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Full text of "Proceedings of the sixty-seventh annual conclave of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar of the State of Indiana, May 11 and 12, 1921, A.O. 803 .."

ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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Fr-eefriasons» Knights Templars 
of the state of Indiana. 

Proceedings of the sixty- 
seventh annual conclave of 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



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^^^^^^^-^ 1919-1922 

Joseph Kyle Orr 

M.-.E.-.Grand Master Atlanta, Ga. 

Jehiel W. Chamberlin 

R-.E.-. Deputy Grand Master St. Paul, Minn. 

Leonidas P. Newby 

K.'.E.'.Grand Generalissimo Knightstown, Ind. 

William H. Norris 

R.'.E.'. Grand Captain General Manchester, Iowa 

George W. Vallery 

R.'.E.-. Grand Senior Warden Denver, Colo. 

William L. Sharp 

R.".E.". Grand Junior Warden Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Troy Beatty 

K.'.E.'.Grand Prelate Memphis, Tenn. 

H. Wales Lines 

R.-.E.-. Grand Treasurer Meriden, Conn. 

Frank H. Johnson 

R.'.E.". Grand Recorder Louisville, Ky. 

(Room 201 Masonic Temple) 

Perry W. Weidner 

R.-.E.-. Cirand Standard Bearer Los Angeles, Cal. 

Robert S. Teague 

R.-.E.-. Grand Sword Bearer Montgomery, Ala. 

Charles C. Homer, Jr. 

R.-.E.-.Grand Warder Baltimore, Md. 

George T. Campbell 

R.-.E.-.Grand Captain of the Guard Owosso, Mich. 





GRAND COMMANDER PRESIDING 



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GRAND COMMANDER, 1921-1922 






GRAND RECORDER 



PROCEEDINGS 

■ — i — h 

^F THE 

SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CONCLAVE 



OF THE 



GRAND COMMANDERY 




KNJGHIS TEMPLAR_ 

OF THE X* r 

STATE OF INDIANA o^^^- ^ 



May 11 and 12, A. D. 1921. A. O. 803 



EUGENE VATET, Grand Commander, Muncie 
WM. H. SWINTZ, Grand Recorder. 
Masonic Temple, Indianapolis 



1718941 



PREFACE 

According- to custom, Sir Knight Harry C. Moore, 
R, E. Grand Commander, appointed a General Com- 
mittee to make arrangements for the entertainment of 
all members and visitors attending this annual con- 
clave, and members of their families accompanying 
them. This committee consisted of Sir Knights Brandt 
C. Downey, Chairman ; Adrian Hamersly, P. G. C, 
Vice-Chairman ; William H. Swintz, P. C, Secretary; 
Harry G. Strickland, P. G. C, and William D. Ker- 
lin, C. 

Other committees were as follows : 

Escort — Sir Knight George W. Thompson, Chairman; Sir 
Knight Walter S. Handy, Sir Knight Arno G. Siefker, 
Sir Knight Fred C. Phinney. 

Distinguished Visitors — R. E. Sir Leonidas P. Newby, Chair- 
man; R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, R. E. Sir Joseph G. 
Ibach. 

Ladies' Committee — Mrs. Charles F. Neu, Chairm;in; Mrs. 
Dirrelle Chaney, Mrs. Harry G. Strickland, Mrs. William H. 
Swintz, Mrs. Adrian Hamersly, Mrs. E. J. Scoonover. 

Reception — E. Sir Louis G. Buddenbaum, Chairman; Past Com- 
manders and Officers of Raper Commandery No. 1, K. T. 

Entertainment — Sir Knight Paul B. Elliott,, Chairman; Sir 
Knight J. Harry Green, Sir Knight Granville A. Richey, 
Sir Knight Harry Marquette. 

Music — Sir Knight Harry Weiland. 

Hotels — E. Sir Fred W. Gunkle, Chairman; Sir Knight Oscar 
L. Pond, Sir Knight Charles F. Neu. 

Automobiles — Si:- Knight Andrew W. Hutchison. 

Decorations — Sir Knight Elmer F. Gay, Chairman; Sir Knight 
William E. Bnlch, Sir Knight Charles P. Balz, Sir Knight 
Robert L. Elder, Sir Knight John W. Erther. 

Publicity — Sir Knight Paul J. Mass, Chairman; Sir Knight 
Oscar G. Thomas. Sir Knight Frank Bowers. 



4 Proceedings Ginnd Commandery [May 11, 

Prizes — Sir Knight James W. Hopkins, Chairman; Sir Knight 
Frank Bowers, Sir Knight 0. R. Sumner. 

Grand Stand— Sir Knight Oscar G. Thomas, Chairman; Sir 
Knight John H. Collins, Sir Knight Maurice M. Kiefer, 
Sir Knight William Engle, Sir Knight Joseph Bernauer, 
Sir Knight John B. Givan, Sir Knight George J. Lehnert, 
Sir Knight Fred A. Lorenz, Sir Knight Frank Bowers. 

Transportation— Sir Knight Elbert Arnett, Chairman; Sir 
Knight J. W. Gardner, E. Sir A. J. Smith, Sir Knight C. E. 
Alwes, Sir Knight H. L. Stonecifer. 

Baggage — Sir Knight Albert MacLeod, Chairman; Sir Knight 
John W. Erther, Sir Knight Leigh Oglesby, Sir Knight Fred 
A. Lorenz, Sir Knight Charles Jones, Sir Knight Frank 
Holden, Sir Knight J. Burdette Little, Sir Knight H. H. 
Monger, Sir Knight Boyd Templeton. 

The committees began early and labored faithfully 
and deserve great credit for the very successful results 
obtained in carrying out the following program, which 
had been previously announced : 

PROGRAM. 

Wednesday, May 11, 1921. 
Forenoon — 

Receiving \and escorting Commanderies. Details from 
Raper Commandery No. 1 will meet the Constituent Com- 
manderies on their arrival, and escort them to the Masonic 
Temple. 

Representatives to the Sixty-Seventh Annual Conclave will 
report to E. Sir William H Swintz, Grand Recorder, Re- 
corder's Office, Masonic Temple, and file credentials. 
Captains General of Commanderies will report to E. Sir 
Elwood Barnard, Grand Marshal, Masonic Temple. 
9:30 a. m.— 

Escorting Officers of Grand Commandery from Claypool 
Hotel to Masonic Temple by Raper Commandery No. 1, 
Knights Templar. 

10:00 a. m.— 

Opening session of Grand Commandery, Masonic Temple. 
The military evolutions incident to the opening ceremony of 
a Constituent Commandery will be performed by Marion 
Commandery No. 21. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 



11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p.m.— 

Adoniram Grand Lodg-e of Perfection A. A. S. R. will serve 
luncheon at the Scottish Rite Temple, 29 S. Pennsylvania 
Street, to all Sir Knights in uniform and their ladies with 
tickets. These guests will assemble in the Social Room, 
fourth floor, prior to luncheon. 
2:00 p. m.— 

General Orders. Arrangements for the parade will be 
addressed to Captains-General later by E. Sir Elwood 
Barnard, Grand Marshal, who will direct the visiting Com- 
manderies to the respective stations assigned to them. 
2:30 p. m. — 

Grand Parade of all Commanderies. 

4:30 to 6:00 p. m.— 

Buffet Luncheon will be served by the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine at Murat Temple. Only Knights in full Templar 
Uniform and their Ladies with tickets will be admitted. 

6:00 p. m.— 

Exemplification of Order of Knight of Malta by Raper 
Com.mandery No. 1 at Masonic Temple. All representatives 
are expected and other Sir Knights are invited to witness 
this work. 

Entertainment in the Auditorium on first floor of Masonic 
Temple for the ladies of Sir Knights. Admission by ticket. 

8:00 p. m.— 

Reception by the Officers of the Grand Commandery in 
Grand Recorder's Office at Masonic Temple, followed by 
dance. Knights in Templar Uniform, without sword. 

Thursday, May 12, 1921. 
9:00 a. m.— 

The Grand Commandery of the State of Lidiana will again 
convene. 
10:00 a. m.— 

Awarding the prizes for attendance. 

All Sir Knights in uniform and their ladies were 
complimented by being invited to a luncheon at noon 
given by the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite and to a 
luncheon in the late afternoon given by the Nobles of 
Murat Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Both were well 
attended. 



6 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 

The Grand Parade was a most imposing feature. 
Threatened rain kept some nearby members from at- 
tending, yet the attendance was unusually large and 
the parade w^as not disorganized in the least by the few 
light sprinkles that caused the intermittent sunshine 
to be the more appreciated. 

Promptly at 2 :30 o'clock the Grand Parade started 
over a comparatively short route in charge of Sir 
Knights Elwood Barnard, P. C., Grand Marshal; 
George W. Freyermuth, P. C., Chief of Staff; David C. 
Behrman, P. C., Assistant Chief of Staff, and Past 
Commanders Burwell W. Sale, James A. Riddell, 
Thomas J. Creel, Lawrence K. Tuley, Robert W. Phil- 
lips, William J. McKahin, Arlie Crim. Thomas Beecher, 
Edward Cooper and Sir Knight Robert G. Barnard 
(Bugler), members of staff. 

There were 2,000 plumes and eight bands in line. 
The parade was reviewed by the Grand Commander 
and other Grand Officers and distinguished visitors at 
the corner of Meridian and Vermont Streets. 

After the procession had passed over several of the 
principal "down town" streets, the Commanderies 
went into mass formation and proceeded toward the 
Monument from the north on Meridian Street, passed 
entirely around the Circle and disbanded after every- 
one joined in singing two stanzas of America, accomp- 
anied by the massed bands. It was indeed a most in- 
spiring spectacle and was cheered repeatedly by the 
vast concourse of spectators who thronged the side- 
walks along the line of march. Moving pictures were 
taken that are being shown in all cities in Indiana 
where a Commandery of Knights Templar is located. 

The Grand Officers' reception in the Masonic Tem- 
ple was held in the Grand Recorder's offices, which 
were beautifully decorated and the reception was fol- 
lowed by a ball in the social rooms. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 7 

We were honored with the presence of two of the 
four living Past Grand Masters of the Grand Encamp- 
ment in the persons of Sir Knights George M. Moulton 
and William B. Melish. Other distinguished guests 
were William H. Norris, Grand Captain-General of the 
Grand Encampment, and the personal representative 
of Joseph Kyle Orr, M. E. Grand Master; William L. 
Sharp, Grand Junior Warden of the Grand Encamp- 
ment; George T. Campbell, Grand Captain of the 
Guard of the Grand Encampment; Samuel P. Cochran, 
P. G. C. of Texas; Nelson Williams, P. G. C. of Ohio; 
Major Roland Hollock, Grand Commander of Illinois; 
Andrew D. Agnew, Grand Commander of Wisconsin ; 
Gary B. Fish, Grand Commander of Florida ; Miles H. 
Davis, Grand Generalissimo of Kentucky; George W. 
Bunton, Grand Prelate of Ohio, and Frank L. Mc- 
Namara, Commander Ivanhoe Commandery No. 24, of 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Assisting in the dual capacity 
of host and guest were our own honored fraters Leon- 
idas P. Newby, Grand Generalissimo of the Grand 
Encampment, and Winfield T. Durbin, Chairman of the 
Finance Committee of the Grand Encampment. 




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OPENING 



PROCEEDINGS 

The Sixty-seventh Annual Conclave of the Grand 
Commandery of Knights Templar of the State of 
Indiana was held in the Asylum of Raper Commandery 
No. 1, Masonic Temple, Indianapolis, beginning at 
lU o'clock A. M. on Wednesday, the 11th day of May, 
A. D. 1921, A. 0. 803, being the second Wednesday 
in May. 

GRAND OFFICERS PRESENT. 

R. E. Sir Harry C. Moore. Grand Commander. 
V. E. Sir Eugene Vatet, Deputy Grand Com- 
mander. 

E. Sir George A. Newhouse. Grand Generalissimo. 
E. Sir Gaylard M. Leslie, Grand Captain General. 
E. Sir Albert D. Ogborn, Grand Senior Warden. 
E. Sir Dirrelle Chaney, Grand Junior Warden. 
E. Sir John C. Parrett, Grand Prelate. 
E. Sir Vestal W. Woodward, Grand Treasurer. 
E. Sir William H. Swintz, Grand Recorder. 
E. Sir Edward J. Scoonover, Grand Standard 
Bearer. 

E. Sir George F. Hitchcock, Grand Sword Bearer. 
E. Sir William M. Sparks. Grand Warder. 
E. Sir Olin E, Holloway, Inspector General. 
Sir Jacob Rubin, Grand Captain of the Guard. 

PAST GRAND OFFICERS PRESENT. 

R. E. Sir Walter M. Hindman, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 



12 Proceedmgs Grand Commayidery [May 11, 

R. E, Sir Leonidas P. Newby, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir Oliver Gard, Past Grand Commander. 

R. E. Sir Vestal W. Woodward, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir Charles Day, Past Grand Commander. 

R. E. Sir Luther Short, Past Grand Commander. 

R. E. Sir William B. Hosford, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir John L. Rupe, Past Grand Commander. 

R. E. Sir Joseph G. Ibach, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir Harry G. Strickland, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir Adrian Hamersly, Past Grand Com- 
mander. J 

R. E. Sir James L. Randel, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir George S. Parker, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

R. E. Sir Henri T. Conde, Past Grand Com- 
mander. 

REPRESENTATIVES PRESENT. 

Representatives were present from the fifty-eig-ht 
chartered Commanderies subordinate to the Grand 
Commandery of Indiana, as shown by the report of 
the Credentials Committee. 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES PRESENT. 

E. Sir George A. Newhouse, of Alabama. 
R. E. Sir Harry G. Strickland, of Arkansas. 
R. E. Sir Harry C. Moore, of Connecticut. 
R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, of District of 
Columbia. 



1921] of the State of Indiaym. 13 

R. E. Sir Oliver Gard, of Florida. 
E. Sir John A. Rhue, of Georgia. 
V. E. Sir Eugene Vatet, of Idaho. 
E. Sir Herbert A. Graham, of Illinois. 
E. Sir Olin E. Holloway, of Kansas. 
R. E. Sir Vestal W. Woodward, of Louisiana. 
E. Sir William L. Kiger, of Maine. 
R. E. Sir John L. Rupe, of Maryland. 
R. E. Sir Leonidas P. Newby, of Massachusetts 
and Rhode Island. 

E. Sir J. Wallace Perkins, of Minnesota. 
E. Sir J. Austin Jones, of Mississippi. 
R. E. Sir William B. Hosford, of Missouri. 
E. Sir Lee A. Carr, of Nebraska. 
R. E. Sir Walter M. Hindman, of New Hamp- 
shire. 
R. E. Sir Joseph G. Ibach, of New York. 
E. Sir Robert A. Woods, of North Dakota. 
R. E. Sir Charles Day, of Oklahoma. 
R. E. Sir Henri T. Conde. of Pennsylvania. 
R. E. Sir James L. Randel, of South Carolina. 
R. E. Sir Adrian Hamersly, of South Dakota. 
E. Sir Earl H. Payne, of Tennessee. * 

R. E. Sir George S. Parker, of Texas. 
R. E. Sir Luther Short, of Vermont. 
E. Sir William H. Tupper, of Washington. 

PAST C03I3I ADDERS WHO KECilSTEKED. 

E. Sir Vestal W. Woodward. Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Charles L. Hutchinson, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Henri T. Conde, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Elias J. Jacoby, Raper No. 1. 



14 Proceedmgs Grcvnd Commanderij [May 11, 

E. Sir George M. Spiegel, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Leon T. Leach, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Edward J. Scoonover, Raper No. 1. 
. E. Sir Alexander Rumpler, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Louis G. Buddenbaum, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Harry L. Morrison, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Charles S. Barker, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Franklin L. Bridges, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Fred W. Gunkle, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir J. Ambrose Dunkel, Raper No. 1. 
E. Sir Everett E. Stroup, Baldwin No. 2. 
E. Sir Frank Bass, Baldwin No. 2. 
E. Sir Will A. Yarling, Baldwin No. 2. 
E. Sir Caughey S. Fleming, Baldwin No. 2. 
E. Sir Eleazer K. Amsden, Baldwin No. 2. 
E. Sir Clarence F. Hitch, LaFayette No. 3. 
E. Sir John M. McWilliams, LaFayette No. 3. 
E. Sir Erwin F. Gery, LaFayette No. 3. 
E. Sir Gaylard M. Leslie, Fort Wayne No. 4. 
E. Sir Jacob M. Stouder, Fort Wayne No. 4. 
E. Sir Fred H. Pocock, Fort Wayne No. 4. 
E. Sir Manford M. Smick, Fort Wayne No. 4. 
E. Sir Brown Cooper, Fort Wayne No. 4. 
E., Sir Sylvester B. Kerlin, Fort Wayne No. 4. 
E. Sir Charles Day, New Albany No. 5. 
E. Sir George A. Newhouse, New Albany No. 5. 
E. Sir Arthur E. Brown, New Albany No. 5. 
E. Sir Lawrence K. Tuley, New Albany No. 5. 
E. Sir Fred C. Neal, Connersville No. 6. 
E. Sir John L. Rupe, Richmond No. 8. 
E. Sir Leroy E. Browne, Richmond No. 8. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 15 

E. Sir George R. Gause, Richmond No. 8. 
E. Sir Robert W. Phillips, Richmond No. 8. 
E. Sir Leonidas P. Newby, Knightstown No. 9. 
E. Sir Olin E. Holloway, Knightstown No. 9. 
E. Sir Flo^d J. Newby, Knightstown No. 9. 
E. Sir Richard H. Schweitzer, Knightstown No. 9. 
E. Sir Thomas Beecher, Knightstown No. 9. 
E. Sir Edmond C. Cammack, Warsaw No. 10. 
E. Sir Chester E. Bolinger, Warsaw No. 10. 
E. Sir James L. Randel, Greencastle No. 11. 
E. Sir Richard S. Cowgill, Greencastle No. 11. 
E. Sir Edward E. Caldwell, Greencastle No. 11. 
E. Sir Will G. Crabill, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir Edward V. Gingrich, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir William H. Swintz, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir George W. Freyermuth, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir John H. Ellis, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir J. WiLLARD Shidler, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir Paul N. Prass, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir Charles A. Lippincott, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir Clarence H. Snoke, South Bend No. 13. 
E. Sir Edward E. Fricke, South Bend No. 13. 
* E. Sir Charles Hege, Columbus No.' 14. 
E. Sir George H. Denison, Columbus No. 14. 
E. Sir George W. Robertson, Columbus No. 14. 
E. Sir Walter E. Conn, Columbus No. 14. 
E. Sir David C. Behrman, Columbus No. 14. 
E. Sir MoR'tON J. Compton, LaValette No. 15. 
E. Sir William W. Ross, LaValette No. 15. 
E. Sir Frank C. Baugh, LaValette No. 15. 
E. Sir Albert W. Funkhouser, LaValette No. 15. 
E. Sir John C. Warren, Terre Haute No. 16. 



16 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 

E. Sir Will W. Adamson, Terre Haute No. 16. 

E. Sir Burwell Sale, Terre Haute No. 16. 

E. Sir James A. Riddell, Aurora No. 17. 

E. Sir J. Wallace Perkins, Muncie No. 18. 

E. Sir George W. Wagner, Muncie No. 18. 

E. Sir Eugene Vatet, Muncie No. 18. 

E. Sir Everett Moffitt, Muncie No. 18. 

E. Sir J. Austin Jones, Apollo No. 19. 

E. Sir Walter M. Hindman, Vincennes No. 20. 

E. Sir Justus H. Henkes, Vincennes No. 20. 

E. Sir George W. Gunder, Marion No. 21. 

E. Sir John A. Rhue, Marion No. 21. 

E. Sir Harry C. Moore, Marion No. 21. 

E. Sir Wilson D. Lett, Marion No. 21. 

E. Sir Robert F. Stanton, Madison No. 22. 

E. Sir Luther Short, Franklin No. 23. 

E. Sir James M. Robinson, Franklin No. 23. 

E. Sir William W. Suckow, Jr., Franklin No. 23. 

E. Sir Arthur F. Ballard, Franklin No. 23. 

E. Sir Thomas Myer, St. John No. 24. 

E. Sir Paul C. Barnett, St. John No. 24. 

E. Sir M. Charles Miller, St. John No. 24. 

E. Sir Ralph W. Searight, St. John No. 24. 

E. Sir Herman A. Wallace, St. John No. 24. 

E. Sir Charles E. Klinck, St. John No. 24'. < 

E. Sir Edgar S. Hunt, St. John No. 24. 

E. Sir Chris Livingston, St. John No. 24.. 

E. Sir Fletcher W. Boyd, Crawforctsville No. 25. 

E. Sir Frederick A. Turner, Crawfordsville No. 25. 

E. Sir George H. Thayer, Jr., Plymouth No. 26. 

E. Sir Herschel M. Tebay, Plymouth No. 26. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 17 



E. Sir John G. Southworth, Plymouth No. 26. 
E. Sir George F. Hitchcock, Plymouth No. 26. 
E. Sir Fielding L. Wilson, Jeffersonville No. 27. 
E. Sir Thomas B. Bohon, Jeffersonville No. 27. 
E. Sir Mark L. Dickover, Valparaiso No. 28. 
E. Sir Oliver Gard, Frankfort No. 29. 
E. Sir John C. Shanklin, Frankfort No. 29. 
E. Sir Alfred N. Berry, Frankfort No. 29. 
E. Sir Charles G. Aughe, Frankfort No. 29. 
E. Sir Herbert A. Graham, Elkhart No. 31. 
E. Sir William J. McKahin, Elkhart No. 31. 
E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Anderson No. 32. 
E. Sir William A. Kittinger, Anderson No. 32. 
E. Sir George S. Parker, Anderson No. 32. 
E. Sir Blanchard J. Horne, Anderson No. 32. 
E. Sir EIinest R. Watkins, Anderson No. 32. ' 
E. Sir William E. Thompson, Anderson No. 32. 
E. Sir Thomas S. Williamson, Anderson No. 32. 
E. Sir John J. Glendening, Washington No. 33. 
E. Sir Adrian Hamersly, Washington No. 33. 
E. Sir Thomas F. Spink, Washington No. 33. 
E. Sir Clyde B. Kellar, Washington No. 33. 
E. Sir Robert N. Kuhn, Washington No. 33. 
E. Sir Roy D. Smiley, Washington No. 33. 
E. Sir William E. Williams, Kokomo No. 36. 
E. Sir Allison C. Donnelly, Kokomo No. 36. 
E. Sir Orin Simpson, Kokomo No. 36. 
E. Sir Charles Jinkerson, Kokomo No. 36. 
E. SIR George L. Davis, Kokomo No. 36. 
E. Sir Samuel R. Chancellor, Kokomo No. 36. 
E. Sir Charles E. Sackett, Wabash No. 37. 
E. Sir Edwin A. Edwards, Wabash No. 37. 



18 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 

E. Sir L. G. A. Powell, Wabash No. 37. 

E. Sir Charles M. Worden, Wabash No. 37. 

E. Sir Lee A. Carr, Wabash No. 37. 

E. Sir Joseph A. Lay, Wabash No. 37. 

E. Sir William L. Kiger, Bluffton No. 38. 

E. Sir William W. Weisell, Bluffton No. 38. 

E. Sir George L. Arnold, Bluffton No. 38. 

E. Sir Harry G. Strickland, Greenfield No. 39. 

E. Sir Elwood Barnard, Greenfield No. 39. 

E. Sir Harry D. Barrett, Greenfield No. 39. 

E. Sir John H. Mugg, Greenfield No. 39. 

E. Sir Edward A. Cooper, Greenfield No. 39. 

E. Sir George J. Busteed, Delphi No. 40. 

E. Sir Lewis G. Niewerth, Delphi No. 40. 

E. Sir Thomas J. Ryan, Delphi No. 40. 

E. Sir Joseph G. Ibach, Hammond No. 41. 

E. Sir George 0. Mallett, Hammond No. 41. 

E. Sir Robert W. Stevens, Bedford No. 42. 

E. Sir Charles H. Strupe, Bedford No. 42. 

E. Sir Ben H. Coombs,. Lebanon No. 43. 

E. Sir Ivory C. Tolle, Lebanon No. 43. 

E. Sir George F. Mowrer, New Castle No. 44. 

E. Sir Arlie E. Crim, New Castle No. 44. 

E. Sir Albert D. Ogborn, New Castle No. 44. 

E. Sir Thomas J. Creel, Angola No. 45. 

E. Sir Fred M. Starr, Angola No. 45. 

E. Sir Melvin W. Kratz, Angola No. 45. 

E. Sir Robert A. Woods, Princeton No. 46. 

E. Sir Horatio W. Vedder, Princeton No. 46. 

E. Sir Guy H. Briggs, Clinton No. 48. 

E. Sir Oliver P. Middleton, Clinton No. 48. 

E. Sir Earl H. Payne, Rushville No. 49. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 19 

E. Sir William L. King, Rushville No. 49. 

E. Sir William B. Hosford, Mishawaka No. 51. 

E. Sir William H. Tupper, Mishawaka No. 51. 

E. Sir John N. Penwell, Tipton No. 52. 

E. Sir Meade Vestal, Tipton No. 52. 

E. Sir Will E. Beeson, Winchester No. 53. 

E. Sir Dirrelle Chaney, Sullivan No. 54. 

E. Sir John C. Chaney, Sullivan No. 54. 

E. Sir Walter E. Hendricks, Martinsville No. 55. 

E. Sir Roy E. Tilford, Martinsville No. 55. 

E. Sir Giles M. Dickson, MartinsviUe No. 55. 

E. Sir Reuben W. Miles, Martinsville No. 55. 

E. Sir Albert Meseke, Seymour No. 56. 

E. Sir Clifford H. Long, Seymour No. 56. 

STAXDIX; C03IMITTEES PRESENT. 

Finance Committee — R. E. Sirs Winfield T. Durbin, 
Harry G. Strickland and James L. Randel. 

Auditing Committee — E. Sirs Albert W. Funk- 
houser, Clyde B Kellar and Mark L. Dickover. 

Annual Conclave, 1921 — Sir Brandt C. Downey, R. 
E. Sir Adrian Hamersly, E. Sir William H. Swintz, 
R. E. Sir Harry G. Strickland, E. Sir William D. 
Kerlin. 

Committee to Contract for Uniforms — E. Sir Olin 
E. Holloway, V. E. Sir Eugene Vatet, and R. E. Sirs 
Winfield T. Durbin, Joseph G. Ibach and John L. Rupe. 

Triennial Committee, 1922 — R. E. Sirs John L. Rupe 
and Adrian Hamersly, V. E. Sir Eugene Vatet, E. Sir 
Floyd J. Newby. 

GRAND C0M3rAM)EKY CONVENED. 

There being a constitutional number of constituent 
Commanderies duly represented, after devotional exer- 



20 Proceedings Chxind Commandery [May 11, 

cises led by E. Sir John C. Parrett, Grand Prelate, the 
Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of the State 
of Indiana was convened in annual conclave by R. E. 
Sir Harry C. Moore, Grand Commander, and declared 
ready for the transaction of business. 

RECEPTION OF DISTIXGIISHED GUESTS. 

Harry C. Moore, R. E. Grand Commander, directed 
the Grand Warder to ascertain if there were distin- 
guished guests in waiting. The Grand Warder re- 
paired to the parlor and found in waiting the following 
Sir Knights: 

William H. 'Norris, R. E. Grand Captain General of 
the Grand Encampment and personal representative of 
the Grand Zvlaster. 

George M. Moulton, Past Grand Commander of Illi- 
nois and Past Grand Master of the Grand Encampment. 

William B. Melish, Past Grand Commander of 0/iio 
and Past Grand Master of the Grand Encampment, 

Leonidas P. Newby, Past Grand Commanders of 
Indiana and Grand Generalissimo of the Grand En- 
campment. 

William L. Sharp, Past Grand Commander of Illinois 
and Grand Junior Warden of the' Grand Encampment. 

George T. Campbell, Past Grand Commander of 
Michigan and Grand Captain of the Guard of the 
Grand Encampment. 

Samuel P. Cochran, Past Grand Commander of 
Texas and member of the Committee on Jurisprudence 
of the Grand Encampment. 

Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Commander of Indi- 
ana and Chairman of the Committee on Finance of the 
Grand Encampment. 

Nelson Williams, Past Grand Commander of Ohio 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 21 

and the Committee on Necrology of the Grand En- 
campment; 

Roland Martin Hollock, Grand Commander of Illi- 
nois. 

Andrew D. Agnew, Grand Commander of Wisconsin. 

Gary B. Fish, Grand Commander of Florida. 

Miles H. H. Davis, Grand Generalissimo of Ken- 
tucky. 

George W. Bunton, Grand Prelate Grand Command- 
ery of Ohio. 

Frank L. McNamara, Commander of Ivanhoe Com- 
mandery No. 24 of Wisconsin. 

The Grand Commander named Sir Knights Leonidas 
P. Newby, Past Grand Commander, and Joseph G. 
Ibach, Past Grand Commander, to receive and intro- 
duce. the guests. They were severally presented by Sir 
Knight Newby and most cordially received by the 
Grand Commander. 

Sir Knight Leonidas P. Newby, Past Grand Com- 
mander of Indiana and R. E. Grand Generalissimo of 
the Grand Encampment, was introduced in a very 
gracious manner by Sir Knight William B. Melish, 
Past Grand Commander of Ohio and Past Grand Mas- 
ter of the Grand Encampment, and Sir Knight Newby 
responded in his usual happy manner. 

Sir Knight William H. Norris, the personal repre- 
sentative of the Grand Master, was conducted to the 
station of the Grand Commander, who requested him 
to preside. Sir Knight Norris, however, waived his 
right in favor of the Grand Commander of Indiana, 
requesting him to proceed with the business and stated 
that he would at a subsequent time address the Grand 
Commandery. 



22 Proceedings Grand Commayidery [May 11, 



MLITARY EYOLUTIOXS. 

The military evolutions incident to the formal open- 
ing of a Commandery were exceptionally well executed 
by a detachment of Marion Commandery No. 21, under 
the command of Sir Knight John A. Rhue, Captain- 
General, after which the Grand Commander announced 
the convening of the sixty-seventh annual conclave, 
pursuant to the adjournment of the Grand Conimand- 
ery. May, 1920. 

On motion of Sir Knight George S. Parker, Past 
Grand Commander, the thanks and congratulations 
of the Grand Commandery were extended to Marion 
Commandery No. 21 for the splendid manner in which 
the work was done. 

MIMTES OF ANM AL COXCLAYE, 1920. 

On motion, the reading of the minutes of the Annual 
Conclave, 1920, was dispensed with and they were 
approved without reading. 

STANDING C03DnTTEES. 

The following standing committees were announced 
by Sir Knight Harry C. Moore, R. E. Grand Com- 
mander: 

On Templar Jurisprudence — George W. F. Kirk, 
Walter M. Hindman, Winfield T. Durbin, John E. Red- 
mond, John H. Nicholson, Leonidas P. Newby, Oliver 
Gard, Vestal W. Woodward, Charles Day, Luther Short, 
William B. Hosford, John L. Rupe, Charles M. Zion, 
Joseph G. Ibach, Harry G. Strickland, Adrian Ham- 
ersly, James L. Randel, George H. Steel, George S. 
Parker, Henri T. Conde. 

On C'redentials — Karl F. Bosworth, Julius A. New- 
man, Jay L. Brown, August Barth, Albertus 0. Strat- 
ton, Claud L. Van Zant. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 23 

On Visiting Sir Knights — Clayton 0. Griflfin, Fred 
J. Deitzer, Floyd Cutsinger, Ben H, Coombs, Orlin J. 
Schrock. 

On Dispensations and Charters — George S. Parker, 
William M. Amos, John J. Early, Walter L. Brown, 
Allen G. Pate, Charles J. Blackman. 

On Grievances and Appeals — Philo Q. Doran, Fred- 
erick A. Turner, Carl H. M. Bilby, Heber H. Ellis, 
Grant B. Bushnell, William A. Cobb. 

On Finance — Winfield T. Durbin, Harry G. Strick- 
land, James L. Randel. 

On Unfinished Business — Perry C. Traver, Paul C. 
Hurst, Albert B. Stevens, George S. Snyder, Thomas 
L. Cooper, William E. Seidel. 

On Correspondence — Robert A. Woods, William D. 
Scoble, Marshall F. Wallace, Charles Cox. 

On Paij-RoU—WiUmm^I). Kerlin, Guy Duckwall, 
Fred N. Prass, William G. Clark, George J. Busteed, 
James D. Ryan. 

On Auditing — Albert W. Funkhouser, Clyde B. Kel- 
lar, Mark L. Dickover. 

CJRA>D r03r>rA]M)ER'S ADDRESS. 

R. E. Grand Commander Harry C. Moore then pre- 
sented the following address and report : 

To the Officers and Members of the Grayid Command- 

erij of Knights Templar, of Indiana: 

Sir Knights, it is with much happiness that I greet 
and welcome each of you to this, our sixty-seventh 
Annual Conclave. We are fortunate in having with 
us on this occasion distinguished visitors from other 
Jurisdictions, and I wish to assure them that we 
greatly appreciate their presence here, and I trust 
their visit with us will be a most pleasant one for all. 



24 ProceedinQs Grand Commandery [May 11, 

I would particularly welcome the Old Guard who have 
done so much for this Grand Commandery. They are 
fewer today than in other years and it is a sad thougxit 
to me that they can not be with us always. Then we 
see those who are here today for the first time. I 
extend to them a cordial greeting and express the 
hope that they will receive much help and inspiration, 
and an increased interest in the affairs of Templar 
Masonry. 

THE KNIGHTLY DEAD. 

Before proceeding with a report of the official acts 
of the year, it is fitting that we should pause at this 
time and recall the memory of those who have passed 
from mortal life into immortality beyond the grave. 

Within the year two of our beloved Past Grand 
Commanders have been conducted through the dark 
Valley of the Shadow of Death to the peaceful abodes 
of the blessed. 

On June 22, 1920, R. E. Sir Frederick Glass, Past 
Grand Commander of our Grand Comm.andery, died 
at his home in Madison, Indiana. The funeral was 
held June 25th, at the Presbyterian church in Madison. 
Union Lodge No. 2 conducted the services, with Madi- 
son Commandery No. 22 acting as an escort. Grand 
Generalissimo Newhouse, and Past Grand Command- 
ers Newby and Rupe, were present as representatives 
of the Grand Commandery. 

On February 14, 1921, R. E. Sir Henry H. Lancas- 
ter, Past Grand Commander of our Grand Com- 
mandery received the final summons after a brief ill- 
ness. On February 16th, the funeral services were 
held in the M. E. church at Lafayette, Indiana, with 
Lafayette Commandery No. 3 in charge. Grand Senior 
Warden Ogborn, and Past Grand Commanders Hosford 
and Parker, were present as representatives of the 
Grand Commandery. 



1921] of the State of hidiana. 25 

Our Official Ranks were also broken during- the 
year. On August 1, 1920, announcement came of 
the death of our dearly beloved Grand Recorder, Cal- 
vin W. Prather, While his death had been expected 
for some time, yet it came with a distinct shock to 
his host of friends in this and other Grand Jurisdic- 
tions. The funeral services were held in the Masonic 
Temple, in Indianapolis, with the Grand Commandery 
in charge. Nearly every Grand Officer and Past Grand 
Commander were present. Deputy Grand Commander 
Vatet, and Past Grand Commanders Newby and Dur- 
bin being designated to represent the Grand Com.- 
mandery, accompanied the remains to Jeffersonville, 
Indiana. 

In addition to these members of the Grand Com- 
mandery, we revere the memory of beloved Fraters 
of the Subordinate Commanderies, who have been 
stricken from the roll here, to join the Grand Com- 
mandery above. 

The Angel of Death has also been busy in other 
Grand Jurisdictions taking many honored and beloved 
Fraters from friends who mourn their loss. We enum- 
erate the names of the Distinguished Knights in the 
Addenda (A). 

It is not my purpose to make more than this brief 
mention of these Fraters, for Special Committees of 
Necrology will be appointed and they will pay fitting 
tribute to them. I recommend that pages of the Pro- 
ceedings of this Conclave be set aside to commemorate 
the virtues of these deceased Fraters. 

CONDITION OF THE ORDER. 

The peace and harmony that has ever prevailed in 
the Jurisdiction, is still undisturbed, and our relations 
with others are cordial and harmonious. All our Com- 
manderies have w^orked loyally for the best interests 



26 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



of our jurisdiction and have prospered. The net gain 
in membership in Indiana, has been eleven hundred 
and ninety-nine. This is one of the two largest years 
in our history. Last year we gained one member 
more than this year. The largest previous year was 
in 1914 when there were four hundred and thirty-five 
added to the total. 

The character of our membership in Indiana, is 
something that we may well be proud of, and I call 
on every Commander in Indiana, to see that we keep 
it so. While I believe that we should never lose an 
opportunity to present the aims and purposes of Temp- 
lar Masonry, and to secure good men and true as 
members, yet we must never rush men through the 
Order for the mere sake of numbers, or for any other 
reason, for after all, it is not more Templars that we 
need, but better Templars^ 

GENERAL ORDERS OF THE GRAND ENCAMPMENT U. S. A. 

During the year I had the honor to receive General 
Order No. 5 issued by the Grand Master, announcing 
the appointment of Representatives to the various 
Grand Commanderies in the United States. R. E. Sir 
William H. Norris, Grand Captain General of the 
Grand Encampment, was assigned to Indiana. I also 
received the Bulletin announcing the conferring of the 
Orders of Knighthood on President-Elect Warren G. 
Harding, and that he was dubbed and created by the 
Grand Master. The Toast and Response issued by the 
Committee on Christmas Observance was received and 
published in my General Order No. 4 to all Command- 
eries in Indiana. Copies of the above will be found in 
Addenda (B). 

GENERAL ORDERS OF THE GRAND COMMANDERY OF 

INDLA.NA. 

As Grand Commander, I have issued during the year 
General Orders Nos. 1 to 5 inclusive. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 27 

No. 1 refers to the report of the Uniform Committee 
and gives instructions in regard to the contract made 
by it. 

No. 2 refers to the appointment of E. Sir William 
H. Swintz as Grand Recorder. 

No. 3 refers to Official Visitations and assignments 
made. 

No. 4 refers to Christmas Observance. 

No. 5 refers to the wearing of Templar Uniform 
while on the pilgrimage to the Annual Conclave of the 
Grand Commandery in 1921. 

Copies of these Orders will be found in Addenda 
(C). 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 

It has been my privilege and pleasure to recommend 
several of our honored Sir Knights as representatives 
of other Grand Jurisdictions near the Grand Com- 
mandery of Indiana. The following were recom- 
mended : 

E. Sir William L. Kiger, Bluffton No. 38 for Maine. 
E. Sir John Austin Jones, Apollo No. 19, for Missis- 
sippi. 

E. Sir Lee A. Carr, Wabash No. 37, for Nebraska. 

E. Sir Williard H. Kingery, ' Warsaw No. 10, for 
New Mexico. 

INTER-STATE COURTESIES. 

During the year a number of requests have been 
received from Grand Commanders for the conferring 
of the Orders upon Companions now residing in In- 
diana, and on several occasions I have requested 
Grand Commanders of other Jurisdictions to perform 
like services for us. In each case the request has 
been cheerfully granted and the service performed. 
A full list will be found in Addenda (D). 



28 Proceedmgs Grand Commandery [May 11, 



DECISIONS. 

I. On December 2, 1920, I received from Anderson 
Commandery No. 32 the following communication : 

"Edward C. Moore, married, wife lives at North 
Vernon, Indiana, occupation of Moore, railroad detec- 
tive, lives in Anderson half of his time. No Com- 
mandery at North Vernon and wants to make appli- 
cation for the Orders of Knighthood in Anderson. Will 
this be permissible." 

To this I replied as follows: 

"Replying to yours of December 2nd, I would say 
that the legal residence of Edward C. Moore, is North 
Vernon, Indiana, and he is therefore in the jurisdic- 
tion of Seymour Commandery at Seymour, Indiana. 
I feel sure, however, that Seymour Commandery will 
waive jurisdiction for this party if request is made 
to them." 

II. On December 16, 1920, I received from Brazil 
Commandery No. 47, the following: 

"At a regular meeting of Brazil Commandery No. 
47, a petition for membership by demit, was elected, 
since which time objection has been made to the 
Eminent Commander. No demit has been received 
by our Commandery from the Commandery in which 
he claims membership. Will objection stand? Please 
give ruling at earliest convenience." 

To this I replied as follows : 

"You state that you had elected a Knight to mem- 
bership by demit but no demit had been received. The 
Statutes of the Grand Encampment, Section 190 (a) 
read as follows : 

" 'A demit or its equivalent must accompany a 
petition for affiliation and no Commandery shall 
admit a Knight to membership without a demit 
or its equivalent.' 



1921] of the State of Indiana. "29 



"Your action ip electing the Knight to membership 
is illegal, and he is not a member of your Command- 
ery." 

III. I replied as follows to an inquiry from Terre 
Haute Commandery No. 16: 

"Replying to your inquiry of January 24, will 
say that a majority vote will waive jurisdiction. 
This is not specifically stated in the Book of 
Templar Law, but is covered by the Section which 
says that where not otherwise provided a major- 
ity vote applies." 

Several other questions were submitted to me, but 
in each case they were answered by reference to the 
Statutes of the Grand Commandery or to the Ritual. 

DISPENSATIONS. 

I was requested to issue a number of dispensations 
for Commanderies to appear in public and to hold spe- 
cial elections. A list will be found in Addenda (E). 

DISPENSATIONS REFUSED 

I refused one Commandery a dispensation to appear 
in public and advised another that it was not in the 
power of the Grand Commander to change the stated 
conclave of a Commandery to another date. Both are 
given, in Addenda (E). 

CHANGES IN BY-LAWS. 

A list of the changes in the By-Laws of certain 
Commanderies is submitted for your approval and is 
given in Addenda (F). 

BONDS OF OFFICERS. 

In accordance with the Laws of the Grand Com- 
mandery of Indiana, I have in my care the surety 
bonds of the Grand Recorder and Grand Treasurer. 



30 Proceedings Grand Commanderij [May 11, 



NEW COMMANDERY. 

A petition signed by a constitutional number of Sir 
Knights was presented to me praying for a dispensa- 
tion to form a new Commanderj^ at Peru, Indiana. 
The petition was accompanied by a recommendation 
from Wabash Commandery No. 37. After a thorough 
investigation I issued the dispensation on February 
21, 1921, appointing Sir Charles M. Worden, as Emi- 
nent Commander ; Sir William B. McClintic, as Gen- 
eralissimo; and Sir William A. Hammond, as Captain- 
General ; the dispensation to be in effect until May 4, 
1921. I delivered the papers in person and gave the 
new Commandery som.e instructions. The Peru 
Knights are loyal and enthusiastic and I predict that 
a good Commandery will be quickly built up in that 
city if a charter be granted. 

COMMANDERY CONSTITUTED. 

Greensburg Commandery U. D. having been granted 
a charter at the Annual Conclave in 1920, I commis- 
sioned R. E. Sir Leonidas P. Newby, to act as my spe- 
cial deputy and to constitute the Commandery located 
at Greensburg, Indiana, under the name and number 
of Greensburg Commandery No. 59. He reported that 
he performed this duty on June 3, 1920, with the 
asistance of a number of officers and knights of Bald- 
win Commandery No. 2. From my knowledge of the 
conditions, and the report he made to me, I am sure 
that Templar Masonry will be well supported in the 
community. I submit the report herewith. 

RECORDS AND RECORDERS. 

At the last Annual Conclave of the Grand Com- 
mandery, the Grand Commander was authorized to 
appoint a committee to revise the requirements and 
prepare a new set of instructions for the Recorders. 
The committee I named, consisted of V. E. Sir Eugene 
Vatet, E. Sir Olin E. Holloway, and E. Sir William H. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 31 

Swintz. They found that in order to relieve the 
Recorders as had been recommended, it was necessary 
to change only a few words in the instructions. On 
account of the high cost of printing a whole new set 
of instructions, I ordered the Grand Recorder to issue 
a circular letter giving the necessary changes, and to 
send it to the Commander and Recorder of each Com- 
mandery in Indiana. This letter is given in full in 
Addenda (G). 

From various sources and my experience, I learn 
that many Recorders are very negligent about answer- 
ing correspondence and also in bringing matters to the 
attention of the Commandery. I am of the opinion 
that all communications of the Grand Commandery, 
either from the Grand Commander or the Grand 
Recorder, should be mailed to the Eminent Com- 
mander, as it is he that is responsible for the work 
of the Commandery and everything should pass 
through his hands without fail. 

UNIFORM COMMITTEE. 

The Committee on Uniforms appointed at the last 
Grand Conclave has proven to be a very competent 
one. After a number of sessions they reported to me 
that they had standardized the uniform ; that they had 
submitted specifications for the adopted uniform to 
several regalia houses, and had received bids from 
them ; and that after due deliberation had entered into 
a contract with the firm of M. C. Lilley & Company 
for the supply of all uniforms to constituent Command- 
eries of Indiana, for a period of one year for a certain 
price, and under certain conditions. They recom- 
mended that in order that the purpose of the Grand 
Commandery in creating this Committee be fully 
realized, that the Grand Commander issue an order 
giving the Commanderies the necessary instructions 
in regard to the purchase of uniforms in Indiana. On 



32 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 

August 31, 1920, I issued General Order No. 1 having 
reference to the work of this Committee. A full report 
will be presented to the Grand Commandery by the 
Committee, and I invite your special attention to it. 

ABSENCE FROM THE JURISDICTION. 

On July 20, 1920, I advised the Deputy Grand Com- 
mander, Eugene Vatet, that I would be absent from 
the state for about a month, and placed in his charge 
the duties of my office, until I should return. A 
number of important matters came to his attention 
during this time, all of which were carefully attended 
to and I commend his actions in each case. Among 
these were the convening of the Grand Commandery 
in Special Conclave, and the appointing of a Grand 
Recorder Pro Tem, both of which I refer to hereafter. 

SPECIAL CONCLAVE OF THE GRAND COMMANDERY. 

On August 4, 1920, at 9 A. M., the Grand Com- 
mandery Knights Templar of Indiana, was convened 
in Special Conclave in the Masonic Temple, Indianapo- 
lis, by V. E. Sir Eugene Vatet, Deputy Grand Com- 
mander, for the purpose of paying the last tribute of 
fraternal love and respect to the remains of E. Sir 
Calvin W. Prather, Grand Recorder, of Indiana, who 
passed away August 1, 1920. 

The Templar Burial Seryice was then conducted by 
the Officers of the Grand Commandery, with the 
Deputy Grand Commander in charge. After this, R. 
E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin made some beautiful re- 
marks which sank deep into the hearts of those present. 
At the conclusion of the Templar Services, the Scot- 
tish Rite Ring Service was given by E. Sir William 
Geake, 33°, for the Supreme Council A. A. Scottish 
Rite, N. M. J. 

The Grand Commandery then adjourned and the 
officers and members accompanied the remains to the 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 33 

Jeffersonville cemetery, where the Grand Lodge of 
Indiana had charge, E. Sir Olin E. Holloway, Past 
Grand Master, giving the Masonic Burial Services in 
a most impressive manner. 

INSTALLATION. 

Sir Knight John C. Parrett, elected Grand Prelate, 
being unable to be with us at the last conclave, I 
commissioned Past Grand Commander, Joseph G. 
Ibach, to install him as such. R. E. Sir Ibach accepted 
the commission and reported that he performed the 
ceremony on June 7, 1920. 

AUDIT OF BOOKS. 

After the death of E. Sir Calvin W. Prather, Grand 
Recorder, a certified public accountant was employed 
to audit the books of both the Grand Recorder and 
Grand Treasurer. This audit showed that the books 
and accounts were in perfect condition as we expected, 
and the same were balanced to August 1, 1920. The 
report of the auditor is submitted herewith. 

APPOINTMENT OF GRAND RECORDER. 

A conference of the Presiding Grand Officers of the 
several Grand Bodies of Masonry was held, at which 
time it was decided to appoint E. Sir Olin E. Holloway 
as Secretary-Recorder Pro Tem, to serve until a suc- 
cessor to Sir Knight Prather could be selected. Sir 
Knight Holloway was able to perform the duties only 
with a great deal of personal sacrifice and inconven- 
ience and I recommend that the Grand Commandery 
give to him an expression of its appreciation of his 
loyalty and willingness to perform this service, and 
for the very efficient manner in which he conducted 
the affairs of the office. 

Later I held several conferences with the Officers 
and Past Grand Commanders of the Grand Command- 
ery, and also with the Grand Master of the Grand 



34 Proceedings Gixind Commandery [May 11, 

Ldodge, the Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter, 
and the M. 111. Grand Master of the Grand Council, 
looking to the appointment of some one who could fill 
the office of like character in. all the Grand Bodies. The 
result of these conferences was, that I decided to select 
E. Sir William H. Swintz, of South Bend Comm.andery 
No. 13, for the office of Grand Recorder and was much 
pleased to have him advise me that he would accept 
the appointment. On September 13, 1920, I issued 
General Order No. 2, announcing his appointment and 
I immediately installed him into office. From the 
letters and expressions received, I feel confident that 
I appointed one of the best qualified men in our Grand 
Commandery for this office. During the eight months 
which he has served as Grand Recorder, his knowledge 
of Masonic Law, his good judgment, and his fine per- 
sonality, have all been displayed, and he has shown 
himself to be a most efficient officer. i 

OFFICIAL VISITATIONS. 

The matter of Official Visitations by the Grand 
Officers having been left to the discretion of the Grand 
Commander, I held a conference with the Deputy 
Grand Commander and the Inspector-General, and 
gave the matter full consideration. We were unani- 
mous in the opinion that the work should be continued 
and that these visits not only brought the Command- 
eries in closer touch with the Grand Comm.andery, 
but it was a splendid way for the Grand Officers to 
get a practical knowledge of Templar afi'airs over the 
state and assist them in qualifying for the leadership 
of the Order when they should severally become Grand 
Commander. 

On December 1, 1920, I issued General Order No. 3 
assigning the Grand Officers to the various districts 
and outlining the work which they should perform. 
From the reports they have sent me I feel confident 



1718911 

1*921] of the State of Indiana. 35 



that their work has been well done; that they have 
given much assistance to the Commanderies in solving 
the problems with which they had to deal; and that 
everywhere they have created a renewed interest in 
Templar Masonry. Many valuable suggestions and 
data are contained in these reports and I will turn 
them over to the incoming Grand Commander for his 
use. These visitations entailed some expense to each 
Officer and I recommend that they be reimbursed for 
their expenses in making such visitations. 

