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Full text of "Proceedings of the United States National Museum"

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM 



COPY. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM 



VOLUME 90 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1942 



ADVERTISEMENT 

The scientific publications of the National Museum include two 
series, known, respectively, as Proceedings and Bulletin. 

The Proceedings series, begun in 1878, is intended primarily as a 
medium for the publication of original papers, based on the collec- 
tions of the National Museum, that set forth newly acquired facts 
in biology, anthropology, and geology, with descriptions of new 
forms and revisions of limited groups. Copies of each paper, in 
pamphlet form, are distributed as published to libraries and scientific 
organizations and to specialists and others interested in the different 
subjects. The dates at which these separate papers are published are 
recorded in the table of contents of each of the volumes. 

The present volume is the ninetieth of this series. 

The series of Bulletins^ the first of which was issued in 1875, con- 
tains separate publications comprising monographs of large zoologi- 
cal groups and other general systematic treatises (occasionally in 
several volumes), faunal works, reports of expeditions, catalogs of 
type specimens, special collections, and other material of similar 
nature. The majority of the volumes are octavo in size, but a 
quarto size has been adopted in a few instances in which large plates 
were regarded as indispensable. In the Bulletin series appear vol- 
umes under the heading Contrihution.s from the United /States National 
Her-harimrb^ in octavo form, published by the National Museum since 
1902, which contain papers relating to the botanical collections of 
the Museum. 

AlJEXANDER WeTMORE, 

Assistant Secretary^ Smithsoniun Institution. 




COPv 



CONTENTS 



Pages 

Babiy, p. p. a new genus of psammocharid wasp from China. 
No. 3119. October 24, 1941 ^ 543-546 

New geuus : SinotocypJius. 

New species: SinotocypJius chinensis. 

Berry, Willard. Pamlico fossil ecliinoids. No. 3113. July 

5, 1941 1 443-445 

Clark, Austin H. Notes on some North and Middle American 

danaid butterflies. No. 3118. November 4, 1941 ' 531-542 

New species : Danaus candidtis. 

New subspecies: Danaus plexipptis tohagi, D. p. portoricensis. 

Cl^vkke, J. F. Gates. Revision of the North American moths 
of the family Oecophoridae, with descriptions of new genera 
and species. No. 3107. November 6, 1941 ^ 33-286 

New genera : Martyrhilda, Bibarrambla, ApacJiea, Hinunacia, 
Mathildana, Carolana, Anoncia, Antequera. 

New species : Agonopterix arcucUa, A. oregonensis, A. fuscitermi- 
nella, A. cajonensis, A. thelmae, A. dimorphella, A. costimacida, 
A. antennaricUa, Martyrhilda sordidella, M. sphaeralceae, M. 
hildaella, Semioscopis traunae, 8. mcdunnoughi, Depressaria 
atrostrigella, D. palousella, D. eleanorae, D. whitmani, D. yaki- 
niae, D. angustati, Psilocorsis caryae. 

New variety : Agonopterix rosaciliella echinopanicis. 

New combinations : Biharramhla aUenella (Walsingham), Apachea 
barberella (Buscls), Eimmacia huachucella (Busck), Inga hu- 
mata (Meyrick), /. concolorella (Beutenmiiller), /. canarieJla 
(Busck), /. trigama (Meyrick), I. cretacea (Zeller), /. ohscitro- 
maculella (Chambers), /. ciHella (Busck), Mathiidana newma- 
nclla (Clemens), Carolana ascriptella (Busck), Anoncia episcia 
(Walsingham), A. conia (Walsingham), A. fasciata (Walsing- 
ham), A. orites (Walsingham), A. diveni (Heinrich), A. splia- 
celina (Keifer), A. marinensis (Keifer), Antequera acertella, 
(Busck). 

Fisher, Walter K. A new genus of sea stars {Plazaster) from 
Japan, with a note on the genus Parasterina. No. 3114. 

June 18, 1941 1 447-456 

New genus : Plazaster. 

Fowler, Henry W. New fishes of the family Callionymidae, 
mostly Philippine, obtained by the United States Bureau of 
Fisheries Steamer Albatross. No. 3100. April 8, 1941 ^ 1-31 

^ Date of publication. 

ni 



IV PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Pages 

New subfamilies : Amorinae, Draculinae. 

New genus : DicalUonymus. 

New species: Callionymus vmbrithoraof, C. scabriceps, C. hole- 

ogenys, C. marisinensis, C. hudsoni, C. longi, C. irunneus, C. 

pimctilateralis, C. keeleyi, C. distethommatus, C. leucobranchi- 

alis, Synchiropus paUidus, 8. grinnelli, Elcutherochir mccad- 

deni. 

Gahan, a. B. a revision of the chalcid-flies of the genus 
M onodontomenis in the United States National Museum. 
No. 3116. August 19, 1941 ^ 461-482 

New species: Monodontomerus dianthidii, M. cuhensis, M. viridi- 
scapus, M. mexicanus, M. indiscreUis, M. mandibularHs, M. bakeri, 
M. emarginatus, M. subobsolctus. 

GiLMORE, Charles W. A history of the division of vertebrate 

paleontology in the United States National Museum. No. 

3109. August 5, 1941^ 305-377 

Greene, Charles T. Two new species of cecidomyiid flies from 

Phlox. No. 3120. October 30, 1941 ^ 547-551 

New species : Hyperdiplosis phlox, Lestodiplosis macuUpennis. 

Henderson, E. P. (See under Preston, F. W.) 387-416 

Humes, Arthur G. A new harpacticoid copepod from the gill 

chambers of a marsh crab. No. 3110. August 5, 1941 ^ 379-386 

New species : Cancrhicola plumipes. 
Linton, Edwin. Cestode parasites of teleost fishes of the 

Woods Hole region, Massachusetts. No. 3112. July 15, 

1941 ^ ____ 4i7_442 

Preston, F. W., Henderson, E. P., and Randolph, James R. 

The Chicora (Butler County, Pa.) meteorite. No. 3111. 

June 17, 1941^ 387-416 

Randolph, James R. (See under Preston, F. W.) 387-416 

Stejneger, Leonhard. Notes on Mexican turtles of the genus 

Kinostemon. No. 3115. July 25, 1941 ^ 457-459 

New subspecies: Kinosternon cruentatmn consors. 
Webber, Rat T. Synopsis of the tachinid flies of the genus 

Tachinomyia^ with descriptions of new species. No. 3108. 

June 30, 1941 ^ 287-304 

New species: Tachinotuyia cana, T. acosta, T. nigricans, T. dako- 
tensis. 

Wetmore, Alexander. Notes on the birds of North Carolina. 

No. 3117. October 31, 1941 ^ 483-530 

New subspecies: Dryobates borealia hylonomus. 

^ Date of publication. 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



PLATES 

Following 
page 

1. North American Oecophoridae, Cosmopterygidae, and Ethmiidae: 

Lateral aspect of heads 286 

2. North American Oecophoridae : Lateral aspect of heads 286 

3. North American Oecophoridae, Cosmopterygidae, Blastobasidae, and 

Heliodinidae : Lateral aspect of heads 286 

4. North American Oecophoridae and Cosmopterygidae: Wings and 

lateral aspect of heads 286 

5. North American Oecophoridae : Wing venation 286 

6. North American Oecophoridae and Blastobasidae: Wing venation- 286 

7. North American Oecophoridae, Cosmopterygidae, Ethmiidae, and 

Heliodinidae: Wing venation 286 

8. North American Oecophoridae and Blastobasidae: Ventral aspect 

of male genitalia 286 

9. North American Oecophoridae and Cosmopterygidae : Ventral aspect 

of male genitalia 286 

10, 11. North American Oecophoridae : Ventral aspect of male genitalia 286 

12. North American Oecophoridae, Ethmiidae, and Heliomidae : Ventral 

aspect of male genitalia 286 

13. North American Oecophoridae and Cosmopterygidae : Ventral aspect 

of male genitalia 286 

14, 16. North American Oecophoridae : Ventral aspect of female gentalia__ 286 
15. North American Oecophoridae and Heliodinidae : Ventral aspect of 

female genitalia 286 

17. North American Oecoplioridae and Ethmiidae : Ventral aspect of fe- 

male genitalia and abdominal spines 286 

18. North American Oecophoridae and Cosmopterygidae : Ventral aspect 

of female genitalia 286 

19. North American Oecophoridae, Cosmopterygidae, and Blastobasidae : 

Ventral aspect of female genitalia 286 

20-38. North American Oecophoridae : Ventral aspect of male genitalia 286 

39-48. North American Oecophoridae : Ventral aspect of female genitalia,. 286 

49. Main exhibition hall for fossil vertebrates, U. S. National Museum : 

Diagonal view from the southeast 3-'0 

50. Main exhibition hall for fossil vertebrates, U. S. National Museum : 

View from the west, second floor 320 

51. General view of the vertebrate paleontology laboratory, U. S. Na- 

tional Museum 320 

52. View of storage room for reserve or study collections of fossil ver- 

tebrates, U. S. National Museum 330 

53. Storage cases and cupboards for vertebrate collections, showing utili- 

zation of corridor, U. S. National Museum 330 

54. The two individuals of the Chicora meteorite fall 390 

55. Map of terrain covered by witnesses of the Chicora meteorite fall 390 

V 



VI PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Following 
page 
5G. Map showing observations, in tliree dimensions, of the Chicora 

meteorite fall 390 

57. The appearance of the smoke cloud as seen from the wvjst at an 

infinite distance (Chicora meteorite) 394 

58. Drawing illustrating the absorption of kinetic energy of the meteorite 

by the air (Chicora meteorite) 394 

59. Fragment of the banded olivine chondrule and the fibrous upper half 

of the field contains a fragment of a pyroxene chondrule (Chicora 
meteorite) 410 

60. Cestodes from fishes: Caryophyllaeus terebrans (Linton) ; Llyula 

sp. ; Spathehothriiim simplex Linton ; Bothrimonus intermedius 
Cooper; Bothriocephalus scorpii (Miiller) .. 442 

61. Cestodes from fishes: Bothriocephalus scorpii (Miiller) ; B. claviceps 

(Goeze) ; B. sp. ; Clestohothrium crassiceps (Rudolphi) 442 

62. Cestodes from fishes: Ahothrium rugosum (Batsch) ; Ancistro- 

cephalus aluterae (Linton) ; Bothriocephalus sp. ; Proteocephalus 

macrocephalus (Creplin) ; Corallobothrium flmbriatum Essex 442 

63, 64. Encope michelini L. Agassiz 445 

65. Encope michelini L. Agassiz and Mellita guinquiesperforata (Leske) 445 

66. Plazaster borealis (Uchida) 456 

67. Lahidiaster annulatus Sladeu; L. radiosus Liitken 456 

68. Plazaster borealis (Uchida) : Abactinal and lateral surfaces of five 

rays and about half of disk 456 

69. Plazaster borealis (Uchida) : Actinal surface of three rays and part 

of disk 456 

70. Patiria granifera Gray ; NepaMhia crassa (Gray) 456 

71. Danaus plexippus plexippus, male ; D. p. megalippe, male ; D. p. 

tobagi, new species, male 536 

72. Danaus candidus, new species, male; D. plexippus portoricensis, 

new subspecies, male 536 

73. Danaus jamaicensis, male; D. berenice berenice, male; D. b. strigosa, 

male 536 

74. Danaus eresimus, female; D. cleothera, male 536 



TEXT FIGURES 

Page 

1. CalUonymus umbrithorax, new species: Type 3 

2. CalUonymus scabriceps, new species: Type 5 

3. CalUonymus boleogenys, new species: Tyi)e 6 

4. CalUonymus marisinensis, new species: Type 8 

5. CalUonymus hudsoni, new species: Type 9 

6. CalUonymus longi, new species: Type 10 

7. CalUonymus brunneus, new species: Type 12 

8. CalUonymus punctilateralis, new species: Type 14 

9. CalUonymus keeleyi, new species: Type 15 

10. CalUonymus schaapii Bleeker 17 

11. Callioyiymus distethommatus, new species: Type 17 

12. CalUonymus leucobranchiaUs, new species: Type, male 20 

13. CalUonymus leucobranchiaUs, new species: Paratype, female 20 

14. Synchiropiis pallidus, new species: Type 23 



ILLUSTRATIONS VII 

Following 
page 

15. Synchiropus grinnelli, new species : Type 25 

16. Eleutherochir mccaddeni, new species: Type 28 

17. Tachinomyia characters: Lateral aspects of anal forceps of male 

genitalia (several species) ; hind tibia of T. apicata; apex of abdomen 
with drawn genitalia showing formation of fourth and fifth sternites 
in lateroventral aspect of T. apicata and T. variata 298 

18. Cancrincola plumipes, new species 383 

19. Sketch of clouds and explosion aa noted from "north side" Pittsburgh 

(Chicora meteorite) 392 

20. Nepanthia crassa (Gray) : Abactinal plates near base of ray 453 

21. Nepanthia crassa (Gray) : 6 lateral plates of third and fourth series 

above superomarginals near base of ray, to show pedicellariae 453 

22. Nepanthia variabilis Clark: A plate from lateral area near base of ray 

to show pedicellaria 454 

23. Sinotocyphus chinensis, new species 1545 

24. Two new flies reared from Phlox: nyperdiplosis phlox; Lestodiplosis 

maculipennis 549 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM 

by the 




SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



Vol.90 Washington: 1941 No. 3106 



NEW FISHES OF THE FAMILY CALLIONYMIDAE, MOSTLY 
PHILIPPINE, OBTAINED BY THE UNITED STATES BU- 
REAU OF FISHERIES STEAMER "ALBATROSS" 



By Henry W. Fowler 



In my studies of the Indo-Pacific fishes of the family Calhonymidae, 
with special reference to those of the Phihppines, I found a number of 
interesting new species in the collections of the United States National 
Museum. These are described and figured herein, with the same 
methods employed as in an earlier paper.' Each figure is drawn in 
lateral view, with an insert showing a dorsal view of the head and 
predorsal region and a ventral view showing the under surface of the 
head, together with the chest and breast. The head is measured to 
the gill opening. 

ANALYSIS OF GENERA 

a'. Two distinct dorsal fins. 

6'. Callionyminae. No supraorbital tentacle; body smooth. 
cK Lateral line single. 

dK Gill opening superior, above opercle; ventral without free ray. 

eK Ventral with last membrane connected to middle of base of pectoral. 
/'. Gill opening exposed, superior on neck; opercular membrane not 
free posteriorly. 

.g'. Lateral line simple Callionymus 

g^. Lateral line jointed Paracallionymus 

/-. Gill opening above or hidden by opercle; opercular membrane 

forms free flap posteriorly Synchiropus 

C-. Ventral with last membrane not united with pectoral; gill opening 
hidden by opercle Eleutherochir 

1 Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 85, pp. 31-135, ftps. l-(il. 1938. 

1 



Z PROCEEDINGS OF THE XATIOXAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

(P. Gill opening behind opercle; opercular membrane without free lobe; 
ventral with free ray, posterior part of fin with ventral membrane 

united to middle of anterior pectoral base Dactylopus 

c2. Two lateral lines Dicallionymus 

62. Amorinae. Each eye with long tentacle above; gill opening behind pre- 

opercular spine; body spinulose Amora 

a2. Draculinae. Only one dorsal, corresponds to second dorsal of other gen- 
era Draculo 

Callionyminae, new subfamily 

Type genus. — Callionymus Linnaeus. 

No supraorbital tentacle. Body smooth. Two distinct dorsal fins. 

Genus CALLIONYMUS Linnaeus 

ANALYSIS OF SPECIES 

a'. Maxillary entire, without serrae. 

61. First dorsal spines not prolonged, or but little longer than first ray of second 
dorsal, 

ci. Chest and breast dark or blackish brown umbri thorax 

c2. Chest and breast pale to whitish like rest of under surface of body. 

d>. Preopercular spine slender, straight, with 7 to 9 small antrorse serrae 
along its inner edge. 
eJ. Parietal region rather coarsely rugose; snout but little longer than 

eye scabriceps 

e^. Parietal region with more obscure and radiating striae; snout much 

longer than eye . boleogenys 

d?. Preopercular spine more robust, with 4 recurved denticles; eye 

greatly exceeds short muzzle raarisinensis 

d?. Preopercular spine with 2 recurved denticles; eye subequal with 

muzzle '. hudsoni 

■6*. Spines of first dorsal more or less prolonged or filamentous. 

/'. Only first dorsal spine free terminally or prolonged. 

g^. Eye subequal with muzzle; inner edge of preopercular spine 
with 4 or 5 antrorse spinules. 

h}. Preopercular spine inserted close behind eye longi 

h?. Preopercular spine inserted well behind eye, or nearer gill 

opening than eye brunneus 

g^. Eye 2 in muzzle; preopercular spine with 7 antrorse spinules 

along its inner edge punctilateralis 

p. First 2 dorsal spines elongated; preopercular spine with 4 recurved 

denticles keeleyi 

p. First 3 dorsal spines elongated filaments; preopercular spine short, 
curved, with 2 curved denticles on inner edge, -distethommatus 
a^. Maxillary with outer edge denticulate in males, entire in females; preopercular 
spine long, with 4 recurved denticles on its inner edge; chest with a con- 
trasted white band on each side and approximating forward. 

leu c ob ran chi alls 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE FOWLER 6 

CALLIONYMUS UMBRITHORAX, new species 

Figure 1 

Depth 7; head 3}^, long as wide. Snout 3 in head; eye 3, subequal 
with snout; maxillary not quite reaching eye, entire; mouth cleft short, 
reaches halfway to eye, lower jaw very slightly shorter and included in 
upper jaw; lips narrow; teeth very minute, villiform, in moderate 
bands in both jaws; interorbital very narrow bony frenum, with 
longitudinal groove. Preopercular spine large, nearly long as eye, ends 




H.W.F.del, 



Figure I. — Callionymus umhrithorax, new species. Type. 

incurved in point followed by four recmwed denticles along its inner 
edge, and a small subbasal denticle in front pointing forward. 

Lateral line complete, high along side of back, simple. 

D. IV-10, I fh-st spine 1% in head, fh'st ray l)i; A. 9, i, first ray 3; 
caudal 2)^ in rest of fish, cuneate; least depth of caudal peduncle 5 in 
head; pectoral 1^, rays 17; ventral rays I, 5, fin 1}^ in head. Anal 
papilla elongate, conic, length half of eye. 

Color in alcohol, rather light brovm above, with many obscure or 
faint darker rings and arcs on trunk and tail above. Six dark- to 
blackish-brown spots close below along lateral line. Various blackish- 
brown spots scattered about upper surface of head ; pair on each side 
of snout, 2 each side before preopercular spine, and several on opercle 
especially distinct. Under surface of body largely whitish. Breast and 
chest blackish brown, dark area extending between bases of vcntrals. 



4 PROCGEEDINGS OF THE NATIOIfAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

First dorsal shaded with dark brown, and large black ocellus on second 
membrane. Second dorsal largely transparent, with dark basal spot 
in front. Anal dark brown marginally, pale basally. Caudal white, 
with 10 transverse rows of dark-brown spots, these chiefly on mem- 
branes. Pectoral transparent, with 2 dark spots subbasally above. 
Ventral becomes dark brown terminally, also with some ill-defined 
scattered brown spots on rays. 

Philippines. A species defined chiefly by the dark-brown color of 
the breast of the male. It is quite different from Callionymus maldi- 
vensis Regan,^ the males of which are said to have an oblong blackish 
blotch on the tkroat. Callionymus margaretae Regan,^ based on 
material 47 mm. long without caudal, is described with an oblong 
blackish or triangular patch on the throat in the male. It differs in 
the male having the first dorsal spine produced in a filament 2% in the 
fish excluding the caudal. Its preopercular spine is said to be straiglit, 
with serrated inner edge and forwardly directed spinous extension at 
base in front. 

Type.— U.S.N. M. No. 99433. D. 5345. Cliff Island, S. 43° E., 
4.4 miles (lat. 10°50' N., long. 119°22'03" E.), Malampaya Sound, 
Palawan Island. December 26, 1908. In 7 fathoms. Length 47 
mm. Male. 

Paratype.— U.S.N. M. No. 99434. Same data. Length 38 mm. 
Female. 

(umbra, dark place + thorax.) 

CALLIONYMUS SCABBICEPS, new species 

Figure 2 

Depth 6; head 3%, length iKo in width. Snout 2% in head; eye 2%, 
subequal with snout, well protruded on upper profile of head; maxillary 
reaches three-fourths to eye, entire; mouth cleft reaches halfway to 
eye, upper jaws greatly protractile and mandible shorter or included in 
upper jaw; teeth very fine, minute, villiform, in narrow bands in jaws; 
no interorbital space, eyes closely set in apposition. Preopercular 
spine long, slender, greater than orbit, inner edge with eight antrorse 
spinules, and small spine at front of base directed forward. 

Lateral line elevated, high along side of back, complete. Along 
and above course of lateral line four short vertical bars of papillae or 
pores, last over caudal peduncle before caudal fin base. Parietal 
region of head with striate rugae, rather coarse and irregular. 

D. IV-9, I, first spine 1% in head, first ray 1%; A. 8, i, first ray 2^; 
caudal 2% in rest of fish, cuneate ; least depth of caudal peduncle 4 in 

> Trans. Linn. Soc. London, ser. 2, voL 12, ZooL, p. 247, pi. 30, flg. 3, 1908 (type locality: Maldives, S. 
Nilandu. in 30 to 36 fathoms). 

3 Journ. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc, vol. 16, No. 2, p. 326, pi. 3, fig. 3, 1905 (type locality; Muscat, in 15 to 30 
fathoms). 



NEW PHILTPPIN'E CALLIONYMIDAE FOWLER 5 

bead; pectoral rays 19, fin 1 in head; ventral 3 in fish without caudal, 
ra^/s I, 5. 

Color in alcohol, back brown, with six darker saddlelikc cross bands, 
though ill-defined and more or less obscured by paler rings or blotches, 
the various shades producing more or less mottled appearance above. 
Dark-brown blotches also on sides of head and prepectoral region. 
Eye gray-brown, with darker mottling and spots. Under surface of 
body uniform whitish. First dorsal with dark-brown spots, obscurely 
ocellated with paler and with some h'regular white spots on last two 
membranes. Second dorsal transparent, with three and sometimes 



J 




H. W. F. del 



Figure 2.-^Callionymus scahriceps, new species. Type. 

fom' longitudinal rows of black ocelli, subbasal and median series most 
contrasted. Anal with rays tipped white and submarginallj'- dark 
brown, shading paler basally on fin. Caudal transparent, with eight 
transverse dark-brown bands on lower two-thirds of fin, and in each 
band brownish-black spot, only distinct as fin is expanded. Pectoral 
largely colorless. Ventral variegated with brown, as pale to whitish 
spots, producing a mottled appearance. 

Philippines. Distinguished by its combination of characters, espe- 
cially the prominent long slender attenuated preopercular spine, which 
is \% times the eye and furnished with 8 antrorsc spinules along its 
inner edge, besides a small spine directed forward at its base in front. 
Top of head rugose. Snout subequal with eye. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



TV^e.— U.S.N.M. No. 99406. Jolo, Jolo Islands. February 8, 
1908. Length, 58 mm. 

Paratype.—lJ.S.l<iM. No. 99407. Surigao, Mindanao. Fifty-foot 
seine. May 8, 1908. Length, 38 mm. 

{scaber, rough +«€0aX77, head.) 

CALLIONYMUS BOLEOGENYS, new species 

Figure 3 

Depth 7K; head S%, width 1% in its length. Snout 2}i in head; eye 
2^0, 1% in snout; maxillary reaches four-fifths to eye, entire; mouth 




H. W. F. del. 



Figure 3. — Callionymus holeogenys, new species. Type. 

cleft reaches two-fifths to eye, long premaxillaries well protruded and 
a little protractile, lower jaw shorter; teeth very minute, villiform, in 
narrow bands in jaws, none on palate ; interorbital narrow bony frenum, 
with median longitudinal shallow concave groove. Preopercular 
spine long, straight, slender, ends in short spine and also short basal 
spine directed forward; eight fine antrorse serrae along inner edge. 

Lateral line complete, high along side of back, and continued on 
caudal base. Parietals with very fine or weak radiating striae. 

D. IV-8, I, first spine l)i in head, first ray \)i; A. 7, i, first ray 2)^; 
caudal 3}^ in rest of fish, cuneate, with upper rays graduated shorter; 
least depth of caudal peduncle 4; pectoral \)i, rays 15; ventral rays I, 
5, fin equals head. Anal papilla small, short, depressed or subconic 
fleshy point. 



NEW PHILIPPINE OALLIONYMIDAE FQi^VLER 7 

Color in alcohol, back and upper surfaces very pale bro\\Ti, washed 
with rose, with still paler to whitish blotches, ringed areas and irregular 
and slightly darker arcs, circles, etc. Eye gray-white, with pink tinge 
above, and variegated with gray to dark gray. Under surface of body 
uniform whitish, with six longitudinal gray bands, variable and irregu- 
lar. Caudal with seven rows of large blackish blotches on lower half. 
Fins otherwise all pale to transparent. 

Pliilippines. Characters of distinction are the long, slender pre- 
opercular spine which equals the eye, protractile mouth, very pale 
coloration washed with rose and with pale to whitish spots. The low 
first dorsal has gray longitudinal lines and narrow bands. 

TVpe.— U.S.N.M. No. 99408. Pandanan Island. Seine, 130 feet. 
March 23, 1909. Length 51 mm. 

Paratope. — U.S. 'NM. No. 99409. Same data. Length 32 mm. 

(j3oXts, diirt-\-ykvv<i, cheek ; with reference to the slender preopercular 
spine.) 

CALLIONYMUS MARISINENSIS. new species 

Figure 4 

Depth 8}i; head 4, length 1}^ in its width. Snout 4 in head; eye 
2Ko, about twice snout length, enters upper profile of head; maxillary 
reaches front eye edge, miarmed; mouth cleft reaches halfway to eye, 
lower jaw slightly shorter or included in upper jaw; teeth minute, 
villiform, firm, simple, in narrow bands in each jaw; interorbital 
narrow firm bony keel and separating eyes. Preopercular spine long 
as eye, ends in rather short and slightly curved in spme, followed by 
thi'ee or four more slightly recurved spines along its inner edge, first 
longest and fourth (anterior) smallest; at base in front short spine 
directed forward. Gill opening superior, small, about half long as 
pupil. 

Lateral line high along side of back, simple, complete to caudal base. 

D. IV-9, I, fu'st spine 1^ in head, first ray IK; A. 9, i, first ray 2%; 
caudal 3% in rest of fish, rounded behind; least depth of caudal pe- 
duncle 4 in head; pectoral 1, rays 18, fin rounded; ventral rays I, 5, 
long as head. Anal papilla short, depressed, pointed. 

Color in alcohol, brown above, with innumerable darker brown 
lines forming a marbled appearance, due to arcs, curves, rings, and 
blotches darker and paler. Iris silvery gray. Under surface of body 
uniform whitish. Dorsal dark or gray black with four whitish 
oblique bands. Soft dorsal pale or whitish, with faint brown spots on 
each ray. Anal pale or whitish. Caudal pale, with six brown spots 
on each membrane, forming dark transverse bands in retracted fin. 
Paired fins pale, pectoral with brown cross lines and ventral with 
faint brown spots on each ray. 



8 



PROCEEDINGS OF 'THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



China Sea. Greatly resembles Callionymus hudsoni, but with an 
entirely different preoperciilar spine long as eye. 

Type.—V.S.NM. No. 99410. China Sea, vicinity of Hong Kong, 
lat. 21°44' N., long. 114°48' E. In 34 fathoms. August 9, 1908. 
Length 48 mm. [D. 5303.] 




H. W. F. del 



Figure 4. — Callionymus marisinensis, new species. Type. 

Porafype.— U.S.N.M. No. 99411. Tinakta Island (N.), S. 80° W., 
3.3 mUes (lat. 5°12'30" N., long. 119°55'50" E.). February 21, 1908. 
Length 36 mm [D. 5157.] 

(marisinensis, of China Sea.) 

CALLIONYMUS HUDSONI, new species 

Figure 5 

Depth Q%; head '3%, width 1%. Snout 3/8 in head (m profile) ; eye 3, 
slightly greater than snout; maxillary not reaching eye, length 4K in 
head; mouth cleft 5% in head from snout tip, extends halfway to eye, 
lower jaw well protruded in front; teeth very minute, in narrow villi- 
form band, firm, more easily felt than seen without a lens; interorbital 
narrow, with large eyes set close. Preopercle ends in spine directed 
up and back, with small one at base in front and two large, subequal, 
recurved spines along its hind edge. Gill opening small, high, faces 
upward. 

Lateral line high, complete, simple. 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE FOWLER \) 

D. IV-9, I, first 2 spines end in short filaments, first spine IY2 in 
total head length, first ray 1^^; A. 7, i, first ray 2%; caudal 1, rounded 
or convex behind; least depth of caudal peduncle 4%; pectoral iKo, 
rays 18; ventral rays I, 5, fin 2% in fish without caudal. 

Color in alcohol, very pale gray brown above, with slightly darker 
variable spots, blotches, and bars. Iris silvery to coppeiy gray. 
Entire under surfaces of head and body white. Fins all largely whitish. 
First dorsal with dark or blackish brown blotch on most membranes 
marginally. Few scattered pale brown spots on ventral rays. 




^^^^-'^~— 



H. W. F. del. 



Figure 5. — Callionymus hudsoni, new species. Type, 

Known only from the Philippines. Characterized by its moderate 
caudal, large ventrals, and coloration, the inner edge of the preoper- 
cular spine with only two recurved hooks. 

r?/2Jg.— U.S.N.M. No. 99412. Pandanan Island. Seine, 130 feet. 
March 23, 1909. Length 35 mm. 

Para^?/pes.— U.S. N.M. No. 99415. Cabugao Bay, Catanduanes 
Island. From seine. June 9, 1909. Length 40 mm. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99417. Cebu market, Cebu. March 20, 1909. 
Length 50 mm. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99414. 
1908. Length 38 mm. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99416. 



Mantacao Island. From seine. April 8, 
Port San Vicente, Luzon side (beach). 



November 18, 1908. Seine 130 feet. Length 29 mm. 



10 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



U.S.N.M. No. 99413. Reef opposite Cebii, Cebu Island. AprU 7, 
1908. Length 44 mm. 

(Named for Capt. Charles B. Hudson, whose valuable figures of 
Japanese dragonets were published in 1903.) 

CALUONYMUS LONGI, new species 

Figure 6 

Depth 9; head 4Ko, length iKo in its width. Snout 2%, in head; 
eye 2%, subequal with snout; maxillary nearly reaches orbit, length 
3)8 in head; mouth cleft reaches tlu-ee-sevenths to eye, lower jaw 




Tnrrt. 

H.W.F.del 



Figure 6. — Callionymus longi, new species. Type. 

shorter or included m upper; teeth villiform, fine, close set, simple, 
conic, in bands in jaws, narrowing along sides of jaws; interorbital 
bony frenum separating large close set eyes. Preopercular spine very 
long, slender, but slightly ciu*ved and ends behmd in a long slender 
spine, fom* low broad spinules along its inner edge, and small 
forward directed basal spine in front. 

Lateral line complete, high along side of back, with loop above 
close before caudal fin, and extendmg out on caudal base. Occiput 
finely striate, with striae not greatly developed. 

D. IV-9, 1, first spine slender, ends in free filament 3% in fish without 
caudal; A. 9, i, first ray 2% m head measured to gill opening; least 
depth of caudal peduncle 4K; pectoral Iji, rays 20; caudal 2% in rest 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMID'AE FOWLER 11 

of fish; ventral 3%, rays I, 5. Anal papilla conic, pointed, nearly 
long as pupil. 

Color in alcohol, back and upper sui'faces light brown, warmer 
tint on trunk and tad. Back also variegated with pale and dark 
rings and marbling. Under surfaces of body white, with pale buff 
and brown tints. Side of head with rather large brown spots inter- 
spersed with white dots and small spots, and on under sides of head 
variable, inclined, short white lines and bars. Eyes brown, variegated 
with dark blotches above. First dorsal whitish, with black pale-edged 
ocelli, on last two membranes largest and with dark to black bands. 
Second dorsal pale or transparent with several brown spots on each 
ray. Anal transparent. Caudal transparent whitish, with six trans- 
verse bars made up of dark-brown spots, chiefly on upper half of fin. 
Pectoral white, with small brown spots mostly on upper part of fin. 
Ventral pale or whitish, with scattered brown spots on hind half of 
fin. 

Philippines. Known by the long preopercular spine 1 + % times eye, 
ends in a backward dhected barbed point behind; four low broad 
spinides along its upper edge and a small basal forward directed spine 
in front. The first dorsal spine is an extended filament, little shorter 
than head. Entire under surfaces uniformly white. 

Type.— [J. S.N. M. No. 99418. Pajumajan Island (W.), S. 2° W., 
2 miles (lat. 5° 22' 55" N., long. 120° 15' 45" E.), Sulu Archipelago, 
Tawi Tawi Group. In 34 fathoms. February 18, 1908. Length 98 
mm. Biu-eau of Fisheries (No. 22922). [D. 5152.] 

(Named for Bayard Long, of the Department of Botany, Academy 
of Natiu-al Sciences of Philadelphia, to whom I am indebted for 
many American fishes.) 

CALLIONYMUS BRUNNEUS, new species 

Figure 7 

Depth 9)^; head 3%, long as wide. Snout 2% in head; eye 3%, 1% 
in snout ; maxiUary reaches halfway to eye, length 4% in head ; mouth 
cleft reaches two-fifths to eye, lower jaw included; premaxillaries very 
protractile; teeth fine, conic, pointed, villiform, in bands in jaws, 
broader anteriorly and on sides narrowing back; interorbital narrow 
bony frenura, separating large closely set eyes. Preopercular spine 
large, slender, slightly longer than eye, nearly straight, ends in 
slender long spine, with five recurved denticles along inner edge, and 
small subbasal denticle in front directed forward. 

Lateral line complete, runs little high along side of back and out on 
caudal base. Parietal region smooth, only some very feeble radiating 
obscure striae, little visible except under a lens. 



12 



PROCEEDING'S OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



D. IV-9, I, first spine 1)^ in head, first ray Iji; A. 9, 
caudal Sji in rest of fish, cuneate; least depth of caudal peduncle 4:% in 
head; pectoral 1%, rays 19; ventral rays I, 5, fin 3% in fish without 
caudal. Anal papilla depressed, narrowly triangular, two-fifths of eye. 

Color in alcohol, back and upper surfaces brown, variegated with 
slightly darker rings, arcs, circles, and spots, all producing little con- 
trast. Under surface of body uniform whitish, with buff and pale- 
brown suffusions. Several well-inclined dark-brown bars along lower 
side of head and cheek. Opercle with brown spots, these extending on 
connecting membrane below to ventral fin. Obscure brown spots 



^.:^^^m^ 




H.W.F.del 



Figure 7. — Callionymus brunneus, new species. Type. 

little inclined back and below along side of tail. Eyes gray, brown 
above with darker spots and blotches. First dorsal with pale brown 
membrane, large black blotch on two last membranes, with several 
dark streaks on fu'st two membranes. Second dorsal transparent, 
greatly variegated with dark brown spots, ocelli and blotches. Anal 
transparent basally, with blackish brown shading terminally on each 
membrane and lower edge of each interradial membrane white in 
front. Caudal pale to whitish with six transverse dark bars, mostly 
made up of spots. Pectoral whitish, upper portion with small numer- 
ous dark-brown spots. Ventral whitish basally, dark brown termin- 
ally, upper outer surfaces also thickly spotted with still deeper brown 
Philippines. A species easily known by its general brown appear- 
ance. Its long slender straight preopercular spme ends in a slender 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE FOWLER 13 

spine directed straight back, with five small antrorse spines along its 
upper edge, and a small spine directed forward from its base. First 
dorsal spine a little longer than tlie others in the male and less than 
the head. Last two dorsal membranes black and anal with a black 
siibmarginal line. 

Type.— V.S.N M. No. 99419. Balayan Bay, Taal. January 19, 
1908. From fishermen's seine. Length 80 mm. 

Paratypes. — U.S.N.M. No. 99420. Same data as for type. Length 
67 to 78 mm. Seven specimens. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99421. Subig Bay, Subig, southern Luzon. From 
seine. January 7, 1908. Length 34 to 52 mm. Two specimens. 

(brunneus, brown.) 

CALLIONYMDS PUNCTILATERALIS, new epecicB 

Figure 8 

Depth 8; head 4%, length %o of width. Snout 2 in head; eye 4, 2 in 
snout; maxillary reaches two-thirds to eye, ridges and edges entire; 
mouth cleft reaches halfway to eye, lower jaw slightly shorter and 
included in upper when mouth is closed; teeth in villiform bands in 
jaws, bands broken anteriorly; teeth strong, fu-m, conic, close set, and 
in quite narrow bands on sides of jaws; interorbital narrow, concave, 
width about equals diameter of pupil. Preopercular spine slender, 
1% times eye, ends in point behind; seven recurved small denticles 
along inner edge; small basal spine directed forward. Gill opening 
small, an orbital diameter behind eye. 

Lateral line complete, but little waved or undulate, high along side 
of back. Parietals each with radiating striae. 

D. IV-9, 1, first spine largely detached, prolonged, 3% in fish without 
caudal, first ray 1% in head; A. 9, i, first ray 2J^; caudal 2% in rest of 
fish; least depth of caudal peduncle 3K in head; pectoral rays 20, fin 
iKo in head; ventral rays I, 5, fin 3% in fish without caudal. Anal 
papilla slender, tapering, depressed, three-fourths length of orbit. 

Color in alcohol, burnt umber or warm brown above, variegated 
with many close-set intricated darker marblings, arcs, circles, and 
vermiculating lines. Lower surfaces uniform whitish. All along 
sides of head and body very numerous thickly strewn, dark to black- 
ish-brown spots. On lower side of head and thorax spots larger or as 
blackish blotches, especially contrasted with whitish of under surfaces. 
Iris gray, variegated with darker spots on orbit above. First dorsal 
with first and second membranes largely white, marked with some 
black white-ringed ocelli; other membranes blackish, with four or five 
oblique whitish lines. Second dorsal with graj^ to black ocelli, variable 
on fm membranes. Anal largelj'' shaded gray-brown below or toward 
margins. Caudal marked with large white-ringed ocelli on greater 



14 



PROCEEDINGS OP THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



upper portions, and fin otherwise with variable more or less transverse 
gray waved parallel lines or narrow bands. Pectoral whitish, with 
numerous small blackish-brown spots on upper part. Ventral whitish, 
rays dark brown terminally and axillary membrane finely spotted with 
black. 

Philippines. Known by its small dark spots scattered over the side 
of the body in the male. 




H.W.F.del. 



Figure 8. — Calltonymus punctilateralis, new species. Type. 

Type.— One example. U.S.N.M. No. 99422. Tigbauan, Panay 
Island. May 14, 1929. Male. Length 162 mm. 

Paraty pes. —Four examples. U.S.N.M. Nos. 99423 and 99424. 
Below mouth of Mindanao River, Cotabato, Mindanao. Seine. 
May 20, 1908. Two males and two females. Length 52 to 84 mm. 

(punctum, spot -\- lateralis, of the side.) 

CALLIONYMUS KEELEYI, new species 

Figure 9 

Depth 7%; head 3%, long as wide. Snout 2% in head; eye 3%, IK in 
snout; maxillary concealed; mouth cleft reaches halfway to eye, low^er 
jaw little shorter; teeth villiform, fine, conic, simple, in rather wide 
short bands in jaws, form narrow band along each side of jaw; man- 
dible shallow, rami not elevated inside mouth; interorbital narrow 
bonj'- ridge separating large close set eyes. Preopercular spine % of 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE ^Ol^VX,ER 



15 



eye, ends in small slightly recurved denticle, four more mostly larger 
ones along inner edge, and small basal denticle in front pointing 
forward. 

Lateral line complete, high along side of back, simple, and extends 
out on caudal base. Parietal region smooth. 

D. IV-9, I, first 2 spines prolonged into long filaments, first longer 
or 1% in fish without caudal, first ray VA in head; A. 9, i, first ray 2%; 
least depth of caudal peduncle 4; pectoral 1%, rays 19; ventral rays I, 
5, fin Sji in fish without caudal; caudal 1%. Anal papilla conic, 
simple, depressed, long as pupil. 

Color in alcohol, back and upper surfaces brown, variegated with 
darker and paler marblings. Eight diffuse or obscure median darker 




Figure 9. — Callioyiymus keeleyi, new species. Type. 

blotches on back. Sides of head and body with more defined and 
contrasted dark spots on sides. Eyes gray, with silvery tints and 
darker markings. All under surfaces of body immaculate whitish. 
First dorsal dark gray to gray-black, especially on second and thu'd 
membranes; some paler longitudinal lines on fu-st two membranes. 
Second dorsal transparent, with scattered dark spots or specks on 
rays. Anal pale, dark to blackish brown m.arginally. Caudal whitish, 
gray terminally, and with a dozen irregular transverse rows of dark to 
kackish spots. Pectoral whitish, with numerous small, irregular, 
blackish-brov/n spots above. Ventral pale to whitish basally, dark 
to blackish brown termuially, and inner half of fin with connecting 
membrane marked with small dark to blackish dots. 



16 PROCEEDINOS OP THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Philippines. Known by the orbit 1}^ in snout and first dorsal with 
two spines elongate filaments, fin dark, on last membrane black with 
white lines. Caudal with a dozen rows of dark spots and anal border 
black. Pectoral with many fine dark spots and ventral blackish 
terminally. 

Type.— U.S.N. M. No. 99425. Cebii. April 17, 1929. Lt. H. C. 
Kellers. Length 80 mm. 

(Named for Frank J. Keeley, of the department of mineralog}^, 
Academy of Natm-al Sciences of Philadelphia.) 

CALLIONYMUS SCHAAPII Bleeker 

Figure 10 

Callionymus schaapii Bleeker, Nat. Tijdschr. Nederl. -Indie, vol. 3, p. 455, 1852 
(type locality: Banka). — Gunther, Catalogue of fishes in the British Museum, 
vol. 3, p. 148, 1861 (copied). — Bleeker, Versl. Meded. Akad. Wet. Amster- 
dam, ser. 2, vol. 14, p. 94, 1879 (Singapore; Banka; Java). 

Depth 7% to 8K; head 4:% to 4%, length lYi in its width to width 1}^ in 
its length. Snout 3 to 3% in head; eye 3}^ to 3%, subequal with snont; 
maxillary reaches three-fifths to eye, entire; mouth cleft with rictus 
halfway in snout, lower jaw little shorter than upper, which protrudes 
in front; teeth very small, fine, simple, conic, close set, villiform, in 
narrow bands in each jaw; interorbital narrow, concave, with median 
longitudinal groove, bony width wide as pupil. Preopercular spine 
large, bent, ends in small terminal point, also similar small basal 
point in front directed forward, and along inner edge four or five 
rather large recurved denticles. 

Lateral line high along back to caudal base, simple and continuous 
with loop above over caudal peduncle posteriorly, Parietals with 
fine, narrow striae. 

D, IV-9, I, first spines end in long filaments, second spine 1% to Sji 
in fish without caudal, first ray 1% to 1% in head; A, 9, i, first ray 2% 
to 2%; caudal 2% to 3 in rest of fish, convex behind; least depth of 
caudal peduncle 3K to 4 in head; pectoral iKo to 1 + Ko, rays 20; 
ventral rays I, 5, fin slightly longer than head to twice length of 
head. Anal papilla simple, conic, three-sevenths of eye. 

Color in alcohol, dull brown above, with many obscure darker 
spots, specks, and blotches; also many arcs, rings, and circles on 
trunk and tail above; on tail form four obscure dark saddles, Dark- 
bro^vn spot about half size of orbit, on opercular flap. Dorsals and 
anals largely transparent. Caudal with five transverse darker bars. 
Pectoral with five or six dark transverse bars, more or less forming- 
imperfect pale rings over upper part of fin. Ventral pale to whitish, 
each ray with four or five brown spots. 



KEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE FOWLER 



17 



.^ 




H.W.F.del 



Figure lO.—CaUionymus schaapii Blecker. 




H.W.F.del. 



Figure U. — Callionymus distethommatus, new species. Type. 



274411—41 2 



18 PROCEEDINGS OF THE KATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

East Indies, Philippines. Resembles Callionymus hudsoni and 
Callionymus marisinensis but differs in having the preopercular spine 

1 + /^ times the eye, first three dorsal spines filamentous and pro- 
longed, also the head striate behind eye. The species may be known 
by the very conspicuous ocellated black blotch below and before the 
pastoral origin. 

Fifteen examples: Buenavista, Guimaras Island. Seine. January 
14, 1909. Length 54 to 88 mm. 

One example. Cebu. April 14, 1921. Lt. H. C. Kellers. Length 
70 mm. 

Four examples. Iloilo market, Panay. March 28, 1908. Length 
57 to 85 mm. 

CALLIONYMUS DISTETHOMMATUS, new species 

Figure 11 

Depth 7M; head 4, broad as long. Snout o% in head; eye 3%, in- 
vades upper profile of head; maxillary reaches below front of eye, 
length 3K in head; mouth cleft reaches two-thirds to eye, greatly 
protractile down and forward; teeth fine, villiform, in narrow bands 
in jaws; interorbital very narrow frenum, or bony ridge with median 
fine longitudinal groove, separating two large close-set eyes. Pre- 
opercle with moderate spine, ends in recurved denticle and followed 
by two others along hind edge; small basal spine in front directed 
forward. 

Lateral line high along upper side of body, simple, complete. 
Parietal with very fine rugae. 

D. IV-8, 1, spines all prolonged in filaments so third 1% in fish with- 
out caudal, first ray 1% in head; A. 7, i, first ray 2%; least depth of 
caudal peduncle 4; pectoral 1, rays 18; ventral rays I, 5, fin 2% in 
fish without caudal; caudal 2%, cuneate. Anal papiUa conic, slender, 

2 in orbit. 

Color in alcohol, pale or light grayish above variegated with gray- 
brown and brown, forming five transverse dark bars or blotches on 
back. Snout pale above. Many small black to blackish-brown ocelli 
scattered on sides of head and top of head and on fins, also two below 
head at front of branchiostegal region. Iris gray and pearly. First 
dorsal with large black ocellus on third membrane. Second dorsal 
with some faint dark spots on rays. Anal blackish brown marginally. 
Caudal pale to whitish, with large pearly ocellus basally and many 
dark ocelli on lower and terminal part of fin. Pectoral largely whitish, 
only very faint trace of gray spots. Ventral whitish, grayish 
terminally and each ray with a few dark spots. 

Philippines. A very handsome and ornamental species, with very 
definite color pattern. 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE FOAVLER 19 

Type.— U.S.N. M. No. 99426. Cebii market. August 28, 1909, 
Length 69 mm. Male. [1835.] 

Paratypes.—V .S.N .M. No. 99429. Cebu market, Cebu. ISIarch 
20, 1909. Length 40 mm. Female. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99431. Cebu m.arkct. March 28, 1909. Length 
41 mm. Male. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99428. Cebu market. August 26, 1909. Length 
52 to 58 mm. Males. Three examples. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99427. Cebu market. August 28, 1909. Length 
45 to — mm. Males. Two examples. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99432. Guijulugan, Tanon Strait, east coast of 
Negros. Shore seme. April 2, 1908. Males. Length 48 to 59 mm. 
Two examples. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99430. Port Matalvi, off western Luzon. Seine 
150 feet. November 23, 1908. Females. Length 35 to 42 mm. 
Two examples. 

{8is, twice + (jT^Oos, breast + ^fifia, eye; with reference to the 
double ocellated spot on each side of breast.) 

CALLIONYMUS LEUCOBRANCHIALIS, new species 

Figures 12 (male), 13 (female) 

Depth 8K to 10%; head 3%o to 4:%, long as wide. Snout 2% to 3 m 
head; eye 2% to 3, subequal with snout; maxillary reaches seven- 
eighths to eye or little below front of eye; outer ridge in males with row 
of denticles, entire in female; mouth cleft horizontal, rictus three- 
sevenths in space to eye; lower jaw slightly included in male, jaws 
subequal or lower slightly protrudes in female; teeth fine, minute, 
villiform, crowded and in narrow bands in both jaws; interorbital 
narrow bony frenum, with longitudinal groove, bony width about half 
diameter of pupil. Preopercular spine long as eye, ends in short 
curved point behmd, with three or four recurved denticles along its 
inner edge, and short denticle basal in front directed forward. 

Lateral line complete, distinct, extends high along side of back 
out on caudal base, with or without loop over caudal peduncle above 
and just before caudal base. Parietal region smooth, radiating striae 
feeble and not very distinct. 

D. IV-9, I, or 10, I, spines all prolonged into slender free filaments 
terminally reaching well mto caudal base in males, first dorsal spine 
VA in head in females, first dorsal ray 1% to 1%; A. 9, i, first ray 2Ko 
to 2% in males; caudal nearly long as rest of fish, in females caudal 
3 m rest of fish; least depth of caudal peduncle 4% to 5 in total head 
length; pectoral greater than head in males or 3% in fish without caudal, 
subequal with head in females, rays 17 or 18; ventral rays I, 5, fin 
3% in fish without caudal or 1}^ in head. Anal papilla long, slender. 



20 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 




H.W.F.deI. 



Figure 12. — Callionymus leucobranchialis. Type. Male. 




xe-r-. 




:v 



:^ 



H.W.F.deI. 



Figure 13. — Callionymus leucobranchialis. Paratype. Female. 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE^ FOWLER 21 

Color in alcohol, light brown, on back with many faint and in- 
distinct brown rings, arcs, and mottlings. Under surfaces largely- 
whitish. Groove of lower lip each side of mandible, dark brown. 
Throat, chest, and breast rather light to pale brown, with strongly 
contrasted white gills. Iris silvery gray, with brown variable lines or 
arcs. First dorsal variegated with white marks on dark gray -brown 
backgroimd in male, less contrasted in female. Second dorsal pale or 
transparent whitish, with dull brownish spots on rays. Anal similar 
to second dorsal, or with oblique dark streaks below. Caudal pale or 
whitish basally, with five to seven transverse series of large rounded 
dark-brown spots, in closed fin forming transverse bands; terminally 
fin darker or brown with still darker mottling or obscure blotches. 
Pectoral pale, with about nine transverse brown lines. Ventral 
whitish basally and marked with many inconspicuous brown spots; 
fin gray black terminally. 

Philippines. Apparently approaches Callionymus neptunia Scale ^ 
l)ased on examples 160 to 190 mm. It differs from that species in the 
preopercular spine robust, but with the terminal spine small and 
straight anterior basal spine directed forward well developed, and only 
four large strong denticles along the upper edge of the spine. More- 
over the four dorsal spines are greatly elongated and reach the basal 
part of the caudal fin. The coloration is also different. 

Type.— V.S.N.M. No. 99393. San Fernando Point Light, N. 39°E., 
8.4 miles (lat. 16°30'36" N., long. 120°11'06" E.), west coast of 
Luzon. In 45 fathoms. May 11, 1909. Length 99 mm. 

Paratypes.—V .S.N M. No. 99399. Same data as for type. Length 
43 to 97 mm. Six specimens. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99400. Bacoor, Luzon. Seine. June 15, 1908. 
Length 60 mm. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99395. Same data as precedmg. Four specimens. 
Length 38 to 59 mm. 

Other specimens. — U.S.N.M. No. 99403. Bolalo Bay, Malampaya 
Sound, Palawan Island. Dynamite. December 21, 1908. Length 
42 to 73 mm. Two examples. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99394, Cavite and San Koque markets. June 27, 
1908. Length 53 mm. 12819. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99396. Cebu market. April 5, 1908. Length 73 
mm. 8564. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99401. Manila Bay, Luzon. December 12, 1908. 
Length 42 mm. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99402. Manila Harbor, Luzon. Seine of 34 feet. 
March 16, 1908. Length 68 mm. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99397. Outside harbor wall, Manila Bay, Luzon, 
Dredge. December 12, 1907. Length 40 to 43 mm. Three examples. 

* Philippine Journ. Sci., vol. 4, No. 6, p. 539, 1909 (type locality: Balayan Bay, Luzon). 



22 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

U.S.N.M. No. 99404. Philippines. Length 48 to 65 mm. Two 
examples. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99405. D. 5442. San Fernando Point Light, N. 
39° E., 8.4 miles (lat. 16°30'36" N., long. 120°11'6'' E.), west coast 
Luzon. May 11, 1909. Length 28 to 73 mm. Five examples. 

U.S.N.M. No. 99398. Sandakan Bay, Borneo. Seine. March 2, 
1908. Length 58 to 66 mm. Three examples. 

{XevKos, white +/8pd7xtQ;, gills) 

Besides the above several other mteresting species in the collection 
are: 

CALUONYMUS SAGITTA Pallas 

Callionymus sagitta Pallas, Spicilegia zoologica, vol. 8, p. 29, pi. 4, figs. 4-5, 1770' 
(type locality: Amboyna). — Jordan and Richardson, Bull. U. S. Bur. 
Fisher., vol. 27, p. 283, 1908 (Manila). — Borodin, Bull. Vanderbilt Marine 
Mus., vol. 1, art. 2, p. 61, 1930 (Manila Bay).— Herrb, Fishes Herre 1931 
Philippine Expedition, p. 94, 1934 (Manila). 

22169. Davao, Mindanao. May 16, 1908. Length 58 rmn. 
One example. Cebu. April 24, 1909. Lt. H. C. Kellers. Length 
66 mm. 

callionymus BENITEGURI Jordan and Snyder 

Callionymus benileguri Jordan and Snyder, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 23, p, 
370, pi. 17, 1900 (type locality: Tokyo Bay). — Jordan and Fowler, ibid., 
vol. 25, p. 956, 1903 (Misaki, Otaru, Wakanoura, Kobe, Hakodate, Aomori, 
Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Matsushima Bay).— Jordan and Hubbs, Mem. 
Carnegie Mus., vol. 10, No. 2, p. 317, 1925 (Toba, Kobe, Tatoku Island, 
Mikawa Bay). — Schmidt, Trans. Pacific Committee Acad. Sci. U. S. S. R., 
p. 143, 1931 (NagasaKi). 

Calliurichthys beniteguri Franz, Abh. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., vol. 4, Suppl. Band 1, 
p. 84, 1910 (Yokohama). 

U.S.N.M. No. 49402. Bay of Tokyo, Japan. K. Otaki. Length 
185 mm. Type. 

One example. Miyazaki, Japan. Rev. Cyrus A. Clark. Oberlin 
College. Length 105 mm. 

CALUONYMUS VALENCIENNEI Schlegel 

Callionymus valenciennei Schlegel, Siebold's Fauna Japonica, Poissons, pts. 7-9,.. 
p. 153, pi. 78, fig. 3, 1845 (type locality: Nagasaki, Japan). — Jordan and 
Hubbs, Mem. Carnegie Mus., vol. 10, No. 2, p. 317, 1925 (Kobe, Toba). 

Callionymus valenciennesi Bleeker, Versl. Meded. Akad. Wet. Amsterdam, ser. 2, 
vol. 3, p. 238, 1869 (Japan). 

Calliurichthys valenciennesi Franz, Abh. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., vol. 4, Suppl. Band 
1, p. 84, 1910 (Sagami Bay; Aburatsubo). 

Callionymus japonicus (not Houttuyn) Valenciennes, Histoire naturelle de 
poissons, vol. 12, p. 299, 1837 (Japan). 

Callionymus simplicicornis Valenciennes, ibid., p. 303, 1837 (type locality: 
Guam) . 

Callionyjuus reevesi (part) Richardson, Zoolog}^ of the voyage of H. M. S. Sul- 
phur, Ichthyology, p. 60, pi. 36, 1844 (female; on drawing made in Canton, 
not type). 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE FOAVLER 



23 



Callionymus flagris Jordan and Fowler, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 25, p. 952, 
fig. 7, 1903 (type locality: Tsuruga; Tokyo; Aomori; Kobe; Nagasaki; Owari 
Bay; Matsushima Bay), 

Two examples. China. A. de W. Sowerby. Length 64 to 75 mm. 
Genus SYNCHIROPUS GILL 

ANALYSIS OF SPECIES 

o'. Second dorsal elevated; pectoral long, reaches halfway to caudal pallidus 

a^. Second dorsal lower; pectoral moderate, reaches Yi to caudal griimellj 

SYNCHIROPUS PALLIDUS. new species 

Figure 14 

Depth 6K; head Sji, wide as long. Snout 4 in head (in profile) to 
gill opening; eye 2%, greatly exceeds snout; maxillary reaches below 




mm. 

H. W. F. del. 



Figure 14. — Synckiropus pallidus, new species. Type. 

front of eye, length 3% in head to gill opening, entire; mouth cleft 
reaches tlu-ee-fourths in snout, lower jaw very slightly shorter; jaws 
greatly protractile down and forward; teeth small, very close set, 
villiiorm, in bands in jaws which narrowed posteriorly or along sides 
of jaws; bony interorbital narrow, width two-thirds of pupil, shallowly 
concave; preopercle spine less than e3^e, curved, ends in slender spine 
and rather large forward curved denticle on inner upper edge; no 
basal spinule in front. 



24 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Lateral line complete, simple, extends on caudal base, and its course 
little high along side of body. Parietals striate, rather smooth. 

D. IV-7, I, first spine terminally free, equals head, first ray 2)2 in 
fish without caudal; A. 7, i, first ray 3% in head to gill opening; least 
depth of caudal peduncle 4; pectoral l}(o, rays 19; ventral rays I, 5, 
fin 3Ko in fish without caudal; caudal 2, cuneate. Anal papilla very 
short, conic, simple. 

Color in alcohol, very pale brown above, whitish below. Iris copper 
color, dark gray on eyes above. Fins all pale to transparent. First 
dorsal with eight transverse and slightly inclined pearl-white lines 
and about six on caudal. 

Known by its very pale general coloration and the second dorsal 
with eight transverse, pearly white, wide-spaced, narrow bands, the 
caudal with six. 

TV^e.— U.S.N.M. No. 99437. No. 1355. Length 190 mm. to end 
of broken caudal. 

(pallidus, pale.) 

SYNCmROPUS GRINNELLI, new species 

Figure 15 

Depth 6%; head 3%, width 1. Snout 4% in head; eye 2%, greatly 
exceeds short obtuse snout, with orbits conspicuously impinging on 
upper profile of head; maxillary reaches below front part of orbit; 
mouth cleft slopes little down and forward, rictus extending very 
nearly opposite front edge of orbit and lower jaw slightly shorter than 
upper; teeth small, simple, conic, close set or crowded, uniformly 
villifoi-m and in moderate bands in jaws, which little broader anteri- 
orly; no teeth on palate; interorbital narrow bony frenum separating 
veiy large orbits and traversed by a shallow longitudinal groove. 
Preopercular spine large, strong, ends in slightly upturned spine and 
another on inner edge recurved, and both invested in connecting mem- 
brane. Gill opening rather large, nearly opposite first dorsal origin. 

Lateral line complete, high at first along back, posteriorly falls 
until axial along middle of side of tail and caudal peduncle on to 
caudal base. Parietal areas of cranium osseous, with pits and short 
anastomosing radiating bony branches. Preorbital broadly tri- 
angular, with fine radiating striae. 

D. IV-9, I, first 2 spines with ends flexible and filamentous, first 
spine IK in head, first ray 1%; A. 7, i, first ray 3^; caudal cuneate or 
hind edge obliquely and slightly convex down to lower branched 
rays, which longest and fin 3 in rest of fish; least depth of caudal 
peduncle 5 in head; pectoral 1%, rays 20; ventral rays I, 5, length 1 
in head Anal papilla very short, depressed, blunt, cutaneous flap. 



NEW PHrLTPPIN'E CALLIONYMID.'LE FOi\\T.ER 



25 



Color in alcohol, pale buff -brown , inclining to whitish below. Upper 
part of back with very faint traces of light blotches or spots, variable 
though rather large. Iris grayish. First dorsal whitish, with large 
black ocellus terminally on third membrane, and other membranes 
with white and brownish shades. Second dorsal pale, with some 
pure-white blotches medially or in upper half, in some lights these 
markings reflected as brownish. A pale or transparent like second 
dorsal, with subterminal dark-brown band, beyond or on edge of nar- 
row white line. Caudal transparent with white markings as three 
imperfect transverse bands sloping little back, as upper part of fin, 




Synchiropus grinnelli, new species. Type. 



and two large white basal blotches. Pectoral transparent, with 
obscure w^hitish basally and tw^o very imperfect whitish bars above 
transversely. Ventral pale to whitish, with two dark blotches on 
each ray, outer or subterminal darker, and fin edge narrowly white. 

A handsome species with large orbits greatly exceeding length of 
snout. Preopercular spine half length of orbit, ends in upturned 
spine, besides another spine above slightly bent forward, but no 
lower basal spine. The species is known by its peculiar physiognomy, 
the greatly enlarged orbits, and bony broad triangular postorbital. 
Dorsal and anal both with membranes notched marginally. 

T?/i>g.— U.S.N.M. No. 99436. D. 5475. San Bernardino Light, 
S. 27° W., 11 miles (lat. 12°55'26" N., long. 124°22'12" E.), east 



26 PROCEEDINGS OF 'THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

coast of Luzon, San Bernardino Strait to San Miguel Bay, In 195 
fathoms. June 24, 1909. [1699.] Length 118 mm. 

(Named for the late Dr. Joseph Grinnell, of the Museum of Verte- 
brate Zoology, Berkeley, Calif.) 

Besides the above, there are several very handsome specimens of 
the following: 

SYNCmROPUS OCELLATUS (Pallas) 

Callionymus ocellatvs Pallas, Spicilegia zoologica, vol. 8, p. 25, pi. 4, figs. 1-3, 
1770 (type locality: Amboina). — Weber, Sihoga Expedition, vol. 57, Fische, 
p. 524, 1913 (Beo; Kabaena Island; Ambon; Nusa Laut; Tiiir). 

Synchiropus ocellatus Jordan and Richardson, Bull. U. S. Bur. Fisher., vol. 27, 
p. 282, 1907 (1908) (Calaj^an).— Herre, Fishes Herre 1931 Philippine Exped., 
p. 94, 1934 (Dumaguete). 

Callionymus pundulatus LACi^pfeoE, Histoire naturelle des poissons, vol. 2, pp. 
328, 340, 1800 (type locality: No locality). 

Three examples. Gubat Bay, Luzon. Tide pools. June 23, 
1909. Length 31 to 73 mm. [1693, 1696.] 

SYNCmROPUS SPLENDIDUS (Herre) 

Callionymus splendidus Herre, Philippine Journ. Sci., vol. 32, p. 416, 1927 (type 

locality, Bungau). — Whitley, Rec. Australian Mus., vol. 16, No. 4, p. 222, pi. 

17, figs. 1 a-b, 1927 (Hayman Island reef, Whitsunday Group, Great Barrier 

Reef, Queensland). 
Synchiropus splendidus Giltay, M^m. Mus. Roy. Hist. Nat. Beige, Hors ser., 

vol. 5, fasc. 3, p. 84, 1933 (reference). 

One example. Biri Channel. June 1, 1909. Dynamite. Length 
70 mm. [1545.] 

Genus ELEUTHEROCHIR Bleeker 

Eleutherochir Bleeker, Versl. Meded. Akad. Wet. Amsterdam, ser. 2, vol. 14, 
p. 103, 1879. (Type, Callionymus opercularioides Bleeker, orthotypic.) 

BrachycalUonymus Herre and Myers, in Herre, Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, 
vol. 49, p. 12, 1936. (Type, BrachycalUonymus mirus B.erre = Callionymus 
opercularioides Bleeker, orthotypic.) 

There is hardly any question that the small specimens named as 
BrachycalUonymus mirus Herre are the young of Eleutherochir opercu- 
laris. 

Eleutherochir differs from the other genera especially in its even 
head with straight profile. The gill opening resembles that of Synchi- 
ropus, but is larger and hidden under the opercle, which is extended 
back in a free-pointed lobe. 

ELEUTHEROCmR OPERCULARIS (Valenciennes) 

Callionymus opercularis Valenciennes, Histoire naturelle des poissons, vol. 12, 
p. (228) 305, 1837 (type locality: "L'embouchure de la riviere d'Arian- 
Coupan").— Day, Fishes of India, pt. 2, p. 323, 1876 (Pondicherry; Madras). 
— Weber, Sihoga Expedition, vol. 57, Fische, p. 522, 1913 (Menado; Ambon). 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMIDAE FOWLER 27 

Synchiropus opercularis Gill, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1858, p. 130 

(reference). — Herre, Fishes Herre 1931 Philippine Expedition, p. 95, 1934 

(Lemery) . 
Callionymus opercularioides Bleeker, Nat. Tijdschr. Nederl.-Indie, vol. 1, p. 

(30) 32, 1850 (type locality: Padang, Sumatra). 
Eleutherochir opercularioides Bleeker, Versl. Meded. Akad. Wet. Amsterdam, 

ser. 2, vol. 14, p. 103, 1879 (Sumatra; Bali; Celebes; Batjan; Ceram; Amboi- 

na; Guebe). 
Brachycallionymus ?mrus Herre, Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, vol. 49, p. 12, 1936 

(type locality: Celebes; Philippines). 

Two examples. Camp Overton, Mindanao. August 15, 1909. 
Electric light. Length 24 mm. 

Nine examples. Malabang. May 2 1,1908. Electric light. Length 
20 to 23 mm. 

One example. Nato. June 18, 1909. Electric light. Length 24 
mm. 

One example. Taal. February 20, 1909. Electric hght. Length 
20 mm. 

U.S.N.AL No. 98827. Romblon. March 25, 1908. Albatross 
Collection. Length 16 mm. Paratypes of Brachycallionymus mirus. 
Two examples. 

U.S.N.M. No. 98828. Nasugbu, Batangas Province. January 15, 
1908. Albatross Collection. Length 15 mm. Paratype of B. mirus. 

22170. Davao, Mindanao. Seme 150 feet. May 16, 1908. Length 
59 to 85 mm. Six examples. 

20824. Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. May 11, 1909. Seine 500 feet. 
Length 77 mm. 

One example. Nasugbu, Luzon. Seine. January 16, 1908. 
Length 52 mm. 

13959. PaluanBay, Mindoro. Seine 130 feet. December 11, 1908. 
Length 37 to 70 mm. Three examples. 

24132. Port San Vicente, Luzon. Seine 130 feet. November 18, 
1908. Length 57 mm. 

Two examples. San Vicente Harbor, Luzon shore. November 13, 
1908. Seine. Length 54 to 59 mm. 

ELEUTHEROCHIR MCCADDENI, new species 

Figure 16 

Depth 7; head 3, width 1%. Snout 0% m head; eye 3, slightly 
greater than snout; maxillary reaches opposite front of eye, entire; 
mouth but little inclined from horizontal, mouth cleft with rictus 
reaching halfway to eye, and lower jaw well protruded in front; teeth 
fine, conic, simple, close set, villiform, very minute, and set in inconspic- 
uous narrow band above; lower teeth uniserial, rather large in com- 
parison with upper, little curved in, situated along outer edge of 



28 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



mandible and always visible, even in closed mouth ; rami of mandible 
well elevated inside mouth; no teeth on palate; tongue small, entire, 
rounded and free in front; intcrorbital narrow, bony width two-fifths 
of eye, flattened. Preopercular spine curved back and up terminally, 
ends in strong spine, and two spines curved up and back on its upper 
edge. Opercular flap extends well back on pectoral base. 

Lateral line complete, little high at first, becomes axial along side of 
tail. 

D. IV-9, I, spines not free, short, flexible, first 2% in total head 
length, first ray 2; A. 10, i, first ray 2%; caudal 3K in rest of fish^ 




H.W.F.del 



Figure 16. — Eleutherochir mccaddeni, new species. Type. 

rounded convexly behind; least depth of caudal peduncle 3^5 in headp 
pectoral 1%, rays 20; ventral rays I, 5, fin 1}^ in total head length. 

Color in alcohol, back and upper surfaces dull brown, everywhere 
more or less finely specked, dotted and spotted with darker, though 
markings nowhere- much contrasted. On sides of head and opercle 
they are larger, coarser, and fewer. All over back above traces of 
dark arcs and circles, nowhere prominent. Entire under surfaces 
whitish, with dull-gray or brown tints. Eyes dark gray above, with 
dark blotches and mottling, pale to whitish below. First dorsal gray 
black, with some obscure pale blotches on first membrane. Second 
dorsal pale, with two dark spots on each ray. Caudal pale or light 
brown, with five transverse dark bars, last subtenninal and empha- 



NEW PHILIPPINiE CALLIOXYMIDAE FO'WLER 29 

sized with several blackish-brown spots. Anal transparent. Pectoral 
pale, with four very slightly darker transverse bars above. Ventral 
pale. 

Philippines. Known chieily by the long preopercle spine and white 
€olor of the thorax. 

Characterized by its dentition and especially by the long opercular 
flap encroacliing on the pectoral fin base. Ventral without upper 
basal membrane connecting fin to lower outer part of pectoral. It 
differs from Eleutherochir opercularis in the projecting lower jaw, the 
crooked or arched terminal preopercular spine, narrower bony inter- 
orbital, and pale ventrals. 

Type.— V.S.N. M. No. 99435. Hinunangan Bay, Leyte. Seine. 
July 30, 1909. Length 52 mm. 

(Named for David McCadden, formerly taxidermist in the Academy 
of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, to whom I am indebted for many 
American fishes.) 

DICALLIONYMUS, new genus 

Type. — Callionymus goramensis Bleeker, 

Body elongate, slender, depressed anteriorly. Head moderate, 
depressed, as seen from above tapering into rather narrowly triangular 
muzzle. Snout nearly pyramidal. Eye rather large, well invading 
upper profile of head, upper velum of eye invading pupil above. 
Mouth protractile down and forward, jaws subequal or lower little 
shorter. Maxillary reaches front of eye, entire. Teeth in villiform 
bands in jaws. Interorbital very narrow bony frenum, between large 
close-set eyes. Long preopercular spine Iji times eye in length; with 
small basal denticle directed forward, terminal spine upturned and 
with five others along its upper edge. Gill opening small slit, con- 
cealed by opercular flap, which rounded and not reaching pectoral 
base. Upper lateral Ime normal, along upper side of back; lower 
lateral fine extends only along lower side of tail, and like upper ex- 
tended on caudal base. First dorsal spine elongate, filamentous, 
reaches back well into middle of second dorsal. Last dorsal ray nearly 
long as head and reaches well into caudal base. Edge of soft dorsal 
entire. Anal with a slight notch along edge of each membrane. 
Caudal but little longer than head, cuneate, lower median rays longest. 
Pectoral broad, little shorter than head. Ventral longer than 
pectoral, broad with inner membrane well connected up on pectoral 
base. Anal papilla simple point. Coloration pale, variegated. 

Distinguished from Synchiropus, with wliich it was later placed by 
Bleeker, this genus is unique among the Callionymidae in the presence 
of two lateral lines. It resembles Synchiropus in its gill openings. 

(5ts, two + Callionymus; with reference to the two lateral lines.) 



30 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

DICALLIONYMUS GORAMENSIS (Bleeker) 

CalUonymus goramensis Bleeker, Nat. Tijdschr. Nederl. -Indie, vol. 15, p. 214, 

1858 (type locality: Goram Island). 
Synchiropus goramensis Bleeker, Versl. Meded. Akad. Wet. Amsterdam, scr. 2, 

vol. 14, p. 101, 1879 (Goram). 

Eleven examples. Pandanan Island. Seine 130 feet. March 23, 
1909. Length 33 to 71 mm. 

Amorinae, new subfamily 

Type genus. — Amora Gray. 

Long tentacle above each eye. Gill opening behind preopercular 
spine. Body spinulose. Two distinct dorsal fins. 

Genus AMORA Gray 

Amora Gray, Illustrations of Indian zoology, Hardwicke, vol. 2, pi. 90, fig. 1,. 

1833-34. (Type Amora tentaculata Gray, monotypic.) 
Anaora -Gray, ibid., in directions for arranging the plates. (Type, Amora 

tentaculata Gray.) 

Body moderately elongate, little broader than deep. Head large, 
depressed moderately. Snout rather long. Eye large, elevated, but 
little advanced in head length. Mouth terminally inferior. Above 
each eye a filament, twice eye length. Gill opening behind pre- 
opercular spine. First dorsal begins over gill opening, with four 
spines, about high as second dorsal. Second dorsal with eight rays, 
last branched. Anal similar with seven rays; also last branched. 
Paired fins little shorter than head. 

This genus, long overlooked, was originally established on the 
colored figure published and named by Gray as Amora tentaculata. 
Bleeker in 1879 appears to have been the last author that accepted it. 
Though he diagnosed the genus he failed to call attention to any of the 
specific characters, some of which are of sufficient importance to be 
readily made out. He mentioned that the body is spinulose, and this- 
is better indicated by Gray's figure la, giving a dorsal view. This 
suggests that CalUonymus Jimbriatus Herre,^ described with short 
conspicuous cutaneous filaments on the body, and otherwise largely 
in agreement, is a synonym of Amora tentaculata Gr&j. 

AMORA TENTACULATA Gray 

Amora tentaculata Gray, Illustrations of Indian zoology, Hardwicke, vol. 2, pi. 

90, figs. 1, a-b, 1833-34 (type locality: Amboina). — Bleeker, Versl. Meded. 

Akad. Wet. Amsterdam, ser. 2, vol. 14, p. 107, 1879 (reference). 
Synchiropus tentaculatus Herre, Philippine Journ. Sci., vol. 35, p. 33, pi. 3, 1928' 

(type locality, Puerto Galera). 

One example. Port Caltom. December 15, 1908. Caught in 
seine. Length 46 mm. 

» The fishes of the Herre 1931 Philippine Expeditiorf, p. 94, 1934 (type locality: Sitanki Reef). 



NEW PHILIPPINE CALLIONYMID'AE^ FOWLER 31 

Two examples. Port Galera, Mindoro. June 9, 1908. Caught in 
a seine. Length 36 to 48 mm. 

One example. Romblon. March 26, 1908. Caught in seine. 
Length 62 mm. [817]. 

19319. Sandakan Bay, Borneo. March 2, 1908. Caught in seine. 
Length 39 mm. 

[2158.] Great Tobea Island. Tide pool. December 15, 1909. 
Length 42 mm. 

Draculinae, new subfamily 

Type genus. — Draculo Snyder. 

Only one dorsal, corresponds to second dorsal of other genera. 



U. S. eOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE] l»4l 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM 




issued v.m*v\^^ Q^^S ^y '^* 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



Vol.90 Washington: 1941 No. 3107 

REVISION OF THE NORTH AMERICAN MOTHS OF THE 
FAMILY OECOPHORIDAE, WITH DESCRIPTIONS OF 
NEW GENERA AND SPECIES 



By J. F. Gates Clarke 



INTRODUCTION 

This study of the North American Oecophoridae was begun several 
years ago at the suggestion of August Busck, of the United States Bu- 
reau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. In the beginning I had 
intended to do only a specific revision of the genera Agonopterix and 
Depressaria. It soon became apparent, however, that it would be nec- 
essary to study carefully all the species known from North America 
together with many from other parts of the world. Hence this paper 
has become a revision of the entire family. 

In North America the family Oecophoridae comprises a large group 
of small to medium-sized moths most of which are inconspicuously 
colored. A few, however, are brilliantly marked. The moths are 
chiefly nocturnal, but some may be seen flying about in the bright sun- 
light. Because of their retiring habits they are seldom seen and are 
best secured by rearing the larvae. 

The majority of the Oecophoridae are leaf and flower feeders in the 
larval stage. Those that feed in the inflorescence usually attack plants 
of the family Umbelliferae, while the leaf feeders attack a large variety 
of plants in many families. Some are forest insects. 

Besides the leaf and flower feeders there are others that feed on 
stored products, such as dried foods, bulbs, and tubers. Some are 
scavengers and feed in the refuse occurring in the nests of mice and 
birds. Some live in the cracks of bark, others beneath the bark where 

286614—41 1 33 



34 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. so 

they feed eitlier on refuse or bits of dried vegetable matter. One 
{Martyrhilda sphaeralceae, new species) is a leaf miner. 

Among the flower feeders the most important is Depressaria herac- 
liana (Linnaeus) (the parsnip webworm), which does considerable 
damage to commercially grown parsnips by destroying the flower- 
heads and immature seeds. A closely related species, D. cinereo- 
costella Clemens, has been recorded from caraway but is most 
frequently found on closely related indigenous plants such as Sium 
lineare Michx. 

Among the forest insects we find Agonopterix argillacea (Walsing- 
ham), which has been reared in quantity from willow {Salix spp.). 
The species of the genus Psilocorsis attack beech {Fagus grandifolia 
Ehrh.), oak [Quercus spp.), and pecan {Carya pecan Aschers. & 
Graebn.) and hickory {Carya ovata (Mill.) Koch). P. caryae^ new 
species, is of considerable importance in the South, where it is de- 
structive to pecan. In the immediate vicinity of Washington, D. C, 
the larvae of P. fagineUa (Chambers) do a great deal of damage 
to beech. 

In addition we have the European Carcina quercana Fabricius, 
which is an oak feeder and has been introduced on Vancouver 
Island, British Columbia, and Machimia tentoriferella Clemens, 
which feeds on Castanea^ Juglans^ Quercus^ and Prunus. 

The scavenger bulb moth, Hofmannophila pseudospretella (Stain- 
ton), is recorded from stored bulbs and tubers of tulip, dahlia, and 
gladiolus and from dried fruits and other stored products (see hosts 
under species) and is a common pest in houses. It is found through- 
out Europe and America and in New Zealand. 

Endrosis lactella (Schiffermiiller) does considerable damage on the 
Pacific coast and in Europe, feeding on stored cereals, fruits, and 
other products. 

The pupae are formed in debris, in leaves, or in hollow stalks and 
do not protrude at the time of emergence of the moth. Many species 
hibernate as adults. 

Several species are of considerable economic importance. Notable 
among these are Endrosis lactella (Schiffermiiller), Hofmannophila 
pseudospretella (Stainton), and Depressaria heracliana (Linnaeus). 

The distribution of the North American Oecophoridae appears to 
center about the Southwestern States, particularly Arizona, Colorado, 
and California. The genus Agonopterix^ the largest in the family, is 
particularly well represented in western North America. 

Since Busck^ published his paper on the North American moths 
of this family no attempt has been made to revise the group. He 



* Busck, A., A generic revision of American moths of the family Oecophoridae, with 
descriptions of new species. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, pp. 187-207, 1908. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 35 

recognized 19 genera and 121 species of North American Oecophori- 
dae. In the Barnes and McDunnough list^ the authors followed 
Busck in recognizing 19 genera but enumerated only 98 species, the 
remainder being transferred to other families. Meyrick ^ recognized 
17 North American genera and 104 species. 

EXCLUSION OF UNRELATED FORMS 

Within the family I recognize 22 genera and 117 North American 
species. Six genera, 19 species, and 1 race are described as new in 
this paper. 

The genus Etidrosis is retained in the family with doubt. Busck * 
transferred TAclonella to the Cosmopterygidae in 1932. I have re- 
moved Eumeyrickia and Gerdana from the family and have placed 
them in the families Ethmiidae and Blastobasidae, respectively. For 
part of the species formerly placed in Borkhausenia I have erected the 
genus Anoncia and have referred it to the Cosmopterygidae. For 
Semioscopis acertella Busck I have erected the genus Antequera and 
have placed it in the family Cosmopterygidae. 

CHARACTERS OF THE FAMILY 

Head usually smooth, with loosely appressed scales; often with 
raised side tufts. Antenna simple to strongly ciliated, usually with 
pecten on basal segment but frequently with pecten absent or slightly 
developed. Labial palpus well developed, usually long, upwardly 
curved, variously scaled; terminal segment acutely pointed. Maxil- 
lary palpus short, filiform, appressed. Prothoracic and mesothoracic 
legs normally slender, moderately long; posterior tibia with long rough 
hairs above. 

Fore wing with 12 veins (or 11 by coincidence of veins 7 and 8) ; 
lb furcate at base; Ic always preserved, at least at margin; 7 and 8 
stalked or coincident, 7 to costa, apex or termen. 

Hind wing with eight veins or rarely seven by coincidence of veins 
5 and 4 {Endrosis) ; veins 6 and 7 remote, subparallel; veins 3 and 4 
normally stalked or connate (rarely separate); 8 free; 5 nearer to 
4 than to 6 (except Oecopliora and Mathildana). 

Male genitalia symmetrical; harpe with or without clasper, base 
of harpe broadly attached; sacculus well defined; cucullus rounded 
or pointed except in Carcina^ where it is greatly reduced and weakly 
sclerotized. Anellus a simple plate or with moderately or well de- 
veloped lateral processes. Aedeagus with very small "blind sac" or 

* Barnes, W., and McDunnough, J., Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, pp. 
160-1C2, 1017. 

* Meyrick, E., in Wytsman, Genera Insectorum, fasc. 180, 1922. 

* Busck, A., Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 34, p. 19, 1932. 



36 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

none. The entrance of the penis is dorsal, near the proximal end. 
Vinculum bandlike or moderately produced. Gnathos present.^ Socii 
and uncus present or absent. First and eighth segments simple or 
with hair pencils. 

Female genitalia : Ostium opening in median part of genital plate, 
the latter simple or modified {Fabiola, Inga) ; signum present or 
absent; abdomen weakly or strongly sclerotized; sometimes spinose. 

The foregoing characters will serve to distinguish this family from 
all other Lepidoptera except a few Blastobasidae and Ethmiidae. The 
Blastobasidae may be separated from the Oecophoridae by the widely 
separate veins 11 and 10 of the fore wing, the proximity of veins 2 
to 10, and the thickening of the membrane below the costa (the "stigma" 
of Zeller). Certain of the oecophorid genera have some of the char- 
acters of the Blastobasidae while lacking others. Endrosis possesses 
a spinose abdomen, a character frequently encountered in the Blasto- 
basidae,** but lacks the characters listed in the foregoing paragi-aph 
as being tyjDical of that family. The larva of Endrosis further sug- 
gests Blastobasidae. The Ethmiidae may be distinguished from the 
Oecophoridae (except Oecophora and Mathildana) by the proximity 
of vein 6 to 6 of the hind wing; and the characteristic male genitalia, 
which exhibit a primitive segmented type of harpe. 

I have removed the genera Oecophora and BorJchausenia from our 
American lists, as the only species formerly included are referable 
to other genera. 

For haydenella and pseudospretello I have resurrected the names 
Chamhersia Riley and Hofmminophila Spuler, respectively. For 
ascriptella Busck I have erected the genus Garolana. I propose the 
genus Mathildana for newmaneUa and have restricted Oecophora 
to hractella and its congeners. I retain all these in the family 
Oecophoridae. 

Larva.'' — ^With primary setae only (except in Apachea., which has 
a few secondary hairs in group VII on most of the abdominal segments 
and two or three on the pro thoracic shield) ; three setae on prespiracular 
shield of prothorax ; setae IV and V approximately and directly below 
or (frequently) ventrocephalad of the spiracle on proleg-bearing seg- 
ments; on eighth abdominal segment seta III usually dorsocephalad 
of the spiracle, rarely directly above, never dorsocaudad or wdth a 

*The genera of the family fall into two groups on characters of the gnathos. Agonop- 
terix, Bibarramila, Apachea, Depressaria, Seminscopis, Martyrhilda, Machimia, Himmacia, 
and Psilocorsis fall into a group with a spiny gnathos. The remaining genera are without 
spines on the gnathos. This suggests a division that may be of subfamily significance. 

• The spinose abdomen is found in at least seven other oecophorid genera. They are 
Martyringa, BorJihausenia, nofmannophila, Carolana, Pleiirota, Inga, and Semioscopis. 

'' The setal characters of group VII should be used with caution as occasional abnormal 
specimens occur in nearly all species. A hair may be missing from the group on either the 
first or eighth abdominal segment, but only on one side of the insect. The opposite side 
is nearly always normal. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 37 

pigmented sclerotized ring surrounding the base of the tubercle; on 
ninth abdominal segment seta I ventrocephalad of II, rarely approxi- 
mate to II {Endrosis^ Eofmannophila)^ usually about equidistant 
from II and III, III much nearer to IV-V than to I, IV and V closely 
approximate, VI rarely (Psilocorsis) on the same pinaculum with 
iy_Y^ sometimes approximate to VII, VII unisetose. Legs and pro- 
legs normal. Crochets in a complete circle, biordinal and, occa- 
sionally, irregularly triordinal, never in a penellipse (or a ring broken 
outwardly). 

Head with adfrontals extending to incision of dorsal hind margin 
of epicranium; frons not extending to incision of hind margin; a 
longitudinal ridge always present; epicranial seta L^ usually closer 
to A^ than A^ is to A^ Ocelli normally six (reduced to 4 or 2 in 
Hofmannophila and Endrosis) , arranged approximately in a parallelo- 
gram ; 3 and 4 mostly in a straight line with 2 and 5 ; 3 and 4 closely 
approximate. 

Pupa.— Smooth, or pubescent. Body usually depressed. Epicranial 
suture present; frontoclypeal suture not distinct for its entire length 
or reaching the meson ; maxillary palpi present, large, usually reach- 
ing proximolateral angles of maxillae; caudal portions of antennae 
lying adjacent on the meson, separating at their distal ends to expose 
metathoracic legs ; maxillae from one-half to two-thirds the length of 
wings; labial palpi rarely exposed {Endrosis) . Prothoracic femora 
sometimes exposed, often not. Abdomen with segments 4 to 6 movable 
and with deep incisions between these segments on dorsal and ventral 
surfaces; genital and anal openings slitlike in both sexes; no hooked 
setae on ventral surface of ninth segment; cremaster absent or shortly 
developed. 

CLASSIFICATION 

In the classification of this family venation, palpi, general habitus, 
and genitalia have been employed in this revision. The genitalia are 
especially helpful and have been used to separate species as well as 
genera. I have found the anellus of the male genitalia to be particu- 
larly useful, and in most cases it is possible to separate species as well 
as genera by this structure. 

The palpi are normally useful in the separation of genera but in a 
few cases cannot be relied upon. The eyes and vestiture of the head 
may be useful taxonomically, and Meyrick laid gi-eat weight on the 
length of the ciliation of the antennae, but the modifications of these 
characters appear to be too gradual for safe generic differentiation and 
have not been employed in this paper. 

Venation is usvially reliable within a genus, but occasionally unusual 
venation is encountered. A large niunber of genera have nearly iden- 
tical venation, but such cases are easily separable on genitalia or ex- 



38 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. so 

ternal characters. In a few the venation is unstable. This is par- 
ticularly true of veins 2 and 3 of the fore wing of Semioscoj)is and 
veins 3 and 4 of the hind wings of Agonopterix and Depressaria. The 
genitalia of these three genera distinguish them, however, from all 
others. The species fall, with one or two exceptions, into natural 
groups on habitus as well as on structure, so that the definition of 
genera is comparatively simple. 

In a few genera it is not entirely clear what we are dealing with. 
For example, in Depressaria there are five distinct species groups, 
which may actually represent separate genera. The leptotaeniae-mul- 
tifdae group is especially interesting and represents a series of 
"species" that may represent only simple Mendelian variants of oTie. 
species. As will be noted, in the proper place, all these except yahiTmae. 
are of practically the same color and have closely similar habits and 
hosts, yet aU have distinct genitalia. 

In the genus Psilocorsis it is particularly difficult to separate many 
of the species {re-ftexella-faginella group) , and here we are confronted 
again with the problem of what actually constitutes a species. 

These problems can be settled only by careful breeding, and in the 
meantime we shall have to content ourselves with the supposition that 
genitalic differences represent specific entities or genera depending on 
their nature. Nevertheless, I strongly suspect that Mendelian varia- 
tion may be transmitted to the genitalia as well as other structures and 
that eventually we shall be able in most instances to use genitalic 
characters for group separation only. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

I wish to express my gratitude to August Busck, of the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, for suggesting this most 
interesting study and for much advice and help received through 
correspondence while I was at Washington State College and since I 
came to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. To Dr. 
R. L. Webster, Head of the Department of Zoology, Washington State 
College, my sincere thanks are due for the use of his library and the 
release from many duties which enabled me to do research and spend 
much time in the field ; to Carl Heinrich for the larval diagnoses and 
notes and for many helpful suggestions and much useful criticism; 
to Dr. J. McDunnough, Chief of the Division of Systematic En- 
tomology, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada; to Dr. 
Annette F. Braun, Cincinnati, Ohio ; to H. H. Keif er, Department of 
Agriculture, Sacramento, Calif.; and Mrs. Florence Blackmore, Vic- 
toria, British Columbia, for much material lent for study; to Dr. 
Lincoln Constance, Department of Botany, Washington State Col- 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 39 

lege,« for his keen interest, the identification of host plants, and the 
coUection of very interesting material; to Dr. Harry F. Clements, of 
the same department,^ who kindly arranged for greenliouse facilities 
for rearing purposes; and to Miss Grace Val Sisler for much kmd 
help in cataloging and recording. In addition Dr. Braun kindly sub- 
mitted notes on specimens in her collection and material for study. I 
wish also to express my thanks to Nathan Banks, of the Museum of 
Comparative Zoology, Cambridge; to E. T. Cresson, Jr., and J. A. G. 
Rehn, of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, for mak- 
ing it possible for me to study types of Chambers and Clemens re- 
spectively; and to the National Research Council for a grant-in-aid, 
which enabled me to obtain needed equipment and supplies and to 
take many field trips in Wasliington, Idaho, and Oregon. 

The drawings for this paper were made by the author. Whenever 
possible the genitalia were figured from the type, either male or 
female, and where the type was not available, from paratypes or 
authentically determined specimens. I have been able to examine 
the genitalia, both male and female, of all the genotypes and of either 
male or female, or both, of all the species of Agonopterix and_ De- 
pressaria except A. endryopa (Meyrick), A. murmumm (Meyrick), 
D. nymphidia Meyrick, D. corystopa Meyrick, Borkhausenia axiiculata 
Meyrick, and Paratheta astigmatica Meyrick. I am unable to recog- 
nize these species. 

For most of the Canadian records no reference is made to the sex 

of the specimens. These records were sent to me by Dr. McDunnough. 

The following keys to the genera include all genera discussed by 

Busck (1908), with the addition of two old and six new genera 

described in this paper. 

ARTIFICIAL KEY TO THE GENERA 

1. Basal segment of antenna with pecten (figs. 3, 4, 6, 9, etc.) 2 

Basal segment of antenna without pecten (figs. 7, 10, 14, 18, etc.) 13 

2. Second segment of labial palpus long, straight, porrect (fig. 6) 

12. Pleurota (p. 230) 

Second segment of labial palpus otherwise (figs. 3, 4, 9) T" oox 

3. Antenna longer than fore wing 13- Carcina (p. 233) 

Antenna shorter than fore wing ','"," nA^\ 

4. Veins 7 and 8 of fore wing coincident (fig. 55) 16. Decantha (p. 241) 

Veins 7 and 8 of fore wing not coincident ^ 

5. Veins 2 and 3 of fore wing stalked (figs. 29, 44, 45) o 

Veins 2 and 3 of fore wing separate 

6. Costa of fore wing arched; costa of hind wing arched, veins 4 

and 5 well separated (figs. 29, 45) 

Costa of fore wing straight or slightly concave; costa of hind 
wing concave, veins 4 and 5 closely approximate at bases 
(f^g 44) 2. Martyrhilda (p. 12o) 



• Now at the Department of Botany, University of California, Berkeley. Calif. 

• Now at the Department of Botany, University of Hawaii, Honolulu. 



40 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. oo 

7. Abdomen flattened; labial palpus with well-developed brush on 

second segment; hind wing lobed at anal angle... 1. Agonopterix (p. 43) 
Abdomen not flattened; labial palpus without well-developed 
brush on second segment; hind wing without lobe at anal angle. 

3. Bibarrambla (p. 146) 

8. Costa of hind wing excavated (fig. 51) 22. Endrosis (p. 262) 

Costa of hind wing not excavated g 

9. Second segment of labial palpus with brush (figs. 11, 16) 10 

Second segment of labial palpus without brush (figs. 3, 4, 12) _. ._ H 

10. Brush of labial palpus broadly triangular (fig. 16) 6. Apachea (p. 197) 

Brush of labial palpus not broadly triangular (fig. 11) 

5. Depressaria (p. 163) 

11. Fore wing lanceolate, apex pointed; veins 3 and 4 of hind wing 

stalked (fig. 49) 15. Carolana (p. 239) 

Fore wing not lanceolate, apex not pointed; veins 3 and 4 of 

hind wing connate or closely approximate (figs. 43, 46) 12 

12. Veins 2 and 3 of fore wing remote (fig. 46) 19. Chambersia (p. 252) 

Veins 2 and 3 of fore wing approximate (fig. 43) 

21. Hofmannophila (p. 258) 

13. Fore wing: Veins 8 and 9 out of 7 (fig. 39) 11. Martyringa (p. 228) 

Fore wing: Vein 9 separate 14 

14. Labial palpus with longitudinal stripes 9. Psilocorsia (p. 204) 

Labial palpus without longitudinal stripes 15 

15. Fore wing with veins 7 and 8 coincident (fig. 41) 17. Fabiola (p. 244) 

Fore wing with veins 7 and 8 otherwise 16 

16. Hind wing with vein 5 nearer to 6 than to 4 (fig. 50) 14. Mathildana (p. 236) 
Hind wing with vein 5 nearer to 4 than to 6 17 

17. Discocellulars of hind wing strongly outwardly oblique between 

veins 4 and 6 (fig. 31) 8. Himmacia (p. 202) 

Discocellulars not outwardly oblique between veins 4 and 6 18 

18. Fore wing with vein 2 distant from 3 (figs. 33, 47, 56) " 19 

Fore wing with vein 2 approximate (sometimes connate or 

stalked with 3 in Semioscopis) to 3 (figs. 35, 37) 21 

19. Costa of hind wing excavated (fig. 47) 20. Epicallima (p. 254) 

Costa of hind wing not excavated (figs. 33, 56) 20 

20. Fore wing broad; termen straight (fig. 33) 7. Machimia (p. 198) 

Fore wing narrow, pointed; termen confluent with inner margin 

(fig. 56) 18. Schiflfermulleria (p. 246) 

21. Fore wing with costa and inner margin parallel; vein 11 from 

middle of cell (fig. 37) 10. inga (p. 217) 

Fore wing with costa and inner margin strongly divergent; vein 

11 from well before middle of cell (fig. 35) 4. Semioscopis (p. 149) 

KEY TO THE GENERA BASED ON MALE GENITALIA 

1. Gnathos strongly spined (figs. 59, 62, 64, etc.) 2 

Gnathos not spined (figs. 60, 76, 78, etc.) '" 10 

2. Transtilla and anellus fused (fig. 86) 6. Apachea (p. 197) 

Transtilla and anellus not fused (figs. 62, 64, etc.) 3 

3. Anellus with long, free lateral processes (fig. 70) 7. Machimia (p. 198) 

Anellus without long, free lateral processes (figs. 59, 64, etc.) 4 

4. Uncus well developed (figs. 59, 64) '_ " 5 

Uncus absent, or if present, poorly developed (figs. 62, 65, 67, etc.) 6 

5. Clasper present (fig. 64) 8. Himmacia (p. 202) 

Clasper absent (fig. 59) 9. Psilocorsis (p. 204) 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 41 

6. Sacculus extended as a furcate process or as a broad truncated 

expansion with a small toothlike clasper; or vesica armed 
with a forked or strongly curved single cornutus. 4. Semioscopia (p. 149) 
Sacculus and cornuti not as above 7 

7. Clasper absent or present; if present then the aedeagus twisted; 

or sacculus with process from base; or aedeagus with basal 

process 5. Depressaria (p. 163) 

Clasper always present but without the above combinations 

(figs. 62, 65, 67) 8 

8. Clasper divided (fig. 67) 2. Martyrhilda (p. 125) 

Clasper simple (figs. 62, 65) 9 

9. Uncus and socii fused forming hood (fig. 65) 3. Bibarrambla (p. 146) 

Uncus (if present) and socii not fused (fig. 62) 1. Agonopterix (p. 43) 

10. Anellus with lateral processes (figs. 60, 61, 62, etc.) 14 

Anellus without lateral processes (figs. 69, 72, 78, 80) 11 

11. Clasper present (figs. 78, 80) 12 

Clasper absent (figs. 69, 72) 13 

12. Clasper concave distally; aedeagus coiled, bandlike basally 

(figs. 78, 78a) 21. Hofmannophila (p. 258) 

Clasper never concave distally; aedeagus never coiled or band- 
like basally (figs. 80, 80a) 10. Inga (p. 217) 

13. Gnathos flat, broad, shovel-shaped; vinculum narrowly 

rounded (fig. 69) 15. Carolana (p. 239) 

Gnathos narrowed distally; vinculum strongly produced an- 
teriorly (fig. 72) 11. Martyringa (p. 228) 

14. Extension of sacculus with tuft of strong, curved setae (fig. 

71) 13. Carcina (p. 233) 

Sacculus without such tuft 15 

15. Sacculus with pointed, curved or nearly straight, free extension 

(figs. 60, 61, 66, 81) 16 

Sacculus without such free extension (figs. 74, 76, 79, 82) 19 

16. Vinculum spatulate (fig. 60) 22. Endrosis (p. 262) 

Vinculum rounded (figs. 61, 66, 81) 17 

17. Vesica unarmed (fig. 61a) 17. Fabiola (p. 244) 

Vesica strongly armed (figs. 66a, 81a) 18 

18. Lateral processes of anellus flattened and expanded distally 

(fig. 66) 16. Decantha (p. 241) 

Lateral processes of aneUus not appreciably flattened; pointed 

distally (fig. 81) 20. Epicallima (p. 254) 

19. Vesica strongly armed (fig. 74a) 14. Mathildana (p. 236) 

Vesica unarmed (figs. 76a, 79a, 82a) 20 

20. Lateral processes of anellus sharply pointed; aedeagus small, 

weak (figs. 79, 79a, 82, 82a) 21 

Lateral processes of anellus dilated distally; aedeagus stout 

(figs. 76, 76a) 12. Pleurota (p. 230) 

21. Lateral processes of anellus very broad basally; gnathos pointed 

(fig. 79) 19. Chambersia (p. 252) 

Lateral processes of anellus of about equal width throughout; 

gnathos not pointed (fig. 82) 18. SchiflEermiilleria (p. 246) 

KEY TO THE GENERA BASED ON FEMALE GENITALIA 

1. Anterior apophyses branched (figs. 101, 116) 2 

Anterior apophyses not branched (figs. 95, 97, etc.) 3 



42 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

2. Ovipositor always extended after death; ductus bursae not con- 

voluted (fig. 116) 22. Endrosis (p. 262) 

Ovipositor not extended after death; ductus bursae convoluted 

(fig. 101) 21. Hofmannophila (p. 258) 

3. Bursa copulatrix single (figs. 97, 99, etc.) 4 

Bursa copulatrix double (fig. 105) 9. Psilocorsis (p. 204) 

4. Ductus bursae with saclike evagination from ventral surface 

(fig. 118) 14. Mathildana (p. 236) 

Ductus bursae without such evagination 5 

5. Inception of ductus seminalis at, or anterior to, middle of ductus 

bursae (figs. 87, 91, 95, 98, 115) 6 

Inception of ductus seminalis posterior to middle of ductus 

bursae (figs. 109, 110, etc.) 10 

6. Signa several (fig. 87) 12. Pleurota (p. 230) 

Signum, if present, single 7 

7. Signum a weakly developed toothed plate (figs. 91, 115) 8 

Signum absent or, if present, not as above 9 

8. Ductus bursae membranous (fig. 115) 19. Chambersia (p. 252) 

Ductus bursae at least partly sclerotized (fig. 91)--- 16. Decantha (p. 241) 

9. Genital plate strongly convex, protruding (fig. 95) 17. Fabiola (p. 244) 

Genital plate convex but not protruding (figs. 98, 213-215) 

18. SchiflPermiilleria (p. 246) 

10. Ductus bursae strongly sclerotized, broadened and somewhat 

flattened posterior to inception of ductus seminalis (figs. 

90, 92, 99) 11 

Ductus bursae otherwise 13 

11. Signum present; sclerotized portion of ductus bursae armed 

on inner surface (fig. 99) 20. Epicallima (p. 254) 

Signum absent; ductus bursae unarmed (figs. 90, 92) 12 

12. Ostium protruding; ventroanterior edge strongly sclerotized 

(fig. 90) 11. Martyringa (p. 228) 

Ostium not protruding; ventroanterior edge membranous (fig. 

92) 7. Machimia (p. 198) 

13. Signum very large, broadly oval or elongate (fig. 100) 

2. Martyrhilda (p. 125) 
Signum, if present, otherwise 14 

14. Signum absent (figs. 89, 229, 240, 272) 15 

Signum present (figs. 96, 102, 109, etc.) 16 

15. Area surrounding ostial opening always membranous (figs. 89, 

206-210) 10. Inga (p. 217) 

Area surrounding ostial opening always sclerotized (figs. 229, 

240, etc.) 1. Agonopterix (part) (p. 43) 

16. Genital plate dilated ventrolaterally; ostium transverse, slit- 

like (fig. 88) 13. Carcina (p. 233) 

Genital plate otherwise 17 

17. Signum a toothed plate (figs. 102, 103, 109, etc.) 18 

Signum a small plate with median keel (fig. 110) 8. Himmacia (p. 202) 

18. Ductus bursae armed with small teeth for much of its length 

(fig. 96) 15. Carolana (p. 239) 

Ductus bursae otherwise 19 

19. Signum a distinct cross; ostium very large (fig. 94) 6. Apachea (p. 197) 

Signum and ostium otherwise 20 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 43 

20. Signum a moderately large plate with two or three large strong 

teeth (fig. 109) 3. Bibarrambla (p. 146) 

Signum otherwise 1. Agonopterix (part) (p. 43); 

5. Depressaria (p. 163); 4. Semioscopis (p. 149) 

1. Genus AGONOPTERIX HUbner 

Plate 2, Figube 13 ; Plate 6, Figubb 45 ; Plate 8, FiGxmES 62, 62a ; Plate 17, 

FiGUBB 103 

Agonopterix Hubneb, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 410, 1826. — 
PiEBCE and Metcalfe, The genitalia of the British Tineina, pp. 35-38, 1935. 
(Genotype: Pyralis ocelhina Fabricius, Systema entomologiae, p. 652, 1775.) 

Agonopteryx Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 1908.— Walsingham, 
Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, pp. 135-136, 1912.— Barnes 
and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 4, pp. 231-233, 1920.— Sasscer, 
Journ. Econ. Ent, vol. 13, p. 183, 1920.— Bbaun, Proc. Acad. Nat Sci. Phila- 
delphia, vol. 73, pt. 1, p. 10, 1921.— Busck, Can. Ent., vol. 53, pp. 277-278, 
1921.— FoEBES, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, pp. 236-241, 1923.— 
Clarke, Can. Ent., vol. 65, pp. 84-85, 1933.— McDunnough, Can. Ent., vol. 
67, pp. 74-75, 1935. 

Agonopterys Ely, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 12, p. 68, 1910. 

Agnopteryx Babnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, p. 160, 1917. 

Epeleustia Hubner, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 410, 1826. — 
Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 136, 
1912.— IMeybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 169, 1922. 
(Genotype: Tinea- hypericella Hiibner, Sammlung europaischer Schmetter- 
linge, vol. 8, fig. 441, 1796.) 

Pinaris Hubneb, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 411, 1826. — Walsing- 
ham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 135, 1912. — Mey- 
BiCK, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 169, 1922. (Genotype: 
Tinea gilvella Hiibner, Sammlung europaischer Schmetterlinge, vol. 8, fig. 96, 
1796; synonym of Agonopterix areneUa Schiffermiiller.) 

Tichonia HiJBNER, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 412, 1826. — Walsing- 
ham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 136, 1912. — Mey- 
EiCK, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 169, 1922. (Genotype: 
Phalaenae Tineae atomella Schiffermiiller, Systema tisches Verzeichniss der 
Schmetterlinge der Wiener Gegend, p. 137, 1776. ) 

Haemylis Teeitschke, Die Schmetterlinge von Europa, vol. 9, p. 235, 1832. — 
Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 136, 
1912. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 169, 1922. 
(Genotype: Haemylis assitnilella Treitschke, Die Schmetterlinge von Europa, 
vol. 9, p. 259, 1832.) 

Head with appressed scales ; tongue developed ; antenna ciliated or 
simple; basal segment elongate, with pecten; labial palpus long, re- 
curved; second segment with well-developed furrowed brush; terminal 
segment shorter than (or rarely as long as) second segment, sometimes 
roughly scaled, acute. Thorax smootlily scaled to strongly crested. 

Fore wing elongate (narrow to moderately broad) ; 12 veins; 2 and 3 
stalked ; 7 and 8 stalked ; 7 to costa or apex. 



44 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. oo 

Hind wing as wide as or wider than fore wing, with costa nearly 
straight, termen evenly rounded; 8 veins; 3 and 4 connate or short- 
stalked; 5 curved, approximate to 4; 6 and 7 subparallel. Abdomen 
flattened. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe ample; clasper present, simple. Anellus 
without well developed fingerlike processes. Vesica with or without 
cornuti. Socii fleshy. Uncus reduced or lacking. 

Female genitalia. — Bursa copulatrix with or without signum ; ductus 
bursae membranous throughout (except fuVva). 

Larva. — Ninth abdominal segment with setae I and II well separated 
(I as near or nearer to III than to II) : seta VI not on a single pinacu- 
lum with IV and V but not approximate to VII. Setal group VII 
bisetose on first and seventh abdominal segments, unisetose on eighth 
and ninth abdominal segments, normal (trisetose) on proleg-bearing 
abdominal segments. Ocelli normal. Submentum without sclerotized 
pit. 

Pupa. — Pubescent. Prothoracic femora and labial palpi not 
exposed. Cremaster absent. 

Remarks. — Agonopterix is a valid genus readily separable from 
Depressaria^ with which Meyrick and others continue to synonymize 
it, and from Apach£a. The stalking of veins 2 and 3 of the fore wing 
in Agonopterix is constant and is associated with the absence of the 
long lateral processes of the anellus so frequently encountered in 
Depressaria and other oecophorid genera. The pattern of the fore 
wings of Agonopterix always differs from that of Deprcssaria by en- 
tirely lacking conspicuous longitudinal streaks such as are found in 
the latter genus. 

The moths of this genus, with the exception of one small group, 
form an extremely compact assemblage of species, often difficult to 
separate. The male genitalia are strikingl}'^ similar, species being 
best separated on characters of the anellus, clasper, and aedeagus. 
The anellus seems to be the most stable of the three and may suffice 
for separation of species where the other two fail. The length of 
the harpes {psoraliella and others) and the shape of the cucullus are 
apt to vary considerably. (In preparing mounts of the genital 
organs great care must be exercised to eliminate distortion and 
shrinkage.) 

The remaining species of the genus all have fingerlike claspers, 
small, numerous, few, or no cornuti on the vesica, and all the females 
have a closely similar type of genitalia with or without a signum. 
The wing form varies from moderately narrow to broad, and the 
palpus has a well-developed brush on the second segment. There 
are, however, in this last large group, sections that show divergence 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 45 

from the usual type. One section of the group, consisting of atro- 
dorsella, scdbella^ pulvipennella, ptdeae, and eupatoriiella, forms a 
very closely knit complex. Another section, consisting of gelidella, 
hyperella, lythrella, nuhiferella, and arcuella, forms another com- 
plex of species so closely related that separation on male genitalia 
is difficult. The female genitalia, however, usually give good char- 
acters, but where they fail larvae or host plants suffice to distinguish 
the species. 

In addition there are two species, fulva and amicella, which have 
become modified and represent offshoots from the type stock. 

The remaining species form a group of very closely related forms. 

Busck^° lists 39 species as belonging to this genus, one {plum- 
merella) being described as new. The latter falls as a synonym of 
eupatoriiella. In 1920 Meyrick" described dryadoxena (synonym 
of costosa) and sciadopa (and proposed the new name testifica for 
the supposedly preoccupied hyperella Ely) . That same year Barnes 
and Busck" described pteleae^ latipalpella, hlacella^ callosella, and 
terinella, of which pteleae and latipalpella are valid species ; Macella 
falls as a synonym of argUlacea^ terhiella falls to paUidella^ and 
callosella to sabulella. In 1921 Busck^^ described 'blackmori (syno- 
nym of costosa) and Braun" described nivalis^ the latter being valid. 
In 1926 Braun ^^ added cogitata ( synonym of canella) , and in 1933 '^^ I 
added serrae (synonym of pallideUa) . Keifer ^^ added clarkei in 1936. 
In the present paper I have transferred eight species to the new genus 
Martyrhilda and have described eight species and one race as new, 
bringing the total niunber of described species for our fauna to 44. 
There are additional species on hand at the present time, but these 
are represented by poor or unreared material, and I deem it inadvisa- 
ble to add more names for these. When long or reared series can be 
obtained, then, and then only, can we safely add new names. The 
larvae of comparatively few of the species of this genus are known, 
but those known are found attacking a large variety of plants. Many 
larvae roll the leaves of the host plants and feed within the tube thus 
formed; some are leaf tiers and others feed in webs in the inflores- 
cence or leaves. Pupation occurs in debris on the ground or, 
occasionally, in the leaf roll made by the larva. 

JO Busck, Proc. V. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 1908. 

^ Meyricb, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 2, p. 313, 1920. 

^2 Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 4, p. 231-233, 1920. 

" Busck, Can. Ent., vol. 53, p. 277, 1921. 

1* Braun, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 73, pt. 1, p. 10, 1921. 

^ Braun, Can. Ent., vol. 58, p. 47, 1926. 

"Clarke, Can. Ent., vol. 65, p. 84, 1933. 

" Keifer, Bull. Southern California Acad. Sci., vol. 35, p. 10, 1936. 



46 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF AGONOPTERIX BASED ON COLORATION 

1 . Fore wing roughened with numerous raised scales 2 

Fore wing smooth or with few raised scales 5 

2. Fore wing light ochreous-brown with black markings 3 

Fore wing ochreous-fuscous thickly mottled with black and 

white scales ^ 4 

3. A large blackish-fuscous spot at end of cell reaching costa 

pteleae Barnes and Busck (p. 72) 
No such large spot latipalpella Barnes and Busck (p. 118) 

4. Terminal segment of labial palpus long, recurved 

eupatoriiella (Chambers) (p. 74) 
Terminal segment of labial palpus short, hardly recurved 

scabella (Zeller) (p. 72) 

5. Fore wing with crescentic discal dash before middle 6 

Fore wing otherwise 10 

6. Fore wing predominantly grayish ochreous 

curvilineella (Beutenmiiller) (p. 62) 
Fore wing otherwise 7 

7. Discal spot at end of cell yellow or cream colored 8 

Discal spot at end of cell white 9 

8. Fore wing grajash lavender hyperella Ely (p. 56) 

Fore wing brownish purple lythrella (Walsingham) (p. 59) 

9. Fore wing predominantly reddish purple arcuella, new species (p. 58) 

Fore wing purplish fuscous gelidella (Busck) (p. 55) 

10. Fore wing some shade of ochreous or yellow 11 

Fore wing otherwise 5 

11. Base of fore wing blackish fuscous atrodorsella (Clemens) (p. 70) 

Base of fore wing otherwise 12 

12. Inner margin of fore wing immaculate, or with minute, incon- 

spicuous dark irrorations 14 

Inner margin of fore wing with conspicuous dark markings 13 

13. Inner margin with fuscous subtornal blotch, posticella (Walsingham) (p. 119) 
Inner margin strongly suflfused basally with blackish to reddish- 
fuscous.. flavicomella (Engel) (p. 105) 

14. Third segment of labial palpus with at least two dark annuh 18 

Third segment of labial palpus with one or no dark annulus 15 

15. Outer discal spot fuscous 16 

Outer discal spot cream colored or yellow 17 

16. Abdomen suffused with fuscous beneath; terminal segment of 

labial palpus with brownish-red subapical annulus 

nubiferella (Walsingham) (p. 60) 
Adbomen with black lateral line on each side beneath; terminal 
segment with subapical annulus and apex blackish fuscous 

sabulella (Walsingham) (p. Ill) 

17. Outer discal spot yellow; terminal segment of labial palpus fus- 

cous with creamy-white median fascia; abdomen with black 

lateral line on each side dimorphella, new species (p. 97) 

Outer discal spot cream colored; terminal segment of labial 
palpus with apex and subapical annulus black; abdomen with 
row of black spots on each side beneath costosa (Haworth) (p. 113) 

18. Outer discal spot absent or indistinct; subbasal annulus of third 

segment of labial palpus brick red robiniella (Packard) (p. 92) 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 47 

Outer discal spot conspicuous; subbasal annulus of third segment 

of labial palpus never brick red 19 

19. Outer discal spot preceded by an orange-red streak 

tlielmae, new species (p. 96) 
Outer discal spot not preceded by any such streak 20 

20. Outer discal spot whitish or whitish ochreous 21 

Outer discal spot black or blackish fuscous 24 

21. At basal third of fore wing two conspicuous black discal spots 

surrounded by a pale ochreous shade lecontella (Clemens) (p. 94) 

Discal spots at basal third of fore wing not surrounded by a pale 

ochreous shade 22 

22. Ground color of fore wing reddish ochreous; outer discal spot 

white pulvipennella (Clemens) (p. 76) 

Ground color otherwise 23 

23. Ground color of fore wing whitish ochreous; outer discal spot 

white with black ring arnicella (Walsingham) (p. 90) 

Ground color of fore wing pale grayish ochreous; outer discal 

spot sordid whitish argillacea (Walsingham) (p. 98) 

24. Fore wing ochreous overlaid with reddish fuscous; third segment 

of labial palpus with subbasal and supramedial annuli and tip 

black fusciterminella, new species (p. 80) 

Fore wing light ochreous irrorated with blackish fuscous and 
shaded with fuscous; third segment of labial palpus with sub- 
basal and supramedial annuli blackish fuscous, tip whitish 
ochreous pallidella (Busck) (p. 88) 

25. Fore wing predominantly red, tawny-red or reddish brown 26 

Fore wing otherwise 33 

26. Fore wing tawny-red fulva (Walsingham) (p. 53) 

Fore wing otherwise 27 

27. Costa of fore wing conspicuously grayish 28 

Costa of fore wing otherwise 29 

28. Brush of second segment of labial palpus trumpet-shaped 

antennariella, new species (p. 108) 
Brush of second segment of labial palpus not trumpet-shaped 

oregonensis, new species (p. 65) 

29. Fore wing crimson-red irrorated with black and cinereous 

scales; costa lighter, tawny-red walsinghamella (Busck) (p. 78) 

Fore wing otherwise 30 

30. Fore wing reddish brown 31 

Fore wing ochreous-white suffused with reddish fuscous and 

sparsely irrorated with black scales 32 

31. Third segment of labial palpus with subbasal and subapical 

annuli and apex black; abdomen with a lateral row of black 

spots on each side beneath psoraliella (Walsingham) (p. 121) 

Third segment of labial palpus with subbasal and subapical an- 
nuli black; apex yellowish white; abdomen with four longi- 
tudinal rows of fuscous spots beneath clemensella (Chambers) (p. 68) 

32. Fore wing strongly suffused with reddish fuscous; discal spots 

usually not sharply contrasted rosaciliella (Busck) (p. 83) 

Fore wing liberally sprinkled with fuscous to black scales, but 
these and discal spots usually sharply contrasted 

echinopanicis, new subspecies (p. 86) 

33. Fore wing some shade of gray 34 

Fore wing otherwise 38 



48 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

34. Brush of second segment of labial palpus trumpet-shaped; fore 

wing lavender-gray nebulosa (Zeller) (p. 110) 

Brush of second segment of labial palpus not trumpet-shaped; 

fore wing not lavender-gray 35 

35. Fore wing without row of dark subterminal spots; ground color 

gray, carmine tinted; third segment of labial palpus light 
grayish ochreous with black apex and black spot near base 

anteriorly sanguinella (Busck) (p. 123) 

Fore wing and labial palpus otherwise 36 

36. Third segment of labial palpus with two conspicuous dark annul! 37 

Third segment of labial palpus without conspicuous bands; 

suffused with ochreous-gray outwardly muricolorella (Busck) (p. 64) 

37. Fore wing pale yellowish gray with rosy tint on apical third of 

wing and on basal half of inner margin canadensis (Busck )(p. 104) 

Fore wing ochreous-gray without rosy tint senicionella (Busck) (p. 107) 

38. Fore wing grayish fuscous 39 

Fore wing otherwise 40 

39. Fore wing without dark subterminal spots; third segment of 

labial palpus with subbasal and supramedial annuli and tip 

black cajonensis, new species (p. 82) 

Fore wing with dark subterminal spots; third segment with sub- 
basal and supramedial annuli black; apex sordid whitish 

novi-mundi (Walsingham) (p. 87) 

40. Fore wing some shade of brown or fuscous 41 

Fore wing luteous, infuscated; cilia fuscous, tipped with luteous 

ciarkei Keifer (p. 66) 

41. Alar expanse, 16-17 mm 42 

Alar expanse, 20-25 mm 43 

42. Fore wing violaceous-brown; apical third of terminal segment of labial 

palpus black amyrisella (Busck) (p. 124) 

Fore wing ochreous-brown; terminal segment of labial palpus with 
subbasal and supramedial annuli black; apical third ochreous-white 

amissella (Busck) (p. 117) 

43. Fore wing light brown, without row of dark subterminal spots 

pergandeella (Busck) (p. 116) 
Fore wing brownish or ochreous-fuscous and with row of dark subter- 
minal spots 44 

44. Third segment of labial palpus with basal three-fourths and apex black 

nigrinotella (Busck) (p. 101) 
Third segment of labial palpus with subbasal and supramedial annuli 
and apex blackish fuscous costimacula, new species (p. 102) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF AGONOPTERIX BASED ON MALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Clasper short, flattened, longitudinal; tegumen and socii strongly sclero- 

tized (fig. 152) fulva (Walsingham) (p. 53) 

Clasper not flattened and socii never appreciably sclerotized (figs. 153, 

157, etc.) 2 

2. Socii small and widely separated; tegumen truncated (fig. 153) 3 

Socii and tegumen otherwise (fig. 62) 7 

3. Hairs of the transtillar lobes coarse and strong (fig. 156) 4 

Hairs of the transtillar lobes fine and weak (fig. 153) 6 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 49 

4. Coarse, strong hairs of the transtillar lobes three or less (fig. 156) 5 

Coarse, strong hairs of transtillar lobes at least six 

lythrella (Walsingham) (p. 59) 
6. Clasper of harpe stout, curved (fig. 156) hyperella Ely (p. 56) 

Clasper of harpe stout, straight (fig. 154) arcuella, new species (p. 58) 

6. Anellus broader than long (fig. 161) nubiferella (Walsingham) (p. 60) 

Anellus longer than broad (fig. 153) gelidella (Busck) (p. 55) 

7. Costa and sacculus of harpe parallel; cucullus broad and rounded (fig. 

186) amicella (Walsingham) (p. 90) 

Costa and sacculus of harpe not parallel and cucullus not broad and 
rounded (figs. 157, 158, etc.) 8 

8. Clasper attaining or reaching beyond costa of harpe (figs. 174, 

177, 190) 9 

Clasper not attaining costa of harpe (figs. 169, 170, etc.) 11 

9. Clasper reaching beyond costa of harpe (figs. 177, 190) 10 

Clasper not reaching beyond costa of harpe (fig. 174) 

costimacula, new species (p. 102) 

10. Harpe long, slender; posterior edge of anellus strongly concave 

(fig. 190) posticella (Walsingham) (p. 119) 

Harpe broad; posterior edge of anellus nearly straight, with 

shallow median cleft (fig. 177) psoraliella (Walsingham) (p. 121) 

11. Anellus broader than long (figs. 173, 183, 184, 185) 12 

Anellus longer than broad (figs. 181, 182, etc.) 16 

12. Aedeagus short, stout (figs. 183a, 185a) 13 

Aedaegus other\vise 14 

13. Posterior margin of anellus strongly convex, smooth (fig. 183) 

pergandeella (Busck) (p. 116) 
Posterior margin of anellus not strongly convex or smooth (fig. 

185) nebulosa (Zeller) (p. 110) 

14. Clasper very stout, nearly reaching costa of harpe (fig. 184). 

costosa (Haworth) (p. 113) 
Clasper slender, not reaching far beyond center of harpe (figs. 

159, 173) 15 

15. Clasper straight, with small basal protuberance; distal end ser- 

rate (fig. 173) flavicomella (Engel) (p. 105) 

Clasper hooked, without basal protuberance; distal end not 

serrate (fig. 157) curvilineella (Beutenmuller) (p. 62) 

16. Clasper abruptly broadened at distal end (fig. 181) 

sabulella (Walsingham) (p. Ill) 
Clasper otherwise 17 

17. Lobes of anellus large, prominent (figs. 158, 159) 18 

Lobes of anellus small, inconspicuous (figs. 169, 170, 176, 179) 30 

18. Posterior margin of anellus distinctly concave (figs. 158, 159, 

160, 163, 164, 165, 180, 188) 19 

Posterior margin of anellus not distinctly concave (figs. 162, 166, 

172, 178, 182) .". 26 

19. Clasper reaching well beyond middle of harpe (figs. 159, 160, 

163, 164, 180, 188)_...l 20 

Clasper not reaching much beyond middle of harpe (figs. 158, 165) 25 

20. Aedeagus slender, sharply pointed (figs. 159a, 163a, 164a, 180a) 21 

Aedeagus stout (figs. 160a, 188a) 24 



50 PROCEJIJDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ]MUSEUM vol. 90 

21. Anellus narrowed posteriori}^; clasper very slender (fig. 159) 

clemensella (Chambers) (p. 68) 
Anellus not appreciably narrowed posteriorly; clasper strong 

(figs. 163, 164) ' 22 

22. Anellus with a narrow, biramous, strongly sclerotized median 

area pulvipennella (Clemens) (p. 76) 

Anellus without such sclerotized area (figs. 163, 180) 23 

23. Lateral lobes of anellus nearly attaining posterior edge of cen- 

tral plate (fig. 180) cajonensis, new species (p. 82) 

Lateral lobes of anellus not nearly attaining posterior edge of 

central plate (fig. 163) eupatoriiella (Chambers) (p. 74) 

24. Anellus strongly constricted anteriorly; harpe abruptly narrowed 

beyond clasper (fig. 160) atrodorsella (Clemens) (p. 70) 

Anellus not strongly constricted anteriorly and harpe not 
abruptly narrowed beyond clasper (fig. 188) 

latipalpella Barnes and Busck (p. 118) 

25. Distal half of aedeagus much more slender than proximal half 

(fig. 165a) walsinghamella (Busck) (p. 78) 

Aedeagus of about equal thickness throughout its length (fig. 

