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Full text of "Spiers and Surenne's French and English pronouncing dictionary : newly composed from the French dictionaries of the French Academy, Laveaux, Bescherelle, Landais, and from the English dictionaries of Johnson, Webster, Worcester, Richardson"

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SPIERS AND SURENNE'S 

FRENCH AND ENGLISH 

PKONOUNOING DICTIONARY. 

NEWI Y COMPOSED FROM TEE FRENCH DICTIONARIES OF 

THE FRENCH ACADEMY, LAYEAUX, BOISTE, BESCHERELLE, LANDAIS, ETC, 

AND FROM THE ENGLISH DICTIONARIES OF 

JOHNSON, WEBSTER, WORCESTER, RICHARDSON, ETC. 

CONTAINING A GREAT NUMBER OF WORDS NOT POUND IN OTHER DICTIUNARIB3, 

AND GIVING 

I All the words of both languasjes now in use, as well as those, now obsua'te, but employed by thi 
earlier classic writera ; — 2. The principal terms connected with navigation and military tactics, tlio 
sciences, the arts, manufactures and trade, especially those contained in the Dictionary of the French 
Academy ; — 3. The compounds of words that most frequently occur, particularly such as are not 
literally translated; — 4. The various equivalents of the words in their logical order, separated by 
numbere; — 5. Short sentences and expressions illustrating such acceptations as present any difficulty to 
iiifa stuaent ; — 6. The modifications which the meanings of words undergo, on the addition of adjectivcH, 
prepositions, adverbs, etc. ; — ^7. The principal idioms and familiar phrases; — 8. The prepositions used 
after verbs, adjectives, etc. ; — 9. The irregularities of verbs, of adjectives, of the plurals of noums, 
M<K : — 10. Signs distinguishing between the literal and figurative use of words, showing whether 
Uiey are antiquated or rarely employed, and the style to which they belong : 

FOLLOWED BY 

^ COMPLETE VOCABULARY OF THE NAMES OF PLACES AND PERSONS, MYTHOLOGICAL 
AND CLASSICAL, ANCIENT AND MODERN. 

BY A. SPIERS, 

or KKQLTBH AT THE NATIONAL OOLLKaK OF BOMAPABTK (PARIS) AND TH« NATIONAL gOllOOL OF OIVIL KNGINBKiBJ, PUl 



CAREFULLY REVISED, CORRECTED, AND ENLARGED, 

Wrm THF »>RONUNOIATION OF BAOH WOKD ACCORDING TO THE SYSTEM OP STJRKNNK's PRONOUNOINU 
rUOTIONAKY ; TOGETHER WITH THE IRREGULAR PARTS OF ALL THE IRREGULAR VERBS, IN 
ALPHABETICAL ORDER; THE PRINCIPAL FRENCH STN0NTME8 ; IMPORTANT ADDI- 
TIONAL DEFINITIONS, ILLUSTRATIONS, IDIOMS, PHRASES, AND GRAMMATI- 
CAL remarks; AND FOUR THOUSAND NEW WORDS OF GENERAL 
LITERATURE, AND MODERN SCIENCE AND ART: 



G. P. QUACKENBOS, A. M. 



ISTEW YORK: 
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY, 

1907. 



Ektbrsu, acwrding to act of Congress, in the year ISBt, by 

D APPLETON & CO., 

IB U>e Clerk's Office of the DiMrict Court of the United States for the Southern' Diatrict of Nev-Toik. 



A ! 



PEEFACE 

BY THE AMEEICAN EDITOR. 



The want of a good French-Englisli and English-Frencli Dictionary haa 
been so long and so sensibly felt, that no apology is necessary for presenting 
this volume to the American public. The time-honored works of Boyer and 
Chambaud, reproduced during the past century and a half in a multitude 
of different forms, but still the same in their inaccuracies, deficiencies, and 
total lack of proper arrangement, should certainly before this late period, 
have been superseded by more reliable and useful original compilations- 
Lexicography should have kept pace with the changes and additions which 
have been made in both languages by successive advances in literature,, 
Bcience, and art. The difficulty of original compilation, however, as com- 
pared with mere imitation, long deterred the scholars of both countrie» 
from attempting any improvement in this department of science ; and it 
was left for Professor Spiers to take the initiatory step in the proper 
direction. Passing beyond the restricted limits to which others had con- 
tined themselves, and not content with the antiquated authorities which 
they had exclusively and servilely followed, Spiers made an entirely new 
compilation, elaborated from the latest and best sources in both languages^ 
and containing, to an extent before unapproached, the new terms which 
new necessities had created. The favor with which his work has beeD 
everywhere received by students, is suflicient proof of its merits as a prac- 
tical book of reference ; while the praises lavished upon it even by the 
most captious critics, are but just tributes to the judgment, research, and 
scholarship of its autiior. 



IV PREFACE. 

The plan of the work having been explained at length, and its dxann 
guishiug features fully set forth in the Author's Preface to the Paris edition 
hereto subjoined, it remains for the American Editor merely to state what 
improvements he has made, and what new features he has introduced, for 
the' purpose of rendering it in every way worthy of the respect and approval 
of his countrymen 

The first object of the Editor was the attainment of perfect accuracy ; 
and to ensure this the whole work was subjected to a rigid revision. It 
was found that the original text abounded in errors of every kind. Noung 
were called- adjectives, and adjectives adverbs ; accents were omitted by 
scores ; the reference-numbers were often wrong, through entire paragraphs, 
and words necessary to the sense left out; crabbed and ungrammatical 
English was employed ; in a word, there was every variety of mistake 
calculated to mislead the pupil in the grossest manner. More than three 
thousand errors, which still deface the Paris edition, have been corrected 
in this volume. 

It is now admitted that no French and English Dictionary should be 
put into the hands of a beginner, which does not supply the pronunciation 
of every word. In our country particularly, where there are so many xocal- 
Ities destitute of all facilities for the acquisition of French, a Dictionary 
ought in this respect to be a complete and reliable guide. It has, there- 
fore, been deemed absolutely essential in the present work to accompany 
each word with its exact pronunciation ; and for this purpose the notation 
•of Surenne's celebrated Dictionary has been adopted, not only as being 
more simple and precise than any other, but as having already passed 
unscathed the ordeal of criticism. By the aid of his system, which is else- 
where fully explained, the sound of each word is indicated as given by 
the acknowledged standards of orthoepy in both languages. 

Superior in fullness of definition as the French-English part of Spiers', 
work undoubtedly is, it was found that not a few acceptations occurring 
as well in the classical as in the living writers of France are omitted. 
The deficiency has here been supplied by the insertion of aJ those senses 
nhich could be gleaned from an extended course of reading. These new 
definitions, including additional versions of phrases which have been sup- 
plied as appropriate to difierent styles, are no less than three thousand in 
DumDer. The various definitions and their proper construction are also 
fiirther elucidated by occasional grammatical remarks, and by the addition 



PREFACE. V 

of nearly one thousand illustrative clauses and sentences. Four thousand 
new phrases and idioms in common use, have likewise been incorporated, 
for the benefit of those who wish to acquire a conversational knowledge 
of a tongue which may almost be regarded as the vernacular of the whole 
European continent. 

The Editor believes that another feature which has been introduced 
into this volume greatly adds to its usefulness, especially in the case of 
those who have occasion to translate English into French. He refers to 
the remarks on synonymes, in which he has pointed out in the compass 
of a few lines their distinctive shades of meaning, and illustrated them by 
such examples as can leave no doubt as to their proper use. About 
twelve hundred synonymous terms are thus explained. 

No student of the French language can have failed to experience the 
difficulty occasioned by the numerous iri'egularities of its verbs. To remove 
this, all the irregular parts, as well of the compound as of the simple 
verbs, have been inserted in alphabetical order, to the number of four 
thousand ; so that a single reference gives the mood, tense, person, num- 
ber, and the infinitive under which the meanings of the verb are to be 
found. This addition will be appreciated by all who remember their first 
lessons in French translation. 

"When it is added that four thousand new French words connected with 
science, art, and general literature, have been inserted, the Editor will 
have completed the account of his labors. Tliese terms have been taken 
only from the best sources. They have been selected to a considerable 
extent trom the departments of medicine, surgery, and chemistry, the value 
or the French text-books in these branches of science rendering it highly 
important that our students and professional men should encounter no diffi- 
culty in reading and understanding them. 

No addition or alteration has been made that is not authorized by 
competent authority. To enumerate all the sources from which material 
has been drawn, would be as tedious as it is unnecessary. Among the 
more important French works to which the Editor is indebted, he would 
mention : Dictionnaire de I'Acad^mie Fran9aise (sixi^me Edition) ; Comple- 
ment du Diet, de I'Acad^mie Franyaise ; Bescherelle's Diet. Nationel; 
Landais' Diet, des Dictionnaires ; Boiste's Diet. Universel ; Schuster's 
Nouveau Diet. Allemand-Fran9ais et Frangais-Allemand ; Laveaux' Nouveau 
Diet. : Diet, du Commerce et des Marchandises : Diet, de Marine a Voiles 



VI PREFACE. 

et k Vapeur, Spiers' Manuel des Termes du Commerce Anglais et Fran 
^ais ; Duvivifai-'s Grammaire des Grammaires ; Guizot's Nouveau Diet 
Universel des Synonymes de la Langue FranQaise ; Laveaux' Diet. Eaisonnd 
des Difficult^s Grammaticales et Litt^raires de la Langue Fran9ai8e ; etc., etc 

The strictest care having been exercised in the correction of the proofs, 
it is believed that as great a degree of typographical accuracy has been 
attained as is possible in a work of such magnitude and difficulty. 

With these prefatory observations the Editor commits his work to the 
American world. He can only wish that the favor it shall receive, mav 
be proportionate to the labor expended in its preparation. 

G. P. QUACKEII^OS. 



PREFACE 

TO THE PARIS EDITiOIS 



The plan of this dictionary was conceived and matured fourteen years since, in 1835 ; 
it was submitted to the Minister of Public Instruction of France (Monsieur Guizot) 
and the Minister of Public Works, who approved it highly and promised it encourage- 
ment. Under their auspices the work was commenced ; and it has been prosecuted not- 
withstanding innumerable diflficulties. My deficiency, which I willingly avow, I have 
endeavored to compensate by constant research ; and when this has been unavailing, I 
have had recourse to the knowledge of others, which has rarely been withheld. 

But neither my own researches nor the learning of others have protected me from 
errors inseparable from such & work. Our great lexicographer Johnson having been 
asked by a lady how he could have defined pastern the knee of a horse, " Ignorance^ 
Madam, pure ignorance" answered ho. Assuredly to similar interrogations I may be 
allowed to offer by anticipation a similar reply. 

This work contains, besides the words in ordinary use, the principal terms of the 
sciences, the arts, manufactures, commerce, navigation, etc. The nomenclature of 
each branch of the arts and sciences would alone form a volume. The limits of my 
work do not admit of the introduction of more than general terms ; but from a desire 
of excluding none of these, words that could not upon this principle strictly claim 
admittance have been not unfrequently inserted. I have in this respect been guided 
by the dictionary of the French Academy. In addition to the terms of the arts and 
sciences contained in the latter, innumerable terms especially of science, of civil engi 
neering, of the arts and manufactures, of commerce, the customs, finances, political 
economy, railways, steam-engines, have been introduced, many of which are of too recent 
adoption to have found their way into dictionaries in general. 

Before entering, however, into detail, I would present a few observations on the French 
ind English dictionaries already published. 

FRENCH AND ENGLISH DICTIONARIES. 

It has been justly remarked by an eminent French grammarian, Mr. Delalande-Hadley, 
that the least bad, the least defective of these dictionaries scarcely rises to mediocrity. 
There are usually wanting in them the most ordinary words and senses in general um 
connected with literature, science, and technology. In truth, the hapless student is most 
fortunate when he does not find them, as then he is not led into error • for if by any mis- 



9m PKEFAOE. 

chance he should unluckily meet with the word he is looking for, he will for the most part 
find idle definitions or a numberless host of words in lieu of the one thing sought, the 
equivalent, the proper term; and if by singular good fortune this is given, it must be 
known beforehand (and then the research is useless) to extricate it from all that 
surrounds it ; the lexicographer having heaped up into one confused mass, rudtr 
indigestaque moles, words, senses, definitions, examples, idioms, and proverbs, as if the 
»ole purpose were to challenge the ingenuity of the most skilful ; 



Devine si tu peux, et choisie si tu I'oses. 



There is almost a total absence of the language of literature, and of those innumerable 
.diomatic forms of speech peculiar to each language, which next to the words themselves 
are the most important and useful part of a dictionary. Misinterpretations and barba 
risms abound in them ; misinterpretations, because when words resemble each othe? 
in the two languages, the resemblance is held to be sufficient without a comparison of 
the definitions to ascertain whether the sense is the same ; barbarisms, because words 
are fabricated when they are unknown. Judging by these words, it would be imagined 
that the French part was written by an Englishman, and the English by a Frenchman, 
or rather that both were the performance of one equally unskilled in both languages 
A few examples will justify the preceding assertions. 

OMISSIONS. 

Examples of ordinary or literary words wanting. 
A&rage, airing; aluminiere, alum-works; bareme, ready reckoner ; beurrerie, butter-dairy; bicorru^ 
twc-horned ; brevete, patentee ; briqueteur, brick-layer ; corsetier, stay-maker ; douzil, spigot-; embSter, 
le antoy ; to worry ; embrun, spray ; etanche, water-tight ; wind-tight ; air-tight ; Uiade, Iliad ; inter 
na<, boarding-school ; inverse (nonn), reverse; Marseillaise, Mai-seillaise hymn; mioche, hv&t (si littla 
child) ; se rappeler, to remember (omitted in nearly all) ; retribuer, to remunerate (wanting in most) ; 
Umrnevis, screw-driver, etc., etc. ( V. Ex. page xiii.) 

The omissions in the compounds are most curious ; it may even be said that omission 
is the rule, and insertion the exception. In a dictionary of one language this is justifiable, 
but not in that of two languages, as a compound in one tongue is often translated by a 
single word in the other, and when it is not, it cannot always be construed literally. For 
instance, bell-hanging is rendered in French by pose de sonnettes, and carpet-bag by sac 
de nuit, neither easily guessed ; but bill-case is in French portefeuille ; burial-ground. 
cimetiere ; hair-dresser, coiffeur ; night-mare, cauchemar ; salt-cellar, saliere, etc. Such 
as are not translated literally have been inserted. 

Examples of the omission of ordinary seiises of iwrds that are given. 

At anticedent is not to be found previous conduct ; at cuir, fault iu language ; igoiste, selfish ; favon. 
whisker ; entrepot, bonded warehouse ; portefeuille, bill-case ; priser, to take snuff; resine, resin. 

DEFINmONS INSTEAD OF THE PROPER TERM. 

Jlxamples of idle definitions or of a host of words instead of the equivalent, the p roper term. (1) 
Aluner, to steep in alum- water, instead of to alum; petase, winged hat of Mercury, for p«tam$, 
tutr bouilli, leather prepared in a certain manner or boiled iu some resinous substance to make bottlea, 
trackets, etc, (for waxed leather) ; coup de soleil, a violent impression of the sun upon those that ar« 

(1) The extracts from the French and English dictionaries found in this preface are made from the large Dietionon 
fenenlly called Royal dictionary of Boyer Chambau^ Garner, Des Carri^res. and Fain, published in 1829. 



PREFACE. 1^ 

ixposed to it in hot countries (for mn-stroke). At pantalon, pantaloon and buffoon are given ; trouetn 
idone, the only proper term, is omitted. — In the English-French part it is still worse. Arson, action d« 
mettre le feu h une mai3on(thi3 is called incendie par malveillance) ; mittimus, un ordre en vertu duquel 
on met un criminel en prison (for mandat de depot) ; search-warrant, ordre du juge pour faire une vieitc 
(mandat de perquisition) ; waistcoat, chemisette, camisole, veste (which describe perfectly what it \m net* 
M qilet would what it is). 

MODIFICATION OF THB SENSES OK WOKD8, FORMS, AND IDIOMS. 

Examples of words with adjectives, etc., and idiomatic forms wanting. 

Bonne pmir Unit faire, maid of all -work ; fer forge, wrought iron ; /er /am»n^ rolled iron; papur 
velin, wove paper ; papier vergi, laid paper ; piaru) droit or vertical, upright piano ; piano d queue, grand 
piano ; terre sainte, consecrated ground ; bon voyage I a pleasant journey to you 1 

Envers et contre tous, in opposition to all men ; sauf erreur ou omission, errors excepted ; d genoux 
on one's knees ; «« gencm en terre, kneeling on one knee ; induire en erreur, to lead into error ; chanter 
misire, to plead poverty; passer la plaisanterie, to be no jest; porter prejudice, to be prejudicial, 
injurious, or detrimental to ; laver la vaisselle, to wash up the dishes. For others, see the words eovp, 
dieonndiration, escalier, huile, mimoire, monnaie, reve, rhume, soir, sourire, souvenir, eUi., etc. 



BARBAKISMS AND MISTEANSLATION8, 

Examples of barbarisms, solecisms, and mistranslations. 

FitBNCH BAEBARISM3 : e/oMT du quartief (quarter-day), for terme ; d Pouverture du livre (4 livre Ouvert) ; 
ouiuance executrice (pouvoir executif ) ; seigneur lige for seigneur suzerain (liege being applied ia 
French to the vassal only and not to the lord). 

English barbarisms : He co^tsin, she cousin, she defendant (after which other examples might be dW 
pensed with); flying coach for stage coach ; to turn a thing with a droll (what it means I have never yet 
been able to discover) ; a turning joint (vert6bre) ; it does not concern me netthee one way nor ot\er ; to 
LAT (lie) along upon the grotTid ; wind tn the small guts (iliac passion), I would apologize for venturinf 
to present the last example ; but I cannot otherwise convey to the reader an adequate idea of the «lc- 
ganoe of language constantly remarked in these dictionaries. 

Examples of words fabricated. 

Partition, in music, for score ; pass-rose for holly-hock ; English taffety for conirt plaster ; fagemt or 
fagona for pancreas ; redhibitory for setting aside a contract of sale. To translate the English word 
wUrut, the dictionaries have invented walrus, walros, and torwac for : 



Examples of mistranslations. 

Actueilement is translated by actually, really, instead of at present, because of the resemblance ; billion, 
billion (instead of a thousand millions ; billion in England means a million of millions) ; detrempe, water- 
colors (for distemper [in painting] ) ; dissidence, scission (for difference, schism ; scission signifies cutting) ; 
emphase, emphasis (instead of magniloquence, pompousness) ; inoffcieux, inofficious, unkind (for thai 
disinherits the legitimate heir) ; trillion, trillion (for billion) ; vindicte, vengeance (for prosecutt^n of 
crime) ; vindicte publique, avenging the public (for prosecution of crime by the public prosecutor). 

Pomme de pin haa been so invariably translated by jnne-apple, and vice-versa^ that 
all the French journals, in their account of the city feast of the 9th of November, until 
within the last two or three years, annually charged our aldermen of London, proYcr^ 
bially renowned for their good taste, with having eaten (peace to their digestions !) m 
many hundred fir-cones ! — in French, pommes de pin. 

1 cannot refrain from presenting one of the innumerable erroneous indications, as it 
proves how entirely these works have been left as they were by the self-styled authors 
of new dictionaries, the principal novelty of which consists of the new name they bear. 



X PREFACE^ 

wad «ome new blunders added to the already plentiful stock. At the word Louvre^ the 
reader will find in nearly all dictionaries the king of Fraiux^s palace at Paris. This wai 
true in the reign of Charles IX. and of Henry IV. down to that of Louis XIV. But no 
king of France has inhabited it since Louis XV. It would be as well to define it the 
long of France's hunting-seat, as it was in the good old time of Dagobert, or his strong- 
bold, because it was so under Philip Augustus. For a hundred and fifty years then h&i 
ibis definition been erroneous ; but it has remained as it was written perhaps by the first 
lexicographer, whose definition was probably right when he penned it 

These extracts assuredly prove the truth of the preceding assertions ; they mighi 
have been increased ten or a hundredfoW 



mSTOEY or THE DICTIONARIES OF THE TWO LANGUAOBS. 

The history of the dictionaries of the two languages explains their insufficiency. 

The earliest French and English dictionary of which I find any record was an ano- 
nymous publication of 1570. In 1611 Cotgrave's appeared, and of this Johnson speaks 
in terms of high encomium, calling it " a truly valuable work " and " a rich store-house 
of old French and English also." Boyer's name replaced Cotgrave's ; Boyer's alone has 
survived. 

The French and English dictionaries are but reprints of Boyer and Chambaud with 
mere changes in the size, sometimes with insignificant corrections and additions, and fre 
quently with fresh faults. Boniface put into octavo what was before a quarto, added his 
name, the announcement of 5000 familiar terms, and many new faults. (1) Wilson se* 
lected among the materials of Boyer ; but as he does not appear to have known Frenc 
(a slight disadvantage it must be confessed), he was naturally and necessarily directed by 
chance. The smaller dictionaries are made from the larger ones, or rather in what they 
give they are the larger ones in a diminutive form. 

Boyer and Chambavd. — Boyer was a French Protestant, who sought a refuge in 
England at the revocation of the edict of Nantes. He died in 1729. He published his 
dictionary in 1699 or 1702. The first edition of the dictionary of the French Academy 
appeared in 1694; the second, not until 1718; so that Boyer must have compiled his 
from the first. J ohnson's great work, which will ever be the basis, the foundation of 
English lexicography, was not published till 1755, i. e., twenty-six years after Boyer's 
death. There existed before Johnson's, according to Lord Chesterfield, no English die 
tionary, nothing but word-books, in which " all words, good and bad," says he, " are there 
jiuubled indiscriminately together, insomuch that the injudicious reader may speak and 
write as inelegantly, improperly, and vulgarly as he pleases, by and with the authority of 
one or other of our word-books." 

How faithfully does this description portray the state of the French and English die 
tionaries, which bear internal evidence of their having been composed from the word- 
books Lord Chesterfield describes. Boyer then composed his dictionary, if he did not 
fcrauscribe Cotgrave's with Sherwood's supplement, as his successors have done with 
regard to his, from the English vocabularies, before there existed an English dictionary 
m the absence, then, of proper guides, he fabricated the words with which he was unao- 

(t> At p«ndulvm^ Boniface corrected rniTpmiduU into v/n« pmA/viU (-rbicb means a clock) ; and at licence, called paUmki 
■Ml given hj Boyer, Chambaud, and Wilson as droit (Fauban, tb* old name for It, Boniface has correcfed it Into 4»-«*t 
Vmubaxnt. 



PREFACa \i 

luainted. It is easy to estimate the value of words coined by a foreigner by no inean^ 
impressed with the genius of our language. Chambaud, who at least knew French (and 
I doubt whether Boyer was well acquainted with his own language), succeeded Boyer 
He was justly desirous of availing himself of -the labors of Johnson ; but he seems tc 
liave contented himself with translating Johnson's definitions ; a system which has a 
most grave inconvenience, that of introducing every thing that approaches the word, all 
its synonymes, in short, every thing that is not the word, and of excluding nought but 
the word itself It is, however, this dictionary of Boyer, published in all forms, and 
copied, even to the misprints, ( 1 ) transcribed under all names, which has been the guide 
of all who have studied French and English for a century and a half, for five genera 
tions I 

THIS DICTIONARY. 

This work has been composed from dictionaries exclusively English or French. 
Among the former, the dictionaries of Johnson, Webster, and Richardson have been 
taken for its basis. I have often culled from Smart's Walker remodelled ; and I regret 
not having been acquainted, until nearly the end of my task, with Worcester's critical 
and pronouncing dictionary, the nomenclature of which is rich. I have never con- 
sulted Ash, who, after his etymology of curmudgeon, can inspire no confidence. Of the 
French, the dictionary of the Academy is naturally the ground-work ; its authority has 
always been with me decisive. I am, however, much indebted to the two dictionaries o' 
Laveaux and Boiste, but perhaps still more to the valuable pages of Bescherelle. 

I have abstained from naming in my title any other than general dictionaries, having 
MTupulously avoided adding names, too frequently all that is borrowed from the book& 
A long list of names in a title-page is often extracted from a catalogue. 

SOURCES OF NEW WORDS. 

Nearly all the new words, not literary, introduced into this dictionary, have been bor 
rowed from the following works: and I here acknowledge the obligation with pleasur« 
and gratitude : Brando's Dictionary of Science, Literature, and Art, Hebert's Engi- 
neer's and Mechanids Encyclopaedia, Loudon's Encyclopaedias of Agriculture, Gar 
dening, Plants, and Cottage, Farm, and Villa Architecture and Furniture, McCulloch'* 
Dictionary of Commerce and Commercial Navigation, and lire's Dictionaries of 
Chemistry and Mineralogy, and of Arts, Manufactures, and Mines. For innumerable 
terms of the arts and manufactures I am indebted principally to Dr. Ure's esteemed 
works, and for very many to the personal kindness of the learned author. For these 
terms in French I have had recourse to translations of several of these works, and to the 
French Dictionnaire du Commerce et des Marchandiscs, but principally to the personal 
assistance of the most competent French authorities in every department ; and no fewei 
than five members of the Institute have, with a disinterestedness characteristic of the 
Boientifio men of France, enriched these columns with perhaps some of their most valua- 
ble information. 

The part of the Dictionary relating to the Natural Sciences has been wholly entrusted 
lo Dr. Doyere, Professor of Natural History of the French University, and author of 

(i) CStuicle has rematned upper-room, ffuest-chamber. Instead of nipper room ; cytise has ever been left bate tr^^ 
tern b«an tr^oil ; echatae ts vpper sea folding pole, because It was orlirlnally \ misprint for upher, acaffolding-poU. 



KB PREPACK 

works on these subjects. Dr. Doyere has placed the scientific name first, and afterwardi 
the vulgar terms, marked with the sign of familiar words, thus (II). 

Whole works have been read for railway terms and those of steam-engines, for many 
of which I am indebted to Dr. Lardner's. kindness. The terms of commerce have been 
extracted from my Manual of Commercial Terms in English and French ; those of the 
post-office from the conventions between Great Britain and France, and the " articlct 
agreed upon between the post-offices'^ of the two countries. Various technological voca- 
bularies that have been collected by private gentlemen, and especially those made in England 
by Engineers of the French government, have been communicated to me. Law terms 
naturally attracted my serious attention ; either they did not exist in the French and 
English dictionaries, or they presented the still greater inconvenience of being given 
erroneously ( V. arson, mittimus, and search-warrant, page ix). Mr, Marie, a French 
barrister and since Minister of Justice, and Mr. Else and the late Mr. Leahy, member? 
of the English bar, have kindly afforded me the most valuable assistance. 

Examples of terms of commerce, science, or the arts and manufactures, not in other dictionaries. 
Artesian (Hebert); cholerine (Copland); copartnery (McCulloch); dahlia (Loudon); to madder 
(Ure); to ret (Ure); uniiidifferency (Blackstone) ; air-stove (Hebert); bleach-works (Ure). I would 
refer the reader to the English-French dictionary for the following words. For commerce : hank (with 
8 new compounds) ; dock (of 5 compounds 4 are new) ; cash (4 out of 6, and among the new is cash- 
tiffiee, caisse); hill (6 out of 8). For civil engineering: bridge, draiii, lock, pile and its compounds, rail, 
•nd particularly road and its compounds. For the arts and manufactures : gas (with 8 new compounds) ; 
engine (9 new compounds), cotton (10), iron (15), and coal (44 compounds, 21 of which are in no other 
iictionary). 

In ordinary language or that of literature the new words added are numerous and 
important. Familiar terms have been gleaned from authors, from tradesmen's catalogues, 
from all sources. I have done what Johnson alleges he could not do, but probably did 
not attempt ; I have " visited the warehouses of merchants, and shops of artificers, to gain 
the names of wares, tools, and operations, of which no mention is found in books." 

I have borrowed considerably from the terms of our own great writers and from 
those of the French, including authors of our own times, preserving those antiquated or 
obsolete words or senses that are to be found in the standard authors of either country. 
The English should assuredly be able to read with the assistance of a French dictionary 
Pascal, Corneille, Racine, Moliere, La Fontaine, Boileau, Montesquieu, Bossuet, Flechier, 
Massillon, Voltaire, Rousseau, Mirabeau, Chateaubriand, De Lamartine, Beranger, etc. 
I have inserted words sanctioned by such writers, " quand meme," as Balzac has well 
expressed it, " I'usage n'en aurait pas encore corrige I'amertume de la nouveaute." Much 
circumspection, it is allowed, should be used in granting such words the privilege of 
naturalization ; but the French Academy did not exclude from the first edition of their 
dictionary Balzac's neologisms fdidter, urbanity, etc. ; they have since admitted La 
Fontaine's Fabuliste and the bienfaisance of Abbe de Saint-Pierre ; and what should 
we now say to a lexicographer of antiquity, had there been any, who should have 
obstmately refused to admit into his rolls Cicero's neologism mo7-al philosophy, or 
Plato's Providence ? 

I have scrupulously abstained from creating new words ; it is the business of the 
lexicographer to record the creations of others. T have added no terms but those I 
Have found and have deemed legitimate. * 



PREFACE. nil 

Examples of literary terms or those in general use that are not in other dictionaties. 
Anarchiser (Mirabeau), to throw into anarchy ; archinoble (Lbsage), most noble ; bareine, readj> 
leckoner; boutonnet (Voltaire), little bud; briqueteur, brick-layer; buvard, blotting-case ; oalcain 
(noun) (Acadkmie), lime-stone; causant (Sbvigne), chatty; chloroforme, chloroform; cortetier, corset- 
maker ; un dependant (La Bruyere), a dependant ; derailler, to run ofif the rails ; detroner (VoltatrkX b" 
dethrone; diableteau (Rabelais, La Fontaine, Voltaire^, devilkin; entenebrer (Chateaubrland), tc 
inTolTC in darkness ; ergoterie (Rousseau), cavilling ; escompteur, discounter ; Iliade, Iliad ; inestim 
(Dklille), uncsteemed ; inharmonieux (Laharpe), unharmonious, unmusical ; inindttstrie (MirabeauX 
QiiBkilfulness ; internat, boarding-school; internissable (VovtMViE), unsullied; magnanerie (Darcet), silk- 
worm nursery ; mesinterpriter (Rousseau), to misconstrue ; mioche (Bescherelle), bi'at ; poisseux (Buffon), 
pitchy ; se rappeler (Acadbmie), to remember (wanting in nearly all) ; staticette, statuette ; trass (Bbschx- 
rklle), tan-as or terras (a cement much used) ; viadue (Bescherelle), viaduct ; etc., etc. For other 
▼ords, see Omissions, page viil 

Obsolete words and senses of the French classics not in other French and English dictionaries. 

Obsolete words : Accointement (Cornkille), skilfully ; assembleur (La FontaineX collector, gatherer ; 
bonfwmmeau (La Fontaine), simple, easy man ; brevete (La Fontaine), brevity, shortness ; cachemeni 
(Moubre), hiding ; consonner (Molikre), to harmonize ; feux (La Fontaine), child ; grippeminaiid (La 
Fontaine), grimalkin ; hommeau (La Fontaine), little man ; jarni (Moliere), by heaven ; penaille and 
penaillerie (La Fontaine), monks ; polide (Racine), pretty ; tete-bleu (Moliere), zounds ; voi (Racine), 
indeed, bless me, etc. 

Obsolete senses : Assembleur (La Fontaine), collector, gatherer ; compasser (Moliere), to consider, 
to weigh ; malpropre (Corneille, Mouere), unfit ; ressentiment (Corneille), injury ; ressentiment (Flk- 
oaiER, Voltaire), feeling ; sentiment (Corneille), resentment ; trotter (La Fontaine), to follow fast^ et<s. 

Unauthorized and useless words, that are in new dictionaries merely because they 
h»ve been in old ones, have been pitilessly suppressed ; and room has thus been found 
for new and useful words without exceeding the size of ordinary dictionaries. 



COMPOUNDS. 

In both dictionaries the compounds are inserted when they are not translated literally, 
or when they are rendered by single words. This is an important part of a dictionary 
of two languages ; but these words are not generally given in a dictionary of one lan- 
guage only. Brass-foil is in no English lexicon ; but one must be gifted with powers of 
divination to surmise that it is called in French oripeau or clinquant. The dictionaries 
insert br ass-candlestick ., brass-cannon., brass-kettle, brass-money ., that are translated lite- 
rally. These then I have suppressed, or rather I have replaced them by other compounds 
not construed literally, the number of which has been so greatly increased that I have 
sometimes (as at the word coat) as many as forty -four compounds, twenty -one of which 
are in no other dictionary. In the French-English dictionary these compounds are" 
scarcely fewer. Among those of the word porte, I have numbered seventy-six, sixty-one 
of which are in very few French and English dictionaries, and of these twenty-nine are 
to be found in none. 

SUPPRESSIONS. 

Not, however, satisfied with making valuable additions to the vocabulary, I have 
endeavored to render the service of suppressing improprieties, not merely of language, 
that have been accumulating for more than a century. I have never forgotten that I was 
writing for youth, and that the instructor of youth is invested with a moral priesthood 



«▼ PREFACE. 

COINS, WEIGHTS, AND MEASURES, 

The coins, measures, and weights of one country have been accurately reduced t<j 
those of the other. It will be readily imagined that for both nations the new system 
has been adopted ; a table of them has been added at the end of the dictionary. I have 
taken for the basis of these reductions the Annuaire du bureau des longitudes, which 
if an authority in England and France. (See page 666 and the words of the table.) 

POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS AND PUBLIC FUNCTIONS. 

I have succinctly explained the greater part of the political institutions and of public 
functions when they differ in the two countries. ( V. HaZ civil, itats gineraux, tien 
itat, etc.) I have given at the names of the months of the calendar of the first French 
republic, constantly met with in French works, the corresponding time of the ordinary 
calendar. ( V. Vend^miaire, Brumaire, Primaire, Nivose, Pluviose, Ventose, etc.) 

ABBREVIATIONS. 

The greater part of my readers will not learn with indifference that the principal 
abbreviations and contractions in use are found in the following pages ; they are 
intended for the foreigner, who is often embarrassed by their absence. 

GRAMMATICAL PART. 

It is superfluous to dwell on the importance of the grammatical accuracy of a work 
batended to serve as a guide, and destined by its very nature to be an authority. The 
dictionaries of the two languages are in this respect sadly deficient ; they commonly 
unite in one article the active and neuter verb, and not unfrequently words of two or 
three different denominations. Since, the preposition, adverb, and conjunction, forms a 
single article. The dictionaries constantly construe the verb active by the neuter, and 
vice versa. Surpass, the active verb, is rendered by exceller, Vemporter, which in French 
are neuter verbs, and which necessarily mislead the student ; it should be exceller sur. 
Vemporter sur. These faults are of constant recurrence. Much care has been bestowed 
on this portion of the work. I have called attention especially in the French-English 
dictionary to the principal grammatical distinctions, and have added observations and 
frequently examples to elucidate them. (See the words dont, ^chapper, gens, le (the 
pronoun), ni, on, se, voir, etc.) I have cautioned the student against confounding such 
words as in one of the languages are rendered by two different words in the other. This 
'Will perform the service of a dictionary of synonymes. ( V. apporrter and ame7ier, to 
luring ; aveu, confession, and confesse, confession ; briser, casser, and rompre, to break ; 
jaur and journie, day ; opprimer and oppresser, to oppress ; partial and partiel, par- 
tial ; retourner and revenir, to return ; soir and soirde, evening ; soupgonneux and 
suspect, suspicious ; etc.) 

ACCEPTATIONS OF WORDS. 

Like Johnson, whose example cannot be too often imitated, I have presented the 
acceptations of words in their genealogical- order, i. e., in the logical order in which they 
were probably formed or at least deduced from each other 



PREFACK x» 

By this system, the student understands them better and the memory retaios thea 
more tenaciously, for the various senses present to the mind but a series of modification 
of one and the same idea, because they follow each other and are connected together like 
80 many links of a chain. The different senses are separated from each other by num- 
bers, in order that they may not be taken for synonymes of the same acceptations. 
Obsolete senses, however, are generally placed last, but before those of the arts or 
sciences. Acceptations peculiar to certain objects or to certain arts and sciences aro 
given in the alphabetical order of their designations. ( V. aiguille, canon, face, ceil, 
piece, tete.) Words that are nearly synonymous or that differ by their style only, are 
united under the same number. 

I deem it unnecessary in a dictionary of two languages to give definitions that may 
be sought elsewhere, and that occupy space better devoted to what can be found there 
alone. My definitions are, in general, but means of distinction ; anoblir, to ennoble, is 
defined by to confer nobility on, in order to distinguish it from to ennoble (give excellence 
to), which is rendered in French by ennohlir; oXjour I have put day (space of time from 
sunrise to sun-set), that it may not be confounded with day (space of time from rising 
to retiring to rest), in French, yowrw^e. 

In this part of my task I have every where observed and denoted those most impor- 
tant distinctions between the acceptations of words taken in a proper or a figurative 
sense, applied exclusively to persons or to things, employed in a good or a bad sense. 
These may be reckoned among the principal difficulties of the study of foreign languages ; 
for a word the same in signification not unfrequently receives a totally different applicik- 
tion in passing from one language to another. 

Use in a good or a bad sense. — "Words often assume a bad sense in one language 
which they have not in another. Femelle is applied in a good sense in French to 
animalu only ; in relation to persons it is used in a bad sense ; to translate into French 
a female friend or a female deity by une amie femelle, une divinite femelle, would be 
making an egregious and ridiculous mistake ; these two expressions would be equivalent 
in English to a she friend, a she deity. PatJios, unlike the Greek or English word 
pathos, being used in a bad sense, means in English bathos, bombast, fustian, rant. 
The above is more than sufficient to prove the absolute necessity of such indications in 
dictionaries. 

Distinction between persons and things. — The difference in this respect is very 
great between any two languages ; in one, words apply to both which in another are 
employed of one only of the two. Incurable (incurable) is used of persons and things, 
whereas ingu^rissahle, its synonyme, is employed of persons only. Miritant is said of 
persons only, and may be translated by deserving or meritorious; m^ritoire on the con- 
trary is used but of things, and can be rendered by meritorious only, as deserving is not 
employed in English of things. Natal is similarly distinguished from natif, both signi- 
l^ing native. Frequenter must be translated by to frequent (a place) ; but to frequent 
he society of (persons). Sometimes this affects the place of the adjective, as in malhoti- 
nete. ( V. Suicide.) In short, it is a distinction that must constantly be made and that 
mxist consequently be learned ; where is it to be recorded, if not in a dictionary ? 

Distinction between the proper and figurative senses. — This I consider one of the 
most important parts of the study of a language, and consequently of the dictionary of 
two tongues. For blhidness the French use cicit^ in the proper sense, for a want of 
nght, and avtuglement in the fiffvirative for ignorance, although aveugle (blind) is em- 



m PREFACE. 

ployed in both cases. On the other hand, mur in the proper sense is with us ripe, and in 
the figurative, mature; lisible is properly legible, but figuratively readable. It has been 
well said that every language has its peculiar metaphors, so established by usage that il 
the nearest equivalent term is substituted, ridicule ensues. Had Young found the dis- 
tinction between entr allies (proper and figurative) and boyaux (proper only) denoted in 
dictionaries, he would not have written to Fenelon : " Monseigneur, vous avez pour nun 
lies boyaux dep^re" " My lord, you have the entrails of a father for me." 

EXAMPLES. 

Examples have been inserted when they have been deemed necessary to elucidate the 
ralue of a word or a sense, to illustrate the manner of using it, to render more obvious 
the distinction between a word and its synonymes, or to exemplify some grammatical 
difficulty ; frequently to show some particular use of prepositions that differ in the two 
languages. They have not been repeated at derivatives; the reader must refer to the 
primitive. I have studiously avoided adducing examples of obsolete significations, that 
might lead the student into error. The limits of this work have not permitted me to 
consider literary beauty in the examples, which have been reduced to what mathematicians 
call their lowest terms. After having thus altered or maimed them, I have been unwil- 
ling to add to them the names of authors. 

MODIFICATION OF THE SENSE OF WORDS. 

The sense of words, and especially the manner of translating them, is often considera- 
bly modified by the addition of other words, especially adjectives or nouns subjoined to 
nouns, adverbs to verbs, etc. ; or these have forms peculiar to themselves. ChoseilU 
eignifies a currant ; but grosse groseille, or groseille a maquereau, is gooseberry ; or if 
groseille is considered to mean gooseberry^ then groseille a grappes becomes currant and 
groseilles a la crime our gooseberry fool. I have given the principal sorts of things when 
not translated literally, as piston plein is not Englished hy full but solid piston ; papier 
de Chine is not China but India paper ; encrier a pompe, not pump but hydraulic 
inkstand. A literal translation would often be unintelligible and not unfrequently ludi- 
crous ; as piano a qu£ue (grand piano) would inevitably be, if the evil genius of a luckless 
student, unable to find it in his dictionary, and thus left to chance, were to light on piano 
urith a tiil! Much attention has been devoted to this department of lexicography; the 
reader is referred to the words bois, coton, effet, fer, lampe, lettre, machine, monnaie, 
•papier, savon, vinaigre, etc. The verbs have also adverbs peculiar to them, which, to 
be known, must be gleaned from reading, and ought to be recorded in dictionaries. The 
French say lutterferme or fort (to atmggle firm or strong) which we render by to strug- 
gle hard ; but douter fort we do not translate by to doubt hard, but to douht rnivch, 
although we do say ior pleuvoir fort, to rain hard or fast ; transpirer abondamment is 
with us to perspire copiously or prnfusdy. In fact, they cannot be guessed, but muat 
b© learned, and ought, therefore, to be found in the columns of a dictionary. 

IDIOMS AND Familiar phraseology. 

Idioms and familiar phraseology are, after words, the most important part of a dic- 
cicnary of two languages ; they are indispensable, fundamental, the very essence ot a 
language. It is a strange fact that in dictionaries exclusively English they are rarely 



PREFACE. rvn 

noticed ; and in the greater part of dictionaries wholly French they occupy a prominent 
part. From isolated words the foreigner cannot form idioms ; he must receive them as a 
people have made them ; he must take the home-born plant, and not substitute an exotic 
production. 

I have inserted all those in general use and those I have collected, either in my reading 
r in my personal intercourse with the French, during a twenty years' residence in Paris : 
hey are placed where they will probably be sought, at the important word, which is not 
4 slight innovation ; they are separated from the acceptations and examples ; they are 
classed, so that one may be readily found without a perusal of the whole ; the nouns are 
presented in the following order: 1, the word with the adjective; 2, with other nouns; 
3, with prepositions ; 4, with verbs. The verbs are not less methodically arranged : 
1, attended by adjectives or adverbs ; 2, accompanied by nouns ; 3, in any part of their 
conjugation ; 4, when attended by prepositions or adverbs, that so profoundly modify the 
sense in English. Each of these series is exhibited in alphabetical order. ( V. heure, 
piedypicrre, temps, tete, vote, etc. ; faire, vouloir, etc.) 

PREPOSITIONS, MOODS, ETC., GOVERNED BV WORDS. 

• Prepositions. — I have shown what prepositions are governed by words when they diflFei 
in the two languages. Grammars can present but few such words ; the place of these 
indications is the dictionarj . Mine is, I believe, the first that has supplied them. They 
are perhaps the greatest difficulty to be encountered in the study of a language, and few 
or none are so thoroughly conversant with them as to be able to dispense with assistance. 
How then is a learner to imagine to guess that the French say angry against (fachfi 
aontre) and not ivith ; and pleased of (content de) and not with ; to consiU in and never 
o consist of; to answer of to dispense of to threaten of to inspire a sentiment to any 
>ne, to reproach a. th. to a. o., etc. ? 

Moods, etc. — When a word governs the subjunctive mood in French, I have always 
noticed it by marking (subj.) or [subj.] ; no indication is given when the mood governed 
IS the indicative. ( V. abominable, admire^-, v. n., bien que, hon, douter, quoique, etc.) 
If the verb requires ne or admits of the suppression oi pas or point, it is stated in a note 
at the end of the word, and frequently elucidated by an example. ( V. craindre, cesser, 
oser, pouvoir, savoir.) 

VOCABULARIES OF MYTHOLOGICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES, AND NAMES OF PERSONS. 

These two vocabularies contain all the important names that differ in the two lan- 
guages; they also comprise the names connected with Biblical, Greek, and Bomtn 
antiquity ; they have been compiled with great care. The genders, when they are consid- 
ered doubtful, are omitted. 

GENERAL ORDER AND TYPOGRAPHICAL ARRANGEMENT. 

One of the most important ends to be attained was to introduce order and metnod 
into the " tenfold confusiou" found, where all was " dark, wasteful, wild." Senses, defini 
tione, examples, idioms, and proverbs, were, to use the language of Lord Chesterfield, 
"jumbled indiscriminately together," so that a student adventuring into these wild 
regions was mora likely to lose himself than find the object of his search. The definitions 
>f words that have but one acceptation, or all the senses of which correspond in both Ian- 



ma PREFACE. 

goages, have been suppressed. When a definition or an explanation, which is generally a 
single word, is inserted, it is in a parenthesis and in a type different from the translation 
All the acceptations follow each other without interruption, in order to present at a glance 
the whole of the significations of the word ; these acceptations are separated from th? 
examples ; the latter open a new paragraph and bear numbers corresponding to those of 
the senses ; they are given in a smaller type, as are likewise the grammatical observationu 
tt ihe end. The examples are, in their turn, separated from the idioms, and these begin 
another paragraph with the type of the acceptations. 

After having presented to the reader all the details that the limits of a preface admit 
(and I fear rather to have abused his indulgence), I have but to request him to compare 
this dictionary with other works of the same description. I wish it to imdergo serious 
and critical examination. I venture to suggest a few words for comparison. For ordi- 
nary terms : apopkxie, atteinte, comprendre, coup, d^considiration, doux, escalier^fdche. 
fini, fleuve, frapper, jour, monnaie, moraliU, pantalon, pension, pensionnat, pere. 
reprisaUles, rester, reve, rhume, soir, soirie, vache, vif, vigne, etc. ; for the arts and 
manufactures : colon, cuivre, fer, gaz, houille, huile, soie, etc. ; for commercial terms : 
assurance, banqiie, capital, commis, compte, compagnie, dock, effet, envoi, escompte 
payement, police, presentation, prix ; for the customs : entrepot, droit, transit ; foi 
engineering : coussinet, ecluse, pavi, pont, route, vapeur, etc. ; for the grammatical part : 
s'attendre, bien, ce, cesser, craindre, dessous, dessus, dont, echapper,feu (adjective), gens 
sHndigner, je, le (pronoun), ni, on, pardonner, se, sien, tu, voir ; for law : arbitre, com 
•paraitre. contrat, detention, emprisonnement, h^ritier, homicide, magistrature, perqui 
iUion, vol; for military terms : faction, file, garnison ; for mining : filon, galerie.^ etc. 
for the navy : ancre, armAe, hatiment, cable, fiotte, mat, voile, etc. ; for post-ofl&ce terms 
d^peche, lettre, port, etc. ; for railways : convoi, rail, train, etc. ; for general technology 
machine, pompe, puits, roue, treuil, vis, etc. 

The pleasing duty now devolves on me of acknowledging my obligations, which are 
great and numerous. The difficulties of the translation from English into French have 
been submitted to Frenchmen, and vice versa. The gentlemen whose names I have the 
honor to inscribe here, have been kindly pleased to enrich these volumes with some of 
their most valuable information. I would here offer them the expression of my gratitude. 

These gentlemen are Professor Elie de Beaumont, Member of the Institute of France 
(for geology and mineralogy) ; Robt. Bell, Esq., author of the Lives of the Poets, the 
History of BMSsia, the Life of Canning, etc. (for English literature) ; Professor Blanqui, 
Member of the Institute of France (for political economy and commerce) ; Professor 
Combes, Member of the French Institute (for mining and mechanics) ; Monsieur Cor- 
tambert, author of several works and professor of geography (for geography) ; Cesar 
Daly, Esq., architect and director of the Revue des Travaux Publics (for architecture) ; 
Professor Donaldson, of University College (for architecture and building) ; Rich. Else, 
Esq., barrister of London (for law) ; 'Professor Fremy, of the Ecole Polytechnique (for 
shemistry) ; Admiral Giffard (for naval terms) : Professor Guigniaut, Member cl the 
fnstitute of France and Secretary General of the Council of the University of France 
(for geography) ; Edw. Hclmes, Esq., of London (for music) ; Dr. Lardner, director of 
the Cabinet Cyclopcedia, author of the Steam-engine, etc. (for the exact sciences and 
civil engineering) ; the late Mr. Leahy, barrister of London (for law) ; Monsieur Marie, 
formerly Minister of Justice and Keeper of the Seals (for law) ; D. McCarthy, M. D 



PREFACE. xn 

physician to the English Embassy in Paris (for the medical sciences) ; the late Admiral 
Massieu de Clerval, commissioner of the Board of Admiralty (for the navy) ; General 
Saint- Arnaud (for military terms) ; Monsieur Sichel, M. D. (for ophthalmology) ; Cap- 
tain Stephenson, of the Scotch Fusilier Guards (for military terms) ; Dr. Ure, F. R. S. 
(for chemistry, the arts and manufactures) ; Monsieur De Vilback (for music) ; Monsieur 
Villemain, Perpetual Secretary to the French Academy and formerly Minister of Public 
Instruction (for the French language and literature). I regret infinitely the utter im- 
possibility of naming here the many other persons to whose kindness I am indebted for 
much very valuable information. 

The gentlemen who have so kindly contributed to the dictionary, and the public in 
general, are earnestly entreated to communicate their observations ; it is by these princi- 
pally that I hope to correct the errors that have inevitably found their way into these 
pages ; they will be gratefully received, and will meet with all due consideration. 

I confidently trust that I have conscientiously and faithfully fulfilled the promises of 
the title of my work ; it is for others to appreciate the execution of my task ; but lik« 
Johnson I confess that " I look with pleasure on my book, however defective, and delivei 
it to the world with the spirit of a man that has endeavored well." 



EXPLANATION OF THE ABBREVf ATI ON S 



USED -IN THE FRENCH-ENGLISH DICTIONART. 



any, quelqve. 
ebbrev., abbreviation, abreviation. 
aba., absolutely, in an absolute sense, db- 

tolwment. 
oec, accusative case, acotisati/. 
acoust, acoustics, acovstique. 
adj., adjective, adjectif. 
a<ljecL, acljectively, adjeotivement. 
a<iin., administration, administration. 
a<lv., adverb, udverbe. 
adverb., adverbially, adverbialement 
ft & m., arts and manufactures, Industrie. 
atf., affirmatively, affitinativement. 
agr., agriculture, agnoulture. 
alg., algebra, algebre. 
anat, anatomy, anntamie. 
ana, ancient, ancien. 
ant, antiquity, antiquiU. 
a. o., any one, quelqu'un. 
arch , architecture, architecture. 
aritL , arithmetic, arUhmetique. 
irt, article, article. 
artlL, artJUery, artillerie. 
•atr., astronomy, astranomie. 
Mtrol., astrology, antrologie. 
a. th., any thing, quelque choge. 
aux., auxiliary, auxiliaire. 

a. wh., any where, quelque part 

bak., baker's trade, bakers' term, &ow- 

langerie. 
bank., banking, banque. 
bil., billiards, bUlard. 
bind., binding, reliure. 
book-k^ book-keeping, comptabilite. 
book-s., book-selling, librairie. 
hot, botany, botanique, 
brew., brewing, forme de brasseur. 
brick., brick-making, briqueterie. 

b. s., bad sense, en mav/vaiKe part 
build., building, construction. 
butch., butchers' term, boucherie. 

cab., cabinet-making, cabinet-work, e'6e- 
nisterie. 

cal., calendar, calendrier. 

can. law, canon law, droit canon. 

carcin., carcinology, carcinologie. 

carp., carpentry, diarpenterie ; menv/i- 
Herie. 

eath., catholic, catholique. 

cath. lit, catholic liturgy, Uturgie ca- 
tholique. 

cath reL, catholic religion, religion ca- 
th iique. 

chai c., chancery, chancellerie. 

shem., chemistry, ohimie. 

chron., chronology, chronologie. 

ohr. relig.. Christian religion, religion 
Chretienne. 

dv., civil, civil. 

civ. eng., civil engineering, ginie civil. 

elv. law, civil law, droit civil; droit 
remain. 

eoia., coining, monnnyage. 

eom., commerce, amimerce. 

command., command, word of command, 
commundement. 

oom. nav., commercial navigation, com- 
merce maritime. 

oomp., compound, compose. 

oomp., comparative, comparatif. 

oonch., conchology, conchyliologie. 

oond.. conditional mood, conditionnel. 



cent, confectioners' term, tenne Js Mn- 

fiseur. 
conj., conjugated, conjugue. 
conj., conjunction, conjoncUon. 
coop., cooperage, tcnnellerie. 
crim., criminal, crim,inel. 
crim. law, criminal law, droit crimiMl. 
crit, criticism, critique. 
culin., culinary art, art eidinaire. 
cur., curriery, corroyeur. 
cust, customs, douanes. 
cut, cutlery, coutellerie. 
dat, dative case, datif. 
def., defective, de/ecti/. 
dial., dialling, gvomoiiique. 
did., didactic, didactique. 
dipl., diplomacy, diplomatique. 
dist, distillery, dintillerie. 
dom. econ., domestic economy, iconomie 

domestique. 
draw., drawing, dessin. 
dress-m., dress-making, terme de coutu- 

rUre. 
dy., dyeing, teinture. 
eccl., ecclesiastical affairs, affaires eccU- 

Hastiquea. 
elect, electricity, electricite. 
enam., enamelling, email. 
engin., engineering, genie oivil. 
Engl., English, England, Anglais; An- 

gleterre. 
engr., engraving, gravure. 
ent, entomology, entomologie. 
erp., erpetology, erpetologie. 
exclam., exclamation, e(eclam.ation. 
f., feminine, ./«r»mi«. 
falc, falconry, /«wcoMn«ri«. 
far., farriery, marechalerie. 
fenc., fencing, escrime. 
feud., feudal, feudality ,./'^daZ ;feodalite. 
fin., flnance,^nances. 
fish.. Ashing, peche. 
fort, fortiflcation,y?>rW/ca<»on. 



Fr.. French, France, Francaia^ France. 

fur., furriery, peUeterie. 

ftit, future./««Mr. 

gas., gas-lighting, eclairage au gaz. 

geog., geography, geographie. 

geol., geology, geologie. 

geom., geometry, geometrie. 

glass., glass-making, verrerie. 

gold, goldsmith's art,'work, orflmreirie. 

Gr., Greek, Grecian, Grec. 

Gr. ant, Grecian antiquity, wntiquiti 

grecque. 
gram., grammar, grammaire. 
g. s., good sense, en bonne part. 
gun., gunsmiths' term, terme d'armtt- 

rier, 
hat, hat-making, chapellerie. 
helm., helminthology (worms), helmin- 

thologie (vers). 
her., heraldry, Mason. 
hist, history, histoire. 
horol., horology, horlogerie. 
hort, horticulture, horticulture. 
hunt, hunting, venerie ; chasse. 
hyg., hygiene, hygiSne. 
ich.. Ichthyology, ichthyologie. 
Imp., impersonal, impersonnel. 
Imperf, iuiDerfect ten.se. impar/ait 



Ind., Indicative mood, indicai^. 

inf., infinitive mood, inflnitif. 

Inst, Instrument, instrument 

int. Interjection, interjection. 

inter., interrogatively, intert'OifattM 

ment. 
iron., irony, ironie. 
irr.. Irregular, iiTeguHer. 
jest, jestingly, par plaisanteri«, 
Jew., Jewish, Jui/. 
Jewel., jewelry, ^oa*M«3r*«. 
join., joinery, menuiserie. 
lap., art of the lapidary, art du lapt 

daire. 
Lat, latin, latin. 
leg., legislation, legislation. 
liter., literature, litteruture. 
lit, liturgy, litnirgie. 
lock., locksmith's art, serrurerie. 
log., logic, logique. 

look., looking-glass-making, miroitoria, 
m., masculine, masculin. 
mach., machinery, machiriea. 
mak., ma.\i.m^, fabrication. 
mam., mammalogy, mammaloffi^, 
man., manege, manege. 
mar. law, marine law, naval jurlspnih 

dence, droit maritime. 
mas., ma><onry, ma^onnerie. 
math., mathematics, mathematiquet. 
meas., measure, menure. 
mod., medicine, medical, m^deein«; mi- 

dical. 
metal., metallurgy, miuillurgie. 
metaph., metaphysics, mAtaphysiqus. 
mil., military art, art militaire. 
mil. eng., military engineering, gmi4 

militaire, 
mllL, millrights' term, moulins. 
min., mineralogy, mineralogie. 
moll., moUnsks, mollusques. 
mus., music, musique. 
myth., mythology, mythologie. 
n., noun substantive, worn .lubstanUf. 
nat hist, natural history, histoire naMh 

relle. 
nav. arch., naval architecture, cowstru* 

tion navale. 
nav., navig., navigation, navigation. 
need., needle-work, ouvrage a I'aiguill* 
neg., negation, negatively, negation ; 

aveo negation. 
nent, neuter, neutre. 
neut, neutrally, neutralement 
nom., nominative case, nominaUf, 
o., one, un. 
obj., objective case, cas objectif {acemta 

tif, datif ou abUitif). 
opt, optics, optique. 
orn., ornithology, ornithologie. 
p., proper, propre. 
paint, painting, peinture. 
pa. p., past participle, /)ar<icip«j9a««< 
pari., parliamentary language, langag* 

parlementaire. 
past, pastry-cooks' term, terme de pA 

tiaxerie. 
pers., persons, speaking of persona, p«r 

Sonne ; en parlant de peraonnea. 
pers., perspective, perspective. 
pharm., pharmacy, pJiarmade. 
i philol., philology. philoloatA 



EXPLANATION OF THE ABBREVIATIONS. 



pbilos., philosophy, phUosophie. 

phys., physics, natuial philosophy, phy- 
sique. 

physiol., physiology, phygiologie. 

pi., plural, pluriel. 

poet, pmetry, poeaie. 

pol., pohtics. politique. 

pol. econ., political economy, iconomie 
poUHque. 

polyp., polypes, po^pu* 

post, post-otBce, pontes. 

|»r., pronoun, prorwm. 

pref.) prefix, preJUne, 

prep., preposition, prSposltion. 

pres., preeent tense, present 

pres. p, present participle, parUcipe 
prtient. 

pret, fretbrite, priUrit. 

print, printing, imprimerne. 

