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Full text of "Prominent Jews of America; a collection of biographical sketches of Jews who have distinguished themselves in commercial, professional and religious endeavor"

Copyright. 1918 

by 
S. B. G0ODK1ND 



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HE PROPER DEDICA- 
TION OF A BOOK OF 
THIS KIND SHOULD BE 
TO NO INDIVIDUAL 
BUT TO "THE JEWS OF 
AMERICA." 



q WITH NEW HOPES & ASPI- 
RATIONS THEY CAME TO 
THESE SHORES FROM LANDS 
BEYOND THE SEAS, WHERE 
PERSECUTION REIGNED, TO 
SEEK HOMES IN THE LAND 
OF LIBERTY & FREEDOM. 

q THEY CAME FIRST A FEW, 
&THEN A MULTITUDE. THEY 
WERE STURDY, SELF-RELI- 
ANT, HONEST & PROGRESSIVE. 

q THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED 
THEREFORE TO THE JEWS OF 
AMERICA, WHO HAVE BEEN 
POTENT FACTORS IN THE 
BUILDING OF OUR GREAT 
NATION. 




as 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
The Library of Congress 



http://www.archive.org/details/prominentjewsofaOOtole 




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THE purpose of this work is to 
perpetuate in the minds of this and 
coming generations, a knowledge 
of those sterling traits of character 
which have distinguished the Jewish 
race since the first dawn of civilization. 

C| It is an interesting fact that they 
are the only people in the world who 
have been able to mingle with all 
nations without being absorbed by any 
of them. 

•I Although loyal to the various 
countries of their adoption, sending 
their sons forth to fight their battles; 
giving with lavish generosity, both of 
time and money, toward the promotion 
of every worthy national or communal 







13 



m 



cause, they have yet maintained a dis- 
tinct racial individuality, which is the 
wonder of the world. 

CJ Without organized political in- 
fluence, they have financed Crowned 
heads and Kingdoms; sent forth across 
an uncharted waste of waters an expe- 
dition which opened the entire western 
hemisphere to the eyes of an incredu- 
lous world. For it is an established 
fact that it was Jewish money and in- 
fluence which enabled Queen Isabella 
to send forth Christopher Columbus 
upon his momentous voyage of dis- 
covery. 

•J The Jew is essentially a lover of 
liberty, of freedom of thought and 
action, and is always ready to grant 
these rights to others. Small wonder, 
then, that the United States, the most 
vigorous exponent of freedom of all the 
nations of the earth, should have at- 
tracted to her shores a large body of 







men and women of Jewish nationality, 
seeking to escape from the oppression 
of old world tyranny. 

^ The story of their experiences 
forms a unique chapter of national his- 
tory — a brave narrative replete with 
help and inspiration for the struggling 
young men of our land. 

€J Many of those whose biographies 
appear in this volume are unknown to 
fame in the commonly accepted sense 
of the term. Their activities have 
perhaps been confined to their own 
communities, and only their immediate 
families and intimate friends realize 
fully the bitterness of the cup of expe- 
rience which their lips have touched. 

^ Some of them were reluctant about 
having their life histories included in 
this work, actuated, no doubt, by a sense 
of modesty regarding their achieve- 
ments, which is an admirable racial 
trait 








€fl However, in the life story of each 
one is found much that is worthy of 
perpetuation, much that has moulded 
the commercial and religious thought 
of their generation, and we offer this 
volume as a record and tribute to those 
men who have lived simply, nobly and 
without ostentation, that America and 
the Jewish race might maintain their 
dearest traditions of liberty, charity 
and equality among men. 



o« 



■j* 



v* 



"Advance, then, ye future generations. We 
would hail you as you rise in your long succession to 
fill the places which we now fill. We bid you Wel- 
come to this pleasant land of the fathers. We bid you 
welcome to the healthful skies and the verdant fields 
of our wonderful country. We greet your accession to 
the great inheritance which we have enjoyed. " 

— Daniel Webster. 



SAUL ABENSON 

Mr. Saul Abenson of Miami, Fla., is still on the right side of thirty, hav- 
ing been born on the 15th of April, 1883. His cradle stood on Russian soil 
and he calls Borisov, in the old government of Minsk, his birthplace. He is 
the descendant of a Rabbinical family, his parents being Simeon and Elke Eva 
Abenson, both dead at the present writing. 

Saul Abenson landed in New York during the year 1905. Some months 
afterwards he went to Philadelphia, and before the year was over he boarded 
a trans-Atlantic steamer and went to Norway, and before another year he 
was again on American soil, this time in Georgia peddling merchandise and 
then engaging in the grocery business. In 1908 he first went to Florida, set- 
tling in Miami in 191 1. 

Mr. Abenson is engaged in the sale of dry goods, under the firm name 
of the Chicago Bargain Store, at 300 Avenue G, Miami, Fla. 

When Mr. Abenson first arrived in America he was on the Russian army 
list, having been just ordered to the front, in the late Russo-Japanese War. 
When he attempted to cross the border, twelve bullets were fired at him, and 
it took him forty-five days to land on these shores. 

Mr. Abenson was married, on the 10th of January, 1912, to Lena Gelfman, 
born in Russia, and there are two children of this marriage, Samuel and Gladys. 
He is a Talmud student of note and a member of the local congregation. 



ABRAHAM ABRICH 

At 432 Eddy street, Providence, R. L, is located the Rhode Island Paper 
Stock Company, an institution devoted to waste material. One of the part- 
ners in this business is Mr. Abraham Abrich, who was born in Minsker, 
Guberne, Russia, July 18, 1869, the son of Asher Abrich, a merchant of his 
native city. 

He came to America in 1891, landing in New York, where he began 
working as a shirt operator. For the first four weeks he received no pay, as 
he was just learning the trade. Later he was paid $5 per week, but only re- 
mained four months. He then went to Cleveland, and began peddling fruit, 
later turning his attention to dry goods. This was followed by a variety of 
experiences in a foundry as moulder, which work he found to be too heavy ; 
then in a cap shop, later as a helper in a furniture store and finally he again 
turned his attention to peddling. He later worked in a rubber factorv for 
three years, but not finding any of these occupations to his liking, he started in 
the present line of business, where he has been very successful in every way. 

Mr. Abrich was married in Providence, R. I., in March, 1900, to Miss 
Ida Taber, and they have eight children, five boys and three girls, all of whom 
are going' to school and being educated in music. 

Mr. Abrich is a member of the B'nai Zion, B'rith Abraham, Zionists Order 
of Talmud Torah and the Hebrew Free Loan Society. He also contributes to 
the Denver Hospital, the Immigration Society of New York, all the Yshivis 
and charities. 

He is Past Treasurer of congregation, charter member of the Free Loan 
Society mentioned above, and a Director of Talmud Torah. 



RABBI WILLIAM ACKERMAN 

Rabbi William Ackerman, of Pensacola, Fla., is still young in the rabbin- 
ical profession, having been graduated from the Jewish Theological Seminary 
of America in 191 1, but, judging from the popularity he has acquired and the 
unwonted energy displayed in the discharge of his duties, we are justified in 
predicting a still greater future for his remarkable abilities, 

Rabbi Ackerman was born on the 6th of December, 1886, in Kaschau, 
Hungary, as the son of J. and Vilma Ackerman. He is the descendant of a 
great rabbinical family, and when still at home he received a good education. 
. He studied Talmud, and was graduated from the Royal Gymnasium at 
Kaschau. When he arrived in America, in 1905, he decided to take up the 
duties of a rabbi, and, in addition to a course he took up in Dr. Schechter's 
Seminary, lie received his secular education at Columbia University. 

In 1913 he came to Pensacola as the rabbi of Congregation Beth El. He 
was previously the rabbi of Sinai Congregation at Lake Charles, La. 

In addition to his rabbinical duties, he is prominently connected with nearly 
every phase of communal activity. He is the president of the I. O. B. A. Lodge 
of Pensacola and a member of the General Committee for the Southern District 
of B'nai B'rith (No. 7), comprising seven States. He is the chairman of the 
Child Labor Law Committee for the State of Florida, and is a member of the 
Executive Board of the Army and Navy Life Activities Commission. 

In personal intercourse Dr. Ackerman is a highly pleasing young man, 
an exceptionally gifted orator and undoubtedly headed for a national reputation. 



BEN ADLER 

As an illustration of the fact that life is not a matter of years, but of 
achievement and accomplishment, the career of Mr. Ben Adler of San Antonio, 
Texas, is highly valuable. 

Mr. Adler was born on August 29, 1889, in Des Moines, Iowa. His parents 
are Israel and Yenta Adler. After graduating from the public schools and the 
high school, he left his native city and came with relatives to San Antonio, 
Texas. This was in 1906. For several years after his arrival in that city 
he worked in a wholesale dry goods business and then started a dry goods 
store of his own at Rockdale, Texas. Two years later he returned to San 
Antonio, where he conducted a dry goods store for a short time, and then con- 
nected himself with the wholesale and retail grocery business of his father-in- 
law, Mr. Joseph S. Hahn, to whose daughter. Miss Dora Hahn, he was mar- 
ried on April 16, 1913. This concern, whose firm name is that of Joseph S. 
Hahn, and whose place of business is at 501 to 505 S. Alamo street, has im- 
measurably profited by Mr. Adler's connection with it and by his high intelli- 
gence and great ability. 

Despite the fact that Mr. Adler is still a very young man, his interests and 
activities in the Jewish community have received wide recognition. He has 
held the position of president of the Jewish Literary Society for several years 
and is a past president of Edar Lodge 211 of the Independent Order of B'nai 
B'rith. He is also a trustee of the Agudath Achim Congregation and has 
served as secretary of the local Relief Committee for Jewish Sufferers through 
the war. He holds membership also in the Zionist organization and the 
Masonic fraternity, and is deeply interested in all works and endeavors tending 
to progress and human advancement. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adler are the happy parents of two lovely children, Hortense 
and Edyth. 




LAZAR ADLER 

Austria-Hungary has given to Wilkes-Barre one of its best citizens and 
most able business men in the person of Mr. Lazar Adler. 

He was born in 1867 and came to America May 
15, 1896. Having a brother in Wilkes-Barre, he 
came direct to him, where he worked for a time at 
the small wage of 90 cents per day. He then started 
buying and selling junk, which he continued for ten 
years. His next venture was in the grocery busi- 
ness, but, not finding this to his liking, he sold out 
and opened a junk yard, which has developed into 
the present large firm operating under his name. 

Mr. Adler was married in Europe in 1888 to 
Miss Edith Rosa Simsaretch. They have a family 
of six children, four boys and two girls, the oldest 
son, Samuel, being in business with his father. The}' 
are all living at home, are excellently educated and, 
being talented musicians, form a delightful family 
circle. 

In matters of charity. Mr. Adler is exceedingly- 
generous, contributing to the Denver Hospital, Mercy Hospital, all the Yishivis 
and the Y. M. H. A. He is also a prominent member of Congregation Habra 
Anshe Hungarian Independent Order of B'rith Abraham and the Odd Fellows. 



MAX ALDERMAN 
ABRAHAM ALDERMAN 
WILLIAM ALDERMAN 

The Alderman family, prominent in Russia as merchants, have given three 
business men to the new world, of whom New Haven, Conn., is justly proud. 

We re'fer to the Alderman brothers. Max, Abraham and William. These 
men came to America without capital and by hard work and shrewd business 
judgment have placed the firm of Alderman Brothers on a sound financial basis, 
and a position of prominence among other industries of New Haven. 

Their experiences in America all bear great similarity, as they began work 
upon very small salaries, peddling and buying and selling junk in order to gain 
experience for their future larger activities. 

The elder brother, Max, was born in 1871, while Abraham is eight years 
younger. The}' all came to this country in 1892, and in a comparatively short 
time have won an enviable place for themselves in the business world. 

Max Alderman was married in New Haven, Conn., in 1894 to Miss F. N. 
Wiener, and they have five children, one boy and four girls, all going to school. 

Abraham Alderman was married in New Haven in 1899 to Miss Mollie 
Carlson and they have three children, one boy and two girls, who are attending 
high school. 

William Alderman was married in New Haven in 1906 and their five chil- 
dren, two boys and three girls, are all in school. 

All three brothers are prominent in the various Jewish organizations, Max 
being Past Vice-president of Savas Achem, Past Treasurer Rambaum Lodge, 
Director of Free Loan Association, Director of the Jewish Aged of New Haven. 
He is also member of the Knights of Israel. Vilna Society and Peddlers' Asso- 
ciation. 

Abraham Alderman is Treasurer of Hebrew Free Loan Association and 
President of Rambaum Lodge. He is also affiliated with the other organiza- 
tions to which Max Alderman belongs. 

William Alderman is Past President of the Vilna Association and Director 
of Jewish Consumptive Relief Association of Denver, Col. He is also affili- 



ated with the Rambaum Lodge, Knights of Israel, and the Hebrew Free Loan 
Association. 

All three brothers are very public-spirited and generous in their gifts to 
charity. 



LEO ALEXANDER 

"Tenacity is the only key that will open the door of success." Employers 
today shun shifters. Find your sphere, then stick to it. Even a postage stamp 
knows enough to stick until it gets there. Had our forefathers been quitters, 
there would have been no LJnited States today. It is stick-to-it-iveness that has 
made both nation and individuals great. 

Decay and decline only come when nations or individuals cease their striv- 
ing, when they become slack, slothful and shiftless. 

Is it not the literal truth that America, as we know it, owed its discovery 
by Christopher Columbus to this very virtue of stick-to-it-iveness? Without 
it no man is likely to climb to the top of the ladder — and remain there. 

Every inch an American, and one of the shrewdest business men in Niles, 
Ohio, Leo Alexander is a fine example of the second generation of the Hebrew 
blood infused from birth with the spirit of freedom and progress. He was 
born, raised and still lives in the city of Niles, and is a part of its life and 
activities in a broad sense. 

Mr. Alexander is the son of the late Abraham, scrap iron dealer, and Rose 
Alexander, of Niles, Ohio, born June 13, 1892. 

At present he is running his father's business, which he took over in 191 1 
when his. father departed this earth. 

But, like all good Jews, let us mention just a word about his social life. 
On October 24, 19151 he was married to Miss Kate Lavine, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Barnett Lavine. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander have one 
daughter. 

Mr. Alexander is a Mason, is affiliated with the K. of P. lodge and Anshe 
Emeth Congregation, and he is a liberal contributor to many charities, both 
local and national. 



MEYER SOLOMON ALPER 

In this day of superficiality, when less attention is given to matters of reli- 
gion, it is indeed edifying to find a Jew of the old school who has not only 
trained his own son thoroughly in the beliefs and traditions of his race, but 
whose grandchildren are also receiving a thorough Jewish education. We refer 
to Mr. Meyer Solomon Alper, of Providence, R. I., who is a prominent and 
wealthy wholesale dealer in waste paper. 

Mr. Alper was born in Minsker, Guberne Russia, in the year 1858. He 
was married in 1876 and five years later came to America. He came direct to 
Providence, R. I., where he peddled rags for the first two years, and then 
opened a small shop. However, Mr. Alper decided that his best future would 
be in the paper business, in which he engaged, and they have today an 
immense plant, employing a large number of people and shipping their 
products to all sections of the country. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alper have one son, Benjamin, who is in business with his 
father. He was married to Miss Rachel Abelson, of Providence, and they have 
two children, one boy and one girl, who are attending school and are at the 
same time being given a thorough training in Jewish literature. 

In addition to Mr. Alper's business responsibilities, he finds time for 
affiliation with all the prominent religious orders of his race, being past Vice- 
president of Avas Sholom Congregation, Mannan Avas Lodge, B'rith Abra- 
ham, and Talmud Torah. 



His wife is also very active in the promotion of the various charities of 
Providence, and both Mr. and Mrs. Alper are liberal in their contributions not 
only in their own city, but also to the support of institutions in other sections 
of the country. 



OSCAR H. ALTSHULER 

Mr. Oscar H. Altshuler, although still a young man. is one of the most 
successful business men of Youngstown, Ohio. He was born in Shavel, Prov- 
ince of Kovno, in August, 18S9, and is the son of Myer Altshuler, a great 
Hebrew scholar, who has made contributions of merit to the important field of 
Jewish learning and education. He was brought to this country at the age of 
ten and went to school in Akron and Youngstown. In 1907 he started his pres- 
ent business of manufacturing preserved food products, with a plant at Springs- 
boro, Pa., and headquarters at Youngstown, Ohio, under the firm name of 
Altshuler Brothers. The Youngstown establishment is located at Nos. 19-25 
Prospect street. 

If one was asked to define in one word Mr. Altshuler's chief social and 
spiritual interest in life, he would have to say "Zionism.'' Zionism was his 
hobby from the first. He came to the conclusion that in order to create con- 
ditions that would place our race in the foremost ranks, where he was sure we 
belonged, an adherence to Zionist principles was more than essential, it was 
indispensable, and the only thing worth while. Repeatedly did he hold office 
and occupied high positions in the Zionist movement ; at the present writing he 
is Vice-president of the Ohio State Zionist organization and chairman of the 
local committee in charge of the preparations for a Jewish congress, which Mr. 
Altshuler always regarded as a highly important movement from the point of 
view of Jewish organization and unity. In addition, Mr. Altshuler is a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the Young Men's Hebrew Association of 
Youngstown and the local Talmud Torah, and a member of the Congregation 
Emanu-El. 

Mr. Altshuler's Jewish training and thorough Hebrew education have 
fitted him pre-eminently for a position of leadership among the young Orthodox 
Jewry of Youngstown. He is a thorough nationalist and devoted Zionist. He 
represents the type of clean-cut young American who has not forgotten his 
true and inborn Jewish idealism in the turmoil of the American business life. 
While successful in his vocation, he is perhaps more interested in the propa- 
ganda of his idealism than in matters of daily life and the routine of his every- 
day business. It is that high-mindedness of the young American Jew which 
enables the Zionist movement to look forward with great hopefulness and 
causes men of Mr. Altshuler's type to assume the place they are best fitted for 
as leaders and masters of modern American Jewry. 



JACOB AMRON 

The high cost of living in hotels early attracted the attention of a young 
man who at the present moment is the proud part owner of the Marlborough 
Hotel, New York City. This young man, named Jacob Amron, observed an- 
other thing. He came to the conclusion that the high cost of living in hotels 
was due to a leakage in the various departments of the hotel or restaurant, 
creating overhead charges which must needs be met by the patron. In this way 
it is not the high cost of material, but lack of proper administration, that caused 
the high cost of living. Mr. Amron decided to organize a hotel which would 
accommodate the man of moderate means and the Marlborough is a typical 
instance of this endeavor. 

Jacob Amron was born in Russia in 1875, and was brought to America 
at the age of eleven. After his graduation from elementary school, he 




obtained a position as waiter in a well-known restaurant, after a year's time 

becoming assistant purchasing agent. He then took 

a position with the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, where 

he received his training under the celebrated maitre 

d'hotel Oscar Tschirky, and a few years later, when 

still a very young man and not quite twenty, he 

accumulated a little capital, which enabled him to 

go into business for himself. His first business 

venture was an establishment known as The Little 

Waldorf, and it was an immediate success. This 

was followed by the taking over of an internation- 

ally famous house which had been run as a gam- 
bling house and was frequented by America's most 

noted men. It was located at No. 33 West Thirty- 
third street and known as the Bronze Door. 

Mr. Amron's reputation was by that time so 

well established that he was sought by the Manger 

Brothers, who induced him to associate himself with . Ja< ' ob An,ro " 

them in the building up of their several hotels. With what success this work 

was accomplished can best be told by the many Xew Yorkers who have since 
become his patrons. In a magic manner he transformed the dying old Endicotl 
Hotel restaurant into one of the city's most attractive places. Other hotels 
followed suit and the corporation with which Mr. Amron was associated took 
over the Grand Hotel with equal success, and later the Netherland, all con- 
ducted in the manner which Mr. Amron has made his principle ever since : cater- 
ing to the masses instead of the classes. 

Mr. Amron soon began to look for other fields and selected a hotel which 
once had been known from coast to coast and was the headquarters of the best 
traveling element of the country, the Marlborough Hotel, at Thirty-sixth street 
and Broadway. This hotel had been thoroughly remodeled and reconstructed 
from cellar to roof, and Mr. Amron saw the possibility of making this hotel 
again as popular as in the days gone by, so that he severed his connections with 
all other interests and associated himself as full partner with Mr. Charles I. 
Ruhl. His judgment and wonderful knowledge of the restaurant business won 
for him again a phenomenal success, so that today the entire country is singing 
the praises of the Marlborough Hotel and its unequalled restaurant, with its 
high class of attractions and vaudeville features. Above all, the distinguishing 
feature of the Marlborough Hotel is its marvelous cheapness, so that we find 
all high class features of the great restaurant equalled if not excelled by the 
Marlborough — and at just one-quarter of the price. It is this popularity of 
management and a truly wonderful business genius of the man that made such 
conditions possible. As stated at the outset, it had been Mr. Amron's con- 
tention from the start that if the overhead waste could be eliminated from 
enterprises of this kind, the public would find itself in the position of enjoying 
all the benefits of a high-class hotel and restaurant service at prices meant for 
the man cf moderate means. The results have more than proved the soundness 
of this view. 

Some twenty years ago Mr. Amron was married to Miss May Propper, of 
Xew York Citv, and they have two sons and two daughters. 

Mr. Amron is a member of a number of charitable organizations in the 
citv and contributes to every worthy cause. His tremendous and unrivalled 
success stand as a monument to human perseverance, energy and ability, win- 
ning the laurel through unceasing adherence to a noble principle. 

Mr. Amron has recentlv purchased the Vogue Restaurant, at Forty-eighth 
street and Broadway. He reorganized the place in accordance with his well- 
tried ideas, changing its name from Vogue to Amron's, and we can easily 
expect that it will turn out the success he had been fortunate to establish in 
connection with his other great undertakings. 



AARON H. ARONOVSKY 



The path to success in business is invariably a route punctuated with guide 
posts of perseverance and common sense. 

Notwithstanding all that has been said about luck, the success that endures 
is never achieved by accident. It is wrested from a reluctant fortune by sheer 
will power and ability. 

Such is the life story of Mr. Aaron H. Aronovsky, who was born in 
Deritchen Grodner Guberne, Russia, in 1874, and came to America in April, 
1902. 

His destination was Cleveland, where he worked for an electrical company, 
and in this way accumulated enough money to go into business for himself, 
which has invariably been the early ambition of every successful man. 

Engaging in the butcher business, he made some money, which he invested 
in real estate and became so thoroughly interested in this branch of his inter- 
ests that he has since devoted most of his time and 
capital to the real estate business. He also has a 
very profitable interest in the liquor business in con- 
nection with Mr. Leveine. 

No business man in Cleveland is held in better 
repute or his opinions more valued than are those 
of Mr. Aronovsky. His policy of working' hard, 
attending to business and doing the right thing by 
everybody, may well be emulated by every young 
person just coming face to face with the problems 
of life. 

His generosity is well known to charitable in- 
stitutions all over the country, being a liberal con- 
tributor to Mount Sinai Hospital and Denver Sani- 
tarium, as well as those of his own city. He is an 
active member of Shara Torah Congregation, Sco- 
vill Avenue Temple, Brith Sholem and a staunch 
supporter of the United Benevolent Association. 

His wife, who, before her marriage, was Miss Chaina Bellia Cherebnick, 
also has many benevolences which she loyally supports. 

They have five fine children, all of whom are receiving a liberal educa- 
tion, and will be finely equipped to assist their father in the care of his multi- 
plicity of business and charitable interests. 




I. LEONARD ARONSON 



Mr. Aronson. a successful Pittsburgh attorney, was born and spent all 
his life in his native town. He is a tremendous power for good, a "live wire" 
and a man the contact with whom inspires you with confidence, and is refresh- 
ing in every way. I. Leonard Aronson was born on May 30, 1877. attended 
elementary and high school to 1898, admitted to the bar in the same year, and 
has been engaged ever since in the practice of the law. specializing in real 
estate, banking and corporation law. While in college he workedhis way 
"through" by a position as bookkeeper and ever since took a great interest 
in modern methods of correspondence and keeping of records. 

Under the firm name of Aronson & Aronson, four enterprising young 
lawyers are engaged in a highly interesting practice. The members of the 
firm are Harry M., Jacob H., Harvey Morton and I. Leonard Aronson, and 
their offices are located at the Union Arcade. I. Leonard Aronson is the 



President of llie so-called Aronson Realty Company, the banking company of 
Aronson Brothers, the Real Estate Auction Company, the Commonwealth In- 
vestment Company, the Aronson Improvements Company, the Lawyers' Oil 
and Gas Company, the Standard Construction Company, the Real Estate Sav- 
ings and Loan Association, the Columbia Realty Company, the Garwood Gas 
Radiator Company, the Webster Land Company, the Apollo Land Company, 
and his own law linn. In addition, Mr. Aronson is a Director of the Pitts- 
burgh Realty ( )wners' Association, the L r ptown Board of Trade, the Cleve- 
land and Pittsburgh Coal Company and the Continental Coke and Coal Com- 
pany. Mr. Aronson is a man of temperate habits, economy and hard work, 
and his unusual success is undoubtedly due to these characteristics. 

Air. Aronson is a member of the Congregation Rodeph Sholom, but he 
holds no office in the organization. 

( )n Line 30, 1912, Air. Aronson was married to Dora Bernstein of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. There are two children of this marriage. Mr. Harter devotes 
much of his time to public and social affairs. He belongs to a number of 
Jewish and general clubs and is a very active member of the Pittsburgh Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



WALTER ARONSTEIN, 

The "Morgan of the Millinery Industry" — A Keen Business Man With An 

Excellent Reputation 

Air. Walter Aronstein is a manufacturer of ladies' hats, having his office at 
5S0 Broadway, New York, and his factory in his own immense building in the 
Bronx, but he is not the ordinary manufacturer, as are so many others. In 
trade circles he is known as "The 'Alorgan' of the Millinery Industry," and all 
who are identified with this industry admit that he is the leading expert in the 
line. He is considered a great authority, and all watch his movements closely, 
in order to imitate what Walter Aronstein does. 

Mr. Aronstein was born Alay 12, 1877, in Alezeritz, Poland. In 1895 he 
came to America and started to work for X. H. Bornstein. who was then in the 
cap business, but being a born business man, he was not satisfied to work long 
for others. After being only two years in the country he started for himself, 
then he took a partner. Later, for some time, he even was in partnership 
with his former boss, X. H. Bornstein, who was bv that time his brother-in- 
law : then he went into the millinery business, together with his brothers, and 
now they constitute the firm of W. Aronstein & Bros. The firm has a verv high 
standing and is considered one of the most successful in the line. 

Air. Aronstein is a very keen and extremelv able business man. In his 
circles he is considered the moving spirit of his trade, and it is no wonder, 
because Mr. Aronstein was one of those who were mainly instrumental in 
uniting and combining the millinery manufacturers, and all accord him due 
credit for having raised the trade to its present stage. At the organization 
banquet of the Eastern milliners, he delivered an address which was considered 
a "pathfinder" in that line. The trade journals always quote his opinions as an 
authority and as a man who can show the way to others. 

Air. Aronstein, being a very busy man, accepts no office in institutions, but 
he does his share in the community, contributing to the Federation, and he par- 
ticularly played a great part in the building of the Alezeritzer School in which 
he was instrumental, combining his business ability, his money and his enter- 
prising spirit, and all the members of this congregation, of which Air. Aron- 
stein is still a member, admit that the building of the svnagogue would never 



have been accomplished were it not for Mr. Aronstein's great energy. He is 
also the chairman of the Mezeritzer Relief Committee, who have already for- 
warded over $3,000 to their distressed countrymen. 

The writer had occasion to discuss the question of success and failure in 
life with Mr. Aronstein. His reply to the query as to what is the most essential 
element for a young man to succeed in life was quite different from the other 
responses generally given to this question. He said : "In order for a young 
man to succeed in life he should not look for an easy job. At the moment 
when a boy gets an easy berth and everything goes smoothly with him, he kills 
his future. In order for a young man to be successful he requires a bitter strug- 
gle. He must work hard, and the harder he works the better are his chances of 
success. Economy? This is not the fundamental element of success. I do 
not like a stingy man, because he is of no value to the community. Let a young 
men spend liberally, and strive to earn it. It is work, work and work that 
leads to success." 

Mr. Aronstein generally makes a very pleasant impression, and he is inter- 
esting in conversation. He married in this city in 1902, and has a son and 
daughter. 



BENJAMIN BABCOCK 

Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood. No 
amount of scholastic knowledge, however valuable it may be, can compensate 
for the training one gets in the stern school of experience, where the high 
purpose and perseverance of so many of our best citizens have been tested. 

When Benjamin Babcock came to America, a young man of twenty-one, 
he brought with him plenty of enthusiasm, but little capital with which to begin 
his business career. 

He landed in Detroit and turned to the first honest employment which 
presented itself, a job in a metal yard at $7.50 per week. 

Seeing the great possibilities in this business, he served a hard apprentice- 
ship of about five years and then, using his small savings to purchase a horse 
and wagon, started into business for himself. 

His business has grown to very large proportions, but success has not 
made him forgetful of the land of his nativity, as was evidenced by his recent 
gift of $1,000.00 to the war sufferers of Russia. 

Benjamin Babcock was born in Berjolitz, Getuma, Geberne, Russia, in 
1880. His father was a merchant and he doubtless inherited from him much 
of his business ability. 

He was married in 1900, the year before he came to America, to Zlotta 
Karkofsky. 

They have four fine children, three girls and one boy. all going to school 
and displaying remarkable musical ability. 

Mr. Babcock is a most liberal contributor to all worthy charities, the Old 
Age Home having special reason to be grateful to his beneficent spirit. He also 
is a member of B'nai Israel, Talmud Torah and President of Aguda Achiem 



JOSEPH BARNETT 

Seemingly trivial circumstances are often fraught with weighty and far- 
reaching results. The gods of chance and coincidence sport with the carefully 
laid plans of men, twisting them here, defeating them there, working out life's 
intricate pattern in a way which we cannot understand until its final purpose is 
revealed. 

The town of Pontiac, Mich., owes the acquisition of one of its most valued 
citizens to the fact that Joseph Barnett stopped at Pontiac en route from 
Detroit, where he had gone to attend a wedding. He was greatly impressed 
with the thriving, progressive spirit of the little city and decided that here would 
be an ideal place to launch a new business enterprise. From that resolution 
has developed a business that has been of inestimable value to the community. 

Joseph Barnett was born February 15, 1867, in Werberon, Russia. His 
father, Aaron Michael Barnett, was a successful boat manufacturer and a great 
scholar. 

Coming to America at the age of 17, Joseph turned to the first employ- 
ment available, and for five years sold dry goods from a wagon throughout the 
length and breadth of New Jersey. 

This was followed by several business ventures in Xew York and Reading, 
Pa., but owing to adverse circumstances and the condition of the money 
market they were not a success. This in reality was the transitional period, 
the preparation for the larger enterprise which was to become his life work. 

He was married in New York June 8, 1891, to Rachel Rogopsky, and they 
are the proud parents of thirteen fine children, four boys and nine girls. 

The girls have shown a remarkable aptitude for music and all are very 
proficient at the piano. 

Mr. Barnett is a staunch supporter of many charities, including the Old 
Folks' Home, Detroit, Cleveland Orphans' Home, Denver Hospital, City Hos- 
pital of Pontiac and all Jewish organizations. 

He is also a valuable member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mrs. Barnett is President of the Ladies' Aid of Pontiac and finds time for 
many other benevolent activities. 



SAMUEL BARNETT 
New York 

Abandoned Rabbinical Career — President of His Industry 

Samuel Barnett was born in Bialystock, Russia, on March 2, 1881, and 
came to America when but three years old. He attended the Yeshibah Etz 
Chaim for five years, went to Public School No. 2 (Henry street), and later to 
the city College, but was compelled to leave very shortly through lack of funds. 
He obtained a situation in a muslin underwear factory and at the age of six- 
teen returned to college. He determined to study for the rabbinate and, with 
the assistance of Rabbi Gustave Gottheil of Temple Emanu-El, was sent to 
the Hebrew Lfnion College at Cincinnati, but after a few years decided that a 
professional career was not to his liking, and returned to work in the under- 
wear factory. This was at the age of twenty-two. Now he is a member of the 
large firm of Harris Brothers & Barnett, at Nos. 11-13 East Twenty-sixth 
street, New York, and president of the association of those engaged in the 
muslin underwear industry. 

Mr. Barnett is reserved to a degree, modest and retiring and a serious- 
minded, deep thinker. He believes a maxim for business success is, "Don't 
watch the clock." He is a believer in modern orthodoxy and for ten years has 
been a member of the Jewish Theological Seminary. On July 24th he married 
a daughter of Rabbi Isaac Margolis and in consequence is a brother-in-law of 
Prof. Margolis of Dropsie College, Philadelphia, and Rabbi Elias Margolis of 
Mt. Vernon. 

10 



SAMUEL BARNETT 
Cleveland, O. 

It is natural for us to believe in great men, just as we like to believe in 
truth and beauty ; and, by the same token, we think of ugliness as an accident 
of nature, and a lie the result of a strange mental deformity. 

Mother Nature must inevitably claim a big share in the success of any of 
her children, for she has given to all a priceless endowment set upon the shin- 
ing heights— the lofty example of her favored sons. Thus we learn that "the 
gods of fable are but the shining moments of great men." 

We move forward largely upon the credit derived from the actions of hon- 
orable men, and every community is exalted by the presence of a man who 
always keeps faith with his fellows. 

Such a course of action, coupled with much natural ability, has placed 
Samuel Barnett in the foremost rank among the business men of Cleveland, O. 

He was born in Haradock, near Wilna, Russia; April 23, 1884, and came to 
this country with his parents at the age of six years. 

His father engaged in the iron business in Wooster, Ohio, and when 
eighteen years of age Samuel commenced to assist him. 

Wishing to have a business of his own, he saved as much of his earnings 
as possible, and at the end of three years had accumulated $300.00, which 
served as a capital for his business venture. 

That he has achieved unqualified success goes without saying. 

There is not a man in Cleveland whose promises are more respected, and 
whose business integrity is better regarded than Samuel Barnett, and he attrib- 
utes his rapid rise to these qualities, combined with a strict attention to business 
and a singleness of purpose which has never deviated. 

Someone has said that "Genius is an infinite capacity for hard work," and 
Mr. Barnett believes this truism can well be adopted in any line of endeavor. 

He was married in Cleveland, August 17, 1909, to Miss Sadie Friedman, 
whose family was one of the most prominent in the city, her father being a 
successful business man, and very active in all Jewish organizations. 

Mrs. Barnett is a liberal contributor to the Infants' Home, Old Age Home, 
Instant Aid Society, and Euclid Avenue Temple, of which both Mr. and Mrs. 
Barnett are members. 

No worthy charity, regardless of race or creed, applies in vain to Mr. and 
Mrs. Barnett. 

At this writing they are still young, with many years of helpful activity 
before them. 

May their children follow in the shining path of virtue and benevolence 
which their parents have so plainly indicated to them. 



SAMUEL BAUM 

The Talmudic maxim that it is the man who dignifies his calling, and not 
the calling which reflects honor and dignity upon die man. is clearly demon- 
strated in the career and experience of Mr. Samuel Baum. of Austin. Texas. 

Mr. Baum has carved his own career and has made an honored place for 
himself in the cirv and community in which he lives solely through his fine per- 
sonalitv and his noble qualities of heart and mind. Hard and taxing work 
from the time he was eleven years old has not robbed him of a most cheerful 
disposition nor of an exceedingly benevolent and optimistic view of life. He 
was born to his parents. Jacob and Yetta Baum. in St. Louis, Mo., on October 
28. 187S. After attending the public schools of his native city until he was 
eleven vears of age. he started as cash boy in one of the stores and later 
accepted employment as cutter in a shoe factory, where he worked for eight 
vears. He then took a position with the G. Mathews Metal Company, and 
after serving that firm most faithfully and zealously for seven years, he was 
sent as its representative to Austin. Texas, where he established a similar busi- 
ness enterprise of his own in 1906. This business, which has now been in 
existence for twelve vears and which, under the name of the Baum Metal Com- 
panv. is located at 800 East 6th street, has become widely and favorably known 
throughout the State of Texas. 

Despite the business details which claim Mr. Baum"s thought and attention. 
he takes an active and leading part in the work of the community and con- 
tributes liberally, both of his means and of his personal sen-ice. to the various 
Jewish and general organizations of Austin. 

On December 6. 1904. Mr. Baum was married to Miss Bessie Littman, a 
popular young lady of Austin, and their union has been blessed with four 
bright children. Gerald, Marcus, Minette and Edward. 



SAM BECKERMAN 

Success is a fickle goddess, many times not easily won. 

It is onlv to those who have the necessary qualities of self-discipline and 
persistence that she finally turns a smiling face. 

We are reminded of these facts in connection with the career of Mr. Sam 
Beckerman. who was born in Yolina. Guberne. Russia, in May. 1878. His 
father. Ben Beckerman. was a distinguished scholar and successful merchant 
of his native city. 

Feeling that his opportunities would be greater in the new world. Mr. 
Beckerman came to America in June. 1901. going directly to Chelsea. Mass., 
where he worked in a rag shop at S9 per week. Continuing this for four years, 
he accumulated sufficient capital to go into the grocery business. This was an 
unfortunate venture, and he was obliged to go to work again where, for three 
vears. he continued with almost superhuman industry in his efforts to save 
enough capital for another business of his own. but success was not yet ready 
to crown his efforts, as conditions over which he had no control during the 
panic of 1907 swept away his entire capital. With sturdy determination and 
undaunted purpose he again went to work, and after a few years of the most 

- economy went into business with his present partners, Mr. Schechter and 
Mr. Weinstein. This business venture was successful from the start, and they 
are todav doing an immense business that is national in its scope. 

Mr. Beckerman was married prior to his coming to this country (in the 
vear 1898 ) to Miss Bessia Brandman. They have four children, one boy and 
three girls, who are all going to school and studying music. 

Mr. Beckerman is affiliated with all of the prominent charities of his city, 
and is also a member of the Orthodox Congregation. 

12 



SAM BECK 

In these perilous days, when our nation in the first time in its history has 
been awakened to the importance of conserving its meat supply that we may be 
able to feed not only our own nation, but our allies and the great armies depend- 
ing upon us, fish has become a prominent article of diet upon many an Amer- 
ican table, where it seldom appeared before. 

One of the largest dealers in this line of food products is Mr. Sam Beck, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, who only sixteen years ago landed on our shores with no 
capital, but an overwhelming ambition to succeed in some business of his own. 

He was born in Lember, Galicia, in 1871, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Solo- 
mon Beck, his father being an accomplished Yiddish scholar and a very success- 
ful dry goods merchant, from whom he undoubtedly inherited much business 
ability. 

He came to America in March, 1902, and found his first occupation in a 
cloak factory, where he worked for six months, saving every penny he pos- 
sibly could in anticipation of embarking in a business venture of his own. 

Shortly after he went into the waist business and, while he was very suc- 
cessful, he saw bigger opportunities in wholesale fish, so he turned his atten- 
tion to this line, which he has conducted with most gratifying results to the 
present time. 

Mr. Beck is now proprietor of a large establishment at 3322 Woodland 
avenue, Cleveland, O., where he does a flourishing business. 

Mr. Beck was married in Europe in April, 1889, to Miss Bene Schubert, 
who has been a most devoted wife and has given their five children excellent 
home training. The eldest son is married and has one small son of his own, 
five years old. The balance of the children are still at home. 

Like all self-made men, Mr. Beck has a definite idea of the qualities which 
are requisite for success and his advice is worthy the careful attention of all 
young men just starting out on a business career : "Be honest. Save your 
money, and go into business for yourself." This is the policy which has placed 
Mr. Beck in a pre-eminent position among business men of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Beck are beloved for their liberality and, among many 
other benevolences, they are staunch supporters of Mt. Sinai Hospital. 



MAX LEE BEAR 

Pensacola, Fla., can by no means be considered a large Jewish center. 
But the place contains, among its population, a number of Jewish citizens who 
undoubtedly deserve to be presented to the American public. 

At the head of these we must place the name of Mr. Max Lee Bear, who 
is of that type of Jew who would gain the attention of even the largest Jewish 
communities. 

Mr. Max Lee Bear was born on the 7th of January, 1872. in Greenville, 
Ala., the son of Louis and Henrietta Bear. He attended the public schools of 
his native city and Cincinnati, and later he obtained a higher education in the 
Military Academy of Staunton, Va., from which he graduated in 1888. He 
began his business career as a traveling salesman for his father's firm, of which 
he shortly became a full-fledged member. 

13 



What Mr. Bear had already accomplished at this early age can be seen by a 
perusal of his business connections. He is a part- 
ner in the large wholesale grocery firm of D. Lewis 
Bear & Co., located at the corner of Palifox and 
Main streets : he is president of and owns the con- 
trolling interest in the large San Carlos Hotel., the 
only first-class hostelry of Pensacola ; he is Presi- 
dent of the Pensacola Crockery Company and is 
the President of the Ball Book & Novelty Com- 
pany. 

But the real accomplishments of the subject of 
this sketch are to be sought elsewhere than in the 
business world, where he has become so large a 
factor. He is a great figure in the Jewish communal 
life of his city, and is part and parcel of the social 
and political life of Pensacola. For the last thirteen 
years (with a single exception of three years) he 
has been the President of the Congregation Beth-El. 
He is very prominent and has held the highest offices among the Elks, Knights 
of Pythias and the Pensacola Yacht Club. He also was the President of the 
Progress Club, a member of the City Council and chairman of its finance com- 
mittee. He is the only Jew who was ever elected king of the carnival which 
is held in Pensacola. 

Mr. Bear is a gentleman of the highest type and is generally admired and 
beloved by all. 

He is married to Bella Rosenau. born in Louisville, Ky. Thev were mar- 
ried on the 12th of October, 1899, and they are the parents of three children, 
named Leonia Yetta. Elise Rosenau and Maxine. 

Mrs. Baer is vice-president of the Pearl Eagar Home, an institution for 
orphans, and president of the Beth-El Guild. 




Max Lee Bear 



HARRY BELENSKY 



The life historv of Mr. Harry Belensky proves conclusively that no mat- 
ter how humble the beginning, success is bound to follow hard work and busi- 
ness ability rightly applied. 

Mr. Belensky was born in Antonifka. W'holvna, Russia, in September. 
1876. He came to America in March. 1909, landing in New York with but 
$16 capital. He obtained employment as a machine operator, but had to pay 
$10 of his meager capital for the privilege of learning and was obliged to work 
for a month without pay. He decided that there was no future in this line, so 
went to Detroit and began working in a rag shop for $6 per week. He was 
able to increase this salary very rapidly and in two and one-half years had 
saved $600 besides supporting his family in Russia and assisting his brother. 
Investing his capital in a business of his own, he started in with a partner and 
by unceasing work gradually established their business on a firm basis. They 
then planned to bring their families from Russia, and with all the money 
available sent across for that purpose. However, about this time the war 
started, their families were unable to cross and lost all the money which was 
sent them. Although this was a great disappointment, they kept right on with 
their business, firm in the belief that happier days were to come. 

14 



The}' are today doing a very large business at 253-261 Winder street, 
Detroit, Mich., and are hoping that conditions will soon make it possible for 
their families to join them in America. 

Mr. Belensky was married in Russia in August, 1901, to Miss Fannie 
Rabber, and they have four children, two boys and two girls, as above stated, 
all being in Russia at the present time. 

Although Mr. Belensky's business cares are very arduous, he still is a 
devout attendant at Beth David Congregation and is a member of Talmud 
Torah. He also gives most liberally to charities, not only in his own city, but 
also to institutions of national importance, such as Denver Sanitarium. ' 



SAM BELLMAN 

Every youth, doubtless, in his first start in life, purposes to have a definite 
object; to make life practical and useful. In this epoch, earnest resolutions are 
made and a strict line of conduct is marked out. However, only a few have the 
strength of character necessary for the fulfillment of youthful ideals. 

Mr. Sam Bellman, of Toledo, Ohio, has to his credit an exceptionally 
brilliant commercial career, which may largely be attributed to his concentration 
upon a given object, doubtless inherited from his father, who was also success- 
ful in the same line of business. 

Sam Bellman was born in Toledo, Ohio, April 16, 1881, the son of Ben- 
jamin and Sarah Bellman, his father being engaged in the grocery business. 

He was educated in Toledo until fourteen years of age, when he com- 
menced helping his father in the store and there acquired a vast amount of 
knowledge regarding the practical management of the business, which was to 
serve his purpose so well in later years. 

A few years later he started the first of a chain of grocery stores which 
are now to be found in various parts of the city, and which speak volumes for 
the business ability and progressiveness of Mr. Bellman. 

Mr. Bellman was married in Toledo in 1907 to Miss Hilda Michale, and 
they have one son, who is attending school. 

A prominent member of B'nai B'rith and the Federation of Jewish Chari- 
ties, Mr. Bellman overlooks no opportunity to assist those less fortunate than 
himself, and is active in many charitable and philanthropic causes. 



CHARLES BELSKY AND A. GOLDBERG 

One of the most prosperous business houses of Holyoke, Mass., is that of 
Belsky & Goldberg. These two men, whose business partnership has been so 
successful, were both born in Lumzer, Guberne, Russia, Mr. Belsky on April 
22, 1885, and Mr. Goldberg in the year 1876. 

Both of them had a hard struggle to establish themselves in the new world, 
working at any honest employment that came to hand until they established 
the present wholesale junk business, which has been successful in every respect. 

Mr. Belsky was married June 11, 1912, to Miss Esther Cohen, "and they 
have three children, two boys and one girl, all going to school. 

15 



Mr. Goldberg was married in Russia in 1896, and they also have three 
children, two boys and one girl, who are in school. 

Both families are very prominent in their social circle and are noted for 
their generosity in gifts of charity. 

Messrs. Belsky and Goldberg are members of Rotve Sholam Congregation, 
I. O. B. A., Arbetier Ring, Talmud Torah and Degel Zion. 



ADOLF BERCOVITZ 

In the year 1877, when Adolf Bercovitz was born, if his father and mother 
could have looked forward with the eye of prophecy, they would have been 
very proud of the prominent position in business which their son was destined 
to fill in Providence, R. I. 

The father of Mr. Bercovitz, Alter Bercovitz, was a brick manufacturer 
in Hertza, Roumania. Adolf did not come to America until he was thirty 
years old, three years after his marriage to Miss Toba Aranovitz. He landed in 
New York and after a two weeks' stay, during which time he was unable to 
find any profitable employment, he went to Providence and landed in that city 
with but $3 in his pocket. With this meager capital he began buying and sell- 
ing junk, continuing for two years. He then opened a yard, which since has 
grown into the large establishment at 29 Hilton street, and he is today consid- 
ered one of the most able and prosperous business men in the city. 

The Bercovitzs have four children, two boys and two girls, all going to 
school, and studying music. 

Among the organizations with which Mr. Bercovitz is connected we wish 
to make special mention of the Western Star, which was founded by him and 
named for him, in appreciation of the very valuable service which he rendered. 

Mr. Bercovitz is still in the prime of life and it is to be hoped will have a 
great many years in which to promote the business, civic and philanthropic 
interests of the city of his adoption. 



MAX BENSTOCK 

We learn to appreciate all things by contrast ; the beauty of springtime 
after bleak winter days ; the blessings of peace after war's devastations ; the 
companionship of friends after long absence ; the smile of fortune after years 
of struggle. 

The fruition of Mr. Max Benstock's labors come while he is yet in the 
prime of life and able to enjoy in the fullest measure the success which has 
crowned his efforts. 

Born in Keltz, Guberne, Russia, June 10, 1872, he embarked for America 
at the age of nineteen, landing in New York City. For the first two weeks he 
worked without pay, learning to be a presser. As his subsequent salary was 
only $2 per week, he went to Niagara Falls and worked for a time on the 
tunnel being constructed for the Niagara power plant. 

Some time later he came to Buffalo, and, after several other small business 

16 



ventures, started in the wholesale iron and metal business with his present 
partner, Mr. Rosenberg, which business has been an unqualified success. 

He was married in Buffalo, January 26, 1896, to Miss Sophie Kallnisky. 
Mrs. Benstock is a charming woman who has always been very active in dis- 
pensing help to all worthy charities. She is a member of. the Daughters of 
Judea, Ladies' Aid Society, Auxiliary of the Old Age Home, Beth-El, and is the 
executive head of a large knitting club. 

Mr. Benstock's charitable connections extend from coast to coast and also 
to foreign lands, to the needy of every creed. He is a member of Temple of 
Beth-El, B'nai B'rith, Khilah of Buffalo, Buffalo Hebrew School, Hebrew 
Benevolent Loan Association, Manhattan Social and Benefit Society, also a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce, a contributor to the Old Age Home, 
Federation of Jewish Charities, Immigration Charities of New York, Hospitals 
for Consumptives of Denver, Colo., Farm School of Philadelphia, Pa., and all 
other charities, including all the Yishivas of Europe, Palestine and America. 

They have three children, one boy and- two girls, who will doubtless emulate 
the sterling precepts laid down by their parents. 



ELIAS BEREN 

To work with zeal ; to avoid all luke-warmness ; to have the genius and 
inclination to do things perfectly ; to work courageously, remembering that in 
the bright lexicon of aspiring youth, there is no such word as "fail." These 
are the great secrets of success, and are the traits of character which distin- 
guish Elias Beren from his fellows. 

Mr. Beren was born in Yitopsky, Guberne, Russia, in the year 1856, the 
son of Oscar and Etta Beren. He was raised and educated in Russia, and in 
1887 married Miss Leah Yoffer. 

At the age of forty-two, although having reached the age when less 
courageous men would not have considered starting a career anew, Mr. Beren 
decided to try his fortunes in America. He landed in Baltimore, Md., but 
came direct to Ohio, where, with only $18 capital, he began peddling. He 
continued for six months, and by the exercise of the most rigid economy man- 
aged to save enough to buy a horse and wagon. After about three years' very 
hard work, he decided that he would be more successful in some other line, so 
went to Marietta, Ohio, and engaged in the oil well supply business. This 
modest beginning has since developed into the Buckeye Supply Co., of which 
Mr. Beren is president, and in which he has accumulated a fortune. 

•Mr. Beren has a fine family, consisting of his wife and five children, and 
is also the proud grandfather of eight, the children of his sons Jacob and Louis 
who married Miss Mollie Rievman of Baltimore and Miss Rose Gordon of 
Cincinnati. 

Mr. Beren does not forget his early struggles, and gives liberally to every 
charity, both local and national, besides being a member and ardent supporter of 
Congregation B'nai Israel. 

His advice to young men of this generation is, "Find the occupation to 
which you are adapted, and follow that line square!}' and honestly." 



17 



HARRY BEREN 

The exalted position which America holds among the nations today is 
largely attributable to the fine class of immigrants who have sought her shores. 
Oppressed by tyrannies and traditions of the old world, these free, progressive 
spirits have come under the protection of Liberty's banner, bringing with them 
a priceless heritage of self-reliance and love for the land of their adoption. 

Should you ever be in Parkersburg, W. Va.. and have the pleasure of 
meeting Mr. Harry Beren, manager of the Mountain Iron & Supply Co., you 
will find a representative of the fine type of man we have described above. 

When Mr. Beren came to America the sun of his life had already touched 
the meridian. He had attained his forty-fourth year, just the age when expe- 
rience has ripened the mind for its best judgments. 

So, while his business career started in humble fashion, his subsequent 
movements, actuated by a concentration and fixity of purpose which would 
probably have been impossible in a younger and more inexperienced man. 

Harry Beren was born in Itopsky, Guberne, Russia, September 20, i860. 
He came from a long line of merchants, his father being of that occupation in 
his native town. 

He was married in 1894 to Rachel Arolowitz, who came with him in 
September, 1904, to share his new fortunes in America. He landed at Balti- 
more, Md., and from there went to Central Station, W. Va., where he started 
selling dry goods from a pack. This action was consistent with his strong 
conviction that a man should do anything to make an honest living, save his 
money and go into business for himself. 

Four years later we find him in partnership with his brother, opening a 
metal yard and specializing in oil well supplies. This business has been very 
successful and Mr. Beren has amassed a fortune, a large per cent of which he 
delights in spending for the uplift of his less fortunate fellow men. 

He belongs to the Congregation B'nai Jacob, B'nai B'rith, is a most liberal 
contributor to Denver and Los Angeles Sanitariums, besides many other 
benevolent societies of every denomination. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beren have four children, three boys and one girl, all going 
to school at the present time and enjoying the privileges which their father's 
wonderful business ability has made possible for them. 

That they will emulate the virtues of their parents and prove worthy 
custodians of the fortune he is amassing is a foregone conclusion, as their 
minds are thoroughly inculcated with the honorable principles which have con- 
tributed so largely to their father's success. 



ABRAHAM BERGER 

If a young man possesses real ambition to succeed very little outside assist- 
ance is necessary, as is proven in the life history of Mr. Abraham Berger, owner 
and manager of the large establishment of A. Berger & Son, located at 104 Otis 
street, Brockton, Mass. 

Mr. Berger was born in Volina, Guberne, Russia, in 1869, and came to 
America in 1896. He landed in Boston without a cent and went to his 
brother-in-law, who gave him an opportunity to go out peddling chair bottoms. 
At this he was able to make a scant living and managed to save enough money 
to bring his family over from Europe. 

Twelve years ago he went to Brockton and established the present busi- 
ness, which has grown to be the largest of its kind in that section of the 
country. 

18 



Mrs. Berger before her marriage in Russia in -1892 was Golda Garnick. 
The Bergers have three sons, the eldest, David, being in business with his 
father. The others are still going to school. 

David was married, a few years ago to Miss Rose Kruger of Brockton, 
and they have one baby girl. 

Mr. Berger is prominently identified with a number of organizations, 
being past President of Congregation Anses Schaad, past Vice President and 
past Treasurer of the I. O. B. A., and a Director of the Hebrew Loan Associ- 
ation. 

In his gifts to charity he is not prejudiced regarding race or creed, but 
gives liberally to all worthy causes, both local and national. 



HYMAN BERKMAN 

Diamonds are chunks of coal that stuck to their job. If it has taken 
millions of years to develop mankind, must we fret if it takes us a few years 
to rise above the rank and file of mankind? Must we quit if we don't get 
there quickly ? Note this : There is not one major figure in American finan- 
cial, industrial or commercial life today under forty, not one. 

At fifty Woodrow Wilson was a little-known college professor, though a 
student of politics and history. 

Washington was no youngster when he won the immortal title of "Father 
of His Country." 

But the}' were stickers. They conceived their goal, and pressed on cour- 
ageously, unflinchingly, unswervingly, hurdling more obstacles than we are 
ever likely to meet. Find your sphere, then stick to it. 

We move forward largely upon the credit derived from the actions of 
honorable men, and every community is exalted by the presence of a man wdro 
always keeps faith with his fellow men. 

Such a course of action has placed Mr. Hyman Berkman among the lead- 
ing business men of Canton. O. Hyman was born in Wilna, Guberne. Russia. 
February 15, 1885, son of Simon, horse trader, and his wife, Goldie Berkman. 

In 1902 he was married to Sarah Gelman, daughter of Abram Gelman, 
of Wolczin, Russia. 

In 1906 we find Mr. Berkman in New York City, where he worked in a 
butcher shop at $7 a week for three months. This being but a very meager 
salary, he started to peddle with paper and envelopes in Newark, N. J., which 
he was at for six months. He then came to Canton, O., and started horse 
trading, was at this for three years, then desiring a change, was a fruit huck- 
ster for three years, at the end of which time he started to peddle junk for 
two years, gave that up and went to Cadiz, O.. opened a yard there and in con- 
junction with this formed a partnership with Ben Rudner in 1917, under the 
firm name of Rudner Iron & Steel Co. 

Now, possessed with the stick-to-itiveness idea, we find Mr. Berkman 
doing very well, contributing to all charities irrespective of race or creed. 

Like all good Jews, he belongs to the Congregation of Sherah Torah and 
B'rith Sholom. where he is a frequent visitor. 



1'J 



WOLF BERGER 

Mr. Wolf Berger of Boston, sole owner of the Boston Wrapper Manu- 
facturing Company, of 177 Blackstone street, is a strict Sabbath observer and 
truly orthodox Jew. From his native place of Slobodka, Kovno Gubernia, 
Russia, he carried away impressions which are bound to last throughout his 
life, and will never change his aspect of things. He comes from an Orthodox 
family, his mother's ancestors being all rabbis and scholars. Wolf Berger 
was born on October 8, 1866, and came to America in August, 1884, when but 
eighteen years of age, and young enough to fit himself into the new life he 
was about to begin. Having no trade or profession, all he could do was to 
start peddling in the streets of Boston, which he did until 1895, when finding 
himself in possession of a few hundred dollars, he started, at the age of twenty- 
two, the manufacturing of wrappers, which became the foundation of his 
present successful concern. 

In the Jewish community life of Boston Mr. Berger is a conspicuous fig- 
ure. He was a Dirctor of the Sheltering Home and the Hebrew Immigrant 
Aid Society, a Director of the Federated Jewish Charities, President of the 
Congregation Beth Israel for six years, and is life Director of same. He is 
a Director of the Temple Beth El and belongs to all charities, making no dis- 
tinction of race, creed or religion. 

Mr. Berger is a modest and unassuming man and it was no easy task 
to obtain from him a statement of what he considered the most essential ele- 
ment of success. He believes in honesty in one's business dealings and thor- 
ough reliability. 

In June, 1884. Mr. Berger was married to Miss Dora Warshawsky, and 
he is the father of four children, Carlton K., Jason J.. Robert and Maud. 
Carlton Berger is married to Eleanor Solomon and Jason J. is also married. 



JULIUS BERMAN 

The peoples of all nations and all ages have worshiped at the shrine of 
courage and fortitude. 

Among the ancients the giant of physical strength and the stoic shared the 
popular plaudits. 

Courage has moulded public opinion and reversed the decisions of kings. 
Thus we find Nero at the side of the arena with thumbs up, saving the life of 
a gladiator for whom he felt no throb of pity in his heart. One man's courage 
swayed the sympathies of the vast throng, and Nero the merciless, Nero who 
fiddled while Rome was burning, dared not oppose the mighty wave of popular 
sentiment. 

In the Detroit Free Press of September 28, 1916, there appeared a picture 
of Captain Julius Berman, commanding Company C ( Detroit) and an indig- 
nant article under the caption "Detroit Captain Arrested on Border ; Plight 
Result of Effort to Protect Men from U. S. Army Officer." 

Then followed an account of the arrest of several men in Captain Ber- 
man's company by order of Captain Caperon of the regular army. 

Captain Berman insisted that his men be turned over to him for trial, 
the regular army officer claiming command over both camps by right of senior- 
ity. After a heated argument Captain Berman was arrested and confined to 
quarters. 

Captain Berman steadfastly maintained his position, and after consultation 
with several other officers in wdiich he was told to stand his ground, he informed 

20 



Captain Caperon that under no circumstances would he consent to his men 
heing tried unless he had a voice in the hearing. 

After twenty-four hours' confinement Captain Berman notified his supe- 
rior officer, and the testimony of all interested being submitted, the decision 
was rendered that Captain Caperon was wrong, as the law declares that no 
National Guardsman shall be tried for an offense except by National Guard 
officers, and Captain Berman was completely exonerated, much to the delight 
of the entire command. 

Captain Berman's courage won for him the admiration and gratitude of 
every man in his company, whom he saved from severe treatment at the hands 
of Captain Caperon. 

Capt. Julius Berman was born January 14, 1880, in Russia, and came 
to America with his parents in 1885. 

He is a partner in the firm of Berman & Dwyer, who conduct a large 
real estate business at 1317 Dime Bank Bldg., Detroit. 

He was married in Detroit to Annie Moscovich, and they have three 
promising children. 

He is a member of Sharra Zedek, Beth. Abraham, the Board of Commerce 
and is Detroit Armory Corp. Director. 

Although Detroit recognizes in Mr. Berman one of her most successful 
business men, she likes best to think of him as the gallant soldier who jeop- 
ardized his own position in defense of his men. 

Captain Berman represents a type of army officer whose moral courage is 
as unflinching as his physical bravery. 



OSCAR BERMAN 

Mr. Oscar Berman is the founder and owner of the Crown Overall Man- 
ufacturing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. All who know him and who deal 
with him agree that he is a kind-hearted and noble man, and it does not re- 
quire more than a look into his eyes to conclude that here is a good man whom 
even the exciting battlefield of business could not spoil. 

Mr. Oscar Berman was born December 23, 1877, in Salant, Kovno Guber- 
nia, the son of Charles Meyer and Sophia Berman. Both parents are still 
living in Russia. Mr. Berman belongs to an aristocratic family. The renowned 
Reb Israel Sallant was an uncle of his, and a younger brother, Jacob, is Chief 
Ralbi of Berditchev and has been recently appointed Chaplain of the Russian 
Army. 

Mr. Berman came to America in 1893. For one year he attended the 
public schools of Cincinnati. At the age of seventeen he took employment 
in a wholesale dry goods house at a very small salary. Then for a time he 
traveled as a salesman for a Cincinnati firm and later for a New York neck- 
wear house. In 1903 he became interested in a little overall business which 
he bought out shortly afterwards and six months later, with a capital of $2,000, 
he started the firm which has since become the largest overall manufacturing 
concern in the United States. Mr. Berman owns two plants employing over 
700 people, and he is now erecting a giant structure of five stories which will 
occupy an entire block on Plum Street from Third to McFarland streets. After 
the completion of this building Mr. Berman will employ over 2,000 people. 

Mr. Berman is not eager for honors and has not the time to hold public 
office. But he is, nevertheless, active in many charitable organizations, is a 
Trustee of the Raeding Road Temple, a member of the Board of Governors 
of the Hebrew Union College and is a national Director in several national 
institutions. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, of the Business 

21 



Men's Club, of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, of the National 
Association of Manufacturers and is Chairman of the Executive Board of 
the Union Overall Manufacturers' Association of the United States and Can- 
ada. 

On the 5th of December, 1900, Mr. Berman was married to Miss Cora 
Frank of Cincinnati and they are the parents of two sons, Benjamin, aged 14, 
and Arnold, aged 9. 

Asked what he considered was the most essential to success in business. 
Mr. Berman declared: "Learn to thoroughly understand your business, give 
it all your attention, and don't be afraid of hard work." 



ISAAC BERNER 

Mr. Isaac Berner of Tampa, Fla., is a type of Jewish immigrant whose 
life was a series of struggles, and whose success was bought after many sacri- 
fices. He was born on the 25th of September, 1876, in Tukan, Courland, the 
son of Harry and Rose Berner. He came to America in 1897. For six 
months he lived in Brooklyn, N. Y., peddling matches, writing paper, etc. He 
then went South, peddling from town to town until he arrived at Savannah. 
Ga., where he settled down for a time. When the Spanish-American War 
broke out, he enlisted in the army and was honorably discharged at the 
termination of the war. 

After saving up a little capital of $350, he returned to Savannah, where 
he started a bakery, in which he lost his entire fortune. He then went 
into the dry goods business in a small town in Georgia. In 1905 he came to 
Jacksonville, Fla., where he found employment at $15 per week. In 1909 he 
came to Tampa, where he engaged in the junk business. He is still in the 
business, as the Tampa Bag Company, with main offices at 1407 Marion Street, 
Tampa, and a branch office at Jacksonville. He is also an owner of the Royal 
Palm Soap Company of Tampa. He not only made a material success, but 
also brought over to this country his brothers and sisters, whom he well pro- 
vided for and whose fortunes he established. He has gained a wonderful 
reputation for himself by his untiring and devoted work. 

Mr. Berner is a trustee of the Congregation Rodeph Sholom of Tampa, 
f-.nd he belongs to many other Jewish organizations. 

On August 15, 1903, he was married to Miss Bessie Abrams of Boston. 



PHILIP G. BLANCK 

Mr. Philip G. Blanck, the owner of Blanck's Department Store at 901-3-5 
Avenue D, Miami, Fla., is one of those Jewish young men who have made 
a success in the South, and who have achieved a high reputation and kept their 
connection with Jewish interests. 

He was born on the 25th of April, 1885, in Kishineff, Bessarabia, Russia, 
as the son of Samuel and Sarah Blanck. Both parents live in New York. 

Mr. Blanck came to America in 1903. He spent his first year in New 
York, working at shirts. But the position did not appeal to him : he felt a 
spirit of enterprise within him, and he went South, opening a dry goods store 

22 



in Key West, Fla. In 1912, when he noticed that Key West was falling, while 
Miami was rising constantly, Mr. Blanck moved to Miami, opening a depart- 
ment store which proved a success almost from the beginning. The business 
is run very methodically and with a perfect system which is largely patterned 
after Mr. Blanck's personal ideas. 

But not only is Mr. Blanck a successful man of business : above all he is 
a man of the public and the affairs of the community, particularly the Jewish 
community of his town, are very close to his heart. Every spare moment 
of his time is given over to public affairs. While in Ke}' West Mr. Blanck 
was particularly interested in the life of the Jewish Congregation of the place. 
In Miami he is the Treasurer of the Progressive Social Club, which is the 
Jewish club of Miami. 

Mr. Blanck received in his youth a good Jewish education, and he rep- 
resents the type of the Jewish immigrant which combines native Jewish intelli- 
gence with American methods and ideals. 

Asked what he considered the chief element of success in life, Mr. Blanck 
said : "Be conservative in all your enterprises and undertakings." 

Mr. and Mrs. Blanck, who was Miss Jenny G. Ripper, were married in 
New York in 1906. They are the parents of three children, named Minnie. 
Bernard and Saul. 



JACOB BERNSTEIN 

Mr. Jacob Bernstein is one of the best known and most respected Jewish 
citizens of Savannah, Ga., and is the head of one. of the most representative 
families. Personally, he is a man of noble character and aristocratic bearing 
of the patriarchal Jewish type. In his youth he was a Talmudic scholar and 
now, having added to his stock of Jewish education the products of a long 
life experience, he presents the type of the accomplished, deep-thinking man. 

Mr. Bernstein is the father of a family which affords him great pleasure 
and enjoyment. There are four children. His oldest son, Morris H., is a 
practicing attorney in Savannah, where he is recognized as one of the ablest 
and most successful young lawyers of Georgia. For four years he held the 
post of Assistant Solicitor General and he made an enviable record for him- 
self in this position. The second child, Augusta, is pretty and highly accom- 
plished, as is her younger sister, Molly Dorothy, who is a great pianist 
and a composer of music. At concerts given by her in Savannah and New 
York, she has earned favorable criticism and high admiration. Mr. Bern- 
stein's youngest child, Albert, is a college student at Athens, Ga. He is the 
manager and a contributor to The Georgian, a magazine published by the 
University of Georgia. He shows admirable talent as a writer and commands 
an easy and very pleasant style. 

Mr. Jacob Bernstein was born on the 15th of November, 1866, in Brest- 
Litovsk, Russia, the place which will be of historical importance due to the 
peace parleys now going on there between the Central Powers and the present 
Russian government. He is the son of Moses Hirsh and Sarah Bernstein, and 
his grandfather, known as Reb Benjamin Chaim Wilners, was renowned as a 
Dayan and late Chief Rabbi of Minsk. 

In 1889 Mr. Bernstein arrived in the United States, and for the first six 
months he peddled in the section around New York, when he decided to go 
South, and settled in Savannah. Here he became a custom or installment ped- 
dler. In 1898 he went into the wholesale clothing and shoe business, working 
up his place to a remarkably successful concern and now his business reputa- 
tion stands unrivaled. Xot only has he never had any business troubles, but 

23 



he has never been sued and never brought suit against any one. The firm, 
known as Bernstein & Co. (but only Mr. Bernstein's son is interested in the 
business), now has its headquarters at 315 Congress street west. Mr. Bern- 
stein is also interested in real estate and he was among the first Jews to invest 
heavily in Savannah real estate. 

Mr. Bernstein belongs to and is a liberal contributor to every worthy cause 
in the city. He is a Director of the Kehillah, and has been for sixteen years 
a prominent member of the B'nai B'rith Jacob Synagogue. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernstein (nee Sarah Leaf ) were married in March. 1884. 



SAMUEL ZELICK BLASBERG 

Some of this country's best citizenship has found our shores because of 
the hatred of their parents for European military systems. The more intelli- 
gent class of Europeans have always rebelled against the militaristic govern- 
ments, and have sought for their children opportunities in a land where higher 
ideals of life prevailed. 

These thoughts touched the career of Mr. Samuel Blasberg. who was 
born in Kovno, Russia, July 2, 1876, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Blas- 
berg. He came to America at the age of thirteen, his father having preceded 
him while he remained on a farm with his uncle. Going to Cleveland, Ohio, 
to his father, he started peddling matches and notions and sent all his little 
savings to his mother, who is still in Russia. Within a year, however, he was 
able to buy a horse and wagon and peddled fruit for the next year. He then 
went through the country, selling dry goods and picture frames, and with a 
hundred dollars which he was able to save in two years he went into business 
with a Mr. Rose of Minneapolis, under the firm name of Ohio Moulding Com- 
pany, which partnership, devoted to the manufacture of picture frames, existed 
for five years. He then went into business for himself in Duluth, Minn., and 
later in Toledo, Ohio, and in Cleveland. After a few years he went to Dayton, 
where he engaged in the junk business, but at the end of nine years their 
plant was much damaged by the flood, and he came to Columbus, Ohio, where 
he organized the Columbus Waste Paper Company, of which he is now man- 
ager and Treasurer, and which has been an unqualified success. 

Mr. Blasberg was married in Jul)', 1898, to Miss Lilly Cohen of Duluth. 
They now have a family of two sons and two daughters, who are exceptionally 
talented. Their daughter, Sara, is a graduate of the Columbus High School 
and is a pianist, who has made many very successful public appearances. She 
expects to study later for an operatic career. The rest of the children are 
still in school. 

Mr. Blasberg is a member of Agudas Acheim Temple, is ex-President of 
Western Star, Brith Achim Lodge 127, and is prominent in the Odd Fellows 
and Uniform Rank, Knights of Pvthias. 



24 



HARRY B. BLASBERG 

It is not given to every man to arrive at the goal of his ambitions by a 
straight road. Many times the road points to devious paths, and we cry out 
that we have lost the guiding light of the rainbow that leads to the pot of gold. 

But if ambition be worthy and the effort sincere, every footprint in the 
snow, every tear that is shed, marks in indelible characters the location of 
another milestone on the map of the march. 

So it was with Harry B. Blasberg, who followed the light of the rainbow 
from his native Russia, to find the treasures buried deep beneath difficulties 
which would have crushed a less dauntless spirit. 

Harry was born in Kovna, Guberna, Russia, October 6, 1883, and at the 
age of nine helped his parents financially by selling newspapers and shining 
shoes after school hours. Later on he learned the cigarmaking trade and had 
to work the first month for nothing, then he received a salary of $3 a week 
for the first six months, which money he turned over to his parents. Also, he 
spent much of his vacation helping his father peddle junk in the country, 
being from home five to six weeks at a time. After this Harry and his father 
took up the feed business for one year. Then he came to Toledo, Ohio, where 
he got a job as a clerk in a dry goods store run by his cousin, Steinberg Bros., 
and where his salary at the start was but three dollars a week, but gradually 
was increased until he was getting nine dollars a week. 

Finding the dry goods business not to his liking in the way of advance- 
ment, Harry returned to his home town, Cleveland, Ohio, and entered the 
employ of his brother-in-law, A. Shaw, who was in the scrap iron business, 
remaining in this business for one year. He again became restless because of 
a seemingly slow advancement and always feeling the great urge of ambition, 
he took a position as shipping clerk with another brother-in-law, Mr. S. Silber- 
man, who was in the waste paper business, remaining with him but one year 
in order to become acquainted with the waste business. 

This business sufficed as a means to an end, as Harry was saving every 
cent possible from his meager salary and at the end of the year he had accumu- 
lated $300, so he decided to go into the waste paper and rag business with his 
brother, Wolfe, Harry's father loaning him $200. This business they were in 
one year. 

Then Harry with his brother-in-law, J. A. Jahl, of Dayton, Ohio, bought 
out the firm, of Morrisson Iron & Metal Co., of Norwalk, Ohio, giving this 
business his usual one-year trial. 

Thinking they were not making proper advancement, Harry then went 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, and with J. A. Jahl organized the Queen City Rag and 
Paper Co., of which he holds the active secretaryship. The same office he 
holds with the Columbus Waste Paper Co. of Columbus, Ohio. 

One of the greatest hardships of Harry's life was his unfulfilled wish 
that his dear mother and sister, whom he loved, should be at his wedding, but 
that was not to be, as his mother died when Harry was but 20 years of age, 
and two years after this his sister, Mrs. A. Shaw, died. Harry was engaged 
at this time, but the event was postponed until after a year's period of mourn- 
ing had elapsed. Mr. Harry Blasberg was married to Miss Netti Jahl of Day- 
ton, Ohio, February 19, 1907, and together they have dispensed charity to 
every worthy cause in Columbus as well as to the Jewish hospitals and the 
Denver Sanitarium. 

Why relate the further hardships of the next few years, the deprivations 
for the sake of the success which he knew would ultimately come to crown his 
efforts ? It is the old story of the sacrifice which has been written in every 
tongue ; which has sunk deep into the hearts of men who have lived and suf- 
fered to accomplish the big things of life. 

Mr. Harry Blasberg's advice to the younger generation is this : "Try to 
have a good education, give your fellow man a square deal, and be absolutely 
honest and you are bound to be successful." 

Mr. Blasberg is a member of Tifereth Israel Cong. B'nai Brith and many 

25 



others. Mrs. Blasberg is particularly active in works of benevolence and 
devotes much of her time, as well as money, to their promotion. 

They have one boy and three girls, who will doubtless inherit their par- 
ents" ability and sterling qualities. 



ISRAEL BLICKSTEIN 

There has always existed a marked distinction between the old European 
and die new American Jew. Xot only is this difference discernible in his 
social life, but in his religious and national life as well. This contrast is becom- 
ing more noticeable with the passing of the years. 

The European Jew is inclined to be more devoted to his religion, and in 
national spirit and in commercial life the older Jews have always in their hum- 
ble way and submissive attitude been willing to sacrifice their own personal 
interests that the Jews, as a race, might be strengthened and perpetuated 

Such a man is Israel Blickstein of Zanesville. Ohio, who came to this 
country from Russia at the age of nineteen, handicapped by poverty and with 
no knowledge of the language and customs of the land to which he came. All 
the events in the history of this young man's struggle toward success it is not 
possible to relate in a brief biography. These facts are only known to his imme- 
diate family and friends. 

He was born in Moledshna. V.ilner. Guberne. Russia. September i, 1868. 
his parents. \Yoli and Mary Blickstein. being very prominent in their native 
city. Israel won his uphill fight for wealth and position by sheer force of char- 
acter, which is so often the outcome of hard conditions of youth, particularly 
when the young man possesses a fine parentage. 

It is a far cry from the first years of Israel Blickstein's life when he had 
to pay Sio for the privilege of learning to be a tailor, and then worked the 
first nine months at the small salary of S3 per week until today, when he is 
known as one of the largest and most successful dealers in scrap iron and 

. in the state of Ohio. 

Mr. Blickstein was married in Russia to Miss Mary Allem. who has 
always ^iven him the utmost encouragement and assistance during the years 
of his early struggles and is now enjoying with him the success which he has 
so meritoriously earned. She is very active in the promotion of charities, 
xmtributing liberally both of her tim e and her money. 

Mr. Biickstein is a member of Congregation Beth Abraham. Knights of 
Pythias, and contributes to the Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums, as well 
as a number of other charir.r- 

?\Ir. Biickstein's advice to young men is worthy of their most serious con- 
sideration, as he says that honesty, hard work and strict adherence to the 
Tew:- .re the three fundamentals of success. 



26 



ISRAEL S. AND MARY E. BLATTNER 




McKeesport, Pa., is not one of the large Jewish communities of America, 
but if we compare the work done for our race by that community, it measures 
up with the largest Jewish cities in the country. That this is so is due to the 
fact that the city has been blessed with a number of men who feel a Jewish 
responsibility in giving away a part of their time and energy for communal 
and public-spirited work. 

Among the most active Jews of the city, we must number Mr. Israel S. 
Blattner and his wife, Mary E. Under ordinary circumstances when the man 
is interested in public affairs his wife protests against being compelled to satisfy 
herself merely with shreds of her husband's leisure as he takes it away from 
her and gives it to social pursuits. In this case, however, both Mr. and Mrs. 
Blattner are united in their hoi}- endeavor to do good for the community. 
Let us begin with a short life sketch. 
Mr. Blattner was born March 20. 1866, in Gal- 
sach, Hungary, the oldest son of Jacob and Lina 
Blattner. who were the parents of eleven children. 
Both parents are living in Pittsburgh. At the age 
of fourteen, Israel Blattner came to America, and 
almost at once began to work for a living. He 
peddled, worked at cigars and finally went into busi- 
ness for himself. He is now the owner of a large 
millinery establishment and cloaks and suits store 
at Xo. 317 Fifth avenue, McKeesport, Pa. 

His wife, Mary E.. was born on the 24th of 
August, 1873, in the same place where her husband 
was born. She is one of nine children, her parents 
being Morris L. and Kate Steinberger, who are no 
longer among the living. 

At the age of two, she was brought to America. 
She went to school in Pittsburgh and then contin- 
ued in Cincinnati, where her parents afterwards had moved. 

This is the second marriage of both Mr. and Mrs. Blattner and both have 

children from their first unions. Mr. Blattner had married Miss Anna Lebow- 

ltz. who died, leaving him with four children, Sadie, Rose, David and Abraham. 

Mrs. Blattner was also married and became the mother of nine children, onlv 

two of whom have survived, named Leon and 

Adolph. When war against Germany was declared, 

Adolph voluntarily enlisted as an engineer and went 

to France. At the time the writer of these lines 

interviewed the mother, her heart was sad with the 

news that the young man was wounded and a 

patient in one of the army hospitals there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blattner married on November 1. 
1906. and have no children. 

Mr. Blattner is very active in social and com- 
munal work. He was the founder and first Grand 
Master of the Independent Order Sons of David, 
of which he is now Treasurer. He has organized 
a number of lodges of this order, as the Iron City 
Lodge of Braddock. Pa., etc. He was one of the 
founders and many times President of the Gmilos 
Chesed Anshe Ungarn. He served as President of 
the local B'nai B'rith Lodge and was a director of the Pittsburgh Mosheb 
Skenim. He was also a founder and director of the Hebrew Charities of 
McKeesport and is connected with some twenty-odd other organizations and 
institutions. 

No less active in social life is Mrs. Blattner. She is the President of the 
Hebrew Ladies' Beneficial Society of McKeesport. President of the Ladies' 

27 




Auxiliary of B'nai B'rith, very active in the Columbia Council of Jewish 
Women, which is an immigrants' aid society in Pittsburgh. She founded the 
Jewish Women's Red Cross Auxiliary of McKeesport, of which she is Vice- 
President, and she brought to the organization forty-two charter members. 

The environment of the Blattner family is very sympathetic. Mr. Blattner 
is a serious man and Mrs. Blattner makes a very pleasant appearance. She is 
of the American intellectual type and thoroughly Jewish. Mr. Blattner's chil- 
dren, whom the writer chanced to see, are lovely and devoted to their parents. 



HARRY BLOOM 



One of the tragedies of our national life is that we too often form false 
ideas of that which constitutes real success in life. To every man the word 
has a different meaning. To one it may mean money, to another political 
power, to another opportunities for travel. 

In reviewing the life histories of men whom the world calls successful, 
it would seem that Mr. Harry Bloom has struck the happy medium and has 
found that which represents sane and lasting success. He is manager of a 
prosperous business. His home life is ideal, surrounded as he is by his family 
to whom he is able to give the advantages of education and to prepare them 
for lives of usefulness and good citizenship. 

Mr. Harry Bloom was born in Minsk, Guberne, 
Russia, in December, 1869, the son of Yail and 
Anna Bloom, his father being a lumber merchant 
and also a man of recognized scholarship. 

Mr. Bloom came to America in 1904, landing 
in Baltimore, Md., where he began working in a 
bakery for the small sum of $5 per week. Here he 
remained for two years, and by the exercise of the 
greatest economy, he managed to save $290. Going 
to Lima, Ohio, he started in the junk business, 
where he has been very successful, and has also 
accumulated considerable real estate. The first year 
in which Mr. Bloom was in business for himself 
he sent for his family, whom he had left in Russia 
until he became established. The Blooms have 
seven children — two boys and five girls — all of 
whom, with the exception of the oldest daughter, 
are going to school and are being educated in music. The oldest daughter is 
married to Mr. A. Miller, of Miller Brothers, Lima, Ohio. 

Mr. Bloom is a member of Shaara Zedek Congregation and B'rith Abra- 
ham Society, and is a liberal contributor to all charities. 




28 



MOSES BOFF 

We get out of life just what we put into it. The greatest geniuses of the 
wdrld have been the greatest toilers. Whether it be business, music or art, 
success has her crown for the brave spirit of perseverance which has been the 
most marked characteristic of all our great men. 

Moses Boff came to America with but two assets — a boundless courage, 
which brooked no discouragements, and a heritage of fine intellect from his 
father — a soldier, arid in private life a man of scholarly attainments. 

Born in Suwalk, Geberne, Russia, July 2, 1865, he came to America in 
November, 1885, and went direct to Buffalo, N. Y., where an aunt was residing. 
Here he obtained no salary, working for his board only. 

After this severe apprenticeship he worked for two years at $10 per month 
and board, and out of this meager salary he saved enough to purchase a horse 
and wagon. This humble beginning launched a business career that has been 
an unqualified success. 

He was married in Buffalo, February 2, 1891, 
to Anna Sklarsky, an American-born girl of high 
accomplishments, who has been of the utmost assist- 
ance to her husband at every turn in his affairs. 

His iron and metal business has grown to enor- 
mous proportions, which enables Mr. and Mrs. Boff 
to contribute liberally to the many charitable organ- 
izations which have enlisted their sympathies. 

They are members of the Beth Israel Congre- 
gation, supporters of the Denver and Los Angeles 
Hospitals, as well as many local charities which 
they consider worthy, without respect for creed or 
religion. 

Mr. Boff is a member of the Eagles, Odd Fel- 
lows and Chamber of Commerce. 

Mrs. Boff's activities in the promotion of social 
and charitable organizations of various kinds have been of the utmost benefit to 
their community. She is a founder and President of the Ladies' Benevolent 
Society and a charter member and Sergeant of the Maccabees. 

They have one daughter going to high school and taking special instruction 
in music. 




ISAAC BLUMBERG 

I 
Mr. Isaac Blumberg, of Savannah, Ga., is still a very young man, having 
been born on the 7th of March, 1879. He has, however, accomplished very 
much in business already, and not only is his success one of a material sort, but, 
on the contrary, he had become one of the standing figures of Judaism in his 
town, and Savannah is proud of him in every way. Mr. Blumberg is a director 
of the Jewish Educational Alliance, the Congregation B. B. Jacob, and played 
a very prominent part in the war relief work of his city. In short, there is 
scarcely any activity of a public nature which he has not been engaged in and 
in which his pecuniary aid and wise counsel has not been heard. 

Isaac Blumberg is one of the four sons of Moses and Rebecca Blumberg, 
who live in Savannah. His father, Moses Blumberg, is one of the oldest 
Jewish residents of Savannah, a strictly Orthodox Jew and one of the founders 
of the Congregation B. B. Jacob. 

Isaac was born in Shavel, Kovno Government, and together with his par- 

29 



ents came to America in 1891. Here he attended school and then went into 
business with his father and brothers, gaining a tremendous success. They are 
all at present located at 113 to 119 Brothon street, West, forming the firm of 
Bliunberg Brothers, and in addition, the firm of M. Blumberg & Sons, 108 
Brothon street, West, both stores selling men's and ladies' ready-to-wear arti- 
cles. They also own and control the firm of Blumberg Brothers, shirt manu- 
facturers of 74 and 76 Leonard street, New York City. The family started 
verv modestly but by dint of energy and perseverance they have reached their 
high position in the business world. 

In addition to his Jewish activity, Mr. Blumberg is also a 32 Mason. 

On January 6, 1914, Mr. Blumberg was married to Miss Florence Nuren- 
berger, of New York. Mrs. Blumberg is one of the most respected and popular 
Jewish women of Savannah, Ga. 

Mr. Blumberg has a strong, pleasing personality ; he is a kind-hearted man 
and a great Jew. 



SAM BONART 

Sam Bonart was born December 25, 1869, in the city of New Orleans. His 
father, Hertz Bonart, was born in Krakow, Austria, and his mother, Bertha 
Cohan, was born in Scherwerin, Germany. 

He attended the public schools, started to work at the age of fourteen, 
and at the age of seventeen embarked in a small way in business for himself, 
which business has since grown to the large establishment at corner of South 
Rampart and Poydras streets 

Besides being President of the Y. M. H. A., he is also Trustee of the 
Tewish Federation of Charities, Treasurer of the Orthodox Congregation Beth 
Israel, and member of the Playground .Commission. Also President of the 
Cemetery Congregation Tememe Derech. 

Mrs. Bonart, whose maiden name was Goldie Spingarn, takes a deep inter- 
est in all Jewish communal work. Their daughters — Pauline, Anna and Bertha 
— grace their pretty home at 1620 Napoleon avenue. 

Mr. Bonart "was twice married. His first wife died in 1901, 



JACOB BOROWSKY 

One of the most modern and perhaps the largest plant in the State of 
Massachusetts devoted to iron and metal scrap is that owned and operated by 
Mr. Jacob Borowsky. His success is another example of what may be accom- 
plished by a man possessing unusual traits of determination in the face of 
obstacles. 

Mr. Borowsky was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in 1868, and came to 
America in 1885. When he landed in New York, the first employment he 
found was in a grocery store at $2 per week. He then worked in a brickyard 
and finally started out peddling tinware. This brought him to Worcester, 
Mass., where he had his first experience in buying and selling junk. Several 
years later he opened the present business in Fitchburg, Mass., which has grown 
to enormous proportions. 

30 



Mr. Borowsky was married in Fitchburg in 1892 to Miss Sadie Sarkins. 
They have three children — two boys and one girl. The eldest son, Sam, is a 
graduate of business college and is in business with his father. David is a. 
graduate of the high school and is also assisting his father. The daughter is 
still in school. 

Mr. Borowsky has the distinction of being the founder of Congregation 
Harra Augudohs Achem, of which he was first President. He is also intensely 
patriotic and was Captain of the local Liberty Loan Campaign. 

Among the man)- charities which have reasons to be grateful for Mr. Bor- 
owsky's generosity, we might mention two of national importance — the Denver 
Hospital and the Immigration Society. He is also a member of the Zionist - 
and Bnai Brith. 



SAMUEL H. BOROFSKY 

Born April 30, 1865, in Wolkovishki, Government of Savalki, Russia, edu- 
cated in the schools of his native city and Manchester, England, to which place 
he was taken in 1875. Mr. Borofsky came to the United States in 1879 and in 
1882 he made a voyage to the South Pacific, including the interior of Ecuador, 
the Isthmus of Panama, and Jamaica, West Indies, returning to Boston in the 
earlv part of 1884. Shortly thereafter he engaged in the business of real estate 
and" insurance which he continued until the year 1902, at which time he entered 
the business of law stationery and supplies. 

He was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar in February, 1908, and has 
continued in the active practice of- the law with offices in Barristers' Hall, where 
he is still to be found. 

Mr. Borofsky was a member of the Boston City Council for the year 1898 
and of the Massachusetts Legislature for the year 1900 and 1901. 

During the first year of his service in the Legislature, Mr. Borofsky intro- 
duced and caused to be enacted the "Five Cent Ice Bill," making it compulsory 
for ice companies to sell ice in five-cent pieces at fair value, which they had 
refused to do prior to the enactment of the law. During his second year of 
service he introduced the "Seventh Day Sabbath Bill," exempting the seventh 
day observers from the penalties provided for violators of the State's "Lord's 
Day Law." 

After a very strenuous campaign, this bill was. passed by the House of 
Representatives but was ultimately defeated in the State Senate. Mr. Borof- 
skv's efforts in behalf of this legislation attracted nation-wide attention and 
many leaders in Judaism from other sections of the country came to his 
assistance. 

A physical breakdown caused Mr. Borofsky's withdrawal from public life 
for a time, but in February, 1906, he accepted an appointment as a member of 
the Board of Principal Assessors for the city of Boston, in which capacity he 
served until March 1, 1908, at which time he entered the practice of law. 

During the Spanish-American War, Mr. Borofsky was commissioned 
Captain of Infantry of the Massachusetts Provisional Militia, from which he 
was honorably discharged on the declaration of peace. 

Mr. Borofskv's recent activities in Liberty Loan, Red Cross and shipbuild- 
ing drives and as a "Four Minute Speaker" have been of much value, and his 
gifts as a loyal and gifted speaker have been turned to good account. 

Mr. Borofsky is also active in civic affairs, being prominently connected 
with many Jewish and non-Jewish organizations and institutions. 

In 1898 he organized and was the first President of the "Helping Hand 
Home for Destitute Jewish Children" ( now Home for Jewish Children) ; for- 

31 



mer Secretary of the Benote Israel Sheltering Home ; Director of the Con- 
gregation Aduth Jeshuam of Roxbury ; Trustee of the Federated Charities of 
Boston ; Organizer and first President of the Congregation Ohel Jacob of East 
Boston; former President Corporation Tifareth Israel; Treasurer George 
Putnam Home and School Association ; Director Roxbury Historical Society, 
and many others. 

Mr. Borofsky was married January 6. 1886, to Miss Ettie Wilensky and 
they have one daughter, Sarah Rebecca, who is now attending high school. 

Mrs. Borofsky also possesses much executive ability and is very prominent 
in the organization and promotion of various philanthropies. 

Bibliography : "The Wheel of Destiny," Richard G. Badger, Publishers, 
1917, and contributions to several periodicals and newspapers. 



HARRIS AND HYMAN BOTWINIK 

If you were to go to New Haven, Conn., you would find located at_2l 
Sylvian avenue a large business house conducted by Botwinik Brothers and 
devoted to the sale of machinery, belting and scrap. It would probably be inter- 
esting for you to know that this immense concern is not the product of more 
than one generation of industry and commercial ability, but has been reared 
unaided within the last twenty years by two men who came to our shores with- 
out capital, speaking a strange language, and knowing nothing of American 
commercial life. 

Harris Botwinik, the elder brother, was born in April, 1872, in Minsker, 
Guberne, Russia, and his brother Hyman in the year 1889. They were the sons 
of Hyman Botwinik, who was a man of great scholarly attainments, being a 
Rabbi of their native town, and also a successful leather merchant. From him 
the sons undoubtedly inherited much of the business ability which has been built 
into the fabric of the present large firm in New Haven. Harris Botwinik came 
to America in April, 1898, and for four years peddled junk. He then worked 
for three years in a bottle shop, saving a small capital with which to go into 
business for himself. He made his venture shortly after and in the meantime 
his brother Hyman having come to America, he gave him employment for three 
years, affording him an opportunity to learn the business, and then took him 
into partnership. The business has flourished remarkably, and they are today 
not only very wealthy, but are conducting the largest business in their city. 

Mr. Harris Botwinik was married August 30, 1898, to Miss Fannie Kom- 
mier of New Haven, and they have five children, four boys and one girl. That 
they have inherited the scholarly traits of their forefathers is demonstrated by 
the remarkable standard of scholarship to which they have attained. Louis is 
attending Yale College ; Sam is in business with his father ; Mike is attending 
high school, and Estelle is also in school. All of the children are receiving ex- 
cellent musical educations. 

Mr. Hyman Botwinik was married June 25, 191 1, to Miss Esther Hirsh- 
berg of New Haven, and they have two children, the eldest of whom is already 
in school. 

It is indeed a wise Providence that gave over the custodianship of such 
vast interests to men of such generosity as Botwinik Brothers. Both themselves 
and their wives are most generous in their contributions to all charities, includ- 
ing the Denver Hospital, the Immigration Society of New York, the United 
Hebrew Charities. Talmud Torah, the Hebrew Institute, the Hebrew Free Loan 
Association, Y. M. H. A., Orphans' Society, the Old Age Home, and all the 
Yishivas, as well as the Red Cross and the funds for the benefits of war 
sufferers. 

32 



Mr. Harris Botwinik is Past President of B'rith Abraham, Past President 
of Knights of Israel, Past President of Working-men's Circle, and is at the 
present time Treasurer of B'rith Abraham and a Director of the Hebrew Free 
Loan Association and the Hebew Orthodox Association. 

Mr. Hyman Botwinik is also prominent in nearly all of the above men- 
tioned organizations, being Past Treasurer of the Workingmen's Circle and 
also a member of the Odd Fellows and the Auto Club. He is Director of the 
Merchants' Loan Association and a stockholder in the Broadway Bank of New 
Haven. 



BARNETT BRICKMAN AND PHILIP CUTLER 

Prominently identified with the business interests of Chelsea, Mass., is the 
firm of Cutler & Brickman, located at 170-174 Second street, and devoted to 
the sale of burlap. 

The junior partner, Mr. Brickman, was born in Volina, Guberne, Russia, 
in the year 1875,. and came to America in 1900, landing on our shores April 15. 
Going to Chelsea, Mass., he worked in a junk yard for the small remuneration 
of $3 per week, as he, like many other ambitious young men, was willing to 
sacrifice present gain for future benefits. By the exercise of the utmost econ- 
omy he managed to save a little capital, and went into business for himself. 
This he continued for a short time, and then joined his present partner, Mr. 
Cutler. 

Mr. Brickman was married in Chelsea, August 8, 1904, to Miss Minnie 
Kleyman. and they have two children, both of whom are going to school and 
are studying music. 

Mr. Brickman is a member of an Orthodox Congregation, the Knights of 
Pythias and the I. O. B. A. His generosity in matters of charity is well known 
throughout the entire community. 

Mr. Philip Cutler was born in the year 1872, and upon landing in America 
when a very young man, came to Chelsea, Mass., and found his first employ- 
ment working in a soda water factory. He then started out peddling and later 
obtained some valuable experience in a junk yard, which was of much assist- 
ance to him when he went into business with his present partner. 

Mr. Cutler was married in Russia in 1897 and has four children, two girls 
and two boys, who are all excellently educated and accomplished musicians. 



PHILIP BROWARSKY 

The instances are so numerous where successful men who have in their 
youthful years been poor, that the readers of biography almost invariably look 
upon that condition of early life as necessary to future success. 

There can be no doubt that overcoming difficulties early in life is a train- 
ing' which no amount of mere scholastic teaching can supply, and that men 
who are consistently persevering and progressive can attain a high step on the 
ladder of success. 

So it was with Philip Browarsky, who came to America in 1883 from 
Suwalk, Russian Poland, where he was born in 1867, the son of Hyman 

33 



Browarsky, a shoeman by trade, but recognized as a man of considerable intel- 
lectual attainments. 

Arriving in New York, with but little money, he went out peddling small 
merchandise for two months, and then went to Pittsburgh, Pa. Here he con- 
tinued peddling for five years, when he went to Xew Orleans and from there 
to Toledo, Ohio. 

Here he met his present wife, who was then Miss Rebecca Urbansky, to. 
whose inspiration and assistance a large measure of his success is due. They 
were married in July, 1890, and Mr. Browarsky secured a position which paid 
but seven dollars per week. Out of this meager sum he not only sustained his 
family, but also helped his parents in Europe. In a short time he started ped- 
dling again, and in the year 1898, having been able to save a little money, he 
went to Bucyrus, Ohio, and engaged in the junk business. 

In 1905 he had the misfortune to lose everything, but being so well and 
favorably known in the community, his credit was of such a high order that 
he was again able to start into business, and justified the confidence of his 
friends by paying off every dollar of his indebtedness, together with 6 per 
cent interest. Todav he is doing an immense business, operating under the 
firm name of the Bucyrus Iron and Metal Company. 

He is also a director of the Bucyrus Rubber Company, a stockholder in 
the Ohio State Insurance Company, the Building Corporation of Bucyrus, the 
American Clay Machinery Company and the Allen Motor Company of Fos- 
toria. He is a stockholder in the Carroll Foundry and Machine Company and 
the First National Bank of Bucyrus, is President of the Bucyrus Machine and 
Tool Company, Inc., and owns 90 per cent of the stock. He also owns a large 
amount of property, free from all incumbrances. 

Mr. Browarsky belongs to both Orthodox congregations of Toledo, is a 
member of the Federation of Jewish Charities, the Red Cross in Bucyrus, Ohio, 
Knights of Joseph, Maccabees, Brith Moraham and Chamber of Commerce. 

Not wishing to wait until death to dispose of his money, Mr. Browarsky 
delights in making liberal donations to the Denver hospitals, Cleveland Or- 
phans' Home. Old Age Home at Cleveland, Orphans' Home at Erie, Pa., and 
is one of the largest contributors to the Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus of 
Bucyrus and the Red Cross, of which he is Director in his city. 

Mr. Browarsky is a member of the Masons and Elks and B'nai B'rith. Is 
also National Director of Consumptives' Home in Denver, Colo. 

The Browarskys have three sons who are all associated with their father 
in business. 



DR. SIGMUND SCHULEM BURG 

Among those who will some day, when the Jewish history of this country 
will be written, make the historian's task both pleasant and full of contents 
and meaning is Dr. Sigmund Schulem Burg of San Antonio, Tex, for Dr. Burg 
has for many years occupied a position of prominent leadership both in the 
Jewish community and the city at large. He was born on April 15, 1861, at 
Brody, Galicia, and received, in addition to a thorough secular education, an 
excellent Jewish training, which his parents, Samuel Eliezer and Esther 
Frumme Burg, provided for him. His great aptitude for deep studies mani- 
fested itself at a very early age, so his parents decided to have their young son 
combine Jewish interests and general scholarship with the knowledge and 
practice of medicine. 

And Dr. Burg has certainly measured up in his activities and achieve- 
ments to the most hopeful expectations of his parents. He took up the study 

34 



of medicine at the University of Vienna, from which he was graduated in 
1887. The proficiency he made in his studies was so great that he was ap- 
pointed Sekundar-Arzt in the K. K. Krakenhaus "Wieden" of that city. In 
1889 he came to this country and settled in San Antonio, where his great skill 
and knowledge have resulted in immeasurable benefits to the city and com- 
munity. 

During the period of almost three decades that Dr. Burg has resided in 
San Antonio, he has occupied many positions of distinction and prominence. 
For ten years he has served as Health Officer and City Physician ; to his care 
and skill the people of San Antonio entrusted their City Hospital, and he is 
at the present time Surgeon-in-Chief of the Robert B. Green Memorial Hos- 
pital. He also represented the city of San Antonio at the International Con- 
gress for Tuberculosis at Washington, D. C. and held the office of National 
Medical Examiner in the Order of Hermansons. 

_ Numerous and prominent as have been the positions of trust and respon- 
sibility which Dr. Burg has occupied in his own profession and in the city 
generally, just so numerous and prominent have been the positions he has held 
among our people, both in the city of San Antonio and in the state of Texas. 
Already as a young man, before he came to this country, his interest in Jewish 
affairs was so strong that he took a leading part among the organizers "of the 
academical Kadimah Society of Vienna. This interest he has quite naturally 
retained, and the great success and the high standing which he has gained have 
given him the opportunity of accomplishing many noble tasks in behalf of 
his people and their cause. Among the things that he has accomplished in that 
direction, it deserves to be mentioned particularly that he organized the Zionist 
movement in the state of Texas, that he has twice been chosen to the presi- 
dency of the Texas State Zionist organization, that he heads at the present time 
the San Antonio B'nai Zion Association, that he has founded and sub-edited 
the monthly magazine. The Jcwisli Hope, the onlv Zionist publication of the 
South, which during the time of its existence had a marked influence in the 
spreading of the gospel of Zionism, and that he was chosen last fall to repre- 
sent the Jewish population of his city and vicinity at the Jewish Congress that 
was to convene in Washington. 

Dr. Burg, whose office is in the Moore Building, is married and is the 
father of four highly talented children. His first wife's maiden name was 
Antonia Scharfmesser and their children are : Edward, who is a graduate of 
the State University and is studying medicine at Galveston; Beatrice, who is 
likewise a graduate of the State University and is also studying medicine ; Elsa, 
wdio upon graduation from the State University has taken up teaching in the 
public schools, and Minna, who shares the great prominence and popularity 
of the Burg family. In his second marriage Dr. Burg married Mrs. Molli'e 
Mindes, a popular and beautiful lady of St. Louis, Mo. 



SAM BURGIN 

A man's career is not decided in one lifetime. He comes into the world, 
burdened or blessed by a heredity which is bound to strongly influence even- 
action of his life. The deeds of men live after them in the lives of their de- 
scendants and in the hearts of their associates. 

Many years ago in Russia a Jewish Rabbi labored among his people try- 
ing to inculcate principles of practical business integrity as well as the'Ortho- 
dox doctrines of his creed. At that time a debt, if unpaid for seven years, 
became outlawed, the debtor being relieved from further legal responsibility. 

Rabbi Burgin saw a higher moral responsibility than the law imposed and 

35 



was influential in having a law enacted whereby a debt was never outlawed, 
but remained a personal obligation of the debtor until paid. 

In Medina, Ohio, resides the grandson of this man, Mr. Sam Burgin, 
honorable business man, philanthropist, friend. He was born in Vilna, Gu- 
berne, Russia, in September, 1869. His father, adopting the profession of his 
father before him, was an Orthodox Rabbi, and a most accomplished scholar. 
One of his brothers also chose the church as his life work and rose to a posi- 
tion of great distinction, being the official head of the Church of St. Peters- 
burg and the first Rabbi to be chosen by election of the people instead of 
appointment by the Czar. 

But Sam Burgin heard the call to the new world and came to America in 
July, 1892. Landing in New York with but $5 in his pocket, he started selling 
small articles from a basket, this being the only honorable employment which 
immediately came to hand. Being well educated, he later went to friends in 
Louisville, Ky., and obtained a position as teacher of Talmud. His health 
failing him, he was advised by his physician to leave the city, and he went 
to Medina, Ohio, engaging in the iron and metal business, in which he has 
been wonderfully successful. 

In relating the incidents of his successful career, we must not overlook 
the wide influence exerted by his wife, whom he married in Russia, and who 
has been of the utmost assistance to him in every important event of his life. 

They have five children, all of them being finely educated as befits t^eir 
distinguished ancestry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burgin are both actively engaged in the promotion of many 
charitable organizations, their interests not being confined to their own com- 
munity, but extending over the entire nation. Thev are liberal contributors 
to Denver and Los Angeles hospitals and are members of the Jewish Congrega- 
tion in Cleveland. 

Medina is fortunate in having such a citizen to whom it can turn with 
all enterprises for civic betterment. 

As the influence of the grandfather, father and brother has broadened the 
lives of their community and nation, so Mr. Burgin's associates have never 
found him wanting in extending his influence for the cause of mankind. 



JACOB BURSTEIN AND LOUIS EHRLICH 

The firm of Burstein & Ehrlich owes its success to the two partners, both 
of whom came to America and unaided fought their way to positions of inde- 
pendence and affluence. 

They were both born in Volina, Guberne, Russia, Mr. Burstein in 1879 
and Mr. Ehrlich in 1873. 

Mr. Burstein came to America in 1904 and his partner a year later. They 
both found their way to Chelsea, Mass., where they spent a number of years 
in hard work buying and selling rags and junk, until they joined forces in 
1916, and established the present prosperous business. 

Mr. Burstein was married four years prior to his coming to America, to 
Miss Ida Goldberg, and they have six children, four boys and two girls, all 
going to high school and studying music. 

Mr. Ehrlich was also married in Russia, in 1900, to Miss Sarah Green- 
field, and they have four children, two boys and two girls, all in school. 

Mr. Ehrlich is a member of the Orthodox Congregation and is liberal in 
his gifts to charity. The Burstein family are members of the Russian Ortho- 
dox Congregation, and Mr. Burstein is also prominent in a number of organi- 
zations, being past Treasurer of I. O. V. A., and a member of Talmud Tohra, 

36 



Hasas Sholomes, Adas Israel, I. O. B. A., United Brothers Lodge of Minxt, 
and United Hebrew Charities of Boston. His wife is also very active in social 
and charitable matters and is prominent in the promotion of ladies' charities. 



GUTMAN CAPLAN 

Mr. Gutman Caplan is one of those staunch Russian immigrants whose 
success in the new world is unquestionably due to the "never say die" attitude, 
and who in their chief sojourn in this country have actually accomplished won- 
ders, due to their never-ceasing zeal and energy. 

Born sixty-three years ago in the province of Vilna, he came from a 
famous rabbinical stock, being the son of Reb Nachum and Gitel Caplan. He 
came to America in 1873 and started his business career peddling in New York 
City and other places until fate carried him to St. Paul, Minn. In 1881 he 
settled in Pittsburgh and started a general bakery and a bakery for Matzoth. 
This venture proved the opening wedge in his drive for success and power, 
for the Caplan Baking Company of 75 Logan street, Pittsburgh, is known far 
and wide for the delicious quality of its product. 

Mr. Caplan always took an active interest in the doings of his fellow men 
and when in St. Paul he was President of the Congregation Bnei Jacob and 
an active force in many of its Jewish and general organizations. In Pittsburgh 
he belongs to a large number of societies and is the President of the important 
Congregation Beth Jacob. The St. Paul congregation was built mainly by his 
own efforts and after it was erected he was made first Honorary Secretary and 
then its President, staying at the head of this institution until he came to 
Pittsburgh. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Caplan was married in the city of New York to Rikla Blum- 
berg, and they have six children. Moses, Samuel, Isaac Elchanan, Herman, 
Zola and Rachel Caplan are all highly accomplished and follow in their par- 
ents' footsteps. Isaac Elchanan is a prominent student at Harvard L T niversity, 
Samuel is a scholar, a graduate of the L'niversity of Pittsburgh and now in 
business with his father. Moses, the eldest son, is also a scholar and now in 
the wholesale grocery business. The eldest daughter married Mr. Wolk, while 
the second daughter is Mrs. Joseph Lando. Mr. Caplan is a Shomer Shabas 
and as a former Yeshiba Bochur he gave his children a thorough Jewish 
education. 



JULIUS HARRY CAPLAN 

While many have succeeded without the aid of educational advantages, 
at the same time they are the greatest assets which a young man can possess. 
Certain it is that Mr. Julius Harry Caplan found his thorough knowledge of 
Hebrew literature to be of great assistance to him. 

Mr. Caplan was born in Shedlitzer, Guberne, Russia, in March, 1880, and 
came to America April 10, 1900. Plis father was a most devout Jew and ac- 
complished scholar, being the Shocket of the community, and" from him 
young Julius obtained much of the knowledge which was to prove so valuable 
to him in later years. 

37 



Upon landing on our shores he came to Ansonia, Conn., where a brother 
resided, and started out peddling. He then went to Lebanon, Pa., and upon 
making known his scholarly accomplishments was given a position as Jewish 
butcher by the local Tews. As this did not occupy all of his time, he was able 
to work in a junk yard for Luriah Bros., where he had an opportunity of 
learning the business. After about eighteen months he and a partner opened 
a yard for themselves, and this continued until two years ago, when they sold 
the business and Mr. Caplan started in for himself. He is not only proprietor 
of the present large firm of J. H. Caplan, but is also President of the Pennsyl- 
vania Rag & Metal Co., of Reading, Pa., one of the largest businesses of its 
kind in the state. 

Mr. Caplan was married June 7, 1902, to Miss Elizabeth YVolfson of 
Lebanon. They have four children, three boys and one girl, all receiving 
excellent educations as befits their prominent position in the community. The 
son, Hyman, has made a remarkable record in the school, as he will graduate 
from high school this year, although he is only thirteen years of age, and is 
by far the youngest graduate in the Lebanon High School. The children are 
also being thoroughly educated in music and in the literature and traditions 
of their race, as the Caplans are firm believers in the teachings of their 
religion. 

Mr. Caplan is a prominent member of Beth Israel Congregation of Leb- 
anon, is past Grand Master of the Odd Fellows, past Chancellor of Knights 
of Pythias, and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. He is also a liberal 
contributor to Denver Hospital. Immigration Society of New York. National 
Jewish Hospital of Colorado, National Orphans' Llome of New York, all the 
Yishivis, and the Red Cross, War Sufferers' Fund and also all other local 
charities. 



ABRAHAM CARNICK 

If every man were able to arrive at the goal of his ambitions by straight 
road, much of the fineness of character, which is only brought out by adversity, 
would be lost to the world. 

The striving toward worthy ambitions tempers the fine metal of the moral 
fiber which enables men to achieve the seemingly impossible. 

So it was with Abraham Carnick, who was born in Wilner, Guberne, 
Russia, on the 15th day of August, 1892. and at the age of fifteen came to 
America, the land of equal opportunity for all. His father, John Carnick, was 
a Jewish scholar of considerable prominence, and his mother, Mollie. was a 
woman of noble character and strong personality. 

When he arrived in America he seized upon the first opportunity which 
presented itself, going to his brothers in Franklin, Pa., where he entered a 
cigar factory, and gradually worked himself up to a salary of fifteen dollars 
a week. He continued in this line for the following three years, when he 
decided to go to work for his brothers, who were in the scrap iron business, 
in order that he might learn thoroughly all the details of the business. After 
working for one and one-half years, he was made manager of his brother's 
yard in Franklin, Pa., which responsible position he still holds. 

We do not feel that it is necessary to relate the hardships of his first 
years, or the sacrifices which he made in order to gain the success which he 
knew ultimately would crown his efforts. It is the old story known too well 
to every man who has been obliged to face adversity in a strange land. Suffice 
it to say that it has taught Mr. Carnick the secret of success which he passes 

38 



on to the younger generation in this hrief advice : Find the work you are best 
fitted for, attend strictly to business, and give every man a square deal. 

Mr. Carnick is a member of the Orthodox Congregation of Oil City, Pa., 
the Young Men's Hebrew Association, and is a liberal contributor to every 
worthy cause, regardless of race, creed or religion. 

Prominent among the institutions to which he makes liberal contributions 
are the hospitals of Denver and Los Angeles. 



SAMUEL CAPLAN 

Samuel Caplan is not accustomed to think that the difficulties he encoun- 
tered in early life really retarded his progress ; he realized the truth that those 
who accomplish anything great in the world must depend upon themselves, 
and not upon circumstances. Necessity is a stern master, but it is probably 
the best. 

Samuel was born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, in 1873, son of Joseph, 
farmer, and Elume Caplan. At the time of McKinley's election he came to 
Baltimore, from where he went to Canton, Ohio, worked in a junk vard for 
five weeks for $6 a week. But being an enterprising young man, and realizing 
it is best to start out for oneself, no matter how hard the efforts may be, he 
did so with no assets but his good name, and today is one of the leading men 
of East Liverpool, where he owns property valued at $40,000. In conjunction 
with his junk yard he has a ladies' ready-to-wear business which does about 
$50,000 worth of business yearly. 

Rich in business success, he is still richer in his home life, having a wife 
and four children. He was married in Russia to Sahra Rudner. 

Besides contributing to all charities, including the Los Angeles and Denver 
sanitariums, Mr. Caplan was one of the founders and the first President of 
Congregation of Jacob in East Liverpool, now one of the Trustees, also is a 
member of the B'nai Brith and Brith Shalom of Philadelphia. 

