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Full text of "The progressive Latin lesson book"

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THE PROGRESSIVE 

LATIN LESSOIS^ BOOK, 

CONSISTING OF 

VARIED EXERCISES IN COMPOSITION, TRANS- 
LATION, GRAMMAR, <fca 

BY 

REV. H. STRETTON, M.A., Oxon., 

HEAD MAfiTJBB 07 BT. ALBAN'S ORAMMAB. SCHOOL, HSBT8 ; 

JOINT-OOMPILKR OF VI8ITATI0 INFIRMORUM ; 

AUTHOR OF THS ACTS OF ST. MARY MAGDALENE ; A GUIDE 

TO THE INFIRM, SICK, AND DYING ; A 0AT£CHI8M 

OK THE GREED. ETC. 




LONDON: 
DAVID NUTT, 270, STRAND. 

MDCCCL2LIX. 

<PC/0 ' %. Dgtzedb'ifcoOgle 



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PEEFACE. 



The object of this compilation is to provide a Latin Lesson 
Book, so entirely progressive in its construction as to be 
capable of adequately assisting the young scholar in his 
first approaches to a confessedly difficult acquirement, and 
of carrying him forward by a nicely graduated process of 
study to a successful mastery of those difficulties of the 
Latin Language which, while they exercise the moral qualities 
of patient reflection and persevering diligence in the Student, 
become at the same time the finest instrument for training 
and disciplining his mental faculties. Even when the 
attempt has been made by a systematically progressive 
method of teaching, to smooth away, in the fullest degree, 
from the path of the pupil, the thorny trials which beset his 
course, there will yet be left enough of difficulty in Latin 
to stimulate his liveliest attention and to arouse his most 
strenuous exertions after accuracy. It has been thought then 
that, in an elementary work like the present, the higher forms 
of construction such as the Accusative with the Infinitive, 
the Ablative Absolute, and the use of the Subjunctive Mood, 
might be altogether dispensed with, or if brought in at all 
in the course of the work, always with ample foot notes 
of explanation. 

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IV 

The Author has put forth the present work, which haa 
for a long tune been in fragmentary portions in the hands 
of his pupils, in the belief that Material and Apparatus would 
be afforded in it both for acquiring a sound grammatical 
basis; and for promoting the desirable object of paving the 
way for the young student's more pleasant and self-gratify- 
ing approach to Latin Beading and Composition. 

One leading principle relied upon in the construction of 
this work is frequent repetition of words and phraseology 
under changed forms and aspects — a principle which has 
been carried out with success by several Authors of Latin 
Exercise Books, but as it is believed never in so thoroughly 
progressive detail, and to such a practical extent, as is now 
exhibited in this work In this point of view it is desirable 
to notice the first fifty-five Lessons upon Substantives, 
Adjectives, and Pronouns, as they enter into combination 
with the Verb esse to be. 

The objection sometimes urged to plans for facilitating 
the acquisition of the Latin Language, is that if the mental 
exertions of the pupil are to too great a degree spared, an 
important training for his mind is lost to him, and the 
foundation for habits of inaccuracy thus encouraged; the 
pupil being apt, in condoning for a want of accuracy by his 
general knowledge of words and phrases, to fall into slovenly 
ways and inexact methods of study. 

It would be useless to attempt to conceal that there would 
be some groimd for such fears if any system of the kind were 
not adequately protected by an ample apparatus of Grammati- 
cal Lessons. To obviate this apprehension that the young 
might be likely to fall into habits of inaccuracy, if aided merely 
by a succession of easy progressive exercises, lessons have 

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been oonstructed in Grammar bo as to arrest his path at eyeiy 

short interval, and oblige him to undergo, in course, the 

necessary amount of Grammatical discipline with as much 

regularity and frequency as he performs the Exercises them- 

selyes. The oral or written Exercises, Gr. Praxis, xvL xviiL 

xix. xxyL dec, &c., wiU be found in connection with these 

remarks iuYaluable for fft.Tni1iii.riiyiTig the pupil's mind with the 

various forms of Declension and for teaching liim the practice 

of the Concords. It should be remembered also that the 

Author does not think it prudent to forego the concurrent 

use of some established Latin Grammar. — See directiofiy p, 1. 

Indeed this prominent feature of the work, viz: the 

combination of Exercises, Grammatical Praxis, Vocabularies 

with suggested studies for the use of words, Phraseology 

and Lections with Methods of Analysis, into one series of 

related lessons, must, the Author believes, bear a very 

efficient result in the assistance of the young as well as 

aid effectively the efforts of the Tutor. It is of no small 

advantage to the Master to be able to point out to his class 

the precise portion of Grammar which, with reference to 

their future lessons, will be immediately useful in promoting 

their knowledge of them; as also to have it in his power 

to direct the scholars to go on straight with the lessons 

seriatim, imder the conviction that nothing material to a 

Bcholarlike foundation has been left imtaught which he has 

to think of supplying by supplementary lessons hastily 

devised from other sources. 

As early as may be in the Scholar's course the Latin 
Exercise should form a basis for Parsing Lessons, this 
exercise being under ordinary circumstances frequently 
omitted till the best part of an Exercise Book has been 

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passed througk Further, the Vocabularies of this work 
should be committed to memory, and in the hands of the 
intelligent tutor, be used for instruction in Derivation, 
Wordbuilding, Praxis or Genders, and Paradigms of Verbs. 
Although the model for Parsing is given at a later stage of 
the work, it has been supposed that such Parsing Lessons 
would be earlier given as would be accommodated to the 
reach of the class. 

One of the great advantages of written exercises is found to 
consist in the opportimity they afford of the pupils working 
away from and independently of a tutor. While then this 
advantage is carefully to be maintained, another which may 
be arrived at by oral instruction in Class, should never be 
overlooked. Indeed the Master should prove his boys in 
each exercise orally, and oblige every individual of his Class 
to demonstrate that he has worked for himself the several 
mental processes which have resulted in the exercise pro- 
duced. If the class is not constantly passed through this 
oral exercise, the merely written exercise will either come to 
be most inefficiently performed or, but too frequently, it will 
degenerate into a copied production from the work of some 
brighter boy or boys of the Class. 

As soon as it was thought that the young Student would 
be sufficiently prepared for such work, he is introduced to the 
translation or rendering of Passages from a Latin Author, 
and a collection of easy sentences has been gathered out of 
Cicero's De Senectute for the purpose. Up to this time, it 
will be found that the Exercises are, for the most part, pre- 
sented in the English rather than in the Latin order of 
words. And as now a further progress is needful on the 
part of the pupil, some directions have been given him at 
this portion of the Book to assist him in construing. 

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Vll 

In the Declensions the arrangement of Cases suggested by 
the Public School Latin Primer has been followed. Other 
useful material has also been brought under contribution 
from the same source ; but references and citations have 
also been made throughout the work to King Edward VI.'s 
Latin Grammar, to suit the convenience of those who may 
still prefer to use that compilation. 

It has been the Author's aim to produce a work essentially 
elementary,* and therefore, as before observed, no serious 
difficulties of Syntax have been proposed for the pupiVs exer- 
tions. But should the present work have a favourable recep- 
tion, a further one conceived in the same spirit and carrying 
on the more advanced rules of Composition will be (D.V.) 
offered to the public. 

The Author is conscious that this is very far from being a 
perfect work. He felt the want of a similar aid in the 
course of his duties in the instruction of the young, and 
long hoped that such a Book of Exercises might have been 
supplied by an abler hand. He trusts that the utility of the 
conception of this work may outweigh the imperfection of its 
execution in the estimation of the heads of schools, and that 
its reception may be such as to afford him the opportunity 
of remedying the deficiencies and inaccuracies which are 
almost incidental to the first passing of such a work through 
the press. 

H. S. 



* In St. Alban's Grammar School, the Progressive Latin Lesson Book is 
ased as introductory to Dr. Smith's First Latin Coarse. 



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CORRIGENDA, 



»» 


3 O. 
4. 


»» 


6. 


9) 


11. 


W 


12. 


}t 


13. 


»» 


14. 


»» 


16. 


»> 


21. 


»» 


84. 


»» 


66. 


»» 


70. 


>» 


84. 


l» 


85. 



For Imsband read husbandman. 

For nm read a rein. 

For anrig-fB read anriga-se. 

For tres Nom. read tres. Nent. 

For tolus read totus. 

For qnStuor read qnfttnor. 

For proBminm retid prseminm. 

15 and 17 Lines. Dele wood. 

Make a note that anus is of Fourth Declension. 

For mari read Yoc. mare. 

Ex. XL, 13. For commodayemt read commodaverant. 

17 Line. For lexi read legi. 

7th Line from bottom. For exper virtutis read expers. 

Ex. LXX, 3. For aliquis cupit, &c.f read quisque 
natare quam perire mavult. 
86. Ex. LXXI, 3. For horto read hortum. 

Ex. LXXI, 9. For quandam read cujusdam. 
88. Ex. LXXY, 2. For mortals read mortal. 
91. 12th Line from bottom. For 99 read 97. 
122. drd Line from bottom. For deditiorem read deditionem. 
125. 3rd Line from bottom. For moram read monuu. 



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THE PROGRESSIVE 

LATIN LESSON BOOK. 



LESSON L 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS I. 



Direction. This Booh^ though replete with exercises on 
Grammar, is not to he considered as intended to supersede the 
VM of the Latin Gramm^r^ constant and successive repetitions 
in which are held to he absolutely necessary to successful 
instruction. While the learner is committing to memory even 
the earliest portions of his Latin Grammar, he wUl he found to 
do readily the following exercises in translation. 

Note 1. Nouns ending in a of the First Declension are 
all feminine, except those which denote persons of the mas- 
culine gender, as lanista, a fencing master, <&c. 

Note 2. The Article a, an, or the is not to be translated 
into Latin, there being no Latin Article. 

Direction. The learner is to he well exercised in the First 
Declension^ hoth hy terminations and in full words, according 
to thefollounng example. 

EXAMPLE OF FIRST DECLENSION, 
rota — a, or the, wheel. 







Termixuition. 


Signs of Cue. 


Nom- 


Bot 


-ft 


a, or the, wheel 


Voc. 


ft 


-ft 





Ace. 


if 


-am 


a, or the, wheel 


Gen. 


tf 


-» 


of a, or of the, wheel 


Dat. 


» 


-» 


to, or for, the wheel 


AbL 


n 


-a 


by, from, with, or in th« 
wheel 

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Direction, n., g., d.^ ace, v., a., signify respectively in 
the following Exercises nominativCy genitive, dative^ acciisative, 
vocative, ablative, 

rotas — wheels, or the wheels. 







Termination. 


Signs of Case. 


t. Nom. 


Bot 


•SB 


the wheels 


Voc. 


it 


-SB 





Ace. 


ti 


-as 


the wheels 


Gen. 


yt 


-anim 


of wheels 


Dat. 


>i 


-is 


to, or for, wheels 


AbL 


>i 


■is 


by, from, with, or in the 
wheels. 



Note 3. The terminations in Latin express meanings 
which in English are represented by the Prepositions to, for, 
by, (fee, &c. In English a change in the meaning is much 
less frequently made by terminations than in the ancient 
languages. It is to be observed, however, in the Plural 
endings, as wheel, wheels, and in the Possessive case, king's, 
which is the Saxon Genitive king-es, the apostrophe or turn- 
ing off being used to mark the contraction. 

The STEM is that part, <kc. See P.S.L.P., p. 3. 

Direction. The learner at the discretion of the tutor may he 
tav^IU to distinguish here the different meanings of stem, root, 
character, suMx, <lcc, 

LESSON IL 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS II. 

The Dative and Ablative Plurals of dea, equa,filia, mula 
end sometimes in abus. 

In good prose writers the form in is is the more common, especially 
if an adjective be joined. Zumpt. Domina, soda, serva end in abua 
more commonly than in it. 

Zumpt throws doubt on asinaf nata, and says that conserva and liberta 
are found in the Roman lawyers. 

Note 4. In declining vacca, area, and other nouns ending 
in ca, we make the c soft when it precedes cp, and ^, and is, 
but leave it hard before the other endings. 



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3 

Decline Agricola et columba. 
A husband and a dove* 
Poena et ruina. 
A punishment and an overthrow. 

Direction. The above Exercise is to be written otU by the 
pupH, 

LESSON III. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS III. 

Decline (as before) Vacca et hostia 

A cow and a sacrifice, 
Ara et columbse. 
An altar and doves, 
Filia et Squa. 
A daughter and a mare. 
Csepse et bubula. 
Onions and beef. 

LESSON IV. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS IV. 

What are the Parts of Speech ? 

Noun or Substantive, Adjective, Pronoun, Verb declined. 

Adverb, Preposition, Conjunction, Interjection undeclined. 

What is a Noun ? 

. The name of anything. 

It is also called a Substantive (from sub and stare, whence 
also substance)^ meaning something which exists, as homo, 
a man ; virtus, virtue. 

What is an Adjective ? 

An Adjective is a word added to a Substantive {adjectus, 
cast to or added to), and expresses the quality of the Sub- 
stantive to which it belongs as m£nsa magna, a great table, 
i. e.f the quality of greatness is attributed to the table. 



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P.S.L.G. Notins comprise Substantives, Adjectives, and Pronouns ; 
but the term is often used when SubstantLVes alone are meant. OI088, 
Oram. See also page 2. 

LESSON V. 
LATIN VOCABULARY L WORDS OF FIRST DECLENSION. 
To be committed to memory before Exercise 1 is translated. 



A run. 


h&bena 


-89 


A 80vl, life, &n3fma -89 


An overihr(m 


, niTna 


-83 


A rib, costa -88 


A table, 


mensa 


-88 


^ss-rH**^- 


A song. 


cantil6na-8e 


A bench, 


tSlbtLla 


-88 


Punishment, poena -89 


A wheel, 


r5ta 


-88 


Pardon, vSnia -88 


Earth, 


terra 


-88 


Chest, coffer area -88 


Water, 


aqua 


-88 


A dove, pigeon, c51umba-89 


A Star, 


Stella 


-88 


A family, fftmllia -88 


An altar, 


Sra 


-88 


A sacrifice, hostia -88 


A cow, 


Tacca 


-88 








LESSON VL 



GRAMMAR PRAXIS V. 

How many numbers have Nouns 1 

Two, the Singular and the PluraL 

What does the Singular speak of? 

Of one object or person. Singularis from singulus, one of 
its kind. 

What does the Plural speak of ? 

Of more than one. Plurcdis from plus, piuris, more. 

How many Cases are there 1 

Six. The Nominative, Vocative, Accusative, Genitive, 
Dative, Ablative. 

ON THE LETTERS. 

What Letter which we employ in English is not used in 
Latin? 

W. 



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How are Letters divided ? 
Into Vowels and Consonants. 
What is the meaning of Vowels ? 
Letters sounding by themselves. 
They are a, e, i, o, u, y. 
What is the meaning of Consonants ? 
Letters sounding with the aid of Vowels. 
How are Consonants divided ? 

Into Mutes — b, c, d, g, k, p, q, and t : Liquids — 1, m, n, 
r : Spirants — f, h, j, s, v : Double — x and z, expressing two 
letters each, cs, ds. (See P.S.L.P., I.) 
EXERCISE I. 
ON FIRST DECLENSION. SING. NUMBER. 

1. Habena. 2. Ruinse (g). 3. Rotee (d). 4. Aqul 5, 
Hostia. 6. Arc4. 7. Columbse (g). 8. Famili&. 9. hos- 
tiee (d). 10. Vacca. 11. VenisB (g). 12. Mens4. 13. 
Stellse (d). 14. Tabula. 15. Terrse (g). 16. Columbi. 
17. Venia. 18. Arse (d). 19. Agricolse (g). 20. Animse 
(d). 21. Costa. 22, Poense (g). 23. Hosti&. 

LESSON VIL 

1. A rib. 2. Of a rein. 3. For a punishment 4. Of 
an overthrow. 5. By a rein. 6. From a song. 7. O 
Sacrifice! 8. By an overthrow. 9. To a table. 10. O 
Soul! 11. With a bench. 12. O wheel! 13. In awheel. 
14. With a rein. 15. Of a wheel. 16. Of earth. 17. By 
a star. 18. By an altar. 19. For a husbandman. 

LESSON VIIL 

VOCABULARY II.— WORDS OF FIRST DECLENSION. 

fferby herba -cb (h/nter, ostrSa -8e 

Mint, nientha db Cabbage, brassYca-se 

Oniorif coepa -a) Bief, bubttla -ae 

Parsnip, pastlnaca-ae Hen, gallina -sb 

^^^j I servant, famtila -»* Fencing-master, lankta -« 

Female ) ' W&maUf femina -se 

Daughter, filia -ae 

On some Nouns of this and Lbe next Vocabulary see note in Orammar Praxis 2. 

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6 

LESSON IX. 

VOCABULARY III. 

A gate, a door, porta -se A girl, puella -jo 

A berry, bacca -ae A plant, planta -sb 

A mare, 6qua -89 A grape, ftva -ae 

The moon, lana -ae An olive, Olea -ae 

A bean, feba -ae A lettuce, lactHca-ae 

Acoachman,charioteer, ) . _ 

dHver, \ *^^S '^ 

LESSON X. 

EXERCISE II.— ON PLURAL NUMBER. 

1. MenthsB (g). 2. CaBpl 3. OstrSis (d). 4. Bubula. 
5. GallinsB (n). 6. Cseparum. 7. Ararum. 8. Columb&. 
9. Costa. 10. Anima. 11. Venia. 12. Poenis (a). 13. 
Mentha. 14. Pastinacarum. 15. Herbis (a). 16. Costis 
(d). 17. Mensl 18. Brassicis (d). 19. Poenarum. 

1. Of an onion. 2. By a Cabbage. 3. For a hen. 4. 
Mint. 5. By mint. 6. By a pardon. 7. Doves (ace). 8. 
Onions (n). 9. For onions. 10. For beef. 11. By a hen. 
12. Of parsnips. 13. By Oysters. 14. To sacrifices. 15. 
On the earth. 16. From an oyster. 

Direction, The above Exercise to be prepared by pupih — 
on paper. If there is time for an oral examination* also, it 
might be advantageously prefaced by the declension of one or 
two examples, 

LESSON XI. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS VI. 

Explain what is meant by the Nominative Case of a Noun. 

It is the Noun as it is in itself, without any change of 
ending. (Derived from nomino-atumj I name, hence called 
the naming or nominative case). 

If all words were in th« Nominative, we sbonld have no need of De- 
clensions, i.e., the ubb of th"- Genitive. &C.. which are said to decline or 



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fall from the Nominative, and so are called cases, from cado'Cammf I 
fall. The ancient Grammarians called the Nom. rectiis casus ; the other 
cases they called oblique oases. 

Explain -what is the Vocative Case. 

It is the calling case (voco, I call), and is used when per- 
sons are addressed in any manner, or called upon to do auy 
thing, Sisjllif 0, my son. 

What is the Accusative Case ? 

It is the case which in the English translation comes after 
the Verb, and answers the question whom or what, as "John 
struck the dog." " John" is the Nominative, and ** the dog" 
the Accusative. Der., accuso-aium, I accuse. Exam, in 
P.S.L.P. quem video 1 Yvrum, 

LESSON XII. 
EXERCISE III.— FIRST DECLENSION— CoNTmtJED. 

MASCULINES OF FIRST DECLENSION AND FEMININES, DAT. AND ABL. IN ABUS. 

1. Ruinse (g). 1. RuinsB (n). 3. Mensis (a). 4. Bubula. 
5. Rotfie(g). 6. Plant8e(n). 7. Tabularum. 8. Famulabus 
(d). 9. Agricolis(a). 10. Aurigi8(d). 11. Mensarum. 12. 
Lactuca. 13. Habenis (d). 14. Vaccis (a). 15. Filiarum. 
16. Uvis(d). 17. Port8e(n). 18. Terr8e(g). 19. Aquarum. 
20. Columbis (d). 21. Luna. 22. Costarum. 23. Csepis 
rd). 24. FiUabus (a). 25. Oleis (d). ^^, Fabarum. 

EXERCISE IV. 

1. To mares. 2. Of songs. 3. For a rein. 4. Of a table. 
5. To souls. 6. By cabbages. 7. With overthrows. 8. O 
souls. 9. By plants. 10. With benches. 11. Of wheels. 
12. To daughters. 13. A moon (ace). 14. By ribs. 15. 
Fencing-masters. 16. To grapes. 17. For lettuces. 18. Of 
Onions. 19. Of a pardon. 20. Of a girl. 21. For parsnips. 
22. Of a cow. 23. ^^ berries. 24. To servants (female). 

LESSON XIII. 

EXERCISE V. 

1. Of a daughter. 2. By beef. 3. Of gates. 4. To 
olives. 5. Of herbs. 6. By hens. 7. Of altars. 8. Of 



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oysters. 9. A girl (ace). 10. By chests. 11. Of a coach- 
man. 12. For stars. 13. From altars. 14. Doves (ace). 
15. By daughters. 16. Of families. 17. Moons (ace). 18. 
To Women. 19. Of sacrifices. 20. Of beans. 21. Of 
grapes. 22. Of women. 23. Of servants. 24. For mares. 
25, By souls. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS VII.— CASES— Continued. 

Explain what is meant by the Genitive. 

It is called the getting case, from gigno genui, to beget, 
(P.S.L.P. the case of the proprietor) and is translated by of 
or from or by the possessive case in English, as John's book, 
liher Johannis, It answers the question wJiose or whereof 
P.S.L.P.. Cujus donumi Whose gift. Viri, a man's. 

Explain what is meant by the Dative. 

It is called the giving case, from do, dedi, datum, to give. 
P.S.L.P. — It is the case of the recipient, and is translated by 
to or for whorn or for what Cut ddtum, Viro, to a man. 

Explain what is meant by the Ablative. 

The Ablative or taking away case (from aufero ahlatum), 
so called from one of its uses (P.S.L.P.), is known by prepo- 
sitions expressed or understood, governing the Ablative. It 
answers the question by with whom or whaty P.S.L.P. A quo 
ddtum ? A vlro, by a man. 

It is also by the Ablative that the instrument or manner 
of doing any thing is expressed, as interfidtur suo gladio, he 
is killed with his own sword. 

Also than after the comparative degree takes the Ablative. 

LESSON XIV. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS VIII. 
What is meant by Gender 1 

The distinction of Nouns, as Masculine, Feminine, or Neu- 
ter, that is, neither of the two. P.S.L.P. 

What is the derivation of Gender ? 

Genus, pi. genera. 



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9 

What Nouns are always Masculine ? 

Males, Months, Winds, and People. 

What Nouns are always Feminine ? 

Females and Islands, and most names of Countries, Cities, 
and Trees. 

What are those Nouns called which expresss both sexes 
without change of termination ? as vulpes, a male or female 
fox. 

Common. 

Of what Gender is tigrisy a tiger or tigress ? 

Common are to either sex, &c. P.S.L.P., p. 12. 

CONCERNINa THE ABLATIVE. 

How is the Ablative Case Singular formed ? 

From the Accusative, by dropping the letter m, thus — 
musam, musd ; honorem, honore. As to the Second Declen- 
sion, the ancients used the letter o in the Nominative and 
Accusative, thus — dominus was dominos, and the Accusative 



LESSON XV. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS IX. 

Direction, Let th^ teacher exercise the pupil in the example 
follomng of an Adjective, bOnua-a-um, making him compare it 
with unus, solus, &c. Also, making him observe that the 
Feminine is like Nouns of the First JDeclension. 

Masculine. Feminine. Neuter. 

Term. Term. Term. 

Smg, Nom. bon -us bon -8, bon -um 

Voc. bon -e bon -S, bon -um 

Ace. bon -um bon -am bon -um 

Gen. bon -i bon -a bon -i 

Dat. bon -o bon -ae bon -o 

AbL bon -o bon -g, bon -o 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



Plu, 



Nona. 

Voc. 

Ace. 

Gen. 

Dat. 

Abl. 



10 

Masculine. 
Root. Tenn. 
bon -i 
bon -i 
bon -OS 
bon -oruttl 



Feminine. 
Boot Term, 
bon 'IB 
bon -8d 
bon -as 

bon -arum 



W ;ilj Of aU Genders. 



Keuter. 
Root. Term, 
bon -a 
bon -a 
bon -a 

bon -onun 



Directum. Let the teacher shew the similarity of tlie Mascu- 
line terminations of the preceding Adjective loith those of a 
Substantive of the Second Declension^ as follow. 

SECOND DECLENSION. 

Nominatives Singular of the Second Declension end in 
-us and -er in the Masculine, and -um in the Neuter. 





Singular. 




PluraL 




Term. 




Term. 


Nom. 


rustic -US 


Nom. 


rustic -i 


Voc. 


rustic -e 


Voc. 


rustic -i 


Ago. 


rustic -um 


Ace. 


rustic -OS 


Gen. 


rustic -i 


Gen. 


rustic -omm 


Dat. 


rustic -0 


Dat. 


rustic -is 


AbL 


rustic -0 


Abl. 


rustic -is 



When the Nominative ends in •'us the Vocative ends in -e. 
Nouns in iiis, make i, filius Jili, genitis-i, Virgilius-i. 

Direction. Also^ the similarity of the Neuter of bonus, with 
a Neuter Substantive of the Second Declension as follows. 



Nom. 

Voc. 

Ace. 

Gen. 

Dat 

AbL 



Singular. 
Boot. Term, 
verb -um 
verb -um 
verb -um 
verb -i 
verb -0 
verb -o 



Nom. 

Voe. 

Ace. 

Gen 

Dat. 

AbL 



FluraL 

Boot. Term, 

verb -a 

verb -a 

verb -a 

verb -onun 

verb -is 

verb -is 



In Neuter Nouns the Nominative, Accusative, and Vocar 
tive are alike, and in the Plural these all end in a. 

CONCORD OF ADJECTIVES WITH SUBSTANTIVES. 

Note 5. In writing Latin, the Adjective must be made to 
agree with the Substantive, thus : — 1st. If the Substantive 



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is of the Masculine Gender, the Adjective must likewise be 
Masculine : as quintus auriga, the fifth charioteer ; if Femi- 
nine, the Adjective is to be Feminine; as una olea, one olive; 
if Neuter, then the Adjective will be neuter: as quartum 
helium, the fourth war. 2nd. If the Substantive is of the 
Singular Number, the Adjective must be in the Singular ; 
but if Plural, the Adjective will be Phu-al. 3rd. If the Sub- 
stantive is of the Nominative Case, the Adjective must be so 
likewise ; and so through all the cases. 

LESSON XVI. 

VOCABULARY IV.— NUMERAL ADJECTIVES AND SOME 
SUBSTANTIVES OF SECOND DECLENSION. 



One, 
Two, 

Three, 



CABDmAL Numbers DECLmABLE. 

unus-a-um 

duo. Declined thus: — Nom. dtlo sb-o. Gen. -orum arum 

-orum. Dat. and Ahl, -obus -abus -obus. 
tres. Nom. tria. Gen. trium. Dat. tribus. 

Ordinal Numbers. 



First, 


primus -a-um 


Tenth, 


dScimus -a-um 


Second, 


secundus-aum 


Eleventh, 


undecimus -a-um 


Third, 


tertiuB -a-um 


Twelfth, 


duodecimus-a-um 


Fourth, 


quartus -a-um 


A lark, 


alanda-ae 


Fifth, 


quintus -a-um 


An apple^ 


, p6mum-i (N.) 


Sixth, 


sextus -a-um 


Aunt, 


amtta-8e 


Seventh, 


Septimus -aum 


War, 


bellum-i 


Eighth, 


octavus -a-um 


Boy, 


puer-i 


Ninth, 


nonus -a-um 


A word. 


verbum 



Nouns ending in er of Second Declension are Declined aa 
follows : — 





LESSON XVII. 




GRAMMAR PRAXIS X. 




Singular. Plural. 


Nom. 


Puer Puer-i 


Voc. 


Puer Puer-i 


Ace. 


Puer-um Puer-os 


Gen. 


Puer-i Puer-ori 


Dat. 


Puer-o Puer-is 


Ace. 


Puer-o Puer is 




Digitized by VjO 



12 

So are declined adulter, armiger, gener, socer, Itber, presbyter, 
vesper; but most Nouna drop the Vowel from the ending of 
the Nominative in the Gen., Dat, Ace, and Abl, as follows : 





Singular. 


Plural. 


Nom. 


Magister 


Magistr-i 


Voc. 




Magistr-i 


Ace. 


Magiatr-um . . . . 


Magistr-os 


Gen. 


Magi8tr-i 


Magistr-omm 


Dat. 


Magistr-o . . . . 


Magistr-is 


AbL 


Magistr 

iri/rck Art*, hfi^rmct f.n t. 


Magistr-is 
hfl Ser»nnd Deftlfinaion. 



Umis, toltLSy solus, <fec., are Declined as follows : — 

Singular. Plural. 

Nom. Unu8-a-um Uni 8d-a 

Ace Unum*am-tuii Unos-as-a 

Gen Unius Unorum-arum-onun 

^A ::::: SnU-o ::::: {JSIh^^^-^- 

LESSON XVIIL 

EXERCISE VI. 

CONCORD OF ADJECTIVES WITH SUBSTANTIVES. 

1. Unius Verbi. 2. Nona galling. 3. UndecimeB ceepee (g), 
4. Quintus auriga. 5. Decimae portse (d). 6. Secundft lac- 
tuca. 7. Uni fabse. 8. Tertiee fiiiae. 9. Quartum helium. 
10. Amitis (d). 11. Alaudarum. 12. Undecimum aurigam. 
13. Quarto lanistsB. 14. Unam oleam. 15. Tres lanistse. 
16. Tria verba. 17. Octavum pSmum. 18. Nonam costam. 
19. Duodecimo puero (a.) 

LESSON XIX. 

EXERCISE VII. 

1. One parsnip (n. and ace.) 2. Of the fourth hea 3. The 
eighth onion (ace.) 4. The fifth star. 5. The fourth fencer. 
6. To the eleventh war. 7. From the ninth fencer. 8. To 
the eleventh apple. 9. The sixth word. 10. The seventh 
coachman (n. and ace.) 11. Of one countiyman. 12. Of 
th^ tirat grape. 13. Of the seventh boj, 14. The fourth 



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ploughman (n. and aco.) 15. To the fifth daughter. 16. Of 
the seventh boy. 17. To the eighth war. 18. By the 
eleventh apple. 

LESSON XX. 
VOCABULARY V. 



Not, 
And, 
But, 
Daily, 
Arms, ) 
Weapons, \ 



non 
et 
Bed 
quotidie 

arma-orum 



Lastly, poBtrSmo 

But lately, ) ^^ 
In time past, ) ^"^'**" 
Long since, jamdtldum 
Hitherto, hactenus 
Or, aut 



CARDINAL NUMBERS INDECLINABLE. 



Four, quStuor 
Five, quinque 
SiXj sex 
Seven, septem 
Eight, octo 
Nine, nSvem 
Ten, d3cem 



.Eleven, 

Twelve, 

Thirteen, 

Fourteen, 

Fifteen, 

Sixteen, 



undScim 

duSdScim 

trSdecim 

quatuordecim 

quindScim 

sSdScim 



Seventeen, septendScim 



LESSON XXL 



VOCABULARY VL 



Countryman, 

Archer, 

Apple, fruit, 

Trumpet, 

Ma(jle, 

Fight {wUh jUts), 

Battle, 

Maidservant, 

Spider, 

AncJior, 

Freedrwoman, 

She-ass, 

Goddess, 

Mivalling, 

Patient, \ 

Impartial, ( 

Fair, t 

Just, ) 



rusttcufl 

B&gittarius 

pomum-i 

bucclnum 

&qulla 

pugDa 

andlla 

&r&nea 

anc5ra 

Uberta 

aslna 

Dea 

semiilua 

sequua 



Bad, evU, 

White, 

Harsh, ) 

Hoarse, ) 

Clay, 

She-mule, 

Daughter, 

Lady, 

I, 

Thou, 

He, 

We, 

You or ye, 

They, 

This, also 

He, she, it. 

This, that 

— of yours 



i\ 



m&lus 
albiis 



argilla 

mula 

nfita 

dQmina 

«go 

tu 

me 

noB 
vos 
iUi 

(m.), hie ; {{.), 
hsec ; (n.)) hoc 

iste 



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u 

LESSON XXII. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XL 

What is a Pronoun? 

A word used instead of a Noun (proj for or instead of, 
rwmen). 

P.S.L.P. Pranomen, an inflected part of speech, ranking among 
Nouns, and so called because it is a substitute for a name. Olots, Oram. 

What is a Declension ? 

The Flexion of Nouns. F.S,L,P. Gloss. Gram. 

How many Declensions are there ? 

Five. Distinguished by the endings of the Genitive Case. 

What are the endings of the Grenitives of the five De- 
clensions ? 

1st in 0?, 2nd in i, 3rd in is, 4th in us, 5th in ei. 

Of what Declension are the following Nouns : — "piMas-atis, 
spes spei, insuloroe, familia-ce, ensis-is, dmor-is, fructus-us, 
grex gregis, dies did, quercus-us, prosmium-i, dius-i, res ret. 

What is a Verb ? 

A Verb {Verbum) is the chief word (Verhum*) in every 
sentence. 

It is accordingly, par excellence, the Verbum, no other word or sen* 
tence being complete without it. 

How are Pronouns Declined ? 
With Number, Case, and Gender, 
What are Personal Pronouns? 
Pronouns which express persons or things. 
State in what manner the several persons singular and 
plural are used with Verbs. 

Ego and nos are 1st persons sing, and plural) 

Tu and vos are 2nd ditto ditto > respectively. 

Ille and Illi are 3rd ditto ditto ) 

*P.S.L.P. So called, as the word which effects disoQune. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



15 

These are Nominative Cases to the Verb in a sentence, but 
are seldom expressed before the Verb. They are said then 
to be understood: as currunt; i.e. iUi (understood) before 
currunt. 

State when a Verb is said to be in the first, second, or 
third person respectively. 

When ego, tu, ille, <lcc. are understood before them. 

Is sui a Personal Pronoun ? 

Yes, but also called a Reflexive Pronoun. 



LESSON XXIII. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XII. 

Personal. 

Sing. Nom. Eg8, / Plural. NOs, we 
Voc. — — 

Ace. Me, me Nob, us 

Gen. M6i, of me NostrOm, of us 

Dat. Mlhi, to or for me Nobis, to us 

Abl. Me,/rom or by m>e Nobia, from or by us 

Nom. Tu, thou or you Vos, you 

Voc. Tu, thou or you Vos, you 

Ace, Te, thu or you Vos, you 

Gen. Ttli, of thu or you Vestriim, of you 

Dab. llbi, to thee or you Vobis, to you 

Abl. Te, from or by thee or you Vobis, from (w* by you 

For is, ea, id, see Lesson infra. 

Singular. Plural. 

Ille — that (yonder). 

Nom. nie, illft, illtid, he, she, it IIH, illse, ill&, they 
Voc. 

Ace. Ilium, illam, illtid, him, her, it Illos, illas, ill&, them 

Gen. IIKu&, of him, &e. Illorum, illarum, illorum, of th^m 

Dat. Jl]i, to him f &c. IWiSy to them 

Abl. lUo, ilia, illo, by him, &c. Illis, from or by them 

Observe that ipse, otherwise declined like Ule, makes ipsvm 
in the Neuter. Iste is declined like Ule, i.e. iste, istd, istud. 



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Hie, thiSf (near me), 

Sing. Nom. hie, hsec, hoe Plural. Nom. hi, hse, hsee 
Ace. hiiiic, hanc, hoc Ace. hoB, has, hsdo 

Gen. hujtis Gen. h5rum, harum, honim 

Dat. huic Dat. his 

Abl. hoc, hae, h5e Abl. his 

Fgo, tu, and mi, are Personal Pronouns, and are purely 
Substantival ; the rest are generally Adjectival, but are often 
used Substantively. P.S.L.P. § 38. 

LESSON XXIV. 

EXERCISE VIII. 

1. Of me the seventh boy. 2. To us seven boys. 3. To 
you good boys. 4. By those goddesses. 5. Of those just 
daughters. 6. This twelfth freed woman (ace.) 7. To these 
white wood pigeons. 8. Lastly rivalling archers (aoc.) 9. 
That bad she-ass (ace.) 10. To me the just countryman. 
11. Of the two wood pigeons. 12. These sixteen white 
eagles. 13. That daughter of yours. 14. Of this eagle. 
15. Of that evil maid-servant. 16. Of these bad apples. 

LESSON XXV. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XIII.— THE VERB SUM. PRESENT 
TENSE. INDICATIVE. 

Direction. The Teacher should, before commencing thefol- 
lovdng Exercise, practise the Pupil in the Present Tense in the 
several forms below — 

Sing. First Person sum, lam 
Seeond Person 6s, thou art 
Third Person est, Jie, she or it is 

Plural First Person stimtls, we are 

Second Person estis, you or ye are 
Third Person sunt, they are 

First Person non sum, / am not 
Second Person non es, thou art not 
Third Person non est, Jieisnot 



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Plural First Person non sumus, toe are not 

Second Person non estis, you or ye are not 
Third Person non sunt, they are not 

These Persons may be indicated by Pronouns as follows : — 

ego sum nos sumus 

tu es YOB estis 

^h ^\-^ 

The Pronouns are commonly used to express emphasis. 

egone sum nosne sumus 

tune es vosne estis 

In this manner may also be used nonne, as nonne mm, 
am not I ; nonne sumiis, are not we ; nonne es, art not thou ; 
nonne estis, are not ye ; nonn^ est, is not he ; nonne sunt, are 
not they. So also annon may be used. 

Note 6. Words in the Nominative are used both before 
and after sum, es, est, <5sc. Most other Verbs require an Ac- 
cusative after them. 

Note 7. The pronouDS I, thou, he, &c., are not to be trans- 
lated by ego, tu, ille, nos, &c., except in particular instances. 
These tvUl be Iiereafter noticed ivith an asterisk, thus * 

Verbs have two Numbers, the Singular and the Plural, and 
Three Persons in each number. 



LESSON XXVI. 

Note 8. All Nouns are of the Third Person, except when 
conjoined with the Pronouns ego, I, nos, we, tu, thou or you, 
and vos, ye or you ; but nouns of the Vocative Case are pro- 
perly of the Second Person, because tu or vos, according as 
the Noun is Singular or Plural, must necessarily be under- 
stood. 

Note 9. In making Latin the Nominative must agree with 
the Verb. If the Nominative be in the Plural the Verb 
must be in the Plural, and if the Nominative be of the 
First Person the Verb must be of the First Person, and so 
of the Second and Third Persons. 



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est mihi, / have {there is to tm) 

est nobis, toe have {there is to us) 

sunt mihi, I have {there are to me) 

sunt nobis, we have {there are to us) ^ 

est tibi, thou hast or you have {there is to thee) 

sunt vobis, you have {there are to you) 

est illi, ?ie has {there is to him) 

sunt iUi, they have {there are to him) 

EXERCISE IX. 

I. Thb Verb Sum, Peesent Tense. 2. Est mihi for habeo. 8. Neoa- 
TiVB AND Interrogative Forms. 4. The Pronouns hic, ille, &c. 

1. Non sum. 2. Non estis. 3. Sunt mihi habenae. 4. 
Non es sexta filia. 5. Sunt nobis quatuor filiee. 6. Non 
sunt nobis sex mens®. 7. Est imdecima porta. 8. Sum 
agricola. 9. Illae sunt puellse. 10. Vos estis amitse nostrse. 

II. Est nobis rauca buocina. 12. Sunt nobis aquae. 13. 
Ilia est tertia colimiba. 14. Nonne est nona alauda. 15. 
Illi stmt septem lanistse. 16. Quatuor famulabus. 17. 
Quinque auriganmL 18. Est dominus nobis. 

LESSON XXVU. 
EXERCISE X. 
1. Are not they cows? 2. Are not you two ploughmen 1 
3. I am one star. 4. I have the sixth altar. 5. Have we 
not a ploughman 1 6. You are not hoarse doves. 7. It is 
the eighth coffer. 8. Art thou not the tenth sacrifice. 9. I 
have those three cabbages. 10. I am a good soul. 11. It 
is the seventh berry. 12. We have eight aimts. 13. Have 
we four tables? 14. It is not the third gate. 15. Are they 
not benches? 16. We have nine cows. 17. Those beans 
of ours. 18. You are (sing.) a countryman. 

LESSON XXVIII. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XIV. 
Future Simple. Imperfect Tense. 

Sing, 2ro, I shall he Sing, eram, I was 

eria, th^u wUt he eras, thou wast 

erit, he will he erat, he was 

Plural, erimus, we shall he Plural, eramus, we were 

eritis, ye shall he eratis, ye were 

enrnt, they shall he erant, they were 



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Pretsrpebpect Tense. 

Sing, ftii, I have been 

huBti, thou host been 
ftUt) he has been 
Plural, f ulmus, we have been 
fuistis, ye have been 
fuSrunt vel fuSre, they have 
been 



Future Perfect. 

Sing, fii^ro, / shall have been 

fueris, thou loUt have been 
fuerit, he will have been 
Plural, fuerimus, we shall have been 
fueritis, ye shall have been 
f ueiint, they shall have been 



Note. The third person is to 
be translated sometimes, there 
are, there were, it toill be, there 
vdll be. 



PreterplUperpbct Tense. 

Sing, fueram, I had been 

fueras, thou hadst been 
fuerat, he had been 
Plural, fueramus, we had been 
fueratis, ye had been 
fuerant, they had been 

Note that fui, the Perfect Tense, Indicative Mood, of e«w, 
is most frequently translated by "was," instead of "have 
been," as in the grammars. 

LESSON XXIX. 

EXERCISE XL 

THE VERB SUM. PAST TENSES. FUTURE. 