158a) muricolorella (Busck) (p. 64) 

26. Clasper nearly attaining costa of harpe (figs. 162, 178) 27 

Clasper not reaching much beyond middle of harpe (figs. 166, 

172, 182) 28 

27. Posterior edge of anellus convex (fig. 178) clarkei Keifer (p. 66) 

Posterior edge of anellus not convex (fig. 162) 

pteleae Barnes and Busck (p. 72) 

28. Aedeagus long, slender (fig. 166a) rosaciliella (Busck) (p. 83) 

Aedeagus stout (figs. 172a, 182a) 29 

29. Anellus with a narrow, longitudinal, weakly sclerotized median 

area; cucullus rather pointed (fig. 182) pallidella (Busck) (p. 88) 

Anellus without such median area; cucullus rounded (fig. 172) 

senicionella (Busck) (p. 107) 

30. Clasper twisted (fig. 168) novi-ravxndi (Walsingham) (p. 87) 

Clasper not twisted (fig. 167, etc.) 31 

31. Clasper reaching at least three-fourths of the way to costa of 

harpe (figs. 170, 187) 32 

Clasper reaching to or slightly beyond middle of harpe (fig. 167, etc.).. 34 

32. Clasper straight (figs. 170, 187) 33 

Clasper definitely curved distally (fig. 176)__oregonensis, new species (p. 65) 

33. Clasper stout (fig. 187) amissella (Busck) (p. 117) 

Clasper slender (fig. 170) nigrinotella (Busck) (p. 101) 

34. Posterior edge of anellus concave (figs. 171, 179) 35 

Posterior edge of anellus not concave (figs. 167, 169, 175, 189) 36 

35. Clasper slender, reaching slightly beyond middle of harpe (fig. 

171) argillacea (Walsingham) (p. 98) 

Clasper stout, not reaching beyond middle of harpe (fig. 178) 

dimorphella, new species (p. 97) 

36. Anellus nearly round (figs. 169, 189) 37 

AneUus roughly rectangular (fies. 167, 175) 39 

37. Posterior margin of anellus with shallow cleft; cucullus sharply 

pointed (fig. 189) sanguinella (Busck) (p. 123) 

Posterior margin of anellus without any trace of a median cleft; 

cucullus dull-pointed (fig. 169) 38 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 51 

38. Cornuti fine, spiculate (fig. 169a) robiniella (Packard) (p. 92) 

Cornuti coarse, small thelmae, new species (p. 96) 

39. Posterior margin of anellus distinctly convex (fig. 167) 

fusciterminella, new species (p. 80) 
Posterior margin of anellus not distinctly convex (fig. 175) 

antennariella, new species (p. 108) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF AGONOPTERIX BASED ON FEMALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Bursa copulatrix with signuin (figs. 241, 255, 270, etc.) 5 

Bursa copulatrix without siguum (figs. 229, 240, 272) 2 

2. Ductus bursae short, not much longer than bursa copulatrix 

(fig. 272) amyrisella (Busck) (p. 124) 

Ductus bursae much longer than bursa copulatrix 3 

3. Anterior edge of genital plate convex, entire; ostium large, 

round (fig. 240) hyperella Ely (p. 56) 

Anterior edge of genital plate produced (figs. 229, 259A) 4 

4. Produced margin of genital plate before ostium truncate; ostium 

round (fig. 229) diraorphella, new species (p. 97) 

Produced margin of genital plate before ostium strongly convex; 

ostium broadly oval (fig. 259a) thelmae, new species (p. 96) 

5. Signum minute, round; area posterior to ostium with two small 

sclerotized patches (fig. 259) robiniella (Packard) (p. 92) 

Signum a small to large toothed or scobinate plate (figs. 242, 245, 

250, 255, etc.) 6 

6. Ductus bursae with a large sclerotized patch adjacent to bursa 

copulatrix (fig. 248) fulva (Walsingham) (p. 53) 

Ductus bursae without sucli sclerotized area 7 

7. Anterior margin of genital plate cleft (figs. 230a, 249-253) 8 

Anterior margin of genital plate not cleft 13 

8. Lobe of ovipositor clothed with spines (fig. 230) clarkei Keifer (p. 66) 

Lobe of ovipositor not clothed with spines (figs. 249-253) 9 

9. Cleft narrow (figs. 251, 253) 10 

Cleft semicircular (figs. 249, 250, 252) 11 

10. Inception of ductus seminalis at the ostium (fig. 251) 

pteleae Barnes and Busck (p. 72) 
Inception of ductus seminalis a short distance before the ostium 

(fig. 253) pulvipeiinella (Clemens) (p. 76) 

11. Anterior points of genital plate nearly touching (fig. 252). 

atrodorsella (Clemens) (p. 70) 
Anterior points of genital plate widely separated (figs. 249, 250) 12 

12. Ostium occupying over half length of genital plate (fig. 249). 

eupatoriiella (Chambers) (p. 74) 
Ostium occupying less than half length of genital plate (fig. 250). 

scabella (Zeller) (p. 72) 

13. Genital plate with pronounced anteromedian ventral evagina- 

tion (fig. 274) posticella (Walsingham) (p. 119) 

Genital plate without such evagination 14 

14. Anterior margin of genital plate produced (figs. 255, 261, 265, 

266, 269, 270, 273) 15 

Anterior margin of genital plate not produced 26 

15. Production of margin as wide or nearly as wide as genital plate is 

long (figs. 255, 265) 16 

Production of margin of genital plate narrower 17 



52 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

16. Ostium large, round (fig. 265) nigrinotella (Busck) (p. 101) 

Ostium spindle-shaped (transverse) (fig. 255) argillacea (Walsingham) (p. 98) 

17. Ostial opening definitely in anterior half of genital plate (fig. 261). 

costimacula, new species (p. 102) 
Ostial opening not definitely in anterior half of genital plate 

(figs. 262, 263, 264, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 273) 18 

18. Ostial opening about middle of genital plate (figs. 266, 269) 19 

Ostial opening definitely in posterior half of genital plate (figs. 

262, 264, 267, 268, 270, 273) 20 

19. Anterior to ostium a strongly sclerotized crescent-shaped bar; 

posterior to ostium a small sclerotized rectangular area 

(fig. 269) amissella (Busck) (p. 117) 

Anterior to ostium an elongate, slightly curved, sclerotized mar- 
gin; no sclerotized area posterior to ostium (fig. 266) 

nebulosa (Zeller) (p. 110) 

20. Signum distinctly 4-pointed (figs. 262, 264, 270, 273) 22 

Signum not 4-pointed (figs. 267, 268) 21 

21. Genital plate broad, with a gently concave, narrow, sclerotized 

anterior margin; ostial opening on extreme posterior edge 

(fig. 268) latipalpella Barnes and Busck (p. 118) 

Genital plate narrow with a broad, convex anterior margin; ostial 
opening not reaching extreme posterior edge of genital plate 
(fig. 267) flavicomella (Engel) (p. 105) 

22. Ostial opening occupying more than half length of genital 

plate (figs. 262, 263, 270) 24 

Ostial opening occupying half or less than half length of genital 

plate (figs. 264, 273) 23 

23. Signum large, with small, scattered teeth; lateral points much 

larger than anterior and posterior points (fig. 273) 

costosa (Haworth) (p. 113) 
Signum small, with strong teeth; lateral, anterior, and posterior 

points about equal in length (fig. 264) antennariella, new species (p. 108) 

24. Posterior and anterior points of signum of about equal length 

(fig. 263) senicionella (Busck) (p. 107) 

Posterior and anterior points of unequal length (figs. 262, 270) 25 

25. Anterior point of signum longer than posterior point (fig. 262) 

canadensis (Busck) (p. 104) 
Anterior point of signum shorter than posterior point (fig. 
270). sabulella (Walsingham) (p. Ill) 

26. Signum situated in extreme anterior end of bursa copulatrix 

(figs. 242, 243, 245, 247a, 271) 27 

Signum not situated in extreme anterior end of bursa copula- 
trix (figs. 241, 246, 254, 256, 257, 258) 31 

27. Ostial opening at extreme anterior margin of genital plate (fig. 

271) psoraliella (Walsingham) (p. 121) 

Ostial opening not at anterior edge of genital plate (figs. 242, 

243, 245, 247) 28 

28. Ostial opening at extreme posterior edge of genital plate (fig. 

242) clemensella (Chambers) (p. 68) 

Ostial opening not at posterior edge of genital plate (figs. 243, 

245, 247) 29 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 53 

29. At posterior end of ostium two small, sclerotized lateral areas 

(fig. 243) muricolorella (Busck) (p. 64) 

No such sclerotized areas at posterior end of ostium (figs. 245, 

247) 30 

30. Signum a distinctly 4-pointed plate (fig. 247a) gelidella (Busck) (p. 55) 

Signum irregular, not 4-pointed (fig. 245) 

curvilineella (Beutenmliller) (p. 62) 

31. Ostial opening at extreme posterior edge of genital plate (fig. 

254) walsinghamella (Busck) (p. 78) 

Ostial opening otherwise (figs. 244, 246, 256, 257, 258) 32 

32. Bursa copulatrix symmetrical (figs. 244a, 256, 257, 258) 34 

Bursa copulatrix distinctly asymmetrical (figs. 241, 246) 33 

33. Signum oval; ostium oval (fig. 246) arcuella, new species (p. 58) 

Signum diamond-shaped, ostium elliptical (fig. 241) 

oregonensis, new species (p. 65) 

34. Signum large (figs. 244a, 258) 35 

Signum small (figs. 256, 257) 36 

35. Signum a 4-pointed plate (fig. 244a) cajonensis, new species (p. 82) 

Signum roughly diamond-shaped (fig. 258) 

fusciterminella, new species (p. 80) 

36. Signum bilobed (fig. 257) rosaciliella (Busck) (p. 83) 

Signum oval (fig. 256) pallidella (Busck) (p. 88) 

AGONOPTERIX FULVA (Walsingham) 

Plate 25. Figuees 152, 152a ; Plate 42, Figxjee 248 

Depressaria fulva Walsingham, Trans. Amer, Ent. Soc, vol. 10, p. 175, 1882. — 

Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5251, 1891.— 

Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 741, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. 

Bull. 52, No. 5871, 1903.— Keakfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 

America, No. 6414, 1903.— Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 

180, p. 176, 1922.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 824, 

1939. 
Agonoptcryx fulva (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 

1908.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 240, 1923. 
Agnopteryx fulva (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6453, 1917. 
Agonopterix fulva (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 

of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8446, 1939. 
Labial palpus with second segment tawny-red outwardly irrorated 
with whitish and fuscous scales, whitish inwardly ; third segment sor- 
did whitish with a poorly defined narrow, light tawny-red subapical 
band. Antenna pubescent, fuscous, narrowly and faintly annulated 
with ochreous. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing tawny- 
red ; thorax suffused with fuscous and irrorated with white posteriorly ; 
fore wing irrorated with fuscous and with a large fuscous shade at end 
of cell; in the center of this shade is a white discal spot (absent in some 
specimens) ; at extreme base of wing on inner angle a small transverse 
whitish patch not reaching costa ; veins, beyond cell, marked with fus- 
cous scales ; cilia grayish fuscous edged lightly with rosy red. Hind 



54 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

wing and cilia grayish fuscous, the latter lightly edged with rosy red. 
Legs whitish inwardly, overlaid outwardly with tawny-red and with a 
rosy-red suffusion; tarsi fuscous narrowly annulated with whitish. 
Abdomen grayish-fuscous above, whitish beneath, strongly overlaid 
with fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Strikingly different fi'om those of any other de- 
scribed North American species : Harpe only moderately clothed with 
hairs at the cucullus and along the costal edge ; sacculus deeply folded 
and very strongly sclerotized; clasper short, flattened, longitudinal, 
constricted at middle, broadly rounded at its extremity. Anellus 
broadly oval, moderately sclerotized, with a deep excavation on the 
posterior edge. Vinculum broadly rounded. Aedeagus sharply bent 
near the middle, slender, dilated at the distal end ; armed with many 
short, stout, cornuti. Tegumen strongly sclerotized, more so along 
the ventral edges. Socii strongly sclerotized flaps, very sparsely 
clothed with hairs. Gnathos a small, round, spined knob. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, strongly sclerotized except 
for a narrow, median, longitudinal membranous portion posterior to 
ostium. Ostium large with deeply concave anterior edge, and open- 
ing near anterior edge of genital plate. Ductus bursae membranous 
except for a large sclerotized patch adjacent to bursa copulatrix and 
a short portion before ostium ; anterior to the latter the ductus bursae 
is constricted at the inception of the ductus seminalis. Signum a 
small, irregular sclerotized plate. 

Alar expanse, 22-24 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Not designated. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Rocky Mountains region of the United States and 
Canada, and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

Arizona: White Mountains, Apaclie County, near McNary P. O., 2 {1-15-IX-25, 
O. O. Poling). 

Canadian records 

Alberta: "Head of Pine Creek," Calgary, $ (VIII-5-05, F. H. Wolley-Dod). 
British Columbia: Jesmond, S (2-VIII-1937, J. K. Jacob). 
New Brunswick: Fredericktown, $ ("August 20"). 
Ontario: Stittsville, $, 2 (21-VIII-1939, E. G. Lester). 

I have seen other specimens without locality labels. 

Remarks. — An easily recognizable species not to be confused with 
any other described from North America. 

The type, which is before me, shows only a single white scale in the 
single discal spot at the end of the cell as described by Walsingham, 
but a "homotype" from Alberta, which is clearly this species, shows a 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 55 

well-defined spot at the end of the cell. A third specimen, from 
Beutenniiiller's collection, has only a few blackish scales suggesting 
this same spot. 

The female from Arizona, which I have identified as this species, 
undoubtedly belongs here. 

AGONOPTERIX GELIDELLA (Busck) 

Plate 25, Figures 153, 153a ; Plate 42, Figxikes 247, 247a 

Depressaria gelidella Busck, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 9, p. 90, 1908. — 

Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 177, 1922. — Gaede, 

in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 325, 1939. 
Agoywpteryx gelideUa Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 1908. 
Agnopteryx gelideUa (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6450, 1917. 
Agonopterix gelidella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 

S451, 1939. 

Labial palpus yellowish white ; second segment purplish black out- 
wardly tinged with carmine; third segment strongly suffused with 
purplish black anteriorly, tip white. Antenna purplish black on 
basal segment, remainder fuscous. Head grayish fuscous. Thorax 
purplish gray; tegula purplish black tipped with whitish. Ground 
color of fore wing dark purplish fuscous, sparsely irrorated with 
black; near base, from inner margin, a transverse yellowish-white 
streak, not reaching costa; on the disk, at basal third, a crescent- 
shaped black dash with a few carmine scales mixed and followed by 
a white patch ; at the end of cell a white spot edged with black ; costa 
faintly spotted with whitish; from costa a poorly defined, narrow, 
outwardly curved whitish line to inner margin before tornus ; around 
termen a series of blackish- fuscous spots forming an almost continu- 
ous fine line before cilia; inner margin and apical portion of wing 
carmine tinted ; cilia grayish fuscous. Hind wing yellowish fuscous ; 
cilia light fuscous with considerable white mixed. Legs yellowish 
white inwardly, purplish black outwardly. Abdomen grayish fuscous 
above, yellowish white beneath, suffused and irrorated with fuscous 
and with a longitudinal row of black spots on each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe only weakly sclerotized and moderately 
clothed with hairs; cucullus rounded; clasper very stout, somewhat 
dilated distally; outer edge rough; reaching two-thirds distance to- 
ward costa. Anellus narrow, longer than broad, roughly rectangular, 
emarginate on the posterior edge; lateral lobes weak. Vinculum 
broad, rounded. Aedeagus moderately stout, gently curved and ter- 
minating in a sharp upturned point; just before middle a forked 
sclerotized arm by which it is attached to the anellus. Transtilla a 
weakly sclerotized band with large, hairy lateral lobes, the hairs fine 



56 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

and weak. Gnathos an oval, spined knob. Socii very small, widely 
separated, sparsely clothed with fine hairs. Tegumen truncated. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad with a row of strong hairs 
on posterior margin. Ostium large, round, nearer to anterior than 
to posterior edge ; anterior edge well sclerotized. Ductus bursae long, 
rather stout, constricted just before ostium at inception of ductus 
seminalis. Bursa copulatrix large with a well developed 4-pointed 
signum in the anterior end. 

Alar expanse, 19-20 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada (A. W. Hanham) 

Distribution. — Alberta, eastward to Ontario. 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Nordegg, $ (l-VIII-1921, J. McDunnough). 

Manitoba: Winnipeg, 2 $ $ (no date, A. W. Hanham). 

Ontario: Ottawa, $, 5 (&-VII-1905, 25-VII-1906, C. H. Young) ; Trenton, $ 

(27-VI-1911, Evans). 
Saskatchewan: Earl Grey, $ (24-VII-1925, J. D. Ritchie) ; Indian Head, 9 

(3-VIII-1925, J. J. de Gryse). 

Remarks. — This and the following species are similar in pattern 
to the European conterminella (Zeller) . 

The abdomen of the type is missing, but I do not hesitate to place 
the series before me under this name. 

Through the courtesy of Dr. McDunnough I have been able to 
dissect one of the only two females I have seen and have figured the 
genitalia. 

This species has been recorded fi'om British Columbia, but all 
specimens so determined are referable to oregonensis (new species) . 

AGONOPTERIX HYPERELLA Ely 

Plate 25, Figxjbes 156, 156a ; Plate 42, Figube 240 

Agonopterys hyperella Ely, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 12, p. 68, 1910. 

Agonopteryx hyperella (Ely) Foebes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, 
p. 240, 1923. 

Agonopterix hyperella (Ely) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 
8438, 1939. 

Agnopteryx hyperella (Ely) Baenes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepi- 
doptera of Boreal America, No. 6457, 1917. 

Depressaria testiflca Meykick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 2, p. 316, 1920; in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. (New synonymy.) 

(Not Agonopteryx hyperella McDunnough, Can. Ent., vol. 67, p. 74, 1935.) 

Labial palpus creamy white, exteriorly heavily overlaid with 
fuscous; third segment with a broad black subapical annulation. 
Antenna dark purplish fuscous annulated with gray. Head creamy 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 57 

white in front, grayish above. Thorax lavender-gray overlaid with 
cinereous to white scales. Fore wing dark grayish lavender shaded 
with yellowish brown, especially toward inner margin; at base of 
wing, from inner angle almost to costa, a transverse yellowish line 
preceded by two black spots, one near costa, the other at inner angle ; 
in center of cell a black crescent-shaped dash margined with yellowish 
brown and followed by a grayish shade ; between the upper point of 
this dash and the costa a small black spot similarly edged with yel- 
lowish brown ; at the end of cell a conspicuous, though small, cream- 
colored or yellowish spot edged with brown and preceded and fol- 
lowed with a few scattered black scales; costa somewhat strigulated 
with fuscous and grayish; around termen, at base of cilia, a thin 
fuscous to black line; cilia light purplish fuscous mixed with gray. 
Hind wing smoky fuscous; cilia somewhat more brownish with a 
fuscous basal band. Legs creamy white to yellowish shaded with 
fuscous exteriorly except at joints. Abdomen grayish fuscous above; 
beneath, yellowish overlaid with fuscous and with indistinct black 
lateral lines. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slender, moderately clothed with fine hairs; 
clasper very stout, gently curved inwardly, its outer edge rugose; 
cucullus bluntly pointed; sacculus short, broadly folded. Anellua 
deeply incised on posterior margin, concave laterally; lateral lobes 
scarcely developed. Aedeagus curved, pointed, with a short ventral 
arm which articulates with the anellus; vesica armed with fine 
cornuti. Vinculum rounded. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band 
with well-developed lateral lobes; each lateral lobe bears three long, 
stout hairs. Gnathos a spined oval knob. Socii small, widely sepa- 
rated. Tegumen truncated. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized; 
anterior edge convex, entire. Ostium large, round; at center of 
genital plate. Ductus bursae membranous; inception of ductus semi- 
nalis shortly before ostium. Bursa copulatrix without signum. 

Alar expanse, 15-18 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type localities. — Great Falls, Md., and Great Falls, Va. 

Food plant. — Hypericum proli-jicum L. 

Distribution. — Middle Atlantic States. 

United States records 

Maryland: Great Falls, 2 $ $, 9 (V-26-09, Chas. R. Ely) ; Plummors Island, $ 

(V-30-09, Chas, R. Ely). 
Virginia: Great Falls, $ (V-31-10, Chas. R. Ely). 

Remarks. — Meyrick proposed testifica in place of hyperella think- 
ing that the latter name was mtended for hypencella of Hiibner and 
further states that hyperella is preoccupied by hypeHcella. Ely's 



58 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. so 

species is distinct from the European hypericella, and hyperella is not 
invalidated by Hiibner's name. I, therefore, reinstate Ely's species 
and sink Meyrick's name. 

The stout, gently recurved clasper of hyperella distinguishes it from 
both lythrella and arcueUa. The clasper of lythrella is slender and 
straight, and that of arcueUa is stout and straight. The separation 
of lytJvrella from gelidella is discussed under lythrella. The females, 
however, give the best characters for separating hyperella from 
arcueUa. The signum is present in arcueUa, absent in hyperella. 

AGONOPTERIX ARCUELLA. new species 

Plate 25, Figure 154 ; Plate 42, Figube 246 
Agonopteryx hyperella McDunnough [not Ely], Can. Ent., vol. 67, p. 74, 1935. 

A small reddish-purple species closely related to the foregoing two 
and to the following species. 

Head yellowish ochreous, mixed with golden-brown; labial palpus 
whitish ochreous ; brush of the second segment narrow, heavily over- 
laid with reddish purple and black outwardly and beneath; terminal 
segment thickened, reddish purple and black exteriorly, with incom- 
plete reddish-purple basal and subapical annuli ; antenna with basal 
segment blackish fuscous, with narrow ochreous apical annulus; 
remainder of antenna fuscous, ochreous annulated, and the whole 
with a purplish sheen. 

Thorax strongly crested, yellowish ochreous mixed with golden- 
brown ; tegula and crest yellowish purple, the former strongly shaded 
with fuscous. Ground color of fore wing reddish purple strongly 
suffused with fuscous along costa and at base ; the fuscous basal shad- 
ing terminated by a sharply contrasting, narrow, whitish ochreous 
line and including a sharply contrasted black spot near dorsal edge; 
another similar black spot at base of radius; costa strigulated with 
whitish and carmine ; at basal third an outwardly curved black cres- 
cent preceded by carmine and followed by whitish scales ; discal spot 
at end of cell white ; from middle of costa to center of wing a strong 
whitish shading from costa; at apical third an indistinct fascia out- 
wardly curved to between veins 6 and 7, then turned back, parallel 
to termen, nearly to dorsum; cilia purplish fuscous, carmine tipped, 
with black basal line from veins 3 to 7. Hind wing brownish fus- 
cous; cilia a shade lighter with dark subbasal and light basal line; 
underside with strong black line at base of cilia. Legs blackish fus- 
cous, with whitish outwardly on femora and reddish purple on tibiae 
and tarsi; tarsi annulated yellowish ochreous. Abdomen fuscous 
with much yellowish ochreous beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately sclerotized and sparsely clothed 
with hairs ; cucullus rounded ; clasper stout, straight, rugose on outer 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 59 

edge; anellus roughly oval, emarginate on posterior edge; lateral 
lobes undeveloped; aedeagus stout, pointed, slightly curved, with 
large spinulate patch. Vinculum rounded. Transtilla a sclerotized 
band with large lateral lobes, the latter with few strong, coarse hairs. 
Gnathos an oval spined knob. Socii small, widely separated, with 
few hairs. Tegumen truncated. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium large, oval at about center of genital 
plate; genital plate membranous or sclerotized posterior to ostium; 
ductus bursae long, membranous, slightly dilated at point of inception 
of ductus seminalis ; bursa copulatrix large, asymmetrical, bulging on 
left side ; oval, with oval, spined signum. 

Alar expanse, 16-18 mm. 

Type. — In the Canadian National Collection. 

Paratypes. — U. S. N. M. No. 52078. Also in Canadian National 
Collection and collection of Dr. A. F. Braun. 

Type locality. — White Point Beach, Queens County, Nova Scotia. 

Food plant. — Hypericum virginicuTn L. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type, IQ $ $ and 10 9 5 para- 
types all from Wliite Point Beach, Queens County, Nova Scotia 
(VIII-7 to 13-34, J. McDunnough) ; 2 5 $ , $ , Sparrow Lake, Ontario 
(VII-1-26, A. F. Braun); $, Black Mountains, North Carolina 
("VII-20"). 

McDunnough misidentified this species and reported it under the 
name A. hyperella Ely. In addition to the above I now have two 
specimens from Chamcook, New Brunswick, Canada (4— 5-VIII-1938, 
T. N. Freeman; Rf. Hypericum sp.) submitted by Dr. J. McDunnough, 
and three specimens from Orrington, Maine (24-VII-1922, A. C. 
Ward; Rf. Hypericum sp.), submitted by J. V. Schaffner. 

AGONOPTERIX LYTHRELLA (Walsingham) 

Plate 25, Figuke 155 

Depressor ia lythreUa Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol 1, p. 257, 1889. — Busck, Proc. 
U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 744, 1902; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, 
No. 5879, 1903.— Ke,\rfott, in Smitli, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6422, 1903. — Meyrick, in W.ytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 176, 1922.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 332, 
1939. 

Agonopteryx lythrella (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat Mus., vol. 35, p. 
199, 1908.— FoEBES, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 240, 1923. 

Agonopterix lythrella (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8437, 1939. 

Agnopteryx lythrella (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6468, 1917.— Bbimley, The Insects 
of North Carolina, p. 304, 1938. 



60 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Labial palpus yellowish mottled exteriorly with purplish fuscous; 
third segment with indistinct basal and subapical fuscous annuli. 
Antenna fuscous broadly annulated with tawny. Head and thorax 
cinereous, the former with a fuscous median shade, the latter irrorated 
with purplish fuscous ; tegula purplish fuscous. Fore wing brownish 
purple dusted with fuscous and with much cinereous scaling along 
costa; at base, from inner angle almost to costa a narrow, cream- 
colored, transverse line preceded at inner angle by a distinct black 
spot; on disk, before middle, a short outwardly curved, black 
crescent-shaped dash edged with reddish and followed by cinereous; 
at end of cell a small cream-colored spot edged with fuscous; from 
costa to termen at apical third a more or less distinct cinereous fascia ; 
inner margin narrowly shaded with reddish ; around termen, at base 
of cilia, a narrow blackish-fuscous line; cilia purplish gray. Hind 
wing and cilia brownish gray, the latter edged with cinereous. Legs 
cream-colored strongly overlaid and irrorated exteriorly with pur- 
plish fuscous except at joints. Abdomen purplish gray above; 
beneath, cream-colored strongly suffused and overlaid with purplish 
fuscous. 

Alar expanse, 13-18 mm. 

Tyfe. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — "Illinois." 

Food plant. — Lythrum alatum Pursh. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 
Illinois. 
North Carolina: Black Mountains (July 20, from larvae). 

Remarks. — The male genitalia of this species are nearly identical 
with those of hyperella, arcuella, nuhiferella, and gelidella. The 
clasper of the harpe (fig. 155), however, is much more slender than 
that of any of the other four. Each of the hairy lobes of the 
transtilla bears about half a dozen strong hairs. In hyperella and 
arcuellu there are only two or three hairs and in gelidella the hairs 
are numerous but weak. I have not seen the female genitalia of this 
species. All females examined are without abdomens. 

AGONOPTERIX NUBIFERELLA (Walsingham) 

Plate 26, Figuees 161, 161a 

Depressaria nuhiferella Walsingham, Proc. Zool. See. Lonclou, ISSl, p. 316, 
pi. 36, fig. 6.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 745, 1C02 ; iyi Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5S81, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No 6424, 1903. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 27, p. 764, 1904. — MeyeicKs in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 
p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 335, 1939. 

Agonopteryx nuMferella (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, 
p. 199, 1908. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 61 

Affonopterix nuUfereUa (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepi- 
doptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera), No. 8450, 1939. 

Agnoptcryx nuUfercUa (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6470, 1917. 

Labial palpus light ochreous, second segment overlaid with brownish 
red exteriorly ; third segment with subapical annulus of the same color. 
Antenna fuscous with slight reddish luster. Head, thorax, and ground 
color of fore wing ochreous ; tegula and anterior part of thorax over- 
laid with brownish red. Extreme base, except costa, of fore wing 
unmarked, remainder of wing suffused with brownish red and irrorated 
with scattered fuscous scales ; from costa, across end of cell, almost to 
inner margin, a dark brownish-red shade with a fuscous central discal 
dot ; this shade is preceded by two more or less distinct brownish-red 
discal dots, obliquely one above the other ; along costa a series of red- 
dish-fuscous spots; around termen, at base of cilia, a line of the same 
color ; cilia ochreous, shaded with brownish red. Hind wing grayish 
fuscous ; cilia yellowish basally, grayish fuscous apically. Legs light 
ochreous; anterior and median pair strongly overlaid with reddish 
fuscous except at joints; posterior legs irrorated and suffused with 
light fuscous except at joints. Abdomen ochreous overlaid with 
fuscous beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe clothed with rather coarse hairs; cucullus 
rounded; clasper short, reaching just beyond middle, but very stout, 
bluntly pointed. Anellus a lightly sclerotized plate, broader than long, 
indented at the posterior edge ; lateral lobes undeveloped. Vinculum 
rounded. Aedeagus stout, dorsoventrally depressed, with a slightly 
upturned point; near the base is a bifid plate by which the aedeagus 
articulates with the anellus. Transtilla a narrow band with large, 
hairy lateral lobes, the hairs fine and weak. Gnathos an oval spined 
knob. Socii very small, widely separated, and sparsely clothed with 
fine hairs. Tegmnen truncated. 

Alar expanse, 18-20 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Eogue River, Oreg. 

Food plant. — Hypericum perforatum L. (The Hypericum referred 
to by Walsingham is probably this species also.) 

Distribution. — Western United States and Canada. 

United States records 

California: Mendocino and Shasta Counties (June and July 1871, Walsingham). 
Idaho: Lapwai (V-28 to l-VI-35, J. F. G. Clarke [reared]). 
Oregon: Rogue River. 

Washington: Logan Hill, Chehalis (IX-8-29, T. M. Clarke) ; Pullman 
(VH-24-9S and VIII-10-9S, C. V. Piper). 



62 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Canadian records 
British Columbia: Shawnigan Lake, Vancouver Island (VII-14-23, E. H. 
Blackmore) . 

Remarks. — This and the four foregoing species all have very sim- 
ilar genitalia, but nubiferella has distinctly narrower harpes than the 
others and is widely different in pattern and coloration. 

All the specimens I have seen are males. The California and Oregon 
specimens (including cotypes) are all considerably lighter in colora- 
tion than specimens from Washington, Idaho, and British Columbia. 
The northern specimens may represent a species distinct from that rep- 
resented by the California and Oregon specimens, presenting a par- 
allel case with that of arcueJla and hyperella in which the females 
give the only reliable character for separation. The type locality 
(from which I have two specimens) is not far from the locality where 
the Idaho material was collected, and it does not seem likely, there- 
fore, that the two color forms represent different species. Until fe- 
males from both northern and southern localities are obtained I 
believe it advisable to leave both color forms under one name. 

AGONOPTERIX CURVILINEELLA (Bentenmuller) 

Plate 26, Figures 157, 157a ; Plate 42, Figueb 245 

Depressaria curvilineella BEXJTENMtiLLEit, Ent. Amer., vol. 5, p. 10, 1889. — Busck, 
in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5874, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, List 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6417, 1903. — Meyeick, in Wyts- 
man. Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidop- 
terorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 321, 1939. 

Depressaria curvilinieUa Rilet, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 5260, 1891. — Dietz, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New 
Jersey, p. 474, 1900.— Btjsck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 742, 1002. 

Agonopteryx curvilinieUa Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 1908. 

Agonopteryx curviUneella (Beutenmiiller) Forres, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 68, p. 240, 1923. 

Agonopterix curvilineella (Beutenmiiller) McDunnough, Check list of the Lep- 
idoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera). No. 8439, 1939. 

Agnopteryx curvilinieUa Ke^^kfott, in Smith, Catalogue of the Insects of New- 
Jersey, p. 561, 1910. 

Agnopteryx curvilineella (Beutenmiiller) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6445, 1917. 

Labial palpus white ; second segment irrorated with blackish fuscous 
exteriorly; third segment with basal and subapical bands and apex 
blackish fuscous. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing light 
grayish ochreous; face white; base of tegula and fore part of thorax 
suffused with brown; fore wing, except extreme base and basal half 
of costa, strongly suffused with brown and irrorated with scattered 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 63 

in pale basal patch two small blackish-fuscous 
spots; along costa and around termen a series of blackish-fuscous spots, 
those around termen small and indistinct ; at end of cell a white discal 
spot edged with blackish fuscous and preceded by a long, curved, 
blackish-fuscous discal dash ; cilia light grayish ochreous, suffused with 
brown. Hind wing gi-ayish fuscous; cilia white with grayish-fuscous 
basal band. Legs white suffused with fuscous ; tarsi of hind legs with a 
fuscous spot at the base of each. Abdomen grayish ochreous above 
suffused with fuscous ; beneath, whitish sparsely irrorated with fuscous 
scales and with a row of blackish-fuscous spots on each side ; between 
these rows of spots two rows of smaller spots of the same color. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, profusely clothed with fine hairs, par- 
ticularly basally; cucullus pointed; sacculus moderately sclerotized, 
broad; clasper slender, heavily sclerotized, hooked, reaching two-thirds 
distance toward costa and without basal protuberance ; anellus moder- 
ately sclerotized, oval, broader than long, with weak lateral hairy 
lobes. Vinculum with a well-developed dorsoanterior process. 
Aedeagus nearly straight, wedge-shaped, bluntly pointed. Transtilla 
a narrow sclerotized band, with sparsely hairy, lateral lobes. Gnathos 
a finely spined, elongate-oval knob. Socii weakly sclerotized, broad, 
hairy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately sclerotized. Ostium 
near middle of genital plate. Ductus bursae long, slender, mem- 
branous. Bursa copulatrix oval; signum a small, irregular, sclero- 
tized plate, armed with short thornlike teeth. 

Alar expanse, 15-20 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — "New York." 

Distribution. — Eastern United States and Canada. 

United States records 
District of Columbia: Chain Bridge, 2 9 5 (October 20, 1920, A. Busck). 
Maryland: Cabin John (11-26-11, F. Knab) ; Plummers Island, 29 5 5, 14 9 9 

(March and April dates ; A. Busck and H. S. Barber). 
New Jersey: Essex County Park, 9 ("June 10," W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: 2 9 9 (Beutenmiiller) ; Ithaca, 2 9 9 (6-15-V-30, A. B. Klots) ; 

Rochester, 2 9 9 (8-VII-33, A. B. Klots). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 10<J 5, 10 9 9 (May and August to November 

dates, H. D. Merrick) ; Oak Station, Allegheny County, 3 $ S, 9 (July and 

September dates; Fred Marloff). 

Canadian records 

Manitoba: Aweme (2S-IX-23, N. Criddle) ; Winnipeg, $ (A. W. Hanham. 

no date) ; 9 ("1-5-98," no collector). 
Ontario: Ottawa (28-VIl-2-VIII-190o, C. H. Young). 



64 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

AGONOPTERIX MURICOLORELLA (Busck) 

Plate 26, Figitbes 158, 15Sa ; Plate 42, Figuee 243 

Depressaria muricolorella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 741, 1902; 
in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5873, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, 
List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6416, 1903.— Meyrick, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922,— Gaisde, in Bryk, 
Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 333, 1939. 

Agonopteryx muricolorella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 199, 1908. 

Agonopterix muricolorella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepi- 
doptera of Canada and tlie United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera). No. 8441, 1939. 

Agnopteryx muricolorella (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6455, 1917. 

Labial palpus creamy white; outside of second and all of third 
segment suffused with ochreous-gray ; second segment sparsely ir- 
rorated with fuscous. Antenna dark ochreous-gray. Head, thorax, 
base and basal third of costa of fore wing light grayish brown ; fore 
wing dark mouse gray with sparse blackish-fuscous irrorations and 
with a purple tint around edges and at apex; at end of cell a 
white discal spot edged outwardly with a semicircle of blackish- 
fuscous scales ; first discal spot indicated by a few scattered blackish- 
fuscous scales at basal third; on costa and around termen a series 
of indistinct blackish-fuscous spots; cilia mouse gray with some 
mixture of pale whitish ochreous. Hind wing grayish fuscous; 
cilia a shade lighter with light fuscous band and whitish tips. 
Legs light grayish ochreous suffused with fuscous. Abdomen dark 
purplish gray above; beneath grayish ochreous shaded with fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately clothed with fine hairs ; cucul- 
lus pointed ; clasper rather stout, lightly sclerotized, constricted just 
before middle and having a twisted appearance; apex heavily scler- 
otized, rough. Anellus oval, longer than broad, with large hairy 
lateral lobes; posterior edge concave. Vinculum rounded with a 
well developed dorso-anterior process. Aedeagus stout, cur\xd, and 
terminating in a sharp, slightly upturned point. Transtilla a scler- 
otized band with well developed hairy lateral lobes. Gnathos oval, 
clothed with spines. Socii broad, hairy lobes. Tegumen terminating 
in a single short median projection. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately broad; deeply cleft 
on posterior edge. Ostium small; near anterior margin of genital 
plate ; at posterior end of ostium two small, sclerotized lateral areas. 
Ductus bursae long, gradually enlarged to form the small oval 
bursa copulatrix. Signum an oblong, sclerotized plate with pro- 
jections on the anterior and posterior edges. 

Alar expanse, 17-18 nun. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 65 

Type locality. — Golden, Colo. 

Food 'plants. — "An umbelliferous plant" (Dyar) ; Lomat'mm grayi 
Coult. and Rose (Clarke). 

Distribution. — Western United States. 

United States records 

Colorado: Golden, $ (Dyar and Caudell, no date). 

Washing'ton: Snake River, Whitman County, opposite Clarkston, 3 5 5,39 9 
(V-3()-31, VI-4 to 18-33, and V-11-34, J. P. G. Clarke). 

Remarks. — With Busck's unique type male I associate six reared 
specimens from the Snake River, AVash. (Clarke Nos. 2944, 4416, 4417, 
4418, 4419, and 5209) . The Washington specimens fit the description 
in every detail except that some of them show two discal spots, the 
single discal spot not being present. In specimen 5209 veins 3 and 
4 of the hind wing are short stalked as described, but in the remaining 
specimens they are connate. In spite of tlie variation in venation it 
would be illogical to consider the Washington specimens anytl.dng 
but one species. The male genitalia show some slight variation in 
the length of the harpe and shape of the cucullus, but this is not 
significant. 

AGONOPTERIX OREGONENSIS. new species 
PrAiTc 31, Figures 176, 17Ga ; Plate 42, Figuee 241 

A small reddish species with contrastingly lighter costa. 

Antenna with basal segment blackish fuscous; remainder shining 
grayish fuscous, darker distally; narrowly annulated with blackish 
fuscous; the whole with a faint reddish sheen. Labial palpus with 
second segment light whitish ochreous, the brush pink beneath both 
inwardly and outwardly ; outwardly, and at apex inwardly, irrorated 
with fuscous; third segment blackish fuscous with a pink-tinged 
whitish-ochreous median fascia. Head light brownish fuscous with 
a pink suffusion; scales tipped with whitish ochreous; face shining 
whitish ochreous. Thorax, tegula, and fore wing brownish fuscous, 
the fore wing so heavily overlaid with brick-red scales that it appears 
dark reddish. Thorax and tegula with a strong reddish suffusion 
anteriorly and much whitish-ochreous scaling posteriorly. Base of 
fore wing and costa to middle a contrasting light gray; beyond middle 
of wing the light-gray scaling diminishes; extreme costal edge bright 
pink spotted with black; along costa, inside the grayish area, and 
along veins toward the apex, with abundant black scaling. At the 
end of cell a conspicuous white spot encircled with black scales; at 
basal third two small, obliquely placed black spots followed by white 
scaling; cilia fuscous with pink suffusion. Hind wing dark smoky 
fuscous; cilia fuscous; pink tinged apically. Legs whitish. ochreous 

286614—41 3 



66 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

much suffused and irrorated with fuscous ; tarsi fuscous above except 
for narrow band of whitish-ochreous at distal ends of segments. 
Abdomen grayish fuscous above, whitish ochreous below; posterior 
edges of segments above whitish ochreous ; on underside a lateral row 
of black spots ; anal tuft tinged with pink. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe clothed with many long hairs; cucullus 
pointed; costa strongly sclerotized; clasper stout, pointed, reaching 
three-fourths of way to costa; definitely curved distally; sacculus 
moderately sclerotized. Anellus an elongate, moderately sclerotized 
plate, lateral edges concave; anterior edge convex, posterior edge 
deeply cleft, lateral lobes small. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus 
slender, gently curved, pointed. Transtilla a narrow, strongly scle- 
rotized band, lateral lobes large, hairy. Socii large, fleshy, hairy 
lobes. Tegumen pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad. Ostium large, broadly 
elliptical. Lobes of ovipositor clothed with long coarse hairs. Duc- 
tus bursae long, membranous; inception of ductus seminalis just 
before ostium. Bursa copulatrix large with well developed diamond- 
shaped signum. 

Alar expanse, 15-18 mm. 

T'y^e.—U.S.N.M. No. 62079. 

Type locality. — Salem, Oreg. (March; E. Y. Lansing, Jr.) 

Described from the $ type and 5 5 5 and 10 ? 9 paratypes as 
follows: 5 , Pullman, Wash. (8-II-30, J. F. G. Clarke) ; 2 5 5 , Dun- 
can, British Columbia (26-11-21, W. Downes) ; 5 , Duncan, British 
Columbia (25-III-21, A. W. Hanham) ; 5 , Fitzgerald, British 
Columbia (14-V-22, E. H. Blackmore) ; 5, Salem, Oreg. (March; 
E. Y. Lansing) ; 2 , Logan Hill, Chehalis, Wash. (15-X-29, T. M. 
Clarke) ; 9 , Departure Bay, British Columbia (^11-29) : 5 , 
Fitzgerald, British Columbia (14-V-22, E. H. Blackmore) ; 9 , Era- 
ser Mills, British Columbia (22-XI-23, L. E. Marmont) ; 9 , Quam- 
ichan Lake, British Columbia (l-IV-23, E. H. Blackmore) ; 2 9 9 , 
Victoria, British Columbia (21-III-21, E. H. Blackmore; 23-VI-23, 
W. R. Carter) ; 2 9 9 , no locality but British Columbia, specimens 
under Blackmore No. 160 (13-IV-23; 5-V-23). 

Remarks. — This species has been placed under the name gelidella 
in collections. 

AGONOPTERIX CLARKE! Keifer 

Plate 31, Figubes 178, 178a ; Plate 40, Figures 230, 230a 

Agonopteryx clarkei Keifer, Bull. Southern California Acad. Sci., vol. 35, p. 10, 

pi. 4; pi. 7, fig. 6, 1936. 
Agonoptcrix clarkei (Keifer) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8415, 1939. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 67 

Dcpressaria clarkei (Keifer) Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, 
p. 315, 1939. 

Labial palpus liiteous ; second segment irrorated with fuscous out- 
wardly and in brush; third segment somewhat darker than second 
with poorly defined blackish-fuscous basal and subterminal annuli. 
Antenna fuscous with narrow, darker annulations, the latter obscured 
below. Head, thorax, base and cost a of fore wing luteous, the head 
infuscatecl above; thorax infuscated particularly anteriorly; costa 
with fuscous spots and dashes throughout its length; beyond luteous 
basal patch deeply infuscated, this color rapidly fading; at middle a 
dark blotch from costa; first and second discal spots minute, black, 
obliquely one above the other; third discal spot at end of cell whitish 
followed by a black scale or two ; all discal spots practically obsolete ; 
cilia fuscous tipped with luteous. Hind wing luteous, darker api- 
cally; cilia with a fuscous basal band. Legs luteous overlaid and 
suffused except at joints ; posterior legs somewhat lighter. Abdomen 
luteous, darker above than below; on each side, beneath, a blackish- 
fuscous line. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe heavily clothed with long hairs; cucullus 
bluntly pointed, sacculus moderately sclerotized, narrow; clasper 
long, slender, straight, nearly reaching costa. Anellus a simple 
sclerotized plate with deeply excavated lateral, and convex posterior 
edges; longer than broad; hairy lateral lobes well developed. Vin- 
culum evenly rounded. Aedeagus short, stout, strongly bent; vesica 
armed with many small spinules. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized 
band with well-developed hairy lateral lobes. Socii large, hairy, 
fleshy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized, 
anterior margin cleft. Ostium small, situated near posterior edge 
of plate. Ductus bursae membranous, moderately long ; inception of 
ductus seminalis just before ostium. Bursa copulatrix large, with a 
large, strongly sclerotized, toothed signum. Lobe of ovipositor with 
a few long, strong hairs and numerous moderately long stout spines. 

Alar expanse, 18-20 mm. 

Type.—V.S.l^M. No. 52092. 

Type local'itij. — Missouri Flat, Placerville District, Calif. 

Food plant. — Artemina vulgaris L. var. 

Remarks. — Keifer has discussed and figured this species in his 
paper, but I have refigured it for completeness' sake. 

I have before me the specimens from Aweme, Manitoba, which 
Keifer discusses, but I do not believe these represent a different 
species. Although they could possibly be considered as a race, they 
differ from the typical specimens only in the slightly paler pink 
coloration in the cilia of the fore wing and in the apparently slightly 



68 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

shorter spines of the lobes of the ovipositor. Until we know more 
about the specimens from Aweme I decline to give them a separate 
designation. 

The type of ovipositor found in this species is unique for the genus. 

AGONOPTERIX CLEMENSELLA (Chambers) 
PLATE! 26, FiGUKES 159, 150a ; Plate 42, Figure 242 

Qelechia clemensella Chambers, Can. Ent., vol. 8, p. 173, 1876. 

Dcprcssaria clemensella (Chambers) Bxjsck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mns., vol. 27, p. 766, 
1904.— Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 315, 1939. 

Dcpressaria applana (Fabrlcius) Walsingham, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 10, 
p. 175, 1882. — RiLET, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 5251, 1891.— BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5862, 1903.— 
Kearfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6405, 
1903. 

Affonopteryx clemensella (Chambers) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mas., vol. 35, p. 
198, 1908. 

Agonopterix clemensella (Chambers) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , 
No. 8430, 1939. 

Agnoptcryx clemensella (Chambers) Babnes and McDuxnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6447, 1917. 

Agonopteryx applana clemensella (Chambers) Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Memoir 68, p. 239, 1923. 

Labial palpus yellowish white; second segment irrorated with fus- 
cous exteriorly and with a strong pink suffusion in the brush ; third 
segment with basal and broad subapical tumuli black. Antenna fus- 
cous, somewhat lighter beneath. Head, thorax, and base of fore wing 
very light yellowish gray with fuscous and reddish-brown irrorations 
and a rosy suffusion. Ground color of fore wing reddish brown ; costa 
and termen blotched with alternate fuscous and yellowish- white spots; 
whole surface of wing marked with scattered yellowish-white scales; 
discal spots four, white; one at end of cell preceded by one at middle 
of wing; at basal third two, one obliquely above the other; the outer 
surrounded by a dull fuscous cloud, the inner, oblique pair preceded 
by a few black scales ; cilia reddish brown suffused with fuscous and 
irrorated with yellowish white. Hind wing and cilia shining yellow- 
ish fuscous, the latter with a fuscous basal band. Legs yellowish 
white overlaid and irrorated with fuscous exteriorly; posterior pair 
lighter in color, all with a rosy tint. Abdomen grayish fuscous above, 
yellowish white beneath with four longitudinal rov.s of fuscous spots. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slender, heavily clothed with hairs; sacculus 
moderately sclerotized ; clasper slender, nearly reaching costa of harpe, 
slightly thicker at middle, strongly curved toward the cucullus. Anel- 
lus broadly rectangular, slightly constricted posteriorly; posterior 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE CLARKE 69 

margin concave and with well developed lateral lobes. Vinculum 
broad with a pointed dorso-anterior process. Aedeagus long, curved, 
terminating in a sharp slender point; basally there is a sclerotized 
biramous arm by which tlie aedeagus articulates with the anellus. 
Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band, with large, profusely hairy, 
lateral lobes. Gnathos long, oval, slender, clothed with fine spines. 
Socii broad fleshy lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, lightly sclerotized; ostium 
small oval, at posterior edge of genital plate. Ductus bursae mem- 
branous, inception of ductus seminalis rather remote from ostium; 
bursa copulatrix oval. Signum a small, more or less rectangular 
plate, slightly cupped and covered with thornlike teeth. 

Alar expanse, 16-20 mm. 

Type. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Type locality. — Easton, Pa. 

Food plant. — Parsnip; wild parsnip?. 

Dis-trihution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

Connecticut: $ (Beutenmiiller). 

District of Columbia: Chain Bridge, 5 ("2-4-85") ; Washington, 2 ("21-4-85"). 

Illinois: Putnam County, S (M. O. Glenn). 

Maryland: Plummers Ishmd, S (March 1908, H. S. Barber). 

New Hampshire: Hampton, S (IV-2G-04, S. A. Shaw). 

New York: Ilion, $ (IX-3-11, McBlhose) ; Ithaca, 2 9 9 (5-19-V-31, A. B. 
Klots) ; Lockport, 9 (XI-30-35, L. L. Pechumau) ; Long Island: Orient, $ 
(VII-27-26; Ray Latham) ; Montvale, 9 (November 26, 1923, F. M. Schott) ; 
Rochester, 9 (3-IV-33, A. B. Klots). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 12 $3,7 9 9 (March and July to November 
dates, H. D. Merrick) ; Oak Station, Allegheny County, 2 9 9 (Oct. 15, 
1908, and March 30, 1910, Fred Marloit) ; Pittsburgh, $ (IV-7-06, Henry 
Engel). 

Vermont: Clarendon, $ (no date or collector). 

Wisconsin: Millwood County, $ ("X-14-08"). 

Canadian records 
Ontario: Ottawa (VIII-21-05, C. H. Young) ; Toronto ("III-2 to 8-95"). 

Remarks. — Busck ^® pointed out that in all probability cle^rnemella 
is distinct from the European applana. There can be no doubt about 
the close relationship between the two species, but they can be separated 
easily on genitalic characters as well as pattern. 

The ground color of applana is much lighter than that of clemrnsella; 
in the former there is a tendency to coalescence of the discal spots, 
whereas in the latter the spots are smaller and distinctly separated. 

The male genitalia of clemensella show a slender, gradually finely 



« Eusck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 766, 1904. 



70 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

pointed aedeagus and a very slender clasper as compared to a more 
abruptly pointed aedeagus and a stouter clasper in applana. The 
female genitalia show fewer differences, but those examined indi- 
cate that the ductus bursae of applana is longer in proportion to the 
other structures than that of clemensella. I have examined 16 Euro- 
pean and 41 American specimens, all of which bear out the above 
conclusion. 

In view of this evidence, I believe it is certain that the European 
applana does not occur in North America. 

AGONOPTERIX ATRODORSELLA (Clemens) 

Plate 26, Figuees 160, 160a ; Plate 43, Figxjbe 252 

Depressaria atrodor sella Clemens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 124, 
1863. — Packard, Guide to the study of insects, p. 349, 1869. — Robinson, Ann. 
Lye. Nat. Hist. New York, vol. 9, p. 156, pi. 1, fig. 7, 1870.— Clemens, in Stain- 
tou, Tineina of North America, p. 91, 1872. — Chambers, Can. Eut., vol. 4, p. 
91, 1872.— Zeller, Verh. zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 233, 1873.— Chambebs^ 
U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 138, 1878.— W.\lsingham, Proc. Zool. 
Soc. London, 1881, p. 312.— Coquillett, Papilio, vol. 3, p. 98, 1883.- Beuten- 
MULLER, m Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 355, 1890.—^ 
Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5255, 1891. — 
DiETz, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 473, 1900. — BuscK^ 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Miis., vol. 24, p. 736, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, 
No. 5854, 1903. — Kearfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal Amer- 
ica, No. 6397, 1903. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 
173, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 310, 1939. 

Agonoptenjx atrodor sella (Clemens) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 
1908.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 238, 1923. 

Agonopterix atrodorsella (Clemens) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8409, 1939. 

Agnopteryx atrodorsella (Clemens) Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New 
Jersey, p. 561, 1910. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Boreal America, No. 6433, 1917. 

Labial palpus and face yellowish white ; second segment of palpus 
irrorated with fuscous exteriorly and in the brush, the latter also 
tinted with pink; third segment with basal and subapical annuli 
and tip blackish fuscous. Antenna with black, ochreous-tipped basal 
segment; remainder fuscous annulated with ochreous-fuscous. Head 
reddish ochreous with median fuscous area. Thorax and extreme 
base of fore wing blackish fuscous; collar whitish. Fore wing yel- 
lowish ochreous with sparse blackish irrorations; costa with four to 
six or seven blackish-fuscous spots; at basal third a black discal dot 
followed by a white one at the end of cell ; from center of cell a longi- 
tudinal reddish blotch extending to apical third and enclosing the 
white discal spot; on costa, from apical third to apex, a longitudinal 
fuscous and ochreous cloud ; cilia reddish ochreous. Hind wing light 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 71 

reddish fuscous; cilia whitish with basal and two subapical bands 
fuscous. Legs yellowish white strongly overlaid with blackish fus- 
cous except at joints; the latter suffused with pink. Abdomen light 
brownish ochreous, lighter on posterior margins of segments; beneath, 
yellowish white with broad, blackish-fuscous longitudinal, lateral 
stripes and two rows of similarly colored spots between. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad basally but abruptly narrowed be- 
yond clasper; moderately clothed with hairs; clasper long, slender, 
slightly bent, not quite reaching costa. Anellus a sclerotized plate, 
longer than broad, concave on posterior edge, constricted anteriorly, 
with prominent hairy lateral lobes. Aedeagus stout, slightly curved, 
pointed, with large spinulate patch in basal two-thirds of vesica. 
Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band with well developed, hairy, 
lateral lobes. Gnathos an elongate, oval, spined knob. Socii large 
fleshy, hairy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium large, near posterior edge of genital 
plate. Genital plate very broad, produced anteriorly; anterior 
edge deeply cleft, the cleft semicircular, the anterior points nearly 
touching. Ductus bursae long, membranous, gradually tapering to 
form the large oval bursa copulatrix; inception of ductus seminalis 
just anterior to ostium. Signum a large diamond-shaped, spined 
plate. 

Alar expanse, 18-24 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Type locality. — Pennsylvania, 

Food plants. — Bidens frondosa L., Myrica asplenifolia L., Eupa- 
torium sp. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States and Canada. 

United States records 

Connecticut: $ ^ Beutenmiiller, coll.). 

District of Columbia: W^ashington, S (X-25-02). 

Illinois: Flosmoor, S, $ (no date or collector) ; Evanston, $ ("4-99"). 

Massachusetts: Cummington, $ (no date or collector) ; Dover, $ (8-7-33, no 

collector) ; Marthas Vineyard, $ ("1-3," George D. Eustis) ; Winchendon, $ 

(IX-2S-02, no collector). 
New Hampshire: Hampton, 3 $ $ (V-10-13, S. A. Shaw). 
New Jersey: Cedar Grove, $ (IV-9-24, F. M. Schott). 
New York: Ilion, $, ? (V-3-13, H. McElhose) ; Ithaca, ? (X-24-35, J. G. 

Franclemont) ;2 3 $ (12-V-31, 5-V-31, A. B. Klots) ; Liberty, 9 (no date or 

collector) ; New Windsor, 2 $ $ (13-VIII-'93; 23-VIII-'97, E. L. Morton). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 4$$ (IX-7-02, IX-27-02, V-25-06, IX-29-06, 

H. D. Merrick). 
Vermont: Clarendon, S (W. D. Kearfott). 
"Wisconsin: Cranmoor, Wood County, ? (IV-22-0S, C. B. Hardenberg) ; 

Madison, $ (XI-10-23, S. B. Fracker). 



72 PROCEEDINGS OF TPIE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Canadian records 

Ontario: Bobcaygeon (July 24, 1931, J. McDunnough) ; Hymers, S (IX-16-23) ; 
Merivale (May 1, 1936, W. J. Brown) ; Ottawa, $ (IV-21-1900) ; (3 speci- 
mens. May 9, 1904, C. H. Young; March 29, 1906, May 1, 1906, J. Fletcher) ; 
Toronto (no further data) ; Trenton (May 5-21, 1911, Evans). 

Quebec: Aylmer (April 29, 1904, C. B. Hutchings) ; Chelsea (July 17, 1915, 
J. McDunnough) ; Fairy Lake (April 24, 1932) ; Knowlton (September 11, 
1929, J. McDunnough); Meach Lake (March 29, April 25, 1900; Sep- 
tember 25, 1902; May 4, 1901, C. H. Young). 

Rema7'ks. — In addition to a long collected series of this species I 
have a specimen before me from Madison, Wis., reared from Myrica 
asplenifolia by S. B. Fracker, and four from Dover, Mass. (Gipsy- 
Moth Lab.), reared from '"'■Goieopsis'''' (synonym of Bidens). The 
wide difference in food plant is very surprising in view of the fact 
that nearly all species are either host specific or feed on very closely 
related species of plants. The specimen from Bobcaygeon, Ontario, 
was reared fi-om Eupatorium. 

AGONOPTERIX SCABELLA (Zcller) 

PI.ATE 43, FiGTJKB 250 

Depressaria scabeUa Zexleb, Verii. zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 236, 1873. — 
Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 138, 1878.— Rim:y, in 
Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5280, 1891. — BuscK, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 749, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, 
No. 5892, 1903. — Kb;aefott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6435, 1903. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 177, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 
348, 1939. 

Depressaria scahrelJa Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 312. 

Agonopteryx scahella (Zeller) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 
1908.— FoEBES, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 239, 1923. 

Ago7ioptetix scabella (Zeller) McDunnough, Check List of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , 
No. 8453, 1939. 

Agnoptenjx scabella (Zeller) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6439, 1917. 

Alar expanse, 24 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality.— ''Ohio y 

Reviiarhs. — I have one specimen, supposedly this species, before 
me and have figured the genitalia (fig. 250, ? ) , which show it is very 
close to atrodorsella. 

AGONOPTERIX PTELEAE Barnes and Busck 

Plate 27, Figukes 162, 162a ; Plate 43, Figure 251 

Agonopteryx ptclcac Baenes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 4, 
p. 231, pi. 28, fig. 13 ; pi. 38, fig. 1, 1920. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE CLARKE 76 

Agonoptcrix pteleae (Barnes and Busck) McDunnoiigh, Check list of Lepid- 

optera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 

tera), No. 8426, 1939. 
Depressaria pteleae (Barnes and Busck) Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 

torum, fasc. ISO, p. 175, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, 

pt. 92, p. 342, 1939. 

Labial palpus light ochreous ; second segment with fuscous base and 
iiTorations exteriorly; third seginent with fuscous basal and sub- 
apical annuli. Antenna fuscous. Head reddish ochreous above ; face 
light silvery ochreous, Tliorax and fore wing light ochreous-brown 
mottled and suffused with black and brown, the entire surface rough- 
ened with raised scales ; extreme base at inner angle whitish ochreous 
broadly edged with black; from costa to end of cell a large blackish- 
fuscous blotch; along costa and around termen a series of blackish- 
fuscous spots ; first and second discal spots black, the latter obscured 
by the large costal blotch. Hind wing light ochreous fuscous; cilia 
light ochreous brown with basal band a shade lighter. Legs light 
ochreous brown suffused and annulated with blackish fuscous. Ab- 
domen light ochreous-brown, with two lateral longitudinal rows of 
black spots on the underside. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately sclerotized, pointed, and almost 
entirely clothed with fine hairs; at base, just inside costa, is a group 
of long fine spines; clasper and a narrow "spur" of the sacculus adja- 
cent to it, heavily sclerotized. The clasper tapers gently to a fine 
point, is slightly curved, and reaches almost to costa. Anellus a 
heavily sclerotized oval plate, longer than broad, with truncated pos- 
terior edge ; lateral lobes large, hairy. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized 
band with well-developed, hairy lateral lobes. Aedeagus rather stout, 
curved, and pointed, with a lateral, lightly sclerotized flap from about 
the middle to the apex. Gnathos a short oval knob armed with many 
spines. Socii small, mainly indicated by hairs. Tegumen with a 
single apical projection. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium large, near posterior edge of genital plate. 
Genital plate greatly produced anteriorly and narrowly cleft on an- 
terior margin. Extreme posterior portion of ductus bursae abruptly 
constricted before ostium, where ductus seminalis enters ; ductus bursae 
gently tapering to form the large bursae copulatrix. Signum a roughly 
diamond shaped, sclerotized, spined plate. 

Alar expanse, 20-22 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Decatur, 111. 

Food plant — Ptelea trifoliata L. (hoptree). 

Remarks. — This species is exceedingly close to pulvipennslla but dif- 
fers from it by the rough-scaled fore wing, smaller anellus, and less 
sharply pointed anterior margin of the genital plate. 



74 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Besides the typer series in the National collection from Decatur, 111. 
(June 1-15), there are two specimens from Rockford, 111, (collector 
"O, H. S.") among the undetermined material, which, although some- 
what larger and darker than the types, undoubtedly belong here. This 
species has an unmistakable roughened appearance due to the presence 
of many long, slender, almost hairlike, upturned scales on practically 
the entire insect. 

AGONOPTERIX EUPATORIIELLA (Chambers) 

Plate 27, Figukes 163, 163a ; Plate 43, Figihse 249 

Depressaria eupatoriiella Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 82, 

115, 1878. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 

5261, 1891. 
Agonopteryx plummerella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mns., vol. 35, p. 199, 1908. — 

Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exii. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 239, 1923. (New 

synonymy. ) 
Agonopteri.v plummerella (Busck) McDunnough, Check List of the Lepidoptera 

of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8454, 1939. 
Agnoptenjx phimwcrella (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6456, 1917. 
Depressaria plummerella Meyeick, in "Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 

177, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus. pt. 92, p. 340, 1939. 
Depressaria pnlvipennella Busck, not Clemens (in part), Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 

vol. 24, p. 737, 1902. 

Labial palpus light ochreous-gray : second segment lightly irrorated 
with black scales ; third segment almost wholly black, with only nar- 
row, poorly defined, median and apical bands of the light ground 
color showing; long, recurved. Antenna dark fuscous narrowly an- 
nulated with light ochreous. Head, thorax, and fore wing ochreous- 
fuscous; face shining light ochreous-gray; thorax and fore wing 
speckled with numerous black and white scales, the majority of the 
former raised ; at the end of cell a white discal spot surrounded by a 
few black scales and preceded by two black discal spots at basal third, 
the latter obliquely one above the other ; along costa a series of poorly 
defined blackish spots; cilia ochreous-fuscous. Hind wing shining 
fuscous, lighter basally than apically; cilia light fuscous, whitish 
distally with a narrow dark basal band. Legs whitish ochreous over- 
laid and mottled with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen ochreous- 
fuscous above, whitish ochreous beneath with four longitudinal rows 
of blackish-fuscous spots. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather short, broad, with the costal two- 
thirds clothed with fine hairs ; cucullus rounded ; sacculus and clasper 
moderately sclerotized; clasper slightly curved toward cucullus dis- 
tally and reaching about two-thirds distance across harpe. Anellus 
oval, longer than broad, well sclerotized, with posterior edge concave; 
lateral lobes clothed with fine hairs. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 75 

slender, bent just before middle, apex pointed, upturned. Transtilla 
a narrow, weakly sclerotized band with well-developed, hairy lateral 
lobes. Gnathos an oval spined knob. Socii broad flaps, weakly sclero- 
tized and with few hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Ostial opening very large, occupying over half 
t]ie length of the genital plate ; genital plate broad ; anterior margin 
with semicircular cleft, the anterior points of which are widely 
separated. Ductus bursae long, gradually broadening into the large 
bursa copulatrix ; at posterior end of ductus bursae an elongate, lightly 
sclerotized patch. Signum a large, strongly sclerotized, diamond- 
shaped plate with the anterior and posterior points of the diamond 
curled. The plate is armed with short stout teeth. 

Alar expanse, 22-24 mm. 

Types. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 
{eupatoriiella) ; in the United States National Museum (No. 11943) 
{phmimerella) . 

Type localities. — "Kentucky" {eup at or Hell a) ; Plunnners Island, 
Md. (Busck) ; Cincinnati, Ohio (Dr. A. F. Braun) {phmwierelkf) . 

Food plant. — Eupatorium. 

Distrihutioii. — Eastern United States probably as far north as New 
England. 

United States records 

Illinois: Putnam County, 9 (14-IV-1939, M. O. Glenn). 

Maryland: Plummers Island, 10 $ S , Q 9 9 (March to August dates, 1905-1908, 

A. Busck and H. S. Barber). 
Ohio: Athens, 3 $$,2 $9 (ll-XI-39, 29^1-40, 10-11-40, R. C. Barnes); 

Noble County, $, 9 (ia-IX-39, 31-XII-40, R. C. Barnes). 
Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh, $, 9 (4-IV-06, lS-XI-06, Henry Engel). 

Remarks. — This species is apparently very close to scahella Zeller, 
but since I have no authentic material of the latter species, I carniot 
be sure of the genitalia. I quote, in part, a letter from Mr. Stringer 
of the British Museum, to Mr. Busck concerning plummerella and 
scdbella.) which was written before I had an opportunity to examine 
eupatoriiella : 

"I have carefully compared plwnmerella with our type of scdbella 
Z., and have no doubt that they are distinct. The labial palpi of 
scdbella have the Deprcssaria "furrow" on second joint but much more 
compact and the terminal joint is shorter, not so pointed or recurved 
as in your species and nebvlosa Z. ; in color markings there is no 
difference. In size and color of fore wings your species is nearer to 
nehulosa; scaheUa is a smaller species with mucli narrower fore wing 
and is brown-gray, not salt and pepper ; it is also devoid of any mark- 
ings on the underside of either wing as in jjlummereUa and almost all 
of the species of the genus." 



76 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

I have examined the type of eupatoriieUa in the Museum of Com- 
parative Zoology and have made a slide of the female genitalia. 
This and plumineTella appear to be identical ; ewpatoriiella was syn- 
onymized with pulvipeiineUa Clemens through misidentifications made 
by Lord Walsingham. The specimens in the United States National 
Museum, referred to by Busck,^^ are clearly p^dvipenneUa; pulvipen- 
nella lacks the rough scaling which is found on the wings of eupatori- 
ieUa and so cannot be confused with it. Chambers clearly states in 
his description of eupatoriieUa^ "the palpi and wings dusted with 
blackish atoms, each of which is a minute tuft * * *" 

AGONOPTERIX PULVIPENNELLA (Clemens) 

Plate 27, Figures 164, 164a ; Plate 43, Figure 253 

Depressaria pulvipennella Clemens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 421, 
1864.— Robinson, Ann. Lye. Nat. Hist. New York, vol. 9, p. 157, 1S68.— 
Chambers, Can. Ent., vol. 4, p. 91, 1872. — Clemens, m Stalnton, Tineina of 
North America, p. 244, 1872. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 5276, 1891.— Busck. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 737, 
1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5858, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, 
List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6401, 1903. — Meybick, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, 
Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 342, 1939. 

Depressaria fulvipcvnelJa Dietz, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New 
Jersey, p. 474, 1900. 

Depressaria soUdagivis Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 255, 1899. — Riley, in 
Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5281, 1891. 

Agonopteryx pnlvipcnneUa (Clemens) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, 
p. 198, 1908— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir G8, p. 238, 1923. 

Agonopterix pulvipennella (Clemens) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera). No. 8410, 1939. 

Agnopteryx pulvipennella (Clemens) Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New 
Jersey, p. 561, 1910. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Boreal America, No. 6449, 1917. 

Agnopteryx pulvipenella Brimley, The insects of North Carolina, p. 304, 1938. 

Labial palpus whitish ochreous tinged with pink; second segment 
irrorated with blackish fuscous exteriorly; third segment with basal 
and subapical annuli and tip black. Antenna fuscous. Face shining 
whitish ochreous. Head reddish ochreous suffused with fuscous pos- 
teriorly. Thorax and fore wing light reddish ochreous mottled and 
irrorated with blackish fuscous; extreme base of the light ground color 
and followed by a rapidly fading fuscous shade that does not reach 
costa; at basal third two black discal spots obliquely one above the 
other, followed by a third, white discal spot at the end of cell; in 
center of wing beyond the first and second discal spots a blackish- 
fuscous shade surrounding the third discal spot ; along costa and around 

"Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 737, 1902. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 77 

termen a series of blackish-fuscous blotches and spots; cilia light 
ochreous-fuscous. Hind wing light fuscous; cilia somewhat lighter 
with a dark basal band. Legs whitish ochreous suffused and mottled 
with blackish fuscous except at joints ; at joints the ochreous is strongly- 
tinged with pink. Abdomen grayish ochreous above ; beneath whitish 
ochreous with broad blackish-fuscous longitudinal lateral lines and 
two rows of blackish-fuscous spots between the lateral lines. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, clothed with fine hairs; clasper 
straight, slender, reaching well beyond middle of harpe; cucullus 
bluntly pointed. Anellus a large oval plate, longer than broad, with 
concave posterior margin, narrow biramous, strongly sclerotized me- 
dian area and well developed hairy, lateral lobes. Aedeagus slender, 
sharply curved, pointed; vesica with large spinulate patch. Vincu- 
lum rounded. Transtilla a moderately broad, sclerotized band, with 
well developed, hairy, lateral lobes. Gnathos an oval, spined knob. 
Socii large, sparsely hairy, fleshy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium small, near posterior margin of genital 
plate. Genital plate very broad, produced anteriorly and deeply and 
narrowly cleft o\\ median anterior edge. Ductus bursae long, mem- 
branous, gradually tapering into the large bursa copulatrix ; inception 
of ductus seminalis very near ostial opening. Signuni a large, dia- 
mond-shaped, spined plate; posterior and anterior points curled. 

Alar expanse, 18-24 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Tyfe locality. — "Illinois." 

Food plants. — Solidago and Urtica. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States and Canada. 

United States records 

Connecticut: East River, 5 (September 3, 1908, Chas. R. Ely). 

District of Columbia: Washington, 3 5 5, 9 (IV-21-85) ; S (IV-7-1900) ; 

S (IV-21-1900). 
Louisiana: Natchitoches, $ (August, G. Coverdale). 
Maine: Orono, 2 S $ (October 8, '88, one, no date). 
Maryland: Plummers Island, 17 $ S , 4 9 9 (March, April, and September dates, 

collected by H. S. Barber, A. Busck, E. A. Schwarz). 
Massachusetts: Chilmark, $ (IX-3-1935, George D. Eustis) ; Cohasset, 9 (May 

11, '07, Owen Bryant) ; Framingham, 5 (April 21, 1905) ; Springfield, $ 

(nodate, G. Dimmock) ; Winchendon, S (IX-28-02). 
Missouri: (One specimen, no date.) 
ISTew Hampshire: Hampton, 6 (IV-30-04, S. A. Shaw). 
Few Jersey: Denville, 5 ("X-14") ; Essex County, 9 (IV-20-09, W. D. 

Kearfott). 
Nev/ York: Ilion, $,2 99 (IX-3-11, H. McElhose) ; 9, same (IX-2-12) ; 

Ithaca (many $ $ and 9 9 , various dates in coll. CornellUniv. ) . 
Ohio: Athens, 2 9 9 (29^1-40, R. C. Barnes). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, c5 , 9 (IX-27~02, X-^S-OT, II. D. Merrick). 
Virginia: Vienna, 9 (February 14, 1915, R. A. Cushman). 
Wisconsin: Cranmoor, V/ood County, $ (IV-22-08, C. B. Hardenberg). 



78 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Canadian records 

Manitoba: Cartwright, 9 (X-11-03, E. F. Heath). 

Nova Scotia: Bridgetown, $, ? (5-9-IX-1912, G. E. Saunders). 

Ontario: Ottawa ( 5, April 28, 1905; $, May 7, 1905, C. H. Young) ; Trenton, 

$ (25-IV-1911, Evans). 
Quebec: Meacli Lake (9, April 19, 1902; October 12, 1907, C. H. Young); 

Montreal, S (V-3-04, "A. F. W."). 

Remarks. — The variety of food plants indicates that this species 
is a rather general feeder. I believe we are dealing with at least 
two very closely related species, which can be separated only by a 
careful comparison of larvae and pupae, the adult characters not 
being sufficient for separation. Moths reared from Solidago are 
darker, and the coloring is more suffused than in the majority of 
specimens. This may be due entirely to the difference in food plant, 
but there is not sufficient material at hand to determine this 
definitely. 

The species appears to be confined to midwestern and eastern North 
America. 

AGONOPTERIX WALSINGHAMELLA (Busck) 

Plate 28, Figukes 165, 165a ; Plate 44, Figuee 254 

Depressaria walsinghamella Busck, Proe. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 739, 1902. — 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 356, 1939. 

Depressaria fernaldella Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 256, 1889. — Busck, in 
Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5S64, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, List 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6407, 1903. — Meyeick, in Wyts- 
man, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 176, 1922. [Not Depressaria fernal- 
della Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 82, p. 138, 1878.] 

Agnopteryx fernaldella Baenes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Boreal America, No. 6443, 1917. 

Agonoptcrix fernaldella (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera), No. 8443, 1939. 

Agonopteryx walsinghamella Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, 
p. 239, 1923. 

Agonopteryx icalsinghamiella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 
1908. 

Agonopterix walsingTiamiella McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 
8443, 1939. [As synonym of fernaldella (Walsingham).] 

Labial palpus pale cinereous strongly suffused with reddish ; second 
segment irrorated with blackish scales exteriorly ; third segment with 
blackish scales exteriorly; third segment with blackish-fuscous basal 
and median annuli (the former poorly defined) and apex. Antenna 
fuscous annulated with dull cinereous and tinged with reddish. Head 
tawny-red with slight cinereous irrorations; face pale cinereous. 
Thorax and base of fore wing, except costal part, cinereous ; fore part 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 79 

of thorax and tegula suffused and irrorated with reddish. Fore wing 
deep crimson-red sparsely irrorated with black and cinereous scales; 
costa, nearly to apex, broadly tawny-red with veins 9 to 12 strongly 
indicated by cinereous and irrorated with black scales and with poorly 
defined fuscous spots on extreme edge; discal spots white; first discal 
spot at basal third edged with carmine; second at end of cell preceded 
by a few carmine scales; cilia reddish fuscous edged with carmine. 
Hind wing light fuscous, darker apically than basally; cilia light 
fuscous with whitish irrorations and pale pink suffusions. Legs pale 
cinereous overlaid and irrorated with fuscous, except at joints, and 
suffused with reddish. Abdomen pale grayish fuscous above ; beneath, 
pale cinereous with two black longitudinal lateral stripes. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately clothed with fine hairs, tapering 
gently to a pointed cucullus; clasper short, stout, straight, scarcely 
exceeding middle of harpe, slightly rugose on exterior edge. Sacculus 
narrow, moderately sclerotized. Anellus longer than broad, concave 
on posterior edge, narrowed basally, with well-developed, sparsely 
hairy lateral lobes. Aedeagus stout, curved, much narrower in distal 
than proximal half; vesica armed with numerous spinulate cornuti. 
Vinculum rounded. Transtiila a narrow, lightly sclerotized band with 
moderately well developed, hairy lateral lobes. Gnathos a spined oval 
knob. Socii fleshy, hairy flaps. Tegumen terminating in a moderately 
long, pointed process. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, lightly sclerotized. Ostium 
round, opening at posterior edge of genital plate; the area around 
ostium slightly raised above the remainder of surface of plate. 
Ductus bursae long, membranous; ductus seminalis opening well 
before ostium. Bursa copulatrix large with small signum situated 
about middle. 

Alar expanse, 20-22 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type localities. — Orono, Maine; Wisconsin. 

Food plants. — Myrica asplenifolia L. and Myrica carolinensls Mill. 

Distiihutian. — Eastern United States and Canada. 

United States records 

Connecticut: East River, $ (August .j-13, Chas. R. Ely). 

Maine: Bar Harbor, 8 S$, 2 (May to November dates, 1934-193S, A. E. 

Brewer) ; Kennebunkport, 2 $ $ (September 24-30) ; Orono, 9. 
Massachusetts: Springfield (a series of 4 5 5 and 3 2 9 reared from Myrica 

asplenifolia by Dimmock). 
New Hampshire: Hampton, 8 S S (March and April dates; S. A. Shaw, coll.). 
New York: Albany. 

Pennsylvania: Hazel ton, $ ("9-12-04"). 
Wisconsin: (Ace. Forbes.) 



80 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ]VIUSEUM vol. 90 

Canadian records 

Nova Scotia: Digby, $ (IX-19-07, J. Russell) ; White Point Beach, Queens 

County, 5 (VIII-20-34, reared, J. McDunnough). 
Ontario: Biscotasing (May 16, 1931, Karl Schedl) ; Constance Bay (October 3, 

1932, W. J. Brown). 
Quebec: Kazubazua (August 13-23, 1933, G. S. Walley) ; Laniel (June 3, 1932, 

H. S. Fleming). 

Remarks. — The identity of this species and the invalidity of 
Walsingham's name have been established by Busck.-" 

AGONOPTERIX FUSCITERMINELLA, new species 

Plate 28, Figuees 167, 167a ; Plate 44, Figuke 258 

Depressaria yeatiana Walsingham (not Fabricius) Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 

1881, p. 316. 
Depressaria arenella Wai^singham (not Schiffermiiller), Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, 

vol. 10, p. 175, 1882. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 

America. No. 5253, 1891.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 743, 1902 ; 

in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5877, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, 

Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6420, 1003. — Meyeick, 

in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. 
Agonopteryx arencUa Busck (not Schiffermiiller), Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 

35, p. 199, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 

of Boreal America, No. 6446, 1917. 

Antenna fuscous, faintly and narrowly annulated with ochreous; 
apex and underside of basal segment whitish ochreous sprinkled with 
black or dark-brown scales outwardly; palpus with brush well de- 
veloped; terminal segment with black subbasal and supramedial 
annuli and black tip. Face and head whitish ochreous, the latter 
intermixed with brownish scales. Thorax whitish ochreous ; dorsally 
the ground color is liberally mixed with brown and blackish scales. 
In the posterior half are two crests of raised scales. Fore wing with 
ochreous ground color strongly overlaid with reddish brown and 
liberally sprinkled with fuscous to black scales ; extreme base ochreous 
followed, in dorsal half, by a strong red-brown patch, the latter 
mixed with black in basal part; at the base of cell two small obliquely 
placed black spots followed by a strong fuscous or black cloud; the 
latter surrounded by a reddish-brown suflfusion; at the end of cell 
another small black spot. Costa and termen with conspicuous black 
spots. Cilia ochreous with brown scales intermixed and the whole 
with a distinct rosy tinge. Hind wing whitish, strongly suffused 
apically with fuscous; scales at base of cilia, along termen. and fre- 
quently around posterior margin, black. Cilia light brownish 
ochreous. Underside of hind wing with many black scales in apical 
half. Legs ochreous ; fore leg with femur fuscous inwardly ; anterior 
surface of tibia bright pink with overlying brownish scales, the 

2« Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 739, 1902. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 81 

latter having a purplish sheen: tarsi broadly edged with fuscous. 
Mesothoracic legs like anterior pair but without fuscous femora and 
with more fuscous on tibiae and tarsi. Hind legs almost wholly 
whitish ochreous except for delicate pink suffusion on tibiae and 
fuscous tibial spurs. Abdomen ochreous with broken black lateral 
lines beneath and suffused with fuscous above. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe elongate, narrow ; weakly sclerotized except 
for clasper, sparsely clothed with fine hairs; clasper straight, blunt, 
pointed, reaching about two-thirds distance across harpe. Anellus 
longer than broad, subrectangular, moderately sclerotized; posterior 
edge convex; lateral lobes little developed. Transtilla a narrow 
sclerotized band with weak lateral lobes. Aedeagus moderately slen- 
der, with sharp, upturned point. Gnathos an oval, spined knob. 
Socii well developed hairy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Base of lobe of ovipositor with a row of long 
stout hairs. Ostium moderately large, round. Genital plate broad, 
moderately sclerotized. Ductus bursae long, membranous; inception 
of ductus seminalis near opening of ostium. Bursa copulatrix large, 
oval, symmetrical, merging gradually with the ductus; gignum a large, 
roughly diamond-shaped, spined, sclerotized plate. 

Alar expanse, 22-25 mm. 

Type.—V.S.'^.M. No. 52077. 

Type locality. — Duncan, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 

Food plant. — Cynoglossum grande Dougl. ex Lehm. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type and b $ $ and 13 $ 2 
paratypes as follows : Type $ , Duncan, Vancouver Island, British 
Columbia (July 1, 1910, Hanham) ; paratypes, Z $ $ and 7 $ 9 , 
Duncan, British Columbia (June and July dates, Hanham) ; $ 
and 2 5 2, Wellington, British Columbia (April and October dates, 
G. W. Tavlor) ; $ and 4 5?, Phoenix Lake, Marin County, Calif. 
(V-11 to VI-2-1927, H. H. Keifer). 

Paratypes in the U. S. National Museum and H. H. Keifer collec- 
tion, Sacramento, Calif. 

In superficial appearance very much like the European arenella 
but easily differentiated from it by the genitalia; in the male of 
arenella the clasper is very broad and flattened, with a deep excavation 
on the outer edge, while the clasper of fuscitemiinella is straight, 
fingerlike ; the harpe of arenella is shorter and broader than that of 
fusciterminella. In the female of arenella the anterior edge of the 
genital plate is strongly convex but that of fusciterminella is much 
less strongly so. 

The California specimens are somewhat darker than those from 
British Columbia, but this may be due to their having been reared. 

286614—41 4 



82 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

The northern specimens show more pink on the legs also, but they are 
identical in other characters, including genitalia. 

This species has been confused with pallidella Busck and has been 
placed in collections under that name. 

AGONOPTERIX CAJONENSIS, new species 

Plate 31, Figures ISO, 180a ; Plate 42, Figures 244, 244a 

This species is much like argilJacea but lacks the median dark shade 
of the fore wing. 

Labial palpus light ochreous-white, lightly mottled exteriorly on 
second segment with fuscous ; third segment with black subbasal and 
supramedial bands and tip; the basal band is poorly defined. An- 
tenna fuscous with ochreous-white scaling on basal segment and basal 
third. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing grayish fuscous 
heavily overlaid with ochreous-white ; face light ochreous-white ; base 
of fore wing and basal third of costa ochreous-white ; the light basal 
portion is followed by a dark fuscous shade; whole surface of fore 
wing sparsely irrorated with small fuscous spots; at the end of cell 
a conspicuous ochreous-white spot narrowly edged with fuscous; 
cilia grayish fuscous. Hind wing grayish fuscous; cilia concolorous 
with light basal band. Legs grayish fuscous strongly overlaid with 
ochreous-white. Abdomen grayish fuscous above with posterior mar- 
gins of segments ochreous-white ; beneath ochreous-white with a well- 
defined lateral stripe on each side and a pair of black spots on the 
posterior margin of each segment between the lateral lines. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather sharply narrowed before cucullus; 
cucullus bluntly pointed; clasper long, curved, slightly dilated 
distally ; sacculus moderately sclerotized. Anellus longer than broad, 
slightly constricted at about middle; posterior edge concave; lateral 
lobes large, extending nearly to posterior edge of central plate. 
Aedeagus slender, curved, pointed, with ventral sclerotized arm by 
which it is attached to the anellus; vesica armed with an elongate 
patch of fine cornuti. Vinculum rounded, with well-developed dorso- 
anterior process. Transtilla a moderately broad sclerotized band 
with well-developed lateral lobes. Tegumen pointed. 

Ferruile genitalia. — Genital plate very broad, strongly sclerotized. 
Ostium small, crescentic, opening slightly posterior to middle. Ductus 
bursae long, membranous; inception of ductus seminalis just before 
ostium. Bursa copulatrix large, oval, symmetrical, with well- 
developed 4-pointed signum. 

Alar expanse, 20-23 mm. 

Type.—V.S.^.M. No. 52948. 

Type locality. — Cajon Valley, Calif. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 83 

Remarks. — Described from the type 5 and 1 9 paratype (Cajon 
Valley, Calif., 25-VI-1937, Grace H. and John L. Speiry). 

Both specimens were received from ISIr. Sperry in material sub- 
mitted for determination. 

AGONOPTERIX ROSACILIELLA (Busck) 

Plate 28, Figures 166, 166a ; Plate 44, Fiquke 257 

Depressaria rosacilieUa Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 763, 1904.^ — 
Anderson, Catalogue of British Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1093, 1904. — 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidoptororum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 346, 1939. 

Depressaria ciliella Walsingham (not Stainton), Proc. Zool. Soe. London, 1881, 
p. 316.— Busck (not Stainton), Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 739, 1902; in 
Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5863, 1903. [Not Depressaria ciliella 
Stainton, Trans. Ent. Soc. London, 1849, p. 161, pi. 17, fig. 7; or Rebel, in 
Staudinger and Rebel, Catalog der Lepidopteren des palaearctischen Faunen- 
gebietes, vol. 2, No. 3234, 1901.] 

Depressaria rosiciliella Meyekick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 
176, 1922. 

Agonopteryx rosacilieUa Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 1908l — 
Braun, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 73, pt. 1, p. 10, 1921. 

Agonopterix rGsaciliella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No, 
8431, 1939. 

Agonopteryx ciliella Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 239, 1923. 

Agnopteryx rosacilieUa (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6448, 1917. 

Labial palpus ochreous-white suffused with pale reddish; second 
segment mottled exteriorly with blackish fuscous ; third segment with 
basal and subterminal bands and tip black. Head, thorax, and fore 
wing ochreous-white heavily overlaid with reddish, suffused with red- 
dish fuscous, and irrorated with sparse blackish scales ; face whitish ; 
light basal portion of fore wing containing a fuscous spot and fol- 
lowed by a deep reddish- fuscous shade, the latter diminishing in in- 
tensity outwardly; costa and termen with a series of more or less 
distinct fuscous spots, those on costa alternated with small whitish- 
ochreous spots; discal spots four, white, edged with black; first and 
second obliquely one above the other, third and fourth in line with 
second, the fourth at end of cell ; cilia fuscous with strong reddish suf- 
fusion. Hind wing and cilia light fuscous, the latter with a strong 
reddish suffusion. Legs ochreous-white with reddish tinge and 
strongly overlaid and irrorated with blackish fuscous except at joints. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe long, lightly sclerotized, bluntly pointed, 
very hairy, especially in costal half. Clasper straight, slender, grad- 
ually tapering to a blunt point, reaching beyond middle of harpe. 
Vinculum produced anteriorly to form a broad, rounded, short pro- 
jection. Anellus a more or less rectangular plate, longer than broad, 
slightly emarginate on posterior edge, with large, hairy, lateral lobes. 



§4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Aedeagus slender, not heavily sclerotized ; dilated basally and sharply 
pointed distally; the point is slightly upturned; vesica armed with 
numerous fine, long cornuti. Transtilla a weakly sclerotized band 
with slightly hairy, lateral lobes. Gnathos conical, slender; covered 
with fine spines. Socii fleshy lobes mainly indicated by hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized. 
ostium situated at about center of plate. Ductus bursae very long 
(permitting the bursa coupulatrix to reach extreme anterior portion 
of abdomen), slender, gradually becoming larger to form the sym- 
metrical bursa copulatrix; inception of ductus seminalis well before 
ostium. Signum a small, lightly sclerotized, spined, bilobed plate. 

Alar expanse, 20-26 mm. 

Type. — ^In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality.— ''CdiXiv^ Watson," Oreg. (III-IV-1872, Walsing- 
ham). 

Food plants. — OsmorJiiza (Dr. A. F. Braun, 1921) ; 0. occidentalis 
Torr. (Clarke, 1935). 

Note. — Osmorhiza occidentalis Torr. Although the three species 
of Osmorhiza [occidentalis., divaricata., and hi^evipes) that are in- 
digenous to the State of Washington were found at Godman Springs, 
Blue Mountains, at an altitude of approximately 6,000 feet, larvae 
infested only O. occidentalis. An extended search was made to 
determine the host specificity of the species, and in all localities where 
the food plants were found rosaciliella attacked only O. occidentalis. 

Distribution. — Northwestern United States and southwestern 
Canada. 

United States records 

Montana: Glacier National Park, $ (August 7, 1920, A. F. Braun). 
Oregon: "Camp Watson," 9 (III-IV-1872, Walsingham). 

Washington: Godman Springs, Blue Mountains, alt. 6,000 feet, 8 S S (VIII-3 
to 8-35) ; Pullman, 2 (III-1-98, C. V. Piper). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Kaslo, $ (Dyar and Cockle) ; Trout Lake, $ (lS-VIII-1937, 
H. Leech). 

Saskatchewan: Scott, 9 (20-X-1923, Kenneth M. King). 

Remarks. — I have before me a series of 12 specimens reared from 
Osmorhiza occidentalis and 90 from Echinopanax horridum. The 
former series is from the interior of Washington State, while the 
latter is from the Puget Sound (coastal) region. 

For some time I have thought that these two series represented two 
distinct but closely related species. I am now of the opinion, how- 
ever, that they are conspecific, but that the coastal specimens represent 
a distinct race. The interior specimens are, with one exception, con- 
siderably darker and more suffused than those from the Puget Sound 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 85 

area, but on genitalia characters they are identical, and for this 
reason I do not feel justified in separating them specifically. The 
larvae show a few differences in coloration, but larvae of this group 
are likely to vary even though they may come from eggs of the same 
female. No doubt the color variation existing between the two groups 
of specimens is induced by differences in food plants. The habits of 
the larvae are much the same, both forming rolls, but those on 
Osmorhiza have an easier time of it because of the small size of the 
leaves on which they work; those on Echinopanax have to cut the 
leaf from the edge inwardly first and then form the roll. 

I am including a description of the lai-^'ae from both localities so 
that their similarities and differences may be appreciated better. In 
the main the larvae are the same. 

Dr. Braun has been kind enough to send me a specimen from Yellow- 
stone National Park reared by her from Osmorhiza. It resembles the 
Puget Sound series more closely than do the eastern Washington 
specimens. 

The larva is as follows : Length, 15-16 mm. Head dull yellowish 
brown, spotted with a darker brown posterolaterally ; from the base of 
the antenna, extending in a line to the posterior edge of the head, is a 
broad blackish-brown band constricted in the middle (in some speci- 
mens the band is considerably broader than in others) ; ocelli light 
brown. The margins of the underside of the head are blackish brown. 
Cervical shield pale green, broadly edged laterally and posteriorly with 
black and bisected with a fine whitish-green median line. Thoracic 
and abdominal segments bright green heavily suffused with reddish 
purple in the dorsal half when the larva is mature. Posteriorly on 
the segments the reddish-purple color entirely obscures the green. In 
the dorsal half there are three brownish-fuscous longitudinal stripes, 
the outer ones fully twice as broad as the median one. On abdominal 
segments 2-7 inclusive, near the dorsoanterior margin, on each side 
of the dorsal stripe, is an outwardly oblique line of 4 to 6 small green 
spots. Between the longitudinal lines are several small green spots 
generally following folds in the skin. Anal plate green, heavily suf- 
fused with reddish purple. Tubercles black centrally, whitish green 
outwardly. Spiracles ringed with black, with a whitish-green suffu- 
sion outwardly. Thoracic legs concoiorous with segments. 

Dr. A. F. Braun first discovered larvae of this species in Yellow- 
stone National Park. She has sent me one bred specimen from this 
lot of larvae. Although the food plant is widespread throughout the 
inland empire, the larvae are very difficult to locate. Much time has 
been spent in a search for these larvae in order to clear up the status 
of this and related species. On July 13, 1935, a stand of Osmorhiza 
was found at Godman Springs, Blue Mountains, Columbia County, 



5b PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Wash., at an altitude of 6,000 feet. After a somewhat prolonged 
search ten larvae and one pupa were collected, the latter being the 
first found. 

The larva is distinctly a leaf roller, not invading the umbels as is 
done so commonly by members of Agonopierix and Depressaria. The 
pupa was found in an umbel, but there was no sign of feeding having 
taken place, and I do not think it is the usual habit for pupation to 
occur there. It seems more likely that pupation generally occurs 
about the base of the plant in debris. This larva is one of the most 
active in the group, being easily disturbed and very difficult to capture. 

Pupa : Normal for group : "Wing, antenna, and leg sheaths bright 
green. Abdominal segments green heavily suffused with reddish pur- 
ple dorsally. On the second day the color begins to deepen; the 
sheaths become a duller and darker green and the abdominals a light 
reddish brown. The color gradually becomes darker until the pupa 
is almost black. 

The pupal period is lS-14 days. 

This species is very close to the European cilieUa and was identified 
as such by Walsingham. The American rosaciUeJla has a much more 
slanting termen and appears to be a more narrow-winged species than 
cilieUa. The genitalia of the male of rosaciliella show a truncated 
anellus, while in cilieUa the anellus is concave. The harpes of the 
former species are less pointed and broader than those of the latter. 

The abdomen of the type is lost, but I do not hesitate to place the 
reared series under this name. 

AGONOPTERIX ROSACILIELLA ECHINOPANICIS, new variety 

Similar to typical rosoxiilieUa but may be distinguished from it by 
the generally lighter color and less suffused and less smoky appear- 
ance. The black scaling is sparser and more sharply contrasted. 

The male and female genitalia are the same as those of typical 
ros(wiliella. 

Alar expanse, 20-2G mm. 

Type.—^]. S. N. M. No. 52252. 

Type locality. — Skyline Eidge, Mount Baker district, Whatcom 
County, Wash. Altitude 2,500-3,000 feet. 

Food plant. — Echinopanax horridwm (Smith) Dene, and Planch. 

Remarks. — Described from the type $ and 78 $ and $ paratypes 
as follows : Skyline Eidge and Bagley Creek, Whatcom County, Wash., 
altitude 2,500-3,000 feet, 35 5 5 and 40 $ 9 (September 5-12, 1933 
and 1935, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Fraser Mills, British Columbia, 2 9? 
(IV-10-21, IV-4-23, L. E. Marmont) ; Vancouver, British Columbia, 
9 (no date). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 87 

Paratypes in the United States National Museum, Canadian Na- 
tional collection, and the collection of H. H, Keifer, Sacramento, 
Calif. 

The larva is as follows: Length, 14-16 mm.; head dark brov/n to 
black. Thoracic shield greenish to light brown bisected by a whitish 
median line and broadly bordered with black on the posterolateral 
edges. Thoracic and abdominal segments green, the latter suffused 
dorsally with reddish; from the mesothorax, in the dorsal half, two 
broad longitudinal brown stripes; a third median longitudinal stripe 
of the same color beginning at the first abdominal segment and con- 
tinuing posteriorly the full length of the body. Thoracic legs green- 
ish. Tubercles black. Spiracles edged with black. Anal plate light 
brown. 

Pupa : At first yellowish green with the abdominal segments suffused 
with reddish dorsally. In 24 hours the wing sheaths become green 
and the abdominal segments reddish brown. The pupa finally turns 
deep reddish brown; wing sheaths nearly black, but they still retain 
a greenish sheen. 

The pupal period of 12 to 15 days. 

AGONOPTERIX NOVI-MUNDI (Walsingham) 

Pl.\te 28, Figures 168, 168a 

Depressaria paHJeUa novi-mundi Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 256, 1889'. — 
Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5273, 
1891.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Miis., vol. 24, p. 74, 1902. 

Depressaria novimiindi (Walsingham) Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 
52, No. 5866, 1903.— Keakfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6409, 1903. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
ISO, p. 175, 1922.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 
335, 1939. 

Agonoptcryx novimundi (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. IMus., vol. 35, 
p. 198, 1908. 

Agonopterix novimundi (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepi- 
doptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera), No. 8428, 1939. 

Agnopteryx noinmundi (Walsingham) Barnes and IMcDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6454, 1917. 

Labial palpus sordid whitish; irrorated with blackish fuscous 
inwardly and outwardly on the second segment and in the brush; 
third segment with black subbasal and supramedial annuli. An- 
tenna blackish fuscous with grayish annulations. Head, thorax, and 
ground color of fore wing grayish fu.scous, the latter heavily overlaid 
with dull purplish fuscous ; head scales and dark scales of fore wing 
tipped with cinereous; at base of fore wing an indistinct fuscous 
patch followed by a poorly defined yellowish-brown shade; at basal 
third an outwardly oblique black dash in disk edged with yellowish 



88 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

brown ; at end of cell an indistinct white discal spot ; between veins, 
in apical third, yellowish-brown shading; along costa and around 
tei-men a series of poorly defined fuscous spots; cilia fuscous tipped 
with white. Hind wing shining yellowish fuscous; cilia concolorous, 
lighter apically. Legs cinereous strongly overlaid with shining yel- 
lowish fuscous except at joints. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, sparsely clothed with hairs; clasper 
slender, pointed, dilated about middle, reaching two-thirds distance 
to costa. Anellus more or less rectangular, longer than broad, con- 
cave on each side before posterior end and also on posterior margin; 
lateral lobes weak, hairy. Vinculmn rounded. Aedeagus stout, bent, 
pointed, the point slightly upturned; vesica with a weak spinulate 
patch about middle. Transtilla a broad, sclerotized band with large 
hairy lateral lobes. Gnathos an oval, spined knob. Socii large hairy, 
fleshy flaps. 

Alar expanse, 16 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type localities. — Mount Shasta, Siskiyou County, Calif., and 
"North Oregon." 

Remarks. — ^Various specimens in collections have been associated 
with this species, but the only two I have seen that belong under this 
name are paratypes of Lord Walsingham's that he deposited in the 
National collection. I have seen no females. 

AGONOPTERIX PALLIDELLA (Bnsck) 

Plate 32, Figubes 182, 182a ; Plate 44, Figure 256 

Depressaria pallidella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 765, 1904. — Ander- 
son, Catalogue of British Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1095, 1904. — Meybick, 

m Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, 

Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 337, 1939. 
Agnopteryx pallidella (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6461, 1917. 
Agonopterix pallidella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8418, 1939. 
Agonopteryx terinella Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 4, 

p. 232, pi. 28, fig. 15, 1920. 
Agonopterix terinella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8418, 1939. (As synonym of pallidella (Busck).) 
Depressaria terinella Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 

p. 174, 1922. 
Agonopteryx serrae Claeke, Can. Ent., vol. 65, p. 84, pi. 5, 1933. 
Agonopterix serrae (Clarice) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8418, 1939. (x\s synonym of pallidella (Busck).) 
Depressaria serrae (Clarke) Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, 

p. 350, 1939 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 89 

Labial palpus whitish ochreous, second segment irrorated with 
blackish fuscous exteriorly; third segment with subbasal and supra- 
medial bands blackish fuscous. Antenna fuscous. Head, thorax, 
and fore wing light ochreous. Face shining light silvery ochreous; 
head with light infuscation anteriorly; thorax and fore wing irro- 
rated with blackish fuscous and shaded with fuscous; extreme base 
whitish ochreous, with a single blackish fuscous spot in the fold and 
followed by a rapidly fading fuscous shade; along costa and around 
termen a series of blackish fuscous spots; at basal third, in cell, two 
black discal spots, obliquely one above the other, followed by a fuscous 
cloud; the latter is in turn followed by a blackish fuscous spot at end 
of cell; cilia light grayish fuscous irrorated with wiiitish ochreous. 
Hind wing grayish fuscous, cilia concolorous, with a slightly darker 
basal band. Legs whitish ochreous ; fore and mid legs heavily over- 
laid with fuscous except at joints; hind leg overlaid with fuscous on 
femur with slight infuscation on tibia and tarsus. Abdomen fuscous 
above; beneath whitish ochreous with broad, fuscous lateral line on 
each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe almost entirely clothed with fine hairs; 
cucullus rounded, with several long, coarse marginal hairs; 
clasper straight, reaching just beyond middle of harpe; anellus 
a moderately sclerotized plate (with the posterior edge convex), 
with large sparsely hairy lobes laterally. Vinculum rounded, with 
dorsoanterior process well developed. Aedeagus stout, slightly bent 
about middle, and bearing a flat, sclerotized basal process by which 
the aedeagus articulates with the anellus. Transtilla a narrow, lightly 
sclerotized band. Gnathos a heavily spined cone. Socii flat, hairy 
lobes. Terminal portion of tegumen pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow. Ostium semicircular. 
Ductus bursae membranous, becoming gradually larger to form the 
symmetrical bursa copulatrix. Signum an oblong-oval, toothed plate. 

Alar expanse, 17-24 mm. 

Types. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type localities. — Kaslo, British Columbia {pallidella) ; Silverton, 
Colo, (terinella) ; Pullman, Wash, {serrae). 

Food plant. — Senecio serra Hook. 

Disfrihution. — ^Western United States and southwestern Canada. 

United States records 

California: Warner Mountains, 3 miles east of Davis Creek, Modoc County, alt. 

5,500 feet, 2 $ $ and $ (VII-8 to 15-22, A. W. Lindsey). 
Colorado: Silverton, 3 $ $ and 5 ( August 24-30 ) . 
Utah: Stockton, 2 5 5 and 5 (VII-8-07, VII-30-13, VII-21-07, Tom Spalding) ; 

Warner Ranger Station, La Sal Mountains, 9,000 feet, (July 1933, A. B. 

Klots). 



90 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Washington: Pullman, SI $ $ and 37 $ 2 (VI-15 to VII-3-1932-35, J. F. G. 
Clarke [reared]). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Kaslo, $ (Dyar and Coclde) ; Keremeos, 3 $ $ (VI-30 to 
VII-11-23, C. B. Garrett). 

Remarks. — I do not hesitate to accept the above synonymy after 
carefully studying the types of all three species. It is not surpris- 
ing that the three species should have been described because of the 
apparent differences. When carefully compared these differences are 
reduced to mere shades of coloration. The specimens of teri/tiella are 
somewhat darker than the type of pallideUa., and this is no doubt 
due to the fact that they are in better condition than the rubbed type 
of the latter species. A long reared series of serrae shows all but one 
or two decidedly darker than either of the two types above, but this 
depth of color is purely environmental. There are no differences 
in the genitalia of either the males or females. 

Under this name a long series of both reared and captured speci- 
mens from British Columbia and California has previously been 
placed. Although the genitalia of these specimens are similar to 
pallidella they are amply different in other respects. They are de- 
scribed on an earlier page of this paper as A. fusciterminella^ new 
species. 

AGONOPTERIX ARNICELLA (Walsingham) 
Plate 33, Figtjee 186 

Depressaria arnicella Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 313, pi. 36, 
fig. 3. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5254, 
1891.— BusCK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 738, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. 
Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5859, 1903. — Kearfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6402 1903. — Anderson, Catalogue of British Columbia 
Lepidoptera, No. 1089, 1904.— Kearfott, Can. Ent., vol. 37, p. 296, 1905.— 
Metbick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. — Gaedb, 
in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 307, 1939. 

Agonoptcryx arnicella (Walsingham) BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol 35, p. 
198, 1908. 

Agonopterix arnicella (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) 
No. 8414, 1939. 

Agnoptcryx arnicella (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6452, 1917. 

Labial palpus pale whitish ochreous ; second segment heavily over- 
laid with fuscous exteriorly and with a pink spot, about the middle 
of brush, inwardly ; third segment with apex and subterminal annulus 
black and a poorly defined subbasal annulus fuscous. Antenna dark 
grayish fuscous. Face shining whitish. Head yellowish ochreous; 
tuft beneath eye brilliant carmine. Thorax and fore wing pale whitish 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 91 

ochreous ; thorax suffused and irrorated with fuscous ; pale basal shade 
of fore wing with black suffusion on extreme base of costa, a black 
spot in fold and followed by a fuscous shade that does not reach costa ; 
on the inner margin, at angle, an elongate black blotch in the fuscous 
shade; along costa and around termen a series of blackish-fuscous 
spots; apical third of costa roseate; at basal third two black discal 
spots, obliquely one above the other, followed by a fuscous shade ; at 
end of cell a white discal spot edged with black; cilia grayish fuscous 
suffused with reddish. Hind wing shining gray; cilia concolorous, 
with strong reddish suffusion. Legs whitish ochreous strongly over- 
laid with fuscous except at joints; tip of tibia of first leg and the tips 
of tibia and first tarsal segment of second leg, carmine ; tibia of hind 
leg with strong reddish suffusion. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, moderately sclerotized, sparsely 
clothed with fine hairs ; sacculus slightly emarginate at base of clasper, 
otherwise parallel with costa; harpe not narrowing toward the broad, 
rounded cucullus; clasper very short and slender, scarcely reaching 
past the middle of the harpe. Anellus an oval plate constricted basally 
and produced posteriorly, with hairy, lateral lobes. Vinculum 
rounded. Transtilla a broad but lightly sclerotized band with small 
narrow, lateral lobes. Gnathos an oval, spined knob. Socii mod- 
erately clothed with fine hairs. Aedeagus slender, curved, pointed; 
dilated slightly basally and with a well developed sclerotized arm by 
which the aedeagus articulates with the anellus; vesica armed with 
numerous fine, weak cornuti. 

Alar expanse, 22 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

"^we locality. — Mount Shasta, Calif. 

Food plants. — Arnica angusti folia (Vahl) (?) ; Erigeron sp. (Dr. 
Braun's record). 

Remarks. — ^I have received a male and a female of this species from 
Dr. Annette F. Braun, of Cincinnati, Ohio. This is the first record of 
the occurrence of this species since its discovery at Momit Shasta, 
Calif., by Lord Walsingham in 1871. Dr. Braun's material was reared 
from larvae collected at Hoh Lake, Olympic Mountains, Wash., 
August 13, 1936. The moths emerged September 2, 1936. This record 
extends the known range of the species 1,000 miles northward. 

Notes made in the field by Dr. Braun are as follows : "Larvae in the 
top of Erigeron shoot, webbing together the uppermost leaves and 
flowerbuds ; very dark purplish in color, with paler tubercles." 

The food plant, as recorded by Dr. Braun, casts some doubt on 
the correctness of Lord Walsingham's determination of the host of 
ai^icella. Both food plants are Compositae, but I question Lord 
Walsingham's record. 



92 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

The female submitted by Dr. Braim is the first I have seen. Lord 
Walsingham did not specify the sexes of the five specimens in his 
type series, and, although he probably had a female or two, the one 
before me is the only authentic one in this country. There are two 
male paratypes from Lord Walsingham's series in the National col- 
lection and one male in the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Cam- 
bridge, Mass. I have compared the genitalia of one of the National 
Museum paratypes with the genitalia of Dr. Braun's male and find 
them identical. The male genitalia of arniceUa are unique in the 
genus so there can be no doubt about the identity of the Washington 
specimens. 

I am gTeatly indebted to Dr. Braun for this interesting record and 
also for the male specimen she has deposited in the National collection. 

AGONOPTERIX ROBINIELLA (Packard) 

Plate 29, Figures 169, 169a ; Plate 44, Figure 259 

Depressaria rotlniella Packard, Guide to the study of insects, p. 349, pi. 8, fig. 14, 
1869.— Chambers, Can. Ent., vol. 4, p. 91, 107, 1872 ; Cincinnati Quart. Journ. 
Sci., vol. 1, p. 208, 1874.— Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 312.— 
Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5278, 1891. — 
BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 745, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. 
Bull. 52, No. 5882, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No 6425, 1903.— Traver, Psyche, vol. 26, p. 78, 1919.— Meyrick, 
in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, 
Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 346, 1939. 

Agonopteryx robiniella (Packard) BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 199, 
1908.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 241, 1923. 

Agmiopterix ro'bimella (Packard) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8448, 1939. 

Agnopteryx roMnieUa (Packard) Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, 
p. 561, 1910. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6471, 1917. — Brimley, The insects of North Carolina, 
p. 304, 1938. — Procter, Biological survey of the Mount Desert region. Part 6, 
The insect fauna, p. 273, 1938. 

Depressaria hilarella Zellee [not Coquillett, Papilio, vol. 3, p. 98, 1883], Verh. 
zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 234, 1873.— Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. 
London, 1881, p. 312. — Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 355, 
1890. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5266, 
1891. — Dietz, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 474, 1900. 

Agonopterix hilarella (Zeller) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 
8448, 1939. (As synonym of roUniella (Packard) .) 

Labial palpus whitish ochreous basally, gradually becoming more 
yellowish toward the apex ; second segment mottled with brick red and 
fuscous exteriorly and in the brush ; third segment with subbasal and 
subterminal annuli brick red and fuscous, respectively, the former 
redder, the latter more fuscous. Antenna fuscous with considerable 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE CLARKE 93 

red scaling basally, especially above. Head, thorax, and <i;i-ound color 
of fore wing yellow, mottled and overlaid with brick red and irrorated 
and shaded with fuscons and black; at basal third two black cliscal 
spots, the one nearer the inner margin less distinct than that toward 
eosta ; discal spot at end of cell absent or very indistinct ; replaced by 
a snbtriangular fuscous shade; before termen a poorly defined dark 
band not attaining costa; along costa and around termen a series of 
indistinct blackish spots; cilia light fuscous, tinged with red. Hind 
wing grayish fuscous with terminal edge narrowly blackish fuscous; 
cilia light fuscous with narrow subbasal and subterminal bands. Legs 
whitish ochreous suffused and mottled with brick red and fuscous. 
Abdomen whitish ochreous strongly overlaid with fuscous above; be- 
neath sparsely irrorated with fuscous and black and with a row of 
black spots on each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe elongate, clothed with fine hairs, cucullus 
pointed; clasper short, stout, straight. Anellus oval, slightly longer 
tlian broad, posterior edge truncated; lateral lobes w^eak, clothed with 
short hairs. Aecleagus stout, slightly curved ; vesica with an elongate 
patch of fine, spiculate cornuti. Vinculum rounded. Transtilla a 
broad sclerotized band with large lateral lobes. Gnathos an elongate, 
oval, spined knob. Socii large, hairy, fleshy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad; area posterior to ostium 
with two small sclerotized patches. Ostium oval, near center of plate. 
Ductus bursae long, membranous, dilated at point of inception of 
ductus seminalis. Bursa copulatrix with minute signum. 

Alar expanse, IJ— 20 mm. 

r^/z^e.— Lost? 

Type locality. — ^Massachusetts ? 

Food plants. — Hohinia psexidoacacia L. ; Saniculaf 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

TJyiited States records 

Illinois: Oconee, $ (July 1-7). 

Maine: Freedom, S (J- C. Purlin) ; Salisbury Cove (July 27; ace. Procter). 

Maryland: Plummers Island, 2 S S (August 1903, A. Busck ; 2-VIII-20, H. S. 
Barber). 

Massachusetts: Manchester, $ (Beutenmiiller coll.) ; Marthas Vineyard, 5 S S , 
2 ? $ (July and August, F. M. Jones) ; Vineyard Haven, $ ("VII-13," 
F. M. Jones) ; Woods Hole {$, 19-VII-1919; $, l.WIII-1014, W. T. M. 
Forbes ) . 

New Hampshire: Hampton, 3 9 9 (VII-2-05, VII-8--08, S. A. Shaw). 

New York: Bedford, 2 5 5 (ir)-VII-34, A. B. Klots) ; Ithaca (5 $ S , July and 
August dates, W. T. M. Forbes ; S , 8-VIII-33, E. C. Hodson ; S , ll-VII-1928, 
S, 22-VII-1928, A. B. Klots; 5, 27-VII-1929, A. G. Richards) ; Mattituck, 
Long Island, 5 (4-VI-1933, Roy Latham) ; New Windsor, $ (June 1891) ; 
Orient, Long Island, 8 $ S, 8 5 5 (April to October dates, 1933-1934, Roy 
Litham) ; Rochester, 5 (31-VII-33, A. B. Klots) ; Southold, Long Island, 
2 (August, Roy Latham). 



94 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

North Carolina: Black Mountains, 2 ("July 4"). 
Ohio: Cincinnati, $, 5 ( VI 1-11-04, A. F. Braun). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, $, 2 (VIII-9-07, VII-20-02, H. D. Merrick); 
Oak Station, Allegheny County, $ (26-VI-1911, Fred Marloff). 

Canadian records 

Nova Scotia: Bridgetown, 2 (VIII-8-1912, "G. E. S.") ; Truro, 2 (25-VII-1913, 
R. Matheson). 

Ontario: Point Pelee, $, 2 (26-VII and ll-VII-1927, F. P. Ide [reared from 
Rohinia pseudoacacla]) ; Port Hope, 2 2 2 (one, 24-V 1 1-1897 ; the other 
without date or collector) ; Toronto, 2 (no date or collector) ; Trenton, $ 
(12-VII-1908, Evans) ; Vineland Station, 22 2 (5-VII-1038, W. L. Putnam 
[reared from Rohinia pseudoacacia]). 

Remarks. — This and the following three species have been confused 
repeatedly in collections because of the difficulty of separating them 
on superficial characters. The moths of all four intergrade to some 
extent, but dimorpheUa, and less so lecontella, can be distinguished 
rather readily. Under the respective species I have discussed their 
separation from robinieUa. 

I have described what I consider to be typical rohinielJa. It must 
be borne in mind that there is considerable variation between speci- 
mens and that many lack the red coloration found in tlie typical 
form. The characters I have used in the key, and those I have dis- 
cussed in my remarks under the various species, should suffice to 
place any doubtful specimens. 

AGONOPTERIX LECONTELLA (Clemens) 

Plate 44, Figure 260 

Depressaria lecontella Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1860, p. 174. — 
Robinson, Ann. Lye. Nat. Hist. New York, vol. 9, p. 157, pi. 1, fig. 9, 1870. — 
Clemens, in Stainton, Tineina of North America, p. 137, 1872. — Chambers, 
Can. Ent, vol. 4, p. 146, 1872; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 
138, 1878.— Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 312.— Riley, 
in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5268, 1891. — 
BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 745, 1902; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. 
Mus Bull. 52, No. 5883, 1903. — Kearfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera 
of Boreal America, No. 6426, 1903. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 
torum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, 
pt. 92, p. 330, 1939. 

Ago^iopteryx lecontella (Clemens) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 
199, 1908. 

Agnopteryx lecontella (Clemens) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6472, 1917. 

Agonopterix lecontella (Clemens) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 
8447, 1939. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 95 

Labial palpus pale ochreous; second segment irrorated exteriorly 
with fuscous ; third segment with subbasal and median bands fuscous. 
Antenna fuscous. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing light 
ochreous; the thorax, except collar, and fore wing, except base and 
basal third of costa, strongly overlaid and suffused with brown ; fore 
wing sparsely irrorated with black scales, more so in distal half; a 
spot at extreme base of costa, one subcostally and another on inner 
angle near base, black; at basal third two conspicuous, black discal 
spots, one above the other, surrounded by a pale ochreous shade, the 
latter followed by a poorly defined fuscous cloud ; at the end of cell 
a poorly defined whitish-ochreous spot; along costa, around termen to 
inner margin a series of small fuscous spots; cilia pale ochreous- 
fuscous edged outwardly with pale ochreous. Hind wing grayish 
fuscous ; cilia somewhat lighter with ochreous-fuscous terminal band. 
Legs pale ochreous slightly irrorated and suffused with fuscous. Ab- 
domen light ochreous, suffused with fuscous. 

Female genitalia, — Genital plate moderately narrow with a strongly 
sclerotized, slightly produced anterior edge. Ostium large, occupying 
most of length of genital plate. Ductus bursae very long, gradually 
tapering into the large asymmetrical bursa copulatrix. Inception of 
ductus seminalis on right side of ductus bursae just before ostium. 
Bursa bulged out to the right, the evaginated part annulated with a 
series of concentric ridges ; the signum is a moderately large, strongly 
sclerotized, toothed plate with well developed anterior and posterior 
points and is situated at the periphery of the evaginated portion of 
the bursa copulatrix. 

Alar expanse, 18-25 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Science of Philadelphia, 

Type locality. — "Pennsylvania." 

Food plant. — Baptisia tinctoj^ia R. Brown. 

Dis-tnhution. — Known only from the type locality (presumably 
Pennsylvania) and one other specimen from Arendtsville, Pa. (7-4-29, 
S.W.Frost). 

Remarks. — In the National collection there is a single female of 
this species. Aside from the type it is the only other specimen I 
have seen. Everything else I have seen in the collections under this 
name is referable to other species and is dealt with accordingly. 

This species can be distinguished from the others with which it 
has been confused by the pale area surrounding the two conspicuous 
black discal spots at basal third, by the pale whitish-ochreous spot 
at the end of the cell, and by the strong signum of the bursa. 

This species is not included in the key based on gentalia. 



96 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

AGONOPTERIX THELMAE, new species 

Plate 44, Figtjke 259 A 

Depressaria leeontella Smith [not Clemens], Catalogue of the insects of New 

Jersey, p. 355, 1890. — Dietz, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New 

Jersey, p. 474, 1900. 
Agonopteryx leeontella Fokbes [not (Clemens)], Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 

Memoir 68, p. 241, 1923. 
Agnoptery.v leeontella Smith [not (Clemens)], Catalogue of the insects of New 

Jersey, p. 561, 1910. 

Labial palpus whitish ochreous ; second segment irrorated exteriorly 
with reddish fuscous; third segment with blackish-fuscous subbasal 
and supramedial bands. Antenna with basal segment whitish ochre- 
ous indistinctly annulated with fuscous basally, finally becoming fus- 
cous in apical third. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing 
whitish ochreous. Thorax and fore wing irrorated with fuscous and 
suffused with dull reddish ; beneath inner edge of tegula, on each side, 
a fuscous spot ; extreme base of costa and a narrow line beyond light 
basal area, fuscous; at basal third two superposed blackish-fuscous 
spots ; a similar one at end of cell preceded by an orange-red streak ; 
between this streak and the costa a small fuscous shade; along costa 
and around termen a series of indistinct fuscous spots, those around 
termen more reddish; cilia whitish ochreous with a reddish tint. 
Hind wing fuscous ; cilia whitish ochreous banded with fuscous. Legs 
whitish ochreous suffused and irrorated with reddish fuscous except 
at joints. Abdomen whitish ochreous heavily overlaid with fuscous 
above and with a row of black spots on each side beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Similar to rohiniella but with slightly narrower 
transtilla and with coarse, though small, cornuti. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow, convexly produced an- 
teriorly. Ostium large, broad, oval, about middle of genital plate. 
Ductus bursae membranous except for a strongly dilated, lightly sclero- 
tized area near posterior third; inception of ductus seminalis near os- 
tium. Bursa copulatrix moderately large, without signum. 

Alar expanse, 17-25 mm. 

Type.—\J. S. N. M. No. 53175. 

Type locality.— Oak Station, Allegheny County, Pa. (21-VIII-1910, 
FredMarloff). 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Bemarks. — Described from the $ type, 16 $ and 14 5 paratypes as 
follows: 9 , "Connecticut"; S $ S , Plummers Island, Md. (July, Au- 
gust, 1903, A. Busck; 2-Vn-1920, H. S. Barber) ; 9 Marthas Vine- 
yard, Mass. ( September 1, F.M.Jones) ; $ , Ithaca, N. Y. (2-IX-1924, 
W. T. M. Forbes) ; 2 , Lenox ([New York?] ; Beutenmiiller) ; 2 9 5 
"New York"; S , Linwood Hill, N. Y. (14-VII-1888, H. G. Dyar) ; $ , 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 97 

Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. ("August") ; 12 5 $,9 Oak Station, 
Allegheny County, Pa. (July and August dates, 1908-1911, Fred Mar- 
loff) ; ? , Lobo, Ontario (29-VIII-1924, H. F. Hudson) ; 2 $ ? , Port 
Hope, Ontario (17-Vni-1896, 15-VIII-1897, no collector); 2 9 9, 
Toronto, Ontario (no date or collector) ; 2 $ ? , Montreal, Quebec 
(lO-IX-1904, no collector). 

Paratypes in the United States National Museum, Canadian Na- 
tional, and Cornell University collections. 

This species is difficult to separate, ^Yith certainty, from rohiniella 
on superficial characters and on male genitalia. All the specimens I 
have seen, however, have a distinct orange-red bar or dash in the cell 
before the outer discal spot; all specimens of 7'ohm.iella I have seen 
lack it. The females can be easily separated by genitalia. The gen- 
ital plate of thelmae is narrow, that of rohiniella broad. 

In addition to the type series I have seen 2 5 9 from Massachusetts 
(Chilmark, "VIII-6'' George D. Eustis ; Vineyard Haven, VIII-10-36, 
F. M. Jones) and 1 2 from Maine (October 12, 1938, A. E. Brower). 

AGONOPTERIX DEWORPHELLA, new species 

Plate 31, Figures 179, 179a ; Plate 40, Figure 229 

A medium-sized species superficially resembling lecontella and 
Tohinella but darker and smaller than either. 

Labial palpus with second segment creamy white irrorated with 
fuscous outwardly; third segment fuscous with each scale tip and 
a median, inner fascia creamy white. Antenna with basal segment 
and proximal fourth creamy white beneath and fuscous above; distal 
three-fourths fuscous with narrow, lighter annulations. Head, 
thorax, and fore wing reddish ochreous, suffused with fuscous. 
From costa a fuscous median shade extending almost to inner mar- 
gin; well before termen a similar but narrower, less conspicu- 
ous outwardly curved shade; before middle of cell two small black 
discal spots, one above the other ; at end of cell a conspicuous yellow 
discal spot; cilia fuscous, irrorated with creamy white, and wnth a 
distinct pink tinge; underside of fore wing blackish fuscous. Hind 
wing blackish fuscous; cilia a lighter shade of the same color. Fore 
leg with femur fuscous inwardly, creamy white outwardly; tibia 
creamy white overlaid or irrorated with fuscous outwardly; tarsi 
fuscous annulated with creamy white. Mid legs and hind legs creamy 
white with tibiae fuscous outwardly; tarsi fuscous with creamy white 
annulations. Abdomen fuscous above, creamy white beneath with a 
black lateral line on each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately clothed with hairs; cucullus 
pointed; clasper stout, short, scarcely exceeding middle of harpe, 

286614 — 41 5 . .rv-^H 



98 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

bluntly pointed; sacculus moderatelj^ sclerotized. Annellus longer 
than broad, constricted basally; lateral edges convex; posterior edge 
concave; lateral lobes poorly developed. Aedeagus stout, slightly 
curved, bluntly pointed; vesica armed with a large patch of small 
cornuti. Vinculum rounded, with prominent dorsoanterior process. 
Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band with well developed, hairy 
lateral lobes. Socii moderately large hairy lobes. Tegimien pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately sclerotized, with pro- 
duced, truncate anterior margin. Ostium small, round. Ductus 
bursae membranous ; inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. 
Signum absent. 

Alar expanse, 11-18 mm. 

Type.—\].^.'^M. No. 52947. 

Type locality. — Henry, Putnam County, 111. 

Food plant. — Amorplia fruticosa L. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type, 78 $ and 65 5 paratypes 
all from the same locality. These are all reared specimens, bearing 
May and June dates, from larvae collected by Murray O. Glenn. 

Paratypes in the collections of Murray O. Glenn, Magnolia, 111.; 
H. H. Keifer, Sacramento, Calif. ; Dr. Annette F. Braun, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. ; Los Angeles Museum ; and Canadain National Museum. 

In this species the males are strikingly darker and smaller and the 
markings less contrasting than in the females. 

I am indebted to Mr. Glenn for the long series of reared specimens 
which make up the type series. Some of the specimens were reared 
by Mr. Glenn while others were reared in Washington from 
larvae submitted by him. The specimens reared at Washington are 
identical with those reared in Illinois, although the emergence dates 
are earlier for the former than for the latter. 

Of this species Mr. Glenn writes, "The first emergence was June 4 
(1938), and the heaviest from June 10-13. Pupation in the field 
occurs immediately (after the larva matures) at the base of the 
plant. In many instances this is the only place available as the 
shrub is often completely surrounded by water, except for a small 
hummock, about a foot in diameter, formed by the plant roots." 

This species may be separated readily from roMniella or lecon- 
tella by the yellow discal spot of the fore wing. 

AGONOPTERIX ARGILLACEA (Walsingham) 

Plate 29, Figures 171, 171a ; Plate 44, Figuee 255 

Depressaria argillacea Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 313, pi. 
36, fig. 2. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal Amei'ica, No. 
5252, 1891.— P.uscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 788, 1902; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5860, 1903 ; Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 99 

763, 1904.— Anderson, Catalogue of British Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1090, 
1904. — Kearfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
6403, 1903; Can. Ent., vol. 37, p. 296, 1905. — Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera 
insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum cata- 
logus, pt. 92, p. 306, 1939. 

Agonopteryx argillacea (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, 
p. 199, 1908.- Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 238, 1923. 

Agonopterix argillacea (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8413, 1939. 

Agnoptcryx argillacea (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6459, 1917. 

Agonopteryx Uacella Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. N. Amer., vol. 4, p. 232, 
pi. 38, tig. 2, 1920. (New synonymy.) 

Agonopterix Nacella (Barnes and Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepi- 
doptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera), No. 8422, 1939. 

Depressaria bJacella (Barnes and Busck) Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 
torum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. 