Thus we see the future holds in store much that is good for one of cour- 
age and integrity who makes it a rule to accomplish the purpose for which he 
sets out. 



JACOB CARNICK 

Opportunity is a precious thing justly celebrated in poem and proverb, 
but absolutely useless unless people are prepared to pay the price in hopes long 
deferred and in earnest endeavor. 

Perhaps no young man ever started a career with more handicaps than 
Jacob Carnick, who within the space of a few short years has attained a posi- 
tion of prominence in the business and civic life of Youngstown. Ohio. 

Jacob Carnick was born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, June <). 1887, and 
came to America at the age of sixteen. The first years of his life in this 
country were a continual struggle against seemingly insurmountable handicaps, 
and only those of his immediate family and his most intimate friends know 
of the difficulties which he encountered and overcame. 

From Oil City, Pa., where he had worked at the cigarmaking trade for 

39 



four months, he came to Franklin, Ohio, where he started a scrap iron yard 
with his brother Robert. They also opened one in Youngstown, Ohio, which 
they are now operating under the firm name of Carnick Brothers, and doing 
a very large business. 

Mr. Carnick was married October 31, 1916, to Miss Dora Cohen, a popu- 
lar young lady of Corry, Pa., and they are not only prominent in the social life 
of Youngstown, but are also well known for their kindly, charitable deeds. 

Mr. Carnick is a prominent member of the Masons, Talmud Torah and 
B'nai Brith. 



ROBERT CARNICK 

The most important history of any nation or community is that relating 
to its business interests. 

Business provides the means for the conduct of wars ; it opens the door 
to the fine arts, it sets in motion the harmonies of wonderful music, it is the 
supreme educator of our times. 

The life history of every successful business man is then a partial history 
of the entire progress of his community and it is a great pleasure to chronicle 
the events in the career of Mr. Robert Carnick of Youngstown, Ohio. 

He was born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, January 14, 1881. and came to 
America at the age of eighteen. Landing in New York, where he stayed only 
a short time, he went to Boston, Mass., Berlin, N. H., and finally to Franklin, 
Pa., before he found an opening which suited his liking. 

Here he joined forces with Mr. S. Cohen, whose daughter Fanny he later 
married. Eight months later Mr. Cohen retired and his interest was taken 
over by Mr. N. Cohen of Corry, Pa. About a year later Mr. Carnick took over 
the Cohen interest and went into partnership with his brother Jacob, which 
partnership exists in Youngstown today, under the name of Carnick Brothers. 
He also has another iron and metal yard in conjunction with Mr. N. Cohen at 
Corry, Pa. 

The Carnick Brothers married two daughters of Mr. Nathan Cohen. 

Mr. Robert Carnick and wife have three sons who will doubtless succeed 
their father in the conduct of the immense business interests which he has so 
successfully developed. 

Mr. Carnick is not at any time unmindful of those in less fortunate cir- 
cumstances than himself and is a liberal subscriber to all charities. 

He is also a member of the Elks and B'nai B'rith. 



BERNARD CHAIMOWITZ 

There are men who were born for social work, just as there are such who 
were gifted by nature with some peculiar talent or capability, or fit for poetry 
or music. A social worker who was born to the manner will naturally find his 
life work in helping his fellow man, in philanthropy. 

Such a one is Mr. Bernard Chaimowitz of McKeesport, Pa. His life 
story as a whole is one endless chain of philanthropic activity. 

He was born on the 17th of November, 1873, in Savene, Roumania, as the 

40 



son of Elijah Chaim and Pearl Chaimowitz. His father, who is a "Lamdan" 
and former Shochet, is now at Palestine. His brother is a Rabbi in 'Browns- 
ville and there are many Rabbis in his family. 

Mr. Chaimowitz came to America on the 18th of January, 1900. He 
landed in New York, where he worked for a time at suspenders, earning as a 
married man the munificent wage of $2.50 per. He then went to Pittsburgh, 
where for a few months he was employed in the cigar trade. Afterwards he 
accepted a position as manager in Kaplan's bakery, and he kept this position 
for three and a half years. 

As soon as Mr. Chaimowitz found his "basis'' in the new country, he took 
an interest in social work. He became the protecting spirit of every newly 
arrived immigrant from his native Roumania. He became the Pittsburgh rep- 
resentative of the Industrial Removal Office. He was also at the same time 
assistant manager of the United Hebrew Charities of Pittsburgh and superin- 
tendent of the B'nai B'rith Employment Bureau for western Pennsylvania. 

At the same time he continued in other social activities. He was respon- 
sible to a very large extent in the building up of the Roumanian congregation 
in Pittsburgh, of which he was Secretary and Vice President. He was the 
founder and President of the Lebanon Roumanian Beneficial Society. He or- 
ganized a number of Roumanian Lebanon B'nai B'rith lodges, of which he had 
been President and Treasurer ; and he organized the David Wolfsohn Lodge 
of the Independent Order B'rith Abraham. 

In 191 5 he bought a hotel in McKeesport, Pa., and here he also continues 
as social worker, being the Vice President of the McKeesport Society of Jew- 
ish War Sufferers. He is the Vice President of the Dorschei Zion Society of 
McKeesport and was recently appointed a member of the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Welfare League of Allegheny County. 

In his social and philanthropic work Mr. Chaimowitz can point with pride 
to the assistance of his wife, whose maiden name was Dora Eger. 



ISIDOR M. CASSEL 

We are pleased to be able to include in this work a brief sketch of the 
life of a young man whose years have not yet touched the meridian, as real 
success should be measured by earnestness of purpose, and accomplishment, 
rather than by years. 

Mr. Cassel represents a fine type of young American business man, pos- 
sessed of a modest, unassuming, but at the same time, magnetic personality. 
He was born at 114 Orchard street, New York City, October 14, 1887, the 
son of Morris Cassel, who died when Isidor was but two years of age, and 
of Ray Cassel, who now resides at Miami, Fla. 

Mr. Cassel attended the public schools, then the Morris High School, from 
which he graduated, and also had considerable work as a student at the Tal- 
mud Torah, of East Broadway, New York. 

When he had finished school, a business career appealed to him, and he 
obtained employment with Kaufman Mandel, whose biography appears in 
volume one of this work, and was later in the employ of Oshinsky & Valentine, 
a well-known shirt manufacturing concern of New York. He remained with 
this firm for nine years, gaining much valuable experience which fitted him for 



41 



the management of a business of his own. This he established and continued 
for a year and a half, when his brother-in-law purchased the New York De- 
partment Store at Miami, Fla., and he entered into the management of the 
store. This business is in a most flourishing condition. 

Mr. Cassel has a deep appreciation of the artistic side of life, and has 
displayed considerable ability as a musician. He finds an unfailing source of 
pleasure and relaxation from business cares in his work at the piano. 

He is a past Chancellor Commander of the Knights of Pythias. 

His daily life is an inspiring example of unostentatious, earnest endeavor 
which is well worthy of emulation. 



DAVID CHESNEY 

One of the most prosperous business houses in Pittsfield, Mass., is the 
Pittsfield Junk Company, owned and managed by Mr. David Chesney. 

Mr. Chesney was born in Volina, Guberne, Russia,. in January, 1878, the 
son of Kolman and Zelda Chesney. He grew up in an atmosDhere of intellect 
and refinement, as his father was a Rabbi and a great scholar in the commu- 
nity. 

Coming to America in December, 1904, he found his way to Pittsfield, 
Mass., where he spent six years working in a junk yard in order to master 
every phase of the business. He then went into business for himself, which 
has resulted in the present prosperous establishment. 

Mr. Chesney was married in Russia October 1, 1897, to Miss Rebecca 
Zemal, and they have four children, one boy and three girls, all going to school. 

No worthy charity ever appeals in vain to Mr. Chesney, as he is a liberal 
contributor to all, regardless of race or creed, although he is a member of the 
Orthodox Congregation, and a regular observer of all the rites of his religion. 



HARRY COHEN. 

About forty years ago in the village of Osterlanikz, Lomzer, Guberne, 
Russia, Mr. Harry Cohen first saw the light of day. His father, Eli, was a 
tailor and his mother, Frumene. was always ready to make any sacrifice for 
the welfare of her son. 

On April 1, 1893, Mr. Cohen first saw the Statue of Liberty in the harbor 
of New York, the symbol of freedom. 

After setting foot on American soil he began learning the trade of tailor 
at a small salary of only $3 per week. There he remained for four years 
and then coming to Cleveland, he learned to be an operator, earning from $15 
to $18 per week, and after three years of persistent labor and with exceptional 
ability he became a designer of cloaks, earning a salary of $35 per week. With 
money saved from his labor, he opened a retail store, then became a manufac- 
turer, which, not proving a success, he again opened a retail store, where he 
remained for six years, then he came to Dayton, where he went into partner- 
ship with his brother-in-law in the iron and metal business under the name of 
Dayton Iron & Metal Co. 

On May 14, 1901, at Cleveland, Ohio, he was married to Miss Lilian 

42 



Levy, and they have one child, a daughter. Their domestic life is full of 
happiness and joy. 

Mr. Cohen is active in the B'nai B'rith, a member of the Anshe Emeth 
Temple of Cleveland and a liberal contributor of all worthy charities. 

He is known by all as industrious, honest and versatile, and always strives 
to do the right thing at the right time. 

Air. Cohen's home environment is all that can be expected, his wife and 
daughter are his pride and joy and he furnishes them with all the comforts 
of life. 

Mr. Cohen is a consistent worker for all noble enterprises, giving his time, 
labor and monev towards their success. 



HARRY I. COHEN 

The path of success in business is invariably a high road lined with guide 
posts of common sense, honesty and perseverance. 

Notwithstanding all that has been said about luck, the best good fortune 
in every man's life is not that which comes by accident. The only good things 
which we are justified in hoping for are those which we are capable of creating 
for ourselves. 

The above is the substance of a conversation held with Mr. Harry I. 
Cohen, one of the wealthiest and most influential Jews of Detroit, and his advice 
carries with it the utmost value to young people just starting out on a business 
career, inasmuch as Mr. Cohen has won his way in the world unaided by 
anything but his wonderful ability and intense application. 

He was born in Shiclava. Grodna, Russia, December 15, 1883, and prob- 
ably inherited considerable adeptness for business from his father, who was 
a successful dry goods merchant in his native city. 

He came to America when only a small child 
and attended public school until the age of 13 
when he was obliged to assume the responsibilities 
of earning his own living. 

Business history furnishes few instances of 
harder apprenticeship than that served by this 
young boy who worked in a dry goods store 12 
hours a day and received the mere pittance of 
$1.50 per week. By dint of much hard work he 
finally had his salary raised, step by step, to $15 
per week. Had young Mr. Cohen been possessed 
with less ambition and foresight he probably would 
have remained indefinitely at this salarv, but real- 
izing that he had about exhausted the opportunities 
which this business offered, he resigned to accept a 
nosition of more responsibilitv with S. Sarasohn & 
Co. 

He remained with them four years and during that time gained their 
complete confidence as to his high integrity and ability, when the smouldering 
ambition to be in business for himself took definite form, and he notified his 
employers of his intention. 

Rather than lose his valued services, they offered to open a branch store 
and make him an equal partner. This offer "he accepted and for three years 
operated same as Sarasohn & Cohen Co. This partnership was dissolved', but 
in the absence of his able management the store did not prove a success, and 
he was asked to take it over. This he did, taking as partner Mr. D. Robinson, 

43 




which partnership still exists and has proved a remarkable mutual success, as 
the Robinson-Cohen Co., is konwn today as Detroit's largest east side depart- 
ment store. 

Mr. Cohen was married to Miss Rae Goldstick, and they have two fine 
children going to school. 

Notwithstanding the fact that Mr. Cohen is one of Detroit's most wealthy 
and influential Jewish citizens their home life is very simple and free 
from ostentation, as both himself and wife prefer to spend a large share of 
their income in bringing happiness to others. Their liberality in all charitable 
and philanthropic enterprises is so well known that they need no elucidation 
here. 

Mr. Cohen is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Beth Jacob, and Shar- 
rey Zedek. 



JACOB M. COHEN 

It was an old maxim among the Jews that he who did not bring up his 
son to some honest calling, brought him up to be a thief. True it is that the 
teachings and environoment surrounding a man's early years are bound to 
strongly influence his future actions. 

We can easily picture Jacob Cohen, Rabbi and prominent Talmudist of 
Yilna, Guberne, Russia, peering into the future to the time when the son, who 
was also his namesake, should go forth into a great new world, and arming 
him with the strongest weapons which a young man can possess, absolute hon- 
esty and concentration of purpose. 

Jacob Cohen, Jr., was born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, November 14, 1872, 
and came to America in the summer of 1892. 

Landing in New York with practically no money, he sought an uncle, who 
urged him to become an operator in the cloak business. Finding in this occu- 
pation very little to satisfy his rising ambition, he 
embarked in a number of other ventures, which 
took him from New England to the Gulf. Coming 
back to New York, he finally located permanently at 
Olean, opening an iron and metal yard, where he 
has enjoyed the prosperity which his unswerving 
diligence and integrity so richly merit. 

He was married in 1899 to Miss Rosa Sink- 
man of New York City, an accomplished girl who 
has made an ideal wife and mother. 

They have four daughters, who are all being 
liberally educated in music as well as their regular 
scholastic training. Two of them are going to high 
school, while the younger ones are yet in the grades. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cohen have always been most 
generous in their support of all worthy charities 
and have taken great pleasure in assisting those less 

fortunate than themselves, whom they have found deserving of their help and 
sympathy. 

Mr. Cohen's advice to young people just starting out in life is the sum total 
of his own experience : 

"Find out your vocation, follow it honestly and success will follow." 




44 



JOSIAH COHEN 

When the biography of the Honorable Josiah Cohen will be written in the 
future, it will probably have a sub-title, "An Essay on Ideal Americanism." 
Such biography will no doubt be scrutinized by the generations to come, who 
will seek therein the leitmotif, the key to a useful life; for, in truth, biography 
must be subjected to the same scientific determinism as is any other branch of 
human knowledge. 

Here is an immigrant boy who comes into an American community, pro- 
vided with naught of worldly goods, with only a will to do and serve; then 
this boy marks out a path for himself which leads him to a place far above his 
fellow men, to a place of eminence and distinction. 

What one phase of this man's character, we are moved to ask, is it that 
served as the motive force? Or is it perhaps a happy combination of qualifi- 
cations that produced this career of leadership? For three generations men 
have loved Josiah Cohen because they recognize in 
him that something — indescribable, perhaps, but it 
is there, just the same — which puts him at once at 
the head of the procession, be that in the sphere of 
politics or in religious activity or in philanthropy. 

Born in Plymouth, England, November 29, 
1 841, Josiah Cohen spent his boyhood there, where 
his ancestors had lived for generations and prior to 
that had settled in Cornwall. In 1857 he came to 
America with his parents, Henry and Rose, and set- 
tled in Pittsburgh, Pa. Soon "after his arrival be 
became active in the work of the synagogue, having 
been employed as a teacher in English to the Ger- 
man-Jewish immigrants who arrived about that 
time. Rabbi L. Naumburg, whose daughter, Car- 
rie, Josiah Cohen later (1870) married, was at that 
time the Rabbi of the Rodef Shalon Congregation, 

and the services were conducted in Hebrew and in German. Soon, howevt. ,,, 
order to attract the younger generation to the synagogue, Mr. Cohen was en- 
gaged to deliver English sermons supplementary to those delivered by the 
Rabbi in German. Later he studied law at the office of Kirkpatrick & Mellon ; 
apparently a very fortunate step in his career, for in the dual role of teacher 
and jurist this man was destined to play his part so excellently. 

In January, 1866, he was admitted to the bar. The practice of law soon 
brought him m contact with the city administration. Very early his unusual 
oratorical ability was recognized and for a generation he served on the plat- 
form in the interest of the Republican Party of Allegheny County In 188' 
he was chairman of the Executive Committee of the party. In the year 1884 
he was one of the presidential electors for the state of Pennsylvania. 

In recognition of an able and honorable legal career, Josiah Cohen re- 
ceived in 1901 the appointment of Judge of the Orphans' Court. This marked 
the beginning of an even more able and honorable judicial career. Tudge 
Cohen brought to play a fine personality, an attitude of sympathy and kindli- 
ness, a demeanor bespeaking elemental justice. It is a delicate task to sit in 
judgment, day in and day out, over human beings who are accused; and at 
the same time to enjoy universal recognition as a righteous judge. In 1907 
he was elected for a term of ten years in the Court of Common Pleas, and 
in 1917, at a ripe age, but nevertheless young in spirit, he again placed his name 
in the primaries before the electors of Allegheny County for the nomination 
to the same office and received a more signal honor than was ever received 
by any judicial candidate in so closely a contested election. That a Jew should 
receive such a distinction in a popular election makes the occasion epoch- 
making in modern history. Of the 15 candidates for five vacant positions in 
the Common Pleas Court, Judge Cohen received 79,043 votes, about 80 per 

45 




v'er, in 



cent of all the votes cast, heading the list in the number of votes polled and 
receiving 11.453 votes more than the next highest candidate. 

Thus he discharged the obligations of a citizen. He did not, however, stop 
there, realizing that one has other obligations, namely, those of a neighbor 
and of a fellow Jew. This brought him into the field of philanthropy. He 
was connected with all charitable undertakings in Pittsburgh, particularly those 
ministering to the poor Jew. In the work of the Hebrew Relief Association 
or in that of the Gusky Orphanage, or in that of the Home for the Aged, no 
public undertaking could be expected to succeed if the services of Judge Cohen 
had not been enlisted. To this day he is a member of the Executive Board of 
the Federation of the Jewish Philanthropies. For many years he has been a 
Director of the Allegheny General Hospital. As far back as 1862 he was 
President of the Allegheny County Teachers' Association. To this day he is 
a member of the directorate of the Union of American Hebrew Congrega- 
tions. He was on the Board of the Western Pennsylvania Reform School at 
Morganza. From the very beginning he devoted a great deal of his attention 
to the Rodef Shalom Temple, into which' he came when it was in! its infancy 
and which he helped to build up, making it one of the most important religious 
institutions in this part of the country. He was Vice President of the con- 
gregation until 19 10, when he was elected President, succeeding the late 
Abraham Lippman to the office. As a public man he served not alone his local 
community. Active in the B'nai B'rith, he became President of District No. 3, 
I. O. B. B. He was one of the organizers of the Hebrew Union College lo- 
cated in Cincinnati. For a long time he was on the directorate of the Jewish 
Publication Society of America. He was connected with the National Jewish 
Hospital for Consumptives located in Denver. For many years he has been 
a life member of the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh. 

Here is indeed a busy and fruitful life, that affords the newer generation 
a criterion, a model for emulation. The personality of Judge Cohen, while 
it suggests primarily that of the patriarch and jurist, blends with it the type 
of the scholar and the man of affairs. He is well read, a forceful speaker, 
revealing extreme earnestness. Loyal in friendship, he evidently has in him 
that quality which inspires steadfast attachment and devotion in return. 

A sketch of the life of this man would be incomplete without some ref- 
erence at least to the public activity of his wife, Mrs. Carrie Naumberg 
Cohen. Her field has been charity. For half a century she has ministered 
to the poor of the city of Pittsburgh with a kindliness and genuine warm human 
sympathy which is rare and which makes Jewish charity an ideal for the high- 
est. In the Ladies' Aid Society she was associated for two generations with 
Mrs. Rosalia Rauh of sainted memory. This society amalgamated in 1880 
with the Hebrew Benevolent Society, the two forming the present United 
Hebrew Relief Association. Mrs. Cohen carried her activity into the United 
Hebrew Relief Association, in which she is still serving as Vice President. 
She has been connected with the Board of the J. M. Gusky Orphanage and 
Home of Western Pennsylvania since its inception. She has been a true Big 
Sister to the girls who have been raised in that institution. For years it has 
been her hobby to select those orphans who had an aptitude for music and 
to see to it that the proper education in that direction has been provided. Not 
alone in Jewish charity has Mrs. Cohen been active ; for many years she 
served on the Board of Directors of the Pittsburgh Association for the Im- 
provement of the Poor, and as a member of the Relief Committee of that 
association has been devoting herself untiringly to this very day. 



46 




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MAX COHEIV 
Cleveland, Ohio 







MAX COHEN 
Cleveland, O. 

All of the characteristics of the successful foreign-born Jew in America 
seem to be embodied in Max Cohen, of Cleveland, a man of sterling moral 
worth, business integrity and unusual benevolence. Like many young Russian 
Jews who have emigrated to this country, poor in pocket but rich in dreams 
and determination, Mr. Cohen, on his arrival in New York at the age of 18, 
began his uphill but persistent fight for money and position and won out by 
sheer force of character, the character which is so often the outcome of hard 
conditions in youth, particularly when given a background of good parentage. 
Born of Meyer Cohen, a Jewish scholar and agriculturist, and Annie, his wife, 
in Walkowisk, Suwalker, Guberne, Russian Poland, October 10, 1854, Mr. 
Cohen's only handicap on his arrival in America was poverty, the poverty of 
struggling youth in a strange land. Just how this lad of 18 "made good'' is a 
brave tale, beyond the scope of a brief biography, and only the hundreds of 
people he has succored and his own immediate family and friends can possibly 
know of the true worth of this good man. 

It is a far cry from the first barren years of Max Cohen's life as a worker 
in men's clothing at $7 a week in New York to the big, prosperous iron busi- 
ness conducted under the name of M. Cohen & Sons Co., at 1252 East 55th 
street, in Cleveland, Ohio, of which he is the head, a business of millions a 
year, which has made him rich beyond his boyhood's dream and enabled him 
to exercise to the full his natural tendency to charitableness. 

After four years in New York, when but 22 years of age, Max went into 
business for himself in Cleveland and prospered. He had but little money. 
Today he is known as one of the most successful men in that city, owner of 
an entire business block downtown and actively identified, at the age of 63, 
with the great iron interests which is one of its chiefest industries. 

Like all good Jews, however, Max Cohen's private life is the better part of 
him. He has a large family, three boys and five girls. His wife. Sarah 
Bialowsky, to whom he was married in 1875, and who has shared his earl}' 
vicissitudes and later successes, is well known in Cleveland societv as a charitv 
worker. She is the organizer and director of a Jewish Infants' Home, and 
like her husband, gives liberally to numerous benevolent institutions. This 
worthy couple belong to every charity in and around Cleveland, some 26 
societies in all, and also contribute to the Max Nathan Home in Chicago, the 
Jacob Joseph Rabbinical Home in New York, Mt. Sinai Hospital, both Denver 
sanitariums, all the Ishives in Russia and all the institutions in Jerusalem, 
Mr. Cohen is a member of the Congregation of Anshe Ames, and has been a 
member of Beis Medresh Agadmel for 41 years. He has held almost every 
office in this organization. He organized the Talmud Torah 34 years ago and 
is still a Director, also the Old Home, Free Loan, Jewish and Hebrew Relief 
societies, and is a director and member of many other organizations and Jew- 
ish charities — a list too long to enumerate, but indicating his character as noth- 
ing else could do. 

"When I landed in New York,'' said Mr. Cohen, "all I had was a capital 
of $6 in German money and I have never vet had any assistance from anv- 
body." 

His advice to the young is. "Work hard. Be strictly honest. Trv to get an 
education, and you will find many opportunities open to you." 

All of Mr. Cohen's children are successfully married, except one son, 
Abner L., who has been in business with his father, but is now drafted for 
service in the great world war. 



47 



MAX COHEN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rough treatment gives to the characters of men as well as to precious 
stones their lustre. The more the diamond is cut the more brightly it sparkles, 
and the trials which beset the souls of men work progressively from tribula- 
tion to patience, from patience to experience and from experience to hope. 

This is exemplified in the life of Mr. Max Cohen, who landed in Harris- 
burg, Pa., with but two cents in his pocket. 

He was born in Kavna, Gurberne, Russia, in March, 1864, and came to 
America in July, 1893. Without friends or money, he obtained a pack of 
goods on credit and started out selling them from house to house. He con- 
tinued tliis for five years and then deciding that the most profit lay in the 
iron and metal business, he opened a small yard, which was the beginning of 
a wonderful success which has crowned all his efforts since that time. 

The business soon grew to such large proportions that he was compelled 
to have assistance, so he took into partnership with him his two sons, who still 
assist their father in the conduct of their enormous business. 

Mr. Cohen was twice married and has 10 fine children, to whom he 
has given good educations, and they are all serving useful purposes in the 
world. Three daughters who have all graduated from high school are at home, 
one is still in school and one is cashier for her father. His daughter Lena is 
married to Mr. Solomon of Harrisburg. 

Jacob and Lewis Cohen are the two sons associated with their father un- 
der the name "Max Cohen Sons Co. Harry is still in College and Mose is al- 
ready in business for himself. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cohen are devoted to the promotion of many charities 
which are not regulated by creed or locality. Many distant cities are recipients 
of their kindness, one of the most prominent being the Denver Hospital. 

Thev are exceedingly liberal when called upon to aid any local philan- 
thropic or religious enterprise, and contribute liberally to Casar Israel and 
Hishka Mina Congregations, also Breth Abraham, Breth Sholoni and Liberty 
Lodge. 

Harrisburg is indeed fortunate in having within its gates a family of such 
sterling worth to the community. 



MAX COHEN AND HYMAN RUBENSTEIN 
Chelsea, Mass. 

It is our pleasure to relate the life histories of two prominent business 
men of Chelsea. Mass., whose interests have been identified for many years. 
We refer to Mr. Max Cohen and Mr. Hyman Rubenstein. of the firm of Cohen 
& Rubenstein, located at 215-17 Second street. 

Mr. Cohen was born in Kavno. Guberne, Russia, in September, 187S, his 
father, Solomon Cohen, being a Rabbi of his native town, and also a very 
learned Hebrew scholar. 

Mr. Cohen came to America in May, 1899. landing in Boston. Here he 
met Miss Lena Sander, and the following year they were married, going from 
Boston to Chelsea, Mass.. where thev began their new life with the small sum 
of $12. This Mr. Cohen invested in a horse and wagon, and started out to 
peddling vegetables. After the first season he turned his attention to junk, 
and in a short time was able to open a vard, where he continued until 1908. 
After a few years in the liquor business, where he was unsuccessful, he sold 
this interest and again engaged in the wholesale junk business with his present 
partner, where they have been highly successful. 

The Cohens have five children, two boys and three girls, all going to 

4S s 



school and well educated in music. Mr. Cohen is prominent in many fra- 
ternal organizations, being past President of I. O. B. A. and United Hebrews 
of America, past President of Hoves Achem and Anses Ford Congregation. 
He is also on the Board of Directors of these congregations and is a prominent 
member of the Foresters, Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows. and Y. M. H. A. 

His partner, Mr. Hyman Rubenstein, was born in Kavno, Guberne, Rus- 
sia, in 1877, and upon coming to America, found his first employment in a junk 
yard. During the several years in which he bought and sold junk and rags, 
he accumulated a valuable fund of knowledge which he brought to the busi- 
ness partnership formed later. 

He was married in Chelsea, Mass., in 1901, and has three children, all 
girls, who are being excellently educated. 

The Rubensteins belong to the same congregations as the Cohens, and 
both families are exceedingly generous in their gifts to charitable organiza- 
tions. 



SAMUEL COHEN 

Independence of spirit is a quality which is bound to prove a big asset 
to any young man just embarking upon a commercial career, and it is one of 
the distinguishing features of Jewish character. 

We have a fine example in the life history of Mr. Samuel Cohen, who 
was born in Vilna, Gurberne, Russia, in the year 1865. He was the son of 
Mr. Max Cohen of that city, who was engaged in the buying and selling of 
waste material. Twenty years later the family decided to move to America, 
and young Samuel's first experience in the new world was in New York, 
where he took up any employment which offered in order to make a living. 
After one year he went to Philadelphia, where he spent two years peddling, 
and then went to Lowell, Mass., and devoted several years to the same occupa- 
tion. In the meantime his father had established a waste material business in 
Lowell and the son decided to join him. Under the able management of father 
and son, the business, which is located at 61-81 Suffolk street, has attained 
great prosperity and both partners are very wealthy. 

Mr. Cohen was married in 1887 to a daughter of his own native Russia, 
and they have a lovely family of eight children, seven boys and one girl. 

Like many families during the last year, the Cohens have been called 
upon to give a son to the service of their country, and Max is now in France 
serving under the flag of the United States. Alex is learning the garment 
business and Leo is working for his father. The rest of the children are going 
to school. 

Mr. Cohen is quite prominent in the Montefero Society, the Hebrew Free 
Loan Society, I. O. B. A., and the Odd Fellows. He is also past President 
of the Jewish Congregation of Lowell. Both himself and wife are always 
counted upon for generous contributions to all charities, as they are unfailing 
in their liberality. 



49 



SOL. COHEN 

While many men have achieved success without having the advantages of 
cultural and educational influences in the home, the boy who enjoys these 
advantages certainly is possessed of a valuable asset which will carry him far 
in any business or profession he may choose. 

The earliest remembrances which Sol. Cohen has of his father are asso- 
ciated with his profound knowledge of Hebrew, to the study of which he 
devoted his entire life, and who can say how largely this educational atmos- 
phere served to mould the plastic mind of his young son? 

Solomon Cohen was born in Suwalker, Guber, Russia, in 1878, the son 
of Benjamin and Bashe Cohen. Here he received his education, but finding 
little opportunity to gratify his rising ambition for a business career, he said 
good-bye to his parents and sailed for America in 1899. 

Landing in New York, his first venture was the sale of notions. Later 
he engaged in the installment business, but finally came to Franklin, Pa., where 
he is now the leading grocer of his city. 

A few years after Sol. came to America his parents followed him. His 
tather died in 1914 at the age of 84, and his mother still resides at Titusville, 
Pa. ■ 

Mr. Cohen was married October 11, 1903, to Miss Rebecca Lieberman of 
New York City, who has been a most charming and capable wife and mother. 

They have three children, two boys and one girl, all going to school. 
Doubtless their brilliant academic education will sustain the Cohen standard 
of scholarship. 

Mr. Cohen is a man of wide influence in his community, both himself 
and wife devoting much time and money to the promotion of welfare and 
philanthropic work. 

Mr. Cohen is chairman of the Society for Assistance of Jewish War Suf- 
ferers, and an ardent supporter of the Jewish Emigration Society. He is 
.one of the national directors of the Denver and Pittsburgh Orphans' Homes 
and a valued member of the Board of Trade. Also a member of Orthodox Oil 
City Shule. 



ISAAC COLP 

In the village of Vilna, Guberne, Russia, October 25, 1870, was an event 
of no small significance for Toria and Yenta Colp, when there was born to 
them a son whom they named Isaac. 

Isaac left his native town in 1891, and landed in New York. From there 
he came to Springfield, Ohio, where he peddled junk for 10 years, being 
quite successful. The eagerness with which he entered into his work soon 
brought him more success. He went to Jamestown, Ohio, opened another 
yard, which was running for 14 years. 

It is true, success or no success, we all get the craving for a change. 
Mr. Colp moved to Xenia, Ohio, and opened a yard under the firm name of 
Xenia Supply Co., where he owns his own home and business property and is 
doing very well. 

Mr. Colp's advice to young men is this, "Be honest, develop a good char- 
acter and work hard." 

Mr. Colp was married in 1889 in Europe to Miss Ida Toben, and together 
they have dispensed charity to every worthy cause, as well as to the local 
hospitals and the Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums. 

They have three promising children, one son and two daughters. Jacob 

50 



and Rebecca in business with their father, and Sara married to Joseph Kastner 
of Piqua, Ohio. 

Mr. Colp is also a member of B'nai B'rith. Masons and K. of P. 



SAMUEL COOKE 

Our Jewish nation seems destined to go down in history as one which has 
shown its great versatility in many lines of endeavors. Xever has any race 
seemed so able to adapt itself to the needs and circumstances of the times as 
our own Jewish race. The Jew has ever been known as a believer in justice 
and right. Back through the times of persecution by the Pharaohs and down 
through the ages until the present day, the Jew's existence has not always been 
the most pleasant. It was a constant struggle for self-existence ; and all 
through this the Jew was taught the moral lessons of what it means to suffer 
for one's faith. Thus has the Jew fought with all his soul where justice was 
at stake. 

At the present day we are again engrossed in such a struggle where democ- 
racy and freedom are at stake, and the American Jew, although his race has 
had no part in any war confabs, has seen the justice of the course of the 
United States and has freely given his all to do what little he could. What a 
proud day it must have been for Emanuel and Anna Cooke when three of 
their sons left for the army in the cause of democracy, and with what mis- 
givings did their fourth son, Samuel, stay behind because of physical dis- 
abilities. 

Born in the Battersea, a suburb of London, England, on December 24, 
1876, Samuel Cooke came to Xew York in the summer of 1884. destined to 
enter a new life in a new country. As our modern hero he began his adven- 
tures bv selling newspapers on the Bowery, later doing various kinds of work 
at the Saratoga race tracks, at Long Branch, and at Jerome Park. His spirit 
for venture lured him on and he subsequently became a jockey under an 
assumed name, for fear his parents would not consent to his new profession. 

This same spirit later took him to Cleveland, where he engaged in the 
manufacture of cigars, keeping a pool parlor in connection with his cigar 
establishment. Samuel Cooke also found time to settle down and enjoy family 
life. His daughter Ada seems destined for a business career, having graduated 
with high honors from Spencerian College. She is also well known among 
Cleveland's music admirers, for she has for several years studied music under 
various masters, the latest one being Mr. B. Landino. Mr. Cooke's son, Ed- 
ward, a young man of seventeen, is at present enrolled at Annapolis with a 
view of becoming a naval officer. 

At the present time Mr. Samuel Cooke is located at 1350 Ontario, with 
a cafe and restaurant, known as Cooke's Inn. He has ever found himself 
ready and willing to partake in the Jewish affairs of his city, having served 
successfully as officer in the various societies with which he has been con- 
nected. The Bnei Jeshurun Temple, the B'nai B'rith, the Bais Abraham and 
the Hungarian Aid Society feel highly honored with the membership of the 
benevolent Air. Samuel Cooke, who is also an active member of the Odd Fel- 
lows, Eagles and the Moose. 



51 



SAMUEL COOPER 

The dealer in waste materials has at last come into his own. Not only 
is he able to make handsome profits at the present time, but his business has 
gained importance and recognition since the beginning of the war, such" as it 
had never acquired before. This is due to the fact that conservation is the 
watchword of the hour and is one of the elements which is helping us win the 
war. 

Prominent among" the dealers in waste metal and iron is the firm National 
Smelting & Refining Co., represented by Cooper & Temchin, located at No. 
119 Illinois street, Detroit, Mich. Mr. Cooper, the senior member of the firm, 
was born in Rovna, Valina, Russia, in September, 1879, and came to America 
in July, 1910. He landed in Detroit and began working in the junk business for 
$4.50 per week. He remained one year and from his meager earnings saved $75 
besides sending money for the support of his family in Russia. He then went 
into business and after four years of very hard work, during which time he got 
the business established in a fair way towards success, he joined forces with 
his present partner, Mr. Temchin, and their progress has been very rapid. 

Mr. Cooper was married in Russia to Miss Zipa Schnei, and they have 
four children, all girls, who are still in Russia. 

Mr. Cooper is very active in religious and educational affairs, being one 
of the founders of Beth Amadrash Agudal School and was the first President 
of same for five years. This institution is today considered one of the finest 
schools in the city. Mr. Cooper is also active in a number of other organiza- 
tions and is most liberal in his gifts to charity. 



ISRAEL CORMAN 

Although Mr. Israel Corman, one of the older residents of Massachusetts, 
has retired from active service, he is still a prominent figure in the business 
life of the community, as through his efforts the American Bag & Burlap 
Company was built up into the large and successful concern which his sons 
are so ably managing at the present time, in Chelsea, Mass. 

Mr. Corman was born in Volina, Guberne, Russia, and came to America 
many years ago. He began working in a factory for three dollars per week, 
and later in a junk yard for six dollars per week. Then he decided to go into 
business for himself, and started out peddling junk, but not being very suc- 
cessful, he went to work in a bag shop, but the desire for being in business 
for himself was still within him, and he started peddling again with his son 
Samuel. This venture was more successful and they soon saved enough money 
to start the nucleus of the present business. After a while business progressed 
and Louis and Benjamin were also taken into the business, and today Samuel, 
Louis and Benjamin are the active managers of the institution. The three 
daughters and youngest son are all attending school. 

We feel that a word should be spoken regarding Mrs. Corman, who is 
very active socially and an ardent promoter of the various charities, to which 
the entire family are liberal contributors. They are all members of the Russian 
Orthodox Congregation, and Mr. Corman is Treasurer of the Vischiritz Relief 
Society. 



52 



JOSEPH CORMAN 

Few things are impracticable in themselves. It is usually from want of 
application, not of opportunity, that men fail of success. 

When we have before us so many instances of men coming to our shores 
friendless, in a strange land without money, surrounded by new faces and an 
unknown language, yet conquering all these obstacles by sheer tenacity of 
purpose, we should be ashamed to ever acknowledge discouragement. 

Such is the life story of Joseph Corman, son of Zelik and Fanny Corman, 
who was born in Rorchonsk, Russia, September 15, 1885. 

" He came to America, landing in Cleveland during the winter of 1906, 
and for a short time worked in a clothing shop. However, the calling of his 
father, who was a dealer in iron and metal, made a strong appeal to him, so 
he started in this line of business in a small way. Seven years later he came 
to Canton, Ohio, where, with Mr. Heller, he opened an iron and metal ware- 
house under the name of Corman & Heller, which is the business he is engaged 
in today, and which has proven very successful. 

He was married January 2, 1908, to Miss Bessie Schwartz of Cleveland, 
Ohio, who has been of wonderful assistance to her husband and is giving their 
two children a home training that will be of the utmost benefit to them during 
their whole lives. 

He is a member of Old Schule and very liberal to all charities appealing 
to him for aid. 



JACOB M. COUSINS 

Jacob M. Cousins, whose great success in life may be attributed to his 
unceasing industry and perseverance, was born in Suwalk, Guberne, Russia, 
May 15, 1876, son of Sam and Freda Cousins. 

While yet very young, Jacob was sent to America, the land of gold, landed 
in New York in April, 1894, began working at his trade of blacksmithing at 
$2 per day, remaining at it for six months, but, not being afraid of work and 
realizing $2 but a meager salary, he came to Toledo and with a partner went 
into the meat business. This being out of his line, and young as he was, he 
showed much of the business skill which was to make him rich in later days. 
He left this business and began peddling junk and for three years he did well 
at that. 

Now fairly embarked, he advanced on the road to fortune steadily, ex- 
hibiting great exactness, fairness and energy in all that appertained to busi- 
ness. He then came to Kenton, Ohio, and opened a yard, was there for two 
years, then sold out and came to Mansfield, Ohio. 

In 1908 he met with reverses through failure of several firms in which 
he. was interested and although left penniless, he had something of more 
value, a good name. He began again at the beginning and todav is doing the 
biggest business in the territory and considered very wealthy, besides being 
Treasurer of Kenney Foundry Co., stockholder of the Hughes-Keenan Co., 
American Clay Products Co., photoplay houses in Toledo, and many others. 

His wife, who was Gussie Eppstein, daughter of Julius and Lottie Epp- 
stein, of Toledo, has always been active in his business, and being highly edu- 
cated, always, even to thio day, manages the finances of his business, besides 
being very active in the Red Cross, Ladies' Aid Society, Eastern Star and 
K. of P. " 

Let me say here, her brother, Joseph O. Eppstein, of Toledo, was the 
youngest member of the House of Representatives from this state, being at that 

S3 



time only 22 years of age, and is now Assistant District Attorney General of 
Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cousins contribute to all charities, including Denver and 
Los Angeles hospitals, Orphans' and Aged Home in Cleveland, and while 
they have no children of their own, they raised one girl, who married one of 
the Eppstein boys of Toledo and are now bringing up a boy who bids fair 
to follow the footsteps of his adopted parents and become a pride to them. 

Mr. Cousins is a member of Temple in Mansfield, Ohio, B'nai B'rith, 
Elks, Masons, K. of P., Odd Fellows, Foresters, Moose, Chamber of Com- 
merce and Auto Club. 

"Hard work, integrity and perseverance'' is his advice to the younger 
generation. 



JOSEPH COUSINS 

If experience is the best teacher, she is also a most exacting task mistress. 
She teaches us that the road to success is not to be traversed in a day. We pass 
slowly, step by step, learning life's lesson bit by bit. This is the only way to 
wisdom ; the only way to wealth ; the only way to honor. 

So it was with Joseph Cousins, who learned the value and uses of iron 
in the foundry where it comes white hot and molten to be welded or moulded 
into a thousand purposes for mankind. 

Where men sweat and toil in an inferno of heat that we may enjoy the 
modern conveniences of civilization. 

Joseph Cousins was born in Toledo, Ohio, June 6, 1885, where his father, 
Samuel Cousins, was engaged in the iron and metal business. 

Young Joseph, being of a very independent disposition, did not go to 
work for his father, but decided to serve his apprenticeship in a foundry 
where he could obtain a first-hand knowledge of metals. 

He first worked in his native city, then in Ft. Wayne, Ind., and finally 
went to Lima, Ohio, where he was employed by M. Bernstein & Co. 

His technical knowledge and unusual executive ability soon made his 
services very valuable to his employers, who made him a member of the com- 
pany, where he has remained ever since. 

'Mr. Cousins is yet a very young man, with the best years of life before 
him. and, judging by the brilliant achievements of his earlier years, will yet 
become a national figure in the business world. 

He is a prominent member of the Elks. 



SAMUEL CREMAR 

Versatility is the greatest asset which a business man can possess. 

The capacity to direct one's energies to the accomplishment of any task 
which comes to hand has carried many a man swiftly up to the summit of 
success and has held him there against tremendous odds. 

When Samuel Cremar landed in New York he was only 19 years old 
and had absolutely no preconceived ideas regarding a business career. Going 
to his brother in Bangor, Me., he was given credit for the purchase of a few 

54 



notions which he started out to sell as a means of livelihood. His next occu- 
pation, radically different from the first, was that of house painting, and this 
he pursued with the same diligence for the following eighteen months. 

But the strong desire to be in business for himself, which is inherent in 
every progressive spirit, led him to Canton, Ohio, where he started an iron 
and metal business. From there he went to Newark, Ohio, and finally to 
Parkersburg, W. Ya., where he joined his present partner in the business which 
they are now conducting so successfully. 

He was married in 1903 to Miss Shara Friedman of Norwich. Conn., and 
to her sympathetic co-operation he attributes much of his success. They have 
five children, four boys and one girl, who are being thoroughly educated in 
musical as well as along academic lines. 

Mr. Cremar is a member of B'nai Jacob, B'nai B'rith, and is also affiliated 
with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Moose. 

His liberal contributions to the Denver and Los Angeles hospitals, the 
Old Age and Orphans' Home and the many local charities which never appeal 
to him in vain have been the means of alleviating much suffering and has 
brightened the lives of thousands who have been recipients of his beneficence. 



OSCAR CUTLER 



The great mistake which many American-born young men make, is that 
thev are not willing to serve the severe apprenticeship which seems almost 
necessary to a successful business career. This accounts largely for the fact 
that many young immigrants have outdistanced them in the race to a business 
success. 

We have such an example in the life of Oscar Cutler, who was born in 
Yolma, Guberne, Russia, in 1870, the son of Wolf and Hanna Cutler. He 
came to this country in 1899, and started working in a junk shop in Chelsea. 
Mass., for $3 per week and board. While Mr. Cutler realized that this was a 
very meager salary and that he could make a great deal more money in some 
other way, he wisely continued for two years, ac- 
quiring an intimate knowledge of the business 
which proved most valuable to him when he 
started in for himself. He is today conducting one 
of the largest establishments in Chelsea, handling 
all kinds of metals and rubber. His plant is located 
at 46 Arlington street, where he owns the entire 
building and all equipment. 

Mr. Cutler was married in 1891 to Miss Bessie 
Levine, and they have five children, three boys and 
two girls, who are all being fitted to occupy useful 
and prominent positions. The eldest son. Xathan. 
was in business with his father until our country 
became engaged in the war, at which time he patri- 
otically shouldered arms in his country's cause. 
Benny is studying Medicine in Tuft College. The 
one daughter is a high school graduate and a 
younger son and daughter are still in school. 

Mr. Cutler is very prominent in all charitable activities and is past Treas- 
urer of the Anses Schwat Congregation, of which he is also one of the found- 
ers. He is also very active in f. O. B. A. 




BENNY CUTTLER 

The career of Mr. Benny Cuttler is one which should inspire every young 
man to renewed effort in the face of .discouragement, as it is another exempli- 
fication of the old truism, "Where there is a will, there is a way." 

Mr. Cuttler was horn in Kiev, Guberne, Russia, in March, 1876, and 
came to America in the year 1907. Finding his way to Chelsea, Mass., he 
worked in a blacksmith's shop for about eight months, at which time the town 
suffered a severe fire, and Mr. Cuttler worked on the streets clearing away 
debris for 30c per day. Later he received $1 per day, and was able to save 
$12, with which he began buying and selling junk. 

He was so successful that he saved $1,000 the first eight months, and 
then decided to go into the teaming business. Prior to this time he had been 
sending money back to Europe for the support of his family, but he now felt' 
justified in sending for them. However, just before they arrived he was so 
unfortunate as to lose his horses and had to start all over again. 

Obtaining employment at only $9 per week, and with his family just 
arrived from Russia, they were all obliged to endure extreme privation, during 
which time Mr. Cuttler supported them by digging ditches or any other hard 
labor which came to hand, until he had saved $150, with which lie went into 
business, and this was the first step toward the big success which he has 
achieved in wool scrap and burlap. 

The Cnttlers have eight children, three boys and five girls. Morris is in 
business with his father. Paul is going to Burdett College. The balance of 
the children are all in school and are accomplished in music. 

The Cuttlers are liberal in their gifts to Charities, and Mr. Cuttler is 
Treasurer of Orthodox Congregation. He is also prominent in Talmud Torah, 
Liberty Lodge and Progressive Society. 



HYMAN CUTTLER 

Prominent in the business life of Chelsea, Mass., is the firm of H. Cuttler 
& Co., of which Mr. Hyman Cuttler is the directing genius. 

Mr. Cuttler was born in Volina, Guberne, Russia, in August, 1870, the son 
of Morris Cuttler, a prominent mill owner and scholar. 

A good demonstration of the qualities of initiative and courage which 
Mr. Cuttler possesses is the fact that he was 36 years old at the time he came 
to America, an age when a less bold spirit would hardly consider starting in 
upon a new career. 

Mr. Cuttler came to America in 1906, and coming direct to Chelsea, Mass., 
started in a rubber shop at the small salary of $6 per week, in order to have 
an opportunity of learning the business. After three months he went into 
business for himself and has been successful in the highest degree. 

Mr. Cuttler was married in April, 1900, to Miss Bessie Cutler. They 
have six children, three boys and three girls, who are all being excellently 
educated. 

In addition to the excellent home training which Mrs. Cuttler has given 
her children, she has found time for activity in many prominent social affairs, 
and devotes a great deal of time and money to the promotion of charities. 
Mr. Cuttler is prominent in both the Orthodox Congregation and the United 
Hebrews of America. He is also a member of the Foresters. 



56 










M 







i 


3ttj 




WOLF DANIELS 





?5# 




§*< 




1 





MYER DANA 

Mr. Myer Dana, who is one of the leaders in real estate and banking in 
Boston, started life very humbly. He came to America some twenty-seven 
years ago from a little village near Vilna, Russia, practically without a cent. 
Arriving in Boston, he became a peddler ; at first he sold matches, then dry 
goods and later on all sorts of merchandise on the intallment plan. In 1895 
he found himself with an accumulated capital of $1,200, which was just suffi- 
cient to buy the first lot. He started in the real estate business by building his 
first house. The net proceeds of his first two years in this venture brought 
him large returns. He opened a real estate office in partnership with a Mr. 
Levin under the firm name of Dana & Levin, continuing it under this title 
until 191 1, when the partnership was dissolved and he started in business on 
his own account. His office is at present located at the Pemberton Building of 
Boston and his business has been remarkably successful. 

The Congregation Adath Yeshurun numbers Mr. Dana among its most 
active members. He is one of the organizers of this important Jewish relig- 
ious center and during the construction of the building was Vice President. 
Financial Secretary and a member of the Building Committee. He is one of 
the charter members of Beth Israel Hospital, was Chairman of its Building 
Committee and is now Vice President and Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee. Mr. Dana is also active in the order B'nai B'rith, to which he has be- 
longed for many years, and the Boston Hebrew Educational Alliance, to which 
institution he presented, at a banquet given in October, 19 16, a mortgage 
which he held. 

Mr. Dana's wife, nee Etta Finn, comes from the government of Suvalk. 
Russia, and is the daughter of Chain Finn, one of the most prominent Jews 
of his native place. Her grandfather was the renowned Rabbi Elimelech Meir 
Shapiro of Kovno and her ancestors were all high in the Jewish councils of 
learning. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Dana took place on May 24, 1896, 
and the marriage was blessed with three highly accomplished children : Ger- 
trude, the oldest daughter, is a graduated of the Boston High School and of 
the local seminary and is now a student at Seamen's College ; Herman gradu- 
ated from the grammar school at the age of eleven, completed his studies at 
the Boston Latin School at 15, and now, at the age of nineteen, has already 
obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard College. While at the 
Latin School he received every prize awarded, including the Franklin medal, 
at his graduation. In Harvard he made a very creditable record and he is a 
thorough Hebrew scholar. Lesta, the youngest daughter, is in the Boston Latin 
School and has also studied Hebrew. As a matter of fact, all of Mr. Dana's 
children have received a Hebrew education. He is a modern Orthodox and 
himself a Talmudic scholar. 

Mrs. Dana belongs to nearly every charitable institution in Boston and is 
also a member of the B'nai B'rith. 



WOLF DANIELS 

It is one of the strange paradoxes of human nature that ease, opportunity 
and early advantages often invite slothfulness, while hardships and privation 
bring out the fine gold of character. 

In the person of Mr. Wolf Daniels we find one of the older generations 
of Jews, who had a hard struggle for all the advantages he and his children 
now enjoy. He was born March 15, 1855, in Suwalker, Guberne, Russia, and 
came to America in 1882. During the first six years he peddled junk, and later 

57 



opened a small yard of his own, which under his able management grew to 
such proportions that after ten years he sent for his brother-in-law, Mr. Miller, 
and took him into the firm. They are now operating under the name of 
Daniels & Miller, and are one of the largest concerns of the kind in the state. 
The city of Greenburg, Pa., has reason to be proud of this institution, as it 
affords employment for a number of people. 

Mr. Daniels was married in Russia in 1871 to Miss Anna Miller, and they 
have a fine family of five boys and six girls. Four of his children are mar- 
ried, while two sons are today serving their country in the great war. The 
entire family have been well educated, both in musical and commercial lines. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Daniels are liberal contributors to Denver and Los 
Angeles hospitals and the Old Age and Orphans' Home of Pittsburgh and the 
Orphans' Home of Erie, Pa. 

Mr. Daniels is a member of Congregation B'nai Israel, B'nai B'rith and the 
Protected Home Circle. 

His advice to aspiring young men is, "Work hard, be persevering and 
honest in all your dealings." 



MAX A. DANIEL 

Although Mr. Max A. Daniel is still a comparatively young man, he has 
arisen to a position of great prominence in the business world without outside 
assistance. 

He was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in June, 1880, and came to 
Boston, Mass., with his parents in 1891. As his father was having a severe 
struggle to establish himself, young Max was obliged to not only earn his 
own living, but to contribute something to the sup- 
port of his family. This he continued for six years 
or more, when he found employment in an iron 
and metal yard, spending a year and learning all 
the details of the business. He then opened an es- 
tablishment of his own in Boston, where he re- 
mained until 1910. 

At that time he built a plant in Chelsea, Mass., 
and in 1915 discontinued the house in Boston, as he 
wished to concentrate his business in one location. 
He is today a verv wealthy man and conducting one 
of the largest plants in the country. 

Mr. Daniel was married in Boston. Mass., in 
October, 1905, to Miss Amelia Levine. They have 
one son, who is going to school, and is being edu- 
cated in Hebrew. 

Among Mr. Daniel's man}' patriotic and fra- 
ternal affiliations may be mentioned his membership on the Liberty Loan Com- 
mittee, Deputy Grand Chancellor Knights of Pythias, Board Director Congre- 
gation Adath Yeshurine and Master of Exchequer of Knights of Pythias. He 
is also a member of I. O. B. A., Odd Fellows, Talmud Torah, Y. M. H. A., 
and the Hebrew Free Loan Association, of which he is a life member. He is 
a liberal patron of the Denver Hospital, Immigration Society and the Federated 
Jewish Charities of Boston, as well as the Old Age Home and the Children's 
Home of Boston. 

Mrs. Daniel is very prominent socially, and is also a member of all of 
the prominent women's organizations. 




SAMUEL DANNEL 

In Reading, Pa., at 707 Molino street, is situated the Reading Rag & Metal 
Company, one of the leading industries of the city. This business is conducted 
by two brothers, of whom Samuel Dannel is the senior partner. 

Mr. Samuel Dannel was born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, January 15, 
1870, the son of Abraham and Sahra Dannel. His father was engaged in the 
world's most ancient and honorable occupation — agriculture — and was a very 
accomplished Jewish scholar as well. 

In the spring of 1899 Mr. Dannel decided to come to America, and came 
direct to Reading, Pa., where an uncle resided. He began working in a junk 
yard and was there seven 3'ears, during which time he not only accumulated 
a small capital, but also all necessary knowledge of the business. He then 
started into business with his brother Danil, which partnership has proved 
exceedingly successful, as is very obvious to any one looking over their fine 
plant in Reading. 

Mr. Dannel was married November 8, 1904, to Miss Katie Gittleson of 
Reading, and they have five children, two boys and three girls, three of whom 
are old enough to go to school. 

Mr. and Airs. Dannel are most generous contributors to all charities and 
are also prominently connected with the B'nai Chean Congregation. Mr. 
Dannel is also prominent in Kasher Israel. 



JACOB DAVIDSON 

To one who has made a careful study of biography, one of the most 
impressive features is the fact that so few men find their true vocation in life 
until they have passed through many experiments and failures. 

However, we occasionally find a man who through strong tendencies of 
heredity or being gifted with an unusually keen power of self-analysis, is able 
to select his life work at an early age and pursue it with success. 

Such is the first chapter in the life history of Jacob Davidson, which we 
esteem it a great pleasure to record. 

He w-as born in Divinisky, Russiar July 7, 1891. His father was a man 
of scholarly attainments and also a successful merchant, so his son came into 
the world well endowed with a strong mentalitv and adeptness for his future 
career. 

He came to America in 1906 and secured a position as clerk for M. D. 
Shannon. Cleveland, Ohio, at the small salary of $4 per week. However, he 
was gradually raised to $12 per week, which he was receiving at the expiration 
of three years. 

At this time he made the fortunate decision that his future interests could 
he best served in a business of his own, so he started out buying out bankrupt 
stores and job lots of goods, disposing of same at a profit. 

This he continued for six years, when he opened his present store at 5634 
Broadway, where business has been rapidly increasing for the past two years. 

Possessed as he is of such natural ability and true merchandising in- 
stinct, together with a seemingly limitless power of concentration upon the 
business at hand, Mr. Davidson has before him a brilliant future which his- 
torians of Cleveland will be glad to follow. 

While care and consideration for the poor and unfortunate are attributes 
which we usually associate with more mature vears. Mr. Davidson is most 
zealous in his contributions to the various charities of his city, and he makes 
no distinction in race or creed. All share alike in his beneficence. 

59 



SAMUEL DAVIS 



No man is liberally educated unless he has obtained a thorough knowledge 
of human nature. It is a business asset for the lack of which no amount of 
academic training can possibly compensate. That this is best acquired by first- 
hand dealing with men of all walks of life has been amply proven in the 
histories of some of our foremost business men. One whom we have in mind 
is Mr. Samuel Davis of Jamestown, N. Y., who has felt the keen edge of many 
vicissitudes, and who has the distinction of having overcome these difficulties 
after reaching middle life. 

Born in Negrosht, Roumania, in December, 1865, he remained in his native 
land until June, 1906, when he came to America. 

Landing in New York with but a few dollars, 

he spent three weeks searching for work, but with- 
out success. When his small fund had dwindled to 
to only one dollar he came to Jamestown and found 
employment in an iron and metal yard at $6 per 
week, which small wage after a number of months 
was gradually increased to $9 per week. In the fol- 
lowing year, by the exercise of the greatest econ- 
omy, he was able to save enough money to send for 
his wife and family, whom he had left in Roumania 
until such time as he was established in America. 

Feeling that his energies could best be directed 
toward the establishment of a business of his own, 
he set about collecting waste paper, and four years 
later opened a yard for the handling of this busi- 
ness on both a wholesale and retail basis. This 
business, under his remarkable management, has 

grown to enormous proportions, and from the profits of same he has also ac- 
quired a considerable amount of real estate. 

His wife, who was before her marriage Miss Pessa Lewis, Iras been a 
wonderful wife and mother and has trained their boys in such a manner as 
to make them worthy custodians of the multiplicity of interests which their 
father will some day turn over to them. 

Four of the boys are already assisting' their father in the conduct of the 
business, while the youngest child is still in school. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Davis have devoted much of their time and wealth 
to the promotion of the various charitable interests, not only of their city but 
throughout the nation, prominent among them being the Denver and Los 
Angeles hospitals, all the Yishivas, the Hebrew Beth El and Cemetery Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. Davis is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows and Eagles, and" 
his various beneficent activities have woven themselves into the lives of many 
people in Jamestown, who have reason to be grateful for his able assistance. 




BEN DUBERSTEIN 

The shaping of our lives is our own divinely appointed task. We may 
make them things of beauty or ugliness, just as we will. No opposition is 
too difficult, no handicap too great, if the fine, free spirit of the man goes forth 
bravely to meet them. 

In Minsker, Guberne, Russia, forty-two years ago there began a life that 



60 



was to develop into a shining example of accomplishment under difficulties 
which would have completely overwhelmed a less 
dauntless spirit. 

Ben Duherstein's father, although a successful 
merchant and a man of considerable scholarship, 
early found that the narrow confine of their native 
town did not provide sufficient scope for the activi- 
ties of his ambitious son, so in 1900 we find Ben on 
his way to America with no money, but a high hope 
and determination to succeed. 

Landing in New York, he suffered all the pangs 
of poverty and disillusionment which it has ever 
been the lot of an alien to meet, but Ben saw riches 
in material which other men cast aside, and com- 
ing to Dayton, Ohio, he commenced collecting old 
iron, first with a push cart, then with a wagon. 
Accumulating a little money, he started a metal 
brokerage business, and here began the phenomenal 
success that has marked every step of his progress 
present. 

He was married just before he came to America, to Dora Simonowitz, 
who accompanied her husband to the new land of opportunity, and has bravely 
stood beside him at every precarious moment of hiscareer. 

They have five children, three boys and two girls, all going to school. 

Mr. Duberstein is a member of Beth Jacob, President of Talmud Torah. 
Vice President of B'nai B'rith, an active' member of the Odd Fellows and 
Zionist Society. Both himself and wife subscribe to the Los Angeles and 
Denver hospitals and Mrs. Duberstein is a staunch supporter of the Auxil- 
iary of Talmud Torah. 




lieu Diilterstein 

from that time to the 



NATHAN DEZEN 

Generations are to eternity as a fleeting moment is in the lives of men. 
From father to son comes a great heritage of the world's unfinished work 
which he in turn must push a little further toward completion. There is no 
pause in the mighty progress of development, never a time when our labors 
can quite be laid down. 

So it was with Nathan Dezen. who came with his parents from their 
native Russia to find new opportunities in the western world. He was born 
July 5, 1889, in Padolsky, Guberne. Russia, where his father conducted a 
wholesale business in dried fruits. 

When Nathan was only eleven years old his parents came to America, 
landing in New York, but shortly removing to Rhode Island. His father, fully 
realizing the value of an education as equipment for a successful business 
career, sent him to school for six years and then took him into the iron and 
metal business, which he in the meantime had established. 

Here he gained a world of practical experience, and six years later, having 
saved sufficient capital, he started into business for himself at Wellsburg, 
W. Va. After four years, which were successful in every particular, he came 
to Steubenville, Ohio, where he has remained ever since, his brother-in-law, 
Mr. Harry Fisher, and himself having bought the firm of Berger & Jones. 
They are doing a wonderful business and furnish employment for a large 
number of men. 



61 



Mr. Dezen was married July 4, 1908, to Miss Theresa Fisher, and they 
have four lovely children, three of whom are old enough to go to school. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Dezen are active in all charitable movements in their 
city and also contribute liberally to the Los Angeles and Denver hospitals. 
Mr. Dezen is a member of the Maccabees, the Congregation B'nai Israel of 
Steubenville and B'nai B'rith. 



JOSEPH DUNN 



Russia, August 2, li 



Every man whose life has been unusually successful owes to posterity 
and to the world at large a history of his success and how he achieved it. 
Thus the study of biography becomes one of the most instructive and inspiring 
studies which can possibly be presented to the youth of our country. 

It is with great pleasure that we are able to publish the life story of one 
who had to meet and overcome many discouragements and misfortunes ; who 
tried many vocations before finding the one work to which he was adapted, 
who pushed forward with unfaltering faith in the ultimate victory of perse- 
verance over adverse conditions. 

Joseph Dunn was born in Grodna, Guberne, 
and remained in his native country until 1898, when, 
having accumulated a small capital, he decided to 
try his fortune in America. He did not come di- 
rectly to the United States, but went to England and 
from there to St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, 
landing on western soil with $1,800. His first busi- 
ness venture netted him a loss of $600. Selling out, 
he came to Boston, Mass., and thence to Lowell, 
Mass., where he lost all his money in the cattle 
business. Penniless and friendless, he went to New 
York and walked the streets looking for work. All 
that presented itself was a job in a butcher shop at 
$3 per week, which he accepted. He only remained 
two. weeks, however, until he had an opportunity 
to go to work in a packing house at $4.50 per day. 
Here his business ability found due recognition and 
the firm put him in charge of a shop at Hartford, 
Conn., where he was very successful. 

However, he was not content unless engaging in a business of his own, so 
he tried several other ventures with indifferent success until he engaged in 
the iron and metal business. 

This, together with' the large commission business to which he now de- 
votes his energies, have proven successful in every way, proving the truth of 
the old maxim, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again." 

He was married in 1903 to Miss Rosa Faverman, and they have two 
children, a boy and a girl, who not only go to school, but are being thoroughly 
educated in music, both attending t he conservatory, where Carrie studies piano 
and Meyer the violin. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Dunn are very charitable and do not confine their 
activities along this line to local organizations, as many worthy causes all over 
the country are recipients of their generosity. 




02 



BENJAMIN DUSHMAN 

The human temperatment at best has somewhat the same consistency as 
a rubber ball ; the harder it falls, the higher it rebounds. 

This accounts for the ultimate success of so many men who, laboring 
under the most adverse circumstances, emerge finally triumphant over seem- 
ingly overwhelming difficulties. 

Such dearly won achievements stand as mighty beacon lights of inspira- 
tion to the youth of our land. 

Such is the story of Benjamin Dushman, who, at the age of 19, landed 
at the gates of our country without money, friends or influence of any sort 
whatsoever. 

He was born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, December 22, 1863, and came to 
America in the summer of 1882, landing in Philadelphia, where he worked 
at odd jobs for six months, which only averaged about $3 per week. We next 
find him in Pittsburgh selling chair bottoms and working in an iron foundry, 
and from his meager earnings he managed to help his father in Russia and 
save $160, with which he went to Canada. This venture, while a failure 
financially, was one of the happiest moves of his career, as he here met Miss 
Racheal A. Newman, who later became his wife and has been a wonderful 
help and inspiration to him in all the subsequent events of his life. 

From Canada he came to Baltimore, Md., but there met with severe 
reverses which left him with practically nothing but an excellent reputation 
for business integrity, which, after all, is a man's best asset. His last and 
finally successful enterprise developed into the flourishing iron and metal 
business which he is conducting today in Huntington, W. Va. 

Mr. Dushman states that the first requisite in business is absolute hon- 
esty ; the next, finding the vocation for which you are best adapted. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dushman have five children, two married and three still in 
school. 

That Mr. and Mrs. Dushman never forgot those less fortunate than them- 
selves is evidenced by their liberality in the matter of charities. 

Among, some of the more prominent organizations grateful for their 
beneficence may be mentioned the Jewish Congregation in Huntington, B'nai 
B'rith, Denver and Los Angeles hospitals. Orphans' homes in Cleveland, Ohio, 
and Erie, Pa., and the Immigration Aid Society. 



HERMAN EICHNER 

At No. 577 Hastings street, Detroit, Mich., is located the office of a man 
whose ability has helped to shape some of the principal industries of Detroit, 
and whose identity is associated with the .remarkable growth of the city's vast 
real estate interest during the last decade. 

We refer to Mr. Herman Eichner, prominent real estate man, who has 
closed some of the largest transactions in the history of Detroit. 

He was born in Torna, Hungary, March 26, 1880, and was given a thor- 
ough education, graduating from the leading college in Hungary. He was 
most fortunate in having a father of great scholarly attainments who realized 
the value of education, regardless of the business to which a young man might 
devote himself in later life. 

He came to America in July, 1905, landing in New York City, where he 
began working in a bottle yard at $10 per week. After the first year he went 
to Detroit, arriving in that city with but $4 in his possession. 

His first employment was with a construction gang, digging a tunnel un- 

63 



der the Detroit River for the Michigan Central Railroad. Later he secured a 
position with a bottling company, and then with Dodge Bros., where he worked 
in the capacity of expert millwright. 

His next venture was in the business which was to prove his future suc- 
cess — real estate. His exceptional sales ability while with the Flint Land 
Co., Ltd., soon earned for him the position of head salesman, and in January, 
1914, he was presented with a fine gold watch in recognition of his valuable 
service, and honoring him as the best salesman on their large force. 

In the meantime Mr. Eichner had been conducting a business of his own, 
which had grown to such large proportions that he felt the necessity of devot- 
ing all of his time to these interests, consequently he severed his connection 
with the Flint Land Co. and opened an office at his present location, where he 
has been wonderfully successful. 

On February 7, 1905, but a few months before his coming to America, 
Mr. Eichner was married to Miss Goldstein, and they now have a fine family 
of five children, three boys and two girls, all going to school. 

In addition to Mr. Eichner's many business interests he finds time for 
some valuable work in various religious and fraternal organizations. He is 
now serving his fourth term as President of the First Hungarian Hebrew 
Congregation ; he is ex-President of Independent Order B'nai B'rith Abraham 
and is also an active Mason. Both himself and wife are liberal contributors 
to many charities. 



MORRIS M. EIDELMAN 

Mr. Morris M. Eidelman of Youngstown, Ohio, is still a very young man, 
having been born in the year 1880, but belongs to the class known as "promis- 
ing young men.'' He has a noble and sincere character, is hard working and 
serious minded and his splendid qualities fit him for a leading role among the 
Jews of Youngstown. 

Mr. Eidelman was born in Barbrowitz, Russia, the son of Isaac and Han- 
nah Eidelman. His father, who is still living, is one of the most prominent 
Jewish scholars of Youngstown. 

Mr. Eidelman came to America in 1891. He began his career as a news- 
boy in Pennsylvania. He then worked in the cotton mills of New Jersey and 
in Norwich, Conn., and has made a remarkable success in this field, earning 
the reputation of the best cotton spinner in America. Arriving in Youngs- 
town, he became an agent for Swift & Co., was later employed by Ozersky 
Brothers and as soon as he felt that he had the means of going into business 
on his own account, he did so, buying a meat market at 1426 West Federal 
street, which he is still conducting today, with a remarkable success. 

He is a member of the order B'rith Abraham and Congregation Emanu 
El, of the Orphan Asylum, the Los Angeles Sanitarium, the Zionist Lodge 
and many other organizations. 

On December 4, 191 1, Mr. Eidelman was married to Miss Frume Stern, 
and they are the proud parents of two children, Harold and Pearl. 

Mr. Eidelman is very religious and like a true Jew, he performs his 

prayers three times a day. After his mother's death in 1910 he would insist 

on a Jewish "Minyan" morning and night, and as he would gather large 

throngs for the purpose, within a short time the Jewish population of Youngs- 

' town learned how to pray. 



64 



NATHAN J. EISENDRATH 

Mr. Nathan J. Eisendrath was born in Chicago, 111., on the iSth of Janu- 
ary, 1874, and is the son of Julius and Regina Eisendrath of that city, who 
emigrated to the United States with fifteen out of twenty-three grown-up 
children. It is a family tradition that all sons bear the letter "J" as their middle 
name. 

Nathan went to public and high school in Blue Island, 111., selling news- 
papers on trains between Chicago and Blue Island. He took a course in busi- 
ness college which fitted him for a position as assistant bookkeeper with Calm 
Wampold Company and then Straus Eisendrath & Co. He then started to 
manufacture shirtwaists, but was not very successful in that. He went into 
the fur business in Calumet, Mich., but when an epidemic of spinal meningitis 
broke out in the place, he went back to Chicago and took a position as repre- 
sentative and later manager of Reed Bros. & Co. of Cleveland, Ohio, continu- 
ing there for eight years. 

His next step was to start in the commission business fpr New York lines, 
in which business he was very successful and kept up for two years. He then 
embarked in the paradise and aigrette feather importing business, which 
brought him good returns until the government decided to stop further im- 
portations. 

Not knowing what to do next, he went into the millinery line, and having 
opened some eighteen departments in various department stores, he lost prac- 
tically all he ever made and found himself absolutely without funds. Even 
though he had wealth}' brothers who would have gladly helped him, he never 
asked their assistance, but was determined to win in the line he had chosen. He 
took over the Fair, a concern selling millinery and general merchandise, and 
started in to make good. The Fair in due time became the Eisendrath Com- 
pany, and is today doing a splendid and unimpeachable business. 

Mr. Eisendrath is a member of the Congregation Roileph Sholom and for 
the last twelve years was a member of the Executive Committee and Board 
of Trustees of Temple Emanuel of Chicago. 

On October 11, 1900, Mr. Eisendrath was married to Miss Clara Oester- 
reicher, whose father was a great philanthropist in Chicago. Three children 
have blessed their union, named Juliette, Morris and Arthur. 



SAMUEL ELKINS 

Mr. Samuel Elkins of Mount Clemens, Mich., owes his success, strange 
as it might seem, to his physical disability, rheumatism. It was rheumatism 
that made him go to Mount Clemens, and in due time become the owner of the 
well-known Elkins Hotel. And his hotel has become an institution and its 
owner almost a national figure. 

Mr. Elkins treats his guests not as customers, but as close personal friends, 
and they seem to appreciate it, for, when some years ago Mr. Elkins was in 
bad financial straits and sorely in need of funds, he made a tour over the 
country, where he knew many of his guests, and in a short time raised the 
money. 

He was born on the 19th of October. 1879, in Grodno, Russia, the son of 
Nachman and Rose Elkins. His father was a "Lamdan" of note, and among 
his forbears Mr. Elkins numbers such distinguished Jewish scholars as Rabbi 
Eliezer of Tiktin and Rabbi Samuel of Grodno. At the age of thirteen he 
came to America and immediately went to work as a shirt operator, sending 
home to Russia every cent he could spare. He then went to Hartford, where 

65 



he worked in a furniture store until he fell ill with rheumatism and was 
obliged to go to .Mount Clemens for his recovery. 

Here he opened a little grocery store, then a boarding house, and finally 
his present hotel, which is so prominently known to many American Jews. 

At the age of eighteen Mr. Elkins was married to Miss Ethel Adelman. 
who died only two years ago i iqi6). There were four children of this mar- 
riage, of whom one died in 1015 at the age of fifteen. The other children are 
Max. aged twenty: Joe. aged fourteen, and William, aged seven. 



ABRAHAM ENGLER 

Among the successful and popular Jewish business men of Florida, one 
cannot omit die name of Mr. Abraham Engler of Miami. He is a man who 
has been materially successful, but has not paid for it with his good name or 
popularitv. as is frequently the case. In addition to his money he has a splen- 
did reputation and is beloved and admired by all with whom he comes in 
contact. 

Mr. Engler has been Vice President of the Miami Congregation, takes an 
interest and is actively engaged in every Jewish movement in the city, and 
whenever or wherever opportunity presents itself, is ready with his purse or 
his enlightened counsel based on a varied life experience and a sound business 
- - Mr. Engler is an intelligent man and an interesting personality. He 
is a great student and devoted reader and supporter of Jewish literature. 

Abraham Engler w-as born on the 25th of February. 1869. in Yassy. Rou- 
mania. the son of Isaac and Xachmah Engler. His mother lives in Xew York. 
Mr. Engler came to America during the Spanish- American War and settled at 
Kev West. Fla., where he engaged in a grocery business. He then decided 
to become a farmer and purchased a farm in Rensselaer County, Xew York, 
which he cultivated for three years. He soon became tired of the tedious and 
unexciting life of a farmer and in 1913 established himself at Miami, where 
he conducts a large wholesale and retail grocery business at 206 Avenue G. 
still retaining his farm in Xew York state. 

! [r Engler was married in March. 1905, to Miss Anna Schechtman. who is 
[ 7:oumanian ancestry. They are the parents of a girl named Rebecca, 
who. though ' ut eleven years of age. shows remarkable abilities. 



SAMUEL EMERMAN 

If vou were to ask the majority of successful business men what they 
considered the most essential feature contributing to a rapid rise in the world, 
they will tell you that next to honesty and application to business, finding your 
true vocation is most important, 

Manv voung men are unable to settle upon the career to which they are 
- i idapted and all their ability and effort are practically wasted. 

T - - the substance of the remarks made by Mr. Samuel Emerman, an 
r~.il :__s:_.is; ~in :: Z'e__£.:re. .hi:. 

. £r. Emerman —as bom in Kotus. Guberne. Russia. December 27, 1872. 
whert his father was a cattle dealer and also a Jewish scholar of considerable 

r_rr.tr.~s. 

66 



His first business experience in America was in Canton, Ohio, where an 
uncle gave him enough financial assistance to enable him to go out peddling 
with a pack. After one year he purchased a horse and wagon and succeeded 
so well that eight years later he was able to engage in the iron and metal busi- 
ness, in which he has prospered and has given his two older sons an oppor- 
tunity of going in with their father, where they are at present assisting in the 
management of his large interests. 

Mr. Emerman was most fortunate in his marriage, as his wife is a very 
accomplished woman, the daughter of Morris Rosen of Cleveland, a promi- 
nent scholar and Schochet. 

They have seven children, the two sons, Nathan and Israel, being in 
business with the father, and the others, with the exception of the youngest, 
still in school. 

As might be expected of a woman of Mrs. Emerman's ability, she is very 
philanthropic and gives much time and money to the promotion of charities. 
Among the organizations to which she is particularly devoted might be men- 
tioned Ladies' Aid Society, Red Cross, Relief Committee for War Sufferers 
and Woman's Auxiliary. 

Mr. Emerman belongs to Aggudas Achem, Independent Order Western 
Star and is President of Jewish War Sufferers' Relief Committee. 

Both contribute liberally to all local charities and to the Denver and Los 
Angeles hospitals. 



PHILIP ETTINGER 

If there is one thing in the world that a young man should be more grateful 
for than another, it is the poverty which necessitates his starting in life under 
great disadvantages. Here lies one of the best tests of human character and 
a triumph over such adverse circumstances is like graduating with honors at 
West Point. It demonstrates stamina and willpower. It is the certificate of 
labor well performed. 

These thoughts remind us of the career of Mr. Philip Ettinger. owner 
and manager of the Standard Roofing Company of Detroit. 

He was born in Lemberg, Galicia, December 10, 1873, the son of Marcus 
and Rosa Ettinger. His father was a farmer and also a scholar of some 
prominence. Mr. Ettinger came to America in July, 1900, and finding his way 
to Cleveland. Ohio, began working at the roofing trade for $5 per week. He 
continued two months and then found a more profitable job, where he remained 
for two years. He then accepted a position as traveling agent, installing work 
in various localities, and after having saved a capital of $600, went into busi- 
ness for himself in Cleveland, where he remained for four years. He then 
sold this business to his brother and w ; ent to Detroit, Mich., where he opened a 
similar business at his present address, 732 Rivard street. 

This venture has been very successful and has placed Mr. Ettiiiger in 
the front ranks of Detroit business men. 

He was married in his native town in March, 1897, to Miss Freda Fisher. 
They have six children, one boy and five girls. The son, Adolph, although 
but nineteen years of age, is in business with his father. The eldest daughter, 
Molly, seventeen years of age. has already graduated from the high school. 
The rest of the girls are all going to school and are also being thoroughly edu- 
cated in music. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ettinger take a great interest in matters of charity, being 
liberal contributors to all worthy causes. Mr. Ettinger is a member of the 

67 



Builders and Traders' Exchange, the Employes' Association, Talmud Torah, 
B'rith Sholom, Miskin Israel Congregation and a patron of the Denver Hos- 
pital. 

This family presents an ideal which might well be emulated by native-born 
Americans. 



ISIDORE FADER 

Mr. Isidore Fader is still a young man, having been born on the 25th of 
December, 1885, at Kolomea, Galicia. But when one stops to consider the 
success he has attained in the business and social world one must needs con- 
clude that he will, in all likelihood, become a prominent figure in the near 
future. 

Mr. Fader was recommended as a man fit to be included among the 
"Distinguished Jews of America." The writer spent some time with him and 
found him a very engaging young man. 

In business Mr. Fader has already gained recognition. He arrived on 
these shores in 1902. Having taken up carpentry in the old country, he took 
to the same trade upon landing here. For three years he was a wage-earner, 
and then realized that one cannot acheive success working for another. The 
deed followed the thought, and he ventured into the carpentry business on 
his own hook. In 1912 he started the manufacture of iron-sheathed, or fire- 
proof, doors. At present he and his brother, David, are the owners of the 
firm, Eastern Fireproof Sash and Door Co., located at No. 109 Cook street, 
Brooklyn. 

Although Mr. Fader made an unusual success in business, he has not. 
like a good many others, given his life to it to the exclusion of all else. He 
gave his part time to communal work. He was President of the Austrian 
Talmudical School in Morrell street and is Vice President of the Hebrew 
Burial Association of Brooklyn. 

He is a member of the Brooklyn Federation of Charities, Hebrew Immi- 
grant Aid Society, Hebrew Home and Relief for Consumptives, and many 
other institutions. He is also a prominent member of the Odd Fellows and 
various other organizations. 

Mrs. Fader, nee Victoria Lindenbaum, was married to Mr. Fader on the 
25th of December, 1910. She takes an active interest in social work and is 
very charitable. She is on the Board of Directors of the Bikur Cholim Ladies' 
Kosher Hospital in Brooklyn, a woman's organization that called forth admi- 
ration from all. This organization is the largest and most active in Greater 
New York, having accomplished wonders, and Mrs. Fader, as Director, is one 
of the most active members and gives her life and soul to the work. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fader have one child, Ruth, five years old, an unusually 
precocious child. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fader are popular in their circle and 
have a host of admiring friends. 



6H 



BENJAMIN FEALK 

It was written of one of America's foremost business men that not by 
extraordinary talents did he succeed, but because he had a capacity on a level 
for business and not above it. 

To a man with a natural business instinct, no task is too menial, no path 
too steep, if it but leads him into a fuller experience along the lines he has 
chosen. 

Benjamin Fealk, a prominent and wealthy business man of Detroit, Mich., 
won his way to success in just this way. 

Born in Beroswitz, Volina, Guberne, Russia, in April, 1882, he came to 
America in September, 1901, landing in Boston, Mass. 

He went from there to Claremont, N. H., where his brother resided, and 
earned his first money in the new land by peddling. 

After three months he came to Detroit and much against his inclination he 
worked six months in an automobile factory in order to accumulate money 
enough to buy a horse and wagon. 

Then began again the independence of working for himself, always keep- 
ing before him a vision of big achievements which should crown his years of 
perseverance. 

And after nine years the opportunity came, when he opened an iron and 
metal yard, which has enabled Mr. Fealk to realize all his dreams of wealth 
and success. 

He was married January 2, 1910, to Miss Bertha Ferguson of Cleveland. 
a young lady eminently fitted to share her husband's wealth and social position. 

They have two fine children- — one boy and one girl — who have brilliant 
careers before them, with the opportunities which their parents are able to 
provide. 

Mr. Fealk is a member of Congregation Bereth Xitze and neither him- 
self nor wife are ever appealed to in vain when a worthy charitable cause is in 
need of assistance. 



ISRAEL FEALK 

Russian history contains many dark pages wherein are recorded deeds of 
frightfulness, of oppression and sorrow. But through it all runs a thread of 
gold which beautifies and vitalizes, for Russia has given to the world a great 
commercial talent if she did not furnish the opportunity for its exercise. From 
her shores young men have peered across the waste of waters into other lands 
of opportunity and following the vibrant flame of progress have come to estab- 
lish themselves where their great gifts could expand and have proper devel- 
opment. 

Thus we find Israel Fealk seeking America when only twenty years of age. 
Without money or influential friends, he began the -struggle toward success, 
and Detroit, Mich., is richer today in the possession of such a public-spirited 
citizen possessed with a remarkable talent for business. 

He was born in Beroswitz, Yolina, Guberne, Russia, in April, 1885. His 
father, Scholom Fealk, was a successful merchant and was also a man of con- 
siderable scholarly attainments from whom his son undoubtedly received a rich 
heritage of mentality and business acumen. 

Mr. Fealk came to America in April, 1905, and spent seven years in the 
East, where he was fortunate in only one particular. 1 le met and married 
Miss Fannie Fishman, of Manchester, N. H., a charming girl who is admirably 
fitted to share the success which crowned her husband's later efforts. 

69 



Coming to Detroit Mich., shortly after his marriage, he arrived in the city 
with but 50 cents in money but a firm determination to wrest success from 
reluctant fortune. Then began the upward climb, not spectacular, it is true. 
but die healthy, persistent progress which lays a firm foundation for the future. 
Mr. Fealk had no friends or influence to aid him. He wrought the fabric of 
his entire fortune with his own hands and brain. I lo is today operating a 
re iron and metal business from which he is amassing a fortune. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walk have two children — a hoy and a girl, who are just 
entering school. 

. ences if Detroit and other cities as well have had frequent cause 
to be grateful for Mr. and Mrs. Fealk's prosperity as they are most generous 
in their contributions whenever assistance is needed. 



SAM FEALK 

The lews are the world's greatest merchants. They have also taught us 
some valuable lessons in conservation. That we, as a nation, have still a great 
deal to learn is evidenced yearly by the immense fortunes they are amassing 
from material which has been cast away. 

Such is the business history of Sam Fealk. who was born in Beros- 
witz. Volina, Guberne, Russia, in December, 1874. He inherited much of 
his business instinct from his father, who was a successful merchant and 
a very learned man. 

He did not come to America until May. 1903, when he landed in Xew 
York, with practically no money and a wife and family dependent upon him. 

Going to New Hampshire, he received sufficient assistance from a Jewish 
friend to enable him to begin peddling, which he continued for six years. 
Coming to Detroit, he started in business for himself, but was very unfortunate 
as the panic of 1007 swept away his entire savings. 

With the invincible will which characterizes so many of his brethren, he 
started peddling again, bravely defying an unkind fate in his effort for a new 
start in life. 

Two years later he opened an iron and metal yard at his present place of 
business. 174 Clinton street, where success crowned his efforts. 

Mr. Fealk was twice married: once in Russia, and his wife dying after 
he came to this country. He was again married in 1000 to Miss Gittle Ginda, 
daughter of Josel and Lea Ginda of Xew York. 

Mr. Fealk is the father of eight children, all of whom are going to school 
with the exception of David, who is in business with his father. 

He is a member of Tefereth Israel Congregation and other Jewish organ- 
izations. 

Roth Mr. and Mrs. Fealk are very generous in their assistance of the poor 
and unfortunate and contribute most liberally to all charities who ask their 
assistance. 



70 



WILLIAM FELDMAN 

In the life of Mr. William Feldman of New Orleans we have a striking 
example of a self-made man whose youth was beset with many difficulties and 
such instances prove conclusively that a young man who cannot stand this test 
is not worthy a place in the great battle of life. If he cannot feel his will 
hardened as the yoke of poverty presses upon him, and his pluck rise with every 
new difficulty which is thrown in his way, he may as well withdraw from the 
conflict at once, as his defeat is already assured. 

Poverty saves a thousand more men than it ruins, for it ruins only those 
who are not worth saving. 

Mr. Feldman was born in Hungary on June 20, 1875, the son of Judah 
and Libbe Feldman, who are still living and residing in Scranton, Pa. 

At the age of seven he was brought to America by his parents, and being 
one of a very large family, was obliged to do something toward his own sup- 
port, as his father was having a hard struggle to gain a foothold in the new 
country, and at the same time take care of his family. 

Mr. Feldman sold papers on the streets of New York and did many other 
odd jobs, which unconsciously contributed to his mercantile experience and 
future success. While still in his early 'teens he crossed the ocean ten times 
as cabin boy and then went to California. A few months later he went to 
Marshall, Texas, and opened a dry-goods store, but became very ill and had 
to give it up. After his recovery he traveled considerably, selling merchandise 
to pay his expenses, and after a brief business venture in Marion, Ala., came 
to New Orleans. That was nineteen years ago, and since that time he has 
built up a fine business at 437 Royal street as a dealer in antiques and general 
merchandise. He not only does a retail business, but conducts a factory as 
well. 

Mr. Feldman was married twenty years ago to Miss Flora Asher of 
Nashville, Tenn., and they have seven children, all of whom have received a 
thorough Jewish education. Mrs. Feldman is very prominent socially and is 
Jictive in the promotion of all worthy charities. Mr. Feldman is President of 
the Congregation Agudath Achim Anshe Afarad and has been a member of 
the Grand Lodge of the order B'nai B'rith for fifteen years. He organized 
the United Brothers Love Association of New Orleans and was its first Presi- 
dent. He is also ex-President of Sonech Nophlem, and is a Director of the 
Rittenberg Synagogue, the Orphans' Home and is Past Grand Patriarch of 
the Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having the dis- 
tinction of being the only Jew who ever held that office in the state. He is also 
a prominent Mason. Mr. Feldman organized the Ezra, a Jewish relief fund, 
of which he is President. He is also an ardent Zionist and has served as a dele- 
gate to a number of conventions. 



70a 



SAMUEL FELDSTEIN 

Samuel Feldstein was born in Roumania and came to the United States 
when but a child of five years. Having the benefit of a common school educa- 
tion, he began life as a clerk. Through manifesting real business principles he 
was soon accepted as a partner in the dry goods business of his father. 

In T902, Mr. Feldstein became associated with the late Leopold Bieber, 
who wa$ then conducting the Cold Spring House at Tannersville, N. Y. Under 
Mr. Feldstein's able management, the business rapidly improved, making 
extensive alterations necessary. Mr. Feldstein with Mrs. Yetta Bieber, the 
widow of Leopold, are now conducting the beautiful Hotel Majestic at Lake- 
wood, N. J. Mr. Feldstein is very outspoken in regard to those who have 
assisted in his success. He highly praises Mrs. Feldstein, who was formerly 
a Miss Bieber and one of the right bowers in the business of her late father, 
Leopold Bieber. "Mrs. Feldstein," he says, "has not only proven a devoted 
friend, a good wife and a good mother, but her true womanly companionship 
causes her to be eagerly sought by the women and girl guests of the hotel." 

Mr. Feldstein wishes also to go on record as saying that he is peculiarly 
blessed in having an absolutely perfect mother-in-law, for he realizes that his 
success, in a very great measure, is due not only to her great knowledge of 
the culinary arts, but of all the minutest details which count in the successful 
management of a large hotel. In details which count in the assembling of a 
large number of guests, it requires great skill and tact to satisfy the many and 
varied tastes of each patron, but Mrs. Yetta Bieber always rises to the occasion, 
and with a sang-froid that is really remarkable, causes the cherished dish to 
immediately appear. The fame of Mrs. Yetta Bieber as an expert in conduct- 
ing a hotel where the strict dietary laws are observed has spread from one end 
of the country to the other, and the privilege of spending a few weeks at a 
hotel with Mrs. Yetta Bieber as the hostess is one for which all are willing 
to pay. 

While the Majestic Hotel is patronized by some of the foremost repre- 
sentatives of the Jewish clergy and laymen alike, it is known as a popular resort 
for the younger element, for the parents know that their children are well 
chaperoned and receive the very best of care under the motherly guidance of 
Mrs. Bieber who, as a true Jewish woman, knows how to cater to the individual 
wants of both young and old. 

Regular services are conducted in the synagogue of the hotel, and during 
Passover and the High Holiday season, it is necessary to secure rooms in 
advance, so great is the demand. 

In 1897, Mr. Feldstein married Miss Sadie Bieber. They have four chil- 
dren — three girls and one boy. Irene, aged nineteen, is a high school graduate ; 
the others are Alex, sixteen, Ruth, twelve, and Helen, eight years, respectively. 
All of the children, in addition to their regular schooling, are receiving the 
benefit of a thorough Jewish training. 



LYMAN FELHEIM 

In these tempestuous days when the world trembles before the tread of 
mighty war lords ; when deeds of military valor are chronicled on every hand : 
when the energies of the entire world seem bent upon destruction that out of 
the awful cataclysm a great reconstruction shall follow, it is a pleasure to 
record the events of a life lived in an era of progress and peace — a life now 
at the zenith of its usefulness and activity. 

We refer to Lyman Felheim, successful business man, honored citizen 
of Erie, Pa., and a thorough American, both by birth and sympathies. 

71 



Lyman Felheim was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 7, i860. His 
father, Solomon Felheim, was a thoroughly educated man, being a teacher of 
German. Like many another prominent man, Mr. Felheim acquired his first 
business experience selling papers on the streets, where the life of the city 
passed by him in its multiplicity of fascinating phases, where he learned that 
the most interesting study of mankind is man. 

He was twelve years old when he started selling papers and later spent 
one year clerking in a store. Having- the opportunity of working for an uncle 
in Cleveland, he went to that city, where he remained for six years, finally 
going to Erie, Pa., where he located permanently, engaging in the lumber 
business. 

Since that time his business interests have extended into many other indus- 
tries of Erie, in several of which he is a stockholder and director. 

Mr. Felheim became very interested in the Boy Scout movement and is 
First Vice-President of the Boy Scouts for his section. He is also a prominent 
Mason, being Past Honorary Priest and Past Master of the Blue Lodge. He 
also is a member of the Elks. 

Mr. Felheim was married twenty years ago to Miss Laura Lasalle, of 
Toledo, Ohio, a woman charmingly fitted to grace the prominent position 
attained by her husband. They are members of the Temple and contribute 
most liberally to all charitable institutions, both national and local. They are 
also patrons of the Jewish Immigration Society, the German Turner and Ger- 
man Singing Society. 

Mr. and Mrs. Felheim have two -fine boys, one of whom is still in high 
school, while the other is attending Exeter College, New Hampshire. 



HERMAN B. FERGUSON 

A fine example of a splendid personality, uniting in himself the noblest 
traits of the Jewish race, a native born intelligence and shrewdness with the 
most thorough-going education, a man of remarkable success in the world of 
business and who had, in the course of his life, accumulated the most won- 
derful experience vouchsafed to any man — such in brief is the career of Mr. 
Herman B. Ferguson, one of the leading manufacturers of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

He was born in the city and province of Suvalk, Russia, as the son of 
Benedict and Esther Ferguson, both living. His family is among the most 
prominent of Russia and his father was connected with the well-known Union 
Bank of Libau. 

Herman B. Ferguson was born on October 17, 1872, and came to America 
in 1891. Being a well-bred aristocratic boy, there was no apparent need for 
his going to America, but he went simply because "he took a notion," as 
a boy ordinarily would. He was nineteen, of good address and education, and 
he had no difficulty in finding a position very soon after he landed on these 
shores. He became a bookkeeper for the American Stamping Company of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., exchanging this occupation for that of a traveling salesman 
of tinware some time later. About six years after his arrival in this country 
he settled in Pittsburgh with a capital of a few hundred dollars and he became 
a jobber in shirts. Two years later he went into the manufacturing of shirts 
and he has been in the business ever since. At the present writing he is among 
the giants in the industry, operating five factories, one at Ninth and Market 
streets, McKeesport, Pa. ; two in Louisville, Ky. ; one in Indianapolis, and one 
in Columbus, Ohio, all under the firm name of H. B. Ferguson & Company. 
His total of employes is around one thousand people. 

Mr. Ferguson was one of the first directors of the Federated Jewish 

72 



Charities in Pittsburgh. He was greatly instrumental in the building of the 
Montefiore Hospital, being the Secretary of its Board of Directors and the 
Chairman of its Building Committee. In addition, Mr. Ferguson is a member 
of the Temple Rodeph Sholom and of every Jewish institution of importance. 

As has been stated, Mr. Ferguson received a thorough education. He was 
considered a great mathematician and he carried away in school every prize 
given in mathematics, expecting to make it the subject of his special interest 
later in life. On his arrival in this country he went to night school and took 
an interest in literature. He is Americanized, a studious and omnivorous reader 
of books and of a most remarkable intelligence. Of a family, in which we find a 
brother, Max, a famous pianist in Paris and a graduate of the Paris Conserva- 
tory of Music, and another, Joseph, living in Germany, a graduate of the 
Leipzig Handels-Schule — we do not wonder that Herman B. could not but live 
up to traditions. 

On the 14th of April, 1913, Mr. Ferguson was married to Miss Mary 
Coblins. 



ABRAHAM FIELD 

It is indeed fortunate for mortal man that an all wise Providence hung a 
veil between the present and the future through which he cannot peer. 

Thus we live only in the present, hoping the best for tomorrow, and when 
tomorrow comes it is but another today with the golden light of still another 
tomorrow beckoning us just ahead. 

When Abraham Field landed in America he was but twenty-one years old, 
with no capital but plenty of ambition and determination to succeed. Had he 
known the discouragements he was to encounter it would have been a severe 
test of even his high courage. 

He was born in Podalsky, Guberne, Russia, March 4, 1884. His father 
was a lumber merchant and also a man of considerable education. 

At the age of twenty-one, he came to America, landed in New York, going 
from there to Fort Wayne, Ind. He went out peddling general wares for six 
months. This was followed by sixteen months' buying and selling rags, after 
which he went to Plymouth, Ind., and opened a yard. He was unfortunate in 
the time selected for this venture as it was in 1907, the year of the panic, and 
he was unsuccessful, so he returned to Fort Wayne and startea peddling again. 
After a year and a half, with two partners he started in the junk business and 
continued for three years, when he dissolved partnership with them and his 
entire capital after the dissolution amounted to $500. 

Being rather discouraged with the result of this business venture, he 
started traveling as salesman and continued for several years. 

But the ambition to be in business for himself, which is ever present in 
the mind of a man with true business ability, led him to give up his position 
and start a general junk yard. 

After a year of successful business he decided to specialize on paper mill 
supplies, which he is still doing today, and has been immensely successful. 

He was married December 27, 1908, to Miss Clara Rotter of Milwaukee 
and they have three small daughters, the eldest of whom is in school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Field are very charitable, being members of B'nai Jacob 
Congregation and the Federation of Jewish Charities. He is also a prominent 
member of the committee appointed to secure funds for Jewish war sufferers 
and Jewish welfare work among soldiers. 

Mrs. Field not only contributes much money but devotes a great deal of 
time to the Ladies' Aid Society, Daughters of Israel, and Auxiliary of Parents', 
Teachers' and Mothers' Association. 

73 



HARRY FICKSMAN 

There is hardly an organization in Chelsea, Mass., with which Mr. Harry 
Ficksman is not in some way prominently identified. All of these responsibili- 
ties are assumed in addition to large business interests which he owns and 
controls. 

Mr. Ficksman was born in Yolinsky, Guberne, Russia, in April, 1885, and 
came to America at the age of fifteen, landing in Boston, where he peddled 
drygoods for several years. He then went into the fruit business, but not 
finding it to his liking, started buying and selling metal scrap, which has 
resulted in the large plant he is operating today. He is also Treasurer of the 
Brennen Grain Company, another prosperous concern. 

Mr. Ficksman was married in Chelsea, Mass., in 1906 to Miss Goldie 
Rosenblatt, and they have three children — two boys and one girl, the eldest two 
being in school. 

Among Mr. Ficksman's many civic and fraternal interests we wish to men- 
tion the following: He is Secretary of the Finance Committee of Jewish War 
Relief ; Board Member of Liberty Loan and Red Cross Committees ; President 
of I. O. B. A. of Chelsea, and District Deputy of Grand Lodge ; Second District 
Deputy of Independent Hebrews of America ; President of Ward Four, Citi- 
zens' Club of Chelsea ; Director of Talmud Torah ; ex-Treasurer and Board 
Member of Elm Street Congregation ; member Board of Governors of Y. M. 
H. A. and member of the Committee appointed to purchase the new home of 
the Y. M. H. A. He is also a member of the Board of Trade, the Metal Deal- 
ers' Association, and the Free Loan Association. 

His wife is also very prominent in social and charitable matters, being 
connected with the Federated and Ladies' Charities. 



SAM FINE AND SAMUEL NURENBERG 

, The city of Brockton, Mass., boasts no better business men than the 
partners in Brockton Iron and Metal Co., Mr. Sam Fine and Mr. Samuel 
Xurenberg. 

Mr. Nurenberg, the senior partner, was born in Kiev, Guberne, Russia, in 
1886 and came to America in 1901. Landing in Boston, he started working 
in a coat factory at eight dollars per week, where he showed such wonderful 
proficiency that at the end of two years he was making fifty-five dollars per 
week. However, he was fired with the ambition to go into business for him- 
self, so gave up his position and started in the soda-water business. He was 
very successful in this line for six years, but owing to some unfortunate in- 
vestments in real estate, he lost nearly all of his money. Going to Vermont, he 
engaged in the junk business, but having had no experience in this line, he 
lost the balance of his savings and decided to go to Maiden, Mass. Here he 
worked in the express business for a short time and then went to Brockton, 
where he joined his present partner and has since been wonderfully successful. 

Mr. Xurenberg was married December 2, 1912, to Miss Rose Adelstone. 
and they have two young sons. 

The junior member, Mr. Sam Fine, was born in Kishinif, Guberne, Rus- 
sia, June 23, 1889. He came to America with his father and went to school 
until at the age of twelve years it became necessary for him to make his own 
living. He found employment in a box factory, where he remained for three 
years, and then started out peddling fruit. His next venture was in the junk 
business, in which he is continuing today, and although a very young man, has 
a business career to his credit which many an older man might envy. 

74 



Mr. Fine was married in Providence. R. I., in March, 1910. to Miss Rosa 
Kessler. and they have one daughter going" to school. 

Mrs. Fine is very popular socially, and is Secretary of the Ladies' Benev- 
olent Society. 

Doth the Xurenbergs and Fines are members of the Russian Orthodox 
Congregation and are liberal contributors to all charities. Mr. Fine also is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias and I. O. B. A. 



LOUIS FINE 

Mr. Louis Fine of Miami. Fla.. belongs to the class of Jews who are 
largely responsible for the development of a Jewish spirit in this country. 
Whatever he is engaged in or wherever he goes, he always bears in mind the 
interests of his race and class. Judaism and his own career go hand in hand. 

He had been a Yeshiba Bochur, He is an Orthodox in the strictest sense 
of the word and a Jew of the idealistic sort who would never give up his 
idealism for any material ends. When Mr. Fine arrived in America in 1887 he 
settled at Yyseport, Pa., where he took to peddling for a living, but at the same 
time he started to build a Jewish center in the place, establishing" a ritual 
"Shochet" and arousing the town to an interest in Jewish affairs. When three 
years later, after a short sojourn in Texas, he settled in Key West. Fla.. he 
went into the grocery business, then into the drygoods line and also took 
employment as an agent of the Houston Ice & Brewing Company, but with 
all these vocations he assiduously worked for the interests of Judaism. For 
eighteen years he had occupied the post of President of the Congregation 
Rodeph Sholom in Key West. He then moved to Miami, where he resides 
today, and established the Modern Grocery at 101S Avenue D, a business 
which he had established for his two sons. But at the same time he again 
cave his attention to Jewish interests. He again obtained a ritual '"Shochet" 
for the city and took a place on the Congregation Building Committee, inspiring 
all with a Jewish consciousness. 

Mr. Fine is also a National Director of the Denver Sanitarium and con- 
nected with nearly every form of Jewish activity in and outside of the city 
where he resides. While he lived in Key West he played a prominent part in 
the Committee which sought to create the independence of Cuba, sending men 
and ammunition out of the United States, and he lost one of his trade vessels 
on this occasion. He saw in this a part of Jewish vengeance against Spain, the 
old persecutor of the race. 

Louis Fine was born on the 27th of November, 1866. in Smorgon, Gov- 
ernment of Yilna. the son of Reb Abraham Pinucs and Ittee Fine. His father 
is a prominent Jewish scholar and his grandfather was the distinguished Rabbi 
Leib Masirer. the rabbi of his native town. In iSS^ he was married to his> 
wife. Cadie who is the daughter of Reb Chaim Yankel Shwirsky. They are 
the parents of two accomplished sons. Joseph M. and Isidore, and of a daugh- 
ter. Ida. who is married to Nathan Goldman, a highly intellectual and truly 
Jewish young man who is likewise in business in Miami and comes from a 
much respected Rabbinical family. 



SAMUEL FINE 

The average young man of today knows very little of the severe hard- 
ships endured by those pioneers of commerce who came from Europe to seek 
their fortunes in the new world. In fact, very few of them would have suffi- 
cient perseverance to pass through the fires of adversity which their elders 
were obliged to endure. 

In the person of Mr. Samuel Fine we have an instance of a strong char- 
acter which was able to cope with the most difficult situations and attain 
wealth and independence. 

Mr. Fine was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in 1878, and was married 
in the year 1894 to Miss Jennie Sodnisky. Five years later he decided that 
America would offer a better field for his endeavors 
and leaving his family in Russia, came to East Bos- 
ton, where he was obliged to work at first for only 
$1.50 per week. After eight weeks he began buying 
and selling junk, which he continued for three 
months. He then worked in an ice factory until he 
had money enough to buy a horse and wagon. But 
'a short time after he suffered the misfortune of los- 
ing his horse and was obliged to go to work again in 
order to replace the animal. As soon as it was pos- 
sible for him to buy another horse he again em- 
barked in the junk business and it was not long 
before he had accumulated sufficient funds to send 
for his family. After their arrival, he opened a 
junk yard on a very small scale and under his able 
management it has grown into an immense business, 

1 • ,1 c 1 Samuel Fine 

employing a great number of people. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fine are the parents of eight children, three boys and five 
girls. The girls are all going to school and are being well educated in music. 
The son, Joe, is a very fine scholar, having graduated with honor medals from 
the Boston Latin School and is now attending Harvard. Harry is a civil 
engineer. 

In addition to the many duties incident to rearing her family, Mrs. Fine 
has found time to engage in many social and charitable enterprises, in which 
she assumes a very prominent and helpful part. Although both Mr. and Mrs. 
Fine are very loyal to all organizations of their own religion, they are not 
biased in their philanthropy by creed or nationality, and give liberally to all 
worthy causes. 

Mr. Fine is a member of all congregations in East Boston, the Knights of 
Pythias, I. O. B. A., Balkemeier Society, Millis Haseb, Federation of Jewish 
Charities, Havre Tillim, Talmud Torah and Beth Israel Hospital. 




HARRIS T. FEINBERG 

One of the most interesting stories in the business history of Chelsea, 
Mass., is that of Harris T. Feinberg, prominent woolen scrap dealer of that 
city. He was born in 1859 in Sualker, Guberne, Russia, the son of Isaac and 
Leah Feinberg, his father being a prominent horse dealer. He came to 
America in 1888, landing in New York City, where he began peddling small 
merchandise and later went to Shenandoah, Pa., where he sold dry goods for 
one year. He then spent a short time in Elmira, N. Y., and in Keene, N. H. 
After he had been in America six years he had accumulated enough to bring 

76 



his family over from Europe and to start into business for himself in a modest 
way. However, he was unfortunate in losing all of his money and was obliged 
to go back to Keene, N. H., where he peddled for one year. He then went to 
Worcester, Mass., where he remained for eleven years in the junk business, 
after which he permanently established himself at Chelsea, Mass., opening up 
his business on Auburn street, where he has been exceedingly successful. 

Mr. Feinberg was married in Russia in 1878 to Miss Pauline Kabotchnik, 
and they have four children, three boys and one girl. The boys are all in 
business with their father. 

Mr. Feinberg is a member of the Board of Directors of Congregation 
Agudas Acham, and is also prominent in the Sons of Abraham and I. O. B. A. 
He is also a most liberal contributor to all charities. 



M. FINGER 



The Tew is essentially a business man, and is 
seldom content unless he is engaged in business for 
himself. This is true of Mr. M. Finger, prominent 
iron scrap dealer of Lynn, Mass. 

He was born in Austria in 1881 and came to 
America in 1897. Going to Haverhill, Mass., he 
worked in a mill for several years, and then came to 
Lynn, where he went into the present line of busi- 
ness, and has been very successful. 

He was married in Haverhill in 1903 and has 
three children, two boys and one girl, all of whom 
are going to school. 

Mr. Finger is prominent in fraternal organiza- 
tions of Lynn, being President of I. O. B. A. and 
also a member of Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows 
and Havas Sholom Congregation. 

He has unselfishly shared his prosperity with 
those less fortunate than himself, and is much rever 
generosity in matters of charity. 




ed for his kindness and 



BENJAMIN FINKELHOR 

Mr. Benjamin Finkelhor of Pittsburgh, Pa., has had a very interesting 
and varied career. Born in Niemen, near Vilna, Russia, on January 1, 1870, 
he is the son of Max and Hannah Finkelhor, and came to America at the 
age of sixteen. His first occupation was to work on knee pants in New 
York, soon exchanging this to making white goods. All that was only a tem- 
porary makeshift, and the poor boy tried to help himself as best he could. 
A few years later he went to Pittsburgh and went into the manufacturing of 
white goods, which did not, however, turn out a success. 

Mr. Finkelhor returned to New York, where he applied himself to the 
sample card business with a relative, and for six months was busily engaged 
in trying to make it a success. But the hoped-for success never came. Mr. 

77 



Finkelhor went out selling white goods, and went to Pittsburgh again, later 
on clerking in Connellsville and Greensberg, Pa. He then started a clothing 
business with his brother, which in 1903 was given over to the brother, while 
he himself went out on the road as a salesman of pants. He was very suc- 
cessful and covered a large part of the country, and then located in Beaver 
Falls, Pa., where he started manufacturing on a comparatively large scale. 
The business went on well, and after three years he found himself in a posi- 
tion to return to Pittsburgh, where he became a jobber of clothes under the 
firm name of Finkelhor Brothers, his brother Samuel being with him. This 
is the business he is engaged in at the present time, at 928 Penn avenue, with 
a factory under the same name at 1 13 University place, New York City. 

Among his many charitable connections we must mention Mr. Finkel- 
hor's membership in the Jewish Home for the Aged of Pittsburgh, where he 
is a charter member and Director. He is also a Director of the Montefiore 
Hospital and a charter member and former Director of the Pittsburgh Federa- 
tion of Jewish Charities. Fie is an ardent Socialist and though he owns a 
factory and possesses "capital," he would resent being called a "capitalist." 
He once financed a Socialist paper named "Justice," and is firmly convinced 
that Socialism is the creed of the future and will finally win as a political 
system. He is an idealist and supports all possible Jewish organizations and 
charities. He retains a membership in the famous Congregation Tree of Life. 

Married in 1893 to Miss Sarah Samuels, there are six children of this 
union, named Leonard, Nathan, Herbert, Morris, Howard and Eugene. 



NEAL FINKELSTEIN 



When the state of Florida was called upon to select a delegate to the 
Jewish Congress, a large majority chose Mr. Neal Finkelstein of Jacksonville, 
which was an expression of general recognition accorded to a man who is 
considered the leader of the Orthodox community in Jacksonville and perhaps 
in the state of Florida as well. 

Mr. Finkelstein is a man of very high reputation. He is the Chairman of 
the Board of Directors of the Young Men's Hebrew Association of Jackson- 
ville and was formerly Treasurer of the Orthodox Congregation. He is a 
Director of the United Hebrew Charities, is a national Director of the Hebrew 
Immigrant Aid Society and also of the Denver Sanitarium for Consumptives. 
He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce of Jacksonville and a Past 
Master of the local Masonic Lodge. In the business world of the town his 
name stands very high, and whoever in Florida is 
approached will certainly mention the name of 
Neal Finkelstein with great respect and reverence 
as a leading citizen of Jacksonville. 

Asked by the writer of these lines what he 
considered the reason for his unusual success in 
life, Mr. Finkelstein stated that "honesty and 
hard work" brought about the result. It is un- 
doubtedly true in that it required the strictest 
honesty at all times to gain in the world of busi- 
ness such an enviable name as that enjoyed by 
Mr. Finkelstein. 

Mr. Neal Finkelstein was born on the 26th 
of August, 1873, in Pussolat, Government of 

Kovno, Russia. His parents, Gabriel and Sarah Finkelstein are both living in 
Jacksonville. Mr. Finkelstein is a descendant of a prominent Rabbinical fam- 

78 




ily and bears the name of his great-grandfather, who was a well-known Rabbi, 
while his grandfather, Reb Hillel Kundes, was also a renowned Rabbi. 

Mr. Finkelstein came to America in 1888. He settled in Fernandino, 
Fla.. where he began his career by peddling and working as a clerk. He then 
made a trip through Georgia and Texas and in 1899 he came to Jacksonville, 
where he started a pawnbrokerage and general merchandise business, which 
rapidlv rose to great importance until today it is a gigantic concern located at 
Bay and Broad streets, affording its owner not only material success but also 
a great name. 

Mr. and Mrs. Finkelstein, who was Miss Mary Smith, were married on 
August 23, 1901, and they are the parents of four sons, named Harold, Leon- 
ard, Malvern and Chester. 



JACOB FIRSTENBERG 

Born in Zirado, Russia, in 1889, Mr. Firstenberg came to the United States 
in 1906. After receiving a common school education he worked as an errand 
boy in Trenton, N. J. His salary was $16 per month, but it was understood 
that he was not to receive pay for the first month. He then worked as a shipping 
clerk for $5 per week, devoting every moment of his spare time to the study 
of salesmanship, business and elementary drawing, at which he was quite 
an adept. On July 14, 1910. Mr. Firstenberg made a design for a calendar 
which, he felt sure, would take among business people. His entire capital on 
that day was twenty-five cents, but he was by no means daunted. It is easy, 
he says, for an)' one to start business with a bank account, but it is a greater 
trick to start with nothing; it requires courage and determination and confi- 
dence ; and any one possessing these qualifications is, he thinks, bound to 
succeed. 

A little room in a tenement house was the first scene of Mr. Firstenberg's 
business activities, where his venture was an immediate success, so that its 
owner moved in a very short time to larger quarters in a loft at 302 East 
Forty-eighth street. 

