address of the grand master that the blackball 
is very freely used throughout the State during the year for he reports 
numerous complaints where candidates have been rejected as a result of 
spite work. He brings up the question of the large amount of work in 
lodges and suggests that so many candidates are being initiated that the 
degrees have lost much of their charm and have degenerated into purely 
monotonous affairs. He thinks some remedy should be devised whereby the 
burden which is now so heavy upon lodge officers might be lightened. 

What the grand master really would like to see is group work but he 
has not quite enough courage to come out boldly for something which the 
craft must ultimately come to. The subject of large vs. small lodges is 
discussed and suggestions made that the best offices of the fraternity are 
more manifest in the small lodges than in the large lodges. 

One recommendation which the grand master makes is that when a 
committee on petitions makes an unfavorable report that it should not be 
necessary to spread the ballot but that the candidate should be declared 
rejected. Brother Collins concluded his address by declaring the grand 
lodge to be supreme among all Masonic bodies. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence makes a report covering two pages 
but the subject matter is largely of local interest. 

The Committee on Credentials reports the presence of Frederick I. Dana, 
Illinois representative. One thing the grand lodge did was to levy an 
assessment of $1.00 per .capita on each Master Mason in the State, 75 
percent of which is to go to the George Washington Memorial Association 
and the other 25 percent to be known as the Masonic Service Association 
Fund. 

The report of the treasurer, which appears near the close of the pro- 
ceedings, shows the grand lodge to be in an excellent condition financially. 

The election and installation of officers closed the session. There is no 
report on foreign correspondence. 

James E. Batty, G.M., Pawtucket. 

S. Penrose Williams, G.S., Providence. 



Masonic Correspondence 113 



SOUTH CAROLINA, A. F. M. 

1921 

The 184th annual communication convened in the Masonic Temple in 
the city of Charleston on the 23rd day of February. John F. Ficken, 
Grand Representative of Illinois, is credited with having been present. Two 
hundred and sixty-three lodges out of two hundred and eighty were rep- 
resented at this session of the gi-and lodge. 

The first business was the passing of a resolution appropriating the 
sum of $50.00 for the purpose of employing a stenographer to take the 
annual proceedings. The grand master, Samuel T. Lcnliam, presented a 
report which is quite long and in which he gave in a very complete 
manner the various transactions of his office during the year. He refers 
to the general condition of unrest throughout the country and seems to 
think that affluence and luxury caused more immorality than poverty. In 
commenting upon the great wave of crime sweeping over the country, he 
was disposed to charge it to lack of employment. 

The grand master goes much into detail on the subject of Necrology 
and gives the name of every Master Mason in the jurisdiction who died 
during the year. 

The state of the Craft is reported to be most satisfactory and the gen- 
eral growth in membership is commented upon as healthy and natural. 
The grand master apparently is very much of a ritualist for he lays great 
stress upon the importance of the ritual in all Masonic systems. 

The Masonic Service Association is commended by the grand master 
as is also the George Washington Memorial Association. A communication 
from the Grand Orient of France is reported, wherein they advise the 
grand lodge of their sincere desire to erect a memorial at Verdun to the 
soldier Masons who died during the war. 

Six dispensations for the formation of new lodges were issued and 
four corner stones laid during the year. 

Fourteen opinions are reported by the grand master. None of tlicm 
are unusual and relate in a way to the construction of local statutes and 
regulations. Several recommendations are made by the grand master but 
they are purely of local significance and concern matters in which the Grand 
Lodge of South Carolina is alone interested. 

Concerning the subject of dispensations, Grand Master Lcnham says 
that he departed from the precedent set by his predecessor and granted 
dispensations to confer more than the constitutional number of degrees 



114 Appendix — Part I 



at one communication. His limit was ten Master's degrees, fifteen Fellow 
Craft degrees and five Entered Apprentice degrees. Appended to the report 
of the grand master are documents from the several district deputies in 
which they set forth the various acts performed by them in the discharge 
of their official duties. 

• The grand treasurer gives his annual receipts as $55,768.00 and his 
disbursements $47,238.00. 

The report of the grand secretary is brief and covers such matters as 
were handled by him during the year. 

The Grand Lodge of South Carolina evidently maintains a cemetery, 
for a committee asked that an appropriation for maintaining the cemetery 
be granted at this session of the grand lodge. 

The Grand Lodge of South Carolina administers its relief in a very 
generous manner. It contributes to several orphan asylums and at the 
same time assists its lodges in earing for their dependents. 

A motion prevailed that the sum of eighty-five dollars be given to 
the Gideons for the purchase of Bibles. 

The grand lodge held an evening session at which suitable memorials 
to the distinguished dead of the jurisdiction were read. 

The Grand Lodge of South Carolina proposes to remodel its temple, 
for the sum of $70,000.00 was appropriated for that purpose. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence did not agree with the grand master 
in all of his decisions and in a number of instances made alterations or 
changes to suit the ideas of this august body. 

The constitution of the grand lodge was amended allowing represen- 
tatives $5.00 per day for each day's attendance at the sessions of the 
grand lodge. 

A resolution providing for the purchase of a suitable portrait of Albert 
Mackey received the approval of the grand lodge. 

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence declined to recommend the 
recognition of the Grand Lodges of Porto Rico, Mexico, Costa Eica, and 
Colombia. The grand lodge, according to the finance committee, collected 
$14L00 as penalties from its constituent lodges. There is nothing, however, 
to show that any of the penalties were remitted and the amounts refunded. 
An appropriation was made for the Masonic Service Association and the 
salary of the foreign correspondent fixed at $750.00. The election and in- 
stallation of officers was the last act of the session. 



Masonic Correspondence 115 

J. L. Micliie prepared the report on fraternal correspondence. He de- 
votes two and a quarter pages to Illinois. He quotes very liberally from 
the annual address of Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, and takes a generous para- 
graph from what he said concerning the American language in lodges. 

The correspondence of this writer is referred to in very kindly terms 
although Brother Michie does not like what was said about the past 
master 's degree. He claims that this degree is still conferred in fifty 
English speaking grand jurisdictions and thijiks that the correspondence 
reporters of Illinois have in times past shown considerable ignorance and 
stupidity upon the subject. 

S. T. Lanham, G.M., Spartanburg. 

O. Frank Hart, G.S., Columbia. 



TENNESSEE, F. & A. M. 

1921 

The annual communication was held in the city of Nashville, in Free- 
masons Hall, opening on January 26. The giand representative of the grand 
lodge of Illinois, J. T. Spaulding, is among those accorded as being present. 
One of the first items after the introduction of distinguished visitors was 
reading of the law relating to furnishing information of the proceedings to 
newspapers. 