DubL adm., public administration, ad- 
miniHtration publique. 

q. eh. (quelque chose), any thing, qtielqut 
cKoae. 

% p. (quelque part), any where, quelque 



q. u. (quelqu'un), any one. quelqu'wi. 

rail., railways, chemins d» J'er. 

rel., religion, religion. 

rel. onL, religious order, ordre reH- 

gietix. 
rept, reptiles, reptiles. 
rhet. rhetoric, rhetoriqtie. 
Rom., Roman, Romain. 
Rom. ant., Roman antiquity, antiquite 

romaine. 
rur. econ., rural economy, economie ru- 

rale. 
sch., scholastic scolasUque. 
sculpt, sculpture, sculpture. 
sew., sewing, coutfure. 
silver., silver- smith's work, or/evrerie 

d'urgent 
sing., singular, singulier. 
soap., soap-making, /airieaiion de sa- 

von. 
spin., spinning,. jH<rfMr«. 
Stat, statistics, ataUstiqvs. 
sta., stationery, papeteine. 
st-boat, steam-bosts, iateawe d va- 

peur.- 



st-eng., Bteam-engine, machines d va 

suDj., subjunctive mood, subjonctif. 
snbst, substantively, substanUvetnent 
sup., superlative, superlatif. 
surg., surgery, surgical, chirurgie ; cht 

rurgical. 
surv., surveying, arpentnge. 
syn., synonymes, synonymes. 
tail., tailoring, tertne de taiUevr 
tech., technology, technologie. 
term., termination, terminaison. 
th., things, alluding to things, ehasM , en 

parlant de c/ioses. 
theat. theatre, thM^a. 
theol., theology, thiolo(/1(i. 
univ., university, universiU. 
v., vide, see, voir. 
V. a., verb active, nerbe aestAf. 
vers,, versification, versification. 
vet, veterinary art, dtrt veterifiairt 
V. n., verb neuter, verbe neutr^. 
writ, writing, ecriture. 
zooL, zoology, eoologie. 
zooph., zoophytes, aoophytoa 



EXPLANATION OF THE SIGNS 



EMPLOYED IN THE FRENCH-ENGUSH DICTIONAKT. 



w_ Bepreaents the repetition of the French word, rSpitition 

du mot/rancais. 
= Bepreaente the repetition of the English word, rSpHltUm 

du mot anglais. (1) 
t Antlqaated, «ieiUi. 
X Little nsed, inusitS. 
I In the proper sense, literally, aupropre. 
I In the figurative sense, figuratively, aufiguri. 
A General acceptation, acception genirale. 



* Elevated style, style aoutenu. 

** Poetical language, «<yi«^ttcwA 

+ Biblical style, religions expression, ityU hMlffw; 

preagion rdigieuae. 
1 Familiar style, style famUier. 
^~ Trivial style, styU trirdaL 
•T- Popular language, terme pbpulaira. 
ffi Low expressitn, terme bos. 
0% Proverb, proverbe. 



- before flna' letters signifies that these letters are changed In the feminine Into those that follow: Tkompet-r, sb, I «, 
trompeur, in the masculine, and trompeuse, In the feminine. 

jr. B. Wb-in the signs, abbreviations, etc., precede the first number, they apply to all the senses of the word; when they 
(tUow a number, they are applicable to the acceptation of that number only. These signs placed after the English apply ta 
Ujo latter. 

Prepositions in parentheses. — The French preposition nsed before a noun or pronoun is in small capitals, and the corres- 
pocding Etigllsh one in italics ; the French preposition used before a verb is in italics, and the English one Soman. Thus at 
tbe word Fachb, (DB,/or; d«, to; que [sub].]) signifies that before a noun or pronoun de is used in French, and /or in Eng- 
Ush ; Ur» f&cM de quelque chose, to be iorry for any thing; before a verb de is used in French and to in English, or some- 
times que with the following verb in the subjunctive mood : itre fdcM de voir quelque chose, to be sorry to see any thing ; 
f« suis/dchi que ee soU ainsi, I am sorry it is so. 

Irregular verba in parentheses.— In the parentheses which follow Irregular verbs, the first word is the present participle, 
tbe second the past participle ; in the other parts, the moods and tenses are marked. The parts that are not irregular are not 
given. As the imperftet of the Indicative is formed from the present participle, the conditional f^om the future, and tb« 
imperfect of the subjunctive from the preterit of the indicative, they are omitted immediately after the verb, but will be fbund 
In their proper alphabetical place. This observation applies equally to the Imperative. When at » verb the manner of con- 
Ingatiiig it is not pointed out, the verb is regular; if ending in er, it is conjugated like parler ; if in ir, like^ir; if In oir, 
llk« recevoir; if in r«, like rendre. 

(1) — Bhowi that tb« Eneliah word !• tbe ume m that which trantlatM the French word marked I 
IhB iBiit time, tb« si^ — i> einployod, tbe French word may be traudated by either o! the T 



EXPLANATION OF THE KEY TO THE PRONUNCIATION, 



STANDING AT THE HEAD OF EACH PAGE IN THE FIRST PART 



It being impossible to represent with exactness all tLe French sounds by any letter or combinatioB 
of letters in the English language, and any such attempt having a tendency rather to mislead than 
aasist the pupil, it has been deemed expedient in this work to make reference to French key-worda 
alone, as will be seen in the line running at the head of each page in Part I. If the pronunciation oi 
these twenty-two key-words be acquired correctly from a teacher, this Dictionaiy will enable eyen a 
beginner to pronounce without difficulty eveiy word in the language. For the benefit of those, how- 
ever, who have not the means of thus becoming acquainted with them by imitation, an explanation ol 
the Key is subjoined, in which those sounds that are not common to the two languages are approxi 
mately represented by combinations calculated to impart the most correct idea of them to ai, 
English ear. 

KEY. 

A a in the French key-word mat it prononnced like a in fat. 
d 

4 *♦ 

» 
i 
I i 



S 
6 

XJ u " tuo has no English equivalent! 

OU OM " jow Is pronounced like oo In moor. 

ott " j<y&te " 00 in moor (prolonged^ 

KU eu " jeu " m in tub:i 

e& " j»&n6 " « In tub (prolonged).* 

«d " peur " 11 in bum.* 

AN an *• pan " «n In encore.'i 

IN In " pin "■ on In aang.'i 

ON dn •♦ bon ** ow in song^ 

UN im * brtm " wt in sunff.i 

LL 0* liquid " Ui in brUUant 

QN gn* " *^ gn in mignonetU. 

J^" A word to which no pronunciation is assigned, is sounded like the one which immediately 
precedes. 

> When the English letter i is pronounced, the tongue becomes widened in the direction of the cheeks, so that it touchea 
the first molars. While it is in this position, advance both lips a little, shutting them at the same time in such a manner as 
to leave a narrow oval passage for the breath. This movement will lightly press the tongue between the molars, and Its tip 
ijpdnst the fore-teeth of the inferior jaw. Then let the breath pass, and you have the French u. The eiroumflex placed 
Tver this letter merely prolongs Its sound. 

i The neArest approximation. 



m&le 


« 


a in far. 


fee 


" 


a In fate. 


f^6 


» 


e in Oiert. 


fUe 


- 


e In there (prolonged). 


i« 


" 


u in tub. 


il 


» 


i in pm. 


U« 


« 


e in me. 


mol 


« 


In not 


mdU 


« 


in no. 


moH 


" 


in nor. 



GENERAL 

FRENCH AND ENGLISH 

DICTIONARY. 

FRENCH STANDARD OF PRONUNCIATION. 



OlUfJ 


; 4 male; 


it^; 


<jfuve; ^fete; 


«je;t 


u; 


lile; 


omol 


6 mole; 


<}mort; 


Msuc; ^sftre; 9U 


jour; 




o&joflte 


«wjei] 


; *Jije&ne; eH 


peur 


an 


pan; 


in pin; 


dnbon 


tmbrun 


♦llliq.; 'gnUq. 





A [»] n. m. (first letter of the alpha- 
bet) a. 

Panse d'— , 1. I oval part ofan=.\ 2. 
I stroke ; first stroke. N'avoir pas fait 
one panse d' — , § not to ha^ee done a 
stroke qfa.th.; to have done nothing 
at ail. Ne savoir ni — ni B, Twt to 
know A from B; 1 not to kiuyw a B 
fr<ym abuWsfoot. 

A, ind. pres. 8d sing, of Avoir. 

A. (Abbreviation of Altessk, EigTi- 
ness)H. 

A, [privative prefix In words derived 
Itoia Greek: Acepualk, acephaloxhs 
(without a he«d)l a...; vMhout. 

A [»] prep. 1. I (of place) to (with mo- 
ycn towards) ; 2. II (of place) at (without 
motion towards) ; 3. | (of place) in (with- 
out motion towards); 4. 1 in (within); 5. 
Won; 6. 1 <m (on the surface of) ; 7. § 
to: a S ai: 9. § M; 10. J § hy; 11. § 
voiih; 12. withQay means of); 13. %for; 
14. %for (used for, Intended for) ; 15. § . . , 
(used for, intended for); 16. § <?/ (belong- 
ing to, possessed by); '«;. 17. (of car- 
riages) and (drawn by . . . horses) ; 18. 
(with certain verbs) /rom,- 19. accord- 
ing to ; 20. (preceding an infinitive) to ; 
21. (with other words forms adverbial 
phrases) ; 22. (with qtd, and in exclama- 
tions, expletive). 

1. AUer d'lin lieu — un autre, to go from <mt 
piace to another. 2. Demeurer— Versailles, to rf- 
tide at Vertailta. 8. Vivre — Paris, to live in 
Pari: 4. fttre blessfi — la t6t8 ou — I'^panle, to be 
wounded in the Kead or in the thou/der. 6. I — 
Srenoux, on o.'« kneee ; | — pied, on /oo« ; | — che- 
val, on horte-back; $ — ion retour, on o.'« return. 
t. Porter un bracelet au bras, to wear a bracelet on 
».'« arm. 1. Donner q. cb. — q. u., to give a. th. 
to a. 0. ; «crir« ou parler — q. u., to vrrite or to 
tpeak to a. o. ; appartenir — q. ii., to belot\g to a. 
o. 8. — une telle 6poque, at suck a time ; — sa 
■iort,at Am death. 9. Au matin ou au soir, in 
tit morning ortn the evening; — I'incre, au cray- 
on, in ini, in ptnei! ; arriver — temps, to arrive in 
Umt; 6tr« — la moile, to be in the faehion. 10. 
Ooatte — groutte, drop by drop ; un — un, one by 
one ; — I'ann^e, by the year ; au poids, by weight ; 

— ton sir, by At« look. 11. — bras ouverts, with 
open amu; Vbomme — la barbe, tA« man with a 
teard; une table — tiroir, a table with a draper. 
\H. Se battre — IMp^e ou o« piatolet, to fight 
with n>orda or with pittott. 18. C'est — tous a 
|i«rler, it it (or ;/ou to tpeak. 14. Un march^ — 
tolaille, a marlctt for poultrv; a pankry-nuirkel, 

%, Un sac — ouvng*. a work-box ;_ une bouteille 

— Tin, « teniu-bottle ; du bois — bruler, fire-wood. 
1(. Avoii une maison — »oi, to have a heme of 
».'t »ym ; Totre devoir — tons, tA« duty of »o» all ; 
mtte maison est — mon p4re ou — moi, (Am Aoims 
u mv/atker'i or mine ; tout — tous, your* tr«/y. 
'7. (Jne voiture — qiiatre cheTaux, • carriage and 
low. 18. Oter n. ch. — q. u., to take a. th. from 
11.0. 19. — mon gout, according to my ta«t«. 20. 
IJjUiion — Tendre, Aouw to 6< »old ; cela est — 
ratudre, tAot « to be feared, 21. — has, do¥m ; — 
•ort. ^nmgfully ; — reculone, hackwardt. 22. C'est 

— qui amTera le premier, let tu tee whn will be the 
tint to arrive. Au fen I nr* t — I'assassin 1 mur- 
>• / — !• garde I wotcA / 

AA. (Abbreviation of Awmsss, Righ- 

TUMMS) K 



ABA 

ABACA [a-b»-ka] n. m. abaca; Ma- 
nilla hemp. 

ABAClfS [a-bft-kus] n. m. (math.) a6o- 
eus. 

ABAI8SE [a-b4-s] n. £ (culln.) bottom, 
wider o-ust. 

ABAI88EMENT ra-b4-s-man] n. m. 1. 
I lowering; 2. I falHng; 8. I letting 
down ; 4. | putting dovyn ; 5. | bringing 
down ; 6. | casting aoion ; 7. I taking 
down ; 8. | ptMim^ dUnon ; 9. | throwing 
down; 10. I sinking; sinking down; 
11. I weighing dmon ; 12. | subsiding ; 
18. § abatement; diminution; 14 § 
(pers.) lowering; depression; hum- 
bling; ^bringing down; ^/etching 
down; -f bowing down; 15. § (b. b.> 
abasement; debasemmt; 16. § (b. s.) 
stooping {Uf) ; 17. § (b. s.) demeaning ; 

18. (alg.) (of an equation) depression ; 

19. (,astr.) (of the horizon, of the pole^ 
depression; 20. (surg.) (of the cataract) 
ociuching. 

— volontaire, self-abasement; — sous 
Thorizon, (astr.) (of a star) depression. 
Operation de la cataracte par — , (surg.) 
couching; proc6de par—, (surg.) (of 
the cataract) couchtng. 

ABAISSER [n-bi-ti] V. a. 1. 1 to Imoer 
(cause to be less high) ;% I to let down ; 
draw down ,* 8. ) to put down ,* 4. | to 
bring down ,* 5. | to cast down ; 6. j to 
take down ,• 7. I to puU down ; 8. | to 
throw down ; 9 | to weigh doton; 10. § 
to abate; to diminish; 11. J t:* lower; 
to depress ; to hunible ,• T to bring 
down ; ^to fetch doicn ,• -f- to bow 
down ; 12. § (b. s.) to abase ; to debase ; 
18. § to vili/i/; 14. (alg.) to reduce (an 
equation) ; 15. (geom.) to let fall ; 16. 
(nav.) to strike (a mast) ; 17. (past.) to 
roll (a paste); 18. (surg.) to couch (a 
cataract). 

1. — une route, to lower a road. 2. Abaitnez 
les stores, draw the blindt down. 5. — ses regards, 
to cast down o.'« eyet. 

ABAI88K, K, pa. p. V. senses of 
Abaissbr. 

Non — , ( V. senses) § unabased; tm- 
debased. 

S'abaisser, pr. v. 1. I to lower ; 2. 
§ to fall ; 8. 1 to let down ,• 4. 1 to take 
m; 6.1 to sink ; to sink down; 6. | 
to weigh down; 7. | to subside; 8. § 
(pers.) to Imoer o.'s self; to humble o.'s 
self; 9. § (pers.) (a, dbvant, to, be/ore) 
■ toop ; 10. § (b. s.) (pei«.) to demean 
o.'s self; 11. § to slope down. 

2. Sa Toil t'abaitia, Ai« Totce fell 11. Le ter- 
in t'abaitte Ters la mer, tA« land slopes down 

towardt the tea. 

Qui ne s'ao&isse pas, (F. senses^ { 
I (pers.) wnstooping. 

ABAI88EUR [a-bi-senr] adj. (»n*t) (of 
i the muscles) deprimeni. 



ABA 

Muscle—, (anat) depressor; depr*' 
ment m,uscle. 

ABAI8SEUR, n. m. fanat) depressor. 

ABAJOUE [a-ba-jou] n. C (uiam ) 
pouch in tJie cheek (of certain animals) ; 
pouch; giU; gills. 

ABANDON [a-ban-d«n] n. m. 1. I (ac- 
tion) abandonment ; abandoning ; 2. 
(state) ahwndommerU ; 8. | forsaking ; 
4. I desertion ; 5. | forlomness ; 6. J 
quitting; leaving; 7. | surrender; 
giving up; yielding up ; i [ reHn- 
quisliment; 9. Irenunoiation, t^viiuf 
over, up ; 10. % ease; 'jneouttraifit ; \l. 
§ unreserved confidence; iamfidenac; 
12. (law) abandwUng; li (iaw) d^i^ 
liction. 

10. Un — dans les mani^res, eaee, onconrtraiiit 
in o.'» manneri. 11. Parler avec — , lo tpeak witA 
unreserved confidence. 

A r — , 1. at r and om ; 2. in confusion ; 
in disorder ; ^^ at sixes and sevens ; 
3. (b. 8.) to shift for o.'s self; to tak« 
care ofo.'s self; 4 (mar.) adrift. Fain? 
un — ,to make a surrender ; falre uu 
— de, to yield up, to make over (goods 
to a creditor) ; laisser h V—, (V.k Y—) to 
abandon ; se livrer avec — (a), to lumu- 
Hate {in). 

ABANDONNATAIRE " 
ti-r] n. m. C (law) relessee. 

ABANDONNE [a-ban-do-n«] n. m. E, 
t t prqfiigate; reprobate; ahan- 
wretclh 

ABANDONNEMENT [a-ban-do-n-min] 

n. m. 1. 1 (action) abandonment; aban- 
doning; 2. I (state) abandonment; & 
i sv/rrender ; girnng up ; yielding vp , 
4 I reli/)iqwishment ; renunciation, 
giving over, up; 5.% (b. s.) prqfiigacy , 
6. (law) abandoning ; surrender. 

Si/n. — Abanuonnehent. abdication, renoncia. 
TioN, DEMISSION. Abandonntment i^ UB6'*. inconneo. 
tion with that which we are not capable or desi- 
rous of retaining ; abdication, witn that which we 
are no longer in a conditio 



ith a statioa 
whose duties we can no longer perform with honoi 
or satisfaction. Wemakean<i4o?i<ionB«ni«Uof pro- 
pertv ; an abdication of dignity or power ; a r^noi^ 
datum of rights or pretensions; a demittitu ai r 
post or situation. 

ABANDONNER [»-ban-do-n«] v. a (A., 
to) 1. 1 to abandon; 2. | to forsako; 2. 
I to desert; 4 | to quit; to leave; (x 
to surrender ; to yield up; to give up , 
6. 1 to reUnqvish ; to renounce ; to gtot, 
over; to lay by to lay down; ic 
throw by ; 7. | v (vWoer oner, up; to 
give over, Mp ,• Pv 5 u give up; to Uave ; 
9. t to let go; 10, (( to evyplode; ll. % to 
fail; 12. to set (a horse) at full speed; 
18. to give over, up la patient) ; 14 (law^ 
to reUase; to reitvue; 16. (oom. mtv.) 
to abandon. 






ABA ABC 


ABI 


^ 


onua; dm&le; «(ge; (sf&v*; ^fSte; (rje;iU; Itle; omd 


; dmole; 5mort; wsno; Aslire; OMjour, 





to fonakt) ft.^tffUndi or eon^panunt. 



— U partie, to ffi/ve it v/p. Peraonne 
q'iil abandonne, ( V. senses) 1. abandon- 
«r ; 8. (law) reU«8or. Falre —,{¥. sen- 
nee^ to aupm-sede. 

Abandonne, e, pa. p. {V. senses 
<rf Abandonnee) 1. tmswayed ; 2. «b- 
fiod«d (abandoned); 8. (law) aban- 
aoned; 4. (law) derelict 

Non — , L vmforaaken ; 2. untwrren- 
dtired. Objet — , (law) derelict 

S'abandonnkk, pr. v. (a) 1. I fe> 
surrender o.'b self (to) ; to gt/ee, to yield 
o.'t »elf v/p (to) ; % % to abandon o.'a 
$elf {to) ; to (rive, to yield o.'s self vp 
(to) ; i.%to ffvve way (to) ; 4. %to ff ra- 
tify o.'a self (in) ; to indulge, to indulge 
o.'* tdf (in, with) ; 5. § (b. s.) tc addict 
».'« <tel/(to) ; 6. § to betake oJs self (to) ; 
7. S (b. s.) to give loose (to) ; 8. § to trust 
(to) ; to commit o.'« self (to) ; 9. § to be 
*d»y, unconstraiMed ; 10. § (of drivers) to 
drive away. 

ABANNATION [»-i»-nA-«on] n. t t 
(erim. law) aboMrUtion ; banisMnentfor 
• year. 

ABANTIADES [a-ban-ci-«-d] p. n. m. 
felass.) Abantiades (patronymic of 
Persens and other kings of Argos). 

ABANTIAS [a-ban-ci-a] p. n. C (class.) 
Abantias (patronymic of Danaa and 
Atalanta^. 

ABAPTI8TE [a-ba-tia-t] n. m. t 
^rarg.) trepan : abaptiston. 

ABAQUE [a-ba-k] n. m. 1. (arch.) aba- 
om; 2. (math.) abacus; S. (sculp.) 
rmised table. 

ABARTICULATION [a-bar-ti-ka-U- 

<»n] n. t (anat) abarticuMtion ; diar- 
ffirosis. 

ABAS [a-bial 8. m. obas (Persian 
»olght forjpearls). 

ABA80URDIR [a-ba-Kur-dir] V. a I^L 
fogtwn; to deafen; 2. § to astound; 
to strike dumb. 

ABATAGE [a-ba-ta-j] n. m. 1. eumng 
(i/ trees) ; 2. felting (of trees) ; 8. sUminh- 
taring (of animals) ; kilUng ; 4. pulling 
down (of houses); 5. (nav.) heaving 
dxnon; careening; 6. (jaac\i.) power. 

i. Avec un grand levier, on a plus d' — qu'avec 
an petit, vitk a long lever you Jutve greater power 
tian witk a tkort one. 

ABATANT [a-ba-tan] n. m. 1. (mova- 
ble) sash ; 2. leaf (of a table or counter). 

ABATARDIE [a-bS-tar-dir] V. a. § to 

debase ; to corrupt; to render degene- 
rate. ^ 

Abataedi, «, pa. p. 1. degenerate; 
debased; 2. half-blooded. 

Non — , vndebased. 

8'abatardir, pr. v. to degenerate. 

ABATARDISSEMENT [a-ba-tar-di* 

wml n. m. degeneracy ; debasement. 

AbAT-CHAUV:6E [a-ba-ih6.T«] n. t 
flock-wo^. 

ABATEE [a-ba-t*] n. f (nav.) casting; 
fiJlingof. 

Faire son — , to cast; tofaU off. 

ABAT-FAIM [a-ba-fin] n. m., pi — 1 
tubstantiaZ, large joint (of me&i). 

ABAT-FOIN [a-ba-foin] n. m. (agric.) 
opening over a hay-rack (through 
which the hay is put in). 

ABATIS [a-ba-ti] n. m. 1. demoUUon ; 
ptUling dmon; 2. felling; cutUng 
down ; 8. (pi.) things pulled doion ; 4. 
fpl.) (of poultry) giblets; 6. slaughter; 
£ (hunt) abature. 

— en rapofit «tow«f giblets. 

ABAT-JOUK fa-b».joor] n. m., pi — , 
L (arob.) sky-Ught ; 2. reflector; 8. (of 
hmpe, etc.) shade ; 4. (of prisons, vaults) 
nbaiour. 

A3AT08 [a-ba-to.] p. n. m. l.(8nc.geog.) 
Abatoe(h rocky island in the Nile); 2. 
finyth.) Abates (one of the horses of 
Plato) ; & (astr.) Abatos (a constellation). 

Abatb. ind. pres. Ist, 2d sing. ; impera. 
M. sing, of Abattre. 

ABAT8 [a-baTn. m. (pi.) (butch.) offaL 

ABATTfeE. V. Abatee. 

AiiA'rrjfiMENT [a-ba-t-man] n. m. !. 
\i tie body) Imoneas; prostration of 



iitrenifth; 2 (of the mind) dejectedness 
depression of spirita; despondency 
depressed, low spirits; towness of 
spt-rits; * heart-heaviness; 8. (her.) 
nlatiment ; 4. (med.) collapse ; pros- 
tration of strength ; depression of pow- 
ers. 

— d'honneur, (her.) abatement; — 
des forces, (med." (V. — ). Dans 1"—, 1. in 
a low state; 2. tow-^rited ; deeded; 
desponding; * spiritless; 8. faint- 
hearted. Jeter dans 1' — , to deject; * to 
cast down; to t..ik'^ to render low- 
spirited; ^ to puiom n,' cj-^-nts; ^ to 
bring a. o. low; r6pandre 1' — loO.), to 
cast down, ^ to strike a damp (upon) ; 
tomber dans 1'—, 1. to get low ; 2. to lose 
o.'« spirits ; to become deeded, low- 
spirited. Qui jette dans 1—, depres- 
sive. 

ABATTEUR [a-baUur] n. m. feller 
(of wood). 

C'est un grand — de (juilles, Iheifia 
fam/yus hand at nineqyins, %'[he does 
vp a job in no time, (iron.) h^s a great 
brag. 

ABATTOIR [a-ba-toar] n. m. 1. slaitgh- 
ter-house ; 2. " abattoir" (public slaugh- 
ter-house). 

ABATTRE [a-ba-tr] v. a. irreg. (conj. 
like Battrb) 1. I to throw dozen; to 
take doion ; 2. | to lay Uno ,- 8. ^ | to get, 
to have down ; 4. | to knock down ; 6. | 
to pull down ; to pluck down ; 6. | to 
let down ; 7. | to fell ; 8.1 to cut down ; 
9. 1 to hew down ; 10. | to hew of; 11. 
to strike down; to lay low;. 12. \ to 
strike off; 13. | to clea/ve down; 14. 1 to 
mow down; 15. | to hack doion; 16. | 
to dig down; 17. | to break down; 18. 
I to beat down; 19. | to push down; 20. 
i to lay down; 21. | to lay; 22. | to 
slaughter (an animol) ; to kiU ; 23. § to 
overthrow; to subvert; 24. § to de- 
press (a. o.); to bring (a. o.)low,^ 
down; to humble; 26. § to d^«ct (a. o.) ; 
to render, to make (a o.) low spirited; 
to put (a o.) out qf spirits ; ^ to dash ; 
26. (surg.) to couch (a cataract). 

^21. La pluie abat la pouasi^re, tke rain lavs the 
duet. 

— en carSne, to careen (a ship). Un 
vaisseau dur i — , a stiff ship. 

8'abattre, pr. v. 1. | tufall doicn ; to 
coTne down; 2. § to abate ; 8. (of birds) 
to alight; 4. (of birds of prey) to stoop ; 
to make a stoop ; 5. (of horses) to break 
down; 6. (of a storm) to burst; 7. (of 
the wind) to abate ; to subside ; 8. (of 
the spirits) to be cast down, dejected. 

Qui ne s'abat pas, ( V. senses) unabat- 
ing ; that does not abate. 

ABATTRE, v. n. irreg. (conj. like 
Battre) 1. (cards) to lay down o.'s 
cards. 2. (nav.) to swing; to cast. 
Faire—, laisser — , (V. sefases) (nav.) 
to let swing ; to let cast 

ABATTU, E [a-ba-tu] adj. ( V. senses 
of Abattre and 8'abattre) 1. de- 
pressed; low (without strength); 2. § 
dejected; spiritless; low-spirited ; out 
q/ spirits ; 8. faint-hearted ; ^ down- 
fiearted; 4 humbled ; ^ crest-fallen. 

Non—, 1. unabated; 2. unbroken; 
8. undepressed. 

ABATTURES [a-ba-tfl-r] n. C (pi.) 
(hunt) abature ; _finUng. 

ABAT- VENT [a-ba-van] n. m., pL — , 
(of steeples) penOuruse. 

ABAT-VOIX [a-ba-voa] n. m., pi. — , 
1. reflector of the voice ; 2. (of a pulpit) 
sounding-board. 

ABBASSIDES [a-ba-ai-d] p. n. m., (pi.) 
Ahbassides (37 caliphs descended from 
Abbas, uncle of MahometV 

ABBATIAL, E [a-ba-«-ai] adj. abba- 
Ucal; abbatial. 

ABBATIAL, n. m. abbey. 

ABBAYE [a-bi-i] n. t abbey. 

Administration d'nne — , abbacy. 

ABBi; [a-b«] a. m. abbe; abbot 

Dignity, fonctions (pL) d'— , abbot- 
ship. 

ABBES8E [a-b*-a] n. t abbess. 

Dignit6 (slng.X fonctions (pL) d'— , ab- 
botship, sing. 

ABO [a-b«-a*1 n. HL 1. | $ a & (al- 
phabet); 2. spelling-book; primer. 



£tre k Y— (de), to be at the abo {of) 
remettre q. u. a 1" — , to put a o. baH fc 
Am = ; renvoyer q. u. 4 1 — , to r^er a, 
o. to his =. 

ABCi^DER [ab-.«-d«] V. n. (meO.) k> 
form into an abscess. 

ABCi;8 [ab-iA] n. m. (med.) abioeec 

Former un — , (med.) to f^rm an —; 
to gather; vider un — , to f«r>u>c/ the 
contents of an =:. 

ABCISSE. F.j^BscissE. 

ABDALAS [ab-da-la] p. n. m. (pLI Ab 
dais (religious enthusiasts of Persia). 

ABDERE [ab-dA-r] p. n. (anc goog.) 
Abdera. 

ABDIAS [ab-di-A«] p. n. m. ObadiaA. 

ABDICATION [ab-di-ka .ion] n. C t 
abdication ; 2. t (law) disinheritance. 

Faire — , to abdicate ; to give up. 

ABDIQUER [ab-di-k«] V. a. to abdi- 
cate. 

ABDIQUER, V. n. to abdicate. 

ABDOLONTME [ab-do-lo-ni-m] p. x 
m. (class.) Abdalonimus. 

ABDOMEN [ab-do-men] n. m. (anat) 
abdomen; venter. 

ABDOMINAL, E [ab-do-mi-nal] adj. 
(aaat) abdominal ; abdomiwnM. 

ABDUCTEUR [ab-duk-tenr] ac^. (anat) 
abducent. 

Muscle — , = muscle. 

ABDUCTEUR, n. m. (anat) abduo- 
tor. 

ABDUCTION [ab-duk-BOn] n. C 1. (log.) 
abduction ; 2. (physioL) abduction. 

AB^Cl^lDAIEE [a-b«-.«-di-r] adj. 1. 1 
alphabetical (order); 2. § <j^a 6 c. 

AB^CEDAIRE, n. m. tpeUing-book ; 
primer. 

ABECQUER, 

ABi:QUER Ta-M-k*] V. a (of birds) to 
feed (with the beak). 

AB*E [a-b«] n. £ (mlU.) mill-dam. 

ABEILLE [a-bi-i] n. t (ent) bee. 

— domestique, honey, hivez=; — oB- 
vriSre, working = ; — bourdon, hu^n- 
ble^; — m^re, m6re — , reine — , gruecn 
= ; — de ruche, hive =. fileveur d'— e, 
d' — », swarm of ■=^; 



herbe aux — s, (botO m-eadow-sux^ ; 
pain d' — s, = -bread; ruche d'— a, =- 
hi/ve. D'— , comme les — s, = -like. C»- 
rillonner les — s, to ring =«. 

AB:6N:6VIS [a-b« n«-Ti] n. m. t (feud.) 
privilege granted by a lord of a ma- 
nor to a tenant, to divert the cowrst qf 
a stream,, for irrigation, &c 

ABERRATION [a.b«r-ra^i«n] n. C 1. 
aberration ; 2. (sciences) aberration. 

— de r6frangibilit6, (opt) Newtonian 
=. Cercle d' — , (astr., opt ) oroivn of=. 

ABETIR [a.b«-tir] V. a to stuUify; to 
stupefy. 

S'abetik, pr. V. to become stultified, 
stup^ed ; to get, to grow stupid. 

ABflTIR, V. n. to become, grow stu- 
pid. 

AB HOC ET AB HAC [a-bo-k«-ta-bak] 
adv. 1 at random. 

ABHORRANT [a-bftr-ran] p. n. m. 
(hist, of Engl) Abhirrer. 

ABHORRER [a-bAr-rt] V. a to abhor; 
to liold in horror; to loathe; to detest 

Personne qui abhorre, abhorrer; 
leather. 

ABIG:6AT [a-bi-j«-a] n. m. (crim. law) 
robbery of cattle. 

ABtME [a-bl-mj n. m. 1. I $ abyss; 2. 
I H- ** deep ; heU; 8. § unfathomable 
depth ; 4.% mine; treasury. 

ABtMER [a-bi-m«] V. a 1. 1 to east in- 
to an abyss ; 2. 1 to swaUow up; i.\ 
to overwhelm ; 4. § to ruin (a. o.) ; to 
undo; 5. ^ § to damage; to spoil (a 
th.); to rum; 6. § 1 to cut (a o.) to 
pieces (to censure) ; -f- to cut (%. o.) up, 
to cut (a o.) up to nothing. 

S'abImer, pr. V. ( P: senses cf AbImec, 
to be lost(in)(pye o.'s self up to). 

AB INTESTAT [a-bin-ti^ta] adv i'lawl 
(of the heir) intestate ; abiniestatf 

Succession — , 1. intestacy ; 2 tnto*- 
tote's esUite. 

AB IRATO [a-bi-ra-to] adv. in a Jit <^ 
passion. 

AB-IRRITATION [a-btr-ri-ti-aleal n 
t (med.) diminution of the pKmomsn* 
qfUf« : abienoe qf irritation. 



"^ ABU ABO 


ABR 




oil joute; *i« jeu; «6 jeune; e& pear; a»i pan; In pin; on bon; un brun; *1I liq. 


♦gnliq. 





ABJECT, E [8b-j4k, t] 84j. abject; 
viU; hose; mean. 

Dune maniere — e, ay«cfly ; v9,ely; 
basely; meanly. 

ARTECTION [ub-jik-nsnl »• f- 1- ab- 
jection; 2. abjectnesn; vueness; base- 
tiee» ; m^eanness ; 3. + outcast. 

Avec— , abjectly; vUely ; basely; 
rtuanly. 

ABJURATION [ab-jn-ra-aion] n. £ 1. 

G-'ijuraUim; 2. (hist of Engl.) abjura- 
tion. 
Faire — da, to oMure. 

ABJURATOIEE [ab-ja-ri-U»-r] 8(1j. 



ABJURER [ab-ju-rt] V. a. to abjure. 

Personne qui abjure, abjurer. 

Abjuke, k, pa. p. abjured. 

Non — , unabjured. 

ABLACTATION [a-blak-tirfion] a £ 
'med.) ablactation. 

ABLAQUE r»-bla-k] n. f ardassirus. 

ABLATIF [a-bla-tif] n. m. (gram.) 
ablati/ve ; abZati/ek case. 

— absolu, ablatwe absolute. A T — , 
f» <A« =, = case ; de 1' — , of the=~,=z 
ease; ablative. 

ABLATION [a-bU-aion] n. t (surg.) 
ablation. 

ABLATivo r»-bi»-u-To] adv. igr 

UggledAf-piggledy. 

ABLE r«-bl] n. m. 

ABLETTE [a-bi4-t] n. £ (Ich.) a&te< ; 
ablen; bleak; whitebait; blay. 

ABL:feGAT [a-bi«-ga] n. m. legatees 

ABLERET [a-bW-rt] n. m. (fish.) 
irwae-net. 

ABLUER l*-biu-«] V. a. to wash with 
gaU-rmt. 

ABLUTION [a-bld-usn] n. £ 1. dblu^ 
turn ; 2. + althitwn ; 3. (hyg.) ablution. 

Faire ses — s, to perform o.''s =a. 

ABN:fcGA riON rab-n«-ga-ii6n] n. £ 1. 
abnegation ; 2. selfdsnial. 

— de 8ol-m§me, self-denial. Faire — 
ilo, 4) r*rw(WK3« ,• to lay, to set osidA 

ABNORMAL, E [ab-nor-mal] acy. V. 

A3.-OKMAU 

ABOI [»->>oa] n. m. 1. t barking; 
^ork; 2. —8, (pL) (hunt) baq/. 

Aux —8, 1. j at bay ; 2. § ?Mrd up ; 
de grand — , deep-moutlied. Etre aux 
— «. L I to be, to stamd at bay ; 2. § to 
be hard up ; mettre aux — 8, to hold, to 
keep at bay. 

ABOIEMENT [a-bo»-manj, 

ABOtMENT, n. m. 1. bark ; 2. bark- 

ABOLIE [a-bo-Ur] v. a. to abolish; 1 
V> do OAJoay with. 

Personne qui abolit, dbolifther (of). 

Aboll, e [a-bo-U] pa. p. abolished ; ^ 
lione away leith. 

Non — , ttnabolishfd. 

8'abolir, pr. V. to fall into disuse. 

AB0LIS8ABLE [a-bo-li-M-bl] adj. abo- 
Ushable. 

Non — , ttnabolishable. 

ABOLISSEMENT [a-bo-li a-man] n. m. 
dboUshm^ent. 

ABOLITION [a-bo-ll-.i6n] n. £ 1. abo- 
lition ; 2. indemnitt/ (prince's pardon). 

ABOLITIONISTE [8->><>-"-"-o-'^-'] n. 
m. £ aboUUonist. 

ABOMINABLE [a-bo-mi-na-bl] adj. (d^, 
to ; que. [subj.]) abominable. 

ABOMINABLEMENT [a-bo-mi-na-bl* • 
■uiii! adv. abominably. 

ABOMINATION [a-bo-ml-na-eiSn] n. £ 

1. (DE, of, to) abomination ; 2. abonii- 
nobleness ; 3. abominable cHme. 

Avoir en — , to hold in abomination ; 
(de) to abominate (to) ; fitre en — , to be 
al'onviiMted ; commettre des — s, to 
commit abominable crimes. 

ABONDAMMENT [a-bdn-da-man] adv. 
L abundantly ; in abundance ; 2. 
phnteouely; 3. am,ph/; copiously; 
Hchly. 

ABONDANCE [a-bdn-dan-a] n. £ 1. 
abundance; affluence; 2. plenti/ ; * 
plenteousness ; 8. am^pleness ; copious- 
ness ; richness ; 4. (of language) d4fu- 
eJrien esH : 5. (of a reoast) heartiness ; 6. 
^^" (schools) weak wine and water, 

Grande — , 1. great abundance ; plen- 
'y;i. luantriance. Come d*— , (myth.) 



horn of plenty ; cornucopia. D' — , 1. ** 
plenteous; 2. (of speech) offluind; avec 
grande — , 1. icith great abundance, 
plenty ; 2. luamriantly ; en — , in abun- 
dan-ce ; plentiful ; plenty. Avoir — de, 
to have an abundance of; ecrire, par- 
ler d'— , to v^rite, to speak extempore ; 
repandre 1' — (sur), to scatter, to spread 
abimdunce (over) ; — de biens ne nuit 
pas, store is no sore. 

ABONDANT, E fa-bdn-dan, t] adj. 1. 
abundant ; 2. plentiful ; * plenteous ; 
3. ample; copious; rich; 4. (of a re- 
past) hearty ; 5. (of speech) ■poiwi^,- ti. 
(of style) diffusi/ve. 

Tres , 1. very = ; 2. luamricmt 

ABONDER [a-bon-de] V. D. (de, kn, 
in, with) to abound ; to be abundant. 

— dans le sens de q. u., to concwr in 
am, opinion with a. o. 

ABONNfi [a-bo-n*] n. m., E, l. £ (de, 
to) subscriber (to periodicals). 

ABONNEMENT [a-bo-n-man] n. m. 
(DE, to) subscription (to periodicals). 

Prendre an — h, to subscribe to ; to 
take a subscription to. 

ABONNER [a-bo-n«] V. a. to subscribe 
for. 

— q. n. a q. ch., to subscribe for a. o. to a. tk. 

8'abonner, pr. v. (a, to) to subscribe 
(to periodicals) 

On sabonne . . . , subscriptions are re- 
ceived .... 

ABONNIR [a-bo-nir] v. a. | to improve 
(a. th. bad). 

8'abonnir, pr. v. t to improve. 

ABONNIR, V. n. + to improve; to 
m.end. 

ABORD [a-bor] n, m.(DE, to) 1. ap- 
proach; 2. access; S. arrival; land 
ing ; 4. resort (of persons). 

Au premier — , 1. | on o.'s first ap- 
proach ,• 2 § at first vieio ; d'lm — diffi- 
cile, facile, difficult, easy qf access ; d' — , 
de prime — ', \. first; at first; at first 
sight ; 2. at once ; tout d" — ^ first and 
foremoHt. D' — que, as soon as. Avoir 
r — ...,\.tobe... qf access ; 2. to ha/ve 
a ... manner. 

ABORDABLE [a-bor-da-bi] adj. 1. ap- 
proachable; 2. accostable; 8. acces- 
sible. 

i;tre — , to be easy of access. 

ABORDAGE [a-bor-da-j] n. m. (nav.) 

1. (by accident) running foul ; 2. (as an 
enemy) boarding. 

Marin qui va a 1' — , boarder. Sur le- 
qnel on peut tenter 1' — , boardable. Al- 
ler k Y — , to go boarding. 

ABORDER [a-bor-d6] V. a. 1. to ap- 
proach ; 2. to accost (a. o.) ; 3. to broach 
(a. th.) ; to enter on, upon ; 4 (nav.) to 
touch ; 6. (nav.) to scuttle ; 6. (nav.) (ac- 
cidentally) to run foul of; tofuU aboard 
qf; 7. (nav.) (as an enemy) to board. 

3. — one (lueation, une diHicult^, to broach a 
^HeHion, a diffictiUit. 

— par accident, to run foul of; tofaU 
aboard of. Que Ton peut — , (nav.) 
boardable. 

8' ABORDER, pr. v. ( V. senses of Abor- 
der) 1. to run against each other ; 2. 
(nav.) to run, tofaUfoiU of each other. 

ABORDER [a bor-d«] v. n. 1. to land; 

2. (nav.) (a, . . .) to reach (the ship). 

[Aborder is conj. with avoir when itexpressea 
an action : when it denotes a state it takes etre.] 

ABORDEUR [a-bor-deur] n. m. (nav.) 
hoarding-ship. 

ABORIGi:NES [a-bo-ri-ji-n] n. m. (pi.) 
aborigines; aboriginals. 

D' — , <>/■= ; aboriginal. 

ABORNEMENT [a-bor-n-man] n. m., 
fianng of boundaries. 

ABORTI-F, VE ra-bor-tif, I-t] adj. L 
abortive ; 2. (hot) abortive. 

ABOT [a-bft] n. m. tether ; h<ypples. 

ABOUCHEMENT [a-boa-sh-man] n. m.. 
1. 1 interview ; 1. (anat) anastomosis. 

A BOUCHER ra-bou-ah«] V. a. to bHng 
together ; to effect an interview be- 
tween. 

— ensemble, =. 

S'ABonciiER, pr. V. 1. to have an in- 
terview ; 2. (anat) to inosculate. 

ABOUT [a-bou] n. m. (carp.) end. 

ABOUTIR Ja-boa-tir] V. n. (th.) 1. 1 (A) 
to cotn* out (mto) (end) ; 2. | (a, . . .) to 



meet (at the end); 3. § (a) to end (if>) 
to come (to) ; 4. (of an abscess) to hrcaJt 

N' — a rien, to come to nothing Ftdrc 
— , to bring (an abscess) to a head, k 
quoi aboutit tout cela ? tohat ie t\i iKul, 
5 drift of aU that r 

S'aboutir, pr. V. (hort.) to bud. 

, ABOUTISSANT, E [a-bou-U-aan,t] ,^ 
(a, on) bordering. 

ABOUTISSANT, [a-bou-ti-aiiii] n. nj 

1. I abuttal ; 2. § particular'; detail, 
3. § (pen.) connection ; acquaintance. 

Savoir tons les tenants et — s de a. eh., 
to know aU the particulars of a. m. ; tii 
know all about a. th. 

"AB OVO" [a-bo-vo] a6v. from the be- 
ginning, first 

ABO Y ANT, E [a-boa-ian, t] adj. barb- 
ing. 

ABOTER [a-boa-i«] V. L V 1 (a, APREa, 

CONTEE, at) to bark; 2. (A, aprM, 
coftre) to bay ; 3. § (a, ... i to dun (a 
creditor). 

ABOYEUE [a-boa-ienr] n. m. 1. II bark- 
er; 2. § (pbrs.) snarler : 3. § (pers.) (of 
creditors) d^m, ; 4 (om.) greenshank. 

ABRASION [a-bra-iion] n. f (med.) 1. 
abrasion; 2. superficial ulceration (of 
the skin or intestines). 

ABRfiGJfe [a-br«-j6] n. m. 1. 1 (of books) 
abridgment ; compendium- ; epitome ; 

2. § abridgment; epitome; abstrad; 
8. S brief, short account 

Auteur d'un — , abridger; epitomizer. 
En — , 1. uy abridgment; 2. in an 
abridged form ; compendiously ; 3. 
briefiv. Reduire en — , to abridge. 

ABRfiGEMENT [a-br«-j.min] n. m. 
abridgment; abridging. 

ABRfiGER [a-br«-j^] V. a.1. to abridge; 
2. to abbreviate; 8. to epitomize; 4 to 
shorten; 1 to out short, doom. 

4. — les joura de q. u., U> shorten a. *>.'» (fayt. 

Pour — , to be brief. Personne qui 
abrege, abridger ; epitomizer. 

Abrege, k, pa. p. FT senses of Abskozxi. 

Non — , 1. unabridged ; 2. unatin^ 
viated. 

ABREUVER [a-breu-v«] V. a. 1. | * 
water (animals) ; 2. (pleasO to makt (k 
o.) drink; to give (a. o.) drink; 8. ! U 
soak (a. th.) ; to tcater ; 4 § (de) to gt»at 
(in); tofiU (icith); to load (with); 8 
(arts) to prepare. 

S'abreitver, pr. v. 1. (of animals) to 
go to water ; 2. ** § to drink. 

ABREUVOIR [a-breu-viar] n. m. 1. | 
watering-place (for animals); 2. t horito- 
pond. 

ABR:feVIATEUK [»-br«-Ti-»-Uar] n. m. 
abbreviator ; abridger. 

ABRfiVIATI-F, VE [a-brt-Ti-a-tif, !-▼] 
adj. abbrematory. 

ABR]£VIATION [a-br^-vi-A-aion] n. £ 

1. abbreviation; 2. (math.) contraty 
tion. 

Par — , by abbreviation. Faire une — , 
to make an =. 

ABR^YER, V. a. (nav.) to belee; tc 
becalm. 

£tre abr6y6, (nav.) to be beleed, be- 
calmed. 

ABEI [a-bri] n. m. 1. 1 § shelter ; cover; 

2. ** I conceaMnent. 

A r — , 1. 1 under shelter, cover ; shel- 
tered ; 2. (de) sheltered (from) ; 3. § (b. 
8.) not liable to ; sans — , 1 II § unshel- 
tered ; * shelterless ; 2. § unharbored ; 
** harborless; houseless; **?u>melesa. 
Donner un — k, | § to shelter; to har- 
bor ; se feire un — , to provide a shelter, 
mettre a 1' — , 1. 1 to shelter; to put un- 
der shelter; 2. § to shelter; to screen; 
(de) to ihiield (jrom) ; se mettre h Y — 
1. 1 § to shelter o.'a self; 2. § to shield 
o.'s self; to screen o.'s self. Qiil n'eet 
pas a Y — (de), unsheltered ( from). 

ABRICOT [a-bri-ko] n. m. (bot ) aprH 
cot. 



pfiche, peach- =. 

ABRIC< 



ICOTIER [a-bri-ko-ti*] n. m.(bot) 

apricot-tree. 
ABRITER [a-bri-t«] v. a. (oontbe, 

from) 1. I § to. shelter ; 2. § to shield ; U. 

screen; 8. (nav.) to becalm. 
Abrite, b, pa. p. V. senses of Abrit«« 
Non — , 1. J § unsheltered ; 2. § un 

shielded; unscreened; unharbored. 



ABS 



ABb 



AUA 



anuU; dmkle: 4f<6e; iRve; « fete; ^je; til; Hie; o mol; omole; •!} mort; msuc; u stre; oujonr , 



pr. T. to »heU«r o.'t »elf; 



ABEOGATION [»-br».f4-««n] ii.fl. 
abrogation,; 2. repeal. 

ABEOGEB [»-bro-j«] V. a. 1. to dbro- 
ffots ; 2. to repeal. 

Penonne qui abroge, repeaUr. 

Abrosk, k, pa. p. V. senses of Abbo- 



Non — i 1. unabrogated; 2. v/nre- 
pmled. " 

8'abboger, pr. v. to fall into disuse 

ABEOUTI, E ra-brou-ti] adj. browsed. 

ABBUPT, E [a-brup, tj adj. 1. 1 ruff- 
0td ; 2. (bot.) abrupt 

ABEUPTION [a-brap-aicn] n. t (surg.) 
abruption ; fracture. 

ABEUTIR [a-bru-tir] V. a 1. to brutal- 
is«; 2. to Uultify ; to stwpefy ; 3. to be- 
tot. 

S'abkutir, yr. v. 1. to Irutalise; to 
become, to get brutalized ; 2. to stultify, 
to stwpeft/ o.'s self. 

ABEUTISSANT, E [ «-b™-ti-«in, t ] 
adj. 1. brutalizing ; 2. stultifying : stu- 
pefying ; 8. besotting. 

ABEUTISSEMENT [a-bru-ti-.-man] n, 

m. 1. brutishn^ms ; 2. beastliness (stupi- 
dity of tlie brute) ; 3. (by drunlcenness) 
mttHshness. 

ABRUTISSEUR [a-bru-ti-ienr] n. m. 
brutaUzer. 

ABEUZZES (LES) [l«-»-bni..] p. n. t. 
(pi.) (geog.) the Abruzzt. 

ABSALON [ab-«^i6n] ^.n.m., Absa- 
lom. 

AB8CISSE [ab-.i-.;] n. f. (geom.)l. ab- 
aeiss ; abscissa ; 2. intercepted avis. 

ABSENCE [ab-aan-i] n. f. 1. I § (DK, 

from\ absence ; 2. § absence ; absence 
of mind. 

1. L' — de q. ■ d'un endruit, a. o.'t absence 

— d'esprit, dbaence of mind ; absence. 
Dn r — de q. u., in a. o.'s =. Avoir des 
— «, J to &« absent ; faire une — , to be 
absent; faire des — s frequentes, to be 
^ne(piently, often absent; remarquer 
r — de, g'8i)ercevoir de V — de, to nvms ; 
iont on ne remarque pas 1' — , dont 1'— 
■'est pas remarquee, unmissed ; on 
»'aperfoit de V — de . . , . . i* missing; ; 
^ there is a miss of 

ABSENT, E [ab-an,t] ad.i. 1. | (dk, 
frorrC) absent ; 2. | away ; from home ; 
8. 1 missing ; wanting ; 4. § (pers.) ab- 
sent (in mind). 

— de Chez sol, absent ; from hom-e ; 
away ; out. Les — s ont toujours tort, 
o^U of sight out of mind. 

ABSENT, n. m., E, n. C 1. absenter ; 
8. absentee. 

ABSENT^ISME [ab-uio-W-i.-ni] n. m. 
absenteeism. 

ABSENTER (8') [eab-wn-w] pr. v. [de, 
from) 1. to absent «.'« self; 2. to stay 
away ; 3. to stay out ; 4. to tcithdraw ; 
to retire. 

AB8IDE [ftb-.i-dl, APSIDE [ap-ti-d] n. 
C (arcli.l ai)xi.'< ; ahsis. 

ABSINTHE [ab-ain-t] n. f. 1. (bot) 
%Dormwond ; 2. hitters (liquor), pi. 

Grande — , — officinale, (hot) icorm^ 
wood ; petite — . — pontique, lioman =. 
D' — , or = ; * ahsivthian. 

ABSINTHE, E [ab-.in-U] adj. (chem.) 
absinthiated. 

AB80LU, E [ab-«>-ln] adj. 1. absolute- : 
8. (subst) absoliite ; 8. positive (not 
relative); 4. (pers.) peremptory: 6. 
I.) absolute; 6. (metaph.) abso- 



(gram.) 
hiie. 



CaractSre — , 1 . absolutensss ; 2. (pers.) 
neremptoriness ; mani^re — e, 1. abso- 
luteness; 2. (pers.) peremptoriness ; 
nature — e, 1. absolute nature ; 2. posi- 
Umeness. D'une manifere — e, 1. abso- 
lutely ; 2. peremptorily. 

ABSOLU.MENT [ab-«>.:«.man] adv. 1. 
abtohiteiy ; 2. positively (not relative- 
ly); S. peremptorily. 

.Te 1« venx — , I insist upon it; — par- 
hut, in the m<iin. 

ABSOLUTION rab-».i4-d«n] n. t 1. 
aosoluUon; 2. Haw) discharge on fhs 
prowid of the offence not being punish- 
uhle by U to; 8. (rel.) absohition. 

D'— . (eocL) 1. of absolution ; 2. ab- 
4 



solutory. Sans avoir ref u 1'—, (rel.) un- 
absolved. 

AB80LUTISME [ab-«)-la-ti.-in] n. m. 
absolutism ; absolute governmient. 

ABSOLUTISTE [ab-io-lu-tu-t] adj. & 
n. m. C absolutist 

ABSOLUTOIRE [ab-w-lu-toa-r] adj 
(eccL) absolutory. 

Absoltais, Ind. imper£ 1st, 2d aing. 
of Absottdke. 

Absolvant, pres. p. 

Absolvk, subj. pres. 1st, 3d sing. 

Absolvons, Ind. prea. & Impera. 1st pi. 

ABSORBABLE [ab-wr-ba-bl] adj 
(chem.) absorbable. 

Non — , unabsorbable. 

•AB80EBANT, E [ab-aor-ban, t] adj. 1. 
(chem.) absorptive ; 2. (pliarm.) absor- 
bent; 9. (phy&\o\.') absorbent. 

Vaisseau — , (physiol.) absorbent. 

ABSORBANT, n. m. (pharm., phy- 
siol.) absorbent. 

ABSORBER [ab-wr-b^] v. a. 1. ! to ab- 
sorb ; to imbibe ,• to drink in, up ; to 
soak up; to suck wp ; 2. § to absorb ; 
to drink ; 3. § to engross ; to take up ; 
to run away with ; 4. (did.) to expend. 

3. — rattentiun de q. u., (r engrusa a. o.'» at- 
teniion. 

Faculty d'— , (did.) absorbabUity. Qui 
a la faculte d'— , absorptive. 
Abborbe, e, pa. p. V. senses of Absok' 

BER. 

Non — , unabsorbed 

ABSORPTION [ab-«tr.#i?nl n. C ab- 
sorption. 

ABSOUDRE [ab-aoa-dr] V. a. (Absolv- 
ant, ABSOXJS; ind. pres. Absous; Nous 
ABSOLvoNs) 1. to absolve; 2. (law) to 
discharge (a prisoner) on the ground of 
the offence not bein^ punishable by 
laic ; 3. (rel.) to absolve ; 4. to pardon. 

Absou-s, te, pa p. of Absoudre. 

Absous, ind. pres. 1st, 2d sing.; impera 
2d sing. 

Absout, ind. pres. 3d sing. 

ABSOUTE [ab-aou-t] n. t 1. (cath. rel.) 
general absolution ; 2. (rel.) absolution. 

ABSTEME [abi-W-m] adj. (hyg.) ab- 
stemious. 

ABSTEME, n. m. C person that ab- 
stains from, wine. 

Abstenais, ind. imperf 1st, 2d sing, of 

S'ABSTENia 

Abstenant, pres. p. 

Abstenkz, ind. pres. & impera 2d pi. 

Absteniez, ind. imperf. & subj. pres 
2dpL 

Abstenions, ind. imperf <fe subj. pres. 
Ist pi. 

ABSTENIR (8') [aaba-U-nir] pr. V. 

(conj. like Tenir) {wv^from) 1. | to <tb- 
stain ; 2. § to r^rain ; 8. § {de) to for- 
bear (to). 
Abstenonb, ind. pres. & impera Ist pL 

of S' ABSTENIR. 

ABSTENTION [abnan-aidn] n. t. (law) 
toithdrawal (of a judce) from a trial 
(for some legitimate cause). 

Abstenu, e, pa p. of S'abstknir. 

ABSTERGENT, E faba-ar-jan, t) adj. 
(pharm.) abstergent ; detergent. 

ABSTERGENT, n m. (med.) abster- 
gent. 

ABSTEEGER [abnir-je] V a (surg.) 
to absterge. 

ABSTERSI-F, VE [aU-t4r^if, i-v] adj 
(pharm.) atjstergent. 

ABSTERSION [aba-t4r«6n] n. t (med.) 
absters-ion. 

Abstiendkai, Ind. fut 1st sing, of 
S'abstenir. 

Abstiendraib, cond. Ist, 2d sing. 

Abstienne, subj. pres. Ist, 3d sing. 

Abstiennent, Ind. & subj. pres. 3d p! 

Abstiens, ind. pres. Ist, 2d sing. ; im- 
pera 2d sing. 

Abstient. ind. pres. 3d sine. 

ABSTINENCE [ab.-ti-nAn:.] n. C 1. 
(nE,/r<wi) abstinence ; 2. (med.) absti- 
nence ; 8. temperance. 

Avec — , absUnently. 

ABSTINENT, E fabni-nin, t] adt t 
abstemious. 

AsBTtMUES, ind. pret Ist pL of S'ab- 

BTBinB. 

Absthtrent, ind. pret 3d pi. 
AnaTiNft, ind. pret Ist 2d sinx. 



Abstinsse, subj. imperf Ist sing. 

Abstint, ind. pret 3d sing. 

Abstint, subj. imperf 3d sing. 

AbstIntes, ind. pret 2d pL 

ABSTRACTI-F, VE [ab^tnk liS, ( t) 
adj. abstractive. 

ABSTRACTION [ab^trak-dao] r t 
abstraction ; absence of mind. 

Avec — , with = ; abstractedly ; •>i[ 
— , abstractly ; abstractedly ; ubstrct"' 
tively. Faire — de, to abstract; t' 
take away ; — faite de . . ., 1. ... oh 
str acted ; 2. esfclusively of... 