Determined to illustrate that there was a real demand for his creations, 
Mr. Firstenberg went on the road as his own salesman. It was on this trip 
that he laid the foundation for his extensive business, which now, in truth, 
covers every part of the United States, with resident salesmen in many of the 
larger cities. Mr. Firstenberg is today one of the largest jobbers in adver- 
tising calendars in the United States, and his large warehouse at 332 East 
Forty-eighth street, New York, is a veritable hive of industry. 

Mr. Firstenberg is a Director in the Calendar Jobbers' Association of 
New York, of which he was offered the presidency. He is a firm believer 
in all of the principles of Judaism, is an active worker in the institution for 
Jewish blind children, and a generous contributor to many charities. He is 
well known for his firm devotion to Socialistic principles. 

On November 9, 1916, Mr. Firstenberg was married to Rose Levitt, a 
native of Minsk, Russia. Mrs. Firstenberg is of a most amiable and loving 
disposition, always ready to share in the joys and sorrows of her husband 
and believes that the greatest boon a woman can bring to a man is compan- 
ionship. Mr. and Mrs. Firstenberg modestly compare their success to the 
saying of Josh Billings and the postage stamp, whose success lay in its ability 
to stick to one thing until it got there. 



79 



JACOB FISHER AND ISAAC KURNITSKY 

It is interesting to relate the history of two men who, although born in 
different towns in Russia and not knowing each other until some time after 
they had landed on American soil, had at the same time experiences almost 
identical. We refer to Mr. Jacob Fisher and Mr. Isaac Kurnitsky, members of 
the prosperous firm of Fisher & Kurnitsky, located at 68-70 Liberty street, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Mr. Fisher was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, and Mr. Kurnitsky in 
Vilna, Guberne, Russia, in the years 1876 and 1877, respectively. They came 
to America within two years of each other, Mr. Fisher landing in 1896 and 
Mr. Kurnitsky in 1898. Both came to New Haven, Conn., and found their 
first employment in junk yards, where they received but scant remuneration 
for their services. Shortly after they went to Springfield, Mass., and joining 
forces, went into the iron, metal and waste paper business. 

That they are both exceedingly capable business men is attested by their 
rapid rise and flourishing condition of the large business which they are con- 
ducting today. Mr. Fisher was married in 1901 to Miss Eva Kalvinsky of 
Worcester, Mass., and they have four children, two boys and two girls, all 
going to school. He is a member of Congregation Kesser Israel and I. O. 
B. A. 

Mr. Kurnitsky was married in Holyoke, Mass., in 1902 to Miss Ida B. 
Barowsky. Their family consists of six children, five boys and one girl. The 
older children are in school. Mr. Kurnitsky is a member of Congregation 
Israel, I. O. B. A., Minsker Unterstizung Ferein, all Hebrew charities and 
Talmud Torah, of which he was one of the founders and now holds the office 
of Treasurer. 

There are no citizens of Springfield whose business ability and integrity 
are more respected than Mr. Jacob Fisher and Mr. Isaac Kurnitsky. 



ABRAHAM FISHMAN 

Some of the best citizenship of which our country boasts has been mus- 
tered from the ranks of those who were born in the old country, but who 
loved freedom of thought and action sufficiently to leave their old environ- 
ment and seek the fulfillment of their ideals in the new world. 

Such a man is Mr. Abraham Fishman. He was born in Gradno, Guberne, 
Russia, in 1881, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Hirsh Fishman, his father being- 
engaged in the milk business. He came to America in 1906 and finding his 
way to Center Falls, R. I., began peddling junk, which he continued for four 
years. He then went into business with a partner and this arrangement con- 
tinued for six years, when the partnership was dissolved and he continued 
business for himself. He is today owner of a fine modern iron and metal 
plant at 16 Water street, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Mr. Fishman was married in Worcester, Mass., in August, 1900, to Miss 
Rachel Lea Tittlebaum. They have five children, two boys and three girls, 
all going to school and being thoroughly educated in music. 

In addition to Mr. Fishman's arduous business activities, be finds time 
for a number of fraternal affiliations, in. which he holds prominent offices. He 
is President of Talmud Torah, Treasurer of the I. O. B. A., Twin City Lodge, 
Secretary oi Free Loan Association and Secretary of Avas Sholom Congrega- 
tion. He is also prominent in the Zion Society and the Sons of Zion. 

The accomplishments of Mr. Fishman are really remarkable in view of 
the few years he has devoted to the development of his business and civic 
associations. 

SO 



SAMUEL I. FOGELMAN 

A distinguished judge, upon being asked what contributed most to his 
success, replied: "Some succeed by great talent, some by the influence of 
friends, some by a miracle, but the majority by commencing without a shilling.'' 
Poverty is uncomfortable, but nine times ovit of ten the best that can happen 
to a young man is to be tossed overboard and compelled to sink or swim for 
himself. 

These sentiments may be most consistently applied to the career of Samuel 
Fogelman, who started working as parcel boy for $2 per week and from this 
humble beginning has developed an immense business, the prosperity of which 
is due largely to his efforts. 

Samuel I. Fogelman was born in Reading, Pa., December 22, 1890, his 
parents being Jacob and Sarah Fogelman. 

In very early years Samuel began earning money working for a local dry 
goods store as parcel boy for $2 per week. Later he was allowed to take up 
the selling end and his salary was raised to $5 per week. Seeing little oppor- 
tunity of further advancement, he decided to go to Toledo, Ohio, where he 
became the bookkeeper for a local scrap iron concern. After remaining there 
for two years, he went to Detroit, Mich., accepting a position as bookkeeper 
in a similar line of business at $100 per month. 

Here lie remained three years and displayed such marked business ability 
that upon the death of a member of the Wayne Scrap Iron and Metal Co. he 
was offered an opportunity to buy his share and pay for it from the profits. 
This offer he accepted and as President and General Manager of the firm, he 
has more than doubled their business. Mr. Fogelman is still a very young 
man with a brilliant business career already to his credit and the future roseate 
with the promise of further success. 

He was married in Toledo, Ohio, July 21, 1910, to Miss May Horowitz, 
and they have three lovely children, two boys and one girl. . 

Besides being a prominent member of the Elks and Knights of Pythias, 
Mr. Fogelman is affiliated with Temple Beth El and Congregation Mogen 
Aorom. Both himself and wife are most generous in their contributions to 
various charities, making no discrimination against those of creed or religion 
other than their own. 

In Mr. Fogelman and wife, Detroit possesses two most progressive, phil- 
anthropic and valued citizens, whose time, talents and money are ever at the 
command of all worthy causes. 

Mr. Fogelman's advice to the young man or woman just starting out in 
business typifies the manner in which he. himself, achieved his present envia- 
ble position, "Give everybody a square deal, work hard and save your money." 



MORRIS FOX 

The true test of a man's character is shown in the amount he is willing 
to sacrifice for the sake of principle. 

Civilization has overruled the old laws of seizure and conquest by those 
of kindness and charity, yet we find men blindly striving for happiness through 
selfish means. 

That the selfish way is not the best way is exemplified in the remarkable 
life history of Mr. Morris Fox, one of Buffalo's wealthy and successful 
citizens. 

When a man will give up a prosperous, flourishing business for the sake 
of his principles, his soul posesses qualities of nobility which are bound to 
find due recognition and result in a happy, successful career. 

81 



Morris Fox was born in Gorod, Gishin, Kamenetz, Podolsky, Guberne, 
Russia, March 15, 1861. His father, Xathan Fox, was a successful produce 
merchant of that city. 

He came to America in December. 1887, his destination being' Buffalo, 
N. Y., where he began peddling rags with a push cart. A few months later 
he obtained employment in a tailor shop at $8 a week, and finally opened a 
tailor shop of his own. This was followed bv a venture in the grocery busi- 
ness, which was not very successful, so borrowing $500 from a friend, he 
started a dry goods store, where he was doing a fine business. Here came 
the critical point in Mr. Fox's career. 

He was continually obsessed with the thought that his profits were com- 
ing from the meager earnings of the poor because of buying dry goods from 
the rich and selling' to the poor peddler, while in the rag business he was 
buying from the poor and selling at a profit to the rich, so he gave up his 
dry goods business and started buying and selling rags. This has prospered 
to such an extent that he now has a branch firm in England managed by his 
son Harold, and the business in Buffalo is now one of the largest in the coun- 
try, giving employment to over 100 people. 

Mr. Fox was twice married, and has fifteen children, all of whom are 
starting successful careers either in business or in college. They have all been 
highly educated and are accomplished musicians. 

His older sons are connected in important capacities in the diamond and 
precious stone business with some of the largest mercantile houses in this 
country and Europe. 

His charitable activities are as varied and as liberal as might be expected 
from such a generous nature. 

He is a member of Beth Israel Congregation and Reformed Temple, also 
the Kehillah of Orthodox and many other institutions. 

Mrs. Fox. who is also a great promoter of charitable enterprises, is a 
patroness of the Immigration Society of Xew York, the Denver and Los An- 
geles sanitariums, and the Federation of Jewish Charities. Thev also sub- 
scribe liberallv to all the Yishivas of Europe and America. 



LOUIS FRANKS 

Love of family is one of the finest traits of Jewish character and is very 
strongly distinguishable in many of the Jews who have come to this country 
from Europe. In the case of Mr. Louis Franks there was no occupation too 
menial, no hours too long, in his determination to save enough money with 
which to bring his family to their new home in this country. 

Mr. Franks was born in Pavolskv, Russia, in 1868, the son of Morris 
Franks, a grain merchant of that city, and also a man of considerable scholar- 
ship. He came to America in 1895 and going direct to YVardentown. N. J., 
worked in a factory for two years at $4 per week. He then went to Phila- 
delphia, peddling toys, and later worked in the cotton mills in Wardentown. 
He next went to the woolen mills, where he worked for $6 per week for two 
years. Then came the glad day when he found his savings were sufficient to 
go back to Russia and bring his family to America with him. 

Returning, he began work in the mills, where he continued for one year 
and then started peddling. After having saved a modest capital, he opened 
;■ small iron and metal yard which, since that time, has grown to enormous 
proportions and is now located on the Bay State Road at Lawrence. Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franks have six children — four boys and two girls. The 
st>ii Joe is in business with his father and the balance are going to school with 



the exception of the daughter Pearl, who is married to Mr. Harry Young, of 
Lawrence, Mass. 

In addition to Mr. Franks' strenuous business activities, he finds time for 
several fraternal affiliations, prominent among them being the Knights of 
Pythias and the I. O. B. A. He is also a member of the Russian Orthodox 
Congregation and is most generous in his contributions to all benevolent 
organizations. 



HENRY FREEDBERGER 

The life story of Henry Freedberger is a wonderful demonstration of the 
resourcefulness which is sometimes developed by misfortune. 

At the age of eight he found himself bereft of the protection and guidance 
of his father. After his death the mother bravely assumed the burden of 
rearing her children, but a year later she also was called by death and the six 
children — three daughters and three sons — were left orphaned. 

Henry, the subject of our sketch, at this crisis demonstrated those remark- 
able qualities of initiative which have distinguished his entire later career. 

Three years after the death of his mother, Henry, then a young lad of 
only twelve years, decided to try his fortune in America and bravely sailed 
alone. Later three others of the family followed. 

At first Henry did some peddling, then took up work in a shop, until he 
entered the employ of a big furniture store at $7 per week, where he stayed 
for fifteen years, until he advanced himself to the position of secretary- 
treasurer of the concern. During this time, by dint of hard and ceaseless work, 
he was able to save up a little fortune, or at least what he thought to be a little 
fortune, and with $1,000 he opened a small furniture store at 434 Grand street, 
New York, where he stayed for four and a half years. Business began to in- 
crease rapidly and he was compelled to move to a larger place. In May, 1905, 
he took his present place of business at 6-8 Avenue A, a building of six stories, 
where he made a singular success. He struggled very hard, worked day and 
night, never thought of himself but had the interest of his customers at heart, 
pleasing them by giving them the best money could buy, until he had established 
a business reputation hardly equalled by anyone. 

The business is arranged in the following manner : There is a warehouse 
at 49 First street ; the main floor of the building is devoted to an assortment 
of suites ; the second floor contains dining room suites ; the third floor consists 
of living room and library suites ; on the fourth floor we find bedroom suites 
and all kinds of bedroom furniture ; the fifth floor is given over to carpets and 
rugs. The business is conducted under the firm name of Freedberger & Kosh 
and employs twenty-four people. 

Mr. Freedberger's marriage on June 10, 1900, to Miss Augusta Kosch was 
a big event in the Norfolk Street Synagogue. Mrs. Freedberger is the daugh- 
ter of the late Philip Kosch. who. was an Orthodox religious observer and 
prominent in the paint business. 

The First Federation of Hungarians in New York counts Mr. Freed- 
berger as one of its charter members. Mr. Freedberger is also actively con- 
nected with the Temple Shaari Zedek, of Brooklyn, N. Y. He is the Treasurer 
of the Religious Sunday School of Brooklyn, a member of the Akiba Lodge, 
No. 173, I. O. B. A., and a good many others. 

Mrs. Freedberger is also very conspicuous in all social and charitable 
activities. 

Mr. and Mrs. Freedberger are the parents of two children — a son, Leo- 
pold, attending high school, and a daughter, Natalie, attending public school. 

Some of Mr. Freedberger's rules of life are : "Get a good education, learn 
a business, start in at a young age, work hard, be honest, and save; and you 
will surely succeed." 

83 



MOSES B. FREEDMAN 

Moses B. Freedman was born in Hungary, Rosch Chodesh Ab, 1857, the 
son of Joel and Ziporah Freedman. His father was a great philanthropist in 
Hungary, and his family is one of rabbis and men of letters ; a nephew of his 
father's was chief rabbi of Troppau, Silesia. However, all this availed him 
of nothing when he landed in the United States in 1877, and he had to start 
life from the very bottom, as a peddler of merchandise. He then moved to 
Cincinnati, where he started a Minian, becoming later connected with a con- 
gregation in the town. He accepted a similar position in Zanesville, Ohio, 
where he also organized a Jewish Knights of Pythias lodge, known as King 
David Lodge. 

Removing to Cleveland, he went into manufacturing and established the 
firm of Freedman Brothers, wholesale manufacturers of clothing, 707 St. Clair 
street, where he is successful. There is now little time, however, which he 
could give to public affairs and all he could give to his community is the presi- 
dency of a very large congregation in Cleveland, B'nai Jeshurun, where he 
has held the office for six years. The congregation is the largest of its kind in 
the United States and is connected with a Talmud Torah. In addition, Mr. 
Freedman is a member of nearly every important charitable organization in 
the city. 

Mr. Freedman was married, in 1888, in Cincinnati, to Miss Emma Loeb. 
Their daughter, Florence May, married Mr. M. B. Koblitz, of the firm of 
Koblitz & Son. 

He is Orthodox in his religious views and is particularlv interested in the 
education of children. He believes that by giving them two hours of daily 
Hebrew instruction, with a cantor to give them fifteen to twenty minutes of 
chanting, if applied to children between six and twelve, will produce a lasting- 
influence and make them so profoundly religious that nothing on earth will 
ever change them. In his Talmud Torah, situated in Scovill avenue and East 
55th street, 1,600 seats are provided for the children, who receive their Hebrew 
instruction in the method "Ibrit b'Ibrith," with services on Friday evening and 
Saturdav morning and afternoon. 



WOLF FREEDMAN 

To the young man first starting out in life the world seems full of com- 
plexities. 

As time passes the mists clear away and he sees before him a shining light 
of simple duty leading to the goal of all great and worthy ambition. 

When Wolf Freedman landed in New York he had but $100 with which 
to start his career in the new world. Confronted with new customs, a strange 
language and people, the task was one that would have easily discouraged a 
less dauntless spirit. 



84 



He was born in Karno, Guberne, Russia, December 15, 1872, and came to 
America at the age of eighteen. Realizing that he must conserve his meager 
capital, lie bought a small stock of merchandise and started peddling, journey- 
ing all the way from Philadelphia. Pa., to Harrisburg, Pa., on foot, selling his 
wares as he went. This he continued for three years, when he had an oppor- 
tunity to go in the rag business with Air. Williams. This partnership is exist- 
ing at the present time and has proved very successful. 

Thev have also taken on a line of iron and metal and both have grown 
very wealth}'. 

Mr. Freedman was married in December, 1893, to Miss Rachel Cohen, 
who has been an ideal wife and mother, besides taking a very prominent part 
in the various social and charitable activities of their city. 

Either Mr. or Mrs. Freedman are affiliated with every prominent organiza- 
tion in Harrisburg, among which may be mentioned both Jewish Congrega- 
tions. B'nai B'rith, Independent Order of Brith Abraham, Ahanas Israel, Odd 
Fellows and Modern Woodmen of the World. 

They contribute to the Denver Hospital, the Immigration Society of Xew 
York, Orphans' Home of Erie, Pa., the Philadelphia Farm School, and others 
too numerous to mention. 

Mr. and Airs. Freedman have seven fine children. The two boys are in 
high school, while Mollie is assisting her father in the office. The other girls 
are still in school, and are all well educated in music. 



ABRAHAM W. FREDLAND 

Mr. Fredland, of Pittsburgh, is a descendant of a prominent Rabbinical 
family, and Judah Leib Eger, the famous Gaon of Posen, was a direct lineal 
ancestor. Abraham W. was born in Kedan in June, 1864. and he was brought 
up in the old city of Riga, so well known for its great spiritual life and the 
wonderful caliber of men it gave to the world. At a comparatively early age, 
some thirtv years ago, he decided to emigrate to the Xew World, and as he 
was a tailor by trade, he came directly to Pittsburgh, where he obtained work 
in his chosen line and started to make good. 

Merchant tailoring brought in good money and Mr. Fredland was soon 
making a success. He then opened a men's furnishings store ; a clothing store ; 
for a time plunged into real estate ( 1905-6-7), and is now back again at his 
well tried trade of merchant tailoring, his place of business being located at 
the Oliver Building, Pittsburgh. 

Air. Fredland, like his father before him, is a member of many organiza- 
tions. He has been a member of the Congregation Tree of Life for over 
twenty years. He belongs to the B'nai B'rith and other charitable institutions 
and is as active in communal Jewish affairs as time and circumstances will 
permit. 

Abraham W. Fredland had the good fortune to marry Miss Becky Abel- 
son, whose family comes from Courland. They were married on the other 
side in the month of Ab, 1884, when Mr. Fredland was but twenty years of 
age. Six children have blessed this union, namely: Louis (married), Max 
(married), Anna (Airs. Rubin), Alorris (married). Ike is in the Army of the 
LJnited States and Jacob, the youngest, is with his father. Air. Fredland is an 
Orthodox in religious matters and he gave his children a thorough Jewish 
education. His daughter was a Hebrew school teacher before her marriage. 



85 



HENRY L. FREYMAN 

When the honorable Mr. Francis, ex-Governor of Missouri and ambassa- 
dor to Russia, decided to use his influence toward the staging of a world's fair 
in the United States, he little realized what a varied assortment of talent would 
be necessary to make the fair a success. Not only was it necessar}? to have all 
nations represented in the arts and sciences, but the financial success of the 
project also had to be assured. The men who conducted successfully the 
various concessions, where merchandise of all kinds was sold, contributed very 
largely to the success of the gigantic enterprise. 

Prominent among them was Mr. Henry L. Freyman, who was born in 
Koenigsberg, Germany, October 12, 1876. His father was a merchant and a 
Jewish scholar, prominent in his native town. He came to America July 3, 
1891, and went to Albany, N. Y., where an uncle gave him a basket of small 
merchandise and matches to peddle. He continued this three months, and then 
found employment as clerk in a clothing store. Eight months later he went to 
Xew York, working in the same capacity, and developed such a high degree of 
salesmanship that his salary was advanced to $20 per week. 

His next connection was with a collar and cuff factory, and being; desirous 
of learning the business he took the only position available — that of a sweeper 
at a salary of $5 per week. His rise was very rapid, however, and the firm 
soon sent him on the road as salesman at a salary of $40 per week. Later he 
opened an office as commission salesman, handling a number of other lines, 
and became a familiar figure among the selling fraternity from coast to coast. 

Then came the St. Louis World's Fair, where he remained until the close, 
and then went back to Cleveland, looking for a good opportunity and location 
for a clothing store. He finally opened one at Conneaut, Ohio, and later at 
Lorain, but finally came back to Cleveland, where he started a hardware and 
tool store at 21 16 Ontario street. His business grew so rapidly that he was 
soon forced to take larger quarters and located on Prospect avenue, where he 
is today successfully managing the Freyman Tool Company. 

Mr. Freyman was married in Cleveland, September 15, T908, to Miss 
Evelyn Krohn, and they have two small children — one boy and one girl. 

Mr. Freyman is connected with every charitable organization in Cleveland 
and also a number of national institutions. He contributes to the Federation 
of Jewish Charities, Mount Sinai Hospital, B'nai B'rith, and the Hebrew Free 
Loan Association. He is a valued member of the Hebrew Working Men's 
Association. 



DAVID FREID 

Much of the Jew's success in America is due to his ability to adapt himself 
to conditions, and the career of David Freid is perhaps as interesting a narra- 
tive of thrift and resourcefulness as it is possible to compile. He was born in 
the Province of Poltova, November 12, 1867, and after serving four years in 
the Russian Army, was rewarded by being expelled from Russia. He came to 
America, his intended bride coming with him, for he had an older brother here 
who was married to the sister of his bride-to-be. He worked at a newsstand 
from 5 a. m. to 7 p. m. for $2.50 per week, then became a cloak presser, and 
when the big strike threw him out of employment, he shovelled snow. Later 
he found work in a laundry, as did his faithful Kollah ; they saved some money, 
married, and purchased a delicatessen store at 61 Bleecker street, Xew York. 

.Mr. Freid, quick to discern the lack of variety in the establishment, grad- 
ually developed it into a large restaurant. Most of his customers were fur 



manufacturers of the vicinity and while continuing the restaurant, he sold 
trimmings to his customers as a side line, and marvelous to relate, in seven 
years made over $55,000 through his thrift and ability. When the furriers 
moved uptown, he moved with them, engaging in the trimming business. Liter 
shifting to silks and satins at his present establishment, .106 West 27th street. 
He is a man of high standing in the commercial world and a contributor to 
many institutions. He is a founder and the first member of the Rostover 
Society, organized twenty-one years ago. He has four sons, Abraham, the 
oldest, a very bright young man, being in business with him. 



CHARLES FRIEDBERG 

America is the land of the self-made man. Here an inheritance of worldly 
goods, a wealthy and prominent family circle counts for something in the 
career of the young man. But infinitely more does character count and the 
native ability to overcome obstacles, to fight against odds successfully. The 
latter type is well represented by Mr. Charles Friedberg of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

He was born in Meritz, Province of Vilna, Russia, Maich 14, 1874, the 
son of Simon and Tillie Friedberg. His maternal grandfather was a rabbi 
(a "Dayin" to be exact) in the little town in which he was born, and scholarly 
traditions were long cherished in the family and handed down to the children. 
At the age of eight he journeyed with his parents to America. Quite early in 
life, Mr. Friedberg was obliged to earn his own living and maintain himself. 
Young Charles went to school every morning and sold papers in the after- 
noons and Sundays. 

It has been noted frequently that selling papers on the streets of a great 
city is often an excellent preparatory school and a fortification for the success- 
ful fight in the battle of life. Here there is no room for the weakling; only he 
who has courage and stick-to-itiveness will win out. As Charles Friedberg 
grew older, and as his weekly income increased, he entered Duff's College and 
took up a course in preparation for commercial life and a business career. For 
some time he was employed by the firm of D. Avner as bookkeeper ; subse- 
quently he held a similar position with M. Levy, a merchant at 51 Wylie 
avenue. Even then he supplemented his income by giving lessons in English 
in the evening. Mr. Friedberg records as a matter of pride that he always 
was able to support himself as long as he remembers. At the age of 17 he 
became interested in the business of tobacco and cigars, and three years later, 
about the year 1895, he entered the shoe business, first by establishing a chain 
of retail stores, and subsequently by confining himself to the wholesale trade. 
At the present time he is the head of the Penn Shoe Company, 710 Penn 
avenue, Pittsburgh. 

Men of the type of Mr. Friedberg are not satisfied with material success 
alone. At the first opportunity he showed an inclination for public service. 
The Jewish philanthropic organizations of the city first claimed his attention. 
He is of a charitable disposition and is always anxious to do that which is 
humane and constructive. A few years ago, when the Hebrew Institute of 
Pittsburgh was founded by the well-known philanthropist, Mr. Louis I. Aaron, 
Mr. Friedberg was one of the most active workers in the cause and has to this 
day remained one of the life members, also Director in the Jewish Home for 
the Aged. For five years he has been treasurer of the Congregation B'nai 
Israel. In addition he, of course, contributes to all worthy Jewish causes. In 
connection with the synagogue above mentioned, he became enthusiastically 
interested in collections for war relief purposes. The fact that this congrega- 
tion holds a prominent place among the synagogues of the city in the amount 

87 



of money contributed to the relief of the Jews stricken in the war zone, is due 
largely to the untiring efforts of Mr. Friedberg. For nineteen years he has 
been affiliated with the Masonic Lodge, and, of course, belongs to a number 
of Jewish lodges in his community. 

Such is the story of an American Jewish citizen, self respecting, willing 
to do and to serve, of modest pretensions, kindly by nature ; he certainly merits 
recognition on the. part of his fellowmen. Charity and religious precepts, Mr. 
Friedberg holds, are principles not to be displayed on public occasions for self- 
gratihcation ; one must introduce them into one's daily mode of living and 
make them a factor in one's business career. 

On March 14, 1809, he was married to Miss Rebecca Kirstein, of New 
York. Fie is the father of two children, Esther and Mulford. Mrs. Friedberg 
is a member of the Council of Jewish Women and is prominently connected 
with the Ladies' Auxiliary of B'nai Israel Synagogue, and she shows the same 
interest in Jewish public affairs which distinguishes Mr. Friedberg to so 
remarkable a degree in both Jewish public life as well as the civic affairs of 
his community. 



HYMAN ALBERT FRIEDMAN 

Of all tt-.c world's teachers, experience is at once the most thorough and 
the most stern. She turns to her pupils an uncompromising countenance with 
the trials she imposes, endowing her pupils with that supreme confidence which 
is a characteristic of most self-made men. 

Such is the history of Flyman Albert Friedman, who was born in Skodvil, 
Kovno, Guberne, Russia, January 15, 1881, and came to America with his 
parents in September, 1890. 

His first experience was in the schools of Pittsburgh, which he attended 
until he was fourteen. Most boys of fourteen at the present time would con- 
sider it a great hardship if they were obliged to earn their own living, but 
young Hyman went at the task with a stout heart and a firm determination to 
succeed. 

His first employment was found in a clothing store where he clerked for 
$5 per week, but his small remuneration was the least of the advantages he 
derived as he was gaining valuable experience, which was to be of the utmost 
assistance in future years. 

After continuing here for five years he went to Braddock, Pa., and opened 
a store which he conducted successfully for fifteen years. Selling out, he 
moved to Franklin, Pa., where he again started the drygoods store which he 
is conducting on a large scale at the present time. 

Mr. Friedman's advice to the young is the rule which he has followed 
with such remarkable success: "Work hard, be honest, and give your fellow- 
men a square deal." 

He was married June 21, 1910, to Miss Anna Cohen of Corry, Pa., a 
woman who has assumed a most prominent place in the various social and 
benevolent activities of Franklin, Pa. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Friedman are patrons of all charities, including the 
Jewish Orphanage. 

Mr. Friedman is also a member of Orthodox Shule, B'nai B'rith and the 
Elks. 

They have two small daughters, who will be given every educational 
advantage. 



JACOB FRIEDMAN 



The best argument against' any attempt to restrict immigration to this 
country is such a career as that of Mr. Jacob Friedman, of Birmingham, Ala. 

Mr. Friedman was born on July 4, 1869, in the Province of Subalki, Rus- 
sian Poland, the son of Isaiah and Pesha Friedman, and came to this country 
at the age of fifteen. After spending two years in New York City, where he 
worked in a cigar factory, he went to Chattanooga, Tenn., and entered the 
business of a brother in that city. Representing his brother's firm, he removed 
1889 to Alabama, spending one year at Talladega, and then he spent two years 
in Pulaski, Tenn., and three years in Brooklyn, N. Y. In 1897 he decided to 
go into business for himself and came to Birmingham, Ala., where he estab- 
lished the clothing firm of J. Friedman & Company, which is located at 1908 
First avenue. This business has now, through his able management and the 
fine reputation he bears in the city and community for integrity, intelligence 
and charitableness, grown to be a most substantial en- 
terprise in the commercial field of Birmingham. 

Yet, the great measure of success which Mr. 
Friedman has gained in the business world is but in 
keeping with the success and standing that he has at- 
tained in other fields of human endeavor. He is very 
prominent and popular in the Jewish community which 
he is serving as Vice President of the Federation of 
Charities, the organization which he has helped to estab- 
lish, and is holding the position of Treasurer in the local 
B'nai B'rith Lodge. He is also a Director of Temple 
Emanuel and is at present engaged in organizing the 
"Kehillah" of Birmingham in order to bring about a 
closer relationship and a truer co-operation between the 
German and the Russian Jews of that city. Along the 
lines of general endeavor he has achieved prominence 
and popularity through the Masonic order, in which he 
has held a number of distinguished positions. He is 

a Past Master of the Blue Lodge and the Lodge of Perfection ; he is Chairman 
of the Blue Lodge Committee of the Whole and of the Relief Committee of 
King Solomon Lodge ; he is a Board Member of the Masonic Temple organ- 
ization and is serving on the Scottish Rite Standing Committee. 

On February 16, 1896, Mr. Friedman was married to Miss Ida Rose, who, 
to the great sorrow of the community in whose charities she had long been 
most active and prominent, departed this life on August 30, 1916. 




JOSEPH FRIEDMAN 



Not only is Mr. Joseph Friedman one of the most successful young attor- 
neys in Youngstown, but he enjoys another distinction, perhaps equally impor- 
tant, but certainly very pleasing to himself. He is generally idolized by the 
Jewish population of the city and is extremely popular with the order B'nai 
B'rith, to which he devotes so much of his time and energy. Joseph Friedman 
is one of those young men whose very presence is inspiring and who, for this 
reason alone, even if he were not possessed of remarkable ability, which he is, 
must make a success of whatever they undertake. 

Born in the city of Berzevicze, Baros, Hungary, February 15, 1882, he 
came to this countrv all by himself when but thirteen and a half years of age. 
Started work in a cigar factory in New York, at the same time attending night 



school for the double purpose of learning the language of the country and 
preparing himself to pass the regents' examinations with a view of taking up 
the study of a profession. He then took a collegiate entrance examination for 
Baldwin University and took up the study of law at the Cleveland Law School. 
Working his way through college, he was graduated in July 1908, and at once 
commenced the practice of law at Youngstown, Ohio. 

Mr. Friedman's office is located at the Stambaugh Building, and he is 
undoubtedly one of the best liked practitioners in the city. He was President 
of the local lodge and is now the Acting Secretary of the B'nai B'rith Lodge, 
a member of the Federal B'rith Sholom Lodge and a member of the Federated 
Charities of Youngstown. He takes an active part in all Jewish affairs and 
contributes to all possible charities. He is a member of the Temple Rodeph 
Sholom and the Children of Israel and is a modern Orthodox in his religious 
views, having himself been a Yeshiba Bochur in his early days. Air. Friedman 
was married in 1910 in Cleveland, Ohio, to Mabel E. Krohngold, and they are 
the parents of two children, Reta and Arthur. 



LOUIS FRIEDMAN 

The business world has great heed of men of unquestioned integrity and 
honor. 

The entire commercial fabric is built upon confidence and the ability of 
men to meet and sustain the obligations which they assume. 

Thus, we feel that while the ministry sustained a great loss when Louis 
Friedman, forsook that profession, the business world was made richer and 
has given Mr. Friedman equal opportunities to be of service to mankind. 

He was born in Sagone, Kovno, Guberne, Russia, September 25, 1861. 
His father, Mendel Friedman, was a rabbi and excellent Jewish scholar. 

Mr. Friedman came to America when a very young man and after work- 
ing for an uncle for three or four years, went to Cincinnati and spent one year 
studying for the ministry. But the call to a business career was more insistent 
and he went to Du Bois, Pa., the scene of his first venture, where he remained 
for over ten years. 

Selling out, he came to Bradford and opened the store which has since 
developed into the splendid business in general furnishings of which he is the 
head today. 

He was married April 15, 1886 to Miss Rose Asch, and they have a fine 
family of eight children — four boys and four girls — all of whom are high 
school graduates. 

Mr. Friedman is prominent in many Jewish organizations, the principal 
ones being Orthodox Schule, of which he is Treasurer, and the Western Star, 
of which he is Secretary, the Beeker Home and Achnoses Orchinn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Friedman are among the most influential citizens of their 
city and are both noted for their kindness and liberality. 



90 



MAX FRIEDMAN 

Someone has said that the Jew is the Pilgrim of Commerce, trading with 
all nations, yet blending with none of them. They, thrive wherever they go. 
They are able to oblige the rulers of their country with loans. They never beg, 
yet the needy rarely appeal to them in vain. And best of all, they keep 
together. 

When interviewing Mr. Max Friedman, of Cleveland, Ohio, we were 
much impressed with the fact that the above very nearly expressed Mr. Fried- 
man's sentiments regarding his people, as when asked what advice he would 
give to the young people of his race, he said: "Be a Jew first, last and all the 
time. Iiring up vour children to be good Jews ; have all Jewish movements at 
heart and never intermarry. Be strictly honest and honorable in your dealings 
and give everybody the same treatment you would like to receive yourself." 

Such a course of action conscientiously followed has placed Mr. Friedman 
in the enviable position of wealthy business man and exemplary citizen which 
he today occupies in the city of his adoption. 

He was born in Berditshiva, Russia, May 10, 1884, and came to America 
about eighteen years ago. He first learned the cloak and suit trade, working 
without pay for four weeks. His first salary was $5 per week and in four 
years he was advanced to $40 per week. This enabled him to save $200, which 
was sufficient capital for his first business venture. 

Obtaining a horse and wagon, he started buying and selling scrap iron 
and prospered so rapidly that he soon owned three wagons. From this first 
success, it was but a short step to his ownership of a yard, where he is today 
doing an immense business. 

He was married in Cleveland, April 10, 1910, to Miss Eva Rosenberg, of 
Columbus, Ohio, daughter of Philip and Goldi Rosenberg, of that city, and 
they have two lovely children, one boy and one girl. 

Mr. Friedman is very generous to various charities calling upon him for 
assistance and his wife is a gracious lady, amply qualified in every way to 
assist him, in addition to the promotion of various philanthropic projects in 
which she is particularly interested. 

Among the organizations with which they are affiliated, the most prominent 
are: B'nai Ishurim Temple, Independent Aid Society, K. of P., B'nai B'rith. 
the Zionists, Mount Sinai Hospital, Old Age Home, Orphan Asylum and 
Infants' Home. 



PAUL FRIEDMAN 

It is not given to every man to arrive at the goal of his ambition by a 
straight road. 

Many times the way points through devious paths, and we cry out that we 
have lost the guiding light of the rainbow that leads to the pot of gold. 

But if ambition be worthy, and the effort sincere, every footprint in the 
snow, every tear that is shed, marks in indelible characters the location of an- 
other milestone in the map of the march. 

So it was with Paul Friedman, who followed the light of the rainbow 
from his native Russia, to find the treasure buried fathoms deep beneath diffi- 
culties which would have crushed a less dauntless spirit. 

He was born in Mochnoka, Russia, July 16, 1886, and at the age of thir- 
teen left school to assist his father, who was a grain merchant and a Jewish 
scholar of considerable prominence in his native town. 

91 



At the age of eighteen he came to America and seized upon the first op- 
portunity which presented itself — the trade of cigarmaking. 

This sufficed as a means to an end, as Paul was saving every cent possible 
from his meager salary and at the end of two years had accumulated $120. 

With $90 of this small capital he purchased a horse and wagon, reserving 
$30 as cash in hand with which to do business. 

Why relate the hardships of the next few years? The deprivations for 
the sake of the success which he knew would ultimately crown his efforts? 
It is the old story of sacrifice which has been written in every tongue, which 
has sunken deep into the hearts of men who have lived and suffered to accom- 
plish the big things of life. 

At the expiration of five years, his business being fairly established, he 
entered into partnership with his brother, and they opened a scrap iron yard, 
where with a limited capital they marked out the roads to success even in the 
first year. As a result of their continued efforts they have, year by year, 
enlarged their business until, at the date of writing, they are foremost in their 
line, in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mr. Friedman's advice to young men is this : "Find the work which you 
like and for which you are best fitted, and stick to it, regardless of the obstacles 
which seem to beset your way. Make your every act earn for you a reputation 
for honesty and reliability." 

Mr. Friedman was married January 27, 1909, to Helen Manilov of Phila- 
delphia, and together they have dispensed charity to every worthy cause in 
Cleveland, as well as to the .local hospitals and the Denver Sanitarium. 

Mrs. Friedman is particularly active in works of benevolence, and de- 
votes much of her time, as well as money, to their promotion. 

They have two promising boys, who will doubtless inherit their parents' 
ability and sterling qualities. 

Mr. Friedman is also a member of and a liberal contributor to Congrega- 
tion Anshe Emeths, Independent Order B'nai B'rith. 



WILLIAM FRIEDMAN 

There has always existed a marked distinction between the old European 
and the new American Judaism. Not only is the difference discernible with 
regard to the social life of the Jew, but in his religious and national life as 
well. And this contrast is not at a standstill ; it is becoming more and more 
noticeable with the passing of time. 

The European Jew was at all times more devoted to his religion than is 
his American brother. In national spirit and in his commercial life, the Ori- 
ental Jew has always in his own humble manner and submissive attitude sacri- 
ficed his well-being that the Jew as a race might be strengthened and perpetu- 
ated. He was first of all a Jew, rejoicing in their festivities and weeping in 
their sorrows, born a Jew, raised among Jews and among his co-religionists he 
preferred to die. 

Quite different, however, are the facts concerning tile American Jew. The 
ordinary masses as well as some of the middle class still remember that they 
originate from Jewish parentage ; that it is becoming and proper for Jew and 
Jew to mingle, to pass the time of day with him, to live in his neighborhood, 
to take an active interest in Jewish affairs and to inquire into his welfare. The 
more successful American Jews, and especially those in professional voca- 
tions, are for the most part so absorbed in their daily routine, are so bewildered 
by their temporary prominence, that they forget their origination, their creed 
and even their Maker. 

92 



who stands out a 5 a marked exception to the foregoing condition is 

.Mr. William Friedman, a prominent and influential attorney at Detroit, Mich. 
While horn on American soil, far from the influences of the European Jewish 
life. Mr. Friedman is a )cw to the core, ever ready and willing to render assist- 
ho appear worthy, and is devoting a large part of his life to 
the betterment and uplifting of his co-religionists. 

Born in Detroit. April r. )88o. his father, Samuel Friedman, a retired and 
well-known merchant, and his mother, Celia Friedman, both took an active in- 

t in their son's future. He was sent to the public and high schools of 

oit, graduating from the latter with high honors. Young Friedman then 
followed up his high school education with an academic training, attending 
both the Detroit College of Law and the University of Michigan, obtaining high 
honors and the degree of LL, B. 

Shortly after this. Mr. Friedman married Florence R. Blumrosen, the 
daughter of Moses and Jennie Blumrosen of Detroit. Jn [910, however, his 
wife died and Friedman became at once the providing father and tender 
mother to his only daughter. 

While his law business, located at 1517 Dime Bank Building, is steadily 
increasing and demanding more and more of his time, yet Mr. Friedman is 
always active in social work and i- not infrequently found to be the instigator 
and the head 01' the most vital and important undertakings of his community. 
Besides being Trustee of the L'nited Jewish Charities and the Shaarey Zedek 
Congregation, Mr. Friedman is an active member of the Talmud Torah, the 
House of Shelter, the B'nei B'rith, the K. of I'., the Elks, the Masons, the 
Lawyers' Club, the Detroit Bar Association, the Phoenix Club and several 
others. He is highly respected and honored for his sound judgment, his kind 
heart, his integrity and perseverence and his never-failing efforts to further 
the interest of the Jew wherever possible. 



SAM FRIEDMAN 

Success in life is largely governed by a man's willingness to "pay the 
price." Jt takes effort, concentration and hard knocks, but if these are boldly 
withstood, he will eventually rise to the realization of his highest ambition. 
These characteristics are most apparent in the career of Mr. Sam Friedman, 
who was born in Atsombar, Galicia, March 15, 1864, the son of Louis and 
Esther Friedman. His father was a farmer and real estate man, who pos- 
sessed a large amount of native shrewdness. 

Mr. Friedman came to America, landing in Xew York in August. 1893, 
where he began working in a factory as an operator. He received no pay at 
first. In fact, he was obliged to pay twenty dollars for the privileges of 
instruction and contributed his services for six months. At the end of that 
period he went to Scranton, Fa., and secured a job as a day laborer in a factory 
at 75 cents a day. He continued five years, during which time he received 
several small increases in pay. 

From there he went to Pittsburgh, Pa., then to McKeesport and Browns- 
ville, but was unable to find employment. Being entirely without funds, he 
walked to Charleroi, where he found work in a grocery store. As soon as 
he had saved enough money, he sent for his wife in Galicia, who before her 
marriage was Miss Rosa Friedman. After her arrival he saved enough money 
to buy a horse and wagon, and began peddling fruit. A year later he went 
into the junk business, and with the able co-operation of his wife, who 
assisted him in every manner possible, they managed to save a thousand dol- 

93 



lars, which proved a stepping stone to the large fortune which the)' have since 
amassed. 

Aside from Mr. Friedman's iron and metal business he is interested in 
three banks in Charleroi, of which he is one of the directors, and also controls 
a large amount of real estate. 

Mr. Friedman is a liberal contributor to all charities, and is a member of 
the congregation in Monnessen, Pa., as well as the Eagles and Moose. 



JACOB FRUMAN 

Every new industry carries with it a number of allied businesses which 
develop in proportion to the public need. Thus we find that the giant industry 
of automobile building has developed a new line in the junk business, and to 
the handling of automobile scrap we find one of the best business men in 
Chelsea, Mass., devoting his time and attention. 

Mr. Jacob Fruman, whose place of business is located at 104 Spruce 
street, was born in Valina, Guberne, Russia, in 1873. He came to America 
in 1902, landing in Boston, where he worked in a blacksmith shop for_seven 
and one-half years. He then decided to go into business for himself, and in 
addition to a regular junk yard has developed a highly specialized line of auto- 
mobile scrap, and is today doing an immense business. 

Mr. Fruman was married in Russia, in igoo, to Miss Vittle Yassin. They 
have one daughter, who is at the present time going to school. 

Mr. Fruman and wife are both very public-spirited and generous in their 
contributions to various charities, in the promotion of which they are ever 
occupying prominent place. They are members of Congregation Beth Jacob, 
and Mr. Fruman is also affiliated with the I. O. B. A. and the Boston United 
Hebrews of America. 



ABRAHAM GASH 

One of the best known bean and rice importers in the country is Mr. 
Abraham Gash, whose place of business located at No. 7 Worth street, New 
York City, is almost internationally known. Its owner is one of those rare 
characters with whom one naturally desires to make friends in any capacity. 

Born on March 7, 1877, in the province of Warsaw, he is the son of 
Chaskel and Gittel Gash, both in Warsaw. The father was in the leather 
business, and after his death in 1887 the family moved to Poltusk, where 
Abraham became a "prikashchick," or general clerk, for his uncle, Yokel 
Brenn, who was a contractor for the government. But at the age of nineteen 
and facing military service, he made up his mind to leave home and start anew 
in the country of opportunity. He arrived here in 189S, and like many others 
of his race, began his career by becoming a customer peddler. 

His first step was to act as canvasser for another, but very soon he bought 
out his boss and continued the business for himself. However, he did not stay 
in the business a long time before he became aware that he was not par- 
ticularly attached to it, and he went into the dry goods business with a partner, 
opening a place at 121 Division street, under the firm name of A. Gash & Co. 

94 



At length the partnership was terminated and he opened a business for him- 
shelf at 34 Henry street, but soon found the place too small and in 1906 he 
moved to Xo. 30 Henry street. After being there for several years, with 
business constantly expanding, he went in 191 1 to 2J Roosevelt street. Busi- 
ness kept on increasing and Mr. Gash was compelled to look for larger quar- 
ters, which he found at his present business address. Xo. 7 Worth street, 
where he occupies the entire building, doing an import and export business, 
and having the reputation of being one of the largest rice and bean houses in 
the country. 

Mr. Gash is prominentlv identified with a good many charitable institu- 
tions and organizations, such as the Chesed Shel Ernes and Gmiloth Chesed of 
Xew York and Brooklyn, the Zion Hospital of Bensonhurst and the Orthodox 
"Schul" located at Bay 22, Bath Beach, and he donates to everything worth 
while. He also belongs to a number of Talmud Torahs and fraternal associa- 
tions. 

He was married in the city of New York in May. 1004. to Ida Cooper, who 
comes from a well-known Rabbinical family of the Kovner "Gaon." and 
they have three children, named Selma, Chester and Freda. All children attend 
public school and study Hebrew and Yiddish at home. The home life of the 
Gashes is an ideal picture of Jewish traditional life, and it is maintained on 
the principle of strict Orthdoxy and Kashruth. Mrs. Gash was one of the 
first organizers and a Director of the Jewish Maternity Hospital, where she 
still retains her membership on the Board. 

Abraham Gash's father was not only a great Talmudist, but also a thor- 
ough Polish. Russian and German scholar. The son believes in keeping up 
Judaism under all conditions and that "Honesty is the best policy," sticking 
to one's business with all zeal. 



ISAAC GENDELMAN 

Some one has said that there is in the growth of a tree from its earliest 
sprouting to its vigorous maturity a beautiful example of patience, endurance, 
steadfastness of purpose and often the determination and strength to overcome 
obstacles that the Creator of all has given us that should guide us. 

As trees grow upward, their roots grow downward and outward, and age 
and increasing grandeur give them corresponding deep-rooted, unfailing 
security. 

We might liken this growth to a business such as has been created and 
developed by Mr. Isaac Gendelman of Detroit. Mich. Mr. Gendelman was 
born in Olersk, Yolina. Guberne, Russia, in May, 1873. the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Abraham Gendelman, and came to America in December, 1907. He re- 
mained in Xew York but three weeks and then went to Detroit, wdiere he 
worked in a junk yard for $5 per week. He then started to peddle on his own 
account and with his small savings was able to buy and sell to such advantage 
that five years later he had $5,000 with which to establish a yard. He joined 
his partner. Mr. Morris Levin, and they started in business at their present 
location on Brady street, operating under the firm name of East Side Scrap 
Iron & Metal Company, where they have attained a most remarkable success. 

Mr. Gendelman was married in Russia in June, 1897. to Miss Rose Levit, 
and they have five children, one boy and four girls. Their eldest son, Joe, is 
in business college. Anna is working in the store, while the younger children 
are still going to school. 

Mr. Gendelman finds time for a number of interests outside his business 
and is a prominent member of the B'nai Jacob. Michigan Lodge, Progress of 

95 



West, Tu rover Unterstitzning Ferein, Talmud Torah and contributes to all 
charities, including the Denver Hospital and Home of Shelter. 

Mr. Gendelman is a fine type of foreign-born Jew, who possesses all the 
traits of generous, progressive Americanism. 



LOUIS GINSBURG 

"Life," said one of our great philosophers, "is a voyage in which our 
scenes are constantly changing." 

Sometimes our bark floats placidly along between flower strewn shores : 
sometimes tempest tossed it lies helpless and broken upon the rocks of adver- 
sity. But through every storm there still shines the guiding star of hope for 
every soul brave enough to look upward and seek it. 

The life history of Louis Ginsburg is a story of many vicissitudes 
bravely endured and overcome. He was born in Little Guberne, Russia, 
February II, 1881, his father being a prominent Talmudist and scholar of 
that community. At the age of twenty-two he came to America, going direct 
to Clarksburg, W. Va., where his older brother resided. 

His first business venture was peddling small wares from a basket, which 
he continued for six months, when he bought a horse and wagon and began 
buying and selling scrap iron and metal. This business led him into the oil 
fields of Illinois, where he saw wonderful possibilities, not only in the oil 
well supplies, which was allied to his business, but also in the oil producing 
end, and he became interested in several large producing companies. He 
also has some excellent investments in the fields of Ohio and West Virginia. 

Returning to Ohio, he opened an oil well supply business at Marietta, 
Ohio, where he has been exceedingly successful, and is at present engaged in 
business, the name of his firm being Producers' Supply and Tool Co. 

He was married in Marietta, March 8, 1908, to Miss Dora Brachman, 
and they have three fine boys, two of whom are old enough to go to school. 

Mrs. Ginsburg is a charming woman, well fitted to grace the prominent 
position which her husband holds in the various activities of the community. 
She is identified with many charities and does not confine herself to local 
projects, as the Ginsburgs are also liberal contributors to the National Jewish 
Hospital of Denver and the Los Angeles Sanitarium. 

Mrs. Ginsburg is Secretary of Congregation B'nai Israel, President. 
Local Jewish War Sufferers' Relief Society, and member and director of the 
Hebrew Immigration Society. The Red Cross and Talmud Torah also 
receive generous contributions. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ginsburg not only give liberally of their money, but also 
devote much of their time to the promotion of these worthy projects, identify- 
ing themselves inseparably with all works of kindness and mercy. The city of 
Marietta is indeed fortunate in having them identified with her business, civil 
and social interests. 



96 



MOSES GLOSSER 

Biographies of good men whose souls possessed patience, fortitude and 
charity are the richest pages in history. From them we learn the great lessons 
of life which they have painfully gleaned from the stern school of experience. 

The events which we here chronicle, incident to the success of Mr. Moses 
Glosser have many pathetic sidelights, which mere words can never properly 
express. Only the near relatives and friends of Mr. Glosser can appreciate 
to the full the remarkable fortitude which sustained him through the trying 
days of his struggle. 

He was born in Grodna. Guberne, Russia, in January, i860, his father 
being a shoemaker by trade, but a man of considerable scholarly attainments. 

He was married at the age of 23 to Miss Darimos and later events in his 
career proved that he was indeed fortunate in his selection of a wife, as she has 
been an exemplary mother and her cheerful, brave spirit and willing assistance 
has sustained her husband through the dark days when failure seemed inevit- 
able. 

Coming to America in April, 1890, he landed with his family in Philadel- 
phia with only $4.00. The immediate necessity of finding employment led him 
to start peddling tinware. Later he took up a line of notions and for three 
vears was a familiar figure in various Pennsylvania towns. 

He then purchased a horse and wagon and, locating in Williamsport, Pa., 
began buying and selling old iron and metal. Just as success seemed smiling 
upon him, he was so unfortunate as to meet with a serious accident, breaking 
his leg, which confined him in a hospital for ten weeks. After he left the 
hospital, he was badly crippled for a year and a half and, unable to work, was 
given assistance by his older children. 

Later he opened a grocery store, but, starting with too small capital, he 
found himself, after six months, $350.00 in debt, besides owing on his home, 
which he had bought prior to his accident. 

His health being somewhat improved, he left the grocery to the manage- 
ment of his wife and children and started out buying and selling junk, and was 
so successful that within a short time he had paid off his indebtedness and had 
saved money enough to open a yard from which business he and his sons, 
whom he has taken in with him as they grew up, have accumulated a large 
fortune. 

The Glossers have five children, four boys and one girl. The daughter is 
a highly educated young lady and is a teacher of English in the public schools. 
Manuel is in the iron business in McKeesport, Pa. David is going to school, 
while Sol and Nathan are in business with their father, although, at the present 
writing, Nathan has answered his country's call and is serving as First Ser- 
geant in the U. S. Army. 

Mr. Glosser is a member of Congregation Rudof Sholom, Zionist, and 
Order B'rith Abraham. Both Mr. and Mrs. Glosser are exceedingly phil- 
anthropic and take great delight in passing their prosperity along to those in 
unfortunate circumstances. Among some of the national institutions of which 
they are patrons are Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals, Immigration Society 
of New York and all the Yishivas. 

Mr. Glosser is also a prominent member of the Chamber of Commerce. 



97 



WOLF LOEB GLOSSER 



A few years ago the civilized world believed that the age of conquest and 
bloody battles was over. That the only generals the world needed were those 
giants of commerce who keep the wheels of industry moving; who provide 
those conveniences and comforts which, during a long era of peace and pros- 
perity, have come to be almost essential. 

Now that the world is in the throes of the most gigantic struggle in his- 
tory, it is to these men that we turn for money, for equipment, for their sons. 

So it is with Mr. Wolf Loeb Glosser, whose sons Saul and Simon have 
answered the call and have gone forth to battle that his country and the 
oppressed shall be free. Simon Glosser enlisted in the Jewish Legion after 
being rejected by the U. S. Army and Saul Glosser is with the American 
National Army, at present stationed at Camp Lee. 

Wolf Loeb Glosser was born in Grodno, Guberne, Russia, in August, 1854. 
He did not come to America until March, 1902, and 
landed in New York with his family and but 27 
cents in the world. He succeeded in borrowing a 
dollar, with which he immediately started peddling 
junk. This he continued very successfully for two 
3'ears, when he went to Johnstown, Pa., and en- 
gaged in the clothes cleaning and pressing business. 
By the exercise of the utmost diligence and economy 
he saved enough capital to open a small store arid 
this venture has grown into the large establishment 
of which he is the guiding genius today. The firm 
name is Glosser Brothers, handling ladies' and 
gentlemen's ready-to-wear apparel. 

Mr. Glosser was married in Russia in April, 
1877, to Miss Pesha Greenberg and they have a fine 
family of seven children, four boys and three girls, 
all of whom reflect credit upon the superior home 
training which they have received. 

Nathan is in business for himself in Detroit, Mich., while David and Solo- 
mon are engaged in business with their father. Simon was in business for 
himself prior to his entry into the army. 

The two elder daughters are married and live in Europe, while the younger 
daughter is at home. She is a graduate of the high school and a very accom- 
plished musician. 

Mrs. Glosser's accomplishments and usefulness do not cease with her ideal 
wifehood and motherhood. She finds time for many social and charitable 
activities, as well ; in fact, she is the leader in all such movements in Johns- 
town. 

Mr. Glosser's affiliations are with Congregation Radof Sholom, Inde- 
pendent Order of B'rith Abraham, and Chamber of Commerce. He con- 
tributes liberally to Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals, Immigration Society 
and all the Yishivas. 




98 



JACOB GOELL 

Brownsville is an important accomplishment of the Jews of New York. 
i in the site where Brownsville is now built there was, a few years ago, nothing 
but wilderness, and the Jews have turned it into a livelj and thrifty community. 
The historian of Jewish activitj in New York will have to take note of Mr. 
Jacob i •< nil. the real creator of modern Brownsville. 

Mr. Goell was horn Jul) 15, 1871, in Poswel, in the Province of Kovna, 

omes of a prominent family. His father was Reb Jechiel Michael Goell, 
a famous Lamdan and Maskel. Hi* mother, tiinda, who at present resides in 
Brooklyn, is a very pious woman. I li* grandfather was Reb Simcha Linkiver, 
who, as an intimate friend of the Ra\ of Linkiva, taught mathematics to the 
rabbi's son. who later became Hirshel Rabinowitz, famous Maskel and editor. 
I Ms uncle was Reb Nute ('bar it'. Schochet in Kupishik, Province of Kovna. 

Mr. Goell, who in early youth was brought up at Dineburg, at present 
Dwinsk, came to America in December, 1890. \t r u—t he worked a* a car- 
penter at $5 per week, later lie became a building contractor, and in 1901 
to Brownsville, where he started his real estate activities. Even though 

hi* friends predicted failure, he dared to undertake the enterprise of building 

modern apartment houses in that section of the city, lie had a keener in*i}dit 
into conditions than his friends thought, ami before many months had passed 
his success was assured, for other builders followed hi* example. Brownsville 
developed, and Mr. Goell grew with it. until todaj he own* over fifty houses in 
that part of the city. Mr. Goell himself lives with his family in a beautiful 
home at I 541 ' I 'nioii street. 

Mr. < loell i* an intelligent man of high moral character and i* held in high 
esteem in the community, lie believes in helping others, and practices this 
belief. Ih- participates in ever) good enterprise, and contributes to all fewish 
charitable institutions in Brooklyn and to some in Xew York, lie is president 
of \da* Israel of Brownsville, and was vice-president of the Stone Avenue 
Talmud Torah, to which institution, next to hi* business and family, he devotes 

much of hi* time. 

lie was the first to propose the erection of the new Talmud Torah on 
Stone avenue, which he built, lie i* a modern orthodox, maintaining a 
Strictly Jewish home. 1 te believes that the Jews ought to appreciate the liberty 
and opportunity that this country affords, hut yet he also feels that every Jew 

ought to adhere strictly to traditional Judaism, 

Mr. Goell has a younger brother, Charles, who attended Yeshiva in Europe. 
Charles i* now prominent in the building trade and Jewish charity in the Flat- 
bush section of Brooklyn. 

1 hi March 2, 1899, Mr. Goell married Mi** Marj Samowitz, daughter of 
the well-known builder, Samuel Samowitz, and they have five accomplished 
children. 



ABRAHAM GOLDBERG 
Of The Art Cloak Co., Cleveland. O. 

It i* the misfortune of man) young 1 ersoris toda) that the) begin life with 
too mam advantages. Ever) possible want of their many-sided nature* i- 
supplied before it* need i* consciously felt: hook*, teachers, mental and relig- 

training, amusements, clothes and food, all of the best quality and un- 
stinted in quantit) : in short, the choice of the world'* good thin-* are lavished 

upon them until all ambition is extinguished. 

What motive has a young man. under such circumstances, to exert llilll- 

self? Like a hothouse plant, grown weak through tin, much shelter and watch- 

99 



nig", he needs nothing so much as to be set in the open air of the world and 
to grow strong by struggling for existence. 

These are the sentiments of Mr. Abraham Goldberg, who knows what it 
is to fight repeated failure until the goal of success is reached. 

Mr. Goldberg was born in Lutz-K, Russian Poland, April 23, 1881, and 
came to America in September, 1903. He first learned to be a cutter at $2 
per week and gradually worked himself up until he was able to save a capital 
of $500. with which he started in business in the manufacture of skirts. How- 
ever, competition was very keen and after a hard year's fight, Mr. Goldberg- 
lost his business. 

He then went to Cleveland, Ohio, and worked as assistant designer for 
about a year. Then followed a partnership with Abraham Goble, in the manu- 
facture of cloaks. After about one and one-half years his present partner, Mr. 
Max Eppstein, bought out the Goble interest, and the business is continued in 
this way at the present time, under the firm name of Art Cloak Company, one 
of the best known concerns in the business. 

Mr. Goldberg was married June 21, 1914, to Miss Gittle Kochman of 
Cleveland, and they have two small children, one boy and one girl. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg are very public-spirited and generous and 
are popular in their social circle. 

Mr. Goldberg believes that the principles upon which all permanent suc- 
cess is founded are honesty, hard work and economy. 



ABRAHAM GOLDBERG 
Corset Manufacturer, Cleveland, O. 

Carlyle says, "He who has battled, were it only with poverty and toil, 
will be found stronger and more expert than he who would stay at home from 
the battle.'' So we say that it is of decided advantage for a man to be under 
the necessity of struggling with poverty and conquering it. It is not prosperity 
so much as adversity, not wealth so much as poverty, that stimulates strong 
and healthy natures, rouses their energy and develops character. 

In an interview with Mr. Abraham Goldberg the story of his early strug- 
gles reminds us of these words of Carlyle. Mr. Goldberg was born in Chumsk, 
Russia, April 15, 1879, and although his father was a land owner and a Jewish 
scholar, when the boy decided to start his career in the new world, he landed in 
New York with no funds of consequence and with little mercantile experience. 

He first found employment where he learned to be a vest maker, starting 
in at a salary of $3 per week. He later went to Cleveland, working at the 
same trade, but finally became a cloak and suit operator, where he commanded 
a salary of $35 per week. Saving a little money, he went into the manufacture 
of corsets, starting in a modest way with only two machines. His business had 
a steady and healthy growth and today he is one of the best known manufac- 
turers in the business, the product of his shop going to all parts of the country. 

Mr. Goldberg was married to Miss Sarah Abramowitz, and they have one 
boy and one girl. The daughter, Roseline, who is eighteen years old, is a most 
accomplished musician, being manager of the Troubador Troupe of players, 
engaged in concerts for commercial purposes. 

Mr. Goldberg is a loyal supporter of various charities of not only local 
but national scope, contributing to the Denver Sanitarium. He is also a 
member of the Knights of Joseph. We feel that any advice to the young 
coming from him is of the utmost value, so asked him what he considered 
requisites for success. His reply was, "Find the vocation for which you are 
best fitted, work hard, be honest and success will follow.'' 

100 



ABRAHAM GOLDBERG 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Although the ancient Jews were much devoted to agriculture, the later 
generations seem more adapted to success in commercial life. 

As an example we are pleased to relate the events in the life of Mr. Abra- 
ham Goldberg, of Columbus, Ohio. 

He was born in Musistz, Wolinsker, Guberne, Russia, the son of Isaac 
Goldberg, who was the leading Rabbi and Talmudist of that community. 

Mr. Goldberg came to America at the age of 
twenty, and went to Wichita, Kans., where he was 
given a government allotment of 160 acres of land. 
He remained about nine months, but did not find 
farming to his liking, so he went to Columbus, Ohio, 
and started peddling junk. The first year he saved 
a little money, with which he opened a small scrap 
iron and metal yard, and this small beginning has 
grown into one of the largest establishments of the 
kind in the city. 

Mr. Goldberg was married prior to his coming 
to America to Miss Toba Hurwitz, and they have 
a family of six children, three boys and three girls, 
nearly all of whom are married. The son Harry is 
connected with his father in the business. 

Mr. Goldberg is a member of Beth Jacob, is 
President of the Congregation Agudas Acheim, 
Knights of Joseph, B'nai B'rith, and the Columbus Home Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias. He is also director of the Denver Sanitarium and President of 
Talmud Torah. 

Both himself and wife contribute liberally to every worth}' charity. 




SAMUEL GOLDBERG 

Mr. Samuel Goldberg is one of the most successful Jews of Cincinnati,. 
Ohio. He is a retail merchant and very few of his class have reached as high 
a position as has Mr. Goldberg. 

"To what do you attribute your success?" the writer of these lines asked 
Mr. Goldberg. Mr. Goldberg 1 did not take long to think it over, but straight- 
way replied: "Hard work and economy; these are my watchwords!" 

Mr. Goldberg was born on the 28th of January, 1875, in Marienpol, Poland, 
as the son of Lipman and Peshe Goldberg, who live in Bialystok. Mr. Gold- 
berg's grandfather, Reb Shebach Altshuler, was the Rabbi of Mariampol, and 
Rabbi Motel Altshuler, an uncle of his, was one of the best known scholars of 
Suvalk. 

In 1892 Mr. Goldberg came to America. He landed in New York, where 
he worked for a number of weeks in a brush factory. He then went to Wash- 
ington for a short time, working in a store, and afterwards he settled in Cincin- 
nati (in 1899), opening a cloak and suit store, where without any extensive 
speculation he became very successful, due to simple and steady work and a 
gradual rise in the scale of life. 

Mr. Goldberg is the owner of the Main Cloak & Suit Co., 11 16 Main street, 
and of the Princess Cloak #- Suit Company, at 1115 Main street, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

Mr. Goldberg divides his success with many charitable and philanthropic 
institutions. He belongs to nearly every organization of importance, is a direc- 

101 



tor of the Orthodox Home for the Aged, Vice-president of the Talmud Torah, 
and a former treasurer of the Avondale Schul. He is a respected member of 
the Chamber of Commerce, of the Automobile Club and of many other organ- 
izations. 

On March 7, 1895, Mr. Goldberg was married to Miss Birdie Scheingold, 
of Cleveland, and they are the happy parents of an accomplished daughter, 
Lucille. Mr. Goldberg is a very sympathetic, friendly man, and enjoys a won- 
derful reputation in Cincinnati. 



ISAAC LEO GOLDBERG 

Many prominent men can trace their success back to some display of ability 
or act of honesty which revealed to their elders the promise of a wonderful 
fruition in the best of all gardens, a noble character. 

To such young men a helping hand is always waiting at the appointed time, 
and it was so in the case of Isaac Leo Goldberg, the subject of our sketch. 

He was born in Wrlick, Russia, July 17, 1885, and was brought to America 
by his parents when only five years of age. 

At a very early age he began to sell matches on the streets of Columbus, 
Ohio, where his intelligent appearance and ability were so evident that he 
attracted the special attention of many of his customers, and this led to their 
helping him establish himself in the iron and metal business. This led to a 
partnership with his father under the firm name of Capital City Iron and Metal 
Company. He later organized the Central Market Paper Company in connec- 
tion with a Mr. Ornstine, and eleven months later merged his interests with 
Topper Brothers' Iron & Metal Company, the firm name under which they are 
operating today. 

Such is the business history of one of the foremost business men of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and it should hold out nothing but hope and inspiration to any young 
man who, with nothing but honesty and ability as assets, is struggling to make a 
place for himself in the world. 

Mr. Goldberg was married in Columbus, Ohio, December 20, 1910, to Miss 
Sophia Topper, a very prominent young lady of that city, who is as charmingly 
fitted to occupy a brilliant social position as her husband is in the business 
world. 

They are both most generous in their contributions to charity and are 
prominent in every worthy cause in their own and other cities. 

Mr. Goldberg is an active and valued member of Agudas Acheim, Knights 
of Joseph, B'nai B'rith and the Athletic Club. 

He is still a very young man with a long career of useful activity before 
him. 

May the golden bow of promise continue to shine on into the sunset of life 
with a splendor and refulgence that shall infuse hope and new impetus into the 
lives of those with whom he is associated. 



102 



MORRIS GOLDENBERG 

Failure is often the sharpedged tool with which fate etches some of the 
finest lines of character. It is not the failure itself, but the resilience with 
which man rebounds to renewed effort that is the true test of calibre and moral 
courage. 

When Morris Goldenberg landed in America he came to the new land with 
high hopes and noble ambitions, as had others of his people before him. That 
he never ceased to strive against the adverse circumstances that surrounded 
him, that he never wavered in his firm belief that his expectations would be 
realized, is largely accountable for his marked success. 

Mr. Goldenberg was born in Konis Padalsky Guberne. Russia, in October. 
1879. His father and mother, Samuel and Esther Goldenberg. came. to 
America sometime before their son, settling in Newark, Ohio. Mr. Goldenberg 
was married in Russia April 4, 1902, to Tuba Erlichman. and four years later 
came with his wife to America. He landed in New York, but immediately 
went on to Newark, Ohio, where his father resided. 

Finding no opening there, he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, then to Carbin, Ky., 
where with the capital he had brought with him from Russia, he went into the 
furniture business. Not being satisfied with results, after five months' effort, 
he sold out and went to Somerset, Ky., where he opened another furniture 
store. Meeting with no better success, he sold the store, and, coming back to 
Newark, Ohio, he invested his money with his father in the iron and metal 
business ; but, owing to unfortunate circumstances for which he was not in any 
way responsible, he lost all his money in this venture and was forced to start 
in peddling again. Finally, after another unfortunate experience in the furni- 
ture business, he invested his small savings in the Parkersburg Junk Co., and 
under his management the business has prospered until it is the largest of the 
kind in Parkersburg, W. Ya. 

The Goldenbergs have three children, who are receiving splendid educa- 
tions and are also being educated in music, for which they have shown remark- 
able talent. 

Mr. Goldenberg is secretary and treasurer of Congregation B'nai Israel, 
vice-president Local Order B'nai B'rith, and is a prominent member of Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is a liberal contributor to all charities, both local 
and national, and gives most liberally to Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals. 



HARRIS GOLDMAN 

One of the most firm believers in the efficacy of close application to duty is 
Mr. Harris Goldman, of Easton, Pa. 

Mr. Goldman was born in Kovno. Guberne, Russia, in the year 1872. 
Flis father was a merchant and prominent scholar of that city. In 1891 Mr. 
Goldman came to America, landing in New York, where he worked as an 
operator. He then obtained a position in a milk store, where he put in very 
long hours, working sometimes fourteen and fifteen hours a day. He then 
went to Easton, Pa., and began buying and selling junk, later opening a yard on 
a small scale. In 1905, his brother in the meantime having come to America, 
they engaged in the wholesale scrap iron business, which has grown to im- 
mense proportions and is today being operated under the firm name of Gold- 
man Brothers. 

Mr. Goldman was married in 1894 to Miss Bertha Cohen, of Easton, and 
they have three sons. Phillips is in business with his father, and Herman is 
attending the Lehigh College. 

103 



Although the business affairs of Mr Goldman occupy a great deal of Mns 
time he is still mindful of his duty to suttenng humanity, and is a liberal lot, 
tributor to all charities, including the Denver Sanitarium, the Immigration 
Soc ety of New York, and the Y. M. H. A. In his gifts to benevolence, Mr 
Go dman "lakes no distinction between Jewish and Gent, e orgamzations. He 
is also a prominent member of Congregation Children ot B nai Abraham. 



DR. MICHAEL GOLLAND 

Dr. Michael Golland, of St. Louis, Mo., is known to almost every Jew of 
importance who ever went there, because his house is the headquarters of Jew- 
ish hitellectual life of St. Louis. Dr. Golland is himself a Talmudic scholar 
a Hebrais an Orthodox, and a great social character and whenever a speaker 
or any public man of importance comes to St. Louis, he becomes the guest of 
Dr Gofland Not only is Dr. Golland so well disposed towards everything 
Sat favors of Jewish public life, but his wife. Mrs. Bertha ( Greenburg ) Gol- 
and Is a devoted Jewish daughter and a splendid hostess. She is the President 
of the Women's Proclamation League, of the Daughters of Israel, which is an 
auxiliary of the Congregation B'nai Emunoh, and active m every Jewish and 

^tSSTthe ist of April, xKa, at Wolkowisk, Russia 

the son of Abraham and Breine Golland. He received a good Jewish and 

general education and when he came to America he 

took up the study of medicine. In 1891 he con- 
tinued his study at the Washington University, 

from which he was graduated in 1895. Since that 

time he has continued the practice of medicine in a 

very successful manner. His offices are located in 

the' Chemical Building. 

Dr. Golland is not the type of man who seeks 

office or publicity, as his professional duties would 

scarcely give him time for that. But he can not 

refuse to give his time and attention to the Zionist 

movement, which is his life-ideal, and for the last 
ten years he has been chairman of the St. Louis 
Zionist Council. He also was chairman of the 
local relief committee, obtaining $30,000 m the 
space of eighteen months, and was also elected a 
delegate to the American Jewish Congress Mr. 

and Mrs. Golland, whose marriage took place in September. 1884. are t lie 
parents of one daughter, Sophia, now Mrs. Greenberg who in turn is the 
mother of two children, William and Leslie. Dr. Golland is a devoted Ortho- 
dox and his home is truly Jewish and kosher. 




104 



ISRAEL GOLDMAN 

Elsewhere in this volume we have briefly outlined the career of Mr. Harris 
Goldman. It is now our privilege to relate the events in the life of his younger 
brother, Israel, whose business career has been very closely associated with him. 

Israel Goldman was born in May, 1880, in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, and 
came to America July 11, 1900. As his brother was already established in 
Easton, Pa., he came to that city and immediately started out to peddling dry 
goods, continuing this for two years, he opened an iron and metal yard, which 
was wonderfully successful. In 1905 the two brothers consolidated their busi- 
ness interests and have continued since that time under the firm name of Gold- 
man Brothers. 

Mr. Goldman was married in March, 1907, to Miss Ida Burgen, of Easton, 
and they have five children, one boy and four girls, all going to school, and 
studying music. 

Mr. Goldman's ideas regarding philanthropy are very broad and his con- 
tributions are equally generous to Jews and Gentiles. He is a member of Con- 
gregation Children of B'nai Abraham and a liberal contributor to the Immi- 
gration Aid Society of New York, the Y. M. H. A., the Denver Sanitarium, and 
all local charities. 



HARRY GOODMAN 



Although some of our greatest statesmen, professional and business men 
have achieved fame without the aid of much education, none knows better than 
they the tremendous handicap under which they labored. 

Some such thought must have been in the mind of Mr. Harry Goodman, 
prominent business man of Bradford, Pa., in a recent interview, when he laid 
much emphasis upon the importance of a young man obtaining a good educa- 
tion before embarking on a business career. 

Mr. Goodman was born in Galb, West Preusen, 
Germany, in December, 1884. His father was en- 
gaged in the fur manufacturing business, but de- 
cided to try his fortunes in the new world. He 
landed in Toronto, Canada, and Harry, then but 
thirteen years of age, was allowed to go to school 
for a short time only, as his father was having a 
hard struggle to re-establish himself in business. 
So he began peddling with a push cart, which he 
continued for about a year and a half. 

After a number of years' hard work devoted 
to the buying and selling of iron and metal, he and 
his brothers decided to open a yard, and came to 
Bradford, Pa., where they have been remarkably 
successful. 

The father, now retired, lives with his son 
Harry. 

Mr. Goodman devotes much time and money to the promotion of char- 
itable enterprises, and is affiliated with a number of such organizations, promi- 
nent among them being the Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals. 

He is a member of Bradford Orthodox Congregation, the Order of West- 
ern Star, Herva Veke Holam of Bradford, and the Moose. 

He is a thorough American and active in all patriotic movements. 




105 



THEODORE GOODMAN 

It is certainly a great pleasure to be able to record the histories of two 
brothers who came to the new world together, and during the first years of 
their struggle upward toward affluence kept their interests almost identical. 

Elsewhere in this volume we have related the events of Harry Goodman, 
the younger brother of Mr. Theodore Goodman, the subject of this sketch. 

Mr. Theodore Goodman was born in Galb, West Preusen, Germany, June 
14, 1879, and came to America with his father and brother Harry when a very 
young man. 

He started working immediately, buying and selling old metal, and gradu- 
ally accumulated the necessary capital with which to engage in business for 
himself. 

Then followed the establishment of the iron and metal business in Brad- 
ford, Pa., which was successfully conducted in partnership with his brother 
Harry until about a year ago, when he removed to Tulsa, Okla., where he is 
prominently connected with the Indiana Supply & Junk Co., dealers in oil field 
supplies. 

He was married March 28, 1905, to Miss Mary Baltimore, of Elmira, 
N. Y., a young lady who has been a great acquisition to their resident city, 
and who is an exemplary wife and mother. They have four children, two of 
whom are old enough to go to school, and also take piano lessons. 

Mr. Goodman is identified with many prominent organizations, including 
the Knights of Pythias, the Moose, and the order of Western Star. Both 
himself and wife are very public. spirited and contribute liberally not only to 
all local charities, but also to Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals, and many 
others too numerous to mention. 



SAMUEL GOLDSTEIN 

No man with true commercial instinct is ever content to work for some- 
one else. He will endure any hardships or privations in order to accumulate 
enough capital with which to make a start for himself. The history of the big 
commercial heads in this country all coincide on this one point. It is indicative 
of an independence of spirit which is one of the chief attributes of success. 

Samuel Goldstein, of Detroit, Mich., is no exception to the rule. 

Born in Onopol, Volina, Guberne, Russia, in 1870, he came to America 
at the age of twenty-six and began working for an iron and metal dealer for 
$3.00 per week. 

He was advanced rapidly and in a few years had accumulated enough for 
his first business venture. 

This was made in Providence, R. I., where he stayed seven years and 
accumulated a small fortune. However, he was very unfortunate in having a 
great deal of illness in his family and was obliged to use his accumulated sav- 
ings in an effort to restore them to health. 

Going to Detroit, he again worked on a salary and by the exercise of the 
utmost economy gradually saved enough capital to go into business for him- 
self. 

This venture has resulted in the large iron and metal yard at 318 Clinton 
street, where he is doing a wonderful business at the present time. 

He was married in April, 1893, to Miss Nahama Gircherman, at Anapol, 
Russia. Mrs. Goldstein came to America with her husband and has been an 
unfailing aid and comfort to him during the dark days of his struggle toward 
affluence. 

106 



They have eight children, five girls and three boys, all of whom are being 
given excellent educations, and will doubtless be of much assistance to their 
father in later j'ears. 

Mr. Goldstein is a member of B'nai Israel and is a generous patron of 
other Jewish and philanthropic organizations. His wife is also very charitable 
and an active worker in various organizations. 



DAVID GOLDSTEIN 

A community owes much to those substantial citizens who, coming into its 
midst and winning their way to fortune, take up their permanent abode and 
enter whole-heartedly into the various social, civic and philanthropic activities 
in which it is engaged. 

Such a man is Mr. David Goldstein, for forty years a resident of Toledo, 
Ohio, and one of the most useful and loyal citizens of which that city boasts. 

He was born in Peterkopf, Guberne, Russia, sixty-eight years ago, and 
probably inherited much of his aptitude for business from his father, Itzhok 
Goldstein, who was a successful merchant of his native town. 

. He sailed for America in the summer of 1882, and came directly from 
New York to Toledo, where he has resided for nearly forty years. 

The first fifteen years of his business life in America were beset with many 
difficulties, as he was without money or influence to assist him. 

But his heart was in his work and his courage was invincible and at the 
end of that time he had accumulated enough to start an iron and metal yard, 
in which business he is engaged today, and which has grown to enormous 
proportions. 

He was married in 1876 to Miss Sora Gittle, a young lady of his native 
town of Peterkopf, who came with her husband to America, and has been of the 
utmost assistance to him throughout his entire career. 

They have a fine family of nine children, four boys and five girls, who 
will doubtless inherit the fine integrity and ability of their parents. 

All local charities have been recipients of liberal contributions from Mr. 
and Mrs. Goldstein, as well as the hospitals of Denver and other cities, and the 
Kovna Charity. 

Mr. Goldstein is a trustee of B'nai Israel and_also prominent in B'nai 
B'rith and Western Star. 



HENRY GOODMAN 

A perusal of some of the pages of business history which have to do with 
the achievements of Jewish business men, should certainly cause the younger 
generation to point with pride to their Jewish ancestors. 

Among the hundreds of men who have distinguished themselves in the 
commercial world few have attained more prominence against great odds than 
Mr. Henry Goodman, of Zanesville, Ohio. 

Mr. Goodman was born in Lubatin, Hungary, December 5, 1865, the son 
of Joseph and Rachel Goodman, his father being a well-known Jewish scholar. 
Mr. Goodman came to America when quite young and spent a number of 

107 




years peddling in Cleveland, Springfield, Richmond and Chillicothe, where he 
eventually opened a junk yard. He remained about two years, then went to 
Columbus, Ohio, and engaged in business with a partner under the firm name 
of Shonthal-Goodman Company. This business was quite a success until the 
panic of 1901, when they lost the entire business, 
and Mr. Goodman went to Zanesville, where he 
bravely made another start. This time success 
crowned his efforts, and the history of his business 
has been one of continual prosperity. 

Mr. Goodman's home life is ideal. He was 
married to Miss Anna Goldberger, of Zanesville, 
December 31, 1890, and they have a fine family of 
six children. The daughter Rachel is married to 
Walter Kaufman, a prominent manufacturer of 
Cleveland ; Isadore Goodman is married to Miss 
Ella Bayer, of Cleveland ; Abe is in business with 
his father ; Bertha has displayed considerable busi- 
ness ability and is taking up a special commercial 
course in Lash High School ; Helen also goes to 
high school, and the girls have also been educated 
in music, as they have displayed considerable talent Henry Goodman 

along this line. 

Mrs. Goodman is very prominent in Zanesville society, and is a charity 
worker who always has every good cause at heart. She is a member of the 
Ladies' Beth Abraham Auxiliary, of which organization she is at the present 
time treasurer. Mr. Goodman is vice-president of. the Beth Abraham Congre- 
gation at Zanesville, a member of B'rith Abraham Lodge, and a liberal con- 
tributor to all charities, both national and local. 



ISADORE GOODWIN 

The city of New Haven, Conn., is proud of its business interests, promi- 
nent among which may be mentioned the firm of I. Goodwin, located at 231 
Washington avenue. Mr. Goodwin was born in Minsker, Guberne, Russia, in 
October, 1883, and came to America at the age of seventeen. Landing in New 
York, he began working as an operator in a factory for $1 per week. During 
the three years in which he continued this employment his rise was very rapid, 
the salary being increased to $18 per week. Deciding to go into business for 
himself, he went to Waterbury, Conn., where he peddled dry goods for six 
months, but finding this unprofitable he obtained employment in a factory and 
worked for four years, saving his money with the idea of establishing a busi- 
ness of his own. During this time he was married to Miss Sarah Levin, of 
New Haven. 

Shortly after his marriage he opened a grocery store and meat market, but 
he did not find this business to his liking and transferred his interests to the 
clothing business. After six months in this line he again sold out and went to 
New Haven. After five months' preliminary experience, he opened an iron 
and metal yard, which was to prove the field for his big success. He has con- 
tinued this business most successfully up to the present time. Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodwin have three children, all boys, two of whom are old enough to be in 
school. 

Mrs. Goodwin is very active in social circles and is identified with the 
promotions of many charities, including Denver Hospital, Immigration Society 
of New York, Fund for War Sufferers, and the Red Cross. Mr. Goodwin is 
prominent in the Y. M. H. A., Independent Order of B'rith Abraham. B'nai 
B'rith, Masons, Odd Fellows, and Moose, and is the director in the Hebrew 
Free Loan Society of New Haven. Conn. 

108 



HARRY M. GORDON 

Under another heading in this volume, we have outlined the events in the 
career of Mr. Jacob Levy. It is now our pleasure to be the narrator of the life 
of his business partner and friend for many years. Mr. Harrv M. Gordon. 

Mr. Gordon was born in Koneman, Guberne. Russia, in October, 1874, the 
son of Israel and Fannie Gordon, the former a Jewish scholar of prominence 
in their community. 

He came to America in August, 1891, landing in Xew York. 

Like all young men of earnest, ambitious tendencies, he took the first 
honest employment which came to hand and this happened to be a job in a 
butcher shop, which paid $5.00 per week and board free. This he continued 
for a year and a half, and then went to Ironton. where an uncle resided. Here 
he began peddling with a pack, and although the start was humble, he was at 
last in business for himself. Two months later he secured a horse and wagon 
and continued in this manner for about two years, when he went to Circleville. 
Ohio, and bought and sold old iron and metal for six vears. 

At this time the partnership between himself and Mr. Lew was formed 
which has existed amicably until the present time. Mr. Gordon is still actively 
engaged in the junk business, both in buying and sales departments, and in the 
handling of correspondence, although he also devotes part of his time to the 
management of a large grocery store. 

Mr. Gordon is a firm believer in an education as a big asset in a com- 
mercial career, and that even- young man should go into business for himself 
as soon as possible, as the attendant responsibilities are bound to develop 
strength of character and initiative. 

Mr. Gordon was married in Circleville. Ohio, in July. 1896, to Miss Yetta 
Dolsky, and they are the parents of ten fine children, seven boys and three 
girls, all of whom are going to school. 

Among the fraternal organizations with which Mr. Gordon is connected 
may be mentioned the Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. He is a mem- 
ber of Aguodohos Congregation and of several charitable organizations. He 
is also a prominent member of the Ohio Retail Grocers' Association. 



SOL ENGEL GORDON 

Mr. Sol Engel Gordon of Beaumont. Texas, is still a very young man, 
having been born on January 24, 1884. In addition he is the child of immi- 
grants. He was born in Marienpol, Poland, and came to America with his 
parents, Isaac and Deborah, when he was a child of four. 

There are, therefore, lacking in Mr. Gordon's case the usually conceded 
circumstances that tend to establish a man's success as a wealthy and influential 
family, which helps so much. And yet, with all these disadvantages, Mr. Gor- 
don managed to become a very prominent figure in Beaumont, and to a certain 
extent in the State of Texas in general. He is well liked and everybody sings 
his praises, foretelling for him a great future. 

Mr. Gordon comes from very remarkable stock. His grandfather was the 
Rabbi of Marienpol and the whole Gordon family was prominent in Jewish 
life, numbering among its members some of the most conspicuous Jewish schol- 
ars and Rabbis. 

Sol Engel Gordon received his primary and high school education in the 
public schools of Beaumont. He then entered the A. & M. College of Texas, 
taking a course in civil engineering. Afterwards he became a student of the 
Lniversity of Texas, taking a general college course and a course of law in 

109 



its law department, from which he graduated in 1904, being admitted to the 
bar in the same year. From that time he practiced in general law in Beaumont, 
with main offices in the Perlstein Building. His firm is known as Lipscomb & 
Gordon. 

Mr. Gordon held the office of Judge of the City Court, which position he 
resigned after a year, as he could not spare the time from his private practice. 
He gained great prominence in the state, when, as a special attorney for the 
state, he prosecuted the moving picture trust for violation of anti-trust laws, 
achieving the conviction of the guilty. 

Socially, Mr. Gordon is very active. He is a thirty-second degree Mason 
and a Shriner. He is prominent in the Elks and the Knights of Pythias, is 
a Zionist, a member of the B'nai B'rith, having at one time been their Delegate 
to the state convention. 

Mr. Gordon was married on June 9, 1909, to Pauline Mayer, who was 
brought up in Waco, Texas. They are the parents of two children, Julius and 
Beverly. 

Mr. Gordon's is a noble and sympathetic personality, which qualities tend 
to explain much of his unusual success. 



ISRAEL GORMAN 

In 1903 a young man of twenty-seven found difficulty in obtaining em- 
ployment. He was a recent immigrant from Russia and the large metropolis 
of New York offered little to the uncouth stranger. He brought with him a 
knowledge of dyeing and cleaning, but the market for such service seemed 
overcrowded and Israel Gorman decided that New York was not the place in 
which he could achieve the wished-for success. 

He went West and located in Kansas City, Mo. Here he opened a clean- 
ing establishment and met with a success from the start. For the last nine 
years he has stood at the head of the Gorman Cleaning & Dyeing Company of 
1213-1215 Brooklyn avenue. Kansas City, Mo., and he is among the most 
successful and reliable in his line. 

Israel Gorman is the son of David and Libe Gorman, both living in Kansas 
City, and was born in Pikoff, Podolia, on the 9th of January (Russian style), 
1876. He is a Poale-Zionist and belongs to many organizations. He became 
a Zionist after a German employer once told him that Jews have no home and 
are no better than dogs. Mr. Gorman is a man full of heart and sentiment ; 
an idealist of the purest quality and one whose purse always stands open to all 
who apply for it ; a man one would like to meet anywhere and to make friends 
with, and a staunch and ardent son of his race. For a time he was connected 
with the Socialist movement, but he gave it up and became an Orthodox, doing 
his share in the erection of the magnificent Beth Hamidrash Hagodol. But 
somehow or other Orthodoxy did not appeal to his imaginative disposition and 
he did not feel at home in all the splendor of the Beth Hamidrash he helped to 
erect. His final goal became Poale-Zionism, and he is truly devoted to its 
great principles. 

In 1903, when still struggling and fighting to gain a foothold in the new 
land, he was married to Jennie Gitteman, of Kishineff, Bessarabia, Russia. 
They have two children, named Pearl and Samuel. 



110 



JACOB GOREN 

The growth of the acorn into the sturdy oak is a mild comparison to the 
phenomenal development of Goren's Bag Company, located at 204 Maple 
street, Chelsea, Mass. 

Mr. Jacob Goren. owner and manager, was born in Podolsky, Russia, in 
1878, and came to America in April, 1905. Going to Lynn, Mass., he worked 
in a factory for $6 per week for six months, and then obtained a better position 
in Plymouth, Mass. He then came to Chelsea, where he worked at any honest 
employment that he could find, until he had accumulated enough capital to go 
into business on a very small scale. His rise has been steady and exceedingly 
rapid, until today he has a fine modern plant, employing a large number of 
people. 

Mr. Goren was married in Russia two years prior to coming to this country 
to Miss Esther Soponas. They have four children, one boy and three girls, all 
going to school, and being educated in Hebrew. 

Mr. Goren is prominent in a number of fraternal organizations, and is 
also most generous in his gifts to charity. 



DAVID AARON GRAFF 

Success is measured by many standards. Sometimes by wealth, often by 
social position, or political power. 

The ideal of success handed down to the true Jew by the teachings of 
the Talmud is measured by the degree of usefulness to his fellow men, which 
a man has achieved. 

It is not strange, then, that the Jews should have attained guardianship 
of more worldly treasures according to their numbers than any of the other 
nationalities of the world. 

A fine representative of the Jewish race is Mr. David Aaron Graft" of 
Kalamazoo, Mich. He was born in Russia in 1853 and came to America in 
18S9, where he started at the lowest rung of the financial ladder, peddling dry 
goods from a pack. From this humble beginning he has developed an im- 
mense business operated today under the firm name of D. Graff & Sons, where 
he employs over 125 people. This institution is devoted to papermakers' 
supplies. 

. Mr. Graff was married forty-one years ago to Miss Hanna Lepgold and 
they have five children. The sons are engaged in the same line of business 
as their father and one daughter is married to Mr. David Friedland, of the 
Friedland Iron & Metal Company, Lansing, Mich. 

In the matter of charities Mr. Graff is equally liberal to all institutions 
applying to him for aid. A large portion of his wealth is devoted to the 
assistance of the sick and unfortunate of all creeds and denominations. 

He is a fine representative of successful business man, useful citizen and 
philanthropist. 



Ill 



HARRY S. GRANT 

In a new country a man should possess at least three strongly accentuated 
virtues, if he is to really succeed. 

First of all, he must be honest, as honesty raises a mighty bulwark about 
his self-respect; and self-respect begets self-confidence without which no con- 
spicuous achievement has been attained. 

The second — a generosity of mind which overlooks petty or superficial 
criticism. 

Third — a high courage to sustain him through dark days when every face 
seems turned against him ; to enable him to toil toward the ultimate goal with 
infinite patience and unclouded vision. 

All of these characteristics are possessed to a marked degree by Harry S. 
Grant, who was born in Byalostock Grodno, Russia, September 22, 1879, and 
came to America in March, 1896. 

The story of his adventures began in Detroit, where he arrived with only 
forty cents in his pocket. 

Receiving some slight assistance from his uncle, he obtained a small stock 
of picture frames which he sold from house to house for about a year. 

We next find him in Indianapolis, serving a hard apprenticeship in the 
junk business, where he remained for about one and one-half years. This was 
followed by a year in Ft. Wayne, Ind., where he was engaged as traveling sales- 
man for a hide and fur company. This position was far from satisfactory, and 
Mr. Grant was convinced that his talents should be directed to the develop- 
ment of the iron trade, so he returned to Detroit and obtained a position with 
Harold Ginsberg Sons Co., at that time the largest house of the kind in Detroit. 

His experience as traveling salesman for this firm and a subsequent short 
business venture of his own in South Bend, Ind., admirably fitted him for the 
larger undertaking in which he was soon to engage in Detroit. 

Shortly after his marriage in 1903 to Miss Edna Roth, he started in busi- 
ness at his present location on Franklin street, having with him until 1910 two 
business associates, whose interests he acquired. 

For the past seven years the business has been conducted exclusively by 
Mr. Grant under the title Grant Iron & Metal Co., and it has grown at an 
unbelievably rapid rate. 

Mr. Grant has also accumulated some valuable real estate, and gives gen- 
erously to those in less fortunate circumstances. 

He is a liberal subscriber to the Denver and Hot Springs Hospitals, and 
makes no creed distinctions in his philanthropy, as all Jewish benevolences and 
non-sectarian charities as well, have many reasons to be grateful for his kind- 
ness. 

He is an active Mason, being a member of the Shrine and Scottish Rites. 
Is also prominent in the Knights of Pvthias and B'nai B'rith. 

Mrs. Grant comes of a very highly connected and charitably inclined fam- 
ily, her mother being the founder of Talmud Torah and the Old Folks' Home in 
Detroit. 

His father, Benjamin Grant, was a highly educated man, and a student of 
all European languages. 



112 



HARRY M. GREENBERG 

The histories of all self-made men are of vital interest. To a much greater 
degree do we pause in admiration of a man who, without money, in a strange 
land and feeling the absolute necessity of constant work, still holds to his reli- 
gious convictions and sacrifices one day each week on the altar of his belief. 

Such is the life story of Mr. Harry M. Greenberg, who was born in Lecha- 
vith Muisk, Guberne, Russia, November 7th, 1879, and came to America with 
his father at the age of sixteen. 

Landing in New York, they went direct to Detroit, where Harry began 
peddling matches. Later he sold dry goods, and for six months made chair 
bottoms in the evening, and selling them during the day. Although this necessi- 
tated long hours of labor, he never deviated from his purpose of keeping Satur- 
day, the Jewish Sabbath, and never did any work on that day. 

After about a year he and his father went to Albany, Ind., starting with a 
capital of $300.00. 

In 1908, prosperity having crowned their efforts, occurred one of the 
happiest incidents of their lives, as they were able to bring the mother and 
family to America. His brother, Ray, also came from Alaska, and the two 
brothers started in the iron and metal business in Detroit, Mich. Here they 
have been remarkably successful, and have accumulated a large fortune. The 
brother died sometime since and the business has been carried forward ex- 
clusively by Harry. 

Mr. Greenberg was married in Detroit January 19th, 1902, to Sylvia 
Singer and they have five fine children. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Greenberg are very active in promoting charitable 
enterprises not only in their own city, but hospitals in Western cities as well. 

Mr. Greenberg belongs to Shara Zedik, Beth Jacob, and Morgan Abraham. 



PETER GREENBERG 

One of the most public-spirited and reliable business men in Springfield, 
Mass., is Mr. Peter Greenberg, who was born in Kieve, Guberne, Russia, in 
March, 1872, the son of a prominent wheat merchant of that community. 

He landed in America May 28, 1903, and, going to Springfield, Mass., 
worked in a junkshop for five and a half years in order to thoroughly familiar- 
ize himself with all details of the business. He then formed a partnership 
with Mr. Skvirsky and they are still in business together operating the large 
plant at 270 Sharon street. Their business is exclusively wholesale and is one 
of the largest of its kind in the state. 

Mr. Greenberg was married in Russia in 1890 to Miss Lena Greenberg and 
they have five children, four boys and one girl, who are all being well edu- 
cated. Sam is attending a college of pharmacy in Boston, Israel and Sol are 
in business with their father, Harry has just graduated from school, and the 
daughter, Nellie, is the wife of M. K. Greenberg of Fairview, Mass. 

We. feel that a word should be spoken regarding the social activities of 
Mrs. Greenberg and her untiring efforts in the cause of charity, to which they 
are most liberal contributors. 

Mr. Greenberg is past president of Sons of Israel, past treasurer United 
Hebrews of America, and is a prominent member of the I. O. B. A., Talmud 
Torah and the Hebrew Charities of Springfield. 



113 



MAX GREENBEKG 



Although handicapped by a lack of school education, Mr. Max Greenberg 
managed to educate himself through incessant reading. Born in Bessarabia, 
on March 6, 1876, Mr. Greenberg is the son of Lazar and Hinda Greenberg, 
who are still living, and the grandson of a Chossidic rabbi. He learned the 
trade of a tinsmith, and spent his youth in Roumania, and, as his father was 
an invalid, he was the provider of the family at an early age. At eighteen he 
went to Canada, where he worked at his trade for two years. From there he 
went to New York, and thence to the South. After 
a few years he came to Cincinnati, where '--e ad- 
vanced himself by reading. 

He moved to Cleveland in igoo, where he en- 
tered the roofing business, becoming in due time the 
general manager and shareholder in the Complete 
Roofing Company, at 471 1 Payne avenue, Cleve- 
land. 

Mr. Greenberg holds the office of treasurer in 
the Gotthold Ephraim Lessing Lodge. He is an 
active worker and held various offices in the Odd 
Fellows, being at present treasurer of their encamp- 
ment. He is a member of the Congregation Oheb 
Zedez and belongs to many charity institutions. He 
is about to organize all the lodges of the Independ- 
ent Order of B'rith Abraham in the state and he 
takes an unusual interest in everything pertaining 
to Jewish organization or charity. 

.Mr. Greenberg was married in 1899 to Miss Sadie Moskowitz. They have 
one child, Eleanor. 

"Live a straightforward life and be economical in order to be honest," is 
bis advice to the young. 




BEN GREENBLATT 



One of the principal business houses in New London. Conn., is the East- 
ern Iron & Metal Co., 145 Howard street. If you were to call upon this con- 
cern, you would find in charge Mr. Ben Greenblatt who has attained such a 
remarkable business success that we feel this volume would be incomplete 
without his life history. 

Mr. Greenblatt was born in Kovno. Russia, in the year 1870 and at the 
age of twenty years came to America. Lie went direct to New London, Conn., 
and for five years made his living peddling. At the same time he was ac- 
cumulating a small capital and at the expiration of the five years went into 
business at his present location, where he has now a very flourishing trade. 

Mr. Greenblatt was married February 14, 1893, to Miss Mary King, of 
New London, and they have six children, four girls and two boys, all of whom 
are receiving excellent educations. That they show a great aptitude for 
scholarship is not surprising, inasmuch as Mr. Greenblatt's father was a rabbi, 
and a most accomplished Hebrew scholar. The son Morris is a graduate of 
Ann Arbor, Mich., having qualified as an electrical engineer. The rest of the 
children are all receiving high school educations, and are also studying music. 

Mr. Greenblatt is very liberal in his contributions to charities, being a sub- 
scriber to the Denver Hospital, the Immigration Society, the National 
Orphans' Home and many others. 

114 




SAMUEL GREENSTEIN 

Mr. Samuel Greenstein is one of the most successful Jewish business men 
in Brooklyn. He has climbed from the lowest to the highest rung of the ladder 
of success, acquiring during his time not only wealth but also a high reputa- 
tion in the business world. He is especially interesting, not only for his busi- 
ness success, but mainly because of his unusual intelligence. In his youth he 
was a Talmudical student and at the present time he is a diligent reader of 
Jewish literature. 

Mr. Greenstein was born September 17, 1862, in Bialystok, Russia. He 
came to America in the year 1890, bringing along a "capital" of $1.53. His 
landsleute who knew him from the old country did not think that it was 
advisable for him to work in a factory, and they furnished him with a basket 
of merchandise and sent him out peddling. 

Mr. Greenstein was very ambitious to bring to this country and support 
his wife and five children, and for a few days he 
tried hard to succeed in his peddling, but he could 
not make things go his way. During that time he 
met a friend who was selling matches successfully, 
and this friend advised him to follow his example, 
and Mr. Greenstein made an investment of seventy 
cents for a supply of matches. 

He looked for a field where competition would 
not be so keen, and he invested his last nickel in 
carfare, going to a fine section of the west side. 
The first day was a day of bitter experience, a day 
which put an end to his aspirations toward success 
in peddling. 

In the fine section Mr. Greenstein met with 
special difficulties which were very discouraging and 
depressing. One whole day he walked about without 
making a penny's sale ; the fine ladies and gentlemen of that section took no 
notice of the poor peddler. The day was nearly over and Mr. Greenstein had 
done no business and did not have five cents for food or carfare. 

He went into a saloon with the determination to sell ; he made up his 
mind to sell a ten-cent package of matches for seven cents. The saloonkeeper 
accepted the offer and gave him a dime in payment for the matches. Mr. 
Greenstein did not have three cents in change and the saloonkeeper in the 
usual American liberality told him to keep the change. This was the last drop 
in Mr. Greenstein's cup of bitter experience. Before he was under the im- 
pression that he was a merchant, but the attitude of the finer class ot that 
section toward the "poor peddler" and finally the saloonkeeper's offer of three 
cents insulted his pride. He took the few cents and went home with the deter- 
mination to have no more of peddling. Never again did he peddle. And so 
the city of New York, through the liberality of a saloonkeeper, lost a peddler 
of matches. 

He went to work in an upholstering shop. In order to earn his little pay 
he had to work hard, often carrying couches on his shoulder. However, he 
learned a trade and as soon as he had fifty dollars saved up, being at that time 
about two years in this country, he started business for himself, occupying a 
part of the cellar at 90 Eldridge street, where he paid $8 per month rent. 

And so he gradually worked up to the present stage of success. He is now 
the owner of two big factories in Brooklyn, producing the finest parlor furni- 
ture. 

In addition to his standing in the business world, Mr. Greenstein is an. 
important figure in Jewish social life. He was prominently active in the Bialy- 
stoker Society, and was instrumental in bringing about a union of both the two 
Bialystoker organizations. This union made possible the purchase of the big 
church on Willard and Grand avenues, which was converted into Beth 
Hakneses Anshe Bialystok, of which Mr. Greenstein was the President a few 

115 



years. Mr. Greenstein also took an active part in the Meserole Street Talmud 
Torah, having been the Chairman of the Building Committee. He is promi- 
nently connected with the Biker Cholim Kosher Hospital movement. He 
belongs to a great many other institutions and he is a devoted Zionist. He was 
one of the first members of the order Benei Zion. Some years ago he went to 
the Zionist Congress at The Hague with Dr. Blaustein, where he had occasion 
to meet Dr. Nordau and others interested in the Zionist movement. 

His wife, Sarah, is descended from a very prominent family in Russia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Greenstein do not share the modern tendency towards small 
families, for they are the proud parents of nine children. Two of his six sons 
are with him in business, and the other four sons will get their share of the 
business when they are married. One of his three daughters is married, an- 
other is his private secretary and the third is a student of fine arts at Columbia 
University. 

One of the most practical bits of advice that Mr. Greenstein gives to the 
young is to make no hasty step, but to give every idea a second consideration. 



ISAAC GRODIN 

Every inch an American, and one of the shrewdest financiers of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, Mr. Isaac Grodin is one of the finest examples of the second gen- 
eration of Jewish blood infused by birth of the spirit of freedom and progress. 

He was born, raised and still lives in the big, hustling lake city of Cleve- 
land, and is a part of its life and activities in a broad sense. 

Grodin Bros., whose headquarters are on East Thirty-eighth street, Cleve- 
land, do a gigantic business in scrap metal and rubber. At present this is a 
two-man concern, as Joseph Grodin is the other member. 

Still a young man, since the date of his birth is November 22, 1872, Mr. 
Isaac Grodin has many years before him in which to further extend his busi- 
ness. 

The first rung of the commercial ladder up which he has climbed to suc- 
cess taught him alertness and resourcefulness, for he began life as a newsboy. 
Later he laid the basis of his business career by taking a commercial course, 
which included bookkeeping, and at the age of 17 he started to work for L. A. 
Stone as a bookkeeper and an all-round man at a weekly salary of $5. This, 
however, was gradually increased until this lad was receiving a $15 salary. He 
kept this up for the next six years, and having saved every cent of his meager 
salary, he entered into a partnership with Mr. L. A. Stone and the firm name 
was Stone & Grodin. This partnership lasted until 1899, when they dissolved 
and Isaac entered into another partnership, this time with his brother Joseph, 
and together they have seen their business grow wonderfully. His name today 
stands on the honor roll in the scrap metal business of this country and with 
an eye for still greater development of this business, it is not uncommon to see 
Mr. Isaac Grodin work late into the night, though he is in a position where he 
can take things very easy. 

Mr. Isaac Grodin is a Director of the Euclid Avenue Temple, a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce as well as the Credit Men's Association, member 
of B'nai B'rith, and subscribes to all charities, local as well as national, irre- 
spective of race, color or creed.. 

Rich in business success, he is still richer in his home life, having a wife 
and four very charming children, to whom he is devotedly attached. He was 
married in Detroit to Lowlis Applebaum. daughter of Isaac Applebaum. a 
prominent Jew of Detroit, on the 8th day of March, 1899, and, like her hus- 

116 



band, Mrs. Grodin is an ardent chrarity worker and contributes both time and 
money to any worthy cause. 

Air. Grodih's advice to the younger generation is. "Find the work which 
you like and to which you are best fitted, and stick to it, regardless of the 
"obstacles which seem to beset your way, make your every act earn for you a 
reputation for honesty and reliability." 



DR. GASTON J. GREIL 

When a man who has achieved a great measure of success and a high 
degree of distinction in his own profession still finds the time and has the 
inclination to interest himself wholeheartedly and soulfully in the affairs and 
activities of his city and community, it merits more than passing comment and 
commendation. Such a man is Dr. Gaston J. Greil of Montgomery, Alabama. 
He was bom in that city January 21, 1878, the son of Jacob and Mena Greil. 
His father emigrated to this country from Bavaria at the age of fourteen, set- 
tling in Montgomery a few years later. He enlisted in the Confederate army at 
the beginning of the war between the states and served throughout the four 
years of conflict. Afterward he did much to upbuild his section of the South 
in both civic and business affairs. 

Dr. Greil received his early education in the public and private schools of 
Montgomery, after which he entered the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, which 
conferred upon him the degree of B. S. in 1897. 

He thereupon went to New York City and entered the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, Columbia University, from which he graduated in 1901. 
Though equipped with a thorough general education and a fine preparation for 
his chosen profession, Dr. Greil was determined to obtain the highest degree 
of skill possible before taking up the practice of medicine. For this reason 
he spent two years in Bellevue Hospital and then went abroad, where he spent 
a year in the leading hospitals and clinics of Europe. Upon his return in 1905 
he began the practice of medicine in Montgomery, where he has since been 
devoting his vast knowledge and high skill to his chosen profession, specializ- 
ing in pediatrics. 

It goes without saying that Dr. Greil's services are much sought in his 
city and community. Yet, he finds time for active participation in works of 
charity and philanthropy, in which fields of human endeavor he is justly recog- 
nized as a leader. Thus he served for four consecutive years as City Health 
Officer and has founded a number of institutions from which have accrued 
many and invaluable services to his city. Among these are the City Labora- 
tory, the City Clinic for Children and the Montgomery Anti-Tuberculosis 
Camp, all of which institutions he has established. In fraternal circles, too, 
he is both active and prominent. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and holds 
the position of Chief Physician to the hundred children in the Masonic Or- 
phans' Home at Montgomery. Among Dr. Greil's literary activities it may be 
mentioned that he is a contributor to various medical journals, and besides be- 
ing closely identified with the Jewish community in its various institutions and 
organizations, he is a member of the county, state, Southern and American 
Medical associations. 

On October 9. 1912, Dr. Greil was married to Miss Cecile Loeb, the 
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Jacques Loeb. Mrs. Greil is a young woman 
of rare accomplishments and attainments, and is actively interested in literary 
and communal work of a Jewish and general character. She is President of the 
Jewish Literary Society, known as the Sesame Club, and holds the position of 
Secretary to the Mothers' Club. 

Dr. and Mrs. Greil are the parents of two lovely children, Jaerueline and 
Gaston, Jr. 

117 



OSCAR GROSBERG 

The Eagle Cloak Company at 484-576 Washington street, Boston, Mass., 
is owned by -Mr. Oscar Grosberg, whose life story and rise from humble 
beginnings to a position of affluence and influence among the Jewry of the Mas- 
sachusetts capital is as remarkable as it is interesting. He was born in the 
month of Tebeth, 1866, near Kovno, Russia, and comes from Rabbinical stock. 
1 1c arrived in America on January 1, 1887, and started as a peddler in Boston. 
Within a year he saved up enough to go into the manufacturing of cloaks, and 
finally he went into the retail business, starting in due time his present concern. 

Having established for himself a real success, Mr. Grosberg gave much 
thought and attention to those "poorer than ourselves," whose cause he began 
to champion. In a most interesting" manner and by a perseverance which is 
as great as it is unusual, he started a house-to-house canvass to raise the sum 
of $50,000 for the Home of Jewish Children, in which institution he was in- 
terested from the start and which actually owes its existence to this first col- 
lection of $50,000 which Air. Grosberg arranged. He was made Treasurer of 
the home and a better selection could never be made. He organized a very 
efficient financial system, a good Membership Committee and a businesslike 
system of keeping accounts, making the home a model institution, which is 
steadily referred to by other organizations of similar type throughout the 
country as the "home that knows how to do business." Mr. Grosberg is also 
a Director of the Federated Charities and of the Beth Israel Hospital. As 
Treasurer of the Home for the Aged he saw through its financial difficulties 
and arranged for the paying off of their first mortgage. 

Mr. Grosberg was married in Boston on October 27, 1890 to Miss Celia 
Richman, and is the father of one son, Caspar M., who is associated with him 
in business and married to Sarah Azoos. 

Mr. Grosberg is a modern Orthodox, who studied Hebrew and Talmud 
and was a Yeshiba Bochurt in his native town. His son has received a Jewish 
education and his wife is an active charity worker. Caspar M. Grosberg is a 
graduate of Harvard College. 



MAX GROSS 

The real optimist is the man who never allows the shadows of today's 
evening to darken the brightness of tomorrow. Each day is a closed book, and 
the next brings another beginning, a new opportunity. 

Such an attitude toward life begets self-confidence, without which real 
success is impossible. 

This trait is one of the strongly accentuated features of Mr. Max Gross' 
character, and without it he would have been unable to surmount the difficulties 
which beset his early career. 

He was born January 2, 1877, in Liska, Tolave, Hungary, his father, Mor- 
ris Gross, being a very prominent Jewish scholar. Being more ambitious than 
the majority of his fellow townsmen, he decided to seek his fortune in the new- 
world, and arrived in New York when he was only sixteen years old. He 
started work in a pipe factory, where he only made $2.50 per week, but he 
persevered and at the end of six months found employment in a tin shop in 
Brooklyn at $6 per week. For twelve years he struggled along in this way 
and finally went to Girard, Ohio, where he arrived with but sixteen cents in his 
pocket. Deciding that a business of his own was the only solution to a more 
successful career, he started to peddle junk, and after five years had accumu- 
lated enough money to open a grocery store. This he is still running on a 

118 



large scale, where he has heen so successful that he has accumulated a large 
amount of real estate. 

Mr. Gross was married June 7, 1902, to Miss Katy Kline of New York, 
and to her assistance Mr. Gross attributes considerable of his success, as she 
is a woman possessed of rare business ability. They have two daughters, both 
attending school. 

Mr. Gross is a member of Congregation Children of Israel, Odd Fellows, 
Knight of Pythias, is the Federal Lodge starter of B'rith Sholum, and a mem- 
ber of the Young Friends' Society of New York, with which organization he 
has been connected actively for the past twenty-five years. 



SAMUEL L. GRUNDSTEIN 

Of all the nations which the world has known, the commercial instinct 
is strongest and most fully developed in the Jew. He never sacrifices future 
opportunity for present gain. No salary, however attractive, can compensate 
for the satisfaction which he feels in conducting a business for himself. So 
thought young Samuel Grundstein when, as a young boy, he worked himself 
up from $2.00 per week to $18.00 per week in six short months and then 
having saved enough money to buy a horse and wagon, gave up his position and 
started in for himself. 

Samuel Grundstein was born in Nieblyec, Austria-Hungary, May 14, 
1886, and probably inherited a great deal of commercial ability from his father, 
who was a successful merchant of his native place. 

He came to America in January, 1903, and his first employment was found 
in Cleveland, where he started as office boy at $2.00 per week. His rapid rise 
would have been sufficient inducement to have kept most boys satisfied with 
their progress, but Samuel's one ambition was to be in business for himself 
and subsequent events proved the wisdom of his decision. 