TEMPLAR OBSERVANCES. 

The observance by our Commanderies of those spe- 
cial days that commemorate the birth, resurrection, and 
ascension of our Saviour, is I believe, becoming more 
generally observed. 

Upon receipt of the Christmas Observance, I issued 
General Order No. 4, which is given in the Addenda. 
I received letters and telegrams from a number of 
Commanderies reporting the observance and conveying 
season's greetings. I also received a number of invita- 
tions and announcements showing the observance of 
Easter and Ascension Day. 

WASHINGTON MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION. 

January 3, 1921, I received an invitation to attend 
the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the George Washing- 
ton National Memorial Association, in Alexandria, 
Viriginia, on February 22, 1921. I was compelled to 
decline the honor of being present. 

COURTESIES. 

Many courtesies and kindly expressions have been 
extended from a number of Commanderies, and many 
courteous requests to attend conclaves and social events 
have been received, but most of them I was compelled 
to decline. I have endeavored to acknowldge all of 
them, but whether I did or not, I greatly appreciate 



36 Proceedings Grand Commmidery [May 11, 

them and I would now express my thanks for all of 
them. 

RECOM MENDATIONS. 

I desire to renew the recommendations made by 
several of my predecessors, that jewels be purchased 
for the Grand Officers of this Grand Commandery. As 
a mark of distinction it is well to permit them to wear 
the jewels of their respective offices. 

Nearly all the letters coming to the Grand Com- 
mander from Grand Commanders of other Jurisdic- 
tions bear a small Grand Commander's seal of the 
Jurisdic^tion which they represent. This to my mind 
adds much dignity to the corpmunication. I would 
renew the suggestion that was made heretofore, that 
a small seal be purchased and placed in the hands of 
the Grand Commander for his use. 

One of the best helps in the study of the Templar 
Law that we can obtain today, is the work "Sidelights 
on Templar Law," written by our own frater, R. E. 
Sir Leonidas P. Newby. Many jurisdictions have 
recognized the value of this work and have secured a 
copy for each Commandery in the Jurisdiction. I 
w^ould recommend that a sufficient number of copies be 
purchased and that the Grand Recorder send one to 
each Commander in the state and that he be required to 
receipt for it as is now done for the rituals and that 
he be instructed to transmit the book to his successor 
in office. I would also recommend that the same thing 
be done with a copy of the Templar Law. 

A number of changes have been made in the 
Statutes of the Grand Encampment and in those of 
the Grand Commandery of Indiana since the last edi- 
tion of the Laws was printed in 1910. I would further 
recommend that these changes be compiled and printed 
so that every Commandery in Indiana may paste them 
in the additions of the Law which thev now bavp. 



1921] of the State of hidiana. 37 

The reports of the Inspector-General contain many 
important decisions and instructions in regard to the 
Ritual and Manual, and I would recommend that these 
be compiled into a booklet form and furnished the 
Commander of each Commandery for reference in con- 
nection with the work of the Order. 

CONCLUSION. 

I desire to thank the members of this Grand Com- 
mandery for elevating me to the position of Grand 
Commander. I have fully appreciated the honor and 
responsibility of the office and have given the best I 
have to performing the duties of it. 

To my Associate Grand Officers and the Past Grand 
Commanders, I express my very cordial thanks for 
their loyalty and devotion. It is impossible here to 
mention each one to whom I am indebted, but I feel 
an especial obligation to Past Grand Commanders Dur- 
bin and Newby, Deputy Grand Commander Vatet. and 
Inspector-General Holloway, for their words of counsel 
and advice. I would also mention our Grand Recorder, 
E. Sir William H. Swintz, for his most excellent serv- 
ices and for his unfailing kindness to* me, and to all 
with whom he comes in contact in the affairs of his 
office. 

I assure you that I will always look upon my official 
connection with the Grand Commandery as one of the 
most pleasant periods of my life, and that I will 
always cherish in my heart the friendships made dur- 
ing these years of service. 

I wish today that I might impress upon the mind of 
each Sir Knight in this assembly that we as Knights 
Templar have a real and positive service to perform. 

Our Order of Christian Knighthood had its be- 
ginning many years ago, and as we all know, its pur- 
pose was the defense of the Holy Sepulchre. However, 



38 Proceedmgs Gtxmd Commander-y [May 11, 

the call for service and duty is not over, but is as great 
as ever. The world as never before needs men of the 
highest character to shape its course amid the problems 
that confront the people of every land. In this period 
of reconstruction, we should be mindful as Knights 
Templar, standing for the highest type of manhood, 
that we are called upon to exemplify in our daily lives, 
those Christian principles for which our Order has 
ever stood, and as defenders of the Christian Religion, 
we should resolve to be more loyal and steadfast in 
His cause, and more diligent in our endeavors to 
spread His teachings among mankind. Let me leave 
with you the thought as expressed in a little poem, by 
Roy D. Hudson, suggested to him by Sam W. Foss's 
poem, "The House by the Side of the Road". 

There are men who live for the love of gold. 

For the pompous show of wealth; 

There are men who live for pleasure and lust 

At the cost of manhood and health; 

There are men who live for office and power. 

With ambitions for worldly gain; 

But I would not live by the side of the road — 

Let me live as a man among men. 

Let me leave my house by the side of the road 

Where the race of men go by — 

For I see men grapple and fight with sin, 

And I hear their piteous crJ^ 

Then a throng passes by, 'tis the Nation's youth. 

Light hearted and free of care. 

And they travel on down the bread highway 

Into sin's seductive snare. 

' The path is narrow, the way is steep, 

That leads to the mountain height, 
But those who travel are filled with joy, 
As they climb toward the greater light. 
And now I rejoice when the travelers rejoice. 
And comfort them when they moan — 
For I do not live by the side of the road 
And see men struggle alone. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 39 



Let me leave my house by the side of the road, 

And help men to win life's fight; 

Let me lead them to know the Master Man, 

Who will guide their steps aright; 

Let me mingle with them in their journey of life 

As a Christian citizen — 

Let me leave my house by the side of the road 

And live as a man among men. 



Courteously submitted, 




-^^ 



Grand Commander. 
ADDENDA "A" 

DISTINGUISHED DEAD OF OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS. 

The deaths of distinguished fraters of other Grand 
Jurisdictions have been officially reported to me as 
follows : 

Colorado — E. Sir Charles Henry Jacobson, Grand Record^-, 
died. February 20, 1921. 

Connecticut — R. E. Sir Charles Ethan Billings, Past Grand 
Commander, died June 5, 1920. R. E. Sir Frederick H. Parmelee, 
Past Grand Commander, died October 5, 1920. E. Sir Eugene 
J. Clark, Grand Generalissimo, died December 5, 1920. R. E. 
Sir Julius W. Knowlton, Past Grand Commander, died January 
.5, 1921. ^ 

Florida — R. E. Sir Willi.im Clarence Arrdress, Past Grand 
Commander, died September 1, 1920. 

Georgia — R. E. Sir Joseph Cholmondeley, Greenfield, Past 
Grand Commander, died December 20, 1920. 

Illinois — R. E. Sir Joseph G. Dyas, Past Grand Commander, 
died September 2, 1920. 

Iowa — R. E. Sir Francis Hanmer Loring, Past Grand Com- 
mander, died May 6, 1920. 

Kentucky— R. E. Sir Edwin Gilbert Hall, Past Grand Com- 
mander, died June 26, 1920. R. E. Sir Eugene Algernon Rob- 
inson, Past Grand Commander, died March 19, 1920. 

Maine— R. E. Sir Frederick S. Walls, PasL Grand Com- 
mander, died March 1.5, 1921. 



40 Proceedings Gmnd Commandery [May 11, 



Maryland— R. E. Sir Robert David Grier, Past Grand Com- 
mander, died June 15, 1920. R. E. Sir Edwin Jerome Griffin, 
Past Grand Commander, died February 22, 1921. 

Massachusetts and Rhode Island — R. E. Sir Samuel Dibble 
Sherwood, Past Grand Commander, died May 5, 1920. 

Missouri — R. E. Sir William Henry Huters, Past Grand 
Commander, died June 1, 1920. R. E. Sir Arthur Middleton 
Hough, Past Grand Commander, died July 3, 1920. 

Michigan— R. E. Sir Charles Eber Hiscock, Pnst Grand Com- 
mander, died November 1, 1920. 

Minnesota — E. Sir Charles W. Wilson, Grand Junior Warden, 
died June 6, 1920. 

North Dakota — R. E. Sir Herman Winterer, Past Grand 
Commander, died August 4, 1920. 

Ohio — R. E. Sir Alex. F. Vance, Jr., Past Grand Commander, 
died July 14, 1920. R. E. Sir Eli Fasold, Past Grand Com- 
mander, died January 7, 1921. 

Tennessee — R. E. Sir Archibold Nevins Sloan, Past Grand 
Commander, died November 29, 1920. 

Texas — E. Sir William Nevins Kidd, Grand Treasurer, died 
February 12, 1921. 

Virginia — R. E. Sir Frederick Greenwood, Past Grand Com- 
mander, died January 23, 1921. 

• ADDENDA "B" 

GENERAL ORDER AND COMMUNICATIONS OF THE GRAND 
ENCAMPMENT KNIGHTS TEMPLAR, U. S. A. 

GRAND ENCAMPMENT OF KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

Joseph Kyle Orr, Most Eminent Grand Master. 

Genei'al Orders No. 5. 

To All Grand Commanderies and Subordinate Cominanderies 
imthin the Jurisdiction of, avd Holding Allegiance to, the 
Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the United 
States of America, Greeting: 
Know ye, that in conformity with a custom heretofore ap- 
proved by this Grand Encampment, we have appointed the fol- 
lowing named Inspectors, to whom commissions have been 
issued, as our Representatives to the respective Grand Com- 
mandery to which each is assigned, during the year 1921, charg- 
ing each frater with the duty of visiting the Grand Command- 
ery, to which he has been assigned, inspecting said body, and 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 41 



reporting to us upon such matters as may seem to him im- 
portant. 

The Grand Commandery of Alabama, to which is assigned 
Dick Grnham Crabtree, Grand Commander, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The Grand Commander of Arizona, to which is assigned 
Samuel S. Clarke, Past Grand Commander, San Francisco, Cal. 

The Grand Commandery of Arkansas, to which is assigned 
John Hessey Corbitt, Grand Commander, Nashville, Tenn. 

The Grand Commandery of California, to which is assigned 
Jehiel W. Chamberlin, Deputy Grand Master of the Grand 
Encampment, St. Paul, Minn. 

The Grand Commander of Colorado, to which is assigned 
William E. Richardson, Past Grand Commander, Duluth, Minn. 

The Grand Commandery of Connecticut, to which is assigned 
Harry G. Pollard, Grand Commander, Lowell, Mass. 

The Grand Commandery of the District of Columbia, to 
which is assigned Emanuel Ethelbert Downham, Past Grand 
Commander, Alexandria, Va. 

The Grand Commandery of Florida, to which is assigned 
Leonidas P. Newby, Grand Generalissimo of the Grand En- 
campment, Knightstown, Ind. 

The Grand Commandery of Georgia, to which is assigned 
Charles Kilg )re Chreitzberg, Past Grand Commander, Colum- 
bia, S. C. 

The Grand Commandery of Idaho, to which is assigned. 
Frank S. Baillie, Past Grand Commander, Portland, Oregon. 

The Grand Coram.andery of Illinois, to which is assigned 
George T. Cam.pbell, Grand Captain of the Guard of the Grand 
Encampment, Owosso, Mich. 

The Grand Commandery of Indiana, to which is assigned 
William H. Norris, Grand Capt. Gen. of the Grand Encamp- 
ment, Manchester, Iowa. 

The Grand Commandery of Iowa, to which is assigned 
George M. Moultcn, Past Grand Master of the Grand En- 
campment, Chicago, 111. 

The Grand Commandery of Kansas, to which is assigned 
Harold B. Downing, Grand Commander, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

The Grand Commandery of Kentucky, to which is assigned 
William B. Melish, Past Grand Master of the Grand Encamp- 
ment, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Grand Commandery of Louisiana, to which is assigned 
John Blackburn Sawtell, Grand Commander, Waco, Texas. 

The Grand Commandery of Maine, to which is assigned 
Freeman C. Hersey, Past Grand Commander, Boston, Mass. 



42 Proceedijigs Grand Commandery [May 11, 



The Grand Commandej-y of Maryland, to which is assigned 
Peter McGill, Past Grand 'Commander, Boimd Brook, N. J. 

The Grand Commandery of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 
to which is assigned Frederick C. Thayer, Past Grand Com- 
mander, Waterville, Maine. 

The Grand Commandery of Michigan, to which is assigned 
William L. Sharp, Grand Junior Warden of the Grand En- 
campment, Chicago, 111. 

The Grand Commandery of Minnesota, to which is assigned 
Frank H. Sprague, Past Grand Commander, Gi-afton, N. D. 

The Grand Commandery of Mississippi, to which is assigned 
Robert S. Teague, Grand Sword Bearer of the Grand Encamp- 
ment, Montgomery, Ala. 

The Grand Commandery of Missouri, to which is assigned 
Francis E. White, Past Grand Commander, Omaha, Neb. 

The Grand Commandery of Montana, to which is assigned 
William D. Henry, Past Grand Commander, Wahpeton, N. D. 

The Grand Commandery of Nebraska, to which is assigned 
George W. Vallery, Grand Senior Warden of the Grand En- 
campment, Denver, Colo. 

The Grand Commandery of Nevada, to which is assigned 
Perry Winslow Weidner, Grand Standard Bearer of the Grand 
Encampment, Los Angeles, Cal. 

The Grand Commandery of New Hampshire, to which is 
assigned Robert A. Greenfield, Past Grand Commander, Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y. 

The Grand Commandery of New Jersey, to which is assigned 
Charles C. Homer, Jr., Grand Warder of the Grand Encamp- 
ment, Baltimore, Md. 

The Grand Commandery of New Mexico, to which is assigned 
Judge Given Wooten, Past Grand Commander, Paris, Texas. 

The Grand Commander of New York, to which is assigned 
Wilson I. Fleming, Past Grand -Commander, Bellefonte. Pa. 

The Grand Commandery of North Carollina, to which is 
assigned Benjamin F. Hardeman, Past Grand Commander, 
Athens, Ga. 

The Grand Commandery of North Dakota, to which is as- 
signed Charles S. Schurman, Past Grand Commander, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

The Grand Commandery of Ohio, to which is assigned Win- 
field T. Durbin, Past Grand Commander, Anderson, Ind. 

The Grand Commandery of Oklahoma, to which is assigned 
Edward W. Wellington, Past Grand Commander, Ellsworth, 
Kansas. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 43 



The Grand Commandery of Oregon, to which is assigned 
Robert Lewers, Past Grand Commander, Reno, Nevada. 

The Grand Commandery of Pennsylvania, to which is as- 
signed Thomas P. Morgan, Past Grand Commander, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

The Grand Commandery of South Carolina, to which is as- 
signed William Schweigert, Past Grand Commander, Augusta, 
Ga. 

The Grand Commandery of South Dakota, to which is as- 
signed Charles B. Finch, Past Grand Commander, Kearney, 
Nebr. 

The Grand Commandery of Tennessee, to which is assigned 
Robert Rodes Burnam, Past Grand Commander, Richmond, Ky. 

The Grand Commandeiy of Texas, to which is assigned Lee 
E. Thomas, Past Grand Commander, Shreveport, La. 

The Grand Commandery of Utah, to which is assigned Darius 
A. Barton, Past Grand Commander, Denver, Colo. 

The Grand Commandery of Vermont, to which is assigned 
Everett C. Benton, Past Grand Commander, Belmont, Mass, or 
65 Kilby St., Boston. 

The Grand Commande7-y of Virginia, to which is assigned 
William S. Parks, Past Grand Commander, Washington, D. C. 

The Grand Commandery of Washington, to which is assigned 
Newton D. Brookhart, Past Grand Commander, Pocatello, Idaho. 

The Grand Commandery of West Virginia, to which is as- 
signed Charles F. Henry, Past Grand Commander, Marietta, 
Ohio. 

The Grand Commandery of Wisconsin, to which is assigned 
George W. Buck, Past Grand Commander, Duluth, Minn. 

The Grand Commandery of Wyoming, to which is assigTied 
Frederick C. Richmond, Past Grand Commander, Salt Lake 
City, Utah. 

The Subordinate Commanderies of the Grand Encampment 
will be under the direct supervision of the Grand Master. 

In event the appointee cannot serve, he will promptly ad- 
vise the Grand Master, also the Grand Commander of the 
state to which he has been assigned. 

The representative will send his bill of expense to the Grand 
Master, who will O. K. same for a warrant to be sent by the 
Grand Recorder. 

Upon receipt of this General Order, the Grand Commander 
of each state will, as soon as possible, open correspondence with 
the Visiting Inspector appointed as Visitor to his Grand Com- 
mandery, and give him all information as to the time and place 



44 Proceedings Gmnd Commandery [May 11, 



of the next Annual Conclave of his Grand Commandery and 
arrange for his official visit thereto. 

Given under my hand and seal, in the City of Atlanta, 
State of Georgia, this 10th day of January, A. D. 1921, A. O. 
803. 

Joseph Kyle Orr, 

Grand Master. 
Attest : 

:fRANK H. Johnson, 

Grand Recorder. 



GRAND ENCAMPMENT OF KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

OFFICE OF THE GRAND MASTER, 
SPETOIAL BULLETIN. 

To All Grand Comma^ideries and Subordinate C omnia yideries 
within the Jurisdiction of, and Holding Allegiance to, the 
Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the United 
States of America, Greeting: 
Companion Warren G. Harding, President-elect, in practical- 
ly his last act as a private citizen, on March 1st, becomes a 
Knight Templar. He is Knighted by Joseph Kyle Orr, Most 
Eminent Grand Master of the Grand Encampment, Knights 
Templar, U. S. A., in Marion Commandery, Marion, Ohio. 

A NOTABLE EVENT. 

Our Order was indeed honored when a citizen about to as- 
sume the responsibilities of Chief Magistrate of this, the 
greatest nation of the earth, was willing to^pause in the midst 
of the busy precious hours that were left of the first days of 
March to give an evening that he might round out, and complete, 
his Masonic degrees. 

It was with peculiar pleasure that I received an invitation 
by wire from Orlando S. Rapp, Chairman of Committee on Ar- 
rangements, that the Grand Master and the officers of the 
Grand Encampment would receive a formal invitation from the 
Grand Commander of Ohio and from the Eminent Commander 
of Marion Commandery to be present on Tuesday, March 1st, 
for the conferring of the Orders of Knighthood upon Companion 
Warren G. Harding, President-elect. 

-This invitation was promptly repeated to all the officers 
of the line. On account of the short notice only thi'ee were 



1921] of 'the State of Indiana. 45 



able to be present — H. Wales Lines, R. E. Grand Treasurer; 
Rt. Rev. Bishop Troy Beatty, R. E. Grand Prelate, and the 
Grand Master. 

Thomas J. Jones, R. E. Grand Commander of Ohio, was 
present with his staff of officers, including many Past Grand 
Commanders. 

The spacious well-appointed asylum of Marion Command- 
ery was filled with over four hundred, many of its own members 
staying away to make more comfortable the hundreds of visitors 
who had come from over the state. 

THE PROGRAM. 

At six o'clock p. M. Senator Harding joined the visitors at 
a bounteous supper served by the ladies of the Eastern Star in 
the banquet hall of the Masonic Temple. The Order of Red 
Cross was conferred by Past Commander James E. Messenger. 
The Knights of Malta in short form by James A. Knapp, as 
Eminent Prior. 

The Grand Master and his staff were received by Grand 
Commander Thos. J. Jones in a cordial address, which on ac- 
count of the value of time was responded to in short form, 
after which he introduced Grand Treasurer Lines, who, though 
only eighty odd years young, had come all the way from Con- 
necticut to be present. The Grand Prelate, Bishop Beatty, 
and Robert C. Greenfield, Grand Commander of New York, 
likewise made brief acknowledgments of the pleasure of being 
present. 

The Order of the Temple was conferred in full form by 
Eminent Commander Day Albert Orr and the officers of Marion 
Commandery. 

Considering the trying conditions, the work was excep- 
tionally well done. Special mention should be made of the 
superb presentation of the excellent Prelate, Sir L. D. Zach- 
man. 

By invitation Grand Commander Jones administered the 5th 
Libation, his staff with Grand Commander Greenfield, of New 
York, forming the Triangle. 

The fourth Scripture lesson was read by the Right Eminent 
Grand Prelate. 

The Pilgrim was "dubbed and created" by the Grand Master. 

The "Remaining Attributes" were presented and explained 
by different members of the Commandery, most of whom were 
life-long friends, the presentation of the Colors being peculiarly 
personal and timely. 



46 Proceedings Grand Coyyimandery [May 11, 



In place of the explanatory lecture, the Grand Master gave 
by request a short synopsis showing the part plaj-^d by Masonry 
in the founding of the Republic, and connecting the Ancient 
Templar with the Modern Order of the Temple, closing with a 
pledge to the new Knight that with the rising of the morrow's 
sun the Three Hundred Thousand Knights of the Temple, with 
their two million Masonic brethren, would have a greater in- 
terest in and a closer kinship with him than they had ever had 
before. 

Sir Knight Warren G. Harding was received with tremend- 
ous applause. His response was from the heart. Its words 
cannot be repeated, its deep personal appreciation of the solemn 
service, his true conception of the teachings of our Order were 
fittingly acknowledged. 

The sense of humility with which he faced the heavy respon- 
sibilities so soon to be assumed were feelingly expressed and 
won the hearts of all. 

The memory of this hour will ever be cherished by those 
privileged to be present. 

Brief talks were made by Grand Commander Jones and 
Grand Commander Greenfield, of New York, with a few closing 
words by the Grand Master. 

At a recess between the orders the President-elect had a 
conference with General and Sir Knight Leonard Wood, who 
was later introduced by the President and made a splendid 
five minutes' speech. 

Notwithstanding the lateness of the hour, about 1:30, 
the President, as "another proof of his patience," submitted to 
several sittings for a half dozen group pictures which the Pathe 
Company especially desired. 

This closed an event that will be memorable in the annals 
of our Order, and one that we believe will prove an influence 
for good in the history of our Country. 

Given under my hand and seal, in the City of Atlanta, 
State of Georgia, this 15th day of March, A. D. 1921, A. 0. 803. 

Joseph Kyle Orr, 

Gravd Master. 
♦Attest : 

Frank H. Johnson, 

Grand Recorder. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 47 



GRAND ENCAMPMENT, KNIGHTS TEMPLAR, 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

OFFICE OF THE COMMITTEE ON CHRISTMAS OBSERVANCE, 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

M. E. Sir and Dear Fratcr: 

The following- sentiment has been prepare^' for the coming 
Christmas observance: 

To Joseph Kyle Orr, Most Eminent Grand Master: 

Three hundred thousand Knights Templar sincerely wish 
you: 

"A Merry Christmas, and a Happy Christmas, such as fol- 
lows duty well observed, faith steadfastly kept, vows scrupu- 
lously performed, ears ever attuned to the cry of the fatherless 
and helpless, and a heai't always beating in unison with your 
fellow man." 

The Grand Master sends the following response: 
Sir Knights: 

The words duty, faith and vows should never fall on 
closed ears nor hardened hearts. Official position may bring 
high honors but not without responsibilities. The vows of 
Knighthood are individual to you and to me. One would be 
faithless to his conscience who should fail to im.press vipon the 
heart of each Knight Templar that he is under vows for the 
defense of the innocent, the helpless and the destitute. 

It seems fitting at this Christmas season that by some con- 
crete act we should give expression to a reconsecration of our 
better selves. Deeds speak louder than words and go further 
than good intentions. 

What part shall be yours of the good deeds that shall be 
done this day in the name of our beloved Order? 

We are in the midst of a year of reconstruction. As we 
come down from the pinnacle of Prosperity there are many pit- 
falls. 

In the industrial world there has been an orgy of riotous 
living. A wave of wasteful .extravagance has held high 

carnival. 

But almost over-night we have awakened. Common sense 
is doming back. The cure is to be quicker — by a mustard plaster 
— though most of us would rather have had a poultice. 

The laborer is still worthy of his hire but competition will 
show him the wisdom of producing more than he consumes. 

This is a world-wide movement — it concerns you and me 



48 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



and we cannot side-step it. In the words of a Geor^a philoso- 
pher : 

"*=^*****I asked— 
"What is the world?" and you replied — 
"Myself and you — by millions multiplied." 

Born of a spirit of unrest, there are scattered in our country 
small groups of fire-brands, who, thank God, remain a minority, 
yet are still a distui'bin.a; factor. 

If the three hundred thousand Knights of the Temple, and 
the two million of their Masonic brethren whom they might in- 
fluence, c»uld become, irrespective of party, an outstanding and 
outspoken force for Law and Order — for Liberty- — for independ- 
ence of thought and action of every worker, they would put 
the heel of public opinion upon the heads of every hydra-headed 
monster who under a crimson flag seeks to sow sedition and 
discontent among cur people. 

Then might we realize, in the words of Past Grand Master 
Hugh McCurdy: 

"The world is not asking how far back into the past 
we can trace our family tree but how far into the future shall 
reach the influence of our present everyday lives." 

"For the structure that we raise 
Time is- with material filled — 
Our todays and yesterdays 
Are the blocks with which we build." 

Today, as never before, the world needs us at our best. 

Courteously yours, 

Joseph Kyle Orr, 

Grand Master. 

Will you join in these sentiments Saturday, December 25, 
1920, preferably at noon. Eastern Standard Time, (equiva- 
lent to 5 P. M., Greenwich,) and will you extend the invita- 
tion to your command, as well as all true Templars and their 
friends wheresoever dispersed, on land or sea. 

Courteously and fraternally yours, 

Alexander B. Andrews, P. G. C, 
Committee on Christmas Observance. 
Address of the Grand Master: 
Joseph Kyle Orr, Atlanta, Ga. 

Hawaiian Standard Time, 165° W., 6 a. m.; Alaska Standard 
Time, 135° W., 8 a. m.; Pacific Standard Time, 120° W., 9 a. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 49 



m. ; Mountain Standard Time, 105° W., 10 a. m.; Central Stand- 
ard Time, 90° W., 11 a. in.; Eastern Standard Time, 75° W., 
12 m. ; Greenwich Standard Time, 0°, 5 p. m. ; Phillippine Stand- 
ard Time, 120° E., 1 a. m , December 26. 

ADDENDA "C" 

GENERAL ORDERS OF THE GRAND COMMANDERY OF 
INDIANA. 

GRAND COMMANDERY KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF 
INDIANA. 

OFFICE OF THE GRAND COMMANDER. 

Marion, Indiana, Au^st, 31, 1920. 
General Order No. 1. 

1. At the last annual conclave of tne Grand Commandery 
of Indiana the following resolution was adopted, "That the 
incoming Grand Commander be authorized and directed to ap- 
point a Special Committee of not less than three members and 
not to exceed five members and that such committee be vested 
with full authority upon the subject of uniforms; to specify a 
standard uniform in conformity with our present laws : elimin- 
ating any requirements under the present law upon the subject 
found necessary or desirable to reduce the cost and with full 
authority to contract on behalf of the Grand Commandery, 
either for this Grand Commandery alone, or in conjunction with 
Grand Commandories of other jurisdictions for the purchase 
of uniforms for all Commanderies in this jurisdiction and that 
when such contract is completed, if made, that each subordinate 
Commandery in the State shall order uniforms required by 
it of the company contracted with and pay therefor such 
contracted price direct to the company furnishing the same as 
now. That any and all adjustments of controversies in regard 
to uniforms shall be referred to and decided and determined by 
such Special Committee." 

2. This Special Committee, composed of R. E. Sir Win- 
field T. Durbin, P. G. C; R. E. Sir John L. Rupe, P. G. C; V. 
E. Sir Eugene Vatet, D. G. C, and E. Sir Olin E. Holloway. 
Inspector General, has filed a complete report of their actions, 
which report can be summarized as follows : 

First. The uniform has been standardized in conformity to 
present laws. Only such changes have been made as will discom- 
mode the least number of Commanderies. A complete and il- 
lustrated description of the uniform is in preparation for dis- 



50 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



tribution and for the guidance of the constituent Command- 
eries. Certain articles are required to be purchased and cer- 
tain others are made optional. 

Second. A conference was had with representatives from 
several sister jurisdictions and while these representatives were 
not authorized to join in a combined contract they were in sym- 
pathy and harmony with the idea and will be in touch with the 
results. 

Third. In order that the standard uniform alone would be 
furnished and that the best prices might be obtained through 
competitive bidding for such standard uniforms to be supplied 
to the Commanderies of the State, it was determined to contract 
for the supply for one year for all the Commanderies in this 
jurisdiction. 

Fourth. The report shows that the same proposition and 
description was furnished to the following regalia houses : Hen- 
derson-Ames Co., The M. C. Lilley Co., Ihling Bros. & Everhard, 
C. E. Ward & Co., Ward-Stilson Co., Pettibone Bros. Mfg. Co., 
and Cincinnati Regalia Co., and they were asked to submit 
sample uniforms and make proposals for supplying the con- 
stituent Commanderies of Indiana with their requirements for 
uniforms for the period of one year. That two of the firms 
declined, the other firms, namely. The Henderson-Ames Co.. The 
M. C. Lilley Co., Ihling Bros. & Everhard, C. E. Ward & Co., 
and Pettibone Mfg Co., presented sample uniforms and made 
proposals in accordance with the specifications and terms sub- 
mitted to them. The report further contains a copy of the five 
proposals made and the prices on each of the separate articles 
composing the uniform. 

Fifth. The bid of the M. C. Lilley Co. being the lowest 
and best one submitted the committee entered into a contract 
with that firm for the supply of Templar Uniforms for the In- 
diana Commanderies for the period of one year. 

In this contract certain articles of the uniform are to be 
required of every candidate and certain others are to be made 
optional as to purchase. The required uniform under this con- 
tract will cost the Com.manderies $85.00 plus war tax and 
delivery; the fibre suit case costing $9.50 and the cap and red 
cross cover costing $5.95 being optional with the purchaser. 

The complete uniform under the contract will cost $100.45 
plus war tax and delivery. 

The contract price on the separate articles composing the 
uniform and the change from silver to gold is as follows: 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 51 



REQUIRED UNIFORM. 

Coat— E. Cloth $ 29.95 

Chapeau 21.45 

Chapeau Cover .50 

Baldric 7.75 

Belt 7.10 

Sword 11.80 

Sword Case 4.45 

Sleeve Crosses 1.70 

Gloves .30 

Cost of Required Uniform $ 85.00 

OPTIONAL. 

Cap $ 5.45 

Cap Cover .50 

Suit Case 9.50 

Cost of Complete Uniform $100.45 

CHANCE FROM SILVER TO GOLD. 

Chapeau — Gilt trim; solid rayed cross, slash- 
ings and half round tassel $ G.OO 

Chapeau — Cleaning and curling plume 1.00 

Cap — Gilt Cross and Buttons 1.50 

Belt— Gilt trim 6.00 

Sword— Gold Plated 8.00 

Sword — Add. Im. Ivory Grip with Etched Cross 1.50 

Sword — Add. for Etched Monogram 2.50 

Sleeve Crosses— Gilt Solid Rays 8.00 

Coat — Single to Double Breasted 17.00 

Sixth. It was the understanding with the representatives 
of all the houses bidding on this contract that any Command- 
ery having made a previous or subsequent contract with any 
one of them would be privileged to cancel such contract upon 
thirty days' notice, should the Grand Commandery make a 
general contract. 

Seventh. In order to make the Indiana uniform conform 
to that of other Grand Jurisdictions, the "half round black 
silk buttons" were adopted for Commanders and Past Com- 
manders. 

Now therefore by direction of the Grand Commandery and 
by virtue of the authority in me vested as Grand Commander 
of the Grand Commandery of Indiana it is hereby ordered 



52 Proceedings Gi'and Commanderij [May 11, 



First. That the contract entei-ed into and between the M. 
C. Lilley Company of Columbus, Ohio, and the Grand Com- 
mandery is hereby approved. 

Second. That all existing contracts for Uniforms held by 
Indiana Commanderies be cancelled under the thirty day clause 
and future orders for uniforms held for the contractor firm. 

Third. That all orders for uniforms must go directly from 
the constituent Commanderies to the M. C. Lilley Co., Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and that within thirty days after the receipt of the 
goods must pay direct to the uniform house for the goods so 
received. 

Fourth. That all Commanderies will be held chargeable for 
all uniforms used or ordered by them during the life of this 
contract. 

Fifth. That complaint as to service, workmanship or ma- 
terial is to be made through the Uniform Committee which 
can be reached through the Grand Recorder's office. 

Sixth. That uniformity may prevail each Commander will 
arrange at once to secure for himself and the Past Commanders 
of his respective Commandery, the regulation black silk buttons 
and have same placed on the uniforms in lieu of the ones now in 
use. 

Done at Marion, Indiana, August 31st, 1920. 

Harry C. Moore, 
Grand Commander. 

Attest : 

Olin E. Hollov^^ay, 

Grand Recorder Pro-tem. 

GRAND COMMANDERY KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF 
INDIANA. 

OFFICE OF THE GRAND COMMANDER. 

Marion, Indiana, September 13, 1920. 

General Order No. 2. 

Whereas, It has pleased our Heavenly Father to take from 
us our dearly beloved Grand Recorder, E. Sir Calvin W. 
Prather, who passed away August 1st, 1920, it becomes my duty 
to fill the office made vacant by his death. 

Therefore, By the authority in me vested as Grand Com- 
mander Knights Templar of Indiana, I have this day selected 
and appointed E. Sir William H. Swintz, of South Bend Com- 
mandery No. 13, to serve as Grand Recorder until the next an- 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 53 



nual Conclave of the Grand Commandery, or until his successor 
shall be elected and installed. 

By command of 

Harry C. Moore, 
Grand Covi^nander. 
Attest : 

Olin E. Holloway, 

Acting Grand Recorder. 

GRAND COMMANDERY KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF 
INDIANA. 

OFFICE OF THE GRAND COMMANDER. 

Marion, Indiana, December 1, 1920. 
General Order No. 3. 

To the Officers and Members of the Grand and Subordinate 
Commanderies of Indiana, Greeting: 

The matter of official visitation by the Grand Officers of 
the Grand Commandery having been left to the determination 
of the Grand Commander, I herewith issue the following order 
and instructions : 

The Grand Jurisdiction has been divided into eight districts 
and each of these will be under the supervision of one of the 
Grand Officers, who will be held responsible for the work as- 
signed. The districts and the assignments are as follows: 

District No. 1. Grand Sword Bearer, George F. Hitchcock: 
Hammond, Gary, LaPorte, Plymouth, East Chicago, Michigan 
City, South Bend, Valparaiso. 

District No. 2. Grand Captain General, Gaylard M. Leslie: 
Fort Wayne, Kendnllville, Elkhart, Warsaw, Angola, Goshen, 
Mishawaka, Columbia City. 

District No. 3. Deputy Grand Commander, Eugene Vatet: 
Huntington, Bluffton, Logansport, Delphi, Wabash, Marion, 
Kokomo, Tipton. 

District No. 4. Grand Senior Warden, Albert D. Ogborn: 
Muncie, Winchester, Richmond, Indianapolis, Anderson, New 
Castle, Connersville. 

District No. 5. Grand Standard Bearer, Edward J. Scoon- 
over: Terre Haute, Brazil, Lafayette, Frankfort, Clinton, 
Greencastle, Lebanon, Crawfordsville. 

District No. 6. Grand Warder, William M. Sparks: Mar- 
tinsville, Franklin, Shelbyville, Greenfield, Columbus, Greens- 
burg, Knightstown, Rushville. 



54 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



District No. 7. Grand Generalissimo, George A. Newhouse: 
Jeffersonville, Seymour, Madison, New Albany, Aurora. 

District No. 8. Grand Junior Warden, Dirrelle Chaney: 
Evansville, Vincennes, Washington, Princeton, Sullivan, Bed- 
ford. 

It is expected that the officer assigned, will take immediate 
steps to perfect a good working organization of the Command- 
eries in his district and use every means to secure an added 
interest in Templar Masonry; assist each Commandery in 
solving its individual problems; and bring each one regardless 
of its present status, to a higher plane of efficiency, in the 
Manual, Ritual, and observance of the Laws. 

He will hold a round table conference with the Command- 
ers in his district, discuss ways and means of conducting the 
work, and arrange for dates when visitations can be made. He 
will arrange to hold special conclaves in which several of the 
Commanderies will participate and at which the officers of 
one of theni or those selected from among them, will confer 
one or more of the Orders as he may direct. This will all be 
done under his supervision and he will assist the officers and 
knights, correct irregularities, and do everything possible to 
create a greater interest and enthusiasm among the m;embers 
in his district. 

It is to be definitely understood that while the Grand Officer 
will give instructions, he will in no way infringe on the work 
of the Inspector-General, but will conform to all interpreta- 
tions and instructions as given by him. To the end that the 
Grand Officer may be in full harmony with the Instructor-Gen- 
eral, a conference has been arranged at which time definite in- 
structions will be given by the Inspector-General regarding the 
most common errors and deviations which are made in the 
Manual and Ritual; the needs of the Commanderies in each 
district; and suggestions as to how conditions may be improved. 
It is also understood that in no case will the Grand Officer 
make any decisions or interpretations in regard to the Manual, 
Ritual or Laws, unless he has positive knowledge of the opinion 
of the Grand Commander or Inspector-General on the subject, 
and should such cases arise he will submit the matter to them 
for advice. 

After he has held the round table of the Commanders and 
has fully acquainted himself with the conditions and needs of 
the various Commanderies, he will report to the Grand Com- 
mander full details in regard to each, and will follow with 
other reports as the work progresses. To those Commanderies 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 55 



which showed a score of eighty or less in the last inspection he 
will give special attention and assistance. 

The Grand Officer thus assigned is the representative of the 
Grand Commander, and it is earnestly desired that every 
officer and knight will not only extend to him the usual court- 
eous reception, but will make an especial effort to become per- 
sonally acquainted with him, confer with him, and give him 
all the information possible which will aid in stimulating 
greater interest in the Commandery and of bringing about the 
desired results. He will be more than a visitor, he is an ad- 
visor, instructor, and helper, and will try and take the same 
interest in your Commandery as his own. 

Never before has our Country needed "good men and true" 
as today, and f urgently call upon every Templar Mason to 
join in this revival effort, and come out and be just what he 
professes, and to take a firm stand as a true defendant of the 
Christian religion and the principles for which our Order has 
ever stood. What we need today is not more Templars, but 
better Templars, and surely nowhere outside the Church of 
cur Blessed Emanuel can we receive the inspiration we should 
have, better than within the Asylum of our Commandery. 

In order to have better Templars our Commanderies must 
at all times confer the Orders in an earnest and effective man- 
ner, and never should the work be done otherwise. It is far 
better that the Candidate should wait until a later date than 
for the Commandery to confer the Orders in a half hearted 
or makeshift way. 

No Commandery is going to be better than the man at the 
head of it, and no Commandery is going to produce satisfac- 
tory results which has officers v/ho only fill the stations as 
stepping stones for the shoulder straps and the gold lace. It 
is necessary that they should feel the responsibility of their 
office and take a keen interest in the affairs of the Command- 
ery, and always do their part in a dignified way, otherwise 
they can not hope to make the desired impression on the candi- 
dates or the members. But while much is expected from the 
officers, it is also necessary that they receive the loyal support 
of the members and every Knight should do his part to co- 
operate in making our Order the success it should be. 

I quote you these lines from one of our distinguished 
f raters : 

"Isn't it strange that Princes and Kings, 

And clowns that caper in sawdust rings, 

And common people like you and me. 

Are all workers for Eternity?" 



56 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



"Each is given a bag of tools, 
A shapeless mass and a book of rules, 
And each must make ere his life is flown, 
A stumbling block or a stepping stone." 
It is the desire that this order should reach every Knight in 
the Grand Jurisdiction and I hope each Commander will 
arrange to have it be so. 

Very courteously yours, 

Harry C. Moore, 
Grand Commander. 
Attest : i 

Wm. H. Swintz, 

Grand Recorder. 

GRAND COMMANDERY KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF 
INDIANA. 

OFFICE OF THE GRAND COMMANDER. 

General Order No. 4 — Christmas Observance, 1920. 

Marion, December 1, 1920. 

To the Officers and Members of the Grand Commandery and 
the Officers and Members of Constituent Commanderies, 
Knights Templar of Indiana, Greeting: 

The following sentimejit has been prepared for the coming 
Christmas observance: 
To Joseph Kyle Orr, Most Eminent Grant Master: 

Three hundred thousand Knights Templar sincerely wish 
you: 

"A Merry Christmas, and a Happy Christmas, such as fol- 
lows duty well observed, faith steadfastly kept, vows scru- 
pulously performed, ears ever attuned to the cry of the father- 
less and helpless, and a heart always beating in unison with 
your fellow man." 

The Grand Master sends the following response: 
Sir Knights: 

The words duty, faith and vows should never fall on closed 
ears nor hardened hearts. Official position may bring high 
honors but not without responsibilities. The vows of Knight- 
hood are individual to you and to me. One would be faithless 
to his conscience who should fail to impress upon the heart 
of each Knight Templar that he is under vows for the defense 
of the innocent, the helpless and the destitute. 

It seems fitting at this Christmas season that by some con- 
crete act we should give expression to a reconsecration of our 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 57 



better selves. Deeds speak louder than words and go further 
than good intentions. 

What part shnll be yours of the good deeds tl:at shall be 
done this day in the name of our beloved Order? 

We are in the midst of a year of reconstruction. As we 
come down from the pinnacle of Prosperity there are many 
pitfalls. 

In the industrial world there has been an orgy of riotous 
living. A wave of wasteful extravagance has held high car- 
nival. 

But almost over-night we have awakened. Common sense 
is coming back. The cure is to be quicker — by a mustard 
plaster — though most of us would rather have had a poultice. 

The laborer is still worthy of his hire but competition will 
show him the wisdom of producing more than he consumes. 

This is a world-wide movement — it concerns you and me 
and we can not side-step it. In the words of a Georgia 
philosopher: 

"***** * * I asked— 
"What is the world?" and you replied — 
"Myself and you — by millions multiplied." 

Born of a spirit of unrest, there are scattered in our 
country small groups of firebrands, who, thank God, remain a 
minority, yet are still a disturbing factor. 

If the three hundred thousand Knights of the Temple, and 
the two million of their Masonic brethren whom they might 
influence, could become, irrespective of party, an outstanding 
and outspoken force for Law and Order — for Liberty — for 
independence of thought and action of every worker, they 
would put the heel of public opinion upon the heads of every 
hydra-headed monster who under a crimson flag seeks to sow 
sedition and discontent among our people. 

Then might we realize, in the woi'ds of Past Grand Master 
Hugh McCurdy: 

"The world is not asking how far back into the past we 
can trace our family tree but how far into the future shall 
reach the influence of our present everyday lives." 

"For the structure that we raise 
Time is with material filled — 
Our todays and yesterdays 
Are the blocks with which we build." 
Today, as never before, the world needs us at our best. 
Courteously yovirs, 

Joseph Kyle Orr, 

Grand Masfer. 



58 Proceedings Grand Commayidery [May 11, 



The above sentiment and response are both timely and 
appropriate, and I sincerely trust that the officers and mem- 
bers sf each Commandery in this Grand Jurisdiction will 
assemble in their Asylum on Saturday morning', December 25, 
1920, at 11 o'clock and participate in the ceremonies of the 
Christmas observance, as arranged in the Ritual. 

While we enjoy the happiness of the Christmas season and 
celebrate the coming to the world of the Blessed Emanuel, the 
Great Captain of our Salvation, mny each one be reminded of 
his vows of Christian Knighthood and take opportunity to 
actually feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and help and com- 
fort the widow and orphan, and thereby give definite expression 
of thanks and gratitude for the manifold blessings and com- 
forts which have come to us. 

Prompt report of the ceremonies should be made to the 
Grand Commander, giving full information regarding the 
program, the number of Knights present, and the amount of 
donations or other charitable woi'k done. 

Your Grand Commander extends knightly greeting to every 
Knight with the sincere wish that the Christmastide may be 
most joyous and happy. 

Sincerely and courteously yours, 

Harry C. Moore, 
Grand Covimander. 
Attest: 

Wm. H. Swintz, 

Grand Recordc'. 

The address of the Grand Master is: .Joseph Kyle Orr, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

GRAND COMMANDERY K. T. OF INDIANA. 

Office of 

R. E. GRAND COMMANDER. 

Marion, April 18, 1921. 

General Order No. 5. 

Dispensation is hereby granted to all Commanderies 
and individual Sir Knights in this Grand Jurisdiction 
to appear in Templar Uniform at Indianapolis, on the 
occasion of the Sixty-seventh Annual Conclave of the 
Grand Commandery of Indiana, May 11 and 12, 1921, 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 59 

and on the pilgrimage to Indianapolis and the i^eturn 
to their respective stations. 

Harry C. Moore, 

Grand Commander. 
Attest : 
Wm. H. Swintz, 

Grand Recorder. 

ADDENDA "D" 

INTER-STATE COURTESIES. 

May 20, 1920, requested D;i!las Commandeiy No. 6, Dallas, 
Texas, to confer the Orders on Wilbur Hipskind, for Wabash 
Commandery No. 37, Wabash, Indiana. 

August 17, 1920, reque.'sted Golden Gate Commandery No. 
16, San Francisco, California, to confer the Orders on John E. 
Banks, for Tipton Commandery No. 52, Tipton, Indiana. 

August 17, 1920, requested Raper Commandery No. 1, Indi- 
anapolis, to confer the Orders on Turner Linton Bunnell, for 
DeMolay Commandery No. 12, Louisville, Kentucky. 

August 28, 1920, requested DeMolay Commandery No. 12, 
Louisville, Kentucky, to waive jurisdiction over Andrew Sohn, 
as a favor to New Albany Commandery No. 5, New Albany, 
Indiana. 

August 30, 1920, requested the Grand Commander of Ken- 
tucky to grant dispensation for Owensboro Commandery No. 
15 and Henderson Commandery No, 14, of Kentucky to visit 
LaValette Commandery No. 15 for a special conclave. 

September 26, "1920, requested San Francisco Commandery 
No. 10, San Francisco, California, to confer the Orders on 
Clifton Miles Beaty, for Apollo Commandery No. 19, Kendall- 
ville, Indiana. 

October 18, 1920, requested Rebecca Commandery No. 50, 
Sherron, Pennsylvania, to confer the Orders on Robert W. Wil- 
son, for Tipton Commandery No. 52, Tipton, Indiana. 

October 18, 1920, requested Raper Commandery No. 1, Indi- 
anapolis, to confer the Orders on Glen C. Holmes, for St. 
Albian Commandery, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

November 4, 1920, reouested DeMolay Commandery No. 
7, Boston, Massachusetts, to confer the Orders on George Cal- 
vin Prather, for Anderson Commandery No. 32, Anderson, 
Indiana. 



60 Proceedings Grand Commander y [May 11, 



January 24, 1921, requested St. Omar Commarsdery No. 9, 
Missoula, Montana, to confer the Orders on Ralph R. Starrett, 
for Madison Commandery No. 22, Madison, Indiana. 

March 12, 1921, requested the Grand Commander of Georgia 
to have a Commandery at Atlanta, Georgia, to confer the 
Orders on Harrold J. Hockin, for New Albany Commandery 
No. 5, New Albany, Indiana. 

ADDENDA ''E" 

DISPENSATIONS GRANTED AND REFUSED. 

DISPENSATIONS GRANTED. 

May 25, 1920, to Anderson Commandery No. 32, to elect a 
Recorder to fill vacancy caused by resignation. 

June 10, 1920, to Raper Commandery No. 1, to appear in 
Templar Uniform on St. John's Day and attend the exercises 
at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, Indianapolis. 

July 30, 1920, to Winchester Commandery No. 53, to net 
as escort for the Grand Lodge F. & A. M. of Indiana at the 
laying of the corner stone for a school at Union City, Indiana. 

August 18, 1920, to Elkhart Commandery No. 21, to elect 
a Treasurer to fill vacancy caused by resignation. 

November 5, 1920, to Kokomo Commandery No. 36, to ap- 
pear in Templar Uniform while making a pilgrimage to Ander- 
son, Indiana, to attend a conclave of Knights Templar. 

November 18, 1920, to LaPorte Commandery No. 12, to ap- 
pear in Templar Uniform while acting as an escort to South 
Bend Commandery when they visited LaPorte Commandery. 

November 23,, 1920, to South Bend Commandery No. 13, to 
appear in Templar Uniform while making a pilgrimage to 
LaPorte, Indiana, to attend a conclave of Knights Templar. 

January 3, 1921, to Aurora Commandery No. 17, to hold 
their annual election of officers on January 10, 1921, having 
failed to do so at the regular time. 

January 10, 1921, to Anderson Commandery No. 32, to wear 
the Templar Uniform while making a pilgrimage to Kokomo, 
Indiana, to attend a conclave of Knights Templar. 

January 12, 1921, to Tipton Commandery No. 52, to elect a 
Junior Warden, to fill vacancy caused by resignation. 

January 26, 1921, to Fort Wayne Commandery No. 4, to 

appear in Templar Unifoi^m on the occasion of their annual 

,ball held in the Scottish Rite Cathedral, Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

January 29, 1921, to South Bend Commandery No. 13, to 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 61 



appear in Templar Uniform, on the occnsion of their annual 
ball held at the Oliver Hotel, South Bend, Indiana. 

February 5, 1921, to Seymour Commandery No. 56, to elect 
Trustees, as they failed to do so at the regular time. 

February 9, 1921, to Wabash Commandery No. 37, to appear 
in Templar Uniform while making the pilgrimage to Marion, 
Indiana, to attend a conclave of Knights Templar. 

March 10, 1921, I granted the request of the Grand Com- 
mander of Illinois, to permit Palestine Commandery No. 27, 
stationed at Paris, Illinois, to visit Terre Haute Commandery 
No. 16, on March 27, 1921. to participate in Easter Services. 

March 10, 1921, to Hammond Commandery No. 41, to act 
as an escort to the Grand Lodge F & A. M. of Indiana at the 
laying of the corner stone of the Masonic Temple in Hammond, 
Indiana. 

March 16, 1921, I granted the request of the Grand Com- 
mander of Illinois, to permit Mt. Carmel Commandery to join 
Princeton Commandery No. 46, in celebrating Easter. 

March 22, 1921, to East Chicago Commandery No. 58, to 
appear in Templar Uniform, while making the pilgrimage to 
Hammond, Indiana, to attend the laying of the corner stone 
of the Masonic Temple, in Hammond, Indiana. 