T. W. Peace, grand master, then presented his annual address. He 
pays tributes of respect to the dead of his own as well as other grand 
jurisdictions. He refers to the Board of Custodians as being most important, 
and recommends that the board be increased from three to five members. 
Reference is made to the work of the year and it is pointed out as the 
greatest record the grand lodge has ever made, 4,476 being raised to the 
sublime degree of Master Mason. The grand master thinks this is a cause 
for congratulation provided the candidates received were worthy and well 
qualified. He seems to think that the fraternity has before it a great 
opportunity for doing educational work, in taking these new Masonic 
recruits and training them in the ways and meaning of the society. One 
hundred ninety-five requests to do work by courtesy were sent to other grand 
lodges and one hundred fifty-two were received and the requests com- 
plied with. 

The question of the Masonic Home is brought up and the necessity of 
additional revenue is pointed out. Grand master states that a number of 



116 Appendix — Part I 



lodges were amending their by-la-ws, by raising the cost of the degrees. He 
very truly says that every lodge should have revenue sufficient to provide 
more than the bare necessities. 

Grand Master Peace made a recommendation that the mileage paid 
representatives be increased from five to ten cents. 

Twenty-six decisions are reported. A large number of them relate 
to questions of jurisdiction. One decision is quite interesting, it reads 
as follows: 

"Eooms under a lodge room should not be used for residential, or 
other purposes, if, in order to secure privacy for the lodge, it would be 
necessary for such occupant to lease said rooms while the lodge is in 
session. Change of mind, sickness, or other cause might prevent compliance 
with agreement so to vacate." 

It is apparent that do^^■n in Tennessee they do not believe in experi- 
menting in the matter of conferring degrees, for the grand master rules 
it unwise to have any person preside and confer a degree unless he is a 
master or past master of a lodge. Grand Master Peace expresses himself 
very forcibly on the question of large lodge membership and seems to think 
that the lodges of State should be limited to a membership, not to exceed 
two hundred. He points out one case wherein a very important matter 
was referred to him. The record shows that the matter in question hap- 
pened in a lodge of eight hundred members, when only thirty-three were 
present. The grand master does not hesitate to say that the formation of 
new lodges should be encouraged. 

The grand master made one very generous recommendation. A certain 
brother took out a life insurance policy in favor of the grand lodge for 
the sum of $1,000.00. After his death his wife appealed to the grand lodge 
for the money, stating that it was needed to educate the daughter of the 
brother. The grand master recommended that the money be returned. 

The charter of one lodge was arrested and the usual number of dis- 
pensations issued. 

Grand Master Peace refused to issue a dispensation permitting a lodge 
to join a Knight Templar procession on Easter Sunday. He also declined to 
issue a dispensation, permitting a lodge to celebrate St. John 's Day in 
August, rain having prevented same on June 24. 

Four corner-stones were laid during the year, but the grand master 
refused to perform the service for a tuberculosis hospital on Sunday. 

The Masonic Service Association is presented to the grand lodge for 
such action as it mav wish to take. 



Masonic Correspondence 117 

The grand master gets after the grand lodge for the Avay and manner 
that it handles its funds. At the last annual meeting a liberal donation 
was made from one fund to another and before the year was out the grand 
lodge found itself compelled to borrow money, until the annual dues com- 
menced to come in. 

The question of observing the Masonic birthday of George Washington 
interested the grand master very much and he states that he was happy to 
know that many lodges observed this occasion. 

Electioneering in the grand lodge receives the condemnation of the 
grand master and attention is called to a letter written by a brother urging 
his advancement in the Masonic line. 

The grand master closed by recommending that an appropriate pic- 
ture of the grand secretary be made and preserved among the priceless 
relics of the grand lodge. 

The grand treasurer gives his annual receipts at $135,500.00, and his 
expenditures as $130,110.00. The grand secretary's rejiort goes much into 
detail and covers various acts transacted by him during the year. 

The grand lodge has one rather unusual committee called Ways and 
Means, this committee made twenty-three recommendations, many of them 
appropriating money for various purposes. 

Quite a long report comes in from the Masonic Home. It appears that 
it cost $62,532.00 to operate the home for the year just closed. The Gen- 
eral Masonic Belief Association spent $250.00 in caring for needy Master 
Masons. A motion was made and carried that the grand lodge remain in 
session three days. It is. apparent that the Grand Lodge of Tennessee does 
not propose to have its business hurried. 

The grand lodge voted to continue its membership in the Masonic Ser- 
vice Association. The sum of $1,000.00 was appropriated for the benefit 
of the local Committee on Education and the committee was asked to co- 
ordinate its efforts with similar movements. 

Eleven cases were considered by the Committee on Appeals and Griev- 
ances. In each instance the name of the defendant is published in the 
proceedings. At a night session of the grand lodge held on the first day 
the work was exemplified by the Board of Custodians. 

On the second day this board makes quite an extended report of their 
visitations to lodges and what they accomplished. One hundred fifty lodges 
were visited and instructed by the lecturers and thirty-nine by the custodians. 



118 Appendix — Part I 



The following resolution was presented and adopted : ' ' That the Board 
of Custodians of the Work be and arc hereby instructed to take up and 
consider the ritual of the second section of the third degree, and agree 
among themselves on a ritual and make their recommendation to this or 
to the next communication of the M.W. grand lodge. That they shall 
especially consider and determine what password and sign shall be given; 
on the craft work and throne speeches of the master, and shall cause to be 
printed for distribution among the lodges such parts of these various 
speeches as is permissible to be printed, as adopted by the M.W. grand 
lodge." 

The Committee on Jurisprudence make quite a long report in which 
they endorse practically everything that the grand master did. This com- 
mittee goes much into detail showing that they believe in having tlie grand 
lodge know the way and manner that they arrive at their deductions. 

A resolution declining to recognize the grand bodies of France was 
presented and adopted. 

The George Washington Memorial Association is commended and the 
information given that to date $1,100.00 had been raised for that work. 

A long report is made concerning the Widows and Orphans Home which 
deals with the matter of finances and points out what will be necessary 
to maintain that institution in a proper manner. The election and installa- 
tion of oflicers together with the presentation of the signet ring closed 
this most interesting session. 

The report on correspondence is prepared by H. A. Chambers. It is 
quite brief. He quotes all that Grand Master Fitzgerrell said on the ques- 
tion of physical qualification as well as his paragraph headed "A Per- 
nicious Practice." He thinks the report of the special committee on the 
Masonic Service Association is quite interesting. The correspondence re- 
port of this writer is briefly mentioned and what was said concerning the 
Masonic Service Association is quoted in full. 



Eodney Blake, G.M., Erin. 
Stith M. Cain, G.S., Nashville. 