After buying and selling metal for three years, he accumulated money 
enough to go into the commission business, which he established at Medina, 
Ohio. Here he was very successful, but deciding that his best future lay in 
the junk business, he sold out and started a yard, which is the business that 
he is so successfully conducting today, at Ashland, Ohio. 

Mr. Grundstein was married May 3, 1915, to Miss Sofie Messing of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and they have one young son who will doubtless inherit the 
remarkable business talent which seems to be a distinguishing trait of the 
Grundstein family. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Grundstein are very charitable and do not confine their 
activities to local charities, as the Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals, the 
Orphans and Old Age Homes of Cleveland, and many others have been 
recipients of their support. 

Mr. Grundstein belongs to Bnai Brith, the Moose, Eagles and is an active 
member of the Chamber of Commerce. 



119 



MORRIS GROSSMAN 

The making of wine is one of the oldest occupations in the world. Small 
wonder then that the Jews, the world's most ancient, civilized race, should 
have produced many men adept in the art of wine making, and with a thor- 
ough knowledge of the commercial value of spirits. 

Such a man is Mr. Morris Grossman, who was born in Opelhead, Hun- 
gary, March 16, 1876, the son of Marcus and Eva Grossman. 

His father was an extensive land owner, wine manufacturer and Jewish 
scholar, and young Morris had opportunity from his earliest childhood to 
absorb much knowledge of the business which proved later to be of inestimable 
value to him. 

At the age of seventeen the spirit of adventure and the longing for bigger 
opportunities prompted Morris to come to America, where he landed May 4, 
1893.^ 

For the first five years he peddled fruit in Cleveland, but finally decided to 
try out the opportunities in the liquor business, and in order to gain experience, 
accepted a position as bartender at $9 per week. He continued this for five 
years and then went into business for himself, where he has been very success- 
ful, and is now operating at No. 2259 Ontario street, under the title "Gross- 
man's Liquor House.'' He also owns no acres of land from his father's 
estate in Hungary. 

Mr. Grossman was married December 1, 1901, to Miss Hannah Gottlieb 
of Cleveland, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Gottlieb. They have three 
daughters, who are not only being well educated, but have also displayed 
remarkable talent for music. This is being fostered and developed by then- 
parents, and the two older girls are already displaying great proficiency on 
the piano and violin. 

Mr. Grossman, like all successful men, has a strict business code, to the 
adherence of which he attributes much of his good fortune, rather than to luck 
or favorable circumstance. 

Honesty, charity and a strict attention to business are the three qualities 
which he deems essential to a successful career. In the matter of charity, Mr. 
Grossman has a record of which any man might feel justly proud. Not only 
is he most liberal in bis contributions to all local institutions, but he extends 
his benevolences to every section of the country, including the Hungarian 
Benevolent Association, the Federation of Jewish Charities and the Denver 
Sanitarium. 

He is a prominent member of Congregation Bnei Ishurim, Beth Abraham 
and Greisses Temple, Montifiore Lodge. 



AARON GUBER 

At 143 East Cambridge street, East Cambridge, Mass., is located a flour- 
ishing concern devoted to metals and rubber, and owned and managed by Mr. 
Aaron Guber. 

Mr. Guber was born in Volina, Guberne, Russia, in August, 1873, and 
came to America in 1897. He landed in Boston and in order to learn the busi- 
ness worked in a junk yard for a very small salary. He then went into busi- 
ness for himself and is today one of the most successful business men of 
Cambridge. 

Mr. Guber was married in July, 1896, to Miss Ida Shultz and they have 
three children, one boy and two girls, all going to school. 

120 



Mrs. i iubi i in her social circle and is a pr inent worker in 

miit. ritii rhej an members of the Orthodo ;ation, and 

ii supporters of Jewish Charities, and thi Hi hool. Mr. Gubcr is 

i i promim nl member i il Reth Israel. 



ELY DAVID GUREVITZ 

i Ine of England's greatest poets has written: 
"I am master of my fate, 
I am captain of my soul." 

'I'lu -i- words are most appropriately applied to those brave spirits who 
have come from Europe, determinedly facing poverty and working oul their 
■ li stinies, surrounded by strange faces, language and customs. 

Such :i man was Mr. Eh David Gurcvitz, who was born in Rorisoff, 
Russia, March 15, 1879. His father was a grain merchant, and at the age 
of thirteen he started to assist him. Feeling thai Russia offered few oppor- 
tunities, at tlir age of twenty the young man decided to come to America, 
and found his first occupation in a tailor shop in New York City, which trade 
In had learned while still in Russia. Here his services proved very valuable, 
and In- was soon making a splendid salary, which average 1 nearly one hundred 
di illai - a w eek. 

1 1 <■ next went to Columbus, and after working as a tailor for about three 

years, opened a tailoring shop under the firm nana- of the 1 >hio Coat Makers, 

where he spent the next seven years. He then decided that the junk business 

offered more opportunity, so he opened a yard, where he has been exceedingly 

rous. 

Mr. Gurevitz was married January 13, 1909, to Miss Dora Marion of 
1 olumbus, ' ihio, and they have a fine family of two boys and one girl, all 
going to school. 

Mr. ( lure\ iiz i- a member of Congregation Beth Jacob, the Hungarian 
Shule, Brith Abraham, and the Knights of Joseph. He is also a liberal con 
tributor to the Denver Sanitarium", and man) other charities. 

When asked li i> advice to the young, Mr. Gurevitz said, put your ver) best 
efforts in whatever you undertake to do, give your fellowman a square deal. 
and be honest and upright at all times. 



LOUIS HALBERSTEIN 

Thrift and the ability to -axe has put many a man on the high road to 
success. 

1 ine of our great financiers lias said that the reason most nun do not acquire 
wealth is because they lack the stability of purpose which would enable them 
in save the first thousand dollars. 

In the life of Mr. Louis Halbefstein we have an example of perseverance, 
thrift and ability which ha- placed him in tin- foremost rank of business men 
at Sidney . < Ihio. 

Horn in Lublina, Guberne, Russia, in 1882, he was the son of Joseph and 

121 



Hannah Halberstein, prominent people in their native town, where his father 
was owner of a mill, and was also recognized as an 
authority as a Jewish scholar. 

Louis decided to try his fortunes in America 
and came to this country January I, 1905. 

Beginning the new year and the new life to- 
gether, he met with the usual discouragements 
which fall to the lot of the young emigrant, but 
finally found employment in a factory in Cincinnati 
at $10.00 per week. During the four years that he 
continued there he managed to save enough money 
to start a small store, and deciding that Sidney. 
Ohio, would be a good place for his venture, opened 
his store there. 

His success has been all that could be desired, 
and he is today conducting one of the largest stores 
in the city. 

Mr. Halberstein was married prior to his com- 
ing to America, his wife having been before her marriage Miss Rosa Falk, 
and she cheerfully shared all the hardships and discouragements that fell to 
the lot of her husband, secure in her belief in his ability to overcome all 
obstacles. 

They have three children who are all in school at the present time. 

Like all good Jews, Mr. Halberstein is most devout in his belief and is a 
regular attendant at the Brith Abraham Congregation of Dayton, Ohio. 

Both himself and wife are conscientious and liberal contributors to the 
charities appealing to them for help, including the Denver and Los Angeles 
Sanitariums. 




SOLOMON HARRIS 



Some one has said that salesmen are born, not made. While the art of 
salesmanship can, of course, be greatly developed, a review of the careers of 
the selling fraternity would indicate that native adaptability has a great deal 
to do with success along this line. 

That Solomon Harris, at the age of sixteen, should have shown a marked 
degree of talent along selling lines makes the after events of his career less 
surprising to those who have followed him closely and interestedly. 

He was born December 15, 1882, a native of Suwalk, Russia, but spent 
practically all of his life in America, as he was brought to New York at the 
age of four. He attended the public schools and the Yieshibah Etz Chaim, and 
while still quite young started to work in a jewelry factory. 

At the age of sixteen the desire for a selling career sent him on the road 
with a line of muslin underwear and today he is the best known and most 
successful salesman in that line in America, having distinguished himself by 
taking the largest single orders ever entered, and has more sales to his credit 
than anv man in the industry. 

It is also a well-known fact among the trade that Mr. Harris has never 
failed to book an order on any day of his travels. 

Mr. Harris is today but thirty-four years of age, having already attained 
the position of senior member of Harris Brothers & Barnett, manufactures 
of muslin underwear, their location being 11-13 East Twenty-sixth street, New 
York City. 

Mr. Harris is a man of quick decisions, who rarely makes an error of 

122 



judgment and possesses a firm belief that whatever a man purposes to do he 
can accomplish. He has traveled abroad a great deal and is a familiar figure 
in Europen markets, being a member of the St. Gall (Switzerland) Merchants' 
Club. 

Although being obliged to be away from New York a good share of the 
time, he has not lost interest in local and charitable activities and is also an 
active member of the West End Congregation. He is a Mason and was re- 
cently appointed as a member of the grand jury upon the recommendation of 
Judge Rosalsky. 

Mr. Harris was married March 29, 1903, to Miss Frances Lipman. They 
have two fine children and their home life is ideal in every respect. 



JOSEPH HAYMAN 

When the writer recently had the pleasure of interviewing Mr. Joseph 
Hayman, prominent scrap metal dealer and salvage broker of Dayton, Ohio ; 
he was much interested in Mr. Hayman's code for a successful career. Ex- 
pressed in a few brief words, it is as follows : "Never give up, no matter 
how discouraged you may become. Work and win is my motto." 

Then Mr. Hayman went on to relate how when he first landed in America 
he worked as a laborer for $3 per week for seven weeks, when he was raised 
to $5. On this meager salary he married, and, given this new incentive for 
greater effort, opened a grocery store after he had saved $250. All this oc- 
curred in Buffalo prior to his removal to Dayton in 1913. 

He arrived in that city just before the flood and conditions immediately 
after were very propitious for his line of work. During all of this time Mr. 
Hayman worked as hard as any of his help and 
had the pleasure of seeing his business steadily 
gaining in volume. He is now owner and man- 
ager of the larger establishment at 638-40 Rich- 
ards street, where his daughter acts as bookkeeper. 
His son is in the Ohio State University. 

Mr. Hayman was born in Botoschani, Rou- 
mania, September 15, 1870, and when only sixteen 
years old owned a grocery store in Europe, so we 
may well believe that his remarkable business abil- 
ity developed at a very early age. He came to 
America September 2, 1889. 

When one reviews the life history of such a 
man as Mr. Hayman, it hardly seems credible that 
young people enjoying advantages of our country 
should ever be discouraged in the upward climb 
towards success, as he has achieved an enviable 
position by sheer force of character and strict ap- 
plication to business. 

He is a prominent Zionist and member of B'nai B'rith and gives liberally 
to the Hebrew Institute, the Jewish Federation and the Denver Sanitarium. 




123 



HARRY HELPER 

It is a pleasure to believe that at some future time monuments will no 
longer be erected to men whose chief distinction was that desolation and 
human slaughter marked their pathway. When the hour strikes and the new 
era dawns, the monuments we unveil will carry with them no suggestion of 
orphan's tears, wrecked cities or a starving people. Peace and industry shall 
come into her own and with them due recognition of the sterling traits of 
such men as Mr. Harry Helper of Bay City, Mich. 

Born in Yilna, Guberne, Russia, May 10, 1884, he was brought to America 
by his parents at the age of three years, and until ten years of age was allowed 
to attend the public schools. At this time it seemed necessary for him to 
contribute to the support of the family so he started peddling with his father 
and continued for the next nine years. 

He then went to Bay City, Mich., and his brother Sam and himself pooled 
their little savings and opened a junk yard. They put fourteen years unceasing 
industry and much natural ability into their efforts, and today are rewarded 
by having one of the most thoroughly equipped modern plants in the country 
and an immense .annual business. 

Mr. Helper was married in June, 191 3, to Miss Esther Rosenberg and 
they have one small daughter of whom the)' are very proud. 

Although both Mr. and Mrs. Helper are very reticent regarding their 
charitable activities, we do not feel that this biography would be complete 
without making mention of same, as they are both exceedingly generous in 
their devotion of both time and money to all worthy causes. 

Mr. Helper was one of the original founders of the Temple Abraham of 
Bay City and devoted much time and money to insure its successful com- 
pletion. At the present time he holds the office of Treasurer. He is also 
active in B'nai B'rith, the Elks and the Chamber of Commerce. 

The Old Age Home of Detroit and the Orphans Home of Cleveland are 
also receiving much assistance from Mr. and Mrs. Helper as are various insti- 
tutions in Los Angeles, Denver and Chicago. 

The true test of a really great man is the measure in which he passes 
his own good fortune on to others, whom the buffeting winds of adversity 
have almost swept from their moorings, and in this Mr. Helper has never been 
found wanting. 



LOUIS HERMAN 

There is a story told of an eminent painter who was asked what he mixed 
his colors with to produce certain extraordinary effects, and his reply was 
"I mix them with brains, sir." 

This anecdote very aptly illustrates the methods by which the Jews of 
our nation have reached the prominent positions they occupy today, as various 
causes for many centuries have conspired to set aside their ambitions and 
nullify their efforts. Yet despite these hindrances, the Jew is steadily forging 
to the front with little assistance but his own remarkable resourcefulness. 

A remarkable instance of this kind is exemplified in the life of Mr. Louis 
Herman who was born in Chumsk, Russia, April 24, 1876, where his father 
was quite a prominent land owner and Jewish scholar. 

At the age of seventeen, young Louis being very ambitious and feeling 
that the western world offered more opportunities, came to America and 
landed in New York, where his first employment was in a vest factorv. So 
closely did he apply himself that within two years he became proprietor of 

124 



llic shop, enjoying the distinction of being tlie youngest owner of an exclusive 
vest miking shop in New York. And this was all accomplished through his 
own efforts, as he had no capital except his savings which he accumulated 
while learning the trade. 

He very successfully conducted this business for eight years, during which 
time he became the leading manufacturer of this particular line, but deciding 
that the household installment business offered more opportunity, he sold his 
business and went into the new line at Elizabeth, X. J. Here he enjoyed three 
very successful years, when he met with a terrible misfortune. His store was 
destroyed by fire, and as he had no insurance, he became penniless. 

Discouraged but still undaunted, he came to Cleveland and began working 
in a cloak and suit factory at $12.00 per week, and after seven years' hard 
work accumulated a little capital. This he invested with a partner in a 
theater, which continued two years, after which he opened up a garage, which 
he still owns. 

In May, 1917, he bought the lease of the Royal Theater and so successful 
has this venture proven that he is building another theater which will soon be 
in operation. This will have a seating capacity of 2,000. He has also acquired 
considerable real estate which occupies a part of his time. 

Mr. Herman is married and has two fine boys, both nearly through school, 
who will doubtless be of much assistance to their father in the management of 
his various interests. 

Both himself and wife are most liberal in their contributions to charities 
and give to all regardless of creed or religion. 



MAX HERMAN 

To the casual observer it would seem that Mr. Max Herman had never 
experienced an unpleasant day in his life, now that he has attained a state of 
affluence and plenty. But this is far from being the actual case. Like every 
other pious European-born Jew who emigrates to America with a view of 
making this country his future home, Mr. Herman encountered many diffi- 
culties. Primarily it was a struggle for an existence, since he landed on Amer- 
ican soil with exactly seven dollars with which to support himself and his 
family, but in that battle for his livelihood was involved also another grave 
question ; one which appears only in the life of the truly Orthodox and pious 
Jew of Eastern birth and training. It was the serious problem of maintaining 
the strong ties of his religion, to which he was brought up from childhood and 
for which hs even now would sacrifice his fortune, his liberty, and his life. 
Such was the influence of father upon son, that when Mr. Herman came to 
Cleveland, Ohio, on July 3, 189 1, he accepted employment as a bottle sorter, 
at a salary of six dollars per week, with the privilege of observing his Sabbath, 
rather than to work at a higher wage without that privilege. For four years 
he struggled along at various occupations until he had accumulated sufficient 
capital with which to enter into business for himself. 

In 1913 Mr. Herman commenced his present business of Wholesale Bottle 
Assorting, but on a very limited scale. In the course of a short time the new 
venture outgrew his small capital and a corporation was formed under the 
name of The Advance Bottle Company, witli headquarters at 2670 East 51st 
street, Cleveland, Ohio, and with numerous branches throughout the city to 
accommodate their steadily increasing trade. 

Mr. Max Herman was born at Skulian, Russia, in 1876. His father, 
David Herman, was a very wealthy and influential lumber merchant and 
Jewish scholar of considerable fame. As is the custom in that part of Russia, 

125 



young Herman was taught neither trade nor profession, but instead devoted 
his earty life to securing a sound knowledge of the Talmud and Bible, in which 
he became thoroughly proficient. 

During the year of 1902 Mr. Herman left for Kishineff, Russia. There he 
married Miss Zippa Sidekursky, the daughter of Fival and Frumme Sidekur- 
sky, a very prominent family of Kishineff. .A short time after his marriage, 
however, the war broke out between Russia and Japan, and Max Herman 
together with his young wife, both left for Austria, leaving behind their 
wealth and well established home. Here Mr. and Mrs. Herman lived through 
a very critical period. Not knowing the language and possessing no pro- 
fession, it was some time before he secured employment, and when he finally 
did obtain a position, it was accompanied by a compensation of twenty-five 
dollars a month. Upon this meager income Mr. Herman managed to exist 
until 1910, when he came to Cleveland. But even here he was destined to 
struggle and soon became resigned to his fate. Formulating some well laid 
plans for his future, Mr. Herman immediately commenced to work, with the 
result that today he is Vice-President and guiding spirit of the vast enterprise 
previously mentioned, and the owner of real estate which is estimated to be 
worth approximately twenty thousand dollars. 

Mr. Herman is Secretary of the Agudath Bnei Israel, Anshe Svard Con- 
gregation, first President and founder of the Bass Arabier Yerband, a char- 
itable organization of prominence in Cleveland, and an active member of the 
Yilno Unterstitzung Verein. Besides these he is chairman of the Board of 
Directors of the Yashivath Adath Bnei Israel, and is one of the directors of 
the Hebrew Free Loan Association. Both Mr. Herman and his wife are very 
charitably inclined, donating annually to the Denver and Los Angeles Con- 
sumptive Sanitariums, and to Mt. Sinai Hospital of Cleveland. They also 
contribute liberally to all of the Cleveland charities and are quite active in 
social work. 

Unlike a great majority of successful Jewish business men, Mr. Herman 
still observes his religion as in days of old, and it is his one great ambition 
in life to train his three voung sons to do likewise. 



MORRIS HERMAN 

In recording the incidents of a successful well lived life, it cannot be 
doubted that such biography is potent for good in moulding the character and 
fitting the vouth of this and succeeding generations for the important duties 
that pertain to good citizenship. It is not too much to believe that this will 
be one of the strongest agencies which, through the outstretched years, will 
inspire the young with loftier ideals of the duties that life holds. 

That they may be, as one of our great English statesmen has said. "In- 
spired with the belief that life is a great and noble calling ; not a mean and 
groveling thing that we are to shuffle through as we can, but an elevated and 
lofty destiny." 

We believe that the following life story of Morris Herman will fill such 
a mission as it is the story of a self-made man who has found success without 
losing that keen human sympathy which is the finest attribute of man. 

Morris Herman was born in Lackovitz Minsk, Guberne, Russia, July 1, 
1875, the son of Moses and Ida Herman, his father being a merchant of his 
native city and a scholar of recognized ability. 

Mr. Herman came to America in August, 1902, landing on our shores 
with but 14 cents in his pocket. He worked his way to Albany, Ind., where 
lie found employment in a junk yard at $4.00 per week. After six weeks of 

126 



this work, he took his very small savings and invested them in a stock of 
dry goods which he peddled for four months. By this time he had accumu- 
lated enough to buy a horse and wagon and began handling junk. 

In April, 1900, two years prior to his coming to America, he had been 
married to Miss Mary Kapelansky, but for financial reasons was unable to 
bring his family with him to America. By this time, he had accumulated suf- 
ficient money to send for them and it was a happy reunion when they landed 
in America. 

He also bought a junk yard shortly after, which he conducted for six 
years. Then sold out and moved to Detroit where he embarked in the shoe 
business. This venture was unsuccessful and Mr. Herman sold the business. 
Being a man of the most scrupulous honor, he settled in full with his cred- 
itors and had practically nothing left for himself. However, he cheerfully 
went to work again in the junk business and success has rewarded his honesty 
and hard effort, as he is today owner of a large and prosperous business with 
modern equipment. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman have five children, all of whom are in school and 
being educated in music. Their son, Bennie, although only eleven years old, 
sings in the choir of Beth Jacob Congregation and gives much promise of 
vocal ability of a high order. 

In addition to their church membership, Mr. and Mrs. Herman contribute 
liberally to Denver Hospital, Old Folks' Home and Talmud Torah. Mr. 
Herman is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and a promoter of the 
Free Loan Association. 



NATHAN HIRSH 

Born in Roumania some forty-five years ago, Mr. Nathan Hirsh of the 
Pioneer Film Corporation, 126-130 West 46th street, New York, came to 
America at the tender age of thirteen. His father was already dead, and he 
landed here with his mother and sister. He secured a job, learning the sus- 
pender trade, and though he was only receiving a wage of fifty cents per week, 
in the early weeks of his apprenticeship, he learned his trade so well, that at 
the age of nineteen he had a goodly sum of money saved and he ventured into 
business on his own hook. Though only nineteen years old, he brought to 
his work such mature views and understanding that he was well on the road 
to success when the panic of 1907 came and swept all before it. 

He paid all his creditors and dissolved his little business in 1908. Then, 
realizing that the motion-picture business was the coming industry, and with 
the assistance of his father-in-law, he built a motion picture theater at 125th 
street and Lenox avenue, and after conducting- it for a time, he sold it at a 
profit. . He kept on building theaters for moving pictures and selling them 
at a profit, until 1914, when he organized his present company, the Pioneer 
Film Corporation. 

Mr. Hirsh is President of the company, and the corporation procures 
state rights of the best pitcures produced, leasing them to all big theaters 
throughout the states of New York and New Jersey. Some of the most 
remarkable pictures, such as "Civilization," "The Garden of Allah," "The 
Submarine Eye," "Today," and many others are controlled by this concern. 

Mr. Hirsh is a Master Mason and for twenty-five years has been a 
member of Darcy Lodge No. 187. He has organized the Temple Penill of 
Washington Heights and is its Treasurer and he belongs to every Jewish and 
non-Jewish charity in town. 

Married twentv years ago to Augusta Monheimer, he is the father of 

127 



two children, a son named Melvin and a daughter Sylvia. Mrs. Hirsh is as 
active socially as her husband and is Vice-President of Temple Peni El's 
sisterhood. 

Mr. Hirsh attributes his success to his hard efforts and tireless ambition 
to make good. Both of his children received a good secular and Jewish 
education. 



FRANK HOLTSBERG 

We do not believe that this biographical work of prominent Jews of 
America would be complete without mention being made of representatives 
in a charming little city at the extreme southern boundary of our country, 
Key West, Florida. 

Here resides Mr. Frank Holtsberg, prosperous owner and manager' of the 
dry goods store which bears his name. He came to America at the age of 
nineteen, having been born in Roumania, May 15, 1869. The first years in 
this country he spent peddling, and during the course of his travels found 
his way to Key West, Florida. He was so delighted with the charming 
environment that he decided to make it his permanent home and opened a 
small dry goods store. 

This modest beginning has developed into the present large establishment 
which is operated under his name and which is considered one of the finest 
mercantile enterprises in the city. 

■Mr. Holtsberg was married March 11, 1909, to Miss Anna Goldin and 
both Mr. and Mrs. Holtsberg are very active in the social life of their com- 
munity. They take a great interest in civic affairs and are most generous in 
their gifts to all worthy charities. 

They are Orthodox in their religious beliefs and are notable examples of 
upright and loyal citizenship. 



THEODORE HOLTSBERG 

The writer of these lines had paid a visit to Key West, the magnificent 
city in the extreme South, the foot of Florida, to secure some interviews for 
the "Distinguished Jews of America." Key West is one of the most charming 
places in the sunny South, and perhaps anywhere in the world. The very 
sun of Key West seems to shine with a peculiar splendor of its own, appearing 
as he does in all his fascinating beauty, and his rays deeply penetrate the 
earth, exhaling a vigorous and refreshing radiance. 

We frequently meet people in life whose lives and characters act as reac- 
tion against nature's charms ; it happens quite often that, while nature is most 
bounteous in the exhibition of its gifts, the people whom she thus favors de- 
serve it least. But the writer was most fortunate in finding on his first visit a 
man whose great characteristic and qualities of heart and mind beautifully 
harmonize with the charming surroundings of Key West. 

Mr. Theodore Holtsberg is one of the oldest Jewish inhabitants of the 
city and his family is as though to the manner born. All of its members are 
brilliant and charming and full of interest. It consists of Mr. Theodore Holts- 

128 



berg, the father, a man of great intelligence, grounded with an intimate knowl- 
edge of the Talmud, which he studied in his youth, and moulded by the sun- 
shine and rain of life's practical experiences ; Mrs. Holtsberg, who was Elka 
Berenson, a pleasing type of a truly Jewish house-mother; Morris Holtsberg, 
Mr. Holtberg's only son, an intelligent young man of the type which unites 
native Jewish virtue with the refinement of American culture and training : 
his young wife, formerly Miss Rose Halperin, a charming young woman of 
unexhausted life strength and interest ; Ethel, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Holts- 
berg's only daughter, a beautiful girl, of rare intelligence and wit ; Herman, 
a little three-year-old boy, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Holtsberg. 
The family occupies one house, and we can plainby see there the joy and un- 
bounded affection of Jewish patriarchal and family life. 

Mr. Theodore Holtsberg was born in July, 1857, in Hussy, Roumania, the 
son of Mendel and Hannah Holtsberg. In 1890 he came to America. Two 
years later he returned to his native land, but after another period of seven 
years he again landed on these shores, making his new home in Florida, where 
he began as a peddler in Key West, and in due time developed a dry goods 
business located at present at 512 Duval street, under the firm name of 
T. Holtsberg & Son, the son being a partner. 

Mr. Holtsberg has achieved a prominent position in the community, gain- 
ing for himself a name which will remain a source of pride to posterity for 
generations to come. He also was one of the founders of the Congregation 
B'nai Zion. 

Mr. Holtsberg while in Roumania followed the occupation of a general 
storekeeper in a small way and was a competitor of Mr. Halperin, whose 
daughter married Mr. Holtsberg's son. The children had known one another 
from their earliest youth, and Rose Halperin, though brought up in New York, 
left this center of humming life to find her happiness in the quiet of Key 
West as the wife of Morris Holtsberg, the companion of her youthful days. 



JACOB AND HARRY HOFFMAN 

Never before in the history of our country has the junk business assumed 
such prominence in the eye of the public as at the present time, when our 
national resources are being strained to the utmost in order to win the world 
war. 

Thousands of tons of steel have been available for use because of the far- 
sightedness of those greatest of all conservationists — the iron and scrap metal 
dealers, the majority of whom are Jews. 

Prominent in this line of industry may be mentioned Jacob and Harry 
Hoffman of Coshocton, Ohio. They were born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, 
Harry in 1881 and Jacob in August, 1885, the sons of Leo and Liba Hoffman. 

Upon coming to America they encountered all of the privations usual to 
the life of an immigrant who lands upon our shores without money or influ- 
ence to assist him. Jacob worked in New York as a laborer for one year, and 
during the first two months received only sixty-five cents per day. His father 
having been a tailor, he decided to learn that trade, and worked for two weeks 
for nothing. He then received a small salary, but after six months decided 
that the indoor work was not suited to his constitution, so he went to Buffalo, 
where he peddled with a push cash for two months. He then went to Cleve- 
land, Ohio, where he peddled with a cart until he had saved enough 
money to buy a horse and wagon. He finally found his way to Coshocton, 
Ohio, and having acquired considerable valuable business experience, he joined 
forces with his brother and together they opened a yard, where they have been 
exceedingly prosperous. 

129 



Harry Hoffman's experience was in some ways identical with that of his 
brother, inasmuch as he worked in a New York clothing shop for nothing while 
learning the trade, but decided that his future lay in another line, consequently 
joined his brother in the junk business. 

Both brothers are married and each family has a baby boy. Jacob Hoff- 
man was married to Miss Annie Lenson of Cleveland, Ohio, September 24, 
1914, and Harry Hoffman was married to Miss Bertha Lewin of Cleveland, 
October 27, 1914. 

Both families are very charitable and are connected with the principal 
organizations of Coshocton. 



ROBERT G. HOROWITZ 



Orthodoxy is by no means a dead issue in this country. Here is a young 
man, born on the 15th of September, 1891, who is the type of modern Ortho- 
doxy with all that it stands for. Robert G. Horowitz was born in the Govern- 
ment of Vilna, as the son of Gedalia and Mary Horowitz, and if anything, he 
exceeds in religious zeal and devotion any of his predecessors. He attends 
Schul every morning and is a strict Sabbath observer. Not only is his factory 
closed on Saturdays and holidays, but he pays his 
workmen double wages for every holiday week. 

Mr. Horowitz came to America in 1906 ; he 
attended the public school and high school, and was 
employed for a time as inside worker and salesman 
in the clothing line. A few years ago he went into 
business for himself in New York City and has 
accomplished a splendid success and unimpeachable 
reputation, due to his strict and honest business 
methods. 

Business does not devour all of Mr. Horowitz's 
attention, not even most of it. He is very actively 
engaged in social and charitable work. He is a 
Director and very active member of the Hebrew 
Institute, where he had also been an effective mem- 
ber on its building committee. He is a member of 
the Beth David Hospital, the Free Loan Association 

and other Jewish institutions all over the country. He also indulges to a 
considerable extent in practical private charity wherever he goes. 

On the third of June, 1917, Mr. Horowitz was married to Miss Lillian 
Schainuck, the accomplished only daughter of Mr. Benjamin Schainuck, a 
renowned man of wealth in Pittston, Pa. And although Mrs. Horowitz is 
American by birth and had graduated in high school with distinciton, she is 
thoroughly Jewish and as orthodox as her father and husband. 




I Jill 



LOUIS HORN 

Mr. Louis Horn of Pittsburgh, Pa., is not only a highly successful mer- 
chant, but he is one of the most interesting personalities one is apt to meet 
in any relation in life. He is just fifty years of age, having first seen the 
light of day in the city of New York on July 31, 1867. He is of German 
stock, his father, still living and eighty-five years of age, having settled here 
after he left Germany fifty-six years ago. Louis attended public school in 
New York and started to work at the age of twelve. He at first took to the 
occupation of selling newspapers in the streets, then went to peddling, and at 
the age of twenty-three he went to live in Pittsburgh. 

At first he opened a retail dry goods store on Fifth avenue ; gradually 
developing, he went into the wholesale line, so that within ten years he had 
added different articles, like silks, velvets, hosier)' and underwear to his line 
of merchandise. His place of business at the present writing is located at "jj 
Chatham street, under the firm name of Louis Horn & Son. 

Mr. Horn belongs to a number of fraternal organizations, including the 
Masons, Moose, Knights of Pythias, and others. He is active in the Young 
Men's Hebrew Association of Pittsburgh, and for the last twenty-five years 
has been a member of the Tree of Life Congregation. 

In 1889 Mr. Horn was married to the late Rebecca Dribble of New York. 
Eight children have blessed this union, named Leo, Hanna, Jacob, Harry, Mor- 
ris, Albert, Joseph and Elizabeth. Leo Horn was married on November 5, 
1916, to Bertha Bildhauer. Harry and Morris have enlisted in the United 
States army. 

Mr. Horn is of the opinion that hard work, clean life and a vigorous 
ambition to succeed will lead us wherever we want to go. He believes in regu- 
lar school attendance and a religious spirit. He strongly emphasizes the need 
of a thorough Tewish education. 



HARRY HURWITZ 

To a young man with a definite ambition to succeed, no occupation is 
too humble, provided it is honest and is likely to prove a stepping stone to 
future success. 

This seems to have been the sentiment of Mr. Harry Hurwitz who was 
born in Hulick, Russia, September 25, 1889, the son of Ishiah Hurwitz, a 
prominent Jewish scholar of that town. 

Mr. Hurwitz came to America during the winter of 1905, and coming to 
Columbus, Ohio, peddled small wares for about three years, meeting with only 
a very moderate success. He began working as conductor on a street car, 
where he continued for four years. His next venture was in the junk busi- 
ness, and having little capital he peddled with a wagon until 1915 when he 
came to Newark, Ohio, and opened a yard with his brother Sam. The fol- 
lowing year he suffered the great misfortune of losing his brother by death, 
and since that time has been running the business by himself. 

The firm is very prosperous and is still operated under the old name of 
Hurwitz and Hurwitz, where all sorts of scrap iron and rubber are handled. 

In reading the life history of Mr. Hurwitz it would seem that young 
people should receive much inspiration owing to the fact that few young men 
have started with less opportunities. The same perseverance, hard work, and 
steadfast determination to succeed will place others in the enviable position 
which Mr. Hurwitz occupies amongst his business associates today. 

Mr. Hurwitz is very public spirited, contributing liberally to various 
charities including the Denver Sanitarium and is also a most prominent 
member of the Knights of Joseph and the National Jewish 'Working Alliance. 

131 



NATHAN I. ISAACSON 



The photo cut herewith is a reproduction of Mr. Isaacson, the only son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Herman B. Isaacson of New York, who passed from this 
life on October 29, 1913, at the age of thirty-eight years. 

Mr. Isaacson was one of the most accomplished Jewish young men in the 
local Orthodox community, was a scholar, pious and beautiful both in body 
and character, and was born September 1, 1876. 

His accomplishments made his parents happy 
and he was beloved by all who mingled in his circle, 
but the unfortunate young man who had to leave 
this world so early in life endured years of bitter 
suffering. 

Nine years before his death, when apparently 
healthy and extremely handsome, he suddenly be- 
gan to complain of pains in his leg, which pains 
became more and more acute, necessitating in a 
short time amputation. A year before his death he 
developed a tumor in his head. He was operated 
upon four times, and at the end, after having suf- 
fered for an entire year, and after his parents had 
expended a fortune to save him, he departed from 
this life, leaving an eternal and incurable wound in 
the hearts of his parents, his wife and four children, 
who under their mother's tutelage are receiving ex- 
cellent Jewish education. 




MAX LOUIS ISRAEL 



In every community you will find successful men in all walks of life who 
in consistency with their altruistic nature, are only content when doing some- 
thing to elevate their fellow-men. 

In the city of Dayton, Ohio, you will need to make but few inquiries to 
find that Mr. Max Israel is one of these men who, for his noble deeds, his 
wide-awake civic interests, his accomplishments for the common good, is 
known in every home of the community. 

Born on the fifth day of April, 1874, in the beautiful village of Torin, 
Germany, amidst enviable home surroundings, he was reared by his father, 
Benjamin, and his mother. Bertha, in a wholesome atmosphere which pre- 
pared him to meet the later vicissitudes of life. 

In 1881, in company with his parents, he immigrated to this country from 
his native land to enjoy the blessings of liberty and to take advantage of the 
wonderful opportunities this country offered. At the age of eighteen he 
entered his father's iron and steel business, from which his father retired in 
1905, and of which he is today Vice-President and Treasurer. The firm is 
operated under the title "The Israel Bros. Iron & Steel Co." Mr. Israel's 
wisdom, energy and good judgment has made this firm one of the best known 
and most successful in the country. 

On January 10, 1900, he married Miss Gussie Wolf, of Athen, Ga., who, 
upon coming to Dayton as the bride of Mr. Israel, charmed and delighted all 
who had the pleasure of coming within the radius of her remarkable per- 
sonality. This marriage has been blessed with two children, one boy and one 
girl, who are destined to follow the footprints of their parents. 

Mr. Israel is fortunate in the companionship and love of his brothers, five 

132 



in all, and three sisters. One brother, Mr. Harry Israel, is now a representa- 
tive of the firm at Columbus, Ohio. 

Mr. Israel has always taken an active interest in civic, fraternal and com- 
munal affairs, and many times has been repeatedly honored by various organ- 
izations, although he is of a very modest disposition and very reticent about 
speaking of these matters. 

He is connected with all worthy institutions and organizations of Dayton, 
is Vice-President of the Federation of Jewish Charities, a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Temple. As Director of the Jewish War Sufferers 
of Dayton, he was instrumental in raising the huge sum of ten million dollars 
for the alleviation of suffering among the war stricken Jews. He is Vice- 
Chairman of the Traffic Board of Greater Dayton Association, a member of 
the B'nai B'rith, U. C. T., Knights of Pythias, the Brotherhood of Elks, and 
other fraternal and social organizations. 

He is a director in many large commercial institutions, among which he is 
Vice-President of the Dayton Bronze Bearing Co. and takes an active interest 
in all his business connections. His career can well be studied by the younger 
generation as an ideal worthy of emulation. 



WILLIAM JACKSON 

Although the Jew's have perhaps won most recognition as leaders in com- 
merce and merchandising, at the same time they have contributed much to 
science and invention. We are told that many of our so-called modern inven- 
tions were in use by the Jews many years before our western civilization began. 

Histroy does not state whether or not they knew anything of harnessing 
that greatest of all modern servants, electricity, but certain it is that her possi- 
bilities are well known and applied by the Jews of today. 

One of the best electricians in Detroit is Mr. William Jackson, who was 
born in Dalena, Austria, October 21, 1880, his father being a large owner of 
flour mills and like many of the older Jewish business men, a man of great 
learning. He came to New York in 1902 and obtained his first employment 
in a plumbing shop. 

Remaining only a short time, he went to work in the electrical machine 
business, where he remained until 1907, after which he went with the West- 
inghouse Electric Company as road repair man. Two and one-half years later 
he went with The Illinois Steel Co. at Gary, Ind., where he was foreman of 
the electrical department, a position of great responsibility. 

Two and one-half years later he returned to Detroit as superintendent of 
the Amature Motor Works and was there over three years when he joined 
his present firm, The Spaulding' Electrical Co., at a handsome salary. 

Mr. Jackson was married July 22, 1903, to Miss Pauline Kirshenbaum 
of New York. 

They have three children, two girls and one son. The eldest daughter, 
Bella, is going to school and taking piano lessons. 

Mr. Jackson is a 32nd degree Mason and is also a member of the Shrine. 

Both himself and wife are. most generous in their contribution to chari- 
ties and are public spirited, useful citizens. 



133 



MAX JACOBS 

To those who have ever doubted the inestimable value of Jewish immigra- 
tion to this country, a most casual investigation of their activities in business, 
in science, in literature and music would convince that they are bringing to 
our shores unparalleled examples of concentration, ability, industry, courage 
and patriotism. 

In our schools they will find the children of Jews standing high in their 
classes, maintaining the honor of those ancestors who gave to the world its 
first court of justice and its first literature, including the great Book of Books. 

This reminds us of the life history of Mr. Max Jacobs and his fine family 
of eight children, all of whom are occupying honorable and responsible posi- 
tions in life. 

Mr. Jacobs was born in Lidvonvoi, Russia, September 21, 1864. His 
father, Gaziel Jacobs, was a bottle merchant and engaged in the real estate 
business. He was also a Talmudic scholar of considerable attainments. 

Mr. Jacobs came to America in July, 1880, landing in Baltimore, but 
went to Detroit where he worked for a tailor for about a week, after which 
time he started peddling junk. 

The next five years were very hard ones, as he had to resort to any occu- 
pation by which he could make an honest living. During this time he was 
much benefited by the advice given him by an older brother, and at the expira- 
tion of five years went into the bottle business, which has netted him a large 
fortune. 

Of his eight children four of the sons are in business with their father 
under the title of M. Jacobs & Sons. 

All of his children have excellent educations, and are occupying positions 
of prominence and responsibility. 

Mr. Jacobs is a prominent member of Beth Jacob, having held every office 
in that organization. He is also a member of Chered Zakek and is at the 
present time trustee of Beth Abraham. He is also affiliated with the Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

His contributions to charity are exceedingly liberal, embracing all local 
organizations, as well as those of national scope, including the Denver 
Sanitarium. 

His influence and usefulness are of far reaching importance and it is a 
pleasure to have this opportunity of recognizing them while he is still in active 
business life so he may know in what high esteem he is held by his con- 
temporaries. 



HYMAN S. JACOBS 

Mr. Hyman S. Jacobs of Atlanta, Ga., and Jacksonville, Fla., is a young 
rnan, very young in fact, having been born on the 15th of March, 1882, in 
Rassin, Government of Kovno, but he has distinguished himself already not 
only in the field of business but also in the realm of philanthropy and social 
work. 

Mr. Jacobs is the son of Abraham and Rose Jacobs, who live in Atlanta, 
Ga. His father is a strict Orthodox. Young Jacobs came to America in 1891 ; 
he attended school in Atlanta until 1898. He began his business-career work- 
ing for an uncle at Pensacola, Fla. For a time he was employed in the furni- 
ture business at Columbus, Ga. ; he then went into the wholesale liquor busi- 
ness, conducting it in many sections and places. He now owns a large business 
in that line at No. 1127 West Forsyth street, Jacksonville, Fla. Outside of 

134 



that he is interested in real estate in Atlanta and is a Director and former 
President of the Mutual Savings Company of Atlanta. 

But the most interesting feature of Mr. Jacob's career is that wherever 
he comes for business, he becomes interested and is active in social work. 
In Atlanta he was the President of the Y. M. H. A., he was their Secretary 
for seven years and is now an honorary Director of the Jewish Educational 
Alliance ; he is a Director of the Atlanta Hebrew Orphan Home, and he was 
also Vice-President of the Congregation Ahabath Achim. In Columbia, Ga., 
he was the Treasurer of the War Sufferers' Relief Fund : in Chattanooga, 
Tenn., he was a Director of the Y. M. H. A. ; and in Jacksonville he is a 
Director of the Orthodox Congregation of the United Jewish Charities, of the 
Jewish Soldiers' Welfare League, of the Y. M. H. A. and is the Treasurer 
of the Jewish Relief Fund. 

His wife Sadie (Saul), to whom he was married on the 30th of December, 
1908, is a devoted Zionist, and active in the Hadassah organization. 



SAMUEL JACOBSON 

When one stops to consider how many of our eminent men have at one 
time been newsboys, it seems that it is almost a physical impossibility to make 
one's place in the world without having been through a course in selling news- 
papers, the benefits of which have never been realized to such an extent from 
any course which the modern college has to offer. The very experiences which 
the newsboy encounters are such as to make him able to cope with the prob- 
lems of life which he must sooner or later experience. From the scorching 
summer days to the "below-zero" weather of our northern winters he is always 
on the jump to add whatever he can to his small store, in order that he may 
rise to higher things. The very qualities which the young newsboy displays 
argue well for success. And in this respect the life story of Mr. Samuel Jacob- 
son rings true to the core. When Rachel Jacobson, wife of Mr. Morris 
Jacobson, a grain and forest merchant of Vilna, Russia, and one of its most 
renowned Jewish scholars, gave birth to Sam, little did she think of how he 
was destined to make his way in the new world. 

From the age of thirteen, when he set foot on American soil, to the ripe 
age of twenty-one, Samuel sold newspapers in Cleveland for a livelihood. Not 
that he especially cared for that particular profession, but that he might be 
allowed the opportunity of attending Spencerian College, where fie was to pre- 
pare himself for his new career. Sam, evidently desiring to make the most of 
his twenty-four hours, kept books for a number of firms, day and night, in 
order to work up some available capital with which to enter into business for 
himself. 

Soon the time was at hand, and he launched forth into business with what- 
ever capital he could bring together and formed several partnerships. But his 
individual enterprise soon led him on into new fields where he not only saw 
an opportunity for self-remuneration but also the means to employ business 
methods in the reclamation of material which had formerly been a loss to the 
men who were interested in installing modern plumbing in our present building 
schemes. 

As a result, Sam Jacobson is today the principal owner of the successful 
plumbing supply company known by his name, and located at 215-221 St. Clair 
avenue, Cleveland. 

His wife, formerly Miss Dorothy Gimp, the daughter of Herman and Anna 
Gimp, has been of the greatest assistance to him in establishing himself as a 

135 



man of respect in the Jewish community, while his two small sons are already 
beginning to show signs of inheriting their father's ability. 

Although one more devoted to the Jewish cause can hardly be found, 
Mr. Samuel Jacobson's contributions to charity have not been limited by race, 
creed or religion. The Mt. Sinai Hospital has been the recipient of many kind 
gifts from him, while the war sufferers, both Jewish as well as Gentiles, have 
felt the kindness and good will of this youthful sympathizer. Besides being 
a member of the Anshe Emeth Congregation, Mr. Jacobson is a member of 
several prominent social organizations in Cleveland and is very highly regarded 
by a large circle of acquaintances. 



ABRAHAM JAFFA 

A community is successful or otherwise largely because of the nature of 
the industries it contains. 

One of the principal business houses of Gardner, Mass., is the Gardner 
Metal & Iron Company, of which one of the active partners is Mr. Abraham 
Jaffa. 

Mr. Jaffa was born in Minsk, Guberne, Russia, in 1872, and came to 
America in 1904. He found his way directly to Gardner, Mass., where he 
worked in a junk yard for two years at a very small salary. Then followed 
a year and a half during which he bought and sold 
junk in a small way, after which he opened a yard 
which has grown into the present immense business, 
giving employment to a number of people. 

Mr. Jaffa was married in Russia in 1898 to 
Miss Mollie- Sorodnitzky, and they have one daugh- 
ter who is going to school and also being educated 
in music. 

The Jews are noted for their generosity in mat- 
ters of charity, as it is one of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of their religion, and Mr. Jaffa is no excep- 
tion in this respect. He is most generous in his 
gifts to all charities, regardless of nationality or re- 
ligion, and is also a faithful attendant at the Avas 
Sholom Congregation, of which he is President. 
He is also Past President and Treasurer of I. O. 
B. A. 




WILLIAM JOFFE 

For many centuries the Jew has been the leader in finance — the factor 
which has supplied money to many nations. Yet in all his transactions he 
has proven himself a creator rather than a destructionist, as with few excep- 
tions the Jews have built their fortunes along lines of conservation or as manu- 
facturers and merchants. 

The men who cause the waste of our country to be gathered up and 
diverted to new uses are the greatest of all constructionists. 

136 



Such a man is Wm. Joffe, who was born in Kovna, Guberne, Russia, 
October 10, 1885, his father, Mr. Loeb Joffe, being a great scholar and suc- 
cessful merchant. 

Deciding to come to America after being told by friends of the opportuni- 
ties which the new world offered, he left his native land in July, 1907, and 
after landing, came direct to Sidney, Ohio, and started to buy and sell junk. 
This he continued four years, when he went to Hartford, Conn., and engaged 
in the drygoods business. Here he was very unsuccessful, and out of over 
$5,000 capital invested, left Hartford with but $6.70. Coming back to Sidney, 
he again began peddling junk, and in seven weeks cleared $410. His sister 
having married, he sent her $150 as a wedding present, and with $253, his entire 
capital, went to Van Wert, Ohio, and opened a junk yard, which he still owns, 
although he has a manager to look after his interests, as he is also in partner- 
ship with his brother-in-law, Mr. Jacob Solomon, under the firm name of 
Sidney Iron and Metal Co., and here he devotes his time as financial manager, 
Mr. Solomon being business manager. 

He also has interests in various other companies and considerable real 
estate. 

Mr. Joffe is a member of the Wayne Avenue Congregation of Dayton, 
the Immigration Society of New York and the Misnuch Society of New York. 
He subscribes liberally to all charities, including the Denver and Los Angeles 
sanitariums. 

The Joffe family are very prominent in their native country, the grand- 
father and uncle being Rabbis and very learned men. 



MAX KAHNE 

Although Mr. Max Kahne did not come to America until he was thirty- 
five years of age, a time of life when most men consider that they must have 
their careers very definitely outlined, he has accomplished more than many 
native-born business men who have had twice the number of advantages 
which were allotted to him. 

He was born in Sulzberg, Baden, Germany, September 2, 1846, the son 
of Marks Kahne, a prominent Jew of that locality. He came to America at 
the age of thirty-five and seized the first employment which came to hand, 
which happened' to be in a tannery in New York. Here he remained for two 
years and then went to Baltimore, Md., where he remained, for about the 
same length of time. Deciding that the West offered more opportunity, he 
bought a ticket for Chicago, but on his way was compelled to remain over 
night at Ashtabula, Ohio. The next morning he found some old friends, who 
persuaded him to remain in Ashtabula and found employment for him in a 
tannery. Here he remained for six months, when he decided to go into busi- 
ness for himself and opened a cigar store with newspaper and magazine stand 
attached. He continued this business on a large scale until the time of his 
death, which occurred in Ashtabula, February 10, 1918, and on that day 
Ashtabula lost a public-spirited citizen of sterling moral worth, business integ- 
rity and unusual benevolence, a man who was a loyal Jew, a patriotic American 
and whose every action reflected credit upon his race. He was also a great 
Talmudist and gave to his children a rich heritage of Hebrew knowledge. 

Mr. Kahne was married in Constant, Germany, October 24, 1871, to Miss 
Emma Bernheim, and both have dispensed charity to every worthy cause, irre- 
spective of race or creed. They have two sons, one of whom is a prominent 
doctor in Cleveland, Ohio ; the other taking complete charge of his father's 
business. 

Mrs. Kahne is still very active in works of benevolence and devotes a 
great deal of time, as well as money, to their promotion. 

137 



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BENJAMIN F. KAHN 

The Union Square Theatre, situated at Fourteenth street and Broadway. 
New York City, is in many respects one of the finest and cleanest amusement 
places of its kind. Clean and wholeome burlesque, with a change of program 
ever)' Monday, is what its owner, Mr. Benjamin F. Kahn, had striven to give 
his public for some time past, and he can proudly state that the theatre he oper- 
ates is the only burlesque theatre in the city where the "ladies can feel at 
home," and one can find at each performance as many women as men — a condi- 
tion not found in any other burlesque house. 

Mr. Benjamin F. Kahn was born in Bavaria in the month of May, 1872, 
and was brought to this country as a child of eleven. His father, Elias Kahn, 
established himself in the meat business, and the boy helped after school hours, 
running errands for him. At the age of sixteen Benjamin secured a position 
as stock boy in a wholesale hothouse, where he remained five years, advancing 
himself to the position of traveling salesman. At 
the age of twenty-one, Mr. Kahn entered the em- 
ploy of Sullivan, Harris & Woods as a so-called 
advance agent, and after four years he decided to 
enter the theatrical field in his own right. 

Acting on this impulse, he immediately leased 
from Sullivan, Harris & Woods a few successful 
plays such as "The Fatal Wedding," "Wedded and 
Parted," "At Cripple Creek," "Tangled Relations" 
and other productions, touring the country for a 
number of years. The venture proved a tremen- 
dous success, and towards the close of 1906 he 
became a manager for the various vaudeville thea- 
tres operated by the B. F. Keith combination. 
While managing Keith's Union Square Theatre, 
B. F. Keith's lease expired and Mr. Kahn saw that 
his employers were not going to renew it. In 1914 

he renewed, the lease for himself, remodeled the entire theatre and today he 
owns one of the most splendid amusement places in New York City. He 
conceived the idea and originated "The Family Stock Burlesque," housing the 
same comedians the entire season and giving the public clean and wholesome 
burlesque. The theatre is very comfortable and courtesy is shown to its 
patrons even by the least important clerk and emplove. 

There is a green room, richly provided with literature, where employes 
can lounge around and spend their leisure time. Mr. Kahn gives his personal 
attention to the wants of his patrons, and can be found at the theatre every 
day in the week from 9 o'clock in the morning until 11 o'clock at night. 

A really bright spot in the whole undertaking is Mr. Kahn's devotion to 
the wants of his employes. Every year he arranges a ball for their benefit. 
At the beginning of the war he volunteered his services to the government, 
but as he is above military age, he could not be accepted into the army. He 
therefore organized the Union Square Home Defense League, which consists 
of his male employes, with Mr. Kahn as their captain. They hold regular 
drills at the Sixteenth Precinct Police Station. 

Mr. Kahn is a member of the Mount Neboh Temple and a liberal con- 
tributor to charities. He is a Master Mason, an Elk, a Knight of Pythias, and 
belongs to the orders B'nai B'rith and the Eagles. He is married, his wife 
being the former Miss Sadie Seigler of Nashville, Tenn., to whom he was mar- 
ried in April, 1906. They have one son, Edgar. 

Among his documents Mr. Kahn treasures a letter from the police depart- 
ment, in which we find the statement that during its existence never was there 
any trouble at the theatre of any kind which would necessitate the interference 
of the police. 



I.W 



HENRY ELI KAHN 



A man who has attained high standing, success and distinction in some 
particular field of his chosen profession is not always one from whom a com- 
munity may expect much service or ready co-operation. Mr. Henry Eli Kahn 
of Houston, Texas, has, however, the happy faculty and the generous dispo- 
sition to combine the work of a busy, well-known and widely-extended law 
practice with the interests and activities of a highly commendable religious, 
social and civic nature. 

Mr. Kahn was born to his parents, Pauline and Anselm Kahn, on June 
26, 1876, at Schirhoffen, Alsace. His grandfather, Samuel, was the Rabbi of 
his native town, and Mr. Kahn accordingly was imbued with the ideal of edu- 
cation from his earliest childhood. At the age of eleven he came, accompanied 
by his sister, to this country, and went to Gainesville, Texas, where his two 
brothers resided. Upon his arrival there he at once entered the public schools 
and within a period of eight years he acquired a thor- 
ough knowledge of English. Upon his graduation, 
June 16, 1895, he was admitted to the University of 
Texas, and four years later, on June 16, 1899, he was 
graduated as a lawyer. His admission to the bar by 
the Supreme Court of Texas immediately followed his 
graduation, as did also his license to the state courts 
and to the Supreme Court of the United States. 

With a thorough preparation for his chosen field 
of labor, Mr. Kahn entered into partnership with an- 
other well-known attorney of Houston, and helped 
greatly to make the law firm of Meek & Kahn, whose 
offices are in the Hoffman Building, famous, not only 
in Houston, but throughout Texas. And, while his 
firm does a general practice, Mr. Kahn has gained a 
wide and favorable reputation through his able han- 
dling of criminal cases. . 

Aside from the high standing Mr. Kahn enjoys in his profession, he 
occupies also a place of prominence in the Jewish community of Houston and 
in the city generally. With the former he is affiliated through his interests and 
activities of a religious and charitable character, while with the latter he is 
prominently connected through the services which he has rendered in various 
civic movements of a progressive and altruistic character. He is particularly 
popular and highly esteemed in fraternal circles, having held the position of 
Chancellor Commander in the order of Knights of Pythias and having filled 
offices of similar honor and distinction in the Woodmen of the World and 
many other organizations. 

On December 28, 1910, Mr. Kahn was married to Miss Lottie Beatrice 
Schermann, an accomplished and charming young lady of Goshen, Ind., and 
their union has been blessed with a lovely child, Betty Rose. 




LEON I. KAHN 



In the thriving and flourishing city of Shreveport, La., the citizens have 
for several years been in the habit of judging the worth and value of any new 
enterprise along civic lines by the approval or disapproval of Commissioner 
Leon Isaac Kahn. 

Mr. Kahn was born in Shreveport, November 21, 1870. His parents, 
Isaac and Fannie Kahn, came originally from Alsace. He received his educa- 
tion in private schools of his home town and later attended the Soule College 

139 




of New Orleans and the Thatcher Military School. Upon leaving school, he 
took up a business career and is at present connected with the Levy Realty 
and Planting Co. His chief interests^and activities are, however, to be found 
along civic and progressive lines. And it is here that he has established an en- 
viable record for public-spiritedness, political integrity and intelligent leader- 
ship. 

To what extent the citizens of Shreveport have acquired a feeling of 
implicit trust and confidence in Mr. Kahn's ability and integrity may be gauged 
by the fact that they placed him at the head of public 
utilities and made him Commissioner of the water and 
sewerage department, which position he has filled with 
honor and credit since 1914. Since his election to the 
position of Commissioner many progressive measures 
have been adopted by the city administration chiefly 
through the effort and instrumentality of Mr. Kahn. 
Among these may be mentioned the successful han- 
dling by his department of a bond issue of $1,250,000, 
which enabled the city to acquire its efficient water 
and sewerage system ; the establishment of the Shreve- 
port Municipal Market, which has proved of inesti- 
mable benefit both to the farmers of Caddo Parish 
and the households of Shreveport; the organization of 
a Municipal Employment Bureau, whereby the prob- 
lem of unemployment has to a large measure been 
solved and the preventable cases of- poverty and unrest I ' effln *• Kahn 

among the unemployed have been greatly checked ; and the institution of public 
instruction and practical demonstrations in the art of canning fruits and vege- 
tables, which has promoted to a very high degree the habit of thrift and indus- 
try on the part of the Shreveport housewives. 

Aside from the various positions Mr. Kahn occupies in a political way, 
he has rendered valuable services also to numerous organizations of a pureiy 
charitable or civic character. Thus he is at the present time the Vice President 
of the Southwestern Water Works Association, which includes among its 
membership distinguished men from seven southwestern states ; he is a mem- 
ber of the Advertisers' Club of America, a Director and officer of the Lions' 
Club, a charter member of the Elks, a member of the League of American 
Municipalities, a member of the American Water Works Association, a Di- 
rector of the War Savings Stamps Committee and Chairman of the Campaign 
Committee of the War Camp Community Recreation Fund. In the Jewish 
Community, too, Mr. Kahn has always taken an active interest. He is promi- 
nently identified with the local congregation and the B'nai B'rith Lodge and 
holds the position of President of the Columbia Club. 

Mr. Kahn is pleasantly domiciled with his wife, who was Miss Juliette 
Levy, the daughter of the late Captain Simon Levy, to whom he was married 
on June 15, 1898, and his daughter, Leona Fannie, in their beautiful home at 
528 Travis street. 

That the city of Shreveport is cognizant and appreciative of Mr. Kahn's 
services may be seen from a tribute which appeared recently in the local daily 
press and in which a prominent citizen summarizes Mr. Kahn's work ana 
worth in the following paragraph : 

"Shreveport is to be congratulated upon having the services of Mr. Kahn, 
and I believe I have voiced the sentiments of the majority of our citizens in 
saying to him that we deeply appreciate his untiring efforts in our city's behalf." 



140 



ISAAC KAMINSKY 

If one wants to acquaint himself with the Jewish immigrant who has 
achieved success in this, the greatest Jewish community in the history of Jewry, 
he cannot afford to overlook Mr. Isaac Kaminsky, the head of the well-known 
cloak-making establishment bearing his name at No. 15 to 19 East Twenty- 
sixth street, New York. Mr. Kaminsky should not be overlooked, because of 
his standing and importance in the community, and furthermore, because of 
the extremely interesting story which his upward climb on Fame's ladder 
furnishes. 

Mr. Kaminsky first saw the light of day on November 1, 1873, in Elie, 
Province of Minsk, where his father was a lumber dealer of prominence. 
.By a peculiar coincidence he landed in this glorious land of liberty on Inde- 
pendence Day, 1889. That he is not a parvenu or one whose head has been 
turned by material success is evidenced by the feeling of pride with which he 
recounts his earlier struggles and his trials and tribulations. Accompanied by 
his mother and a younger sister he arrived in New York with barely enough 
money with which to send a telegram to his brother. He had a sister living 
in Newark, but lacked the necessary funds with which to send her a telegram 
apprising her of his arrival. When he came over here, most of the immigrant 
Jewish population was more or less directly concerned with the cloak and suit 
industry, and when he landed the first great strike of workers in that industry 
was then in an advanced stage, and he found poverty and troublous conditions 
everywhere: and when he heard of the struggles of the workingmen, little did 
he dream that at some future day he himself would be one of the wealthy 
manufacturers. 

Seeing that his brother could do nothing for him, he sought out his sister 
in Newark, taking his mother and his other sister with him, determined to 
make his way for them. In Newark the same deplorable conditions greeted 
him. His brother-in-law was out of work and his sister eked out a miserable 
existence in a very small shop. While in the store Mr. Kaminsky noticed that 
quite a few people purchased fly-paper, and thought it would be a good idea 
to go out and peddle this article. His sister laughed at the idea, but Mr. 
Kaniinsky's natural business instincts prevailed and he went out and made 
12 cents as the fruit of his first day's efforts. Then he sold matches, and later 
carried a stock of dry goods and chair seats on his back, going from house to 
house. When the strike was settled, he worked at cloakmaking, and before 
two years had passed he went into business for himself, with a capital of $350. 
His first shop was on East Broadway, where he paid $14 a month rent, and his 
progress .may be gleaned by his several successive moves and the increased 
rent he pays — $10,500 per year — in his present premises, where he has 350 
people on his payroll. He is also financially interested in another large cloak 
concern, is the President of a prominent realty company, and the Treasurer of 
a large moving picture corporation. 

Mr. Kaminsky is a member of the Congregation Poel Zedek Anshei Elie 
on Forsyth street, of which his brother is President. His charities are innu- 
merable and he gives with a free hand wherever and whenever his aid is called 
upon. He is one of the standing figures in the Bronx, where he resides, and is 
a member of the Congregation Kehillath Israel. He is a firm advocate of the 
Young Men's Hebrew Association, to which he once belonged, and which he 
advises every young man to affiliate with. He is also a Free Mason. 

He married in 1895 and is a son-in-law of the famous Rabbi of Wolk- 
owishk. He has five children and has provided the best of education for 
them. His oldest daughter, Mollie S., was married on the 6th of March, 1917, 
to Mr. Irving Stein, wdiose father is the owner of the well-known establish- 
ment of Stein & Blane, high-class ladies' tailors and furriers. 



HI 



HARRY KANDER 

The Jew has been subjected to centuries of persecution, yet through all 
the weary years the hunger for knowledge has ever been a salient character- 
istic. No matter how humble the home, it still contains within its walls the 
treasures of Jewish literature which are conned by the evening lamp after the 
day's work is done and handed down from father to son as a priceless heritage. 

In reviewing the life history of Mr. Harry Kander, one is much im- 
pressed by the manner in which he took advantage of the meager advantages 
open to him and made the most of adverse circumstances. 

He was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in April, 1884, the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Mordcha Leib Kander, farmers in their district. He came to 
America in the summer of 1894 and landed in New York. Having a brother 
in Toledo, Ohio, he went direct to that city. Here he went to school and sold 
papers on the streets after school hours. 

Two years later he was obliged to end his school days and start upon the 
more serious problems of finding his life work. His beginning was humble 
as has been the experience of many men who have won marked success in life. 

The first employment he obtained was in a junk yard at $3 per week. By 
steady, persistent industry, in five years he had been advanced to $10 per 
week and had saved $200. Feeling that a smaller town offered him more 
opportunity, he went to Bowling Green, Ohio, and invested his small capital 
in the iron and metal business. He was successful from the beginning, and 
now does a very large business under the firm name of H. Kander & Co. 

He was married in August, 19.13, to Miss Bessie Kander, and they have 
one young son. 

Mr. Kander's advice to young persons just starting out in the world is a 
brief summary of the policy which is so successfully operating in his own 
career. He says, "Get a job, work hard, save your money, go into business 
and be honest." 

Mr. Kander is a member of the Congregation of Toledo, Ohio, B'nai 
B'rith, Knights of Pythias and Odd Fellows, and both himself and wife con- 
tribute most generously to all charities, prominent among which should be. 
mentioned Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums. 



JACOB KAPLAN 

The first principle underlying all Jewish law was that of liberty. Accord- 
ing to their jurisprudence, all men, heathen or Israelite, were equal before the 
tribunal, and no caste distinctions were ever made. 

It is not strange, therefore, that America, the land where liberty is founded 
upon these same Judaic dispensations, should become a haven for this op- 
pressed people. 

Some such feeling probably unconsciously guided young Jacob Kaplan 
when he made his decision to come to the land of the free. 

He was born in Odessa, Russia, December 25, 1874, his father being 
Moshe Kaplan, Twei Socher Jewish scholar. 

He came to America in the summer of 1885, working for two seasons on 
a sugar plantation near New Orleans for 60 cents per day. He then went to 
St. Louis, where he was with the police department for twentv-one years. 
Deciding that this held no further opportunities for him, he decided to go into 
business for himself, so went to Los Angeles, where he ran a commission 
house, handling fruits. He then went to Toledo, Ohio, and engaged in the 
same business. Later he opened an iron and metal yard, where he has been 
most successful and has accumulated considerable wealth. 

142 



Mr. Kaplan was twice married: In St. Louis, May 5, 1891, to Miss 
Rachel Applebaum, and nine years ago in Los Angeles to Miss Chai Saksi. 
They have three children, two boys and one girl, all of whom will receive 
excellent educations. 

Mr. Kaplan is very prominently connected with various Jewish organiza- 
tions, being President of Anshe Scwort, President of Montefore Society, the 
American Jewish Aid Society and is active in every Jewish movement. 

He contributes liberally to all charities and is a fine type of active, useful 
citizen. 



BENJAMIN KAPLAN 

The watchword of all modernism is "Progress" ; from time immemorial 
the Jew has been its chief exponent. This is to a considerable extent accounted 
for from the fact that education is given so much attention and is so universal 
among the Jews. 

Their literature and laws have come through repression and persecution, 
from antiquity, to feel again the breath of life breathed from a modern era. 
This was true in the case of the Kaplan family, where scholarship has ever 
been regarded as a first consideration. 

The subject of our biography, Mr. Benjamin Kaplan, was born in Volna, 
Guberne, Russia, March 3, 1867. His father, Mr. Abraham Kaplan, was a 
wine merchant of his native town and was very well educated. 

He was married in 1888 to Miss Edith Birrenbaum, and a few years later 
when he decided to try his fortunes in America, she remained behind in the 
old home to care for her children until such time as her husband could become 
established and send for her. 

When Mr. Kaplan landed in New York he began working in a shirt fac- 
tory for $3 per week, where he continued for eighteen months. Going to 
Cleveland, he spent the next year and a half in peddling brooms and other 
commodities, saving up enough monej' to send for his wife and children. 

It was surely a happy and fortunate day for the Kaplans when the wife 
and mother landed in America, as, in all the after years, she was not only of 
the utmost assistance to him in conducting the business, but was also a con- 
stant source of inspiration and sympathy, and he attributes much of his subse- 
quent success to her unceasing efforts. 

After the arrival of his wife, he went to Monroeville, Ohio, where he 
engaged in the junk business. He also tried the grocery business in Cleveland, 
but a fire destroyed his entire stock, on which he had no insurance, and he 
was obliged to start over again with no assets excepting his reputation for 
honesty and ability. 

Coming to Upper Sandusky, Ohio, he started in the junk business, where 
he has been located ever since, and where he has been unusually successful. 

The Kaplans have six children, who, true to the family ideals, have all 
been well educated. 

Mr. Kaplan advises every progressive young man to work hard, save his 
money, and go into business for himself. This is the policy upon which his 
own success was founded. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kaplan are very charitable, contributing to Los Angeles 
and Denver sanitariums as well as all local philanthropies. 



143 



ISAAC KAPLAN 

During times of national stress, such as we are passing through today, 
many of us are brought to realize the difficulties which have been met and 
overcome by men who have acted as pioneers in the development of certain 
industries. Conservation is now the watchword which is helping us win the 
war, and to the dealers in scrap iron and metal we owe much of our present 
ability to handle the vast problems which are confronting us. 

Prominent in this group of men we wish to mention the name of Air. 
Isaac Kaplan of Detroit, Mich., owner and manager of the National Smelting 
and Refining Company at ng Illinois street. 

He was born in Russia, September 27, 1865, the son of Harry and Esther 
Kaplan, his father being a teacher and highly- educated man. 

He came to America nineteen years ago, and brought with him a valuable 
experience, having bought metal in Russia. As soon as he landed on our 
shores he engaged in the same line, and the first five years were very hard 
ones, as he was unable to bring his family to this country until the expiration 
of that time. 

His first experience was in St. Louis, where he peddled and collected 
junk for three years. He then went to Detroit and continued in the same way 
for two years, when he brought his family from Russia, and having exhausted 
his entire finances, borrowed fifty dollars from a friend and started in business 
at 181 Clinton street. Shortly after the business of the country was para- 
lyzed by a panic and during this time the business only netted himself and 
his daughter seven dollars a week, and, by the way, we feel that his daughter, 
Eva, is worthy of special mention, as she has assisted her father since she was 
eleven years old and is possessed of such remarkable business ability that she 
is the active head of the business during all of his absences. 

He continued on Clinton street for seven years, his business showing a 
steady and healthy growth, and has been at his present location for about five 
years, where he has been exceedingly successful. 

Some time ago he was forced by ill health to temporarily retire, and is 
spending this winter, accompanied by his' family, in Asheville, N. C. 

Mr. Kaplan was married to Miss Sarah Mendelsohn, and they have nine 
children, three boys and six girls. 

Mr. Kaplan is very active in charities, having purchased a house on East 
Warren avenue, where he formed a society which maintains the building as 
a kindergarten and school for small children. Hebrew is taught here as well 
as regular course of study. He is also a member of the Michigan Lodge, O. 
B. A., and although he is active in five different Jewish societies, he is best 
known by his intimates as the friend of all men, whether Christian or Jew. 



JOSEPH KARP 

Mr. Joseph Karp, who is the owner of the Ohio Auto Company, East 
Fifty-fifth street and Euclid avenue, in Cleveland, Ohio, is a typical example 
of devotion which has raised him above the ordinary level of a successful 
merchant and has made his reputation among his many friends a thing of more 
than passing regard. 

Mr. Karp was born and reared in the city of Tulzen, Russia, some thirty- 
five years ago, the son of Moses and Rachel Karp. His mother still lives in 
Europe. In his early manhood he went to South Africa, where in the course 
of ten years he made a creditable fortune. But his place of residence was 
not satisfactory, so he decided to give up his business connections and settle 

144 



in the United States. He came to Cleveland with a capital of $12,000 in cash, 
and went into the grocery and real estate business, in which he stayed just long 
enough to lose his fortune. It was a severe blow, but it did not crush his 
spirit, as Joseph Karp was made of the stuff which will not admit of reverses 
standing in the way of future success. He decided to start life anew ; little 
by little his money came back to him until he became the owner of the above- 
mentioned Ohio Auto Company, and. in addition, is interested in the scrap 
iron and metal business and considered a wealthy man. 

All this came in a remarkably short time. Mr. Karp has always retained 
the esteem and regard of his friends and business associates and he is again 
in a position to contribute freely to all causes that demand his aid and attention. 

In 1005 Mr. Karp was married to Miss Anna Goldstein, and the couple 
are the parents of three children. Morton. Ruth and Sanford. 

Asked what he considered the principle of success in life. Mr. Karp 
answered: "Honesty. I have traveled all around the world and have experi- 
enced much. I am convinced that only honesty will vield a true reward. - ' 



EENJAMIN KARPF 



Some people require decades to achieve a prominent success. Others 
acquire the greatest success in a short time, even though the circumstances 
under which thev work offer an equal handicap. YVe can find a strong proof 
of this axiom in Mr. Benjamin Karpf, of 346 Broad street. Savannah, Ga. Mr. 
Karpf arrived in this country in 1904, at a time 
when many Jewish immigrants who could not 
achieve a success have positively declared that 
"America is already played out." and that the "good 
days of yore are gone forever." But all these say- 
ings did not deter Mr. Karpf from trying, and that 
trying has its advantages can easily be demonstrated 
by the fact that Mr. Karpf is one of the most suc- 
cessful business men of Savannah and is reputed to 
lie of great wealth. 

Mr. Karpf was born on the 15th of February. 
1886, in Soklow. Galicia. the son of Simon and 
Frume Karpf. He comes from a wealthy and re- 
spectable Galician family and received a good Jew- 
ish education. 

When Mr. Karpf came to America, he settled 
in Xew York and stayed there for three years, en- 
gaged as a salesman of eggs. He then went to Savannah, where he engaged in 
the business of ladies' "readv-to-wear," and he made a tremendous success in 
his new undertaking. He is also a director in The Mercantile Bank and Trust 
Company, a former director of the Hebrew School of Savannah, and generally 
interested in every Jewish movement in the city. 

Mr. Karpf was married on June 30. iqoS. to Miss Gussie Rabhen, who 
had helped him to his success, and the couple are the proud parents of three 
children. Svlvia, Lucia and Beatrice. 




MAX KARPEL 

It was Lincoln who said, "All that I am or hope to be I owe to my angel 
mother." Many a man in later life has been able to trace a large share of his 
success to the early influence of his mother's strong character and personality. 

Mr. Max Karpel, whose education was largely attained within the walls 
of his home and in the great world of business, feels that he is largely in- 
debted to his mother's intelligence and influence. 

Mr. Karpel was born in Charkow, Hungary, April 8, 1871, his father, 
Jacob Karpel, being an agriculturist. At the age of nineteen he came to 
America, landing in Philadelphia, Pa., where he peddled notions for two 
years. He then went to Cleveland, Ohio, and opened a grocery 'store, which 
he continued for three years. Selling the grocery, he went to Ashtabula, Ohio, 
and during the first year peddled dry goods. Deciding to invest his small 
capital in a business of his own, he opened a men's clothing and general fur- 
nishings store, which has grown into the large institution he is so successfully 
managing at the present time. 

Mr. Karpel was married in Cleveland, Ohio, November 2, 1909, to Miss 
Mollie Strauss, whose father, Albert Strauss, is one of the most prominent 
Jews in Ashtabula. They have two children. 

Never forgetting his early struggles and the fact that he for some time 
was obliged to do without everything but the bare necessities of life, Mr. Kar- 
pel is always mindful of those in less fortunate circumstances than himself, 
and it is one of his greatest pleasures to help others to a new start in life. He 
belongs to that class of citizens who represent the best assets of a community. 

Among his fraternal connections may be mentioned the Elks and Masons. 
He is also an a.rdent supporter of all Jewish organizations, although he con- 
tributes indiscriminately to charities regardless of race or religion. 

While Mr. Karpel has succeeded without the aid of much scholastic 
training, it has caused him to feel a keen appreciation of the advantages he 
was not able to enjoy, and he advises every young man to obtain all the educa- 
tion possible. The next step towards success is to find out what his abilities 
best fit him for and then attend strictly to business. These principles Mr. 
Karpel regards as the secrets of success. 



ABE KASLE 

One of the great problems confronting the young man of today is that 
of selecting a permanent vocation suitable to his abilities. 

I recall a little advertisement which read "There is gunpowder in every 
man," and this does not apply to the explosive element which is being used 
with murderous intent upon the fields of battle-torn Europe. It means that 
latent force hidden within the mental faculties of the human being which 
needs but the spark of definite ambitions to ignite it. That so few men have 
found their real mission in life is largely due to a lack of earnestness of 
purpose. 

This quality we do not find lacking in Mr. Abe Kasle who came to 
America without money or other unusual opportunities. 

Mr. Kasle was born in Wollin, Russia, April 1, 1895, and when but four- 
teen years of age, came to America where he had a brother residing. On 
July 21, 1909, we find him transplanted to American soil where he imme- 
diately started to peddle junk. After nine months of very hard work he was 
able to repay every cent of his indebtedness to his brother, and continued 
profitably in this line for two years. He then decided to try the cigar making 

146 



trade, but did not find it to his liking so he moved to Toledo, where he worked 
for his brother in the junk business for two years. After another short period 
spent in Detroit, he decided to return to Toledo, and invested his savings in 
the Kasle Iron & Metal Company where he remained for eighteen months. 
He then decided to go into the wholesale scrap and iron business, in which he 
has been exceedingly successful. 

Mr. Kasle was married February 14, 1914, to Miss Pearl Silverstein, and 
they have one son and one daughter. 

Mr. Kasle is a member of the Anshe Sfard Congregation of which he is 
also second Trustee, and is most generous in his contributions to charities. 



SAMUEL KASLE 

In the history of every business success, the big share of credit is due 
the man who, with practically no assistance, surmounts obstacles and arrives 
at the realization of his ideals. These are the men to whom the business world 
is ever ready to pay homage. 

Thus it is that we find Mr. Samuel Kasle occupying a very prominent 
position in the business interests of Toledo, Ohio. Mr. Kasle was born in 
Wollin, Russia, January 8, 1887, the son of Hyman and Fanny Kasle. When 
but nineteen years of age he left his native land and arrived in New York, 
where he worked for four weeks as a buttonhole maker. He did not find this 
occupation to his liking so he went to Monroe, Mich., and in order to gain 
experience in the business that was to prove his future life work, he peddled 
junk for one year. At the expiration of this time he opened a yard where he 
remained four years. In the meantime he had been sending to Europe for 
his brothers whom he wished to give an opportunity to share in his success, 
and they then came to Toledo, Ohio, where he opened a small retail scrap yard. 
This modest venture grew into the present large wholesale business, which is 
one of the largest in the city. 

We do not think this biography would be complete without reference to 
Mr. Kasle's home life, which is ideal in every respect. He was married June 
27, 191 1, to Miss Hannah N. Tuschman of Toledo, Ohio, and they have two 
fine children, one boy and one girl. 

Mr. Kasle never fails to remember the early days of his struggle toward 
affluence and is consequently most generous to those in less fortunate circum- 
stances than himself, contributing most liberally to the various charities which 
come to his attention. He is Treasurer of Anshe Scfort Congregation where 
his services and liberal contributions are much appreciated. 



SAMUEL KATZENSTEIN 

There is a hidden chord in every man's nature which, if touched by just 
the right influences, will vibrate to the urge of half-remembered dreams and 
ambitions. Motives scarcely possible of self-analysis have sent many a man 
to the ends of the world in search of opportunities which never cease beckoning 
them on. 

Thus we find Samuel Katzenstein at the age of nineteen bidding farewell 
to his native land and coming to America. 

He was born in Achenhausen. Germany, May 25, 1847, tne son °f Joseph 

147 



and Sarah Katzenstein, his father being- a grain merchant of his native com- 
munity. 

Like many other young immigrants, Mr. Katzenstein had a hard struggle 
for the first few years, finally coming to Alliance, Ohio, where he found em- 
ployment clerking until he embarked in the general dry goods business with a 
Mr. Seidenbach under the firm name of Seidenbach & katzenstein. This part- 
nership lasted for three years, when Mr. Katzenstein bought over the entire 
business and conducted it most successfully for forty years. In 1916 he 
retired from active service and his brothers are now conducting the business. 

An interesting sidelight on the character of Mr. Katzenstein is the fact 
that upon his arrival in Alliance he found there was no Jewish Sunday school, 
so he organized one, that the Jewish children of Alliance might have the bene- 
fits of Hebrew teaching. The memory of this Sunday school which he con- 
ducted so long and so successfully is one of the most pleasant incidents of his 
life. 

He was married in 1876 to Miss Marie Hecht of New York, a woman of 
charming and kindly personality. 

Mr. Katzenstein is a member of Rabbi Woolsey's Temple, Temple of Israel, 
B'nai B'rith, Chamber of Commerce and in 1898 was elected to the city coun- 
cil. He is also the original organizer of the Ladies' Auxiliary. 

His advice to young men is "to be a good Jew, respect your elders and 
give every one a square deal." 



JOSEPH M. KASTNER 

In former years it was deemed quite necessary that every young man 
should be taught some trade, regardless of whether or not he chose to follow 
it in later life. 

While this old fashioned principle had its disadvantages when the time 
spent in learning it was taken into consideration, at the same time it has been 
the means to an end for many a struggling young man. 

When Joseph Kastner landed in America he had many vague, half-formed 
longings for a commercial career, but no capital with which to begin, so, 
having been taught the trade of a cabinet maker, he at once turned to this 
as a means of support and also saved enough money for his later venture. 

He was born in Potolsky, Guberne, Russia, October 25, 1889, his father 
being a grain dealer of his native city. 

He came to America August 14, 1907, landing in Baltimore, Md. He did 
not remain there, however, but went direct to Dayton, Ohio, and began work- 
ing at his trade of cabinet maker. 

Later he spent a year in Chicago working at the same trade, and again 
four years in Dayton. 

By this time he had accumulated a small capital which he decided to invest 
in some business, so he went to Piqua, Ohio, and bought an iron and metal 
yard, where he has been very successful. 

He was married March 29, 1914, to Miss Sarah Colp of Xenia, Ohio, 
and we feel that this biography would be incomplete without special mention 
of the charitable activities of the lady who, by her generous, although unos- 
tentatious giving, has done an untold amount of good in Piqua. 

The charitable activities of the Kastners are not confined to their home 
town, as they are liberal contributors to Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals. 

The Y. M. C. A. and Red Cross have also received a generous share of 
their philanthropy. 

Mr. Kastner is a prominent man in fraternal organizations, being identi- 
fied with the Knights of Pythias and the Masons. He is also a member of the 
Jewish Congregation of Piqua and B'nai B'rith. 

148 



EDGAR J. KAUFMANN 

The name Kaufmann has for two generations been associated in the 
minds of the people of western Pennsylvania with merchandising on a large 
scale. Before coming to America in the middle of the nineteenth century, the 
Kaufmann brothers resided in Mannheim, Germany, where their father was 
well known as a cattle dealer. In Pittsburgh these four ( Isaac, Jacob, Henry 
and Morris ) created "The Big Store," which has sold "Everything under the 
sun" to a greater clientele than any other store between New York and Chi- 
cago. This wonderful institution . is now largely in the hands of one of the 
younger representatives of the Kaufmann family, Edgar J. Kaufmann, a son 
of Morris" 

Edgar J. Kaufmann was born November i, 1885, in Pittsburgh, Pa., his 
parents being Morris (deceased in the fall of 1917) and Betty (Wolf). He 
received his education in the public schools of Pittsburgh ; he attended a college 
preparatory school in Ithaca, N. Y., and later studied at Yale University. His 
business career started at the age of twenty, when he entered actively a num- 
ber of departments of "The Big Store." Today Mr. Kaufmann is Secretary 
and Treasurer of the company, and in the short time he has served in this 
capacity he revolutionized the system under which it is run, making it a 
cosmopolitan institution, a unique establishment, with hardly another like it in 
the country. 

The personality of the man is what chiefly interests the chronicler, for 
after one is" in Mr. Kaufmann's presence but a few moments one is impressed 
with a certain personal charm of his which is almost inexplicable. He gives 
all who associate with him the feeling that he is master of the situation. One 
realizes in his presence a certain nervous tension and a certain mental activity, 
which is unusual and which is a recognized characteristic of leaders of men. 

Sons of rich men have often been known to conduct themsleves as if their 
sole task in life was to spend their father's fortune. Others, however, and of 
whom there are too few, similarly endowed, have regarded their inheritance 
as a public trust, as a responsibility and as a social duty. They have shown 
themselves to be possessed of vision, of imagination, and of an appreciation of 
the principles of co-operation. Mr. Kaufmann belongs, beyond a doubt, in the 
second group. He has an inordinate capacity for hard work and enthusiasm 
for getting results. 

It is not important to record the variety of activities of Mr. Kaufmann, nor 
their extent; that would serve no end in itself, unless perhaps as indication of 
what may be expected from this comparatively young man in the future, in 
commerce and industry, and in civics and philanthropy. In addition to his 
being associated with the department store business, Mr. Kaufmann is inter- 
ested in the automobile business, steel manufacturing, and in the theatre busi- 
ness. Mr. Kaufmann is an honorary Director of the Y. M. H. A. of Pitts- 
burgh, one of the Trustees of the Irene Kaufmann Settlement and a member of 
the Hebrew Institute. He is actively connected with and a life member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, of the Civic Club and also of the Americus Club. He 
is a life member of the Loyal Order of Moose. He belongs to the City Ath- 
letic Club of New York, the Yale Club of New York, the Excelsior Club of 
Cleveland, the Athletic Club of Chicago, the Athletic Club of Detroit. He is 
affiliated with the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, and supports 
in addition to the local charities, the Hebrew Union College of Cincinnati, the 
National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives of Denver. 

During the industrial depression of 1913 and 1914, when hundreds of 
workmen were thrown out of employment and immediate relief was a great 
necessity, Mr. Kaufmann was active Chairman of the Bundle Day Committee. 
The energy and enthusiasm which Mr. Kaufmann usually displays in his busi- 
ness he threw into this campaign. Two hundred and eighty thousand bundles 
of discarded clothing were collected and distributed among the poor. When 
the following year a campaign was launched in Pittsburgh in behalf of Belgian 
relief, again Mr. Kaufmann showed his wonderful organizing ability. He 

149 



was responsible for the slogan, "A sack of flour for Belgium" ; 282,000 sacks 
of flour were thus collected. 

Early in 1917 there was in American Jewry an agitation for an American 
, Jewish Congress to be held in Washington. The purpose was to bring to the 
notice of the powers the fact that the Jew as an international figure deserves 
recognition when the treaty of peace is to be signed. Some elements of the 
community were rather lukewarm to the whole proposition, the Yiddish-speak- 
ing element was the sole sponsor of the congress movement. It is regarded 
today as a fortunate thing in the history of the Jewish community of Pitts- 
burgh that Edgar J. Kaufmann decided to place his name before the qualified 
electors of the city for the office of delegate to the Jewish Congress, and fur- 
thermore, to work hard to secure such election. He injected an interest into 
the movement, a universal interest as was never known before in the communal 
life of the Jews of Pittsburgh. Here again Mr. Kaufmann's peculiar genius 
for magnitude and for "doing things big" was evident. His personal popular- 
it}', his friendship with hundreds of persons in every walk of life, the essential 
democracy in his personality, and the method of compaigning in person 
"brought out the vote," to use a common political phrase. He helped to give 
serious import to a phase of Jewish life which heretofore received scant 
recognition. Thousands of people voted, thanks to Edgar J. Kaufmann. 

On June 22, 1909, Mr. Kaufmann married his first cousin, Lillian S. 
Kaufmann, the only daughter of Isaac, mentioned above. They have one 
child, a son, Edgar, Jr., aged eight. Mrs. Kaufmann is an intellectual, well- 
read woman, in all respects a fitting companion to her husband. Mr. Kauf- 
mann is a member of the Rodef Shalom Synagogue, of the Westmoreland 
Country Club and of the Concordia Club. 



HENRY KEMPER 

Any young man who, without special educational advantages, can, at the 
age of twenty-five, attain a prominent place for himself in the business life 
of his community, is worthy of a place in a biographical work of this kind. 

Henry Kemper was fortunate in one respect. He was born in America, 
and did not have to start life with the handicap of a foreign language and 
strange customs, but aside from that he was obliged to overcome as many 
obstacles as the average immigrant Jew seeking fortune at our gates. 

He was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., January 1, 1893, an( l attended the public 
schools until fourteen years of age, which enabled him to complete his grammar 
grades. 

At that time it became necessary for him to earn his own living, so he 

obtained employment peddling junk, as he was anxious to learn the business 

. and also to save some money with which he might go into business for himself. 

Within four years he had accomplished both purposes, and going to Nor- 
walk, Ohio, he opened an iron and metal yard, where he has since remained, 
and is today firmly established in the commercial life of the community, doing 
a big business and supporting his parents. 

Many pages of history and biography have been devoted to the advice 
which those of advanced years and deep experience have to offer to the 
young, and the writer was anxious to know what would be the point of view 
of a successful young business man such as Mr. Kemper. His reply proves 
that he must have early realized the necessity of hard work and square business 
methods, as he said: 

"Be industrious, always honest, and live up to all obligations." 

These principles, coupled with much natural ability, have placed Mr. 
Kemper, at the age of twenty-five, well on the high road to success. 

The future with its brilliant opportunities lies before him, and it is safe 
to predict that he will yet lie a national power in the country's financial life. 

150 



OTTO KAUFMANN 

There are few, if any. Jews in America whose popularity and importance 
can in any way be compared with that of Otto Kaufmann of Youngstown, 
Ohio. Xot only is Mr. Kaufmann a representative citizen of the highest type, 
but in the domain of philanthropy and social work his is a tremendous power 
for good and an unwonted and never-ceasing energy. 

He was born in Ladenburg. Germany, on the 24th of October, 1866, the 
son of Ferdinand and Fannie Kaufmann. and came to America in 1885, when 
but nineteen years of age. He was. therefore, young enough to effect a com- 
plete assimilation to American ideals and methods of thinking, and young 
enough to give up any or all of his old world traits. On the other hand, he 
was old enough to amalgamate his European training to the opportunities of 
America, creating within himself a sweet and harmonious synthesis. 

Mr. Kaufmann's first job in the new world was to become a clerk in New 
York at $6 per week. Ten years ago he came to Youngstown. and in due 
time became a manufacturer of gas mantles and lamps, organizing the Block 
Gas Mantle Company, and becoming its President. His venture proved a tre- 
mendous success and made it possible for Mr. Kaufmann to devote time and 
energy to the interests of his fellow men "less fortunate than ourselves." 

Mr. Kaufmann is the active head of the War Sufferers' Committee of 
Youngstown. a Trustee in the Temple and member of many charity organiza- 
tions. 

He was married to Miss Rose Haber of Xew York City and four children 
have blessed their union, named Edward S.. who is in the army ; "William D., 
Ferdinand J., and Theodore A. 

In religion Mr. Kaufmann is a Reformer. He had received a Talmudic 
education, and his children have all been trained in the essentials of the Jewish 
faith. 



MAX KESSELMAN 

Most men are well content if thev have achieved a fair success by the time 
they have readied or passed the prime of life. It is only in exceptional cases 
that we are able to record the historv of a self-made man who arrived at a posi- 
tion of wealth and eminence before he is yet thirty years of age. 

Such, however, is the experience of Mr. Max Kesselman. who was born in 
Yalina. Guberne, Russia, Februarv 25. 1894, and came to America in 1910. 
Finding his way to Shelby. Ohio, he obtained his first employment as appren- 
tice to a printer, for which he received S5.50 per week. Being very ambitious 
for a business of his own, he started peddling junk, but having no capital, he 
decided to continue the printing business until he had saved up enough to start 
in on a larger scale. He then went to Marion, Ohio, and started buying and 
selling in a modest way, and the experience he had previously gained proved 
verv valuable to him at this time. By hard work and the application of his 
unusual abilities he has built up the large institution known as the Marion 
Junk Company, which is doing a most flourishing business. 

Mr. Kesselman. although a very young man. is most thoughtful for others 
and is a liberal contributor to the Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums, as well 
as many other charitable organizations. He is also a devoted son to his aged 
parents, upon whom he bestows all comforts which his prosperity makes pos- 
sible. 

At this writing he is serving his countrv in the army, where he will doubt- 
less make a record as creditable as that which he has achieved in civilian life. 

151 






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MORRIS KINGSBACHER 

At 637 Liberty avenue, Pittsburgh, is located the wholesale jewelry estab- 
lishment of Mr. Morris Kingsbacher. Upon entering his place of business, 
which bears every evidence of able management and modern ideas, one might 
expect to find it the product of at least more than one generation of the best 
type of American business man. However, this is not the case, as the owner 
and proprietor, Mr. Kingsbacher, did not see our shores until he was nineteen 
years of age. 

Morris Kingsbacher was born in Thalheim, YVittenburg. in 1847, and 
came to America in 1866, the first years representing a bitter struggle for a 
foothold, but he persevered and was finally able to start a small business of 
his own, which has developed into the present prosperous establishment known 
as Kingsbacher Brothers. 

Xot only is Mr. Kingsbacher a successful business man. but he also finds 
time for connection with many philanthropic organizations, prominent among 
which is the Jewish Federation. He is also most generous in his gifts to 
hospitals and never turns a deaf ear to a worthy appeal for assistance. 

Mr. Kingsbacher was married in Xew York in 1882 to Miss Sophie 
Friedenheit, and they have three daughters and one son, all of whom are 
married. The son is at the present time in the employ of the governmnt. 

Their family is a fine representation of ideal American citizenship, which 
might well be emulated by many native-born sons and daughters of our 
republic. 



IGNATZ KLEIN 

Klein's restaurant, located at 736 Prospect street, Cleveland, Ohio, is 
very popular because the food is always excellent and the service perfect. 

The owner of this establishment, Mr. Ignatz Klein, is a thorough stu- 
dent of human nature, a courteous and enterprising business man, who has 
made it a principle to give everybody a square deal, and has always lived true 
to his precepts. 

Mr. Klein was born in Hungary on August 16, 1873. the son of Israel 
Klein, who was a supervisor of the government forest lands in the county of 
Berger. 

When thirty years of age. Mr. Klein first landed on our shores, the date 
of his arrival being November 10, 1903. He first found employment as a 
waiter at S6 per week, and after having saved a few hundred dollars, he 
opened a restaurant of his own in Cleveland, where he has since remained, 
and where his rapid rise is regarded as most remarkable in business circles. 

Having established a prosperous business, Mr. Klein turned his attention 
to those in less fortunate circumstances than himself, and contributes to even- 
charity that applies to him for aid. He is most generous in his gifts to 
the Mount Sinai Hospital. St. Luke's Hospital, the Denver Sanitarium, the 
Federation of Jewish Charities of Cleveland and other similar organizations. 

Mr. Klein also finds time for affiliation with a number of fraternal orders, 
among which we wish to prominently mention Independent Order B'nai 
B'rith. the Odd Fellows. Baron de Hirsch Society and the Hungarian and 
Independent Aid associations. He is also a prominent member of Congrega- 
tion B'nai Yeshurun. 

On September 2. 1906. Mr. Klein was married to Miss Ethel Unger of 
Xew York, and they are the parents of two sturdy bovs. both of whom are 
attending school. 

152 



Mrs. Klein is a woman possessed of much executive ability and is very 
actively interested in the work of the Temple to which she belongs. 

Mr. Klein's advice to the voung is as follows: "Be honest and always 
(jO the right thing." And his own life is an excellent example of the success 
which is to be achieved through adherence to these principles. 



SIMON KLEIN 

In the life of Mr. Simon Klein we have another example of a man who 
sees opportunity in that which the ordinary individual passes by. As Mr. Con- 
noil}', the popular lecturer, has said, "There are acres of diamonds all about us 
if we could but see them." 

Mr. Klein was born in Kavno, Guberne, Russia, in the year 1859, and 
was married to Miss Fanny Price of his own native country in 1883. In 1892 
he decided to try his fortunes in the new world, and came to New York. He 
immediately saw a big opportunity in the buying and selling of waste materials 
and engaged in this line without delay. After spending one year in New York, 
he went to Providence, R. I., and established the business of which he is sole 
proprietor today, located at 108 Chalkstone street, and is one of the most 
prosperous institutions in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Klein have a fine family of nine children, two boys and 
seven girls. The two sons, Max and Abe, are in business with their father. 
The daughter Annie is married to Mr. David B. Isenberg, a prominent insur- 
ance man of Worcester, Mass. Jennie is the wife of Harry D. Bellan, one of 
the leading attorneys of Providence, R. I. Max married Miss Fenistein of 
Providence, and Abe, Miss Bender of the same city. 

Like all good Jews, Mr. Klein is very conscientious regarding the observ- 
ance of all the rights of his church and is past President of both the Congrega- 
tion and B'rith Abraham. He is also a prominent member of Avas Sholom 
Congregation and I. O. B. A., and is most generous in his contributions to all 
other charities. 



LOUIS V. KLEINE 

Perhaps no line of business demands in its management a more thorough 
and sympathetic knowledge of human nature than the hotel business. To be 
successful in this line a man must not only be thoroughly proficient in business, 
but also must be keenly alive to the demands of the public. He must be of 
genial personality and possess an unusual capacity for organization. 

Such a man is Mr. Louis V. Kleine, owner and manager of Gettys Square 
Hotel, located at Gettys Square, Yonkers, New York. 

Mr. Kleine was born in Hungary in February, 1868, the son of Mr. Wm. 
and Rebecca Kleine. He came to America in 1889 and during the first months 
experienced the usual hardships of the emigrant, working in various restau- 
rants on the east side of New York, and finally as salesman in department 
stores, and men's furnishings. 

He then started in the hotel business, for which he seems to have been 
peculiarly adapted, and has been very successful. 

Mr. Kleine is prominent in fraternal organizations, being a member of the 

153 



Masons and Elks, and is also most generous in his gifts to charities, and is 
affiliated with the Federation of Charities of New York. 

He was married in New York in 1891 to Miss Caroline Tepper, who is 
also very popular in their social circle. 

Mr. Kleine is a fine representative of prosperous useful citizenship and is 
one of the most popular men in Yonkers. 



SIMON KLOTZ 

By far the most respected member of the Jewish community of Birming- 
ham and one of the most conspicuous Jews of America is Mr. Simon Klotz, 
French Consul at Birmingham and for many years a strong link binding France 
with this country. He was born in Nancy (France) on the 16th of December, 
1855, and he comes from a family which has contributed very greatly to the 
making of America. 

When Simon Klotz arrived on these shores, he sought out a town in 
Lousiana where other members of his family resided. This happened in 
1872. He went to Klotzville, a. town named after his uncle and brother who 
had served the cause of the South and the Confederacy in the Civil War. 
Twelve years later he went to Birmingham, Ala., where he resides today and 
where he engaged in business, first as a partner with Caheen Brothers (his 
brother-in-law), and then for himself. He conducts his business today in the 
Brown-Marx Building of Birmingham under the firm name of S. Klotz, 
insurance and real estate. 

As can well be expected, Mr. Klotz is a very busy and occupied man 
and his community places upon him manifold cares and responsibilities. There 
are many offices and dignities which his fellow-citizens have bestowed upon 
him and will in the future. Mr. Klotz stands exceptionally well with his 
Gentile fellow-citizens, and, as has been remarked, the government of his 
mother-land saw fit to appoint him to the responsible position of French 
Consul at Birmingham, Ala., an honorary life-position which he has held with 
great dignity for the last twenty-three years. The French government has 
also bestowed a decoration on him when he visited that country at the begin- 
ning of the present war. 

Mr. Klotz is the organizer and President of the Birmingham Federation 
of Jewish Charities, and it was his idea to do away with unnecessary flower- 
offerings at the death of relatives and friends and to send the money thus 
saved to the Federation for worthy charitable purposes. The Federation has 
actually consolidated all the charity-work of the city and is exceptionally suc- 
cessful in its collections and ever-increasing membership. 

In addition to the Federation, Mr. Klotz is associated with the Jewish 
Relief Fund for War Sufferers, of which he is Honorary Secretary. For four 
years he had been President of Temple Emanuel and is now a Trustee of the 
Congregation. Mr. Klotz is also Chairman of the Masonic Relief Committee 
for the city of Birmingham and had been an Alderman for eight years. 

On June 28, 1882, Mr. Klotz was married to Miss Camille Caheen, who 
was born in Louisiana. There are two children of this marriage, a son Ray- 
mond, associated with his father in business, and a daughter, now Mrs. Mar- 
celle Hagedorn. 



154 



ISIDOR KLINE 

All of the fine ttait^ of character which the foreign-born Jew has brought 
ir upon his life in America seem to be combined in the person of I 
Kline of N'iles, I (hio. 

Like man} young Jews who have come to our shores, he landed in Amer- 
ica poor in pocket, but with high ideals for the future, which have developed 
into a highlj useful citizenship and financial prosperity. 

[sidor Kline was born in Szanto, Hungary, September 29, 1848, the -«n 
of \'li)l|'li Kline and Ins wife, Rosa. I lis father was a successful lumber 
merchant and an authority on Jewish scholarship. 

The stor; of Mr. Kline's struggles would prove an inspiring example for 
any young man who felt that he was starting life under a great handicap. 
However, onl) a few brief points may be brought out within thi : this 

biography. 

During the ti r-t seven years of his life in America Mr. Kline worked in 
a grocery -ihiy in Cleveland for the meager sum of $25 per month and board. 
By the exercise of great economy he managed to save $500, and with this 
capital went to Xiles. 1 >hio, and Opened a liquor Store, where he was very 
successful until [908, when the city went dry. and he opened a grocery store. 
\fter seven and one-half years the citizens again voted the city wet. and he 
started another liquor stnre. which he ran successfully for two and one-half 
Mars, when it was once mure voted dry, and he again changed his business t" 
that nf a grocer) store. During these man) changes Mr. Kline's popularity and 
rare business ability have enabled him to steadil) prosper, and he i* today one 
of the foremost citizens of Xiles. 

Mr. Kline was married in Cleveland, < Ihio, lime 9, 1888, to Miss Lena 
Friedman, who has shared hi> early vicissitudes and later successes, and is 
well known in Xiles and Cleveland society as a charity worker who is always 
ready to contribute both time and money to am worthy cause, irrespective of 
race, creed or religion. 

Roth Mr. and Mrs. Kline contribute to all national as well a-- local chari- 
ties, ami Mr. Kline is a member of Congregation Rudolf Sholem of Youngs- 
town, Congregation of tin- Children of Israel, the II. 1'.. S. (J. of Cleveland, 
B'rith Abraham Lodge and is Trustee and former Ruler of the Elks. < >ne of 

the facts of which Mr. Kline is justly proud is that he landed in this couiltr) 

without any money, and has never yet received assistance from any one. 



JACOB KNOFSKY 

if every struggling young man who at times feels discouraged and believes 

that the entire world is arrayed against him, could know the intimate details 
in the life of Mr. Jacob Knofsky, he would take heart again and continue with 

new courage and determination. 

Mr. Knofsky was horn in Dubitz, Russia, September 15. iSi/i. his father 
Ahrain Knofsky being a merchant and also a Jewish scholar. 

When Jacob Knofsky came to America, he had none of the advantages 

possessed by the American horn boy. He knew nothing of the language, man- 
ners or customers of our people, and was without money, friends or influence 

sisl him. It is certainly a long step upward from the first barren years 
of his life when he bought and sold rags in Warren. ' ihio, until the present 
time, when he is recognized as one of the leading scrap iron dealers of that 
city. 

Mr. Knofsky was married in Russia in [887 and his wife has been an 

155 






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ideal mother to their children as well as a kind-hearted, public-spirited woman 
who has done a great deal of valuable work for the various charities in. her 
community. 

It is not surprising that the Knofsky children should possess a large 
amount of business ability, as they are descended from a long line of successful 
merchants and had the advantage of their father's precept and example. 

On May i, 1917, Mr. Knofsky incorporated his business, and his sons 
Roy, Isidor, Harry and Ody, as well as his daughter Ida, are connected in 
some capacity with the business. The daughter Sophia is married to Mr. Saul 
Shackne. Abraham and Esther are still going to school. 

Mr. Knofsky feels that his children deserve considerable credit for the 
later success of the business, as they have brought to it a great deal of en- 
thusiasm and true American business methods. 



RUDOLPH C. KOBLITZ 

There is not a man in Cleveland, Ohio, whose promises are more re- 
spected and whose business integrity is better regarded than Rudolph C. 
Koblitz, senior member of R. C. Koblitz & Son. 

Mr. Koblitz has spent most of his life in America, having come to this 
country at the age of fourteen. He peddled rags for the first three years, in 
New York, and then went to work for his brother who was in the general 
junk business. He remained there for five years, and then started out as 
traveling salesman for a stove concern, with whom he was connected for the 
following three years. 

He then formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. Adolph Kohn, 
and they started a scrap iron business under the firm name of R. C. Koblitz 
Company. This partnership existed for the next ten years, when a Mr. Stone 
was taken into the company, and the firm was known as Stone, Koblitz & 
Kohn. Later Mr. Kohn retired, and for the next three years it was known 
as Stone & Koblitz. Some time after Mr. Koblitz again formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. Kohn, and when their sons became of age, they were also given 
an interest in the firm. Koblitz, Kohn & Co. was incorporated in October, 
1912, arid some time later Mr. Koblitz retired from the firm, although it still 
carries his name. In 1916, finding inactivity rather irksome, Mr. Koblitz de- 
cided to go into business again, so he started a metal business with his son, 
Martin, the firm name being R. C. Koblitz & Son. 

Mr. Koblitz was married in Cleveland January 16, 1888, to Miss Matilda 
B. Smitz, well known in Cleveland society as a charity worker. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Koblitz are most generous in their contributions and Mr. Koblitz is also 
proininent in the B'nai B'rith, and is a member of Grieses Temple. 



156 



ISADOR LOEB KNOFSKY 

The Oriental people are the great rug makers of the world. Into the 
intricate patterns the}' have woven all the joyous romance and dark mysteries 
of the east. Their masterpieces are enduring things of beauty, which are 
symbols of life itself, for every life is woven of an infinite variety of lights 
and shadows, joys and sorrows, trials and triumphs. Even the weaver him- 
self knows not the full beauty until the pattern is complete. 

This may fittingly be compared to the career of Mr. Isador Loeb Knofsky, 
who, although still a very young man, has attained remarkable success, which 
presages a brilliant future. 

He was born in Ahroan, Russia, May 12, 1894, and in the summer of 
1899 was brought by his parents to America. 

His father started in the iron and metal business, and young Isador 
attended the public schools at Warren, Ohio. When he was ready to enter 
high school he had to make a decision between giving up school or earning 
the money to maintain himself while he attended school. The decision he 
made demonstrated the strength of character and desire to succeed which 
have always been his salient characteristics. 

He decided to continue at school and worked morning and evening on a 
wagon soliciting junk. 

After graduating from high school he attended business college, still earn- 
ing his own way, and graduated in 1915. He then started working for his 
father as salesman, and the following year was made a member of the firm, 
being given complete charge of the business at Sharon, Pa. He is also Vice- 
President of the Warren Iron and Metal Company, the original business organ- 
ized by his father. The Sharon firm is known as the Sharon Iron & Metal 
Company. 

Thoroughness has been "Mr. Knofsky's motto in ever}' undertaking and in 
a recent interview, when asked what his advice would be to young men just 
starting out in business, he replied : "Honesty and continually bearing in mind 
that 'what is worth doing is worth doing well.' " 

He finds time, in addition to his many business activities, to affiliate him- 
self with a number of organizations, prominent among them being the Young 
Men's Hebrew Association of Youngstown, the Anshe Schwort of Youngs- 
town and the Odd Fellows of Warren. 

By the time the sun of Mr. Knofsky's life reaches its meridian, we feel 
safe in predicting that the business world will be unable to produce his peer. 



DR. WILLIAM KOHLMAN 

It can readily be imagined that the Surgeon-in-Chief of the Touro In- 
firmary of New Orleans, La., which is the finest institution of its kind in the 
South and one of the very best and finest in the whole country, must neces- 
sarily be a recognized leader in the medical profession. And Dr. William 
Kohhnan has held that position for many years. For, in 1901, when a suc- 
cessor was to be selected to the late Dr. Loeber in the medical administration 
of that hospital, the choice fell at once and as a matter of course upon Dr. 
Kohlman. 

Dr. Kohlman's education and preparation for his chosen field of labor at 
once placed him in the forefront of his profession. He was born in Kirch- 
heim, Germany, the son of Lazarus and Regina Kohlman, on June 6, 1863. 
He attended the public schools of his native town and then passed to the 
academies of Gruenstadt and Kaiserslautern. Upon his graduation from these 

157 



institutions, he look up the study of medicine when but nineteen years of age 
ai the University of Wuerzburg, and graduated from that University and the 
University of Heidelberg. Thereupon, be was for a short time engaged in the 
practice of bis profession and later rendered valuable services in the capacity 
of surgeon in the German Army. 

In 180,1 Dr. Kohlman arrived in this country, going to New 1 Irleans, 
where he has almost from the day he arrived occupied a position of prom- 
inence and leadership in the city and community. His keen intellect, his 
thorough education and his great capacity for work at once led people to feci 
confident that many and great benefits would accrue to the community from 
his residence and the practice of bis skill. And the period of more than a 
quarter of a century has proved that the confidence had not been misplaced. 
For todav he is recognized by the profession and the laiety alike as one of 
the foremost authorities in the medical profession of the entire South. Aside 
from the high position he occupies in the Touro Infirmary, be also holds posi- 
tions of importance and great responsibility in other institutions of the city 
and state. He is professor of gynecology in the Post-Graduate School of the 
Loyola University; he is the Chief Visiting Surgeon in the Gynecological and 
Obstetrical Division of the Charity Hospital; the Chief Gynecologist and 
1 >bstetrician of the Touro Infirmary; the Consulting Gynecologist of the New 
(Irleans Dispensary for Women and Children, and holds membership in the 
Xew ( Means, the Southern, and the American Medical Associations and also 
in the Southern Surgical Association and the American College of Surgery. 
And all these have greatly benefited by his superior skill and vast knowledge, 
not only through their personal contact and association with him. but also 
through the numerous papers, pamphlets and lectures of his which have been 
of inestimable service to the members of his profession. 

Dr. Kohlman is as great a favorite in the fraternal and social circles of 
the community as he is in the medical societies with which he is connected. 
Me is a member of the Harmony Club, of the Jewish Orphans' Home, of the 
I'.'nai B'rith and the Masonic fraternity and contributes liberally, not only of 
his means but also of his time and attention, to the various charitable and 
philanthropic endeavors of the city and community. 



ADOLPH KOHN 

Under another heading in this volume we have outlined the career of Mr. 
Rudolph Koblitz, prominent business man of Cleveland. It is now our 
pleasure to record a few facts with reference to bis business associate and 
life long friend. Mr. Adolph Kobn. who is one of the most influential and 
prosperous citizens of Cleveland. 

I lis education was obtained largel) in the world of business, and lie knOWS 
from experience that riches and power are not easily won. lb- also knows 

that determination and hard work can overcome almost every obstacle. 

Adolph Kohn was born in Czbcgni. Hungary, in tin- year [856. Ilis 
father. Jacob Kohn. died shortly before he was burn. Ilis mother, < Lira. 
lived until he was about iwo years "1.1. when she, ion. was taken to that land 
from whence no traveler returns, lb- then lived in the family of an Uncle, 
and from the time he was eighl years old until the age of twenty, when he 
came to this country, be did any odd jobs that came to band, as it was neces- 
sary for him to be self supporting. 

Landing in New York penniless be went direct to Cleveland, which has 
been bis home ever since. lie became a peddler of small merchandise, and 
continued for eighteen months, when having Saved a little money he went 

158 



into the ray business, and continued for two years, after which he formed a 
partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. Koblitz, and they have been asso- 
ciated in business nearly all the time since iSjij. 

Mr. Kohn was married in Cleveland June 17, 1883, to Miss Rose Koblitz, 
prominent in Cleveland as an ardent charity worker, who is always willing to 
give up her time and money to every worthy cause. 

Mr. Kohn is a member of the Euclid Avenue Temple, is an enthusiastic 
promoter of all associations for Jewish uplift, and gives his hearty co-opc-ra- 
tion and financial assistance to every worthy charity. 

The Kohns have a fine familv of two bovs and two eJrls. 



SAMUEL KOPPELMAN 



The Jews are by nature and tradition an agricultural people. History 
reports the sons of Shem building their first cities remote from the chief 
arteries of commerce, and only centuries of persecution has diverted the 
Jewish mind from his pastoral occupation to that of trade and barter in which 
he has become equally skilled. This has shown the great versatility of the 
nation, as they have become recognized leaders of 
commerce. 

It is a great pleasure to record the history of 
two figures in the financial life of Creston, Ohio, 
Messrs. Samuel and Dave Koppelman, whose life 
histories are of the utmost interest. 

The elder brother, Samuel Koppelman, was 



born 



Yilna, Guberne, Russia, in August, 1871. 




His father, in addition to the operation of a junk 
yard, was an accomplished Jewish and Russian 
scholar. 

Mr. Koppelman was married at the age of 21 
to a young ladv of the same name, Miss Sarah Kop- 
pelman, daughter of Nathan and Sophie Koppel- 
man, and two years later they came to America. 
Deciding to try his fortune in Cleveland, Ohio, he 
started peddling junk, which he continued very suc- 
cessfully for seven years. At the expiration of that time, he went to Creston, 
Ohio, and started the junk yard where he and his brother have been so suc- 
cessful and have accumulated a nice fortune. 