Labial palpus, antenna, head, thorax, and fore wing pale grayish 
ochreoiis; labial palpus suffused and lightly irrorated exteriorly on 
second segment with fuscous; third segment with subbasal and sub- 
apical annuli (the former poorly defined) and tip blackish fuscous; 
antenna darker apically; face lighter than rest of head; pale basal 
patch of fore wing diffused along costa and bounded below it by an 
outwardly diffused but inwardly distinct blackish-fuscous shade; re- 
mainder of fore wing sparsely irrorated with black scales ; along ccsta 
and around termen a series of indistinct fuscous spots ; at basal third, in 
cell, two black discal spots (sometimes containing some brown scales) 
obliquely one above the other, followed by a blackish fuscous cloud 
above the middle of the wing and reaching a sordid-whitish discal 
spot at the end of cell ; the spot at end of cell is narrowly edged with 
blackish fuscous and brown scales and usually preceded by a similar, 
brown-edged white spot; cilia concolorous with ground color of fore 
wing. Hind wing and cilia pale grayish ochreous, the latter with 
light-fuscous basal band. Legs pale grayish ochreous suffused with 
blackish fuscous except at joints. Abdomen light grayish fuscous 
above; beneath, pale grayish ochreous with a lateral row of black 
spots on each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe ample, moderately sclerotized and clothed 
with hair; cucullus rounded; clasper slender, straight, reaching be- 
yond center of harpe. Anellus broadly rectangular, somewhat nar- 
rower basall}^, longer than broad and with weakly developed lateral 
lobes. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus moderately sclerotized; stout, 
curved with apex pointed and sometimes slightly dorsally upturned. 
Gnathos an elongate oval spined knob. Socii fleshy, hairy lobes. 



100 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Female genitalia. — Ostium spindle-shaped (transverse). Genital 
plate moderately broad, produced anteriorly, the production of the 
anterior margin as wide as the genital plate is long. Ductus bursae 
membranous, variable in length; inception of ductus seminalis just 
anterior to ostium. Bursa copulatrix not abruptly defined but 
formed by the gradual broadening of the ductus bursae. Signum a 
sclerotized, toothed, diamond-shaped plate. 

Alar expanse, 19-24 mm. 

Types. — In the British Museum {argillacea) ; in the United States 
National Museum {hlacella). 

Type localities. — Newville, Tehama County, Calif, {argillacea) ; 
Shasta Eetreat and Truckee, Calif, (blacella). 

Food plant. — Salix spp. 

Distribution. — Western United States and western Canada and 
northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

California: Sacramento, 11 $ $,2 9 9 (V-10 to 24-33, H. H. Keifer [reared]) ; 

Truckee, 8 S $, 8 9 9 (August and October dates, Ximena McGlashan). 
Idaho: Johnson's Bar, Snake River, 9 (IV-l()-26, J. F. G. Clarke). 
Oreg-on: Fort Klamath, Fort Watson (Walsingham). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 9 (VI-20-07, H. D. Merrick). 
Washington: Dieringer, 9 (VIII-1-32, W. W. Baker [reared]) ; Battleground, 

Clark County, $ (VIII-22-30, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Logan Hill, Chehalis, $, 

9 (II-5-30, III-28-30, T. M. Clarke) ; Pullman (4 $ $, S 9 9, March to 

November dates, T. M. and J. F. G. Clarke [reared]). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Duncan, 9 ("1-10-12", Hanham) ; Vancouver, $ (IV-6-03) ; 

Victoria, $, 9 ("7-9-03" ; "3-7-03") ; Wellington, 2 $ $ (IV-30-02), 9 9 

("2-5-02"; "20-4-07") 4 S S (April, G. W. Taylor). 
New Brunswick: Frederickton, 9 (Aug. 27, 1929, R. P. Gorham). 
Ontario: Biscotasing, $ (VIII-4-31, Karl Schedl) ; Bobcaygeon, $ (VIII-16-32, 

J. McDunnough) ; Stittsville, $ (21-VIII-1939, E. G. Lester). 

Remarks. — The study of 22 male and female genitalia slides, to- 
gether with host records, convinces me that the above synonymy is 
correct. 

A paratype of Walsingham's argillacea is before me. This speci- 
men, in good condition, although somewhat faded, exactly matches 
specimens of hlacelln. All the male genitalia are identical except 
for slight variations in the harpe, a phenomenon frequently encoun- 
tered in this gi'oup. The female genitalia show wide variation in the 
length of the ductus bursae, but a study of Busck's cotypes of hlacella 
show this wide variation in length even in the type series. The length 
of the ductus bursae is not a reliable character for the separation of 
species of this group. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPPIORIDAE — CLARKE 101 

I have before me long bred series from various localities, all show- 
ing some variation. Specimens from Sacramento, Calif., match Wal- 
singham's description of argillacea^ while other bred specimens from 
Washington State match the types of hlacella. The pattern of both is 
identical. The depth of color and the definition of the discal spots 
vary throughout the series. These characters cannot be used for dif- 
ferentiation of species since, in any long bred series, all degrees of 
depth of color or definition of spots may be found. 

AGONOPTERIX NIGRINOTELLA (Busck) 

Plate 29, Figukes 170, 170a ; Plate 45, Figure 265 

Depressaria nigrinotella Bxjsck, Proc. Ent. Soc. "Washington, vol. 9, p. 88, 1908. — 

Meykick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in 

Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 334, 1939. 
Aganopteryx nigrinotella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, IGOS. — 

Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. N. Amer., vol. 4, p. 232, 1920. — Forbes, 

Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 240, 1923. 
Agonopterix nigrinotella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2. Microlepidoptera), No. 

8444, 1939. 
Agnopteryx nigrinotella (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6444, 1917. 

Labial palpus pale yellowish brown ; second segment sparsely irro- 
rated with blackish fuscous exteriorly; third segment with basal 
three-fourths and apex black. Antenna fuscous. Head light reddish 
brown. Thorax, base, and basal half of costa of fore wing light yel- 
lowish brown; anterior edge of thorax and tegula somewhat darker 
brown ; posterior tip of thorax blackish fuscous. Fore wing brownish 
fuscous faintly irrorated with blackish fuscous; beyond light basal 
part of wing a blackish-fuscous shade, which fades rapidly into the 
lighter ground color ; at basal third, in cell a black discal dot followed 
at end of cell by a yellowish- white discal spot ; cilia brownish fuscous, 
more whitish at tornus. Hind wing shining light yellowish fuscous; 
cilia somewhat lighter with pale fuscous subbasal and subterminal 
bands. Legs pale yellowish brown, irrorated and suffused with black- 
ish fuscous except at joints. Abdomen yellowish. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, pointed, clothed with long hairs; 
clasper moderately sclerotized, slender, reaching almost to costa. 
Anellus a rectangular plate longer than broad, with the posterior 
edge truncated ; lateral lobes weak with only a few hairs. Vinculum 
rounded with a well developed dorsoanterior process. Aedeagus ro- 
bust, curved, pointed. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band with 
elongated lateral lobes. Gnathos an elongated cone armed with fine 
spines. Socii moderate, clothed with many long hairs. 



102 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Female genitalia. — Ostium large, round, near anterior margin of 
genital plate ; anterior edge of genital plate produced, the production 
nearly as wide as the plate is long. Ductus bursae membranous, 
long ; ductus seminalis entering well before ostium. Bursa copulatrix 
relatively small; signum a weakly sclerotized, oval, toothed plate. 

Alar expanse, 20-23 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Food plants. — Xanthoxylum amsricanum Mill, and Oarya (sp. ?). 

Distribution. — Eastern United States and Canada and probably 
as far west as Texas in the South, following the distribution of the 
food plant. 

United States records 

Ohio: Cincinnati, 2 S S , 4 $ 5 (June and July dates, A. F. Braun). 

Canadian records 
Ontario: St. Davids, 2 5 2 (VII-16-34, W. L. Putnam). 

Remarks. — Busck^^ recorded this species from Ptelea trifoliata., 
but the food plants of nigrinotella are Xanthoxylum annericanum 
and Carya (sp. ?). The species referred to by Mr. Busck is an 
undescribed species, the description of which follows. 

AGONOPTERIX COSTIMACULA, new species 

Plate 30, Figures 174, 174a; Plate 45, Figure 261 

Agonopteryx nigrinotella Barnes and Busck (not Busck), Contr. Lepid. North 
America, vol. 4, p. 232, 1920. 

Superficially much like nigrinotella but lighter, less immaculate, 
and averaging larger with correspondingly wider wings. 

Head light ochreous-f uscous ; face whitish ochreous; labial palpus 
light ochreous-fuscous, lighter interiorly on second segment and 
irrorated with blackish fuscous exteriorly; terminal segment with 
blackish- fuscous subbasal and supramedial annuli and apex ; antenna 
ochreous-fuscous, darker toward apex, narrowly annulated with 
blackish fuscous. Thorax light ochreous-fuscous mixed with fuscous 
anteriorly; ground color of fore wing ochreous-fuscous, the base and 
costa to about middle slightly lighter; light basal area followed by 
a blackish- fuscous shading; at basal third two obliquely placed black 
discal spots, the upper, inner one large, the outer, lower one small; 
at end of cell a light whitish-ochreous discal spot narrowly edged 
with fuscous; on costa, six or eight conspicuous fuscous spots and a 
series of smaller ones at ends of veins around termen; the whole 



Busck, Contr. Lepid. Nortli America, vol. 4, p. 232, 1920. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 103 

wing is irrorated with black scales ; cilia ochreous-f uscous with many 
lighter tipped scales. Hind wing light smoky fuscous, lighter 
basally, underside heavily shaded with black toward apex ; cilia light 
fuscous with narrow, dark, subbasal band. Legs, except tarsi, yel- 
lowish ochreous shaded with blackish fuscous; tarsi blackish fuscous 
annulated with yellowish ochreous. Abdomen fuscous and whitish 
ochreous above and whitish ochreous below with broad, black, lateral 
lines. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe long, moderately wide; cucullus pointed; 
clasper long, stout, straight, reaching costa ; sacculus narrowly folded. 
Anellus oval, truncated on posterior edge; lateral lobes weak with 
few hairs. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus long, curved, bluntly 
pointed; vesica with large spinulate patch in basal half. Transtilla 
a narrow sclerotized band with large, hairy, lateral lobes. Gnathos 
an oval spined knob. Socii large hairy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate long; anterior edge folded nar- 
rowly. Ostium near anterior margin of plate. Ductus bursae long, 
membranous; inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix large with small signum. 

Alar expanse, 21-25 mm. 

Type.—\]. S. N. M. No. 52080. 

Type locality. — Plummers Island, Md. 

Food plant. — Ptelea trifoliata L. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type and 51 $ and ? paratypes 
as follows : 13 $ $ and 5 $ 9 , Plummers Island, Md. (March and 
April dates, H. S. Barber and August Busck) ; Decatur, 111., $ and 
2 9 5 (June 8-15, no collector) ; Cincinnati, $ and 2 5 5 (X-8-04, 
X-8-07, VI-25-08, A. F. Braun) ; Clermont County, Ohio, 2 9 5 
(VI-14-14, A. F. Braun) ; Point Pelee, Ontario, 13 5 5,8 55 
(VII-15 to VIII-11-27, F. P. Ide; VII-30-31, G. S. Walley; VII- 
27-31, W. J. Brown) ; Pelee Island, Ontario, 2 5 5 (VII-30-31, G. S. 
Walley). 

Paratypes in U. S. National Museum, Canadian National collection, 
and collection of Dr. A. F. Braun, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

This species has been mixed in collections, being placed vnider 
eupatoHiella {=^ plummerella) ., argillacea., and nigrinotella. Ob- 
scurely marked specimens of any of these species might easily be 
confused. The long clasper which reaches the costa of harpe im- 
mediately distinguishes the present species from the others. 

I am indebted to Dr. J. McDunnough for a long, reared series from 
Point Pelee, Ontario, which has greatly supplemented the material 
here. 



104 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

AGONOPTERIX CANADENSIS (Busck) 

Plate 45, Figure 262 

Depressaria canadensis Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 744, 1902 ; 

in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5878, 1903.— Keaefott, in Smith, 

List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6421, 1903.— Meyrick, in 

Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 174, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, 

Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 311, 1939. 
Agonopteryx canadensis Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35. p, 199, 1908. — 

Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 240, 1923. 
Agonopterix canadensis (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 

of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 

No. 8424, 1939. 
Agnopteryx canadensis (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6467, 1917. 

Labial palpus pale ochreous- white ; second segment evenly 
springled with blackish fuscous exteriorly ; third segment with broad 
subbasal and subapical annuli and tip black. Antenna fuscous with 
indistinct black annulations. Head, thorax, and fore wing pale yel- 
lowish gray; face creamy white; thorax with a few light-reddish 
scales mixed ; pale base of fore wing diffused along costa, containing 
a small black spot in fold and bounded below with a rapidly fading 
blackish-fuscous shade ; remainder of fore wing irrorated with black- 
ish-fuscous and black ; along costa and around termen to near middle 
of inner margin a pronounced series of well-defined black spots; on 
costa, in apical third of wing, and on basal half of inner margin a 
rosy tint; at basal third a pair of rather large black discal spots, 
obliquely one above the other and followed by a blackish-fuscous 
shade above the middle of the wing ; at the end of cell a black discal 
spot ; cilia yellowish gray, slightly darker than ground color of fore 
wing. Hind wing light fuscous; cilia sordid whitish with yellowish 
tint. Legs ochreous-white mottled and suffused with blackish fus- 
cous except at joints. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow, weakly sclerotized, pro- 
duced anteriorly. Ostium occupying nearly all central portion of 
genital plate ; inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. Duc- 
tus bursae membranous, very long, slender, gently tapering to form 
the small bursa copulatrix. Signum of bursa a small, narrow, 4- 
pointed plate, with anterior point longer than posterior. 

Alar expanse, 17 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — ^^Yinnipeg, Manitoba (A. W. Hanham). 

Remarks. — The female type is the only specimen of this species 
I have seen. It is very distinct and should not be confused with 
any other described North American species. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 105 

Specimens from British Columbia and Ontario have been sent to 
me under this name, but all these are referable to other species 
{klamathiana or sciadopa) to which there is, in some cases, a super- 
ficial resemblance. The genitalia of canculensis show no close re- 
semblance to those of the other species, and canadensis is further dis- 
tinguishable from them by lacking discal spots that thei others possess. 

AGONOPTERIX FLAVICOMELLA (Engel) 

Plate 30, Figures 173, 173a ; Plate 45, Figuee 267 

Depressaria flaricomella Engel, Ent. News, vol. 18, p. 276, 1907. — Metriok, in 

Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, 

Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 324, 1939. 
Agonopteryx flavicomella (Engel) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 199, 

1908.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 240, 1923. 
Agonopterix flavicomella (Engel) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 

8420, 1939. 
Agnoptcryx flavicomella (Engel) Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, 

p. 561, 1910. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Boreal America, No. 6463, 1917. — Brimi.et, The insects of North Carolina, 

p. 304, 1938. 

Labial palpus and head pale whitish ochreous; second segment of 
palpus strongly irrorated and suffused with blackish fuscous exteriorly 
and in brush ; third segment immaculate ; sides of head slightly darker. 
Antenna grayish fuscous narrowly annulated with fuscous. Thorax 
and basal part of fore wing (except costa) light ochreous; thorax 
suffused and lightly irrorated with reddish brown and with a black- 
ish-fuscous spot on each side beneath inner edges of tegulae. Ground 
color of fore wing light ochreous heavily overlaid with reddish brown 
and fuscous and irrorated with black; beyond the light basal patch 
a dark blackish-fuscous shade, which rapidly fades to reddish, then 
to ochreous at apical part of wing; basal part of costa suffused with 
fuscous; costa and termen marked with a series of black spots, those 
around termen more conspicuous than those on costa; at basal third 
a conspicuous black discal spot followed by a similar but larger one 
at middle and another larger more diffused one at end of cell; be- 
tween the first and second discal spots and the inner margin (on vein 
Ic) a somewhat diffused black spot; cilia fuscous, darker basally. 
Hind wing grayish fuscous with a series of blackish- fuscous dashes 
around apex and outer margin ; cilia yellowish fuscous with an indis- 
tinct dark subbasal band. Legs light whitish ochreous strongly over- 
laid or suffused with shining sooty black except at joints and on pos- 
terior tibiae. Abdomen pale whitish ochreous irrorated with fuscous 
above; ventrally with a broad blackish-fuscous longitudinal line on 



106 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

each side and two indistinct median longitudinal rows of similarly 
colored spots. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather broad basally, tapering gently to the 
bluntly pointed cucullus, profusely clothed with coarse hairs; costa 
narrowly sclerotized ; sacculus moderately sclerotized ; clasper slender, 
gently excurved, bluntly pointed, with small basal protuberance, 
reaching well beyond center of harpe ; distal end serrate ; clasper and 
inner edge of sacculus heavily sclerotized. Anellus broader than 
long, convex laterally and slightly concave on posterior edge ; lateral 
lobes large, sparsely hairy. Aedeagus stout, gently curved, pointed; 
vesica armed with a large elongate patch of strong but moderately 
small cornuti. Vinculum rounded with small dorsoanterior process. 
Transtilla a narrow lightly sclerotized band with large, hairy, lateral 
lobes. Gnathos rather long, slender. Tegumen pointed. Socii 
large, hairy, fleshy flaps. 

Female genitalia, — Genital plate moderately narrow; weakly 
sclerotized around ostium with a broad convex anterior margin. 
Ostium round, slightly nearer to anterior than posterior edge ; margin 
narrowly sclerotized except posteriorly. Ductus bursae long, mem- 
branous with entire inner surface studded with numerous minute 
stout teeth anterior to inception of ductus seminalis ; ductus seminalis 
well before ostium. Bursa copulatrix rather small, inner surface also 
with numerous small teeth, but fewer than in ductus bursae ; signum 
a moderately large irregularly shaped toothed plate. 

Alar expanse, 15-17 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — New Brighton, Pa. 

Food plant. — Heraclemn sp. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States and Canada west to British 
Columbia. 

United States records 

Illinois: Chicago, $ (no date or collector) ; Monee, 2 $ S (VI-21-12, A. Kwiat). 
New Jersey: Essex County Park, 5 S $ (VII-2-^6, W. D. Kearfott). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 22 5 5 , 9 (June and July dates, H. D. Merrick) ; 
Oak Station, Allegheny Coimty, 16 S o , 4 5 $ (June dates, Fred Marloff). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Rolla (5-VIII-1927, P. N. Vroom). 

Manitoba: Riding Mountain Park, 2 $ S,S 9 9 (25-VI-33, J. McDunnough). 

Ontario: Trenton (VII-22-12, Evans). 

Saskatchewan: Indian Head (VII-22-25, J. J. de Gryse). 

Remarks. — The abdomen of the type is missing. The genitalia are 
figured from a "cotype" male and a typical female. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 107 

AGONOPTEUIX SENICIONELLA (Busck) 
Plate 30, Figukes 172, 172a ; Plate 45, Figures 263 

Depressaria senicionella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 742, 1902; in 

Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5875, 1903.— Ke^vrfott, in Smith, List of 

the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6418, 1903.— Engel, Ent. News, 

vol. 18, p. 276, 1907. 
Depressaria seniciella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 743, 1902. 
Depressaria senecionella Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 

174, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 350, 1939. 
Affonopfcnjx senecionella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. jNIus., vol. 35, p. 199, 1908.— 

Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 240, 1923. 
Af/onoptrrix soiicioiiella (Busck) McDunnougii, Check list of the Lepidoptera 

of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 

No. 8423, 1939. 
Agnoptenjx senicionella (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6464, 1917. 

Labial palpus light ochreous ; second segment irrorated with black- 
ish fuscous exteriorly ; third segment with subbasal and subterminal 
annuii and apex black. Antenna fuscous with grayish-ochreous an- 
nulations. Head and thorax light ochreous; face yellowish white; 
thorax with brownish-ochreous suffusion and irrorations. Fore wing 
dark ochreous-gray, strongly overlaid and suffused with brownish 
ochreous; light basal patch suffused on costa with fuscous, contain- 
ing a blackish-fuscous spot in fold and bordered outwardly by a 
rapidly fading fuscous shade ; at basal third, in cell, two black discal 
dots, obliquely one above the other ; the lower one of these two is often 
lacking ; at the end of cell an inconspicous black discal dot preceded 
by an indistinct fuscous shade; termen and costa indistinctly marked 
with poorly defined fuscous spots ; cilia ochreous-gray with two nar- 
row ochreous-white lines, one at middle and one around outer edge. 
Hind wing grayish fuscous, darker apically; cilia light yellowish 
fuscous with grayish-fuscous subbasal and subterminal bands. Legs 
light ochreous overlaid with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen gray- 
ish ochreous above; beneath light ochreous with a broad blackish- 
fuscous line on each side ; between these two lines a pair of indistinct 
longitudinal rows of blackish-fuscous spots. 

Male genHaUa. — Harpe rather broad, well sclerotized along costa; 
clothed with fine hairs; cucullus rounded; clasper nearly straight, 
modei'ately sclerotized and reaching slightly beyond middle of harpe. 
Anellus oval, longer than broad, lateral lobes well developed, clothed 
with few fine hairs. Vinculum narrow, rounded, with well-developed 
dorsoanterior process. Aedeagus stout, slightly curved, bluntly 
pointed ; ventral arm by which it is attached to anellus short, broad, 
and situated near base of aedeagus. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized 



108 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM tol. 90 

band with large, hairy, lateral lobes. Gnathos an oval spined knob. 
Socii very large flaps clothed with many fine hairs. Tegumen pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow, strongly sclerotized and 
produced anteriorly. Ostium round. Ductus bursae membranous, 
gradually becoming larger to form the large oval bursa copulatrix. 
Signum a large four-pointed plate, the anterior and posterior points 
of about equal length but smaller than the lateral points. 

Alar expanse, 18-22 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Cabin John, Md. 

Food plant. — Senecio aureus L. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: Washington, 8 5 (J, 9 (May 28 to June 16, 1900, August 

Busck). 
Maryland: Cabin John, 2 S S (IV-28 and 30-1900, August Busck) ; Plummers 

Island, 3 5 5 , 11 $ $ (May and June dates, A. Busck and Chas. R. Ely). 
Virginia: Great Falls, 9 (May 28, 1900, no collector), 

AGONOPTERIX ANTENNARIELLA, new species 

Plate 30, Figuees 175, 175a ; Plate 45, Fig-dbe 264 
A medium-sized red-brown species unlike any other described from 
North America. 

Head dark reddish fuscous above mixed with carmine and whitish- 
ochreous-tipped scales ; face shining whitish ochreous ; second segment 
of palp)us whitish ochreous tinged with carmine inwardly and irrorated 
with fuscous exteriorly; brush trumpet-shaped; terminal segment 
whitish ochreous with broad blackish-fuscous basal and subterminal 
annuli. Antenna fuscous, aimulated with whitish ochreous. 

Thorax, base of fore wing, and costa to well beyond middle cine- 
reous; anterior portion of thorax and extreme base of costa suffused 
with rich brown ; ground color of fore wing red-brown, scales lightly 
tipped with carmine ; at basal third two small obliquely placed black 
discal spots followed by a few cinereous scales ; at end of cell a third 
white discal spot edged with black; apical third of wing heavily 
shaded with cinereous; cilia reddish fuscous, tipped with carmine; a 
row of fuscous spots around tennen at base of cilia. Hind wing light 
fuscous above ; with much white scaling beneath in apical third and a 
black line at base of cilia ; cilia light fuscous with distinct rosy hue, 
and darker subbasal band. Legs fuscous overlaid with whitish 
ochreous and strongly suffused with carmine ; hind tibiae whitish, suf- 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 109 

fused with carmine; tarsi annulated with whitish ochreous. Abdo- 
men grayish fuscous above, whitish ochreous below; ventrolateral 
lines poorly defined, black; anal tuft yellowish ochreous, suffused 
with carmine. 

Mode genitalia. — Harpe moderately sclerotized and covered with 
hairs over entire inner surface; costa and sacculus parallel beyond 
middle then converging to form a narrowly rounded cucullus. Clasper 
heavily sclerotized, smooth, short, terminating in a blunt point. Anel- 
lus longer than broad, truncated on posterior edge; lateral lobes weak. 
Vinculum with a very short, small dorsoanterior process. Transtilla a 
very narrow, moderately sclerotized band with small lateral lobes. 
Aedeagus stout, rather short and evenly tapered, terminating in a 
sharp point. Armature consisting of many fine spinules. Gnathos a 
heavily spined cone. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately sclerotized, broad, 
slightly produced anteriorly. Ostium near posterior margin of plate. 
Ductus bursae slender, gradually becoming larger till it merges with 
the bulbous bursa copulatrix. Signum a 4-pointed, moderately sclero- 
tized small plate with strong teeth; lateral, anterior, and posterior 
points about equal in length. 

Alar expanse, 17-24 mm. 

Type.— U. S. N. M. No. 52081. 

Type locality. — Kamiack Butte, Whitman County, Wash. 

Food plant. — Antennaria luzuloldes T. and G. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type, 7 $ and 4 $ paratypes, as 
follows: Kamiack Butte, 3 5 3,25$ (V-18 to 22-34) ; 4 5 5 , 1 9 
same (VI-15 to 19-35) ; $ , Pullman, Wash. (1-28-31 [indoor 
record] ) ; $ , Godman Springs, Blue Mountains, Wash., 6,000 feet 
(VIII-1-35) ; all reared from larvae collected by the author. 

Paratypes in collections of United States National Museum, Cana- 
dian National Museum, and H. H. Keifer, Sacramento, Calif. 

Dr. J. McDunnough, of Ottawa, has sent me three specimens of 
this species from British Columbia. The larvae, from which these 
moths were reared, were collected by A. N. Gartrell at Shingle 
Creek Road, Keremeos. The adults emerged from 30-VI to 
&-VII-35. 

Mr. Gartrell has labeled his specimens as reared from wild red 
currant. The food plant record is rather surprising since most of 
the species of this group are host specific, and it will be noted that the 
type series was reared from Antennaria. I have carefully compared 
the genitalia of specimens of the two lots and find them identical. 



110 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

AGONOPTERIX NEBULOSA (Zeller) 

Plate 32, Figuees 185, 185a ; Plate 45, Figueb 266 

Dcpressaria nehulosa Zeller, Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 237, 1873.— i 
Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 138, 1878.— Walsing- 
HAM, Proc. Zool Soc. London, 1881, p. 312.— Riley, in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5269, 1891.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 24, p. 741, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5870, 
1903. — Kearfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
6413, 1903. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 177, 
1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 334, 1939. 

AgonopteryoR nebulosa (Zeller) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.. vol. 35, p. 198, 
1908.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68 p. 239, 1923. 

Agonopterix nclulosa (Zeller) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8452, 1939. 

Agnopteryx nehulosa (Zeller) Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, 
p. 516, 1910. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6438, 1917. 

Labial palpus shining creamy white ; second segment sprinkled with 
black scales outwardly and with brush suffused with white-tipped 
fuscous scales; brush abruptly expanded, trumpet-shaped; third seg- 
ment with broad subbasal and subapical annuli black; the black scales 
of these annuli white tipped. Antenna fuscous annulated with gray. 
Head, thorax, and fore wing lavender-gray, the scales white tipped; 
face creamy white, tegula with a bluish iridescence; along costa and 
around termen a series of poorly defined light fuscous spots ; at basal 
third two black cliscal dots, the upper, inner one small, the outer, 
lower one dashlike and both bordered outwardly with white scales; 
at the end of cell a white black-edged discal spot preceded by a similar 
one; sometimes these two are confluent, forming a white and black 
longitudinal dash; cilia grayish fuscous with narrow median and 
terminal white lines. Hind wing and cilia light yellowish fuscous, the 
wing darker apically ; cilia with several, somewhat darker bands. Legs 
ochreous-white, overlaid and irrorated with grayish fuscous above, 
ochreous-white beneath; the usual longitudinal lines or rows of dark 
spots lacking or only faintly indicated by a few blackish-fuscous scales. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately broad, entirely clothed with fine 
hairs; cucullus narrowly rounded; clasper stout, curved, slightly 
hooked, reaching two-thirds of distance to costa. Anellus broadly 
oval with poorly developed lateral lobes. Vinculum rounded. Aedea- 
gus short, stout, straight, with a blunt point; vesica armed with 
numerous spinulate cornuti. Transtilla a very narrow sclerotized 
band with moderately large, hairy, lateral lobes. Gnathos an oval, 
spined knob. Socii hairy flaps. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 111 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow, emarginate behind ; ante- 
rior margin in the form of a narrow, sclerotized, curved bar; ostium 
occupying nearly whole ventral portion of genital plate and without 
sclerotized area posterior to it. Ductus bursae membranous, abruptly 
constricted before ostium. Bursa copulatrix oval ; signum an elongate 
plate with posterior pointed process. 

Alar expanse, 19-20 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Cambridge, Mass. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distrihution. — Northeastern United States. 

United States records 

Maine: Monmouth, S ( "November 30, '05" ) . 

Massachusetts: Amherst, 2 S S (January 21, 1906). 

New Hampshire: 2 $S without further data; Hampton, $, 2 (III-26-05, 

III-22-05, S. A. Shaw). 
New York: New Windsor, $ (June 24, 1903, E. L. Morton). 

Remarks. — Differs from all other gray American species by the 
accentuated trumpet-shaped palpus. 

AGONOPTERIX SABULELLA (Walsingham) 

Plate 32, Figotes 181, 181a ; Plate 46, Figure 270 

Depressarla sabulella Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 313, pi. 36, 
fig. 1. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5279, 
1891.— BusCK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 743, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. 
Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5876, 1903. — Keaetott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera 
of Boreal America, No. 6419, 1903 ; Can. Ent. vol. 37, p. 296, 1905.— Meyeick, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepi- 
dopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 348, 1939. 

Agonopteryx sabulella (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 
199, 1908. 

Agonopterix sabulella (Walsingham) McDunxough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 
8412, 1939. 

Agnoptenjx sabulella (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnougii, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6465, 1917. 

Agonopteryx callosella Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 4, 
p. 231, pi. 38, fig. 4, 1920. (New synonymy). 

Agonopterix callosella (Barnes and Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 
lepidoptera) No. 8421, 1939. 

Depressarla callosella (Barnes and Busck) Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 
torum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 
92, p. 311, 1939. 

Labial palpus pale ochreous; second segment with slight fuscous 
shading and blackish-fuscous irrorations exteriorly; third segment 



112 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

with subapical aniiulus and apex blackish fuscous. Antenna blackish 
fuscous. Head, thorax, and fore wing pale ochreous; face ochreous- 
white; base of costa and spot in anal angle blackish fuscous; forewing 
sparsely irrorated with fuscous and shaded with reddish scales; at 
basal third two fuscous discal spots obliquely one above the other; 
at end of cell a fuscous spot preceded above by a less conspicuous one 
of the same color; between the outer and inner pairs of spots a poorly 
defined fuscous cloud in costal half of wing; apical half of costa and 
termen and the cilia with a reddish suffusion, cilia light ochreous. 
Hind wing grayish ochreous, cilia paler, with alternating light fus- 
cous and whitish bands. Legs ochreous-white strongly suffused and 
overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints; posterior tibia and 
tarsus hardly more than irrorated with fuscous. Abdomen grayish 
fuscous above, pale ochreous beneath ; on each side ventrally, a black 
longitudinal line. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe narrow, long, pointed, clothed with very 
fine hairs; clasper stout, slightly curved toward cucuUus, and termi- 
nating in a knob, Anellus a roughly oval plate, longer than broad, 
truncated posteriorly, and with well developed, hairy, lateral lobes. 
Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus stout with a long slender upturned 
point and a large, spinulate patch in basal half. Transtilla a nar- 
row, lightly sclerotized band with well-developed, hairy, lateral lobes. 
Gnathos a spiny cone. Socii broad flaps clothed with fine hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Ovipositor naked except for a few strong long 
hairs at base and a few weak hairs distally. Genital plate moderately 
broad, slightly produced anteriorly. Ostium is posterior half of 
plate. Ductus bursae membranous, slender, widening abruptly to 
form the large oval bursa copulatrix. Signum a diamond-shaped 
plate, with the anterior point shorter than the posterior. 

Alar expanse, 19-23 mm. 

Types. — In the British Museum {sahulella) ; in the United States 
National Museum {callosella). 

Type localities. — Mendocino County, Calif, {sabulella) ; San Ber- 
nardino, Calif, {callosella). 

Food plants. — Eriophyllum stachaedi folium Lag. and Eriophyllum 
lantanum typicum Constance, 

Distribution. — ^Western United States probably as far north as 
southern British Columbia in the interior. 

United States records 

California: Land's End, San Francisco, $ (VII-23^09, F. X. Williams) ; San 
Francisco, $ (VI-12-26, H. H. Keifer) ; Monachee Meadows, Tulare 
County, 8,000 feet, $ ("July 8-14") ; Croville, S (IV-14-28, H. H. Keifer) ; 
San Bernardino, 9 ("June 1-7") ; San Diego, $, 5 ("May 24-30"). 

Idaho: Kamiah, $ (VI-27-35, L. Constance). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 113 

R&marks. — The above synonymy is based on a comparison of Wal- 
singham's figure and description with the types of callosella. 
Although there is no authentic material of Walsingham's species 
here, there appears to be no doubt about the synonymy. Mr. Busck 
concurs with me in this opinion. 

H. H. Keifer, of Sacramento, Calif., was kind enough to send me 
three specimens, which I associate with this species, two of which 
were reared by him from ErioyhyUmn stachaedi folium. These speci- 
mens are identical with the types of callosella^ which are before me. 

I have another specimen before me from Kamiah, Idaho, reared 
from Eriophyllwm lantanum typicwm^ which was collected by my 
friend Dr. Lincoln Constance, of the Department of Botany, Uni- 
versity of California. This specimen is close to the types of callosella 
but differs in details. I am placing it here, however, until more 
material can be obtained and its specific limits ascertained. 

AGONOPTERIX COSTOSA (Haworth) 

Plate 32, Figtxres 184, 184a ; Plate 46, Figure 273 

Depressaria costosa Hawobth, Lepidoptera Britarmica, vol. 3. p. 508, 1811. — 
Wood, Index entomologicus, p. 172, pi. 38, fig. 1182, 1845. — Stainton, Trans. 
Ent. Soc. London, vol. 5, p. 153, 1849 ; Insecta Britannica, p. 84, 1S54. — Zeu^er, 
Linn. Ent., vol. 9, p. 198, 1854. — Stainton, A manual of British butterflies and 
moths, vol. 2 p. 320, 1859. — Fbey, Die Tineen und Pterophoren der Schweiz, p. 
82, 1856. — Heinemann, Die Schmetterlinge Deutschlauds und der Schweiz, 
vol. 2, p. 143, 1870.— Meykick, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 13, p. 281, 1870.— 
Fkey, Die Lepidopterea der Schweiz,. p. 351, 1880. — Rossleb, Jahrb. nassau. 
Vereins Naturk., vol. 33, p. 282, 1881. — Snellen, Die Vlinders van Nederland, 
vol. 2, p. 577, 1882. — Steudetl and Hofmann, Wiirttemberg. Vereins vaterl. 
Naturk., vol. 38, p. 196, 1882. — Joubdheuiixe, Mem. Soc. Acad. I'Aube, vol. 47, 
p. 176, 1883. — Sorhagen, Die Kleinschmetterlinge der Mark Brandenburg, p. 
175, 1SS6.— Meyrick, A handbook of British Lepidoptera, p. 620, 1895.— 
Reutti, Verb. Naturw. Vereins Karlsruhe, vol. 12, p. 228, 1898. — Stangk, Die 
Tineinen der umgegend von Friedland in Mecklenberg, p. 20, 1899. — Stau- 
dinger and Re:bel, Catalog der Lepidopteren des palaearctischen Faunenge- 
bietes, vol. 2, No. 3177, 1901.— Car.\dja, Bull. Soc. Sei. Bucarest, vol. 10, p. 149, 
1901.— Malloch, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 37, p. 186, 1901.— Disque, Deutsche 
Ent. 'Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 14, p. 205, 1901. — Longstaff, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol 
38, p. 28, 1902.— ScHtJTZE, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 15, p. 12, 1902.— 
Crombbugghe, Mem. Soc. Ent. Belgique. vol. 14, p. 43, 1906. — Gibbs, Eutomolo 
gist, vol. 39, p. 7, 1906 [as D. costana, nom. nud.]. — MUlleb-Rutz, Bull. Soc, 
Ent. Suisse, vol. 11, p. 346, 1909.— Spulee, Schmetterlinge Europas, vol. 2, p, 
333, pi. 89, fig. 13, 1910.— GiANEixi, Ann. Accad. Agr. Torino, vol. 53, p. 94, 
1910. — SCHIULE, Krakow. Akad. Umiejetnosci Sprawozdania Komisyi fizyo 
graficznej, vol. 45, p. 29, 1911.— Sk.u.a, Int. Ent. Zeitschr., vol. 5, 303, 1912 
Verb, naturf. Vereins Bi-unn, vol. 51, p. 312, 1913. — Vorbbodt and Muller- 
Rutz, Schmetterlinge der Schweiz, vol. 2, p. 456, 1914. — Buxton, Ent. Rec, 
vol. 27, p. 183, 1915.— Galvagni, Wien. Ent. Vereins Jahresb., vol. 25, p. 32, 
1915.— Martini, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris. vol. 30, p. 153, 1917.— Resjel, 
286614—41 6 



114 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Sitzungsb. Akad. Wiss. Wien, vol. 126, p. 808, 1917.— Galvagni, Wien. Ent. 
Vereins Jahresb., vol. 28, p. 63, 1918. — Strand, Archiv fiir Natnrg. vol. 85A, 
pt. 4, p. 9, 1919. — Meyrick, Entomologist, vol. 55, p. 254, 1922; in Wytsman, 
Genera inseetorum, fasc. 180, p. 173, 1922. — Zimmerman, Verb, zool.-bot. 
Ges. Wien. vol. 71, p. (43), 1922. — Preissecker, Wien. Ent. Vereins Jahresb., 
vol. 30, p. 187, 1924.— Blair, Entomologist, vol. 58, p. 10, 1925.— Stephan, 
Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 39, p. 123, 1925.— Larsen, Ent. Meddel., vol. 
17, p. 73, 1927.— Zeirny, Eos, vol. 3, p. 480, 1927.— Wickham, Entomologist, 
vol. 60, p. 43, 1927. — Meyrick, A handbook of British Lepidoptera, p. 683, 
1928. — Hayward, Entomologist, vol. 62, p. 50, 1929. — Lhomme, L'amateur de 
papillons, vol. 4, p. 209, 1929. — Uffeln, Westfalischer provinzial-Verein fiir 
Wissenschaft und Kunst, Miinster, Abhandl., vol. 1, p. 76, 1930. — Amsel, 
Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 44, p. 121, 1930. — Ve3ibrodt, Deutsche Ent. 
Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 45, p. 126, 1931.— Chater, Bull. Ent. Res., vol. 22, p. 231, 
1931. — Rebel and Zerny, Denkschr. Akad. Wiss. Wien, math.-nat. Kl., vol. 
103, p. 150, 1931. — Hering, in Brohmer, Ehrmann, and Ulmer, Die Tierwelt 
Mitteleuropas, vol. 1, p. 142, 1932. — Eckstein, Die Kleinschmetterlinge 
Deutschlands, p. 118, pi. 5, fig. 213, 1933. — Sterneck, Prodromus der Schmet- 
terlingsfauna Bohmens, vol. 2, p. 105, 1933.— Rapp. Beitrage zur fauna 
Thiiriugens, vol. 2, p. 131, 1936; Beitrage Schmetterlingsfauna Harz, p. 28, 
1936. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus pt. 92, p. 318, 1939. 

Agonopterix costosa (Ha worth) Pierce and Metcalfe, The genitalia of the 
tineid families of the Lepidoptera of the British Islands, p. 35, pi. 19, 1935.— 
McDuNNouGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United 
States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8410, 1939. 

Agonopteryx blacktnori Busck, Can. Ent. vol. 53, p. 277, 1921. 

Depressaria Nackmori (Busck) Meyrick, Entomologist, vol. 55, p. 254, 1922. (As 
synonym of D. costosa (Haworth).) 

Depressaria dryadoxena Meyrick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 2, p. 315, 1920; 
Entomologist vol. 55, p. 254, 1922 ; in Wytsman, Genera inseetorum, fasc. 180, 
p. 173, 1922. (As synonym of D. costosa (Haworth).) 

Agonopterix dryadoxena (Meyrick) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8410, 1939. (As synonym of D. costosa (Haworth).) 

Agonopterix hlackmori (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 
8410, 1939. (As synonym of D. costosa (Haworth).) 

Tinea depunctella Hxjbner, Sammlung Europaisher Schmetterlinge, vol. 5, pi. 
56, fig. 378, 1816. 

Pinaris depunctella (Hiibner) Hubner, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, 
p. 411, 1825. 

Depressaria depunctella (Hiibner) Koli.ar, Linz. Oberosterreicher musealverein 
Jahresb., vol. 2, p. 92, 1832.— Zeller, Isis von Oken, 1839, p. 195.— Duponchel, 
Historie naturelle de lepidopteres . . . de France, vol. 8, p. 148, pi. 291, fig. 2, 
1838. — Hekrich-Schaffer, Die Schmetterlinge von Europa, vol. 5, p. 123, 1853. 

Haemylis depunctella (Hiibner) Teeitschke, in Ochsenheimer, Die Schmetter- 
linge von Europa, vol. 9, p. 260, 1832 ; vol. 10, p. 185, 1835. 

Haemylis costosa (Haworth) Stephens, Illustrations of British entomology, 
Haustellata, vol. 4, p. 203, 1835. 

Labial palpus, head and face creamy white; second segment irro- 
rated with blackish fuscous exteriorly; third segment with subapical 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 115 

aniiulus and apex black; head frequently suffused above with fuscous; 
spot above base of antenna brown; tuft below eye pink. Antenna 
brown, darker basally than apically. Thorax and ground color of 
fore wing whitish ochreous; posterior tuft on thorax yellowish ochre- 
ous; light base of fore wing diffused along costa to apex, sparsely irro- 
rated with black scales; beyond light base a dark ochreous shade, 
which covers posterior two-thirds of wing but becomes lighter toward 
termen. The whole surface of wing more or less irrorated with black 
scales ; on costa, slightly beyond middle a sooty cloud ; at basal third, 
two black spots obliquely one above the other sometimes edged by a 
few dark reddish-ochreous scales ; between the outer of these two spots 
and inner margin a small dark reddish-ochreous spot; at the end of 
cell a cream-colored discal spot edged with dark reddish ochreous and 
preceded by a dark reddish-ochreous spot. Sometimes the latter 
spot and the reddish-ochreous scales of the outer discal spot are con- 
fluent, forming a dash ; cilia whitish ochreous strongly suffused with 
reddish fuscous, especially toward apex. Hind wing light yellowish 
fuscous; cilia yellowish, banded with light fuscous. Legs whitish 
ochreous overlaid with fuscous and tinged with carmine. Abdomen 
light ochrex)Us above, whitish ochreous beneath; a row of black spots 
on each side ventrolaterally. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe long, slender, tapering into a long, pointed 
cucullus ; moderately covered with hairs ; clasper very stout, somewhat 
dilated distally, nearly reaching costa ; sacculus short, strongly sclero- 
tized. Anellus broader basally than apically, broader than long; pos- 
terior edge convex; hairy, lateral lobes well developed. Aedeagus 
stout, slightly narrower in middle, nearly straight, pointed; vesica 
armed with a large patch of spinulate cornuti. Vinculum rounded. 
Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band with large hairy lateral lobes. 
Gnathos a spined oval knob. Socii hairy, fleshy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately broad, sclerotized ; an- 
terior edge slightly produced. Ostium round; situated about middle 
and occupying less than half the length of the genital plate. Ductus 
bursae membranous; inception of ductus seminalis just before ostium. 
Signum distinctly 4-pointed, with slender anterior and posterior points ; 
teeth small and scattered. 

Alar expanse, 18-22 mm. 

Type.—\\\ the British Museum. 

Type locality. — "Europe." 

Food plants. — Genista, Qu-ercus (f), Lahiuvmm, and Cytisus scopa- 
rius (L.) Link. 

Distrihution.—'ExtvQmQ northwestern United States, southwestern 
and eastern Canada and Europe. 



116 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

United States records 

Washington: Bellingham, 3 $ S, 9 (IX-1-29, VIII-4-31, IX-7-35, VIII-2a-33, 
J. F. G. Clarke) ; Tacoma, 9 (VII-15-2S, T. M. Clarke). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Victoria, 19 5 (J, 9 9 5 (July to October dates, E. H. Black- 
more, W. Downes, W. R. Carter collectors) ;2 $ S, 9 (9-15-VII-1923, K. F. 
Auden). 

Ontario: London, $, $ ( 19-26-IV-1933 [Good's Greenhouse]). 

Note. — ^Well established in the Puget Sound region and no doubt 
wider spread than the above records indicate. May not have escaped 
at London, Ontario. 

Remarks. — There appears to be no doubt of the synonymy as given 
above. Ahhough I have not seen drijadoxena^ Meyrick's description 
tallies with costosa and the locality for the former species agrees with 
that of hlackmori. The food plant of dryadoxena {Quercus) is ques- 
tionable, since the species of this genus rarely feed on such widely 
separated species of plants and are more frequently host specific as 
has already been pointed out. 

The genitalia of the males and females are identical except for 
slight variation in the male harpes, a condition frequently encountered. 
Pierce ^^ figures the genitalia of costosa showing the ostium opening 
near the anterior margin of the genital plate. In the specimens I have 
seen (4), both European and North American, the ostium opens 
slightly nearer to the posterior than to the anterior edge (see fig. 273). 
Furthermore, the signum as figured by Pierce lacks the anterior and 
posterior points, present in all specimens I have examined. The sig- 
num, it must be admitted, may be somewhat variable, but in this 
species it appears to be unusually constant. 

AGONOPTERIX PERGANDEELLA (Busck) 

Plate 32, Figures 183, 183a 

Depressaria pergandeeUa Busck, Proc. Ent. Soc. "Washington, vol. 9. p. 89, 1908. — 

Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922. — Gaede, 

in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 339, 1939. 
Agonopteryx pergandeeUa Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat Mus., vol. 35, p. 199, 1908. 
Agnopteryx pergandiella Baenes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepi- 

doptera of Boreal America, No. 6462, 1917. 
Agonopterix pergandiella McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada 

and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8417, 1939. 

Labial palpus ochreous- white ; second segment sparsely irrorated 
with fuscous exteriorly, brush suffused with brown [third segment of 
both palpi missing]. Antenna with basal segment fuscous above, 
whitish beneath [remainder of both antennae missing]. Head 



22 Pierce, F. N., The genitalia of the Tineina, pi. 19, 1935. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 117 

ochreous with a median fuscous band; face shining creamy-white. 
Thorax and fore wing light brown; thorax strongly suffused with 
brownish fuscous ; surface of fore wing irrorated with poorly defined 
blackish-fuscous spots and with a series of similarly colored spots 
around termen ; at basal third, in cell, two black discal spots obliquely 
one above the other ; another similar spot at the end of cell preceded 
by a poorly defined blackish-fuscous cloud; extreme base of costa 
fuscous; a well-defined black spot in inner angle; cilia light brown 
suffused with fuscous. Hind wing shining light yellowish fuscous; 
cilia more whitish. Legs whitish ochreous overlaid and mottled with 
fuscous except at joints. Abdomen dark yellowish fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately clothed with long hairs [cucuUus 
broken from each harpe] ; sacculus only moderately sclerotized ; 
clasper nearly straight, slightly dilated distally, reaching fully two- 
thirds of the distance toward the costa. Anellus broadly oval, 
posterior edge strongly convex, smooth ; with very small lateral lobes. 
Vinculum roimded. Aedeagus nearly straight, stout, and deeply 
notched distally. Transtilla a broad, sclerotized band with large 
lateral lobes. Gnathos a finely spined cone. Socii small, weak, 
sparsely clothed with hairs. Tegumen produced into a moderately 
large broad flap. 

Alar expanse, 21 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — "Nebraska." 

ReTiiarks. — The only specimen I have seen is the type male. This 
is very distinct from any other North American species. 

AGONOPTERIX AMISSELLA (Busck) 

Plate 33, Figubes 187, lS7a ; Plate 46, Figure 269 

Depressaria amissella Busck, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington., vol. 9, p. 89, 1908. — 

Meykick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 174, 1922.— Gaede, 

m Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 300, 1939. 
Agonoptcryx amissella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 190, 1908. 
Agonopterix amissella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8425, 1939. 
Agnopteryx amissella (Busck) Babnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6460, 1917. 

Labial palpus ochreous- white ; second segment with the brush suf- 
fused with fuscous and sparsely irrorated with fuscous exteriorly; 
third segment with subbasal and subterminal annuli black. Antenna 
fuscous with light ochreous- fuscous annulations; basal segment 
ochreous- white beneath. Head, thorax, and fore wing light ochreous- 
brown; face shining ochreous- white ; thorax suffused with fuscous; 
surface of fore wine: irrorated with black and blackish-fuscous scales 



118 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

and with a series of blackish-fuscous spots along costa and around 
termen; extreme base of costa fuscous; light basal patch bordered out- 
wardly by a transverse fuscous dash, which contains some jet-black 
scales and does not reach costa; at basal third, in cell, two conspicuous 
jet-black spots of raised scales, obliquely one above the other and fol- 
lowed outwardly by a poorly defined fuscous shade ; discal spot at end 
of cell inconspicuous or absent, but when present indicated by a few 
whitish scales; cilia light ochreous-brown the scales tipped with 
ochreous-white. Hind wing light fuscous, darker apically than 
basally; cilia light yellowish fuscous tipped with ochreous-white and 
with a narrow, fuscous subbasal band. Legs ochreous-white strongly 
suffused and overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints. 
Abdomen ochreous-fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather narrow, pointed, only sparsely 
clothed with hairs ; clasper very stout, straight, reaching three-fourths 
of the distance to costa. Anellus roughly rectangular with trun- 
cated posterior edge; lateral lobes small. Vinculum rounded. 
Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band with large lateral lobes. 
Aedeagus stout, curved, with a heavily sclerotized band basally; 
vesica armed with a large patch of weak, spinulate cornuti. Gnathos 
an elongate, oval knob clothed with fine spines. Socii weakly sclero- 
tized, small, with few hairs. Terminal portion of tegumen pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow ; anterior edge in the form 
of a strongly sclerotized crescentic bar. Ostium broad, oval, with a 
small, strongly sclerotized area posterior to it. Ductus bursae mem- 
branous. Bursa copulatrix small; signum of bursa a small, oval, 
spined plate. 

Alar expanse, 17 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Kissimmee, Fla. (Wm. Beutenmiiller) . 

Remai'hs. — The only specimens I have seen of this species are the 
type male and a paratype female. The species is quite distinct from 
any other North American species. 

AGONOPTERIX LATIPALPELLA Barnes and Busck 

Plate 33, Figuees 188, 188a ; Plate 46, Figxjbe 268 

Agonopteryx latipalpella Baenes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 

4, p. 233, 1920. 
Agonopterix latipalpella (Barnes and Busck) McDunnoxjgh, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 

lepidoptera). No. 8432, 1939. 
Depressaria latipalpella Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 

p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 330, 

1939. 

The entire insect presents a roughened appearance due to the raised 
scales that cover almost the whole surface. Labial palpus ochreous- 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 119 

white; second segment irrorated with black and fuscous exteriorly 
and suffused with fuscous in the brush; third segment with broad, 
poorly defined blackish-fuscous basal and median annulations. 
Head, thorax, and fore wing light ochreous-brown, the scales suffused 
with fuscous and tipped with sordid whitish; collar narrowly black; 
base somewhat lighter than the rest of wing, the light color diffused 
for a short distance along costa and bordered outwardly by a strong 
black shade, the latter from the middle to inner margin of wing; at 
basal third an inconspicuous white discal spot (sometimes two) pre- 
ceded by a few black scales, at the end of a cell a small white discal 
spot broadly edged with black; cilia light ochreous-brown with a 
narrow median fuscous band. Hind wing ochreous-fuscous, darker 
around margins; cilia ochreous with narrow fuscous subbasal and 
subterminal bands. Legs ochreous-white suffused and mottled with 
blackish fuscous and fuscous. Abdomen ochreous-fuscous edged lat- 
erally with numerous light ochreous-brown hairlike scales; beneath, 
two broad, black, longitudinal lines broken into spots in posterior 
half; between these two lines two indistinct parallel rows of spots. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe elongate, moderately narrow; sparsely 
clothed with hairs; cucullus pointed; clasper long, slender, slightly 
enlarged in middle; sacculus broad. Anellus rectangular; posterior 
edge emarginate ; lateral lobes well developed, hairy. Aedeagus stout, 
slightly bent, pointed ; vesica with a weak spinulate patch of cornuti 
in basal half. Vinculum rounded. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized 
band, with large hairy, lateral lobes. Gnathos a spined, oval knob. 
Socii hairy flaps. 

Female gemtalia. — Genital plate broad, with a gently concave, nar- 
row, sclerotized anterior edge. Ostium small, round, situated on pos- 
terior margin of genital plate. Ductus bursae sclerotized behind incep- 
tion of ductus seminalis, short, membranous before, gradually widen- 
ing into the very large bursa copulatrix ; signum large, 3-pointed, with 
a few large teeth on posterior margin. 

Alar expanse, 17-19 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — San Benito, Tex. 

Remarks. — The species is represented only by the type series from 
Brownsville and San Benito, Tex. 

AGONOPTERIX POSTICELLA (Walsingham) 

Plate 33, Figures 180, 190a ; Plate 46, Ficuee 274 

Depressaria posticeUa Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 315, pi. 36, 
fig. 5. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
5274, 1891.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 744, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. 
Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5880, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith. List of the Lepidop- 
tera of Boreal America, No. 6423, 1903. — MEYracK, in Wytsman, Genera in- 



120 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

sectorum, fasc. 180, p. 173, 1922. — Gab3)e, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, 

pt. 92, p. 340, 1939. 
Agonoptcryx posticella (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 

190, 1908. 
Agonopterix posticella (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 

tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , 

No. 8411, 1939. 
Agnopteryx posticella (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6469, 1917. 

Labial palpus dull whitish ochreous ; second segment irrorated with 
fuscous exteriorly ; third segment with apex fuscous and, in a few speci- 
mens, a faint indication of a fuscous subterminal annulus. Antenna 
fuscous. Head, thorax, and fore wing dull whitish ochreous; thorax 
with slight inf uscation ; fore wing irrorated with black and fuscous and 
suffused with reddish especially toward apex ; on costa at base and on 
inner angle near base a blackish-fuscous spot; at basal third a black 
discal spot followed by a similar one at end of cell, the latter frequently 
obsolete ; on inner margin, before tornus a fuscous blotch not attaining 
costal half; cilia fuscous with reddish tinge. Hind wing light grayish 
fuscous; cilia lighter with rosy tinge. Legs pale whitish ochreous 
heavily overlaid with fuscous except at joints and on posterior tibiae, 
the latter with faint rosy tinge. Abdomen pale ochreous, suffused with 
f uscuous above and with a row of more or less confluent spots on each 
side beneath ; anal tuft usually with rosy tint. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slender, almost entirely clothed with long 
hairs; clasper reaching beyond costa, slightly narrowed about the 
middle and somewhat enlarged at the distal end, terminating in a 
sharp point. Anellus a sclerotized plate, posterior edge concave, and 
with weak lateral lobes. Vinculum rounded, broad, with well de- 
veloped dorsoanterior process. Aedeagus slender, slightly curved, 
gradually tapering to a sharp, dorsally upturned point; at the base 
is a bifid sclerotized arm by which the aedeagus articulates with the 
anellus. Transtilla a narrow band, with well developed, hairy, lat- 
eral lobes. Gnathos a long, spined cone. Socii rather small, clothed 
with fine hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, with pronounced anterior 
median ventral evagination. Ostium large, oval, in posterior half 
of genital plate. Ductus bursae membranous, long; inception of 
ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa copulatrix large, oval; 
signum a small, oval plate, with serrate edges and a pointed process 
from the posterior margin. 

Alar expanse, 17-21 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Lake County, Calif. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 121 

Food, plants. — Psoralea physodes Dougl., P. macrostachya DC, 
and P. tenuiflora Pursh. 
Distribution. — Western United States. 

United States records 

Arizona: Yavapai County, $ (no date). 

California: Fresno, $ (no date; E. A. Schwarz) ; Sacramento, S $ $ (V-11-S3), 

and Applegate, Placer County, $ (VII-14-32), all reared and sent to me 

by H. H. Keifer. 
Colorado: Boulder, 2 ("May 14, Cockerell") ; other specimens (Dyar and 

Caudell, labeled "Colorado"); Chimney Gulch, Denver, $ (6-13). 
Oreg-on: McMinuville, $ (VII-9-22, S. E. Keen) ; Salem, 9 ("March," E. Y. 

Lansing Jr.). 

Remarks. — This far-western species seems to be confined to the 
area south of the Cohimbia River. A diligent search in the spring 
of 1934 by W. W. Baker, of Puyallup, Wash., failed to reveal the 
presence of this species in Washington State. Mr. Baker did, how- 
ever, locate larvae of psoraliella (referred to in this paper), which 
is found feeding with posticella in California. The food plant {P. 
physodes) is rather widely distributed on the Pacific slope west of 
the Cascades in both Washington and British Columbia, so the 
species may eventually be found in both places. 

AGONOPTERIX PSORALIELLA (Walsingham) 

Plate 31, Figxjres 177, 177a ; Plate 46, Figure 271 

Depressaria psoraliella Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 317, 
pi. 36, fig. 7. — Riley, in Smith, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
527.5, 1891.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 740, 1902 ; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus, Bull. 52, No. 5865, 1903.— Kearfott, m Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6408, 1903. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum 
catalogus, pt. 92, p. 342, 1939. 

Agonoptcryx psoraliella (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 
198, 1908. 

Agonopterix psoraliella (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera). No. 8449, 1939. 

Agnopteryx psoraliella (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6442, 1917. 

Labial palpus pale gray; second segment strongly suffused with 
fuscous and dull red exteriorly; third segment slightly tinged with 
red and with subbasal and subapical annuli and apex black. An- 
tenna fuscous with reddish tint. Head gray, lightly suffused with 
fuscous and tinted with red laterally; face shining white. Thorax, 
base of wing, and basal fourth of costa gray irrorated with deep 
red-brown and black (thorax in one specimen wholly red-brown) ; 



122 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

posterior tuft of thorax light red, beneath the inner edge of each 
tegula a small black spot ; fore wing deep red -brown irrorated with 
blackish fuscous and gray, especially toward costa and along veins; 
at basal third two small yellowish discal dots, one above the other, 
followed by another at the end of cell ; frequently there is a fourth, 
though smaller spot between the outer and inner discal spots; all 
spots edged with deep red; along costa and around termen a series 
of indistinct blackish-fuscous spots; cilia fuscous with a reddish 
tinge. Hind wing dark grayish-fuscous ; cilia lighter, reddish tinged 
with a well-defined fuscous basal band and several less distinct sub- 
terminal ones. Legs gray overlaid with blackish fuscous, except at 
joints, and tinted with red. Abdomen gray, suffused with fuscous 
above ; beneath, lightly suffused with red, irrorated with fuscous and 
with a row of black spots on each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad and short (when compared with 
those of other members of the genus) , clothed over most of the sur- 
face with fine hairs; cucullus rounded (in one specimen from Cali- 
fornia the cucullus is long and slender) ; clasper long and slender, 
reaching to, or slightly beyond, the costa; occasionally the clasper 
is slightly hooked at the distal end. Anellus an oblong-oval plate; 
posterior edge nearly straight with shallow median cleft; lateral lobes 
well developed. Vinculum rounded, with dorsoanterior process. 
Aedeagus slender, tapering distally to a point just past the middle, 
then becoming larger and finally terminating in a sharp point. At 
the base of the aedeagus is a bifid arm by which it articulates with 
the anellus. Transtilla a broad sclerotized band, with large, hairy, 
lateral lobes. Gnathos a slender spined cone. Socii large hairy 
flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad. Ostium small, at ex- 
treme anterior margin of plate. Ductus bursae long, membranous; 
inception on ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa copu- 
latrix scarcely larger than the ductus. Signum a lightly sclerotized, 
oval plate. 

Alar expanse, 20-24 mm. 

Type. — ^In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Sonoma County, Calif. 

Food plants. — Psoralea physodes Dougl. and Psoralea macro- 
stachya DC. 

Distrihution. — The Pacific slope of the United States. 

United States records 

California: Pope Creek, Napa County, ,^,2 5 5 (V-27 to V-30-32, H. H. Keifer 
[reared] ; Mills College, Alameda County (1 specimen in Dr. Braun's col- 
lection) ; Dry Creek, Sonoma County, $ (V-21-1S71, Walsingliam [reared]). 

Washington: Puyallup, 4 S $, 5 9 $ (V-7 to 17-34, W. W. Baker [reared]). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 123 

Remarks. — The species is easily recognizable from Walsingham's 
description and figure. There is one specimen from Washington State 
that has the head and thorax dark reddish brown instead of the usual 
gray. 

AGONOPTERIX SANGUINELLA (Busck) 

Plate 33, Figures 189, 189a 

Depressaria sanguineUa Btjsck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 738, 1902. — 
in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5861, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, List 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6404, 1903. — IMeyrick, in Wyts- 
man. Genera insectorum, fasc. 180 p. 176, 1922. — Gaedb. in Bryk, Lepidopter- 
orum catalogue, pt. 92, p. 348, 1939. 

Agonoptenjx sanguineUa Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 199, 1908. 

Agonopterix sangiiinella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8445, 1939. 

Agnoptenjx sangui^icUa (Busck) Baenes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6458, 1917. 

Labial palpus pale grayish ochreous; second segment sparsely ir- 
rorated with black exteriorly; third segment with a small spot near 
base anteriorly, and apex black. Antenna dark fuscous. Face, head, 
and collar of thorax light straw color, the scales of the head with a 
grayish suffusion. Thorax and fore wing gray, sparsely irrorated 
with black and with a carmine tint, the carmine color more pronounced 
along costa and apex of fore wing; extreme base of wing and costa 
pale grayish ochreous, the former followed by and the latter narrowly 
edged with black; at basal third two obliquely placed black discal 
spots edged with a few carmine scales; at end of cell a white discal 
spot conspicuously edged w4th carmine; from the discal spot at end 
of cell an inwardly oblique, blackish dash not reaching costa; cilia 
gray with reddish suffusion and sparse black irrorations; termen with- 
out row of dark spots. Hind wing light ochreous fuscous ; cilia con- 
colorous with subbasal and two jDarallel fuscous bands and with whit- 
ish irrorations apically. Legs pale grayish ochreous irrorated and 
suffused with blackish fuscous except at joints. Abdomen pale 
grayish ochreous irrorated with black and with a row of black spots on 
each side beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slender, clothed with long, fine hairs ; cucul- 
lus pointed; clasper short, straight, bluntly pointed; sacculus mod- 
erately sclerotized. Anellus slightly longer than broad, v/ith small 
lateral lobes; posterior margin with shallow cleft; basal portion con- 
stricted. Aedeagus stout, slightly curved, bluntly pointed; vesica 
armed with numerous strong spinulate cornuti. Vinculum rounded. 
Transtilla a sclerotized band with well-developed lateral lobes. 
Gnathos a spined knob. Socii fleshy, hairy flaps. Tegumen termi- 
nating in a blunt point. 



124 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Alar expanse, 21 mm. 

Ty^e. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Pinal Mountains, Ariz. (R. Kunze). 

Remarks. — I have seen no specimens certainly referable to this 
species, although I have before me a series from White Mountains, 
Ariz., which may belong here. The specimens from this locality aver- 
age considerably larger than the type of sanguinella but may be well 
within the range of variation for this species. 

AGONOPTERIX AMYRISELLA (Busck) 

Plate 46, Figure 272 

Depressaria amyrisella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 23, p. 233, 1901. — Dyab, 
Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 4, p. 476, 1901. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 24, p. 741, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5872, 1903.— Keab- 
FOTT, in Smithy List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6415, 1903. — 
Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 175, 1922. — Gaede, in 
Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 300, 1939. 

Agonopteryx amyrisella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 1906. 

Agonopterix amyrisella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 
8427, 1939. 

Agnopteryx amyrisella (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6446, 1917. 

Labial palpus yellowish white ; second segment with blackish-fuscous 
base and with black irrorations ; third segment with apical third black, 
subbasal fourth light reddish fuscous ; the whole palpus with a reddish 
tinge. Antenna dark metallic greenish brown. Face yellowish with a 
few brown scales. Head with erect scales, yellowish at bases, purplish 
black toward tips, tips white with reddish tinge. Thorax yellowish 
brown with violaceous scales intermixed and with a transverse crest of 
six tufts of scales. Fore wing dark violaceous-brown sparsely irro- 
rated with black scales ; extreme base yellowish, the color not extend- 
ing to costa, and containing a black spot near inner angle ; beyond this 
light basal patch a purplish-black fascia not attaining costa ; at basal 
third, in cell, a few scattered purplish-black scales; at end of cell a 
small white discal spot broadly edged with black ; on costa five rather 
large blackish spots, the fourth (from base of wing) the largest, ex- 
tending into cell and confluent with the black-edged white discal spot ; 
around termen six to eight small black spots; cilia yellowish brown 
with a narrow fuscous subbasal line and tinged with reddish. Hind 
wing yellowish brown, much darker apically; cilia light yellowish 
fuscous with a broad fuscous subbasal band. Legs pale yellowish 
brown irrorated and suffused with purplish black except at joints. 
Abdomen pale yellowish brown infuscated above and with a row of 
black spots on each side beneath. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE CLARKE 125 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately sclerotized; anterior 
edge lobed. Ostium small, round, opening about middle of plate. 
Ductus bursae short, not much longer than bursa copulatrix; incep- 
tion of ductus seminalis just before ostium. Bursa copulatrix large, 
oval, without signum. 

Alar expanse, 16-17 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Palm Beach, Fla. 

Food plant. — Ainyris -jioridoma Nutt. 

Remarks. — This species is represented only by the type series. 
These are females. 

2. MARTYRHILDA, new genus 

Plate 2, Figure 17 ; Plate 6, Figuee 44 ; Plate 10, Figures 67, 67a ; Plate 16, 

Figure 100 

Genotype. — Depressaria canella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 
27, p. 764, 1904. 

Similar to Agonopterix but palpus more slender, smooth, brush on 
second segment poorly developed or absent. Fore wing narrow, 
elongate, bluntly pointed; costa straight. Hind wing with costa 
straight or slightly excavate. Abdominal wall strongly sclerotized. 

Male genitalia. — Clasper divided, with transverse arm and longi- 
tudinal arm, the former sometimes with lateral process from inside; 
gnathos broadened, sometimes renifonu; vesica usually armed with 
strong cornuti. 

Female genitalia. — Signum always large, broadly oval to elongate, 
never diamond-shaped. Ductus bursae membranous or partly sclero- 
tized, sometimes with strong thornlike processes from inner surface. 

Larva. — ^As in Agonopterix. 

Pupa. — Pubescent. Prothoracic femora exposed. Labial palpi not 
exposed. Cremaster absent. 

Remarks. — ^This genus is closely related to Agonopterix., differing 
from it by the poor development or absence of the brush of the second 
segment of the labial palpus, the divided clasper of the harpe, the 
unusually large broadly oval or elongate signum, and the exposed 
prothoracic femora of the pupa. 

With the genotype I associate ten other species, three of which I 
have described as new. 

The larvae of only three species of this genus are known. The larva 
of sphaeralceae is a leaf miner ; those of umhraticostella and canella 
are leaf tiers. 



126 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF MARTYRHILDA BASED ON 
COLORATION 

1. Ground color of fore wing white or whitish 2 

Ground color of fore wing otherwise 4 

2. Costa with a large fuscous blotch at middle canella (Busck) (p. 128) 

Costa without large dark markings 3 

3. Basal segment of antenna sordid whitish; hind wing smoky 

fuscous sordidella, new species (p. 132) 

Basal segment of antenna fuscous; hind wing white, nivalis (Braun) (p. 139) 

4. Base of fore wing dark reddish brown or blackish fuscous 5 

Base of fore wing otherwise 7 

5. Ground color of fore wing straw yellow gracilis (Walsingham) (p. 133) 

Ground color of fore wing otherwise 6 

6. Ground color of fore wing light reddish ochreous 

umbraticostella (Walsingham) (p. 130) 
Ground color of fore wing pale ochreous-gray. 

thoracenigraeella (Chambers) (p. 135) 

7. Costa, to about middle, lighter than general color of wing 8 

Costa not contrastingly lighter than remainder of wing 10 

8. Third segment of labial palpus immaculate., hildaella, new species (p. 140) 
Third segment of labial palpus maculate 9 

9. Fore wing suffused or marked with reddish or brownish; alar 

expanse 20 mm. or more klamathiana (Walsingham) (p. 142) 

Fore wing without reddish or brownish suffusions or markings; 

alar expanse 19 mm. or less sciadopa (Meyrick) (p. 144) 

10. Ground color of fore wing grayish fuscous strongly overlaid with 

whitish ochreous sphaeralceae, new species (p. 138) 

Ground color of fore wing brownish fuscous sparsely irrorated 

with whitish ochreous thoracefasciella (Chambers) (p. 136) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF MARTYRHILDA BASED ON MALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Gnathos reniform (figs. 100, 143) 2 

Gnathos not reniform (fig. 149) 4 

2. Transverse arm of clasper extending beyond middle of harpe (figs. 

67, 143) 3 

Transverse arm of clasper short, stout, not extending beyond 

middle of harpe (fig. 145) sordidella, new species (p. 132) 

3. Harpe slender; both arms of clasper of about equal length; trans- 

verse arm reaching costa of harpe (fig. 143) 

umbraticostella (Walsingham) (p. 130) 
Harpe short, broad; transverse arm of clasper longer than longi- 
tudinal arm but not attaining costal edge of harpe (fig. 67) 

canella (Busck) (p. 128) 

4. Lobes of transtilla fused (figs. 146, 147) 5 

Lobes of transtilla not fused (figs. 148, 149, etc.) 6 

5. Sacculus as broad as one-third width of harpe at base; transverse 

and longitudinal arms of clasper of about equal length; 
aedeagus about one-half length of harpe (fig. 146) 

thoracefasciella (Chambers) (p. 136) 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 127 

Sacculus broader than one-third width of harpe at base; trans- 
verse arm of clasper appreciably longer than longitudinal 
arm; aedeagus longer than one-half length of harpe (fig. 147) 

sphaeralceae, new species (p. 138) 

6. Transverse arm of clasper short, hardly extending beyond 

middle of harpe (fig. 148) hildaella, new species (p. 140) 

Transverse arm of clasper long, at least extending beyond middle 

of harpe (figs. 142, 144, etc.) 7 

7. Aedeagus sharply bent at middle (fig. 142a)- .gracilis (Walsingham) (p. 133) 
Aedeagus slightly curved (figs. 149, 150, etc.) 8 

8. Transverse arm of clasper arising at middle, or slightly before 

middle of harpe; aedeagus strongly compressed (figs. 149, 151) 9 

Transverse arm of clasper arising well before middle of harpe; 

aedeagus not appreciably compressed (fig. 150) 10 

9. Transverse arm of clasper reaching to or slightly beyond costa 

of harpe ; free from below middle of harpe 

klamathiana (Walsingham) (p. 142) 
Transverse arm of clas^jer not reaching costa of harpe; free 

from middle of harpe or beyond (fig. 149) sciadopa (Meyrick) (p. 144) 

10. Both arms of clasper very slender, sharply pointed; vesica armed 
with an elongate patch of fine cornuti (figs. 150, 150a) 

nivalis (Braun) (p. 139) 
Arms of clasper otherwise; vesica armed with an elongate patch 

of strong cornuti (fig. 144) thoracenigraeella (Chambers) (p. 135) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF MARTYRHILDA BASED ON FEMALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Ductus bursae partly sclerotized (figs. 100,239) 2 

Ductus bursae membranous (figs. 232, 233; etc.) 3 

2. Sclerotized portions of ductus bursae consisting of one moder- 

ately large and one small area, the former bearing several 
thornlike teeth inwardly (fig. 239) .thoracenigraeella (Chambers) (p. 135) 
Sclerotized portion of ductus bursae consisting of one large 
area armed inwardly wdth 17 or 18 short, stout teeth (fig. 100) 

canella (Busck) (p. 128) 

3. Inner surface of ductus bursae armed with a group of 11 stout 

teeth (fig. 238) sordidella, new species (p. 132) 

Inner surface of ductus bursae unarmed (figs. 232, etc.) 4 

4. Signum broadly oval (figs. 231, 233) 5 

Signum elongate (figs. 232, 235, etc.) 6 

5. Ostium with a strongly sclerotized area laterally (fig. 233) 

gracilis (Walsingham) (p. 133) 
Ostium without such sclerotized area (fig. 231) nivalis (Braun) (p. 139) 

6. Signum with several long teeth projecting from posterior end 

(fig. 232) umbraticostella (Walsingham) (p. 130) 

Signum without such teeth (figs. 235, etc.) 7 

7. Bursa copulatrix distinctly asymmetrical (figs. 234, 236) 8 

Bursa copulatrix symmetrical (figs. 235, 237) 9 

8. Genital plate with two narrow raised ridges posterior to ostium 

(fig. 234) klamathiana (Walsingham) (p. 142) 

Genital plate without such ridges (fig. 236) sciadopa (Meyrick) (p. 144) 

9. Ostium with sclerotized, cuplike structures laterally (fig. 235) 

thoracefasciella (Chambers) (p. 136) 
10. Ostium without such structures (fig. 237).. sphaeralceae, new species (p 138) 



128 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

MARTYRHILDA CANELLA (Busck) 

Plate 2, Figure! 17; Plate 6, Figure 44; Plate 10, Figures 67, 67a; 
Plate 16, Figure 100 

Depressaria canella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 764, 1904.— 

Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, 

in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 311, 1939. 
Agmopteryx canella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 85, p. 198, 1908.— 

Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 238, 1923. 
Agonopterix canella (Busck) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 

of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepitloptera), 

No. 8433, 1939. 
Agnoptcryx canella (Busck) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6437, 1917. 
Agonopteryx cogitata Braun, Can. Ent., vol. 58, p. 47, 1926. 
Agonopterix cogitata (Braun) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 

8433, 1939. (As. synonym of canella (Busck) ). 
Depressaria cogitata (Braun) Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 

92, p. 316, 1939. 

Labial palpus white strongly irrorated with fuscous. Antenna, 
head, and collar of thorax fuscous to black; face whitish. Thorax 
and ground color of fore wing pure white, the latter marked with 
black, brown, and fuscous ; basal third with a few inconspicuous black 
and fuscous spots and fine strigulae; from costa, at middle, a large 
fuscous blotch extending to near middle of cell edged above and below 
with brown and preceded by a black crescentic dash; around termen 
a series of black or fuscous spots ; cilia whitish strongly suffused with 
fuscous. Hind wing light fuscous; cilia whitish. Legs white 
strongly mottled and overlaid with fuscous or black. Abdomen 
white with a black lateral stripe on each side beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe lightly sclerotized except for sacculus, 
which is heavily sclerotized and deeply folded ; sacculus produced to 
form a broadly bifid clasper, transverse arm long, extending beyond 
middle of harpe, the other produced toward cucuUus. Anellus a 
broad, sclerotized plate, dorsoventrally concave; two dorsal projec- 
tions laterally produced. Aedeagus stout, blunt; vesica armed with 
several stout cornuti, the terminals (1-3) at right angles to the long 
axis of the aedeagus forming hook. Vinculum broad, rounded. 
Lobes of transtilla not fused. Gnathos a reniform, heavily spined 
knob. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium round. Genital plate heavily sclerotized 
at edges of ostium ; ductus bursae short, constricted just before bursa 
copulatrix ; the posterior portion broad, heavily sclerotized ; near the 
anterior edge of the sclerotized portion of the ductus a group of 18 
short, stout spines (this probably varies) . Signum of bursa copulatrix 
a large oval plate. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 129 

Larva.— Length 11-12 mm. Head light brown with a heavy suffu- 
sion of dark brown on the margins, epicranial sutures and, especially, 
beneath. Body subcylindrical, considerably thicker at middle and 
tapering toward each end. Thoracic and abdominal segments light 
yellowish green, lighter ventrally. Prothoracic shield light yellowish 
brown. Thoracic legs yellowish with joints edged with brown. 
Tubercles large, black; spiracles edged with brown. 

The larvae of canella are often abundant, and their work is char- 
acteristic and easily recognized. Early in spring the tubes, formed 
by the larvae from tied terminal leaves, are conspicuous as "beaked" 
processes at right angles to the long axis of the stem. Frequently 
several tubes are constructed by one larva so that it becomes necessary 
to inspect several tubes before the larva is finally located. From the 
terminal portion of the tube the woolly covering of the leaves is ejected, 
this often forming a conspicuous mass. Pupation occurs in debris 
at the base of the plant. In the laboratory larvae pupated on April 
24 and 25, and the moths emerged May 8, 1934. 

The species is exceedingly difficult to rear. In the spring of 1935 
nearly 400 larvae were collected but only 19 moths were obtained. 
This might suggest faulty rearing conditions but three systems were 
used with the same results. This and the fact that in nature the 
moths are scarce, although the larvae are abundant, suggest a natural 
high mortality. 

Alar expanse, 16-20 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum {canella) ; A. F. 
Braun collection, Cincinnati, Ohio {cogitata). 

Type localities. — Pullman, Wash, {canella) (Piper) ; Aweme, 
Manitoba {cogitata). 

Food plants. — Antennaria luzuloides T. & I. (Clarke) ; Gtmphalium 
(J. McDunnough). 

Distribution. — ^Western United States and Canada in the Rocky 
Mountain and intermountain areas; northeastern United States and 
eastern Canada. 

United States records 

California: Warner Mountains, 3 mi. E., Davis Creek, Modoc County, alt. 5,500 
feet, 3 (8-10-VII-1922, A. W. Lindsey). 

Connecticut: New Haven, $ (Dr. Britten), 

Idaho: Viola, Moscow Mountains, 5 (12-VI-35, J. F. G. Clarke [reared]). 

ITe-w Hampshire: Portsmouth, $ (VI-9-05, C. E. Montgomery). 

New York: Big Indian Valley, Catskill Mountains, 9 (IX-2-10, R. F. Pearsall) ; 
Iliou i$, VI-25-13, 2 5 9, VI-25-13, VlI-11-17, H. McElhose) ; also Wil- 
mington and Ithaca (according to Forbes) ; Ithaca, 9 (30-VI-31, A. B. Klots) . 

V/ashington: Kamiack Butte, Whitman County, S $ S and 9 9 9 (May 8, 1934; 
Jlay 16-June 18, 1935, J. F. G. Clarke [reared] ) ; Pullman, S (2 September 
'98). 
286614—41 7 



130 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Waterton Lakes (12 July, J. McDuunough). 

British Columbia: Chilcotin, $ (VIII-22-25, George V. Copley). 

Manitoba: Aweme. 

Quebec: Kazubeque, $ (VI-24-27, J. McDunnough [reared]). 

Remarks. — There is no doubt about the synonymy of this species. 
Dr. Braun distinguishes her cogitata from canella on the basis of the 
absence of the bhick anterior border of the thorax and the white apical 
portion of the hind wing of the latter species. Although Busck did 
not mention the black anterior portion of the thorax in his description, 
all specimens I have seen, including the type, have it present. The 
use of a white apical portion of the hind wing to distinguish further 
between the two is impractical, no two specimens of this species having 
the same amount of black scaling at the apex of the hind wing and some 
lacking it entirely. The difference in the male genitalia is confined 
to the number of cornuti present on the vesica; but this character is 
useless since the number differs in different specimens. 

This species closely resembles the European alstroemeriana but is 
easily distinguished from it by the black or very dark-brown collar. 

MARTYRHILDA UMBRATICOSTELLA (Walsingham) 

Plate 24, Figtjres 143, 143a ; Plate 41, Figure 232 

Depressaria umbraticostella Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1S81, p. 318, 
pi. 36, fig. 8. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 5283, 1891.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 736, 1902 ; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5855, 1903.— Keaefott, in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6398, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 27, p. 763, 1904. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 177, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 356, 
1939. 

Agonopteryx umhraticostella (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 
35, p. 198, 1908.— Bbaun, Trans Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 51, p. 197, 1925. 

Agonopterix umhraticostella (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 
lepidoptera). No. 8455, 1939. 

Agnopteryx umbraticostella (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6434, 1917. 

Labial palpus light ochreous suffused with light fuscous; third 
segment with median and basal bands, the latter poorly defined. 
Antenna fuscous. Head ochreous irrorated with fuscous. Thorax 
and base of fore wing blackish fuscous to black. Fore wing light 
reddish ochreous with small diffused blackish-fuscous spots on costa 
and around termen ; on middle of costa a conspicuous, outwardly dif- 
fused blackish-fuscous shade preceded by two minute (sometimes 
inconspicuous) discal dots of the same color; from costal patch, 
around termen to near middle of inner margin, a light fuscous shade; 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 131 

cilia light fuscous. Hind wing shining grayish fuscous. Legs 
whitish ochreous, the fore and mid legs strongly overlaid with fus- 
cous; hind legs lightly so with their tarsi fuscous and annulated with 
whitish ochreous. Abdomen light fuscous above, whitish ochreouS 
beneath with a lateral stripe on each side and irrorations blackish 
fuscous. 

Mate genitalia. — Harpe lightly clothed with hairs; costa heavily 
sclerotized; clasper divided, the arms long, of about equal length; 
one arm, parelleling the sacculus, stout and sharply pointed ; the trans- 
verse arm curved, reaching costa and having a lateral thornlike 
process projecting toward the sacculus. Anellus a more or less 
shield-shaped plate, deeply excavated on the posterior margin, the 
excavation, in the main, being formed by two heavily sclerotized, 
winglike processes. Vinculum broad, rounded. Aedeagus stout, 
straight, bluntly pointed, with a large spinulate patch about the 
middle. Transtilla a broad sclerotized band. Gnathos reniform. 
Tegumen bifid. Socii rectangular flaps bearing a few hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow at the middle, the entire 
width being taken up by the rectangular ostium, then broadening 
laterally. Ductus bursae short, broad, and membranous. Bursa 
copulatrix large, oval; signum a large, elongate oval plate, slightly 
broader anteriorly than posteriorly, with long, spinelike projections 
at the posterior end. 

Alar expanse, 16-19 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type localities. — Mount Shasta, Calif., and "North Oregon." 

Food plants. — Balsamorhiza sagittata (Pursh) Nutt. and Helian- 
fhits pumilits Nutt. 

Distribution. — Western United States and Canada. 

United States records 

Arizona: White Mountains, Apache Indian Reservation, alt. 7,000 ft., 5 $ ^, 
3 5 9 (June 1925, O. C. Poling) ; 5, 9 (July 5-15, 1925) ; ? (August 1-15, 
1925). 

California: Mount Shasta, $ ; Placer County, $ (September), 

Colorado: Williams Range, $ (August 8, A. J. Snyder). 

New Mexico: Fort Wingate, $ (July 16-23). 

Oregon: "Camp Watson" 2 $ S (III, IV, 1872, Walsingham). 

Utah: Stockton, 2 $ $ (IX-6, IX-7-07, Tom Spalding) ; Eureka {$, VII-13-11, 
$ , VIII-14-11, 9 , VIII-29-11, Tom Spalding) . 

Washing'ton: Almota, Whitman County, $ (IV-5-30, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Pull- 
man, 2 $ $ (III-1-98, C. V. Piper), 9 (11-17-30, D. H. Brannon), 
$ (VII-26-32, T. M. Clarke [reared]), $ (IV-13-26, J. F. G. Clarke), 9 
(II 1-26-30, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Snake River, Whitman County, opposite 
Clarkston, $ (IV-28-32, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Wenatchee, 2 $ $ (VI-5-30, 
VI-10-30, A. Spuler), 9 (rX-5-29, A. Spuler). 



132 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Canadiayi records 
British Columbia: Vernon (20-XI-1927, A. A. Dennys). 

Remarks. — This species seems to be confined to far-western North 
America, where it is rather widely distributed. It was originally 
described from specimens collected by Lord Walsingham on Mount 
Shasta, Calif., and in North Oregon. Busck ^^ also records specimens 
from Arizona. He further states that Dyar bred a specimen from 
Helianthus pumilus collected near Denver and Sedalia, Colo. 
Braun -* bred three specimens from BalsamorMza sagiftata collected 
near Logan, Utah. 

MARTYRHILDA SORDIDELLA, new species 

Plate 24, Figttbes 145, 145a ; Plate 41, Figure 238 

Labial palpus, head, thorax, abdomen, and ground color of fore 
wing sordid whitish; second segment of labial palpus with sparse 
brown and fuscous irrorations exteriorly ; third segment immaculate ; 
antenna with basal segment sordid whitish; remainder of segments 
fuscous with dull golden-yellow scaling above. Thorax and fore wing 
irrorated with dull golden-yellow and brown; from apical third of 
cost a around termen to inner margin a series of indistinct brownish 
spots, with a few dull golden-yellow scales mixed; at basal third a 
brown discal spot; below this spot in fold (vein Ic) an elongate dull 
golden-yellow patch ; at end of cell a conspicuous brown discal spot ; 
cilia white, rather shining; underside of fore wing fuscous, except 
around edges. Hind wing smoky fuscous; cilia white with a brown 
subbasal line. Legs sordid whitish, slightly overlaid and mottled 
with fuscous exteriorly; tarsi fuscous except at joints. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately broad, tapering gi^adually to 
the bluntly pointed cucullus, and lightly clothed with coarse hairs; 
sacculus broad and very heavily sclerotized ; clasper divided, the longi- 
tudinal arm produced as a strong, long, bluntly pointed extension of 
the sacculus, the transverse arm as a short, stubby, moderately sclero- 
tized projection about middle of harpe. Anellus a broad rectangular 
plate with concave posterior edge, moderately well developed hairy 
lateral lobes and a broad median process from basal edge. Aedeagus 
stout, moderately long, nearly straight, bluntly pointed ; vesica armed 
with an elongate patch of strong cornuti. Vinculum broadly rounded. 
Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band with large, hairy, fleshy, lateral 
lobes. Gnathos reniform. Tegumen pointed. Socii large fleshy, 
hairy lobes. 

Feinale genitalia. — Genital plate moderately broad, lightly scler- 
otized. Ostium large, round, with an elongate, strongly sclerotized 



23 Busck, A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 736, 1902. 

2< Braun, A. F., Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 51, p. 197, 1925. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 133 

patch on each side inwardly ; anterolateral edge narrowly but heavily 
sclerotized. Ductus bursae membranous, short, broad, with 10 or 11 
short, stout, strongly sclerotized, thornlike teeth inwardly ; inception 
of ductus seminalis adjacent to ostium. Bursa copulatrix moderately 
large, round ; signum a large, round, toothed plate. 
Alar expanse, 18-21 mm. 
Type. — In the Canadian National collection. 

Paratyfes. — U. S. N. M. No. 53258 ; also in the Canadian National 
collection. 

Type locality. — Shingle Creek, Penticton, British Columbia. 
Food plant. — Unknown. 

RemarJcs. — Described from the $ type, 10 $ and 3 $ paratypes 
from British Columbia as follows: Brent's Landing, Penticton, 
Z $ $ (30-V-1935) ; Shingle Creek, Penticton, & $ $ (1&-V-1936) ; 
Shingle Creek Road, Keremeos, $ (8-VI-1935) ; Summerland, 2 9 $ 
(25-V-1935) ; Vaseaux Lake, 9 (18-V-1936), all collected by A. N. 
Gartrell; Penticton, $ (7-VI-1935, J. McDunnough). The entire 
type series was submitted by Dr. McDunnough. 

This is the third species of the genus from North America with a 
white ground color to come to my attention. 

The costa of the fore wing of the female is somewhat straighter 
than that of the male and is more nearly parallel to the inner margin, 
producing a wing that is narrower and of nearly equal width 
throughout its length. 

MARTYRHILDA GRACILIS (Walsingham) 

Plate 24, Figotjes 142, 142ji ; Plate 41, Figube 233 

Depressaria gracilis Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 257, 1889. — Busck. Proc. 

U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 737, 1902; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, 

No. 5857, 1903.— Keaefott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 

America, No. 6400, 1903. — IVIeyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 

180, p. 177, 1922.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 325, 

1939. 
Agonopteryx gracilis (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 

198, 1908. 
Agonopterix gracilis (WalsinglVam) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 

of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 

No. 8457, 1939. 
Agnopterjix gracilis (Walsingham) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6436, 1917. 

Labial palpus straw yellow ; second segment blotched with reddish 
brown outwardly; third segment with a reddish-brown subapical 
annulus. Antenna with basal segment dark brown, remainder brown. 
Head straw yellow with a light reddish-brown patch above the base 
of each antenna. Thorax and base of forcwing dark reddish brown. 
Ground color of fore wing and cilia straw yellow; discal spots dark 



134 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

brown, the first two, obliquely one above the other, before middle, 
the third at end of cell ; from costa, just before apex, around termen 
a series of six or seven dark brown spots; cilia strongly mixed with 
dark brown. Hind wing pale grayish fuscous; cilia pale straw 
yellow with a faint, narrow, brown subbasal line. Legs straw yellow ; 
anterior femora and tarsi strongly overlaid with brown; tarsi of 
middle and hind legs tinged with brown. Abdomen brownish above 
with posterior edges of segments and ventral surface straw yellow. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately broad; costa heavily sclerotized 
to a point just before cucullus ; clothing of hairs confined to the apical 
half except for a group of coarse hairs on base just below the costa ; 
clasper divided, one arm, paralleling the sacculus, short and acutely 
pointed, the other, long, reaching to a point just below the costa, with 
a short, blunt lateral projection. Anellus a broad, sclerotized plate 
with an elongated troughlike articulation on which the aedeagus 
rests. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus stout, bent sharply at middle 
and tapering gently to a blunt point. Transtilla a narrow band with 
hairy lateral lobes. Gnathos an oval, spined knob. Tegumen rounded 
at apex. Socii fleshy flaps with a few hairs. 

Ferrbale genitalia. — Genital plate broad, rather heavily sclerotized 
around the ostium. Ostium deeply concave. The edges inunedi- 
ately around the ostium and the posterior portion of the ductus bursae 
are spinulate. Just before the ostium the ductus bursae is constricted. 
Ductus bursae short, membranous, unarmed on inner surface, widen- 
ing gently into the large bursa copulatrix. Signum a large, broadly 
oval, slightly sclerotized plate. 

Alar expanse, 15-18 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Texas. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — ^Western United States. 

United States records 

California: Laguna Beach, 9 ; Loma Linda, San Bernardino County, ? (Oct. 
&-15) ; San Diego, 2 $ $ (Nov. 21, 1921, Karl R. Coolidge), S $ S (May 
24-30), 9 (June 16-23), 9 (April 16-23), 9 (IV-26-08, Geo. H. Field). 

Colorado: Colorado Springs (Fountain Valley School), 3 $$ ( 20-31- VIII-32, 
A. B. Klots) ; Denver, $ (Oslar) ; 2 9 9 (no data). 

Iowa: Iowa City, 9 (G. G. Ainslie). 

South Dakota: Elk Point, 9 (Aug. 1918, C. N. Ainslie). 

Texas: 2 $ $ (X-06, H. Lacey). 

Remarks. — This very distinct species cannot be confused with any 
other described North American Martyrhilda, but it closely resembles 
the European culcitella. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 135 

MARTYRHILDA THORACENIGRAEELLA (Chambers) 
Plate 24, Figuee 144 ; Plate 41, Figure 239 

Oelechia thoracenigraeella Chambers, Cincinnati Quart. Jouru. Sci., vol. 2, p. 246, 

1875 ; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 147, 1878. 
Depressaria thoracenigraeella (Chambers) Rilet, in Smith, List of the Lcpidop- 

tera of Boreal America, No. 5495, 1891.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. INIus., vol. 24, 

p. 736, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5856, 1903.— Kearfott, in 

Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6399, 1903.— 

Meyrick, in Wyt&man, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in 

Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 355, 1939. 
Agonopteryx thoracenigraeela (Chambers) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, 

p. 198, 1908. 
Agonopterix thoracenigraeella (Chambers) McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 

lepidoptera ) , No. 8456, 1939. 
Agnopteryx thoracenigraeella (Chambers) Barnes and McDunnough, Check 

list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6435, 1917. 

Labial palpus whitish ochreous; second segment irrorated with 
fuscous; third segment with a broad, well-defined black subapical 
anmilus and a narrower, poorly defined basal annulus of the same 
color. Antenna fuscous. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore 
wing pale ochreous-gray ; fore part of thorax and base of fore wing 
blackish fuscous ; from costa to middle of cell a fuscous shade edged 
above and below with brown and preceded by a conspicuous outwardly 
oblique black dash; on costa and around termen a series of grayish- 
fuscous spots; cilia light fuscous irrorated with wliitish ochreous. 
Hind wing brownish fuscous ; cilia somewhat lighter with a white ter- 
minal edge. Legs light grayish ochreous overlaid and mottled with 
fuscous ; hind tarsi fuscous, annulated with whitish ochreous. Abdo- 
men grayish ochreous above, beneath whitish ochreous with a black 
lateral line on each side. 

Male genitaUa. — Essentially like gracilis^ diflfering chiefly in the 
characters of the aedeagus. Harpe moderately broad and clothed with 
fine hairs, especially in apical half; clasper divided, one arm parallel- 
ing sacculus, the other transverse, arising well before middle of harpe, 
reaching nearly to costa, and without lateral process ; sacculus heavily 
sclerotized; anellus a sclerotized plate with median trough on which 
the aedeagus articulates ; lateral hairy lobes present. Aedeagus stout, 
only slightly curved ; cornuti numerous, strong, in an elongate patch. 
Vinculum rounded, broad. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band with 
lateral hairy lobes. Gnathos an oval spined knob. Socii fleshy hairy 
lobes. Apex of tegumen with median cleft. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium moderately large, located near anterior 
edge of genital plate. Ductus seminalis entering ductus bursae just 
anterior to ostium. Ductus bursae membranous except for two sclero- 



136 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

tized patches, one large, tlie other small, each set with sharp thornlike 
projections. Signiim of bursa very large, oval. 

Alar expanse, 16-17 mm. 

Type. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Type locality. — Behrens, Calif. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Known only from California. 

United States records 
California: Carmel, 4^5,9 ("June," A. H. Vachell). 

Reviarhs. — The type of thoracenigraeella, in the Museum of Com- 
parative Zoology, Cambridge, is in verj^ poor condition. The right 
fore wing, in good condition, is still attached to the thorax, but the 
abdomen, most of the legs, and all the other wings are gone. 

Despite the poor condition of the type I have been able to recognize 
five specimens as this species. The figures of the genitalia have been 
made from two of these specimens. 

MARTYRHILDA THORACEFASCIELLA (Chambers) 

Plate 24, Figures 146, 146a ; Plate 41, Figure 235 

Gelechia thoracefasciclla Cuaubers, Cincinnati Quart. Journ. Sci., vol. 2, p. 246, 

1875; Can. Ent., vol. 10, p. .50, 1878; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, 

p. 147, 1878. 
Depressaria thoracefasciella (Chambers) Riley, Iji Smith, List of the Lepidop- 

tera of Boreal America, No. 5494, 1891.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 

24, p. 740, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5867, 1903.— Keakfott, 

m Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6410, 1903. — Gaede, 

in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 354, 1939. 
Depressaria thoracifasciella (Chambers) Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 

torum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. 
Agnoptcryx thoracefasciella (Chambers) Babnes and McDunnough, Check list 

of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6451, 1917. 
Agonopterix tJioracefasciella (Chambers) McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 

lepidoptera), No. 8442, 1939. 

Labial palpus with second segment ochreous-white, mottled with 
fuscous exteriorly; third segment blackish fuscous with a poorly 
defined ochreous-white median band and ochreous-white tip. 
Antenna blackish fuscous. Head, thorax, base and basal fourth of 
costa of fore wing whitish ochreous. Ground color of fore wing 
brownish fuscous sparsely irrorated with whitish ochreous; extreme 
base of costa, and shade beyond whitish-ochreous base, blackish 
fuscous; first two discal spots small, black, obliquely placed one above 
the other ; at the end of cell a conspicuous white or whitish-ochreous 
discal spot surrounded by a blackish-fuscous suffusion; along costa 
and around termen a series of poorly defined blackish-fuscous spots ; 
cilia fuscous, mixed with ochreous-white. Hind wing brownish 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 137 

fuscous, lighter basally; cilia fuscous. Legs blackish fuscous irro- 
rated with ochreous-white ; tarsi annulated with ochreous-white. 
Abdomen fuscous above; beneath, ochreous-white overlaid and irro- 
rated with fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately sclerotized; cucullus rounded 
and clothed with fine hairs. Transverse and longitudinal arms of 
clasper of about equal length, the former extending beyond the costa ; 
sacculus as broad as one-third the width of harpe at base. Anellus 
a roughly rectangular sclerotized plate emarginate on the posterior 
edge; lateral lobes minute. Transtilla a narrow band with fused 
hairy lobes. Vinculum rounded, broad. Aedeagus slender, about 
one-half the length of harpe, slightly curved, unarmed ; apex slightly 
recurved. Gnathos an oval spined knob ; supporting arms moderately 
sclerotized. Socii small, clothed with few hairs; widely separated. 
Tegumen truncated, slightly emarginate. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium large, rounded; on each side of the 
ostium the genital plate is produced into a strongly sclerotized pocket. 
Inception of the ductus seminalis slightly anterior to the sclerotized 
pockets. Ductus bursae membranous, unarmed on inner surface, 
tapering gradually into the symmetrical bursa copulatrix. Signum 
an elongate scobinate plate attenuated and broken posteriorly. 

The abdominal wall of this species differs from that of sphaeralceae 
in being much less strongly sclerotized. The harpes of the male are 
broader and correspondingly shorter, and much less sclerotized. The 
aedeagus is shorter than that of sphaeralceae and the apex is more 
strongly recurved. The female genitalia show marked differences. 
The signum of sphaeralceae is smaller and less strongly sclerotized 
than that of thoracefasciella and the sclerotized pockets of the latter 
species are totally wanting in the former. 

Alar expanse, 15-17 mm. 

Type. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Type locality. — Behrens, Calif. 

Food plants. — Siclahea malvaeflora A. Gray (Keifer rearing) and 
Malvaf (C. M. Dammers). 

Distrihution. — Southwestern United States. 

United States records 

Arizona: Hualapi Mountains, Mojave County, 2 $ $, 9 (May 24-31, no col- 
lector). 

California: Diamond Spring, Eldorado County, 3 $ $, 3 5 9 (V-26 to V-3-35, 
H. H. Keifer) ; Canyon Valley, San Bernardino County, $ (VII-1-32, no 
collector) ; Riverside, 9 (June 1930, C. M. Dammers) ; Mill Valley, Marin 
County, 4 $ $ (5-12-III-20, E. P. Van Duzee). 

Reinarks. — I have examined the type of this species and have made 
a slide of the male genitalia. These agree exactly with specimens 
from our reared series. 



138 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. »o 

MARTYRHILDA SPHAERALCEAE, new species 

Plate 24, Figures 147, 147a ; Plate 41, Fiqube 237 

A small, gray, narrow-winged western species, closely related to the 
foregoing, but easily distinguished from it by the genitalia. 

Head, palpus, and antenna dark grayish fuscous; face whitish 
ochreous ; second segment of labial palpus whitish ochreous inwardly 
and above with a liberal sprinkling of whitish-ochreous scales out- 
wardly; third segment whitish ochreous above, the color extending 
around middle to form an incomplete annulus ; apex whitish ochreous ; 
antenna with narrow fuscous annulations. Thorax and ground color 
of fore wing grayish fuscous, the tips of the scales narrowly whitish 
ochreous ; basal part of fore wing, usually with more whitish-ochreous 
scaling, appearing lighter than ground color and followed by a dark 
fuscous shading ; at basal third two black obliquely placed discal spots 
followed by white scales, the spots frequently confluent, forming an 
outwardly oblique discal dash ; at end of cell a white discal spot sur- 
rounded by blackish-fuscous scales; along costa and around termen 
a series of indistinct fuscous spots ; underside of costa whitish ochreous 
to apex ; a row of black scales around termen ; cilia gray mixed with 
fuscous and whitish-ochreous scales. Hind wing grayish fuscous with 
light fuscous cilia; a fuscous band around margin at base of cilia; 
a blackish-fuscous line around apex and termen beneath. Legs fus- 
cous irrorated with whitish ochreous; tarsi annulated with wliitish 
ochreous. Abdomen fuscous above with grayish at the posterior mar- 
gin of each segment ; grayish laterally and beneath with a row of black 
lateral spots. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe ample, strongly sclerotized ; cucullus blunt- 
pointed, clothed with fine hairs ; transverse arm of clasper appreciably 
longer than longitudinal arm, reaching well beyond costa; sacculus 
broader than one-third the width of harpe at base. Anellus roughly 
rectangular, emarginate on the posterior edge; lateral lobes scarcely 
developed. Transtilla a narrow band with well-developed, fused, 
lateral hairy lobes. Aedeagus slender, slightly curved, longer than 
one-half the length of harpe, pointed, unarmed. Vinculum rounded. 
Gnathos an oval spined knob; supporting arms strongly sclerotized. 
Socii fleshy hairy lobes, well separated. Tegumen with the apex 
emarginate. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium small, round at extreme anterior edge 
of genital plate. Genital plate broad, weakly sclerotized. Ductus 
bursae moderately stout, membranous, tapering gradually into bursa ; 
inception of ductus seminalis just anterior to the ostium. Bursa 
copulatrix symmetrical, oval; signum a small, weakly sclerotized, 
elongate plate. 

Alar expanse, 15-18 mm. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 139 

Larva. — Length 9-11 mm. Head and cervical shield light brown, 
the former broadly suffused laterally and posteriorly with dark 
brown ; epicranial sutures dark brown ; ocelli light brown surrounded 
by a blackish area. Underside of head yellowish brown. The shield 
is bisected by a narrow light-green or yellowish longitudinal line; 
posterior half of shield dark brown; beyond this, on dorsal half, 
prothorax whitish. Thoracic and abdominal segments apple green 
with a broad suffusion of whitish around the dark brown tubercles 
and on the posterior edges of the segments. Setae long, yellowish 
brown proximally, whitish distally. Anal plate pale green with 
whitish posterolateral edges. Thoracic legs yellowish brown with 
lighter annulations at the joints. 

The larva is a leaf miner forming a blotch mine. In the early 
stages frass is ejected from the mine through a small silken tube, 
which is constructed at one edge of the mine, usually parallel to 
the midrib of the leaf. In the later instars the larva folds a leaf 
and completely mines out the spongy material between the upper and 
lower epidermal layers. The larva remains in this large, roomy mine 
until ready to pupate. Pupation occurs in sand or soil at the base 
of the plant. 

The larvae are abundant in the Grand Coulee, where nearly all 
plants of Sphaeralcea mMnroana, which are numerous, are heavily 
infested. The leaves are badly discolored owing to the thoroughness 
with which they are mined. 

ry/>e.— U.S.N.M. No. 52076. 

Type locality. — Park Lake, Grant County, Grand Coulee, Wash. 

Food plant. — Sphaeralcea munroana (Dougl.) Spach. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type, 5 $ and 4 9 paratypes 
(V-15 to VI-12, 1935, J. F. G. Clarke). Paratypes in United States 
National Museum, Canadian National, and H. H. Keifer collections. 

MARTYRHILDA NIVALIS (Braun) 

Plate 25, Figures 150, 150a ; Plate 40, Ftgltre 231 

Agonopteryx nivalis Braun, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 73, p. 10, 1921. 

Agonopteris nivalis (Braun) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Can- 
ada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidopteru), No. 8419, 
1939. 

Depressaria nivalis (Braun) Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, 
p. 334, 1939. 

Labial palpus white except for some light-brown scaling on the out- 
side of second segment. Antenna fuscous. Head, thorax, and fore and 
hind wings white; slightly beyond base of fore wing, in inner angle 
and along inner margin, a faint light-brown shade ; two discal spots, 
obliquely one above the other, at basal third, another, larger, white- 
centered discal spot at end of cell, a series of spots along costa and 



140 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

around termen and sparse irrorations over entire surface of fore wing 
fuscous to blackish fuscous. Legs and abdomen white, the former 
strongly suffused with fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe ample, gently tapering toward cucullus, the 
latter rounded. Sacculus strongly sclerotized; both arms of clasper 
very slender, sharply pointed, the transverse arm arising well before 
middle of harpe and reaching two-thirds distance toward costa. Anel- 
lus a weakly sclerotized broad plate with well developed, slightly hairy, 
lateral lobes. Transtilla a weakly sclerotized band with well developed 
lateral lobes. Aedeagus slender, slightly curved, not appreciably com- 
pressed, bluntly pointed with elongate, spinulate patch on vesica. Vin- 
culum rounded. Gnathos an oval spined knob. Socii weakly sclero- 
tized, sparsely hairy, fleshy lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium small, round, without strongly sclero- 
tized area laterally. Ductus bursae membranous, slender, inception of 
ductus seminalis on right side just before ostium. Bursa copula trix 
large, pear-shaped, with strongly sclerotized oval signum. 

Alar expanse, 21-23 imii. 

Type. — In collection of Dr. A. F. Braun, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Type locality. — Two Medicine Lake, Glacier National Park, Mont. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — ^Western United States and Canada in Mountains. 

United States records 

"Washington: Skyline Ridge, Mount Baker district, Wliatcom County, alt. 6,000 
feet, 5,399 (26-VII-25 and 16-VIII-30, J. F, G. Clarke). 

Wyoming: Green River Lake, Wind River Range, 12 5 5 , 9 (July 24 to August 
7, 1935, A. B. Klots). 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Lake Louise, $ ("VIII-1918"). 

Remarks. — ^This is one of three known white species in this genus 
from North America. The others, canella and sordidella (new spe- 
cies) , cannot be confused with it. 

Dr. Braun has compared a male with her type and has kindly 
verified my determination of the species. 

The venation is subject to considerable variation, one female having, 
on the right side, an accessory cell in the fore wing between veins 9 
and 11 that is included in the discal cell ; vein 7 of the hind wing is 
forked. 

MARTYRHILDA HILDAELLA, new species 

Plate 24, Fioxtkes 148, 148a 

Labial palpus sordid whitish ; second segment with sparse black and 
fuscous irrorations exteriorly, mostly confined to basal half, and with 
slight infuscation in the undivided slender brush; third segment im- 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 141 

maculate. Antenna grayish fuscous with narrow fuscous annulations. 
Head, thorax, and base of fore wing sordid whitish, the latter diffused 
along costa to slightly beyond basal third ; tegula with a pale brownish 
suffusion toward apex ; fore wing strongly irrorated with contrasting 
black spots, especially along veins; in the light basal patch, slightly 
below costa, a conspicuous black spot; beyond basal patch a transverse 
dark fuscous dash, which does not reach costa and which rapidly fades 
to a pale brownish ochreous, becomes stronger in color from middle to 
apical third, where it is followed by sordid whitish or cinereous and 
is narrowly diffused along costa to apex ; at middle of cell a conspicuous 
though small black discal spot ; at end of cell a white discal spot edged 
with black ; above and below the latter spot considerable black scaling 
fusing with the brownish-ochreous shade; from apical third of costa, 
around termen to inner margin a series of blackish dashes edged in- 
wardly and narrowly with pale yellowish brown; whole surface of 
wing somewhat lustrous and appearing predominantly gi'ay; cilia 
light fuscous, darker basally. Hind wing shining grayish fuscous; 
cilia brownish fuscous with a fuscous basal band. Legs ochreous-white 
strongly overlaid and suffused with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen 
light grayish fuscous with some cinereous and white scales mixed and 
with a median longitudinal fuscous shade beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather broad, clothed with coarse hairs in 
outer half; basal half heavily sclerotized except for a small naem- 
branous median area; costa and ventral margin parallel and evenly 
curved ; cucullus rounded ; sacculus rather narrow, very strongly sclero- 
tized; clasper divided, the longitudinal arm produced as a strong 
pointed extension of the sacculus, the transverse arm a slender pointed 
process extending but slightly beyond middle of harpe. Anellus a 
broad, subrectangular plate with large hairy lateral lobes, concave 
posterior edge and broad sagittate basal process. Aedeagus stout, 
moderately long, gently curved; vesica armed with a large elongate 
patch of rather strong cornuti. Vinculum narrov. ly rounded. Trans- 
tilla a narrow sclerotized band with large hairy lateral lobes. Gnathos 
oval. Tegumen truncate. Socii fleshy, hairy lobes. 

Alar expanse, 18-21 mm. 

Type. — In the Canadian National Collection. 

Paratypes. — U. S. N. M. No. 53259 ; also in the Canadian National 
Collection. 

Type locality. — Cameron Bay, Great Bear Lake, Northwest Terri- 
tories, Canada. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type and 5 $ paratypes all from 
the type locality ( 8-12-VII-1937, T. N. Freeman). I have seen no 
females. 



142 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

MARTYRHILDA KLAMATHIANA (Walsingham) 

Plate 25, Figure 151 ; Plate 41, Figube 234 

Depressaria Idamathiana Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1S81, p. 314, 
pi. 36, fig. 4. — Riley, m Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 5267, 1891.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 740, 1902 ; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. BuU. 52, No. 5868, 1903.— Keaefott', in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6411, 1903. — BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 27, p. 762, 1904.— Dyae, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 934, 1904.— 
Andeeson, Catalogue of British Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1091, 1904. — • 
Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in 
Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 328, 1939. 

Agonopteryx JdamatMana (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, 
p. 198, 1908. 

Agonoptcrix klamathiana (Walsingham) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepi- 
doptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera). No. 8435, 1939. 

Agnopteryx klamathiana (Walsingham) Baenes and McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6441, 1917. 

Depressaria cinifiuaella Walsingham (not Zeller), Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 256, 1889. — 
Riley, m Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5259, 1891. — 
BuscK (not Zeller), Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 740, 1902; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5869, 1903.— KKVEForr, in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6412, 1903. — Andeeson, Catalogue of 
British Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1092, 1904. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera 
insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 176, 1922 (part). — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum 
catalogus, pt. 92, p. 314, 1939. 

Agonopteryx ciniflonella Busck (not Zeller), Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 198, 
1908. 

Agnopteryx ciniflonella Baenes and McDunnough (not Zeller), Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6440, 1917. 

Agonopterix ciniflonella McDunnough (not Zeller), Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8436, 1939. 

Labial palpus gray; second segment strongly mixed with reddish 
fuscous; third segment with a broad, fuscous annulus before apex. 
Antenna reddish gray. Thorax, base of fore wing, and costa to about 
middle sordid whitish ; anterior part of thorax suffused with reddish 
fuscous ; ground color of fore wing reddish gray strongly suffused with 
reddish fuscous; at basal third two obliquely placed black discal dashes 
of raised scales followed by white or grayish scales ; beyond this light 
patch a fuscous shade ; at the end of cell a white discal spot margined 
by blackish fuscous ; around termen a series of fuscous dots ; cilia dull 
reddish with a narrow, fuscous median band ; under side of costa nar- 
rowly edged with carmine. Hind wing grayish fuscous; cilia light 
fuscous with a rosy tinge and a fuscous basal band. Legs grayish 
overlaid with fuscous and strongly suffused with carmine. Abdomen 
grayish fuscous above; beneath sordid whitish with a broken, black 
lateral line on each side. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 143 

Male genitalia. — Harpe with the apical and basal portion just below 
costa clothed with coarse hairs ; marginal hairs fine ; sacculus heavily 
sclerotized; clasper divided; transverse arm straight, slender, arising 
at or before middle of harpe and reaching to or slightly beyond costa ; 
at the base of the arm a sclerotized portion forming a short, sharp 
thorn (in some specimens this is scarcely noticeable) ; the other arm 
is short, sharply pointed and parallel to the sacculus; cucullus 
rounded. Anellus a rectangular plate, deeply cleft on the posterior 
edge; lateral lobes weak. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus broad 
dorsoventrally and compressed laterally. The dorsal edge is strongly 
sclerotized ; both ends slightly enlarged ; vesica with a spinulate patch 
at middle. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band ; lateral lobes large, 
not fused. Gnathos a spined oval knob. The gnathos varies slightly 
in different specimens. Socii broad hairy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, with two narrow, raised 
ridges posterior to ostium. Ostimn small, roimd and situated at ex- 
treme anterior edge of plate. Ductus bursae membranous, short, and 
tapering into the bursa copulatrix. The latter is large, asymmetrical. 
Signum an elongate-oval, sclerotized, scobinate plate, extending almost 
the entire length of the bursa. 

Alar expanse, 20-25 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Fort Klamath, Oreg. 

Food plant. — Apple? 

Distribution. — Western United States and Canada as far east as 
Ontario. 

United States Records 

Montana: Ravalli County, 3 $$,9 (1-29-33, from magpie nests). 
Oregon: Fort Klamath, 2 $ $ (IX-20-71, Walsingham). 

Washington: Bellingham, ? (VIII-22-26, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Logan Hill, Chehalis, 
3 5 5,29? (11-16 to in-28-30, T. M. Clarke). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Duncan, $ (Apr. 1-7, Hanham) ; Fraser Mills, 5 (IX-5-20, 
L. E. Marmont) ; Hazelton, $ (IX, 14-21, W. B. Anderson) ;' Kalso, $ 
(IV-24-15, J. W. Cockle) ; Marron Lake, $ (Apr. 1924, C. B. Green) ; Quami- 
chan Lake, Vancouver Island, $ (IX-27-02) ; Vancouver, $ (III-18-96, 
Livingston) ; Victoria, $ (IV-18-17, E. H. Blackmore), $ (VIII-29-23, K. F. 
Auden), $ (III-10-23, W. R. Carter) ; Wellington, 3 5 5,6 5 $ (V-25-07, 
April [3 specimens] ; 3 specimens, III-22-03, G. "W. Taylor). 

Ontario: Hymers, 2 5 5 (no date or collector) ; Ottawa, 5 (II 1-18-05, C. H. 
Young). 

RenypLvks. — After studying 45 specimens and 29 wing and genitalia 
slides, I am convinced that all the above material is referable to this 
species. I admit that the series studied shows many minor superficial 
differences existing between specimens. In genitalia, however, even 



144 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

though slight variations occur, there are no major differences and none 
which would separate one group of specimens from another. 

In addition, some specimens are more gray than others, having little 
of the red scaling that is characteristic of the species ; others possess a 
white, rather than gray, head. 

The European ciniflonella is a gray species with very narrow wings. 
The costa is not strikingly lighter as in most specimens of Mamathiana. 
One or two North American specimens I have seen approach cmi-floneTla 
very closely. The wing form appears to vary considerably due to the 
differences in length of veins ^9 of the fore wing. In some specimens 
these veins are considerably longer than in others, and the fore wings 
are correspondingly longer. It is possible that what I consider Ma- 
mathiana actually includes more than one species, or one in a state of 
flux, but this entire group {Jdmnathiana^ sciadojm, cinifloneUa, and a 
fourth unnamed) represents a very difficult complex of species. Only 
careful rearing will determine the status of these. 

MARTYRHILDA SCIADOPA (Meyrick) 

Plate 24, Figures 149, 149a ; Plate 41, Figuee 236 

Depressaria sciadopa Meykick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 2, p. 315, 1920 ; in 

Wytsman, Genera iiisectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 176, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, 

Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 348, 1939. 
Affonopterix sciadopa (Meyrick) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8434, 1939. 

This species is like the foregoing, kh?7iathiana, but lacks the red 
or brown scaling of that species, is without carmine suffusion, and 
averages smaller in size. 

Labial palpus whitish gray; second segment irrorated and suffused 
with grayish fuscous exteriorly; third segment with broad supra- 
medial grayish-fuscous annulus. Antenna grajdsh fuscous above, 
whitish gray beneath. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing 
whitish gray. Head lightly irrorated with grayish fuscous. Thorax 
strongly overlaid with grayish fuscous and irrorated with black, the 
darker colors almost obscuring the lighter ground color. Fore wing 
suffused with grayish fuscous and irrorated with black; extreme 
base of wing and basal half of costa whitish gray strigulated with 
grayish fuscous and with a small black spot near base slightly inside 
the costal edge; beyond the light costal and basal areas a strong 
blackish to grayish fuscous shade rapidly fading to the light ground 
color slightly beyond basal third; a similar, but smaller, dark shade 
at middle of wing; at basal third a pair of small black discal spots, 
one above the other, followed by white scales; sometimes these two 
spots are confluent, forming a short, outwardly oblique black dash ; at 
the end of cell a small white spot edged with black ; at apical fourth a 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 145 

narrow, faint, outwardly curved grayish-fuscous shade; along costa 
and around termen a series of small black spots ; cilia whitish gray ir- 
rorated with grayish fuscous. Hind wing whitish gray basally, gray- 
ish fuscous apically; cilia whitish gray with a grayish-fuscous 
subbasal band. Legs whitish gray overlaid and suffused with grayish 
fuscous except at joints. Abdomen whitish gray suffused with gray- 
ish fuscous above and with a poorly defined row of black spots on 
each side beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather heavily sclerotized except for the 
cucullus and a small area about the middle; cucullus and the sclero- 
tized costal area moderately clothed with fine hairs (the cucullus of 
one male is considerably rounded while those of four other males are 
somewhat pointed) ; clasper strongly sclerotized; the free transverse 
arm originating about the middle of the harpe; longitudinal arm 
short, sharply pointed ; sacculus heavily sclerotized. Anellus a narrow 
concave plate forming a trough on which the aedeagus articulates; 
lateral lobes weak. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus stout, slightly 
curved, very much compressed, rather broad dorsoventrally, constricted 
at about the middle; dorsal edge heavily sclerotized; vesica armed 
with a patch of very small cornuti. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized 
band with well-developed lateral lobes. Gnathos an oval spined knob, 
Socii fleshy lobes clothed with fine hairs. Apex of tegumen bluntly 
pointed ; ventral edges with rather well developed outgrowths. Abdo- 
men of male heavily sclerotized. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad with the small romid ostium 
situated at the extreme anterior edge. Ductus bursae short, membra- 
nous, stout, tapering into the large asymmetrical bursa copulatrix; 
signum an elongate sclerotized plate with small thornlike projections 
covering the surface. 

Alar expanse, 15-19 mm. 

Tyjye. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Field, British Columbia, Canada. 

Distribution. — Canada and northeastern United States. 

United States records 

New Hampshire: Jefferson, 2 $ $ (30-III-36, 21-X-1936, A. E. Brower). 
New York: Oswegatchie, 5, 2 $ $ (31-III-33, A. B. Klots). 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Edmonton, 2 S $, 2 ? 5 (IV-10-21, K. Bowman) ; 3 9 ? (IV-ij to 
13-24, Owen Bryant) ; Red Deer, 7 5 5,1? (VI-1 to 16-23, K. Bowman). 

Manitoba: Aweme, 1 5,5 5? (XI-9-05), $ (III-31-04), ? (IX-29-20), $, ? 
(X-16-20), all collected by N. Griddle; Cartwright, $ (XI-23-05, E. F. 
Heath) ; Winnipeg, $ (no date, A. W. Hanham). 

Ontario: Ottawa, $ ( X-1 7-07, C. H. Young). 

Quebec: Chelsea, 5 (IV-21-23, J. McDunnough). 
2S6G14 — 41 8 



146 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

RemarJcs. — This species, Mamathiana^ ciniflonella^ and a few mis- 
cellaneous unnamed specimens form a very complex group in which the 
species are exceedingly difficult to separate. On genitalia it is difficult 
to separate one from the other, only one specimen, an unnamed unique 
female from the Moscow Mountains, Idaho, showing good specific 
characters in the genitalia. The harpes of sciadopa are clothed with 
seemingly finer hairs than those found in Jdaviathiana or cinifionella^ 
but this character, even though probably sufficient to distinguish 
sciadopa from the others, fails in separating the latter two. The point 
of origin of the transverse arm of the clasper and the comparative 
lengths seem to be the safest characters for separating the males of 
the two species. The length of the wings of cinifioneUa is proportion- 
ately greater than in klamathiana, but I am skeptical of the value of 
this character. In some long reared series of other species both long- 
and short-winged forms are found. In some specimens the lengthen- 
ing of the wings seems to be retarded. The venation shows some vari- 
ation in all species, thus eliminating venation as a means of specific 
separation. 

On pattern and size it is possible, with exceptions, to distinguish the 
three; sciadopa may be separated from the other two by its much 
smaller size, grayer appearance, and total absence of brown or red 
scales. Under this name I place with some doubt the specimens listed 
above. Meyrick's description of sciadopa could actually fit any one of 
two or three species before me, but because of the type locality and the 
fact that Meyrick has placed sciadopa in the '■'■cini-fionella group." I 
prefer to use his name instead of proposing another. An examination 
of the type will be necessary to determine definitely what the name 
really represents. 

3. BIBARRAMBLA, new genus 
PL.VTE 4, FiGTTRES 29, 30 ; Plate 9, Figxtbes 65, 65a ; Plate 18, Figube 109 

Genotype. — Semioscopis alleneUa Walsingham, Trans. Amer. Ent. 
Soc, vol. 10, p. 174, 1882. 

Similar to Agonopterix but the second segment of the labial palpus 
without furrow ; socii and uncus fused to form hood. 

Head with appressed scales; side tufts spreading; antenna simple 
in both sexes ; basal segment short, with pecten. Labial palpus long, 
recurved, second segment much longer than third, without furrow. 
Thorax with two minute crests. Abdomen not flattened. Fore wing 
with arched costa ; scale tufts present ; 12 veins ; 2 and 3 stalked from 
angle; 2 and 3, 4 and 5 closely approximate; 7 and 8 stalked, both to 
costa; stalk of 7 and 8 approximate to 9; 11 from well before middle; 
termen straight, oblique. 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing ; 8 veins ; 3 and 4 connate ; 6 and 7 
subparallel. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 147 

Male genitalia. — With clasper. Anellus well developed, without 
lateral processes. Uncus and socii fused. Gnathos a spined knob. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate strongly sclerotized, signum 
present. 

Remarks. — This genus is closely allied to Agonopterix. 

BIBARRAMBLA ALLENELLA (Walsingham), new combination 

Plate 4, Figures 29, 30 ; Plate 9, Figures 65, 65a ; Plate IS, Figure 109 

Semioscopis alleiieUa Walsingham, Trans. Amer. Eat. Soc, vol. 10, p. 174, 1882. — 
BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5894, 1903 ; Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908.— Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6489, 1917. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 186, 1922.— McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 
lepidoptera ) , No. 8464, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, 
pt. 92, p. 369, 1939. 

Agonopteryx allenella (Walsingham) Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat 
Memoir 68, p. 241, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 101, 
p. 545, 1928. — Procter, Biological survey of the Moimt Desert region: The 
insect fauna, p. 273, 1938. 

Labial palpus sordid whitish; second segment shaded with fuscous 
on basal half and irrorated distally; slightly before apex a naiTOW, 
incomplete, brownish-fuscous annulus; third segment with a spot an- 
teriorly at base and a broad, supra-medial annulus brownish fuscous. 
Antenna sordid whitish, narrowly annulated with fuscous; basal seg- 
ment fuscous above. Head, thorax, and fore wing grayish white, suf- 
fused and irrorated with fuscous ; at basal third, in cell, two fuscous 
discal spots (sometimes confluent) of raised scales followed by some 
ochreous scaling and with a few scales of white mixed; at the end of 
cell a black-edged white discal spot of raised scales followed by some 
ochreous scaling; along costa, and around termen to inner margin, a 
series of fuscous spots; costa narrowly edged with pink (this pink 
tint is obscure in some specimens but is strongly continued through the 
cilia in others) ; cilia sordid whitish with a broad, pale grayish-fuscous 
subbasal band. Hind wing pale grayish fuscous, darker apically; 
cilia sordid whitish with a broad, pale grayish fuscous subbasal band. 
Legs sordid whitish suffused and annulated with fuscous except at 
joints and on hind tibia, the latter with pale ochreous suffusion and a 
faint pink tint. Abdomen pale ochreous suffused with fuscous above. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad ba sally, tapering to the pointed cucul- 
lus, hairy ; sacculus broad, strongly sclerotized, clasper stout, dilated 
distally, recurv^ed. Anellus a large sclerotized plate, pointed an- 
teriorly, slightly concave posteriorly and without lateral hairy lobes. 
Aedeagus long, slender, narrowly S-shaped; basally, on ventral side 
a small, flat protuberance; vesica armed with minute cornuti. Vin- 
culum broad, rounded, with a well-developed dorsoanterior process. 