ABSTRACTIVEMENT [abi-trak-U-, 
man] adv. abstractively; abstrac&y; 
abstractedly ; in the abstract. 

Abstraie, subj. pres. Ist 3d sing, ol 
Abstraire. 

Abstrairai, Ind. fut Ist sing. 

Abstrairais, cond. 1st 2d sing. 

ABSTRAIRE [ab.-tri.r] V. a irreg. 
def (conj. likeTRAiRE) (did.) (de,^o»») 
to abstract 

Abstrais, ind. pres. 1st 2d sing.; im 
pera 2d sing, of Abstraire. 

Abstrait, ind. pres. 3d sing. 

Abstrait, e, pa p. 

ABSTRAIT, E [ab.-tri, t] adj. 1. <»/►■ 
struse ; re^'ondite ; 2. (pers.) abstrco 
ted; 3. (did.) abstract; 4. (math.) ^.li 
numbers) abstract. 

1. Cne question — e, an abstruse qvettinn. 

Oaractere — , nature — e, abstracted 
nesK 

ABSTRAITEMENT [aba-trt-t-mi. 
adv. abstractedly ; abstractly. 

Abstratant, pres. p. of Abstrairb. 

Abstrayais, ind. imperf let, 2d sing. 

Abstrayions, ind. imperf &, subj. prea 
Ist pi. 

Abstrayons, ind. pres. &im[)eralBt pL 

ABSTRUS, E [ab.-trd, i] adj. ab^ru*.^. ; 
recondite. 

Nature — e, quali»§ — e, abstrvMnea 
D'une maniere — e, abstrusely. 

ABSURDE [ab-aur-d] adj. 1. {de, to; 
absurd ; 2. preposterous ; 8. nonsevtiC 
ccd ; 4. (subst) absurd ; absurdity. 

R^duire a I' — , 1. to drive (a o.) to a/" 
surdity ; 2. to show the = of (n. tb.> - 
tomber dans 1'—, to fall into =i, the ao^ 
surd. 

ABSURDEMENT [ab-aur.d«-a.»n] adT 

1. absurdly ; 2. preposterously ; 8. non- 
sensically. 

ABSURDITE [ab-.ar-di-t«] n. f 1 
absurdity; absurdness ; 2. absurditf 
(thing) ; nonsense ; 8. vrepoeteroui- 
ness ; 4. nonsensicalness 

ABUS [a-bu1 n. m. 1. abuse ; misuse ; 

2. (de, to) abuse (thing); 8. (de, to) 
error : mistake. 

ABUSER [a-bu.»«] V. a to deceive; tr 
dehuJe ; to alnise. 

Qu'on ne pent — , undeceivable. 

S'abuser, pr. V. 1. to delude, to de- 
ceive o.'s self; 2. to mistake ; to b* 
mistaken. 

Qni s'abuse, ( V. senses) misguided ; 
deluded. 

ABUSER. V. n. 1. (DE,...)to abuse; 
to misuse ; 2. (de) to impose (on, up- 
on) ; to take advantage (of) ; ^ to put 
(upon) ; 8. (de, on, upon) to encroach ; 
4. (law) to cxmsumne ; to destroy. 

1. — d*une laveur, to abuse a favor. 3. — del 
moments de q u., to encroach on a. o.U time, at- 
Untion. 

ABU8EUR [a-bo-«ttr] n. ni. 4. J. dft. 
ceiver ; ab-user. 

ABUSI-F, VE [a-bi-rif, i.»] .dj. abu 
sive; improper. 

Emploi — , misemploymeKi. F»ihe cr 
emploi — de, to misemploy. 

ABUSIVEMENT [a-bu-il-T jBto] »Jv 
abusively; improperly. 

ABUTILON [a-bu-ti-ion] a na. (boi) 
species of marsh-mallow. 

ABYME. n. m. V. Abimk. 

ABYSSIN, E [t-bi-sin,i.nj adj. AtyyMlr 
nian. 

ABYSSINIE [a-bi-«-ni] p. n. t Ahy» 
sinia. 

ACABIT [»-ka-bi] n. m. 1. 1 (of frnJta 
vegetables) quality ; 2. $ (p«n.) guai 
ity; 8. 8 (pers.) stamp. 

3. C«t bomme est d'rji bon— , ki u * ma* « 
the rigid atnmD. 



ACO 



ACU 



ACU 



o&io&te; wjeu; #6 jeiine; odpeur; dnpan; i«pU- dnbon; Mnbrun; •llliq.; 'gn liq. 



ACACIA [»-k«-ria] n. m.(bot) acacia ; 
yiinn-tree. 

Fsiuc — , — vulgaire, 1. ha^tard, false, 
oormnon acacia ; 2. locust-tree. 

ACAD:&MICIEN [a-k8-d«-mi-«m] n. m. 
J. aendemidan ; 2. (of Plato's school) 
A oademic. 

ACADt^:MIE [a-k8-d«-mi] n. f. 1. aca- 
dmiy (of learned men) ; 2. acadmny (di- 
Wslon of the university of France); 3. 
Academy (Plato's) ; 4 (draw.) academi- 
oad figure ; 5. t gambling -house. 

ACADfiMIQUE [H.ka.d«-mi-k] adj. 1. 
acttdemdo (of learned men) ; academi- 
oal ; 1. Academical (of Plato or his 
school) ; 3. (draw.) academical. 

Philosophe — , Academist; syst^me 
— , Academism (Plato's). 

AOADfiMlQUEMENT [».k^«-im-k. 
man] adv. academically. 

ACADfiMISTE [a-ka-d«-mi.-t] n. m. 



i pupil of a riding-school. 

ACADIE 

dia. 



[a-ka-di] p. n. f. (geog.) Aca- 



ACAGNARDER [a-ka-piar-d**] v. a. 
1 to accustom to an obscure ana idle 
life. 

S'aoagnardkr, pr. v.^to indulge i/n 
idleness ; to get into idle habits. 

ACAJOU [a-ka-jou] n. m. 1. (bot.) ma- 
hog any ; acajou; 2. (wood) mahoga- 
ny. 

— chenlll6, molr6, mettled mahoga- 
ny ; — mouchet6, spotted = ; — ronceux, 
curled = ; — k pommes (bot.) casheio. 
Bille d' — , log ofr=. ; bois d' — , mahoga- 
ny ; feuille d' — , sheet, veneer of-=. ; mar- 
chand d' — , dealer in=:; noi.x, pomme 
d' — , (bot) cashew ; casheio-nut. 

ACALICIN, E [a-ka-U-iin, i-n] adj. 
'bot) wthout a calyx. 

ACANTHABOLE [a-kan-ta-bo-l] n. m. 
(Burg.) acanthdbolus (a kind of forceps). 

■ ACANTHE fa-kan-t] n. C 1. (arch.) 
acanthus; 2. (bot) acantha; acan- 
thus. 

Brod6 en forme d' — , acanthine. 

ACARIATRE [a-ka-ri-i-tr] adj. orab- 
bfd; cross; cross-graiiied ; teaspish. 

Humeur — , crabbedness ; crossness ; 
ioaspishnsss. 

ACARIEN9 [a-ka-ri-an] n. m. (pi.) 
(ont) " acari ;" mites. 

ACARU8 [a-k».n..] n. m. (ent) tick. 

— de la gale, itch - =. 
ACATALECTE, ACATALECTI- 

QD E [a-ka-ta-iAk-t, u-k] adj. (Gr., Lat 
Yors.) acatalectic. 

ACATAPOSE [a-ka-to-pft-a] n. C (med.) 
ucataposis. 

ACAULE [a-kft-l] adj. (bot) acaulous. 

ACCABLANT, E [a-ka-blan, t] adj. 1. 

§ ovenchelming ; oppressive ; 2. § 
yritwous ; 8. § tiresome ; annoying. 

Nature — e, 1. oppressiveness ; griev- 
ousness; 2. tiresomeness. D'une ma- 
nifere —^ 1. | § overwhelmingly ; op- 
pressively ; 2. grievously. 

ACCABLEMENT [a-ka-blS-man] n. m. 
1. \ heaviness, languor (of body); i § 
■eartrems defection ; extreme aepres- 
'ion, lameness qf spirits ; extrem,elii de- 
pressed, low spirits ; 3. § press (of busi- 
ness). 

Avec — , oppressively. Etre dans V — 
(de), 1. to be overwhelmed (tcith) ; 2. to 
he in ecttreme d^ecU(m ; to be extreme- 
ly Unc-spirited. 

ACCABLER [a-ka-bl«] v. a. (de, icith) 
'..\ to weigh dman ; 2. | to crush be- 
neath the weight ; 8. | § to overwhelm, ; 
to overpotoer; A. % to load; 5. § to 
Wr<M« ; to harass out ; 6. § to depress, 
<o deject (a. o.) extremely ; ^ to make 
(h. o.) extrem^ely loto-spirited ; T. § to 
/iwi doicn ; 8. § to load. 

AcoABLE, E, pa. p. ( F! senses of acoa- 
ULini) extremely dejected, depressed, 
^ritUss. 

ftti'8 — , ( V. senses) to labor under ex- 
treme depression of spirits. 

*y)».— ACCABLKR, OPPP.IMER, OPPRESSKR. Ac- 

ytbfer ai^nifie* to wrei^h down, to cause to sink 
.wneath a burden : it is used in both a eood and 
,a bad asnae ; thu» we say, to be aecahli by »or- 
irow« -K .te wtcahti with attentions or kindnesses. 
.'h.-piim*r, to the signification of acemkler adds th« 
jia of force and violence ; it is used in a had 

■ DOM culy. OpprtutT indicates oothine more 



than physical action; it means to press strongly. 
A people aeeabli (weighed down) by taxes, is 
opprime (oppretted) by its sovereign. Excess of 
food oppreae (oppreue; it heavy upon) the sto- 

ACCALMIE [a-kal-mi] n. C (nav.) hM. 

ACCAPAREMENT, [a-ka-pa-r-man] n. 

m. I 1. engrossm^ent ; engrossing; 2. 
nwnopoly. 

ACCAPARER [a-ka-pa-r«] v. a. 1. ! to 
monopolize ; to engross ; to buy up ; 
2. I to forestall ; 3. § to m^onopolize ; to 
engross ,• 4 § to swallow up. 

ACCAPAREU-R [a-ka-pa-renr, eti-r] n. 

m. 8E, n. f. 1 1. monopolizer ; engross- 
er; 2. forestaller. 

ACCASTILLAGE [a-ka-sti-ia-j*] n. m. 
(nav. arch.)^ upper works (of a vessel). 

ACCASTILLER [a-ka-sti-i«*] v. a. 
(nav. arch.) to budld the upper works 
(of a vessel). 

ACC^DER [Hk-s«-d«] V. n. (a) 1. to 
accede {to); 2. to comply 'ywitK); 3. 
(law) (th.) to vest (in). 

^. — a one deniande, to comply with a rtqutet. 

Demandsr qa'on accede (a), 1. to beg, 
to request (a. o.) to a^ccede (to) ; 2. to 
request compliance (with). Obtenir 
qu on accede (a), 1. to obtain of •* o. to 
accede (to); 2. to obtain compliance 
(with). En acc6dant k, 1. acceding to ; 

2. com/plyvng toit/i ; in compliance 
with. 

ACC:feL:fcRA-TEUR, TRICE [ak-s«- 
W-ra-tenr, tri-s] adj. accelerating ; accel- 
erative. 

ACCELERATION [ak-si-l^-ii-ajii] n. 
f. 1. acceleration; 2. dt^patch; hasten- 
ing ; hastening on ; S (sciences) accel- 
eration. 

ACCElERE, E rak-s4-l«-r«] adj. 1. ac- 
celerated ; 2. quickened ; 3. (of coach- 
es) /rts<; 4 (mil.) qudck. 

Non — , imaccderated. Roulage — , 

( V. RotTLAGB.) 

ACCElErEE [ak-.«-W-r«] n, t fast 
coach. 

ACCELERER [ak-s«-I6-r«] V. a. 1. to 

accelerate ; 2. to quicken ; 3. to dis- 
patch ; to hasten ; to hasten on. 

ACCENT [ak-san] n. m. 1. accent ; 2. 
emphasis ; 3. (gram.) accent. 

— aigu, acu& accent ; — circonflexe, 
circumflex = ; — grave, graA)e = ; — 
monotone, monotonous z=; — oratoire, 
emphasis; — trfes-fortement prononce, 1. 
strong = ; 2. 1 broad = ; 3. (Irish) 
brogue ; — nasillard, twang ; — tonique, 
tonic=. Sans—, (F. senses) wnac- 
cented. 

ACCENTEUR [ak-san-teur] n. m. (orn.) 
accentor. 

ACCENTUATION [ak-^n-tu-a-sidn] n. 

t 1. accenting ; 2. accentuation. 

ACCENTUER [ak-san-tu-^] V. a. 1. to 
accent ; 2. to accentuate ; 3. to lay «m- 
phasis on. 

— fortement, to lay great emphasis 
on ; to eTnphasize. 

AccBNTUE, E, pa. p. accented. 

Non — , vm accented. 

ACCEPTABLE [ak-sAp-ta-bi]' adj. ac- 
ceptable. 

ACCEPT ANT [ak-sip-t«, t] n. m., E, 
n. f. acceptor. 

ACCEPTATION [ak-s4p ti-sidn] n. f. 
1. ar^.eptance ; 2. (com.) acceptance ; 

3. (law) acceptance. 

— conditionnelle, (com.) qualified = ; 
— pure et simple, absolute ■=■. Annuler 
nne — , to cancel an ■=.. 

ACCEPTER [ak-s4p-t«] V. a. 1. to ac- 
cept ; 2. to take up ; 3. (com.) to accept. 

Personne qui accepte, acceptor (qf). 
Prier q. u. d' — q. ch., to beg, to entreat, 
to request a. o. to accept a. th. ; to beg, 
to entreat, to request a. o's acceptance 
of a. th. Valoir la peine d'fetre accepts, 
to be worth acceptance. Digne, indigne 
d'Stre accept6, worthy, iMworthy of ac- 
ceptance. Qui vautla peine d'etre ac- 
cept6, worth acceptance. 

Accepte, e, pa. p. 1. accepted; 2. 
(com.) accepted. 

Non — , vniaccepted. 

ACCEPTEUR [ak-sip-teur] n. m. 
(coin.> acceptor. 

AG .^EPTIL.\TION r»k sep-ti-ii-sisn] n. 



t (law) % acceptilation : remission f/a 
debt without paynnent. 

ACCF"TION, [ak-sip-sidnl n. t 1. re 
ga/rd; respect; 2. (of words) accept<t 
tion ; sense ; ^ meaning. 

Sans — de, without awy distinction 
of; sans — de personnes, without re- 
gard, respect of persons. Faire — d» 
personnes, to be a respecter of persons j 
to have respect of persons ; to respt.x<i 
persons. 

ACCES [ak-s«] n. m. 1. (a, to) access 
2. (AUPKE8 DE, to) access ; 8. (a, to) «i- 
mittance; 4 (a, to) approach; 5. (ot 
anger) paroxysm, ; Jtt ; 6. (arch.) adU , 
7. (med.) attcuik ; fit ; 8. (med.) (of car- 
tain diseases) paroxysm. 

1. Avoir — a q. ch., tu have access <o a. th. t 
Avoir — aupres de q. u., to have access to a. o. 

Leger, petit — , slight attack, fit D'or 
— difficile, facile, difficult, easy of ac- 
cess; par—, 1. byflis; ^ by fits cmd 
starts ; 2. by snatches. Avoir on --, I 
to home an attack, a fit; 2. to fall into 
a fit ; donner — , to gwe way. 

ACCESSIBLE, [ak-s4-si-bi] adj. ( i, to) 
1. J accessible ; approacliable ; 2. § ac- 
cessible. 

ACCESSION [ak-a^-sion] n. C 1. acces- 
sion ; 2. (a, to) acceding : adhesi,on. 

ACCESSIT [ak-s4->it] n. -. pL — , ao- 
CE88IT8, (school) " accessU ■* (distinctior 
granted to him who, not having obtftinei 
a prize, has come the nearest to it). 

ACCESSOIRE [ak-s4-soa-rl adj. (A, to) 

1. accessory ; 2. (law) (of acts) collateral. 

Action — , underaction ; partie — , v^i^ 
derpart 

ACCESSOIRE [ak-s*-soa-r] n. m. 1. ac- 
cessory ; 2. (anat.) accessory nerve ; 3 
(ai-ts) accessory ; detail ; 4 (theat)i>n> 
perty. 

Foumisseur d'— «, (theat) property 



ACCESSOIREMENT [ak-, 
adv. accessorily. 

ACCIDENT rak-«-dan] n. m. L flhwi 
dent; 2. (Aid.)" accidental ; 8. (gooJ.) 
accident ; 4 0?ram.) accident ^ t (mok) 
accidental ; 6. (paint.) accident ; t 
(philos.) accident ; 8. chance ; 9. (med.) 
symptom. 

— fScheux, 1. disagreeable accident ; 
2. mischance. Par — , by = ; accident 
tally ; sans — , 1. without any =; 2. 
clean. 

ACCIDENT*, E [ak-ai^an-t*] adj. (of 
ground) uneven ; hilly ; UTidulaUng. 
' ACCIDENTEL, LE [ak-si-dan-t4l] adj. 
1. accidental; 2. *ad/ventitious; 8. (mecL, 
surg.) ad/ventitious ; 4 (philos.) acci- 
dental. 

Signe — , (mus.) accidental, 

ACCIDENTELLEMENT [ak-ii.da» 
tj-l-man] adv. ]. accidentally; 2. * advert- 
titiously ; 3. (philos.) accidentally. 



Syn. — ACCIDBNTELLKMENT, L „. 

first is used in a bad, the second in a good sense 
We ^nd,/itrtuit€iiieHt, a protector whom pood for 
lune has given us; we lose a friend aeeuleatell* 



ACCI8E [ak-al-s] n. C excise. 
Prepose kV- 
exf.isable. 



, exciseman,. Sujet k V- 



ACCLAMATION [a-kU-ma-.ian] a t 

1. acclamation; shout; 2. cheering; 
cheer. 

Forte — , loxul acclam.ation; great 
shout; loud. cheeHng, cheer. Par — , 
by =. Faire nne — , to give a shout ; 
faire des — s, 1. to shout; 2. to cheer; 
saluer par des — s, to clieer. 

ACCfLAMPER [a-k!an-p«] v. a. (nav.) 
t to clamp ; to fish, (a yard, or mast). 

A CCLIM ATEMENT [a-kli-mi. s miie\ 
n. m. (hyg.) acclimation. 

ACCLIMATER [a-kli-ma-t«] y. %. U 
acclimatize ; to acclimate ; to aceu^ 
torn,, to naturalize to a climate; ^ to 
season. 

S'acclimatek, pr. v. to become acUi 
mated. 

Acclimate, e, pa. p. I. accustomcn, 
naturalized to a climate; 1 seasoned; 

2. (Iiyg.) acclimated. 

Non — , unaccustomed, un inured to f 
climate ; ^ unseasoned. 

ACCOINTANCE La-kom-»»n-e| U. E T J 





ACO 












ACC 










ACC 




amal 


<iiDAle; 


itde 


it^ve; 


it&U, 


.rje; 


iU; 


tUe; o 


mol; 


^mfile 


5mort; 


•M8UC 


&*ttf>', mi 


Jonr; 



1 vnMmate 



nc«; intercourse; 2. (b. s.) 



^OCOINTER (8') [w-koin-u] pr. v.t^ 
Co become, to get intimate. 

ACCOISEMENT ra-koH-i-mfin] n. m. 
(ci«d.) subsiding/ of the humors. 

AGC0I8EK [a-koa-««] V. a. 1 1. fe> qv^ ; 
1 (med.) (of the humors) to stiU, to cav^e 
tc mbside. 

8*A0coi8EK, pr. Y.l.Xto grow calm or 
ttlU; to cease; 2. (med.) to subside. 

A(;COLADE [»-ko-l»-<i] n. £ 1. <w»- 
brace ; kiss ; 2. (culin.) brace (of rab- 
blte): 3. fmus.) brace; 4. (print) brace. 

— brlsee, (print) hajf-brace. Donner 
r— ^ 1. to embrace: 2. to dub (a 
knight). 

ACCOLEE [»-ko-l«] y. H. 1. I to em- 
brace ; 2. § to put together ; ^ to tack 
together; S. (a, tcith) to couple (persons) ; 
i. f hort) to prop (a vine) ; to tie up. 

AoooLB, E, pa. p. ( F. senses of Acoo- 
U!e) {her.) Joined. 

8'accolke, pr. v. (agric.) (of vines) to 
interlace. 

ACCOMMODABLE [a-ko-mo-da-bl] adj. 
(of differences) that may be adjusted, 
$ettled. 

ACCOMMODAGE [a-ko-mo-da-j] n. m. 
1. (culin.) dressing ; cooking; 2. (hair- 
dressing) dressing. 

ACCOMMODANT, E [a-ko-mo-dan, t] 
»^ 1. accommodating ; 2. complying. 

Pen — , 1. unaccommodating ; 2. un- 
complying ; 8. uncompromising. 

ACCOMMODEMENT [a-ko-mo-d-man] 
Bl m. 1. accommodation; arrangement; 
tettlement; 2. msans of accommodation, 
arrangement 

Homme d' — , man easi/ to agree with, 
to corns to tenrw with. En venir a un — 
»vec q. n., to come to terms with a. o. 
Qui n'entre pas en — , uncompromdsinff. 

ACCOMMODEE [a-k'o-mo-d«l v., a. 1. 
to mitt ; to adapt ; 2. (de, wim; k, to) 
to euicommodate ; to have accommoda- 
tions for; 8. to arrange; to Jit up; to 
\io vp; 4 to prepare (victuals) ; to 
dr«9»; to cook; 5. to dress (hair); 6. to 
ailfftist; to settle; to make vp; 1. to 
reconcile; 8. to spare; to let {il. o.) 
have (a th.) ; 9. to improve (o.'s affairs) ; 
1ft (b. s.) {DE,/br) ^T" to give it to (ill- 
tTMt a. 0.). 

Etr e accomnode, ( K senses of — ) 
%S to be in ajness ; 6tre etrangement 
acoommodS, ^P~ to be in a mu'x mess. 

8'aocommoder, pr. v. ( V. senses of 
Acoommodeb) 1. (a) to acconvmodate 
o.'s telfifd) ; to make a shift {with) ; to 

rii v/p {loith) ; 2. (a) to comply {with); 
to agree ; to come to an agreement, 
widerstanddng ; to come to term^; 4. 
to take o.'s comfort, ease; to make o.'s 
telf comfortable ; 5. |^~ to make free 
with the bottle. 

— de tout, to be pleased idth every 
tMng ; ne — de rien, to be pleased with 
nothing. II s'accommode de tout he is 
pleased witJi, every tiling ; nothing 
comes amiss to him. 

ACCOMPAGNA-TEUR [a-kSn-pa-gna- 

tainr*] n. m., TEICE [tri-i] n. f (mus.) ac- 
companist 

ACCOMPAGNEMENT fa-kon-pa-gn- 

min*] n. m. 1. accompanytng ; 2. at- 
tendance ; 8. addition ; appendage ; 
4. (mus.) accompanim.ent. 

PourT — de, 1. to accompany; 2. to 
attend. 

ACCOMPAGNEE [a-kSn-pa-gn**] V. a. 
I. I J to accompany ; 2. || to attend ; to 
wait wpon ; 8. § (th.) to be a concomi-" 
tant{to); 4. § fth.) tomdt; to' match; 
to be in keeping with; to set of; 5. 
(mii&) to accompany. 

1. Une pencxine arewnpaffn^-e d'une autre, a pertrm- 
t<coim>aiiied bii another ; un present accompagne 
J'nne l«Ure, a pruent accompanied mtt a letter. 

Qal accompagne, ( V. senses) 1. atten- 
i*in*j ; 8. concomita/nt with. 



may be raid of one perwm alone. Etci/rter meant 

ake or protecting, and !• alwaya 

one. We aecoinpagrwnt friendi 

or being pleaaed ; we e«- 



to attend for the i 



Ironi a deaire of pleating 
VTloH* them, a* a praraiiti 
wiiic npprehendvd danrer. 



S'accompagnek, pr. v. % (de) to be ac- 
companied {by) ; to be in t/ie oompawy 
{¥)■ 

AcooMPAGNK, E, pa, p. V. Benscs of 
Accompagner. 

Non — , 1. unaccompcmied ; 2. unat- 
tended ; 8. wnfoUowea. 

ACCOMPLI [a-k6n-pli] adj. 1. (pers.) 
accomplished; 2. fished; perfect; 
thorough; pW" regular; 8. ^ (b. s.) 
true bred ; thorough bred ; ^ regular. 

Non — , 1. uncompleted ; un/imished ; 
2. wnaccompUshed ; unperformed ; 
unacted ; 8. wnfuWUed ; 4 umexecvted; 
6. wnachiened. Kendre — , to accom^ 
pUsh (by education). 

ACCOMPLIE (a-ksn-pUr) v. a. 1. to 
complete ; to finish ; 2. to accomplish ; 
to perform ; 8. to fulfil ; 4 to execute ; 

5. to achieve ; 6. to work out ; 7. to toil 
out ; 8. to serve (a time of service) ; to 
serve out. 

S'accomplir, pr. v. to be accomplish- 
ed ; to be fulfilled ; to be brought 
about. 

ACCOMPLISSEMENT [a-kdn-pli^- 
man] n. m. 1. completion ; finishing ; 2. 
accomplishment ; performance ; Z.ful- 
fUmerU ; 4 eonecutlon ; 6. achievement ; 

6. working out ; 7. toiling out ; 8. serv- 
ing (a time of service) ; serving out. 

ACCON [a-k6n] n. m. (nav.) Jlat-bot- 
tomed lighter. 

ACCOQUINEE. V. Acoquiner. 

ACCOED [a-kor] n, m. 1. agreement ; 
2. concord ; harmony ; union ; 8. ac- 
cordance ; agreement ; hamnony ; 
keeping; 4 consonance; consonant- 
ness ; 6. uniformity; 6.** strain ; tone ; 

7. (arts) union; 8. (gram.) concord; 
agreement; 9. (law) concord; 10. (civ. 
law) transaction ; 11. (mus.) accord ; 
12. (mus.) chord ; 18. (paint) harmony ; 
accord ; keeping. 

6. Let doDX — • de la lyre, t/kt melodiout ttramt 
of the lyre. 

Bon — , agreement ; — final judiclaire, 
{\a,y<i)fvne (final agreement between land- 
lord and tenant for lands). D6faut, man- 
que d' — , { V. senses) 1. wnsuitableness ; 
2. inconsistency ; inconsistence. D' — , 

1. agreed; 2. together; 8. unitedly; 
4 ** confederate ; 5. hand in hand ; 6. 
in concord, harmony, union ; 1. ac- 
cordant; wndiscordant ; 8. in keep- 
ing; 9. (AVEc) in accordance, conform- 
ity {with) ; 10. (mus.) in con,cord ; 11. 
(mus.) in tune; d' — ! 1. agreed; ^ 
done ; 2. granted ! d'un commun — , 1. 
by common, by mutual consent; 2. 
vfith one consent, accord ; sans — s, dis- 
cordant; tuneless. Avoir de T— 7-, (th.) 
to be in keeping ; demeurer d'— , 1. to 
agree; to be agreed; 2. to admit; to 
acknowledge; to allow; 6tre d' — , 
(pers.) to agree ; to be agreed ; 6tre en 
— , (th.) to be in keeping ; faire, passer 
un — , to nmke an = ; marcher d' — , to 
agree ; ^ to go hand in hand- mettre 
d' — , 1. to agree; to efect an := between; 

2. to reconcile; 8. to tune (an instru- 
ment) ; se mettre d' — , to agree ; preter 
des — s k, tirer des — s de, to attune ; 
s'en tenir A un — ,to abide by anz=\ ^ 
to stand to an=^; tenir V — , (mus.) tc 
keep in tune ; tomber d' — , to come to 
an agreem^t ; to come to terms. 

ACCOEDABLE [a-kor-da-bl] adj. 1. 
fiat cam be made to agree ; 2. recon- 
cilable; 8. grantable; 4 admissible; 
allowable ; 6. (mus.) tunable. 

ACCOED AILLES [ a-kor-da-i* ] n. f. 
{n\.) meeting for the purpose of signing 
me marriage-articles. 

ACCORDANT, E [a-kor-dan, t] adj. 
(mus.) accordant; concordant. 

Son — , chord. 

ACCOEDlfi [a-kor-d*] n. m., E, n. f 
bridegroom (after the marriage-articlea 
are signed) ; bride. 

ACCOEDEE, V. a. 1. to accord; to 
bring to agree ; to make agree ; to ef- 
fect an agreement between (persons); 

8. to reconcile ; 8. (a, to) to grant ; to 
make a grant of; 4 (A) to firant {to) ; 
to bestow {on) ; to give (to) ,• 5. to grant ; 
to admit; toalUno; 6. (gram.) to make 
agree ; 7. (law) to _flnd (damasres) ; 8. 



(mus.) to tune; 9. (mus.) to string (cer 

tain instruments). 
— mal, {V. senses) (mus.) to mitten* 
AccoEDE, E, pa. p. V. senses of Aocott 

DER. 

Non — , { V. senses) ungrantec ; wu 



S'accorder, pr. V. 1. to agree; % 
(aveo, with) to accord ; 8. (avbo, tcit/i) 
to coincide; to be coincident; 4 to 
suit; 6. (aveo, u>ith) to be conksteiUj 
6. (th.) (avkc) to be agreeable {witlCi ; t. 
to liarmonise; 8. (gram.) to agree; 9, 
(mus.) to accord; 10. (nav.) to act to- 
getlier (in a manoeuvre) ; 11. (nav.) (ol 
rowers) to pull togeffter. 

— comme chien et chat, to a^ree Uh* 
cat and dog. 

ACCOEDEU-R [a-kor-deur, eii-«] n. m , 
8E, n. t tuner (of instruments). 

Clef d'— , twning-hammer. 

ACCOEDOIE [a-kor-doar] n. m. twn- 
ing-hammer. 

ACCOEE [a-kor] n. m. (nav.) Owr* 
(piece of wood). 

ACCORER r.^ko-r«] v. a. (nav.) to 
shore ; to slu^re up; \to prop. 

ACCOET, E [a kor, t] adj. 1. ^ comply- 
ing; easy ; 2. adroit; cmindng. 

ACCOETEMENT, adv. t V. Adroit*. 

MENT. 

ACCOETISE [a-kor-a-.] n. £ ^ cotnpli- 
ance ; easiness cf temper. 

ACCOSTABLE [a-kot-t*-bl] adj. % ac- 
costable. 

ACC08TEE [a-kot-t«] V. a. 1. 1 to ao- 
cost; 2. (nav.) to come along side of. 

S'aocoster, pr. v. (b. s.) (de) to ./»•♦• 
quent {...); to keep company {with). 

ACCOTEMENT [a-ko-t-min] n. m. (en- 
gin.) drifttcay. 

ACCOTER ra-ko.t«] V. a. 1. to support 
on one side ; 2. to lean on one side. 

ACCOTOIR [a-ko-toar] n. m. l.prop; 
2. leaning-stock ; 8. (nav.) tfwre. 

ACCOUCHifeE [a-koa.th«] n. f. laOy, 
woman confined ; ^ lying-in leoman. 

ACCOUCHEMENT [a-konrt-mio] n 
m. 1. I confinement; delivery: a» 
couchement ; ^ lying in;1.% deM/eeryi 
8. obstetrication ; midwifery. 

Art des — s, (med.) midwifery ; h6pl- 
tal des — s, lying-in hospital. Faire na 
— , to attend at an accouchement ; ^tc 
deliver a woman; faire des — s, *h 
practise as an accoucheur. 

ACCOUCHER [a-koa^h«] V. a. 1. 1 fti 
deliver; to attend (a. o.) at h,er ao- 
eouchernent; ^ to put to bed ; 2. { to 
deliver ; to bring forth. 

jfctre accouch6e, ( V, senses of Accou- 
oher) to be confined ; ^ to He in. 

ACCOUCHER, V. n. I to &« deHcered ; 
to be confined ; ^ to be brought, put 
to bed. 

— avant tenae, = be/bre her Ume. 
Accouche I accouchez ! ^ § out with it ! 

[AccoucHEK it conj, with avoir when it ex- 
presses an action, and with etre when it denotes ii 
state.] 

ACCOUCHEU-R [a-kon^henr, efl-.] n. 
TCI., SE, n. C 1. accoucJieur, m. ; man- 
midtoife,va.; midwife, t; 2. (did.) o6«<«- 
tridan. 

Assistance d' — , midwifery. 

ACCOUDEE, (S') [ia-kou-d«] pr. v. to 
lean on o.'s elbow ; (sue) to lean o.'s el- 
bow {on). 

ACCOUDOIR [a-kon-doar] n. xa. abm» 
rest; elhotc-cushion. 

ACCOUER [a-kon.«1 V. a. (bxait) fc 
strike (a stag) in the moulder ; to hia/n^ 
string. 

ACCOUPLE [a-koo-pl] n. C (; nuv) 
leash; couple. 

ACCOUPLEMENT [a-kou-pW-mai,] a 

m. 1. (of beasts) coupling; copulatum; 
2. {ot xtirds) pairing ; 8. (of beasts^) yo* 
ing together; matching; 4 (arcb.) 
cou/pWng. 
Saison de T — , (of birds) r'airing-tlme, 
AC-COUPLER [a-koupW] V. a. 1. «« 
couple ; to unite ; to join together ; 4 
to put together; 8. to ocnmle (beasts), 
4 to pair (birds); 5. to y.-ke (oxen); C 
to match (persons). 

AocorpLE, H, pa. p. {V. mlmb of A** 
oouplee) (arch.) 



ACC AOf! AOU 




oAjoftte; «MJen; efl jeftne; ^ peur; dn pan; m pin; d» bon; tl« bnm; 'U Bq.; -pi Uq. 



Non — , ( K senses) 1. (of beasts) im- 
xnmled ; 2. (of birds) unpaired. 

slooouPLKR. pr. V. 1. (of beasts) to 
jciwple; 2. (of birds) to pair; 3. (of 
birds) to tread 

AccouKAis, ind. imperf 1st, 2d sing, of 
A.coonEiR. 

AcootTEArTi pres. p. 

ACCODKClR («-koui-«ir) V. a. toahort- 

8'A.oooirROiB, pr. v. 1. to shorten; 2. 
; ifioriein ike way ; 8. to shrink. 

ACCOURCISSEMENT [ »-kour-m-i- 
.:ito] n. m. 1. shortening (of the way, of 
Uiae); 2. shrinking. 

ACOO0RE, subj. pres. 1st, 8u sing, of 

AOCOURIR. 

AOCOURIR [a-kon-rir] v. n. liTeg. 
(conj. like Coubib) (a, to) to rwn , to nm 
up ; to hasten. 

— en foale, to flock. 

[iiccoURiR iB conj. with avoir when it eiprewe* 
ui action, and wbeii a state with ftre.] 

AocouKONS, ind, pres. and impera. Ist 

pL of ACCODBIR. 

AccouREAi, ind. flit. 1st sing. 
AccouBRAis, cond. 1st, 2d sing. 
AccouBBONS, ind. fut Ist pi. 
AooouRS, ind. pres. Ist, 2d sing.; impera. 

AC^'OURSE, ACCOURCIE [»-kour-., 

si] (nav. arch.) postage in a ship's hold. 

AcoouKT, ind. pres. 3d sing, of Aoooir- 

RIB. 

AooouRtr, E, pa p. 
AccouBUMKS, ind. pret Ist pi. 
AocoJiRcrs, ind. pret. 1st, 2d sing. 
A0COCBU88K, subj. imperf. 1st sing. 
AcoouBUT, ind. pret 8d sing. 
AccouRUT, subj. imperf. 3d sing. 
AccouRfrTES, ind. pret 2d pi. 

ACCOUTREMENT [a-kou-trS-man] n. 

m. (b. s.) accoutrement 

ACCOUTRER [a-koa-tr«] V. a. (b. 8.) to 
•fjccoutre ; to dress ont, up. 

ACCOUTUMANCE [a-kou-ta-man-t] n. 
£ t custom ; habit 

ACCOUTUM:^, "E [»-koa-tn-m«] a(y. 
(loeustomed ; fuibitual ; usuiU. 

Non peu — , unoustomary ; unacous- 
trmved; unfiabitwited {to); ** unao- 
qvaiAVted {with). A 1' — e, customarily ; 
as usual. 

ACCOUTUMER, v. a. (a, to) 1. to 
accustom ; to habituate ; to use ; 2. (b. s.) 
to inure. 

ACCOUTUMER, v. n. {d^, to) l.(per8.) 
to b« accustomed, htibitaated, used ; 2. 
(th.) to u^e ; to be used. 

[ACCOUTUMER is conj. with avoir when it ex- 
presses notion ; when a state, with av/ir or etre.] 

ACCR:6DIT6, E [a-kr«-di-w] adj. 1. 
accredited; 2. (pers.) in credit; S. (th.) 
credited ; 4 (dipl.) accredited. 

Non — , 1. VMOCcreddted ; 2. (adm.) 
wnacknowle/lged ; 8. (dipL) unaccre- 
dited. 

ACCRfiDITER [a-kr«-di.t«] v. a. 1. to 
accredit ; to give credit to, sanctio7i to ; 
2. to bring (a. o.) into credit; 8. (dipL) 
to accredit 

S'AOORiDiTEB, pr. V. 1. (pcrs.) to get 
into credit ; a (th.) to gain credit ; to 
be credited. 

ACCR:6TI0N [a-krA-i:6n] n. C (med.) 
accretion ; increase. 

ACCROC [a-kro] n. m. «f 1. \ rent; 
tear; 2. § impemment; hinderaTfe ; 
something wrong in the way. 

Faire un — a, to rend, ; to tear. 

ACCROCHE-C(EUR [a-kro-.h-keiir] n. 
uu, pi. — , II Iteart-breaker (curl). 

ACCROCHER [a-kro-.h«] v. a. 1. to 
Sook, cm : 2. to hoMO uv ; to hang ; 8. 1 to 
oateh ; to tear ; 4. || to hooK (cjuTiages) ; 
6. fW to get hold of; to get ; to find : 
to pick t p ,• 6. ^ § to lay aMde ; to p^u 
t4,f/<m the sh^elf; '. '.^3.~.'', Co yrappie. 

6'ACt'ROCHBR, pr. V. if 1. (a) to eaich 
(iw) ,• 2. I § to lay hold of; 3._ § to han^g 
\fm. upon a o.) ; -r- to sUck (a, to a. o.) ; 



S to pin o.'s self {to a th.). 
ACC 



liCCROIRE [a-kroa-r] V. a. J irreg. 
.©©•xi- like Cboibk) to believe. 

Faire — a, to tniike (a. o.) believe ; en 
1aire — a, to iyrvpoxe tipon {&. o.); to 
itake (a. o.) believe a. th. ; s'en faire — , 
1 to assnime ; to he assuaning. con- 



ceited; ne pas s'en faire — , to be wnas' 
swmdng. 

AocBOiB, ind. pres. 1st, 2d sing.; impera. 
2d sing, of AccEoixEE. 

AocBoiBSAis, ind. imperf Ist, 2d sing. 

AncROissANT, pres. p. 

AocROissE, subj. pres. 1st, 8d sing. 

ACCR0I8SEMENT [»-kro»-^£jan | 13. 

m. 1. increase ; 2. enlargement ; h. eob- 
tension ; 4. growth; 6. (law) accre- 
tion; 6. (phys.) accretion; 7. (physiol) 
growth. 

Baas — , {V. senses) unenlarged. 
Prendre do V — , 1. to increase ; 2. to en- 
large ; to eastend. 

AccEoissoNs, ind. pres. and impera. 1st 

pi. of ACCEOITRK. 

AcOBoiT, ind. pres. 8d sing. 

AccROiTBAi, ind. fut Ist sing. 

AccEoiTBAis. cond. 1st, 2d sing. 

ACCROtTRE [a-kroa-tr] v. a. (conj. 
like CEoiTRB) 1. to increase ; 2. to en- 
large ; 8. to extend. 

8'accroItrk, pr. v. 1. to increase ; 2. 
to enlarge ; 3. to eastend ; 4. to grow. 

ACCROtTRE, V. n. (conj. like Cbo!- 
trb) 1. to increase ; 2. to enlarge ; 3. to 
extend; 4. to grow; 6. (law) (a, to) to 
accrue; to/all. 

ACCROUPIR (8') [«i-kron-pir] pr. V. to 
cower ; to squat ; to squat down ; to Ue, 
to sit squat. 

:^tre accronpl, = . 

ACCR0UPI8SEMENT [a-krou-pi-i- 
man] n. m. cowering ; squat ; squatting. 

ACCRtI, E, pa. p. of ACCROiTRB. 

ACCRUE [a-kni] n. T. (law) 1. increase 
of land by Vie withdrawal of the sea; 
2. encroacliment on adjoining land by 
ths trees of a forest 

AooBUMBS, ind. pret. 1st pL of AccroI- 

TKE. 

Aocrus, ind. pret 1st, 2d sing. 

AcoBDB.SE, subj. imperf. Ist sing. 

AcCRUT, ind. pret 8d sing. 

AccRfrr, subj. imperf. 8d sing. 

AccBUTES, ind. pret 2d pi. 

ACCUEIL [a-keui*] n. m. 1. recf(t:on 
(of a o.) ; 2. welcome ; 8. (th.) accept- 
ance; 4 (com.) (of bills) protectUm; 
honor. 

Bon — , 1. kind reception ; toetcome ; 
2. + acceptableness ; gracieux — , kind 
z= ; welcome. Mauvais — , — flroid, cold 
reception. FaXr^ — k, to receive kindly; 
to welcome ; faire bon — ft, 1. to receive 
kindly ; to welcome ; 2. (com.) to honor; 
to protect; recevoir bon — , (com.) to 
meet diis honor, protection. 

AcouETLLAis, ind. imperf Ist, 2d sing. 

of AOOTJEILLIB. 

AoouEii.LE, ind. pres. 1st, 3d sing.; 
impera. 2d sing. ; subj. pres. 1st, 3d sing. 

AccuEiLi.EBAi, ind. fut 1st sing. 

AcouEiLLBBAis, cond. Ist sing. 

AccuEiLLi, E, pa p. 

AccuEii.LiMES, ind. pret 1st pL 

ACCUEILLIR [a-keu-ir*] V. a. irreg. 
(conj. like Cueillir) 1. | to receive (a. o. 
well' or ill) ; 2. 1 (g. s.) to welcom^e; 8. § 
to receive (a. th. ill or well) ; 4 § to take 
(a. th.) Mjt) ; 5. § (b. s.) to amaU ; 6. 
(com.) to lionor ; to protect. 

— bien, to receive kindly, tcell ; to 
welcmne ; 1 to moJce much of; — avec 
indifference, to receive coldly; 1 to 
make Utile of. 

AccuEiLLi, E, pa. p. F; senses of Ao- 

CTTEILUB. 

Mai — , umwHoome. Etre bien — , 6tre 
— avsc plaisir, to be welcome ; to be 
greeted with a hearty welcoms ; fetre 
l)ien — , (com.) to m,eet due honor, pro- 
tection. 

A "OCEILLIS, ind. pret Ist, 2d sing of 

AnOTTKILLIR. 

A ccPEiLLiT, ind. pret 8d sing. 

ACCTTEILUT, subj. imperf. 3d sing. 

.\co0EiLLiTB8, liid. pret 2d pi. 

AoouEiLLissE, subj. imperC Ist sing. 

ACCUX, [a-kul] n. m. 1. place withmtt 
egress; ^ blind alley; 2. (artil.) 6r«ecA- 
ing; 8. (hunt) end of a terrier; 4 
(nav.) cove ; creek. 

ACCULEMENT [a-kn-l-man] n. m. 
(nav.) 1. pooping ; heamng astern ; 2. 
rising of the floor-Umbers. 

ACCULER [a-ka-i*] V. a. 1. 1 to dnve 



(a. o. to a place ftom which ther« to no 
escape) ; 2. § to drive (a. o.> iruo a ear- 
ner; to bring to a sta/nd; 8. (hoct) tc 
run home. 

S AcciT'ijt, pr. v., to betake one's self, 
ti) t<Mce ta a corner or wall. 

ACCULER, V. n. (axr.,} to futont*' 
asti-m ; to be pooped. 

ACCUMULATION [a-ko-mu-UUilan] a 
t I § accumulation. 

ACCUMULER [a-ku-ma-U] v. a. 1. 1 J 
to w.cmnulat^ ; 2. to heap up ; to troth 
sure vp ; to store up ; 8. (b. s.) to hoani; 
to hoard up; 4. (b. s.) to cram in; tc 
stuffin. 

AccuMULK, ^ pa. p. F. senses of tu)- 

CTmiTLBB. 

Non — , unacctt7ttyiated:untreasured. 

S'accttmuleb, pr. v. ? § to acctimulato. 

ACCU8ABLE [a-ku-i^bl] adj. acou- 
sable. 

ACCUSA-TEUR [a-k. -ra-teu-l n. m. 
TRICE [tri-.] n. £ accuse" 

fitre un — , 1. « 8 to be a~ = of; 2. S' 
(pour) to rise up in judgment {againsf), 

Svn.— ACCUSATEDR, nKNOKCUTKUK, DKLATKDR. 

The accutateur is one who, to defend society, pur- 
sues the criminal before the tribunal of justic*, to 
have him punished. The dinonetateur is one who, 
zealous for the law, makes known to the authori- 
ties some secret crime, for them to inquire into 
and punish. The di/ateur is one who, out of 
niali-e or hatred, gives information of some offenne 
in word or deed, with which he may have becomi' 
acqiiamted while deep in the confidence of the ae- 
ensed party. A sense of duty, or perhaps ft per. 
sonal mterest in the punishment of misdoers, ia the 
inotive of the aeeutateur ; strict attachment to tlw 
law, that of 'he dinoneiattur ; a malicious de^r« 



third party, that of the dilat 

ACCU8ATIF [a-ku-M-tif] n. m. (grfiinj 
accfusative; accusative cage. 

A r — , in the acoitsative. Comme — >, 
<M aw = ; accusatively. 

ACCUSATION [a-ku-s4-si6n] n. C 1. (M> 
eusation; * accusal; 2. (of oerfctla 
public l\inctionaries) impeachment ; S, 
(law) indictment; charge; 4 (crliTi 
law) prosecution. 

Acte d— , 1. artid-es of impeaok- 
ment; 2. (law) indictment; bilt of in- 
dictment; cople d'acte d' — , copy of in 
dictrnent ; interrogation prfeliminaire ct 
lecture de I'acte d' — , arraigrvment ; 
chef d' — , co7tnt of an indictment ; com- 
missaire charg6 de soutenir 1'—, mana- 
ger of the=.; erreur dans le libell6 de 
facte d' — , (lawX;?«w in th^ indictment ; 
mise en — , 1. (of high public officers) = ; 
2. (law) arraignment; personne c^arg6o 
de soutenir une — , impeacher. Sujet k 
— , k 6tre mis en — , 1. impeachable ; 2. 
(law) indictable. D^forer une — {k), tn 
pr^er a bid of indiebinent {to) ; drefr- 
ser, rediger un acte d' — . to frame an in- 
dictm^Tii ; Stre en etat d' — , to stand in- 
dicted ; faire une — , to make an accu- 
sation; intenter une — , to prefer an 
indictment; juger une — , to try an-=.; 
mettre en — , 1. to impeach; 2. (crim. 
law) to indict; etre mis en — , 1. to be 
impe<tched ; 2. to stand indicted; pou- 
voir etre mis en — , (law) to be appeal- 
able; prononcer la mise en — , (law) to 
find a true bill; pronoP'"!r une miae 
en — , to find an indictment; saisir Ui 
cour (des pairs) a'nne — , to eteliibit ar- 
tid/^t of-=.; soutenir une — , 1. to mdht 
good articles of ■:=.; 2. to support a 
charge. 

ACCU8:fe [a.ku-i«] n. ra., E, n. f. 1. ao- 
Cfused ; person accused ; 2. . (law) pri- 
soner. 

— de reception, receipt ; ackn/ywiedff' 
ment of receipt; — qui reflise de r6po[> 
dre, (law) mute. 

ACCUSER [».ku-z«] V. a. 1. » § <o '«<- 
ctise ; 2. 1 § (a, icith) to charge ^accux•) 
8. § to rise up in judgment igainsi, 
4 § to argue; to imply; 5. fe acknou^ 
ledge ; 6. (law) to arraign; T. [xnM.) tt. 
complain of. 

4. Les apparences aeeutent une intentioii, uf 
ptaraneit argue an interUian. 8. — la rioepljot 
d'une iottre, to acknowledge «ee»p« of a leUer. 

— k tort, to acctise, to cliarge wron^ 
ly; — fanssement de crime capital, (law] 
to conspire, Qa'on ne pent — , «»*§#» 
peachable. 

Accuse, e, pa p. FI senses of Aociions 



ACH 



ACl 



AUli 



a mal; d mMe; e f&«; e fi^vo; « (&te; ^J«; i il; { He; o mol; d mole; ^ mort; w sac ^ e&re; em Joar ; 



Non — , ( V. senses) 1. tmimpeaohed ; 
i. vnarraigned. 

ACJfePHALE [s-i«-fa-l] adj. (lool.) 1 
acephaZoua; 2. (subst.) — «, (pi.) ace- 
fihaUi. 

ACERBE [a-.«r-b] adj. 1. | acerb; 
%turah ; 2. § harsh. 

Eendre — , to acerbate. 

ACEEBIT6 [a-.«r-bi-i«] n. L $ 1. ! acer- 
b4tu ; harshness ; 2. § harshness. 

IlC^^% E [a-.«.r«] adj. 1. 1 steeled; 2. 
1 \ liharp-edged ; sharp ; keen ; piero- 

AClfcRER [a-.«.r«] y. Si. I to steel. 

ACJEREU-X 8E [a-.6-red,eu-.] 



(bot) acermis ; ac«rose. 
AC 



] adj- 

ESCENCE [a.e.-ian-i] n. t (did.) 
aoe«cenoy. 
ACESCENT, E [a .ii-ian.t] adj. (did.) 

ACESTE [a-i4i-t] p. a m. (class.) Acea- 
tos. 

AC:fcTATE [a-iA-ta-t] n. m. (chem.) 
»cetate. 

ACJfeT:^, E ra-»«-t6] adj. t acidulated. 

ACi;TEU-X, SE [a-s«-tei,ea-z] adj. 

(chem.) acetous. 
AC:6TIQUE [a-t«.ti-k] adj. (chem.) 



ACETITE [a-a-ti-t] n. m. % (chem.) 
nceUte. 

AC:6TUM [a-««-tum] n. m. acetimu 

ACHAB [a-kab] p. n. m. Ahab. 

ACHAlE [a-ka-i] p. n. C (geog.) 
Achaia. 

ACHALANDAGE [a-«ha-Ian-da-j] n. m. 

1. act, art of procuring custom ; 2. ctwj- 
tom; good-will. 

ACHALANDER [a-.ha-lan-d*] V. a. to 
procure custom to. 

AoHALANDE, K, pa. p. hovf/nff eus- 
tnm. 

Bien — , with a good custom. £tre 
— , tc h/pve custom ; etre bien, fort — , to 
have good custom; 6tre peu, uial — ,to 
fitive little custom,. 

8' ACHALANDER, pr. V. to get custom,, 

ACHARNli; E [a-ahar-n6] adj. 1. (hmit.) 
fUxhM; 2. 1 excited; 8. | rabid; mud- 
'Ifntiil ; infuriated ; 4. § (th.) desperate; 
&. 5 implxcable; in/veterate; embitter- 
ed; 6. $ intense. 

«. Une lutte — «, a desperate stmgglt. 5. Une 
kxaia — e, an implacable hatred. 6. Une applica- 
ticn — «, intense application. 

Non — , (hunt) tmfluihed. 

ACHARNEMENt [ a-.har-n-man ] n. 

m. 1. I rabidness; 2. § desperation; 3. 
S implacableneas ; 4. § stubborn ami- 
itosity; 5. % obstinacy. 

Avec — ,{V. senses) X.wwweariedZy ; 
desperately; 2. implacably; iwvete- 
rately; 3. obstinately. 

ACH ARNER [a-.hav.n«] v. a. 1. (hunt.) 
to flesh ; %\to excite ; to set an; 8. ito 
madden ; to infuriate. 

S'acharner, pr. v.l.lto be excited ; 

2. I to be rabid, maddened, infuriated; 
i. %tobe implacable, inveterate. 

A CHARS [a-shar] n. m. (Ill) India 
pickles. 

ACHAT [a-«ha] n. m. purchase. 

— an comptant, (com.) = for 3ash. 
— k credit, (com.) = on credit. .^Mx 
d'— , = -money. — d'or et d'argent, 
room.) bvlUon-office. A titre d' — , (law) 
hy purchase; par — , par vole ff— , by 
e=. Faire 1' — de, to purchase ; to make 
a purchase of; to buy ; faire un — , to 
malk«a=:. 

ACHATE [a-k»-t] p. n. m. (class.) 
dcAatei. 

dCHE [a-th] n. f. (bot.) smallage ; age. 



ACH^E U-tM] n. f. lob-worm. 



- d'ean, sktrr^, 
liCHtE U-«h«] n 

ACHEMmEMENT [a-.h-mi-n-man] n. 

fSL (a, to) step ; preliminary step ; pre- 
pttrotory measuro. 

ACHEMINKR [a-.h-mi-D6l V. a. (vers, 
to) to forward; to dispatch; to send; 
Ui aemd on. 

H 'AOHEMINER, pr. V. 1. | (VBKS) to Set 

tut (for a place); to direct o.'a steps 
{towards); %%{th.) to proceed; to pro- 
ffreas; to get on, forward. 

ACHETER [a-ah-t«] V. a. 1. (a, of; a, 
POUR, for) to buy ; to pv,rchase ; to 
fmUv a purchase of; 4 (b. s.) to buy ; 



to btibe; to suborn; 8. •♦ to barter; 
4. (com.) to buy in. 



— eher, to buy, to purchase dear ; — 
en bloc, to =: in. a hi/mp ; — comptant, 
au comptant, to = for cash, ready mo- 
ney ; — k bon compte, k bon marche, to 
= cheap ; — k credit, to ■= on credit ; 
— la part, les droits de, to = out ; — chat 
en poche, to = a pig in a poke. Faire 
q. u. — bien cher q. ch., to m<ike a. o. 
pay dear for a. tJi. 

AcHETE, E, pa. p. F; senses of Acheter. 

Non — , 1. ujibought ; unpurchased ; 
2. unsubomed ; unbribed. 

ACHETEUR [a-.h-teur] n. m. buyer; 
pti/rchaaer^ 

Masse des — s, (pol. econ.) market. 

ACHEVE, E [a-ths-v«] adj. l.finished ; 
perfect; thorough; 2. true bred; 3. 
(b. s.) arrant; regular; down-right; 
4 (b. s.) egregious ; 5. (tech.) trimmed.. 

Non — , 1. myfinished ; 2. (tech.) wi^ 
trimmsd. 

ACHi:VEMENT [a-.h4-v-man] n. m. 1. 
cotnpletion ; Anishing ; 2. trimm,ing. 

ACHEVEE [a-.h8.T«] V. a. 1. to com- 
plete; to finish; 2. to work out; 8. to 
e^id ; 4. (b. s.) to end (kill) ; to dispatch; 
5. to give the finishing stroke'to; 6. to 
serve out (a time of service) ; 7. (tech.) 
to trim. 

Ach6ve! achevez! ^ out with it t 

S'/n.— ACHIVKR, FINIR, TERMINER. The leading 
idea of achever is the conducting of a thing to its 
final period; that of finir, the arrival of that pe- 
riod ; that of lerminer, the cessation of a thing. 
We aehevuHM (emiptete) what is undertaken, by 
continuing to labor at it; viefini»tont(finitk) what 
is in a state of forwardness, by putting the last 
touch to it ; we termi7t<m» (terminate^ what ought 
not to last, by bringing it to a close. 

AOHILLE [a-shi-l] p. n. m. 1. Achilles; 
2. n. m. (anat.) tendon of Achillea; 3. | 
unanswerable argument ; 4 species of 
butterfly. 

ACHILL:feE [a-shi-U] n. t (bot) mil- 
foil. 

— stern ntatoire, goose-tongue. 
ACHIOTE [a-shi-o-t] n. C (dy.) achiote; 

awnotto: 

ACHIT [a-shit] n. m. achith; (bot.) 
wild-mne. 

ACHI.YS fak-lis] p. n. f. 1. Achlya 
(goddess of darkness); 2. n. £ (med.) 
achli/s. 

ACHOPPEMENT [s-sho-p-man] n. m. 
X stumbling. 

Pierre d' — , stimibUng-block ; impe- 
diment. 

ACHORES [a-ko-r] n. m. (pi.) (med.) 
a-cluyr ; scald-head. 

ACHROMATIQUE [a-kro-ma-tt-k] adj. 
(opt.) achromatic 

ACHROMATISME [a-kro-ma-ti-Hu] n. 
m. (opt) achromatism. 

ACHRONIQUE [a-krcni-k] V. ACRO- 
NYQUE. 

ACICULAIRE [»^i-ku-i4-r] adj. aci- 
oular. 

Cristal — , (mln.) needle. 

ACIDE [a-si-d] adj. 1. acid; sour; 2. 
(chem.) acid. 

ACIDE, n. m. 1. acid ; 2. (chem.) acid. 

ACIDIFIER [a-si.di-fi-4] v. a. (chem.) 
to acidify ; to sov/r. 

ACIDITife [a-si-di-u] n. C acidity; 
acidness; sourness. 

ACIDUL:^, E [a-si-dn-U] adi. acidii- 
lows; subflcid. 

Substance — e, aubacia. 

ACID CJLER, V. a. to ac<<i?<^ato. 

AciDULK, B, pa. p. acidulated. 

Trop — , superacidulated. 

ACIER [a-si«] n. m. 1. steel (metal.); 
2. (med.) steel. 