Mr. and Mrs. Koppelman have two children. Ida, the daughter, has 
graduated from high school and is studying piano. Nathan is in college and 
is being educated for violin and cornet playing. 

The Jewish trait of liberal philanthropy is very marked in the Koppel- 
mans, who give liberally to all charities. Mr. Koppelman is a member of 
Knights of Joseph and B'rith Abraham. 

The career of the younger brother, Mr. Dave Koppelman, is set forth in 
a separate biography. 



159 



DAVE KOPPELMAN 



( >n another page in this history we have outlined the events in the career 

of Mr. Samuel ECoppelman, wealthy citizen and philanthropist of Creston, I ihio, 

It is with (.-i|tial pleasure that we record the went.- in the career of his 

younger brother, Dave, who came to America four years after Samuel landed, 
lie was born in Vilna. Guberne, Russia, January to, 1884, and at the 
age of fourteen landed in New York, starting bis 
financial career as so many prominent men have 
done, selling papers on the street, where he learned 
the first elementary rules of business. This he con- 
tinned for six months when be went to Cleveland 
to bis brother and learned the trade of cigar maker. 
Not finding this to his liking, he started peddling 
small merchandise which he continued successfully 
for three years, when he engaged with his brother 

in the junk business. Eight years later, he opened 

a fruit store in Cleveland, 1 Ihio, followed by a ven- 
ture in the Soft drink business, but neither being 

successful he again joined his brother in the junk 

business at Creston, Ohio, and they have been in 
partnership ever since. 

lie was married June (6, to.02, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Epstein, of Cleveland, < >hio, and they have six 
fine children, three of whom are old enough to be in school. 

Like the Samuel Koppelmans, Mr. Dave Koppelman and his wife arc 
devoted to the promotion of various charities and are most liberal in their 
contribution of both money and time. 

Mr. Koppelman is still a young man and has a long career of success and 
usefulness before him, which will be devoted to the welfare of his family, his 
city and his nation. 




JACOB KOVINSKY 



We are told that some men are born great, some achieve greatness and 

Some have greatness thrust upon them. 

History has proven this truism, but it has also shown that the names 
which long endure are those of men who achieved greatness, who wrested 

from reluctant fortune the thing- which they desired and which were worth 

while. 

( )ur country is the great arena where many of these commercial battle- 
have been fought, and nothing more dramatic is recorded in the annals of 
history. 

facob Kovin-ky is a line example of this type of man. lie doubtless 
inherited vigorous qualities of mind from hi- father, who wa- a successful 
iron merchant and a great Jewish scholar. 

lie wa- born in Suwalk. Guberne, Poland, September 15. [883, and came 
to America in May, 1894. lb- landed with hi- parent- in Windsor, ( anada, 

and attended the public schools tor three years following. During tin- time 

he peddled eiie.- after School bom- and assisted his father. 

At the age of thirteen hi- native independence of spirit asserted itself and 
he -tatted peddling notion-. Tin- In- continued for three years, when he moved 
with his parents to Chatham, ' >nl . and with the little monej he had been able 
to saw. began buying junk, selling to hi- father, who wa- in the metal business. 

160 



Ili> parent moving to Detroit, he started out on his own account at 
Pontiac, Mich., buying metal and storing it until he could sell to advantage. 
This business he successfully conducted on the small capital of $213, which 
is all he had besides his horse and wagon when he arrived in Pontiac. 

Thus he continued for three years, gradually building up his business. 

lie was married December 25, 1901, to Miss Ida Sterling, and Mr. Kovin- 
sky attributes much of his subsequent success to her assistance and rare judg- 
ment. 

His business grew very rapidly, until today he is doing an annual business 
of S^oo.ooo and has accumulated real estate in Pontiac and Detroit to the extent 
of over S125.000. 

Mr. Kovinsky advises voung people to save their money and go into 
business for themselves. To be thrifty, honest and persistent, and success will 
follow. 

They have four children, wdio are going to school, being educated in music 
and are being given many advantages which their father was not privileged to 
enjoy. 

Mr. Kovinsky is a member of Beth Israel Congregation of Detroit, 
founder and President of the congregation of Pontiac. to whom he gave bis 
hall and lights free; also all necessary financial support until it became self- 
supporting. 

Mr. and Mr;. Kovinsky subscribe liberallv to hospitals and other charita- 
ble organizations, Mrs. Kovinsky being a staunch supporter of the Home for 
the Aged. 

Thev are devoting much of their time as well as money to the promotion 
of these institutions, and Jews and Gentiles alike have cause to be grateful for 
their remarkable generositv. 



JOSEPH KOVINSKY 

Robert Louis Stevenson has said: "O toiling hands of mortals! O un- 
w caried feet, traveling ye know not whither ! Soon, soon, it seems to you, 
you must come forth on some conspicuous hill-top, and but a little way further, 
against the setting sun, descry the spires of El Dorado. Little do ye know 
your own blessedness, for to travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive, 
and the true success is to labor." 

< )ne of those pilgrims to the Shrine of Success, who traveled hopefully and 
finally arrived at the goal of his ambition, is Mr. Joseph Kovinsky. 

He was born in Suwalker. Guberne. Russian Poland, in 1871, and came to 
America during the summer of 1887. Landing in Xew York, he worked as 
operator in a pants factory for six years and then went to Windsor, Canada, 
where he started to peddle poultry. He then moved to Chatham, and with his 
father started to peddle junk, where he continued about two years. He then 
sold his interests and went back to Windsor, where he opened a junk yard on a 
small scale and later bought the present large establishment, which he owns 
and operates. 

Mr. Kovinsky 's struggle was verv difficult at times, as he had very little 
capital with which to begin, but he was given most able assistance by his wife, 
who worked as hard as he and after the first two years conditions became much 
easier for them. 

He not only operates the large junk yard, but is also an owner of con- 
siderable real estate in Windsor and Ford City. Ontario. 

The Kovinskys have nine children, five boys and four girls. Abraham 
is a doctor in Detroit, who is very charitably inclined and gives much of his 

161 



time and skill to charity without any remuneration whatsoever. The daughter 
Lottie is married to Edward Wolf of Detroit, and the rest of the children arc- 
all in school. 

In addition to Mr. Kovinsky's multiplicity of business interests, he is ex- 
vice-president and treasurer of Windsor Shera Zedek, and also a contributor 
i" die Detroit Ladies' Hospital, and lias aided in the construction of the 
Talmud Torah of Windsor. 



JOSEPH KRALL 

il is not -hen to many nun to find early in life the true vocation for 
which they are hest fitted. Experience is the best teacher, and cultivates a 
power of discrimination which enables the man to find his proper groove in the 
business mechanism. 

Sneh was the ease with Joseph Krall. who was horn in Zebrarsh, Austria, 
March 15, (868. lie did not come to America until 1890, and landing in New 
York set out to learn the trade of shirt making. Me did not find this occupa- 
tion congenial, however, so he went 10 Providence, R. I., and began peddling 

table oil cloth. Later he spent some time in a textile mill, when' he acquired 
much valuable experience, although the salary wa- only S7.51 1 per week. This 

lead to his establishment of the present business devoted to floor coverings, 
which has proved a wonderful success. 

Mr. Krall was married in Austria in 1SS7 to Miss Bertha Tishler, who 
is very popular in their circle of friends and acquaintances. 

In addition to generous gifts to charity. Mr. Krall is quite active in a 
number of fraternal organizations, being Past President of 1. t 1. B. A.. Past 
Treasurer Workmen's Association, and is also a faithful member of Avas 

Sholeni t'onyre^ation. 



BEN KRAMER 

Until very recent years, historians have been too prone to write beautiful 
memoirs of departed great men, leaving unchronicled the important events 
happening in their own era. 

We of to, lay like to believe that the proent is just a- interesting a- the 

past; that nothing more wonderful has happened than the hi-torv which our 

own contemporaries are making 

It i~ therefore a great pleasure to record the events of a successful career; 

one onlv well begun, it is true, but already replete with brilliant achivement. 

Ben Kramer was horn in ( leveland, Ohio, Mav 15, [885. His father, 
I icob Kramer, was a prominent iron dealer of that city, and when onlv eight 

years of age Ben began helping him in the business, lien- he served a hard 
apprenticeship until 1007. working [4 or 15 hours a da) 

lie thin engaged in business fur himself and during the next seven years 
achieved such marked success as an iron and steel broker that he claimed the 
attention of Mr. A. Rotter of I >etroit, who offered bun an interest in his busi 

ness. This olfer he accepted, and the next two years as manager of the tii in 

marked another epoch in a reuiarkablv successful career. 

At the end of this time he wa taken into full partnership in the firm of 

162 



A. Rotter, who have an international reputation and are ranked as one of the 
largest iron and metal businesses in the world. 

Mr. Kramer was married in Cleveland. June 14, 1007. to Miss Ida Levine, 
and their liberal philanthropies are well known to all worthy charities and 
Jewish organizations in Detroit and Cleveland. 

Mr. Kramer is a member of the Temple Beth El., B. P. O. E. Lodge Xo. 
34 of Detroit. Past Chancellor K. of P. of Cleveland, Independent Aid of 
Cleveland, member of Cleveland and Detroit charities, Denver Sanitariums 
and Jewish Hospital. 

Like many other prominent men who have been denied the privilege of 
much academic instruction and has been obliged to depend upon their owe 
native ability and the knowledge they could obtain from reading and observa- 
tion, Mr. Kramer places very high value on a good education and urges all 
voting men to go to school just as long as possible. 

While he has attained an enviable position unaided by such advantages, 
many other young men would have failed absolutely, and certain it is that his 
own path would have been much more smooth had he been able to acquire a 
good education. 

He also believes in the gospel of hard work, as, without close application, 
the most brilliant talents are often of little value. 

The third requisite of success — "To be fair in all your dealings" — is a 
principle to which Mr. Kramer has faithfully adhered during his entire busi- 
ness career, and he considers this the most important of all. 



HYMAN KRAMER 

Perhaps no industry in our country enables a shrewd business man to gain 
an insight into the possibilities of the junk business as railroading. In this 
line Mr. Hyman Kramer found his first employment in America, and it was 
a stepping stone to the larger business achievements which have since distin- 
guished his career. 

Mr. Kramer was born in Cleveland, Ohio, November 13th, 1883, the son 
of Joseph and Pauline Kramer, his father being in the metal business in his 
native city. He was given a high school education and after completing his 
course began working for the railroad company. He remained five years and 
when he left their eniplov had gained the position of yard clerk. He then 
went to Cleveland, where he was employed as car dispatcher for the X. Y. C. 
& St. L. This position paid $90.00 per month and he remained five years. 

He then decided to look about him for a good location, in which to estab- 
lish a business, and his father having moved to Detroit, he was induced to go 
there. His success was phenomenal from the start, but feeling that he wanted 
to operate on a larger scale, he interested some capital and organized a com- 
pany under the firm name of Hyman Kramer & Company. At the present 
time they have an immense modern plant, humming with activity and emanat- 
ing an atmosphere of prosperity. 

They own property on both sides of Twenty-fourth street, their holdings 
extending from 627 to (^>2>7- 

Mr. Kramer at this writing is unmarried and resides with his parents. 
Although a very young man and- burdened with many business cares, he is 
still prominent in fraternal and religious organizations, being a Mason and a 
member of the 29th Street Synagogue. He is also a member of Temple Beth 
El, Talmud Torah, and contributes liberally to the Denver Hospital, as well as 
all local charities. 

Mr. Kramer is very highly regarded in Detroit and is considered one of the 
city's most able and dependable business men. 

163 



SOLOMON HENRY KUSMINSKY 
The write- of these lines paid a visit to the Beaver Valley section of 
Pennsylvania to find suitable men whose biographies could be included in the 
"Distinguished [ews of America." He selected For the purpose Mr Solomon 
Henry Kusminsky, of Farrell, Pa. The selection was made, under the impres- 
sion and with the full conviction that not only because Farrel is Mr. K.us- 
minsky's residence, can he lay a justified claim for such distinction, but even 
in the larger cities of America one would seek him out for the purpose, tor 
Mr. Kusminsky belongs to the class of Jewish young men who deserve to be 
presented to the fewish community of America. _ 

It was bj no means an easy task for the writer to obtain any information 
about Mr Kusminsky, since the latter is of the kind who despise the lime- 
lights of pilblicit) and do not consider themselves in any way superior to 

other people. But 1 learned enough details to be able to compile this short 

sketch. rT . _ aQ 

Mr Kusminsky is still a very young man. lie was horn January 5, (882, 
in Tulcriin near Kamentz Podolsky, the son of Israel and Hannah Kusminsky. 
Mr Kusminskv looks as youthful as his years, but after a conversation with 
him one soon gains the impression thai here is a man who has already passed 
through much in his life and who is, in addition, blessed with a higher intelli- 
gence which welcomes great experiences. . 

\t the tender age of tour, the child was first brouglH 1" Mncnca D) his 

parents but they could not adjust themselves to the new conditions and they 

returned to Russia, taking their child with them. When Solomon 1 Iciuw was 
eight years of age his family brought him hack again. 

lie was ai firsl sent to the Pittsburgh public schools, hut In- passed only 
through the first grades, and then, like many other poor children, he was tossed 
upon the battlefield of life, lie was then only about twelve years of age and 
he found employment for $1.00 a week in a tinware store. Later he left this 
place and wen' 'to work as a cash hoy in a department store. Afterwards he 

became a messenger boy tor the telegraph company and then he found a berth 
as clerk with the telephone conipanv. at which he stayed for Hilly eight years, 
In [906 h.- came to Farrel. He had hut a scanty sum oi money with him, 
hut a thorough life-experience unusual for his years. His past connections 
have earned him a good name and he decided to Utilize it tor his purposes. 
He opened a small store which gradually began to expand, and under his able 
management ami through honest and diligent work the business grew to large 
proportions. It exited for nine years. In 1015. realizing that the- rapid 
growth of the citj necessitated a department store, he organized the Farrel 
Drj Goods Company, becoming it~ general manager Thus Mr. Kusminsky 

came to he the head of a large department si,, re which could easily lit ml" a 
town larger than Farrel. . , , , ■ 1 

S. . much about Mr. Kusminsky's achievements in business. In the Jewish 
life Mr. Kusminsky is highly important for his activity in the Zionist move- 
ment. 

He was one of the first and most active young Zionists ol Pittsburgh, I- or 
ten years he has been prominently connected with the organization known as 
"Tiphereth Zion," and In- was one of the pillars on which the Zionist move 
iiu-nt was built in Pittsburgh. No toil was ever too hard for hmi. no sacrifice 
too great win-never Zionism was the issue. Outside of his Zionist activity 
Mr. Kusminsk) is not active in social life, being too much taken up with his 
business, but he belongs to ever) important Jewish institution in Pittsbut 

Discussing the question of what constituted success in life, Mr. Kusminsk) 
answered after a few moments of consideration. "Persistent, honest work 
must always be crowned with success." 

Mr. Kusminsk) is the father of two children, Evelyn, aged eight, and 
Bernard, six years of age. rheir mother, nee Pauline Werbach, died in May, 

|Q1 l, and Mr. Kusminskv has since devoted his life to the education and mak 

ing happ) the two children, who are under the tutelage of their grandmother 
in Pittsburgh. 



164 



CHARLES LANDAY 

While Mr. Charles Landay is not by any means an old man and is still 
actively engaged in the management of his business, he has been for over a 
quarter of a century a most prominent actor in that most fascinating of all 
dramas, American business life. 

Charles Landay was born in 1'odola. Guberne, Russia, in the year 1856. 
He was 32 years old before he decided to come to America, an age when must 
men would consider it rather late to embark upon a new career. 

lie landed in this country July 3, 1888, and found bis way to Pittsburgh, 
Pa., where he peddled dry goods for six months. Finding this most unsatis- 
factory, be started buying and selling junk, and three years later went to Wash- 
ington, I 'a., where he opened a junk yard. Under his able management the 
business has proved a wonderful success and goes to show conclusively that 
.Air. Landay's doctrine of "Hard work and a business of your own," if faith- 
fully followed, is bound to produce results. 

Mr. Landay was twice married; first in Europe and then in America, in 
1801, to Miss Rifka (ioldenberg. He has nine children, three girls and six 
boys, who seem to have inherited their father"s business ability, as the two 
older sons, Morris and Louis, are prominent steel workers in Pittsburgh. The 
others are still in school, with the exception of the daughter Pearl, who is 
married to Mr. Sam Cohn, a manufacturing jobber of Washington. I'a. 

Like all good Jews, Mr. and Mrs. Landay regard liberality in matters of 
charity as a sacred duty and are very active in the promotion of all societies for 
public betterment. They not only contribute liberally to all local activities, but 
the Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums as well. 

Mr. Landay also lends valuable assistance to Talmud Torah and the Loan 
Association, being President of both organizations. He is also prominent in 
the Congregation Beth Israel and on the Board of Trade. 



MORRIS LANDSKRONER 

L'nfailing courtesy is one of the biggest assets that a business man can 
possess. This is especially true in the case of a man who is continually being 
brought in touch with the public, as is the case in a barber shop. 

Although Mr. Morris Landskroner is very reticent about his extraordi- 
nary success in this line of business, his friends and business associates have 
not failed to appreciate the sterling qualities which have contributed to his re- 
markable rise, and we do not feel that this volume would be complete without 
his interesting history. 

Morris Landskroner was born in Sered, Bukvania, October 3, 1883, the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Sherl Landskroner. His father was one of the prominent 
citizens of his native town and recognized as an absolute authority in all mat- 
ters of Jewish scholarship. 

In the year 1903 Morris, then a young man of 20 years, came to America, 
landing on our shores October 3. As he had learned the barber trade in Aus- 
tria, he secured a position at this work upon his arrival in America, and after 
working six months decided to go into business for himself. He continued in 
New York for ten years and then went to Cleveland. For the first year he 
worked with a Mr. Stein, who was located at 1976 East Ninth street, and then 
having opportunity to buy the business, he assumed entire control and has been 
at this location since that time. 

Mr. Landskroner has been remarkably successful. His business has 
grown to be one of the largest of its kind in the city, yielding to him consequent 

165 



financial prosperity, the t which are not enjoyed by himself alone. as 

be is must generous in hi- ;:ifts to charities, both local and national. 

Mr. Landskroner was married in N'ew York City. M -_ 
Lena Rubin, and their family consists of two tine boys, who are going to school. 

Like all successful business men. Mr. Landskroner realizes the ne: 
of hard work and absolute honesty. These are the principles which he 
should be strongly impressed upon the minds of the young, as they are the 
golden keys that unlock the doors to a life of usefulness and prosperity. 



JOSEPH LASDUSKY 

Homestead. Pa., is a little but very enterprising community of the Alle- 
gher. f the state. Among its citizens known for their rugged ho- 

and integrity, the writer had the occasion to interview a man who. taken from 
all a: . - that mention be made of his personality and achievements. 

Joseph L:.- vncr of a general store at X- • ~ 141 Eighth avenue. 

Mr. Lasdusky is the scion of a scholarly family, his great-grandfather. 
Rabbi Mi - ier. being one of the most famous Lamdanim of his day 

and time. Joseph Lasdusky 's father. Moses, was named after his illusr 
ancestor. and it was he who decided i- $7: exchange their humble sur- 
roundings of a little town. Kalvaria. in Russian Poland, for the unlimited 
ilities and the boundless opportunities of free America. It was. there- 
fore, in 1S75 that the subject of this article first landed on the friendly shores 
of the I'nited States. Having been born on the 4th of September. 1870. he 
was just five years of age at the time, and there can scarcely remain with him 
any memory of his native land. Mr. LasdusJ - - •.horoughly American as 
conditions could make him ; and by his breeding and education he typifies the 
successful American business man. Withal, he is ardently Jewish, and while 
his brothers and even his sons changed their patronymic to Mr. 

usky staunch! his traditional family name, even though he 

realizes that circumstances might justify such action on the part of his other 
immediate relatives. 

At the age of ten. Joseph Lasdusky began a struggle f selling 

matches, and then at eighteen he became a clerk in a store. T - later 

see him conducting a little store in Coal Center. Pa., and at the a^ 
twenty-two he settled in Homestead, where he owns the general ■ hich 

mention has already been made. The store, small and insignificant at fi-- 
today the pridi An. and its owner, one of the pill Mr. 

Lasdusky is a great communal worker - .minenllv connected with the 

Congregation Rodeph Sholotn, of which h< •' the 

' the beautiful • : >uilt in 1014. which 

a pride and a credit to immunity of H 

• lent when th< -liber 

of (he Ej 
member of th< 

in < Idd Fellowship in all it* branches He was the :nbcr 

of ti e local I'.'nai B'rith and 

times del 
phaned and Friendless Children of Eri 

and Organized by the order In * ; 

June. 1917. Mr. Las 

Din u of 

the I 

Mr. Lasdosky's interest in matters of edu 



office as Chairman of the Educational Committee of the Independent < >rdcr 
B'nai B'ritli. This committee looks alter the religious training of the [ewish 
inmates of juvenile institutions in Allegheny County. Mr. Lasdusky was also 
the first Jew to be elected by popular vote a member of the local school board 
of education, for a term of seven years, serving for two terms as I 'resident of 
the board and having the distinction that under his administration the town 
built a high school and equipped it in a very modern and progressive manner. 
In .March, 1891, Mr. Lasduskv was married to Miss Sallie Rubin, who has 
proven a helpmate in every sense of the word, for she devoted herself to their 
home and their business. To his wife Mr. Lasdusky concedes all credit for his 
success in their well-established business and his activities that have accom- 
plished so much "good to others." Mr. and Mrs. Lasdusky are the parents 
of four sturdy sons, two of whom. Ralph, aged 24, and Louis, aged 21, are in 
the service of Uncle Sam. Ralph volunteered at the beginning of the war. 
while Louis was drafted by his local board. The other two sons, Isidor and 
Harry, are students in the University of Pennsylvania. 



LOUIS LEBSTER 

In our lives, as in the growth of a giant oak, many years are often required 
to attain ftdl development. Much time, patience and diligence are necessary 
for the attainment of a worthy and enduring maturity and a firmly rooted 
foundation is necessary for a perfection of development. 

As we study the careers of some of the successful foreign-born American 
business men we are reminded of these facts, especially when one is fortunate 
enough to be able to interview such a man as Mr. Louis Lebster of Flint, Mich. 

Mr. Lebster was born in Husiatyn, Austria, September 15th, 1879, and 
came to America in the fall of 1894. He went to Fall River, Mass, where he 
worked as helper in a bakery for one year at $2.00 per week. He then went 
to Providence, R. L, where he worked at the same trade, at a slightly higher 
wage. Later we find him in Walesberg, Canada, where he went into the junk 
business, but after a few weeks decided that he needed a larger field for his 
activities, so went to Detroit, Mich. Here he entered into partnership with a 
Mr. Kovinsky, and remained one year. They later moved to Pontiac and here 
the partnership was dissolved. He returned to Detroit and engaged in the 
shoe business, but this venture proved unsuccessful, so he went to Flint, Mich., 
and in conjunction with his brother entered into the junk business. Their 
firm is known as Flint Scrap Iron & Metal Company, and is one of the most 
prosperous and modern concerns of the kind in the country. 

Mr. Lebster was married January 29th, 1902, to Miss Hanna Shapiro of 
Detroit and they have two children, one boy and one girl. 

Mr. Lebster is an active Mason and is also very devoted in his religious 
beliefs, being a prominent member of Congregation Beth Jacob of Detroit. 
1 le is also an ardent supporter of various charities, both local and national. 



167 



MAX LEBSTER 

It is a pleasure to record the events in the life of a man of whom it can 
be truly said, "lie took council ever of his courage — never of his fears." Few 
young men have been better endowed by nature and at the same time few have 
had more difficulties to overcome than those which opposed Mr. Lebster. 

lie was horn in llusityn, Galicia, Austria, July 17. [869, the son of Morris 
and Meria Lebster. From his father he inherited a large amount of business 
ability and an aptitude for culture, his father being an accomplished Jewish 
scholar as well as grain merchant of his native city. 

lie was twcim two years old when he came to America, and having little 
money with which to begin his career, was compelled to accept the first honest 
employment which came to hand. This was in a cotton mill in Fall River, 
Mass.. at the meager salary of ><> per week. He remained one year, when his 
first great misfortune overtook him. 1 lis right hand was caught in the machin- 
ery and not only was he incapacitated for further work of this nature, but 
nearl) losl his hand. 

When he became well enough, he secured employment in a furniture store, 
and during the next year accumulated .S400 capital, with which he went into the 
furniture business for himself in Detroit. Mich. This venture did not prove 
very profitable and after eight years' hard struggle he decided to try the iron 
and metal business. 

Going to Flint, Mich., he opened a scrap iron yard and at last found the 
vocation which was to bring him wealth and a position of usefulness and 
influence in the community. Mr. Lebster is a representative of that high-class 
type of Jew who lives up to the best traditions of Judiac law. 

To him the dispensing <>f charily is the first duty, and in this he is ably 
seconded by his wife. who. prior to her marriage to Mr. Lebster, [line 15. 
[894, was Miss Lena Kavinskv. of ball River, Mass. 

Mrs. Lebster is devoted to all the charities of their city and is a prominent 
member of the Eastern Star. 

At the present time Mr. Lebster is directing his talents and money toward 
the erection of a synagogue, which is sorely needed in their thriving Jewish 

community, lie is the founder and President of the Flint Hebrew Congrega- 
tion, is a prominent Mason and Maccabee and a member of the Flint Chamber 
of I oiniuerce. 

Among prominent charities having reasons for gratitude to Mr. and Mr-. 

Lebster may be mentioned the < >rphans' Home of Cleveland, ("lid Age 1 Iodic 

of Detroit and Talmud Torah. 

The Lebsters have one daughter, the wife of Dr. Abe Korrisky, of Detroit. 



JOSEPH LEFKOFSKY 

Someone has said that the soul of :i poel .an In- expressed in the perfei 
tion of a pie, and if that is true, the business establishment of Mr. [oseph 

Lefkofsk) emanates the perfection of true artistry, as an) on,- who has visit,-, 1 

bis delicatessen store at 255 Gratiot avenue, Detroit, Midi., can attest. 

He was born in Bilistock, Russia, Februarj 16, 1864, and came to America 

at the age of 01 wars. 

His first business experience was thai of a salesman in a drj g Is firm 

in Canada, where he remained four years, He then went to and 

ted in the restaurant and delicatessen business, which be conducted for eight 
1 loing t" I ictroit. Mich., be established himself at ins present location, 
where his business has been constantl) increasing for eighteen years, 

168 



For hostesses of Detroit to serve delicacies coming from Lefkofsky's 
means that their guests are being given the best that the market affords, as it 
has been Mr. Lefkofsky's unfailing policy to keep the standard of his product 
up to the highest mark. 

Mr. Lefkofsky was married July 17. 1886. to Miss Esther Mecanic of 
Toronto. Canada, and they have two sons, who are married and engaged with 
their father in the conduct of the business. Harry is married to Lilly Solinsky 
of Detroit, while Goodman's wife was formerlv Miss Lea Lepskv of Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

They all contribute most liberally to charities and are very popular in their 
social circle. 



ABRAHAM H. LEGOMSKY 

Prominent among the business men of Ashtabula, Ohio, is the name of 
Mr. Abraham Legomsky. 

Although yet a very young man, he has displayed remarkable ability and 
is successfully conducting a fine meat market and 
grocery. 

He was born in Haduchisak, Russia, Septem- 
ber 5, 1892. His father, David Legomsky, was a 
contractor of their native city. 

Young Abraham came to America at the age 
of fifteen and found his first employment in a cloth- 
ing store, where he worked for six months at $3 
per week. He then worked in a meat market in 
New York, after which he went to Marinette. Wis. 
At Cleveland, Ohio, he started a meat market for 
himself, obtaining much valuable experience which 
was to be useful to him when he went into business 
for himself in Ashtabula, Ohio. He is today re- 
garded as a rising young business man of much 
promise, and possessed of great ability. 

Mr. Legomsky was married October 23, 1915, 
to Miss Mollie R. Jaffee of Colchester, Conn. 

The two young neople are very popular in their social circle and are always 
ready to give liberally to any charitable cause. 

They are members of Ashtabula Congregation, and Mr. Legomsky is also 
affiliated with tne order of Moose and the Wilner Unterstitsing Farein of 
Cleveland. 




JONAS LEIBEL 

Every young man, arriving at maturity, has unconsciously formed his idea 
of success. 

Yet he is probably unaware of all the influences which have been at work 
to give shape and color to his ideal. 

To Jonas Leibel was given parents who understood the value of Biblical 
and religious literature and the men and women he knew first and best were 
those of the ancient Hebrew world. 

169 



Who can sav that the vision of the camels and caravans of the Ishmaelit- 

ish merchants toiling through the deserts did not lire the childish imagination 
for a commercial career? 

He was born in Krakow. Austria. March [3, (866, the son of Akivar and 
Sarah Leihel, the father a money broker and Jewish scholar, whose associa- 
tion and teachings were in themselves a liberal education. 

He was married at the age of 18 to Miss Rivka !• lomenhal't. and two 
years later the young people decided to try their fortunes in America. 

Landing in Xew York, his brother-in-law, who was a cloak and suit 
manufacturer, took him into his establishment and gave him a chance to learn 
the business. From being an operator he rapidly advanced to designing, at 
which he proved to be most adept, and lie remained nine years, having his 
salary raised from nothing during the days of his apprenticeship to Sj.umo per 
year. 

However, he tired of New York, and the idea of a business of his own 
was also taking form, so he resigned his position, and. going to Cleveland, 
started as designer for a small concern in order to acquaint himself fully with 
the business ami his new surroundings. 

Two years later we find him in business with three associates whom he 
bought out, one at a time as the business flourished, until today he is the sole 
owner of the immense establishment located at 208 St. Clair avenue, which 
bears his name, and merchandise bearing the Leihel label is now being shipped 
to every section of the United States. 

The Leibels have three line children, one hoy and two girls. The eldest 
daughter. Martha, is a high school graduate and also an accomplished pianist. 
Florence, only fourteen, is already in high school and also plavs the piano. 

The son, Carl, who is named for his grandfather, is in school and studying 
the violin. 

Mr. Leibel's name is connected with every charity in Cleveland, and he 
personally contributes to Mount Sinai Hospital and the Denver sanitarium. 
While he is. of course, interested in all Jewish movements, he is not prejudiced 
in his beneficence by either race, creed or religion. 

He has also several prominent organization connections, among them 
being the Masons, Elks and ( kid Fellows, the Congregations B'nai l-hurim and 
I'.'nai B'rith. 



JACOB LEIBOVITZ 
Success is the reward of those who "spurn delights anil live laborious 

days." 

The iron of opportunitj is shaped in life's red-hot forge in unceasing 
toil and perseverance. It is never a stroke of luck; the reins of the world are 

draw 11 loo tightly for that. 

These principles are aptly illustrated in the career of Mr. |a,oh I .eiho- 

vitz, who has known the bitterness of failure thai, h\ contrast, he might enioj 
to the full a success so hardly gained. 

lie wa- born in Roumania, Vugusl 15. 1878, and was fortunate in having 

hi-- childhood surrounded by an atmosphere of intellectuality, as his father was 
a line lew ish scholar. 

lb- came to Montreal. Canada, in 1902, and having ., bill,- capital, went 
into business for himself and was at firsl \cr\ successful. llowe\er. In- was 

most unfortunate in losing his mone) during a panic and arrived in I leve 
land. Ohio, with bui $500, which he invested in the millinery business. >,,,,,. 
that time his unceasing labor and able management have resulted in an cnor- 

l7o 



mous wholesale millinery establishment, and also a fur manufacturing com- 
pany at 6307 Euclid avenue. 

Mr. Leibovitz was married in December, [901, to Miss Mina Berkowitz, 
who accompanied her husband to America the following year, and has been 
a wonderful help to him during the difficult years in which he was endeavor- 
ing to establish himself. 

.Mr. Leibovitz considers a good education of the utmost value to a young 
man or woman, regardless of their vocation, and the six Leibovitz children 
are given the best possible advantages which money can procure. 

In addition to the regular academic studies, their training in music is 
most thorough, consisting of both piano and violin, and if the Leibovitz family 
gives to the world a really great musician, it will be another laurel leaf added 
to the crown of artistry which the Jewish nation wears, as some of the world's 
most wonderful harmonies have come from instruments in the inspired hands 
of Jews. 

The benefits of Mr. Leibovitz's prosperity do not end with his own fam- 
ily, as he is most generous in his contributions to all charities. He is also very 
active in local affairs, being past President of the Business Welfare Associa- 
tion. 

He is also prominently connected with Talmud Torah, B'nai B'rith and 
Beth Abraham. 



JACOB LEIBOVIT 

Mr. Jacob Leibovit of Key West, Fla., is a young man still engaged in 
the work of climbing the ladder of success, and, judging by his past perform- 
ances, his unusual reputation and great intelligence, we cannot doubt but that 
the future still holds great things in store for him. 
He was born on May 5, 1885, in Botoshan, Rou- 
mania, the son of Abraham and Mollie Leibovit, 
who are both at present at Key West. He came to 
America in 1900. The first three years he spent in 
Philadelphia, where he was employed in the great 
John B. Stetson hat works. He then came to Key 
West, taking a position as a clerk for D. H. Wein- 
stein, whose daughter, Tillie, he was destined to 
marry later, on the 9th of February, 191 3. 

In 1908 he became a junior partner in the busi- 
ness of his ultimate father-in-law. In 1910 he 
bought Mr. Weinstein's interest in the firm, which 
was then only a retail business, and in 1914 he 
started jobbing on his own account, and at the pres- 
ent writing he owns a very large retail and whole- 
sale gents' furnishings business at 506 Duval street. 
Key West, doing a large and profitable business 
over the whole state of Florida. 

Personally, Mr. Leibovit is a very sympathetic young man, of sincere and 
earnest character and most congenial with all whom he meets. He is a con- 
spicuous member of the Key West Congregation, the Knights of Pythias and 
many other Jewish and non-Jewish organizations and institutions. Two chil- 
dren, Bertha Claire and Sylvia, have blessed the married life of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leibovit. 




171 



NATHAN LESHNER 

The spirit of independence and self-help is the source of all genuine worth 
in the individual, and is the means f bringing success and affluence to men 
who have no advantages of outside help. _ 

It illustrates in no uncetrain manner what it is possible to accomplish 
when perseverance and determination form the keynote of a mans hte. 

( )ne of the best examples of these principles is Mr. Nathan Leshner, who 
was horn in Reiver. Guberne, Mosnue, Russia, February 20, [887, the son 
of a distinguished fewish scholar and wine merchant. At the age oi twelve 
he started earning his own living working for a wholesale grocer. 

lie came to America in fuly, 1000. and landed in New York, when- lie 

remained only about eight davs. going in turn to hall River. Mass. and Mid- 
dletown, < »hio. He started buying and selling rags— first with a i>nsh cart and 
later with a horse and wagon. , 

\ little later he went to Hamilton. I >hlO, where he was SO successful that 
in less than a year he had saved $1,000. IK- then went hack to Europe with 
his brother Jacob. . . . , ,. 

1 hiring his stay in Europe he was married to Rosa Strauss, and 111 the tall 
of 100- returned with hi- bride to America. 

Mr lcslmer landed in Buffalo with absolutely no money and suffered 

fearful deprivations until he reached Middlctown. Ohio. Here he worked 
for a short time, then went to Hamilton, I )hio, the city which was to he his 
permanent home, and where his fortune was made. 



JOSEPH LEVENE 

The fews have given to tlie world the basic principles upon which all law is 
founded." Their ancient codes have for centuries balanced the Male-, of 
human justice. We never realize so fully the import of that old truism " 1 here 
is nothing new under the Mm" until we find how easily traceable 1- our mod- 
ern law. hack to the old Talmudie principle-. 

It i- not strange therefore that some of the leading legal practitioners ..I 
our country are Jews, a- centuries of training and tradition have peculiarly 
lined them for this profession. 

tine of the leading attorneys of Yonkers, N. "i .. is Mr. Joseph Levene, 
whose offices are located al 193 S. Broadway. Mr. Levene claim- Vmenca as 
the land of hi- nativity, being born in Mt. Vernon, N. Y., March 12, [888. 

Father, Morris Levene, was a prominent manufacturer of that city. 

Mr. Levene graduated from the Mt. Vernon High School in 1905, from 
New York tin i ollege in ['909, and completed the law course in the same 
institution in 1912. lie was admitted to the bar in 1913, and so rapid was his 
rise in tin- profession thai he he'd the position of citj attornej during 1916 and 
1917, He i- al-o a member of the legal advisor} board and although -till a 

\crv \..img man. ha- mad.- remarkable pro: I 

At the present time he is expe ing to he 1 ailed i" tin colors, and 1- wait- 
ing anxiousl) to serve his countrj in any capacity. 

Mr. 1 evene i- a prominent member of tin- Elks and 1- also a member ol 
th.- New York Federation of Charities and the Mt. Vernon I loin.- for the \ged. 

He i- a line example of our best Citizenship and ha- a brilliant career 

before him. 



17.' 



HERMAN LEVENDORF 

i Ine of the most striking characteristics of the Jewish people is the high 
standard of scholarly attainment achieved by even those engaged in humble 
occupations. 

It is common practice for the Jew, working from sunrise t" sunset at a 
menial occupation, to devote his evenings to the stud) of some leather-bound 
tome of the Talmud, thumbed and frayed from years of use. This has devel- 
oped ;i scholar]) standard that is enlarged to the highest degree by those whose 
lives have been devoted to the study and propounding of Jewish doctrim 

Such ;i man is Herman l/.ikcil Levendorf, who was born in Wilna, Rus- 
sia. PcivmliiT 15, 1S70. Ilis father n;h a wealth) merchant of that city and 
was able in give liis -.on excellent educational advantages. 

He was married in his native town November 5, 1891, to Mis- Ethel 
Chakrusky, daughter of Mr. Aaron Chakrusky, a very learned man, and in the 
joining of these two families there were united the very highest ideals of 
scholarship and moral precept. 

The following year Mr. Levendorf and his young wife came to America 
and settled ill Cleveland, where Mr. Levendorf tunk ii] 1 the duties of a Rabbi. 
Here he spent two years, when he removed to McKeesport, Pa., for three 
years, to Greensburg eight years and to Homestead for two years, serving 
in the same capacity iii each place. 

Ilis next ministry was in Monessen, Pa., when- he is at present located 

and where he has done an untold amount of good, especially among the chil- 
dren, in whom he is intensely interested. 

lie first started the Sunday school in Monessen, and has worked unceas- 
ingly to inculcate sound Jewish doctrines in youthful minds for the- past thirty 

years. Mr. Levendorf is a firm believer in a thorough Jewish education for 
young people, believing that if they are taught to follow these doctrines 
closely their every act will earn for them respect and honor. This is well 
exemplified in his own fine family, all of whom are occupying positions of 
prominence and influence. 

< )f their three sons, two of them are in the service of their country. Israel 
being in the medical corps at Camp Stewart and Abraham a first lieutenant. 

The younger son. Lewis, is still in school, specializing in pharmacy. 

Their daughter, Rose, is married to Mr. Frank Linkoff of Wheeling. 
\Y. \ a., am! Esther, who is a line musician, is still at home. She has a won- 
derful voice, which has delighted hundreds who have heard her. 

\s might he expected, both Mr. and Mrs. Levendorf are most generous 
in their subscriptions to charities, among which we might specially mention 
the I ,os Angeles and Denver hospitals and the Hebrew Immigrant Society. 

It is the earnest desire of the people of Monessen that Mr. Levendorf 
shall remain for many years in their midst, as his teachings and model citizen- 
ship are a constant inspiration to the entire community. 



HENRY H. LEVENSON 
In the Jewish communal life of Boston the high esteem and popularity 

enjoyed by Mr. Henry II. Levenson can hardly he rivaled by any one. All classes 

of tiie Jewish population know and hold him in high regard. He is promi- 
nently connected with a score of organizations and institutions, his voice is 
heard wherever fewish interests are discussed, he is always a defender of 
democracy and popular rights, and an ardent Zionist. He is a well-read and 
versatile man who can converse on nearly all topics of daily life and wdiose 

17.1 



manifold abilities have conspicuously manifested themselves wherever and 
whenever he was called upon to take an active interest. 

We must precede our discussion of Mr. Levenson's career with a state- 
ment thai he has one of the best-organized minds one is apt to encounter in 
any relation of life. Mr. Levenson is a man of business; in fact, one of the 
busiest men in llnstnn. and yet owing to the systematic manner in which he 
goes about his tasks, he finds lime and leisure enough to actively interest himself 
in the doings of his fellow man. I lours dues he spend in the work of uplift 
which he conducts among the Jewish masses, and his great popularity is un- 
questionably due to the fine and unselfish spirit with which he accomplishes 
his noble task. 

Henry II. Levenson was horn in Zizmo, Province of Vilna, Russia, on 
April 22. 1877. lie came to America with his parents at the age of fifteen, 
and as he was young enough to he sent to elementary school, his parents sent 
him there and later to high school. As a hoy he helped in his father's dry- 
goods store and after his graduation from high school he was made a member 
of his father's firm, which came to he known as L. Levenson & Sons. For 
thirty years the firm was in existence, and only recently it was dissolved, when 
Mr. Levenson went into real estate, where his good judgment and ability have 
in a short time made a success of his new venture. 

Mr. Levenson, however, is not onlj a business man. lie decided to 
gain a thorough preparation in the law, and he enured the Harvard Univer- 
sity Law School, from which he graduated in t'll.v and was admitted to the 

nar in the same year. His place of business is located at 2~ School street. 

Mr. Levenson organized the first Zionist society iii Boston, naming it the 
B'nai Zion Educational Society, and becoming its first President, lie was also 
President of the Zionist Council of Boston, of the Hebrew Protective League, 
of the Boston Educational Union and of the Jewish People's Institute, which 

he built and maintained largely from his own fluids. In the civic life of 

I'.osinn Mr. Levenson made his mark Iw accepting the presidency of the Bos- 
ton Citizenship League and of the United Improvement Association. Mr. 
Levenson is President of the West End Hebrew Association, which has re- 
ditu erected a building at a cost of $40,000, to which Mr. Levenson himself 
subscribed a few thousand dollars. Mr. Levenson is also the Grand Master 

of the Independent Order Sons of Israel, a New England fraternal organiza- 
tion, and a I (irector of Federated lew ish Charities of Boston. I [e is a member 
of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, the Secretarj of one of tin- local 
hoard- of tin- National Credit Men's Association and a prominent figure in 

the commercial life of the city. 

'In June 10. 1017. Mr. Levenson was honored by an election to the first 

American Jewish Congress. Ills great popularity made him an case winner 
in i'i'- election and the fact that lie is a member of the Executive 1 ommittee 
of the Congress i trganization Committee contributed large!} t" his success at 

■oils. 

in addition to his civic interests. Mr. Levenson is socially prominent and 

a member of the Elysium 1 lnl •. one of the fine) of its type in Boston. 



IM 



JACOB LEVINE 

It is perhaps not generally known that the discovery of America may be 
attributed to the wealth and influence of Jews. Yet the Spanish archives and 
records reveal the fact that the expedition of Columbus was financed by two 
wealthy Jews, Luis de Santangel and Gabriel Sanchez, the former being the 
Chancellor of the royal household and the latter chief Treasurer of Arragon. 

These men not only used their influence with the Queen in the royal 
endorsement of the expedition, but furnished the necessary funds. Thus the 
b.. coming to .America from a foreign country brings with him a proud her- 
itage dating back to the days when the intrepid Columbus sailed forth upon 
the world's greatest adventure. 

\\ irh hardly more encouragement did Jacob Levine push his way from 
extreme poverty to a position of wealth and influence. He was born in 
Geronin, Wilner, Guberne, Russia, in 1865, his father, Wolf Levine, being an 
innkeeper and a fine Jewish scholar. 

He came to America 32 years ago, landing in Xew York with but 18 
cents to start his fortunes in the new world. Taking the first employment 
which presented itself, he became a track walker for the railroad at 50 cents 
per day, which he continued for four months, when he went to Hoosic Falls, 
N. Y., and started peddling dry goods. This lasted for three years, during 
which time he met Miss Bessie Wolf, who was later to become his wife. They 
were married in 1890. 

Mrs. Levine's father is a great Talmudist and Jewish scholar and is liv- 
ing at the present time in Jerusalem. 

Shortly after his marriage, Mr. Levine decided to go to Xew Castle, Pa., 
where he began buying and selling junk. . Continuing for several years and 
accumulating a small capital, he entered into partnership with S. H. Levine, 
Joe Levine and Harry Edelstein in a scrap iron yard under the firm name 
of Xew Castle Junk Co. Eight years later he sold his interest and opened 
another yard in partnership with his son, the firm being known as J. Levine 
& Son. 

This business has been wonderfully successful and is a fine example of 
what determination and a high order of business ability can accomplish. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levine have six children, four boys and two girls, who are 
all receiving good educations. 

Knowing full well what it means to feel the sharp pangs of poverty, Mr. 
Levine is always most generous with the unfortunate, and contributes lib- 
erally to all charities. He is President of Tiferis Israel Congregation, Presi- 
dent of Chevra Kadishe, member of B'nai B'rith, B'rith Sholom and Jewish 
Immigration Society. He is also Xational Director of the Denver Hospital 
and subscribes liberallv also to all local charities. 



MAX LEVINE 

Books alone will not make a genteel or successful man. I had rather con- 
fide great responsibilities to one who had learned the art of self-discipline; 
who gave careful heed to every duty that came his way ; who was a man of 
rectitude, decision and conscientious in all business dealings. 

Such a man is Mr. Max Levine, who began his business career in America 
with $1.50 capital and is now one of the most prominent men in Lewistown, Pa. 

He was born in Kovna, Guberne, Russia, September 15, 1863, and came 
to America in 188S. Coming to a brother in Harrisburg, Pa., with but the 
afore-mentioned $1.50 for capital, he obtained credit for a small stock of 
merchandise, which he started peddling with a pack. This he continued for 

175 



four years when he decided to go to Africa. This was a most unfortunate 
move from a financial standpoint, but very rich in experience. Returningto 
Harrisburg he arrived with but $4.00, but having left behind him a reputation 
for absolute reliability, he received credit for a horse and wagon and started 
buying and selling old clothing and scrap metal. 

Four years later he went to Lewistown where his present large establish- 
ment is located, although the family still lives in Harrisburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levine have six children, five boys and one girl. Harry 
is in business in Lewistown and was married July 23, 1918, to Miss Lena 
Krentzman, daughter of Albert Krentzman, a prominent family of Lewistown. 
Sam was a lawyer in Baltimore, Md. Henry is serving as top sargeant in the 
army. Samuel volunteered and is serving in the navy. The younger boys are 
stilfin school, as is the daughter who is also an accomplished musician. 

The Levines are very prominent socially in Harrisburg as they arc affili- 
ated with every Jewish organization and hold prominent places in many of 
them. 

Mrs. Levine devotes much time to charity work in which she is a recog- 
nized leader. 

Mr. Levine is connected with Congregation Hezig Hamona of Harrisburg. 
Independent tinier of B'rith Holam. and is a liberal contributor to Denver 
hospitals, the Immigration Society of Xew York and all the Yishivas, as well 
as all local charities. 



HERMAN C. LEVINGER 

Herman C. Levinger is one of the later generation of American born 
Jews whose career is worthy of emulation. 

It was on September 16, 1878, that Herman Levinger first opened his 
eyes to the joys and perplexities of this great world. His father was a very 
scholarlv man — a furrier by trade. 

Young Herman went to school until the age of fourteen when the adverse 
circumstances of his father made it necessary for him to go to work with a 
view not only of earning his own living but that of his parents as well. 

His first employment as errand boy brought the scant remuneration of 
Sj.no per week, but it carried with it a wealth of experience which was to 
serve him well in later years. 

Deciding to learn his father's trade, he worked as a furrier for three years. 
His next experience was that of a traveling salesman at which be was ven 
Successful, but the road wink did not appeal to him. so he quit and went into 

the cloak and suit business. 

Three years later he came to t ihio and started working in a junk yard, 

with the idea of learning the business, and how admirably he succeeded in this 
is atteMed bv the fact that within a few years be bad established himself in an 
iron and metal yard of bis own at Fremont, < 'bio. where he is at the present 

time engaged in a most profitable and flourishing business at No. [200 Carbon 

street. 

Mi. Levinger was married Januarj 1. i'x>-. to Miss Dora Weisman of 

I remont, a .banning lady who is very popular in their social circle. 

Vllhough Mr. Levinger's education is to some extent acquired, 

the earl) age at which be was obliged to leave school, he is a firm believer in 

tin great value of education in a business career. \t the same lime he believes 
that the young man who is obliged to work bis own Way in the world is most 

likeb to develop strong traits of character so necessary to sucks-. 

Mr. I .evinger is a member of the I [ungarian ( !ongregation of Detroit and 

a liberal contributor to all charities. 

176 



BENJAMIN F. LEVINSON 

In the practice of law an intimate knowledge of human nature is an in- 
valuable asset, which no amount of academic knowledge can replace. Some of 
our country's best lawyers have been men who have struggled for a living in 
many lines of endeavor before they finally started the practice of their 
profession. 

This applies to Benjamin F. Levinson, who was born in Kieff, March 9, 
1X88. and was brought by his parents to America when but two years of age'. 
Mr. Levinson is the fortunate possessor of a strong, vigorous mentality, as he 
is a descendant of a family of rabbis and learned men and his ancestry is 
conspicuous for scholarly attainment. 

Mr. Levinson attended public school in Philadelphia, where his family first 
located, and at the age of twelve began his business career by selling news- 
papers. At the age of thirteen he went to New York and there learned the 
electrical trade, followed by several years in Columbus, Ohio, where he found 
employment with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 

In 1911 he became a collector for an installment house, at the same time 
taking up a course in stenography at business college. This opened the way 
tn his opportunity for gaining legal experience, as he became stenographer for 
a large law firm. By working very hard he was able to pass the bar examina- 
tion in 1915 and started the practice of law at 44 West Broad street, Columbus. 
Although still a very young man, he is distinguishing himself in his profession 
and is also conspicuous in Jewish activities of various kinds. He has fre- 
quently held important honorary positions and has been called upon to repre- 
sent the Jewish citizens of Columbus in a number of enterprises. He is ex- 
Secretary of the Jewish Community of Columbus and the local Congress Com- 
mittee and was a delegate to the preliminary conference in Philadelphia. There 
are no Jewish activities in Columbus, or in fact of national scope, which escape 
the attention of Mr. Levinson or lack his unlimited co-operation. 

Mr. Levinson was married March 21, 1909, to Miss Esther Clebone and 
they have four children, Inez, Maurice, Phyllis and Miriam. 

Mr. Levinson is a member of the Congregation Iieth Jacob and is a mod- 
ern Orthodox Jew of the highest type. 



JACOB LEVY 

A man of much wisdom and broad experience once said "The real differ- 
ence between men is energy. A strong will, a settled purpose, and an invincible 
determination can accomplish almost anything ; and in this lies the distinction 
between great men and little men." 

The careers of Jacob Levy and Harry M. Gordon, which merged in one 
business about twelve years ago, are identical in all essentials, as they both had 
many difficulties to overcome, and "invincible determination" was the sterling 
quality that carried them both through to success. 

In this biography we will deal with the events in the career of Mr. Jacob 
Levy. Mr. Gordon's life history appears under a separate heading. 

Jacob Levy was born in Suwalk, Guberne, Russia, in October, 1867, and 
came to America in 1888. He landed in New York and began peddling small 
merchandise of various kinds which he continued for six months. Going from 
there to Pittsburgh, he sold dry goods for a year and a half, and finally drifted 
to Circleville, Ohio, the scene of his future activities. 

Llere he bought and sold old iron and metal until 1906 when he met his 
present partner, Mr. Gordon, and they decided to enter into partnership. 

177 



Their business lias grown very rapidly, and they are rated anion';- the 
most successful business men of their community. 

A year prior to coming to America Mr. Levy was married to Miss Sara 
Sashonski, ami they have five children who seem to have inherited their father's 
independence of spirit ami business ability, as they are all earning their own 
living. 

Mr. Levy is a member of iguanas Acham Congregation of Columbus, 
( Ihio, and is also affiliated with the Knights of Joseph. 

lie is a liberal contributor to Denver and Los Angeles hospitals, the 
< Irphans' 1 tome of Cleveland. < >hio, and the Talmud Torah of Columbus, < >hio. 



MAX M. LEVY 

The Jewish community of New < Irleans, La., includes with just pride the 
name of .Max M. Levy among its most successful and distinguished members. 

Mr. Levy is, comparatively speaking, still a very young man. but he has 
made a place for himself both in the Jewish and the general community which 
justly places him among the leading men of the city, lie was born in New 

< Irleans on November 26, (883, the son of David and Sanchen Levy. After 

completing his studies in the public schools of his native city and at a military 
academy, he took up a course in a business college and. at the age of nineteen, 
started to work as a clerk in the Interstate Bank. A year ami a half later he 
changed positions and served in a similar capacity, and for a similar period of 
time in another banking institution, the Stale National Bank. Willi the three 
years' experience behind him. he was now prepared to reach out for a larger 
held of activity, and his father, who recognized his sterling qualities, entrusted 
to him the management of a sugar plantation which be owned. In Mi; Mr. 
Levy organized the Stern Foundry, in which concern he has held the office of 
Vice-President and which he has helped in make a large and flourishing 

enterprise. 

Mr. Levy's ability and line personality are readily recognized, however, 
and greatly appreciated, not only in the business world bin also in the fields 
of philanthropy, civic and social progress. Thus, he is a member of ever) 
leading Jewish institution of the city and of main institutions and associations 
of a general character, lie is a thirty-second degree Mason, a Sbriiur and an 
Elk; he is a director of the Touro lnlirmarv and has served cm the boards of 

the Young Men's lb-brew Association and of the Touro Synagogue, lb- has 
taken also an active and leading pan in the Jewish War Relief and contributes 
largely and liberally to various other charitable causes. At the present time he 

is devoting himself entirely to work of a patriotic nature. lie is on the 

Executive Committee of the War Savings Stamp for Louisiana ( ommission. 

Mr. Levv\ services to the community were immeasurablv enhanced on 

obei [8, ion. when he was married 10 Miss Louise Isaacs, a charming 

young lad) anil a member of one of the leading and mosl prominent families 
of New 1 uleans, for Mrs. Levy is also an ardent and active worker in the 
various fields of charily and philanthropy, 



17S 



JOSEPH LEVYE 

The power of adaptability to various circumstances and conditions is one 
of the best traits which a struggling young business man can possess, and 
accounts, to a considerable extent, for the success of Mr. Joseph Levye who 
was born in Kavno, Russia, in 1863 and came to America in 1885. 

Landing in New York City, Mr. Levye worked for a short time at the 
carpenter trade, as this was the first honest employment available. He then 
went to Hartford, Conn., and peddled with a pack, working at the carpenter 
trade all his spare time. His next venture was in Providence, R. I., where 
he began by buying and selling old clothes. After several years he saw a big 
future in buying and selling cotton remnants, and decided to devote all his 
energies to this line. That his judgment was sound is attested to by the fact 
that he is today doing a national business in wholesale cotton remnants and 
has accumulated a fortune. 

Mr. Levye was married in March, 1890, to Miss Annie Hirsh of Hart- 
ford, Conn. They have four children, one boy and three girls, who have all 
been given excellent educations. The daughter Julia is also very accomplished 
both in music and art. Lea is married to Mr. Max Ross who is in business 
with Mr. Levye. Both Mr. and Mrs. Levye are exceedingly active in the 
promotion of charities and are considered great benefactors of the Jews com- 
ing to America. Mr. Levye is also very patriotic and was one of the leading 
spirits in raising fifty thousand dollars among the Jews in Providence for the 
relief of war sufferers. He is also a member of B'nai Zion and Anserarno 
Congregation, Zionist Society, Zionist Order, Havra Zass and Havra Tillam. 
He is also a director of the Free Loan Association, the Jewish Cemetery. Old 
Age Home and Hebrew Free School. His life is an inspiration to the young 
people of Providence and it is hoped that he will be given many more years 
of usefulness and activity. 



DR. ADOLPH L. LEWIN 

A physician of note, well known in the city of Pittsburgh as a general 
practitioner, Dr. Adolph L. Lewin, first saw the light of day in the province 
of Posen, Germany, on February 25, 1871. The son of Herman and Pauline 
Lewin. who have both since died in this country, Adolph L. Lewin was only 
nine years old when he was brought here by his parents, lie immediately 
entered elementary school and then attended high school and the University of 
Pittsburgh, receiving his M. D. degree in 1892, and M. L T . C. D. in Berlin in 
1895. Since then he studied abroad frequently, taking up internal medicine. 

Dr. Lewin began almost immediately the practice of his profession. Since 
his eleventh year he had been employed as a chemist for Dr. Hugo Blank, 
and he also held the position of Pathologist in West Penn Hospital and taught 
pathology in the Medical School from 1895 t0 1 902. In this way his scientific 
training was very comprehensive. In a few years Dr. Lewin became more 
generally known throughout the city as a civic worker, being elected President 
of Allied Boards of Trade seven times. At the present moment he is a staff 
surgeon at the Montefiore Hospital. 

In addition to his practice, Dr. Lewin is socially prominent, being a mem- 
ber and a former Trustee of the Congregation Tree of Life, and a Trustee of 
the Montefiore Hospital. He is a member of the Pittsburgh Board of Public 
Education since its creation in 1913. Dr. Levin also holds many other positions 
of honor. 

In April, 1897, Dr. Lewin was married to Miss Eva Jackson, who is a 

179 



native "f Pittsburgh. The couple was blessed with a son named Herbert 
Aaron. 

Dr. Lewin is a modern < trthodox in religion, and believes in die impor- 
tance of lewish education to a boy. 



MAX LEWIS 

One of our great writers lias said that the talent of success is nothing 
more than doing what yon can do well, and doing well whatever you do with- 
out a thought of fame. 

Many men who are today occupying positions of greatest usefulness have 
succeeded in just this manner; in fact, few really worth-while careers have 
been spectacular or meteoric in their rise. 

If you were to go to ( >il City, Pa., you would find within its gates no 
citizen more thoroughly respected; no man whose life is of greater usefulness 
to his fellows than that of Mr. Max Lewis, yet he is one of the most quiel and 
unassuniing of men, and very modest regarding his own achievements. 

Max Lewis was born in Eydtkuhuen, East Prussia. March 21,. 1883, the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Julius Lewis. His father conducted a restaurant in 
his native city. 

Mr. Lewis came to America in April, 1903, and landed in New York, 
where he remained for a week visiting relatives. 1 laving a brother in ( >il City, 
Pa., he decided to go with him, and for the first three years worked for his 

brother in the grocery business. He then decided to go into the grocery busi- 
ness for himself in which he has been very successful, and in which he is 
engaged today. 

Mr. Lewis is active in a number of fraternal organizations including the 
Tree of Life, the < Md Fellows, and the Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

Ik* also subscribes liberally to all charities including the Denver Hospitals 
and the < Irphans' Nome in Erie. 



BEN LICHTER 

Chelsea, Mass.. is fortunate in having prominently identified with it* 
business life a number of influential Jews, among whom it i* our pleasure to 

mention the name of Mr. Ben l.ichter. 

Mr. l.ichter was born in Valino, Guberne, Russia, in September, iss;. 
and came to America in the year 1905, landing in Philadelphia, where he 
obtained employment in a shoe factor) at the small sum of $5.00 per week. 
["his he continued for two and one half years, gaining much valuable experi 

en, -e. and then went into business for himself, the line being bags and burlap, 

and he is t< >< lav one- ,ii the mo fill business men in Chelsea, the name 

of the ti I'm being l.ichter Bros, 

In February, 1911, occurred the marriage of Mr. Lichtcr t" Rosa Mar- 
u ■ d 1 1 « - ol 1 hclsea, and Mis. Lichter is today occupying .1 verj prominent p 
in the social life of the community. Both herself and husband are raosl 
erous in their eiii~ to charit) and arc a. me in all movements for civic 
betterment. 

Mr. l.ichter i- a member of the I'.'uai Zion and 1 lobno \ olina Association 
of Boston, M 1 

1x0 



MORRIS AND IGNATZ LICHTCSIEN 




It is the pride and joy of a father to be blessed with a son who takes an 

active interest in the happiness and comfort of his parents and prepares him- 
self to assume the responsibilities of the father's 

business, when he is ready to lay it down. Such a 

son is Mr. Morris Lichtcsien, who is engaged in the 

iron and metal scrap business with his father in 

Xorwalk, Ohio. 

Mr. Ignatz, the elder Lichtcsien, was born in 

Lanaur, Austria-Hungary, in the fall of 1875, and 

when a lad of nine years of age was left an orphan 

and compelled to make his way in the world alone, 

as he had no relatives to lend him a helping hand. 

He started out earning his living by peddling small 

merchandise, and continued for eleven years. 

At the age of eighteen he was married in his 

native town, and two years later he and his wife 

came to America to try their fortunes in the land of 

equal opportunities. He started out peddling with a 

hand cart, and this small beginning was the nucleus is ""'" Lichtcsien 

of the large iron and metal yard owned and operated by himself and son in 

Xorwalk, Ohio. 

We feel a word should be said regarding the able assistance which Mr. 
Lichtcsien has received from his son Morris, who is 
a man of exceptional business ability, and their in- 
stitution is today known throughout the state of 
Ohio. 

The Lichtcsiens have six children, of whom 
Morris is the oldest, and they have all been given 
excellent educations both in Hebrew and English. 
At the same time Mr. Lichtcsien has found oppor- 
tunity to devote considerable time and money to the 
development and promotion of charitable organiza- 
tions, as like all good Jews he feels this a part of the 
duties of citizenship. He is also a member of the 
Hungarian Temple in Cleveland. 

Mr. Lichtcsien's code of living is well worth the 
emulation of young men just starting out in life. 
"Give your fellowmen a square deal. Be an honest, 
Morris i.r.iii.si.ii energetic and consistent worker. 




SAMUEL LICHTMAN 



One of our most prominent Americans — a man of wide acquaintance and 
a keen student of human nature has said "I never met a self-made in my life 
who did not firmly believe that he had been handicapped, no matter how great 
his success, and who was not determined to give his children the advantages 
of which he felt so great a need. 

"It used to be a popular theory that strong men who had won great places 
in the business world would have been ruined if they had been educated. The 
better belief is that on account of genius and special capacity they succeeded 
in spite of their disadvantages." 

His opinion reminds us of the life of Mr. Samuel Lichtman, whose varied 
career has resulted in such marked success, and is well worth commemorating 

181 




for the benefit of young nun and women who are having a hard struggle to 
succeed. 

IK- was born in Laskrung, Komino Spodolsky, 
Russia, fifty-eight years ago, his father bting a dis- 
tinguished Jewish scholar, from whom he obtained 
much knowledge and valuable precepts which have 
been of inestimable benefit to him through life. 

He «as married at the age of 25 to Miss Etta 
Utman. Five years later we find them departing 
for Vmerica in seek their fortune in the new world. 

Their destination was Buffalo, where Mr. 
Lichtman bought and sold rai;s for about nine 
months. However, as he had learned the wool 
business in Russia, he turned this knowledge to ac- 
count under the firm name of Fox & Lichtman. 
Vfter about four years this partnership was dis- 
solved and Mr. Lichtman was for a short time asso- 
ciated with a Mr. Shapiro. This was followed by 

1 . . . , , . ,1 ■ , ' •'in 1 Llctai 1111111 

a short term 01 partnership with Mr. tionck. 

By this time Mr. Lichtman's sons, Jacob and Victor, had grown old enough 
tn help assume the business responsibilities, so they were taken into partner- 
ship with his father, and the husiness i- todaj being operated under the firm 
name of S. Lichtman & Sons, and occupies a line four-story, modern brick 
building devoted to the re-sale of paper and woolen rags. Mr. Lichtman was 
,,11,. of the lir-i in Buffalo to start the c<>tii m and woolen rag business. 

The Lichtmans have seven children, three hoys and four girls, who are 
well educated, and the older one- already occupying positions of importance 
and responsibility. They are being thoroughly trained in business principles 

SO llu\ ma) carrj on the many interests which their father will at some time 
turn over to them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lichtman are much interested in Rabbinical schools and 
contribute liberally to their support. 

They also are generous in their contributions to all charities, including 
the Relief Fund ami all the Yishivas. 

Mr. Lichtman i- a prominent member of B'nei Israel. Ili- career 1- one 
of the 1110-1 interesting and successful in the husiness history ot Buffalo. 



ABE LICOFSKY 

( if all the race- of the world, none have fought SO mam battles for free 
(lom and moral uplift a- the Jew-. Since the earliest dawn ><\ civilization 
have always been arrayed upon the side 01 rirjit and ill-lice. 
Small wonder, then, that ill the present international cri-i- thousands of 

fewish home- have given their most priceless possessions the sons in whom 
all their hope- are centered. 

We mention this in connection with the biograph) of Mr, M>c Licofsky, 
c hose -on Nathan is now serving a- an officer miller our beloved Mai Spangled 
Banner. 

M.e Licofsk) wa- horn in \ ilna. I iiiherue. Ku--ia. in the war i860 He 

,li,l not come to Vmerica until in Vugust, 1899, some years after hi- father 

had made hi- home in the new world. Consequently, when he arrived at OUT 

shores he cam ' ihio, when his father resided, and ! 

peddling junk. This lie continued for thirteen years, accumulating enough 
monej to go into th<- grocer) business. That he has succeeded is attested 

182 



b) the fact that he is now one of the leading business men of Wooster and is 
very well-to-do. 

Mr. Licofsky was married in Europe two years prior to his coming to 
America, to Miss Nittie Abramoritz, and they have four children, two hoys 
and two girls, who have made excellent records in school. The eldest son, 
Nathan, is an officer in the army. Sam is still in school. The eldest daughter, 
Sarah, has displayed exceptional business ability, and is rendering valuable 
assistance to her father. Ethel is going to school. P>oth girls have been edu- 
cated in music and play delightfully. 

A Jewish characteristic which it would be laudable in other races to 
emulate is their generosity in matters of charity and boundless enthusiasm for 
all enterprises dealing with the public good. 

In the case of Mr. Licofsky, he not only gives most liberally to local 
charities, but also to those in far distant cities, such as the Denver and Los 
Angeles hospitals. He is also a prominent member of the congregation in 
Canton, Ohio. 



LOUIS LICOFSKY 

Who, having seen David Warfield, the great actor, in perhaps his best 
role, the Auctioneer, has not been moved to tears by the trials of the typical 
immigrant Jew, trying to maintain his footing upon our slippery commercial 
fabric ? 

Yet we have many thousands every year whose histories are just as 
replete with pathos; whose struggles have been just as severe. 

Among the successful Jews whose upward climb has been full of ob- 
stacles, the name of Louis Licofsky should be given particular prominence. 

Born in Yilna, Guberne, Russia, in April, 1843, he did not come to 
America until forty-three years of age, the time when most men would despair 
of making a new start in life. 

He landed in Philadelphia, and having no money, was obliged to walk to 
New York City, where he managed to get some tinware on credit and started 
out on his humble commercial career. 

Three months later he went to Hazleton, Pa., and finally to Wooster, Ohio, 
where he established himself in the junk business, which he is prosperously 
conducting at the present time. 

Mr. Licofsky was married in Europe in 1882 to Miss Esther Zuckerman, 
and they have raised a fine family of ten children, the eight boys all being well 
established in business and the two daughters married. 

Who can estimate the wonderful value of this family to the social and 
civic life, not only of their own home town, but of the state? For states and 
nations are onlv families of larger growth, each individual of which conspicu- 
ously influences the destiny of the whole body. 

They are all most generous in their contributions to charity and not only 
are active in local movements but are assisting the Denver and Los Angeles 
hospitals as well, and enjoy the respect and admiration of their entire com- 
munity. 



183 



MAX LIEBER 

Behind the bleak walls of Russian tyranny and despotism have been en- 
acted mam scenes of self-sacrifice for the sake of principle, which will some 
time stand' forth in the- white light of a new liberty, as have the deeds of the 
martyrs of old. 

To such men will the Russian Renaissance be accredited, and one oi them 
is Mr. Max Lieber, who is now a prominent resident of tin- Lnited States. 

Mr. Lieber was born in Kiev. Russia, in (88o, the sou of Tankel Lieber, 
a much respected Shochet, who died in Kiev in [916, aged eighty-five. 

At the age of thirteen young Max started to learn the leather business, 

which was to prove a means to his future financial success. 

\\ hen Mr. Lieber was hut sixteen years of age a revoluntionan movement 
was Started in his section of the country and he was one of the prominent 
participants, with the result thai he was thrown into prison for six months. 

Who shall sa\ how much influence the sufferings of Mr. Lieber and other kin- 
dred spirits have had upon the recent uprisings in Russia ami how much the) 
1 ave contributed toward a new libert) for their native land. 

After his release from prison lie started in business for himself in the 

■ own of Slobodka, where he was quite successful, hut at the age of twenty-one 

he again felt the iron hand of tyranny and was called to serve four years in 
the Russian army, where, as he was an accomplished musician, he did much 
to cheer the soldiery. When his time expired he decided to try his fortunes 
in America and landed on our shores in 0104. 

For the first live years he was obliged to work at the leather l; Is trade 

ll a very small salary, hut here his musical talent again came to his aid. and 
he gave evening lessons, as well as acting as leader of an orchestra. I le finally 

accumulated $200 and started in business in 1 leveland, Ohio, on Woodland 

avenue, where he manufactured a patented folding lunch box. Since that time 
he has made wonderful progress and now owns three stores, which are located 
on Woodland, 1'rospect and Wade Park avenues. 

In lune. [906, Mr. Lieber was married to Miss Jennie Goldstein, and he 
attributes a part of his success to his wife, as she i- a thorough business woman 

and still assists him in the management of the stores. The) have one small 

daughter, Florence. 

Mr. Lieber is an accomplished Hebrew scholar and very devoted to his 
religion, although he is a thorough, progressive American b) adoption lb is 
an active member of the Knights of Pythias ami the Knights of Joseph and 

contributes liberally to all worthy charities. 






DR. JAY S. LIEBMAN 

1 1 is usually a matter of years of struggle for a physician to achieve fame 
and influence in the medical world. But, of course, there are exceptions. Dr. 
Jay S. Liebman of Atlanta, Ga., seems to be one of them. He is still a young 
man, but he is already conceded to be of considerable importance, and what 
one would term a splendid success. A great future is generally predicted for 
him, a future that will not only bring him material advance, but also establish 
for him a durable and honorable position among the Jews of the world. 

The reason for this unusual success can probably be found in the fact that 
at the beginning of his career he at once devoted himself to his specialty, which 
is surgery. This, coupled with tremendous energy, native-born ability and 
shrewdness, and an extremely pleasing personality, has gone very far toward 
creating these unwonted conditions, viz., a young man practically leading his 
profession, and have made Dr. Liebman's reputation far and wide the most 
enviable and creditable on record. 

Dr. Liebman was born on the 21st of February, 18S4, in Youngstown, 
Ohio, as the son of Charles and Emma Liebman. His father is the son of 
Rabbi Lippman Liebman, the well-known Rabbi of Youngstown, who died 
only a month ago (February, 1918), and his mother was born in Youngstown, 
the daughter of Edward Ritter, a member of one of the most prominent Jew- 
ish families in Youngstown. 

Dr. Liebman received his elementary education in Youngstown. He then 
studied medicine at the L'niversity of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated 
in 1909. A year later he served at the Philadelphia General Hospital, from 
where he came to Atlanta, where he began to practice his profession, opening 
an office in the Healy Building. He is an assistant to Dr. William Perrin Nich- 
olson, for the last thirty-eight years one of the best known and most prominent 
surgeons in the South. 

Dr. Liebman is connected with the St. Joseph's Infirmary ; he is the chief 
of the medical staff of the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills Hospital. He is the 
examining surgeon of the Lmited States Casualty Company, the Maryland 
Casualty and Surety Company : he is a fellow of the American Medical Soci- 
ety, a member of the Georgia State and Fulton County Medical Societies and 
of the Southern Medical Association. He is a prominent Mason and active 
member of the Standard Club and the Ingleside Country Club. 

On November 15, 1912, Dr. Liebman was married to Miss Helene Lieb- 
man, the daughter of a prominent Atlanta family, not related to Dr. Liebman, 
though of the same name. There is one child of this marriage, a daughter, 
named Sarah Frances. 



SOLOMON LINDER 

The indescribable persecutions which have been the lot of the Jewish 
people at the hands of the Russians is better known to few men than Solomon 
Under, the subject of this sketch. 

He was born in Swinuch, Russia, December 18. 1S80, his father being an 
employe in government work, so Solomon had ample opportunity to learn much 
of the methods bv which his people were made to suffer. 

During the Russian- Japanese War he served for one year, but conditions 
were so unendurable that he escaped into Austria, where he found employ- 
ment in a lumber yard, and for three years saved every spare penny, having in 
mind a trip to America. 

On January 19. 1907, he landed on our shores, and going to Pittsburgh, 

184 







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began to buy and sell junk. Two years later he bought a horse and wagon 
and going to Now Philadelphia, wenl into partnership with Mr. Weisman. 
This continued for sunn- time, when the partnership was dissolved and Mr. 
Linder conducted the business independently. 

In [915 he was joined l-\ Mr. Edelstein and this partnership exists today 
under name of Tuscarawas Iron & Metal Company, doing a national business. 

Mr. Linder was married in 1916 to Miss Sarah Bitterman of Brooklyn, 
X. Y.. and their family consists of one boy and one girl, both in school. 

lie is a member of Wolina of Pittsburgh, B'rith Abraham and Royal 
1 Irder of Lyon. 

There are no citizens of New Philadelphia held in higher repine than the 
Linder family. They are a line example of ideal American citizenship and 
are always ready to generously give monej or time to the promotion of any 
worthy charity. 

Through the tyrannical governmental systems which prevail so largely 
through Europe, America has gained some of her most loyal and worthy sons, 

Max 1 they have many years of prosperous contentment in the land of their 
adoption. 



ALEX LISCHKOFF 

Mr. \U-\ Lischkoff is not only President of B'nai Israel, the only 1 Irtho- 
dox congregation in Pensacola, Ida., hut he is the recognized head and leader 
of the < Irthodox community of tin- city. 

lie is an 1 Irthodox in the best sense of the word. He is a Jewish citizen 
who certainly deserves the praise of every fair-minded co-religionist, and is 
the only Jewish business man in Pensacola who is a strict Sabbath observer. It 
i- clear that his home life is conducted with the strictest regard to Jewish 
observance, particularly if one learn- that he is a former Yeshibali Bochur. Bui 
he is not a fanatic or zealot, but is a modern American gentleman, well liked 
by the community at large and all classes of the population. His religion i- a 
matter that endears him even to those who ordinarily do not agree with him. 

In addition to B'nai Israel, Mr. Lischkoff has been a Trustee of Beth El. 
lie i- Chairman of the House Committee and one of the founders of the 
Progress Club, which i- a remarkable Jewish institution ami can lie considered 
a- the leading Jewish club in southern United States. For t w . ■ term- he has 
been a Director of the Chamber of Commerce, lie was a Director and mem- 
ber of the Finance Committee of the Pensacola Bank and Trust Company, 
and he was President of the local lodge of B'nai B'rith and the Chairman of 
its Propaganda < Committee. 

Mr. \le\ Lischkoff was horn on 1 Ik- 23d of December, [867, in Lo 
Russian Poland, the -on of Yakir and Esther Lischkoff. Both hi- father and 
mother were of the most prominent families of that ,-it\, and on his mother's 
side he is the descendant of prominent Rabbis, < Ine of his grandfathers was 
Rabbi Mo-he of Lezdzei, a well known "gaon" in his days. 

Mr. Lischkoff came to America in 1883. For a time he stayed in New 
Haven, ' onn., then in t incinnati. In 1889 he settled in Pensacola, where he 
conducted a jewelry and diamond business. Since 1907 he has conducted a 
real estate and insurance business, with offices in the Brent Building. He is 
highly successful in the line and became prominent in the city as a n 

ator, having closed the largest cash deal in real estate in the whole histon 
of Pensacola. 

t Mi April 30, 1889, Mr. Lischkoff was married to Frances 1 orchcimer, and 
they are the parents of three verj accomplished children. Their oldest 



Dr. M. A. Lisclikoff, is a young man of great education, who has studied medi- 
cine in America and Europe and is now a highly successful specialist in throat, 
nose, eye and ear diseases, with a still greater future universally predicted. 
The second son. Leon, a lawyer, is now a sergeant in the army. The youngest 
child is a daughter. Bertha Esther, aged 15. 



DAVID LOEB 

It is our pleasure to record the biography of one who, while not claiming 
the United States as the land of his nativity, was born on the American conti- 
nent, and has spent the most of his life under the Stars and Stripes. 

Mr. David Loeb. the subject of our sketch, was born in Hamilton, Canada, 
and while he lived there for a number of years, the real story of his adven- 
tures begins when he arrived in Titusville, Pa., and started the uphill fight 
toward wealth and affluence. 

He began clerking for S3.00 per week, and remained for two years, after 
which we find him in Louisville. Ky., and then in Okolona, Miss., remaining in 
each place for two years. From there he went to Aperson, AYis.. and after 
three years, having saved some money, went to Bath, X. Y., where, in partner- 
ship with a cousin, he opened a store. After four years, this partnership was 
dissolved, and Mr. Loeb went to Ashtabula, Ohio. 

In Ashtabula he found the life work for which he was best adapted, and 
is today one of the most successful merchants in the city. 

Mr. Loeb was married January 25th, 1903. and has a fine family of three 
children, one boy and two girls. 

Mrs. Loeb is a charming woman, well known in Ashtabula and Cleveland 
for her untiring activities in behalf of charities, and co-operates with her 
husband in the many philanthropies to which they jointly contribute. 

Although Air. Loeb is a very busy man, he still finds time to be affiliated 
with a number of fraternal organizations, prominent among them being the 
Masons, Elks. Odd Fellows. Knights of Pythias. 

If we were to cite a definite ideal of well rounded, useful American 
citizenship, the life of Mr. David Loeb would serve as a fitting example, well 
worth v of study and emulation. 



LUCIEN S. LOEB 

For a young man, not yet thirty years of age, to be considered a most 
prominent figure in an old and highly developed Jewish community is a distinc- 
tion which is extremely rare. Yet, Mr. Lucien S. Loeb of Montgomery, Ala- 
bama, assistant United States Food Administrator of Alabama, has justly 
achieved that enviable distinction. 

Air. Loeb's career is that of a young man who was reared among cultured 
surroundings and has received the advantage of a higher education which he 
is utilizing, together with his exceptional natural endowments of heart and 
mind, for the good of his fellow men. He was born in Montgomery, Ala., 
on September 24, 1888. His parents. Jacques and Selena Loeb, were both 
very prominent and popular in the city and community, and instilled into the 

186 



heart and mind of their young son Lucien the love for his people and the 
ideal of civic progress and human advancement. And it was not only by 
precept, but also by example, that young Loeb was prepared for the high posi- 
tion of trust and responsibility which he now occupies. For his father took 
a most active part in the various worthy endeavors of a Jewish and general 
character. He held the position of President of the District Grand Lodge 
No. 7 of the B'nai B'rith and served as Chairman of the Endowment Board. 
He was a delegate to the ( (institution Grand Lodge conventions of that order 
five consecutive times in 1895 at Cincinnati, in io«'> at Giicago, in 1005 at 
New 1 Means, and in [910 at Washington, 1>. C. He was also Vice President 
nf tin- Congregation Kahl Montgomery, while in a commercial way he held 
the position of Vice President of the Chamber of Commerce and was a Di- 
rector nt' the Capital National Bank and other large business enterprises. 

And in all these various institutions and organizations the mantle of 
Jacques Loeb fell upon his son, Lucien Loeb. Thus he Lucien Loeb, is Presi- 
dent of the Rotary Club, \ ice President of the Montgomerj 1 hamber of Com- 
merce and Chairman of its transportation bureau, a Director in the Capital 
National Bank, Treasurer of the Montgomerj Live Stock lair Association, a 
Director of tin- Montala Manufacturing Company, and a Director of the 
Dixie Cotton 'HI Company. IK- headed the committee in charge of the Red 
(rn-- membership drive last I lecember and is a member of the war camp com- 
munity service. 

Mr. I. mil'- Jewish affiliations and activities an- equally numerous and 
noteworthy, lie is a Trustee of Kahl Montgomery and of Emanuel Lodge 
103 hi the B'nai B'rith. lie is a member of the Graduate Menorah Society, 
a member of the ( leneral Committee of District < .rand Lodge No. 7. I. < '. Ii. U.. 
a Trustee of the United Hebrew Charities and a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the Leo N. Levi Memorial Hospital at Hot Springs, Ark. 

.Mr. Loeb received his education in the public .and private schools of 
Montgomery and later attended Cornell University, from which he received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in ig s. He thereupon returned to his native 
city, where he entered his Father's firm, which is a large and flourishing whole- 
sale concern bearing the name of Winter-Loeb Grocer) Co. But, although he 
has charge of that firm, he devotes very little time to it at present, as he gives 
almost all of his time and thought unselfishlj and unstintingly to the service of 
hi country, his city and his community. 



HERMAN H. LOUIS 

This country owe- an inestimable debt of gratitude to the men who have 
come to us from foreign shores and taught us something of the art of con- 
servation. 

( >ur resources have been so vast that we have grown into a nation of 
wasters. 

It remained for the leu to Come to America, gather Up the waste and 
divert it to new uses, 

. nun and nnt.il yard in the country i- a monument to Jewish enter- 
prise and a rebuke to our lack of thrift. 

Herman II. Louis i 'he men who has made a fortune from that 

which other men have cast away. 

Ill wa- horn in Ezno, Russia, November 25, 1868, and came to America 
in May. tss_>. He first found employment in a junk yard at ( Icvcland, < Ihio, 
and two years later went to Parkersburg, W. \ a., when- he worked on the rail- 
road for three years. Then followed a numb varied experiences, 



including the management of a junk yard, three years in a grocery and three 
years as motorman. 

i mm" in \shtalmla, < >hio, lie again opened an iron and metal yard, where 
he is still located and doing a flourishing business under the firm name of Ash- 
tabula Junk Co. 

Mr. Louis was married May 24, 1896, to Miss Celi H. Orkin. and they 
have three children, two boys and one girl, who are being well educated. 

He is a prominent member of the Moose. Knights of Pythias and Masons 
and is a liberal contributor to all charities. 



SAMUEL MALTINSKY 



It is a well-established fact that misfortunes are for a man what fire is 
for iron ; they make one softer, more pliable and nobler. Even though a man 
is bad by nature, he will usually be swayed toward the nobler traits of charac- 
ter under the fire of misfortune. In the case, however, of a good man it will 
influence him still more and render him still better. 

To this last-named group we must add the name of Mr. Samuel Maltin- 
sky, chief proprietor. President and Treasurer of the Crescent Jewelry Com- 
pany, of 641 Smithfield street, Pittsburgh, Pa. Mr. Maltinsky belongs to the 
better and nobler sort of characters among men, but in the last few years he 
has gone through many trials and ordeals, and though physically he appears 
strong and alert, you will notice in his actions and mood that he is a man who 
has been mercilessly crushed under the wheels of fate. 

Mr. Maltinsky has experienced great misfortunes in business and lost 
considerable sums of money. But all these 
disasters are nothing in comparison with the 
loss he has sustained through the early demise 
of his beloved daughter, Tisha Manna, on 
December 9. 1915. She was one of the most 
accomplished Jewish girls in Pittsburgh, a cel- 
ebrated elocutionist who could recite in many 
languages. And it was this accomplishment 
that made her father's sorrow' the greater 
when she was taken away from the loving 
arms of her parents into the Great Unknown 
from which there is no return. It was a mis- 
fortune over which many of their friends and 
relatives have expressed their sympathies to 
Mr. and Mrs. Maltinksy. But there is com- 
pensation in their sorrow in the fact that their 
other daughter, Rosa, is equally as accom- snmnei Mnitin»ky 

plished as her late-lamented sister. Rosa Maltinsky is brilliant in many respects, 
but she is particularly proficient in muic. At the age of 16 she played in a 
concert at the Pittsburgh Exposition with \\ "alter Damrosch ; she has held for 
three years a scholarship at the Peabodv Institute at Baltimore, and she is not 
only extremely pretty, but also known as an amiable voting woman, gracing 
the Maltinsky household with her extraordinary personality. 

Mr. Maltinsky is not a communal worker in the sense of holding office 
or taking an active interest in organization, but his purse is ever ready to 
help and he is considered one of the finest and most reputable Jewish citizens 
in Pittsburgh. 

Born in Libau, Courland, on May 25, 1867. Mr. Maltinsky is the son of 
1 [yman and Sarah Maltinsky. His father was a "Davvan" and one of the 




18S 



most popular men in the city. Samuel came to America in 1888, starting as 
as a peddler in Pittsburgh, and then for 21 years keeping a jewelry store in 
Braddock, Pa. In 1907 he opened a store in Pittsburgh. He has passed 
through many a crisis, but always managed to keep his name clean, so that 
by systematic and diligent work he finally won the success which was long his 
due. 

In his younger days Mr. Maltinsky was a Talmudic scholar and he went 
through gymnasium studies in Russia. After he had been in this country for 
six months he entered Duff's College. All these scholastic achievements have 
only helped to make him a man of wider outlook, in addition to his inborn 
generous character. 

Mr. and Mrs. Maltinsky, who before her marriage was Miss Gertrude 
Kunst, were married on May 25, 1894. 



SIGMUND MAIER 

Among the most prominent business men of Fort Wayne, Ind., stands the 
name of Sigmund Maier. 

We relate the events of his early struggles to illustrate what persistent 
application will do, provided a man has ability to develop. He, like the major- 
ity of our eminent men, has made his own opportunities and acquired success 
by his own effort. 

His varied experiences led him into many cities of the United States, and 
afford a variety of incidents that make a most interesting chapter of business 
history. 

He was born in Dulendurf, Germany, July 24, 1866, the son of Jacob and 
Dina Maier. his father a dealer in cattle. He came to America at the age of 
sixteen, landing in New York. 

Going almost immediately to Ligonier, Ind., he obtained employment in 
a dry-goods store and remained six months. 

We next find him in Appleton, Wis., where he again worked in a store at 
a very small salary. From there he tried the rigors of a lumber camp, remain- 
ing for six months at $40 per month and board, when he again found a position 
in a department store. 

His next experience was in Milwaukee, where he started ped.dling with 
a pack. This he continued for three months, after which he rented a store, 
remaining six years. From Milwaukee he went to Escanaba. Mich., working 
in a store. Next we find him in Warsaw, Wis., putting into practical use the 
knowledge acquired, as he was now manager of a store. He was later trans- 
ferred to another store at Phillips. Wis., and remained two years. Feeling 
that his opportunities lure were limited, he went to Fort Wayne and accepted 
a position with Will Bros., which only paid $10 per week, solely for the oppor- 
tunity of advancement, which the larger institution offered. Ami time proved 

him entirely right in his judgment, as he was advanced to the position of 
manager at a line salary, and remained with this concern lor twenty-three 
years. 

Mr. Maier was married August _' 1 . [893, to Miss Charlotte I.owenstcin of 

Fori Wayne, Ind. 

They have live children, four boys and one girl. 

The sc m. Felix, is manager of a branch of their business which is situated 
at Decatur, Ind. Jacob and Edwin are traveling salesman. The other two 
children are still small and in school. 

Mr. Maier is a linn believer in the gospel of hard work and advises young 

189 



people 1" take any employment that comes to hand, just so it is honest, believ- 
ing that it will ultimately serve as a stepping stone to the desired goal. 

He contributes liberally to all charities, including the ' >rphans' Home of 
Cleveland, the Denver and Los Angeles hospitals, the Old Age Home and the 
Red Cross. He is also affiliated with the Temple of Fort Wayne, B'nai B'rith 
and the Knights of Pythias. 



SAMUEL MALLINGER 

Mr. Samuel Mallinger of Pittsburgh is another instance of a man who 
will "never say die," no matter how outward conditions might point against 
him. He was born in a little village near Sanok, Galicia, and came to America 
at an early age. His date of birth is April 18, 1877; his date of arrival in this 
country is 1894. He came with his cousin, with whom later he went into 
business, and settled in Pittsburgh, where he immediately went to work at 
bottles for the munificent wage of $3 per week. 

Samuel had pluck, perseverance and energy and he rose very rapidly in 
his new occupation. His wages took an upward climb and were constantly 
higher, enabling its recipient to save and lay by money for a better future. In 
the course of five years he organized a jobbing bottles concern, going into 
partnership with a cousin, who was in the same business. Four years later the 
partners separated and Mr. Mallinger started his present concern, which has 
been since in existence for the last thirteen years, never causing its owner any 
trouble and making it possible for Mr. Mallinger to realize his early dreams 
and ambition. 

Not content with success in business, Mr. Mallinger has taken an active 
interest in social work as a member of the Austro-Hungarian Congregation 
of Pittsburgh and the Federation of Charities. He is an Orthodox in his relig- 
ious tenets, of modern tendencies and a staunch supporter of Jewish education. 

On October 17, 1899, Mr. Mallinger was married to Anna Klee, .who 
comes from the same part of Galicia where he was brought up, and they are 
the parents of four children, named Emanuel, Ruth, Fannie and Benjamin. 



MORRIS MANES 

Prominent in the business life of Xorth Adams, Mass., is the name of 
Mr. Morris Manes, wealthy dealer in iron and metal scrap. Mr. Manes was 
born in Kiev, Guberne, Russia, in the year 1867, and came to America in 1890, 
landing in New York. He worked in a factory as buttonhole maker for $6 
per week. This he continued for nine months, during which time he became 
so proficient that he was able to start in the same line of business for himself. 
He continued for nine years, and then decided to take up farming, but after 
one year, finding this occupation unsuitable, he moved to Xorth Adams and 
engaged in the junk business. 

Mr. Manes is todav a wealthy and influential man and his entire success 
is the result of his own individual efforts, as he had neither money nor influen- 
tial friends to assist him when he came to America. 

Shortly before coming to this country Mr. Manes was married to Miss 

190 . 



Rebecca Oxenfeld, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sander Oxenfeld, and they have 
a family of five children, all of whom are now married with the exception of 
the daughter, Anna, who is at home. 

Mr. Manes is prominent in local organizations, being President of Hiaa 
Adam Congregation, the Labor League and is also prominent in the Masons. 



THE LATE RABBI DAVE BEHR MANISCHEWITZ 

The name of Manischewitz is well known in every Jewish household in the 
L'nited States, and also throughout the civilized world. The founder of the 
nationally famous Matzos, the late Rabbi Dave Behr Manischewitz, was born 
in Salant, Province of Kovno, Russia, in 185S, and died at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
March 8, 1914. 

He came to America in 1885, after having served as Schochet in the 
Prussian city of Memel. He gained extensive prominence through his Lam- 
duth, piety and insatiable desire toward charity and philanthropic proclivities. 
The Cincinnati Congregation, the Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol, imported him as 
Schochet. 

After acting as a leading Schochet for several years, his inventive genius 
soon led to the inception of the present world-famous mammoth Matzo bak- 
eries, of which the world too well knows. 

Rabbi Dave Behr Manischewitz was married in Memel to Chaia Xeshe, 
the daughter of Rabbi Meier (Rosin) of Memel. She was prominent in chari- 
ties, the founder of numerous institutions, and devoted many years of her life 
toward the uplifting and support of poverty-stricken Jews, more especially 
those residing in the Holy Land. She survived her husband by only two years, 
having died June 17, 1916. 

A striking feature of the will of Rabbi Dave Behr Manischewitz was the 
fact that he requested his business to be incorporated, dividing 90 per cent of 
the capital stock among his five sons and the remaining 10 per cent to go 
annually for charity, 60 per cent of which is for Jerusalem alone, and the 
balance for other philanthropic purposes. 

Eight children were left by the late Rabbi Dave Behr Manischewitz. all 
of whom received a thorough Jewish education, while two of his sons spent 
more than ten vears each studying in Jerusalem, and where they married daugh- 
ters of learned and prominent Jews. Their names are as follows: 

Meyer Victor, married to Minnie Goldstein, of Xew York. 

Mamie, married to Dr. Reuben Finkelstein, son of prominent Rabbi of 
Brooklyn. X. Y. Three children. 

Jacob Uriah, married to Pearl Quitman of Cincinnati. He is the father of 
two children. 

Joseph, married to Bessie Sagalowsky of [ndianapolis, Ind. lie is the 
father of two children. 

Rose, married to Sol Rogen, of Xew York. 

Max. married to Edith Cohen, of Jerusalem. Palestine. 

Harry, married to Sara Malka Gelerinter, daughter of Rabbi A. Galerinter 
of Xew York, and formerly of Jerusalem, where thej were married, lb- is 
the father of four children. 

Kac, married to Bernard Prensky, of New York. 



191 



JOSEPH MARIL 



The Orthodox Jewish community of Savannah, (la., consists of a number 
of highly influential citizens, among whom we cannot fail to mention Mr. 
loseph Maril. Mr. Maril was horn on the 15th of May. 1869, in Torrogan, 
Government of Kovno, Russia, the son of David Moses and Sheine Maril. 
He is the descendant of a renowned rabbinical family, and his father was also 
a celebrated Talmudic scholar. When but thirteen years of age the boy 
landed in the United States. The first two years and a half he spent in New 
York, working at cigarmaking, a trade he learned here, and he then went to 
Savannah, ( ieorgia, where he started his successful business career. He par- 
ticularly made a mark in the business of real estate and building. Xow Mr. 
Maril is interested in various business enterprises, among them being a skirt 
factory at Xo. no Abercorn street, maintained under the firm name of the 
Economy Manufacturing Company, of which he is president. He is also the 
president of the Cooley Laundry Company. 

In social life he is also very active. He is a 
director of the Kehillah, an active and devoted 
Zionist, and takes an interest in everything Jewish. 
He is a man of intelligence and a Talmudist. 

Mr. and Mrs. Maril (whose maiden name was 
Dora Moskofsky, and who was married in the year 
1890) are the parents of three accomplished chil- 
dren — Nathan, who is the secretary and treasurer 
of the Economy Manufacturing Company; Lillie, 
and Edith. 

Lillie Maril is an artist, and though but sev- 
enteen years of age, and without any art school 
training as yet, has already produced remarkable 
works which now adorn the walls of the Maril 
home. The paintings are so beautiful and executed 
with so much technical skill and real talent that it 
sometimes makes it hard for one to believe that she Joseph Mam 

is a mere beginner. There is no doubt that Lillie Maril is an artist to the 
manner born and will become a celebrity some day when she has had the 
opportunity to develop and perfect her natural talent. 




AARON AND HARRY MANN 



Norristown, Pa., is indebted to the Mann family for two of its prospering 
business houses, the Mann Iron & Steel Company, conducted by Mr. Aaron 
Mann, and H. Mann & Co., of which Mr. Harry Mann is owner. 

These two brothers were born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, Harry on 
March i, 1885, and Aaron on March 5, 1889. They are the sons of Mr. Zelick 
Mann, who was a prosperous merchant of their native city. 

They came to America in 1905, and Harry, being the elder, at once went 
to work peddling junk, while his brother continued to go to school for one 
year and then started in at the same occupation. A few years later, having 
saved a small capital, they went into partnership and opened a junk business. 
As they were both most able business men and the firm did not need more 
than one executive head, they decided to dissolve partnership and operate sepa- 
rately, which they did in 1917. 

They have both achieved a remarkable success and their ability and integ- 
rity are highly respected in the city of their adoption. 

192 



Mr. Harry Mann was married July 25, 1913, to Miss Bessie Michelson of 
Baltimore, Md. 

Mr. Aaron Mann was married June 11, 1916, to Miss Sadie Lefco of 
Philadelphia, and they are the parents of a baby girl. 

Both men are generous contributors to the various charities and are also 
prominent members of Feres Israel Congregation and B'rith Sholom. 

Their achievements are deserving of special credit, owing to the fact that 
they were accomplished unaided, and as Mann brothers are still very young 
men, it is not difficult to predict a long and brilliant career for each of them. 



WILLIAM MARCUS 

Over in Europe, where conditions of life were so well settled, where life 
changed but rarely and all changes were slow and scarcely perceptible, it was 
the Jewish parents who would naturally decide the future of their children. 
When the father was in a position to do so and the son would show ability to 
acquire a good education, it was ordained forthwith that the son become a 
Rabbi. Otherwise, the son was to become a toiler, which he did. 

But there developed among the European Jewry a steady-rising wave 
of immigration to America, a wave that gave up all tradition, established cus- 
toms and uprooting things to such an extent that the children's future was no 
longer a matter for the parents' thought, but was left to the drifting current 
events. 

And so we see that young men who were destined to become Rabbis be- 
came merchants in the new world, or plain workingmen, while others who 
brought with them no traditions and whose means forced them, in the old 
country, to remain in the artisan and toiler class, became physicians and law- 
yers and reached high positions in life and society. 

Mr. William Marcus of Savannah belongs to the former class. His par- 
ents destined him for a Rabbinical career. He was a great scholar, well versed 
in the mysteries of Talmudic lore, and so his parents never doubted that they 
had in their son an accomplished Rabbi. Later he became a Hebrew writer and 
started to write for Hameliz. The tide of immigration brought him to Amer- 
ica, where, looking around, he found that this practical country would reward 
him much better if he went into business — and so, leaving "learning'' as a 
profession to others, he went into business, utilizing in it his good abilities — 
and he found in his decision a rare success. 

He arrived in America in 1885. For a few months he peddled in New 
York, and then a few years more in Savannah, Ga. He then opened a store 
for the sale of ladies' wear, working up a large business, located at present at 
209 Broughton street West, under the name of Marcus & Co. Mr. Marcus 
is now financially independent, yet he is still active in the business, in connec- 
tion with his son Barney, who is a partner. In addition Mr. Marcus is inter- 
ested in real estate and is a Director of the Peoples Bank and the Mercantile 
Bank of Savannah. 

Having gained his independent position by dint of perseverance, courage 
and strong will power, he has every reason in the world to look confidently 
into the future. 

Mr. Marcus was born on the 15th of December, 1862, in Pinsk, as a son 
of Moses and Jeanette Marks. On July 3, 1882, he was married to Esther 
Joseloft" of Slonim, and they arc the parents of five highly proficient children. 
Barney is the only son and the youngest child. The oldest daughter. Rebecca, 
is now Mrs. Rashken. Anna is Mrs. Prank and lives in New York. Rosa is 
the wife of Mr. Frohmberg of Charleston, S. O, who is a member of the legis- 

19.1 



hture of lii* state. Fanny, the youngest daughter, is married to Mr. Ravson 
of Atlanta. 

Mr. Marcus is one of the oldest Jewish settlers in Savannah, ami he is 
to a large extent responsible for the splendid reputation the Savannah com- 
munity has earned for itself. He always worked in the interest of the com- 
munity as well as for his own. He was one of the founders and original 
directors of the Orthodox Congregation D'nai B'rith Jacob. He was the Presi- 
dent of the Hebrew school, a Director of the Jewish Educational Alliance, 
and contributes with a free hand to even - good Jewish cause. 

Yet his remarkable success did not carry Mr. Marcus away from education 
and Judaism. He has a large library which contains the best products of Eng- 
lish. Jewish and Hebrew literature, and from time to time, when business 
over. Mr. Marcus peruses the volumes of his library and stills his thirst for 
knowledge. 



BENJAMIN MARKOWITZ 



Mr. Benjamin Markowitz and his family, consisting of a wife and eleven 
children, are fitting proof of the contention that work, ceaseless hard work, is 
always rewarded. 

Mr. Markowitz is one of the wealthiest and most successful Jews in Brad- 
dock. Pa. He is a banker, owns a very large establishment with countless 
wagons and trucks, selling his wares in the whole surrounding territory up to 
Pittsburgh, and dwells in a remarkably beautiful house which he has built for 
himself. And all that — he explains to me with deserved pride — is the result 
of hard work. 

"'You see.'" said Mr. Markowitz to the writer of these lines, pointing to 
a verv small child gathering something in the yard, "this is my voungest child, 
and she already does useful things. All. all work, and this has made our 
success." 

In such a simple manner. Mr. Markowitz 
explains the great world truth that only per- 
sistent work can be crowned with success. 

Mr. Markowitz was born in 1S64 in Rib- 
nitz. Hungary, as the son of Henry and Lena 
Markowitz. He came to America in 1889. 
P>eing a baker by trade, he went to work in his 
line immediately after his arrival in Home- 
stead. Pa. His mother and his brother Adolph 
then lived in Pottstown. Pa. Benny went to 
see them one day and bought a little bakery 
there, which he kept for about a year. Then 
came the panic of 1893 and he "lost everything. 
He betook himself to New York, where he 
worked at his trade for a number of years. 
later returning to Homestead. He opened a 
bakery there in partnership with his brother. 
but in 1900 he went to P.raddock. where, with 

a small capital, but a vast store of energv. he opened the bakerv which he so 
successfully operates to this day. 

"The only reason of my success."' Mr. Markowitz says, "is work. During 
the first year in this business. I have been working dav and night. During 
the whole year I did not sleep in bed even once, except on Saturdays, when 
we did not bake." 




194 



\s a result of this hard work Mr. Markowitz now owns the large bakery 
:it Nos. lorn and 1021 Talbot street, and his splendid home at No. ioij of 
the same street, and he has brought up eleven children, all well educated and 
usefully engaged. Mr. and Mrs. Markowitz, who was Rose Goodman, are 
the parents oi the following children: Sadie, now Mrs. Myers; Harry. Ja- 
cob, a student of law; Morris, I ul is, Regina, Bella, Louis, Joseph, Emanuel 
and Dorah. All children have received a Jewish religious education and Jacob 
is the leader of a Sunday school in Braddock. 

Mr. Markowitz was for three years President of the local Talmud Torah, 
is a member of the Congregation Vgudath Achimand, B'nai B'rith and many 
other organizations and institutions. 



ELIEZER MARGULIES 

Readers of Hebrew periodicals, interested in the illuminating discussions 
between Eliezer Margulies and the late Doctor Solomon Rubin, would never 
suspect that the Margulies whose articles the) read with such interest was a 
\ew York manufacturer. But such is actually the case. Putting all literary 
fame aside, Mr. Margulies is a first-rate business man. 

P.nrn in I'ren. Government of Suwalk, in [848, Mr. Margulies came in 
Imerica in [890. lie had been already a clothing manufacturer in Lodz 

before he came to this country. Here he turned his steps to Cincinnati, where 
he engaged in the same business very successfully, and then to New York. 
where he has been established since, specializing in pants and knee pants. 

Mr. Margulies is a thorough < Irthodox, a strict Sabbath observer and a 
Director of the Machsikei Talmud Torah. Me is a former pupil of the re- 
nowned Rabbi Abraham Yekutiel Mapu. lie was married in [872 to Soshe 

Marion, who died in [916, leaving four sons and four daughters. 



NATHAN MARSHALL 

tine of the finest traits of Jewish character is the remarkable capacit) 
for adaptability to new conditions and environment. Few men at the age of 
thirty-sis would consider it possible to go to a new countrj and. starting at 
the bottom of the ladder, work out a career culminating in great financial 

sllCC 

However, this i- the ex| of Mr Nathan Marshall, who was born 

in Minsker, Guberne, Russia, in tin- year 1867. He came to Vmerica in 1 
landing in Boston, Mass. The onlj available occupation was that of peddling 

with a basket, which In- did for one Mar. He then went to Gloucester, M 

where In- started in working as a laborer for the city. However, In- was tired 
b) an ambition to have a business for himself, and his spare time was de- 
voted to buying and selling junk in a ven modest way. This business devel- 
oped so rapidly that he was soon able to devote his entire time and attention 
t.i -anii-. and he is today one of tin- most prominent htisiiiess men in the coin 

munity. 

Mr Marshall was married in Russia in 189I to Mis, [da Yardh.i. and 
tlu-\ have eight children, ~i\ i,,n, and two girls. 

19! 



Like many other patriotic Americans, they have given one of their sons 
to the service of democracy. Jocke is now in the U. S. Coast Artillery serv- 
ice. Two Other sons, Albert and Sam. are in business with their father. The 
other children are still in school. 

Mr. Marshall is most generous in his contributions to charities and is also 
prominent in several organizations, chief of them being B'rith Abraham, of 
which he is Treasurer, and Avas Acham Congregation. 



JOHN MARKS 



Among the business men of Center Falls. R. I., no name is more promi- 
nent than that of Mr. John Marks, whose place of business is located at n 
Falles avenue. 

Mr. Marks' success must be attributed entirely to his own efforts, as he 
landed in America without any capital with which to begin a business career. 

He was born in Volina, Guberne, Russia, in 
May, 1885, and came to America in 1903. Going 
direct to Pawtucket, R. I., he began buying and sell- 
ing old iron and metal, which he continued for two 
years. He then opened a yard at his present loca- 
tion, where he has been most successful. 

Mr. Marks was married in New Haven, Conn., 
in June, 1908. to Miss Annie Brawn. Of their four 
children, three boys and one girl, the two eldest are 
going to school. 

Generosity in contributions to charity is one of 
the traits which has distinguished Mr. Marks and 
he is also prominent in a number of fraternal organ- 
izations, chief among them being I. O. B. A., Zion- 
ists and a number of others. In fact. Mr. Marks 
has distinguished himself in this regard, as he is 
connected with thirty-six organizations. He is also 

Treasurer of Ivas Sholom Congregation, and it is certainly encouraging to find 
a man of the young generation holding so closely to the religious ideals 
established by the Hebrew fathers. 




1<J<5 



JACOB MASUR 

Mr. facob Masur is foreign-born, having come to the world in Russia in 
December, (869, the son of Rubin and [da Masur. The father is at present 
engaged in the real estate business in the city of New York. When Mr. Masur 
was twenty-one years of age, in the year 1890, he emigrated to America with 
his brother, having just ten dollars in his pocket. But there was no trouble 
about finding employment. The clothing trade was just then at the height of 
demand, and the immigrant decided to learn the trade and lit himself For it. 
To be sure, being inexperienced, and as he merely wanted to learn a new 
trade. Jacob Masur had to work for nothing— and kept on in that state for 
twelve weeks. But he graduated soon into a paying position and at the end 
of his first year in America was already making as much as four dollars per 
week. During this trying period young M:i>ur devoted all his spare time 

to study, attending the evening high school, and had ambition of entering a 
university and studying for a profession; hut circumstances turned him into 

the commercial world. 

But then' was something in Mr. Masur that kept on telling him that he 
would certainl) succeed if he Inn attempted the right thing. Mr. Masur took 

cutting. For three months he worked for nothing; in fact, even paid Sioo in 
cold cash to learn the track-, and in the end he was employed at $5 per week. 
Yet he managed to save money at that, and within a very short time he was 
already manufacturing on a small scale, with a place at Mo. 237 Rivington 
street. But this first business venture was nothing short of an adventure. It 
lasted as long as there was ready capital to draw on the hank and as soon 
as thai gave out. Mr. Masur had to close his shop and seek employment. lie 
secured a position as culler at S4 per week. Within a year he found a job 
elsewhere and for a time kepi changing places from year to year. I lis salar) 
rose 1" $25 per week, and then he felt secure enough to venture into luisiness 
for himself again. 

lie opened a loft at University place and Twelfth street, manufacturing 
cloaks and suits, and for five years he struggled vcr\ hard to make both ends 
meet, working day and night at his new business. Hut work had its reward, 
and Mr. Masur stands today as a successful manufacturer at his line. Ilis 
place of husiucss is ai 131 West Thirty-fifth street. New York 1 ity. 

Having founded his financial success. Mr. Masur went hack to the subject 

of Ilis early interest and for a time delved ini" the studies long neglected, "f 

the Talmud and its commentators, and also secular education. Following ill 
the footsteps of his father, who is a Hebrew scholar highly versed in the Tal- 
mud, and devotes much of his spare time to same. Mr. Masur applies himself 

likewise. 

Mr. Masur is married In Miss Rose I'.randus, since iSu). and is the father 

of four children. The oldest daughter, Sophie, graduate of New York ! 
versity Law School, is married t" Mr. Alexander II. Weinberg, a lawyer by 

profession, as his wife is. and a lieutenant in the United States army, lie 

is in the service in France and has recentl) keen wounded. 

William, a younger son. is a student at a private militar) school at Bor- 
dentown, and a violinist; Marie attends high school and Harold is in public 
school. 

Mr. Masur is a thirty-second degree Mason, a Shriner, a member of the 

Mecca Temple, the Elks Lodge and other fraternal organizations. lie also 

belongs 1,1 the Hebrew Free Loan Association, the Hebrew Orphan Asylum 

and Other Jewish charities. His g.ispel is "Hard work." 



I"7 



OTTO J. MAYER 

\ community looks for leadership not only to the nun who have attained 
tn success and high standing in commerce, science, or art, but also to those, 
perhaps even primarily to those, who together with achievement of success 
possess also the personal charms of a cheerful disposition and the spirit of 
boundless optimism. To this class of worthy and distinguished citizens belongs 
Mr. < >tto Jacob Mayer of Xew < )rleans. 

Mr. Mayer is still a young man. but has already made an honored and 
enviable place for himself in the community. He was born on July 13, 1880. 
in Xew Orleans, and received his education in a private school of his native 
city. He comes from an old. well-established and highly esteemed Xew Or- 
leans family. His father was Abraham Mayer and his mother was Rebecca 
Frank, the daughter of Michael Frank, a very prominent and leading man of 
the community, who was the first President of the Temple Sinai Congregation. 

At the present time Mr. Mayer is prominently connected with large and 
leading business interests, chief among which are the Harry S. Kaufman 
Insurance Co., whose offices are at 327 Baronne street, and the Mayer Realty 
Co.. which is conducted in the interests of the estate left by his parents. But 
it must not be supposed that he started at the summit of his career. ( In the 
contrary, when but a boy of 17 he engaged in work for a grocery concern as 
office boy. After three years of experience in that capacity he associated 
himself with the stave commission business, which four years ago enlarged 
its scope to include also exporting, and in which he still retains an interest. 
The Harry S. Kaufman Insurance Co. was organized in 1903, and has devel- 
oped into one of the best known firms of its kind in the city chiefly through 
Mr. Mayer's good judgment and able financiering. 

In the Jewish community Mr. Mayer's services are valued very highly. 
He is the Treasurer of the Touro Infirmary, which institution he has also 
served in the capacity of Director and as Chairman of the Finance Committee. 
The importance of that office may be judged by the fact that the expenditures 
of the institution during the past year exceeded the sum of $270,000. He is 
also a member of the B'nai B'rith and the Touro Synagogue. 

( >n April 7. 1906, Mr. Mayer was married to Miss Elise B. Newman, a 
charming young lady who belongs to one of the best families of the South, 
and their union has been blessed with two lovely children, Rebecca Frank 
Mayer and Elise Newman Mayer. 



GEORGE MEHL 

The history of Mr. George Mehl is a wonderfully interesting life drama, 
full of the shadows of pathos and the darkness of discouragement. But Mr. 
Mehl believed in turning his clouds inside out. and behold! the beautiful silver 
lining! 