1. Jamdudimi eram nona puella. 2. Nos fuimus novem 
libertsB. 3. Erimus quinque dominse. 4. Fui hactenus 
octava famula. 5. Ilia erit undecima vacca. 6. Tu eris 
undecima nata. 7. Eramus duo aurigse. 8. Vos fueritis 
tres mulse. 9. Eramus septem ancillse. 10. Eritis decem 
rustici. 11. Fuistis quinque sagittarii. 12. Quatuor aquilse 
nobis ftierunt. 13. Nos sumus decem Dese. 14. Nonne. 
erunt mihi imdecim ancorse. 15. Sunt illi novem araneee. 
16. Est tibi argilla. 17. Erunt octo bella. 18. Anna non 
sunt bellum. 19. Simt illis quinque albse famulse. 

LESSON XXX. 

EXERCISE XII. 

1. They were four good archers. 2. We were not these 
four countrymen. 3. We were but lately two girls. 4. We 
were not two ladies, but two good girls. 5. You were long 
since three good husbandmen. 6. We have six doves 



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and four larks. 7. It was not a she-ass, but tliat mule. 
8. They have been eight sacrifices, 9. Are they thirteen 
tables? 10. They were but lately soxds. 11. Lastly, was 
I not the aunt? 12. Wast thou not long since the fifth 
archer? 13. Had they not been seven spiders? 14. The 
archers had been fencers daily. 15. Am I this freedwoman? 
16. Are we fi-eedwomen or maid-servants? 

LESSON XXXI. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XV. 
The following numeral and pronominal Adjectives vmus 
one ; solus, alone ; totus, the whole ; uUibs, any ; nullus, none ; 
alth', the other of two; iUer, which of the two; neuter, 
neither of the two, make the Genitive Singular to end in 
liLS, and the Dative in i. 

Decline tohis, &c., as unus, Lesson xvi. Decline aliuSt another, as 
f oUowB : 
Smg. Nom. ftUtis, filiS., aliad Plural, alii, alise, edift 

Ace. alium, aliam, aliud alios, alias, ali& 

Gen. aMs aliorum, aliarum, aliorum 

Dat. alii aliis 

AbL alio, alia, alio aliis 

But alter, uter, neuter, as follows : — 

SiNouLAB. Plural. 

Nom Alter-a-um Alteii-8B-& 

Ace Aiterum-am-um Aiteros-as-& 

Gen Aiterins Aiterorum-arum-oruin 

Dat Alteri Alteris 

Abl Altero-a-O Alteris 

Uter is Declined with the omission of e in all the cases, 
except the Nominative Masculine. 

Ambo-Se-O ] 

Ambos or Q-aS-O f f ^^^ l xv. 

Amborum-arum-orum ( 
Ambobus-abns-obns ) 

There are some Neuters of the Second Declension ending 
in us, as virus, pelagus, and vulgus, which last is also Mascu- 
line ; also some Feminines, as vannus, &c. 

Exercise Feminlna stand in vs, P.S.L.P., p. 13. 

Dbclinb Georgius with primus, making Latin for George L 
fllius with unus, making Latin for One son. 
deus with duo, making Latin for Two Gods. 

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21 



LESSON XXXII. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XVL 
Dboline dea with untUy making Latin for One goddess. 
mtUa with tres, making Latin for Three mules. 

There are some Feminines in i£«, as anus. 

Decline dnua with deHrus, making Latin for A mad old woman. 
tUerque with lingua, making Latin for Both languages. 

LESSON XXXIIL 



Indeed, 



VOCABUL 

Why, cur 

Wketker, an 

Also an asks a question. 

!qiiYdem 
san^ 

Or aut 

Introduces alternative as a fact. 
S.L.D. 
Or va 

Implies an alternative still to be 
chosen. S.L.D. 

Thu8y 80, I J^ 

In such a manner. 
So, thus, ade5 

In such a degree. 
So, tam 

So great, tantus 

So many, tot 

By chance, fort^ 

Much, very Tmtch vald^ 



ART VII 

What 
Also, even, 
Afterwards, 

Although, 

Now, 
Neither, 

Neither, nor, \ 

Nothing, 
Unless, 
Never, 
Without {prep.) 

Seldom, rarely. 

Than, 

Therefore, ) 

Then, ) 

Apart, 

In a short time. 

Sometimes, 

As yet, 

Formerly, 

To-day, 



quid 
Stiam 
posteS 
etsi, tametsi 
quamvis 
nunc 
neque 

neque-neque 
nec-nec 
nYhil 
nisi 

nunquam 
sYnS (takes Abla- 
tive after it) 
rSr6 
qui^m 

igltur 

sSorsum 

brSvi 

aliquando 

adhuc 

olim 

hSdie 



LESSON XXXIV. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XVII. 

IMPERATIVE MOOD. 



Pbesent Tense. 
Sing. Ss, he thou 
Plural, este, he ye 



Future Simple. 
Sing, esto, thm must he 
esto, he must he 
estote, ye must he 
sunto, they must he 



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CONJUNCTIVE MOOD. 

Prbsent Tbnsb. Imperfect Tense. 

sim, / may be essem vel forem, / might be 

818, thou mayeat be esses vel forSs, thou mighte$t be 

sKt, he may be eaa&t vol for6t, he might be 

simtLs, we may be essemus Tel foremus, toe might be 

niXa, ye may be essetKs vel foretis, ye might be 

flinty th^ m>ay be essent vel f orent, they might be 

EXERCISE XIII. 

1. Cur adeo bonus es? 2. An es animal 3. Nonneeritis 
boni 1 4. Nihil est nisi pastinacae et cepae. 5. Neque pueri 
neque puellee smnus. 6. Nunc v6ro eritis mese Dese. 7. 
Certd DomineB bonsB fuerunt. 8. Erunt nobis aut sex alb» 
columbse aut sex alaudee. 9. HsBcpuellaadeoestjusta. 10. 
Hie Sagittarius adeo est aemxQus. 11. Hsec argilla non est 
alba. 12. Nonne ^it liberta eemula? 13. Annon sunt 
sedecim malsB libertae. 14. Hie auriga est m^us aut* certd 
semulus. 

LESSON XXXV. 

EXERCISE XIV. 

1. Be ye indeed just countrymen. 2. Be ye certainly 
rivalling archers. 3. Let them never be white eagles. 4. 
Let them not therefore be rival maid-servants. 5. Are they 
not every day very just coimtrymen. 6. May they not be 
by chance white she-mules. 7. She was rarely just to the 
she-mules. 8. Without five evil spiders (abl.) 9. Hitherto 
I have been a freed woman. 10. Lastly, she had been the 
twenty-first freedwoman. 11. A battle therefore without 
weapons (abL) 12. Formerly sacrifices were sometimes with- 
out altars (abL) 13. Altars in a short time will be without 
sacrifices. 

LESSON XXXVI. 

E X EJR C I S:E XV. 

1. Have we not hitherto been countrymen 1 2. These two 
freedwomen will be in a short time aimts. 3. Why are they 

* Translate as if it were written aut est malm aut, &c. The first is 
never expressed except in poetry. Smith. 



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not eleven songs? 4. I have now rarely seven doves. 5. 
They had been but lately eleven hens. 6. Were these not 
both (of them) she-asses ? 7. Unless you have been formerly 
maid-servants. 8. Thus you have been sometimes four rival- 
ling families. 9. You never shall be ten goddesses. 

10. They* will never be twelve, or even ten, white eagles. 

11. Although of an eagle alone. 12. Will they not be as 
yet the first rivalling mares. 13. Thus these are the sacri- 
fices of the tenth archer. 14. Either* mares or she-asses 
will be in the battle f to-day. 



LESSON XXXVII. 

GRAMMAB PRAXIS XVIII. 
Decline like bonus. 



Ctijus 


cuja 


cujum 


w?u>8e 


M^iis 


me^ 


meum 


mine 


Tiiiis 


tui 


tuimi 


thine 


Suiis 


su^ 


suum 


his ottm. 



Also, noster and vester are declined like nigery see Lesson 
infra. Also like bomiSy but e is omitted in all the cases but 
the Nominative and Vocative, Singular, Masculine. 

Dbci^inb Peritus noster lanista, our ikUled fencing-master 
Quintus vester puer, your fifth hoy 
Ingens with coluber, a huge snake 
Uterque with civltas, both states 
Una mala ilva, one bad grape 
Ager with ftrmientarius, a cornfield 
Acutus tuus culter, your sharp knife 
Natus vrith alter, one of two sons 
Legatus vnth uterque, both ambassadors 
Alius vjith vannus, another winnowingfan. 



• Understand Vd. See Vocabulary V, t In Pugna. 

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24 

LESSON XXXVIIL 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XIX. 

Declinb Alius with anciUa. 
Peritus hie nisticus. 
Gravissimum hoc bellum. 
nie sequus socer, father-in-law. 
Ilia septima puella. 
Albus with vacca and noster. 
iEmxila haec ^us. 
Tres bonsB feminee. 
Malus tuus corvus. 
Noster vdth alba liberta 
Uterque gallus, coch 

LESSON XXXIX. 
VOCABULARY VIII. 



A lord, 


d5mYniis-i 


Great, 


xuagnuB 


Not onCf 
None, nOf 


nullus-a-um 


Narrow, 
Black, 


angustus 
n«grer-ra-rum 


The whole, 


totuB-a-um 


Broad, 


l&tus 


A female slave, 


serva-ae 


Bordering, 


finXttoius 


A hingdom, 


regnum-i 


Greedy, 


&Yldus 


A calf. 


vlttQus-i 


Joyful, 


Isetus 


A hook, 


Uber-ri (m.) 


Dead, 


znortiius 


A female eompaniony 


sQcia 


Sacrificed, 


xnact&tus 


A grove, 


Iticus-i 


Foolish, 


Btultus 


A river. 


fltlviiis 


Little, 


parvus 


God, 


d6us-i 


Bitter, 


amarus 


MasUr, 


magister-n 


Sour, 


acerbus 


S(m, 


filius-i 


Field, 


^er-ri 


Wall, 


murus-i 


Grandfather, 


&VU8-i 


Beast, 


bestia-88 


Friendly, 


amicufl-a-um 


Idle, 


ign5vus-a-um 


Tender, 


tener 


Spacious, 


ampluB 


Frequent, many, 


cre6er-ra-rum 


Ripe, 


mSturus 


Given, 


datus-a-um 


High, deep. 


alius 




(part) 



LESSON XL. 

EXERCISE XVI. 

1. Non ero laetus magister. 2. Postremb enint crebrsB 
pugnse. 3. Sumus Iseti amicL 4. Hi vituli non fiierunt 



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felices hostise. 5. Non sunt multsB hostise. 6. Vestrse vaccse 
sunt magnse bestise. 7. Sunt hostise pingues. 8. Non sunt 
nostrsB hostise vituli. 9. Vos essetis hact^nus magni Dei. 
10. Non fuerunt finitimi igri. 11. Hsb pastinacse nunquam 
sunt 2,mar8e. 12. Sint hostise nuUi pingues vituli. 13. Hse 
hostiae non erant mactatse. 14. Omne tuum regnum hactenus 
fuit amplum. 15. Toti regno lato. 16. Hie Sagittarius erat 
quotldiS semxdus. 17. Hi lanistee. essent hodie amici. 18. 
Illud non est justum bellum. 19. Hie fluvius esset latus et 
altus. 20. Hie est m^lus liber. 



LESSON XLI. 

EXERCISE XVII. 

1. I * am as yet a joyful lord. 2. They * might be little 
books. 3. The grandfathers were never gieedy masters. 4. 
It was sometimes a foolish calf. 5. We were long since little 
charioteers. 6. Those sons were but lately rivalling archers. 
7. The eagles will not be friendly charioteers. 8. The whole 
grove will not be broad and large. 9. Ye * are not white 
calves but black. 10. The very mild old woman.* 11. These 
have been greedy and foolish spiders. 12. This most heavy 
war. 13. There might be no large anchors. 14. Those 
grandfathers will not be idle. 

LESSON XLII. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XX. MOODS. 

What is the meaning of a Mood ? 

A Mood (modus) expresses the manner in which the action 
or state denoted by the Verb exists. Zumpt 

What is the meaning of the Indicative Mood 1 

The Indicative is the Mood, which points out (indicat). 
It declares the action or state to exist simply and as a fact. 

• Use Superlative. 

D 



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26 

What is the meaning of the Imperative Mood 1 

The Mood which commands (imperat)^ desires, or entreats. 

What is the meaning of the Conjunctive 1 

The Conjunctive declares the action or state to exist, as 
something conceived by the mind. It is called Potential 
\i'hen it denotes that it might, could, should, or would exist ; 
and Subjunctive when it is subjoined to certain words. 
J^umpt. 

The Conjunctive Mood (P.S.L.P.) has two uses : 1. Pure, 
or not subordinate to another Verb. 2. Subjunctive, or 
subordinate to another Verb (subjungo, junctum). 

The Pure Conjunctive is rendered in English with aux- 
iliary Verbs for signs, generally would or should, sometimes 
could, may, might, shall, or will. 

How is the present Conjunctive also used Imperatively ? 

As eamus, let us go, or optatively {opto, I wish) ; as nsfelix, 
may you be happy. 

What is the Infinitive Mood 1 

It is called Infinite {infinihiSy undefined). 

It is a Mood to which is assigned no limits {fines) of 
number or persons, as is the case with the other Moods. 

LESSON XLIII. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXI. 

Note, The Pupil should be made to observe that "she" 
and "it" are the Third Person as well as " he." 

** There is not," " there are not," are also to be rendered 
non esty non sunt 

SmouLAB. Plubal. 

Terminatioiu. Tenuinations. 

Boot. M. F. N. Bool M. F. N. 

Nom. T6ner -a -um Nom. Tener -i -se -a 

Voc. „ -a -um Voc. „ -i -» -a 

Ace. „ -um -am -nm Ace. „ -ob -as -a 
Gen. „ -i -89 -i Gen. „ -omm -arum -orom 

Dat. „ -o -89 -0 Dat. „ -is -Ib -iS 

AbL „ -o -a -O AbL „ -is -Ifl -is 



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Direction, The Teacher is to instruct his Pupil, \st, that 
the Adjectives in -us make e in the Vocative; and 2nc?, thaJt 
sfyme Adjectives ending in -er drop e from the root, in tlie 
9ame manner as Substantives in -er, as follows : — 



Nonu 


nlger 


nigr-a 


. . nigrum 


Voc. 


mger 


nigr-a 


nigr-um 


Ace. 


nigr-nm 


nigr-am 


nigrum 


Gen. 


mgr-i 


mgrSB 


. . . mgr-i 


Dat. 


nigr-o 


nigr-SB 


mgr-o 


Abl. 


mgr-o 


nigr-a 

LESSON XLIV. 


mgr-o 



GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXII. 

Direction. The Teojcher should now exercise his Pupils in 
the various Moods and Tenses of the Verb Sum. 

PERFECT, PLUPERFECT, CONJUNCTIVE OR POTENTIAL. 

CONTmUlBD FBOM LESSON XXXIV. 

fuerim, I may have been. fuissem, I might have been. 

f ueris, thou m^yst ha/ve been. fuisses, thou mightest have been, 

fuerit, he may have been. fuisset, Jie might have been. 

fueiimiis, we may have been. fuissemus, we might have been. 

fueritis, ye may have been. fuissetis, ye might have been. 

fuerint, ihey may have been. fuiasent, they might have been. 

The Preserit Indicative is often found in English, with the 
Participle in ing, with the signs am, art, is, are, and likewise 
the Preterimperfect, with the signs was, wert, were. It would 
be wron^ to translate by sum, Jhc. or erar/i, d;c., and the 
Active Participle, such sentences as — I am doing; I was 
building, which are to be rendered facio, oedifico. 

LESSON XLV. 

EXERCISE XVIII. 

1. Aunon fui decimus lanista? 2. Eratne quarta aranea? 
3. Nonne fuerit primus coluber? 4. An fuit sexta aquila 
magna 1 5. Fuerat undecima ancilla nigra. 6. Estne tertia 
anima Iseta? 7. Est quidem septima psena maxima. 8. 
Certe undecima vSnia fuit data. 9. Quarta uva est major. 
10. Fuerant verb quinque ignavi aurigSB. 



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EXERCISE XIX. 
1. She was not the second greedy girl. 2. There were 
neither seven onions nor seven apples. 3. As yet, this is the 
fifth snake. 4. Is it not a little mare I 5. Is she not the 
eleventh foolish woman? 6. The second woman was idle. 
7. This was the seventh ripe bean. 8. They had eight bit- 
ter herbs. 9. Has it not been the fifth black mare ? 10. It 
has been the tenth tender rib. 11. Afterwards there will 
be nine great battles. 12. Will there not be fourteen nar- 
row rivers ] 13. Hitherto he has been a tender grandfather. 

LESSON XLVI. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXIII. 
What are Tenses ? 

The Tenses are used to express the times in which an 
action or event takes place. 

In what Times or Tenses must be put anything which is 
done, or to be done, to be, or to be about to be ? 

The time in which anything is done, takes place, or is to 
take place, &c., must be either Present, Past, or Future ; 
i.e., an action or event must be taking place now, or have 
taken place, or be about to take place. 

There is then a general division of all Tenses into, 1st, 
Present ; 2nd, Past ; 3rd, Future. What other division of 
Tenses is there ? 

Another division is that which commonly is found in 
Latin Grammars : Ist, Present ; 2nd, Imperfect ; 3rd, Per- 
fect or Past Definitive ; 4th, Pluperfect or Past Perfect ; 
5th, first and second or Simple and Perfect Futures. 



Nom. 

Voc. 

Ace. 

Gen, 

Dat. 

AbL 



LESSON XLVIL 






GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXIV. 




PRONOUNS— Continued. 






Mm. Fern. Neut 
is ea id Nom. 
wanting Voc 
eum eam id Ace. 


Mm. 
ii 

wanting 
eoB 


Fern, 
ess 

eas 


Neut 
ea 

ea 


ejua Gen. 
ei Dat. 
eo ea eo Abl. 


eorum 

iis 

iis 


earum 
vel 


eorum 
eia 




Digitized by V. 


^ooQle 





29 





Has. 


Fem. 


Nent. 


Mas. Fem. 


Neut. 


Nom. idem 


e&dem 


tdem 


Nom. iidem eaedem 


eadem 


Voc. 


wanting 






Voc. wanting 




Aoc. 


emidem 


eandem 


Idem 


Ace. eosdem easdem 


e^em 


Gten. 


ejusdem 






Gen. eonmdem eanindem eonmdem 


Dat. 


eidem 






Dat. iisdem or eisdem 




AbL 


eodem 


eftdem 


eodem 


AbL iisdem or eisdem 






Mas. 


Fem. 


Neut. 


Mas. Fem. 


Neut. 


Nom. 


ipse^ 


ipsa 


ipsum 


Nom. ipai ipsss 


ipsa 


Voc. 


wanting 






Voc. wanting 




Ace. 


ipsum 


ipsam 


ipsum 


Ace. ipaos ipsas 


ipsa 


Gen. 


ipsius 






Gen. ipsorum ipsarum 


ipsorum 


Dat 


ipsi 






Dat. ipsis 




Abl. 


ipso 


ipsa 


ipso 


Abi. ipsis 





Ipse is like ilk with exception of Nominative and Accusa- 
tive, Neuter, Singular, as observed at Grammar Praxis XI I. 

LESSON XLVIII. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXV. 

1. How are Adjectives declined ? 

According to the rules for Substantives of the first three 
declensions. 

2. What are Adjectives of three terminations? two and 
one terminations 1 

3. With which will you class Possessive Pronouns ? 

4. It has been noticed by what declensions Adjectives of 
three terminations are declined. After what declension are 
Adjectives of two and Adjectives of one termination declined? 

Some Adjectives of three terminations are declined as 
follows : — 





Singular. 


Plural. 




N. V. 


acer acris ficre iharp. 


N. V. acres 


acria 


Ace. 


acrem acre 


• Ace. ScrSs 


acria 


Gen. 


acrls 


Gen. acrium 




Dat. 


acri 


Dat. acribus 




Abl. 


acri 


Abl. acribus 





Distinguish Adjective, Reflective, Possessive, Demonstra- 
tive, Relative, and Interrogative Pronouns. 

The Pronouns vieus, tuns, «nd suus have the same fcases as 
their Substantives, when the word own can be put after the 
Pronoun. 



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LESSON XLIX. 






VOCABULARY IX. 




Ttdhative, 
Chattenng, 


garruluB 


A wood, 
^ frog. 


sylva 
rana-aB 


Crafty, 


callidus 


A nose, 


nasus 


Convenient, 


commoduA 


Arm, 


brSchium 


Learned, 


doctus 


Paw, 


ungula 


Sad, 


moQstus 


Log, 


tig3lum 


True, 


vgnis 


Turnip, 


napus 


Forbidden, 


vetitus 


Thistle, 


caiduus 


Unknown, 


ignotufl 


Thorn, 


spina 


Fiery, 


ignSus 


OU, 


oleum 


yotorious, ) 
Famous, \ 


famosus 


Ant, 


formica 


Gracchus, 


Gracchus-i 


More generally bad sense 


Meat, 


cibus-i 


Jlound, 


rQtundiis 


Anger, 


irase 


Wandering, 


vagus 
vagans-tis 


Always, 


semper 
1 tamen 


Gentle, 


mansuetus 


ing, but, hoivever, 


Bare, 


nudus 


Uflually put after one word so 


Provident, ) 
Cautious, ) 


J providufl 
] cautus 


clause. Riddle. 




Companion, 


86ciu8-i 


Hurtful, 


noxius 


Companion, female 


socia 


Many, 


multus (with neut. 


^ Perhaps, 


( f orsan 
} forsitan 


When "much " it takes a gen. 


Tongue, 
Way, 


lingua 
via 


Corrupted, 
Stale, 


cormptufl 
putridus 






rancidua 



GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXVI. 

Decline idem with socitis^ regina, regnum, majuSy istud, 
tigillum, 

LESSON L. 

EXERCISE XX. 

1. Of the same deep river. 2. Will they have been the 
same wandering calves? 3. By the same bordering fields. 
4. Of the same dead beasts. 5. For the same chattering 
female companion. 6. In the same sharp thorn. 7. The 
same meat is cornipted. 8. Corrupted meat is hurtful to 
men. 9. Your little log in that river. 10. They themselves 
were sharp. 11. Both states were great. 12. Both knives 
were sharp. 13. Both sons were ambassadors. 14. The 
fencers, however, were skilled (men). 



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LESSON LI. 

EXERCISE XXI. 

1. Although stars are not joyful soxQs. 2. Punishment is 
not pardon. 3. This deep and narrow river is bitter. 4. 
The whole wall is high. 6. No ripe grape will be bitter. 6. 
Of no ripe grape. 7. Art thou the same idle hoy 1 8. They 
are never foolish boys. 9. We are the same good grand- 
fathers. 10. Those female slaves and freed- women are bad 
female companions. 11. Was not the calf dead? 12. That 
field is not large and broad, but narrow. 13. These same 
female companions are now slaves. 14. There are mad 
women in the fields. 15. Bad boys are seldom glad boys. 
16. Are these same not white hensi 17. These are unknown 
woods. 18. A broad way and large fields. 19. This is a 
forbidden apple, and that a greedy boy. 20. These same 
bare white arms are never idle. 

LESSON LIL 
EXERCISE XXII. 

1. Hae t^men vagse fuissent stellae. 2. Esto Isetus. 3. 
Fuerint adhuc multsB spinse. 4. Nostras fabse non fuerint 
magnse. 5. Essent multi cardui. 6. Erant dudum ignotse 
stellsB. 7. Hoc 5l6um forsan est rancidum. 8. Fuerint 
altsB portae. 9. Fuerunt jamdudum SBmulsB nostrae gallinae. 
10. Ira noxia est vetlta. 11. Simus boni. 12. Hi sint 
gamili aurigae. 13. Sintne has forsan acerbae baccae] 14. 
Estote semper vetitae eaedem uvaa. 15. Fuit tamen magna 
aranea in muro. 

LESSON LIIL 

EXERCISE XXIII. 

1. Hoc bellum gravissimum erit. 2. Hoc bracchium solum 
esset nudum. 3. Esto tu semper provida f ilia. 4. Vestrae 
olesB sunt acerbae. 5. Estote vos semper amici. 6. Vobis 
pugna vetita est. 7. Postremo ira est noxia. 8. Nobis arma 
non fuerunt hactenus ignota. 9. Hae uvae sunt acerbae. 10. 
lUi napi sunt rot audi. 11. Estote laetae social. 12. Estote 



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providi et cauti. 13. Illse futuree sint socisB. 14. Foret 
Ivus meestus. 15. Nos fuissemus aurigse. 16. Illi futiiri 
sint magistri. 17. Futura sint bella. 

LESSON LIV. 

EXERCISE XXIV. 

1. The aunt though always sad was talkative. 2. Little 
logs are in the river. 3. That river might not have been 
always narrow. 4. The ant is not idle but provident. 5. 
Be always true. 6. Gracchus was always famous but gentle. 
7. The meat might not be corrupt. 8. These same boys 
were unhappy. 9. Oil might have been sometimes bad. 
10. Your lords were learned. 11. They have been wander- 
ing frogs. 12. Let them be unknown. 13. We may not be 
about to be crafty girls, but we shall be foolish ones. 14. 
The same diligent countrymen will be talkative. 

LESSON LV. 

EXERCISE XXV. 

1. These thorns may be hurtful. 2. Be now wise nnd 
not talkative. 3. She may have been a gentle not a bitter 
woman. 4. Be all of ye good boys. 5. Those beautiful 
calves are about to be sacrifices. 6. She might indeed be an 
unknown woman. 7. You may be about to be perhaps 
maidservants. 8. You may be about to be wandering 
buffoons. 9. There would be thirteen fights. 10. Perhaps 
there may have been white doves. 11. He might not be 
their companion. 12. They may yet be round turnips, 
13. Let them be hurtful. 14. Onions miy sometimes be 
bad (ones). 

LESSON LVL 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXVII. 

What endings have Singular Nominatives of the First 
Declension ? 

What three endings have Singular Nominatives of the 
Second Declension ? 



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How do words of the Second Declension in -tis and -er 
form their Plural Nominative ? 

And how do words of the Second Declension in -urn form 
their Plural Nominative ? 



THIRD DECLENSION. 



Nouns of the third Declension are some of them declined 



as follows : 



Nom. 

Voc. 

Ace. 

Qen. 

Dat. 

Abl 



Singular. 
Ay-is 
Av-is 

Av-em 
Av-is 

Av-i 

Av-e 



Plubal. 
Av-es 
Av-es 
Av-es 
Av-ium 
Av-ibus 

Av-ibUB 



Some having Nominatives in es are declined in like man- 
ner, as nubes, coedea. Others increase in the Genitive, as : — 



SmauLAB. Plural. 

Nom. Parens Parent-es 

Voc. Parens Parent-eS 

Ace. Parent-em Parent-es 

Gen. Parent-is Parent-um 

Dat. Parent-i Parent-ibus 

AbL Parent-e Parent-ibUS 



Singular. Plural. 

N. V. Lapis Lapid-es 

Ace. Lapid-em Lapid-eS 

Qen. Lapid-is Lapid-um 

Pat. Lapid-i Lapid-ibus 

AbL Lapid-e Lapid-ibUB 



Note. — Lapis is supposed to have been originally Lapidsj 
from which the Genitive was made by introduction of i. So 
sermo was sermons, making sennonis naturally in the Genitive. 





Singular. 


Plural. 




Singular. 


Plural. 


Nom. 


Virgo 


Virgin es 


Nom. 


, Leo 


Leon-es 


Voc. 


Virgo 


Virgin-es 


Voc. 


Leo 


Leon-es 


Ace. 


Virgin-em 


Virgin-es 


Ace. 


Leon-em 


Leon-es 


Qen. 


Virgin-is 


Virgin-um 


Qen. 


Leon-is 


Leon-um 


Dat. 


Virgin-i 


Virgin-ibUS 


Dat. 


Leon-i 


Leon-ibus 


AbL 


Virgin-e 


Virginibus 


AbL 


Leon-e 


Lcon-ibns 


Nom. 


Pater 


Patr-eS 


Nona. 


Miles 


MiUt-es 


Voc. 


Pater 


Patr-es 


Voc. 


Miles 


Milit-es 


Ace. 


Patr-em 


Patr-eS 


Ace. 


Milit-em 


Milit-es 


Gen. 


Patr-is 


Patr-nm 


Qen. 


MiUt-is 


Milit-um 


Dat. 


Patr-i 


Patr-ibus 


Dat 


Milit-i 


Milit-ibUS 


AbL 


Patr-e 


Patr-ibUS 


AbL 


Milit-e 

Digitized b^ 


Milit-ibus 

/GooQie 



34 





SlNQULAR. 


Plural. 




Singular. 


Plural. 


Nom. 


Ars 


Art-es 


Nom. 


Nox 


Noct-es 


Voc. 


Ars 


Art-es 


Voc. 


Nox 


Noct-es 


Ace. 


Art-em 


Art-es 


Ace. 


Noct-em 


Noct-es 


Gen. 


Art-is 


Artium 


Gen. 


Noct-is 


Noct-ium 


Dat. 


Art-i 


ArtibUS 


Dat. 


Noct-l 


Noct-ibus 


AbL 


Art-e 


Art-ibuS 


AbL 


Noct-6 


Noct-ibus 


euter 


B are declined as follow : 


— 






Nom. 


Mare 


Mar-ia 


Nom. 


Gen-US 


Gener-a 


Voc. 


Mar-i 


Mar-ia 


Voc. 


Gen-US 


Gener-a 


Ace. 


Mar-e 


Mar-ia 


Ace. 


Gen-US 


Gener-a 


Gen. 


Mar-is 


Mar-ium 


Gen. 


Gener-is 


Gener-um 


Dat. 


Mar-i 


Maribus 


Dat. 


Gener-i 


Gener-ibuS 


AbL 


Mar-i 


Mar-ibuS 


AbL 


Gener-e 


Gener-ibus 



GRAMMAR QUESTIONS. 
What are parisyllables 1 What imparisyllables 1 
See sec. 20 P.S.L.P. ; K. Edw. VI. Lat. Gr., sec. 16, obs. 4. 

RHYME TO BE COMMITTED TO MEMORY PROM LATTER. 

What Nouns form their Ablative Singular in i instead of el 

Nouns which end in al, ar, e, make i in the Ablative Sin- 
gular instead of e. 

Rhyme to be learnt — Edw. VI. Lat. Gr., sec. 16, obs. 3. 

LESSON LVIL 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXVIII.— FIRST CONJUGATION OF 
REGULAR VERBS. INDICATIVE MOOD. PRESENT TENSE. 



Singular. 

First Person am-6 / love 

Second Person am-as thou lovest 

Third Person am-&t he loves 



Plural. 
First Person am-amUS we love 
Second Person am-atis ye love 
Third Person am-aut they love 



Interrogatively with apiro. 

spirone do I breathe 
spirasne dost thou breathe 
spiratne does he breathe 

Also with an examples, spero I hope 

annon volo Ifiy 



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GRAMMAR QUESTIONS. 

Into what voices are Verbs divided ? 

Verbs are divided into two voices. The Active and the 
Passive. 

What division is to be noticed concerning Active Verbs ? 

That into Transitive and Intransitive. 

What is a Transitive Verb ? 

A Verb is called Transitive when the action passes on to 
the Noun following : as ego vinco te, I conquer thee. 

Transitive is derived from tranSy across, and co, I go ; so 
that a Verb Transitive is a Verb whose action goes across or 
passes on to the Noun or object following. 

What is meant by the subject and the object ? 

The Nominative to the Verb is called the subject or 
agent, and the word which receives the action is called the 
object. It is put in the Accusative, as vaccce the cows 
(nom. or sub.) amant love (the Verb) vitulos (ace. or ob.); 
or, amitce (sub.) locant (verb) cdaudas (ob.) The aunts 
place larks. 

Some Adjectives are declined like the third declension of 
Substantives. Those of one termination are declined thus : 

SiNGULAB. Plural. 

Nom. and Voc. felix fe]ic-es-I& 

Ace. felic-em (neut) felicia felic-es-I& 

Qen. felic-is feliclnm 

Dat. felic-i felic-IbUS 

Abl. felic-6 felic-ibus 

Those of two terminations as follows :— 

Singular. Plural. 

Nom. and Voc, tristis (neut.) triste trist-es-ia 

Ace trist-em (neut.) triat-e trist-es-ia 

Gen. trist-is trist-ium 

Dat. triflt-i trist-ibus 

Abl trist-i triBt-ibua 

For those of three terminatioiu see Lesson zlviii 

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LESSON LVIIL 



VOCABULARY X.— VERBS OF FIRST CONJUGATION. 



Totoalk, 
To love, Itke, 
To plan, lay out, 
To value, 
To fly. 

To fly often to and ) 
fro, \ 

To plough. 
To water or irrigatey 
To baUd, 
To cheat. 



To ornament, 

To eat, dine off. 
To swim. 
To drive away, 
To inhabit, live, or 

dwell in, 
To taste. 
Sea, 

Pompey, 
Friend, 
Sugar, 



ambtilare 

amare 

I5care 

SBstimare 

volare 

volitare 

&rare 

irrigare 

sedificare 

dgfraudare 

omare 

exomare 

coenare 

natarc 

ftLgare 

h&bitare 

gii stare 

m&re-ifi 

Pompeius 

amicus 

Bacch3rum-i 



Feather, 
EnougA, 



Light, swift, 
Wife, ^ 
Physician, 
Hail, 
Frail, 



peiiiia-89 

satis 

cervTifl 

levis-is 

conjux-iigifl 

medicus-i 

grando-iDis 

fragilis-iB 



In the same place, ibidem 
For ibidem loci 



Jackdaw, 


graculus 


Garden, 


hortu8-i 


Mountain, 


mons-tis 


Bark, vessel. 


r&tis-is 


Flock, troop, 


grex-gia 


Wa^np, 


vespa-ae 


Hor»e, 


equus-i 


Henven, 


coelumi 


Cold, 


gelidiis-a-um 


Basket, 


calathus-i 


Swelling, 


turgidus 


Cheese, 


caseus-i 


Pig, 


porcus-i 



LESSON LIX. 



Decline, orally or in writing, 

Ingens formldo, fear 
Triste bellum 
Humilis populus. 
Ca,ni8 utilis. 
Mulier sapiens. 
Quod vis longum crus. 
Mater tua. 
Bqs iratus, oxy hull. 



idem with miles, 
idem vnih mulier. 
idem toith flumen. 
utraque femina nobilis, 
quisque Justus vir. 



LESSON LX. 

Pecl;nb Opus vestrum. 
Suum corpus. 
iSuus gladius. 



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Dboline Soi cives. 

Yestra consuetudo. 
Aliqua charta. 
QusBvis toga. 
Quodlibet corniu 



LESSON LXL 

Dbouns Quodque cruentum bellum. 
Qui with alius and signum. 
Pes&ima ista pu8ll& 









LKSSON LXIL 










GBAMMAB \ 


PRAXIS XXIX. 










RELATIVES, ftc. 








SiNGULAB. 






Plubal. 






1^. 


Fern. 


Kentw 




Mm 


F^mL 


N«iil 


NonL 


qui 


quae 


quod 


Kom. 


qui 


quae 


quse 


Ace. 


quern 


Quam 


quod 


Aca 


quos 


quas 


qua 


Gen. 


cujus 






Gen. 


quorum 


quarum 


quorum 


Dat. 


cui 






Dat 


quibuflof 


> queis 




AbL 


quo 


qui 


quo or qui 


AbL 


quibus Of 


•queia 





So is declined also gut, guce, quod Interrogatiye. In like 
manner are declined the compounds of qui^ i.e., quidam, a 
certain one ; qiioedam, quoddam, or guiddam (a certain per- 
son whom I know but do not choose to mention bj name — 
Edw. VI., 27 p.) ; quivis, quilibet, anyone you choose ; quicun- 
qWy whosoever. 

Quis, qud, quid, is a Pronoun Indefinite ; quis, qucB, quid, 
who or what ) is a Pronoun Interrogative, and both are de- 
clined like qui, with slight variation ; as is also aliquis, some 
one (generally some great or important object) ; and other 
compounds of quis are also declined like qui, as ecquis, who ; 
quimam, who, which, what pray ; qiiisquis, whoever, what- 
ever; quisquam, quaequam, quicquam, any, any one, any 
body, any thing, something ; quispiam and quidpiam or quip- 
piam, any one, any body, any thing. 



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Quis, ecquiSf and aliquis make the Feminine Gender of the 
Nominative Case Singular, and the Nominative and Accusa- 
tive Cases Plural in qud, Ed. VI. L. G. 

Distinguish between quis and qui, 

Quis and its compounds are used Substantively and qui 
Adjectivelj, as quid condlii, but quod consilium. Ed. VL G. 

Decline Idem qui. 

Of the two Singular Neuter forms, when should quod bo 
used and when quid ? 

LESSON LXIII. 

EXERCISE XXVI. 

1. Do I love good men? 2. We love children who are 
happy. 3. The joyful lark always loves a field. 4. The 
physician builds houses.^ 5. We are placing your baskets 
to-day. 6. The horses plough the fields. 7. Your physician 
and his son were yesterday both cautious. 8. Do we cheat 
the crafty spiders 1 9. Do not the aunts place round 
cheeses 1 10. I do value that pig much. 11. The jackdaw, 
in a beautiful troop of peacocks, ornamented itself. 12. 
You like sugar much. 13. The archers are swimming. 14. 
The peacocks drove away the jackdaw. 

LESSON LXIV. 

EXERCISE XXVII. 

1. Are the white pigeons tasting the sacrifice 1 2. A deep 
river always waters the gardens. 3. He dwells in a high 
mountain. 4. The timid doves are flying to-day. 5. God 
inhabits the high heaven. 6. The proud jackdaw adorned 
itself with the feathers' of a peacock. 7. Ships in* a swelling 
sea. 8. The arms were yesterday bare. 9. The water is 
cold. 10. Is not a friend convenient? 11. A turnip is 
round. 12. A foolish friend is talkative. 13. Pompey and 
Gracchus were formerly famous. 14. The nimble stags are 
fleeing in the high mountains.' 

X Houses, domos. ' Put the Adjective and Substantive in Ablative. 
' Use Ablative. 

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39 

LESSON LXV. 
EXERCISE XXVIII. 
1. Liber olim foret famosus. 2. Sagittarius non amat 
libros. 3. Vaccse semper amant vitulos. 4. An amitse 
amant alaudas ? 5. Hodie csenamus caseum. 6. Irrigas 
hortum. 7. Vituli non gustant amaram aquam. 8. Forskn 
defraudamus teneras conjuges. 9. Hodi^ aramus magnos 
et latos agros. 10. Fort^ locant comniodos calathos. 11. 
Amone vetitum sacoharuml 12. Medicine locant doctos 
libros? 13. Jam satis^ grandinis misit* Jupiter. 14. 
Lanistse csenant caseum et cepas. 15. Pavidse damse in 
alto fluvio natant. 16. Mariti amant teneras conjuges. 
17. Columbae semper habitant hortum. 18. Fluvii vagi 
irrigant hortos. 19. Avi Iseti gustant . bubulam. 20. 
Aliquando medici ambulant in horreo.' 21. Nonne erant 
calathi, casei, et bubula in horreo. 22, Sunto formicse sem- 
per cautse. 33. Pompeius et Gracchus olim fuemnt amici. 





LESSON LXVL 






VOCABULARY XI. 




Avr, 


aer-eris 


The day after. 


] )ostridie 


In presence of, 


coram* 


Heated, 


i ervidus 


Without tJui know- 1 ^,^^^' 


Benign, 


beniguus 


hdge of, 


r 


Dry, 


j arfdufi 
j siccus 


Presently, soon, 


mox 


To demand, 


flag^tare 


Wild boar, 


ap6r 


Hard, 


durus 


Cherry, 


cfirasum 


Patient, 


patiena 


To reproach. 


vltiiperare 


Stag, 


cervus 


To walloto, 


volutare 


Lion, 


leo leonis 


Warlike, 


bellicosus 


Swift, 


j velox 
/ rapidus * 


Pertaining to war, 


bellicus 


Pear, 


pKrum 


With amnis. With a bird, pemix. 


Leg, 


crus, cruris 


Alsopemicib 


us alis, with swift 


Sow, 


BUS, Bute 


wings. 




A ltogether,entirely 


omnino 


Sick, 


segrotus 


Wood, 


lignum 


AU, 


totus 


Bristled, 


setoBUs 


The day hef<yre, 


pridiS 


Pea, 


pisum 


Strength, might, 


J vis, vim. 
j plu. vires 


Famed, 
Bam, 


notus 
horreum 






Dark, 


obscurus 



* Observe satis takes after it the Genitive Case, » misit, has sent. 
» Horreum, a bam. * Preposition takes Ablative after it, » Hapidus 
with cBstus and color, excessive. 



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LESSON LXVII. 
VOCABULARY XII. 



Thick, 


densuB 


Slow, 


lentus 


Wild, 


ISruB 


Half dead. 


semianimii 


Swiftness, 


pemicitas-siis 


Proud, 


BuperbuB 


Dolphin, 


delphinuB 


Covenanted, 


pactua 


Fruitful, 


fecundus, fenx 


Reaper, 


messor-is 


Before, 


pra (prep.) 


Weary, 


fessuB 


Together, with, cum (prep.) 


Heat, 


sestuB-UB 


Tree, 


arbor-oris 


Pmd, 


Btagnum 


Fleet, swift, 


pemiz-icis 


Safe, 


tutus 


Turf, 


C8Qspe8-itis 


Reward, 


prsBiniuiii 


F<yrd, 


vadum 


Philosopher, 


phllosophus 


She-goat, 


c&pella 


Sophist, 


Bophista 


Cottage, 


tttgttrium 


Cfrasshopper, 


cicftda 


oitvni/ng, 


nXtlduB 


MUd, fiexibU, 


mitiB-iB 


Poor, 


pauper-is 


goodnatured. 