April 15, 1921, to South Bend Commandery No. 13, to ap- 
pear in Templar Uniform while making a pilgrimage to La- 
Porte, Indiana, to attend a conclave of Knights Templar. 

April 15, 1921, to LaPorte Commandery No. 12, to appear 
in Templar Uniform, while acting as an escort to South Bend 
Commandery, when they visited LaPorte, Indiana, to attend a 
conclave of Knights Templar. 

DISPENSATIONS REFUSED. 

On October 30, 1920, I refused a dispensation for Richmond 
Commandery No. 8, to appear in Templar Uniform to partic- 
ipate in a general observance of "Armistice Day". 

On April 19, 1921, I advised South Bend Commandery No. 
13 that the Grand Commander could not issue a dispensation 
for them to change their stated meeting to another date. 

ADDENDA "F" 

CHANCES IN BY-LAWS. 

May 20, 1920, approved amendment for LaValette Com- 
mandery No. 15, making the compensation of the Recorder 60 
cents per member per annum and payable quarterly. 

August 19, 1920, approved amendment for Anderson Com- 



62 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



mandery No. 32, making the fee for the Orders $50.00 instead 
of $30.00. 

November 5, 1920, approved amendment for Lafayette Com- 
mandery No. 3, making the salary of the Recorder $100.00 per 
annum. 

November 5, 1920. approved amendmeiit for Muncio Com- 
mandery No. 18, making the fee for the Orders $75.00 and 
naming time when uniform shall be purchased. 

March 29, 1921, approved amendment for Terre Haute 
Commandery No. 16, making the fee for the Orders $150.00, 
the same to also cover the cost of the uniform. 

April 29, 1921, approved amendment for Mishawaka Com- 
mandery No. 51, making the fee for the Orders $50.00; the 
compensation of the Recorder $1.00 for each conclave; and the 
compensation of the Sentinel, $1.00 for each conclave if there 
is no woi'k in the Orders, and $2.00 if the Orders are conferred. 

April 29, 1921, approved an entirely new set of By-Laws 
for South Bend Commandery No. 13, in lieu of the old ones. 

ADDENDA "G" 

CIRCULAR CONCERNING MINUTES. 

GRAND COMMANDERY KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF 
INDIANA. 

OFFICE OF GRAND RECORDER. 

Indianapolis, Ind., December 27, 1920. 

To the Eminent Coinmander and Recorder of each Co>istituent 

Commandery of Knights Teniphir in Indiana. 
Dear Fraters: 

In the "Form of Minutes for use of Commanderief, Sub- 
ordinate to Grand Commandery of Indiana" there appear the 
following instructions : 

"Transcribe fully all General Orders, Dispensations and 
other Official Documents", and "Copy Annual Return to Grand 
Recorder, including Roster of Membership in full." 

At the last Annual Conclave of the Grand Commandery, 
the Grand Commander was authorized to appoint a committee 
to revise the present requirements and to prepare a new set 
of instructions for Recorders. 

The Committee has reported, and by order of R. E. Grand 
Commander Harry C. Moore, I inform you that the Form of 
Minutes now in your possession will continue in effect with 
two changes, as follows: 



1921] of the State of. Indiana. 63 

Under "Notes", strike out lines 10 and 11 and insert there- 
for "After General Orders, Dispensations, and other Official 
Documents have been read to the Commandery, they shall be 
filed in a suitable book or cabinet and a record made in the 
minutes showing the number, subject matter, and date of the 
communication and the action taken thereon", and "Record in 
the minutes tiiat the Annual Return to the Grand Recorder was 
made and then file the copy of the Return for future reference." 

I am pleased to submit this decision, as it will relieve the 
Recorder of considerable work and the information will be on 
file. 

Courteously yours, 

WM. H. SWINT7, 

Grcnul Recorder. 
GRAXD COMXA>DER'S ADDRESS REFEKRJ-D. 

K. E. Sir Leonidas P. Newby, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following- for the Committee on 
Jurisprudence : 

Resolved, That so much of the R. E. Grand Com- 
mander's Address as refers to the death of R. E, Sir 
Frederick Glass, Past Grand Commander, be referred 
to a special committee ; 

That so much as refers to the death of R. E. Sir 
Henry H. Lancaster, Past Grand Commander, be re- 
ferred to a special committee ; 

That so much as refers to the death of E. Sir Calvin 
W. Prather, Grand Recorder, be referred to a special 
committee ; 

That so much as refers to Distinguished Dead of 
Other Jurisdictions be referred to a special committee ; 

That so much as refers to Our Own Knightly Dead 
be referred to a special committee; 

That so much as refers to General Orders of the 
Grand Encampment, U. S. A., General Orders of the 
Grand Commander, Decisions, Dispensations, Dispen- 



64 Proceedings Grand Commanderij [May 11, 



sations Refused, Changes in By-Laws and Recommend- 
ations be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence ; 

That so much as refers to Grand Representatives, 
Inter-State Courtesies, Commandery Constituted, 
Records and Recorders, Installation of Grand Pre- 
late, Audit of Books, Appointment of Grand Recorder, 
Official Visitations and Templar Observances be ap- 
proved ; 

That so much as refers to the organization of a new 
Commandery at Peru be referred to the Committee on 
Charters and Dispensations. 

Which was adopted. 

SPECIAL COXMITTEES. 

R. E Sir Harry C. Moore, Grand Commander, an- 
nounced the following special committees : 

Oyi Death of R. E. Sir Frederick Glass, P. G. €.— 
Adrian Hamersly, Arthur F. Funkhouser, Walter T. 
Hardy, William A. Shoemaker, William E. McCormick. 

On Death of R. E. Sir Heyiry H. Lancaster, P. G. C. 
— William B. Hosford, Julius J. Greisel, James F. 
Treon, Sidney W. Curtis, Lewis E. Jones. 

On Death of E. Sir Calvin W. Prather — John L. 
Rupe, Kersey W. Maxwell, Hal T. Kitchin, Albert M. 
Thomas, Burdette F. McNear. 

On Distinguished Dead of Other Jurisdictions — 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Harry H. McDonald, Thomas 
B. Bohon, Benjamin F. Harrison, Will E. Beeson. 

On Our Own Knightly Dead — George W. Wagner, 
Norton E. Bickell, Jacob W. Eidson, Fred M. Starr, 
William G. McCormick. 



1921] 



of the State of hidiana. 



65 



EEPOKT OF C03DI1TTEE 0> CKS:i)EMIALS. 

E. Sir Karl F. Bosworth presented the following: 

To the Grand Commandery: 

Your Committee on Credentials courteously submits 
the following report, showing a complete roll of the 
Commanderies, together with the names of the repre- 
sentatives present and entitled to seats in the Grand 
Commandery at the present Annual Conclave, there be- 
ing a full representation of all Commanderies, with 
the exception of the Generalissimo of Michigan City 
Commandery No. 30 : 



No. 



Commanderies. 



Representatives. 



Raper 



Baldwin 



LaFayette 



Fort Wayne 



New Albany 



Connersville 



William D. Kerlin, E. C. 
Brandt C. Downey, Gen. 
Louis G. Buddenbaum, C. G. 

Fred J. Deitzer, E. C. 
Harry G. Auman, Gen. 
Everett E. Stroup, C. G. 



Fred N. Prass, E. C. 
J.ames L. Wunderlee, 
John Cockle, C. G. 



Gen. 



Clayton 0. Griffin, E. C. 

John H. Aiken, Gen. 

Fred H. Pocock, C. G., proxy. 

August Barth, E. C. 
Carl N. F. Best, Gen. 
Arthur E. Brown, C. G. 

Paul C. Hurst. E. C. 
Fred C. Neal, Gen. 
Harry P. Riley, C. G. 



66 



Proceedings Grcmd Commandery [May 11, 



CREDENTIALS— Continued. 



No. 


COMMANDERIES. 


Representatives. 


8 


Richmond 


William D. Scoble, E C 


9 
10 


Knightstown 

Warsaw 


George L. Smith, Gen. 
LeRoy E. Browne, C. G. 

Kersey W. Maxwell, E. C. 
Thomas Boecher, Gen. 
Floyd J. Newby, C. G. 

Marshall F. Wallace, E. C. 


11 


Greencastle 


Ed. C. Cammack, Gen. proxy. 
Chester E. Bolinger, C. G. 

Heber H. Ellis, E. C. 


1^ 


LaPorte 


Edward E. Caldwell, Gen. proxy. 
Emmett E. Greene, C. G. 

Philo Q. Doran, E. C. 


1? 


South Bend 


Daniel A. Lewis, Gen. 
William F. Gooden, C. G. 

Perry C. Traver, E. C. 


I'l 


Columbus 


George A. Swintz, Gen. 
Peter F. Ahrens, C. G. 

Albert B. Stevens, E. C. 


15 


La V ALETTE 


Jesse R. Everroad, Gen. 
George W. Robertson, C. G. 

Arthur F. Funkhouser, E. C. 


Ifi 


Terre Haute 


Charles W. Hartloff, Gen. 
Frank C. Baugh, C. G. 

William G. Clark, E. C. 






Alwert Balsley, Gen. 
Will W. Adamson, C. G. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



67 



CREDENTIALS— Continued. 



COMMANDERIES. 



Representatives. 



Aurora 



MUNCIE 



Apollo 



ViNCENNES — 



Marion 



Madison 



Franklin 



St. John_. 



Crawfordsville 



James F. Treon, E. C. 

Matt S. Gibson, Gen. 

James A. Riddell, C. G. proxy. 

Carl H. M. Bilby, E. C. 
Moses E. Black, Gen. 
Everett Moffitt, C. G. 

George S. Snyder, E. C. 

J. Austin Jones, Gen. proxy. 

Clifford H. Martin, C. G., proxy, 

Karl F. Bosworth, E. C. 
Justus H. Henkes, Gen. proxy, 
John T. Boyd, C. G. 

Guy Duckwall, E. C. 
James S. Sisson, Gen. 
John A. Rhue, C. G. 

Charles Cox, E. C. 
Harry H. Cope, Gen. 
Robert F. Stanton, C. G. 

Floyd Cutsinger, E. C. 
E. Victor Bergen, Gen. 
John H. Tarlton, C. G. 

Thomas L. Cooper, E. C. 
Leroy M. Hardy, Gen. 
Herman A. Wallace, C. G. 

Frederick A. Turner, E. C, 

proxy. 
Eugene M. Goodbar, Gen. 
Glen N. Swartz, C. G. 



68 



Proceedings Grand Commandery []\Iay 11, 



CREDENTIALS— Continued. 



No. 


COMMANDERIES. 


Representatives. 


26 


Plymouth 


Jacob W. Eidson, E. C. 
Ed N. Cook, Gen. 
John W. Kitch, C. G. 


?.l 


Jeffersonville 


Thomas B. Bohon, E. C, proxy. 






Fielding: L. Wilson, Gen., proxy. 




' 


William G. Young, C. G. 


?8 


Valparaiso 


Lewis Edward Jones, E. C. 






Frank R. Lunbeck, Gen. 






Charles W. Light, G. C, proxy. 


?Q 


Frankfort 


Walter L. Brown, E. C. 






Lewis M. Morris, Gen. 






G. Max Fowler, C. G. 


80 


Michigan City 


Walter Williams, E. C, proxy. 






Walter H. Daly, C. G. 


81 


Elkhart 


Grant B. Bushnell, E. C. 






George Snyder, Gen. 






Robert R. Haggerty, C. G. 


89 


Anderson 


Albertus 0. Stratton, E. C. 






Gustave Johnson, Gen. 






Richard Downward, C. G. 


88 


Washington 


William G. McCormick, E. C. 






Frank McGehee, Gen. 






Roy D. Smiley, C. G. 


34 


Gyrene 


Burdette F. McNear, E. C. 
G. Fred Yontz, Gen. 
Georgs J. Leininger, C. G. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



69 



CREDENTIALS— Continued. 



No. 


COMMANDERIES. 


Representatives. 


35 


Huntington 


William A. Shoemaker, E. C. 
Herbert T. Bunce, Gen. proxy. 
Clark C. Griffith, C. G., proxy. 


.Sfi 


KOKOMO 


William E. Seidel, E. C. 






George L. Davis, Gen., proxy. 






William E. Williams, C. G. 


37 


Wabash 


Jay L. Brown, E. C. 






John R. Logan, Gen., proxy. 






Ernest B. Wooldridge, C. G. 


38 


Bluffton 


Charles J. Blackman, E. C. 






Grant Pyle, Gen. 






Wm. Luther Kiger, C. G. 


39 


Greenfield 


John J. Early, E. C. 






Jesse D. Hughes, Jr., Gen. 






Elwood Barnard, C. G. 


40 


Delphi 


George J. Busteed, E. C, proxy. 






Thomas J. Ryan, Gen., proxy. 






Louis G. Niewerth, C..G. 


41 


Hammond 


Walter T. Hardy, E. C. 






William E. Startsman, Gen. 






Jacob H. Kasper, C. G., proxy. 


4?. 


Bedford _ 


William E. McCormick, E. C. 






Charles H. Strupe, Gen., proxy 






Robert W. Stevens, C. G., proxy 


43 


Lebanon 


Hardy Lumb, E. C, proxy. 






Arlie E. Lewis, Gen. 






Ben H. Coombs, C. G. 



70 



Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



CREDENTIALS -Continued. 



No. 


COMMANDERIES. 


Representatives. 


44 


New Castle 


Claud L. Van Zant, E. C. 






Isaac M. Langston, Gen. 






Roy Kenyon, C G., proxy. 


45 


Angola 


Fred M. Starr, E. C, proxy. 
Melvin W. Kratz, Gen. 








» 


Thomas J. Creel, C. G. 


46 


Princeton 


James D. Ryan, E. C. 

Geo. F. Kilmartin, Gen., proxy. 










Robert A. Woods, C. G., proxy. 


47 


Brazil 


Albert M. Thomas, E. C. 






Samuel G. Ralston, Gen. 






Rodrick M. Stewart, C. G., 






proxy. 


48 


Clinton 


Benjamin F. Harrison, E. C. 
Oliver P. Middleton, Gen., proxy. 










Guy Briggs, C. G. 


49 


RUSHVILLE 


William M. Amos, E. C. • 






Lawrence L. Allen, Gen. 






Bert '0. Simpson, C. G. 


50 


Goshen 


Orlin J. Schrock, E. C. 






Peter R. White, Gen. 






Harry V. Brown, C. G., proxy. 


51 


MiSHAWAKA 


Julius A. Newman, E. C. 






George C. White, Gen. 






William H. Tupper, C. G. 


52 


Tipton 


Sidney W. Curtis, E. C. 






Sam D. Groves, Gen. 






Clyde E. Barr, C. G. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



71 



CREDEN HALS— Continued. 



No. 


COMMANDERIES. 


Representatives. 


58 


WINCHESTE21 


Will E. Beeson, E. C, proxy. 






Bert Matteson, Gen. 






Albert F. Huddleston, C. G., 






proxy. 


54 


Sullivan 


Allen G. Pate, E. C. 






Harry L. Stratton, Gen. 






John Ersinger, C. G. 


55 


Martinsville 


William A. Cobb, E. C. 






Roy E. Tilford, Gen., proxy. 






Peter F. W. Newman, C. G. 


56 


Seymour 


Harry H. McDonald, E. C. 






Clifford H. Long, Gen. 






Arthur C. Livensparger, C. G. 


57 


Gary 


Julius J. Griesel, E. C. 






Robert Kurth, Gen. 






William M. Hampton, C. G. 


58 


East Chicago 


Norton E. Bickell, E. C. 
Harry L. Rudolf, Gen. 
James Thomson, C. G., proxy 


5Q 


Green SBURG 


Hal T. Kitchin, E. C. 






Roy Rutherford, Gen. 






Locke Bracken, C. G. 



Respectfully submitted; 

Karl F. Bosworth, 
: ^ Jay L. Brown, 
August Barth, 
Julius A. Newman, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 



72 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 

GRAND TREASl EER'S REPORT. 

E. Sir Vestal W. Woodward, Grand Treasurer, pre- 
sented the following : 

To the Grmid Commander, Officers and Members of 
the Grand Commandery Knights Templar of Indi- 
ana: 

Your Grand Treasurer herewith submits his report 
of the finances of this Grand Body for the year end- 
ing May 1, 1921, as follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

May 1, 1920, balance in hands of Treasurer $ 8,841.63 

June 21, 1920, received from Calvin W. 

Prather, Grand Recorder $ 9.70 

July 1, 1920, received from Calvin W. 

Prather, Grand Recorder 35.00 

July 31, 1920, received from Calvin W. 

Prather, Grand Recorder 14.60 59.30 

$ 8,900.93 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

I have paid out warrants drawn on me by 
Calvin W. Prather, Grand Recorder, 

No. 1 to 18, inclusive $ 6,874.18 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, Aug'- 

ust 1, 1920 2,026.75 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in hands of Treasurer % 2,026.75 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

I have paid out warrants drawn on me by 
0. E. Holloway, Grand Recorder, pro 
tern. No. 19 to 27, inclusive 293.26 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, Sep- 
tember 14, 1920 $ 1,733.49 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, Sep- 
tember 14, 1920 $ 1,733.49 

October 1, 1920, received from W. H. 

Swintz,' Grand Recorder % 35.00 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



73 



January 1, 1921, received fi'om W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 35.00 

January 31, 1921, received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 894.00 

February 14, 1921, received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 2,974.75 

February 21, 1921, received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 5,253.50 

March 3, 1921, received from W. H." 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 2,607.25 

March 22, 1921, received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 2,944.75 

April 4, 1921, received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 176.00 

April 20, 1921. received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 255.50 

April 29, 1921. received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Record-r 93.18 

April 30, 1921, received from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 131.50 

April 30. 1921, i-eceived from W. H. 

Swintz, Grand Recorder 787.55 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

I have paid warrants drawn on me by W. 
H. Swintz, No. 28 to 45, inclusive 



.$16,187.98 



$17,921.47 



3,088.71 



Balance in hands of Treasurer May 

1, 1921 $14,832.76 

The follov/ing is a statement of the permanent funds of 
the Grand Commandery: 

15 Hendricks County Bonds, 472%, $224.00 each__$ 3,360.00 
2 Pulaski County Bonds 4i/2%, 168.00 each_. 336.00 

2 Knox County Bonds, iVz7c, 738.75 each__ 1,477.50 

3 Harrison County Bonds, 5%, 640.00 each__ 1,920.00 
2 Madison County Bonds, 57c, 835.29 eich__ 1,670.58 
2 Sefton Mfg-. Co.. Pref. Stk. Cer., 1 000.00 each__ 2,000.00 
2 Indianapolis Y. M. C. A. Bonds, 1000.00 each__ 2.000.00 
2 Methodist Hosnital Bonds, 1,000.00 each__ 2,000.00 

United States War Saving-s Stamps 846.00 

2 Victory U. S. Bonds, 4%%, 1,000.00 each__ 2000.00 

1 Victory U. S. Bond, 4%%, 500.00 

1 Liberty U. S. Bond, 474% 1,000.00 



74 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



1 Liberty U. S. Bond, 41/4% 500.00 

3 Liberty U. S. Bonds, 4%% 2,896.20 

5 Liberty U. S. Bonds, 4^^% 5,000.00 

1 Certificnte of Deposit, J. F. Wild & Co , 551.46 

Total investments __$28,057.74 

Cash balance in Treasury 14,832.76 

Makes total assets of Grand Commandery $42,890.50 

Increase in cash over last year's balance $ 5,991.13 

Increase over last year's securities $ 2,683.05 

Interest collected on securities $ 1,183.05 

Interest collected on daily bank balance 93.18 

2 Knox County Bonds, $106.50 each. 
2 Knox County Bonds, 738.75 each. 
2 Pulaski County Bonds, 168.00 each. 

matured during the year and by direction of the Finance Com- 
mittee have been re-invested. 

The cash balance is deposited in the National City 
Bank of Indianapolis. 

The bonds and securities are deposited in a safety 
vault, in the Fletcher American National Bank of 
Indianapolis. 

Courteously yours, . 

Grand Treasurer. 
Which was referred to the Auditing Committee. 

GRAXD RECORDER'S REPORT. 

E. Sir William H. Swintz, Grand Recorder, pre- 
sented the following: 

To the R. E. Grand Commander, Officers and Sir 
Knights of the Grand Commandery Knights Temp- 
lar of Indiana: 

I herewith present the report of the Grand Re- 
corder for the fiscal year ending May 1, 1921. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 75 

The financial report is divided into two sections, 
the first showing the transactions from May 1, 1920, 
to August 1, 1920, the date of the death of my 
esteemed predecessor, E. Sir Calvin W. Prather. The 
second section shows the transactions from August 1, 
1920, to May 1, 1921. 

Financial Statement May 1, 1920 to July 31, 1920. 
Cash balance May 1, 1920 $ 8,841.63 

RECEIPTS. 

83. Tactics and Observances sold $ 14.60 

115. Refund of mileage and per diem, 

member of Temple Order Team_ 9.70 

138. Interest on Permanent Fund 35.00 

Total receipts 59.30 

Total, including- balance $ 8,900.93 

Disbursements. 

10. Indiana State Badges $ 126.00 

25. Rent for safety deposit box 5.00 

31. Postage stamps 111.00 

33. Grand Encampment dues 517.60 

75. Past Grand Commander's jewel 52.50 

81. Pay-roll, 1920 2,390.70 

82. Floral tribute, Frederick Glass, 

P. G. C. 15.40 

92. Premium on suiety bonds 37.50 

115. Grand Commandery Appropriations 523.89 

115. Expenses of Temple Order Team 87.35 

124. Stenographer and office expenses 98.80 

128. Printing and stationery 815.79 

138. Permanent fund — Securities pur- 
chased 1,500.00 

140. Annual Conclave, 1G20 592.65 

Total disbursements 6,874.18 

Cash balance July 31, 1920 $2,026.75 

Financial Statement July 31, 1920 to May 1, 1921. 
Cash balance July 31, 1920 $ 2,026.75 



76 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 11, 



RECEIPTS. 

10. Grand Commandery badges sold $ 5.00 

42. Dispensations and Chnrters 100.00 

83. Tactics and Observances sold 126.50 

138. Interest on Permanent fund 1,148.05 

141. Grand Commandery dues, 1920___ 14,715.25 

144. Interest on daily bank balance 93.18 

Total receipts 16,187.98 

Total, including balance $18,214.73 

Disbursements. 

25. Audit of books by Accountant 11.25 

25. Floral tributes 15.00 

25. Official visitation to Goshen Com- 
mandery 9.25 

55. Office rent for 1920 and 1921 600.00 

82. Funeral Expenses Past Grand Com- 
manders and Grand Officer 176.01 

124. Stenographer and Office Expenses- 382.37 

128. Printing and Stationery 385.04 

129. Grand Recorder's salary 600.00 

138. Interest added to Permanent Fund_ 1,183.05 
140. Railroad certificates — Annual con- 
clave, 1921 20.00 

Total disbursements $ 3,381.97 

Cash balance May 1. 1921 $14,832.76 

Permanent fund reported in 1920 $25,374.69 

Interest to May 1, 1921 1,183.05 

Invested from general fund 1,500.00 

Total permanent fund 28,057.74 

Total assets of Grand Commandery $42,890.50 

The annual reports of all constituent commanderies 
have been received for the calendar year of 1920 and 
all dues are paid. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 77 



Following- is the statistical report for 1920: 

STATISTICS. 

No. of Constituent Commanderies ]May 12, 1920 58 

No. of Commnndei'ies under dispensation 1 

Total No. of Constituent Commanderies May 11, 1921__ 59 
Membership December 31, 1919 10,352 

ADDITIONS. 

Knighted in 1920 1,448 

Reinstated 27 

Affiliated 74 

Total additions 1,549 

Total to be accounted for 11,901 

DEDUCTIONS. 

Died in 1920 160 

Demitted 131 

Suspended 58 

Expelled 1 

Total deductions 350 

Membership December 31, 1920 11,551 

Membership December 31, 1919 10,352 

Net increase in membership 1,199 

OBSERV.ANCES. 

The supply of books containing the ceremonies for 
observance of Christmas, Easter, Ascension Day and 
the Funeral Ritual becoming exhau.sted, with unfilled 
orders on hand, the R. E. Grand Commander and 
Grand Recorder, as authorized one year ago, had a 
new supply printed. The new edition is ready for 
distribution at 75 cents per copy. 

RITUALS. 

Revised rituals were received from the Grand En- 
campment in exchange for the old rituals and each 
Commanderv in Indiana now has five rituals receipted 



78 Proceedings Gi'and Commandery [May 11, 

for by the Eminent Commander, Generalissimo, Cap- 
tain General, Prelate and Recorder respectively. In 
addition to the above the R. E. Grand Commander, 
V. E. Deputy Grand Commander, Eminent Grand 
Generalissimo, Eminent Grand Captain General and 
Grand Recorder each has received one copy. 

Five of the old rituals in this grand jurisdiction 
were lost, for which the Commanderies at fault re- 
mitted to me $10.00 each and the $50.00 was for- 
warded to R. E. Frank H. Johnson, Grand Recorder 
of the Grand Encampment, for which I hold his re- 
ceipt. 

In closing, I wish to thank R. E. Grand Commander 
Harry C. Moore and all others who were instrumental 
in my being tendered the honor of being the Grand 
Recorder of this Grand Commandery. I very much 
appreciate the compliment and confidence. I have 
greatly enjoyed the work and have endeavored to fill 
the office in a proper manner. 

This report together with all books and papers is 

Sincerely and courteously submitted. 





Grafid Recorder-. 
Which was referred to the Auditing Committee. 

REPORT OF COMM^ITTEE OIV CORRESrOXBEXCE. 

E. Sir Robert A. Woods, Chairman, presented the 
following: 

To the Grayid Commandery : 

Your Committee on Correspondence herewith pre- 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 79 

sents ill print the eighth annual review of the Templar 
world as prepared by its Chairman. 

Courteously submitted, 

Robert A. Woods, 
William D. Scoble, 
Marshall F. Wallace, 
Charles Cox, 

Committee. 

Which was referred to the Committee on Jurispru- 
dence. 

RE3IABKS BY DLSTIXtUISHED GUESTS. 

Although the time was limited, the Grand Com- 
mandery would not again convene until tomorrow 
morning and a number of our guests could not remain 
with us for the second day, the Grand Commander 
therefore courteously insisted that each one who could 
not remain throughout the conclave should give us a 
short address. The request was graciously complied 
with and the remarks of each of the following were 
received with enthusiasm: George M. Moulton, M, E. 
Past Grand Master; William B. Melish, M. E. Fast 
Grand Master; William L. Sharp, R. E. Grand Junior 
Warden; George T. Campbell, R. E. Grand Captain of 
the Guard; Samuel P. Cochran, P. G. C. of Texas; 
Roland M, Hollock, Grand Commander of Illinois, and 
George W. Bunton, Grand Prelate of Ohio, personal 
representative of the Grand Commander of Ohio. 

REGRETS. 

Knightly greetings were received from four of our 
own Past Grand Commanders, George W. F. Kirk, John 
H. Nicholson, John E. Redmond and William E. Perry- 
man, each of whom regretted his inability to be pres- 
ent owing to physical ailments. Past Grand Com- 
mander George H. Steel, now stationed at Fort D. A. 



80 Proceedings Grand Commander y [May 12, 

Russell in Wyoming, could not leave his post at present 
for the length of time that would he required to attend 
this conclave. 

ADJOIRAED. 

At 1 o'clock P. M., after prayer by E. Sir John C. 
Parrett, Grand Prelate, the Grand Commandery of 
Knights Templar of the State of Indiana adjourned 
until 9 o'clock tomorrow morning. 



SECOND DAY. 

Indianapolis, Thursday, May 12, 1921, A. 0. 803. 

The Grand Commandery Knights Templar of Indi- 
ana, pursuant to adjournment, assembled at 9 o'clock 
this morning, R. E. Sir Harry C. Moore, Grand Com- 
mander, presiding. Grand Officers, Past Grand Of- 
ficers and representatives present as on yesterday. De- 
votional exercises were led by E. Sir John C. Parrett, 
Grand Prelate, whereupon the Grand Commander de- 
clared the Grand Commandery ready for business. 

3QMTKS APPROTED. 

Pending the reading of the minutes of yesterday's 
session, on motion of R. E. Sir Henri T. Conde, Past 
Grand Commander, the further reading thereof was 
dispensed with and the minutes approved. 

ADDRESS OF WILLIAM H. MORRIS. 

The Grand Commander presented R. E. William H. 
Norris, of Manchester, Iowa, Grand Captain General 
of the Grand Encampment, who was with us as the per- 
sonal representative of the M. E. Grand Master, Joseph 
Kyle Orr. Sir Knight Norris addressed the Grand 
Commandery as follows: 

To the Officers and Members of the Grand Commandery 
Knights Templar of the State of Indiana: 
Brethren : It is especially pleasing to me to be 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 81 

permitted to visit your Grand Commandery in an of- 
ficial way on the occasion of this Annnal Conclave. 
The Grand Master desires me to express to you his 
best wishes and his deep appreciation of the prosper- 
ous condition of Templar affairs in this jurisdiction. 
Personally, I am of the opinion that the manifest pros- 
perity in Templar matters here is largely the result 
of good team-work and united efforts on the part of 
the fraters who have been in charge of Templary in 
this state for lo ! these many years. 

As the Personal Representative of the Grand Master, 
I come to you without authority to criticize or to in- 
struct — simply to observe and report to my superior 
officer the conditions that I find. Taking into con- 
sideration the well-known efficiency of the men who 
have been in charge of Templar affairs in this juris- 
diction, I expect to find nothing to report that will not 
be highly commendatory to the cause of Templary in 
general. Any remarks that I may make or opinions 
that I may express should be considered purely per- 
sonal and not official in any sense. My duties, there- 
fore, are made extremely light and I expect to enjoy 
to the limit my opportunity to visit that which I con- 
sider one of the great Templar jurisdictions owing 
allegiance to the Grand Encampment. 

My pilgrimage to your state is made all the more 
pleasant to me because of the similarity of Templar 
conditions existing between your jurisdiction and that 
of Iowa. I understand that according to your 1920 
report you had fifty-eight constituent Commanderies 
showing a net membership of 10,352. The report for 
my own state that will be submitted to our Grand 
Commandery in July of the current year will show a 
total net membership in sixty-seven Commanderies as 
of date December 31, 1920, of 11,021. The figures that 
will be submitted by your officers at this Conclave will 



82 Proceedings Grand Commanderij [May 12, 

undoubtedly show the numerical stren^h of the Grand 
Commandery of Indiana at this time somewhat in ex- 
cess of the Iowa figures as above stated. Iowa is 
strictly an agricultural state having within its borders 
no large urban centers, but a number of splendid 
smaller cities where York Rite Masonry is making most 
satisfactory gains. While Indiana has some manufac- 
turing centers, the large majority of your Commander- 
ies are located as in Iowa in the smaller country county 
seat towns. I am of the opinion that under existing 
conditions this is as it should be, for nothing brings 
the teachings of the Order more closely home to its 
members than the monthly and bi-monthly meetings 
held by our Templar brethren. I believe much more 
good is accomplished through such meetings than 
would result from the holding of large conventions 
once or twice or three times a year and these only in 
the larger cities. 

I am gratified to learn of the numerical gain that is 
shown by your reports — a gain that is common, I be- 
lieve, throughout the Templar world — but let me say 
right here that numerical gain is but a small part of 
the healthy and vigorous growth which I believe is be- 
ing made throughout the jurisdiction of the Grand En- 
campment. A postulant who does not appreciate the 
objects and purposes of the Commandery can not, in 
my opinion, be considered any great advantage to the 
Order. Unless he is possessed of the right qualities 
of heart and mind, he may well be considered a liabil- 
ity' instead of an asset to Templary. If he becomes a 
member only to enable him to join some other organiza- 
tion, he is scarcely fit to take our vows of knighthood. 
If he does take these vows and then participates no 
further in the purposes of the Order of the Temple 
than to conspicuously display a beautiful Templar 
charm upon his waistcoat, he is a Templar only in 
name and should be rated as a blank so far as the 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 83 

attributes of knighthood are concerned. I am firmly 
of the belief, however, that our postulants in the main 
are made up of men thoroughly imbued with a truo 
sense of the importance of Templary who have taken 
the vows of knighthood with a firm resolve to be better 
men and to be more helpful to mankind. So long as 
our ranks are being replenished by taking into mem- 
bership only those of such purposes and aims, the 
future of the Order is safe. 

The thought which I wish to leave with you along 
these lines is the fact that Knights Templar should 
never be satisfied with simply word service. They 
should be practical doers of good along the lines of the 
attributes of the great Order of the Temple. It is not 
sufficient to be able only to glibly repeat our vows 
while we are really strangers to the purposes of the 
Order. Our vows to protect the helpless and the needy 
should be reduced to concrete actions. The beautiful 
custom of giving flowers to the relatives of our de- 
ceased fraters on holiday occasions is commendable. 
Much sunshine is thus brought into the hearts of these 
dependents. I believe, however, we have not done our 
full duty by simply making these floral offerings. 
Many of these persons need more substantial help — 
possibly not in a money way, but in getting started 
or placed right in the battle for life chat confronts 
them. Most of our people on account of pride are in- 
clined to cover up such necessities. I believe it is our 
duty as Knights Templar to be constantly on guard 
for the purpose of discovering where we may be use- 
ful along such lines. I am of the opinion that the 
efficiency of the French people in looking after their 
dependents commends itself to our consideration. They 
are organized up to the minute concerning their needs 
— with complete rosters of the names and addresses of 
those who should be assisted. In the great work that 
is being done by the Templars of the jurisdiction of 



84 Proceedings Grand Commanderij [May 12, 



the Grand Encampment, one of the French war or- 
phans was nominally assigned to me. In some manner 
I lost his address. On making this fact known at 
Pittsburgh, a letter was sent to New York and exact 
information was given me concerning the orphan's 
present address. Not only strong and effective or- 
ganizations in France are looking after such matters, 
but similar organizations are formed in our own coun- 
try for the purpose of keeping in touch with the neces- 
sities of French dependents. I am not in a position to 
say how such an organization could be made efficient 
in this country. Until some plan is worked out, each 
Knight Templar should consider it his personal duty 
to investigate and report all cases where help is needed. 
It will not do to say that the dependents of our fraters 
are being substantially cared for at the present time 
by our Government. Such claim would be manifestly 
misleading. When our boys were being entrained for 
service, "leading citizens" accompanied them to the 
railway stations and in bursts of oratory pledged that 
the republic would never be unmindful of the great 
service they were rendering. On their return to civil 
life they were promised the best that the country 
should have at its disposal. Everyone present is fa- 
miliar with the results. Notwithstanding the many 
things that have been done, hundreds of thousands of 
these across-the-sea veterans and their dependents are 
now needy — most of them too proud to admit that the 
world is going wrong with them. Shell-shocked and 
nerve-racked — many of them returned to their homes 
really not in a condition to compete in a business way 
so far as efficiency is concerned with the swivel-chair 
fellows who never got anywhere near the front line 
trenches. Surely, we are going through a restless age, 
and in my opinion a majority of these veterans re- 
turned home not quite fit to successfully enter into 
life's battles. Isn't it possible that we should be able 



1921] of the State of hidiana. 85 

to assist these men in finding some sort of employment 
for which they are fitted at the present time? I do 
not believe we are doing our full duty when we say in 
substance that it is the Government's business to look 
after this part of humanity. To be true to our vows 
of knighthood, I believe we should be alert to discover 
such conditions where we may be helpful and this 
without reference to the Masonic affiliations of the 
persons in need. 

In conclusion, I want to say that in my opinion we 
fall far short of our duties as Knights Templar when 
we are rendering to the Order only ivord service. The 
tree is known by its fruit and not necessarily by what 
is said about it in the descriptive catalogue. The 
great Order of the Temple intends that its votaries 
shall be doers of the work and expects them to be 
strictly true to their vows of knighthood. Anything 
short of these results will mean failure to our beloved 
fraternity. I firmly believe, however, that the great 
majority of our members are thoroughly imbued with 
the sincerity of their professions and that throughout 
the ages to come Templary will prove one of the great 
forces in this world for good. And as the work goes 
magnificently forward may we with reverence be able 
to truthfully say "Emanuel — God with us." 

REPORTS OF (0M3IITTEE 0> JIRISPRIDEX E. 

R. E. Sir Walter M. Hindman, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following: 

To the Grand Commanderu of Indiana: 

Your Committee on Jurisprudence, to which was re- 
ferred the address of the R. E. Grand Commander, beg 
leave to report that we have carefully examined the 
same and feel that we should compliment him on his 
very excellent address. 



86 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 

As to his decisions 1, 2 and 3, we approve each one 
of them. 

As to his recommendation as to how the correspond- 
ence between the Grand Commandery and constituent 
Commanderies should be conducted, we find that at the 
meeting of this Grand Commandery in 1914 your com- 
mittee reported that all correspondence between the 
Grand Commander and the constituent Commanderies 
should be conducted between the Grand Commander 
and the respective Eminent Commanders, and we here- 
by affirm said decision of 1914, 

As to the Grand Commander's recommendation that 
jewels be purchased for the officers of the Grand Com- 
mandery, we recommend that the same be postponed 
for future action. 

In regard to his recommendation providing that the 
Grand Commandery should provide a seal for the 
Grand Commander, would state that the Grand Com- 
mandery now owns a seal as recommended by the 
Grand Commander. 

As regards the Grand Commander's recommendation 
recommending the revision of our laws, we beg leave 
to state that in view of the fact that the Grand En- 
campment of the United States will meet within a year 
and probably make various changes in the law, we 
recommend that the matter of the revision of our laws 
be postponed until after the next Triennial Conclave of 
the Grand Encampment of the United States. 

As regards compiling the decisions of the Inspector- 
General, in view of the fact that the Inspector-General's 
decisions are only binding until the next meeting of the 
Grand Commandery thereafter and do not become the 
fixed law of the Order, we recommend that such recom- 
mendation be not approved. 



1921] of the State of hidiana. 87 

As regards dispensations granted and refused, we 
approve his action in the premises except that it is not 
necessary to issue a dispensation for the election of 
members of the Board of Trustees of a subordinate 
Commandery, as there are no such officers contemplated 
in Templar law. 

Your committee approves the Grand Commander's 
action in the approval of various by-laws except his 
action in approving the by-laws of Terre Haute Com- 
mandery No. 16, in which the fee is fixed at $150, the 
same to cover the cost of uniform. Would state that 
a uniform is no part of the fee for an order, that in 
no case can the fees be less than $30.00 and should not 
be connected in the same item with the price of a uni- 
form, as a uniform might cost more than $50.00, or it 
might cost the candidate for orders nothing, and there- 
fore recommend that the Grand Commander's action 
upon approval of this by-law be not approved. 

In all other respects, except as herein named, we 
recommend that the Grand Commander's address be in 
all things approved. 

Courteously submitted, 

Walter M. Hindman, 

Chairman. 
Which was adopted. 

R. E. Sir Walter M. Hindman, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following : 

ON REPORT OF CORRESPONDENT. 

To the Grand Commandery of Indiana: 

We, the Committee on Jurisprudence, beg leave to 
report that we have examined the report of our Corre- 
spondent and recommend that the same be approved 



88 Proceedings Grcnid Commandery [May 12, 

and printed in the proceedings of this Annual Conclave 
of the Grand Commandery. 

Courteously submitted, 

Walter M. Hindman, 

Chairman. 
Which was adopted. 

REPORT OF ('03I3riTTEE 0> VISITING SIR KMGHTS. 

E. Sir Clayton 0. Griffin presented the following: 

To the Grand Commanderij of Indiana: 

Your Committee on Visiting Sir Knights beg to re- 
port as follows : 

All visiting Sir Knights have been duly received and 
presented to this Grand Comimandery. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Clayton 0. Griffin, 
Fred J. Deitzer, 
Floyd Cutsinger, 
Ben. H. Coombs, 
Orlin J. Schrock, 

Confimittee. 
Which report was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE 0> CHARTERS AND 
DISPENSATIONS. 

R. E. Sir George S. Parker, Past Grand Commander, 
presented the following : 

on PERU commandery, U. D. 

To the Grand Commanderij: 

We, your Committee on Charters and Dispensations, 
having had under consideration the petition for a char- 
ter for Peru Commandery, U. D., beg leave to report 
after a careful investigation of the conditions in the 
jurisdiction affected by this Commandery and the char- 
acter of the petitioners, that it would be for the best 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 89 

interests of Templar Masonry that a charter be granted 
to this organization and we hereby recommend that the 
charter be given, to be known as Peru Commandery 
No. 60. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George S. Parker, 
Allen G. Pate, 
William M. Amos, 
John J. Early, 
Walter L. Brown, 
Charles J. Blackman, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

REPORT OF C0M3HTTEE ON iiRIEYAXC ES AM) APPEALS. 

E. Sir Philo Q. Doran presented the following: 

To the Grand Conimandenj: 

Your Committee on Grievances and Appeals are 
pleased to report that no matters under these heads 
have been reported to us. 

Very courteously submitted, 
Philo Q. Doran, 

CAYh H. M. BiLBY, 

Heber H. Ellis, 
Frederick A. Turner, 
William A. Cobb, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS TO E. SIR OLI> K. HOLLOIVAT. 

R. E. Sir John L. Rupe, Past Grand Commander, 
offered the following: 

Rt. Em. Grand Commander and Si)- Knights: 

The Committee on Templar Jurisprudence, heartily 
approving the recommendation of the Right Eminent 
Grand Commander that this Grand Commandery recog- 



90 Proceedings Grand CommanderTj [May 12, 

nize its obligation to and appreciation of the valued 
service of Em. Sir Olin E. Holloway in accepting tem- 
porarily the duties of Grand Recorder in the emergency 
caused by the death of our beloved Recorder, Calvin W. 
Prather, recommend the adoption of the following 
resolution : 

Resolved, By the officers and members of the Grand 
Commandery of Knights Templar of Indiana that we 
tender to Em. Sir Olin E. Holloway our very cordial 
and fraternal thanks and assurance of our full appre- 
ciation of his Knightly service in assuming and with 
signal ability performing the duties of Grand Recorder 
in the emergency brought about by the death of our 
Grand Recorder, Em. Sir Calvin W. Prather. The wide 
experience and exceptional ability of our Eminent 
Frater at once suggested him for this emergency duty 
and we are pleased to commend his conduct of this 
important office in a manner entirely satisfactory to the 
Grand Commandery and all his Indiana Praters. 

Which was adopted. 

REPORT OF C03DIITTEE 0> UNFIM8HED BUSINESS. 

E. Sir Perry C. Traver presented the following: 

R. E. Grand Commander and Sir Knights of the Grand 
Commandery, K. T., of Indiana: 
The Committee on Unfinished Business begs leave to 
report that there is no unfinished business. 
Respectfully submitted, 
P. C. Traver, 
Paul C. Hurst, 
Thomas L. Cooper, 
George S. Snyder, 
Albert B. Stevens, 
William E. Seidel, 

Committee. 

Which report was adopted. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 91 

REPORT OF rOM3IITTEE ON PAY-ROLL. 

E. Sir William D. Kerlin presented the following: 

To the Grand Commandey^j: 

Your Committee on Pay-Roll has examined the same 
and finds the allowance for the mileage and per diem to 
the several officers and members of the Sixty-seventh 
Annual Conclave of the Grand Commandery to be cor- 
rect, and we, therefore, recommend that a warrant for 
the sum of $2,412.80 be drawn on the Grand Treasurer 
for the payment of said pay roll, which is made up as 
follows : 



92 



Proceedings Grand Commandenj [May 12, 



GRAND COMMANDERY PAY-ROLL, 1921. 



GRAXD 01 FICERS. 


Post-Office. 


Grand CouimauJiT 


-Marion 


Deputy Grand Commander- 


.\Iuueie 


Orand Generalissimo 


.N'ew Albany 


Grand Captain General 


Fort Wayne .. 


Grand Senior Warden.r_t_. 


Xew Castle .. 


Grand Junior Warden 


Indianapolis 


Grand Prelate . 


Hammond 


Grand Treasurer 


Indianapolis .- 


Grand Recorder. 


Indianapolis 


Grand Standard Bearer 


Indianapolis .. 


Grand Sword Bearer 


Plymouth 


Grand Warder 


Rushville 


Gr. Captaiu of the Guard... 


Indianapolis ._ 


Inspector General 


Fvnightstown _ 


PAST GRAXD OFFICERS. 




Walter M. Ilimlman 


\'incenues 


Winfield T. Durbin 


Anderson 


Leonidas P. Xewby 


Knightstown _ 




Frankfort 


Vestal W. Woodawrd 


Indianapolis .- 


Charles Day 


Xew Albany ._ 


Luther Short 


Knightstown 


William B. Hosford _ 




John L. Rupe 


Rirhmond 


Joseph G. Ibach 


Hammond 


Harry G. Strickland 


Greenfield 




Indianapolis __ 




George S. Parker. 


.\nderson 


Henri T. Conde 


Indianapolis ._ 





OS 

53 

11.5 

118 

44 



118 
39 



115 

34 

143 

OS 

157 

21 

39 
3fi 



Mile- 
age 



4.75 
3.70 
8.05 



S.20 
2. St' 
2.40 
3.30 

S.05 

2.4<1 

10. 00 

4.75 
11.00 
1.45 

2.70 

2.50 



Per 
Diem. 



$ 0.00 
0.00 
6.00 
G.OO 
COO 
6.00 



G.OO 

CO!' 

G.OO 
G.Oi 
G.OO 

G.OO 
0.00 
G.OC 
G.OO 
6.00 
6.00 
6.00 
G.OO 
G.OO 
G.OO 
6.00 
G.OO 
6.00 
6.00 
6.00 



$ 4.7.- 

9.7c 

14.0. 

14.2L 

9.1C 

G.OO 

17.01 



6.00 
14.2.^ 

8.7.; 
G.OO 
8.40 

14.20 

8.50 

8.40 

9.30 

6.00 

14.05 

8.40 

16.00 

10.75 

17.00 

7.45 

6.00 

S.70 

8.5( 

6.00 



By Whom Received. 



Harry C. Moore. 
Eugene Vatet. 
Geojge A. Xewhousfe. 
Gaylard M. Leslie. 
Albert D. Ogborn. 
Dirrelle Chaney. 
J. C. Parrett. 



E. J. Scoonover. 
George F. Hitchcock. 
Will M. Sparks. 
Jacob Rubin. 
Oliu E. IJoUoway. 

Walter M. Ilindman. 
Winfield T. Durbin. 
Leonldas P. Xewby. 
Oliver Gard. 
A'estal W. Woodward. 
Charles Day. 
Luther Short. 
William B. Hosford. 
John L. Rupe. 
Joseph G. Ibach. 
Harry G. Strickland. 
.\<lrian Hamersly. 
James L. Randel. 
George S. Parker. 
Henri T. Conde. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



93 



GRAND COMMAXDERY PAY-ROLL— Continued. 



No. 


Commanderies. 


Post-Office. 


Mile^, 


Mile- 
age 


Per 
Diem. 


Total. 


By Wh.iui Ue, vived. 


1 


Rapor 


Imliauaiiolis — 






.$ 6.00 
6.0U 
6.00 


.$ 6.00 
G.OO 
G.OO 


William D. Kerlin. 
Brandt C. Downey. 
Louis G. Buddenbaum. 


2 




SlM-lbyville — 


27 


.1; 1.90 
1.90 
1.90 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


7.90 
7.90 
7.90 


Fred J. Deitzer 






Harry G. Auman. 
Everett E. Stroup. 


3 




LaFayette — - 


(>4 


4.50 
4.50 
4.50 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


10.50 

10.50 

, 10.50 


Fred X. Prass 






Tames L. Wunderlee. 
John Cockie. 


4 


Fort Wayne 


Fort Wayne -- 


118 

lis 
lis 


S.25 
8.25 
8.25 


6.00 
G.OO 
6.00 


14.25 
14.25 
14.25 


Clayton 0. Griffin, 
lohn n. Aiken. 
Freil IL Pocock. 


5 


New Alban.v 


Xew Alban.v 


11. "> 
11.5 
115 


S.05 
8.05 
8.05 


6.00 
6.00 

6.00 


14.05 
14.05 
14.05 


.Vugust Bartli. 
Carl X. F. Best. 
-Vrthur E. Brown. 


c 






57 


4.00 
4.00 
4.0Ct 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


10.00 Paul C. Ilnrst. 








10.00 Fred C. Xeal. 
10.00 Harry P. Riley. 


s 




Richmond 


c.s 

(IS 
(JS 


4.75 
4.75 
4.75 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


10.75 .Villiam 1). Seoble. 






10.75jl.'eorge I>. .'^mitli. 
10.75 LeRoy E. Browne. 


9 


Kiiightstown 


Knightstown - 


?A 
34 
34 


2.40 
2.40 
2.40 


G.OO 
6.00 
G.OO 


8.40 Kersey W. Makwell. 
8.40 Thomas Beeeher. 
8.40 Floyd J. Xewby. 


10 


Warsaw 


Warsaw 


122 
122 
122 


s. .5.5 

8.55 

8.55 


6.00 
G.OO 
6.00 


14..55, Marshall F. Wallace. 
14.55 Ed C. Cammack. 
14.55 Chester E. Bolinger. 


11 




Greencastle — 


39 
39 
39 


2.70 
2.70 
2.70 


G.OO 
6.00 
G.OO 


8.70 Hebern. Ellis. 






8.70 Edward E. Caldwell. 
8.70 Eramett E. Greene. 


T' 




LaPorte 


148 
14S 
148 


10..'i5 
10.35 
10.35 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


I6..35 Philo Q. Doran. 






16.35 Daniel A. Lewis. 
16.35 William F. Gooden. 


13 






14:1 
14:1 
14:5 


10.00 
10.00 
10.00 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


16.00 Perry C. Traver. 








16.00 George A. Swintz. 
16.00 Peter F. Ahrens. 


14 


Columbus 


Columbus 


41 
41 
41 


2.85 

2.85 
2.85 


G.OO 
6.00 
6.00 


S.S5 Albert B. Stevens. 
S..80 Jesse R. Everroad. 
8.85 George W. Robertson. 


Ifi 


LaValotte- - 


Evansvilli' 


109 
IGO 
169 


11.80 
11.80 
11.80 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


17.80 Arthur F. Funkhouser. 






17.80 

17..S0 


Charles W. Hartloflf. 
Frank C. Baugh. 


16 


Terre Haute . 


Terre Haute-_ 


72 


5.(»5 
5.05 
5.05 


6.00 
6.00 
G.OO 


11.0.^ 
11.05 
11.0.- 


William G. Clark. 