Born in Koona. Poland, August 12. 1872, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Solomon Mehl, the father a merchant and an accomplished Jewish scholar. 

The subject of our sketch came to America during the summer of 1889 
and obtained his first employment in a butcher shop in Baltimore. Here he 
was forced to work for only $1 per week and board, so he decided to go to 
Cincinnati, where an uncle resided. He received no assistance from him, 
however, so he again worked for a short time in a butcher shop. 

Obtaining a small stock of tinware, he started out to sell same, but was 
so bashful that during the first week he slept on the streets or in the woods 
rather than approach any one for shelter. 

198 



The picture of 1 1 1 i — . young boj fighting his way upward against such 
odds is pathetic in the extreme and presages brilliant achievements for a race 
that produces examples of such fortitude and singleness oi purpose. 

Ilr continued in this waj until 1897, when he went to Brookville, Ind., 
and started in the junk business with but $80 and a team as assets, 

Five years later he came to Middletown, 1 )hio, and started business in a 
modest way. where his business has grown in the present large institution 
located at Sixth and (anal streets. 

Mr. Mehl was married April [3, 1X117. to Miss Minnie Kleine of Cin- 
cinnati, 1 (hio. 

Their family consists of three girls and two boys, all of whom arc in 
school. 

Mr. Mehl believes every man owes much to his associates and the world 
at large, as well as himself, and both he and his wife arc- very active in benevo- 
lent organizations. 

lie is former President ami now Treasurer of Anshe Sholurn Yahreda, 
a member of the Chamber of Commerce, an active worker fur hospitals and 
llood prevention and is Captain of the Red Cross. Mis fraternal affiliations 
are the Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 

lie advises all young people to obtain all tin- education they can and he at 
all times a true and loyal citizen. 



EDWARD EVERETT MAYER 
The Jew has been a most prominent figure in the held of medicine as far 

hack as the beginning of the medieval period in history. The part that he 

has played in this field in the present generation is universally acclaimed. 
During the present great war it has been remarked by numerous publicists that 

in medicine ami in surgery, mi the side of the Allies or on that of the central 
-. those who are the most prominent are the Jews. 

It is for that reason that a great deal of significance is attached to the 
life story of the Jewish physician who has attained eminence in medicine. 
Ilr. Edward Everett Mayer comes from a scholar!} and rabbinical family, and 
he can point with justifiable prid<- to his illustrious parentage, His father 
was the late Rev. I.ippman Mayer, fur a generation rabbi of the Rodef Sha- 
lom Congregation of Pittsburgh, and tin- predecessor of tin- late I. Leonard 

Levy. Ilis mother. Elise I Ih. In 1. was a daughter of the famous Profi 

I lei In. of the Real Schule and member of the Diet of his state, whose ' 
raphy appears in the Jewish Encyclopedia. 

Edward E. Mayer was born in the citj of Mlegheny, Pa., June is. [876. 

lie received his education in the grammar and high schools and later in the 

Western Universit) of Pennsylvania, since changed to the University of Pitts- 
burgh, from which he graduated in 1895. 

lie later continued his sin, |i,s .-,1 the university, receiving the degree of 
Master of Vrts and that of Doctor "f Medicine in 1897. Subsequently he 
went to Europe, when- he furthered his studies in Vienna, Paris and I ondon, 
specializing in neurology. Since his return to Vmerica he has practiced medi 

cine in the- eitv of Pittsburgh and is at the present time located in the Jenkins 
Meade Building of that citj 

I >r. Mayer's ability in his chosen specialty in the field of medicine, namelj . 
mental diseases, soon came- to he recognized universally, ami he has for a num- 
ber of years held the post of associate professor of mental diseases at the 
University of Pittsburgh, \t tin- present tune In- is the chief neurologist at 
the Presbyterian, Montefiore, South Side and Crippled Children's Home 

pi.) 



Prior to that lie was connected with the St. Francis Hospital and the city 
insane asylum at Mayview. He has read many papers on this subject before 
medical bodies, both local and national. He is the American editor of < Ippen- 
heim's famous text-book on "Diseases of the Nervous System," and is the 
author of many important contributions to medical and neurological journals. 
I [e held the office of President of the Phi Beta Pi medical fraternity; Treas- 
urer of the Pittsburgh Academy of Medicine, and Secretary of the Allegheny 
County Medical Society. For a number of years he has been connected with 
the American Medico-Psychological Association. 

Unlike a great many learned specialists, who have become narrow because 
of their devotion to one and only one field of work. Dr. Mayer is broad in 
his sympathies and activities. The Alumni Association of the University of 
Pittsburgh was a body wdiose influence upon the scholastic life of the city was 
very limited until 1910, when Dr. Mayer became its president. He lent to 
it his enthusiasm and injected into this organization a spirit of good fellowship 
which helped to turn his Alma Mater from a secondary college to a great city 
university. He is still active in the Alumni Association, serving as a mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee. 

Like his father. Dr. Mayer is a Reformed Jew. Rabbi Mayer was a 
great Plebraist and a Talmudical scholar of note, from whom young Maver 
learned a great deal. To this day Dr. Mayer is a lover of Jewish lore. He is 
affiliated with the Rodef Shalom Congregation and is prominent in the work 
of the Judeans. He has during the last few years espoused the cause of cul- 
tural Zionism. On June 16, 1901, Dr. Mayer married Miss Rose Lamm of 
Chicago. He has one daughter, Catherine. His address is 5815 Ferres street. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



ISRAEL MICHELSOHN 

When Mr. Israel Michelsohn of New York City arrived in this country in 
March. 1902, he was forty-one years of age and the father of seven children. 
Porn in the city of Folticeni, Roumania, in 1861, he was the son of Rabbi 
Michel Isaac Michelsohn, who was the Talmudical instructor of the late Dr. 
Solomon Schechter, founder of the Jewish Theological Seminary. His last 
few years Rabbi Michelsohn spent in Palestine. On his arrival here, Mr. Israel 
Michelsohn had only $63 in his possession, but it was enough to start peddling 
hosiery. After six months of this business, he bad netted a few dollars and 
opened a stand where he sold laces and embroideries at the corner of Hester 
and Orchard streets. In addition to this and his first business, he dealt on a 
moderate scale in jobbing hosiery. Two years later found him a partner in the 
wholesale hosiery and underwear firm of Finkelstein Brothers, 51 Orchard 
street. His efficiency there resulted in his taking over the business, buying out 
the Finkelstein Brothers and taking in as his partner his son-in-law. Mr. Irving 
Signer. After two years of this co-partnership, the business increased so as to 
demand larger quarters. They moved across the street into a store at 48-52 
( Irchard street, where the business has been established for the past ten years, 
and having made such progress as to find it necessary to acquire additional 
quarters in the same building. 

In February, 1917. the co-partnership was dissolved. Mr. Irving Signer 
retiring from the firm and Mr. Michelsohn taking his sons into the business, 
under the firm name of I. Michelsohn & Sons. This wholesale and jobbing 
hosiery and underwear and knit goods house is making great strides. 

Mr. Michelsohn is of a highly charitable turn and is a member of the 
Federation of Charities, the First Roumanian American Congregation, the 

200 



Beth David Hospital, Hebrew National Orphans' Home, Jewish National Fund 
Bureau Rabbi [acob Joseph School, Adas Israel Hebrew Kindergarten and 
Day Nurser) Hebrew Sheltering Society, Hebrew Free Loan Society, Nosnim 
Rachmonoth Society, Mt. Vernon Home for Aged, Hebrew Free Burial Asso- 
ciation, Talmud Torah Darchei Noam, Congregation Ohab Zedek Maskil -.1 
Dol, and there are also other organizations and charities to which he contrib- 
utes with a free hand. 

Mr Michelsohn had married al the age of nineteen Miriam Vbramowitz, 

and there are seven children, four sons and three daughters. 'I he eldest son, 

Abraham is married and a father of three sons. He is associated in business 

with the elder Mr. Michelsohn, as arc the other of his three brothers, Martin, 

\drian and Max, all of whom are well reputed and well educated both in 

Hebrew and English. The) are considered by the trade to be making g 1 

progress in business. 

' The eldest daughter, Sarah, is married to Mr. Lrvmg Signer, who 
established in business for himself. The second daughter, Nettie, was mar- 
ried to Mr. Sam Sirkin, the executive of Sirkin & Sirkin, jobbers ol hosiery at 
467 Broadway. They have one son. I lis youngest daughter, ( lara, is mar- 
ried i" Mr. Mitchel Fliegel, of the firm of Fliegel & Son, manufacturers oi 
raincoats at 40 East Twelfth street. 

Mr. Michelsohn lias talon under his charge Ins brothers grandchild, 
who is an orphan, and he and his wife are showing her parental care. The) 
have brought about her marriage to a reputable young man. 



ALEXANDER MILLER 

The only life which can win a large measure of success is one begun 
with a high conception of the possibilities of achievement. 

America has called many such line spirits from across the seas who have 

added laurels t,, her artistic, educational ami commercial activities. 

In the latter field, no name is more worthy of prominence than that of 

Alexander Miller of Detroit, who was born in Kovno, Vilna, Guberne, Rus- 
sia, December 11. [885, and came to America when a young man of twenty 
1 ears. 

lie obtained employment in a New York fur factory at onl) $4 per week. 

hut advanced his salan to $25 per week in the short 

period of one and one-half years, 

While this measure of success would have ap- 
l eased tin ambition of hm,i young men. Mr. Miller 

wanted a business of his own. however modest the 

beginning might In-, s,, he purchased a wagon and 
engaged in the junk husiness. This venture prov- 

till, it was followed by a partnership 
with Louis Miller, and their untiring efforts and 

exceptional executive abilit) have resulted in the 
development of a large commission business, deal- 
ing in butter, eggs and other produce: also 

elevator. 

Mr. Miller is still a young man with a roseate 
futun before him. 

He was married in New York January 27, 
• 1. to \li-s Gussie Bagdonofsky, .and the) I 
two promising boys of school age 

Mi. and Mrs Miller an ■ ontributors to all worth) charities, and 

tin- jo) the) derive from thl ence leads ,, v back to the old truism: 

"Thi' truly generous is trill) wise, and he who loves not ,.1! 

201 




MIKE MILLER 

i 'in- of the leading citizens of Sunbury, Pa., is Mr. Mike Miller, owner 
n| a large iron and metal business operating under his name. Mr. Miller was 
born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, April 17, 1873, his father being a merchant 
of that community. 

In December. 1885, father and son decided to come to America, and 
upon landing found their way to Lancaster, Pa. Here they both began buying 
and selling metal and after the first year went to Reading, Pa., continuing in 
the same line until the death of the father. Mr. Miller then went to Sunbury, 
Pa., where for twelve years he continued buying and selling junk, and then 
opened a small yard. This business has grown to immense proportions and 
he is today one of the largest dealers in that section of the state. 

Mr. Miller was married August 23, 1896, to Miss Rebecca Fink. Their 
family of ten children, seven boys and three girls, are all at home and have 
been given excellent educations both in academic and musical lines. 

Mr. Miller is prominent in the various fraternal orders, being a member 
of B'rith Sholom. Odd Fellows, Eagles, Owls, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen 
of the World. Chamber of Commerce, and Travelers of America. He is 
President of Talmud Torah, a member of Havra Samra Habrith Congrega- 
tion of Reading and is also President of Moses Israel of Northumberland of 
Sunbury. Pa. 

His father was the founder of the Jewish cemetery of Reading and was 
the first man to be buried there. 

We also wish to say a word regarding the social activities of Mrs. Miller, 
who belongs to every charitable and social organization of any prominence in 
Sunbury, and is very popular in their social circle. 



CARL MINSK AND LOUIS COHEN 

A partnership that has resulted in the establishment of a fine business in 
Chelsea, Mass., is that of Mr. Carl Minsk and Mr. Louis Cohen, whose plant 
is located at 246 Second street. 

Messrs. Minsk and Cohen were both born in Kiev, Guberne, Russia, the 
former in 1875 a "d tne latter in 1877. They are both descended from families 
of merchants and are by inheritance as well as training fitted for responsible 
executive positions. 

Mr. Cohen came to America in 1903 and Mr. Minsk a year later. They 
both went to Chelsea, Mass., upon their arrival, Mr. Minsk having a brother 
in that city. He obtained work in a rag shop, wdiere for the sake of experi- 
ence he continued at the meager salary of $2 per week. Fie then went into 
business for himself and after two or three partnerships finally joined forces 
with Mr. Cohen, the result of which is the present large business establish- 
ment which they are so successfully operating. 

Mr. Cohen's first experience in America was somewhat similar, as he 
also worked in a rag shop for the first three years, when he returned to Russia 
for seven months. Coming back to America, he worked for two years and 
then went into business with Mr. Minsk. Mr. Cohen was married in Russia 
in 1895 an d thev have six children, two boys and four girls, all going to school, 
the eldest being in business college. 

Mr. Minsk was married in Russia in 1900 to Miss Rebecca Minsk, and 
they have two children, one boy and one girl, going to school. 

Both families are members of the Orthodox Congregation, and are very 
generous in their gifts to charity. 

202 



JACOB MILLER 

The most beautiful trait of Jewish character is their love of home and 
kinfolk. 

Perhaps no other characteristic has had so much influence in maintaining 
the solidarity of the Jewish people throughout the many centuries in which 
they have been scattered over the face of the earth, mingling amicably with 
all nations, yet losing no part of their identity. 

Such a character is Jacob Miller of Wheeling, W. Va., as the events of 
his life which we narrate will illustrate. 

Corn in Yilna, Guberne, Russia, August 15, 1875, ' le came to America 
at the age of twenty-one and found his first employment in a pants factory, 
where, although the pay was rather meager, he managed to save some money. 

Going to Canton, Ohio, he worked in a junk shop for $1 per day in order 
to obtain experience, and four months later bought a horse and wagon and 
began buying and selling junk. 

On July 5, 1900, he was married to Miss Bessie Emerman. 

Shortly after he sold the junk business and engaged in the liquor busi- 
ness, where he was very successful. Seven years later he sold out and having 
accumulated a snug fortune, decided to travel and look up all the family 
connections, who were scattered in various parts of the United States. Six 
months later he again felt the urge of a business life and going to Wheeling 
started in the iron and metal business with two partners. 

This venture was most unfortunate, as he lost all his money, and in 1910 
was obliged to take over the business, assuming all liabilities. 

Under his able management the firm again began to prosper and within 
a few years he had again accumulated a nice fortune. 

Not being content to selfishly enjoy his prosperity, he sent for his three 
brothers and four sisters, who were still in Europe, and not only educated 
them, but gave each of the girls upon her marriage a dowery of $500. 

He is also most liberal in his gifts to all charities and is one of those noble, 
public-spirited citizens who are a blessing to any community. 

Mr. Miller is a member of the Congregation Ahav Sholem of Wheeling 
and B'nai B'rith No. 615 of Wheeling and many other important organizations. 



203 



ELI MINSKER 

The Jews have always been great students of law in one form or another. 
Law is the name applied to the Scriptures; law marks the discourses of the 
Talmudists and the bulk of Hebrew literature consists of law, which has be- 
come ingrained in the racial fabric. Small wonder that Jews coming to our 
country become industrious, progressive, law-abiding citizens. Throughout 
their history law has been taught, studied and lived. 

Such is the history of 'Sir. Eli Minsker. who was born in Letova, Gubeme, 
Russia, in April, 1873. His father, Mr. David Minsker, was a successful 
merchant and a man of line education, who saw that his son had every advan- 
tage that opportunity afforded. Consequently, young Eli obtained an excel- 
lent knowledge of Jewish scholarship ; in fact, studied to be a Rabbi, and today 
has a knowledge of Schochat. But Eate willed that Mr. Minsker should dis- 
tinguish himself in the business world, as later events showed. 

The family removed to America in the fall of 1889, and our subject, then 
a young man of sixteen years, came with his parents to Cleveland, Ohio, where 
he began peddling with a push cart. Later he got a horse and wagon and 
continued buying and selling old iron and metal. At the expiration of the 
first year he opened a wholesale junk yard. 

Shortly after coming to Cleveland he met and married Miss Anna Leren- 
man, a capable young woman of considerable business ability, who assisted 
her husband in conducting a store in Norwalk, Ohio, in addition to his other 
activities. This they continued for twelve years, when he opened a wholesale 
scrap iron business in Erie, Pa., wdiere he remained one year. He next went 
to Jamestown, N. Y., where he bought an interest in an established business 
and later took over the interests of his partner, taking his son, now grown to 
manhood, into the firm. They incorporated under the present name of James- 
town Iron & Metal Co., Mr. Minsker being President and his son, Morris, 
Secretarv and Treasurer, and their business is today the largest of its kind in 
that section of the state. 

The son. Morris, in addition to his business activities, is a graduate of 
the University of Buffalo Law School, and practiced in Buffalo for two years. 
He is a thirty-second degree Mason, a member of Temple Beth El Club of 
Buffalo, and very active in all civic affairs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Minsker have two other sons, Lewis, who is going to high 
school, and Frank, only five years old. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Minsker are exceedingly active in the various char- 
itable movements of their city, contributing to all worthy causes. They are 
members of the Hebrew Beth El Congregation and patrons of the Jewish 
Consumptive Relief Society of Denver, the Cemetery Association, all the 
Yishivas and many other charities. 



CHAUNCEY A. MINTZ 

Most of the human driftwood of the world are men whose lives have 
been diverted from the channels to which they were by nature and tempera- 
ment best fitted. 

It is only in rare instances that we find an individual possessed of suffi- 
cient talent and versatility to be successful in two widely differing professions 
or occupations, both of them exacting in the extreme, and requiring years of 
preliminary training. 

In the life history of Chauncey A. Mintz we have a most interesting 
example of this type of man — one who, partly through force of circumstances 

204 




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and partly from a sense of duty, gave up his chosen profession in which he 
was unusually successful, to engage in an entirely different line of work, which 
he has conducted with equal success. 

Chauncey A. Mintz was born in Titusville, Pa., July 26, 1870, his father 
being Mr. Israel Morris Mintz, whose biography also appears in this volume. 

After receiving a thorough education, young Mr. Mintz chose the pro- 
fession of medicine as a life work, and after graduating from the Western 
University of Pittsburgh, Pa., began his practice there. 

It is a well-known fact that no profession exacts so much of time and 
strength as that of a physician, and after a number of years, during which 
his practice became very large, Mr. Mintz found that his strength was hardly 
sufficient for the discharge of his arduous duties. His father was also becom- 
ing rather advanced in years, and as he had no other sons to assume the re- 
sponsibility of his immense iron and metal business, Mr. Mintz's sense of filial 
obligation prompted him to give up his profession and devote his time to his 
father's business. 

That he has been just as successful here as he was in the practice of medi- 
cine is very obvious to one who has visited their immense plant at Oil City. 
Pa., and in addition he has regained his health. His interests are not con- 
fined entirely to this business, as he is also a Director of the American Railway 
Appliance Company. 

Mr. Mintz has not only mastered the arts of medicine and business, but 
has found time for the promotion of the various social and civic activities of 
his community. He is President of the Orthodox School of Oil City, contrib- 
utes to many charities, both local and national, is a prominent Elk and also a 
member of the Tree of Life Congregation. 

His life is one of such unusual activity and usefulness that it is proving 
a constant source of inspiration to the young people of the community and Oil 
City is indeed fortunate in having within its gates such a citizen as Mr. Mintz. 



ISRAEL MORRIS MINTZ 

Good citizenship is less a matter of nativity than allegiance to certain 
principles which the spirit of the adopted country typifies. 

It is the vibrant flame which sends voyagers across unknown seas ; which 
inspires the pioneer in his penetration of the virgin forests of a new world. It 
is the spirit of progress, unquenchable, unconquerable; the steady seeking of 
new lands in which to develop new ideals of living. And whether the man's 
effort shall be directed to the world of commerce, of agriculture, or of art. the 
efiort and its result are equally commendable. 

Such a man was Air. Israel Morris Mintz of * 111 City, Pa., who, as a very 
young man, came witli his bride to seek his Fortune in America. 

He was born in Suwalk, Guberne, Russia, in September, 1847. 

The Mintzs arc descended from a long line of cultured people and the 
father of our subject was no exception lie was also a very successful mer- 
chant, as well as an able scholar. 

Young Israel received his education in his native town, having the advan- 
tage of cultured home surroundings, and in [866 was united in marriage lo Miss 
Eva < Ishinsky. Shortly after their marriage the) departed for America, com- 
ing direct to Titusville. Pa., where an uncle resided. 

1 lis firsl occupation was peddling merchandise from a pack, which he con- 
tinued for ten years. Then followed another ten years with :i horse and wagon. 
after which he had accumulated sufficient capital lo open a --tore and later 
another in 1'elrola. l'a. 

205 



Although these ventures were very successful. Mr. Mint/. s;iw more oppor- 
tunity in the iron and metal business, so he sold his stores and invested in the 
junk business. 

Time has proven the soundness of his judgment, as he is now conducting 
one of the largest yards in the state, giving employment to a number of people, 
lie is assisted by his son. whose separate biography appears in another place. 

lie also has a daughter. Kae. who is the wife of Dr. A. A. Goldman of 
Oil City. Pa. 

His wife died about three years ago. and her loss is keenly felt by her 
family and the entire community, to whom she was an ideal wife, mother and 
friend. 

Mr. Mintz is very liberal in his contributions to charities, is a member of 
the Orthodox school of Oil City and the ( kid Fellows. 

Among the organizations to which he is most generous, are the Denver 
and Los Angeles Hospitals, Old Age and Orphans" Home of Cleveland, and all 
the Yishivas. 



LOUIS MINTZ 

To young people who at times underestimate the opportunities which the 
industrial system in our country affords, a conversation with Mr. Louis Mintz 
of Cleveland. Ohio, would be both a help and an inspiration. 

Mr. Mintz has experienced to the full, conditions both in Europe and 
America and is able to appreciate by contrast those advantages which Amer- 
ican-born young men and women are inclined to pass over lightly. Mr. Mintz 
was born in Lobirrin, Russia, in 1875. the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
Mintz. His uncle was one of the largest railroad builders in Russia and his 
father was a clerk working for his uncle. His employment in Europe con- 
sisted of the manufacture of cigarette tips, but feeling that there was no future 
in this occupation, he decided to come to America, and, owing to the fact that he 
was only making a very small salary, landed on our shores without a cent. 

For one year he was employed as a painter at Sq.oo per week. During 
this time he gained much valuable information regarding our language and 
customs and, at the expiration of this time, he decided to go into business for 
himself, doing painting and small jobs in contracting. This he followed for 
five years, and by that time had earned such reputation for ability and first- 
class work that he became the largest Hebrew building contractor in the city. 
In 1913 came his opportunity to organize the Ohio Window Shade Company, 
and since that time Mr. Mintz has devoted nearly all his time and attention to 
this business, of which he is president. 

Mr. Mintz was married to Miss Gussie ^"igutoof and they have five chil- 
dren, four bovs and one girl, who are all in school with the exception of the 
eldest son. Max. who is in business with his father. 

The business interests of Mr. Mintz necessarily occupy a great deal of his 
time, but he is vitally interested in every movement for Jewish betterment and 
his wife spends a great deal of time investigating various charities and con- 
tributing to them for her husband and herself jointly. She is a member of 
Talmud Torah and a patroness of the 1 'Id Age Home, the Orphans' Home, and 
many others too numerous to mention. They also contribute to the Denver 
Sanitarium. 



206 



MICHAEL MOHR 

The Jewish community of Montgomery, Ala., has an unusually large pro- 
portion of men who have won distinction in the various walks of life and are 
occupying a high position in the city. Few are more esteemed, however, for 
their interests and activities and for their contribution to the progress of civic 
enterprise than is Mr. Michael Mohr. 

Mr. Mohr was born on July 4, 1849, in Oberlustadt, Rheinpfalz, Bavaria, 
the son of Jacob and Minna Mohr, and came to this country at the age of 17. 
He arrived in this new land of liberty and opportunity with little more than a 
determination to achieve success in life. But he possessed the personal quali- 
ties and qualifications that usually make for success. He had a bright mind, 
a good bringing up, and a desire to make a place for himself amidst his new 
surroundings through hard work. He also had the advantage of a worthy 
example set for him by his uncle, Josiah Weil, who was the organizer and first 
president of the Kahl Montgomery Congregation. 

After acquiring a thorough knowledge of English and completing his 
education, for which he had obtained a good foundation in his native town, 
he started out as a clerk in a store and, in 1880, he established a general mer- 
chandise business of his own. Three years ago he retired from that business 
and is now devoting his time in looking after his interests in cotton plantations, 
maintaining a city office at No. 8 Washington avenue. 

During all this time Mr. Mohr has devoted a large portion of his time to 
charitable, civic and educational endeavors of a Jewish and general character. 
And his great capabilities and fine capacity for leadership along these lines have 
been clearly recognized by every association and institution with which he has 
been connected. Accordingly, he has been elected to positions of trust and 
responsibility by associations, not only of local but also of national standing 
and importance. Thus he has held and has now the position of president of 
the United Jewish Charities of his city and has served as vice-president of 
Kahl Montgomery, of which he has been a trustee for the past thirty-two years. 
He has served on the Board of the Cleveland Orphan Asylum for sixteen 
years ; he is a director of the National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives of 
Denver, and is a past-president of the District Grand Lodge No. 7 of the 
B'nai B'rith. Among the positions he has occupied in the city at large, and 
which gave him great personal satisfaction and reflected much credit upon the 
Jewish community, is that of chairman of the school board, which enviable 
position he has filled, with much honor to himself and great benefit to the citv 
and its schools, for more than a quarter of a centurv. 

On February 20. 1884, Mr. Mohr was married to one of Montgomery's 
charming young ladies, Miss Minna Dreyfus, and their union has been blessed 
with two children. Blanche, who is now Mrs. H. I. Davis of Atlanta, Ga., and 
Miss Delia Mohr, who is exemplifying the deep interest in education with 
which she has been imbued by her parents in her splendid work as a teacher 
in the local high school. 



ABRAHAM MORRISON 

I 11 11 11 humble labor in a factory to the sole owner of an immense iron and 
metal business, and all accomplished within the space of ten years, is the 
remarkable achievement of Mr. Abraham Morrison. 

Born in \ ilna, Guberne, Russia, in ( Ictober, [881, he was th» sun of Louis 
and Freda Morrison, bis father conducting a tannery in his native town, I ike 
many of the older generation of Jews. Mr. Morrison, Sr., was a great scholar 

207 



and was able to teach his son much that his meager scl I opportunities would 

not afford. 

He came to America Ma) 29, [898, his destination being Grand Rapids, 
Mich., where he worked in a factor) for about eight months, until he could 
accumulate sufficient capital to bu) a horse and wagon. 

I [e then began buying and selling old iron and metal and from this small 
beginning, by unceasing industr) and courage, lia- amassed a fortune and is 
considered one of the leading business men of his city. 

Mr. Morrison was married « Ictober 29, [906, to Miss Rose Wepman of 
< ; r.-nnl Rapids, and the) arc the parents of three fine children, all going to 
school and. iii addition, receiving musical training. In addition to the careful 

home training of llieir children. Mrs. Morrison finds time for main -< p. i:il 

activities of which she is the popular leader. Both Mr. and Mrs. Morrison 
devote a considerable amount of their wealth to charitable causes and Mr. 
Morrison is also <|tiite prominent in fraternal circles, being a member of 

1 Irder Independent Western Star. Jewish Social ( lub, Woodmen of America. 
I'.'nai I'.'rith and Vla\ as Solium. 

I le is also trustee of the \\ est Side ( bngregation and i* very devout in his 
adherence to Jewish principles. 



DR. BERNARD MOUNT 

1 or a city to have only two Jewish physicians and to know that both of 
them have achieved distinction and are prominently and active]) connected 
with the civic, charitable, and social life of the community, is indeed a satis- 
faction such as few cities can enjoy and experience. Yet, Montgomery, Ala., 
i- thus fortunate and privileged. For the success and distinction, both in a 
professional and communal way. which Dr. 1 ireil enjoys are shared in the 

largest possible measure by Dr. Bernard Mount. 

Dr. Mount has been splendidl) prepared and eminently fitted for the 
position of leadership which he occupies in his profession, lie i-.. com- 
parative!) speaking, only a young man. but he has nevertheless accomplishments 
and achievements to his credit which older men with lifelong practice would 
undoubtedly feel proud to call their own. He was horn in Forsyth, Ga., on 
January 4, [880. His father, fsidor Mount, immigrated to 1 1 1 i - country at an 
earl) age from his native place in Germany, and his mother. Celia Mount, is a 
native of Macon. Ga. After gaining a primary education in the public schools 

at Atlanta. Dr. Mount pursued further studies in the Mercury University at 

Macon. Ga., and then went to New Orleans, where he entered the medical 
department of the Tulane University, from which institution he graduated in 

[900. The same year he established himself in Batchelor, la., where he hllilt 

up a large practice during a stay of si\ years. Being desirous of specializing 
in internal medicine, however, and of reaching out for a larger field and a 
wiiler scope of activity, he weni to New York, where he pursued post-graduate 
studies and then came to Montgomery and opened offices in the Bell building of 
that city. 

Dr. Mount's affiliations in his cit) and community are ver) numerous, and 
hi- services and active co-operation in tin- various charitable, civic, and educa- 
tional endeavors are greatly admired and highly appreciated. 

Besides holding membership in the different philanthropic institutions and 

organizations, both Jewish and non-Jewish, he is a member of the State. South- 
ern, and American Medical Associations. lie has held the position of presi- 
dent in the County Medical Association and is at the present time a member of 
United States Medical Advisory Board. He is a member of B'nai B'rith; a 

208 



thirty-second degree Mason; atttending physician of Masonic Home and Hos- 
pital; lecturer on medicine at Nurses' Training School, St. Margaret's Hospital, 
and local examiner for National Hospital for Consumptives, Denver, Colo. 

On April 29, 1914, Dr. Mount's opportunities for valued and valuable 
services to the city and community were enhanced by bis marriage to Miss Kate 
Steiner, an accomplished young lady of Montgomery, who is very active in 
various organizations, notably in the Federated Women's Club, dividing her 
time and attention between the exquisite and affectionate care of a bright baby, 
Bernard, Jr., and the interests and endeavors which her prominent station in the 
community entails. 



JACOB MOSCOVITZ 

The Jewish race has produced the best body of business men which the 
world has ever seen. Regardless of the line to which they turn their attention, 
they seldom fail to achieve success. 

We find an example of this kind in the life of Mr. Jacob Moscovitz, who 
was born in Iiassarolia, Kishnip, Guberne, Russia, in December, 1867. He 
was the son of Solomon Moscovitz, who was a prosperous merchant of his 
native town, and also a prominent scholar. At the age of 20, young Jacob 
decided that the new world would offer him better opportunities than he could 
find at home, so he came to America and found his way to Detroit, Mich., 
where he peddled for eight years. 

He was then connected with a five-and-ten-cent store for about one year, 
after which he engaged in the commission business. His next venture was in 
the bottling business, his hrst establishment being on Adelaide street. Here 
he was very successful, and after fours years he removed the business to his 
present location at 246 Windsor street, where he is conducting one of the 
largest businesses of its kind in the city. 

Mr. Moscovitz was married July 6, 1897, to Miss Rosa Goldberg of 
I 'droit, and they have six children, three boys and three girls. The eldest son, 
Sidney, now 19 years old, is in business with his father. Bessie is a stenog- 
rapher, and the balance of the children are still in school. They all have shown 
a marked musical ability, and play the piano, and here it might be well to 
mention the fact that it is rare indeed to find both business and artistic abili- 
ties so happily combined. 

Mr. Moscovitz is very prominent in a number of organizations, chief of 
which ma) lie mentioned Beth Jacobs Congregation, the Odd Fellows, Knights 
of Pythias. Beth Abraham, the Maccabees, and the Hebrew Protective Union. 

The city of Detroit recognizes in the persons of Mr. and Mrs. Moscovitz 
two of its most useful and public-spirited citizen-;. 



SAM MOSTOV 
The life history of Mr. Sam Mostov proves conclusively thai no matter 

how humble the beginning, success is bound to follow hard work and business 
ability rightly applied. 

Mi-. Mostov was born in Valencia, Witipsk, Guberne. Russia, December 15, 
1880, the sun of Mr. and Mrs. Chaim Musiov. His father was not only a suc- 
cessful merchant of his native town, but alsn a most accomplished lewish 

209 



scholar, and the early lessons learned at the home fireside compensated in a 

large measure for whatever lack of scholastic learning young Sam may have 
realized later. 

I [e came to America in March, 11)05, starting to work in the junk yard at 
$7.00 per week. Although the salary was meager, he obtained some very 
valuable experience, which served him well six months later, when he bought a 
horse and wagon and started out in business for himself. 

He first went into the country and stopped at Bucyrus, Ohio. Here he 
found a good opportunity to work for a dealer and later opened a yard for 
himself, where he remained for two years, doing a very good business. Sell- 
ing out at a good profit, he then went to Toledo, Ohio, and rented a small 
building, which he was obliged to enlarge three-years later, until at the present 
time he owns a large modern plant advantageously located on the railroad 
tracks and is also owner of considerable real estate. 

Mr. Mostov was married February of 1907 to Miss Dora Smirin of Toledo, 
Ohio, and they have three sons and three daughters, four of whom are in 
school. 

In addition to Mr. Mostov's many business activities, he finds time to 
associate himself with every organization having to do with civic improvement 
and philanthropy. He is a trustee of Congregation B'nai Israel, treasurer of 
the American Jewish Aid Society, prominent member of the Maccabees and 
Knights of Joseph, the founder of the Mizrooe Society Federation of Chari- 
ties, Federation of Charities, member of the B'nai B'rith. 

That a man of foreign birth and no opportunities except those which he 
has created for himself can do so much in such a short time, should be an 
inspiration to all young people just starting out in life. 



SIMON MYERS 

Some of the earliest and best lessons in salesmanship have been gained 
by the sale of newspapers on the street. This is the manner in which the suc- 
cessful career of Mr. Simon Myers of Salem, Mass., was begun. 

He was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, December 23, 1880, and at the 
age of eight years came to East Boston, to his 
father, who had preceded him to the new world. 
He went to school for four years, when, feeling the 
necessity of earning his own living, he began selling 
papers. Later he started peddling, and continued 
until 1903, when he went into the present iron and 
metal scrap business, which has grown to be one 
of the principal plants in Salem. He also owns, and 
is treasurer of. the North Shore Waste Paper Co., 
Inc.. another concern of considerable prominence. 

Mr. Myers was married in November. 1904. to 
Miss Amelia Gold of Chelsea, and they have one 
boy, who is going to school and is also being edu- 
cated in Hebrew. 

Mr. Myers is a strict believer in the traditions 
of his race and religion, and is a devout attendant 
upon the congregation of which he is director. He is 

also a prominent Elk, and member of the Chamber of Commerce. His con- 
tributions to the Denver Hospital are one of the many philanthropies which 
are benefited by his prosperity. 

210 




DAVID NORWICH 

One of the most prominent citizens and able business men of Chelsea, 
Mass., is Mr. David Norwich. 

Mr. Norwich was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in 1N7S. and came to 
America [uly ,}. [893. Landing in Boston, he took the first honest occupation 
which came to hand, and which happened to be peddling potatoes. \ few 
wicks later In- obtained employment in a junk shop, where he continued for 
three years, and then, going into business for himself, was so unfortunate as 

se all of his capital. He went to work again, devoting three years to the 
hay and ^rain business, after which he established his present wholesale liquor 
house, which is a success in every way. 

Mr. Norwich was married in the year rgoo to Miss Ida Cohen, of Chelsea, 
and they have five children, cue boj and four yirls. all going to school. The 
eldest daughter, Jennie, is a graduate from high school, and also husiness co l- 

lege at Maiden. 

Mrs. Norwich is very prominent in various social and charitabk activities, 
nne of the institutions of which sh,- is a patroness being the 1 >ld Age Home. 
Mr. and Mis. Norwich are also contributors to the Denver Hospital, as well as 
all local institutions. 

Mr. Norwich is a member of Angudas Sholom and Avas Achem I ongrega- 
tions, as well as P.'rith Abraham. 

Mis financial prosperit) is a distinct advantage not only to his family, hut 
to the community in general where he is regarded a most valued and public- 
spirited citizen. 



ABRAHAM NOWAK 
The question has been repeatedly raised by the Jewish press whether the 

new generation of jews growing before our eyes in America, will ever he able 

to produce strong spiritual leaders. There were some, in fact it seined to 
be the- consensus of opinion for some time at least, who believed that the era 
of spiritual leaders of Judaism was gone and nothing new could he expei 

But, as is usual with prophets of evil, their fears were proved groundless, anil 
we witness toda) the remarkable growth ^>i rabbinical talent among the present 

ition 'if American Jewry coupled with thorough preparation for the duties 

of spiritual leadership. 

Rabbi Abraham Nowak has been in Boston only a wr\ short time, and 
yet he has already accomplished wonders, lie has become the conceded 
leader of the Jewry. \ strong force and a brilliant future is undoubted!) his. It 
is almost inconceivable to think thai mis well-known rabbi and threat leader is 
onh twenty-seven years of age, having been horn in the cit) of New York on 

August 15, 1890. Kahhi Nowak is the sun of Harris Nowak, a clothier in 
New York, who is a thorough Orthodox and imbued his son with a love for 
[ewish tradition and history and threw the first seed of love for fudaism in the 

live mind of the young lx>) . 

Abraham attended the public school in New N ork and the I nllegr of the 
( itv of New York, from which he was graduated with a I'.. S. degree in igiO. 
lie then entered the Jewish Theological Seminary of Ami eiving his 

degree of rabbi in 1913, in which year In- was a ]-,i made a M. \. at Columbia 
University, where he took his post graduate studies, fmmediatel) after his 
admission to the rabbinate he was offered a pulpit in Louisville, Ky., becoming 
associated with a conservative congregation, the \dath Jeshurun, in which he 

remained for lour years, until he was called to assume the pulpit of the I 

.'II 



gregation Ohabei Sholom in Boston, which duties he assumed on August i. 

While iu Louisville, he was actively engaged in the promotion of the 
Zionist movement and held prominent office in the Zionist organization of the 
city, lie was also the president of Louisville Lodge. Branch No. 14. Inde- 
pendent tinier B'nai B'rith, where he was very conspicuous and active. He 
was a member of the executive board of the Federation of Jewish Charities 
in Louisville, and is at present member of a similar board in Boston. Rabbi 
Nowak is not only a great preacher, but an ardent social worker, and he has 
made it his principle to become an active leader in the civic uplift of his 
brethren. 

In Boston Rabbi Nowak found plenty of work for himself and with his 
wonted energy he applied himself to the task, lie intends to raise the Jewish 
people of Boston to a higher spiritual life and awaken their religious conscious- 
ness. He is a Jewish idealist, believing in the principles of the Jewish faith 
ardently and without compromise and he is fully convinced of success. He is 
young, brilliant and full of zeal and ardor ; a powerful speaker and an orator 
of no mean ability, who can sway the audience. Rabbi Xowak will add to his 
intellectual equipment the noble fire of his inspiration and the courage of his 
undaunted conviction. 



ABRAHAM NOVEK 

Few men have had a harder fight upward toward success than Mr. Abra- 
ham Xovek, of Fall River, Mass. H e was born in Gravno, Guberne, Russia, 
in 1863, and did not come to America until 1900. For two months he worked 
as an ironer. During this time he received no salary, as he was just learning 
the trade. Not finding this to bis liking, he went to Fall River, Mass., and 
obtained employment in a junk shop, where he served a hard apprenticeship, 
working for $4.00 per week. This he continued for three years in order to 
obtain a thorough knowledge of the business. He then went into business for 
himself, and now conducts a fine modern plant at Xo. 65 Hargrave street. 

Mr. Novek was married in Russia in 1893 and has three children, one boy 
and two girls. The son, Charles, is in business with his father, and is a gradu- 
ate of business college. The daughter Gertrude is a graduate of high school, 
and Fannie is at present attending high school. Mr. Xovek is president of 
Avas Achem and B'rith Jacob Congregation, and is also prominent in 
Bristol Countv Lodge, and Talmud Torah. He is generous in his gifts to 
all charities, including the Denver Hospital and the Immigration Society. 



LEE A. OCHS 

Mr. Ochs belongs to the younger generation of genuine American Jewry. 
He was born in Cincinnati on the 13th of November, 1880. attended the public 
schools of Chicago and a business college at X T e\v York, graduating from the 
well-known Packard School at the age of fifteen. He then went into business 
with his father, becoming the general manager of his father's clothing factory. 
He stayed at this post for five years, and when his father sold the business he 
secured a position as salesman for a large clothing house, where he remained 
for a few years. 

212 



Alter his marriage, on the 14th of 1 Jecember, 1903, he decided to starl into 
business for himself, and he entered the theatrical field, ;i new and growing 
industry, in which Mr. Ochs determined to make good. He became a pro- 
ducer of important pictures and booked them all over the United States. In 
[908 he opened a motion picture theatre at 89th street and Amsterdam avenue, 
called the Millard Theatre, and since then has owned and operated a number 
of theatres. 

In 1913, Mr. I Ichs was elected president of the Motion Picture Exhibitors' 
League of America, for the city of New York only. At the end of that year 
he was re-elected president and given control over the industry < > f tin- State 
of New York, which position he held for two years, and in July. 1916, was 
elected national president over the entire United States. His offices arc at 
No. 1587 Broadway. 

Mr. ( )chs is a Master Mason and a Shriner of the Mecca Temple, a mem- 
ber (if the Elks, New York No. t, and other fraternal organizations, and he 
contributes to all charities. Mis wife, who was Miss Nana K. Kaufman, is the 
daughter of fonas Kaufman, the well-known president of the Standard Wire 
\\ orks. Two children have blessed their union, a sun, Millard, and a daughter, 
Willa. 



DAVID OPPENHEIM 

The best experience in merchandising which the world affords is found on 

-nits of our cities, where youthful knights of commerce vie with each 

other in cornering the newspaper trade. Here the high lights and shadows 

are thrown on the great human drama from the time the curtain rises in the 

morning until it is lowered again by the hand of night. It is the great school 

where human nature nia\ he read a- an open 1 k; that has given to manv ol 

our foremost business and professional men that keen insight and thorough 
understanding of their fellows which ha- served them so well in after years. 
This may he -aid of Mr. David Oppenheim, who -old papers upon the 

street- of Detroit when only a -mall bo) going to school. That he learned how 
to .leal successfully with people of nearly all walks in life is evidenced by the 

fact that he wa- first proprietor of a restaurant; next ran a billiard academy, 
and in mi.' started in the real estate and tire adjusting business. In all these 
he attained fan- success, but the venture in which he wa- destined to make his 
fortune and reputation a- a business man was asbestos mining. 

Me i- on,. ,,f \er\ few lew- engaged in the development of this industr) 
and ha- large holdings which are immensely valuable. Me -till continue- his 
real estate and insurance business, his office being located in the Dime Bank 
building, 1 >etroit. 

Mr. < Ippenheim i- American horn, the -on ,,\ Benjamin and Jennie ■ Ippen- 

heiin. horn \pril 16, 1872, in Detroit, Mich. His father 1- a retired merchant 
of that city. 

He received a high school education, earning his own monc) selling papers 
while going t" school. 

Me was married in Detroit in 1896 to Miss Sarah Rosenthal, and they 

have five children, all in school. 

Mr. I ippenheim finds time to I.e. omi affiliated w it 1 1 a number of charitable 
organizations, being trustee of the Jewish Old loll--' Home, the lion 1 

Iter, and president and founder of the largest 1 Machpcleh) > emetcr) in 
Detroit. He is also a member of Shaare) Zadek Beth lacob and B'nai Israel. 

Mr. Oppenheim considers moralitj and honest) the two cardinal virtues 
worth) of cultivation b) the young. 

Jit 



LOUIS OPPENHEIMER 

The pages of modern biography contain main stories as replete with vivid 
experiences, and overwhelming difficulties surmounted, as the histories of the 
pioneers who conquered the vastness of the new and unexplored world. What 
more thrilling experiences are to be found than those related in the annals of 
modern business life? 

We are reminded of these facts in connection with the life history of 
Louis I ippenheimer, who was born in Alsheim, Germany, May 31, 1855, the son 
of Simon and Sarah Oppenheimer. lie came to America in March, 1872, going 
to Akron, Ohio, where he stayed for four years, working as a clerk, and then 
went to Cleveland, where he continued in the same capacity for nine years. 
He then went into business for himself, and four years later went to Xorwalk, 
Ohio, where he was prominently connected with the firm of J. Kahn Co. In 
1902 he retired from membership in this firm, and became the head of L. 
Oppenheimer & Co., general furnishing and clothing dealers. 

Mr. ( Ippenheimer was married January II, 1885, to Miss Blanche Lobel, 
of Cleveland, Ohio, and they have one son, who is in the service of bis country. 

Mr. Oppenheimer is a member of the Odd Fellows. I Irphans', and Jewish 
Old Folks' Home, is a national director of the Denver Sanitarium, and one 
of the advisory committee of Memorial Hospital of Xorwalk. His activity in 
movements for public betterment have been of the utmost value to his com- 
munity, and to the world at large. 



LOUIS A. OZERSKY 

During the brief period of time since our Russian, Galician and Rou- 
manian co-religionists began to immigrate to this country, it has become pos- 
sible to build up a number of Jewish communities which are a source of pride 
to American Jewry. The establishment and maintenance of these communi- 
ties would be absolutely impossible if there had not been in every city a few 
idealists, men who would not let their souls be drowned in the sea of material- 
ism, and who would remain Jews, true and loyal even in America, and who 
deserve our recognition for the remarkable work thev had performed in the 
establishment of these Jewish communities. 

In Youngstown, O., we must count among those men Mr. Louis A. Ozersky. 
He is one of the few public-spirited Jews of Youngstown. one of those public 
men whose actions nobody can subject to criticism, but whose praises every- 
body sings. And a close acquaintance with the man will surely add to this high 
estimation. 

Mr. ( Izersky was born on the 23rd of December, 1873, in Maglin, Govern- 
ment of Chernigov, the son of Reb Isaac and Nachma Ozersky. The whole 
family was one of Talmudic students, and their grandfather was the renowned 
Rabbi Israel Zhastiker. 

Louis Ozersky was himself a Talmudic scholar until bis sixteenth year. 
Today he is engaged in the business of baker and he is naturally absorbed in 
his work, but after a few minutes' talk to him you will soon learn that you have 
to deal with a student, a man of greater intelligence than the average success- 
ful business man. 

Mr. Ozersky learned the baker's trade in order to obtain the permission of 
the Russian government to live in Russia proper. But when he came over to 
America, at the age of nineteen, he soon discovered that this trade would help 
him to establish himself in the country and make a living. Lie spent two years 
at it in Xew Haven, and in 1895 he come to Youngstown, where he went into 
the business in his own right, establishing the firm of Ozersky Brothers, con- 
sisting of Louis. Nathan (the subject of the next biographical sketch), and 

214 



Emanuel * IzersK) a firm very popular and among the most successful in its 
line. 

I '.ui the most important things about Mr. i Izersky arc his social connec- 
tions. He is the president of the Hebrew Institute, ex-president of the Con- 
gregation Emanu-F.l, member of tin- Zionist Council of Youngstown, vice-presi- 
dent of the local relief committee, which he had helped to establish, ex-presi- 
dent of the local B'nai B'rith Lodge, ex-president of the B'rith Abraham Lodge, 
and a member of the executive committee of the Ohio State Zionist League. 
lie hail served many times as a delegate to conventions of the B'nai B'rith and 
was also a duly nominated candidate for the Jewish ( ongress. 

It ^iiis without saying that such many-sided participation in public work - 
requires many sacrifices, and Mr. t izersk) gives ungrudgingly. I lis readiness 

lo serve when business would call him away have brought him nearer to many 
hearts. 

( )n June 15. [902, Mr. I Izersky was married lo Anna, daughter of the well- 
known Youngstown "Lamdan" Mr. Altshuler. Mr. and Mrs. t Izersky an- the 
parents of five accomplished children, Sarah Norma. Saul David, Ruth Bessie, 

Mildred Dorothy, and Miriam. 

Xot only is Mr. t Izersky a great philanthropist, but he is a charming con- 
versationalist and one greatl) enjoys his company. 



NATHAN OZERSKY 

There are many men who seem remote from the humming social life of the 
community and prefer solitude. We call them "quiet" : in a city like New York. 
where there 1- SO much life, they are not apt to come to public notice. The late 

Benjamin Altman belonged t<> that type. No matter how charitable or philan- 
thropic such a. man may he. he trio to pass by unnoticed, hut their g 1 deeds 

.oe. nevertheless, recognized and appreciated by the hundreds who come within 
the radius of their beneficence. 

Mr. Nathan < Izersky, the older brother of the firm of 1 Izersk) Brothers 
of Youngstown, ( ihio, i- in the full sense of the word a quiet, retired and char 
itable citizen, a man who looks For no credit or appreciation; hut lie i- a kind- 
hearted man. possessing the true Jewish spirit and the community hade him 

come forth from his retirement to which he naturall) incline- and showed him 
to the world in hi- true colors. Though he dreads publicity ami would prefer 
an unassuming and retired life, he was for five years president of the Congre 

gation Knianti I.I which he had helped establish and which he helped !" a 

remarkable synagogue building. I It was also for the period of -is years presi- 
dent of the I It-brew tnstitl 

\- has been said, Mr. Ozersk) look- for no recognition, yet the com- 
munity cannot gel along without his assistance and he has been brought into 
the limelight of publicity not once but man} times. 

Nathan Ozersky wa- 1h. ru mi the 24th of December, 1867, in Moglin, 

rnigov Government, a- the son of Reb Isaac ami Nachmah 1 Izersky. In 

hi- youth be studied the Talmud and dreamed of becoming a great Rabbi and 

teacher in Israel. I'.llt when he tame to \mcrica he learned the baker'- trade. 

and, through hi- hard work ami hones) methods, he ami hi- younger brother 
brought about the present successful firm ol ' Izersky Brothers in Youngstown 

1 9CC pie. cding -ketch 1. 

Mr. Nathan < izersky was married in April. 1898, t" Miss Sophie Adel- 
m.,11. and the) are the parent- of a ver) accomplished daughter, Cecilia, who 
1- .. high school student. 

Mr. 1 Izersky i- not a- active in social affair- now a- he wa- formerly, but 

be i- a Jew of a large heart and always read) to help hi- fellow lew and 

fellow-man. 

.*i? 



MORRIS PERELL 

Elsewhere in this volume we have recorded the achievements of .Mr. 
Thomas Rosen, and it is now our pleasure to give to our readers the life his- 
tory of his partner. Mr. Morris I'erell. who lias likewise had a most astonish- 
ing rise in commercial circles. 

Mr. I'erell was burn in Chirvint Wilna, Russia, July 21. 1882, the son of 
Jacob and Frieda I'erell, his father being a commission merchant and Talmud- 
ist of note. 

1 le came to America during the winter of hjoi and, landing in Xew York, 
found his first employment in a shirtwaist factory, where he worked for three 
weeks at $5 per week, lie then went to Erie, Pa., where he began buying and 
selling junk for a cousin. After six months' experience he decided to go into 
business for himself, which he continued for two years. At the end of this 
time he sold jewelry, traveling about the country and gaining much valuable 
experience. However, he was so unfortunate as to become very ill with rheu- 
matism, and was unable to work for about five months. He then returned to 
Erie, where he bought and sold junk for two years, following which he con- 
tinued the same business in Franklin, Pa., for nine years. In KJ14 he opened a 
yard in Franklin and also became interested in the business in Jamestown, X. V., 
which he operates in partnership with Mr. Rosen, under the firm name of 
Chataqua Iron & Coal Company. 

Mr. I'erell was married in Erie, X'ovember 3, 1907, to Miss Xellie Hyman, 
and they have two children, one boy and one girl. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perell are both very popular, and are connected with every 
charitable enterprise of their community, being prominent also in the Erie 
Federation of Charity. The)- are also contributors to Denver and Los Angeles 
Sanitariums. 

Mr. Perell is a member of ( irthodox Shule, the ( )dd Fellows, and Eagles, 
and is a man whose business integrity and opinions have earned for him the 
respect of the entire business fraternity of Franklin. 



MOSES PEARLMAN 

The world has seen fine displays of courage in other places than in armed 
camps, and on the battlefields. Some of the finest examples have been found in 
the histories of men who have always been engaged in civilian enterprises. 

A notable example is to be found in the life of Mr. Moses l'earlman, who 
came to America a young man of but eighteen years, without friends or influ- 
ence to assist him. 

He was born in i860 in Kovna, Russian Poland, and came to Xew York 
in the summer of 1878. 

I icing obliged to go to work at once, he found employment in a cigarette 
factory where he remained one year and then came to Cleveland, Ohio. Flere 
he became a huckster, following this occupation for six years. His next move 
was to Ashtabula, Ohio, where he started in the junk business, and. after ten 
years of bard work, decided that he would find bigger opportunities in the 
fruit business. Consequently he sold the junk yards and engaged in the new 
line, win. re he has been very successful. 

Mr. Pearlman was married in Cleveland, in the year 1882. to Mrs Anna 
Wolf, ami they have one son, Louis, who is married to Rose Gottleib, of 
Buffalo. 

In addition to Mr. Pearlman's business interests he finds time for connec- 
tion with a number of prominent organizations, among them being Anshe 
Emeth Congregation, at Cleveland, and lirith Abraham. Both himself and 

216 



wife are most liberal subscribers to the various charities to whom their gen- 
erosity endeared them. 

Mr. Pearlman is rather reticent in discussing his business success as 
modesty is always one of the chief attributes of a really prominent man, but 
his life is so obviously successful because of those sterling attributes of deter- 
mination and ability that it should prove a wonderful inspiration to any young 
man just engaging in business. May he be given many more years of prosperity 
and usefulness. 



DR. LEONARD MORDCAI PALITZ 

While every American city possesses its recognized leader of Reform 
Judaism in the person of its Rabbi, Orthodox Jewry, though always in the 
majority so far as numbers go, can rarely point to a real recognized leader of 
the community. But there are exceptions, of course, and Savannah, Georgia, 
has found its recognized spiritual adviser of Jewish Orthodoxy in the person 
of Rabbi Leonard Mordcai Palitz. 

Although it is only in 1916 that Dr. Palitz came to Savannah, his phe- 
nomenal success is undoubtedly conceded. What are the grounds? It seems 
to the writer of these lines that it is both his great scholarship and erudition, 
and his ability to be the leader of men, that have gained him this enviable 
record. 

Dr. Palitz was born on the 9th of February, 1881, in Xovo-Alexan- 
drovsk, Government of Kovno, the son of Shabsi Shlomoh Palitz. His father's 
ambition was to make of his son a great Rabbi, and Dr. Palitz spent his young 
days in a thorough preparation for his present position. Xot only did he 
acquire a complete knowledge of Jewish religion, but he also attended the 
"Gymnasium" of Tomsk. Siberia, and in 1903 he came to America to study 
at Dr. Schechter's Theological Seminary. Professor Schechter advised the 
young scholar to wait some time until he had gained a mastery of English and 
Dr. Palitz secured a position as superintendent of the Hebrew Children's Shel- 
tering Home in Baltimore. Later he became superintendent of the Hebrew 
Immigrant and Aged Home. This was the beginning of his career as a social 
worker. He held several other positions, and in 1910 became a student of 
medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, graduating 
in 1914. He never went into the actual practice of medicine, his sphere being 
social work. He was chaplain and agent for the care of Jewish Delinquents 
for five years from 1910 to 1915, and connected with the Federated Jewish 
Charities during and after his college studies. 

Pie was called to fill many a position, and in 1916 the city of Savannah 
invited him to become superintendent of its Hebrew school. It is here that we 
find him as a recognized leader of < )rthodox Jewry. As evidence of his popu- 
larity, we must take his recent election as "headworker" or superintendent of 
the Jewish Educational Alliance. 

Dr. I'alitz was married on the 24th of October, [899, to Dorah Lefkonsky. 
who, in the words of Dr. Palitz, is responsible to a large degree for his unusual 
social ami educational rise. 



.'17 



SIMON PFEIFER 



Among the most highly esteemed and best known men in the city of New 
i Irleans and the State of Louisiana is Mr. Simon Pfeifer, who is at the head 
of a large and well established wholesale business, that of S. Pfeifer & Co. 
His concern is so well and favorably known for its reliability and high standing 
commercially that its trade extends throughout the South. It deals in gro- 
ceries and imports green coffee from Brazil. 

Mr. Pfeifer was born to his parents, Moses and Regina Pfeifer, on Decem- 
ber i, 1861, in Brookhaven, Mississippi, lie received his early education in 
the public schools of New Orleans and then continued his studies in ( iermany. 
Upon his return, in 1SS5, he took up a business career, associating himself with 
his father's firm, which was then M. Pfeifer & Son, and which is now his own. 

In April, 1888, he married Miss Xettie Newman, whose family came orig- 
inally from Mississippi and was rightly counted among the very leading fam- 
ilies of New Orleans. Mr. snd Mrs. Pfeifer's home, 
which has long been known and classed among the 
prettiest in the fashionable residential district, has 
been blessed with two fine children, Frank and Julia 
Louise. 

But it is not onlv in a commercial way that Mr. 
Pfeifer is so well known and so highly esteemed. 
He is closely identified with, and his association is 
eagerly sought and heartily enjoyed in, the Jewish 
community and in the city at large. The different 
organizations and institutions have benefited greatly 
by his benevolence, and his support and co-operation 
have proved an invaluable asset to his fellow Jews 
and fellow citizens. He holds membership in the 
Temple Sinai Congregation, in the Jewish Federa- 
tion of Charities, the Harmony Club, the Touro 
Infirmary and Hebrew Benevolent Association, the 

Jewish Orphans' Home, and the Young Men's Hebrew Association. He is a 
B'nai B'rith, and an Elk, holds the position of vice-president in the Citizen's 
Bank and Trust Co.. and is a director in the Commercial Trust and Savings 
Bank. And to all of these organizations and institutions he gives liberally, 
definite lines of work and to adhere to them persistently and consistently until 
not only of his means, but also of his time, thought and personal service. 

To those who would succeed in life. Mr. Pfeifer's advice is to choose 
success is achieved. 




MORRIS PICKARD 



There is onlv one standard by which a man's citizenship can be measured, 
and that is by the amount of good which he does in the community. 

If you were to go to Ashtabula. Ohio, and ask to be introduced to its 
leading Jewish citizens, men who have made a name for themselves, not only 
as successful, honorable business men, but also because of their generosity and 
liberal philanthropies, one of the first persons to whom you would be directed 
would be Mr. Morris Pickard. 

He was born at Emmendingen, Baden, Germany, July 9, 1861, his father, 
Jakob Pickard. being a prominent cattle merchant. 

He came to America at the age of twenty and for the first six months 
found employment as a clerk in a Buffalo store. He next accepted a position 

218 



as clerk in Danville, Pa., where he remained for three months. Having saved 
a very small amount of money, he went to Jersej Shore, Pa., and opened a 
store where he remained for the next few years. He then sold out and wenl 
to Ashtabula, Ohio, where he opened a store and has prospered until he is 
today one of the leading merchants of the town. 

He u.i- married in Buffalo, X. Y., April 29, [894, to Miss Hattie Assel, 
<ii Ashtabula, ' >hio, and ac • f > « not feel that Mr. Pickard's entire success as a 
citizen can lie reckoned without taking into account the many activities and 
rare capacity for organization which his wife possesses. She has seconded 
his every effort for the betterment of Ashtabula and its people, whom they 
never fail to serve in every way which their prosperity makes possible. 

Mr. Pickard is a member of the Elks and Masons, and subscribes to 

every charity, irrespective of creed or race, lie not only contributes to local 

organizations, but to national charities as well, and Ins high business ideals are 
an inspiration to the young men of Ashtabula, whose welfare he continually 

has at heart. 



WILLIAM A. PINKOSON 



St. Augustine, Florida, the oldest city on the American continent, the city 
which possesses such charm t'or everyone interested in American history, does 
not contain a large Jewish settlement, taiong the best and most prominent 
lews we must assuredly number Mr. William A. Pinkoson, owner of a large 
dr\ goods and clothing store at 90 and 92 St. John's street. 

Mr. Pinkoson is interesting not on account of his material success. Then' 
might he and probably are wealthier Jews in the city of St. Augustine, but 
none whose citizenship is more valued. He is a man of intelligence and ideals, 
even though he has had hi- business as an avocation. 

Mr. William A. Pinkoson was horn in the third week t>i the fewish month 
of Shebath, in the year 1879, at Krasnow, Government of Suwalk, as the son 
of Leib and l.ihhe Pinkoson. Ili- grandfather, on 

his mother's side. was a renowned "l.amdan." and 

he comes from a very re-.pect.ihle and prominent 

family. 

In [891, when William »a~ barely twelve 

years of age, his family moved to Bostdn, where 

the hoy entered school. Alter thev moved I" St 
Augustine, he clerked for a while, after which he 
went into business for himself, and from 1 < « »5 his 
business kept on growing steadily, Mr. Pinkoson 

gaining an unimpeachable reputation and the re- 
spect of all with whom he came into contact 

Mr. Pinkoson i- an 1 Irthodox, and i- Secretary 
of the Congregation I'.'nai Israel since it- inception 
in I lecember, 11 

On the 6th of July, \>i<t\. Mr. Pinkoson was 
married n> Minnie Talinsky, a relative of hi-, and 
there arc four children of tin- union, named Harry, Libbic, \U- and [oscph. 




21" 




LOUIS PLACK AND NATHAN LIFF 

Russia has given tn America some of her most valued and progressive 
citizens, notable among whom we wish to mention Messrs. Louis I 'lack and 
Nathan I. iff. two rising young business men of Delphos, Ohio, and partners 
in the iron and metal business, which is conducted 
under the firm name of Flack and Lift". 

Mr. 1 'lack was horn in Vitipski, Guberne, 
Russia. Nov. 15, 1882, and came to America in 
August, U)ol. His first employment in Xew York 
was in a factory which was followed by a venture 
in the grocery business. This he sold at the end of 
four vears and went to Spencerville, Ohio, where he 
started to buy and sell junk, opening a yard with a 
partner. He sold out, however, after one year, and, 
going back to Xew York again engaged in the gro- 
cerv business. 

This was an unfortunate venture as he lost 
everything. Unshaken in His determination to suc- 
ceed, he borrowed $100.00 on his life insurance 
policy and, going to Delphos, Ohio, engaged in the Louis nook 

iron and metal business with his present partner, 
Mr. Lift, where they have attained a large degree of success. 

The fortunes of Mr. Lift" were, for a number of years, as uncertain as 
those of his partner, Mr. Plack. 

Horn in Minskern. Guberne, Russia. August 
15, 1890, he came to America in August, 1906, and 
found his first employment in a clothing factory 
where, for the first month, he worked without sal- 
ary in order to obtain experience. 

After two years he went to Europe for a visit 
and upon his return to America he was unable to 
find work. In his search for same he traversed a 
large portion of the country, finally landing in Pan- 
ama, where he worked on the canal for three years. 
Returning to Ohio, he began peddling junk and 
in April, 1906, went into business with his present 
partner, Mr. Plack. 

Mr. Lift' was married June 2. 1917. to Mis> 
Fannie Levine of Xew York, a charming lady who 
is a great addition to the community. 

Mr. Nathan Lin' Both Mr p ]ack am , Mj . j ; ff are g enerous j ln 

their contribution to charities and have an enviable reputation for honesty and 
business ability. 




MORRIS PLEKANSKY 

< hie of the most distinguished Jewish citizens of Miami, Florida, is Mr. 
Morris Plekansky, owner of two great stores, the Century Clothing Store at 
Xo. 309 Twelfth street, and the Bihi Bargain Store at 303 Avenue G. 

He is one of that sort of self-made and dignified American Jewish young 
men who have acquired a reputation not only for themselves but also for the 
Jewish community at large. He has made a success, and at the same time 
acquired a blameless reputation. In addition to that, he is a kind-hearted man, 
a man of charitable inclinations and a gentleman of the finest sort. He was 

220 



elected by the Jews of Miami as a treasurer of their Congregation. He is 
also a Mason and belongs to many other organizations. 

Mr. Morris Plekansky was born in Peoria, Illinois, on the 15th of Decem- 
ber, 1884, the son of Jacob and Freda Plekansky. Morris attended Public 
School Number 75 in New York City and also one of the city's high schools 
until he was seventeen years of age, when he went to work for a living as a 
clerk in a wholesale clothing store. When he was twenty-one years old he 
went South. He took employment as a clerk at St. Augustine and Miami, and 
in 1910 he went into business for himself. 

As business-man in his own right, he had made a success and not only 
amassed wealth, but also acquired a high reputation in the business world. 

On October 22. 19 12, he was married to Miss Eveline Herstein, and they 
are the proud parents of two children, named Fred and Sidney. 



SAM PLOTKIN 

How a man achieves greatness and climbs the ladder of success, is the 
question of thousands of men both foreign born and American, and can truly be 
answered when we study the biography of successful business men, whose life 
stories can be used as marked examples for our teachings and guidance, es- 
pecially for those that grope in the dark and are at a loss how to begin the 
upward climb. 

When a representative of the American Hebrew Biographical Company 
called on Mr. Plotkin to learn how- he achieved his wonderful success and 
wealth, it did not take him long to reply. "Energy, efficiency, hard work and 
honorable dealings were the principles of my success, and these to my mind 
are the secrets of success" ; and as Mr. Plotkin is a man of few words, but wdiat 
he savs is true in every sense, it is said by all men knowing him that his life 
story is indeed a remarkable one and a credit not only to him, but also to the 
race he springs from. Mr. Plotkin. who was born in Barrisav, Minsk Guberne, 
Russia, in October, 1884, from a highly respected family, who were honest 
tradespeople, and whose thrift Mr. Plotkin inherited and which stood him well 
in his successful fight, came to America in May. 1908, seeking his fortune in 
the land of plenty. Landing first in Toronto, Canada, he began the building 
of his wonderful career by working hard at odd jobs, and at times found it 
almost impossible to maintain himself and at one time had to shovel snow on 
the streets of Toronto for a livelihood, but it was honest labor and Mr. Plotkin 
never shirked work that was honest. After a short time he came to Detroit, 
obtaining work as a carpenter which trade he acquired in the old country and 
at that trade he worked and saved until he had a few hundred dollars. With 
that small capita] he began building and his business began growing through 
his untiring efforts and without the assistance of anyone until today he not 
only owns over S2.000.000 worth of property, but is considered the wealthiest 

builder and real estate operator in Detroit, with offices in the Northern 
Insurance Building, under the firm name of Sam Plotkin. 

Mr. Plotkin, although wealthy and able to retire from active work, has 
not done ->>. hut on the contrarj is daily supervising his entire and immense 
business, tending thai idleness of mind and body is a decadence of man and 

we must Keep active, 

Mr. Plotkin married in England Miss Sarah Plumenkoff, a young lady 
of line Jewish family, and has six children, two boys and four girls, all n\ 
whom are getting an education and musical training that befits the children of 
such line parents. 

Mr. Plotkin is not only a business man. bill is devoting both his link' 

221 



and wealth to charily. He is a member of Sharey Zedek Congregation, Beth 
Jacob Congregation, Denver Hospital, ( >ld Age Home, and trustee of the 
House of Shelter, and contributes to all charities both Jewish and Gentile; 
in fact. Mr. and Mrs. Plotkin have always a ready hand and a willing heart 
inward all mankind and many a one has been made happy by their generosity, 
'those who know him and his wife recognize them as one of the leading fam- 
ilies of Detroit and as models of the Jewish people, and fully deserving the 
good fortunes that befell them, for neither one have forgotten the struggles 
that they have had and they do more than their share towards the uplift of 
their race of which they have cause to be proud, and we hope their children in 
years to come will point with pride to the monument left them by their 
parents. 



CHARLES POLLOCK 

In the city of Pottstown, Pa., no name is more honored than that of 
Pollock. We have elsewhere outlined the life histories of other members of 
this family, and it is now our privilege to say a few words regarding Charles 
Pollock, who was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, February 15. 1884, and 
came to America June 20, 1913, going to Pottstown, Pa., where his brothers 
resided. He found employment as a carpenter for three years and then joined 
his brothers in the iron and metal business, where they have already prosper- 
ously established themselves. 

Mr. Charies Pollock has proved himself to be a very valuable member of 
the firm, displaying the same traits of business ability which have distinguished 
his brothers. 

Charles Pollock was married in England in February, 1906, to Miss 
Minnie Robinson, and they have a family of four children, one boy and three 
girls, three of whom are old enough to go to school. 

He is prominent in all the fraternal and charitable organizations of Potts- 
town, being identified with the Odd Fellows, B'rith Abraham, Denver Hospital. 
Immigration Societv of Xew York, Hebrew Institute, member Congregation 
Mercy of Truth. 



MAYER POLLOCK 

Prominent in the business, religious and civic life of Pottstown, Pa., is 
the name of Mayer Pollock. 

Born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, April 15, 1858, Mr. Pollock continued 
to live in his native town until the year 1884, when he came to America. 

A few years prior to this time he had been married to Miss Hanna Ber- 
man, who came with her husband to the new land. They landed in Phila- 
delphia and a countryman loaned Mr. Pollock seven dollars worth of tinware, 
a basket, and money enough to pay his fare into the country. During the 
first two months he was so successful that he was able to discharge his obliga- 
tions and buy a small stock of dry goods. The next two years were full of 
hardships, as he had the care of his wife and small son, together with the 
problem of saving capital for further business advancements. However, he 

222 



managed i<> buy a team and for the next seven years boughl and sold junk so 
successfully that at the expiration of this time he was able to open a yard. 
Today the firm of Mayer Pollock is the largest concern in the state of Penn- 
sylvania devoted to the dismantling of factories and old buildings. The) also 
do a tremendous business in iron and steel scrap, machinery, and buil ling con- 
struction material. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pollock have a fine family of eight children, four boys and 
four girls. David is in business with his father, as i- also the younger son, 
Abraham; Albert is connected with a railroad, and Leonard is Mill in school. 

Vmong the prominent charities supported by Mr. Pollock may be men- 
tioned the Denver Hospital, Immigration Society of New York, and the 
( Irphans National Home of New York. He is also a member of Congn 
tion Mercj of Truth, B'rith Abraham and the ' Irder of Moose. 

The daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Pollock are all very popular in their 
social circle, Bessie being the wife of Mr. Krevlitz of Pottstown, Pa.; Annie 
is married and living in I larrislmrg, 1'a. : t htvsie has displayed considerable 
business ability and is now one of her father's most able assistants; Mora is 
-till in school. 



NATHAN POLLOCK 

Elsewhere in this volume we have related the history of Mr. Mayer 
Pollock. We now have the pleasure of chronicling the events in the career of 
his younger brother, Nathan. 

Nathan Pollock was horn September S. 1NS7. in Kovno, Guberne, Russia. 
and came to America Februar) 6, 1901. His brother already being established 
in Pottstown, Pa., he went to that city and started buying and selling junk for 
him. This he continued for six years, then quit to accept a position as assist- 
ant manager in the shir! factory, continuing there for six years. He then 
went into the junk business for himself, and in 1916 was joined b) his brother 
Henry, whom he took into the firm, known ,e- Pollock Brothers. The) are 
toda) doing a splendid business 

Mr. Pollock was married December 30, 1906, to Miss Mary Sasman, of 
Reading, Pa., and they have four children, one bo) and three girls, all going 
to school. 

Mthough Mr. Pollock's business interests occupy a great deal of his time, 
he Mill finds opportunity to promote a number of benevolences, prominent 
among them being the- immigration Societ) of New York and the Hebrew 
Institute. He is also a member of Congregation Mercy of Truth. Brith VI 
ham. and the I ^l^ Fellow S. 



BARNLY PORTNOY 



I he Jew - ate cssentiall) leaders among business men. The ambition to he 
n business tor themselves seems to he an inherent characterise of thi 
rherefore, when Mr. Barnej Portno) came to America, although he |><k. 
iessed no funds or influential friends, his first ambition was to own and man- 

Ige his ow 11 bllStni 

Mr. I'ortnov was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, Deccmbei .7. 1875. \t 
he age of t went) three he was married to Miss Ida I'ortn 

V.t being satisfied with tin- opportunities which tin- ''Id World offered, 



Mr. Portnoy came to America in 11107, going direct to Chelsea, Mass., where- 
in- began working in a coal yard at a very small salary. However, it was an 
opportunity for him to demonstrate bis ability, and within two years he was 
made superintendent of the yards. He continued in this position for five 
years, at which time he had saved sufficient capital to go into the coal business 
for himself. I lis business has prospered in a remarkable manner and he i- 
considered one of the foremost business men of Chelsea. 

Mr. Portnoy's remarkable executive ability has also been demonstrated 
in his connection with many fraternal organizations. He is Past Secretary of 
the Congregation, Past Secretary of Cnited Brothers of Anix. which position 
lie held for five years, receiving a gold watch and chain in recognition of his 
services. He is now Treasurer Arbeiterer and ex- President of the local ( )rder 
I. O. B. A., from which society he received a medal upon retiring from the 
presidency. His wife is very popular socially and is active in all philanthropic 
movements. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Portnoy are most liberal in their contribution to all 
charities, including' the Cnited Hebrew charities. Their family consists of two 
daughters, the eldest of whom is in school. 



PHILIP PRESENT 

Among the Jewish citizens of Rochester, X. Y., mention must be made of 
Mr. Philip Present, the well-known wholesale jeweler, whose offices are lo- 
cated in the Chamber of Commerce building. He was born in Kalvaria, Poland, 
on November 23, 1856. His grandfather was very prominent in town and was 
the owner of the only factory. Mr. Present came to America in 1874, landing 
in New York without a cent in his pockets, as he was robbed of his little 
store of worldly goods by a companion in Hamburg, to whom he was foolish 
enough to entrust his baggage. 

Pie started work in a grocery, in return for board and lodgings, and after- 
wards took employment with a Hoboken family as a teacher of Hebrew and 
German on the same conditions. At the same time he peddled in the streets 
until he was arrested for peddling without a license. He then started to sell 
pictures and frames in the vicinity of New York, going to Elmira, where he 
had relatives. In 1884 he learned watch-making and opened a small store in 
Clinton street, Rochester, where his sister resided. Pie then brought over 
four brothers and three sisters, taking care of them with his own scanty means. 
The business grew, from its very inception, to such an extent that its owner, 
wdio at first only thought of selling wholesale and retail, had to concentrate 
his attention on wholesale exclusively. He then moved to State street and 
from there to his present location, where he has been highly succsssful. 

Mr. Present is actively interested in a number of Jewish institutions, 
being Honorary President of the Hebrew Young Men's Association (for life), 
being its founder and president for many years. He is also a trustee of the 
Temple Brith Kodesh, having held this office for thirteen years, director of the 
Social Settlement of Rochester, director of the Jewish Charities, trustee of 
the Bnei Brith Lodge, and ex-president of the Free Sons Lodge. He was a 
director of the Rochester ^'estern New York Orphan Asylum, and a member 
and trustee of the Chamber of Commerce, for many years. He was president 
of the Rochester Credit Men's Association and was for many years vice-presi- 
dent and chairman of the ways and means committee of the Public Health 
Association, having withdrawn but recently, partlv due to ill health. 

Mr. Present's membership in the Chamber of Commerce has made him 

224 



a conspicuous figure in the commercial life of Rochester and raised the popular 
estimation of the Polish Jew. 

On the 21st of October, 1888, Mr. Present was married to Celia Selling, 
of Hartford, Conn., and he is the father of three children, named Reta, LeRoy 
and Henrietta. 



FRANK RABINOVITZ 

Prominent among business men of Hartford, Conn., may be mentioned 
Mr. Frank Rabinovitz, who was born in Padalsky. Guberne, Russia, in the 
year 1877. His father was a prominent merchant of that community and from 
him young Frank doubtless inherited considerable business ability. 

He came to America in January. i8<)8, landing in Boston, Mass., and from 
there went to Hartford, Conn. Here he began peddling general merchandise, 
and was so successful that at the end of the first 
year was able to open an iron and metal yard 
where he is today doing a fine business, at 66 Pleas- 
ant street. 

Mr. Rabinovitz was married in Hartford in 
the year 1901, to Miss Anna Hoffman, and they 
have four children, one boy and three girls, all going 
to school. The family occupies their charming resi- 
dence at 233 Vine street. 

Among the many charitable organizations to 
which Mr. Rabinovitz is a liberal contributor can 
be mentioned the Denver Hospital, the Immigration 
Society, the National Orphans' Home, all the Yish- 
ivis, and a number of other charities, both local 
and national. He is a prominent member of Agudas 
Achem Congregation, Brith Abraham, and Inde- 
pendent Order Brith Sholom. 




BERMAN RAFF 

Thirty years ago Mr. Berman Raff, an ambitions youth of 21, started in 
the jewelry business with a small outdoor stand mi Sixth avenue, New York 
t ity. llis capital was small and sci was his stock in trade. But there was one 
asset which has stood him in good service from tin- first da) In- commenced 
business right up to the present time, when Mr. Kali's business reaches into 
six figures. It was his unflinching rule never i" deceive a customer, never in 
misrepresent an article in an) waj ; this, combined with strict attention to the 

wants of llis customers, an unselfish desire t<> please, and a willingness to be 
satisfied with moderate profits, was the real foundation of Mr. Kali's remark- 
able success, so that within a comparatively shorl time he found himself thi' 
proprietor of a large store at the corner of Sixth avenue and Twenty-sixth 

street. That was twent) one years ago. Mr. Raff remained true to his princi 

pies in his new establishment, and the business continued tn grow to such ail 
extent that he was obliged to seek larger quarters, lie finally semrcd a store 

at 455 Sixth avenue, which is now bountifull) stocked with all articles of the 
jeweler's trade. 

225 



Thirty years ago Mr. Raff, who was then but a mere lad of 21 and landed 
from Jassy, Roumania, had laid down the principles of industry and fair deal- 
gs that were in later years, to a large extent, responsible for the enviable 
reputation he now er 

He t 3 of a good family and is one of five brothers, all of whom 
are leaders in their particular fields of endeavor in Xew York and Chicago. 

Mr. Raff was married in 1893 to Betty Euer, at the age of 26. in the City 
of Xew York, and his family consists of two sons and one daughter. The 
oldest son. Isadore A. Raff, is an attorney at law who is sacrificing his practice 
for the vast responsibilities of the ever increasing wholesale business of the 
firm of B. Raff & Sons, at 1161-75 Broadway, by taking charge of the financial 
and secretarial work. Similarly, his second son. Max 1. Raff, also a member of 
the firm, is relieving the father of the complex intricacies of this institution 
by acting in the capacity of general manager, while his only daughter, Mar- 
guerite. 17, a beautiful girl of charming personality, is now completing her 
high school education. 

Mr. Raff is also distinguished in charity and religious circles and is a 
member of the Free Loan Association, a Master Mason, a member of the 
Royal Arcanum, and the First Roumanian American Congregation. 

He resides at 308 West 03d street and is identified in philanthropic and 
patriotic activities to the fullest extent of his energies and means at his 
command. 



LOUIS RAPPOPORT 

In civilized countries the struggle for existence is severe : the competition 
much keener than in savage lands. Here we realize to the full what an elusive 
godek - - E :cess. We implore her favor, but are forced to accept hope long 
deferred. She exacts a heavy penalty in patience, industry, courage and that 
infinite perseverance and fixity of purpose which the world calls geni - 

The career of Louis Rappoport is just such an interesting story of 
achievement in business. 

Born in Warsaw. Poland. October 11. 1S81). he was brought by his parents 
to this country while only an infant. 

At an early age he began work as clerk and mechanic in a jewelry store in 
Erie. Pa., the very liberal compensation for twelve hours' work per day Iieing 
52 = per week. 

After over a year of this severe apprenticeship, he removed to Cleveland, 
where he secured a position in a similar capacity at Si 0.00 per week. Here he 
advanced rapidly, but decided to go into business for himself. 

His entire capital consisted of S20.00. but owing to his excellent reputation 
and recognized ability, he was able to obtain S3.000 credit. 

Adverse business conditions in 1914 prompted him to close out his busi- 
ness, and after another short period of employment, during which he operated 
an optical parlor in the evenings, we find him in Detroit, where he became inter- 
ested in the scrap iron and storage tank business. 

Once more his good name served him instead of cash capital, and shortly 
thereafter he took into partnership Mr. Leo Moss, a young man of ability, but. 
like himself, able to lend no financial assistance. 

With but S65.60 borrowed capital they rapidlv built up a business which 
today averages over a quarter of a million dollars annually. 

He was married in Cleveland. November 5, 1912, to Miss Bessie Kramer, 
and they have two fine young heirs, one boy and one girl. 

Mr. Rappaport is very generous to those less fortunate than himself and 
- . iiberal subscriber to every worthy charity. 

226 



ISAIAH RAPPORT 

"Nothing venture, nothing gain," is an old maxim which seems to have 
helped many a struggling young business man through dark, perilous days, 
when failure seemed almost inevitable. 

It certainly expresses the spirit in which Mr. Isaiah Rapport defied dis- 
couragement and repeatedly staked his all against his ability to overcome 
unfortunate circumstances. 

He was born in Lumzer, Guberne, Russia, in August, 1881, and at the 
age of nineteen came to America. 

Landing in New York he went direct to Uhrichsville, Ohio, where he 
started buying and selling old iron and metal. 

After three years of this experience he decided to open a yard. Within 
the next eighteen months he met and married Miss Esther Josefsom, and, 
during the dark periods of his business career which followed he had many 
reasons to be thankful for the cheerful, unselfish assistance which seemed a 
part of her generous nature. 

Shortly after his marriage he decided to try his fortunes in New York, 
where he opened a delicatessen store. This venture proved very unfortunate 
and he returned to Uhrichsville with no capital. However, he possessed a 
business asset, which is more valuable than capital, a reputation for a high 
order of business integrity, and with the confidence and best wishes of his 
fellow-townsmen, he again started buying and selling junk, at which he was 
ver\ successful. 

Then came the panic of 1907, sweeping away his small investment and 
leaving him with nothing but a firm belief that ultimately fortune would smile 
upon his efforts. 

Bravely starting over again, he at last attained the goal of his ambitions, 
and is today conducting the largest business in his town. 

We feel that any word of advice which Mr. Rapport might give to young 
people just starting in business is worthy of record, so on the occasion of our 
interview the. writer asked him what qualities he considered most necessary to 
a successful career, and his reply is characteristic of the earnest purpose which 
he has always applied to his own life work. 

"Find your vocation, then work hard," says Mr. Rapport, and you will 
find the golden key that unlocks the door to fortune. 

Mr. Rapport is a member of the Owls and both himself and wife are 
most liberal in their gifts to charitable causes. 



AARON RAUZIN 

The best type of Jewish home has always represented a cultural center 
where the children have opportunity (if obtaining a thorough education with 
little assistance from outside sources. 

In Mich a home Aaron Rauzin first saw the light of day. I [e was born in 
a little village in Grodno, Russia, November 41I1, 1S74. the son of Yechiel 
Mechel ami Amelia Rauzin. At his own father's lire-side he received a thor- 
ough Jewish education, which has probably hern largely responsible for his 
signal success in later li fe. 

In 1890 he came to Augusta, Ga., where hi- father had preceded him ami, 

in accordance with his father's wishes, he worked 011 ;i farm. However, he 
did not find this occupation congenial and within a few years both father and 
son wnil lo Savannah, where Aaron became a member of the police force. 

Here In- continued for five wars, when he decided to start his business career 

227 



;iinl founded a new industrial insurance company, which is now operating 
under the title of Mutual Benefit Insurance Companj of Georgia. This organ- 

n todaj has offices in ever) prominent city of the state and Mr. Rauzin 
i- president. 

In i < j 1 1 > he organized the Mercantile Bank & Trust Company, of which he 
is also president. This bank i- devoted large!) to the interest of Jewish clien- 
tele, ;i- the majority of its investors and directors are of this nationality. 

Mr. Rauzin was married January _^ i -t . 1904, to Miss Anna flelfant, 
daughter of a prominent Jewish attorney, and they have four fine children, 
Albert, Julius, Miriam and Moses. 

Mrs. Rauzin, as well as her husband, is devoted to the promotion of charit- 
able organizations and is active in every Jewish movement in the city. Mr. 
Rauzin is director of the Jewish Educational Alliance and the Keliillah. He 
is also an enthusiastic Zionist and organized the Zionists of Savannah. 

lie i^ the possessor of a most genial but modest personalis and performs 
his many public-spirited ami charitable acts without ostentation or de-ire for 
public recognition. 



MORRIS RATNER 

Russia has given m America some of her 
best and most successful business men, and among 
them we wish to mention the name of Mr. Morris 
Ratner. 

IK- was born in Minsker, Guberne, Russia, in 
tin- year 1870, and came to America at the age of 
26 lit- found lii-- waj direct tn Fall River, Mass 
when- he lirst began peddling. Ik- tin-it spent one 
and one-half years in a junk -lun.. and having 
mastered all the details of the business, started in 
fur himself. He is now proprietor of a large con- 
cern ai 172 Broadway, which is operated under 
Ins name. 

Mr. Ratner was married in \Yw York in 
an I has five children, three boys and two girls, all 
going tu school. 

lie is a liberal contributor in all charities and 
is a member of I. 1 >. I'.. \. and \l>as fsrael. 




MARCUS RAUH 

I in great American need in these days of stress and -train is a citizenship 
willing i" give, willing to make sacrifices for an ideal. Sometimes that ideal 
expresses itself in the form of patriotism, sometimes in civic betterment, at 
other times it may he the promotion of intensive religious precepts. In this 
raphical cyclopedia it is intended to prove that the lew- in America has 
made and is making a liberal contribution to such a citizenship. 

Marcus Rauh was horn in Dubuque, Iowa. April 14. 1859, hi- parents being 

non and Rosalia (Lippman). His father died in iSSn. and hi- mother 

lived until I'H.s. when she died at the age of 82, revered by Jew and Gentile, 

228 



representing, as she did, the best type of Jewish mother, typifying kindliness, 
sympathy and whole-souled charity. 

Marcus Rauh attended the public schools of Cincinnati, and had four 
months of high school. He also had a good Jewish education, having attended 
the religious school conducted under the auspices of the renowned Isaac M. 
Wise. At the age of 14 he started to work in Pittsburgh. In 1882 he entered 
business with his brothers, and has since been associated with them as Rauh 
Brothers & Company, shirt manufacturers and wholesale distributors of men's 
furnishings. On October 7, 1896, Mr. Rauh married Rachel Cohen, a native of 
Freeport, Pa. Mrs. Rauh is active in the Jewish communal work of Pitts- 
burgh, particularly in that of the Sisterhood of Rodef Shalom Congregation, 
and since the war is vice-chairman of its Red Cross activities. They have two 
children, Bertha C. and Henrietta C. 

In tracing the career of Mr. Rauh in religious activity, in philanthropy, 
or in civics, one must recall the beneficent influence of his uncle, the late Abra- 
ham Lippman, who for many years lived at the home of Mr. Rauh. Abraham 
Lippman was for 21 years the president of the Rodef Shalom Congregation, 
and for almost as many years president of the Jewish Charities of his city. 

Mr. Rauh is a Reform Jew and a member of the board of trustees of the 
Rodef Shalom Congregation: he holds the important office on that board of 
chairman of the Religious School Committee. He is a director of the Hebrew 
Institute. He is also a member of the executive board of the Union of Amer- 
ican Hebrew Congregations, the parent body of the Hebrew Union College, 
located at Cincinnati. 

The major part of Mr. Rauh's public activity is in the field of civics. In 
1909 the Pittsburgh Civic Commission of Fifteen was created by the then out- 
going mayor, Hon. George W. Guthrie. Air. Rauh was appointed one of the 
members of the commission, and was chairman of its Committee on Municipal 
Research. The commission sponsored the revision of the city charter giving 
Pittsburgh a modified commission form of government. For many vears Mr. 
Rauh has been a director of the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh and is 
now affiliated with it as second vice-president. During the last few vears he 
has become active in the Boy Scout movement, and holds the office of vice- 
president of the association. 



ENOCH RAUH 

One of Pittsburgh's foremost citizens, who holds a prominent place in the 
Jewish community, is Mr. Enoch Rauh. lie was born June 12. 1S57. in 
Dubuque, Iowa, his parents being Solomon and Rosalia (Lippman). When 
Enoch Rauh was a buy, his father moved to Pittsburgh, lie went in the 
public school until the age of thirteen, when lie was obliged to go in work. I [e 
started as an errand buy and attended the night school. Thirty vears ago he 

laid the foundation of the business which is now universally known as Rauh 
Bros. & Co., shirt manufacturers and dealers in wholesale men's furnishings. 

In this linn Mr. Rauh is the senior member, associated with bis two brothers. 
Marcus Rauh and Abraham 1.. Rauh. The present location of the liiismcss is 

at 051 Penn avenue, Pittsburgh. Mr. Rauh is also a large stockholder in the 
I Icnner 1 .aughlin ( Ihina I ompany. 

For the last 35 years Mr. Rauh has been a member of die Rodef Shalom 
Congregation, lie i- at the present time a member of die advisory board of 
1 be Y. M. 1 1. A. For one term he served as president of the Concordia Club, 



when it was located on Stockton avenue, lie was also on the executive board 
of the J. M. Husky < Irphanage and Home. 

In December, 1888, Mr. Rauh married Bertha Floersheim, to whom were 

born two children. Helen B. and Richard S. The latter, though a very young 
man, has established one of the most progressive advertising offices in the city. 
There is in the Rauh family a tradition of royalty to Judaism and an appre- 
ciation of Jewish ideals and Jewish learning. 

( If his mother, Mrs. Rosalia Rauh. it was said recently in connection with a 
historical reference to the Hebrew Ladies" Aid Society : 

"It came into existence at the beginning of the Civil War and performed 
the functions of a Red Cross Society. It constituted the contribution of the 
Jewish women in the aid of the wounded soldiers and other sufferers from the 
war. Many of Pittsburgh's best Jewish women performed a most unique 
service through the medium of this society. In the spring of 1880, the Hebrew 
Ladies' Aid Society consolidated with the Hebrew Benevolent Society, forming 
jointly the United Hebrew Relief Association. Airs. Rosalia Rauh was presi- 
dent of the Ladies' Society, and she became the first vice-president of the 
newly created association. In this capacity 'Grandma' Rauh served until she 
died in 191 5. Here was a beneficient influence upon the community, that of 
'a mother in Israel,' beloved by thousands." (Jewish Charities. Vol. VIII. 
Xo. 2, Pittsburgh Edition. ) 

When a young boy, his parents wanted Enoch Rauh to become a rabbi, 
but he preferred to enter the career of a business man. He received a good 
Jewish education at Cincinnati, ( )hio, wdiere he had the privilege of receiving 
Jewish precepts from the famous Dr. Isaac M. Wise. In turn Mr. Rauh saw- 
to it that his children received a thorough Jewish education. In his public 
life Air. Rauh has before him at all times the thought that his acts when they 
are acceptable and worthy, will redound not alone to his personal credit, but 
to that of his people. He is a Reformed Jew, but at the same time appreciates 
the scruples of his Orthodox brethren. A few years ago, when the primary 
registration day set for September 18, which happened to be the first day of 
Rosh Hashanah, Air. Rauh used his influence with the governor at Harrisburg 
to have this registration day changed to the following day, in order to make it 
possible for the Orthodox Jews to exercise their franchise without violating 
their religious feelings. Air. Rauh is a Republican in national politics, hut 
strictly non-partisan in local politics. 

He was for six years president of the Pittsburgh Association of Credit 
Alen, and for four years one of the vice-presidents of the National Association 
of Credit Alen. In 191 1 he was appointed a member of the Council of Nine 
in the city of Pittsburgh by Gov. John K. Tener. Since then he has been re- 
elected three times, always with a very large vote. He has never been defeated 
for anv public office voted upon by the people. In the capacitv of councilman, 
he holds the office of chairman of the Parks and Libraries Committee of the 
city, and is also a member of the Finance Committee, of the Public Works 
Committee, of the Public Service and Surveys Committee, of the Public Safety 
Committee, of the Committee on Health and Sanitation, of the Committee on 
Filtration and Water, and of the Committee on Charities and Corrections. He 
is a trustee of the Carnegie Institute, one of the most honorable positions in the 
State of Pennsylvania. He is also a trustee of the Carnegie Free Library and 
a trustee of the Carnegie Music Hall, as well as a chairman of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds of the Carnegie Institute. 

Air. Rauh twice refused to allow his name to be used as candidate for 
Mayor, and once as Lieutenant-Governor of Pennsylvania. Owing to his large 
business connections, he felt he could not serve the people with the devotion and 
the care that the particular offices demanded. 

The career of Airs. Rauh in public life is unique. There is perhaps no 
other Jewish woman in America who possesses the qualities of leadership as 
does this woman. She is forceful and eloquent, an erudite and powerful writer 
and a dynamic leader in social and civic work. Her greatest work has been in 
the office of president of the Pittsburgh Section of the Council of Jewish 

230 



Women. She has also been president of the Pittsburgh and Allegheny Milk 
:iik1 [ce Association, :i member of the Board of the Associated Charities, ami 
connected with probably two dozen other philanthropic organizations, a number 
of these of state and national scope. 



JOSEPH RITTENBERG 

In a city like New ' Irleans, which is justly famous for its charitable insti- 
tutions and the spirit of generosity and liberality with which these institutions 
arc supported and conducted, it speaks much for a man to have established a 
record of philanthropy that is highly appreciated and greatly admired in the 
Jewish community as well as in the city in general. Yet, such a record Mr. 
Joseph Rittenberg has justly earned for himself. 

Mr. Rittenberg's career has been that of a struggling young man who came 
tn litis country from a foreign land and finally won out against mam difficul- 
ties and great obstacles. He was hunt in Byelostok, Russia, on October Ji. 
[868, the son of Isaac and Miriam Rittenberg. At the age of seventeen he 
landed in New York and proceeded to Albany, where he remained for three 
years. Thereupon, he trieil to gain fame and fortune in other large cities until 
he finally came to New t Irleans, where he clerked in a store at first and then, 
in 1895, established a business of his own. Since that 
time hi* business, which consists of a loan office and 
jewelry store, and is located at [66 t" 186 South Ram- 
part street, lias grown to large proportions and has 
become a real landmark in the city's commerce. 

Mr. Rittenberg is intimately and prominently 
connected with the religious, charitable and fraternal 
life and activities of the New < Irleans Jewish commu- 
nity, lie is President of the Beth Israel I ongregation 
and holds membership also in the Touro Synagogue. 
lie i- President of the Jewish communal school, a 
Director of the Touro Infirmary, a member of the 
Grand Lodge of the Seventh District of B'nai B'rith, 
and a liberal contributor to the various philanthropic 
institutions, both Jewish and non-Jewish, of the city. 

Me i- also a thirty-second degree Mason and take- an 

active interest in movement- of a patriotic characti 

Recently Mr. Rittenberg has acquired a beautiful home at the corner of 

Rosa I'ark and St. ( harles avenue and i- now happil) domiciled there with 

hi* g 1 wife, who heartily cooperate- with him in his various interests and 

activities. Mrs. Rittenberg's maiden name was Miss Rebecca Baron, and her 
former home was in San rrancisco, 1 al 

Mr and Mr-. Rittenberg were married on July 11. I9OO, and are the par- 
ent- of four talented children, the eldest of whom. Leon, is at present a -indent 
at the Tulane University, to which institution of learning he won a scholarship 
from the Warren la-ton Boys' High School. The other three children are 
Philip Dave, Mildred and Ida Rittenbci 




J.ii 



SIGMUND RAVINSON 

About fifteen years ago there landed on our shores a man who was 
destined to occupy a conspicuous place in the business life of Cleveland, t (hio. 
We refer to Mr. Sigmund Ravinson, sole proprietor of a gent^' furnishings 
and clothing establishment at 4.^15 Woodland avenue. 

Mr. Ravinson upon his arrival in this country had practically nothing 

imbition and ability as assets. He worked at anything that came to hand 
and about ten years ago started in busness at his present location with prac- 
tically no capital. In fact, the only backing which he received was from the 
clothing manufacturers of Cleveland. From this humble beginning he has 
developed the business into the present large establishment which places him 
among the most prominent business men in the Jewish neighborhood of 
Cleveland. 

He was married six years ago and both himself and wife are identified 
with a number of prominent organizations. 

He is ex-President of the Merchants' Welfare Association and a mem- 
ber of all Jewish organizations, both charitable and fraternal, taking an active 
Dart in all of them. He is also Director of the Merchants Savings and Bank- 
ing Company. 

The achievements of Mr. Ravinson. although covering but a short period 
of time, are very remarkable and would be considered bv most men suffi- 
cient reward for an entire lifetime of activity. 



DAVID ROBINSON 

To no people in the history of nations has there been meted out so much 
persecution as the Jews. While other nations have only enjoyed a great 
degree of prosperity during the period of their greatest national ascendancy, 
the Jews, without a country for many centuries, their members being only a 
few millions scattered throughout the world, have yet been a strong determin- 
ing factor and have exerted a transforming influence upon human life beyond 
that of any nation that has ever lived. 

An individual instance of those sterling traits of character which have con- 
tributed to the greatness of the Jews as a people is exemplified in the life of 
Mr. David Robinson of Detroit. Mich., who was born in Lechovitch Mintsk. 
Guberne. Russia, in 1867 and came to America at the age of twenty-seven, 
leaving his family in Russia until such time as he should become established. 

During his first nine months in this country he worked for ?i<i per month. 
and from this meager sum managed to save enough to buy a horse and wagon. 
Then followed his first venture in the buying and selling of waste iron and 
copper. This he continued for three years, accumulating enough to send for 
his family, who joined him soon after. 

He then decided to try the coal business, and was engaged in this line 
for three years. At the expiration of that time he decided that his best oppor- 
tunities were to be found in the scrap metal and waste paper business. 

His judgment proved correct, as his business grew very rapidly, and for 
two years he also conducted a branch in England which was in charge of his 
brother Charles. 

In April. 10,12. he decided to try his fortunes in merchandising, and opened 
a dry-goods store under the present firm name of Robinson & Cohen, which 
has been exceedingly prosperous and is now an immense wholesale and retail 
corporation doing a very large business. 

The wholesale waste paper business is still conducted under the firm name 
of D. Robinson & Sons. 

232 



Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have eight children, seven sons and one daughter. 

Charles is in the firm, D. Robinson & Sons; Louis, Morris and Nathan are 
all connected with the department store. The balance of the children arc in 
school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson contribute to all charitable institutions. Mr. Rob- 
inson is also a member of B'nai B'rith and a supporter of Beth Jacobs School. 



BEN ROCKOWSKY 

Slighting disagreeable tasks lias handicapped many an otherwis 
ful career. The young man who is not read] t" cut his whole energies to any 
task that comes to hand is not likel) to find the occupation for which he is 
by nature and capacity best fitted. 

The advice of Mr. Rockowsky of Lima. < >hio, is significant along this 
line, as he says, "Work hard, irrespective of the work you do. until you find 
that for which you are best titU'd. Don't depend upon help, but make- your 
every act earn for yon a reputation for honesty and integrity. 

Mr. Rockowsky was horn in Warsaw. Russia, in April. [886, and at a 
verj earl) age was obliged to leave school to assist hi- father, who was a wood 
merchant and prominent Jewish scholar of his native town. 

\t the age "i twenty-six he decided to come to America, ami landing in 
this country without money, he worked his waj t" Galveston, Texas, where 
he worked as a laborer for several months. We then find him in fiibig, Minn.. 
Duluth, Minn., and Chicago, 111. From Chicago he went to Toledo, < (hio. 

Here he worked as conductor on a street car and after eight months, having 

saved a little money, he decided to c," int.. business for himself. 

Taking his small capital to Lima, i ihio, he opened a junk yard, which has 
grown today into a large, modern institution, from tin- proceeds of which he 
ha- amassed a fortune. 

Mr. Rockowsk} i- not content to selfishly enjoy his prosperity, but con- 
tributes most liberall) to various charities, regardless of race or religion, 
although I I few, and takes everj opportunity to promote the welfare 

of hi- race ["here is no movement for Jewish betterment to which Mr. Roc- 
kowsky does not lend his hearty co-operation and give financial assistance. 



THE ROGGEN BROTHERS 

A large number of the successful Jewish business men migrated from 
Europe t" our country, ami it i- not strange that the) should have retained to 

markable degree the i Irthodox beliefs and customs of their religion It 
i- our plea-ure to here narrate the lives of three young business men who 

;h born in Vmerica, have held to .-■ strict ob 
ism. We refer to three brothers, I ouis \ . Harrj and Selig R< ns of 

Nathan and the lale \nna Roggcn 

ung men. whose plai •• of business 

k < it) . ha I ihet hai 11 

tin- need of :. written agreement of am kind. Their : 
tluin above an on of pen 



Mr. Many Roggen was burn July 4, 1880. He was married to Miss 
llaltie Goldberg at the Hotel Majestic in 1908 and they had the distinction 
of having the first wedding where Benschen caps were distributed to the 
guests. This custom lias since become quite general at 1 trthodox weddings in 
our large hotels. 

Mr. Selig Roggen was born June m, 1882, and was married June ifi, 1910, 
In Miss b'tta Wierner of Montreal. Canada. 

The eldest brother, Mr. Louis A. Roggen, was born July 2, 1879. and was 
married several years ago to Miss Pauline ( (shinsky. 

The rapid growth of Roggen Brothers & Co. is a practical demonstration 
that strict observance of the Jewish Sabbath is in no way a handicap to busi- 
ness success, and it is certainly a pleasure to find young men of the younger 
generation carrying out with such fidelity the honorable doctrines and creeds 
of their forefathers. 



SAMUEL ROSEFSKY 

Our prominent men have not all been of American birth. Europe has 
sent us many young men who have become among the best of American citi- 
zens and dwellers upon our soil. 

One of these, a man of high distinction in the business life of Altoona. Pa., 
is Samuel Rosefsky, wdio was born in Yilna, Guberne, Russia, in 1885. His 
father was a merchant and also a man of wide reading and a deep thinker. 

Deciding that America was the land of opportunity, the family removed 
to America, landing August 26, 1900. The first destination was Binghamton, 
N. Y., where he assisted his father until ujoS. However, very few men of 
marked business ability have ever been content to work for some one else. 
so he decided to go into business for himself, and chose the state of Indiana as 
the scene of his endeavors. Here he bought and sold junk for two years, 
accumulating a little money and much valuable experience, and April 15, 1910, 
he returned East, going to Altoona. Pa., where he opened an iron and metal 
yard, and has been conducting it with marked success since that time. 

He was married October 27, tgo8, to Miss Mamie Sinerofsky. and they 
have two fine sons, who will be educated and fitted to carry on their father's 
extensive business interests in years to come. 

He is a member of the Hebrew Orthodox Congregation, Congregation of 
Aquadas Acham ; is an ardent supporter of the Immigration Societv of New 
York and the National Orphans' Home of New York ; all the Yishivas, as 
well as the Denver sanitarium, also have reason to be most grateful to Mr. 
Rosefsky. 

Both himself and wife devote much time as well as money to the promo- 
tion of charity in their city, and are fine examples of progressive, useful citi- 
zenship. 



234 



ABRAHAM ROSEN 

Mr. Abraham Rosen began his life in America b) offering the country 
of his adoption the greatest service which any man can render, lie- came t" 
New York at the age "i nineteen, and his iir>t act was i" enlist in the United 
States arm) and fight for • Mil Glorj until the close of the Spanish-American 
War. 

He was born in Minsker, Guberae, Russia, in August, 1875, his father, 
Yehel Rosen, being an accomplished Jewish scholar. 

Ili- first employment in America alter the close of the Spanish-American 
War was in a butter and egg supply house, where he held the position of 
candler. 

Being conscientious in his religious beliefs, he objected to working on 
Saturdays, and the linn, recognizing in him an expert at his work, arranged 
matters so Mr. Rosen 'li'l not have to work on Saturday, \fter he had saved 
Ii is first hundred dollars, he opened a butter and For himself, where 

In- remained six months. He later went into the country, and started buying 
rattle, sheep and poultry, which he continued for two years, and saved enough 
mone) to go to Cincinnati and start a furniture store, 

Here he remained for about five years, when he went to Newport, Ky., 
and opened another furniture store. In the nexl two years he lost not only his 
own capital, but also mone] which he had borrowed, and the misfortunes of 
this time would sunlv have overwhelmed a less courageous man. 

With stout heart Mr. Rosen set ahum carving another career, this time 
buying ami selling automobiles, in which business he has been very successful. 
He has discharged all indebtedness relating to his other ventures, including 
the borrowed money, and is regarded as a man of absolute honor and integrity. 

Mr. Rosen was married to Miss Sura Molsasky, September ;. 1893, and 
they have a family of seven children, inur boys anil time girls. 

Mr. Rosen is a member of Newport Shule, of which he was a former 
Trustee, Chesid Shellames and the 1 tdd Fellows, lie is also a loyal supporter 
1.1' all worthy charities. 



THOMAS ROSEN 

The atmosphere of a city expresses personality as distinctly as does an 
individual. We go into a community ami ate welcomed or repelled by an in- 
tangible something which emanate- from the life anil activity about us. In 
reality this is hut a composite expression of the citizens who form the commu- 
nity, a reflection of their individual characters. 

If Mm wen- tn go tn Jamestown, V Y.. ami ask to he introduced to her 
leading citizens, one of tin- lir-t gentlemen you would meet would he Mr. 
Thomas Rosen, a man of affairs whose success 1- c direct result of his own 
individual efforts. 

Mr Rosen was hum in Politskwitipkcr, Guberne, Russia, March 1. 
an. I although In- i- -till a very young man. has achieved a prominent place in 
tin- community. He came to America during tin- summer of 1906, anil Ian. I 
ing in New Ynrk. worked a- a plasterer fur three months. He then went to 
Stanford, where he engaged in the junk business fur two years, after which he 

nued in the same business fur three \ear- m Jamestown Deciding I 
hi- han. I in another line. In- went into the eattle business, which held In- .:■ 
tion fur twu r which he decided that hi- best interests could be 

served in the junk busim 

lie therefore started 1 ^ar■l in partnership with Mr Morris Perell, which 
partnership ha- continued most successful!) up to the present tune 



Mr. Rosen was married in Jamestown in September. 1917. to Mi<s Sylvia 
Cohen, daughter of Joseph and Yetta Cohen, and both young people are ex- 
ceedingly popular in their social circle. They not only contribute liberally to 
all charities, but are regular attendants at Jamestown Congregation. 

Mr. Rosen is prominently connected with various civic interests and is 
also a prominent member of the Odd Fellows. 

Many a man at the age of threescore years and ten would be proud to look 
back upon a life representing as much success as Mr. Rosen has achieved 
within the few brief years since he arrived on our shores. It is certainlv a 
pleasure to include this history of his early years in the present biographical 
work. 



SAMUEL ROSENBAUM 
Of Waterbury, Conn. 

America, the land of opportunity, has twice opened her doors to Mr. 
Samuel Rosenbaum after the old world had offered nothing but failure and 
disappointment. 

Mr. Rosenbaum was born in Podolsky. Gubeme, Russia, in 1865. He 
came to America in 1893. leaving his family in Russia until such time as he 
had established himself in this country. Going to Waterbury, Conn., he ped- 
dled rags for a short time and then decided to seek further opportunity in the 
West. After seven years" hard work he accumulated a considerable sum of 
money and went back to Russia with the idea of bringing his family back with 
him. While there he lost his entire capital, owing to the failure of a bank in 
that country, so he had to return to America and 
start his career all over again at Waterbury. Conn. 
After a few vears he was able to send for his two 
sons, and with their assistance opened the present 
business, taking them into partnership with him. 
Thev have been exceedingly successful and are to- 
day not only doing a big business, but have real 
estate interest of considerable importance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rosenbaum have a fine family of 
five children, four boys and one girl. Dave i- now 
in business for himself, and the younger brother. 
Louis, works for him. Isadore and Harry are jun- 
ior members of the firm of S. Rosenbaum. estab- 
lished by their father. The daughter. Ida. is mar- 
ried to Mr. Farker. a prominent business man of 
Waterbury. 

Mr. Rosenbaum is a most generous contributor 
to charities and is also prominent in B'rith Israel Congregation. B'rith Abra- 
ham and the Waterburv Hebrew Free Loan Association. 




Samuel ItUKenhaum 



ZM> 



SAMUEL ROSENBAUM 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Few American-born men have any conception of the privation and suf- 
fering endured bv some of the immigrants who have landed on our shores 
and by sheer force of character and hard work have fought their way to places 
of prominence. Such is the life history of Mr. Samuel Rosenbaum, who was 
born in Yolina, Russia, in July, 1865, and who came to America in 1894. He 
landed in Boston with but ninety-three cents and while seeking for a place of 
employment was obliged to sleep in a park and suffer the pangs of hunger. He 
finally got a job as an apprentice in a factory, but was obliged to work for two 
weeks for nothing. After that time his' advancement was rapid, and by the 
utmost economy he was able to save enough money to send for his family, who 
was still in Russia, and to establish himself in a small junk business. After 
a few months of great hardships the business became established and after 
twelve years of prosperity he decided to go to Cambridge, Mass., where he oper- 
ated a wholesale yard in connection with a partner. After one year the part- 
nership was dissolved and he then became associated with his brother Phillip, 
who is still with him at the present time. 

Mr. Rosenbaum was married in Russia in 1885 to Miss Dora Fisher, and 
they have three daughters, all of whom have married prominent business men. 

The Rosenbaum brothers are liberal contributors to all charities and are 
members of Orthodox Congregation and Independent Order B'rith Abraham. 



WALTER ROSENBAUM 

If one were to give, in just one word, a summary of the character of 
Mr. Walter Rosenbaum, of Pittsburgh, Pa., it would be that of a "gentleman" 
in the right application of the term. For Walter Rosenbaum is one of the 
noblemen of nature. A sympathetic personality, a gifted man of affairs, a 
successful business man and more than a philanthropist by nature, he is one 
of those rare personages whose presence gives a thrill to every fair-minded 
individual, and with whom even- one would like to associate and make 
friends. 

Uorn in the city of Pittsburgh, at the corner of Franklin and Sedgwick 
streets. Allegheny, on July iS. 1875, Mr. Rosenbaum is the son of Max and 
Sidonie Rosenbaum, both prominent citizens of Pittsburgh. The father died 
on January 20, 1908. The mother is slill living. The elder Mr. Rosenbaum 
was the founder of the well-known department store bearing his name in the 
city, and il was there that Walter learned the business from the bottom up. 
Mrs. Sidonie Rosenbaum was highly active in the organization of |ewish insti 
tutions, and she still retains an interest in many Jewish organizations. She 
comes from an important Jewish stock, her maiden name being Rothchild. 

Walter Rosenbaum attended elementary and grammar school in bis native 

•ity. lie graduated with the highest honors from Grant public school in [890 
;inil then entered the Pittsburgh lli^h School, which lie left in [894, gradual 
ing with honors and going into his father'- store. Me went through all its 
branches, becoming an experl in the science of buying and selling, and training 
for the position of leadership be was in time to assume in the mercantile world. 
\s a result Mr. Rosenbaum possesses in a verj remarkable degree a complete 

knowledge of his business, 

In ilue time', and after his father's untimely death, Mr. Walter Rosenbaum 
became tin- general superintendent of their department store, located at Sixth 
street, Liberty and Penn avenues, and occupying a full front block, lie is the 
Secretary-Treasurer of tin- Rosenbaum Company, a corporation which owns 

;!iis store. They employ sum,' 2,000 people in all of their departments. 