148 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. oo 

Transtilla a narrow, weakly sclerotized band with small hairy lateral 
lobes. Gnathos a spined, oval knob. Socii small, hairy, fused with 
uncus to form a narrow hood. 

Female genitalia: — Genital plate narrow, produced anteriorly, 
strongly sclerotized ; anterior edge produced ventrally to form a small 
shelf. Ostium small, elongate ; on each side a shallow, narrow cavity. 
Ductus bursae membranous, slender, gradually tapering into the large 
bursa copulatrix; ductus seminalis opening just before ostium. Sig- 
num a small, strongly sclerotized plate with two or three strong teeth. 

Alar expanse, 19-22 mm. 

Ty^pe. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Maine ( ? ) . 

Food plants. — Alniis sp. ; oak; birch. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: Washington, S (May 1902, A. Busck). 

Maine: Kingsfield, $ (lO-VII-1936, no collector) ; Rangeley, 5 (12-VII-1936, 

v. H. dos Passos) ; Sebec Lake, $,299 (June and July; no collector) ; 

Wales, $ (21-VI-1907; uocoUector). 
Maryland: Plummers Island, 3 $ $ (May and August 1903, 1919, A. Busck). 
New Hampshire: Center Harbor, $ (July 27, 1902, H. G. Dyar) ; Dublin, 2 $ $ 

(no date; A. Busck) ; Hampton, $ (4-VII-1906, S. A. Shaw). 
New Jersey: Essex County Park, $ (ll-VI-1899, W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: McLean, Rhinebeck, Lond Island, etc. {teste Forbes). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 19 S $, 8 5 5 (May and June dates, 1901-1907, 

H. D. Merrick). 
Virginia: Upton, 5 (25-IV-1913, F. Johansen [Hopkins No. 9861d]). 

Canadian records 

Nova Scotia: Petite Riviere (July 11-18, 1935, J. McDunnough) ; S. Milford 
(June 29, 30, 1934, J. McDunnough) ; White Point Beach (July 1934 and 
Feb. 8, 1936 [indoor record?] J. McDunnough). 

Ontario: Biseotasing (June 14-20, 1931, K. Schedl) ; Ottawa (June 3-24, 1906, 
C. H. Young; July 19, 1926, C. H. Curran). 

Quebec: Alcove (July 8, 1936, F. A. Urquhart) ; Brome (June 4, 1936, G. S. 
Walley) ; Gracefield (June 16, 1937, O. Peck) ; Kazubazua (June 8, 1927, F. P. 
Ide) ; Knowlton (Feb. 13, 1930 [indoor record?], J. McDunnough) ; Meach 
Lake (July 20, C. H. Young) ; Mount Lyall (July 15, 16, 1933, W. J. Brown). 

Reniarhs. — Forbes correctly removed allenella from Semioscopis, but 
I do not agree with him in placing it in Agonopterix. The genus is 
close to Agonopterix^ but the absence of the furrow or brush on the 
labial palpus, absence of lateral lobes of the anellus, fused socii and 
uncus in the male, and the unique signum of the female indicate that 
this species is generically distinct. 

The genotype is the only species I have seen referable to this genus. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 149 

4. Genus SEMIOSCOPIS Hubner 

Plate 2, Figuke 15; Plate 5, Figuee 35; Plate 11, Figures 73, 73a; 
Plate 16, Figure 97 

Semioscopis Hubnee, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 402, 1826. — 
Walsingham, Trans. Aruer. Ent. Soc, vol. 10, p. 174, 1882. — Riley, m Smith, 
List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 99, 100, 1891. — Dyar, Can. Ent., vol. 
34, p. 319-320, 1902.— BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 523, 1903.— 
Keabfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 114, 1903.— 
BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908. — K&vrfott, in Smith, 
Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 562, 1910. — Busck, Journ. Ent 
Zool., Claremont, vol. 5, p. 100, 1913. — Barnes and JIcDu^nough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 161, 1917. — ^Meyrick, in Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 186, 1922. — Foubes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. 
Stat., Memoir 68, p. 234-244, 1923. (Genotype: Phalaenae Tortrix steinkell- 
ncriana Schiffermtiller, Systematisches Verzeichniss der Schmetterlinge der 
Weiuer Gegend, p. 130, 1776). — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, 
pt. 92, p. 369, 1939. 

Epiffraphia Steiphens, Catalogue of British insects, p. 304, 1872. — Grote, North 
Amer. Ent., vol. 1, p. 53, 1880.— Walsingham, Trana. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 
10, p. 174, 1882. — Beutenmtjlleb, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New 
Jersey, p 355, 1890. — Dietz, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, 
p. 473, 1900. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 185-186, 
1922. (Genotype: Tinea avellanella Hiibuer, Sammlung europiiischer Schmet- 
terlinge, No. 8, fig. 27, 1796.) 

Head smooth, side tufts somewhat spreading. Tongue developed 
but short. Antenna shortly ciliated in male, simple in female ; basal 
segment without pecten. Labial palpus moderatel}'^ long, curved ; sec- 
ond segment with appressed scales which protrude at apex ; terminal 
segment much shorter than second, slender, acute. 

Fore wing ample, elongate ; 12 veins ; 2 and 3 approximate, connate 
or stalked, 7 and 8 stalked, 7 to costa or apex, 11 from well before 
middle. 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing, ovate; 8 veins; 3 and 4 closely 
approximate or connate. 

31 ale genitalia. — Harpe elongate; sacculus frequently produced. 
Anellus with lateral processes that are sometimes reduced. Transtilla 
membranous; lateral lobes usually slender, digitate but greatly re- 
duced. Gnathos a spined, oval knob. Socii mainly indicated by hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Ductus bursae membranous or partially sclero- 
tized ; signum present. 

Remarks. — Meyrick ^^ separates Epigraphia from Semloscopis on the 
condition of veins 2 and 3 of the fore wing (stalked or separate), yet 
he ignores this same character in the case of Agonopterix and Depres- 
saria except to use it to divide Depressaria into two sections. In Semio- 
scopis veins 2 and 3 are much more unstable than in Agonopterix and 
Depressaria., indicating that Semioscopis is in a state of flux and not 



Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 185-186, 1922. 



150 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. »o 

yet clearly definable into two genera. I have examined several hun- 
dred specimens and find that veins 2 and 3 of the fore wing vary from 
remote to stalked in every species, frequently differing on the two sides 
of a specimen. The genitalia support the view that in the case of the 
species of Semioscopis we are actually dealing with one genus. In 
Agonopterix and Depressaria their separation is supported by geni- 
talic evidence. 

Busck ^® recognized six species in this genus. Forbes '^ later removed 
alleneUa to Agonopterioo. For this species I have erected a new genus. 
Two species, mcdunnoughi and hraunae^ are described as new in this 
paper bringing to a total of seven the number of species for the genus. 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF SEMIOSCOPIS BASED ON 
COLORATION 

1. Fore wing with a dark, outwardly curved bar at end of cell 2 

Fore wing without such bar at end of ceU; ground color gray or 

whitish, strongly irrorated with grayish fuscous and without 

large, conspicuous dark spots or dashes inornata Walsingham (p. 155) 

2. Discal mark continued toward base as a straight or curved bar or 

series of short lines 4 

Discal mark not continued toward base 3 

3. Fore wing sordid whitish marked with small contrasting black 

irrorations braunae, new species (p. 159) 

Fore wing whitish gray marked with small black irrorations and 

generally suffused with fuscous megamicrella Dyar (p. 157) 

4. Discal mark continued toward base as a strongly contrasted 

curved bar 5 

Discal mark not continued toward base as a curved bar 6 

5. Discal bar reaching base of fore wing packardella (Clemens) (p. 151) 

Discal bar sharply terminated at basal third of fore wing. 

merriccella Dyar (p. 153) 

6. Second segment of labial palpus suffused with blackish on distal 

half; third segment contrastingly marked black and white 

aurorella Dj-ar (p. 160) 
Second segment of labial palpus almost wholly blackish exteri- 
orly; third segment weakly mottled black and white 

mcdunnoughi, new species (p. 162) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF SEMIOSCOPIS BASED ON MALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Ventral margin of sacculus with prominent extension (figs. 137, 138, etc.). 2 
Ventral margin of sacculus without prominent extension (fig. 135) 6 

2. Extension of sacculus slender, simple, pointed (fig. 137) 

inornata Walsingham (p. 155) 
Extension of sacculus otherwise 3 

3. Extension of sacculus bifurcate (figs. 140, 141) 4 

Extension of sacculus otherwise (figs. 138, 139) 5 

M Busck, A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908. 

ST Forbes, W. T. M., CorneU Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 241, 1923. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 151 

4. Vesica with one or two slender cornuti (fig. 141) _ merriccella Dyar (p. 153) 
Vesica with cluster of slender cornuti (fig. 140) 

packardella (Clemens) (p. 151) 

5. Outer dorsal edge of sacculus evenly curved (fig. 138) 

megamicrella Dyar (p. 157) 
Outer dorsal edge of sacculus sharply angulate (fig. 139) 

braunae, new species (p. 159) 

6. Vesica armed with a stout, moderately short curved cornutus (fig. 

135a) aurorella Dyar (p. 160) 

Vesica armed with a stout, long, straight cornutus (fig. 136) 

mcdunnoughi, new species (p. 162) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF SEMIOSCOPIS BASED ON FEMALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Ductus bursae with a conspicuous, large sclerotized area (figs. 

223, 224, 226) 2 

Ductus bursae membranous or with a minute subtriangular 

sclerotized area adjacent to ostium (figs. 225, 227, 228) 4 

2. Ductus bursae sclerotized adjacent to bursa copulatrix (fig. 223) 

aurorella Dyar (p. 160) 
Ductus bursae membranous adjacent to bursa copulatrix (figs. 224, 226) — 3 

3. Ostial opening as narrow as or narrower than portion of genital 

plate posterior to it; loop of ductus bursae sclerotized for less 

than half its length (fig. 224) bravmae, new species (p. 159) 

Ostial opening wider than portion of genital plate posterior to it; 
loop of ductus bursae sclerotized for more than half of its length 
(fig. 226) megamicrella Dyar (p. 157) 

4. Ovipositor lobes armed with hooked macrosetae (fig. 225) 

inomata Walsingham (p. 155) 
Ovipositor lobes without hooked macrosetae 5 

5. Bursa copulatrix elongate, definitely asymmetrical; signum 

minute, in posterior part of bursa (fig. 228a) _ packardella (Clemens) (p. 151) 
Bursa copulatrix oval, not definitely asymmetrical; signum small, 

about middle of bursa copulatrix (fig. 227) merriccella Dyar (p. 153) 

SEMIOSCOPIS PACKARDELLA (Clemens) 

Plate 23, Figuke 140, 140a ; Plate 40, Figubes 228, ^8a 

Enicostoma pacJi-ardclla Clemens, Proc. Ent. See. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 125, 
1S63 ; in Staiuton, The Tineina of North America, p. 231, 1872.— Bxtsok, Proc. 
Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 214, 1903. 

Semioscopis packardella (Clemens) Dyab, Can. Ent., vol. 34, p. 319, 1902. — 
Busck, m Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus., Bull. 52, No. 5893, 1903; Proc. Ent. Soc. 
Washington, vol. 5, p. 214, 1903. — Keakfott, in Smith, Check List of the Lepi- 
doptera of Boreal America, No. 643G, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 201, 1908. — Baknes and aicDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Boreal America, No. 6484, 1917. — Fokees, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Memoir 68, p. 244, 1923; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 101, p. 546, 1928. 

Epigraphia packardella (Clemens) Walsingham, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc. Phila- 
delphia, vol. 10, p. 174, 1SS2. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 186, 1922.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada 



152 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8459, 1939 
[cited as synonym of Epigraphia steinkellneriana (Scliiftermiiller)]. 
Epigraphia eruditeUa Gkote, North Amer. Ent., vol. 1, p. 53, pi. 5, fig. 12, 1880.— 
Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectornm, fasc. 180, p. 186, 1922. — Mc- 
DuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of 
America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8459, 1939 [cited as synonym of 
Epigraphia stemkelhieriana (Schiffermiiller)]. 

Labial palpus sordid white ; second segment overlaid with blackish 
fuscous exteriorly, except at base and apex, and lightly suffused with 
pink ; third segment with a small black spot at base anteriorly and a 
broad, black subapical annulus. Antenna light fuscous, narrowly an- 
nulated with gray. Head with the scales light brown, tipped with 
white and appearing gray. Thorax gray suffused with brown ante- 
riorly and with a faint carmine tint. Fore wing light shining gray 
marked with numerous faint, short transverse strigulae ; at the end of 
cell an outwardly curved transverse black bar continued as a longitudi- 
nal curved black line to extreme base of costa ; between the bar at the 
end of the cell and the costa two longitudinal brown-edged black 
dashes (sometimes fused) followed on costa by a small, indistinct light 
brown shade; costa marked with poorly defined, light-brown spots 
and dashes and narrowly edged with pink to slightly beyond middle ; 
around termen to inner margin a series of small black spots; cilia 
pale gray with a light-brown suffusion outwardly. Hind wing pale, 
shining gray, darker apically; cilia paler, with narrow light brown 
bands. Legs pale ochreous-white overlaid exteriorly, except joints 
and hind tibiae, with blackish fuscous; pale areas with a faint pink 
tint. Abdomen sordid ochreous with a slight fuscous suffusion 
beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Very similar to memccella^ differing primarily in 
characters of the aedeagus. 

Harpe long, rather narrow, slightly wider before cucullus ; costa and 
cucullus sclerotized, area between membranous; cucullus narrow, 
rounded ; sacculus produced to form a large forked process. Anellus 
long, strongly curved posteriorly to form a semicylinder ; basolateral 
lobes reduced to slight swellings, chiefly indicated by hairs. Aedeagus 
long, sharply curved, pointed; vesica armed with an elongate patch 
of small straight cornuti. Vinculum rounded. Lobes of transtilla 
long, digitate, hairy, fused with anellus at base. Tegumen roimded. 
Socii reduced to small hairy lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Much as in merriccella but differing by the 
longer bursa and minute signum. Genital plate narrow, broadened 
at middle to form the cup-shaped ostium. Ductus bursae a long, 
slender, convoluted tube with a small, subtriangular sclerotized area 
near ostium; inception of ductus seminalis at the sclerotized part. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 153 

Bursa copulatrix large, definitely asymmetrical, elongate; sigiium a 
minute toothed plate in posterior end of bursa. 

Alar expanse, 21-28 mm. 

Type. — In the Acadamy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Type locality. — Not stated; probably Massachusetts. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

Maine: Bar Harbor, $ (2-V-1936, A. E. Brower). 

Michigan: No specific locality, $, 9 (male without date; 2, 14-V-1885, 

Gillette). 
New Jersey: Montclair, S, 9 (13-V-1900, l-V-1899, W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: Ithaca, Big Indian Valley, Albany (ace. Forbes). 
Ohio: Cincinnati, 2 $ S, 9 (18-IV-1911, A. F. Braun). 
Pennsylvania: Franconia, Montgomery County, 2 (no date or collector) ; New 

Brighton, 3$S, 35$ (April 1902-1908, H. D. Merrick); Oak Station, 

Allegheny County, 76$, 52$ (April and May dates, 1902-1915, Fred 

MarlofE) . 

Canadian records 

Manitoba: Cartwright, 2 (no date; E. F. Heath). 

Quebec: Burbridge (May 25, 1937, F. A. Urquhart) ; Meach Lake (April 27, 1899, 
C. H. Young). 
Remarks. — This species will probably be found throughout the 
mid western United States and Canada as far west as British 
Columbia. 

SEMIOSCOPIS MERRICCELLA Dyar 

Plate 23, Figitee 141 ; Plate 40, Figure 227 

Semioscopis merriccella Dyab, Can. Ent., vol. 34, p. 319, 1902. — Keaefott, in 
Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6437, 1903.— 
BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908.— Barnes and McDun- 
NOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 64S5, 1917. — 
Forces, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 224, 1923 ; in Leonard, 
Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., IMemoir 101, p. 546, 1928. 

Epigraphia merrickella Meyiiick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 
p. 186, 1922.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and 
the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8459, 1939 
[amended spelling for S. mcrrUccUa Dyar and cited as synonym of 
Epigraphia steinkellneriana (SchifEermiiller) ]. 

Labial palpus white ; second segment suffused with blackish fuscous 
exteriorly ; third segment with a fuscous spot at base anteriorly and a 
broad black subapical annulus. Antemia with basal segment blackish 
fuscous ; remainder light fuscous, narrowly and indistinctly annulated 
with gray. Head and thorax gray, the latter rather strongly suffused 
with fuscous. Fore wing light, shining gray lightly shaded and 
strigulated with brown ; costa, from base to middle of wing, lighter ; 
at the end of cell an outwardly curved blackish-fuscous bar followed 



154 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

by a rapidly fading and spreading brownish shade; between the discal 
bar and costa a short, poorly defined blackish-fuscous bar followed by 
a blackish-fuscous spot before apex; before the discal bar, in cell, a 
conspicuous, broad, curved, longitudinal, blackish-fuscous bar, which 
does not reach base of wing but is preceded by a similarly colored 
narrow dash and one or two spots from base of wing at costa ; from 
apex, around termen, a series of blackish-fuscous spots; cilia pale 
gray lightly suffused with brown. Hind wing shining gray with a 
fine terminal brown line ; cilia lighter, shining, with narrow subbasal 
and two subterminal, faint brown bands. Legs shining creamy white 
strongly overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints and on hind 
tibiae. Abdomen sordid ochreous, faintly suffused with fuscous 
beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe long, narrow, slightly wider before cucul- 
lus; clasper absent, sacculus produced as a forked process; cucullus 
narrow, bluntly pointed; costa and sacculus sclerotized, with area 
between them membranous. Anellus a broad plate produced pos- 
teriorly as a semicylinder ; basolateral lobes indicated by a few hairs. 
Aedeagus long, slender, curved, terminating in a slender, curved 
point; vesica armed with two, long, slender cornuti, one about half 
the length of the other. Vinculum rounded. Lobes of transtilla long, 
digitate, hairy, and fused with anellus at base. Tegumen rounded. 
Socii mainly indicated by a few hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow. Ostium cup-shaped. 
Ductus bursae a long convoluted tube with a small subtriangular 
sclerotized area near ostium ; inception of ductus seminalis just before 
ostium. Bursa copulatrix large, oval; signum a small toothed plate 
about middle of bursa copulatrix. 

Alar expanse, 24-31 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality^ — New Brighton, Pa. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and Canada to western 
British Columbia. 

United States records 

Maine: Bar Harbor, $ (13-V-1937, A. E. Brower). 
New Hampshire: Hampton, 5 (l-IV-1907, S. A. Shaw). 
New York: Big Indian Valley, Albany (ace. Forbes). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 12 S S, 4 $ $ (March and April dates, 1902- 
1904, H. D. Merrick). 

Canadian records 

British Cohimbia: Salmon Arm, $ (16-V-1922, W. R Buckell). 
Manitoba: Aweme, $ (15-V-1905, N. Griddle) ; Cartwright, $ (no date, E. F. 
Heath). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 155 

Remarks. — This species is very much like packardella but may be 
distinguished from it by the broken discal bar, its more striate 
appearance, and usually larger size. The genitalia of the two species 
are strikingly similar, but they can be distinguished by the characters 
given in the keys. 

The single male from British Columbia is worn but undoubtedly 
belongs to this species. The distribution of the species indicates this 
specimen might be mislabeled or only a stray although further col- 
lecting may reveal that the species is well established in the far West. 

SEMIOSCOPIS INORNATA Walsinghara 

Plate 22, Figuees 137, 137a ; Plate 40, Figure 225 

Semioscopis mornata Walsingham, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 10, p. 174, 
1S82.— Dyae, Can. Ent., vol. 34, p. 320, 1902.— Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. 
Mus, Bull. 52, No. 5895, 1903. — Keaefott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Boreal America, No. 6440, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 201, 1908. — Baenes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Boreal America, No. 6488, 1917.— Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera 
insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 186, 1922.— Fokbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 68, p. 244, 1923; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 101, p. 546, 1928. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 
8460, 1939.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 372, 1939. 

Semioscopis inornatella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908. 

Labial palpus white ; second segment black externally, especially in 
distal half except extreme apex; third segment with a subbasal spot 
and a subapical annulus black. Antenna blackish fuscous and 
broadly amiulated with white on basal third, the color fading to a 
light yellowish fuscous, and the annulations disappearing, apically. 
Head and thorax sordid white suffused and clouded with grayish 
fuscous. Fore wing sordid white, profusely irrorated and suffused 
with grayish fuscous; outer discal mark reduced to two indistinct 
grayish- fuscous spots edged with whitish scales; at basal third two 
blackish-fuscous spots, one above the other; costa spotted with gray- 
ish fuscous especially before apex; around termen a series of poorly 
defined blackish-fuscous spots ; cilia sordid white with basal and nar- 
row subterminal bands light grayish fuscous. Hind wing shining 
grayish fuscous, cilia sordid white with subbasal and narrow subter- 
minal bands light grayish fuscous. Fore and middle legs sordid white 
strongly overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints; posterior 
leg pale ochreous- white ; femur and tarsus suffused with fuscous. 
Abdomen dull ochreous above, whitish ochreous beneath with a poorly 
defined fuscous line on each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad basally, narrowed beyond the ventral 
extension of the sacculus, sacculus moderately and narrowly sclero- 



156 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

tized and produced as a long bluntly pointed process; cucullus nar- 
row, rounded ; clasper absent. Anellus an elongate sclerotized plate, 
convex laterally beyond middle and basolaterally produced to form 
small, hairy lobes; posterior edge deeply and broadly V-shaped. 
Aedeagus stout, long, twisted, terminating in a blunt point; vesica 
armed with a single, stout, forked cornutus. Vinculum rounded. 
Lobes of transtilla rather thick, clothed with thick, short hairs apic- 
ally and fused to harpe. Tegumen rounded. Socii poorly developed, 
moderately hairy lobes. 

Female genltal'm. — Lobes of ovipostor with conspicuous, hooked 
macrosetae. Genital plate narrow, especially so at ostium where the 
sclerotized portion is no more than the narrow anterior edge of the 
ostium. Ductus bursae a long convoluted membranous tube; in- 
ception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa copulatrix 
large, oval; signum a small toothed plate. 

Alar expanse, 25-35 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Orono, Maine?. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States, Canada, west to British 
Columbia and Alaska. The species probably will be found in some 
of the Northwestern States. 

United States and Alaskan records 

Alaska: Rampart, 6 $ $ (no date or collector). 

Illinois: Putnam County, S (8-VI-1936, Murray O. Glenn). 

Maine: Orono, 3 $ $ (April; no collector). 

New Jersey: Essex County Park, $, 9 (29-III-1905, 15-V-1906, W. D. 

Kearfott). 
New York: Ithaca, Karner (ace. Forbes). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 5 ( 25-1 V-1908, H. D. Merrick). 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Calgary (April 24, 190S, F. H. Wolley-Dod) ; Edmonton, 5 S $ 
(25-IV-1924, R. Aitcheson ; IV-26-29-1924, Owen Bryant ; 19-IV-28-IV-1921, 
no collector) ; Red Deer, $ (lS-IV-1903, no collector). 

British Columbia: Victoria, S $ $ (29-III-1920, 7-IV-1922, W. Downes). 

Manitoba: Aweme, 7 $ S , 2 ? $ (April 3 to May 2, 1904-1905, N. Criddle; also 
April 14 to May 12, 1920-1924) ; Cartwright, S $ $ (3 $ 5 -11-13-IV-1913, 
no collector; 5 $ S, 7-IV-1905, E. F. Heath) ; Miniota, 9 (18-IV-1903, no 
collector). 

Ontario: Bells Corners (25-IV-1937, G. S. Walley) ; Biscotasing (16-V-1931, 
K. Schedl) ; Constance Bay (26-IV-1935, J. McDunnough) ; Ingersoll (1-V- 
1934, G. S. Walley); Merivale (2-V-1934, W. J. Brown; l-V-1936, G. S. 
Walley) ; Ottawa, (21-IV-1906, C. H. Young; 18-IV-1927, G. S. Walley); 
Port Hope (H. Bowers) ; Toronto (no date or collector). 

Quebec: Aylmer (3-V-1923, C. H. Curran) ; Wright (19-V-1932, J. McDun- 
nough). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 157 

Remarks. — The British Columbia specimens, although larger and 
more contrastingly marked, are otherwise indistinguishable from the 
average specimens. 

Walsingham did not state the type locality when he described the 
species, but it is presumably Orono, Maine ; several specimens before 
me with serial numbers corresponding to that of the type bear that 
locality label. The type label bears an "O" ( = Orono?) in Walsing- 
ham's handwriting. 

The hooked macrosetae of this species are found on the European 
strigidana also. These and other similarities lead me to believe that 
inomata is only a race of strigulana. For the time being, however, 
I am retaining inomata as a distinct species. 

SEMIOSCOPIS MEGAMICRELLA Dyar 

Plate 23, Figukes 138, 138a ; Plate 40, Figube 226 

Semioscopis megamicrella Dyak, Can. Eiit., vol. 34, p. 820, 1902.— Ke.\efott, in 
Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. G439, 1903. — 
BuBCK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908.— Barnes and Mc- 
DiTNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6487, 1917. — 
Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 186, 1022. — Forbes, 
Cornell Univ. Agi-. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 244, 1923 ; m Leonard, Cornell 
Univ. Agr. Esp. Stat. Memoir 101, p. 546, 1928. — McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, 
Microlepidoptera), No. S4G1, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum cata- 
logus, pt. 92, p. 372, 1939. 

Labial palpus white; second segment blackish fuscous in apical 
two-thirds except for a narrow longitudinal area inwardly ; third seg- 
ment with a minute subbasal spot anteriorly and subapical annulus 
blackish fuscous. Antenna with basal segment blackish fuscous 
above, whitish beneath; remainder light fuscous, narrowly and in- 
distinctly annulated with grayish fuscous. Head, thorax, and ground 
color of fore wing whitish gray irrorated with black and brown scales 
and lightly shaded with fuscous ; at the end of cell a blackish-fuscous, 
outwardly curved, crescentic bar (sometimes inconspicuous or broken 
into a series of dots) preceded by some white scaling; at basal third 
a pair of superposed blackish-fuscous dots ; in some specimens a longi- 
tudinal dash of the same color; costa narrowly edged with pink (this 
absent in some specimens) and spotted with blackish scales; a sub- 
marginal and terminal row of blackish-fuscous spots, the former usu- 
ally poorly defined ; cilia light gray, with pale fuscous subbasal and 
apical bands. Hind wing shining pale grayish fuscous, cilia some- 
what lighter, with pale fuscous subbasal and apical bands. Legs 
sordid whitish overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints and 
on hind tibiae. Abdomen light fuscous. 



158 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Male genitalia. — Harpe short, broad, sacculus produced as a broad 
truncate sclerotized process, cucullus bluntly pointed ; clasper a small 
tooth about middle of harpe. Anellus a broad oval plate narrowly 
produced posteriorly, basolateral lobes small, sparsely hairy. 
Aedeagus long, slender, curved and terminating in a long, slender, 
curved point ; vesica armed with a slender, curved cornutus. Vinculum 
narrowly rounded. Lobes of transtilla short, broad, hairy, and closely 
attached to the harpe. Tegmnen rounded. Socii moderately well 
developed hairy lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately broad at ostium, nar- 
rower laterally. Ostium broad with a strongly sclerotized anterior 
edge. Ductus bursae convoluted, the loop of the ductus sclerotized 
for more than half its length ; ostium preceded by a broadly dilated, 
sclerotized part of ductus bursae; before this a narrow membranous 
band, anterior to which is a longer sclerotized portion of the ductus 
bursae ; inception of ductus seminalis at the dorsoposterior edge of the 
latter sclerotized part. Bursa copulatrix large oval with a moderately 
large toothed signum. 

Alar expanse, 16-27 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — New Brighton, Pa. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and Canada westward to 
Idaho and Alberta. 

United States records 

Idaho: Wallace, $ ( 17-1 V-23, Otto Huelleman). 

Massachusetts: Foi'est Hills, $ (25-III-1930, no collector) ; Newton, $ 
(25-IV-1909, William ReifE) ; Winchendon, $ (12-IV-1902, no collector). 

New York: Ithaca, Long Island (ace. Forbes). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 72 S $ , 15 $ 9 (March 1902-1907, H. D. Mer- 
rick) ; Oak Station, Allegheny County, $, $ (4-IV-1909, 23-III-1907, Fred 
Marloff ) . 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Edmonton, $, $ (2-V-1924, Owen Bryant). 

Quebec: Aylmer, $ (9-V-1932, W. J. Brown) ; Meach Lake (April 28, 1903, 
O. H. Young). 

Remarks. — In this species there is unusually great variation in the 
size of the specimens. This variation is not associated with sex or 
locality. 

The Idaho and Alberta specimens are considerably darker than 
the types, but I can find no other external differences, and the genitalia 
are identical. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 159 

SEMIOSCOPIS BRAUNAE, new species 

Plate 23, Figukes 139, 139a ; Plate 40, Figure 224 

Semioscopis megamicrcUa Forbes (not Dyar), in part, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Memoir 68, p. 244, 1923. 

Labial palpus white, second segment suffused with blackish fuscous 
except for a narrow line inwardly and at tip ; third segment with sub- 
basal spot anteriorly and a subterminal annulus black. Antenna 
fuscous, spotted with white above on basal fourth. Head, thorax, 
and ground color of fore wing white ; the head sordid, thorax strongly 
infused with grayish brown and with posterodorsal crests blackish 
fuscous, and the fore wing irrorated with blackish fuscous and black ; 
at the end of cell an outwardly curved crescentic discal bar and at 
basal third two spots, one above the other, black ; along costa and around 
termen a series of blackish-fuscous spots ; before apex, subcostally, one 
or two conspicuous black spots; cilia pale grayish white, with light 
brown subbasal and subterminal bands. Hind wing shining grayish 
fuscous, with a narrow fuscous terminal line; cilia pale grayish white, 
with light fuscous basal band and pale brownish terminal suffusion. 
Legs light creamy white strongly suffused and overlaid with blackish 
fuscous except at joints and on hind tibiae. Abdomen pale shining 
ochreous- fuscous, suffused with fuscous beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, short; cucullus long, narrowly 
rounded; sacculus narrow basally and with a broad, strongly sclero- 
tized expansion distally; outer dorsal margin angulate; clasper mi- 
nute, pointed. Anellus a moderately small oval plate, somewhat nar- 
rowed posteriorly ; posterior edge convex ; lateral lobes absent or indi- 
cated by a few hairs. Aedeagus long, slender, narrowed at middle, 
curved and terminating in a slender, curved point ; vesica armed with a 
single slender, pointed cornutus. Vinculum narrowly rounded. 
Transtilla membranous; lateral lobes mainly indicated by a few 
hairs. Tegumen rounded. Socii small fleshy lobes. 

Female genitalia, — Genital plate narrow, slightly broader posterior 
to ostium. Ostium as narrow as or narrower than portion of genital 
plate posterior to it, bordered anteriorly by a strongly sclerotized 
and dilated portion of the ductus bursae. Ductus bursae membra- 
nous except for less than half the length of a posterior loop, and the 
dilated part before the ostium; inception of ductus seminalis at 
anterior edge of dilated section. Bursa copulatrix large oval; sig- 
num a moderately large, narrow, transverse, toothed plate about 
middle of bursa. 

Alar expanse, 22-26 mm. 

Type.—[]. S. N. M. No. 53118. 



160 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Type locality. — Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Food 'plant. — Unknown, 

Remarks. — Described from $ type and 5 2 paratypes all from the 
type locality (March and April dates, 1904^1908, Dr. Annette F. 
Braun). Paratypes in the Canadian National and Dr. A. F. Braun 
collections. 

This species is much like inegamicreXla but is lighter in color, lacks 
the fuscous or brown suffusion, and is more contrastingly and more 
sparsely marked than that species. In male genitalia it differs from 
megamwreTl<i in the stouter expansion and the angulate outer dorsal 
margin of the sacculus. In the female the ostium is smaller as is 
the posterior dilated portion of the ductus bursae adjacent to it. 
The posterior loop of the ductus bursae is less strongly sclerotized. 

This is the species placed under megamicreUa by Forbes. 

I take pleasure in naming this species after Dr. Annette F. Braun, 
who collected the type series. 

SEMIOSCOPIS AURORELLA Dyar 

Plate 22, Figure 135, 135a; Plate 40, Figure 223 

Semioscopis aurorella Dyar, Can. Ent., vol. 34, p. 319, 1902.— Keabfott, in 
Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6438, 190®.— 
BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908.— Barnes and 
JilcDuNNouGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6486, 
1917. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 186, 1922. — 
Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 244, 1923 ; in Leonard, 
Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 101, p. 546, 1928. — McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America 
(Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8463, 19.39. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopter- 
orum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 370, 1939. 

Labial palpus white with a faint roseate tinge; second segment 
overlaid with blackish fuscous exteriorly on distal half except at 
apex; third segment with a black spot anteriorly above base and a 
black subapical annidus. Antenna light fuscous, with poorly defined, 
narrow, grayish annulations. Head and thorax gray, the former 
more whitish and with some brown intermixed, the latter suffused 
with fuscous and with fuscous posterior tufts. Fore wing shining 
gi-ay suffused with brown, with a roseate tinge and variously marked 
with blackish fuscous; at the end of cell an outwardly curved 
blackish-fuscous bar preceded by a whitish or light-gray patch; in 
cell a pair of superposed dashes, sometimes fused to form an elongate 
V-shaped mark ; a short basal subcostal dash and a basal dash follow- 
ing vein Ic to slightly beyond basal third, blackish fuscous; a sub- 
terminal row of five more or less well defined dashes between the 
veins and a series of spots from costa around termen, blackish 
fuscous; cilia pale grayish fuscous, darker apically and with a 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 161 

roseate tinge. Hind wing shining grayish fuscous, darker toward 
margin and with a fine fuscous terminal line; cilia pale grayish 
fuscous, with subbasal and terminal bands fuscous. Legs yellowish 
white heavily overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints and on 
hind tibiae. Abdomen light fuscous narrowly annulated with pale 
yellowish fuscous at posterior ends of segments ; anal tuft yellowish 
fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe narrow, long ; costa gently and evenly con- 
cave; cucullus bluntly pointed; sacculus narrowly but strongly 
sclerotized; clasper long, slender, curved inwardly, attaining or 
slightly exceeding costa. Anellus a subrectangular plate with convex 
lateral edges; posterior edge concave, basolateral lobes indicated by 
a few hairs. Aedeagus stout, curved, moderately long, bluntly 
pointed; vesica armed with a single stout, curved cornutus. Vincu- 
lum broadly rounded. Transtilla indicated only by a weak mem- 
brane; lateral lobes absent. Tegumen rounded. Socii moderately 
well developed hairy lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately broad, strongly sclero- 
tized. Ostium large, oval, with a narrow, strongly sclerotized an- 
terior edge. Ductus bursae membranous in posterior half, strongly 
sclerotized, convoluted and broadened in anterior half; inception of 
ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa copulatrix large, round; 
signum a small toothed plate. 

Alar expanse, 24—31 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — New Brighton, Pa. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

New York: Ithaca, Big Indian Valley (ace. Forbes). 

Ohio: Cincinnati, 2 $ (27-III-1903, A. F. Braun). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 20 5 (J , 16 $ $ (March and April dates, 1901- 

1905, H. D. Merrick); Oak Station, Allegheny County, 9 5 5 , 10 9 5 

(March and April dates, 190S-1914, Fred Marloff). 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Red Deer, 4 S S, 2 5 $ (16-24 April, 1922-1923, K. Bowman). 
Manitoba: Aweme, $ (3-V-1924, N. Griddle) ; Cartwright, $ (no date, E. F. 

Heath). 
Ontario: Constance Bay, 2 $$ (26-IV-1935. W. J. Brown; 26-IV-193.'>, 

J. McDunnough) ; Ottawa, 5 9 9 (26-IV-1909. l-V-1906, C. H. Young). 

Rcnmrks. — The specimens from Canada, which I have before me, 
are considerably darker and, for the most part, are less conspicu- 
ously marked than the specimens from the United States, owing to 

286614 — 41 9 



162 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM tol. 90 

a strong brownish or fuscous suffusion which appears to be char- 
acteristic of the northern specimens. The genitalia of the two forms 
are identical. 

SEMIOSCOPIS MCDUNNOUGHI. new species 

Plate 22, Figuke 136 

Semioscopis aurorella Blackmore (not Dyar), Kept. Prov. Mus. Nat. Hist. 
British Columbia for 1921, p. 32, pi. 4, 1922. 

Similar to aurorella but slightly broader winged, less distinctly 
marked and with a longer, straight cornutus. 

Labial palpus white with a carmine tinge; second segment 
strongly overlaid with blackish fuscous exteriorly for its whole 
length; third segment with poorly defined blackish-fuscous subbasal 
spot and subapical annulus. Head whitish with some brown scales. 
Thorax cinereous strongly infused with fuscous and with median 
longitudinal streak and tufts blackish fuscous; tegula blackish fus- 
cous, white-edged. Fore wing shining gray suflPused with brown and 
with a roseate tinge; discal bar, reduced to a poorly defined cres- 
centic dash or a spot, a dash in cell, a basal dash following vein Ic, 
and a basal shade, blackish fuscous; along costa and around termen 
a well-defined series of blackish-fuscous spots; cilia light fuscous 
with a median grayish band and a whitish pink-tinged terminal 
line. Hind wing grayish fuscous, darker toward margins and with 
a narrow fuscous terminal line; cilia pale yellowish fuscous with 
basal and subterminal fuscous bands. Legs yellowish white strongly 
overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints and on hind tibiae 
where the lighter ground color is carmine tinted. Abdomen 
ochreous-fuscous lightly suffused with fuscous beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe narrow, long; cucullus rounded; clasper 
long, reaching almost or quite to costa, slightly curved, pointed; 
sacculus narrow, strongly sclerotized. Anellus a broad, oval plate, 
narrowed, produced, and curved posteriorly to form a semicylindrical 
articulation for the aedeagus; lateral lobes absent or at most only 
indicated by a few hairs. Aedeagus stout, moderately long; apex 
flattened, rounded; vesica armed with a single long, stout, straight, 
sharply pointed cornutus. Vinculum broadly rounded. Transtilla 
membranous ; lateral lobes vestigial, mainly indicated by a few hairs. 
Tegumen bluntly pointed. Socii small hairy lobes. 

Alar expanse, 28-29 mm. 

Type.—U. S. N. M. No. 53117. 

Type locality. — Bellingham, Wash. 

Food plant. — ^Unknown. 

Remarks. — Described from the ^ type (Bellingham, Wash., 
14-in-1923, J. F. G. Clarke, ¥0. 573) and 1 5 paratype (Fraser 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 163 

Mills, British Columbia, 14^111-1921, L. E. Marmont), the latter 
in the Canadian National collection. 

This species is much like aurorella and is the one reported by 
Blackmore from British Columbia by that name. It can be dis- 
tinguished from aurorella by the poorly defined markings of the 
third segment and the blackish-fuscous shading of the second seg- 
ment of the labial palpus, the absence or only faint indication of the 
subterminal row of spots on the fore wing, the presence of a rather 
strong basal blackish-fuscous suffusion and the long straight 
3ornutus. 

There is another known specimen in the collection of the Uni- 
versity of British Columbia, the one figured by Blackmore, from 
Millardville, British Columbia. 

I have seen no females certainly referable to this species. There 
are before me, however, two females from southeastern Washington 
that may belong here, although they are considerably smaller and 
probably represent an undescribed species. Females must be ob- 
tained from the coastal region before these two can be definitely 
placed here or described as new. 

5. Genus DEPRESSARIA Haworth 

Plate 2, Figuee 11 ; Plate 6, Figxjre 48 ; Plate 10, Figures 68, 68a ; Plate 17, 
Figure 102 

Depressaria Haworth, Lepidoptera Britannica, p. 505, 1812. — Chambers (in 
part). Can. Ent., vol. 4, p. 91, 146-148, 1872.— V^.vlsingham, (in part), 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 311-319; Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 10, 
p. 175, 1882. — BEUTBrNMXJTXER (in part), In Smith, Catalogue of tlie insects 
of New Jersey, p. 355, 1890. — Riley (in part), in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 99, 1891. — Dietz (in part), in. Smith, 
Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 474, 1900. — Busck (in part), 
Proc. U. S. Nat. IMus., vol. 24, p. 731-749, 1902; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. 
Bull. 52, p. 520-522, 1903.— Kearfott (in part), in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 114, 1903. — Busck (in part), Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 763-766, 1904.— Dyar (in part), Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 27, p. 934, 1904. — Anderson (in part). Catalogue of British 
Columbia Lepidoptera, p. 54, 1904. — Busck (in part), Proc. Ent. Soc. 
Washington, vol. 9, p. 88-91, 1908.— Kearfott, in Smith, Catalogue of the 
insects of New Jersey, p. 561, 1910. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal Axoerica, p. 161, 1917. — Meyrick (in part), Ex- 
otic Microlepidoptera, vol. 2, p. 223, 1918; p. 315, 1920; pp. 391-^92, 1921; 
p. 513, 1922; m Wytsman (in part), Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, pp. 169- 
177, 1922.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir OS, p. 241-243, 
1923.— Pierce, The genitalia of the tineid families of the Lepidoptera of 
the British Islands, p. 33, 1935. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
p. 78, 1939.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterornm catalogus, pt. 92, p. 269, 1939. 
(Genotype: Plialaena Tortrix lieracliana Linnaeus, Systema naturae, ed. 10, 
p. 532, No. 225, 1758.) 



164 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Biganorosis Waui^ngken, Ent. Tidskr., vol. 2, p. 94, 1881. (Genotype: Phalaetm 
Tortrix Iwracliana Linnaeus, Systema naturae, ed. 10, p. 532, No. 225, 1758.) 

Head with appressed scales ; tongue developed ; antenna simple or 
moderately ciliated; basal segment elongate, with pecten. Labial 
palpus long, recurved ; second segment reaching base of antenna, with 
rough, projecting scales and furrowed beneath; terminal segment 
shorter than, or rarely as long as, second, acute. Thorax smooth or 
crested. Abdomen flattened. 

Fore wing with 12 veins; 2 and 3 separate, 7 and 8 stalked; 7 to 
costa or apex, 11 from middle. 

Hind wing as broad as or broader than the fore wing; 8 veins, 3 
and 4 connate or short stalked; 6 and 7 subparallel. 

3Iale genitalia. — Harpe with or without clasper and with or with- 
out process from base of sacculus. Anellus a well sclerotized plate 
without long lateral processes. Aedeagus stout with or without 
cornuti. Gnathos an oval, spined knob. Socii well developed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate strongly sclerotized ; ductus bursae 
frequently sclerotized for a considerable portion of its length; signum 
present (in all species seen) though frequently weak. 

Larva. — Ninth abdominal segment with setae I and II well sep- 
arated; seta VI not on the same pinaculum with IV and V, remote 
from VII. Setal group VII bisetose or trisetose on first abdominal 
segment, bisetose on seventh and eighth abdominal segments,-^ and 
unisetose on ninth abdominal segment. Ocelli normal. Submentum 
without pit. 

Group A : Setal group VII on first abdominal segment &^setose. 
licracliana 
juliella 
dracunouU 

Group B : Setal group VII on first abdominal segment ^Wsetose. 
multifidae 
leptotaeniae 
angustati 

Pupa. — Pubescent. Prothoracic femora exposed. Labial palpi not 
exposed. Cremaster absent. 

Remarks. — The separation of Depressaria from Agonopterix is dis- 
cussed under the latter genus. 

In this genus there are five distinct species groups. The first, con- 
sisting of atrostrigella and dracuncul't., and probably palousella (males 
not known), is characterized by the process from the costa of the 
harpe in the male and the broad, somewhat dilated sclerotized band 
in the ductus bursae of the female. The second group consists of 

** Rarely unisetose on eigbth segment and if so trisetose on first. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 165 

jidiella^ eleanorae^ heracliana, and cinereocostella with the European 
nervosa. These have a strong basal process from the sacculus and no 
clasper in the male and an elongated, sclerotized section of the ductus 
bursae posteriorly. We have two species in the third group, artemisi- 
ella and alienella, in which the clasper is present but the basal process 
of the sacculus is absent in the male and the ductus bursae is wholly- 
membranous. The fourth group, consisting of the togata-angustati- 
multi-fldae complex, forms a perplexing assemblage of species charac- 
terized by their similarity in coloration, by the peculiar spined proc- 
ess from the base of the sacculus in the male, and by the frequently 
present sclerites anterior to the genital plate in the female. The fifth 
and final group is composed of three broad-winged forms, maculatella^ 
'betulelJa, and groteUa. In the males the divided clasper, extending 
beyond the ventral margin of the harpe, and the spiraled ductus 
bursae of the female are characteristic. 

Although rather a large number of species have been reared, the 
larvae of only six were available for study. By a comparison of the 
larval characters it will be seen that the first two groups (Group A 
under larvae) are closely similar. The fourth group (Group B under 
larva) suggests generic separation, and I am inclined to believe that 
this group does represent a distinct genus. Likewise I believe that 
the fifth group should be given a separate generic designation, which 
would be consistent with other generic separations in this paper. 
Nevertheless I prefer to wait for the collection of more larvae before 
making the separations which are suggested or before concluding that 
the species all belong to one genus and merely represent species groups. 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF DEPRESSARIA BASED ON 
COLORATION 

1. Thorax white alienella Busck (p. 180) 

Thorax otherwise 2 

2. Fore wing distinctly reddish 3 

Fore wing otherwise 5 

3. Costa contrastingly lighter than ground color of fore wing 

cinereocostella Clemens (p. 171) 
Costa not contrastingly lighter than ground color of fore wing 4 

4. Alar expanse 21 mm. or more juliella ^9 Busck (p. 176) 

Alar expanse 20 mm. or less eleanorae, new species (p. 178) 

5. Ventral side of abdomen with two distinct rows of blackish spots 

or lines 6 

Ventral side of abdomen without such spots or lines 8 

6. Fore wing with light discal spot at end of cell 7 

Fore wing without such spot heracliana (Linnaeus) (p. 173) 



29 1 have examined over 150 specimens ot juliella none of which measures as small as 20 mm. The larger 
specimens of eleanorae approach the smaller specimens ot juliella in size but noce has been found exceeding 
20 mm. 



166 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

7. Fore wing with distinct elongate blackish dash between two 

discal spots. grotella Robinson (p. 192) 

Fore wing without such dash betulella Busck (p. 195) 

8. Second segment of labial palpus white irrorated with black and 

fuscous 9 

Second segment of labial palpus otherwise 11 

9. Third segment of palpus white with blackish-fuscous subbasal 

annulus and apex maculatella Busck (p. 194) 

Third segment otherwise 10 

10. Third segment of palpus fuscous irrorated with whitish and 

with whitish apex yakimae, new species (p. 185) 

Third segment whitish with black basal and subapical annula- 

tions palousella, new species (p. 171) 

11. Fore wing blackish fuscous or brownish fuscous, at least always 

dark 12 

Fore wing grayish or light brownish 14 

12. *" The two species of this couplet cannot be separated on char- 

acters of coloration; genitalia and food plant must be used. 
Costa of fore wing with a distinct pinkish cast on underside; 

Upper Sonoran or Arid Transition Zones. 

whitmani, new species (p. 182); leptotaeniae Clarke (p. 184) 
Costa without such pink color 13 

13. The two species of this couplet (angustati and multifidae) cannot 

be separated by the use of superficial characters. Collected 
specimens may be separated as follows: 

(a) Hudsonian Zone, altitude about 6,000 feet, Cascade 

Range angustati, new species (p. 189) 

(b) Upper Sonoran Zone to Arid Transition timbered Zone 

in "intermountain" area; altitude 1,000 to 5,700 feet 

multifidae Clarke (p. 187) 

14. Alar expanse 19 mm. or less.. artemisiae dracvinculi Clarke (p. 169) 

Alar expanse over 20 mm 15 

15. Fore wing with conspicuous blackish-fuscous streak in cell. 

atrostrigella, new species (p. 168) 
Fore wing without conspicuous blackish-fuscous streak in cell. 

artemisiella McDunnough (p. 181) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF DEPRESSARIA BASED ON MALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Harpe with process from base of sacculus (figs. 198-205) 8 

Harpe without such process (figs. 191-197) 2 

2. Costa with prominent process before cucullus (figs. 194, 197) 3 

Costa without such process (figs. 191-193; 195, 196) 4 

3. Vesica armed with two or three straight terminal cornuti and a 

cluster of stout curved ones near middle (fig. 194a). 

atrostrigella, new species (p. 168) 
Vesica armed with a cluster of straight, strong cornuti about 
middle (fig. 197a) artemisiae dracxinculi Clarke (p. 169) 



•• The species of this group are very difflcult to separate and must be carefully examined for characters 
under the microscope. A careful examination of characters coupled with data on habitat will serve to 
distinguish them. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 167 

4. Clasper slender, armed with small spines and never projecting 

beyond ventral edge of harpe (figs. 195, 196) 6 

Clasper broad, without spines and at least part of it extending 

beyond ventral edge of harpe (figs. 191-193) 6 

5. Lateral edge of anellus strongly produced (fig. 196) 

artemisiella McDunnough (p. 181) 
Lateral edge of anellus not strongly produced (fig. 195) 

alienella Busck (p. 180) 

6. Transtilla roughly diamond-shaped (figs. 192b, 193b) 7 

Transtilla roughly rectangular (fig. 191b) maculatella Busck (p. 194) 

7. Width of clasper half, or less than half width of harpe (fig. 193) 

betulella Busck (p. 195) 
Width of clasper more than half width of harpe (fig. 192). 

grotella Robinson (p. 192) 

8. Clasper present (figs. 198-202) 9 

Clasper absent (figs. 203-205) 13 

9. Aedeagus as long or longer than harpe (figs. 198a-200a) 10 

Aedeagus much shorter than harpe (figs. 201a, 202a) 12 

10. Anellus longer than wide; spines of basal process of sacculus 

long, stout (fig. 199) multifidae Clarke (p. 187) 

Anellus much broader than long; spines of basal process of sac- 
culus fine, slender (figs. 198, 200) 11 

11. Posterior edge of anellus deeply cleft; transtillar lobes large, 

broad; harpe short, broad (fig. 200) whitmani, new species (p. 182) 

Posterior edge of anellus not cleft; transtillar lobes large, 

narrow, harpe narrow (fig. 198) angustati, new species (p. 189) 

L2. Basal process of sacculus curved toward cucullus; spines few, 
large; clasper sharply angulate; transtillar lobes weak (fig. 201) 

yakimae, new species (p. 185) 
Basal process of sacculus transverse; spines numerous, rather 

small; transtillar lobes strong (fig. 202) leptotaeniae Clarke (p. 184) 

L3. Basal process of sacculus pointed (figs. 68, 205) 14 

Basal process of sacculus not pointed (figs. 203, 204) 15 

14. Costa of harpe deeply excavated before cucullus (fig. 68) 

heracliana (Linnaeus) (p. 173) 
Costa of harpe not excavated before cucullus (fig. 205). 

cinereocostella Clemens (p. 171) 

15. Basal process of sacculus armed with spines for most of its length 

(fig. 203) juliella Busck (p. 176) 

Basal process of sacculus armed with spines only at distal end 

(fig. 204) eleanorae, new species (p. 178) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF DEPRESSARIA BASED ON FEMALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Ductus bursae membranous (figs. 102, 275-278, 282) 2 

Ductus bursae at least partly sclerotized (figs. 279-281; 283-289) 7 

2. Ductus bursae spiraled (fig. 275) 3 

Ductus bursae not spiraled (figs. 102, 278, 282) 5 

3. Ostium a longitudinal slit between raised edges (figs. 275, 277) 4 

Ostium nearly round, within triangular raised portion of genital 

plate (fig. 276) betulella Busck (p. 195) 



168 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

4. Ostium considerably shorter than width of genital plate; genital 

plate with a long row of hairs posteriorly (fig. 277) .grotella Robinson (p. 192) 
Ostium as long as width of genital plate; posterior row of hairs 

reduced to about half a dozen (fig. 275) maculatella Busck (p. 194) 

5. Ductus bursae bulbous before ostium (fig. 102) .heracliana (Linnaeus) (p. 173) 
Ductus bursae not bulbous at any point (figs. 278, 282) 6 

6. Anterior edge of ostium convex (fig. 278)-artemisiGlla McDunnough (p. 181) 
Anterior edge of ostium cleft (fig. 282) alienella Busck (p. 180) 

7. Ductus bursae sclerotized for at least two-thirds of its length 

(fig. 279) eleanorae, new species (p. 178) 

Ductus bursae otherwise (figs. 280, 281; 283-289) 8 

8. Sclerotized portion of ductus bursae limited to a narrow band 

(figs. 283, 284) 9 

Sclerotized portion of ductus bursae otherwise (figs. 196, 197, 285, 289). 10 

9. Sclerotized portion of ductus bursae armed with small teeth 

(fig. 284) palousella, new species (p. 171) 

Sclerotized portion of ductus bursae unarmed (fig. 283) 

artemisiae dracvmculi Clarke (p. 169) 

10. Sclerotized portion of ductus bursae strongly curved (figs. 286-288) 11 

Sclerotized portion of ductus bursae straight or only slightly 

curved (figs. 280, 281, 285, 289) 13 

11. Genital plate with a pair of shallow, cupped sclerites on anterior 

margin (fig. 288) multifidae Clarke (p. 187) 

Genital plate without such sclerites (figs. 286, 287) 12 

12. Genital plate abruptly narrowed laterally; ostium a narrow slit 

(fig. 287) angustati, new species (p. 189) 

Genital plate of nearly equal width throughout, ostium trian- 
gular (fig. 286) whitmani, new species (p. 182) 

13. Signum in posterior part of bursa copulatrix (figs. 285, 289) 14 

Signum in anterior part of bursa copulatrix (figs. 280, 281) 15 

14. Sclerotized ventral sclerites of genital plate equal to length of 

sclerotized portion of ductus bursae (fig. 285) 

yakimae, new species (p. 185) 
Sclerotized ventral sclerites of genital plate shorter than length 
of sclerotized portion of ductus bursae (fig. 289) 

leptotaeniae Clarke (p. 184) 

15. Ductus bursae sclerotized for less than half its length; a small 

protuberance from the side of the sclerotized part (fig. 281) 

cinereocostella Clemens (p. 171) 
Ductus bursae sclerotized for about half its length and without 
small protuberance from the sclerotized part (fig. 280) 

juliella Busck (p. 176) 

DEPRESSARIA ATROSTRIGELLA, new species 
PlxVte 35, FiGUKES 194, 194a 

Labial palpus light oclireous- white ; second segment suffused with 
fuscous in the brush; third segment immaculate. Antenna light fus- 
cous somewhat mottled basally with gray; basal segment gray be- 
neath. Head, thorax, and fore wing ochreous-white. The whole 
so strongly suffused with deep gray that the ground color is nearly 
obliterated. Vertex and the head behind the antennae infuscated. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 169 

Thorax liglitly irrorated with fuscous. Inner angle of fore wing, 
veins, a strong longitudinal dash in cell and a series of poorly defined 
spots around termen, blackish fuscous. The veins are, for the most 
part, weakly marked, but vein Ic is marked with blackish fuscous for 
its entire length ; cilia deep gray, tipped with ochreous-white. Hind 
wing pale smoky gray; cilia lighter. Legs ochreous-white, the fore 
and mid legs suffused with grayish fuscous exteriorly. Abdomen 
pale grayish fuscous, faintly annulated with dull ochreous-white, 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately broad, clothed apically with 
numerous stout, straight hairs; cucullus rounded; on costa, before 
cucullus, a large flat process that terminates in a small hook ; sacculus 
moderately broad and sclerotized, without basal process; clasper a 
minute papillate process about middle of harpe, with three or four 
strong hairs from surface. Anellus a large subrectangular plate con- 
stricted posteriorly; posterior edge truncate. Aedeagus rather long, 
stout, tapering gradually to a slender, curved point ; vesica armed with 
two or three long straight cornuti and a cluster of short, stout, curved 
ones about middle. Vinculum rounded with well developed dorsoan- 
terior process. Transtilla a broad, sclerotized, curved band; lateral 
lobes indicated chiefly by hairs and constituting the lateral extremities 
of the transtilla proper. Socii long digitate hairy lobes. Tegumen 
reduced, truncate. 

Alar expanse, 21-24 mm. 

Type. — In the Canadian National Collection. 

Type locality. — Aweme, Manitoba. 

Paratype.—U. S. N. M. No. 53299. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type and 1 S paratype, both 
from the type locality (6-IX-1928, N. briddle). 

The genitalia of this species are nearest to dracunculi but differ 
from it chiefly by the cornuti and the transtilla. The figures of 
the two will show these differences adequately. I have seen no 
females of atro^trigella. 

The paratype is not marked so contrastingly as the type male and 
is the larger of the two specimens. 

DEPRESSARIA ARTEMISIAE DRACUNCULI Clarke 

Plate 35, FiGxniES 197, 197a ; Plate 48, Figure 2S3 

Depressai-ia dracunculi Clarke, Can. Ent., vol. 65, p. 90, pi. 5, 1933. — 
McDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States 
of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8395, 1939. — Gaede, m Bryk, 
Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 282, 1939. 

Labial palpus creamy white ; second segment suffused and irrorated 
in the brush with fuscous; third segment with subbasal and supra- 



170 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

medial annuli black, these sometimes poorly defined and almost 
wholly replaced by the lighter ground color. Antenna fuscous with 
grayish or white annulations. Head light fawn, the scales tipped 
with sordid white. Thorax light fuscous, the scales tipped with 
gray or white; anteriorly the fuscous is more pronounced. Fore 
wing with costal third fuscous mixed with gray, remainder light to 
dark fawn irrorated with fuscous and gray; toward apex the colors 
merge and are indistinguishable; at base, in anal angle, a small 
blackish-fuscous patch; in cell a series of three blackish-fuscous 
spots, sometimes confluent, forming a single longitudinal dash; cilia 
grayish fuscous with a broad, dark, subbasal band. Legs creamy 
white, strongly overlaid with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen 
silvery grayish above; creamy white beneath suffused with fuscous 
laterally. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, with very few coarse hairs ; cucullus 
rounded, densely clothed with coarse, stiff hairs; before cucullus, 
from costa, a prominent dull-pointed projection; clasper minute; 
emitting a few long hairs ; sacculus broadly folded and without basal 
process. Anellus a moderately small sclerotized plate, constricted 
at middle ; anterior and posterior edges strongly convex. Vinculum 
broad, rounded. Aedeagus long, slightly curved, terminating in a 
long, attenuated point ; vesica armed with a cluster of straight, strong 
cornuti. Transtilla a very broad, sclerotized band with well-devel- 
oped hairy lobes, the whole fused with the posterior portion of the 
anellus. Socii small, narrow, hairy lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately broad. Ostium large, 
round, situated at the extreme anterior edge of the genital plate. A 
narrow area of the ductus bursae, just posterior to the bursa copulatrix, 
moderately sclerotized, unarmed; the remainder of the ductus mem- 
branous; inception of the ductus seminalis about midway between 
the sclerotized part of the ductus bursae and the ostium. Bursa copu- 
latrix large with a very small signum in the anterior half. 

Alar expanse, 12.5-19 mm. 

Tyfe.—\n the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Snake River, Wliitman County, opposite Clarkston, 
Wash. 

Food plant. — Artemisia dracunculoides Pursh. 

DistHl)Ution.—^OYi\mQsiQvr]. United States and southwestern 
Canada. 

United States records 
Washington: Almota, Whitman County, 12 $ $ , 12 9 ? (5-23-IV-34) ; Snake 
River, Whitman County, opposite Clarkston, 5 $ $, 1 9 9 (February to 
May dates, 1931-32 ; the February and March dates are for specimens reared 
in a greenhouse) ; Truax, Whitman County, 7 5 5 , 10 9 9 (4-12-V-35) . (All 
these specimens were reared from larvae collected by the writer.) 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 171 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Vernon (2 $ 5, 6-VI-1926; 2 , 12-VII-1927, E. P. Venables). 

DEPRESSARIA PALOUSELLA, new species 

Plate 48, Figure 284 

A distinct, medium-sized moth resembling yakimae but smoother in 
appearance. 

Labial palpus with second segment shining white with much black 
scaling exteriorly ; the white scales show a faint pinkish iridescence ; 
third segment white with black basal and subapical annulations. An- 
tenna with basal segment blackish fuscous with a few whitish scales 
mixed; remainder grayish with blackish-fuscous annulations. Head 
light fuscous, the scales white tipped. Thorax, base of tegula, and 
base of fore wing black. The posterior two-thirds of tegula, the costa 
to middle of fore wing and the major portion of the thorax strongly 
marked with cinereous. Ground color of fore wing a light brownish 
fuscous, darker basally and faintly irrorated with cinereous; in the 
cell a strongly marked, longitudinal black dash edged anteriorly with 
cinereous; veins, especially 9, 10, and 11 strongly marked with black 
and around termen a series of indistinct, blackish spots at ends of veins ; 
cilia light brownish fuscous. Hind wing light grayish-fuscous but 
darker at extreme apex and around termen ; cilia light brownish fus- 
cous, darker basally. Legs blackish fuscous irrorated with white. 
Abdomen grayish fuscous above, blackish fuscous with much white 
scaling below. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized, not 
appreciably produced ventrally around ostium. Ostium oval, trans- 
verse. Posterior fourth of ductus bursae broadly expanded with the 
major portion of this section strongly sclerotized and armed with 
small teeth ; the remainder of the ductus is membranous. Inception 
of ductus seminalis on the posterior margin of the sclerotized part 
of the ductus bursae. Bursa copulatrix moderately large with a small 
but well-defined signum. 

Alar expanse, 19-20 mm. 

Type and paratypes. — U.S.N.M. No. 52074. 

Type locality. — Pullman, Wash. 

Remark.^. — Described from the $ type (26-VI-30) and 1 9 para- 
type (20-IX-30), both collected by the author. 

DEPRESSARIA CINEREOCOSTELLA Clemens 

Plate 38, Figures 205, 205a ; Plate 48, Figure 281 

Depressaria cinereocostella Cij:mens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 
422, 1864.— Robinson, Ann. Lye. Nat. Hi.st. New York, vol. 9, p. 155, pi. 1, 
fig. 6, 1869. — Clemens, in Stainton, Tineina of North America, p. 245, 1872. — 



172 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Chambers, Can. Eut., vol. 4, p. 91, 1872; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. 
Bull. 4, p. 138, 1878.— Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 255, 1889.— Riley, in 
Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5258, 1891.— Busck, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 749, 1902; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. 
Bull. 52, No. 5891, 1903 ; Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 217, 1903.— 
Kh:abfott, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6434, 
1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908.— Babnes and Mc- 
DuNNouGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6482, 
1917. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 172, 1922. — 
Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 242, 1923.— McDun- 
NOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of 
America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8408, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, 
Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 278, 1939. 
Depressaria clatisella Waxker, List of the lepidopterous insects in the collec- 
tions of the British Museum, vol. 29, p. 564, 1864. — Walsingham, Proc. Zool. 
Soc. London, 1881, p. 312. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 
8408, 1939 (cited as synonym of cinereocostella Clemens). 

Labial palpus pale cinereous; second segment with submedial and 
subterminal spots exteriorly blackish fuscous and with the brush 
suffused with reddish; third segment with a dull blackish-fuscous 
supramedial annulus. Antenna cinereous, narrowly annulated with 
fuscous basally and suffused with reddish; beyond middle strongly 
suffused with fuscous ; extreme tip cinereous. Face, head, thorax, and 
ground color of fore wing cinereous ; collar fuscous ; head and thorax 
irrorated with fuscous and suffused with red, the thorax and tegula 
especiall}'- so anteriorly. Fore wing, except costa, heavily overlaid 
with dull brownish red, so much so that the wing appears red with a 
contrasting light costa, suffused with blackish fuscous in basal half 
and irrorated with black and cinereous scales ; in fold and along veins 
a series of longitudinal black dashes; extreme base of costa and anal 
angle blackish fuscous; from middle of costa, around termen to inner 
margin, a series of poorly defined blackish-fuscous spots; cilia fus- 
cous suffused with red. Hind wing grayish fuscous, lighter basally ; 
cilia pale fuscous, white tipped, with rosy tinge and with dark fuscous 
subbasal and subterminal bands. Legs cinereous with dull blackish 
irrorations and suffusion except at joints. Hind tibia with a dull 
smoky streak exteriorly; outer pair of spurs dull black. Abdomen 
cinereous with fuscous suffusion dorsally and a blackish-fuscous longi- 
tudinal line on each side beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broadest at middle, sparsely clothed with 
fine hairs ; cucullus rounded ; clasper absent ; sacculus broadly folded, 
with long, pointed basal process; the basal process of the sacculus is 
clothed with short, stout spines over its entire length. Anellus rec- 
tangular, narrowed posteriorly; lateral edges concave in anterior 
part. Vinculum bluntly pointed. Aedeagus long, slender, and 
slightly curved ; bluntly pointed ; vesica with three to seven stout 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 173 

cornuti. Transtilla a large rectangular plate, produced anteriorly 
at middle, with well-developed hairy lobes, the latter fused. Socii 
large fleshy, hairy flaps. 

Female genitaUa. — Genital plate broad. Ostium a long transverse 
slit. Posterior two-fifths of ductus bursae sclerotized, straight; a 
small protuberance from the side of the sclerotized portion of the 
ductus bursae; inception of ductus seminalis just before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix small with well developed signum in the anterior 
end. 

Alar expanse, 15-22 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Type locality. — "Virginia." 

Food plants. — Carum carvi L., Sium lineare Michx., and 
Ligusticum scoticum L. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: 2 S S (19-VII-99, A. Busck). 

Iowa: Ames $ (22-VIII-1918; A. W. Lindsey) ; Iowa City, $ (15-IV-1917). 

Missouri: St. Louis, S (2(>-VIII-05, H. McElhose). 

New Hampshire: Hampton, 9 5 5 , 10 $ 9 (February to August dates, 1906- 

1908, S. A. Shaw [reared]). 
Pennsylvania: Philadelphia (no date or collector). 

Canadian records 

Manitoba: Cartwright, S (no date; E. F. Heath). 

Nova Scotia: White Point Beach, Queens County, 13 cJ 5 , H 5 ? (2-ia-VIII- 

1934, J. McDunnough [reared]). 
Ontario: Toronto, ? (2-III-95). 

Remarks. — The number of cornuti on the vesica seems to be of no 
significance in this species. Such differences in the number of cornuti 
are usually specific but in the present case all intergrades may be 
found in any one group of specimens. It is also rather strange that 
cinereocostella should feed on so many species of plants, a habit which 
is unusual for species of this genus. The specimens reared from the 
different food plants exhibit no characters by which any one group 
can be separated from another. 

This species is of some economic importance. Although it has not 
done great damage to crops of caraway, it is potentially dangerous 
because of its unusual habit of feeding on a number of food plants. 

DEPRESSARIA HERACLIANA (Linnaeus) 

Plate 2, Fi;;xjee 11 ; Plate 6, Figuee 48 ; Plate 10, Figures 68, 68a ; 
Plate 17, FiotJKB 102 

Phalaena Tortrix heracUana Linnaeus, Systema naturae, ed. 10, p. 532, No. 
225, 1758; ibid., ed. 12, p. 380, No. 326, 1767.— De Geee, Memoires pour 
servir a I'histoire des insectes, vol. 2, p. 407, No. 5, 1771. 



174 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. eo 

Phalaena Tortrix heracleana Linnaeus, Fauna Suecia, p. 347, No. 1334, 1761. 

Phalaena heraclia7ia (Linnaeus) Mulleb, Natursystem, p. 731, No. 326, 1774. 

Phalaena Jwracleana Retzius, Genera et species insectorum, p. 45, 1783. 

Pyralis heracleana Fabeicius, Systema entomologiae, p. 655, No. 56, 1775; 
Entomologia systematica, vol. 3, pt. 2, p. 286, No. 178, 1794. 

Depressaria heracliana (Linnaeus) Zellek, Isis von Oken, vol. 4, p. 305, 1839; 
Linnaea Ent., vol. 9, p. 312, 1854.— Bethune, Can. Ent., vol. 2, p. 19, 1870.— 
LiNTNER, Can. Ent., vol. 5, p. 82, 1873.— Zeixeb, Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, 
vol. 23, p. 235, 1873.— Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 
138, 1878.— Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 312.— Riley, in 
Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5265, 1891. — Dietz, 
in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 474, 1900. — Rebel, in 
Staudinger and Rebel, Catalog der palaearctischen Lepidopteren, vol. 2, No. 
3280, 1901.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 748, 1902; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5889, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6432, 1903.— Pettit, Michigan Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Bull. 233, p. 189, 1906. — Chittenden, Insects injurious to vegetation, 
p. 187, 1907.— Jarvis, Ontario Ent. Soc. Rept., vol. 37, p. 48, 1907.— Busck, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908.— Bethune, Ontario Agr. Coll. 
Bull., vol. 171, p. 28, 1909. — Fulton, Wright, and Gregg, Pennsylvania Agr. 
Exp. Stat. Bull. 110, p. 29, 1911. — Sanderson, Insect pests of farm, garden, 
and orchard, p. 417, 1912. — Gooderham, Proc. Ent. Soc. Nova Scotia, vol. 1, 
p. 94, 1915.— Brettain and Gooderham, Can. Ent., vol. 48, p. 37, 1916.— 
Du Porte, Ontario Ent. Soc. Rept., vol. 46, p. 50, 1916.— Barnes and Mc- 
DuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6478, 
1917.— Bethune, Ontario Dept. Agr. Bull. 251, p. 24, 1917.— Gibson, Ontario 
Ent. Soc. Rept., vol. 47, p. 16, 1917.— Gossard, Ohio Monthly Bull., vol. 4, 
p. 379, 1919.— Mosher, Journ. Econ. Ent., vol. 12, p. 261, 1919.— Traver, 
Psyche, vol. 26 p. 77, 1919.— Gibson, Can. Dept. Agr. Ent. Circ, vol. 14, p. 13, 
1920. — Leonard, Journ. Econ. Ent., vol. 13, p. 491, 1920.— Hudson, Ontario 
Ent. Soc. Rept., vol. 21, p. 35, 1921. — Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera in- 
sectorum, fasc. 180, p. 171, 1922.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 68, p. 243, 1923.— Ellis, Journ. Agr. Res., vol. 30, p. 789-790, 1925.— 
Caesar, Ontario Dept. Agr. Bull. 325, p. 27, 1927.— Brettain, Nova Scotia 
Dept. Nat. Res. Bull. 12, p. 86-87, 1927.— Drake and Decker, Iowa Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Circ. 103, p. 16, 1927.— Pettit, Michigan State Board Agr. Rept., vol. 66, 
p. 343-344, 1927.— Caesar, Ontario Dept. Agr. Bull. 359, p. 29-30, 1931.— 
DusTAN, Can. Dept. Agr. Ent. Bull., vol. 32, p. 51, 1932.— McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America 
(Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8404, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum 
catalogus, pt. 92, p. 283, 1939. 

Phalaena heraelei Retzius, Genera et species insectorum, p. 45, 1783. 

Pyralis umhellana Fabricius, Entomologica systematica, vol. 3, p. 286, No. 
177, 1794. 

Haemilis pastinacella Duponchel, Histoire naturelle des Lepidopteres de la 
France, vol. 11, p. 153, pi. 291, figs. 4 and 5, 1S38.— Beuand, Ann. Ent. Soc. 
France (ser. 2), 1844, p. 189, pi. 6, fig. A, B, a, b. 

Haemylis heraeleella Zetterstedt, lusecta Lapponica, p. 999, 1840. 

Depressaria ontariella Bethune, Can. Ent., vol. 2, p. 3, 19, 1870. 

Labial palpus wliitish oclireoiis; second segment suffused in the 
brush and irrorated exteriorly with fuscous and brown ; third segment 
with subbasal and supramedial annuli blackish fuscous, the former 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 175 

narrow and poorly defined. Antenna luteous annulated with fuscous ; 
basal segment blackish fuscous above. Face pale, shining grayish 
fuscous. Head, thorax, and fore wing luteous shaded and streaked 
with brown and blackish fuscous; extreme base of costa, anal angle, 
discal spot at the end of the cell, and a series of spots from apex, 
around termen to imier margin, blackish fuscous ; veins rather strongly 
indicated by blackish-fuscous scaling; apical area with whitish irrora- 
tions and an indistinct, narrow, outwardly curved fascia of the same 
color from apical third of costa; cilia grayish-fuscous. Hind wing 
pale yellowish- fuscous, darker apically and with a narrow, fuscous 
terminal line ; cilia paler with a fuscous subbasal band. Legs luteous 
shaded and irrorated with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen luteous 
above, lightly infuscated; beneath, whitish-ochreous with a row of 
blackish-fuscous spots on each side. 

Male genitalia: — Harpe with cucullus and distal half of ventral 
margin clothed with stout hairs; costa excavated before cucullus; 
clasper absent, sacculus moderately broad, strongly sclerotized, and 
with a long slender process from base. Anellus an elongate slightly 
sclerotized plate narrower at distal than at proximal end. Transtilla 
a broad band with well-developed hairy lobes. Aedeagus stout, elon- 
gate, pointed; vesica armed with eight or ten long slender cornuti. 
Vinculum rounded. Gnathos a spined knob. Socii elongate hairy 
lobes, widely separated. Tegumen truncated ; uncus absent. 

Female genitalia. — Lobe of ovipositor somewhat sclerotized basally. 
Genital plate broad, strongly sclerotized. Ostium round; anterior 
edge strongly sclerotized. Ductus bursae membranous, dilated at pos- 
terior three-fourths; inception of ductus seminalis just before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix moderately large with small diamond-shaped signum. 

Alar expanse, 21-29 mm. 

Types.— Lo^fi ''^ 

Type localities. — Europe {heracliana, heracUi, umhellana.^ pastina- 
cella) ', Ontario, Canada (ontariella) . 

Food plants. — Parsnip {Pastinacea sativa Ij.) ; Angelica sp. (boring 
in stem). 

Distribution. — Throughout United States and southern Canada. 

United States records 

Arizona: Walton, Yuma County, 9 (1-6-III-1925, O. C. Poling). 

Illinois: Chicago, S S $ (June, 1900; 12-VII-'02, W. D. Kearfott ; one without 

date, K. Wyatt collector) ; Decatur, 2 $ $ (July 1-7). 
Indiana: Morgan County, $ (lO-VII-1931, B. E. Montgomery; "reared from 

wild par.snip"). 



SI Dr. McDunnough states (in lift.) : "Regarding the type of ontariella Bethune, I have no 
information. It is certainly not in Ottawa and I imagine that most of Bethune's types 
have been destroyed by Dermestes. . . . What remains of his collection has been scattered 
about, but Dr. Ide of the Royal Ontario Museum who went over the specimens stated that 
there were no types amongst them." 



176 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Massachusetts: Cliftondale, 2 $ $ (August 1920, J. D. Caffrey). 
New Jersey: Caldwell, S $ $,5 9 9 (August, W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: Rye, Q $ S , 10 9 9 (2-20-VIII-1939, J. F. G. Clarke) ; $ (no date 

or locality: Wm. Beutenmiiller). 
Oregon: Portland, $ (l-VIII-1914, L. Leland). 
Pennsylvania: Bristol, 8 $ S , 8 9 ? (June to August dates, 1S88, T. Pergande; 

reared from parsnip) ; New Brighton, 3 S $,2 9 9 (5-13-VIII-1907, H. D. 

Merrick) ; Oak Station, Allegheny County, $ (30-VII-lO, Fred MarlofE) ; 

Pittsburgh, $, 9 (10-IV-'06, 13-IV-'06, Henry Engel) ; West Chester, 

2 5 (5, ? (July, 1919, F. M. Trimble; reared from parsnip). 
Rhode Island: Bristol, $ (15-VII-1920, no collector). 
Utah: Logan, 9 ( lO-VIII-1907, E. S. G. Titus; reared from wild parsnip); 

Murray, $ (12-VII-1913, Timberlake) ; Vineyard, 9 (l-IX-1912, Tom 

Spalding). 
Washington: Bellingham, 12 S $, 9 (4-VIII-1930, W. W. Baker; reared from 

parsnip) ; Oroville, $ (18-VII-1933, Judson Murray; reared from parsnip) ; 

Pullman, $ (29-IV-24, J. F. G. Clarke.) 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Fraser Mills, 9 (18-IX-1925, L. E. Marmont) ; Lillooet 
(2-VIII-1931, A. W. A. Phair) ; Summerland (12-IV-1934; 22-24-VII-1935, 
A. N. Gartrell). 
Nova Scotia: Truro (17-VIII-1915, no collector). 
Ontario: London (2S-29-VII-1931, G. S. Walley) ; Ottawa (19-VIII-1903; 

ll-VIII-1908, J. Fletcher); Port Hope (S-IV-1895, no collector). 
Quebec: Meach Luke (29-VII to 6-VIII-1903, C. H. Young). 

Re?narks. — This is the notorious "parsnip webworm," which has 
appeared so frequently in the literature in America and abroad. 

The name has repeatedly been credited to De Geer (1T71) but 
should be attributed to Linnaeus (1758). Sherborn (Index Ani- 
malium, 1902) credits the name to Linnaeus, but others have failed to 
acknowledge this authorship. 

The species is undoubtedly more widespread in America than is 
indicated by the distribution given; but I have included in the dis- 
tribution only the localities from which I have seen specimens. At 
New Castle, Del., however, I have seen abundant evidence of the work 
of this species. 

I have been unable to locate any of the types, although some may 
be in existence. 

DEPRESSARIA JULIELLA Busck 

Plate 38, Figures 203, 203a; Plate 47, Figxjee 280 

Depressaria juUclla BuscK, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 9, pi. 91, 1908; 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908.— Baenes and McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6475, 1917. — Metrick, 
in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 171, 1922.— Clarke, Can. 
Ent., vol. 66, p. 178, 1934.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8399, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 286, 
1939. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 177 

Labial palpus ochreous; second segment with a dark reddish-fus- 
cous spot near base externally and with the brush suffused with red 
and irrorated with reddish fuscous; third segment suffused with red 
anteriorly and with poorly defined reddish-fuscous subbasal and 
supramedial annuli. Antenna light reddish fuscous, narrowly and 
faintly annulated with fuscous; basal segment ochreous beneath. 
Face shining whitish ochreous. Head, thorax, and fore wing light 
ochreous suffused and mottled with red. Below antenna, in front, 
a vertical reddish-fuscous patch ; from base of costa, following fold, 
a reddish-fuscous streak to about basal fourth ; in anal angle a small 
reddish-fuscous patch; both of these dark markings mixed with black 
scales. Along costa and inner margin and in apical third numerous 
white scales; all the veins are more or less indicated by reddish fus- 
cous and black mixed ; discal spot at end of cell faintly indicated by 
a few red scales; cilia fuscous, strongly suffused with red and with 
a blackish-fuscous subbasal band. Hind wing fuscous, lighter 
basally; cilia red with a fuscous subbasal band. Legs ochreous suf- 
fused with red and mottled with reddish fuscous. Abdomen ochre- 
ous suffused with fuscous dorsally and with a blackish-fuscous line 
on each side ventrally. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe gradually tapering to the rounded cucullus ; 
clasper absent, sacculus broadly folded, with a large, elongate, trun- 
cated process from its base ; this elongate process is more or less armed 
with spines over most of its length; at the distal end the spines are 
numerous. Anellus a sclerotized plate ; broad anteriorly, narrow pos- 
teriorly; anterior edge with a shallow median cleft; posterior edge 
convex. Vinculum produced anteriorly. Aedeagus long, nearly 
straight, dilated at proximal end ; vesica armed with 7-10 stout cornuti. 
Transtilla membranous, with small hairy lobes. Socii long, narrow, 
hairy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized. 
Ostium transverse, elliptical, situated at anterior margin of the genital 
plate. Ductus bursae sclerotized, slightly curved and dilated in pos- 
terior half, without protuberance; membranous in anterior half; in- 
ception of ductus seminalis just anterior to ostium. Bursa copulatrix 
large with a small, but well developed signum near anterior end. 

Alar expanse, 21-25 mm. 

Type. — In United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Pecos, N. Mex. 

Food plant. — Cicuta occidentalis Greene. 

Distribution. — ^^Vestern United States. 



178 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

United States records 

Colorado: Alamosa, $ (Oslar). 

New Mexico: Pecos, $ (September, T. D. A. Cockerell). 

Utah: Prove, 5 S $, S $ 9 (August and September dates) ; Vineyard, IQ $ S , 

17 9 9 (September and October dates, Tom Spalding). 
Washington: Pullman, 56 $ $ , 52 9 9 (reared, July, August dates, 1933-1935, 

J. F. G. Clarke). 

Remxirhs. — I have already given ^^ a summary of the habits and have 
briefly described the larva of this species but it seems appropriate to 
give a brief description of the pupa at this time. 

Pupa. — First day : Wing, antennal and leg sheaths, also dorsal part 
of head and thorax light lemon yellow. Abdominal segments light 
whitish ochreous except the last caudal segment which is strongly 
tinged with reddish brown. The last five segments are free and 
movable. 

Second day: Ptipa light reddish brown; last segment somewhat 
darker. From the second day on the color becomes progressively 
darker. The wing sheaths become very dark brown first. The ab- 
dominal segments gradually become darker until at the time of emer- 
gence the entire pupa is nearly black. 

Busck's remark ^^ concerning the close relationship of julAella to the 
European nervosa is borne out by a study of both the male and female 
genitalia. The differences in genitalia (although admittedly slight) 
and the difference in food plant will serve to distinguish the two. The 
coloration of juliella^ as indicated by a reared and a collected series of 
over 150 specimens, is usually brighter and lighter than that of nervosa. 

DEPRESSARIA ELEANORAE, new species 

Plate 38, Figukes 204, 204a ; Plate 47, Figure 279 

Similar to D. juUella Busck but smaller. 

Antenna reddish ochreous above, lighter beneath and toward tip; 
narrowly annulated with reddish fuscous. Second segment of labial 
palpus whitish ochreous strongly suffused with red and reddish fus- 
cous exteriorly; third segment whitish ochreous with broad reddish- 
fuscous basal and subapical fasciae. Head light reddish ochreous; 
face light yellowish ochreous. Thorax, tegula, and fore wing ochreous 
strongly overlaid with red, reddish fuscous, and white scales; at base 
of wing a black spot on costa and a similar one on dorsum ; narrowly 
but strongly tinged with bright red; in middle of cell an indistinct 
longitudinal streak of reddish fuscous and white scales mixed; cilia 
light reddish fuscous. Hind wing light fuscous, lighter basally with 
a distinct reddish hue ; cilia light reddish fuscous with a fuscous sub- 
s'" Clarke, J. F. G., Can. Ent. vol. 66, p. 178, 1934, 
«3 Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 9, p. 91, 1908. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 179 

basal band. Legs: Femora whitish ochreous; fore and mid femora 
strongly marked with reddish fuscous exteriorly; tibiae and tarsi of 
fore and mid legs reddish fuscous with whitish ochreous inwardly. 
Hind tibia whitish ochreous strongly tinged with pink ; tarsi strongly 
marked with fuscous. Abdomen whitish ochreous; basal segments 
suffused with light fuscous; underside with well-defined lateral row 
of fuscous spots on each side. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe sparsely clothed with fine hairs; clasper 
absent; cucullus rounded; sacculus broadly folded and with a long, 
distally dilated, curved basal process; the latter armed with spines 
only at distal end. Anellus a broad, sclerotized plate abruptly nar- 
rowed in posterior half ; posterior edge strongly convex ; anterior mar- 
gin indented. Vinculum with a strongly produced, acutely pointed 
anterior process. Aedeagus long, slender, nearly straight ; vesica with 
12 or more stout cornuti. Transtilla membranous with weakly de- 
veloped, haiiy lobes. Socii long, slender, hairy flaps. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized; 
ostium transverse, slitlike; anterior edge of ostimn slightly convex. 
Posterior two-thirds of ductus bursae strongly sclerotized. Bursa 
copulatrix large ; signum small and situated at the anterior end. 

Alar expanse, 18-20 mm. 

ry/?6'.— U.S.N.M. No. 52082. 

Type locality. — Hymers, Ontario (August 16-23). 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type, 1 $ and 6 $ paratypes as 
follows: Ottawa, Ontario ?> $ $ (28-VIII-1906 ; 5-IX-1908, James 
Fletcher; 19-III-1933, C. H. Young) ; 5 (20-V-1925, C. H. Curran) ; 
Trenton, Ontario, $ (9-IX-lO, Evans). The other two paratype 
$ $ are without locality labels ; one with "In office, 21-X-1903" and the 
other "23-X-04 J. F." (James Fletcher?). Paratypes in U. S. Na- 
tional and Canadian National collections. I am indebted to Dr. J. 
McDunnough for seven of the eight specimens of the type series. 

This species is the eastern analogue of the western juliella but is 
immediately distinguished from juliella by its smaller size. The 
genitalia of the two are similar but differ as follows : In the male of 
juliella the vinculum is bluntly pointed, in eleanorae sharply pointed ; 
the basal process from the sacculus of juliella is spiny over practically 
its entire length while that of eleanorae has spines only on the distal 
half; on the vesica of jidiella there is one comutus which is noticeably 
much larger than the rest, but in eleanorae the differences in the 
lengths of the cornuti are not so striking. The ductus bursae of the 
female genitalia of eleanorae exhibits a sclerotized portion of much 
greater length than that found in juliella. 

I take pleasure in naming this species for Mrs. Eleanor A. Carlin, 
staff artist for the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. 



180 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

DEPRESSARIA ALIENELLA Busck 

Plate 35, Figubks 195, 195a ; Plate 48, Figuee 282 

Depressaria alienella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 765, 1904. — Ander- 
son, Catalogue of British Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1094, 1904. — Busck, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6473, 1917. — Meykick, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 171, 1922. — McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part. 2, 
Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8393, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum cata- 
logus, pt. 92, p. 273, 1939. 

Depressaria emcritella Walsingham (not Stainton), Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 
1881, p. 381. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
5261, 1891.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 746, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. 
Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5884, 1903. 

Depressaria emeriteUa alienella (Busck) Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., 
Memoir 68, p. 243, 1923. 

Labial palpus white ; second segment irrorated exteriorly, and suf- 
fused in the brush, with reddish fuscous and with a distinct blackish- 
fuscous spot near base exteriorly ; third segment with a broad blackish- 
fuscous supramedial annulus. Head and thorax white ; thorax sparsely 
irrorated with reddish fuscous anteriorly ; tegula dark reddish fuscous. 
Fore wing light fuscous strongly overlaid with red or reddish fuscous, 
irrorated with cinereous and fuscous and streaked with blackish 
fuscous; at the end of cell a white discal spot preceded and followed 
with fuscous; around termen a poorly defined row of fuscous spots. 
Legs white, suffused and irrorated with blackish fuscous except at 
joints. Abdomen pale fuscous above, ochreous-white beneath, irro- 
rated with fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately clothed with long fine hairs, 
clasper long, pointed, not projecting beyond ventral edge of harpe, 
armed with numerous fine spines; sacculus narrowly folded, without 
basal process ; cucullus bluntly pointed. Anellus broadly oval ; lateral 
edge not strongly produced. Vinculum bluntly pointed. Transtilla 
a broad sclerotized band with hairy lobes moderately well developed. 
Aedeagus long, slender, gently curved. Tegmnen truncated; socii 
small, hairy lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium slitlike transverse, with shallow median 
cleft on anterior edge ; situated near the anterior edge of the genital 
plate. Duetus bursae membranous, straight; inception of the ductus 
seminalis well before ostium and anterior to the sclerotized portion 
of the ductus bursae. Bursa copulatrix large with well-developed 
toothed sig-num. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 181 

Alar expanse, 18-21 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 
Type locality — Kaslo, British Columbia, Canada. 
Food plant. — Artemisia sp., yarrow. 

Distribution. — Northeastern and Western United States and Canada 
from the Atlantic to Pacific. 

United States records 

California: Shasta Retreat, Siskiyou County, 2 S $, S 9 9 (July 1-7). 

Maine: Bar Harbor, 4 $ $ (24-VIII-35; 26-IX-36, A. E. Brewer). 

Massachusetts: Worcester, $ (2-VIII-1902). 

New York: Ilion, 5,299 (2-3-IX-ll, H. McElhose). 

Oregon: Rogue River, Josephine County (VI-1872, Walsingham). 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Nordegg, S $ S (16-18-IX-1921, K. Bowman), 

British Columbia: Kaslo. 

Manitoba: $ (lO-VIII-1905, L. E. Marmont) ; Rounthwaite, 9 (lO-VIII-06, 

L. E. Marmont). 
New Brunswick: Fredericton, $ (22-VII-35, A. E. Brower). 
Nova Scotia: Round Hill, $ (28-VII-1935, F. C. Gilliatt). 
Ontario: Ottawa, 3 S $ (30-VII-07, ll-VIII-1905, C. H. Young; 17-VII-1933 

[reared from Yarrow] C. H. Young) ; Trenton, S $ $ (9-IX-ll, 5-IX-04, 

5-IX-12, Evans). 
Quebec: Meach Lake, 9 (16-VII-1902, C. H. Young). 

Eemarhs. — The specimens I have placed under this name show con- 
siderable variation in coloration, but all have one character in com- 
mon, white head and thorax. The variation in the color of the fore 
wings is of no value in distinguishing this species, and, further, the 
color forms cannot be separated on genitalia. 

The only North American species with which alienella might be 
confused is art&misiella., to which it is very closely related, but the two 
may be easily distinguished on characters of the anellus, and artemi- 
siella lacks the white head and thorax so characteristic of alienella. 

The European eirueriteTla has the thorax white as in alienella., but the 
two are easily distinguished by their genitalia. 

DEPRESSARIA ARTEMISIELLA McDunnongh 

Plate 35, Figukes 196, 196a ; Plate 47, Figuee 278 

Depressaria arfanisiella McDunnough, Can. Ent., vol. 59, p. 271, 1927 ; Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Mi- 
crolepidoptera), No. 8402, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, 
pt. 92, p. 273, 1939. 



182 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Labial palpus ochreous ; base of second segment deep brown and the 
brush suffused and profusely irrorated with brown; third segment 
with i)oorly defined brown subbasal annulus. Head ochreous mixed 
with brown; anterior margin of front deep brown. Thorax deep 
purplish brown mixed with ochreous. Ground color of fore wing 
light wood brown, shaded with deep brown on costal half at base and 
streaked with white and black; subcostal vein black irrorated with 
white on outer half; veins 5 to 9 indicated by black scaling; at apical 
third a transverse, outwardly curved, crescentic, whitish fascia; at 
basal third, in cell, an indistinct black discal spot followed by a white 
streak, the latter confluent with the poorly defined white outer discal 
spot at the end of cell ; vein 2 largely white with brown shading above 
and below ; veins 3 and 4 liberally sprinkled with white, 5 sparsely so ; 
from apical third of costa, around termen to middle of inner margin, 
a series of poorly defined blackish spots ; cilia concolorous with slight 
pink tinge. Hind wing and cilia pale smoky; wing darker apically 
with blackish terminal line. Legs ochreous suffused and irrorated 
with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen ochreous. 

Male genitalia. — Similar to alienella except that the lateral edges of 
the anellus of artemisiella are strongly produced (see key and fig. 196). 
The clasper of artemisiella appears to be armed with fewer and coarser 
spines than that of alienella., but I have not seen sufficient material to 
determine whether this character is constant. 

Female genitalia. — Similar to alienella except that the anterior 
edge of ostial opening is convex in artemisiella but slightly cleft in 
alienella. 

Alar expanse, 22 mm. 

Type. — In the Canadian National Museum. 

Type locality. — Seton Lake, Lillooet, British Columbia, Canada. 

Food plant. — Arteinisia. 

Distrihution. — Known only from the type locality. 

Remarks. — In addition to the differences in genitalia the thorax 
in artemisiella is not white as it is in alienella and the fore wing lacks 
the red coloration of the latter species. 

DEPRESSARIA WHITMANI, new species 

Plate 36, Figures 200, 200a ; Pl.\te 48, Figure 2S6 

A medium-sized dark species similar to leptotaeniae. 

Labial palpus with tuft of second segment blackish fuscous below 
and outwardly; inwardly and above this segment is olive-buff; ter- 
minal segment blackish fuscous; apex olive-buff. Antenna blackish 
fuscous narrowly annulated with grayish fuscous; basal segment 
shining black above, olive-buff below. Head light fuscous, scales 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 183 

gray tipped. Thorax and tegula blackish fuscous anteriorly, drab 
posteriorly. Fore wing blackish fuscous irrorated with drab and 
olive-buff scales; wing, at exti-eme base in angle, three short dashes 
at basal third, the bases of veins 9, 10, and 11, and a series of small 
spots at the ends of all veins around termen, black; at end of cell a 
well-defined olive-buff spot preceded by a few black scales ; at apical 
third a poorly defined, narrow, outwardly curved olive-buff fascia; 
extreme edge of costa f aintlj^ pink ; cilia grayish fuscous. Hind wing 
light fuscous, darker apically; cilia very light shining fuscous with 
a darker subbasal line. Legs fuscous strongly overlaid with olive- 
buff ; tarsi annulated with olive-buff. Abdomen fuscous, the posterior 
edges of the segments dorsally grayish ; under surface heavily over- 
laid with olive-buff. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, sparsely clothed with hairs; clasper 
stout, abruptly excurved just below middle; at base of clasper a 
series of four or five short, stout bristles; sacculus narrowly folded 
but strongly sclerotized; from base of sacculus an elongate, gently 
excurved process armed with fine, slender spines. Anellus a broad 
sclerotized plate broader than long; posterior edge narrowly pro- 
duced to middle and deeply cleft. Aedeagus longer than harpe, 
slender, evenly curved ; at base a broad, flat dorsal winglike expan- 
sion; opposite this a broad concave plate by which the aedeagus 
articulates with the anellus. Vinculum rounded with prominent 
ventroposterior ridge. Transtilla membranous with large, hairy, 
broad lateral lobes. Gnathos a spined, oval knob. Socii minute, 
mainly indicated by a few hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow, of nearly equal width 
throughout; ventroanterior edge produced into a narrow flap. 
Ostium small, somewhat triangular. Ductus bursae membranous ex- 
cept for a small, strongly sclerotized, curved section from middle to 
posterior three-fourths ; entire posterior half rigid and slightly curved ; 
inception of ductus seminalis just before ostium. Bursa copulatrix 
large; signum a large, sclerotized, toothed plate with prominent 
anterior and posterior points. 

Alar expanse, 18-22 mm. 

7V/^c.— U.S.N.M. No. 52083. 

Type locality. — Snake River, Whitman County, Wash., opposite 
Clarkston. 

Food plant. — Lotnatium macrocarpum (Hook, and Am.) Coult. 
and Rose. 

Remarks. — Described from the $ type, 2 $ and 1 $ paratypes 
all from the same locality. These specimens were reared from larvae 
which I collected. The moths issued 26-27-V-1935. 



184 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

The species appears to be closest to leptotaenkie in coloration but 
nearest angustati on characters of the genitalia. In coloration it is 
inseparable from leptotaemae but may easily be separated from 
angustati by the presence of the pink cast of the costa which angustati 
lacks. D. lohitinani can be separated from leptotaeniae by its long 
slender aedeagus ; from angustati by the more evenly curved aedeagus, 
the more strongly excurved spine cluster from the base of the sacculus, 
the series of four or five short bristles as the base of the clasper, and 
the deeply incised posterior margin of the anellus. The females are 
at once distinguishable by their genitalia. D. leptotaeniae lacks the 
curved, sclerotized posterior portion of the ductus bursae; angu^stati 
lacks the produced ventroanterior flap of the genital plate and the 
pronounced anterior and posterior points of the signum ; the sclerotized 
portion of the ductus bursae is longer in angustati than in whitmani. 

DEPRESSARIA LEPTOTAENIAE Clarke 

PL.VTE 37, Figures 202, 202a ; Plate 48, Figure 289 

Depressaria leptotaeniae CLmArke, Can. Ent., vol. 65, p. 87, pi. 4, 1933. — McDun- 
NOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of 
America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8396, 1939.— Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidop- 
terorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 286, 1939. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather short, broad, sparsely clothed with 
hairs; clasper stout, long, curved toward the cucullus ; cucullus pointed ; 
sacculus narrowly curved, with a prominent transverse, spinous basal 
process, the spines numerous, rather small. Anellus a long sclerotized 
plate ; posterior and anterior edges deeply concave ; lateral edges con- 
vex. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus stout, pointed, curved. Trans- 
tilla a moderately broad sclerotized band with well-developed hairy 
lobes. Socii small, hairy. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow with narrow, strongly scle- 
rotized ventral sclerites, the latter narrower than the sclerotized part 
of ductus bursae. Ostium triangular. Posterior portion of ductus 
bursae broad, slightly curved, sclerotized ; inception of ductus seminalis 
just anterior to ostium. Bursa copulatrix large with a well-developed 
signum near posterior end. 

Alar expanse, 17-23 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Pullman, Wash. 

Food plants. — Leptotaenia rrmlti-flda Nutt. and L. salmom-flora 
Coult. and Kose. 

Distribution. — Northwestern United States and Canada in the inter- 
mountain area. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 185 

United States records 

Idaho: Viola, Moscow Mouutains (=Thatuna Hills), altitude 3,000 feet, 11 S $ , 
7 $ 9 (10-1&-VI-35). 

Utah: Eureka, S, 5 (13-VII-1911, 2S-VI-1911, Tom Spalding). 

Washington: Almota, Whitman County, altitude, 2,000 feet, $ (ll-VI-35) ; 
Cashmere (Hay Canyon), 2 $ S,7 5 $ (24-V to 7-VI-35, I. W. Bales) ; Dry 
Falls, Grant County, 2 $$, 9 (14-V-35) ; Eatiat, $ (9-V-1034, A. N. 
Gartrell) ; Grand Coulee City, 17 $ S , 10 9 ? ( 20-22-1 V-34; 12-21-V-35) ; 
Kamiack Butte, Whitman County, altitude 3000 ft., 6G $ $ , G3 9 9 (5-13- 
V-34; 27-V to 1&-VI-35) ; Park Lake, Grant County, 15 5 5 , 12 9 9 
(9^21-V-35) ; Pullman, altitude 2,500 feet, 5 5 5,899 (30-V to 1&-VI-32). 
(Unless otherwise stated all were reared from larvae collected by the writer.) 
Canadian records 

Alberta: Waterton Lakes, 5 (18-VII-1923, J. McDunnough [rf. yellow flowered 
umbel] ) . 

Remarhs. — In this large series are two specimens (approximately 
1 o/o) with short broad wings which otherwise are quite normal and 
apparently functional. These two are not crippled in any sense, and 
were reared under the same conditions as were the rest, which suggests 
that this short-winged form may be the result of a Mendelian factor 
such as has been demonstrated in experiments with DrosophUa. 

I mention these short- winged forms merely to show that if they were 
collected in nature they would undoubtedly be described as a distinct 
species (distinct from that to which they actually belong). 

Since this species was described I have been able to rear a series of 
over 200 moths from various localities in the states of Idaho and 
Washington. The Utah specimens are somewhat smaller than those 
from Idaho and Washington and show slight variations in the gen- 
italia but unquestionably belong here. 

DEPRESSARIA YAKIMAE, new species 

Plate 37 Figxjbes 201, 201a ; Plate 48, FictrEB 285 

A very distinct, medium-sized, grayish species close to leptotaeniae. 

Labial palpus with second segment white strongly irrorated with 
blackish fuscous; third segment blackish fuscous sparsely irrorated 
with white; apex white. Antenna with basal segment blackish 
fuscous with a whitish-ochreous patch beneath at apex; remainder 
of antenna brown above, whitish ochreous beneath, narrowly an- 
nulated with blackish fuscous. Head light brownish fuscous, the 
tips of the scales whitish. Thorax and ground color of fore 
wing brownish ochreous mixed with white scales. Bases of tegula 
and fore wing blackish fuscous; costa of fore wing fuscous mixed 
with white; an indistinct longitudinal dash, and streaks following 



186 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

the veins, black; at apical third an indistinct outwardly curved, 
broken, white fascia formed by short series of white scales following 
the veins; around termen a series of seven indistinct black spots; 
cilia light smoky. Hind wing fuscous, lighter basally; cilia light 
brownish ochreous with a distinct fuscous subbasal line. Legs 
blackish fuscous outwardly, mixed with whitish ochreous inwardly ; 
annulations of tarsi whitish ochreous. Abdomen gi-ayish above, 
whitish ochreous beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, sparsely clothed with hairs ; cucullus 
broadly rounded; clasper stout, sharply and outwardly angled; 
distal end with small scobinations ; sacculus narrowly folded, with 
spinous process from base curved toward cucullus; elements of 
spinous basal process long, stout, rather few in number. Anellus 
longer than broad; anterior margin deeply cleft; lateral edge con- 
vex, undulating; posterior margin concave. Aedeagus stout, gently 
curved, sharply pointed; base with large, winglike dorsal expansion 
and spoon-shaped ventral process by which the aedeagus articulates 
with the anellus. Vinculum rounded. Transtilla broad, narrowly 
hood-shaped; lobes of transtilla mainly indicated by hairs. Socii 
small, hairy. 

Female genitalia.. — Ostium large, oval ; genital plate broad, strongly 
sclerotized, somewhat evaginated ventrally around ostium ; anteriorly 
the ventral sclerites are produced to form two conspicuous, shallow, 
sclerotized pockets equal in length to the sclerotized part of the duc- 
tus bursae ; ductus bursae strongly sclerotized in posterior third, the 
remainder membranous; inception of ductus seminalis just before 
ostium; bursa copulatrix large, with a conspicuous, strongly sclero- 
tized, toothed signum in posterior part. 

Alar expanse, 20-22 mm. 

ry;?^.— U.S.N.M. No. 52073. 

Type locality.— Ya]nmn, Yakima County, Wash. (18-V-31, Fred 
P. Dean, collector). 

Food plant. — ^Unknown. 

Remarks. — ^Described from the 9 type, 3 $ and 3 9 paratypes as 
follows: Walla Walla, Wash., ^ $ $ and 3 9 9 (Clarke, No. 4731- 
4736; [8-14-VI-1931, D. H. Brannon]). 

This very distinct species cannot be confused with any other de- 
scribed from North America. A few species {leptotaeniae, mulfi- 
fldae, and angustati) show a slight tendency toward the formation 
of the shallow anterior pockets of the genital plate but none has 
them so well developed as yahimae. 

I suspect that the larva will be found on some species of Lomatiwm 
or a closely allied plant. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 187 

DEPRESSARIA MULTIFIDAE Clarke 

Plate 3G, Figures 1D9, 199a; Plate 48, Figure 288 

Dcpressaria multifidae Clarke, Can. Eiit., vol. 05. p. 85. pi. 4, 1933; vol. 66, 
p. 179, 1934. — McDuNNouGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and 
the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidopteva), No. 8394, 1939.— 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 288, 1939. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, sparsely covered with fine hairs; 
cucullus pointed; clasper slender, fingerlike, curved toward cucullus; 
sacculus narrowly folded with a prominent basal process armed with 
long stout spines. Anellus a sclerotized plate longer than wide, with 
sides convex; posterior and anterior margins concave. Vinculum 
rounded. Aedeagus longer than harpe, slender, pointed; sharply 
curved at distal third, less strongly so at basal third ; base of aedeagus 
with a small bulbous process dorsally and a long, broad, shovel-shaped 
process ventrally. Transtilla a broad, lightly sclerotized band with 
moderately developed hairy lobes. Socii very small, mainly indicated 
by hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow with a pair of shallow, 
cupped sclerites anteriorly. Ostium a longitudinal slit, wider at 
anterior end. Ductus bursae with a sharply curved sclerotized portion 
near its middle; inception of ductus seminalis just before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix large with a well-developed signum near posterior 
end. 

Alar expanse, 17-21 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Snake River, Whitman County, opposite Clarkston, 
Wash. 

Food plant. — Lomatium grayi Coult. and Rose. 

DistrihiUion. — Northwestern United States. 

United States records 

Idaho: Lapwai, Nez Perce County, 23 ^ 5 , 20 ? 5 ( 21-26-V-35 ) . 

Washington: Penawavv'a, Whitman County, 6 $ $, 4 9 9 (3-12-V-35) ; Snake 
River, Whitman County, opposite Clarkston, 6 5 (J , 10 9 2 (May dates 
1932-34) ; Truax, Whitman County, 5,299 (4-9-V-35) ; Godman Springs, 
Blue Mountains, Columbia County, altitude 5.700 feet, 2 SS, 4 9 9 
(23-31-VII-35). 

(All the above specimens were reared from larvae collected by the writer.) 
Remarks. — Although the male and fem.ale genitalia were character- 
ized in the original description, it seems advisable to make necessary 
corrections at this time. They have been correctly redescribed above. 
The name of this insect is unfortunate and resulted from a mis- 
identification of the host. The plant, upon which the larva feeds, 
grows to a very large size on the sandy or gravelly bars of the Snake 



188 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

River. Because of the large size of these individual plants they have, 
for many years, been considered conspecific with the true Leptotaenia 
multifida of the high plateau of the Palouse region around Pullman, 
Wash. 

Suspecting some error in my rearing records of this and allied 
species, or in the identification of the hosts, I supplied larvae feeding 
on true Leptotaenia with food from the Snake River locality. They 
refused this substitute food. Wlien this evidence was obtained further 
investigations were carried out which proved, beyond doubt, that the 
food plant is Lomatium grayi. 

A long series of moths has been reared from larvae collected in 
several localities. These moths show some variation in structure and 
habits, but not enough, I think, to warrant separation. Superficially 
the moths cannot be distinguished, nor can the larvae or pupae. 

The differences in habits are directly the result of the variations 
in the host plants themselves. As already pointed out, the plants 
growing in the sandy or gravelly bars of the river are unusually large, 
while those growing on the dry banks a few yards away are scarcely 
recognizable as the same species. This plant grows also in the Blue 
Mountains of Washington and Oregon up to altitudes of slightly over 
6,000 feet. As might be expected it varies greatly in its different 
habitats there, from a small, sessile plant to one almost reaching the 
proportions of the individuals of the Snake River bars. 

The moth, however, apparently does not go above 5,700 feet, 
although it is common at that altitude at Godman Springs, in the 
Blue Mountains. 

The larvae collected at Godman Springs show some colorational 
differences but I think these unimportant specifically; one often finds 
such differences in larvae from one locality. The larvae from God- 
man Springs measured 12-14 mm. in length, 2 to 3 mm. smaller than 
the mature larvae from the Snake River. This difference, I believe, 
is purely the result of the different environments. 

The larval habits of the mountain insects are much the same as 
those of the desert-inhabiting individuals. The former differ, how- 
ever, in producing much more webbing of the parts of the plants 
affected, with pupation frequently taking place in the webbed leaf 
sheaths. I failed to find a pupa (living or dead) in the stalks of the 
mountain plants although I did find a few larvae in the flower stalks. 
All of the larvae found in the stalks were parasitized. Because of 
the small number of larvae and pupae found I suspect that many 
larvae pupate in debris at the base of the plant. A brief description 
of the pupa is as follows : Wing, antennal and leg sheaths bright green 
gradually becoming darker and duller, tinged with brown. Abdomi- 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 189 

nal segments yellow-brown shaded with green. Just preceding 
emergence the wing, antennal and leg sheaths become very dark brown 
while the abdominal segments remain a deep reddish brown. Last 
five segments free. Pupation period 8-10 days. 

DEPRESSARIA ANGUSTATI, new species 

Plate 36, Figures 198, 198a ; Plate 48, Figure 287 

A medium-sized dark species close to multi-fldae and tohitmam. 

Second segment of labial palpus ochreous with much blackish 
scaling intermixed, especially exteriorly; third segment blackish 
fuscous, ochreous tipped. Antenna blackish fuscous, slightly lighter 
beneath, the whole becoming lighter toward the distal end. Head 
ochreous with much fuscous scaling above. Thorax and fore wing 
blackish fuscous with scattered ochreous scales. Tip of tegula and 
posterior portion of thorax ochreous. Discal spot at middle of cell 
black with some ochreous scales mixed; frequently this spot is very 
indistinct; at end of cell a usually conspicuous ochreous spot pre- 
ceded and followed by black scales. From the costa, at the middle, 
to the center of the cell an indistinct broad ochreous fascia ; at two- 
thirds from costa, outwardly to vein 6 then inwardly to inner margin, 
a similarly colored but narrower fascia ; costa sprinkled with ochreous 
scales above and ochreous beneath mixed with fuscous scales; cilia 
light brownish fuscous. Hind wing fuscous, lighter basally; cilia 
light brownish fuscous with a narrow fuscous subbasal line. Legs 
with femora ochreous, strongly (usually) suffused with fuscous; 
tibiae and tarsi ochreous inwardly, fuscous outwardly ; tarsi ochreous 
annulated. Abdomen grayish above with ochreous at posterior 
edges of segments; beneath fuscous except midventrally where it is 
ochreous; anal tuft ochreous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe narrow with the cucullus bluntly rounded ; 
clasper strongly sclerotized, moderately slender and strongly curved 
outwardly in distal half; sacculus moderately broad with a promi- 
nent spinous basal process the elements of which are fine, slender and 
compactly associated, Anellus a very broad, sclerotized plate, broader 
than long; posterior edge not cleft; from each basolateral edge of 
the plate a pointed projection articulating with the sacculus of the 
harpe. Vinculum very broad and only slightly curved on its anterior 
edge. Transtilla scarcely sclerotized but w^ith well-developed, nar- 
row hairy lobes. Aedeagus about as long as harpe, slender, pointed 
and sharply curved at basal and distal ends ; at the base are a small 
bulbous process dorsally and a broad spoon-shaped sclerotized por- 
tion ventrally by which the aedeagus articulates with the anellus. 
Tegumen broad, rather short. Socii small. 



190 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow, more so laterally. Os- 
tium small, elongate. Ductus bursae membranous except an elon- 
gate, curved, sclerotized area on one side about the middle ; inception 
of ductus seminalis just before ostium. Bursa copulatrix large with 
well developed signum. 

Alar expanse, 17-21 mm. 

Type.—\J. S. N. M. No. 52075. 

Type locality'. — Skyline Ridge, Mount Baker District, Wliatcom 
County, Wash., altitude 6,200 feet. 

Food plant. — Lomatium angustatuni (Coult. and Rose) St. Jolin. 

Remarks. — Described from the 5 type, 9 $ and 6 9 paratypes all 
from the type locality. All were collected by the author. Paratypes 
in the United States National, Canadian National, and H. H. Keifer 
collections. 

The larvae, from which the type series was reared, were collected 
on August 17 and 18, 1933. From the larvae collected 25 pupae were 
obtained. From these pupae 16 moths emerged. Pupation began 
on August 21 and ended August 24; emergence of the moths began 
on August 31 and ended September 2. 

The host of this species is a small plant growing on open gravelly 
slopes or on rock outcrops where considerable fracturing of the basic 
rocks has taken place. The basal leaves of the plant are frequently 
closely appressed to the ground and it is in these leaves that the larva 
does most of its feeding. Frequently, however, the more erect leaves 
are involved by the tubes and webs spun by the larva. The silken 
tubes in which the larva lives are constructed among the broken 
rocks and soil and frequently extend several inches down cracks in 
the rock, thus providing an excellent hiding place for the larva when 
not feeding. 

This species is clearly related to multifidae but may readily be 
distinguished from that species by its genitalia. 

DEPRESSARIA TOGATA Walsingham 

Plate 37, Figure 200B 

Depressaria togata Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 254, 18S9. — Riley, in 
Smith, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5282, 1891. — Busck, Proc. 
U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 746, 1902; m Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, 
No. 5885, 1903.— KEARroTT, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6428, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 
1908. — Baenes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6474, 1917. — Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
ISO, p. 172, 1922.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 242, 
1923. — IMcDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the 
United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8397, 1939.— 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 294, 1939. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 191 

"Antenna purplish-fuscous. Palpi cinereous, speckled with fuscous 
externally on the second joint; apical joint entirely suffused with 
fuscous, with the exception of the apex which is ochreous. Head, 
dull grayish-ochreous ; face paler. Thorax, cinereous, speckled with 
fuscous. Fore wings pale grayish-ochreous, thickly suffused and 
streaked with purplish-fuscous, the markings ill-defined, consisting 
of a dark fuscous patch at the base of the dorsal margin, a dash of 
the same color immediately above the middle of the wing at one third 
from base, followed by some pale grayish-ochreous scales; a pale 
grayish-ochreous spot on the middle of the wing at about the end of 
the cell is preceded and followed by fuscous scales, and beyond and 
above it are several fuscous dashes radiating outwards to the costal 
and to the upper half of the apical margin, where is a row of obscure 
fuscous spots preceding the somewhat paler mottled cilia. Hind 
wings, pale shining whitish-gray, with the cilia scarcely darker in 
which a slight tinge of grayish-ochreous is traceable. Abdomen, 
grayish-ochreous." 

Male genitalia. — Essentially like angustati but with the posterior 
margin of the anellus narrower and the lateral edge entire, convex. 
The clasper is outwardly angulate instead of evenly curved. 

Alar expanse, 20 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — "Montana." 

Food plan t. — Unknown. 

Disfrihution. — Known only from the type locality. 

Remarks. — The above color description is taken from the original. 
I have drawn up the brief description of the male genitalia from a 
sketch (see fig. 200B) kindly submitted by Herbert Stringer, of the 
British Museum. 

Mr. Stringer states {in litt.) that ''Hogata is nearest to angustati 
but not that species," or any of the others included in this paper, 
and of which I submitted drawings of the genitalia. 

The figure of the male genitalia is a copy of the sketch sent by 
Mr. Stringer and shows adequately the differences between tog at a 
and the other species. 

In 1902 ^* Busck applied the name togata to specimens from Colo- 
rado and Vermont. The Colorado specimens, which are before me, 
are not this species, as the genitalia indicate, but represent an unde- 
scribed species. I am leaving this series undescribed until more 
and better material comes to hand, because the moths are now faded 
and were none too good when collected. The Vermont specimens 
were probably hetulella; I know of no species in the togata-angustati 
complex east of the Kocky IVIountains. 

3* Busck, A., Proc. IJ. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 746, 1002. 



192 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

In tliis complex the moths are so much alike superficially that it is 
almost impossible to separate the various species except by a comparison 
of genitalia. The species are widespread throughout the far west 
and each appears to be confined to its particular food plant and re- 
stricted geographical area. 

I have not included togata in the keys because of my inadequate 
knowledge of the species and because of the uselessness of trying to 
separate the species of this group entirely on coloration. 

DEPRESSARIA GROTELLA Robinson 

Plate 34, Figtjees 192-192b ; Plate 47, Fiqukes 277, 277a 

Depressaria groiella Robinson, Ann. Lye. Nat. Hist. New York, vol. 9, p. 157, pi. 
1, fig. 10, 1870. — Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 312. — Coquil- 
LETT, Papilio, vol. 3, p. 98, 1883.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat Mus., vol. 24, p. 748, 
1902. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 172, 1922. — 
Forces, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 242, 1923. 

Depressaria groteella Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 138, 
1878. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5264, 
l§9l._BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5890, 1903.— Keaefott, in 
Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6433. 1903.— Busck, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6479, 1917. — Traver, Psyche, 
vol. 26, p. 78, 1919. — Barnes and Btjsck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 4, 
p. 233, 1920. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and 
the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8405, 1939.— 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 283, 1939. 

Depressaria symmocMota Meyrick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 2, p. 223, 1918. — 
Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 242, 1923.— McDunnough, 
Cheek list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America 
(Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8405, 1939 (cited as synonym of groteella 
Chambers). 

Labial palpus pale whitish ochreous; second segment irrorated with 
fuscous exteriorly and suffused with fuscous in the brush ; third seg- 
ment with blackish-fuscous subbasal and supramedial annuli, the 
fonner poorly defined. Head, thorax, and fore wing pale ochreous; 
head infuscated above; collar blackish fuscous; tegula suffused and 
thorax irrorated with fuscous ; fore wing heavily overlaid with brown 
and streaked and irrorated with blackish fuscous, especially along 
veins ; at basal third a whitish discal spot, followed at the end of cell 
by a similarly colored spot; between the two a prominent, longi- 
tudinal, blackish-fuscous streak ; base of wing, in anal angle, blackish 
fuscous rapidly fading to brown; from middle of costa, around ter- 
men to inner margin, a series of blackish-fuscous spots; cilia light 
fuscous with a darker fuscous, median band. Hind wing very pale 
fuscous with considerable white scaling apically and with a narrow 
blackish-fuscous terminal line; cilia pale fuscous, white tipped and 
with a fuscous subbasal band. Legs pale whitish-ochreous overlaid 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 193 

and mottled with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen pale ochreous 
slightly infuscated above and with a fuscous line (sometimes rather 
poorly defined) on each side beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, sparsely clothed with long hairs; 
cucullus pointed; clasper very broad, wider than half the width of 
harpe, terminating in two widely separated points, one of which ex- 
tends beyond ventral edge of harpe ; sacculus short, narrowly folded. 
Anellus a moderately sclerotized plate abruptly constricted posteriorly ; 
posterior edge concave; anterior edge convex, produced laterally; 
sides oblique; anterior end of anellus broader than posterior end. 
Vinculum rounded. Transtilla a diamond-shaped plate with mod- 
erately well-developed, hairy lobes. Aedeagus short, stout, with a 
slight twist ; vesica armed with very fine spinules. Tegiunen and socii 
greatly elongated, fused; socii with few hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized with 
a long roAv of hairs posteriorly; ostiiun a longitudinal slit between 
Eaised edges. Ductus bursae a long membranous spiral; inception 
of ductus seminalis just before the ostiiun. Bursa copulatrix large, 
with a well-developed signum. 

Alar expanse, 20-22 mm. 

Type. — In American Museum of Natural History. 

Type localities. — "New York," "Pennsylvania." 

Food plant. — Corylus americana Wait. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

Maine: Sebec Lake, 2 $ S,2 $ ? (July 16-23). 
New York: (no data). 
Pennsylvania: (no data). 

Canadian records 

Manitoba: Aweme (July 8, 1925, R. Bird [rf. Corylus']). 

Ontario: Bobcaygeon (June 28, 1931, J. McDunnough [rf. Corylus]); Ottawa 

(July 27, 1905, July 21, August IG, 190G, C. H. Young; June 21, 1927, J. 

McDunnough ) . 
Quebec: Aylmer (June 23, 1927, J. McDunnough [rf. Hazelwood]) ; Gracefield (no 

other data) ; Kazubazua (June 30- July 4, 1927, J. McDunnough). 

Remarks. — This and the following species {maculatella) are very 
closely related. In superficial appearance groteUa is much darker 
than maculatella and the males can be easily separated on genitalic 
characters. The female genitalia of grotella have a long row of hairs 
on the posterior edge of the genital plate and the ostium is consider- 
ably shorter than the width of the genital plate; in maculatella the 
row of hairs is reduced to about half a dozen and the ostium is much 
longer. 

286614-^1 11 



194 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

DEPRESSARIA MACULATELLA Busck 

Plate 34, Figuees I91-191b ; Plate 47, Figure 275 

Depressaria maculateUa Bubck, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 9, p. 90, 1908. — 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908.— Baknes and McDtrNNOUQH, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6481, 1917. — Meteick, 
in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 172, 1922. — Forbes, Cornell 
Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 242, 1923.— McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, 
Microlepidoptera), No. 8407, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum cata- 
logus, pt. 92, p. 287, 1939. 

Labial palpus white; second segment irrorated with fuscous and 
black and suffused with fuscous in the brush; third segment with 
subbasal annulus and apex blackish fuscous. Antenna brown, broadly 
annulated with dull ochreous-white ; basal segment ochreous-white 
beneath. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing ochreous- 
white suffused with brown and irrorated and streaked with blackish 
fuscous, with much ochreous scaling; at extreme base, from costa to 
inner angle a transverse blackish fuscous line interrupted at middle 
by the white ground color; at basal third a poorly defined white 
discal spot preceded by some blackish fuscous scales; at the end of 
cell a similar spot; between the two a conspicuous longitudinal, black- 
ish-fuscous streak; veins 9 and 10 strongly marked with blackish 
fuscous ; the bases of the other veins less conspicuously so ; on costa, 
about middle, a blackish-fuscous spot; from apical third of costa, 
around termen to inner margin, a series of blackish-fuscous spots; 
cilia concolorous, white, with fuscous suffusion and irrorations. Hind 
wing whitish fuscous, darker apically; cilia white with fuscous sub- 
basal band. Legs whitish ochreous suffused and mottled with fus- 
cous except at joints ; metatarsus of fore leg white. Abdomen ochre- 
ous, sparsely irrorated with blackish fuscous beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, without process from base of sacculus 
or costal margin ; sparsely clothed with long hairs ; cucuUus narrowly 
rounded; clasper wide, flattened, extending beyond ventral edge of 
harpe, terminating in one long and one short point; sacculus short, 
broadly folded. Anellus a flat plate, constricted posteriorly; sides 
strongly convex ; posterior edge deeply concave ; anterior edge pro- 
duced laterally. Vinculum rounded. Transtilla roughly rectangu- 
lar; without hairy lobes. Aedeagus short, stout, with a slight twist; 
vesica armed with small spinules. Tegumen and socii greatly produced 
posteriorly forming an elongated hood. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotizecl with 
a row of about half a dozen hairs posteriorly ; ostium narrow, elongate, 
bordered on either side by a raised edge. Ductus bursae a long mem- 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 195 

branous spiral; inception of ductus seminalis just before ostiiun. 
Bursa copulatrix large, with a well-developed, though small signum. 

Alar expanse, 21-23 mm. 

Tyfe. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — "Ontario," Canada. 

'Food j)lant. — ? 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States. 

United States records 

Connecticut: East River, $ (13-VIII-1910, Ctias. R. Ely). 

New York: Ithaca, 2 $ ? (36-IX-35, J. G. Franclemont) ; Onteora Mountain, 

? (1927, L. O.Howard). 
Ohio: Cincinnati, 5 (1&-IX-1903, A. F. Braun). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, o $ $ (August and September dates; H. D. 
Merrick). 

Remarks. — ^Although very close to grotella and hetulella, this species 
is distinct from both in genitalia and coloration. From grotella it 
may be distinguished by the narrower clasper and from hetuleUa by 
the rectangular transtilla in the males; in the female it may be dis- 
tinguished from grotella by the small number of hairs on the posterior 
part of the genital plate and from hetuleUa by the slitlike ostium. 

DEPRESSARIA BETULELLA Busck 

Plate 34, Figuees 193-193b; Piate 47, Figures 276, 276a 

Depressaria letulella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 746, 1902; 
m Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 58S6, 1903; Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 200, 1908.— Babnes and McDuNNotrGH, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6480, 1917. — MErracK, in Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 172, 1922. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Memoir 68, p. 242, 1923.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8406, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 275, 
1939. 