.\lwert Balsley. 
Will W. Adani>on. 


17 




Vurora 


95 
95 
95 


6.65 
6.65 
6.65 


G.OO 
6.00 
6.00 


12.6.^ 

12.6.- 
12.6.^ 


James F. Treon. 






Matt S. Gibson. 
James A. Riddell. 



94 



Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



GRAND COMMANDERY PAY-ROLI^— Continued. 



CNniimandei'ies. 



— Miincie 



Apollo. 



Maii'jii 



ilailison 



St. John. 



Crawfordsville- 



Jeffersonville 



Valparaiso- 



Frankfort- 



Michigan City-- 
Elkhart 



Anderson- 



Washington- 



Kenilallville 



Vincennes 



Logansport 



frawfordsville- 



U'lyniouth 



;'fffrsonville - 



S'alparaiso 



Michigan City- 



Washington _- 



Mile^. 


Mile- 
age 


.-,3 
33 


3.70 
3.70 
3.70 


140 
14(i 
140 


10.20 
10.20 
10.20 


117 
117 
117 


S.20 
8.20 
S.20 


OS 
(jS 

us 


4.7r. 

4.7.1 
4.75 


so 
so 
so 


0.00 
6.00 
6.00 


21 
21 
21 


1.45 
1.45 
1.45 


77 


5.40 
5.40 
5.40 


43 
43 
43 


3.00 
3.00 
3.00 


118 

lis 

lis 


S.25 
8.25 
8.25 


lOS 
108 
lOS 


7 . 55 
7.55 
7.. 55 


142 


9.95 
9.95 
9.95 


47 
47 

47 


3.30 
3.. 30 
3..30 


lo4 
154 


10.80 
10.80 


157 
157 
157 


11.00 
11.00 
11.00 


36 
30 
30 


2.. 50 
2.. 50 
2.. 50 


136 
130 
136 


9.. 50 
9.. 50 
9.50 



Per 
Diem. 



6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

0.00 
0.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
0.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
0.00 

6.00 

o.oo 

6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 

0.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 

6.00 

0.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 



By Whom Keceived. 



9.70 Carl H. M. Bilby. 
9.70 Moses E. Black. 
9.70 Everett Moffitt. 

16.20 George S. Snyder. 
lC.2;ij J. Austin Jones. 
16.2! Clifford H. Martin. 

I 
14.20 Karl F. Bosworth. 
14.20 Justus H. Henkes. 
14.2C|john T. Boyd. 

10.75 Suy Duckwall. 
10.75 James S. Sisson. 
10.75 John X. Rhue. 

I 
12.00 Charles Cox. 
12.00 Harry H. Cope. 
12.00 Robert F. Stantcn. 

7.45|Floyd Cutsinger. 
7.45jE. Victor Bergen. 
7.45| John H. Tarlton. 

11. 4o| Thomas L. Cooper. 
11.40 Leroy M. Hardy. 
11.40 Herman A. Wallace. 



9.00 
9.00 
9.00 

14.25 
14.25 
14.25 

13.55 
13. .55 
13.55 

15.93 

15.9 

15".9: 

9.30 
9.30 
9.. 30 

16.80 
16. SO 

17.00 

17.00 
17.00 

.8. .50 
S.oO 
S.50 

15.50 
15..50 
15. .50 



Frederick A. Turner. 
Eugene M. Goodbar. 
Glen N. Swartz. 

Jacob W. Eidson. 
Ed N. Cook. 
John W. Kitch. 

Thomas B. Bohon. 
Fielding L. Wilson. 
William G. Young. 

Lev. is Edward Jones. 
Frank R. Lunbeck. 
Charles W. Light. 

Walter L. Brown. 
Lewis M. Morris. 
G. Max Fowler. 

Walter Williams. 
Walter H. Daly. 

Grant B. Bushnell. 
George Snyder. 
Robert R. Haggerty. 

Albertus 0. Stratton. 
Gustave Johnson. 
Richard Downward. 

William G. McCormick. 
Frank McGehee. 
Roy D. Smiley. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



95 



GRAND COMMANDERY PAY-ROLL— Continued. 



No. 


Ciiiiiiuandei'ies. 


rnh^t-Otflce. 


Miles. 


Mile- 


Per 
Diem. 


Total. 


I'.v Whom lte(eived. 


"^4 




Columbia City. 


119 
119 
119 


8.35 
8. 35 
8. .35 


6. CO 
6.00 
0.00 


14.3,^ 
14.3; 
14.3.- 


Burdette F. MeXear. 
14. Fred Yontz. 
George J. Leiuinger. 






35 


Huntington 


Ilvnitington 


106 
lOG 
106 


7.40 
7.40 
7.40 


6.00 
6.00 
0.00 


13.40 
13. 4( 
13.41 


William A. .Shoemaker 
Herbert T. Bunco. 
Clark C. (irifflth. 


3G 


Kokouio 


Kulconio 


:,i 

.54 
,54 


3. SO 

3.80 
3.80 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


9..8< 
9.. Si 
9.81 


William E. .Scidd. 
George L. D.ivis. 
William E. Williams. 


37 


Wabash 


Wabash 


89 
89 
89 


6.25 
6.25 
6.25 


6.00 
6.00 
0.00 


12. 2P 
12.25 
12.25 


Jay L. Brown. 
John R. Logan. 
Ernest B. Wooldridge. 


:^S 


Bluffton 


Blufl'ton 


93 
93 
93 


6.. 50 
6.50 
6.5(1 


6.00 
6.00 
6,00 


12. .50 
12., 50 
12.. 50 


Charles J. Blackman. 

Grant Pyle. 

Wm. Luther Kigcr. 






-39 


Greenfield 


Ureenfield 


21 
21 
21 


1.45 
1.45 
1.45 


0.00 
6.00 
0.00 


7.45 
7.45 
7.45 


John J. Early. 
Jesse D. Hughes. 
Elwood Barnard. 


A<\ 


Delphi 


Deiplii 


7- 


5.05 
5.05 
5.05 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


11.05 
11.(15 
11.05 








Thomas J. Ryan. 
Louis G. Niewerth. 


41 


Hammond , 


Haiumond 


1-57 
1.57 
157 


11.00 
11.00 
11.00 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


17.00 
17.00 
17.00 


Walter T. Ilanly. 
William E. Startsman 
Jacrl, i;. Kaspcr. 


42 


Bedford 


Bedford 


S7 
87 
87 


0.10 
6.10 
6.10 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


12.10 
12.10 
12.10 


Wm. E. -McCormiek. 
Charles II. Strupe. 
Robert W. Stevens. 


43 


Lebanon 


fjebanou 


28 
28 
28 


1.95 
1.95 
1.95 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


7.95 
7.95 
7.95 


Hardv Luml). 
Arlie E. Lewis. 
Ben H. Coondis. 


Ai 


New Castle 


Xew Castle — 


44 
44 
44 


3.10 

.•;.io 

.•!.10 


6.011 
6.00 
6.00 


9.10 
9.10 
9.10 


Claude L. Van Zant. 
Isaac M. Langston. 
Roy Kenyon. 


■45 




Angola 


Kill 
1611 

10^:) 


11.20 
11.20 
11.20 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


17.20 
17.20 
17.20 


Fred M. Starr. 






Melvin W. Kratz. 
Tliomas J. Creel. 


46 


Princeton 


Princeton 


142 
142 
142 


9.95 
9.95 
9.95 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


■15.95 
15.95 
15.95 


James D. Ityan. 
(Jeorge F. Kilmartin. 
Kobert .\. Woods. 


47 


Brazil 


Brazil 


57 


4.00 
4.00 
4.00 


6. CO 
6.00 
G.OO 


10.00 
10.00 
10.00 


Albert M. Thomas. 
Samuel G. Ralston. 
Rodrick M. Stewart. 


4S 


Clinton 


Clinton 


76 

76 
76 


5.. 30 
5.. 30 
5.30 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


11.. 30 
11.30 
11.30 


Benjamin F. Harrison 
Oliver P. Middleton. 
Guy Briggs. 


49 


Rushville 


Rushville 


39 
39 
39 


2.75 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


8.75 
8.75 
S.75 


William M. Amos. 
Lawrence L. .\lleu. 
Bert 0. Simpson. 



96 Proceedings Grand Commander y [May 12, 



GRAND COMMANDERY PAY-ROLL— Continued. 



No. 


Commaudei'ies. 


Post-Office. 


Miles. 


Mile- 
age 


Per 

Diem. 


Total. 


By Whom Received. 1 


iiO 


Goshen-- 


Goshen 


140 
141; 
140 


10.20 
10.20 
10.20 


0.00 
G.OO 
6.00 


1 
i6.20.Orlin J. Schrock. 
10.20 Peter R. White. 
16.20 Harrv V. Brown. 

1 


51 


Jlishawalsa 


Mishawaka 


143 
143 
143 


10.00 
10.00 
10.00 


O.OO 
6.00 
6.00 


1 
10.00 Julius A. Xewman. ^ 
10.00 George C. White. 
16.00 William H. Tupper. 


ro 




Tipton 


39 
39 

39 


1 2.75 
2.75 
2.75 


0.00 
6.00 
6.00 


8.75 Sidney W. Curtis. 
8.75 Sam D. Groves. 
8.75 Clyde E. Barr. 






53 


Winchester 


Wineliester 


75 
75 


5.25 


6.00 
O.lXi 
6.00 


11.25 Will E. Beesou. 
11.25 Bert Matteson. 
11.25 A-lbert F. Huddleston. 

1 


54 




Sullivan 


1(10 
100 
100 


7.00 

7.00 
7.00 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


13.00 Allen G. Pate. 
13.00 Harry L. Stratton. 
13.00 fohn Ersinger. 











30 
30 
30 


2.10 
2.10 
2.10 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


8.10 William A. Cobb. 

8.10 Roy E. Tilford. 

8.10 Peter F. W. Xewman. 








5G 




Seymour 


59 
59 
59 


4.15 
4.15 
4.15 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


10.15 Harry H. McDonald. 
10.15 Clifford H. Long. 
10.15' A. C. Livensparger. 






57 


Gary 


Gary 


165 
105 
105 


11.55 
11.55 
11.55 


6.0.0 
6.00 
6.00 


17.b5 Julius J. Griesel. 

17.55 Robert Kurth. 

17.55 William M. Hampton. 


58 




East Chicago 


105 
105 

105 


11.55 
11. .55 
11.55 


6.00 
0.00 
6.00 


17.55 Norton E. Bickell. 
17.55 Harry L. Rudolf. 
17.55 James Thomson. 
1 , 






59 


Greensburg 


Greens^burg 


47 
47 
47 


5.40 
5.4<i 
5.40 


6.00 
0.00 
6.00 


11.40 Hal T. Kitchin. 
11.40 Roy Rutherford. 
11.40 Locke Bracken. 


60 


Peru 


Pern 


75 
75 


5.25 
5.25 
5.25 


6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


11.25 
11.25 
11.25 


Charles M. Worden. 
John J. Munro. 
W. A. Hammond. 




Totals 




.$1200.80 


.$1212.00 


?2412.80 



Respectfully submitted, 

William D. Kerlin, 

Guy Duckwall, 

Fred N. Prass, 

William G. Clark, 

James D. Ryan, 

George J. Busteed, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 



1821] of the State of Indiana. 97 



REPORTS OF AUDITING C03niITTEE. 

E. Sir Albert W. Funkhouser presented the fol- 
lowing: 

ON GRAND recorder's REPORT. 

To the Gra)id Commandenj: 

Your committee appointed to audit the books and 
vouchers of the Grand Recorder have made a complete 
and exhaustive examination of all the books, papers, 
vouchers and warrants kept, both by our late beloved 
Grand Recorder, Calvin W. Prather, and by Em. Sir 
William H. Swintz, and find that all the accounts and 
vouchers have been carefully and accurately kept and 
preserved, and that they are correct and complete in 
every detail. 

Albert W. Funkhouser, 
Clyde B. Kellar, 
Mark L. Dickover, 

Auditing Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

E. Sir Clyde B. Kellar presented the following: 

ON GRAND treasurer's REPORT. 

To the Grand Commandery: 

Your committee appointed to audit the books and 
vouchers for the Grand Treasurer are pleased to report 
that they have made a thorough examination of the 
books, warrants and vouchers kept by the Grand Treas- 
urer and find the same accurate and in perfect condi- 
tion. 

We find that there was in the hands of tRe Grand 
Treasurer on the first day of May, 1921, the sum of 
$14,832.76, for which a certified check was exhibited to 
your committee. 

A verified list of securities belonging in the perma- 
nent fund of the Grand Commandery was submitted by 



98 Proceedings Grand Commanderij [May 12, 

the Grand Treasurer. This list includes securities of 
the stated value of $28,057.74. 

Albert W. Funkhouser, 
Clyde B. Kellar, 
Mark L. Dickover, 

A.uditing Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

ADDKESS BY R. E. SIR NELSON WILLIAMS, PAST GRAND 
COMMANDER OF OHIO. 

At this time R. E. Sir Nelson Williams, P. G. C. of 
Ohio, and the Committee on Necrology of the Grand 
Encampment was introduced and favored the Grand 
Commandery with a very interesting address in which 
he fully sustained the title of Poet Laureate. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PRIZES. 

Sir Knight Frank Bowers presented the following : 

To the Grand. Commandery, K. T., of hidiayia: 

The committee appointed to ascertain the percentage 
of membership of constituent Commanderies in attend- 
ance and participating in the parade incidental to the 
Sixty-seventh Annual Conclave of the Grand Com- 
mandery, held in the city of Indianapolis, May 11-12, 
1921, respectfully reports : 

From certificates filed with the committee is derived 
the following percentages : 

Zone 1. 

Knightstown Commandery No. 9 13.09 per cent. 

Greencastle Commandery No. 11 28.03 per cent. 

Muncie Commandery No. 18 26.90 per cent. 

Franklin Commandery No. 23__ _— 30 per cent. 

Anderson Commandery No. 32 25 per cent. 

Greenfield Commandery No. 39 82.80 per cent. 

Lebanon Commandery No. 43 37.10 per cent. 

New Castle Commandery No. 44 30 per cent. 

Rushville Commandery No. 49 65.40 per cent. 

Tipton Commandery No. 52 53.90 per cent. 

Martinsville Commandery No. 55 49.09 per cent. 

Greensburg Commandery No. 59 76.50 per cent. 




Frederick Glass 

PAST GRAND COMMANDER OF INDIANA 

BORN JANUARY 29, 1855 
DIED JUNE 22, 1920 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 99 



Zone 2. 

LaFayette Commandery No. 3 13.30 per cent. 

Richmond Commandery No. 8 16.80 per cent. 

Marion Commandery No. 21 41.20 per cent- 

Terre Haute Commandery No. 16 30.60 per cent. 

St. John Commandery No. 24 42.50 per cent. 

Wabash Commandery No. 37 16.40 per cent. 

Zone 3. 

Fort Wayne Commandery No. 4 14.60 per cent. 

New Albany Commandery No. 5 12.60 per cent. 

South Bend Commandery No. 13 21.30 per cent. 

LaValette Commandery No. 15 9 per cent. 

Washington Commandery No. 33 13.50 per cent. 

Conforming with circular of information and in- 
structions, issued to all constituent Commanderies 
under date April 18, 1921, Greenfield Commandery 
No. 39, in Zone One, St. John Commandery No. 24 in 
Zone Two, and South Bend Commandery No. 13 in 
Zone Three, showing the highest percentages, are en- 
titled to trophies, and are herewith submitted to you 
for disposal. ■ . " 

Fraternally submitted, 

James W. Hopkins, 
Frank Bowers. 
O. R. Sumner, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

MEMORIAL— K. E. SIR FREDERICK 0LAS8, P. G. C. 

R, E, Sir Adrian Hamersly, Past Grand Commander, 
presented the following : 

Right Eminent Grand Commander and Sir Knights: 

As we assemble here in the Sixty-seventh Annual 
Conclave of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar 
of Indiana, we are constantly reminded of the de- 
parture of a frater who was very near and dear to us. 

Right Eminent Sir Frederick Glass passed June 22, 



100 Proceedings Grand Commandern [May 12, 

1920, at his home in Madison, Indiana. Born in the 
city of Columbus, Ohio, on January 29, 1855, the son 
of Charles and Elizabeth Glass, he moved to Madison, 
Indiana, in June of 1871. He engaged as an apprentice 
in the confectioner's trade and in 1878 purchased the 
business of his employer and continued the business 
in the same location until his death, a period of nearly 
forty-two years. 

He was married August 31, 1876, to Miss Louisa 
Pfeiffer, of Madison. To this union two children, one 
daughter, Mary Sabina, and one son, William Robert, 
were given, who, with the widow, survive him. 

At the age of twenty-one he saw the Masonic Light 
and dedicated his life to faithful service in the cause, 
being at the time of his death an acknowledged leader 
of the Craft in his home city and in the state. 

Raised to the sublime degree of a Master Mason in 
Union Lodge No. 2, Madison, Indiana, October 17, 
1876 ; exalted to the degree of Royal Arch Mason in 
Madison Chapter No. 1, October 16, 1879; received as 
a Royal and Select Master in Madison Council No. 36, 
May 9, 1887 ; created a Knight Templar in Madison 
Commandery No. 22, June 12, 1882. 

He was Worshipful Master of his Lodge the years of 
1883, 1884, 1886, 1901, 1902; he was High Priest of 
his Chapter the year 1890 ; he was Illustrious Master 
of his Council the year 1903 ; he was Eminent Com- 
mander of his Commandery the years of 1889, 1892, 
1893, 1894 and 1899. 

He was elected Sword Hearer of the Grand Com- 
mandery of Indiana in 1896, and advanced from that 
station in successive steps until the year 1903, when he 
was elected Grand Commander of Indiana, serving in 
that honorable station faithfully and well. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 101 

He served for years as Treasurer of the Triennial 
Committee Knights Templar of Indiana and for twenty 
years was a member of the Grand Encampment Knights 
Templar of the United States. His life was closely 
interw^oven with Masonry, evidenced not only by his 
activities in the York Rite, but by his devotion to the 
Scottish Rite as well. 

He received the degrees, 4th to 32nd, inclusive, An- 
cient Accepted Scottish Rite, in the Indiana Consistory 
Bodies, Indianapolis, Indiana, November, 1890, and 
was crowned a Sovereign Grand ^ Inspector-General, 
33% Honorary member of the Supreme Council North- 
ern Masonic Jurisdiction, September 20, 1910. 

He was a member of Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine ; a member of St. 
John's Conclave No. 16, Order of the Red Cross of 
Constantine, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

In his home city he was affiliated with various fra- 
ternal orders, social and civic organizations, including 
the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Elks, Red Men, 
the Rotary Club, the Commercial Club and the Country 
Club. 

He was an honorable citizen, a consistent church 
man, and ever faithful in the discharge of his benevo- 
lent and civic responsibilities. 

He was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church 
and served for years as a Trustee ; was Trustee of the 
City Public School for four years ; served as a member 
of Madison City Council and superintended the con- 
struction of Kings Daughter Hospital, a benefaction 
which was very close to his heart. He was a member 
of the Board of the Masonic Temple twenty years. 

By his industry and skill he built his business to a 
point where the merit of the goods of his manufacture 
acquired a reputation national in its scope. 



102 Proceedings Grand Commayidery [May 12, 



Funeral services were held Friday, June 25, 1920, 
two o'clock p. M., at the Second Presbyterian Church, 
Union Lodge No. 2 officiating. The remains lay in 
state at the church from 11 a. m. to 1 :30 P. M., attended 
by a guard of honor from Madison Commandery, where 
his legion of friends and neighbors came to pay their 
respects. Beautiful floral emblems representing the 
Masonic bodies with which he was affiliated and pieces 
from other organizations, lodges and friends filled the 
altar and the front of the church. The services were 
without ostentation as befitted the man. His remains 
were laid away in pretty Springdale Cemetery. Four 
officers of the Grand Commandery, four Past Grand 
Commanders of Indiana and one officer of the Grand 
Encampment of the United States were present. 

Our beautiful ritual teaches us that although the 
body become inanimate and lose its power of life, that 
all its vital energies become extinct, yet the soul is 
immortal and shall dwell forever in the realms of life 
and light eternal. 

"As we mourn the loss of our frater, and drop a sym- 
pathetic tear over the grave of our deceased friend," 
let us who remain gather comfort and consolation from 
faith in our belief that he is at rest in that home eter- 
nal, where joy and happiness shall reign forever and 
suffering and sorrow are unknown. 

Courteously submitted, 

Adrian Hamersly, 
William A. Shoemaker, 
William E. McCormick, 
Arthur F. Funkhouser, 
Walter T. Hardy, 

Committee. 

Which report was unanimously adopted by a rising 
vote. 




Henry H. Lancaster 

PAST.GRAND COMMANDER OF INDIANA 

B9RN JANUARY 6, 1843 
DIED FEBRUARY 14, 1921 



1921] of the State of Indiana. ' 103 

MEMORIAL— R. E. SIR HE\RY H. LANCASTER, PAST GRAND 
COMMANDER. 

R. E. Sir William B. Hosford, Past Grand Command- 
er, presented the following : 

R. E. Grand Commander, Ofjicers and Sir Kfiights of 
this Grand Body: 
Your committee assigned to report on the death of 
our dear brother and honored Past Grand Commander, 
Henry H. Lancaster, desire to voice our deep sorrow for 
our loss at his passing from his earthly activities to a 
higher and more glorious life. 

His eulogy, from the pen of Past Grand Commander 
George S. Parker, is eloquent in reviewing his life, his 
accomplishments, and his splendid personality, leaving 
but little to be said from any other point of view in an 
attempt to extol his virtues, that endeared him to us all. 

By the courtesy of Eminent Sir Parker we quote 
his eulogy as follows : 

"The Angel of Death has called to the Higher Life, 
our friend and companion, R. E. Sir Henry H. Lan- 
caster, who died in his home city of Lafayette, Indiana, 
February 14, 1921. 

With his passing on, a vacant chair is left in our 
circle; his pleasant smiling countenance has disap- 
peared, and his kindly words and hearty laugh will be 
heard no more. 

Henry H. Lancaster was born in Tullow, County 
Carlow, Ireland, January 6, 1843, and departed this life 
February 14, 1921, being just past 78 years of age. 
He came to this country at the age of 18, finally settling 
in Lafayette, Indiana, in 1871. He was the head of the 
American Express Company in that city for 45 years, 
being the oldest employee in its service at the time of 
his retirement in 1916. 



104 Proceedi7igs Grand Commandery [May 12, 



Brother Lancaster was married to Sarah Annette 
Bartlett in 1868, whose death occurred in 1913. One 
daughter, Mrs. F. H. Wilson, and two sons, Harry B. 
and Leland, are the surviving members of his family. 

Brother Lancaster's Masonic record is a long and 
useful one. He was raised a Master Mason April 14, 
1868, in Centre Lodge No. 23, located in Indianapolis. 
Exalted to the degree of Royal Arch Mason October 17, 
1873, in Lafayette Chapter No. 3, at Lafayette, Indiana. 
Received the degrees of Royal and Select Master De- 
cember 23, 1895, in Montgomery Council No. 34, at 
Crawfordsville, Indiana. Created a Knight Templar 
in Lafayette Commandery No. 3 ; received the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite degrees in December, 1888, 
at Indianapolis ; and was crowned an honorary member 
of the Supreme Council, 33^, September 20, 1893, at 
Chicago. He held every office in his Lodge, Chapter 
and Commandery; passed through the several stations 
in the Grand Commandery and in 1890 served as Grand 
Commander of the Knights Templar of the State of 
Indiana with conspicuous ability. 

He was interred by his home fraters in beautiful 
Springvale Cemetery on the banks of the Wabash River, 
Amid those peaceful hills, beautified by the hand of 
man, his body was laid away, but his memory is en- 
shrined in our hearts and his kindly words and deeds 
remain an inspiration to all those who knew him. 

As a citizen. Sir Knight Lancaster was a potent force 
in his community. He was a leader in the political and 
civic afl^airs, a member of the School Board for many 
years and a staunch supporter of the church. 

Full knightly with his armor on did he meet the 
trials of this life ; with courtly grace, with manly kind- 
ness, with heartfelt joy, he spread about him a spirit 
of trustfulness and courage, which helped many a dis- 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 105 

tressed companion who bore burdens heavy with toil 
and discouragement. 

Such is the Modern Knight, 'without fear and with- 
out reproach/ following in the footsteps of the Master, 
succoring the needy and the distressed, supporting 
staunchly the Banner of the Cross. Then Death comes. 

'Death is another life; — we bow our heads 
At going on; we shrink — then enter straight 
Another golden chamber of the king, 
Larger than this we leave — and lovelier.' 

George S. Parker. 

Past G)'aiid Commander." 

The sincere grief evinced at the funeral by the daugh- 
ter and sons -or the loss of their beloved father, elo- 
quently bespeak for him the highest degree of character 
and manhood. 

Thus closes the earthly activities of one whom we all 
as Templars loved and held in highest esteem, but his 
example as a man, with his attractive personality, will 
live on with those of us who knev/ him so well. 

"Peace to his ashes." 

Courteously submitted, 
w. b. hosford, 
Sidney W. Curtis, 
Julius J. Griesel, 
James F. Treon, 
Lewis E. Jones, 

Committee. 

Which was unanimously adopted by a rising vote. 
ADDRESS BY ANDREW D. AONEAV, (IRAND C0M3IAXDER OF 

ivisro>8i>. 

Andrew D. Agnew, R. E. Grand Commander of 
Knights Templar of Wisconsin, made a timely address, 
which was heartily received by our Grand Command- 
ery. He extended the greetings of the Wisconsin 



108 Proceedmgs Grayid Commandery [May 12^ 

Templars and made flattering observations concerning 
our own jurisdiction and the conduct of Templar affairs 
in Indiana. 

3IEM0RIAL— E. SIR CALYIX W. PRATHER. 

R. E. Sir John L. Rupe, Past Grand Commander^ 
presented the following: 

Right Eminent Grand Commander ayid Sir Knights: 

Eminent Sir Calvin W. Prather, for more than nine- 
teen years the active, efficient and universally beloved 
Grand Recorder of the Grand Commandery of Knights 
Templar of Indiana, after a prolonged and lingering 
season of physical pain and suffering, on the first day 
of August, 1920, left us forever. Men say he died, is 
dead. Yes, and no. The physical man, the body which 
was the temple and abode of the great heart and soul 
we honored and loved, did die. 

The voice which in all the years of our fraternal asso- 
ciation together gave out from a heart overflowing 
with fraternal love and affection is stilled forever: 
the warm handclasp which was the symbol of friend- 
ship and kindly interest, has passed from the realms of 
present happiness to that of joyous, happy miemory. 

Earth to earth. Dust to dust. 

Looking alone upon man's physical being and end, 
the body aside from his spiritual nature, the Song of 
the Clay is impressive. 

I lie in state, 
Insensate clay; 
• ■ - And on me wait 

A long array 
That celebrate 
My festal day. 
Solemn and slow, 
About they go, 
And say as they pace, 
"What a smile on the face." 




Calvin \A/. Prather 

GRAND RECORDER 

BORN AUGUST 19, 1845 
DIED AUGUST 1, 1920 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 107 



Well may I smile with perfect peace, 
To greet the hour of my release: 
When the things which vexed me fled, 
The stricken mourners murmered "Dead." 
Dead — What is dead? I lie at rest. 
No longer driven and distressed; 
The tyrant will at last is still. 
That tortured me with good and ill. 

Alive they said "Alas how worn; 
How sad the face; how full of scorn." 
That was from the soul within 
Tormenting me forever; 
Restless, weary, sick with sin. 
Mad with vain endeavor. 

Now, I shall turn to waving grass. 

Bending to the airs that pass; 

Upward mount in flickering flame; 

Sleep in the dust from whence I c;ime; 

By warring waves be fiercely hurled; 

On wandering winds blow round the world, 

And fall again, 

To the earth in rain — 

Soulless motion and soulless rest, 

Rid of my soul, I now am blessed. 

Thus speaks the Clay only ; that of the physical man 
which must die. Our great Order teaches and we be- 
lieve in its teachings of immortality. 

We believe in the immaculate Jesus who died that we 
might live, and in his words which have come down to 
us through the centuries and which are as vivid at this 
moment as in the beginning: "He that believeth in me 
though he were dead, yet shall he live, and he that 
liveth and believeth in me shall never die." 

Somewhere I read, in an old book whose name 

Is gone from me; I read that when the days 

Of a man are counted, and his business done, 

There comes up the shore at evening with the tide. 

To the place where he sits, a boat — 

And in the boat, from the place where he sits he sees, 

Dim in the dusk, dim and yet so familiar. 

The faces of his friends long dead; and knows 



108 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



They come for him, brought in upon the tide. 
To take him where men g-o at set of day. 
Then rising, with his hands in theirs, he takes. 
Between them his last steps, that are the first 
Of the new life — and with the ebb they pass, 
Their shaken sail grown small upon the moon. 

Thus we believe, aye, more, we know, in our con- 
sciousness that our beloved brother. Sir Knight, Com- 
panion, Friend, did not die; but as he had lived full 
knightly with his armor on, he passed through the 
gateway we call death, into the larger, fuller, more 
perfect life beyond : that with serene faith he ap- 
proached the silent stream and upon the farther shore 
was greeted by hosts of friends, watchful for his 
coming. 

What is our human life, when it shall come to its 
earthly end ? It may leave' a light which shall illumi- 
nate the pathway of those who are le't as a blessing 
in the years to come. 

It may leave only a flickering light which goes out 
with the end as the light of a falling star. 

Happy is he, who by a life of devotion to duty and 
high purpose, whose sun has set, shall have left a light 
and glow which shall linger long behind ; whose un- 
erring steps shall have left footprints upon the sands 
which may serve as safe guide to others who travel 
life's troublous and uncertain pathway. 

We treasure as a consolation and satisfaction, aye, 
as an inspiration, the assurance we have that our be- 
loved Brother, Sir Knight, Companion, Friend, in the 
useful, noble and beautiful life he lived attained the 
summimi bommi of our human life ; that he lived un- 
selfishly; that he found what all the world is seeking, 
happiness, and found it in service to his fellow men ; 
that he walked courageously in every path where duty 
called ; that his hand was ever stretched forth in loving 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 109 

sympathy to succor the needy and relieve distress ; that 
his great heart responded in tender, generous sympathy 
and helpfulness to all human ills and in all life's mani- 
fold distresses and misfortune ; whose friendships are 
measured only by his acquaintance, and when the end 
cahie he left life's activities in the full, complete and 
perfect enjoyment of the confidence, respect, friendship, 
love and affection of all who had ever touched his life. 

What more to be desired, attained, or what more in 
human life worth striving for? 

His Masonic record is illustrious. In full detail it is 
safely preserved in our archives. 

For the purpose of this brief memorial it is sufficient 
to say, that he served efficiently as the head of every 
Masonic body save one, in his home city or town ; that 
he served with honor and distinction as Grand Master 
of the Grand Lodge, as Grand High Priest of the 
Grand Chapter and as Grand Secretary and Grand 
Recorder of all the State Masonic bodies for many 
years of his life and to the time of his death. 

These exceptional honors came to him by the favor 
of his Masonic brethren, not because of personal pre- 
ferment, but because of the true Masonic spirit he man- 
ifested, the zeal and wise interest he brought to every 
Masonic cause and the perfect efiniciency and fidelity 
with which he discharged every duty and performed 
every trust. 

He not only performed his every duty in the various 
and responsible positions he held, but he improved the 
opportunity it brought him to store and accumulate 
knowledge and information of Masonic law and pro- 
cedure and by which he was always able in kindly 
counsel and advice to be helpful to his Masonic 
brethren. 

For years he has been looked to as a leader in all 
Masonic activities. 



110 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



To be a potent factor and accorded leadership in 
carrying forM^ard the fundamental aims and purposes 
of the great Masonic orders, devoted as they are to 
the formation of human character, teaching the prac- 
tical lessons of life which make for the highest and 
best type of manhood, is worthy the ambition of any 
good man, and must reflect upon the life and character 
of him so engaged, and we are assured we may see 
such reflection and influence in the beautiful life of 
our beloved brother. His place left vacant cannot be 
easily filled. That which he attained was a result of 
long time of patient effort and development, ennobled 
by generous loving service through all the days and 
years. 

We come now in reverent contemplation of his life, 
bringing our sweet memory garlands, fragrant with 
love and aff'ection, not sorrowing, but rejoicing for the 
success and sweetness of his beautiful life; for the 
assurance that the world has been made better because 
he has lived ; for the memories he has left us of happy 
fraternal association together in all the years. 

We knoiv the end of such a life is peace. Our thought 
of him is not of the worn body mouldering back again 
to earth, but upward where his spirit dwells with his 
God who gave it and may our God whom we strive, to 
serve, in His infinite love and mercy, be with us all 
until we may meet him again, there. 

John L. Rupe, 
Kersey W. Maxwell. 
Hal T. Kitchen, 
Albert M. Thomas, 

BURDETTE F. McNEAR, 

Committee. 

Which report was unanimously adopted by a rising 
vote. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. Ill 

MEMOBIAL— DISTIXGlLSHEl) DKAD 01 OTHEK 
JURISDICTIOXS. 

E. Sir Charles L. Hutchinson presented the follow- 
ing: 

Right Emiyient Grand Conmiander, Officers and Mem- 
bers of the Grand Commandenj of Indiana: 
Another milestone has been passed on the great high- 
way of life, since last we met in this asylum of peace 
and good-will, where the beautiful and ever-increasing 
glorious truths of our beloved Order are promulgated, 
and indelibly imprinted upon the minds and hearts of 
our beloved f raters. During the past year twenty-five 
distinguished Knights, residing in nineteen different 
jurisdictions, have answered the summons of the grim 
reaper and have joined the great army in the Eternal 
City. Twenty-one were Past Grand Commanders, 
many of them were prominent members in the Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry ; nine had been 
honored with the thirty-third and last degree. 

It is a most fitting tribute to mention that many of 
our distinguished deceased fraters were active and 
consistent members of the church of Jesus Christ of 
which our beloved Order is typical in a large degree — 
thus leaving a most noble example and blessed heritage 
for those remaining with us. When we reflect upon 
the world conditions and the needs of humankind, how 
forcibly are we reminded of the memorable words of 
the wise men of ancient times in their earnest quest for 
happiness, "We have seen His star in the East and 
have come to worship Him." Our great confiding hope 
and faith should be that the immortal "Star of Bethle- 
hem" shines today with more effulgent splendor than 
ever before and that mankind of every tongue and 
nation may be taught to follow in the footsteps of the 
blessed Immanuel. 

To the Fraters of our Sister Jurisdictions, we extend 



112 Proceediyicjs Grand Commandery [May 12, 

fraternal sympathy in their varied bereavements, and 
commend them to the Father of all light, life, peace 
and happiness, Who is pleased to note even the fall of 
a sparrow. How much more will He be pleased to 
receive in loving embrace all those who have departed 
in the Lord ! 

The active participation of prominent Masons gen- 
erally in the varied activities of communities is very 
commendable and deserving of much praise, yet in the 
greatest reconstruction period of all ages, vitally af- 
fecting nearly every nation of all the earth, are we not 
basking in the sunshine of contentment and prospedty, 
while those around us may be in the slough of despond? 
'Tis well and fitting that we stop and listen to the mur- 
murings of the widow or wail of orphans and father- 
less children, by proffering and rendering assistance, 
we are doing the will, practicing the precepts and fol- 
lowing the statutes of the greatest law-giver that ever 
came among men — thus rendering to our varied com- 
munities a concrete example of the best means and only 
way to incite and lead mankind to righteous living thus 
insuring peace of mind, happiness and prosperity in a 
true sense. So when our stewardship here shall close 
and we shall be called , to render an accounting, may 
we be privileged to hear the sweet words of approval, 
"Well done, good and faithful servants,^ enter in and 
enjoy the rewards prepared for the faithful since the 
foundation of the world. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Charles L. Hutchinson, 
Harry H. McDonald, 
Thomas B. Bohon, 
Benjamin F. Harrison, 
Will E, Beeson, 

Committee. 
Which report was unanimously adopted by a rising 
vote. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 113 



ADDRESS BY CAR! B. FISH, GRA>D C03nrA>DER OF 
FLORIDA. 

Gary B. Fish, R. E. Grand Gommander of Knights 
Templar of Florida, now addressed the Grand Gom- 
mandery. Sir Knight Fish is so well acquainted with 
many of our present and Past Grand Officers and other 
Indiana Sir Knights that the feeling prevailed that he 
was one of us. His remarks were very pleasing to this 
Grand Gommandery. 

3IE>rORIAL— OIR OWX KNIGHTLY DEAD. 

E. Sir George W. Wagner presented the following: 

Right Emineyit Grand Commander, Officers and Mem- 
bers of the Grand Gommandery, Knights Templar 
of Indiayia: 
Your committee, to which was referred so much of 

the Right Eminent Grand Gommander's address as 

refers to Our Own Knightly Dead, beg leave to present 

the following: 

In the midst of the business, the rush, the enthu- 
siasm of our annual conclave, we do well to pause to 
pay our tribute to our Knightly dead. 

During the past year, one hundred sixty of the hon- 
ored and valiant Fraters of our Jurisdiction have been 
called to their final reward. Some have been known 
throughout the State and even Nation. Some have 
been content in more humble spheres. But whether 
honored or unknown, they have all been noble and 
worthy. They have graced the role of professional, 
business, and industrial life, and are all alike mourned 
and honored among our sainted dead. 

When distress has plead for aid, they failed not to 
respond. When the cry of innocence was heard in the 
night, they hesitated not to enter the dark. When 
virtue was in danger, they sprang to the rescue. When 
patriotism called for .sacrifice, they shrank not from 



114 Proceedings Grcmd Commandery [May 12, 

the need. When the Christian faith was maligned, 
they unsheathed the sword in its defense. 

All honor to our valiant comrades M^ho placed right 
before convenience, who desired the victory of truth, 
and who lived in unsullied confidence in the Great 
Leader of our Faith ! 

In the tenderness of sacred memory we will cherish 
them. In reverence we will endeavor to imitate their 
virtues and avoid their mistakes. We will pledge our 
undying friendship to the cause they loved and to the 
God they served ; and do now call upon every true 
Knight, wherever found, to lift high the ideals of 
right, to make Knighthood worthy of its immortal 
claim. 

Courteously submitted, 

George W. Wagner, 
Norton E. Bickell, 

J. W. ElDSON, 

Fred M. Starr, 
William C. McCormick, 

Committee. 

Which report was unanimously adopted by a rising 
vote, 

REPORT OF C03DnTTEE ON UNIFORM. 

E. Sir Olin E. Holloway presented the following: 

To the G7^and Commandery: 

Your Committee on Uniform, created by action of 
the Grand Commandery at its annual conclave in May, 
1920, said committee "to be vested with full authority 
on the subject of uniform, to specify a standard uni- 
form in conformity with our present laws, eliminating 
any requirements under our present law upon the 
subject found necessary or desirable to reduce the 
cost, and with full authority to contract on behalf of 
this Grand Commandery, either for this Grand Com- 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 115 

mandery alone or in conjunction with Grand Com- 
manderies of other jurisdictions for the purchase of 
uniforms for all Commanderies in this jurisdiction, 
and that when such contract is completed, if made, that 
each subordinate Commandery in the state shall order 
uniforms required by it of the company contracted 
with and pay therefor such contracted price direct to 
the company furnishing the same as now. That any 
and all adjustments of controversies in regard to uni- 
forms shall be referred to and decided and determined 
by such special committee," would respectfully report 
concerning our actions. 

The first act of your committee was to standardize 
the uniform following as closely as possible the action 
of the Grand Commandery in 1909 regarding the same. 

The object being to inconvenience the least number 
of Commanderies by selecting a uniform that would 
correspond in the main with those in general use and 
eliminating only those special or distinctive features in 
use by a few of the subordinate bodies which tended 
to make the Indiana uniform so variable when several 
of the Commanderies were brought together in line, 
your committee found that most other Grand Jurisdic- 
tions had already adopted a standard uniform and that 
Indiana v/as one of the very few where indiscriminate 
selection was allowed. 

The necessity of selecting a uniform which would 
comply with the requirements of the Grand Encamp- 
ment, satisfy the wishes of Indiana Knighthood, main- 
tain quality and keep within reason as to price was 
fully recognized by your committee. That the feeling 
of the membership might be determined a question- 
naire comprehending all these points was formulated 
and sent to the Commanderies of the state for the 
purpose of securing expression of the Knights along 
these lines. With a compilation of the wishes of the 



116 Proceedmgs Grand Commafidery [May 12, 

subordinate bodies of the state, as shown by the ques- 
tionnaires, the requirements of the Grand Encamp- 
ment and the 1909 Indiana law regarding uniform be- 
fore the committee, a standard uniform was selected. 

That the price might be held to the lowest point 
possible consistent with such quality and workmanship 
as would produce a uniform of service and good ap- 
pearance, the purchase of certain of the articles which 
were considered essential was made obligatory and 
others not absolutely necessary were made optional. 

An illustrated description of the several articles 
comprising the uniform was prepared and sent to the 
several Commanderies. The description was as 
follows : 

COAT. 

For Knights, black broadcloth, frock, military style, 
single-breasted, standing collar not less than one inch 
nor more than one and one-half inches in height, to 
hook in front, corners to be square, collar to be lined 
with black velvet ; the skirts to extend to three-fourths 
the distance from hip-joint to the bend of the knee. 
The coat to have eleven half-round black silk buttons 
on breast, equally placed ; two on back seam at the 
waist, two on skirt at bottom of pocket lapel, and two 
on the underseam of sleeve cuffs. The sleeve to have 
hand-embroidered raised silver bullion crosses. The 
coat to be lined with black throughout. 

For Commanders and Fast Commanders, the coat 
shall be double-breasted, with two rows of nine half- 
round black silk buttons equally distant from each 
other. The distance between the rows shall be five 
and one-half inches at the top and four inches at the 
bottom, the line of buttons slightly curved, making a 
distance of seven inches at the breast. The same ar- 
rangement of buttons to be had on back and sleeves as 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 117 

for Knights. The crosses on the sleeves to be of gilt 
or gold bullion and appropriate to rank. 

For Grand and Past Grand Officers, the coat shall 
be the same as for Commanders, except that there shall 
be raised gilt or gold Templar crosses on the sleeves, 
appropriate to rank. 

TROUSERS. 

To be of black broadcloth or doeskin without orna- 
ment of any kind. 

CHAPEAU. 

For Knights, the chapeau shall be black regulation 
style for Knights Templar, bound with silk velvet, 
lined with satin and with leather sweat band. There 
shall be placed on the left side of the chapeau a rosette 
of silk velvet and silk ribbon, with hand-embroidered 
silver bullion passion cross, without rays. The 
chapeau to be trimmed with two black ostrich plumes 
and one duplex white ostrich top plume, to extend 
three inches beyond the rear peak of the chapeau and 
to be not less than six and three-quarters inches in 
width. The chapeau to be supplied with water-proof 
rain cover. 

For Commanders and Past Commanders, the same 
except that on the rosette there shall be a hand-em- 
broidered raised gilt or gold passion cross with solid 
rays. The color of the filling of the cross shall be 
appropriate to the rank. There shall be gilt wire 
slashings, one inch in width on both sides, front and 
back and a half-round gilt bullion tassel on front peak. 

For Grand and Past Grand Officers, the same as for 
Commanders except that on the rosette there shall be 
a hand-embroidered gilt or gold Templar cross with 
filling color appropriate to rank. 

FATIGUE CAP. 

For Knights, the cap shall be of black gros grain 
silk, three and one-quarter inches deep, with drooping 



118 Proceedings Grand Coynmanderij [May 12, 

black patent-leather curved visor, lined with green 
leather, black silk band one and one-fourth inches wide, 
silver passion cross without rays on the front, black 
silk cord across front and crown buttons on each side. 
The cap to have a black sateen cover, bearing on its 
front a red velvet cross of equal arms and angles, with 
the proper lettering thereon for use as a Red Cross 
cap. 

For Commanders and Past Commanders, the same 
as prescribed for Knights except that the trimmings 
shall be gold with a band of black silk one and one- 
eighth inches wide, and a gold or gilt embroidered pas- 
sion cross with solid rays. 

For Grand and Past Grand Officers, the cap shall be 
the same as provided for Commanders except that it 
shall have a Templar cross one and one-half inches 
square, instead of the passion cross, and appropriate 
to rank. 

The silk crush traveling or lounging cap, known as 
the "Pittsburg Pattern", shall be an optional part of 
the uniform and be worn only as a substitute for the 
fatigue cap when not on duty. The trimmings shall 
consist of the cross and crown, the cord and buttons 
on the front of the cap, in color appropriate to rank. 
For Grand and Fast Grand Officers, the Templar cross, 
appropriate to rank shall be used. 

BALDRIC. 

The baldric shall be four inches in width, with a 
center of white watered silk two inches in width, bor- 
dered on both edges with black velvet one inch in 
width, strips of navy lace one-fourth of an inch in 
width between the white and black ; in the front center 
a nine-pointed star, three and three-fourths inches in 
diameter, in the center of which shall be a passion 
cross encircled by the motto "In Hoc Signo Vinces". 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 119 

The baldric to be lined with green silk, and with a red 
cross of equal arms and angles so placed as to come 
in the front center when the baldric is reversed. The 
baldric is to be of length appropriate to the size of the 
wearer, the ends to extend nine inches below the point 
of intersection on the left hip, at the point of intersec- 
tion there shall be a metal fastener in the form of a 
maltese cross from which the sword may suspend. 

The baldric shall not be worn by the Eminent and 
Fast Eminent Commanders, Generalissimo and Cap- 
tain-General. 

BELT. 

For Knights, the belt shall be of black enameled 
leather one and three-fourths inches wide, mounted 
with lace woven of silver wire and black silk, one and 
five-eights inches wide, in parallel stripes, four of silver 
and three of black silk; the belt to have three slings, 
one long and two short, on which to hang the sword, 
the slings to be silver-plated barrel chains, they are to 
be suspended from the belt by a metal clasp from a 
leather strap fastened to the inner side of the belt, 
each sling to have a swivel hook on the lower end for 
attachment to the sword. The front sling to have a 
hook at the upper end from which to suspend the scab- 
bard. 

For officers of the rank of Eminent Commander and 
above, the belt is to be the same as for the Knights 
except that the woven lace covering shall be of gold 
instead of silver, and that the slings shall be of the 
same material and design as that of the belt proper 
and to have two stripes of gold and one of silk. 

BELT PLATE. 

The belt plate to be of metal, rectangular in shape, 
two by three inches, with bevel edge, a cross of red 
enamel appropriate to rank in the center, surrounded 
by the motto "In Hoc Signo Vinces" in relief. The 



120 Proceedings Grand Conunanderjj [May 12, 

metal to be plated gold or silver in accordance with 
the rank, 

SWORD. 
Straight, narrow blade, 19m. pattern, thirty-four to 
forty inches in length, inclusive of scabbard; pommel 
shall be helmeted head of Knight with visor closed and 
plume on top, best of steel blade etched with Knight 
Templar emblems and owner's name. Grip to be of 
black ebony with silver passion cross one inch in 
length inlaid flush with the surface ; the cross hilt shall 
be a straight solid pattern without chain. The scab- 
bard. shall be of steel heavily nickel-plated, with heavily 
silver-plated, clean-cut emblematic mountings and 
without etching. 

For Commanders and Past Commanders, the sword 
shall be the same as for Knights, except that all metal 
parts shall be heavily gold-plated, the grip to be of 
white imitation ivory, with etching of cross on one side 
and monogram of owner on the reverse side. 

For Grand and Past Grand Officers, the sword shall 
be the same as for Commanders except that the 
Templar cross shall be used instead of the Passion 
cross. 

The sword shall be furnished with a substantial cot- 
ton flannel cover. 

SWORD CASE. 

The sword case shall be of good medium weight 
leather, embossed, and with leather handle, spring 
fastener, and name and location painted on. 

SUIT CASE. • 
The suit case to be of full weight, selected heavy 
leather, dark tan or russet in color, lined and inter- 
lined, two straps in lid, made over two steel frames, 
brass lock and catches, with two heavy front straps, 
folding handle, and removable chapeau partition. . 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 121 

SHOULDER STRAPS. 
For Commanders. 
Emerald-green silk velvet, one and one-half inches 
wide by four inches long, bordered with one row of 
embroidery of gold a quarter of an inch wide, the Pas- 
sion cross with a halo embroidered of silver in the 
center. 

For Past Commanders. 
The same as for Commanders, except that the color 
of the strap shall be of bright red. 

For the Generalissimo — during his incumbency in 
office — The same color as for Commander, with Square 
surmounted with the Paschal lamb in place of Passion 
cross. 

For Captain-General — during his incumbency in 
office — The same color as for Commander, with Level 
surmounted with the Cock in place of Passion cross. 

COSTUME FOR PRELATE. 
Prescribed hij the Grand Encampment. 
The costume for Prelate shall consist of under robe, 
Mantle or overrote. Stole and Biretta, as follows: 

Underrobe — To be made on yoke and to button be- 
hind. The sleeves to be fashioned with a band at the 
wrist and puffed or fashioned like a Bishop's sleeve. 
Straight standing collar. To be made throughout of 
white material, lined with white. No ornamentation 
on underrobe. 

Mantle or Ore) robe — Mantle to be made with flow- 
ing sleeves and with hood at back. Mantle to be made 
of black material, lined with black. Lining of hood to 
be white. Hood to be trimmed around edges with black 
girdle, by means of which Mantle is fastened in front. 
The overrobe or Mantle is to be ornamented on left 



122 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 

breast with Passion cross with upright arm of cross 
approximately seven inches in height, with transverse 
arm in proportion. Cross to be of red material, edged 
with silver bullion or jaceron. Cross without rays. 

Stole — To be in a single piece made Math a circular 
collar fastening behind. Edges of Stole to be trimmed 
with silver lace and with silver fringe across bottom. 
Stole to be made of white satin or other white material, 
lined with white. The Stole to be ornamented with 
three Passion crosses, graduated in size, the crosses to 
be made of red material, edged with silver bullion or 
jaceron. Crosses to be without rays. 

Biretfa — To be made of black material with black 
tassel. On the front of Biretta shall be the Prelate's 
jewel of office in silver bullion. 