— fondu, cast =; — Indien, wootz, 
wools ; — naturel, de forge, de fusion, 
natural = ; — rafflne, shear =^ — poule, 
de cementation, blistered =:. Durete 
d' — , steeliness ; fll d' — , = -aoire. Ou- 
vrages d'— ,= -^oorks. D'— , 1. o/=; 2. 
steely. Cou v»rt revetn d' — . 1. covered 
loifli = ; 2. " steel-clad. Tremper 1' — , 
to temper =. 

ACIARER [a-si«-r6] V. a. to eowoert in- 
to steel. 



S^ACiERER, pr. V. to become steei. 
ACIfiRIEjTa si4 ri] n. f. steel-toorha. 

ACINEU-X, SE [a-si-nen,ij a^). aot 

nose; acinous. 

ACME [aknid] n. m. (med.) acme. 

ACOLYTE [a-ko-iy-t] n. m. 1. aad^tr^ 
acolothyst; 2. 1 compeer. 

A-COMPTE [a-k6n-t] n. m. (coil) (n 



A CON, V. AccoN. 

ACONIT [a-ko-ni-t] n. m. (bot) au- 
nite; ^wolf's bane. 

— tue-ch6vre, goafs bane; — tur, 
chien, dog's bane. 

ACOQUINANT, E [a-ko-ki-nin, t] ««. 
t captivating; bewitching ; faacinat- 
ing. 

ACOQUINER [a-ko-ki-n«] V. a. t to 
CK-tti/vate; to bewitch; tofaacinate. 

S'acoquiner, pr. v. tto becom,e capti- 
vated, irresistibly attached. 

AgORES (LES) [l«-ia-so-r] p. n. C (pl.> 
(geog.) Tlie Azores. 

AC0TYL:&D0NE [a-ko-U-U-do-n] adj 
'bot.) acotyledonmm. 

ACOTYL^DONE, n. £ (bot) acoty 
.edonous plant. 

A-COUP [a-kou] n. m. ^\.—,jerk. 

Par—, \. by jerka; 2. by fita an<i 
atarta. 

ACOUSTIQUE [a-kou^ti-k] adj. 1 
acoustic; 2. (anat) acouatio; audi 
tory. 

Cordon — , speaking-pipe ; comet — , 
ear-trumpet; nerf— , (anat) acoustic, 
auditory nerve ; voflte — , whispering- 
dome, gallery. 

ACOUSTIQUE, n. £ (sing.) acmiatioH 

AcQUKRAis, Ind. lmper£ Ist, 2d sing 

of ACQUBEIB. 

ACQUERANT, pres. p. 

ACQU^REUR [»-k«-r.«] a. m. 1. 6i«v. 
er; purchaser; 2. (law) vendee; M 
(law) bargainee. 

ACQUERIR, [».k«.rir] ▼. «. Incf 
(acquerant; acquis; ind. prea. AOQin 

ERS ; NOUS ACQUERONS ; ftlt AOiJlTKEEA"; 

1. I to btiy; to purchase; 2. § to ac 
quire ; to be an acquirer of; to obtain^ ; 
1 to get; 8. (feud, law) to conquer. 

Facult6d' — , acquirability ; personno 
qui acquiert, § acquirer (of); qn'wn 
pent — , acquirable; s' — q. u., to make 
a, o. o.''a own. 

ACQUERIR ra-k*-rir] v. n. llTCg. 

(conj. like Acquerie) (of wines) to im- 
prove. 
AcQUKRRAi, ind. ftlt 1st sing, of ACQUB 

RIR. 

AcQTTERRAis, coud. Ist, 2d sing. 

ACQUETS [a-k«] n. m. (pi.) (Fr. law) 
property belonging to the huabana 
and toife, obtained by one of them. 

AoQuiERB, subj. pres. 1st, 3d sing. ol 

ACQUERIR, 

AcQuiERENT, lud. <fe subj. pres. 8d pL 

AcQUiERS, ind. pres. 1st, M sing. ; ini 
pera 2d. sing. 

Acquiert, ind. pres. 8d sire. 

ACQUIESCEAIENT [«-ki-»-o-manJ n. 
m. (a) acqwieacence (in) ; conmUand 
(vjith). 

Non , refus d' , non - =. 

ACQUIESCER [a-ki-4-s6] v. n. (a) to 
aoqiiieace (in) ; to compl/y (with). 

Refus d' — , n07i-acqv4sscence ; non 
compliance. Dispose, port6 k — , acqui- 
escent; qui refuse d' — , n<.'n-fornply- 
ing. 

AcQuiMES, ind. pret 1st pL of AcQr^ 

KIR. 

Acquis, ind. pret Ist, 2d sing. 

Acquis, e, pa. p. 

ACQUIS, E [a-ki, .] adi. 1. a.-quired , 

2. (med., surg.) adventitious. 
Non—, 1. unacquired; 2. wncaughl 

Autorit«S — e, pouvoir — , acquisition. 

ACQUIS [a-ki] n. m. acquirementa 
attainments. 

ACQUISITION [a-ki-ii-sion] n. £ 1. | 
purchase; acquisition; acquirement ; 
2. (feud, law) conquest 

Contrat d'— , (law) deed of purautOA 
Faire — , 1' — de, to purchase ; to mate a 
purchase of; faire one—, to make a 
purchase, 

AcQuusK sabj. i'r|ier£ let stiis. cl 



ACT 



ACT 



ADfi 



<»ft joftte; «MJeu; eiijeflne; eA peur; an pan; in pia; on bon; tin bnm; ♦!! liq. ; *gn llq. 



ACQUIT [»-ki] n m. 1. discharge; 
8. (bil.) lead ; 3. (com.) receipt. 

— a caution, {cns,V) perrmt ; — de sorte, 
(custl cooket. A, en r — de,/or tlie dis- 
charge of, par maniSre d' — ,for form's 
take ; pour — , (com.) (at the foot of a 
bill, invoice) received ; reed ; paid ; pd. 
Se faire dtilivrer un — a caution, (cust.) 
to takeout, to receive a pertnit; donner 
— (de), to give a receipt {for) ; donner 
I — , (bil.) to lead ; faire q. ch. par ma- 
nV>re d' — , to do a. th. for the sake of 
Kiijfing it ia done ; jouer kV—,to play 
off; mettle son, un — a, sur, (com.) to re- 
ceipt (a bill) ; to put a receipt to. Son 
ref u vous eervira d'— , his receipt sImU 
be pour discharge. 

AoQiriT, ind, pret 3d sing, of Aoquekir. 

AoQulr, subj. imperf. 3d sing. 

AcQtriTBS, ind. pret 2d pi. 

ACQUITTEMENT [»-ki-t-manl n. m. 
1. (of debts) discharge; liquidation; 
payment; clearing; 2. (\si\v) acquittal 
(of a prisoner). 

ACQUITTER [a-ki-t^] v. a. 1. to per- 
form; to fulfil; 2. to ease (o.'s con- 
science); 3. to discharge (a debt); to 
Uqvddate; to dear; to pay ; to pay 
off; 4 (de, of) to clear (of an accusa- 
tion) ; 5. (com.) to receipt (a bill, an in- 
voice) ; to put a receipt to ; to put 
^paid'' to ; 6. (com.) to pay (a bill of 
exchange); to take up; 7. (law) to ac- 
quit (&. o). ^ 

AcQUiTTE, E, pa. p. (V. senses of Ao- 
QUiTTwt) (of bills, of invoices) receipt- 
ed. 

Non — , 1. wnperformed, ; wnfulfilled ; 
S (of debts) unliquidated; unpaid; 
8. (law) (pers.) wnacqvAtted. 

S'acquitter, pr. v. 1. (de, ...)to per- 
form; tofulftt; 2. (dk) to discharge 
(...); to acqvAt o.'s adfipf) ; 3. (de, . . .) 
to discharge (a debt) ; to Uqtddate ; to 
olear; to pay ; to pay off. 

Action de — , 1. performxvnce ; fulfil- 
vrvmt; 2. discharge; 3. (of a debt) dis- 
iifinrffe; liquidation. 

Sun. — AcQUiTTfi, QUiTTE. One is acquitti when 
'art ha* paid all that he owes ut the nionient ; lie 
Ic q^itte when he owes nothing more at all. One 
kaa acquitti levera'. notes of hand, but be it not 
fuitte until the last it paid. 

Aequitti convey*, in eeneral, the idea of pay- 
ment ; qaiUe impliet nothing more than exemption, 
ditcharge. To be aejuUti of a debt is to have paid 
it; to be quiUe of it it to be liberated from the 
obligation in any way, whether by a compromise 
or by the gift of the creditor. 

AORATIE, ACRATftE [a-kra-tt, M] n. 
C (med.) weakness ; debility. 

ACRE [a-kr] n. f acre. 

Acre [a-kr] adj. l. I acrid; taH; 
acrimonious ; 2. § acrimoniaut ; tart. 

ACRET^ [a-kr8.t«] n. f. 1. I acnty; 
acridness : acritude ; acrimony ; tart- 
ness; 2. § acrimony; acrimonious- 
ness; tartness. 

ACRIMONIE [a-kri-rconi] n. C 1, 
(med.) acrimony ; 2. § acrimony. 

Avec — , acrimoniously. 

ACRIMONIEU-X, SE [a-kri-mo-ni-eu, 
en-i] adj. 1§ acrimonious. 

ACRISE [a-kri-t] pr. n. m. (class.) Acri- 
eius. 

ACROBATE [a-kro-ba-t] n. m. C rope- 
danoer. 

ACROC^R AUNIENS [a-kro-t«-r6-ni-in] 
Bcy. and p. n. m. pi. (anc. geog.) Acroce- 
roMn/ian Mountains, 

ACROCHORDON [a-kro-kor-dSn] n. m. 
(sure.) acrochordon^ 

ACROMION [a-kr«.mi-«n] n. m. (anat.) 
(lormrbion. 

ACRONYQUE [vkro-ni-k] adj. (as-x.) 
acronyoal. 

ACROPATHIE [a-kro-pa-M] n. f. (med.) 
ajfection of any eastremity of the body. 

AOROPOLE [a-kro-po-l] n. f. 1. (anc. 
nlitt) acropolis; citadel; 2. p. n. £ 
Acropolis of Alliens. 

ACROSTiOHE [»-kro.-U-th] adj. ao^oa- 
'ie. 

ACROSTICHE, n. m. aorosUc 



En forme d'— , acrosHcaUy. 

TEP- ■ - 

I. aoroteria; 2. blocfoing-oourse ; 3. 



AOROTERE [a-kro-ti-r] n. m. (arch.) 



*vmv.) cape ; promonton/. 
ACTE [ak-t] n. m. 1. act; 2. action; 



3. instrument ; document ; 4. (of a 
play) act; 5. — s, (pi.) (sAm.) registers, 
pi. ; 6. (law) deed ; title-deed ; 1. (law) 
charter (contract) ; 8. (pari.) act ; act of 
parliament ; 9. (physiol.) act ; 10. 
(school) act (thesis). 

— faux, {\a.wr) forged deed; forgcrxi ; 
— jndiciaire, 1. judicial act; % yM »t) 
tcrit ; — simnle, (law) feigned =; — va- 
lable, (law) good, valid = ; — sous seing, 
sous seing prive, (law)=. Expedition, 
grosse d'un — , Haw) copy Qfa=. Alte- 
rer un — , (law) (b. s.) to alter a — ; de- 
mander — de, (law) to apply for an offi- 
cial certificate of; donner — do, (law) 
to deU/cer an official certificate of; 
passer un — , (law) to enter into a = ; 
prendre — de, 1. (law) to receive an offi- 
cial certificate of; 2. § to declare o.'s 
intention of availing o.^a self of; redi- 
ger un — , (law) to dra/tc up a = ; rendre 
un — parfait, (law) to execute a=; re- 
silier un — , (law) to cancel a = ; signer 
un — , (law) to witnesa a = ; signifler 
un — judiciaire & q. a., to aerve a writ 
upon a. o. 

ACTi:E [ak-t*] n. C (hot) actcea. 

— a epis, bane-berry. 

AC-TEUR [ak-teur] n. m. TRICE [tri-s] 
n. f. 1. actor, m. ; actress, f. ; perform- 
er, m. £ ; player, m. £ ; 2. (b. s.) stage- 
player, m. £ 

ACTI-F, VE [ak-ti-f, 1-t] adj. 1. active; 
2. (com.) actvoe; brisk; 8. (gram.) act- 
i/ve. 

Masse active, (com., law) assets, pi. 

ACTIF [ak-ti-tj n. m. 1. (law) asseta ; 
2. (gram.) active voice. 

— net, (law) aurplua; — et passif, 
(com.) assets and debts. A 1' — , (gram.) 
1. in the active voice ; 2. actively. 

ACTINIE [ak-ti-ni] n. £ (polyp.) aea- 
anemoni/. 

ACTION [ak-sisn] n. £ 1. action; 2. 
act ; 3. deed ; .4. (com.) aluire ; 5. — s, 
(pi.) (com.) stock ; 6. (law) action ; suit; 
auit at law ; 7. (mil.) action; engage- 
ment ; battle ; 8. (i)hysioL) act; 9. (rhet.) 
action. 

Bonne — , good action, deed ; — cessi- 
ble, (com.) tratuferable ahare; — con- 
traire, 1. contrary =.; 2. coiinter = ; — 
nominative, (com.) personal share; — 
transmissible, au porteur, (com.) trans- 
ferable ahare; — vitale, vital =:; life 
blood ; — d'6clat, aplendid deed. Passi- 
ble de r — publique, (law) indictable; 
defaut, manque d" — , (th.) inactivity; 
suspension d' — , (law) discontinuance 
of suit _ En—, 1. in = ; 2. on foot; 3. 
in motion ; 4. (mach.) in gear ; hors d'— , 
(mach.) out of gear ; par — s, (com.) (of 
companies) joint stock ; sans — , 1. (th.) 
inactive; 2. deedless. Entrer en — , 
(mil.) to begin operations; faire une — , 
to perform an^=, a deed ; intenter une 
— (a), (law) to bring a suit {against) ; 
mettre en — , to carry into=z; to bring 
out. Qui determine une — , (did.) mo- 
tive; que Ton peut poursuivre par — , 
(law) (th.) actionable. Denue, depourvu 
d' — , (th.) inactive. 

Si/n. — Action, Acte. Action ie applied to what- 
ever is done, in general ; acte only to that which 
is remarkable or extraordinary. The sentiments 
of the heart are easier to be^iacovered by one's 
actions than by one's words: it is an heroic ac(« to 
fjrgive an enemy when we have him in our power. 
The good man is cautious in all hit actions to avoid 



ACTIONNAIRE [ak-tio-ni-r] n. m. £ 
(com.) 1. share-holder ; 2. stock-lwlder. 

ACTIONNER [ak-sio-n«] V. a. (law) to 
bring, to enter an action against; to 
aue. 

Que Ton peut — , (pers.) actionable. 

ACTIVEMENT [ak-ti-v-man] adv. 1, 
actively ; 2. (gram.) actively. 

ACTIVER (ak-ti-T«] V. a. 1. to accele- 
rate ; to give tncreased activity to; to 
hasten ; to hasten on ; to press ; to urge 
on; to fonoard ; 2. to urge (a Are). 

ACTIVITY [ak-ti-Ti-t«] n. £ 1. acUvity; 
2 action; 8. (adm.) active aervioe; 4. 
(a. & m.) employment. 

En — , 1. in activity ; 2. (adm.) in ao- 
Uve aervice; 8 (a. <k m.) in employ- 



ment; en non — , (adm.) not in active 
service ; en pleine — , (a. & m.) in full 
employment, work. 

ACTUEL, LE [ak-tu-M] adj. 1. eKStual ; 
effective ; 2. (of time) present ; 3. for 
the time being. 

ACTUELLEMENT [ ak-tu-i-;.mau ] 
adv. at present; at the present time, 
moment; now. 

AOUlTfi [a-ku-i-t«] n. f (muB.) ( 



ACUMIN:6, E [8-kt.-mi-n6] adj. (bot) 
acumdnate ; acvmiinated. 

ICUPONCTURE [a-ku-ponk-tfi-r] n. £ 
(surg.) acupuncture. 

ACUT ANGLE [a-kn-tan-gl] adj. (math.) 
acute-angled. 

ACUTANGUL:^, E [a-ku-tan-guW] 
adj. (bot) acute-angled. 

AD [ad] prefix used in French in the 
composition of words derived from La- 
tin : ADMETTKB (ad-mittcre), to admit ; 

— is sometimes added to French words, 
not immediately derived from the Latin : 
An.iuGER (ad-juger) to adjudge. 

'n the composition of words the d oi 
o is often changed, for the sake of eu- 
pKmy, into the same letter as that before 
which it is placed : attribuke (at-tribu- 
ere for ad-tribusre), to attribute. 

ADAGE (a-da-j) n. m. adage ; aaying. 

Passe en — , proverbial. On dit en 
commun — ,itiaa common adage, say- 
ing. 

ADAGIO [a-da-ji-o] n. m. (mus.) ada- 
gio ; alow movement. 

ADAM [a-dan] p. n. m. Adam^ 

Poi»\me d' — , 1. (anat) Adam's ap- 
ple; 2. (hot.) Adani'a apple. Je ne le 
connais ni d'kve, ni d'Adam ^, / kmote 
nothing zt all about him. 

ADAMANTIN, E [a-da-man-Hn,*..] 
adj. (min.) adamantine. 

, ADAPTATION [a-dap-tA-tl5n] n. t ^ 
(A, to) adaptation. 

ADAPTER [a-d«p.t«] V. a. (A, to) 1. «c 
adapt; 2. to apply; 8. to »Ut; 4, ic 
trim up. 

Facult6 d'Stre adapt6, adaptability'. 
Que Ion peut — , adaptable. 

Adapte, k, pa. p. K senses of Adai»- 

TER. 

Non, pen — (k), unaccommodated 
(to) ; unjit (for) ; unsuitable (for) ; un- 
swited (to). 

S'adaptkr, pr. Y.(V. senses of Adap 
TER) (A, to), 1. to apply; 2. to fit; 3. to 
suit. 

Pouvoir — , to be adaptable.^ 

ADATIS, ADATAIS [a-da-ti, tu] n. m. 
adatais (East India muslin). 

ADDITION [ad-di-sidn] n. £ 1. (A, to) 
addition ; 2. sit/mming xt/p ; 3. bill ; 
reckoning; 4. (math.) addition; 6. 
(print) side-note. 

— compos6e, (arith.) compound ad- 
dition ; — simple, (arith.) simple = , 

— en hache, (print) interllneary mat- 
ter. Par — , additionally. Faire une — 
(a), to make an = (to) ; faire des — «, 1. 
to make =« ,• 2. to add ; to add up; to 
oast up; to sum up; faire V — de, to 
add ; to add up ; to cast up; to sum 
up. 

ADDITIONNEL, LE [ad^U-«o-nii] ac^. 
additional. 

ADDITIONNER [ad-di-sio-n«] v. a. to 
add ; to add up ; to cast up ; to sum 
up. 

ADDUCTEUR [ad-duk tear] a<y.(«iwt.) 
adductor. 

Muscle — , = muscle. 

ADDUCTEUR, a m. (anat) OiUiuo 
tor. 

ADDUCTION [ad-duk-tisn] n. £ action 
of the adductors. 

ADi3LE [ti-dh-q p. n. £ Adela. 

ADELPHIXIE [a-dM-flk-ti] n. £ (ir.o<l» 
sympathy between different parte <y 
the body. 

ADELSTAN [a-dM-ttan] p. n. m. Kihel- 
Stan. 

ADEMPTION [a-daniMd6a] n £ (law) 
ademption; revocation. 

AD:6NALGIE [a-<i«-D»l-jq n, t (mei.) 
pain tn a gnand. 

ADlfeNEMPHRAXIE WH-nia.ftA-J\ 
n. £ (mod.) obatruction qf a gland. 



ADJ 


ADM ADO 


amai;d male; e fee; e feve; e f&te; <f je; 


i il; nie; o mol; 6 mole- « nrirt; « sue; ■& »ftre; oujcnr; 



AD:feNITE [a-di-ni-t] n. C (med.) m- 
/Umimation qf the glaiids. 

AD:fcNOLOGLE [ a-di-no-lo-ji ] n. t 
adendoffy. 

ADENONCOSE [a-d6-Ddn-ko-i] n. m. 
(nied.) glcmdvMir Umwr. 

AD^NO-PHAKYNGITE [a-d*-mo-fft- 
«fc-ji-t] n. t (med.) inflammation of Vie 
tfintiU. 

ADfiNOS [»-d*.a»-t] n. m. adenoa; 
wuirine ootton. 

ADJfcNOTOMIE [ a i«-no-to-mi ] n. £ 
(an»t) adenotomp. 

ADfiPHAGIE r«.aj.3a.ji] n. f. (med.) 
inaaUable appetite. 

ADEPTE [a-dSp-t] n. m. f. | § adept. 

ADJfcQUAT, E [a-d6-koiu.,t] adj. (phi- 
lOB.) adequate. 

ADH:6KENCE [a^l^-raD-.] n. f. 1. 1 (a, 
to) adherence; adhetdon; 2. t § (b. s.) 
adhesion; 3.(phy».) adhesion, ; 4. (surg.) 
adhesion. 

Avec, par — , | hy adhesion ; adJie- 



(A,fa 

D'1 



)H£RENT, E [a-dfi-ran, t] adj. 1. | 

, to) adherent; 2. (did.) adherent 
"'une maniere — e, adJierentt/y. Etre 
— , to adhere. 

Syn. — ^ADHiRENT, ATTACnfi, ANNEXE. A thing 
II adhirerU by the union which nature produces, or 
which proceeds from a continuity of matter; it is 
eitaclu by arbitrary ties which keep it close to 
•ome other object; it is annexi by a simple junc- 
tion, eatablished by inclination or human institu- 
tions. The branches are adherent to the trunk ; 
■ails are attacks to the mast, and tapestry to walls ; 
some stations and benetiees are annexe to others, 
to render them more considerable. 

ADK^EENT [a-d«-ran] ^m.\% ad- 
herent. 

ADHERER ra-d«-r«] V. n. (1, to) 1. 1 
to adhere ; to be adhesive ; to cohere ; 
to stick close ; to stick fast ; to stick on ; 
% ^ to adhere. 

i. — a q. a., a q. ch., to adhere to a. o., to a. th. 

Qnl pent — , qui tend a — , (phys.) co- 



AI>HE&I-F,VE [a-d«-sif, i-T] adj. (med.) 
fkihesive. 

ADE:fi8I0N [a-d«.si6n] n. f .1. (a, to) 
adhesion ; adherence ; 2. § (.i, to) ad- 
hmion; 3. § (1, witli) compliance; 4 
(tjarg.) adh^ion. 

Ayao, par — , (med.) adhesively. 

AD HOC [»-dok] adv. directly ; pre- 
oitely ; to the point. 

"AD HONOEES" [a-do-nd-ri-s] hono- 

^DIANTE [a-di-an-t] n. £ (bot) adi- 
antv/m. 

ADIEU [a-disu] adv. good-hy ; adieu ; 
fareweU. 

— le, la, les . . . , addeu to (a th.) ; good- 
by to (a. th.). Sans — ! / tc-ill not hid 
you adieu! I shall see you again! 
Dire — (a), 1. 1 to take afareweU (of) ; 
to bid, to say aMeu, farewell, good-hy 
(to) ; to take lea/oe (qf) ; dire — a q. ch., 
lo bid adieu, good-hy to a. th.; — val 
(nav.) about ship ! hekrCs a lee ! 

ADIEU, n. m. adieu; farewell. 

D' — , parting ; fa/reioeU. Faire ses 
— ^x, to take o.^sfa/reuoeU, leave ; faire ses 
— 1. (i), to bid, to say good-hy (to a. o.) ; 
to take lea/Be (qf) ; to bid adieu (to) ; to 
take o.^s farewell (of). 

ADIPEU-X, SE [a-di-pea,eu-r] adj. 

(anat.) adipose ; adipous. 

ADIPOCIEE [a-di-po-si-r] n. £ adipo- 
cere. 

ADIRER [a-di-r«] V. a. (law) to put out 
f>f ihe warn ; to lose. 

ADITION [a-di-si6n] n. £ (law) accept- 
ance. 

ADJACENT, E [ad-ja-san, t] adj. 1. ad- 
jacent; 2. (aeam.) adjacent. 

ADJECTI-F,VE [ ad-j4c-tif, i-y ] adj. 
igntai.)ad^ecti/ve. 

ADJECTIF [ad-jJe-tif] n. m. (gram.) 
iidoective. 

ADJECTIVEMENT [ ad-jic-ti-v-man ] 
■dv. (gram^ adjectimdy. 

ADJOINDRE [ad-join-dr] v. a. (o)nj. 
Uke Ckaindrb) (a, to) 1. to adjoin (a. d.) ; 
2. to assign, to give as a coadfutor. 

9'adjoimdek, pr, v. to take as a aoad- 
itUor. 

ADJOINT, E [aJ-join, tj adj. 1. assis- 
nnt ; 2. (adm.) deputy. 
10 



ADJOINT [ad-join] n. m. 1. assistatU: 
% coadjutor; colleague; 3. (ofmayorB) 
deputy -mayor ; deputy ; 4 (adm.) de- 
puty ; 5. (gram.) adjunct. 

Commissaire — , deputy-commissary; 
maire — , = mayor ; receveur — , = 
collector. Fonctions d' — , coadjutorship. 

AUJONCTION [ad-jdnk-sion] n. £ 1. 
adjunction ; 2. (gram.) zeugma. 

ADJUDANT [ad-ju-dan] n. m. (mil.) 
ai^utant. 

— gen6ral, = general. Fonctions d'— , 
adjutancy. 

ADJUDICATAIEE [ad-ju-di-ka-ti-r] 

adj. 1. (of sales by unctiovi) purchasing ; 
2. (adm.) contracting ; ViM lias the 
contract. 

ADJUDICATAIEE, n. m. 1. (of sales 
by auction) purchaser; 2. (adm.) con- 
tractor. 

AD JUDICATI-F,VE [ad-iu-di-k»-tif,i.T] 
awarding ; adjudging. 

Arret — , adjudication. 

ADJUDICATION [ad-ja-di-ka-si«n] n. 
£ 1. auction ; sale by auction ; 2. (adm.) 
contract; 3. (law) recovery. 

— a lextinction des feux, auction, sale 
by inch of candle ; — au rabaisj Dutch 
auction. Par — , (adm.) hy contract. 
Mottre en — , (adm.) to put up to con- 
tract ; to contract for. 

ADJUGEE [ad-ju-j«] V. a. 1. to ad- 
judge ; to award; 2. (a, to) (by auction) 
to knock down; 3. (adm.) to gime, to 
grant a contract for (a. th. to a. o.) ; 4 
(law) to adjudicate. 

Adjuge! (of things sold by auction) 
gone ! Se faire — ,(V. senses) (adm.) 1. 
to obtain the contract for; 2. (law) to 
recover. 

ADJUEATION [ad-ju-ri-sion] n. £ 

(Eom. cath. rel.) adjuration. 

ADJUEEE [ad-ju-r6] v. a. (de, to) to 
adjure. 

. ADJUVANT, E [ad-ju-Tan, t] adj. 
(med.) adjuvant. 

AD LIBITUM [ad-ii-bi-tom] adv. at 
pleasure ; as you will. 

Admbt, ind. pres. 3d sing, of Admet- 

TRK. 

ADMETE [ad-mJ-t] p. n. m. (class.) 
AdMietus. 

Admets, ind. pres. 1st, 2d sing. ; impera. 
2d sing, of Admettre. 

Admettais, ind. imperf 1st, 2d sing. 

Admettant, pres. p. 

Admette, subj. pres. Ist, 3d sing, 

Admettrai, ind. fut 1st sing. 

Admettrais, cond. 1st, 2d sing. 

ADMETTEE [ad-mj-tr] V. a. Irreg. 
(conj. like Mkttre) 1. | (dans, into) to 
admit (a. o. a. wh.); to give admittance 
to; %. % (a, to) to admit (a th.); 3. § 
(th.) to admit of; to aUoto of. 

— comme vral, to concede. Ne pas — , 

1. I § not to admit ; 2. to vote out ; to 
black-ball, fitre admis (dans), to gain, 
to get admittance (into, to). Demander 
a etre admis, to beg admittance ; prier, 
soUiciter d'etre ad nis, to request, to soli- 
cit admttta/nce; faire — (a), to admit (to, 
into). Personne qui admet, admitle.r 
(of). En admettant, 1. in, hy admit- 
ting ; 2. § by the admission of. Gene- 
ralement admis, .(th.) generally admit- 
ted ; current 

Admlmes, ind. pret Ist pL of Ad- 
mettre. 

ADMINICULE [ad-mi-ni-ka-l] n. m. 
(\a,w) pre^imptive proof ; presumption. 

. ADMINISTEA-TEUE [ad-mi-nis-tra- 

teur] n. m. TEICE Ptri-s] n. £ 1. adminis- 
trator, m. ; administratrix, £ ; 2. trus- 
tee; 8. (of the poor) gvm-dian. 
Fonctions d' — , 1. administratorship; 

2. trusteeship ; 8. guMrdianship. 
ADMINISTEATI-F, VE [ad-mi-nis-tra- 

tif, i-v] adi. administrative. 

ADMINISTEATION ad-mi-nis-tra-sidn] 
n. £ 1. administration; 2. trusteeship; 

3. guardianship. 

Manvaise — , maladmimistrationj 
m,isgovermmeaL Susceptible d' — , aoL- 
ministrahle. 

8yn. — ADUWISTRATION,00nTERNElCENT,RlioiMB. 

The fomvernemerU is that which directs public af- 
fairs ; tne regime is the system of disciplme estab- 
lished bv the gituvemement ; the arlminutratiim is 
the method of executing what is ordained by the 



poufirnement, and regulated by the regime. Tbs 
ffnuvernemerU ought to be wise ; the regime, oild. 
the adntinintratiim. just. 

ADMINISTEATIVEMENT [<^-»< 
nia-tra-ti-v-manl adv. odmvnistrati/eel/y. 

ADMINISTE:^ [ad-mi-niiutr«] L. m. E 
n. £ 1. person under a. o.'« adrntmstrot 
tion; 2. person under a. o.'t jwrisdio 
tion. 

f:tre r — de q. u., to 6«. to Kv4 und4ir 
a. o.'s administration ; 2. to ba withirt 
a. o.'s jurisdiction. 

ADMIN ISTEEE, v. a 1. (a, to) to ad 
minister; 2. to administer (gl^e) ; 3. to 
administer (justice); to dispense; to 
distribute; 4 (law) to furnish (proof); 
5. (law) to find (witnesses); 6. (rel.) to 
administer (the sacrament); 7. (rel.) 
to administer the last sacrament* to 
(a o.). 

Droit d'— , (law) letters of adminis- 
tration (to administer the esute of an 
intestate). 

ADMIEABLE [ad-mi-ra-blj acy. (de, to ; 
que, [subj.]) admirable. 

ADMIEABLEMENT[ad-mi-ra-bl»-iiiin] 
adv. admirably. 

ADMIEANT, E [ad-mi-ran, t] adj. od 
miring. 

ADMIEA-TEUE [sd-mi-ra-Uur] n. m. 
TEICE [tri-s] n. f admirer. 

ADMIEATI-F, VE [ad-mi-ra-tif, i-T] 
adj. of admiration. 

Genre — , style intended to excite ad- 
miration; point — , (gram.) note of ad- 
miration. 

ADMIEATION rad-mi-rA-sidn] n. £ 1. 
admiration ; 2. object qf admiration ; 
3. ^ (pers.)^a«M (person loved). 

Point d'— , (gram.) note of admira 
tion. Avec — , unth = ; admiringly ; 
dans r — , admiring ; tout dans T — , all'- 
admiring; sans — , 1. without =; 2l 
unadmired ; 3. VMOdmiring. Avoir dj 
r — pour, 6tre dans 1' — de, to admira; 
to he in ■= of: to feel =^for; saisir d' — , 
to strike with =i. 

Admikejjt, ind. prot 3d pL of Ai>- 

METTRE. 

Admiebnt, ind. pres. 3d pL oi Au- 
hirer. 

ADMIEEE [ad-mi-r*] v. a 1. to ad- 
mire ; 2. (b. 8.) to wonder (at) ; to be 
astonished (at). 

ADMIEEE, V. n. 1. to admire ; % 
(que, [subj.]) to wonder; to be aato 
wished. 

Qui admire pen, vmadmiring. 

Admire, e, pa p. admired. 

Non, pen — , imadmired. 

Admis, ind. pret Ist, 2d sing, of Ad 

METTRE. 

Admib, b, pa p. 

Admisse, subj. imperf 1st sing. 

ADMISSIBILITE [ad-mi-B-bi-ii-t«] n 
£ (a, to) admissibility. 

ADMISSIBLE [ad-mi-si-bl] adj. 1. (a, 
to) admissible ; 2. aUowoble. 

Dune maniere — , admissibly. 

ADMISSION [ad-mi-sion] n. £ (A, to) 1. 
I admission ; admittance; 2. § adnUa- 
sion (reception). 

Admissions, subj. imperil 1st pi. of Ad 

MltTTRE. 

Admit, ind. pret 8d sing. 

Admit, subj. imperf 3d sing. 

Admites, ind. pret 2(1 pi. 

ADMON^TEE [ad-uu. n«-t«] v. a 1. 
(law) to reprimand ; 2. (can. law, school' 
to admonish. 

ADMONESTION [ad.mo-n.^tJ«B] n. t 
(eccl. hist) adm^omiUon. 

ADMONI-TEUE rad-mo-ni-tenr] Z. UL 



TEICE [tri-s] n. £ adviser. 

TION [ad-i 
Q&w) reprimand ; 2. (school) admoi^i- 



ADMONn 



-mo-nf-si6n] n. £ L 



tion. 

ADOLESCENCE [a-do-U-Oa-i] n. £ 
adolescence; adolescenoy. 

ADOLESCENT, E [a-d^U-On, t] aOJ. 
adolescent. 

ADOLESCENT, n. m. E, n. £ ado- 
lescent, m. £ ; lad, m. ; lass, t ; strip- 
Ung. m. 

ADOLPHE [a-doi-f] p. n. m. Adolphua 

ADONIEN fa-do-ni-in] NE [A-o], 

ADONIQUE [a-doKi-k] a^. (vem) 
adonic. 
ADONIS la-do-n-til n. m 1. fmvth.i 



ADO AbR ADV 

«wjofite; OTtjeu; «iije1k<c; «ipeur; Snpan; «tpin; owbon; wnbrun; *11 liq. ; *gn liq. 



ddonis; 2. $ ^ Jine lemi; 3. (bot) 
jdonis. 

AD0NI8ER [a-do-ni-z«] V. a. 1. to dreaa 
out, up ; 2. to bedizen, 

S' — , 1. to dress o.'s self out, wp; 2. to 
iisen o."a self. 

AUONNER (8') [M-do-n«] pr. v. (a, to) 

I &) csp/J^y o.'* ««^ (to a. th.) ; to gice 
tppUodtion; 3. (b. s.) to be addicted; 
L (of animals) to become attached (to 
\ >.). 

Etie »donn6 (a), to be given {to); 2. 
Ji 8.) fe) be addicted {to). 

ADONNER [a-do-n«] V. n. (nav.) (of 
the wind) to veer. 

ADOPT ANT [a-dop-tan] n. m. (law) 
adopter. 

ADOPT:^, E [a dop-w] adj. (th.) adop- 
ted. 

Non — , imadopted. 

ADOPTS, n. m. E, a f. adoptive. 

ADOPTER, [a-dop-te] V. a 1. 1| to adopt 
(a. o.) ; 2. II (as a son) to affiliate ; Z. % to 
adopt (a. th.) ; \ to take up. 

■A. — line opinion, un systeine, to adopt, to take 

Personne qui adopte, § \ adopter (of). 

ADOPTI-F, VE [a-dop-tif, i-v] adj. 
(pers.) 1. adoptive (adopting) ; 2. adop- 
ted. 

Non — , (pers.) unadopted. Enfant 
— , 1. II adopted, adoptive child ; 2. * § 
foster babe, child-; etat — , adoption 
(state); mere adoptive, 1. I adoptive 
mother; 2. % foster-mother ; pure — , 1 
I adoptive father ; 2. % foster -father. 

ADOPTION [a-dop-8i6n] n. f. 1. 1 § 
adaption (action) ; 2. (as a son) affilia- 
Uon. 

ADORABLE [a-do-ra-bl] adj. j § ado- 
rable. 

Qualit6 — , adorableness. D'une n»- 
tVire — , adorably. 

ADORA-TEUK [»-do-r».t*ur] n. m. 
TEICE [tri-f] n. t 1; \ worshipper ; ** 
.iii(y>er ; 1. % adorer ; adnUrer ; lov- 
er. 

8«J8— , 1. I § nnworshipped ; una- 
dUtred; 2. without adorers, admirers, 

ADORATION [a-do-ra-iion] n. C | § 

teorship ; adoration. 

Sans — , im/worshipped ; unadored. 

ADORER [a-do-ri] V. a. \. \to wor- 
ship ; to offer, to render worship to ; 
to adore ; 2. § <o worship ; to adore. 

— Dieu, son Dieu, to worship God ; 
to worship; — ses dieu-x, ses idoles, to 
worship. 

Adokk, e, pa. p. worshipped ; adored. 

Non — ,unworshlpped ; unadored. 

ADOS [a-d4] n. m. (hort.) slielving 
bed. 

ADOSSER [a-do-.«] V. a. (A) 1. 1 <o lean, 
to set, to put a. o.'s back (against); 2. 
$ to lean, to support (a th. against a. 
til.). 

AD088E, p, pa. p. ( V. senses of Ados- 
»er) back to back. 

S" ADOSSER, pr. V. (a.) h to lean o.'s 
back (against); to lean (against); 2. 
to stand back to back. 

AD0U15ER [a-dou-b*] V. n. (che.ss) to 
adjust, to arrange a piecti. 

Jadoube, "■fadoube.''' 

ADOUOIR [a.dou-.ir] V. a. 1. I § to soft- 
on ; to soften down ; 2. | to nmooth ; to 
tmooth doton ; to polish ; 'i.\%to mceet- 
tti ; 4. § to render, to make mild ; 5. § 
to rsnder, to make gentle ; to temper ; 
6. S <o mollify; 1. % to allay; to as- 
tvage ; tc appease ; to mitigate ; 8. S 
to soothe ; to alleviate ; to relieve ; 9. § 
fti modify ; 10. (arch., paint) to soften ; 
It* sweeten ; 11. (m'^a) to sqft«r, ; 12. 
(mat.) to flatten. 

2. I — le bois, to unooth ximod. 3. § — la vie, 
to tweeten life. 4. — le temps, to render, ^/ make 
lie tiieatktr mild. 8. — la douleur ou le chagrui, 

Brosse 4 — , softener. Qn'on ne pent — , 
V. sen-^es) 1. unappeasaljle ; unmiti- 
fable ; 2. wnrelievahle. 
Adouoi, e, pa p. F: senses of Adod- 

Son — , (V. senses of ADorciR) 1. nn- 
tenpered ; 'i.unaUnyed , ut assuaged; 



unappeased ; unmitigated ; 3. un- 
soothed; unallmiated ; unrelieved. 

S'adoucir, pr. V. 1. I § to soften ; to 
soften down; 2. | to become, to get 
smooth ; 3. § to become, to get, to groio 
m,iid ; to be tempered ; 4. § to become, 
to get, to grow gentle; 5. § to become 
mollified ; to be allayed, assuaged, ap- 
peased, mitigated ; 6. § to wnruffie ; 7. 
^tobe soothed, aUemated, relieved ; 8. 
§tobe modified ; 9. (of the cold) to break 
up. 

'A. he temps commence a — , the weather begint 
to grow mild. 

ADOUCISSANT, E [a-don-si-san, t] adj. 
(med.) emollient ; demulceiit. 

ADOUCISSANT [a-dou-si-s^] n. m. 
(med.) emollient. 

AD0UCI8SEMENT [a-dou-si-s-man] n. 
m. 1. I § softening ; softening down; 
2. I § smoothing ; smoothing down ; 3. 
I § sweetening ; 4. § rendering, mak- 
ing mild ; 5. § rendering, making gen- 
tle ; tempering ; 6. § mollifying ; 7. § 
allaying ; assuagement ; mitigation ; 
8. § soothing ; alleviation ; relief; 9. 
§ modiflcation, ; la (arch., paint) soft- 
ening ; sweetening. 

ADOUCISS-EUR [a-dou-si-s-seur] n. m. 
EUSE, [eu-z] n. £ mirror-polisher. 

ADOUJ!;, E [a.dou-4] adj. (hunt) coup- 
led; paired. 

"AD PATRES" [ad-pS-tres] ^f to 
kingdom come. 

Aller, envoyer — , -i- to go, to send to 
kingdom, come. 

ADRAGANT, ADRAGANTE [a-dra- 
gan, t] aflj. 1. (hot) tragacanth; 2. 
(l>hanTi.) adraganUi. 

ADRAGANTHE, [a.dra-gan-t] n. £ 
(pharm.) adraganth. 

ADRASTE [a-dr» >->.] p. a m. (class.) 
Adrastus. 

ADRE8SE [a-dr4^1 n. £ 1. address 
(speech); 2. address (to a constituted 
authority) ; 3. (of a letter, a packet) ad- 
dress ; superscription, ^ direction ; 4. 
(of a residence) address. 

Bureau d' — , intelligenoe-office. Sans 
— , (of a letter, a packet) loithout an ad~ 
dress ; wndirected. Aller, etre k Y — de 
q. u., \.\to be addressed to a. o. ; 2. § 
(b. s.) to be intended for a. o. ; arriver 
a r — de q. u., (b. s.) to hit, to strike 
home; envoyer h son — , faire tenir k 
son — , to forward to its destination ; 
proposer une — , to move an address. 

ADRESSE [a-dri-s] n. £ 1. | (of the 
body) dexterity; adroitn^s; expert- 
nejts ; skill ; cleverness ; 2. | (of the 
hands) handiness ; i. § (of the mind) 
skill; cleverness. 

Tour d' — , legerdemain; sleight of 
hand ; trick. Avec — , par — , dexter- 
otisly ; adroitly; expertly; skilfully; 
cleverly; sans — , 1. wvskilful; 2. un- 
skilfully. 

Avoir r — (de), ( V. senses) to be able 
(to). 



Souplt99e is an ability to accuinmi'date one's self 
to emerKencies. A finesse is a kind ol atratagent, 
in whicn ahrewdneaa and cunning are combined 
with diseimulation. A ruse is a disguised wuv of 
arrivinj? at one's ends. An artifice ia a deep-laid 
secret plan for the execution of one'a designs. 
Adrtsse employs means, and rfouirea intelligence. 
S'laplesse avoids audden obstacles, and requires 
qtiickneas of thought. The finesse by msensible 
degrees gains ita Ppiii^ And presupposes cunning 
and penej^-ation. The ruse deceivea; and is the 
result of an in^eni«ius imagination. The artifice 
surprises, and implies a well-practised dissimu- 
lation. The merchant acts with adresse ; the 
courtier, with soitplegse ; the diplomatist practises 
finesse ; the apy succeeds in a ru^e ; the prosecu- 
ting attorney uaea artifice in his examinationa. 

ADRESSER [a-dr4-s6] V. a (i, to) 1. to 
address ; to send ; 2. to forwara (let- 
ters, parcels) ; 3. to address (letters) ; to 
direct; to superscribe; 4 to offer ii,p 
(a prayer) ; ^ to p^U up ; 5. to direct 
(o."s steps). 

— mal. to misdirect (letters, packets). 
— q. ch. a q. n., (com.) to wait on, upon 
a. o. with a. th. 

Sadrekser, pr. v. (i., to) 1. (pers.) to 
address o.'s self (to a <>.); to address. 
(..,.); 2. (th.) to be addressed ; to bfi 



directed ; 8. (pers.) to apply (to & a.) 
to make apphcation. 

— mal, to apply to the tcrong perm /n ; 
— k...l (in advertisements) apply U\ 
at... I — ici ! inquire within ! 

ADRIATIQUE (L') [U^ri a-ti-k] p. u. 
£ (geo^.) Tli^ AdriaUc Sea, the ihii^ 
of Venice. 

ADRIEN [a-dri-m] p. n m. Adrf^ir 
Hadrian. 

ADROIT, E [a-droa, i] adj. (d, tn) 1 
(of the body) dexterous ; adroit ; ne- 
pert; skilful; clever; 2 (of thehafde) 
handy; 3. § (of the mind) skilfji ; 
clever. 

St/n, — Adroit, Habile, Entendu. One » 
adroit with the band, m action; huM'e in an art; 
eutendu in business. Nature makes us adrviit ; 
study, experience, habiiet ; both, aided by intelli- 
gence, eitienduti. 

ADROITEMENT [a-dro«-t-ma!i] adv. 
1. I dexterously ; adroitly ; expertly ; 
skilfully; cleverly; 2. \ handily ; 3. J 
skilfully; cleverly. 

A"DRUMi;TE [a-dni-me-t] p. n. £ (ana 
geog.) Iladmvmetwm. 

ADULA-TEUR, TRICE [a-du-Ia-teur 

tri-s] adj. adulatory ; sycophantic. 

ADULA-TEUR, n. m. TRICE, n. £ 
adulator, m. ; adulatress, £ ; syco 
phant, m. £ 

ADULATI-F, VE [a-du-ia-tif, i-v] adj. 
adulatory. 

ADULATION [»■ lu-U-sion] n. £ adu- 
lation; sycophancy. 

ADULER [a.du-1^] V. a to adulate; 
to bestow adulation on ; to fawn on ; 
to play the sycophant to. 

ADULTE [a-dul-t] adj. 1. adidt; full- 
grown ; ^ grown up ; ^ grown ; % 
(hot) fuU-groum. 

ifctat — , adidtness. 

ADULTE, n. m. £ adidt; ^ grown 
person. 

ADULT:6RATI0N [a.dul.t*-ra.»i«a] a 
£ (pharm.) ad/ulteration. 

ADULTi;RE [a-dul-t* r] adj. 1. | (pf^n.; 
adulterous; adulterate; 2. § (th.) ath/f 
terate. 

Femme — , adulteress. 

ADULTERE, n. £ (pers.) adulterer 

ADULTi;RE, n. no. 1. adtdter'f 
(crime) ; 2. (pers.) adv2terer, m. ; 3. (law) 
criminal conversation ; crim. con. 

Par r— , by adadtery ; adulterouely. 

ADULT:&RER [a-dul-t«-r6] v. a 
(pharm.) to adulterate. 

Adui-tere, e, pa p. 1. ad%iU«rate,d ; 
2. (pharm.J adulterate ; adulterine. 

ADULTI;:RIN, E [a-dul-t#-rin, i-n] adj. 
adulterine. 

ADULT6R1N, n. m. E, n. £, adulte- 
rine ; child begotten in adulteri/. 

ADU8TE [a-dus-t] adj. (med.) adust 

ADUSTION [a-dus-tion] n. £ % (med., 
surg.) adtistion ; biirning up. 



ADVENIR [ad-v*-nir] v. n. impers. 
(^conj. like Tenir) (th.) to occur ; to Imp- 
pen, 1( to fall md. 



Qutrt qii'il advieiine, whatever may 
occur, lujppen. Advienne que ponrra, 
happen what iciU, may ; let what may 
will happen ; ^ come what may, vriU 

[Ai.vKMRmconj. will, ,-•««.] 

ADVENTICE [ad-vSn-ti-,] adj. 1. (did.) 
adventitious; 2. (med., surg.) adveiUi/- 
tious. 

D'une manicure — . adventitiously. 

ADVENTl-F, VE [ad-vin-tif, I-t] a<y 
Haw) ad/nentire. 

ADVERBE [ad-v^r-b] n. m. (ZT&ii\.)ad^ 
•verb. 

ADVERBIAL, E [ ad-T^r-bi-al J a 7 
(gram.) adverbial. 

ADVERBIALEMENT [Rd-Tirr.** 
man] adv. (gram.) adverbiaUy. 

A OVERS AIRE [ad-»»r-.4-r'] n. a. ad- 
versary ; opponent. 

Se presenter comme — , 1. to aj'perjt 
as an = : 2. to appear against u. o. 

ADVERSATI-F, VE [ad-vJr-sa-lif, i. v) 

adj. (gram.) ad/cersative. 

ADVERSE [ad-ver-s] adj. 1. adverse. 
2. (at the bar) opposite ; of »'te opposiv 
side. 

Avocat — , counsel on the opposiU 
side ; partie — . opposite party. 

ADVERSITJi; [ad-Tirii-t«] n. £ l aa 



a roal ; A mftle ; i i 



AFP 



AFF 



>; ^fSte; ^je; »il; iUe; omal; 5 ni61e; (5 mort wsnc; iistoe; omjow; 



tjersity ; adverse fortune : a. misftrr- 
!iu4ie. 

2. De <rande» — s, i/rea( niist'ortuncB. 

ADrNAMIE [a^i-na-ml] n. t (med.) 



adynamy. 



>k] adj. 



ADYNAMIQUE [ »-di. 
(inod.) adynamic. 

^G6E (L') [i6-j«] p. n. f. (anc. geog.) 
ft« jEgean Sea. 

AlfcKAGE [a-«-r.-j] n. m. atrmflr (re- 
iiwiral of air). 

Palts d' — , (tosh.) air-shaft ; voie d' 
— > toinlng) wind-ffats. 

AJ£e£, E [ai-*-r6] adj. 1. aired/ 2. 
oiry. 

AEKER [a-«-r«] V. a. 1. <o air (to re- 
new the air in) ; 2. (cliim.) to aerate. 

A:fcRIEN, NE [a.«-ri-m,4-n] adj. 1. 
aerial ; of the air ; 2. (did.) aerial 

Cellule — ne, (bot) air-cell; conduit 



— , voie — ne, (anat.) 1. wind-pipe , 

air-tube; adr-vensel; 

air-vessel. 



air-tube ; air-vessel ; vaisseau — , (bot.) 



A^RIFilRE [a-«-ri.fe-r] adj. (anat) 
a ir-cowveying. 
Voiee — s, air-vessels. 
A:^EIF0EME [a-«-ri-foi--ni] adj. aeri- 

A:^R0DYNAM1QUE [8-«-ro.di-na-mi-k] 
B. f. (did.) aerodynamics. 

AEROGRAPHIE [a-^-ro-gra-fi] n. f. 
aeroaraphy. 

AEROLITHE [a-«-ro-li-t] n. m. aero- 
lite; aeroUOie ; atmospheric, meteoric, 
falmvg ston^. 

AJ^ROLOGIE [a-«-ro-lo-ji] n. f aero- 

De r — , aerological. 

AiROLOGUE [»-«-ro-lo-g] n. m. aero- 
U>ffist. 

A:6R0MANCIE [a-«-ro-man-ii] n.tae- 
romancy. 

A£EOM:feTEE [a-i-ro-mi-tr] n. m. ae- 
rometer. 

AilROMifeTRIE [m-«.ro-m«-tri] n. £ ae- 
rttmetry. 

AfeEONAUTE [a^-ro-n6-t] n. m. aero- 
naut. 

Art de 1' — , aeroTiauUei ; aeronaut- 
(m% ; priiicipe, scieaoe de 1'—, aeronau- 

AEROPHOBIE [8-«-ro-fo-bq n. £ (med.) 
dread of contact with the atr. 

A:6r6pHYTE [a-^-ro-a-t] n. m. (hot) 
aorophyte. 

AERO^AT [a-«-ro^ta] n. m. aeros- 
tat: air-halloon. 

^:6R08tATION [a-«-ro.-ta-.i6n] n. £ 

-aerostation. 

A:eROSTATIQUE [n-«-rot-ta-ti-k] adj. 
"aerostatic. 

Art — , aerostatics; ballon — , air- 
.1>alloon. 

.iEEUGIN-EUX, EUSE [«-ru-ji-neu, 

*i-«] adj. ceniginous. 

iES'f HI;ME [fe«-t6-m] n. m. (med.) sen- 
sation. 

.(ESTH:fi9IE [J.-U-.i] n. £ (med.) sen- 
sibiUty. 

^STH:6TIQUE [a-W-ii-k] n. £ (did.) 
OMihetics. 

Ai;TITE [a-«-ti-t] n. £ (min.) ostites; 
eagle-stone. 

AFFABILITl!: [a-fa-bi-li-t«] n. £ affa- 
bility; affableness. 

D6ftut manque d'— , iraffahtUty. 
Avec — , xiyith affability ; afiahly. 

AFFABLE [a-fa-bi] e'dj. affable,. 

Feu — , inaffahle. D'une mani6re — , 
affably. 

AFFABLEMENT [a-fa-bl8-n.at1 adv. 
X xffahly. 

A.FFABULATION [a.fa-bu-i&-«6n] n. £ 
(did,) moral ofafahle or apologue. 

AFFADIR [a-fa-dlr] V. a. 1. J § «» ''^^ 
lUrr, to make insipid; 2. I to make, 
S> render iimsaron/ ; 8. 1 to cloy ; 4. § 
fli ' pall ; to pall upon ; 6. % to flat- 
'am. 

S'ajtadir, pr. V. 1. J § to becom^e, to 
•#rt 4nsijnd ; 2. J <o become, to get mi- 
io/vorv ; 3. § to paU. 

ArFADI89EMENT [a-fa-di-a-man] n. 
in. 1. § cloying ; 2. § itisipidity ; 8. § 
namseo'usnt-t. 

AFFAIBLIR [a-fi-biir] v. a. 1. I § «« 
x-eak«n ; 2. 1 § to enfeeble ; 3. f to xll ly; 
'it abala ; to tale off (J^ott), i 8 to im- 
12 



pair; 5, § to remit; 6. to craze (the 
brain) ; 7. to debase (coin). 

Chose, personne qui aflfaiblit, 1. weak- 
ener (of) ; 2. en,feebler {of). 

Affaibh, b, pa. p. V. senses of affai- 

BLIR. 

Non — 1 !• I § tinweakened ; 2. 1 § un- 
enfeebled ; 3. 1 unaZlayed ; unabated, ; 
4. II § unspent; 5. | § unimpaired; 6. 
(of coin) wndebased. 

S'affaiblir, pr. v. 1. | § to become, to 
get, to grow weak ; 2. I § to becom,e en- 
feebled ; 8. Jo be allayed, abated ; 4 
§ to 5« impaired, enfeebled; 5. § to 
grow faint ; 6. § to lower. 

Qui ne s'affalblit pas, ( V. senses) 1. wiv- 
abating ; 2. unremitting. 

AF]fAlBLIS8ANT, E [ a-fi-bU-.an, t ] 
»dj. weakening ; enfeebling. 

AFFAIBLISSEMENT [a-ft-bli-nnan] 

n. m. 1. 1 8 weakening ; 2. 1 § enfeeble- 
ment; 8. § (th.) enervation ; 4 § allay- 
ing ; abating; taking off; 5. § irr.- 
pairing ; 6. (of coin) debasement. 

AFFAIRE [a-ft-r] n. £ 1. affair; 
thing; matter; 2. affair; bus'ineso ; 
piece of business ; 8. concern ; concern- 
ment ; 4. — s, business; 5. — b, (pi.) 
dealing; 6. — s, (pi.) business; com- 
merce ; trade, (sing.) ; 7. t (b. S-Yaffair; 
concern ; piece qfbiunness, work ; job; 
scrape ; 8. (com.) affair ; transaction ; 
piece of business ; 9. (law) carise; case; 
10. (mil.) action ; engagement. 