Labial palpus light ochreous; second segment irrorated exteriorly 
with black ; third segment with indistinct subbasal and broad supra- 
medial annuli, black. Antenna light oclireous with purplish-black 
annulations ; basal segment black above. Face pale whitish ochreous. 
Head and thorax light oclireous, irrorated with brown ; collar blackish 
fuscous ; tegula blackish fuscous. Fore wing light ochreous suffused 
with fuscous and irrorated and streaked with black; extreme base of 
costa and base of wing in inner angle black, the latter rapidly fading 
to fuscous ; at basal third, in cell, a whitish-ochreous discal spot pre- 
ceded and followed by a few black scales ; at the end of cell a similar 
discal spot. At apical third a poorly defined, outwardly curved, 



196 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

narrow, pale ochreous fascia; from middle of costa, around termen 
to inner margin, a series of pronounced black spots; cilia pale 
ochreous strongly infuscated. Hind wing yellowish fuscous, darker 
apically and with a narrow, blackish-fuscous line before cilia; cilia 
whitish ochreous, banded with fuscous. Legs pale ochreous suffused 
and mottled with blackish fuscous except at joints. Abdomen ochreous 
suffused with fuscous above and with a blackish-fuscous line on each 
side beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe without process from base of sacculus or 
costa; moderately clothed with long hairs; cucuUus bluntly pointed; 
clasper broad, less than half the width of harpe, flattened, extending be- 
yond ventral margin and terminating in one long and one short point ; 
sacculus short, narrowly folded. Anellus a sclerotized plate abruptly 
constricted posteriorly; posterior edge concave; anterior and lateral 
edges convex, the former more than the latter; posterior edge pro- 
duced laterally. Vinculum rounded. Transtilla a diamond-shaped 
sclerotized plate with slightly developed hairy lobes. Aedeagus short, 
stout, with a twist ; vesica armed with many small spinules. Tegumen 
and socii distinctly rounded, sparsely clothed with hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized ex- 
cept around the ostium where it is nearly membranous; the portion 
of the plate surrounding the ostium is raised and roughly triangular 
in shape (apex posteriorly). Ostium broadly oval. Ductus bursae 
a long membranous spiral ; inception of ductus seminalis well before 
ostium. Bursa copulatrix large with well-developed signum. 

Alar expanse, 20-23 mm. 

Type. — In United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — "Pennsylvania." 

Food plant. — Betula (sp. ?) ; Ostrya virginiana (Mill.) Koch. 

Distribution. — Northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

Connecticut: East River, 2 S 3 ( 14-VII-14 ; 2-VIII-lO, Chas. R. Ely). 
District of Columbia: $ ("ll-VI-'84"). 

New Jersey: Greenwood Lake, 2 $ 9 (26-VI, W. D. Kearfott). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 13 $ $, 8 5 2 (July to September dates, H. D. 
Merrick). 

Canadian records 

Ontario: Biscotasing (August 16, 1931, K. Schedl) ; Bobcaygeon (July 5, 1932, 
J. McDunnough) ; Ottawa (July 19-30, 1905 and 1906, C. H. Young). 

Quebec: Meach Lake (July 23, 1933, C. H. Young) ; Otter Lake (August 6, 1931, 
G. S. Walley). 

Remarks. — This species is close to grotella and maculatella but is 
amply distinct in genitalia (both male and female) and lacks the black 
discal dash so prominent in both the other species. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 197 

6. APACHEA, new genus 

Plate 2, Figure 16 ; Plate G, Figure 40 ; Plate 13, Figukes 86, 86a, 86b ; 
Plate 15, Figure 94 

Genotype. — Depi-essaria harherella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 24, p. 747, 1902. 

Similar to Depressaria but with broadly triangular brush on second 
segment of palpus, fused anellus and transtilla in the male genitalia 
and with the signum of the female genitalia a distinct cross. 

Head with appressecl scales; side tufts spreading; tongue de- 
veloped; antenna simple in both sexes; basal segment elongate, with 
pecten. Labial palpus moderately long, recurved; third segment 
nearly as long as second, acute; brush of second segment broadly 
triangular, flared. Thorax with two small crests. Abdomen flat- 
tened. Fore wing with 12 veins ; 2 and 3 closely approximate ; 7 and 
8 stalked, 7 to costa; 11 from before middle. Hind wing broader 
than fore wing; 8 veins; 3 and 4 short stalked, 5 separate from 4; 
6 and 7 subparallel. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe with clasper. Anellus and transtilla fused. 
Uncus distinctly wanting. Aedeagus armed. Gnathos a spined 
knob. Socii wanting. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate strongly sclerotized. Signum 
present. 

Larva. — Ninth abdominal segment with setae I and H well sep- 
arated ; setae VI on the same pinaculum with IV and V, remote from 
VII. Setal group VII with multiple hairs (4 to 6) on abdominal 
segments 2 to 7, trisetose on eighth and unisetose on ninth abdominal 
segments. A few secondary hairs on anterior margin of prothoracic 
shield and on anal prolegs. Ocelli normal. Submentum without pit. 

Pupa. — Pubescent. Prothoracic femora and labial palpi not 
exposed. Cremaster absent. 

Remarks. — This genus is closely allied to both Depressaria and 
Ago7ioptenx but appears to be a specialized offshoot from the 
former. It can be distinguished readily from both by the fused anel- 
lus and transtilla and armed aedeagus of male, the 4-pointed signum 
of female, and the proximity of veins 2, 3, and 4 of fore wing. 

In the larval stage Apachea is distinguished from other genera of 
American Oecophoridae by the presence of secondary hairs in setal 
group VII, a character which otherwise distinguishes the family 
Ethmiidae. The pupa is typically oecophorid with essentially the 
same characters as the pupae of Agonopterix and HofmannopMla. 

The genotype is the only species I have seen referable to this genus. 



198 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

APACHEA BARBERELLA (Busck), new combination 

Depressaria harierella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 24, p. 747, 1902. — 
Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5887, 1903.— Kearfott, in 
Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6431, 1903.— 
Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908.— Barnes and McDun- 
NOUQH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6477, 1917. — Mey- 
EiCK, in Wytsraan, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 171, 1922. — McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America 
(Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8401, 1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidoptero- 
rum catalogus, pt. 92, p. 275, 1939. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe clothed with fine hairs; clasper broad bas- 
ally, flat, sharply pointed and situated near cucullus ; sacculus narrow, 
strongly sclerotized. Anellns consisting of a small sclerotized plate, 
which is deeply cleft on the anterior margin; a narrow lightly scle- 
rotized band connecting the above plate with a strongly sclerotized 
rectangular part posteriorly; the posterior part consists of the trans- 
tilla and part of the anellus which form a ring through which the 
aedeagus passes; on the lateroposterior corner of the transtilla is a 
conical, fleshy lobe. Vinculum produced anteriorly into a point. 
Aedeagus stout, curved and sharply pointed, and armed with many 
sharp teeth in the middle portion. Gnathos a spined oval knob. 
Socii and uncus lacking (a few hairs indicate the position of the 
socii). 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate moderately broad. Ostium large, 
protruding, round, lateral margins slightly produced, winglike; an- 
terior margin very narrow. Ductus bursae stout, sclerotized poste- 
riorly ; inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa copula- 
trix large, elongate with a large cross-shaped signum in posterior end. 

Alar expanse, 21-31 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — ^Williams, Ariz. 

Food plant. — Prunus sp. 

Distribution. — Southwestern United States. 

United States records 

Arizona: Paradise, Cochise County, $ ; Santa Catalina Mountains, 4 S $ ,4 9 $ 
(June 10-24, 1913, Carl Heinrich [Hopkins No. 12114]); Huachuca 
Mountains, S. 

Colorado: Boulder $ (April 15, T. D. A. Cockerell). 

New Mexico: Jemez Springs, 2 $ S, 2 $ 9 (April 8-15) ; Jemez Mountains, 
6,600 feet, 4 ^5,19 (June 28-September 13, 1915, John Woodgate). 

7. Genus MACHIMIA Clemens 

Plate 3, Figure 26 ; Plate 5, Figure 33 ; Plate 10, Figures 70, 70a ; Plate 14, 

Figure 92 

MacMmia Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1860, p. 211 ; Stainton, 
Tineina of North America, p. 147-148, 1872. — Zeller, Verh. zool.-bot. Ges. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 199 

Wien, vol. 23, p. 239, 1873; Hor. Soc. Ent. Ross., vol. 13, p. 258-259, 1877.— 
Chambers, U. S. Geol. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 156, 1878.— Butler, Trans. 
Ent. Soc. London, 1883, p. 50.— Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 2, p. 150-151, 
18S9._RiLEy, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 98, 
1891 — BusCK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 520, 1903.— Kearfott, in 
Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 113, 1903.— Mkyeick, 
in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 79, 1922.— Fletcher, Mem. 
Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 131, 1929.— Gaede, in Bryk (part), 
Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 135, 1938. (Genotype: Maclvimia 
tentorifereUa Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Scl. Philadelphia, 1861, p. 212.) 

Labial palpus long, recurved; terminal segment shorter than 
second, acute; second segment roughened beneath. Antenna strongly 
ciliated in male, simple in female; basal segment without pecten. 
Tongue well developed. 

Fore wing with costa slightly arched, termen slightly oblique, 
weakly concave; 12 veins; 2 remote from 3; 3, 4 and 5 approximate, 

7 and 8 stalked, 7 to termen just below apex ; 11 from before middle. 
Hind wing as broad as fore wing ; apex rounded, termen oblique ; 

8 veins ; 3 and 4 connate or short stalked, 6 and 7 parallel at base, 
divergent distally; discocellulars inwardly oblique between 3 and 7. 

Male genitalia.— C\?iS]}QV present. Anellus with lateral projections. 
Gnathos spined. Vesica armed (^^e^iZ^oW/e re ^Za). Socii absent. Uncus 
well developed. 

Female genitalia. — Signum absent. Ductus bursae partly 
sclerotized. 

Larva.— ChuTSicters essentially as in Agonopterix: Ninth abdominal 
segment with setae I and II well separated; seta VI not on the same 
pinaculum with IV and V, remote from VII. Setal group VII bisetose 
on first and seventh, unisetose on eighth and ninth abdominal seg- 
ments. Ocelli normal. Submentum without pit. 

Pupa.—Smooth. Prothoracic femora and labial palpi not exposed. 
Cremaster absent. 

Remarks.— The absence of the cremaster distinguishes the pupa of 
this genus from Carcina. 

I agree with Meyrick ^^ in separating MacUmia from Cryptolechin 
but cannot agree with his synonymizing of Eoplitica with Machimia. 
The former does not agree with the latter at all on genitalia. Meyrick 
also places in synonymy the three following Australian genera: 
Gcm-Tia Walker, List of the specimens of lepidopterous insects in the collection 
of the British Museum, vol. 35, p. 1835, 1866. (Genotype: Qarrha sincerella 
Walker.) 
Hoplomorpha Turner, Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, vol. 41, p. 373, 1916. 
(Genotype: Cryptolcchia abalie7iella Walker, List of the specimens of 
lepidopterous insects in the collection of the British Museum, vol. 29, p. 762, 
1864.) 



» Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 79, 1922. 



200 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Lepidozancla Tubneb, ibid., vol. 41, p. 375, 1916. (Genotype: Leindozancla 
zatrephes Turner, ibid., vol. 41, p. 376, 1016.) 

It does not seem likely that these genera and Machimia are con- 
generic, but until the genitalia of the genotypes are carefully studied 
we must accept Meyrick's classification. 

Busck^'^ and Walsingham ^^ have correctly separated Psilocorsis 
from Ci^ptolechia and Machimia^ on the distance of veins 2, 3, and 4 
from each other, but have synonymized the latter two. As stated 
above, I follow Meyrick in the separation of G infptolecliia and Mach- 
imia^ his contention being borne out by genitalic as well as palpal 
characters. Of the American species formerly included in this genus 
all but teiitoriferella are referable to other genera. 

MACHIMIA TENTORIFERELLA Clemens 

Machimia tentoriferella Clemens, Proe. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1860, p. 
212; in Stainton, The Tineina of North America, p. 148, 1872.— Chambers, 
U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, pp. 120, 156, 1878.— Riley, in Smith, 
List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5225, 1891. — Busck, in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5853, 1S03 ; Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, 
p. 205, 1903. — Keakfott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6396, 1903. — IVIetrick^ in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 82, 1922.— Fletcheb, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, 
p. 131, 1929. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 143, 
1938. — McDuNNOXJGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the 
United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8383, 1939. 

Machimia tentoriftiella Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 83, 
1878. 

Cryptolechia tentoriferella (Clemens) Zeller, Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, 
p. 238, 1873; Hor. Soc. Ent. Ross., vol. 13, p. 259, 1877.— Chambers, U. S. 
Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 137, 1878.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 35, p. 195, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6424, 1917. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr, 
Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 235, 1923; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Memoir 101, p. 544, 1928. 

Depressnri^ fertialdelln Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4. p. 83, 
1878. 

Depressaria confertella- Walker, List of the specimens of lepidopterous insects 
in the collection of the British Museum, vol. 29, p. 563, 1864. — Waxsingham, 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1881, p. 312. 

Machimia confertella (Walker) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 
8383, 1939 (cited as synonym of M. tentoriferella Clemens). 

Machimia fernaldella (Chambers) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8383, 1939 (cited as synonym of M. tentoriferella Clemens). 

Labial palpus pale yellowish white; second segment strongly suf- 
fused with blackish fuscous exteriorly on basal half; basal third, 

"8 Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 194, 1908. 

^ Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer. Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 122, 1912. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 201 

inwardly, irrorated with blackish fuscous. Antenna ochreous, annu- 
lated with fuscous. Head pale whitish ochreous. Thorax and fore 
wing reddish ochreous, sparsely irrorated with blackish fuscous; at 
basal third, in cell, a blackish-fuscous spot followed by a similar one 
at the end of cell ; on vein Ic, about equidistant from both discal dots, 
a third blackish- fuscous spot; from costa, about middle, a row of 
blackish-fuscous spots to vein 7 then sharply angulated to inner margin 
at about two-thirds; around termen a series of small, blackish-fuscous 
spots; cilia ochreous. Hind wing fuscous with reddish cast; cilia 
ochreous with a fuscous subbasal band. Legs ochreous, heavily over- 
laid with fuscous except at joints. Abdomen ochreous, irrorated and 
suffused with blackish fuscous. 

Male genitalm. — Harpe long, narrow, slightly clothed with hairs; 
cucullus rounded; clasper small, stout, pointed; sacculus narrowly 
folded. Anellus with lateral projections well developed. Gnathos 
large, spined. Aedeagus large, stout; vesica armed with numerous 
strong cornuti. Socii undeveloped ; uncus broad, spoon-shaped. 

Female genitalia. — Bur^a copulatrix without signum. Ductus 
bursae membranous except just before ostium, there sclerotized. 

Alar expanse, 19-28 mm. 

Types. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia {ten- 
toriferella) ; in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, 
Mass. (?) {fernaldella) ; in the British Museum {confertella). 

Type localities. — Unknown ( tentorifcrella) ; Maine {fernaldella) ; 
Nova Scotia {confertella). 

Food plants. — Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh., Oephalanthics 
occidentalis L., Syrlnga vulgaris L., apple, cherry, elm, hazel, hickory, 
oak. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: Washington, 7 $S (17-IX-1884, no collector; 16-10- 
82, no collector; 1-6-XI-1914 and 27-IX-1933, A. Busck). 

Iowa: Iowa City, 2 (September 1917, A. W. Lindsey) ; Sioux City, $ (Septem- 
ber 3, 1921, A. W. Lindsey). 

Maine: 2 5 2 (one September 28, 1909; the other without date or collector). 

Maryland: Plummers Island, 3 $ $ (29-IX-1905, A. Busck) ; $ (October 4, 
1932, George P. Engelhardt). 

Massachusetts: Cambridge, $ (no date or collector) ; Newton Highlands, $ (no 
date) ; Springfield, 2 5 5 (9-IX-1897 and 30-VII-1897, George Dimmock, 
Nos. 1204, 1208). 

Michigan: St. Clair County, $ (September 1, 1927; no collector). 

New Hampshire: Canobie Lake, 2 (14-IX-1892, George Dimmock, No. 10.54). 

New Jersey: Elizabeth, 2 ("9-19," A. J. Weidt) ; Essex County, 2 2 2 (27-IX- 
1902, W. D. Kearfott) ; Montclair, $, 2 (lO-IX-1899, 2o-IX-1899, W. D. 
Kearfott) ; Woodside, S ("9-19", A. J. Weidt). 



202 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

New York: Ilion, $ (23-IX-1911, H. McElhose) ; Kendall, $,2 5 $ (no date; 
H. S. Burnett) ; Onteora Moimtam, Greene County, $ (l-IX-1929, L. O. 
Howard) ; Staten Island, 2 $ S (17-IX-1902, no collector) ; Utica, $ (4-IX- 
1911, H. McElliose). 

Ohio: Cincinnati, $ (20-IX-1909, A. F. Brauu). 

Pennsylvania : Arendtsville, 2 S S (2-IX-1918 ; ll-IX-1918, S. W. Frost) ; Hazel- 
ton, S (no date; Dr. Dietz) ; New Brighton, 7 $ $ , 4 2 5 (September and 
October dates, 1902-1905, H. D. Merrick) ; Oak Station, Allegheny County, 
8 $ S,4 5 9 (September dates, 1908-1911, Fred Marloff). 

Rhode Island: Newport, 2 $ $ (no date; W. Barnes) ; Weekapaug, 2 5 5 (Sep- 
tember 14, 1904, H. G. Dyar). 

Virginia: Falls Church, 2 5 5 (19-IX-1913 and l-X-1913, C. Heinrich [Hopkins 
No. 11132b]). 

Canadian records 

Ontario: Bobcaygeon (August 16-28, 1932, J. McDunnough) ; Ottawa (August 
27, 1905; August 21-26, 1931, C. H. Young). 

Remarks. — The habit of feeding on a large assortment of food 
plants is unusual for species of this family, and I know no other in 
North America that is such a general feeder. 

8. HIMMACIA, new genus 

Plate 4, Figuees 31, 32 ; Plate 9, Figures 64, 64a ; Plate 18, Figuke 110 

Genotype. — Cryptolechia Tiuachucella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 195, 1908. 

Labial palpus long, slender, recurved; terminal segment shorter 
than second, acute ; second segment slightly roughened beneath. An- 
tenna strongly ciliated in male, simple in female ; basal segment with- 
out pecten. Tongue well developed. 

Fore wing with cost a slightly arched, termen slightly oblique, 
straight ; 12 veins ; 2 rather distant from 3 ; 4 and 5 closely approxi- 
mate ; 7 and 8 stalked ; 7 to apex ; 11 from before middle. 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing, apex rather pointed, termen 
oblique, slightly convex; 8 veins; 3 and 4 connate; 6 and 7 subpar- 
allel; discocellulars strongly outwardly oblique between 4 and 6; 
inwardly oblique between 6 and 7. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe with clasper. Gnathos broad, spined. Socii 
absent. Vesica armed. Uncus present. 

Female genitalia. — Signum present. Ostium large. 

Remarks. — This genus appears to be closely allied to Machimia, 
PsilocoTsis, and Inga. It may be distinguished from all these genera 
by the direction of the discocellulars of the hind wing. The male 
genitalia differ from those of MacJiimia in lacking the lateral proc- 
esses of the anellus, from Inga in having a spined gnathos, and from 
Psilocorsis in possessing a clasper. The female genitalia differ from 
those of Machimia and Inga in possessing a signum ; from Psilocorsis 
in having a single bursa. The only species I have seen that is refer- 
able to this genus is the genotype. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 203 

HIMMACIA HUACHUCELLA (Busck), new combination 

CryptolecJhki Imachucella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 195, 1908. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 6421, 1917. 

Machimia liuaclutcella (Busck) Meykick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 82, 1922. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 139, 
1938. — McDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the 
United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8381, 1939. 

Cryptolechia diligenda Meyrick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 3, p. 477, 1928. 
(New synonymy.) 

Labial palpus ochreous-white with reddish tinge; second segment 
shaded with brown exteriorly on basal half and with an indistinct 
rose-red shade at apex; third segment with an indistinct, brown sub- 
basal amiulus and a narrow, indistinct, longitudinal blackish line 
anteriorly. Antenna ochreous-white suffused with salmon above; 
basal segment red above; in male the antenna is strongly cilate (about 
4). Face shining ochreous-white. Head, thorax, and fore wing 
unicolorous sahnon-oclireous ; costa slightly more red. Cilia pale 
ochreous preceded by sparse, red irrorations. Hind wing light 
ochreous-fuscous slightly darker around margins; cilia ochreous. 
Legs ochreous-white suffused with dark brown exteriorly except at 
joints. Abdomen ochreous-white suffused with reddish-ochreous 
above. 

Male genitalia! — Harpe slender, clothed with hairs; clasper long, 
slender, nearly attaining costa; cucullus rounded, narrow; sacculus 
broadly folded, strongly sclerotized. Anellus a sunple V-shaped 
plate. Aedeagus long, slightly bent ; vesica armed with 5 or 6 strong, 
sharply pointed cornuti and two triangular, sclerotized plates, each 
with a finely serrated edge. Vinculum broadly pointed. Transtilla 
membranous with well developed lateral, hairy lobes. Gnathos broad, 
armed with spines. Uncus moderately short, curved, pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate simple. Ostium very large, nearly 
as wide as plate. Ductus bursae sclerotized just before ostium and 
also before the inception of the ductus seminalis ; inception of ductus 
seminalis at posterior two-thirds of ductus bursae. Bursa copulatrix 
large, round; signum a simple, small, sclerotized plate with median 
keel, and situated in posterior part of bursa copulatrix. 

Alar expanse, 21-25 mm. 

Ti/pe. — In the United States National Museum (huachucella) ; in 
the British Museum {diligenda) . 

Type localities. — Huachuca Mountains, Ariz, {huachucella) ; 
"Texas" {diligenda) . 

Distribution. — Southwestern United States. 



204 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM voi,. 90 

United States records 

Arizona: Baboquivari Mountains, Pima County, 3 $ $ (15-30 July 1924, O. C. 

Poling) ; Huachuca Mountains, S $ S ; Palmerlee, Cochise County, 5 $ $ , 

2 9 9; Redington, 2 $ $. 
Texas: No further data. 

Remarks. — The description of diligenda agrees in every detail with 
the type of huacliuceTla so there appears to be no doubt about the 
synonymy. 

9. Genus PSILOCORSIS Clemens 

Plate 3, Figure 24 ; Plate 5, Figure 38 ; Plate 8, Figures 59, 59a ; Plate 17, 

Figure 105 

Psilocorsis Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 12, p. 212, 1860; 
in Stainton, Tineina of North America, p. 149-151, 1872. — Zeller, Verh. 
zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 239, 1873.— Busck, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, 
vol. 5, p. 207, 1903 ; Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 196, 1908.— Walsingham, 
Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 118-119, 1912. — Barnes 
and McDuNNouQH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 160, 
1917.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 235-236, 1923.— 
Brimlet, The insects of North Carolina, p. 304, 1938. (Genotype: 
Psilocorsis quercicella Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 12, 
p. 212, 1860.) 

Eagno Chambers, Can. Ent., vol. 4, p. 129-132, 191, 1872 ; Journ. Cincinnati Soc. 
Nat. Hist., vol. 2, p. 198, 1880. (Genotype: Eagno faginella Chambers, Can, 
Ent.vol. 4,p. 131, 1872.) 

Labial palpus long, slender, smooth, always with conspicuous longi- 
tudinal stripes; terminal segment scarcely shorter than second. An- 
tenna simple, without pecten on basal segment ; tongue well developed. 

Fore wing with costa arched, termen slightly oblique, straight; 12 
veins ; 2 from near angle, 3-5 approximate, 5 and 6 parallel, 7 and 8 
stalked, 7 to apex, 11 from before middle of cell. 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing ; apex rounded, termen oblique ; 8 
veins; 3 and 4 connate or short stalked, 5 equidistant from 4 and 6; 
6 and 7 nearly parallel, slightly divergent at tip. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe long, narrow, without clasper, moderately 
clothed with hairs. Anellus membranous, with long, fingerlike lateral 
lobes. Aedeagus stout ; vesica armed with one or more strong cornuti. 
Gnathos large, broad, spined. Uncus simple. Socii absent. 

Female genitalia. — Signum large, many branched. Bursa copula- 
trix double. 

Larva. — Ninth abdominal segment with setae I and II well separated. 
Seta VI closely associated and on the same pinaculum with setae 
IV and V. Setal group VII (as in Agonopterix) bisetose on first and 
seventh, unisetose on eighth and ninth abdominal segments. Ocelli 
normal. Submentum without pit. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 205 

Pupa. — Smooth. Prothoracic femora exposed. Labial palpi not 
exposed. Cremaster present (short but distinctly developed) , straight 
(not hooklike). 

Remarks. — This genus is remarkably homogeneous and the species, 
for the most part, are difficult to separate. 

The larva is at once distinguished from larvae of other American 
oecophorid genera (studied) by the above association of setae IV, V, 
and VI of the ninth abdominal segment on a single pinaculum. 

The pupa is characterized by exposed femora, developed cremaster 
and lack of exposed labial palpi and absence of pubescence. 

The specific separation, based on genitalia, is especially difficult 
in the males. The simplicity of the genital structures and the similar- 
ity in the armature of the vesica prohibit the selection of suitable 
characters for keying out the larger part of the species. A key is pre- 
sented, but when more preparations of the genitalia are made and 
larger series of bred specimens are studied the characters used may 
prove unstable. 

The females appear to possess better characters for separation. 
Although the sclerotized portions of the ductus bursae are strik- 
ingly similar and, with few exceptions, useless for separating the 
species, I believe the number of branches on the signa are relatively 
constant within a species. With this in mind I have used the signa, 
in most cases, for separating the various species. 

As good superficial characters for the separation of species are 
lacking, I have used alar expanse in several cases. This is ad- 
mittedly weak but is the only tangible character available. Large 
bred series will, in some cases, render the use of alar expanse value- 
less, but for the present we must rely upon it. 

Busck =*^ placed seven species in the genus. Gibson ^^ added -fietch- 
erella in 1909 and I have described one other {caryae) as new in 
this paper. I have made ferrugiiwsa a synonym of faginella because I 
can find nothing except its lighter color on which to base separation. 
Two of the species are retained only because I do not feel justified 
in placing them in synonymy on present evidence, bringing to eight 
the total number of described species from North America. 

Despite the fact that we have many food-plant records compara- 
tively little is known of the larvae. Two species, ohsoletella and 
quercicella^ can be separated easily on larval characters, but we 
know nothing about the characters of the larvae of the other species. 
The larvae, with one or two exceptions, feed on the leaves of trees 
and shrubs and pupate between two tied leaves. 

88 Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 197, 1908. 
3" Gibson, A., Ottawa Nat., vol. 22, p. 226, 1909. 



206 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

At present I have before me several species that appear to be 
distinct from those already described, but their description must 
await the receipt of more carefully reared material accompanied 
by larvae that have been properly associated with the moths. 

The generic synonymy as given by Meyrick/'' cannot be considered 
correct for our North American species. Until more careful study 
of all the genotypes can be made we must accept Meyrick's synonymy 
for the species outside of North American, but the American 
genera {Psilocorsis and Inga) certainly do not belong with Crypto- 
lechia. The double bursa and the remarkable signum of the females 
of Psilocorsis immediately distinguish this genus from all other 
American oecophorids. 

KEY TO SPECIES OF PSILOCORSIS BASED PRIMARILY ON 
COLORATION 

1. Fore wing with a broad, dark, transverse fascia at outer two- 

thirds obsoletella (Zeller) (p. 209) 

Fore wing without such fascia 2 

2. Fore wing with distinct purplish luster; species dark colored 3 

Fore wing without purplish luster, or if this is present, it is only 

faintly indicated; light-colored species 4 

3. Alar expanse 19 mna fletcherella Gibson (p. 216) 

Alar expanse 18 mm. or less caryae, new species (p. 215) 

4. Alar expanse 18 mm. or more 5 

Alar expanse 16 mm. or less " quercicella Clemens (p. 207) 

5. Fore wing with dark markings confined to the outer discal spot 

and a few spots around termen faginella (Chambers) (part) (p. 213) 

Fore wing otherwise 6 

6. Thorax much darker than head reflexella Clemens (p. 212) 

Thorax and head nearly concolorous faginella (Chambers) (part) (p. 213) 

KEY TO SPECIES OF PSILOCORSIS BASED PRIMARILY ON 
MALE GENITALIA 

1."^ First abdominal segment with hair pencil 2 

^First abdominal segment without hair pencil 3 

2. Vescica armed with one large cornutus and a patch of smaller 

ones (fig. 133) obsoletella (Zeller) (p. 209) 

Vesica armed only with a patch of small cornuti (fig. 59a) 

quercicella Clemens (p. 207) 

3. Base of large cornutus broad, strongly sclerotized; the cornutus 

short, stout, curved (figs. 131, 134) 4 

Base of large cornutus not appreciably broadened and weakly 
sclerotized; the cornutus straight, nearly as long as distal 
width of aedeagus (fig. 132) caryae, new species (p. 215) 

4. Vinculum broad ventrally faginella (Chambers) (p. 213) 

Vinculum narrow ventrally reflexella Clemens (p. 212) 

*<>Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, pp. 195-196, 1922. 

« In this couplet dubitatella (Zeller) and cryptolechieUa (Chambers) should be included, but they have 
been omitted because of the lack of information concerning them. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE— CLARKE 207 

KEY TO SPECIES OF PSILOCORSIS BASED ON FEMALE GENITALIA 
1. Ductus bursae dilated before ostium (figs. 217, 220) 2 



Ductus bursae not dilated before ostium (tig. 106)^^^^,^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

2. Ostium and sc,eroti.ed portion of ductus b"-- -"„ ^^'cZeller) (p. 209, 

(ng. i/U; . 

Ostium and sclerotized portion of ductus bursae contiguous ^ 

(fig 217) 

3. BranOes of the signum 22-24 on each side (Sg. 222)^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

Branches of the signum 21 or less on each side (Ag^. 218, 221).. .- i 

4. Branches of the signum 15-16 on each side (flg. ^^)^^^^^^^^^ ^.^^^^ ^^ ^16) 

Branches of the signum 17-21 on each side... -.-... « 

5. Sclerotized anterior band of genital plate bro.diH^m ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

Sclerotized anterior band of genital plate narrow (te^^^l*^^^ ^^^^.^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

PSILOCORSIS QUERCICELLA Clemens 

Pi^TE 3, FiGXJKE 24; Pi^tk 5, Figt;be 38; Pi^vte 8, Figxtt-es 59, 59a; Pl..te 17, 

FlGtTKE 105 

PsUocorsis auerciceUa Cx^emens, Proc. Acad Nat Sci. Plf adell^jia, vol- 12^ P- 212 
1860; in Stainton, Tineina of North America, p. 147, 1S'2.-Busck, Pioa 
Ent Soc Washington, vol. 5, p. 206, 1903.-Keakfott, ^n Smith, Check 
List of the Lepidopte a of Boreal America, No. 6390, 1903.-Bx;sck, Proc. 
U S Vat Mul vol. 35. p. 197, 190S.-Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., 
Lepfdoptera-nete'rocera, vol. 4, p. 118, 119, 1912.-Bak.ks and McD...o.gh, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 642o, 1917.-Foebes 
Cornell UBiv Agr Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 235, 1923; in Leonard, Cornell 
SXi^ EXP S at., Memoir 101, p. 545, 1928.-F.etchek. Mem Dept Agr. 
?Mla (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 190. 1929.-Bkim.et, The insects of North 

0..^r:!:'^;^S;r;Clemens) z™ Ver. .ool..ots. ^.. ^^^ 
240 1873.-CHAMBEKS, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 120, 13- 
?8?8.-WA.siNGHAM, Ins. Life, vol. 2, p. 151, 1889.-Rn.KT, n. ^nnth, List 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5223, 1891.-Busck, ^n ^yar. U S. 
Nat Mus Bull. 52. No. 5851, 1903.-Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera msec- 
forum fasc. 180. p. l97, 1922.-McDunkough. Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and th^ United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

P«n 'r;/f.'tdcna CHAHBKKS, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 162, 

1878. . , u- 1 

Head and thorax dark yellowish brown. Second segment of labial 
palpus ochreous with the usual dark fuscous longitudinal stripe be- 
neath; third segment fuscous with median and atera longitudma^ 
whitish stripes. Basal segment of antenna dark yel owish biown 
above with fuscous and white longitudinal stripes beneath ; remainder 
of antenna whitish ochreous with longitudinal fuscous stripes, the 
latter breaking up into spots toward the distal end. Fore wing yel- 
lowish brown mottled with short fuscous lines and spots; at the end 
of cell a blackish-fuscous spot; around termen a narrow blackish 
fuscous hne; before tornus, on inner margin, a fuscous shadmg; cilia 



208 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

fuscous with a slightly darker subbasal band. Hind wing and cilia 
pale ochreous-fuscous. Legs whitish ochreous, the fore tibiae and 
tarsi shaded with fuscous. Abdomen yellowish brown above, whitish- 
ochreous beneath. 

Hair pencil from first abdominal segment of male strongly 
developed. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slightly longer than twice its width; sac- 
culus ill defined, narrow, weakly sclerotized. Anellus a broad, oval, 
weakly sclerotized plate with a small, broadly obtuse, strongly scle- 
rotized base; lateral fingerlike lobes hardly exceeding central plate, 
broadly dilated distally. Aedeagus stout, acutely pointed. Vesica 
armed with a large patch of strong, but slender, cornuti. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous except for a narrow 
sclerotized band at anterior edge. Ostium small, round. Ductus 
bursae slender, slightly sclerotized just before ostium and before 
ductus seminalis; inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. 
Signum with 17 to 19 branches on each side. 

Alar expanse, 13-16 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Type locality. — Pennsylvania ? 

Food plant. — Oak. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States and Canada. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: 6 $ $ , fj $ 9 (April, July, and August dates, 1900 and 

1910, A. Busck) :2$S (July 31, 18S5, C. V. Riley). 
Illinois: Putnam County, $ (lO-VIII-1939, M. O. Glenn). 
Maryland: Hyattsville, 2 $ $ (7-VII-1913, 21-VII-1913, A. Busck). 
New Jersey: Anglesea, 2 $ $, 9 (V-30-1905, W. D. Kearfott) ; Essex County, 

Park, 9 ("20 May," W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: Heliport, $ (l-VI-1902, H. G. Dyar) ; Ramapo, $ (27-V-1900. 

W. D. Kearfott). 
Ohio: Cincinnati, 2 9 9 (14-VIII-1907; 29-V-1907, A. F. Braun). 
Pennsylvania: Beaver County, 2 $ S, 2 9 9 (May 1900, Kemp coll.); New 

Brighton, ^, 29 9 (14-19-VIII-1903, H. D. Merrick). 
Virginia: Great Falls, 9 (25-IX-1914, A. F. Kneale). 

Canadian records 
Ontario: Ottawa (July 13-24, 1906; April 13-16, 1935, C. H. Young). 

Rema7'ks. — Although this and the following species closely resemble 
each other they may be distinguished quite easily. The transverse 
dark markings of querciceUa are broken and in the form of small 
spots and there is usually a dark spot on the hind margin of the fore 
wing at two-thirds. The transverse markings of ohsoletella are more 
evenly strigose and the dark suffusion of the fore wing at two-thirds 
is usually in the form of a band across the wing. 

The larva of querciceUa has the three thoracic segments darkened ; 
in ohsoletella only the prothorax is darkened. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 209 

PSILOCORSIS OBSOLETELLA (Zeller) 

Plate 22, Figure 133 ; Plate 40, Figure 220 

Crypfolechia obsolctcUa Zeller, Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 242, 1873. — 
Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 137, 1878.— Walsikgham, 
Ins. Life, vol. 2, p. 151, 1889. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 5221, 1891.— Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, 
No. 5849, 1903 ; Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 206, 1903.— Meyeick, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 197, 1922. — McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, 
Microlepidoptera), No. 8471, 1939. 

Psilocorsis ohsoletella (Zeller) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 197, 
1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of tlie Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6426, 1917. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, 
p. 236, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 101, p. 545, 
1928. 

Psilocorsis quercicella Ke^^rfott, part (not Clemens) in Smith, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6390, 1903. 

This species is much like quercicella, but the fuscous shading 
before the tornus extends entirely across the wing in the form of a more 
or less conspicuous band. The fuscous markings of the fore wing 
are longer, narrower, and more numerous. The abdomen is light 
grayish fuscous above. All other characters practically as in 
quercicella. 

First abdominal segment of male with well-developed hair pencil. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe rather heavily clothed with hairs ; sacculus 
narrow, ill defined, weakly sclerotized. Anellus a weakly sclerotized, 
more or less oval plate with a small crescent-shaped base; lateral 
fingerlike lobes slender, small. Aedeagus stout, sharply bent, acutely 
pointed; vesica armed with one long stout cornutus and a patch of 
small spiculate cornuti. Gnathos very broad, strongly spined lat- 
erally, weakly spined ventrally. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous except for a nar- 
row, sclerotized anterior band; ostium small, round. Ductus bursae 
membranous except for a narrow sclerotized band before ostium and 
a sclerotized, dilated portion well before the inception of ductus 
seminalis. Inception of ductus seminalis just before the sclerotized 
band which precedes the ostium. Branches of signum 19 to 20 on 
each side ; the entire inner surface of the signum-bearing half of the 
bursa copulatrix strongly spiculate. 

Alar expanse, 13-17 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Ohio. 

Food plant. — Oak; chestnut? 

Distrihuti/yn. — Eastern and southern United States. 



286614—41- 



210 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

United States records 

District of Columbia: 13 $ $, 9 2 9 (July and August dates, 1899-1900, A. 

Busck) . 
Illinois: Decatur, 2 $ $ ("May 16-23") ; Putnam County, $ (14-VIII-1939, 

M. O. Glenn). 
Maryland: Hyattsville, $, 9 ("1907," A. Busck); Plummers Island, Q $$, 

4 9 5 (May, June, July, September dates, A. Busck). 
Massachusetts: Marthas Vineyard, 3 $ $ (VII-15 to VII-29-1931, P. M. Jones). 
Missouri: St. Louis, $ (V-15-1904, H. McElhose) ; "central Missouri" 5 9 

("4-14-84," "5-5-89"). 
New Jersey: Anglesea, 9 (V-30-05, W. D. Kearfott) ; Esses County Park, 9 9 

(26-IX-02, W. D. Kearfott). 
Ohio: Cincinnati, 3 S S, 2 9 9 (V-29-06, V-21-07, VI-9-07, VIII-10-14, A. F. 

Braun). 
Pennsylvania: Nicholson, $ ( VII-4-1904, A. E. Lister ) . 
Texas: Kerrville, 2 S $,2 9 9 (IV-11-1907, F. C. Pratt) ; $, "Texas" ("18-5," 

Belfrage). 
Virginia: Cape Henry, 9 (8-9-27, A. Busck) ; Falls Church ($,2 9 9, 22-29- 

VII-1914, Carl Heinrich) ; $ (June 2, 1920, Kneale and Heinrich). 

Remarks. — The distinguishing characters of this and querdcella 
have been discussed under the latter. 

Although ohsoletella and quercicella cover much of the same range, 
the former appears to be the more widely distributed of the two. 
Much more rearing must be done to establish the limits of both. 

PSILOCORSIS CRYPTOLECHIELLA (Chambers) 

Depressaria cryptolechiella Chambers, Can. Ent, vol. 4, p. 91, 1872. — Busck, 

Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 206, 1903. 
Hagno cryptolechiella (Chambers) Chambers, Can. Ent., vol. 4, p. 131, 1872. — 

Bkaun, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 49, p. 350, 1924. 
Cryptolechia cryptolechiella (Chambers) Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. 

Terr. Bull. 4, p. 116, 1878. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, 

fasc. 180, p. 197, 1922.— McDunnotjgh, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 

Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 

8474, 1939. 
Psilocorsis cryptolechiella (Chambers) Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6391, 1903. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. 

Mus., vol. 35, p. 197, 1908.— Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 

Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6432, 1917. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. 

Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 236, 1923. 
Cryptolechia cryptolechiaeella Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 

4, p. 84, 137, 1878. 
Cryptolechia quercicella Walsingham (part) (not Clemens), Ins. Life, vol. 2, 

p. 151, 1889. — Riley (part), in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 

America, No. 5223, 1891.— Busck (part), in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. .52, 

No. 5851, 1903. 

Alar expanse, 15 mm. 
Type. — ^Lost. 

Type locality. — Kentucky ? 
Food plant— Holly "i 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 211 

Remarks. — This species is unknown to me, but I am retaining the 
name for the present in anticipation of the rediscovery of the species. 

It appears to be nearest to, if not synonymous with, obsoletella. 
For the sake of completeness I give a copy of the original description : 

"Third joint of the palpi black, with a narrow longitudinal white 
line on each side. Second joint pale yellow with a narrow longi- 
tudinal black line beneath. Antennae pale yellow, checkered above 
with black and with a narrow longitudinal black line on each side 
of the basal portion. Head, thorax and base of the anterior wings 
dull reddish-orange; anterior wings to the naked eye, pale golden, 
with the lustre of "watered" silk, produced by a multitude of trans- 
verse, narrow, wavy, dark brown lines, as seen under the lens; six 
small dark brown spots in a row around the apex, to the naked eye 
appearing like a narrow marginal line. Ciliae pale fuscous, with a 
silvery lustre and a somewhat darker hinder marginal line at their 
base. Hind wings yellowish-white with a silky lustre." 

PSILOCORSIS DUBITATELLA (Zeller) 

Cryptoleclila (Psilocorsis) dwbitatella Zellee, Hor. Soc. Ent. Ross., vol. 13, p. 262, 
1877. 

Cryptolechia duMtatella (Zeller) Metteick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, 
fase. 180, p. 197, 1922.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Mierolepidoptera ) , No. 
8469, 1939. 

Psilocorsis dulitatclla (Zeller) Busck, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 206, 
1903. — Keaefott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 6393, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 197, 1908.— Barnes 
and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
6429, 1917.— FoEBES, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir. 68, p. 236, 1923. 

Cryptolechm quercicella Walsingham [not Clemens], Ins. Life, vol. 2, p. 151, 
1889. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5223, 
1891.— Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5851, 1903. 

Alar expanse, 16 mm. (3%'"'). 

Type. — Zoological Museum, Berlin. 

Type locality. — "North America." 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Remarhs. — I do not know this species. Following is a copy of the 
original description : 

"Capillis et thorace ochraceis, palpis linea longitudinali nigra sig- 
natis; alls ant. subelongatis, ochraceis, obsolete transverse strigulatis, 
puncto venae transversae obsoleto f usco, nebula cinerea inferius addita, 
punctis marginalibus nigris superius majusculus, ciliis fusco-cinereis. 
?." 

There seems to be considerable difference of opinion regarding the 
proper placement of this species. Walsingham considers it a synonym 
of quercicella and Forbes suggests its synonymy with ohsoletella. I 



212 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

am inclined to believe that the latter view is correct, but we must wait 
for a more careful study of the type and the discovery of the larva to 
settle the matter. 

PSILOCORSIS REFLEXELLA Clemens 

Plate 22, Figure 131 ; Pi.ate 40, Figxjre 222 

Psilocorsis reflexella Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 12, 
p. 213, 1860; in Stainton, Tineina of North America, p. 150, 1872.— Busck, 
Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 207, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6394, 1903. — Busck, Proc. 
U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 197, 1908.— Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., 
Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 119, 1912. — Barnes and McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6427, 1917. — Forbes, 
Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 238, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell 
Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 101, p. 545, 1928. — Procter, Biological survey 
of the Mount Desert region. Part 6, The insect fauna, p. 274, 1938. 

Psilocorsis reflexa Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 162, 
1878. 

Crypt olecliia reflexella (Clemens) Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. 
Bull. 4, p. 137, 1878.— Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 2, p. 151, 1889.— Riley, 
in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5224, 1891. — 
Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5852, 1903.— Meyrick, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 197, 1922. — McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 
2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8467, 1939. 

Cryptolechia cre-'^sonella Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 
86, 1878. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the 
United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8467, 1939 (cited 
as synonym of C. reflexella (Clemens)). 

Head ferruginous-brown. Labial palpus light ochreous with the 
usual dark stripes; second segment with some fuscous shading exte- 
riorly. 

Thorax and fore wing ochreous strongly overlaid and mottled with 
reddish fuscous; inner and outer discal spots usually ill defined, 
blackish fuscous; terminal row of spots confluent forming a nar- 
row, poorly defined blackish-fuscous line; cilia yellowish fuscous 
with a dark subbasal band. Hind wing and cilia yellowish fuscous, 
the cilia with a dark subbasal line. Legs whitish ochreous suffused 
with dull fuscous. Abdomen fuscous above and whitish ochreous 
beneath. 

First abdominal segment simple. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately clothed with hair; sacculus 
narrow, weakly sclerotized. Anellus a broad, oval, cupped plate, 
strongly sclerotized basally; lateral lobes greatly exceeding central 
plate, slender, no thicker distally than basally. Aedeagus stout, 
sharply bent, pointed; vesica armed with one large, stout cornutus 
and a patch of strong, but smaller ones. Vinculum with a pointed 
dorsoanterior process. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 213 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow, membranous except for 
a broad, sclerotized, anterior band. Ostium round. Ductus bursae 
membranous except for a large dilated, partially sclerotized portion 
immediately preceding the ostium; ductus seminalis spiculate on 
inner surface and entering ductus bursae just anterior to ostium. 
Branches of signum 22-24 on each side; signum-bearing half of 
bursa copulatrix spiculate. 

Alar expanse, 18-25 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Type locality. — "Pennsylvania." 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: S, $ ("1906," A. Busck) ; 5 (May 19, 1902, A. Busck) ; 

$ (Sept. 20/34, no collector) ; 9 (6-15-06, Charles R. Ely). 
Illinois: Putnam County, $ (13-VI-1936, M. O. Glenn). 
Maine: Mount Desert (May 24). 
Maryland: Plummers Island, $ (June 1903, A. Busck); 2 55 (1903, 1904, 

Barber and Schwarz). 
Massachusetts: Boston, 5 (Beutenmiiller) ; Cohasset, $ (July 6, 1909, Owen 

Bryant). 
New Hampshire: Hampton, $ (6-9-1904, S. A. Shaw). 
New Jersey: Anglesea, 6 $ $, 2 5 5 (3-3O-V-1905, W. D. Kearfott) ; Essex 

County Park, 2 S $ ("May 20" and "6-19-99," W. D. Kearfott) ; Greenwood 

Lake, $ ("V-30," W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: $ ("1906," Walsingham) ; $ (Beutenmiiller). 

Pennsylvania: Beaver County ,$, 5 (May, 1900, Kemp) ; New Brighton, 13 
$$,7 5 5 (May and June, 1902-1906, H. D. Merrick); Pittsburgh, 
5,25 5 (VII-12-06; VI-11-05, Henry Engle). 
Virginia: Mountain Lake, $ (June 14-21, 1907, A. F. Braun). 

Remarks. — In addition to the above I have before me a single male 
from Putnam Company, 111. (13 June 1936, M. O. Glenn), which 
appears to belong here. The specimen is, however, heavily overlaid 
with fuscous scales and may be another species. 

This is the largest species of this genus from North America and 
is usually readily recognized by its size. It is the only described 
species for which we have no definite host record. 

PSILOCORSIS FAGINELLA (Chambers) 

Plate 22, Figxjke 134 ; Plate 40, Figuees 217, 218 

Hagno faginella Chambers, Can. Ent., vol. 4, p. 131, 1872; vol. 6, p. 131, 232, 
1874. 

Crypt olechia faginella (Chambers) Chamdees, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. 
Bull. 4, p. 84, 120, 137, 1878. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, 
fasc. 180, p. 197, 1922.— McDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 
8472, 1939. 



214 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. so 

Psilocorsis faginella (Chambers) Busck, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, 
p. 206, 1903. — Keaefott, i7i Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6392, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mns., vol. 35, p. 197, 
1908. — Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 
118, 1912. — Baknes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6428, 1917. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat, 
Memoir 68, p. 236, 1923. — Procter, Biological survey of the Mount Desert 
region. Part 6, The insect fauna, p. 274, 1938. 

CryptolecMa quercicella, Walsingham, part (not Clemens), Ins. Life, vol. 2, 
p. 511, 1889. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 5223, 1891.— BtJSCK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5851, 1903. 

CryptolecMa ferruginosa Zeller, Verh. zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 243, 
1873.— Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 137, 1878.— 
Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5219, 
1891.— Busck, m Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5847, 1903 ; Proc. Ent. 
Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 205, 1903. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 
torum, fasc. 180, p. 197, 1922.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8468, 1939. (New synonymy.) 

Psilocorsis ferruginosa (Zeller) Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Boreal America, No. 6395, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol 35, 
p. 197, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6430, 1917. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., 
Memoir 68, p. 236, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 
101, p. 545, 1928. 

Labial palpus and head ochreous-yellow (typical dark stripes 
present on palpus). Thorax and fore wing brownish ochreous, the 
latter lightly irrorated with brown (some specimens lighter in color, 
with little or no brown irroration) ; inner and outer discal spots 
blackish fuscous, the former usually inconspicuous, the latter well 
defined; around termen a row of five or six small blackish-fuscous 
spots. Hind wing and cilia yellowish fuscous. Legs whitish 
ochreous, lightly suffused with brown. Abdomen light yellowish 
brown above, whitish ochreous beneath. 

First abdominal segment simple. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately clothed with hairs ; sacculus nar- 
row, weakly sclerotized. Anellus an oval, deeply cupped plate; base 
strongly sclerotized; lateral lobes stout, exceeding the central plate. 
Aedeagus large, stout, sharply bent, pointed; vesica armed with one 
large cornutus and a long, narrow patch of strong slender ones. 
Vinculum with a prominent, broad, pointed clorsoanterior process. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous except for a moder- 
ately broad, strongly sclerotized anterior band, which is slightly 
broader laterally than centrally. Ductus bursae dilated and strongly 
sclerotized at ostium. Inception of ductus seminalis at about middle 
of the sclerotized part of ductus bursae; inner surface of ductus 
seminalis finely spiculate. Signum with 19 to 21 branches on each 
side ; signum-bearing half of bursa strongly spiculate. 



REVISION OF THE OECOFHORIDAE — CLARKE 215 

Alar expanse, 18-23 mm. 

Type. — In Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 
{fagineUa) ; in British Museum {ferruginosa) . 
Type localities. — Kentucky {fagineUa) ; Ohio {ferruginosa). 
Food plant. — Fagiis grandifoliu Elirh. 
Distribution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 

Delaware: Lowes, $ (8-8-35, Donald McCreary). 

Louisiana: East Baton Rouge Parish, 2 2 9 (24-VIII-1923, T. H. Jones and 

W. G. Bradley). 
Maine: Augusta, 3 5 5 , 2 $ 2 (February 1931 [indoor record?] ) ; Aurora, 3 $ $ , 

4 2 2 (13-16-VI-32; 6-4-31 [Gip. Moth Lab. No. 12164-S185] ) ; Bar Harbor 

(June 2-12). 
New Hampshire: Dublin, 2 (A. Busck) ; Hampton, 2 (VI-25-1907, S. A. 

Shaw). 
Ohio: Cincinnati, 2 (VIII-11-1917, A. F. Braun). 
Vermont: One male; no further data. 

Remarks. — I have placed ferruginosa as a synonym of fagineUa^ 
since, aside from the coloration {fenmginosa is lighter than fagineUa) 
there are no differences between the two. Both have the same food 
plant and distribution. 

PSILOCORSIS CARYAE, new species 

Plate 22, Figtjee 132 ; Piate 40, Figure 219 

Psilocorsis crypt olechiella Beimley (not Chambers), The insects of North Caro- 
lina, p. 304, 1938. 

Labial palpus with the second segment sordid whitish ochreous 
shaded with grayish fuscous exteriorly; a fuscous longitudinal line 
beneath, narrowly bordered laterally with whitish; third segment 
fuscous with a whitish tip, and a narrow whitish line on each side. 
Face, head, and basal segment of antenna above dark yellow-brown 
to light fuscous ; underside of basal segment of antenna fuscous with 
two longitudinal whitish lines; remainder of antenna checkered 
with white and fuscous, less distinctly so and lighter toward the 
extremity. Thorax and base of fore wing deep brown. Fore wing 
light j^ellowish fuscous strongly overlaid with deep brown. Thorax 
and fore wing with a purplish luster; inner and outer discal spots 
and an indistinct row of spots around termen blackish fuscous; cilia 
light fuscous. Hind wing shining yellowish fuscous (with a brassy 
appearance), darker apically; cilia light fuscous with a darker sub- 
basal band. Legs whitish ochreous suffused with light fuscous. Ab- 
domen yellowish fuscous above, whitish ochreous beneath. 

First abdominal segment simple. 



216 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Male genitalia. — Harpe long and slender, cucuUus pointed. Anel- 
lus a lightly sclerotized plate with slender digitate lateral processes, 
the latter not exceeding the posterior edge of the central plate. Ae- 
deagus stout, sharply bent, sharply pointed; vesica armed with one 
large, sharply pointed cornutus and a narrow, elongate patch of 
smaller ones. Vinculum rounded with a well-developed, pointed 
dorsoanterior process. 

Female genitalia. — Ostium large, oval. Genital plate membranous 
except for a narrow, sclerotized anterior band. Ductus bursae di- 
lated and strongly sclerotized before ostium, otherwise slender and 
membranous; inception of ductus seminalis just before ostium. Sig- 
num with 17-21 branches on each side ; signum-bearing half of bursa 
copulatrix strongly spiculate. 

Alar expanse, 15-18 mm. 

rype.— U.S.N.M. No. 52866. 

Type locality.— Cuero, Tex. (September 13, 1910, M. M. High). 

Food plants. — Carya pecan Aschers. and Graebn. and Carya ovata 
(Mill.) Koch. 

Remarks. — ^Described from the 5 type and 17 5 and 11 $ para- 
types as follows: Cuero, Tex., % $ $ and 8 $ ? (June, July, and 
September dates, 1910, M. M. High) ; San Antonio, Tex., 3 5 ^ 
(July 14r-24, 1908, McMillan) ; Norfolk, Va., $ (September 13, 1910, 
M. M. High), all reared from pecan; Winfield, La., $ (June 16-23) ; 
Monticello, Fla., 3 5 5 (June 23, 1914, A. I. Fabis; April 8-9, 1915, 
John B. Gill) reared from hickory. 

Paratypes in the U. S. National Museum, Canadian National, and 
H. H. Keifer collections. 

With the exception of fetcherella this is the darkest species of the 
genus described from North America. It may be distinguished from 
■fUetcherella by its smaller size and the larger number of branches on 
each side of the signum. In female genitalia caryae more closely 
resembles faginelhi from which it may be distinguished by the more 
strongly sclerotized portion of the ductus bursae. 

PSILOCORSIS FLETCHERELLA Gibson 

Plate 40, Figuee 221 

Psilocorsis fletcJierella Gibson, Ottawa Nat., vol. 22, p. 226, 1909. — Barnes and 
McDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6431, 
1917.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 236, 1923. 

Vrypfolechia fletcherella (Gibson) RIetrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, 
fasc. 180, p. 197, 1922. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8470, 1939. 

Cryptolechia quercicella Gibson (not Clemens), Can. Ent., vol. 40, p. 84, 1908. 

Palpus, exclusive of the usual dark stripes, whitish ochreous. Head, 
thorax, and fore wing yellowish strongly overlaid with brown and 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 217 

having a purplish tinge; inner and outer discal spots and a row of 
five or six terminal spots blackish fuscous ; the first discal and the ter- 
minal row of spots sometimes ill defined. Hind wing and cilia light 
brown, the latter with a narrow yellowish basal line. Legs and under- 
side of abdomen whitish ochreous. Abdomen brown above. 

Female genitalm. — Genital plate membranous except for a narrow, 
sclerotized anterior band. Ostium round. Ductus bursae dilated 
near ostium ; membranous except for a narrow sclerotized ring before 
ostium and a small sclerotized plate before inception of ductus semi- 
nalis; ductus seminalis and area of ductus bursae immediately sur- 
rounding its inception finely spiculate. Branches of signum 15 to 16 
on each side ; signum-bearing half of bursa copulatrix strongly spicu- 
late on inner surface. 

Alar expanse, 19 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 

Food plant. — Populus tremuloides Michx. 

Distribution. — Eastern Canada and probably northeastern United 
States. 

Canadian records 

Ontario: Ottawa, 2 $ 9 (lO-VI-1909, A. Gibson) ; Merivale (2-VII-1935, T. N. 
Freeman). 

Quebec: Meach Lake {13-VI-1906, July 1906, 30-VI-1937, C. H. Young) ; Wake- 
field (13-VII-1925, F. P. Ide). 

Remarks. — I have not seen the specimens, nor do I know the sexes 
of the specimens from Merivale, Meach Lake, and Wakefield, but the 
identification is presumably correct. 

10. Genus INGA Busck 

Plate 1, Figure 7 ; Plate 5, Figuke 37 ; Plate 12, Ftgubes 80, SOa ; Plate 14, 
Figure 89 

Inga Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908.— Barnes and McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6483, 1917. — Forbes, 
Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 243, 1923.— Brimley, The insects 
of North Carolina, p. 304, 1938. (Genotype: AnesycMa sparsiciliella Clem- 
ens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 430, 1864.) 

Antenna slender, strongly ciliate in male, smooth in female; basal 
segment without pecten. Labial palpus long, slender, recurved, 
reaching well above apex; terminal segment slightly longer than 
second, the latter thickened with closely appressed scales, roughened in 
front. 

Fore wing elongate ; length nearly 3 times the width ; costa slightly 
arched; apex blunt; termen oblique, straight; 12 veins; 7 and 8 stalked, 
both to costa or apex, or with 7 to termen scarcely below apex. 



218 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Hind wing as broad as f orewing ; 8 veins ; 3 and 4 connate or stalked ; 
6 and 7 somewhat divergent; 5 approximate to 4. Abdomen not 
depressed. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe with sacculus very broad, deeply folded, 
heavily sclerotized and clothed with long coarse hairs. Clasper long, 
reaching to or beyond costa, usually dilated distally with apex armed 
with short, stout spines. Cucullus narrow, lightly sclerotized, clothed 
with fine hairs; apex rounded. Anellus broad, without lateral proc- 
esses; lateral lobes wealdy developed, with few hairs. Aedeagus 
long, slightly curved, apex pointed. Vinculmn broad, rounded. 
Transtilla membranous with weak lateral hairy lobes. Gnathos long, 
bluntly pointed. Uncus well developed, elongated, narrowly pointed, 
moderately clothed with hairs. 

Female genitalia. — Ductus bursae membranous or narrowly sclero- 
tized just before ostiiun. Signum present or absent. 

Remarks. — Meyrick'^^ has synonymized Inga with Cryptolechia^ 
but the two are sufficiently distinct to justify their separation. The 
male genitalia of Cryptolechia show a tubular anellus, spined, broad 
gnathos and spoon-shaped micus, together with minor differences. 
These characters, when compared with the description and figure of 
Inga, will serve to distinguish between the two. 

As a means of separating the oecophorid genera, Busck, Meyrick, 
and others have used the direction of vein 7 of the fore wing (to termen, 
to apex, or to costa) . For the most part this character serves for sepa- 
rating the genera into two groups, but in this genus we find all condi- 
tions existing. In sparsicllieUa.^ obscuromaculella, canariella, and 
concolorelJa 7 is distinctly to costa but in cretacea and ciliella it goes 
to the termen scarcely below the apex. Normally veins 2 and 3 of the 
forewing are widely separated but in some specimens may be either 
connate or short-stalked. 

In view of the fact that aberrations in venation occur here and that 
the genitalia indicate that the species are unmistakably congeneric, 
we may well associate them. 

On the abdominal segments of the males of concolorella and ciliella 
and the females of canariella there are spines such as are commonly 
found in the Blastobasidae. The spines in Inga, however, differ from 
those found in the Blastobasidae by being dilated toward their ex- 
tremities; those of the Blastobasidae (studied) are evenly tapered 
to a sharp point. The spines of loiga are, in most cases, readily de- 
ciduous, those of Blastobasidae more firmly attached. 

Busck *^ erected this genus for Anesychia sparsiciliella Clemens. As 
already pointed out Meyrick considered the genus synonymous with 

« Meyrick, E., in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 195, 1922. 
" Busck, A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 200, 1908. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 219 

Cryptolechia. With this one exception Inga has been considered a 
valid genus with the genotype as the only species. From Machimia 
(sensu Meyrick) I am transferring cretacea (Zeller), canarieUa 
(Busck) , ohscuroTnaculella (Chambers), concolorella (Beiitenmiiller), 
ciliella (Busck), and hiimata (Meyrick) and from Cryptolechia 
{sensu Meyrick), trigama- (Meyrick) to Inga^ bringing to eight the 
total number of North American species referable to this genus. 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF INGA BASED PRIMARILY ON 
COLORATION 

1. Fore wing yellow canariella (Busck) (p. 222) 

Fore wing otherwise 2 

2. Fore wing white or whitish 3 

Fore wing otherwise 4 

3. Costa of fore wing with a conspicuous black spot 

sparsiciliella (Clemens) (p. 222) 
Costa of fore wing without such spot cretacea (Zeller) (p. 225) 

4. Antennal ciliations 5 ^^ humata (Meyrick) (p. 220) 

Antennal ciliations otherwise 5 

5. Antennal ciliations >^ trigama (Meyrick) (p. 224) 

Antennal ciliations otherwise 6 

6. Alar expanse less than 15 mm obscuromaculella (Chambers) (p. 226) 

Alar expanse more than 15 mm 7 

7. Labial palpus whitish ochreous; basal three-fifths of second seg- 

ment blackish fuscous ciliella (Busck) (p. 227) 

Labial palpus grayish fuscous concolorella (Beutenmiiller) (p. 221) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF INGA BASED PRIMARILY ON MALE 
GENITALIA 

1. Abdomen spined 2 

Abdomen not spined 3 

2. Clasper curved, very thick, heavily spined (fig. 128). ciliella (Busck) (p. 227) 
Clasper straight, slender basally, abruptly dilated and finely 

spined apically (fig. 129) concolorella (Beutenmiiller) (p. 221) 

3. Clasper slender, bluntly pointed, extending little beyond middle 

of harpe (fig. 127) canariella (Busck) (p. 222) 

Clasper slender or stout, dilated distally, and extending at least 
to costa (figs. 80, 126, 130) 4 

4. Clasper strongly spined down to sacculus (fig. 130) 

cretacea (Zeller) (p. 225) 
Clasper with few or no spines as far down as sacculus (figs. 80, 126) 5 

5. Clasper stout, hardly reaching costa (fig. 80) _ sparsiciliella (Clemens) (p. 222) 
Clasper slender, reaching beyond costa (fig. 126) 

obscuromaculella (Chambers) (p. 226) 



" The antennal ciliations of Meyrick (the relation of the length of the cilia to the width of the antennal 
shaft) are used here because both humata and trigama are known only from unique males and this character 
is the only one which can be used safely. None of the other species has antennal cilia as long as 5 or as 
short as ^4. 



220 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF INGA BASED PRIMARILY ON 
FEMALE GENITALIA 

1. Signum present 2 

Signum absent 4 

2. Signum minute^"; a narrow sclerotized ring before ostium (fig. 

206) obscuromaculella (Chambers) (p. 226) 

Signum well developed; ring before ostium broad or narrow 3 

3. Sclerotized ring before ostium broad (fig. 209) ciliella (Busck) (p. 227) 

Sclerotized ring before ostium narrow (fig. 210) cretacea (Zeller) (p. 225) 

4. Abdomen strongly spined canariella (Busck) (p. 222) 

Abdomen not spined 5 

5. Sclerotized ring before ostium broad (fig. 208) 

concolorella (Beutenmiiller) (p. 221) 
Sclerotized ring before ostium narrow (fig. 89) 

sparsiciliella (Clemens) (p. 222) 

INGA HUMATA (Meyrick), new combination 

Machimia humata Meyeick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 1, p. 181, 1914 ; in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 82, 1922. — McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 
2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8387, 1939. 

Cryptolechia humata (Meyrick) Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6420, 1917. 

Head whitish gray, somewhat sprinkled with light gray. Palpus 
ochreous whitish, second segment with the basal three-fifths gray ex- 
ternally. Antennal ciliations 5. Thorax gray irrorated with darker. 
Abdomen gray. Fore wing pale gray irrorated with dark fuscous; 
first and second discal spots and an outwardly curved row of spots 
from two-thirds of costa to two-thirds of inner margin, fuscous ; cilia 
gray. Hind wing and cilia gray. 

Alar expanse, 20 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Palmerlee, Ariz. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Remarks. — I know this species from description only and am plac- 
ing it here on the evidence presented in the description. The dark, 
lower portion of the second segment of the labial palpus and the 
pattern indicate that the species belongs in Inga. Until the type 
has been examined and a final disposition of the species has been made 
we can refer it to this ffenus. 



« A single female of this species is available for study. The bursa of this specimen shows a minute, round 
signum, which may or may not be present on other specimens. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 221 

INGA CONCOLORELLA (Beutenniiiller), new combination 

Plate 21, Figures 129, 129a ; Plate 39, Figure 208 

Cryptolechia concolorclla Beutenmuller, Ent. Amer., vol. 4, p. 30, 1888.— 
Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 2, p. 152, 1889. — Riley, in Smith, List of 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5217, 1891. — BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. 
Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5845, 1903.— Keari-ott, in Smith, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6386, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 195, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6419, 1917. 

MacMmia concolorella ( Beuteumiiller ) Meyrick:, in Wytsman, Genera in- 
sectorum, fasc. 180, p. 82, 1922. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America ( Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 
8386, 1939. 

Head, palpus, thorax, abdomen, and fore wing grayish fuscous. 
Discal dots and an outwardly curved line of spots from two-thirds 
of costa to two-thirds of inner margin indistinct, fuscous. Legs 
grayish mottled with fuscous; the fore legs almost wholly overlaid by 
the latter color. 

Male genitalia. — Cucullus broad, rounded; clasper slender basally, 
broadly dilated, obliquely pointed and reaching well beyond costa; 
distal surface clothed with fine spines. Anellus a broad sclerotized 
plate with a deep, median V-shajDed excavation; from the postero- 
dorsal edge a broad, flat process, broader distally than proximally; 
lateral, fleshy lobes moderately well developed, hairy. Aedeagus long, 
slender, slightly curved, bluntly pointed ; dorsal third strongly scler- 
otized and armed with small teeth. Lateral lobes of transtilla stout, 
hairy. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ostium round, 
moderately large. Ductus bursae with a broad, sclerotized ring before 
ostium. Inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa 
copulatrix sparsely and finely spiculate on inner surface. 

Alar expanse, 20-22 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Nevada. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Southwestern United States. 

United States records 

California: San Diego, 5 9 9 (June 16- July 23). 
Nevada: 5 (no date or collector). 

Remarks. — ^With the type male I associate the five females from 
California. These agree well with the description and the type, 
although the latter is somewhat more suffused. 



222 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

INGA CANARIELLA (Busck), new combination 

PL.VTE 21, FiGUEES 127, 127a ; Plate 39, Figuee 207 

CryptolecMa canariella Busok, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 195, 1908. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 6422, 1917. 

MacMmia canariella (Busck) Meykick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorura, fasc. 
180, p. 82, 1922. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada 
and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8382, 1939. 

Head, palpus, legs, thorax, fore wing, and abdomen yellow. An- 
tenna, palpus and legs mottled with reddish yellow; base of costa of 
fore wing reddish yellow. Hind wing and cilia whitish yellow ; cilia 
with a darker subbasal line. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slender, long ; portion beyond clasper longer 
than that before; cucullus bluntly pointed; clasper slender, straight, 
not extending much beyond middle of harpe. Anellus large, triangu- 
lar, broader distally than basally ; lateral lobes near distal end minute. 
Aedeagus long, slender, gently curved; vesica armed with a small 
patch of weak spiculate cornuti and one bladelike distal one. Trans- 
tilla with small, hairy, papillate lateral lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous; ostium large oval, 
anterior edge narrowly sclerotized. Ductus bursae membranous; in- 
ception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa copulatrix 
large ; inner surface finely spiculate. 

Alar expanse, 21-24 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Huachuca Mountains, Arizona. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Known only from the type locality. 

United States records 

Arizona: Huachuca Mountains, 2 S $,2 2 9 (no date or collector) ; Palmerlee, 
Cochise County, $ (no date or collector). 

INGA SPARSICILIELLA (Clemens) 

Plate 1, Figure 7 ; Plate 5, Figure 37 ; Plate 12, Figures 80, 80a ; Plate 14, 

Figure 89 

Anesychia sparsiciliella Clemens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 430, 
1864 ; in Stainton, The Tineina of North America, p. 255, 1872.— Chambers, 
Can. Ent., vol. 12, p. 226, 1880.— Busck, Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, voL 
5, p. 218, 1903. 

Anesychia sparcicella Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr, Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 129, 
1878. 

Cryptolechia sparsiciliella (Clemens) Bltsck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. BuU. 
52, No. 5844, 1903. — Meybick, m Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 
p. 197, 1922. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 223 

Inga spa7-siciliella (Clemens) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.„ vol. 35, p. 200, 
1908. — Baenes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6483, 1917. — Fokbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 08, 
p. 243, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 101, p. 546, 
1928. — Bkimley, The insects of North Carolina, p. 304, 1938. — McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America 
(Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8466, 1939. 

MacMmia sparsiciliella (Clemens) Meybick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 3, 
p. 471, 1928. 

Cryptolechia contrariella Waxkek, List of the specimens of lepidopterous 
insects in the collection of the British Museum, vol. 29, p. 771, 1864. — 
Walsingham, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1880, p. 85. — Keaefott, in Smith, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6385, 1903. 

Inga contrariella (Walker) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8466, 1939 (cited as synonym of /. sparsiciliella (Clemens) ). 

Inga atropicta (Zeller) McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada 
and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8466, 
1939 (cited as synonym of /. sparsiciliella (Clemens)). 

CryptolecJiia inscitella Walker, List of the specimens of lepidopterous insects in 
the collection of the British Museum, vol. 29, p. 772, 1864. 

Cryptolechia atropicta Zellek, Verh. zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 25, p. 343, 1875. — 
Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5216, 1891. 

Ground color of labial palpus, basal fourth of antenna, head, tho- 
rax, and fore wing white. Basal half of labial palpus outwardly 
blackish fuscous. Outer three-fourths of antenna brownish fuscous. 
Base of costa, and extreme edge to beyond middle, inner angle, discal 
spot at basal third and a conspicuous large costal spot reaching middle 
of wing, black or blackish fuscous. From the middle outer edge of 
the large costal spot a broken, outwardly curved, narrow, blackish - 
fuscous line to vein 6, then the line is inwardly curved to inner margin 
at outer third; cilia with some brownish scales mixed. Hind wing 
and cilia brownish fuscous. Legs brownish fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Portion of harpe beyond clasper as long as that 
before; clasper dilated distally, nearly attaining costa and clothed 
with short stout spines in distal half. Anellus broad with a deep 
V-shaped median excavation; lateral lobes weak; a well developed, 
pointed, dorsoanterior process. Aedeagus long, slender; vesica with 
an elongate, narrow, weakly sclerotized bar. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous; ostium round; duc- 
tus bursae membranous except for a narrow sclerotized band just 
before ostium. Inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix large, oval, with smooth or very finely spiculate inner 
surface. 

Alar expanse, 14-19 mm. 

Types. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia {spar- 
siciliella) ; in British Museum {contrariella^ inscitella, atropicta). 



224 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Type localities. — "Virginia" {sparsicilieUa) ; ? {contrariella, in- 
scitella) ; "North America" {atropicta) . 
Food plant. — Unlmown. 
Distribution. — New York south to Florida and west to Texas. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: 2 $ 5 (no data). 

Florida: Altamont, $ (21-IX-1924, F. R. Cole); St. Petersburg, 3 S3, 9 

(April) ; Paradise Key, 2^ $ (3^111-1919, E. A. Schwarz aud H. S. Barber). 
Georgia: Spring Creek, $ (18-V-1916, J. C. Bradley). 
Maryland: $ (no data). 

Mississippi: Ocean Springs, 9 ( 29-VI-1921 ) . 
New York: $ (William Beutenmiiller). 

North Carolina: Southern Pines. 2 5? (July S-15 ; Aug. 1-7). 
Pennsylvania: York, $ (W. D. Kearfott). 
Texas: Kerrville, S, 2 (May, 1906, F. C. Pratt) ; Harris County, $ (no data) ; 

Victoria, $ (6-10-18, J. D. Mitchell). 
Virginia: Fortress Monroe, $ (VII-19-03, W. D. Kearfott). 

Remarks. — The white ground color and the contrasting black mark- 
ings immediately distinguish this from all other species of the genus. 

The species is widespread but apparently not common in any one 
localit}^ The specimen from Victoria, Tex., is the only reared exam- 
ple I have seen, but its host is not recorded on the label. 

INGA TRIGAMA (Meyrick), new combination 

Cryptolechia trigama Meyrick, Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 3, p. 476, 1928. — 
McDuNNOTJGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada aud the United States 
of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8475, 1939. 

Head and thorax pale grayish. Palpus whitish with the basal 
two-thirds of the second segment and basal, median and subapical 
annuli of terminal segment dark fuscous. Fore wing light gray 
with some scattered black scales. On costa a black spot at base and 
before middle, some black scaling beneath and confluent with the 
latter; inner and outer discal spots black; two strongly angulated 
series of small black dots crossing wing outwardly; cilia pale gray, 
with dark basal line. Hind wing and cilia light gray. 

Alar expanse, 20 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality.— Fort Davis, Tex., 5,000 feet. 

Food plant. — ^Unknown. 

Remarks. — This species is known to me only from the description. 
I place it here with some hesitation, but its proper assignment can 
be made only after an examination of the type. On pattern it 
appears to be near sparsiciliella. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 225 

INGA CRETACEA (Zeller), new combination 

Plate 21, Figures 130, 130a ; Plate 39, Figube 210 

Cryptolechia cretacea Zeller, Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 2-13, 1873. — 
Walsingham, Ti'ans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 10, p. 176, 1882. — Riley, in 
Smith, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5218, 1891. — Busck, in 
Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5846, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6387, 1903. — Busck, Proc. 
U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 195, 1908.— Babnks and McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6417, 1917. 

Machimia cretacea (Zeller) Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fa.sc. 
180, p. 83, 1922.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada 
and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8388, 
1939. 

Labial palpus, head, and fore wing white to sordid whitish more 
or less sprinkled with small brown scales. Basal two-fifths of second 
segment of labial palpus brown outwardly. Eyes narrowly edged 
with brown in front. Antenna brown. Base of costa, first and 
second discal spots, and an outwardly curved subterminal line of 
spots brown. Hind wing and cilia brownish. Legs whitish strongly 
overlaid with brown. Abdomen whitish somewhat suffused dorsally 
with light brown and with more or less brown scaling ventrally. 

Male genitalia. — Cucullus rounded, narrow ; clasper gently curved, 
slightly dilated distally, heavily clothed with stout spines (the latter 
extending inwardly down to sacculus) and extending well beyond 
costa. Anellus a broad, strongly sclerotized plate with a deep 
V-shaped median excavation; from posterodorsal margin a broad, 
spatulate process; lateral lobes weakly developed, moderately hairy. 
Aedeagus long, slightly curved, pointed; vesica armed with a long, 
strongly sclerotized bar. Transtilla with long, digitate, hairy, lateral 
lobes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ostium large, 
round. Ductus bursae with a narrow sclerotized plate ventrally just 
before ostium. Inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix oval, with few minute spicules on inner surface; 
signum well developed. 

Alar expanse, 14-16 mm. 

Type. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Type locality. — Texas. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Southern United States. 

United States records 

Arizona: Palmerlee, 4 $ $ (no data or collector). 
Kansas: Onaga, $ (Crevecoeur, collector). 

North Carolina: Southern Pines, 15 $ S , '^0 2 $ (July 15 to August 15). 
286614—41 13 



226 PROCEEDrNGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Texas: Brownsville, $ (no data or collector) ; Kerrville, 5 5 5,5 (April to 
August dates, F. C. Pratt); San Benito, $ and $ (March 16-23; Sept. 
8-15) ; Victoria, 5 ("3-20," E. A. Schwarz). 

Remarks. — This species and sparsiciUella are the only two de- 
scribed species of this genus with white or whitish ground color. 
The black markings of sparsiciUella will immediately distinguish it 
from cretacea. 

INGA OBSCUROMACULELLA (Chambers), new combination 

Plate 21, Figubes 126, 126a ; Plate 39, Figure 206 

CryptolecMa ohscuromacuJella Chambees, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 
4, p. 86, 1878. — RiXEY, in Smith, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
5220, 1891.— BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5848, 1903.— 
Kearfott, in Smith, Check List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
6388, 1908.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 195, 1908.— Barnes and 
McDuNNoxjGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6418, 
1917. 
Ma-chimia ohscuromaculella (Chambers) MinrBicK, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 
torum, fasc. 180, p. 82, 1922. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8385, 1939. 
Labial palpus, face, and head whitish ochreous to ochreous. Bnsal 
three-fifths of second segment of palpus and front around eyes fus- 
cous. Antenna whitish ochreous annulated with fuscous. Thorax 
and fore wing ochreous strongly irrorated with fuscous; first and 
second discal spots fuscous ; an indistinct, outwardly curved subtermi- 
nal row of small fuscous spots. Hind wing grayish fuscous. Legs 
fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe moderately narrow; cucullus bluntly 
pointed; clasper slender, slightly dilated and clothed with fine spines 
distally, reaching slightly beyond costa. Anellus broad with a deep 
V-shaped, median excavation, and a large spatulate process from the 
dorsoposterior margin; the latter broader distally than proximally; 
lateral lobes small. Aedeagus long, slender, pointed; vesica armed 
with a large patch of fine cornuti and a long, strongly sclerotized, 
irregularly shaped band. Lateral lobes of transtilla moderately 
large, hairy. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ostium moderately 
large. Ductus bursae membranous with a narrow sclerotized ring 
before ostium. Inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix large, oval with a minute, round signum. 
Alar expanse, 14-15 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 
Type locality. — Basque County, Tex. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 227 

Food Plant. — ^Unknown. 

Distribution. — This species is known only from Texas. 

United States records 

Texas: Kerrville, $ (IV-12-07, F. C. Pratt) ; San Antonio, $ (June 1899, O. C. 
Poling). 

INGA CILIELLA (Busck), new combination 

Plate 21, Figures 128, 128a; Plate 39, Figure 209 

Cryptolechia ciUella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 196, 1908.— 
Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 6423, 1917. 

Machimia ciliella (Busck) Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorura, fasc. 180, 
p. 82, 1922; Exotic Microlepidoptera, vol. 3, p. 471, 1928. — McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America 
(Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8384, 1939. 

Labial palpus, head, face, thorax, and fore wing light ochreous 
more or less suffused with fuscous scaling. Basal three-fifths of 
labial palpus blackish fuscous. Antenna blackish fuscous narrowly 
annulated with brown. Base of costa, first and second discal spots, 
a poorly defined spot near middle of inner margin, and a more or 
less well defined undulating, outwardly curved row of spots blackish 
fuscous ; cilia concolorous with fore wing. Hind wing and cilia dark 
fuscous; cilia with a light basal line. Legs light ochreous strongly 
overlaid with fuscous, the fore legs more so than the others. Ab- 
domen light ochreous suffused and irrorated with fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe very short; cucuUus small, bluntly pointed; 
clasper large, stout, reaching beyond costa, strongly spined. Anellus 
large, laterally produced, recurved, forming a semitubular articula- 
tion for the aedeagus ; dorsoanterior spatulate process well developed ; 
lateral lobes small, hairy, fleshy. Aedeagus slender, long, nearly 
straight; dorsodistal two-fifths scobinate; vesica armed with a long 
sclerotized band. Lateral lobes of transtilla well developed, fleshy, 
hairy. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ostium large 
round. Ductus bursae with a broad sclerotized band before 
ostium; ductus seminalis enlarged with its inception well before 
ostium. Bursa copulatrix with a well developed signum; inner sur- 
face finely spiculate. 

Alar expanse, 16-23 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Ti/pe locality. — Baboquivari Mountains, Pima County, Ariz. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Southwestern United States. 



228 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

United States records 

Arizona: Baboquivari Mountains, 9 5 5,3?? (July 1903, August 1923, October, 
November 1924, O. C. Poling ; July, August 1916 [no collector] ) ; PaLmerlee 
3 $ S (no date or collector) : Yavapai County, $,392 (no date or 
collector). 

New Mexico: Sapello Caiion, $ (7-27-02, Oslar). 

Remarks. — Some specimens of this species are rather heavily in- 
fuscated and at first may be mistaken for concolorella but the geni- 
talia will immediately distinguish the two. 

The specimens from the Baboquivari Mountains are consistently 
lighter than specimens from the other localities. 

11. Genus MARTYRINGA Busck 

Plate 1, Figube 10 ; Plate 5, Figure 39 ; Plate 11, Figi-res 72, 72a ; Plate 14, 
Figure 90; Plate 17, Figure 107 

Martvringa Busck, Journ. New York Ent, Soc, vol. 10, p. 96, 1902 ; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 489, 1903.— Ke^vrfott, in Smith, List of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 107, 1903. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 190, 1908. — Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heter- 
ocera, vol. 4, p. 120, 1913. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 160, 1917. — Foiibes, Cornell Univ. Agr. 
Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 234, 1923. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera insec- 
torum, fasc. ISO, p. 54, 1922. — Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), 
vol. 11, p. 134, 1929. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 96, 
1938. (Genotype: Oegoconia latipetmis Walsingham,Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, 
vol. 10, p. 190, 1882.) 

Antenna stout (thickened in the male) ; basal segment without 
pecten. Labial palpus long, recurved, reaching beyond vertex; sec- 
ond segment thickened and roughened beneath, slightly longer than 
third. 

Fore wing slightly more than three times as long as wide ; termen 
convex ; apex rounded ; inner margin straight ; 11 veins ; Ic strong at 
margin, weaker basally; 2 and 3 coincident; 4 stalked with 2+3; 5 
connate or approximate to 4 and parallel to 6 ; 8 and 9 out of 7 ; 7 to 
termen just below apex. 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing, costa slightly arched; tennen 
oblique, straight; 7 veins; 3 and 4 coincident; 5 comiate with 3+4; 
6 and 7 slightly divergent. 

Male genitalia. — Clasper absent. Gnathos not spined. Uncus well 
developed. Anellus membranous, not forming ring around aedeagus. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate sclerotized ; ductus bursae strongly 
sclerotized posterior to inception of ductus seminalis ; signum absent. 

Remarks. — This genus is closely related to the Asiatic genus 
Anchonoma Meyrick {=Santuzza Heinrich). A marked difference, 
however, exists in the male genitalia. The anellus of Anchonoma is 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 229 

moderately sclerotized basally, and terminates in two long, strongly 
sclerotized processes, the whole closely attached to the aedeagus. In 
Martyringa the anellus is membranous and the two sclerotized 
processes of the aedeagus, although closely resembling those of the 
anellus of Anchonoma, cannot be homologized with them. Only ono 
species of Martyringa (latipennis) is at present recognized. 

By the weakness of Ic of the fore wing the genus approaches the 
Gelechiidae, but on genitalic characters it clearly remains oecophorid. 

MARTYRINGA LATIPENNIS (Walsingham) 

Plate 1, Figtjke 10; PlxVte 5, Figure 39; Plate 11, Figures 72-72a ; Plate 14, 
Figure 90 ; Plate 17, Figure 107 

Oegoconia latipennis Walsingham, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 10, p. 190, 
1882. — Riley, in Smith, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5578, 
1891. 

Martyringa latipennis (Walsingham) BuscK, Journ. New York Ent. Soc, vol. 10, 
p. 86, 1902 ; in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5476, 1903.— Kearfott, in 
Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. GOOO, 1903.— 
BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 190, 1908.— Barnes and McDun- 
NOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6412, 1917. — 
Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fuse. 180, p. 55, 1922. — Forbes. 
Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 234, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell 
Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 101, p. 544, 1928.- Fletcher, Mem. Dept. 
Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 134, 1929.— Beimley, The insects of North 
Carolina, p. 302, 1938. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, 
p. 96, 1938. — McDuNNOuGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the 
United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8380, 1939. 

Labial palpus, antenna, head, thorax and legs, and ground color of 
fore wing pale ochreous. Second segment of labial palpus shaded 
with fuscous on basal two-thirds outwardly and irrorated basally in- 
wardly; third segment with an indistinct fuscous, subbasal annulus; 
antenna narrowly annulated with fuscous basally and shaded with 
fuscous apically; basal segment fuscous above except at extreme tip. 
Thorax and base of tegula strongly overlaid with fuscous. Ground 
color of fore wing largely obscured by the fuscous shading; at basal 
third two large blackish- fuscous spots followed by a broad, pale 
ochreous dash ; at the end of cell a large blackish-fuscous spot ; from 
costa, at beginning of cilia, a transverse, pale ochreous fascia to vein 
6, then outwardly angled and curs^ed to inner margin slightly before 
tomus ; termen pale ochreous ; cilia grayish fuscous. Hind wing pale 
cinereous, shaded with fuscous toward apex; tenninal edge pale 
ochreous ; cilia grayish fuscous. Legs shaded and banded with fuscous 
except at joints. Abdomen ochreous, lightly suffused with pale fuscous 
above ; below lighter, sparsely irrorated with fuscous. 

Male genitaIia.-,r-HarpQ elongate, without clasper, sparsely clothed 
with minute hairs. Anellus membranous. Vinculum produced ante- 
riorly as a spatulate process. Transtilla a weakly sclerotized band. 
Gnathos bluntly romided, roughly spoon-shaped. Uncus elongated, 



230 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

recurved ventrally and terminating in a sharp point ; aedeagus long, 
slender, heavier at the distal end than at the proximal end, terminating 
in two stout, sharp-pointed processes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate heavily sclerotized, with a shallow 
cleft on the posterior margin ; posterior part of ductus bursae flattened 
and broadened ; ostium only a narrow horizontal slit ; bursa copulatrix 
small, membranous. 

Alar expanse, 15-21 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum. 

Type locality. — Not stated. 

Food plant. — ^Unknown. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 

Connecticut: East River, $ (July 7, 1908, Charles R. Ely). 

Maryland: Cabin John, $ (August 1902, A. Busck) ; Plummers Island, 37 5 5, 

5 $ S (July and August dates, 1902-1924, A. Busck; July, 1924, L. J. Bot- 

timer). 
New York: Ithaca (fesie Forbes). 

North Carolina: Tryon, 2 $$,9 (3-16-VII-1904, Fiske). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 5 $ S, 2 9 9 (July dates, 1903-1907, H. D. 

Merrick) ; Nicholson, 10 5 5 (July, August 1904, A. E. Lister). 

Reinarks. — This species is probably more widespread than indicated 
by present records. According to Mr. Busck the adults fly in the early 
morning hours after midnight and are, therefore, collected infre- 
quently. Mr. Busck also states that the larva probably will be found 
in rotten wood. 

12. Genus PLEUROTA Hubner 

Plate 1, Figuee 6 ; Piate 5, Figure 34 ; Plate 12, Figubes 76, 76a ; Plate 14, 

Figure 87 

Pleurota Hubnee, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 406, 1826. — Busck, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 191, 1908.— Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., 
Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 134, 1912. — Barnes and McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 160, 1917. — Metriok, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 105, 1922; Revised handbook of 
British Lepidoptera, p. 674, 1928. — Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. 
Ser.), vol. 11, p. 180, 1929. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 
88, p. 169, 1938. (Genotype: Phalaena Tinea hicosteUa Clerck, Icones in- 
sectorum rariorium cum uominibus eorum trivialibus, locisque e C. Linnaei 
syst. nat allegatis, pi. 3, fig. 15, 1761.) 

Eupleuris Hubner, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 406, 1826. — Meyeick, 
in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 105, 1922. (Genotype: Tinea 
honorella HUbner. Sammlung europilischer Schmetterlinge, vol. 8, fig. 254, 
1796.) 

EoloscoUa Zet.t.kr, Isis von Oken, vol. 3. p. 190, 1839. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 105, 1922. (Genotype: Tinea forficella 
Hubner, Sammlung europilischer Schmetterlinge, vol. 8, fig. 343, 1796.) 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 231 

Protasis He2ueu:oh-Schaffeb, Systematisches Bearbeitung der Schmetterlinge von 
Europa, vol. 5, p. 40, 1853. — Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera iusectovum, fasc. 
180, p. 105, 1922. (Genotype: Protasis punctella Costa, Fauna del regno di 
napoli, vol. 2, pi. 4, fig. 2, 1836.) 

Head with loosely appressed scales ; tongue well developed ; antenna 
finely to strongly ciliated, basal segment with pecten; labial palpus 
long, porrect; second segment densely clothed with long spreading 
scales, especially beneath; third segment short, acute. Abdomen 
strongly spined. 

Fore wing elongate, pointed or falcate; termen very oblique; 12 
veins; 7 and 8 stalked, 7 to termen; 2-5 approximated, 11 from before 
middle. 

Hind wing ovate, as broad as fore wing; 8 veins; 3 and 4 connate, 
6 and 7 subparallel. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe without clasper. Anellus with lateral proc- 
esses well developed. Gnathos well developed, pointed. Uncus well 
developed. 

Female genitalia. — Ductus bursae sclerotized for at least part of its 
length ; inception of ductus seminalis at anterior third of ductus bursae. 
Signum of bursa copulatrix present. 

Remarks. — At present only one recognized American species; P. 
albastrigulella (Kearfott). 

Thema Walker (List of the specimens of lepidopterous insects in 
the collection of the British Museum, vol. 29, p. 802, 1864 ; genotype : 
Thema hrevivitella Walker) and Phtn/ganeutis Meyrick (Proc. Linn. 
Soc. New South Wales, vol. 9, p. 742, 1884; genotype: Phryganeutis 
cinerea Meyrick) have been synonymized with Pleurota Hiibner, but 
it does not seem likely that these Australian genera are congeneric with 
Pleurota. 

Pleurota can be distinguished from any other North American 
oecophorid genera by the porrect labial palpus. 

PLEUROTA ALBASTRIGULELLA (Kearfott) 

Plate 20, Figures 123, 123a ; Plate 39, Figure 212 

Dorata albastrigulella Keaefott, Can. Ent., vol. 39, p. 8, 1907. 

Pleurota albastrigulella (Kearfott) Babnes and McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6413, 1917. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopter- 
orum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 170, 1938. — McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 
lepidoptera). No. 8389, 1939. 

Pleurota albastrigilella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 191, 1908. 

Pleurota albistrigulella Metykick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 
p. 107, 1922. 



232 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Labial palpus, antenna, head, thorax, and fore wing fuscous over- 
laid, strigulated, or otherwise marked with white. Second segment of 
labial palpus white beneath at base; from basal third irrorated and 
mixed with white scales; third segment white exteriorly. Antenna 
white beneath. Head and thorax almost entirely overlaid with white. 
Edge of costa of fore wing white from base to apical third ; central 
portion and apex of wing strongly dusted and overlaid with white; 
at basal third, in cell, a blackish-fuscous spot followed by a similar 
one at the end of cell ; on vein Ic an elongate, blackish-fuscous spot, 
slightly nearer the inner and outer discal spot ; vein 7 marked with a 
more or less distinct longitudinal, blackish-fuscous streak; around 
termen a poorly defined series of blackish-fuscous spots; cilia white 
with a light fuscous median band. Hind wing grayish fuscous, darker 
apically ; cilia pale fuscous with an indistinct, darker, subbasal band. 
Legs fuscous marked with silvery white; hind tibia and tarsus 
ochreous-white, the latter overlaid with fuscous exteriorly except at 
joints. Abdomen shining grayish fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slender, rather abruptly narrowed beyond 
middle ; cucullus narrowly rounded. Anellus with a narrow, strongly 
sclerotized portion and long, slender, bluntly pointed lateral processes. 
Aedeagus slender, curved, somewhat dilated at each end ; vesica armed 
with a few weakly sclerotized, short cornuti and with a small weakly 
sclerotized folded area. Vinculum narrowly rounded. Gnathos long, 
beaked, pointed, with a scobinate posterior surface. Uncus stout, 
pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ostium large, oval, 
transverse. Ductus bursae depressed and sclerotized in posterior third ; 
inception of ductus seminalis at anterior third. Bursa copulatrix 
large, oval, elongate ; signa consisting of two slender, thornlike proc- 
esses from posterior surface of bursa, and a transverse, lunate plate 
slightly posterior to middle of bursa ; at right angles to the long axig 
of the plate, one third from each end of inner surface, two flattened, 
pointed processes. 

Alar expanse, 15-20 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — Placer County, Calif. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — Southwestern United States. 

United States records 

Arizona: Pinal Mountains, alt. 5,000 feet, 9 (May 15, 1925, O. C. Poling). 

California: Camp Baldy, San Bernardino Mountains, $, 9 (June 24-30, July 
16-23) ; Gavilan HiUs, Riverside, S (2-V-1935, C. M. Dammers) ; Havilah, 
2 S $ (June 1-7) ; Los Angeles, S ("IV-22," O. Buchholz) ; San Diego, 
S, 9 (8-12-V-1907, W. S. Wright), $ ("9-V-23," no collector), 2 S $ (no 
date, Ricksecker) ; Shingle Springs, El Dorado County, 6 $ $ (16-V-1931, 
7-V-1934, H. H. Keifer). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 233 

13. Genus CARCINA Hubner 

Plate 1, Figure 9 ; Plate 5, Figure 36 ; Plate 11, Figures 71, 71a ; 
Plate 14, Figure 88 

Carcina Hubner, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterliiige, p. 410, 1826. — Rebel, 
in Staudinger and Bebel, Catalog der Lepidoptereu des palaearctischen 
Faunengebietes, vol. 2, p. 175, 1901. — Waxsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lep- 
idoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 126, 1912.— Busck, Can. Ent., vol. 53, p. 277, 
1921. — BL.VCKM0KE, Report of the Provincial (British Columbia) Museum 
of Natural History for the year 1920, pp. 23, 31, 1921.— Meyrick, in Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc, ISO, p. 159, 1922. — Fleichee, Mem. Dept. Agr. 
India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 40, 1929. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum 
catalogus, pt. 92, p. 251, 1939. (Genotype: Pyralis qiiercana Fabricius, Sys- 
tema entomologiae, p. 652, 1775.) 

Phiialocera Stephens, Illustrations of British entomology, Haustellata, vol. 
4, p. 192, 1834. (Genotype: Pyralis quercana Farbricius, Systema ento- 
mologiae, p. 652, 1775.) 

Head with appressed scales ; tongue developed ; antenna longer than 
fore wing, thick, simple; basal segment with pecten. Labial palpus 
long, recurved ; second segment thickened with appressed scales ; ter- 
minal segment shorter than second. 

Fore wing broad, termen oblique, straight, 12 veins; 2 from well 
before angle, 3 and 4 stalked, 5 and 6 parallel, 7 and 8 stalked, 7 to 
termen, 11 from before middle. 

Hind wing nearly as wide as fore wing ; 8 veins ; 3 and 4 stalked ; 
6 and 7 divergent toward apex. 

Male ge7iitalia. — Cucullus divided; clasper absent. Anellus with 
lateral processes. Vesica armed. Gnathos and uncus well developed, 
the former unspined. 

Female genitalia. — Ductus bursae membranous. Inception of 
ductus seminalis adjacent to ostium. Signum present. 

Larva. — Characters essentially as in Agonopterix : ninth abdominal 
segment with setae I and II well separated; seta VI not on same pin- 
aculum with IV and V, remote from VII. Setal group VII bisetose 
on first and seventh, unisetose on eighth and ninth abdominal seg- 
ments. Ocelli normal. Submentum without pit. 

Pupa. — Smooth except for a fringe of hair on dorso- and latero- 
caudal margins of seventh abdominal segment. Prothoracic femora 
and labial palpi not exposed. Cremaster present but greatly reduced. 

Remarhs. — This genus may be distinguished from the other genera 
of North American oecophorids by the antenna which exceeds the 
length of the fore wing. 

The presence of a short (vestigial) cremaster in the pupa will dis- 
tinguish Carcina from Machimia. 



234 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

CARCINA QUERCANA (Fabricius) 

Pyralis quercana Fabkicius, Systema entomologiae, p. 652, 1775 ; Entomologia 
systematica, vol. 3, p. 271, 1793. 

Phalaena quercana (Fabricius) Donovan, The natural history of British in- 
sects, vol. 3, p. 93, pi. 106, fig. 3, 1794. 

Tortrix quercana (Fabricius) Haworth, Lepidoptera Britannica, 1811. 

Carcina quercana (Fabricius) Heinemann, Die Schmetterlinge Deutschlands 
und der Schweiz, vol. 2, p. 362, 1870. — Rossler, Jahrb. nassau. Vereins 
Naturk., vol. 33, p. 282, 1881.— Snellen, Die Vlinders van Nederland, vol. 2, 
p. 609, 1882. — Steudel and Hoffmann, Wiirttemberg. Vereins vaterl. 
Naturk., vol. 38, p. 206, 1882.— Jourdheuille, M(5m. Soc. Acad. I'Aube, 
vol. 47, p. 188, 1883.- Bau, Handbiich fiir Schmetterlings-Sammler, p. 358, 
1886. — SoRHAGEN, Die Kleinschmetterlinge der Mark Brandenburg, p. 216, 
1886.— Failla-Tedaldi, Nat. Siciliano, vol. 8, p. 186, 1889.— Rebel, Verh. zool.- 
bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 42, p. 530, 1893.— Meyrick, A handbook of British Lep- 
idoptera, p. 613, 1895. — Reutti, Verh. Naturw. Vereins Karlsruhe, vol. 12, 
p. 237, 1898.— Seebold, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 11, p. 317, 1898.— 
Caradja, Deutsche Ent. Zietschr., Iris, vol. 12, p. 207, 1899.— Stance, Die 
Tineinen der umgegend von Friedland in Mecklenberg, p. 34, 1899. — Rebel, 
in Staudinger and Rebel, Catalog der Lepidoptern des palaearctischen 
Faunengebietes, vol. 2, No. 3323, 1901.— Caradja, Bull. Soc. Sci. Bucarest, 
vol. 10, p. 155, 1901. — Sorhagen, Allgemeine Zeitschr. Ent., vol. 7, p. 77, 
1902.— DiSQTJi;, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 14, p. 213, 1902.— 
ScHtJTZE, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 15, p. 23, 1902. — Speiser, Konigs- 
berg. Physikal-Oekonom. Ges. Beitr. Naturk. Preussens, No. 9, p. 148, 1903. — 
Rebel, Ann. Naturh. Hofmus., vol. 18, p. 336, 1903. — Mendes, Broteria, vol. 3, 
p. 248, 1904.— Crombrugghe, M^m. Soc. Ent. Belgique, vol. 2, p. 51, 1906.— 
Rebel, Veih. zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 58, p. (80), 1908.— Spuler, Die 
Schmetterlinge Europas, vol. 2, p. 343, pi. 89, fig. 35, 1910.— Griebel, 
Lepid. Fauna Rheinpfalz., vol. 2, p. 55, 1910. — Piquenabd, Bull. Soc. Sci. MM. 
Quest. (Rennes), vol. 19, p. 79, 1910. — Gianetxt, Ann. Accad. Agr. Torino, 
vol. 53, p. 96, 1911.— Rebel, Ann. Naturh. Hofmus., vol. 25, p. 417, 1911.— 
HoLL, Bull. Soc. Hist. Nat. Afrique du Nord, vol. 3, p. 26, 1911.— Haudeb, 
Ent. Zeitschr., vol. 25, p. 204, 1913.— Skala, Verh. naturf. Ver. Briinn, vol. 
51, p. 316, 1913.— Rebel, Wien. Ent. Ver. Jahresb., vol. 23, p. 202, 1913.— 
Verbkodt and Mtjller-Rutz, Die Schmetterlinge der Schweiz, vol. 2, 
p. 476, 1914.— Galvagni, Wien. Ent. Ver. Jahresb., vol. 25, p. 35, 1915.— 
ScHAWERDA, Wien. Ent. Ver. Jahresb., vol. 20, p. 46, 1916. — Rebel, Ann. 
Naturh. Hofmus., vol. 30, p. 166, 1916 ; Sitzungsb. Akad. AViss. Wien, vol. 126, 
p. 808, 1917.— Martini, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 30, p. 155, 1917.— 
MiTTELBERGER, Wien. Ent. Ver. Jahresb., vol. 28, p. 66, 1918. — Turati, Soc. 
Italiana Sci. Nat. Mus. Civico, Pavia, vol. 58, p. 116, 1919. — Strand, 
Archiv fiir Naturg., vol. 85A, pt. 4, p. 9, 1919. — Blackmore, Report of the 
Provincial (British Columbia) Museum of Natural History for the year 
1920, pp. 23. 31, pi. 2, 1921.— BuscK, Can. Ent., vol. 53, p. 276, 1921.— 
Blackmore, Report of the Provincial (British Columbia) Museum of 
Natural History for the year 1921, p. 28, 1922.— Zimmerman, Verh. zool.-bot. 
Ges. Wien, vol. 71, p. (43), 1922. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera in- 
sectorum, fasc. 180, p. 159, 1922. — Chretien, in Oberthiir, Etudes de Lepidop- 
terologie compar^e, fasc. 19, p. 368, 1922.— Galvagni, Wien. Ent. Ver. Jahresb., 
vol. 30, p. 105, 1924.— Lr.oNARDi, Elenco delle specie di Insetti dannosi e 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 235 

loro parassiti ricordati in Italia fino all' anno 1911, pt. 2, p. 281, 1927. — 
Zerny, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 41, p. 144, 1927. — Larsen, Ent. 
Meddel., vol. 17, p. 80, 1927. — Meyeick, A revised handbook of British 
Lepidoptera, p. 675, 1928. — Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), 
vol. 11, p. 40, 1929.— Amsei., Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 44, p. 121, 
1930. — Drenowski, Mem. Bulg. Akad. Wiss., vol. 26, No. 6, p. 75, 1930. — 
Vkrbrodt, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 45, p. 129, 1931. — Eschesich, 
Die Forstinsekten Mitteleuropas, vol. 3, p. 202, fig. 162, pi. 1, fig. 22, 1931.— 
Kebel and Zerny, Denkschr. Akad. Wiss. Wien, math.-nat. Kl., vol. 103, 
p. 151, 1931. — Hiking, Die Tierwelt Mitteleuropas (Die Schmetterlinge), 
p. 154, 1932.— Eckstein, Kleinschmet. Deutschlands, p. 123, pi. 6, fig. 223, 
1933. — Sterneck, Prodromus der Schmetterlingsfauna Bohmens, vol. 2, 
p. 109, 1933. — MoRLEY and Rait-Smith, Trans. Ent. Soc. London, vol. 81, 
p. 176, 1933.— Zeei^y, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 48, p. 25, 1934.— 
Ostheldi:r, Mitt. Miinch. Ent. Ges., vol. 24, p. 82, 1935. — Pierce and Met- 
calfe, The genitalia of the tineid families of the Lepidoptera of the 
British Islands, p. 32, pi. 18, 1935. — Rapp, Beitrage zur Fauna Thiiringens, 
vol. 2, p. 140, 1936. — McDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada 
and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8392, 
1939. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterormn catalogus, pt. 92, p. 251, 1939. 

Phibalocera quercana (Fabricius) Stithens, A systematic catalog of British 
insects, pt. 2, p. 192, No. 7153, 1829; Illustrations of British entomology, 
Haustellata, vol. 4, p. 193, 1834.— Wood, Index entomologicus, p. 169, fig. 1160, 
1845. — Stainton, Insecta Britannica, p. 81, 1854; A manual of British 
butterflies and moths, vol. 2, p. 319, 1859; The natural history of the 
Tineina, vol. 13, pp. 296, 297, pi. 7, fig. 1, 1873. 

Phalaenae Tortrix fagana Schiffermuller, Systematisches Verzeichniss der 
Schmetterlinge der Wiener Gegend, p. 128, pi. 16, fig. 6, 1776. 

Tortrix fagana (Schiffermiiller) Hubner, Sammlung europiiischer Schmetter- 
linge, vol. 7, pi. 24, fig. 153, 1830. 

Carcina fagana (Fabricius) Heerich-Schaffer, Systematisches Bearbeitung 
der Schmetterlinge von Europa, vol. 5, p. 131, 1853. 

Tinea cancella HtJBNER, Sammlung europiiischer Schmetterlinge, p. 69, fig. 453, 
1796. 

Carcina cancrella Hubner, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 410, 1826. 

Lampros faganella Treitschke, in Ochsenheimer, Die Schmetterlinge von Eu- 
ropa, vol. 9, pt. 2, p. 67, 1833. 

Labial palpus pale yellow ; second segment irrorated with pink on 
apical third. Antenna pale yellow below, dull pink above. Face 
shining pale yellow. Head and thorax very pale, dull brownish 
ochreous. Fore wing dull pink overlaid and suffused with pale, dull 
brownish ochreous and sparsely irrorated in apical third with black ; 
on basal tliird of costa a narrow, yellow patch fading to white on 
extreme costal edge; from middle to apical third of costa a quadrate 
yellow patch; edge of costa to apex and termen to tomus and the 
cilia dark yellow ; cilia at tornus dull pink ; from basal third to about 
middle of inner margin a subtriangular yellow patch extending well 
into cell; in this patch, which is ochreous in some specimens, some 
reddish-ochreous scales. Hind wing pale straw-yelloAv suffused with 



236 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

pink at apex; cilia pale yellow. Legs creamy white; fore pair 
strongly overlaid exteriorly with dark pink. Abdomen light 
yellowish. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe ample, hairy, without clasper; sacculus 
deeply folded; cucullus deeply cleft, lower point (extension of sac- 
culus?) with tuft of strong, curved bristles. Lateral processes of 
anellus long. Vesica armed with 4 to 7 strong cornuti. Gnathos 
without spines. Uncus elongate, hooked, lateral edges infolded. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate dilated laterally; ostium slitlike; 
ductus bursae membranous; inception of ductus seminalis just before 
ostium; bursa copulatrix with small signum. 

Alar expanse, 17-21 mm. 

Type.—Los.t'i 

Type locality. — Europe. 

FoQcl plants. — Quercus; Gotoneaster pyracantha L. ; apple. 

Distribution. — Europe, Asia Minor, and southern Vancouver Is- 
land, British Columbia, Canada. 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Victoria, 14 5 (^, 10 5 5 (July and August dates, 1920- 
1922, E. H. Blackmore ; 19-VII-1922, W. R. Carter ; 7-8-VIII-1929, J. F. G. 
Clarke) . 

Remarks. — The species is well established on southern Vancouver 
Island, British Columbia, and probably will be found in Washington 
State, across the Straits of Juan de Fuca, where oak is abundant. 

There is considerable variation in this species, wliich probably 
accounts for some of the synonymy, but all figures of this species I 
have seen are readily recognizable. 

14. MATHILDANA, new genus 

Plate 1, Figure 2 ; Plate 7, Fiquee 50; Plate 11, Figuees 74, 74a, 74b ; Plate 19, 

Figure 118 

Genotype. — Dasycera newmanella Clemens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadel- 
phia, vol. 2, p. 428, 1864. 

Head smooth, tongue developed ; antenna thickened with scales ; cili- 
ated in male ; basal segment without pecten. Labial palpus long, slen- 
der; second segment thickened with appressed scales; third segment 
shorter than second, slender, acute. 

Fore wing narrow, costa straight or gently arched ; apex narrowly 
rounded ; 12 veins ; 2 about as near to 3 as 4 is to 5 ; 7 and 8 stalked, both 
to costa ; 11 from about middle of cell ; cell not much longer than one- 
half the length of wing. 

Hind wing about as wide as fore wing ; costa gently convex ; 8 veins ; 
3 and 4 connate ; 5 nearer to 6 than to 4. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 237 

Male genitalia. — Harpe without clasper. Anellus with lateral proc- 
esses. Vesica armed. Gnathos and uncus well developed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate partly sclerotized. Ductus bursae 
with blind sac from ventral surface. Signum present. 

Remarks. — The species neivmanella has been placed in several dif- 
ferent genera by various authors, but I have found it impossible to 
include our North American specimens in any of the established 
genera. 

Walsingham ^° has discussed the confusion arising from the descrip- 
tion of two species with the name sulphurella by Fabricius, and sup- 
pressed the genus Oecophora as a result. He was erroneous in this, as 
brought out by Meyrick,''^ who resurrected Oecophora and separated 
it from Dasycera. Dasycera Stephens (1829) is synonymous with 
Dasy census Haworth (1828), the latter being preoccupied by Dasycerus 
Brongniart (1800). Esperia is therefore the proper generic 
name for the European species, as pointed out by Fletcher.*^ This 
name is not available for our American species since the two, n&wman- 
ella and sulphur ella., are not congeneric. 

In Espeiia the costa of the fore wing is concave, the cell reaches to 
outer two-thirds, vein 2 is remote from 3 ; 3, 4, and 5 are about equidis- 
tant at their bases. In the hind wing vein 5 is much nearer to 4 than to 
6. In the male genitalia the clasper is present and the vesica is without 
armature. (I have not seen a female of Esperia.) 

The genus Mathildana differs from Esperia by the straight or convex 
costa of fore wing, the short cell, which does not extend much past the 
center of the wing, and the approximation of vein 2 to 3. In the 
hind wing vein 5 is nearer to 6 than to 4. In the male the clasper is 
absent, and the vesica is strongly armed. 

MATHILDANA NEWMANELLA (Clemens), new combination 

Dasycera neivmanella Clemens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 428, 1864 ; 
in Stainton, Tineina of North America, p. 252, 1872. — Zelleb, Verh. zool.-bot. 
Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 289, 1873.— Chambers, U. S. Gaol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. 
Bull. 3, p. 145, 1877. — BEUTENMtJLLEB, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of 
New Jersey, p. 357, 1890. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 5545, 1891.— Dietz, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects 
of New Jersey, p. 476, 1900.— Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 
5932, 1903. — Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera in^ectorum, fasc. 180, p. 22, 1922. — 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 18, 1938. — IMcDttnnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America 
(Part 2, Mlerolepidoptera), No. 8353, 1939. 



^ Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 141, 1912. 
*T Meyrick, in V. ytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 20-21, 1922. 
*8 Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. sen), vol. 11, p. 8.5, 1929. 



238 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Oecophora neivmanella (Clemens) Keaefott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Boreal America, No. 6478, 1903. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 
35, p. 203, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Cheek list of the Lepidoptera 
of Boreal America, No. 6499, 1917. — Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North 
America, vol. 4, pi. 38, fig. 6, 1920.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., 
Memoir 68, p. 249, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 
101, p. 546, 1928.— Brimley, The insects of North Carolina, p. 304, 1938. 

Labial palpus orange-yellow; third segment with brownish suffu- 
sion. Tongue yellow. Face, tegula, collar, and basal segment of 
antenna brassy; remainder of antenna shining purplish black except 
for about eight terminal segments, which are silvery white. Head, 
thorax, and fore wing dusky black with a pronounced purple luster ; 
from base of wing, along fold, an orange-yellow dash extending to 
basal fifth; in cell, a similarly colored, longitudinal dash reaching 
slightly past middle of wing (in some specimens the orange dashes 
are weak or absent, this is especially true of the southern examples) ; 
cilia fuscous, lighter apically. Hind wing dark fuscous ; cilia lighter. 
Legs shining brassy. Abdomen fuscous above with a faint purple 
sheen ; brassy below. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe narrow ; divided beyond sacculus ; sacculus 
broad ; cucullus sharply pointed. Anellus a small plate ; lateral proc- 
esses long, flattened, dilated distally. Aedeagus moderately short, 
stout; vesica armed with numerous long, straight cornuti. Vinculum 
narrowly rounded. Gnathos broad, thick, slightly excavated posteri- 
orly and terminating in a long, sharply pointed process. Uncus long, 
pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate narrow; sclerotized posteriorly. 
Ostium rather broad, oval, opening in membranous anterior part of 
genital plate. Ductus bursae narrowly sclerotized adjacent to ostium, 
with short blind sac from ventral surface anterior to sclerotized part ; 
inception of ductus seminalis well before ostium. Bursa copulatrix 
large, asymmetrical; signum a lightly sclerotized elongate, weakly 
spined plate. 

Alar expanse, 14r-19 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Type locality. — "Virginia." 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distrihutio7i. — Eastern United States and eastern Canada. 

United States records 

District of Columbia: Washington, $ (no date or collector). 
Maryland: $ (May 30, 1916, A. Busck) ; 9 (May 30, 1906, H. S. Barber). 
New Hampshire: Hampton, 2 S $ (lO-ll-VI-1911, S. A. Shaw). 
New Jersey: Greenwood Lake, $ (June 10, 1900, Wm. Beutenmiiller). 
New York: Numerous localities (ficie Forbes). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 239 

North Carolina: Black Mountains, G S $ ,4 ^ ^ (May 3-27, Wm. Beutenmiiller) ; 
Mount Graybeard, S ("V-26," Wm. Beutenmiiller). 

Ohio: Cincinnati, 4 $ $ {28-V-1904, A. F. Braun) ; $ ("5-23-03," no collector) ; 
Cuyahoga County, $ (9-VI-189S, W. D. Kearfott). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, 2 $ $ (lO-VI-1907, 10-21-1907, H. D. Merrick). 

Vermont: 2 S $ (no date or collector). 

Virginia: Mountain Lake, 2 $ 3 (June 14, 1907, A. F. Braun) ; Virginia shore, 
opposite Plummers Island, Md., $ (May 28, 1914, R. C. Shannon) ; Wood- 
stock, 9 (June 1, 1903; no collector). 

Canadian records 

Ontario: Bala (July 19, 1932, G. S. Walley) ; Fishers Glen (June 12, 1931, W. J. 
Brown) ; Georgian Bay (July 13, 1932, G. S. Walley) ; Leamington (June 8, 
1929, G. S. Walley) ; Orillia (June 26, July 2, 1926, C. H. Curran) ; Ottawa, $ 
(19-VI-1905, C. H. Young) ; Point Pelee (July 22, 1927, F. P. Ide). 

Quebec: Kuowlton (June 24, 1929, G. S. Walley) ; Laval County (July 13, 1907) ; 
Mount St. Hilaire (July 1, 1909) ; Oka (June 12, 1911) ; St. Johns (June 19, 
1911, G. Chagnon). 

Remarks. — The specimens from North Carolina have little or no 
orange color in the center of the wing but otherwise agree with the 
specimens from more northern localities. 

15. CAROLANA, new genus 

Pjlate 1, Figure 3; Plate 7, Figuke 49; Plate 10, Figthjes 69, 69a, 69b; 
Plate 16, Figup.e 96 ; Plate 17, Figuke 108 

Genotyye. — Borhhausenla aseripteUa Busck, Can. Ent., vol. 40, p. 
194, 1908. 

Head with closely appressed scales; tongue well developed; antenna 
strongly ciliated in male, simple in female ; basal segment with strong 
pecten; labial palpus long, slender, smooth; third segment nearly as 
long as second. Abdomen armed with peculiar, short, stout, trun- 
cated setae. Thorax smoothly scaled. 

Fore wing elongate, costa gently arched; apex pointed; 12 veins; 
2 distant from 3 ; 3, 4, and 5 equidistant ; 7 and 8 long stalked, both 
to costa; 10 distant from 9; 11 from basal fourth of cell. 

Hind wing narrower than fore wing; apex pointed; 3 and 4 stalked 
from angle of cell ; 6 and 7 subparallel ; cell shorter than one half the 
length of wing. 

Male genitalia. — Clasper absent. Anellus without lateral processes. 
Vesica armed. Uncus and gnathos present. Socii absent. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ductus bursae 
partly sclerotized. Signum present. 

Remar^ks. — This genus may be distinguished from Borkhau^enia 
by the following characters: In Garolana vein 2 of the fore wing is 
distant from 3, 10 is distant from 9, 11 from basal fourth, and there 
is no internal cell. In the hind wing 3 and 4 are stalked and the cell 



240 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL IVIUSEUM vol. 90 

is shorter than one-half the length of the wing. The clasper is 
absent in the male genitalia, and the ductus bursae of the female is 
partly sclerotized. In BorJchausenia veins 2 to 5 of the fore wing are 
equidistant, 10 is near 9, 11 is from about middle of cell, and the 
internal cell is present. In the hind wing 3 and 4 are approximate 
and the cell is about half as long as the wing. In the male genitalia 
the clasper is present and in the female genitalia the ductus bursae 
is membranous. 

The genotype is the only species I have seen referable to this 
genus. 

CAROLANA ASCRIPTELLA (Bnsck), new combination 

Borkhausenia ascrxptella Busck, Can. Ent., vol. 40, p. 194, 1908; Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 204, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6505, 1917. — Barnes and Busck, 
Contr. Lepid. North America, vol. 4, p. 235, 1920. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 40, 1922. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. 
Stat. Memoir 68, p. 249, 1923; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 101, p. 546, 1928. — Procter, Biological survey of the Mount Desert 
Region: The insect fauna, p. 272, 1938. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum 
catalogus, pt. 88, p. 51, 1938. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
No. 8369, 1939. 

Labial palpus, antenna, face, head, thorax, and fore wing straw 
colored, shining. Second segment of labial palpus shaded with black- 
ish fuscous exteriorly on basal half. Antenna indistinctly and nar- 
rowly annulated with fuscous. Fore wing irrorated with blackish 
fuscous; base of costa, a large spot at basal third, in cell, and one 
at end of cell, blackish fuscous; cilia straw colored, more ochreous 
basally. Hind wing pale light fuscous ; cilia ochreous basally fading 
to straw color outwardly. Legs straw colored, strongly overlaid 
with blackish fuscous exteriorly except at joints and on hind tibia 
and tarsus. Abdomen shining whitish-ochreous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe narrow ; cucullus rounded. Anellus deeply 
incised on posterior edge. Aedeagus large, stout, sharply pointed, 
sharply curved basally; vesica armed with a single, long, sharply 
pointed, strong cornutus. Vinculum narrowly rounded. Gnathos 
very broad, shovel-shaped and very closely approximated to the 
slender, pointed uncus. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ostium broad, an- 
terior edge concave. Ductus bursae slender, twisted, sclerotized in 
posterior two-thirds, the sclerotized portion bearing numerous small 
teeth on inner surface ; ductus seminalis entering well before ostium. 
Bursa copulatrix large, oval; signum a weakly sclerotized, toothed 
plate. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 241 

Alar expanse, 9-12 mm. 

Ty^e. — In the United States National Museum. 
Tyj)e locality. — Oak Station, Allegheny County, Pa. 
Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distnhution. — Eastern United States from Maryland northward 
to Maine. 

United States records 

Connecticut: East River, $ (July 8, 1909, Charles R. Ely). 

District of Columbia: Anaeostia, $, 5 (7-VI-1910, P. R. Myers). 

Maryland: Plummers Island, 4 $ S,2 5 $ (June 1903, A. Busck). 

New Hampshire: 2 $ $ (A. Busck). 

New Jersey: Essex County Park, $, 9 (June 24-30, W. D. Kearfott) ; Mont- 

clair, 2 S $, S 5 5 (June, July dates, 1913, 1920, W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: Ithaca {teste Forbes). 
Pennsylvania: New Brighton, S $ $ (June, July, 1907 and 1911, H. D. Merrick) ; 

Oak Station, Allegheny County, 14 $ $, Q 5 5 (June, July dates, 1911, 

Fred Marloff ) . 

Remarks. — This species has been recorded *^ from JMexico and Costa 
Rica but the specimens I have seen, determined as this species, are 
referable to other genera. 

16. Genus DECANTHA Busck 

Plate 3, Figure 19 ; Plate 7, Figuee 55 ; Plate 10, Figukes 66, 66a ; 
Plate 14, Figure 91 

Decantha Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 202, 1908; vol. 47, p. 31, 
1915. — Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 
422, 1915. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, p. 161, 1917. — jMeyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorimi, 
fasc. ISO, p. 24, 1922.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir OS, 
p. 248, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 101, p. 540, 
1928.— Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 64, 1929.— 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 23, 1938. (Genotype: 
OecopJiora borkhausenii Zeller, Isis von Oken, vol. 3, p. 192, 1839.) 
Head sm^ooth; tongue developed. Antenna ciliated in male; basal 

segment with pecten. Labial palpus long, recurved; second segment 

roughened in front and thickened with appressed scales; terminal 

segment shorter than second, acute. 

Fore wing elongate, pointed, 11 veins; 2 from toward angle, 3 

from angle, 7 and 8 coincident, to costa ; 11 from middle. 
Hind wing narrower than fore wing, 8 veins; 3 and 4 remote, 4 

from angle; 5 to 7 r)arallel. 
Male genitalia. — Harpe without clasper. Anellus with elongate, 

strap-like, lateral processes. Gnathos not spined. Vesica with strong 

cornuti. Uncus pointed. 



*» Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 143, 1912. 
286614 — 41 14 



242 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Female genitalia. — ^Ductus biirsae lightly sclerotized posteriorly. 
Signum present. 

Remarks. — This genus is similar to Fdbiola in having veins 7 and 8 
of the fore wing coincident. It may be distinguished, however, by the 
presence of pecten on the basal segment of the antenna, the presence of 
strong cornuti on the vesica of the male, and the presence of a signum 
in the female. 

There is a single North American species belonging to this genus. 

DECANTHA BOREASELLA (Chambers) 

Plate 20, Figuees 125, 125a ; Plate 39, Figuee 211 

Oecophora horeasella Chambeks, Can. Ent., vol. 5, p. 189, 1873 ; Cincinnati Quart. 
Journ. Sci., vol. 2, p. 114, 292, 1875 ; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 3, 
p. 129, 141, 1877. — Riley, in Smitb, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 5550, 1891.— BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5921, 1903. 

Borlhai(senia horeaseUa (Chambers) Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6468, 1903 (as a synonym of Bork- 
haiisenia horkhausenii [Zeller]). 

Decantha ioreasella (Chambers) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 202, 
1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6497, 1917. — Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 24, 1922.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 
248, 1923; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 101, p. 546, 
1928.— Gaede. in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 23, 1938.— Mc- 
Dunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States 
of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8358, 1939 (as a synonym of 
Decantha horkhausenii [Chambers]). 

Borkhausenia lorkhauscnii (Zeller) Dyar, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 934, 
1904. 

Labial palpus white overlaid and irrorated with black. Antenna 
checkered black and white. Head black, with a reddish luster and 
mixed with white posterodorsally. Thorax and fore wing shining 
golden ; base of tegula and collar narrowly black ; base of wing black, 
outer margin of the black basal patch concave and edged with white ; 
the color of the basal patch is narrowly continued along the costal 
edge to apical fourth; at basal third a triangular area (broadest at 
costa) of black crosses the wing to the inner corner of a quadrate 
black spot on the inner margin ; from middle of costa, to apical fourth, 
a rectangular black area extending past the middle of wing, and 
joined by its inner corner to the outer corner of the spot on the inner 
margin; the outer corner of the rectangular costal spot extends to 
tonius where it broadens and fades to reddish brown; all spots are 
edged outwardly with white and the spot on the inner margin is 
edged inwardly with white: at apex a black spot; icilia golden 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 243 

cchreous. Hind wing dark fuscous; cilia shining yellowish fuscous. 
Legs black annulated with white at joints. Abdomen fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad, short, cucullus rounded; sacculus 
rather strongly, though narrowly, sclerotized and produced as a 
pointed process slightly beyond cucullus. Anellus consisting of two 
long, flattened, truncated, lateral processes arising from a small basal 
plate. Aedeagus relatively long, stout, nearly straight, bluntly 
pointed ; vesica armed with one long cornutus with lateral serrations 
and a smaller, stout, hooked distal one. Vinculum bhmtly pointed. 
Gnathos truncate. Uncus long, pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate lightly sclerotized posteriorly; 
ostium long, narrow, opening in anterior membranous part of genital 
plate. Ductus bursae strongly sclerotized in posterior two-thirds, 
posterior third somewhat narrower than anterior part ; at middle, from 
inner surface several long slender spines ; inception of ductus seminalis 
at posterior two-thirds. Bursa copulatrix small; signum a poorly 
developed, elongate plate. 

Alar expanse, 10-15 mm. 

Type. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Type locality. — Not stated. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distrihution. — Far-western United States and Canada and North- 
eastern United States. 