Robe for Prior — A surcoat of red material with a 
Maltese cross (eight pointed) on the breast. A long 
flowing black cloak or mantle, with a white Maltese 
cross (eight pointed) on left side of breast. The 
Mantle is fastened with a white cord with heavy tas- 
sels. The cap is red, with a band of white fur or ermine 
around it, and a Maltese cross in front. The gauntlets 
are black, with silver trimmings, top boots, sword and 
belt. ^ 

The Chaplain's Costume shall consist of an under- 
robe, overrobe. Stole and Biretta. The underrobe shall 
be of white material without ornamentation, made on 
yoke to button behind, sleeves plain, straight standing 
collar. 

The Overrobe shall be a long flowing black mantle 
with a white Maltese cross (eight pointed) on left 
breast. The mantle is fastened with a white twisted 
cord with heavy tassels ; lining of white material. 

The Stole shall be of white satin or other white mate- 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 123 

rial lined in white. To be made in a single piece and 
with a circular collar fastened behind, edged in white 
gilt lace, with gilt fringe across bottom, three black 
Maltese crosses, graduated in size on the front. 

The Biretta of black material with black tassel. On 
front a white Maltese cross. 

Following the selection of the standard uniform a 
meeting of the committee was held for an interchange 
of ideas on the subject of collective bids for the supply 
of uniforms for this and if considered feasible, for 
several of the adjacent jurisdictions. At this meeting 
we were honored by the presence of distinguished rep- 
resentatives from Ohio, Kentucky and Michigan, The 
interchange of views and ideas was of much value to 
your committee and although these visiting Sir Knights 
had no authority to join with us in asking for a col- 
lective bid, they assured us that their states were labor- 
ing under the same handicap as our own, and that with 
them there existed the same feeling in the constituent 
bodies regarding the uncertainty as to price and the 
necessity for some united action. The meeting was 
highly satisfactory to us in that the necessity for some 
action looking towards uniformity in Indiana was em- 
phasized by the experiences previously had in these 
sister jurisdictions. 

For this purpose if for no other, youV committee 
was convinced of the advisability of making a collec- 
tive contract with one firm only to supply the Indiana 
Commanderies with uniforms, thereby securing abso- 
lute uniformity in the articles and material composing 
the uniform. At the same thiie it was our hope to se- 
2ure some reduction in price or at least making optional 
such of the non-essentials as to reduce the cost of the 
essential articles and still maintain uniformity. The 
specifications for the adopted uniform were therefore 



124 Proceedings Grand Commanderij [May 12, 



submitted to the several regalia houses previously sup- 
plying Indiana Commanderies with uniforms, in the 
following form : 

The Uniform Committee of the Grand Commandery 
of Indiana will receive bids in the office of the Grand 
Recorder, Masonic Temple, Indianapolis, Ind., July 8th, 
for the supply of Knight Templar uniforms for the 
constituent Commanderies of Indiana for the period of 
one or more years. The contract to be for a yearly 
minimum of eight hundred uniforms, or more, as may 
be required, and under the following conditions: 

1st. The several articles comprising the Regulation 
Indiana Uniform as adopted by the committee — a de- 
scription of which is attached to this notice — must be 
priced separately, the committee reserving the right to 
select therefrom such articles as they may desire to 
compose the uniform for which they wish to contract, 
eliminating such articles as they choose, and making 
optional such others as they may select. 

2d. Samples of the complete uniform, as is proposed 
to be furnished by the bidder, must be submitted for 
the inspection of the committee, and a full and complete 
description of the construction of the several articles 
composing it, such as the make-up and material going 
into the chapeau, the cap, the coat, the belt, the sword 
case, and the suit case, and the plating of the several 
metal parts, must be furnished for the information of 
the committee, and as a basis for comparison. 

3d. Any contract entered into will be with the 
Grand Commandery of Indiana, to whom the contract- 
ing party will be responsible for any variation in qual- 
ity, material or workmanship from that contracted for. 
The orders for the uniforms will come directly from the 
constituent Commanderies, as needed, as will the pay- 
ment for the same, but the Grand Commandery will 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 125 

guarantee the bidder as against loss for any uniform 
so purchased. 

4th. A surety bond of a reasonable amount will be 
required from the bidder for the faithful performance 
of any contract entered into. 

5th. The committee reserves the right to reject any 
or all bids. 

On the date appointed, we had proposals from five 
firms manufacturing Knight Templar uniforms as 
follows : 

HENDERSON-AMES COMPANY, KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN. 

Coat (27.50-D Cabot) $32.00 2749-D Dakota 29.00 

Chapeau (1903-A) 21.70 

Fatigue Cap and Rnin Cover 

(2161-A) 4.75 

Baldric (2255-A) 8.40 2254-A 6.95 

Belt and Plate (2387-A) 7.20 

Sword & Cover (2479-A) 11.99 

Sword Case (2542-A) 7.70 2540y2-A 4.45 

Suit Case— Fiber (2559-Ai 7.83 

Sleeve Crosses 2.85 

Gloves (2660-A) .32 

Fatigue Cap Cover— Silk 1.30 

(2232-A) Sateen .70 

Chapeau Cover— Rain (1805-A)_ .50 

$105.94 
If materials are reduced in price, we get benefit. 

C. E. M^ARD AND COMPANY. 

Coat $ 37.50 16 oi,. all wool 

Chapeau 20.90 7-inch plume 

Fatigue Cap 4.60 

and Cover 1.00 Including rain cover 

Baldric 6.40 

Belt and Plate 7.60 

Sword 11.50 

Sword Case 6.50 Cow-hide 



126 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



Suit Case 18.00 Cow-hide 

Sleeve Crosses 2.00 

Gloves .40 

Chapeau Cover .50 

Chapeau Brush .35 



$117.25 



Fatigue Cap Cover — Rain. 



IHLING BROS. & EVERHARD, KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN. 

Coat— 1200 $ 27.25 

Chapeau 20.00 

Fatigue Cap and Rain Cover 4.50 

Baldric 7.00 

Belt and Plate 7.00 

Sword 10.50 

Sword Case 7.00 Split $ 5.00 

Suit Case 15.45 Leather 15.45 

Sleeve Crosses 2.50 

Gloves .40 

Fatigue Cap Cover— Silk .70 : 

Chapeau Cover — Rain .45 



$102.75 



Fatigue Cap Cover — Rain. 



PETTIBONE BROS. MANUFACTURING COMPANY, CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

Coat $30.60 

Chapeau and Rain Cover 20.65 

Fatigue Cap and Rain Cover 4.60 

Baldric, 5% 9.00 

Belt and Plate, 5% 7.70 

Sword, 5% 13.25 

Sword Case 4.00 4 oz. $ 6.75 

Suit Case 7.65 14.50 

Sleeve Crosses 2.70 

Gloves .35 

Fatigue Cap Cover— Silk 1.08 Sateen .58 



$101.58 



Fatigue Cap Cover — Rain. 
Chapeau Cover — Rain. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 127 



THE M. C. LILLEY & COMPANY, COLUMBUS, OHIO. 

Coat, E cloth $ 29.95 

Chapeau 21.45 

Chapeau Cover .50 

Cap 5.25 

Cap Cover .70 

Baldric 7.75 

Belt 7.10 

Sword 11.80 

Sword Case 4.45 

Suit Case — Fiber 9.50 

Sleeve Crosses 1.70 

Gloves .30 



$100.45 

A sample uniform was in each case submitted for 
our inspection as well as were articles inferior in qual- 
ity proposed to be substituted for those specified by 
the committee. 

From previous conversations with the representa- 
tives from the several regalia houses, your committee 
was convinced that no considerable concession would 
be made on a contract such as we proposed, for the 
reason that any reduction in price in Indiana must of 
necessity be followed by a like reduction in other juris- 
dictions. Your committee likewise found the same ap- 
parent understanding between the several houses re- 
garding prices as had the constituent Commanderies 
in the past. We were not therefore surprised to find 
that the prices offered corresponded exactly with those 
listed in the several catalogues and for the same 
articles varied little from each other, and in the make- 
up of the uniform as related to price your committee 
did not consider the proposal to substitute inferior ma- 
terial in order to reduce the cost. 

After a very thorough inspection of the sample uni- 
forms presented for our inspection and as thorough a 
compilation and comparison of the prices named, your 



128 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12^ 



committee awarded the contract for the supply of all 
uniforms to the constituent Commanderies of Indiana 
for the period of one year to the M. C. Lilley Company 
of Columbus, Ohio, upon the following conditions : 

1st. The contract price for the complete uniform, 
the several parts of the same, and for the change of 
the silver uniform to the gold is to be as follows : 

2d. The Indiana regulation uniform only is to be 
furnished. 

3d. A reduction in the price is to be made from 
time to time as the price of labor and material will 
allow. ■ At all times we are to have the lowest price 
made on these goods. 

The contract contains a thirty-day cancellation 
clause. 

4th. The constituent Commanderies are to order 
uniforms direct from the manufacturer as their needs 
may require and are to pay for the same direct to the 
manufacturers within thirty days after their receipt. 
Complaint as to service, workmanship or material is to 
be made through the Uniform Committee. 

The Grand Commandery is not to be primarily re- 
sponsible for the payment for uniforms purchased by 
the constituent bodies, but agrees to be responsible as 
guarantor to the uniform company that the Command- 
ery ordering the same will pay therefor, and to pay 
therefor in case the Commandery ordering the same 
fails to do so. 

5th. The required uniform under this contract will 
cost the Commanderies $85.00, plus war tax and deliv- 
ery. The fibre suit case costing $9.50 and the cap and 
Red Cross cover costing $5.95 being optional with the 
purchaser. 



1921] of the State of hidiana. 129 

The complete uniform under the contract will cost 
$100.45 plus war tax and delivery. 

Your committee regret that they were unable to 
secure a better price on the uniform, but for the rea- 
sons stated before and the fact that there w^as an 
apparent understanding if not agreement among the 
bidders, very little concession on price could be ob- 
tained. However, the quality, with the possible excep- 
tion of the coat, is of a better grade than the majority 
of the Commanderies have been obtaining for a like 
price. 

The Commanderies can be assured that your commit- 
tee has been active at all times during the year and 
that you have had the benefit of every reduction in 
price made by any of the regalia houses. They have 
also been in close touch with other Grand Jurisdictions 
and have positive knowledge that Indiana is getting as 
good a price as any of them, quality considered. 

We feel that the action of the Grand Commandery 
was a wise one and will be productive of much good. 
Immediately, it will standardize the uniform and pre- 
vent the purchase of articles at variance with the pre- 
scribed standard as well as correct the evils that have 
obtained in the purchase of uniforms individually. In 
the future, the indications are that the collective bar- 
gaining will result in securing better goods at a lower 
price. The evidence of future competition is already 
presenting itself and Indiana Commanderies are certain 
to profit thereby. 

That the purpose of the Grand Commandery in cre- 
ating this committee may be fully realized and as the 
best method toward securing the enforcement of its 
action, we would recommend that each incoming Grand 
Commander be directed to appoint a Uniform Commit- 



130 Proceedings Grand Commandery^^ [May 12, 

tee similar to that of the past year with like authority 
to continue this work along the present lines. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Olin E. Holloway, 

Eugene Vatet, 

John L. Rupe. 

• WiNFIELD T. DURBIN, 

Joseph G. Ibach, 

Committee. - 
Which report was adopted. 

REPORTS OF COJOriTTEE ON FINAIVCE. 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following: 

ON ALLOWANCES. 

To the Grand Coinmandery : 

Your Finance Committee recommends the following 
appropriations be made : 

Grand Commander $100.00 

Grand Treasurer ^ 100.00 

Chairman of Committee on Correspondence 200.00 

Grand Captain of the Guard 10.00 

Committee on Jurisprudence 45.00 

Committee on Auditing — 

Albert W. Funkhouser 20.80 

Clyde B. Kellar 18.50 

Mark L. Dickover 18.95 

Grand Recorder, for incidentals 5.00 

The Grand Recorder is hereby directed to draw war- 
rants for the above items. 

Courteously submitted, 
, . Winfield T. Durbin, 

' . James L. Randel, 

Harry G. Strickland, 
. Committee. 

Which report was adopted. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 131 



R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following : 

ON APPROPRIATION TO TRIENNIAL COMMITTEE. 

To the Grand Commandenj: 

Your Committee on Finance recommend that there 
be appropriated $2,000, or so much thereof as shall be 
necessary, for the Triennial Committee for use at the 
Triennial Conclave to be held at New Orleans in 1922, 
and the Grand Recorder is hereby directed to draw 
warrant for same thirty days before the meeting of 
the Grand Encampment. 

Courteously submitted, 

Winfield T. Durbin, 
James L. Randel, 
Harry G. Strickland, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following: 

ON ALLOWANCES FOR SPECIAL VISITATIONS. 

To the Grayid Commandery: 

Your Committee on Finance recommend that the 
Grand Recorder be directed to draw warrants for the 
following persons and in the amounts opposite their 
names for their visitations to the constituent Com- 
manderies : . 

George F. Hitchcock $39.61 

Edward J. Scoonover 41.90 

Gaylard M. Leslie 32.38 

Albert D. Ogborn 20.95 

Eugene Vatet 39.43 

Will M. Sparks 15.31 



132 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 

Dirrelle Chaney 84.48 

George A. Newhouse 28.26 

Courteously submitted, 

WiNFIELD T. DURBIN, 

James L. Randel, 
Harry G. Strickland, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following: 

ON APPROPRIATION FOR ANNUAL CONCLAVE, 1921. 

To the G7^and Commandery : 

Your Committee on Finance recommend the Grand 
Recorder be directed to draw a warrant in favor of 
Brandt C. Downey, Chairman of the Committee on 
Entertainment for this annual conclave, for $800.00, 
or so much thereof as is necessary. 

Courteously submitted, 

Winfield T. Durbin, 
James L. Randel, 
Harry G. Strickland, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following: 

ON expenses of distinguished guests. 
To the Grand Commandery: 

Your Committee on Finance recommend the Grand 
Recorder be and is hereby instructed to ascertain the 
local expenses of the distinguished visitors while with 
us, and that he draw warrants to pay the same. 
Courteously submitted, 

Winfield T. Durbin, 
James L. Randel, 
Harry G. Strickland, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 



1921] of the State of hidimia. 133 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following- : 

ON SALARY OF GRAND RECORDER. 

To the Grand Commandery: 

Your Finance Committee recommend that the salary 
of the Grand Recorder be fixed at $750.00 from the 
1st of May, 1921. 

Courteously submitted, 

Winfield T. Durbin, 
Harry G. Strickland, 
James L. Randel, 

Coynmittee. 
Which report was adopted. 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following: 

RELATIVE TO PERMANENT FUND. 

To the Grand Commanderij: 

Your Committee on Finance, after conference with 
the Grand Recorder estimating the expenses for the 
coming year, including the appropriation to the Trien- 
nial Committee, find there will be sufficient funds to 
permit the transfer of $2,000 from the general fund to 
the permanent fund. They recommend that the Grand 
Recorder be directed to draw a warrant for the sum of 
$2,000, payable to the order of the Grand Treasurer 
for deposit in the permanent fund. 

Courteously submitted, 

Winfield T. Durbin, 
James L. Randel, 
Harry G. Strickland, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 



134 Proceedings Grand Commandenj [May 12, 

R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, Past Grand Com- 
mander, presented the following: 

ON APPROPRIATION TO MISS MYRTLE SMYTHE. 

To the Grand- Commandery: 

Be it known Miss Myrtle Smythe, during the last 
absence of Grand Recorder Prather, had full charge of 
the office, performing largely the duties of Grand Re- 
corder, etc., the Finance Committee recommends the 
thanks of the Grand Commandery be tendered in ap- 
preciation of her faithful services, and the same is 
hereby tendered ; also, that a warrant for one hundred 
dollars be drawn in her favor for extra services. 
Courteously submitted, 

Winfield T. Durbin, 
James L. Randel. 
Harry G. Strickland, 

Committee. 
Which report was adopted. 

ELECTION OF ORAND OFFICERS. 

R. E. Sir Harry C. Moore, Grand Commander, an- 
nounced that the hour had arrived for the election of 
Grand Officers, and appointed as tellers R. E. Sirs 
Henri T Conde, Charles Day, James L. Randel and 
Vestal W. Woodward, who, after collecting and count- 
ing the ballots, reported the result of the election. The 
Knights named below, having received a majority of all 
the votes cast, were duly elected to the respective 
offices named : 

Eugene Vatet, of Muncie, Grand Commander. 

George A. Newhouse, of New Albany, Deputy 
Grand Commander. 

Gaylard M. Leslie, of Fort Wayne, Grand Gener- 
alissimo. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 135 



Albert D. Ogborn, of New Castle, Grand Captain 
General. 

DiRRELLE Chaney. of Indianapolis, Grand Senior 
Warden. 

Edward J. Scoonover, of Indianapolis, Grand Junior 
Warden. 

John C. Parrett, of Hammond, Grand Prelate. 

Vestal W. Woodward, of Indianapolis, Grand 
Treasurer. 

William H. Swintz, of Indianapolis, Grand Re- 
corder. 

George F. Hitchcock, of Plymouth, Grand Standard 
Bearer. 

William M. Sparks, of Rushville, Grand Sword 
Bearer. 

Clarence H. Snoke. of South Bend. Grand Warder. 

RESOLl TIO>— A3rEKICAM8M. 

R. E. Sir George S. Parker, Past Grand Commander, 
offered the following : 

Whereas, The American Legion, an organization of 
the soldiers and sailors of the late war, has inaugurated 
a movement seeking the betterment of American cit- 
izenship, and are putting on a campaign for the im- 
provement and elevation of civic ideals in this country ; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Grand Commandery of Indiana 
pledges its hearty support to all efforts made to ad- 
vance American ideals and American principles ; that it 
join with all others to suppress Bolshevism, Socialism 
and anarchy in our civil life ; that it demands American 
citizenship for all those who make this country their 
home ; that it demands the English language to be the 
medium of education in all our schools ; that we 



136 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



call upon all Knights Templar in this jurisdiction to 
support unqualifiedly all efforts to raise the standard 
of American citizenship, to inculcate the principles of 
government established by our fathers as a bulwark to 
law and morality in the United States. 

Which was adopted, 

ADDRESS BY MILES H. H. DAVIS. GRAM) GENERALISSIMO, 
REPRESENTING GRAND COMMANDERY OF KENTUCKY. 

Miles H. H. Davis, Grand Generalissimo of the Grand 
Commandery of Kentucky, addressed the Grand Com- 
mandery and in the fearless manner characteristic of 
the residents of our neighboring state on the south, 
referred to matters demanding the attention and sup- 
port of the Knights Templar in the best interests of the 
future of our country. ■ 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS. 

R. E. Sir John L. Rupe, Past Grand Commander, 
offered the following: 

Resolved, By the officers and members of the Grand 
Commandery of Knights Templar of Indiana that our 
thanks are due and very cordially tendered to the offi- 
cers and members of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, the officers and members of Murat Temple of the 
Order of the Mystic Shrine, the Masonic Temple Asso- 
ciation and to the officers and Sir Knights of Raper 
Commandery for their exceptionally valuable services 
in the entertainment of the Sir Knights and their 
ladies in attendance upon this our annual conclave. 
Without such very excellent services thus rendered us 
our present meeting could not have been the success 
it has been. 

We congratulate all the marshals who organized the 
parade and all the Sir Knights who participated in the 
wonderful and impressive parade of yesterday, and the 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 137 



Knightly spirit which prompted them to ignore the 
unfriendy elements and, rain or shine, they made the 
parade a splendid success. 
Which was adopted. 

RESOLUTIOIV RELATIVE TO APOSTLES CREED. 

E. Sir George H. Thayer, Jr., offered the following: 

Reso-vecl, That in the opinion of the Grand Com- 
mandery of Knights Templar of the State of Indiana, 
the statement of Christian faith known as the Apostles 
Creed should be recited by all Sir Knights standing at 
"Present Swcrds", by order of the Captain-General 
under instructions from the Commander in appropriate 
form, as the climax of the ceremony of opening the 
Commandery in full form. 

Which was referred to the Committee on Jurispru- 
dence. 

RESOLUTION— L\yiTATIOX TO (iRAND EXCAMPMEXT TO 
HOLD TRIENMAL CONCLAVE IX IMHAXAPOLIS. 

R. E. Sir John L. Paipe, Past Grand Commander, 
offered the followiiig: 

Resolved, That it is the sentiment of Indiana Knights 
Templar that we invite the Grand Encampment, K, T., 
U. S. A., to hold the Triennial Conclave in Indianapolis, 
the time — 1925 or 1928 — to be left to the Committee on 
Jurisprudence. 

Which was adopted. 

REPORT OF C0X3IITTEE 0\ JIRISPRIDEXCE. 

R. E. Sir Leonidas P. Newby, Past Grand Command- 
er, presented the following: 

ON RESOLUTION RELATIVE TO APOSTLES CREED. 

To the Grand. Commandery of Indiana: 

We, the Committee on Jurisprudence, beg leave to 
report that this Grand Commandery has no authority 



138 Proceedings Grcmd Commandery [May 12, 



in the premises, for the reason that all matters relating 
to the Ritual rests with the Grand Encampment. 
Courteously submitted, 

Walter M. Hindman, 

Chah^man. 
Which was adopted. 

JEWEL PRESENTED TO THE RETIRING GRAND 
(0M3IANDER, 

R. E. Sir Leonidas P. Newhy, Past Grand Command- 
er, in his usual pleasing manner, presented to the retir- 
ing Grand Commander a Past Grand Commander's 
jewel, complimenting and congratulating him upon his 
efficient handling of the affairs of his office. R. E. Sir 
Moore responded very happily, expressing his appre- 
ciation of the courtesies extended him. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

Eugene Vatet, Grand Commander-elect, announced 
the following appointments : 

Committee on Templar Jurisprudence — R. E. Sirs 
George W. F. Kirk, Walter M. Hindman, Winneld T. 
Durbin, John E. Redmond, John H. Nicholson, Leonidas 
P. Newby, Oliver Card, Vestal W. Woodward, Charles 
Day, Luther Short, William B. Hosford, John L. Rupe, 
Charles M. Zion, Joseph G. Ibach, Harry G. Strickland, 
Adrian Hamersly, James L. Randel, George H. Steel, 
George S. Parker, Henri T. Conde and Harry C. Moore. 

Auditing Committee — E. Sirs Albert W. Funkhouser, 
George L. Davis and Arlie E. Crim. 

Finance Committee — R. E. Sirs Winfield T. Durbin, 
Harry G. Strickland and James L. Randel. 

Committee on Uniform — E. Sirs Olin E. Holloway, 
George A. Newhouse, R. E. Sirs John L. Rupe, Win- 
field T. Durbin and Joseph G. Ibach. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. 139 

Chairman of Committee on Correspondence — E. Sir 
Robert A. Woods, of Princeton. 

Grand Captain of the Guard — Sir Jacob Rubin, of 
Indianapolis. 

INSTALLATIOIV. 

R. E. Sir William H. Norris, Grand Captain-General 
of the Grand Encampment, K. T., U. S. A., and personal 
representative of the M. E. Grand Master, assisted by 
R. E. Sir John L. Rape, Past Grand Commander, in- 
stalled the of^cers as follows : 

R. E. Sir Eugene Vatet. Grand Commander. 

V. E. Sir George A. Newhouse, Deputy Grand 
Commander. 

E. Sir Gaylard M. Leslie, Grand Generalissimo. 

E. Sir Albert D. Ogborn, Grand Captain-General. 

E. Sir Dirrelle Chaney, Grand Senior Warden. 

E. Sir Edward J. Scoonover, Grand Junior War- 
den. 

E. Sir John C. Parrett, Grand Prelate. 

E. Sir Vestal W. Woodwapd, Grand Treasurer. 

E. Sir William H. Swintz, Grand Recorder. 

E. Sir George F. Hitchcock, Grand Standard 
Bearer. 

E. Sir William M. Sparks, Grand Sword Bearer. 

E. Sir Clarence H. Snoke, Grand Warder. 

Sir Jacob Rubin, Grand Captain of the Guard. 



140 



Proceedings Gimnd Commandery [May 12, 



GRAM) C0>1-MAM)EIIY ADJOIRNED. 

All business having been completed, after devo- 
tional exercises, led by 
E. Sir John C. Parrett, 
Grand Prelate, the 
Grand Commandery of 
Knights Templar of the 
State of Indiana ad- 
journed at 1 P. M., to 
meet in Masonic Tem- 
ple, in the city of In- 
dianapolis, the second 
Wednesday in May, 
A.D.1922, A.O.804 (it 
teing May 10, 1922). 




^^^' 




Grand Commander. 



Attest : 




Grand Recorder. 



1921] of the State of Indiana. . 141 



GRAND COMMANDERS 

OF THE GRAND COMMANDERY KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF THE STATE OF IN- 
DIANA FROM ORGANIZATION IN 1S54 TO DATE, THE YEAR GIVEN 
BEING THE YEAR OF INSTALLATIOxN INTO OFFICE. 

1. tHenry C. Lawrence, of LaF;iyette, 1854, 1855, 1856. 

2. tEphraim Colestock, of Indiauapolis, 1857. 

3. tGeorge W. Porter, of New Albany, 1858. 

4. tWilliam Pelan, of Connersville, 1859. 

5. tSolomon D. Bayless, of Fort Wayne, 1860, 1862, 1863. 

6. tWilliam Hacker, of Shelbyville, 1864, 1865. 

7. tHarvey G. Hazelrigg, of Lebanon, 1866, 1867. 

8. tThomas Newby, of Connersville, 1868, 1869. 

9. tDavid P. Whedon, of Fort Wayne, 1870. 

10. tElbridge G. Hamilton, of LaPorte. 1871. 

11. tCbarles Cruft, of Terre Haute, 1872. 

12. tEdwin D. Palmer, of Richmond. 1873. 

13. tAndrew H. Hamilton, of Fort Wayne, 1874. 

14. tNicholas R. Ruckle, of Indianapolis, 1875. 

15. tErville B. Bishop, of Muneie. 1876. 

16. fAugustus D. Lynch, of Indianapolis, 1877. 

17. t Alexander Thomas, of Terre Haute, 1878. 

18. tSalathiel T. Williams, of Kendallville, 1879. 

19. tHenry G. Thayer, of Plymouth, 1880. 

20. tJohn H. Hess, of Columbus, 1881. 

21. t Samuel B. Sweet, of Indianapolis, 1882. 

22. tRichard L. Woolsey, of Jeffersonville, 1883. 

23. tWalter Vail, of Michigan City, 1884. 

24. tHenry C. Adams, of Indianapolis. 1885. 

25. tEphraim W. Patrick, of Evansville, 1886. 

26. George W. F. Kirk, of Shelbyville, 1887. 

27. tReuben Peden, of Knightstown, 1888. 

28. tDuncan T. Bacon, of Indianapolis, 1880. 
29 tHenry H. Lancaster, of LaFayette, 1890. 

30. tirvin B. Webber, of Warsaw, 1891. 

31. tJoseph A. Manning, of Michigan City, 1892. 

32. tSimeon S. Johnson, of Jeffersonville. 1893. 

33. tCharles W. Slick, of Mishawaka, 1894. 

34. Walter M. Hindman, of Vinceunes, 1895. 

35. Winfield T. Durbin, of Anderson, 1896. 

36. John E. Redmond, of Franklin. 1897. 

37. John H. Nicholson, of Richmond, 1898. 

38. William E. Ferryman, of Franklin, 1899. 

39. tEugene W. Kelley, of Muneie. 1900. ■ 

40. Leonidas P. Newby, of Knightstown. 1901. 



142 . Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



41. tSidney W. Douglas, of Evansville, 1902. 

42. tFrederick Glass, of Madison, 1903. 

43. tCharles Goltra, of Crawfordsville, 1904. 

44. jNathan L. Agnew, of Valparaiso, 1905. 

45. Oliver Gard, of Frankfort, 190G. 

46. Vestal W. Woodward, of Indianapolis, 1907. 

47. Charles Day, of New Albany, 1908. 

48. Luther Short, of Knightstown, 1909. 

49. William B. Hosford, of Mishawaka, 1910. 

50. John L. Itupe, of Richmond. 1911. 

51. Charles M. Zion, of New York City, 1912. 

52. Joseph G. Ibach, of Hammond, 1918. 

53. Harry G. Strickland, of Greenfield, 1914. 

54. Adrian Hamersly, of Indianapolis, 1915, 

55. James L. Randel, of Greencastle, 1916, 

56. George H. Steel, of Evansville, 1917. 

57. George S. Parker, of Anderson, 1918. 

58. Henri T. Conde, of Indianapolis. 1919. 

59. Harry C. Moore, of Marion, 1920. 

60. Eugene Vatet, of Muncie, 1921, 



GRAND RECORDERS 

OF THE GRAND COMMANDERY FROM ORGANIZATION IN 1854 TO DATE, 

1. tFrancis King, 1854 to 1865. 

2. tWilliam Hacker, 1866 to 1868. 

3. tJohn M. Bramwell, 1868 to November 10, 1888. 

4. tWilliam H. Smythe, Nov. 10, 1888, to Feb. 11, 1901. 

5. tJacob W. Smith, February 11, 1901, to April 18, 1901. 

6. tCalvin W. Prather, April 18, 1901, to August 1, 1920. 

7. Wm. H. Swintz, September 13, 1920, to 



tDeceased. tNot affiliated in Indiana. 



1921] of the State of India7ia. 143 



CHKONOLOGY. 

The ordinary calendar, or vulgar era, is not generally used by 
Freemasons in dating their official documents. They have one 
peculiar to themselves, differing according to their various Rites. 
The Masons in all parts of the world working in the York and 
French Rites add 4,000 years to the Christian era, calling it Anno 
Lucis — Year of Light; abbreviated A. L.; thus the year 1921 
would be A. L. 5921. (This fact has a symbolic reference not 
because they believe Freemasonry is, but that the principles and 
light of the institution, are coeval with the creation.) 

Masons practicing in the Ancient and Accepted Rite use the 
Jewish Calendar, which adds 3. 700 to the vulgar era. styled Anno 
Mundi — A. M. — year of the world; the year 1921 would be A. M. 
5681. Or they sometimes use the Hebrew year, which begins on 
the 17th of September, or 1st of Tisri, using the initials lA. H. — ■ 
Anno Hebraico. 

Royal Arch Masons date from the building of the second Tem- 
ple — 530 B. C. Their style is therefore Anno Inventionis — A. Inv. 
— in the year of the discovery; the year 1921 would be A. I. 
2451. 

Royal and Select Masters should date from the completion of 
Solomon's Temple, which would add 1000 to the Christian era. 
Their style is Anno Depositionis — A. Dep. — in the year of De- 
posit; the year 1921 would be A. Dep. 2921. 

Knights Templar date from the organization of the Order— 
1118. Their style is therefore Anno Ordinis — A. O. — in the year 
of the Order; the year 1921 would be A. 0. 803. 



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146 



1921] 



of the State of Indiaym. 



147 



PAST COMMANDERS OF INDIANA 

Who are now affiliated with the Commandery named, 
and are, therefore, permanent members of the Grand 
Commandery : 



Raper Comviandery No. 1. 



William J. McKee. 
John W. Staub. 
Vestal W. Woodward. 
William S. Rich. 
Charles L. Hutchinson. 
George A. Gay. 
Henri T. Conde. 
John J. Boaz. 
Elias J. Jacoby. 
George M. Spiegel. 
Leon T. Leach. 



Leslie D. Clancy. 
Edward J. Scoonover. 
Alexander Rumpler. 
Louis G. Buddenbaum. 
John W. Swanton. 
Harry L. Morrison. 
Charles S. Barker. 
Franklin L. Bridges. 
Fred W. Gunkle. 
J. Ambrose Dunkel. 
Charles C. Kuhn. 



Baldwin Commandery No. 2. 



John A. Young. 
George W. F. Kirk. 
Samuel P. McCrea. 
Henry C. Morrison. 
Everett E. Stroup. 
Squire L. Major. 
Frank C. Sheldon. 
Frank Bass. 
Jacob A. Conrey. 
Julius L. Showers. 



David L. Wilson. 
Will A. Yarling. 
Thomas E. Yarling. 
Edward R. Moberly. 
Caughey S. Fleming. 
Daniel Wray DePrez. 
Elliott S. Gorgas. 
Ara E Lisher. 
Eleazer K. Amsden. 



LaFayette Com,mandery No. 3. 



David H. Flynn. 
Granvillle H. Hull. 
George P. Haywood. 
John Kimmel. 
Frank B. Thompson. 
George F. Keiper. 
John Cockle. 
Robert Alexander. 
James Troop. 
George B. Thompson. 
Septimius Vater. 



Rudolph C. Eisenbach. 
Arthur McQueen. 
Frank S. Moore. 
James H. Mitchell. 
Samuel F. Martin.. 
Frank Kimmel. 
Charles T. Stallard. 
Alvester Maple. 
Clarence F. Hitch. 
John M. McWilliams. 
Erwin F. Gery. 



148 



Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



Foyt Wayne Conwmndery No. 4. 



John H. Bass. 
Ferdinand F. Boltz. 
Henry W. Mordhurst. 
William Geake. 
Charles E. Read. 
James M. Henry. 
John F. Wing. 
John W. Hayden. 
Charles B. Fitch. 
Michael 0. Ginty. 
Clyde M. Gandy. 



William E. Lipsett. 
Gaylard M. Leslie. 
Byron H. Somers. 
Walter E. Cook. 
Jacob M. Stouder. 
Fred H. Pocock. 
William J. Adams. 
Manford M. Smick. 
Brown Cooper. 
George B. Warren. 
Sylvester B. Kerlin. 



Levi S. Nold. 

Neiv Albany Commandery No. 5. 



Frank A. Wells. 
Beauregard Cullen. 
Arthur E. Brown. 
William H. Day. 
Urban S. Widman. 
Louis H. Jones. 
Ferdinand Kahler, Sr. 
Edgar A. Needham. 
Lawrence K. Tuley. 



Hugh J. Needham. 
Theodore A. McDonald. 
Charles Day. 
George A. Newhouse. 
Charles D. Knoefel. 
James W. Dunbar. 
Charles W. Edler. 
William A. Laufer. 
George Borgerding. 
C. William Sieveking. 

Connersville Commandery No. 6. 

Charles L Showalter. August C. Fick. 

John Payne. John E. Page. 

William L. Cortleyou. Allen Wiles. 

William M. Gregg. Thomas H. Stoops. 

Joseph R. Mountain. Charles T. Gordon. 

Lewis E. Green. Fred C. Neal. 

Orie V. Handley. William F. McNaughton. 

Richmond Commandery No. 8. 



Charles E. Marlatt. 
Leroy E. Land. 
Samuel Marlatt. 
Joseph L. Smith. 
John H. Nicholson. 
John L. Rupe. 
Albert G. Ogborn. 
Elwood Morris. 
Leroy E. Browne. 
William S. Porterfield. 



Henry R. Click. 
Harry C. Keelor. 
Philip H. Worrall. 
Fred S. Bates. 
George R. Cause. 
Ora Frank Ward. 
Luther E. Bruce. 
Robert W. Philips. 
Frank Benn. 



1921] 



of the State of Indimm. 



149 



Knightstown Commandery No. 9. 



John E. Keys. 
Thomas B. Wilkinson. 
Leonidas P. Newby. 
Olin E. Holloway. 
William Beeman. 
Lewis A. Bell. 
Omer H. Barrett. 
Ralph W. Wagoner. 
Claud E. Wilkinson. 



Edward B. Williams. 
Floyd J. Newby. 
Richard H. Schweitzer. 
Raymond G. Bales. 
W. Edward Call. 
Jene S. Holloway. 
Thomas Beecher. 
Robert M. Parker. 



Warsatv Commandery No. 10. 



Joseph S. Baker. 
Wilbur F. Maish. 
Oren J. Chandler. 
Williard H. Kingery. 
Francis E. Bowser. 
Lucius C. Wann. 
Charles M. Long. 



Edmond C. Cammack. 
Flint E. Bash. 
Warren Darst. 
Charles H. Ker. 
Chester E. Bolinger. 
Marshall F. Wallace. 



Greencastle Commandery No. 11. 



Edwin E. Black. 
James L. Browning. 
Wm. M. Houck. 
James L. Randel. 
Andrew B. Hanna. 
Charles E. Zeis. 
Samuel A. Harris. 
William B. Vestal. 
Charles W. Huffman. 



Amos Evan Ayler. 
Richard S. Cowgill. 
Lewis A. Zaring. 
Clarence E. Crawley. 
David W. Campbell. 
Earl C. Lane. 
Conrad C. Gautier. 
Edward E. Caldwell. 
Joseph F. Gillespie. 



LaPorte Commatidery No. 12. 



Silas E. Taylor. 
John W. Pottinger. 
Jesse M. Callender. 
John W. Le Roy. 
William S. Fisher. 
James E. Bowell. 



Austin Cutler. 
William A. Jones. 
William D. Smith. 
Henry C. Noe. 
Philip Q. Doran. 



150 



Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



South Bend Commandery No. 13. 



Samuel T. Applegate. 
Jacob M. Chillas. 
Albert A. Fulk. 
William G. Crabill. 
Dudley M. Shively. 
Edward W. Gingrich. 
William H. Swintz. 
Arthur S. Irwin. 
George W. Freyermuth. 
Thomas W. Slick. 



Stuart MacKibbin. 
John H. Ellis. 
Edward J. Harrison. 
Rollo G. Page. 
J. Willard Shidler 
Paul N. Prass. 
Chas. A. Lippincott. 
Clarence H. Snoke. 
Edward E. Fricke. 



Columbus Commandery No. 14. 



William F. Kendall. 
James B. Safford. 
William F. Coates. 
William Henderson. 
Marshall Hacker. 
Charles Hege. 
Oliver Ong. 
John W. Suverkrup. 
Charles A. Sergeant. 
John Jewell. 
James A. Glanton. 
George H. Denison. 



George W. Robertson. 
Christian M. Keller. 
Allen C. Denison. 
Arthur W. Mason. 
Roy M. Jackson. 
Darcey E. Lewellen. 
William N. Ackenbach. 
Walter E. Conn. 
David C. Behrman. 
Clarence C. McCullough. 
Albert W. Phillips. 



La Valette Commandery No. 15. 



Charles P. Bacon. 
Clarence L. Hinkle. 
Edward P. Busse. 
William H. Patrick. 
George H. Steel. 
Albert R. Messick. 
Morton J. Compton. 
William W. Ross. 
Edward R. Smith. 



Frank C. Baugh. 
George D. Heilman. 
C. Netter Worthington. 
James W. Roper. 
Edward A. Torrance. 
Albert W. Funkhouser. 
Leo E. Price. 
John Wyttenbach. 
William R. Davidson. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



151 



Terre Haute Commandery No. 16. 



Jacob C. Kolsom. 
William E. Ferryman. 
John C. Warren. 
Charles Balch. 
James K. Allen. 
Frederic C. Goldsmith. 
Emil Froeb. 
John R. Coffin. 
Edward E. Bitner, 
Robert W. Van Valzah. 
Charles G. Reynolds. 
Ora D. Davis. 
William F. Hartoug:h. 



Herman Froeb. 
Will W.-Adamson. 
Merit L. Laubach. 
Charles S. Batt. 
John W. Parks. 
Charles H. Traquair. 
William Penn. 
John R. Harkness. 
Joseph S. Coleman. 
Conrad J. Herber. 
Jacob E. Mechling. 
Burwell W. Sale. 



Hubert J. Marshall. 
James A. Riddell. 



Aurora Commandery iVo. 17. 
James F. Treon. 



Muncie Commandery No. 18. 



J. Wallace Perkins. 
J. Edward HafFner. 
William R. Snyder. 
Beecher W. Bennett. 
Frank G. Jackson. 
William C. Ball. 
Charles E. Miller. 
Oliver W. Storer. 
James M. Motsenbocker. 
George W. Wagnei\ 
Eugene Vatet. 



Walter Shewmaker. 
R. Milton Retherford. 
Charles A. Woods. 
Charles S. Parkhurst. 
Everett Moffitt. 
Samuel G. Jump. 
Benjamin F. Moore. 
Emory J. Niday. 
Richard C. Stone. 
Thomas F. Fitzgibbon. 
Charles 0. Grafton. 



Apollo Commandery No. 19. 



George W. Hartsuck. 
Sylvester J. Hartsuck. 
William H. Leas. 
John Austin Jones. 
John W. Hanan. 
Bernard Pullman. 
Rufus C. Jones. 
Charles W. Kimmel. 



Clinton M. Case. 
Clarence E. Baker. 
John L. Henry. 
Edward P. Eagles. 
Harry D. Bodenhafer. 
Clifford H. Martin. 
C. Hugh Baker. 
Frank J. Bussard. 



lo2 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



Vincennes Conunandery No. 20. 

Aurelius M. Willoughby. John W. Gaddis. 

Walter M. Hindman. Frank D. Foulks. 

Edward P. Whallon. Thomas F. Palfrey. 

Mason J. Niblnck. Thomas Dixon. 

George G. Ramsdell. George E. Henry. 

Benjamin M. Willoughby. Justus H. Henkes. 

Edgar H. DeWolf. William M. Willmore. 

George W. Donaldson. Karl F. Bosworth. 
Edgar J. Julian. 

Marion Commandery No. 21. 

George W. Gunder. Harry C. Moore. 

David S. Hogin. Wilson D. Lett. 

Charles A. Ball. John L. McCulloch. 

Clarence E. Utley. George A. Bell. 

John A. Rhue. Ulysses G. Rithmiller^ 

A. Ross Manley. Charles H. Gear. 

Samuel C. Zombro. Samuel Frank Jones. 

Field W. Swezey. Harry O. White. 

George M. Kleder. George W. McKowen. 



Madiso7i Commandery N'o. 22. 

Samuel M. Strader. Charles W. Geile. 

Robinson L. Ireland. Thomas M. Reed. 

Joseph M. Nichols. Andrew M. Stevens. 

Greenville Johnson. Frank C. Vawter. 

Robert F. Stanton. Charles Cox. 
James E. Crozier. 



Franklin Commandery No. 23. 

Luther Short. Eugene O. Collins. 

Alva O. Neal. James M. Robinson. 

Elba L. Branigin. Ivory J. Drybread. 

Henry E. Lochry. David B. Kelly. 

L. Ert Slack. Lyman E. Ott. 

Harry Bridges. William W. Suckow, Jr. 

Columbus H. Hall. Jasper W. La Grange. 

John H. Tarlton. Arthur F. Ballard. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



153 



St. Johyi Commandery No. 24. 



John E. Redmond. 
Henry Tucker. 
Thomas Myers. 
Chauncey M. Custer. 
Isaac Shideler. 
Cott Barnett. 
Horace C. Linville. 
Victor E. Seiter. 
•J. Abner Seybold, 
Edward H. Grace. 
Benjamin F. Sharts. 
William H. Gerberich. 



William P. Felver. 
James Burt Winter. 
Frank H. Parker. 
Paul C. Barnett. 
Martin Charles Miller. 
Ralph W. Searight. 
Herman A. Wallace. 
James P. Reneker. 
Charles E. Klinck. 
Edg-ar S. Hunt. 
Chris Livingston. 



Craivfordsville Commandery No. 25. 



Albert S. Miller. 
Chauncey R. Snodgrass. 
Edward L. Morse. 
Jere West. 
Jacob Frank Warfel. 
Charles L. Goodbar. 
William M. White. 
William W. Goltra. 
Moreland B. Binford. 
Clarence W. Stroh. 
Fletcher W. Boyd. 



Charles W. Hiff. 
Emerson E. Ballard. 
John M. Jjickman. 
Tully C. Crabbs. 
Meredith B. Rountree. 
M. Ward Williams. 
Stephen C. Campbell. 
Frederick A. Turner. 
Clifford V. Peterson. 
Frank W. Davis. 
Newton L. Goodbar. 



Plymouth Commandery N'o. 26. 



William E. Leonard. 
Lucius Tanner. 
George H. Thayer, Jr. 
Joseph Swindell. 
James W. Thayer. 
John C. Gordon. 
Bradley C. Southworth. 
Charles S. Cleveland. 
William Everly. 
Arnott M. Cleveland. 
Adolph R. Clizbe. 



Frank S. Southworth. 
Frank W. Bosworth. 
H. Paul Preston. 
Herschel M. Tebay. 
John G. Southworth. 
George F. Hitchcock. 
William H. English. 
Ely B. Milner. 
Delph L. Mc'f^'esson. 
Edd S. Kitch. 



154 



Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



Jeffersonville Commandery No. 27 

Herman H. Heaton. 
Edward C. Eaken. 
John Rauschenberger. 
Alfred M. Thias. 



Hai-vey G. Eastman. 
Arthur Loomis. 
Andrew P. Williams. 
George A. Dunham. 
Charles E. Louis. 

Valparaiso 

Jonathan Osborn. 
Sylvanus J. Summers. 
Hannibal H. Loring. 
Melvin J. Stinchfield. 
Charles D. Jones. 
William F. Lederer. 
Mark L. Dickover. 
William H. Williams. 
Edgar Guy Osborne. 
John Carson. 

Frankfort 

William B. Kramer. 
James W. Morrison. 
Oliver Gard. 
Martin V. Young. 
John C. Shanklin. 
Martin A. Morrison. 
Richard Newhouse. 
John F. Kramer. 
Moses S. Canfield. 
John J. Fisher. 
Charles S. Ashman. 



George G. Watson. 
Fielding L. Wilson. 
Christian J. F. Eismann. 
John J. Snyder. 
William H. Willcox. 
Thomas B. Bohon. 
Henry Best. 
Franklin M. Rose. 

Co7nmandery No. 28. 

John H. Ross. 
Addison N. Worstell. 
Byron H. Kinne. 
Clarence Stockman. 
Edmund W. Chaffee. 
Fred M. Lindner. 
Brinton B. Black. 
Clinton Jones. 
Arthur A. Hughart. 
Orris Booth. 

Commandery No. 29. 

Alfred N. Berry. 
Harry M. Cosner. 
Harvey H. Flora. 
Bert T. Pedlow. 
Norman 0. Davis. 
John A. Rice. 
Bert G. Shanklin. 
Harry E. Pavey. 
Eugene 0. Burget. 
Charles G. Aughe. 



Michigan City Commandery No. 30. 

Alvin G. Tillotson. Henry C. Todd. 

Frank H. Doran. Milo C. Murray. 

John B. Faulknor. Fred A. Long. 

William H. Williamson. Harry A. Stein. 

Harry B. Tuthill. Denton M. Hutton. 
William H. Weiler. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



155 



Elkhart Comtnayidery No. 31. 



Charles G. Conn. 
Eugene L. Foster. 
Melvin U. Demarest. 
George B. Hoopingarner. 
Judson B. Martin. 
Herbert A. Graham. 
John F. Werner. 
Willinm E. Specht. 
John H. Wineland. 



Charles A. Davisson. 
Peter C. Kendall. 
Amandus M. Smith. 
Frank E. Bryson. 
Gottlieb F. Schaffert. 
Brice H. Reid. 
Ira Kauffman. 
Wm. J. McKahin. 
Herman A. Compton. 



Anderson Commandery No. 32. 



Winfield T. Durbin. 
William A. Kittinger. 
David 0. Cook. 
Jesse Forkner. 
Joseph M. Watkins. 
Joseph L. Schalk. 
Edward R. Prather. 
James J. Netterville. 
Cyrenus F. Heritage. 
Joseph I. Schuhmacher. 
George S. Parker. 
George W. Bickford. 



Earl Berkebile. 
E. B. A. Kellum. 
Blanchard J. Home. 
James C. Black. 
Charles J. Rozelle. 
Carl K. Stephens. 
Curtis C. McGuire. 
Ernest R. Watkins. 
William E. Thompson. 
John W. Wilson. 
Thomas S. Williamson. 



Washington Commandery No. 33. 



John J. Glendening. 
Elisha L. Hatfield. 
Samuel C. Eskridge. 
John H. Wright. 
Frank A. Evans. 
Adrian Hamersly. 
Thomas F. Spink. 



Hugh L. Cox. 
Milton S. Hastings. 
Clyde B. Kellar. 
Robert N. Kuhn. 
Edward D. Redford. 
Roy D. Smiley. 
Charles F. Cochran. 



Cyrene Commandery No. 34. 



Thomas R. Marshall. 
Homer A. Ireland. 
Walter F. McLallen. 
Joseph R. Harrison. 
H. Dewitt McLallen. 
Ephriam K. Strong. 
Andrew A. Adams. 



Julian C. Sanders. 
Hugo Logan. 
Lloyd T. Bailey. 
George O. Compton. 
Walter T. Binder. 
Edward C. Binder. 



156 



Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



Huntington 

Walter S. Morrison. 
William H. H. Brown. 
Charles E. Newcomb. 
Ervin Wright. 
Robert M. Berry. .. 

George B. Whitestine. 
Robert V. LaMont. 
John C. Altman. 



Commandery No. 35. 

Abner H. Shaffer. 
Marion B. Stults. 
Charles H. Small. 
Robert R. Glenn. 
Melville W. Tuttle. 
Ambrose Burgett. 
Wm. A. Shoemaker. 



Kokomo 

William E. Williams. 
William E. Stansbury. 
Abram L. Spangle. 
Oscar H. Dailey. 
Milton M. Cook. 
Charles A. Ford. 
Shiloh S. Shambaugh. 
James A. Breedlove. 
Allison C. Donnelly. 
Harry Raines. 
John E. Palethorpe. 



Commandery No. 36. 

Robert Orchett. 
William E. Sollenberger. 
Amos M. Hawkins. 
Kenneth H. Rich. 
Ralph G. Tudor. 
Orin Simpson. 
James F. Milnei:. 
Charles Jinkerson. 
George L. Davis. 
S. Roscoe Chancellor. 



Wabash Commandery No. 37. 



Charles E. Sackett. 
Edwin A. Edwards. 
L. G. A. Powell. 
Romeo L. DePuy. 
Charles M. Wordea. 
John R. Logan. 
Maurice S. Howe. 
Frank V. Conner. 
George S. Courtier. 

Bhiffton 

Edwin C. Vaughn. 
Emanuel E. Mosiman. 
William H. Eichhorn. 
Thomas F. Hoffer. 
Samuel E. Hitchcock. 
William L. Kiger. 
William R. Barr. 
Charles M. Miller. 



Samuel R. Craig. 
Lee A. Carr. 
Neil Lumaree. 
Otto G. Christman. 
Joseph A. Lay. 
Willard J. Creighton. 
Burton E. Walrod. 
Charles F. Kohler. 
Frederick J. Motz. 

Commandery No. 38. 

Ernest Weicking. 
Dell Locke. 
John G. McCleery. 
Herman W. Thoma. 
William W. Weisell. 
George E. Mosiman. 
Frank E. Ehle. 
George L. Arnold. 



1921] 



of the State of Indiana. 



157 



Greenfield Commandery No. 39. 