WUlaw, 
Beech, 


fftgus 


A sheep, a flock 
of sheep. 




Sheep, 


8vifl-ifl 


Chestnut, 


caBt&nea 


Bright, 


laclduB 


Soft, 


mollis 


To require, 


poBtulare 


Productim 


uber 



LESSON LXVIIL 



VOCABULARY XIII. 



Cardinal Numbers. 



Eighteen, 

Nineteen, 

Twenty, 

Twenty-one, 

Tvfenty-eight, 

Twenty^ine, 



Twentieth, 

Thirtieth, 

Fortieth, 

Fiftieth, 

Siastieth, 



duo-de-viginti 

un-de-viginti 

viginti 

viginti unuB 

duo-de-triginta 

un-de-triginta 



In the river, in fluvio 

In the air, in aere 

In the garden, in horto 

In the woods, in sylvis 

In the waters, in aquis 

To be present, adesse 

To be absent, abesse 



Ordinal Numbers. 



viceBimuB 

tricesimus 

quadragesimuB 

quinquagesimuB 

sezagesimus 



Seventieth, 
Eightieth, 
Ninetieth, 
Hundredth, 



Beptuagesimus 
octogesimuB 
nonagesimuB 
centesimus 



Twothousandth,hiB millesimuB 



Nom. vicesimiiB primns 

Aca vicesimiini primum 

Gen. vicesimi primi 

Dat. vicesimo primo 

AbL yicesmo primo 



-a pnma 

•am primam 

•» prim® 

-m prima 
-a prima 



-um pnmam 

-mn primum 

•i primi 

•O primo 

-O primo 



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LESSON LXIX. 

GRAMMAH PRAXIS XXX. COMPARISON OF ADJECTIVEa 

How is an Adjective compared ? 

By Three Degrees — Positive, Comparative, and Superla- 
tive. 

What is the meaning of Positive ? 

Denotes the quality absolutely. Edw. VL L. G., 19. 

What is the meaning of Comparative 1 

Expresses an increase of the quantity. Edw. VI. L. G. 19. 

What is the meaning of Superlative ] 

Increases the comparison to the greatest degree. Edw. 
VL L. G. 19. 

How is the Comparative formed ? 

From the Positive, by changing i or w of the Genitive 
into idr. 

How may the Superlative be formed ? 

From tbe Positive, by changing i or w of the Genitive 

into immus. (P.S.L.P.) 

Adjectives of Thbee Terhinationb. 

Positive. Comparative. Superlative, 

doctus gen. doct-i doct-ior doct-issimus 

Adjectives of Two Terminations. 

brevYs gen. brSv-Ks brev-ior brev-issiniiis 

How do Adjectives in er form their Superlative ? 

By adding rimUs to the Nominative. 

pulcher pnlchr-ior pulcher-rfmtta 

vetiiB veter-ior veter-rtratifl 

How do Adjectives in lis form their Superlative 1 

According to the general rule, but some by changing is into 
Umils, as 

facilis facil-limufl. 

How many Terminations have Adjectives of the Compara- 
tive Degree ? 

Is there any resemblance in the English and Latin forms 
of Comparison I 

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42 



What two distinct renderings may be given to the Super- 
lative in Latin ) 

Doctimmua may be rendered "most learned" and "very 
learned/' and so of other Superlatives. 

LESSON LXX. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXI. ADJECTIVES FORMTNG THEIR 
COMPARISON IRREGULARLY. 



PoeitiTB. 
BQntLs, good 
M&ltls, had 
Magntls, great 
Parvus, littU 
MulttLs, much 
Dives, rich 
NSquam, wicked 

Eztemus, ouitwaird 

InfSrus, low 

PostfiruB, hehind 

StLperuB, high 



JtiTezuB, young 
S&iez, old 



Comparative. 
mSUor, better 
pSjor, 'ioorse 
major, greater 
minor, leas 
plus, more 
ditior, richer 
nSqulor, more wicked 

exterior, m4>re outward 

inferior, lower 

posterior, more heJwnd 

stiperior, higher 

interior, m.ore inward 

junior, younger, or 

more young 
senior, older, or mart 

old 
prior, former 



Superlative. 
optimiiB, best 
pessimus, worst 
maximus, greateat 
minimus, leaM 
plurimus, most 
dltissimuB, richest 
nequissimus, mott 

wicked 
extremuB vel extbnus, 

mx}»t outward 
inflmus vel imus, 

lowest 
postremus Tel posttL- 

mus, m^it behind 
BnprSmusvel sanmiuB, 

highest 
intlmuB, innermost, 

most inward 



pnmuB, first 



LESSON LXXL 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXIL 

What Positives, Comparatives, and Superlatives are formed 
from Prepositions ? 



Pr6pe, nigh 

Extra, 

Super, above 

CitrS, on the near tide 

UltrS, beyond 

Prse, before 

De, down from 

Post, afur 

Ante, b^ort 



propior, nearer 

externus, 

supenis, 

cit3rior, hither 

ulterior, further 

prior, 

dStSrior, less good 

posterns, 

anterior, more in front 



proxmius, nearest 

citimus. most hither 
ultimus, last 

dSterrimus, Uaet good 



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43 

Show how the Comparatives and Superlatives of some 

Adyerbs are formed from Adjectives. 

From many Adjectives, as certus, are formed Adverbs after 

the following model — cert as, certi, certiory certiUs, certisdmus, 

ceHisdm^. See P.S.L.P. 

How are the Comparatives and Superlatives of mcUedicua, 

&c., formed? 

nuJedicus -dicentior -dioentiasimus 

benef icuB -ficentior -ficentissimuB 

benevOluB -volentior -volentissiinus 

If a vowel comes before iw in the Nominative Case of an 
Adjective, how is the comparison usually made ? 

By magisy more, and maxim^, most ; as piiLS, godly ; magi$ 
pins, more godly ; maxime pijis, most godly. 

What are the exceptions ] 

Where qu precedes i«, as arUtquuSy antiquior, csquus^ 
cequiar. 

LESSON LXXII. 

EXERCISE XXIX. 

1. Erant duriora cerasa in horto. 2. Fuisset pridie duris- 
simum pirum in arbore. 3. Incola cum socio. 4. Ceenat 
pastinacas et pira. 5. Cervus vituperat crura. 6. Sunt 
nobis mitia poma in horto. 7. Equus esset heri msestissi- 
mua 8. Undeviginti semianimes columbae. 9. Nasus cum 
oculo magno. 10. Aper turbavit vadum. 11. Felix pecus, 
ite, capellaB. 12. Millesimus calathus est in tuo horto. 13. 
Duodeviginti nigrse aranese. 14. Fuerunt nobis castanese 
moUes. 15. Non salices amaras gustabitis. 16. Vacca, et 
capella et patiens ovis socii fugre cum leone. 17. Sunt 
septemdecim apri in sylvis. 18. Galli et gallinse nunquam 
natant. 19. Duo de triginta duriores unguiee. 20. Apri 
fuisaeut semianimes in sylvia. 21. Porci semianimes non gus- 
tant pira. 22. Delphini natant in mari. 23. Gustaut 
sedecim pira clam patre. 24. Cervus totis viribus per^ flumen 
natat. 

^ Perjlumen, through the river. 

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44 

LESSON LXXIIL 

EXERCISE XXX. 

1. The just grandfather demands his reward. 2. Ton 
taste daily the sacrifices among^ the thick beeches. 3. The 
anchor is in the river. 4. The wasp tastes daily the forbid- 
den sugar. 5. The pig is altogether wild among the thick 
beeches. 6. The she-goat requires a reward to-day. 7. O 
stag, where is your famed swiftness. 8. The wasp tastes by 
chance the dry cheese. 9. So the water will be more 
bitter without' sugar. 10. He ploughs with difiiculty the 
dry clay. 11. Tlie little pig is altogether wilder than the 
sow. 12. They all despised the proud philosopher. 13. 
The reapers were wearied with the excessive heat. 14. They 
drive away the hoarse grasshoppers. 

LESSON LXXIV. 

EXERCISE XXXI. 

1. The sick physician values his friends. 2. What a proud 
cock is walking in your garden? 3. The swift' stag flies 
with all his might into the woods. 4. The craftiest she-goat 
cheats the pig in the presence of the cock. 5. A hard pear 
is the most hurtful food. 6. The wasp is to-day most weary. 
7. The horse is swimming in the river. 8. The lark flies 
often in the air. 9. The wood pigeon by chance might fly 
in our garden to-day. 10. He dines, unknown to his phy- 
sician, off"* corrupt meat and hard peas. 11. The earth is 
always very fruitful 12. The hen demands the covenanted 
reward. 

LESSON LXXV. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXIIL 

Comparatives are used with qvxxm. The Nouns both bo- 
fore and after quam are put in the same case. 

* InteTf which takes after it the Accusative. ' Sine takes the Abl*- 
^ve after it. ' Vclox. * Off, not to be translated. 



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45 

Nouns when compared by means of quhm are placed in 
the same case on both sides (Edward YI. Latin Grammar, 
148, 137) aa : 

Ennius major fuit natu qud,m Plaiitus et NsBvius. 
Enniua was older than PLautus and Nasvius, 

Ego hominem callidiorem vidi neminem quilm Phormionem. 
/ have seen no one more crafty than Fliormio. 

Comparatives, unless thus used with qu^mj take after them 
an Ablative (Edward VI. Latin Grammar, 148, 136) as : 

Vilius argentum est auro, virtutibus aurum, i.e., qu^m 
aurum, qu^m virtutes sunt. 

Silver is cheaper than gold, gold than virtueSy that is, than 
gold (is) ; than virtues (are). 

If the complement of a Comparative is an Adjective, it is 
also put in the Comparative and in the same case. 
Obscurior qud^m darior, obscuriorem qudm clariorem, 

LESSON LXXVT. 

EXERCISE XXXII. 

1. Habitat caelum cum amico. 2. Durissimum lignum 
natat in stagno. 3. Fluvius irrigat fervidissimum locum in 
horto. 4. Cervus amat rapidissimos fluvios pree^ sylvis. 
5. Columbee hS-bent pisa duriora. 6. Vespse volitant in 
horto. 7. Locat duriores spinas cum ligno. 8. Gallus csenat 
formicas. 9. Asellus insueta voce evocat feras. 10. Unde- 
viginti cardui sunt cibus. 11. Alaudee pernices volitant 
totis viribus in aere. 12. Nos dociles gustamus fervidum 
vinum cum oleis. 13. Omnes BBstimanius sacch3,rum. 14. 
Gracillimae puellse habitant obscuras sylvas. 15. Nunquam 
gustabam meliorem quam hunc caseum. 16. Nunquam am- 
bulavi in latiori horto. 17. Nunquam irrigavi latiores agros. 
18. Aurigae viginti ibant' fervidis rot is. 19. Septimus fui. 
20. Vicesima puella aderat. 21. Viginti ettresequiaberant, 
22. Stellse lucidiores quam fervidiores. 

* Pra STfhis, in preference to the woods. • Ibant, were going. 

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46 

LESSON LXXVII. 

EXERCISE XXXIII. 

1. The physicians taste the best pears without cherries. 
2. We lay out the worst baskets with wood. 3. These horses 
entirely like (or love) beans. 4. Are not the bitterest cherries 
safest? 5. They will be less hens than those. 6. These 
may have been formerly the least pigs. 7. The sacrifices 
might have been yesterday the covenanted reward. 8. The 
most heated cherries are the ripest 9. The patient cows 
were the most productive. 10. Will the father taste the bit- 
ter cheese with onions? 11. Five hundred gardens more 
barren than fruitful. 12. The reaper is more weary than 
the ploughman. 

LESSON" LXXVIIL 

EXERCISE XXXIV. 

1. The cherry is fairer than the pear. 2. The stag was 
swifter than the she-goat. 3. Pompey built three hundred 
more houses than Gracchus. 4. The stags were swimming 
faster than the horses. 5. Pompey was building high rather 
than safe houses. 6. The garden was more fruitful than 
pleasant. 7. The physician was more benevolent than 
benign. 8. Do the charioteers value the covenanted reward ? 

9. The woman declared her opinion with an unusual voice. 

10. Did you ever love that most crafty man? 11. Was 
Pompey older than Gracchus? 12. Silver is less valuable 
than gold. 

LESSON LXXIX. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS 34. 

How are all Comparative Adjectives declined ? 

SmauLAB. 
Like melior (m. and 1), melios (n.) 



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Soro. Mas. Fem. 


Neut. 


Plural. 


Nom. melior 


-US 


■or-es-a 


Voc. melior 


-ns 


-or-es-a 


Ace melior-em 


-us 


-or-es-a 


Gen. melior-ig 




-or-tini 


Dat melior-i 




-or-ibUB 


AbL melior-e or i 




-or-ibus 


Decline orally or in writing. 




Animal ingentius. 




Maturior uva. 




Regnum majus. 




Tristior virgo. 





LESSON LXXX. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXV. 

PREPOSITIONS GOVERNING AN ACCUSATIVE. 

Ad, totyr oA Ob, for or because of 

Adversum, adversuB, iig<iiiM,i Penes, in ike power of 

Ante, before Per, by or through 

Apud, at or among Pone, behind 

Circa, circum, circiter^ oJmhU Post, after 

Cis, citra, on this side Pneter, beside or over and above 

Contra, against Prope, nigh or near to 

Erga, toward Propter, near, for or because of 

Extra, without Secundum, according to 

Infra, beneath Supra, above 

Inter, between or among Trans, beyond 

Intra, within Usque, until 

Juzta, beside or nigh to Versus, toioards 

What is a Preposition t 

A Preposition is a part of speech most commonly set 
before (praeposita) a Noun. 

GOTESLNINa THX AbLATIVE. 

A, ab, abfl, from or by E, ex, of from, or out of 

Absque, without Palam, before or in the presence of 

Clam, without the knowledge of Prae, before or in comparison with 

Coraniy M^ore or in presence of Pro, for^ instead of 

Cum, with Sine, without 

De, of or from Tenus^ up to or as for tu 

Decline Nullus altus fluvius. 
No deep river, 
Serva stulta sed tenera. 
A foolish but tender slave, 
Medicus £plix et doctu^ 
A Jiappy and learned physician,. 



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LESSON LXXXL 



PHRASES I. 



Pirection. The following Phrases are to he committed to 
memory agamst future occasion. 



Pheases 

Apud HomSrum, 

A frontei 

A tergo, 

A calce ad caput, 

A primis annis, 

A prima adolescentia, 

A puero. 



BY Prepositions. 

in Homer 

before him, or in hit face 
behind Aim, or at ht8 back 
from the heel to the head 
from his first years 
from a stripling 
from a boy 



In the following is described an office with the Datiye 
Case. 



Principi a secretis, 
Prindpi a concionibus, 
Principi a cubiculo, 
Principi a thesauris, 
J^rincipi a xnanu, ab epistolis. 



privy counsellor to a prince 
preacher to a prince 
a gentleman of the bedHshamber 
treasurer to the prince 
secretary to the prince 



A is yjaed in the sense of afteel, 

A prandio, after dinner 

A cten^ after supper 

A jentaculo, after breakfast 

A fiinere, a morte ejus, trfter his death 

A is used in the sense of with. 

^ me sentit, he thinks as Jdo,i,e,f foith mc 

A potu quidam prandium indpiunt, some begin dinner wiih drink 



LESSON LXXXIL 



VOCABULARY XIV. 



■To overcome, 
A sparrow, 
Leader, general. 
To fight, 
WeU, 
Sure, 
A bee, 
To smoke, 
^0 show, 



superare 

passereris 

dux ducis 

pugnare 

bfine 

certus 

ftpis-is 

famare 

monstrare 



^ mftlum-i 



Paiemal, natipe, p&trius 
To call, vOcare 

An evil or wMfor- ) 
tune, \ 

Children, Hberi-orum 

A dog, c&nis-is 

Fault, vltium-i 

AlmostAnarnxmner, pend 
Almost, ferd, ferm^ 



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Teacher or School- \ 
nKuter, \ 

Sacred, 

JRed, 

Unhappy, 

Wild, 

Deservedly, 

Lofty, highf 

Fierce, sharp, se- 
vere, hold, 



Sheep, 

Lion, 

By degrees, 

Winter, 

Crow, 

Angel, 



prsBceptor-ifl 

sSLcer-ra-rum 

riiber 

infeliaf-icis 

Sgrest»-e 

mgrito 

Bublimis 

> acer-ris-re 

sapo saponiB 

6vis-is 

leo leonis 

sensim 

hiems, hiSmis 

comix-icis 

angelns 



Often, 
Altar, 
Ass, 

To bray, as an ass; 1 
roar, as a lion, I 
A hunting dog, 
Illboding, 
A sword. 
Blue, 
A gift. 
To hark. 
Vehemently, 
A deluge, Jlood, 
An oak, holm-tree, 
Old, 

In the morning, 
Wretched, 



altare-is 
asTnua 

riido-i and ivi 

dkms yenSticua 

Binist^r-ra-rum 

gl^dius 

coertileuB 

donum 

latrare 

y^hSmenter 

dflttvium 

Uex-YciB 

ygtus-eria 

mane 

miser-a-um 



LESSON LXXXIII. 



GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXVI. ADJECTIVES. 

agilis, niTnible, agil-lKmus, nimMest or most nimble, 

docilis, docile, docil-limus, Tnost docile. 

&ci]ia, easy. facil-limus, most easy. 

gracilis, slender. gracil-limus^ slenderest 

humllis, low. humil-limufl; louKSt. 

Bimilis, like. simil-liimu, likest or most like. 



maledicus -dicentior 

benef icus -ficentior 

beneyolus -volentior 



-dicentissimns 
-ficentiBsimuB 
-yolentiBBimus 



SUBSTANTIVES. 

Here follow examples of the Fourth Declension. 

Gr&dtLs^ a step. 

Sma. Plubal. 

Nom. grSdtls -US Observe that gradus is 

I^' ^^^ ^ contracted from the Third 

G^*. |rad^ '.'.*.".* 'uum Declension. Gradus, geni- 

Dat gradui -ibus tive, graduu-us. 

Abl. gradu -ibuS 

Decline dcus, a needle, gesttis, a gesture, nurusj a daughter- 
in-law, sUcnis, a mother-in-law, mdniUj a hand. 

F 



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Certain Nouns of the Fourth Declension form their Dative 
Phinil in -ubus, as portubus, arcubus. See Edw. YI. L, G., 
see. 17, obs. 3 ; or P.S.L.P,, sec. 30. 

JDonius is of the Second and Fourth Declension. Avoid 
the endings we, mu, mi, mis. Speme me, mu, mi, misy si 
declinare domus vis. Genu and comu are undeclinable in the 
Singular. In the Plural — 

Nom., Voo., Ace. genu&. 
Gen. genuum. 

DatJ., Abl. genibus-tlbttfl. 

P.S.L.P. Genitive Singular, gentis. 

Decline acer acris acre sharp 

cSler celSris c^lere quick 

saluber salubris salubre healthy 



LESSON LXXXIV. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXVII, 

ENDINGS OF PRESENT TENSES OF REGULAR VERBS. 

1. 2. 8. 4. 

-o -Smus -eo -emus -o -YmuB -io -imus 

-as -atis -es -etis -is -itis -is -itis 

-at -ant -et -ent -it -unt -it 4unt 



-&ham -abamus 
-abas -abatis 
-abat -abant 



ENDINGS OF IMPERFECT TENSES. 

-€bam -ebamus I -ebam -ebamus 
-ebas -ebatis -ebas -ebatis 



-ebat -ebant -ebat -ebant 



-iibam -iebamus 
-iebas -iebatis 
•iebat -iebant 



NUMERAL 4DVERBS. 

To what do Numeral Adverbs answer ? 

Numeral Adverbs answer the question 

semel et vicies 

duodetricies 

undetricies 

tricies 

quSxlr^gies 

quinquagies 



Sgmel 

Bis 

Ter 

Quater 

Quinquies 

Sexies 

Septiea 

Octies 

NOvies 

Dficies 



und6cies 

duodecies 

tredecies 

quaterdecles 

quindecies 

sedecies 

septiesdecies 

duodevicies 

undevicies 



septuagies 

oct^gies 

nonagies 



Quoties, h/)w often f 

undecenties 

centies 

ducenties 

trScenties 

quadringenties 

quiogenties 

sexcenties 

septingenties 

octingenties 

noDgenties 

millies et bis millies 



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LESSON LXXXV. 
EXERCISE XXXV. NUMERAL ADVERBS. 

Direction. An useful series of Grammar Lessons, may he 
formed upon the Vocabularies, The Parts of Speech may he de- 
manded, the Genitive Cases of Nouns, the Endings of Adnctives 
vyith their comparative degrees, Perfects and other Tenses of Yerhs, 

1. Hie tener agnus non est infelix sine socio. 2. Ille dux 
acer pugnabat vicies. 3. Sinistra cornix volitat in aere. 4. 
Hoc malum sensim monstrabat noxium vitium. 5. Duode- 
cim rubrsB vaccsB arant patrios agros. 6. Sexcenti libri 
omant murum. 7. Infelices medici decies defraudaut liberos. 
8. Pinguis caseus premebatur ingratse urbi.^ 9. iEgrotus 
magister merito sestimat asinum. 10. Sinistra cornix prse- 
dicebat ab ii!ce cavl 11. ^Egrotus niHgister habet divitem 
medicum. 12. Oves valdd amant napos. 13. Domini cum 
liberis habebant carros. 14. Filii nunquam quater manb 
monstrant gladios. 15. Rusticus nunquam ter vocat cervos. 
16. Bis senos* dies nostra altaria fumant. 17. Hanc capellam 
vix duco. 18. Diluvia sunt maxima mala. 19. Non 
amabamus duram hjemem. 20. ^Edificamus quinquies 
rubros muros. 21. Acer canis latrat duodevicies. 22. 
Duces vehementer culpant acrem hyemem. 23. Leo semel 
pugnat cum cervo. 24. Canis pseni superat veterem leonem. 
LESSON LXXXVL 





VOCABULARY XV. 


More and most. 


niagis & maxime' 


Lead, plumbum 


Least, 


mmTme 


^"i"^' ^r 


Most assuredly, 


certissim^ 


Crwd, 


crudelifl 


To delight, delectare 


Man, 


homo-ihia 


Mortal Men, ) mortales 
Mankind, \ fr. mortalia 


Man^\uihere praise \ ^.^ . 


is implied), 


S "* 


Metal, a mine, metallum 


Cold, shade. 


frigiM-oris 


To count, Dtimerare 


Thick, cool, 


5p5cu8 


Sister, Bftrororia 


To desire, 


captare 


Stone, lApM-idis 


Sweety 


dulcis 


Fat, pinguM-e 


Trickle, flow. 


mSnare 


Queen, regina-ae 


Gold, 


aurum 


A nsweTf respousum 


Heavy, 


gravis 


''ttfZS'" "^^-^ 


High, 


excelsus 


High {also as he- 


altus 


People, nation, gens-isB 


fore). 




Dark, niger 


iForthe. « 


Space of time is put 


in the accusative. 'Used with 


pius, godly, affectionate. 








Digitized by GoOQie 



52 

LESSON LXXXVII. 
VOCABULARY XVI. 



Wonderful, 


mir&bilis-e 


Swift, 


dSier-^TiB^ 


Happy, 


fortunatus 


Arrow, 


B&gitta 


Abundance, 


c5pia 


To drive together 


, compgllere-vii 


Old many 


BSneas-ia 


Ugly, uncome/y, 


informis 


Nohltyhigh 6om,n6bilM-€ 


Shepherd! s crook, 


pedum 


Fimntainy 


fonx-tis 


Wax, 


cera 


To a8k. 


rogare 


To unite, 


conjun^riJre-xi 


Base, 


turpw-e 


A reed, arrow. 


c&lamus 


A vrise man. 


fiapiens-tia 


Pipe, 


fistula 


Common, 


vulgaris 


Made, 


compactus 


To lend, 


commodare 


Ooat, 


cS-preolus 


Tlu gods, 


divi-orum 


Pluck, 


carpowBi-tum-ere 


Colour, 


color-orifl 


Pale, 


pallens-tis 


Royal, 


regius 


Poppy, 


p&pSver-firiB (n.) 


To seize, 


oorripio-pui-eptum 


Fair, 


candidufl 



LESSON LXXXVIIL 

EXERCISE XXXVI. 

1. The schoolmaster was having gifts twice. 2. That 
teacher always has a sure friend. 3. Did not those bold 
archers deservedly value their six swords 1 4. Was not the 
miserable ass dining off thistles thrice in the morning 1 5, 
Were the hunting dogs swifter than the stags 1 6. The five 
red lions swam faster than the dogs. 7. The maid-servants 
call the black sheep five times. 8. Did the bees once desire 
the thick shade ? 9. The old swords are forbidden gifts. 10. 
The women were calling by degrees the sacred calves. 11. 
He first gave me an answer.^ 12. Boys love a sharp winter. 
13. The red soap is a better gift than white soap. 14. An 
old fault is the greater evil. 

LESSON LXXXIX. 

EXERCISE XXXVII. 

1. Is blue clay colder than red? 2. The hunting dog is 
often weary. 3. A deluge often watered the dry lands. 4. 
The sacred teachers were shewing old gifts the day before. 
5. Happy old man, you shall enjoy the sacred fountains. 6. 

^ Mihi dedit. 



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Pardon is not often an evil. 7. We children always like 
pears. 8. The dogs swim five times in the momiDg. 9. 
The talkative (man) was walking the day Hfter. 10. He 
never eats fat cheese. 11. The evil angels were formerly in 
high places, 12. The old men will enjoy greatly the cool 
shade. 

LESSON XC. 

VOCABULARY XVII. 

I have seen, vidi Frequent, crSb«r-ra-ruin 

Gratping^ rftpox-acis Suppliant, suppkos-lcis 

DeceUfulf faUaxaciB Ancient, antiquuB 

Barren, sterYlM-e The ancients, antiqui 

Hot, calidus Certain, i.e. acme, quidam, pL 

Poor, mean, bau, Bordidus / would rather, malo 

Herd, armentum-i Name, nomen-inifl 

Green, vMdia-e Enemy, hostw-is 

Unruffled, placYdus A homicide, h6micida 

Bold, audofB-ftciB A crime, fl&gitium 

Tenacious, that ) . . Barter, permatare 

holds fast, |*enaa>«ci8 y^^^^ ^j^j^ 

Lean, m&cer-ra-rum Country, patria 

Cotioffe, caaa A hmo, arcut-Os 

LESSON XCL 

VOCABULARY XVIII. 

AfooUtep, vestigium FruUs {of the J,^„_„^ 

A branch, ramiM earth), { f ragee-um 

Ashant, threaten- ) ^j.^^ Rain, pluvia 

ing, J Raven, corvus 

A miser, avSnis To aioait, desier, ezpectare 

To follow, track, lustrare To arm, stir up to ) 

A thief, fur fQris arms, furnish, \ "^^^^e 

A barbarian, barbarua A thing, res rei 

To serve up food, to ) ^^^^^^ Year annus 

supply, furnish, S Wind, ventua 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXVIII. 

The Fifth Declension ends in -ei in the Genitive, as : 

Sing. Plural. 

Nom. faci-ea -es 

Voc. faci-es -es 

Ace. faci-em es 

Gen. faciei erum 

Dat. faciei -ebus 

Abi. faci-e -ebus 

Declixb Summa vis et vir nobilis. Also EfFtgies cerea 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



5i 

LESSON XCII. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XXXIX. 
Decline orally — 

Altare sanctum, a holy aUar. 

Rete parvum, a little Tiet. 

Vir doctus, a learned man. 

Arcus lethtfer. a deadly how, 

Collis asper, a rough hill. 

Feles nigra, a black cat. 

Leo 8Bger, a sick lion. 

Mus^ sktur, a well-fed mouse. 

Poculum inane, an empty cup. 

Altare v^tus, an old altar. 

COlilber ^trox, a fierce snake. 

Verbum facilius, an easier wwd. 

ChriBtchurch Grammar. 
Nonne expects the answer Yes ; num expects No. 

LESSON XCIIL 

EXERCISE XXXVIII. 

\. Rusticine rapaces defraudabant rapaciores nautas? 2. 
Luci etiam non fuerant stSriles. 3. Cervi velooiores quam 
fecundiores erant. 4. Verba fallacia pene fuerunt flagitia. 
6. HomicidaB permutabant patriam. 6. Angeli vocabant 
rapidos ventos. 7. Permutabamus veteres arcus (translate 
Imperf. with Part.) 8. Agricolse calidissimi csenabant pin- 
gues porcos. 9. Rami teneriores quam vMdiores erant. 10. 
Fluvius non fuit rapidissimus. 11. Ramus fuit moUior. 12. 
Num tenacissimi avari sedificant domum % (answer, No). 13. 
Macri nautsB saepd vocant rapaces fures. 14. Superbus leo 
habitat sterilem lucum. 15. Torvus leo csenat pinguem 
camem.* 16. Bellicosi sagitarii sexies ambulabant in sylvis. 
17. Nauta rapacior est quam ille avarus. 18. CastanesB illsB 
erant molliores quam nostra poma. 19. Barbari fuissent 
atrociores quam fures. 20. Fruges viridiores ministrabant. 

* Um and ium Genitive Plural. Flesh. Caro-nis. 



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LESSON XCIV, 



QRAMMAB PRAXIS XL. 



Substantives joined by the Conjunction et must be pnt in 
the same Case. Also Adjectives. 



Here commences the use of the Future and 
Tenses. The Terminations are as follow : — 


Perfect 


1. 
-&bo -abimus 
-abifl -ftbitifl 
-abit -abunt 


-6bo 
-ebifl 
^bit 


2. 

-eWmufl 

-ebitis 

-ebunt 


S. 

-am -emuB 
-es -etis 
-et -ent 


-iam 

-ies 

-iet 


4. 

•iemus 

-ietifl 

-ient 




PERFECTS. 






-gyi -aylmus 
-avisti -avistia 
-avit -avenint 


-iii 

-uiflti 

-uit 


-uYmuB 
-lustis 
-uSrunt 


-i -imus 
-isti -istis 
-it -€runt 


-ivi 

-ivisti 

-ivit 


S.a| 



The Adjectives reUquus, mmmuSy imtis, cdvtis, m^dius, ex- 
tremus have a peculiar use in Latin. The Substantive is put 
in the same case, but is translated as a Genitive. See Edw. 
VI. L. G., Syntax Rule 67. 

When an Adjective and Substantive translated literally will not make 
good English, take the equivalent Substantive for the Adjective, then 
turn the Substantive into the Genitive and it will rarely faiL 

NUMERALS— Continued. 
To what question do Distributive Numerals answer ] 
Distributive Numerals answer the question Quoteni, how 



many to each ? 








Singuli-8B-a 


s€ni 


un-deni 


Beni-deni 


vioeni 


Bini 


septeni 


duo-deni 


septeni-deni 


centeni 


Temi 


octoni 


temideni 


octoni-deni 


milleni 


Quatemi 


noveni 


quaterni-deni 


noveni-deni 


bis milleni 


Quini 


deni 


quini-deni 







LESSON XCV. 

EXERCISE XXXIX. 

1. The children did often call the herds. 2. Did these 
lean ploughmen in the morning plough the poor fields. 3. 
You are both beautiful boys, although he is dark and thou 



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art fair. 4. The sea stood* unruffled by the winds. 5. 
Ravens will furnish ripe fruit in the morning. 6. This book 
is not deceitful 7. Yours will not be a fat cock. 8. What 
general always supplies cows and sheep ? 9. Whilst I track 
your footsteps. 10. The suppliant girl will cheat the de- 
formed master. 1 1. A thousand lambs of mine wander on 
the mountains of Sicily*. 12. The soft wind was awaiting 
the rain. 13. And I am not so uncomely. 14. God will 
call the unhappy homicide. 15. I have no want' of milk in 
the summer. 16. The lords were but lately bartering their 
mean fields. 17. Let me plough with thee* mean fields and 
inhabit humble cottages. 18. A thorn arms the green 
plant. 

LESSON XCVL 

EXERCISE XL. 

1. Mirabilis sanb est avarus inter homines. 2. Fallax 
certissimb est aurum. 3. Corvi rapacissimi volitabunt in 
aere. 4. Postea domus erit inanis. 5. Dona regia certis- 
Bimh delectabunt animum. 6. Fugaces anni labuntur.* 7. 
Corripuit arcum celeresque sagittas. 8. Vituperabunt etiam 
meliorem servam. 9. Iste homicida est turpis quamvis 
nobilis. 10. Pemices venti semper delectant nautam. 11. 
Molles feminse dominum nobilem minimb vituperant. 12. 
Canis venaticus est fermfe pemicior vento. 13. Sorores 
libros sacros commodverant. 14. Gens vulgaris quamvis 
maximfe pia. 16. Mortales magis pii quam hi angeli. 16. 
Divi antiqui fuerunt aliquando turpiores quam mortales. 17. 
Ego nunquam vidi hominem molliorem quam ilium pastorem. 

18. Nunquam vidi moitalem nobiliorem quam Ennium. 

19. Nunquam vidisti pessimum avarum. 

LESSON XCVII. 

EXERCISE XLI. 

1. In the kingdoms below I have seen mines. 2. From 
the heavens above flows rain. 3. Approach the infernal 



' Stahat. * In montibus Siciilis. ' Use desum. * Pronouna put 
before it, tecum. Glide away, deponent. 



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dwellings. 4. Boys and maidens will sing sacred songs. 5. 
He builds walls, although very low ones (the lowest). 6. I 
will drive together the flock with my shepherd's crook. 
7. Pan will is^e care^ of sheep and their masters. 8. Pan 
was the first to unite' several reeds with wax. 9. I have a 
pipe formed out of seven reeds. 10. There was lately made a 
pipe out of seven reeds. 11. I myself will gather quinces' 
white^ with tender down. 12. Gather the chesnuts which I 
so like. 13. The &ir Nais plucks' for thee pale violets and 
poppy heads*. 14. Lead is by far the heaviest metal 

LESSON xcvin. 

EXERCISE XLII. 

1. A base people furnished the bad gold. 2. The best 
things are often the least valued. 3. The queen is deservedly 
the greatest mistress among women. 4. The barbarians 
long since built these walls. 5. Have you not a pipe made 
of seven reeds ? 6. These goats which I preserve for you. 
7. Fair Nais plucks all violets and poppy heads. 8. Will 
that base people furnish gold to us. 9. Did you make a 
pipe constructed of seven reeds ? 10. Is not lead the heavi- 
est metal 1 11. The old sugar is by far the sweeter. 12. It 
is indeed a most wonderful year. 13. Nais has plucked 
these poppy heads. 14. Narcissus has taken care of those 
pipes made of reeds. 





LESSON XCIX. 






VOCABULARY XIX. 




To Bay, tell, 


dico dixi 


To name. 


n5m¥no 


To buUd, 


condo-idi 


To free, 


libSro 


To strike, 


verbero 


To leave. 


relinquo-iqm 


To teach, 


doc60-ui 


To corrupt. 


comimpo-upi 


To hear. 


audioire 


To elude. 


ehido-uai 


To command, 


impero,^ mando 


To disturb. 


perturbo-avi 


To rehearse, say, 


reddo-dere 


To know, 


Bcio-scivi 


To write, 


Bcrifto-psi 


To hinder, 


impSdio-ivi 


To play. 


Inrfo-si 


To undertake, 


Buscipto-epi 



* Curo. * Translate Pan first tmited. ' Mala. * Cana tenere ianu- 
gine. * Lego. ® Summa papavera, the tops or beads of poppies. See 
Gr. Pr. XL. ^Imperare to order, to furnish or supply, to gi/oe orders for. 
Quum Verrea frumentum sibi in cellam imperavisset, Cic. 



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LESSON C. 

EXERCISE XLIII. 

1. After dinner he said the best things from^ the ancients. 
2. He built a city with* stone walls after his death. 3. The 
barbarians taught the thieves. 4 They heard the cry of 
the hunting dogs through the woods. 5. Verres gave orders 
for the fruits of the earth for himself. 6. The sailors played 
by sixes in the groves with even the smallest children. 7. 
The most deceitful women said the sweetest words. 8. The 
sailors played by twos and by threes. 9. He writes concern- 
ing the best gold in the* middle of the mine. 10. They 
awaited the sailors after breakfast* in the furthest parts of 
the grove. 11. From a stripling" he was exceedingly pioas. 
12. The little nets of the sailors will much disturb the fishes. 







LESSON CI. 






VOCABULARY XX. 




Little, petty, 


mediocris 


Omitted, 


intermissuB-a-um 


To blame, 


rgprehendo 


Offence, 


oflfensio-nis 


To frighten, 


terrco-ui 


Merchant, 


n6gotiator-is 


To call upon. 


invOco 


Openly, 


palam 


To approve, 


probo 


Advice, 


constlium 


Expectation, 


expectatio 


Consulship, 


consiilatuS'UB 


Hatred, 


5dium 


Conquer, 


vinco-vici 


Fortune, 


fortuna 


Take up arms, 


eSpio-cepi, arma 


Poet, 


poeta 


To possess, hold,t6neo-\ii 


Brave, 


fortis 


Farm, 


prsBdium 




nubilis 


Citizen, 


ClVM-ifl 


Madness, 


dementia 


Favour, aid, 


adjuvo-avi 


ffeir, 


hereg-edis 


Introduce, 


inducoxi 


Building, 


flBdifXcIum 


Lamenting, 
LESSON GIL 


l&mentaiK-tiB 




EXERCISE XLIV. 





The following is altered from Ellis's Exercises, p. 10. 

1. I have named no one. 2. One man has freed us. 3. 
The benevolent mistress left a marriageable daughter. 4. 

* Ex. ' Ablative without Preposition. • Translate as if " drawn from 
the middle." « See p. 48. • See p. 48. 



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59 

Madness overcame reason. 5. The brother left an heir. 6. 
He left DO lofty building. 7. Capua by degrees corrupted 
Hannibal himsek 8. How long shall your abominable (use, 
iste) madness elude us. 9. One day omitted often disturbs 
the whole. 10. A wise prsetor entirely avoids offence. 11. 
All the nobles knew these things; our own countrymen,* 
knew them; the little merchants knew them. 12. Your 
tears* thrice hindered me. 13. The senate openly' undertook 
my cause. 14. Bold men have openly blamed my gentle 
advice. 

LESSON cm. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLI. VERBS IN CONJUNCTIVE MOOD, 

PRESENT. 

SiNGULAB. Plural. 

Am-em, / may love, ftm-emus, toe may love. 

Am-es, thou may est love, ametis, you may love. 

Am-et, he may love. am-ent, ikey may love. 

IMPERFECT. 

Am-Srem, I might love. ftm-aremus, we might love. 

Am-ares, thou mightest love. am-aretis, you might love. 

Am-aret; h>e might love. am-arent, they might love. 

PERFECT. 

Am-averim, / may have loved. am-averimua, we may have loved. 

Am-averis, thou mayst have loved. am-averitis, ye or you may have loved 
Am-averit, he may have loved, am-averint, they may have loved, 

PLUPERFECT. 

Am-Syissem, / might have laved. am-avissemus, tre might have loved. 
Am-avisses, thou mightest have loved. om-SkviaBeiiajyeoryoumighthavedoved 
Am-avisset, he might have loved. am-avlBsent, they might have loved^ 

This Tense is also rendered by should have, would have, 

LESSON CIV. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLI.— Continued. 
How are certain Tenses formed from the Perfect ? 
The Pluperfect is formed from the Perfect by changing 
let — avi into averam ; 2nd — ui into ueram', 3rd — i into 
eram ; 4th^— m into Iveram. 

* NosPri homines. ' Lachrpmas. • Palam, used as an Adverb not as 
a Preposition, as palam te. 



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60 

How is the Second Future formed % 

The Second Future is formed by changing the -am termin- 
ating the Pluperfect into -o, as av-eram^ av-ero. 

How are Perfect and Pluperfect of the Conjunctive formed? 

They are formed in like manner by adding -erim, -iaem to 
the stem of the Perfect. 

What is your account of Irregular Verbs. 

Some Verbs form their Tenses irregularly, that is, not in 
conformity with the model furnished by the four Conjuga- 
tions ; as, the Second Conjugation has Perfect Tenses formed 
after the model of the Third Conjugation ; the First after 
the Second, <fec. 

Direction. The Teacher is referred to the list of Irregular 
Verbs in F.S.L.F., or in Arnold's Second Latin Book. The 
Pupil should he made to commit this to memory in his Gram- 
mar Course^ and great care should he taken by frequent repeti- 
tion to ensure accuracy. A few variations are now given to 
serve the imm^ediate objects of this EoC'Crdse Book. 



LESSON CV. 



VOCABULARY XXI. 



To remove^ 


removeo-vi 


Contest, 


oonientio-nis 


Instruction, 


disclplina 


Unequal, 


dispar-f^bis 


Declare, 


declare 


A fmTstfiil 


exsecratus 


Modesty, 


piidor-oris 


Xt (/vWVoCCVa 


Goodness, 


b5nita«-atis 


How, 


quomSdo 


To lead out, 


educo-xi 


When, 


quum 


Very many, 


complures 


Diligence, 


dUigentia 


To see, 


vldeo-idi 


Thence, 


inde 


Male, 


mas mSlris 


Wlumee, 


unde 


Wash, 


lavo-lavi 
lautiim & lotnm 


Hence, 


hinc 


Tkence, 


mine 


Sup, dine, 


oaenoavi 


There, 


fti 


To make, 


facio feci 


Where, 


tibi 


Honour, 


hOnestcM-atis 


Here, 


hie 


Boldness, 


audScia 


There, 


illic 


Disagreement, 


^sensio-nia 










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61 

LESSON CVI. 

EXERCISE XLV. 