Belle — , T. ^e = ; 2. (b. s.) pretty 
job ; 3. J^~ (b. s.) catch ; — chaude, 
Vive, warm work ; — s courantes, (pi.) 
current business, sing. ; facheuse — , 
disagreeable, sad =: ; fameuse — , fa- 
mous = ; — manquoe, miscarriage; 

— urgente, pressing, urgent bvMne^s ; 
vilaine — , ttgly = ; — de ri «n, trifliiig 
affair; — d'Etat, state affair; — de 
coeur, affair of the heart; — d'honneur, 
affair of honor ; — d'int^ret, money 
concern., matter. Occup6 d' — , (pers.) 
biisinesM-like ; propre anx — s, (th.) bu- 
siness-like ; bien dans ses — s, in good 
drctmuitances ; ^ well off; . mal dans 
ses — 8, in ba/1 circunMtances ; ^ badly 
off; ni bien ni mal dans ses — s, in mid- 
dling circvmstances. Cabinet d' — s, 
agency ; cabinet pour — s, office ; busi- 
n^Jis-room ; courant des — s, course of 
affairs, Intsiness ; gens d' — 8, m,en of 
biisiness ; homme d' — s, 1. man of bu- 
/nn^^<is ; 2. agent; 3. steward; 4 (in 
Ireland) middls-mam ; homme qui en- 
tend les — 8, man of business. Toute 

— cessante, to the mtspenMan of all 
other business. A la tete des — s, at 
the head of affairs ; au-dessous de ses 
— s (de), (ct»m.) minus (...); dans les — s, 
in busineJts; en — , engaged in biisi- 
ness ; engaged ; hors d' — , 1. ^ o^it qfa 
scrape ; 2. (of sick people) o^U of dan- 
ger ; Tour — , an busine'm. Aller k sm 
— s, 1. to g'o to o.'s business ; 2. ^ to 
n ind o.'s business ; arranger un e — , to 
settle a = ; attirer une — k, |^^ to 
draw into a scrape ; sattirerune — , to 
get o.'s self into a serape ; avoir — a, I. 
to hatje business with; 2. to hare to 
deal, to do with ; avoir — de, 1. to hatie 
to do loith ; 2. to luire nsed of; to want ; 
avoir — k forte partie, a plus fort que 
sol, to have the otlds agatnst o. ; avoir 
des — s par-dessns la tSte, to be over head 
iinij ears in business ; ceder 8e.s — 8, to 
give up o.'s bitMness ; 6tre a son — , to 
mind o.'s busin^MS ; 6tre au-dessus de 
ses — , to be beforehand icitli the tcorld ; 
etre en — (avec) to transact bvMness 
(with) ; 6tre de . . . au-dessous de ses — , 
to he ... worse than nothing ; exposer 
une — , 1. to state the fmsiness ; 2. (law) 
to state a case ; 6viter le8 — s, to keep, 
to steer clear of scrapes ; faire des — s, 
to do b'.isiness ; faire 1" — de q. u., 1. to 
do a. o.'i business ; 2. to answer a. o.'s 
pttrpose; 8. to served, o.'s turn; faire 
son — i q. u. 'o settle a. o.'s business; 
f^~ to Jo thejohfora.o.; faire ses — s, 
1. to do o.'s business ; 2. to do well ; 
faire bien ses — s, faire de bonnes — s, to 
do well ; faire de grandee — s, to do an eo!- 
tensive hu'ti,ne*s ; -i- to do a good gtroke 
qfbvMness; faire mal fww —», to do 



badly; ne faire rlen k I'—, to be nothing 
to the purpose ; faire une beI2e — , 1. ta 
do a good piece of business ; 2. ^ to 
make a. good job ; (b. 8.) to m^^ake a nice 
mess qfit ; faire une jolie — , ^^ (b. 8.) 
to make a fine kettle of Ji«h of it ; 
n'avoir pas fait une belle — , to have no 
catch ; no great catch ; en faire ishn — ._ 
to make it o.'c justness ; s'imitiscej 
dans les — s do q. n., se mfeler dee — s dt 
q. u., to intermeddle in a. o.'s concemtf 
mettre dans les — s, 1[ 1. to put in brtsi 
ness ; 2. to set up ; se mettre dans let 
— , 1. to engage in affairs, business ; % 
to begin biisiness ; to enter, to go into 
business ; ^ to set top ; se mettre hor« 
d' — , ^°° to get out of'x scrape ; s'occu 
per de ses — s, to attend to o.'s business, 
s'occuper de ses propres — s, to mind 
o.'s own business, c(mcerns ; regler une 
— , to settle an affair ; se retirer des — «, 
to retire from business ; sortir d'uno — 
avec . . ., to come off. . . ; sortir d' — . to 
get out of a scrape ; term^er une — , 
(com.) to close a transai tion ; tirer 
d'— , 1. to extricate ; to getiff; 2. to help 
out ; to carry, to get out, through ; se 
tirer d' — , 1. to ea-tricate / .'s self; *( to 
get off; 2. to get cleat ; 8. ^ to gel 
through, oeerit ; to get o .it of a scrape ; 
4. (of the sick) to get < oer it ; se tirer 
d' — salii et san£ ( V. s< nses of Se tirer 
d'— ) to bHng o.'s self off; to get off shot- 
free; vaquer aux — s, to attend to busi- 
ness ; vider nae — , to settle an affair ; 
to fight a duel. C'e«t une — , it is no 
easy matter ; ce n' i «t pas une — , it it 
an easy matter; c'3St une — faite, t/te 
busin,ess is concludM, settled ; c'est nnn 
autre — , that is a.^other matter; thai 
alters the case; c'est a vons que j'ai — , 
my business is with you; c"ect juste 
votre — , ceia fait jnste votre — , thaij-uti 
»uits you ; ce ne sont pas la mes — s," v«h 
— s, that is no business of mine, qf 
yours; mfilez-vous de vos — st mind 
your awn business ; au point oil en sont 
les — s, as affairs stand; son — eet 
bonne, he icill get his deserts ; ^^~ he 
is in for it ; son — est faite, 1. ^_ his for- 
tune is made; 2. (b. s.) he is donefwr; 
it is all over with him. 

AFFAIR^, E [a-K-r«] adj. bu»y ; Se- 
cupied; engaged; ^,ful/ofbu»iness. 
Trop — , overbusy. Fai/e 1'—, toplai 
the man of business. 

AFFAISSEMFJVT [a-ft-.-ioan] n. m. 1. 
II sinkir.,g ; 2. 1 subsidence ; subsidence; 
8. J giving way ; 4 ^ flagging ; 6. \ 
weakness; enfeeblem e)it ; 6. § depres- 
sion. 

' AFFAISSER [a-ff-e^] v. a. 1. ^ to sink; 
2. I § to weigh down. ; 3. § to flag ; 4 J 
to weaken; to enfeeble; f>. § to depress. 
S'affaissek, pr. v. 1. I! § to sink; to 
sink down ; 2. | to subside ; 3. to weigh 
down ; 4. || to e*"« way ; 5. I to couch 
down ; 6. 1 to collapse ; 7. || to cower ; 
8. II to flag; 9. § to become, to get, to b« 
weak, feeble ; to give way; 10. § to &e 
depressed ; 11. (tech.) to sag. 

Qui ne s'affaisse pas, ( V. senses) ««- 
sinking. 

AFFALER [a-fa-l*] v. a. (nav.) to over- 
haul (a rope) ; to lower. 

fttre affale sur la cote, to be embayed. 

S'affaleb, "1-. V. (nav.) 1. (pers.) to 

shde, down a back-stay ; 2. (of ships) ta 

be embayed ; to drive upon a lee-snoro, 

— sur la cote, (nav.) to be embayed. 

AFFAMi, E [a-fa-m«] adj. 1. 1 starved^ 

starving ; famished ; 2. § (de, fof) 



Animal — , plante — e, starveling. 

AFF VMER [a-fa-m6] v. a. to star^ ; 
to famish. 

txre aftam6, 1. 1 to \unger ; to famish 
2. § (de) to thirst (for); to be eager 
(for) ; to long (for'). 

AFFilAGEMiSNT [t'«-*-j-uian] n. m. 
(law) feoffment. 

AFFEAGER [a.«-fc.;<] v. a. (law) fe 

Mf- 

AFFECTATION [^f»k-ta-,dd:i1 n. £ L 
affectation (mannei) ; 2. affected way. 

Aveo — , vrith affectation ; affeateduq/ ; 
sans — . 1. without = ; unaffijcttxl ; vn 
affectedly: 





Ab'F 




AFh 


AFF 




»itJoute; eujeu 


Siijeune; ^peur; 


dn pan; m pin; onhon; wn brnn: *11 liq. 


♦gnliq. 



81/A, — AFFHCTATroN, AFFKTKRiK. Afectaticn 
Ml(m^ to the thuu^hu, the sentiment, the tttste, 
•which one wishes to parude ; affHtrxty 10 the nian- 
oers by which one thinks to pleaixj. Aj^tct<ition 
\M often opposed to sincerity; ajfderie is always 
the opposite of the simple and natural. 

AFFECTS, K [a-ftk. M] adj. 1. affected; 
J. (a!g.) affect^i. 

Non — , imtiffeoled. ^tat de ce qui est 
' , affeotaiion. D'une maniere — , «/- 
ifcted'/t/. 

' AFFECTEK [a-ftk-W] v. a. 1. l § <o 
iffeat; 2. (i., pour, to) to appropriate ; 
i. to cf loose ; to give preference to ; 4. 
U.) seek ; to aspire to ; 5. (law) to affect; 
6. (med.) to affect. 

? — line anninie pour le payement ■"une dette, 
U appropriate a sum U> the payment cf a debt. 

Personne qui aflFecte, affecter (of) ; 
pretender (to). Action d' — , (law) affec- 
tion. 

8'affectbr, pr. v. to be affected. 

AFFECTI-F, VE [a-ftk-tir, i-v] adj. + 
effective. 

AFFECTION [a-ftk-iion] n. f. 1. affec- 
tion ; 2. {povn,/or)/ondnes8 ; 3. liking ; 
pariiality ; fancy ; 4. (did.) affection ; 
6. (med.) affection ; ^ touch. 

Marque, temoignage d" — , tok»n of af- 
fection. Avec — , affectionately ; with 
r= ; par — yfrom = ; *f out of = ; sans — , 
xoithout = ; vmaffectionately. Avoir de 
I' — pour, to ha/ee an r=:for; to be f mid 
of; to have a partiality to ; to be par- 
tial to ; mettre son — a, to net o.'s =» 
071 ; porter de 1' — k, to bear ■=. to; to 
entertain =for ; prendre en — ,l.to be- 
come attacfied to ; to become fond of; 
2. to take n liking, a fancy to; ^to take 
to ; prendre q. u. forteinent en — , 1. to 
become very mtich attacfied to, very 
/and of; 2. to take a great liking, 
fancfjto; ^ to take very much to; ^ 
to take a great deal to ; avoir pris en — , 
\o be att/JLched to ; to have a liking, a 
fiincyfor ; to be partial to. 

Al^FECTIONNfi; E [a-Rk-.io-n*] adj. 
(<hrm used for the termination of letters) 
•{^ectio^iate. 

AFFECTIONNER [a-ftk-sio-n«] v. a. 1. 
i) ka/ce an affection for (a. o.); to be 
Aiid, of; 2. to be fowl of (a. th.) ; to be 
partial to ; to delight in. 

S'ajfeotionner, pr. v. (a.) 1. to be- 
lome attached (to), fond (of) ; 2. to de- 
ight (in); to take delig/it (in); 8. to 
kike a liking, ^ a fancy (to). 

AFFECTUEU8EMENT fa-Rk-tu-en-^ 
man] adv. 1. affectionately ; 2. lovingly. 

AFFECTUEU-X, SE [a-fek-tu-en, eu-z] 

1. affectionate ; 2. loving. 
on, peu — , 1. unaffectionate ; 2. un- 
loving. 

AFF:feEENT, E [a-tt-ran, t] adj. (law) 
relating to t/ie nhare of an interested 
party in an indivisible property. 

AFFERMER [a-Rr-m«] V. a. 1. to farm 
(let); to farm out; 2. to farm (take); 
8. to rent ; 4. (law) to demise. 

Que I'on pent — , qui pent ftre af- 
fermo, 1. farmable (to be let) ; 2. renU 
able ; 8. (lavv) deTnisahle. 

AFFERMIR [a-ftr-mir] V. a. 1. H ^ 
itrengtJien ; 2. I § to consolidate ; 3. I § 
to render, to make firm ; to give firm- 
nesx to ; 4. || to harden ; 5. || to fasten ; 
tofx; 6. § to establish; 7. (tech.) to 
fasten. 

8' AFFERMIR, pr. V. 1. | § fo Strengthen; 
2. II § to con-sohdate ; 8. i| § to become, to 
yet lirm ; 4. 11 to harden ; 5. \ to fasten ; 
Ufix; 6. § to become, to get established. 

Ai PERMIS8EMENT [a-f^r-mi-nnan] 
u. m. 1. + 1 strengt/iening ; 2. § str&ngth- 
•jiUng; 3. § consolidation; 4. § estab- 
'/jthment 

AFFJfeRON [a-K-r6n] n. m. (a. and 
ajw .) tag. 

ki^Vtn^t., E [a-tt-M] adj. 1. affected; 
r/UncUig ; 2. canting. 

Peisonue — e, 1. affected person ; 2. 



ftdj. 1 
No 



AFF^TERIE [a-K-t-rt] n. f 1. affecta- 
Hon ; 2. 1 cant. 

Avcc — , 1. affectedly ; 2. ^ cantingly. 
Parler avec — , 1. to speak with affecta- 
ion ,• 2. 5 to cant. 

AFFICIIE ra-fl-«l>] n- I "i. placard; 
'^tU: % hnnaHU. 



Petites — 8, (pL) advertiser; adver- 
tising-sheet; — de spectucle, plo''j (fill. 
Poser une — , 1. to post, to post up a 
placard, bill ; 2. to paste up a placard, 

AFFICHER [a-d-th^J v. a. 1. J to stick 
■up ; to post; to post up; 2. H to paste 
^P ; 8. § (b. 8.) to make a show of; 4. § 
(b. s.) to publish; 5. § to ea-pose; 6. § to 
ad'vertise (a. o.). 

Defense d'— 1 stick no bills 1 

S' AFFICHER, pr. V. 1. to Set Up (for) ; 
2. to repose o.'s self. 

AFFICHEUR [a-fl-gheur] n. m, bUl- 
sticker. 

AFFID:^, E [a-fi-a«] adj. t trusty; 
trustioorthy. 

AFFIL:^, E [a-fi-l«] adj. 1. (of sharp 
instruments) sharp ; 2. § (of the tongue) 
well oiled. 

AFFILEE, V. a. 1 to let; to sharpen; 
to whet ; to give an edge to. 

AFFIL-EUR [ a-fi-Wur ] n. m. EU8E 
[cu-t] n. f. one that sets, sharpens, whets. 

AFFILIATION [a-fi-U-i-uon] n. C af- 
filiation (association). 

AFFILIER [a-fi-U-6] V. a. to affUiate 
(associate.) 

AFFILOIR [a-fi-loar] n. m. hone. 

AFFINAGE [a-fi-na-jj n. m. (a ife man.) 
fining; refining; affinage. 

AFFINER [a-fl.n6J V. a. 1. (a.&man.) 
to fine ; 2. to reffne (metals) ; to try. 

Affine, e, pa. p. 1. (a. & man.) fined; 
2. (of metals) refined ; tried. 

Non — , 1. (a. & man.) unfined ; 2. (of 
metals) unrefined; untried. 

S'affiner, pr. V. 1. (a. & man.) to be 
fined ; 2. (of metals) to be refined, tried ; 
8. § to refine. 

AFFINERIE [a-fi-n-ri] n. C (metal.) 
finery. 

Foyer d'— , =. 

AFFINEUR [a-fi-neur] n. m. Lfiner; 

2. (of metals) refiner. 

AFFINITY [a-fl-ni-w] n. f. 1. P affinity; 
alliance; 2. § affinity; 8. § congenia- 
lity ; 4. (chem.) affinity. 

Sans — (avec), 1. § without affinity 
(with); 2. uncongenial (to); 8. § not 
akin (to). Avoir de 1'— (avec), § 1. to 
ha/ve = with ; 2. to be congenial (to) ; 

3. to be akin to. 

AFFINOIR [a-fi-noar] n. m. (a. & man.) 
fine hatchel. 

AFFIQUET [a-fi-k«] n. m. 1. knitUng- 
pin ; 2. ^ — s, ( pi. ) knick-knacks ; 
bawbles ; ge^cgaws. 

AFFIRMATI-F, VE [ a-flr-ma-tif, i-v ] 

adj. 1. affirmative; 2. positive; 8. asser- 
tory; 4. (\og.) predicatory. 

AFFIRMATION [a-fir-ma-«6n] n. f. 1. 

affirmation; 2. averment; 8. (law) 
oath; 4 (\os.) predication. 

— solennelle, asseveration. Avec — , 

1. vnth affirmation; 2. (gram.) affirma- 
tively. I aire une — , to make an affir- 
mation. 

AFFIRMATIVE [ a-fir-ma-ti-y ] n. t 
affirmative. 

A r-^, in the =. Repondre par 1' — , to 
repli/ in the =. 

AFFIRMATIVEMENT [a-fir-ma-ti-r- 

man] adv. 1. affirmatively ; 2. in the af- 
firmative ; 8. (gram.) affirmMtmely. 
AFFIRMER [a-fir-m«] v. a 1. to affirm; 

2. to assert ; 3. to avouch ; to aver ; 4. 
(law) to affirm to ; 5. (log.) to predicate. 

— solennellement, to dsneverate. Per- 
sonne qui affirme, 1. affirmer ; affir- 
mant; 2. (log.) predicant. Faire — , to 
affirm to; pouvoir etre affirme, tobeaf- 
firmable. 

AFFIXE fa-fl-k.] n. m. (gram.) «#». 
AFFLEUR:6, E [a-fleu-r6] adj. 1. lema ; 



(arch.)^?«A. 
AFFLEUREMENT raOeu 



m. 1. levelling ; 2. (arch.) making, ren- 
dering flush ; 8. (mining) cropping. 

AFFLEURER [a-fleu-r«] V. a. 1. to 
level; to make, to render even; 2. 
(arch.) to make, to render flush ; 3. 
(mming) to crop ; 4. (nav. arch.) to fay. 

AFFLEURER [a-fleu.r«l v. n. 1. to be 
level; 2. (arch.) to be flush. 

APFLICTI-F, VE [a^flik-tif, i-v] adj. 
(law) (of penalty) that affects the per ton ; 
corporal. 



AFFLICTION [a-aik-.i6n] n. t 1. af- 
fliction ; distress ; trouble ; grief; aor- 
row ; 2. heart-ache ; 3. affiiction (oauM 
of distress.) 

Avec — , 1. with = ; 2. m^urnftttly ; 
dans r — , 1. in =.; 2. afflicted; dis- 
tressed; grimed; sana —, without =:i\ 
unaffUcted. 

AFFLIGEANT, E [afli-jan, t] ndj. <//: 
flicting ; * afflictive ; distressing ; rfw- 
tressful; grievous. 

Caract^re — , nature — e, grievoitsnerm, 
D'une maniere — e, affUcUveiy ; dis- 
tressfully ; grievously. 

AFFLIGER [a-fli-j^] v. a. (DE,«^<ft)L 
to affiict ; to distress ; to grieve ; to 
trouble ; 2. -\- to mort^y (the body). 

Personne qui afliige, affiieter (qf); 
veeeer (of). 

Afflige, b, pa. p. 1. afflicted ; diatreM- 
ed: 2. (th.) affected ; diseased. 

Non — , unaffiicted. 

S"affliger, pr. v. (de) to affiict o.'« 
self (at) ; to be affUcted (at, by) ; to re- 
pine (at); to grieve (at); to sorrow 
(for) ; to mourn (for) ; *( to fret (at) ; 
to vex. 

Sans — , (V. senses) 1. unrepining ; 8. 
wnrepiningly. 

AFFLUENCE [a-fla-an-.] n. f. 1. Iflmo 
(of liquids); 2. § influm; 3. §(th.) afflu- 
ence ; abundance; 4. (pers.) concov/rse; 
crowd; gathering. 

Sm. — AfFHJKNCK,CONC0DR»,F0DLE, MULTITUDB. 

Ci'MMira «ignifie« the »imultaneou« action of per- 
sons who betake theinselves to the same place ; 
muHHiidt expresses the number of those persoMj 
affluence indicates the large eathering that foU 
lows; and /ou/« unites to the idea of numljer th«« 
of confinement within a narrow space, and coo^n- 
quenl jostling and in».jnvenience. The COTHX«rt 
of a great multUui/e produces an affluence frons 
which a/oule usually results. 

AFFLUENT, E [a-flu-an, t] -nXy 1. (erf 
streams, rivers) tributary; 2. (phyk) 
V tat flows, runs. 

... —, current of.... Matiero — e, 
cnrrent of matter. 

AFFLUENT [a-flu-an] n. m. tribvia^y 
streaTn. 

AFFLUER [a-flu-«] V. n. 1. I (BASh, 
into) toflmo ; to fall ; 2. § (dans, into\ 
to flow ; 3. § (th.) to abotmd ; 4. (pers.) 
to flock ; to crowd ; 5. (of the blood) to 
rush. 

AFFLUX [a-fln] n. m. (med.) afflwx,; 
affiuaerion. 

AFFOLlfe, E [a-fo-i«] adj. (nav.) of the 
magnetic needle) defecwoe ; pertur- 
bated. 

AFFOLEE, V. a. to m,ake (a. o.) dote 
on, upon. 

Etre afrol6 de,l. to dote on, vpon (a. o.) ; 

2. to be very, excessively fond of(sL. th.). 
S'affolkr, pr. V. 1. (de) to dote on. 

upon (a. o.) ; 2. to be excessively fond </ 
(a. th.). 

AFFORAGE [a-fo-r«-j] n. m. (feud.) 
afforage (lord's due on the sale of wine). 

AFFOUAGE [a-fou-a-j] n. m. right of 
cutting wood for fuel. 

AFFOUILLER [a-fou-i**] v. a. (build.) 
to undermine : to tcash atcay. 

AFFOURCHE [a-four-rii] n. f. (nav.) 
small bower. 

Ancre d' — , = anchor ; cable d' — , = 
cable. 

AFFOURCHfi, E [a-four-.h6] a^J. 1 
astride ; astraddle. 

AFFOUECHER, v. a. (nav.) to rr.oor 
across. 

S'AFFoutcHKR, pr. v. (Dav.) to moor 
each way. 

AFFRAlCHIE [»-fr«-shi] n. f. (nor) 
increase of wind. 

AFFRANCHI fa-fran-shi] n. m. E, n. £ 
freed man, m. ; freed woman, t 

AFFRANCHIR [a-fran-shir] 'v. a. (DK, 

from) 1. to free ; to affranchise • to en 
franchise ; to set free ; 2. to liberate , 
to discharge ; to let loose ; ^ to let go ; 

3. to exempt ; 4. to manumit (a slave ;) 
to give o.'s liberty to ; 5. to free ; to d«- 
Hver ; 6. to free ; to absolve : to relea») ; 
1. to pay the postage of (letters) ; 8. tc 
pay the carruige of (j>aice.B) ; 9. (pout.) 
to prepay. 

Affranchi, e, pa. p. (F. senses of Ar 
rRANCHin) (of letters) 1. post-paid , ?' 
13 



AQA 



AGE 



AUl 



amal; <im&Ie; «fee; it^ve; it&te; ^je; ill; iile; omoi; dmole; dmort; usuc; ilsiire; owjoni 



Jof parceie carriage-paid ; 8. (post.) 

Non - -, ( F. senses of AFFRANCurR) 1. 
tmcMi/cered ; 2. unabsolved ; 3. (.of let- 
ters, parcels) tmpaid. 



Syn.- 


Affranchir, 


dAi 


IVRl 


R. AffmncUr 




»et freo; di/hrer. 


to t 


Oliver. -^One 


at. 


Jraneki 


a slave that 


18 hm 


own 


but dilivre 


the 


ri»ve of 


anotUer. 











8'AiTKANCniR, pr. V. ( V. senses of Af- 
WiANOHiE) 1. (de) to shake off; 2. to 
ir«ak loose ; S. (de) to break through. 

AFFEANCHISSEMENT (a-fran-8hi-^ 
asa] n. in. (de, from) 1. affranchise- 
inent; ertfraiiehtsemerd ; setting free ; 
i. liberaUon ; discharge ; letting loose ; 
8. easenvpUon; 4 manumission (of a 
Bkve) ; b. freeing ; delivery ; 6. release ; 
7. (of letters) payment cf postage; 8. 
^of parcels) payment of carriage; 9. 
(post) prepayment. 

Timbre d' — , {^o&t) postage-siamp. 

AFFKE [4-fr] n. £, — s, pi. 1. t dread ; 
terror ; 2. terrors (of death). 

AFFE^TEMENT [a-fre-t-man] n. m. 
(com. nav.) chartering ; freighting. 

AFFKf:TEK [a-W-t6] v. a. (com. nav.) 
to charter ; to freight. 

AFFRfiTEUR [a-fi-^-teur] n. m. (com. 
aav.) charterer ; freighter. 

AFFREUSEMENT [a-frea-nnan] adv. 

frightfully; horribly; terribly; dread- 
fuUy; horridly; slwckingly. 

AFFREU-X, SE [a-freu, eu-z] adj. 
frightful ; horrible ; terrible ; dread- 
ful ; horrid ; shocking. 

AFFRIANDER [»-M-an-d«] v. a. 1. 1 fc 
make, to render dainty ; 2. %to allure ; 
to entice. 

AFFRIOLEE [a-fri-o-i«] v. &. ^ to al- 
tare ; to entice. 

AFFRONT [a-fr6n] n. m. 1. affront; 
insult ; 2. dishonor ; discredit; 3. Am- 
miliation ; shame. 

— sanglant, outrageou s affr ont ; out- 
rag*. Avaler, boire un — 1^~ to pocket 
an = ; digerer mi — , to brook an = ; 
nenyer un — , to receive an = ; falre — , 
an — , to affront ; to offer an ■=. ; rece- 
volr mi — , to receive an = ; subir un 
— , to put up vAth an =. 

8a memoire lai fit — , his memory 
failed hirn. 

AFFRONT:^ E, [a-fron-u] adj. (her.) 
lAffrontee. 

AFFRONTER, v. a. 1. 1 § to face; 2. 
t (b. s.) to affroni (face) ; 3. t to deceive ; 
to cheat ; to take in. 

AFFUBLEE [a-fu-bl«] v. a. (de) 1. ! to 
torap up (in) ; 2. | (b. s.) to muffle, to 
muffle up (in) ; 3. J (b. s.) to dress out, 
•MP (in) ; 4. § to cover (with). 

AFFUSION [a-fu-.i6D] n. £ (pharm.) 
cffiisio7i. 

AFFtjT [a-fu] n. m. 1. watch ;^ catch; 
B. (artil.) (of a gun) carriage. 

A r — , 1. upoji tlie watch ; 2. in wait. 
Avoir Toeil a 1' — , to keep o.'s watch; 
■•Vtre a V — , 1. (de) to be upon the watch 
{Jor\ : 2. to Me in wait (far). 

AFFtJTAGE [a-fu-ta-j] n. m. 1. (hat) 
dressing ; 2. (tech.) (of tools) sharpen- 
ing ; setting ; wJietting ; 3. (tech.) ^ 
uf tools. 

AFFtlTEE [a-fu-ti] V. a. 1. to paint (a 
pencil) ; 2. (tech.) to set, to sharpen, to 
V)h^ (tools). 

AFFtTTIAU [a-fa-ti-6] n. m. J^" 
Itnick-knack ; bawble ; gewgaw. 

AFIN [a-fin] conj. 1. (de) in order 

!M ; 2. ig-ue) (subj.) in order (that) ; ^ so 
that). 

- - de, (inf.) in order to; to; — que, 
Vtioj.) 1. in order to ; 2. that ; so tMit. 

AFEICAIN, E [a-fri-kin. kA-n] adj. Afri- 

AFEICAIN, n. m. E, n. f. African, 

IT: i. 

AFRIQUE (L') [U-fri-k] p. n. £ Africa. 

^GA [»-g»] n. m. aga (Turkish mili- 
twy chielf). 

A.GAgANT, E [a-ga-.aii, t] adj. excit- 
ing; alluring. 

AGACE, AGASSE [a-ga-.] n. £ F! 

AGACEMENT [a-ga-i-man] n. m. 1. 
tetting (the ta^ th) ore edg» ; 2. irrUoMon 
'of tie nervef) 
14 



AGAOER Fa-gM*] V. a. 1. I to set (the 
teeth) on edge; 2. | to irritate (the 
nerves) ; 3. i to torment ; to plague ; to 
tease; to set on; 4. § to animate; to 
excite ; 5. § (b. s.) to exciU ; to allure. 

AGACERIE [a-ga-.-ri] n. £ allure- 
ment ; enticement ; enticing manner. 

Faire des — « a, to allure ; to set o.'s 
cap at. 

AGAME [a-ga-m] adj. (bot) agamous. 

AG AMI [a-ga-mij n. m. (orn.) agami; 
^ trumpeter. 

AGAMIE [a-ga-mi] n. £ (bot) crypto- 
gatny. 

AGAPE [a-ga-p] n. £ (theol.) agape; 
love-feast 

AGAPETES [a-ga-p4-t] n. £ Agapetce 
(unmarried women leading a recluse 
life). 

AGAR [a-gar] p. n. £ Hagar. 

AGARIC [a-ga-rik] n. m. (bot) agaric. 

— champfetre. eatable field = ; mush- 
room ; — femelle, de chene, des chirur- 
tiens, touch-wood. 

AGASSE [a-ga-.] n. £ F. Pie. 

AGATE [a-ga-t] n. £ a^ate. 

D'— , l.of = ; 2. agaty. 

A6ATHE [a-ga-t] p. n. £ Agatha. 

AGATHOCLE [a-g»-to-kl] p. n. m. 
(class.) Agathocles. 

AGATHYRSES [a-ga-ti-r.] p. n. m. pi. 
(anc. hist.) Agathyrsi. 

AGAVE [ft-ga-v] n. m. (bot) aga/ve. 

AGE [a-j] n. m. 1. age ; 2. age ; years ; 
^ tim^ of life; 3. age ; century. 

— avance, advancing age ; '\ time of 
day; bas — , infancy ; jeune — , 1. child- 
Iwod ; 2. young years ; moyen — , (hist) 
middle =« ; — moyen, mid = ; — mur, 
mature = ; = ; — nubile, — de pubert6, 
— hse marier, marriageable = ; — ten- 
dre, early age ; vieil —,l.old = ;=;2. 
oldness ; — viril, 1. manJiood ; 2. (law) 
man's estate; — d'airain, brazen = ; = 
of brass ; — d'argent, silver = ; — de 
discernement, (law) = of discretion ; — 
de fer, iron = ; — d'or, golden = ; — 
d'homme, (law) man's estate ; — de rai- 
son, = of discretion. D6faut d'— , wmit 
of ■=:; fleur del' — , prims of Ufe. A 
la fleur de 1' — , \. in the prime of life ; 
^ in o.'s prims ; in the flower ofo.'s = ; 
2. blooming ; k V— de . . . , at the=:iof 
...; at...yearsold; at...; atout — , 
at any and every = ; avant 1' — (de), by 
the = (of) ; d' — en — , fi-om = to = ; 
d' — , in years ; du jeune — , youthful ; 
du meme — , 1. of the sawe = ; 2. coeval ; 
en—, 1. ;«. years; 2. (law) offtdl = ; 
en bas — , of tender =: ; in infancy ; 
entre deux — s, middle-aged ; hors d'-— , 
l.^a«t= ; 2. (of horses) oW ,• aged ; hors 
d' — d'avoir des enfants, (pers.)pa«< bear- 
ing ; hors d" — de porter, (of trees) past 
bearing; pour son —,for o.''s-=, years. 
Atteindre V — de . . . ans, to reach . . . 
years of^= ; Stre d' — a, to be of an :^ 
to ; etre bien pour son — , to bear o.'s 
yea/rs well ; etre sur V — , to be in years ; 
etre en — , avoir V — , avoir atteint Y — , to 
heof =■; paraitre son — , to look o.'s =. 
Honore par 1' — , * time-honored; qui 
tire sur 1' — , elderly. Quel — avez-vous ? 
funo old are you f quel — me donnpriez- 
vous ? lunu old should you take ms to 
be? 

Ag6, E [a-j6] adj. 1. (DE, . . .) of age; 
old ; aged ; 2. aged ; old ; in years. 

1. — de dix ana, aged ten years ; ten years old, 
of agp. 'i. C'est un homme — , he is an aged, old 
man, a man in years. 

Un pen — , elderly. Personne plus 
— e, elder. 6tre — , to be aged, old, in 
years ; 6tre — de • . . ans, to be... years 
old, of age. 

A6ENCE [a-jan-i] a. £ (com.) agency 
business; a^ertcy. 

AGENCEMENT [a-jan-i-man] n. m. 
arrangement; disposition; ordering. 

AGENCER [a-jin-.6] v. a. 1[ to ar- 
range ; to d'ipose ; to order. 

:fetre agenoii, ( F. senses) to be dressed 
up, off. 

AGENDA [a-jiE-d»] c m. m.einoran^ 
dum-book. 

AG*NESIE [a-j«.n«.ri] n. £ (med.) 
sterility ; impotence. 

AGENOUILLKR (8') [la-j-noo-i**] pr. 



V. (devant, before, to) to kneti ; to kiva 
dawn. 

Agenouille, e, pa. p. kneeling; knocl 
ing down ; on o.'s knees. 

AGENOUILLOIR [a-j-nou-ioar*] n, a 

hassock. 
AGENT [a-jan] n. m. 1. 1 § agmt; i 

I fellow-agent; 8. (in Ireland) middle 
man ; 4. (admin.) -agent ; 5. (com.; 
agent; 6. (com ) (of a business) transaa 
tor ; 7. (philos.) agent. 

— eomptable, 1. accountant; 2. («*•; 
purser;— interm6diaire, (did) mediui/\ 
— monetaire, de circulation mon6tairc 
(polit econ.) circulating (nediv/m; sous 
— , sub-agent ; — d'aflfair,*, ageni ; — di 
change, stock-broker' aroker ; — di 
faillite, assignee of a bankrupt. 

AG:feSILAS [a-jfi-ii-iaa] p. n. m. (class.) 
AgesUaikS. 

AGEUSTIE, n. £ F Agueubtik 

AGG:feE [ae-jfi] p. n. m. Haggai. 

AGGLOMERATION [a-glo-me-ra-sion] 
n. £ agglomeration. 

AGGL0M:6r:^, E [a-glom^-^] adj. L 
agglomerated; 2. (bot) agglomsrated. 

AGGLOM^RER, v. a. to agglome- 
rate. 

S'agglomerer, pr. v. to agglomerate 

AGGLUTINANT, E [a-glu-ti-nan, t], 

AGGLUTINATI-F, VE [a-glu-tUna-u^ 
i-v] adj. (med.) agglutinant; aggluti- 
native; glutinative. 

AGGLUTINANT [a-gU-U-nan] n, m. 
agghitinant. 

AGGLUTINATION [tt-glu-U-ni-sian] 
n. £ (surg.) agglutination. 

AGGLUTINER [»-gia-ti-n«] v. a. ft) 
agglutinate. 

AGGRAVANT, E [a-gim-van, t] hO^ 
(law) aggravating. 

Circonstance — e, aggravation. 

AGGRAVATION [a-gra-va-.ionj a t 

aggraration ; atigmentation. 

AGGRAVE [a-gra-v] n. £ (can. Uw) 
second fulmiaiation qf a threatenint} 
monitory. 

AGGRAVER [a-gra-v«] V. a. to aggrcr 
vate (render more grave). 

AGGREDIR [a-grt-dir] V. a. t to at 
tack. 

AGGRfiGAT [a-gr^-ga] V. Aoreoat. 

AGILE [a-ji-l] adj. 1. agHe ; 2. nim- 
ble ; 8. active. 

AGILEMENT [a-ji-l-man] adv. 1. wilk 
agility ; 2. nimbly. 

AGILITY [a-ji-ii.t6] n. £ 1. agiMty ; 
2. nimbleness. 

AGIO [a-ji-o] n. m. (bank.) agio ; pre- 
m,iwn. 

AGIOTAGE [a-ji-o-ta-j] n. m. «toc*- 
jobbing ; jobbing. 

Faire V — , to gamble, to play in the 
funds, stocks. 

AGIOTER [a-ji-o-t«] V. n. to gamble, to 
play in the fwnds, stocks. 

AGIOTEUR [a-ji-o-tear] n. m. stock- 
jobber ; money-jobber ; jobber. 

AGIR [a-jir] V. n. 1. to att; l.todo, 
8. to act ; to operate ; to work ; 4 
(pers.) to behave ; to conduct o.'s self, 
5. (law) (contre) to proceed (against) ; 
to sue (, . .). 

— bien, 1. to act right; 2. (envebs) 1<> 
beha/ve handsomely {to) ; — bien envere 
q. u., to treat, to use a. o. well ; — con- 
formement k, to-=.up to; — librement 
avec, to make bold toith ; — mal, 1. to := 
wrong ; 2. to do wrong ; 3. (bnvers) to 
behave unha/ndsomely (to); — mal en- 
vers q. n., to treat, to use a. o. ill ; — poai 
soi, 1. to —/or o.'s self; 2. to set up f'/r 
o.'s self; — avec, to w«e ; en — avec, in 
deal by; — d'aprSs, to = u/pon ; — envei'B 
q. u., to do by. Etre port6 a — , to ft' 
vnduced to action; faire—, to ctiuse Ic 
= ; to make =; 2. to put, to set in »io- 
tion; 3. (tech.) to driAse. Qui fhlt — 
qui porte a — , (did.) motive. 

S'agik, pr. V. (imp.) 1. (de, to) to bt 
in question ; 2. to be the matter ; 8. H 
be at stake. 

1. II t'agit de choisir, tke queation ia to ekoose 

De quoi s'agit-il ? what is the matter 

II sagit de..., 1. fJie ^inestion is . .. 

is the question ; 'i. ... t« the matt<rr ; 8 
...is at stake ; II s'agit bien do . ., 1. . . 
is really the q uexi um in pMnt ; 2. (Iron 



AWC AGR 




AH 


ixfijoftte; «MJeu; #MJeiine; «flpeur; d«pan; in pin 


owbon; dK brun *Uliq.; 


•gnllq. 



Twy hat)e somethinff else to think of; II 
1© a"aglt pas de . . . , ...is not the quea- 
%3n, t/te point in question. 

AGIS9ANT, E t»-Ji-»^'^. '] adj. 1. act- 
ive ; 2. effi,cacious ; 8. (pers.) eii/fing ; 
busy : 4. buHUing. 

AGITATE UR [a-ji-ta-teur] n. m. agi- 
t'Uor. 

AGITATION r«-ji-t&-ii«n] n. C 1. I § 
Vjitdtien : 2. || shaking ; 3. || tossing ; 
t i stir ; 5. I § bustle ; 6. | motion ; 7. P 
ftyggin^ ; joggling ; 8. I waving ; 9. § 
ajitaUon ; dicturbing ; ruMe ; flutter'. 

Dans — , agitated, ruffled. Avoir de 
r — . ( V. senses) to be in agitation. 

AGITER [a-ji-t«] V. a. L '§ to agitaU ; 
'L 5 to shake ; 3. || to toss ; 4. 1 to stir ; 
5. I to move ; 6. to Jog ; to joggle ; to 
give a jog to ; 7. || to wave ; 8. 1 to strug- 
gle; 9. % to agitate; to disturb; to 
trouble; to disquiet; 10. % to ruffle; to 
flutter; 11. § to agitate (a question); to 
Mr ; 12. to/ret (liquids). 

— violemment, ( V. senses) § to con- 
vuZae. Que I'on pent — ,{V. senses) agi- 
table. 

AOITK, E, pa. p. ( F; senses of Agiteb) 

1. (til.) in agitation ; 2. in motion ; i. 
(pen.) disturbed ; restless; tmeasy. 

S'/».—A.a\T-k, KMU, trol'blA. The heart is 
<mB by a single sentiment, agiti by more than one, 
and trouble hy the disorder whicn they produce. 
Compassion emeut ; indi}fnatic>n at a crime, and 
I'lty for its perpetrator, ugitent ; love and jealousy 
tronb^ent the heart and the reason. 

S' AGITEB, pr. V. 1. 1 § to be agitated ; 

2. to shake; 8. 1| to toss; to toss about; 
4. !1 to stir ; to stir about ; 5. H to move ; 
to be in motion ; 6. | § to bustle ; l.\to 
jog; to joggle; ^.\ to wave: 9.1 (pers.) 
to he restless; 10. \ to struggle; 11. § to' 
he induced to action ; 12. %to be agi- 
tated, diehtrbed, troubled, uneasy ; 13. 
% to fret: 14. § to flutter; 15. (of ani- 
uujls) tob', restless ; 16. (of liquids) to be 
en, upon the /ret; 17. (of a question) to 
be agitattid ; 18. (of the sea) to nse ; to 
fj€t rough. ■ 

renvoi r — , (F! senses) to be agitable. 
Personne qui s'agite, ( V. senses) 1. Inist- 
Iv ; 2. Htruggler. 

A8LA:6 [a-gla-«] p. n. f (myth.) 
Aglaia (one of the Graces). 

AGLOM:fcRER. V. Aqglomerer. 

AGLOSSIE [a-glos-si] n. t (med.) loss 
if the tongue. 

AGLUTINER. V. Aggi.ittiner. 

AGNAT [ag-na] n. m. (anc. law) ag- 
nate. 

AGNATION [ag-nA-sion] n. t (anc law) 



A.GNATIQUE [ag-na-«-k] adj. (anc. 
!«w) agnatic. 

AGNEAU [a-gno*] n. m. lamb. 

— femelle, eice - =; ; — juineao, twin- 
ling ; — pasc&\, paschal ■=; — de lait, 
tucking = ; — .sans tache + , spotless =. 
Laine d' — , lamb's wool; peaa d' — ^ 
lambskin; petit d' — , lambktn. 

D'— , 1. of lamb ; 2. lamb-like. 

AGNEL [a-gnei*] n. m. agnel (old 
French gold coin). 

AGNELER [a-gns-u*] V. n. + to yean ; 
tu bring forth lambs. 

AGNELET [a-gn«-l«*] n. in.t lambkin. 

AGNELINE [a-gn«-li-n*] adj. i. % of a 
iamb. 

IjAn 3 — , lamVs wool. 

AGNi:S [a-gn^s*] n. f \. innocent, sim- 
ple gill; simpleton; 2. p. n. Agnes. 

Faire V- -, to play the simpleton. 

.'^GNITB [ag-nus] n. nn. (Rom. cath. reL) 
U/nus-dei. 

AGNU8-C.\STUS [ag-nus-kat-tu." n. 

ca, pi. — , (hot.) chaste-tree. 

AGNU8-DEI Ug-nua-dA-i] n. m. (Rom. 
<»*Ji. lit.) aynus-aii. 

AGONE [a-go-n] n. m. (ant) puhUo 
v.»f'r<j««, gam-e. 

t ombattant aux — s, (ant) agonistes. 

AGONIE [a-go-nil n. i 1. agony; an- 
polish ; pang ; 2. agony ; pdi^ys of 
keath ; deaVi^struggles. 

AT—, 1. di/mg ; «epiring ; in the 
pangs of death ; 2. at the paint of death; 
•f at death's door. SouffWr 1'—, to 'ago- 
niae; faire souflMr de* — s i , to agonize. 
Qui souffre 1'—, ag^nie&l ; qui fait 
JouflWr de» — e, agonising. 



AGONISANT, E [a-go-ni-zan, t] ad], dy- 
ing ; expinng ; in the pangs of death. 

AGONISER [a-go-ni-z«] V. n. to be dy- 
ing, ecepiring ; to be in the pangs of 
death. 

AGONISTARQUE [a-go-ni.-tar-k] n. 

m. (ant) officer wlio presided at tlie 
pubUo games. 

AGONOTHfeTE [a-go-no-t4-t] n. m. 
(class.) officer who presided at the sa- 
cred games (of the Greeks). 

AGOUTI [a-gou-ti] n. m. (mam.) 
agouty. 

AGRAFE [a-gra-f ] n. f 1. hook (to en- 
ter an eye) ; 2. hook and eye ; 3. clasp ; 
4 (arch.) cramp. 

— et porte, Jwok and eye. 

AGRAFER [a-gra-«] V. a. 1. to hook 
(into an eye) ; 2. to clasp. 

AGRAIRE [a-grJi-r] adj. agraHan. 

AGRANDIR [a-gran-dir] V. a. 1. l to 

enlarge ; 2. J to make, to render larger ; 
3. § to aggrandize ; 4 H to magnify ; 
5. I (in lengtli) to lengthen ; 6. | ^in 
width) to widen ; 7. § to raise ; to in- 
crease ; to augment ; 8. § to exalt ; to 
raise ; to dignify i 9. 1 § (b. s.) to ex- 
aggerate. 

1 . — une maisTin, to enlarge a hrmte. 2. — la 
taille, to make the fij/ur-. larger (to add to the 
stature). 3. — une famille, to aggrandize o /am- 
ilt). 4. Le microscope affrandti les objets, the 
microscope magnifies cojects. T. — sea pretentions, 
to raise, to increase o.> preteruioM. 8. — un su- 
jet donn^, to raise, to exalt a given subject. 9. 
Vous agrandissez sa fiiute, t/oa exaggerate his 
fault. 

Ageandi, e, pa. p. V. senses of Agran- 

DIR. 

Non — , ( V. senses of Agkandir) 1. | 
unenlarged : 2. § unaggrandized. 

S'agrandik, pr. v. 1. 1| f th.) to enlarge ; 
2. I (pers.) to enlarge o}s estate; 8. || to 
become larger ,• 4 § (pers.) to aggra/w- 
dize o.'s self; 6. I to be magnified ; 6. 1 
(in length) to lengthen ; 7. 1 (in width) 
to widen ; 8. § to rise ; to increase ; to 
augment; 9. § to be exalted, raised, 
dignified. 

AGRANDISSEMENT[8-gran-di-s-man] 
n. m. 1. I enlargement; 2. | making, 
rendering larger; 8. § aggrandize- 
m»iit ; 4 I magnifying ; 5. J (in length) 
lengthening ; 6. (in -wKdiVti) vddewing ; 

7. S raising ; increase ; augmentation ; 

8. § exaltation ; raising ; dignifying ; 

9. § (b. 8.) exaggeration. 
AGRAVER. V. Aggraver. 
AGR^ABLE [a-gr«-a-bi] adj. (sub.) (a, 

to ; DE, to ; de, to) 1. agreeable ; plea- 
sa7it; 2. pleasing: 3. * grateful; * 
plea.ntrable ; 4 (pour, to) acceptable 
(to) ; 6. desirable ; 6. § welcome ; 7. (to 
the senses) comfortable ; 8. (to the taste) 
palatable. 

1. Un lieu — , an agreeable, pleasant ^/a«e ; une 
pcrsiinne — , an agreeabln, pleasant person. 2. 
Des nianieres — s, pleasing manners. 3. Des Amo- 
tions — «, pleasurable emotions, fi. Oes nouvelles 
• — s. welcome iuteltigence. 1. Maison ou feu — , 
comfortable house or fire ; vAtement — , comforta- 
ble ch'ihing. 

Peu — , ( V. senses) 1. unpleasing ; 2. 
ttm acceptable. — au gout, palatable. 
Avoir pour — ,to allow; to permit; 
faire V — auprfes de, to play the agreea- 
ble, to pay co^trt to. Ayez pour — , al- 
Imo ms ; permit me ; tiiill it be agree- 
able to you t 

AGR^ABLEMENT [ a-gr«-a-bI8-man ] 
adv. 1. agreeably ; pleasantly ; 2. pleas- 
ingly; gratefidly; 8. pleasurably; 4 
acceptably ; 5. (to the .senses) comfort- 
ably ; 6. (to the taste) palatably. 

AGRAe [a-gr«-«] n. m. solicitor, attor- 
ney (to the tribunal of commerce). 

AGR^ER, V. a. 1. to accept; to re- 
ceive ; 2. to a/pprove ; 8. {que, subj.) to 
allow ; to permit. 

3. Affr'tfiz que je vous dise, allou) me to tell you. 

AGR:fiER. V n. ^a, . . .) to please. 

Cela ne liii n<r"e pas, that does not please him. 

AGRT^ER, V. a. + V. Grkee. 

AGU:6GAT [a-gr«.ga] n. m. (did.) ag- 
gregat.e 

AGRliIGATIF, VE [•-r«-ga-tif,l-T ] 
adi. aqgregatvoe. 

AGRltGATION [a-gr«-g4.i!an] n. f 1. 

aggregate; 2. (th.) congregation; as- 

i semblage ; 8. (pers.) admission (ln»© a 



body); 4 (chem., phys.) aggregoHoni 
5. (univ.) fellowship ; 6. (unlv.) ABonu* 
nation for thefeUmcship. 

Concours d'— , (univ.) examfnation 
for the fellowship. 

AGR^Gfi, E ra-gr«-j«] adj. 1. (bot) 
clustered; 2. (chem.) aggregate; ft. 
(did.) aggregate. 

AGRI^^G:^, n. m. (univ.)/«jKow. 

AGRi^GER, V. a. to admit, to roatjbe 
(into a public body). 

AGR:^MENT [a-gr«.man] n. m. 1. (XTTk 

sent ; approbation ; 2. agreeableneM : 
pleasantness; 8. plea»ingne.ss ; gratt- 
flcation; grat^ulnese ; 4 * pleasv/ra- 
bleness ; 5. pleasure ; charm ; 6. orna- 
ment (of clothing, furniture) ; 7. (to the 
senses) comfort ; 8. (mus.) grace. 

Art, talent d'— , accomplishment.; 
note d'— , (mus.) grace-note. Sans — , 

Lr. senses) 1. micomfortable ; comfort- 
ss; 2. uncomfortably. Qui ne laisae 
pas d' — , comfortless. 

AGRi:S [a-gT«] n. m. (pL) (mar.) rig- 
ging, sing. 

AGRESSEUR [a-gri-seur] n. m. ag- 
gressor. 

D'— , aggressive. £tre 1' — , to he the 
aggressor ; to aggress. 

AGRESSION [a-gr4-«i6n] n. t aggres- 
sion. 

Faire une — , to make an ^ 

AGRESTE [a.gr*8-t] acy. 1. agresHe; 
wild; 2. rural; sylvan; 3. (b. a.) rut- 
tic; rude. 

AGRICOLE [a-gri-ko-l] a^j. agriotO- 
tural. 

Industrie — , agriculture; husbamdri/. 

AGRICULTEUR [a-gri-kul-teur] n. m. 
1. agriculturist; 2.husbaMdmMn, ; tilf 
ler. 

AGRICULTURE [a-gn-kul-td-r] n. f L 
agriculture ; 2. husbamdry ; tillage. 



D — ' o/= ; agricultural. 
AGRIE [a-gri] - • ■■ 



n. £ (med.) h^trptu (n 
species of tetter). 

AGRIFFER (S') [sa.gri-f«;|pr, v. {A,te 
to cling by its claws ; to chng. 

AGRIGENTE [a-gri-jin-t] p. n. (aoo 
geog.) Agrigentum. 

AGRIPAUME [a-gri.p6-m] n. t (bot) 
(genus) 1. motherwort ; 2. wild palm, 

AGRIPPEK [a-gri-p6] V. a. to matoh; 
to snatch up. 

AGRIPPINE [a-gri-pi-n] p. n. C (daae.) 
Agrippina. 

AGRONOME [a-gro-no-m] n. la agri- 
culturist 

AGRONOMIE [a-gro^K-ml] I. t ogri- 
ouUure. 

AGRONOMIQUE [a-gro-no-ml-k] o^J. 

agricultural. 

AGROSTEMME [ a-gro-»ti-m ] n. ni 
(bot) 1. rose campion; campion-roee; 
2. corn-cockle. 

— des jardins, rose-campion. 
AGROSTIDE [a-gro-sti-d] n. £, 
AGROSTIS [a-gro»-tU] n. m. (bot) 

bent-grass. 

— stolonifdre, foHn. 
AGROUPER [8-grou.p«] V. a. (astr.) to 

group. \ 

AGRYPNIE [a-grip-nl] n. C (med.) 
agrypmia; wakefulness. 

AGUERRIR [a-gh6-rir] 7. a. 1. | to iji- 
u/re to wa/r; 2. § (a, to) to inwre; to 
season. 

Agxtkeri, k, pa. p. F: senses of Agoihi 

EIR. 

Non — , tminured ; -unseasoned. 

S'agttereir, pr. v. 1. to become aceu^ 
tomed, inured to war ; 2. to become ao- 
customed, in ured, used (a, to). 

AGUET8 [a-gh6] n. m. (pi.) % waU 



Personne aox — , 1. person o^, vpon 
the watch ; 2. lurker ; 3. person on iAt 
look-out. Aux — , 1. in wait ; 2. on, 
upon ^ts watch; on the look-oui; den 
— , lurking, fitre, sa tenir aux — . 1. to 
lie in watch ; 2. to lurk ; S. to He on, 
upon the watch, loot out Mettre q. a 
atix — , to set a. 0. on the watch. 

AGUEU8TIE [a-geu-att] n, t (med.) 
loss of taste. 

AGUIMPER [a-ghia-p*] v. •. t to ^Mf 
in a tucker. 

All [a] Int ah. 

15 



AIR 



Aia 



AlO 



amal; din&le; «f6e; ef6ve; ^IBte; rfje; iil; ille; omol; 6 mole; imort; msuc; ^sure; c>u jour; 



AHEURTEMENT [a-heur-t-man] n. m. 
<%tmacy ; stubbornness. 
AHEURTER (8') [sa-heur-w] pr. v. (i.) 



lo &« obsUimte, stubborn (iJt) ," ^o ie 
vedded {to) ; ^ to stick (to). 

AHI [a-iflntF. AiE. 

AHURIR [a-a-rir] V. a 1. to astound ; 
•^ to dvmfoum.der ; -r- to strike all of 
it heap ; 2. tojiurry. 

Ai, ind. pres. 1st sing, of Avoir. 

AI \k\ (termination of the first person 
alagular of the indicative preterite of 
twbs of tlie first conjugation). 

Al [a-i] n. ni. (main.) ai ; sloth. 

AICHE, i;CHE [4-ib] n. t (fish.) bait 
(worms). 

AICHER [6-8h6] V. a. (fish.) to put a 
U)orm on (a hook) ; to bait. 

AIDE [4-d] n. £ 1. aid ; help ; assist- 
ance ; 2. succor ; relief; 3. aid (tax) ; 
4. parochial chapel ; chapel of ease ; 5. 
(man.) aid. 

A r— I help! k V— de, tcith tlie =. 
aid of; avec 1' — de, (pers.) by the aid 
of; en — , in. aid ; sans — , 1. imaided ; 
mihelped ; wnassisted ; 2. "unbefriend- 
ed ; 8. imbacked ; 4. (b. 8.) tmabetted. 
Appeler k T — , to call for = ; donner — 
et protection, to grant aid and protec- 
tion ; prater — kq.vu,to give a. o. = ; 
preter — et assistance, to lend aid and, 
assistance ; venir k 1" — de q. u., venir 
en — kq. u., to come to a. o.'s aid. Dieu 
solt en — k...\ God ?ielp ...! Ainsi 
Dieu me, vous, soit en — ! so help me, 
you, Ood I 

8t/n.—\\nM, SBCOUK8, appui. Aide U that 
which a person aakt, when unable to perform the 
dnties with which he is chareeii ; teeoitn is what 
cne implores, when too weak to meet alone the 
attack of an enemy ; appui ia what'one requires, 
when incompetent to irmintain bis position, or too 
weak for the situation in which he finds himself 
pkced Aidt is a service to us in heavy labors , 
teoim, in danger ; appui, at all times. Rlan in his 
hslnleisness has recourse to religion, which he 
finds an appui {support) amid the labors and trials 
of life, which vields him stcfurs {succor) agabist 
the attacks of tne passions, and aide (aid) in his ef- 



(orutolendi 



life. 



AIDE [4-d] n. m. 1. assistant; 2. 
htipar ; 8. coadjutor; 4 (comp.) uti- 
d«r- ... ; 5. (mar.^ mate. 

mafon, — k m&^oji, laborer ; — 

ehfettigien, swrgeotCs mate ; — de cai- 
•ine, vnder-cook; — des ceremonies, 
assistant master of ceremonies ; — ma- 
lor, adj'jiant; — du patron, masters 
mate ; — canonnier, quarter-gxm,ner. 

AIDE DE CAMP [J-d6-kan] n. m., pL 
AiDBS DK OAMP, (mil.) aid de camp. 

— du roi, 1. king's = ; 2. (in England) 
lord in icaiting. 

AIDER U-dS] V. a. 1. (db, with ; k, in, 
to); to aid; to help; to assist; 2. to 
ruccor ; to relieve ; 8. (law) to comfort. 

— ou assister, (law) to aid and assist ; 

— k avancer, to help forward, on ; — k 
avoir, to Ivelp on; — k descendre, 1. to 
help dmon ; 2. to hand down ; — a en- 
trer, 1. to help in ; 2. to hand in. into ; 

— k marcher, to help on ; — k monter, 
1. to help tip ; 2. to Jiand up ; — a pas- 
•er, surmonter, traverser, to help over ; 

— k relever, to help wp ; — a sortir, 1. to 
fteto ovZ ; 2. to hand out. Pour — . . . , 
( Y. senses) in aid of 

8'aider, pr. V. 1. to aid, to help, to 
assist one's self, one another ; 2. to act ; 
io bestir o.'a self; 8. (de) to make tise 
(.of). 

— Tun I'autre, to aid, to help, to assist 
tach otlier. 

AIDER. V. n. 1. (a, . . . ; d, in, to) to 
aid; to aid, to help, to assist (a. o. mo- 
mentariiy) ; 2. (a) '/> aid (in a. th.) ; to 
contribute (to) ; to promote (...); to 
fi<0ther (..)). 

:■ aq. a. qui tombe,fa)'ielpa. o. <Aa« ie falling. 
%. ' in snccti de q. ch -o contribute to the suc- 
i-t^ f a. Ik. ; — a une entreprise, to further an 

- a la lettre, to n^Jd to the matter. 
r*en aidant, loifA 0"j s help. 

AlE [a-f] int. oh I 

AiB, impera. 2d sing. ; subj. pres. Ist 
^^. of Avoir. 

AiENT, subj. pres. 8d pi. 

Aies, «ubj. pres. 2d sin p 

AIENT [i] (t«'rmln%tion of the third 



person plural of the Imperfect tense of 
the indicative mood, and of the present 
tense of the subjunctive mood of verbs). 

AIEUL [a-ieui] n. m. 1. (pi. Ai'EULs) 
grandfather ; * grand-sire ; 2. (pi. 
AiEux) ancestor ; forefatlier ; * father ; 
sire. 

Les deux — s, the paternal and riM- 
ternal grand-fathers ; the two grand- 
fathers. 

AlEULE [a-ieu-i] n. f. grand-motTier. 

AIGE p-jtn. £ (med.) white spot on 
the pulpit of the eye. 

AIGLE [fc-gi] n. m. 1. (om.) eagle 
(genus); 2. § star; great genius; 8. 
eagle (American gold coin) ; 4. (of 
churches) reading-desk ; 5. (astr.) aqwi- 
la; eagle. 

Grand — , (sta.) grand eagle ; double 
elephant. — royal, (om.) golden, ring- 
tailed = ; — de mer, (om.) sea eagle,. 
Pierre d' — , (min.) atites ; = -stone. A 
vol d' — , ** = -winded ; a la vue de 1' — , 
= -sighted ; aux yeux «!'— , qui a des 
yeux d' — , = -eyed; = -sighted. D' — , 
aquiline. 

AIGLE, n. 1 1. (her.) eagU ; 2. (Rom. 
hist.) eagle. 

AIGLETTE [i-gU-t] n. £ (her.) eaglet. 

AIGLON [6-gi6n] n. m. 1. eaglet; 2. 
(her/) eaglet. 

AIGRB [*-gr] adj. 1. | acid; sour; 
tart; 2. § sour; tart; sharp; acri- 
monious; harsh; 8. § (pers.) acrimo- 
nimvs; sour; crabbed; churlish; 4. 
(of the air, wind) sharp ; piercing ; 5. 
(of metals) brittle ; eager ; 6. (of odors, 
taste) musty ; unpleasant ; 7. (of sounds 
sharp; shrill; 8. (paint.) (of colors) 
harsh. 