Edwin P. Thayer. 
Henry Snow. 
Harry G. Strickland. 
Elwood Barnard. 
William A. Justice. 
James M. Larimore. 
Samuel J. Offutt. 
Harry D. Barrett. 



Benjamin S. Binford. 
Irven Barnard. 
Charles H. Cook. 
John H. Mugg. 
Edwin P. Wilson. 
Paul F. Binford. 
Edward A. Cooper. 



Delphi Coniniandery No. 40. 



Edward W. Bowen. 
Renwick W. Crockett. 
Cloid M. Kerlin. 
James P. Wason. 
George J. Busteed. 
Wilber F. Sharrer. 
Lewis G. Niewerth. 
Thomas J. Ryan. 
James C. Smock. 



Harry G. Baum. 
Thomas Kennar Stewart. 
Jesse M. McCain. 
Philip B. Hemmig. 
Calvin E. Carney. 
Wilbert Whitemnn. 
LeRoy P. Martin. 
Alfred H. Brewer. 



Hammond Commandery No. 41. 



Edwin P. Deming. 
Joseph G. Ibach. 
Joseph J. Ruff. 
Harry E. Sharrer. 
Joseph T. Hutton. 
Frank C. Williams. 
Carl A. Smiley. 



George O. Mallett. 
William F. Howat. 
Eldridge M. Shanklin. 
William H. Davis. 
Willis R. Ford. 
Joseph P. Kasper. 
G. Roscoe Hemstock, 



Bedford Commandery No. 42. 



Sherman L. Keach. 
Allen Conner. 
Morton F. Brooks. 
Charles G. Malott. 
Robert W. Stevens. 
L. Berry Emery. 
James C. Stevens. 
James B. Wilder. 
John V. Strout. 
Charles H. Strupe. 



Raymond H. Williams. 
Walter J. Bailey. 
Fred N. Strout. 
James W. Malott. 
James A. Zaring. 
Ward H. McCormick. 
Walter A. Pitman. 
David Warnock. 
Wm. E. McCormick. 



158 Proceedings Grand Commayidery [May 12, 



Lebanon Commayidery No. 43. 

Joseph A. Coons. Charles Hartman. 

Charles M. Zion. Benjamin F. McKey. 

Charles D. King-. Ben H. Coombs. 

Demetrius Tillotson. Lester F. Jones. 

Thomas W. Huckstep. Carl Br.itton. 

Charles D. Orear. Ivory C. Tolle. 

Charles C. LaFollette. George H. Kincaid. 

New Castle Comma ndery No. 44. 

Charles N. Mikels. Robert H. Mclntyre. 

William C. Bond. Albert D. Ogborn. 

John R. Leonard. Thurlow E. Richards. 

Frank E. Beach. John F. Mclntyre. 

George F. Mowrer. Harry A. Martin. 

Harvey H. Koons. Frank H. Crim. 

John R. Hinshaw. Clifford E. Canaday. 
Arlie E. Crim. 

Angola Commandery N^o. 45. 

Frank B. Humphreys. William E. Heckenlively. 

Harry K. Scott. Frank E. Burt. 
Thomas S. Wickwire. " , Thomas L. Gillis. 

Cyrus Cline. Fred M. Starr. 

W. Weir Wood. E. Marion Hetzler. 

Calvin H. Ramsay. Thad K. Miller. 

Alphonso C. Wood. Thomas J. Creel. 

Albert J. Mitchell. Melvin W. Kratz. 

Princeton Commandery No. 46. 

Robert A. Woods. Clarence Rosenbarger. 

George J. Welborn. Robert C. Baltzell. 

Paul S. Brownlee. Samuel H. Blino. 

Horatio W. Vedder. Charles Baker. 

Joseph B. Pilant. Fred T. Ward. 

Brazil Comtnandery No. 47. 

Robert M. H. Britton. Major R. Torbert. 

William Daly. Walker W. Winslow. 

Charles W. Culbertson. John H. Riddell. 

Harry E. Weinland. Thomas S. Campbell. 

Thomas A. Thompson. Marshall P. Wilder. 

Thomas A. Walsh. Harry G. Vickers. 
William M. Strobel. 



1921] of the S.tate of hidiayia. 159 



Clinton Commandery No. 48. 

Chiirles M. White. William T. Reid. 

Frank Hutchinson. Oliver P. Middleton. 

James A. Wilson. Valzah Reeder. 

Guy H. Briggs. Ira T. Peer. 
Jasper N. Frist. 

Rushville Commandery No. 49. 

Earl H. Payne. William L. King. 

Virgil W. Tevis. Frank C. Buell. 

Rush G. Budd. Joseph B. Kinsinger. 

Frank M. Sparks. Edwin R. Cassady. 

John Paul Frazee. Wilbur Stiers. 

James V. Young. Samuel L. Trabue. 

William M. Sparks. Hugh E. Mauzy. 

Goshen Commandery No. 50. 

Dwight H. Hawks. Thomas A. Davis. 

Frank D. Finney. Ernest E. Hazen. 

William H. Charnley. Abraham C. Mehl. 

William 0. Vallette. Charles E. Morrice. 
Harry V. Brown. 

MishawaJca Commandery No. 51. 

John W. Hutchinson. Luther A. Etter. 

Charles Endlich. William L. Chandler. 

William B. Hosford. Lewis C. Rogers. 

Melville W. Mix. . George B. Sandilands. 

William H. Tupper. Walter Michael. 

Duncan J. Campbell. J. Alvin Scott. 

Edwin H. Ahara. Myles S. Smith. 

Walter E. Roe. Grover C. Hambright. 

Tipton Commandery No. .52. 

Arthur J. Smith. Meade Vestal. 

Shirl S. Walton. Charles W. Ramsay. 

John N. Penwell. Elmer E. Ludwig. 

Claude C. Cochran. Harry Combs. 

Sam G. Vanneman. Harold H. Vawter. 

Horace G. Read. Garrad G. Davis. 



160 Proceedings Grand Commandery [May 12, 



Winchester Commandery No. 53. 

Thomas F. Moorman. John C. Leggett. 

Benjamin E. Hinshaw. Stephen Clevenger. 

Edgar W. Rine. William S. Preston. 

Clifton M. Kelley. Oscar G. Puckett. 

John H. B. White. Max Diggs. 

Will E. Beeson. Ernest E. Chenoweth. 

Sullivan Commandery No. 54. 

James M. Lang, John Ersinger. 

Dirrelle Chaney. J. Harve Crouder. 

Will H. Hill, Jr. Ransom W. Akin. 

Will H. Hays. John C. Chaney. 

Charles D. Hunt. Herman Smock. 

May^tinsville Commandery No. 55. 

Walter E. Hendricks. Jacob M. Neely. 

Roy E. Tilford. Reuben W. Miles. 

Giles M. Dickson. Samuel M. Guthridge. 
Charles C. Coleman. 

Seymour Commandery No. 56. 

Albert Meseke. " Omer D. Seelinger. 

George G. Graessle. Frank S. Gilbert. 

Frank Gardner. Sidney U. Hooper. 

Simmons Watkins. Clifford H. Long. 

Gary Commandery No., 57. 

Harley H. Molyneaux. Harold Sandbach. 

Dwight M. Kinder. William W. Shipman. 

Frank Hall. John K. Devitt. 

Thomas G. Taylor, Jr. Alfred Patch. 

East Chicago Commandery No. 58. 

Waldo C. Bailey. -Hairy L. Rudolf. 

Robert Smith. Peter Jamieson. 

Willard B. Van Home. Stephen W. Winters. 

Greensburg Com,mandery No. 59. 
John H. Christian, Jr. 



GRAND RECORDERS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

SHOWING THE YEAR WHFN FIRST ELECTED AND INSTALLED. 



Grand Commandery Tear 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

Arizona 

California 

Canada 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

District of Coluinbia__ 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky i 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts & R. I.- 
Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Montana 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina : 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Oklahoma 

Pennsylvania 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont- 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Grand Encampment^_- 



1901 
1920 
1894 
1898 
1917 
1921 
1895 
1898 
1898 
1909 
1914 
1910 
1920 
1902 
1912 
1899 
1916 
1917 
1920 
1892 
1913 
1907 
1911 
1907 
1906 
1899 
1919 
1909 
1908 
1902 
1904 
1914 
1910 
1886 
189.3 
1904 
1919 
1913 
1908 
1915 
1909 
1911 
1902 
1920 
1891 
1920 
1900 
1919 
191.3 



Grand Recorder. 



Geo. A. Beauchamp, Montgomery. 
Fay Hempstead, Little Rock. 
George J. Roskruge, Tucson. 
Thomas A. Davies, San Francisco. 
Philip D. Gordon, Montreal. 
William W. Cooper, Denver. 
Eli C. Birdsey, Meriden. 
Arvine W. Johnston, Washington. 
Wilber P. Web.ster, Jacksonville. 
Charles S. Wood, Savannah. 
Lewis W. Ensign, Boise. 
Delmar D. Darrah, Bloomington. 
Wm. H. Swintz, Indianapolis. 
David M. Brownlee, Sioux City. 
Albert K. Wilson, Topeka. 
Alfred H. Bryant, Covington. 
John B. Parker, New Orleans. 
Charles B. Davis, Portland. 
Charles Clark, Baltimore. 
Benjamin W. Rowell, Boston. 
George T. Campbell, Owosso. 
John Fishel, St. Paul. 
Oliver L. McKay, Meridian. 
Cornelius Hedges, Jr., Helena. 
Robert F. Stevenson, St. Louis. 
Francis E. White, Omaha. 
William Sutherland, Reno. 
Harry Morrison Cheney, Concord. 
John M. Wright, Trenton. 
Alpheus A. Keen. Albuquerque. 
John H. Bennington, Brooklyn. 
John B. Griggs, Elizabeth City. 
Walter L. Stockwell, Fargo. 
John N. Bell, Dayton. 
James F. Robinson, Portland. 
George W. Spencer, Oklnhoma City. 
A. Howard Thomas, Philadelphia. 
Joseph Lindsay, Chester. 
George A. Pettigrew, Sioux Falls. 
Stith M. Cain, Nashville. 
John Carson Kidd, Houston. 
William A. Raddon, Park City. 
Henry H. Ross, Burlington. 
J. Gus Hankins, Richmond. 
Yancey C. Blalock. Walla Walla. 
Henry F. Smith, Fairmont. 
W. W. Perry, Milwaukee. 
Samuel Corson. Cheyenne. 
Frank H. Johnson, Louisville, Ky. 



161 



GRAND REPRESENTATIVES 

NEAR THE GRAND COMMANDERY OF INDIANA. 

ALABAMA, George A. Newhouse, of New Albany. 

ARIZONA, Frank B. Humphreys, of Angola. 

ARKANSAS, Harry G. Strickland, of Greenfield. 

CALIFORNIA, George Borgerding, of New Albany. 

COLORADO, Demetrius Tillotson, of Crawfordsville. 

CONNECTICUT, Harry C. Moore, of Marion. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Winfield T. Durbin, of Anderson. 

FLORIDA, Oliver Card, of Frankfort. 

GEORGIA, John A. Rhue, of Marion. 

IDAHO, Eugene Vatet, of Muncie. 

ILLINOIS, Herbert A. Graham, of Indianapolis. 

IOWA, John E. Redmond, of Franklin. 

KANSAS, Olin E. Holloway, of Knightstown. 

KENTUCKY, Henry W. Mordhurst, of Fort Wayne. 

LOUISIANA, Vestal W. Woodward, of Indianapolis. 

MAINE, William L. Kiger, of Bluffton. 

MARYLAND, John L. Rupe, of Richmond. 

MASS. and R. ISLAND, Leonidas P. Newby, of Knightstown. 

MINNESOTA, J. Wallace Perkins, of Muncie. 

MISSISSIPPI, J. Austin Jones, of Kendallville. 

MISSOURI, William B. Hosford, of Mishawaka. 

MONTANA, John H. Nicholson, of Richmond. 

NEBRASKA, Lee A. Carr, of Wabash. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE, Walter M. Hindman, of Vincennes. 

NEW JERSEY, L. Ert Slack, of Franklin. 

NEW MEXICO, Williard H. Kingery, of Warsaw. 

NEW YORK, Joseph G. Ibach, of Hammond. 

NORTH CAROLINA, Charles D. King, of Lebanon. 

NORTH DAKOTA, Robert A. Woods, of Princeton. 

OHIO, Thomas W. Slick, of South Bend. 

OREGON, George H. Steel, of Evansville. • 

OKLAHOMA, Charles Day, of New Albany. 

PENNSYLVANIA, Henri T. Conde, of Indianapolis. 

SOUTH CAROLINA, James L. Randel, of Greencastle. 

SOUTH DAKOTA, Adrian Hamersly, of Indianapolis. 

TENNESSEE, Earl H. Payne, of Rushville. 

TEXAS, George S. Parker, of Anderson. 

UTAH, William Wasson Goltra, of Crawfordsville. 

VERMONT, Luther Short, of Knightstown. 

VIRGINIA, Dudley M. Shively, of South Bend. 

WASHINGTON, William H. Tupper, of Mishawaka. 

WEST VIRGINIA, William Geake, of Fort Wayne. 

WISCONSIN, George W. F. Kirk, of Shelbyville. 

WYOMING, Mason J. Niblack, of Vincennes. 

162 



GRAND REPRESENTATIVES 

OF THE GRAND COMMANDERY OF INDIANA NEAR OTHER GRAND 
COMMANDERIES. 

ALABAMA, John W. Hooper, of Roanoke. 

ARIZONA, John A. Sweeney, of Phoenix. 

ARKANSAS, J. E. Powers, of Van Buren. 

CALIFORNIA, George D. Metcalf, of Oakland. 

COLORADO, Irving W. Stanton, of Pueblo. 

CONNECTICUT, John R. Hughes, of Waterbury. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Frank E. Gibson, of Washington. 

FLORIDA, E. L. Wirt, of Bartow. 

GEORGIA, Charles A. McAlister, of Macon. ' ' - 

IDAHO, William H. Miniely, of Boise. 

ILLINOIS, Delmar D. Darrah, of Bloomington. 

IOWA, Lewis H. Moore, of Des Moines. 

KANSAS, John McCullagh, of Galena. 

KENTUCKY, Emery G. S. Alverson, of Fulton. 

LOUISIANA, R. N. Ross, of Baton Rouge. 

MAINE, Thomas P. Shaw, of Portland. 

MARYLAND, James Pressley Foster, of Baltimore. 

MASS. and R. ISLAND, Edward A. Blodgett, of Springfield. 

MINNESOTA, John M. Rowley, of Rochester. 

MISSISSIPPI, Charles E. Grafton, of Brookhaven. 

MISSOURI, Gib W. Carson, of St. Louis. 

MONTANA, Henry B. Miller, of Livingston. 

NEBRASKA, Wyman S. Clapp, of Kearney. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE, Alonzo M. Foss, of Dover. 

NEW JERSEY, Robert Thorpe, of East Orange. 

NEW MEXICO, Claude Hobbs, of Roswell. 

NEW YORK, William R. Condit, of White Plains. 

NORTH CAROLINA, Leon Cash, of Winston. 

NORTH DAKOTA, Frank White, of Valley City. 

OHIO, William B. Melish, of Cincinnati. 

OKLAHOMA, Milton C. Hale, of Tulsa. 

OREGON, Frederick A. Van Kirk. 

PENNSYLVANIA, Wilson I. Fleming, of Bellefonte. 

SOUTH CAROLINA, Curran B. Earle, of Greenville. 

SOUTH DAKOTA, John A. Cleaver, of Sioux Falls. 

TENNESSEE, Homer R. Goodell, of Memphis. 

TEXAS, William James, of Dallas. 

UTAH, James H. Brown, of Salt Lake City. 

VERMONT, Geo. B. Wheeler, of Bellows Falls. 

VIRGINIA, L. T. Christian, of Richmond. 

WASHINGTON, S. Harry Rush, of Spokane. • ' 

WEST VIRGINIA, Boyd Wees, of Elkins. 

WISCONSIN, Geo. C. Kellogg, of Elkhorn. 

WYOMING, Thomas Cottle, of Green River. 

163 



AMENDMENT TO SECTION 448 OF TEMPLAR LAW. 

Sec. 448. Commanderies of this Grand Jurisdiction 
shall be inspected biennially by some eminently qualified 
fvnight, or Knights appointed by the Grand Commander, 
by and with the consent of the Committee on Templar 
Jurisprudence. His or their duties shall be to inspect, 
correct errors, and give such instruction and information 
immediately after inspection as the Inspector may deem 
necessary and in accordance with the interpretations of 
the Ritual and Tactics as laid down by the Grand Com- 
mander and said Committee. He or they shall make a 
report at the first Annual Conclave after inspection, giving 
the Commanderies a comparative standing. For com- 
pensation he sliall receive his actual expenses and five dol- 
lars for each inspection, the same to be paid by the Grand 
Commandery on a warrant drawn by the Grand Recorder 
and approved by the Grand Commander. It shall be the 
duty of each Commander to assemble his Commandery 
for inspection at such time as may be designated by the 
Inspector-General, or Inspectors-General. 

(Adopted at the Sixty-third Annual Conclave of the 
Grand Commandery May 10, 191 7.) 

RESOLUTION— RELATIVE TO ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

Whereas, The Grand Encampment of Knights Templar 
of the United States of America has provided that each 
Grand Commandery may determine whether nominations 
may be made at an election for officers in either Grand or 
subordinate bodies ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By tlie Grand Commandery of Knights 
Templar of Indiana, That nomination for ofiice may be 
made in the Grand Commandery of Indiana and in all 
bodies subordinate and constituent thereto, except that in 
the Grand Commandery no nomination shall be made for 

164 



Grand Prelate, Grand Standard Bearer, Grand Sword 
Bearer and Grand Warder ; and in subordinate Command- 
eries no nomination shall be made for Prelate, Standard 
Bearer, Sword Bearer, or Warder. Where more than 
one name is in nomination, the election shall be by ballot 
and when one name only is in nomination, the election may 
be by acclamation. 

That in putting names in nomination no nominating 
speeches can be made, further than to give the name of 
the nominee, his residence and the Commandery of which 
he is a member. 

(Adopted at the Sixty-third Annual Conclave of the 
Grand Commandery May lo, 1917. ) 

AMENDMENT TO SECTIOIN 450 OF TEMPLAK LAW. 

Sec. 450. The time for inspection of the Command- 
eries subordinate to the Grand Commandery shall be 
from October ist to March ist, unless by request of any 
Commandery the Grand Commander may for sufficient 
reasons shown defer the time of the inspection of such 
Commandery to a later date. 

(Adopted at the Sixtieth Annual Conclave of the Grand 
Commandery May 14. 19 14.) 

AME>DME>T TO SECTION 452 OF TEMPLAR Li^y. 

Sec. 452. Each Grand Officer and each Past Grand 
Commander who shall be present, in attendance at and 
representing this Grand Commandery in the Grand En- 
campment of the United States, shall be entitled to receive 
from the funds in the hands of the Grand Treasurer of 
this Grand Commandery five dollars for each day spent 
in attending the conclaves of the Grand Encampment, 
also the further sum of three cents per mile for every mile 

165 



necessarily traveled by the most direct route in going to 
and returning from such conclaves. 

(Adopted May 13, 19 15, at the Sixty-first Annual 
Conclave of the Grand Commandery of Indiana.) 

AMENDMENT TO SECTION 456 OF TEMPLAR LAW. 

Sec. 455. The Order of the Temple shall not be con- 
ferred upon any Knight of the Red Cross until he be- 
comes the owner of a suitable Templar uniform, as pro- 
vided by the laws of this Grand Commandery, and it is 
declared and shall be held to be unmasonic conduct for 
any Knight Templar to sell or otherwise dispose of his 
uniform, to leave himself without a uniform as provided 
by Templar law. 

(Adopted at the Sixtieth Annual Conclave of the 
Grand Commandery, ]\Iay 14, 1914.) 



166 



3n iHrmory 
of 



(§f O^lIiPr JuriH&irtiottH 



Death is auother life. We bow our heads 
And, going out, we think, and enter straight 
Another golden chamber of the King's, 
Larger than this we leave, and lovelier." 



167 



®0 tlje iMrmarg 

nf tl|P 

2(mgt|tla Bmh 

nf lljf 

Surtalitrttan of 3lnliiana 
Srrrasrii in 1920 



Raper No. 1— Muter M. Bachelder, November 4. 
Raper No. 1 — Charles E. Barmm, June 11. 
Raper No. 1— William C. Bryan, April 12. 
Raper No. 1 — Constantine L. Davis, March 26. 
Raper No. 1 — Eugene C. Dolmetsch, Jr., February 5. 
Raper No. 1— Charles D. Ebert, April 29. 
Raper No. 1 — Hervey B. Fatout, April 5. 
Raper No. 1— William H. Gipe, February 27. 
Raper No. 1 — Wm. Harvey Huston, December 4. 
Raper No. 1— Samuel D. Kiger, January 25. 
Raper No. 1 — James M. Larned, March 21. 
Raper No. 1 — J. Harry Leitch, September 16. 
Raper No. 1 — Edward H. Meyer, February 20. 
Raper No. 1 — Isaac B. Pickett, February 5. 
Raper No. 1— John C. Schlee, March 10. 
Raper No. 1 — Joseph K. Sharpe, October 26. 
Raper No. 1 — Edgar N. Smallwood, August 17. 
Raper No. 1— Walter T. Tate, January 28. 
Raper No. 1 — William L. West, January 2. 
Baldwin No. 2 — James M. Shortridge, January 16. 
Baldwin No. 2— Alfred Clark, February 9. 
Baldwin No. 2 — Charles B. Harrison, November 14. 
LaFayette No. 3 — John W. Rommel, April 5. 
LaFayette No. 3 — Alvester Maple, May 1. 
LaFayette No. 3 — James H. Jones, July 3. 
LaFayette No. 3— William F. Perkins, October 20. 



168 



LaFayette No. 3— Peter J. McCorkhill, November 26. 

LaFayette No. 3 — Frank P. Bellinger, December 9. 

Ft. Wayne No. 4— Willard P. Smith, January 2. 

Ft. Wayne No. 4 — James C. Craig, January 29. 

Ft. Wayne No. 4— Charles P. Milliken, February 1. 

Ft. Wayne No. 4 — Edgar S. Young, March 3. 

Ft. Wayne No. 4 — Charles D. Ream, July 15. 

Ft. Wayne No. 4 — Benjamin F. Sarver, July 23. 

New Albany No. 5 — Charles R. Meekin, January 27. 

New Albany No. 5 — James M. Devol, February 14. 

Connersville No. 6 — Johnnie C. White, January 13. 

Connersville No. 6 — Charles P. Riley, February 13. 

Richmond No. 8 — Alvin A. Marlatt, April 10. 

Knightstown No. 9 — ^Charles M. Risk, August 8. 

Warsaw No. 10 — Oscar S. Mabie, June 10. 

Greencastle No. 11 — Jackson Boyd, March 16. 

Laporte No. 12 — Alfred H. Kimble, November 26. 

Laporte No. 12 — Harry H. Long, October 19. 

South Bend No. 13— Abram W, Byers, July 27. 

South Bend No. 13 — Fred J. Roys, January 31. 

South Bend No. 13 — John H. Heckman, March 

LaValette No. 15— Albert P. Fenn, June 11. 

LaValette No. 15— Thomas Walsh, July 6. 

LaValette No. 15 — Christian W. Kratz, September 16. 

LaValette No. 15 — Charles VonBehren, September 19. 

LaValette No. 15 — Duncan C. Givens, October 4. 

LaValette No. 15 — Charles L. Howard, December 18. 

Terre Haute No. 16— William T. Beauchamp, Feb- 
ruary 10. 

Terre Haute No. 16— Luther Z. Breaks, July 10. 

Terre Haute No. 16 — Elmer Dunkin, November 14. 

Terre Haute No. 16 — George E. Farrington, February 
7. 

Terre Haute No. 16 — John G. Heinl, December 31. 

Terre Haute No. 16— Richard C. Orman, April 23. 

Terre Haute No. 16— A. Nicholas Smith, March 18. 

Terre Haute No. 16— Edward M. Tuttle, December 3. 

Muncie No. 18 — J. Augustus Guthrie, January 1. 

Muncie No. 18 — George R. Green, January 24. 

Muncie No. 18— David W. Mathias, February 2. 

Muncie No. 18 — Oscar B. Bannister, May 11. 

Muncie No. 18— Thomas S. Guthrie, June 30. 

Muncie No. 18 — Lee Shaw, September 9. 



16;^ 



■ 



Muncie No. 18 — John R. Johnston, October 8. 
Apollo No. 19 — Joseph I. Norris, February 2. 
Apollo No. 19 — Milo O. Stroup, November 1, 
Vincennes No. 20 — James F. Lewis, September 15. 
Vincennes No. 20— Minard J. Emison, October 30. 
Vincennes No. 20 — Louis A. Meyer, December 30. 
Marion No. 21 — Lewis P. Cubberly, December 13. 
Marion No. 21— Virgil R. McKnight, December 26. 
Madison No. 22 — Frederick Glass, June 22. 
Franklin No. 2-3- Charles C. Smith, March 18. 
Franklin No. 23 — William T. Thompson, June 26. 
St. John No. 24 — John A. Wilson, January 31. 
St. John No. 24— John Alber, April 23. 
Crawfordsville No. 25 — Allen Byers, January 10. 
Crawfordsville No. 25 — George W. Irwin, January 12. 
Crawfordsville No. 25— Samuel E. Voris, May 27. 
Crawfordsville No. 25— Harry J. Helfrich, August 18. 
Crawfordsville No. 25 — James E. Van Camp, Decem- 
ber .27. 
Plymouth No. 26— William W. Hill, July 8. 

Plymouth No. 26— Henry B. Hall, December 22. 
Valparaiso No. 28 — William T. Brown, January 12. 
Valparaiso No. 28— Edgar D. Crumpacker, May 19. 

Valparaiso No. 28 — Berryman Frank Jones, November 
2. 

Valparaiso No. 28— George Frank McCurdy, May 9. 

Frankfort No. 29— John Caplinger, February 10. 

Frankfort No. 29 — Jonas D. Fritch, April 11. 

Frankfort No. 29— Cassius -E. Elliott, September 1. 

Frankfort No. 29— Charles D. Kent, October 21. 

Frankfoi't No. 29 — William H. Murray, November 26. 

Michigan City No. 30— Francis J. Franklin, March 15. 

Michigan City No. 30— William E. Sweet, February 1. 

Elkhart No. 31— William H. Bridenbaugh, August 19. 

Elkhart No. 31— Farrington A. Bodge, June 24. 

Elkhart No. 31— Samuel Cawley, May 2. 

Elkhart No. 31— John B. Davidson, August 20. 

Elkhart No. 31— Seth A. Jones, December 4. 

Anderson No. 32 — James A. Taylor, December 20. 

Anderson No. 32 — Calvin W. Prather, August 1. 

Washington No. 33 — Henry Aikman, March 8. 

Washington No. 33— Jesse C. Trueblood, March 13. 

Washington No. 33— Charles C. Martin. 



170 



Cyrene No. 34— John H. Raber, February 22. 
Cyrene No. 34 — Chauncey B. Mattoon, April 14. 
Cyrene No. 34— Fred E. Sanders, May 27. 
Cyrene No. 34 — Herbert B. Clugston, July 5. 
Huntington No. 3;" — James R. Slack, December 10. 
Kokomo No. 36— William C. Purdum, June 13. 
Kokomo No. 36 — Walter J. Owens, August 3. 
Kokomo No. 36— Peter E. Hoss, November 12. 
Wabash No. 37 — Cornelius N. Hetzner, February 15. 
Bluffton No 38— Benjamin L. Dehaven, April 14. 
Bluffton No. 38— Alex W. Snyder, December 19. 
Bluffton No. 38— Christy Stogdill, December 27. 
Greenfield No. 39— Abram C. Pilkenton, March 18. 
Greenfield No. 39— James Rader Boyd, April 12. 
Greenfield No. 39— John Corcoran, October 12. 
Delphi No. 40 — William A. Roach, January 17. 
Delphi No. 40— Will H. Whittaker, February 10. 
Delphi No. 40 — George Gay, July 4. 
Hammond No. 41 — George H. Hoskins, November 3. 
Hammond No. 41 — George W. Jones, July 3. 
Hammond No. 41 — Anthony C. Le Page, October 12. 
Hammond No. 41 — Frank A. Scowden, June 2. 
Bedford No. 42 — Charles Hoover, February 6. 
Bedford No. 42— John R. Hughes, August 30, 
Bedford No. 42— John W. Wilder, September 1.1. 
Newcastle No. 44 — Obediah H. Garrett, September 16. 
Newcastle No. 44 — Wm. Gephart, May 3. 
Newcastle No. 44 — Ed A. Colson, November. 
Newcastle No. 44 — Mark E. Forkner, December. 
Newcastle No. 44 — D. Olney Gronendyke, November. 
Newcastle No. 44 — Robert J. Smith, February 4. 
Angola No. 45 — George E. Mallory, February 11. 
Princeton No. 46— Elmer C. Edington, March 13. 
Princeton No. 46 — Will L. S. Wood, November 19. 
Princeton No. 46 — Oscar M. Vierling, December 21, 
Brazil No. 47 — John D. Sourwine, June 26. 
Rushville No. 49 — Lewis E. Ging, February 11, 
Goshen No. 50— Orrin H. McBride, May 6. 
Goshen No. 50 — John A. Carmien, August 6. 
Tipton No. 52 — George Dyer, February 3. 
Winchester No. 53 — William D. Stuck, February 16. 
Winchester. No. 53 — Charles F. Gray, June 17. 
Winchester No. 53— George H. Clark, July 17. 






171 



Winchester No. 53 — Jesse W. Mullen, December 26. 

Winchester No. 53 — William E. Murray, December 29. 

Sullivan No. 54 — Lee Jenkins, May 18. 

Sullivan No. 54 — John T. Readhead, December 12. 

Seymour No. 56 — Frank H. Adams, July 4. 

Gary No. 57 — Harold Echstarm, February 5. 

Gary No. 57 — Roy W. Flovi^ers, February 7. 

Gary No. 57— Frank J. Kluge, March 1. 

East Chicago No. 58 — Louis C. Emenhiser. 



172 



APPENDIX. 



ANNUAL TEMPLAR REVIEW 



BY E. SIR ROBERT ARCHER WOODS. 



To the Grand Commaudery, Knights Templar, of 
Indiana: 

In herewith submitting my eighth annual review of 
the Templar world my only desire is that it shall meet 
with the same approbation as its predecessors. There 
shall be no attempt to deal in flattery or criticism, to 
revel in platitudes or useless jargon, but to present a 
faithful resume of the doings, the thoughts, the aspira- 
tions of our chivalric confreres wheresoever dispersed, 
that our own Hoosier fraters may become broader in 
their outlook and wiser in their judgments, to the 
saner and surer development of an Order we most 
cherish in our hearts. 

This review covers all proceedings received during 
the year ending April 20, 1921, alphabetically arranged 
as follows : 



Alabama. 



Alabama April, 1920 

Arizona Feb., 1920 

Arkansas ^lay, 1920 

California April, 1920 

Canada Ang.. 1920 

Colorado Sept., 1920 

Connecticut Mar.. 1920 

Dist. Columbia :\Iay, 1920 

England-Wales :\Iay, 1920 

Florida April, 1920 

Georgia ^lay, 1920 

Idaho May, 1919 

Illinois Sept., 1920 

Iowa July, 1920 

Kansas May, 1920 

Kentucky May. 1920 

Louisiana April, 1920 

Maine . May, 1920 

Maryland . May, 1920 

Michigan June, 1920 

Minnesota ^lay, 1920 

Mississippi ^lay, 1920 

Missouri May, 1920 

Missing: ^lassachusetts and 
Montana, June, 1919 and 1920. 



Nebraska ^April, 1920 

Nevada__J June, 1919 

New Hampshir Sept., 1920 

New Jersey May, 1920 

New Mexico Feb., 1920 

New York June, 1920 

■ North Carolina May, 1920 

North Dakota :\Iay, 1920 

Ohio Sept., 1920 

Oklahoma April, 1920 

Oregon Oct., 1920 

Pennsylvania May, 1920 

South Carolina April, 1920 

South Dakota Aug., 1920 

Tennessee , ^lay, 1920 

Texas April, 1920 

Utah May, 1920 

Vermont June, 1920 

Virginia Oct., 1919 

Washington--- May, 1920 

West Virginia-_---]\Iay, 1920 

Wisconsin Oct., 1920 

Wyoming July, 1920 

Rhode Island, Oct., 1920; and 



60th Annual. 



ALABAMA, 1320. 

Mobile. 



April 28. 

Commanderies, 27 ; represented, 20 ; members, 5,- 
183; gain, 1,624; cash and bonds, $4,514.00. 

R. E. Sir J. Paul Haller, of Louisiana, was wel- 
comed as the personal representative of Grand Master, 
after Grand Commandery had been opened in "ample 
form." Indiana was without representation. 

The address of Grand Commander (John V. Falck) 
is a commendable business document, wherein he re- 
cites the combined contributions of the Commanderies 
for Christmas observance as $1,367.42, his regret at 
being unable to make extended visitations, the deaths 
of Past Grand Commanders John Douglas Wilkins and 



Alabama. 3 

John Gilbert Smith, the issuance of several special 
dispensations, the organization of four new Commancl- 
eries which were later chartered, the constituting by 
proxy of Ozark Commandery, the necessity of assisting 
her sister State in entertaining the Grand Encamp- 
ment (to which $1,500 was later appropriated), the 
importance of supporting the Washington Memorial 
Association, the standing of the several Commanderies 
on inspection and that they are 100 per cent on uni- 
forms because candidates must make bona fide pay- 
ment therefor before being knighted, and closes with 
an expression of appreciation for the honor conferred 
upon him. 

It was ordered that Past Grand Commanders' 
jewels that do not conform to the regulations of Grand 
Encampment be replaced by the proper design. 

Following an address by the superintendent of the 
Alabama Masonic Home, the Commanderies and Grand 
Commandery pledged $3,600 towards its support. 

In the evening, after the close of the first day's 
proceedings, Grand Commandery attended divine ser- 
vice in the Government Street Presbyterian Church 
and listened to a strong sermon delivered by the Grand 
Prelate, Eminent and Reverend Sir James W. Johnson. 

The second day's proceedings were held upon a 
Mobile river steamer during a pleasure trip up the 
river and across the bay to Fairhope, which was novel 
to say the least. Dinner was had in Magnolia Beach 
Pavilion, with dancing and other gaieties. 

■ The Jurisprudence Committee recommended the 
approval of the decisions of the Grand Commander, but 
a search of the record fails to bring any to light. 

The Report on Correspondence is the third venture 
of Eminent Sir George H. Thigpen, Superintendent of 
the Masonic Home, and is rather brief, but contains 



4 Arizoym. 

the salient points of the jurisdictions under review. 
Indiana for 1919 has gracious mention, and the corre- 
spondent is dubbed as Robert C, one who happens to 
be a full cousin of the real author. 

Walter H. Trimby, Selma, Grand Commander; 
George A. Beauchamp, Montgomery, Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, Selma, April 27, 1921, 

ARIZONA, 1920. 

27th Annual. Phoenix. February 9. 

Commanderies, 6 ; represented, 6 ; members, 652 ; 
gain, 49 ; cash and investments, $3,645.35. 

Grand Commander (Louis Gwaltney Moyers) pre- 
sents a comprehensive address, islanded v\^ith a few 
circulars and letters. The surrounding water is tine. 
He chronicles the deaths of Past Grand Commanders 
George W. Vickers and Owen T. Rouse. He presents 
two pages of memorial matter and remarks that the 
necrology committee will do likewise, but in its case 
twelve lines suffice. He finds that their contribution 
to the Grand Master's emergency fund had never been 
forwarded, and orders it sent, in sum of $515.00. Did 
not deem a dispensation necessary for a Commanderj? 
to appear in uniform in its own asylum at a dance 
where none but Masons and their families were pres- 
ent. Reports that with one exception the observance 
of Christmas by his Commanderies was general. Was 
unable to make but three official visitations. Ap- 
pointed inspectors, and reports that inspections show 
"non-attendance, laxity in providing the regulation uni- 
form, few full-form openings, and the resulting neglect 
of rehearsal of duties and tactical drill," and predicts 
that no revivifying interest in the Commandery can 
take place until these short-comings are rectified. 

One hundred dollars was appropriated to the Wash- 
ington Masonic Memorial Fund. 



Arkaihsas. 5 

No report on Correspondence. 

Epes Randolph, Tucson, Grand Commander ; George 
James Roskruge, Tucson, Grand Recorder; next An- 
nual, Bisbee, February 7, 1921. 

AKKAXSAS, 1920. 

48th Annual. Little Rock. May 18. 

Commanderies, 22; represented, 12; members, 1,- 
749 ; gain, 254 ; cash and bonds, $3,333.20. 

After Grand Commandery was "declared open," R. 
E, Sir Edgar A. McCulloch, Past Grand Commander 
of Arkansas, was received and welcomed as the per- 
sonal representative of the Grand Master. No one 
answered for Indiana. 

Grand Commander (Fay Hempstead) presented a 
well-ordered and comprehensive address. He cited the 
failure of Grand Commandery to provide for the 
traveling expenses of its Grand Commiander for at- 
tendance upon the triennial of Grand Encampment ; 
recited the serious loss occasioned by fire, wherein their 
entire library, with all their printed proceedings from 
the foundation of Grand Commandery were completely 
destroyed ; set forth his inability to make but few visi- 
tations ; detailed the institution of two new Command- 
eries, which Grand Commandery duly chartered ; re- 
counted the attendance at Christmas and Easter 
observances ; noted interstate courtesies ; epitomized his 
decisions and dispensations, which were all approved, 
and among which we note that "a Commandery cannot 
confer the Orders in any other town than that. named 
as its domicile" and "the Grand Commander has no 
power to grant a dispensation to shorten time required 
for balloting on candidates" ; and submitted a recom- 
mendation curing the failure above noted, which was 
adopted, so that hereafter Grand Commandery will be 
assured of representation at triennials. 



6 Arkansas. 

The Christmas Circular of the Grand Commander 
was entirely in verse, entitled "A Christmas Wish," 
and but for lack of space should be printed in this 
review. 

The work of Grand Commandery was routine, with 
nothing- of general interest demanding attention. 

Right Eminent Sir Fay Hempstead submitted a 
short Report on Correspondence, written in his usually 
attractive and pointed style. Indiana for 1919 has 
ample and fraternal notice. He cites one feature of 
our session which "made us rub our eyes to see whether 
we read it correctly ; it was a resolution that the Corre- 
spondence report is to be passed on by Grand Com- 
mandery. What we fail to discover is what there is 
in a Correspondence Review for a Grand Commandery 
to pass upon, for the function of a correspondent as we 
conceive it is to wade through the accumulated mass of 
the various proceedings and cull therefrom what may 
seem to him to be of interest or value to the Order, 
and to group it together in readable form, not always 
presenting it as dry husks, but embellishing it with 
whatever touch of thought or fancy may be pertinent. 
His writings are his own opinion solely, and no one 
else's. So where there is anything in such a situation 
for a Grand Commandery to pass upon is not promi- 
nently visible." Under Illinois, he opines their resolu- 
tion endorsing the good roads movement is consider- 
ably out of line. Under Maine, he again rises to re- 
mark that the pure wine of the ritual is "wine only, as 
distinguished from wine mixed with something else." 
Under Michigan, he decries the appearance of Tem- 
plars in parade except where the occasion is strictly 
Masonic, lest, in the language of the Grand Commander 
of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, "we challenge corn- 
parison with other bodies in the same procession and 
invite criticism in the same manner." Under Missouri, 



California. 7 

he pertinently opposes state-wide concurrent jurisdic- 
tion, and adds that "it works finely for the fellow who 
can't get by in his home town." 

After a year's occupancy of the station of Grand 
Commander, we find our right eminent frater back in 
the harness as Grand Recorder. 

James H. Clendening, Fort Smith, Grand Com- 
mander ; Fay Hempstead, Little Rock, Grand Re- 
corder. Next Annual, Blytheville, May 17, 1921. 

CALIFORMA, 1920. 

62d Annual. San Francisco. April 22. 

Commanderies, 53 ; represented, 50 ; members, 
8,651 ; gain, 553 ; cash and investments, $67,590.33. 

Grand Commandery was "assembled," and "the 
opening of a Commandery in Long Form was exempli- 
fied" by a local Commandery. Grand Master was per- 
sonally represented by one of their Past Grand Com- 
manders. 

The address of Grand Commander (Benjamin 
Franklin Bledsoe) is remarkable for its pure diction 
and the ennobling sentiments it contains. He records 
the passing away of Past Grand Commander William, 
Monroe Petrie. He issues the usual circular letters for 
Templar observances, and in one dedicated to the foun- 
dation principles of the Order he proclaims that "or- 
ganized government is the foundation stone of our 
civilization, the home is its hearth-stone, the school is 
its stepping stone, and the church is its cap-stone" and 
that, to his thinking, "no sincere Knight Templar can 
in good conscience be other than a member of some 
church of the living God." He rendered no decisions. 
He formed three Commanderies under dispensation, 
which Grand Commandery duly chartered. He dwells 
upon the diversity of pronunciation of the Latin 
phrases found in the ritual and argues for standardiz- 



8 Canada. 

ing the system of pronuncation by the adoption of that 
best understood by the people generally, the American- 
ized pronunciation, rather than the "somewhat stilted 
phraseology of the modern lexicograpers and orthoep- 
ists, for Caesar, to me, is always going to be Caesar, 
and not Kaiser, and I prefer vinces to winkes." Upon 
his recommendation the salary of Grand Recorder was 
raised to $1,800 and for the Washington Masonic Me- 
morial there was appropriated $1,000. 

Grand Commandery granted dispensation for for- 
mation of a Commandery at Alameda, endorsed the 
efforts of the teachers of the public schools to secure a 
living wage, reaffirmed allegiance to the government, 
and adopted the American creed in use in their Grand 
Lodge and ordered it repeated by each postulant after 
the conclusion of the ceremonies of the Temple. 

Grand Recorder Thomas A. Davies presents the 
Report on Correspondence in his accustomed satisfying 
manner, crisp and complete. Indiana for 1919 has 
courteous and ample treatment. He finds it ''rather 
drastic to punish Sir Knights for not donating to a 
fund in response to an appeal for a voluntary offering, 
even though that appeal came from the Grand Master 
of the Grand Encampment: are we guilty of lese 
majeste because we do not pony up every time the 
Grand Body rings the bell?" 

Robert Wankowski, Venice, Grand Commander; 
Thomas A. Davies, San Francisco, Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, Long Beach, April 21, 1921. 

CANADA, 1920. 

37th Annual. Calgary. August 13. 

Priories, 64 ; members, 9,488 ; gain, 837 ; cash and 
bonds, $54,446.09. 

The address by Supreme Grand Master (Abraham 
Shaw) is an able document detailing the work of the 



Canada. 9 

year. He made numerous visitations, instituted three 
Preceptories, memorialized the death of Past Supreme 
Grand Masters, Daniel Fraser MacWatt and William 
P. Ryrie, issued special dispensations to ballot at 
shorter period than allowed by the statutes, refused to 
grant waiver to New York on material living in Que- 
bec, and among his decisions he held that **the statutes 
do not demand that a Royal Arch Mason continue to be 
a m.ember of a Chapter after receiving the various Or- 
ders of the Temple," which is at variance with the 
practice south of the lakes, where we require Knights 
to maintain membership in all bodies that contributed 
towards their advancement to the grade and dignity of 
Knights Templar. 

Sixty-five pages of the, record are given over to the 
reports of the Provincial Priors, the consensus of 
whose opinion is that the Order is making steady prog- 
ress, and increasing in members and enthusiasm. How- 
ever, certain laxity in attendance is pointed out and 
the cause assigned to be the fault of officers in not 
learning the work "so as creditably to confer the 
Orders." 

The establishment of fraternal relations with the 
Great Priory of Scotland was held in abeyance, "as the 
existence of the St. Stephens Encampment, New Bruns- 
wick, and their revived activity during the year stands 
in the way." 

The Report on Correspondence is the work of Pra- 
ter J. A. Cowan, P. G. R. Indiana for 1920, has fra- 
ternal consideration. The report is concise and inter- 
esting throughout. 

Abraham Shaw, Kingston, Supreme Grand Master 
(re-elected) ; W. H. A. Eckhardt, Montreal, Grand 
Chancelor; next Annual, Kingston, Ontario, August 
9, 1921. 



10 Colorado. 

COLOKADO, 1920. 

45th Annual. Denver. September 24. 

Commanderies, 34 ; represented, 32 ; members, 
4,121 ; gain, 296; cash and bonds, $19,180.14. 

Grand Commandery was "duly convened and its la- 
bors resumed." The Grand Master had as his personal 
representative R. E. Sir John A. Houghton. Indiana 
was represented by Past Grand Commander Irving W. 
Stanton. 

The address of Grand Commander (George A. 
Reese) was a compilation of letters and orders and 
covered the doings of his administrative year. He 
notes the deaths of three Past Grand Commanders, 
William David Todd, Clarence Melville Kellogg and 
James Montgomery Strickler, and of Past Deputy 
Grand Commander William Fullerton. The first named 
was long the gifted Correspondent of the Grand Com- 
mandery. His dispensations follow Templar law. He 
formed a new Commandery, which was continued un- 
der dispensation another year, as was another formed 
the previous year. No decisions called for. He reports 
that Christmas was generally observed by the Com- 
manderies, and that Easter and Ascension services 
were fairly well attended. His visitations were few. 

An appropriation of $500 was made for the Ma- 
sonic Soldiers' and Sailors' Welfare Committee of 
Grand Lodge, for Hospital work. 

The Grand Commandery of Nevada was formally 
recognized and an exchange of representatives au- 
thorized. 

The Correspondence Report is by Past Grand Com- 
mander John M. Maxwell, who planned his work 
"without comment, criticism or censure." It is thor- 
oughly and fully done, and nothing escapes his reporto- 



Connecticut. 11 



rial pen. He quotes largely. Indiana for 1920 has 
ample consideration, and in view of the action of our 
Grand Commandery in deciding to subject the Corre- 
spondence Report to the approval of the Jurisprudence 
Committee before publication, he "awaits with interest 
and curiosity the next ensuing report of the Corre- 
spondent." Well, Frater Maxwell, here it is, like your 
own, "without comment or criticism," scarcely more 
than dry bones. 

Stanley C. Warner, Denver, Grand Commander; 
Charles H. Jacobson, Denver, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, Denver, September 23, 1921. 

COX>E(TICrT, 1920= 

93d Annual. New London. March 16. 

Commanderies, 11; represented, 11; members, 
4,877 ; gain, 287 ; cash and investments, $13,185.16. 

Grand Commandery was "opened", with Indiana 
represented by Frater John R. Hughes. Grand Mas- 
ter had as his personal representative, R. E. Sir Will- 
iam H. Emerson, of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

The address of Grand Commander (Carey Cong- 
don) is a creditable and concise document. In it he 
mentions the death of Past Grand Commander Samuel 
J. Bryant. His special dispensations were approved, 
although we find one permitting a Commandery "to 
hold its stated Conclave on June 11th instead of on the 
regular date." It was permitted to confer the Order 
of Knighthood on one with an artificial limb provided 
he "could conform to statute 153." He compliments 
the Grand Inspector, advises that the Christmas cere- 
monies were generally observed, and insists that Com- 
manders observe the forms for correspondence as laid 
down in the regulations and save the annoyance of 
delay. 



12 Distiict of Columbia. 

An appropriation of $350 was made for the main- 
tenance, furnishing and equipment of the dining-room 
of the Masonic Home, and that the lounging-room be 
furnished at a cost not to exceed $500. 

' Grand Recorder's salary was increased $200. 

The Report on Correspondence is bj^ Frater George 
A. Sturdy. He follows the veteran, R. E. Sir Samuel 
J. Bryant, whose death is noted above. Frater Sturdy 
writes easily and entertainingly, and presents a good 
review. Indiana for 1919 has ample and courteous 
mention. May his tenure at the Round Table be long 
and pleasurable. 

Benjamin L. Coe, Waterbury, Grand Commander ; 
Eli C. Birdsey, Meriden, Grand Recorder ; next Annual, 
Waterbury, March 15, 1921. 

DISTRICT COLI.MBIA, 1920. 

25th Annual. Washington. May 10. 

Ccmmanderies, 5 ; represented, 5 ; members, 2,086 ; 
gain, 299 ; cash, $2,067.55. 

Grand Commandery was opened in "ample form", 
and without the presence of the legate from Indiana; 
but Grand Master was represented by R. E. Sir Alex- 
ander B. Andrews of North Carolina. 

The address of Grand Commander (Charles E. 
Baldwin) presents a creditable resume of the work of 
the year. In it we learn of their "splendid condition of 
harmony and prosperity ;" of the deaths of Past Grand 
Commanders Charles T. Lindsey and George C. Ober; 
of the issuance of only one special dispensation ; of his 
decision, which was upheld, that a Government em- 
ployee, coming from Pennsylvania, but having a bodily 
residence in the District for more than six months, 
was proper material for a Washington Commandery; 
of his full measure of grand visitations ; of his dis- 



England-Wales. 13 



pensing with the annual inspections because of the 
Philadelphia Triennial ; of the compliance of all his 
Commanderies with his request to observe Christmas ; 
of the holding- of Ascension Day services for the first 
time under the auspices of Grand Commandery ; and 
of the usual formalities of the office. 

The Report on Correspondence is the fourteenth 
and last to issue from the sanctum of R. E. Sir George 
E. Corson. He retires on his own motion, because of 
''advancing age and the demands of other duties," and 
it is with profound regret that we see him go, for he 
has ever been courteous and gentlemanly in all his 
dealings, and his reports were of the highest merit. 
His age may be advancing, but George will never grow 
old, for his heart is as young as that of the youngest 
.neophyte entering for the first time our sacred pre- 
cincts. Indiana for 1919 has full and honorable 
mention. 

Fred S. Cawson, Washington, Grand Commander; 
Arvine W. Johnston, Washington, Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, May 9, 1921. 

ENGLAND-WALES, 1920. 

Great Priory of the United Religious and Military 
Orders of the Temple was holden at Mark Masons' Hall, 
London, on December 12, 1919, and May 14, 1920, with 
Most Eminent and Supreme Pro Grand Master, R. 
Loveland Loveland, on the Throne for the first, and 
Very High and Eminent Great Seneschal, C. W. Napier 
Clavering, on the Throne for the second. 

There are 156 Preceptories, including four new 
ones, on the roll ; with approximately 4,000 members. , 
The Order of Knight of Malta was conferred upon 61 
candidates and that of Knight Grand Cross upon 13. 