1. I had removed that severe old man, the prince's privy 
councillor,^ six times out of my garden. 2. Some one will say, 
Is this then your instruction ) Do you so teach young men 1 
3. Reason herself had declared the same things before. 4. 
You loved modesty, ■ goodness and virtue' from a boy. 5. 
Antony had led out two legions and two praetorian cohorts. 
6. The old men after dinner had seen very many males and 
females. 7. Wash your hands quickly and sup. 8. Nature 
has made men bolder than women. 9. There is the highest 
honour, the highest dignity. 10. After his death there was 
such boldness and such violence. 11. There is the greatest 
disagreement, but an unequal contest. 12. There is great 
disturbance and confusion throughout the city. 

LESSON CVIL 

EXERCISE XLVI. 

1. Quam callidd senex defraudabat. 2. Quam commode 
conjux locavit napos. 3. Quam doct^ medicus loquitur.* 4. 
Quam leviter cenrus volat per campos. 5. Quam cautfe 
graculus gustabat cibum. 6. Quam forte est bracchium. 7. 
Quam inutilis fer^ est ira. 8. Quam famosa est ^nus. 9. 
Quam tristissim^ mulier ambulat in rate. 10. Quam super- 
bissimd graculus ambulat. 11. Quam suavissim^ conjux 
maritum ornat. 12. Quam velocissirad natat in mari. 13. 
Quam fragillim^ ratis natat in mari. 14. Quam sapientis- 
simd hsec mulier liberos docuit. 15. Quam gelidissimi cadit 
grando. 

LESSON CVIII. 

VOCABULARY XXII. 

Hazeltree, corylus Liberty, libertas-tia 

Head, cap1*^itis (n.) Time, tempwa-oris 

City, Unon, urba-is (f.) Rker, flumew-inis (n.) 

* See p. 48. * Introduce et ' Que, put after virtus, * Speaks. 

O 



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62 



iSftfi^, dbiere, cScYni 


To hreak. 




To flee. 


Breeut aura 


Gift, 


Strait, sea, fretum 


Oalatea, 




PhiUis, 


Shore, littiu-oria 


Quarrel, 


Naked, defeneele8$,nM\iB 


Contention, 


FUh, piBcw-is 
Misshapen, ugly, inf onnis 


To settle, 


Coaxing, caret 


jSfoep, Bopor-is 


ing,(Aarmin 


LESSON 


CIX. 


EXERCISE XLVII. 



frangOj fr^^i 
f ttgio, fOgi 
muntu-eiis 
GkJatea 
Phillu-^i 

I lii-tis 

oompono^ui 



1. Here among the thick hazel trees I abandon the hope 
of the flock. 2. Do not break the bow. 3. The arrows were 
the gifts of PhiUis. 4. Thou may est have settled the quar- 
rels of PhiUis and Galatea. 5. The sea left the fish defence- 
less on the shore. 6. Liberty might have escaped from 
that town. 7. What an ugly head ! 8. What a naked 
shore ! 9. Time had fled among these hazel trees. 10. 
The woodcutter settled wisely his quarrel. 11. Fountains, 
rivers, shores, and caressing breezes, how delightfuL 12. 
The woodcutter was singing. 13. The sea left the shore. 





TiERSON ex. 




VOCABULARY XXIII. 


Flower, 


flo8-ris 




Pour, 


fundo fQdi 


Quench, restin^uo-xi- 


Elm, 


ulmus 


The heat, sestus [ctum 


To mix, 


miAceo, mistum 


Fire, hearth, f 5cus 


To sit together, comldeo, Sdi 


Cold, frigiM-oris 


To move fre- 


1 moto-are 


Harvest, messts is 


quently, 


Flow down, decurro 


West wind, 


zephyrus 


Stony, saxosus 


To go under. 


8ucc6do-es8i 


Altar, altar«-is-n 


Shepherd, 
Drive, 


pastor 

agosgi 


""^^S. off'^^tt) 


Fed, 
Cool, 


pastas 
frigidus 


^'l^'ld^" 


Thirst, 


sltis 


Wearied, fessus 


^ Greek CoDsonant Nouns form Ace. 


Sing, in a or em. P.aL.P. 121. 






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63 

LESSON CXI. 

EXERCISE XLVIII. 

1. Hie inter densas corylos spem gregis reliquit 2. Haec 
exttdit^ caput inter alias urbes. 3. Libertas post longo tem- 
pore venit 4. Tityrus hinc aberat. 5. Hie inter flumina 
nota, et fontes sacros. 6. Hine eanet frondator ad auras. 
7. Freta destituent in litore nudos pisces. 8. Inter densas 
fagos assidud veniebat. 9. Nee sum ade5 informis ; nuper 
me in littore vidi. 10. Habitarunt di quoque* silvas. 11. 
Aut hic ad yeteres fagos quum arcum et oilamos fregistL 12, 
Galatea fugit ad salices. 13. Spes gregis fugiet 

LESSON CXIL 

EXERCISE XLIX. 

1. Phoebo semper sunt apud me Jovis' munera. 2. Philllda 
amo ante alias. 3. Non nostrum* tantas lltes inter vos eom- 
ponere. 4. Ipsa eunabula* tibi blandos flores fondent. 5. 
Hie inter ulmos eorylis mistas eonsedimus. 6. Sub umbras 
ineertas Zepbyris motautibus succedimus. 7. Non ulli pas- 
tores egere illis diebus pastes boves ad frigida flumina. 8. 
Tale tuum earmen quale sopor fessis. 9. Ante foeum si frigus 
erit, si messis in umbra. 10. Nee qusB flumina deeurrunt 
inter saxosas valles juvant. 11. Soror in Aonas* montes 
Galium' duxit 12. Terque eireum heec altaria effigiem duco. 

LESSON CXIIL 
EXERCISE L. 

1. Every new form frightens the eyes of the gentle boy. 

2. What more eursed witness has ealled upon Posthumius. 

3. Pompey very much approved my consulship. 4. Your 
noble ancestors conquered all Italy. 5. Will our ancestors 
take up arms quickly 1 6. Will the Roman people ever pos- 
sess Macedon 1 7. Those most slender girls received your 
pleasing letter. 8. The humblest peasants love the man 
greatly. 9. After his death you never had more than six- 

* Hath raised. ■ Also. ' Jupiter, Gen. Jovis. * Understand e$U 
' Cunahulororum n, cradle, infancy. ? Of Aonia, * Qallui, 



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IV 

The Author has put forth the present work, which has 
for a long tune been in fragmentary portions in the hands 
of his pupils, in the belief that Material and Apparatus would 
be aflfbrded in it both for acquiring a sound grammatical 
basis; and for promoting the desirable object of paving the 
way for the young student's more pleasant and self-gratify- 
ing approach to Latin Reading and Composition. 

One leading principle relied upon in the construction of 
this work is frequent repetition of words and phraseology 
under changed forms and aspects — a principle which has 
been carried out with success by several Authors of Latin 
Exercise Books, but as it is believed never in so thoroughly 
progressive detail, and to such a practical extent, as is now 
exhibited in this work. In this point of view it is desirable 
to notice the first fifty-five Lessons upon Substantives, 
Adjectives, and Pronouns, as they enter into combination 
with the Verb esse to be. 

The objection sometimes urged to plans for facilitating 
the acquisition of the Latin Language, is that if the mental 
exertions of the pupil are to too great a degree spared, an 
important training for his mind is lost to him, and the 
foundation for habits of inaccuracy thus encouraged; the 
pupil being apt, in condoning for a want of accuracy by his 
general knowledge of words and phrases, to fall into slovenly 
ways and inexact methods of study. 

It would be useless to attempt to conceal that there would 
be some ground for such fears if any system of the kind were 
not adequately protected by an ample apparatus of Grammati- 
cal Lessons. To obviate this apprehension that the young 
might be likely to fall into habits of inaccuracy, if aided merely 
by a succession of easy progressive exercises, lessons have 

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diart intcrvd, mi 

regnlmtj and i 

fldrw. Hie onl 

xix. xxTL 4e^ k€^ wZL 

remarks imnlnaUe Ibri 

Tarious fotms of Dec^ssiEiJtL bul ifi 

of the Gooeofik. It ttr.**^ ut 

Author does matt thak 2 jru^ac ti lirsr- tj* 

use of aome fitah'ihfd Lksx «>?iHaBC — n» o*^ 

Indeed this proBJMS^ inrvn 1/ -as vitl 

combinstkm of £scttaitf&. «>naiiiiacj(aik. hr^LM, 

^th suggested stodieB ijr ite iik •i' Vif-^k. ' 

and LectioDS with Methudi 'Y As^tul on. vi 

rdated leaaona^ moat, the; Xisaair vsur'vcft. m 

efficient result in the aanaciatt vi -^^ * «u*k 

aid effectiTelj the effotta d tte Tir. .c jr. m 

advantage to the Master t& be tAit ^. woe .nr 

the precise portion of Graar.Tiar "viuta. vm 1 

their fdtnre lesaona, will be buan^jigjir-j imi^ a. .-^.^ ".s* 

their knowledge of them ; as Win: *.. UK«k r a ..» -*- v^ 

to direct the acholan to go cb mn.ijzr. vm i^r^ «d»r^ 

seriatim, mider the oonrictkai uas la.r-i.^ u^.^^ • ». 

Bcholarlike foundation has bee& kfi ^iir^'^nr. v i^-.i ^ «jm 

to think of supplying bj sni^iwmrBOgj .««».■:« i^tfi.-; 

deyised frmn other aoorees. 

Ab earlj as may be in the Sci« Ikr » crjisns -uit Lir a. 
£xerciae should fonn a basis ftc Fma<^ Ltf>M»iL^ *ua 
exercifle being under oidiiwfy dm£aHU»*js» ^^ -dr.ir j 
omitted till the best part of aa Isewdm Bmk i^m vwm 



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64 



teen farms. 10. We have lost Scipio, a very worthy citizen. 

11. Your most accursed expectation does not disturb me. 

12. From your boyhood you have easily avoided hatred. 13. 
Fortune will favour the bold. 14. The poet introduced even 
the bravest men lamenting. 15. Such is thy song to me as 
to quench thirst in heat. 16. As the women, so the men. 



LESSON CXIV. 

EXERCISE LI. 

1. Where is the greatest disturbance 1 In the city. 2. 
When was this boldness? After his death. 3. When do 
very many males wash their hands? Before dinner. 4. 
Where do you place the praetorian cohorts 1 There, in the 
market place. 6. When had the old man seen very many 
males and females ? After dinner. 6. Where did you see 
the beautiful women? Here, within the walls. 7. What 
does Antony lead out? Two legions. 8. Where does the 
jackdaw walk so proudly? In the garden. 9. How will 
dissension disturb brave men? 10. What will the poet in- 
troduce ? Brave men lamenting. 



LESSON CXV. 



VOCABULARY XXIV. 



HoitUe, adverse, 
Charming, lovely, 
Pleasant, delight- 

M 
Hateful, 
Hay, 
To laugh. 
Meadow, 
To repeat, 
Death, 
To come, 
Beautiful, 
Dinner, supper, 

m£al, 
RighUy, 
Hollow, 



infestus 
S,moenus 

jucundus 

Qdiosus 
fSnum 
ridere risi 
pratum 
rSpetere 
mor«-tis (f.) 
vgnire 
formosus 

coena 

rect^ 
c&vus 



Left behind, re- 
maining 

Fair, beautiful, 

Cunning, 
sagacious, 

A rod, 

Cart, 

To give. 

Citadel, 

Hand, 

Course, motion, 

Consort, i.e., hus- 
band or wife, 

Wife, 

Pale, 



( rSUquus 



pulcher 

> sSgoo^acia 

virga-89 
caiTus 
dSire 
ara-cis 

in&n««-tis (f.) 
curs«s-us (1) 

conjiiojgifl-c 

uxor is 
pallidus 



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65 
LESSON CXVI. 



GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLIL 



PHRASES 11. 



Usque a cunabulis. 
Usque a Romulo, 
Ad nausgam usque, 
Usque ad ngcem. 
Usque adeo demenB, 
Verum est, 
Verum scire, 
Die mihi verum, 
Venire ad coUSqutum, 
ObTlam venire alicui, 
Eo ventum est, 
Venire ad aures. 



even from my cradle. 

even from the time of Romidw, 

even to loathing. 

even unto death. 

80 exceedingly foolish. 

it is right, proper, reatonahle. 

to know the truth. 

tell me the truth. 

to come to speech one foith another. 

to come to meet one. 

it came to that pass. 

to come to one^s hearing. 



GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLIII. 



Give English of- 



Also right quantities of — 



Removerat 


removerifl 


repetere 


venias 


Educam 


faciamus 


repetivere 


repetitis 


Videto 


lavabitis 


fecere 


venistis 


Lavero 


lavant 


veneram 


repetere 


Fecerit 


ccenarea 


riseram 


venerunt 


Coenaverant 


removissem 


facimuB 


fecifisent 


Lavabitis 


veni 


faciemufl 


fecenmt 


Declarato 


educebatis 


lavamus 


risere 


Eduxistis 


fecerim 


educetis 


eduzeratis 


Coenaveritis 


lavere 


repetivimus 


laveratis 


Lavimus 


lavare 


risistis 


venerant 


Feciasetis 


venixnus 


venire 


venere 



LESSON CXVIL 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLIV. 



Give Latin of — 

Remove ye 

Let them declare 

They have removed 

They did send out 

We were sending out 

I am seeing 

To wash 

They might make 

They might have made 

They will declare 



we will wash 
ye will see 
they will have seen 
we shall have sent out 
let them see 
^let them laugh 
they were laughing 
I was laughing 
they have laughed 
they will repent 



they will have come 
we will come 
they have given 
let us give 
they were giving 
they repeated 
they sought out again 
they are supping 
they laugh 
they do see 



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66 

LESSON CXVIII. 

EXERCISE LI I. 

1 Homicida est aliquando fare odiosior. 2. Kami in 
Bummi arbore erant excelsissimi. 3. Angeli super! vocabunt 
odiosoa et infestos avaros e terra. 4. Exsecratse sorores de- 
fraudabunt parvos vitulos et vaccas. 5. Hoc flagitio nihQ 
est odiosias et infestius. 6. Medici colent fertilissimum hor- 
tum. 7. Avarus semper amabat, sapiens tamen aurum 
non eestimabit. 8. Nihil est sterilius hoc luco. 9. Nunquam 
vidi amceniores his frugibus. 10. Nunquam habitavi 
pulchriorem hac domo. 11. Nunquam videram hiemem 
mitiorem quam illam. 12. Medicus est sapientior avaro. 
13. Plumbum est gravius auro. 14. Fratres sunt exsecra- 
tiores sororibus. 15. Hsec prata amseniora sunt quam iLlud. 
16. Metallum ingentius est quadraginta magnis domibus. 



LESSON CXIX. 

EXERCISE LIII. 

1. The first and second horses will await the noble chario- 
teer at the bottom of the grove. 2. The sisters were count- 
ing apart the peas and beans. 3. How did the deceitful 
mistresses afterwards bend the heavy bows 1 4. The children 
will barter the beautiful stone. 5. When did the unhappy 
charioteers blame the hostile gods ? 6. How will the angels 
summon the fleet winds from the hollow mountain. 7. The 
third gift was indeed great, pleasant, and beautiful, but 
nevertheless hurtful. 8. The rest of the branches were low, 
although charming. 9. The thief overcame his enemy at the 
bottom of the garden. 10. The grasping miser also waited 
for the gold and metals at the top of the wall. 11. The 
thief was more nimble than the fencer. 12. The barbarian 
was more beneficent than the citizen. 13. The robber was 
more rapacious than tenacious. 14. The mistress was more 
pliant than gentle. 



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67 

LESSON CXX. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLV. 
Duration of time is put in the Accusative. The answer 
to the question How long, is thus in the Accusative, as Hio 
jam ter centum totos regnabitur annos. 

Part of time is put in the Ablative. Put the question 
When, and the answer is the Ablative, as Nemo mortalium 
omnibus horis adpit. 

Other expressions are — 

In panels diebus^ in a few days. 

De die, by day. 

De nocte, by night. 

Commodo in mensem, / lend for a month. 

Annos ad quinquaginta nStus, born to fifty years or fifty years old. 

Per tres annos etiidui, I studied for three years. 

Puer id setatis, a boy that of age, i.e.^ of that a^e. 

Non plus triduum aut triduo, not more thin three days. 

Tertio (vel ad tertium) calendas on the third or at the third before the 
vel csjendarum, calends or of the calends of the 

month. 

Ante hos sex menses, tix months ago or before this. 

Ace. or ( Abhine dies tres ) Of time three days ago. 

AbL j Abhine annis tribus J P»st. three years ago. 

An arrangement for payment in a few days is expressed 
In jMUcia diehus. 

The day appointed is expressed thus : Tertio vel ad tertium 
calendas vel calendamm. 

Also— 

Paueis post mensibus, a few months afterwa/rds, 

Paucis post diebus, a few days hence. 

Nudius sextuS; six days ago. 

Paucia illis diebus, a few days before. 

Paucis ante diebus, a few days hence, 

Paucis his diebus, a few days ago. 

LESSON CXXL 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLVI. 

Adjectives and Substantives take an Ablative, signifying 

the cause, form, and quality, instrument, or manner of a 

thing. Adjectiva et Substantiva, &c. See Syntax Edw. VI. 

L. G., Eule 130, Qspallidus ira. 



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68 

Ablative of Quality, with Epithet P.S.L.P., sec. 115. 

Rule 151, Edw. VL L. G. Every Verb admits an Abla- 
tive without a Preposition, signifying the instrument, or the 
cause, or the manner of an action. Quodvis verbum, &c. 

See P.S.L.P., sec. Ill, Ablative of Cause; 112, Ablative 
of the Instrument; 113, Ablative of Manner. 



PHRASES III. 



PalliduB irS, 

Crine rtiber, 

NKger ore, 

Brevis pede, 

Lumine Iuscub, 

Grandis verbis, 

Creber sententiis, 

Origine Trojanus, 

IngenYD maximus, 

Arte riidis, 

Nomine grammaticus, 

R^j barbSriia, 

Senez promissa barba, 

Hoireuti capillo, 

Cseptis immanibus effSra, 



pale through anger, 

having red hair. 

having a black face, 

having a short foot. 

being one eyed. 

majestic in language. 

frequent in aphorisms. 

by extraction a Trojan. 

very great in genius. 

in art rude. 

in name a grammarian* 

in reality a barbarian. 

an old man with long beard, 

and rough hair. 

wiM with horrid purposes. 



LESSON CXXII. 



PHRASES IV. 



Odenmt peocare boni virtutis 

ftmore, 
Hi jactOis ill! certant dSfendSrS 

saxis, 
iDJuria fit dtLobus mSdis, aut vi 

aut fraude. 
Dente Itlpus, comu taurus p6tit, 

Et corde et genibus trSmit, 
Vehementer ird excanduit. 
Vlrum bonum nee prSce nee pretio 
& vi& rectd deduci oportet, 

Nam deteriores omnes fimus licentift, 
Mird cSlSritate rem pSrSgit. 



the good hate to sin from love of 

virtue, 
these strive to defend with javelins, 

those with stones, 
wrong is done in two m/mners, either 

by force or by fraud, 
the wolf assails with his teeth, the 

bull with his horn, 
it trembles both in heart and hnees. 
he grew vehemently pale with rage, 
a good man ought not to be moved 

from the right way neither by 

prayers nor bribes, 
for we all become worse by licence, 
with wonderful expedition he dt" 

spatched the matter. 



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69 

LESSON CXXIII. 

EXERCISE LIV. 

1. WheDce comes boldness ? 2. Where are the males 1 
In the citadel. 3. Where are the rods ? Here, in the cart. 
4. How is discipline seen ? In unequal contests. 5. Where 
is modesty seen ? Is it seen in boldness aud contests ? 6. 
In what manner does the wolf assail ? With his teeth. 7. 
How does the bull assail ? With his horn. 8. How does he 
grow pale? Vehemently, with anger. 9. In what manner 
is wrong done ? In two ways. 10. What is done either by 
force or by fraud? Wrong. 11. Whence does he come] 
In reality he is a barbarian ; by extraction a Gaul. 12. 
Where is the old man 1 Beside the wall. 

LESSON CXXIV. 

EXERCISE LV. 

1. Sagaces nautse sedificabunt arcem vetere gladio, lapidi- 
bus et ligno. 2. Reliqui reges docuerunt conjuges bonis 
verbis. 3. Hse urbes pulcherrimse exsecratse sunt 4. Con- 
juges aliquando ministrabunt fenum manibus suis. 5, Filise 
arte rudes docebunt liberos doctis libris. 6. Rex pallidus ira 
verberavit nautam virgis. 7. Mandabat tredecim csenas. 8. 
Senex promissa barba dabit undeeim agiles cervos. 9. Prse- 
ceptores docuerant liberos a primis annis. 10. Angeli voca- 
verunt ventos et pluviam. 11. Aurigse horrenti capillo vide- 
bunt csenas. 12. Infesta mors veniet rapido cursu. 13. 
Prseceptor nomine, re barbarus. 1 4. Rex nomine, re tyrannus. 
15. Verum scire est felicius quam facilius. 16. Media urbs 
lapidibus condita est, extrema ligno. 15. Senex niger ore. 

LESSON CXXV. 

EXERCISE LVI. 

1. Tell me the truth, Did the kings plough the fields with 
cows or with horses 1 2. Their husbands will have built high 
houses with the greatest diligence. 3. Will the wives come 
to speak with one another. 4. These girls, endowed with the 
highest genius, deservedly inhabited pleasant cities. 5. The 



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husband, an old man with a long beard, afterwards saw his 
own wife. 6. Is it right ? Shall kings pale with anger com- 
mand hateful crimes 1 7. Will the mistress never come to 
meet her waiting-maid ? 8. Will not the angels, majestic in 
language, teach good words by the prudent girls. 9. Death 
is ordinarily hateful. 10. To know the truth is a good 
thing.^ 11. Nothing is more barren than this hundred and 
twentieth field. 12. Lead is a heavier metal than gold. 13. 
The four thousandth cart was in the wood. 14. Tell the 
truth. 15. No one of tJiese old men was one-eyed. 





LESSON ( 


DXXVL 






VOCABULARY XXV. 




An oak, 


querctM-tls 


Father, 


p&ter 


A Jiff-tree, 


ficiM-us 


Brother, 


: rater-ris 


A needle, 


&CU8-US 


Likeness 


imSgo-iDis 


A spit, 


verw-us 


Virgin, 


virgo-Xnifl 


Cave, 


SpSctM-UB 


To read. 


legere lexi 


Ti-ibe, 


tribiM-us 


Orasshopper, 


dcada 


Joint, limh, 


a,Ttus-ns 


Ever, 


unquam 


Port, haven. 


portiM-us 


Tiger, 


tigm-is 


Birth, 


parttt8-u8 


Peacock, 


pavo-onis 


Motise, 


mus, muris 


To hope. 


sperare 


Parrot, 


psittS,cu«-i 


Bird, 


9,yts-is 


Soldier, 


inil^«-itia 


To murder, 


trttcidare 


Boat, 


cymba-SB 


To enjoy. 


habere 


Priest, 


B£lcerdos-otis 


Pleasure, 


delectatio 


Shepherd, 


pastor-orifl 


To know. 


nosco novi 


Pheasant, 


pha8i5na-89 


To confute, 


confutare 


To wish, desire. 


ciipto-gre 
volo velle 


Censurer, 


vtttiperator 
invXdiis 


Mother, 


matcr-ria 


Pour out, 


profim<2er«-udi 



LESSON CXXVIL 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLVIL 
How is the latter of two Verbs frequently to be rendered? 
By the Infinitive Mood, when the sign to goes before it. 
How is posmm deiived 1 Pdtis, able, and mm, 

^ Not expressed. 



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POSSUM. INDICATIVE. PRESENT. 

Possum, / am able. Posstimus, we are able, \ 

Potes, thou art able, Potestis, ye are aMe. 

Potest^ he is able. Possunt, they are able, 

IMPERFECT. 

Poteram, Itoas able, Poteramus, we were able. 

^ Poteras, thou wast able. Poteratis, ye were able. 

Poterat) he was able. Poterant, they were able. 

PERFECT. 

FQfctii, Iwca or have been able. PotiiYmus, toe were or have been able. 

Potuisti, thouwast orhast been able. Potuistis, ye were or have been able. 
Potuit, he was or has been able. Potuenint, they wereorhave been able. 

VOLO. PRESENT. 

V61o, / am willing. Voliimufl, we are willing. 

Vis, thou art willing. Vultis, ye are wUling. 

Vult, he is willing. Volunt^ they are willing. 

IMPERFECT. 

Volebam, Twos wUlvng. Volebamus, we were willing, 

Volebas, thou wast willing, Volebatis, ye were willing. 

Volebat, he was willing. Volebant, they were willing. 

PERFECT. 

V5ltd, / was or have been willing, VoMmus, we were or have beenwilling, 
Voluisti, thou wast willing, Voluistis, ye or you were willing. 

Voluit, he was willing. Voluerunt, they were willing. 

lialo, I wish rather or I had rather, compounded o/majus and Yolo. 

Malo Maltlmus 

Mavis Mavultis 

Mavult Malunt 

Nolo, compounded of non and volo, / am not willing. 

PRESENT. 

Nolo, lam unwilling. Noltlmus, we are unwilling. 

Nonvis, thou art unwilling. Nonvultis, ye are unwilling, 

Nonyult, he is unwilling, Nolunt, they are unwilling. 

The Imperfect and Perfect are formed like volo. 



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LESSON CXXVIII. 

PHRASES V. 

Ego facere possum, / can or am able to doii^ 

Tu facere potes, thou canst do it. 

Ille facere potest, Jie can do it. 

And iu like manner with the Plural The Perfect Tense, 
however, is to be rendered thus — 

Ego facere potui | 'j'^^^if^^ ^^havedone it. 

And in like manner with the remaining Persons. 

After the same model use debere with Infinitives, e.g., debut 
docere, I ought to have taught. 

Me facere oportet, / ought to do it. 

Te facere oportet, thou oughtest to do it. 

Ilium facere oportet, he ought to do it. 

Me facere oportuit, / ought to have done it. 

Te facere oportuit, thou oughtest to have done it. 

Ilium facere oportuit, he ought to have done it. 

The Infinitive is sometimes used for a Noun, as canere est 
jucundum. 

LESSON CXXIX. 
EXERCISELVII. 

1. By descent a Trojan, ought I not to shun a Greek 1 2. 
Being one-eyed from my cradle, ought I not to have been 
careful ? 3. Majestic in language, frequent in aphorisms, I 
studied the faculty of speech even to loathing. 4. Let us 
strive to come to speech one with another. 6. He is so ex- 
ceedingly foolish that he will not sup. 6. Even from the 
time of Romulus, Rome carried on war. 7. The report 
reached his ears, but was not believed. 8. An old man with 
a long beard had taught the children. 9. I ought to have 
taught Latin long since. 10. I ought to have been careful 
from my cradle. 11. I was able to give in a few days a bird. 
12. To confute is not easy. 13. To confute a censurer is 
pleasing. 14. He lent money for three months. 



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LESSON CXXX. 
PHRASES BY PREPOSITIONS— Cohtinukd. 

A IN THK SENSE OF Of. 

A me dabo, I will give of mine own. 

AqainiSt. 

Defendere a frigore, to defend against the cold. 

A Bciibendo prorsus abhorret animuB, it u against my native genius to 

write; my mind revolt* en- 
tirely against 

TOWABD. 

A Iffiva, toward the left hand. 

A deztra, toward the right hand. 

Baeillum leviter a summo inflezum^ a staff bending slightiy toward 

the top. 

A expresses also other PrepositioDS. 

A rege secundus, next in dignity after the king. 

' A me salutem die illi^ salute him in my name. 

A puppi rSlYgatuB, hound cU the hind part of the ship. 

A verecundia, for shame. 

A senatu stat, 7u is on the senates pari. 

A parte Oqundnis, on the north, 

LESSON CXXXL 



VOCABULARY XXVI. 




Compel, 


cogo, coegi 


So great an 


affair, 


tantares 


Answer, 


respon(ieo-di 


Think, 




sen^io-si 


Forbid, 


veto-ui-are 


Recently, 




nuper 


Cease, 


desino-ivi 


How many, 




quot 


Oppose, 


oppugno 


A few, 




paud^ 


Command, 


jubeo, jussi 


Most, 




plerique 


Mistake, 


error-is 


All, 




cuncti 


Begun, unfiamlud, 


inchoatus 


Some, 




nomiulli 




LESSON CXXXIL 








EXERCISE LVIIL 







1. How many peacocks are there ? A few peacocks are 
seen on the walls. 2. Some grasshoppers* hope to live long. 
3. How do the rest of the princes keep the kingdom from 
war? By counsel, goodness, and honour. 4. Every good 

* Genitive after pauci. Nomina partitiva, &c., Edw. VI. § 141, 67. 
P^S.L P. § 130. * Refer to same rule. 



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man was on the senate's part. 5. To leave unfinished so 
greitt an affair is a sad^ mistake. 6. So great an affair 
compelled me — To do what? 7. My mind revolts entirely' 
against writing. 8. To defend from cold is not foolish. 9. 
It is better to give than to receive. 10. It is better to sing 
than to blame. 11. To rule well is not easy. 12. It is 
more easy to blame than to advise well. 13. Our business' 
is to weep. 

LESSON CXXXIIL 

EXERCISE LIX. SELECTIONS FROM ELLIS. 

1. The fierce tiger desires to pour out all his blood even 
unto death. 2. Thy grief would compel me to answer. 3. 
What* tyrant has forbidden the unhappy to lament? 4. He 
had ceased to oppose Brutus. 5. Pythian Apollo commands 
us to know ourselves. 6. The active mind always desires to 
do something. 7. The sacred priests indeed desire to hear 
these things. 8. The marriageable daughters think natural 
law to be divine. 9. It was difficult to leave so great an 
affair unfinished. 10. The active mice desire to escape the 
cat. 11. The frogs desired to dethrone their king. 12. The 
grasshoppers do not compel the peacocks to answer. 13. It 
was difficult to hear these things. 14. It was difficult to 
think natural law to be divine. 

LESSON CXXXIV. 

EXERCISE LX. SELECTIONS FROM ELLIS. 

1. They have desired to murder our children. 2. We are 
able to enjoy many other pleasures. 3. I desire to hear 
what you yourself, Cotta, think. 4. Who is able to know 
these things 1 5. We are able to confute invidious censurers. 
6. He was not able to tell their names. 7. He preferred to 
pour out all his blood. 8. I am unwilling to know these 
things. 9. You will be unwilling to enjoy many other plea- 
sures. 10. You will prefer to hear what I myself think? 
11. Will you be able to confute invidious censurers? 12. He 
had rather not tell their names. 

^ Use gravis, ^ See Phrases 73. • Say ours, * QuU with the Qenitive. 

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75 

LESSON CXXXV. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLVIII. 
Irregular Perfects and Supines. 
State the Perfects of c?o, sto — did% stHi, 

Give the Supines of both and point out a difference — ddtUrHy 
stdtum ; from Infinitives, stdrey ddre. 

Give Perfects of plico-are, cUhd-are, mico, tdno. 

Give Supine of misceo — mistum. 

Give Perfect and Supines oi juvo-are—juvi jutum. 

Give Perfect and Supine of torqueo-ere — torsi tortum. 

Give diflference between Perfects of lugeo, mourn, and 
IticeOj shine. Both have luxi. 

Give Perfects of ardeo, suadeo, rideo. All have -w, emitting 
the -d. 

Give Perfects of jubeo, hoereo^ maneo—jussiy hoed, mansi 

Give Supines oifulgeo and luceo — none. 

Give Perfects of mordeo, spondeo^ pendeo, tondeo. All have 
Re-duplication, mo, spo, pe, to, before what would be the 
usual Perfect. ' 

Give Perfects of audeo, gavdeo, soleo — atLsiis sum, gavisus 
sum, solitus sum. 

What are the Supines of cdveo, fdveo, fdveo, mdveo, voveo — 
cautum, fautum, fotum, motum, votum. 

What are the Supines of prandeo, sMeo, video — pransum, 
sessum, visum. 

What are the Perfects of coquo,figo, trdho, veho, vivo — coid, 
fixi, traxi, vexi, vixi. 

What are the Supines of coquo, Jigo, Jingo, pingo,Jluo, struo 
— coctum, fixum, jktum, pictum, fluxum, structum, 

LESSON CXXXVI. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS XLIX. 
In determining the Persons of Verbs having Nomina- 
tives of different Persons, the First Person is accounted of 
more consequence than the Second, and the Second than the 
Third. Edw. VL L. G. Syntax Rule 3. 

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76 

What are the two Voices of Latin Verbs ? 

The Active and the Passive. 

What is the meaning of the Active Voice 1 

Verbs are said to be in the Active Voice when they express 
action or the doing something (from ago-ctctum, to do), as, 
I teach, doceo. 

What is the meaning of the Passive Voice % 

Verbs are in the Passive Voice which express the reception 
of some impression or suffering (from pcUwr-passus^ to si:^er), 
as, I am struck, verheror. 

How may a large number of sentences in the Active be 
changed into the Passive Voice, and the same sense be pre- 
served 1 

By turning the Accusative or object of Transitive Verbs 
into the Nominative, changing the Verb into the Passive, 
and the Nominative into the Ablative, governed by the 
Preposition A or Ab. (Edw. VI. §155). As, nas omnes 
cestimamvs mccharum becomes mccharum cestimatur a nobis 
omnibus ; iUi cum laudant is laudatur ab Ulis, 

Direction, Some examples from preceding Exercises of Verbs 
in the Active may be chosen for conversion after this model to 
the Passive, 

LESSON CXXXVIL 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS L. 

PASSIVE VOICK AMOR. INDICATIVE MOOD. PRESENT 

TENSE. 
Amor, I am or am being lowd, am-amur, we curt hved. 

Am-gris, tfum art loved, am-amini, ye are loved. 

Am-atur, he is loved, am-antur, they are loved. 

IMPERFECT. 

Am-abar, / vhzs or wag being loved, am-abSmur, we were loved, 
Am-&baris, thou vnist loved. am-abamini, ye were loved. 

Am-abatur, he was loved. am-abantur, they were loved. 

PERFECT. 

Am-atua siim, I was or have been loved, am-ati sumus, we were loved, 
Am-atus es, thou wast loved. am-ati estis, ye were loved. 

Am-atus est, he was loved. am-ati sunt, they were loved. 

These Participles are changed to -a and -um accordingly as 
the Verbs with which they are united are Fern, or Neut 



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GRAMMAB PRAXIS L.— Coktivded. 

PASSIVE VOICE. MONEOR INDICATIVE MOOD. PRESENT 
TENSE. 



Mon-eor, / am advUed. 
Mon-eris, thou art advised, 
Mon-etur, he ie adviaed. 



mon-€mar, we are advUed* 
mon-Smiiii, ye are advised, 
mon-entur, ikey are advised. 



IMPERFECT. 

Mon-€bar, I was advised, mon-ebamur, we were advised. 

Mon-ebans, thou toast advised. mon-ebamini, ye were advised. 

Mon-ebatur, he was advised. mon-ebaatur, they were advised. 

PERFECT. 

Mon-Ytus sum, I was or have been advised, mon-iti suxnuB, toe were advised. 
Mon-ituB 68, thou wast advised. moD-iti estis, ye were advised. 

Mon-itua est, he was advised. mon-iti sunt, they were advised. 

To make the Pluperfect and Second Future, the same 
Participles are to be used with eram and ero. In like man- 
ner are formed the tenses of the Conjunctive Mood, by add- 
ing essem, fuerim, Sindfuissem, to the Participle. 

Wilkins' Lat. Prose Intro., page 11 (7). Ordo. The Ad- 
jective is placed after the Substantive when it merely ex- 
presses an accessory or incidental quality; before, when it 
implies an essential difference between that Substantive and 
others, e.g., Theodosianus Codex is distinguished from every 
other Codex. 



LESSON CXXXVIII. 
VOCABULARY XXVII. 



To snatch. 


rapio-ui 


A law, 


To dig, 


f odio, f odi 


A woman, 


To look at, view, 


, inspectare 


Prosperous, 


To bear or carry 


1 exportare 


To remember. 


out. 


Ruined, decayed. 


To reign, 


regnare 


Temple, 


Honour, 


honor-is (m.) 


Withered, 


To plunder. 


ezpilare 


Cobbler, 


Truly, 


profecto 


Clownish, coun- 


England, 


Anglia-S0 


trified. 


Cave, 


antrum 


The other, 


To beget, 


pStrio, pSpSri 


One, another. 


To rule. 


rgggre 


The one, tlie other, 


Condemn, 


damnare 


To be vdse, 


Guest, 


con viva 


Xenophon, 



lex-gis 

mulier-is 

prosperus 

meminisse 

ruinosus 

templum 

marcidus 

sutor 

rusticiw-a-um 

ceterte9-a-um 
alius-alius 
alter-alter 
B&pto-ivi & -ui 
Xenophon-tis 



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Ewrope, 


EurGpa 


Henry, 
CharUt, 


Henricus 


CarQlufl 


Edward, 


Edvardus 


Greece, 


Giwda 


Samuel, 


Samuel-is 



Jlecline, recamhere-hm 

Candlestick, lampeu-fidia 

Robber, latru-nia 

How many times, quSties 

France, GkJlia 

Athens, Athexus-anim 



LESSON CXXXIX. 
EXERCISE LXI. 

1. The other ^ soldiers may have afterwards wished to bear 
the truth. 2. No clownish soldiers had hitherto been praised 
by me.' 3. All the pleasant fields of the general might hare 
been, in a short time, plundered. 4. What ruined walls were 
but lately looked at by the beautiful sisters ? 5. Might not 
the ripe grapes be carried out by the women's carts. 6. 
Much wood* was carried away yesterday. 7. He might have 
seen a certain theft 8. The charge of theft may have been 
read upon the walls. 9. Those who suffer injustice are not 
always destitute of valour. 10. Every frog lovss water. 11. 
The rest of the peacocks saw themselves* in the mirror of 
the waters." (For 8 <fc 9 refer to Lemm CL,) 

LESSON CXL. 
EXERCISE LXII. 

1. What priests ought* always to have taught the truth 1 
2. Which soldiers had I not hitherto praised? 3. What 
beautiful queen hopes in a short time to reign ?' 4. Will 
any* kings and priests hereafter' reign? 5. Certain thieves 
may have plundered the forbidden fields in a short time. 6. 
May not the beautiful sisters have looked but lately at the 
peacock's feathers 1 7. Remember^® to praise the troop of 
beautiful peacocks.^ 8. What carts may carry out, in a short 
time, all the ripe grapes % 9. These clownish shepherds 
by thirteens and fourteens might have carried away yester- 
day the forbidden wood. 10. Every ^ man may soon plunder 
the ruined temples. 11. Ought any one to like the charjjce 
of theft ? 12. Remember not to praise theft before his face. 

^ Ceteri. * A me, as culpatur ah Ulia. * Multum ligni. * Seee. 

• In specula lympharum. • Detent with Infin. ^ Fiit. in run after apero. 

• UUi, • Posthac. * » Takes Ace. with Infin. * * Pavo (m.) » « Quaque. 



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LESSON CXLL 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS LI. 
THE FIRST FUTURE OR FUTURE SIMPLE PASSIVE, 
jr * iw. I -^ria -Itur -Xmur -Imim -untiir 



I 



Audior » "^™ -Stur -Smur -Smiui -entiir 

THE PRESENT CONJUNCTIVE PAS8IVK 

AmSr •€il8 -etur •emur -emim -enttlr 

Moneor ) 

Regar >-3ri8 ^tiir -ftmur -Smini «a]ittLr 

Audior ) 

What is the rule of Nouns in Apposition 1 

Two or more Substantives signifying the same thing are 
put in the same case. Substantiva rei eftudem, due. Edw. 
VL §140,50. 

Effodiuntur 5pes irritamenti m^orum. 

RicheSj incentives of evil, are dug out of the ground, 

P.S.L.P. p. 2. A Substantive attributively joined to an- 
other Substantive is called its apposite : as CroesuSj rtx Ly- 
dorum, CrcBsus, king of the Lydians, where rex is an apposite 
to Crossus, and agrees with it in casa 

What is to be observed of the Prepositions verms, tenus, 
tuque, Bind penes? 

That they are set after their case, as Londinum versus, 
towards London ; portd tenuis, as far as the gate. 

In the Plural the Noun is commonly put in the Genitive, 
as aurium tenus, up to the ears. 

Pube tenus, up to the time of youth. 

Crurum tenus, up to the shins. 

Urbium Corcyrae tenus, ca far as the cities of Corqfra. 

Verbo tenus, ) as far as the meaning of the word or 

Nomine tenus, \ name extends. 

The Prepositions following serve to both the Accusative 
and Ablative Cases : — 

In for into, signifying motion to, or against, has an Accusa- 
tive Case, as eo in urbem, I go into the city ; oratio in CcUa- 
linam, a speech against Cataline. 



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80 

In for in only, without motion^ aenres to the Ablative Case, 
as in eo spes est, my hope is in him. 

Subf as sah noctem, a little before night ; sitb octdos venit, 
it comes in sight ; subjudice lis est : sub dio in the open air ; 
sub node, at night time. 

Subter, as subter terram, under the earth ; subter aqua, un- 
der the water. 

Super (motion to — Accusative) as super lapidem, on to a 
stone ; (position — ^Ablative) as frande super viridi, upon a 
green bough. 

PHRASES VI. 

Ire rufl, to go into the country, 

Rure redire, to return from the country. 

Stabat } ^T"^"^' ^ stood } ^ 5^ t*^^ ^^'^' 

I infenor, • J on the lower. 

Omne verbum, Edw. VL, 172 j Verum si, 174 ; Verbis signi- 
ficantibus, 176, 182. 

LESSON CXLIL 

EXERCISE LXIII. 