2. Des paroles qui sont — », words that are sour, 
sharp, acrimonious. 

Son, ton — , shrillness. A Pair—, 
bitter looking. Avec un gofit — , mus- 
Mp ; d'un son, d'un ton — , shrilly. 

AIGRE, n. m. 1. 1 acidity ; sourness ; 
tartness ; 2. (of the air, wind) sharp- 
ness ; piercingness ; 8. (of odor, taste) 
miMtiness ; unpleasantness. 

Sentir 1'—, to smell musty, tmplea- 
sant ; tirer sur T — , to be somenehat acid, 
sour. tart. 

AIGRE-DOU-X, CE [4-gr8-don, ofi-s] 
adj. 1. fl between sweet and sour; 2. § 
sourish ; tartish. 

Parler d'un ton — , to speak with af- 
feHed gentleness ; to disguise the real 
bitterness of one's meaning. 

AIGREFIN [J-grs-fin] n. m. $ ^?- 
sharper. 

AIGRELET, TE [i-gr8-lj, t] adj. | § 
sourish ; tartish. 

AIGREMENT R-gr8-min] adv. §acri- 
moniwisly ; sourly ; tartly ; sharpVy ; 
harshly. 

AIGREMOINE [4-gr8-moa-n] n. £ (bot) 
agrimony ; lirer-^rort: 

ATGREMORE [i-grg-mo-r] n. m. pul- 
verized charcoal (for fire-works). 

AIGRET, TE [e-gre, t] adj. I sourish; 
tartish. 

AIGRETTE [i-gr*-t] n. f 1. (of birds) 
egret; aigret; aigrette: head-dress ; 
If tuft ; 2. egret (ornament) ; 3. (of fea- 
thers) tuft; 4. (bot) egret; 5. (mil.) 
tuft ; 6. (om.) (of the owl) horn ; 7. (om.) 
(of the peacock) crext; 8. (om.) egret; 
9. (phys.) aigrette ; bnish. 

— 8 luminenses, (ptiys.) himinmis 
aigrette. H6ron — , (orn.) egret ; maca- 
que — , (mam.) egret. A — , 1. (orn.) 
crested ; 2. tufted. 

AIGRETTE, E [*-grJ-t8] a.^. with an 
egret ; tufted. 

AIGREUR [^-greur] n. £ 1. 1 acidity ; 
sourness, tartness ; 2. § sourness ; 
sharp-icss, t(irtr.£ss ; acrimo^vy ; harsh- 
neso ; '3. § (pers.) acrimony ; sourness ; 
crabbeAness ; chv/rUsh/ness ; 4. — s, (pi.) 
(engr.) harsTmess ; 6. — s, (pi.) (med.) 
acidity of stomach. 

Avec — , harshly. Avoir de 1' — dans 
I'hunieur, I'esprit, to be of a sour, cross 
disposition ; ^ to be oross-grained. 

AIGRIR [i-grir] V. a. 1. I to sowr ; to 
turn sour ; to turn ; 2. § to sour ; 8. § 
to etrasperate ; to incense ;■ to embitter ; 
4. J to increase , to augment 



2. — le caractfere, io sour the temper. 3. — q. n, 
to exasperate, to incense a. o. 4. — la douleur, l< 
mnl. tf inrreftse the pain, the disease. 

S'aigrir, pr. V. 1. B to sour ; to turn 
sour ; 2. § (of the temper) to sour ; 8. $ 
to become exasperated, incensed ; 4. J 
to increase ; to augment 

AIGU, £ [*-gu] adi. 1. 1 acwto ,• sharp- 
pointed ; 2. 1 § sharp ; 3. (of P»ln) 
acute ; 4 (of sound) sharp ; shrill ; 6. 
(geom.) ac^ite; 6. (gram.) acat,e ; T. 
(med.) acute ; 8. fmus.) shrill. 

Son, ton — , shrillness. D'une iiv» 
nit^re — 6, 1. sharply ; 2. acutely. Fatre 
un son — , to shrill; rendre plus — 
(med.) to exacerbate. 

AIGUADE [i-ga-d] n. t. (nav.) 1. 
water; supply of water ; 2. waterinf- 
place. 

Faire — , to water. 

AIGU AIL [i-ga-i*] n. m. (hunt) de»- 
drop. 

AIGUA YER j;i-gh4-i«] V. a. 1. to watef 
(horses) ; 2. to nnse (linen). 

AIGUE-MARINE [i-g-ma-ri-n] n. £, 
pi. AiGTTES-MAKiNES, (jewel.) aqua ma- 
rina. 

AIGUi:feRE ri-gM*-r] n. £ ewer. 

AIGUli;;R:feE J>-ghi«-rt] D. £ $ ewerfuU. 

AIGUILLADE [i-gui-ia-d*] n. £ goad. 

AIGUILLAT [i-gui-u*] n, m. (ich.) 
needle-fsh. 

AIGUILLE [4-gui.i*] n. £ 1. needle ; 
2. (of a balance) indea> ; 3. (of a compass) 
needle ; spindle ; 4 (of dials, clocks, 
watches) hand; 5. (of steeples) spire; 
6. (ich.) ac«s ,• horn-fish ; 7. (min.) 
needle ; 8. (rail.)^ai«i ; pointer; switch. 

4. La grande— , 1' — des minutes, the mimitt 
► hand ; la petite — , V — des heures, the hour hand. 

— aimant^e, de boussole, animated, 
magnetic, magn^tical needle; — fine, 
fne = ; — de berger, (bot) lady's comb; 

Venus's comb ; — k contre poids, (rail) 
self-acting pointer ; — k coudre, sewing 
= ; — a emballer, pack- ■=■; — de m«r, 
(ich.) hom-Jish ; — a passer, bodkin ; — 
k repriser, a reprises, durmtig ^ ; — t 
tapisserie, embroidery, carpet, rug s= ; 
— k tfete argent6e, dor6e, gold-eyed, til- 
ver-eyed = ; — k tricoter, knitting- =, 
Chas, trou d' — , eye of a =i; febricant 
d' — s, = -maker, mamifactwrer ; on- 
vrage a 1' — , = -work. En — , acerous ; 
in the form of a =■. Cristalliser en — , 
(crystal.) to needle; se cristalliser en — , 
(crystal.) to needle ; disputer sur la pointe 
d'une — , to dispute about a pin's point ; 
enfiler une — , to thread a = ; prendre 
la forme d'une — , (crystal.) to needle; 
travailler k V — , to do = -work ; to work 
at o.'s = ; to work. 

AIGUILLilE [4-gui.i«*] n, t needle- 
ful. 

AIGUILLETAGE [8-gai.i-ta-j«] n. m. 
(riAv.)f rapping ; seisting. 

Faire un — , to seize. 

AIGUILLETER [i-gui-i-t«*] v. a.(n»v.) 
to f rap ; to seize ; to mouse. 

AIGUILLETIER [4-gui-i-ti6*] n. m. 
tagger. 

AIGUILLETTE [4-gni-iJ-t*] n. £ 1. 
aiglet; 2. (of flesh, of skin) slice; 8. 
(nav.) sennit ; 4. (nav.) knittle ; 5. (nav.) 
tricing-line ; 6. (nav.) (of stoppers) lai^ 
yard. 

— ferr^e, tagged aiglet. 
AIGUILLEUR [i-gui-ieur*] n. m.(raiL) 

point-turner ; pointsman ; switcher. 

AIGUILLIER [A-gui-i«»] n. m. 1. (th.) 
needle-case ; 2. (pers.) needle-maker. 

AIGUILLON [^-gni-ion*] n. m. 1. | 
goad ; 2. § (a, to) spur ; incentive ; sti- 
mulus; incitement; 3. (of insects, ser- 
pents) «Wn(7 ,• 4 -f thorn ; 5 (bot) stim/a- 
lus; \ prickle. 

Anne d'— s, (bot) prickly ; ponm; 
d' — 8. (did.) aculeate. Briser 1'— de 5> »< 
unsting. 

AIGUILLONNER [i-gni-io-n**] v. a. L 
1 § to goad ; 2. § (a, to] to spur ; to »pi*r 
on; to stimulate; to incite. 

Action d' — , goading; stimulation; 
personne qui aiguillonne §, stimulator. 

AiGuiLLONNE, B, pa. p. ( V. seDses oi 
AiouiLLONNER (did.) aculeate. 

Non — §, unstimulated. 

AIGUILLOT [4-pil-lj*] n. jn. (jm.\ 
arch.) pintle. 



\m. 



AIR 



AIS 



ozi joute; «»MJeu; eujeftne; »& P«iir; dn pan; In pinj an, bon; mw brun; •ll liq. ; *ga Ilq. 



AIGUI8EMENT [i-gui-z-man] a. m. 
1 1 whetiing ; sliarpeniTig. 

AIGUISER [^-gui-zfi] V. a. 1. 1 to whet; 
to sharpen ; to edge ; to (/ise an edge 
to; 2. 1 to 8?uirpen ; to whet ; Z. % to 
fwicken ; 4. § io point (an epigram). 

■2 — I'app^tit, to sharpen, to whet the appetiU. 
i. — I'esprit, to quicken the mind. 

Pierre h — , h^ie. 

AIGUISEEIE [i-gni-i-ri] n. C (cut) 
thcp wliere instruments are sharpen^. 

AIL [ai] n. m., pL Aulx, [6] (bot.) (ge- 
4ns) garlic. 

— sterile, eschalot. Gousse d' — , clove 
if garlic ; garlic-liop ; gousse, t6te d' — , 
head of garlic. 

AILE [S-I] n. f. 1. S § iBvng; 2. ** 
pinion ; van ; fam, ; 3. (of armies, fleets) 
xoing ; 4 (of cliurclies) aide ; aile ; 5. 
(o'' tlie nose) ala ; 6. (of pinions) leaf; 
. (of* windmills) /Mi. ,• 8. (arch.) vrnig ; 
9. {hot.) vying; 10. {hoto\.)fly ; 11. (nav.) 
rung 

Battel v.ent de Y — , 1. flapping of th« 
= ; 2. flickering; bout d" — , pinion 

i quill) ; coup d' — , flap ; — de derive, 
nav.) lee-lcard; — de pigeon, (nav.) 
»ky-8orap.T. Aux — s rapides, swift- 
toinged; svuift of^\ k tire d' — , at a 
tingle flight; sax X — ,onthe^=. Avoir 
le8 — s rapideo, to be swift-winged, ; to 
be snoift of-=:. , en avrir dans 1' — 1. not 
to be what ont, woa ; I. to be in love ; 
arreter, retenir les — «", ( t pinion (by fast- 
ening); attelndre, Mft«er, frapper il' — 
to vying; battro des — s, 1. to beat o.'a 
=s; 2. to flO/p ; 8. (*ilc.) to bate ; ne 
battre plus quo d'uije — , to be almost 
over with a. o. ; couf er le bout de 1' — k, 
to pinioih ; t>oii ler, preter des — s, to give 
=s to; to wing , etendre ses — s, 1. to 
spread o.'s ~i; 2. (falc.) to mantle; 
frapper de 1'—, to flap ; munir, gamir 
d' — s, to vyMiQ ; porter, transporter sur 
des, ses — s, to vying; rogner les — s a q. 
n., to clip a. o.'s =« ,• tirer de 1' — (vers), 
to make z=. (to) ; trembusser de 1'—, to 
jU^ih»r ; to flutter ; voler de ses propres 
— «, ^ to stand upon o.'s men legs ; vou- 
k>ir voler sans avoir des — s, to try tojiy i 
■without =.s. II en a dans 1' — , there is a ' 
aoreto loose ; qui n"a pas d' — , toingless. 

AILE [e-l] n. f. ale (beverage). 

Brasseur d' — , = -brewer ; cabaret oft 
I'on debite de V — , = -lumse; debitant 
d' — , = -house-keeper. 

AIL% E \_h-\i] adj. 1. toinged; 2. (bot) 
tcinged ; 3. (her.) winged. 

L'enfant — ,Love; Cupid. 

AILERON [6-i-ron]n. m. l.pmMm; 2. 
(of a wam-whee\) float-board ; 3. (Ich.S 
(of some fishes) fln ; 4 — 8, pL (nav.) 
rudder-boards. 

AILETTE [fe-ii-t] n. f. 1. (arch.) mnaU 
vying ; 2. side-lining ; 8. (a. & m.) wing- 
let ; 4. (nav.) decking ; side-boards, 

AILLADE [»-ia-d*] n. f. garUo-sauct. 

AiLLE. sub), pres 1st 3d sing, of Allkb. 

AILLEURS [»-ieur*] adv. 1. else- 
cohere; 2. somewhere else; anywhere 
e>«e. 

NuUe part — , nowhere else ; d' — , 1. 
I (of place) elseficJiere ; some, anywhere 
else; soms, any other place ; %~%from 
tome other cause ; on anot/ier account ; 
8. § besides ; moreover , 4 § in addi- 
tion to which. 

AIMABLE, [J-ma-bl] adj. 1. lovely 
(worthy of being loved); 2. (pour, to; 
de, to) amiable ; 3. endearing ; 4 {de, 
tn) kind ; 5. agreeable. 

1. La vertii est — , wirtMie lovely; 5. Des mani- 
res — B, ag^reoable Tnannert, 

Pen—, 1. imloveiy; 2. imamidble ; 
Sk unkind. Faire 1' — , to play the agree- 
able. 

AIMABLEMENT [4-in»-bl»-m«n] adv. 
X amiably. 

AIMANT, E [i-man, t] adj. loving; 
affectionate. 

> ... _. nmlomnJj; tmaffectionate. 

AIMANT [i-man] n. m. 1. loadstone ; 
■magnet ; 2. § magnet ; 3. (mln.) load- 
itonA. 

— artificiel, artifloial loadstone ; 
pierre d' — . =; magnet. Pole de T — , 
mugneno pole. Armer un — , to arm, 
\o cap a =, magnet 

3 



AIMANTfi, E [e-ma..,.t6] adj. (pliys.) 
m,(i(/netic. 

Aiguille — e, =, anim.ated needie ; 
barreau — , 1. artificial magnet ; 2. 
(com.) artificial loadstone ; pierre — e, 
loadstone ; magnet. 

AIMANTER, v. a. (phys.) to magn^et- 
ise. 

S' AIMANTER, pr. v.(phYs.)to magnetise. 

AIM£, E [h-mi] adj. loved ; beloved. 

Bien — , beloved ; well-beloved ; dear- 
ly loved ; mieux — , best beloved ; nou, 
peu — , unloved ; wnbeloved. 

AIMEE [J-m«] p. n. £ Amy. 

AIMER, V. a. 1. to love (with ardor, 
affection) ; to be fond of; 2. (d, to ; que 
[subj.]) to like ; to be pari/ial to ; to 
home a partiality for ; \to be fond of; 
3. (d) to like (. .) ; to delight (in) ; to be 
fond (of) ; ^^ to be in lore (with). 

1. — Dieu, see pdre et mdre, ses enfauts, son 
prochain, sa patrie, to love GiKi, o.^e father and 
mother, o.> chil'fren, o.'a neighbor, o.'a countrt/. 
9. — tout le uionde, «o like every body ; — le fruit, 
to like/rwt(. J^aiitte quMl fasse cela, / like him to 
do titat. 3. — a lire, to like reading, to delight in 
reading. 

Ne pas — , 1. not to love ; not to be 
fond of; 2. to dislike ; not to like ; not 
to be partial to ; — mieux, to pr^er ; to 
give tlie preference to ; to like better 
(to) ; to choose rather (to) ; had, would 
rather ; — passionnoment to bepassion- 
ately fond of; — tendrement to love 
dearly, tenderly ; — k la folie, — 6per- 
dument, to love to distraction ; — k Tido- 
latrie, to idolize ; — sa personne, to love 
o.'s dear self. Faire — , 1. to endear ; 
to make (a. o.) beloved; 2. to make 
(a. o., a. th.) liked. J'aimerais mieux, / 
had ratlier; I would rather; qui 
n'aime pas, 1. unloving; 2. that dis- 
likes. Qui n'est pas aime, 1. unloved ; 
2. disliked ; indigne d'etre aim6, un- 
lovely. Qui aime bien chiitie bien, he 
chasteneth that loveth well ; ^ spare 
the rod and spoil the child ; qui m'aime, 
aiuie inon chien, love me, love my dog. 

Aime, e, pa. p. V. senses of Aimer. 

Bien — , 1. loved ; beloved ; well-be- 
loved ; dear, dea/rly loved; 2. (subst) 
love ; true love. 

mean* to love; 



"■ 8igni 

iliat love by tenderness and attention*. We amumt 
in general all that pleases as; but we eherissone 
only persons, or what forms a part of ourselves, as 
our ideas or our prejudices. An infant is otten 
cheri by those who cannot ai/ner its father or 
mother. 

Si/n. — ArMB« MiBDx, aimer pliis. Both of 
these expressions indicate preference, but the first 
does not imply that there is any attachment to 
either of the two objects compared, while the sec- 
ond does imply such attachment. An upright 
person aimerait mie-ux {-would rather) be dishon- 
ored by the foulest calunmies, than dishonor him- 
self by the slightest wrong to another, because he 
aime pill) (luvei) justice (more) than bis standing 
in the eyes of the world. 

8' AIMER, pr. V. 1. to love o.'« self; to 
tefondofo.^sself; 2. to love each other, 
one another ; 3. to like o.'s self; 4 to 
like each other, one another; 5. t (a) 
to delight (in) ; to take pleasure (in) ; 
to like (. . .) 

AIMEZ-MOI [J-m«-moa] n. C (bot) 
marsh scorpion-grass. 

AINE r^-n] n. f. groin. 

AtNi;,E [4-n«] adj.l. «W«r; adest; 
2. senior ; 8. (com., school) senior; Sr. 

AtN^fe, n. m. E, n. f. elder ; senior. 
AINESSE [6-n^-e] n.f. X primogeniture. 

Droit d' — , birvi-right ; primogeni- 
tureship. 

AINSJ [m-ti] adv. 1. so, thtia ; * even 
so ; 1 in mis, that manner, way ; 2. so. 

Comme ... ainsi ..., a« ... so ; et — du 
reste, et — de suite, et — des autrea cho- 
ses, and so on, foi'th ; il en est — , ^ 
c'est — , so it is ; s'il en est — , ^ si o'est 
— , if so ; ^ if it is, be so ; il n'en est pas 
— , «f ce n'est pas — , not so ; it is not so: 
— 8oit-il I so be it I pour — dire, as it 
were. 

AINSI, conj. so ; thus ; therefore. 

— que, 1. as ; so as ; * even as ; tn 
the same manner as; 2. as well as; 
and . . . likeiwise, too ; 1^ along with. . , . 

AIR [er] n. m. 1. J air ; 2. § air ; look ; 
appeAtravce ; mien ; *>. § manner ; 
way ; 4 S l^ft ;fa.<ihio^ ,• 5. $ air ; tune ; 



6. (chem.) air; 7. (man.) air; 8, (iniM.) 
air; 9. (paint, sculp.) air. 

— abatcu, downcast air, look; — cha- 
grin, sour =, look ; — 6veille, sharp 
look; — farouche, forbidding =, ^>ok; 
— infect malfaisant malaria;— ilbjn, 
open — ; — rapide, (mua) flowivh; — 
renferme, confined = ; — vicie, X. JboJ 
= : 2. choke-damp; — k bolre, drjnjt 
ing := ; — de gaiete, cheerful cownli 
nance; — , aire de vent (nav ) point q/ 
the compass ; point. Boitc k — , (tecl^; 
= -box; capacite de V — , (mach.) = 
-space; chateau en 1' — , castle in the =:\ 
=1 -castle; cote de V — , (mill.) weather; 
coup d' — , cold (in the head or chest) , 
courant d' — , draught; draught of-=-\ 
exposition k 1'—, 1. (action) airiness ; 8. 
(state) airing; impermeabilit6 k 1'-—, 
(nat phil) state of being air-tight; pro- 
menade pour prendre 1' — , airing ; mo- 
yenne region de 1' — , mid-^^. iilevd 
dans r — , airy; in the ■=^; impermeable 
a r — , (phys.) = - tight. Dans T — , in tht 
= ; dans les — s, ** in the ■=■ : on h%gh ; 
de bon — , 1. genteel ; graceful ; 2. gen- 
teelly ; gracefully ; des — s, airy ; t^the 
= ; en 1'—, 1. J airy; \ in tlie = ; 2. | * 
on high; 3. § ^ (th.) idle; em^pty ; 4 
J^~ harwm scartim, ; 5. § (pers.) in a 

flutter ; en plein — , 1. in tlie open = ; 
2. out of door, doors ; without doors ; 
8. itnlwused; entre deux — s, in a 
draught ; sans — , vyithout = ; * airlese. 
Avoir r — , 1. (b. s.)to glare ; 2. to mako ; 
avoir 1' — ...,to make a ... appearance ; 
to look ...; avoir T — dei, to. look like ; 
avoir 1' — malade, to look ill ; avoir T— 
bien portant to look well ; avoir nn — . ., 
to make «... appearance ; to look, . . , ; 
changer d' — , to have a change of-=\ 
donner de 1*— k. renouveler 1' — dans, 1- 
to air; to let the = in; 2. to ientiZato; 
se donner des — s, to give o.'s self=tj 
^ to sli/yw =is ; |^^ to shmo a'« 6^1/ Qf{ 
se donner un — de, to give o.^s self an. =» 
of; exiMwer a Taction de 1'—, (a. <fc nu) }'i 
weatlier; fendre les — s, ** to pltryo'i 
the ■=. ; jouer un — rapide, (mus.) to siivct 
up a flourish ; lancer en 1" — , (of horrioo 
cattle) to toss; mettre q. ch. k V — , to put 
a. th. in the=:; to air; ouvert k P— , 
airy ; eayposed to the = ; perdu dans lee 
— B, airy ; lost in tlie = ; [)arler en 1' — , 
to talk idly; pren<lre des — s, to give 
o.^s self-=» ; 1 to show =zs ; prendre T — , 
to take the =, an airing ; faire prendre 
r — (k), to give an airing (to) ; prendre 
un — (de), to give o.'s self an = (of); 
prendre un — de feu, to war-m o.'s s^f 
at tliefl/re. Par lequel 1' — sort, (mining) 
(ofapit)M/>ctf«t 

AIRAIN [6-rin] n. m. 1. I brass; 2. ) 
brass (boldness) , brome. 

Age, si^cle d— , brazen age; front 
d' — , brazen face ; qiialit6 propre k 1 — . 
ressemblance k \ — . brassir^efs. A fi^nf 
d' — , brass-visaged ; brazen-btowea ; ^ 
brazen-faced; aux pieds d'— , braeen- 
footed ; d'— , 1. i § brassy ; brazen ; 2. 
§ of steel (hard). Avoir un front d'— , ta 
have assurance, -— brass ; avoir nn 
coeur d' — , to be hard-hearted ; durcif 
comme 1'—, to brome ; inontrer un fron» 
d' — , to brazen ; rendre dur cotnme 1' — , 
to braze; travailler en — , to wcrk in 
brass. 

AIRE [*-r] n. f \.area (space) ; 2 (cf a 
barn) floor; thrashing-fljor ; 8. (oj 
birds of prey) aerie; eyr-y ; 4 (bnllu.) 
platform,; 5. (geom.) area; space; u 
(tech.) area. 

— de murs, walled area ; — de p .m- 
cher, (mas.) ptigging. 

AIR:fiE [h-ri] n. f. b(tf -i-floor full. 

AIRELLE [4-ri-l] n. f. (bot) 1. (?c.r.nr 
whortle-berry ; 2. bilberry ; 8. aK£> 
berry. 

— mvrtille, des bois, ouderry. ' 
AIRER [A-r«] v. a. (of bird* of proy) 

to huild an, its aerie, eyry. 

AIS [4s] n. m. 1. plank; board; % 
(print) wetting-board. 

— de bateau, ship-plank ; — de boa- 
cher, butcher's block. 

AIS [41 (termination of adjectives prim- 
cipally fonned by names of nations) isK 
AIS (Wirmination of the first and «<• 
i" 





AJU 


ALA ALU 




a ma) : d m&le : e fee ; e f^ve 


« f6te ; i je ; t il ; t ile : o mol ; /) mole ; 6 mori ; it sue ; H sure ; <w jonr ; 



»nd persons singular of tlie iinj,erfect 
iense ot the Indicative mood of verbs). 

AI8ANCE [A-«an-«] n. £ 1. eaue ; facu- 
lty; 2. ease ; freedom ; 8. ease; com- 
ftnri; competency ; 4. — s, (pi.) water- 
eloset; necessary ; privy. 

UoBTfete — , com,petency. Cabinet 
rl' — , ileux d' — , icitter-closet ; neces- 
sary ; pnvy ; fosse d' — , cesspool. 
I-Vbo — , 1. (pers.) loith ease; 2. (th.) 
Kmifortdbly ; dans 1'—, at o.'i'ease ; in 
1 etatt of competency ; in easy dr- 
3:mstan-c^ ; 1 well off; sans — , 1. un- 
MnyfortahU ; 2. tmconifortahly Avoir 
de r — , etre dans P — , to have a cx>m,pe- 
Unc-y ; to be at o.'« ease ; to be in easy 
circumstances ; ^ to he well off. 

AISE [i-z] adj. [que [subj.], dk) glad 
(of, to) ; pleased (at, to) ; luippy (to). 

J 'en suis bien — , / am very jflad of it, 1 am much 
pleiised at it ; je Mils fort — Ats I'apprendre, / am 
ftry (flad, happy to hear it ; je anis bien — que ce 
soil ainsi, / am very glad, liappy it i> to. 

Bfen, fort, trSs , very glad, happy ; 

much, very m/uch pleased. 

Syn. — Aisg, contknt, ravi. SucceM, though it 
aiHV concern u> only indirectly, makes u« bien 
«»'»« ; the accomplishment (if our deeires, so far as 
Uiey concern us personally, renders us contentt ; a 
strong impression of pleasure makes us ravia. 

AISE, n. f. 1. gladness ; joy ; graUJi- 
ention ; pleasure ; 2. ease ; conveni- 
ens ; — s, (pi.) comforts. 

A r — , 1. at ease ; 2. comfortable ; at 
o.'a = ; 8. easily ; a son — , 1. a< = ; 2. 
in earn/ circvmstances ; ^ well off; 
g^ beforefutnd with the world; 8. 
eomfbrtable ; 4. comfortably ; 5. ivnem- 
barrassed ; nial a son — , imeasy ; un- 
comfortable. Aimer ses — s, to like to 
indulge o.'s self; mettre a 1'—, 1. to put, 
U> let at = ;2.to make a. o:eam ; 8. to 
tet up ; ee mettre k son — , to take o.'s 
= ; se mettre beaucoup trop a son — , to 
■Make much too free ; to take too great 
liberties ; ^ to make o.'s self too much 
lit home ; en prendre k son — , to take it 
fU o.'s = ; en prendre bien a son — , to 
'uke it much at o.'s — • se sentir mal a 
xm — , ne pas se sentir h V — , to feel un- 
otmfortahle; etre ravi d' — , to le over- 
joyed; tressaillir d'— , to leap for j»y. 

AlgE, E \k-Tf,] adj. 1. (d, to; impers. 
(fo, t») easy; 2. easy ; con/venient ; com^ 
ntodioua ; 8. (persj at o.'s ease ; in earn/ 
nlreunuftances ; T weU off. 



Sm.—Aiai, facilk. Both these words mean 
without difliculty ; but/octVe properly excliides the 
iifficulty wUch proceeds from obstacles and oppo- 
•jition ; aiti, that which springs from the nature of 
the thing Itself. Thus we say the entrance is 
faeile, when there is nnthnig to obstruct it ; that it 
in ahe, when it is large and convenient to pass 

AIsifcMENT [;-««.man] adv. 1. easUy ; 
B. easily ; convenienUy ; commodi- 
vusly. 

AisSELIER [i-s«.li«] n. m. (carp.) 
brace. 

AISSELLE \i.^-\1 n. f. 1. arm-pit; 2. 
(anat) axil ; a»iUa ; 8. (bot) aa-U ; aa-- 

Creu.T de 1'—, arm-pit. 

AISSIEU, n. m. t V. Kssieit. 

AIT [e] (termination of the third per- 
lon singular of the imperfect tense of the 
lidicative mood of verbs). 

aitiologie,f: foioi-oGiK. 

AJONC [a-jon] n. m. (bot.) 1. (genus) 
/Vrs<? ; 2. furze ; whin ; a prickly 
iniom. 

— d'Enrope, furze ; whin. Convert 
i-*i/ursy. 

A.JOUKNEMENT [a-jonr-n-mar] n. m. 
u (A, to) adjournment ; 2. postpone- 
'/.A/nt 3. (law) SHmmons. 

— Ind6fliil, adjournntent sine die ; — 
f in jugement criminel, (civ. law) am- 
ti (ation. 

AJOUENER [a-jour.n«] V. a. (A, to) 1. 
i> adjourn ; 2. to postpone ; to defer ; 
iyput off; 8. (law) to sum,mon. 

— Ind6flnlment, to adjourn sine die. 

H'ajoubnkr, pr. V. 1.' to adjown; 2. 
V be pnntjponm, deferred, put off. 

AJODTAGE U jou-fc.-j] n. m. (a. Am.) 
iHecs adiled on 
18 



AJOUTER ra.jou-t«l v. a. 1. (a, to) to 
add ; 2. (i., . . .) to embeUish (add to) ; 8. 
(falc.) to imp. 

— au conte, k la lettre, to embellish a 
story ; -7- to stretch ; — a la fin, (gram.) 
to suffix ; — foi a, to give credit to ; to 
believe. En ajoutant, in addition to. 
Sans rien — , 1. without adding a. th. ; 
2. ^ without more speech, ado. Qui 
^oute, additory, 

AJOUTOIE, n. m. V. Ajutage. 

AJUSTAGE [a-jus-t«-i] n. m. 1. ad- 
justing ; 2. (tech.) fitting ; 8. (tech.) 
mUl^wrigMs work. 

Atelier d' — , miU-wrigMs sfiop. 

A.IUSTEMENT [a-jus-t8-man] n. m. 1. 
I § adjustment; 2. | sizing ; 8. tally- 
ing ; 4. letting ; 5. arrangement ; fit- 
ting ; doing tip ; 6. D apparel ; attire ; 
toilette ; dress ; 7. 1 ornamental part 
of dress ; 8* § agreement ; 9. § adjust- 
ment, settlement (of a difference); 10. § 
reconciliation; 11. (civ. law) transac- 

A JUSTE, A.JUST, AJUS [» ju-st, just, 
ju] n. m. {nay.) fast. 

AJUSTEE, v. a. 1. B § (a, to) to adjust; 
2. I to «&« ,• 8. 1 § (a, vnth) to tally ; 4. 
j (a, to) to fit; to adapt; 5. B to aAm (a 
gun) ; 6. 1 to aim at (a. o., a. th.) ; to take 
aim at ; 7. 1 to arrange ; to do, to fit up ; 
8. B to dress (a o.) ; 9. | (b. s.) to trick 
off, out, up ; to tnm wp ; 10. § to make 
(a. tb.) agree ; 11. § to adjust, to settle 
(a difference) ; 12. | to reconcile (a. o.) ; 
13. (build.) to trim in, up ; 14. (carp.) (by 
planing) to shoot ; 15. (tech.) to fit 

4. — une pijce au theatre, «.y adnjit a p/ay to (he 
>tage. 1. — une maison, to fit up a hou>e. ' 10. — 
d«-8 passages d'un livre, to make pauagetof a Ix^ok 
agree. 

— bien q. u., — comme il faut, to set a. 
o. to rights. Personne qui ajuste, 1. ad- 
juster ; 2. trimmer. 

Aju8tk,e, pa. p. F; senses of A jtrsTEK. 

Non — ,{V. senses of Ajuster) 1. un- 
adjuHted ; 2. untrimmed.^ 

S'ajuster, pr. V 1. 1 § (a, to) to be ad- 
justed ; 2. I (A, witli) to tally ; 8. i (a, 
to) to fit ,• 4. B to prepare ; to get ready ; 
5. 1 (pers.) to dress ; 6. B (b. s.) to trick 
o.'s self off. Old, up ;7. § (a, tcith) to 
suit ; to agree ; 8. § (a, to) to reconcile 
o.'s self; to be reconciled ; 9. (tech.) (a, 
into) to fit 

A.TUSTETTE [a-jus-tetir] n. m. 1. (mint) 
adjuster ; 2. (tech.)^<tor ,• 8. (tech.) mill- 
wright. 

A.llTTAGE, AJUTOIR [a-ju-ta-j, toar] 
n. m. (hydraul.) adjutage ; spout (of a 
water-pipe). 

ALABASTRITE [a-la-bas-tri-t] n. C 
(min.) ahdiastrites ; alabaster-stone. 

ALAIN [a-lin] p. n. m. AUen. 

JLALIK [a-la-li] n. f. (med.) inability 
to speak. 

ALAMBIC [a-lan-bik] n. m. (chem.) 
alem/dc ; "till. 

Passer par 1" — , 1. I to pass through 
the = :2.^ to Kit't thoroughly. 

ALAMBIQU:^. E [«-lAn-bi-kc] adj. § 
strained ; wire-drawn,; fine-spun ; far- 
fetched. 

ALAMBIQUER [a-ian-bi-k«] V. a. §1. 
to pitzzle (the brain, the mind); 2. to 
strain ; to roire-draw. 

S' — Tesprit, la tfete, topuezle o.'s brain. 

ALARGDER [a-iar-gh^] V. n. J (nav.) 
to fall of; to sh«&r off. 

ALAEMANT, E [a-Iar-man, t] adj. 
(pouK, to ; die, to) alarming. 

D'une mani^re — e, alarmingly. 

ALAEME [a-lar-m] n. f. 1. alarm ; 2, 
■uneasiness ; 3. (mil.) alarm. 

Chaude — , great alarm ; fausse — . 
(mil.) false =. Cloche d— , = -hell. 
Dans r— , in a state of=: Donner des 
— s a, to gime um^asin^Jis to: to make 
■uneasy ; porter V — dans, to alarm ; re- 
venir de ses — s, to recover from o.'s =: 
sonner 1" — , to sound an =. 

5'/n.— Alarmk, apprkhkxrion, ^iffroi, tkr- 

RECR, EPOUVANTE, CEAINTE, FRAYKUR, PEl'R. 

Alarme is produced by what one hears ; appr'hci^ 
tion, by what one expecu ; 'ffroi, by « hat one 



one presumes ; 



' imagines ; ep*tuvant«, by i 
U, by what one knows ;/rai 



oos afarnif : tb« sguality 



> apprehension ; the oigtt 
oi ; the loss of the battk 
quences spia.d < 






J'rayeur ; one has peur ot I 
ALARMER [»-Iar-m*] 



AlbivA 



k. Mticda, 



_,.&.to alarm. 

Sans etre alarm6, ■without taihC 
alarmed ; * ■u/tialai-med. 

S'alar.mer, pr. V. to alarm ».'» 0^^-' 
to be alarmed. 

ALAEMISTE [a-iar-mu-t] n. au ncu: 
mist 

ALATERNE [a-la-tir-n] n. m. Oj'-t 
alatem. 

ALBANAI8, E [ai-b».n4, i ] a^. and p. 
n. m. t. Albanian. 

ALBAN IE (L") [lal-ba-ni] p. n. £ (geog.) 
Albania. 

ALBATRE [al-ba-tr] n. m. 1. (min.) 
alabaster ; 2. § altihqster ; snowy whiio- 
ness ; whiteness. 

Faux — , (min.) alabaster-stone. D' — , 
1. B of alabaster ; alabaster ; 2. § of ala- 
baster ; snowy-white ; snovyy. 

ALBATROS [ai-ba-tros] n. m. (orx) 
albatros. 

ALBEEGE (al-bftr-j] n. £ (bot) alboi gt 
(small early peach). 

ALBEEGIEE [al-b«r-ji«] n. m. (botl 
alberge-tree. 

ALBINOS [al-bi-nos] n. m. albino. 

ALBION Lai-bUt" z. £ " '" 
(England). 

La nouvelle — , New =. 

ALBEAN, V. Halbran. 

ALBUGIN:^, E [ai-bu-ji-n«] adj. (an«t 
albugineous. 

ALBUGINEU-X, 8E [al-bu-jl-ned, •*-•; 
adj. (anat) albugineous. 

ALBUGO [8l-bn-g6] n. £ (med.) a/feuflv- 

ALBUM [al-bomf n. m. L aib'umi a 
scrap-hook ; sketch-book. 

ALBUMINE fai-bu-mi-n] n. t aUm- 
men ; ^ white (or an egg). 

ALBUMINEU-X, SE[ri-bs-iu-a.4, .»«? 
adj. albuminous. 

Cordon — , treadle (of an i 

ALCADE [al-k«- ' 
caid (of Spain). 

ALCAlDE [ai-ka-i-d] a m. alcodo, oi- 
caid (of Morocco). 

ALCAlQUE [al-ka-i-k] adj. (6r. »iu« 
Lat vers.) alcaio. 

ALCAlQUE, n. m. (Gr. and Lat veruj 
alcaic. 

ALCALESCENCE [al-k»-UMin-j] t. / 
(chem.) alkalescency. 

ALCALESCENT, E [«l-ki^U^iin,.| 
a^j. (chem.) alkalescent 

ALCALl [ai-ka-li] n. m. (chem.) aUcai 

ALCALIFIABLE [ai.k»-li-fi-»-bl] a<y. 
(chem.) alkaliflable. 

ALCALIMETEE [al-ka-U-mi-tr] n. in. 
(chem.) alkalimeter. 

ALCALIN, E [ai-ka-iin, i-n] adj. (chem.) 
alkaline. 

Substance — e, (chem.) alkaline. Een 
dre — , (chem.) to alkalify. 

ALCALISATION [al-ka-U-i4-«5n] n. t 
(chem.) alkalization. 

ALCALISEE [al-ka-U-z6] v. a. (chem.) 
to alkalize. 

S'alcalirer, pr. v. (chem.) to alkalize. 

ALCANTAEA fal-kan-ta-ra] p. n. m. 
Alcantara (Spanish military order). 

ALCAEAZAS [al-ka-ra-zasj n. m. 1. <rf- 

carraza ; porous earth ; 2. aZcarraza ; 
water-cooler. 

Al^CtV. [al-s*] n. f (bot) hoUyhock. 

— rose, = ; — a feuilles de figuler.Tt? 
leaved =. 

ALCJ^lETai s«] p. n. m. (class) Aloonin 

ALCESTE [ai-s4s-t] p. n. £ (myth.).d,. 
cestis. 

ALCIIIMIE [ai-shi-mn n. £ atchoTT^. 

ALCIIIMILEE [ai-sh .•ni-i*]n. t Owt. 
(genus) lady's nuintle. 
" — commune, = ; — des cbunpa, j>an> 
ley-piert 

ALCIIIMIQUE [aisti-mi-k] t^. aicho 
mic ; alchemical. 

Par un proc<id6 — , by an = prooeao 
alchemicallv. 

ALC/llMISTE [al-ehi-miii-t] n. HL (Ji 
clietnist. 

D" — , alchemistlc ; alchmnisticaL 

ALCIBIADES [al-si-bi-Sr-d'' p. a in 
(class.) AlcUiiatlejt 



ALE 



ALl 



ALK 



ou lofite; eu ieti; eti jeune; ei pear; an pan; in ,'^n; on bon; un brun; *11 liq. ; *gn llq. 



ALCIDE [ai-.i.d] p. n. m. (myth.) Al- 
ridea (an appellation of HercHlesV 

ALOM:feNE [sik-mJ..r.] D. n. f. ^myth.) 
Alcmena. 

ALCMfiON [alk-m4^n] p. n. ni. (class.) 
Alcnur-on. 

.4 LCOOL [al-ko-ol] n. m. (chem.) aieo- 

.iliCOOLIQUE [«l-k«^li.k] aA}. 
'(■JwiK.) alcofuiiic. 

J»L000LI8ATI0N [al-ko-o-h.xA-.i6n] n. 
£ fo'jein.) (tlcoholiziMon. 

ALC^OOLISER [al-ko-o-ll-»6] v. a. 
fefecTi) to alcoholize. 

ALOOOLOMilTKE [al-ko-o-lo-m^-tr], 

ALOOOMETRE [al-ko-o-m4-tr] n. m. 
'phys.) alcohomster. 

ALCOKAN [al-ko-ran] n. m. alkoran ; 
boron. 

ALCOVB [al-kft-v] n. t (of a room) al- 
oove ; receHH. 

ALCYON [ai-w-on] n. m. (orn.) hal- 
cyon. 

ALCTONIEN, NE [al-u-o-ni-in, 4-n] 
»dj. halcyon ; hcdoyoriian. 

ALDfiBARAN [aidi-ba-ran] n. m. 
(astr.) aldehnrun. 

ALDERMAN [aI-dJr-m»n] n. m. alder- 
man. 

D' — , alderrmmly. 

AL:6AT0IRE [a-l«-a-toa-r] adj. (law) 
'of contracts) contincent. 
' ALECTON [a-Uk-ton] p. n. f (myth.) 
Alecto (one of the Furies). 

ALECTOROMANCIE [a-lik-to-ro-mAn- 

rf] D. £ dimnation by meuiis of a cock. 
■ ALEGRE [a-iJ-gr] V. Allkore. 

AL^NE [»-l«-n] n. C tshoenuiker'twwl; 
yu>l. 

En — , (did.) awl-shaped. 

ALfeNIER [a-l«-K;«] n. m. awl-m<iker. 

ALlfeNOIS ta-16-noa] adj. (of cresses) 
oommon garden. 

Cresson — , (bot) = crem. 

ALENTIE, V. a. + F: Ralentir. 

AIJINTOUR [a-iiii,t>ur] adv. armmd; 
^ ahtyut. 

\y — , = ; siMrTOwndvng ; neighboring. 

ALENTOURS [a-lan-tour] n. hl (pi.) 1. 
t^lnces oromul ; 2. environs, pi. ; neigh- 
h-^hooi ; 8. (pere.) persons, people 
oi>'yjt arjuind. 

1»M — 8, aroimd; av/rrormding ; 
n^ .iiboring. 

AL]5:0UTIENNES (LE8 tLES) [!«- 
Bl-itt-l«-ou-ti-A-n] p. n. £ pi., the Aleutiam, 
Islandn. 

ALEP ra-lipl p. n. m. (geo^.) Aleppo. 

AL;^PINE [a-l«-pi-n] n. C bombazine. 

AL^.tlION [a-i«.ri-6n] n. m. (her.) 
tpread eagle (without beak or feet). 

ALEETE [a-ler-t] adj. 1. (A, in; d, to) 
alert (vigilant); 2. sharp; quick; 3. 
uprightly; Uvely. 

— 1 qvdck ! be on your guard / 

ALERTE [a-i4r-t] n. C alert 

En — , on, upon the =. 

ALfiSAGEVa-i^-'a-J] n. m. (tech.) \. 
lor^ng; 2. drilling. 

ALESER [a-W-««] V. a. (tech.) 1. (hori- 
tontally) to bore ; 2. (vertically) to drill. 

Machine k — , 1. boring-machine ; 2. 
drilling-machine. 

ALl<:80IR [a-W-.oar] n. m. (tech.) bor^r 
(instrument). 

ALl5:SURE [a-l«-zar] n. f. borings. 

ALEVIN [»-l-vin] n. m./ry (fish). 

A LEVIN AGE [a-1-vi-n.-j] n. m. smull 

ALEVINER [»i-Ti-n<,] V. a. <o stock 
u>:ih/r>/. 

ALEKANDRE [a-lek-.an-dr] p. n. m. 
I. AlexawUr; % (class.) Paris; a 
■«;'88s.) Alese^mder. 

ALEXANDRIE [a-lik-ian-drt] p. n. C 
'iMs) A leaxindria. 

ALtXANDRIEN, NE [a-lik-ian-dri-in, 
I «] adi. Aleie^ifi^lri'An, (of Alexandria). 

.i.Li;XANDRIN [a-l^k-.an-drin] adj. 
.Ters.) (deonamdrine. 

ALEXANDRIN [a-i6k-«an-drin] n. m. 
(vBrs.) atca-a/ndrine. 
" ALEXIPHARMAQTTE [a-Uk-.i.lar- 
fi»-k] adi- (pharro.) aleicipharmic. 

ALEJilPIIARMAQUE, n. m.(pharm.) 
ileaeipharm/ic ; antidote. 

ALEXIPYE:feTIQUE, r«-l*k-.i-pi-r6- 
' kl adi. an 1 n. OL (meA.) febrifuge. 



ALEZAN, E [a-l-.8n, »-n] adj. (of 
horses) chestnut 

— saure, sorrel. ChevA — , chestnut- 
horse ; couleur — saure, sorrel. 

ALEZAN [a-i-ian] n. m. cliestnut- 
horse. 

ALi:ZE [a-lfe-i] n. t (med.) sheet 
(folded square). 

ALFANGE [«l-faD-j] n. f. % phalanx, 
battalion (Tartar, Chinese). 

ALGALIE fai-ga-li] n. f. (surg.) cath«- 
te,. 

AL6AN0N [ai-ga-non] n. m. cha/tn 
(for galley-slaves). 

ALGARADE [ai-p.-ra-d] n. £ L in- 
mdt; affront; 2. J^~ rating; -r- set- 
ting doicn; -i- blowing up. 

Faire une— k q. u.. ^W" to rate a. 
o. ; to give a. o. a rating ; -i-to bf.ow 
a. o. up. 

ALGATRANE [al-ga-tre-n] n. t pitch 
(for calkine vessels). 

ALGEBRE [al-j*-br] n. f (math.) alge- 
bra. 

— 616mentaire, nivmeral algebra ; — 
speciale, literal, specious =. C'est de 
r — pour Ini, it ii unvntelligible to him ; 
^ it is Greek to him. 

ALGfiBRIQUE [ni-ji-bri-k] adj. alge- 
braic; algehraicat. 

ALGlftBRIQUEMENT[al-j«-bri-k-man] 
adv. algebraically. 

ALG:fiBRISTE [al-j«-bri8-t] n. m. alge- 
braiat. 

ALGER [al-jf] p. n. in. (geog.) Algiers. 

ALGliRIE (L) [Ial-j6-ri] p. n. £ (geog.) 
Algeri<i. 

ALG^RIEN, NE [»i-j«-ri-in, *-n] adj. 
Algeririe. 

ALGliRIEN, n. m. NE, n. £ Alge- 
rine. 

ALGIDE [al-ji-d] adj. (med.) cold. 

Sentiment — , (med.) algor. 

ALGOR [al-gor] n. m. (med.) algor. 

ALGORITHME [al-go-rit-m] n. m. 
(math.) algorithm. 

ALGUAZIL [ai-goua-iil] n. m. algua- 
eil. 

ALGUE (al-g) n. £ (bot) 1. alga ; 2. 
icrack; Z. sea-wrack ; A. flag ; 5. — s, 
seaweed -tribe ; aigce. 

— marine, if wrack grass ; t **« 
icrack grass. Des — 8, qui a rapport aux 
—8, algous. 

ALIBI [a-U-bi] n. m., pi. — , (law) 
alihi, 

Prouver V — , son — , to prrme am. •=.. 

ALT BILE [al-i-bi-l] adj. (med) idible; 
nutritive. 

ALIBOEON [»-li-bo-r6n] n. m. (fable) 
1. grizzle; loTig-ears; 2. ignorannis. 

Maitre — , 1. = ; 2. (pers.) long-ears ; 
am. 

ALIBOTJFIER [a-li-bon-6^] n. m. (bot) 
(genus) storaa: 

ALI15:NABLE [a-U-«-na-bl] adj. (law) 
alienable. 

ALI*:NATAIRE [a-li-«-n«-a-r] n m. 
(law) alienee. 

ALITiINA-TEUR [a-li-^-na-Ufir] n. m. 

TRICE [tri-s] n. £ alienator. 

ALI15:NATI0N [a-li-«-na-.idn] n. f 1. 

laliemdion (of property) ; 2. %(diena- 
tion (of the heart mind) ; estrangement 

— mentale, d'esprit t. m^ental aliena- 
tion ; = of mind ; insanity ; livmmy ; 
derangement ; 2. (med.) vesania. rtu- 
reau de 1'— des biens, (law) alienation- 
office. 

ALi:feN:fi, E [a-li-«-n*] adj. 1. 1| (of prop- 
erty) alienated ; 2. § (of the affections, 
the mind) alienated ; estranged : 8. 
(pers.) (of the mind) deran^ged (mad). 

Non — , (law) untramsferred. £tat — , 
cMenation. 

ALI:6n;6, n. m. E, n. C lunatic ; m<i- 
niac. 

Hospice pour les — s, maison d' — s, lu- 
natic asyliMn ; ^ moii^Jwuse. En — , in- 
sanely : like a lunatic. 

ALIGNER [a-u-e-n*] V. a. l.\io alien- 
ate (property); % % to derange (the 
mind) : 3. § <o alienate (the aflfections, 
the mind). 

Capacity d'etre ali6n6 1, (law) aUen- 
ability ^ 

S'altenib pr y % to alienate 'the 
affections); io'estrange. i 



ALIF4:RE [a-li-ft-r] adj. alifbrow, 
beariiig icings. 

ALIGNEMENT [a-li-gn-maa*] n. m. 1 
line (of a garden, road, street, waii, etc.); 
straight line ; 2. (mil) dressing ; line ; 
3. (print) ranging. 

— I (mil.) (command.) dress ! — k gau- 
che, a droite! (mil.) dress left, right t 
fitre d'— , to be in a line ; se jeter es 
dehors de V — , to fall outofline ; prendfo 
des — s, to lay oiit, to trace by ms Une, 
prendre 1" — de, to trace the line of, 
rentrer dans T — , to fall into Une. 

ALIGNER [a.ii-gn«*] V. a. 1. « io toy 
out, to trace in a line, straight Une; 
%%to square ; to pid into precise or- 
der ; 8. (mil.) to dress ; 4. (print) to 
range. 

Aligne, k, pa. p. ( V. senses of Alionicb) 
in a line. 

S'aligner, pr. V. (F. senses of Ali- 
gner) (mil.) to dress. 

ALIGNOIR r«-ii-gno8r*] n. m. iron 
wedge (used in siato-qujirnes). 

ALIGOUFIER [a-U-gou-fi*] n. m. (bot) 
storax. 

ALIMENl [i 'i-man] n. m. 1. 1 %food; 
aliment ; nutrition ; nutriment ; i. 
end (food in the first stomach of rumlsft- 
ting animals) ; 8. S/j^^i ,• 4. (law) alloto- 
once; estovers, pi; 5. (rmW.) feed. 

Consignation d" — s, (law) muking al- 
lowance. Sans — , I. wWwutfood; 2. 
imfed. fttre 1' — de q. u. ^ <o be a. o.'t 
food, aliment ; ^ to be metit and drink 
to a. o. ; consigner des — s (pour), (Jaw) 
to make an all^otoance (to). 

ALIMENTAIRE [a-li-m.in-t*.r] adj. 1. 
alimentary ; feeding; 2. (med.) ali- 
mental. 

Canal, tube — , (physiol.) (dimeniary 
canal, duct ; pension — , (law) 1. main- 
tenance ; 2. (to a >vife) aUm^my ; proNt- 
sion — , (law) estovers, pi. ; quality de « 
qui est — , alimentariness. 

ALIMENTATION [a-li-man U-JSn] a 

£ 1. alimentation; feeding; feed; i 
(tech.) feeding ; feed. 

Appareil d' — , (tech.) 1. filler; 3. 
feeding-apparatus ; rigoie d'— , (engliu) 

1. feeder ; 2. artificial fteder ; taysr. 
d'— , (tech.^ feed-^pe. 

ALIMENTER [a-li-man-W] v. t L U 
to fe^ed ; *to nurture ; 2. § to sufdtjiti ; 
to stcpport ; to keep alive ; to wwrse ; 
8. II (of combustibles) tofeM ; tofueL 

Alimente, e, pa. p. V. senses of Au- 

MENTER. 

Non — , 1. 1 v/nfed ; unnurtured ; 3. | 
unsustaitisd ; unsupported ; un»up- 
pUM. 

ALIMENTEU-X, SE [a-li-mKn-wn, .d-.] 
adj. (med.) alimental ; nutritive, 

ALINfiA [a-li-n6-a1 n. m., pi. — , \. par- 
agraph ; 2. (print) break. 

Nouvel— , (print) break. Compost 
d" — . paragraphic. Par — ,pa/ragraph- 
ic<dly. ifecrire, former des — , to paror- 
graph. Faire un — , to begin a nena 
paragraph. 

A LIQUANTE [a-U-konan-t] adj. (math.) 
aliquant 

ALIQUOTE [a-U-ko-t] adj. (math.) cdi- 
quot. * 

Methode des parties — s, (arith.) prac- 
tice. 

ALIT^, E [a-li-t«] adj. bed-ridden. 

ALITER [a-li-w] v. a. <o confine M 
o.'s bed ; ^ to lay up. 

S" A LITER, pr. V. 1. to take to o.'s bed; 

2. to keep o.'s bed. 

Ne pas s"— , not to take to o.'s bed ; ^ 
to keep 11/p. 

KlATUf.V r«-H-W] p n. £ AUthea. 

ALIZARI [a-U-ia-ri] n m. maddor 
root; lizari. 

ALIZE [a-ii-i] n. £ (bot) beam-ti-ifi. 
berry. 

KLlZt [a-U-z«] adj. 

Vents — s, trade-rm-' ia 

ALIZIER [« a-ii«] L. m. (bot) boon 
tree. 

— blanc, := ; white =;. 

ALKALI, V. Aloali. 

ALK^KENGE [a!-k«-kan-i] n. m. (bW. 
alkakengi, tointer cherry. 

.\LKER Mi;S [ai-kir -nAr] n. m. (phaim. 
alkennet. 

19 





ALL AL 


L ALL 




amai; dmale; it&e; <Jf6ve; ^fBte; cfje; ill; iile; 


mol; 6 mole; 6 mort; w sue; & sftre; ou Joui , 



ALIxAII [»-li] n. m. AUah (the Maho- 
motaas' name for Ood). 

ALLAITEMENT [»-i4-t-nian] n. m. | 
MJtrsin^ (action); suckling. 

Qui sert a 1' — , sagescent. 

ALLAITER j;R-lJ-t6] v. a. | to nurse; 
tr tuchle ; to give suck to 

ALLANT, E [a-lan, t] adj. active; 
dkw/ ,• stirring ; OusUing. 

ALLANT [a-laa] n. m. goer. 

ALLANTOTDE [.l-ian-to-i-dl n. f. 
jtAat) allantois. 

ALLECHEMENT [a-lft-«h-man] n. m. 
I aUwe-ement ; enticement. 

ALL£CHER [a-l«-th«] V. a. I § to oZ- 
Iwre ; to entice. 

ALLfiE [a-16] n. f. 1. going ; 2. pas- 
aage; 8. (of gardens, parks, &c.) alley ; 
tealk ; path. 

— couverte, covered walk ; grove ; — 
t»tir6e, by=-\ — sablee, gravelled walk ; 
— de face, fi-mit alley ; — s et venues, 
(l)L) going in and out; going to and 
fro. Apres bien des — s et venues, after 
mmch running; after great trouble. 
Falre des — s et venues, to go in and 
out ; to go to and fro. 

AJXEGATION [al-l«-ga-.i6n] n. C 1. 
allegation ; 2. quoting. 

— erronee, fausse — , misallegation ; 
errfmeonx, false allegation. 

ALLEGE |Vl6-j] n. f. 1. (of windows) 
allaying ; 2. lighter (boat). 

Frais d' — , (com.) lighterage. 

ALL:6GEANGE [ai-^-jiu-.] n. t 
(Engl, hist) allegiance. I 

ALLfiGEMENT [ai-i6-j-man] n. m. 1. I 
I lightening (of a burden) ; easing ; dis- \ 
burdening ; 2. § reU^' (of a. o.) ; 8. § I 
lessening; 4 § alleviation; 5. § (th.) ! 
aUeviatine ; 6. § allaying ; allayment. ' 

ALL:feGER [«l-l«-j«] v. a. 1. 1 to lighten \ 
(a. o. of a burden) ; to ease ; to disbv/r- 
d-m.; 2. § to reUeve (a. o. of a. tli.): 3. § 
to lessen (a. th.) ; 4. § to alleviate ; 5. § to 
allay ; G. fnav.) to buoy up (a cable) ; 7. 
(naT.) to stick out (a rope). 

4, — 1b douleur ou le chagrin, ta alleviate pain or 
mrrov. 6. — la douleur, to allay pain. 

Allege, b, pa. p. V. senses of Al- 

LKGER. 

Non — , 1. imreUeved; 2. unallema- 
tod ; 8. v/iiallayed, 

ALLfiGIK [al-16-jir] V. a. (a. and m.) 
to reduce. 

ALL£G0PJE [ai-i«-go-ri] n. f. aU«- 
a&ry. 

Anteur d' — b, allegorist Par — , alle- 
aoricaUy. Faire une — , to make an al- 
legcn/ ; faire des — s, to allegorize. Qui 
iilmeles — s, allegorizing; qui fait des 
— s, allegorizing. 

ALLEGORIQUE [ai.l«.go rik] adj. al- 
legoric ; allegorical. 

Quality de ce qui est — , allegorical- 
ness. 

ALLt.GORIQUEMENT [al-M-go-ri-k- 
nin] adv. allegoricalli/. 

ALLltGORISER [al-U-go -ri-i«] v. a. to 
allegorize. 

ALLi:G0RI8EUR [al-l«-go-ri-Mur] n. 



ALLELUIA [al-U-iu-ia] n. m. 1, + 

halleluiah ; 2. (hot) 1 little, wood sorrel. 

ALLEMAGNE [a-l-ma-gn*] p. n. f. 



L (b. sd allegoHzer. 



:.EGORISTE [al-l6.go-rU-t] n. m. 
(tllegoriiit 

ALLt:GRE [al-l*-gr] adj. lively; 
eprighUyj cheerful; merry; jolly; 
festime ; joyful.. 