Donations and subscriptions to the Building Fund 



14 Florida. 

of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem amounted to the 
sum. of £1,682. 

Supreme Pro Grand Master having- resigned, on 
account of ill health, the Supreme Grand Master was 
pleased to announce Thomas Charles Pleydell Galley as 
his successor. . 

The aggregate of their General, Benevolent and 
Building Funds is £16,549. 

FLORID An lS20o 
26th Annual. Lakeland. April 13. 

Commanderies, 21 ; represented, 21 ; members, 
2,853 ; gain, 867 ; cash and bonds, $5,466.17. 

Opened in "ample form," with R. E. Sir Alva C. 
Atkins, of Georgia, personal representative of the 
Grand Master, as the guest of honor. One of Indiana's 
Past Grand Commanders, R. E. Sir Oliver Gard, was 
formally received and escorted to the East. 

The address of Grand Commander (Charles S. Hill) 
is a commendable document, from, which we learn of 
the death of Past Grand Commander James W. Boyd ; 
that he ruled that the Orders' could not lawfully be con- 
ferred upon one totally deaf; that he commended the 
action of Olivet Commandery in requiring each candi- 
date to own a uniform before taking the Order of the 
Temple and urged other Commanderies to go and do 
likewise ; that he issued the call for Christmas Observ- 
ance, but only received advices of compliance from 
three ; that he visited all his Commanderies except one, 
and comments on the laxity with which the work is 
done in many instances ; that he recommended the ap- 
pointment of an Inspector General, but Grand Com- 
mandery said '*not now;" that of his special dispensa- 
tions, one to "elect an Eminent Commander" was not 
approved, for the reason that "Section 103 prohibits 



Georgia. 15 

the granting of such in such a case ;" that he issued dis- 
pensations for the formation of four new Command- 
eries, which were later chartered ; and that his other 
acts were of the usual routine nature.. 

The committee appointed to solicit funds for the 
Florida Masonic Home reported contributions by the 
several Commanderies to the amount of $2,650. 

Appropriations : $100 for the Washington Masonic 
Memorial and $150 towards a monument as a memorial 
to Past Grand Commander James W. Boyd. Simon 
of Cyrene Commandery added $100 to the latter ap- 
propriation. 

No report on correspondence. 

John L. Hall, Jacksonville, Grand Commander ; 
Wilber P. Webster, Jacksonville, Grand Recorder ; next 
Annual, St. Petersburg, April 19, 1921. 

GEOKGIA, 1920, 

59th Annual. Albany. May 12. 

Commanderies, 32 ; represented, 31 ; members, 
7,785; gain, 1,990; cash and investments, $38,720.41. 

Grand Commandery "convened pursuant to ad- 
journment," following a review and parade, welcome 
address and devotional exercises by the Grand Prelate. 
In the language of Grand Recorder, the address of 
Grand Prelate was ''splendidly composed, with a nice 
eloquence of creeds, its synoptical distribution being 
well-nigh perfect, and its delivery convincingly fluent 
and beautiful." Evidently, most of us missed a treat. 

Grand Master was personally represented by R. E. 
Sir John L. Hall, of Florida. 

The address of Grand Commander (Alva C. At- 
kins) was a praiseworthy epistle and clearly and con- 
cisely set forth the doings of an active year. It recites 



16 Georgia. 

the deaths of two Past Grand Commanders, Washing- 
ton Pitt Baldwin and George Bucknam Whiteside ; an- 
nounces the greatest year in their history in numerical 
gain ; reports his decisions and special dispensations, 
one refusing a demit to a member initiated after May, 
1917, who was not in possession of a uniform, was ap- 
proved, and one according jurisdiction to the State 
where an applicant sleeps and eats, rather than to an- 
other State where Ihe works, votes and pays poll-tax, 
was not approved, it being held that the place of voting 
and paying taxes constituted residence; advises the 
constitution of a Commandery under charter; chroni- 
cles his personal inspection of nine Commanderies, and 
scores those officers guilty of "omissions and addi- 
tions" in the conference of the Orders ; and announces 
the usual routine acts of his administration. 

Grand Recorder claims their net percentage of gain, 
34.34 per cent, is the largest of any jurisdiction; and 
that they are exceeded in numbers by only two, Illinois, 
2,276, and Texas, 2,383. 

Appropriations: $100 to the Salvation Army; $100 
to Georgia Industrial Home ; $250 to Masonic Orphans' 
Home ; $500 to Scottish Rite Crippled Children's Home, 
and $500 to Washington Masonic Memorial. And the 
salary of Grand Recorder was increased from $2,100 
to $2,400, and that of Grand Treasurer from $300 to 
$500. 

A charter was granted to Calvary Commandery, 
without it having worked under dispensation. 

Grand Recorder Charles S. Wood again presents the 
Report on Correspondence in his usual able manner. 
In commenting on Alabama's special dispensations to 
railroad candidates he says : "No doubt some of us will 
look back upon those emergent times and feel like we 
were wafted away as by a dream in the night when we 
were doing things illegal and were commended for it." 



IdaJio. 17 

Indiana for 1919 has ample and courteous consider- 
ation. He thinks our then Grand Commander is of the 
opinion that "the Correspondence business don't 
amount to much," and adds: "But they still live to 
conquer, and with all their faults, have a glorious 
place." And commenting on your reviewer's report 
says: "His reviews and criticisms are courteous and 
creditable, and demonstrate in an educational way that 
Foreign Correspondents should not be buried alive." 
In effect, it would seem they are so, now, in Indiana. 
He closes with a splendid poem, entitled "Carry-On." 

James C. Watts, Rome, Grand Commander ; Charles 
S. Wood, Savannah, Grand Recorder; next Annual, 
Macon, May 18, 1921. 

IDAHO, 1919, 

16th Annual. Moscow. May 23. 

Commanderies, 11; represented, 11; members, 958; 
gain, 64 ; cash, $2,367.04. 

Grand Commandery opened "in full form" and wel- 
comed one of their own Past Grand Commanders as the 
personal representative of Grand Master. 

The address of Grand Commander (Charles E. 
Wierman) was brief but sufficient. He issued the usual 
Christmas circular; urged the Commanderies to speed 
up on the War Emergency Fund ; issued two dispensa- 
tions to appear in public in full Templar uniform in 
parade on Memorial Day, which the juriscon- 
sults approved but declared same not Masonic; com- 
missioned a proxy to constitute St. Maries Command- 
ery under charter ; and did other usual acts. 

They have constitutional troubles over their Cor- 
respondence Reports in that bailiwick. At this Con- 
clave the Correspondent reports he will have it ready 
by September 1st. In Indiana it must be in the hands 



18 Illinois. 

of the Grand Recorder at least a month before the An- 
nual Conclave. A section to their code was adopted 
requiring- the Correspondent in future to have his re- 
port in hands of Grand Recorder within ''four months 
after Grand Conclave or forfeit pay for services." Why 
four months after ? Why not one month before ? Then 
it was ordered that the 1918 Report and the 1919 Re- 
port both be published in the 1919 Proceedings, but 
neither appear, 

Newton D. Brookhart, Pocatello, Grand Com- 
mander; Lewis W. Ensign, Boise, Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, Boise, May 14, 1920. 

ILLOOIS, 1920, 

64th Annual. Rock Island. September 1. 

Commanderies, 82 ; represented, 76 ; members, 
29,425; gain, 6,194; cash and investments, $56,791.87. 

Grand Commandery opened in "ample form," with 
a host of distinguished visitors in attendance, among 
them the personal representative of Grand Master, 
R. E. Sir Winfield T. Durbin, of Indiana, and our R. E. 
Sirs Newby and Conde. 

The address of Grand Commander (Louis Lincoln 
Emmerson) was a clear, concise and well-ordered docu- 
ment detailing the administrative labors of a busy ad- 
ministration. He speaks of the growth of the past 
year as phenomenal, there having been knighted nearly 
three times the number of any preceding year, and feels 
that the Order is increasing in popularity, engendered 
from an interest in military alTairs as the outgrowth of 
the war. He pays tribute to a deceased Past Grand 
Commander, Smyth Crooks. He cites the issuance of 
the Christmas circular and the response thereto by 
thirty-four Commanderies; and that Easter was also 
generally observed. He made an effort to have a school 
of instruction in each Templar district, reports them 



lUinois. 19 

fairly well attended, and much benefit resulting there- 
from. He made but few visitations. He reports hav- 
ing denied dispensations to railroad candidates and to 
change date of "regular meeting," but granted three to 
attend "divine worship" (read Section 156) and one to 
attend institution of the White Shrine. He closes with 
an exortation to "be careful whom we select to partici- 
pate in our privileges" and "that this great Templar 
body has a mission in the world and that mission is the 
upholding of those sublime principles which are ac- 
cepted as the basis of the Christian religion and which 
for many years have distinguished all moral, social and 
intellectual progress." 

It was resolved to give moral encouragement and 
support to a movement to establish and maintain a 
Masonic hospital for the exclusive treatment of Ma- 
sonic illness and injury. 

Two requests for the formation of Commanderies 
were denied. 

The proceedings of the morning of the second day 
were saddened by the announcement of the sudden 
death of Past Grand Commander Joseph E. Dyas, 
which occurred during the night at a local hospital. 
Sir Knight Dyas was also Past General Grand High 
Priest of the General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch 
Masons of the United States. 

The Illinois Masonic Hospital Association was 
awarded a grant of $750. 

It was ordered that the Commanderies of the juris- 
diction be severally urged to take a life membership in 
the Washington Masonic Memorial Association, the 
cost of which is $100. It was further ordered that 
Grand Commandery appropriate $150 for the purchase 
of Frater Newby's "Side Lio-hts on Templar Law," a 
copy for each Commandery and each Grand OfFicer. 



20 Iowa. 

An amendment to the regulations was adopted and 
hereafter white, and not buff, gloves with the uniform 
will prevail. 

The Report on Correspondence is from the pen of 
Past Grand Commander Louis A. Mills, who takes up 
the work laid down by our much beloved and lamented 
Frater, R. E. Sir Arthur M. Otman, to whom he offers 
a most tender tribute of love and affection. His con- 
ception of the office of Correspondent is thus expressed : 
"While it is no place to exploit mere opinions of the re- 
porter, yet his duty leads him to indulge in friendly 
and constructive criticism of acts and practices that 
seem in need of attention." From which position, after 
a half-century, Indiana seems to have receded. Indiana 
for 1920 has most cordial and complete treatm.ent. Ke 
writes: "Something quite out of the ordinary, if not 
entirely new, has come out of Indiana. The report on 
correspondence must be submitted to the Grand Com- 
mandery and approved before it can be printed in the 
proceedings. In most jurisdictions the report is pre- 
sented and printed without endorsement. Any opin- 
ions expressed are those of the correspondent." 

Roland Martin Hollock, Chicago, Grand Com- 
mander; Delmar Duane Darrah, Bloomington, Grand 
Recorder; next Annual, Ft. Sheridan, September 7, 
1921. 

IOWA, 19-20. 

57th Annual. Spirit Lake. July 13. 

Commanderies, 64 ; represented, 60 ; members, 
9,516; gain, 740; cash and investments, all funds, 
$8,457.65. 

Grand Commandery was "declared convened," 
."after which the full form opening was exemplified." 
Indiana's favorite son, R. E. Sir Leonidas Perry 
Newby, Grand Generalissimo of the Grand Encamp- 



Iowa. 21 

ment, was present as the personal representative of 
Grand Master, a splendid likeness of whom adorns one 
of the pages of the proceedings. There were other dis- 
tinguished visitors to grace the occasion. 

The address of Grand Commander (John Ketcham 
Elwell) is most meritorious in subject matter and ar- 
rangement. He declared "we must stand uncompromis- 
ingly against the forces that would undermine the very 
bulwark of our national civilization, our public free 
school system and institutions for Christian education." 
He pays tribute to two Past Grand Commanders who 
passed away during the year, R. E. Sirs Henry William 
Rothert and Francis Hanmer Loring. He feels that 
"undue alarm is aroused by the agitation of the in- 
creased cost of uniforms, as evidenced by the fact of 
greater activity of our Commanderies" since the in- 
auguration of higher prices. He reports having con- 
stituted in person St. Paul Commandery under charter. 
He has a kick anent the shortage of accommodations 
given foreign Grand Commanderies at the Triennial. 
He reports attendance at each of the fourteen district 
group meetings, attributes the grow^th of Templar Ma- 
sonry in Iowa to their stimulating influence, and rec- 
ommends their continuance. In addition he visited 
twenty-five Commanderies. His dispensations were 
approved, except those "to do regular business at 
special conclaves." He issued the usual Christmas 
circulars and opines that the observance is growing in 
favor ; but observes that Ascension Day services are 
not so generally observed. He granted a dispensation 
to form a new Commandery at Albia, which was later 
chartered. He also issued dispensation for formation 
of a Commandery at Ames, wiiich was continued under 
dispensation another year. His other acts were 
routine. 

The building committee made report on the con- 
struction of their new Grand Commandery home at 



22 Iowa. 

Spirit Lake, from which it appears that the total cost 
of building, furnishings, roads, etc., was $140,591.12. 
Our fraters are to be congratulated upon the comple- 
tion of this unique project, one that gives them a won- 
derful establishment, which can be used for vacation 
purposes as well as Grand Commandery conclaves. 

An "Episode" of the Conclave was the lecture by 
R. E. Sir L. P. Newby, Grand Generalissimo of the 
Grand Encampment, on Thursday evening, on *'Devas- 
tated France," which was pronounced as "a great op- 
portunity for those who heard him." He was elected 
to Honorary Membership in Grand Commandery the 
following day. 

E. Sir Charles C. Clark again writes the Report on 
Correspondence, one of the best that comes to my table. 
He takes those Grand Commanderies that publish 
rosters of members to task for needless expense. He 
criticises the flag used in our proceedings as not up-to- 
date, being shy two stars. Thanks for this kind notice : 
"Reading it (Woods' Report) we marvel that any 
thoughtful Templar of Indiana can for a moment think 
of submitting the statistical abnormality proposed by 
the Wisconsin plan." He concludes with this stirring 
sentiment : "Thoughtful men everywhere, sober lovers 
of home and country, are approaching as never before 
the absolute necessity of an antidote for the unrest, the 
unvoiced longings, the heartbreakings, the utter selfish- 
ness which are threatening to uproot the very founda- 
tions of society, and, appreciating, are finding in the 
solid, substantial, eternal verities of Masonry, or Tem- 
plary, the remedy for every human ill, and are flocking 
to its standard as never before in the history of the 
race." 

George August Riemcke, Muscatine, Grand Com- 
mander; David Millar Brov.mlee, Sioux City, Grand 
Recorder ; next Annual, Spirit Lake, July 5, 1921. 



Kansas. 23 

KAXSAS, 1920o 

51st Annual. Salina. May 11. 

Commanderies, 56 ; represented, 40 ; members, 
9,163; gain, 1,410; cash and bonds, all funds, 
$26,613.77. 

After being "opened in ample form," R. E. Sir 
Charles B. Finch, of Nebraska, personal representative 
of the Grand Master, was welcomed. The Grand Treas- 
urer, E. Sir John McCullagh, answered for Indiana. 

The address of Grand Commander (Owen J. Wood) 
was a splendid document, worthy of a good Hoosier 
born and bred. He constituted Pratt Commandery, by 
proxy. His special dispensations were approved, and 
he declined dispensations to receive and ballot at spe- 
cial conclaves, to waive the statutory time on petitions, 
and to make pilgrimages to other cities to confer the 
Orders. He declined to order the observance of Field 
Days, owing to the lack of interest manifested. He 
refused to disturb the charter of Tancred Commandery 
because of its logical position and a revival of interest 
among its members, and this Commnadery is to have 
the help it needs to make it thrive. He reports that the 
Christmas observance was general, likewise Easter 
services. The state of the Order is defined as in "a, 
most prosperous and flourishing condition." He was 
not called on for any decisions on points of law. Fifty 
Commanderies were inspected, and pronounced to be 
"well equipped, proficient in the work and alive to the 
best interests of the Order." His other acts were 
routine. 

The Report on Correspondence was prepared by 
Grand Recorder Albert K. Wilson, and evinces the care 
and completeness of that efiicient oflicer. He criticizes 
the Arkansas fraters for mixing in the matter of pub- 
lishing the proceedings and says : "The proposition of 
juggling the printing of proceedings from one printer 



24 Kansas. 

to another and from one town to another in order to 
save a few dollars is poor business judgment." Indiana 
for 1919 is courteously reviewed. He remarks that our 
new plan of official visitation is "practically the same 
as their 'Inspection System'," apparently overlooking 
the fact that our inspections are biennial, by one in- 
spector-general, and that these official visitations on 
the alternate years are not in anywise inspections, but 
merely visitations, to create renewed interest and to 
observe whether the inspector-general's v/ork is being 
followed. With reference to our action relative to cor- 
respondence reports he says : "The recommendation 
and report of the committee on jurisprudence contem- 
plates that the report on correspondence, which has 
required several months' time in its preparation, shall 
be subjected to a hasty scrutiny for a few hours by 
a committee who have but little or no knowledge of the 
work necessary to prepare an intelligent report con- 
cerning the acts in other jurisdictions as reflected in 
their printed proceedings." 

And then he thinks the Grand Encampment "makes 
ample provision for the adjournment of a Grand Com- 
mandery, but leaves the matter of opening to the good 
judgment of each jurisdiction." It is not my intention 
to haggle over words, but as Masons we know that if 
we "open" we must "close," and if we "adjourn" we 
necessarily must "convene," for one can not "open" 
what is not "closed." 

He finds fault with me for not calling upon him 
while in Topeka recently : the truth is, I did call at his 
office twice, for I very much wished to see him, but it 
was not "open," it was "closed." I counted it then, 
and I count it now, a distinct loss. 

Charles A. Loucks, Lakin, Grand Commander; Al- 
bert K. Wilson, Topeka, Grand Recorder; next Annual, 
Hutchinson, May 10, 1921. 



Kentucky. 25 

KEXTl CKY„ 1S2(1 

73d Annual, Lexington. May 19. 

Commanderies, 35 ; represented, 33 ; members, 
7,112; gain, 1,386; cash and investments, all funds, 
$16,171.56. 

Preliminary to the Conclave were welcome ad- 
dresses, a splendid parade, and a fine sermon by Rev. 
Benjamin C. Horton. Grand Commandery was "opened 
in ample form" and the personal representative of 
Grpnd Master received. 

The address of Grand Commander (Taylor M. 
Estes) ably set forth the doings of an active adminis- 
tration : wherein we learn that this was the 100th anni- 
versary of the entertaining Commandery, Webb No. 2 ; 
that harmony and prosperity prevails throughout the 
jurisdiction ; that twenty-three Commanderies were in- 
spected and nineteen acknowledged having held Easter 
services ; that dispensation was issued to form Central 
Commandery, which Grand Commandery chartered ; 
that he refused dispensations to ballot out of time and 
was not called on"^r decisions of any kind ; that Grand 
Master's emergency war fund was finally met in full ; 
and other routine acts had attention. 

The committee charged with securing a new Grand 
Commandery Banner offered the same in evidence, and 
although one of the members of that committee was 
the agent of a prominent regalia house, this banner 
was surmounted with a Patriarchal Cross, instead of 
the Salem Cross as prescribed by Grand Encampment, 
and "the report was referred back to the committee to 
ascertain what is required." 

It was ordered to invest $1,000 in Liberty Bonds 
and the same added to the Permanent Fund. 

The Report on Correspondence issued from the 
sanctum of E. Sir William W. Clarke, and is as usual 



26 Louisiana. 



full of meat and spice. No review of Indiana is found, 
although our proceedings were issued eleven months 
prior to Frater Clarke's report going to press. Our 
distinct loss; yet not our fault. 

Albert Aden Hazelrigg, Mt. Sterling, Grand Com- 
mander ; Alfred Hughes Bryant, Covington, Grand Re- 
corder; next Annual, Mt. Sterling, May 18, 1921. 

LOUISIANA, 1920. 

57th Annual. New Iberia. April 12. 

Commanderies, 12; represented, 11; members, 
1,473; gain, 149; cash and investments, $2,689.75. 

The annual church service was held in the Meth- 
odist Church and the sermon preached by Rev. Albert 
S. Lutz, on "The Sun of Righteousness." 

Grand Ccmmandery "opened in due form," with 
Indiana represented by R. E. Sir R. N. Ross, a one-time 
Hoosier. R. E. Sir John V. Falck, of Alabama, was 
received as the personal representative of Grand 
Master. "^-^ 

The address of Grand Commander (J. Paul Haller) 
is brief but sufficient to properly portray the doings of 
his administration. He urged that strenuous efforts be 
made to land the coming Triennial of Grand Encamp- 
ment "because of the great good it will do to the cause 
of Masonry in the State of Louisiana, where we have 
had much opposition from certain sources." He ap- 
pointed an Inspector General who visited all but two 
Commanderies and reports them active. He decided 
installation by proxy was illegal and that fees for the 
Orders can not be remitted. He refused dispensation 
to ballot on petition at special conclave. He reports a 
balance due on Grand Pvlaster's emergency fund of 
$490, and did other customary acts. 



Maine. 27 

It was ordered to purchase a Certificate of Honor 
in the Washington Memorial Association, 

The Report on Correspondence of nine pages is by 
Past Deputy Grand Commander, Herman C. Duncan. 
Indiana for 1919 has more than general consideration. 
He thinks the Report on Correspondence should have 
supervision and limitation. The labors of such an ex- 
amining committee in his case would be light. 

Charles F. Crockett, Alexandria, Grand Com- 
mander; John B. Parker, New Orleans, Grand Re- 
corder ; next Annual, Shreveport, "second Monday after 
Easter Sunday," 1921 (April 28, 1921). 

IIALXE, 1920. 

69th Annual. Portland. May 6. 

Commanderies, 23 ; represented, 21 ; members, 
6,746; gain, 671; cash, $3,969.13. 

Grand Commandery "opened in ample form" and 
Indiana was represented by Past Grand Commander 
Thomas P. Shaw. 

The address of Grand Commander (Wilmer J. Dor- 
man) ably recounts the work of his ofricial year, where- 
in vve learn "that never before has Templar Masonry 
drawn closer to the fulfillment of its highest destiny 
than in the very recent past;" that no decisions were 
sought ; that his special dispensations were in accord- 
ance with Templar law ; that he refused dispensation to 
appear in public in full Templar regalia upon other 
than strictly Masonic occasions ; that he issued the cus- 
tomary Christmas circulars but that only five Record- 
ers were gracious enough to accede to his request to 
notify him as to their compliance; that he recom- 
mended departure from their custom of requiring the 
Grand Commander to write the necrological notices and 
that a standing committee be appointed for that pur- 



28 Maryland. 

pose, which was approved ; and that the usual formali- 
ties of the office were not neglected. 

The Inspecting Officers and the Military Instructor 
made reports, and "a high standard of excellence is 
manifested in most of the Commanderies" is the gen- 
eral verdict. 

The Correspondent had his allowance increased by 
fifty dollars. 

Grand Recorder Charles B. Davis presents his third 
Report of Correspondence, interesting and instructive 
as heretofore. Long may he live to wield the reporto- 
rial pen. Indiana for 1919 has ample and most cour- 
teous attention. He "admires the frank and fearless 
manner in which he (this writer) expresses his private 
opinion" and compliments beyond my deserts; but he 
is a personal and warm friend of mine, and that may 
account for it. But, Charley, it is not permitted me to 
"comment and criticise" any more, for they do not 
want anything in Indiana but a "review." 

Frater Davis questions our decision to "assess and 
collect as dues" from each Indiana Templar the one- 
dollar Grand Master emergency money, and says "the 
principle involved is altogether too expansive" and may 
lead to any abuse. 

Edward W. Wheeler, Brunswick, Grand Com- 
mander; Charles B. Davis, Portland, Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, Portland, May 5, 1921. 

MARYLAND, 1920. 

50th Annual. Baltimore. May 12. 

Commanderies, 13 ; represented, 9 ; members, 3,228 ; 
gain, 586; -cash, $7,237.82. 

Indiana was represented by Past Grand Com- 
mander James P. Foster ; the Grand Master was rep- 
resented by the Deputy Grand Commander of Pennsyl- 



Michigan. 29 

vania, V. E. Sir Thomas R. Patton. Grand Command- 
ery was "declared at labor." 

The address of Grand Commander (James Madison 
Rawlings) was brief but satisfactorily summarized the 
doings in that bailiwick. The year was pronounced as 
"the most prosperous one in our history." The urban 
Commanderies assembled together for Christmas Day 
observance, and the collection (the largest ever re- 
ceived on such an occasion) was distributed among 
four very worthy charitable institutions of Baltimore. 
He issued three special dispensations that violate Tem- 
plar law, "to hold regular conclave on a certain date 
instead of the date named in the by-laws", but the ju- 
risconsults approve as "within the lav/." 

The Report on Correspondence is the first by their 
new appointee. Rev. Dr. Henry Branch. The work is 
ably done, as one would expect. 

Indiana for 1919 has cordial and courteous con- 
sideration. 

A. LeRoy McCardell, Frederick, Grand Com- 
mander; Charles Clark, Baltimore, Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, Frederick, May 18, 1921. 

MICHIGAN, 1920. 

64th Annual. Saginaw. June 2. 

Commanderies, 52 ; represented, 47 ; members, 
11,873; gain, 1,228; cash and bonds, $17,808.28. 

Notable incidents of the Conclave were the parade 
and drills, the many delightful social functions, the 
splendid address by Rev. Dr. Frederick Spence on "The 
Knights Templar and the New Day," and the annual 
banquet of the Past Grand Commanders. 

Grand Commandery was "declared in session," and 
R. E. Sir Charles F. Lamb, of Wisconsin, personal rep- 



30 Michigan. 

resentative of the Grand Master, was formally pre- 
sented and welcomed. Old Glory was escorted to the 
East during Flag Service. 

The address of Grand Commander (Edmond S. 
Rankin) was exceptionally fine in composition and sen- 
timent. Three Past Grand Commanders and the Dep- 
uty Grand Commander crossed the Great Divide during 
the year, namely: R. E. Sirs Richard D. Swartout, 
William F. King and Charles R. Hawley and V. E. Sir 
William C. Grobhiser. The many special dispensations 
were approved, -except one permitting the Red Cross 
order to be conferred after payment for uniform and 
before its arrival, which was adjudged unnecessary, 
and one to elect a Sword Bearer where the incumbent 
had removed from the city, which was declared illegal 
because no vacancy existed. His decisions were all ap- 
proved : one held that a Companion of the Red Cross 
failing to report for the Temple within twelve months 
must petition for advancement and another held that a 
Commandery could not meet at an hour other than that 
named in the by-laws. He reports that every Com- 
mandery in the jurisdiction had been inspected, and 
their growing efficiency was commended. He an- 
nounces that the Grand Master's War Fund was raised 
to $8,713, so as to "compare favorably with our sister 
jurisdictions," although it is still short of the full 
quota. More than usual interest was manifested in the 
Christmas observance. He recites that several Com.- 
manderies are making an effort to increase the interest 
in the Order of the Red Cross. His other acts were 
routine. 

An exhaustive report of the work done by the sev- 
eral organizations engaged in war work was made, 
showing from the files in the war department that the 
percentage of activity in behalf of men in the service 
was as follows: Y. M. C. A., 90.55 per cent; Salvation 
Army, 1.73 per cent; K. of C, 7.18 per cent. That the 



Minnesota. 31 



Y. M. C. A. raised $100,000,000 and maintained 1,600 
huts at a cost of $62,500 per hut, while the K. of C. 
raised $30,000,000 and maintained only 150 huts at a 
cost of $200,000 per hut. Further, that the Y. M. C. A. 
turned over to the American Legion $400,000, to be 
used as a trust fund, the income to be for the benefit of 
disabled soldiers. Over 65 per cent of the secretaries 
abroad were Masons. 

Appropriations: $100 each to the widows of three 
Past Grand Commanders, and $250 to the George 
Washington Memorial Association. 

The report of the Instructor General is excellent, • 
and marks an efficient and zealous officer. The Flag 
Service used at the convening of Grand Commandery 
was formally adopted. Five thousand copies of the 
pamphlet, "What Is Meant By the York Rite?" were 
ordered to be purchased for the use of the Instruction 
Board. 

The Report on Correspondence is the second ven- 
ture of E. Sir Emil Montanus, Grand Prelate, quite 
'brief, but effective in its conciseness. Indiana for 1919 
has more than its share, paying especial and compli- 
mentary attention to the address of Grand Commander 
Parker and the review of your correspondent. 

Guy Brownson, Lansing, Grand Comniander; 
George T. Campbell, Owosso, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, Lansing, June 1, 1921. 

MINNESOTA, 1920, 

55th Annual. Minneapolis. May 19. 

Commanderies, 35 ; represented, 22 ; members, 
5,924; gain, 523; cash and investments, 817,052.30. 

After being declared "open," R. E. Sir George T. 
Campbell, Grand Captain of Guard of Grand Encamp- 
ment and personal representative of Grand Master, 
was officially received. Indiana was represented also. 



32 Minnesota. 



The address of Grand Commander (Charles S. 
Schurman) was a concise, comprehensive and well-or- 
dered document, wherein we are informed that he made 
thirty-one official visitations ; that all the Command- 
eries in his bailiwick were inspected and the results 
gratifying; that attendance on conclaves and attention 
to ritualistic work is far short of what it should be ; 
that the price of uniforms is halting accessions and on 
his recommendation to change the requirements the 
baldric was ordered dispensed with in future ; that his 
special dispensations were approved, including one to 
a Commandery that had been granted a charter but not 
yet constituted because awaiting completion of their 
Masonic Temple to elect candidates and take them to 
Duluth for the Orders ; that observance of Christmas 
was general ; and that the usual courtesies and routine 
acts were accorded attention. 

Grand Recorder reports $247.50 collected on Grand 
Master's Emergency Fund, in addition to former 
reports. 

The Hospital Fund shows cash and securities to 
amount of $6,648.09. 

The "Tactical Evolutions" incident to the opening 
of a Commandery were exemplified by a local Com- 
mandery. 

The funds contributed to relief of Fergus Falls 
cyclone sufferers was reported to be $670. 

E. Sir Alfred G. Pinkham presents his second Re- 
port on Correspondence. It is quite brief, but covers 
the salient features profitably. He quotes liberally and 
comment^ occasionally. Indiana for 1919 has ample 
mention, but he errs in saying our Grand Commander^/ 
"opened in ample form." Our record reads, "convened, 
and declared ready for the transaction of business." 

He is of the same opinion as Frater Parshall of 



Mississippi. 33 

Wyoming as to our decision to assist the Wisconsin 
Plan of Correspondence and describes it as "autocratic 
and not democratic." Under North Carolina, comment- 
ing on the illegal dispensations issued, he says: 'This 
kind of utter disregard of legal enactments and statu- 
tory requirements is enough in itself to discourage any 
right thinking, conscientious Templar from active in- 
terest in his Commandery." 

Silas H. Towler, Minneapolis, Grand Commander; 
John Fishel, St. Paul, Grand Recorder ; next Annual, 
Duluth, June 15, 1921. 

3IISSISSIPPI, 1930. 

60th Annual. Holly Springs. May 25. 

Commanderies, 26 ; represented, 20 ; members, 
2,801; gain, 514; cash and investments, $6,592.14. 

Grand Commandery "convened" and "opened in due 
form." R. E. Sir Charles C. Taylor, of Tennessee, per- 
sonal representative of Grand Master, was formally 
welcomed. 

The address of Grand Commander (James F. Hill) 
contains memorials, reports and circular letters. He 
appeals to his fraters for "the necessity of a close and 
vigilant watch as to what is being taught in our public 
schools, and by whom these children are being taught." 
He chronicles the deaths of Past Grand Commander 
Edwin J. Martin and Grand Recorder Frederick Gor- 
don Speed. Being elected to the position of Superin- 
tendent of the Masonic Home, he was prevented from 
making extended visitations. He refused to issue dis- 
pensations to waive statutory time on petitions, but 
suggested to Commanderies to revise their by-laws so 
as to provide for two conclaves per month. No requests 
for decisions. Few responses to his Christmas circular 
leads him to the conclusion that the observance was not 
generally kept. His recommendation that $100 be ap- 

■ ■ ■ •[ -T 



34 Missouri. 

propriated for the Salvation Army was approved ; like- 
wise his recommendation that the system of inspection 
be continued and that the inspector be required to visit 
each Conimandery at least once a year. Other routine 
duties had attention. 

Donations were made to the Natchez Protestant 
Orphan Home in the sum of $745 by the Commanderies 
and $255 by Grand Commandery; total, $1,000. 

Grand Commandery attended a night service, devo- 
tional in its character, and Grand Prelate preached the 
sermon. 

Other appropriations: $400 to Masonic Home and 
$5,000, in installments, for entertaining the Triennial 
in 1922 at New Orleans. 

The Report on Correspondence is by Past Grand 
Commander Oliver Lee McKay, and although brief is 
efficient and satisfactory. He quotes with fervency 
and zeal, and seldom offers comment. Indiana for 1919 
has courteous attention. 

Benjamin J, Smith, Jackson, Grand Commander ; 
Oliver Lee McKay, Meridian, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, McComb, April __, 1921. 

3IISS0rBI, 1920. 

59th Annual. Joplin. May 25. 

Commanderies, 60 ; represented, 57 ; members, 
9,981 ; gain, 1,738; cash and investments, $35,653.89. 

Grand Commandery was declared "open and ready 
for business." Indiana was represented by Past Grand 
Commander Gib. W. Carson. M. E. Sir William B. 
Melish, Past Grand Master, was welcomed as the spe- 
cial representative of Grand Master. 

The Conclave was enlivened with parades, exhibi- 
tion drills, automobile rides, reception and ball, lunch- 
eons, etc., and everybody was happy. 



Missouri. 35 

The address of Grand Commander (Herman 
Mauch) was lengthy and exhaustive. The year was 
the most prosperous one in the history of Grand Com- 
mandery. No decisions. His recommendation that the 
charter of Constantine Commandery be restored was 
approved. He organized a new Commandery, West- 
port, and same was chartered. He reported further 
contributions to the Grand Master's War Fund, still 
leaving a shortage in their quota of $868.75. He made 
numerous visitations. The death of Past Grand Com- 
mander Emanuel F. Hartzell is mentioned. His many 
special dispensations, being statutory, were approved. 
Questions of local import are considered and the usual 
formalities given attention. 

An appropriation of $200 was made to the Acacia 
Fraternity, a student organization composed of Master 
Masons at the University of Missouri, to aid in the 
erection of a home for the fraternity and another for 
the sons of Master Masons under twenty-one years 
of age. 

Fifteen thousand dollars was appropriated towards 
the erection of a Masonic Temple at St. Louis, same to 
provide a place for annual conclaves of Grand Com- 
mandery together with office quarters. 

The required Templar uniform shall be : "dress 
coat, sword and case, belt, baldric and chapeau." 

The Grand Instructor and Inspector made seventy- 
seven visits, and reports "an encouraging interest on 
the part of officers to confer the work with impressive- 
ness and efficiency, but there is room for improvement." 

The Jurisprudence Committee reports that "no 
Commandery has a right to arrange tv/o, three, five or 
ten open stalls in a room, place as many candidates in 
them ; have the Junior Warden give the work to all at 
once and call it a lawful Chamber of Reflection," etc. 



36 Missouri. 

The report on Christmas observance shows many 
Commanderies participating and large gifts to chari- 
table objects. 

M. E. Sir William B. Melish was elected an Hono- 
rary Member of Grand Commandery ; and in the list 
of such dignitaries on page 194 Indiana is credited 
with one William T. Durbin, P. G. C. It should read 
"V/infield." 

R. E. Sir William F. Kuhn submits his ninth Re- 
port on Correspondence. It is entertaining, exhaustive, 
able, as of yore. He hews to the line, fearless, yet 
courteous. He claims the Moulton Amendments to 
Sections 46, 60 and 95, and the clause to Section 95, in 
reference to the use of "Sir Knight," were not adopted 
at the Triennial at Philadelphia, and in three pages he 
proceeds to make his claim apparent, concluding that 
"it is a fair sample in which the business of the turbu- 
lent and noisy session was conducted." 

Indiana for 1919 comes in for considerable attention 
and he takes exception to Grand Commander Parker's 
stand on Correspondents, as follows : 

He recommended that the Wisconsin idea be adopted. His 
criticism of correspondence is amusing" rather than instructive. 
He says: "Criticisms of other Grand Templar Bodies are not 
in good taste; suggestions for the good of the Order should 
be made at tlie proper time and should be welcomed. They 
should have proper consideration; but before becoming authori- 
tative they should have had the sanction required by our laws 
before being made a part of our record." There are possibly 
other Grand Commanders who feel like Frater Parker, because 
the sharp pencil of that free lance known as Foreign Corre- 
spondent is a terror. There is no question that the work of 
the Correspondents has accomplished more for the good of the 
Order than all the addresses of the Grand Commanders. The 
Wisconsin idea, which was to have Indiana's support, flickered 
somewhat, and where was Parker when the "lights went out"? 
The "Wisconsin idea went into the soup without a single hand 
being raised to prevent its immersion. 



Nebraska. 37 

He attributes the great increase in our numbers to 
the world's war, with possible other causes suggesting 
themselves after we shall have more thoroughly studied' 
the question ; and that if due to the war alone then we 
shall see a big slump with dimissions and suspensions 
in a few years. 

G. Goodson Wright, Kansas City, Grand Com- 
mander; Robert F. Stevenson, St. Louis, Grand Re- 
corder; next Annual, Kansas City, May 24, 1921. 

NEBRASKA, 1820. 

48th Annual. Omaha. April. 15. 

Commanderies, 29; represented, 19; members, 
3,576; gain, 307; cash and bonds, $8,636.00. 

Grand Commandery w-as "declared duly assembled 
for the transaction of business" and the Deputy Grand 
Master, Sir Jehiel W. Chamberlain, welcomed as the 
personal representative of the Grand Master. The 
Grand Commandery being seated, a local Commandery 
was invited to open a Commandery of Knights Templar 
in due form, "so the members of Grand Commandery 
could see how the work was done in the largest Com- 
mandery in the State." 

The address of Grand Commander (John S. Har- 
man) was creditable indeed, being concise, free of 
extraneous documents, and clear in its diction. He 
mentions the death of Past Grand Commander James 
Tyler ; reports the future of the Order very encour- 
aging; pronounces the affairs of the Nebraska Masonic 
Home as carefully and intelligently administered, as 
well as the children's homes at Fremont and Platts- 
mouth, and the Home for Aged People. He reports 
having visited and inspected eleven Commanderies, at 
the request of the Inspector. His special dispensations 
were approved, as were his refusals to issue dispensa- 
tions to ballot out of time and to elect officers at special 



38 Nevada. 

conclaves. His Christmas letter met with liberal re- 
sponse from the Commanderies, and $664.70 was con- 
tributed to the Masonic Home. He held that it was 
necessary for requests for escorts at a Templar funeral 
in a neighboring jurisdiction to pass through the regu- 
lar channels of the two Grand Commanders interested, 
whereas we have the approved decision of Grand Mas- 
ter that funerals are an exception, for time is an ob- 
ject in such cases and not to be interfered with by red 
tape. The usual courtesies and local matters had the 
required attention. 

Twenty-seven of the twenty-nine Commanderies 
were inspected ; $600 was ordered invested in stock of 
the Masonic Heme and $300 in stock of the Eastern 
Star Home. 

Sir Knight Francis E. White submits a twelve-page 
Report on Correspondence, Indiana for 1919 getting 
good allowance, and your correspondent is favored with 
complimentary notice. 

Edward C. Jackson, Blair, Grand Commander; 
Francis E. White, Omaha, Grand Recorder; next An- 
nual, Lincoln, April 7, 1921. 

XEYADA, 1919, 

1st Annual. Reno. June 9. 

Commanderies, 3 ; represented, 3 ; members, 222 ; 
gain, since organization on April 15, 1918, 12; cash, 

$792.42. 

At the organization conclave, which was assembled 
in the city of Reno by authority of Grand Master and 
under his commission to R. E. Sir Perry W. Weidner, 
Grand Warder of Grand Encampment, there were 
present the representatives of three Commanderies sta- 
tioned at Reno, Goldfield and Winnemucca. A constitu- 
tion was adopted and Grand Officers elected and 
installed. 



New Hampshire. 39 



At the first annual, Grand Commandery "opened in 
ample form," when R. E. Sir Jonathan M. Peel, of Cali- 
fornia, was welcomed as the personal representative of 
Grand Master. 

The address of Grand Commander (Walter J. Har- 
ris) is crowded with letters, orders and circulars. He 
issued the Christmas circular ; reports that Grand Com- 
mandery attended divine services on Easter Sunday ; 
issued two special dispensations ; decided that a Knight 
could not hold two offices at the same time, and that 
Templar work could not be done on the Sabbath day. 

The "Ritual and Tactics as used by the Grand Com- 
mandery of California" were adopted. 

No Report en Correspondence. 

Robert Lewers, Reno, Grand Commander ; William 
Sutherland, Reno, Grand Recorder; next Annual, Reno, 
June 7, 1920. 

>EW HAMPSHIBE„ 1920. 

73d Annual. Concord. September 28. 

Commanderies, 11; represented, 10; members, 
3,054; gain, 169; cash, $3,001.55. 

Grand Commandery was "opened in ample form," 
with Indiana's legate. Past Grand Commander A. Mel- 
vin Foss in attendance. R. E. Sir Clayton J. Farring- 
ton, of Maine, was welcomed as the personal represent- 
ative of Grand Master. 

The address of Grand Commander (Benjamin 
Franklin St. Clair) is a commendable document detail- 
ing the doings in his bailiwick for the past year. He 
insists "the world needs today, more than ever, the 
faith which we profess." He memorializes the passing 
away of Past Grand Commander George Isaac McAl- 
lister. He makes many visitations and inspections, and 
believes their jurisdiction does not need an official In- 



40 New Jersey. 

spector, and his view is upheld. He issued the Christ- 
mas circular and announced generous and magnani- 
mous response, with liberal contributions to the Ma- 
sonic Home. His special dispensations were statutory 
and no decisions were requested. His recommendation 
that the salary of Grand Recorder be increased $15(> 
and that it be made retroactive for 1919 was approved. 
Other duties routine. 

The Report on Correspondence is again by Grand 
Recorder Harry M. Cheney, in his usual concise and 
all-embracing style. He feels the past year "has been 
the most wonderful year in our organized career" and 
that "our ranks are a high, stout wall which revolu- 
tionists and government destroyers must lay low before 
they win." Indiana for 1920 has courteous notice. He 
opines that our inspection in the three Orders "would 
be disturbing in New Hampshire." And this pleasant 
compliment is dropped : "The splendid quality of the 
correspondence is easily discoverable and appreciated. 
It is inconceivable that his Grand Commandery, to 
which his product is submitted, can find anything in it 
save to praise." 

John Kimball Bates, Portsmouth, Grand Com- 
mander ; Harry Morrison Cheney, Concord, Grand Re- 
corder; next Annual, Concord, September 27, 1921. 

>EW .SEIiSEY, 1820. 
60th Annual. Trenton. May 11. 

Commanderies, 20 ; represented, 20 ; members, 4,- 
871 ; gain, 722 ; cash, $6,822.62. 

Opened in "ample form." R. E. Sir Frederick W. 
Sim, of New York, personal representative of Grand 
Master, was welcomed. 

The address of Grand Commander (Henry F. 
Barth) covered fifty-four pages, with its thirty-five 



Neic Jersey. 41 

letters, telegrams, documents, and not including seven 
general orders. He reports the death of V. E. Sir 
James A. Cortright, Deputy Grand Commander; that 
the past year was a banner year for his body ; and that 
their inspection system is getting good results. His 
special dispensations were approved, except one per- 
mitting a Commandery to confer Orders in a neighbor- 
ing town, and Grand Commandery ordered the candi- 
dates healed. He constituted Lafayette Commandery 
and issued a dispensation for the formation of a Com- 
mandery at Camden, v\'hich was chartered. He finds 
fault v/ith Illinois for suggesting a "conditional demit" 
instead of a pure ''demit" for a member desiring to 
affiliate in Nevr Jersey, and quotes Section 178; evi- 
dently he never heard of 190 B, He refused dispensa- 
tions to ballot out of time and to open stated conclaves 
before the hour set in the by-laws. And then he de- 
sired that Grand Commandery create the office of 
Grand Marshal, but the jurisconsults held that Grand 
Encampment did not permit. And after asking the 
Grand Master for an opinion as to whether a Special 
Conclave of Grand Commandery "closed" or "ad- 
journed," and was informed that it "adjourned," he 
comes back with the statement that he "does not quite 
agree with the Grand Master!" His recommendation 
to substitute the black belt for the red now in use fell 
by the wayside. He issued the Christmas circular, 
made visitations, and did the customary routine acts 
of his stewardship. 

It v/as ordered to invest $3,000 in Liberty Bonds. 

The Report on Correspondence is the joint product 
of R. E. Sir Peter McGill and E. Sir Edwin A. Whit- 
man, with the bulk of the work on the latter. It is 
rather brief this year, covering the salient points only, 
without comment. Indiana for 1919 is accorded fav- 
orable notice. 



42 Neiv Mexico. 



Archibald G, Smith, Lambertville, Gi^and Com- 
mander; John M. Wright, Trenton, Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, Trenton, May 10, 1921. 

>EU 3IEXIC0, 19-20„ 

19th Annual. Albuquerque, March 19. 

Commanderies, 13; represented, 11; members, 905; 
gain, 88 ; cash, all funds, $3,498.74. 

Grand Commandery "opened in ample form," hav- 
ing been adjourned from February 20, on account of 
health conditions in the State. 

The address of Grand Commander (Claude Hobbs) 
effectively outlined the business of his stewardship. 
He believes that "the great need in our country today 
is an intelligent promulgation and a faithful practice 
of the principles inculcated in our Order." He 
chronicles the death of Past Grand Commander Joseph 
P. McGrorty. He failed to visit all his subordinates; 
reports peace and harmony prevailing, and conditions 
except in one Commandery quite satisfactory ; declares 
that Christmas observance was participated in by the 
major part of his Commanderies; lists his special dis- 
pensations, which were approved ; decided that only 
such as were members of the Order when entering 
service in the Great War or who received the Orders 
prior to the armistice could be placed on their me- 
morial tablet. 

He granted a dispensation to form Clovis Com- 
mandery, and same was chartered. His other acts 
were of the usual nature and of local interest only. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

John M. Bowman, Las Cruces, Grand Commander; 
Alpheus A. Keen, Albuquerque, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, Albuquerque, February 25, 1921. 



New York. 43 

>EW YORK, 1920o 

107th Annual. Newbiirgh. June 21. 

Commanderies, 72; represented, 66; members, 27,- 
739 ; gain, 2,821 ; cash and investments, all funds, 
$48,107.76. . 

Grand Commandery was "declared open and in or- 
der for business," which was followed by fourteen pages 
of welcoming speeches and responses thereto. Indi- 
ana's legate, E. Sir William R. Condit, was present. 
Among the distinguished visitors we note R. E. Sir 
Guy W. Shoemaker, of Vermont, as the personal rep- 
resentative of Grand Master. 

The address of Grand Commander (Robert D. Wil- 
liams) splendidly portrays the doings of a busy ad- 
ministration. He reports unusual prosperity, and 
wonders if it is transitory or solid and lasting, adding 
these words : "Must we reconcile ourselves with the 
belief that men through the stress of things have 
learned to appreciate the value of Christian Knight- 
hood?" No decisions made. Many special dispensa- 
tions were issued, several "to attend divine service." 
It might help to read Section 156. He refused dis- 
pensations to confer the Orders in neighboring cities, 
to parade for the Order of Amaranth, and to partici- 
pate in a Shrine Parade. His interstate courtesies 
granted were legion. Other duties routine. 

The report of the committee on charities and re- 
ligious observances shows a vast contribution and 
distribution of gifts, with entertainments for the chil- 
dren, orphans and aged, during the year, at Easter, 
New Year's, Good Friday and Ascension Day. 

A resolution was offered, wherein it is stated that 
"in the territory east of the Mississippi river and 
north of the Ohio river vou will not find among the 



44 North Carolina. 



officers of the Grand Encampment a single name ap- 
pearing there who is affiliated with a Commandery in 
the territory in which the greater number of Knights 
Templar is located," and urges a canvas for the ap- 
pointment of one from New York. What of Newby 
of Indiana, Sharp of Illinois, and Campbell of Michi- 
gan, for "some of the jurisdictions in this important 
section?" 

A charter was granted to Nassau Commandery and 
a dispensation ordered issued for a new Commandery 
at Port Henry. 

It was ordered to purchase new horse saddles, 
bridles and blankets at a cost not to exceed $500, to 
replace present worn ones. 

E. Sir John W. Jenkins presents his sixteenth Re- 
port on Correspondence, condensing this year where 
possible, but giving a good review nevertheless. In- 
diana for 1919 has courteous notice. He says that 
inasmuch as our Grand Commander "considers that 
criticisms of other Templar bodies are not in good 
taste, we will not run the risk of commenting on any 
of his recommendations." 

Robert A. Greenfield, Mount Vernon, Grand Com- 
mander; John H. Bennington, Brooklyn, Grand Re- 
corder; next Annual, Syracuse, June 13, 1921. 

]NORTH CAROLIXA, 1920. 

40th Annual. Wilmington. May 12. 

Commanderies, 24 ; represented, 20 ; miembers, 4,- 
450; gain, 757; cash and investments, all funds, $14,- 
038.82. 

Grand Commandery worshiped at the First Pres- 
byterian Church ; the sermon was preached by Grand 
Prelate D. Clay Lilly. Opened in "ample form." 



North Carolina. 45 



The address of Grand Commander (George S. Nor- 
fleet) was concise and well-ordered, wherein we learn 
that he established two new Commanderies, to which 
Grand Commandery granted charters; that he issued 
several special dispensations waiving statutory time 
on petitions, which were disapproved by the juris- 
prudence committee (his only excuse was that "they 
had been in practically long enough!") ; that he issued 
the Christmas Observance circular, and the happy sea- 
son was observed by most of the Commanderies ; that 
he ruled that a bona fide purchase of a uniform en- 
titled one to receive the Orders even though the uni- 
form had not arrived ; and that other customary acts 
were duly performed. 

R. E. Sir Thomas P. Morgan, of District of Colum- 
bia, was received and welcomed as the personal repre- 
sentative of Grand Master. 

An appropriation of $300 was made for the educa- 
tional fund in aid of boys and girls ; $500 for the 
Masonic and Eastern Star Home and $500 for the Ox- 
ford Orphan Asylum. 