1. Hodife inspectabuntur. 2. Qaotidie exportabamur. 3. 
Ssepe vocaberis. 4. Fermfe monstrabimini. 5. Postridie 
turbati eritis. 6. Pridie flagitati sunt grgges. 7. Teneree 
conjuges amatse sunt. 8. Omnino vituperabamur. 9. Ce- 
rasa gustata sunt. 10. Mulieres ornabantur. 11. Brevi 
omabimini. 12. Brevi preBlium pugnabitur. 13. Apud 
Homerum legitur. 14. A calce ad caput bene vestitur. 15. 
15. Vituperatus est "k tergo. 16. A primis aunis sestimata 
est 17. A puero pulcherrimus fuit. 18. Tugurium habi- 
tatur. 

Let the Pupil put to some of the Examples Nouns or Pro- 
nouns in the Ablative, with Preposition A or Ab. 

LESSON CXLIIL 

EXERCISE LXIV. 

1. Sometimes our baskets will be placed. 2. Perhaps our 
tender wives will be defrauded. 3. Let not the rich cheeses 



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be tasted. 4. Has enough rain been already sent ? 5. Will 
the cheeses be soon demanded ? 6. Will the houses be always 
inhabited? 7. Will the reapers be required? 8. You will 
be frequently disturbed. 9. The legs of the stag were re- 
proached. 10. The half-dead pigs were soon disturbed. 1 1. 
The covenanted reward had been demanded. 12. These 
veiy crafty men were rightly despised. 



LESSON CXLIV. 

EXERCISE LXV. 

1. Formoseene sorores libris docebuntur. 2. Sacerdotes 
octoni arces lapidibus condent. 3. Sagaces patres liberos 
suos Buis arcubus docuerint. 4. Mus debet dormire. 5. 
Psittacus m^num videbit. 6. Fenum ministrabatur a pas- 
tore. 7. Fili, muros malis libris omavisses. 8. Habente 
binsB ministrabantur a pastoribus. 9. Nemo flagitia alicui 
imperare debet. 10. An conjuges in excelsam arcem inyectse 
sunt amilitibus. 11. Givisne ramum formosissimum dedit ? 
12. Pastores amsDnissimam patriam irrigavissent. 13. Cupio 
dormire. 14. Debetne epistolas denas scribere. 15. Rana 
cupivit ludere. 16. Pater mens bonus debuit scribere. 17. 
Cymb^ ludere cupiet 18. Mus cum phasiana ludere cupi- 
verit. 

LESSON CXLV. 

EXERCISE LXV I. 

1. Semper ludere est stultitia. 2. Semper dormire est 
perdere vitam. 3. Multum legere est multum sapere. 4. 
Accusare pene damnare est. 5. Qui expers virtutis est 
non meruit etiam meriti pretium. 6. Fuit crurum ten us 
in lutulenta aqua. 7. Effbdere opes est irritamenta malorum 
eflFodere. 8. Bene vivere est bene sapere. 9. Sapienter 
regere est ]eges SBstimare. 10. Antrum latronum expilare 
fuit opus omnium convivarum. 11. Dicere verum semper 
est sapientissimum. 12. Dulcis cantilena bis canebatur 
sacris templi virginibus. 13. Ire rus est jucundum. (Fw 
5 see Lemma GXLIX and CL,) 



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LESSON CXLVL 
EXERCISE LXVII. 

1. Henry, king of England, went into the conntry. 2. 
France, a country in Europe, was praised by the guests. 3. 
Xenophon, a wise philosopher of Greece, returned from Athens 
into the country. 4. Charles, up to the time of his youth, 
used to recline.^ 5. Where does Samuel, the cobbler, 
dwein In a hole in the wall.* 6. Croesus, king of the 
Lydians,* had* a son bom dumb." 7. Let us go into the 
country. 8. Charles and Edward, sons of the ambassador, 
are coming to Athens from the country. 9. He walked into 
the pond of muddy water up to his shins. 10. Will you go 
as far as the gate? 11. Let us go from the country and 
travel* towards London. 12. The one reigned over^ a large 
and fine country,* the other over* his people. 13. How 
many lamps were carried out of the caves by the robbers 1 
14. You are about to be profitable. 

LESSON CXLVIL 
EXERCISE LXVIII. 

It is better to stand than to sit. 2. It is easy to lie down 
on the grass. 3. To live happily is more easy than to live 
holily. 4. To live holily is to live happily. 5. Mine is to 
instruct, yours to be instructed. 6. It is ours to be blamed 
7. It is more pleasant to be praised. 8. To sit is easier than 
to stand. 9. Seeing is believing. 10. Being advised is not 
always pleasant. 11. Being laughed at is most unpleasant. 
12. We are about to be present." 13. We are about to be 
absent. 14. We are about to be wanting. 

LESSON CXLVIIL 
EXERCISE LXIX. 

1. Ought we not always to speak the truth from our 
earliest youth. 2. I wish to sing a sweet song. 3. I ought 

* Use imperfect. « Translate of the wall « Lydus, a Lydian. * 
Dative with tMt. • Naturd mutus. • Iter facere. ' Per. • Begio fer- 
tilis. • In with Ablative. *• For the Future Tenses in -nu, see Edw. 
VI. or P.S.L,P. 



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to have taught my brother from his earliest years. 4. The 
king although weary ought to command^ the soldiers. 5. By 
the choristers in twelves were the horses adorned yesterday 
with beautiful reins. 6. The deceitful virgins may have 
bartered the kingdoms for charming lands.* 7. The forbidden 
books have been read daily by us. 8. The citizens and 
soldiers each a hundred at a time went out of doors. 9. 
The learned priests of Egypt will have been taught even by 
the citizens, shepherds and fishermen. 10. The frogs and 
grasshoppers by twenties at a time were singing and leaping. 

11. We may have desired to speak the truth before him.* 

12. We were all present ; no one was absent. 

^ LESSON CXLIX. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS LII. 

When two or more Nouns of different Genders are united 
by a Conjunction, in translating them into Latin the Masculine 
is to be accounted more worthy than the Feminine, and the 
Feminine than the Neuter. 

Frequently an Adjective stands alone in Latin, hymo^ 
negotium, or some other word being understood. 

When the party spoken of is not the same as the Nomin- 
ative, we use w, ea, id. 

The Construction op the Genitive. 

What is the Rule of the Eton Latin Grammar ? 

When in English two Substantives signifying different 
things come together, the latter is put in the Genitive. 
Quum duo, Substantive, &c., Edw. VL, Rule 52. Cremt 
amor nummij the love of money increases. 

Decline Amor nummi. 

Veuatoris equus. 

Tfie horse of a huntsman. 

Prati gram en. 

The grass of the meadow, 

1 Imperare governs the dat. of the person, and ace. of the thing. — 
Edw. VI. Gr., § 144, 100. ^ Ablative. > ie., in his presence. 



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The English Possessive^ it may be observed, takes the 
same order, the huntsman's horse. — See p. 2. 

How is this Genitive explained in P.S.L.P..? 

1. § 127. As the Genitive of the Author and Possessor. 

Venatoris equus. 

P5Iyc1eti sign^ plane perfecta sunt. 

PolycUtuds statues are quite perfect. 

2. § 132. As the Objective Genitive. Say Rule. 

Pretium meriti. 

Reward of desert. 

Amor numrai. 

Insitus est menti cognitionis ^mor. 

Love of knowledge is implanted in the mindt 

Tempus edax rerum est. 

Time is consume of things, 

LESSON CL. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS LIII. 

What Rule is to be observed concerning the (h'do of 

Genitives. 

Place the Genitives before the Substantives to which they 
belong, as pavonis pennoe. 

But if there is an Adjective ? 

If there be an Adjective agreeing with the former Noun, 
the Adjective is put first, then the Genitive, and lastly the 
Noun. 

Patiens injurise. 

Suffering injury, submitting to injustice, 

Exper virtutis. 

Destitute of valour. 

See Edw. VI. Lat. Gr., Rules 60, 66. These latter in- 
stances are generally distinguished by the name Objective 
Genitive from the former, which are called Subjective Genitives, 
They may be known by their Adjective or Substantive im- 
plying, as it were, a Verb, 



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Patiena injuriee = qui patitur injuriam. 
Pretium meriti = quod muneratur meritum. 
Expers virtutis = qui caret virtute. 
i.e., Objeotum quo quid tendit, not Subjectum quo quid 
constat. — Edw, F/., 51 afid 185. 

The charge of theft, furti crimen, may also be explained 
by Rule 76 {crimen being omitted). 

Infinitives may become the Nominative Case or Subject of 
the Verb, as — 

Docere est aliquando utilius quam gratius. 
To teach is sometiTnes Trwre useful than pleasing. 

LESSON CLL 

EXERCISE LXX COMPARATIVES AS BEFORE. 

1. Aliquis cupit sexies natare. 3. Quisque vult nat^are. 
3. Aliquis cupit sexies natare. 4. Rana cupivit sexagies 
natare. 5. Quisnam civis nonvidt urbem suam videre. 
6. Quam imaginem frater faciet ? 7. Quamvis virtutis ex- 
pers ipse mihtis virtutem potest laudare. 8. Queedam 
phasiana veniet. 9. Hie miles quamvis virtutis expers a pos- 
teris tamen laudabitur. 10. Quanta est terra major quam 
luna. 11. Est medico major nasus quam sacerdoti. 12. 
Venti crebriores sunt quam equi pemiciores. 13. Pavonis 
pennse formosiores sunt quam pennsa cujuspiam avis. H. 
Quisque pavo virtutis est expers. 

LESSON CLIL 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS LIV. 
What is the meaning of a relative pronoun ? 

A pronoun which implies a relation to a word going before 
it in the sentence, called its antecedent. 

What is the derivation of these two words — relative and 
antecedent 1 

Relative from {refero — latum). Antecedent from {ante 
before and cedo go). 

I 

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86 

EXAMPLES. 

1. Homo qui vidit aprum. 

The man who saw a wild boar, 

2. Homo quern vidi sub arbore. 

The man whom I saw under the tree, 

1. Hom^ antecedent, qui relative in the nominative case. 

2. Homo antecedent, quern relative governed by the nomi- 
native tgo understood in the verb vidi in the same sentence. 

Sometimes a pronoun, w or HU^ is the antecedent. Some- 
times the relative is placed first in tlie sentence, 

LESSON CLIII. 

EXERCISE LXXI. 1. RELATIVES. 2. GENITIVE, THE 
LATTER OF TWO SUBSTANTIVES. 

1. Quis expert em virtutis militem laudabit % 2. Qui rex 
patiens injuria^ non a malis civibus brevi expilabitur? 3. 
Yirgo quse a medico sanata est hodie ex casa in horto expor- 
tata fuit 4. Pastor^s qui e rure venerant quartemideni 
rite^ docti fuerunt a sacerdotibus. 5. A rege et regina, 
qui in bibliotheca erant, locus ille apud Homerum valde laud- 
atur. 6. Profecto regis lanista, qui aptissimus sestimatur, 
exsecratus fuisset. 7. Quam urbem formosam temploruni 
sacerdotes viceni condent. 8. Quis medicus s uteris nasum 
unquam inspectabit. 9. Quidam rusticus uxorem, quandam 
sutoris sororem, habet. 10. lUud ruinosum templum ab 
aliquo aadificatum est. 11. Quisnam mus in hoc ruinoso 
deorum templo vixit ? 

LESSON CLIV. 

EXERCISE LXXII. 

1. Luci qui amsenissimi sunt ab illis expilabuntur. 2. In 
nostris carris expilati sumus. 3. Num' frater ad verso oculo 
a milite inspectabiturl (No). 4. An' tu unquam me laudas? 
(No). 5. Num tu me inspectas? Non arbitror.' 6. An 

3 Correctly. ^ Both Num. and An suggest doubt. 

* I think not — a deponent. 



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ego a te laudabar ? Non arbitror. 7. An ego a te docebor ? 
Plus satis.^ 8. Annon milites qui currebant quam citissime 
expilati sunt 1 Negant* 9. Nonne corvi centeni exportabun- 
tur earns? 10. Alius carros expilabit; alius templa. 11. 
Quaenam cicada in his amsenis agricolae agris canit 1 12. 
Psittacus quendam pavonum gregem ride bat. 13. Meriti 
pretium principi a secretis datum est. 14. Quidam tigris 
saepe in his dpQiini sylvis dormiebat. 15. Uter horum 
melior est. 

LESSON CLV. 

EXERCISE LXXIII. 

PARTITIVE WORDS TAKING A GENITIVE. 

1. To every man there is his own work.* 2. Some boys 
are in the field of a certain woman. 3. In every age there 
is something charming. 4. Both Brutus and Ceesar were 
illustrious. 5. On every table there are not apples and 
quinces. 6. Some good thing is celebrated in every land. 
7. One of the carts was plundered 8. Many of the wisest 
men shared* our counsels. 9. Henry is the eldest of my 
sons. 10. They alone of the women had inspected the 
snares. 11. Which of the elms is on fire?" 12. Many of the 
girls are seen seated.* 13. None of the men went away. 
14. Very many wars are destructive. 

LESSON CLVI. 

EXERCISE LXXIV. 

1. Quisque miles hostem adverse oculo inspectabit. 2. 
Males feminae oculus est noxius laqueus. 3. Quidam sutores 
qui docentur laudabuntur. 4. GailinsD a mulicribus quibus- 
dam docebantur. 5. Quidam milites lucos expilabunt. 6. 
Hujus mulieris formosa pira exportabuntur. 7. Horum 
militum carri brevi a tergo expilati sunt. 8. Quisque oculus 
oleam istam videbit. 9. Piscis quisque natat in fluviis. 10. 
li milites quos in silva vidisti fuerunt bellioosiores quam 

1 More than enough. " They say not. » Or, Evexy man haa. 
« Partior. ' Ardeo. * Considentes. 



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crudel lores. 11. Ea niinosa templa qnsB in iEgypto vidisti, 
ex mea sentential non debent inspectari. 12. Kegina qaam 
amavimus ccepit valde asgrotare.' 

LESSON CLVIL 

EXERCISE LXXV. 

PART OF TIME, ABLAT. DURATION OF TIME, ACCUS. 

1. He lived a hundred years. 2. No mortals (no one of 
mortals) is wise at all times. 3. He lent his money for a 
month. 4. A boy of that age I studied for two years. 5. 
By day and by night I thought upon these things. 6. How 
long did the old man live ? A hundred and four years. 7. 
How old is this boy ? He is ten years old. 8. A few months 
afterwards I saw my friend in the arms of death.' 9. A few 
dBi^B hence I shall have gone to Rome.^ 10. A few days ago 
I was travelling on the continent.' 11. Six days ago I was 
studying with aU my might 12. The country shall be 
reigned over forty years. 

LESSON CLVIII. 
EXERCISE LXXV I. 

1. The laws, to my mind, had been justly praised by 
them. 2. Let the laws be praised by the women. 3. Let 
us be heard by the robbers. 4. Be ye ruled by the priests. 
5. Let the woods and the clouds never be seen. 6. By 
whom is that cruel man armed with bows and arrows? 7. 
By one the citizens advised, by another condemned. 8. 
How many beautiful women by twos and threes were seen ? 
9. How many are ye? 10. How many pleasant faces were 
seen in these most charming groves ? 11. In Xenophon* you 
read of twenty guests' reclining by fives. 12. How many 
times may you have advised the swift charioteers? 13. 
Thirty times, five times, &o, 14. Let us walk about the 
walls. 



* Bx mea sententia, in my opinion, to my mind. * jEffrdtare, to be 
sick : neut. verb. • In articido mortis, * Se« Rules at end of Lesson 
CXLI. * In continente or -entL ' Xenopho»-tis. ^ Convlvce. 



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LESSON CLIX. 

EXERCISE LXXVII. 

1. By Tfhom will the ripe grapes be carried out afterwards 
to the physician 1 2. The priests, one at a time, will view 
the crows the day after. 3. The greatest fishes will have 
swam apart. 4. The robbers of the cave might recently 
have dined off cabbages. 5. You and the sailors might be 
plundered by the exceedingly rapacious (sup.) cobbler. 6. 
The citizens, thousands at a time,^ might have been soon 
carried away. 7. The twenty-nine snares will have been 
thoroughly inspected. 8. The withered olives may have 
been carried away by one party, the rotten fish by another. 
9. The candlesticks will be hereafter inspected, ten at a time, 
by the prince's treasurer. 10. Who might have looked at 
the candlesticks of my father. 11. In Homer sacrifices are 
offered constantly. 12. From a boy he was remarkable* for 
praising his father^s guests. 13. On this side of the moun- 
tain are the flocks and herds* of the king. 14. Everything 
is in the power of the preetors.^ 

LESSON CLX. 

EXERCISE LXXVII I. 

1. Sextum flagitium imperaverint. 2.* Rex odiosns regnet. 
3. A callidissimis latronibus expilabuntur sacerdotes. 4. Duo 
de triginta milites saoerdotibus non docebuntur. 5. Millesi- 
mam lamp&dem quae ultima fuit non locaverant. 6. Pastores 
qui nocte dieque vigilabant mirabilem laqueum inspecta- 
verunt. 7. Virgines arcem quam aedificaverunt ibant saepe 
visum." 8. Sagaces cives dabunt ad versa judicia. 9. Rubree 
nubes totum caelum sensim omaverint. 10. Porci cardaos 
gustavissent. 11. Lampades decem dabantur. 12. DCmus 
et templum expilata sunt vicies. 13. Postea putrid^ cepee 
et lactucsD exportatea sunt. 14. Quod flagitium odiosissi- 
mum fuit? 15. Virgines quas vicen as locavissent sacerdotes 
in templo. 16. A qui bus fuerunt exportata retia et laquei? 

^ Milleni, or Singula, millia. * Insigniter laudavit. ® Armenta. 
* Penes with accus., see 79. " Supine, to see. 

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90 

LESSON CLXI. 

EXERCISE LXXIX. 

1. The men may view their paternal fields. 2. Look at 
the little woman in our house. ^ 3. They will be condemned 
by these most hateful laws. 4. Let the most beautiful 
candlesticks be ornamented seventeen times. 5. woman ! 
are those rotten lettuces and other vegetables carried out. 
6. Let us not look at the swift clouds with unfavourable 
eyes. 7. The mournful eyes shall look at the ruined walls 
which now smoke. 8. The king, to my mind, might be 
taught by the priests. 9. The children who have been 
called by the citizen are obedient. 10. Let the mother be 
called by the gentle sister whom we all love. IL Let us 
not be plundered even by priests. 12. Let the two thousand 
swords be carefully looked at by the soldiers. 13. He is in 
the highest degree a timid' sailor. 



LESSON CLXIL 

EXERCISE LXXX. 

1. The unfavourable laws will be praised. 2. One is 
plundered by the priests; another by the women. 3. The 
parents will have been called in a short time by their hostile 
children. 4. The king cannot be praised by his enemies. 
5. How can these robbers have been* good men ? 6. Why 
do you praise yourself? 7. The prosperous king shall in- 
spect the great army with his own eyes. 8. By whom will 
the hostile king inspect the ruined walls ? I do not know.* 
9. What candlesticks will have been put into the great 
temple by the priests ? From thirty to thirty-five. 10. The 
huge* temples were plundered and ten most beautiful candle- 
sticks were carried away. 11. In Cicero* there is much 
concerning laws. 12. In Xenophon we read much about 
Persians.^ 

^ Apud no8. * Pamdus. » Quomodo fuerint. * Netcio. * Ingens. 
■ Cicero -nia. * Pertce -arum, de with obL 



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LESSON CLXIII. 



VOCABULARY XXVIII. 



Fortwne, 


fortuna 


To flow, 


fliiere, fluxi 


Obtain, get. 


obtinSre 


Faith, fWes-ei 


Fruit, 


fruct»s-u» 


Bear, tvffer, fero-tuli 


To rob. 


spoliare 


Hope, spes-ei 


Mind, 


menj-tis 






Love, 


&mor-is 


preserve. 


servare 


To learn, disco, didYci 


To keep, take care 
of. 


cufitodio 


To fear, 


ttmere 


Utual, wonted, s^ntus 




PHRASES VII. 


In postSrum, 


for the time to come. 


Hue atq 


ue illuc, 


here and there. 


Id est, profecto. 


it is even so, in truth. 


Ubique, 


wed with and without 







LESSON CLXIV. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS LV. 

Some Intransitive Verbs take an Accusative after them of 
a cognate signification, as — 

Duram servit servitutem. 
He serves a hard servitude. 

Verba neutra, &c., Edw. VI., Syn. 118. P.S.L.P., sec. 99. 

Minim somniavi somnium. 

/ have dreamt a wonderful dream. 

Vitam jucundam vivere. 

To live a pleasant life. 

Piignam pugnare. 

To fight a battle. 

Viam ambulare. 

Perpetuas ilia vias ambulat. 

Some Verbs, as doceo I teach, rogo I ask, and celo I con- 
ceal, take after them a Double Accusative, one of the person, 
another of the thing. 



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Dedocebo te istos mores. 
/ toUl unteuch thee those (bad) manners. 
Ea ne me celet consuefeci filium. 
/ have accibstomed my son not to conceal 
these things from me. 

Verba rogandi, docendi, &c., Ed. VL, Syn. 121. P.S.L.P., s. 98. 

LESSON CLXV. 
EXERCISE LXXXI. 
1 Talis qualis semper fuit. 2. Pastor veru trucidatus est. 
3. In vituperatoris confutatione nonne fuit multum volup- 
tatis? 4. In specu omnes virgines trucidatse fuerunt. 5. 
Mater cupit habere bonos gnatos. 6. Invidus vituperator 
non profudit omne suum odium in gnatum meum. 7. Ali- 
quis expers virtutis non obtinet pretium meriti. 8. Possumus 
multa alia jucunda invenire. 9. Non pertimescam* hujus 
testimonia. 10. Eidiculum est facere mentionen^ alicujus 
ineptiss. 11. Tanta erat vis virtutis quanta vis amoris. 12. 
Kidiculum est te istuo admonere. 13. Facere mentionem 
omnium rerum ridiculum est. 14. An odisti peccare virtutis 
amore? 15. Certabunt sese defendere jaculis. 16. An cer- 
taveruntsese defendere alupi dentibus. 17. Quomodo petit 
lupus dente ? 

LESSON CLXVL 
EXERCISE LXXXI I. 
1. To sin is sometimes harder than to live holily. 2. 
Avoid the charge of theft. 3. The wicked ought to shun 
the charge of theft. 4. The reward of desert is obtained by 
diligence. 5. The Christian often submits* to injustice. 6. 
The coward obtains no reward of merit. 7. Will the coward 
ever obtain the reward of merit? 8. Are prizes given to 
cowards 1 9. Are those who suffer injury therefore destitute 
of spirit (valour) ? 10. Many men will bear the charge of 
theft with boldness. 11. Do you hate to sin from love of 
virtue 1 12. They will strive to defend themselves with darts. 
13. Have they striven to defend themselves from the teeth 
of the wolf 1 14. How does the wolf assail? With his teeth. 

* To be much afraid of. * Patior. 

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93 

LESSON CLXVII. 

EXERCISE LXXXIII. 

1. Will he have served a hard servitude ? 2. Who has 
dreamt a wonderful dream? Can you telll 3. The boys 
were playing their usual games here and there in the fields. 

4. Let not my son conceal anything of importance from me. 

5. Are you able to unteach my son these (bad) manners. 

6. I had taught my daughters-in-law many things within six 
months. 7. Mothers must teach their daughters the best 
things. 8. Why do you ask me for your shoes 1 9. Because 
you have concealed them from me. 10. Did you put on new 
shoes? 11. No but I took off the old ones. 12. Do not 
conceal anything from me. 13. All countries demanded 
peace of the king. 14. Do not admonish me of that. 

LESSON CLXVIIL 

EXERCISE LXXXIV. 

1. In posterum discere potero. 2. Id est profecto, rusticus 
sutorem verberavit. 3. Malo discere. 4. Nolo spem habere. 
5. Sutorem verberare possum. 6. Velim timere. 7. Nonne 
fidem servare potuissem ? 8. Hsereditatem in posterum ser- 
vare potest. 9. Malumus ludere ludum quam regere. 10. 
Volumus hereditatem nostram servare. 11. Malumus here- 
ditatem servare quam obtinere. 12. Spes fortunam obtinet. 
13. Nonvisne rusticum sutorem verberare. 14. Fidem ser- 
vare potest. 15. Nonne potui rogare regem aurum et gem- 
mas. 16. Mens celare h89c sua mala nonvult. 

LESSON CLXIX. 

EXERCISE LXXXV. 

1. The wolf will assail you in two ways, either by fraud 
or by force. 2. This good man was not led away either by 
force or by fraud, 3. He could do many things with won- 
derful despatch. 4. The wolf was trembling both in heart 



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and knees. 5. The wolf assailed the bull five times. 6. 
Did you tremble in heart when the wolf attacked you 1 7. 
He grew pale with anger with wonderful quickness. 8. Can 
you attack a wolf with stones ? 9. Can we grow exceedingly 
pale with anger ? 1 0. You cannot certainly be led from the 
right way. 11. No one will be able to lead you from it 
either by bribes or by entreaty. 



LESSON CLXX. 
EXERCISE LXXXVI. 

1. Fortuna nunc nos admonet ista seria.. 2. Alius nos 
spem admonet, alius nos dedocet antiques mores. 3. Malu- 
mus te hoc insuescere quam iUud te cogere. 4. Male heredi- 
tatem obtinere quam spoliare. 5. Verberes fortiter, neu 
timeas has nugas. 6. Noli admonere me istuc. 7. Potestne 
calceos se induere. 8. Ea me maluit celare quam in 
suescere. 9. Pacem te poscimus omnes. 10. Cur omnes 
poscitis nos pacem. 11. Poscit nos lampadem. 12. Sacer- 
dos poscit te exta boyis. 13. Cela mentem tuam hostes. 
14. Cyrus iter omnes celabat. 

LESSON CLXXL 

EXERCISE LXXXVII. 

1. You must learn to maintain an even mind. 2. Let 
the boy learn to unteach himself those (bad) manners. 3. 
The faith shall be carefully taught by us for the time to 
come. 4. Put on your shoes ; do not take them off again. 
5. Learn to fear crimes and teach us all good laws. 6. You 
have concealed great evils from us. 7. Will they not have 
dreamt a terrible dream. 8. The priests will have been 
slain by the soldiers. 9. Learn to bear well a great fortune. 
10. By the women will the inheritance be long kept. 11. 
The sisters will not be blamed by their brothers. 12. They 
must teach themselves in like manner many things. 13. 
The women were unwilling to learn their own minds. 1 4. 
To sleep a deep sleep. 



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LESSON CLXXIL 

EXERCISE LXXXVIII. 

1. Amongst us there are no fine^ fruit& 2. Where did 
the armies join battle 1 On this side of the mountain. 3. 
Against whom was the battle fought 1 Against the Latins. 
4. On what account was this spectacle ? On account of that 
most mournful event. 5. What is the width* of this river ? 
About half-a-mile across.* 6. Amongst us are many learned 
men. 7. The battle was fought against the Spaniards^ with 
very great spirit. 8. Do you see anybody behind me ? 9. 
I unhappily fell into the hands of a most wretched man, 
who never spake well of anybody. 10. I see nobody except 
Julius. 1 1. Do not ask the gods for riches, but for a con- 
tented mind. 12. Shall I not teach my brothers letters) 

LESSON CLXXIII. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS LVI. 
ON PARTITIVE WORDS WHICH TAKE THE GENITIVE. 

When of or from a whole a certain part only is taken, that 
whole is expressed by the genitive. This is often called the 
partitive genitive, as — 

Pars militum. 

A part of the soldiers, 

Oratorum prsBstantissimi. 

The most distinguished of orators, 

Reliquum noctis. 

The rest of the night. 

Id negotiL 

That piece of business, or that business. 

Key's Short L. Grammar, sec. 922. 

Nomina partitiva, numeralia, comparativa, <Sec. — Edward 
VI. L. Grammar, Synt, sec. 67. 

Utrum horum mavis accipe. 

Take which of these you prefer. 

Primus regum Romanorum fuit Romulus. 

The first of the Roman kings was Romulus, 

1 Speciosus. ^ Latitude. " LatuB fermd quingentos passus- 
Edw. VI., i€C. 150. * Hispani. 

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96 

Manuum fortior est dextra. 

The right hand is the stronger one, 

Indus omnium fluminum maximum. 

Indus, the greatest of all rivers. 

Sapientum octavus. 

The eighth of wise men, 

Sequimur te, sanote deorum. 

We folhw thee, holy one of the gods. 

Multum pectinlfiB. 

Mttch money. 

Quid r6I est 

What is the matter. 

Plus eloquentlsB. 

More eloquence. 

Tantum fIdSi. 

So great faith. 

Multum boni in amidtla. 

Much good in friendship. 

Multum m41I in discordia. 

Much evU in disunion. 

Exlgiiiun temporis. 

Short time. 

Quid operse et curse. 

What pains and care. 

Quantum p^riculi. 

Houf much danger. 

LESSON CLXXIV. 

EXERCISE LXXXIX. 

1. One of the sheep is coming behind me. 2. Accept 
which of the two you had rather. 3. Neither of the mas- 
ters is a good one. 4. Which is the second {altera) of the 
(two) girls. 5. There is little produce (fruges) in this field. 
6. The eldest of the girls is unteaching herself those bad 
manners. 7. The younger of the boys has dreamt a terrible 
dream. 8. Very much wine has been concealed from me. 

9. Many of the kingdoms have been admonished of that. 

10. Here is more wine than wit 11. There is too little 



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wisdom in the multitude of men. 12. Before Christ there 
was much darkness in the world. 13. Ask the king fot 
riches. 14. Do not conceal your opinion from me. 

LESSON CLXXV. 

EXERCISE XC. 

1. They alone of the apples are ripe. 2. None of the 
soldiers are coming. 3. Many of the chariots have lost theiif 
charioteers. 4. Some of the masters are sitting on the 
benches.^ 5. This is the best of these eggs. 6. Which of 
the oaks are still to be seen.* 7. Very many of these men 
were Komans. 8. Much wisdom is in old age. 9. There is 
often, however, too much slowness as well of action as of 
thought. 10. Few men are worthy of praise. 11. The best 
of the poets was crowned with a wreath of laurels.' 12. 
Whom do you blame ? 

LESSON CLXXVI. 

GRAMMAR 1»RAXIS LVII. 

Verbs of mdhing, crtatingy electing have an accusative of 
the new condition or office (called the factitive accusative) 
besides the accusative of the object. (Key> 106i) 

Me hSbetem molestiiB l^ddlderunt* 

For mi/self, troubles have made me dvlt of feeling^ 

Ancum Martium regem popiilus creavit. 
The citizens elected Ancus Martina king. 

So also verbs of calling^ thinking, showing, take two accu- 
Batives, as 

Octavium sui Csesarem s3.1(itabant. 
Octavius his ovm friends saluted as Ccesar, 

Socrates totius mundi se civem arbitrabatur. 
Socrates thought himself a citizen of the universe^ 

Gratum me prsebeo. 

/ show myself grateful. (See also P.S.L.P. sec. 99.) 

^ Jtesidens toro, sitting on his bed. Sttet. * VisibUia^ ® ZaureWf 
translate genitive by adjective, and a wreath by corona, 

K 

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98 

LESSON CLXXVIL 

EXERCISE XCI. 

1. Who will reckon thee a wise man? 2. And will any- 
one call that man wise. 3. A poet is bom,^ he is not made. 
4. What makes me sad 1 5. T)o you reckon me severe ? 6. 
Yes, I think you very severe. 7. Which do you like best* — 
the beech or the oak tree 1 8. Nobody is born a poet. 9. 
What is that animal called ? It is a lion. 10. One of which. 
11. None among mortals. 12. Peace, the best of gifta 
13. No one among us is without blame. 14. One of the 
muses. Which of you two 1 15. You are dull of feeling. 

LESSON CLXXVIII. 

EXERCISE XCI I. 

1. Six months ago I lent money for a month. 2. A boy 
of that age ought not to lend money. 3. Six months before 
this I was travelling in Gaul. 4. I think of him by day — I 
weep over him by night. 5. I cannot lend you this more 
than three days. 6. In a few days I will do it without en- 
treaty, certainly without a bribe. 7. I wish to study for 
three yeara 8. I shall not be able, perhaps shall not wish 
to study a few days hence. 9. A few years afterwards I 
shall be reckoned a wise man. 10. Tell me the truth — can 
we come to speech with the rebel' bands ?* 

LESSON CLXXIX. 

EXERCISE XCIII. 

1. Fear not adverse fortune, and conceal not great evils 
from us. 2. It is so, in truth, we came on horseback. 3. 
The hateful king has sufficient eloquence. 4. You had too 
little wisdom. 5. Let the faith be taught everywhere.' 6. 
You shall have something of your former strength. 7. The 
king will ornament his beautiful horses with something 

* Nascitur from nascor natus sum nasci, ^ Translate m ihe highest 
degree. ' Contumax, * Cohort, * Passim. Ubique loci. 

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of his former skill. 8. You strike the old citizens 
amongst whom were learned and good men. 9. The carts 
were carrying out the ripe fruits. 10. The distinguished 
women will take off their shoes at the temple doors. 11. 
The soldiers and priests have sufficient patience. 12. The 
soldiers will have been advised to give the signal for new 
disturbances.^ 

LESSON CLXXX. 



VOCABULARY XXIX. 



Because, 

I Tiave begun, 

Quarrels, 

Lovers, 

Condemn, 

To comb, 

Rashly, at a ven- 

tv/re, 
Hair, 
Stick, 
The way, 
Horrid, 
To plan, schenne, 

commit, 
Late, 
Crime, 

To be reported^ 
Fw, 

To heap up, in- 
crease, 

Renewal, 



qutSL 

coepi* 

ine 

amantes 

damnare 

pectSre, pexui 

temSr^ 



I te] 



cnni«-is 
bS^tiliM-i 
via-se 
horridt^-a-um 

I designare 

serus 

scSlus-eris. n. 
f 6ror, latus sum 
nam 

iaugeo, auxi, auc- 
tum, acciimti- 
lare 
intSgratio 



Accuse, 
Folly, 

Letter, 

Money, 
To receive, 

Vegetables, 

Pulse, 

Pot-herbs, 

At tim^s, 

Blame, 

Now, 

Paternal, 

Timid, 

A horseman, 

One who goes on 
foot, a foot 
soldier, 

Onfoot, pedestrian. 

Belonging to car- 
riages, by car- 
riage, 



accusare 
Rtultitia 
epistola, litterse 

-arum 
p6cunia 
accipSreepi 
Iggumina nm, 
olera-um, from 
iSgumen-inifi 
olus-eria 
filiquQties 
culpa 
nunc 
patrYus 
pavidus 
fiques-ltifl 

pSdcs-itis 

,pSdester ris-re 

vgWctllaris 



PHRASES VIII. 



Si placet tibi, 
Dicis sequum, 
Quam brevissimft, 
Quam brevissimfe potui, 
Quam celerrime, 
Iter facere, 
Quam maxime, 
Quam minime, 
Maxime, 
Minime, 



if you please. 

you say right. 

as shortly as possible. 

flw briefly as I could. 

as quickly as possible, 

to travel. 

in the highest degree. 

in the loivest degree. 

yes ; by all means. 

no ; not at all. 



* Classicum can4re novarum rerum. * See Defective Verbs, P.S.L.P., 
8ec. 74. 



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LESSON CLXXXI. 

EXERCISE XCIV. 

1. Nunquam misi ejus pecudem. 2. An damnatis ejus stul- 
titiam 1 3. Parum pecunia), satis autem litterarum accepi. 
4. An flagitia designas ? 5. An melior est spes, fides aut 
amor? 6. Legumina aliquoties^ videntur in ejus horto. 7. 
Vir eequus stultitiam suam videt. 8. Legumen augetur. 
9. Si placet tibi raultum irse non augebitur. 10. Episto- 
1am Bcripsi quam brevissimfe potui. 11. Crinem ejus pectam 
quam celerrimb possum. 12. Nunc potes me damnare aut 
accusare. 13. Visne multum pecuniae accumulare? 14. 
Bacchus baculo peciidem verberavit. 15. An melior est 
eques aut pedes 1 16. Alius mavult pedestre iter alius vehi- 
culare. 17. Alii adveniunt equites, alii pedites. 18. Si 
placet vobis, iter faciam navigio. 19. Itinera quam celerri- 
m^faciemus. 20. Pecus mittitur a te. 21. Stultitia cujus- 
dam aliquando videtur. 22. Omnes omnia bona dicere 
oceperunt. 

LESSON CLXXXIL 

EXERCISE XCV. 

1. You cannot comb his hair quickly. 2. You cannot 
take money for crimes.* 3. You ought never to rob' for the 
. time to come. 4. How* will you bear your misfortunes ? With 
hope. 5. How' is it that you do not learn to rule your mind? 
6. Hope all things. Suffer all things. 7. Every one began 
to say good things of me.* 8. England is less than France. 
9. I ought to have made a journey as quickly as possible 
into France. 10. I ought to have combed my hair at least 
three times a day. 11. I was able to do it six times. 12. 
The last part of the book I was unable to read. 

LESSON CLXXXIIL 

EXERCISE XCVI. 

1. It is so in truth, to my mind he is a good man. 2. 
You say right, he is increasing his [own] money. 3. Does 

* Divers times. * Pramium flagUiorum. ^ Fwror-ari. * Qtuymodo^ 
^ 'art (qud de re J non discis. « De met {of meaning concerning,) 



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he keep* his money ? No.* 4. If you please, Philip will keep 
his [another man's] stick. 5. You say right, George shall 
comb his [another man's] hair as fast as possible. 6. If 
you please he shall read the letter. 7. The way may have 
been inspected. 8. Was the sword well inspected yesterday ? 
Not at all. 9. The good men have long since exceedingly 
condemned his folly. 10. Certain beautiful girls received 
his ripe berries and grapes. 11. Certain unheard of crimes 
were committed by him. 12. The clownish cobblers accused 
their own folly. 13. Who gave the signal for new commo 
tions ? 

LESSON CLXXXIV. 

EXERCISE XCVII. * 

1. We will teach pleasant things with the books of the 
women.'* 2. The robbers were struck with their own sticks.* 
3. I accused the soldiers as briefly as I could. 4. If you 
please, I will commend the boy. 5. Grapes, olives, and 
vegetables have been carried forth bj the soldiers. 6. Could 
horrid crimes have been committed by the citizens? No. 7. 
The soldier was struck with the stick. 8. The cattle, horses, 
and money have been increased by an inheritance. 9. She 
wrote the letter as quickly as she could with her own beauti- 
ful hand. 10. What has she written with her beautiful 
hand. 11. We have neither' cattle nor horses. 12. Why do 
you commit horrid crimes 1 

LESSON CLXXXV. 

EXERCISE XCVIII. 

1. He is reported to be planning desperate crimes." 2. 
Does he say right ; is it wine 1 3. He says that the faith 
of the soldiers was the faith of the women. 4. Truly he 
is reported to have advised well. 5. The brothers whom 
you rightly condemned were advised by their own sisters. 
6. He is reported to have sent word by charioteers as quickly 
as possible. 7. In a short time the poor sons of the old 

1 Custodit. ^ (See p. 54.) ® Use ablat. of the instrument. * Ditto. 
» See Edw. VI., sec. 135; also sec. 127, obs. 2; P.S.L.P., sec. 94. 



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soldiers were permitted to plough their own field. 8. Truly 
the learned man was permitted to advise well. 9. The 
happy old man combed as quickly as possible the hair of hia 
younger son. 10. The beautiful sisters are said to have 
bought their books with another's money. 11. Truly, the 
women were feeling the wickedness of the rich cobbler. 12. 
1 am permitted to strike that clownish brother with a stick. 

13. Thou didst receive thy little inheritance with anger. 

14. You are permitted to preserve your inheritance with 
another's money. 15. If you please, finish your short letter 
and send word to the old man concerning those affairs. 16. 
He travels with another's money (by another's assistance). 
17. I hope that you will find all well. 



LESSON CLXXXVl. 

EXERCISE XCIX. 

1. Paucis ante diebus ibo rus. 2. Patiens injurise nullum 
jurgium^ intulit. 3, Fertur eiim incitatum* esse fauce' im- 
probS,* ut jurgii causam inferret. 4. Ait se rure rediisse ante 
hos sex dies. 6. Fertm* eum siti compulsum venisse ad rivum." 
6. Athleta in foveam® incldit. 7. Athleta agricolse agnum 
abhinc dies tres tradiderat.' 8. Spero illic lupum non spolia- 
turum esse ovem agno.' 9. Spero eum apud ilium rivum 
offensunim* omnia leeta. 10. Spero eum nuntium missurum 
paucis post diebus. 11. Ait se rure rediturum paucis post 
mensibus. 12. Sperat se omnia comraoda offensurum esse. 
13. Speravit se jamdudum valiturum" fuisse. 14. Nunquam 
vidi virum aliquem injurise patientiorem. 16. Quis patient- 
issimus fuit inter bos amicosi 16. Audebisne templum 
spoliai'el 17. Spero eum cauturum lupum. 18. Mansueti 
agni improbos latrones hos sex menses cavebant 19. 
Latrones canem caveant. 



* Quarrel. « Stirred np. * Fauaj-cis-jaw. * Wicked. * Stream, 
river. « Pit. ^ To deliver. Accus. of the person and Abl. of the 
thing robbed ; agmus, a lamb. ® To meet. Fr. Offenrfo-di-sum, to 
hit unawares. *® Vfileo, to be well, to be strong. ^^ Audeo ausus sum, 
ausurus, to dare. 



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LESSON CLXXXVIL 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS LVIII. 
DEPONENT VERBS. 
Explain the nature of a Deponent Verb. • 
What form is it ? Passive in form. 
What in meaning ? Active in meaning ? 

The present participle is retained, whence verbs de- 
ponent afford two present participles. 

CONJUGATIONS. 