Masonic Correspondence 119 



TEXAS, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The eighty-fifth annual communication was held in the Masonic Temple 
in the city of Waco, comr;iencing Tuesday, December 7, 1920. When the 
grand lodge opened, there was a vacant chair on the dais, properly draped 
with a beautiful flora' emblem, as a memorial to Past Grand Master Walter 
Acker, Superintendent of the Orphans' Home, who died the preceding 
April. The report of the Committee on Credentials does not show the rep- 
resentative of Illinois to have been present. A number of distinguished 
visitors were in attendance at the session of the grand lodge, all of whom 
were formally presented and accorded the grand honors. Sixty Master 
Masons who had been in good standing in their lodges for forty years or 
more, were presented and duly honored by the grand lodge. 

The first business of importance was the annual address of the grand 
master, George F. Morgan. It required seventy pages to transmit his mes- 
sage to his brothers. He refers to his duties as multitudinous and states 
that he discharged them to the very best of his ability. He pays elaborate 
tributes of respect to the dead of his own and other grand jurisdictions. 

The foreign relations with the Grand Lodge of Texas have been exceed- 
ingly pleasant during the year, nothing having transpired to occasion any 
discord. The grand master refers to the large number of appeals that have 
been sent to the lodges of his jurisdiction from various bureaus and 
charitable enterprises, and states that he instructed the lodges to make no 
contributions to any concern unless the approval of the grand lodge was 
granted. 

The Grand Lodge of Texas appears to have been in a quandary as to 
just what its relations were with the York Grand Lodge of Mexico and 
considerable corrcsiaondonce upon this subject is presented for consideration. 
The observance of the Masonic birthday of George Washington is mentioned 
and the lodges were invited to observe this anniversary. Both the George 
Washington Memorial Association and the Masonic Service Association of 
the United States received favorable mention. 

In the State of Texas there are one hundred fifteen district deputies 
representing the nine hundred active lodges. Reference is made to the 
faithful and hearty co-operation of these officials and the splendid service 
which they have rendered the craft during the year. Four lodges had their 
charters returned to them, the same having been arrested for infractions of 
Masonic laws. One case of discipline is reported, a Canadian Mason being 
the offender. Ten lodges were chartered during the year and dispensations 



120 Appendix — Part I 



issued for the formation of five new lodges. Six dispensations for new 
lodges were refused because the proposed lodges were less than ten miles 
distant from the next nearest lodge. Nine lodges received dispensations to 
publicly install officers and eighteen lodges received dispensations to lay 
corner-stones. Most of these ceremonials pertain to court houses, churches 
and school buildings, but few dispensations were issued to confer degrees 
out of time and one dispensation was issued to permit the examination of 
a candidate at a special meeting. 

The Grand Lodge of Texas exercises complete control over the halls and 
meeting places of its constituent lodges for the number of permits granted 
to purchase and convoy realty is a long one. 

Some of the lodges of the State of Texas must have had the moving 
fever for an extended list is given wherein permission was granted lodges 
to move from one location to another. During the year ten trial Masters 
were appointed to conduct Masonic trials in various Masonic lodges. A full 
and detailed report is given of each case. During the year permission was 
granted the Mystic Shrine to use the grand lodge building to hold a meeting 
for business purposes, it being expressly understood that no degrees were 
to be exemplified. Twelve cases of invasion of jurisdiction are reported in 
much detail, all of which were referred to the grand lodge for final approval. 

Grand Master Morgan made thirty decisions. One was to the effect 
that an objection sent by telegraph was not only ineffective but subjected 
the sender of the telegram to Masonic discipline. Another decision was 
that an illegitimate was not ineligible to receive the degrees of Masonry. 
Grand master held that it was wholly discretionary on the part of the master 
as to whether a non-affiliated Master Mason might appear at a Masonic 
funeral procession. The grand master held that the use of the Masonic 
emblem and inscription on the corner-stone of a church edifice was pro- 
hibited. He also held that it was permissible for a lodge to conduct degree 
work in two separate rooms at the same time, providing the proper officers 
were in charge of each meeting and the degrees being conferred were the 
same. The grand master takes a rap at a side degree called the Tall Cedars 
of Lebanon, and states that such a degree is not recognized in the State 
of Texas and could not be conferred in any Masonic lodge room. 

Eefcrcnce is made to the chain prayer proposition which it seems is 
so difficult to get stopped at the present time. All matters relating to the 
conferring of degrees by courtesy are handled through the grand secretary 's 
office, that official being made responsible for the proper conducting of such 
correspondence. No dispensations were issued for the initiation of candi- 
dates who were maimed. The whole question was left to the grand lodge to 
decide what it might want to do in the premises. 



Masonic Correspondence 121 

The Masonic Home ami school is commoiulcd in the very highest terms 
and the thanks of the grand master rendered to the craft of the State for 
the very generous support which has been accorded him during his incum- 
bency of office. 

Tlie grand treasurer reports receipts of $94,500.00 and expenditures of 
$82,392.00. The report of the grand secretary is quite an extended docu- 
ment and covers many matters which passed through his hands during the 
year. He shows that 12,052 were raised to the sublime degree of Master 
Mason and gives the present membership as 94,218. The lodges of Texas 
conferred five hundred forty-three degrees by courtesy for other jurisdic- 
tions and the compliment was returned in four hundred eighty-nine cases. 

The Grand Lodge of Texas apparently believes in ample devotion, as 
the grand chaplain offered prayer at both the opening and closing of each 
session. The report of the Committee on Printing shows that the contract 
for printing the x^roceedings was awarded at a cost of $4.50 per page. 

An extended report is made by the Board of Directors of the Masonic 
Orphans' Home and one of the urgent needs which is set forth, is that of a 
hospital. Both the superintendent of the Masonic Home as well as the 
board of directors came in for the hearty commendation of the grand 
lodge. A vote of thanks was tendered them for the splendid services which 
they had rendered. The grand lodge maintained a committee on Masonic 
History and Eesearch and quite a long report is made by them of their 
activities and the work which they have accomplished. It is apparent from 
the proceedings that the Grand Lodge of Texas is revising its constitution 
and by-laws, for a preliminary report from a committee, appointed for that 
purpose, appears in the proceedings. 

The Jurisprudence Committee was extremely generous with the grand 
master and approved most of his acts. The grand lodge operates under 
the budget system and the Finance Committee makes an appropriation for 
each department. 

It is noticed that the salary of the grand secretary is fixed at $4,800.00. 
Last year the Grand Lodge of Illinois attempted to raise the salary of its 
grand Secretary to $4,000.00 and the proposition met with an avalanche 
of nays. 