ALL^GRESSE [al-l«.grA-.] n. f. live- 
liness ; sprightHness ; cli,e«rfulness ; 
alacrity; joUity ; festivity; glee; mirth; 



sej t — 8, (Rom. cath. rel.) the seven. 
Ori d'— , shmit of 



^tee 



joys. Ori d' — , shmit of-=. ; shxnit ; 
\tuea. A vec — , limely ; with sprigh tli- 
■eM ,• cheerfxiUy ; imf.li alacrity ; mirth- 
ftMv ; merrily :joyfuUi/. 

ALLilGRETTO [al-W-grit-to] adv. 
(mus.) allegretto. 

ALL:feGRO .[ai-l«-gro] adv. (mus.) al- 
hffro. , 

ALL1!:GUER [al-l«.gh«] V. a. 1. + to 
allege ; to state ; to plead ; to urge ; 2. 
to adduce ; 8. to quote. 

Pouvolr Otre allegue. ( V. senses) 1. to 
\« addwible ; 2. to le pleadable ; ne 
pouvoir Scr«« — , yV. senses) to be wn- 
pUaddbU, 



La Mef d'— , the German Ocean ; the 
North Sea. 

ALLEMAND, E [a-l-man, d] adj. Ger- 
ma/ii. (of modern Germany). 

ALLEMAND, n. m. E, n. f. 1. Ger- 
man (native of modem Germany); 2. 
German (language). 

Bas — , low = ; liaut — , high ^. Cher- 
clier une querelle d — , topick a quarrel 
about nothing. 

ALLEMANDERIE [a-l-man-di-ri] n. C 
(a. & m.) small forge. 

ALLER [a-U] n. m. 1. | going ; 2. % 
rrtn (course of time) ; 3. (nav.) outward 
voyage ; voyage out. 

— et retour, (nav.) entire voyage; 

voyage out ami in. Laisser , ( V. Lws- 

8er) ; pis , ( V. Pis-ALLEK.) Au long — . 

in the long run. Avoir V — pour le ve- 
nir, to lose o.'« labor ; to hwve o.^s labor 
for o.''s pains. 

ALLER, V. n. irreg. (in 1 pres. Jb vais ; 
TTJ VA8 ; IL VA ; IL8 VONT fut. Irai ; subj. 
pres. Aillb) (de from ; a, to) 1. | § to 
go ; 2. II to go (to a pI»oe) ; to repair ; 
to proceed ; 8. | (de) to leave (...); to 
go away (from) ; to depart (from,) ; 
4. B to move ; to be in motion ; 5. ^ 1 
to go to the water-closet, necessary; 
6. § (. . ., to) (followed by an infinitive) to 
be about ; to be going ; 1.%to go on ; to 
get on ; to proceed ; to advance ,■ 8. § to 
go on ; to continite ; 9. to go ; to eaetend ; 
to reach ; 10. § to lead ; to go ; 11. § (a) 
to Und {to) ; to be (Jor) ; 11.% to be; to 
turn out ; 13. § (a, to) to amount ; ^ to 
come ; 14 § (expletive) . . . ; 16. (of gar- 
ments) to^t ; to sidt ; 16. (of garments, 
colors, &c.) to become ; to be beconving 
to; 17. (of fire) to btirn ; to bum up ; 
IS. (of time) to run on ; 19. (nav.) to sail ; 
20. (play) to play ; to stake. 

1. 11 serait alU aiijourd'hui, he mmid haw 
eons to-day. 3. ^//«z en paix, depart tn />eace. 6. 
II va parler, he is goin": to apeak. 7. Ce batiment 
est atle vite, this building hat gone on, proceeded 
fast. 8. — croissant, to go on increasing. 9. Ses 
cheveux roni JuBQu*a terre, her hair reaches the 
around. 10. Ce chemin va a la viUe, this road 
leads to the town. 11. Ses vceuj; vunt a la paix, hia 
wishes tend to peace, are fur peace. 12. II en va 
d'une choee ooninie d^une autre, it is vnth one as 
with another. Comment va-t-it ce matin ! how is 
he this nutmingf 13. Un m^moire qui va a . . . 
francs, a 6*7/ that amounts Ui . . . fi 



:pas( 



ela, do not helieve that ; U va ve- 

16. Le bleu ne lui va pas dc 

rtoAcr. 



nir, he u coming. 
tout, b/ue It not at 

— , (from the capital into the country) 
to go do^cn; — , (IVom the country to 
the capital) to = up. — fa et li, 1. to = 
about ; 2. to ramble ; 8. to roam. — 
chez . . ., to g'o to . . .'«; to call on, upon...; 
— doucement, tout doucement, 1. [ to = 
softly; 1. to — slowly; 8. (th.) to be 
middling ; — en avant, 1. to =. forward; 
2. to z:^ on ; 8. to keep on. ; — hien en- 
semble, 1. ! to =: -lOeil together ; 2. § to 
be a good match; — grandement, to 
spend, to lay out o.'s money ; — mal 
ensemble, 1. | to = together badly ; 2. § 
to be a bad match; — partout, 1. to = 
everywhere ; 2. to = abmtt ; — toujours, 
1. II to = always ; 2. 1 to = still ,• 3. ( to 
keep on; to hold on; ^ to keep up ; 4. 
§ (^b. s.) to blunder on ; 5. (b. s.) to rattle 
on (to speak) ; — de pair avec, to be equal 
with, to rank unth ; — en I'autre monde., 
to die ; — par haut, to vomit ; — par 
quatre chemins, to use evasion, ^ to beat 
the bush ; — k mats et a cordes, to sail 
under bare poles; — a tatons, to = 
gropin.g aUnig ; — k toutes jambes, k 
toute bride, a bride abattue, to = atfuU 
speed ; — au pas, to walk ; — et venir, 
1. to = and come ; 2. to =■ there and 
back ; 8. to = in and out ; 4. to=^ to 
and fro ; faire — et venir, 1. to make go 
and come ; 2. to move to and fro ; — de 
c6t6 et d'autre, 1. to =^ about; 2. 
to toriggle ; ne pas y — de main 
morte, -f- to-=.at it tooth and nail ; — 
grand train, 1. | to drime cmay ; 2. § to 
= on fast ; to run on; — son train, to 
keep on ; to = on; — ft q. u. comme un 
gant, -=- to fit a.o. to a T ; — ou va toute 
choso to = «Ae •<Jiny of all things. Fairo 



— , 1. II to make = ; 2. 1 to drive ; 8. | fe 

rt.i, to set in motion ; to set going ; ^ 
to do what o. likes with a. o. ; to tnati 
a lackey of a. o ; fi. (tech.) to work; 
laisser — , 1. to let (a. th.) go ; 2. (nav.) to 
let = ; 3. (nav.) to lie, to rest upon o.^a 
oars ; laisser tout — sous soi, to do ecerf 
thing under oiie ; se laisser —, I. tc be 
careless of c.'s personal appearan<xi ; 
2. to be easijn/ vi\fluenced; Z.(k)tc aban- 
don o.'« s<ilf (to) ; to deliver o.'s solfvp 
(to) ; to give way (to) ; 4. (a) to indvifft 
(in). Allant a, (nav.) bound i to) ; allw I 
va ! \. begone ! be off! 2. go / allons I 1. 
co*ne I 2. weU 1 8. nonsense .' allona 
don^, ! 1. come ttien I 2. indeed ! 8. non- 
aense ! allons, allons ! come, come I cela 
vous va, thatju^ suits you ; cela va, cel» 
Ira, that udll do ; cela va-t-il ? will that 
do t cel» ne va pas, 1. tlutt will not do , 
that won't do ; 2. -i- it is no go ; com- 
ment cela va-t-il ? how goes it t how get 
you o7b t il va comme on le m6ne, 1. he 
is easily led ; 2. (b. &.)•-• he is led by 
the nose ; il y va de ....... i«, are at 

stake ; ou allez-vous ? oil va le navire ? 
(nav.) wher-e are you bound to t qui no 
va pas, (of clothes) 1. that does not fit ; 
2. unbecoming ; qui ne va pas bien, un- 
comely ; tout va a..., nothing comM 
amiss to (a. o.). 

[AiLER is conj. with etre. V. Ex. 2.] 

Sen ALLER, pr. V. 1. J to go away ; ^ 
to go off; ^ to get away ; ■— to walk off; 
-r-tobe off'; -T- to take o.'s self off'; 2. | 
to ride c'way, off; 3. || (th.) to work off; 

4 1 to drop off; 5. || to evaporate ; 6. 15 
to pop off'; 7. ! to slip off; 8. ! (b. s.) to 
sUnk off'; 9. (b. s.) to sneak away, off; 
10. § to dwindle away ; 11. (of liquidn) 
to run away ; 12. (of liquids) to run 
over ; 18. (of boiling liquids) to boil over. 

— bien vite, to hasten, to hurry afioav, 
off; to make haste away. Faire eji ,\1 
ler, to send away. Allez-vonb-en I let 
t"en 1 go along I be off/ off/ offtoiih yout 
^^" go about your business / aUon*- 
nous-en ! come along / let us he {, okif I 

5 let us be going / qui va lA i wh/> goet 
there? , 

ALL:6SER,, ALLfiSOIR, ALLft- 
SURE, V. Aleser, alesoir, alesurb. 

ALLEU [a-leu] n. m. (feud, law) alio- 
diwm. 

Franc — -, 1. = ; 2. freehold. 

KIAALcX E [ai-ii-a-s^] adj. (bot) ail- 
Uac^ous. 

ALLIAGE [a-li-a-j] n. m. 1. (of metaW) 
alloyage (action) ; 2. (arith.) alligation ; 
8. (chem.) alloyage ; 4. (chem.) aUoy ; 
5. I (metal.) alloy ; 6. § rtWoy. 

— t)Our caractfere d'imprimerie, type- 
m.etal. R6gle d' — , (arith.) alligation; 
regie d'— ^ compos6e, inverse, (arith.) al- 
ligation alternate; r6gle d'— directe, 
simple, (arith.) alligation medial. Sanj 
— , II § unalloyed. 

ALLIAIRE [a-li-J-r] n. f. (bot.) alUa- 
ria ; ^ hedg>i garlic. 

ALLIANCE [a-U-an-s] n. £ 1. B § am- 
anoe ; 2. alliance ; mai:h ; 3. wedding 
ring; 4 § v/iiion ; 6. (theol.) cove- 
nant. 

■r- pen con ven able, 1 imjyroper alli- 
ance ; 2. misalliance. — de maribgo, 
wedding ring. Acte, trait6 d' — , =; 
treaty 0/=. Par — , 1. by alliance ; 3, 
by alliance, marriage ; sans — s, loc'lh- 
out =8 ; wnaUied. Faire une — , to makt 
an = ; faire — avec, 1. 1 § to maJkt> ant 
= (zciih) ,• 2. S to rmite (...). 

Syn.— Allianck, ligub, conf6d4rjtic>i. &• 
lationship, frit-ndship, and the prospect of aid ift 
case of necessity, are the usual motivas f Dr 'onninf 
alliances. A ligue is a union of plan, and jtincti*: 
offeree, for the purpose of acting on ll.e offenun- 
or defensive against a common enemy. Crn/edem- 
tions are formed between bodies, t..wns, iDUii 
princes, or petty states, with the view of ' 
redress for some supposed wrong, or af c 
right against usurpation and oppression, /iiixmct 
is applied to both persons and things, and alwuyt 
signifies an upright and honorable union j lime and 
cot'fediration are often employed in a bad ser^ 
and ar« used of persons only. 

ALLI^, E [a.li«] adj. 1. (pers.) aZW<4 
(by marriage or by treaty) ; 2. (pers.) r» 
lated (by marriage) ; 3. § (th.) afovK. 

Mal — , misallied ; non — , 1. P unai 
lied ; 2. \ unrelated ; 8 S fth.) not /vHr 



ALL ALP 


^LT 


vujo'aU; «MJeu; e&jeane- «wpeur; Jwpan; in. pin; <5c»bon; wibnm; *11 liq. 


*gn liq. 



ALLlfi, n. m. E, n. f. ally (by mar- 
tinge or by treaty) ; 2. reUiU&n (by mar- 



•^I 



JER [«-U6] n. m. partridge-net. 

ALLIER [a-ii-6] V. a. 1. II (pers.) to al- 
tf (by marriage or by treaty); 2. <o 
MOic/i; 8. § (th.) (a, avec, tdth) to blend; 
U) comlyime ; 4 (th.) to v/nite ; 6. to ai- 
«rt- {met*ls). 

£i"i.LLiKR, pr. V. (1) 1. I to aZZy o.> 
8<//(by marriage or trsaty) (to); to i-f" 
'■lJ>.«ii (to) ; 2. II to match ; 8. § to ?/i«Mi 
{•UfJiJA) ,• to combine (tvitfi) ; 4. § to wi j<« 
ftn'tA) ; to become akin (to) ; 5. § 
(ATKc, . . . ) to «M«t ; 6. (ol metals) to 
oombiTie. 

ALLIEZ [a-li^] n. m. (bol.) If tare. 

ALLIGATOR [al-li-ga-tor] n. m. (erpet.) 
aUigator ; Amsrican crocodile. 

ALLITl^lRATION [al-li-ti-ra-.ion] n. f. 

(rhet.) alliteration. 

ALLOBROGE [al-lo-bro-j] n. m. down; 
boor ; ^ cov/ntrij bumpkin. 

ALLOCATION [ai-lo-ka-.i6n] n. £ 1 
gram,t ; 2. allocation ; allowance. 

ALLOCUTION i:al-lo-ka-.i6n] n. f. 1. 
(Rom. aiiL) allocution; 2. addrent. 

ALLODIAL, E [al-lo-di-ai] adj. (feud, 
law) allodial. 

ALLODiALIT:^ [ai-io-di* U-i«] n. t 
(feud, law) allodial tenure. 

ALLONGE [a-i6n-j] n. f. 1. piece (to 
lengthen) ; 2. (of a table) leqf; 8. (com.) 
'of a bill) rider; 4. (pav.)futtock. 

ALL0NG6, E [a.l6n j«] ad.i. 1. length- 
oned ; drawn ; 2. long ; 8. (bot.) length- 
ened; 4 (print) (of letters) compressed; 
nondmised; 5. (geom.) prototo. 

Non — ,(V. senses) undra/ion. 

ALLONGEMENT [a-Ion-j-man] n. m. 
L. lengthening ; 2. (did.) elongation. 

ALLONGER [a-i6n-j6] V. a. 1. I § to 
lengthen ; 2. 1 to extend ; to stretch out ; 
a. § to wire-draw ; ^ to spin out ; 4 
(fena) to allonge (a thrust). 

S'allohskr, pr. v. 1. | § to lengthen ; 
'L\to be eoetended, striked out. 

ALLOPATUIE [al-lo-pa-ti] n. f. (med.) 
ClU'pathy. 

ALLO'UCIIIEB [a-lTO-shi*] n. m. (bot) 
beam-tree ; wh:^ bea/m-tree. 

ALLOUER [a-iou-*] V. a. to grant; to 
allow. 

ALLUCIION [a-lu-ihon] n. m. (tech.) 



"i. 



cogged. 

ALLUME, V. Bougie d'allttme. 

ALLUMER [a-lu-m«] V. a. 1. | to light 
'set on Are); + to kindle; 2. to illuminate 
(a th.) ; to light up ; 8. § to kindle ; to in- 
flame ; to excite ; ^ to blow up ; 4. to 
Bet (the blood) in a glow ; 5. to blow in 
('jtwdles). 



Chose qui allnme §, inflam-er (of); 
pcrsonne qui allume, 1. § lighter (of); 2. 
§ Inflamer (o,f) ; kindler (of). 

Allume, e^ pa. p. V. senses of Al- 

LtTMBR. 

Non — , 1. unlighted ; 2. § iminfiamed. 

^'ALLUMER, pr. V. 1. I to light; 2. fl 
to Hght up; 8.\ (of Are) to brighten up ; 
to bum up ; 4 § to kindle ; to be ex- 
lited. 

ALLUMETTE [»-la-m4-t] n. f. match 
for procuring fire). 

— allemande, chimique, Lucifer, loeo- 
A CO = ; Lucifer ; — phosphorique, pho.<)- 
pKorus =. Botte. paquet d' — s, bmidle 
if =es ; fabricant d' — s, = -m,aker. 

ALLUMEUR [a-la-mefir] n. m. 1. light- 
y ; % lamp-Unhter. 

ALLUMlilRE [»-lu-mi.i.r] n. £ 1, 
inatch-box ; 2. match- factory. 

ALLURE [a-iu-r] t.f. 1. 1 (pers.)paj«,- 
Oinrriagi; 2. \ (of animals) gait; 8. I (of 
ti' •!'ee8)7<ac« ,• 4 § (pers.) manner; way; 
ft j; (th ) turn ; way. 

uvai.o -, thU 

N'avoir pas d'— . d'— flxe, (man.) to 
vj«6 no pace; de^olopper 1' — , to en- 
'AJri-ye ; felre firfre rice — «, to put thnmgX 
X 1 =4 ; iiioiitjiu •€» — «, to eJuyu) =». " 



ALLUSION [al-In-iida] n. t (A, to) 1. 
aUu«ion. ; 2. K hi^it. 

— Indirecte, indirect allusion; 2. 
hint ; — peu voilee, 1. broad = ; 2. 
broad hint. Par — , allusively ; par — 
a, in = to. Faire — (a), 1. to make an 
= (to) ; to allude (to) ; 2. (th.) to have 
reference (to) ; 8. to hint (at) ; faire une 

— peu voilee, to drop, to give a broad 
hint. Faisant — , allus-ive. 

ALLUVIAL, E [al-lu-vi-al], 

ALLUVIEN, NE [al-lu-vi-in, 4-n] adj. 
(geol.) allnvial. 

ALLUVION [al-ln-vion] n. m. allum- 
on; alluvium,. 

D6pi">t d" — , aUiimal loam ; terrains 
d' — , alluvia, pi. D" — , allu/vial. 

ALMAGESTE [ai-ma-jea-t] n. m. ahna- 
gest. 

ALMANACK [al-ma-na] n. m. 1. aU 
manac ; calendar ; 2, directory (book 
of names and addresses). 

— nautique, nautU:al almanac ; — 
royal, royal calendar. — du clerg6, cler- 
ical directory ; — du commerce, com,- 
m^ereicd directory ; — de I'universite, 
university calendar. Auteur d' — s, = 

- writer ; faiseur d' — s, = - maker. 
Composer des — s §, to indulge in idle 
reveries ; etre un — de I'an pass6, to be 
stale. 

ALOi:S [a-lo-«B] n. m. 1. (bot) aloes; 
2. (pharm.) aloes. 

Bois d" — , aloes-icood. 

ALOfiTIQUE [a-io-«-ti-k] adj. aloeUc; 
of aloes. 

Acide — , (chim.) aloetic acid; m6di- 
cament — , (pharm.) aloeUc. 

ALOGOTROPHIE [o-lo-go-tro-fi] n. f. 
(med.) ulogotrophia ; irregular or diii- 
proportionate nutrition (of the parts 
of the body). 

ALOI [a-loal n. m. 1. (of gold and sil- 
ver) standard ; 2. § quality ; 3. § (pers.) 
condition. 

3. Un h'linme de bas — . a man of low condition. 

ALOtQUE [a-io-i-k] adj. alofUc. 

Acide — , (chenL) aloetic acid. 

ALONGER. V. Allonger. 

ALOP^CIE [.vlo-p*-.!] n. C (med.) alo- 
pecy ; ^ tbx-evil ; scurf. 
• ALORS [a-ior] adv. 1. then; at that 
time ; 2. by the time (past^. 

I>' — , of that Urns ; of those times ; 
jusqu' — , tiU, imtU then. — comme — ^, 
we shall see when tli^e time combes. 

ALOSE [a-iA-z] n. f. (ich.) alose ; shad. 

ALOUETTE [a-lou-J-t] n. £ (orn.) 1. 
lark ; 2. sky-lark. 

— commune, field lark ; — hupp6e, 
crested, shore = ; — des bois, wood- = ; 

— des champs, field-, sky- = ; — luln, 
wood- = ; — de mer, dunlin ; sea- = ; 

— des pres, titlark. Pied d' — , (bot) 
='s heel; = -spur. Oiseleur pour les 
— s, larker. L' — grisolle, the =. carols. 
8'6veiller, se lever an chant de 1' — , to 
rise tcith the lark. ^*sf Si 1« ciel tombait, 
11 y aurait bien des — prises, if the sky 
falls, we shall catch larks. 

■ ALOURDIR [a-iour-dir] V. a. to make, 
to renAer hea/vy, dull ; to dull. 

S'ALOURniR, pr. V. 5 to get, to grow 
heavy, dull. 

ALOYAU [a-ioa-i6] n. m. sirloin; sir- 
loin ofhefif. 

ALOYER [a-ioa-i*] V. a. to alloy. I 

ALPACA [ai-pa-ka] n. m. (mam.) al- 
paca; paces. 

ALPAGA [a!-pa-ga] n. m. 1. V. Alpa- 
ca ; 2i alpaca (woollen). 

ALPES (LES) [16-ial.p] p. n. t pi. The 
Alps. 

ALPESTRE [al-pJs-tr] adi. alpine. 

ALPHA fal-fa] n. m. 1. alpJm (of the 
Greek alphabet) ; 2. alpha (beginning). 

ALPHABET [a!-fa-bJi] n. m. alphabet 

N'Stre encore qu'ii V — to be still upon 
the rudime7its ; to be only a beginner ; 
renvoyer q. u. ^ 1' — , to put a. o. back to 
his=. 

ALPHAB:6TIQUE [al-fa-b«-U-k] adj. 
alphabetic ; alphabetical. 

Repertoire — , (com.) alphabet; al- 
phdbetioal index. Par ordre — , alpha- 
betically; in alphabetical order. Ces- 
ser, nii^^r par ordm — , to alphabet. 

A Li- a A ii Pi t J EA/ ivNT [al-fa-b*! ti- 



k-man] adv. alphabetically ; in alpha- 
betioal order. 

ALPH:6E [»!-«] pr. n. m Alpheus. 

ALPHONSE [al-ion-i] p. n. m. Al 
phonso. 

ALPHONSIN [»l-fon-.in] n. m. (smg.J 
alphonsin ;foroepi (for extracticj DtlSli 

ALPHOS, ALPHU8 [al-f<w, fiu] a. la. 
(med.) lepra alphas. 

ALPIN, E [al-pin, i-n] ftdj. (scloUCOl^ 

alpine. 

ALPISTE [ai-pii-t] n. m.(bot) canary 
grass. 

ALSINE, n. C F. Morgelikb. 

ALTE, n. f. V. Halte. 

ALT:6RABLE [al-t«-r»-bl] adj. (of met- 
als) alterable. 

ALTERANT, E [al-t«-ran, t] 8«j. 1. 
that excites tliirsi ; 2. (med.) alterati/ce. 

£;tre — , 1 to m,ak6 t/iirsty ; to exciia, 
produce thirst. 

ALTERANT, n. m. (med.) alterati/ve. 

ALTi:RATI-F, VE [al-t«-ra-tif, i-v] adj. 
alterative. 

ALTlfiRATION [al-t«-ra-.idn] n. C 1. 
I deterioration ; 2. | § injuring ; hurt- 
ing ; spoiling ; tainting ; .8. J § debase' 
ment; 4 % impairing ; 5. (of coin)a(it<^ 
teration ; 6. § lessening ; weakening ; 

7. alteration,, cliange (from good to bad), 

8. § misstatir^ ; misrepresentation ; 

9. (did.) alteration. 

Sans — , 1. ttninjured ; unhurt; % 
untainted ; 3. undebased ; 4 ■unim- 
paired ; 5. unadulterated ; 6. not less- 
ened, weakened ; 7. unaltered. CausM 
de r — dans, V. Altkrkr. 

ALT:fiRATION, a. f. OUrst; thirst*- 
ness. 

ALTERCAS [al-tir-ki] n. m. t F. Ai.- 

TEROATION. 

ALTERCATION [al-Ur-ka-tiSn] n. C 
aZtercalAon. 

ALT:6RER ral-t6-r<] v. a. 1. 1 § to <»- 
jure (a. th.) ; to hurt ; to mar ; to 
»p<nl ,• 2. I to ta/int ; 3. II § to debase ; 4. 
§ to impair ; 5. § to adulterate ; d J to 
lessen ; to weaken ; 7. § to alter (front 
good to ba<l) ; a § to misstate ; to dis- 
tort; to misrepresent; to wrest; J. to 
distort (tlie features) ; 10. (did.) to alter. 

1. I — le »ang, to injure, to hurt the blood ; | — 
«on repoa, to injure o.'t rtpott ; § — le caracter* to 
spoil the temper. 



lesgen, to weaken fnendskip. t. 
— de» faiU, to nii»8tale, f dirtort, to inisrepretent 
facte. 

Altere, e, pa. p. V. senses of Alt4- 

RER. 

Non — , 1. I § uninjured, ; unspoiled ; 
unmarred ; 2. || mitainted ; 8. jl § unde- 
based ; 4 § unimpaired ; 5. § unadul- 
terated; 6. %not lessened, weakened; 
7. unaltered ; 8. § not misstated, »»*»- 
represented ; 9. (did.) -unaltered. 

S'alterbr, pr. V. ( F senses) 1. to b4 
injured ; to spoil ; 2. || to taint ; 8. | to 
lessen ; to weaken ; 4 to alter ; 5. %tc 
become distorted. 

ALT^REll, V. n. 1 to excite thirst; 
T to make thirsty. 

Altere, e, pa. "p. 1. i thirsty ; ^ dry ; 
2. %(v,«.,for) Udrsty. 

Etre — de, 8 to thirst for. 

ALTERNANGE [altJr-niiin] n. t 
(geol.) alternation. 

ALTERNAT [ai-tir-na] n. m. aUar^ 
nateness. 

ALTERNATI-F, VE [»l-ar.ii.v.ur, i-vl 
adj. 1. alternate ; alternative ; 2. (inouh.) 
(of motion) reciprocating. 

Empl'" — , alternation. 

ALT±.RNATIVE [ai-tir-n«-ti-T] a 1 L 
alternative (option) ; 2. alt6'na(>Jfi ; 
succession ; 3. interchange ; 4 (b. i^' 
dilemma, 

Cruelle — , (yruel, dire oMematio!* ; k 
cruel, dire dilemma. 

ALTERNATIVEMENT [al-tAr-na-ti 
man] adv. olternateiy ; allematvvelif • 
by turns. 

ALTERNE [al-tir-n] »dj. (bot) 1 u. 
ternate ; alternant ; 2. (geom,) alter 
note. 

ALTERNER tnl-Ur-ni] T. n. 1. to ai 
ternate ; 2. to sttoeeed otu (tnot>\er ai 
ternately. 

21 



AM A AMA AMB 




a inal; a mule; e fee; e Kve- e f6te; ^je; i 11; I lie; o mol; 6 inole; d mort; w sue; u sure; tw jocu-; 





f aire — . to alternate. 

ALTEKQUEK [..l-tAr-ki] v. x + to ais- 
tnite ; to wrangle. 

ALTESSE [il-ti-i] n. f. hiffhn^m (title). 

Son — , fd8 = (prince), m. ; her = 
(princess), £ 

ALTHiEA [alMa] n. m. (bot) »»ar«/t- 

ALT-IEE, lt:EE [ai-U-«, J-r] adj. lofty; 
San^ghty ; ^ proud. 

ALTIMfeTEE [al-ti-mi-tr] n. m. 
J^oia.) altimeter. 

ALTlMfiTRlE [al-ti-m«-tri] n. £(g8om.) 
(jUimelry. 

ALTITUDE [ai-u-tu-d] a C (sciences) 
■nUUude. 

ALTO [al-t6] n. m. (mus. inst) tenor 
vioHn; tenor. 

ALUDE [a-lu-d] n. t sfieep's-leatfter. 

ALUDEL [a-lu-<i4l] n. m. (chem.) aiu- 
'tUl. 

ALUMELLE [a-lu-m&-i] n. C (nav.) 1. 
(of the capstan, windlass) lumaepike- 
hole ; 2. (of the tiller-hole) sheathing. 

ALUMINE [a-lu-mi-n] n. f. (min.) uhi- 
min; alumina. 

ALUMIN:6, E [a-lu-mi-n* ' adj. alum- 
i»h. 

Blanc d'ceuf — , almn-ewrd. 

ALUMINEU-X, 8E [a->u-mi.n«d. rn-«J 
adj. (chem.) aluminous. 

Eau alumineuse, al/u/m-water. 

ALUMINlilEE [a-lu-mi-ni-J-r] n. t 

(iiEg.) (a. & m.) aliumrworka. 

ALUN [a-iun] n, m. alumn, 

— brul6, calcin 5, burnt =. — de 
(tlnme, plwmose, plv/me = ; — de roche, 
■"vche, rock =. 

ALUNAGE, [a-lu-na-j] a m. (dy.) al- 
umdng. 

ALUNATION [a-lu-oi-uSn] n. t (chlm.) 
tilwm-inakmg. 

ALUN£, E [»-l«-n6] adj. (chem.) al- 
vmed. 

ALtTNER, V. a. (a. & m.) to alum. 

ALUNliiRE [a-iu-ni-i-r] n. t alum^ 
Ifti. 

ALVifeOLAIEE [al-T«-o-U-r] a^j. (an- 
i.t) ahieolar. 

ALViOLE [bI-t«-o-1] n. £ 1. (of bees) 
iirf/ ; 2. (of teeth) socket ; 8.-8, (pL) 
/nnut) alveoU, pi. 

ALVIN, E [al-vin, l-n] adj. (med.) al- 

ALTSSE [a-li-s] n. £ (bot) madwort 

AMABILIT:^ [a-ma-bi-U-t«] n. £ 1. 
lowiUness; 2. amiability; 8. kind- 
iiess. 

D6feut d' — , 1. tmloveliness ; 2. v/n- 
anUableness; S. wnkind/neas. Avec — , 
I. lovelily; 2. amiably; 8. kindly; 
•xms — , 1. unlovely; 2. tmamiably ; 8. 
tinlcindly. 

AMADIS [a-m»-<iiB] n. m. sleeve (of a 
garment). 

AMADOTE [a-ma-do-t] 1. n. m. ama- 
dot pear-tree ; 2. n. £ amadot (species 
of pear). 

AMADOU [a-ma-dou] n. m. 1. German 
Cinder; pyrotechmical sponge; black 
tnatch; spunk; 2. (a. «fc m.) ama- 
dou ; amadoro ; 3. (artiL) touch-wood ; 
4. (bot) touch-wood. 

AMADOUER [a-ma-doa-«] V. &. to 
ooatr. ; to wJi^edU. 

AMADOUVIER [a-ma-dou-vifc] n. m. 
(bot) touclt-wo..d. 

Bolct — , =. 

AMAIGRIR [a-mJ.grir] V. a. 1. fe> 
•v^ake lean, lank ; 2. (pers.) to make, to 
render' (a. o.) thin ; to redttce ; to bring 
io'to; 3. (arch.) to thin. 

S'auaiorir, pr. v. 1. 1 to get, to groto 
'.tun, lank ; 2. (pers.) to get, to grow 
.Viin; T to fall away; 3. (sculp.) to 
ikrink. 

JiMA IGRIE, V. n. 1. to get, to grow 
iian, lank ; 2. (pers.) ic get, to grow 
VM,; to fall a/way. 

AMAIGRISSEMENT ra.m4-gri-..inan] 

'L m. 1 growing thin; faUiiig away ; 
tmaciation ; 2. (did.) tcRiefaction. 
AMALEC fa-ma-Uk] p. n. m. Amalek. 

AMALGAMATION ra-mal-ga-ii.a-.i6i.] 

t\. £ (chem., melA-) amalgamation. 

AMALGAME [a-mal-ga-m] n. m. 1. 
rhem., motaL) amalgam, ; 2. $ amial- 
!' I nation. 



AMALGAMER [a-mal-ga-mA] V. a. 1. 

(ciieiii., metal.) to amalgamate ; 2. %to 
arruilgatnate. 

Personne qui amalgame I, am<ilga- 
mator (of). 

S'AMALttAMEE, pr. V. 1. (chem., metal.) 
to amalgam,aite ; 2. § (a, loith) to amal- 
gamate. 

Qui peut — I §, amalgcmiable. 

A MAN [a-man] p. n. m. HamMn. 

AMANDE [a-man-d] n. £ 1. almond; 
2. (of fruit) kernel; 3. (bot) nucleus of 
the seed. 

— amSre, bitter almond; — douce, 
sweet = ; — prallnee, k la praline, 
burnt ■=-. — de Xwrno-oaei, Brazil-nut; 

— a la dame, k la prlncesse, Jordan = ; 

— pistache, pistacchio =. Lait d' — , 
milk of =«. Fait d' — s, 1. mMie of=^s ; 
2. amygdalate. 

AMANDfi [a-man-dt] n. m. amygda^ 
late; ^ milk of almond*. 

AMANDIER [a-man-dii] n. m. (bot) 
aJ.mondb-t/r6e. 

— pecher, peach-almond. Fleui d'— j 
almond-fUyuier. 

AMANT [a-man, t] n. m. E, n. £ 1. 1 
Uyter, \^" mjoeelfieart ; 2. suitor; 
wooer, m. ; 3. § lover ; votary ; 4. (b. B.) 
lover ; paramour. 

3. — de U liberU, lover, votary of libeHy. 

AMAPER [a-ina-pe] V. a. (nav.) to lay 
hold of (in furling sails). 

AMARANTE [a-n«-ran-t] adj. ama- 
ranth-colored. 

AMARANTE, n. £ 1. (bot) ama- 
ranth; amaranthus; ^flower-gentle; 
^ velvet-flower ; 2. amuranth (color). 

— des jardiniers, 1 (bot) cock's-comb ; 

— k queue, (l)ot) tailed amaranth; 
love-lies-bleeding amuranth; — queue 
de renard, floramour. D' — , amaran- 
thine. 

AMAEINAGE [a-ma-ri-na-j] n. m. 
(nav.) manning (a prize). 

AMARINER [a-ma-ri-n6] v. a. (nav.) 
1. to man (a prize) ; 2. to season ; to in- 
ure. 

AMARQUE [a-mar-k] n. £ (nav.) lead- 
ing-mark; sea-mark. 

AMARRAGE [a-ma-rs-j] n. m. (nav.) 

1. mooring; lashing; seizing ; fasten- 
ing; 2. ground-tackUn^. 

— k plat, lashing of the shrouds and 
stays. Ligne, point d' — , lasher ; lash- 
ing. Faire un — , to seize. 

AMARRE [a-ma-r] n. £ 1. (engin.) 
mooring; 2. (nav.)/a«<," seusing. 

— de bout, (^nav.) head-fast ; — de 
poupe, — d'arriere, (nav.) stem-fast; — 
de tou6e, (nav.) tow-line; — de travers, 
(nav.) breast-fast Pieu, poteau d'— , (en- 
gin.) mooring-post ; puits d' — , (engin.) 
(of suspension-bridges) mooring-cham- 
ber; shaft. 

AMARR:fi, E [a-ma-r4] adj. (nav.) 
fast. 

AMAERER, v. a. (nav.) 1. to make 
fast; 2. to lash; 3. to hold fast; 4 to 
hitdt, ; 5. to belay ; 6. to nip. 

AMARYLLIS [a-ma-ril-iu] n. £ (bot) 
amnrylMs; ^ daffodil lUy. 

AMAS [a-ma] n. m. 1. 1 heap; 2 | 
hoard; 8. (of liquids) mass; 4. § lieap; 
mass; lot; load; 5. (did.) congeries; 
6. (mining) pipe-vein ; inass. 

— confus, ^ confused heap ; — couch6, 
horizontal, (mining) pipe ; — entrelac6, 
(mining) stock-work ; belly. 

AMASSER [a-mS-.«] V. a. 1. to heap ; 
to heap up ; 2. to lioar-d ; to hoard up ; 
to amass ; to store up ; to treasure ; to 
treasure up ; to lay in ; to lay up ; 3. 
to gatJier ; to gatlier up ; to moke tip ; 
4. to cluster. 

— toiijours, 1. to Tioard and hoard; 

2. to grasp and grasp. Personne <}ui 
aiiia.s8e, 1. heaper (of) ; 2. hoarder (ftj); 
storer (of). 

Amasse, e, pa. p. n senses of Auab- 

SER. 

Non — , ( V. senses) 1. v/nfioarded ; 2. 
untrea^ured. — de tous c6t68, (did.) 
coUecianeous. 

S'amasser, pr. V. 1. to heap; 2. to 
hoard ; 8. to be a/massed ; 4. io coUoct; 
f^ gather U/gether ; 5. (pers.) to crowd; 
j 6. t*' cluster ; 7. (hL i) to brew. 



S^n.— Amasske, kntassbk, 



tain quantity of things of 



to gather toge 
>f the ume kii 



.other in a largt 
aniag ; accumuler, to be constantly eiUargin^ thi 
heap; while amonef/er adds to all this the idea a. 
great quai.tity, disorder, and confusion. Figuiiv 
tively, a provident spirit amatf ; avarice » 
tatae ; insatiable avidity accumule, and, after k>*^' 
ing aecumuie, avwiteeU. 

AMATELOTAGE [a-iM-t.Io-»»-j] «. •!„ 
(nav.) classing the m^n. 

AMATELOTER [a-m».t-k w] v. a. 
(nav.) to class (the men). 

AMATEUR [a-ma-teur] n. m. 1. (0«. 
of) lover ; 2. am^tteur. 

AMATIR [a-ma-tir] V. a. (golds.) re 
deaden. 

AMAUROSE [a-m6-r6.] n. £ (med.) 
am^aurosis. 

AMAZIAS [8-n.a-«-as] p. n. m. Ama- 
eiah. 

AMAZONE [a-n,a-io-n] n. £ 1. (hist) 
Amazon; 2. Am.<izon (courtigeous wo- 
man) ; 3. riding-habit ; habit 

Habit d' — , riding - liabit ; habit 
D' — , 1. (hist) Amazonian; 2. % Amazo- 
nian. Le fleuve des — s, theAmaeon; 
the Am,azon River. Le pays des — s, 
Ama^^>nia. 

AMAZONE (L') [la-ma-«> n] p. n. m 
the Amazon ; tJie Amazon River. 

AMBASSADE [an-ba-«a-d] n. £ 1. em 
bossy ; 2. § embassy (message). 

Attach^ d'— , attach^ ; gentleman 
attached to an-=.; secr'itaire d' — , sec- 
retary to an =^ En — , on an =. 

AMBA88ADEUR [an-ba^a-deur] n. m. 
I § ambassador. 

— extraordinaire, = extraordinary ; 
— ordinaire, ordinary =;. 

AMBASSADRICE [an-hk-r^dri-s] n. t 
I ambassadress. 

AMBESA8 [an-b«-xS.] n. m. (triok 
track) am6sac«; doubts ace. 

AMBl [an-bi] n. m. (surg.) amb*; 
ambi. 

AMBIANT, E [an-bi-in, t] a^j. (phyt j 
drcumambient ; ambient. 

AMBIDEXT:ifcRIT:6 [an-bi diki-tt- M6] 
n. £ am.bidexterity. 

AMBIDEXTRE [aii-bi-d4k».til wfj 
ambid easier ous. 

AMBIGU, fi [an-bi-gu] a4j omMgwut 

Non — , unambiguous. 

AMBIGUIt:^ [an-bi-gu-i-t«] n. f. any 
biguity ; amMguousness. 

Sans — , urumibigvous ; wiiJiout a/m- 
biguity. 

AMBIGUMENT [an-bi-gu-man] ady 
ambigvoiisly. 

AMBITIEU8EMENT [an-bi-«i-«6.» 
man] adv. am,bitiousli/. 

AMBITIEU-X, SE [an-bi-»i-en, e4-. 
(de, of; de, to) ambitious, 
'en — , unam,bitious ; unaspiring 
Caractere — , ambiUousness. 

AMBITION [an-bi-tion] n. £ (de, of, 
de, to) ambition. 

Defaut manque d' — , unambitious- 
ness. Sans — , unambitious; withovi 



% 



AMBITIONNER [^-bi-.io-n«] v. a. «* 
be ambitious of(&. th.); to aspire to. 
AMBLE [an-blj n. m. (man.) amble. 

— doux, easy = ; grand — , quick = ; 
— rude, rough =:. A T — , amblingly. 
A Her r — , to amble; to amble along; 
faire aller 1' — k, to amble; avoir 1— 
doux, to amble easy ; etre franc d'— , to 
aml/le freely ; mettro un cheval kV—, 
to make a fiorse amble. Qui va k 1'—. 
ambling. 

AMBLER [an-bi«] V. n. + to amble. 
AMBRE [an-br] n. m. (inin-) amb&r. 

— gris, amber-gris. D' — , amber. 
AMBR:1&, E [an.br«] a^j. arnZer-co- 

lored. 

De couleur — e, =. 

AMBR^INE [M>-br«-i-n] n. £ (chowu 
ambreine. 

AMBR:felQUE [an-br«-i-k] a4j. (sheim. 
amnbreic. 

AMBRER [an-br«] v. a. to sc^it wStt 
amber-gris. 

AMBRETTE [an-bri-tl ^. £ L amb,}> 
seed ; 2. (bot) musk-mallows. 

Graine d'— , (bot) wi**fc-«««l 

AMBR0I8E [in-brca p. n. in. Atr 
brose. 



AME 



AME 



AMI 



»M Joilte ; eu jeu ; eu jeune ; «ii peur ; An pan ; in pin ; on 6on ; un brun ; *11 liq ; *gn Uq. 



AMI$R0I8IE [an-bro8-zi] n. f., 
AMBROSIE [an-bro-zi] n. £ ambrosia. 
D' — , o/= ; ambrosial. 

AMBROSIEN, NE [an-bro-zi-in, i-n] 

v\j. Jmirosian (of St Ambrose). 

AMBULANCE [in-bu-lan-.] n. f. (mil.) 
ambulance ; field, Jlt/inff hospital. 

AMBULANT, E [an-bu-lan, l] adj. 1. 
onHyiUant; 2. itinerant; ambulatory; 

5. fb. 8.) strolUng. 

ComediOJi (m.) — , comedienne (f.) — e, 
0irolling player: stroller; personne 
— o, itinerant Etre — , mener une vie 
— «, (b. 8.J to itinerate ; to stroll. 

AMBULATOIEE [an-bu la-toa-r] adj. 
(pore.) 1. ambulatory ; 2. (tli.) itinerant. 

AME [a-ra] n. f. 1. (soul ; 2. + || ghost ; 
8. § life-blood ; 4. § soid ; life ; s^nrit ; 

6. soul (person) ; fellow ; tidng ; 6. (of 
beD>ws) clack ; 7. (of devices) motto ; 
8. (of fagots) small wood ; 9. (of tigures, 
Btstues) core; 10. (of quills) pitli ; 11. 
(artll.) (of a gun) chamber; 12. (mus.) 
aoimd-board. 

— basse, de boue, base, grovelling, 
mean eoul; — bien noe, well-consti- 
tuted, well-regulated;wel/-poised ndnd; 
bonne — , good = ; — boarreloe, == siting 
with remorse ; — damnee, mere tool ; — 
vivante, living ■=, creature. Charge 
d" — s, cure of=^ ; ^galite d' — , equani- 
mity ; tranqulllite d'— , tranquillity of 
=, Tnind ; heart's ease ; heart-ease. 
Funeste k Y — , qui perd 1' — , = -destroy- 
ing. A V — . . . , . . .-soulM ;. . .-thoughted; 
. . . -minded. Du fond de son — , from 
o.'« = ; de toute son — , with all o.'s^z; 
sans — , 1. soulless; spiritless ; lifeless ; 
2. unfeeling ; sur mon — , 1. upon my 
= ; 2. for the =, very = of me. Avoir 
la mcrt dans V — , to be heart-sick ; jouir 
de la tranqaillitfe d' — , to be at liearts 
ease; mettre la mort dans 1'—, to be 

KenrtrSickeninn ; rendi-e 1" 1-, <o give 

up, io yield up the ghost ; reveiller 1'—, 
to he heart-erring. "Qui a 1'—, (V.h 
V—y Dleu veuille avoir son — , God rest 
JUtt, her =. II n"y a pas — qui vive, tJiere 
uncf.a living creature. 

AME [a-m] adj. t well-beloved. 
AMlfiLIE [a-iii«-li] p. n. f. Amelia. 

AM:6LIORATION [;a-m«-li-o-ra-.i6n] n. 

I 1. amelioration ; 2. improvement 

Auteur d' — s, improver. Susceptible 
d — , improvable; non susceptible d' — , 
ttnimprovable. 

AMilLIORER ra-m«-li-o-r6] V. a. 1. to 
ameliorate; to 7nsliorate; 2. to improve; 
8. to better. 

Qu'on ne pent — , unimprovable ; qui 
namellore pas, unimprovlng. 

Ambliork, e, pa. p. V. senses of Ame- 

LIORER. 

Non — , unimproved. 
S'amelioker, pr. v. 1. to ameliorate; 
to meliorate ; 2. to improve ; 3. to mend 
Pouvolr — , to be improvable. 
AMEN [a-mJ,n] adv. amen. 

AM^NAGENIENT [a-mfe-na-j-man] n. 

m. management (of a forest or wood). 

AMIiNAGER [a-m«-na-j«] V. a. 1. to 
ordor, to regulate tlie management of 
(a forest or wood) ; 2. to cut up (a tree). 

AMENDABLE [a-man-da-bl] adj. (agr.) 
unprovable. 

AMENDE [a-man-d] n. £ 1. penalty; 
fine ; 2. (law) ram»om. 

— determinee, stated fine ; — honora- 
ble, " amende Ivonorable ;" apology. — 
k la discretion du tribunal, discretionan/ 
=. Passible d' — , (pere.) finable ; liable 
to =; punissable d' — , (th.) finable. 
Boas peine d' — , under penalty of a =^. 
Condamner a V — , to fine ; to sentence 
toa=; to amerae ; * condamner k une 

- de, to fine ; imposer une — , to im- 
pose, to lay, to levy a =; mettre a 
f— , U fine ; payer une, 1'— de, to pay 
.-» =, penalty of; to forfeit; Stre pas- 
«il)le d'une — de, to forfeit ; to be liable 
to a =1 of. 

AMENDEMENT [a-man-d-man] n. m. 
'. (a, in) amendment ; vmprovement ; 
t. (of things under deliberation) (a, to) 
imendmient; 3. (agr.) means of im- 
provement. 
Faire un — , to make an amendment. 

AMENPER [a-mitn-de] ". a. 1. tO 



amend ; to improve ; 1 to mend ; 2. to 
reclaim (a o.) ; 8. (of deliberative assem- 
blies) to amend (a motion, a bill, &c.) ; 
4 (agr.) to improve (land) ; to manure. 

Agriculteur qui amende les terres, ma- 
nurer. 

Amende, b, pa. p. 1. amended; im- 
j)roved ; 2. (i>ers.) reclaimed; 3. (agr.) 
improved ; manured. 

Non — , 1. unimproved ; 2. (pers.) un- 
reclaimed. Qui pent etre — , reclaim- 
able. 

S'amender, pr. v. 1. to amend ; toim^ 
prove ; 1 to tnend ; 2. (pers.) to be re- 
claim,ed. 

Qui s'amende se repent, amsndm,ent is 
repentance. 

AMENDER, v. n. to amend ; to im- 
prove ; ^ to mend. 

Qui n'amende pas, v/nimproving. 

AMENER [a-m-n*] v. a {DK, from; k, 
to) 1. II to bring (to cause to come with- 
out being carried) ; 2. | to draw ; topiUl ; 
3. § to bring in ; to introduce ; 4. § to 
bring (a. o.) ; to bring (a. o.) over ; 5. § 
to bring (&. th.) about; to bring to 
pass; 6. § to bring forward ; to pro- 
duce ; 7. § (b. s.) to bring on ; to draw 
on; to occasion; to cause; 8. § to in- 
duce ; to bring ; 9. (of dice) to throw ; 
10. (nav.) to haul dmcn; to lower; to 
strike ; 11. (nav.) to strike (a flag, a mast, 
a sail). 

1 . — des peraonnes, di-» animaux, dea voitures ou 
dea bateaux, tu \ini\^ fientotis, aniviala, carriages, or 
boata. 3. — des nitHles, des usages, to bring in, to 
iiitruduce fathiom, uaai/ea. 4. — q. u. a une opi- 
nion, to bruig a. o., to bnng a. o. over ti> an opinion. 
'. — des nuiladies, des nialheurs, to bring on di»- 
fates, miafoHunt: 8. — q. u. a faire q. ch., tu 
bring, ttt induce a. o. to do a. th. 

— (en bas), 1. to bring down ; 2. (en 
dedans), to bring in; 3. (dehors), to 
bring oid ; 4. (en haut), to b/-i7ig tip. 
Mandat d'— , ( V. Mandat). — involon- 
tiiirement, (b. 8.) to bring in ; — a bonne 
fin, to bring about; to bring to an is- 
sue ; — a bon port, to bring to a happy 
issue, fitre amend k, 1. to be brought to ; 

2. to bring o.'s self to ; Stre amene de 
bien loin, (th.) to be far-fetched. Am6ne 1 
(nav.) (command.) 1. amain I 2. dovsn I 

3. in ! 4. strike 1 



not be confounded with ap- 



AM:fcNIE [a-m«-ni] n. £ (med.) sup- 
pression, absence of the 7nenses. 

AMtmrt [a-m«-ni-t«] n. £ 1. I (of 

things) pleasantness; agreeableness ; 
2. § (of persons) amenity; pleasant- 
ness ; qfabiUty ; 3. — s (pi.) amenities. 

AMENORRH:feE [a-m^-no-rfi] u. f 

(med.) am&norrhom. 

AMENTACfiES [a-man-ta-s*] n. £ 

(bot.) amentacem, pi. 

AMENUISER [a-m8-nui-z«] V. a. to r«- 
duce ; to Viin ; to make sleiider. 

AM-ER, i:RE [a-mJr] adj. 1. 1 § biUer ; 
2. (of the sea, of tears) briny. 

Eau amdre, (chem.) another water ; 
principe — , (chem.) bitter principle. 
Assez, un pen — , bitterish. D'un gout 
— , bitter. Rondre — , 1. to make, to 
render bitter ; 2. § to embitter. 

AMER, n. m. 1. II bitter; 2. (of certain 
animals, of fishes) gall. 

Prendre des — s, (med.) to take bitters. 

AMER, n. m. {ja&v.) land-mark ; sea- 
mark. 

AMilREMENT [a-mJ-r-man] adv. § 

bitterly. 

AMEMCAIN, E [a-m«-ri-km, i-n] adj. 
ATnerican. 

Idiot isme — , Americanism: patrio- 
tisme — , Americanism. Naturaliser — , 
to Americanize. 

AMliRICAlN [a-m^-ri-kin] n. m.Amer- 
lean (man). 

AMilRICAINE [a-ra^-ri-k^-n] n. £ 1. 
American iyioiaa,n); 2. (print.) s^ware- 
bodied script : script 

AM6RIQUE (L') [l8-m«.ri-k] p. n. £ 
America. 

L' — septentrionale, du Nord, N^orth 
= ; V — Centrale, Central = ; 1' — Mori- 
dionale, du Sud, South=. Les "ttats 
Unis d"— (m. ^l.) the United States of=. 

AMfeRIC-VKSPUCE [o-mS-rik-vJ.- 
pu-s] |. n. r» AmeHituH VespuUua. 



AMEULONNER [a-meu-lo-n6] V. 8. 



AMERTUME [a-mftr-tu-n.] n. C | § Mt 
tem^.ss. 

— moderee, bitterishnes*. Personno 
chose qui abreuve d' — embitterer q/ 
Sans — , tmeminttered. Vbreuver d* — , 
to embitter ; to be tlie em. *itterer of 

AM]fcTHODIQUE [«-.ii« to-di- k1 >dj 
(did.) vyithout method, order. 

AM:6THYSTE [a-mA-tu-t] a. t (nJ 
amethi/st. 

AM^TIIYSTIN, E [a-m«.ti^tln, \<.\ 
adj. ametliystine. 

AMEUBLEMENT [a-men-bl8-mio) U 

m. \. furniture; set (if furniture ; 'a 
stock of furniture. 

AMEUBLIR [a-meu-blir] T a. (agr.) to 
mellow (lands). 

AMEUBLISSEMENT [a-men-bli-s-miu] 

~ m. (agr.) meUotifing. 

"LONNER [a-i 

stack (hay). 

AMEUTER [a-men-t«] v. a. 1. (hunt) 
to train (do^s) to hunt together ; 2. § to 
raise ; to stir tip ; to work up. 

S'ameutek, pr. V. 1. to rise (seditic.ua 
ly) ; 2. to riot ; to mutiny. 

AMI [a-mi] n. m. E [mi] n. £ | ^f-imd. 

Bon ami, bonne — e, 1. goo<l friend ; 

2. 1 stceet-heart ; — cordial, hearty = ; 

— eprouv6, tried z=; ftrnx—, /tollow — ; 

— solide, steady =. — jusqu'aux autels, 
= as far as cimscience pe^m.its ; — dn 
coeur, bosom = ; anil de cour, hollow =z ; 

— de la famille, de la maison, -^of tht 
family ; — de table, table companion. 
M' — e \ my darling; -r- my duck; 
mon — ! L my = ; 2. 7ny dear I En — , 
friendly; like a friend; sans — ^ 1. 
without z= s ; friendless ; 2. wibefrnend- 
ed; wnfriended. A»"<.ji6rir, se faire dee 
— 8, to gain, to WK/i< =8; n'avoir poini 
d' — 8, etre sans —< to have no =« ; to bn 
friendless; etre — de, \. \ % to be thr 

— of; 2. \%tobea—to; to befri«t^ 
ly to; 3. § (th.) to be the companion. -^ 
4. § (th.) to be grateful, agreeabU,p'jea 
ing to ; se faire 1' — de, to b^riem^ ; Ri 
devenir — s, to be, to become =« again , 
rester — s, to remain =s. #*^ Lee bom 
comptes font les bons — s, short m hory 
ings make long friends. Les Ilet dflf 
— 8, the Friendhj Islands 

AMI, E, adj. \. friendly; 2. (paJnt) 
(oi*" -^oXrin) friendly ; harmonious. 

AMIABLE [a rni-a-bi] adj. X.frier.dly; 
amicable ; kind ; 2. courteous ; 3. ami 
cable. 

A r — , 1. amicably ; 2. (of sales) pri 
vate. 

AMIABLEMENT [a-mi-a-bis-man] adv 
1. amicably ; kindly ; 2. courteously 

3. amicably. 

AMIANTE [a-ini-an-t] n. m. (mln. 
amianthus ; ^ earth, mountain fiaoi. 

AMICAL,E [a-mi-kal] »i}. friendly , 
amdcable. 

Peu — , unfriendly. Caractfere — , di» 
positicji — e, friendliness ; caracttsre peu 
— , (th.) unfriendliness ; disposition peu 
— e, (pers.) ui\friendliness ; etat — , ami- 
cablenesa. 

[Amical has no pi. in the masculine.] 

AMICALEMENT [a-mi-ka-I-man] adT 
friendly; amicably. 

AMICT [a-mi] n. m. amice. 

AMIDON [a-mi-don] n. m. 1. ttarch 
(solid); 2. (chem.)/ec?*^«. 

AMIDONNER [a-mi-do-n«] v. s. (a 4 
m.) to starch. 

AMIDONNERIE [a-mi-d<>-n-rt] n. f 
(a & m.) starch-factory. 

AMIDONNIER [a-mi-do-ni*] n. ui 
starch-maker. 

AMIGDALE, n. £ Fi Ajjtgdalk. 

AMINCIR [a-min-sir] v. a 1. to ma&t. 
to render thin ; 2. to edge off; 8. (citfl*."; 
to thin. 

Samincir, pr. V. to become, to get, tt 
gro^v thin ; to taper. 

AMINCISSEMENT [»-mta.«l-e-man] n. 
m. K 1. making, rendering thin; % 
thinness ; 8. (carp.) thinning. 

AMINEUS [a-mi-neu.] n. m. ioiU 
measurer. 

AMIRAL [a-mi-rail n. m. 1. admirat 
(person) ; 2. admiral (ship) ; 3. giuirtl 
ship ; 4. (conch.) admiral. 

Contre , rear admiral ; grand -* 



AMG 



AMO 



AMP 



& male; < foe; e f6ve; e f6te; (?Je; i il; « lie; o mol; 6 m61e; 6 raort; m sue; & sure; oujooi; 



M(7A = ; vice , vice =. — command 

wt duns un port, jt)ori = ; vaisscau — , 
ic : ='« «Aip ,• flag-ship. 

iMIKALAT [.i-mi-ra-ia] n. m. rawA% 
<(^c«, station of admiral. 

AMIRALE [aini-ra-i] n. C admiral' i 
lady; ad-miral's galley. 

AJlIRAUT:fe [a-mi-r6-t^] n. f. 1. admi- 
ralty ^administration) ; 2. office of ad- 
mtinU. 

Conseil d' — , hoard of admiralty ; bu- 
leenx del'—, (pi.) = -office; hotel de 
P — , =. lie de r — , Admiralty Mand; 
l«e ties de 1'—, the = Idands. 

AMITI^ [a-mi-ti«] n. f. 1. friendship; 
& affection ; love ; fondness ; 3. amity ; 
i. kindness (act) ; favor ; pleasure ; 5. 
— 8, (pi.) regards ; kind regards, pi. ; 
d rth.) sym,patJiy ; 7. (paint) (of colors) 
yW«nd«Atp. 

3. La paLx et 1' — entre nations^ peace and ainitv 
ietwten na1im>. 4. Voulez-TOUi nous laire 1'— "t 
iMl you do ut the iavor, (be m kind t) 

Avec — , 1. with friendship ; 2. lov- 
ingly ; d' — , 1. of^ ; 2. loving ; par — , 
l.for ■=. ; 2. /or /oce. Mes — s i, wi?/ re- 
gard* to ; mes vives — s a, my kindest 
regards to. Avoir de 1'— pour, 1. to en- 
tertain ■=: tmrards ; 2. to hold dear ; 
8. to befHendly to ; envoyer ses — s, to 
tend o.'s regards ; etre sur un pied d' — , 
t» be on friendly terms ; faire ses ^— s, 
k q. u., to give o.'s love to a. o. ; faire • 
feire ses — s a q. u.. to send o.''s love to 
a. o. ; offrir ses — sa.to give o.'s regards 
to ; prendre q. u. en — , to take a liking 
H> a.o.; ^to take to a. o. ; prendre q. 
tt fortement en — , to take a great Uk- 
■ng to a. o. ; '^ to take very much, a 
great deal to a. o. ; avoir pris en — , to 
have taken a great liking to a. o. ; 
to be fond of a. o.; to be partial to 
a.0. 