1. Moderor, moderaris or moderare, moderatus sum or fui, 
moderari ; moderandi, moderando, moderandum ; moderatum, 
moderatu \ moderans, moderaturus, moderatus, moderandus 
to govern, 

2 . Mereor, mereris or mer6re, meritus sum or fui, merSri ; 
merendi, merendo, merendam ; meritum, meritu ; merens, 
meriturus, meritus, merendus, to deserve, 

3. Labor, lab^ris or labere, lapsus sum or fui, labi ; la- 
bendi, labendo, labendum, lapsum, lapsu, labens, lapsurus, 
lapsus, labendus, io slide, 

4. Largior, largiris or largire, largitus sum or fui, largiri ; 
largiendi, largiendo, largiendum, largitum, largitu, largiens, 
largiturus, largitus, largiendus, to bestow freely, 

MODEL FOR PARSING. 

Substantive or noun, — State from what or what is its nomi- 
native, also the genitive. Declension, decline. Gender, num- 
ber. Case — Why] Because governiug what? or governed 
by what 1 

Adjective, — ^^From what, or what its nominative, of how 
many terminations, declined like what ? qualifying what sub- 
stantive. Case, gender, and number agreeiug with what 1 

Verb, — From what sort of verb, voice, mood, conjugation, 
tense, number, person. Governed by what 1 Conjugate it. 

Pronoun, — From. what or what nominative? genitive? 
What sort — if adjective, agreeing with what ; if personal, put 
for what noun ; if relative, what the antecedent ? Show the 



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agreement with antecedent. If the relative not in nominar 
tive, how governed ] 

Participle. — Parse as a verb and an adjective. 

Adverb, — Of manner, of quality, of time? What does it 
qualify 1 

Preposition. — Government What case ? 

Conjunction. — Coupling or disjoining what words. 

RULES FOR TRA.NSLATION. 

1st Rule. Look for the Nominative Case or the Subject, 
anil what belongs to it, called its adjuncts ; then the Verb and 
what belongs to it (adjuncts to the Verb); aft er wards the Ac- 
cusative (if an}) and what belongs to it. 

2nd Rule. In looking for the Nominative or Subject, 
find a Substantive or a Pronoun (expressed or understood) in 
the Nominative Case ; or sometimes a sentence, or a Verb in 
the Infinitive, both of which are sometimes the subject to 
the verb. 

3r</ Rule. If the Noun or Pronoun is not expressed, the 
Verb will tell you in what person you must expect the Pro- 
noun to be, whether First, Second, or Third Person, and 
whether Singular or Plural, as amamvSy First Person, Plural, 
hence the Nominative or Subject is nos. Donee eris felix, 
tu is the Nominative. Tradunt Homerum ccecum fuisse, they 
hand down that Homer was blind ; illi is understood as the 
Nominative. Sperne volupiates, despise pleasures ; tu is the 
Nominative or Subject understood. Cujusvis Iwminis est 
errare, to err is the nature of any man : the infinitive is the 
Nominative or Subjective. 

iih Rule. The words which are governed by Prepositions 
must be translated immediately after them. 

LESSON CLXXXVIIL 

EXERCISE C. MISCELLANEOUS EXAMPLES. 

1. The labours of the pupils were very easy. 2. Nothing 
is better than virtue. 3. He was building a house in the 



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town. 4. Will the soldiers guard the camp well. 5. Who 
will give you a reward of merit. 6. He is not always the 
best general who is the most daring. 7. All your plans are 
most hurtful. 8. Which is the most useful of all the 
metals 1 Is not iron. 9. Is not Jordan a very rapid river 1 
10. You will not find a wolf now in England. 11. It is 
every man's duty to despise pleasures. 

LESSON CLXXXIX. 

EXERCISE CI. 

1. Let the servants obey their masters. 2. Praise worthy 
men, blame the unworthy. 3. If you punish one, you will 
improve twenty. 4. He will be the dearest to us who is the 
best. 6. Wisdom and patience are wanting to their councils. 
6. In the summer the days are longer than the nights. 7. 
The grass of the meadows feeds the cattle. 8. Is gold 
heavier than silver? 9. Your brother would rather walk 
than run. 10. We wish to stay at home. 11. Which do 
you prefer, to read or to play? 12. Will you walk or will 
you teach? 13. It is reported that Socrates despised plea- 
sures. 14. Do not speak at random or rashly. 

LESSON CXC. 

EXERCISE CII. 

1. Both these noble women said very pleasing things. 2. 
All just men are in the highest degree beloved by God, and 
for the most part^ by men. 3. He had a very long leg. 
How long ? Three feet six inches. 4. An exceedingly en- 
raged bull ran at us with his horns. 5. What I pray ? An 
exceedingly enraged bull. 6. What did he do ? He ran upon 
us. 7. With what ? With his horns. 8. With one or both? 
With botL 9. All bloody wars will soon end. 10. Which 
toga' will you put on ? Which you please. 11. Did any one 
ask for me. 12. Is he doing any thing. 



1 Plerumque. * TSg5 se, a gown. 



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106 

LESSON CXCI. 

EXERCISE cm. 

1. Any horn you like will be pleasing to me. 2. Is there 
any paper in that book ? 3. Is there any general who will 
put an end to this bloody war. 4. Let him be a worshipper 
of the gods, I am none. 5. The most learned men have 
decreed to worship one God. 6. The most bloody wars op- 
press every part of the world. 7. A certain thing will soon 
come to pass. 8. A certain man drew a bow at a venture. 
9. Every wise man will be diligent in his calling. 10. 
Will any one be diligent in his calling and not profit himself 
and others. 11. It is every man's duty to worship God. 

LESSON CXCIL 

EXERCISE CIV. 

1. The best people always obey. 3. The most pleasant 
things are not always the wisest. 3. The cheapest things 
are not always the most profitable. 4. Both generals fell 
upon the enemy. 5. Both generals fell in the battle. 6. 
Augustus had a ready ^ and flowing '^ eloquence. 7. Has any 
one been able to triumph over' Augustus? 8. He cured 
one* of his soldiers. 9. On every sixth day'' the soldiers 
stood in battle array.® 10. All faithful soldiers love their 
valiant generals. 11. Do nothing rashly. 

LESSON CXCIIL 

EXERCISE CV. 

1. Was he speaking of any subject T 2. He ordered some 
of the soldiers to be flogged. 3. He ordered rewards of 
merit to be given to some of the soldiers. 4. Some® of 
the soldiers were sent to the citadel. 5. He ordered a thou- 
sand talents to be given to a certain one in the army. 6. 
Is there any one of the conspirators whom we wish to be 
slain ] 7. Every one for his part was speaking of some sub- 

1 PromptvLS. * Profluens. ' Debella/re. * i.e. a certain one. • Sexto 
guoque die. ' In acie steterunt. ^ De aliqua re dicere. ' Quidam. 

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107 

ject. 8. They thought that^ any one of his friends was" to 
be praised. 9. He is the same person whom I knew in 
France. 10. It is the same thing which I observed before. 



LESSON CXCIV. 

EXERCISE CVI. 

1. What advice do you give us. 2. I know not what ad- 
vice to give. 3. Have the farmera had enough rain. 4. 
They have had too much hail. 5. They have eaten too many 
turnips. 6. They had too little beef to eat. 7. The exces- 
sive heat killed all the birds. 8. The excessive heat burnt 
up all the turf in the garden. 9. This clever pupil took off 
all the prizes from the rest of the boys. 10. I like this cot- 
tage above all the others. 11. This stag is swift beyond 
every dog. 12. In the forest I counted to the two thousandth 
tree. 

LESSON CXCV. 

EXERCISE CVII. 

1. AH young men are fond of games. 2. All very wicked 
men incur great peril. 3. Of these two men Samuel was the 
more benevolent. 4. Which of these two men was the more 
godly. 5. Young people should not act in important aflFairs 
without the knowledge of their parents or guardians. 6. 
Among the thick willows there is a cooling shade. 7. They 
brought him before the prince. 8. He stood in the king's 
presence. 9. Henry was older than Horace.' 10. Charles 
was younger than Francis.* 11. I admired the elder brother 
but loved the younger. 

le'sson CXCVL 
exercise cviii. 

1. I like chestnuts better than peas. 2. A craftier fox I 
never saw. 3. No one is more crafty than Phormio.' 4. 

* QuivU. ' Accusative, and esse. ' fforatiuu. * Franciscus, 
• Phormio'Tiis. 



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Bread is cheaper than meat, meat than game.* 5. He Waa 
more wicked than intelligent. 6. A cock more hot than 
high-spirited. 7. He possessed lands more ample than fer- 
tile. 8. In British Authors" we read of all the noblest deeds 
which adorn humanity. 9. Was this done before or behind 
him? 10. I knew him well from a stripling. 11. He was 
beautiful from head to foot. 12. What was his office about 
the king 1 He was his gentleman of the bedchamber. 

LESSON CXCVII. 

EXJERCISE CIX, 

1. After dinner they spent some time in talking. 2. 
After supper they had some grave discourse about JuvenaL* 
3. Soon after breakfast they read letters concerning the late 
bloody battle. 4. His wife did not smile again after his 
death. 5. My most intimate friends think with me. 6. 
Some of my female acquaintance think with me. 7. Some 
begin dinner, others play or sit down. 8. The old dog 
barks with difficulty. 9. Do you wish to make a rich cheese 
for such an ungrateful old man 1 10. Will our altars smoke 
thirty times ? No ; now, only twice six days. 

LESSON CXCVIII. 
EXERCISE ex. 
1. Will you for once lend me your arrows ? 2. This shep' 
herd's crook was never lent to any one. 3. It is the duty 
of a wise man to despise pleasures. 4. Would you drive 
together the goats with the shepherd's crook. 6. Pop- 
pies may be plucked at any time. 6. From the deadly bow 
my hunting dog received his death. * 7. The sick lion played 
In a friendly manner with the well-fed mouse. 8. The fierce 
snake wound round the empty cup. 9. The black cat played 
stealthily with the well-fed mouse. 10. This hill is more 
rough than high. 11. The fisherman* spread his little nets. 
12. Am I so uncomely as you are. 



^ Ferina, • Apud Scriptorei Anglicos, • Juvenal-U* * Piwator, 

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109 

LESSON CXCIX. 

EXERCISE CXI. 

1. I wandered a long time daring this hot summer on the 
mountains of Switzerland.^ 2. Who would not track the 
footsteps of so good a master ? 3. The lords of tender ladies 
blame the bleak* winds which too rudely fan' their cheeks. 
4. What arrows fly faster than the fugitive years. 5. The 
empty house did not please the veteran pailor. 6. Are you 
willing to unite a base and common people with one noble 
and free. 7. Boats made with planks* were sent over the 
sea. 8. Ships, with sails'^ made of canvas,^ were seen off the 
shore.' 

LESSON CC. 

LECTION I. 

(From Cicero de Senectute). Vir hand magna cum re,* sed 
plenus fidei. Mihi quidem ita jucunda hujus libri confectio 
fuit. Suspicor, iisdem rebus, te** gravius commoveri. Non 
modo abstersit omnes senectutis molestias sed effecit mollem 
et jucundam senectutem. Nunquam igitur satis laudari 
dignl poterit philosophia. Omne tempus ajtatis sine molestia 
possit degere. Hunc librum de Senectute ad te misimus. 
Apud quem {i.e. Marcura Catonem) Laelium et Scipionem 
facimus admirantes. Attribuitb Groecis litteris. Sed quid 
opus est® plura. Ipsius Catonis sermo explicabit nostram 
omnem sententiam. 

• Wealth. * Translate by that thou, &c., Accus. with Infin. Verba sen- 
tiendi. Edw, VI. L. G. '^Dicere undei^s. 

LESSON CCL 

LECTION II. (Cio.) 

Ssepenumero admirari soleo cum hoc Caio Lselio tuam 
excellentem, perfectamque sapientiam. Rem hand san^ dif- 
ficilem admirari videmiui. Quibus enim nihil* opis est in 
ipsis, iis omnis gravis est setas. Qui autem omnia bona it 
seipsis petunt, iis nihil potest malum videri. Quo in genere 

* Helvetianis. ^ Translate as if cold. ' Blow upon. Vehermntiui 
affla/re. * Tabula. • Velum, ® Pannus cannablnus, "^ Natantes per 
undaa. L 



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in primis est senectus quam omnes optant ; adept! accu- 
sant ; tanta est inconstantia stnltitiae atque perversitas. 
Primdm quis coegit eos falsum putare. Qui enim citius^ 
adolescentisB senectus, qiiam pueritise adolescentia obrepit ? 

•See Partit. Words, Lesson CLXXIII. no resource. »»Take citiut^mtii 
obrepit, creep upon youth. Obrepit is to be taken again as the Verb of 
the second clause, of which adolescentia is the Nom., and ptteriticB the 
Dat. 



LESSON ecu. 

LECTION III. (Cio.) 

Deinde, qui miniis gravis esset iis senectus, si octingen< 
tesimum annum agerent,* quam octogesimum? PrsBterita 
enim setas, quamvis longa, nulla consolatione permulcere 
potest stultam senectutem. Quocirca in hoc sumus sapi- 
ent es, qubd naturam optimum ducem, tamquam Deum, 
sequimur. Atqui Cato, gratissimum^ nobis feceris, si ante 
multo a te didicerimus,® quibus facillimd rationibus ingrayes- 
centem SBtatem ferre possimus. 

• Subjunctive mood to be translated like the Indicative. Were pasting 
or tpendi/ng. ^ A most pleasing actr— freely, you will have done us a very 
great favour. ^ Translated by we have learnt. 

LESSON CCIIL 

LECTION IV. (Cic.) 

Faciam vero, Lseli ; prsesertim si utriqiie vestriim, ut 
dicis, gratum futurum est. Yolumus, sand, nisi molestum 
est, Cato, istuc qub pervenisti, videre quale sit.* Faciam, 
ut potero, Laeli ; ssepd enim interfui^ querelis meorum sequa- 
lium. Pares autem cum paribus, veteri proverbio, facillime 
congregantur, Eadem mihi usu evenirent reliquisque omni- 
bus majoribus natu quorum ego multorum cognovi senectu- 
tem sine querela. Sed omnium istius modi quSrelarum in 
moribuB est culpa, non in setate. 

•Translate it is, Subjunctive. ^ P.8.L.P. 107 b, Edw. VI. Syn. 110, 

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LESSON CCIV. 
LECTION V, (Cic.) 

Est, ut dicis, Cato : sed fortasse dixerit quispiam. " Tibi 
propter opes, et copias, et dignitatem tuam tolerabilior^ 
senectus videtur." Est istuc quidem, Lseli, aliqiiid; sed 
nequaquam in isto sunt omnia. Themistocles fertur Serlphio 
cuidam in jurgio respondisse. Aptissima^ omnino sunt, Scipio 
et Lseli, arma senectutis, artes, exercitationesque virtutum : 
qusB in omni estate cultas, mirificos efferunt fnictus. Quia 
conscientia ben^ ao+8B vitse, multorumque benefaotorum re- 
eordatio, jucimdissima^ est. 

» More endurable. ^ In the highest degree, exceedingly. 

LESSON CCV. 

LECTION VI. (Cic.) 

Ego Q. Maximum, eum qui Tarentum recepit, adolesoens 

ita dilexi senem ut aequaiem : erat enim in illo viro comitate 

condita gravitas, nee* senectus mores mutaverat. Quanquam 

eum colere csepi non admodtim grandem natu sed tamen 

jam setate provectum. Anno enim pbst^ consul primiim 

fuerat, quam** ego natus sum ; cumque eo quartum consule 

adolescentulus miles profectus sum ad Capuam, quintoque 

anno pbst ad Tarentum qusestor ; deinde sedilis. 

» Translate nee as if que et ne, and old age did not. ^ To be taken with 
post, and the two clauses thus brought together. 

LESSON CCVI. 
LECTION VII. (Cio.) 
Quadriennio pbst factus sum praetor ; quem magistratum 
gessi,* cum quidem, ille admodum senex, suasor** Legis Cinciae 
de Bonis et Muneribus fuit. Hie et bella gerebat° ut 
adolesoens, cum* plan^ grandis esset ; et Hannibalem juven- 
iliter exultantem patienti^ su^ molliebat®: de quo prseclarl 
familiaris noster Ennius : 

Unus, qui nobis cunctando' restituit rem*; 
Non ponebat enim rumores ante salutem : 
Ergo magisque magisque viri nunc gloria claret. 

• Nom. to gesn, e^o und. * By apposition with senex. « Imperfect, used 
to carry on wars with the spirit of a young man, when he was evidently in 
years. * Render wA^w he was. Subj. «Kept on weakenlnpf; observe jn 
culiar use of Imperf. ' By delaying, gerwnd. 8 Our repubhc. 

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LESSON CCVII. 

LECTION VIII. (Cic.) 

Tarentum verb qua vijjilantia, quo consilio recepit 1 cum 
quidem Salinatori, qui fugerat in arcem, glorianti atque ita 
dicenti : Mea opera, Qninte Fabi, Tarentum recepisti: Certd, 
inquit, ridens ; nam, nisi tu amississes* numquam recepissem. 
Multa in eo viro prccclara cognovi ; sed nihil est admirabilius, 
quam quomodo ille mortem Marci filii tulit, clari viri et con- 
sularis. Est in manibus^ laudatio ; quam cum legimus, 
quern philosophum non contemn imus 1 

• Subj., you had lost it. ^ We have in our possession, 

LESSON CCVIIL 

LECTION IX. (Cio.) 

Nee ve^^ ille in luce mod 5 atque in oculis civium magnus ; 
Bed intus domique prsestantior. Qui sermo ! quae prsecepta ! 
Quanta notitia antiquitatis ! Q'lse scientia juris augurii ! 
Multse etiam, ut in homiue Romano, litterse : omnia memoria 
tenebat, non domestica solum' sed etiam externa bella. 
Quorsum igitur hsec tam multa de Maximo 1 quia profecto 
videtis, nefas esse* dictu,*^ miseram fuisse® talem senectutem. 

* A ecus., with Infin., that it is wicked. ^Supine, to say, literaUy to be 
said. ° That such^ dec, has been wretched. 

LESSON CCIX. 

LECTION X. (Cic.) 

Est etiam quietd et purd et eleganter actse setatis placida 

et lenis senectus ; qualem accep.mus* Platonis, qui uno et 

octogesimo anno scribens mortuus est ; qualem Isocratis, qui 

eum librum, qui Panathenaicus inscribitur, quarto et non- 

agesimo anno scripsisse se** dicit, vixitque quinquennium 

postea ; cujus magister Leontiuns Gorgias centum et septem 

complevit annos, neque unquam in suo studio atque opere 

cessavit ; qui cum ex eo qusereretur,® cur tamdiu vellet* esse 

in vit^ ? Nihil habeo, inquit, quod incusem* senectutem ; 

prseclartim responsum 1 

» Such fis we have heard was the old age of Plato. ^ Acciis. with Infin., 
says that he had written. «Subj., translated like Indicat., he was asked. 
* Subj., was tdlling. • Which I should, literally ; nothing to accuse old age of. 



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113 

LESSON CCX. 

EXERCISE CXII. 

(See Voc. XX., Ac, and Gr. Pr. XLV. The Adjectives, &c.) 

1. The heat will be less oppressive in the end of the 

summer. 2. In the middle and in the extreme parts of 

England are valiiable mines. 3. Kivers nm through the 

extremity of France. 4. In the middle of the city he had 

built three lofty buildings. 5. The birds bad constructed 

nests in the top of the cottage. 6. Apples were hanging 

from the top of the tree. 7. Cheeks with tender down. 

8. The king kept cutting^ oflF the heads of the poppies. 

9. Shall madness ever overcome so much reason. 10. His 
abominable madness has often eluded us. (Ex. XLIY.) 

LESSON CCXI. 
EXERCISE CXIIT. 
1. The little merchants will know these things, and will 
openly undertake my cause. 2. Liberty a long time after- 
wards came. 3. Amidst well-known rivers Tityrus was pre- 
sent. 4. The woodman has sung all the day constantly 
amongst the dense beech trees. 6. The fish will be left bare 
upon the shore. 6. To what willows will you flee. 7. Who 
would not love Phillis above all other girls. 8. These rivers 
have long run down between stony valleys. 9. We sit 
among the refreshing breezes of these valleys. 10. The sister 
led her brother's friend into the moimtains of Sicily. 

LESSON CCXIL 
EXERCISE CXIV. (Gb. Pr. XLV.) 
1. He will have reigned thirty years. 2. Who is wise at 
all hours 1 3. In a few days I shall go to France. 4. I was 
hoping for better things by day, i.e., before the end of the 
day {Kennedy' B L. G. sec. 156). 5. For how long will you lend 
me that sum of money 1 For a year. 6. How old is he 1 
He is fifty years old. 7. A boy of that age 1 began to study 
for five years. 8. When will you return the money which 
I lent youl In a few days. 9. For how long did you 
study at college?^ For four years. 10. Six months ago' the 
sailor was beaten with rods.* 

* Imperf., excidere. * Apud cUmam modern. ® Ace, b9Qyo4 ^*'*5^ 
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114 

LESSON CCXIII. 
EXERCISE CXV. 
1. Any man may discern that.^ 2. I can read any part.* 
4. How long have you held the city 1 For twenty-one years. 
3. I wrote it during* dinner, i.e., at some time between the 
beginning and ending of dinner. 5. You come, Henry, in* 
good time. 6. The city in which she had lived for so many 
years. 7. The book is such a one as you gave me yester- 
day. 8. Their perseverance was as great as their fury. 
9. After*' a few months he was appointed general. 10. A 
few months after* or afterwards he lent me the money. 

LESSON CCXIV. 
EXERCISE CXVI. 
1. He remained several days in that country. 2. He came 
at three o'clock.' 3. He invited me to dine with him the 
next day in the gardens, i.e. He invited me to diuner into 
the garden, for or against, next day !^ 4. He is in his twelfth 
year.* 5. He is nine years old. 6. What shall we do in 
winter? 7. We shall know in two or three days concerning 
all these things. 8. We lent the money nearly two years 
ago.^® 9. I will return you the money five days hence. 
10. Six days ago I was walking in the country. 

LESSON CCXV. 
EXERCISE CXVII. 
1 Six months ago I was travelling in Asia. 2. I promise 
for a day.^^ 3. He invited me for the next day. 4. He is in 
his fifteenth year. 5. He came to the Prsetor a little before 
night.^' 6. The general wished to see him a little before 
evening. 7. Three years ago she came into this neighbour- 
hood." 8. Day after day^* I stay at my uncle's. 9. He 
returned the money in the seventli year. 10. He has reigned 
above seven years. ^* 11. He finished all things — a little 
before night. 12. With^' whom will you sup? 

* Crombie 1, 234 Qulvis. * quamW/et. * Inter. * j>er tempus. 
' Prep. * Adverb, ^ Crombie 2, 10. ® Ad prandium me in hortum in- 
vitavii in posterum diem. • Crombie 2, 425, duodecimum annum agit ; 
1.6., he is eleven years old. ^^ Fcrme ahhinc hiennium. ^^ In diem. 
^* SuJ) noctem. "^^ Adhv>c vicinice commigravit. ^* Diem de die. 
Translated he is reigning hia eighth year. ^^ Apvdf 

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LESSON CCXVI. 

EXERCISE CXVIII. (APUD.) 

1. He is with me at my house.* 2. He is sitting by me. 
3. All day long — I heard, at the market, loud cries. 4. I 
ana first in your estimation, or I prevail with you as much as 
any.* 5. I am about to dine or sup with my frieud. 6. He 
is in the army or at the camp. 7. This is no new thing to 
me. It happens daily. 8. He made an excellent oration to 
the Senate. 9. Your commandment is in our thoughts. We 
remember your'^ commandment daily. 10. He grows daily.* 

LESSON CCXVII. 

EXERCISE CXIX. 

1. Come here again about noon." 2. They journeyed 
about fifteen days. 3. They waited at the gate.' 4. They 
sat by' the fire for a short time.® 6. They command all 
things to be done according to i-ule.* 6. According to my 
fancy I am first in your estimation. 7. He was willing to 
write abundantly after his own pleasure.*® 8. He did all 
things according to the measure of his strength." 9. There 
went forth daily about their business to the number of three 
thousand. 10. He determined to plead before the judge." 

LESSON CCXVIIL 

EXERCISE CXX. 

1. Charles come and look toward me." 2. A place 
looking^* towards the south. 3. A place lying" towards the 
west. 4. He slept until it was far in the day.^* 5. He used 
to read until it was far in the night. ^' 6. He was sent for^® 
this purpose. 7. All things were made for the use" of men. 
8. He wished to come here about noon. 9. He lately sat 

* Apud me domi. * Sum apud te primus. ' Apud nos. * Crescit indies. 
Circiter meridiem. ^ Ad 2>ortam. '^ Ad. ^ Ad breve tempvs with sig- 
nification of per. ^ Ad pnescrijdum. ^^ Ad arbitrium. ^^ Pro viribus 
suis. ^^ Ad judicium, diccre. ^^ Ad ia sense of versus, ^* Spectans 
ad. ** Proftus ad. ^^ Ad muHum diei, ad lucem. ^'^ Ad mtUtam noctem, 
usque. \« Ad for j^opter. ^"^ Ad usum. ^ g^^^ ^y GoOg 



116 



by the fire. 10. Do all things according to rule. 11. He 
increased daily in stature. 12. It was determined to plead 
before the Judge. 

LESSON CCXIX. 



P H R A S 

Ad sapientYam hujus nugator est, 



Ad manum esse. 

Ad verbum, 

Ad unguem, 

Ad vivum resecare, 

Ad calcem opens, 

Ad irrltum cadit spes. 

Ad dXgltos venire, 

Ad extremum. 

Ad postremum, 

Ad ultimum, 

Bis terve ad summum^ 

Cras ad summum perendie, 



I X. 

in comparison of this man's vfisdomf 

the other is but a tri/ler, 
to be ready at hand, 
word for word, 
at his fingers' ends, perfectly, 
to cut to the quick, 
at the end {heel) of the work, 
his hope is in vain (falls J. 
to be counted. 



at length, or lastly. 

twice or thrice at the most, 
to-morrow or the next day afUr 
at farthest. 



LESSON CCXX. 
PHRASES X. 



Ab intggro, 

Ab equitatu firmissimus, 
Ab hora tertia blbebatur, 
Ab occidente, 
Ab Komanis, 
Advereus, adversum, 
PiCtas adversum Deum, 
Gratus adversum te, 
Lerinna adversum AntipSlim 

ante, 
Ante lucem, 

Ante oculos coram (Ter.) 
Ante alios hilaris (Plin.) 
Ante me ilium diligo (Cic.) 



afreshf anefO). 

strong at riding. 

after three o'clock they drank. 

on the west part. 

on the Romans' side, 

duty towards Ood. 

thankful to you. 

Lei'inna is over against Antipolit. 

before day. 

in presence before my face, 
more merry than others. 
I love him more than myself. 



LESSON CCXXI. 
PHRASES XI. 



Ciroa ima subsistere (Quint.) 
Animus est circa campos {ffor.) 
Agere circum, 



to stay about low things. 
His mind is in the fields, 
to drive or turn^about.i 

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Cifl montem vel fluvium, on thh side of the hUl or river. 

Citra invidiam {Plin.) without envy. 

Citra risum, without lauyhing. 

p., f^-j- j without loathing, not so far <u to 

Ultra lastiaium, | came disdain. 

Citra senatus authoritatem {Suet.) without the authority of the senate. 

Clam vos, sunt factnQra ejus, hia evil deeds are unknown to you. 

clam, ace. and abL 

Clam iia earn vidi, / saw her without thevr privity. 



LESSON CCXXII. 

EXERCISE CXXI. (Phrases III. IV.) 

1. The grammarian full of aplir.risms read to the end 
of his work. 2. These citizens, pale with anger, assailed 
the old man with tlie long beard. 3. A good man onght 
not to be led out of the right way. 4. We ought not to 
become worse either by prayers or bribes. 6. A Trtjan 
with rough hair, and Wind of one eye, was trembling both in 
heart and knees. 8. Very many barbarians, wild with 
horrid purposes, despatched the matter with wonderful ex- 
pedition. 7. Verres, although very bold in disposition, 
grew exceedingly pale. 8. The wolf attacked the bull with 
his teeth. 



LESSON CCXXIIL 

EXERCISE CXXIL (Phrases p. 78.) 

1. Do not the good hate to sin for shame 1 2. The prince 
was next in dignity after the king. 3. Salute the priest in 
my name. 4. Thy mind was daily opposed to writing. 5. 
The cottage was standing on the higher ground. 6. What 
is a consumer of things'? Time. 7. In what is love of 
knowledge implanted 1 In the mind. 8. The horses of the 
huntsman are first rate.^ 9. Many rewards of merit were 
carried away by robbers. 10. Was I not able to conceal 
his crimes from youl 11. They were daily asking for more 
priests and churches.* 12. I prefer the first of these dis- 
tinguished orators. 

1 P. 84, pland perfecti. « P. 95. 

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LESSON CCXXIV. 
EXERCISE CXXIII. (Gb. Pb. LVI.) 

1. I was doing that piece of business the rest of the night. 

2. Which do you prefer, the right or the left hand 1 3. A 
part of the soldiers were* most distinguished. 4. With what 
pains and care did you conceal that disaster from me ! 5. 
Have you ever seen the Indus, the greatest of all rivers ? 
6. What is the matter 1 There is as much danger as there 
is discord. 7. Is there not great evil in disimion 1 8. He 
possessed much money, but more eloquence, and still' more 
faith. 9. Attack me, I pray, without envy. 10. Regard 
me, I pray, without disdain. 

LESSON CCXXV. 

EXERCISE CXXIV. 

1. There is as much good in friendship as there is danger 
in enmity. 2. Short time was sufficient for so much faith. 

3. What is the matter ? There is little money in the house. 

4. Take care that there is' not little* faith. 5. Conceal not 
these evil deeds from me. 6. Be admonished of that ? 7. 
Salute the lady in my name. 8. Where is the church built? 
Beyond the river. 9. Where does the cottage stand 1 On 
this side the hill. 10. Point out the second of the two 
sisters. 

LESSON CCXXVI. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS LIX. 

FSro, ttlli latum ferrS — to beoTf endure. 

ACTIVE.— iNDic. 

Pres. Imperfect. 

S. FSr-o P. -tmttfl S. Fer-Sbam P. -ebamtts 

FfT-a -tifl Fer-ebas -ebatis 

Fer-t -unt Fer-ebat -bant 

Perfect. — Ttil-i, -isti, -It. P. -Imus, -iatts, erunt or erS. 

Past Perf — Ttll-6ram, -erSs, -ertlt. P. -er&mus, -eratts, erant. 

Fut. Simp. — F6r-am, -es. -6t. P. -€mu8, -etts, -ent. 

Fut. Perf. — Tul-6ro, -eris, -erit. P. -erimus, -eritis, -erunt. 

* Ed. VI., Syn. 17. ■ Etiam. « Cura ne sit. * Paulidum. 

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Imperative. 
Pre8,—FeT, £er-te. .ft**.— Fer-to, fer-to, £erto-te, fenin-to. 

Conjunctive, 

Fret. — ^Fer-am, -as, -at. PI. -amua, -atis, -ant 
jfnp. — Fer-rem, -res, -ret. H. -remua, -retis, -rent. 
Perf, — Tul-firim, -eris, erit PL -erimus, -eritis, -erint. 
Pluperf. — Tul-iasem, IbbSs, issfit. PI. -iasemtUi, -issetls, -iBsent. 

iNFINinVB. « 

Pres.— Fer-rS. Per/.— TtQ-iflsS. i''tt«.— Latunim ease. 

Fabticiples. — Pres, Fer-ens. FtU, L&turtlfi. Supines. — L&tum-u. 
Gexo/nd. — FSr-endi, -o, -um. 

LESSON CCXXVII. 
GRAMMAR PRAXIS LX. 

Indioativb. 

Pres. — Fer-6r, -ris, -tur. P. -Kmttr, -imlni, -untttr. 

Imp. — Fer-ebftr, -ebSrls, -ebfitttr. P- -ebamilr, -ebamlni, ebanttlr. 

Perf. — Latus sum, -es, est. Lati sumus, -estis^ -sunt. 

Past Perf. — Latus eram, &c. 

Fut Simp. — Fer -ftr, -SrtB, -ettir. P. -emilr, -emlni, -enttlr. 

Fut. Pre/. — Latus ero, &c. 

Impebatiyb. 
Prea.—FeT'T^ -Imlni. Fut.— Fer -tor, -tor. PI. -untor. 

Conjunctive. 

Prea. — Fer -ftr -aris -atiir. P. -SmtLr -amlni -anttlr. 
Imperf. — Fer -r6r, -reris, -rettlr, remtlr, -remlni, -renttlr. 
Perf. — Latus aim, &c. Past Pref. — Latus essem, &c. 
Fttt. — Fer -ftr, -eris, -etur. P. emtLr, -emtni, -enttlr. 

Inpinitivb. 
Pres, — Fer -ri. Pref. — Latum essS. i^'itt. —Latum iri. 
Pabticiplbs. — Perf Latiis. Gerundive. — Fer-endtiSt 



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120 

Many oompounds are formed from fero, as ajfero, from ad and/c 
Aufero, from a6 and /ero — effero, from ex and fero, &c., &c. 



LESSON CCXXVIIL 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS LXI. 

60. ivi, -Xtum, -ire — to go. 
ACriAIE. Indicative Present. 
Pres, — eo, -la, !t. P. imus, Itis, eunt. 
/m/xjr/.— i-bam, -bSs, -bat. P. -bamtls, -batte, -bant. 

Per/. — ivi, -visti, -vit. P. -vYmtlB, -vifltis, -verunt or vere. Some- 
times the V. is omitted, as ii, iisti, &c. ; always used in compounds. 

Past Perf. — iveram, &c. Put Perf. — ivero or iSro, &c. 

Put, Simp. — i-bo, -bis, -bit. P. -blmus, -bltls, -bunt. 

Conjunctive. 

Pres. — earn, -as, -St. P. ^mtiH, -atls, -ant. 

Perf. — iverim or ierim, &c. Past Perf. — ivissem or iissem^ &c. 

Infinitive. 

Pres. — ^ire. Perf. — iviase, -iisse. Put.— Itnrum esse. 

Participles. — Pres. lens, genit. euntis. Put. Iturus. Gerund. — 
Simdi. Supine. — Itum. 

Many compounds are formed by combination of prepositions with eo, 
as ad-eo oh-eo. 

Fio, factus sum, fieri, faciendus — to he made, to become — ^is also used 
as the passive oi facto. 

LESSON CCXXIX. 

EXERCISE CXXV. 

L Talis est filius qualia pater. 2. Talis est puella qualis 
mater. 3. Quales fratres, tales sunt sorores. 4. Talem 
puellam nunquam viderani. 5. Patrem habemus talem 
qualem nusquam vidi. 6. Tantse sunt domtis quantas 
nunquam vidi. 7. Tantas oves nunquam inspectavi quanta^ 
in Siculis montibus errant. 8. Tu dicis idem quod alter 
dixerat. 9. Caesar caepit fieri rex, factus autem non fuit. 
10. Virtutem amare omnes oportet, 11. Patres sapientes 
oportuit filios docere. 



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LESSON CCXXX. 

GRAMMAR PRAXIS LXII. 

(Extracts from CromMe^s Gymnasium, 1 vol, 347.) 

"One of many" is rendered, in Latin, by unus, unless 
followed by " another," and then it is rendered by alitiSj as 
" One of the finders/' Umis e digitia. " One fought, another 
fled, and all were thrown into confusion." Alius pugnavit, 
alius fugit et omnes turbati sunt One of two is rendered 
Alter, as "one of the eyes," Alter oculorum. "One of the 
hands," altera manuum, or e manihus. 

The Pronominal adjectives expressing one of two end in er 
— ^thus. 

Which of many, Quia. One of many^ Unus. 

Whether or which, of twOf Uter. One of Two, Alter. 

None (of many) Nullus Any (of many) Quilibet or Qiiiyis. 

Neither {of two) Neuter. Quisquam or uUus. 

Either {of two) Uterlibet, or utervia. 
Everyone {of many) Quisque. Whichever {of many) Quisquis or 

quicunque. 
Each (of two) Uterque. Whethersoeoer {of two) Utercumque. 

LESSON CCXXXL 
EXERCISE CXXVI. 

1. The Athenians^ were building their own walls. 2. The 
Lacedsemonians* took this thing amiss.' 3. Did not Henry 
bear it very ill. 4. Send trusty* men, and in the mean- 
while keep me back.** 5. The Lacedaemonians despatched a 
messenger secretly to* the Athenians. 6. The Romans gave 
heed^ to his advice. 7. Athens was secretly fortified. 8. 
The trusty men whom we had sent took this advice amiss. 

9. So the chief was recovered,^ and the spies* restored. 10. 

10. Detain the spies in whatever manner you can.^* 1 1. 
Heniy deceived them by this stratagem. ^^ 

* AthenMnMis. * Lacedcemoniu^, ' ^greferre. * Certus. * Detinere 
— compound of de and teneo. « Ad. *" Pareo. * Hecuperare, • Ex- 
pUynUor, ** Quacunqve ratione. ^^ Per hunc dolum. 



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122 

LESSON CCXXXII. 

EXERCISE CXXYII. 

1. Claudius Nero hastened^ to Hasdrubal with a few 
chosen* troops.' 2. These two together conquered Hasdrubal 
3. He took several towns of the Persians by storm/ and 
received others on surrender." 4. Returning victorious he 
was slain by an enemy, in the seventh year t)f his reign." 5, 
He was a man of great eloquence, and had a very retentive' 
memory. 6. Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus, descended^ 
from a very noble family, would not suffer Scipio Asiaticus, 
though an enemy, to be carried to prison.* 7. Detain the 
messenger by whatever means you can. 8. The father of a 
family went to" Aristippus one day and asked him for books. 
9. The father, who was a very" covetous man, was frightened 
at the price." 10. Do so — said he — and you will have two 
slaves. 11. Hasdrubal passed over" into Italy with a very 
great army. 12. Claudius Nero joined" his colleague at the 
river Metaurus. 



LESSON CCXXXIII. 

EXERCISE CXXVIII. 

1. Shall we bear labour patiently. 2. How did he bear 
aid to the army? 3. Does the field bear fruit?" 4. Did you 
ever see an old man bear^' hardships more cheerfully 1 5. As- 
sistance was borne to the cavalry. 6. When will assistance 
be carried to the besieged town. 7. Who can bear with an 
even mind such disasters. 8. Weights become lighter with 
time. 9. Bear weights well, and they will become lighter. 
10. Anxieties and troubles may become lighter, if borne with 
fortitude. 11. You will become more daring. 12. The 
world was made by God. 

^ Properare. * Delectus. » Copiae-arum. * Expugnare. • In dediti- 
orem. « Imperium. Tenax. * Natus, and ortus take AbL • Career. 
i^Adeo. "Perquam. ^» Deterreo with Abl. *« Trajido. ^*SaBe 
conjungere (with Dat). i* Fructum edere. ^« Patior. 



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123 

LESSON CCXXXIV. 

EXERCISE CXXIX. 

1. They fought and many wounds were given* and re- 
ceived. 2. Two of the Romans fell, and the three Albans 
were grievously wounded. 3. The single Horatius was not 
a match for the Albans altogether.* 4. Horatius remained 
untouched and pretended flight. 5. They followed him as* 
their strength permitted. 6. They followed as the pain 
of their wounds allowed. 7. They followed one after an- 
other, and he slew them one by one. 8. Will they fight 
one after another. 9. Will they be slain one by one, or 
all together? 10. Is any one a match for a Roman? 

LESSON CXXXV. 

EXERCISE CXXX. 

1. When he was prsetor* he subdued Gaul. 2. In his 
consulship he conquered Spain, and in his second' Sardinia. 
3. It was determined* to finish the affair by the combat^ of 
a few. 4. Will you finish this affair in your first consulship 1 
5. Who subdued Gaul when he was Preetor? 6. There 
happened to be among the Romans thre(^ brothers honi at 
one birth. 7. There were three such also among the Albans. 
8. These were to fight' for the mastery.*® 9. Who will fight 
for the supremacy] 10. Who contended for the consulship 1 
11. Did any one dispute for the preetorship] 

LESSON CCXXXVI. 

EXERCISE CXXXI. 

1. I have taken such a quantity of land. 2. I have taken 
such a number of people. 3. Will you take a quantity of 

* Infero. * Uniyerei. ® Prout. * When not to be expressed. 
» Alter. "Plaouit. ' Certamen. ^TrigeminL •Future. ^« De 
principato. 



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124 

acres? 4. Will you reserve as much for yourself!^ 5. No 
one was ever milder than Scipio Africanus. 6. He, how- 
ever, thought some severity necessary. 7. He stood at 
the furthest part of the bridge. 8. He took the Janiculum 
at the first assault. 9. The Greeks after the victoiy 
determined' upon destroying the bridge. 10. When he 
returned' home. The father was deeply displeased and 
beat him. 12. He said, "I have learnt to bear my fiEkther'g 
anger." 

LESSON CXXXVII. 

EXERCISE CXXXII. 

1. She conceived an affection' for* a poor man's son. 
2. The dolphin^ was accustomed to feed him with pieces* of 
br^ad. 3. The dolphin used to swim to the top of the 
water. 4. He carried the boy on his back. 6. In the same 
way he took the boy back again. 6. He took him to school' 
to Puteoli.^* 7. The dolphin came several times^^ to the 
accustomed place. 8. He is said to have died of grie£ 9. 
My affection for you was conceived ten years ago. 10. He 
used to feed the dolphin with bits of bread. 

LESSON CXXXVIII. 

EXERCISE CXXXIII. 