The proposition to remodel the present grand lodge building was 
brought before the grand lodge, and the committee to which it was re- 
ferred made a report expressing the idea that the expense of remodeling 
would be excessive and when completed the building would still be inade- 
quate for the needs of the grand lodge. They recommended the sale of the 
building and the construction of a new one. A motion was made that the 



122 Appendix — Part I 



United States flag be hung in the East of the grand lodge at each session 
and displayed in every lodge room tliroughout the jurisdiction. The motion 
prevailed. 

Just before the close of the grand lodge a resolution on dancing was 
adopted. E«solution was as follows: "That the subordinate lodges of 
Texas be, and are, hereby prohibited to advertise, conduct or hold balls, 
dances, fairs, concerts, or any other public assembly, by, through, or under 
the auspices of the said subordinate lodges, either directly or indirectly." 

The election and installation of officers closed a busy session. It is 
apparent that it does not cost the Grand Lodge of Texas very much to 
hold its annual meeting for the amount for mileage and per diem paid 
delegates only amounted to $400.0.0, while committees and helpers drew 
$893.15. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by S. M. Bradley, 
past grand master. He gives Illinois three pages of courteous notice, 
quoting very liberally from Daniel G. Fitzgerrell. He seems to find no 
fault with any of our transactions. 

The oration of Edward J. Brundage received favorable comment and 
a number of excerpts are taken therefrom. The correspondence report of 
this writer is briefly mentioned and what was said upon the subject of 
physical qualifications was not well received. It is quite apparent that 
Brother Bradley is a stand-patter who belongs to the old school of Masons 
who still believe that King Solomon was a grand-daddy of the Masonic 
Institution. 

Andrew L. Eandell, G.M., Sherman. 

W. B. Pearson, G.S., Waco. 



UTAH, F. & A. M. 

1921 



The fiftieth annual communication opened in the Masonic Temple in 
Salt Lake City on the 18th of January. The Committee on Credentials 
credit P. L. Williams, grand representative of Illinois, with being present. 
It did not take the grand lodge very long to get down to actual business 
and the first item of interest is the report of the grand master, James L. 
Cattron. His report is quite brief, covering but twelve pages. Three dis- 
pensations were issued for the formation of new lodges, two Masonic Halls 
were dedicated and a large number of lodges officially visited by the grand 



Masonic Correspondence 123 

master. He states that he had many questions referred to him during the 
year but in most instances found it unnecessary to render any decisions. 

He advises that the Committee on Masonic Education and Instruction 
performed its duty efficiently and with dispatch and calls the committee 
one of the most important in the jurisdiction. The Grand Lodge of Utah 
requires that all amendments to by-laws be submitted to the grand lodge 
for approval. The list, however, is not a long one. One by-law to exempt 
members from the payment of dues who are seventy years of age and have 
held continuous mcmbcrs-hip for twenty-five years, was disapproved. 

Apparently the Grand Lodge of Utah does not look with favor upon 
dispensations to waive the law for the list submitted by the grand master 
is a very short one. Among the charitable contributions reported was 
$120.00 for the relief of a past grand master and $50.00 for the relief of 
the widow of a past grand master. 

The George Washington Memorial Association is endorsed and a long 
report made upon the Masonic Service Association. This the grand master 
finds favor with and recommends it to the favorable consideration of his 
grand lodge. The work of revising the funeral ritual which has been in 
the hands of a committee, came up for special consideration and the grand 
master set apart a special hour for the exemplification of this revision. 

The charter of one lodge was arrested for infraction of Masonic rules 
and the condition of the craft reported to be the most prosperous and har- 
monious in its history. The grand master called attention to the fact that 
on January 16, 1922, the grand lodge would celebrate its .50th anniversary 
and recommended that a committee be appointed to prepare a suitable 
program. 

The deputy grand master and grand wardens made reports to the 
grand lodge dealing principally with official visits to lodges made by them. 

The grand treasurer gives his receipts as $6,685 and his disbursements 
as $5,522.00. The report of the grand secretary is quite a long one and 
deals principally with matters which passed through his hands as well as 
some statistics. He gives the net gain for the year in membership at 669. 

The Committee on Masonic Education and Research report the issuance 
of various bulletins and other i)rinted matter which they felt to be helpful 
to those Masons who were looking for Masonic light and information. 

The revision of funeral ceremonies which was exemplified by the Board 
of Custodians was formally adopted by the grand lodge. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence had very little to report, and showed 
the good taste to omit names of defendants in such cases as were reviewed 



124 Appendix — Part I 

]}}■ them. Incident to the meeting of the grand lodge, the custodians held 
a school of instruction on the evening of the first day. The Committee on 
Lodges make an extended report showing that they went very carefully into 
the annual returns and gleaned such facts as they could concerning the 
general condition of lodges. They make some recommendations for the 
betterment and the general welfare of the jurisdiction. A resolution from 
the Jurisprudence Committee, prohibiting smoking in the lodge rooms during 
regular and special meetings at all times, was presented and adopted by the 
grand lodge. 

A resolution was adopted to the effect that an adverse report by the 
Committee on Investigation or any member thereof, shall constitute a re- 
jection of the petition, and no ballot shall be taken thereon. A resolution 
which had been offered, prohibiting constituent lodges from conferring more 
than seventy-five degrees in one year was disapproved by the grand lodge. 

The Committee on Finance fixed the salary of the grand correspondent 
at $600.00 and prepared a budget setting apart suitable appropriations for 
the various departments of the grand lodge. The election and installation 
of ofiicers and presentation of the signet ring closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by Samuel H. Good- 
win who considers Illinois in two and one-fourth pages of very interesting 
review. 

Concerning the grand chaplain's prayer, he offers the following para- 
graph : ' ' The prayer of the grand chaplain printed in full contains one 
or two expressions which set this scribe to thinking. Of course, we are out 
here in the sage brush and may have fallen out of step in the procession, 
theological. And we are willing to admit that we are just a plain, old 
fashioned theist in our conception of Deity. The grand chaplain invoked 
the blessing of the 'All pervading spirit whose presence is in the beauty 
of the dawn and the purple glory of the twilight.' And again: 'But 
oh Thou Infinite Spirit of the dawn and the twilight.' We disclaim any 
thought of being hypercritical or irreverent, but, frankly, we are at a loss 
to know whom or what is addressed." * * * "In this connection we 
are reminded that Illinois refused to recognize our French brothers because 
of their alleged attitude toward Deity and their disinclination to fasten 
upon their membership a personal creed of a particular type — the scope of 
which many American Masons insist upon enlarging. But we very much 
doubt if there is a member of any lodge in France, whatever his intellectual 
or philosophical difficulties might be, who could not join the brethren of 
Illinois in the worship of the 'Infinite Spirit of the dawn and the twilight.' " 

The annual address of Grand Master Fitzgerrell is tersely analyzed. 
What is said concerning the George Washington Memorial Association re- 