United States records 

Arizona: Huachuca Mountains, $ (no date) ; Pinal Mountains, $ (July 1900, 

Kunze). 
California: Burney Falls, Shasta County, $ (20-VII-1871, Walsingham) ; Camp 

Baldy, San Bernardino Mountains, ? (June 24-30). 
District of Columbia: $ (A. Busck). 
Massachusetts: Cohasset, S (July 6, 1907, Owen Bryant). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Kaslo, 2 S $ (29-VI-1903; 25-VII-1903, H. G. Dyar) ; Seton 
Lake, Lillooet, $ (9-VI-1926, J. McDunnough). 

Remarks. — In Chambers' description he gives the dark areas of the 
fore wing, head, palpi, etc., as "reddish-brown." In the fresh speci- 
mens before me these parts are distinctly black, but worn specimens 
are brownish. In view of this I feel that his description was written 
from a faded specimen. 

This is the species that has been listed as a synonym of the Euro- 
pean horkhausenii with which it is definitely congeneric; but a com- 
parison of the figures will adequately show the differences. 



244 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

17. Genus FABIOLA Busck 

Plate 3, Figure 25 ; Plate 6, Figure 41 ; Plate 8, Figures 61, 61a ; Plate 16, 

Figure 95 

FaUola Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat Mus., vol. 35, p. 202, 1908.— Barnes and Mc- 
DuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 161, 1917. — 
Meteick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 23, 1922. — Forbes, 
Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 248, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell 
Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 101, p. 546, 1928. — Fleh-cher, Mem. Dept. Agr. 
India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 96, 1929. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum 
catalogus, pt. 88, p. 22, 1938.— Brimley, The insects of North Carolina, p. 304, 
1938. (Genotype: Oecophora shalcriella Chambers, Cincinnati Quart. 
Journ. Sci., vol. 2, p. 114, 1875.) 

Head with smooth, appressed scales and spreading side tufts ; tongue 
developed ; antenna strongly ciliated in male ; basal segment without 
pecten. Labial palpus long, slender, curved, smooth; terminal seg- 
ment as long as second. 

Fore wing elongate; 11 veins, 2 from well before angle, 7 and 8 
coincident, to costa. 

Hind wing narrow, ovate-lanceolate, 8 veins; 3 and 4 connate or 
approximate ; 6 and 7 parallel. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe without clasper. Anellus with lateral pro- 
cesses. Tegumen broad. Gnathos not spined. Socii absent. Uncus 
present. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate strongly sclerotized, protruding; 
ductus bursae membranous; signum absent. 

Remarks. — ^A derivative of Schiffermulleria, differing from it in 
having veins 7 and 8 of the fore wing coincident, and a slender 
extension of the sacculus. 

This genus contains two described North American species. 

FABIOLA SHALERIELLA (Chambers) 

Oecophora shalerieUa Chambers, Cincinnati Quart. Journ. Sci., vol. 2, p. 114, 
1875. 

Faiiola shalerieUa (Chambers), Mettrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, 
fasc. 180, p. 23, 1922.— Forbes, in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., 
Memoir 101, p. 546, 1928.— Braun, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 61, p. 46, 
1935. — McDuNNOXJGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the 
United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8356, 1939. 

Oecophora shalleriella Rxlet, in Smith, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
No. 5557, 1891.— Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5928, 1903. 

Borkhausenia shalleriella, Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Boreal America, No. 6474, 1903. 

Fabiola shalleriella Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 202, 1908.— Barnes 
and McDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 
6498, 1917.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 248, 1923.— 
Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 96, 1929.— Gaede, 
in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 22, 1938. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 245 

Labial palpus shining white ; second segment narrowly edged with 
fuscous anteriorly and at apex; third segment wholly overlaid with 
fuscous. Antenna shining greenish fuscous narrowly and faintly 
annulated with silvery white. Face shining white. Head and thorax 
iridescent greenish fuscous, this color continued to base of fore wing 
and narrowly around its edges ; at basal forth of fore wing, from inner 
margin, a conspicuous, transverse, white fascia, which does not reach 
costa and is narrowly edged inwardly and outwardly with black; in 
costal half of the white fascia numerous metallic blue scales ; between 
this fascia and the base of wing a large golden-ochreous spot, lighter 
centrally ; slightly before apex, on costa, a white spot ; from this spot a 
short, transverse, black-edged fascia extends almost to inner margin ; 
between this fascia and that at basal fourth the ground color is golden- 
ochreous, this color also between the outer metallic fascia and apex; 
from costa, in the area between the two fasciae, an elongate greenish- 
fuscous shade streaked with white and extending nearly to middle of 
wing; on middle inner margin an elongate, irregular velvety black 
spot containing three small spots of metallic blue scales. Between this 
black spot and the fuscous costal shade a pale, yellowish longitudinal 
streak ; extreme apex white preceded by fuscous ; cilia shining fuscous 
except at tornus; there creamy white. Hind wing blackish fuscous 
except for a whitish baso-costal area ; cilia shining fuscous. Legs sil- 
very white shaded with fuscous. Abdomen greenish fuscous above, 
silvery white beneath. 

Male genitalia. — ^Harpe broad, sparsely hairy ; costa convex ; cucullus 
sharply pointed. Anellus with long, curved, pointed lateral processes ; 
lateral process with double row of minute setae for most of length. 
Aedeagus slender, slightly curved. Vinculum broadly rounded. 
Gnathos long, rugose toward distal end, which is truncated. Uncus 
long, sharply pointed. Tegumen produced laterally into a point. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate strongly sclerotized, convex, 
broader anteriorly than posteriorly. Ostium longitudinal, nearly 
spindle-shaped. Ductus bursae slender ; ductus seminalis at posterior 
third of ductus bursae. Bursa copulatrix oval. 

Alar expanse, 10-15 mm. 

Type. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Type locality. — Camp Bee Spring, Ky. 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distnhution. — Eastern United States and Canada. 

United States records 

Connecticut: Stamford, $ (June 10, 1930, B. T. R. Lab., coll.). 

Kentucky: Camp Bee Spring. 

Maryland: Plummers Island, $, $ (31-V-1908, A. Busck). 



246 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 9a 

New York: Bear Mountain, 2 $ $, 9 (13-VI-1925, F. M. Schott). 

Pennsylvania: New Brighton, $ (24-VI-1907, H. D. Merrick) ; Oak Station, 
Alleglieny County, 11 $$,3 $$ (11-18-VI-1911, Fred Marloff) ; Ohio 
Pyle, $, S 9 9, (lO-VI-1906, Henry Engel) ; Pittsburgh, 2 $ $ ((6-10- 
VI-1906, Henry Engel) ; York, 3 $ $ 2 9 9 (ll-VI-1901 and 1(>-VI-1902, 
W. D. Kearfott). 

Virginia: Great Falls, 31 5 5, 2 9 9 (May dates, 1919-1922, A. Busek). 

Canadian records 
Ontario: Severn (June 17, 1925, C. H. Curran). 

Remarks. — This and the following species are the only two, described 
from North America, referable to the genus Fahiola. 

FABIOLA TECTA Braun 

Plate 20, Figures 119, 119a 

Fahiola tecta Bbaun, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 61, p. 45, 1935. — Beimlet, 
Insects of North Carolina, p. 304, 1938. — McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 
lepidoptera), No. 8357, 1939. 

Similar to shdleriella but smaller, with the golden-ochreous areas 
of the fore wing replaced by yellow, the median black area extending 
almost across the wing and containing three longitudinal metallic-blue 
streaks, and with the fuscous areas and cilia of both wings more 
blackish. 

Male genitalia. — Similar to shaleriella but with the harpe broader, 
cucullus more acutely pointed and with the lobes of the tegumen 
shorter and more bluntly pointed. 

Alar expanse, 9-10 mm. 

Type. — In Dr. A. F. Braun collection, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Type locality. — Near Natural Bridge, McCreary County, Ky. 

Food plant. — ^Unknown. 

Distribution. — Known only from Kentucky. 

United States records 

Kentucky: Cumberland Valley, Letcher County, 2 S $ (l-VII-1935, A. F. 
Braun). 

Remarks. — The two males listed above were sent to me by Dr. 
Braun. I have seen no other specimens. 

This species is amply distinct from shaleriella in markings and 
genitalia. 

18. Genus SCHIFFERMULLERIA Hubner 

Plate 2, Figtjre 18 ; Plate 7, Figure 56 ; Plate 13, Figures 82, S2a ; Plate 16, 

Figure 98 

Schiffermillleria Hubner, Verzeichniss bekannter Scbmetterlinge, p. 421, 1826. — 
Stephens, Illustrations of British entomology, Haustellata, vol. 4, p. 423, 
1835. — Walsingham and Durant, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 45, p. 156, 1909. — 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 247 

Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, vol. 4, p. 421-422, 
1912. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 26-27, 1922. — 
Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir G8, p. 240-248, 1923. (Geno- 
type: Phalaena Tinea schaefferella Linnaeus, Systema naturae, ed. 10, p. 
541, 1758.) 
Chrysia MiTXi:fcKE, Ann. Soc. Ent. France, ser. 3, vol. 2, p. 61, 1854. (Genotype: 
Pancalia grandis Desvignes, Entomologist, vol. 1, p. 342, 1842.) 

Head smooth, side tufts slightly raised; tongue developed; an- 
tenna ciliated; basal segment without pecten. Labial palpus long, 
recurved, smooth or slightly roughened ; terminal segment shorter or 
as long as second segment. 

Fore wing elongate, apex pointed ; 12 veins ; 2 from well before angle ; 
3 and 4 approximate; 7 and 8 stalked, both to costa, 11 from before 
middle. 

Hind wing narrower than fore wing, costa gently arched, 8 veins ; 
3 and 4 connate, 5 nearer to 4 than to 6 ; 6 and 7 subparallel. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe ample. Anellus with lateral extensions. 
Gnathos a broad, unspined band. Socii absent. Uncus well 
developed. 

Femah genitalia. — Genital plate strongly sclerotized ; ductus bursae 
wholly membranous or slightly sclerotized for part of its length; 
signum present or absent.^" 

Remarks. — Busck ^^ recognized five species in this genus (but placed 
them under the name EpicalUma) . Of these I have synonymized one, 
dimidiella.) with quadrimaculella and have placed coloradella in the 
Ethmiidae. The genus Ethmia., as it now stands, is not a homogeneous 
assemblage of species and will accommodate coloradella. The proper 
generic placement of this species must await a revision of the Ethmi- 
idae, and for that reason no further treatment of coloradella is given 
in this paper. In 1912 ^^ Busck added lucidella; Meyrick described 
antidectis in 1914 ^^ and rostrigera in 1918.^* The first, lucidella.^ 
belongs in SchiffermulleHa., antidectis is referable to TricloneUa in 
the family Cosmopterygidae, and rostrigera is a synonym of coloradella 
(new synonymy). In 1923^^ Braun added amplicincta which is a 
synonym of editheUa. I have retained the generic name Eficallima 
for argenticinctella (Clemens) and have associated the European 
formoseUa (Schifferm tiller) with it. The latter has become estab- 
lished in the United States in recent years. This leaves three North 
American species referable to the genus Schi-ffermulleria. 

^ There is only a single female each of editheUa and lucidella available for study. The 
bursa copulatrix of editheUa is missing, and that of lucidella, although partly obscured, 
appears to lack a signum. 

81 Busck, A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908 (argenticinctella, editheUa, 
coloradella, dimidiella, and qiiadrimaculeUa.) 

62 Busck, A., Ent. News, vol. 3, p. 170, 1912. 

" Me.vrick, E., Exotic Microlepidoptora, vol. 1, p. 218, 1914. 

^ Ibid., vol. 2, p. 237, 1918. 

t^^ Braun, A. P., Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 49, p. 117, 1923. 



248 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF SCHIFFERMULLERIA BASED ON 
COLORATION 

1. Ground color of fore wing dark brown to black with conspicuous 

white or whitish markings; no metallic scaHng. 

quadrimaculella (Chambers) (p. 248) 
Ground color and markings otherwise 2 

2. Median longitudinal streak of fore wing reaching apex; deep 

golden-yellow lucidella (Busck) (p. 251) 

Median longitudinal streak of fore wing ending well before apex; 
light golden-yellow edithella (Busck) (p. 250) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF SCHIFFERMULLERIA BASED ON 
MALE GENITALIA 

1. Lateral processes of anellus extending well beyond base of harpe 2 

Lateral processes of anellus short, not extending beyond base of 

harpe (fig. 122) quadrimaculella (Chambers) (p. 248) 

2. Costa of harpe slightly convex (fig. 121) lucidella (Busck) (p. 251) 

Costa of harpe deeply concave (fig. 120) edithella (Busck) (p. 250) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF SCHIFFERMULLERIA BASED ON 
FEMALE GENITALIA 

1. Anterior edge of genital plate straight or slightly concave; ostium 

deeply V-shaped (fig. 213) quadrimaculella (Chambers) (p. 248) 

Anterior edge of genital plate not straight or concave; ostium not 

deeply V-shaped 2 

2. Anterior edge of genital plate strongly convex (fig. 214) 

edithella (Busck) (p. 250) 
Anterior edge of genital plate broadly forked (fig. 215) 

lucidella (Busck) (p. 251) 

SCHIFFERMULLERIA QUADRIMACULELLA (Chambers) 

Plate 20, Figukes 122, 122a ; Plate 39, Figuee 213 

Oecophora quadrimaculella Chambees, Cincinnati Quart. Journ. Sci., vol. 2, p. 292, 
1877 ; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 3, p. 129, 1877 ; p. 159, 1878.— Riley, 
in Smith, List of Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5556, 1891. — Busck, in 
Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. BuU. 52, No. 5927, 1903. 

Borkhausenia quadrimaculella (Chambers) Keakfott, in Smith, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6473, 1903. 

EpicaUima qnadrimaculelJa (Chambers) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, 
p. 202, 1908. — Baknes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. G495, 1917. — Braun, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 
vol. 73, p. 12, 1921. 

ScJiiffermneUeria quadrimaculella (Chambers) Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera 
insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 27, 1922. 

Schiftermillleria quadrimaculella McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidop- 
tera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidop- 
tera), No. 8365, 1939. 

Oecophora dimidiella Walsingham, Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 148, 1888. — Riley, in Smith, 
List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5554, 1891. — Busck, in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 5925, 1903.— Anderson, Catalogue of British 
Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1098, 1904. (New synonymy.) 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 249 

Borkhmiscnia ditnifUeUa (Walfangham) Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6471, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 27, p. 707, 1904. 

Epicallima dhnidiella (Walsingham) Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 202, 
1008. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, No. 6493, 1917.— Treherne, Sci. Agr., vol. 1, p. 116-118, 1921.— 
Beaun, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 73, p. 12, 1921. — EssiG, Insects 
of Western North America, p. 719, 1926. 

Schiffermuelleria dimidieUa (Walsingham) Meyeick, in Wytsman, Genera in- 
sectorum, fasc. 180, p. 27, 1922. 

Schiffcrmiilleria dimidieUa (Walsingham) Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 68, p. 247, 1923.— Br-vun, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 51, p. 197, 
1925. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United 
States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8364, 1939. 

Palpus black ; second segment with a white longitudinal streak in- 
wardly; apex of third segment white. Head and basal segment of 
antenna white to yellowish; antenna black with white spot above 
on each segment. Thorax, fore wing and cilia, and abdomen dark 
brown to black. Fore wing with four white or yellowish spots, two 
on costa and two on inner margin. Hind wing fuscous; cilia con- 
colorous. Legs dark brown to black with whitish to yellowish in- 
wardly ; tarsi annulated with white or yellowish, 

Male genitalia. — Costa straight; cucullus pointed; sacculus broad, 
lightly sclerotized. Anellus with short, slender, lateral processes. 
Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus slender, weak. Gnathos truncated. 
Uncus bluntly pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate rectangular, moderately sclero- 
tized; ostium V-shaped. Bursa copulatrix oval, signum a single, 
strongly sclerotized curved thorn. 

Alar expanse, 11-20 mm. 

Types. — In Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 
(?) {quadrimaculella) ; in British Museum {dimidieUa). 

Type localities. — Clear Creek, Colo. {quadrimMcidella) ; Sonoma 
County, Calif. {dimidieUa). 

Distribution. — North-central and Western United States and 
Canada. 

United States records 

Arizona: Redington, 2 $ $, $ (no date or collector) ; Santa Catalina Moun- 
tains, 9 (no date or collector). 

California: Camp Baldy, San Bernardino Mountains, 2 (July 16-23) ; Monache 
Meadows, Tulare County, 8,000 feet, 5 (July 8-14) ; Sonoma County, $ 
(19-V-1871, Walsingham) ; Tuolumne Meadows, Tuolumne County, 2 (July 
16-23). 

Colorado: Custer County, 2 (Wm. Beutenmiiller) ; Florissant, $ (July 8, 1907, 
S. A. Rohwer) ; Peaceful Valley, 2 (July 5, W. P. and T. D. A. Cockerell) ; 
Silverton, 2 2 2 (July 24-31); $, labeled only "Colorado," Wm. 
Beutenmiiller). 



250 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Minnesota: Duluth, $ (no date or collector). 

Montana: $ (J. Brunner) ; Two Medicine Lake (15-VII-20) ; Going- to the- 

Sun (1S-21-VII-20 {teste Braun), 
Oregon: Ashland, $ (7-XI-1917, A. J. Wagner; [rf. Pinus pondcrosa\). 
Utah: Bear Lake (29-VI-1924) {teste Braun). 
"Washington: Metaline Falls, $ , $ (12-VI-31, W. D. Bedard [from pine slabs]) ; 

Pullman, 4: $ $ (14^V-1930, F. G. Hinman), 2 $ $ (ll-V-1930, 19-VI-1930, 

J. F. G. Clarke), 9 (l^VI-1930, T. M. Clarke); Tieton, $ (12-V-1931, 

Fred P. Dean). 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Bilby, 27 5 .^ , 8 $ $ (June 18 to July 4, 1924, Owen Bryant). 
British Columbia: Kaslo, $ (SO-IV-1905, J. W. Cockle) ; Victoria, Z $ $ , 9 
(June dates, W. R Carter) ; Wellington, $ (June 22, 1904, G. W. Taylor). 

Reinarks. — I have two specimens before me that were determined 
by Walsingham as his dimidieUa. These do not differ in any detail 
from quadriniaculella. I therefore believe the synonjony is correct. 

The life history of this species is imperfectly known, but the larva 
appears to feed on the refuse that collects in the cracks of bark. 

SCHIFFERMULLERIA EDITHELLA (Busck) 

Plate 20, Fiqukes 120, 120a ; Piate 39, Figure 214 

Epicallima edithella Busck, Journ. New York Ent. Soc, vol. 15, p. 138, 1907; 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908.— Barnes and McDunnough, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6491, 1917. 

Schiffermuelleria edithella (Busck) Meyeick, m Wytsman, Genera insectorum, 
fasc. 180, p. 26, 1922. 

Schiffermulleria edithella (Busck) Foebes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 
68, p. 247, 1923.— Braun, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 61, p. 46, 1935.— McDun- 
nough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of 
America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), No. 8362, 1939. 

Epicallima amplicincta Braun, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 49, p. 117, 1923. (New 
synonymy.) 

Palpus yellowish white, with fuscous scaling outwardly on third 
segment and tip of second. Face whitish. Head, antenna, thorax, 
and abdomen dark brown to black. Tip of antenna silvery white. 
Fore and hind wings dark brown, the fore wing with median longi- 
tudinal light golden streak ending well before apex ; base and a trans- 
verse band at basal third golden, margined with brown ; between the 
base and the band a metallic, blue-tinged fascia; on costal edge of 
longitudinal golden streak two bluish metallic dashes separated by 
a costal lobe of the golden color. Cilia of fore and hind wings dark 
brown. Fore and middle legs yellowish ; fore pair fuscous outwardly ; 
middle tibia fuscous outwardly on distal half; hind legs grayish 
exteriorly, yellowish inwardly. 

Male genitalia. — Costa of harpe deeply concave ; cucullus truncate ; 
sacculus broad but not strongly sclerotized ; costa and sacculus clothed 
with strong hairs. Lateral extensions of anellus long, curved, pointed. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 251 

Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus slender, slightly dilated basally. 
Uncus pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, strongly sclerotized; an- 
terior edge convex. Ostium margined posteriorly with broad, finely 
scobinate prominences. [Ductus bursa and bursa copulatrix missing 
in only specimen available for study.] 

Alar expanse, 9-11 mm. 

Types. — In United States National Museum {edithella) ; in collec- 
tion of Dr. A. F. Braun, Cincinnati, Ohio {amplicincta) . 

Type localities. — Center Harbor, N. H. {edithella) ; Cincinnati, 
Ohio {amplicincta) . 

Food plant. — Unknown (probably lichens). 

Distrihution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 

Kentucky: Powell River, 5 (June 26, A. F. Braun). 
New Hampshire: Center Harbor, $ (July 22, 1902, H. G. Dyar), 
Ohio: Cincinnati, 2 $ $ (June 5, June 13, 191S, A. F. Braun). 
Pennsylvania: Delaware Water Gap, 9 (no date or collector). 
Virginia: Great Falls, $ (June 13, 1919, A. Busck). 

Remarks. — Through the courtesy of Dr. Braun I was able to obtain 
a paratype of her species. There is no doubt about the synonymy. 
Although the species is rare in collections it is probably common. 

SCHIFFERMiJLLERIA LUCIDELLA (Busck) 

Plate 20, Figures 121, 121a ; Plate 39, Figuke 215 

Epicallima hwidella Busck, Ent. News, vol. 23, p. 170, 1912. — Baknes and Mo 
DUNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6495, 1917. — 
Braun, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 49, p. 118, 1923. 

Schiffermuelleria lucidella (Busck) RIeteick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, 
fasc. 180, p. 26, 1922. 

SchiffermuUeria lucidella (Busck) Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 
68, p. 247, 1923. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and 
the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8359, 1939, 

Much like the foregoing species, but with the median longitudinal 
streak much darker and wider and extending to apex of wing. 

Male genitalia. — Costa of harpe slightly convex, with a sharp, tooth- 
like projection near apex; cucuUus bluntly pointed; sacculus broad, 
lightly sclerotized. Lateral extensions of anellus very long, slender, 
sharply pointed. Vinculum rounded. Aedeagus slender, dilated 
basally. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate strongly sclerotized, broad, con- 
cave posteriorly and broadly forked anteriorly. Ostium small, round. 

Alar expanse, 10-12 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 



252 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Type locality. — Oak Station, Allegheny County, Pa. 
Food 'plant. — Unknown (probably lichens) . 
Distribution. — Known from the type locality only. 

United States records 

Pennsylvania: Oak StatiOD, Allegheny County, 28 5 5 , 4 $ $ (June 4 to 23, 1911, 
1912, Fred Marloff). 

19. Genus CHAMBERSIA Riley 

Plate 1, Figtjre 4 ; Plate 6, Figuke 46 ; Plate; 12, Figures 79, 79a ; Plate 19, 

FlGtTRB 115 

Chanibersia Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 115, 
1891.— BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 526, 1903.— Keiakfott, in 
Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 115, 1803. — Barnes and 
MoDuNNouGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 162, 
1917. — Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North America, vol 4, p. 235, 1920. — 
Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 49, 1938 (as synonym 
of Borkhausenia). (Genotype: Blepharocera haydenella Chambers, U. S. 
Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 3, p. 145, 1877.) 

Blepharoccrcu Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Tefr. Bull. 3, p. 144, 1877 
(preoccupied). (Genotype: Blrpharocera haydenella Chambers, U. S. Geol. 
Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 3, p. 145, 1877.) 

Labial palpus long, slender ; second segment roughened in front with 
appressed scales; third segment shorter than second, acute. Tongue 
developed. Antenna long, ciliated in male, serrate in female; basal 
segment with pecten. Thorax smooth. 

Fore wing rather narrow, broadest at apical third ; costa straight, 
apex bluntly pointed, termen oblique; 12 veins; 2 remote from 3; 3, 
4, and 5 equidistant ; 7 and 8 stalked, both to costa ; 10 remote from 9 ; 11 
from well before middle of cell ; internal cell absent. 

Hind wing narrower than fore wing; costa gently arched; apex 
pointed ; 8 veins ; 2 remote from 3 ; 3 and 4 connate ; 5 strongly curved ; 
6 and 7 strongly divergent apically. 

Male genitalia. — Clasper absent, Anellus with lateral processes. 
Vesica unarmed. Gnathos and micus well developed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate partly membranous. Ductus 
bursae membranous. Ductus seminalis from about middle of ductus 
bursae. Signum present. 

Remarks. — I am resurrecting Chambersia for haydeneUa^ which I 
am removing from Borkhausenia. This genus differs from Bork- 
hausenia in having vein 2 of the fore wing remote from 3 ; 10 remote 
from 9 and the internal cell absent. The hind wing is narrower than 
the fore wing and veins 3 and 4 are connate. The male genitalia lack 
a clasper and the signum is present in the female. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 253 

CHAMBERSIA HAYDENELLA (Chambers) 

Plate 1, Figuke 3 

Blepharocera haydenella Chambers, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 3, p. 
144, 1S77; Bull. 4, p. 132, 1878.— Fletcheb, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. 
Ser.), vol. 11, p. 33, 1929. 

Chambersia Jianjdenella (Chambers) Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 5547, 1891. — Busck, m Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, 
No. 5931, 1903. — Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6477, 1903. — Babnes and McDunnough, Check list of 
the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6503, 1917. — FLEn:cHER, Mem. Dept. 
Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 44, 1929. 

Borlhausenia haydenella (Chambers) Barnes and Busck, Contr. Lepid. North 
America, vol. 4, p. 235, 1920. — Braun, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 
vol. 73, p. 12, 1921. — Meyrick, in Wytsmau, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 
40, 1922.— McDunnough, Can. Ent., vol. 59, p. 271, 1927.— Gaede, in Bryk, 
Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 88, p. 59, 1938. — McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, 
Microlepidoptera), No. 8370, 1939. 

Labial palpus ochreous-white ; second segment suffused with light 
fuscous outwardly and mottled inwardly ; third segment suffused with 
fuscous outwardly. Antenna light fuscous; basal segment ochreous- 
white above. Head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing grayish- 
fuscous, strongly irrorated with white; a spot at base of costa, a 
large spot at the center of the wing and another at the end of the 
cell, fuscous; at apex a large fuscous spot connected with a similar, 
but smaller spot at tornus, by a narrow fuscous band around termen 
(all the dark markings are more or less indistinct and fused with 
the ground color) ; cilia grayish fuscous. Hind wing fuscous ; cilia 
grayish fuscous. Legs ochreous-white strongly suffused with light 
grayish fuscous. Abdomen shining grayish fuscous ; silvery beneath. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe short, broad ; costa strongly convex; cucullus 
rounded; sacculus moderately broad, lightly sclerotized. Anellus a 
small sclerotized plate with strong, curved, pointed, lateral processes ; 
the lateral processes are very broad basally. Aedeagus slender, 
slightly curved, weak ; vesica unarmed. Vinculum rounded. Gnathos 
broad, with a short, sharp point and median posterior protuberance. 
Uncus pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, membranous anteriorly and 
in middle. Ostium large, broadly oval. Ductus bursae short ; incep- 
tion of ductus seminalis slightly posterior to middle. Bursa copula- 
trix oval; sign um a small, weakly sclerotized, toothed plate. 

Alar expanse, 12-17 mm. 

Type. — In the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Type locality. — "Colorado." 

Food plant. — Unknown. 

Distribution. — From Colorado northward to Alberta and westward 
to Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 



254 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

United States records 

Colorado: Silverton, 3 $$ (July 24-31). 
Montana: {teste Brann) . 

Canadian records 

Alberta: Waterton Lakes, 2 5 i^, 9 (11-14-VII-1923, J. McDunnough). 

British Columbia: Kaslo, $ (7-VI-1908, J. W. Cockle) ; Mount McLean, Lillooet, 

alt. 4,000-5,000 feet, $, 9 (26-VTII-1923, J. McDunnough) ; Salmon Arm, $ 

(2-VI-1922, W. R. Buckell) ; Seton Lake, Lillooet, $ (9-VI-1926, J. 

McDunnough). 

Remarhs. — ^Various authors have placed this species in one or another 

genus, but, as pointed out in the generic discussion, it is unique and 

cannot be confused with ony other described from North America. 

It probably will be found in other western States and Provinces. 

20. Genus EPICALLIMA Dyar 

Plate 2, Fiouke 14; Plate 6, Figuee 47; Plate 12, Figuke 81, 81a; Plate 16, 

FiQXJEE 99 

Epicallima Dyae, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 525, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, 
List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 115, 1903.— Meyeick, Journ. 
Bombay Nat. Hist. Sec, vol. 17, p. 408-409, 1906.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 35, p. 201, 1908. — Kearfott, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects 
of New Jersey, p. 562, 1910. — Busck, Ent. News, vol. 23, p. 170, 1912 ; Proc. 
Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 14, p. 44, 1912; Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 47, 
p. 33, 1914. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, p. 161, 1917. (Genotype : Callima argenticinctella Clemens.) 

Callima Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci., Philadelphia, vol. 12, pp. 166-167, 1860; 
in Stainton, Tineina of North America, p. 122-123, 1872. (Genotype: 
Callima argenticinctella Clemens.) 

Head smooth, side tufts somewhat raised, tongue developed; 
antenna finely ciliated in male, simple in female ; basal segment with- 
out pecten. Labial palpus long, slender, greatly exceeding vertex; 
second segment much longer than third, slightly roughened. 

Fore wing elongate, apex pointed, termen oblique, 12 veins; 2, 3, 
and 4 approximate at base, from angle of cell ; 7 and 8 stalked, both 
to costa ; 11 from before middle of cell. 

Hind wing narrower than fore wing; costa excavated; 8 veins; 
3 and 4 connate or short stalked ; 5 about equidistant from 4 and 6. 

Male genitalia. — ^Harpe long and slender, with pointed extension of 
sacculus arising near cucullus. Anellus with lateral projections, 
fused or separate. Vesica armed. Gnathos and uncus well developed. 

Female genitalia. — Ductus bursae partly sclerotized and armed on 
the inner surface with toothlike spines. Signum present. 

Remarhs. — Dyar^^ proposed the name EpicaUima to replace Cal- 
lima Clemens (1860) which he considered preoccupied by Kallima 



« Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 525, 1903. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 255 

Westwood (1849). This has been generally accepted since the initial 
letter of each is identical. If the two names {Callima and Kallima) 
are ever considered separate terms then Callima will supersede Epi- 
calliina. 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF EPICALLIMA BASED ON COLORATION 

Base of fore wing brown argenticinctella (Clemens) (p. 225) 

Base of fore wing not brown formosella (Schiffermuller) (p. 257) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF EPICALLIMA BASED ON MALE 
GENITALIA 

Lateral projections of anellus divergent, not reaching gnathos (fig. 

81) argenticinctella (Clemens) (p. 255) 

Lateral projections of anellus fused and reaching gnathos (fig. 124) 

formosella (Schiffermiiller) (p. 257) 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF EPICALLIMA BASED ON FEMALE 
GENITALIA 

Signum a small toothed plate (fig. 99) argenticinctella (Clemens) (p. 255) 

Signa two large toothed plates (fig. 216).- formosella (SchiflFermiiller) (p. 257) 

EPICALLIMA ARGENTICINCTELLA (Clemens) 

Callima argenticinctella Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 12, 
p. 167, 1860; in Stainton, The Tineina of North America, p. 123, 1872.— 
Chambeks, U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 134, 1878.— Busck, 
Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington, vol. 5, p. 201, 1903. 

Oecophora argenticinctella (Clemens) Chambers, Cincinnati Quart. Journ. Sci., 
vol. 2, p. 114, 1875; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 158, 1878.— 
Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5549, 1891. 

Epicallima argenticinctella (Clemens) Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 
52, No. 5920, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6467, 1903.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, 
p. 201, 1908. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 6490, 1917.— Rhoads, New York State Coll. For. Techn. 
Publ. 17, p. 204, 1924. 

EpicalUna argenticinctella (Clemens) Bij^ckman and Stage, New York State 
Coll. For. Techn. Publ. 10, p. 108, 1918. 

Schiffermiilleria argenticinctella (Clemens) Meyrick, in Wytsmau, Genera 
inseetorum, fasc. 180, p. 26, 1922. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. 
Memoir 68, p. 247, 1923 ; in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 
101, p. 546, 1928. — Procter, Biological survey of the Mount Desert region: 
Part 6, The insect fauna, p. 273, 1938.— McDunnough, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Micro- 
lepidoptera). No. 8361, 1939. 

Labial palpus with second segment blackish fuscous ; terminal seg- 
ment and antenna black and white. Head pale to golden-yellow. 
Thorax yellowish brown. Fore wing pale to golden-yellow and 
brown; base of inner margin with narrow silver bar; from inner 



256 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

margin an inwardly oblique, narrow, antemedian silvery line, which 
does not reach costa; from costa a postmedian outwardly oblique 
silvery bar reaching about one-half distance across wing ; opposite it 
from inner margin a semicircular silver bar, the outer half of which is 
composed of lead colored scales; all the above silvery bars narrowly 
edged with black; cilia golden-yellow except a few before tornus 
which are fuscous. Hind wing and cilia fuscous. Fore and middle 
pair of legs chiefly black and white; hind pair lighter. Abdomen 
fuscous. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe elongate, slender ; cucullus bluntly pointed ; 
sacculus broad with a terminal curved projection extending beyond 
cucullus. Anellus a more or less rectangular sclerotized plate with 
widely separated lateral processes ; the processes about twice the length 
of the central plate. Aedeagus stout, slightly narrower at the mid- 
dle than at the extremities ; distal end terminating in a sharp, thorn- 
like point; vesica armed with one long straight cornutus. Gnathos 
drawn out into a blunt point medially. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, moderately sclerotized. 
Ostium large, oval. Ductus bursae strongly sclerotized in posterior 
half and armed with 12-18 strong teeth inwardly. Signum a small, 
strongly sclerotized toothed plate. 

Alar expanse, 10-13 mm. 

Type. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 

Type locality. — "Pennsylvania." 

Food plants. — Dead wood and bark of hickory, larch, elder, elm. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 

Illinois: Decatur, S S $ (June 16-23). 

Iowa: Sioux City, $ ("9-18," C. N. Ainslie). 

Kentucky: 9 (no data). 

Maryland: Cabin John, $ (August 1902, A. Busck) ; Plummers Island, 2 $ $ 

(July 1903, A. Busck) ; 5 ('07, Barber and Schwarz) ; 9 (July 17, L. J. 

Bottimer). 
New Hampshire: Central Harbor, 9 (July 30, 1902, H. G. Dyar) ; S (no locality; 

A. Busck). 
New Jersey: 3 $ $ (no locality; A. Busck and Wm. Beutenmiiller) ; Essex 

County, 6 $S, 2 9 2 (July, W. D. Kearfott) ; Montclair, $ (8-6-99, 

W. D. Kearfott). 
New York: Woodhaven, Long Island, 9 (6-VI-21, G. P. Engelhardt) ; 5 (no 

locality, Wm. Beutenmiiller). 
Ohio: Cincinnati, 3 S S, 9 (VII-2-5-1907, VIII-3-07, VI-16-08, A. F. Braun). 
Pennsylvania: Arendtsville, S, 9 (6-VII-1921, S. W. Frost); Harrisburg, $ 

(30-VII-1914, W. S. Fisher) ; New Brighton, $,299 (16-VII-1907 and 

28-VII-1907, H. D. Merrick) ; Oak Station, Allegheny County, 7 $ $, 9 

(June and July 1906 to 1908, Fred Marloft) ; Pittsburgh, 9 (24-VI-06, 

Henry Eugel). 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 257 

Remarks. — This species undoubtedly will be found through much 
more of eastern North America than is indicated by present records, 
and its range may also extend west of the Rocky Mountains. 

EPICALLIMA FORMOSELLA (Schiffermuller) 
PiATE 20, FiGXJREs 124, 124a ; Plate 39, Figure 216 

PliaJaenae Tineae fonnosella ScHiFFEEMfrrxER, Systematisches Verzeiclmiss der 
Schmetterlinge der Wiener Gegend, p. 140, 1776. 

Alucita formosella (Schiffermuller) Fabricius, Mantissa insectorum, vol. 2, 
p. 255, 1787. 

Tinea formosella ( Schiffermiiller ) HiJBNER, Sammluug europaischer Schmetter- 
linge, fig. 248, [1793-1827]. 

OecopJiora formosella (Schiffermiiller) Treitschke, Die Schmetterlinge von 
Europa, vol. 9, p. 170, 1833. — Frey, Die Tineen und Pterophoren der Schweiz, 
p. 158, 1856. — Heinemann, Die Schmetterlinge Deutschlands und der 
Schweiz, p. 382, 1870. 

Lamprns formosella (Schiffermiiller) Herrich-Schaffeb, Systematische Bear- 
beitung der Schmetterlinge von Europa, vol. 5, p. 141, 1855. 

Acampsla formosella (Schiffermuller) Meyrick, A handbook of British Lepidop- 
tera, p. 635, 1895. 

Borkhausenia formosella (Schiffermiiller) Rebel, in Staudinger and Rebel, 
Catalog der Lepidopteren des palaearctischen Faunen-gebietes, vol. 2, p. 
178, No. 3387, 1901. 

SeMffermiilleria formof-ella (Schiffermiiller) Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera in- 
sectorum, f asc. ISO, p. 27, 1922 ; A revised handbook of British Lepidoptera, 
p. 667, 1928. — Forbes, in Leonard, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 
101, p. 546, 1928. 

Rhinosia flammella DtrpoNCHEiL, Histoire naturelle des lepidopt&res ou papillons 
de France, Supplement, vol. 4, p. 253, pi. 72, fig. 4, 1842. 

Much like argenticincfella, but with second segment of palpus ochre- 
ous and head brown. Basal third of fore wing ochreous followed by a 
brown median area, the latter in turn followed by a lighter color ; on 
middle of inner margin a large ochreous spot bounded by a crescentic 
white line inwardly and followed by a narrow extension of the median 
brown shade; from middle of costa to end of cell a moderately broad 
white band narrowing toward end of cell. 

Male genitalia. — Cucullus broadly rounded; sacculus well defined, 
moderately sclerotized ; clasper absent. Anellus strongly sclerotized ; 
lateral extensions reaching gnathos, fused for much of their length, 
pointed. Vinculum bluntly pointed. Aedeagus long, slender, 
straight; vesica armed with a single slender cornutus. Gnathos and 
uncus pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate broad, somewhat rectangular, mod- 
erately sclerotized. Ductus bursae long, slender, sclerotized except for 
a dilated, membranous section near middle and the extreme anterior 
membranous part before the bursa copulatrix. Inception of ductus 



258 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

seminalis between the two sclerotized portions of the ductus bursae ; 
at anterior end of posterior sclerotized portion numerous small but 
strong teeth. Bursa copulatrix moderately large, oval; signa two 
large, sclerotized, finely toothed plates. 

Alar expanse, 10-13 mm. 

Type.— Lost C^.) (/ormose//a) ; Paris Museum ( ?) {fia^nmelJa). 

Type localities. — Europe (formosella, flammeUa). 

Food plants. — ^Under bark of apple and red maple. 

Distribution. — Eastern United States. 

United States records 

New Jersey: North Bergen, 3 5 5,3 5 9 (ll-X-1940, George Rau) ; Ramsey, 

$ (2-VIII-35, Dr. A. B. Klots). 
New York: Flatbush, Long Island, $ (20-VII, G. P. Engelhardt) ; Woodhaven, 

Long Island, $ (9-VII-1930, G. P. Engelhardt). 

Reinarhs. — This species has been introduced into the United States 
within recent years. So far as I am able to ascertain it is to be found 
only in New Jersey and New York. The habit of this and the pre- 
ceding species of feeding under bark of various trees is very conducive 
to the spread of the insects. For this reason we should expect it to 
become rather widespread in this country. 

The specimens from North Bergen, N. J., were reared from larvae 
found in association with the mealybug, Pseudocoocus comstocki 
(Kuw.). It was assumed that the larvae were predacious on the 
mealybugs, but no conclusive evidence in support of this assumption 
has been obtained. 

I have compared our American specimens carefully with a long 
series from Europe and there is no doubt about their specific identity. 

21. Genus HOFxAIANNOPHILA Spuler 

Plate 2, Fiquee 12 : Plate 6; Figure 43 ; Plate 12, Figuees 78, 78a, 7Sb ; PLu\.te 
16, Figure 101 

Hofmannophila Spulek, in Hofmann, Die Schmetterlinge Europas, vol. 2, p. 340, 

1910. 
Borkhausenia Auctonim, in part. 

Head smooth, side tufts loosely appressed; tongue developed. 
Antenna ciliated; basal segment with pecten. Labial palpus long, 
recurved ; second segment slightly roughened in front ; third segment 
as long as second, acute. 

Fore wing oblong-ovate with costa slightly convex ; apex rounded ; 
termen oblique; 12 veins; 2 from near angle; 2, 3, 4, and 5 approximate 
at bases; 5 and 6 parallel; 7 and 8 stalked, both to costa; 11 from 
well before middle of cell. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 259 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing, pointed; costa slightly convex 
before middle ; 8 veins ; 3 and 4 connate ; 5 curved ; 6 and 7 subparallel. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe with clasper. Gnathos and uncus well 
developed. 

Female genitalia. — Anterior apopliyses branched. Ductus bursae 
partly sclerotized. Signum present. 

Larva. — Ninth segment with seta I approximate to II (much closer 
to II than to III) ; seta VI not on the same pinaculum with IV and 
V, approximate to VII. Setal group VII essentially as in Agonop- 
terix: bisetose on first and seventh, unisetose on eighth and ninth 
abdominal segments. Ocelli reduced (ocellus 1 more or less com- 
pletely fused with 2 and ocellus 3 with 4). Submentum without pit. 

Pupa. — Pubescent. Prothoracic femora and labial palpi not 
exposed. Cremaster absent. 

Remarks. — Hofmaimophila may be distinguished, in the larv^a, from 
other oecophorid genera (except Endrosis) by the approximation of 
seta I with II and VI with VII on the ninth abdominal segment; 
and from Endrosis by the absence of a submental pit and the presence 
of only two setae in group VII on the second abdominal segment. 

Lepesme ^^ has pointed out the differences between Hofmannophila 
and BorkJiausenia. Although he has used B. stipella (Linnaeus) (a 
congener of minutella Linnaeus) for his comparisons with pseudo- 
spretella., the differences show adequately why Hofmannophila should 
be removed from BorkJiausenia (Genotype : Phalaena Tinea minutella 
Linnaeus). 

HOFMANNOPHILA PSEUDOSPRETELLA (Stainton) 

Oecophora pseudosprctella Stainton, Catalogue of the British Tineidae and 
Pterophoridae, p. 14, 1S49; Insecta Britanniea Tineina, p. 162, 1854; A 
manual of British butterflies and moths, vol. 2, p. 35S, 469, 1859. — Teng- 
STROM, in Forhandlingar, Pro fauna et flora Fennica, p. 346, No. 1052, 
1869. — Heinemann, Die Schmetterlinge Deutschlands uud der Schweiz, vol. 
2, p. 377, 1870. — WocKE, in Staudlnger and Wocke, Catalog der Lepidop- 
teren des europaeischeu Fauuengebiets, vol. 2, p. 307, No. 2265, 1S71.— 
WoLiASTON, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist., ser. 5, vol, 3, p. 436, 1879. — Sorhagen, 
Die Kleinschmetterlinge der Mark Brandenburg, p. 333, 1886. — Walsingham, 
Ins. Life, vol. 1, p. 149, 1888.— Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of 
Boreal America, No. 5555, 1890.— DiSQUfi, Ent. Zeit. (Stettin), vol. 56, 
p. 244, 1895.— Reutti, Verb. Naturw. Ver. Karlsruhe, vol. 12, p. 238, 1898.— 
Seebold, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol, 11, p. 316, 1898. — Crombijugghe, 
Ann. Soc. Ent. Belg., vol. 42, p. 36, 1898.— DiSQufi, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., 
Iris, vol. 14, p. 214, 1902.— Busck, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52 ,No. 
5926, 1903. — Anderson, Catalogue of British Columbia Lepidoptera, No. 1099, 
1904.— Blair, Entomologist, vol. 58, p. 10, 1925. 

Acompsia pscudospretella (Stainton) Meyrick, A handbook of British Lepidop- 
tera, p. 634, 637, 1895.— Longstaff, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 38, p. 28, 1902. 



•^ Lepesme, P., BuU. Soc. Ent. France, vol. 42, p. 284, 1937. 



260 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Oelechia pseudospretella (Stainton) Herbich-Schaffee, Systematische Bearbei- 
tung der Schmetterlinge vou Europa, vol. 5, p. 162, 181, fig. 627, 1855. 

Lamprus pseudospretella (Stainton) Rosslee, Jahrb. nassau. Ver, Naturk., vol. 
34, p. 281, 1881. 

Lampros pseudospretella (Stainton) Snellen, Die Vlinders van Nederland, vol. 
2, p. 725, 1882. 

Borkhausenia pseudospreteUa (Stainton) Rebel, in Staudinger and Rebel, Cata- 
log der Lepidopteren des palaearctischen Faunengebietes, vol. 2, No. 3358, 
1901.— Malloch, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 37, p. 186, 1901.— Keakfott, in Smith, 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6472, 1903.— Busck, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 766, 1904.— Dyab, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 
27, p. 934, 1904.— Cbombbugghe, Mem. Soc. Ent. Belg., vol. 14, p. 54, 1906.— 
SicH, Entomologist, vol. 40, p. 42, 261, 1907.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 204, 1908.— SiCH, Ent. Rec. vol. 20, p. 92, 1908.— Mijlleb-Rutz, Mitt. 
Schvpeiz, Ent. Ges., vol. 11, p. 348, 1909.— Piquenabd, Bull. Soc. Sci. Med. 
Quest., vol. 19, p. 79, 1910.— Kexilikowski, Rev. Russe Ent., vol. 9, p. 321, 
1910. — Gbiebel, Die Lepidopteren Fauna der bayerischen Rheinpfalz, vol. 2, 
p. 54, 1910.— SiCH, Entomologist, vol. 43, p. 150, 1910.— Skala, Int. Ent. 
Zeitschr., vol. 5, p. 303, 1912 ; Verb. Nat. Ver. Brunn, vol. 51, p. 317, 1913.— 
Hamfelt, Arkiv fiir Z06I., vol. 10, No. 25, p. 9, 1917. — Martini, Deutsche 
Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 14, p. 214, 1917. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6504, 1917. — Mitteebebgek, 
Jahresb. Wien. Ent. Ver., vol. 28, p. 67, 1918. — Havfkshaw, Entomologist, vol. 
52, p. 82, 1919.— Steand, Arcbiv fiir Naturg., vol. 85 A, pt. 4, p. 9, 1920.— 
Cabadja, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 34, p. 140, 1920. — Meyeiok, in 
Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 41, 1922. — Haxtdeb, Jahresb. 
Oberosterr. Musealver., vol. 80, p. 285, 1924. — Cabadja, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., 
Iris, vol. 40, p. 43, 1926. — EssiG, Insects of vrestern North America, p. 719, 
1926. — Waters, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 64, p. 177, 1928. — Metbick, A revised 
handbook of British Lepidoptera, p. 669, 1928. — Haywabd, Entomologist, vol. 
62, p. 50, 1929.— Ford, Entomologist, vol. 62, p. 261, 1929.— Daltey, Entomolo- 
gist, vol. 63, p. 115, 1930. — ScHtJTZE, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 44, p. 
31, 1930.— Nicholson, Ent. Rec, vol. 43, p. 88, 1931.— Ford, Entomologist, vol. 
04, p. 259, 1931.— Chrystal, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 68, p. 9, pi. 2, figs. 1-5, 
1932.— Adkin, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 68, p. 40, 1932.— Fryer, Ent. Monthly 
Mag., vol. 68, p. 137, 1932. — Austen and Hughes, Brit. Mus. Econ. Ser. No. 14, 
p. 34, figs. 19, 20, 1932. — Eckstein, Die Kleinschmetterlinge Deutschlands, p. 
124, pi. 10, figs. 1, 2, 1933.— MoRLEY and RArr-SMiTH, Trans. Ent. Soc. London, 
vol. 81, p. 178, 1933. — Pierce and Metcalfe, The genitalia of the tineid fam- 
ilies of the Lepidoptera of the British Islands, p. 30, pi. 16, 1935.— Rapp, Die 
Natur der mitteldeutschen Landschaft Thiiringen; Beitrjige zur Fauna 
Thiiringens, vol. 2, p. 142, 1936. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera 
of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , 
No. 8376, 1939. 

Bnrkhaitsenia pseudosprella Austen, Ent. Rec, vol. 45, p. 16, 1933. 

Hoftnannophila psevdospr'Ctella Sputter, in Ilofmann, Die Schmetterlinge Europas, 
ed. 3, vol. 2, p. 340, fig. Ill ; pi. 89, fig. 42, 1910.— Vobbeodt imd Mullee-Rutz, 
Schmetterlinge der Schvpeiz, vol. 2, p. 464, 1914. — Linck and Webeb, Schweiz. 
Ent. Anz., vol. 1, p. 59, 1922. — Petersen, Lepidopteren Fauna von Estland 
(Esti), p. 510, 1924.— Gronlein, Norsk. Ent. Tidsskr., vol. 2, p. 46, 1924.— 
HELLfiN, Notulae Ent., vol. 6, p. 31, 1926.— Laesen, Ent. Meddel., ser. 2, vol. 11 
(whole ser. 17), p. 79, 1927. — Fletcheb, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser,), 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 261 

vol. 11, p. 110, 1929.— VoBTKODT, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 45, p. 128, 
1931. — Heking, in Brohmer, Ehrmauii, unci Ulmer, Die Tierwelt Mitteleuroi)a9 
(Ergjinzbd. 1), p. 151, 1932.— Lepesme, Bull. Soc. Ent. France, vol. 42, p. 283, 
fig. 1, pi. 1, figs. 1-4, 1937. 

Labial palpus, head, thorax, and ground color of fore wing pale 
ochreous. Second segment of labial palpus dark fuscous exteriorly 
on basal half; third segment strongly overlaid with fuscous except 
posterior edge at middle. Antenna fuscous narrowly and faintly 
annulated with ochreous. Collar iridescent blackish fuscous; re- 
mainder of thorax, tegula, and fore wing irrorated and suffused 
with fuscous ; in fold, from base, along vein Ic of fore wing, a series 
of two or three short, longitudinal, blackish-fuscous dashes; in cell, 
at basal third, an elongate blackish-fuscous discal spot ; at the end of 
cell another conspicuous, large, similarly colored spot; extreme base 
of costa blackish fuscous ; from apical third of costa, around termen 
to inner margin, a series of short, blackish-fuscous dashes ; cilia pale 
ochreous-fuscous. Hind wing shining light yellowish fuscous; cilia 
yellowish fuscous. Legs pale ochreous strongly overlaid with blackish 
fuscous except on hind tibia. Abdomen pale ochreous, suffused with 
fuscous. Legs and underside of abdomen iridescent. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe ample, strongly sclerotized except for an 
area between sacculus and costa ; near base, at each end of the articula- 
tion with the transtilla, a profusely hairy, fleshy swelling; cucullus 
pointed ; sacculus narrow ; clasper very stout, extending past middle 
of harpe ; distal end deeply excavated. Anellus an elongate plate with 
broadly V-shaped posterior edge and with long, papillate laterobasal 
lobes. Aedeagus stout, terminating in a short point; basal portion 
bandlike, coiled; vesica armed with a single, long, curved cornutus. 
Vinculum broadly rounded. Transtilla a narrow sclerotized band. 
Gnathos beaked, pointed; posterior surface excavated, scobinate. 
Uncus long, stout, pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Ovipostor short; anterior apophyses branched. 
Genital plate sclerotized posteriorly, membranous anteriorly. Ostium 
rather broad oval, preceded by a short, sclerotized portion of the 
ductus bursae. Ductus bursae convoluted; sclerotized in posterior 
two-thirds except for a short membranous portion anterior to the 
sclerotized ring at ostium; sclerotized portion of ductus bursae armed 
with small teeth on inner surface; inception of ductus seminalis at 
posterior edge of the long sclerotized part of ductus bursae. Bursa 
copulatrix small, round with a moderately small, oval, sclerotized, 
toothed signum. 

Alar expanse, 15-26 mm. 

Type. — In the British Museum ( ?). 

Type locality. — ? 



262 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Hosts. — Furs, skins, museum specimens, including moths; seeds of 
many kinds, dried plants, live and dead lepidopterous pupae, figs, 
dates, stored cereals, upholstering, carpets, book bindings, corks of 
wine bottles, etc. 

Remarks. — The above list of hosts will give some idea of the wide 
variety of substances attacked by this species. 

Distribution. — Universal. In North America it is found in the 
Pacific Coast states, Nevada, southern British Columbia eastward to 
Manitoba and Pennsylvania. 

United States records 

California: Alfuneda County, 2 S S, 2 9 2 (20-11-1908, 19-22-IX-1908, G. R. 
Pilate) ; Berkeley, 2 $ $ (May, June) ; Cfirmel, $ (June, A. H. Vacliell) ; 
Eureka, 5 5 .? , 3 2 9 (5-6-VI, H. S. Barber) ; Los Angeles, 2 2 2 (no date, 
Coquillett) ; Mills College, S (7-VI-190S, G. R. Pilate) ; Mount Hermon, 
Santa Cruz County, $ (5-IX-1931, H. H. Keifer) ; Plumas County, 9 
("July 24-31") ; Santa Clara, 2 (no date or collector). 

Nevada: Glenbrook, 2 9 9 (August 25, 1915, H. G. Dyar). 

Oregon: Albany, 9 (12-VII-1940, S. M. Dohanian [rf. filbert nut]) ; Portland 
5, 2 99 (13-VII-1918, E. J. Neweomber [Quaintance No. 14101)]; $ 
(4-VII-1931, J. F. G. Clarke); Shedd, S, 9 (June 1939, J. E. Davis); 
Tualatin, 9 (15-Vir-1919, L. R. Rockwood). 

Pennsylvania: Norristown, 2 9 9 (17-V-1939, G. K. Schumaker [rf. TJmja 
plicata seed] ) . 

Washington: Bellingham, 3 $ $, 2 9 9 (May to September dates, 1922-1931, 
J. F. G. Clarke) ; Blaine, $ (12-VI-1934, no collector) ; Chehalis, 9 (no 
date, T. Kincaid) ; Friday Harbor, S $ $ ( 12-14r-VII-1924, T. Kincaid) ; 
Pullman, 9 (15-VI-1930, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Seattle (2 $ $ , 19-VIII-1930, 
J. F. G. Clarke ; 9 , September, 1898, C. V. Piper) ; Seaview, 4 $$,299 
(23-V-1918; 16-VII-1918, H. K. Plank [Quaintance Nos. 15541, 15582]); 
Snoqualmie Pass, Kittitas County, 9 (12-VIII-1930, J. F. G. Clarke). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Duncan, 9 (June 1908, Hanham) ; Coldstream, 9 (6-IX- 
1920, E. H. Blackmore) ; Kaslo, $ (8-VIir-1903, H. G. Dyar) ; Maillard- 
viUe, $ (9-VI-1920, no collector) ; Malakatla (August 22, 1904, Rev. G. H. 
Keene) ; Maple Bay (13-VII-1933, J. McDunnough) ; Sandon, 9 (13-VIII- 
1903, Currie) ; Sooke, $ (10-III-1922, no collector) ; Vancouver (12-IV- 
1903; 27-VII-1905, no collector) ; Victoria, S $ $ (30-V-1921, 5-VII-1921) ; 
9 (l-IX-1921, W. R. Carter) ; $ (6-VII-1920) ; 2 9 9 (14-VIII-1920, E. H. 
Blackmore) ; 2 2 2 (l-IX-1903, 5-IX-1903, H. G. Dyar) ; Wellington, (2 
$ $, 9, 15-VII-1902, G. W. Taylor; 2 2 2, June 1900, no collector). 

Manitoba: Aweme, 3 2 2 (31-V-1904, 16-V-1905, N. Criddle). 

22. Genus ENDROSIS Hubner 

PiATE 1, FiGiTBE 5 ; Plate 7, Figuke 51 ; Plate 8, Figures 60, 60a ; Plate 19, 

FiGtTiE 116 

EncLrosis Hubner, Verzeichniss bekannter Scbmetterlinge, p. 401, 1825. — 
Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1860 p. 165; in Stainton, 
Tineina of North America, p. 119, 1872. — Chambers, Cincinnati Quart. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 263 

Jouru. Sci., vol. 2, p. 244, 1S75; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 
4, p. 140, 1878. — Riley, fn Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, 
p. 107, 1891.— Dyar, Journ. New York Ent. Soc., vol. 3, p. 19, 1895.— Diktz, 
i?i Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 477, 1900. — Busck, in 
Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 543, 1903.— ICearfott, in Smith, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 118, 1903. — Busck, Troc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 767, 1904. — Andebson, Catalogue of British Columbia 
Lepidoptera, p. 55, 1904. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 203, 
1908.— Forbes, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer., vol. 3, p. 132, pi. 20, fig. 143, 1910.— 
Keabfott, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, p. 562, 1910. — 
Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heterocera, \o\. 4, p. 126, 
1912. — Barnes and McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal 
America, p. 162, 1917. — Meykick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 
p. 33, 1922.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 2.50, 1923.— 
Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 77, 1929. — Pierce 
and Metcai>fe, The genitalia of the tiueid families of the Lepidoptera of the 
British Islands, p. 29, 1935. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum catalogus, pt. 
88, p. 43, 1938.— McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and 
the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), p. 77, 1939. (Geno- 
type: Phalaenae Tineae lactclla Schiffermiilier, Systematisches Verzeichniss 
der Schmetterlinge der Wiener Gegeud, p. 139, 1776.) 

Head smooth. Tongue developed. Basal segment of antenna with 
pecten. Labial palpus long, curved, smooth ; second segment slightly 
thickened with appressed scales; terminal segment nearly as long as 
second. 

Fore wing with 2 from before angle ; 4 and 5 approximated at base ; 
7 and 8 stalked, both to costa ; 11 from before middle. 

Hind wing narrower than fore wing, ovate-lanceolate; 7 veins; 
veins 3 and 4 stalked ; 5 absent ; 6 and 7 subparallel. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe with clasper. Anellus witli elongated, 
lateral processes. Vinculum spatulate. Gnathos and uncus present, 
pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Ovipositor very long, always extended. An- 
terior apophyses branched. Ductus bursae enlarged in posterior 
half; strongly sclerotized. Signum a few minute dots. 

Abdomen spined. 

Larva. — Ninth segment with setae I and II approximate ; seta VI 
not on same pinaculum with IV and V, approximate to VII. Setal 
group VII trisetose on first, bisetose on seventh and unisetose on 
eighth and ninth abdominal segments. Ocelli reduced (ocelli 1, 2, 5, 
and 6 absent). Submcntum with a large sclerotized pit. 

Pupa. — Smooth. Prothoracic femora exposed. Labial palpi ex- 
posed and large. Cremaster absent. 

Remarks. — Endrosis may be distinguished from one group of 
American oecophorid genera by tlie presence of pecten on the basal 
segment of the antenna, and from those genera with peclcn by the 
absence of vein 5 of the hind wing. In the larval and pupal stages 



264 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUAI vol. 90 

it appears nearest to Hofmannophila^ from wliicli it is distinguished 
chiefly by the large pit in the submentum of the larva and the 
exposed labial palpi of the pupa. 

ENDROSIS LACTELLA (Schiffermnller) 

Phalaenae Tineae lactella Schiffeemuixke, Systematisches Verzeicbuiss der 
Schmetterlinge der Wiener Gegend, p. 139, 1776. 

Endrosls lactella (Schiffermuller) Donisthorpe, Eiit. Rec, vol. 29, p. 33, 1917. — 
Meyeick, Natural history of Juan Fernandez and Easter Island, vol. 3, p. 268, 
1920 ; in Wytsman, General insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 33, 1922 ; A revised hand- 
book of British Lepidoptera, p. 668, 1928.— Ford, Entomologist, vol. 62, p. 261, 
1929.— Meyrick, Anal. Mus. Buenos Aires, vol. 36, p. 390, 1931.— Ford, 
Entomologist, vol. 64, p. 259, 1931. — Turner, Proc. Linn. Soc. New South 
Wales, vol. 57, p. 279, 1932. — Austen and Hughes, Brit. Mus. Econ. 
Ser., No. 14, p. 33, fig. 18, 1932.— Fryer, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 68, p. 137, 
1932.— Curtis, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 68, p. 166, 167, 1932.— Austen, 
Ent. Rec, vol. 45, p. 16, 1933.— Morley and Rait-Smith, Trans. Ent. Soc. 
London, vol. 81, p. 178, 1933. — Pierce and Metcalfe, The genitalia of the 
tlneid families of the Lepidoptera of the British Islands, p. 29, pi. 16, 1935. 

Endrosis lacteella Herrich-Schaffer, Systematische Bearbeitung der Schmet- 
terlinge von Europa, vol. 5, p. 262, 1853. — Frey, Die Tineen und Pterophoren 
der Schweiz, p. 168, 1856.— Staudingee, Ent. Zeit. (Stettin), vol. 18, p. 278, 
1857.— Wocke, Ent. Zeit. (Stettin), vol. 23, p. 239, 1862.— Tengstrom, in 
Fordhandlingar, Pro fauna et flora Fennica, p. 346, No. 1053, 1869.— Wocke, 
in Staudinger and Wocke, Catalog der Lepidopteren des europaeischen Faun- 
engebiets, vol. 2, p. 323, No. 2703, 1871. — Heinemann and Wooke, in Heine- 
mann. Die Schmetterlinge Deutchlands und der Schweiz, vol. 2, p. 389, 1877. — 
Wollaston, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 5, vol. 3, p. 438, 1879. — Feey, Die Lepi- 
dopteren der Schweiz, p. 379, 1880. — Sohoyen, Arch, fiir Math, og Naturv. 
1880, p. 245.— RossLER, Jahrb. nassau, Ver. Naturk., vol. 34, p. 281, 1881.— 
Schoyen, Tromso Mus. Aarsh., vol. 4, p. 100, 1881 ; vol. 5, p. 57, 1882. — Snei/- 
len, De Vlinders van Nederland, vol. 2, p. 2, 729, 1882. — Schoyen. Nyt Mag. 
Naturv., vol. 27, p. 53, 1882.— Mason, Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 26, p. 199, 
1890. — Riley, in Smith, List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 5758, 
1891.— Sparre Schneider. Tromso Mus. Aarsh., vol. 15, p. 130, 1892 ; vol. 18, 
p. 85, 1895.— Meyriok, A handbook of British Lepidoptera, p. 688, 1895.— 
Bang-Haas. Dansk. Naturh. For., Vide. Medd., Copenhagen, 1896. p. 192.— 
Rebel, Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 45, p. 392, 1896. — Sparre Schneideb, 
Tromso Mus. Aarsh., vol. 20, p. 155, 1897. — Reutti, Verb. Naturw. Ver. 
Karlsruhe, vol. 12, p. 240, 1898. — Jacobsen, Insecta Novaja-Zemljensia (Ros- 
sice conscr.) Petropoll, p. 45, 61, 1898. — Seebold, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., 
Iris, vol. 11, p. 320, 1899. — Rebel, i7i Staudinger and Rebel, Catalog der 
Lepidopteren des palaearctischen Fauuengebietes, vol. 2, p. 163, No. 3051, 
1901.— Strand, Nyt Mag. Naturv., vol. 39, p. 41, 1901.— Malloch, Ent. 
Monthly Mag., vol. 37, p. 186, 1901. — Sparre Schneider, Bergens Mus. Aarbog 
No. 1, p. 215, 1901.— DisQU^, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 14, p. 221, 
1902. — Schutze, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 15, p. 35, 1902. — Longstaff, 
Ent. Monthly Mag., vol. 38, p. 28, 1902.— Caeadja, Bull. Soc. Sci. Bucharest, 
vol. 11, p. 617, 1902. — PAGENSTECHEai, Die arktische Lepidopterenfaima, p. 390, 
1902.— BuscK, in Dyar, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 6170, 1903.— Keaefott, in 
Smith, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6712, 1903.— 
Speiser, Die Schmetterlings-fauna der Provinzen Ost- und West-preussen, 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 265 

p. 117, 1903.— BuscK, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 767, 1901.— Dyae, Proc. 
U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, p. 934, 1904. — Anderson, Catalogue of British Colum- 
bia Lepidoptera, p. 55, 1904. — Rebel, Ann. Hofmus. Wien, vol. 19, p. 357, 
1904.— Ckombrugghe, Mem. Soc. Ent. Belg., vol. 14, p. 39, 1906.— Gatnar, 
Jahresb. Wien. Ent. Ver., vol. 16, p. 49, 1906.— Rebel, Jahresb. Wion. Ent. 
Ver., vol. 16, p. 72, 1906.— Verity, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital., vol. 88, p. 50, 1906.— 
HoRMUZAKi, Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 57, p. 86, 1907. — Sparre Schneider, 
Tromso Mus. Aarsb., vol. 28, p. 147, 1907.— Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 
35, p. 203, 1908.- Krltlikowski, Deutsche Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, vol. 21, p. 265, 
1909. — Spulek, in Hofmaun, Die Scbmetterlinge Europa, ed. 3, vol. 2, p. 349, 
fig. 118, pi. 88, fig. 66, 1910.— PiQUENARD, Bull. Soc. Sci. Med. Quest., vol. 19, 
p. 97, 1910. — Kearfott, in Smith, Catalogue of the insects of New Jersey, 
p. 562, 1910.— Rebel, Ann. Hofmus. Wien, vol. 25, p. 414, 1911.— Turati, Bull. 
Soc. Ent. Ital., vol. 43, p. 231, 1911.— Skala, Int. Ent. Zeitscbr., vol. 5, p. 303, 
1912. — Vorbrodt und Muller-Rutz, Die Scbmetterlinge der Schweiz, vol. 2, 
p. 472, 1912.— Skala, Verb. Nat. Ver. Briinn, vol. 51, p. 310, 1913.— Rebel, 
Ann. Hofmus. Wien, vol. 27, p. 331, 1913. — Sparre Schneider, Tromso Mus. 
Aarsb., vol. 35, p. 200, 1914.— Galvagni, Jahresb. Wien. Ent. Ver., vol. 25, 
p. 30, 1915.— Schawerda, Jahresb. Wien. Ent. Ver., vol. 26, p. 44, 1916.— 
Hamfelt, Arkiv fiir Zool., vol. 10, No. 25, p. 9, 1917. — Barnes and ]McDun- 
nough. Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6502, 1917. — 
Philpott, Trans. Proc. New Zealand Inst., vol. 49, p. 229, 1917. — Martini, 
Deutsche Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, vol. 30, p. 144, 1917. — Mitterberger, Jahresb. 
Wien. Ent. Ver., vol. 28, p. 61, 1918.— Turati, Atti Mus. Civ. Milano, vol. 58, 
p. 160, 1919.— Hawkshaw, Entomologist, vol. 52, p. 82, 1919.— Caradja, 
Deutsche Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, vol. 34, p. 121, 1920. — Andres, Zeitscbr. Angew. 
Ent., vol. 6, p. 406, 1920.— Sheldon, Entomologist, vol. 55, p. 78, 1922.— Zim- 
merman, Verb, zool-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 71, p. 43, 1922. — Babca, Norsk. Ent. 
Tldsskr., vol. 1, p. 229, 1923.— Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 
68, p. 250, 1923.— Gronlien, Norsk Ent. Tidsskr., vol. 2, p. 46, 1924.— Peter- 
sen, Lepidopteren Fauna von Estland (Esti), p. 501, 1924. — Galvagni, 
Jahresb. Wien. Ent. Ver., vol. 30, p. 105, 1924. — Preissecker, Jahresb. Wien. 
Ent. Ver., vol. 30, p. 186, 1924.— Alfken, Anz. Scbadlinsk, vol. 1, p. 95, 
1925.— Stephan, Deutsche Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, vol. 39, p. 122, 1925.— Rebel, 
Deutsche Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, vol. 40, p. 146, 1926.— Labsen, Ent. Meddel., 
ser. 2, vol. 11 (whole ser. 17), p. 82, 1927.— Zerny, Eos, vol. 3, p. 479, 1927.— 
Leonardi, Elenco delle specie di insetti dannosi e loro parasiti ricordati in 
Italia fino all'anno 1911 (Part 2), p. 278, 1927.— Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. 
India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 77, 1929.— Rebel, Deutsche Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, 
vol. 43, p. 79, 1929.— Hayward, Entomologist, vol. 62, p. 50, 1929.— Wolff, 
Ent. Meddel, ser. 2, vol. 10 (whole ser. 16), p. 352, 1929.— Uffeln, Klein- 
scbmetterlinge Westfalen, p. 75, 1930. — Graves, Ent. Rec, vol. 42, p. 97, 
1930.— Drenowski, Mem. Bulg. Akad. Wiss., vol. 26, No. 6, p. 75, 1930.— 
Amsel, Deutsche Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, vol. 44, p. 122, 1930. — Vorrkodt, Deutsche 
Ent. Zeitscbr., Iris, vol. 45, p. 131, 1931. — Rebel and Zerny, Denkscbr. Akad. 
Wiss. Wien, math. nat. KL, vol. 103. p. 149, 1931.— Turner, Entomologist, vol. 
64, p. 191, 1931.— Nicholson, Ent. Rec., vol. 43, p. 88, 1931.— Hering, in 
Brobmer, Ehrmann and Ulmer, Die Tierwelt Mitteleuropas (Ergiinzbd. 1) 
p. 138, 1932. — Eckstein. Die Kleinscbmetterlinge Deutschlands, p. 126, pi. 5, 
fig. 204, 1933. — Rapp, Die Natur der mitteldeutscben Landschaf Thuringen; 
Beitrage zur Fauna Tbiiringens, vol. 2, p. 127, 1936. — McDunnough, Check 
list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America ( Part 2, 
Microlepidoptera), No. 8368, 1939. 



266 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Eudrosis lacteella DiSQufi, Ent. Zeit. (Stettin), vol. 56, p. 244, 1895. 

Anacampsis sarcUella Stephens, Illustrations of British entomology, Haus- 
tellata, vol. 4, p. 210, 1834. — Wood, Index entomologicus, p. 175, pi. 39, fig. 
1207, 1854. 

Endrosis sarcUella (Stephens) Meybick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 
180, p. 33, 1922 (as synonym of lactella). 

Endrosis kennicotteUa Clemens, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1S60, p. 
165; in Stainton, The Tineina of North America, p. 119, 1872. — Chambers, 
Cincinnati Quart. Journ. Sci., vol. 2, p. 244, 1875. — Busck, in Dyar, U S. 
Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, No. 6170, 1903.— Barnes and McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, No. 6502, 1917. — Metrick, in "Wytsman, 
Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 33, 1922. — McDunnotjgh, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, 
Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8368, 1939 (as synonym of lactella). 

Endrosis JcennikoteUa Caradja, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschr., Iris, vol. 34, p. 121, 
1920. 

Tinea betulinella HtrBNER, Sammlung Europaischer Schmetterlinge, vol. 5 
(Tineen), pi. 67, fig. 448, 1801. 

Endrosis hetulinella HIIbner, Verzeichniss bekannter Schmetterlinge, p. 401, 
1825. — Metrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 33, 1922 (as 
synonj'm of lactella). 

Scardia hctnlinella Tkeitschke. in Ochsenheimer, Die Schmetterlinge von Eu- 
ropa, vol. 9, No. 1, p. 9, 1832 ; vol. 10, No. 3, p. 151, 1835. 

Lita 'betulinella Duponchel, Histoire naturelle des lepidoptercs ou papillons 
de France, vol. 11, p. 298, pi. 297, fig. 8, 9, 1838. 

Endrosis fenestreJla Scopoli, Entomologica Caruiolica, p. 252, 1763. — Stainton, 
Insecta Britannica Tineina, p. 164, pi. 5, fig. 8, 1854 ; A manual of British 
butterflies and moths, vol. 2, p. 359, 469, 1859. — Clemens, in Stainton, The 
Tineina of North America, p. 119, 1872. — Chambers, Cincinnati Quart. Journ. 
Sci., vol. 2, p. 244, 1875; U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr. Bull. 4, p. 140, 
1878. — Metrick, In Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. ISO, p. 33, 1922. — 
Blair, Entomologist, vol. 58, p. 10, 1925 (as synonj^m of lactella). 

Endrosis ferrestrella Chambeks, Cirx-innati Quart. Journ. Sci., vol. 2, p. 244, 
1875. 

Oelechia subditella Walker, List of the specimens of lepidopterous insects in 
the collections of the British Museum, vol. 29, p. 657, 1863. 

Endrosis sichditella Metrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 33, 
1922 (as synonymn of lactella). 

Endrosis lacteella antarctica Staudinger, Hamburg naturhistorisches Museum, 
Ergebnisse der Hamburger magalhaensischen Sammelreise, vol. 2, Arthro- 
poda-Lepidoptera, p. 113, fig. 26, 1898. — Enderlein, Vet. Akad. Handl., vol. 
48, No. 3, p. 92, 1912. — Metrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, 
p. 33, 1922 (as synonym of lactella). 

Labial palpus, head, thorax, and extreme base of fore wing white. 
Basal half of second segment of labial palpus blackish fuscous ex- 
teriorly and anteriorly; third segment with narrow subbasal and 
broad subterminal annuli, dull black. Antenna, anterior part of 
thorax and base of tegula blackish fuscous. Ground color of fore 
wing sordid white strongly suffused and mottled with fuscous; at 
basal third two indistinct discal spots followed by a similar one at 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 267 

end of cell, all blackish fuscous; costa, an elongate blotch on costa, 
joined to outer discal spot, and apex blackish fuscous; cilia pale yel- 
lowish fuscous iiTorated Avitli fuscous. Hind wing shining silvery 
fuscous, darker apically; cilia pale yellowish fuscous. Legs pale 
ochreous-white overlaid with blackish fuscous except at joints, and 
hind tibia and tarsus. Abdomen pale ochreous narrowly edged with 
silvery white on posterior margin of segments. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe broad basally, gradually tapering to the 
pointed cucullus; clasper stout, flattened, pointed; sacculus broad, 
strongly sclerotized. Anellus an oval plate with strong, slightly 
curved, flattened, pointed lateral processes. Aedeagus long, stout, 
nearly straight; vesica armed with three large, toothlike cornuti and 
a long one with a deep lateral excavation near its distal end. Vin- 
culum long, spatulate. Gnathos long, beaked, excavated and armed 
with small teeth on its posterior surface. Uncus strong, slightly 
curved, sharply pointed. 

Female genitalia. — Ovipositor very long, segmented; anterior pair 
of apophyses branched. Ductus bursae strongly sclerotized and di- 
lated in posterior half; membranous anteriorly; inception of ductus 
seminalis at junction of ductus bursae and bursa copulatrix. Bursa 
copulatrix large, oval; signum a few, small sclerotized points. 

Alar expanse, 11-20 mm. 

Types. — Vienna Museum (?) {hetulinella, lactella) ; in the British 
Museum (?) {fenestrella., sarcitella.^ subditella) ; in the Academy of 
Natural Sciences, Philadelphia {kennicottella) ; in the Zoological 
Museum, Berlin {antarctica) . 

Type localities. — Vienna {lactella) ; England (sarcitella) ; North 
Westfield, Illinois {kennicottella) ; Carniola, Austria {fenestreUa) ; 
Africa {antnrctlca) ; New Zealand {subditella) ; Europe {hetulinella) . 

Hosts. — Stored cereals, fruits and other products ; also reared from 
birds' nests and refuse, dried skins, dried flesh, and wool. 

DistHhutlon. — This species is generally distributed throughout 
most of the world. In North America it is found from coast to coast 
as far north as Alaska. 

United States and Alaska records 

Alaska: $ (August 1904, C. V. Piper). 

California: Eureka, 5 $ ? (6-7-VI, H. S. Barber) ; Los Angeles, 3 9 $ (April, 
Coquillett) ; Mills College, 2 S S, 2 5 $ (25-III-1908; 28-IX-1908, G. R. 
Pilate) ; Nevada County, 3 ? 2 ("September"; no collector) ; r;i!o Alto, 
$ (October 1914); Pasadena, $ (7-10-24; no collector); Placer County, 
S, 4 9 9 (September; no collector); San Diego, $ (30-VI-1907, W. S. 
"Wright) ; San Francisco, IQ S $ , $ (Jlarch; no collector) ; Saticoy, $ (Jan- 
uary, 1926; no collector) ; Shasta Retreat, Siskiyou County, 5 $ $ , IS 9 9 
(June to September dates; no collector). 



268 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Nevada: Glenbrook, 2 $ $ (25-26-VIII-1915, H. G. Dyar). 

New York: Two specimens apparently introduced. 

Oregon: Allendale, 2 S S, 9 (7-6-1918, H. K. Plank) ; Corvallis, 3 5? (Novem- 
ber and January ; no collector). 

Washington: Bellingham, 2 $ $,2 9 9 (May, July, September 1922, 1923, J. F. 
G. Clarke) ; Friday Harbor, 9 (June 8, 1924, T. C. Kincaid) ; Olympia, 9 
(5-13-1894; no collector); Pullman, 9 (2-VI-1894, C. V. Piper); 2 $9 
(30-VI-1930; 28-VII-1932, J. F. G. Clarke) ; Seaview, S, 9 (16-VII-1918; 
6-IV-1919, H. K. Plank) ; Seattle, $ (19-VIII-1930, J. F. G. Clarke). 

Canadian records 

British Columbia: Aiusworth, 9 (13-VII-1903, H. G. Dyar) ; Comox (22-VI- 
1933, J. McDunnough) ; Kaslo 5 9 9 (June and July dates, 1903, H. G. 
Dyar) ; Mount Cheam (August 15, 1901, J. Fletcher) ; Vancouver (April 
to September, G. R. Hopping) ; Victoria, 5,899 (May to September dates, 
1917 to 1920, E. H. Blackmore) ; S,2 9 9 (May to September 1922, W. R. 
Carter) ; 9 (12-VIII-1909, A. J. Croker). 

Remarks. — This widely distributed household insect is the only 
species referable to this genus. 

In Europe and on the Pacific coast it does considerable damage, feed- 
ing on stored cereals, fruits, and other products. 

GENERA AND SPECIES ERRONEOUSLY REFERRED TO THE 
OECOPHORIDAE 

Family COSMOPTERYGIDAE 
ANONCIA, new genus 

PiiATE 3, Figure 20 ; Plate 7, Figtjbe 52 ; Plate 13, Figures 85, 85a ; Plate 19, 
Figure 114 

Genotype. — Hypatopa conia Walsingham, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 33, p. 211, 1907. 

Head smooth, side tufts slightly spreading. Antenna ciliated in male, 
simple in female, with pecten on basal segment. Labial palpus mod- 
erately long, curved, upturned ; second segment roughened and thick- 
ened with scales ; terminal segment stout, pointed, shorter than second. 

Fore wing elongate, ovate, 12 veins; lb furcate, Ic absent, 2 from 
near angle ; 7 and 8 stalked, both to costa, 11 from before middle. 

Hind wing narrower than fore wing, 8 veins; 3 and 4 connate or 
stalked, 6 and 7 parallel at base, divergent distally. 

Male genitalia. — Asymmetrical; harpe roughly triangular, clasper 
absent; right harpe with basal process. Anellus with long, lateral 
processes. Elements of gnathos fused, naked, strongly sclerotized. 
Uncus and socii absent. 

Female genitalia. — Ductus bursae membranous or only slightly 
sclerotized. Bursa copulatrix without signum. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 269 

The following species belong to this genus: 

episcia (Walsingham), Proe. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 33, p. 211, 1907. (New com- 
bination). 
conia (Walsingham) , ibidem, vol. 33, p. 212, 1907. (New combination.) 
fasciata ( Walsingham ) , ibidem, vol. 33, p. 213, 1907. ( New combination. ) 
orites (Walsingham) , ibidem, vol. 33, p. 213, 1907. (New combination.) 
diveiii (Heinrich), Journ. Agr. Res., vol. 20, p. 814, 1921. (New combination.) 
spMcelina (Keifer), Monthly Bull. Dept. Agr. California, vol. 24, p. 214, 1935. 
(New combination.) 
marinensis (Keifer), ibidem, vol. 24, p. 215, 1935. (New combination.) 

Genus TRICLONELLA Busck 

PiATB 1, FiGXJBE 1 ; Plate 7, Figure 57 ; Plate 13, Figures 84, 84a ; Plate 19, 

FiGUEB 112 

Triclonella Busck, Journ. New York Ent. Soc, vol. 8, p. 236, 1900; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 525, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, Check list of the 
Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 114, 1903. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 203, 1908. — Walsingham, Biol. Centr.-Amer., Lepidoptera-Heter- 
ocera, vol. 4, pp. 136-137, 1912; p. 422, 1915.— Barnes and MoDunnough. 
Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, pp. 161-162, 1917. — Meybick, 
in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 22-23, 1922. — Forbes, Cornell 
Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 249, 1923. — Fletcher, Mem. Dept. Agr. 
India (Ent. Ser.), vol. 11, p. 230, 1929. — Gaede, in Bryk, Lepidopterorum cata- 
logus, pt. 88, p. 21, 1938. — MoDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), p. 
77, 1939. (Genotype: Triclonella peryandeella Busck, Journ. New York 
Ent. Soc, vol. 8, p. 237, pi. 9, fig. 2, 1900.) 

Labial palpus long, smooth, recurved; second segment slightly 
thickened with appressed scales; terminal segment shorter than 
second, slender, acute. Antenna ciliated in male, simple in female, 
with pecten on basal segment. Tongue developed. 

Fore wing elongate ovate; 12 veins, lb furcate, Ic absent, 2 from 
well before angle, 3 and 4 separate, 7 and 8 stalked, both to costa, 11 
from before middle. 

Hind wing narrower than fore wing, 8 veins; 3 and 4 con- 
nate or stalked; 5 connate with or stalked from 4; 6 and 7 parallel 
basally, diverging distally. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe roughly triangular, without clasper. Gna- 
thos bifid. Uncus absent. 

Female genitalia. — Ductus bursae membranous or sclerotized for 
at least some of its length ; signum absent. 

T triclonella^ like the foregoing genus, is referable to the Cosmop- 
terygidae. In the fore wing Ic, a vein always possessed by Oecopho- 
ridae, is absent, and the socii and uncus of the male genitalia are 
likewise missing. This is evidenced by the fact that the two elongate, 
lateral processes from the tegumen, which might be confused with 



270 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

the uncus, are in front of the anal opening. These lateral processes 
cannot, therefore, be in any way homologized with the uncus. 
Three American species are referable to this genus. They are : 

pergandeella Busck, Journ. New York Ent. Soc, vol. 8, p. 237, pi. 9, fig. 2, 1900. 
determinatella (Zeller), Verb, zool.-bot. Ges. Wien, vol. 23, p. 289, 1873. 
antidectis (Meyrick), Exotic Microlopidoptera, vol. 1, p. 218, 1914. (New com- 
bination.) 

ANTEQUERA, new genus 
Plate 4, Figures 27, 28 ; Plate 9, Figures 63, 63a, 63b ; Plate 18. Figure 111 

Genotype. — Semioscopis acertella Busck, Journ. Ent. Zool., Clare- 
mont, vol. 5, p. 100, 1913. 

Head roughened with slender scales; antenna strongly ciliate in 
male, simple in female ; basal segment without pecten. Labial palpus 
moderately long, slightlj^ upturned; second segment roughened with 
coarse scales, longer than third. Thorax smooth. 

Fore wing elongate ; costa nearly straight ; 12 veins ; lb furcate ; 2-5 
closely approximate at base, from or near angle of cell ; 6 approximate 
to the stalk of 7 and 8 ; 7 to costa ; termen convex, oblique. 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing; 8 veins; 3 and 4 connate; 5 nearer 
to 4 than to 6 ; 6 and 7 parallel. 

Male genitalia. — Slightl}^ asymmetrical ; anellus strongly developed ; 
uncus and transtilla absent ; socii vestigial ; harpe Aveak. 

Fem.ale genitalia. — Genital plate membranous ; signum present. 

ANTEQUERA ACERTELLA (Busck). new combination 

Semioscopis acertella Busok, Journ. Ent. Zool., Claremont, vol. 5, p. 100, 1913. — 
Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera iusectorum, fase. 180, p. 186, 1922. — Mo 
Dunnough, Cbeck list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of 
America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , No. 8462. 1939. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe slender, weak, hairy, without clasper ; cucul- 
lus rounded ; sacculus poorly defined. Anellus strongly developed into 
two lateral processes each forming a half of a cylinder in which the 
aedeagus rests. Aedeagus long, slender ; vesica armed with numerous 
strong cornuti. Vinculum produced, rounded, broad. Socii indicated 
only by a few hairs. Gnathos di%"ided into two long, pointed processes. 

Female genitalia. — Genital plate membranous. Ostium with a broad 
ventroanterior plate. Ductus bursae strongly sclerotized in posterior 
half; inception of ductus seminalis about middle of ductus bursae. 
Bursa copulatrix moderately large; signa two small sclerotized, sco- 
binate plates. 

Alar expanse, 17-19 mm. 

Type. — In the United States National Museum. 

Type locality. — San Diego, Calif. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 271 

Remarks. — I am tentatively placing this genus in the family Cosmop- 
terygidae. It appears to be related to the genus Macrohathra Meyrick. 

The only species I have seen that is referable to this genus is the 
genotype. 

Family ETHMIIDAE 

Genus EUMEYRICKIA Busck 

Pl^vte 1, FiGXXRE 8 ; Plate 7, FigutvE 57A ; Plate 12, Figures 75, 75a ; Plate 17, 
Figure 104 

Enmcyrickia Busck, Journ. New York Eiit. Soc, vol. 10, p. 94, 1902; in Dyar, 
U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 52, p. 525, 1903.— Kearfott, in Smith, Clieck list of 
the Lepldoptera of Boreal America, p. 113, 1903. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 35, p. 191-192, 1908. — Keakfott, in Smith, Catalogue of the in- 
sects of New Jersey, p. 561, 1910. — Baknes and McDunnough, Check list 
of the Lepldoptera of Boreal America, p. 160, 1917. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. 
Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, p. 234, 1923.— Brimley, The insects of North 
Carolina, p. 303, 1938. — McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of 
Canada and the United States of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera), 
p. 78, 1939. (Genotype: Chaetochihis trimaculellus Fitch, Report on the 
noxious, beneficial, and other insects of the State of New York, vol. 2, 
p. 233, 1856.) 

'lEido Chambers, Can. Ent., vol. 5, p. 72, 1873. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
Ao]. 35, p. 192. 1908. (Genotype: Eido albapalpella Chambers.) 

Atheropla Meyrick, Proc. Linn. Ent. Soc. New South Wales, vol. 9, pp. 758-759, 
1884. (Genotype: Atheropla melicMora Meyrick.) 

The genus Eumeyrichia is clearly ethmiid and is here transferred 
to that family. Vein 5 of the hind wing is closer to 6 than to 4, a 
good ethmiid character, which is supported by genitalic characters. 
In the male genitalia, as in other Ethmiidae, the harpe is distinctly 
segmented. This character is not found in the Oecophoridae. 

Meyrick has synonymized Eumeyrichia with the Australian genus 
Atheropla^ which synonymy seems unlikely. In his description of 
the genus ^^ Meyrick states that veins 5-7 of the hind wing are nearly 
parallel. If this is true of his Atheropla (partially described from 
imperfect material), then Eumeyrickia immediately becomes separ- 
able on the character of vein 5, which is divergent from 6. In view 
of these facts I believe it advisable to retain Eumeyrickia for our 
American species. 

The genotype is the only known North American species referable 
to this cenus. 



" Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 180, p. 100, 1922. 



272 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Family BLASTOBASIDAE 

Genus GERDANA Busck 

Plate 3, Figuke 21 ; Plate 6, Figuee 42 ; Plate 8, Figures 58, 58a ; Plate 19, 

Figure 117 

Oenlana Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, p. 193, 1908. — Barnes and 
McDunnough, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, p. 160, 
1917. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectoriim, fasc. 180, p. 191, 1922. — 
Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat. Memoir 68, pp. 234^235, 1923.— McDun- 
NOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States of 
America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , p. 79, 1939. (Genotype: Gerdana 
caritella Busck.) 

Labial palpus short, reaching nearly to vertex; second segment 
somewhat roiighenecl beneath; third segment slightly shorter than 
third. Tongue well developed. Antenna simple, with pecten on 
basal segment. Abdomen strongly spined. 

Fore wing elongate-ovate, apex blunt ; 12 veins ; lb furcate ; Ic not 
preserved at margin; 2 from near angle; 3-5 approximate; 7-8 
stalked; 7 to termen just below apex, 8 to costa; stalk of 7 and 8 
approximate to or connate with 9 ; 11 from middle. 

Hind wing as broad as fore wing with costa excised from middle; 
apex pointed, termen straight, oblique ; 8 veins ; 6 and 7 parallel but 
divergent toward tip ; 3 and 4 connate or stalked ; 5 nearest 4. 

Male genitalia. — Symmetrical; harpe elongate, divided; clasper 
short, curved; anellus tubular; transtilla a narrow band; vinculum 
short, spatulate; aedeagus long, stout, straight. Gnathos a hook. 
Uncus fleshy, slightly hairy. 

Female genitalia. — Bursa copulatrix without signum. Ductus bur- 
sae mebranous. Ostium small, with sclerotized plate ventrally. 

Remarks. — I recognize only one species in this genus. The species 
is not oecophorid, partaking of both gelechiid and blastobasid char- 
acters. Likewise it does not clearly belong to either of these families 
but suggests both when certain characters are considered. The ab- 
dominal segments are heavily spinose, a good blastobasid character, 
but the costa of the fore wing is not thickened nor are veins 10 and 
11 unusually distant as in that family. Vein Ic of the fore wing 
is not preserved at the margin as in Oecophoridae and the gnathos 
is distincity gelecliiid. On the spinose character of the abdomen, 
the absence of vein Ic of the fore wing and the larval habit of living 
in refuse I transfer this genus to the Blastobasidae. 

I have before me a series of 15 specimens reared from "witches'- 
broom." These were reared from larvae collected at Canaan, Maine, 
by Dr. A. E. Brower. Another series, reared from a long-eared owl's 
nest by W. L. Jellison, was collected in Beaverhead County, Mont. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 273 

In addition, I have had for determination the following: 1 male 
from Smnmerland, British Colmnbia (21-VII-1933, A. N. Gartrell) ; 
4 females from Ottawa (8-VIII-1924, G. S. Walley; lG-VII-1906, 
C. H. Young) and Blackburn, Ontario (7-VII-1939, E. G. Lester) ; 
and 1 female from Putnam County, 111. (14-IX-1939, M. O. Glenn). 

Family HELIODINIDAE 

Genus EUCLEMENSIA Grote 

Plate 3, Figure 23 ; Plate 7, Figltee 54 ; Plate 12, Figures 77, 77a ; Plate 15, 

Figure 93 

Eticlemensia Grote, Can. Ent., vol. 10, p. 69, 1878. — Busck, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 35, p. 202, 1908. — Meyrick, in Wytsman, Genera insectorum, fasc. 165, 
p. 20, 1914. — Forbes, Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Stat., Memoir 68, p. 357, 1923. — 
MoDuNNOUGH, Check list of the Lepidoptera of Canada and the United States 
of America (Part 2, Microlepidoptera ) , p. 87, 1939. (Genotype: Hamadnjas 
iassettella Clemens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 423, 1864.) 

Hamadnjas Clemens, Proc. Ent. Soc. Philadelphia, vol. 2, p. 422, 1864 (preoccu- 
pied). (Genotype: Eamadryas bassettella Clemens.) 

Head with smoothly appressed scales; antenna slightly rough- 
scaled, without pecten on basal segment. Labial palpus exceeding 
base of antenna ; third segment slightly shorter than second. Tongue 
developed. 

Fore wing narrow, elongate, costa very slightly concave at middle; 
12 veins ; 7 and 8 stalked, both to costa. 

Hind wing nearly as broad as fore wing, 8 veins ; 6 and 7 subparal- 
lel ; 3 and 4 separate. 

Male genitalia. — Harpe symmetrical, simple. Anellus with well- 
developed lateral processes; central plate absent. Gnathos bifid. 
Uncus absent. 

Female genitalia. — Bursa copulatrix double, partly sclerotized ; in- 
ception of ductus seminalis on bursa; two ducts. Ostium opening 
in median portion of genital plate. 

Remarks. — Although this genus does not belong in the Heliodinidae, 
where both Meyrick and Forbes placed it, I am leaving it there until 
the family is revised and the genera are reallocated. 

EXPLANATION OF PLATES 

The illustrations for this paper were made by the author ; the plates 
were composed by Mrs. Eleanor A. Carlin, Bureau of Entomology 
and Plant Quarantine. No attempt was made to adhere to a definite 
scale in making the drawings. Most of the male genitalia were 
drawn to one scale but the female genitalia were drawn to a con- 
venient size. 



274 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 

Explanation of Hyinhols applied to heads 

P= Palpus. 
pt=Pecten. 
E=Eye. 

Explanation of symbols applied to genitalia 



Cl=Clasper of harpe. An = Anellus. 

Tr=Transtilla. lbAn=Lobe of anellus. 

Lbtr=Lobe of transtilla. lpAn = Lateral process of anellus. 

Hp = Harpe. extSc= Extension of sacculus. 

Sc = Sacculus. V = Vinculum. 

Un = Uncus. Ae = Aedeagus. 

Gn = Gnathos. Vs == Vesica. 

Tg=Tegumen. Cu = Cornuti. 

Si = Socii. ODM = Outer dorsal margin of sacculus. 

th= Terminal hook of aedeagus. 



Gp — Genital plate. Db = Ductus bursae. 

O = Ostium. Ds == Ductus seminalis. 

Be — Bursa copulatrix. Op = Ovipositor. 

S = Signum. SpOp = Spines of ovipositor. 



Plate 1 



1. Triclonella pcrgandeelJa Busck: Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

2. Mathildana neicmancJla (Clemens) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

3. Carolana ascriptella (Busck) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

4. Chamhersia haydenella (Chambers) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

5. Endrosis lactella (Schiffermiiller) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

6. Pleurota bicostella (Clerck) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

7. Inga sparsiciliclla (Clemens) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

8. Eumeyrickia trimaculella (Fitch) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

9. Carcina quercana (Fabricius) : Lateral aspect of head showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

10. Martyringa latipennis (Walsingham) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

Plate 2 

11. Deprcssaria heracHana (Linnaeus) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 275 

12. Hofmannophila psendosprctella (Staintou) : Lateral aspect of head, showing 

eye, labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna with peoteu. 

13. Agonopterix occllana (Fabricius) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

14. Epicallima argent icinctella (Clemens) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

15. Seinioscopis steinkellncriana (Schiffermiiller) : Lateral aspect of head, show- 

ing eye, labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

16. Apachea larbcrcUa (Busck) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

17. Martyrhilda canella (Busck) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

18. SchiffermiiUcria schaeffcrella (Linnaeus) : Lateral aspect of head, showing 

eye, labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

Plate 3 

19. Decantha lorklmusenii (Zeller) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

20. Anoiicia conia (Walsingham) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

21. Gerdana cariteUa Busck : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial palpus, 

and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

22. Occophora bractella (Linnaeus) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

23. Euclemensia hassettella (Clemens) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

24. Psilocorsis quercicclla Clemens : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

25. Fadiola shalerielhi (Chambers) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

26. Alachimia tentoriferella Clemens: Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten, 

Plate 4 

27. Antequera accrtella (Busck) : Wings. 

28. Antequera acerteUa (Busck) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

29. Bibanambla aUenella- (Walsingham) : Wings. 

30. Bibarramhla allenella (Walsingham) : Lateral aspect of head, showing eye, 

labial palpus, and basal segment of antenna with pecten. 

31. Himnnacicb huacliucella (Busck) : Wings. 

32. Himmacia huacliucella (Busck) : Lateral aspect of htead, showing eye, labial 

palpus, and basal segment of antenna without pecten. 

Plate 5 
Wing Venation 

33. Machimia tentoriferella Clemens. 

34. Pleurota bicostella (Clerck). 

35. Semioscopis steinkellneriana (Schiffermiiller). 

36. Carcina quercana (Fabricius). 

37. Inga sparsiciliella (Clemens). 

38. Psilocorsis quercicella Clemens. 

39. Martyringa latipenyiis (Walsingham). 



276 PROCEEDmGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Plate 6 
Wing Venation 

40. Apachea harberella (Busck). 

41. Fabiola shaleHella (Chambers). 

42. Oerdana caritella Busck. 

43. Hofmannophila psetidospretella (Stalnton). 

44. Martyrhilda canella (Busck). 

45. Agonopterix ocellana (Fabricius). 

46. Chambersia haydenella (Chambers). 

47. Epicallima argenticinctella (Clemens). 

48. Depressaria heraclinna (Linnaeus). 

Plate 7 
Wing Venation 

49. Carolana ascriptella (Busck). 

50. Mathildana netonianella (Clemens). 

51. Endrosis lacteUa (Schiffermiiller). 

52. Anoncia conia (Walsingham). 

53. Oecophora bractella (Linnaeus). 

54. Euclemensia bassettella (Clemens). 

55. DecantJia horkhausenii (Zeller). 

56. Schiffermiilleria schaefferella (Linnaeus). 

57. Triclonella pergandeella Busck. 
57A. Eumeyrickia trimaculella (Fitch). 

Plate 8 

58-58a. Oerdana caritella Busck ; 58, Ventral aspect of male genitalia ; 58a, 

aedeagus, lateral view. 
59-59a, Psilocorsis gnercicella Clemens: 59, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

59a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
60-60a. Endrosis lactella (Schitfermiiller) : 60, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

60a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
61-61a. Fabiola shaleriella (Chambers) : 61, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

61a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
62-62a. Agonopterix ocellana (Fabricius) : 62, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

62a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 9 

63-63b. Antequera acertella (Busck) : 63, Ventral aspect of male genitalia with 

aedeagus removed ; 63a, lateral aspect of male genitalia with aedeagus 

removed ; 63b, aedeagus, lateral view, 
64-64a. Himmacia htiachucella (Busck) : 64, Ventral aspect of male genitalia 

with aedeagus removed ; 64a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
65-65a. Biharrambla allenella (Walsingham) : 65, Ventral aspect of male genitalia 

with aedeagus removed; 65a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 10 

6Q-e6a. Decantha borkhausenii (Zeller) : Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

66a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
67-67a. Martyrhilda canella (Busck) : 67, Ventral asi)ect of male genitalia; 
67a, aedeagus, lateral view. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 277 

68-68a. Depressaria heracliana (Linnaeus) : 68, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia ; GSa, aedeagus, lateral view. 

69-69b. Carolana asoriptella (Busck) : 69, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 
69a, aedeagus, lateral view; 69b, gnathos and uncus, lateral view. 

7(>-70a. Machimia tentorifereUa Clemens; 70, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 
70a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 11 

71-71a. Caroina qricrcana (Fabricius) : 71, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 
71a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

72-72a. Martyringa latipennis (Walsingham) : 72, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia ; 72a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

73-73a. Semioscopis steinkellneriana (Schiffermiiller) : 73, Ventral aspect of 
male genitalia ; 73a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

74-74b. Mathildana newmanella (Clemens) : 74, Ventral aspect of right harpe and 
anellus; 74a, aedeagus, lateral view; 74b, gnathos and uncus, lateral 
view. 

Plate 12 

75-75a. Eumeyrickia trimaculella (Fitch) : 75, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia ; 75a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

7Q-76a, Pleurota Ucostella (Clerck) : 76, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 
76a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

77-77a. Euclemensia hassettella (Clemens) : 77, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia ; 77a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

78-78b. HofmannopMla pseudospretella (Stainton) : 78, Ventral aspect of 
male genitalia ; 78a, aedeagus, lateral view ; 78b, gnathos and uncus, 
lateral view. 

79-79a. Chamhersla haydenella (Chambers) : 79, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia ; 79a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

80-80a. Inga sparsiciliella (Clemens): 80, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 
80a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

81-81a. Epicallima argenticinctella (Clemens) : 81, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia; 81a, aedeagus, lateral view, 

Plate 13 

82-82a. ScJiiffermillleria schaefferella (Linnaeus) : 82, Ventral aspect of male 

genitalia ; 82a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
83-83a. Oecophora 'bractella (Linnaeus) : 83, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

83a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
84-84a. TricloneUa pergandeeUa Busck: 84, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

84a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
85-85a. Anoncia conia (Walsingham) : 85, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

85a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
8&SQh. Apachea Mr^erellcu (Busck): 86, Ventral aspect of male genitalia; 

86a, aedeagus, lateral view; 86b, dorsal view of tegumen to show 

absence of uncus, 

Plate 14 

87. Pleurota hicostella (Clerck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

88. Carcina quercana (Fabricius) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

89. Inga sparsiciliella (Clemens) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 



278 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

90. Martyringa latipennis (Walsingbam) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

91. Decantha iorkhausenii (Zeller) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

92. Machiniia tentoriferella Clemens : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

Plate 15 

93. Euclemensia iassettella (Clemens) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

94. Ajjachea harierella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

Plate 16 

95. FaHola sTialcriella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

96. Carolana ascriptella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

97. Semioscopis sieinkellneriana (Schiffermiiller) : Ventral aspect of female 

genitalia. 
08. Schiffermiilleria schaefferella (Linnaeus) : Ventral aspect of female 

genitalia. 
99. EpicalUma argenticinctell<i (Clemens) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

100. Mariyrhilda cav.ella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

101. HofmannopMla pseudospretclla (Stainton) : Ventral aspect of female 

genitalia. 

Plate 17 

102. Depressaria heracUana (Linnaeus) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

103. Agonopterix ocellana (Fabricius) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

104. EumeyricJcia trimaculella (Fitch) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

105. Psilocorsis quercicella Clemens : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

106. Borkhausenia minutella (Linnaeus) : Abdominal spines (setae). 

107. Martyringa latipenvis (Walsingham) : Abdominal spines (setae). 

108. Carolana ascriptella (Busck) : Truncated abdominal spines (setae). 

Plate 18 

109. BldarramUa allenella (Walsingham) ; Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

110. Himmacia liuachucella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

111. Antequera acertella (Busck) : Ventral asi)ect of female genitalia. 

Plate 19 

112. Trlclonella pergandeella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

113. Oecophora hractella (Linnaeus) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

114. A7ioncia conia (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

115. Chamiersia haydenella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

116. Endrosis lactella (Schiffermiiller) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

117. Oerdana caritella Busck: Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

118. Mathildana newmanella (Clemens) ; Ventral aspect of female genitalia. 

Plate 20 

119-119a. Faiiola tecta Braun: 119, Ventral aspect of male genitalia with left 

harpe and tegumen removed; 119a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
12O-120a. Schiffermiilleria edithella (Busck) : 120, Ventral aspect of male 

genitalia with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 120a, aedeagus, 

lateral view. 
321-121a. Schiffermiilleria lucidella (Busck) : 121, Ventral aspect of male 

genitalia with left harpe and tegumen removed; 121a, aedeagus, 

lateral view. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 279 

122-122a. Schiffermiillcria quadrhnaculella (Chambers) : 122, Ventral aspect of 
male genitalia with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 122a, acdeagus, 
lateral view. 

123-123a. Pleurota albastrigulella (Kearfott) : 123, Ventral aspect of male 
genitalia with left harpe and tegimieu removed ; 123a, aedeagus, 
lateral view. 

124-124a. EpicaUima formosella (Schiffermuller) : 124, Ventral aspect of male 
genitalia with left harpe and tegumen removed; 124a, aedeagus, 
lateral view. 

]25-125a. Decantha iorcasella (Chambers) : 125, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia with left harpe and tegumen removed; 125a, aedeagus, lateral 
view. 

Plate 21 

126-126a. Inga olscuromaculella (Chambers) : 126, Ventral aspect of male 
genitalia with left harpe and tegumen removed; 126a, aedeagus, 
lateral view. 

127-127a. Inga canariella (Busck) : 127, Ventral aspect of male genitalia with 
left harpe and tegumen removed ; 127a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

128-128a. Inga ciUella (Busck) : 128, Ventral aspect of male genitalia vvith 
left harpe and tegxmien removed; 128a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

129-129a. Inga concoloreUa (Beutenmiiiler) : 129, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 129a, aedeagus, lateral 
view. 

130-130a. Inga cretacea (Zeller) : 130, Ventral aspect of male genitalia with 
left harpe and tegumen removed; 130a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 22 

131. PsiloGorsis reflexella Clemens : Aedeagus, lateral view. 

132. Psilocorsls oaryae, new species : Aedeagus, lateral view. 

133. Psilocorsis ohsoletella (Zeller) : Aedeagus, lateral view. 

134. Psilocorsis faginella (Chambers) : Aedeagus, lateral view. 

135-135a. Scmioscopis aurorella Dyar ; Ventral aspect of male genitalia with 
left harpe and tegumen removed ; 135a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
136. Semioscopis mcdunmmghl, new species : Aedeagus, lateral view. 
137-137a. Semioscopis inornata (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of male genitalia 
witli left harpe and tegumen removed ; 137a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 23 

138-138a. Semioscopis r.iegamicrella Dyar : 138, Ventral aspect of male genitalia 
with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 138a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

139-139a. Semioscopis hraunae, new species : 139, Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 139a, aedeagus, lateral 
view. 

140-1 40a. Semioscopis packardella (Clemens) : Ventral aspect of male genitalia 
with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 140a, aedeagus, lateral 
view. 
141. Semioscopis meni-ccellaD jar: Aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 24 

142-142a. Martyrhilda gracilis (Walsingham) : 142, Ventral aspect of right harpe 
and anellus of male genitalia ; 142a, aedeagus, lateral view. 



280 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



143-143a. Martyrhilda umbraticostellct- (Walsingham) ; 143, "Ventral aspect of 
male genitalia with left harpe removed; 143a, aedeagus, lateral 
view. 
144. Martyrhilda thoracenigraeella (Cliambers) : Aedeagus, lateral view, 

145-145a. Martyrhilda sordidella, new species: 145, Ventral aspect of male gen- 
italia with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 145a, aedeagus, lateral 
view. 

146-146a. Martyrhilda thoracefasciella (Chambers) : 146, Ventral aspect of right 
harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 146a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

147-147a. Martyrhilda sphaeralceae, new species: 147, Ventral aspect of right 
harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 147a. aedeagus, lateral view. 

14S-148a. Martyrhilda hildaella, new species : 148, Ventral aspect of male genitalia 
with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 148a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

149-149a. Martyrhilda sciadopa (Meyrick) : 149, Ventral aspect of male genitalia 
with left harpe removed ; 149a, aedeagus. lateral view, 

Plate 25 

150-150a. Martyrhilda nivalis (Braun) : 150, "Ventral aspect of male genitalia 
with left harpe removed ; 150a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
151. Martyrhilda klamathiana ("Walsingham) : Lateral view of aedeagus. 
152-152a. Agonopterix fulva ("Walsingham) : 152, "Ventral aspect of male geni- 
talia with left harije removed ; 152a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
153-153a. Agonopterix gelidella (Busck) : 153, "Ventral aspect of male genitalia 
with left harpe removed; 153a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

154. Agonopterix arcuella, new species: Clasper and sacculus of right 

harpe of male genitalia. 

155. Agonopterix lythrella ("Walsingham) : Clasper and sacculus of right 

harpe of male genitalia. 
156-156a. Agonopterix hyperella Ely: 156, "Ventral aspect of right harpe and 
anellus of male genitalia; 156a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 26 

157-157a. Agonopterix curvilineella (Beutenmiiller) : 157, Ventral aspect of 

right harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 157a, aedeagus, lateral 

view^ 
158-158a. AgoJiopterix muricolorella (Busck) : 158, Ventral aspect of right harpe 

and anellus of male genitalia; 158a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
159-159a. Agonopterix clemensella (Chambers) : 159, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 159a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
160-160a. Agonopterix atrodor sella (Clemens) : 100, "Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 160a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
161-161a. Agonopterix nu'biferella ("Walsingham) : 161, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 161a, aedeagus, lateral view. 



Plate 27 

162-162a. Agonopterix pteleae Barnes and Busck 
harpe and anellus of male genitalia; 

163-163a. Agonopterix eupatoriiella (Chambers) : 
harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 

164T-164a. Agonopterix pulvipenyiella (Clemens) : 
harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 



: 162, "Ventral aspect of right 
162a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

163, Ventral aspect of right 
163a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

164, Ventral aspect of right 
164a, aedeagus, lateral view. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 281 

Plate 28 

200B. Depressaria togata Walsingham ; Male genitalia (drawn by Herbert 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 165a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
166-1 66a. Agonopterix rosaciliella (Busck) : 166, Ventral aspect of right harpe 

and anellus of male genitalia ; 166a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
167-167a. Agonopterix fuscitenninella, new species : 167, Ventral aspect of 

right harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 167a, aedeagus, lateral 

view. 
168-168a. Agonopteri.v novi-mnndl ("Walsingham) : 168, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 16Sa, aedeagus, lateral aspect. 

Plate 29 

169-169a. Agonopterix rohiniella (Packard) : 169, Ventral aspect of right harpe 
and anellus of male genitalia; 169a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

170-170a. Agonopterix nigrinotella (Busck) : 170, Ventral aspect of right harpe 
and anellus of male genitalia ; 170a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

171-1 71a. Agonopterix argillacea (Walsingham) : 171, Ventral aspect of right 
harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 171a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 30 

172-1 72a. Agonopterix senicionella (Busck) : 172, Ventral aspect of right harpe 

and anellus of male genitalia ; 172a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
173-1 73a. Agonopterix flavicomella (Engel) : 173, Ventral aspect of right harpe 

and anellus of male genitalia; 173a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
174-174a. Agonopterix costimacula, new species: 174, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 174a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
175-1 75a. Agonopterix antennariella, new species : 175, A^entral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 175a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 31 

17(3-176a. Agonopterix oregonensis, new species : 176, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 176a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
177-177a. Agonopterix psoralieUa (Walsingham) : 177, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 177a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
178-17Sa. Agonopterix clarkei Keifer : 178, Ventral aspect of right harpe and 

anellus of male genitalia ; 178a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
179-179a. Agonopterix dimorpliella, new species : 179, Ventral aspect of male 

genitalia with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 179a, aedeagus, 

lateral view. 
180-180a. Agonopterix cajonensis, new species: 180, Ventral aspect of male 

genitalia with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 180a, aedeagus, 

lateral view. 

Plate 32 

lSl-181a. Agonopterix sabulella (Walsingham) : 181, Ventral aspect of right 
harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 181a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

182-182a. Agonopterix pallidella (Busck) : 182, Ventral aspect of right harpe 
and anellus of male genitalia ; 182a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

183-183a. Agonopterix pergandeella (Busck) : 1S3, Ventral aspect of right harpe 
and anellus of male genitalia ; 183a, aedeagus, lateral view. 



282 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



184r-184a. Agonopterix costosa (Haworth) : 184, Ventral aspect of right liari)e 
and anellus of male genitalia ; lS4a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

185-185a. Agonopterix ncbulosa (Zeller) : 185, Ventral aspect of right harpe and 
anellus of male genitalia ; 185a, aedeagus, lateral view. 



Plate 33 

186. Agonopterix arnicella (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of right harpe 

and anellus of male genitalia. 
187-187a. Agonopterix amisseUa (Busck) : 187, Ventral aspect of right harpe 

and anellus of male genitalia ; 187a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
188-188a. Agonopterix latipalpella Barnes and Busck: 188, Ventral aspect of 

right harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 188a, aedeagus, lateral 

view. 
189-lS9a. Agonopterix sanguinella (Busck) : 189, Ventral aspect of right harpe 

and anellus of male genitalia ; 189a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
190-190a. Agonopterix posticella (Walsingham) : 190, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe and anellus of male genitalia ; 190a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 34 

191-191b. Depressaria maculatella Busck : 191, Ventral aspect of right harpe and 

anellus of male genitalia ; 191a, aedeagus, lateral view ; 191b, trans- 

tilla, ventral view. 
192-192b. Depressaria grotella Robinson : 192, Ventral aspect of right harpe and 

anellus of male genitalia ; 192a, aedeagus, lateral view ; 192b, trans- 

tilla, ventral view. 
193-193b. Depressaria betulella Busck: 193, Ventral aspect of right harpe and 

anellus of male genitalia ; 193a, aedeagus, lateral view ; 193b, trans- 

tilla, ventral view. 

Plate 35 

194-194a. Depressa/ria atrostrigella, new species: 194, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe, anellus, vinculum, and transtilla of male genitalia; 194a, 

aedeagus, lateral view. 
195-195a. Depressaria alienella Busck : 195, Ventral aspect of right harpe, anellus 

and transtilla of male genitalia ; 195a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
196-196a. Depressaria artemisiella McDunnough: 196, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe, anellus, and transtilla of male genitalia ; 196a, aedeagus, 

lateral view. 
197-197a. Depressaria artetnisiae dracuncuU Clarke: 197, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe, anellus and transtilla of male genitalia ; 197a, aedeagus. 

lateral view. 

Plate 36 

198-198a. Depressaria angustati, new .species : 198. Ventral aspect of right harpe, 

anellus and transtilla of male genitalia ; 198a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
199-199a. Depressaria muUifidae Clarke: 199, Ventral aspect of right harpe, 

anellus and transtilla of male genitalia ; 199a, aedeagus, lateral view. 
200^200a. Depressaria wliitmani, new species: 200, Ventral aspect of right 

harpe, anellus and transtilla of male genitalia ; 200a, aedeagus, lateral 

view. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE— CLARKE 283 

Plate 37 

200B. Depressaria togata Walsingham : Male genitalia (drawn by Herbert 

Stringer). 
201-201a. Depressaria yalcimae, new species : 201, Ventral aspect of male genitalia 

with left harpe and tegumen removed; 201a, aedeagiis, lateral view. 
202-202a. Depressaria leptoiaeniae Clarke: 202, Ventral aspect of male genitalia 

with left harpe and tegumen removed ; 202a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 38 

203-203a, Depressaria juUella Busck: 203, Ventral aspect of right harpe and 
anellus of male genitalia ; 203a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

204-204a. Depressaria eleanorae, new species: 204, Ventral aspect of right harpe 
and anellus of male genitalia ; 204a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

205-205a. Depressaria cinereocostella Clemens : 205, Ventral aspect of hight harpe, 
anellus and transtilla of male genitalia ; 205a, aedeagus, lateral view. 

Plate 39 

206. Inga obscuromaculcUa (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

207. Inga canariella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

208. Inga concolorella (Beutenmiiller) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

209. Inga ciUella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without ovipositor. 

210. Inga cretacea (Zeller) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without ovipositor. 

211. Decantha ioreasella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

212. Pleurota alhastrigulella (Kearfott) : Bursa copulatrix and signa of female 

genitalia. 

213. Schiffermiilleria quadrimaculella (Chambers) : Ventral view of genital plate 

of female genitalia. 
214 Schiffermiilleria edithella (Busck) : Ventral view of genital plate of female 
genitalia. 

215. Schiffermiilleria lucidella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of genital plate of female 

genitalia. 

216. Epicallima formosella (Schiffermiiller) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

Plate 40 

217. Psilocorsis faginella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of genital plate, 

ostium, and posterior portion of ductus bursae of female genitalia. 

218. Psilocorsis faginella (Chambers) : Signum of bursa copulatrix. 

219. Psilocorsis oaryae, new species : Ventral aspect of genital plate, os- 

tium, and posterior portion of ductus bursae of female genitalia- 

220. Psilocorsis obsoletella (Zeller) : Ventral aspect of genital plate, os- 

tium, and posterior portion of ductus bursae of female genitalia. 

221. Psilocorsis fletckercUa Gibson : Signum of bursa copulatrix. 

222. Psilocorsis reflexella Clemens : Signum of bursa copulatrix. 

223. Semioscopis aiirorella Dyar: Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 



284 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

224. Semioscopis traunae, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

225. Semioscopis inomata (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of ovipositor, 

showing hooked macrosetae, genital plate, ostium, and posterior 
portion of ductus bursae of female genitalia. 

226. Semioscopis megamicrella Dyar: Ventral aspect of genital plate, os- 

tium, and posterior portion of ductus bursae of female genitalia. 

227. Semioscopis merriccella Dyar: Bursa copulatrix of female genitalia. 
228-228a. Semioscopis packardella (Clemens) : 228, Ventral aspect of genital 

plate, ostium, and posterior portion of ductus bursae of female 
genitalia; 228a, bursa copulatrix. 

229. Agonopterix dimorphella, new species: Ventral aspect of female geni- 
talia without ovipositor. 
230-230a. Agonopterix clarkei Keifer : 230, Ventral aspect of ovipositor lobes of 
female genitalia showing spines (setae) of the ovipositor; 230a, 
ventral view of genital plate and ostium. 

231. MartyrMlda nivalis (Braun) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 
out ovipositor. 

Plate 41 

232. Marti/rhilda vmhratico Stella (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female 

genitalia without ovipositor. 

233. MartyrMlda gracilis (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

234. MartyrMlda MamatMana (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female geni- 

talia without ovipositor. 

235. MartyrMlda thoracefasciella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female geni- 

talia without ovipositor. 

236. MartyrMlda sciadopa (Meyrick) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

237. MartyrMlda sphaeralceae, new si)ecies: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

238. MartyrMlda sordideUa, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

239. MartyrMlda thoracenigraeella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female geni- 

talia without ovipositor. 

Plate 42 

240. Agonopterix hyperella Ely : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

241. Agonopterix oregonensis, new species: Ventral aspect of female gen- 

italia without ovipositor. 

242. Agonopterix clemensella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female geni- 

italia without ovipositor. 

243. Agonopterix muricolorella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 
244-244a. Agonopterix cajonensis, new species : 244, Ventral aspect of genital 
plate, ostium and posterior portion of ductus bursae; 244a, bursa 
copulatrix. 

245. Agonopterix curvilineella (Beutenmiiller) : Ventral aspect of female 

genitalia without ovipositor. 

246. Agonopterix arcuella, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 



REVISION OF THE OECOPHORIDAE — CLARKE 285 

247-247a. Agonopterix gelidella (Busck) : 247, Ventral aspect of genital plate, 
ostium and posterior portion of ductus bursae; 247a, bursa 
copulatrix. 

248. Agonopterix fiilva (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

Plate 43 

249. Agonopterix eupatoriiella (Chambers) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

250. Agonopterix scabella (Zeller) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

251. Agonopterix pteleae Barnes and Busck : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor, 

252. Agonopterix atrodorsella (Clemens) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor, 

253. Agonopterix pulvipennella (Clemens) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

Plate 44 

254. Agonopterix tvalsinghamella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

255. Agonopterix argillacea (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipostor. 

256. Agonopterix pallidclla (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

257. Agonopterix rosacilieUc6 (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

258. Agonopterix fusciterminella, new species: Ventral aspect of female geni- 

talia without ovipositor. 

259. Agonopterix robiniella (Packard) : Ventral aspect of genital plate of 

female genitalia. 
259A. Agonopterix thelmae, new species: Ventral aspect of genital plate of 
female genitalia, 

260. Agonopterix lecontella (Clemens) : Ventral aspect of bursa copulatrix of 

female genitalia. 

Plate 45 

261. Agonopterix costimacula, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

262. Agonopterix canadensis (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

263. Agonopterix scnicionella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

264. Agonopterix antennariella, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

265. Agonopterix nigrinoteUa (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

266. Agonopterix nebulosa (Zeller) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

267. Agonopterix flavicomella (Engel) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 



286 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Plate 46 

268. Agonopterix latipalpella Barnes and Busck: Ventral aspect of female 

genitalia without ovipositor. 

269. Agonopterix amisseUa (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

270. Agonopterix saduIeUa (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

271. Agonopterix psoraliclla ("Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

272. Agonopterix amyrisella (Busck) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia with- 

out ovipositor. 

273. Agonopterix costosa (Haworth) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

274. Agonopterix posticelia (Walsingham) : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

Plate 47 

275. Depressaria mactilateUa Busck: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 
276-276a. Deprcsmria hetulella Busck: 276, Ventral aspect of genital plate and 

part of ductus bursae of female genitalia ; 276a, signum. 
277-277a. Depressaria grotclla Robinson: 277, Ventral aspect of genital plate 

of female genitalia ; 277a, signum. 

278. Depressaria artemisieUa McDunnough : Ventral aspect of female geni- 

talia without ovipositor. 

279. Depressaria eleanorae, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

280. Depressaria juUella Busck : Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

Plate 48 

281. Depressaria cinereocostella Clemens: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

282. Depressaria alienella Busck: Ventral aspect of female genitalia without 

ovipositor. 

283. Depressaria artcmisiae draciinculi Clarke: Ventral aspect of female geni- 

talia without ovipositor. 

284. Depressaria palousella, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

285. Depressaria, yakimae, new species: Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

286. Depressaria whitmani, new species : Ventral aspect of female genitalia 

without ovipositor. 

287. Depressaria angustati, new species : Ventral aspect of genital plate and 

part of ductus bursae of female genitalia. 
2S8. Depressaria multifldae Clarke: Ventral aspect of genital plate and part 

of ductus bursae of female genitalia. 
289. Depressaria leptotaeniae Clarke : Ventral aspect of genital plate and part 

of ductus bursae of female genitalia. 



U S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 1 




/ TRICLONELL/\ 








2 MATHILDANA 




S ENDf^OSIS 










3. CAROLANA 





a EUMErRICKIA 



lO. MARTYRINGA 




NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE. COSMOPTERYG IDAE. AND ETHMIIDAE. 
FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 274. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 2 




16. APACHE A 



17. HARTYRHILDA 



18. SCHIFFERtlULLBRIA 



North American oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 274-275 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 3 



?^K mkw 1"^/ 20.AN0NCIA 




2/ GERDANA 



/S DECANTHA 





Z5 EUCLEMEN5IA 



22. OECOPHORA 




Z4-. PSILOCORSIS 



25 FABIOLA 



Ze. HACHIMIA 




North American Oecophoridae. Cosmopterygidae, Blastobasidae. 
and heliodinidae. 

OF PLATE SEE PAGE 275. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 4 





Z7 ANTEQU£RfK 



2B.ANTEQUERA ^^ 




v5/. HIMMACIA 



^Z HIMMAOA 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE AND COSMOPTERYG IDAE 
FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 275. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATES 




35 SEniOSCOPI5 



^>9 MA/?rr/?INGA 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 275. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATES 




44 MARTYRHILDA 



DEP/P£SSA/?/A 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE AND BLASTOBASIDAE. 
FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 276. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 7 




5J. OECOPHORA 



57A EUMEYRICKIA 



North American Oecophoridae. Cosmopterygidae, Ethmiidae. and 
Heliodinidae. 



FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 276. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 8 




02 AGONOPTERIX 



North American Oecophoridae and Blastobasidae 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 276. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 9 




65 BIBARRAMBLA 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE AND COSMOPTERYG I DAE. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 276. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 10 




70. MACHIMIP[ 



North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 276-277. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 11 




73 5£n/OSCOPIS 



North American oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 277. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 12 




m \ 



81 EPICALLIMA 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORI DAE, ETHMIIDAE, AND H ELIODI N I DAE. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 277. 



U S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 13 




86. APACHE A 



North American Oecophoridae and Cosmopterygidae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 277. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS VOL. 90 PLATE 14 




NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 277-278. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 




93. EUCLEMENSIA 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 15 



;^ 



r>^. 



94. APACHEA 



North American Oecophoridae and heliodinidae. 

, FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 278. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE U 




Se.SCHIFFERMULLERIA 




lot HCFMANNOPHILA 



lOO MARTYRHILD/K 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 278. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUT 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 17 



-P^ 



/OZDEPRESSAR.IA 



y^\\ \)i 



mm 



106 BOHKHAUSEMI/\4 




IO7.MAR.TYRIN0f\f 



lOQ CAROL AN A 3 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE AND ETHMIIDAE. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 273. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL 90 PLATE 




I I 



m^ 



III. ANTEQUERA 



no. HIMMACIA 

NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE AND COSMOPTER YG I DAE 
FOR EXPLANATiON OF PLATE SEE PAGE 278. 



US NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 19 



113 OECOPHORA 




/J5.CHAMBERSIA //6 ENDf?OSIS 




/latlATHILDANA 



North American Oecophoridae. Cosmopterygidae. and Blastobasidae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 278. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 20 




IZ4. formosella 



IZSa. 



North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 278-279. 



' U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUT 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 21 




IZ9. concolonzlla 



130. c ret ace a 



NORTH American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 279. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL 90 PLATE 22 




137. inornata 



North American Oecophoridae. 

for explanation of plate see page 279. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 23 




North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATrON OF PLATE SEE PAGE 279. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 24 




14^ thoracefascieUa 



149. sctadoca 



NORTH American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 279-280. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 25 




North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 280. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 26 




/<3/ nuMfenUla, 



North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 280. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 27 




/04 pulvcpenneUcL 



NORTH AMERICAN OECOPHORIDAE 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 280. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUt 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 28 




J67 fuscitermneJIa 



itenovi-munOLL 



North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 281. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 29 




/// argdlacea 



North American oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 281. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 30 




174 cosumacida 



175 ontennoTLeLLa 



North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 281. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 31 




i79dLmorpheUa 



North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 231. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUf 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 32 




North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATiON OF PLATE SEE PAGES 281-282. 



S, NATIONAL. MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL 90 PLATE 33 




! sangumalla 



North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 282. 



U S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PRCCEEDINGS. VOL 90 PLATE 34 




beta Leila. 



North American Oecophoridae 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 282. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 35 




dracuncuLi 



NORTH AMERICAN OECC PHORI DAE. 

FOR EXPUANATION OF PL^FE SEE PAGE 282. 



U. S NATK3NAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 FLATE36 




200 whitmanL 



North American Oecophoricae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 282. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 37 




North American Oecophoridae 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 2S3. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL 90 PLATE 38 




North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 283. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 39 




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PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 42 




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North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 284-28?. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOU. 90 PLATE 43 




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North American oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 285. 



U- S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOl_. 90 PLATE 




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PROCEEDINGS. VOL 90 PLATE 45 




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North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 285 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 46 




272 amijnsella 



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North American Oecophoridae. 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGES 236 



US NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE. 




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North American Oecophoridae 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 2S6- 



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PROCEEDINGS. VOL 90 PLATE -!£ 




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North American Oecophoridae 

FOR EXPLANATION OF PLATE SEE PAGE 286 



INDEX TO GENERA, SPECIES, AND LOCALITIES 



(Principal references are printed in boldface ; synonyms in italics) 



abalienella (Walker), 199. 
acertella (Busck), 35, 270. 
Agonopterix Hiibner, 33, 36, 38, 39, 40, 
41, 42, 43, 40 (keys), 8G, 125, 146. 
147, 148, 149, 150, 164, 197, 199, 204, 
259 
amissella (Busck), 48, 50, 52, 117. 
amyrisella (Busck), 48, 51, 124. 
auteuiiariella (new species), 47, 51, 

52, 108. 

applana (Fabricius), 68, 69, 70. 
arcuella (uew species), 45, 46, 49, 

53, 58, 60, 62. 

arenella ( Schiffermiiller ) , 43, SO, 

81. 
argillacea (Walsingham), 34, 45, 47, 

50, 52, 82, 98, 100, 101, 103. 
arnicella (Walsingham), 45, 47, 49, 

90. 
assimiliella (Treitschke), 43. 
atomella (Schiffermiiller), 43. 
atrodorsella (Clemens), 45, 46, 50, 

51, 70. 

blacella Barnes and Busck, 45, 99, 

100, 101. 
blackmori Busck, 45, 114, 116. 
cajonensis (new species), 48, 50, 53, 

82. 
callosella Barnes and Busck, 45, 111, 

112, 113. 
canadensis (Busck), 48. 52, 104. 
ciliella (Walsingham), 83, 86. 
clarkei Keifer, 45, 48, 50, 51, 66. 
clemensella (Chambers), 47, 50, 52, 

68. 
conterminella (Zeller), 56. 
costimacula (new species), 48, 49. 

52, 102. 

costosa (Ha worth), 45, 46, 49, 52, 

113. 
curvilineella (Beutenmiiller), 46, 

49, 53, 62. 
depuvctella (Hiibner), 114. 
dimorpht'lla (new species), 46, 50, 

51, 94, 97. 
dryadoxena (Meyrick), 45, 114, 116. 
echinopanicis (new race), 47, 86. 
endryopa (Meyrick), 39. 
eupatoriiella (Chambers), 45, 46, 

50, 51, 74, 103. 
fernaldella (Walsingham), 78. 
flavicomella (Engel), 46, 49, 52, 

105. 
fulva (Walsingham), 44, 45, 47, 48, 

51, 53. 

fusciterminella (new species), 47, 
51, 53, 80, 90. 



iiopferix gelidella (Busck), 45, 46, 

49. 53, 55, 58, GO, 66. 
gilvella (Hiibner), 43. 
hilarella (Zeller), 92. 
hyperella Ely, 45, 46, 49, 51, 56, 57, 

58, 59. 60, 62. 
hypericella (Hiibner), 43, 57, 58. 
latipalpella Barnes and Busck, 45, 

46, 50, 52, 118. 
lecontella (Clemens), 47, 94, 97, 98. 
lythrella (Walsingham), 45, 46, 49, 

58, 59. 
muricolorella (Busck), 48, 50, 53, 

64. 
murmurans (Meyrick), 39. 
nebniosa (Zeller), 48, 49, 52, 75, 

110. 
nigrinotella (Busck), 48, 50, 52, 

101, 102, 103. 
novi-mundi (Walsingham), 48, 50, 

87. 
nubiferella (Walsingham), 45, 46, 

49, 60. 
oeellana (Fabricius), 43. 
oregonensis (new species), 47, 50, 

53, 56, 65. 
palJidella (Busck), 45, 47, 50, 53, 

82. 88. 
pergandeella (Busck), 48, 49, 116. 
plumnierella Busck, 45, 74, 75, 76. 
po.sticella (Walsingham), 46, 49, 51, 

119. 
psoraliella (Walsingham), 44, 47, 

49, 52, 121. 

pteleae Barnes and Busck, 45, 46, 

50, 51, 72. 

pulvipennella (Clemens), 45, 47, 50, 

51, 73, 76. 

robiniella (Packard), 46, 51, 92, 96, 

97, 98. 
rosaciliella (Busck), 47, 50, 53, 83. 
sabnlella (Walsingham), 45, 46, 49, 

52, 111. 

sanguinella (Busck), 48, 50, 123. 
scabella (Zeller), 45, 46, 51, 72, 75. 
senicionella (Busck), 48, 50, 52, 

107. 
serrae Clarke, 45, 88, 90. 
solidaginis (Walsingham), 76. 
terinclla Barnes and Busck, 45, 88, 

90. 
testifica (Meyrick), 45, 56, 57. 
thelmae (new species), 47, 51, 96. 
walsinghamella (Busck), 47, 50, 53, 

78. 
yeatiana, 80. 



II 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



[vol. 90 



Alaska, 156, 267. 
albapalpella (Chambers), 271. 
albastrigulella (Kearfott), 231. 
Alberta, 54, 56, 130, 145, 156, 158, 161, 

181, 185, 250, 253, 254. 
alienella Busck, 165, 167, 168, 180, 182. 
allenella (Walsingham), 146, 147, 150. 
alstroemeriana (Clerck), 130. 
amissella (Busck), 48, 50, 52, 117. 
amplicincta (Brauu), 247, 250, 251. 
amyrisella (Busck), 48, 51, 124. 
Anchonoma Meyrick, 228, 229. 
Anesychia Stephens, 217, 218. 
angustati (new species), 164, 165, 166, 

167, 168, 184, 186, 189, 191. 
Anoncia (new genus), 35, 268. 
conia (Walsingham), 268, 269. 
diveni (Heinrich), 269. 
episcia (Walsingham), 269. 
fasciata (Walsingham), 269. 
marinensis (Keifer), 269. 
orites (Walsingham), 269. 
sphacelina (Keifer), 269. 
antarctica Staudinger, 266, 267. 
antennariella (new species), 47, 51, 52, 

108. 
Antequera (new genus), 35, 270. 

acertella (Busck), 35, 270, 
antidectis (Meyrick), 247, 270. 
Apachea (new genus), 36, 40, 42, 44, 
197. 
barberella (Busck), 197, 198. 
applana (Fabricius), 68, 69, 70. 
arcuella (new species), 45, 46, 49, 53, 58, 

60, 62. 
arenella (Schiffermiiller), 43. 
arenelJa (Walsingham), 80, 81. 
argeuticinctella (Clemens), 247, 254, 

255, 257. 
argillacea (Walsingham), 34, 45, 47, 50, 

52, 82, 98, 100, 101, 103. 

Arizona, 34, 54, 121, 124, 131, 137, 175, 

198, 203, 204, 220, 222, 225, 227, 228, 

232, 243, 249. 

arnicella (Walsingham), 45, 47, 49, 90. 

artemisiella McDunnough, 165, 166, 167, 

1G8, 181. 
aseriptella (Busck), 36, 239, 240. 
f'ssimiliella (Treitschke), 43. 
a stigma tica Meyrick, 39. 
Atheropla Meyrick, 271. 
atomella (Schiffermiiller), 43. 
atrodorsella (Clemens), 45, 46, 50, 51, 

70. 
atropicta (Zeller), 223, 224. 
atrnstrigella (new species), 164, 166, 

168. 
aurorella Dyar, 150, 151, 160, 162, 163. 
avellanella (Hiibner), 149. 
barberella (Busck), 197, 198. 
bassettella (Clemens), 273. 
betulella Busck, 165, 166, 167, 191, 195. 
hetulinella (Hiibner), 266, 267. 
Bibarrambla (new genus), 36, 40, 41, 43, 
146, 150. 
allenella (Walsingham), 146, 147, 
150. 



bicostella (Clerck), 230. 

hlacella Barnes and Busck, 45, 99, 100, 

101. 
blackmori Busck, 45, 114, 116. 
Blastobasidae, 35, 36, 218, 272. 
Blepbarocera Chambei's, 252. 
boreaseila (Chambers), 242. 
Borkhausenia Hiibner, 35, 36, 239, 240, 

252, 258, 259. 
aciculata Meyrick, 39. 
minutella (Linnaeus), 259. 
stipella (L.), 259. 

borkhausenii (Zeller), 241, 242, 243. 

bractella, 36. 

brevivitella Walker, 231. 

braunae (new species), 150, 151, 159. 

British Columbia, 34, 54, 56, 62, 66, 81, 
84, 86, 89, 90, 100, 106, 109, 112, 116, 
130, 132, 133, 143, 145, 154, 156, 157, 
163, 171, 176, 181, 182, 236, 243, 250, 

253, 254, 262, 268, 273. 

cajonensis (new species), 48, 50, 53, 82. 

California, 34, 61, 67, 81, 82, 83, 88, 89, 

91, 100, 113, 120, 121, 122, 129, 131, 

134, 136, 137, 181, 221, 232, 243, 249, 

262, 267, 270. 

Callima Clemens, 254, 255. 

callosclla Barnes and Busck, 45, 111, 

112, 113. 
canadensis (Busck), 48, 52, 104. 
canariella (Busck), 218, 219, 220, 222. 
canella (Busck), 45, 125, 126, 127, 128, 

140. 
cmwella (Hiibner), 235. 
cancrella (Hiibner), 235. 
Carciua Hiibner, 34, 35, 39, 41, 42, 199, 
233. 
cancella (Hiibner), 235. 
canarella (Hiibner), 235. 
fagana (Schiffermiiller), 235. 
faganella (Treitschke), 235. 
quercana (Fabricius), 34, 233, 234. 
carltella Busck, 272. 
Carolana (new genus), 36, 40, 41, 42, 
239. 
ascrlptella (Busck), 36, 239, 240. 
caryae (new species), 34, 205, 206, 207, 

215. 
Chambersia Riley, 36, 40, 41, 42, 252. 
haydenella (Chambers), 36, 252, 
253. 
Chrysia Millere, 247. 
ciliella (Busck), 218, 219, 220, 227. 
ciliella (Walsingham), 83, 86. 
cinerea (Meyrick), 231. 
cinereocostella Clemens, 34, 165, 167, 168, 

171. 
ciniflonella (Zeller). 142, 144, 146. 
clauseUa Walker, 172. 
clarkei Keifer. 45, 48, 50, 51, 66. 
clemensella (Chambers), 47, 50, 52, 68. 
coffitata (Braun), 45, 128, 129, 130. 
coloradella (Walsingham), 247. 
Colorado, a4, 65, 89, 121, 131, 134, 178, 

198, 249, 253, 254. 
comstocki (Kuw.), 258. 



INDEX 



III 



concolorella (Beutenmiillcr), 218, 219, 

220, 221, 228. 
conia (Waisingham), 268, 269. 
Conuecticut, 69, 71, 77, 79, 96, 129, 195, 

196, 230, 241, 245. 
confertclla (Walker), 200, 201. 
coutorminella (Zeller), 56. 
contrariella (Walker), 223, 224. 
corystopa Meyrick, 39. 
Cosmoplerygiilae, 35, 247, 268. 269, 271. 
costimacula (new species), 48, 49, 52, 

102. 
costosa (Ha worth), 45, 46, 49, 52, 113, 
cressonnella (Chambers), 212. 
cretacea (Zeller), 218, 219, 220, 225. 
Cryptolechia Zeller, 199, 200, 202, 206, 

218, 219. 
cryptolechiella ( Chambers ), 206, 210. 
culcitella (Herrich-Schaffer), 134. 
curvilineella (Beutenmiiller), 46, 49, 53, 

62. 
Dasycera Stephens, 236, 237. 
Dasycerus Brongniart, 237. 
Dasycerus Haworth, 237. 
Decantha Bn.«ck, 39, 41, 42, 241. 
boreasella (Chambers), 242. 
borkhausenii (Zeller), 241, 242, 243. 
Delaware, 215. 

Depressaria Haworth, S3, 86, 38, 39, 40, 
41, 43. 44, 86, 149, 150, 163, 165 
(keys), 197. 
alieneUa Busck, 165, 168, 180, 182. 
angustati (new species), 164, 165, 

166, 167, 16S, 184, 186, 189, 191. 
arenclla (Waisingham), 80, 81. 
artemisiella McDunnough, 165, 166, 

167, 168, 181. 

atrostrigella (newspcies), 164, 166, 

168. 
betulella Busck, 165, 166, 167, 191, 

195. 
cinereocostella Clemens, 34, 165, 167, 

168, 171. 
clausella Walker, 172. 
corystopa Meyrick, 39. 
drncunculi Clarke, 164, 166, 168, 

169. 
eleanorae (new species), 165, 167, 

168, 178. 
emeritella Waisingham. 180, 181. 
grotella Robinson, 165, 166, 167, 168, 

192, 195, 196. 
heracleella (Zetterstedt), 174. 
heraclei (Eetzius), 174, 175. 
heracliana (Linnaeus), 34, 163, 164, 

165, 167, 168, 173. 
juliella Busck, 164, 165, 167, 168, 

176, 179. 
leptotaeniae Clarke, 38, 164, 166, 

167, 168, 182, 184, 185, 186. 
maculatella Busck, 165, 166, 167, 

168, 193, 194, 196. 

multifidae Clarke. 38, 164, 165, 166, 

167, 168, 186, 187. 189, 190. 
nervosa Haworth, 165, 178. 
nymphidia Meyrick, 39. 
ontariella Bethune, 174, 175. 



Depressaria palousella (new species), 
164, 166. 168, 171. 
pastinaceUa (Duponchel), 174, 175. 
symmochlota Meyrick, 192. 
togata Waisingham, 165, 190. 
imibellana (Fabricius), 174, 175. 
whitman! (new species), 107, 168. 

182, 189. 
yakimae (new species), 38, 166, 
167, 108, 171, 185. 
depunctella (Hiibner), 114. 
Dermestes, 175. 
determinatella (Zeller), 270. 
diligenda (Meyrick), 203, 204. 
dimidklla (Waisingham), 247, 248, 249, 

250. 
dimorphella (new species), 46, 50, 51, 

94, 97. 
District of Columbia, 34, 63, 69, 71, 77, 
108, 148, 173, 196, 201, 208, 210, 213, 
224, 238, 241, 243. 
diveni (Heinrich), 269. 
dracunculi Clarke, 164, 166, 168, 169, 
dryadorrena (Meyrick), 45, 114, 116. 
Drosophila Holmquist, 185. 
dubitatella (Zeller), 206, 211, 
echinopanicis (new race), 47, 86. 
edithella (Busck), 247, 248, 250. 
Eido Chambers, 271. 
eleanorae (new species), 165, 167, 168, 

178. 
emeritella Waisingham, 180, 181. 
Endrosis Hiibner, 34, 35, 36, 37, 40, 41, 
42, 259, 262. 
antarctica Staudinger, 266, 267, 
hetulinella (Hiibner), 266, 267. 
fenestrella Stainton, 266, 267. 
kennicotella (Clemens), 266, 267. 
Jcennikotella Caradja, 266. 
lactella (Schiffermiiller), 34, 263. 

264, 
sarcifella (Stephens), 266, 267. 
suhditella (Walker), 266, 267. 
endryopa (Meyrick), 39. 
Epeleustia Hiibner, 43. 
Eiticallima D.var, 40, 41, 42, 247, 254, 
255 (keys), 
argenticinctella (Clemens), 247, 

254, 255, 257. 

flammella (Duponchel), 257, 258, 
formosella (Schiffermiiller), 247, 

255, 257. 
Epigraphia Stephens, 149. 
episcia (Waisingham), 269. 
cruditella (Grote), 152. 
Esperia Hiibner, ?37. 
Ethmia Hiibner, 247. 
Ethmiidae, 35, 36, 271. 
Euclemensia Grote, 273. 

bassettella (Clemens), 273. 
Eumeyrickla Bu?ck, 35, 271. 

trimaculoUa (Fitch). 271. 
eupatoriiclla (Chambers), 45, 46, 50, ."1, 

74, 103. 
Eupleuris Hiibner, 230. 



286614 — 41- 



-17 



IV 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



[VOL. 



Fabiola Busck, 36, 40, 41, 42, 242, 244, 
246. 
shaleriella (Chambers), 244. 
tecta Brann, 246. 
fagana (SchifCermiiller), 235. 
faganella (Treitschke), 235. 
faginella (Chambers), 34, 38, 204, 205, 

206, 207, 213, 216. 
fasciata (Walsingham), 269. 
fenestrella Stainton, 266, 267. 
fernaldella (Chambers), 200, 201. 
fernaldella (Walsingham), 78. 
ferruginosa (Zeller), 205, 214, 215. 
flaiiiincUa (Duponcbel), 257, 258. 
flavicomella (Engel), 46, 49, 52, 105. 
fletcberella Gibson, 205, 206, 207, 216. 
Florida, 118, 125, 215, 224. 
forfieella Hiibner, 230. 
formosella (SchiffermuUer), 247, 255, 

257 
fulva (Walsingham), 44, 45, 47, 48, 51, 

53. 
fusciterminella (new species), 47, 51, 58, 

80, 90. 
Garrha Walker, 199. 
gelidella (Busck), 45, 46, 49, 53, 55, 58, 

60, 66. 
Georgia, 224. 
Gerdana Busck, 35, 272. 
caritella Busck, 272. 
gilvella (Hiibner), 43. 
gracilis (Walsingham), 126, 127, 133, 

135. 
grandis Desvignes, 247. 
grotella Robinson, 165, 166, 167, 168, 

192, 195, 196. 
Haemylis Treitschke, 43. 
Hagno Chambers, 204. 
Hamadryas Clemens, 273. 
haydenella (Chambers), 36, 252, 253. 
Heliodiuidae, 273. 
heraclcella (Zetterstedt), 174. 
heraclei (Retzius), 174. 175. 
heracliana (Linnaeus), 34, 163, 164, 165, 

167, 168, 173. 
hilarella (Zeller), 92. 
hildaella (new species), 126, 127, 140. 
Himmacia (new genus), 36, 40, 42, 202. 
dilirjenda Meyrick, 203, 204. 
huachucella (Busck), 202, 203. 
Hofmannophila Spuler. 34, 36, 37, 40, 
41, 42, 197, 258, 264. 
pseudospretella (Stainton), 34, 36, 
259. 
Holoscolia Zeller, 230. 
honorella Hiibner, 230. 
Hoplitica Meyrick, 199. 
Hoplomorpha Turner, 199. 
huachucella (Busck), 202, 203. 
humata (Meyrick), 219, 220. 
Hypatopa Walsingham, 268. 
hyperella Ely, 45, 46, 49, 51, 56, 57, 58, 

59, 60, 62. 
hypericella (Hiibner), 43, 57, 58. 
Idaho, 61, 100, 112, 129, 158, 185, 187. 
Illinois, 60. 69, 71, 73, 74, 75, 77, 93, 98, 

103, 106, 156, 175, 208, 210, 213, 256, 

273. 



Indiana, 175. 

Inga Busck, 36, 40, 41, 42, 202, 206, 217, 
219 (keys). 
atropicta (Zeller), 223, 224. 
canariella (Busck), 218, 219, 220, 

222. 
ciliella (Busck), 218, 219, 220, 

227. 
concolorella (Beutenmiiller), 218, 

219, 220, 221, 228. 
contrariella (Walker), 223, 224. 
cretacea (Zeller), 218, 219, 220-, 

225. 
humata (Meyrick), 219, 220. 
inscitella (Walker), 223, 224. 
obscuromaculella (Chambers), 218, 

219, 220, 226. 
sparsiciliella (Clemens), 217, 218, 

219, 220, 222, 226. 
trigama (Meyrick), 219, 224. 
inornata Walsingham, 150, 151, 155. 
inscitella (Walker), 223, 224. 
Iowa, 134, 173, 201, 256. 
juliella Busck, 164, 165, 167, 168, 176, 

179. 
Kallima Westwood, 254, 255 
Kansas, 225. 

kennicottella (Clemens), 266, 267. 
kennikotella Caradja, 266. 
Kentucky, 75, 210, 245, 246, 251, 256. 
klamathiana (Walsingham), 105, 126, 

127, 142, 144, 146. 
lactella (Schifeermiiller), 34, 263, 264. 
latipalpclla Barnes and Busck, 45, 46, 

50, 52, 118. 
latipennis (Walsingham), 228, 229. 
lecontella (Clemens), 47, 94, 97, 98. 
Lepidozancla Turner, 200. 
leptotaeniae Clarke, 38, 164, 166, 167, 

168, 182, 184, 185, 186. 
Louisiana, 77, 215, 216. 
lucidella (Busck). 247, 248, 251. 
lythrella (Walsingham), 45, 46, 49, 58, 

59. 
Machimia Clemens, 34. 36, 40, 42, 198, 
201, 202, 219, 233. 
confertella (Walker), 200, 201. 
fernaldella (Chambers), 200, 201. 
tentoriferella Clemens, 34, 199, 200. 
Macrobathra Meyrick, 271. 
maculatella Busck, 165, 166, 167, 168, 

193, 194, 196. 
Maine, 59, 77, 79, 93, 97, 111, 148, 153, 
154, 156, 157, 181, 193, 201, 213, 215, 
272. 
Manitoba, 56, 63, 78, 104, 106, 130, 145, 
153, 154, 156, 161, 169, 173, 181, 193, 
262. 
marinensis (Keifer), 269. 
Martyrhilda, 34, 36, 39, 41, 42, 45, 125, 
126 (keys). 
alstroemeriana (Clerck), 130. 
canella (Busck), 45, 125, 126, 127, 

128, 140. 
ciniflonella (Zeller), 142, 144, 146. 
cogitata (Braun), 45, 128, 129, 130. 
culcitella (Herrich-Schaffer), 134. 



INDEX 



Martvrhilda gracilis (Walsingham), 
12U, 127, 133, 135. 
hildaella (new species), 126, 127, 

140. 
klamathiana (Walsingham), 105, 

126, 127, 142, 144, 146. 

nivalis (Braun), 45, 126, 127, 139. 
sciadopa (Meyrick), 45, 105, 126, 

127, 144. 

sordidella (new species), 126, 127, 

132, 140. 
sphaeralceae (new species), 34, 125, 

127, 137, 138. 
thoracefasciella (Chambers), 126, 

127, 136. 
thoracenigraeella (Chambers), 126, 

127, 135. 
imibraticostella (Walsingham), 125, 
126, 127, 130. 
Martyriiiga Busck, 36, 40, 41, 42, 228. 

latipennis (Walsingham), 228, 229. 
Maryland, 57, 63, 69, 75, 77, 93, 96, 103, 
108, 148, 153, 201, 208, 210, 213, 224, 
230, 238, 241, 245, 256. 
Massachusetts, 71. 77, 79, 93, 96, 97, 111, 
158, 176, 181, 201, 210, 213, 243, 245, 
253. 
Mathildana (new genus), 35, 36, 40, 41, 
42, 236. 
newmanella (Clemens), 36, 236, 
237. 
mcdunnoughi (new species), 150, 151, 

162. 
megamicrella Dyar, 150, 151, 157, 160. 
melichlora Meyrick. 271. 
merriccella Dyar, 150, 151, 152, 153. 
Michigan, 153, 201. 
Minnesota, 250. 
minutella (Linnaeus), 259. 
Mississippi, 224. 
Missouri, 77, 173, 210. 
Montana, 84, 140, 143, 250, 254, 272. 
multifidae Clarke, 38, 164, 165, 166, 167, 

168, 186, 187, 189, 190. 
muricolorella (Busck), 48, 50, 53, 64. 
murmurans (Meyrick), 39. 
Nebraska, 117. 

nebulosa (Zeller), 48. 49, .52, 75, 110. 
nervosa Haworth, 165, 178. 
Nevada, 221, 262, 268. 
New Brunswick, 54. 59, 100, 181. 
New Hamshire, 69, 71, 77, 79, 93, 111, 
129, 145, 148, 154, 173, 201, 213, 215, 
238, 241, 251, 256. 
New Jersey, 63, 71, 77, 106, 148, 153, 156, 
176, IV.Q, 201, 208, 210, 213, 238, 241, 
256, 258. 
newmanella (Clemens), 36, 236, 237. 
New Mexico, 131, 177, 178, 198, 228. 
New York, 63, 69, 71, 77, 79, 93, 96, 111, 
129. 145, 148, 153, 154, 156, 158. 161, 
176, 181, 193, 195, 202, 208, 213, 224, 
230, 238, 241. 246, 256, 258, 268. 
New Zealand, 34, 267. 
nigrinotella (Busck), 48, 50, 52, 101, 102, 
103. 



nivalis (Braun), 45, 126, 127, 139. 
North Carolina, 59, 60, 94, 224, 225, 230, 

238. 
Northwest Territories, 141. 
Nova Scotia, 59, 78, 80, 94, 148, 173, 170, 

181. 
novi-mundi (Walsingham), 48, 50, 87. 
nubiferella (Walsingham), 45, 46, 49, 

60. 
nymphidia Meyrick, 39. 
obscuromaculella (Chambers), 218, 219, 

220, 226. 
obsoletella (Zeller), 205, 206, 207, 208, 

209, 211. 
ocellana (Fabricius), 43. 
Oecophora Latreille, 35, 36, 237. 
Oecophoridae, 33, 35, 36, 271, 272. 
Oecogouia Stainton, 228. 
Ohio, 72, 75, 77, 94, 102, 103, 153, 160, 
195, 202, 208, 209, 210, 215, 239, 251, 
256. 
ontariella Bethune, 174, 175. 
Ontario, 54, 56, 59, 63, 09, 72, 78, 80, 94, 
97, 100, 102, 103, 106, 116, 143, 145, 
148, 156, 161, 173, 176, 179, 181, 19S, 
195, 106, 202, 208, 217, 239, 246, 273. 
Oregon, 61, 66, 84, 88, 100, 121, 131, 143, 

176, 181, 250, 262, 268. 
oregouensis (new species), 47, 50, 53, 56, 

65. 
orites (Walsingham), 269. 
packardeUa (Clemens), 150, 151, 155. 
pallidella (Busck), 45, 47, 50, 53, 82, 88. 
palousella (new species), 164, 166, 168, 

171. 
Pancalia Stephens, 247. 
Paratheta Meyrick, 39. 

astigmatica Meyrick, 39. 
pastinacella (Duponchel), 174, 175. 
Pennsylvania, 63, 69, 71, 75, 77, 79, 94, 
95, 96, lOO, 106, 148, 153, 154, 156, 158, 
161, 173, 176, 193, 195, 196, 202, 208, 
210, 213, 224, 230, 239, 241, 246, 251, 
252, 256, 262. 
pergandeella (Busck), 48, 49, 116. 
pergandeella Busck (Triclonella), 270. 
Phibalocera Stephens, 233. 
Phryganeutis Meyrick, 231. 
Pinaris Hiibner, 43. 
Pleurota Hiibner, 36, 39, 41, 42, 230. 

albastrigulella (Kearfott), 231. 
plmnmerella Busck, 45, 74, 75, 76. 
posticella (Walsingham), 46, 49, 51, 119. 
Protasis Herrich-Schiiifer, 231. 
Pseudococcus West wood, 258. 

comstocki (Kuw.), 258. 
pseudospretella (Stainton). 34, 36, 259. 
Psilocorsis Clemens, 34. 36, 37, 38, 40, 42, 
202, 204, 206 (keys). 
caryae (new species), 34, 205, 206, 

207, 215. 
cressonella (Chambers), 212. 
cryptolechiella (Chambers), 206, 

210. 
dubitatella (Zeller), 206, 211. 
faginella (Chambers), 34, 38, 204, 
205, 206, 207, 213. 216. 



VI 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



[VOL. 



Psilocorsis ferruffinosa (Zeller), 205, 
214, 215. 
fletcherella Gibson, 205, 206, 207, 

216. 
obsoletella (Zeller), 205, 206, 207, 

208, 209, 211. 
quercicella Clemens, 204, 205, 206, 

207, 209, 210, 211. 
reflexella Clemens, 38, 206, 207, 212. 
psoraliella (Walsingham), 44, 47, 49, 

52, 121. 
pteleae Barnes and Busck, 45, 46, 50, 51, 

72. 
pulvipennella (Clemens), 45, 47, 50, 51, 

73, 76. 
punctella (Costa), 231. 
quadrimaculella (Chambers), 247, 248. 
Quebec, 72, 78, 80, 97, 130, 145, 148, 153, 
156, 158, 176, 181, 193, 196, 217, 239. 
quercana (Fabriciiis), 34, 233, 234. 
quercicella Clemens, 204, 205, 206, 207, 

209, 210, 211. 
reflexella Clemens, 38, 206, 207, 212. 
Rhode Island, 176, 202. 
robiuiella (Packard), 46, 51, 92, 96, 97, 

98. 
rosaciliella (Busck), 47, 50, 53, 83. 
rostrigera (Meyrick), 247. 
sabulella (Walsingham), 45, 46, 49, 52, 

111. 
sanguinella (Busck), 48, 50, 123. 
Santuzza Heinrich, 228. 
sarciteUa (Stephens), 266, 267. 
Saskatchewan, 56, 84, 106. 
scabella (Zeller), 45, 46, 51, 72, 75. 
schaefferella (Linnaeus), 247. 
Schiffermiilleria Hlihner, 40, 41, 42, 244, 
246, 247, 248 (keys). 
amplicincta (Braun), 247. 250, 251. 
dimidiella (Walsingham), 247, 248, 

249 250 
edithella (Busck), 247, 248, 250. 
lucidella (Busck), 247, 248, 251. 
quadrimaculella (Chambers), 247, 
248. 
sciadopa (Meyrick), 45, 105, 126, 127, 

144. 
Semioscopis Hiibner, 35, 36. 38, 40, 41, 
43, 148, 149, 150 (keys), 
aurorella Dyar, 150, 151, 160, 162, 

163. 
braunae (new species), 150, 151, 

159. 
eruditella (Grote), 152. 
inornata Walsingham, 150, 151, 

155. 
mcdunnoughi (new species), 1.50, 

151, 162. 
megamicrella Dyar, 150, 151, 157, 

160. 
merriccella Dyar, 150, 151, 152, 153. 
packardella (Clemens), 150, 151, 
155. 



Semioscopis steinkellneriana (Schifter- 
miiller), 149, 152, 153. 
strignlana (Fabricius), 157. 
senicionella (Busck), 48, 50, 52, 107. 
serrae Clarke, 45, 88, 90. 
shaleriella (Chambers), 244. 
Slganorosis Walleugren, 164. 
sincerella (Walker), 199. 
solidaginis (Walsingham), 76. 
sordidella (new species), 126, 127, 132, 

140. 
South Dakota, 134. 
sparsiciliella (Clemens), 217, 218, 219, 

220, 222, 226. 
sphacelina (Keifer), 269. 
sphaeralceae (new species), 34, 125, 127, 

137, 138. 
steinkellneriana (Schiffermiiller), 149, 

152, 153. 
stipella (Linnaeus), 259. 
strignlana (Fabricius), 157. 
suMlteUa (Walker), 266, 267. 
sulphurella (Fabricius), 237. 
symmochlota Meyrick, 192. 
tecta Braun, 246. 
teutoriferella Clemens, 199, 200. 
terinella Barnes and Busck, 45, 88, 90. 
testifica (Meyrick), 45, 56. 57. 
Texas, 119, 134, 203, 204, 210, 216, 224, 

225, 226, 227. 
thelmae (new species), 47, 51, 96. 
Thema IMeyrick, 231. 
thoracefasciella (Chambers), 126, 127, 

136. 
thoracenigraeella (Chambers), 126, 127, 

135. 
Tichouia Hiibner, 43. 
togata Walsingham, 165, 190. 
Triclonella Busck, 35, 247, 269. 
antidectis (Meyrick), 247, 270. 
determinatella (Zeller), 270. 
pergandeella Busck, 270. 
trigama (Meyrick), 219, 224. 
trimaculella (Fitch), 271. 
umbellana (Fabricius), 174, 175. 
umbra ticostella (Walsingham), 125. 126, 

127, 130. 
Utah, 89, 131, 176, 178, 185, 250. 
Vermont, 69, 71, 215, 239. 
Virginia, 57, 77, 108. 148, 202, 208, 210, 

216, 224, 238, 239, 246, 251. 
walsinghamella (Busck), 47, 50, 53, 78. 
Washington, 61, 65, 66, 84. 86, 89, 90, 91, 

100, 109, 116. 122, 129, 131, 139, 140, 143, 

162. 170, 171, 17G, 178, 183, 184, 185, 
186, 187, 190, 236, 250, 262, 268. 
whitmani (new species), 167, 168, 182, 

189. 
Wisconsin, 69, 71, 77, 79. 
Wyoming, 140. 
yakimae (new species), 38, 166, 167, 168, 

171, 185. 
yeatiana, 80. 
zatrephes (Turner), 200. 



INDEX TO FOOD PLANTS 



alatiim Pursh (Lythrum), 60. 
Aluus (Tourn.) Hill, 148. 
americana Walt. (Corylus), 193. 
americanuin Mill. (Xanthoxylum), 102. 
Amorpha L., 98. 

fruticosa L., 98. 
Amyri.s P. Br., 125. 

floridana Nutt., 125. 
Augelica L., 175. 
aiigustatum Coult. and Rose {Loma- 

iiiim), 190. 
angustifolia (Vahl.) (Arnica), 91. 
Anteunaria Gaertn., 109, 129. 

luzuloides T. and G., 109, 129. 
Apple, 143, 201, 236. 
Arnica L., 91. 

ansustifolia (Vahl.), 91. 
Artemisia L., 67, 170, 181, 182. 

dracunculoides Pursh, 170. 

vulgaris L., 67. 
asplenifolia L. (Myrica), 71, 72, 79. 
aureus L. (Senecio), 108. 
Balsamorhiza Hook., 131, 132. 

sagittata (Pursh) Nutt., 131, 132. 
Baptisia Vent., 95. 

tinctoria R. Brown, 95. 
Beech, 34. 

Betula (Tourn.) L., 196. 
Bidens L., 71. 

frondosa L., 71. 
Birch, 148. 
brevipes (Coult. and Rose) Suksdorf 

(Osmorhiza), 84. 
carolinensis Mill. (Myrica), 79. 
Carum L., 173. 

carvi L., 173. 
Carya Nutt., 34, 102, 216. 

ovata (Mill.) Koch., 34, 216. 

pecan Aschers. and Graebn., 34, 216. 
Castanea (Tourn.) Hill, 34, 216. 

dentata (Marsh) Borkh., 201. 
Cephalanthus L., 201. 

oecidentalis L., 201. 
Cereals, 34, 262. 
Cicuta L., 177. 

oecidentalis Greene, 177. 
Cherry, 201. 
Chestnut, 209. 
Coreopsis L., 72. 
Carylns (Tourn.) L., 193. 

americana Walt., 193. 
Cotoneaster Rupp., 236. 

pyracantha (L.), 236. 
Cynoglossum (Tourn.) L., 81. 

grande Dougl. ex Lehm., 81. 
Cystisus L.. 115. 

scoparius (L.) Link., 115. 
Dahlia, 34. 



Dates, 262. 

dentata (Marsh) Borkh. (Castanea), 

201. 
divaricata (Britt.) Nutt. (Osmorhiza), 

84. 
dracunculoides Pursh (Artemisia), 170. 
Echinopanax Dene, and Planch., 84, 85. 

horridum (Smith) Dene, and 
Planch., 84, 86. 
Elder, 256. 
Elm, 201, 256. 
Erigeron L., 91. 
Eriophyllum Lag., 112. 

lanatum typicum Constance, 112, 
113. 

stachaedifolium Lag., 112, 113. 
Eupatorium (Tourn.) L., 71, 72, 75. 
Fagus (Tourn.) L., 34, 215. 

grandifolia Ehrh., 34, 215. 
Figs, 262, 

floridana Nutt. (Amyris), 125. 
frondosa L. (Bidens), 71. 
fruticosa L. (Amorpha), 98. 
Genista L., 115. 
Gnaphalium L., 129. 
grande Dougl. ex Lehm. (Cynoglossum). 

81. 
grandifolia Ehrh. (Fagus), 34, 21,5. 
grayi Coult. and Rose (Lomatium), 65, 

187, 188. 
Hazel, 201. 
Helianthus L., 131, 132, 

pumilis Nutt., 131, 132. 
Heracleum L., 105. 
Hickory, 34, 201, 256. 
Holly, 210. 
Hoptree, 73. 
horridmn (Smith) Dene, and Planch. 

(Echinopanax) 84, 86. 
Hypericum (Tourn.) L., 61. 

perforatum L., 61. 

prolificum L., 57. 

virginicum L., 59. 
Juglans L., 34. 
Laburnum L., 115. 
Larch, 256. 
Leptotaenia Nutt., 184, 188. 

multifida Nutt, 184, 188. 

salmoniflora Coult. and Rose, 184. 
Ligusticum L., 173. 

scoticum L., 173. 
lineare Michx. (Sium), 34, 173. 
Lomatium Ral, 65, 183, 186, 187, 188. 

angustatum Coult. and Rose, 190. 

grayi Coult. and Rose, 65, 187, 188. 

macrocarpum (Hook, and Arn.) 
Coult. and Rose, 183. 



VIII 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



[vol. 90 



luzuloides T. and G. (Antennaria), 109, 

129. 
Lythrum L., 60. 

alatum Pursh, 60. 
macrocarpnm (Hook, and Am.) Coult. 

and Kose (Lomatium), 183. 
macrostachya DC. (Psoralea), 121, 122. 
Malva (Tourn.) L., 137. 
malveflora A. Gray (Sidalcea), 187. 
multifida Nutt. (Leptotaenia), 184, 188. 
munroana (Dougl.) Spach. (Sphaeral- 

cea), 139. 
Myrica L. 71, 72, 79. 

asplenifolia L., 71, 72, 79. 

carolinensis Mill., 79. 
Oak, 34, 148, 201, 208, 209, 236. 
occidentalis L. (Cephalanthus), 201. 
occideutalis Greene (Cicuta), 177. 
occidentalis Torr. (Osmorhiza), 84. 
Osmorhiza Raf., 84, 85. 

brevipes (Coult. and Rose) Suks- 
dorf, 84. 

divaricata (Britt.) Nutt, 84. 

occidentalis Torr., 84. 
Ostrya (Michx.) Scop., 196. 

virginiana (Mill.) Koch., 196. 
ovata (Mill.) Koch. (Carya), 34, 216. 
Parsnip, 34, 69, 175, 176. 
Pastinacea L., 175. 

sativa L., 175. 
pecan Aschers. and Graebn. (Carya), 

34, 216. 
perforatum L. (Hypericum), 61. 
physodes Dougl. (Psoralea), 121, 122. 
prolificum L. (Hypericum), 57. 
Prunus L., 34, 198. 
pseudoacacia L. (Robinia), 93, 94. 
Psoralea L., 121, 122. 

macrostachya DC, 121, 122. 

physodes Dougl., 121, 122. 

tenuiflora Pursh, 121. 
Ptelea L., 73, 102, 103. 

trifoliata L., 73, 102, 103. 
pumilis Nutt. (Helian thus), 131, 132. 
pyracantha L. (Cotoneaster), 236. 



Quercus L., 34, 115, 116, 236. 
Red currant, 109. 
Robinia L., 93, 94. 

pseudoacacia L., 93, 94. 
sagittata (Pursh) Nutt., (Balsamor- 

hiza), 131, 132. 
Salis (Tourn.) L., 34, 100. 
salmon iflora Coult. and Rose (Leptota- 
enia), 184. 
Sanicula L., 93. 
sativa L. (Pastinacea), 175. 
scoparius L. (Link.), 115. 
scoticum L. (Ligusticum), 173. 
Senecio L., 89, 108. 

aureus L., 108. 

serra Hook., 89. 
Sidalcea A. Gray, 137. 

malveflora A. Gray, 137. 
Slum (Tourn.) L., 34, 173. 

lineare Michx., 34, 173. 
Solidago L., 77, 78. 
Sphaeralcea St. Hill, 139. 

munroana (Dougl.) Spach., 139. 
stachaedifolium Lag. (Eriophyllum), 

112, 113. 
Syringa L., 201. 

vulgaris L., 201. 
tenuiflora Pursh (Psoralea), 121. 
tinctoria R. Brown (Baptisia), 95. 
tremuloides Michx. (Populus), 217. 
trifoliata L. (Ptelea), 73, 102, 103. 
Tulip, 34. 
typicum Constance (Eriophyllum), 112, 

113. 
Umbelliferae, 33. 
Urtica (Tourn.) L., 77. 
virginiana (Mill.) Koch. (Ostrya), 196. 
virginicum L. (Hypericum), 59. 
vulgaris L. (Artemisia), 67. 
vulgaris L. (Syringa), 201. 
Witches'-broom, 272. 
Xanthoxylum L., 102. 

americanum Mill., 102. 
Yarrow, 181. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTINS OFFICE: 1941 




PROCEEDINGS OF THE UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM 



issued I^JNvA, si^mi h the 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 
VoL 90 Washington: 1941 No. 3108 



SYNOPSIS OF THE TACHINID FLIES OF THE GENUS 
TACHINOMYIA, WITH DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW SPECIES 



By Rat T. Webber 



The genus TacMnomyia was erected by Townsend (1892, p. 96) 
for the reception of two new species, robusta and -floridensh. He 
designated the former as genotype. Coquillett (1897, p. 118) con- 
sidered the genus a synonym of Taehina {= Exori.^ta) ^ as also did 
Aldrich (1905, p. 469). According to Townsend (1908, p. 107), how- 
ever, TacMnomyia "differs from Taehina in the vibrissae being in- 
serted higher above oral margin, cheeks one-half eye height in width, 
and abdomen very elongate."' Since these characters vary to some 
extent, more important, perhaps, is the structure of the genitalia, 
which, as pointed out by Curran (1926, p. 166), are entirely different 
from those of Taehina. 

The writer wishes to acknowledge the assistance given him by the 
late Dr. J. M. Aldrich, who prior to 1926 made a study of the 
material at the United States National Museum and was prepared to 
recognize Tcwhinomyia., with new species included, but did not pub- 
lish because of the appearance of Dr. C. H. Curran's paper (1926) ; 
to Miss Daphne x\ubertin, of the Department of Entomology, British 
Museum, for the comparison of material with Walker's types; and 
to T. H. Jones for the use of material and notes of his making. 
Appreciation is expressed also to David G. Hall for his suggestions 
and advice. That which follows is the result of the writer's study 
of material at the United States National ^luseum, and at the 
laboratory of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 
United States Department of Agriculture, formerly maintained at 

286601 — 41 ,. 287 



288 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Melrose Highlands, Mass., while it was under the direction of 
C. W. Collins. 

The characters employed by Curran, particularly those pertaining 
to the genitalia and sternites, appear to be the most satisfactory ones 
for the separation of the species. In order that they may be given 
careful study the specimen must be relaxed and the genitalia exposed. 
Unless this is done considerable doubt remains as to the formation of 
the anal forceps and the lobes of the fifth sternite. In panaetius and 
apicata the lobes are smooth distally, their inner edges ridgeless 
except at base, where they unite in an abrupt, upwardly rounded 
flange. While there is no basal flange in any of the other species, 
except possibly foridemis, some of them have the distal portion of 
each lobe furnished with a more or less conspicuous ridge along its 
inner edge. It is not clearly understood how much importance 
should be attached to this structure. Obviously it is subject to 
considerable variation within the species, as shown in the case of 
cana and acosta. However, in nearly all the specimens of variata 
that have been seen the ridges are well developed and provide a good 
character for identification. The form of the anal forceps is best 
determined by the aid of a crosshatched eye-piece micrometer, which 
will forestall any imaginary concept. An additional character is 
found in the lengthened villosity of the inner surface of the hind 
tibiae, and while applicable only in the case of panaetius, florldensis, 
and apicata (fig. 17, g), it is of constant occurrence and readily 
recognized. 

The females are identified with clifiiculty. With a few exceptions 
the species, even in the males, appear more or less similar, and fre- 
quently their identity is doubtful. Since several of them occur simul- 
taneously in the same region, association of sexes has but little value. 

Little is known regarding the biology of the species. Townsend 
(1911, p. 141) tentatively placed Tachinomyia in his meigeniine 
series, species that glue a flattened macrotype ^gg to the body of 
the host. Several of the species have been occasionally bred from 
lepidopterous larvae, but records of rearing are rare in comparison to 
the field abundance of the flies, wdiich are among the earliest vernal 
tachinids. Aldrich regarded T. panaetms^ sensu lato^ as one of the 
commonest North American species. In New England there is a 
single generation, the species passing the winter as puparia. 

The generic characters of Tachinomyia are as follows : Eyes bare, 
although frequently thinly pilose in freshly emerged specimens; 
facial ridges bristly on at least the lowest third, usually about two- 
thirds way, but in no instance meeting the lowest f rontals ^ ; ocellar 



"^ Allophorocera montana Smith (191T, p. 140), which Aldrich (1927, p. 21) believed 
to be a Tachinomyia, can be excluded from the genus by this character as well as others. 



THE GENUS TACHINOMYIA — WEBBER 289 

bristles present, directed forward, no orbital bristles in male; antenna 
reaching lowest fourth of face, third segment at apex, outwardly 
truncate, inwardly rounded; second segment somewhat elongate, in 
female sometimes more than one-half length of third; arista bare, 
second segment short; frontal bristles extending below base of third 
antennal joint; front without evenly paired reclinate bristles outside 
of frontal row ; no outer vertical bristle in male ; paraf acialia bare, at 
narrowest part ranging from less than one-half to more than one-half 
distance between vibrissae ; face moderately to strongly receding ; pro- 
boscis short, fleshy; cheeks usually broad, never less than one-fifth 
eye height ; vibrissae situated on or usually above oral margin ; palpi 
well-developed. Thorax with three or four dorsocentral and three 
sternopleural bristles; pteropleural bristle normal; apical scutellur 
bristles present ; infra squamal spinules absent. Abdomen black or 
brownish in ground color, poUinose, decidedly elongated in male, 
shorter and stouter in female ; median marginal macrochaetae present 
on all segments, second segment never with more than four macro- 
chaetae ; discal macrochaetae absent in all except dakotensU ; no ven- 
tral carina, male hypopygium prominent, anal forceps azygous; lobes 
of tenth sternite broad at base, each terminating in a small fingerlike 
process at each side of the hooklike anal forceps. Hind tibia irregu- 
larly ciliate, middle tibia with two or more strong bristles on outer 
front side, near middle ; claws and pulvilli in male conspicuously long. 
Wings long, with the usual tachinid venation; first posterior cell 
open, ending considerably before apex of wing; bend of fourth vein 
destitute of a distinct appendage but frequentlj^ with a faint fold; 
last section of fifth vein less than one-half as long as the precedin 
veins bare except base of third. 



to 5 



KEY TO SPECIES OF TACHINOMYIA 

MALES 

1. Abdomen without discal macrochaetae 2 

Abdomen with discal macrochaetae dakotensis, new species 

2. Abdomen black ; two reclinate upper frontal bristles 3 

Abdomen broadly red at sides, fourth segment wholly red except 

at base; three reclinate upper frontal bristles; parafacialia 
at narrowest less than one-half width of third antennal seg- 
ment (Florida) fioridensis Townsend 

3. Hind tibiae inwardly with long villosity (fig. 17, g), the villi 

often over twice the tibial width in length ; lobes of fifth ster- 
nite, at base, with conspicuous flange 4 

Hind tibiae inwardly with short villosity, the villi scai'cely the 
tibial width in length; lobes of fifth sternite without basal 
flange, their inner edges smooth or with a conspicuous elon- 
gated ridge 5 



290 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

4. Each half of anal forceps (fig. 17, a) viewed in profile straight 

on posterior edge for six-sevenths of its length, then gently 
curving inwardly and abruptly tapering to terminus— panaetius (Walker) 
Each half of anal forceps (fig. 17, e) viewed in profile straight 
on i)osterior edge for about one-half its length, then strongly 
curved inwardly and tapering to a fine point apicata Curran 

5. Frontalia at middle of front about equal to or narrower than 

parafrontalia ; hairs of cheeks predominantly pale ; bristles of 
facial ridges often weak and depressed ; face and front usually 

with a slight yellowish cast 6 

Frontalia at middle of front at least as wide as parafrontalia ; 
hairs of cheeks predominantly black, comparatively long; 
bristles of facial ridges strong and erect; face and front 
silvery; a comparatively black, thinly gray-poll inose, western 
species similis (Williston) 

6. Second genital segment orange-red 8 

Second genital segment black, usually reddish below 7 

7. Viewed from the side the anal forceps (fig. 17, f) strongly 

incurved, their posterior surfaces moderately to densely pilose 

and often obscured in outline acosta, new species 

Viewed from the side the anal forceps (fig. 17, 6) comparatively 
straight, tapering abruptly to terminus, their posterior sur- 
faces moderately pilose and distinct in outline nigricans, new species 

8. Parafacialia at narrowest part at least equal to if not wider 

than one-half distance between vibrissae ; second antenual 
segment mostly reddish brown ; lobes of fifth sternite usually 
smooth or with inconspicuous ridges on their inner edges- cana, new species 
Parafacialia at narrowest part less than one-half distance 
between vibrissae; second antennal segment mostly black; 
lobes of fifth sternite usually with conspicuous ridges on 
their inner edges variata Curran 

FEMALES 

1. Abdomen without discal macrochaetae 2 

Abdomen with discal macrochaetae dakotensis, new species 

2. Posterior border of fourth segment fringed with long bristles 

of unequal length 3 

Posterior border of fourth segment fringed with closely set, 
short bristles of nearly equal length ; front wider than eye 
and widening slowly to base of antennae apicata Curran 

3. Frontalia at middle of front narrower than parafrontalia, 

usually brownish ; hairs of cheeks predominantly pale 4 

Frontalia at middle of front at least as wide as parafrontalia, 
usually black ; hairs of cheeks predominantly black, compara- 
tively long; fourth abdominal segment black, mottled with 
gray-poUinose areas; face and front silvery iX)lliuose without 
yellowish cast; western species similis (Williston) 

4. Posterior preintraalar bristle well-developed; front widening 

slowly to base of antennae; cheeks about one-third the eye 

height; usually four dorsocentrals 5 

Posterior preintraalar bristle absent or vestigial ; usually three 

dorsocentrals 6 



THE GENUS TACHINOMYIA — WEBBER 291 

5. Front at vertex over one-third the head width ; sides of front 

with a few scattered pale hairs panaetius (Walker) 

Front at vertex about or less than one-third the head width ; 

sides of front with many fine hairs species near panaetius (Walker) 

6. Front at vertex less than one-third the head width, with parallel 

margins; cheeks narrow, hardly one-fourth the eye height-- variata Curran 
Front at vertex over one-third the head width and widening 
slowly to base of antennae species near variata Curran 

TACHINOMYIA PANAETIUS (Walker) 

Figure 17, a 

Tachina panaetius Walkeir, List of the specimens of dipterous insects in the 

collection of the British Museum, pt. 4, p. 767, 1849. 
Tachina pansa Walker, ibid., p. 787. 
Tachina violcnta Walker, ibid., p. 788. 
Tachina irrequieta Walker, ibid., p. 789. 
Tachinomyia robusta Townsend, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 19, p. 90, 1892. 

Townsend (1936, p. 281) considers Tachinomyia rohusta a synonym 
of Tachina panaetius Walker. In 1929 Aldrich (1931, p. 13) studied 
Walker's types at the British Museum and formed the same con- 
clusions. The type of panaetius is a single female from Nova Scotia. 
Since the females of rohusta are not readily recognized from other 
closely allied species, this synonymy may be questioned. Aldrich 
also believed that Tachina irrequista Walker, T. pansa Walker, and 
T. violenta Walker were likewise synonymous with panaetius Walker. 
The type of irrequieta is a female, and the same doubt exists as in 
the case of panaetius. The types of pansa and violenta are males, and 
although the genitalia have not been relaxed, it is believed that 
Aldrich was correct in his synonymy. Furthermore, a cotype speci- 
men of pansa is in the United States National Museum collection 
and it is identical with rohusta Townsend. 

In an attempt to clear up this synonymy, specimens of the various 
species, with a key for their separation, was sent to Miss Aubertin 
at the British Museum. The results of this correspondence, while 
not entirely satisfactory, were in effect that the preceding synonymy 
was justified. 

A cotype of Tachinomyia rohusta Townsend, from Brookings, S. 
Dak. (Aldrich), is in the United States National Museum collection. 
It is a male and characterized as follows : Inner side of hind tibia with 
long villi; lobes of fifth sternite with distinct basal flange; fourth 
sternite convexly produced; second genital segment reddish black; 
anal forceps as figured (fig. 17, a) ; fourth abdominal segment black, 
mottled with thin grayish pollen ; four dorsocentrals ; posterior prein- 
traalar bristle- present; second segment of antenna brownish, about 

- The posterior preintraalar bristle equals tbe posterior sublatoral bristle of Curran. 



292 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

one-half the length of third ; paraf acialia at narrowest part compared 
with distance between vibrissae as 11.0 : 19.8 (average of six) ; cheeks 
one-third or more of eye height. 

Thirty-five other males, with the essential characters of the cotype, 
show a slight variation. In all but two specimens, in which there were 
three on one side, there were four dorsocentrals ; the posterior preintra- 
alar bristle was usually strong but sometimes only a hair. Twenty- 
nine specimens had the second genital segment black, tinged with red 
above and wholly red beneath. In the others it was either wholly red 
or black above. Thirty-two flies had the second antennal segment 
reddish or reddish brown and in three it was black, tinged with red. 
Thirty-three had the facial ridges bristly for two-thirds their way and 
in two on the lowest third. Length, 10-16 mm. 

Female. — Front at vertex 0.37 and 0.36 of the head width in 
two specimens; paraf rontalia lightly golden pollinose, sparsely be- 
set with pale hairs; inner and outer verticals developed; orbitals 
strong; frontals nine in number, strong; paraf acialia silvery polli- 
nose with slight golden cast, at narrowest part compared Avith dis- 
tance between vibrissae as 9.5:18.5 (average of two); cheeks one- 
third of eye height ; second antennal segment mostly black, about one- 
half length of third; thorax black, grayish pollinose with brownish 
tinge above, pleurae more grayish ; four dorsocentrals ; posterior pre- 
intraalar bristle present; abdomen black, intermediate segments 
grayish pollinose with trace of brown, particularly at apices; last 
segment wholly chalky white pollinose. Abdominal macrochaetae 
as follows: One fly has a median pair on the basisegment; otherwise 
the first and second segments each has one marginal pair ; third with a 
marginal row; fourth with a row of discal or submarginal onas 
besides the marginal row of moderately long bristles of unequal 
length. 

Remarks. — The foregoing description of the female of panaetius 
is from two specimens captured in coitu at Melrose Highlands, Mass., 
in May 1934. Other descriptions of the female of Tachinomyia 
panaetius have been given by Townsend (1915, p. 103) and Curran 
(1926, p. 169). 

Material examined. — At the United States National Museum there 
are 62 males from various localities in the United States and Canada 
east of the Rocky Mountains. There do not appear to be any speci- 
mens from the Southern or Southwestern States. Six males and 
two females of the Melrose Highlands laboratory collection are from 
Massachusetts and New Jersey localities. 

Hosts. — The writer has not seen any bred specimens that could 
be positively identified as panaetius. There are, however, in the 



THE GENUS TACHINOMYIA — WEBBER 293 

Melrose Higlilands collection,^ females of species near panaetius bred 
by J. V. Schaffner, Jr., et al, from GraptoUtha antermata Walker 
G. M. L. 12161 Tl) ; Orthosia hibisci Guene^, form imciens Walker 
(G. M. L. 12164 K14) ; Catocala sp. (G. M. L. 11707 M3) ; noctuid 
(G. M. L. 11707 J8) ; Acronycta hetulae Riley (G. M. L. 11707 M34). 

TACHINOMYIA APICATA Curran 

Figure 17, e, g, h 

Tachinomyia apicata Curran, Trans. Roy. Soc. Canada, ser. 3, vol. 20, sect. 5, 
p. 171, fig. 16, 1926. 

The species is readily recognized by the form of the anal forceps 
(fig. 17, e) and the conspicuous flange at the base of the fifth sternite 
(fig. 17, 7i). To these characters may be added the follovv^ng: Last 
abdominal segment chalky white pollinose with narrow apical border 
of black, red, or reddish black; fourth sternite brownish, transversely 
flattened, not turned upward; second genital segment orange-red, 
rarely blackish; four dorsocentral bristles; posterior preintraalar bris- 
tle usually present, sometimes weak or wanting; first two segments 
of antenna, base of third, and apex of scutellum reddish ; face and 
front silvery gray with yellowish cast of variable shades; para- 
f acialia at narrowest part compared with distance between vibrissae 
as 10.8 : 20.5 (average of six); cheeks one-third of eye height; 
facial ridges bristly one-half to two-thirds way to antennae; frontals 
varying from 7 to 10; palpi gradually thickened toward tip; orbital 
hairs gray or yellowish gray. Length, 10-20 mm. 

Female. — Essentially like male except more robust in form; last 
abdominal segment wholly chalky white-poUinose, posterior border 
fringed with closely set, short bristles of equal length ; two pairs of 
orbital bristles and a wider front. 

Matenal examined. — Sixty-nine males and 50 females in the Melrose 
Highlands laboratory collection taken during May and June from 
localities in Massachusetts and New Jersey. Also 7 males and 15 
females in the United States National Museum from Ottawa, Canada, 
the District of Columbia, and the following States : New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Indiana, and Missouri. 

Host. — Unknown. 

TACHINOMYIA FLORIDENSIS Townsend 

Tachinomyia floridensis Townsend, Trans. Amer. Eut. Soc, vol. 19, p. 97, 1892. 

The species was described from one specimen, a male, from Florida 

(C. W. Jolmson). Coquillett (1897, p. 82) included -fiondensis as 



'The Melrose Higlilands collection of Tachinidae is now housed in the Forest Insect 
Laboratory of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine at New Haven, Conn. 



294 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

a synonym of Ma-siphya hrasiUana Braiier and Bergenstamm, which 
species he phicod in Bioniyia. Aldrich (1925, pp. 108-109), however, 
examined the type of flondensk and believed it to be "a distinct 
species strictly congeneric with the genotype TacUnomyia rohusta 
Town^end." 

The original description is brief and does not mention all the char- 

aethers necessary for identification. The type has not been seen, but 

Aldrich s description (unpublished notes) verbatim follows: 

"Tachi'Twmyia floridensis Townsend. 

One large male type with label as follows : 

Florida 

26 
Jhnsn. 

inw °'"^' 'r!.- ^•'^'''^^''^^^^^ ^* narrowest less than half the third antennal 
joint or just about half (in rohusta much more). Cheeks less than half the 
eye height. Acrostiehal 3.3; dorsocentral 3.4; humeral 3; posthumeral 2; pre- 

(small) ; sternopleural 2.1 ; pteropleural small ; postscutellum distinct. 

Abdomen largely red on sides, pollen not in perfect condition. First and 
second segments with one pair marginal, third segment with a row of eight 
four he^.,ent with a stout row at last fourth and smaller on margin ^rst 

darker ZT T! ""'^' '"' "^' ^"""^^ ''^'^^ ^-^' ^airy, the forcep 
daiker, not spread; fourth sternite at edge with thin, upstanding brownish 
margin, entirely different from that in rohusta, and tiie infiexed ergui aU 
with long hair entirely different from rohusta (I am comparing with type 
of rohus a) : fifth sternite about a. in rohusta. but reddish. Legs Wack all the 
tibiae villous on flexor .lae about as in rohusfa. A good species 
(Kansas University, June 4, 1924). 
"J. M. Aldrich." 

^em.ar^.._The female of fondenm has been described by Town- 

fl ^' ''' '''^' '"' '''' '''''''' '' "^^^1^ '^ --^^- the species 

irom the description given. 

TACHINOMYIA SIMILIS (Williston) 

Figure 17, c 
^■omery,^ simWs W,IXISTO^■, North American Fauna, No. 7 p 256 
Taok«omy„ <.rme„,aUs Cubh.,,, Tran.. Boy. .S„c. Canada, L' a! ™i 



sect. 5, p. 170, fig. 17, 1926. 



p. 256, 1893. 
20, 



Itus I°""T'' ^'\^'*'^■' (""published MS.) gave it specific 
f^Z ,i"=°''''"'« '» ■>""- ^'"^1 =^s trifled by the writer, Curran's 
ocoidentalt.'i is a synonym. 



THE GENTJS TACHTNOMYIA — ^WEBBER 295 

The following brief description is from a cotype, Sonoma County, 
Calif., now in the United States National Museum collection: 

Male. — Front and face silvery gray pollinose without trace of yel- 
low ; fourth abdominal segment mostly black, mottled gray pollinose ; 
cheeks nearly one-half of eye height, clothed with comparatively 
long hairs which are predominantly black; hind tibia with short 
villosity on inner side; frontalia wider than either parafrontal; 
bristles of facial ridges strong, reaching two-thirds way to antennae; 
lobes of fifth sternite reddish, without basal flange but with slight 
ridges; apex of fourth sternite convexly produced: three dorsocen- 
tral bristles; no posterior preintraalar bristle; anal forceps (fig. 
17. c) somewhat as in nigricans: second genital segment orange-red; 
second antennal segment black. 

Forty-one other males in the United States National Museum col- 
lection agree well with the cotype. There are usually three dorso- 
central bristles although occasionally four are present : posterior pre- 
intraalar bristle absent in all but two specimens, in which case it is 
vestigial; facial ridges bristly two-thirds way to antennae, rarely 
less; vibrissae well above oral margin; scutellum wholly black, fre- 
quently with reddish apex; face and front silvery gray pollinose 
without trace of yellow; usually three strong bristles on anterior 
dorsal side of middle tibia. 

Female. — Essentially like male except for the usual sexual 
differences. 

Variations. — Twenty-one males and 27 females bred by the writer 
from Stajmotia solids Linnaeus, collected at Puyallup, Wash., in 
1935. show the following variations: Three or four dorsocentrals, 
usually the latter, although very frequently the second from the 
suture is either weak or hairlike. When three bristles are present 
they are often irregularly spaced. Posterior preintraalar bristle 
absent in 39 and vestigial in 9. Second genital segment of male 
orange-red in all but two specimens, in which case it is obscurely so. 
Abdomen wholly black, gray pollinose or frequently, in the male, 
with sides of second segment reddish yellow: second antennal seg- 
ment black. Face and front silvery gi'ay pollinose in all specimens. 
Length, 12-13 mm. 

Material examined. — About 90 specimens at the United States 
National Museum from localities in California, Washington, Idaho, 
Oregon, Colorado, and Arizona. 

Hosts. — CUsiocamjya thoracia Stretch : Eemerocam/pa vefusta Bois- 
duval; Stilpnotia f^oIicU Linnaeus; Ualhidota argentafa Packard. 



296 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. M 







Figure 17. — Tachinomyia. Characters 

a-f. Lateral aspect of anal forceps of male genitalia: a, T. panaetius (Walker); b, T. nigri- 
cans, new species; c, T. similis (Williston); d, T. variata Curran; e, T. apicata Curran; 
/, T. acosta, new species, 
g, Hind tibia of T. apicata viewed from behind. 

A, t, Apex of abdomen with drawn genitalia showing formation of fourth and fifth sternites 
in lateroventral aspect: h, T. apicata; i, T. variata. 



THE GENUS TACHINOMYIA — WEBBER 297 

TACHINOMYIA VAKIATA Curran 

Figure 17, d, i 

Tachinomyia variata Citrkan, Trans. Roy. Soc. Canada, ser. 3, vol. 5, sect. 5, 
p. 169, figs. 14, 15, 1926. 

According to Cun-an (1926, p. 168) varmta is characterized princi- 
pally by the dense, bristly pile on the lower surface of the anal 
forceps, three or four dorsocentral bristles, and absence of ridges on 
the lobes of the fifth sternite. 

In his description Curran omitted several characters which would 
have aided materially in the identification of the species. At the 
request of the writer more details concerning the type specimen have 
been furnished by G. H. Shewell, of the Canadian National Museum, 
where the type is deposited. His description is as follows : 

"Length, 12 nmi. Four posterior doi^ocentrals, the second very 
fine; fourth abdominal segment black with reddish posterior border, 
thinly gray pollinose ; fifth sternite lobes reddish with distinct ridges 
on their inner edge; second genital segment reddish; inner forceps 
pilose behind (about as in Curran's drawing) ; ratio of second to 
third antennal segment 1 : 2.5." 

Tachinomyia variata differs slightly from T. cana as follows : The 
ridges on the inner edges of the lobes of the fifth sternite are better 
developed and apparently more constant in character; the second 
antennal segment is mostly black ; the paraf acialia are narrower ; the 
anal forceps are somewhat stouter and usually more densely pilose 
on their posterior surfaces; and there are usually three dorsocentrals. 

Redescription of male. — Hind tibiae inwardly with short villosity, 
villi scarcely the tibial width in length ; inner edges of lobes of fifth 
sternite usually with a conspicuous ridge (fig. 17, i) ; anal forceps 
(fig. 17, d) with dense pilosity behind, stout at base and somewhat 
similar in outline to acosta.; fourth sternite convexly produced; 
fourth abdominal segment black, moderately gray pollinose, with red- 
dish-black apical border; first genital segment reddish black, second 
orange red, moderately pilose above; scutellum black, apex slightly 
reddish; tliree or four dorsoc^entrals; no posterior preintraalar bristle; ■. 
cheeks hardly one-third the eye height, with pale hairs; second an- 
tennal segment mostly black, third segment scarcely three times its 
length. Front silvery gray pollinose, with slight yellowish cast, at 
narrowest part about one-fifth the head width; 10 or 11 frontal bris- 
tles, the last 2 reelinate ; frontalia narrow, widening gradually to base 
of antennae; parafacialia nearly concolorous with front, at narrowest 
part compared with distance between vibrissae 7.6:17.5 (average of 
six); facial ridges bristly one-half way to antennae; vibrissae well 
above oral margin. Length 1^17 mm. 



298 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Female. — Essentially as in male. Front at vertex less than one- 
third of head width, with parallel margins; two pairs of orbital 
bristles; second antennal segment black, third about two and one- 
half times its length; cheeks narrow, less than one-fourth the eye 
height; palpi slender; four dorsocentrals, the second from suture 
weak; no posterior preintraalar bristle; middle tibia with three an- 
terior dorsal bristles, the uppermost one shortest; hind tarsi slender; 
fourth abdominal segment black, thin gray pollinose, the posterior 
border fringed with moderately long bristles. Length 12 nmi. 

Material examined. — In the United States National Museum col- 
lection there are four paratypes, including both sexes, from Ontario, 
Quebec, and Alberta, Canada. There are also six males and one 
female from New Brunswick, Canada, and from the following States : 
New Jersey, Wisconsin, South Dakota, and Colorado. Also there 
are three specimens in the David G. Hall collection from Ohio, 
Kansas, and New Mexico. 

The material representative of this species in the Melrose High- 
lands laboratory collection consists of 10 specimens collected at 
Lunenburg, Mass., from May 21 to June 29, 1914; 3 specimens col- 
lected at Melrose, Mass., June 1917, May 7, 1930, and May 26, 1934: 
4 specimens bearing "G. M. L." numbers 9427di, 9427a\ 9427a-, and 
9427b^, which were bred from Porthetria dispar, collected in Massa- 
chusetts, July 1925. These flies emerged in Jmie 1926 and were used 
in a successful reproduction experiment by T. H. Jones. No. 9427d^ is 
the progeny of Nos. 9427a^ ( $ ) and 9427b^ ( 9 ) . There are also 
two other specimens from Morris County, N. J., collected May 19, 
1936. Specimens of this material were submitted to Mr. Shewell 
for comparison with the type of varlata, and according to him the 
anal forceps agree with those of variata in general outline, though 
they are smaller and more densely pilose behind. 

Hosts. — Nephelodes emmedonia Cramer (W. A. Squires, Sackville, 
New Brunswick, Canada, June 2, 1929) ; Porthetria dispar Linnaeus 
(as preceding). 

TACHINOMYIA CANA, new species 

This species resembles variata but differs in having broader para- 
facialia, a brownish second antennal segment, and slenderer anal 
forceps. 

Male. — Hind tibiae inwardly with short villosity, the villi scarcely 
the tibial width in length ; lobes of fifth sternite orange-red, smooth 
at base and inconspicuously ridged on their inner edges ; fourth stern- 
ite convexly produced; fouilli abdominal segment mostly chalky 
white, with narrow apical border of orange-red : dorsum of scutellum 
broadly reddish at apex; first and second genital segments orange- 



THE GENUS TACHINOMYIA — WEBBER 299 

red; first, second, and base of third antennal sef^ment brown or 
reddish brown. Anal forceps long; each half, viewed in profile, 
straight on posterior edge for two-thirds its length, hence strongly 
forwardly curved; viewed from behind, slender and moderately 
pilose; four dorsocentrals ; no posterior preintraalar bristles; thorax 
black, gray pollinose with brownish tinge; front silveiy gray polli- 
nose with definite yellowish cast, at narrowest part about one-fourth 
the head width; parafacialia concolorous with front, at narrowest 
part compared with distance between vibrissae 10:19.6 (average 
of six) ; cheeks nearly one-third the eye height; facial ridges strongly 
bristly over halfway to antennae; third segment of antenna less than 
three times the second. Length, 14 mm. 

Female. — Unknown. 

Typc.—Mix\^, U. S. N. M. No. 53387. 

Remarks. — The holotype is from Melrose Highlands, Mass., col- 
lected by the writer on May 24, 1932. The two paratypes are both 
males from the same locality as the type collected on May 21, 1932. 
Other material, in the Melrose Highlands laboratory collection, con- 
sists of 25 collected specimens from about the same locality as the type. 
Twenty-one of these have four dorsocentral bristles, one has three, 
and the remaining three have three on one side and four on the other; 
lobes of the fifth sternite smooth in five specimens and inconspicuously 
ridged in the rest ; fourth sternite convexly produced ; first two seg- 
ments of antenna, and usually the base of the third, brown or reddish 
brown ; second genital segment orange-red, posterior border of fourth 
abdominal segment orange-red in all but two specimens, in which it 
is mostly black ; scutellum black, thinly gray pollinose, broadly reddish 
at apex. Length variable, 11-16 mm. Besides the above there are 
three specimens of this species in the David G. Hall collection from 
Kansas and Arkansas. 

TACHINOMYIA ACOSTA, new species 

Figure 17, f 

In acosta the anal forceps are slenderer than in variata. The species 
also differs in having the first and second genital segments as well as 
the fifth sternite black and in characters of lesser importance. 

MaU. — Hind tibiae inwardly with short villosity, the villi scarcely 
the tibial width in length; lobes of fifth sternite black and without 
basal flange, their inner edges smooth or at most with low, inconspic- 
uous ridges; fourth sternite black, convexly produced; fourth abdom- 
inal segment not densely gray pollinose but at most moderately gray 
pollinose with black apical border; scutellum black, faintly reddish 
apically; first and second genital segments black, the latter faintly 



300 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. so 

reddish beneath ; second antenna! segment mostly black, a little less 
than one-third length of third segment; anal forceps (fig. 17, /) 
strongly incurved, their posterior surfaces moderately pilose; four 
dorsocentral bristles; no posterior preintraalar bristle; front and 
upper part of face yellowish pollinose, paler below; parafacialia at 
narrowest part compared with distance between vibrissae 7.6 : 18.6 
(average of six) ; cheeks about one-fourth of eye height, with a predom- 
inance of pale hairs; facial ridges bristly about one-third way to an- 
tennae, the uppermost ones very weak; vibrissae slightly above oral 
margin. Length 13 mm. 

Female. — Doubtfully known. 

ry;?e.— Male, U. S. N. M. No. 53388. 

RemarTis. — The holotype is from Morris County, N. J., collected 
by the writer on May 10, 1936. The two paratypes are both males, 
from Eeading Mass., May 26, 1916 (K. T. Webber), and Wellesley, 
Mass., June 1, 1909 (J. D. Tothill), respectively. 

In 40 other males identified as acosta the lobes of the fifth sternite 
are smooth in 19, nearly so in 11, and slightly ridged in 10. All but 
one of them have four dorsocentrals. In only one instance is the 
posterior preintraalar bristle present. The fourth sternite is turned 
upward from the abdomen in all but eight, in which case it is 
flattened. Usually the fourth abdominal segment is black, moder- 
ately pollinose but occasionally thinly pollinose and indefinitely 
marked; posterior border of segment black. Second antennal seg- 
ment usually black, in 3 specimens slightly reddish, scutellum wholly 
black in 16, slightly reddish at apex in 22, and black, conspicuously 
marked with yellow, in 2; second genital segment always black, 
sometimes reddish beneath, densely pilose above. The pilosity on the 
hind surface of the anal forceps is dense in 23 specimens and but 
moderately so in 17. The front and upper part of the face are pale 
yellow pollinose, in no instance distinctly golden. In some specimens 
the lower part of the face is silvery either with or without a pale 
3'ellowish cast. Length 10-17 mm. 

Hosts. — Graptolitha disposlta Morrison (G. M. L. 11705 J7) ; G. 
innominata Smith (G. M. L. 11705 M8) ; G. a7itennata Walker 
(G. M. L. 12161 J9); Graptolitha sp. (G. M. L. 11705 N2). All 
recorded at the Melrose Highlands laboratory by J. V. Schaffner, 
Jr., et al. 

Material examined. — About 45 males, from Massachusetts and 
New Jersey localities, contained in the collection of the Melrose 
Highlands laboratory. 



THE GENUS TACHINOMYIA — WEBBER 301 

TACHINOMYIA NIGRICANS, new species 
FiGUBE 17, b 

Resembles acosta but differs from that species in the structure of 
the anal forceps and their lack of dense pilosity. 

Male. — Hind tibiae inwardly with short villosity, the villi scarcely 
the tibial width in length ; lobes of fifth sternite black, without basal 
flange, their inner edges smooth or at most with low, inconspicuous 
ridges; fourth sternite convexly produced; fourth abdominal seg- 
ment not densely gray pollinose but mostly black, mottled with thin 
grayish pollen, apical border shining black; scutellum black, thinly 
gray pollinose; second genital segment black above, reddish beneath; 
second antennal segment black with brownish apex; third segment 
hardly twice its length; anal forceps (fig. IT, h) moderately pilose 
behind, nearly straight, tapering abruptly to terminus; four dorso- 
central bristles; no posterior preintraalar bristle; front and face 
silvery gray pollinose, with yellowish cast; parafacialia at narrow- 
est part compared with distance between vibrissae 7.1:18.6 (av- 
erage of six) ; cheeks about one-fourth of eye height, with pale hairs; 
facial ridges bristly about halfway to antennae; vibrissae slightly 
above oral margin. Length, 11-16 mm. 

Female. — Doubtfully known. 

Type.—M^\Q, U.S.N.M. No. 53389. 

Rernarhs. — The holotype is from Lunenburg, Mass., coUex^ted by 
H. W. Allen during 1916. The two paratypes are from Wellesley, 
Mass. (J. D. Tothill, June 1, 1909), and Morris County, N. J. (R. T. 
Webber, May 10, 1936). Other material, in the INIelrose Highlands 
laboratory collection, consists of 60 males from localities in Massa- 
chusetts, some of which are bred specimens. All agree well with 
i\\Q, type, particularly as regards the structure of the anal forceps; 
the lobes of the fifth sternite are black, practically smooth, or each 
bears an inconspicuous ridge; the anal forceps are moderately pilose 
behind, rarely more so. There is some variation in the number of 
dorsocentrals, 8 out of 60 males having 3 instead of the normal 4. 
Of all the specimens examined none had a posterior preintraalar 
bristle; the genital segments are black above, usually reddish be- 
neath; the scutellmn and second antennal segment are mostly black. 
Usually there are 11 or 12 frontal bristles, rarely less; the face and 
front are silvery gray pollinose with yellowish cast in all but two 
specimens, in which they are silvery. 

Another lot of males from Massachusetts localities number slightly 
over 100 specimens. All have the vibrissae on or slightly above the 
oral margin ; the first and second genital segments are entirely black, 
or black above and reddish beneath; normally there are four dorso- 



302 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

central bristles; the second segment of the antenna and the scutellum 
are black in most part. Length, 0-12 mm. 

Placed provisionally with this species is a series of approximately 
200 flies bred at the Melrose Highlands laboratory from AlsophUa 
'pometaria Harris and other species of Geometridae, All these flies 
are much smaller in size than the type but there does not appear to 
be any other appreciable difference. Length, 6-10 mm. 

In the United Slates National Museum there are specimens from 
New Jersey, 1924; J. F. King; Hartford, Conn., May 9, 1916, I. N. 
Gabrielson ; ex AlsophiJ-a fometa-ria^ Quaintance No. 16610, Walling- 
ford, Conn., May 1, 1920, B. A. Porter; Browns Mills, N. J., July 9, 
1926, H. G. Hallock. Also there are one male from Minot, N. Dak., 
June 18, 1918; one male from Lafayette, N. Dak., May 25, 1916; and 
one female from Big Stone City, S. Dak., June 8, 1918, Aid rich. 

Hosts. — Catocala mieronym'pha form jratercyida Grote and Robin- 
son (G. M. L. 11707 L4) ; Gr-optoUtha antennafa Walker (G. M. L. 
12161 E14) ; Porthetrla dispar Linnaeus (G. M. L. 9427) ; Ahophila 
'pometaria Harris (G. M. L. 10076 and sul>nos.) ; Phigalia titca Cramer 
(G. M. L. 10007 C) ; Physostegania ptiMulana Guene-e (G. M. L. 
10016 B) ; Eranrih tmaria Harris (G. M. L. 10018 S3). All recorded 
at the Melrose Highlands laboratory by J. V. Schaffner, Jr., et al. 

TACHINOMYIA DAKOTENSIS. new species 

This species comes nearest to nigricans^ particularly to the small 
forms reared from AlsophUa poTiietar^ia Harris, from which it differs 
in having discul abdominal bristles, brownish legs, and more broadly 
curved anal forceps. 

Male. — Hind tibiae inwardly with short villosity, the villi scarcely 
the tibial width in length; lobes of fifth sternite yellowish brown, 
without basal flange, their inner edges smooth; fourth sternite con- 
vexly produced; thorax and abdomen black, thinly gray pollinose 
with strong brownish cast; fourth segment not densely gray polli- 
nose but mostly mottled with thin grayish pollen, the posterior border 
black, faintly brownish at sides; second antennal segment and most 
of scutellum brown; genital segments orange-red; anal forceps 
sparsely pilose behind, their apices strongly curved forward as in 
aoosta\ three dorsocentrals ; facial ridges weakly bristled; vibrissae 
at or but slightly above oral margin; third antennal segment three 
times the length of second ; parafacialia at narrowest part compared 
w'ith distance between vibrissae 5.3:14.6 (average of six); cheeks 
one-fifth the eye height, with pale hairs; face and front concolorous, 
silvery gray pollinose with faint yellowish cast; third segment of 
abdomen with one pair of discal bristles; legs brownish black. 
Length, 9 mm. 



THE GENUS TACHINOMl'IA WEBBER 303 

Female. — Essentially as in the male, except for the usual sexual 
differences. 

ry/?e.— Male, U. S. N. M. No. 53390. 

Remarks. — Described from 14 specimens. The holotype is from 
Big Stone City, S. Dak., collected on June 8, 1908 (Aldrich), and the 
allotype from Lake Metigoske, Turtle Mountains, N. Dak., June 20, 
1918 (Aldrich). The paratypes are as follows: Two males, Lake 
Metigoske, Turtle Mountains, N. Dak., June 20; one female, Mandan, 
N. Dak., June 16; one female, Bottineau, N. Dak., June 20; one female, 
Minot, N. Dak., June 18; two males, Wanbay, S. Dak., June 6; one 
male. Turtle Mountains, near Bottineau, June 21 (all specimens col- 
lected by Aldrich in 1918) ; two males and one female, Algonquin, 
111. (Nason) ; one male. Oxbow, Saskatchewan, June 17, 1907 (Knab). 

The paratypes agree well with the type, all having brownish legs, 
orange-red genitalia, three dorgocentral bristles, and weakly ciliated 
facial ridges. All but three have well-developed discal abdominal 
macrochaetae, and the scutellum is mostly brownish in all but two 
cases, in which black predominates. 

Material examined. — Besides the above there are specimens in the 
United States National Museum from Idaho, Washington, and Mani- 
toba, Canada; also a specimen from Kansas in the David G. Hall 
collection. 



LITERATURE CITED 

Aldbich, John Merton. 

1905. A catalogue of North American Diptera (or two-winged flies). Smith- 
sonian Misc. Coll., vol. 46, No. 1444, 680 pp. 

1925. Notes on some types of American muscoid Diptera in the collection 

of the Vienna Natural History Museum. Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer., 

vol. 18, pp. 107-130. 
1927. Notes on muscoid synonymy. Bull. Brooklyn Ent. Soc, vol. 22, 

pp. 18-25. 
1931. Notes on Francis Walker's types of North American flies of the family 

Tachinidae. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 80, art. 10, 16 pp. 

COQUILLETT, DANIEI. WIIXIAM. 

1897. Revision of the Tachinidae of America north of Mexico. U. S. Dept. 
Agr., Bur. Ent. Techn. Ser. Bull. 7, 147 pp. 
CuEHAN, Charles Howard. 

1926. The Canadian species of the tachinid genera Ci-yptonveigenia B. B. 

and Tachinomyio, Town. (Dipt.). Trans. Royal Soc. Canada, 1926, 

sect. 5, pp. 155-171, illua 
Smith, Harbison Edward. 

1917. Five new species of North American Tachinidae. Psyche, vol. 24, 

pp. 137-141. 
TowNSEND, Charles Henry Tyler. 

1892. Notes on North American Tachinidae sens, str., with descriptions of 

new genera and species. III. Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, vol. 19, 

pp. 88-132. 
1908. The taxonomy of the muscoidean flies, including descriptions of new 

genera and species. Smithsonian Misc. Coll., vol. 51, No. 1803, 138 pp. 
1911. Announcement of further results secured in the study of muscoid 

flies. Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer., vol. 4, pp. 127-152. 
1915. New genera of muscoid flies from the Middle Atlantic States. In- 

secutor Inscitiae Menstruus, vol. 3, pp. 97-104. 
1936. Manual of myiology, pt. 4, 309 pp. Itaquaquecetuba, Sao Paulo, 

Brazil. 



304 



S. 30VERNMEMT PRINTIN3 i 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM 




issued ImHTvA- \ffi^i h Ae 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



Vol. 90 Washington : 1941 No. 3109 



A HISTOKY OF THE DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE 
PALEONTOLOGY IN THE UNITED STATES NATIONAL 
MUSEUM 



By Charles W. Gilmore 



The National Museum's Division of Vertebrate Paleontology, a 
branch of the Department of Geology, has had a long and distinguished 
record of service to the Nation and to science. In the pages that fol- 
low there is presented for the first time an extended history of this 
Division, beginning vrith the establishment of the Smithsonian In- 
stitution in 1846 and covering a span of more than 90 years (including 
the year 1940) . The account describes the beginnings and growth of 
the Division and shows to what extent it has f uljBlled its mission as a 
national institution in assembling, caring for, and rendering available 
to both students and the general public the fossil specimens entrusted 
to its keeping. 

The data included have been compiled from an exhaustive search of 
the early records of the Smithsonian Institution, as well as an exami- 
nation of its published papers and annual reports, supplemented by 
information resulting from the writer's 37 years of service in the Di- 
vision (1903-40). In order to make the record as complete as possi- 
ble, all phases of its development, organization, personnel, explorations, 
exhibits, and records are discussed. 

I wish to express my great appreciation for the assistance rendered 
by many members of the National Museum staff, and especially to thank 
Dr. Charles Schuchert, of the Peabody Museum, Yale University, for 
reading the manuscript and offering many helpful criticisms. As the 
only surviving member of the Department of Geology of the period 

292963—41 1 305 



306 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

prior to 1900, he was able to furnish information that otherwise would 
have been irretrievably lost. 

EARLIEST VERTEBRATE COLLECTIONS, 1846 TO 1886 

The history of the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology may be 
said to date from the year 1846, when by act of Congress the custody 
of the National Cabinet of Curiosities, then in the Old Patent Office 
Building, was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution. The act 
provided that "all objects of natural history, plants, and geological 
and mineralogical specimens belonging or hereafter to belong to 
the United States," and which were then in the city of Washington, 
should be delivered to the Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 
and together with new specimens obtained by exchange, donation, 
or otherwise, should be so arranged and classified as best to facilitate 
their examination and study. A subsequent act (Sundry Civil Act 
of March 3, 1879), decreed that "all collections of rocks, minerals, 
soils, fossils, and objects of natural history, archaeology, and eth- 
nology, made by the Coast and Interior Survey, the Geological Sur- 
vey, or by any other parties for the Government of the United States, 
when no longer needed for investigations in progress, shall be de- 
posited in the National Museum," 

The vertebrate paleontological material brought together under 
these acts prior to 1886 was relatively small in quantity and of a mis- 
cellaneous character, though of much scientific interest because of the 
number of type and figured specimens it contained. It consisted 
mainly of fossils collected by the early exploring expeditions, such as 
the surveys under the direction of the General Land Office, 1849-58 ; 
the surveys for the Pacific Railroads, 1854-55 ; the surveys west of the 
100th meridian under the direction of the Engineer Corps of the 
United States Army, 1874; and the United States geological and 
geographical surveys under the direction of Dr. F. V. Hayden, 
1856-72. 

In 1849 Dr. John Evans, an assistant to the eminent geologist 
Dr. David Dale Owen, was directed to visit the Maiwaises Terres 
of South Dakota and make a collection of the fossil vertebrate re- 
mains that up to that time were known only to the Indians, trappers, 
and a few explorers. Among the fossils obtained, which were later 
submitted to Dr. Joseph Leidy for study, was the Merycoidodon 
(Oreodon) of that time. 

In 1853 Dr. Evans, accompanied by Dr. B. F. Shumard, again 
visited the Badlands while on his way to Oregon for the purpose 
of making a geological survey of that territory. At this time he 
made a collection of fossil mammals and turtles, all of which were 
sent by the Commissioner of the Land Office to the Smithsonian In- 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 307 

stitution, whence they were transferred to Professor Leidy in Phila- 
delphia for study. Dr. Evans died in Washington in 1861 while 
engaged in the preparation of a report on the Badlands fossils that, 
he and others had collected. 

The vicissitudes attending the custody of vertebrate fossils by the 
Government in these early days are well illustrated by an account 
published in one of the early reports of the National Museum. Some- 
time between 1850 and 1860 an "enlightened"' Commissioner of 
Patents, who was annoyed by the presence of a collection of fossil 
bones in one of the rooms of the Patent Office, without consulting^ 
anyone sent them to a mill at Georgetown, where they were trans- 
formed into commercial fertilizer. A contemporary connnented, 
"Once for thought they there became food for the farmer's plants."' 

Among the early collections of fossil vertebrates received was a 
small one made under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution 
by Thaddeus A. Culbei-tson on an expedition to the Mauvaises Tenses 
(Badlands) and the Upper Missouri in 1850. He was allotted $200 
by the Smithsonian Institution to cover the transportation costs of 
collections made. 

Culbertson was a graduate of Princeton Univei-sity, and he visited 
this region for his health. He was accompanied by his brother 
Alexander, who had long been connected with the American Fur 
Co. and so was familiar witli the whole countrj^, and had indeed sent 
valuable specimens of fossil manmials to the Academy of Natural 
Sciences of Philadelphia. Thaddeus A. Culbertson made collec- 
tions of the recent fauna and flora of the regions visited, and, though 
he was constantly searching for fossils, he met with no success ex- 
cept in the Badlands at the locality where his brother had previously 
found the remains of the fossils sent to the Philadelphia iVcademy. 
According to his journal, published in the Annual Report of the 
Smithsonian Institution for 1851 (pp. 93-95), he spent only a few 
days collecting in the Badlands. The fossil portions of the collec- 
tion were sent to Dr. Joseph Leidy for study, the results of whose 
investigations were published in volume 6 of the Smithsonian Con- 
tributions to Knowledge, 1854. Thaddeus A. Culbertson returned 
to his home from this expedition in August 1850 with renewed health, 
but soon afterward he succumbed to a prevalent disease after a few 
weeks' illness. 

Secretary Henry pointed out in the Fifth Annual Report of the 
Smithsonian Institution that Dr. Joseph Leidy, in a study of the 
Oligocene collections made by Thaddeus A. Culbertson, was able to 
characterize the following animals : Rhinoceros nehrascensis, Rhino- 
ceros occidentalism Palaeotherium hairdii {^Mesohippus hairdi), and 
Agriochaerus antiquus. The type specimens of the second and third 



308 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

■of these are now in the collections of the National Museum, but the 
fourth has never been definitely located. 

A history of the type specimen of Rhinoceros nebrascensis^ Leidy 
{Hyracodon nebrascensis of modern nomenclature) by Drs. Horace 
and Albert Wood ^ is so interesting that it is worth incorporating 
here. I have extracted freely from their account as follows: 

Abel (1926)' discusses and figures a skull of Hyracodan "nebrascensis" with 
badly worn teeth. This bears the "original" label: 

"Skull of Rhinoceros nebrascensis (Leidy) Loc: Coryell County, Texas 
A. R. Roessler collected 1863." 

Abel states that this is the original of Leidy's figured specimen (1853, PL 15, 
Figs. 1-2) from the "Big Bad Lands," and that the label as to collector and 
locality is, therefore, wrong. There have been unpublished intimations that 
ithis is not Leidy's specimen, belonging to the Smithsonian Institution (Leidy, 
1853, p. 14), collected by Dr. D. D. Owen. However, comparison of the specimen 
with Leidy's figures, which are of his usual high standard of accuracy, leaves 
no possible doubt that they are the same, even the breaks being identical. This 
specimen was part of a shipment of allegedly Texas fossils sent to k. k. geologische 
Reichsanstalt of Vienna (now the geologische Bundesanstalt) by A. R. Roessler 
iin 1868 (Schloenbach, 1868). 

Wliat happened may be summarized from the Wood brothers' 
account as follows : 

Dr. B. F. Shumard, who had been on the Owen survey, was appointed 
State geologist of Texas in 1858, and among his subordinates was A. R. 
Roessler. In 1860 Shumard announced the discovery in Washington 
County, Tex., of fossil materials equivalent in age to those of the Big 
Bad Lands, and, as stated by the Wood brothers, "It is entirely reason- 
able to suppose that he borrowed typical Badlands material for com- 
parison from the collection of the Owen survey with which he had 
been associated, although there is no direct proof that he did so." 
On the outbreak of the Civil War, Shumard, Roessler, and others 
went north. From the evidence presented it appears clear that 
Roessler removed certain specimens and maps from the Texas survey 
and that about October 1868 Roessler, who was an Austrian, sent a 
-collection of vertebrate specimens to the Geologische Reichsanstalt, 
among which was the type of Hyracodon nebrascensis. 

Professor Abel has since presented the Hyracodon skull to the 
American Museum of Natural History, where it bears the catalog 
number 22617. 



1 Merrill, George P., Catalogue of the type and figured specimens of fossils, minerals, 
rocks, and ores in the Department of Geology, United States National Museum. U. S. 
Nat. Mus. Bull. 53, pt. 2 (Fossil vertebrates, etc.), p. 60, 1907. The type is listed, but there 
was some doubt that the specimen was the one that Leidy had described and figured. 
It is now known not to be the type. 

* Wood, Horace Elmer, 2d, and Wood, Albert Elmer, Mid-Tertiary vertebrates from the 
•lexas Coastal Plain : Fact and fable. Amer. Midi. Nat., vol. 18. pp. 129-146, illus., 19.37. 

s Abel, O., Paleont. Zeitschr., vol. 8, pp. 241-242, 1926. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 309 

These same aiitliors (p. 141) call attention to two other Oligocene 
specimens of this same collection in the paleontological collections of 
Columbia University. Through the generosity of Prof. G. Marshall 
Kay, these have since been returned to the National Museum. 

Other parts of these early collections were a very long time in 
reaching the national collections. In the Annual Report of the 
National Museum for 1888, it is recorded that a small collection of 
Wliite River fossils, including the type of Testudo eulhertsoni Leidy, 
was deposited by Indiana University. The record is not complete, 
but it appears quite certain that after these specimens had been 
studied by Leidy they were returned to Dr. David Dale Owen, who- 
was then State Geologist of Indiana, where he died in 1860. Al- 
though it is clearly evident that these specimens were Government 
property, the following statement from the Report of the National 
Museum for 1891 (p. 10), is at least of interest. 

'•The Owen type specimens of fossils, mentioned on page 759 of th& 
report of the National Museum for 1888 as having been 'presented' ta 
the Museum by the Indiana State University through the courtesy of 
the university, will be retained in the National Museum as a 'deposif^ 
subject to the order of the board of trustees of the university." 

A fire that occurred in the Smithsonian Building in January 
1865 burned some stored duplicate Museum materials belonging to 
other divisions, but nowhere in the records is it found that vertebrate 
fossils were destroyed. Nevertheless, this conflagration has for years 
served as a convenient explanation for the absence of certain speci- 
mens that were missing from the collections. 

In 1858, Dr. James Deane, of Greenfield, Mass., made a request 
to Secretary Baird for the Smithsonian Institution to publish his 
manuscript on the fossil footprints of the Connecticut Valley. 
On account of the expense involved, and the fact that the manuscript 
was unfinished, the Secretary was unable to approve the project. 
Through the generosity of friends and the cooperation of the Smith- 
sonian Institution, this work was privately published in 1861, shortly 
after Dr. Deane's death, under the title "Ichnographs from the Sand- 
stone of Connecticut River." 

In 1859, Dr. J. S. Newberry, as geologist, accompanied the topo- 
graphic expedition for the exploration of the San Juan River and 
Upper Colorado under the leadership of Capt. J. N. Macomb, U. S. 
Army. The type specimen of the sauropod dinosaur Dystrophaeus 
videmalae Cope was collected by Newberry in southern Utah, and it,, 
with other vertebrate fossils obtained, was deposited in the Smith- 
sonian paleontological collections. 

The Museum's early r*ecords regarding the fossils collected by 
Dr. F. V. Hayden and his geological exploring parties are very in- 



310 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM tol. 90 

complete. In some instances it cannot now be determined whether 
the specimens recorded from this source were vertebrate or inverte- 
brate fossils. 

In 1856, Dr. Hayden accompanied Lt. Gouverneur K. Warren's ex- 
pedition for the exploration of the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers. It 
was on this journey that the first vertebrate materials were collected 
from the Judith River formation. These vertebrates were described 
and illustrated by Leidy under the title "Extinct Vertebrata from 
the Judith River and Great Lignite Formations of Nebraska".* A 
few of these specimens {Thespesius occidentals^ Ischyrotherium anti- 
quum, Compsemys vie f us, and Trioiiyx foveatus) were deposited in 
the National Museum, but for some reason now unknown the others 
were retained in the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. 

In the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution for 1856 men- 
tion is made that Dr. Hayden revisited the Mauvaises Terres of the 
White River and "procured some forms of fossil mammals not pre- 
viously discovered." In 1857 the Museum received two boxes of 
fossils collected by Dr. Hayden while acting as geologist for Lt. 
*G. K. Warren's exploring expedition in the Niobrara Valley. Many of 
these specimens were later described by Dr. Jose])h Leidy ^ and are 
now in the Museum's collections. 

In 1858, Lieutenant Warren deposited 21 boxes containing collec- 
tions of animals, plants, minerals, and fossils from the valley of the 
Platte, gathered chiefly by Dr. Hayden, but the records do not dis- 
close whether vertebrates were included in this accession. 

In 1870, Hayden collected some vertebrates along the Big and 
Little Sandy Creeks to Green River and from the Bridger formation 
in southwestern Wyoming. Cope and Leidy reported on these col- 
lections, all of which were finally transferred to the National Museum. 
So much of these materials was fragmentaiy that many of the speci- 
mens have subsequently been discarded as valueless. 

The bulk of the collections of the National Institute were trans- 
ferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1858. The National Insti- 
tute, known first as the National Institution, contained the earlier 
collections of the Columbian Institution for the Promotion of Arts 
and Sciences transferred to it in 1841. For a time it had custody 
of the governmental collections, assembled and exhibited in a large hall 
in the Old Patent Office Building, from which they were transferred 
to the Smithsonian Institution in 1858 and 1862, in accordance with 
the congressional act of 1846. No list of the vertebrate fossils that 
•were transferred lias been found in the archives of the National 



* Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 11, pp. l.".0-l.-)4, 1860. 
"* Leidy, J„ :Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelpbia, 1858. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 311 

Museum, but in a catalog of the National Institute the following 
vertebrate specimens were listed as being exhibited in case 18 : 

Vertebrae of fossil Cetacea. 

4 specimens of fossil fish from near Astoria, Oreg. (fossil fisli well worthy of the 

attention of the curious). 
Mastodon tooth. 
Fossil skull and fishes. 
Bronze bust of Cuvier. 

Mastodon tooth from Marianna, Fla. Walter Younge, N. C. 
Large ox horn from Missouri. 
Fossil remains of the Arctic or North American elephant or mastodon found 

in the State of Missouri, 1843. 
Numerous tusks (10 to 12 feet long), good preservation. 
100 teeth, many of them, weight being 20 to 30 pounds. 

In addition to the specimens listed above Leidy ^ enumerated the 
bones of a Megatherium from Skidaway Island, Ga., which he exam- 
ined in the National Institute collections.' They are as follows : Lower 
jaw (nearly complete) with teeth; isolated tooth; temporal portion 
of cranium ; annular metacarpal bone ; axis ; cervical vertebra ; 2 dorsal 
centra; spinous process of dorsal vertebra; 2 rib fragments; head of 
femur; proximal extremities of two tibia; os calcis and several tooth 
fragments. 

It is assumed that all these specimens w^ere transferred to the 
Smithsonian Institution in 1858, at the time the bulk of the other 
collections of the National Institute was received. These materials 
were incorporated in the private collections of the Institution in ac- 
cordance with the terms of its charter, thus becoming the property 
of the Government. Now, however, only a few of the specimens can 
be recognized, and in all probability many of them have long since 
been discarded because of the lack of data as to their origin, locality, 
and geological occurrence. 

One of the important specimens of this collection, which only 
recently reached the Smithsonian Institution, was the type of Delfhinus 
calvertensis, for 90 years in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, 
Cambridge, Mass. Its history is as follows : In October or November 
1841, Francis Markoe, Jr., corresponding secretary of the National 
Institute, made a geological excursion in Calvert and St. Marys 
Counties in Maryland. From a cliff in the vicinity of Cove Point, 
with the help of Dr. Tongue, a cetacean skull was collected. In 1842 
this specimen was described by Richard Harlan,^ who named it Del- 



• Smithsonian Contr. Knowl., vol. 7, p. 51, IS.jo. 

■^ Tinder date of April 2, 1851, a letter from Professor Baird to John Varden, curator of 
the National Institute, made a request for the Megatherium bones in case 18, presumably 
for Dr. I^idy. 

8 Description of a new extinct species of dolphin from Maryland. Proc. Nat. Inst., vol. 2, 
pp. 195-196, figs. 1-4, 1842. 



312 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM tol. 90 

phinus calvertensis. On April 29, 1846, the National Institute was 
directed by Congress to deposit its collections in the Smithsonian 
Institution. In 1850 Jeffries Wyman » announced that Louis Agas- 
siz (who was appointed professor of natural history in Lawrence 
Scientific School of Harvard University in 1846) was commencing 
a study of the Cetacea. At a meeting of the American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences in October 1848 Professor Agassiz ^° exhibited 
skulls of fossil cetaceans, including the type of Delphinus calvertensis. 
In 1858 and 1862 the collections of the National Institute were trans- 
ferred to the Smithsonian Institution. From ithis chronological 
record, it appears quite evident that the Delphinus skull was lent 
to Professor Agassiz for use in his studies of the Cetacea and was 
probably in his custody when the actual transfer of the National 
Institute collections to the Smithsonian took place. 

Recently the chronologic events in the history of this specimen 
were laid before Dr. Thomas Barbour, director of the Museum of 
Comparative Zoology in Cambridge, by Dr. Alexander Wetmore. 
assistant secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and the former 
acted promptly in having the specimen returned to the national 
collections. The type is in excellent condition and shows every evi- 
dence of careful handling throughout its unusual history. As an ex- 
ample of true scientific interest and generous cooperation this re- 
covery of an important type, whose ownership was obscured by the 
lapse of time and by the passing of an earlier generation of natu- 
ralists, is an event of more than ordinary significance. 

In 1868 a complete skeleton of Megaceros hihermicus ("Irish elk"), 
from the peat bogs of Ireland, was purchased from Thomas & Sons in 
Philadelphia, and a fine head with antlers of this animal was received 
as a gift from Prof. O. C. Marsh. 

In 1872 Prof. E. D. Cope collaborated with the Hayden survey 
and explored the Bridger, Green River, Washakie, and Wasatch 
horizons in Wyoming, and large collections of fossil vertebrates 
were made. Some of these specimens reached the National Museum's 
collections, but I have been unable to learn from the published 
records what the precise arrangement was between the Interior De- 
partment and Professor Cope concerning the disposition of the 
fossils collected. In a letter to his father, dated May 24, 1872, Cope 
remarked : "I will have every facility furnished by the Interior 
Department, expenses paid, orders for men, wagons, beasts, pro- 
visions, etc." " This statement implies that, since the expenses for 
the trip were borne by the Government, all the specimens collected 

» Amer. Journ. Sci., vol. 10, p. 230, footnote. 1850. 
™Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts and Sci.. vol. 2, p. 5, 1852. 
" Osborn, H. F., Cope : Master naturalist, p. 183, 1931. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 313 

should have become its property. Schuchert, however, offe(rs the 
information that Cope received no salary, and for that reason claimed 
the fossils as his own. This was not an unusual practice in those 
days, as I am told that some of the early ornithologists and biologists 
worked under similar arrangements. Some of the Bridger and 
Green River fossils of this year are in the National Museum's pale- 
ontological collections, but an unknown number were evidently re- 
tained by Cope and are now in the American Museum of Natural 
History, New York City. 

After Cope's death, on April 12, 1897, his entire collection of 
vertebrate fossils was purchased and presented to the American 
Museum of Natural History. Included were many specimens col- 
lected by the Hayden survey that were in Cope's hands at that time. 
Obscurity in the proof of o^vnership led the National Museum au- 
thorities to accept a compromise settlement whereby in 1908 a se- 
lected collection of 99 duplicate specimens, including a mounted 
skeleton of the type of Hoplophoneus rohustus and having an esti- 
mated value of $3,250, was sent by the American Museum of Natural 
History to Washington, D. C. This collection consisted of representa- 
tive specimens from the following formations: Puerco, Torrejon, 
Bridger, Oligocene, Miocene, and Permian of North America; 
Pampean and Santa Cruz of South America, 

In 1874, Prof. E. D. Cope was engaged by the War Department as 
paleontologist to accompany the United States geographical and geo- 
logical survey west of the 100th meridian under the leadership of Lt. 
George M. Wheeler. It was on this expedition that he assembled the 
classic materials from the Upper Miocene and Lower Pliocene of the 
Santa Fe marls in the Rio Grande Valley and the Wasatch Eocene 
specimens from along the course of the Gallinas River in New Mexico. 
All these fossils were shii^ped to Philadelphia for Cope to study, but 
after publication of his report ^- they were transferred by the War De- 
partment to the custody of the National Museum. They formed a 
most important contribution to the paleontological collections of that 
time because of the considerable number of type and figured specimens 
included. 

In 1877, Dr. A. C. Peale, who acted as geologist for the Green River 
division of the Hayden sun^ey, was instrumental in bringing together 
a considerable collection of Eocene Green River fishes. These were 
transferred to the National Museum but later were sent to Professor 
Cope at Philadelphia for study and description.^^ The collection re- 
mained there until after his death, being returned to the National 
Museum bv the executors of his estate in 1898. 



'"Rep. U. S. Geogr. and Geol. Surv. West of the 100th Meridian (Wheeler), vol. 4, pt. 2, 
lS-7. 

" Rep. U. S. Geol. Surv. Terr. (Hayden), vol. 3, 1884. 



314 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 00 

ORIGIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE FOSSILS AND 
ITS LATER ORGANIZATION 

In the formative years of the Smithsonian Institution there was no 
separate unit that dealt exclusively vs^ith vertebrate fossils, their cus- 
tody apparently falling to the lot of vrorkers interested in other sub- 
jects. With the establishment of the United States National Museum, 
however, vertebrate fossils were placed in the custody of the Depart- 
ment of Comparative Anatomy, and such preparatory and exhibition 
work as was carried on at that time was done by the osteologists of 
that department. 

This arrangement persisted until 1887. In that year Prof. O. C. 
Marsh, of Yale University, was appointed honorary curator of the 
Department of Vertebrate Fossils." Professor Marsh had been ver- 
tebrate paleontologist on the United States Geological Survey staff 
since 1882, and during that time, under liberal allotments from the 
Powell administration and with the aid of a large staif of assistants, 
he had made notable progress in collecting, preparing, and describing 
vertebrate materials. The first report of progress of the Department 
of Vertebrate Fossils appears in the Annual Report of the United 
States National Museum for 1891, p. 223, by Frederic A. Lucas, 
Assistant Curator. 

A general reorganization of the department was inaugurated by 
Assistant Secretary G. Brown Goode in 1894, when all the fossil col- 
lections were administered under the title "Department of Paleon- 
tology," with Dr. Charles D. Walcott, Director of the United States 
Geological Survey, as honorary curator and Charles Schuchert as 
assistant curator. 

The appointment of Mr. Schuchert was of more than passing im- 
portance, since for the first time in their history the paleontological 
collections were placed in charge of an official paid by the Museum. 
Mr. Schuchert, although primarily more occupied with invertebrate 
fossils, nevertheless made notable contributions to the upbuilding 
and care of the vertebrate collections during his administration of 
the section. The new Department was divided into three sections: 
(1) Vertebrate fossils, with O. C. Marsh as honorai-y curator and 
Frederic A. Lucas as acting assistant curator; (2) invertebrate fossils; 
and (3) fossil plants. On this reorganization Goode commented: 
"It will now also be possible to bring the work incident to installation 
of all paleontological material under one uniform system." 

In 1897, with the advent of the head curator system, a further 
change in the Museum's organization placed all paleontology under 
the Department of Geology, Vertebrate Paleontology becoming a 

1* Ann. Rep. U. S. Nat. Mus. for 1887. p. 4. 1889. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 315 

section under the Division of Stratigraphic Paleontology, but with 
no change in personnel. 

The rapid growth of the collection, incident to the receipt of the 
Marsh collections from New Haven, and the death of Professor 
Marsh iji 1899 led to the appointment of F. A. Lucas as acting curatoi- 
in 1901, a position he held until his resignation from the Museum staff 
in 1904, From that time until 1908 the collections were administered 
by Dr. George P. Merrill, head curator of geology. 

In 1898 J. AY. Coleman and in 1900 Alban Stewart were employed 
as ])reparators, being the fii'st paid employees to devote all their time 
to the preparation of vertebrate fossils. On account of failing health 
Coleman resigned in June 1903, and Stewart severed his connection 
with the Museum in the spring of 1904. In the meantime, through 
the energetic interest of Dr. Merrill, James W. Gidley (1905) and 
Charles W. Gilmore (1903) were employed as preparators, and 
Norman H. Boss (1904) as assistant prejiarator. The first men- 
tioned came from the American Museum of Natural History, New 
York City, the other two from the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh, 
Pa., all men with previous experience in paleontologic work. 

In 1908 there was a further change in the organization of the 
Department of Geology, when three divisions corresponding to former 
sections were substituted for the Division of Stratigraphic Paleontol- 
ogy. The administration of the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology 
was divided, James W. Gidley becoming custodian of the mammalian 
collection and Charles W. Gilmore custodian of the reptilian collection. 

On June 16, 1911, the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology again 
became a section of the Division of Paleontology, administered by 
Dr. Ray S. Bassler. In March of this same year Thomas J. Home, an 
experienced preparator and ironworker from the American Museum 
of Natural History, was added to the staff. 

On June 30, 1924, the final change was made in the organization, 
which has since been known as the Division of Vertebrate Paleontol- 
ogy, with Charles W. Gilmore as curator and James W. Gidley as 
assistant curator, Norman H. Boss as chief preparator, Thomas J.. 
Home as preparator, and John M. Barrett as junior scientific aide.. 
This staff continued intact until the death of Dr. Gidley on September 
26, 1931. He was succeeded by Dr. C. Lewis Gazin on March 1, 1932.. 
Mr. Barrett reached retirement age on March 1, 1936, and was suc- 
ceeded in August 1936 by Henry Comack, who resigned on June 30j. 
1937. This position was again filled by the appointment of William 
E. Moran in June 1938. 

In the 42 years that paid personnel has been engaged in fossil 
vertebrate work in the National Museum, 28 persons have been em- 
ployed, of which only 14 were on a permanent status. All. others 



316 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE jSTATIONAL jVIUSEUM 



were temporary employees engaged to do special items of work. In 
table 1 is given a complete list of these employees, with the dates of 
their appointment and separation : 



Table 1. 



-Employees of the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology and their terms 
of service 



Name 


Title 


Appointed or 

assigned 


Separated 




Modeler 


May 2,1910 
Spring 1919... 
Apr. 1, 1904 
Nov. 4,1910 
June 1,1911 
Jan. 8, 1913 
Feb. 1, 1898 
Aug. 1,1936 
1914 


Sept. 30, 1910 






Feb. 29,1936 








Boyd, W. P.... 




Dec. 7, 1910 




Mar. 12, 1915 


•Cole, John L 


do 


June 11,1917 


Coleman, J. W., Jr 


do - -- 


June 30, 1903 
June 30,1937 


Eastman Charles R 




1914. 


•Giles Qustavus B 


Preparator 


Jan. 13,1913 
Mar. 1,1932 
Feb. 15,1905 
Nov. 2,1903 
July 16,1916 
Jan. 10,1911 
Aug. 16, 1911 
Feb. 8,1913 
Dec. 1,1890 
Mar. 27, 1911 
Mar. 13, 1911 

Oct. 1888 

Mar. 23, 1914 
May 10, 1887 
July 12,1917 
June 16,1938 
Jan. 11,1932 
Feb. 11,1913 
1894 


July 14,1916 








■Gidley, James W 


...do - 


1 Sept. 26, 1931 


Qilmore, Charles W 










Feb. 29,1920 


Hannan, E. Elmer 


Modeler 


June 30,1911 


Hatcher, John Bell 


Assistant 


Jan. 23,1912 
June 30, 1913 
Jan. 31,1891 


(Home, Thomas J 


Preparator 




Hughes, J T 


Blacksmith 


Mar. 25, 1911 


Lucas Frederic A 


Assistant curator 


June 30,1904 






June 30, 1914 


Marsh, 0. C 




Mar. 18, 1899 






June 15, 1918 


Moran, William E 


Junior scientific aide. 

Preparator 




Neeh, Paul 


July 9, 1932 


Nickles, Edward B 


-—do 


Oct. 10,1916 
Sept. 8,1904 


■Stewart, Alban 


Preparator . 


Dec. 1, 1900 
Mar. 7,1910 


Mar. 12, 1904 


Wade, William H 


Blacksmith 


Sept. 6,1910 







In addition to those of the regular staff there have been several vol- 
unteer collaboratoi-s who have rendered invaluable service in the devel- 
opment of the Government vertebrate collections. The earliest of these 
was Dr. Joseph Leidy. At intervals during the period from 1850 to 
about 1873, most of the vertebrate material brought together under 
governmental auspices was transmitted to liim in Philadelphia for 
scientific investigation. These collections were later returned to the 
Smithsonian and, as many of the specimens had been described and 
illustrated, their importance was greatly enhanced. 

In the early seventies Prof. E. D. Cope began his collaborative work 
■with the Hayden survey. His entry into the western fossil fields in 
1872 led to an immediate break in the hitherto friendly relations be- 
i.ween Cope and Marsh, and eventually to the exclusion of Leidy from 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 317 

further govemment-al work, Cope practically superseding him in that 
respect. Cope was a prodigious worker, as is attested by his many 
volumes and reports on vertebrate fossils published by various 
branches of the Government. As he also accompanied expeditions,, 
the Government collections were greatly enriched by his specimens 
as well as by his paleontological studies and publications. 

Cope was superseded by Prof. O. C. Marsh in 1882, who became 
vertebrate paleontologist for the United States Geological Survey,, 
and for 10 years he brought together collections and described ma- 
terials that together form the most notable contribution ever made 
to the development of the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology in the' 
National Museum. 

Dr. Oliver P. Hay, although never ofRcially connected with the Na- 
tional Museum, nevertheless contributed much to the development of 
vertebrate paleontology in this Institution (1912-30). Appointed re- 
search associate in the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1912,. 
he was provided office space in the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology,, 
which he occupied until his death on November 2, 1930. His bibliog- 
raphy contains no less than 29 papers that were based wholly on- 
Museum specimens. In addition to his research,, he made raany gifts 
to the collections and was responsible for the acquisition of a number 
of unique specimens. It was during this period that he compiled his 
Second Bibliogi'aphy and Catalogue of the Fossil Vertebrata of North 
America and the three volumes on the Pleistocene of North America! 
and Its Vertebrated Animals. 

Dr. Remington Kellogg, while still a member of the Biological 
Survey staff of the Department of Agriculture (1920-28), undertook 
the scientific investigation of the fossil cetacean collections of the 
National Museum, this work being done outside of his official duties 
and supported to some extent by grants from the Carnegie Institu- 
tion of Washington, These studies have been continued since his 
affiliation with the Museum in 1928, and his energetic interest has 
been a very important factor in developing the marine fossil mam- 
mal collection to a point where it ranks first among American col- 
lections of these animals. 

Dr. Charles R. Eastman, under the auspices of the Smithsonian 
Institution, spent a year (1914) in the study of the fossil fish collec- 
tion, rendering valuable service in publication,^^ identification, and 
rearrangement. 

Dr. Alexander Wetmore began the study of fossil birds prior to 
his appointment as Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion in 1925, and since then he has published continually, much of 
his work being based on the Museum's collections. Through his; 



Proc. r. S. N.it. Mus., vol. 52. pp. 235-304. pis. 1-23, 19], 



318 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

interest there has been a steady growth of these rarest of fossil re- 
mains, until at the present time the collection ranks high among 
the fossil-bird assemblages in this country. 

MAESH COLLECTION, PERIOD OF MOST RAPID EXPANSION, 
I 188e-1900 

Tlie greatest impetus to the growth of the collections of vertebrate 
fossils in the National Museum was the transfer from the United 
States Geological Survey of the materials brought together under 
the direction of Prof. O. C. iNIarsh^'^ and known as the "Marsh 
Collection." Professor Marsh, as United States paleontologist, 
worked nnder the auspices of the Survey from 1882 to 1892, and 
during that period lie assembled the fossil materials that were des- 
tined to form a most important pait in the development of a national 
collection of vertebrate fossils. According to Schuchert,^' "the 
Powell survey was liberal in allotments for this work, and he 
(Marsh) was given about $15,000 each year to pay salaries for him- 
self and his numerous assistants — collectors (about 35), prepara- 
tors (9), scientific aides (8), and artists — and for field and laboratory 
expenses, including large freight bills." 

The specimens as they were collected were sent from the field 
directly to Marsh at the Peabody Museum of Natural History of 
Yale University for preparation and study. The first consignment 
returned to Government custody consisted of 72 large boxes, shipped 
to the National Museum in 1886 and there placed in storage un- 
opened; in July 1891 a second shipment, consisting of 380 prepared 
specimens in 33 boxes Aveighing 6,960 pounds, was received. These 
were placed on exhibition in a case especially made for them in 
preparation for the International Geological Congress meeting held 
that year in Washington. 

In April 1896 a third consignment, consisting of 115 boxes of rhi- 
noceros {Teleoceras) skeletal remains from Kansas, was received and 
placed in storage. In 1898, a fourth portion of this assemblage con- 
sisting of two carloads was transferred to Washington. At the time 
of Professor Marsh's death (March 18, 1899), the largest part of the 
collection still remained in New Haven. Shortly thereafter, the 
rest of the collections, five carloads in all, was packed and shipped 
to the National Museum, formal transfer being made by Dr. Charles 
D. Walcott, then Director of the United States Geological Survey, 
under date of December 8, 1899. His letter and that of Secretary 
•Langley in reply are given herewith in abstract. 



^«For full-length biography of Marsh, see Schucheit. Charles, and Le Vene, Clan 
"O. C. Marsh : Pioneer in Paleontology," 541 pp., illus. New Haven, 1940. 

" Sehuchert, Cliarles, Nat. Acad. Sci. Biogr. Mera., vol. 20, 1st mem., p. 26, 19n9. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 319 

U. S. GkOIX)GIC.\L SUIiVEY, 

Washingtov, D. C, December 8, 1899. 

Prof. S. P. Langley, 

Seei-eturu, Smithsonian Institute. 

Wafihiriffton, D. C. 

De.\k Sik: I have the honor to state that all the vertebrate collections of the 
late Prof. O. C. Marsh, belonging to the Government, have been shipped from 
New Haven, Conn., and are now transferred to the custody of the U. S. National 
Museum, subject only to the use of such material as may be necessary for study 
and illustration in the completion of the monographs that were in course of 
^reparation by Professor Marsh at the time of his death. 

The actual number of specimens represented in this collection cannot be stated. 
They range in size from minute teeth of fossil mammals to individual specimens 
weighing from 500 to 2,000 pounds each. The collections are rich in Dinosauria, 
esi>ecially in examples of Triccratops and Htei/osaurus. while the series of Ti- 
tanotherium skulls is one of the best, if not the l)est, in existence. It contains 
fifty or more complete examples cleaned, and a number in the rough, besides 
manv hundred bones. 

Amon- the specimens transferred are the types of forty or more species, 
including dinosaurs, of Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary mammals. Among the 
types are the following : ^' 



Dinosaurs 



Snakf.s 
Coniophis precedens 



Diplodocus longus 

Labrosaurus ferox Jubassic Mammals 

Gamptosaurus nanus Paurodon valens 

Triceratops sulcatus 

Triceratops calicornis 

Triceratops obtusus 

Pleurocoelus nanus 

Cerutosaurus nasicornis 

Ceratops montanus Priconodon crassus '" 

Ceratops alticornis Cimolodon agilis 

Telacodon praestans 
Crocodiles Oracodon conulus 



Menacodon rarus 
Enneodon affinis 
Enneodon crassus 
Laodon venustus 

Cretaceous Mammals 



Ilhytinodon rostratus 



AUacodon pumilus 



The transfer of these great collections to Washington without the loss of any 
material, either through imperfect recording or through misunderstanding as to 
owner.ship of specimens, reflects the greatest credit on the businesslike methods 
and the integrity of Professor Marsh. The addition of the material to the Na- 
tional Museum places it in the front rank among museums in its collection of 
vertebrate fossils. It is necessary that some gaps in the collections be filled, 
and I sincerely trust that it will bo possible for the museum to do this at an 
early date. 

Yours respectfully, 

(Signed) Chas. D. Walcott, 

Director. 



" This list is incomplete, as there were 50 original types, of which 21 were reptilian and 
og were mammalian. Less than half of the tyi>es of the rare Jurassic and Cretaceous 
mammals are listed here, as there were 12 of the first and 10 of the second. 

w An error, as the type is in the Peabody Museum of Natural History. 

"» Wrongly listed, as this is a dinosaur, not a mammal. 



320 PROCEEDINGS OF TK3 NATIONAL MTJSEUM vol. 90 

Smithsonian Institution, 

December 22, 1899. 
Deab Sib: 

I take pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the eighth 
instant, advising me that you have transferred to the National Museum all 
the vertebrate fossils collected by the late Professor O. C. Marsh belonging 
to the United States Government, subject only to the condition that such 
material as is required may be used for study and illustration in completing 
the monographs which were in preparation by Professor Marsh at the time of 
his death. 

The addition of this immense collection of the most important American fossil 
remains to the treasures already assembled in the National Museum will, I 
am sure, afford the greatest satisfaction to all workers in the field of pale- 
ontology both at home and abroad, and you will permit me to add a personal 
word in appreciation of your untiring efforts to facilitate in every way possible 
the great task connected with the removal of the collection from New Haven 
to Washington. 

During the coming year I expect to have two preparators engaged in work- 
ing out the matrix specimens still uncleaned, and confidently hope that it 
may be possible in a few years to have the entire collection made available 
for study and a selected series for public exhibition. From this latter series 
the public will be able to form a con'ect idea as to the number, variety and 
great size of these wonderful extinct creatures of the western country, and 
will undoubtedly be impressed with the extent and importance of the work 
of the paleontological divisions of the Geological Survey and the marvelous 
industry and intelligence displayed by Professor Marsh in bringing together 
this great collection. 

Yours respectfully, 

(Signed) S. P. Langley. 

The Honorable Chas. D. Walcott, 
Director, U. 8. Geological Survey. 

The bulk of this collection consisted of specimens from the Jurassic 
(Morrison), Upper Cretaceous (Lance), Oligocene (Chadron), and 
Pliocene (Republican Eiver) deposits of western North America. 
Lesser lots deemed worthy of special mention were from the Triassic 
of North Carolina, Cretaceous (Arundel) of Maryland, Upper Cre- 
taceous of Montana (Judith River), Upper Cretaceous of Colorado 
(Denver and Arapahoe), Upper Cretaceous of Kansas (Niobrara), 
and Miocene and Oligocene of Oregon (John Day and Mascall), be- 
sides numerous other small miscellaneous lots. 

Many of the specimens came to the Museum either fully or par- 
tially prepared, but the bulk of the material was in the same con- 
dition as when received from the field. In fact, three years' 
collections are still in the original field boxes (49) and have never 
been opened. In transmitting the fifth and final portion of the 
Marsh collection. Dr. Walcott in 1900 estimated it as comprising 
15,000 specimen.s having a value of not less than $150,000. 