1. When Scipio was an infant, a snake twisted itself round 
him, but did him no harm.^* 2. A Serpent of huge size 
embraced him, but did him no harm. 3. When he was 
eighteen years of age, he saved the life of his father at 
Picinum. 4. When he was twenty-four years of age he 
was sent Praetor to Spain. 6. He took Carthage on the 
very day on which he arrived. 6. He returned home 
conqueror. 7. He ordered a soldier to be brought" into his 
presence." 

^ Tibi. • Statuo with the infin. ® Regredior. * OflFendo. » Amorem 
BUficipio. « Erga. '^ Delphinua. » Fra^entum. » Ludus litterariuB. 
> PuteoU-orum. ^^ Aliquoties. i* Lsedo. *» Adduco. ^^Coiwpec* 

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126 

LESSON CCXXXIX. 

EXERCISE CXXXIV. 

1. Scipio was sent into Africa and overthrew^ Hannibal. 
2. Xerxes had sent four thousand armed men. 3. They 
plundered the temple of Apollo. Xerxes waged war not 
only against the Greeks but against the immortal Gods. 
5. The strength of men is insignificant* against the im- 
mortal Gods. 6. A philosopher who had recently come to 
Rome. 7. While he was staying at Rome he attached 
them to him by the sweetness of his manners.* 8. He had 
come to Athens, and received them very kindly.* 

LESSON CCXL. 

EXERCISE CXXXV. 

1. Dion was banished from Syracuse* and went to 
Megara. 2. Aristides among the Athenians and Epami- 
nondas among the Thebans, are reported* to have been 
lovers' of truth. 3. They are reputed to be seekers of money. 

4. The Athenians are reported to study much eloquence. 

5. Among the Athenians I heard more eloquence than 
among the Thebans. 6. Among the Thebans there was 
much faith. 7. Against whom is the strength of men 
insignificant. 8. The strength of men is insignificant 
against the Gods. 

LESSON CCXLL 

EXERCISE CXXXVI, 

1. Was Dion banished* from Syracuse, or from Megara ? 
2. Was Aristides or Epaminondas the better man ? 3. 
Was Aristides or Epaminondas the greater lover of truth ? 
4. Whether do the sun or the stars shine brightest 1 6. 
Do you want to wage war with the immortal Gods 1 6. Do 
the French or the Germans want to wage war with their 
neighbours 1 7. How do you attach people to you 1 By 

Superare. « Nullus. » Moram suavitate sibi devinxit fr. de and 
▼indre to bind. * Perhumaniter. • Syracu8»-arum. •Feror. *Amans 
with Qenit. • Expello. 

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126 

the sweetness of maimers. 8. What General could over- 
throw Hannibal 1 

N,B, — The last Eleven ExercUes are adaptatiom from Grom- 
bi^8 Gymnasium. 

VOCABULARY TQ MISCELLANEOUS EXAMPLES. 
See p. 104. 



Pupil, 

Lahourt, 

Studies, 

Town, 

Guard, to 

Camp, 

Iron, 

Jordan, 

Obey, 

Duty of every 
man — It is the 

Nature of every 
man — It is the 

Praise, to 

Worthy, 

Unworthy, 

Punish, to 

Dear, 

Wanting, to he 
Council, 

Feed, to 

Cattle, 

Stay, to 

Despise, 

Beloved, 
Inch, 

Foot-and-a-half, 
ffalf-a-foot, six 

inches, 

Halfan'hour, 
An hour-and-a- 

half, 



{ alumnuB 
/ discipuluB 
J studMe-orum 
{ litterse-arum 

oppidum 

munire 

castro-orum 

femim 

Jordanus 
I pareo ) take 
\ obedire ) Dat. 
[ est cuj usque 
i viri 

I cujusvls hominis 
I est errare 

laudare 

dignus 

indignus 

icastigare 
punire 
cams 



Hun upon, 



concilium 
J pasco-pavi 
( pastum 

pectM-oris 

manere 

commorari 

spemere, sprevi, 
I spretum 

amatus 

uncia, digitus 

sesquipes 

I semipes 

semihora 

isesquihora, hora 
cum dinfifHi;!. 
iratus 
irruere 



End,to,Le., C0m€ \ 
to an end, \ 

Put on. 

Put an end to 
the war, 

Worshipper, 
whoever is a 

Decreed to 
worship 

Every part of 
the world. 
Come to pass, 
Draw a bow, 
At a venture. 
Whosoever, 
Whoever, 
Calling, 
Business, 

Profit, to 

Profitable, 
Fall upon, to 
Fall in batUey 
Cure, to 
Valiant, 
Subject, 
Conspirator, 
To be slain. 

For his part, 

Know, 

Observe, 

Give, 

Too much. 
Too many. 



desino-ivi 

induere 
finem facere 

belU 
quicuoque 

colit 
statuerunt ut 

colatur unus 

Deus 
univeraus 

mundus 

evenire, accidSre 
arcum flectSre 
forte 

quicunque 

muDUB-eiis 

prosum ) takes 

prodesse ( Dat. 

utilis-e 

irruere 

occldere 

sanare 

fortis 

res rei 

coDJurator-xB 

occidi 

Squod ad eum 
pertinet 
nosco novi 
' , animadvertere 
-ti-sum 

do dedi datum 
\\ dare (takes Dai) 
nimius 

plures quam sat 
est, plus satis 



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127 



Too lUtle, 

Kill, to cut off, 
destroy 

Bum up, 

Gl€V€Ty 

Young man, 
Are fond of, 



I^trum (with Gen )puaj 
Bapientite p&rum ' 

iinterimere emi Look toward, 
-emptuxu Lying toward, 

iurSre ussi uatum Bull, 
■^""^o Church, 



Bolers-tis 
juvenis 
adolescans 
Lat, 



' placent; 
Incur peril, run \ adire 



Distinguuhed, 
Cooling, 
games saeAdmire, 
pleasing to joungHigh-ipirited, 
men (Dat. utterAuthor, 
Deed, 



the hazard, 
Important, 
. O^yressive, { 

Guardian, 
Valuable, 
Bun through. 
Hang down. 
Cheek, 
Down, 

Beason, 

Befreshing, 
Breeze, 

To be wise. 

To return. 
Invite, to 
Calends, 
Promise, 
Com>e into a place 
from another 
Neighbourhood, 
Market, 
Cry, 

Excellent, 



\ periculum 

I gravis 

tutor 

pretiosus 

interfluere 



Humanity, the 
human race. 

To spend some 
time. 

Discourse, 



dependere-di-sum (?raw, 



gena-se 

lanugo-inis 

intelligentia, 

ratiocinandi vis 

refrigerans 

aura 

also -ui 
reddere-ldi-Xtum Acquaintance, 



Smile again, 
After her hus- 
band^ s death, 
The later, 
Intimate friends. 



mvitare 

kalend?e-arum 

promittere 

commigrare 

vicinia 
forum 
clamor 

eximius^ prsecel- 
lens 



Daily {with no- ^^^ 

tvon of increase), \ 

Fire, 

Bvle, 

Pleasure will. 

Determine, 

To be a match, 

Not, <kc,. 

Wage wa/r. 



Ignis 

prsBScriptum 

arbitrium 

statuo 

par-is ) with 

impar \ Dat. 

beUumgerere. 



Sit down. 
Old, 

Make, 

Bich, fat, 
Ooat, 

At any time, i.e., 
when you wUl, 
Met with his 
death, received 
his death-wound. 

Wind round. 



causam dicere, 
or agere 

spectare ad 

prouus ad 

taurus 
j templum, 
( ecclesiaise 

egregius 

refrigerans 

mirari, admirari 

audax, animosus 

scriptor 

facinus-oris 

I humanum genus 

dare, consumere, 
impertire aliquid 
temporis 

isermo-nis, collo- 
quium 
severus, serius 
arridere 

I a funere mariti 

nuper actum 
familiareSj intimi 

I amicus summus 
nobis, arctissima 
necessitate 
conjunctL 
intimi 
muliebr*8-e 
decumbere 
vetulus 
J conficere (Ace. 
( and Dat.) 
pinguis 
capcr-ri 

ubi voles 



Fisherm^m, 
As much, 
Assault, 



I interfici 

Sambire, amplecti, 
circumplecti 
furtim 
piscator 
totidem, 
impetus-US. 



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128 



INDEX OF LATIN WORDS. 



PAOB 

A,ab,ab» 47 

Abewe 40 

Abhinc 67 

Abhorrere 73 

Absque 47 

Abstergeo 109 

Accipio ...99,112, 95 

Accnmiilare 99 

AccuBO 7 

Acer 29 

Acerbns 24 

Acies 106 

Actus Ill 

Acus 49 

Acutus 23 

Ad 47 

Adeo 21 

Adeo-v 120 

Adesse 40 

Adhuc 21 

Adjectns 3 

Adjnvo 68 

Admirari 109 

Admodom Ill 

Adolescentia 4S 

Adversns or -um. . . 47 

.£dificiiim 68 

^dificare 27 

iEdiHs Ill 

iEger 64 

^grotns 89 

.^muliis 13 

.^qnalis 110 

.^qirns 18 

m&c 89 

^Btimare 36 

.ffistns 40 

iEtas 67 

Ager 28 

Agilis 49 

Ago 62 

Agrestis 49 

Agricola 4 

Ala 89 

Alanda 11 

Albus 13 

Aliqnando 21 

Aliqnis 87 

Aliqnoties 99 

AUuB 20 



PAGE 

Alins-alins 77 

Alere 106 

Altare 49 

Alter 20 

Altei--alter 77 

Altus 24 

Alnmnas 104 

Amantes 99 

Amarus 24 

Amatus 106 

Ambo 20 

Ambulare 36 

Amicitia 96 

Amiens, adj. 24 

Amicus, gnhtt. ... 86 

Amita 11 

Amnis 89 

Amo 34 

Amenas 64 

Amitto 112 

Amor-oris 14 

Ampins 24 

An 21 

Ancilla 13 

Ancora 13 

Ancns Martins ... 97 

Angelns 49 

Anglia 77 

Angnstns 24 

Aniinn. 4 

Animadrerto 107 

Animal 47 

Animosns 108 

Animns 116 

Annon 17 

Annus 48 

Ante 42 

Antiqni 68 

Antiqnitas 112 

Antiqnns 43 

Antipolis 116 

Antrum 77 

Anus 20 

Aper 89 

Apis 48 

Aptus Ill 

Apud 47 

Aqua 4 

Aquila 18 

Aquilo ,„ 73 



PAOB 

Ara 4 

Aranea 13 

Arare 36 

Arbitror 97 

Arbor 40 

Area 4 

Arcus 60 

Argentum 45 

Argilla 13 

Aridus 39 

Arma-orum 13 

Armare 53 

Armentum 63 

Ars 84 

Artus 70 

An 64 

Asina 13 

Asinus ^ 

Asper 54 

AthensB 78 

Atque 110 

Atrox 64 

Attribuo 109 

Auctorita«-ati8 ... 117 

Audacia 60 

Audax 63 

Audio 67 

Aufero 8, 120 

Augeo 99 

Augurium 112 

Aura 62 

Aures 65 

Auriga 6 

Aurum 46 

Aut 13 

Autem 120 

Avarus 63 

Avidus 24 

Avis 83 

Avus 24 

Bacca 6 

Bacillum 73 

Baculus 99 

Barba 68 

Barbarus 63 

Bellicosus 89 

Bellicus 89 

Bellum 11 



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129 



PAOB 

Bene 48 

Benefactxun Ill 

Beneficus 48 

Benevolns 43 

BenignuB 39 

Bestia 24 

Bibo 116 

Bi8 60 

Blandns 62 

Bonitas 60 

Bonns 9 

Bos 36 

Brachimn 30 

Brasaica 6 

Brevia 40 

Brevi 21 

Bnbnla 5 

Buccina 18 

Cado 7, 116 

Caducus 99 

Csepa 5 

CaBsar 97 

Cseapes 40 

Cains Ltelius 109 

Calamns 52 

Calathus 36 

Calidus 58 

Callidus 30 

Calor 39 

Calx 48 

Candidns 52 

Campus 116 

Canis 36 

Cano 62 

Cantilena 4 

CapeUa 40 

Capio 68 

Caper 108 

Capreolns 52 

Captare 61 

Capna Ill 

Caput 48 

Cardnns 30 

Carolus 78 

Carpo 52 

Carrns 64 

Cams 106 

Casa 53 

Casens 36 

Castanea 40 

Castigare 105 

Castra 105 

Cato 109 

CautuB 30 



PAOB 

Cavne 64 

Celer 50 

Celeritas 68 

Celo 92 

Centiee 50 

Cera 52 

CerasTim 39 

Certare 68 

Certe 21 

Certissime 61 

Certns 43 

Cervns 36 

Cesso 112 

Cetems 77 

Charta 37 

Cibus 30 

Cicada 40 

Cincia Ill 

Circa, circum, 

circiter 47 

Circamplico, cir- 

cninvolvo 108 

Cis, citra 41 

Citus 110 

Civis 37 

Civitas 23 

Qam 89 

Clams 46 

CoBcus 104 

Coelnm 36 

Coena 48 

Coenare 36 

Coepi 99 

Coeptum 68 

Cceruleus 49 

Clarere Ill 

Cognitio 84 

Cognosco 110 

Cogo 73 

Cohors 98 

CoUis 54 

Colloquium 65 

Colo 106 

Color 52 

Coluber 28 

Columba 4 

Comitas Ill 

Commodare 52 

Commodus 30 

Commovere 109 

Compactus 52 

Compello 52 

Compleo 112 

Complures 60 

Compono 62 

Condio Ill 



PAOB 

Condo ». 57 

Confectio 109 

Conficere 108 

Confutare 70 

Congregare 110 

Conjungere 52 

Conjuratus 106 

Conjux 86 

Conscientia Ill 

Consideo r. 62 

Consilium ......... 58 

Consolatio 110 

Con suef acio 92 

Consuetudo 87 

Consularis 112 

Consulatus 68 

Contemnere 112 

Contentio 60 

Contio 48 

Contra 47 

Contumax 98 

Conviva 77 

Copia 62 

Coram 39 

Corcyra 79 

Comix 49 

Comu 37 

Corpus 36 

Corripio 62 

Corrampo 57 

Corruptus 30 

Corvus 24 

Corylus 61 

Costa 4 

Cras 112 

Creare 97 

Crebor 24 

Crinis 68, 99 

Cmdelis 51 

Crnentus 81 

Cms 86 

Cubiculum 48 

Cujus-a-um 23 

Culpa 99 

Culpare 105 

Culter 23 

Cultus Ill 

Cum 40 

Cunabula 64 

Cunctor Ill 

Cuncti 73 

Cupere 70 

Cur 21 

Cura 96 

Curro 14 

CursuB 64 



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130 



»AOB 

Cnstodio 91 

Cymba 70 

Danmare 77 

Datus 24 

De 42 

Dea 2 

Debellare 106 

Decern 18 

Decide 106 

Decies 60 

DecimnB 11 

Declare 60 

Decnmbo 108 

Decurro 62 

Dedoceo 92 

Deduco 68 

Deesse 105 

Defendere 73 

Defrandare 86 

Degere 109 

Deinde 110 

Delectare 61 

Delectatio 70 

Delirua 21 

Delphinus 40 

Dexnens 68 

Dementia 68 

Dens 68 

DensuB 40 

Designare 99 

Desino 73 

Destituo 62 

Desum 105 

Deterior 68 

Dens 14 

Dextra 78 

Dico 67 

Dies 14 

Difficilis 109 

Digitna 116 

Digne 109 

Dignitas Ill 

Dignns 105 

Diligentia 60 

Diligo Ill 

Diluyiam 49 

DiscipHna 60 

Discipulns 104 

Disco 91 

Discordia 96 

Dispar 60 

Dissensio 60 

Dives 40 

Divi 52 



PAOB 

Do 8 

Doceo 67 

Docilia 49 

Doctus 30 

Domestica 112 

Domina 2 

Dominns 24 

Domi 112 

Domns 60 

Donnm 8 

Dnco 62 

Dndnm 13 

Dolcis 61 

Dno 11 

Dnodecim 13 

Duodecimns 11 

DnruB 91 

Dnx 48 

E, ex 47 

Excellens 109 

Eamns 26 

Ecqnis 87 

Edax 84 

Ednco 60 

EdvardnB 78 

Effero Ill, 120 

EflferuB 68 

Efflcio 109 

Effigies 62 

Ego 13 

Eleganter 112 

Eloqnentia 96 

Eludo 67 

Ennius Ill 

Ensis 14 

Enim 110 

Eoivi 46, 120 

Epistola 48 

Equa 2 

Eques 99 

EqnitatnB 116 

Eqnns 86 

Erga 47 

Errare 104 

Error 73 

Et 13 

Etiam 21 

Etsi 21 

Enropa 78 

Excandesco 68 

Excelsns 61 

Execratns 60 

Exercitatio Ill 

Ezignus 96 



PIGS 

Extemns 112 

Exornare 36 

Expectare 53 

Expectatio 58 

Expera 84 

Expilare 77 

Explico 109 

Exportare 77 

Bxtemns 43 

Extra 49 

Exnltans lU 

Faba 8 

Fabins IW 

Facilis 41 

Facinns-oris 108 

Facio 27 

Fagus 40 

Fallax 53 

Falsns HO 

Familia 4 

FamiliareSjintiini' 108 

Famosas 90 

Famnla ^ 

Fastidinm H^ 

FecnnduB 40 

Feles 64 

Felix 26 

Femina ^ 

Fennm 64 

Fere, ferme 48 

Ferina 108 

Fero 91, IW 

Feror 99, IW 

Femun lOJ 

Ferns 40 

Fenridns 39 

Fessns 40 

Ficns 70 

Fides 91 

Filia 2 

Filins J 

Fines 26 

Finis 1^ 

Finitimns 24 

Fio 68, 120 

Firmns HJ 

Fistnla " 

Flagitare f 

Flagitinm ^ 

Flos w 

Flnmen 36 

Fluo 01 

Flnvins 24 

Focns , 6* 



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131 



PAOB 

Fodio 77 

Fons 62 

Formica 80 

Formido 86 

Formosns 64 

Forsan 80 

Forte 21 

Fortasse Ill 

Fortis 96, 58 

Fortuna 67 

FortnnatuB 52 

FragiUs 36 

FranciscoB 107 

Frango 62 

Frater 70 

Fraus 68 

Frettun 62 

Frigidtts 62 

Frigus 61 

Frondator 62 

Frons 48 

Fmctna 14 

Frages 68 

Fromentarias 28 

Fngio 62 

Fugo 36 

Fmnare 48 

Fundo 62 

Fnnus 48 

Fnrtim 108 

Furor 100 

Oalatea 62 

GaUia 78 

Gallina 6 

Gallus 24 

GarmlnB 80 

Gelidns 86 

Genius 9 

Gens 61 

Genu 60 

Genus 8 

Georgius 20 

Gero Ill 

Gestus 49 

Gigno 8 

GladiuB 8 

Gloria Ill 

Glorior 112 

Gracchus 80 

Gracilis 49 

Graculus 86 

Gradus 49 

GrsBcia 78 

Grscus.. 109 



PAOB 

Gramen , 83 

GranunaticuB 68 

Grandis 67 

Grando 86 

Gratus 85, 97 

Gravis 24 

Gravitas Ill 

GraviuB 109 

Grex 14 

Gustare 86 

Habena 4 

Habere 70 

Habitare 86 

HactenuB 13 

Hannibal HI 

Hand 109 

Hebes 97 

HenricuB 78 

Herba 4 

Hereditas 91 

Heres 58 

Hic-jir 13 

Hic-adv 60 

Hiems 49 

Hilaris 116 

Hinc 60 

Hodie 21 

HomeruB 104 

Homicida 63 

Homo 8 

Honestas 60 

Honor 9 

Hora 116 

HoratiuB 107 

Horrens 68 

Horreum 80 

HorriduB 90 

Hortus 88 

Hostia 4 

Hostis 69 

Hue atque illuo ... 99 

Humanus 108 

Humilis 86 

Jaculum 68 

Jamdudum 18 

Ibant-/r-eo-iTi ... 46 

Ibi 60 

Ibidem 86 

Idem 29 

Jentaculum 48 

Igitur 21 

Iguayas 24 



PAGE 

IgneuB 80 

IgnotuB 80 

Hex 49 

Hie 14 

Dli 13 

Dlic 60 

niinc 60 

Imago 70 

Immanis 68 

Impero 67 

Impedio 67 

In 67 

Inanis 61 

InchoatuB 73 

Incipio 48 

Inconstantia 110 

Incnso 112 

Inde 60 

Induco 68 

Indus 96 

Infelix 49 

InferuB 42 

InfestuB 64 

Informis 62 

Infra 47 

Ingens 28 

Ingravescens 100 

Injuria 68 

Inscribo 112 

Insitus 84 

Inspectare 73 

Insula 14 

Integratio 99 

Integer 116 

Interficio 8 

IntermissuB 68 

Intersum 110 

Invidia 117 

Inquam 112 

Intus 112 

Inyidus 70 

Invoco 68 

Johannes 8 

Ipse 15 

Ira 80 

IrsB 99 

Iratus 86 

Irrigare 86 

Irritus 116 

Is, ea, id 28 

Isocrates 112 

Iste 13 

Istiusmodi 110 

Ita 21 

Iterfacere 99 

Jubeo 

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132 



PAGE 

Jucnndng 64 

Jnrgiiim 119 

JuB 112 

Jnyenal 108 

Jnveniliter Ill 

Jnyenis 42 

Juxta 47 

Kalendse 67 

Lactuca 6 

Labor 103 

Lfelins 109 

LfBva 73 

liamentans 68 

Lampas 78 

Laniata 1 

Lapis 80 

Largior 103 

Latrare 49 

Latro 78 

Latus 24 

Laiido 106, 9 

Laurens 97 

Lavo 60 

Landatio 112 

Legatus 23 

Lego 70 

Lenis 112 

Legumen, lega- 

mina 99 

Lentns 40 

Leo 33 

Leontiniis Gorgias 112 

Lerizma 116 

Lethifer 54 

Levis 36 

Leviter 73 

Lex 77 

Liber 8 

Liberi 48 

Libero 67 

Liberia 13 

Libertas 61 

Licentia 68 

Lignum 39 

Lingna 21 

Lingna 30 

Lis 62 

LittersB 99 

Littns 62 

Locare 36 

Longns 36 

Lncidns 40 



PAOB 

Lncns ...* 24 

Lndo 67 

Lnmen 68 

Lnna 6 

Lnpns' 68 

Lnscns 68 

Lnstrare 63 

Lnx 112 

Macer 53 

Mactatns 24 

Magis 43 

Magister 11 

Magistratns Ill 

Magnus 3 

Major natn 45 

Maledicns 43 

Malo 63 

Malum 48 

Mains 13 

Manare 51 

Mando 57 

Mane 49 

Manere 105 

Mansuetus 30 

Manns 48 

Marcus Cato 109 

Marcidns 77 

Marcus 112 

Mare 34 

Mas 60 

Mater 36 

Matums 24 

Maxime 43, 99 

Maximus 68 

Maximns. 2 Ill 

Medicus 36 

Mediocris 58 

Melior 47 

Meminisse 77 

Memoria 112 

Mens 84 

Mensa 4 

Mensis 67 

Mentha 6 

Mereor 103 

Merito 49 

Meritum 84 

Messis 62 

Messor 40 

Metallnm 61 

Mens 23 

Miles 33 

MiUies 50 

Minime 99, 61 



PAGB 

Ministrare 53 

Minus 110 

Mirabilis 52 

Mirificus Ill 

Mims 68 

Miseeo 62 

Miser 49 

Mitis 40 

Mitto 109 

Moderor 109 

Modo 109 

Modu9 68 

Moestus 80 

Molestia 97 

Molestus 110 

Mollire Ill 

Mollis 40 

Monere 77 

Mons 36 

Monstrare 48 

Mors 48 

Mortalis 51 

Mortuus 24 

Mos 92 

Moto 62 

Mox 89 

Mula 2 

Mulier 86 

Multus 40 

Mundus 97 

Munio 105 

Munns 106, 62 

Mums 24 

Mua 54 

Musa 9 

Mutare Ill 

Nam 68 

Napus 30 

Nascor 98 

NasuB 30 

Nata 13 

Natare 36 

Natura 110 

"NAinSj 8ub9t\ 23 

Natus, oar« 67 

Nausea 65 

Nefas 112 

Negotiator 58 

Negotium 95 

Nemo 45 

Nequam 40 

Nequaquam Ill 

Neque 21 

Neuter 20 



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133 



PAOI 

Nex 66 

Niger 24 

NiSu 21 

Nisi : 21 

Nitidna 40 

Nobilis 36 

Nolo 70 

Nomen 58 

Nomino 6 

Non 13 

Nonagies 50 

Nomie 17 

Nonnulli 73 

Koxrns 11 

Nob 13 

Nosco 70 

Noster 23 

Notitia 112 

Notus 39 

Novem 13 

Novies 60 

Nox 34 

Noxina 80 

Nubilis 58 

Nndins sextus ... 67 

Nudus 80 

Nugator 116 

Nullus 20 

Nmnerare 61 

Nnmmus 83 

Nunc 21 

Nunquam 21 

Nuper 73 

Nums 49 

Nusquam 120 

Ob 47 

Obeo 120 

Obripio 110 

Obscurus 89 

Obviam 66 

Occidens 116 

Occumbere mor- 
tem 108 

Octavius 97 

Octavus 11 

Octiea 50 

Octisgesimnm ... 110 

Octo 13 

Octogesimus 40 

Octogles 60 

Oculxis 112 

Odi 68 

Odiosas 64 

Odium 58 



PAOI 

Offensio 58 

Olea 6 

Olera 99 

Olenm 30 

OUm 21 

Omxuno 39 

Onmia 68 

OpacuB 51 

Opera 96 

Opia 109 

Oportet 68 

Oppidom 106 

Oppngno 73 

Opto 26 

Opna 36 

Orator 95 

Origo 68 

Omare 36 

Os, oria 68 

Oatrea 5 

Ovia 1 40 

Pactua 40 

Palam 47 

Pallena 62 

Pallidua 64 

Panatbenaicus 112 

Papaver 62 

Par 110 

Parena 33 

Pareo 106 

Pario 77 

Para 73 

Partua 70 

Parvua 24 

Paaco 106 

Passer 48 

Passim 98 

Pastinaca 6 

Pastor 62 

Pastus 62 

Pater 33 

Patiena 39 

Patria 63 

Patrius 48 

Paucns 67 

Pauper 40 

Pavo 70 

Peccare 68 

Pectere 99 

Pecnnia 96 

Pecus 40 

Pedes 99 

Pedester 99 

Pedum 52 



PAOB 

PelaguB 20 

Pene 48 

Penes 47 

Penna 86 

Per 47 

Perago 68 

Perendie 106 

Perfectus 84 

Periculum 96 

Peritus 23 

Permulcere 110 

Permutare 53 

Pemicitaa 40 

Pemix 39 

Pertineo 106 

Perturbo 57 

Pervenio 110 

Perveraitaa 110 

Pea 68 

Peaaimua 13 

Peto 108 

Phasiana 70 

PhiUis 62 

PhUosophia 109 

Philosopbus 40 

Pietas 116 

Pinguis 108, 51 

Pirum 89 

Piscia 62 

Pisum 89 

Placet 99 

Placidus 53 

Plane 84 

Planta 6 

Plato 112 

Plenus 109 

Plerique 78 

Plerumque 106 

Plumbum 51 

Pluralis 4 

Plus 67 

Plura 53 

Poculum 54 

Poena 4 

Poeta 58 

Polycletus 84 

Pompeius 36 

Pomum 11 

Pone' 47 

Ponere 106 

Populus 86 

Porcus 36 

Porta 6 

Portus 50 

Possum 71 

Post " 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



I ■ 



134 



PAOH 
PoBtCft 21 

Posterus 42,91 

Postremo 13 

Postridie 89 

Postnlare 40 

Potus 48 

Ptbb 40 

PrsBbeo 97 

PraBceptnm 112 

PrsBceptor 50 

Pneclard Ill 

PrsBclanua 112 

PrsBdinin 68 

Prfleminm 14 

Prsesertim 110 

PrsBstans 95 

PrsBter 47 

Prseteritus 110 

Preetor Ill 

Prandium 48 

Pratnm 64 

Pretinm 68 

Prex 68 

Pridie 39 

Primus 11 

Princeps 48 

Pristinus, former.. 99 

Pro 47 

Probo 68 

Prodesse 105, 106 

Profecto 77 

Proficiscor Ill 

Proflnens 106 

Profundere 70 

Promissas 68 

Promptns 106 

Pronomen 14 

Prope 42 

Propter 47 

Prorsus 73 

Prosperus 77 

Proveetus Ill 

Proverbio > 110 

Providus 30 

Psittacus 70 

Pubes 79 

PueUa 6 

Puer 11 

Pueritia 110 

Ptigna 13 

Pngnare 48 

Puicher 40 

Pnnire 105 

Puppis 73 

Pare 112 

"^utare 110 



PAGE 

Putridus 30 

Qnadragies 60 

Qnadriennio Ill 

Quoestor Ill 

Qualis 62 

Qnam (how) 105 

Qnam (than) 21 

Qaam with snpltve. 99 

Qnamvis 21 

Quantum 96 

Quanquam Ill 

Quare iCO 

Quartus 11 

Quater 60 

Quatuor 13 

Quatuor-decim ... 13 

Quercus 14 

Querela 110 

Que 7 

Quia 99 

Quicunque 37 

Quidam 37 

Quidem 21 

Quies 112 

Quilibet 37 

Quindecim 13 

Quinquagies 60 

Quinquaginta ...:.. 65 

Quinque 5 

Quinquies 60 

Quintus 9 

Quintus Fabius ... 110 
Quia, qua, quid ) „„ 
Quis, qusB, quid j 

Quisnam 37 

Quispiam 37 

Quisquam 37 

Quisque 36 

Quisquis 37 

Quivis 37 

Quocirca 140 

Quomodo 60 

Quorsum 112 

Quot 73 

Quotidie 13 

Quoties 77 

Quum 60 

Ramus 63 

Rana 30 

RanciduB 30 

Rapax 63 

Rapidus 39 



PA6B 

Rapio 77 

Raro 21 

Ratis 36 

Raucus 13 

Recipio 112 

Recte 64 

Recordatio Ill 

Rectus 68 

Recumbere 78 

Reddo 57, 97 

Redire 80 

Regere 77 

Re^a 61 

Regius 62 

Regnare 77 

Regnum 24 

Religatus 73 

Reliquus 64 

Removeo 60 

Repetere 64 

Reprehendo 58 

Res 14, 106 

Resecare 116 

Residens 97 

Respondeo 73 

Responsum 51 

Restinguo 62 

Restituo Ill 

Rete 54 

Rex 73 

Ridere 64 

Risus-us 117 

Rogo 52 

Romanus 95 

Romulus 65 

Rota 1 

Rotundus 30 

Ruber 49 

Rudo 49 

Ruina 3 

Ruinosus 77 

Rumor Ill 

Rus 80 

Rusticus 9 

Rusticus 77 

Saccharum 36 

Sacer 49 

Sacerdos 70 

49 

enumero 109 

64 

Sagitta 62 

Sagittarius 13 



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135 



PAGE 

Salix 40 

Salinator 112 

Saluber 60 

Sains 73 

Saluto 97 

Sanctas 64 

Sane 21 

Sapiens 36 

Sapientia 109 

Sapo 49 

Sat 107 

Satis 36 

Satur 64 

Saxosus 62 

Saxnm 08 

Scelus 99 

Scientia 112 

Scipio 109 

Scio 67 

Scribo 57 

Scriptores 108 

Scurr a, buffoon ... 32 

Secretns 48 

Secundum 47 

Secundus 11 

Sed 13 

Sedecim 13 

Seipsum 109 

Semel 50 

Semianimis 40 

Semper 30 

Senatus-us 73 

Senectus-utis 109 

Senex 42 

Sensim 49 

Sententia 68 

Sentio 48 

Seorsum 21 

Septem 13 

Septemdecim 13 

Septies 60 

Septimus 11 

Septuagies 50 

Seriphius Ill 

Bequor 96 

Sermo 109 

Seras 99 

Serva 2 

Servio 91 

Servitus 91 

Servo 91 

Setosus 39 

Sex 13 

Sexagies 60 

Sexies 50 

Sexto quoque die 106 



PAGE 

Sextus 11 

Sic 21 

Siccus 39 

Siculus 120 

Signum 37 

Similis 49 

Sine 21 

Singnlaris 4 

Singulus 4 

Sinister 49 

Sitis 62 

Socer 24 

Socia 2 

Socius 30 

Socrates 97 

Socrus 49 

Soleo 109 

SoUtus 91 

Solum 112 

Solus 12 

Somnio 91 

Somnium 91 

Sophista 40 

Sopor 62 

Sordidus 63 

Soror 51 

Specus 70 

Spemo 104 

Spero 34 

Spes 14 

Spina 30 

Stagnum 40 

Stare 3 

Statuo 106 

SteUa 4 

Sterilis 63 

Studeo 67 

Studium 112 

Stultitia 99 

Stultus 24 

Suasor Ill 

Sub 3 

Subjungo 26 

Sublimis 49 

Subsisto 116 

Succedo 62 

Sui 15 

Sum 16 

Super 42 

Superbus 40 

Supero ,.. 48 

Superior 80 

Superus 42 

Supplex 63 

Supra 47 

Sub 39 



PAOE 

Suscipio 67 

Suspicor 109 

Sutor 77 

Suus 8 

Sylva 45 

Tabula 4 

Talis 62 

Tam 21 

Tamdiu 112 

Tamen 30 

Tametsi 21 

Tamquam 110 

Tantus 21 

Tarentum Ill 

Temere 99 

Templum 77 

Tempus 61 

Tenax 53 

Teneo 68 

Tener 24 

Tenus 47 

Ter 116 

Tergum 47 

Terra 4 

Terreo 68 

Tertius 11 

Thesaurus 48 

Tigillum 30 

Tigris 9 

Timere 91 

Tolerabilis Ill 

Torus 97 

Torvus 53 

Tot 21 

Totus 12 

Trado 104 

Trans 47 

Tredecim 13 

Tremo 68 

Tres 11 

Tribus 70 

Tricies 60 

Triduum 67 

Tristis 35 

Trojanus 68 

Trucidare 70 

Tu 13 

Tugurium 40 

Turgidus 86 

Turpis 62 

Tutus 40 

Tuus 23 



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136 



PAOK 

Uber 40 

Ubi 60 

UMqne 91 

XTbiqxieloci 98 

UllnB 20 

TTlmos 62 

Ultra 42 

Unde 60 

Undecim 13 

Undecimiis 11 

TJngaig 116 

UnpuU 30 

UniTersas 106 

Unqnam 70 

Uniu 9 

Urb8 61 

Usqne 47 

Ut 106 

Uter 20 

Uterqiie 21 

Utilis 86, 106 

Ura 6 

Uxor 64 

Tacca 4 

Tacniis 61 

Yadnxn 40 

vl^r :::::::::::;} «> 

VaWe 21 



PAOK 

Yannns 20 

Yehemenier 49 

Yel 21 

Yelox 39 

Yenator 83 

Yenia 4 

Yenire 64 

YentuB 63 

Yerbero 67 

Yerbum 9 

Yerecnndia 73 

Yersns 47 

Yero 112 

Vemm 66 

Yeros 80 

Yespa 36 

Yestiginm 63 

Yetitus 30 

Yeto 73 

Yetnliis 108 

Yetas 41 

Yia 30 

Yiciea 60 

Yideo 7 

Yideor 109 

YigUantU 112 

Yifia 45 

Yinco 68 

Yiola 63 

Yir 7 

Yirga 64 



PAGK 

YirgUiuB 9 

Yirgo 83 

Yiridis 53 

YirtuB 45 

Yiras 20 

Yis 39 

YUa 91 

Yitium 48 

YitnluB 24 

Yituperare 39 

Yituperator 70 

Yivere 91 

YivuB 116 

Yocatio 106 

Yoco 7 

Yolare 34 

Yolitare 36 

YolOjVelle 70 

Yolnptaa 104 

Yolutare 39 

Ynlgaris 62 

YulguB 20 

YulpoB 9 

Xenophon 77 

ZephTnu 62 



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137 



INDEX OF ENGLISH WORDS. 