Masonic Correspondence 125 

ceived the following comment: "The grand master favored the George 
Washington Memorial Association and expressed himself on ' The magnitude 
and importance of this great movement to establish a Masonic center at the 
capital.' Talk about a 'wedge of a general grand lodge.' Wow! Some 
timid, distrustful brothers have seen just this in the Memorial Association." 
He seems to think Illinois can live very comfortably and happily without 
the Masonic Service Association, 

Concerning the correspondence report, the following comment is made : 
' ' The correspondence report is again by P.G.M, Darrah. A chief cause 
for regret is that this part of the Illinois proceedings is shrinking in size 
year by year. As told in figures, the tale is as follows : Three reports 
prepared, the first one of 325 pages, the second 275 pages, and the third 
127 pages. Thrift and economy are good things, but speaking generally, 
let economy strike the waist-line first, not above the shoulders. We are 
glad to see that our brother recognizes the fact that Masonic effort should 
be co-ordinated, and that it is desirable for grand lodges to pull together 
so that the energy and power of the craft may be directed to the accomp- 
lishment of ends worthy of the fraternity. Utah for 1920 is given careful 
attention and all of general interest in our proceedings noted. We sincerely 
hope that this brother may be given the space in the proceedings of Illinois 
which his talents deserve so that Masonry in and out of his own jurisdiction 
may profit more largely by his clear insight, broad outlook and ability of 
expression. ' ' 

John Edward Carver, G.M., Ogden. 

Freeman A. McCarty, G.S., Salt Lake City. 



VIRGINIA, A. F. & A. M. 

1921 

The communication under review is the 143rd and was held in the 
Masonic Temple in the city of Eichmond on Tuesday, February 8, 1921. 
The opening ceremonies wore very brief and the grand master immediately 
read his annual address. It is a document of thirty-seven pages in which 
the various acts performed by him are set forth in a businesslike manner. 
Masonry in the grand jurisdiction is reported to be in a highly fiourishing 
condition and the grand master speaks of the wonderful work being done 
by the grand lecturer. Comment is made on the fact that candidates are 
not receiving proper instruction, due to the large amount of work which 
the lodges are doing. He believes in the social side of the f rateruitj- and 



126 Appendix — Part I 



thinks that the officers and menil)Cis of the lodge ought to meet more often 
in social relationship. 

Quite a number of visitations to lodges were reported by Brother Gait, 
he having made fourteen visits in sixteen days. 

The George Washington Masonic Memorial Association receives a most 
hearty boost and the Masons of Virginia urged to make their contribution 
100 percent. Quite a number of dispensations were issued, all of them 
appearing to be for legitimate reasons. The grand master, however, refused 
to issue a special dispensation permitting a lodge to confer all three degrees 
without examination. Seven dispensations for the formation of new lodges 
were issued and thirty so-called decisions rendered. 

One decision was to the effect that a petitioner does not have to declare 
his intent of residing in a place any length of time in order to establish 
a residence. If he has lived there for a year and claims no other place as 
residence that constitutes his Masonic abode. Another decision rendered was 
that the master of a lodge can dispense with the reading of the minutes 
should he deem such action wise. All the other decisions rendered by the 
grand master are merely local constructions of existing laws. 

Nineteen lodges received permission to lay corner-stones during the year. 
It is apparent that the grand lodge does not care to be burdened with cere- 
monies of this kind and is perfectly willing that its constituent lodges shall 
assume the responsibility and pay the expense. 

One lodge surrendered its charter during the year while another lost 
its charter by fire. The grand master recommends that November 4 be com- 
memorated as a Masonic anniversary, thereby honoring the Masonic birth- 
da j' of George Washington. 

Attention is called to the cost of the proceedings, for 1920, the grand 
lodge having paid $6.00 per page for its printed book. The grand master 
thinks that the custom of publishing the names of members of lodges which 
took 302 pages, is not only unnecessary but decidedly expensive. 

The sum of $240.00 was authorized to be paid to the Near East Eelief 
Fund to feed two Armenian orphans. 

The grand master does not hesitate to indicate wherein the by-laws of 
his grand lodge should be amended for he makes a large number of sug- 
gestions proposing changes. 

In his address the grand master makes a reference to Henry Clay, 
stating that when the anti-Masonic party invited that individual to become 
a candidate for president he originated the declaration, ' ' I had rather be 
right than president." The facts are that when Henry Clay was invited 



Masonic Correspondence 127 

to run for president on the anti-Masonic ticket he told the committee that 
waited upon him that in his younger days he had been made a Mason and 
had taken some interest in the fraternity, but that in his later years he had 
been entirely inactive and paid little or no attention to the society. The 
facts are that Henry Clay practically renounced the Masonic fraternity, 
an act which does not stand to his credit, at least so far as Freemasonry 
is concerned. 

The grand treasurer gives his total receipts at $132,149.00 and his dis- 
bursements as $97,500.00. The Masonic Temple in Eichmond is valued at 
$279,710.00 on which there is a mortgage of $60,000.00. 

The report of the grand secretary is extremely brief and is purely 
financial. The board of governors of the Masonic Home of Virginia called 
attention to the necessity of an addition on the present building for the 
accommodation of its constantly increasing number of children in the Home. 
It was estimated that the addition would cost $30,000.00, and the grand 
lodge ordered a tax of $1.0.0 per capita levied in order to meet the expense 
of this enterprise. 

The Committee on Grand Master's Address disapproved of a number of 
decisions that the grand master had presented. The claims of the com- 
mittee were that the decisions objected to were not in accordance with the 
latest Masonic Code. 

The following rather peculiar amendment to the law was adopted: 
"The grand master, unless he decline, shall always be in nomination 
for re-election, and the deputy grand master shall always be in nomination 
for election as grand master, and any member may make an additional 
nomination. ' ' 

The reports of the district deputy grand masters are more or less inter- 
esting, some of them arc brief in the extreme, while others go into detail, 
concerning the condition of affairs in their respective bailiwicks. 

During the grand lodge session the Committee on Work held frequent 
sessions at which the several degrees were exemplified for the benefit of 
those brethren who were seeking further light. 

The election and installation of officers together with the presentation 
of the jewel to the retiring grand master closed the session. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by Joseph Eggleston. 
He reviews Illinois for 1919, also for 1920. Brother Eggleston takes very 
liberal paragraphs from the addresses of Grand Master Daniel G. Fitzgerrell 
and quotes in full the report made to the grand lodge in 1920 on the Ma- 
sonic Service Association. Brother Eggleston uses the scissors quite liberally. 

John S. Bottimore, G.M., Tazewell. 

Chas. A. Nesbitt, G.S., Richmond. 



128 Appendix — Part I 



WASHINGTON, F. & A. M. 