The inspecting officer reported that his road was 
very rough and hard, and closes with a recommenda- 
tion that one Commandery "be given one year to 
answer a letter from a Grand Officer, and if in that 
time it does not do so its charter be removed." 

No Report on Correspondence, but Past Grand Com- 
mander Alexander A. B. Andrews presents several 
pages of Knights Templar statistics, arranged in four 
tables, which is illuminating and valuable beyond 
measure. 

John H. Anderson, Fayetteville, Grand Commander; 
John B. Griggs, Elizabeth City, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, Asheville, May 10, 1921. 



46 North Dakota. 



^ORTH DAKOTA, 1920. 

31st Annual. Grand Forks. May 18. 

Commanderies represented, 8 ; members, 2,025 ; 
gain, 204; cash, $2,787.56. 

From a circular letter (Proceedings not arrived) 
Ave learn that the Grand Commander (William D. 
Henry) presented the Grand Commandery with a 
silver Loving Cup as a trophy to be used in stimulating 
better ritualistic and "tactical" work in the Com- 
manderies ; that he held that a petition for membership 
need only be accompanied by a certificate of good 
standing, and, if elected, petitioner'must file his dem.it 
within ninety days to complete his membership, other- 
wise election is void ; that Carroll J. Atkins Com.mand- 
ery surrendered its charter. 

Grand Commandery went on record in support of 
"thorough training of teachers, the payment of a wage 
adequate to proper living conditions, and the establish- 
ment of the right status of teachers in the social life 
of the state" and urged legislation to keep well pre- 
pared and successful teachers in the profession. 

R. E. Sir Wilbert D. Swain, of South Dakota, was 
welcomed as the personal representative of Grand 
Master, 

Entertainments, music, and a parade, were provided 
for the instruction and enjoyment of the attending 
representatives and officers. 

Wilson L. Richards, Dickinson, Grand Commander ; 
Walter L. Stockwell, Fargo. Grand Recorder; next An- 
nual, Dickinson, May (?), 1921. 



Ohio. 47 

OHIO, 1920. 

78th Annual. Cincinnati. September 15. 

Commanderies, 68 ; represented, 52 ; members, 26,- 
065; gain, 3,121; cash and bonds, $45,301.24. 

Grand Commandery "assembled" and proceeded 
with its business. Incidental thereto was a grand 
parade, with 3,802 Knights in line, who marched un- 
broken through a continued downpour of rain. It was 
a spectacle to be remembered. Many distinguished 
visitors were present, from Indiana, Kentucky and 
Michigan, among them being R. E. Sir Frank H. John- 
son, of Kentucky, as the personal representative of 
Grand Master. 

The address of Grand Commander (Jacob H. Brom- 
well) efficiently and clearly disposes of a good steward- 
ship, wherein his jurisdiction reached the greatest gain 
in its history. He pays tribute to the memory of the 
oldest ranking Past Grand Commarfder, Alexander 
Frank Vance, of Urbana. He issued dispensations for 
five new Commanderies, one of which was returned 
unused, while the four remaining were chartered by 
Grand Commandery. Thirty-three Commanderies held 
formal observance of Christmas and others met for 
charitable acts, the total collections being over $5,000. 

He granted many special dispensations, which were 
approved ; he refused requests to appear in public on 
other than Masonic occasions, to ballot out of time, 
and to hold stated conclave at times other than fixed 
by by-laws. 

His decisions were approved : one being that a can- 
didate who refused to make the declaration that he en- 
tertained no ill will, etc., must be stopped in the work 
at that point, end until he will comply with that essen- 
tial; another, that a Commandery U. D, may receive 
and act upon petitions; and another, that a petition 



48 Ohio. 

may be withdrawn after candidate is elected, and the 
fee returned, same being a "fair method of procedure" 
under Sec. 151. 

Again referring to the far greater increase in mem- 
bership of the Commanderies in the northern part of 
the State, where the rule prevails to require an appli- 
cant for the Scottish Rite and the Shrine to first be a 
Knight Templar, he counsels consideration of the ques- 
tion "to see whether something may not be done to 
bring about a union" between all these bodies through- 
out the State, for the improvement of the status of 
Templary. 

Other customary duties and courtesies had proper 
attention. 

Grand Recorder presented his thirty-fourth annual 
report, in the course of which he called attention to 
Ohio as being "second in the list of Grand Com- 
manderies." (See Conclusion.) 

Salary of Grand Recorder was raised from $1,800 
to $2,200 ; the Local Committee on Entertainment w^as 
allowed $1,000 ; $12,000 was appropriated for the Ohio 
Masonic Home and $5,000 ordered .invested in Liberty 
Bonds. 

It M^as held, on recommendation of the jurisconsults, 
that a collective ballot was of no effect, and individual 
ballot alone valid. 

R. E. Sir Nelson Williams presented his second Re- 
port on Correspondence, full, complete, satisfying. He 
reviews thoroughly, comments with freedom and cour- 
tesy, and quotes as occasion demands. He gives 
Indiana for 1920 ample and fraternal consideration. 
Says the brass buttons are "still to ornament the Sir 
Knights" as evidenced by a motion to postpone consid- 
eration of the subject; but the committee on revision 
of our Regulation Uniform were given full power, and 



Oklahoma. 49 



that committee eliminated them in July, 1920. You 
can't call me "Brigadier" any more, by dear Nelson, 
for they are black now. He gives something more than 
a page to a consideration of our action hereafter to 
subject the Report on Correspondence to the scrutiniz- 
ing eyes of the jurisprudence committee before its ap- 
proval by Grand Commandery, and says that "in law 
it is quite common to criticise the decisions of other 
courts, and yet no one becomes offended by it, but we 
are frank to admit that the trouble is to draw the line 
at the proper place, and we presume our Indiana 
fraters have concluded to eliminate the line entirely." 
He then expresses wonder as to whether a majority 
of the jurisconsults examined the report which it char- 
acterizes as "concise, intelligent and adequate," so as 
to recommend approval, and if not, how were they able 
to so recommend. He then says my report was "a 
good review, although we should prefer to see a little 
more personality in it." You can't have much per- 
sonality with twenty scrutineers camped on your trail, 
can you? Too risky to try it. 

Thomas J. Jones, Cleveland, Grand Commander; 
John Nelson Bell, Dayton, Grand Recorder; next An- 
nual, Cleveland, October 12, 1921. 

OKLAH03L4, 1920. 

25th Annual. Oklahoma City. April 22. 

Commanderies, 41; represented, 40; members, 4,- 
286; gain, 686; cash and bonds, $9,315.68. 

Indiana's legate, the in-coming Grand Commander, 
w^as present. Grand Commandery was "convened" and 
then "opened." The Grand Master was represented by 
R. E. Sir L. E. Thomas, of Louisiana. 

The address of Grand Commander (Fred H. Clark) 
was long and well strewed with letters which could 



50 Oklahoma. 



have been greatly condensed for economy. He divided 
the jurisdiction into seven districts and ordered dis- 
trict conclaves to raise the standard of work. The 
Commandery at Alva was removed to Cherokee, and 
germane thereto he recommended stricter care in for- 
mation of new Commanderies. Three Past Grand 
Commanders were memorialized, viz. : Ctto A. Shuttee, 
John Coyls and D. M. Hailey. He reports "a .total and 
wholesome disregard for all disciplinary matters w^hich 
is simply appalling" and adds that if they are to get 
anywhere all officers and members must be taught to 
"obey orders." He constituted by proxy one Com- 
mandery and took up the charter of another, which w^as 
approved. He charged the Regalia houses to be in a 
"combine," but excepted one, and characterized the 
price being charged for uniforms as a "hold up," show- 
ing to those who really are informed his utter ignor- 
ance in the matter. He later averred that the above 
exception had also gone into the combine ! 

In the matter of Inspections he came to the con- 
clusion that "we will never acquire proficiency we wish 
to see until we have one inspector who can inspect 
every Commandery." 

General Orders were issued for Easter and Christ- 
mas, which were very generally observed. He refused 
to grant dispensations to ballot out of time. He also 
refused to permit the grade of Past Commander to 
be conferred upon anyone not elected to the office of 
Eminent Commander. 

His year was a busy one, and his administration in 
the main beyond criticism. 

Grand Commandery, in open Conclave, conferred 
the Orders upon an elected petitioner of the Command- 
ery at Reno, and we would inquire what law authorizes 
such action. 



Oregon. 51 

The Report on Correspondence is by Frater James 
Q. Louthan, his maiden effort, who holds that "the 
trouble of yesterday and the stress of today are the 
moving causes which impel men to seek membership 
in the Masonic Order, that they may there have its 
comforting seclusion and claim its rational encourage- 
ment." The review is well written and of great value 
to the Oklahoma f raters. Indiana for 1919 has ex- 
tended and courteous mention. In commenting upon 
our action in the matter of Correspondence he avers 
that "The Correspondence is the clearing house for 
Templar Masonry." 

Milton C. Hale, Tulsa, Grand Commander ; George 
W. Spencer, Oklahoma City, Grand Recorder ; next An- 
nual, Bartlesville, May 17, 1921. 

OREGONn 1920. 

34th Annual. ' Portland. October 14, 

Commanderies, 18; represented, 16; members, 3,- 
282; gain, 968; cash and bonds, $15,403.13; in hands 
of Trustees, stocks, $4,000 ; in hands of Grand Re- 
corder, $1,210.68. 

Grand Commandery "met pursuant to adjournment 
and was called to order." Oregon Commandery pre- 
sented "for the edification of Grand Commandery the 
full form opening." 

The report on necrology, which preceeded '^oil-call, 
closes with R. E. Sir Nelson Williams' inspiring poem 
entitled, "The Knights of Yesterday," but without 
acknowledgment of its authorship. 

R. E. Sir Henry Herbert Day, of Washington, was 
received as the personal representative of Grand 
Master. 

The Report of the Official Acts of Grand Com- 
mander (Frank Seymour Baillie) is replete with let- 



52 Oregon. 

ters. He formed three new Commanderies, to which 
charters were granted. He issued the Christmas cir- 
cular and received three acknowledgements. He held 
that "salutes with the national colors are not permis- 
sable, neither should the national colors acknowledge 
a salute," and was sustained. Refused dispensations 
to receive petitions at special "meetings" anj. to waive 
statutory time on petitions. Reports that only five 
Commanderies participated in Easter service. Held 
that the "three questions and answers" were a part of 
the record and must not be destroyed (we hold differ- 
ently in Indiana, as the admission of a candidate is 
evidence he has answered correctly, a matter of fact 
to all present) . His other acts were the customary 
duties of one in his position. 

A proposition to pay the Commandery entertaining 
Grand Commandery $200 was defeated. 

The following was adopted: "We solemnly pledge 
our utmost endeavors in support of the principles 
enunciated against all aggression and insidious propa- 
ganda by any force, agency or institution from without 
or from within, to the end that American liberty shall 
continue to enlighten the world." 

Referring to the placement of funds (see caption 
hereto), it was ordered that funds from all sources be 
paid to Grand Recorder and turned over to Grand 
Treasurer, and that all stocks, bonds, or other collateral 
shall be held in the possession of the Grand Treasurer. 

In lieu of a Correspondence Report, separate re- 
ports were received from Grand Representatives, and 
Indiana was covered by Frater Frederick A. Vankirk, 
w^ho considers it "an honor to represent such a juris- 
diction as Indiana; a study of their annual report is 
a lesson in Templarism, especially the work of the 
Grand Inspector General." 



Pennsi/Jrania. 53 



Weston G. Shellenbarger, Portland, Grand Com- 
mander; James F. Robinson, Portland, Grand Re- 
corder; next Annual, La Grande, October 13, 1921. 

PE^NSYLVAMA, 192(i 

67th Annual. York. May 25. 

Commanderies, 87; represented, 84; members, 30.- 
952; gain, 3,193; cash and investments, $54,309.52. 

Grand Commandery was "opened" by V. E. Sir 
Thomas R. Patton, Acting Grand Commander, the 
Grand Commander, R. E. Sir Frederic Burd Black, 
having died during the year. 

The Report of the Acting Grand Commander pays 
tribute to the late Grand Commander ; notes the gen- 
eral observance of Christmas and the many offerings 
for benevolent purposes ; memorializes the late Grand 
Recorder, R. E. Sir William W. Allen, who passed to 
his reward after long and honorable service ; calls at- 
tention to their record-breaking increase in member- 
ship ; cites his decision that a petitioner could with- 
draw his petition after the report of the investigating 
committee thereon, and likewise his refusal to grant a 
dispensation to change the time of holding a stated 
conclave ; declares that distance is measured not to the 
building or exact spot where the Commandery is domi- 
ciled, but to the "place," the town, or the "limits of 
the principality;" and in approving his special dispen- 
sations the jurisconsults recommended that hereafter 
parades in public be restricted to Masonic occasions, 
which was approved. 

On the m.emorial pages we also find a tribute to 
their late Past Grand Commander, R. E. Sir James H. 
Codding, Grand Secretary-General of the Supreme 
Council of Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, N. M. 
J. from 1902 until his death, September 12, 1919. Also, 
of R, E. Sir John Frederick Laedlein and R. E. Sir 
Frank McSparren. 



54 Pennsylvania. 



The Report on Correspondence is again by R. E. 
Sir Thomas F. Penman, and sustains his well-estab- 
lished reputation for scholarship and Masonic knowl- 
edge. It is most unfortunate that lack of space and 
other limitations preclude a close analysis of it for the 
benefit of my Indiana readers. However, we will risk 
the following excerpt from his comments on India i;a 
for 1919 : 

A subject to which the Grand Commander devoted considerable 
attention was "Foreign Correspondence." His first suggestion 
was that they be edited, censored if advisable, before they 
should become a part of the record. His preference, however, 
was the adoption of the "Wisconsin Plan" — a sort of "boiler- 
plate" affair. The Jurisprudence Committee adopted both plans! 
But the "Wisconsin Plan" did not meet with any success before 
the Grand Encampment at Philadelphia. 

So the alternative is to be tried in Indiana, namely: the 
report on Correspondence is to be filed with the Grand Recorder 
at least ten days prior to the annual Conclave, and copies mailed 
to each member of the Committee on Jurisprudence (there are 
only about twenty of them) for examination before the same 
may be acted upon by the Grand Commandery. We suggest that 
when the Committee on Jurisprudence gets through with it (if 
they ever take the trouble to read it and agree on the subject 
matter) that then the Committee on Finance take a whack at it, 
"to get better results for the money," and determine whether 
the Committee on Jurisprudence know anything about the job: 
and then it might be "turned over to some other learned and dis- 
criminating committee, until it is so dissected and emasculated 
that, unlike the news in a certain New York newspaper, it 
wouldn't be "fit to print." Or. why not let the Committee on 
Jurisprudence write the report in the first instance and do away 
with the Committee Correspondence? Or we might suggest 
still another plan to meet Grand Commander Parker's demand 
for "care and consideration and supervision" of correspondence 
reports: Why not have them read verbatim to the Grand Com- 
mandery, so that any member or members thereof may object, 
amend, interpolate, revise and otherwise kick the poor thing into 
a cocked hat? What is a correspondence report, anyway? Will 
some gigantic intellect please con^e to the front and write a 
model that we can all adopt and copy? 



South Carolina. 55 



Thomas Ranken Patton, Philadelphia, Grand Com- 
mander; A. Howard Thomas, Philadelphia, Grand 
Recorder; next Annual, Philadelphia, May 24, 1921. 

SOUTH ( AROLI> A, 1920. 

14th Annual. Georgetown. April 14. 

Ccmmanderies, 11; represented, 11; members, 2,- 
981; gain, 876; cash and investments, $4,976.17. 

Religious exercises were held in the old historic 
Prince George Episcopal Church, conducted by the 
Grand Prelate. After Grand Commandery "as- 
sembled," the personal Representative of Grand Master, 
the R. E. Sir John M. Anderson, was received and 
welcomed. 

The address of Grand Commander (Jennine:s K. 
Owens) was rather lengthy because of its incorporated 
letters and orders. He pronounces Templarism in his 
jurisdiction in a healthy condition, which he does not 
ascribe to blind chance, but to the "Divinity that shapes 
our ends." He heralds the "pending opposition from 
our ancient enemy and questions the wisdom of delay- 
ing recognition of this opposition. It is subtle, it is 
powerful, it is aggressive. Its success in the past has 
been due to silent, deceptive, enticing methods. It has 
been defeated only in open combat. I fear the irre- 
pressible conflict is near at hand. Choose ye today 
the God whom ye will serve." 

Only a few Commanderies observed Easter. He 
formed two new Commanderies, w^hich Grand Com- 
mandery chartered. He refused to grant dispensations 
to ballot on petitions out of time. His decision that 
a Red Cross and Temple Knight of Scotland, without 
the Malta, could visit when open in Red Cross and 
Temple, and that Malta could not be communicated 
except on petition of Grand Commander, was disap- 



56 Soidh Carolina. 



proved on the ground that the Order of Malta is pre- 
requisite to the Order of the Temple. His visitations 
were few and his other acts routine. 

Constituent Commanderies were urged to secure 
life memberships in the Washington Masonic Memorial 
Association. 

An appropriation of $75 was made to place 100 
Bibles for the Gideon Association in hotels throughout 
the State. ^ 

The Report on Correspondence is again by Grand 
Recorder Joseph Lindsay, in his usual clear, exhaustive 
and interesting style. He quotes and comments with 
freedom, Indiana for 1919 has ample and courteous 
review. He says : "So, Brother Woods, they are going 
to censure your report, are they? Well, when we want 
to talk of the good old times before 'the war,' v.-hy, we 
will just give Uncle Sam two cents for a stamp, will 
we not?" And "We will say of Frater Woods' Report, 
it is a perfect ashlar." He "calls" me in the use of 
the term Sunday for Sabbath in my reference to old 
Covenanter days and the Shorter Catechism. Sure, it 
was Sabbath; Sunday was a proscribed- word in my 
childhood's home. He quotes my chapter on "Illegali- 
ties" with flattering remarks, but I greatly fear it was 
this very chapter that caused the powers that be to 
devise a plan to pass upon my review before printing 
same in the proceedings, with the result that I have 
not ventured to make any criticisms or suggestions 
since. The only way to please twenty men is to have 
no opinions at all. 

Bryan E. Miot, Columbia, Grand Commander; 
Joseph Lindsay, Chester, Grand Recorder; next An- 
nual, Newberry, April 13, 1921. 



South Dakota. 57 



SOITH DAKOTA, 1920. 

37th Annual. Watertown. August 10. 

Commanderies, 20; represented, 17; members, 2,- 
988; gain, 473; cash, $6,474.34. 

Grand Commandery was "declared convened pur- 
suant to adjournment" and the local Commandery "e'x- 
emplined" the full formal opening of a Commandery. 
R. E. Sir William H. Norris, Grand Captain General 
of Grand Encam.pment, and personal representative of 
Grand Master, was welcomed. 

The address of Grand Commander (Henry A. Per- 
riton) was burdened with letters and reports. His 
dispensations were approved, as was his refusal to 
permit balloting out of time. Every Commandery in 
the jurisdiction is reported to have responded to the 
Christmas sentiment; likewise, as to Easter. A won- 
derful Templar growth is acknowledged with much 
gratification. Other duties routine and of local in- 
terest. 

Music for the Order of the Temple was adopted 
and ordered printed and furnished the subordinate 
Commanderies of the jurisdiction. 

Two Past Grand Commanders crossed the great 
divide during the year, R. E. Sirs Joseph T. Morrow 
and Daniel S. Glidden. 

The Baldric as part of the required uniform was 
eliminated, and a "Star, about three-quarters of an 
inch in diameter, with a cross in the center, suspended 
by a black and white ribbon, to be worn upon the coat 
alongside the Malta jewel," was substituted. This is 
to be presented to the candidate at the time he is 
knighted. The Malta jewel is to be of corresponding 
size. . 

The Committee on Charters and Dispensations had 



58 Tennessee. 

under consideration a petition for a dispensation to 
form a new Commandery, and recommended a charter 
instead, to be delivered after necessary paraphernalia 
and uniforms were secured. 

Incidents of the Conclave were daily lunches in the 
Temple, and the banquet at the Country Club on the 
banks of Lake Kampeska, with boat rides, ball, and 
dress parade. 

Frater Charles L. Brockaway presents his eleventh 
Report on Correspondence, brief, but interesting. The 
salient features do not escape his attention. He thinks 
our method of dealing with the uniform question a 
"move in the right direction." 

Gerald W. Collins, Vermillion, Grand Commander; 
George A. Pettigrew, Sioux Falls,. Grand Recorder; 
next Annual, Vermillion, August 9, 1921. 

TENNESSEE, 1920= 
58th Annual. Chattanooga. May 14. 

Commanderies, 20 ; represented, 19 ; members, 2,- 
872; gain, 484; cash and bonds, $13,952.23. 

Grand Commandery was "opened" and the Grand 
Master and his personal representative were both re- 
ceived and escorted to the East. 

The address of Grand Commander (Amos Thomas 
Hooker) shows an active and zealous performance of 
duty. He made fifteen official visitations and consti- 
tuted Cumberland Commandery; mentioned the deaths 
of Past Grand Commander John B. Nicklin and Past 
Grand Prelate J. Lynn Bachman ; issued several dis- 
pensations that complied with the statutes and refused 
others where it was sought to ballot out of time; and 
did other acts of local interest. . ' 

Two thousand dollars was appropriated for social 



Texas. 59 

and entertainment features for the Annnal Conclave 
at Neshville next year; and $200 for the Near East 
Committee for use in succoring Armenian children. 

The annual sermon was delivered by Grand Pre- 
late at the First Presbyterian Church. 

The salary of Grand Recorder was increased from 
$600 to $900. 

The Report on Correspondence was not submitted 
to the Grand Commandery neither is it signed, but we 
presume it is the work of E. Sir J. Leonard Wood. It 
is rather brief, but concise and complete nevertheless. 
Indiana is missing from the review. 

John Hessey Corbitt, Nashville, Grand Com.mander ; 
Stith Malone Cain, Nashville, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, Nashville, no date given. 

TEXAS, 192(L 
67th Annual. Waco. ■ April 7. 

Commanderies, 66; represented, 47; members, 11,- 
113; gain, 2,383; cash and investments, all funds, $22,- 
188.52. 

Grand Commandery was "called to order pursuant 
to adjournment" and the ritualistic opening of a Com- 
mander\ "exemplified" by Worth Commandery. R. E. 
Sir Edward T. Gallup, of Oklahoma, personal represen- 
tative of Grand Master, was escorted to the East and 
welcomed. 

The address of Grand Commander (Frank C. 
Jones) was clean and concise, splendid, ideal. He in- 
stituted two Commanderies, which Grand Commandery 
duly chartered. Christmas and Easter were generally 
observed, perhaps more largely than ever before. He 
ordered $500 sent the sufferers from the Corpus Christi 
storm and the responses from the Commanderies upon 
his appeal for assistance amounted to $61,758.79. He 



60 Texas. 

divided the State into nine inspection districts and 
assigned the Grand Officers to the work, and reports 
that the system has its defects and the Commanderies 
to be in need of drill. He instituted two Commanderies 
under his own dispensations, and same were continued 
another year. His special dispensations, being in ac- 
cordance with Templar law, were approved. He re- 
fused dispensations to ballot out of time and to confer 
Orders in neighboring towms, which were also ap- 
proved. He disciplined Worth Comm.andery and its 
Commander for working illegally, the Commander an- 
nouncing that "w^hile Commander he would do as he 
pleased." His ruling that a Commandery could use 
three triangles in the work, where a large class was 
present (presumably in three separate compartments 
of the Asylum) was approved. He closes with these 
sentiments : 

We must fight those forces arrayed against law and order 
which stril^e at the very foundations of this Government, and 
would destroy our liberties and trail our flag in the dust. The 
ideals of Tem.plars must be preserved. Let us demand and 
stand for our public schools, our public institutions, free speech, 
a free press, free thought, but with loyalty and patriotism to 
our flag, holding and requiring that the American Constitution 
and laws must be preserved, that the American language is the 
language to be taught, spoken and written, and that whether 
residing North, East, South or West, we must at all times and 
wherever we are be true Americans. 

Appropriations : $2,000 for Home for Aged Masons, 
$500 for Library Fund for Masonic Home and School, 
$500 for Library Fund for Home for Aged Masons, 
and $2,000 for markers for the graves of those Masons 
and their wives and widows buried in Arlington Ceme- 
tery whose deaths occur while wards of the Home for 
Aged Masons. 

Grand Recorder John Carson Kidd again writes 
the Report, on Correspondence, full and complete as 
of yore. He quotes and comments with a free, yet 



Utah. 61 

courteous hand, and one can always find nourishment 
in the perusal of his gifted offerings. We can not 
always agree with him in his conclusions, but so much 
the better for the growth of the Order. Courteous dis- 
cussion always gets at the best plan to be finally pur- 
sued. Indiana for 1919 has pleasant review. In 
commenting on Grand Commander Parker's sugges- 
tions as to Correspondence Reports, he has this to say : 
"We did not know that any Grand Body or individual 
considered the suggestion of a Correspondent 'authora- 
tive.' We hope E. Sir Knight Woods' next review may 
also appear as his work, not that of the Jurisprudence 
Committee." He concludes: "The outlook for the fu- 
ture is according to the glasses the individual may be 
wearing. For our self we can see nothing but good." 

John B. Sawtell, Waco, Grand Commander; John 
Carson Kidd, Houston, Grand Recorder; next Annual, 
Wichita Falls, April 20, 1921. 

UTAH, 1820o 

nth Annual. Salt Lake City. May 11. 

Commanderies, 4 ; represented, 4 ; members, 543 ; 
gain, 31 ; cash, $586.60. 

Grand Ccmmandery "convened" and was "declared 
in session." 

The address of Grand Commander (Frederick C. 
Richmond) was brief but sufficient; therein we learn 
that no decisions were requested, that his few dispen- 
sations were statutory, that he visited all his subordi- 
nates and found a beautiful spirit of brotherhood and 
the Order healthful and satisfactory, that all observed 
Easter and made large donations for charity, that Past 
Grand Commander Henry Hughes died during the year, 
that he did the customary and routine acts, and closed 
with these words: 

I believe that Templar Masonry has reached a period in its 
history when we should cease to understand that Masonry is 



62 Utah. 



contained within the four walls of our temples, but that we 
should become true American citizens in every sense of the 
word: that we should use the great power of our Order outside 
of our temple building and disseminate the truths of Ameri- 
canism, and to see that our alien visitors are taught these prin- 
ciples and the true principles of freedom, which they in many 
cases construe as license. 

Grand Comniandery passed a statute authorizing 
Grand Commander to issue dispensation for the forma- 
tion of a Commandery "if in his judgment the rec- 
ommendation of the nearest Commandery te unrea- 
sonably withheld." 

It was ordered that the incoming Grand Com- 
mander grant a dispensation for a new Commandery 
at Provo. 

Just before adjournment the Grand Officers and 
representatives partook of "a most sumptuous colla- 
tion" and tripped the light fantastic in the Ladies' 
Literary Club. Thus braced, the final ceremonies of 
the Conclave were successfully negotiated. 

Past Grand Comm.ander Jacob H. Epperson pre- 
sented the Report on Correspondence, rather abbre- 
viated, but interesting and of value still. He offers 
this sentiment: "The Order of Knights Templar stands 
unanimously for patriotism, and loyalty to our Gov- 
ernment, our Liberty, and our Flag. Its members feel 
the great responsibility for our future peace and pros- 
perity." Indiana for 1919 has courteous review. He 
says, anent the criticism of Frater Parker concerning 
Correspondents, that "the actions of some of the Grand 
Commanders are likewise not in good taste" and "while 
Frater Woods' criticisms are lengthy, they are just 
and right, and "it is the free lance part that makes the 
report valuable." 

William J. Lynch, Salt Lake City, Grand Com- 
mander ; William. A. Raddon, Park City, Grand Re- 
corder; next Annual, Ogden, May 10, 1921, 



Veimont. 63 

\EK3rO>T. 1920. 

78th Annual. Burlington. June 8. 

Commanderies, 13 ; represented, 12 ; members, 3,- 
001; gain, 118; cash, $2,380.44. 

Grand Commandery "opened in ample form" and 
welcomed R. E. Sir Charles H. Armitage, of New York, 
as personal representative of Grand Master. 

The address of Grand Commander (Major C.Hough- 
ton) efficiently recounted the duties of his stewardship. 
He announces the death of Past Grand Commanders 
William H. Brewster and Frank L. Clark. He granted 
all requests for special dispensations, except one to 
ballot out of time. He believes the condition of the 
Order in his bailiwick to be satisfactory, with a good, 
healthy growth. All but one of his Commanderies 
complied with the request for Christmas Observance, 
and Easter and Ascension Day services are rather 
neglected. The usual interstate courtesies and custom- 
ary duties were not neglected. 

One hundred dollars was sent to an aged frater, a 
former Grand Recorder, now helpless and "in need." 

Frater Eugene S. Weston again writes the Report 
on Correspondence, quoting judiciously and comment- 
ing with rare judgment. It is a delight to read his 
reports. Indiana for 1919 has ample attention. In 
his consideration of Frater Parker's stand in the mat- 
ter of Correspondence, he has this to offer : 

With us, it is understood that the report of the Committee on 
Correspondence is not authority for our Grand Body, but is the 
personal opinion of the writer, and it is never adopted by the 
Grand Commandery. As to criticism of other Grand Com- 
manderies, we feel that, if we make any mistake in our law or 
proceeding, it is kindness to have it called to our attention. To 
believe otherwise would class us with a certain public official, 
who seems to think that he can do nothing wrong and that all 
must come to his way of thinking. In this connection, w^e think 
criticism is in order of one of his dispensations, where he 



64 Vermont. 



changed the date of the regular conclave of a Commandery. 
That, he had no right to do. He could have granted permission 
for them to transact their business at the date he gave, but it 
should have been as a special conclave. 

And of your Correspondent he has these words : 

The Frater is outspoken in his opinions on mooted questions, 
which we like. He is unalterably opposed to violation of the 
Templar law. He believes much harm will result from the 
taking in of almost everything for material, owing to the war. 
He doesn't believe in Honorary Past Grand Officers, as the 
creation carries no rights or duties. He believes that Grand 
Commanderies should convene and not open. If it is desirable, 
the opening ceremonies can be gone through with by some pro- 
ficient Commandery. He certainly presents good reasons for the 
faith that is in him. 

On the question of automatic suspension we believe 
mo.st clear-thinking Templars will agree : 

There is some dissatisfaction in the action of Grand En- 
campment relative to automatic suspension, following suspen- 
sion in Lodge or Chapter. There was a majority and minority 
report. The majority taking the stand that no suspension could 
be had without due trial^ The minority contending that no 
action need be taken by the Commandery. The views of the 
later were adopted, after a warm debate on the floor of the 
Encampment. 

It may save some labor in not having to hold a trial, but 
we believe that no Knight should be deprived of his rights, 
without having a chance to appear and put in a defense. This 
is a rule that only works one way, as we never heard of Lodge 
or Chapter automatically suspending, because such penalty had 
been inflicted in the Commandery. 

While they adopted this ruling they made no provision for 
what should be sufficient evidence that such action had been 
taken in Lodge or Chapter. Will it be sufficient evidence if 
some one informs them of the fact, bringing only oral evidence? 
It may be contended that the Secretary of the body taking such 
action will inform the Secretary of the Commandery. This will 
not work satisfactorily for the reason that the Secretary of a 
Lodge or Chapter can not notify all Commanderies throughout 
the land of their action. The Frater rray belong to a Lodge 
in Vermont and to a Commandery in California. If so, we see 
no way for the information to be transmitted. He may not have 
had legal notice of the pending offense to the Lodge. If so, he 



Virginia. 65 

should have the privilege of appearing before his Commandery 
and stating his reasons for not complying with the law, in the 
Lodge. We are unalterably opposed to depriving a Knight of 
his rights and privileges, without having a chance to be heard 
in his own defense. 

We sincerely hope that this law will be changed at a future 
Encampment. 

Otis N. Kelton, St. Albans, Grand Commander; 
Henry H. Ross, Burlington, Grand Recorder; next An- 
nual, Burlington, June 14, 1921. 

VIRGINIA, 1919. 

97th Annual, Richmond. ^ October 30. 

Commanderies, 26 ; represented, 24 ; members, 4,- 
541 ; gain, 558 ; cash and investments, all funds, 
$6,447.50. 

Grand Commandery "opened in ample form." 

The address of Grand Commander (Robert Patrick 
Carr) is lengthy, being augmented by necrological re- 
ports, General Orders, and letters. He cites the death 
of their Grand Generalissimo, Major Stanley Watkins 
Martin, The Christmas Observance was not partici- 
pated in "to as great an extent as it should have been." 
He divided the State into six divisions for inspection, 
and reports the necessity of using the full form open- 
ing more generally, of giving more care to the protec- 
tion of the rituals, and of creating above all more 
interest and enthusiasm among the membership. His 
special dispensations seem to comply with the law. He 
held that a lapse of twelve months after election be- 
fore applying for the Orders necessitated a second 
ballot, and that "one who voted in North Carolina but 
did business, lived and claimed his residence in Vir- 
ginia, was in the latter's jurisdicton. He refused 
several requests to violate Section 111. (The Proceed- 
ings read, HI.) He concludes with the statement that 
"this has been a wonderful year : all of the Command- 
eries have been very active and doing great work." 



66 Washington. 



R. E. Sir James Braxton Blanks, their "faithful 
and efficient Grand Recorder for the past twenty-four 
years," was retired as Emeritus ad vitam, with his 
former salary. 

No Report on Correspondence. The old Corre- 
spondent was elected Grand Recorder and the new 
Correspondent is to be R. E. Sir R. F. Taylor. 

George Craighead Cabell, Norfolk, Grand Com- 
mander; James Gustavus Hankins, Richmond, Grand 
Recorder ; next Annual, Richmond, October 28, 1920. 

WASHINGTON, 1920. 

33d Annual. Spokane. May 6. 

Commanderies, 18; represented, 18; members, 3,- 
070; gain, 391; cash and investments, $4,650.70. 

A little martial music and a good sermon put the 
Grand Officers and members in tune and started them 
off on the right foot, for Grand Commandery was "de- 
clared convened and at labor" and the opening cere- 
monies were "exemplified" by a team from Seattle 
Command/ery. Indiana was answered for by Past 
Grand Commander S. Harry Rush. 

The address of Grand Commander (Henry Herbert 
Day) set forth the work of an efficient administration. 
It was lengthened by the Christmas circulars, letters, 
and a memorial. He constituted Bethlehem Command- 
ery under charter. His special dispensations granted 
conformed with Templar law and he refused requests 
to ballot out of time. When will Commanders cease 
asking for these forbidden things? His decision that 
one must be a resident of the State for six months be- 
fore he could petition for the Orders, was disapproved, 
on the ground that Grand Encampment permits even a 
sojourner to petition, subject to waiver of jurisdiction 
from the Commandery of his residence. All Com- 



West Virginia. 67 



manderies except two observed Christmas and seven- 
teen held Easter services. The death of Past Grand 
Commander Charles Edward Coon is made the subject 
of a memorial. He issued dispensation for the forma- 
tion of a new Commandery, which Grand Commandery 
duly chartered. He appointed eight inspectors, who 
with himself, inspected the Commanderies of his juris- 
diction, but the Jurisprudence Committee reports 
"there is no warrant in law for such appointments." 
Obviously, his appeal for the appointment of an In- 
spector General fell by the wayside, although he found 
conditions warranting such, and several Commanderies 
requesting it. He visited all the Commanderies, except 
three, at the time of their inspection. The matter did 
not come up for discussion in Grand Commandery, and 
thus is "Love's Labor Lost." ,^ 

The Report on Correspondence is the twenty-ninth 
epistle by Grand Recorder Yancey C. Blalock. As 
usual he outlines the doings and quotes with freedom, 
but without comment. Indiana for 1920 has courteous 
attention. 

Jacob Henry Miller, Wenatchee, Grand Commander ; 
Yancey Crawford Blalock, Walla Walla, Grand Re- 
corder; next Annual, Seattle, date not given.' 

WEST VIRGINIA, 1920, 

46th Annual. Wheeling. May 19. 

Commanderies, 23 ; represented, 19 ; members, 5,- 
254; gain, 482; cash and investments, $14,200.01. 

Grand Commandery was "opened" and R. E. Sir 
Nelson Williams, of Ohio, welcomed as the personal 
representative of Grand Master. Indiana's legate 
absent. 

The address of Grand Commander (Charles A. 
Sinsel) very adequately sets forth the events of a 
good stewardship, and therein we learn that peace, 



68 Wisconsin. 



harmony and prosperity prevail, "due to the young 
men, while in foreign countries, seeing the great bene- 
fits and influence that Masonry had;" that practically 
all the Commanderies observed Christmas and Easter; 
that the annual inspection shows percentage of attend- 
ance very low and that it is necessary to do something 
to create renewed interest; that he held there was no 
time limit to a demit, that petitions "should be balloted 
on in order as read when received," and that lapse of 
one year after ballot before conference of Orders ne- 
cessitated a second ballot; that much trouble was 
occasioned by the increased cost of uniforms ; and that 
other customary and routine matters had due attention. 
R. E. Sirs Nelson Williams, of Ohio, and L. P. 
Newby, of Indiana, were elected honorary members of 
Grand Commandery. 

In the list of representatives near other Grand 
Commanderies we note one William Greake assigned 
to Indiana; the name should be Geake. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

C. C. Dusenberry, Huntington, Grand Commander; 
Francis E. Nichols, Fairmont, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, Charleston, May 18, 1921. 

WISCONSIN, 1920o 

62d Annual. Milwaukee. October 12. 

Commanderies, 41; represented, 40; members, 6,- 
867; gain, 526; cash and investments, $17,181.30. 

Grand Commandery was "opened" and the ambas- 
sador for Indiana noted as absent. 

The report of Grand Commander (John Campbell) 
briefly recounts the doings of the year. He notes the 
death of E. Sir Thomas E. Balding, who was Grand 
Captain General in 1874. He issued a dispensation 
for the formation of a new Commandery, which Grand 
Commandery chartered. Among his special dispensa- 



Wisconsin 69 



tions are five permitting Commanderies to ballot on 
petitions "acted upon at a stated Conclave" in two 
weeks : if the Commandery's by-laws provide for bi- 
monthly conclaves the dispensations were not neces- 
sary, but if not, they were illegal. He refused to 
permit a Commandery "to hold a stated conclave at a 
special conclave." He made few visitations. His other 
acts were of local interest only. 

Ordered to invest $3,000 in Government Bonds. 
The "Tactics" were revised and 500 copies ordered 
printed. The special committee on uniforms reported 
that the several uniform houses "were absolutely in- 
different to our appeals" relative to reduction in price. 
Naturally, when these houses actually suffered a net 
loss on every uniform sent out in 1919, and during the 
period of the War never at any time made a net profit 
of more than four per cent. I have personally seen 
the balance sheets; and sworn statements to the Gov- 
ernment, with C. P. A. certificates, will prove this. 
And yet, everywhere, they howl. It is not the regalia 
houses that have been holding you up; if there is a 
hold up, it is farther up the line. 

The office of Inspector General was widened to in- 
clude that of Instructor, "to the end that Command- 
eries requiring his services in that capacity may have 
the same." The Report of Inspections was very com- 
plete and instructive. 

The Report on Correspondence was by R. E. Sir 
Charles F. Lamb, and is well written and full of in- 
terest. He questions the right of the Grand Com- 
mandery of Maryland to approve a dispensation of the 
Grand Commander "to hold a regular conclave on date 
other than that fixed by the by-laws of the constituent 
Commandery." Indiana for 1920 has ample and cour- 
teous review, and therein he takes exception to the 
position taken by our Inspector General, that "The 
Grand Standard, Beauseant, and American Flag be- 



70 Wyoming. 

long on the West: the American Flag on the right, 
looking to the East." He believes "the United States 
Colors, in the Asylum, should properly be placed in the 
East; that the Ritual Committee of Grand Encamp- 
ment reported that 'the United States Colors is always 
on the right of the line and is not dipped in salute 
under any circumstances,' but made no mention of the 
place the Colors should occupy in the Asylum during 
the ceremonies of conferring the Orders or the trans- 
action of business. In the Asylum there is strictly 
no 'right of the line,' but the Commander's station is 
in the East or at the head of his Commandery, and 
when the lines are dismissed the Commander and the 
Colors both go to headquarters 'in the East.' By all 
analogy to military tactics, in the Asylum, the station 
of the United States Colors is in the East and not at 
the right of the Grand Standard." 

Andrew D. Agnew, Milwaukee, Grand Commander; 
William W. Perry, Milwaukee, Grand Recorder; next 
Annual, Milwaukee, October 11, 1921. 

AVYOMING, 1920. 

33d Annual. Rawlins. July 14. 

Commanderies, 11; represented, 10; members, 1,- 
056; gain, 127; cash, $1,867.02. 

Grand Commandery was "declared reconvened for 
business" and duly welcomed R. E. Sir Stephen P. 
Wright, of Montana, as personal representiative of 
Grand Master. Indiana without representation. 

The address of Grand Commander (Charles H. 
Townsend) lengthily defines the work of a busy year. 
He opens with this sentiment : 

This in an Order distinguished for its patriotism and support 
of legally constituted authority, and it is incumbent upon us 
perhaps more than ever before, to spread the teachings and 
use our influence at all times to subdue these radical sentiments 
that are confronting the world today. Now is the time to prac- 



Wyoming. 71 

tice what we preach, and put into practical effect the noble and 
elevated principles of our beloved Order. 

He pays tribute to the memory of R. E. Sir Adrian 
J. Parshall, Grand Recorder and Correspondent for 
nearly twenty years, and who died on November 15, 
1919. He appointed R. E. Sir Samuel Corson to fill 
the unexpired term thus made vacant. 

His special dispensations were approved. His 
Christmas circular got results, for "all but one Com- 
mandery participated in the observance. He visited 
every Commandery in his bailiwick, which is some, job 
in that State of magnificent distances. Other acts 
were routine and of local interest. 

The Jurisprudence Committee reported no matters 
referred to it, but the Committee on Doings of Grand 
Officers approved the special dispensations of Grand 
Commander, even though such pertain to construction 
of the law. 

A resolution w^as offered and approved, "to endorse 
the proposition for the establishment of a national de- 
partment of public education, etc." 

The Report on Correspondence is the first emana- 
tion from the new reportorial sanctum of R. E. Sir 
Samuel Corson. It is written in narrative form, in 
easy flowing style, with frequent quotations, and well 
sustains the reputation of that grand jurisdiction for 
good, true work. 

Indiana for 1919 has four pages of courteous re- 
view, with lengthy extracts from Grand Commander 
and Correspondent, quoting in full my chapter on 
"Illegalities." May you live long to serve your Grand 
Commandery as both Grand Recorder and Correspond- 
ent, my Frater, is our ardent wish. 

William Pugh, Evanston, Grand Commander; Sam- 
uel Corson, Cheyenne, Grand Recorder ; next Annual, 
Lander, July 13, 1921. 



72 Conclusion. 



CONCLUSION. 

From every quarter comes word of a miraculous 
growth during the past year ; in truth the net gain for 
all jurisdictions herein reviewed exceeds 43,000. Penn- 
sylvania leads, with a total membership of 30,952 ; 
Illinois follows with 29,425 ; then New York, with 27,- 
739 and Ohio, with 26,065. 

The figures are not at hand but my prediction is 
that the net growth for the present year, which will be 
covered by the 1921 reports, will far exceed that given 
abo^, if the growth in the prerequisite Orders is any 
indication. 

How is it explained, and what is its caliber? Sev- 
eral reasons have been offered for this marvelous influx 
of members, the best seeming to be that it is the result- 
ant of conditions pressing home upon our young sol- 
diery while across seas. It remains to be seen how 
deep the teachings of the Order have sunk into these 
eager minds and whether the Order can live up to its 
mission and retain its hold, making their lives to fit 
into the great plan that has made it a power for Truth 
and all the Virtues, from its establishment until the 
present hour. It is your mission and mine, my frater, 
to help mold the characters of these new adherents, 
lest they become luke-warm and drift away. It is a 
big job; let us not shirk the work. It is a call; let 
us not fail to answer. 

Courteously submitted. 




Reviewer. 
Princeton, Indiana, April 20, 1921. 



INDEX. 



Page 

Address of Grand Commander 23 

Absence from the Jurisdiction 32 

Addenda 39 

Appointment of Grand Recorder 33 

Audit of Books 33 

Bonds of Officers 29 

Changes in By-Laws 29-61-87 

Commandery Constituted 30 

Conclusion 37 

Condition of the Order 25 

Courtesies 35 

Decisions 28-86 

Dispensations 29-60-87 

Dispensations Refused 29-61-87 

General Orders of the Grand Commanderv of In- 
diana 1 26-49 

General Orders of the Grand Encampment U. S. A._ 26-40 

Grand Representatives 27 

Interstate Courtesies 27-59 

Installation of Grand Prelate 33 

Knightly Dead 24-39-168 

New Commandery 30 

Official Visitations 34 

Recommendations 36-86 

Records and Recorders 30-62 

Special Conclave of the Grand Commandery 32 

Templar Observances 35 

Uniform Committee 31 

Washington Memorial Association 35 

Address of William H. Norris, Official Visitor 80 

Amendments 164 

Appointments 138 

Chronology 143 

Commanders for 1921 144 

Committee Appointments 22-64-138 

Committee on Auditing, reports of — 

On Grand Recorder's Report 97 

On Grand Treasurer's Report 97 

Committee on Charters and Dispensations, report of — 

On Peru Commandery U. D 88 

Committee on Correspondence, report of 78 

Committee on Credentials, report of 65 

Committee on Finance,, reports of — 

On Allowances 130 

On Allowances for Special Visitations 131 

On Appropriation for Annual Conclave, 1921 132 

On Appropriation to Miss Myrtle Smythe 134 



Page 

On Appropriation to Triennial Committee 131 

On Expenses of Distinguished Guests 132 

On Salary of Grand Recorder 133 

Relative to Permanent Fund 133 

Committee on Grievances and Appeals, report of— 89 
Committee on Jurisprudence, reports of — 

On Address of Grand Commander 85 

On Report of Correspondent 87 

On Resolution Relative to Apostles Creed 137 

Committee on Pay-Roll, report of 91 

Committee on Pi-izes, report of 98 

Committee on Unfinished Business, report of 90 

Committee on Uniform, report of 114 

Committee on Visiting Sir Knights, report of 88 

Distinguished Guests 20 

Election of Grand Officers 134 

Eminent Commanders, Recorders and Statistical Table 144 

Grand Commander's Address 23 

Grand Commander's Address Referred 63 

Grand Commanders of Indiana 141 

Grand Officers Elected 134 

Grand Officers Present 11 

Grand Officers Installed 139 

Grand Recorders of Indiana 142 

Grand Recorders of the United States 161 

Grand Recorder's Report 74 

Grand Representatives 162-163 

Grand Representatives Present 12 

Grand Treasurer's Report 72 

Jewel Presented to the Retiring Grand Commander 138 

Memorial— R. E. Sir Frederick Glass, P. G. C 99 

Memorial— R. E. Sir Henry H. Lancaster, P. G. C 103 

Memorial— E. Sir Calvin W. Prather 106 

Memorial — Distinguished Dead of Other Jurisdictions 111 

Memorial — Our Own Knightly Dead^ 113 

Memorial Pages- 
Distinguished Dead of Other Jurisdictions 167 

Knightly Dead of Indiana 168 

Military Evolutions 22 

Minutes Approved 22-80 

Observances 77 

Past Commanders of Indiana now Members of Grand 

Commandery 147 

Past Commanders Who Registered 13 

Past Grand Officers Present 11 

Pay-roll 92 

Reception of Distinguished Guests 20 

Recorders for 1921 144 

Regrets 79 

Remarks by Distinguished Guests 79-80-98-105-113-136 

Report of Auditing Committee 97 

Report of Committee on Charters and Dispensations 88 

Report of Correspondence Committee 78 

Report of Credentials Committee 65 

Report of Grand Recorder 74 

Report of Grand Treasurer 72 

Report of Grievances and Appeals Committee 89 



Page 

Report of Pay-roll Committee 91 

Report of Committee on Prizes 98 

Repoi't of Committee on Unfinished Business 90 

Report of Committee on Uniform- 114 

Report of Committee on Visiting Sir Knights 88 

Reports of Finance Committee 130 

Reports of Jurisprudence Committee 85-137 

Representatives Present 12-65 

Resolution — Americanism 135 

Resolution — Invitation to Grand Encampment to Hold 

Triennial Conclave in Indianapolis 137 

Resolution of Thanks 136 

Resolution of Thanks to E. Sir Olin E. Holloway 89 

Resolution Relative to Apostles Creed 137 

Rituals 77 

Second Day 80 

Special Committees Appointed 64 

Standing Committees Appointed 22 

Standing Committees Present 19 

Statistical Table for 1920 144 

Uniforms 114 

Visiting Officers — 7 



5279 



Grand Officers 

1321 -1922 



Eugene Vatet, o! Muncie No. 18 R. E. Grand Commander 

George A. Newhouse, of New Albany No. 5. . . V. E. Deputy Grand Commander 

Gaylard M. Leslie, of Fort Wayne No. 4 Em. Grand Generalissimo 

Albert D. Ogborn, of Newcastle No. 44 . . Em. Grand Captain General 

Dirrelle Cbaney, of Sullivan No. 54 Em. Grand Senior Warden' 

Edward J. Scoonover, of Raper No. 1 Em. Grand Junior Warden 

Rev. John C. Parrett, of Hammond No. 41 Em. Grand Prelate 

Vestal W. Woodward, of Raper No. 1 Em. Grand Treasurer 

William H. Swintz, of South Bend No. 13 .... Em. Grand Recorder 

George F. Hitchcock,, of Plymouth No. 26 Em. Grand Standard Bearer 

William M. Sparks, of Rushville No. 49 Em. Grand Sword Bearer 

Clarence H. Snoke, of South Bend No. 13 Em. Grand Warder 

Jacob Rubin, of Raper No. 1 Grand Captain of the Guard 

Address 

Eugene Vatet, Grand Commander 
Muncie 



William H. Swintz, Grand Recorder 
Masonic Temple, Indianapolis 



Cbairiuaa Cooitnittee oo Correspondence 

Robert A. Wooda 
Princeton 



The next Annual Conclave of the Grand Commandery will be held in 
Masonic Temple, Indianapolis, commencing at 2 o'clock p. ra , on the second 
Wednesday in May, A. D. 1922, A. O. 804 (May 10, 1922.)