237 



.^osenbaam. as can well *:>e expected. is very prominent in the social 
\miuuik - urgh. He is a member of ibe Concordia I 

- - - uenrial Jews of ihe city, anc 

s also a member of ihe Rodeph Sholerv _ . 

-enbaum is a Mason of mar egi 
in honorary member ige. having served .r therein 

member of the B"nai B'rith. 

Mr Rasenbanm was married to Miss E\-a Ileymann 
^re the pc- ren, St 'ade- 

jeine and Ruth. 



ZPHRAIM ROSENBERG 

">wn anc represent members of the Jewish com- 

mai iitT in Xe~ Mr. Ephraim Rosenberg, who is very promi- 

nently connected w : 

s parents, E rnjamin Rosen- 
l«erg and Racr rnai - - 5 father had come Sooth 

more than half a century ago and without any other advantages than those of 
intelligence and integrity, he became a pioneer in the shoe industry, and the 
Glided later became one of the largest business concerns in the entire 
Sooth. With the example of thrift anc . 

-: ' -:'-j - - ; ti . --. . : - : -; '"." 

aring iron public schoc I » - nteen 

and wilt rs became a partner in the concern, whose firm name 

-Jsen and is a Rosenberg & Sons. In 1910 Mr. Rosenberg retired 

from that firm and soar years ago he engaged in the 
-iness and became cooet: th the 

Rosenberg-Rowan Company, whose offices are ai 904 

. - - r - - - . ■ ■ - - - 

- 

Land and Oil Developing Companv and of the River 
and Rail Terminal Company. 

~r.t - - -.-- .: : --: : - :';.:"- rr 

not the only one. however, that Mr. Rosenberg 
inclined and dispo- How. The various in- 

- : " -. - " . - : ■ ._ 

and philanthropic way strongly appealed to Mr. Eph- 
raim Rosenberg, and in these, too. he has been a 
true follower : .— iple that be had before him 

e irhr age. Tfcns the religions interests which 
had led hi- - donate a synagogue building to 

~evra Tbifim Con g regation conM not fail to im- 
bne rim with tie religious spirit, and be has taken an active part in the religious 
e Tooro Synagogue, with which be is connected. Insrinrfions of a 
charitable character appeal to him with equal force, and be has been affiliated 
Torro Infirmary, the Jewish Orphans' Home, the Young Men"; He- 
brew Association, the B"nai B nth and the order i 

On January 5, 1897, Mr. Rosenberg was married to Miss Jessie HiUborn 
- : - " . - - - - . - . - . - 

charitable inclinations and philanthropic interests, but has herself taken an 
art in the affairs of the different charitable institutions of the c : 

'. '- =-t: :"'= :- - . ■ . - . : ' ;■-;"- = 

cheer and snnsfaine of a chud. Luhe. 

- 




ABRAHAM ROSENBERG 

The prosperity and usefulness of any city or community is largely depend- 
ent upon those public-spirited citizens who take time from tlu-ir own affairs 
in which t<> promote and develop institutions for the pul 

a man i- Mr. Abraham Rosenberg, who. although not an American 
by birth, is a thorough citizen by adoption and whose life conforms in every 
way to our highest ideals of Americanism. 

Mr. Rosenberg was born in Russia in 1876, the son of Israel and Sarah 
Rosenberg. His father was engaged in the tobacco business and was a scholar 
of repute in tlu-ir community. He came to America nineteen years ago. and 

• le interested in the shoe business, which field he has developed into the 
present lar^e establishment at J404 Woodland avenue. Cleveland. < >hio. 

Mr. Rosenberg has been in Cleveland for seven years, ami during that 
brief period has not only won a reputation as being one of the most able and 
reputable business men of the city, but has identified himself with every worthy 
charitable and civic enterprise, especially those devoted to the betterment of 
the people of his own race, although he is very broad-minded and is not par- 
ticularly influenced by creed or religion. 

He is a liberal contributor to all charities, a member of Kn; seph, 

Independent < '.radner. of which be is a member of the Executive Committee. 
He is al-o on the Executive Commi \liskir Babariskir ai lent 

of the Paltyr Society. He is also an active member of the Sick Benefit A- 
ation. 

Mr. Rosenberg was married in August, 1895, in Russia to Miss Marion 
Zahan, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Zahan, who were prominent in 
business ami educational circles in their native town. They have one 
teen \ears of age, who is in business with hi- father. 

Mrs. Rosenberg co-operates with her husband in matl harity and 

thev are both prominent contributors to Jewish Hospital. 

Mr. Rosenberg regards integrity and 1: the two prime requisites 

for a successful business career. 



HARRY ROSENBERG 

The traditions and spirit of the Jews have ever been philanthropic to the 

gree. 
Thev are the people who have followed mosl Id Biblical 

regarding the relief of tin- poor and the welfare 

Hebrew term for charm is Zedokoh, righteousness, which implies an obi 
don, and in this spirit the Rabbis of tlu Talmud maintained that payments 
moral for charitable pui much an obligation 

lebts 
This 1- not only worth] d trait, but we feel should bo 

ial mention in connection with the life histories of Ham 1 
and Isaac Rudolph, who rtner- in busin 

of their wealth in the aid of the unfon 

these men i- the old, old from 

urit> to position- of prominence ami influcn 
Ha; orn m Kieve, 1 lubcn 

and • le tir-t V 

nothing to hi- likin.. 'it in 

a factor] and later went into the butcher bu :t in 

Oil. incr in the iron and 

where t' 



He was married in New York City, June t, 1901, to Miss Anna Mabel, 
and they have throe children, one boy and two girls. 

Both Mr. Rosenberg and his wife are very prominent in all charitable 
activities, giving liberally to Denver and Los Angeles hospitals, the Erie Or- 
phans' Home, National Orphans' Home of Xe\v York City, the Farm School 
of Philadelphia, Immigration Society of New York and all of the Yishivas in 
this country and Europe. 

Mr. Rosenberg is a member of both congregations in Reading and the 
Independent Order B'rith Abraham. 



HYMAN ROSENBERG 

The lives of our country's successful, self-made men have proved that it 
is not so much a question of what you know as how you apply it, less a matter 
of training and more of firmness of character with which you can bend adverse 
circumstances to your will. 

To Mr. Hyman Rosenberg was given more educational advantages than 
the average immigrant seeking a footing in the new world, but even be would 
have been doomed a failure had he not been willing to work at the most humble 
labor and save his money. 

Hyman Rosenberg was born in Suwalk, Guberne, Russia, January 15, 1872, 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rosenberg, his father an agriculturist and a 
well-read, scholarly man. 

At the age of sixteen young Hyman came to America, landing at New 
York and going to live with a sister who resided in that city. 

He attended the public schools for two years after coming to America, 
then went to Cleveland, Ohio, where he secured employment in a butcher shop 
at $6 a week and board. 

Having in mind the establishment of a business of his own, he saved his 
money and in four years was ready to open his own shop. He continued this 
for three years and was very successful, but decided there was more opportu- 
nity in the iron and metal business, so he sold the business and went to Cam- 
bridge, Ohio, where he opened a scrap business. His business has increased 
at a stupendous rate, the plant being located at 310 Dewey avenue. 

Mr. Rosenberg was married June 5, 1897, to Miss Goldie Wine of Cleve- 
land. Ohio. 

They have five children, all of whom are in school. Only one is yet old 
enough to attend college, the son, Nathan, being a student at Ohio State 
University. 

Liberality to those less fortunate than themselves is a characteristic trait 
of the Jewish nation. Indeed, it is a part of the teaching of the Talmud. Were 
it not so, that eternal justice which balances the actions of men would not 
have allowed them guardianship of so much of this world's goods. 

Mr. Rosenberg is no exception to this rule. He contributes generously to 
all charities, including Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums. 

He is also a member of the Congregation Beth El. 



240 



SAMUEL ROSENBERG 



The K-ws are the pioneers of industry. One of our great writers has 
said that commerce and the diffusing of civilization are very closely allied. 
This is proven In the march of progress which has over followed the torch ol 
commercial activity. Ii has opened the doors for the arts and sciences; il has 
been the greal patron of education; ii has been the chief incentive for the dis- 
covery of new lands, and in all this the Jew lias played a leading part. 

Some such spirit of adventure must have guided the footsteps of Samuel 
Rosenberg when he came t" seek his fortune in :i new land. He was born in 
Kishiniff, Guberne, City of Beltz, Russia, April 2, [857, his father being Mr. 
Jacob Loeb Rosenberg of that city, and like many of the older generation of 
"|r ws, a great scholar as well a successful merchant. 

Mr. Rosenberg came to America February 26, 1890, landing in New York 
I ity, and after a week or so of unprofitable effort, was induced to give $5 of 
his meager capital and two weeks of his time to 
learn to be an operator in a factory, but after spend- 
ing his time and money, thej refused to give him 
1 mployment. The next few months were filled with 
discouragements, as several small business ven- 
tures were unsuccessful, and his family, whom he 
left in Russia, were dependent upon him for sup- 
port. So he came to Buffalo and started peddling 
junk, which he continued for a number of years 
with great success, and in [900, joining forces with 
his present partner, they opened the present busi- 
ness, in which they have been very successful. 

Ten years prior to his coming to America, Mr. 
Rosenberg was married to Miss Rebecca I ebel, 
daughter of Solomon and Rachel Lebel, and Mrs. 

nberg's coming to America brought to us an- 
other example of ideal motherhood and womanly 
usefulness which are the most valuable assets of a 
community. 

The Rosenbergs have six children, four boys and two girls, all ol whom 
are highly educated and fitted to till positions of prominence and usefulness. 

The eldest daughter, Anna, is in the Active Motor Corps and is subject to he 

called to France within a short time. The youngest daughter, Rose, has a gov 
eminent position. The youngest son. Max, is a buyer for a large woolen mill. 

Despite Mrs. Rosenberg's man) duties in the care of her family, she finds 
time for many charitable activities. 

Mr. Rosenberg is ex- 1 'resident and Treasurer, founder and builder of Con- 
gregation B'rith Israel, member of Beth El, B'nai B'rith, East Buffalo Social 
Club, founder of the Talmud Torah and Director of same at the present time. 

Both himself and wife are patrons of the Immigration Society of New York, 

all fewish charities, all the Yishivas in Europe and America, and Philadelphia 

farm and Denver and Los \ngeles hospitals. 




Ml 



SAUL N. ROSENBERG 

A Fter we read the life history of Saul N. Rosenberg, at present a successful 
clothing merchant, we wonder how he has crowded so much in it, for he is 
but thirty-three years of age. He was born in Bealow, Russia, in 1884, the 
son of Chain and ( >dis Rosenberg. His father was a scholar and government 
contractor. At the age of fourteen he secured work as an apprentice in a 
tailor shop and received no salary for the first six months. He then received 
$5 a month and board. Shortly after his marriage he and his wife were ar- 
rested for their political activities and sent to prison. He served six months 
in the prison at Bialaw, then in the Warsaw prison for six months, then in Sed- 
litz prison for two months. He was then sent to Siberia for four years, but 
owing to the Japanese War he was sent to Colla Archanguski Guberria. instead 
of Vladivostok. Because of the birth of the Czar's son he was released with all 
other prisoners under twenty-one. 

Being just twenty-one years of age, he was called to do military service 
for Russia, but by this time he had had enough of Russian treatment and went 
to Paris. After three months he went to London and then in three months 
he came to Cleveland. 

In Cleveland he became a successful cloak operator, receiving as high as 
$150 a week at times. After working at this trade for eight years, a strike 
was called by the garment union. He then started in business for himself at 
5417 Woodland avenue with $1,200 he had saved from his salary. He handles 
clothing and furnishings and has succeeded in establishing a successful store. 

He was married on March 10, 1903, to Miss Dora Goldfarb in Misuih, Rus- 
sia. They have three children, two boys and one daughter. One son is at 
present in Europe, being brought up by his grandmother. 

Mr. Rosenberg is an active member of the B'nai B'rith, the Hebrew Social 
Aid, Slutsker Young Men's Society, Workingman's Council. He is Chairman 
of the Inspection Committee of the Business Men's Welfare Association. 

He believes that success will come to those who are honest and upright, 
and is always ready to help those in need of assistance. 



LOUIS ROSENBLATT 

Rosenblatt Brothers, manufacturers of wire frames and ladies' hats at No. 
65 Suffolk street. New York City, is a firm whose business exceeds half a 
million dollars per annum. The writer interviewed Mr. Louis Rosenblatt, of 
the firm, who is described by his friends as "a good boy." meaning a man with 
a large heart and always ready to do a favor for a friend, and this he really is. 

Mr. Louis Rosenblatt was born in Barlot, Roumania, on January 31, 1886. 
He is named after his father, who died at the age of thirty-six, a few months 
prior to the birth of Louis. His death was the result of heart trouble, brought 
on by financial reverses, and the widow was left with six children. She never 
married again, devoting her life to rearing her children. Now she is happy 
in her old age, and her children contribute liberally to her support, vieing with 
each other to gratify her every wish. 

Louis Rosenblatt came to Anierica in i8()2 with a capital of 95 cents. 
Being very energetic, he refused to accept aid from his brothers, and started 
out to work the day after he landed. One year later, with a capital of $100, 
he started manufacturing wire frames, and eventually developed the present 
firm, which now occupies five floors of space. January 6, 1906, Mr. Rosen- 
blatt married Miss Anna Gruber, and they have five daughters, 

242 



ARTHUR ROSENBLATT 

Tin- finest heritage an) young man can receive is a noble, cultured par- 
entage. It i- inure in be desired and is in it-elf a liberal education, as tho 
early influences of home environment often shape the entire career. 

Happy indeed is the man who, in the year- of maturity, in the light of 
a broad experience, can look back upon his father's life and precepts and - 
"I owe mj success to the fact that I followed in my father'- footsteps." 

Such were the words of Mr. Arthur Rosenblatt, wealthy iron and metal 
broker of Tiffin, < > 

Mr. Rosenblatt was horn in Cleveland, < Ihio, February 15. 1878, the son 
of Mr. Max Rosenblatt, successful merchant, exemplary citizen and accom- 
plished scholar. 

lie went t'> school until eighteen year- of age, when he orking 

for his father. Three years later he was married to Miss Gertrude Harnett, 
a prominent young woman of Cleveland, the biography of whose brother, Mr. 
Sam Barnett, also appears in this volume. 

fusl after hi- marriage, Mr. Rosenblatt decided to go into business fot 
himself, and started the present iron and metal brokerage business, which has 
had a phenomenal L;r>>\\ th. being built upon the foundation of sound business 
principles and honest dealings which ever characterized the career of the elder 
Mr. Rosenblatt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rosenblatt have !i\c children, four boys and one l^ i rl . all 
going il. Two of them are ahead} Started upon a musical education. 

Harold Studying violin and Herman the piano. 

The true test of a wealthy man is the account he make- of his stewardship. 

The old Judaic law which regards giving to charity as a sacred obligation 

refully observed b) both Mr. and Mr-. Rosenblatt, who are continually 
making contributions to charities of all kinds. 

They not onlj assist all local charities, but contribute to main of national 

e, two of which are the Denver and Los Vngeles hospitals. The < >ld Age 
and Orphans' Home also have reason to be grateful for their beneficence. 

Mr. Rosenblatt also finds time to affiliate himself with several prominent 
fraternal organizations, including the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 

11<- i- a representative type of that staunch American citizenship upon 

which the future welfare of our nation largely depend-. 



SOL ROSENBLOOM 

1 tnc of Pittsburgh's Jewish citizens who ha- made a remarkable business 
Mr >ol Rosenbloom. Although hi- youth was -pent in the stud) 
of Rabbinical lore to prepare him for the ministry, for which hi- type of mind 
seems to have been prc-eminentl) fitted, In- deep!) philosophic outlook on 

ha- not been a hindrance in hi- business, hut -eein- i.ilh, • 1 the 

cornerstone of hi 

He .ill. mil-, applied this attitude of mind when at th, 

from Russia to these hospit rmined then to make ol 

life in tin- land of opportunities and to lake up the struggli 

■nan 

• things whn h youth 

today will not go with. high id( "lire, not 




KoKt-iihloom 



only financially but also spiritually, with the hope of what he wanted his life 
to .stand for, he succeeded in laying the founda- 
tion inr a business which grew rapidly after sev- 
eral years of hard, uphill work. 

His early struggles have been amply repaid, 
as his business has grown to the dimensions of 
one of the largest mail-order enterprises in his 
line, and his name in the business world stand-, 
high for fairness and integrity. 

I hit all through his phenomenal successes in 
finance, his early training in the laws of Judaism 
and its philosophies has not failed to color his 
thinking processes and he has kept before him 
his Jewish ideals and next to his business. Jew- 
ish interests and Jewish movements have claimed 
his attention. 

Especially have Jewish educational move- 
ments had his interest, as Mr. Rosenbloom con- 
siders it of the utmost importance for the future 
of Judaism to maintain Jewish educational 
centers. 

He feels strongly on this subject and is devoting all his energies toward 
helping the Jews fulfill their sacred duty to establish a cultural center in their 
homeland, built up around and on their traditions, and so maintain for all 
time a source of spiritual energy and religious inspiration for all the Jews all 
over the world. 

It is through men of his type, many o* them who have come from the 
Russian Jewish communities, where they imbibed real Jewish idealism through 
and through, understanding the philosophies of Judaism, that American Juda- 
ism owes in a measure its spiritual rebirth. 

For without this leaven of real Jewishness in its unbroken tradition coming 
from the Russian Jewish centers, American Judaism was in danger of becom- 
ing sterile. 

Mr. Rosenbloom has a mind capable of great initiative and vision and we 
know of no other man, outside of the circle of professional teachers in Juda- 
ism, who takes the problems of their people so seriously as does Mr. Rosen- 
bloom. 

In March, 1S96, Mr. Rosenbloom married Miss Cecilia Xewmark, daugh- 
ter of the late Dr. Abraham S. Xewmark. Rabbi of Orach Chayim Congrega- 
tion of New York, who was a man of scholarly erudition, a philosopher, a deep 
thinker and student, a man of an unusual personality and spiritual power, a 
real Jew. He was a descendant of Rashi. 

The Rosenblooms have three children, Charles, Estelle and Arthur. Mrs. 
Rosenbloom is active socially ; she is the President of the Palestine Welfare 
Society since it was founded ; also has organized the L. A. of the Hebrew In- 
stitute and is its President. Mr. Rosenbloom is President of the Hebrew Insti- 
tute and is deeply interested in this institution. He is on the Board of Di- 
rectors of many worthy institutions and supports all philanthropies liberally 



24 -I 



MAX ROSENBLUM 

Max Rosenblum, one of the most progressive and cleanest cut young busi- 
ness men in Cleveland, Ohio, is a type of the thoroughly Americanized young 
Hebrew, combining in his personality the finest qualities of his race and the 
liberality which comes of daily contact with people of many classes and per- 
suasions. True to racial instincts and upbringing, he lends the most cordial 
support to every worth)- Jewish movement, but he does not stop there. He is 
a live and aggressive worker in civic reforms in Cleveland, a member of its 
Chamber of Commerce and former member and Chairman of the Board of 
Religious School. The story of Max Rosenblum is the story of thousands of 
other young Americans of grit and tenacity, a steady upward climb, made up 
of the experiences which everywhere breed success. He was born in Limes, 
Austria-Hungary, December 5, 1877, and arrived in America in March, 1884. 
His father was Adolph Rosenblum, a Jewish teacher and owner of a grain 
mill. 

Transplanted to an alien soil at the age of seven. Max grew up under the 
free ruling of America that gives equal chances to all. He sold papers on the 
streets. He took a course in bookkeeping and commercial training and at the 
age of 18 he became errand boy, at $4 a week, in a credit clothing store. At 
the end of five years he had more salary and more experience and made two 
big changes in his life. Miss Sarah Weiss had become indispensable to his 
happiness and he forthwith married her and got a better job, that of manager 
for Xewman Bros., another credit clothing firm. This was in 10,00. Max 
remained here five years, then made another change and another step upward. 
He got a working interest and $40 a week as manager for the Enterprise Cloth- 
ing Co. Five years later he knew all that was necessary to run a business of 
his own and he betook himself and his talents to one floor of a small place at 
J014 Ontario street, where he is now the prosperous occupant of the whole 
building, and as an individual credit clothier is the largest in the country. 

Here is an example of the Jewish personality at its best, which works out 
its salvation in the face of obstacles, becomes refined and humanized by the 
process and made fit for the highest citizenship. 

Mr. Rosenblum is a liberal giver as well as a good money maker. He gave 
$1,000 to the building of Mount Sinai Hospital, $600 to the Jewish war suf- 
ferers, and he contributes $300 a year to the Jewish Federation of Charities. 
He is on the Board of Trustees of Mount Sinai Hospital, is President of the 
Jewish Infants Orphans' Home, a member of the board of the Hebrew Free 
Loan, belongs to the Congregation Bnei Ishurim, to Euclid Avenue Temple, 
B'nai B'rith, Knights of Pythias. Hungarian Benevolent Social Union and In- 
dependent Aid Society. 

The family life of Mr. Rosenblum is an exceptionally charming one. His 
children, one boy and two girls, are all musically talented. Thelma, the elder, 
a girl of [5, is in high school, where she is specializing in domestic science. 
She and her sister Pearl, 12, both play the piano, and Harvey, the 10-vear-old 
son, is studying the violin. Mrs. Rosenblum. who is directing the talents of 
her bright little brood, is the daughter of Samuel and Ida Weiss, and well fitted 
to Ik- the companion of this rising young man of business. 



245 



JACOB ROTH 

If the business philosophy of Jacob Roth, which has given him a large 
measure of success in the banking, commercial and industrial life of western 
Pennsylvania, could be briefly summed up, it probably would be something like 
this : 

L'se your brains: work hard; concentrate: play the game Fair; give your 
neighbor credit for as much honesty as yourself: think of big things in a big 
way : do not allow pettiness to master you ; and last but not least, kindness paj s 
even in business." 

Jacob Roth lives at 656] llartlett street, Pittsburgh, Pa. lie was born in 
Zemplin, Cond., Hungary, September 16, 1871. A year after he was born 
Air. Roth's parents. Joseph and Catherine Roth, attracted by the freedom of 
religious and political thought, as well as the greater opportunity for the eco- 
nomic development offered by the great republic of the West, migrated to 
the Untied States. They made their home in Pittsburgh. Later they moved to 
McKeesport, Pa. 

Mr. Roth early developed a strong business instinct and at the age of 
eighteen years he was employed in the First NatipnalBank of McKeesport and 
had assisted his father in establishing a private bank under the name of Joseph 
Roth & Sons, at McKeesport, Pa. ; he proved to be an invaluable aid in promot- 
ing the interests of this institution, which is in existence to this day. Later 
his knowledge of the banking business led him to establish the First Xational 
Bank of Suterville.'Pa., of which he was President for twelve years. Xot sat- 
isfied with these activities, which would have been more than sufficient to engage 
the complete time and thought of experienced business men of mature age. 
young Roth assisted in reorganizing and financing the Westmoreland Brewing 
Company, of which he is the Treasurer. Then in 1903 at the age of thirty-two 
years, Mr. Roth established the Pittsburgh State Hank, of which important 
financial institution he is President. 

With indefatigable and tireless energy Mr. Roth not alone found time to 
develop and to attend to these various banking and business enterprises, but 
he also was able to devote some of his attention to problems in the realm of 
invention. While a boy in McKeesport Mr. Roth had been thrown into contact 
with many of the great industrial geniuses who have become internationally 
known. This led to interest in technical subjects relating to iron, steel and 
kindred products. 

The idea occurred to Mr. Roth that it was possible to obtain a perfect weld 
of two unlike metals and make it of commercial value. So with characteristic 
energy and application Mr. Roth spent nine years in endeavoring to develop a 
process of welding copper and steel so that it would be of practical value in all 
lines of industry where copper exclusively had heretofore been employed. The 
result of this revolutionizing method developed and perfected by Jacob Roth 
has been to introduce to the industrial world one of the most far-reaching of 
all the practical inventions of recent years — copper clad. The patent granted 
by the United States government in 1915 was the successful climax to the 
long and patient years of Mr. Roth's efforts, carried on under the most dis- 
couraging conditions. Today the Copper Clad Steel Company, of which Mr. 
Roth is President, has large mills at Rankin, Pa., and at this time much more 
ambitious plans for immense new plants are under consideration. 

Mr. Roth was married in 1899 to Claudia I.oeb of Sunbury; two children. 
Madeline and Ferdinand, are the result of this happy union. He is identified 
with all the leading religious, philanthropic and social institutions of the Pitts- 
burgh Jewish community. And he not alone gives money, but eenerouslv of his 
service in all the important communal activities that make for the welfare of 
his people. 



247a 



SIMON D. ROSENZWEIG 

Life is never a sn th road For any of us. but in the invigorating atmos- 
phere of high aspirations we find the very roughness stimulates us t>> steadier 
steps uniil the truism, "over steep ways to the star-." is fulfilled. 

This i- the experience of every man who has had to ascend the steep 
pathway in success, with no aid, except his own ability and determination, and 
it is well exemplified in the life history of Mr. Simon I'. Rosenzweig, who was 
born in Suwalk, Guberne, Russia, September 17. 1870. His father, Vbraham 
Rosenzweig, was engaged in the lumber and grocer} business and was also an 
accomplished scholar. 

At the age of ten years young Simon came to America, t" the home oi liis 
grandfather, and went to school until he was thirteen. 

Feeling that it was npw necessary to contribute to his nun support, he 
obtained employment as cash boy in a clothing store, but the salarj was so 
small, with little chance of advancement, that he went to Michigan, and after 
over a year and a half of experience working in various stores, he landed in 
Detroit, where his brother was engaged in the iron and metal business. \ftcr 
a number of years of hard work and persistent saving he accumulated enough 

to buy an interest in the business, hilt ill (910 decided tn conduct a business Oi 
his own. and started tor himself at his present location, where he has been 
wonderfully successful ami has all modem equipment for conducting die 
business. 

lie was married lanuarv 5. iSi><>, to Miss Anna Kashniau and they have 

three line children, two boys and one girl, whom they are thoroughly educat- 
ing in music as well as their academic studies. 

Mr. Rosenzweig is a member of Beth El Temple. B'nai B'rith, the Masons 
and K. of P. 

lie is most liberal in his contributions to various charities, including Tal- 
mud and Denver Hospital. 



AARON ROTTER 

\aron Rotter, iron ami steel broker, is one of the most influential and 1 ros- 
perous citizens of Cleveland. Mis education was obtained in the great world 

Ol business, and he knows from experience that riches and power are not easilj 
won. lie also knows that determination and hard work can overcome almost 
every obstacle. 

\aron Rotter was horn in Gorlice, Galicia, Austria, on August 20, 1861. 
I lis father. Simon Rotter, was a Jewish scholar, and his mother. Hannah 

ter. a woman of strong character. In 1884 he came to Wu York and for the 

first eleven months after he landed he peddled matches and other small wares. 

I hi n he decided thai opportunities were greater farther west, so he came 

to Cleveland ami started to sell drj .e. Is, carrying his merchandise with him 

as before. After two wars he was able to buy a horse and wagon to use in his 
business. \ year later he changed his line to scrap iron and junk and worked 
in the country around Cleveland until his health broke down, and he was 
obliged to return to his home in Europe for a rest. In sj x months he had t< 

ered, but he was too ambitious to staj in a land where he bad s,> little opportu 
nitv io succeed. America still called him. so he came again to 1 leveland and 
opened a small grocery store. This was the onlj time thai bis efforts brought 
him no monev, and he remembers thai experience as a year of unrewarded 
effort and suffering. He gave up the grocerj and again went into the count r) 

with bis scrap iron, and not long after was abb- to open a plan- of business in 

Norfolk, < 'bio. 



Mr. Rotter stayed in Norfolk for twelve years and then returned to 
t leveland, where he bought out the iron yard of II. Silvern & Co. This con- 
cern grew rapidly under the new management and he kept it fur nine years, at 
the end of which he sold out and established the firm of A. Rotter, iron and 
steel broker, in the Leader-News Building of Cleveland. Tin's enterprise has 
brought great wealth to its owner, and he is known as one of the big, reliable 
business men of the city. 

Aanm Rotter was married in Cleveland on June id, 1889, to Katy, daugh- 
ter of Isaac and Hanna Fielkowitz. Mrs. Rotter's loyalty and good judgment 
have been 110 small factor in her husband's success. Mr. anod Mrs. Rotter 
have three daughters, Hattie. wife of Louis Robinson, a furniture dealer of 
Detroit : Anna, wife of Maurice Kreiger, who is in the shoe business in Cleve- 
land, and Mabel, who is still attending one of the Cleveland high schools. The 
youngest daughter has pronounced musical ability. 

Mr. Rotter never forgets his own early struggles; he himself has worked 
hard and at times has done without everything but the bare necessities of life. 
Now that he has achieved success, it is one of his greatest pleasures to help 
others wdio are in misfortune. He gives liberally to every charity and hospital 
in Cleveland, and to organizations doing similar work in many other places. 
He is a member of the Congregation of Bnei Ishurim. 

Mr. Rotter belongs to the class of citizens which is the best asset of any 
community. He is public-spirited and level-headed. Most of all, he tries to 
give every one a square deal and make his word as good as his bond. 



MORRIS ROZNER 

Most people show more persistency in their first twelve months of their 
life than they show later in twelve years; did they not, they never would have 
learned how to walk. Must we quit if we don't get there quickly? No, indeed, 
not. 

America's most successful men sweat blood before they gained a foothold 
on the ladder, sweat and toil with brain and often with body from early morn- 
ing to late at night, many times all night, tasting defeat but never despair. Life 
is so specialized that jacks-of-all-tradcs are wanted by none. All-round men 
find every hole is today square. To last, a man must stick to his last — he cannot 
hope to be a good shoemaker today and a capable plumber tomorrow. 

The pace today calls for red blood, men of grit, not grouch. Stickers, not 
sticklers, are wanted. 

Mr. Morris Rozner, born March 7, 1875. was the son of Osher and Fcige 
Rozner of Griebo, Austria. At the age of 14 Morris left his native land and 
came to America. 

For 18 years he has been in Monessen, Pa., where he is in the retail meat 
line, doing a nice business. 

In [903 Mr. Rozner was married to Miss Freda Israel of McKeesport, 
Pa., ami together they reap the enjoyment of being the proud parents of two 
sons and a daughter. 

Mr. Rozner has always been fair and just in all his dealings, has always 
considered the feelings of all with whom he has come in contact whether in 
business or socially. 

He takes an active interest in the religious life of Monessen, being a mem- 
ber of the congregations, and is also a member of the Board of Trade. 

Xo worthy charity, regardless of race or creed, applies in vain to Mr. and 
Mrs. Rozner. 

249 



SOL RUBENSTEIN 

Sol Rubenstein of Buffalo, N. Y., was born in the Province of Suwalk, 
Russia, sixty years ago, and arrived in America in the year 1880. 

After having resided in New York City for several years he came to 
Buffalo, N. Y., where he married Sarah Mayerberg, sister of Rabbi J. L. May- 
erberg of Goldsboro, N. C, and aunt of Rabbi Sam Maverberg of Detroit, 
Mich. 

Mr. Rubenstein has resided in Buffalo since the early 80s and enjoys a 
good and reputable name throughout the community. During his lifetime he 
has always been inclined toward assisting his fellow men and his home was 
always open to those in want and his time and efforts ready to alleviate the 
burdens of those in distress. 

He is President of the Buffalo Talmud Torah, is one of the original found- 
ers of the Buffalo Gemiluth Chasodim and has always associated himself with 
those institutions which make for the general good. 

Mr. Rubenstein's family consists of his wife and seven children, the oldest 
of whom is Emil H., who is in business with his father. 

Harry J., the second son, is now serving in France, and the other children 
are Ruth, Mrs. Israel Rumizen, Florence, Lenore and Rhea. 



A. F. RUBIN 

It is a strange paradox that men of the fewest opportunities often rise to 
the highest places of prominence: that the inheritance of a fortune is rather a 
detriment than an assistant to progress. Too many young men have frittered 
awav the best hours of life's opportunity waiting for dead men's shoes, to I md 
in the end that they have not developed the ability to handle the fortune which 
they had no part in creating. 

The world pays homage to the young man who strikes out for himself 
boldly, as did Mr. A. F. Rubin of Erie, Pa. 

He was born in Telz Kavna, Guberne, Russia, in June, 1876, the son of 
Samuel and Hoda Rubin. The first nineteen years of his life were spent in 
bis native town, when he decided to come to America, and landed on our shores 
in September, 1895. 

Going to Chicago, lie obtained employment in a factory and remained 
there eight years, during which time he was busy learning the now language, 
manners and customs, and lining himself for a position of more responsibility. 

I IK nexl venture was in the real estate business, but in a short time lie gave 
this up and came In Erie, Pa., where be went into the iron and metal business. 
Here he was very unfortunate, losing all his money, and was obliged to bravely 
start over with nothing but bis re] una lion for honest \ and ability lor assets. 

Mis next venture in the same line was in partnership witli bis brother, 
and by persistent effort the) gradually built up tin- present large business which 
they now operate under the linn name of Nickel Plate Iron & Metal Company, 

Mr. Rubin was married in Chicago in September, 18117. to Mis- Marie 
Klein, and they have .1 line family of eight children, of whom they have every 

reason to be proud, as they are all doing well and are receiving liberal educa- 
tions. 

The son. Henry, is in business with bis father, while Joe has gone into 
business for bimself. The' balance of the children all are in school and are* 
being well educated in music also. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rubin arc interested in all charitable movements, not only 

250 



nf local character but also the Immigration Society of New York, the Denver 
and Liis Angeles sanitariums, and all the Yishivas in Europe and America. 
Mr. Rubin is also affiliated with B'nai Ainsa Hesed Congregation, B'nai I'.'rith. 

Modern \Y Imen of the World, B'rith Abraham of Chicago, Telger Unter- 

stizung Ferein. Timilis Hosodern. 



HYMAN RUBIN 

The lessons in conservation which have been taught us by immigrant Jews 
will be found more valuable as the years pass by, and our resources are more 
taxed by increasing population. Who shall say how much benefit we have de- 
rived from the immense quantity of wool which has been saved in this way and 
is now proving so useful in the conduct of the war? 

One of the largest industries of this kind is conducted by Mr. Hyman 
Rubin at 200 Second street, Chelsea, Mass., under the firm name of H. Rubin 
& Co. 

Mr. Rubin was born in Kovno. Guberne, Russia, in May, 1878, the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Rubin. His father was a wool dealer and also a promi- 
nent scholar. He came to America in 1895 and landed in Boston, June 17. 
where he first worked in the building trade for five dollars per week. He con- 
tinued this for nearly a year, receiving small increases in wages, and then 
decided to go into the rag business. While this offered but a very meager liv- 
ing, at the same time he saw the opportunity which was to develop into a fu- 
ture fortune. He was married in Boston, March 4, 1900, to Miss Rosa Gloser. 
and soon after went to Chelsea, Mass., where he established the nucleus of the 
present large business. 

The Rubins have three children, one boy and two girls, who are all going 
to school and studying music. 

Mr. Rubin is very active in the various prominent organizations of Chel- 
sea, being Past President of the Chelsea Investment Association, Past Presi- 
dent of the Orthodox Congregation. So valuable were his services in these 
capacities that he was presented with medals from both upon the occasion of 
his resignation. 

We feel that a word should also he said regarding the activities of his wife, 
who devotes a great deal of time and money to the promotion of charities, in 
which she also receives the full co-operation of Mr. Rubin. 



JOSEPH RUDNICK 

In Pioston, Mass., there are many prominent business men of Jewish faith 
who were born in Europe, but found the atmosphere of America more con- 
genial to their progressive tvpe of character. Prominent among them is Mr. 
Joseph Rudnick, who was born in the Province of Yilna, Russia, January 10. 
1869, the son of Abraham and Sarah Rudnick. 

He came to America thirty vears ago and started peddling through Massa- 
chusetts and Maine. After five years, during which time he was able to save 
capital enough to go into business in a modest way, he engaged in the restau- 
rant business and later managed a cigar store and two furniture stores. Decid- 

251 



ing that his best interests could be served in the real estate and building indus- 
try, he embarked in this line and has continued ever since. During recent years 
he lias branched "tit into mortgage brokerage, his office being at Mo. v Court 

street. 

Although Mr. Rudnick's business interests are so varied and exact a 
great deal of his time and attention, he is very public-spirited and is prominent 
in many of the organizations which contribute t" social and civic betterment. 
lie is Treasurer of Baldwin Place Congregation, Director of Baldwin Place 
Talmud Torah, Chairman of t onstruction and First \ ice President of Con 
gation \dath Veshurun. At the present time he is \ ice President ami Chair- 
man "f Construction of a Home For Jewish Children, lie i- also a Director 
nt' the Home for the ^ged, the Hebrew Free Loan \ssociation and is Director 
in the Federated Jewish Charities of Boston, lie is honored with the presi- 
dency nt" the Sheltering Home and served for some time a- Director of Beth 
Israel Hospital. 

Mr. Rudnick was married twenty-six years ago in Mi-- Rose Siegel, and 
they have -i\ daughters. Their onlj -mi. David Jacob, died at the ag( of 
twelve. Their daughters are Lena, May, Ida. Anna. Frances and Evelyn. 

Mr. Rudnick ha- a code of lite which has perhaps unconsciously placed 
him in his enviable position among hi- fellows, lie says: "Be ri.^ht. act right 
and make friends under all circumstances." 

\1 r. Rudnick has adhered so strictly to his first two admonitions that the 
matter of friendship was easily solved. \" one can come in contact with his 
kindle personality without wishing to possess his friendship. \m community 
is fortunate in having as a part of its citizenship such a man as Sir. Rudn - 



MRS. MAX RUDNER 



In volume "lie of "Distinguished Jew- of Americ 
hi-tun of Mr. Max Rudner. whose commercial, philanth 
in are known and appreciated m >t only in Canton, 
t ihi". where he reside-, but throughout the entire 
country . 

It is now our pleasure t" publish a brief 
sketch regarding the activities of hi- wife, who is 
ime "f tin- most popular and charitabl) inclined 
ladii - in the cit) "I' t anton. 

Mrs. Rudner before her marriage was Miss 
Jennie Gurans, and during Mr. Rudner's struggle 
toward financial affluence her wise counsel and 
brave co-operation were of the utmost assistance 
in him. She has not onlj been an ideal mother 
t" their seven children, but has devoted a 
deal "t' time t" charitable unrk. where her abilities 
have been much appreciated. 

This estimable ladj is the finest type "t n 
ern woman, who without neglecting the dutii 
her liinne. make- opportunit) t" promote the larger 
affairs of her eit\ and nation. 



is published the life 
ropic and civic acti\ 







ISAAC RUDOLPH 

was born in Kieve, Guberne, Russia, in April 1874. and came to America in 
( ictober, [904, bringing with him his wife, who was Miss Rachel Rosenberg, 

whom he married in June, [902, in Russia, two years before coming to America. 

Coming direct to Reading, Pa., he found himself without money, but was 
able to obtain some goods on credit and started peddling. By saving every 
spare penny he was able to purchase a horse and wagon and for three years 
bought and sold junk in this way until lie had accumulated enough to start 
a yard, when he went into business with his present partner, Mr. Harry Rosen- 
berg. 

Mr. Rudolph and his wife are very prominent in all charitable activities, 
giving liberally to Denver and Los Angeles hospitals, the Erie Orphans' Home. 
National Orphans' Home of New York City, the Farm School of Philadelphia, 
Immigration Society of New York and all the Yishivas in this country and 
Europe. 



SAMUEL RUDOLPH 



While the ancient Jews were essentially an agricultural people, the modern 
Jew is finding his success in the commercial world. This is demonstrated in 
the life of Mr. Samuel Rudolph, who was born in Kieve. Guberne, Russia, 
November 26, 1884, his father being owner of a bottle works and also a distin- 
guished scholar. 

Mr. Rudolph came to America December 6, 1904, landing in Baltimore, 
Md., but shortly after went to Philadelphia. Here he worked at various occu- 
pations for the small sum of $1 per day, and during two years, by the utmost 
economy, saved enough to buy a milk route in Reading, Pa. This was quite 
successful, enabling him to save enough money to engage in the butcher busi- 
ness. This venture proved a failure, however, and losing all his savings, he 
started out peddling junk. Shortly after that he 
was married to Miss Sophie Rosenberg of Philadel- 
phia, the day of their marriage being March 9, 1908. 
He then decided to try agriculture, but after three 
years on a farm he came back to Reading, Pa., and 
went into the junk business, where the small yard 
with which he began has through his efforts grown 
into the present prosperous business of S. Rudolph 
& Co. Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph have four children, 
one boy and three girls, the oldest attending the 
public schools, and also receiving a thorough He- 
brew education. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph are prominent in 
charitable activities, including the Denver Hospital, 
Immigration Society of Xew York and all the 
Yishivas. Mr. Rudolph is a member of Congrega- 
tion Homan Abrith, Director of the Hebrew Insti- 
tute and Trustee of the Independent Order B'rith Abraham. 




253 



MAX M., GEORGE. JOHN AND ABRAHAM D. RUTTENBERG 

Of all peoples of the earth, it can best be -aid of the Jew, "Where his 
home is. there liis heart is." and ;is patriotism is but the home-loving spirit 
enlarged to national proportions, the few is a great patriot. He comes to the 
land of adoption and obeys the law of that great teacher, Mar Samuel, "to hold 
the law of the country in which he lives as the highest law," and these duties of 
patriotism are being impressed upon t !uir children who are going forth by 
the hundreds to fight the battles of civilization and of liberty for the country in 
which they live. 

This is particularly true of the Ruttenbergs, a prominent family of Read- 
ing, Pa. The father, Mr. Max Ruttenberg, came with Ins family from Russia 
man) years ago, and although he has long since retired, his sons have become 
very prominent business nun and have taken n]> the burden of sustaining the 
family reputation t"i >r business acumen where their father laid it down. 

The elder Mr. Ruttenberg began his business experience in America b) 
peddling junk. Later he opened a yard, where he was very successful, and 
after having accumulated a fortune, retired from business, 

( If the fine family of eight children which constitute the Ruttenberg fam- 
ily, i leorge, John and Abraham have all engaged in the same business in which 

their father made hi- success, and they are all three in partner-hip. operating 
an enormous wholesale business where all sorts of waste material are handled. 

The younger brother, Sohra, is also working for his brothers, while Benjamin 
i- -till in school. Jacob hold- a responsible position in a hosiery mill, and Lew is 
is a recruiting officer in the United State- army, 

George Ruttenberg was married in Pottsville, Pa., October 31, nut. to 

\li-- Minnie line, who is yen prominent in social circles of Reading, being 

Recording Secretary of the Ladies' Hebrew Charitj League, Secretary of the 
I adies' Auxiliary and a member of I [odesa. They have one -mall daughter. 

John Ruttenberg is also married, his wi Fe having formerly been Mi-- I .aura 
\ ogelman, a prominent young woman of Reading. The) were married Ma) 

[4, 1015, and have one young child. 

The Ruttenbergs are all very active in charitable ami fraternal organiza- 
tions, all being members of Kosher Israel and the Y. M. 11. A., and making 
most generous contributions to Denver and Los Vngeles hospitals, the Erie 
Orphans' Home. National Orphans' Home of New York, the Immigration 
Society of \V« York, all the Yishivas and man) other charities too numerous 
to mention, Such a family i- a priceless acquisition to the community, state 

and nation. 



MOSES SABEL 

If the cit) of Montgomery, Ala., i^. justl) proud of it- prett) homes and 
the Jewish community point- with just pride and satisfaction to It- beautiful 
Standard < lub, both the city and Jewish communit) are equall) and a- justl) 
proud of the owner of one of tin- prettiest homes and the President of the 
Standard 1 lub of thai city, The man who holds that .ln.il position i- Mr. 
Moses Sabcl. Mr. Sabel was l«>rn to hi- parent-. Mark and Minna Sabel, in 
Louisville, lw . on Januar) 27, [863, an ill) carved hi- own successful 

and distinguished career Hi- received hi- first education in tin- public schools 
of Louisville and continued hi- studies at Montgomery, to which cit) hi- 
cnts ha.l removed Hi- father had intended him tot a legal career, bui young 
Sabel had no taste or desire for the rather dependent life of a professional 




man, and so, at the age of 16, he started to work for his father. After six 
years of faithful anil intelligent service, the advantages that had accrued to the 
firm from his connection and co-operation in the busi- 
ness became so marked and patent that he was given 
a partnership in the concern, and it was not long before 
Mr. Sa.be! became the bead of the large enterprise, 
the largest of its kind in the South, whose firm name 
is that of M. Sabel 6t Son, and whose main offices are 
at 102 Bibb street. 

Mr. Sabel's varied interests and activities in the 
communal life of Montgomery are a matter of com- 
mon knowledge and public record. To be particu- 
larly mentioned is the leading part he has taken in 
the management of the Standard Club, of which he 
is now President and which he previously served for 
twenty-two years as Treasurer, and the valuable 
service and untiring efforts he has devoted to the 
work of Jewish war relief, of which he has been the 
Treasurer. 

Mr. Sabel's prominence and valuable services are fully shared by his 
highly cultured wife, who was Miss Hettie Lazarus, to whom he was married 
June 6, 1899. Her parents, Henry and Carrie Lazarus, belonged to the leading 
families of both Louisville. Ky., where they originallv lived, and Birmingham, 
Ala., where they later resided. Her father was a very prominent Mason and 
was the founder and first President of Temple Emanuel of Birmingham. And 
Mrs. Sabel is following in the footsteps of her parents. She is Chairman of 
the Hospitality Hoard of the Council of Jewish Women, and in that capacity 
she is doing splendid work for the soldiers and sailors. She takes a very active 
part in the Hebrew Ladies' Benevolent Society and is also holding a position 
on the Hoard of the Hadassah Society. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sabel are the happy parents of two highly gifted and 
accomplished children, Mark, who has been educated in a military acadeim 
and at the University of Pennsylvania, and Marcelle, who is a graduate of 
Roger's Hall at Lowell, Mass., and who is following the noble example set by 
her mother and is devoting her time and energy to the promotion of altruistic 
and patriotic work. She is President of the Young Ladies' Auxiliary of the 
Hadassah Society and the Girls' Patriotic League of Montgomery, and is 
rendering most valuable services to a number of other organizations and insti- 
tutions of a philanthropic and patriotic nature. 



MEYER J. SAHPIRO 

Meyer J. Sahpiro, one of the most successful business men in Springfield. 
Mass.. was born in Suwalker, Guberne, Russia, in 1871, his father being a 
successful merchant of his native town. 

At the age of nineteen he heard the call to bigger opportunities in the 
new world and landed in Xew York, where he began making his living ped- 
dling. He had very little success, however, and went to Worcester. Mass., 
where he peddled merchandise for eight years, saving up a small amount of 
capital. He then went to Springfield, Mass., where he opened up a small shop 
devoted to iron and metal scrap, and this small beginning has. through the 
unfailing industry and executive ability of Mr. Sahpiro. resulted in the present 
large establishment where he is doing a very substantial business. 

Mr. Sahpiro was married in Boston, Mass.. in 1894 to Miss Rebecca Quint, 
daughter of Zesid and Freda Quint. They have nine children, two boys and 

255 



seven girls, who arc all going to school, with the exception of the elder son 
and daughter, Julius and Flora, who arc in business with their father, and oi 
much assistance to him. 

Mr. Sahpiro is very devout in his religious beliefs and i- Director of the 
Beth Israel Congregation. He is also a member of B'nai B'rith, B'rith Abra- 
ham, Minsker Ferein and the Heard of Trade. No charity appeals to Mr. 
Sahpiro in vain, and for this reason hundreds besides himself and family have 
been benefited by his prosperity. 



SIMON SAKOWITZ 

Vs an illustration of what straightforwardness, integrity and an intelligent 
application to one's work maj accomplish, the career of Mr. Simon Sakowitz 
of Houston, Texas, is eminently worth while perusing and contemplating. 

Mr. Sakowitz i- a young man who has carved his own career, vet he is 
today among the must highly esteemed residents and business men of the pro- 
gressive and flourishing city of Houston. 'Texas, lie was horn on January I, 
[884, in Kiev. Russia, the son of Louis and I .ina Sakowitz, and arrived in 
this country in 1890. I lis family settled in Galveston, Texas, where Simon 

attended public school for a period of only one year, and then, at the age of 
ten. he started to work as errand Toy in a store. Step by Step he worked his 
way up, at lirst becoming salesman and then manager of thai store. \fter he 
and his brother Tobias had saved up about twelve hundred dollars, they deter- 
mined to establish a business of their own. and in 1903 thee organized the 
linn of Sakowitz Brothers. 'This business, under their able managership, grew 

and developed to such an extent that, after six years, they decided to branch 
out further, and so they bought out a concern in Houston, 'Texas, and Simon 
Sakowitz removed to that city and assumed the managership of the new 
business 

The full measure of success with which the ability of Mr. Sakowitz has 
been rewarded may he -ecu from the fact that the firm of Sakowitz Brothl rs, 

at Main and Preston streets in Houston, i- toda) counted among the biggest 

'Tils that deal in men's, boys' and children's clothing. 

The most beautiful part of Mr. Sakowitz's career, however, i- that hard 
work ami his own remarkable success has not made him indifferent to the 

struggles and sufferings of his fellow men. For he i- a liberal contributor to 
all the Jewish charities and institutions of Houston and take- a deep interest 

in every movement of jn altruistic and ameliorative character. 

In August, [909, Mr. Sakowitz was married to Miss l lara B, Bowsk] of 
Xew < Irleans, and they are now the happy parents t>i two tine children, lulia X. 
and Loui 



ALEXANDER SALES 

The reputation of a community i- hut a composite representation of the 
character- of u- citizens, Thus, the low u of Dennison, < thio, has been made 
and more prosperous by the residence of Mr, Alexander Sale-. 

lie was horn in Wladislovov, Russian Poland, September 6, (888, and 
came to \mcrica at the age ol eighteen, lie hail a brother residing in Sala- 
manca, V V.. for whom he worked for a -hurt time 

256 



After saving sufficient money, he went to Monongahela, Pa., and started 
clerking in a store, where lie remained for a year and a half. 

We next find him in California, i'a., where he remained six months. Here 

ended his career as a clerk, for, although his salary had heen steadily advanced, 
he felt that his best opportunity lay in a business of his own. 

With the few hundred dollars lie had been able to save, he went to Den- 
nison, Ohio, and started a store in partnership with a Mr. Ginsberg, under 
the firm name of Sales & Ginsberg. This partnership continued for a few 
years, when Mr. Ginsberg retired. Mr. Sales remained and has gradually 
prospered until he has developed the finest general merchandise store in 
Dennison. 

( )n November t8, I'H.v Mr. Sales was married to Sarah 1!, Whittenstein 
of Bradford, Pa. They have one son, who will doubtless inherit his father's 
business ability. 

Mr. Sales and wife are both very popular in Dennison, because of their 
genial personalities and their generosity in matters of charity. 

Mr. Sales is a member of the Board of Trade, Knights of Pythias, the 
Elks, is Lecturing Knight of B. P. O. E. and was Secretary of the second 
Liberty Bond issue. When asked his advice to the younger generation, Mr. 
Sales replied that he believed success was due to absolute honesty more than 
to any other quality. 



HERMAN SALLE 

To fullv realize the great debt which the nation owes to the Jew, we need 
only pause a moment and imagine him entirely removed from our commercial, 
scientific and philanthropic life. 

Every community bears witness to the kindness and beneficence of the 
Tew, whose religion has taught him the true meaning of the stewardship of 
wealth for the good of all, and mindful at all times of his sacred obligation 
to ease the burdens of those less fortunate than himself. 

Such a man is Mr. Herman Salle, who was born in Vilna, Guberne, Rus- 
sia, in 1880. 

From his father, who was a merchant of that city, he doubtless inherited 
much of the business ability which has served him so well in America. 

He came to this country in June, 1898, and obtained his first employment 
in Canton, Ohio, where he received $f> per week in a junk yard. After nine 
months he started buying and selling junk for himself, and four years later 
opened a yard, but this venture was unsuccessful, and he lost all his savings. 
I le immediately started peddling again and three years later opened a yard 
in Huntington. W. Ya. Eight months later he came to Ironton. Ohio, where 
he has made an unqualified success and has accumulated a large amount of 
property. 

He was married in 1906 to Miss Fannie Barber of Pittsburgh. They 
have one daughter, who is going to school and is also being thoroughly edu- 
cated in music. 

In addition to Mr. Salle's many business cares, he has found time to iden- 
tifv himself prominently with several fraternal organizations, the most promi- 
nent being the Odd Fellows and Elks. He is also a member of the Chamber 
of Commerce. 

I'm .th be and his wife are most generous in their responses to appeals for 
charity, giving liberally to the Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums. 

Mr. Salle is also a subscriber of the Jewish Publication Society. 

257 



JOSEPH SANDERS 

Ever)' man is, to a large extent, his own educator. Instructors and text- 
books have their functions, but the man himself must be the directing genius 
of thought projection and assimilation. 

Someone has said that the Creator has so constituted the human intellect 
that it can only grow by its own action, and that man is not educated until he 
can direct the full energy of these powers toward vigorous accomplishment. 

The ultimate test of true scholarship is not the number of books that a 
man has read or the number of diplomas he is entitled to display, but the value 
of the knowledge he has disseminated to others and the minds he has aroused 
to a recognition of truth and beauty. 

These thoughts suggest themselves in connection with the interesting life 
of Mr. Joseph Sanders, a resident of Detroit, Mich., where he is known as a 
fine type of lawyer, scholar, philanthropist and friend. 

Mr. Sanders was born in Austria, April 19, 1887, coming to Xew York 
into the home of his sister at the age of five years. His school career immedi- 
ately began and at the age of fourteen he graduated from the public schools. 
He attended DcAYitt High School for a time, but being of very independent 
spirit and feeling the necessity of earning his own living, he stopped school 
and accepted an office position at $7 per week. 

However, his studies did not cease. When other boys were at play, young 
Joseph was busy at night school, perfecting himself in various commercial 
branches. His proficiency developed so rapidly that in 1905 he became Secre- 
tary to Charles Putzel, then tax commissioner of New York. Two years later 
he was appointed Clerk of the Topographical Bureau by the President of the 
Borough of Richmond. That this position should be given to a young man of 
only twenty years demonstrates the absolute confidence reposed in him by his 
superiors. 

In the meantime he devoted his evenings to the study of law. taking 
training at the St. Lawrence University of Brooklyn, and on October 10, 1908, 
was admitted to the bar, but did not begin the practice of his profession until 
July s, 19 10. 

He was married September 16, 1912, to Miss Anna E. Stern, and they 
devoted the next two years and a half to travel. During this period their 
beneficent influence was felt in many remote parts of the United States and 
Canada, as he has always been a zealous worker for the uplifting of his own 
race. 

In the little village of Sudbury, Ont., where there resided but ten Jewish 
families. Mr. Sanders raised sufficient funds to build a synagogue, which is 
todav known as Sharrev Shumain. This is but one incident typical of his 
enthusiasm and earnestness of purpose toward any cause which he espouses. 

He came to Detroit February 15, 1915, and within two vears had formed 
so many warm friendships that he was nominated Circuit Judge by voluntary 
petition, but owing to the unfortunate death of his father-in-law on the day 
when the petition was to have been filed, the matter was dropped at his 
request. 

Mr. Sanders is a liberal contributor to all charities, and is affiliated with 
all the prominent organizations of Detroit, among which we might mention 
tin- following: Morgcn Abraham Congregation; President Michigan Lodge. 
Progressive Order of the West; B'nai B'rith, Knights of Pythias. He is a 
thirty-second degree Mason, member of the Lawyers' Club, President of the 

Detroit Civic Betterment League and is very active in all city affairs. His 
military affiliations arc the Fiftieth Regiment. Company E, Michigan State 
Troops. 

I lis wife is a charming woman, highly accomplished and exceedingly active 

in charitable works. 

Mr. Sander- i- -till a young man. The morning -1111 of life i- still shining 
upon hi- man) activities. May both In- and Mrs. Sanders be given the full 
allotment of year- to work out the line examples of right living which their 

actions exemplify. 

ZS8 



ISIDOR SALLE 

h" the immigrant problem concerned no other people than tin- Jews, the 
question would be :iii easy one to solve. 

Rather than become ;i burden, the Jew has ever been an indefatigable 
worker, and ha- most cheerfully contributed his best powers to tin- commu- 
nity and nation of his adoption. 

While keeping true to themselves and the traditions of their ran-, they 
have nevertheless devoted themselves to the common interest of those with 
whom the) found themselves associated, regardless of race or creed. 

I'l'e '-.die Family is a notable example of useful, influential citizenship 
with which the old world has enriched the new. 

i If the fortunes and vicissitudes which beset the path of the elder brother, 
Herman Salle, we have spoken at length in a separate biography. 

[si dor Salle, il e subjeel of tin- sketch, was born in V'ilna. < luberne, Russia, 
in tss*-, and came to America in igofi lli- brother ua- at that time engaged 
in business in (anion. < Ihio, and to him young Isidor went. They have been 
associated together in the iron and metal business ever since, and have been 
wonderfully successful. At the present time their immense plant is situated at 
fronton, • Ihio, and is known under the firm name of Salle Bros. 

Mr. Salle was married to Mi-- Dora Farber of Parkersburg, W. Va . and 
thej have four tine boys, all going to school and being fitted for the positions 
of responsibility they will one day occupy. 

Mr. Salle subscribes to the Jewish Publication Society of Philadelphia, 
the Denver and Los Angeles hospitals and. like his brother, is a member of 
the ' ^\i\ Fellows, the Elks and the Chamber of Commerce. 

Both Mr. and Mr-. Salle are of great service t" the community, making 
liberal contributions to all charities, which i- one of the finest traits of fewish 
characti r. 



MORRIS SANDMEL 
"If at once you don't succeed, try, try again," seems to be the motto which 

has inspired tile career of Mr. Morris Sandmel. 

Rorn in Jatunah, Vilna, Guberne, Russia, in the winter of 1874, the son 
of Abraham Sandmel. a renowned Talmudist, the boy early realized that his 
future success could not be made in despotic Russia, so he came to America 
in November, 1903, landing in \\-w York City, where he remained for four 
week-, lie then went to visit his uncle in Dayton, t Ihio, and started out ped- 
dling a basket of notion-, but his uncle being in very poor circumstances, he 
felt it his duty to give most of his earnings toward the maintenance of his 
family. I le next found em ploy men t with a man who owned a horse and wagon, 
but this venture was not very profitable, as he was obliged to give his employer 
half of his earnings, \fter a number of weeks of the strictest economy he 
managed to save fifteen dollar-, and with this small capital and his good credit. 
which was already being established in the community, he bought a horse and 
wagon and started in business for himself. 

\fter a year of very hard work he brought from Russia his wife and two 

children, and it was certainly a time Of happy reunion when his family reached 
our shi 

After a shorl trial of the laundry business and then the fish business, he 
decided that his future success was to be found in -crap iron and metal, and 
time has proven the wisdom of his judgment, as he is today one of the leading 
dialers in this line. 

259 



The Sandmels have six children, llirec 1 oyS and three girls, all of whom 
are being well educated. 

Mr. Sandmel is very active in organization work, being Past President 
of Herch Zion Society, Past President of the Board of Education of Hebrew 
Institute of Dayton, Ohio, Past President of Achovas Acheim Society, and for 
the past three years has been President of the B'rith Acham Lodge 127, Inde- 
pendent Order Western Star. He is also President of National Work of Aliens 
and is Secretarv of the Order of B'nai Zion. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Sandmel are liberal subscribers to charities both local 
and national. 



BEN SANDS 

We have all no doubt at one time or another entered an establishment 
bent upon making a purchase. At such times we are more or less interested in 
the general appearance of the store, the size of the selection of merchandise 
in which we are interested, and the price of the goods we wish to buy. But 
nothing will so hasten the consummation of the deal as does the faith and con- 
fidence we place in the proprietor of the establishment, and upon this depends 
the success of the American business man. 

In these days of keen competition, when every merchant strives to impress 
bis customer with the superiority of his merchandise, the ordinary tradesman 
will often resort to commonplace exaggerations, and while a sale may be 
effected thereby now and then, the fundamental principles of continued whole- 
some business are overlooked. The inevitable then follows. Such a merchant's 
patrons will in the course of time dwindle away; bis business succumbs and 
finally gives way to the proprietor of more reliable and fairer methods. 

1 Ine of the most dependable jewelers and diamond brokers of Cleveland. 
Ohio, is Mr. Ben Sands, who conducts his business at [736 F.ast Ninth street. 
His commercial activities date back to about thirty-live years ago, when as a 
child be was already earning his own livelihood and paying bis way through 
school. Not only did Ben inherit his father's industrial instincts, but it was 
due to the hitter's training and sound advice that he was finally able to build up 
bis present vast enterprise and occupy an enviable position among Cleveland's 
most prominent and influential business men. 

Mr. Sands was born in Utica, X. Y.. in 1875, the son of /orach and Dinah 
Sands. At the age of nine both he and bis brother I tarry showed their aptitude 
for industrial SUCCeSS by soliciting the sale of shoe brushes and matches from 
door to door. When one of bis older brothers, who was engaged in the jew- 
elry business, saw lien's abilities along commercial lines, be immediately took 
him into his establishment, assigning at first some very menial tasks, and ad- 
vancing him as fast as bis merit'- warranted. When later this business was 
transferred to Cleveland, young Sands was taken along, being employed hen 
at a salary of five dollars a week, acting as salesman and window trimmer. 
So earnestly did Ben Sands apply himself to bis daily tasks that in a few years 
bis salary was increased to thirty-five dollars a week', and he soon saved up a 

capital of approximately $5,01 0. 

With tins amount Mr. Sands shortly afterward bought out a part of his 
brother's -lore, whereupon the present firm became known as "Hen Sands." h 

would be rather difficult to find a merchant more upright and willing to give 
the other person a square deal than Ben Sands, and it is on this account that 
bis popularity has grown ami the faith of bis customers in him lias nevei 
declined. Willi the exception of a short period of financial reverses during 
the severe panic years of ibis country, Mr. Sands has enjoyed a ven successful 

260 



career, and whatever of earthly goods he can now lay claim to is the result 
of hard and persistent work, coupled with honest business methods. 

In [898 Ben Sands married Miss Julia Jacobs, the daughter of the well- 
known and highly esteemed Abraham and Fanny Jacobs. A son was born to 
them in 11)07. who is now attending school. 

While he is deeply engrossed in his business. Mr. Sands is an active mem- 
ber of the Anshe Emeth Congregation, lie belongs to the Elks, the Moose 
and several other prominent organizations, both charitable and social. Besides 
being a liberal contributor to all of the local charities, Mr. Sands has given 
verv freely to the Mount Sinai Hospital, and it is due in a large measure to 
the benevolence of such citizens as lien Sands that Cleveland can boast of so 
beautiful a hospital as Mount Sinai. 



MORRIS SCHAFFNER 

History has been defined, "The sum of the biographies of a few strong 
men." And certain it is that much that is of profound and abiding interest to 
the nation has to do with the lives of those men who have contributed most to 
her industrial progress. 

It is doubtful if. among the many thousands of immigrants faring west- 
ward from the old world, there was a youth more resolutely and boldly seek- 
ing opportunity than Morris Schaffner. Born in Hessloch, Hessen, Germany, 
November 28, 1866, he early learned much of the business which was to be 
his life \ 
business. 

Coming to America June 18, 1881, the city of Cleveland, Ohio, admitted 
within her gates a young boy self-reliant in every liber and willing to take up 
any honest employment which came to hand. His first job was in a general 
country store in Indiana, but, not being to his liking, he sought other work, 
and found it in a meat market, as butcher's helper, which work he pursued 
diligently for nearly two years, when he decided to go into business for himself, 
despite the fact that he had no capital or influential friends, aside from that 
which his sainted uncle, Gabriel Schaffner, of Cleveland, Ohio, assisted him to. 

His first business venture was made in 1883. One year later he was joined 
by his brother, Jacob, who was associated with him under the firm name of 
Schaffner Brothers. They remained in Cleveland until 1887, when they moved 
the business to Erie. Pa. 

The remarkable growth of Schaffner Brothers Company is now an inter- 
esting bit of business history. They are one of the largest packing houses in 
the East, conducting in conjunction with their business immense stock farms, 
where they specialize in raising Shorthorn cattle. These stock farms cover a 
combined area of over one thousand acres. 

Mr. Schaffner's activities along this line have brought him in close touch 
with the various agricultural organizations of his state and community, and at 
the present time he is President of the Erie County Breeders' Association, as 
well as Director of the Erie Exposition, both of the organizations working for 
the betterment of live stock and agricultural interests. 

Like most good Jews, charity with Mr. Schaffner is a part of his religion 
and his generous contributions have alleviated much suffering. He was one 
of the founders of the B'nai B'rith Orphanage at Erie, as well as its first 
temporarv President ; and is now on the Board of Directors, as well as a 
member of the Board of Governors. He is now serving his eighth term as 
President of the Anche Chesid Temple of Erie, and was elected Second Vice 
President of District Xo. 3 of the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith. and is 

261 



also one of the Directors of the Young Men's Hebrew Association of Erie. 

Mr. Schaffner is President of the Schaffner-Gleason Lumber Co. of Penn- 
side, Pa., and of the Schaffner Bros. Co. of Erie, Pa. He is also prominent 
in the business world of his home town, as well as taking an active part in 
politics, being affiliated with the Democratic Party, and served the city of Erie 
for three vears as Fire Commissioner before the commission form of govern- 
ment was inaugurated. 

He was married on November 28, 1886, to Miss Carrie Schuster of Erie, 
Pa. They have three children, all grown and occupying business and social 
positions. Mr. Schaffner has just attained to that age of mature experience 
when his advice and precepts are most valuable to his contemporaries. 

May he be given many more years of usefulness and inspiration to the 
young generation. 



CHARLES H. SCHAENGOLD 

Cincinnati, Ohio, boasts of an Orthodox institution which is in every 
way a model to be copied by both Jewish and Gentile organizations. 

Its spotless cleanliness and the pleasant, homelike atmosphere surround- 
ing it excite the admiration of every one who comes within its walls. We 
refer to the Home for the Aged, the remarkable success of which is the life 
work of its President, Mr. Charles H. Schaengold. 

Mr. Schaengold is a man of rare executive ability, who makes a success 
of anv enterprise to which he directs his energy and enthusiasm. Therefore, 
when a number of Orthodox Jewish business men decide to open a home for 
the aged, they naturally turned to Mr. Schaengold as the person best fitted 
to carry the project through success full}'. 

Mr. Schaengold was born July 30, 1872, in Warsaw, Poland, the son of 
Moses Wolf and Zippe Schaengold, he being one of a family of seven children, 
consisting of six sons and one daughter. 

He came to America in 1888, and during the first six weeks became a 
familiar figure on the streets of New York, where he peddled matches. He 
then went to Cincinnati, where for some time he peddled merchandise, and 
then having acquired a small capital, he opened a shoe store in Covington, 
Ky. A year later he went to Brookville, Ind., but in a short time returned to 
Cincinnati and went into the clothing business. This initial venture has devel- 
oped into a chain of stores consisting of the "Underselling Store," Fifth and 
Plum streets, Cincinnati ; "The Dunlap Clothing Shop," Vine and Arcade 
streets; "The Worthmore Clothing Co.," 427 Vine street; "Fountain Clothing 
Shop," 330 West Fifth street; "The Worthmore Clothing Shop,'' 136 Hay 
street, Hamilton, Ohio ; "The Yerybest Clothing Co.," 302 West Market street, 
Louisville. Ky. Mr. Schaengold also has large interests in moving picture 
houses in various cities. 

On July 30, 1893, Mr. Schaengold was married to Miss Yetta Kessel, and 
they have two sons, Sam S. and Sol M. 

In addition to the Home of the Aged, Mr. Schaengold is former President 
of Schachna Synagogue, a prominent Orthodox institution of Cincinnati, lie 
is also a Trustee of the Reading Road Temple and a prominent member of 
the Business Men's Club and the Chamber of Commerce. 



262 



MICHAEL SCHONBERG 

For many years psychologists and students of human nature have tried in 
vain to decide whether man's besl abilities were derived from heredity or edu- 
cation. 

Tlu- great army of self-made men who have overcome seemingly unsur- 
mountable obstacles without the aid of education would seem to speak volumes 
for the influence of native ability and heredity. 

A prominent example is Mr. Michael Schonberg, who was horn in < iorlitz. 
Austria. May 1st, [863. Mis father. Julius Schonberg, being one of the lead- 
ing lawyers and TalmudistS of that section. I lis mother was also a woman of 

strong character and one of the most kindly and charitable personalities in tlieir 

native town. 

Mr. Schonberg came to America at the age of nineteen and for the first 
three years peddled drj goods and small merchandise in 1 leveland, ' thio. 

Later, he managed to buy a horse and wagon, and continued to peddle in 
the country for the next four years, when lie was SO 1111 fortunate as to become 

very ill and lost everything he had saved. 

After his recovery, he went to Newark, 1 (hio, with hut 90 cents in the 
world, and for the next six months sold writing paper, envelopes and pencils, 
lie gradually accumulated enough to bring his family from Cleveland to New- 
ark, and also to buy a horse and wagon with which he started to peddle junk. 

Shortly after he accepted a position with a scrap iron and metal concern, 
where he acted as buyer and salesman, and proved so valuable that after the 
first year he was taken into the linn on a profit-sharing plan. 

In lNci^ he decided to go into business for himself, and he has prospered 
to such an extent that he is today one of the largest scrap iron and metal mer- 
chants in the country. 

Mr. Schonberg was married to Miss Toha I'rankel of Cleveland. March 3. 
[883, and they had a family of three hoys and four girls, who are all happih 
married. However, they were so unfortunate as to lose the beloved wife and 
mother by death, and her loss is still keenly felt, not only by her immediate 
family, hut by the community at large. 

Mr. Schonberg is a member and chief contributor to Congregation t >sha\ 
Israel of Newark, and is also active in the Masons, h'.lks. 1','rith Abraham, 
Chamber of Commerce, Dramatic < trder of Knights of (.'ores, and all Jewish 
Charities, including the Sanitariums of Denver and Los Angeles. 



JACOil SCHORIN 

Mr. Jacob Schorin is still a young man. hut. judging from his success jn 
both public and private life in the brief space of time which he spent in this 
country, we can well expect wonderful results for the future. He was horn in 
\ istki, Mohilever < iubernia, Russia, on tin- 23d of Teheth. iNSo. as the son of 
Hirsh and Rebecca Schorin. Ilis uncle. Talman Motlin, was Rabbi in Homel, 
There also are other distinguished relatives. However, all this availed him hut 
little, when, at the age of twenty-two. he landed on these shores. He went to 
Pittsburgh, where he became a peddler, and for five wars sold all sorts of 
merchandise, until he found enough funds at his disposal to come to Akron. O.. 
and embark in business for himself, lie opened a store, which he is still con- 
ducting, and under the linn name of I. Schorin he has heen supplying the 
population of Akron with gents' furnishings and clothing. This store was a 
success from the start and Mr. Schorin is able to trace its growth almost from 
day to day. 

?6.1 



Mr. Schorin finds leisure to accept the honorable position of president of 
the Bowery Street Congregation, and he is one of the directors of the Akron 
Federation of Charities and the Central Relief Committee. He is an active 
member of nearly every important Jewish organization in the city and a liberal 
donor to every Jewish cause of importance. 

He was married on June 24, 1906, to Golde Mogilevitz, who is a descend- 
ant of a well-known Grodno family. He has many relatives and he saw to it 
that all were made financially independent ; he even brings up the children of 
his wife's sister. He is Orthodox. 

From his Pittsburgh days Mr. Schorin retained an interest in the Hebrew 
Institute of that city and he still contributes to its maintenance. 



LEON SCHREIBER 

The pioneer has always been obliged to pay a heavy price for leadership. 
Whether he blazes a new trail into the trackless forest or develops new avenues 
in the heart of commerce, he is obliged to experience privation and sometimes 
the loss of friends and the misunderstanding of the world. Yet the world owes 
everything to these leaders. 

Such a man is Mr. Leon Schreiber, who was born in Chaplie, near Sambor 
Galicia. December 7, 1870, the son of Hirsh and Hena Schreiber. He comes 
from an intellectual family, his uncle having been a Rabbi of note in bis native 
land. 

Mr. Schreiber came to America in 1887 and found his first occupation as 
cloak operator. He remained in New York for two years, and then went to 
Chicago, where he first sold insurance, and then a line of Singer sewing 
machines. He returned to New York in 1899, but four years later went to 
Cleveland, where he held the position of foreman for H. Black Company. 

Here he remained until he had saved enough capital to start in the liquor 
business, when he started up his own establishment at 2802 Scoville avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio, and has been exceedingly successful. 

Mr. Schreiber was married in Chicago October 28, 1892, to Miss Mollie 
Lieder, who came from Bialystok, Russia. They have seven children, six sons 
and one daughter, all of whom have been brought up with a thorough knowl- 
edge and respect for Jewish beliefs and traditions. They are all well edu- 
cated, the third son being a student of law. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Schreiber are active in many organizations, particularly 
those relating to Jewish betterment, and contribute most liberally to various 
charities. 

Mr. Schreiber is a member of the Progressive Order of the West, and the 
Galician Unterstuetzungs-Verein. 



BERNARD SCHWARTZ 

( )ne of the most prominent cigar manufacturers of Detroit, Mich and a 
man who deserves the high repute he has gained among his friends and 
acquaintances on account of his rugged and persistent honesty is Mr Bernard 
Schwartz. Born in Oshtchiluga, Poland, in the month of April 1872 he is 
the son of Moses and Gerta Schwartz. At the age of fourteen he determined 
to change bis lot by emigrating to the New World, and he landed in Montreal. 

264 



Canada, where he wenl to work immediately as a beginner in the <-i^a r trade. 

There was scarcely an opportunity f ■ >r him to ^;iin any education in the 
country of his birth, so when he landed in Canada, he entered an evening 

school, where he learned the rudiments of modern 

education, while supporting himself 1 • \ work at the 
cigar factory, earning $1.50 per week. Four years 
later his weekly wage was increased to $4, when he 
d t" come to Detroit, Mich., again assuming 
work at the same trade. After staying at work for 
some time, he began to save as much as he could, 
and when lie reached the sum of $75, some twenty- 
three years ago, he opened a factory, which was 
a success from the very start, and which has ulti- 
mately grown to its present proportions, giving em- 
ployment to 1511 people. 

Mr. Schwartz is a man of civic interest, who 
belongs to all local charities and is a great contrib- 
utor to every worthy cause. IK' i- a very active 

member of the Temple Beth-El and was repeatedly 

offered office there. hi religious affairs Mr. Brrnonl Sehifuta 

Schwartz believes in Reform Judaism. 

< >n March 26, [895, Mr. Schwartz was married to Miss Esther Rothstein, 
and he is the lather of two sons, Xorman ami Theodore, and one daughter. 
Yetta. Mr. Moses Schwartz, father of Mr. Bernard Schwartz, a man of high 
culture and intelligence, resides with his son. 




BENJAMIN B. SCHWARTZ 



There is a universal law of compensation which exacts an even measure 
of sorrow for every joy; a law that rewards or penalizes in proportion to our 
service to mankind. Every action finds its balance in tin- scale of this eternal 
justice, and writes itself indelibly into the lives of our associates as well as 
ourselves. 

If vmi were to inquire into the remarkable success achieved by Mr. Ben- 
jamin 1'.. Schwartz you would have to traverse not only the length and breadth 
of his own state, hut far distant sections of the country as well, in order to 
realize the extent of his charitable activities. 

Only after visiting the Denver Sanitariums, the New York Emigration 
Society, the Jewish hospitals and many other institutions would you begin to 
appreciate why a wise providence has made Mr. Schwartz custodian of such 
vast interests which he is so generously dispensing for the good of mankind. 

lie was horn in Ivia. Yilna. Guberne, Russia, in April, 1883, and came to 
America at the age of 17. Landing in New York, he found employment as a 
cap maker and during the four years in which he pursued this occupation his 
salary was raised from $7.00 to $20.00 a week. He then went to Detroit, 
where his brother-in-law, Mr. Louis Smith, used his influence in his behalf, 
enabling him to go into business without any capital. 

The first three years were very hard ones, hut Mr. Schwartz had able 
assistance in the person of his wife, whom he married in Detroit, February 19, 
icic/i. and who, before her marriage, was Miss Bella Smith. 

Graduallv the business began to prosper and they are now rewarded by 
having one of the largest commission businesses in the city of Detroit. 

Now that their financial future is assured. Mrs. Schwartz turns her ability 
to the promotion of the various charitable organizations, in which she and her 

265 



husband are interested, and she and her husband are also well known in the 
social life of Detroit. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz have three children, two boys and one girl, all 
quite small, who will doubtless not only inherit the fortune of their parents, but 
their sterling qualities of character, which will prompt them to emulate their 
generous and humanitarian treatment of the unfortunate. 

Mr. Schwartz is a member of the Congregation B'nai Israel, B'nai Abra- 
ham and Talmud Torah. 

Honesty and perseverance are the two qualities which Mr. Schwartz feels 
are most essential to a successful business career and which have contributed 
largely to his own brilliant achievements. 



EDWARD E. SCHWARTZ 

Few of the younger men of the country are better known than Edward E. 
Schwartz of Cleveland, who has a wide circle of friends among his business 
and social acquaintances. His keen and intelligent interest in all the nation's 
policies, and his sympathy with all classes of people have placed him in the 
front rank of the rising generation of influential Americans. Mr. Schwartz's 
ability and integrity are always to be relied upon, a fact which makes him a 
valued member of many of the largest organizations of the country, as the 
Congregation of Euclid Avenue Temple, the Masons, Elks and Knights of 
Pythias. His judgment of men is instant and accurate and he has long been 
a leader in business and political life. 

Mr. Schwartz is a son of Emanuel and Mollie Schwartz, and was born 
on September 10, 1SS0, in Cleveland, where his father was engaged in the 
retail grocery trade. He was educated in the public schools, and at the age 
of fifteen left school and started to work in a soap factory for $20 a month. 
At sixteen he took a step upward and became a bookkeeper, while his weekly 
envelope now contained $9. Later he joined forces with the N. J. Rich Knit- 
ting Co., with which he was associated for ten years. As an employe he was 
both reliable and persevering and before he went into business for himself he 
had seen his salary grow from $5 per week to $2,500 per year. 

At present he is a member of the firm of Green, Haas, Schwartz Co., 
manufacturers of knitted goods, and which does a business of a million dollars 
a year and ships its goods to all parts of the world. Mr. Schwartz's success 
in business has been over the open, straight road, and he passes this advice on 
to beginners in the work: "Be faithful to your employers. Select the line 
you are best fitted for and stick to it. Be honest and industrious." 

On April 4, 191 1, Edward E. Schwartz was married to Miss Anna Fryer, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram M. Fryer. Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz have two 
children, both girls. 

Mrs. Schwartz, a charming and accomplished young woman, is almost rs 
well known in the city as her husband. Their many friends are always wel- 
come at their home, and there, too, the less fortunate always find some one 
to champion their cause. Both Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz are greatly interested 
in all progressive movements and also contribute generously to all the local 
charitable organizations, to the Mount Sinai Hospital and to many branches of 
welfare work. 

The rise of Edward Schwartz from a worker in a factory to the position 
of partner and Secretary in an immense manufacturing business has been very 
rapid, unusually s< > even in this land of opportunity. Business has run smoothly 
for him by reason of his perseverance, good judgment and self-control. Un- 
doubtedly the future holds in store much that is good for this American of 
1 ourage and integrity, who makes it a rule to accomplish the purpose for which 
he sets out. 

266 



IGNACE SCHWARTZ 

Mr. Ignace Schwartz, of the firm of Schwartz & Klein, wholesale liquors, 
.(Hi East Federal street, Youngstown, < >hi<>. is the type of the self-made man 
who started at the lowest rung of the ladder of human ambition and ulti- 
matel) limls li i n 1 --c-1 f the owner of a highly prosperous business, enjoying an 
unblemished reputation and admired and beloved by his fellow citizens. He 
came to America on May 17. [886, when i n - 1 fifteen years of age, he having 
been born in Tokay, Hungary, on April 8, 1871. He landed in New York 
and immediately went to work for a living. 

Tlis first occupation was that of an operator, later changing it to that of 
a peddler, fruit dealer and salesman of gents' furnishings. He stayed in New 
York for only six months, then going to Philadelphia and from there he came, 
in 1903, to Youngstown, where he became engaged in the liquor business, in 
which he is concerned at present. 

Mr. Schwartz's charitable connections arc many and varied. He is an 
active member and was the President and Treasurer of the Federated Chari- 
ties hi Youngstown, was twice President of the Congregation Children of 
Israel, President of the Federal Lodge of the Independent 1 trder P.'rith Sho- 
lom, a member nt' the Prioress l lull ami a good man) social organizations too 
numerous to lie mentioned, lie is a good Hebrew scholar, having had the 
training of a Yeshiba Bochur in his early days, and he is very interested in 
the propagation of the study of the Hebrew language and Jewish education in 
general. 

( in August 17. [897, In- was united in marriage to Miss Pauline Klein, who 
i^ of Hungarian descent, and they are the parents of two accomplished daugh- 
ters, I lelena E. and Regina. 

Mrs. Schwartz i^ President of the Ladies' Aid Society and very interested 

in the social and communal work of her husband. 



NATHAN AND JACOB SCHWARTZ 

ll i^ most interesting to relate the life histories of two brothers who 
came to America within a few years of each other and whose business interests 
have been practically identical since that lime. 

We refer to Nathan and Jacob Schwartz, proprietors of tin- linn of 
Schwartz Brothers, dealers in bags and burlap. They were born in Yilna. 
Guberne, Russia, the -mis of Joseph ami Malka Schwartz. Nathan came to 
America in [909 and Jacob four years later. Both came direct to Chelsea. 
Ma"., ami lor some time worked in a bag and burlap shop, learning all they 
possibl) could regarding the business, with the idea of going into business 

for themselves. This they did a few years later, ami their venture has been 
an unqualified success. 

They were both married in Chelsea, Mass.. and each has one child. They 

are members of the Russian Orthdox Congregation and Minxter Societ] of 
sea. 

t Ine of the Finest attributes of Jewish character i-. generosity in matters 

of charity, and in this regard Schwartz Brothers are no exceptions, as they 

give most liberally to all worth) causes appealing to them tor aid. 



267 



JOSEPH SELIK 

Life is so full of complexities, has so many sides and phases, that the 
man who concentrates his entire time and thought in one channel loses much 
of his versatility. 

The really great man of his time is he who can direct his energies into 
all the worthy experiences and affairs of life and at the same time not lose that 
concentration upon the main issues, which is so necessary to a permanent and 
worth-while career. 

Such a man is Mr. Joseph Selik of Detroit, Mich., who was born in 
Grodno. Russia, in the year 1872. His father was a hardware merchant and 
Jewish scholar. 

Before coming to America Mr. Selik was owner of a factory where 
"Selikowitz Knives of Grodno" were made. This business was flourishing 
until the war with Japan started, when, conditions being rather unfavorable, 
he was advised to sell his business and come to America. 

Landing in New York in June, 1903, he was very unfortunate in being 
unable to find work, so after four weeks' fruitless search he was advised to 
go to the removal office and from there he was sent to Detroit. Here he 
found employment in Ford's automobile works. Following this he was con- 
nected for four years with the Burroughs Adding Machine Company, but 
during this time the spark of ambition to be in business for himself never died, 
so in a barn back of his house Mr. Selik started a small shop and devoted all 
his spare time to the making of tools. Here he was assisted by his brother, 
Bernard, until the business grew to such proportions that they both could 
devote all their time to it. They then bought a lot on Twenty-fourth street and 
erected the present plant, where they do sub-contracting for the United States 
government and also handle a large individual business. 

This history would not be complete without special mention of Mr. Selik's 
home life, which is ideal in every respect. Flis wife, before her marriage, was 
Miss Rachel Avnet. They were married in Russia in 1901, two years before 
Mr. Selik came to America, and have six children, whom they are thoroughly 
educating. In addition to the regular academic studies thev are being taught 
all the fundamentals of Jewish scholarship and receiving instruction in music. 

One daughter, Rebecca, although still a young girl in high school, is a 
thoroughly accomplished violinist and has made many public appearances 
which have received flattering notice. 

Mr. and Mrs. Selik are firm believers in Jewish education, and both are 
devoting much time and money to the promotion of various Jewish move- 
ments. However, their sympathies are so broad that they encompass charities 
of every creed and religion, both local and national, including sanitariums in 
Denver. 

Mr. Selik is President of the Hebrew Hospital Association of Detroit, 
former President of Congregation Mishkin Israel, is a member of Congrega- 
tion Agudas Achim, Vice President of the Progressive Order of the West, 
member of Michigan Lodge Varner Society, former President of B'nai Zion 
and American Publican Society. 



SAM W. SELKER 

The rise of Sam W, Selker from a worker in a factory to the position 
of partner in an immense business has been very rapid, unusually so, even in 
tbi< land of many opportunities. 

Business has run smoothly For him l>\ reason of his excellent judgment, 
perseverance and self-control. Undoubtedly die future holds much in store 

268 



for a man with such qualities of courage and integrity who has never failed to 
accomplish the purpose for which he sets out. 

["o confine what could easily lie made a lengthy story within due limits, 
it is only possible to touch upon the most vital points in the biography of 
.\ir. Selker. lie was born December 22, [887, in Griva Lumzer. I'bern. Rus- 
sian Poland, the son of Esor Selker. When but a young lad of six months 
he came to America with his parents. Through their efforts and good judg- 
ment be was allowed to remain in school until the age of seventeen, and in 
this be bad an advantage over many other boys who are obliged to light their 
way with practically no education to assist them. 

When his school days were over he obtained employment at the factory, 
but later had opportunity to engage in the junk business with bis present part- 
ner, although at that time he had no interest in the business. However, he 
showed such marked ability that he soon proved himself indispensable to the 
firm and was taken into full partnership. They now do a verv extensive 
business in fertilizers, hides and junk, under the firm name of Wernick & 
Selker. Fostoria. Ohio. 

Mr. Selker was married July S. [916, to Miss Bessie Pensky. and they 
have one baby girl. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Selker are most generous in their gifts to charities, 
not only local, but also in other cities, including the Denver Sanitarium. They 
are also members of Sbaava Teve. Toledo, Ohio. 



MAX SEGAL 

It cannot be too often repeated that it is not the so-called blessings of 
life, its sunshine and calms that make men. but its rugged experiences, its 
storms, tempests and trials. Earlv poverty, especially, is emphatically a bless- 
ing in disguise. The school of poverty graduates the ablest pupils. It does 
more, perhaps, than anything else to develop the energetic, self-reliant traits 
of character, without which the highest ability makes sorry work of life's 
battles. 

Such was the experience of Mr. Max Segal, who was born in Sager, Rus- 
sia. March 15. 1858. the son of Moses and Anna Segal, his father being a 
fanner in that district. 

He came to America in September. 1889, and having no funds nor friends 
to assist him, peddled tinware for some time. He then became interested in 
the junk business and established a small yard, which has grown to such pro- 
portions that he has taken his son. Sam L.. into partnership with him, and they 
are todav operating their large establishment under the firm name of Segal 
& Son at Chillicothe. Ohio. 

Mr. Segal was married to Miss Rebecca Bloom, and they have eight chil- 
dren, five boys and three girls. 

As stated above. Sam is in business with his father, and is affiliated with 
many prominent fraternal and civic organizations, being President of Chilli- 
cothe Lodge of Bnai B'rith and President of the Jewish Welfare Board. He 
is a former member of the City Council and one of the prominent members 
of the Chillicothe War Council. The second son, Ben M., is Regimental 
Sergeant-Major of the 135th Field Artillery of the 37th Division, stationed 
somewhere in France. He enlisted two months after the United States de- 
clared war. The third son. Abraham L.. enlisted about the same time and is 
a private in Company K, 156th U. S. Infantry. Rainbow Division, stationed 
somewhere in France. Henry C. is a student at the Ohio State University, 
Columbus. Ohio, and Albert E.. student at Chillicothe High School. 

269 



Rose M. i- Private Secretar) to Districl Judge Westenhaver, Cleveland, 
Ohio; Minnie A. is in the office of Attorney John A. Carpenter, Cleveland, 
i (hio : and Frances I .. is a student .-it < Ihio State I rniversitj at i lolumbus, < Ihio. 

Mr. Segal, St., is a prominent < Idd Fellow and in matters of charity is 
iiiii-i generous in li i - gifts, ^mong the organizations to which he contributes, 
we might mention the ( leveland < Irphans' Asylum, Denver Jewish Consump- 
tive Relief Societ) and other Denver consumptive hospitals. He is a Director 
of the National Consumptive Relief Society, with headquarters in Denver. 

Only coming generations will be able to estimate the g I which has 

resulted from the patriotic, philanthropic spirit which has given to the world 
so much relief from suffering and has sent his sons out to fight Liberty's 
battles. 



MICHELL SESEN 

Prominent in the business and civic life of Lynn, Mass.. is the Candia 
Iron and Metal Co., owned and managed b) Mr. Michel! Sesen. 

Mr. Sesen was born in Volina, Gubeme, Russia, in February, 1874, and 
came to America in 1896. Landing in New York, he worked in a milk store 
for the meager sum of $1.25 per week and board. Later he decided to learn 
the tailoring business, and in order to do so was obliged to pa) five dollars in 
cash and give his services without remuneration. After learning the trade, 
he received a number of advances in salar) and continued in this line for six 

wars. Me next spent two years in buying and selling junk through Xew 

Hampshire. Then deciding to try farming, he spent the next five years with- 
out meeting with enough success to warrant making agriculture his life work, 

so he came to Lynn, Mass.. and went into the present line of cotton and leather 
scrap, where he is today doing a very large business and is counted among 

the successful business men of the city. 

Mr. Sesen was married in New York, November 14. [898, to Miss Etta 
Fadeske, and they have five children, three hoys and two Ljirls. Jack is in 

business with his father, while the balance of the children are going to school. 
All of them are accomplished musicians. 

Mr. Sesen is not content to selfish!} enjoy his own good fortune, but is 

very liberal in his gifts to all charities and is a regular attendant of the < htho- 

dox Congregation, of which he is Past Secretary and Treasurer, lie is also 

a prominent member of Independent < 'rder of I'.'rith Abraham. 



MORRIS SHANE 

One of the man; foreign-born lews who have become Vmericans In 
adoption, and whose name stands out prominent!) as a progressive business 
man. is Mr. Morris Shane, who was born m Moscow, Russia 

Although his earl) boyh I was spent m that dismal land when- no few 

ever realizes the blessings of liberty, he allowed no combination of circum- 
stances to be sir,, ml; enough to thwart bis >.r 

\t tin' age of twelve years, when most boys an- entire!) dependent upon 
their parents, young Moms landed in New Yoik Harbor, all alone 11, knew 

that a number of people from his native land bad come to America, and be 

ted out to try to tin, 1 some friendl) and familial face He managed I 

:7" 



lo Dayton, when- he had the address of i<- old friend-., but was unable t" 

find am tr;ni- of them, and being without money, was forced to seek some 
son of employment. 

Mi- firsi job was in an iron works, where the young boj did the work 
of a man for onl) $2.75 per week, He remained there nine months, and then 
found employment in a ^la-.- factor} at $7 per week. After two <>r three 
years of hard work of various kinds the qualities of energj and thrift which 
he inherited from his parents asserted themselves, and he saved up enough 
monej tu go iiitu business for himself, That he lias been unusually successful 
can be easil) ascertained from any of the business fraternity in Dayton, where 
he stands in high regard. His business is operated under the firm name "t' 
Greater Dayton [ron Metal Company. 

Mr. Sham- was married to Mi-- Dora Burd, and together they do ;i great 
deal hi good among the local charities in Dayton. 

Mr. Shane is also an active member of the < Mil Fellows, Knights of 
I \ thias and Eagles. 



MOSES SHAPIRO 

There art- ten nun who acquire wealth to one who wiselj and righteously 
api lies it. 

I'ntil tlu- wealth acquired be again diverted into channels for the exten- 
sion of human happiness and civilization, unless it is handled as a sacred trust 
rather than a permanent possession, its acquirement detracts from the respecta- 
bility of the 111.111 or woman who possesses it. 

Jewish literature and historj testify to the fact that the Jews have ever 
been wise and generous in philanthropj : indeed, in their Talmud it is regarded 
rather as a duty than a virtue. 

This is well exemplified in the lives of Mr. and Mrs. Moses Shapiro, who 
are constantly devoting time and money to the alleviation of suffering and to 
increase the opportunities of the young. 

Mr. Shapiro was born in Kiofsky, Guberne. Russia. April it. 1868. where 
his father, fsia Shapiro, was a successful merchant and a man possessing a 
high uriU-r of scholarship. 

lie came to Vmerica in the fall of [891, landing in Boston, Mass.. where 
In peddled < I r \ goods fur the first year, lie then sold fruit fur the four fol- 
lowing years, but decided tu go into the rag business. 

Mis first venture was in Buffalo, X. Y.. with a partner, hut in 1900 they 
dissolved partnership ami he continued alone. I lis business has grown enor- 
mously, enabling him tn give his children every advantage of education ami 
position. 

lie was fortunate in his marriage tn Miss Esther Rockloff, which oc- 
curred in Buffalo in March, 1893, as she has been an ideal wife ami mother 
tu their eight children, besides finding time tu devote herself tu social and 
charitable activities, "i which she is the recognized leader in their circle. 

( )f their eight children, Joseph and [sidor are in business with their father. 

1 1 \nian is in business fur himself, and Sophie is married tu a clothing merchant 
of Buffalo. The balance >'i the children are still in school. 

Mr. Shapiro is a member of Temple Beth El, B'nai B'rith, Talmud Torah, 
ami contributes liberall) tu both national and local charities, including the 
Manhattan Social Benefit Association, Queen City Benefit Association, Feder- 
ation of fewish Charities, Denver ami Los Angeles hospitals and all the 
Vishivas in Europe and America. 

271 



SAMUEL SHAPIRO 

i ine author has likened the Jewish nation to a widow who has been robbed 
of all her children. She patiently awaits their return, and finally they come 
from all corners of the earth, bearing fame and wealth to comforl her. 

In a figurative sense this is true, inasmuch as the Jew has "made good - ' 
in every nation which he has favored with Ids adoption. 

Under the must adverse circumstances was the career of Mr. Samuel 
Shapiro launched in this country. 

lie was born in Vilna, Guberne, Russia, in December, [88o, the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Chatcha Shapiro, the father a successful and well-educated 
merchant. 

lie came to America in September, [903, and landed in New York with 
but one shilling, si\ pence, a very small capital with which to start life in an 
alien land. 

Mis first employment was in a waist factory, where he was obliged to 
work for nothing for four weeks, and after that time received $3 per week. 

lie was gradually raised to $6 per week, Imt owing to failing eyesight, was 
obliged to give tip his position and resume his old occupation of carpentering, 

which he had followed in Europe. 

lie then went into the delicatessen business and was rather unfortunate 
in this venture, losing all his money, so he had to go hack to the carpenter 
trade, at which In- worked for one year. 

The smouldering ambition to be in business for himself once more took 

definite form and he again opened a delicatessen shop, where he remained five 
years, this time being very successful. 

Deciding that there were more opportunities in the iron and metal husi- 

ucss, in- sold out. and going to Middletown, Pa., started buying and selling 
junk. This move was a very wise one. as has been proven by the large meas- 
ure of success which has crowned his later efforts. 

Mr. Shapiro operates this business in connection with a partner under 

the firm name of the Middletown Iron and Metal Company, and also owns the 
Palace Steam Laundry, another profitable concern. 

Mr. Shapiro was married July 3, 1906, to Nachanka Zuckerman of New 
York City, and they have live children, all going to school and studying music 

The Shapiros are very active in philanthropic movements, contributing to 
all charities, including the Immigration Society of New York, • 'Id Age Home 
of New York, and Yishivas. 

Mr. Shapiro is a member of the Odd Fellows, Independent Order of 
IVrith Abraham and the Congregation of Middletown. 



ABRAHAM SHAW 
The world judges the character of a community l>\ thai of its repn 

live citi/ens and yields its tribute of admit. ttiou and respect for the Renins. 

learning or virtues of these guiding spirits of civic life. 

It is therefore propel that a just celebrity should In' given to those men 

who are distinguished in their day ami generation that they, living, may enjoy 
the approbation of their contemporaries, as well as that of a grateful 
Also thai the young may ever have before them these worthy examples for 
their regard and emulation. 

Such a man is \Krahatn Shaw of Cleveland, < >hio, who operates an im- 
mense iron and metal yard at <>'<< hast Si\t\ seventh Street, as well as |o,,kitiL; 

after large real estate interests. 



Ik- was burn March 15. 18(13, in Sczagcrm. Russia, and came to America 
when twenty-one years of age. Prior to coming to this country he was a 
grain dealer, but having a very bad year in Russia, owing to too much rain, 
and being advised by a brother of the many opportunities which the western 
world offered, he decided to try his fortunes in the United States. 

Upon his arrival he started to peddle notions, matches and dry goods in 
Phcenixville, Pa. In Pottstown and Shenandoah he met with indifferent suc- 
cess, having started a small picture frame store in the latter town, where he 
lost part of his savings, owing to a miners' strike. For six months afterward 
he peddled in Wilkesbarre, Pa., then went to Hazleton, Pa., and opened another 
picture frame store. Fifteen months later he moved his business to Williams- 
port, Pa., and was doing well when a flood came and most of his surplus was 
again swept away. 

Then he came to Cleveland, where he opened another picture frame store, 
and this time fortune smiled upon him, as he was very successful and con- 
tinued the business for nearly fourteen years, branching out into the manufac- 
ture of picture frames. 

In 1900 he decided to go into the iron business, and bringing to this ven- 
ture the same integrity and rare business ability which has characterized his 
entire career, it is not strange that his business has grown to enormous 
proportions. 

He also owns much valuable real estate, including a block on Wade Park 
avenue and a third interest in a i6j/2-acre allotment in Euclid village. 

Mr. Shaw was married December 24, 1890. to Miss Jennie Blasberg, and 
their five daughters are all well educated and a great comfort and assistance to 
their father. 

Mrs. Shaw died some years ago, and her great loss is still felt most keenly 
by her family, to whom her gentle personality and steadfast love were a con- 
stant source of inspiration. The daughter Sarah is now her father's house- 
keeper, Bessie and Olyn are both assisting their father in his office, and Mollie 
and Miriam will soon graduate from high school. 

As might be expected of a man of Mr. Shaw's sterling character, he is 
very charitable and contributes liberally to all worthy causes. He is a member 
of Reis Madresh Agodel, Eighty-second Street Temple. Knights of Pythias 
and the B'nai B'rith, besides being a patron of the Federation of Jewish Chari- 
ties and the Old Age Flome. 



LOUIS SHERMAN 

When the business history of our country shall be finally written, one of 
the most remarkable features which will be emphasized is the facility with 
which Jewish immigrants to our shores have assimilated our manners and cus- 
toms and at the same time have maintained an individuality all their own. 
This has accounted for some of the phenomenal business successes which have 
crowned their efforts in a seemingly impossible period of time. 

The life of Mr. Louis Sherman affords a fitting example of this kind, as 
he is still a very young man, but has arrived at a stage of prosperity which 
wotdd ordinarily occupy the allotted three score years and ten. 

Mr. Sherman was born in Mjnsker, Guberne, Russia, October 15, 1884, 
the son of Benny and Sarah Sherman, his father being a prominent cattle 
dealer. He came to America in the fall of 1903, landing in Xew York, where 
he began to work at the carpenter trade, which he had learned in Russia. He 
continued for three and one-half years, during which time his salary was 
almost trebled. 

Having saved a small amount of capital, he went to St. Marys, Ohio, 

273 



■and opened a junk yard. After two years he decided to specialize in whole- 
sale iron and also opened a furniture store, which he is today successfully 
operating under the title of Empire Furniture Company. 

Mr. Sherman was married in 1907 to Miss Becky Manowitz, and they 
have two small sons, hoth going to school. 

There are hundreds outside the family of Mr. Sherman who have had 
reason to rejoice in his success, as both himself and wife are liberal contrib- 
utors to charity of both local and national character. Among the institutions 
of which they are patrons, we wish to mention the Denver and Los Angeles 
sanitariums. 

That a man with such meager opportunities should have achieved such a 
high position in the business and social life of his community in such a short 
period of time should be an inspiration to others starting in life under cir- 
cumstances which appear somewhat unfavorable. There is no man in St. 
Marys whose opinions are more respected and whose citizenship is more val- 
ued than Mr. Sherman's. 



JOSEPH SHERMAN AND SAMUEL BEAN 

A number of years ago there was formed in Detroit, Mich., a partnership 
which has resulted in two prosperous business firms, the Monroe Paper Stock 
Company at 76-78 Macomb street, and the Michigan Waste Paper Company at 
133 Brush street. 

The men who organized and developed these concerns are Joseph Sher- 
man and Samuel Bean. Both are the most progressive type of Russian Jew, 
coming to America at an early age and winning their way to affluence by sheer 
pluck and ability. 

Mr. Sherman tried a number of occupations and locations before he per- 
manently located in Detroit, one venture taking him into Africa, where he 
was unsuccessful and was given financial assistance by his family to return. 

Mr. Bean's first experience was in the junk business, and he has not devi- 
ated, although when starting in for himself he had but five dollars, borrowed 
capital, and at the time the partnership was formed Mr. Sherman's sole finan- 
cial assets amounted to $15. The history of their success should be sufficient 
proof of the fact that determination and ability are more necessarv than 
capital. 

Both men are married; Mr. Bean to Miss Ida Sherman, sister of his part- 
ner, and Mr. Sherman to Miss Annie Zemalsky. 

There are seven children in each family, all of whom are receiving liberal 
educations. 

The wives of these men are very active in the various social and charitable 
movements in their circle and are most generous in their gifts to all worthy 
causes. While they are particularly interested in movements for Jewish bet- 
terments, as, for instance, the Hebrew Protective Association, they are very 
liberal in their views and give largely without consideration of race or creed. 

Both families represent ideal types of American citizenship. 



27-4 



ABRAHAM SHEWITZ 

Then- is no element entering into our composite national fabric which has 
been of more practical strength and value than that contributed by the- Jews. 

Tlir\ arc the captains of commerce, the bulwark of the merchandising 
world. 

Thousands of them have sought our shores and without financial backing 
have erected giant monuments to enterprise and thrift which will endure 
through many generations of posterity. 

Such a man is Abraham Shewitz, who was horn in Kosova, Grodno. 
Guberne, Russia, December 15, [878. lie inherited his commercial instinct 
from his father, who was a merchant of his native city, as well as a man ol 
considerable scholarship. 

He came to America in Max, [892, and arrived in Detroit. Mich., with 
but ten dollars capital with which to start life in the new land. 

The first employment that presented itself was with a shoemaker, and 
this Mr. Shewitz promptly accepted, although the salary was very small. 
However, neither this, which soon advanced to $10 per week, nor his next 
employment in a coat factory proved to his liking, so he purchased a small 
Stock of dns> goods and started selling it. Here he found a proper avenue 
for his merchandising ability and was able to save enough capital to go into the 
iron and metal business, where he has been most successful and has accumu- 
lated a fortune. 

Mr. Shewilz's home life is everything that could be desired, as Mrs. 
Shewitz is not only an ideal wife and mother, but is also a leader in all social 
and charitable movements within her large held of activities. 

Before her marriage to Mr. Shewitz, on May in. iSi/S, she was Miss Flora 
Katlar, daughter of Moses and Fannie Katlar of Trob, Russia. 

They have one daughter, Fannie, wdio is attending high school, and is also 
being educated in music. 

The many charities in which Mr. and Mrs. Shewitz are interested and 
to which they are liberal contributors are Old Age Home, Denver Sanitarium 
and A. B. A., in addition to all local philanthropic movements. 

Thev arc also members of I'cth lacob Congregation and Talmud Torah. 



ISAAC SHIFF 

Circumstances and opportunities are not needed to make great men; great 
men make opportunities. The strong, resolute man, the courageous, deter- 
mined youth, are not swayed by obstacles or unforeseen difficulties; these 
hindrances, which turn away the timid and less courageous, only serve to make 
them more energetic and resolute. How many youths are there who will pass 
through life with the keenest mental capabilities, but. lacking purpose and 
determination, achieve nothing, dying as though they had not lived! More 
than every other thing, action is the one thing needful. A purpose once formed, 
and then death or victory. It is in these respects that the lives and biographies 
of successful men serve for examples and encouragement to those vacillating 
between desire and execution — the intention and the fulfillment of a noble 
purpose. 

In the year 18S0, in Wolozin, Russia, there was born to Shlome, a great 
Jewish scholar, and his wife. Dwora Shiff, a son wdio was named Isaac, but 
Isaac, like many foreign-born children, heard of the Land of the Free, and in 
11)04 hade fond farewell to his native land and came to America. 

For two years he peddled jewelry in Xew York, but such was not his 

275 



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I- \ \l -.11111 






sSJP/i 






aspiration, and thinking Cleveland had something better in store for him. h<- 
came here, with the result that after six months, with much hardship and 
saving, he contrived to save $500, and went to Lorain, 1 Ihio, where he is now 
running a jewelry store and making good. 

Mr. Shiff is \ ice President and treasurer of B'rith Jacob I ongregation, 
\ ice Presidnt of B'rith Abraham, is a Mason and a liberal contributor to many 
charities. Was at one time Director of th< ' •rphans' Home. 

Rich in business success, he is still richer in his home life, having a wife 
and three children, to whom he is devoutl) attached. I it- was married in 
\cw York. April 1, 1 < n >— . to Miss Rose Schmitt. 



JACOB SHLAIN 

The world bestows an involuntary tribute of respect to the self-madi 
man who has faced the stern realities of life, and this is not onlj an apprecia- 
tion of the worldly g Is he has acquired, but :i perception of the Merlin^ 

worth of character which has thus been able to battle successfully with adi 
circumstances. 

That this is particularly true of Mr. Jacob Shlain is attested bj the ver) 
high esteem in which he is held in the cit) of Detrbit, Mich., where he is rec- 
ognized as .'1 most capable business man and public-spirited citizen. 

IK- w . 1 - born in Vladimar, Voline, Guberne, Russia, in December, 1872, 
and came to \merica at the age of twenty-eight years. 

I anding in Boston, he began working for a junk dealer at $8 per week. 
Mi- continued this for one year and then went to Rhode Island, where he 
worked for a short time prior to going into business for himself. 

Tin- |>,-ink- from which the countrj suffered a few years later caused him 
in meet with verj severe reverses and he decided to ,l;o to Detroit, where his 
permanent business success was made. 

Having no capital with which to start into business, he was obliged to 
work ver} hard in order to support his famil) and at the same time save money, 
Inn eventually Ins efforts were rewarded and he has todaj a fine, modern 
equipment and .-1 large, flourishing iron and metal business. 

Ili- was married in Russia, jum prior to coming to America, t" Miss Lena 
Buslik, and the) have five children, three l»>\ * and two girls, who arc. with 
the exception of one. all in school, The eldest son. Benjamin, is a student in 
\nn Arbor, taking literal") work preparatory to a course in medicine I'lu-ir 
eldest daughter, Ida, is married i" Mr. Sam Brown, and resides in Detroit 

Mr. Shlain is connected with a number of organizations in Detroit, the 
one whose success perhaps is nearest his heart being ["eferes Israel, 

While both himself and wife are most devout in their adherence to the 
Jewish faith, at the same time their charitable spirit extends itself to organiza- 
tions of all creeds and religions, to which the) arc most generous contributors, 






MAX SHURE 

Prominent among the great army of conservationists to whose ability the 
country dues much at this particular time when every effort is being made to 
develop and extend its resources, may be mentioned the name of Mr. Max 
Share, successful dealer in iron and metal scrap, whose business is located at 
Kenton, ( Ihio. 

Mr. Shtire was born in Grodno, Guberne, Russia, December 7, 1885, the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Moses Shure, his father being engaged in brick and brush 
manufacturing'. He came to America when a very young man, landing in 
New York, April 5, 1905. He went to Kenton, Ohio, shortly after landing, 
and secured a position in the junk yard, where he remained eighteen months. 
With the money he had been able to save during that time, he went into the 
sawmill business, where he continued until the panic of 1907 swept away his 
entire capital. He then went into the junk business with a partner, lint after 
six months described to try out a manufacturing line. Six months' experience 
convinced him, however, that his best financial interests could be served in 
the iron and metal business, and he again established himself in this line. At 
the present time be is doing an immense annual business, his plant being 
located at Walnut and Detroit streets, where it is operated under his name. 

Mr. Shure was married in Kenton, Ohio, ( )ctober 13, 191 1, to Miss Ida L. 
Blum, and to his wife's unfailing assistance and rare ability Mr. Shure attrib- 
utes a great part of his success. They have two children, both girls, who are 
going to school. 

When the writer asked At r. Shure regarding wdiat qualities he considered 
most requisite for business success, he replied: "Be persevering, consistent 
and fair in your dealings," and those who know : Mr. Shure best realize that 
throughout his career he has been actuated by these motives. 

Roth Mr. and Mrs. Shure are enthusiastic workers in various charitable 
enterprises and are very popular in their community. 



SOLOMON SHURBERG 

Psychologists have discussed the relative influence of heredity and envi- 
ronment upon the lives of men, and it is certainlv true that a fine heredity seems 
to outweigh any force of unfavorable circumstances. 

Solomon Shurberg received from his father a rich heritage which prob- 
ably was largely influential in shaping his career. He was born in Tromborla, 
Gaiicia, April 15, 1870, his father being a teacher of Hebrew and the most 
scholarly man in the community. When young Solomon came to America in 
the fall of 1895, although he had no money, he possessed that which is of far 
greater importance, a finely developed, well-disciplined mind. Going to Hart- 
ford. Conn., he began selling small merchandise which he bought with two 
dollars borrowed from a friend. During the first year he accumulated enough 
to buy a horse and wagon, and for the next two years continued to peddle on 
a larger scale. The next two years he devoted to buying and selling junk, and 
then came to New Rritain, Conn., where he started in the iron scrap and coal 
business on a small scale. Within the next three years the business grew so 
rapidly that he took his eldest son into the firm and today they do a business 
of immense volume. 

Mr. Shurberg was married in Europe in 1893 to Miss Rachel Brumer. 
They have seven children, five girls and two boys. Abraham is in business 
with his father, Morris is attending college at Ann Arbor, Mich., and the bal- 
ance of the children are still in the public schools. 