1920 

The proecodiiigs under consideration cover the sixty-third annual com- 
munication which convened in the city of Taeoma on Tuesday, June 8, 1920. 

The first business of the session after opening was the reception of 
grand representatives and according to them the grand honors of Masonry. 
The ambassador from Illinois does not appear to have been present. All the 
lodges in the jurisdiction were represented with the exception of ten. A 
short address of welcome was delivered on behalf of the Masons of Taeoma 
and the same was acknowledged by the junior grand warden of the grand 
lodge. Then followed the annual address of the grand master, Thomas E. 
Skaggs. 

He refers to the past year as one of unprecedented prosperity. All the 
lodges of the state shared in the good things which come to the craft. 

Two lodges were constituted and five corner-stones laid. None of them 
were for Masonic edifices, one being the corner-stone of an insurance build- 
ing. Three Masonic Temples were dedicated during the year and six dis- 
pensations issued for the formation of new lodges. All dispensations 
granted for waiving existing regulations were reported in full. None of 
them appear to have been for unusual causes. The grand master did refuse 
to grant a dispensation to a lodge to hold a special election to fill a vacancy 
caused by the death of the senior warden. His reasons were that the lodge 
still had its master and junior warden and the special election appeared un- 
necessary. 

The by-laws of a large number of lodges were submitted to the grand 
master and approved by him and several lodges were granted permission to 
change their places of meeting. 

The gi'and master states he received numerous requests for rulings upon 
matters of law but that he refrained from making decisions vipon the ground 
tliat existing regulations were plain enough to cover all conditions. 

The Masonic Home is reported to be in a most satisfactory condition. 
The members received splendid care on the part of the superintendent and 
his wife. 

Grand Master Skaggs believes in Masonic education and states that 
he has a plan in this direction which he expects to present to the grand 
lodge sometime during the session. 



Masonic Correspondence 129 

The George Washington Memorial Association is strongly commended 
and the Grand Lodge of Washington urged to raise its per capita at an 
early date. 

Quite a long report is made on the Masonic Service Association. After 
going into much detail the grand master recommends to the grand lodge 
that it withdraw from further membership in this society. The principal 
reason assigned is that the association appears to have departed from its 
original scope and plan. 

In the State of Washington the grand lecturers are under charge of the 
grand master and work under his direction. The grand master states that 
these officials found plenty to do during the year. 

The grand treasurer in his report, states that he received from the 
grand secretary the sum of $45,000.00 and disbursed $47,000.00 He also 
makes reports of numerous si^eeial funds which are in his hands. 

The grand secretary makes an extended resume of the affairs of his 
office. He gives the total number raised to the sublime degree of Master 
Mason to be 3,194 and states that the present number of Master Masons 
on the roll is 28,617. 

The Finance Committee gives the total assets of the Grand Lodge of 
Washington at $211,725.00. A resolution was presented levying a tax of 
25 cents for a period of four years for the benefit of the George Washington 
Memorial Association. 

Quite a report was made by the Committee on Correspondence con- 
cerning cipher rituals which it is claimed are being indiscriminately used. 
This committee likewise goes on record as being opposed to large lodges 
and thinks that the interest of the fraternity are best subserved in the 
smaller organization. This committee also wrestled with the problem of 
outside organizations. They seem to think that something should be done to 
prevent newly raised Master Masons from being solicited to take the so- 
called higher degrees. 

A rather unusual event in the proceedings of the grand lodge was 
the receipt of greetings and salutations from the Grand Lodge of Odd 
Fellows. 

An interesting item appears in the proceedings to the effect that the 
grand secretary announced that at 7:30 o'clock in the evening the Secrets 
of the Chair (whatever they may be) would be imparted by courtesy of 
the Pierce County Past Masters Association to master and past master who 
had not received the same. 



130 Appendix—Part I 



The Masonic Ecseareh and Educational Committee submitted a report 
which shows that the Grand Lodge of Washington is carrying on this work 
according to plans and specifications of its own. 

The Jurisprudence Committee made a report limiting the time between 
the conferring of degrees upon candidates to two weeks unless by special 
dispensation of the grand master. 

The report of the Trustees of the Masonic Home shows that there were 
in that institution during the year a total of fifty members who were main- 
tained at a cost of $17,923.00. The farm earned $7,327.00 of which pro- 
duce to the value of $5,677.00 was used in the Home. 

The grand orator, Tom W. Holman, delivered an oration on the after- 
noon of the second day. It was general in character with many Masonic 
references. 

Several memorials were presented to deceased brethren of the jurisdic- 
tion, all of which are quit« lengthy but show that the Grand Lodge of 
Washington is disposed to pay tribute to its honor dead. 

The grand treasurer who had been elected for twenty-one successive 
years declined re-election and received a vote of thanks for the services 
he had rendered the grand lodge. 

The Board of Custodians of the Work recommended that the flag should 
have a place of honor in the East of every lodge and offered a short cere- 
mony relating to it. 

The Committee on Finance presented a very complete report making 
appropriations under the budget system for the various departments of 
the grand lodge. 

The grand secretary's salary is fixed at $3,000.00 per year with a 
liberal allowance for office assistants. 

A resolution was sent to the Jurisprudence Committee raising the num- 
ber of candidates to receive the degrees at one time from five to ten. The 
committee concurred in the resolution having stipulated that the grand 
master must issue his dispensation before a lodge would be permitted to 
increase the number. 

The installation ceremonies were the closing event of the session after 
which the grand master was presented with a solid gold watch, chain and 
charm. 

The report on foreign correspondence is prepared by Ealph C. Mc- 
Allister. It is brief and directly to the point. 



Masonic Correspondence 131 

He refers in very terse sentences to the principal acts of our session 
of 1919 and a paragraph is taken from the correspondence report under 
Victoria Australia concerning the grouping of candidates for the several 
degrees from which it is inferred that Brother McAllister is not iniiiiicable 
to the group system of conferring degrees. 

James H. Begg, G.M., Seattle. 

Horace W, Tyler, G.S., Taeoma. 



WESTERN AUSTRALIA, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

This particular grand lodge holds quarterly communications. Meeting 
as it does, four times per year, its transactions are more or less divided up, 
and follow very closely the traditions of our E'nglish cousins. It appears 
from the proceedings in the hands of the writer that the craft in this far 
away jurisdiction is in a most excellent condition and enjoying the same 
degree of prosperity which is apparent in all sections of the world. The 
usual number of visitations to lodges of the State is recorded in the pro- 
ceedings. These were made by the various grand lodge officers. The grand 
lodge exercises very strict supervision over the affairs of its constituent 
bodies, as is apparent from the numerous dispensations which were issued, 
some to change night of meeting to initiate candidates, or night of election, 
and to confer degrees with limitations, whatever they may be. 