PAGB 

Abandon, destit- 

uere -ai-ntum ... 62 
Able to be, posse .. 71 
Abont, circiter .... 115 
About, concerning, 

circiter-de 115 

Above, idiomat ... 114 
Absent, to be, ab* 

esse 40 

Abundance, copia 52 
Abundantly, co- 

piose 115 

Accomplish, per- 

ficere 68 

According to, se- 

cundum-ad...47, 115 
Accursed, execra- 

tus 60 

Accuse, accusare .. 7 
Accustom, consue- 

facere 92 

Across, trans 47 

Acquaintance, 

familiares 108 

Added to, adjectus 3 
Admire, mirari ... 107 
Admonished, to be, 

admoneor, mo- 

neor 118 

Adorn, omare 36 

Adverse, hostile, in- 

festus, adversus 64 
Advice, consilium 58 
Advise, monere ... 77 
Affairs, res-negotia 107 

After, post 42 

After, according to 

ad 115 

Afterwards, postea 21 

Again, rursus 115 

Against, contra ... 47 

Age, 8eta8-tis 67 

Ago, ante 67 

Aid, adjuvo 68 

All, omnes, cuncti 

68, 73 

All, the whole, 

omnis, totus .... 12 
Almost, fer^,ferm^ 48 



PAOB 

Alone, solus 12 

Also, etiam 21 

Altar, ara, altare, 

n.3 4, 49 

Although, etiamsi 21 
Altogether, prorsua 73 
Always, semper ... 80 
Ambassador, lega' 

tus 23 

Amidst, inter 113 

Among, inter 47 

Anchor, ancora ... 13 
AncusMartius ... 97 

And, et, que 13 

Angel, angelus .... 49 

Anger, ira 80 

Angered, angry, 

iratus 36 

Animal, animal 

n.3 49 

Another, alius, one 

of two, the other 

of two, alter 20 

Answer, responsum 51 
Answer ,respondere 

-di-sum 37 

Ant, formica 30 

Any, ullus 20 

Any one, with a ne- 
gation; quisquam, 
„ you choose, qui- 
vis, quilibet ; any 
one, aliq^uis ; 

also quispiam.... 37 
Any man, C|ui8- 

quam, quivis 114 

Any time, at, ubi 

voles 108 

Apart, seorsim 21 

Aphorism, senten- 

tia 117 

Apple, pomum 11 

Appointed, to be, 

nominari 114 

Approve, probare 58 
Archer, Sagitta- 
rius 13 

Arm, brachium ... 30 
Arm, to, armare ... 53 



PAOB 

Arms, (weapons) 

arma -orum 13 

Army, exercitus ... 115 
Array, battle,acies 106 

Arrow, sagitta 52 

Art, ars -tis 34 

As, quails ...'. 62 

As far as, tenuB ... 47 

Ask, rogare 52 

Askant, torvus 63 

Ass, asinus 49 

Ass, she, aslna 13 

Assail, petere .... 117 
Assembly, concio 

•nis 48 

Assuredly, most, 

certissmie 51 

Asyet, adhuc 21 

At, apud 47, 115 

At times, aliquoties 99 
Athens, Athenee 

•arum 78 

Attract, ducere -xi 

-ctum 62 

Aunt, amita 11 

Author, auctor 

-is 108 

Averse, to be— to 

abhorrere -ui.... 73 
Await, expectare .. 53 



Back, tergum 48 

Bad, malus 13 

Band, cohor8-tis... 98 
Barbarian, barba- 

rus 53 

Bare, nudus 86 

Bark, ratis 36 

Bark, latrare ... .. 49 

Bam, horreum 39 

Barron, sterilis ... 63 

Barter, permutare 53 

Base,turpi8 52 

Basket, calathus 36 
Battle-array, acies 

-ei, f 106 

Bean, faba 6 

Boar, ferre 91 



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138 



PAOB 

Beard, barba 68 

BearoatfOxportare 77 
Beast, bestia, 

animal 24, 47 

Beat, t.e.with rods, 

Cffidere IIS 

eaTitifiil,fonnoBas 64 

Becanse, quia 99 

Becansv ox, propter 47 
Become, to, fieri. 68 

Be, esse 16 

Bed, lectus 97 

Bee, apis 48 

Beech, fagns f 40 

Beef, bubnla 8 

Before, prsB 40, 42 

Sabjudice 113 

Ad judicium di- 

cere 161 

Ad praetorem 

trahere 107 

Subnoctem 114 

Beget, gigno, 

genni 8, 77 

Begin, incipere ... 48 

Begin dinner 108 

Begun, inchoatus 73 
Begun, I have, ccepi 99 
Benind, cujy. poste- 
rns 42 

Behind,l^reJ7.,pone 47 
BehoTes,it,oportet 68 
Beloyed, amatus 

dilectus, 105 

Bench, tabula 4 

Beneath, infra 47 

Beneficent, benefi- 

CUB 43 

Benevolent, bene- 

volus 107 

Benign, benignus 89 

Berry, bacca 6 

Beside, juxta; oyer 

& above, prseter 47 
Bestow freely, lar- 

gior 103 

Better, melior 47 

Beyond, trans 42, 47 

Bird, avtVis-f 33 

Birth, partus ...4, 70 
Bitter, amarus ... 24 

Black, niger 24 

Blame, culpa 99 

Blame, v& . , culpare 58 
Bleak, frigidus ... 108 
"bloody, cruentus 87 



PAGE 

Blue, csruleus 37 

Boar, ap«r-ri 89 

Boat, lint«r-ris-f 109 

Bodv,corpus-oris-n 36 

Bold, auda«-cis ... 53 

Boldness, audacia 60 

Book, lib«r-ri 8 

Bordering, finiti- 

mus 24 

Bom,natus 67 

Bom, to be, nasci 98 
Both, ambo, uter- 

que 20, 21 

Bound, religatus 73 

Bow, arciM-us 50 

Boy, puer-i 11 

Branch, ramus 53 

Brave, fortis 58 

Bray, rudere 49 

Break, frangere, 

fregi, fractum... 62 
Breakfast,jentacu- 

lum 48 

Breeze, aura 62 

Bribe, pretium 68 

Bright, lucidus ... 40 

Bring before, ad... 107 

BrisUed, setosus... 39 

Bristling, horrens 68 

Broad, latus .. 24 

Brother, frater-ris 70 

Buifoon, scurra ... 32 

Build,edificare27, 57 
Building, edi- 

ficium 58 

Bull, taurus 105 

Bumup, torrere... 107 
Bnsines8,negotium 115 

Piece of, id negotii 117 

But, 8ed, autem^ 3, 30 

By, a, a6, per 47 

Cabbage, brassica 5 

CfBsar 97 

Calends 104 

Calf, vitulus 24 

Call, vocare 7 

Callupon,invocare 58 
Calling, Tocatio ... 106 
Camp, castra-pl 

-orum 105 

Canvas, pannus. 

cannabinus 109 

Candlestick, lamp- 

a«, adia 60 



PAOB 

Care, cura 96 

Care, to take, of, 

custodire 91 

Caressing, blandus 62 
Carriages, belong- 
ing to, by carri- 
age, vehicularis 99 
Carry, ferre, port- 
are, ducere 62 

Carry away, ei^or- 

tare 77 

Cart, carrtM-i 64 

Cast to, adjectuB 
fr. jacio, jeci, 

j actum, jacere... 8 

Cat, feles-is 54 

Cattle, pecus-oris 105 

Cautious, cautus .. 30 
Cave, speciw-u8-m 

-f-n 70 

Antrum 77 

Cease, desino 73 

Censurer, vituper- 

ator 70 

Certainly, certe... 21 
Chance, b^, forte 21 
Char^e,cnm«n-inia 85 
Charioteer, auriga 6 
Charles, Carolus... 78 
Charming, blandus 62 
Charmingjt .e love- 
ly, amienas 64 

Chattering, garru- 

lus 30 

Cheap, vilis 106 

Cheat, defraudare 36 

Cheek, gena 113 

Cheese, caseus 86 

Cherry, cerasum... 39 

Chesnut,ca8tanea. 40 

Chest, area 4 

Children, liberi ... 48 

Church, ecclesia... 117 

Citadel, arx-cis-f .. 64 

Citizen, civis 37 

Clay, argilla 13 

Clever, callidus ... 107 
O'clock ? What, 

quota est hora 114 

Clownish, rusticus 77 

Coachman, auriga. 6 

Coaxing, blandus.. 62 

Cobbler, sutor-is. . . 77 

Cock, gallus 24 

Cold, gelidus,frigi- 

dus 36, 61 



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139 



PAGB 

College, eoUegium, 

alma-mater 113 

Colonr, color-is ... 62 
Comb, pecten-inis. 99 
Come, venio, veni 64 
Come, io pass, eve- 

nire 106 

Commanded, im- 
perare, jnbeo 

jussi 67, 73 

C ommandment, 

prsBceptom 115 

Commit, desisnare 99 
Common, yulgaria 62 
Common people, 

Tulgus 20 

Companion, socins 30 
Companion, fe- 

m^e, socia 2 

Compel, cogo 73 

Conceal, celare ... 92 
Concerning, de ... 108 
Condenin,aamnare 77 
Conquer, vinoo, 

vici, yictnm 58 

Conspirator, con- 

jurator 106 

Constantly, assi- 
dno, sine ulla 
int^rmissione... 113 
Constmct, conf t'cio 

eci-fectom-icere 113 
Consulship, consn- 

latuB-ns 68 

Consuming, edax 

-cis 84 

Contention,li8 litis 62 
Contest, contentio 

-nis 60 

Conyenient, oom- 

modus 80 

Conrersation, col- 
loquium 66 

Cool, opacuB, fri- 

gidus 61, 62 

Cooling, refriger- 

ans 107 

Corcyra 79 

Com, of, or per- 
taining to, fm- 

mentarius 23 

Corrupt, corrum- 

pere-upi-uptum. 67 
Corrupted, pntri- 
dus 80 



PAGB 

Cottage, casa, tu- 

gunum 40, 63 

Council, consili- 
um 105 

Count, SBstimare... 61 
Countrified, rusti- 

cus ....:. 77 

Country,rus5a,80, 114 

Course, cursus-us. 64 
Covenanted, pac- 

tus 40 

Cow, vacca 4 

Cradle, cunabula 

-orum 64 

Crafty, callidns ... 30 
Crime, flagitium, 

scelus-eris-n. 99, 53 
Crook, shepherd's 

pedum 62 

Crow, comt'x-icis. 49 

Cruel, cmdelis-e... 61 

Cry, clamor 115 

Cunning, sagax ... 64 

Cup, poculum 54 

Cure, to, sanare... 106 
Custom, consuetu- 

do 37 

Cut off, decido-idi- 
fr-ccdo 113 

Daily, quotidie, in- 
dies 116, 13 

Danger, pericu- 

lum 96 

Dark, obscurus 27, 39 
Daughter, filia, 

nata 2, 18 

Day, dies-ei-c-m- 

inpl 14 

Day, to, hodie ... 21 
Day, the, before, 

pridie 39 

Day, the, after, 

postridie 39 

Dead, mortuus ... 24 
Deadly, lethalis ... 64 

Dear, earns 105 

Death, mors-tis ... 48 
Decayed, marcidus, 

ruinosus 77, 99 

Deceitful, fallax .. 68 
Declare, declarare. 60 
Decree, statnere 
-ui, decemere 
-crevi 106 



Pias 
Deed, faeinus-oris 

-n 108 

Deep, profundus, 

altus 61 

Defend, defen<2er0- 

di-sum 73 

Degrees, by, sen- 
sun 49 

Delight, delectare 51 
Delightful, amen 

-us 64 

Deluge, diluvium. 49 
Demand, rogare... 39 
Dense, thick, den- 

sus 113 

Desert, meritum. . . 84 
Deserve, mereor... 103 
Deservedly, merito 49 
Desire, captare ... 51 
Desire, cupere, 

velle 70 

Desire, expectare. 68 
Despatch, celeri- 

isLS-Ha 68 

Despise, spemo ... 104 
Destitute,of,exper8 84 
Determine, statuo 115 
Difficulty, with, 

SBgre 108 

Dignity, dignitas 117 
Disaster, calami- 

tatf-tis 118 

Dispel, abstergeo 109 
Distingui8hed,pre- 

stans 95 

Disunion, discor. 

dia 96 

Discem,intelligere 113 
Discourse, collo- 
quium 108 

Do, facere 27 

Docile, docilis 49 

Dog, canis 36 

Dolphin,delphinus 40 
Done, to be, fieri.. 68 

Door, porta 6 

Dove, columba ... 4 

Down, lanugo 113 

Down, from, de ... 42 
Dreadful, gravis... 24 
Dream, auh. som- 

nium 91 

Dream, vb. somni- 

are 91 

Draw a bow, ar- 
cum flectere ... 106 



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140 



PAOB 

Drinking, potas-ns 48 
Drive, ago, egi, 

actum 62 

Drive away, fag- 
are 88 

Drive together, 
compellere, co- 

gere 52 

Dry, siccas, aridns 30 

Dtdl, hebes-etis ... 97 

Dwell, habitare ... 36 



Eagle, aqnila 18 

Ears, to, ad anres, 

an ear, aoris-is. 65 

Earth, terra 4 

Easy,facilis 41 

Eat, (too litUe) to 

parom obsonii.. 107 
Edward, Edvardns 78 

Eight, octo 18 

Eighth, octavas... 11 
Eight times, octies 50 
Eighty times, oc- 

togies 50 

Elect, creartf 97 

Eleven, nndecim .. 13 

Elm, nlmns 82 

Eloquence, elo- 

qnentia 96 

Elude, elndo-si- 

snm 57 

Empty, vacnas ... 51 
End, subs, finis, 

bring to an, pnt 

to an, finire 106 

End, have an, come 

to an, desino-ivi 105 
End, rendered by, 

adj 117 

Endeavour, conari 68 
Enemy, hostis, in- 

imicns 53 

England, Anglia .. 77 

Enjoy, habere 70 

Enraged, iratus ... 105 
Entirely,onmino39, 84 

Err, errare 104 

E8timation,first in 115 
Europe, Enropa... 78 
Even, vel, etiam ... 21 
Evening, vespera.. 114 

Ever, unquam 70 

Every man's duty, 

est with Gen. ... 106 



PAGE 

Every one, qnisqne 36 
Everywhere ...91, 98 
Every sixth day.... 106 

Evil, malum 48 

Exceedingly, ve- 

hementer 49 

Excellent, prae- 

cellens, eximius 115 
Except, praeter ... 47 
Excessive, rapidus 39 
Expectation, ex- 

pectatio 58 

Expedition, celeri- 

tas 68 

Extraction, origo 

-inis 68 

Extreme, extremus 113 
Extremity (by adj.) 113 
Eye, oculus 68 

Face, facies 68 

Fair, pulcher 41 

Fair, candidus ... 52 

Faith, fides-ei ...5, 91 
Fall, cadere, ceci- 

di,casum,...106, 7 
Fall upon, (attack) 

peterc-ivi-itum . 106 

Famed, notus 39 

Family, familia ... 4 

Famous, famosus 30 

Fancy, sententia... 115 

Far in the day ... 115 

Farm, prsBdium ... 58 

Fat, pinguis 51 

Father, pater-ris 33 
Father-in-law, so- 

cer-i 24 

Fault, culpa 48 

Favour, to, adju- 

vare 58 

Fear, timor, ti- 
me© 36, 91 

Feather, penna ... 86 

Fed, pastus 62 

Feed, act, pasco, 

alo 105 

Feel, Bentire-ai- 

sum 48 

Female, femineus. 108 
Fencing-master, 

lanista 1 

Few, pauci 113 

Field, agcr-ri 23 

Fierce, atrox 54 



PAGH 

Fiery, igneus 30 

Fifteen, quindecim 13 

Fifth, quintus ... 9 
Fifty, quinquagin- 

ta 65 

Fifty times, quin- 

quagies 50 

Fight, pugna, hel- 
ium 13 

Fight, pugnare ... 48 

Fig tree, ficus 70 

Fire, focus, ignis 115 

First, primus 11 

Fish, piscis 62 

Fisherman, pisca- 

tor 108 

Five, quinque 13 

Five times, quin- 

quies 60 

Flee, fugio 62 

Fleetjvelox, pemix 40 

Flock, pecus ...14, 40 
Flogged, to be, vir- 

gisccBdi 106 

Flow, manere, 

fluere, fluxi, 

fluctum 51, 91 

Flowing, profluens 106 
Flow down, decnr- 

rere 62 

Flower, flos-ris ... 62 

Fly, musca 34 

Fly often, volitare 

sequor 36, 96 

Follow, lustrare ... 53 

Folly, stultitia ... 99 

Fond, cupidus ... 107 

Foolish, stultuB 24, 65 

Foot, pe«-di8 68 

Foot, on, pedes- 

iris-e 99 

Foot soldier, -pedes- 

itis 99 

Footstep, vestig- 

ium-i 53 

For, nam 68 

For, propter 47 

Forbid, vetare-ui 

-itum 73 

Forbidden, vetitus 30 

Ford, vadum 40 

Forehead, frouA-tis 48 

Formerly, olim ... 21 

Fortune, fortuna .. 91 
Forty times, quad- 

ragies 50 



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141 



PAoa 

Foimtaiii, foii»-tis 62 

Four, qnatnor ... 13 
Fourteen, quatuor- 

decim 13 

Fourth, quartus... 11 

Four times, quater 60 

Frail, fragUis-e ... 36 

France, Gallia ... 78 
Francis, Francia- 

cng 107 

Fraud, frans-dis ... 68 

Free,Hber 67 

Freed-woman, li- 

berta 13 

Frequent, creb«r 

-ra-mm 24 

Friend, amicus ... 86 
Friendly, amicus-a 

-um 24 

Friendship, amici- 

tia 96 

Frighten, terrere.. 68 

Frog, rana 80 

From, a, ab, abs... 47 

Fruit, frnctiM-us ... 14 

Fruitful, fecundus 40 

Fruits, tmges-Tim . 63 

FucdtiTe, fugax ... 109 

FuU, plenus 109 

Funeral, funiM - 

ens 48 

Furnish, minis- 

trare 68 

Fury, furor 114 

Gahitea,id 62 

Games, ludi -orum 107 

Game, ferina 108 

Garden, hortus ... 86 

Gate, porta 6 

General, dux -cis 48 

Genius, id 9„ 117 

Gentle, mansuetus 80 
Gentleman of bed- 
chamber, princi- 

pi&cubiculo ... 48 

George, Georgius . 20 

(Gesture, gestus -us 49 

Get, obtinere 91 

Ghost, effigies -ei 6 

Gift, donum ...8, 62 

Girl, puella 6 

Gire, do, dedi da- 
tum dare 8 



PAOB 

Given, datum 24 

Go, eo. It! itum ... 46 
Go, forth, ire ezire 115 
Go, let us, eamus 26 
Goat, caper -rl ... 62 
Goat-she, capella 40 
Good time, per 

tempus 114 

God, deus 14 

Goddess, dea 2 

Gods, dei 62 

Gk>ld, aurum 46 

Good, bonus, 9 

Gk>odnes8, bonitas 60 
Goodwill, haying, 

benevolus 43 

Go under, succed- 

ere-essi 62 

Ch)vem, moderor 108 

Gracchus, id 80 

Grammarian, gram- 

maticus 68 

Grandfather, avus 24 

Grape, uva 6 

Ghttsping, rapax 63 
Grass, gramen -in- 

is 83 

Grasshopper, cica- 
da 40 

Grateful, gratus 97 
Grave, seyerus ... 108 
Great, magnus, in- 

gens 8, 23 

Great, very, maxi- 

mus 68 

Greece, Grecia ... 78 
Greedy, ayidus ... 24 
Green, yiridw -e 63 

Grove, lucus 24 

Grow, crescere cre- 

vi cretnm 116 

Guard, munire ... 105 
Guardian, tutor-is 107 
Guest, conviva ... 77 



Hail, grando-inis 86 

Hair, crinis 99 

Half-dead, semia- 

nimis-e 40 

Hand, manus-us, f. 48 
Hand down, tra- 

dere 104 

Hang down, depen- 

dere 113 

Happens, fit... 106, 116 



PAGI 

Happy, felix bea- 

tuB 26, 62 

Harbour, portus 60 

Hard, durus 91 

Harvest, messis, f 62 

Hate,Iodi 68 

Hateful, odioBus ... 64 

Hatred, odium ... 68 

Hay, fenum 64 

Hazel tree, coryluB 61 

He,ille 13, 28 

Head, capu^iti8... 48 

Heads of (by adj.) 113 

Health, salus-utis. 73 
Healthy, saluber 

-ris-re 60 

Heap up, augeo ... 99 

Hear, audire 67 

Heat, calor-is 39 

Heated, fervidus... 39 

Heaven, coalum ... 36 

Heavy, gravis 24 

Heel, cua;-cis 48 

He, himself, ipse.. 16 

Heir, here9-diB.68, 68 

Hen, gallina 6 

Hence, hinc, ab- 

hino 60, 67 

Henry, Henricus .. 78 

Herd, armentum .. 63 

Here,hic 60 

Here and there,huc 

atque iUuc 91 

Hither, hue, 116 

High, altus, sup- 

erus, sublimis, 

excelsuB, 24, 42, 

49, 61 

High-spirited, acer 108 

HiU, coUis 64 

Himself, of, sui ... 15 

Hinder, impedire.. 57 

His own, suus 8 

Hitherto, hactenuB 13 

Hoarse, raucus ... 13 

Hold, tenere 68 

Holy, sanctus 64 

Homer, Homerus.. 104 

Horace, Horatius.. 107 
Homicide, homi- 

cida 63 

Honour ,hono«-oris 

honestas-atis 9, 60 

Hope, Bpe«-ei, ... 34 

Hope, to, sperare . 70 

Horn, comu 37 



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142 



PAOE 

Horrid, horridas... 99 

Horse, eqaus 36 

Horseman, eqnes.. 99 
Hostile, infestns .. 64 

Hot, calidas 63 

Honr, hora 113 

Honse, domns, f... 56 
Hoase,atmy,domi 115 
How, quomodo ... 60 
How, with adj. 

qaam 105 

However, tamen... 30 
How is it that? 

cur, quare 100 

How many times, 

qnoties 77 

How much, quan- 
tum 96 

Huge, ingen^-tis... 23 
Humanity, huma- 

na gens 108 

Humble, humilis .. 36 
Hundred times, 

centies 50 

Hunter, senator... 83 
Hunting dog, canis 

▼enaticus 49 

Huntsman, vena- 
tor 117 

Hurtful, noxius ... 30 
Husbandman, ag- 
ricola 4 

I, ego 13 

Jackdaw, graculus 36 

Javelin, jaculum... 68 

Idle, ignavus 24 

n, si 99 

Ill-boding, sinis- 

ter-ra-rum 49 

Illustrious, clarus. 45 

Implanted, insitus 84 
Important, magni 

moment! 107 

Improve, prodesse 

takes Dat 105 

In, in 67 

Inch, uncia 105 

Increase, augeo ... 99 
Indeed, quidem, 

sane 21 

Indus, Indus 96 

Inhabit, habitare 86 
Inheritance, here- 

dita«-ati8 91 



PAOE 

Instead of, pro ... 47 
Instruction, dis- 

ciplina 60 

Intelligent, inteUi- 

gens 108 

Intimate friends, 

necessarii, fami- 

liares, intimi ... 108 

Into, in 67 

Introduce, indu- 

cere 68 

Invidious, invidus 70 
Invite, invitare ... 114 
John, Johannes ... 8 
Joint, conjunctus 70 
Join together, con- 

jungere 32 

Jordan, Jordanus 105 
Journey, to, iter ad 116 

Iron, ferrum 105 

Irrigate, irrigare 36 

Island, insula 14 

Judge, judex 115 

Just, Justus 13 

Juvenal,Juvenal-is 108 



Kalends, kalendse 67 

Keep, servare 91 

Kill, interficere-eci 8 
Cut off birds, &c., 

mterimere emi 10 

Kind, genus-eris ... 8 

King, rex-gis 73 

Kingdom, regnum 24 

Knee, genu 50 

Knife 23 

Know,noscere novi 70 

scire scivi 57 
Knowledge, with- 
out the — of, 

clam 39 

Knowledge, scien- 

tia,cognitio 84 

Labours, labores 

-um 104 

Lady, domina 2 

Lamenting, 1am- 

entans 58 

Language, lingua 21 

Lark, alauda 11 

Lastly, postremo 13 

Late, serus 99 

Lately, but, dudum 13 



PAGE 

Lately, nuper 115 

Laugh, rideo risi 64 
Laurel, adj.y laur- 

eus 97 

Law, lex 77 

Lay out, locare ... 36 
Lead, plumbum ... 51 

Lead, ducere 62 

Lead out of way, 

inducere in er- 

rorem 117 

Leader, dux 48 

Lead out, educere 60 
Lean, macer-ra- 

-rum 53 

Learn, disco 91 

Learned, doctus... 30 
Least, minimus ... 61 
Left behind, reli- 

quus 64 

Left hand, Iseva ... 73 
Leg, cms, (n.) ... 36 
Lend, commodare 52 
Letter, epistola ... 48 
Lettuce, lactuca... 6 
Lying towards,pro- 

nus ad 115 

Liberty, libertas... 113 

Life, vita 91 

Little, low in rank 113 
Live, too little, ... 107 
Loathing, nausea 65 

Lofty, altus 113 

Log, tigillum 30 

Long, longus ... 36, 68 
Long, how, quam- 

diu 113 

Long, all day, per 

totam diem 115 

Long since, jamdu- 

dum 13 

Lon^ beard, pro- 

missa barba 117 

Look at, inspec- 

tare 73 

Look toward, spec- 
tare ad 115 

Lord, dominus ... 24 

Love, amor-m 14 

Love, amare 34 

Lovers, amantes ... 99 
Loud, atroa;-cis ... 115 

Low, inferus 42 

Luncheon, prandi- 

um 48 



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143 



PAOB 

Lying towards 
spectans ad,pro- 

nusad 115 

Mad, delinis 21 

Made, compactas 62 

Madnees, dementia 68 

Maid, puella 83 

Maid-aervant, fa- 

mnla, ancilla ... 18 

Maintain, servare 91 

Majestic, grandis 68 

Make, facio 27 

Make, reddo 97 

Male, mas maris ... 60 

Man, vir, homo ... 3 

Manner, modus ... 68 

Manner, in a, pene 48 

Manners, mores-m 92 
Many, very, per- 

molti 60 

Many, too, plures 

qnam sat est ... 107 

Mare, eqna 2 

Market, fonun ... 116 
Marriageable, nu- 

bilis 58 

Master, magister 12 

Meadow, pratum 64 

Meal, prandinm ... 48 

Mean, sordidns ... 63 
Measure, propor- 
tion, pro with 

abl 115 

Meat, cibuR 80 

Merchant, negoci- 

ator 58 

Merit, meritum ... 117 

Metal, metallum 51 

Middle, medius ... 113 

Mild, mitis 40 

Mind, menS'tis ... 84 

Mine, mens 23 

Mine, a, metallum 61 

Mint, mentha 5 

Miser, avams 63 

Mistress, domina 2 

Mix, miscere 62 

Modesty, pudor ... 60 
Money, pecunia 

nummus ...96, 83 

Month, mensis ... 67 

Moon, luna 6 

More, plus, ma- 

gis 43, 67 



pAoa 
Morning, in the, 

man6 49 

Mortal, mortalis... 61 
Most, plerique ... 73 

Most, maxime 43 

Most part, for the, 

plerumqne 106 

Mother, mater 36 

Mother-ui-law, so- 

cruB 49 

Mountain, mons ... 36 

Mouse, mus 64 

Move aside, dedu- 

cere 68 

Move frequently, 

motare 62 

Moved, to be, com- 

moveri 109 

Much, multnm ... 42 
Much, too, plus sa- 
tis, plus quam 

sat est 107 

Mule, she, mula... 2 
Murder, trucidare. 70 



Name, nomen 63 

Name , nominare ... 6 

Narrow, angustus. 24 

Nation, gens 51 

Nofir to, prope ... 24 
Near side, on the, 

citra 49 

Needle, acus us, f 42 
Neighbourhood,vi- 

cinia 114 

Neither, neque ... 21 
Neither nor, nee- 

nee 21 

Neither of two, 

neuter 20 

Nest, nidus 113 

Net, rete -is n 64 

Never, nunquam ... 21 
New thing, no, ni- 
hil novi 113 

New disturbances, 

novflB res 92 

Next day, for, in 

posterum diem . 114 

Night, nox 34 

Nigh to, prope 42, 47 

Nimble, agilis 49 

Nine, novem 13 

Ninetimes, novies 60 



PAOB 

Ninety times, no- 

nagies 60 

Ninth, nonus 11 

No, not at all, mi- 

nime 99 

Noble, nobilis 36 

None, nullus 20 

Noon, meridies ... 115 

No one, nemo 46 

North, on the, a 

parte aquilonis.. 78 

Nose, nasus 30 

Not, non 13 

Nothing, nihil 21 

Notorious,famosus 80 
Notwithstanding, 

tamen 80 

Now, nunc 21 

Number, to the, ad 
centena- or ad 

miUia-numero... 115 



Oak, qaercus...l4, 49 
Obey, parere, go- 
verns Dat 106 

Observe, animad 

verto 107 

Obtain, obtinere... 91 

Octavius 97 

Of, de 47 

Offence, offensio... 68 
Office, officium, 

munw^-eris 108 

Often, scBpe 49 

Oil, oleum 30 

Old, vetu^-eris 41 

Old, senex 42 

Old, (how) quot 

annos natus ... 113 

Older, senior 46 

Old dog, vetulus 

canis 108 

Old man, senex ... 62 
Old woman, anus 

-us 20 

Olive, olea 6 

Omitted, intermis- 

sus 68 

Once, semel 60 

Once, for, semel, 

but once,omnino 108 

One, unus 9 

One, another, the 

one, the other 

alius, alius 77 



y Google 



Ui 



PlOB 

One-eyed, Itimine 

Inscas 68 

One of its kind, 

singnlafl 4 

Onion, coBpa 3 

Openly, palam 47 

Oppose, to, oppng- 

nare 73 

Opposite to, (so as 

to meet) obviam 65 
Oppress,oppnm«re 

-essi 106 

Oppressive, gravis 113 

Or, ant, vel 13, 21 

Oration, coneio... 48 

Orator, orator 95 

Order (to) to be 
flogged, jnbere 
jn8si,virgis ccedi 106 
Order (to) rewards 
to be given to 
the soldiers, mil- 
ites donari mer- 
it! pretiis 106 

Origin, origo 68 

Ornament, omare 86 
Other, the, alins, 

ceterus 20, 77 

Ought, oportet ... 117 
Ours, nostrum .... 23 
Outward, extemus 42 
Overcome, super- 
are 48 

Overthrow, ruina.. 3 
Ox, bos bovis ; dat 
pi. ; bobus for 

bovibus 86 

Oyster, ostrea 6 



Pains, quid opersB 96 
Pale, pailens, paUi- 

dus 62, 64 

Pale, to grow, ex- 

cemdescere-rd ... 68 

Paper, charta 37 

Pardon, venia 4 

Parent, parens 33 

Parrot, psittacus.. 70 

Parsnip, pastinaca 6 
Part, for the most 

plerumque 105 

Part, pars 73 

Part, of , every, uni- 

versuB 106 



PAoa 
Part, for his, fuod 

ad eum attinet.. 106 

Paternal, patrius.. 43 

Patient, patiens ... 89 

Paw, ungnla 80 

Pea, pisum 89 

Peacock, pavo 70 

Pear, pimm 89 

Pedestrian, pedes- 

tris 99 

People, popnlus 

gens 36, 51 

Perfect, perfectus, 84 
Perseverance, per- 

severantia 114 

Perhaps, forte 30 

Person, same, idem 107 

Petty, mediocris... 58 
Pheasant, phasi- 

anus 70 

PhiUis, id 62 

Philosopher, so- 

phista 40 

Physician, medi- 

CUB 36 

Pig, porcus 36 

Pipe, fistula 52 

Place, locus 36 

Plan, locarCidesig- 

nare 36, 99 

Plank, tabula 100 

Plant, planta 6 

Play, ludere 57 

Plead, causam di- 

cere 115 

Pleasant, jucunduB 64 

Please, placere ... 99 

Pleasing, gratus... 85 
Pleasure, voluptas 

delectatio 70, 104 

Pleasure, will, ar- 

bitrium 115 

Plough, arare 36 

Pluck, carpere ... 52 

Plunder, expilare 77 

Plural, pluralis ... 4 

Poet, poeta 68 

Poison, venenum 20 

Polycletus 84 

Pompey, Pompeius 36 

Pond, stagnum ... 40 

Poop, puppis-f. ... 73 

Poor, pauper 40 

Poppy, papaver-n 52 

Port, Portus-us-m 60 

Portrait, effigies... 62 



Possess, tem 
Poor, fandei 
Poor out, I 

dere 

Power, in th* 

penes 

PrsBtor, pr«et< 
Praise, landti 
Prayer, prex,( 

late, preci 

cam prece, 

nsed ; also 

plural 

Preacher, prm 
Prefer, malo « 
Preference, is, 

prsB 

Presence, is, 

coram 

Present, to I 

adesse ... 
Preserre, see * 

vare 

Prevail with 
Price, pretiniD - 
Prince, princepf' 
Private secret 

ab eplstolis •' 
Privy counselliK 

a secretis « 

Productive, nbtfi 

ferax 

Profit, profitahl* 



Promise, pronutt<> 
Proportion, mea- 
sure, pro witk 

abl 

Pronoun, prono* 

men 

Prosperous, pros- 
penis 

Proud, snperbns- 
Provident, prori- 

dus 

Pulse, legomen... 
Punish, pnnirei 

castigare ^ 

Punishment, poena 
Pupil, alumnus, 

discipulns ^^ 

Purpose, this see D' 
Purposes, coBpta... ^ 
Put on, induero ... 1^ 



Digitized byLjOOQlC 



145 



f PAoa 

Qnarrol, lis 62 

Qaa'^nUs, irffi 99 

Queeu.<reqma 61 

Quench^' resting- 

uere 62 

Quick, celer 60 

QuickneBB, celeri- 

tas 68 

Quite omnino, 

plane 84 



Rain, pluvia 63 

Rashly, temerd ... 99 
Rather, I would... 

malo maUe 63 

Raven, corvus 24 

Read, legere 70 

Ready, promptus.. 106 

ReaHty(in)re 68 

Reaper, messor ... 40 
Reason, i.e. pene- 
tration, intelli- 

gentia 113 

Rebel, contumaas 

-cis 98 

Receive, accipere 99 
Receive death, oc- 
cumbere mor- 
tem, occumbere 

morti 108 

Recently, nuper... 73 
Recline, recum- 

b?re 78 

Red, ruber 47 

Refreshing, cool, 

frigiduB 113 

Region, regio 73 

Rehearse, recitare 67 

Reign, regnare ... 77 

Rein, habena 4 

Remain, manere... 114 
Remaining, reli- 

quns 64 

Remember, memi- 

nisBe 77 

Remove, removere 60 

Renewal, integra- 99 

tio 99 

Repeat, repetere .. 64 
Reported, to be 

ferrl 99 

Reproach, cnlpare, 

vituperare 30 

Require, postulare 40 



PAOB 

Best, the, oeteri 

.omm 77 

Return, {i.e. home) 

redire 80 

Return, money, 

reddere-idi 113 

Revolts against 

prorsuB abhor- 

ret 73 

Reward, prsemium, 

pretium 68 

Rib, costa 4 

Rich, dives ...108, 49 

Right, rectus 68 

Right hand, dex- 

tra (understima- 

nus) 73 

Rightly, rect^ 64 

Ripe, maturuB 24 

Rivalling, eemulus 13 
River, fluvius, flu- 

men-inis 24, 36 

Roar, rudere 49 

Rob, spoliare ...91, 100 

Robber, latro 78 

Rod, virga 64 

Roman, Romanus 96 

Romulus 66 

Round, rotunduB . . 30 

Rough, asper 64 

Rough, horrens ... 68 

Royal, regius 62 

Rudely, vehemen- 

ter 109 

Ruined, ruinosus . 77 

Rule, prfBceptum . 116 

Rule, to, regere ... 77 

Run, curro 14 

Run down, decurro 113 
Run through, per- 

curro 113 

Run upon, irruere 106 

Rural, rusticuB .... 16 



Sacred, sacer ...... 49 

Sacrifice, hostia ... 4 
Sacrificed, macta- 

tus 24 

Sad, tristis 30, 36 

Safe, tutus 40 

Sagacious, sagax.. 64 

Sail, velum 109 

Salute, salutare... 97 

Same, idem 29 



PAoa 
Same place, in the, 

ibidem loci 36 

Sav, dicere 67 

Scheme, designare 99 
Sea, mare, pelagus 

20, 34 

Sea, strait, fretum 62 
Second, secundus. 11 
Secretary, a manu, 

ab epiHtolis 48 

See, videre 7 

Seize, rapio-ere ... 62 

Seldom, raro 21 

Senate, senatus ... 73 

Send, mittere 116 

Serve, servire 91 

Serve up food, min- 

istrare 68 

Servitude, servitu* 

-tis 91 

Settle, componere 62 

Seven, septem 13 

Seventeen, septen- 

decim 18 

Seventh, Septimus 11 
Seven times, sep- 

ties 60 

Seventy times, sep- 

tuagies 60 

Several, (some,) 

nonnullus 114 

Shade, i.e. shady 

i)lace, umbracu- 
um, opaca loco- 
rum 107 

Shame, pudor 73 

Sharp, acer 23, 29 

Sheep, ovis 40 

Shepherd, pastor . 62 

Shining, nitiduB ... 40 

Shore, littus 62 

Short, brevis... 96, 40 
Short time, in a, 

brevi 21 

Short time, for a, 

ad breve tempus 116 
Show, monstrare 

97, 48 

Shudder at, re- 
volt against, ab- 

horrere 78 

Sick, oBger 89, 64 

Sign, signum 37 

Signal, to give the 99 

Silver, argentum .. 46 

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146 



PAOS 

Sin, peecatxun 68 

Sing, canere 62 

Singular, singola- 

ris 4 

Sister, soror-is .... 51 

Sit on, residere ... 97 
Sit together, con- 

sidere 62 

Six, sex 13 

Sixteen, sedecim .. 13 

Sixth, sextas 11 

Sixth day, on every 106 

Six times, sexies . . 60 
Sixty times, sexa- 

gies 50 

SkiUed,peritas ... 23 
Slain, occisas, tm- 

cidatns 106 

Slandering, vitu- 

perans 48 

Slave, female, ser- 

va 2 

Sleep, sopor 62 

Sleep, to, dormire 115 

Slender, gracilis... 49 

SUde, labor 103 

Slightly, leviter ... 73 

Slow, lentuB 40 

Smile, arridere ... 108 

Smoke, fomare ... 48 

Snake, angnis 23 

Snatch, rapio 77 

So, ita 21 

Soap, sapo 49 

Socrates 97 

Soft, mollis 40 

So great, tantas ... 21 

So many, tot 21 

Some, aliquis 87 

Some, nonnnUi ... 73 
Sometimes, ali- 

qnando 21 

Son, filias, nataB7, 23 
Song, canticom, 

cantilena 4, 9 

Soon, mox 39 

Sophist, sophista . 40 

Sonl, anima 4 

Sour, amarns 24 

Sonth, meridies ... 115 

Sow, a, sns 39 

Spacious, ampins . 24 

Sparrow, passer... 40 
Spend, consumers 

-psi-ptum 108 

nder, aranea 13 



PAGB 

Spread, expandere 

-di-sum 108 

Stag, cervna 36 

Stand, stare 3, 107 

Star, Stella 4 

State, civita«-tis... 23 
Statue, signum ... 84 
Stature, magnitu- 

do-inis 116 

Stay, manere 105 

StealthUy, furtim 108 

Step, gradus 49 

Stick, bacillum ... 73 
Stick, baculus ... 99 

Stone, lapis 30 

Stone, saxum 68 

Stonj, saxosus ... 62 

Strait, f return 62 

Strength, vis 39 

Strength, accord- 
ing to, pl.j vires 115 
Strike, verberare 57 
Stripling, from a, 
a prima adole- 

scentia 48 

Strive, certare ... 68 

Strong, f ortis 96 

Strongly, forte, ve- 

hementer 49 

Study, studere ... 67 
Studies, studia ... 104 

Subject, res 106 

Subjoin, subjnng- 

ere 26 

Submitting to, pa- 
tiens witii gen. 84 

Such, talis 62 

Suffer, pati 91 

Sugar, saccharum 36 
Sum of money, pe- 

cunia 113 

Summer, sBsta^-tis 113 

Sup, csenare 36 

Supper, csena 108 

Suppliant, supplex 53 
Supply, ministrare 53 

Sure, certus 43 

Suspect, suspicor 109 

Sweet, dulcis 51 

Swelling, turgidus 36 

Swift, levis 36 

Swift, pemia:-cis 39 
Swiftness, pemici- 

ias-aXia 40 

Swim, natare 36 



PAGS 

Switzerland, Hel- 
vetia 108 

Sword, gladius...8, 14 



Take, capere 95 

Take off, arripere 107 

Talent, talentum 106 

Talk, colloquium 108 

Teach, docere ... 67 

Teachable, docilis 49 
Teacher, priecep- 

tor 60 

Tell, dicere 67 

Temple, templum 77 

Ten, decem 13 

Tenacious, tenax 53 

Tender, tener 24 

Tenth, decimus ... 11 

Ten times, decies 50 

Than, quam 21 

That, ille 15 

Theft, furtum-i ... 85 

Then, tunc 21 

Thence, Ulinc 60 

There, ibi 60 

Therefore, igitur 21 

They, illi 13 

Thick, densuB ... 40 

Thick, opacus 51 

Thine, tuus 23 

Think,arbitrari,97, 106 
Thinks, he, as I do, 

a me sentit 48 

Third, tertius 11 

Thirst, sitis 62 

Thirteen, tredecim 13 

Thirty, triginta ... 113 
Thirty times, tri- 

cies 50 

This, hie 13 

Thistle, carduoB... 30 

Thorn, spina 30 

Thou, tu 13 

Thoughts, in our, 

apud nos 115 

Thousand, 115 

Thousand times 

millies 50 

Thousandth, mil- 

lesimus 107 

Threatening, tor- 

vus 53 

Three, tres 11 

A space of three 

days, triduum... 67 



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147 



PAGE 

Through, per 47 

Thus, ita 21 

Tiger, tigris 9 

Time, tempus 61 

Toga, toga 106 

Tongue, lingua ... 80 
Too much, plus 

eequo 107 

Tooth, dens 68 

Top, by, a<i; 113 

Toward, 47 

Town, oppidum ... 106 

Track, vestigium 53 

Travel, iter facere 114 
Treasurer, a thes- 

auris, und : servus 48 

Tree, arbor 40 

Tremble, tremere 

-ui 68 

Tribe, tribus-us f 70 

Trickle, manare... 61 
Triumph over, de- 

beUare 106 

Trojan, Trojanus 68 

Troubles, molestisB 97 

True, verus 30 

Truly, ver6, pro- 

fecto 77 

Trumpet, buccin- 

um 13 

Turf, cespes-itis... 40 

Turnip, napus 30 

Twelfth, duodeci- 

mus 11 

Twelve, duodecim. 13 
Twenty times, vi- 

cies 60 

Twice, bis 60 

Two, duo 11 

Valiant 106 

Value,sestimare ... 36 
Valuable,pretiosu8 113 
Vegetables, legum- 

ina 99 

Vehemently, ve- 

hementer 49 

Venture, at a, tem- 

ere 99 

Vessel, ratis-f 36 

Veteran, veteranus 109 
View, inspectare... 77 

Violet, viola 63 

Virgil, Vergilius... 9 
Virtue, virtus-utis. 8 



PAOB 

tJncle, avunculus.. 114 
Uncomely, inf orm- 

is 108 

Undefined 24 

Under, sub 3 

Undertake, susci- 

pere 67 

Unequal, impar ... 60 
Unfinished, incho- 

atus 73 

Ungrateful, ingra- 

tus 108 

Unhappy, infelix.. 49 
Unite, conjungere. 62 
Unknown, ignotus. 30 

Unless, nisi 21 

Unruffled, placidus 63 
Unteach, dedocere 92 

Until, usque 47 

UntU, ad 116 

Unwilling, to be, 

nolens 70 

Unworthy, indig- 

nus 106 

Up to, tenus 47 

Use of, ad usum... 116 
Used to, (sign of 

imperf) 115 

Useful, utilis 36 

Usual, solitus 91 



Wait for, expec- 

tare, manere ... 116 

Walk, ambulare ... 36 

Wall, murus 24 

Wallow, volutare.. 89 
Wandering, vagans 30 
Wanting to be, de- 
sum takes, Dat. 105 

War, bellum 11 

War, pertaining to, 

bellicus 89 

Warlike, bellicosus 39 

Wash, lavare 60 

Wasp, vespa 36 

Water, aqua ...... 4 

Water, irrigare ... 36 

Wax, cera 52 

Way, via 80, 68 

We,no8 13 

Wealthy, divea-itis 42 

Weary, f essus 40 

Well, bene 47 

Well-fed, satur-a- 

um 64 



PAOS 

WeU-known,notus 113 
West wind, zephy- 

rus 62 

West, accidens ... 116 

What? quid 21 

Wheel, rota 

When, quum 60 

Whence, unde ... 60 

Where, ubi 60 

Whether, an 21 

Which of the two, 

uter 20 

White, albus 13 

Who? quis 87 

Who, which, qui, 

qu8e, quod 7 

Whoever, what- 
ever, quisquis... 87 

Whole, totus 12 

Why, cur, quare... 21 

Wicked, nequam.. 42 
Wife, uxor, con- 

jux 36, 64 

Wild, ferus, agres- 

tis,eirerus, 40,49, 68 

Willing, (was) 116 

Willow, salix 40 

Wind round, cir- 

cumpJicare 108 

Wine, vinum 63 

Wing, ala 89 

Winnowing-fan, 

vannus 20 

Winter, hiems ... 49 

Wise, sapiens... 86, 96 

Wise, to be, sapere 113 
Wish, cupio-ere 

-velle, optare 26, 70 

With, cum 40 

Withered, marci- 

dus 77 

Without, sine, ab- 
sque 21, 47 

Woft, lupus 68 

Woman, femina, 

mulier-is 6, 36 

Wonderful, mira- 

bilis, mirus...52, 68 

Wonted, solitus ... 91 
Wood, lignum, a 

forest, sylva..30, 39 
Wood cutter, fron- 

dator 62 

Word, verbum ... 9 
World, allthe,uni- 

versus munduF 

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148 

PAGE PAOB PAGB 

World, mtrndxis ... 97 Year, annus 48 Youth, juventus 

Worse, deterior ... 117 Yes, by all means, -tis 79 

Worship, cultus ... 106 maxime 99 

Worshipper, cultor 106 Yesterday, heri ... 114 

Worthless, vilis ...45 Yet, tamen 80 Xenophon, Xeno- 

Worthy, dignus ... 105 Young, juyenis ... 42 phon-tis 77 

Wretched, miser... 49 Young men, juve- 

Write, scribere ... 57 nes, adolescentes 107 
Wrong, injuria ... 68 



FINIS. 



BEMBOSE AND SONS, PBINTEBS, LONDON AND DEBET. 

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WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR. 



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yiSITATIO INFIRMORUM; or Offices for 

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