The Jurassic part of the collections, which exceeded all others in 
bulk and weight, was especially rich in the remains of Stegosaurus, 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 49 




U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 50 




NATIONAL MUSEUM 




DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY— GILMORE 321 

Oamptosaiinis, Ceratosaumis, and Antrodemus (AUosaurm) . 
These Morrison dinosaurs came from two widely separated regions : 
(jarden Park in the vicinity of Canyon City, Colo., and near Como, 
Albany County, Wyo. In both instances fossil quarries were de- 
veloped that produced specLmeiis for several successive seasons. At 
Canyon City the fossils occurred in a thick sandstone layer, and this 
deposit was worked from 1883 to 1887, inclusive, under the direction 
of M. P. Felch. It was from this quarry that the articulated type 
specimens of Ceratosauniis nasicoimis and Stegosaurus stenops and 
an articulated skeleton of Antrodemus fragilis were obtained. 

In the Como region the famous Quarry 13 and Quarry ISi/o were 
fcund by William H. Reed, in 1879. The former was worked for the 
Government for a part of 1882 by Mr. Reed ; in 1883 by J. L. Kenney ; 
and from 1884 to 1887 by Fred Brown. It is one of the few known 
quarries that have produced quantities of stegosaurian and campto- 
saurian bones. The following types were obtained here : Stegosaurus 
sulcafu-s Marsh, Diracodon laticeps Marsh, Camptosawru^ nanus 
Marsli, and C. hrowni Gilmore, all in the National Museum. 

Quarry 9 at Como Bluff, famous because of the occurrence of 
Jurassic mammals, was worked for a number of seasons by Pro- 
fessor Marsh's parties, but for the Government from 1883 to 1885 
by Ed. Kennedy and W. Beck. The specimens obtained are, there- 
fore, divided l:)etween the Peabody Museum of Natural History and 
the United States National Museum. 

The Upper Cretaceous part of the collection was largely from the 
Lance Creek area of Converse (now Niobrara) County, Wyo., made 
under the direction of John B. Hatcher during the years 1889 to 
1892, inclusive, and consisted principally of skulls and skeletal parts 
of the large horned ceratopsian and hadrosaurian dinosaurs. Even 
more valuable scientifically was the large series of teeth and jaws of 
the small mammals of this period, among which were many types. 

Of lesser importance were small collections made b)^ ]\Ir. Hatcher 
in 1887 from the Upper Cretaceous of the Denver Basin, and in 1888 
from the Upper Cretaceous Judith River formation in Montana and 
Arundel formation in Maryland, each of whicli contained several 
type specimens. 

The Oligocene part of the collection made under the direction of 
Mr. Hatcher covered the period from 1886 to 1890, and the greater 
number of specimens came from the Chadron formation of western 
Nebraska (Sioux County) and the Badlands of Washington County, 
S. Dak. Of the Brontotheres alone there were 158 skulls and jaws 
representing many types, besides much slceletal material. The fauna 
of the Brule was scantily represented. Tlie Miocene and Oligocene 
were represented by a season's collection of 15 boxes of materials 

292963—41 3 



322 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

from the Mascall and John Day formations in eastern Oregon col- 
lected by L. S. Davis in 1882. 

The lower Pliocene collections made by Hatcher in 1884 and 1885 
near Long Island, Phillips County, Kans., consisted principally of 
Teleoceras fossiger, of which there were more than 10,000 bones rep- 
resenting all parts of the skeleton. Upper Pliocene was represented 
by small lots of material from Hay Springs, Nebr., and from Archer 
and Williston, Fla. 

At the time of my affiliation with the National Museum in 1903, 
the bulk of the Marsh collection was stored in rented buildings in 
southwest Washington. The first floor of a three-story brick build- 
ing on the west side of Tenth Street near C Street, SW., was then in 
use as a paleontological laboratory, the cellar and two upper floors 
being completely occupied by boxes and crated trays of vertebrate 
material. The study collections of this period were kept in standard 
trays arranged in tiers on a balcony in the southeast corner of the 
present Arts and Industries Building and in the lower parts of the 
A-topped exhibition cases in use at that time. These collections in 
storage from 1903 on were rapidly reduced in bulk through prepara- 
tion and condemnation of worthless material, so that in 1910, with 
the occupancy of the New Natural History Building, the widely scat- 
tered storage collections were assembled as a unit for the first time. 
On this occasion the offices and laboratory were newly furnished and 
equipped, new exhibition cases replaced the old, and steel storage 
cases replaced the wooden racks of a previous period. These com- 
modious quarters permitted a more systematic arrangement of the 
study collections, and for the first time the preparators were provided 
with a well-lighted, well-equipped, roomy laboratory (27 by 77 feet) 
(pi. 61). These improvements in facilities were almost immediately 
reflected in an improved quality as well as quantity of output. 

The study collections have more than doubled in size since the 
Division moved into the Natural History Building in 1910. There 
are now 477 three- and six-foot storage units in use, but in addition 
their tops are covered with the larger specimens that cannot be cared 
for in standard trays. These storage cases now occupy practically 
every inch of case room that can be found in offices, laboratory, and 
adjoining corridors (pis. 52, 53), in addition to the gallery erected 
in 1930 in the main storage room, which practically doubled its 
capacity. 

At the present time (1940) all the Marsh collection, except 49 
boxes from the Morrison of Canyon City, have been prepared, and 
with this exception all the collection is now available. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 323 

EXPEDITIONS 

Since the inception of the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology, it 
has profited from no less than 68 major ^'^ collecting expeditions, of 
which about 30 were financed and directed by the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution or the National Museum. Funds for the others were furnished 
by private sponsors or by other Government agencies. Of the latter, 
the United States Geological Survey has been the outstanding 
contributor. 

The first expeditions organized by the United States National Mu- 
seum exchisively for the collection of fossil vertebrates were those of 
1894 and 1896 to the Eocene of Alabama for Basilosaurus remains. 
Reports of an abundance of archaeocete remains in the Gulf States 
instigated the 1894 expedition, and Dr. Charles Schuchert was de- 
tailed to investigate these and to collect if possible a specimen for 
exhibition. He was successful in finding a much fragmented skull 
and a fine ramus of one and the forward half of the articulated 
skeleton of a second individual of BasiJosaurms, together with other 
less important specimens. This material formed the basis for the 
restoration of the Basilosaunis cetoides skeleton exhibited at the 
Cotton States and International Exposition at Atlanta in 1895. In 
November 1896 Schuchert again visited the Eocene of Alabama and 
collected additional materials of Basllosofiirws, including an articu- 
lated series of vertebrae of the hinder portion of the skeleton. From 
these specimens was assembled the mounted skeleton that for 28 years 
has formed a unique feature of the exhibition series. 

In 1904, under A. G. Maddren, and again in 1907, under Charles 
W. Gilmore, expeditions were dispatched to Alaska by the Smithso- 
nian in the hope of securing a mountable skeleton of the northern 
mammoth {Elephas pi^imigenius) . Although neither expedition was 
successful in getting an elephant skeleton, important collections of 
Pleistocene fossils resulted. 

This quest for elephant remains was further pursued in 1915, 
when Benno Alexander was employed by the Smithsonian to accom- 
pany the Koren expedition to the Kolyma River Valley, Siberia. Mr. 
Alexander obtained a nearly perfect skull of Elephas pHmigemius 
and a large miscellaneous collection of Pleistocene bones. 

Scarcely a year has passed since 1912 when there has not been at 
least one expedition in the field in quest of fossil vertebrates. Begin- 
ning in 1929, however, the Smithsonian Institution has provided 
the means for carrying on annual expeditions, and it has thereby 
been possible to plan a definite program. Geographically the ex- 



^ By major expeditions is meant those collecting parties that have spent 2 or more- 
months in the field and whose energies were wholly devoted to the coUectio^n of fossil 
vertebrates. 



324 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 9Q 

peditions have covered a wide area, collections having been made 
in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Cuba, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Mary- 
land, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Siberia, South 
Dakota, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming. 

Although much of the exploratory work of later years has been 
done in well-known fossil-producing areas, these collecting activities 
have also resulted in the development of important new fossil areas 
and faunas. The more important of these are: Jackson, Eocene 
fauna, near Melvin, Choctaw County, Ala. (1894, 1896, 1929) ; the 
Cumberland Cave Pleistocene fauna near Cumberland, Md. (1912, 
1913, 1914, 1915) ; Paleocene fauna from Sweet Grass County, Mont. 
(1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1934) ; Pliocene and Pleistocene faunas of the 
San Pedro Valley, Ariz. (1921, 1936) ; footprints from the Permian 
of the Grand Canyon, Ariz. (1924, 1926, 1927) ; fauna of the Upper 
Cretaceous, Two Medicine formation, Mont, (1913, 1928, 1935) ; 
Pliocene fauna and development of the famous Plesifpus Quarry 
near Hagerman, Idaho (1929, 1930, 1931, 1934) ; fauna of the Upper 
Cretaceous, North Horn formation, and Paleocene, Dragon forma- 
tion of the Wasatch Plateau region of central Utah (1937, 1938, 1939, 
1940) ; Miocene fauna of the Chesapeake Bay area (1905-1940). 

Although early collecting was intermittent and consisted largely 
in accepting opportunities as they arose, with the exception of the 
Marsh collecting parties for the Geological Survey the work of re- 
cent years has been planned witli the idea of filling in gaps and of 
rounding out the permanent collections, so that they will be more 
fully representative of all the better-known North American faunas 
and fossil-producing areas. As a result of this planned collecting, 
the vertebrate collections of the National Museum are gradually 
reaching a standard that is in keeping with the national character 
of the Institution. 

CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF EXPEDITIONS, OUTSIDE OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTI- 
TUTION AND NATIONAL MUSEUM, FROM WHICH THE DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE 
PALEONTOLOGY HAS BENEFITED 

1849. U. S. Land Office. Oligocene (Brule), South Dakota, "Bad Lands," John 

Evans in charge. 

1850. Thaddeus Culbertson (allotted $200 for freight by the Smithsonian). 

Oligocene, South Dakota, "Bad Lands," Thaddeus Culbertson in charge. 
1853. U. S. Land Office. Oligocene (Brule), South Dakota, "Bad Lands," John 
Evans in charge. 

1856. War Department, U. S. Geographical Exploration of the Yellowstone and 

Missouri Rivers. Upper Cretaceous (Judith River), Gouverneur K. 
Warren in charge. F. V. Hayden made the collections. 

1857. War Department. Oligocene and Miocene, South Dakota and Nebraska, 

Niobrara River. Gouverneur K. Warren in charge. F. V.. Hayden made 
the collections. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 325 

1870. U. S. Geological Survey, Hayden Survey. Eocene, Bridger, and otlier 

Tertiary deposits, Wyoming. F. V. Hayden made the collections. 
1872. TJ. S. Geological Survey, Hayden Survey. Eocene, Bridger, and other 

Tertiary basins, Wyoming. E. D. Cope made the collections. 
1874. War Department, U. S. Geogx-aphical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian. 

Eocene (Wasatch), Miocene and Lower Pliocene, New Mexico, G. M. 

Wheeler in charge. E. D. Cope, assisted by H. C. Yarrow, made the 

collections. 

1882. U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry 13,"' W. H. Reed in charge. 

1883. U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry 13," 6 miles from Como, J. L. Keuney in charge. 
TT. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Colorado, "Garden Park," 
near Canyon City, M. P. Pelch in charge. 

1884. U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry 13," 6 miles from Como, Fred Brown in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry 9," Como Bluff, Ed Kennedy in charge, assisted by W. Beck. 
V. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Colorado, "Garden Park," 

near Canyon City, M. P. Felch in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Lower Pliocene (Republican River), Kansas, 

Phillips County, Long Island, ''Teleoceros Quarry," J. B. Hatcher in 

charge. 

1885. U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry 13," 6 miles from Como, Fred Brown in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Mon-ison), Colorado, "Garden Park," 

near Canyon City, M. P. Felch in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Lower Pliocene (Republican River), Kansas, 
Phillips County, Long Island, "Teleoceras Quarry," J. B. Hatcher in 

charge. 
18S6. U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry IS," 6 miles from Como, Fred Brown in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Colorado, "Garden Park," 

near Canyon City, M. P. Felch in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Oligocene (Chadron chiefly), Nebraska and South 

Dakota, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 

1887. U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry 13," 6 miles from Como, Fred Brown iu charge. 
U. S- Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Colorado, "Garden Park," 

near Canyon City, M. P. Felch in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Denver), Colorado, near 

Denver, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Oligocene (Chadron), South Dakota and 

Nebraska, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Cretaceous (Arundel), Maryland, near Beltsville, 

J. B. Hatcher in charge. 

1888. U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Colorado, "Garden Park," 

near Canyon City, M. P. Felch in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Oligocene, South Dakota and Nebraska, vicinity 

of Chadron and Hermosa, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Cretaceous (Judith River), Montana, Cow Island 

and vicinity of Dog Creek and Judith River, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 



326 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

U. S. Geological Survey. Cretaceous (Arundel), Maryland, near Beltsvllle, 

J. B. Hatcher in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

"Quarry 9," Fred Brown in charge. 

1889. U. S. Geological Survey. Triassic, North Carolina, Egypt, J. B. Hatcher 

in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Oligocene, South Dakota, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Lance), Wyoming, Niobrara 

County, Lance Creek, J. B. Hatcher in charge, assisted by C. E. Beecher 

and O. A. Peterson. 

1890. U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Lance), Wyoming, Niobrara 

County, Lance Creek, J. B. Hatcher in charge, assisted by W. H. 

Utterback, A. L. Sullius, and T. A. Bostwick. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Oligocene (Chadron), South Dakota, "Bad 

Lands," J. B. Hatcher in charge, assisted by W. H. Utterback, E. B. 

Willson, O. A. Peterson, C. E. Beecher, and Gus Ci-aven. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Niobrara), Kansas, Handel T. 

Martin in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Triassic, North Carolina, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 
U. S. Geological Survey. Pliocene, Florida, Levy County, near Archer and 

Williston, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 

1891. U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Lance), Wyoming, Niobrara 

County, J. B. Hatcher in charge, assisted by A. L. Sullins, W. H. Utter- 
back, A. E. Burrell, and O. A. Peterson. 

1892. U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Lance), Wyoming, Nio- 

brara County, J. B. Hatcher in charge. 

1899. Union Pacific Railroad. Jurassic (Morrison), Wyoming, Albany County, 

Freeze Out Mountains, Charles Schuchert in charge. 

1900. U. S. Geological Survey'. Trias.sic (Chinle), Arizona, "Tanner's Crossing," 

Barnum Brown in charge. 
1902. U. S. Geological Survey. Eocene (Bridger), Wyoming, W. D. Matthew 
and Walter Granger in charge. 

1908. U. S. Geological Survey. Paleocene (Fort Union), Montana, Sweet Grass 

County, A. C. Silberling in charge. 

1909. U. S. Geological Survey. Paleocene (Fort Union), Montana, Sweet Grass 

County, A. C. Silberling and J. W. Gidley in charge. 

1913. U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Two Medicine), Montana, 

Blackfeet Indian Reservation, C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by 
Floyd Strayer. 

1914. U. S. Geological Survey. Upper Cretaceous (Judith and Claggett). Mon- 

tana, vicinity of Judith P. O. C. W. Gilmore accompanied parry. 
1916. U. S. Geological Survey. Paleocene (Puerco and Torrejon) and Upper 

Cretaceous (Kirtland), New Mexico, San Juan Basin. J. B. Reeside 

made the collections. 
1921. U. S. Geological Survey. Pliocene (Cochise) and Pleistocene, Arizona, San 

Pedro Valley, J. W. Gidley and Kirk Bryan. 
National Park Service. Miocene (Santa Fe marl), New Mexico, near 

Espanola, C. W. Gilmore in charge. 
1924. National Park Service. Permian (Coconino), Arizona, Grand Canyon, 

footprints, C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by A. Metzer. 
1926. National Park Service. Permian (Coconino and Hermit), Arizona, Grand 

Canyon, footprints, C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by Glen 

Sturdevant. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 327 

1927. National Academy of Sciences. Permian (Hermit and Supai), Arizona, 
Grand Canyon, footprints, C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by Glen 
Sturdevant. 

1929. Carnegie Institution of Washington. Eocene (Jackson), Alabama and 
Mississippi. Remington Kellogg in charge, assisted by N. H. Boss. 

CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF EXPEDITIONS ENGAGED IN THE COLLECTION OF FOSSIL 
VERTEBRATES FOR THE UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM AND SMITHSONIAN 
INSTITUTION 

1894. Eocene (Jackson), Alabama, Choctaw Cuanty, Basilosaurus remains 

principally, Charles Schuchert in charge. 
1896. Same. 
1904. Pleistocene, Alaska, Old Crow and Yukon River Valleys, A. G. Maddren 

in charge. 
1907. Pleistocene, Alaska, Yukon Valley, C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by 

Benno Alexander. 

1912. Pleistocene, Maryland, "Cumberland Cave," J. W. Gidley in charge, as- 

sisted by Raymond Armbruster. 

1913. Pleistocene, Maryland, "Cumberland Cave," J. W. Gidley in charge. 

1914. Same. 

1915. Same. 

1914-1.5. Pleistocene, Siberia, Kolyma Valley, Benno Alexander in charge. 

1915. Pleistocene, Indiana, Pulaski County, "Winaraac Mastodon,'' J. W. Gidley 

in charge. 
1921. Miocene (Harrison), Nebraska, "Agate Springs," slab of Diceratlivrlum 

bones, J. W. Gidley in charge. 

1923. Jurassic (Morrison), Utah, "Dinosaur National Monument," Diplodocus 

skeleton, C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by Norman H. Boss, J. A. 
Kay, E. M. York, and Golden York. 

1924. Triassic, Virginia, Loudoun County, dinosaur tracks, C. W. Gilmore in 

charge, assisted by N. H. Boss. 

1924. Pleistocene, Florida, Melbourne, in cooperation with the Bureau of Amer- 

ican Ethnology, J. W. Gidley in charge. 

1925. Pleistocene, Florida, Melbourne, investigation of occurrence of man with 

Pleistocene fossils, J. W. Gidley in cooperation with Amherst College. 
Pleistocene, Oklahoma, Long Horn Spring deposit, J. W. Gidley in charge. 

1927. Pleistocene, Florida, Melbourne, J. W. Gidley in charge, assisted by C. P. 

Singleton. 
Pleistocene, Oklahoma, near Curtis, J. W. Gidley in charge. 

1928. Upper Cretaceous (Two Medicine), Montana, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, 

C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by G. F. Sternberg and Edwin Cooke. 
Pleistocene, Florida, Melbourne and New Smyrna, J. W. Gidley in charge, 
assisted by C. P. Singleton. 

1929. Pliocene (Hagerman Lake beds) and Pleistocene, Idaho, American Falls 

beds, ''Plesippvs Quan-y," J. W. Gidley in charge, assisted by C. P. 

Singleton. Elmer Cook, and F. V. Conklin. 
Pleistocene, Florida, Melbourne, J. W. Gidley in charge, assisted by C. P. 

Singleton. 
Pleistocene, New Mexico, Dona Ana County, Aden Crater, in cooperation 

with Peabody Museum of Natural History, F. W. Darby in charge, 

assisted by N. H. Boss. 
Upper Cretaceous (Kirtland), New Mexico. San Juan Basin, C W. Gilmore 

in charge, assisted by N. H. Boss, G. F. Sternberg, and C. W. Sternberg. 



328 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL IVIUSEUM vol.90 

1930. Eocene (Bridger), Wyoming, Bridger Basin, C. W. Gilmore in charge, 

assisted by G. F. Sternberg and George B. Pearce. 
Pliocene (Hagerraan Lake beds), Idaho, "Plesippus Quarry," near Hager- 

man, J. W. Gidley In charge, assisted by C. F. Singleton, S. P. Welles, 

Elmer Cook, Frank Gamier, and Y. Young Rogers. 
Pleistocene, Florida, Melbourne, evidence of association of man with 

Pleistocene fossils, J. W. Gidley in charge, assisted by C. P. Singleton. 

1931. Eocene, Miocene, and Oligocene, Wyoming and Montana. Collections made 

from Eocene : Wasatch, Big Horn Basin ; Oligocene : Pipestone Springs : 
Miocene : Canyon Ferry, White Sulphur Springs, and Deep River. C. W. 
Gilmore in charge, assisted by G. F. Sternberg and M. V. Walker. 
Pliocene (Hagerman Lake beds), Idaho, "Plesippus Quarry," near Hager- 
man, N. H. Boss in charge, assisted by C. P. Singleton, C. W. Caldwell, 
Charles Brenner. 

1932. Oligocene (Brule), Wyoming, Nebraska, and South Dakota, C. W. Gilmore 

in charge, assisted by G. F. Sternberg and M. V. Walker. 

1934. Pliocene (Hagerman Lake beds) and Pleistocene, Idaho, "Plesippu.r' 

Quarry and American Falls, C. Lewis Gazin in charge, assisted by G. F. 
Sternberg, George B. Pearce, and Elmer Cook. 
Paleoceue (Fort Union), Montana, Sweetgrass County, George Gaylord 
Simpson in charge, assisted by A. C. Silberling. 

1935. Upper Cretaceous (Two Medicine), Montana, Blackfeet Indian Reserva- 

tion, and Eocene (Wasatch), Wyoming, Big Horn Basin, C. W. Gilmore 
in charge, assisted by G. F. Sternberg and George B. Pearce. 

1936. Eocene (Wasatch), Paleocene (Puerco and Torrejon), and Pliocene, New 

Mexico and Arizona, C. Lewis Gazin in charge, assisted by G. F. Stern- 
berg and H. R. Shepherd. 

1937. Upper Cretaceous (North Horn), Paleocene (Dragon), and Trlassic 

(Chinle), Utah, Emery County, and Arizona, vicinity of Petrified Forest. 
C. W. Gilmore in charge, assisted by G. F. Sternberg and G. B. Pearce. 

1938. Upper Cretaceous (North Horn), Paleocene (Dragon), and Eocene (Uinta), 

Utah, Emery County, and Uinta Basin, C. Lewis Gazin in charge, assisted 
by G. F. Sternberg and H. R. Shepherd. 

1939. Upper Cretaceous (North Horn) and Paleocene (Dragon), Utah, Emery 

County, C. Lewis Gazin in charge, assisted by G. F. Sternberg and 
Franklin Pearce. 

1940. tipper Cretaceous (North Horn), Paleocene (Dragon), Utah, Emery County, 

and Eocene (Bridger), Wyoming, Uinta County, C. Lewis Gazin in charge, 
assisted by G. F. Sternberg and Franklin Pearce. 

CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF COLLECTING TRIPS FOR FOSSIL VERTEBRATES IN THE 
MIOCENE ALONG CHESAPEAKE BAY AND OTHER LOCALITIES NEAR WASHING- 
TON, D. C. 

COLLECTING WAS CARRIED ON BY A CONSIDERABLE NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS, WORKING FROM 1 TO 13 
DAYS AT A TRIP. THE RECORD OF EARLY COLLECTING IS INCOMPLETE 

1905-1914. Calvert Cliffs, Md. ; F. W. True, collector. 

1908: July 3, 7, 11, 18; August 1, 4, 12, 26; September 7. Plumpoint, Md. ; 

William Palmer, D. B. Mackie, N. H. Boss, James W. Gidley, and Marcus 

W. Lyon, Jr. 
1912 : May 31. Plumpoint, Md. ; William Palmer, A. C. W^eed, and S. M. Gron- 

berger. 
1913 : October. Dares Wharf and Plumpoint, Md. ; William Palmer. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 329 

1914 : June 2, i^VS. Dares Wharf and Plumpoiut, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 

1916 : March 4. South Chesapeake Beach, Md. ; William Palmer. 

1918: August 23-26, SO-Sl ; September 4-7. South Chesapeake Beach, Md. ; 

William Palmer and N. H. Boss. 
1919: July 16-19. Willows, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 

1920 : May 30-31 ; June 12, 27-29. South Chesapeake Beach, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 
1921: July 7-9. Willows, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 

1921 : August 1-3, 8-12. South Chesapeake Beach, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 
1922: July 8-11, 13. Willows, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 
1922: July 12. Plumpoint, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 

1922 : October 6-7 ; November 20-21. South Chesapeake Beach, Md. ; N. H. Boss. 
1923: December 30. Raudle Cliffs to Camp Eoosevelt, Md. ; N. H. Boss and 

Remington Kellogg. 
1925: June 7. Randle Cliffs, Md. ; N. H. Boss and Remington Kellogg. 
1925: July 26-27. Nomini Cliffs, Va. ; Alexander Wetmore, E. A. Preble, and 

Remington Kellogg. 
1925 : August 15. Plumpoint to Governors Run, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 
1925 : August 22. Governors Run to Solomons Island, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 
1925 : August 30. Dares Wharf to Plumpoint, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 
1925 : September 6. Dares Wharf, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 

1925 : September 12-14. Dares Wharf to Plumpoint, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 
1925 : September 20. Camp Roosevelt, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 

1925 : September 27. Plumpoint, Md. ; N. H. Boss and Remington Kellogg. 

1925 : November 22-23. St. Marys County, Md. ; C. W. Gilmore, N. H. Boss, and 

Remington Kellogg. 
1926 : May 26. Plumpoint, Md. ; N. H. Boss and Remington Kellogg. 

1926 : May 30. Plumpoint, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 

1926 : July 4. Fair Haven and Randle Cliffs, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 

1926 : July 18. Plumpoint, Md. ; Remington Kellogg. 

1926: August 8. Dares Wharf to Plumpoint, Md. ; Remington Kellogg and W. 

Woodring. 
1929: August. Governors Run, Md. ; A. Lincoln Dryden, Jr., Willard Berry, 

William L. Jones, A. J. Poole, and Remington Kellogg. 
1931 : August 14-20. Governors Run, Md. ; A. Lincoln Dryden, Jr., and Remington 

Kellogg. 
1931 : October 30. St. Marys County, Md. ; A. Lincoln Dryden, Jr.. and Remington 

Kellogg. 
1933: August 9. Governors Run, Md. ; Raymond M. Gilmore, C. Lewis Gazin, and 

Remington Kellogg. 
1935 : August 24-31. Governors Run, Md. ; N. H. Boss and Remington Kellogg. 
1936: July 13. I'arkers Creek, Md. : W. F. Fo.shag, Ed. Mullins, and Remington 

Kellogg. 
1936: July 25. Parkers Creek, Md. : W. F. Fosliag, Ed. Mullins, and Remington 

Kellogg. 
1936 : July 29. Randle Cliffs, Md. ; C. W. Gilmore, Ed. Mullins and Remington 

Kellogg. 
1938 : March 27. Spindle farm, Occupacia Creek, Essex County, Va. ; Remington 

Kellogg and C. W. Gilmore. Examined skeleton in situ. 
1939 : July 15-23. Parkers Creek, Md. ; W. F. Foshag and Remington Kellogg. 
1940: June 6-8. Scientists Cliffs, Md. : W. F. Foshag, C. W. Gilmore, Remington 

Kellogg, and H. S. Bryant. 
1940 : August 3-17. Scientists Cliffs, Md. ; W. F. Foshag and Remington Kellogg. 



330 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

STUDY OR RESERVE COLLECTIONS 

The collections designated as study or reserve comprise those speci- 
mens that have been filed away for study, comparison, and reference 
purposes. They constitute the bulk of the vertebrate fossils now assem- 
bled. They contain many early types of more than ordinary interest, 
since they are those that formed the basis for much of the scientific 
work of Leidy, Cope, and Marsh and thus constitute the primary 
foundation upon which much of modem paleontology of America is 
based. These types are constantly in demand for examination and 
comparison by paleontologists from other institutions of the country. 

These collections now contain representative faunas of most of the 
more important fossil-bearing formations of North America, together 
with a sprinkling of foreign materials. Although some gaps still exist 
and many assemblages need strengthening, taken as a whole it is now 
one of the important fossil vertebrate collections in America. 

In building up this collection, regular expeditions have been the 
most prolific source of materials, and the history of these has been 
covered under the heading "Expeditions," page 323. In the pages to 
follow, however, it is proposed to review some of the other sources 
of material in order to give a complete picture of the growth and 
development of the collection. 

Gifts from individual donors have ever been an important source 
of materials, but next in importance to the specimens obtained by 
regularly organized expeditions are those received in exchange for 
duplicate materials with kindred institutions. Such exchanges have 
been made possible to a great extent by the large suites of duplicate 
materials of Brontotheres, Teleoceras, and PUsippus of which the 
Division of Vertebrate Paleontology is the fortunate possessor. Among 
the more improtant specimens thus obtained were the following : 

DiNOSAUEIA : 

Oorgosaurus Ubratus — articulated skeleton, 
Camarasaurus lent us — articulated skeleton. 
Edmontosaurus regalis — skull and lower jaws. 
Prosaurolophus maximus — skull and lower jaws. 
Mammalia : 

Stenomi/lus hitcJicocki — articulated skeleton. 
Scelidodon capelUna — articulated skeleton. 
Dicer athermm cooki — composite skeleton. 
Trigonias oshorni — composite skeleton. 
Moropus elatus — composite skeleton. 
Equus Occident alis— composite skeleton. 
Mylodon harlani — composite skeleton. 
Aenocyon dirus— two composite skeletons. 
Smilodon californicus — composite skeleton. 

Since 1911 the curator of the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology 
has endeavored to assemble in the National Museum as many of the 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS. VOL. 90 PLATE 52 



♦ 



I « "*f|*% 




U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM 



PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 90 PLATE 53 




Storage cases and cupboards for vertebrate collections, showing utilization of corridor. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 331 

scattered type and figured specimens of fossil vertebrates as could be 
acquired by deposit, exchange, gift, or otherwise. Various institu- 
tions and individuals generously responded to the logic of having these 
important specimens centralized, their preservation guaranteed, and 
their availability to students assured. In all, 156 such specimens have 
now been assembled, of which 94 are original types as listed below. 
The institutions and individuals that have contributed to the success 
of this undertaking are: Geological Survey of Florida, Geological 
Survey of Maryland, North Carolina Department of Agriculture, 
Goucher College, Indiana State University, Johns Hopkins University, 
Columbia University, Colorado Museum of Natural History, Colorado 
College, Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, Peabody Museum of Nat- 
ural History, Earle Sloan, Oliver P. Hay, W. Gardner Lynn, R. Lee 
Collins, Charles T. Berry, and Ermine C. Case. 
PiscKs : 

Anomoedus latidens marylandicus Berry- 
Berry, C. T., .\iner. Midi. Nat., vol. 22, p. 746, fig. 1, 1939. 
Carcharias incidens Eastman. 

Eastman, C. R., Maryland Geol. Surv., Miocene, p. 87, pi. 32, fig. 8, 
1904=Carch arliinus. 
Felichthys staurof orus Lynn and Melland. 

Lynn, W. G., and Melland, A. M., Journ. Washington Acad. Sci., vol. 29, 
pp. 14-20, figs. 1-3, 1939. 
Istiophorus calvertensis Berry. 

Berry, E. W., Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 4, vol. 43, p. 461, figs. 1, 2, 1917. 
Myliobatis copeanus Clark. 

Clark, W. B., Johns Hopkins Univ. Circ, vol. 15, p. 4, 1895. 
Squatina occidentalis Eastman. 

Eastman, C. R., Maryland Geol. Surv., Miocene, p. 71, pi. 28, figs, la, lb, 
1904. 
Synechodus clarkii Eastman. 

Eastman, C. R., Maryland Geol. Surv., Eocene, p. 103, pi. 14, figs. 5a-c, 
1901. 
Xiphias (?) radiata Clark. 

Clark, W. B., Johns Hopkins Univ. Circ, vol. 15, p. 4, 18dh~Ischyrizn? 
Amphibia: 

Crossotelos annulatus Case. 

Case, E. C, 2d Ann. Rep. Geol. and Nat. Hist. Terr. Oklahoma, p. 65. 
1901. 
Reptilia : 

Amyda virginiana Clark. 

Clark, W B., Johns Hopkins Univ. Circ, vol. 15, p. 4, 1895. 
Bystra nanus Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 53-5.5, pi. 1, 1916. 
Chamops denticulatus Gilmore. 

Gilmore, C. W., Mem. Nat. Acad. Sci., vol. 22, pp. 26, 27, fig. 14, 1928. 
Chamops segnis Marsh. 

Marsh. O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 43, p. 450, figs. 2, 3, 1892. 



332 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Chelonia marylandica Collins and Lynn. 

Collins, R. L., and Lynn, W. G., Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc-., vol. 72, pp. 
162-166, fig. 1, 1936. 
Chelydra laticarinata Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Snrv'., pp. 72-73, pi. 6, fig. 6, 1916. 
Chelydra sculpta Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 73-75, pi. 6, fig. 8, 
1916. 
Cteniogenys antiquus Gilmore. 

Gilmore, C. W., Mem. Nat. Acad. Sci., vol. 22, pp. 162-163, pi. 20, 
fig. 14, 1928. 
Dryosaurus grandis Lull. 

Lull, R. S., Maryland Geol. Surv., Lower Cretaceous, pp. 204-206. 
pi. 19, figs. 6, 7, 1911= OrnUhomimus afflnis Gilmore. 
Goniopholis affinis Lull. 

Lull, R. S., Maryland Geol. Surv., Lower Cretaceous, p. 210, pi. 20, 
fig. 7, 1911. 
Glyptosaurus anceps Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 1, p. 458, 1871= Ototriton 
anceps (Marsh). 
Glyptosaurus brevidens Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 305, 3872. 
Glyptosaurus nodosus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 1, p. 458, 1871. 
Glyptosaurus ocellatvis Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 1, p. 458, 1871=Gf. sylvestrh 
Marsh. 
Glyptosaurus princeps Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 301, 1872. 
Glyptosaurus rugosus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 305, 1872. 
Glyptosaurus sphenodon Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 306, 1872. 
Glyptosaurus sylvestris Marsh. 

aiarsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 1, p. 458, 1871. 
Gopherus praecedens Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 55-56, pi. 4, figs. 1, 
2, 1916. 
Hadrosaurus tripos Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 21, p. 192, 1869. 
Hypsibema crassicauda Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 21, p. 192. 1869. 
Iguanavus exilis Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 309, 1872. 
Iguanavus teres Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 43, p. 451, 1892. 
Oreosaurus gracilis Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci, ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 307, 1872=Xestops 
ffracilis ( Ma rsh ) . 
Oreosaurus lentus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 307, 1872=Xestops 
lentus (Marsh). 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 333 

Oreosaunis microdus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 8, vol. 4, p. 308, l872=Xestop8 
mivrodus (Marsh). 
Oreosaurus minutus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 308, 1872=Xe8top$ 
minutus (Marsh). 
Oreosaurus vagans Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 303, lS72=Xcstop8 
vagans (Marsh). 
Palaeophis virginianus Lynn. 

Lynn, W. G., Johns Hopkins Univ. Stud, in Geol., No. 11. pp. 245-249, 
p!. 17, tig. 6, 1984. 
Peritresius virginianus Berry and Lynn. 

Berry, C. T., and Lynn, W. G., Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 76, 
pp. 176-188, pis. 1-4, 1936. 
Polydectes biturgidus Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci., Philadelphia, vol. 21, p. 192, 1869. 
Pseudemys floridana persimilis Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 71-72, pi. 5, fig. 6„ 
1916. 
Taphrosphys miocenica Collins and Lynn. 

Collins, R. L., and Lynn, W. G., Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 76, 
pp. ir.r.-162, pi. 1, 1936. 
Terrapene antipex Hay. 

Hay, O. P., Sth Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 58-61, pi. 4, fig. 1; 
pi. 5, fiji. 1, 1916. 
Terrapene formosa Hay. 

Hay, O. P., Sth Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 57-58, pi. 4, 
fig. 3, 1916. 
Terrapene innoxia Hay. 

Hay, O. P., Sth Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 61-64, pi. 6, figs. 1, 
2, 1916. 
Testudo culbertsoni Leidy. 

Leidy, J., Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci., Philadelphia, vol. 6, p. 59, 1852=Stijle>nys 
fiebrascensis Leidy. 
Testudo distans Hay. 

Hay, O. P.. Sth Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 48-49, pi. 3, fig. 9, 
1916. 
Testudo ducateli Collins and Lynn. 

Collins. R. L., and Lynn, W. G., Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 76, 
pp. 166-171, pis. 3, 4, 1936. 
Testudo equicornes Hay. 

Hay, O. P.. Kansas Univ. Sci. Bull., vol. 10, pp. 40-41, pi. 1, figs. 1-3; 
pi. 3. fig. 1, 1917. 
Testudo hayi Sellards. 

Sellards, E. H., Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 4, vol. 42, p. 235, fig. 1, 1916. 
Testudo incisa Hay. 

Hay, O. P.. Sth Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 46-48, pi. 3, fig. 5, 
1916. 
Testudo luciae Hay. 

Hay, O. P., Sth Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 52-53, pi. 9^ 
fig. 5. 1916. 



334 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

Testudo ocalana Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ami. Rep. Florida Geol. Snrv., pp. 44-46, pi. 8, tig. 1 ; 
pi. 9, figs. 1-3, 1916. 
Testudo sellardsi Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 49-52, pi. 8, figs. 6-8, 
1916. 
Thecachampsa marylandica Clark. 

Clark, W. B., Johns Hopkins Univ. Circ, vol. 15, p. 4, 1895. 
Thinosaurus agilis Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 302, lSJ2=Samiva 
agilis (Marsh). 
Thinosaurus crassus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3. vol. 4, p. 301, 1872=8amum 
crassa (Marsh). 
Thinosaurus grandis Marsh. 

Mar.sh, O. C. Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 301, 18T2=8amwa 
grandis (Marsh). 
Thinosaurus leptodus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 300, \S12^8amwa 
ensidens Leidy. 
Thinosaurus paucidens Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol, 4, p. 299. \S12=Sam'wa 
paucidens (Marsh), 
Tinosaurus lepidus Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 3, vol. 4, p. 308, lS12=Tinosaurua 
stenodon Marsh. 
Tinosaurus stenodon Marsh. 

Marsh, O. C, Amer. Journ. Sci., ser, 3, vol. 4, p. 304, 1872. 
Tomistoma americana Sellards. 

Sellards, E. H., Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 4, vol. 40, pp. 135-138, fig. 1, 
1915. 
Trachemys nuchocarinata Hay, 

Hay, O. P., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 70-71, pi. 6, fig. 1, 
1916. 
Trinacromerum bentonianum Cragin. 

Cragin, F. W., Amer. Geol., vol. 2, pp. 404-407, 1888. 
AvEs: 

Ardea sellardsi Shufeldt. 

Shufeldt, R. W., Journ. Geol., vol. 25, p. 19, 1916. 
Bathomis veredus Wetmore. 

Wetmore, A., Proc. Colorado Mus. Nat. Hist., vol. 7, pp. 11-13, figs. 
19-24, 1927. 
Jabiru weillsi Sellards. 

Sellards, E. H., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., p. 146, pi. 26, 
fig. 1, 1916. 
Larus vero Shufeldt. 

Shufeldt, R. W., 9th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., p. 40, pi. 2, fig. 21, 
1917. 
Palaeocrex fax Wetmore. 

Wetmore, A., Proc. Colorado Mus. Nat. Hist, vol. 7, pp. 9-11, figs. 
15-18, 1927. 
Palaeogyps prodromus Wetmore. 

Wetmore, A., Proc. Colorado Mus. Nat. Hist., vol. 7, pp. 5-9, figs. 7-14, 
1927. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 335 

Phasmagyps patritus Wetmore. 

Wetmore, A., Proc. (^olonxdo Mns. Nat. Hist., vol. 7, pp. 3-5, figs. 1-6, 
1927. 
Querquedula floridana Slmfeldt. 

Slmfeldt, R. W., 9th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., p. 36, pi. 1, fig. 4; 
pi. 2, fig. 25, 1917. 
Sula avita Wetmore. 

Wetmore, A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mns., vol. 85, pp. 21-23, fig. 2, 1938. 
Mammalia: 

Agriotherium schneideri Sellards. 

Sellards, E. H., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv.. pp. 9S-100, pi. 12, figs. 
1, 2, 1916. 
Balaenoptera sursiplana Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 34, p. 151, 1895. 
Canis riviveronis Hay. 

Hay, O. P., 9th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 59-62, 1917. 
Cephalotropis coronatus Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Amer. Philo.s. Soc, vol. 35, p. 143, pi. 11, fig. 2. 1896. 
Cetotherium crassangulum Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 34, p. 168, 1895. 
Cetotherium megalophysum Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc Amer. Philos. Soc. vol. 34, p. 146, 1895. 
Hoplophoneus robustus Adams. 

Adams, G. I., Amer. Nat., vol. 30, p. 49, pi. 1, fig. 4, WM. 
Mesocyon iamanonsis Sellards. 

Sellards, E. H., 8th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 88-89, pi. 11, 
fig. 11, 1916. 
Mesoteras kerrianus Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Amer. Nat., vol. 4, p. 128, 1870. 
Metopocetus durinasus Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 35, p. 141, pi. 9, fig. 3, 1896. 
Odocoileus sellardsiae Hay. 

Hay, (). P.. 9th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., pp. 50-57, pi. 3, fig. 4, 
1917. 
Pelycorham^phus pertortus Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc. Amer. I'hilos. Soc, vol. 34. p. 137, 1895. 
Prepotherium venezuelanum Collins. 

Collins, R. L., Johns Hopkins Univ. Stud, in Geol., No. 11, p. 238-242, 
pis. 15. 16, 1934. 
Priscodelphinus crassangulum Case. 

Case, E. C, Maryhind Geol. Surv., Miocene, pp. 12-13, pi. 11, 1904. 
Prorosmarus alleni Berry and Gregory. 

Berry. E. W., and Gregory. W. K., Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 4, vol. 21, 
pp. 444-450, figs. 1-4, 1906. 
Siphonocetus clarkianus Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc Amor. Philos. Soc, vol. 34, p. 140, pi. 6, fig. 4, 1895. 
Tretulias buccatus Cope. 

Cope, E. D., Proc Auhm-. Philos. Soc, vol. 34, p. 143, pi. 6. fig. 2. 1895. 
Ulias moratus Cope. 

Cope, E. D.. Proc Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 34, p. 141. pi. 6, fig. L 1895. 
Vulpes palmaria Hay. 

Hay. O. P., !)th Ann. Rep. Florida Geol. Surv., p. 57, 1917. 
Xenorophus sloanii Kellogg. 

Kellogg. R.. Smithsonian Misc Coll., vol. 76, No. 7, pp. 1-7. pis. 1, 2, 1923. 



336 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

PRIVATE COLLECTIONS 

In addition to the Marsh collection of vertebrate fossils brought 
together under governmental auspices, the collections of the Division 
have been augmented by a number of private collections acquired 
either through gift or purchase. A brief history of the more im- 
portant of these, arranged in chronological order, follows: 

Lojcoe collection. — The very large and valuable Lacoe collection, 
received as a gift in 1896 from the heirs of R. D. Lacoe, banker 
of Pittston, Pa., and collector of fossils through many years, con- 
sisted primarily of fossil plants and invertebrate (mainly insects of 
late Paleozoic and Cenozoic forms) fossils, but it also contained 
several hundred fish, amphibian, and reptilian remains. Some of 
them are in a rare state of preservation; others from the Linton, 
Ohio, coalfields, owing to the exhaustion of the coal mines, are 
unique. Tlie Tertiary was represented by specimens from the Eocene 
(Green River shales) of Wyoming and from Switzerland; Triassic 
by specimens from Great Britain, France, and the coalfields of Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, and Mazon Creek, Grundy County, 111. The collection 
contained many types and figured specimens, including the unique 
Isodectus punctulatus, thought to be the oldest known reptile. 

Hainbach collection. — The Hambach collection was acquired 
through purchase in 1908 by Frank Springer from Gustav Hambach, 
of St. Louis, Mo., and presented to the United States National 
Museum. The collection consisted principally of fossil Echino- 
dermata (largely crinoids), but it contained also a considerable num- 
ber of Paleozoic fish remains from this country and abroad, as well as 
a few from the Shumard collection, which Professor Hambach had 
previously acquired. 

Orestes St. John collection. — The St. John collection of Paleozoic 
fishes was presented to the National Museum in 1922 by Frank 
Springer, to whom it was bequeathed upon the death of Mr. St. 
John. The collection consists of two parts: (1) A general collection 
of Devonian invertebrate fossils made during Mr. St. John's younger 
days in Iowa; and (2l) his large and extremely valuable collection 
of selachian fish remains accumulated in connection with his special 
studies, chiefly from the Carboniferous of the Mississippi Valley. It 
contains numerous types and figured specimens of si^ecies described 
by him in Illinois Reports and also much original material forming 
the subject of further extensive researches never published. In addi- 
tion to the product of his personal collecting during 40 years of 
diversified field work, there is included a large quantity of very 
choice cestraciont fish material obtained hy Dr. Springer, largely 
from a fortunate discovery in the Burlington limestone in Iowa; 
and also two exceptionally fine collections from the Keokuk lime- 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 337 

stone made, respectively, by Dr. G. A. Williams, of Booneville, Mo., 
and Lisbon A. Cox, of Keokuk, Iowa. These were purchased by 
Mr. Springer and turned over to Mr. St. John together with his own, 
for use in his researches. 

Among other notable items in this important collection is a very 
exceptional specimen from the Coal Measures of Kansas, the com- 
plete dentition of a large Paleozoic shark in a more perfect state 
of preservation than has ever been found elsewhere. This type 
of Canvpodus {Agassizodus) varmhiUs, described in volume 4 of the 
Illinois Reports, is regarded by ichthyologists as without a parallel 
among its kind. 

Teller collection. — The Teller collection of invertebrates and fossil 
fishes was assembled by the late Edgar E. Teller, of Milwaukee, Wis. 
The entire assemblage, w^ith his library, was received as a gift in 
1924 from Mrs. Edgar E. Teller. The fish remains, consisting of 
about 100 specimens, are all from the Devonian and all were collected 
in and around Milwaukee. Included in the collection are a number 
of figured specimens. 

Palmer collection. — The Palmer collection consisted entirely of 
Miocene vertebrate fossils gathered by William Palmer, taxidermist 
and naturalist in the United States National Museum, from the 
Calvert formation along Chesapeake Bay, Md., It was purchased 
by the Smithsonian Institution from his widow shortly after his 
death in 1921. Throughout most of his life Mr. Palmer was an 
indefatigable collector of natural-history specimens, but from 1908 
to the time of his death his interests were largely devoted to the 
collection of Miocene vertebrate fossils. Many of the specimens 
secured were at once turned over to the Division of Vertebrate 
Paleontology as gifts and were described by Dr. F. W. True, but a 
considerable accumulation of specimens, including several extinct 
porpoise skulls, most of them prepared, formed the basis of the 
l^urchase. 

Certain assemblages are outstanding, not only because of the quan- 
tity of materials represented but more especially because of the high 
quality of the preservation. Among these is the fossil cetacean collec- 
tion, which ranks first among aggregations of the kind in American 
museums. The bulk of this assemblage is from the prolific nearby 
Miocene deposits of the Chesapeake Bay area, but the Gulf and Pacific 
coasts are also represented by many well-preserved specimens. This 
collection has resulted from the enthusiastic volunteer work of a con- 
siderable number of collaborators of which the more active were : Head 
Curator Frederick W. True, who pioneered in this work, about 
1905-14; William Palmer, 1907-19; Norman H. Boss, 1914-35; Eem- 
ington Kellogg, 1923^0; and E. L. Collins, 1935-38. 

292963—41 3 



338 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

In recent years, Dr. Kemington Kellogg, through his extensive 
researches on the Cetacea, has been the outstanding contributor to the 
building up and development of the collections in this important gi'oup 
of mammals. 

INFLUENCE OF EXPOSITIONS 

Although the Smithsonian Institution has participated in prac- 
tically all the expositions of this country and many abroad, beginning 
with the Centennial in Philadelphia in 1876,-^ the Division of Verte- 
brate Paleontology was not called upon to contribute to these exhibi- 
tions until 1895. Since then, hovrever, it has participated in the follow- 
ing: The Cotton States and International Exposition, Atlanta, Ga., 
1895; the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, 
Nebr., 1898; the Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901; the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo., 1904; the Lewis and 
Clark Exposition, Portland, Oreg., 1905; the Sesquicentennial Expo- 
sition, Philadelphia, Pa., 1926; and the Texas Centennial Exposition, 
Dallas, Tex., 1936-37. 

Participation in these expositions of national and international 
scope has yielded noteworthy advantages in the fact that the work 
of the division was made known to the people at large and in the 
opportunities offered by direct appropriations that could be expended 
for the purchase of specimens, the making of models, restorations, 
and paintings illustrative of extinct life. This illustrative material 
and a considerable number of choice specimens (listed below) have 
thus been added to the permanent collections : 

1895, Atlanta : A complete model restoration of the skeleton of BasUosaurus 

cetoides, life size. 
1898, Omaha: Lisbon A. Cox collection of Paleozoic fish remains purchased. 
1901, Buffalo : A restoration in oil (8 by 15 feet) of Triceratops, painted by 

Charles R. Knight, W. K. Stone, and Joseph Gleeson. Model restoration 

life size of Trico-atops skeleton. Skeleton of Hesperornis regalis and 

Dinomis crassus purchased. 

1904, St. Louis : Life-size restoration of Stegosatirus stenops. Skeleton of Mas- 

todon amerlcanus. Skeletons of Ichthyosaurus quadricissus, Rhani- 
phorhi/nchus pliyllurus, Stenosaurus hoUensis, and many fishes of large 
size {Aspidorhynchus, Caturus, Hypsocormus, Oyrodus, PJiolidophorus, 
Squatina) purchased. 

1905, Portland : Epyoniis maximns egg purchased. 

1926, Phil.\de:lphia : 12-foot skeleton of Portheus moloss^us Cope. Three skele- 
tons of Protostega gigas Cope and two partial skeletons of Platycarpus 
imrchased. Restoration of Protostega gigas painted by R. Bruoe 
Horsfall. 



21 Dr. J. Leidy (Jouin. Acad. Nat. Sci., Philadelphia, vol. 8, p. 213) stated that a last 
molar of Elephas columM from Beaufort, S. C, was included in the exhibit made by the 
Smithsonian Institution at the Centennial in Fhiladelphia in 1876. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 339 

1936-37, Dallas: Skeletons of Dlatryma gUjus Cope and Qlyptosaurus yiyan- 
teus Gilmore. Distal half of a hadrosaurian Corythosaurus skeleton 
with skin impressions and a complete tail of Camarasaurus all pur- 
chased. Life restoration (canvas 8 by 15 feet) and a model restoration 
of Camarasaums lentus Marsh, painted by R. Bruce Ilorsfall. Restora- 
tion of Permian life, canvas 8 by 15 feet, with Dimctrodon as the domi- 
nant figure, painted by Garnet W. Jex, and a diorama illustrative of 
the dinosaurian life of the Morrison formation. 

EXHIBITS 

The earliest exhibition of extinct vertebrate animals made by the 
Smithsonian Institution consisted of plaster casts of the giant sloth 
Megatherium, cuvien, the large land tortoise Colossochelys atlas^ and 
the South American glyptodon Schistopleurum typus^ which were 
"set up" in the large room of the Smithsonian Institution in 1871. 
In 1872, a skeleton of the Pleistocene Irish elk {Megaceros hihemicvs) , 
which had been purchased from Thomas & Sons, of Philadelphia, in 
1868, was mounted and placed on view, and this specimen thus has 
the distinction of being the first articulated skeleton of an extinct 
animal to be placed on public exhibition in the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion."- At this same time a model restoration of the Irish elk was 
placed on deposit by Waterhouse Hawkins. 

With the completion of the new building in 1881 (now known as 
the Arts and Industries Building), the Irish elk, the Megatherium^ 
and other large casts were transferred to it from the Smithsonian. 
These, together with a few fragmentary specimens from the Western 
States, resulting from the early Government surveys, constituted for a 
time the principal part of the exhibition series. A skeletal restoration 
of the famous Hadrosauims fouJkii^ from the original in the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, also formed a part of 
this early exhibition of extinct animals. An old photograph taken 
some time after the occupancy of the new building shows the Hacl- 
Tosawnis associated with the skeletal cast of the Megatherium- and 
skeletons of recent animals. No record has been found of this speci- 
men, but Dr. Schuchert, under date of May 18, 1939, writes: "This 
restoration of Ha/lrosaurus was made for the United States National 
Museum for the Centennial Exposition. When I joined the National 
Museum, Dr. Goode told me the Hadrosaurus had long stood in front 
of the Museum and had weathered so badly that it was destroyed 
a few years before my arrival in 1893." Following the organization 



22 A curious coincidence is the fact that the lirst skeh-ton to he exhibited (1844) in the 
British Museum was also a skeleton of Mcfjaceros hiberniciis. Skeletons of the "Irish elk" 
were the first to be exliibited in both the American Museum of Natural History. New York 
City, and the Carnegie IMusenm in Pittsburgh. 



340 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

of the Department of Vertebrate Fossils in 1886, and the appointment 
of Prof. O. C. Marsh as honorary curator in 1887, the southeast 
court space was assigned to the exhibition of fossil vertebrates, inver- 
tebrates, and plants. 

There was a small intermittent growth of the exhibition collec- 
tions, the preparation and installation that was necessary being done 
by the osteologists under the direction of F, A. Lucas. 

In December 1890 John B. Hatcher was given temporary appoint- 
ment as assistant to Professor Marsh for the purpose of arranging 
and classifying the collections that had been assembled. The exhibi- 
tion was given a fresh impetus in July 1891 with the arrival from New 
Haven of the second consignment of the Marsh collection. It con- 
sisted of 380 prepared specimens made up as follows : 3 ceratopsian 
skulls, including the type of Triceratops elatus; 10 titanothere skulls, 
representing several genera; skulls and other remains of TeJeoceras 
fossiger; other Tertiary fossils and some rare plaster casts. Owing 
to the gradual growth of the exhibition series, especially augmented 
by the acquisitions from the Marsh collection, in 1898 the entire 
southeast court was given over to vertebrate fossils. 

In 1899 a papier-mache cast of the skeleton of Dinoceras presented 
by Professor Marsh was mounted and placed on exhibition. In 1902 
a mounted skeleton of Hesjjerornis regalis^ first shown at the Pan 
American Exposition in Buffalo, was returned to the Museum and 
placed in the permanent exhibition series. With the acquisition of 
the Marsh collection and the employment of trained preparators from 
1900 onward, there was a slow but steady growth and improvement 
of the exhibition collections. In 1903 the type skeleton of Thespesius 
{Trachodon) amiectens w-as mounted under the direction of Lucas, 
the first articulated skeleton of a dinosaur to be exhibited in the Na- 
tional Museum. This specimen has the further distinction of being 
the second dinosaur skeleton to be thus exhibited in North America, 
first honors going to a companion skeleton in the Peabody Museum 
of Natural History at Yale that was placed on exhibition in 1901. 

When the writer came to the National Museum in November 1903, 
the ground floor of the southeast court in the Old National Museum 
Building was entirely occupied by an exhibition of vertebrate fossils. 
This exhibition was all arranged by Mr. Lucas as acting curator, 
although his main duties were elsewhere in the Museum. The out- 
standing specimens comprised skeletons of Megaceros hihernicus, Thes- 
pesius {Trachodon) minectens^ Hesperoimis regalis, and a skeleton of 
BasUosauTus cetoides^ the bones of the last being laid out in order on a 
shelf in a wall case on the north side that extended entirely across 
the court. A modeled restoration of the skeleton (later sent to the 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 341 

British Museum in exchange) was suspended from the underside of 
the balcony above the original. There were also plaster casts of 
Dinoceras^ Megatheriwm^ Dinotheriwtrh^ and Schistojyleurum^ the orig- 
inal hind limbs and pelvis of Tiicerato'ps, and a hind leg and foot 
of Apatosaurus {Brontosaurus) . The other wall cases and slope- 
top diaphragm cases that occupied the remaining floor space were 
filled with a various assortment of fossil skulls and other skeletal 
parts of mammals, reptiles, and fishes. 

In 1904 the type skulls of Triceratops calicornis and Triceratops 
{Diceratops) hatcheri^ a skeleton of Mastodon atnericamis (returned 
from the St. Louis Exposition), a life-size restoration of jStegosaurm 
stenops, and a skeleton of Dinomis were added to the exhibition 
series. In 1905 a composite skeleton of Tnceratops elatus^ the first 
of this genus to be thus displayed, was installed. The addition of 
these specimens brought about the retirement of several cases of in- 
ferior materials. These constituted the exhibition collections until 
the New Natural History Building was occupied in 1910. Here, for 
the first time in the history of the Division, adequate and commo- 
dious exhibition, storage, and laboratory space was provided. Show 
specimens were assigned to halls 2 and 3, which aggregated 13,950 
square feet of exhibition room, besides much wall space. 

When the Division moved into the new building many of the older 
specimens were renovated, most of the skeletal casts were retired, 
several new specimens were added, and, as a new style of case was 
provided, the exhibition took on a very much improved appearance 
(see pis. 49 and 50), although the specimens were far too few to fill 
the allotted space. 

From 1910 up to the present time there has been a slow but steady 
growth of the exhibition collections, until at the close of the year 
1940 there were more than 50 mounted skeletons, ranging in size 
from the small 14-inch horned rodent Epigaulus hafcheri to the 72- 
foot Diplodocus longus. 

A complete list of the mounted skeletons is given later, but some 
of the more outstanding of these are w^orthy of special mention. The 
articulated skeleton of Basilosobmms cetoides, prepared under the di- 
rection of Charles Schuchert and mounted under the direction of 
the late James W. Gidley, is the only specimen of its kind thus far 
exhibited. The type skeleton of Ceratosawms nasicornis, although 
discovered more than 50 years ago, is also unique in being the only 
known specimen of its kind. The assemblage of Stegosaurus speci- 
mens, consisting of an articulated skeleton in the rock as found, is 
the only one known that furnishes positive information as to the 
arrangement of the dermal plates; an articulated skeleton of this 



342 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

same genus, together with a life-size restoration made for the St. 
Louis Exposition in 1904, constitutes a unique representation of this 
curious armored dinosaur. 

Three skeletons of the mastodon race of proboscidians, a male and 
a female of Mastodon cumericamis from the Pleistocene, and a skele- 
ton of S teg mastodon arizonae from the Pliocene of Arizona are 
adequate examples of this important group of animals. 

The outstanding addition to the collection, especially as it relates 
to time and money expended, is the skeleton of Diplodocus longus 
from the Dinosaur National Monument in Utah. The work of col- 
lecting this specimen occupied the energies of 5 men for 4 months to 
quarry out, transport, box, and ship the 26 tons of rock-enclosed 
bones. From first to last, 2,545 Avorking days were spent on this 
specimen, which, translated into Government time, means 1 man 
working steadily for nearly 9 years. It constitutes the most ambitious 
single piece of exhibition work ever attempted by this Division. 

All classes of vertebrates are now represented in the exhibition 
series, which contains many well-preserved skeletons. Little attempt 
has been made to bring about a systematic arrangement of these 
materials, more stress being given to displaying the larger specimens, 
so as to make them as well as the exhibition halls appear to the best 
advantage. 

With the acquisition of better-preserved specimens, the practice 
has been followed of retiring inferior materials from time to time. 
This has added greatly to the attractiveness of the exhibition as a 
whole, as well as increasing its educational value to the public. 

To some extent the exhibition has been embellished by the addition 
of large canvases depicting the life appearance of various animals 
in their natural habitat. The more important of these are : A resto- 
ration (8 by 15 feet) of Triceratops by Charles R. Knight, W. K. 
Stone, and Joseph Gleeson; a restoration of Camairasaunis by 
E. Bruce Horsfall; and a restoration of Dimetrodon and other Per- 
mian reptiles by Garnet W. Jex. A diorama returned from the 
Dallas Exposition depicts some of the animals of the Jurassic period 
in their natural environment. Other illustrative materials consisting 
of model restorations of various animals, done by Knight, Lull, 
Gidley, and Gilmore, serve as an aid to visitors in visualizing the 
probable appearance in life of these long extinct animals. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 



343 



Table 2. — Chronological list of 7nounted fossil skelelons in the U. S. National 

Museum 





MOUNTED IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 




Skeleton 


Year 


Mounted by— 


1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 


Megaceros hibernicus Owen 

Hesperornis regalis Marsh 

Thespesius (Trachodon) anncc- 
tens Marsh (type). 

Mastodon americanus (Kerr) 

Triceratops elatiis Marsh 

Ursus spelaeus 


1872 
1901 

1903 

1903 
1905 
1905 

1906 
1907 
1910 

1911 

1911 

1912 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1914 

1915 
1915 
1915 
1915 

1916 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 

1920 
1921 
1922 
1922 

1923 
1923 
1924 

1926 
1926 
1931 

1934 
1934 
1934 
1936 
1936 
1937 
1938 

1938 


.J. W. ScoUick, remoi 

H. Boss, 1911. 
Alban Stewart. 

Do. 

C. W. Gilmore and N 
N. H. Boss, remount 

Home, 1913. 
C. W. Gilmore. 
N. H. Boss. 
C. W. Gilmore and N 

C. W. Gilmore. 

N. H. Boss. 

J. W. Gidley and W. 
T. J. Horne. 

Do. 
N. H. Boss and C. V 
N. H. Boss. 
N. H. Boss and C. V 

T. J. Horne. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
N. H. Boss. 
Do. 

T. J. Horne. 

Do. 
N. H. Boss. 
T. J. Horne. 

N. H. Boss. 

Do. 
T. J. Home. 

N. H. Boss. 
T. J. Horne. 
N. H. Boss, T. J. 

J. M. Barrett. 
N. H. Boss. 

Do. 
T. J. Home. 

Do. 
N. H. Boss. 

Do. 
T. J. Horne. 

N. H. Boss. 


nted by N. 

H. Boss, 
cd by T. J. 

H. Boss. 
H. Wade. 


7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 
13. 
H 


Merycoidodon gracilis Leidy 

Dinornis maximus Geoffroy 

Ceratosaurus nasicornis Marsh 

(type). 
Camptosaurus hrowni Gilmore 

(type). 
Camptosaurus nanus Marsh 

(type). 

Basilosaurus cetoides (Owen) 

Diceratherium cooki (Peterson) _ . 
Teleoceras fossiaer Cope 


15. 
16. 
17. 

18. 
19 


Stegosa^irus slenops Marsh (type) 
Kentriodon pernix Kellogg (type), 
Thescelosaurus neglectus Gilmore 

(type). 
Epigaulus hatcheri Gidley (type)_ 
Gulo luscus (Linnaeus) _ -- 


Brcssler. 
Bressler. 


20. 
21. 

22. 
23. 
24. 


Aenocyon dims (Leidy) 

Platygonus cumberlandensis Gid- 
ley. 
Mastodon americanus (Kerr) — 
Sinopa grangeri Matthew (type) _ 
Stegosaurus stenops Marsh 




26. 
27. 

28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 

32. 
33 


Tylosaurus proriger Cope 

Brachyceratops montanensis Gil- 
more (type). 
Brontotherium hatcheri Osborn _ _ 

Euarctos vitabilis Gidley 

Saniwa ensidens Leidy (type) _ _ ^ 
Glyptotherium arizonae Gidley 

(type). 
Bison occidentalis Lucas 




34. 
35 


Stegomastodon arizonae Gidley 
(type). 




36. 
37. 

38. 
39 


Portheus molossus Cope 

Diplodocus longus Marsh 

Hyrachyus eximius Leidy 

Helaletes nanus Marsh 


Horne, and 


40. 

41 


Trigonias osborni Lucas 

Moropus elatus Marsh 




42. 
43. 

44. 

45 


Platygonus pearcei Gazin (type). 

Scarritia canquelensis Simpson __ 

Plesippus shoshonensis Gidley 
(stallion). 

Poly glyph nnodon sternbergi Gil- 
more. 





344 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM 



Table 2. — Chronological list of mounted fossil skeletons in the U. S. National 
Museum — Continued 



Skeleton 


Year 


Mounted by— 


46. Plesippus shoshonensis Gidley 

(mare) . 

47. Plesippus shoshonensis (half 

grown) . 


1939 
1939 


T. J. Home. 
Do. 



MOUNTED ELSEWHERE 



48. Hoplophoncus robustus Adams 
(type) 

Stenomylus hitchcocki Loomis 

Gorgosaurus libraius Lambe 

Merycodus necatus Lcidy 

Ichthyodectes hamatus Cope 

Emeus crassus Owen 

Emeus crassus Owen 

Stenomylus hitchcocki Loomis 



1919 



Adam Hermann, A. M. N. H. 
A. Augustina, C. M. 
Peter Kaisen, A. M. N. H. 
P. C. Orr, F. M. N. H. 
G. F. Sternberg. 



Hugh Gibb, P. M. N. H. 



CATALOGS 

The catalog system first used by the Museum was that devised in 
April 1839 by Professor Baird at Carlisle, Pa., while engaged in 
work upon his private collection of birds. "VVlien he became Assistant 
Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in 1850, his system was 
adopted for the Government collections. 

When cataloging was first begun it was found more convenient to 
keep the records of the several collections in one book, although as 
pointed out by Mr. Geare -^ the catalog for the skeletons, including 
both recent and fossil, was started in 1840. 

This double arrangement was continued through the first four 
volumes of this series as follows : 

Vol. I, Nos. 1 to 3,500 original and copy in the Division of Mammals. Covers 

the period between 1840 and 1859. 
Vol II, Nos. 3,501 to 8,850, original and copy in the Division of Mammals. 

Covers the period between March 12, 1859, to May 1869. 
Vol. Ill, Nos. 8,851 to 15,800, original in the Division of Mammals. Covers the 

period between May 1869 to December 1877. 
Vol. IV, Nos. 14,501 to 18,330, original in the Division of Mammals. Covers 

the period between December 1879 to October 26, 1888. 

It will be noted that the entries in the fourth volume duplicate 
1,299 numbers of the preceding volume. Examination of the original 
volumes shows that the entries also were repeated, so that there is no 
actual duplication of catalog numbers. 



Geare, R. I., Museum catalogues, Ann. Rep. U. S. Nat. Mus. for 1889, p. 8, 1891. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 345 

With the closing of tliis volume a new system was put into effect, 
the fossil specimens being entered in a separate book, designated as 
Volume VII. This was the current catalog for the "Department of 
Vertebrate Fossils." The entries begin at 30,701, and on March 26, 
1891, when the book was discontinued, they had been carried as far as 
No. 31,025. This volume is now in the custody of the Division of 
Vertebrate Paleontology. Many of these numbers still remain on 
the specimens, in addition to the current catalog numbers. 

In 1889 a card catalog was started by F. A. Lucas of all the verte- 
brate fossils belonging to the Museum collections that had been 
entered in the earlier volumes of this series. 

On November 21, 1891, a new system of cataloging vertebrate 
fossils was inaugurated. The entries commenced with No. 1 and 
continued consecutively, with 5,000 entries to the volume. This 
method has been continued up to the present time, the numbers now 
reaching 16,591. All those specimens deemed worthy of retention in 
the collections that were entered in the earlier volumes were included 
here, but each was assigned a new catalog number. 

Some time after 1903 (the exact date is not known), the entries in 
the catalog books were supplemented by duplicate cards for each entry ; 
these cards were filed in an alphabetical and a zoological series under 
each class of vertebrates, as Pisces, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves, and 
Mammalia. This arrangement makes it possible to get information 
regarding a spe<?imen in different ways. If the catalog number only 
is available, the volume carrying the corresponding number should 
be consulted ; if the' name only is available then the alphabetical list 
is the most direct means. If information is desired as to available 
material in a group, the zoological series gives it. 

The first entry to be made in the current system is "No. 1, Mosasaw 
tooth, collected by W. S. Yates, February 11, 1881, in Greene County 
North Carolina." The first entry of a vertebrate fossil in any of the 
catalogs was in Volume I, "No. 929, Fossil Seal, Cast of bone of 
hand, from Dr. Jeffries Wyman, entered in 1852." 

Cards of type specimens have the original citation, and a red 
star is placed in the upper right corner; in the case of plesiotypes 
or figured specimens a blue star is similarly placed on the card with 
the citation. 

THE PRINCIPAL ACCESSIONS TO THE DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE 
PALEONTOLOGY TO THE CLOSE OF THE YEAR 1940 

The following list of accessions, arranged in chronological order, 
includes only those collections or specimens that have been of im- 
portance in building up the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology or 



346 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

are associated with its history. The records of the early years are 
unfortunately incomplete, but most of the specimens of tliis period 
were inferior in quality of preservation. This list has been to a 
great extent compiled from the annual reports, and since the fiscal 
year (introduced in 1885) runs from July 1 to June 30 of the follow- 
ing year, many of the specimens and collections may have been col- 
lected or acquired in the calendar year preceding the annual report 
dates used here. 

1850 

A small lot of Oligocene Mammalia from the "Mauvaises Terres," 
or Badlands, of Dakota Territory was collected for the Smithsonian 
Institution by Thaddeus A. Culbertson. This collection, with other 
materials, formed the basis of Dr. Joseph Leidy's report "The Ancient 
Fauna of Nebraska" (Smithsonian Contr. KnowL, vol. 6, No. 58, 
126 pp., 1853). 

1851 

A collection of fossil vertebrates from the Badlands of Dakota 
Territory was presented by Capt. Stewart Van Vliet, U. S. Army. 
Plaster cast of a fossil seal bone from Maryland was presented by 
Dr. Jeffries Wyman. 

1853 

Vertebrate remains from the exploring expeditions under the direc- 
tion of Dr. David Dale Owen were deposited by the Commissioner of 
the United States Land Office. It is quite certain that these specimens 
were the ones collected by Dr. John Evans in 1849 and 1853 fi'om the 
Oligocene of the Badlands of Dakota Territory. 

1855 

Shark teeth and mastodon bones from the Pleistocene of Florida 
were presented by Capt. John C. Casey, United States Army. Mrs. 
Mary Hereford presented bones of "Zeuglodon" from a marl bed in 
Calvert County, Md. 

1858 

The bulk of the collections of the National Institute was transferred 
to the Smithsonian Institution. See page 311 for list of fossil 
specimens. 

1859 

The type specimen of Dystropluteus viaemalae, collected by Dr. J. S. 
Newberry of the Macomb Expedition from the Jurassic of southern 
Utah, was deposited by the War Department (Cope, E. D., Proc. 
Amer. Philos. Soc, vol. 16, p. 581, 1877) . 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 347 

1860 
Pleistocene fossils from Canada were presented by Prof. J. W. Daw- 
son. A horse tooth from Big Bone Lick was presented by the Hon. 
Kobert Mallory. 

1861 

An important collection of fossil fishes from Mount Blanc was 
received from A, Repetti. 

1864- 

Tooth of mastodon from Kansas was presented by Lt. Edwin T. 
Berthond, United States Army. A box of Lias fossil ganoid fishes 
from Barrow, Leicestershire, England, was presented by E. D. Cope. 
An elephant tooth from Las Vegas, N. Mex., was presented by Andres 
Dold. 

1866 
A lower molar tooth of Elephas coJmribi from the Pleistocene, Petite 
Anse, Iberia Parish, La., was presented by J. F. Clew (Hay, O. P., 
Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 322a, p. 57, 1924). 

1867 

Col. C. S. Bulkley, Overland (Western Union) Telegraph Expedi- 
tion, presented a tusk of the mammoth Elephas primigenim from 
Bering Strait, Alaska. Miocene fossils from Maryland were presented 
by O. N. Byron ; a vertebra of a fossil saurian from Aquia Creek, Va., 
was presented by E. A. Dayton; and bones of a mastodon from 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, were presented by H. R. Helper. 

1868 
A complete skeleton of Megaceros hihernicU'S, "Irish elk,'' from the 
})eat bogs of Ireland, was purchased, and a fine head with antlers of 
the same animal was received as a gift from O. C. Mai'sh. 

1869 
Among the donations were: One box of fossil bones and teeth from 
Wyoming Territory presented by Di-. Charles H. Alden, U. S. Army; 
one box of fossils and minerals from Fort Bridger, Wyoming Terri- 
tory, from J. V. Carter; teeth of fossil horse from Illinois presented 
by Mr, Dille ; one box of prehistoric remains from France sent by Pfof . 
E. Lartet; saurian remains from New Mexico, presented by Dr. W. B. 
Lyons; teeth and bones of mastodon from the Pleistocene of Florida 
presented by Peter Nelson ; tooth of Equus complicatU'S and bones of 
a young mastodon from Washington County, Va., presented by Wynd- 
ham Robinson (Hay, O. P., Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 322, 
pp. 113, 189, 1923). A collection of fossil bones from Mount Pikermi, 
Greece, was received from the Museum of Natural History, Athens, 
Greece. 



348 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL AiUSEUM vol.90 

1870 

Prof. Charles F. Himes presented a collection of bones from Carlisle 
bone cave, Pennsylvania. Dr. Carl Hermann Berendt donated a fos- 
sil fish from Mexico. Dr. J. A. Fitzgerald presented teeth from Indian 
Territory (Oklahoma). Horatio N. Pease presented a tooth of fossil 
cetacean from Gay Head, Mass., and Andrew Sherwood presented 
Devonian fish remains from Pennsylvania. 

1871 

A cast of the giant sloth Megatherkmi cunisri from South America 
was presented by Prof. Henry A. Ward. Casts of the gigantic turtle 
Colossochelys atlas and of a South American glyptodont {Sckistopleu- 
i-UTii typus) were purchased. The last mentioned is still on exhibition ; 
the others have been discarded. George H. Lewis presented an incom- 
plete turtle from Atlantic City, Montana Territory. 

1872 

One box of fossil bones from Sonora, Mexico, was presented by Gen. 
James H. Carleton. A model of the Irish elk was placed on deposit 
by Waterhouse Hawkins. A tooth of Ptychodus was presented by 
G. H. Kalteyer. 

1873 

The Canterbury Museum at Christ Church, New Zealand, through 
its director, Julius Haast, presented a collection of moa bones, among 
which were skeletons f»f Dinonih giganteus and Palapteryx elephan- 
topus and leg bones of Dinoimis gracilis^ D. casuarkis, and D. dull' 
for?}iis. 

1874. 

A cast of the skull of Odontopteryir foliapica was presented by 
Bryce ]M. AVright. From the Wasatch and Miocene of New Mexico, an 
important collection of fossils was transferred by the War Depart- 
ment. These specimens were collected by H. C. Yarrow and E. D. Cope 
of the United States Geographical Survey West of the One-hundredth 
Meridian in charge of Lt. George M. Wheeler. The collections were 
described by Cope in the report of that expedition, vol. 4, 1877. The 
Heidelberg University Museum, through Professor Pagenstecher, pre- 
sented a skeleton of Halitherium schinzi 

Fossil bones from Florida were presented by N. B. Moore. L. G. 
Yates presented a cast of the teeth of a mastodon from Solano County, 
Calif. (Hay. O. P., Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 322b, p. li, 
1927) . 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 349 

.1875 

Donations included specimens of fossil teeth and bones from Badito. 
Colo., by F. W. Fouch; cast of shark's tooth, by Clark Mills; cast of 
fossil tooth from Iowa, by Dr. C. A. White; and a fossil fish from 
Wyoming Territory, by J. W. A. Wright. 

1876 

A collection of fossil bones from the Miocene of Oregon was pre- 
sented by S. S. Davis and William Day ; a plaster cast of the Cahoes '^ 
mastodon (lower jaw), New York, by Dr. James Hall; fossil bones 
and teeth from Nebraska by Sgt. J. A. Leigh, U. S. Army; and a 
fossil bone from Texas by Brownson & Co. 

1877 

The following donations were received: A collection of bones from 
a cave in Ohio from W. Anderson ; portions of mammoth tusk from 
Seth Beach; jaw of fossil 31 aero pus from Queensland from Dr. Ben- 
nett; a collection of bones from a cave near Hagerstown, Md,, through 
Prof. Charles F. Himes ; fossil bones from Wyoming from F. Hirst ; 
a fossil fish from California from Otis T. Mason; tooth of Equux 
occidentals from West Virginia from R. F. Taggart. 

1878 

Donations were as follows: Box of fossil fishes from Connecticut 
from J. H. Clarke ; two fossil horse teeth from C. H. Horod ; plaster 
cast of elephant tusk found near Copenhagen, N. Y., from Dr. F. B. 
Hough; teeth of fossil elephant, horse, and shark from Bull River, 
S. C, from J. W. Quinlion. 

1879 

Plaster cast of the femur of Atlantosawus immants was presented 
by O. C. Marsh. 

1880 

A large series of mammal and some reptilian materials collected in 
the Badlands of South Dakota were received from Capt. Emmet Craw- 
ford, U. S. Army. These were forwarded to O. C. Marsh for inves- 
tigation. A skull of Castoroides ohioenms from the Pleistocene of 
Michigan was received in exchange with Prof. J. Kost, of Adrian 
College (Hay, O. P., Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 322, p. 275. 
1923). 



350 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol. 90 

1881 

An important collection of Pliocene Peace Creek fossils from near 
Arcadia, De Soto County, Fla., was presented by J. F. La Baron. 
The collection was described by Dr. J. Leidy (Trans. Wagner Free 
Inst., vol. 2, 1889). The type of Procyon sirmis from the Pleistocene 
of California was collected and presented by L. Stone (Gidley, J. W., 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 29, pp. 553-554, 1906). 

1882 

Donations included : Vertebra of a whale, Miocene, Stafford Cliffs, 
Va., presented by H. C. Harmon; fossil bones and teeth from Beau- 
fort, S. C, from Mrs. J. E. Jouett; plaster cast of Rhmnplwrhynchus 
fhyllums showing wing membrane was presented by O. C. Marsh ; a 
box of fossil mammals, Myodes and Lagomys^ from Germany from 
Prof. A. L. Nehring ; and a vertebra of a whale from Patuxent River, 
Md., from T. J. Stone. 

188S 

A valuable collection of bones and relics from Kent's Cavern, near 
Lamorna Torquay, England, as a gift from Lord Holdon, received 
through William Pengelly, who was asked to prepare a treatise on 
this subject to be published by the Smithsonian Institution. Other 
donations were a tooth of Equus cabdllus from South Carolina, from 
J. P. Caldwell: two boxes of mastodon, Equus, and Mylodon bones 
from New Iberia, La., from William Crooks (Leidy, Joseph, Proc. 
Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1884, p. 22; Trans. Wagner Fre« Inst., 
vol. 2, pp. 35, 1889) ; fossil fishes from Ohio from R. N. Fearson; a 
fossil bone, tooth, and rib from Tampa Bay, Fla., from Elias 
Hempstead. 

1885 

A collection of 20 species of Pleistocene animals from near Whites- 
burg, Hamblen County, Term., collected by Ira Sayles (Hay, O. P., 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 58, p. 85, 1921) . ' 



A collection of 72 large boxes of fossil vertebrates, a portion of the 
Marsh collection, was transferred to the Museum by the United States 
Geological Survey. Bones and teeth of a Mastodon from the Pleisto- 
cene of Kansas were presented by Dr. A. G. Chase. 



A small collection of Pleistocene fossils from near Rogersville, Tenn., 
was presented by James W. Rogan (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 58, p. 83, 1921). 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 351 



A small collection of Oligocene vertebrates, including Testudo 
oiveni, type of Testvdo (ndhertsoni^ Archaeotherium mortoni^ Rhinoc- 
eros sp., and Oreodon Gulbertsonl (Owen's Report of the Geological 
Survey of Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota, 1852) was deposited by 
Indiana State University. 

A small collection of tortoise and bird bones from Mascarene Islands 
was received in exchange with the Museum of Cambridge University, 
Cambridge, England. A skull of Thoracosaurus neocesariensk from 
the Cretaceous, Aquia Creek, Va., was presented by Nelson C. Page. 

18S9 

A plaster cast of the skeleton of Phenacodus priTtiaevus was pur- 
chased from E. D. Cope ; a collection of the fossil fish Leueisous tuTne7i 
from the Miocene of Esmeralda County, Nev., was transferred by the 
United States Geological Survey (Lucas, F. A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 23, pp. 333-^34, 1900). 

1891 

A partial skull of Bison latifrons from the Pleistocene of the Willa- 
lacoochee River, Fla., was presented by Gen. fj. W. Colby (Hay, O. P., 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 21, p. 767, 1898). 

1892 

A most important accession was a collection of 380 prepared speci- 
mens, a second consignment from the Marsh collection, transferred by 
the United States Geological Survey. It contained three ceratopsian 
skulls, including the type of Tnceratops elatus (Marsh, O. C, Amer. 
Journ. Sci., vol. 42, p. 265, 1891), from the Lance, Upper Cretaceous, 
of Wyoming; a series of 10 titanothere skulls representing several 
genera from the Oligocene of Nebraska and South Dakota ; skulls and 
other remains of Teleroceras fossiger from the Pliocene of Long Island, 
Kans. ; and a few other Tertiary fossils and some rare casts. 

A collection of mammalian fossils from the estate of Joseph Leidy 
was transmitted as a gift by the United States Geological Survey. 

189S 

A small collection of mammalian specimens collected by Frank 
Burns from the Miocene of Maryland and Virginia was transmitted 
by the United States Geological Survey. 

189A 
The most important accession was a collection of Basilosmirus ce- 
toides specimens made for the Smithsonian Institution by Charles 
Schuchert from the Jackson, Upper Eocene, of Choctaw County, Ala. : 



352 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Skull and lower jaws; a series of 24 dorsal vertebrae, 15 dorsal ribs, 
sternal bones of a second individual, and numerous other bones (Kel- 
logg, R., Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 482, pp. 7-20, 1938). A 
skull of Castoroides ohioensh from the Pleistocene near Logansport, 
Ind., was presented by L. S. McFadin (Lyon, Marcus W., Amer. Midi. 
Nat, vol. 17, No. 1, figs. 81, 82, 1936) . The type skull and lower jaw of 
Mesoteras kemanm (Cope, E. D., Amer. Nat., vol. 4, p. 128, 1870) were 
presented by the State Museum of North Carolina. 

1895 

A skull of Portheus molossus from the Niobrara, Upper Cretaceous, 
of Kansas was received in exchange from Edward E. Howell ; a skull 
of Bkon from the Pleistocene of Kansas was presented by Dr. A. G. 
Chase ; a skeleton of I chthyosauo^i^ quadncissus from the Jurassic of 
Lyme Regis, England, was received in exchange with the Wagner 
Free Institute. 

Other accessions for this year were : Case of the skeleton of Pelago- 
saurus typus, in exchange with the University of Caen, France ; plas- 
ter casts of the skull of Ichthyosaurus platyodon; a skull of Elephas 
ganesa; a skeleton of Plesiosaui^rS dolichoderius ; a skeleton of Plesio- 
saurus macrocephalus, purchased from Ward's Natural Science Estab- 
lishment; casts of vertebrate specimens received in exchange with 
the La Plata Museum, Argentina ; skull of Toxodon^ skull of Trlgodon, 
skull and jaw of Nesodon^ jaw of Nesodon^ skull and jaw of Propdl- 
aeohoplophorus^ skull of Dasypotherium., femur, tibia, and fibula of 
Brontomis; skull of Onohippidium and deformed skull of Astra- 
pothenum; 22 casts of mammalian specimens from the Paris Basin, 
received in exchange with the Museum of Natural History, Paris ; the 
sixth installment of the Lacoe collection contained three boxes of 
fossil fishes. 

An important collection of 28 Triassic fishes from Massachus-etts. 
collected by S. Ward Loper, was received as a gift from the United 
States Geological Survey. 

1896 

The most important accession acquired this year was the Lacoe 
collection of fossil plants and invertebrates, which included 408 fish, 
amphibian, and reptilian, specimens received as a gift from the heirs 
of R. D. Lacoe. Among the vertebrates the Tertiai*y was represented 
by specimens from the Green River of Wyoming and from Switzer- 
land ; Triassic by specimens from the Appalachian region ; Paleozoic 
by specimens from Great Britain, France, and the coal fields of Ohio. 
Pennsylvania, and Mazon Creek, 111. Many of the Ohio spe-cimens are 
now unique, since further specimens cannot be obtained because of the 
exhaustion of the coal mines. 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 353 

All important lot of Basiloscmni.s- cetaules remains, including 
the types of Pterosphenus schucherti (Lucas, F. A., Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mns., vol. 21, p. 637, 1898) and Hadrianus schucherti (Hay, O. P., 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 22, p. 22, 1899) , was collected for the Museum 
from the Jackson (Eocene) of Alabama by Charles Schuchert. This 
material supplemented the collection made in 1894, and from the two 
collections a skeleton was mounted for exhibition (Gidley, J. W., Proc. 
U. S. Nat Mus., vol. 44, p. 649, 1913 ; also described by R. Kellogg, 
Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 482, 1936). In exchange with Dr. PI. 
Crediier, a collection of amphibians came from near Dresden, Germany. 

1897 

A fine example of a fossil ray, Xiphotrygon acutidens^ from the 
Green River shales of Wyoming was purchased from R. L. Craig. 

The types of Heterodontosuchus ganei from the Triassic of southern 
Utah, and of Dinictls major from the Oligocene of western Nebraska, 
described by F. A. Lucas (Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 4, vol. 6, pp. 399-400, 
1898), were transferred from the United States Geological Survey. 

1898 

An important collection of fossil fishes made by the Hay den sui'veys 
of 1870, 1872, and 1873 and by A. C. Peale in 1877, and retained by 
E. D. Cope for study and description, was returned by the executors 
of his estate. This collection of 175 specimens, principally from the 
Eocene, Green River, shales of Wyoming, contained a large number 
of type and figured specimens. These were described by Cope ( [)rin- 
cipally in Rep. U. S. Geol. Surv. Terr., vol. 3, 1884) . 

A skull and lower jaws, with associated fore limbs and feet and skin 
impressions, of Thespesius ann^ctens, from the Lance, Upper Creta- 
ceous near Forsyth, Mont., were purchased from Robert Butler. The 
skin impressions were described by J. B. Hatcher (Ann. Carnegie Mus.. 
vol. 1, p. 130, fig, 1, 1901) as CJaosaurm. 

The type specimen of Hoplitosofurus mars hi collected by N. H. Dar- 
ton from the Lakota sandstone. Upper Cretaceous, near Buffalo Gap, 
South Dakota, was transferred by the United States Geological Survey 
(Lucas, F. A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 23, pp. 591, 592, pis. 23, 24, 
1901). 

Two carloads of vertebrate fossils (part of the Marsh collection) 
Avere received from the Mai^h laboratories in New Haven, Conn., as 
-I transfer from the United States Geological Survey. 

An important collection of 138 Paleozoic shark spines and teeth 
from near Keokuk, Iowa, was purchased from Lisbon Cox. 

292963—41 4 



354 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

1899 

A well-preserved skull of Hyracodon nehrascensis from the Oligo- 
cene was presented by A. W. Barber. A small collection of mam- 
malian specimens from the Oligocene, near Oelrick, S. Dak., made 
by N. H. Darton was transmitted by the United States Geological 
Survey. It contained a nearly complete skeleton of Meryco'idodon 
gracilis (Gilmore, C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 31, pp. 513-514, 
1907). A collection of fish remains from the Niobrara, Upper Cre- 
taceous of Kansas, was presented by Dr. A. B. Baker. The type 
skull of Vrsus procerus (Miller, G. S., Jr., Proc. Biol. Soc. Washing- 
ton, vol. 13, pp. 53-56, 1899) from the Pleistocene of Ohio was pre- 
sented by W. G. Roberts. 

1900 

Final consignment (5 carloads) of the Marsh collection of fossil 
vertebrates, consisting of 590 boxes and crates, having a total weight 
of 80 tons and a roughly estimated valuation of $150,000, was trans- 
ferred by the United States Geological Survey. This consignment 
was received in 1899 but not accessioned until 1900. A skeleton of 
Lepidosteus atrox from the Eocene of Wyoming was presented by 
Charles Schuchert. A collection of phytosaurian materials made by 
Barnum Brown, including the types of Placerias hestemus and Meto- 
posaurus fraasi (Lucas, F. A., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 27, pp. 193- 
195. 1904), from the Triassic of Arizona, was transmitted by the 
United States Geological Survey. 

A skull of Arclmeotherkini mortom from the Oligocene of South 
Dakota was purchased from L. W. Stilwell. 

1901 

A well-preserved skeleton of Hesperom'ts regaJls from the Niobrara 
formation. Upper Cretaceous, of Kansas, was purchased from Han- 
del T. Martin. This specimen was mounted for exhibition (Lucas, 
F. A., Smithsonian Misc. Coll., vol. 45, p. 95, 1903) ; a small collection 
of bird bones, including the types of Pufflnus eyermmd and Tanta- 
lus milne-ed'wardsi (Shufeldt, R. W., Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadel- 
phia, 1896, p. 511), from the Middle Miocene of France, was pre- 
sented by Robert W. Shufeldt. 

A skeleton of Maafodon americanv.^^ a female, from the Pleisto- 
cene found near Church, Hillsdale County, Mich., was purchased 
(Gilmore, C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 30, p. 610, 1906). 

A skull and one tusk, the type of Elephas roosevelti, from the 
Pleistocene, found near Ashland, Cass County, 111., were purchased 
(Hay, O. P., Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, vol. 35, p. 101, 1922). 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 355 

1902 

Accessions included a collection of teeth of Camelop.H, Symlos, 
Maw.mut america?mm, Elephas columhi, and E. Imperator from the 
Pleistocene in a spring near Afton, Okla., made by W. H. Holmes 
(Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mns., vol. 58, p. 117, 1921 ; Indiana 
Geol. Surv., vol. 26; Iowa Geol. Surv., vol. 23). 

Plaster casts of five restorations of the heads of as many genera 
of Brontotheres were received in exchange with the American Mu- 
seum of Natural History. 

1903 

Teeth of Mastodon humhoMti an.d M. cordilleinim and plaster casts 
of mandibular rami were received in exchange with the British Mu- 
seum of Natural History. 

A slab of sandstone showing Pennsyivanian footprints from Mount 
Carbon, Pa., was presented by Dr. H. J. Herbein. A tooth of Gladodus 
foi'mosus from Needle Mountain quadrangle, collected by Dr. Wliit- 
man Cross, was transferred by the United States Geological Survey. 

190 A 

A complete skeleton of Rhmnphorhynchus geinmingi showing impres- 
sions of the wing and tail membranes (Gilmore, C. W., Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 30, 1906) and fossil fishes of the genera Aspidorhyn- 
chv.s, Catuinzs, Sqiiatina. Hypsocormus^ Pholidophoynis^ and Gyrodus^ 
from the Upper Jurassic near Eichstatt, Germany, were purcku-ed 
from Fritz Ehrensberger. Complete skeletons of Stenosau7^^ hoJlen- 
sis and Ichfhyosm'rus qiuulriciss-us from the Lias of Wiirttembeig, 
Germany, were purchased from F. Krantz. 

A skull of Bison aUeni with horn and external sheaths, from the 
Pleistocene near Rampart, Alaska, was presented by D. McLean (Hay, 
O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 46, p. 182, 1914) . 

1905 

A small collection of mannnalian specimens from the Wasatch, 
Eocene, of the Big Horn Basin, Wyo., made by Dr. C. A. Fisher was 
transferred by the United States Geological Survey. A collection 
of Pleistocene mammals from Alaska, made by A. G. Maddren, was 
transferred by the Smithsonian Institution (Maddren, A. G., Smith- 
sonian Misc. Coll., vol. 49, pp. 1-117, 1908). 

1906 

The most important acquisition of this year was a beautifully pre- 
served skeleton of SiTwpa grangeri (Matthew, W. D., Proc. U. S. Nat. 



356 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Mus., vol, 30, pp. 203-233, 1906) and specimens of Amyda aequa (Hay, 
O. P., Carnegie Inst. Wasliington Publ. 75, pp. 517-519, 1908) from 
the Eocene, Bridger formation of Wyoming. These were transferred 
by the United States Geological Survey. 

A musk-ox skull from the Pleistocene of Yukon Territory was pre- 
sented by J. B. Terrell through Dr. W. H. Osgood, who subsequently 
described it as the type of Symhos terreUi (Smithsonian Misc. Coll., 
vol. 48, pp. 173-183," 1905). 

A second musk-ox skull {Gldleya zuniensis) from the Pleistocene 
of New Mexico was presented by the Department of the Interior. It 
was originally described by Dr. J. W. Gidley as Lwps (Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 30, pp. 165-167, 1906) . 

1907 

Plaster casts of the skeleton of Pareiasawms hfiini and other rep- 
tilian skulls, all from the Karoo Beds of South Africa, were received 
in exchange from the British Museum of Natural History. A speci- 
men of Lepisosteus simplex from near Cody, Wyo., was presented by 
Jeremiah Ahern. The type of Echmatemys rlvalis (Hay, O. P., Proc. 
U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35* pp. 164-166, 1908) from Wasatch, Eocene of 
Wyoming was transferred by the United States Geological Survey. 

1908 

An important collection of 99 United States and South American 
vertebrate specimens was received in exchange with the American 
Museum of Natural History in settlement of a claim for certain Gov- 
ernment-owned specimens that were retained in the Cope collection 
when it went to that institution. This collection contained many rare 
species, including the type mounted skeleton of Hoplophoneiu'< robus- 
tus (Adams, G. I., Amer. Nat., vol. 30, p. 49, 1896) from the Oligo- 
cene of South Dakota, and a skull and jaws of Uinfafheriuin tnirahile 
from the Washakie (Eocene) of Wyoming. 

The Hambach collection, assembled by the late Prof. Gustav 
Hambach, was presented by Frank Springer. Although consisting 
primarily of invertebrate fossils it also contained a considerable 
number of Paleozoic fish remains, some reptiles and mammals from 
this country and abroad, as well as a few from the Sliumard collec- 
tion, which Professor Hambach had previously acquired. 

A collection of Pleistocene mammals made by Charles W. Gil- 
more for the Smithsonian Institution in Alaska in 1907 (Gilmore, 
C. W., Smithsonian Misc. Coll., vol 51, pp. 1-38, 1908) ; skulls of Bison 
erassicomis (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 46, pp. 179-183, 
1914) ; and a musk-ox skull the type of a new species Ovihos yukon- 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 357 

e/^sw (Gidley, J. W., Proc. U. S. Nat Mus., vol. 34, pp. 681-683, 
1908) were the outstanding specimens. 

A fossil tui'tle from the Niobrara (Upper Cretaceous) of Kansas 
was purchased from Charles H. Sternberg. It was subsequently de- 
scribed by O. P. Hay as the type of To.vochelys stenopora (Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 36, p. 191, 1909). 

A lower jaw of Eqwus occldeiitaJis from the Pleistocene of Nevada 
was presented by C. A. Gaby. A natural cast of a chimaeroid egg 
case collected by N. H. Darton from the Montana, Upper Cretaceous 
of Wyoming, was transferred by the United States Geological Sui-- 
vey. Five fossil fishes from Ceara, Brazil, were presented by David 
Starr Jordan. A cast of the skull of Zeuglodon hydrarchus 
[ = Zygorhiza kochii] was received in exchange with Teyler's Mu- 
seum, Haarlem, Netherlands. 

The types of Delphlnodon divklum (True, F. W., Journ. xicad. 
Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 15, pp. 165-194, 1912) and PsepliopKovm 
calvertensis (Palmer, William, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol, 36, pp. 369- 
373, 1909) and other Miocene vertebrates from the Calvert formation 
of the Chesapeake Bay region were collected and presented by 
William Palmer. 

1909 

A collection of 300 specimens from the Fort Union (Paleocene) 
of Sweet Grass County, Mont., containing many new and little-known 
mammalian forms and the type of Hoplochelys caelata (Hay, O. P., 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 35, pp. 163-164, 1908), was made for 
the Museum by A. C. Silberling. A woolly rhinoceros skull from the 
Pleistocene of Russia was purchased from E. Pfizenmayer. Two ac- 
cessions comprising a very considerable and interesting series of Creta- 
cean remains from the Miocene of Calvert Cliffs, Calvert County, Md., 
were presented by Frederick W. True. 

The type specimen of Lissoprion fcrnerl (Hay, O. P., Science, new 
ser., vol. 26, pp. 22-24, 1907) from the Upper Carboniferous of Idaho 
was presented by W. F. Ferrier. A partial skeleton of Glyptodc/ii 
petaliferus from the Pliocene of Texas was presented by (). S. Shelton 
(Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 51, p. 107, 1916). 

1910 

The Fort Union collections from Montana were augmented by 70 
additional specimens, collected by James W. Gidley and A. C. Silber- 
ling, working under the auspices of the United States Geological Sur- 
vey. A further contribution was made by the Geological Survey in 
a small collectioii of turtles made by James W. Gidley and James H. 



358 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

Gardner from the Upper Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin of New 
Mexico (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 38, pp. 307-326, 1910). 
A complete crocodile skull and lower jaws described by Charles W. 
Gilmore as the type of Leidyosuchus sternbergi (Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 38, pp. 485-502, pis. 23-29, 1910) from the Lance, Upper Cretace- 
ous, and a complete skull and neck of Glidastes velox from the Nio- 
brara formation, Upper Cretaceous of Kansas were purchased from 
Charles H. Sternberg. A plaster cast of the rhynchocephalian reptile 
Homoeosaums maximiliam was purchased. 

1911 

A third addition to the collection of Fort Union mammals was made 
by purchase of 55 specimens from A. C. Silberling. A second con- 
signment of 20 mammal and reptile specimens from the American 
Museum of Natural History completed the exchange for the Cope 
materials ; of the specimens transmitted a partial skeleton of Dimetro- 
don inohius and a skull of Eryops from the Permian of Texas are 
worthy of special mention. Plaster casts of the skull of G amptosawrus 
nanv^ and of the e^jidermis of a hadrosaurian "mummy" constituted a 
second exchange with this same institution. A molar tooth of Elephas 
columhi from Placita, N. Mex., was presented by E. D. Cope (Proc. 
Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1874, p. 221). 

1912 

Type and figured specimens described by E. D. Cope (Proc. Acad. 
Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 21, p. 192, 1869) constituted the outstand- 
ing accession of this year. The types were of Polydectes hiturgidus, 
Hadrosaurus tripos^ and HypHibema crassicaiida., all from the Upper 
Cretaceous of North Carolina. They were deposited by the North 
Carolina Department of Agriculture, through H. H. Brimley, curator 
of the State Museum. A unique type specimen consisting of the jaws 
and teeth of the extinct shark Edestus 7n'u'V8 (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 42, pp. 31-38, 1912) from the Carboniferous of Iowa 
was presented by the Smitlisonian Institution. 

A composite rhinoceros skeleton {Diceratherium cooki), now 
mounted and on exhibition, from the Lower Miocene of Nebraska 
was received in exchange with the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburgh. 
A plaster cast of the hind leg and foot of Diplodocus caimegii was 
received in exchange with this same institution. A turtle, Stylemys 
nehrascensis^ from the Oligocene of Wyoming was purchased from 
Charles H. Sternberg. A lower right molar of Elephas columhi 
from Tama, Iowa, was presented by Fred Herschel (Hay, O. P., 
Iowa Geol. Surv., vol. 23, p. 447, 1912). 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY GILMORE 359 

The type specimen of Neurankylus wyomingensis from the Upper 
Cretaceous of Wyoming was transferred by the United States Geo- 
logical Survey (Gilmore, C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 56, 
p. 113,1920).* 

1913 

The Fort Union collection from Montana was further increased by 
the purchase of 400 specimens from the collector A. C. Silberling 
(Simpson, G. G., U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 169, pp. 1-279, 1937) . A most 
important collection of Pleistocene mammals, representing 22 genera, 
several of which were new, was made by James W. Gidley from the 
"Cumberland Cave" near Cumberland, Md. A collection of Pleisto- 
cene fossils made by Copley Amory, Jr., for the Museum along the 
Old Crow River, Yukon Territory, was transferred as a gift from the 
Smithsonian Institution. It contained a unique specimen, the foot 
bone of a camel, the first evidence of the former occurrence of this 
animal north of the Arctic Circle (Gidley, J. W., Smithsonian Misc. 
Coll., vol. 60, pp. 1-2, 1913). C. P. Snyder presented a skull of 
Equus niohrarensh alashae (Hay, O. P., Smithsonian Misc. Coll., 
vol. 61, No. 2, pp. 1-18, 1913) and a mastodon tooth, both from the 
Pleistocene of Alaska. Cetacean specimens, including the type of 
Panetobalaena 'palmeri (Kellogg, R., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.. vol. 63, 
pp. 1-14, 1924) from the Calvert, Miocene, of the Chesapeake Bay 
region, were presented by William Palmer and A C. Weed of the 
Museum staff. 

An upper molar of a mastodon and a skull of Symhos cavifrons^ 
both from the Pleistocene of Mason County, 111., were presented by 
John Wiedmer (Hay, O. P., Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. ;'>22, 
pp. 103-104, 1.923). 

19U 

The important accession of this year was a collection of dinosaur 
remains collected by Charles W. Gilmore, working under the auspices 
of the United States Geological Survey, from the Two Medicine 
formation. Upper Cretaceous, of Montana, inside from filling an 
important gap in the collections, this assemblage furnished the type 
of a new genus and species {BrdchyGeratops mo n fane mis) of the 
Ceratopsia (Gilmore, C. W., U. S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 103, pp. 
1-38, 1917). 

Another installment of Pleistocene fossils from the Cumberland 
Cave deposit was collected by James W. Gidley. The specimens 
included a mountable skeleton of Pl-atygonns cumherlandensh (Gid- 
ley, J. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol.' 57, pp. 651-678, 1920), and 
many good skulls and articulated limbs and feet, in part belonging 
to genera and species not previously recognized from this locality 
(Gidley, J. W., and Gazin, C. L., U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 171, pp. 
1-99.1938). 



360 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

A small collection of Pleistocene animal remains from Saltville, 
Smyth County, Va., was presented by H. D. Mount (Hay, O. P., 
Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 322, pp. 145-352, 1923). 

Collecting in the local Miocene field in the cliffs along Chesapeake 
Bay by William Palmer and Norman H. Boss yielded a complete skull 
and lower jaws with much of the articulated skeleton of the long- 
beaked porpoise Eurhirwdelphis ho8si, a beautifully preserved short- 
beaked porpoise skull {Kentriodon pernix), and many parts of these 
same animals. 

Other noteworthy accessions for this year were a well-preserved 
slaill of Bison allenl with the horn sheaths and five articulated cervical 
vertebrae from the Pleistocene of Alaska, purchased (Hay, O. P.. 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 46, pp. 183-189, 1913) ; the type of Crosso- 
tfZos armulatiis, a Permian amphibian from Oklahoma, received in 
exchange with Dr. E. C. Case (2d Ann. Rep. Geol. and Nat. Hist. 
Terr. Oklahoma, p. 15, 1902) ; and teeth and jaw fragments of the type 
of Titanoides p7'iiiiaevus from the Fort Union of North Dakota, re- 
ceived by transfer from the United States Department of Agriculture 
through Vernon Bailey (Gidley, J. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 52, 
pp. 431^35, 1917). 

1915 

A composite skeleton of Aenocyondirus and three skulls and jaAvs of 
the same from the famous Rancho La Brea, Pleistocene asphalt de- 
posits, California, were received in exchange with the University of 
Cali f ornia. A large mosasaur skeleton, consisting of the skull, jaws, 50 
vertebrae, and portions of the paddles from the Bearpaw formation, 
Upper Cretaceous of Montana, was purchased from Guy L. Wait. 
A remarkably well-preserved skull of the rare Desmostylus hespe-t^us 
from the Miocene of Oregon was purchased (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 49, pp. 381-397, 1915) . A final consignment of Pleisto- 
cene mammals from the "Cumberland Cave," consisting of 15 skulls, 
was received. A partial skeleton of a very large Mastodon anieri- 
canu^ from the Pleistocene of Indiana was presented by W. D. 
Pattison, with permission to unearth the remaining parts. The type 
slmll of Nothrothe7'iunv texanmii from the Pleistocene of Texas was 
received in exchange with Baylor University (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 51, p. 116, 1917) . 

A collection of 30 dermal plates of armored dinosaurs from the 
Lance, Upper Cretaceous, of Wyoming was presented by Dr. G. R. 
Wieland (Wieland, G. R., Amer. Journ. Sci., ser. 4, vol. 31, pp. 112- 
124, 1911). A small collection of Pleistocene manmiials from the 
vicinity of Denver, Colo., was presented by Prof. George L. Cannon 
(Hay,'0. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 59, pp. 599-603, 1922). 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 361 



The most vahuible accession of the year was the remainder of the 
skeleton of a large Mastodon amenca^ius from the Pleistocene of 
Indiana, presented by Maj, H. H. and W. D. Pattison. The skele- 
ton is now mounted and on exhibition (Lyon, Marcus W.. Amer. Midi. 
Nat., vol. 17, p. 336, fig. 116, 1936) . 

The Fort. Union mammal collection from Montana was increased by 
the purchase of a small assemblage of specimens from A. C. Silberling. 
A collection of Pleistocene specimens made by Benno Alexander, vho 
accompanied the 1914-15 Korean Expedition to the Kolyma liiver 
region in northern Siberia, was presented by the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution. It included about 200 individual specimens, the most im- 
portant being a fine skull of Eleplia.^ j)nmi genius. 

A skull of Canis orciitti from the Pleistocene of California was 
received in exchange with the California State Normal School of Los 
Angeles. The type specimen of the fossil fish Evesthes jordani from 
the Miocene of California was presented by Dr. J. Z. Gilbert (Bull. 
Dept. Geol. Univ. California, vol. 5, pp. 405-411, pis. 41-43, 1910). 
Plaster casts of the type of Allosau7%is fragilis were received in ex- 
■change with the Peabody Museum of Natural History. The United 
States Geological Survey transferred some 30 vertebrate specimens, 
representing 9 species of fossil fishes and reptiles from the Upper 
Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, N. Mex., including the types of 
Baena nodosa and Neunmkylus haiiH (Gilmore, C. W., U. S. Geol. 
Surv. Prof. Pap. 98-Q, pp. 290-295, 1916) . 

1917 

A collection of Permian vertebrates made by Charles H. Sternberg 
in Baylor County, Tex., was purchased. It contained a good skeleton 
of Dimetrodon gigas^ now mounted (Gilmore, C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 56, pp. 525-539, 1919), besides partial skeletons of three other 
individuals. Also worthy of special mention are skulls and partial 
skeletons of the following genera : ('ardiocephalus., Lysorophus, Diplo- 
caulus, Seymo'uria, Lahidosaurus, and Parlotichiis, as well as a great 
quantity of unidentified materials of lesser value. 

A collection of fossil reptile and cetacean remains, including the 
types of Goniopholis affims, Cetotheriwrti crassangidmn, and Metopo- 
eetm durinastis, from the Arundel formation, Cretaceous and Calvert, 
Miocene of Maryland, was deposited by Goucher College. 

A collection of 400 small mammal specimens was made from the 
Pleistocene cave deposits of western Cuba by William Palmer. 

A small collection of turtles from the Upper Cretaceous (Belly 
River), containing the types of Aspideretes latus and Boremys alhert- 



362 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MTJSEUM vol.90 

ensis, purchased from Charles H. Sternberg (Gihnore, C. W., Proc. 
U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 56, pp. 113-132, pis. 29-37, 1919). 

The type skull and lower jaws of Equus lambei from the Pleisto- 
cene of Gold Kun Creek, Yukon Territory (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 53, pp. 435-443, 1917), and a partial skull of Syiribos 
eavifrons from the Pleistocene of Indiana were purchased. 

1918 

A collection made by Dr. Jolm B. B^eside, Jr. (1916), from the 
Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin of New Mexico 
was transferred by the United States Geological Survey. This is the 
most important contribution from this source of recent years, there 
being 50 identifiable turtle specimens, many of them complete, 16 of 
which were described as new species (Gilmore, C. W., U. S. Geol. Surv. 
Prof. Pap. 119, pp. 1-68, 1920). 

The type specimen of Ter^irepene whitneyi from the Pleistocene of 
Texas was presented by Prof. F. H. Whitney (Hay, O. P., Univ. Texas 
Bull. 71, pp. 1-24, 1917). The type of Agomphus aldbaTriensis (Gil- 
more, C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 56, pp. 123-125, 1919) from 
the Cretaceous of Georgia was presented by the Florida Geological 
Survey. 

Additional remains of Pleistocene mammals from Siberia were pre- 
sented by Jolm Koren. These supplement the collection received from 
the Koren Expedition of 1914-15. 

A collection of 76 fish scales from the Cretaceous of North America 
was transferred by the United States Geological Survey (Cockerell, 
T. D. A., U. S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 120, pp. 165-188, 1919). 

A small collection of cetacean remains, including the type of Eu- 
rhinodelphis hossl (Kellogg, R., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 66, pp. 
1-40, 1925) , was made for the Museum by Norman H. Boss. 

1919 

The most important accession of this year was that received as a 
deposit from the Florida Geological Survey, consisting of 24 type 
specimens from the Miocene and Pleistocene of Florida. 

A skull and lower jaws of Monocloniics nasicornis from the Belly 
River, Upper Cretaceous, of Alberta; a skull and partial skeleton of 
Diplocaulus eopei from the Permian of Texas ; and a partly articulated 
skeleton of Tylosaurus pr<yriger and other mosasaurian specimens 
from the Niobrara formation, Upper Cretaceous of Kansas, were pur- 
chased from Charles H. Sternberg. 

A partial skeleton including a well-preserved skull of a long-beaked 
porpoise from the Calvert, Miocene, of Chesapeake Bay, Md., was col- 
lected for the Museum by William Palmer and N. H. Boss. A consider- 



DIVISION OF ^ERTEBKATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 363 

able portion of the skeleton of a mastodon from the Pleistocene of 
Winona Lake, Ind., was presented by Frank L, Clark. 

A cast of the type skeleton of Diati^jma steinii was presented by the 
American Mnsenm of Natural History. 

1920 

A valuable acquisition was a collection of 78 specimens placed on 
deposit by the Maryland Geological Survey of which 74 are either type 
or figured specimens, 13 being original types. These specimens come 
from the Pleistocene, Miocene, Eocene, and Cretaceous of Maryland. 

A collection of 35 specimens from a cave near Bulverde, Bexar 
County, Tex., was presented by O. P. Hay (Hay, O. P, Proc. U. S. 
Nat. Mus., vol. 58, p. 129, 1921). A collection of 60 specimens from 
the Pleistocene, Cavetown, Md., was presented by Phillips Academy 
(Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 58, p. 97, 1921). A small cof- 
lection consisting chiefly of horse and camel remains from Washtucna 
Lake, Wash., collected by Dr. George M. Sternberg in 1877, was pre- 
sented by Mrs. George M. Sternberg (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
vol. 59, pp. 607-608, 1922). 

A beautiful articulated skeleton of Stenoniylus hitchcocki from the 
Miocene of Nebraska was received in exchange with the Carnegie 
Museum. A humerus, the type of JoMni, laeillsi (Sellards, E. H., 8th 
Ann. Kep. Florida Geol. Surv., p. 146, 1916), from the Pleistocene of 
Florida, was deposited by the Florida Geological Survey. Two sets 
of moa leg bones and one lot of crop stones from New Zealand were 
received in exchange with the Public School of Lake Bathhurst, Aus- 
tralia. A skull and two vertebrae, the type of Megaptera miocaena 
(Kellogg, R., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 61, pp. 1-16, 1922), from the 
Miocene, Lompoc formation of California, were transferred by the 
LTnited States Geological Survey. A plaster model restoration of 
Mastodon mnericanus by Charles R. Knight was purchased. 

The type skull of Elephas horeus from Mount Healthy, Hamilton 
County, Ohio, was purchased (Hay, O. P., Observations on some 
extinct elephants, p. 5, June 12, 1922; privately published). 

A small collection of Pleistocene vertebrate fossils was made by 
James W. Gidley near Renick, Greenbrier County, W. Va. (Gidley, 
J. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 57, p. 669, 1920). 

1921 

An important collection of more than 100 specimens representing 
a new Pliocene fauna of 30 or more species was made by James W. 
Gidley and Kirk Bryan in the San Pedro Valley, Ariz. Among the 
more striking new forms were two described by Gidley (U. S. Geol. 
Surv. Prof. Pap. 140-B, 1926), Stegomustodon arizonae and Glypto- 



364 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL IVIUSEUM vol.90 

therimn anzonae, and one by Gilmore, Kinostemwm arizmwnse (Gil- 
more, C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 62, art. 5, pp. 1-8, 1922). 
In another paper (Gidley, J. W., U. S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 131-E, 
1922) 15 new species of rodents were described. The collection also 
contained the types of two new species of birds (Wetmore, Alexander, 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 64, pp. 1-18, 1924). 

A block of Dicerathermm bones in situ from the Miocene of the 
famous Agate Springs Quarry, Nebr., was collected for the Museum 
by James W. Gidley. A collection of about 200 specimens of Pleis- 
tocene mammals from a cave in Coconino County, Ariz., was re- 
ceived in exchange with the University of Arizona (Hay, O. P., 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 59, pp. 617-638, 1921). The type of 
Bystra nanu.^ (Hay, O. P., 8th Ann, Rep. Florida Geol. Survey, p. 
53, 1916), from the Dunnellon formation of Florida, was received 
in exchange with the Buffalo Natural History Society. A skull 
of Lomibeosaurus from the Belly River of Alberta; a half skull and 
lower jaws of a Pleistocene elephant from an unknown locality; 
and an elephant tooth from Otranto, Italy, were received in exchange 
with Ward's Natural Science Establishment. A male and a female 
skull of Dicer athenv.m, cooki and plaster casts of the two skulls of 
the Permian reptiles Edaphosauriis and Diadectes were received in 
exchange with the Walker Museum of the University of Chicago. A 
jaw of Edestus heinrichil from the Mississippian of Illinois was 
presented by the Southern Coal, Coke & Mining Co.; a Pleistocene 
elephant skull from Ohio was purchased. Lower jaw of a mastodon 
from the Pleistocene of Mississippi was purchased. 

1922 

Further collections from the Calvert (Miocene) along Chesapeake 
Bay were made for the Museum by Norman H. Boss. Two out- 
standing specimens are the type skull and parts of skeleton of Squal- 
odon calvertensis (Kellogg, Remington, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 62, 
pp. 1-69, 1923) and skull and lower jaws and much of the skeleton of 
Zarhachis -fiageUator (Kellogg, Remington, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
63, pp. 1-39, 1924). A second collection of Miocene materials from 
the Chesapeake Bay region, consisting of five porpoise skulls besides 
many individual bones, was purchased from Mrs. William Palmer. 

A nearly complete hind limb of Gorgosamm^^ a tail club of an ar- 
mored dinosaur, and the fore limbs, feet, and pectoral girdle of a 
small trachodont dinosaur, all from the Bellj' River, Upper Creta- 
ceous, of Alberta, Canada, were received in an exchange with the 
Victoria Memorial Museum. A series of articulated cervical and 
dorsal vertebrae of Edaphosaurus was received in exchange with the 
Walker Museum. A nearly complete shell of Boremys from the 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 365 

Belly River, Upper Cretaceous, was received in exchange with the 
University of Alberta. 

A collection of skulls and several hundred bones of Bhon occi- 
dentalis from the Pleistocene of Minnesota was presented by John A. 
Savage & Co. A composite skeleton was assembled for exhibi- 
tion from this lot (Hay, O, P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 63, art. 5, 
pp. 1-8, 1923). 

Parts of the famous Beresovka mammoth from the Pleistocene of 
Siberia, such as skin, hair, muscular tissue, and stomach contents, 
were purchased from E. W. Pfizenmayer. 

A tarsometatarsus of Parapavo californicua from the Pleistocene 
of California was presented by the University of California. The 
type of Alamosaurus sanjuanensls from the Ojo Alamo formation. 
Upper Cretaceous, of New Mexico was transferred by the United 
States Geological Survey (Gilmore, C. W., Smithsonian Misc. Coll., 
vol. 72, pp. 1-9, 1922). 

1923 

The most important accession of many years was tlie collection of 
several thousand specimens of Orestes St. John presented to the Mu- 
seum by Frank Springer, to whom it was left upon the death of St. 
John. The collection consists of a general collection of Devonian 
invertebrates, but more important is his large and extremely valuable 
collection of selachian fish i^emains, chiefly from the Carboniferous. 
It contains numerous types and illustrated specimens described by 
St. John in the Illinois reports, as well as a large amount of original 
unstudied material. There is also included a large quantity of very 
choice cestraciont fish material, much of it collected by Mr. Springer 
from the Burlington limestone of Iowa, as well as two exceptionally 
fine collections from the Keokuk limestone made by Dr. G. A. Wil- 
liams and Lisbon A. Cox, which were purchased by Mr. Springer 
and turned over to St. John, together Avith his own, for use in his 
researches. Among other notable specimens in this collection men- 
tion should be made of the type of Campodus {Agassizodus) varia- 
hiJw (Newberry, J. S., Ohio Geol. Surv. Eep., pt. 2, vol. 2, p. 50, 
1870) ; this rejDresents a complete dentition from the Coal Measures 
of Kansas in a state of preservation such as has not been found 
elsewhere. 

Another most notable accession was the residuary portion of the col- 
lection of E. D. Lacoe, of Pittston, Pa., presented by his heirs. Be- 
sides the fossil plants and invertebrates, which formed the bulk of 
the accession of 10,000 specimens, it also contained several hundred 
fish, reptilian, and amphibian remains. The Tertiary is represented 
by specimens from the Green River and from Switzerland; Triassic 



366 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

by specimens from the Appalachian region; Paleozoic by specimens 
from Great Britain, France, and the coal fields of Ohio, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Mazon Creek, 111. It contains many types and figured 
specimens. 

The type specimen of the physeteroid whale {Ontocetm oxymyc- 
tem^) from Santa Barbara, Calif., was presented by Mrs. Charles 
O. Roe (Kellogg, R., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 66, art. 27, pp. 1-8, 
1926). 

1924 

A notable accession was a skeleton of Diplodocus longus collected 
for the Museum from the Jurassic, Dinosaur National Monument, 
Utah. This specimen is now mounted and on exhibition (Gilmore, 
C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 81, art. 18, pp. 1-21, pis. 1-6, 
1932). 

Composite skeletons of fSmilodon califoriuews- and Aenocyon dijiis^ 
suitable for mounting from the Pleistocene of Rancho La Brea of 
California, were received in exchange with the University of Cali- 
fornia ; a slab of dinosaur tracks from the Triassic shales of Virginia 
was presented bj' Frank C. Littleton. The types of Trinacro-menmi- 
henfonmmmi from the Upper Cretaceous of Kansas (Cragin, F. W., 
Amer. GeoL, vol. 2, pp. 404-407, 1888) and Testudo equico7nes from 
the Pleistocene of Kansas (Ha3% O. P., Ivans. Univ. Sci. Bull., vol. 
10, pp. 39-51, pis. 1-3, 1917) were received in exchange Avith Colo- 
rado College. Further cetacean specimens, a partial skull of Z(^hci- 
chw (Kellogg, R., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 67, art. 28, pp. 1-18, 
1926) and one of Eurhinodelphis collected by Norman H. Boss from 
the Miocene, Calvert formation, Chesapeake Bay, Md. The type of 
a fossil sculpin from Nevada presented by David Starr Jordan. A 
small collection of South American mammals was presented hy 
Brother Ariste Joseph ; a skeleton of Elephas lacking the skull from 
the Pleistocene of Franklin County, Wash., was transferred by the 
United States Geological Survey. Cast of the skull of Baluchither- 
imn and cast of the type of Griphodon peruvianus were received in 
exchange with American Museum of Natural History, New York. 

1925 

The most important collection of the year was a series of fossil 
footprints from the Coconino sandstone, Permian of the Grand Can- 
yon of Arizona, collected by Charles W. Gilmore in coo})eration with 
the National Park Service (Gilmore, C. W., Smithsonian Misc. Coll., 
vol. 77, No. 9, pp. 1-41, 1926). This collection was supplemented by 
a smaller one made by Dr. J. C. Merriam and presented by the 
Carnegie Institution of Washington. Two very large dinosaurian 



DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY — GILMORE 367 

tracks from the Mesa Verde, Upper Cretaceous, Clear Creek, Utah, 
were transferred by the United States Geological Survey. 

A collection of Pleistocene mannnals from INIelbourne, Fla., was 
presented by Charles P. Singleton. It included the skull and mucli 
of the skeleton of a mastodon. A small collection of mammalian 
fossils from Chihuahua, Mexico, was presented by Mrs. Bruce D. 
Brown. Three well-preserved turtles from the Upper Cretaceous, 
Kirtland of New Mexico were received in exchange with Ward's 
Natural Science Establishment. 

The collection of fossil cetaceans was materially enriched by two 
.sperm-whale skulls, the type of Aulophysetei' morrlcei (Kellogg, R., 
Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. 846, pp. 1-43, pis. 1-9, 1927) from 
the Temblor, Miocene of California, presented by Charles Morrice, 
and the type skull of Xenorophus sloanii (Kellogg, R., Smithsonian 
Misc. Coll., vol. 76, No. 7, pp. 1-7, pis. 1, 2, 1923) from the Oligocene 
of South Carolina was presented by Earle Sloan. 

A collection of fishes from the Lompoc, Upper Miocene, of Cali- 
fornia w^as presented by David Starr Jordan. Skull and lower jaws 
of Equus Imnhei from the Pleistocene of Alaska were purchased. 

Plaster casts of the type skulls of Batrachosiwhus hroioni, Dlcynodon 
kolhei, and Sti'ufhiocephalus whaitsi were received in exchange with the 
South African Museum. Casts of the types of Andrewsarchiis and 
Proani'phicyon were received in exchange with the American Museum 
of Natural History. 

1926 

A large collection of fossil tracks from the Coconino, Hermit, and 
Supai formations of the Grand Canyon was made for the Museum by 
('harles W. Gilmore (Gilmore, C. W., Smithsonian Misc. Coll., vol. 80, 
No. 3, pp. 1-78, pis. 1-21, 1927) . Additional footprint material from 
the Triassic of New Jersey was received in exchange with Princeton 
University. 

A collection of 38 species of Pleistocene mammals made by James W. 
Gidley from Melbourne, Fla., including a crushed human skull found 
intermingled with the animal remains, gave important evidence of their 
contemporaneity (Loomis, F. B., Nat. Hist., vol. 26, pp. 260-262, 1926) . 
He also made a small collection of Pleistocene mammal remains from 
Long Horn Spring, Okla. 

A further collection of cetacean remains from the Calvert, Miocene 
of Chesapeake Bay region was made by Remington Kellogg and 
Noi-man H. Boss. Two specimens of a well-preserved skeleton of 
Priscodelphinus atropius and a fine skull and partial skeleton of a 
smaller porpoise are deserving of special mention. 

A partial skeleton of a long-snouted crocodilian from the Green 
River shales of Colorado was presented by Prof. O. M. Ball. Addi- 



368 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM vol.90 

tional cetacean materials from the Sooke formation of British Colum- 
bia were presented by Ira E. Cornwall. Type specimen of Bison syl- 
vestris (Hay, O. P., Proc. U. S. Nat. Miis., vol. 48, p. 515, 1915) from 
Huron County, Ohio, and a small collection of Pleistocene fossils from 
Vero, Fla., were presented by Oliver P. Hay. A well-preserved skull of 
Stenosaums hoUensis from Holtzmaden, Germany, was received in ex- 
change with Ward's Natm'al Science Establislmient. A collection of 
five turtles from the Upper Cretaceous of New Mexico was purchased 
from Charles H. Sternberg. A plaster cast of the skull of Protocera- 
tops was received in exchange with the American Museum of Natural 
Histoi-y. 

1927 

An articulated skeleton of Portheus molossus^ three skeletons of 
Protostega gigas, and two partial skeletons of Platecarpus coryphaeus, 
all from the Niobrara, Upper Cretaceous, of Kansas, were purchased 
from George F. Sternberg. A collection of Pleistocene mammals from 
Sarasota, Zolfo Springs, and Venice, Fla., was assembled by James W. 
Gidley. It also includes a partial skeleton of EUphas presented by 
the Venice Co. 

The type of Hypsognathus fenneri (Gilmore, C. W., Proc. U. S. Nat. 
Mus., vol. 73, art. 7,