Considerable capital is made out of the fact that the Prince of Wales 
has been initiated into the fraternity and the proceedings said that this 
announcement will be received with great satisfaction by all of the Free- 
masons of the Empire, and the more so because the whole procedure in 
connection therewith was carried out in strict conformity with the book of 
constitutions. Much stress is laid upon the work of repatriation and the 
craft is everywhere urged to do their full share towards sustaining those 
who are today suffering from wounds and sickness as a result of the war. 

One mighty valuable subject was considered by the grand lodge during 
the year and that was providing Masonic scholarships in various schools and 
universities for the children of those Masons who paid tlie supreme sacrifice 
during the war. 

The grand secretary received a very substantial increase in salary. 
From the various tables which appear it is apparent that the Grand Lodge 
of Western Australia administered to charities in a true Masonic manner, 



132 Appendix — Part I 



for the sums which are collected are generous and the expenditures by no 
moans meager. It appears that during the year alterations were made 
to the offices of tlie grand lodge and the same are now reported to be in 
excellent condition. 

One rather interesting item is gleaned from the proceedings and relates 
to social evenings. It appears that since the close of the "war, a number of 
lodges have again resumed the practice of holding social meetings but on 
some occasions ladies have appeared before the candidates had retired or 
the lodge been closed. This led the Board of General Purposes to pass a 
ruling that when a lodge proposes to indulge in a social evening, there 
shall be no work. 

It appears that the craft in Western Australia must be prospering, for 
the record discloses dispensations issued for the formation of new lodges. 
One rather peculiar incident is reported. The worshipful master refused 
to initiate a candidate and the members present declined to agree with his 
decision and passed a motion that his wishes be disregarded and the candi- 
date initiated. The Board of General Purposes, which happened to be in 
session at the time, was appealed to. The board adjourned and visited 
the lodge and after ascertaining the circumstances ordered the work stopped. 
The obstreperous brethren then questioned the right of the Board of Gen- 
eral Purposes to interfere in the affairs of the lodge and declared that only 
the grand master himself could stop the proceedings. The grand master 
was appealed to and issued an order that the work be stopped at once and 
the whole matter resulted in the suspension from the fraternity of eight 
brothers who were supposed to have defied supreme authority. The matter 
finally reached the grand lodge on appeal and caused a regular tempest, 
with the result that the action of the Board of General Purposes was fully 
sustained. 

Fifty-four lodges in Western Australia applied to the grand lodge for 
exemption from the payment of grand lodge dues, assigning as a reason that 
their members were in active service. 

The grand lecturer in his report, which is quite extensive, calls attention 
to remissness on the part of certain lodges in not reciting the traditional 
historj' of the third degree on the same night that the candidate receives 
his third degree. He says to relate it two or three months afterwards, 
would be entirely ineffective. 

It is apparent that in Western Australia, the legend of the third degree 
has not yet been dramatized and is still given in the old form in which it 
was first used, just about one hundred fifty years ago. A lot of brethren, 
who seem to think that the drama with its character actors as portrayed 



Masonic Correspondence 133 

today, has been haiitlcd down from the days of King Solomon, will do well 
to take note of this fact. 

The report on foreign correspondence covers Illinois for 1918 as well 
as for 1919. The reviewer quotes very liberally from the address of Grand 
Master Austin H. Serogin in 1918 and fully endorses all that he said on the 
subject of physical qualifications. Liberal quotations are taken from the 
correspondence report of this writer, while the reviewer for Western Aus- 
tralia does not always agree with what was said, yet he has been very 
kind in a good many instances and there can be no complaint. In the review 
for 1919 the reviewer quotes all that Grand Master Fitzgerrell said con- 
cerning the death of Austin H. Serogin and" also takes his opening lines on 
the close of the great war. Two pages are given over to quotations from 
the correspondence report of 1919, in which liberal quotations are taken 
and some criticism accorded. 

In reply to the following paragraph which appeared last year, the fol- 
lowing comment is made : 

"It appears that among our brethren of Western Australia the idea 
of a title holds fast in the mind, for the grand master conferred a large 
number of honorary titles upon brothers who had faithfully served the 
craft. ' ' 

"For the information of our brother reviewer we might say that we have 
many brethren who have faithfully served the craft in outlying portions of 
the State, at a distance of anything from 500 to lyOOO miles from the usual 
meeting place of the grand lodge. As it would necessitate a journey of 
anything from three to ten days for these brethren to attend grand lodge 
and the various duties thereof, and an equal time to return, it is impossible 
for them to fill an active office in grand lodge. As a reward therefore for 
their services to the craft, the grand master exercising the authority given 
under our constitution conferred upon them honorary grand lodge rank." 

J. D. Stevenson, G.S., Western Australia. 



WEST VIRGINIA, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The annual communication was held in the city of Huntington, on the 
tenth day of November, 1920. The grand lodge was opened briefly after 
which the representatives of other grand lodges were received and accorded 
the grand honors. Illinois was represented by Fred C. Stcinbicker. Wm. K. 
Cowden, grand master, presented a report to the grand lodge which covered 



134 Appendix — Part I 



ten printed pages. He declared the state of the order to be most gratify- 
ing and says that West Virginia has 155 chartered lodges with a total 
membership of 22,880. The net gain for the year was 2,573. Tributes 
of respect are paid to the dead of his own and other grand jurisdictions. 

Seventy-one requests were sent by grand masters of other jurisdictions 
to confer degrees by courtesy, while the Grand Lodge of West Virginia sent 
eighty-three requests for courtesy work to other grand jurisdictions. 

Grand master reports issuing twenty-one special dispensations, all of 
them he says were for legitimate purposes. 

Two new lodges were formed during the year and proper dispensations 
issued. Four decisions are rendered by the grand master, one was that 
a petitioner having moved out of the jurisdiction of the lodge after pre- 
senting his petition, lost his right to election and the lodge should return 
him his petition and money. Another decision was that a member of a 
lodge could have his name changed upon the records of the grand lodge by 
presentation of a court record showing that he had been given authority 
to change his name. 

Mention is made in the grand master 's report of the funeral of Law- 
rence Washington, the last of the Washingtons to be born in Mount Vernon. 
The George Washington Memorial Association is heartily commended and 
the Grand Lodge of West Virginia urged to do its full share in assisting 
in this laudable enterprise. 

Grand Master Cowden is very frank in declaring that he does not favor 
the Masonic Service Association and states that no matter what its ex- 
pressed purposes may be that it will in time be used as the entering wedge 
for the formation of a general grand lodge. 

The grand treasurer gives his receipts at $35,165.00 and his expendi- 
tures $37,558.00. 