277 



Mrs. Shurberg is verj active in social affairs and is at tin- present time 
Secretary of the Ladies' Aid Society. She devotes a great deal of time to 
the promotion of charity, and sin- and her husband jointly contribute to the 
Denver Hospital, the Immigration Society of Nev* York, the National Or- 
phans' Home of New York, all the Yishivis, the Red Cross, the Y. M. C. A., 
the Y. \Y. C. V. War Sufferers' Fund, the Welfare League, the Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Welfare Fund, and many other local charities. 

Mr. Shurberg is a member of Congregation Brethren and Sons of [srael, 
B'nai B'rith, Independent Order B'rith Abraham and < '< 1. 1 Fellows. 



JACOB SIEGLE 

The city of Dayton, Ohio, may well be proud t<> number among iis citi- 
zens Mr. Jacob Siegle, who within a space of comparatively few years lia- 
found time to attain the foremost rank in the business life of the community, 
and at the same time is always read) t<' assist anj movement for individual or 
civic betterment, 

Mr. Siegle was bom in Aniksta, Kovna, Guberne, Russia, March J4. 1879. 
Ilis father was a well-known farmer in the community, hut young Jacob 
decided that he did not care to make this his life work, so he came to America 
in 1900, finding his waj to Cleveland, Ohio, where he started working in a 
junk yard. The salary was small, but with him this was a minor consideration, 
a- his chief object was to learn the details of the business. 

Later he opened a junk yard of his own. and then decided to move to 
Dayton, < Ihio, where he formed a partnership with Mr. Sam Blasberg under 
the firm name of the Dayton Iron and Metal Company. This was continued 
successfully for seven years, when Mr. Siegle went into business with hi- 
brother-in-law, Mr. Cohen, and the) have built up a fine business which is 
one of the leading institutions of the city. 

Mr. Siegle was married January 17. K1117. to Miss Rachel Cohen of Cleve- 
land, < ihio. and they have four very charming children. 

A word of advice from a man of Mr. Siegle's prominence and proven 

ability should he regarded as of much Value to the rising young man, and we 
are pleased to stale that his polic) is slimmed tip briefly as follows: "Work 

hard, consistentl) ami earnestly. He honest, faithful and trustworthy." 

\ liberal contributor to all charities, Mr. Siegle is at tin- same time quite 
active in a number ol fraternal organizations, prominent among them 1 
the Knights of Pythias, Talmud Torah, K. K. House of Abraham and a num- 
ber of others, lie has a most genial personality and is a fitting representative 
of our best citizenship. 



HARRY SILBERMAN. 

In Lawrence, Mass., tin- name of Mr. Harr) Silberman is considered one 
to he reckoned with in business circles, as he is owner and manager of silU-r 
man Brothers and prominent in all tin- civic affairs in the community. 

Mr Silberman was horn in V'olina, Guberne, Russia, in 1873 il< came 
1.1 America in 1895. He landed in New York, but short 1) after went to I aw- 
rencc, Mass. where lie worked in a junk yard foi s, x dollars per week, hut 
after a short time, In-mi; ambitious to go into I" himself, he started 



out peddling. This he continued for three years, when lie went into his pres- 
ent line and is today doing a most prosperous and profitable business. 

Mr. Silberman was married in Russia three years prior to his coming to 
this country to Miss Mary Girsel, and they have seven children, three boys and 
four girls. The eldest son, Louis, is now in the army, and the others are all 
going to school. 

Mr. Silberman is prominent in a numher of organizations, heing Treas- 
urer of Sons of Israel and is also active in the Knights of Pythias, I. ( ). B. A. 
and Congregation Anses Swat. 

The entire family are very charitably inclined and give much time and 
money to the promotion of such organizations. 



JOSEPH J. SILBERMAN 

Among the prominent Jews of llarrisburg. Pa., no name is regarded with 
more respect than that of Joseph J. Silberman. 

Mr. Silberman is not only prominent in the business life of the city, 
hut is also a true believer in the Jewish faith and an observer of all its rites. 

Joseph J. Silberman was born in Lincawa Kovna, Guberne, Russia, April 
15, 1878. the son of Mardicai and Rachel R. Silberman. His father was a 
merchant and a Hebrew scholar of note, giving to his sons an excellent Jewish 
education, which proved very valuable to him in later years. 

Mr. Silberman came to America in March, 1894, and started his new 
life by peddling matches. He next worked in a clothing factor}-, and later 
started a small factory in New York on his own account, but this venture 
proved unsuccessful. He then turned bis attention to the buying and selling 
of scrap metal and gradually prospered until he had saved enough money to 
engage in the wholesale scrap iron business, in which he is still actively in- 
terested, his plant being located at 445 South Second street. 

Mr. Silberman is married, bis wife's maiden name having been Miss 
Jeanette Jacklowitz. They have two children, one boy and one girl, aged 
seven and four years, respectively. 

As befits the character of a truly generous and broad-minded man, Mr. 
Silberman is very modest and does not care for publicity, but we feel that 
mention should be made of the many charitable enterprises which he so 
generously supports, giving unstintingly both of time and money. He is a 
contributor to the Consumptive Sanitariums of Denver and Los Angeles, the 
Hebrew seminaries, the LTiited Charities, the Hebrew Immigration Societv 
and the Charitable Organization of Palestine. He is a member of Kesher 
Israel, Chisuk Em. B'nai Jacobs Synagogues, B'nai B'rith, Independent B'rith 
Abraham, B'rith Sholom, Harrisburg Beneficial Order of Elks. Order of 
( Kid Fellows and the Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

When asked regarding his advice to young, Mr. Silberman was very 
emphatic upon one point, which is often overlooked in the stress and hurrv 
of commercial life. He says that every young man should be God fearing, 
obedient to parents, and true to their faith, and in his own life we find all 
these traits exemplified in a manner which should prove to every rising young 
man that a successful business career and devout adherence to religious faitii 
are in no way incompatible. 



279 



JOHN SILBERMAN 

li is a pleasun to be able to outline in this biographical work the career 
of Mr. John Silberman, brother of Joseph J. Silberman, whose biography 
appears under another heading. 

Mr. Jolm Silberman i- junior member of the firm of Silberman Brothers, 
located at 445 South 2nd St.. Harrisburg, Pa., which is one of the largest 
institutions in the city devoted to the scrap iron industry. 

John Silberman was horn in Lincawa, Kovna, Russia, in September, 

f88o, and enjoyed with his brother the same advantages of home cultun 

his father was a most learned Hebrew scholar. 

He cami to America in August, 1896, his brother Joseph having pre- 
ceded hint in tK<i4. Upon hi- arrival in America he started out peddling, 
and finally found work in a pants factory, This he continued until he went 
into partnership with his brother in the present business, which they arc 

1 onducting so successfully. 

lie was married to Miss Bertha Jason and the) have two small daugh- 
ters, aged one ami three years. 

We feel that a word should he said regarding the social and charitable 
activities of both Mrs. John and Mrs. Joseph Silberman. They have always 
•he larger interests of the community at heart and devote a greal deal of 
time to the promotion of charities. 

Mr. Silberman greatl) emphasizes the importance of honesty and thrift 

and feels that any young man who obeys the precepts laid down by God 
fearing parents cannot stra\ far from the paths of rectitude and SUCC 

lie himself is an active member of Kesher Israel and B'nai Jacob Syna- 
gogues, B'nai Brith, Independent ( Irder of B'rith Abraham, < Irder of Elks, 
1 idd Fellows, Masons and the Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

IK' contributes mosl generousl) to the charitable organizations of P 
tine, the United Charities, Hebrew Seminaries, Hebrew Immigration So 
ties, and Sanitariums of Denver and Los Vngeles. 

Silberman Brothers have made a fine contribution to the business, social 
and religious life of Harrisburg and as the) are both -till in the prime of life, 
it is hoped thai they will be given many more years in which to dispense 

happiness to their fellow nun. 



MAX SILBERMAN 

Prominent in the business and civic life of Lebanon, Pa., is the name of 
Mr. Max Silberman, who at the age of twenty began life in a new countr) 
without an) assistance whatsoever. 

Mr. Silberman was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in 187a and came to 
America in 1892. He landed in \™ York and having very little money, 

worked for one week at an) odd jobs which he could pick up. Me then 

started oui peddling small merchandise, which took him to Reading, Pa . and 
Lock Haven. After about two years he returned to Reading, where he was 

married in 1895 to Miss Rosa I. una. daughter of a prominent fanuh ol that 

city. After hi- marriage he continued buying and selling in the old wa 
about two years, when he was ottered a partnership in tin- firm of Luria Broth- 
ers. This he accepted and one of his tir-t ventures was opening a -mail yard 
in Lebanon, Pa., where, due to hi- efforts and unusual ability, the firm has at 
the present time a yard occupying twent) eight acre-, equipped with . 
modern convenience The) hi in New ^ork. Reading and Pittsburgh, 

and are the largest dealers in scrap in the United States. 



We feel that a word of recognition is due Mrs. Silberman, who is a most 
charming and accomplished woman, and who has not only been a devoted 
mother to their live children, giving much persona] attention to their training 
and education, but also devotes a great deal of time and money to charitable 
and social activities. Their eldest son, Sam, is attending the academy at 
Mosesburg, Pa., while the rest of the children are still in the public schools 
and are being given a liberal musical education. 

.Mr. Silberman is one of the most prominent men in their community, being 
a member of Shomer Abrith Congregation of Reading, Pa., Kasber Israel Con- 
gregation of Lebanon, Director of the Jewish Consumptive Relief Society at 
Denver, Colo., and a prominent member of the Elks. He also contributes to 
the Immigration Society, the National Orphans' Home of Xew York City, the 
Erie Orphans' Home of Erie, Pa., the Red Cross, all the Yishivas and numer- 
ous other local and national charities. 

When asked what he considered the chief qualifications for success. Mr. 
Silberman laid great stress upon the value of an education. However, he is a 
firm believer in the necessity of hard work, economy and a business of one's 
own, no difference how modest the beginning. 



ISAAC E. SILVER 

If ever the Jewish Congress will take place, the city of Savannah will 
be represented there by a very interesting young man, Mr. Isaac E. Silver. 
Mr. Silver deserves to be known to the country, as he is to his city, as the 
owner of a remarkable department store where goods are sold only up to the 
value of one dollar. "Silver's Store" on Broughton street, Savannah. Ga., is 
only one of many such stores throughout the South, as at Augusta and Sylvania, 
Ga., and at Charleston and Columbia. S. C. Pretty soon a Silver store will 
be opened at Atlanta. But let us first become acquainted with Mr. Silver's life 
history. 

He was born on the 10th of June, 1878, in Russia, as the son of a very 
aristocratic Jewish family, his father being Wolf Silberfarb, and his grand- 
father being one of the most prominent men of his native city. His great- 
grandfather was the Chief Rabbi of Kobrin and his mother Adel is a direct 
descendant of the renowned Rabbi Jonathan Eibschutz. Isaac received a good 
Jewish education and he is the typical product of Jewish Talmudical breeding. 

Mr. Silver came to America in 1893. His father was then already in the 
South, and together they went into business at Sylvania, Ga. But there was 
hard struggle ahead, as the Gentile population of the town did not take very 
kindly to the Jews competing with them in business. There was no lack of 
physical encounters, but young Isaac "beat" his way through, and in the end 
lie became one of the most prominent politicians in the town himself, and was 
even for a time acting Mayor or Mayor pro tern, of the city. In 1910 he 
moved to Savannah, where he became very prominent. 

He is a devoted Zionist, an Orthodox, a true Jew who loves everything 
Jewish. He is the Eirst Vice President of the Jewish Educational Alliance 
and he is interested in everything Jewish. 

On the 16th of February, 1910, be was married to Miss Katie Wilensky. 
the daughter of Mr. Max Wilensky (see biographical sketch), and they are 
the parents of two children, Florrie and Warren. 

Mr. Silver is a strong character, a man of iron will, firm resolution and 
rare courage. He has his firm convictions and knows how to carry them out. 



281 



LOUIS SILBERSTEIN 

In former dark Russia, hidden awa) between walls of tyranny and des- 
potism, lay much native ability which needed but the sunlight of freedom and 
equal opportunity to develop. It is fortunate for both the Jews of Russia and 
for America thai so man] heard the call to the new world and followed the 
guiding light of libertj to our shores. 

In Zagostok, Russia, October 15. [880, occurred the birth of Mr. Louis 
Silberstein, who was among those ill-contenl with conditions in hi* native 
country. 

During the summer of [895 he sought our shores and located in Rich- 
mond, Ind., where, after peddling junk for two years, he went into partner- 
ship with his father, and five years later went to Columbus, Ohio, where he 
established a business of hi* nun. 1 1 «.■ has achieved an extraordinary com- 
mercial success, the benefits "t' which are not selfishly enjoyed by him alone, 
as he is verj active in the promotion of all charitable organizations, including 
the Jewish war sufferers and main others of national and local importance. 
In this he is greatl) encouraged b) his mother, who is, of course, very proud 

of her >nn's success, and anxious that his g 1 fortune shall be passed along 

to those living in less happy circumstam 

He is also a member of ^gudas Achem 1 ongregation, Sun* of Joseph and 
I!*rith Abraham. 



HARRY SIMON 

In the village of Stavisk, Russia, the Purim of 1885 was an event of no 
small significance for Abraham and Leah Simon. Hardly was the rejoicing 
of thi* religious festival over when a nut her and still greater "tie occurred, which 
was to pla) a great factor not onlj in the live* of me famous Jewish scholar 

at Stavisk and his wife, but One which was to have a similar effect Upon the 

Jewish community of Cleveland a* well. 

The birth of Marry Simon was unheralded outside of the narrow circle 
of his family, and until he was eight years old the small confines of the village 
of Stavisk was all of the world which Harr} knew. It was when In* parents 
decided to take their fortunes to the more ol America that hi* world grew 
larger and larger until < >hio was decided upon a* their future home. 

Harrj received hi* education at home, and whatever he ha* obtained in 
life can largely he traced to In* excellent home training. Nor was hi* Hebraic 
training in any waj neglected when so fine a Talmudic scholar a* hi* father was 

there tci teaeli him. 

But young Simon had dream* of conquest. He was to become a part of 
America's industrial life and while the steel business was then on the ad 
vance, he decided to cast hi- lot along those Inn*. Thoroughness, he was 
taught, wa* one of the chief ingredients i" sue,!'**; so it was in*t the natural 
course for him to desire to begin at the bottom. He became a bookkeeper in 
an iron ami steel company in Cleveland at a monthl) *.dar\ of twenty-five 

dollar*, hi* ultimate aim being experience lather than temporal*) tenr. • 

lion. The eagerness with which he entered into Ins work soon brought him 
promotion, and after remaining with the same firm for a period of | 

he derided that he wa* read) to start out 011 hi* own 

wa* not t me bo soon. 

lie entered into several partnerships, ami a* i* usually the case with these 
first business entanglements, the) wen- not successful So he again went to 



work for a steel concern, this lime at a much larger salary than he had previ- 
ously received, and with a share of the firm's profits. 

With added experience and more capital, Simon for the second time 
launched fortlt into business for himself after a two years' staj with his 

firm, and this time with added intensity and determination. It is hardly neces- 
sary to relate what a success his final venture was. It seems that he has blos- 
somed forth as a leader in his chosen field, and the Jewish community feels 
proud to claim him as one of its own. 

In [915 Mr. Simon left for New York City, where he married Mollie 
Shechter. and he now has a young daughter, Selma. 

He is a member of the Anshe Emeth Congregation, also belonging to the 
I'.'nai B'rith, Knights of Pythias, the Zionists and others. Hospitals, homes 
and many charitable societies are daily receiving Mr. Simon's liberal assistance. 



MORRIS SIMON 

One of America's wealthiest men and greatest philanthropists has said. 
"What a man owns is already subordinate in America to what he knows; but 
in the final aristocracy the question will not be either of these, but what he has 
done for his fellows. Where has he shown generosity and self-abnegation? 
Where has he been a father to the fatherless? And the cause of the poor, 
where has he searched that out ? 

That this responsibility has been very keenly felt by Mr. and Mrs. Morris 
Simon of Buffalo. X. Y., is attested by the many organizations who have rea- 
son to be grateful for the business success which Mr. Simon has created for 
himself. 

He was born in Bassarabia, Guberne, Russia. May 15th. 1877. his father 
being a merchant of his native town. At the age of eleven he was very unfor- 
tunate in losing his father by death, and his mother was left with the entire 
responsibility of raising her family. That she inculcated in the mind of her 
young son those sterling principles of honesty and obedience to duty, his after 
life certainly attests. 

When he came to America, he landed in Philadelphia, but did not remain 
long, coming direct to Buffalo, where he began buying and selling old iron and 
metal. 

After a year and a half of this experience, he opened a yard and has con- 
tinued in this business ever since, meeting with wonderful success. About a 
year ago he organized and incorporated the Erie Rag & Burlap Company, of 
which he is president, and this concern is doing an immense business. 

In 1902, prior to his coming to America, he was married to Rosa Kaiser, 
who has been an ideal wife and mother to their three children, two girls and 
one boy, who are still in school. 

Mrs. Simon also devotes much time to charity, being a liberal patron of 
the Old Age Home, B'rith Abraham and the Denver and Los Angeles Hos- 
pitals. 

Mr. Simon is past president and founder of Congregation Anshe Ahmes, 
and is now first trustee. 

He is also prominent in Kehilla of Buffalo, Independent Order B'rith 
Abraham. Gemulas Hosudam of Buffalo, and the Chamber of Commerce. 

He is an ardent supporter of the Immigration Society of New York, his 
influence and spirit of helpfulness extending to all sections of the United States. 



283 



JOSEPH S. SINGER 



The life story of Mr. Joseph S. Singer, his rise i" wealth and position in 
the Jewish community of Jerse) City, hardl) sounds credible. It seems more 
like a Fanciful tale, yet the facts here stated are taken from the life experi- 
ences of Mr. Singer. Twenty-five years ago Mr. Singer started upon life with 
ever) handicap that a lad could have. He was a stranger in a foreign land; 
he did not know the language; he did not have an) money, and he did not 
have an) friends or relatives who could give hira advice as i" his future liveli- 
hood ami existence. He was left to his own resources, but through hard, per- 
sistent labor and an unquenchable <K— ire to get ahead, he has made his way 
through hardships thai men of less strong will would never have succeeded in 
overcoming. 

foseph S. Singer, sou of Meyer and Rebecca, »;h born April u. 1877, in 
Stebnick, Austria, lie received a school education and at the aye ni' sixteen 
came to America. He had no trade, and to earn 
enough for his own support he began to peddle with 
matches, ^s his capital increased, he turned to >ell- 
ing table oilcloth and allied articles, lie struggled 
hard, saved some money, and learned th<- language. 
lie then entered the insurance business, but contin- 
ued in it onl) a .hurt while, llis mone) gradual!) 
disappeared, and when he had onl) twenty-five dol- 
lars left he invested it in a small cand) -tore, lien- 
he prospered, and after a number of years drifted 
into the wholesale business. Mr. Singer i- now the 

head of the firm of Singer Bros., wholesale jobbers 
of candy, at 326 Montgomery street, Jerse) City. 
Since Mr. Singer has become more successful, he 
ha- associated himself with almost ever) charitable 
organization in Jerse) City, lie i- a member of the 
Congregation Tifereth Israel, lie i- a Mason, 

Slniner. Elk and member of the orders B'rith Abraham and B'nai B'rith. He 
is also one of the founder- and directors of the Hebrew Orphan Society of 
Jerse) City, Director of the Talmud Torah and Hebrew Free Loan and con- 
tributes to the Home for Consumptives at Denver. Me is a member and 
organizer of Beth El Lodge I', and A. M. and a member of tin- Salaam Tem- 
ple. \. V 1 1. \. M. S. 

1 '11 March in, ic/ixi, Mr. Singer was married to Miss Rose Singer, daughter 
of the well-known private hanker. Mr. Marcus Singer, who died June 15. 
iuij. Marcus Singer was noble and charitable, and it was with sincere regrel 
thai the news of his death was learned b) the community. 

Mr-. Singer i- prominent!) connected with the communal work of fcr- 
se) 1 ity, and has been affiliated with almost ever) movement for the welfare 

and improvement of the 1 r and needy. Mrs, Singer i- a member of the 

Auxiliar) of the Temple Beth El, Past Matron of 1 olonial Chapter No. 42, 
t irder Eastern Star, and Royal Matron ol I merant of Jerse) 1 ity. 

She i- also a member 01 Ladies' Hebrew Aid Societ) and ( lara De llir-h 

Society. 

Mr. and Mrs. Singer arc the pan nts of -i\ children, one l>o\ and five girls, 

all of whom attend school. 

Mr Singer attributes his success to hard work, honest) and business 
abilit) and feels that an) young man who persists will i;et ahead 







JACOB SINGER 

The life history hi Jacob Singer is of unusual interest, his brave and 

successful struggle with adverse circumstances in early life lending greater 
luster to the achievements which have placed him in the front rank of Detroit 
business men. 

I [e was horn in Yolkovisk, Grodno, Guberne, Russia, July 4, 1883. His 
parents, I lanan and Eva Singer, were quite prominent in their native town, 
his father being a lumber merchant and possessed of an excellent education. 

The opportunities which his local environment offered were, however, too 
meager for the expanding ambitions of young Jacob, so in May, 11)04. he- 
started to America, landing in Philadelphia, where his first employment was 
that of salesman in an installment house. Here he worked for one year and a 
half, increasing his salary from $2.50 per week to $10. He next started trav- 
eling and selling dress goods, and this road experience proved very valuable 
in after years, as it gave him that close insight into human nature which is an 
invaluable asset to a business man. 

During these two years he accumulated $800, with which money he came 
to Detroit in 1905 and began buying and selling old iron and metal. He soon 
opened a yard at Xo. 245 Erskine street, which be sold at a profit and moved 
to his present location at 553 Clay avenue, where he has a fine business and 
every modern appliance for conducting same. 

In addition to this business he has accumulated considerable real estate, 
which occupies a portion of his time. 

Mr. Singer was married December 27, 1912, to Miss Goldie Xovick. an 
eastern girl, the daughter of Yantov and Merka Xovick. They have two small 
children, a boy and a girl. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Singer are most generous in their contributions to 
charity, and Mr. Singer has some very high-class fraternal affiliations, being a 
member of the Masons and Knights of Pythias. He is also a member of B'nai 
Meishe Congregation. 



SOL SLAVIN 

Mr. Sol Slavin was not always a resident of Dayton, Ohio, for he was 
born in Postor, Wilner, Guberne, Russia, on December 15, 1890, but Dayton 
may well be proud that she numbers among her inhabitants a young man 
of such sterling qualities as Mr. Slavin. 

Mr. Slavin came to this country in the fall of 1903, and immediately 
went into the iron business with his father. After eight years he became a 
partner in the business and after a while, having supreme confidence in his 
ability to conduct a business of his own, he went into business of his own 
accord. Mr. Slavin is a member of the Reformed Temple of Dayton, mem- 
ber of the Masons and other organizations and a liberal contributor to charity. 

His firm, known as the Sol Slavin Co., is one of the best known and most 
successful of its kind in the community. 

On December 29, 1^)14, he married Miss Sarah M. Monhiemer, who is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mose Monhiemer, prominent residents of Dayton. 

Although comparatively a young man, Mr. Slavin is a large taxpayer in 
the city, being the owner of much property. He is very much interested in 
civic affairs and always anxious to do bis duty to the community by assisting 
every worthy movement. His advice is, "Give your fellow men a square deal," 
which he not only preaches but practices. 

Mr. Slavin has always been fair and just in all his dealings, has always 

285 



respected the feelings of ;ill with whom he has come in contact, whether in 
business or social life. 

Mr. Slavin takes an active interest in the religious life of Dayton, 
being .in active member of Rabbi Lefkowitz's Temple, and is always :it the 
service of the host interest of the Temple, and judging from his past, he has 
a promising and well-deserving future. 



ISRAEL AND SAMUEL SMITH 

Active, growing races have ever been migratory in their instincts, and 
this accounts for the large number of immigrants who have sought the shores 
of Vmerica, the land of promise. 

The vigor of the United State- has been larger) acquired from this resi- 
le--, energetic element to whom difficulties and dangers were breath of life 
and in whom the conquering -pint ran high. 

Israel and Samuel Smith are line examples "I this -turds, type who dared 
the hazard- of the new world that their abilities might find a proper avenue of 
expression. 

Israel Smith was born in Suwalk, i liiherne. Russia, in 1875, and Samuel, 
twci years later. 

Their father was a merchant in their native town ami a most learned 
Jewish scholar. 

Coming to America at an earl) age, they peddled through the state of 
( thio, first with a pack ami later with a horse and wagon. 

Later the) went tn < .rand Rapids, Mich., opening an iron and metal \ard. 

which business has had a phenomenal growth under their able management, 

and i- now the largest business of the kind in the city. 

The\ were both married in Grand Rapids; Israel to Ida Davidson, who 
have three children who are very brilliant in their studies. Their -on. Ben- 
jamin, although only seventeen years of age, has graduated with honors from 
high school and i- attending tin- law school at the Universit) of Michigan. 
lie also received a diploma and gold medal from tin- Daughters of the Revo 

Intion fur unu-ual proficienc) in the Stud) of \111erican history. 'Tin- daugh- 
ters are -till in school and are being educated in music. 

Samuel Smith wa- married June to. IQOO, to Mi-- Rose Karhaf-ks. and 
they have two boys and one girl who al-o are developing much talent along 
literary and musical line-. Their -on, 1 ester, when onl) eight years old won 
a prize from the Detroit Tree Press for writing stories, ami although onl) 
eleven at tin present time, i- recognized a- a leader of hi- school in scholarship. 

Mr. Israel Smith i- a member of tin- Odd Fellows ami Mr. Samuel i- 
aftiliated with the -ame organization, a- well a- both lewi-h congregations, 

I'.'nai I'.'rith and Ma-oii- 

Both brothers ami their wives are ver) public-spirited and charitable, 
being liberal contributors to Denver and Los Vngeles hospitals, Mas \athan 
Orphans' Home and the Immigration Societ) of \V« >, ork. 

'The father i- -till living, hut ha- retired from hti-uu-- and devote- hi- 

entire time to Jewish study, in which he i- -.1 proficient. 



2«i 



MAX SNITZ 

If we wore to closely scan the annals of business history, it would be 
surprising to find the large number of business men who retire from active 
service, and after a few months or years return to the harness, being unable 
to bear the inactivity and loss of responsibility. It is a well-known fact that 
lack of a regular occupation has aged many a man, as the arduous years of 
application which is part of the success of every big business man leaves him 
practically unable to adapt himself to easier conditions of living. 

This was true in the case of Mr. Max Snitz, who was born in Danzig, 
Posen. Germany, April 10, 1875. and came to America at the age of fourteen. 
Arriving in Detroit, Mich., he began working in a cigar factory and learning 
the trade, six months later going into business for himself. Later he opened 
a bakery, but finding neither line to his liking, went into the paper business, 
where he was very successful. 

About three years ago, having acquired a snug fortune, he decided to re- 
tire, so sold his business and began investing his money in real estate. But the 
habits of years were not to be so lightly put aside, and in 1916 he again went 
into the wholesale paper business. 

In this move Mr. Snitz accomplished a double purpose. It gave him an 
outlet for his own business energies and at the same time an opportunity to 
establish his sons, wdio were growing to maturity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Snitz have a fine family of eight, six boys and two girls, 
who are all in school, with the exception of Lewis and Rubin, in business 
with their father. 

Mr. Snitz has found time among his various activities for a number of 
fraternal organizations, having been presiding officer of the Traders and 
Paper Men's Protective L'nion, and his services being of such a high order. 
he was presented with a gold watch by the association. 

He is also prominent in Beth Jacob, Beth Abraham (being presiding offi- 
cer of Lodge No. 111, O. B. A.), the Odd Fellows, Maccabees and the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. 

His wife is very popular socially and they are both liberal contributors to 
all charities. 



MAX SOBUL 

Prominent in the business and civic life of Cleveland. Ohio, is the name of 
Mr. Max Sobul. owner and manager of the Cleveland Raincoat Co., corner St. 
Clair and W. 6th streets. 

Mr. Sobul was born in the year 1865 in Stawisky, Lomza, Poland, the son 
of Reb Hersh and Zlate Sobul. In his native country the Sobul family is very 
prominent, and has given to the world many men of marked scholarly ability. 

Mr. Sobul came to America in the year 1890, starting his career as an 
operator in a children's clothing factory in Xew York. After about six 
months, during which time he acquired some valuable experience, he went into 
business with a partner, handling work of the same nature on contract. Two 
years later he went to Cleveland, where he engaged in several business enter- 
prises, finally establishing the Cleveland Raincoat Factory, which has been an 
unqualified success. 

Prosperity has not caused Mr. Sobul to be forgetful of the needs of the 
unfortunate, as with each year of increasing financial prosperity he has pro- 
portionately enlarged his gifts to the various charities. His financial backing 
made possible the organization of Orthodox Jewry in Cleveland. For four 
years he was president of Congregation Sh-Arei Torah. He is director of the 

287 



Talmud Torah, a former treasurer of the Board of Kashruth, which he organ- 
ized in Cleveland, and prominent in every institution of an) importance. 

Mr. Sobul was married in [887 i" Miss Yetta Brown, who was born in his 
native town. They have a fine famil) of seven children, the oldest daughter, 
Pearl, being married to Mr. Simberg. Harry is a successful attorney, and 
Sollie is a physician. Sam. Morris and Sadie an' still students in high school. 
They have all been most thoroughly educated both in the regular academic 
branches and in I [ebrew. 

According to Mr. Sobul's expressed opinion, success is only a man 
effort and ambition, and he is certain!) in position to speak with authority on 
the subject, as he lias won hi- own pre-eminent position in business without tin- 
aid of initial capital or assistance "l any kind. In addition to the- ( leveland 
Raincoat Company, Mr. Sobul is treasurer of J. J. Fried Co., another large and 
prosperous firm. 



ISADOR SOBEL 

Isadnr Sobel, lawyer, was born in New York City, August 28, 1858, son of 
Semel and Cecelia (Kunz) Sobel. llis father, a merchant, rami.' from Posen, 
Germany, in 1S47. ami settled in New York city. The son received his pre- 
liminary education in Public School No. 3 of hi- native city, subsequently 
attending the College of tin- City of Now York, and tin- Erie (Pa.) high 
school. Ik- studied law under tin- preceptorship of Hon. S. M. Brainerd, of 

Erie; was admitted tn the bar in iSSS. and that -ante year, in association with 

Mr. Brainerd, established the firm of Brainerd & Sobel. lie has since con- 
tinued a general law practice in tin- county, superior and supreme courts, giv- 
ing special attention tn commercial and bankruptcy law. also corporation law. 
From the beginning of his active career he has been closel) identified with local, 
-tate and national politics, a- a Republican, lie was elected a member of the 
Erie city council in [891; was re-elected in 1893, and was president of that 

111 [894. During [889-9] he wa- Secretary 

of the Erie Count) Republican Committee, and wa- 
it- ( hairman during [893-1896. He became Vice 
President .if the Republican League of Pennsylva- 
nia in 1894, and wa- President during [896-98, am! 
In- wa- a presidential elector in 1896. President 
Mckinley appointed him postmaster of Erie in 
1898, tn which office he wa- reappointed in Presi 
dent Roosevelt in 1902 and 1906, and In President 
Tafl in 1910, Meanwhile, in [908, he served as 
President of the Postmasters' Association of Penn- 
sylvania. He wa- elected President of the National 
Association of Postmasters of First 1 I 
of the United States in 1912, and the following year 
became the tir-t Honorary President of the mean 
i/atimi Hi- became a member of district No 3, 
Independent 1 (rder B'nai B'rith, in [908 ; of the gi 
eral committee of that order in mi", and lent of the district grand 

lodge during 1910 1 -■ lie i- a member hi' the executive committee of the 
American-Jewish Committee; president of the board of governors B'nai B'rith 
Orphanage and Home fur Friendless Children of District No. 3; president 
\nehe < he-,d Kef. inn i ongrcgation, Erie : iii.nil.ii advisor) council Homi 
(he Friendless, Erie; managei of llamut Hospital, Erie, and a member of the 
Jewish Historical Si wish Publication Si d of the Erie, Ilk-. 




Shriners and Country chilis, Erie; is a thirty-second degree Mason and mem- 
ber of the i Idd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. He was married March 17, 
[8 'ii, to Emma, daughter of Samuel Auerhaim, a merchant, of Bradford, Pa., 
and has three children: Jeffrey Mortimer, Norman Tyler and Sidney Amos 
Sobel. 



SIMON SOCK 

It is surprising when one comes to review the lives of many of our great 
men to find how many of them have had to earn a livelihood in boyhood and 
early manhood by manual labor. 

Yearning to spend the time in the pursuit of study, yet laying it aside to 
do their duty, they have developed those sterling traits of character worthy the 
homage paid by friends and associates. 

Such a man is Simon Sock, born at Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in 1870, of 
Solomon and Lea Sock. 

Mr. Sock saw that, both as a scholar and merchant, there was more oppor- 
tunity for advancement in the United States, and accordingly he landed in ■ 
New York City on May 1, 1904, but remained only seven weeks there, when 
he came to Cleveland. 

He engaged in the business of peddling junk, first in Cleveland, then in 
Lorain, Ohio, for a period of nine months, when he came back to Cleveland and 
continued in the same line of business lor ten years. He then associated in 
business in Elyria with his present partner, Mr. David Widzer, the firm being 
known as the Elyria Rag and Metal Company, doing a large amount of business 
a year. 

Mr. Sock says that "to find one's adaptability and then follow it" is the 
secret of success. He has learned it by experience in the school of life, and by 
the aid of his good wife, who was Rachel Lea Rack, to whom he was united 
in marriage before leaving Russia. 

Mrs. Sock has helped instil this principle in the minds of her children and, 
aside from doing her dutv to her family, is a popular member of many socie- 
ties and an active worker in all charities. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Sock have been born four boys and three girls, who 
inherit the scholarly tastes and business propensities of the parents. One of 
the sons. Sol, is in the insurance business, another, Morris, married Miss 
Blanche Soskin of Cleveland, while a daughter, Sarah, is married to Mr. Ellin 
of Chicago. The others are attending school. 

Mr. Sock does not let creed or race influence his gifts to the needy, but his 
liberality is known to many. He is connected with the Mosha Havi Congrega- 
tion of Cleveland, and is a member of Agudas Acham R'nai Abraham Congre- 
gation of Elyria and of the B'nai Yitzhog Yerein, Yoloziner Unterstitzung 
Yerein and Yinsker Benefit Association. Besides being a member of all these 
organizations, he contributes freely to Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals, Old 
Age Home and Talmud Torah of Cleveland and the Chamber of Commerce of 
Elyria. 

Mr. Sock owns considerable property and is highly regarded and respected 
bv all who know him. 



289 



JACOB SOHNEN 

Experience is by t'.-ir the bes( teacher, and a trial at a variety of occupa- 
tions often enables a young man to arrive at a decision regarding the business 
for which he is hi-st fitted. This is the case with Mr. Jacob Sohnen, who was 
born in Austria, August -•->. 1882. 

He came to Werica Januarj 24, iN'14. arriving in New York, where his 
parents were ahead) located. He wenl to school for two years and then went 
into the feather business with his father. This he continued for i'"tir ••■ 
and then wenl to work in a -kin factory. He was quite successful and later 
became a partner in the business, bul did not find it to his liking, and after try- 
ing a number <>t' other lines he finally returned to the feather business, estab- 
lishing the Chelsea Feather Company at 221 Maple street. Chelsea, Mass., 
which is one of the largest concerns of the kind in that section of the state. 

Mr. Sohnen was married in New York, January 3, 1906, to Miss Vnna 
Zwerdling. They have five children, all boys-. Three of them are old enough 
to go to school, and the\ are also being educated in Hebrew. 

Mr. Sohnen is a prominent patron of all charities and a member of 
Arberter Ring Socialist Party. 



JACOB SOLOMON 
A good name is the most valuable asset which any ri-iiiL; young business 

man can possess, The elements of nature b) a trick of fortune ma\ wipe away 
all other possessions within a day, hut the reputation lor good character is a 
solid foundation upon which another fortune can he reared. 

Such was the experience of Mr. Jacob Solomon, who found that neither 
the calamities of flood or tiro could permanentl) -top his progress a- long as 
this one priceless possession was hi-. 

Jacob Solomon was horn in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in September, 1881, 
the son of Hiam and Getta Solomon. His father conducted a grocer) and 
was also a fine Hebrew scholar. 

At the age of si venteen, the problem of a business career presented itself, 
and he decided he would find more opportunities in America. 

Landing in New York, he went direct to Indianapolis, Ind., where he 
found employment in a brewer) at the meager compensation of $6.00 per 

week. Si\ months later he -tarted peddling junk, which he continued for two 
years, at which time he came to Sidney, ' Ihio, and opened an iron and metal 

yard. This business was flourishing, hut in 1912 was lotall) destroyed by 

il I. 

Here hi- reputation for honest) ami ability -1 1 him in good stead ami 

lie again resumed business, building up a -mall fortune, hut in 1914 hi- plant 
wa- destroyed b) lire and. having no insurance, he was again penniless, with 

marvelous determination and faith in In- ultimate power to triumph over nu- 

fortune, he again -tarted into business and in ion. joined forces with hi- pres- 
ent partner, Mr William Joffe. 

Their combined efforts have been successful beyond hi- wildest dri 
ami he ha- been ah!, mulate some fine real 1 state besides his interest in 

their flourishing plant. 

II.- wa- married lamiaM jX. [906, to Mi-- I annil 

ent partner, and a lad) who i- ver) prominentl) connected with all 
movements in their cit) rhe> have four children, who will be well edit 
and given a thorough training in n 



Mr. Solomon is ;i member of ' ongregation Wayne Ave, of Dayton; is a 
member of the Immigration Society, and the Miznuch Society of New York. 
and is a patron of Denver and Los Angeles Hospitals, a~ well ;h many other 
charities. 



KASKEL SOLOMON 

Everj great city is. to a certain extent, the creation of a small number of 
far-sighted, public-spirited men who have been the originators and executants 
■ if those enterprises and organizations which constitute the special glory of 
lilies. A representative of tins class is Kaskel Solomon, for over forty years 
prominently identified with the business life of Pittsburgh, and for a quarter 
of a century head of the well-known mercantile house of K. Solomon & Com- 
pany, and to whom Pittsburgh is indebted for the success <d' many of the large 
undertakings and institutions which have so largely contributed to Iter present 
prosperity and importance. 

Kaskel Solomon was born . \ i >ri 1 30, 1851, in Wreschen, Province Posen, 
Germany, son of Morris and Leah (Krieger) Solomon, lit- came to New 
Ynrk from Germany August ro, [868, remaining in that city a short time, and 
then going to New London. Conn., where he was engaged in mercantile lines 
until April 1. 1878. < >n that date he came to Pittsburgh, Penn., to assist in 
the management of what was then one of the Iron City's best known establish- 
ments- S. Cohen & Company. In [882 Mr. 1. M. Guskj bought the interest 

of S. Cohen, and from that date the linn name was I. M. Gusky, and in which 

business Mr. Solomon was interested for a long term of years. It was with 
this firm thai Kaskel Solomon received the ground-work of his knowledge of 
mercantile business, on which field the foundation of his latter success was 
laid. 

Mr. Solomon remained with the Gusky Store until February 1. 1892, when 
he stepped boldly into the business world at the head of his own establishment, 

founding the- widely-known and prominent store on Smithlield street which 
bore his name until February 1. 1017. when he disposed of it. Mr. Solomon 
now devotes his entire time to looking after his extensive private interests and 

has offices in the Frick Annex Building. In all positions which he has filled he 
has shown remarkable executive ability, a judgment that is seldom at fault, 
boldness of operation in his projects, and an unusual capacity for discerning 

the motives and merits of men. 

Early in his career Mr. Solomon displayed keen judgment in buying real 
estate, being a fine judge of its dormant possibilities. I lis foresight in this 
respeel had made' him the owner of many valuable properties in the down- 
town and residential sections of Pittsburgh, and he is considered somewhat of 
an authority on real estate values, his advice being frequently sought by pros- 
pective buyers. 

Keenly public-spirited, Mr. Solomon is always ready to give practical aid 
to am movement which, in his judgment, would tend to advance the public wel- 
fare, lie has been repeatedly offered the presidency of various financial insti- 
tutions, but has always refused, desiring to devote his entire time to his own 

large interests. Although he has been and is far too busy a man to take any 

active part in politics, no man is more keenly alive to the affairs of his city, 

concerning which his advice is often sought. I lis allegiance is given to the 
Republican party, but he lias never sought office. He is a man of large nature. 
deliberate in the formation of plans, thorough, upright, clear-headed and gen- 
erous in his benefactions to charity, but ever seeking to veil his good deeds 

from the eyes of the world. Mr. Solomon is a member and was one of the 

291 



organizers of the Westmoreland Country Club ; is a member of the Concordia 
Club, and takes an active part in various other institutions. He has been a 
member and trustee of Rodef Shalom Congregation for many years, and has 
also been for years a member of the executive board of the United Hebrew 
Relief Association. 

Kaskel Solomon married, May 22. 1878, in New York City, Miss Rebecca, 
daughter of Marcus and Hannah (Schlossman) Gusky, of New York City, and 
they were the parents of the following children: 1. Gertrude, wife of Jacob 
Bibro, of Pittsburgh, and the mother of two children, Ruth and James. 2. 
Edith, wife of Hugo Baum, of Pittsburgh, and the mother of two children, 
Elizabeth and John Daniel. 3. Mark K., born March 2, 1885, educated in 
Pittsburgh schools and Kiskiminetas Spring College : married Hortense 
Nattans, daughter of Arthur and Jennie ( Rosenberg) Nattans, of Baltimore, 
Md. ; they have a son, Arthur K. ; Mr. Solomon, Jr., is now a member of the 
firm of the Solomon, Bibro Company, of Pittsburgh. 4. Madeline, wife of 
Jerome N. Halle, of Cleveland, Ohio, and the mother of a daughter, Eleanor. 
Mrs. Solomon, who was to her husband not only a charming companion, but a 
helpmate and adviser, passed away December 18, 191 5. She was active in 
church and philanthropic work, and was a member of the Mothers' Pension 
League and other like associations. 

The broad-gauge, all-around business man is at once the mainstay and 
the motive power of every community in which he is found, and especially is he 
essential to the growth and development of great cities. Of this type is Kaskel 
Solomon, and happy would it be for Pittsburgh if she had "five hundred as 
good as he." In any group of her business men, who have materially aided in 
her great growth, his portrait would necessarily have to be included, his career 
forming, as it does, part of the business history of Pittsburgh. 



SIMON SOLOMONT. 

It is only very recently that Mr. Simon Solomont of Boston, Mass., went 
into the jewelry business, after having tried his hand at other pursuits, and he 
is well on his way to become as succesful in his new vocation as he was in the 
many other lines he engaged in before he became a jeweler. But this brings us 
far ahead of our story, for we intend to describe in this sketch the rise of an 
interesting young Jewish business man from small and humble beginnings to a 
position of responsibility and respectability in the Jewish community of his 
place (if residence. Let us, therefore, start from the beginning: 

He was born on August 14, 1871, in Olkinisk, government of Vilna, 
Russia, as the son of Solomon and Estelle Rebecca Solomont. and came to 
America with his parents at the age of fourteen. His father was a prominent 
Orthodox in Boston who died cm April t). 11)17. His mother is still living. 
The boy, on coming to this country, started out peddling in the Slate of Maine. 
Later he went into the grocery business, a few years later starting the whole- 
sale grocery linn of S. Solomont X- Suns. In this concern he was associated 
with his lather and brothers. Nineteen years ago lie became part owner of 
the Standard Grocery Company, remaining in it until September 1. 11)17, when 
he became a member of the linn of James Solomont X- Bros., jewelers, 36 
Salem street, Boston. 

Mr. Solomont is a member of a considerable number of charitable organ- 
izations. I te i--. in addition, a member of two congregations, .-md whenever any 

social or religious activity is shown one ma\ lie sure to find Mr. Solomont's 
name among the most active supporters. 

1 in June 25, [893, Mr. Solomont was married to Vnna Rutstein and two 

292 



children have blessed this union, Sadie, now Mrs. Jacob J. Herman, and Sidney 
Leo, a student at Harvard College. Mr. Solomont is a modern Orthodox who 
is a profound student of the Talmud and gave his son a thorough Hebrew edu- 
cation. Sidney expects to become a student in the ( Irthodox Rabbinical Semi- 
nary of New York. 



JOSEPH SPECTOR AND ABRAHAM LAPINSKY 

Prominent in the business life of Springfield, ( >hio, is the firm of Joseph 
Spector & Co.. conducted by Mr. Joseph Spector and his partner. Mr. Abraham 
Lapinsky. 

Both men are representatives of that stern type of business man who has 
carved out his own fortune under adverse circumstances. 

Mr. Spector was born in Mitto. Kurland. Guberne, Russia, July 7, 1879, 
and came to America when a very young boy. At the age of twelve he 
started in working to help support the family, and when they had accumulated 
a very small capital, his father started a store, while the boys continued ped- 
dling. When he became of age he started out for himself with but $5 capital, 
and going to Altoona. Pa., started peddling stationery. With the first $150 he 
was able to save he went to Dayton, Ohio, where he found his brother very 
ill, and gave him all of bis savings. He again began peddling and finally found 
his way to Springfield. Ohio, where he was so unfortunate as to lose his first 
business property by fire. Having no insurance, he was obliged to make an- 
other start, and this time was very successful, as the fine, modern plant the firm 
now occupies is one of the best of its kind in that section of the country. 

Mr. Spector has one daughter and his wife, who was formerly Miss 
Ethel Katz, is very prominent in their social circle. They contribute liberally 
to charities, including Denver and Los Angeles sanitariums. 

Mr. Abraham Lapinsky. partner of Mr. Spector, was born in Grodno, 
Guberne. Russia. July 2, 1868, and came to America when a young boy. He 
went to school for three months and then began selling newspapers, after 
which he learned the cigarmaking trade. Every cent which he could spare 
from his meager earnings was given to his father, to assist him in bringing his 
mother and the balance of the family from Europe, and after they came he con- 
tinued to assist them. However, lie was able to save some of his earnings 
and finally went into business with his present partner, where he has been 
most successful. 

Mr. Lapinsky was married in Dayton in 1910 to Miss Rosie Sacks, and 
they have two children, one boy and one girl. They are also most generous 
in contributions to charity and both families are affiliated with the principal 
organizations of Springfield. 



SUMER SOMERMAN 

The only Jewish member of the Pennsylvania state legislature elected 
from western Pennsylvania is Hon. Sumer Somerman of Pittsburgh. Mr. 
Somerman is a Republican and well deserves the honor conferred upon him by 
his party and district. 

But Mr. Somerman is not only a statesman interested in the political affairs 
of his district and a public official of Pennsylvania, he is one of those men 

293 



who do honor to their race by their strong adherence to Jewish principles. And 
that his fellow citizens do recognize his abilities and devotion is evidenced by 
his appointment not so very long ago by the Mayor of Pittsburgh as one of the 
"units" of the local exemption boards of Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Somerman was born in Ulashkovce, Galicia, where he first saw the 
light of day on the 6th of December, 1871, the son of Israel Moses and Mattel 
Somerman. He came to America in 1887, and landed in New York, where for 
five vears in succession he worked as a machine hand in the Singer works at 
Elizabeth, X. J. In 1901 he came to Pittsburgh, where he went into the 
butter and egg business and made a success of it. His place of business is at 
present located at 65 Logan street. 

But although business and state politics consume very much of his time, 
Mr. Somerman has managed to take great interest in Jewish social affairs. 
He was the organizer of the S. Somerman Lodge, Independent O. B. S., is a 
prominent member of the Congregation Shaarei Torah, of the Federated Jew- 
ish Charities, a Past Commander of the Maccabees and a Past Deputy of the 
Knights of Pythias. He is also a member of the Monongahela Lodge No. 297, 
O. B. A., Warshaver L T nterstizung Yerein, Austrian Beneficial Society and the 
B'rith Schulem Yerein. 

On the 29th of November, 1896, Mr. Somerman was married to Miss 
Bella Reisman, and they are the parents of five children, Anna, who is now 
Mrs. Obernauer; Esther, Irving, Albert and Rose. 



MAURICE STERN 



When the American Jewish Committee was formed and a truly repre- 
sentative and really distinguished Jew from Louisiana was to be chosen, the 
choice fell quite naturally and as a matter of course upon Mr. Maurice Stern 
of New Orleans. 

Mr. Stern was born at Ermershausen, Germany, to his parents, Salomon 
and Babette Stern, on January 6, 1855, and was educated in the public schools 
of his native land. In 187 c, when but a boy of sixteen, he left home and, upon 
his arrival in this country, settled in New Orleans. Endowed by nature with 
the great qualities of heart and mind that are an earnest of success, he was 
determined to win for himself a name and place in his new home and sur- 
roundings and. not spurning the idea of starting at the very bottom of a career, 
he entered the office of Lehman, Xeugass & Co., doing the work of a mere 
mail boy. Even in that humble position, however, he performed his duties so 
intelligently and faithfully that step by step lie ad- 
vanced, until in 1880 he was admitted" as a partner 
in the business establishment of his former employ- 
ers, the linn's name now being changed to Lehman. 
Abraham & Co. Five years later the value of his 
services as a partner had become so thoroughly es- 
tablished that the linn's name was once more changed 
and the business was incorporated under the title of 
Lehman, Stern X- Co. And ii was not long before 
Mr. Stern became the 1 'resident of that vast concern 
which handles man] million dollars' worth of cotton 
every year. 

In addition in the presidency of his own con- 
cern, whose offices are at 840 Union street. Mr. 
Stern holds many oilier positions of trust and re- 
sponsibility, lie has rendered the cause of educa- 
tion invaluable services as a member of the State 
Board of Education, while in the commercial world he is President of the 

294 




Southern Slates Land and Timber Co., a Director of the Whitney Central 
National Bank and of the Whitney Central Trust and Savings Hank, President 
of the Sagua and Tanamo Land Co., a Cuban concern, and has served both as 
Treasurer and as a Director of the New Orleans Cotton Exchange. In bis 
religious and charitable affiliations he has held the position of President at 
Temple Sinai, has served as a Director of the Touro Infirmary and is at the 
present time Treasurer of the Jewish Widows and ( Irphans' Home, the local 
Treasurer of the Jewish War Relief Committee, and a member of the Execu- 
tive Hoard of the Union of American Hebrew Association. 

If Mr. Stern's career demonstrates to a remarkable degree the possibili- 
ties and the opportunities along the lines of success, it demonstrates to an equal 
degree the proper and commendable use that might be made of success. For 
Mr. Stern is the type of man in whose success a community has every cause 
and reason to rejoice. ( >f a genial and pleasant disposition, plain and unas- 
suming in his conduct and conversation, he is interested in every worthy 
endeavor and is ever ready, with hand and heart,- to support every noble cause. 
Nay, more, he may always be counted upon as among the very first to respond 
sympathetically, liberally and generously to the call of every effort or institu- 
tion that stands for human betterment. 

In conclusion, it may be wel. tj add that Mr. Stern's good wife, who was 
Miss Hannah Bloom, a talented and accomplished young lady of New Orleans, 
and to whom he was married on May 2$, 1883, shares fully his noble senti- 
ments and aspirations and has proved a true helpmate to him in all his char- 
ities and philanthropies and in his active interest in the cause of progress and 
advancement. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stern are pleasantly domiciled at the corner of St. Charles 
and Soniat streets, and are the happy parents of three children. Mr. S. Walter 
Stern, whose wife was Miss Josephine Mayer; Mr. Edgar B. Stern and Mrs. 
Sarah Keiffer. 



JUD STEIN 

American Jewish life has always reflected distinct credit upon any coun- 
try of its adoption, and the qualities which have made possible so many suc- 
cessful Jewish careers are well worthy of emulation by young people of 
American birth. 

The young Jew invariably shows a keen appreciation of the value of 
time and opportunity, and very little is wasted. It is no uncommon occurrence 
to find him a scholar of attainments, even though the regular school career has 
been denied him, as he is inclined to use every spare hour toward the acquire- 
ment of knowledge which is liable to prove useful to him in the future. 

These facts account to a large extent for the rapidity with which the Jew 
rises from mediocrity to a position of affluence. 

Such is the history of Mr. Jud Stein, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, 
in 1875 of Jewish parents. His father, Louis Stein, was a clothing merchant 
and his young son early learned the first lessons in merchandising by selling 
papers on the streets. At night he attended the Spencerian Business College, 
where he laid the foundation for his future business career. Later he accepted 
a clerkship in a store and after two years tried his hand at collecting, also 
assisting in the bookkeeping of the store. The next year was spent in the 
sale of chewing gum, and while Mr. Stein decided that there was no future in 
that line for him, at the same time it afforded him some valuable lessons in 
salesmanship. 

His next connection was with Janowitz Klein, where he acted as salesman 

295 



until they went out of business, and from there went to the H. C. Lang Co. 
Three years later Mr. Max G. Wertheim bought out Mr. Lang, and knowing 
of Mr. Stein's valuable services, he decided to retain him. After six years he 
became a member of the firm and five years later, when Mr. Wertheim re- 
tired, Mr. Stein bought out his interest, and the firm is now known as Klein, 
Stein & Co., Mr. N. B. Spero being its third member. 

Mr. Stein is a liberal contributor to all charities and is also popular in 
the Elks and the Excelsior Club. Both himself and mother belong to the Tem- 
ple of which Rabbi Greise was head. 



DAVID STOBER 

It is a strange paradox that men are still leaders in the designing and 
selling of women's apparel, although this field seems distinctively adapted 
for feminine supremacy. This is not only true in the designing and selling of 
gowns, suits, etc., but millinery as well. 

The subject of our sketch, Mr. David Stober, enjoys the distinction of 
being one of the largest and most progressive dealers in millinery in the city 
of Cleveland, and the story of his rapid rise to a position of wealth and afflu- 
ence is dramatic in the extreme. 

He was born in Rudantz, Bokovina, in July, 1884, his father being a mer- 
chant and a Jewish scholar of considerable attainment. 

Landing in America at the age of seventeen, he went to Montreal, Canada, 
and began peddling small merchandise, as man)' another immigrant has done. 
However, to Mr. Stober this experience proved to be of the utmost value, as it 
gave him a close insight into human nature and prepared him for his future 
activities in the selling field. 

After three years of this work he invested his savings in a stock of ladies' 
ready-to-wear garments and gradually increased his business until he was oper- 
ating three stores. At this time he met with severe reverses, through no fault 
of bis own, and lost practically everything. 

This did not shake his faith in the ultimate success which he knew awaited 
him. so with the last $300 he possessed he went to Cleveland and opened a small 
millinery store. Here continuous prosperity crowned his efforts and in a short 
time he was obliged to enlarge his store, which has grown to the present enor- 
mous proportions at 2131 Ontario street. 

Mr. Stober's code for a successful business career embodies these princi- 
ples: 

Be honest, work hard, save your money, give every man a square deal and 
make your word as good as your bond. 

lie himself has rigidly adhered to this policy and has added to this code 
the greatest virtue of all — charity. No good cause, regardless of creed or 
race ever turns away from Mr. Stob.cr without assistance. 

lie was married in Montreal, "March 15, 1914, to Miss Bessie Friedlip. 
daughter of Aaron and Sarah Friedlip, of thai city, and they have one small 
daughter. 

Mrs. Stober is also very active in the various charitable organizations of 
Cleveland, and is an exemplary wife and mother, 



2% 



HYMAN STONE AND PHILIP MICHELSON 

Two men prominent in the business life of Gloucester, Mass.. are Hyman 
Stone and Philip Michelson, whose interests, although not identical, are some- 
what identified, and who are also connected by the marriage of Mr. Michelson 
to Miss Rachel Stone, sister of Hyman Stone. 

Mr. Michelson was born in Kovno, Russia, in 1878 and came to America 
at the age of twenty. Perhaps no man ever suffered more hardships in his 
struggle toward success than Mr. Michelson. He began life in the new world 
as bottle washer in a soda factory, for which he received his board only. Then 
followed a succession of experiences in buying and selling junk, establishing 
himself several times, only to meet with failure, which was, however, not 
traceable to any fault on the part of Mr. Michelson. Just prior to the panic of 
1907, when fortune seemed to be smiling upon him, he was once again called 
upon to suffer the loss of everything but the reputation for ability which was 
well known to his friends. Again he started into business, and within five 
years had discharged every obligation, when be broke his leg and was obliged 
to quit business for some time. Later he started in the junk and real estate 
business, and is now one of the leading business men of Gloucester. 

In 1900 Mr. Michelson was married to Miss Rachel Stone, and they have 
seven children, one boy and six girls, all being thoroughly educated not only 
in the regular public school course, but in Hebrew and music as well. 

Mr. Michelson is Past President of Aves Acham Congregation, is a Trus- 
tee of B'rith Abraham and a member of the Eagles and Moose. Pie is generous 
in his gifts to all Hebrew charities, the Denver Hospital and the Red Cross. 

His brother-in-law, Hyman Stone, was born in Grodno, Russia, June 7. 
1885, and landed in America in 1899. He worked for his father peddling junk 
in Quincy, Mass., for seven years, when he decided to go into business for 
himself, and spent the next three years peddling on his own account. He then 
came to Gloucester, Mass.. where he started a wholesale junk business with 
his brother, and same is today being most successfully operated by Stone 
Brothers. 

Mr. Stone was married to Miss Dava Cohen, and they have one daughter, 
who is now in school. Mrs. Stone died in 1913, and her loss is still keenly felt 
not onlv in her own family, but the entire community. 

Mr. Stone is a member of Aves Achem Congregation, B'rith Abraham, of 
which he is Vice President, and the Moose. He contributes to the Red Cross 
and all charities. 

The younger brother, Jacob Stone, came to this country in T903 and ped- 
dled until he joined his brother in business. He was married in Boston March 
20, 1912, to Miss Rosa Solt. They have one small son. 



HERMAN STRAUSS 

To the man of strong moral fiber, failure often proves a great incentive 
toward renewed effort. Some of the most prominent names in the business 
historv of the country are those of men who for many years found success a 
most fickle goddess. 

Such a man is Mr. Herman Strauss of Wheeling, W. Va. Mr. Strauss 
was born in Yilna, Guberne, Russia, May 13. 1886, and came to America in 
January, 1903. He landed in New York, where he spent three months work- 
ing in a shop and then went to Pittsburgh, where he was unable to find em- 
ployment. We next find him in Kane. Pa., where he worked in a glass factory, 
but the indoor work was not agreeable to him and he found after a short time 
that his health was much impaired. Buying a horse and wagon, he spent the 

297 



next two years peddling junk, and with $2,800 which he had been able t" 
save, he started for the West. However, he met a friend in Chicago who 
advised him to go in \ irginia, which he did. After peddling junk for three 
iniiiiilis he went into business in the oil < 1 ist rii-t and was quite successful. He 
then started ;i liver) stable and this venture proved most unfortunate, as he 
lost his entire capital and found himself in debt $1,500. Going in Wheeling, 
W. \ a., he again started in the junk business, and in a short time was able to 
discharge all of Ins obligations and is toda) doing ;i large and very prosperous 
business. 

Mr. Strauss is a member of the congregation of Wheeling, W. Va., of 
B'nai B'rith, Y. M. 11. A. and is a liberal contributor to Denver and Los An- 
geles hospitals, as well ;is .-ill local charities. 



ABRAHAM J. SUNSTEIN 

Abraham J. Sunstein of Pittsburgh, Pa., was born January 25, 1861, in 
the city of Suwalk, Russian Poland. Mis parents won- (ass (deceased in 
1913) and Tillie (Shapira), deceased in [879. Mr. Sunstein on his father's 
side is a descendant of Elijah Wilner < iaon and his sun Abraham and his grand- 
son Jacob. Both the latter only second in fame to the Gaon, I lis grandfather 
was Xnali Landau, who was also a Rabbi. < In his mother's side Ihs ancestors 
were people of standing in Suwalk and related to his father's family. The 
family name is Landau, but at the time of his father's birth, for some reason 
or another, bis father was given the surname of Sunstein, the name of a close 
friend and neighbor of the family. 

Mr. Sunstein came t" America with his mother and his two brol 
Meyer E. and Solomon II. (the latter deceased in 1899), in 1870 to join his 
lather, who had preceded them 1>\ neari) four years, lli- sole education was 
m the public schools of Pittsburgh and private 
tutoring in Hebrew and German in this coun 
try and Europe. Mr. Sunstein has been en- 

: in the wholesale liquor business since 
early youth ami also in the distilling business 
since early manhood. He was associated with 
his father until his decease in mi,? and at 
present his son. \. 1 .>. Sunstein, is assi 
with him in the business, the firms being ( 
Sunstein & Sons and the Thompson Distilling 
('o. Mr. Sunstein in 1901 ami [902 was Pres- 
ident of the National Association of Distillers 
ami Whole-ale Dealers ami has been on ils 
Executive Committee practically since it- or 
ganization in 1896, \i present he i- Presi 
dent of the Distillers' \ssociation of Penn 
vania. 

In October, 1887, Mr Sunstein married 
Nora ' >. • •ppenheimcr, a name of Pittsburgh and a descendant of the oldest 
Jewish settlers in Pittsburgh. Mr. Sunstein and his wife are close!) related 
through his father's and her mother's side. He has two children, Mrs, Tillie 

ipeyer and V t a-- Sunstein, Mrs Speyer being married to Alexander 
1 . Speyer and V 1 a-- to Vimee Rauh, daughter ol \ I Rauh. 

1 ..] man) years Mr. Sunstein has been a member of the Board of IVus 
tees of the Rodcf Shalom 1 ongrcgation, one of the- principal Reformed 
grcgations ol the United States. \t present he tn turer of the congre- 
gation ami t hairman of its Ccmetcrj 1 ommittee. He 1- al-" Treasurer of 




the Irene Kaufmann Settlement, the Westmoreland Country Club and West- 
ern Pennsylvania American Jewish Relief Committee, Trustee of the Federa- 
tion of the Jewish Philanthropies of Pittsburgh, the Emma Farm and I'.'nai 
B'rith Orphanage and Home for Friendless Children. District No. 3. In the 
latter institution Mr. Sunstein acted as Chairman of the Site Committee which 
located the institution at Erie and also acted as the Chairman of its Building 
Committee, planning and erecting its first buildings. He is also Trustee of 
the National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives at Denver. Colo., and one of 
the Hoard of Managers of Synagogue and School Extension of the Union of 
American Hebrew Congregations. 

Mrs. Sunstein was the first Secretary of the Columbian Council School 
and Settlement, which is now termed the Irene Kaufmann Settlement, and its 
Treasurer until its reorganization, at which time her husband assumed the 
office. She is now Treasurer of the Sisterhood of Rodcf Shalom. 



HENRY SUWALSKY 

No more interesting history is found in the annals of business than that 
of Henry Suwalsky. wealthy fruit and metal dealer of Washington Court 
House, Ohio. 

His education, largely obtained in the stern school of experience, was also 
contributed to by his father, who was a very scholarly man. 

Born in Suwalk, Guberne, Russia. August 15, 1879, he came to- America 
in the fall of 1890. The family found their home in Circleville, Ohio, where 
his father engaged in the junk business, and at the age of twelve years young 
Henrv started to assist him. This he continued for seven years, at which 
time he had saved up enough money to go into business for himself and his first 
venture was in the liquor business at Columbus, Ohio. He continued for four 
years, but not finding it to his liking, sold out and went into the fruit business. 

A few years later he again sold out and going to Mt. Sterling, started an 
iron and metal business. Two and one-half years later we find him with his 
wife, who was formerly Miss Rosa Bernstein, of Columbus, Ohio, on their 
wav to Aberdeen. Wash., where he conducted a store for seven years, and 
right here we believe a word regarding the business talents of Mrs. Suwalsky 
are in order. 

As long ago as the time of Solomon the model woman possessed the 
business gifts which our later civilization is prone to consider new, and in his 
enumeration of the admirable qualities, the wise man lays stress upon her 
wisdom and foresight in worldly matters. 

"She considered! a field and buyeth it," he declares approvingly, and 
doubtless he would heartily commend the business acumen which is shown 
by women in America today, especially if accompanied by womanly grace and 
refinement. 

Such a woman is Mrs. Suwalsky, who not only assisted her husband in 
all of his business ventures, but has remained in Portland, ( >re., to manage 
"The White House," a store which he started just before returning to ( )hio. 

At the present time he not only conducts a large iron and metal yard, but 
does a large business in wholesale fruits. 

Mr. Suwalsky's advice to the young contains the same thought that has 
provided the right policy for so many successful business men : 

"Be honest, work hard and go into business for yourself." 

Thev have one young son. fourteen years of age, who is being given 
excellent educational advantages and is also receiving instruction on the 
piano. 

Mr. Suwalkv is a member of the congregation in Columbus, Ohio, the 
Woodmen of the World and the Eagles. 

299 



FRANK SWIDLOW 

Prominent in the business life of Marion, < 'hi< >. maj be mentioned the 
name of Mr. Frank Swidlow. 

Perhaps no one man has suffered more hardship and privation in his 
struggle upward toward success than Frank Swidlow. < (nlj himself and the 
wife who braved with him the darkness of misfortune "ill ever know the 
full price which they paid for the happiness they now enjoy. 

lie was born in \ itobsk, Guberne, Russia, November i. iss_>. his father. 
Samuel Swidlow, being a grain merchant and also a man of considerable 
scholarship. 

Mi- came to America in December, 1003. landing first in Montreal, where 

he remained for only a short time. Here he met and married Miss Helen 
Cohen, and later events showed that in her he found a fitting partner to share 
days of both adversity and prosperity. 

He next came to Columbus, Ohio, where he secured a position as day 
laborer at the meager wage of thirteen cents per hour, lie had hut $i8 in the 
world, and himself and wife were compelled to endure hunger and cold, 
sleeping on the floor for the first six weeks. However, within one year he 
had saved $153.50, sufficient capital to go into the junk business. 

Thinking the citj of Marysville offered more opportunity, he moved bis 
business there and remained five years. Then followed one year in Marion. 
( >hio. which was later to be bis permanent home. < ioing to Columbus, he en- 
gaged in the general merchandise business, but was so unfortunate as to lose 

everything. 

Returning to Marion at the personal solicitation of friends in the banking 
business, who were firmly convinced of his ability and integrity, he again 
started a junk yard, which has grown to the enormous business which he 
conducts at the present time. 

The Swidlows have two small children, one bov and one girl. 

Mr. Swidlow is a member of Ahgudas Acham in Columbus, < 'bio. the 
Temple in Marion, and both he and his wife contribute- generously to all char- 
ities, including the Los Angeles and Denver hospitals and the ( Irphans' Home 
of 1 leveland. 



JOSEPH ARYS TAHL 

We occasionally find in business and civic life a man of such rare versa- 
tility and executive ability that he can turn his attention to a number of 
ill projects and bring them all to a most successful lennin.it ion. 

Such a man is Mr. Joseph Tahl. who, only thirty-three years of age, has 
attracted a great deal of attention in business circles. 

\t the earl) age of eighteen years he w as honored with election as \ssist- 

aril 5 Mid Treasurer of Dayton City Club, which responsible position 

he held tor two \ears with gnat credit to himself, lb- then resigned t" be 
..■in. associated with his father in the linn of Tahl ,\ Factor, and for two 

years directed bis entire energies toward the development of this business. 

November 30, 1909, Mr. Tahl was married to Miss Sadie Baneman, the 
daughter of Mr Ben Baneman, a man of prominence in commercial circles 
of Dayton. Mr. ["ahl's removal to t incinnati in 1916 met with deep regrel 
on tin- part ot" ins many friends in Dayton, lb- there associated himself with 

his lather an. I Mr. Ham Blasburg under die firm name of Queen (in Rag >\ 

Paper < ompany, which is now recognized as one of the mosl successful busi 

uess In, uses in tin- , 

300 



Mr Tahl is Treasurer and verj capablj takes care- of hi- business 
interests. 

I he Tahls have two daughters, who are attending public school, and show 
great promise for the future. 

Although Mr. Tahl'- business interests occupj considerable time, he does 
not neglect the various charities in which he is interested, lit- is Chairman 
of Price Hill Hebrew School and has arranged that a genial, kindly atmos- 
phere surround children at all times, 

He is an active member of the Masons and Odd Fellows, and is a gen- 
erous contributor to the Los Angeles and Denver sanitariums, a- well as 
man) other institutions for the alleviation of suffering. 



ALFRED TANZER 

Winn Mr. Alfn-d Tamer of Monessen, Pa., first landed on these shores 
he was a well-educated young man of twenty-two, the graduate of a gymna- 
sium and a graduate lawyer. I lis family preceded him in coming to this coun- 
try, and SO, though there wire excellent prospects for him in his native land 
and emigrating to America was staking all on one card and talcing a tre- 
mendous risk, he nevertheless decided In yo to America and cast his lot with 
his parents and Other relatives. Mr. Tanzer was bom On May 28, [871, at 

Rosenberg, Lopto County, Hungary, the sun of Maximilian and Rosalia Tan- 
zer. Rosalia Tanzer is at present living in New York. The family counts 
among its number prominent rabbis and Jewish scholar-. 

Mr. Tanzer came to America in [893 and began in New York the study 

of law, which he continued for one year. lie then held positions with a 

number of German-language newspapers in different capacities, including that 
of assistant editor. For the next live years he held the position of Secretary 
to the Austro-'Hungarian Consul at Philadelphia and Hazleton, Pa. Later he 

came to Monessen, went into the banking business and has been for the last 
fifteen years the Assistant 'Treasurer of the Monessen Savings and 'Trust 

( ompany. 

Mr. Tanzer is a great communal worker. He is the President of the 
1 ongregation Kneseth Israel of Monessen, an orthodox congregation, where 
he has held his office for six terms, at various periods. For over ten years 
he has been Superintendent of the Sunday School. He is a National Director 

of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society of America, tin- Denver and Los An- 
geles Sanitarium for Consumptives, and was President of the local B'nai 

B'rith Lodge. He was also elected 'Treasurer of the Jewish Religious 'Teach- 
ers' Association of Western Pennsylvania, which was organized by tin- late 
Rabbi Dr. Levy of Pittsburgh, In addition, he was President of the local 
Chamber of Commerce and is now President of the Associated Charities of 
Monessen (non-sectarian). He was also Chairman of the Central Committee 

in both Liberty Loan campaigns and due to his ceaseless efforts the allotment 
for the district in the second issue was three times oversubscribed. 

1 In lune 27, [897, Mr. 'Tanzer was married to Lottie Friedman, and they 
have lour children. Edith, Miriam. Milton and Elizabeth. Edith is a student at 
the State Normal College and she, along with the other 'Tanzer children, has 
the distinction of graduating early and with honors. 



301 



SAM TEPER 



Perhaps no immigrant coming to our shores ever started life with less 
opportunities or has risen to a position of more prominence and usefulness in 
his community than Mr. Sam Teper of Detroit, Mich. 

Mr. Teper was born in Kovel, Russia, May 15, 1890, and came to Amer- 
ica in October, 1906. He landed in Philadelphia, where he worked in a ship- 
yard at $6 per week. Two months later he went to Chelsea, Mass., where 
he worked in a junk shop for six months. He then went to Detroit and with 
a small capital of $400 started in business for himself. Some time later he 
formed a partnership with Mr. Pevian, which continues at the present time, and 
they are doing a most nourishing business, their plant being located at 117- 
119-121 Wilkins street. 

Mr. Teper was married in October, 191 1, to Miss Ethel Levine, and they 
have four children, the eldest of whom will be ready to go to school this year. 

Mr. Teper is not content to selfishly enjoy his 
prosperity, but is prominent in the promotion of 
every charitable and philanthropic enterprise which 
is brought to his attention. He liberally supports 
the Denver Tubercular Hospital and also the Old 
People's Home of Detroit. He is a member of the 
Jewish Hospital and is also affiliated with a num- 
ber of fraternal organizations, prominent among 
them being the Odd Fellows, Jewish National 
Workers, Talmud Torah and contributes to the 
Gona Luda Kindergarten. 

Mr. Teper's religious convictions are very 
clearly defined and he is a devout attendant at Con- 
gregation Rovna Volin. 

Upon such citizenship is the usefulness and 
prosperity of our cities, states and nations based. 

Mr. Teper is still a very young man and has 
a long life of usefulness to his community still before him. 
best type of hustling, clean-cut business man. 




He represents the 



DANIEL TEMCHIN 



Under another heading in this biographical work will be found the life 
historv of Mr. Samuel Cooper, of the firm of Cooper & Temchin. 

It is now our pleasure to relate the events in the career of his partner, 
.Mr. Daniel Temchin. who is also one of the most able business men of 
Detroit. 

Mr. Temchin was born in Guberne, Russia, July 17. 18S1). llis father 
was an accomplished scholar and a dealer in cotton bedding. He came to 
America in 1910 and finding llis way to Detroit, began working in a candy 
factory at $7.50 per week. He continued for eight weeks and then obtained 
employment as foreman in an iron and scrap metal establishment. I Hiring this 
time lie was sending money to Russia for the support of his family, hut by 
the exercise of the greatest economy was also able to save a small capital, 
with which to go into business fur himself, llis lirst venture was on Brady 
street, where he remained for one year, then sold out and engaged in business 
with his present partner, Mr. Cooper. 

( Ine <>f the finest traits of Jewish character is their willingness to lend 
aid to members of their families in order to sec them established in business. 

302 



Iii this Mr. Temchin has followed the best traditions ol 1 » i — race, having 
Jit his brother over from Europe and established him in the metal busi- 
ness al a i osl of about $1 

Mr. Temchin was married in Russia in March, 1907, to Miss Rivka Gen- 
dclman. The) have three children, two t;i rl> and one boy, who arc going '" 
school. The family is Mill in Russia and there will be a happy reunion in 
Detroit when conditions in the war zone permit of their joining Mr. Temchin. 
Mr. Temchin i- a devout member of < ongregation Beth Jacob, being 
retarj for five years. He was also Vice Presidenl for two /ears of 
rurover Unterstizung Ferein. He is also a member of the Workingman's 
Circle and contributes to Denver Sanitarium, Detroit Jewish Hospital and 
Talmud Torah. 



JACOB TOPOLOSKY 

To young people educated in America and enjoying all the advantages 
ol our business opportunities, the stories of some of the hardships endured 
by immigrants coming to this country sound almost like fiction. 

Such a story is that of Jacob Topolosky, who was born in Suwalk, 
tmberne, Russia, February 15, 1859, and came to America in June, 1884. 
rhree years prior to Ids coming to America he was married to Miss flattie 
I'.unisuin. but his wife did not accompany him, as it was thought best that he 
become established in the new land before assuming the burden of supporting 
his family. 

Landing in Mew York, he was sent by a charitable committee to a farm 
in Xi-u Jersey, where he remained for several years, working mr $15 per 
month and board. 

However, he did not feel that he was adapted t" Ins work, and after 
sending for his wife and children, he began peddling with a pack. Meeting 
with no success, he came to Ohio and landed in Circleville, without money, 
but with an unbeatable spirit which inspired the confidence of some charitable 
Jews. 1 Ibtaining from them enough money to purchase a horse and wagon, 
he bes;an peddling junk, assisted by one of his suns, and here began the 
remarkable success which has made him one of the most respected and influ- 
ential nun of Circleville, Ohio. 

He is today a very large shipper of iron and metal-, doing a business of 
international scope. 

Mr. and Mrs. Topoloskj are the parents of nine children, eight boys and 
one girl, all of whom are in business and doing well. 

They have given two sons to the service of their country, their sun Will 
being a sergeant in the Rainbow Division of the U. S. Army, and Joseph, 
who was formerl) assistant manager of the business. 

A feminine member of the Topolosky family has also displayed great 
business ability, the daughter being bookkeeper of her father's large business 

Mr. Topolosky is a member of the Knight- of Joseph and both himself and 
wife contribute liberallj to all charitable organizations, regardless of race or 
religious creed. 



303 



DAVID TREICHLINGER 

Anions; the Jewish citizen-; of St. Louis, Mo., mention must be made of 
Mr. David Treichlinger, of the Rosen Reichardt Brokerage Company, 4-!? 
South Seventh street. Not onlj is Mr. Treichlinger a well-known communal 
and social figure, but lie i- foremost whenever Jewish affairs are in the lime- 
light, and his advice is eagerrj sought by people of all conditions in life. In 
fact, his name has become a synonym for all that is good and noble, ami the 
love and reverence of his community have endeared him to hundreds. 

Born in Strakonitz, Bohemia, on the i8th of December, iS;_>. he is the 
son of Herman and Anna t Bloch) Treichlinger, who both died in this coun- 
try. December 18 proved an important 'late in Mr. Treichlinger's life, as it 
was also on that day. in 1869, that the young man found himself in a new 
country, where the 17-year-old boy became a resident. 

lie at first had difficulty in finding employment, hut finally became con- 
nected with the linn of Jacob Furtli of St. Louis, Mo., where he staved for 
several years. In [880 lie became a partner of the firm and its name was 
changed i" Jacob Furth & < .'<>. For five years the partnership was in existence. 
until, in 1885, Mr. Treichlinger decided to go into business for himself, and 
he opened a brokerage office, dealing in groceries, and became a commission 
merchant. In due time it became known as the Rosen Reichardt Brokerage 
Company, and it is among the best known in its line. 

Having thus established a business. Mr. Treichlinger turned to the needs 
of those "more unfortunate than ourselves." and became an active force in 
Jewish social, communal and charity life. lie became President of the Jewish 
Educational Alliance. Temple Israel and is now Vice President of the Jewish 
1 Printable and Educational Association and a Director of the Mount Sinai 
Cemetery Association. But this list does not exhaust the extent of Mr. 
Trechlinger's charitable interests, and he contributes freely whenever his 
purse is appealed to. 

Mr. Treichlinger has served as President of Ilm Lzra Lodge, of the B'nai 
P.'rith. and he is a member of the Cornerstone Masonic Lodge of St. Louis, 
lie is also a member of the WestWOOd and Mercantile clubs and of the Hospi- 
tal Saturday and Sunday Association. In religion. Mr. Treichlinger is a Re- 
former. He received a good Jewish education and is the son of Orthodox 
parents. 

< hi January 14. 1880, Mr. Treichlinger was married to Miss Lertha 
Frensdorf of Hudson. Mich. Mrs. Treichlinger became interested in all of 
her husband's social activities and for years has been connected with the 
Hospital Saturday and Sundav Association. She is also Vice President of the 
Gertrude Society anil the Treasurer of the Ladies' Auxiliary of Temple Israel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Treichlinger are the parents of one daughter, who is now 
Mr-. Florence Salinger, of St. Louis. She is the mother of two children. 
David and Herman, aged, respectively, fourteen and twelve. 

"Push and energy" is Mr. Treichlinger's motto. It was boundless 
limitless energy which would never stop -hurt of its goal that brought him 
success, and it is this quality which so effectually asserted itself in all of his 
dealings. 



ISAAC TOPPER 

Mr. Isaac Topper of t olumbus, 1 'bio. i- an example of Jewish personal- 
it) at it- best, which ha- been refined and humanized in the lire- of adversit) 

and by this process has been made fit for the highest citizen-hip. 

Mr. Topper was born in Bialostok, Russia, March 17. 1866, the -on of 

Joseph Topper, a grain merchant During bis earl) years he had no oppor- 

KM 



tunity of acquiring even a common school education, as he had to work to earn 
a living not only for himself but to assist the other members of his family. 
Nevertheless, the ambition for success survived all hardships and when a young 
man he came to America, where he worked on a farm for the first six months. 
He then started peddling in the country, and after ten years of this work went 
to Toledo, ( )hio, and became a member of the police force. Six months of 
this life convinced Mr. Topper that he was better fitted for a commercial 
career, so he again started peddling in the country, where he remained for 
two years, and then went to Columbus, Ohio, opening a scrap iron yard. 

A year later he took into partnership with him his brother Max, and 
today they are operating a large and successful business under the firm name 
of Topper Brothers, of which Mr. Isaac is the senior member. 

Mr. Topper was married in Detroit December 4, 1887, to Miss Regina 
Wenk. She bravely shared the vicissitudes of his earlier life and is now en- 
joying with him their later prosperity. 

Prominently known in Columbus society as a charity worker. Mrs. Top- 
per is one of the most generous contributors to both local and national organ- 
izations. Mr. Topper is also very liberal and is engaged in the promotion of 
every important civic enterprise. He is a member of the Board of Trade. 
Chamber of Commerce, was on the Board of Distribution of Relief during 
the flood in 1913, is a member of B'nai B'rith, Breis Sholem, Sons of Joseph, 
Masons, Odd Fellows, Temple of Israel and is Past President of the Congre- 
gation Agudas Acheim. He is of course particularly interested in the promo- 
tion of Jewish movements, but is very liberal in his views and relieves suf- 
fering wherever he finds it, regardless of race or religion. 

The Toppers have three children, one boy and two girls. 



MAX MEIER TOPPER 

Max Meier Topper, one of the most progressive and cleanest-cut young 
business men of Columbus, Ohio, is a type of the thoroughly Americanized 
Hebrew, combining in his personality the finest qualities of his race and the 
liberality which comes of daily contact with people of many classes and per- 
suasions. True to his racial instinct and upbringing, he lends the most cordial 
support to every worthy Jewish movement, but he does not stop there. He 
is a live and aggressive worker in civic reforms in Columbus, Trustee of all 
charities, a member of Congregation Agudas Ancheim, a Mason, Elk, a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, belongs to the Maccabees, is also on the Execu- 
tive Board of the Ohio State Federation of American Zionists and very many 
other worthy organizations and hospitals and is known as a contributor to all 
charities, irrespective of race, creed or religion. 

The story of Max Topper is the story of thousands of other young Amer- 
icans of grit and tenacity, a steady upward climb, made up of the experiences 
which everywhere breed success. He was born in La Pianka Bialostak. Rus- 
sia, June 22, 1877, and arrived in America in the winter of 1878. His father 
was Joseph Topper, owner of a grain mill. 

Transplanted to an alien soil at the age of one, Max grew 7 up under the 
free ruling of America that gives equal chances to all. He started to work 
at the tender age of ten in a tin factory in Toledo at a salary of $2 a week, 
but not being able to help his parents much with a salary, he desired to quit 
and to start peddling, and at the age of twelve was a full-fledged country ped- 
dler, and just to think that a lad of his age had the nerve to make trips lasting 
from thirty, sixty, to ninety days at a time, and kept this up for the next ten 
years, when he gave this up and came to Columbus. After working for his 

305 



brother for one year he was given an equal partnership in the scrap iron 
yard, and not only is this business enough to keep him busy, but he is also inter- 
ested in the American Lathe and Press Co. of Columbus, of which lie was a 

former Director. 

Here is an individual example of the Jewish personality at its best which 
works "tit its salvation in the Face of obstacles, becomes refined and human- 
ized by the process and made lit for the highest citizenship. 

The family of Mr. Topper is an exceptionally charming one, his children, 

two boys and two girls, are all musicall) talented, and his daughter. Matilda, 
who goes to the < ihin State University, and his son, Joseph, who is a pupil of 
the East High School, as well as Mrs. Topper, who was Miss Rebbecca 
Seligman. of Toledo, and whom he married in Toledo. December 4. i8<)8, are 
very well known to the society of Columbus as charity workers whose hearts 
as well as purse are always ready for any charity, irrespective of race, creed 
or religion. 

When asked his advice to the younger generation. Mr. Topper said that 
to respect your parents and elders at all times, always to take advantage of any 

opportunity that presents itself and to try and get the best education possible, 

and to give your fellow man a square and honorable deal at all times. 



PINCUS TROPONSKY 



1 'in of the first citizens of I'ainesville, Ohio, admired and respected for 
his many line traits of character, is Mr. Pincus Troponsky. 

He was born in the village of Walkomies, Russia, July 2. 1885, and 
at the age of fifteen, being fired with ambition for 
greaier opportunities, he came to America. For 
four years he bought and sold junk, and finally 
accumulated enough capital to open a yard in 

I'ainesville. where he has keen ver\ successful. 

After having become well established in busi- 

111 SS, h<- was married to Miss Ida I '.reeuhlatt. a very 
popular young lady of I'ainesville. Their beautiful 
home is now a scicial center utilized for man) of the 

most successful social events in the community. 

They have two children, a small son and 
daughter. 

Mr. Troponsky's advice ni young people is as 
follows: "Work hard, and above all. be honest." 
These are the two principles which have keen mosl 
active in placing him where he is today, 

Possessing a genial kind n\ personality, Mr. 
Troponsk) i- always mosl generous in his gifts 
to the unfortunate, and no charit) appeal- [0 him for aid in vain. 




MX, 



HERMAN TUCH 

To him who reads between the lines, every biographical sketch reveals 
something of the individual, beyond the outlines of occurrences narrated. 

And to him who scans the careers of the Jews who have migrated to this 
country, much can be found of encouragement and inspiration, for their lives 
exhibit those qualities of charity, endurance and devotion to principle which 
are the bulwarks of our civilization. 

Such a life history is that of Herman Tuch, who was born in the year 1866 
in Ivanowitz, Kolisker, Polish Russia, and came to America when a very young 
man, coming over on the famous steamer, "City of Paris," when she made her 
maiden trip. 

Mr. Tuch landed in New York and took the first employment that pre- 
sented itself, that of baker's helper, at $8 per week. Thinking that the South 
might offer better opportunities, he went to Texas, where he sold clothing 
and eyeglasses for three years, but not meeting with the success he expected, 
returned to New York and worked as baker for another year. Again he heard 
the call to the Southland and he spent the next three years in Vera Cruz, 
Mexico City, San Antonio and Houston and Dallas, Texas. 

While Mr. Tuch values very highly some of the experiences which he 
encountered during these years, they were not at all profitable from a financial 
point of view, and he decided to return North, his ultimate destination being 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Here he had to borrow $5 with which to buy up the first lot of junk, which 
he disposed of at a profit, and this humble beginning was the foundation of 
the fortune which he has since amassed. 

Mr. Tuch was married in May, 1891, to Miss Fanny Janoff of Boston, 
Mass., who is very active in all charities, being a member of the Ladies' Aid, 
Ladies' Auxiliary, Council of Jewish Women and many others, for the pur- 
pose of social and civic betterment. 

Not being content in the selfish enjoyment of his success, Mr. Tuch has 
given much assistance to relatives and friends, bringing a sister and brother 
to this country and aiding them until they were well established and happily 
married. 

He also was instrumental in bringing to America two brothers-in-law and 
their families, also another friend of the family, whose boy he educated, pay- 
ing all his expenses at a military training school. 

Mr. Tuch emphasizes the value of an education to a successful career, and 
states positively that to other essentials must be added absolute honesty and 
giving your fellow men a square deal. 

He is a member of the Tree of Life, former President of Polisher Shule, 
third and fourth President of Warshams L'nterstitsing Ferein, is affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Hebrew Institute. 

He is also a liberal subscriber to all national and local charities. 

Such a life is a joy to relatives and friends, and a blessing to the nation 
of his adoption. 



PHILIP ULENDORF 

Mr. Philip Ulendorf is one of the few Jewish settlers at Miami, Fla.,. 
and he is one of those rare and great characters gaining the love and respect 
of all with whom they come in contact. 

He was born on the 1st of March, 1867, in Gross-Schliwitz, West Prussia,, 
the son of Israel and Rosa Ulendorf. He came to America in 1890 and soon 
landed in Mississippi, where he found employment with his brother, who> 

307 



owned a cotton plantation. A short time afterwards he came to Miami and 
went into the meat business, in which he is engaged at the present time. He 
has built up a very large establishment, probably the biggest of its kind in the 
state of Florida. One who has had the good fortune to come into closer con- 
tact with Mr. Ulendorf will readily understand and appreciate the tireless and 
undaunted energy which made it possible for 
him to accumulate his great fortune and make 
him such a prominent factor in the business life 
of Miami. He is one of the principal builders 
of the city and is in a large measure responsible 
for the growth of the place and its flourishing- 
condition. 

Mr. Ulendorf enjoys a high reputation as a 
charitable man and social worker. He was 
elected by the community President of the only 
Jewish congregation in town. A charitable man, 
who gives with a free hand wherever it is re- 
quired and whenever an appeal is made to. him 
he has earned for himself the reputation and 
esteem he enjoys among his neighbors and 
friends 1 . 




On March 31, 189^. Mr. Ulendorf was 



Philip Ulendorf 



married to Miss Jennie Simpson, and they are the parents of twin children, 
Eugene and Annette. 



GOODMAN VELICK 



Life is a story of either constant progress or retrogression. We cannot 
stand still. 

The self-satisfying man works his own undoing. We must either pre- 
pare ourselves for bigger and better opportunities and achievements, or fall 
behind in the race of life. 

These are the sentiments expressed by Mr. Goodman Velick, one of the 
prominent business men of Detroit, Michigan, being President of the Velick 
Scrap Iron and Machinery Company, located at Medbury and Roby Streets, 
on the Grand Trunk Railway. 

Mr. Velick was born in Kurland, Koski, Russia. September 15, i860, 
the son of Jacob and Rachel Velick, his father being a produce merchant 
and also an accomplished scholar. 

Mr. Velick came to America August 10, 1880, and his first years were 
occupied as a lumberman in Michigan. He later settled in Detroit, and went 
into the lumber business, finally turning his attention to the scrap iron busi- 
ness which he is conducting at the present time. 

Mr. Velick was married to Miss Sarah Blumberg, daughter of Moses 
and Jennie Blumberg, and there were nine children of this marriage, six 
bovs and three girls. Three of the sons are connected with their father in 
business, Max M. being Vice President, H. A., Secretary-Treasurer, and 
Samuel, Assistant Manager. Herman Velick, an engineer, is now serving 
his country with the 23rd Engineers in France. Henry and Bernard are 
still in High School, as is also the daughter Ida. Ruth is at home and Rose 
is married. 

The family deeply suffered the loss of their mother some time ago and 
her memorv is still cherished not only in the immediate home circle, but also 
amonj the many friends who knew of her kindness and largeness of, heart. 

.308 



Four of the children are married, H. A., to Miss Ella Stocker ; Max M., 
to Miss Sarah Orman ; Sam, to Miss Lena Hershon, and Rose, to Dr. Hilliard 
Goldstick. 

Mr. Velick is active in all Jewish charities, being Treasurer of the 
Hebrew Protective Association for fifteen years. He is also a member of 
Congregation Mogan Abraham, Talmud Torah, and Odd Fellows. He is 
very generous in his gifts to all worthy organizations. 



LOUIS WAGMAN 

It is a great pleasure to be able to incorporate in this volume the life 
history of one of the leading citizens and business men of Newbury Port, 
Mass. We refer to Mr. Louis Wagman, prominent dealer in iron and metal 
scrap, who is manager of the firm of L. Wagman & Son. 

Mr. Wagman was born in Valina, Guberne, Russia, in 1866, the son of 
Elias Wagman, prominent manufacturer of his native town, from whom he 
doubtless inherited considerable business ability. He came to America in May, 
1900, and went direct to Chelsea, Mass., where he worked in a junk shop for 
the small salary of $7 a week, in order to acquire the necessary experience to 
go into business for himself. Four years later he embarked upon his venture, 
and after three years in Chelsea, came to Newburyport, where he is now doing 
a fine business. 

Mr. Wagman was married in Russia to Miss Annie Schwarzman, and 
they have five children, two boys and three girls. Aleck is in business with his 
father, and is also interested in a shoe manufacturing concern in Epping, 
N. H. Abraham is in business for himself in Newburyport. Both sons are 
married and are prominent in such fraternal organizations as the Knights of 
Pythias, the Federation of American Zionists and Sons of Zion. 

Mr. Wagman is a member of Congregation Hia Hia, I. O. B. A. and 
D. M. J. Both himself and wife are liberal contributors to charity. 



SAMUEL WAGNER 

Perth Amboy, N. J., ought not to be omitted from the list of towns where 
Jews of importance reside. There is Samuel Wagner, "the father of the 
city." He had earned this cognomen from the great mass of Jewish followers 
whom he had gained during the many years of his stay in that city, and he is 
universally beloved and respected. 

Here is a partial list of Mr. Wagner's organizational connections: A 
National Director of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society and of the Denver 
Sanitarium for Consumptives, Treasurer of the Congregation Beth Mordecai 
of Perth Amboy, Treasurer of the Progress Club, ex-President and Deputy of 
the I. O. B. A. (United Hebrew Lodge) ; he had been for six years Treasurer 
of the Hebrew Free Loan Society, he is active in the order Sons of Zion, and 
there is scarcely a Jewish activity in town where his personal influence is not 
felt. 

Mr. Samuel L. Wagner was born on the 13th of December, 1858, in 
Drohobycz, Galicia, as the son of Ezekiel and Sheindel Wagner. He came 

309 



to America in 1892. He settled in Newark, N. J., where he engaged in the 
sale of merchandise on installments. He then learned the trade of manufac- 
turing pants, and in six months thereafter, amid severe struggles and fighting 
every step of his way, he opened a little shop for himself, while his wife 
worked in the millinery business. After eleven years spent in this fashion in 
Newark, he moved to Perth Amboy, where he established a commission house 
of butter and eggs with his son-in-law, Mr. Max Wurzel (see biographical 
sketch in Volume One), under the firm name of Wagner & Wurzel. The 
business was a success from the start, and Mr. Wagner has already retired, 
devoting his entire time to public affairs. 

In 1882 Mr. Wagner was married to Miss Mira Bernstein. She stood 
by her husband through thick and thin and shared all his early struggles, and 
she has brought up two splendid daughters, the elder of whom is married to 
Mr. Wurzel, and the younger being the wife of Mr. Leon Goldstein, City 
Attorney of Perth Amboy. 



LEON WEIL 

The career of Mr. Leon Weil is strongly identified with Montgomery, 
Ala., the city of his birth and where he resides today as a well-known and 
more than locally prominent attorney. Mr. Leon Weil's father, now dead, 
Henry Weil, was also one of the leading citizens of this blooming southern 
city and also served there in the capacity of Alderman while the town was still 
in its infancy. Montgomery is not an old town by any means and belongs 
to that class of southern cities which have risen rapidly and have a great 
future in store. And Mr. Weil is typical of Montgomery. 

He was born on the 20th of March, 1873, and attended the elementary 
schools of his native town, after which he took a preparatory course for col- 
lege in one of the city's private schools. He was graduated from the law school 
of the University of Alabama in 1893 an d was admitted to the bar of the 
state in January, 1894. Since that time he has never lacked clients, and his 
offices are located at the First National Bank Building, where he acts as junior 
partner of the well-known law firm of Steiner, Crum & Weil. 

Mr. Weil is a Trustee of the Alabama Congregation, was President of 
the local B'nai B'rith Lodge and was many times Delegate to the district 
convention of his lodge. He was the first President of the strictly Jewish 
Woodley Country Club, was a Trustee of the Standard Club, Vice President 
of the Chamber of Commerce, Chairman of the Liberty Loan campaign of 
the county. He is a member of the local, state and national bar associations. 

Mr. Leon Weil was married on January 10, 1900, to Miss Mamie Greil, 
who is also a native of Montgomery. Three children have blessed this union, 
named Janice, Mena and Helene. Mrs. Weil is prominently connected with 
many social organizations, was President of the local Council of Jewish 
Women and repeatedly a Delegate to their conventions. She was also Presi- 
dent of the local Federation of Women's Clubs and held office in the State 
Federation of Women's Clubs. 

Reform Judaism is Mr. Weil's religious creed and he is very sincere and 
devoted to it. 



310 



FELIX WEIL 

Orange. Texas, is a rather inconspicuous lirtle town, but it contains some 
of the finest Jewish families. There is. for example. Felix Weil, who bears a 
very prominent family name. We have all heard of Alexander Weil, a well- 
know-n Alsatian who was one of the early fighters for German freedom, and 
a follower of Heine. Felix Weil is a descendant of this family. 

He was bom in Alsace on the 15th of February. 1S6S. the son of Simon 
and Florette 1 Sichel 1 Weil, and came to America at the age of twenty. He 
landed in Xew York, and for ten months was employed as a butcher. He 
then came to Klotzville. La., where he was clerking for a while and working as 
a bookkeeper. Seven years later he went to Xew Orleans, and after a series 
of little excursions to many towns and villages in the country, he finally set- 
tled in Orange. Texas, in 1002. Here he started a clothing and gents" fur- 
nishings store under the firm name of Weil & Bernheim. becoming the sole 
owner in 1907. His place is now run under the name of Felix Weil, and is 
located at 500. Front street. Orange. Texas. 

Mr. Weil came to America to escape intolerable military service in the 
Prussian army, and he is verv anxious to prove his loyalty and devotion to the 
countrv of his adoption, which is now fighting for die freedom of his native 
Alsace. He is prominent socially and plays an important part in the work of 
his community. He is one of the four commissioners of the city of Orange. 
He is a well-known Mason and Elk. a Knight of Pythias. Woodman, member 
of the B'nai B"rith Lodge and other national organizations. 

Mr. Weil was married on the .26th of February. 1913. to Adele Leveson. 
and they are the parents of one child. Mrs. Weil is prominently identified 
with Red Cross work. 



NATHAN WEINBERG 

Mr. Xathan Weinberg, owner of highly successful millinery shops in 
Hoboken and Tersev City, came to America at the age of nineteen. He was 
the son of Pincus and EHna Weinberg, very prominent in their native city of 
Cracow. Austria, and who were the largest hardware dealers in the town. 
However, his parentage availed him but little and Xathan was obliged to work 
hard to maintain himself in the new land. Xathan Weinberg was bom in Cra- 
cow on Februarv 21, 1S75. an d i J - perhaps, the most prominent man today in 
the large colonv which Cracow contributed to American Jewry. 

When Mr. Weinberg started to work in the new countrv - he went to St. 
Louis. Mo., and entered a shirt factory, where he worked for S3 per week. 
But he rose almost from the start, and in the brief space of a year was earn- 
ing between S12 and S15 per week. He was so economical in his ways that 
he w-as able to save up S300. and he possessed so much energy and will power 
that this sum. meager as it was. was not too little for him to start business 
with. He was success ful enough to receive a credit of Si. 000. and he went 
to make his fortune with confidence in the future and a full conviction of 
undaunted hones:;. 

Encouraged by the success he found. Mr. Weinberg turned to Xew York, 
where, on Tanuarv 12. 1901. he married Miss Gussie Shoengut. who has since 
become his inseparable partner in life and who guided him through every busi- 
ness deal, standing by his side and adding her wise counsel to Mr. Weinberg's 
business skill and integrity. To be a business man. honest, reliable and trust- 
worthv. was Mr. Weinberg's guiding principle in life. .He went to Long 
Island, where he established a retail millinery and shoe store, and in 1901 

oil 



went to Jersey City with a capital of $126, where he started business at Xo. 
623 Newark avenue, a place where he still conducts his millinery establish- 
ment, in addition to the two stores in Hoboken, at 302 Central avenue and 
306 Washington street. 

In addition to his regular business, Mr. Weinberg is also interested in a 
wholesale business with his brother-in-law, and is the owner of considerable 
real estate in Brooklyn, and, with his brother-in-law, in West Hoboken. 

Mr. Weinberg is connected with nearly every charitable organization in 
Hudson County, is a member of the Krakauer Charities, the Independent 
Krakauer Hebrew Sheltering Home, the Montefiore Home, Temple Beth El, 
the Denver Sanitarium and many more. From his grandfather, a well-known 
Cracow "gvir," Mr. Weinberg inherited his taste for charity, and there is 
scarcely a cause to which he would not contribute, not only considerable sums 
of money, but what is more important, his personal and close interest and his 
big Jewish heart. 



CHARLES WEINBERGER 



If any southerner were asked to name the wealthiest man or the most 
influential political leader in the city of Xew Orleans, La., many names would 
probably be given. If asked, however, for the name of the most popular and 
the most charitably inclined resident of that city, among the very first names, 
indeed, the first name, perhaps, to be mentioned would undoubtedly be that of 
Charles Weinberger. 

Mr. Weinberger's career is as interesting as it is instructive. He was 
born to his parents. David Weinberger and Marie Stern, on March 28, 1875, 
at Austin, Texas. He attended the public schools at Galveston, Texas, and at 
the early age of thirteen he began to work as a clerk in a store of that city. 
In 1892 he left Texas and came to Xew Orleans in an effort to obtain a better 
position. After a short stay there he went to Mobile, Ala., where he spent 
four years in hard work, and then returned to Xew Orleans, where he en- 
gaged in the fruit business. His keenness of intellect, 
his magnetic personality, and his sympathetic attitude 
to persons and things gained for him both popularity 
and prominence from the very start, while his abilitv 
and capacity for leadership have received such true 
recognition and acknowledgment that he has been en- 
trusted by the Fruit Dispatch Company, one of the 
largest and leading business institutions of the whole 
country, with the managership of its southern division. 
His business interests extend also to a large Central 
American enterprise. 

Mr. Weinberger's prominence and the effects of 
his fine leadership are felt, admired and appreciated, 
not only commercially, but also in the numerous char- 
itable, social and fraternal organizations with which 
lie is connected. Thoroughly modern, liberal and 
broad-gauged in his views, he has a fine appreciation 
of Jewish values and is deeply religious. He takes an 
active interest in the affairs of the Temple Sinai Congregation and has served 
as a Director of the Young Men's Hebrew Association and as a Vice President 
of the Federation of Jewish Charities. He is a thirty-third degree Mason and 
holds the position of Illustrious Potentate of Jerusalem Temple, A. A. O. X. 
M. S. In the latter organization his high standing and great influence are 

312 




attested to by the fact that at his solicitations and through his efforts a large 
and beautiful new building is being erected for the Shriners at a cost of three 
hundred thousand dollars. His private charities, moreover, which he carries 
on in the true Jewish spirit of silence and secrecy, even exceed his many and 
great contributions of money and the service in kind that he devotes to organ- 
izations and public institutions. 

Mr. Weinberger is married and has one daughter. He was married on 
June 17, 1896. His wife was Miss Rose Marx, a popular young lady of 
Mobile. Ala., and their daughter, Miss Amelia Kate Weinberger, is a young 
lady of artistic talent and temperament, whose work has gained great favor 
with art critics and has been awarded several prizes. 



HARRY WEINGARTEN 

In ancient times every tribe or clan had its seer ; its prophet or wise man, 
whom the people sought for guidance and inspiration. 

As these factions joined together or were welded into nations by the iron 
hand of conquest, the complexities of government correspondingly increased. 
But at every crisis of national affairs the great need has brought with it the man 
of the hour ; one on whom providence seems to have bestowed special gifts as a 
leader of men. 

Thus every nation, every state and every community has its hall of fame, 
and every name worthy to be inscribed therein is that of a mighty torch bearer; 
a toiler in that great field we call the world ; a worker for his fellowmen. 

If you were to go to Flint, Mich., and ask to be introduced to its leading 
citizen ; if vou should go there with plans for some great philanthropy ; if your 
business was entangled and you needed expert advice, any citizen of Flint 
would direct you to Mr. Harry Weingarten, their first citizen, philanthropist, 
successful business man and friend. 

Harry Weingarten was born April 15th, 1875, at Tichen, Russia. His 
father, Myer Weingarten, was a prominent boot manufacturer. 

He came to America at the age of 14, and for the first six years sold fruit 
on the streets of Detroit. He then accepted a position with a fruit house at the 
modest salary of $15.00 per week, taking this opportunity to obtain an excel- 
lent working knowledge of the business. 

At the expiration of this time he came to Flint, Michigan, and opened a 
small fruit store which his unusual executive ability and close application devel- 
oped into a thriving business. This, however, was only the first step toward 
the larger field of activities which later were to claim his attention. 

He still retains one-half interest in the fruit business, but takes no active 
part in the management of the firm, as his time is now fully occupied with 
real estate, which business he has been gradually developing for a number of 
years. Some of the largest real estate transactions consummated in Flint have 
been those of Mr. Weingarten. 

He was married in Buffalo, N. Y., November 29th, 1905, to Miss Libby 
Bresin. and we do not feel that the entire measure of Mr. Weingarten's suc- 
cess can be reckoned without taking into account the many activities" and rare 
capacity for organization which his wife possesses. 

She has seconded his every effort for the betterment of Flint and its peo- 
ple, whom they have served for so many years with unfailing kindness and 
generosity. 

While Mrs. Weingarten is of steadfast Jewish faith, and is so educating 
their three children, her generous, humanitarian instincts are not bounded by 
creed or doctrine. This was well exemplified by the fact that she joined the 

313 



Saint Cecelia Society at a time when it was suffering great financial embarrass- 
ment, and although the only Jewish member of the society, she was elected 
president, thoroughly reorganized it, and in a short time had it running on a 
prosperous basis. She also organized and conducts the Sunday School, and is 
organizer and president of the women's Jewish Aid Society, which has a wide 
reputation and is a wonderful power for good among the poor. 

Mr. Weingarten is a member of B'nei B'rith, Congregation Shara Zedek 
of Detroit, and has active charge of every Jewish movement in Flint. He 
was elected to the Board of the Citizens & Commercial Savings Bank of Flint, 
which position of honor and trust he still holds. Fie had charge of the com- 
mittee that raised $13,000,000 for Jewish war sufferers, and is a liberal con- 
tributor to Denver and Fos Angeles hospitals, the Children's Hospital of Cleve- 
land, and Old Folks Home of Detroit. 

His high business ideals in conjunction with the large measure of success 
which he has attained are an inspiration to the young people of Flint, whose 
welfare he has continually at heart, and coming generations will also bless the 
memory of the man who has so benefited and honored Flint with his residence. 



ISAC WEINMAN 

Descendant of noted family — successful business man and prominent in 
the local Galician Colony of New York City. 

The writer, who has occasion to visit and interview various Jewish person- 
alities in every field of human activity, had particular pleasure in the interview 
which he had with Mr. Isac Weinman. The conversation took much time, 
which Mr. Weinman was kind enough to sacrifice, despite the fact that he is a 
very busy man, and all this time I was held with extreme interest, because both 
the observation of his personality and the story he had to tell are almost fas- 
cinating. 

Not everything that I wanted to know did Mr. Weinman care to answer, 
because he is modest and thinks that he is not of sufficient importance for a 
story with so many details to be evolved about him, but the writer has made 
inquiries in different circles where Mr. Weinman is known, and altogether can 
conscientiously record the following about him : 

Isac Weinman was born December 25, 1875, in Fezaynsk, Galicia. Before 
we talk about his American career it is important to note that Mr. Weinman, 
both from his own and from his wife's side, is connected with noted families, 
and both he and his wife (who is a very accomplished woman, knowing 
Hebrew well) come from the highest Galician Jewish aristocracy. 

Mr. Weinman's father is one of the wealthiest leather merchants in that 
section of the country. He is one of its greatest personalities, and for the last 
twelve years has been the government accredited Kultus Yorstand (burgo- 
master) of Lezavnsk. Mr. Weinman's whole family, all of whom are still in 
Galicia, are very prominent, and one of his brothers, Reb. Anschel, is a famous 
Talmud Chochum, and the leading religious authority in Fezaynsk. 

His wife, whom he married in Galicia on October 20, 1894, wdien he was 
but 19 years of age, descends from one of the greatest Galician Jewish families, 
and is a daughter of Reb. Josef Oehlbaum. The Fikevir Rav, known as Reb. 
Koppel Fikevir, and the famous Gute Yid, Rabbi Shiman, of Jaraslow, were 
her uncles. Mr. and Mrs. Weinman have one daughter, Lilian, who is very 
accomplished. She is a singer of note, and is studying for the operatic stage, 
and a great future is predicted for her. Mr. and Mrs. Weinman have taken 
great pains in rearing their daughter, and she is always the center of interest in 
her circle. 

314 



Like his family history, so is the business career of Mr. Weinman, ex- 
tremely interesting. He came to America in 1898, bringing $100 with him. 
When he was in the country ten days he embarked for himself in the follow- 
ing manner : A countryman of his asked him to lend him $30, telling him 
that he needed the money to buy a joblot of elastics. Young Weinman, having- 
been brought up in business, immediately grasped the idea that if $30 could 
purchase a joblot, why shouldn't his $100 purchase more? He offered himself 
as a partner and was accepted. His "fortune" was soon lost, but Mr. Wein- 
man had already learned the business, and, borrowing $200 from an acquaint- 
ance, started up again and succeeded. Today he is at the head of the Weinman 
Elastic Web Company, at No. 33 Green street, and is the president and treas- 
urer of the Live Leather Belt Company, makers of elastic leather belts, a pat- 
ent of his own. He is estimated to be a very wealthy man, and maintains a 
very beautiful home. 

But the most important feature about Mr. Weinman is his interesting 
personality. He is very charitable, giving freely to every good cause. He is 
a prominent member of the Ohab Zedek Congregation, and is the pillar of sup- 
port of all the relatives of both his and his wife's family in Galicia. Since the 
war in Europe he pays regular weekly allowances to twelve families in Galicia, 
and makes a settlement of a larger sum on any one who agrees to get off the 
list and become self-supporting through obtaining a lump sum of money. This 
support is given with the understanding that none are permitted to accept any 
other relief funds, in order not to deprive those who have no other means of 
support. In addition, he gives a dowry and marries off all the poor girls in 
both families in Galicia. 

Mr. Weinman conducts a strictly Jewish home. He is a very intelligent 
and interesting man, and his life motto has been: "Never judge a man until 
you have been placed in his position." The most interesting feature probably 
is the fact that among his employes he has many men of from 70 to 80 years 
of age ; because, when he started in business, he resolved never to discharge 
an employe, and up to date he has clung tenaciously to this resolution. 



MARCUS J. WEINKLE 

Jacksonville, Fla., is not blessed with many Jews of the better type or of 
aristocracy. As Jacksonville is a comparatively new community, its popu- 
lation is brought together from "all corners of the globe." But nevertheless 
we find there quite a number of really sympathetic Jewish "householders'' of 
the Orthodox type, among whom we must naturally count Mr. Marcus J. 
Weinkle. 

Mr. Weinkle's house represents the best of Jacksonville. He is himself 
an Orthodox Jew, leading a strictly Jewish house, and his wife, Hanna Rose 
(Rotkowsky), is an exceptionally intelligent lady. Her father was a Jewish 
scholar in New York, and one of the founders of Machsikei Talmud Torah, and 
he was also interested in the Yeshiba Etz Chaim. His daughter, the present 
Mrs. Weinkle, was brought up in New York, in a scholarly environment, and 
she acquired a wide education in Jewish and worldly matters. Mr. and Mrs. 
Weinkle, who were married on the 26th day of July, 1904, are the parents of 
two children, Charlotte, aged 12, who is the best Hebrew pupil in Jacksonville, 
and Abraham, a younger son. 

Marcus J. Weinkle was born on the 14th of November, 1865, in a village 
in Alexandrowski, Yekaterinoslav. His father, Judah Zewi, who died on the 
4th of January, 1917, was a scholar and student. His mother, Nahma Freida, 
is still living. 

Mr. Weinkle came to America on the 16th of March. 1890. For the first 

.315 



few months he peddled in New York. He then came to South Carolina, where 
he opened a store. Afterwards he went into the timber and lumber business, 
and in 191 1 he settled in Jacksonville, where he built a beautiful home at 809 
West Duval street. He had already retired from active business, and is 
solely interested in monetary investments. 

Mr. Weinkle was one of the founders of the Immigrant Society of J?.ck- 
sonville ; he is treasurer of the B'nai Israel Congregation and is interested and 
participat