The report of the grand secretary is a very complete document and 
sets forth various matters pertaining to his olSce. 

The grand lecturer presents a report in which he refers to the text book 
having enjoyed an unprecedented sale. Just what is meant by the textbook 
is not clear. It may mean a cipher ritual and it may mean a monitor. 

The reports of the district deputy grand masters go much into detail 
concerning the various acts performed by them during the year. 

It cost the grand lodge $33,000.00 to maintain the Masonic Home dur- 
ing the year, while the sum of $963.50 was appropriated from the charity 
fund to relieve worthy Master Masons and their families. Two hundred 



Masonic Correspondence 135 

dollars was used by the grand lodge to help educate the children of a de- 
ceased member of one of the lodges. 

The Grand Lodge of West Virginia is to be commended for the splendid 
work which it is doing along this particular line. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence made a very brief report approving 
all the decisions of the grand master. 

Just before the close of the grand lodge a resolution was introduced 
fixing the minimum fees of degrees at $40.00. This will come up for action 
next year. The election and installation of officers closed the session. 

In reviewing the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of West Virginia the 
writer is impressed Avith the idea that the grand lodge is disposed to let 
well enough alone. Most of the reports which were made were purely per- 
functory and relate in the main to routine matters. It is apparent that 
the Grand Lodge of West Virginia is becoming stabilized. 

George W. Atkinson reviews the Grand Lodge of Illinois for 1919. Ho 
quotes in full what Daniel G. Fitzgerrell says concerning Sea and Field 
Lodge of New York City, and in brief terse paragraphs reviews the principal 
transactions of our session of 1919. Almost one page of his report is 
given up to a quotation from the oration of Edward J. Brundage. He is 
very generous to the Illinois correspondent, quoting liberally from his report 
and refers to him as a liberalist on the subject of physical qualifications. 
Brother Atkinson is quite right, this writer is by no means one of the 
" dyed in the wool" adherents to the illegitimate idea of physical perfection. 

Adrian C. Nadenbousch, G.M., Martinsburg. 

John M. Collins, G.S., Charleston. 



WYOMING, A. F. & A. M. 

1920 

The forty-sixth annual communication opened in the city of Buffalo on 
Wednesday morning, the eighth day of September. 

The Committee on Credentials reported the presence of all grand officers 
as well as representatives of lodges. 

Among the telegrams received was one from Brother F. C. Barnett, 
past grand master, dated at Peoria, 111. 



13G Appendix — Part I 



The grand master, Arthur K. Lee, presented a report to his grand 
lodge covering twenty pages of printed matter. He opens his remarks by 
referring to the close of the war and the spirit of unrest which prevails in 
this country. He refers to Masonry as a great stabilizing influence pro- 
vided it is rightfully understood and used. The grand master calls attention 
to the fact that the Grand Lodge of Wyoming joined the Masonic Service 
Association and he goes to some length in explaining the object and purposes 
of this society. 

During the year, the grand lecturer resigned and the work had to be 
carried forward by the deputy grand lecturer. Several dispensations were 
issued, all of them appearing to be for legitimate Masonic purposes. 

Quite a long list of visitations were reported by the grand master show- 
ing he made every effort to get out among the lodges in his jurisdiction and 
affiliate with his brethren. 

Twenty-two so-called decisions were rendered, all of which were ap- 
proved by the Committee on Jurisprudence. However, none of the so-called 
decisions can be considered as out of the ordinary or introducing any new 
construction of Masonic law. One ruling was that a lodge could not confer 
the degrees on a minister for less than the lawful sum prescribed by the 
by-laws. 1 

Grand Master Lee likes the Iowa method of selecting the grand master 
and recommends to the grand lodge that, in the future, the grand master 
be selected from the eligibles and that less attention be paid to rotation 
in office. This simply means that the brother who is most diligent in his 
services to the craft will be the most likely to receive the honors and awards 
of the grand lodge. Among other recommendations made, is the one that 
the grand master be provided with a stenographer. 

The grand secretary gives quite an extended report wherein he goes 
into detail concerning many matters relating to the affairs of his office. He 
gives the total number raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason as 
722 and the present membership of the lodges of Wyoming to be 5,167. 
The total receipts given by the grand treasurer are $7,500.00 and his expen- 
ditures $5,265.00. The Masonic Home fund appears to be growing, judging 
from the report of the trustees for they show the sum of $19,100.00 now 
in their hands. The Committee on Finance fixed the mileage and per diem 
of representatives. Two representatives traveled 1,047 miles and drew as 
compensation $109.93. 

The report of the assistant grand lecturer is complete and disclosed 
the activities of his office during the year. He proved himself to be diligent 
in visiting lodges and giving them proper instruction. 



Masonic Correspondence 137 

It is apparent that the Grand Lodge of Wyoming is getting out a new 
monitor, for a special committee make a report on that subject. 

The Jurisprudence Committee approve practically all the acts of the 
grand master and delve into the subject of titles and announce the proper 
title of the presiding officer of the lodge as Worshipful Master and grant 
him the right to sign notices, etc., in that capacity. 

A supplementary report by the Jurisprudence Committee recommends 
that the grand lodge exact a per capita tax of $1,00 from each lodge and 
a librarian be appointed to look after the grand lodge library and keep it 
in proper condition. 

The election and installation of officers together with presentation of 
the jewel closed the session. 

The report on correspondence is prepared by Joseph M. Lowndes, 
grand secretary. He treats Illinois very courteously, giving it three pages 
of very generous treatment. He quotes liberally from the address of the 
grand master, Daniel G. Fitzgerrell, and takes quite a long extraction from 
the oration of Edward J. Brundage. A liberal quotation is taken from 
Vvhat this writer said upon the subject of co-ordination. 

William O. Wilson, G.M., Casper, 

Joseph M. Lowndes, G.S., Casper. 



APPENDIX 
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14 



Appendix — Part II 




Lodge Directory 



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16 



Appendix — Part II 



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18 



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30 



Appendix — Part II 



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32 



Appendix — Part II 



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34 



Appendix — Part II 



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35 



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36 



Appendix — Part II 



a0-jCa6200X003D3x.0OXiX0DQ0Ol30 COXX-Xi — COCO-^CO'KQOXOOODOOOOGOCOGOaDXOCaJGO 



ccxi-ir2t*3D:ox';iiccct>^rCiftif:'W^'^^ -^iTpc 00:0 '^oo o ^ to cc «d c-f — w co i-^o co od cc"iC -* t- t> 
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Alphabetical List of Postoffices 



37 



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38 



Apj^endix — Pm't II 



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Alphabetical List of Postoffices 



39 







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40 



Appendix — Part II 



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Alphabetical List of Postofflces 



41 



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42 



Appendix — Part II 



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