8yn. — A-vrnA, amocr, tendrhsse, affection, 
■CUNATION. The first two exceed the rest in in- 
tenaty. Amour (love) springs up in a moment, 
Arlthcttt examination and without reflection, and is 
AjtMCterized by ardor and vehemence. AmitU 
IfrimdMp) originates in esteem and coneenialiti^ 
VdifpodtioQ, requires time for its growth, and is 
ibtia^uished by its constancy. Tendrtme (lender- 
0«»t I It lesa ra action than a condition of the heart; 
t sometimes approaches weakness, and is oftener 
•wakened ii women than in men. Affectum (affee- 
ton) is less strong and active than amitii, and more 
tranij Jl than amour ; it is the offspring of relation- 
ship and frequent intercourse. Inclination (incii- 
ntUion) is merely a disposition to love^ which, culti- 
vated, may become anumr or amittd, as cireum- 
■tances direct. 

AMMAN [am-man] n. m. amman 
(chief of a Swiss canton). 

AMM£RAP0UR [am-m«-ra.pour] p. n. 

(eeoe.) Um/merapoora. 
■-IMI[8 - 



AMMI [am-mi] n. m. 1. (hot) ammi; 
ammios ; ^ bishop's woH ; 2. (pharm.) 
ammi; ammios. 

AMMONIA-C, QUE [am-mo-ni-ak, a-k] 

ti/di. (cliem.) ammioniac ; annmoniacat. 
Gaz — , amvmoniacal gas; gomme 
ammoniaque, ammumiacwm ; gum am- 
moniao ; sel — , ammoniacal salt ; sal 
ammoniac. 

AMllONIACAL, E [am-mo-ni-a-kal] 

»dj. (cl em.) anvmoniacal. 

AMMONIACUM [am-mo-ni-a-kom] n. 

BL (chem.) ammoniacum ; am7nomao ; 
gvm ammoniac. 

AMMONIAQUE [am-mo-ni-a-k] n. f 
(chem.) ammonia. 

AMMONITE [am-mo-ni-t] n. £ (conch., 
fcaii.) ammonite. 

AMMONIUM [am-mo-ni-om] n. m. 
(chem.) ammonium. 

AMN:^.SIE [am-n«-zi] n. f. Suspension, 
diminution, total loss of memory. 

AMNIOS [am-ni-os] n. m. (anat) am- 
Qios; amnion. 

AMNIOTIQUE [am-nio-U-k] a(^ 

icbem.) amniotic (acid). 
AMNI8TIE [am-nis-ti] n. t amnesty 
AMNISTii; tara-ni*-"*] D. m. E, n. C 

person pardon^ by ainn :sty. 
AMNISTIER [am-nis-ti«] 7. a. topar- 

don by amnest>/. 

AMODIATION [a-mo-.ii-&-,i6n] n. f. 

ei-ming, leasing, letting oat (of 
ds). 

AMODIER [a-mo-di«] V. a. to farm out 
Jand.sl ; to lease out ; to let out. 

AMOINDRIR [a-moii. drir] rn. "L to 
24 



lessen : tc decrease ; to diminish ; 2. to 
curtail. 
Amoindri, e, pa. p. V. senses of Amodj- 

DKIR. 

^Von — , 1. undiminished ; 2. VMCfur- 
tailed. 

S'amoindrir. pr. v. to lesseti; to de- 
crease ; to diminish. 

AMOINDRIR, V. n. 1. to lessen ; to 
decrease ; to diminish ; 2. to decay. 

AMOINDRISSEMENT [a-moin-dri-,- 

man] n. m. 1. lessening; dimimition; 
decrease ; 2. ou/rtaUment. 

AMOITER, AMOISTIR [a-moa-t*, 
•tir] y. a. +to moisten; to dampen; to 
render moist, damp. 

AMOLLIR [a-mo-iir] v. a. 1. | § .*! sof- 
ten; to mollify ; 2. § to weaken (a. . .) ; 
8. § to enervate (a. o.) ; to unman ; 4. 
(did.) to intenerate. 

S' AMOLLIR, pr. y. 1. 1 § to soften ; to 
be moUifled; 2. § (ih.) to weaken; 3. § 
(pers.) to become, ^ get effeminate, ener- 
vated. 

AMOLLISSEMENT [a-mo-li-s-man] n. 
m. 1. I § softening ; mMificaUon ; 2. § 
weakening; 3. § (pers.) enervation; 
4. (did.) inteneration ; 5. (metal) enu>l- 
lescence. 

Susceptible d'— , (FI senses) \%mol- 
Ufiable. 

AMOME [«-mo-m] n. m. (hot) amo- 
mwm. 

— a grappes, cardamom-tree; — des 
Indes, ginger. 

AMONCELER [a-mon-s-l*] V. a. 1. 1 § 
to heap up; 2. | § to pile np ; 8. B § to 
gather; to collect; 4. § to accmmvii- 
late. 

S'amonoeler, pr. v. 1. H § to Je heaped 
up ; 2. II § to be piled up ; 8. | § to go- 
tlier ; to collect ; 4. § to a<'cumtdate. 

AMONCELLEMENT [«-m6c-s4-l.miin] 
n. m. 1. 1 § heaping v!p ; 2. || § piling 
'"'P ; 3- 8 § gathering, coHecting ; 4. § 
accumidation. 

AMONT [a-m6n] adv. X (nav.) tip the 
stream, river. 

Vent d' — , (nav.) easterly wind ; Le- 
vanter. D'— , 1. up the river; i.from 
up the river; down the river ; down; 

8. (of the wind) easterly; en — , up 
the river ; up ; upicards ; en — de, 
above. 

AMORCE fa-mor-s] n. f. 1. I bait; 2. § 
(b. 8.) bait; lure; allurement; 8. (of 
nre-arms) prime, priming. 

Corne d' — , (of fire-arms) prvmVng- 
hom. Servir d' — , ( V. senses) (of fire- 
arms) to prime. Se laisser prendre a 
r — , to fall into the snare. lis ont pris 
la vllle sans bruler une — , they took the 
totvn without firing a gun. 

AMORCER [a-mor.s«] v. a. 1. to bait; 

2. § (b. s.) to lure ; allure ; to decoy ; 

3. to prime (fire-arms) ; 4. (angling) to 
decoy ; 5. (mil.) to decoy. 

Se laisser — , to aUow one's self to be 
enticed, aUu/red. 

AMORCOIR, n. m. F; jfesAiTcnoiR. 

AMORPHE [a-mor-f] adj. (nau. hist) 
amorphoxm. 

AMORTIR [a-mor-tir] V. a. 1. 1 § to 
deaden ; 2. § to allay ; to weaken ; 8. 
§ to deaden (a blow); 4. to liquidate 
(a debt); to pay off; 5. to break (a 
fall) ; 6. to slacken (a fire) ; 7. to take off 
the strength <y (herbs) ; 8. (fin.) to sink ; 

9. (fin.) (an annuity) to redeem ; to buy 
up; 10. (law) to amortize; 11. (paint) 
to flatten. 

"S'AMOETin, pr. V. 1. 1 § to be deaden- 
ed; 2. § to be allayed ; to subside ; to 
get, to grow weak ; 8. (of a debt) to be 
paid off'; to be liquidated ; 4. (of a fire) 
to slacken ; 5. (fin.) to be sunk ; 6. (fin.) 
(of annuities) to be bought up. 

AMORTISSABLE [a-mor-ti-sa-bl] adj. 
1. (fin.) that can be sunk; 2. (fin.) (of 
annuities) redeemable. 

AMORTISSEMENT [a-mor-ti-t-man] n. 
m. 1. (arch.) pediment; 2. (arch.)^wt8/t- 
ing ; 3. (of a dabt) liquidation ; pay- 
ing off; 4. (fin.) sinking- 5. (fin.) (of 
annuities) redimption; buying up; 
6. t (law) amortisation ; amortizement. 

Caisse d' — , (fin.) sinking-fund ; fonds 
d'— , Hnking-fmd. 



AMOUR [a-mour] n. m. 1. love; % 

lovingness ; 8. — s, (pi.) (b. s.) amortri, 
pi. ; 4. (pers.) love ; ^g- passion : 
flame; 5. (of animils) heat; 6. (myth.) 
Lave; Cupid. 

propre, de soi, self-love; second 

— , aft^r- =. Digne d' — , lovely ; eperdv 
d' — ,=^-lorn; fndigae d' — , unlovely; 
malade d" — , = -si<k. Dame de ses —a. 
lady-love ; lacs d'— , = -knot ; pencbwit 
a r — , amorousness. D" — , 1. o/=; i 
loving. Avec — , lovingly ; en — , 1. (c 
animals) in heat; 2. (agr., hort) in a 
state of fermentation ; par — , for = - 
pour r— de, 1. for the = of; 2. for Uii 
sake of; for. . .'i sake ; pour 1' — de Dieo, 
1. /or God s sake ; 2. for charity's sake ; 
pour r — <le vous,ydr your sake. Avoii 
del' — pour, to be in = with; etre ma- 
i«de d' — , tobe=. -sick ; faire 1' — , to woo ; 
1^~ to court ; faire 1' — a, to woo ; ^ 
to make = to; ^"to court; 'anguir 
d' — , to be ■=: -sick ; prendre de 1' — 
(pour), to be in = (with). Dont 1'— est 
irflni, * all-loving ; qui languit d' — ,z= 
•szck. #*;^Froides mains, chaudea — «, 
cold hands, warm heart. 

Sim. — Amour, Galanterik. Amour has an in- 
dividual for its object ; galanterie, the sex. Amour 
is !be offspring of the heart; galanierie, of the 
seiie--s tnd appetites. An excess of amour pre- 
du«« jealousy j of galanterie, libertinism. 

AMOUR A CHER fa-mou.r»-.h«] V. a. 1 
(b. s.) to m,ake ...in love. 

— q u. de q. ch., to make a. o in love with a. th. 

Amourache, e, pa. p. (b. B.) (dk, with) 
^ smitten ; in love. 

Cesser d'etre — , to be disenamoured. 

S'amopraciier, pr. v. ^ (b. s.) (db) to 
become emmoured {of) ; ^to be atiiii- 
ten (with) : to fall in love (viith). 

AMOUIETTE [a-mon-ri-l] I. t t 
IWlove; 2. love-affair; 8. — «, (pL) 
(culin.) mc/rrow of calf &, shie^.'t lotna. 

Par—, (b. 8.) for love. 

AMOUIcEUSEMENT [a-mflB-n.A.wnfir} 
adv. 1. vDith love ; 2. lowiigl/y ,• 8. (b. a J 
amoronslu. 

AMOUREU-X, SE [»-iBo«-r»i. od-«J 
adj. 1. J § (pers.) (dk, with) in lore ; & 
(th.) of love ; love. ..; 8. (b. s.) (bx, <yi 
amorous; 4. (paint) «<)/<,• delicate. 

— par-dessuB la tete, over head iwu'. 
ears in love. Deveair — , to become 
enamowred ; 6tre — (de), to be a lover 
(of) ; to be enamoured (of) ; to be in 
love (with) ; etre — de ses opinions, to be 
wedded to one's opinions ; etre — dee 
onze mille vierges, to be a general 
lover. 

AMOUREU-X, n. m. SE, n. C lover, - 
m. ; wooer, m. ; suitor ; ^^ Sfweet^ 
heart, m. f 

AMOVIBILIT]& [a-mo-Ti-bi-li-t«] n. 1 1. 
(pers.) Viability to removal ; 2. (of of 
fices) quality of being held during 
pleas^ire. 

AMOVIBLE [a-mo-vi-bl] adi. 1. (pers.) 
removable ; 2. (of offices) hdd during 
pleasure. 

Avoir un emploi — , des fonctions — a, 
fetre — , to hold an office during plea- 
sure. 

AMPi;LID:6ES [an-p«-ll-d«] n. C (pi.) 
(bot) vine-tribe. 

AMPilLITE [an-p«-li-t] n. t ampelite: - 
vine-earth. 

AMPHIBIE [in-fi-W] a/lj. (nat ktot) 
amphibious. 

Nature — , amphibiousTiesa. 

AMPHIBIE, n. m. 1. (zooL) ampha 
Man; amphibious animal; — s, (j>Li 
amphibia ; 2. ^^ § (pers.) Jack qf<A . 
trades ; 8. § (pers.) man cf two oAtgi, 
mAlar trades. 

AMPHIBIOLOGIE [an.fi-bi.o-l» ■«] a. ^ 
amphibiology ; treatise on amphibiam 
animals. 

AMPHIBOLOGIE [ia-fl-bo-io-jJ] n. i 
amphibology. 

AMPHIBOLOGIQUE [an-a-bo-lo-Ji-k i 
adj. amphibological. 

AMPHIBOLOGIQUEMENT [i»4i 
bo-lo-ji-k-man] adv. ampMbologioaUu, 

AMPHIBRAQUE [an-fi-bra-k] n. m. 
(vers.) amphibraeh. 

AMPHlCTYONIDE ffa-fflt-ti •-.l-^^ 
adj. (Gr. hist) havwng a n^ht <y OMno 



AMU AN 






A 


NA 


<w joute; «M jeu; e^jeune; eiipeur; dftpan; i« pin 


on bon ; un bran ; 


♦11 llq. 


*gn llq. 





.T 



resentea in the Amphictyowic coun- 



AMPHICTYONIE [an-flk-ti-o-ni] n. f. 
(Or. hist) representation in the Am- 
vhictyonio cmmcil. 

AMPHICTYONIQUE [an-fik-ti-o-ni-k] 
li^j. (Gr. hist) (Mnphictyonic. 

AMPHICTYONS [an-fik-ti-6n] n. m. 
f6r. hist) amphictyons; members of 
Lie Amphictuonia etni/iicil. 

AMPHIGENE [an-fi-jA-n] n. m. (min.) 
^nphigene ; Vesxi/vian. 

AMPHIGOUEl [.in-fi-gou-rij n. m. 1. 
burlesque piece ; 2. unintelligible non- 
ter.«e; ntymensical stuff; 3. rigma- 
role. 

AMPHIGOUEIQUE [an-fi-gou-ri-k] adj. 
I. burleique ; 2. imintelligible ; luyii- 
sensicai. 

AMP HIM ACRE [an-fi-ma-kr] n. m. 
(vers.) amphimacer. 

AMPIIISOIENS [an-fl-81-in] n. m. 
(astr., geog.) ampMscians ; amphis- 
<yii, pi. 

AMPHISMILE [an-fi-smi-l] n. m. 
(surg.) two-edged bistoury. 

amphith:6Atkal [sn-fi-w-a-trai] 

■di. (Rom. hist) amphitheatrical. 

AMPHITH:6ATRE [an-fi-t^-Str] n. m. 
1. amphitheatre ; 2. (ant) theatre. 

De r — , (Kom. hist) amphitheatri- 
cal ; en — , amphitheatral ; in the form, 
ofa/n amphitheatre. 

AMPHITRITE [an-fi-tri-t] n. f. 1. p. 
(myth.) Amphitrite ; 2. (nat hist) am- 
phitrite ; 8. ** the sea. 

AMPHITRYON [an-fi-tri-6n] n. m. 1. 
(Gr. hist) Amphitryon ; 2. host (master 
of the house) ; 3. treater. 

AMPHORE [an-fo-r] n. t (Eom. ant) 
amphora. 

AMPLE [an-pl] adj. 1. | (of place) spa- 
oums ; large ; roomy ; 2. (of clothing, 
furniture) fiM; large; 8. 1 § ample; 
AM ; 4. § plentiful.; 5. § copious. 

AMPLEMENT [an-pl8-man] adv. § 1. 

ixtvifly ; fully ; at large; largely; 2. 
ji/fiit^fidly ; 8. copiously. 

AMPLEUR [an-pieur] n. £ 1. 1 (of place) 
UXioiousness ; largeness ; roominess ; 
A (of clothing, ftirniture)/Mi««88,' 8. B § 
itmpimiess. 

AMPLIATI-F. VE [an-pli-a-tif, i-r] adj. 
(of tl:e pope's briefs or bulls) addi- 
tional. 

AMPLIATION [an-pli-fi-.i6n] n. f. 1. 
(adm.) ojfiaial copy (of an act) ; 2. (law) 
exemphjication. 

— d'une quittance, duplicate of a re- 
ceipt. Pour — , (adm.) a true copy. 

AMPLIFICATEUR [an-pU-fi-ka-teur] 
n. m. (b. 8.) amipUJier. 

AMPLIFICATION [an-pU-fi-k&-.i6n] n. 
C (rhet) amplification. 

AMPLIFIER [an-pii-fl6] V. a. 1. to am- 
plify; 2. to estpatiate, to enlarge on, 

pli-tu-d] n. f. 1. (astr.) 
amplitude ; 2. (geom.) amplituAie. 

AMPOULE [an-pou-l] n. f 1. ampulla 
(phial for holy oil); 2. blister (on the 
hands or feet); 3. (bot) bladder; 4. 
(med.) ampulla ; bulla ; bubble ; ^ 
blister. 

Se couvrir d' — s, to blister ; 8'61ever en 
— , se former en —,to = ; faire venir des 
—6, to = \to bring blisters. 

AMPOULfi [an-pou-i«] adj. (liter.) tur- 
gid; twmid; inflated; bombastic; 
fustian ; 2. (metal.) bUstered. 

AMPOULER [an-pou-l«] v. a. (metaL) 
ta blister. 

AMPOULER. V. n. (metal.) to blister. 

AMPOULETTE [an-pou-le-t] n. t (nav.) 
'iiMik ; glass ; ho^t,r-glass. 

AMPUTATION [in-pu-t&-.i«n] n. t 
Srcrg.) amputation. 

Faire une — , to perform an=:; faire 

— de, to amputate ; ^ to cut ofF. 
AMPUTl!: [an-pu-i6l n. m. E, n. f. 

person who has had a Umb ampu- 
tated. 

AMPUTER [an-pu-u] V. a. (surg.) to 
amputate. 

— q. u., — q. u. d\in membre, to = 
a, o.'« Umb ; 6tre ainput6, se faire — , to 
\nv« a Umb amputated. 

AMULETTE {a mu-U-t] n. £ amultt 



AMURAT [a-mu-ra] p. n. m. Amtt- 
rath. 

AMURE [a-mu-r] n. £ (nav.) (of sails) 
tack. 

Premiere — de misaine, fore-tack; 
grande — , — de grande voile, main-tack; 
avoir les — s k babord, to saAl on the lar- 
board tack ; changer d' — s, to take an- 
other tack. 

AMURER [a-mn-r«] V. a. to haul 
aboard the tack of (a, sail). 

Amure la grande voile ! (nav.) aboard 
main tack! f:tre amure tribord, to 
sail on the starboard tack. 

AMU8ABLE [a-mu-za-bi] adj. X amu- 
aable; capable of amusement. 

AMU8ANT, E [a-mu-zan, t] adj. amus- 
ing ; entertaining ; ** amuaive. 

Peu — , unamusing ; vmenif^mning. 
D'une maniSre— e, amusingly; enter- 
tainingly. 

AMUSEMENT [a-mn-i-man] n. m. 1. 
amus ement ; entertainment ; sport ; 
i^~fun ; 2. pastime ; 8. (b. 8.) tricing. 

Grand — , 1. great = ; 2. |0f~ Jlne, 
good fun. Sans — , without = ; un- 
a/m')i8ed; imentertained. 



period of rest, or relaxation ; i 
lig-ht and pleasing entertainment ; divertissement ia 
accompanied by more exciting pleasures; rejauit- 
tance is characterized by outward demonatrationa 
of satisfaction. 

AMU8ER [a-mu.««] V. a. (dk, tcith; d, 
with, in) 1. to amuse ; to entertain ; 2. 
(b. 8.) to am~ise (deceive a. o.) ; to trifle 
with ; 8. to talk a/icay (a. th.). 

-r- le tapis, to talk the time a/way ; to 
spin mtt the time. 

8'am08RR, pr. V. 1. to amuse o.'s self; 
to entertain o.^s self; to sport ; 1. ^ to 
keep it up ; 8. to lose tim,e ; to loiter. 

— bien, to = well; ^ to have fine, 
goodfim ; — de q. u., to amuse o.'s self 
at a. o.'a escpense ; ^ to make sport at, 
of a. 0. , — ^ la bagatelle, h, la moutarde, 
to stamd, to sit trifling; to trifle o.'s 
time away ; — avec des riens, to trifle ; 
1 to peddle about. Personne qui s'amuse, 
sp<yrter, entertainer. Pour — , to amuse 
o.'a self; to entertain o.'s self; ^ for 
o.'s sport Qri ne s'amuse pas, -wn- 
amused. 

AMUSETTE . -o-z4-t] n. £ cAiicfs 
play. 

AMYCTIQUE [a-miiL ti-k] adj. (med.) 
cauterizing ; caustic 

AMYCTIQUE, n. m. % (med.) cau- 
terizing, ca-ustio medicine. 

AMYDON, F. Amidon. 

AMYGDALE la-mig-da-l] n. £ (anat) 
almond ; almond of the throat ; tonsil. 

AMYGDALOIDE [a-mig-da-lo-i-d] n. 
£ (niin.) amygdaloid. 

AMYLACE, E [a-mi-la-i«] adj. amyla- 
ceotis. 

AMYLIQUE [a-mi-U-k] adj. (chem.) 
amylic. 

AMYNTIQUE [a-min-U-k] adj. (med.) 
strengthening (plaster). 

AN [an] n. m. year (considered as a 
whole); ^twelve-month. 

Le nouvel — , the new year ; 1' — du monde, de 
Notre-Seigueur, the year of the world, of our Lord. 

Un — , a year ; ^ a twelvemonth ; — 
bissextile, bissecetile=.; ^ leap =; ses 
— 8, o.'« early =« ; 1' — pass6, last 
tons les — s, yearly ; every = ; tous 
les deux — s, de deux — s en deux — s, 
biennially ; every two =« ; 1' — de grflce, 
(adiliin.) in the =^ of our Lord ; 1*^— de 
Notre-Seigneur, in the = of Ofur Lord ; 
— etjour, (law) a =z'a.nd'a. day; bon 
— , mal — , one = icith another. Animal 
ftg6 d'un — , yearling. Bout de 1' — , ser- 
vice du bout de 1' — , service of the first 
anni/versary ofo.'s death ; jour de Y — , 
new ='« day. D'un — , 1. of a = ; 2. (bot) 
yearly; d'uil — , fig6 d'un — , 1. of a, 
one = old ; 2. yearly ; par — , annually; 
a =. Avoir . . . — s, 4tre ag6 do . . . — s, to 
be... ^=s old, of age ; tobe. .. =s old ; 
n'avolr pas vingt — s, not to be twenty ; 
\ to be in o.'s teens ; avoir pass6 vingt 
— s, to be over twenty ; ^ to be out of 
o.'s teens; 6tre charge d' — s +, to be 
stricken in z=ls ; donner k q. u. . . . — s, 
to take a. o. tobe... -=8 oUl ; loner pour 



u 1 — ,l.to hire by the = ; 2. fc> hiroibf 
a =. Venir d'avoir . . . — b, to be jn*A 
turned of. . . =«. 

Srm. — An, annek. An is ft determinate elemetf 
of time, — we think of a year without regard to ite 
duration; but annee is a determinate dwration, 
divisible into parts. 

ANA [a-nS] n. m. 1 ana (collection of 
memorable sayings) ; 2. ana (terminatiai 
added to the name of ai author); 8 
(pharm.) ana. 

ANABAPTI8ME [a-M-ba- U.-m] n. la 
anabaptism. ((loctrine). 

ANABAPTISTE [a^-ba-ti.-t] n. m 
anabaptist. 

D' — , des — 8, anabaptistio ; en — . 
anabaptisttcaliy. 

ANACAMPTIQUE [a-na-kanp-ti-k] a^J. 

(acoust & opt) reflected ; rejleeting. 

ANACARDE [a-na-kar-d] n. m. (JaoL\ 
anacardium.; cashew-nut , 

— d'Occident, — . 
ANACARDIER [a-na-kar-di«] a m. 

(bot) casTiew ; cashew-tree. 

— d'Occident, =. 
ANACATHARSIE [a-na-ka-tar-ii] n. t 

(med.) vomiting. 

ANACATHARTIQUE [a-na-ka-Uur-t k] 
adj. (med.) emetic. 

ANACHOR^TE [a-na-ko-r4-t] n. m. 
anchorite ; hermit. 

ANACHRONISME [a-na-kro-nit-m] n. 
m. 1. anachronism ; 2. prolepsis. 

Qui contiont un — , anachronistic. 

ANACLA8TIQUE [a-na-klas-U-k] n. t 
(opt) dioptrics. 

ANACLASTIQUE, adj. (opt) 

Point — , point at which a ray i» r«- 
fi'acted. 

ANACOLUTHE [a-na-ko-Iu-t] n. t 
(gram.) anacoluthon (ellipsis). 

ANACONCHYLISME [a-raa-ka. U. 
li»-m] n. m. (med.) gargling. 

ANACREONTIQUE [a-na-kri-in-tt-k] 

adj. aiKicreontio. 

Poeme — , anacreontic. 

ANACT:feSIE [a nak.t6-zi] n, £ (mod.) 
recovery of strength. 

ANADIPL68E [a-na-di-pl6-i] n. 1 
(rhet) anadiplosis. 

ANAGALLIS, n. m. V. Motjbon. 

ANAGOGIE [a-na-go-ji] n. £ 1. (theoL 
& philol.) anagoge; 2. — s, (pi.) (ana 
hist.)festival in honor of Venus. 

ANAGOGIQUE [a-na-go-ji-k] h4J. 

(theol.) anagogical. 

ANAGRAMMATI8ER [ft-n«-gr»-mft-« 
z«] V. n. to anagrammatize. 

ANAGRAMMATISTE [s-na-gnnnn. 
ti»-t] n. m. anagrammatist 

AN AGRAMME [a-na-gra-m] n. m. ana- 
gram. 

Par — , 1. anagrammaUc ; anagram- 
matical; 2. a/nagrammatically. 

ANA6RAPHE [a-na-gra-f] n. m. (med./ 
prescription ; recipe. 

ANAGYRI8, ANAGYRE fa-nu-ji-rit 
ji-r] D, m. (bot) bean trefoil. 

— f6tide, (bot) =. 
ANALECTES [a-na-lik-t] n. m. (phlloL) 

analects, pi. ; select fragments. 

ANALEME [a-na-lA-m] n. m. (astr.) 
analemma. 

ANALEP8IE [a-na-lep-.i] n. £ (med.) 
analepsis. 

ANALEPTIQUE [a-na-Up-ti-k] acQ 
(med.) analeptic. 

ANALEPTIQUE, n. m. (med.) ana 
leptic. 

ANALG.fiSIE [a-nal-j*.zi] n. £ (med. 
absence of pain. 

ANALOG IE [a-na-lo-ji] n. £ analogy. 

Qualit6 d'avoir ile 1'—, analogic<U 
ness ; personne qui utablitdes — 8, an 
alogist Par — , by = ; sans — , 1. icith 
out = ; 2. unanalogical, unanaloi,&M 
Conclure, juger, raisonner par -, to aon 
dude, to juag\ to reason from =. 

ANAL'OGIQUE [a-na-!..ji-k] &(3^. OMO 

logical. 

Non, peu — , unanalouical. 
ANALOGIQUEMENT [«-n«-lo-JI-h 
man] adv. analogically. 

Expliquer — , to analogis6. 

ANAL0GI8ME [a-na-lo-jis-m] n. a 
(philos.) analogism. 

ANALOGTIE fa-na-Io.g] adj. 1. fi, to 
analogous; 2. (lud.) analnyovs; (t*c 
25 



ANA 



ANC 



ANE 



a m«l; d niftle; «' f^; i f&ve; i fSte; ^Je; < 11; {tie; o mol; d nioi»; f!i inoit, u sac; & sClre: oujovat 



Non, peu — ^, imanalogaus. D'nne 
oaanidre — , anaioffousli/. 

AiJALTSE [a-na-ii-z] h. 1 1. analysis; 
i. (gram.) parsing. 

En derniere — , in condition; in the 
iM'^e. Faire une — , to muke an analy- 
ti»; faire 1"—, (gram.) to parse; faire 
. - -, de, l.io analyze; to make an-=.of; 
k (grani.) to parse. 

ANALYSER [a-na-U-.*] V. a. 1. to a«- 
Oly^ ; 2. (gram.) to parse. 

AwAtTSE, E, pa. p. F senses of Analy- 

Non — ^1 1. tmanalyzed ; 2. (gram.) twi- 
pa/rsed. 

ANALTSTE [a-na-lii-t] n. m. oma- 
h/st. 

ANALTTIQUE [a-na-ii-ti-k] adj. ami- 
'/ytic; analytical. 

ANALYTIQUE, n. £ (sing.) analy- 
Ucs, pL 

— d'Aristote, Aristotle's ■=. 
ANALYTIQUEMENT[H-na-li-ti-k-inin] 
•dv. analytically. 

ANAMN^SIE [a-nam-n^-zi] n. C re- 
tum of memory. 

ANAMOKPHOSE [a-na-mor-fft -z] n. f. 



(persp.) anamorphosis. 

ANAF""' 



ANAS [a-na-nA] n. m. (hot) 1. (tree) 
fwne ; pine-plant ; 2. (tree, fruit) pine- 
apple. 

Champ d' — , pinery ; serre k — , pi- 
nery. 

ANAPESTE [a-D8-p4.-t] n. m. (vers.) 
anapest. 

ANAPESTIQUE [a-na-pA.-ti-k] hdj. 
(vers.) anapestic. 

Mesure — , anapestic. , 

ANAPHOKE fa-na-fo-r] n. t (rhet) 
tmaphora. 

ANAPHEODISIE [a-na-fro-di-zi] n. C 
(Eied.) absence of sexual desire. 

ANAPL:^K0TIQUE [a-na-pl«-ro-ti-k] 
■dj. (med.) amiplerotic. 

ANAPTYSIE [a-nap-ti-zi] n. C (med.) 
vpedoration. 

ANARCH IE [a-nar-thi] n. f. anarchy. 

ANAECHIQUE [a-nar-ihi-k] a^j. an- 
arcfdeal; anarchic. 

ANARCHISER [a-nv .hi-i«] v. a. $ to 
QicroiD into anarchy. 

ANAECHISTE r,.o,r..hU-t] n. m. f. 
OfiuirchM^ 

ANAEEHIQTTE ri».»ar.n-k] n. m. (ich.) 
u>olf-fish. 

— loup, 1. cat-Jish ; 2. ravenous wolf- 
fish. 

ANAREHOPIE [a-nar-ro-pi] n. f. (med.) 
rush ofhlood, to tlie v^per parts of the 
body. 

ANASARQU^ [a-na-wr-k] n. f. (med.) 
anasarca ; ^ dropsy of the skin. 

Qui a rapport a 1' — , anasarcous. 

ANA8PASE [a-na-.pa-z] n. f (med.) 
anaspasis ; contraction of the. stovn- 
ach. 

AUA8TASE [a-na-tta-zj p. n. m. ^71- 

astasius. 

ANASTOMOSE [a-na-.to-mfi-z] n. f. 

(anat.) anastomosis ; itwseiUutimi. 

ANASTOMOSER [a-na-.to-m6-z6] v. ft. 

(anat.) to inosculate. 

8' ANASTOMOSER, pr. V. (anat.) to inos- 
yulate. 

ANASTOMOTIQUE [a-na-.to-mo-ti-k] 
»dl. (anat.) anastomotic. 

ANASTROPIIE [a-na-.tro-f] n. f. 
(gram.) anastrophe. 

ANATHfiMATISER [a-na-t«-ma-ti-i«] 

r. a. to anathematize. 

ANATHEME [a-na-U-m] adj. a/nathe- 
}fUieed. 

ANATHi;ME, n. m. anatliema. 

jy — ,\.of-=.\ 2. a/nathematical ; en 
(Inne d'— , anathemaUcaUA/. Dire — 
\ to denounce an = against ; frapper 
r — , to anaihemaUze ; lancer mi — ,to 
V^rl an =. 

ANATIFE [a-na-ti-f] n. m. (moll.) ha/r- 
vi'.'le. 

ANATOCISME [a-na-to-M.-m] n. m. 
wmpound interest. 

ANATOLIE (L') [la-na-to-li] p. n. f. 
igeoc.) Anatolia; NatoUa. 

AN ATOM IE [a-na-to-mij n. f. | § an- 
ttotny. 

— c«)nipar6e, (did.) •'omparati^e =; 
KHiUjmy ; — bumaine de rh»>»"ine, = 



of man. Faire T — de, to anatomize; 
to dissect. 

ANATOMIQUE [a-na-to-mi-k] adj. an- 
atomical. 

ANATOMIQUEMENT [a-na-to-mik. 

manl adv. anatomically. 

ANATOMISER [a-na-to-mi-z«] V. a. ft 

anatomize. 

ANATOMISTE [a-na-to-mi»-t] n. m. 
anatomist. 

ANATR:6SIE [a-na-trf-ii] n. C (surg.) 
trepanning. 

ANATR1P8IE [a-na-trip-.i] n. f. (med.) 
friction. 

ANATRON [a-na-tron] n. m. (chem.) 



ANATEOPE [a-na-tro-p] n, £ (med.) 
vomiting; naiisea. 

ANAUDIE [a-nft-di] n. £ (med.) want 
of voice. 

ANAXAGORE [a-nak-»a-go-r] p. n. m. 
(class.) Anairagoras. 

ANAXARQUE [a-nak-Mr-k] p. n. m. 
(clas-s.) A7Mirurchus. 

ANAXIMANDEE [a-nak-ai-man-dr] p. 
n. in. (class.) AiuitHmander. 

ANC]5:TRES [aii-.*-tr] n. m. (pi.) an- 
cestors, pl. ; ancestry, sing. ; forefa- 
thers, pi. 

Un de ses — , on ancestor; one ofo.''a 
=s. D' — , deses— , 1. ofo.'8=zs; 2. 
ancestral. 

ANCHE [an-.h] n. £ (©f wind-instru- 
ments) reed. 

ANCHILOPS [an-ki-lop-.] n. m. (surg.) 
anchilops ; abscess in Oie eye. 

ANCHISE [an-ehi-z] p. n. m. (class.) 
Ancliises. 

ANCIIISIADES [an-*hi-zi-a-d] p. n. m. 
(class.) son of Anchises (patronymic of 
./Eneas). 

ANCH(»IS [an-.hoa] n. m. (ich.) an- 
chovy. 

ANCHOISi: [an-ihoa.z«] adj. picld^A 
like anchovies. 

ANCIEN, NE [an-uiii, i-nl adj. 1. an- 
cient ; 2. old ; ** older; 8. by-gmie ; 4. 
old; former; late: form^erly ; 5. (in 
otSce) senior. 

I. 1^8 — »^crivain«, ancient mntert ; Vaneienne 
hiatoire, ancient history ; lea languea anciennet^ the 
ancient languai/et. i. Un — Edifice, an old build- 
ing ; V— TeaJament, the old Testament. 3. D'— a 
acteurs, by-gone iterformtrt. 4. Ud — - maire, an 
old, former mayor. 

Plus — , 1. (in age) elder ; 2. (in office) 
senior ; le plus — , 1. (in age) the eldest; 
2. (in office) the senior ; moins — , junior. 

ANCIEN [an-aiin] n. m. 1. ancie-tit; 2. 
-i- codger ; old codger ; 2. (in office) se- 
nior; 8. (of the Israelites, Presbyterians) 
elder. 

L'— , ler" old Scratch (the Devil). 
Conseildes — s, 1. (of the presbyterians) 
eldership ; 2. (Fr. hist.) council of the 
Ancie7i.ts; quality d'— , (of the Israelites) 
eldership. 

ANCIENNEMENT [an..ij-n-m«n] adv. 
1. anciently; of old; of yore; % for- 
merly. 

ANCIENNET6 [an-.ie-n-t*] n. £ 1. 
andentness; 2. old n ess ; 3. (of families) 
ancientry ; 4. (in office) seniority. 

De toute — , from time immemo- 
rial. 

ANCILE [an-.i-lj n. m. (Rom. hist) 
andle ; sacred shield of Mars. 

ANCOLIE [an-ko-ii] n. £ (bot) coltim- 
bine. 

ANCONE [an-ko-n] p. n. £ (geog.) An- 
oona, 

ANCRAGE, n. m. t K MoitillaCxK. 

ANCRE [an-kr] n. £ 1. II § anchor; 2. 
(carp.) brace ; 8. (horol.) anchor; 4 — s, 
(pl.) (nav.) anchorage. 

Seconde — , (nav.) best bower anchor, 
best bower. — daffourche, smuU =; 

— de ^oi, flood ■=.; — de large, »ea=; 

— de misericorde, de salut, s)ieet-=.; — 
de tou6e, kedge; strearh =. Forgeur 
d' — , = -smith ; J as d'— , (nav.) = -stock. 
A r — , 1. ** anchoring ; 2. (nav.) at=.. 
Chasser sur ses — s, dragner ses — s, to 
drag the = ; etre a 1'—, (nav.) to lie, to 
lie ot = ;to ride ; to ride at-= ; fatiguer 
k r— , to HJe hard ; ne pas fatiguer k 
V — , to ri(/i easy ; jeter, moniller 1' — , to 
oasit, to drop =,''6ver 1' — de, to un- 
mo^r irk ship') ; lover son — . tniraigb ■=. : 



mettre 1' — a poste, to stmo the = ; tntil 
bon sur ses — s, dans un coup de vent, ft 
ride out a gale ; laisser tomber ses — 9 
to let go the =. Qui n'est pas a T — , vn 
anchored. 

ANCRER [at-kr^] V. IV ^ t II to anchor, 
2. § to anc/ior (establish, fix). 

Ancke, e, pa. p. 1. (nav.) at anc^io^ 
2. § anchored (established, flx«d). 

Qui n'est pas — 1, unanchored. 

S'ancrke, pr. v. to anchor (establls; 
fix) o.'s self; to be anchored ; to get j 
footing. 

ANDAILLOTS [an-da-io*] n. m. (pl ) 
(nav.) cringles; hanks. 

ANDAIN [an-din] n. m. (agr.) gwath. 

ANDALOUS, E [an-d»-lou, t] adj. <k 
n. m. £ Andalnsian. 

ANDALOUSIE (L') [lan-da-lon-zi] p. n. 
£ (geog.) Andalusia. 

ANDANTE [an-dan-t] adv. (mus.) ar^- 
dante. 

ANDANTE, ANDANTE [an-dan-t, u\ 
n. m. (mus.) andante. 

ANDELLE, V. Bore. 

ANDOUILLE [an-dou-i*] n. £ 1. (o( 
pigs) chitterlings ; 2. (of tobacco) twist 

ANDOUILLER [an-dou-i^*] n. dv. 
(hunt) antler. 

Premier — , 5row=; second — , bt9- 
antler. A — s, antlered. 

ANDOUILLETTE [an-dou-ii-t*] n. t 
force-tneat ball. 

ANDR:^ [an-drt] p. n. m. Andrew. 

ANDRINOPLE [an-dri-no-pl] p. n. 

(geog.) Adrianople. 

ANDROGYNE [an-dro-ji-n] a^. 1. 
(bot) androgynous; 2. (zooL) andrt.-gY- 
nous. 

ANDROGYNE, n. m. androgynut; 
herm aphrodite. 

ANDEOlDE [an^lro-i-d] u. m. <Kt- 
^roid. 

ANDROMANIE [an-dro-in»-n!] n. i 
{med.)nymphomauia. 

ANDROMAQUE [an.dro-in»-k] p. a ! 
(class.) Andromache. 

ANDROMi:DE [an-dro-mi-d] n. C L 

(astr.) Andromeda; 2. (myth!) And/ro- 
m,eda. 

ANDRONIQUE [an-dro ni-k] p. n. m. 
Andronicus. 

ANDROPOGON [an-dro-po-g6n] n. m 
(bot) andropogon ; ^ camePs hay. 
ANDROTOMIE [an-dro-to-mi] n. t 



(anat) androtomy. 

ANE[r - 



« ; di 



n. m. 1. (mam.)o««,-2. ( 



jack-ass; ^ donkey; 8. § (pers.) as»; 
jack-ass ; dolt ; dtmce ; blockhead. 

— sauvage, vrild ass ; — ray6, e«bra. 
Bonnet d' — ,fooV8 cap ; dos d — , 1. r= '< 
back ; 2. (const) sh^mng ridge ; pont 
aux —8, ='« bridge ; promenade a — , 
donkey-riding ; tete d — , 1. ='s-head ; 
2. (ich.) bull-head ; voiture k — , donkey - 
chaise. D'— | § \. of an = ; of asses ; 
2. asinine ; = -like. Comme un — , = 
-like. Aller, monter sur un — , to ride 
on an =, a donk^ ; faire 1' — , to play 
the fool ; faire une partie a — s, to go oat 
donkey-riditm ; monter k — , to ride on 
an=, a donkey. ^% A laverlatete d"un 
— on perd sa lessive, there is no wash- 
ing a blackamoor white ; c'est le pont 
aus — s, every fool knows that. ^,% On 
ne saurait faire boire un — s'il n'a soi£ 
un — qui n'a pas soi£ you may take a 
horse to water, but you cannot mukt 
him. drink. 

AN:feANTIR [a-n«-an-tir] V. a. 1. | to 

annihilate ; 2. § to annihilate (a. th.) 
to destroy ; 8. § to crush (a. o.) ; to d^ 
stray ; to ruin ; 4 § to astound (a. o. ) 



i;tre anSanti, ( V. senses) 1. to be eio 
hausteA ; 2. to be thunder-struck. Qil 
peut 6tre — 1, annihilable. 

8'aneantik, pr. v. ( V. senses of Anb- 
antir) 1. li § to come, io be rtduced tc 
nothing / 2. + § to hwmble o.'s se^. 

S«n.— ANiiANTiR, DftTRUiRB. Whit One de- 
truit (destrnt/s) ceaaea U) exiat, but tniota of ii niaj 
remain; whatone aneantii (annihi/ates}Aita^ptiar 
altogether. Atv'antissem^nt is tola! destruction.. 

AN]feANTISSEMENT[a-n*-8n-ti-«-n.an; 
n. m. 1. 1 § annihilation: 2. § d^struo- 
t> on ■ ruin ; 8. %pro8tratum of strength 
debility; lovmeas;^. + ustf-humi-K^ 



AJSG 



A^l 



AWN 



(Hijoute; «wjeu; aiijeune; etipeur; ore pan; in pin; onbon; wn brui ; 'U Jq. ; *gn Uq. 



ANECDOTE [»-nik-do-t] n. f. anec- 
dote. 

ANEODOTIER [an^k-dotifi] n. m. re- 
later of anecdotes. 

AKECDOTIQUE [a-nek-do-ti-k] adj. 
anecdoUcal. 

Comedie — , dramatic anecdote. 

AN^MOLOGIE [a-n6 mo-lo-ji] n. d ane- 

AJS^fikOMlCTEE [a-n«-mo-m4t-r] n. m. 

tnemometer; wiiid-gauge. 

AN6M0NE L«-n«-nio-i)] n. £ (bot) ane- 
mone; 1 vnnd-flower. 

— hepatique, (bot) noliU liverwort. 
— de mer, (I'ol.) sea anemone. Griflfe, 
pA.ije d' — , anemone-root. 

ANEMOSCOPE [a-n6-mo-.ko-p] n. m. 
(phys.) wnemoBcope ; wind-dial. 

ANERIE [a-n-ri] n. C 1. ffross igno- 
rance; 2. blunder of an ignoramus; 
gross hlwnder. 

Faire une — , to commit the blunder 
of an ignoramus. 

ANESSE [a-ni-«] n. f. 8he-as8 ; ass. 

ANETH [a-n4t] n. m. (bot) dill. 

let; — doux, fenouil, 



fennel. 

AN:6TIQUE [a-n«-ti-k] adj. (med.) se- 
dative. 

AN:feTIQUES, n. m. pi. (med.) seda- 
tives. 

ANEVEISMAL, E [»-i«-yrU-m«l] adj. 
(med.) antmrisnial. 
N*" -" 



AN*VRI8MAT1QUE [a-n6-Trii.ina-U-k] 

] n. m. (med.) 



»di. (med.) aneurisTnal. 
XN^VEISME [. ■ 



aneurism. 

— du coeur, =:, ^ enlargement of the 
heart ; — actif du coeur, active aneurism 
of the heart. 

ANFRACTUEU-X, SE [an-frak-tu-«u, 

•i-i] adj. arifraotuous; winding ; full 
of tcindings. 

ANFRACTU0SIT:6 [a«-frak-ta-o-«i-t«] 
n. f. 1. anfractuousneas ; 2. — s, (pi.) 
trindings ; irregularities ; cavities. 

ANGAR, n. m. V. Hangar. 

ANGE [aa-j] n. m. 1. H angel; 2. 
(«tlL) cro«s-bar shot; 8. — s, (pi.) (mar.) 
arvgelshot 

— d6chu, fallen angel ; — tut61aire, 
guardian, tutelary z=z. — de mer, (ich.) 
:= -fish ; maid ; monk-fi»h ; scate. D'— , 
= ; •= -like ; comme un — , like an = ; 
♦ = -like, fitre aux —6, to be in rap- 
tures, ecstasies. 

ANGE [an-jl p. n. m. Angelus. 

A\GfiLIQ(J E [an-j6-li-k] adj. angelic ; 
a/ngeiical. 

ANGELIQUE [an-j«.U.k] n. C (bot) 
angelica. 

— conflte, coMdied =. — i feuilles 
d'ache, lavage. 

ANG^LIQUEMENT [an-ji-li-k-man] 

adv. angelically. 

ANGELOT [in-j-lo] n. m. 1. angelot 
(cheese); 2. (ich.) angel-Jish; maid; 
mrmk-fish ; scate. 

ANG:&LUS [an-j«-luB] n. m. (Rom. cath. 
rel.) a/ngdus. 

Dire 1' — , to say th^ = ; sinner 1' — , to 
Hng the =:. 

ANGINE [an-ji-n] n. f. (med.) angina. 

— parotide, " = parotidea:^ 
ANGINEU-X, SE [in.ji-i.ea, e4-z] adj. 

(toed.) attended toith angina. 
ANGIOGRAPHIE [in-ji-o-gra-fi] n. C 



igiographi/. 
ANGI 



ANGIOHYDROTOMIE [an-ji-o-i-dro- 
lo-mi] n. f. (anat) dissection of the lym- 
phatlc vessels. 

ANQIOLOGIE [an-ji-o-io-ji] n. t an- 



HOSPERME [an-ji-(»-p4r-m] adj. 
(bet) angiospermoiMS. 
ANGIOSPERME, n. f (bot) a/i.jio- 



ANGIOTOMIE [an-ji-o-to-mi] n. £ (surg. 
St anat) angiotomy. 

ANGLAIS, E [an-gi«, «] adj. EngUsh; 
British. 

A r— e, in the English fashion. Ren- 
ire — , to Anglicize. 

ANGLAIS [in-glS] n. m. 1. EngUsh 
[language) ; 2. Englishman ; British 
mbfect; * Briton. 

fin bon — , in plain En^ Uh Des — , 
tfthe English. B'-itiin. 



ANGLAISE [an-gle-i] n. £ 1. English 
girl; English young lady ; 2. English 
wo^nan ; ^.furniture binding ; 4. " an- 
glaise" (dance). 

ANGLAISER [an-gl4-i«] v. a. to dock, 
to bob (a horse's tail). 

Un cheval anglaise, a bob-tailed horse. 

ANGLE [an-gl] n. m. 1. angle ; 2. cor- 
ner; 8. (of roads, rivers) turning; 4. 
(geom.) angle ; 5. (tech.) quoin. 

— aigu, (geom.) acute angle ; — droit, 
(geom.) right = ; — facial, (anat)/aciai 
= ; — obtus, obtuse = ; — avec le merl- 
dien, (math.) hearing, k. — s, angled ; 
a — droit, (geom.) 1. rectangular; 2. 
rectangularly ; k plusiears — s, qui a 
plusieurs — 8, many-cornered; a — s 
saillants, sharp-cornered ; d'— , (mach.) 
bevel; sans — , unangular. Abattre 
les — , (carp.) to edge ; feire — , to el- 

ANGLET [an-gU] n. m. (arch.) chan- 
nel. 

ANGLETEERE (L) [lan-gls-a-r] p. n. 
£ England. 

La Nouvelle — , New-England. 

ANGLEU-X, SE [an-gled, ei-i] adj. 
fxdl of comers. 

ANGLICAN, E [an-gli-kan, a-n] adj. 1. 

oftJie Church of England ; 2. Anglican. 

ANGLICAN, n. m. E, n. f 1. church- 
man, m. ; member of the Church of 
England, m. £ ; 2. Anglican. 

ANGLICI8ME [an-gU-sU-m] n. m. An- 
glicism. 

ANGLO [an-glo] (comp.) anglo . . . 

AnGLO-DANOIS, K [aD-glo-da-noa, i] ac^ 

Anglo-Banish. 

AnGLO-SAXON, NE [an-glo-iak-wSOj o-n' 

adj. Anglo-Saicon. 

Anglo-Saxon [an-glo-iak-«6n] n. m. 
Anglo-Saseon. 

ANGLOMANE [an-gio-ma-n] adj. in- 
fected with Anglomania. 

ANGLOMANIE [an-glo-ma-ni] n. t An- 
glomania. 

ANGOISSE [an-goa-.] n. £ anguish, 
pang ; distraction. 

Poire d' — , 1. choke pear; 2. gag. 
Faire avaler des polres d'— , to give a. o. 
a choke pear. Faire souffrir des — 6 k, 
to torture. 

ANGON [an-gdn] n. m. 1. angon (jave- 
lin) ; 2. shell-fish hook. 

ANGORA [an-go-ra] adj. Angora. 

ANGORA, n. m. Angora cat. 

ANGOUSSE [an-gouH] n. £ (bot)dorf- 
der. 

ANGUILLADE [an-ghi-i»-d*] n. £ <yut, 
lash (given with an eel-skin, a whip, a 
twisted handkerchie£ &c.). 

ANGITILLE [an-ghi-i*] n. £ 1. (ich.) 
eel (genus) ; 2. (ich.) grig ; 8. (play) fly 
the garter. 

— commime, de riviere, eel (species) ; 
petite — , 1. small = ; 2. elver ; — de 
mer, 1 1. conger- =.; conger; 2. gar- 
fish ; — piit6 d'— 8, = -pie ; — plat-bee, 
grig ; grig ■=■. Claie aux — s, (flsli.) 
z=-pot; trident pour les — s, (fish.) =- 
spear; tronpon d' — , a piece of ■=.. 
Quelque — sous roche, a snake in the 
grass. ^*^, ifccorcher une — par la queue, 
to begin at the wrong end. ^^chapper 
comme une — , to slip through one's 
fingers. 

ANGULAIEE [an-gu-lj-r] adj. 1. angii- 
lar ; 2. (anat) angular. 

:6tat — , angularity; pierre — , (constr.) 
corner-stone ; hend-xtone. 

ANGULAIREMENT [an-gu-le-r-man] 

adv. angidarly. 

ANGULE, E [an-gu-i^] adj. 1. (bot) 
angular ; 2. (did.) angtuatea. 

4NGULEU-X, SE [an-gu-leii, eu-i] adj. 

1. anqulous ; many-coriiered ; 2. (bot) 
aiigidar. 

ANGUSTICLAVE [an.g,..-ti-kla-v] n. 
m. (Rom. ant) angusticla/ce. 

ANIIAPHIE [a-na-fi] n. £ (med.) loss 
of the sense of totich. 

ANII:fcLAtlON ra-n6-la-.i6n] n. £ 

(med.) anlielation ; Hiort/ness of breath. 

ANICROCHE [a-ni-kro-.h] n. £ ^diffi- 
culti/ ; impedimsnt : g^f** hitch. 

AN-IER [a-ni«] n. m. lizXlV. [S-r] n. £ 
(iss-driver. 

ANILfH-nin n. m. 0„n.)„„il. 



ANIMADVERSION [a-ni-mad-vjr n(m\ 
n. £ (POUB, on, upon) animadversion. 

Exercer son — (centre), to animad 
vert (on, upon). 

ANIMAL, E [a-ni-mal] adj. cnimMl. 

Actes, fonctions de la vie — e, = a<v 
tions, functions. Convertir en sub 
stance — e, to animalize. 

ANIMAL, n. m. 1. animal ; 2. % (1 . t \ 
(pers.) mmnal ; hound; brute. 

Vilain — , nasty animal, houn^; .ttt 
D' — , of anz=; beaMy. Ed — , lilt 
an =. Doner des propri6te8 defl anl 
maux, to amimalise ; rendre — ,to ani- 
maUze. 

Sun. — Animal, bkts, brctk. The word am- 
ma/ (anma/) comprises all living orgiuiic beiag»; 
the word bete {becut) marks a class of anitr.aus, m 
opposed to nian ; the word brute (brute) uidicatet 
the class of bitet actuated by the grossest appetite* 
and passions. We would call a man animal, to 
reproach him for coarseness, or rudent-ss; we 
would call him bete, for his awkwardness, incaiia- 
clty, or folly ; we would call him brute, for a cum- 
plete want of sense, perfect stupidity, and, atK)vs 
all, blind bmtality, or unbridled lust. 

ANIMALCULE [a-ni-mal-ku-l] n. m. 
animalcule ; — s, (pL) animalcula. 

Des — s, amimaloular ; animalcu- 
line. 

ANIMALISATION [»-ni.m».U-ia-si6n] 

n. £ animalization. 

ANIMALISEE [ft-ni-m»-li-x«] \. ti. U 
animaUze. 

S'animaliser, pr. v. to become ani- 
malized. 

ANIMALITfi [a-ni.ma-U-t«] n. £ (did.) 
animal ecoistence. 

ANIMATION [a-ni-ma-sion] n.£|(did.) 
animation (giving the principle of life 
to an organized body). 

ANIM:^, E [a-ni-mfi] adj. 1. lanimat- 
ed ; quickened ; 2. § animated ; lively ; 
vivacious ; 8. § (th.) spirited / 4 j 
sprighHy. 

Non — , 1. I vnquickened ; 2. % noi 
animated ; vnlivdy ; 8. § 'umcarmrd. 

ANIMER [a-ni.m«] v. a. 1. 1 to oM 
mate ; to quicken ; to vivify ,• 2 § (dk, 
with ; A to) to animate {pve vivacity, 
heat, strength to); to enltven; to giv^' 
life, animation to; to fire ; 8. § (dk, 
with ; A, to) to animate ; to incite ; 
to summon up; 4. % (b. s.) (contrk, 
against) to incense ; to exasperate ; to 
stir up. 

3. — le teint, to give animation to th* eomplexioiK 
Personne, chose qui aniine, anim.a- 
tor. Capable d' — , animative. D'un« 
manifire propre k — , animmtingly. Qui 
anime, animating ; qui n'est pas animo, 
( V. senses) vnactuated. 

8'ani.mek, pr. v. 1. 1 § to become, ^ to 
get animated; 2. § to cheer up; 8. 
§ to get, to grow warm ; 4. § (b. s.) 
to be incensed, exasperated ; to chafe. 

%. La dispute s'anjme, the diepute is growing 

ANIMOSITY [a-ni-mo-«-t«] n. £ 1 
(CONTRE, to, towards) animosity; 2, 
heart-burning. 

Par — , 1. by animosity ; 2. from -zz. 
fitre port6 d'— contre q. u., to hwce a 
feeling ofz= towards a. o. 

ANIS [a-ni] n. m. (bot) anise; aniss- 
seed. 

— 6toil6, 1. Indian, star anise-seed . 
2. anise^lant ; — vert, anise-se»l . 
Graine d'— , anise-seed. 

ANI8ER [a-m-»«] V. a. to fiavor uUh 
anise-seed. 

ANISETTE [a-ni-i4-t] n. £ anigf ieM 
(cordial). 

ANISOTAQUE [a-ni-zo-ta-k] adj.(m<d.' 
(of the pulse) irregular and rapid. 

ANKYLOMi:LE [an-ki-lo-me-1] n f 
(surg.) bent probe. 

ANKYLOSE [in-ki-16-»l n. t (aod 
anchylosis. 

ANKYLOTOME [an-ki-lo-to-i»] n. la 
(surg.) crooked bistoury. 

ANNAL, E [an-nai] adj. (law) for a 
year. 

ANN ALES [an-n»-l] n. C (pL) an 
nals, pi. 

ANNALISTE [an-na-h.;] n. m. ai 
nalist. 

ANNATE [an na-t] n £ (can law) ' 
atmats, pi.; % first fruits, pi 
?7 



ANN 



ANO 



ANT 



a mal; d rnSle; e fee; i ftve; & Rte; #Je; i 11; i lie; o mol; 6 mole; <ti mort; m sue; u &fire; ow joui ; 



ANNEAU [»-n6] D. m. 1. ring; 2. 
tirclet; 8. (of chains) link; 4. (of hair) 
ringlet ; 5. (anat) ring ; 6. (astr.) m.^r ; 
I. (erpet) nng ; 8. (nav.) ring. 

— brise, »pUt ring ; — mobile, (tech.) 
runner; —nuptial, wedding- — -.Tietit 
— , ringlet; — solaire. small min-aial; 
~- ik' -vis, (tech .) ecrew-hoop. Defeire les 
•—X de, to unMiik (chair») ; mettre un — , 
iuo — X a, to ring ; oter un — , Jes — x a, 
(O wnring. 

ANNEJi". [3-n«] n. f. 1. year (considfir- 
eJ ^vlth regard to duration); twelce- 
month ; 2. (astr.) year. 

— anomalistique, anomalistical, pe- 
riodicai year ; ses bellea — s, tli.6 prir.^ 
ttflife; — bissextile, bissea-tile, le(ip=^; 
— commune, moyenne, one t= witli an- 
other ; 1'— derni6re, last = ; T— pro- 
cbaine, next := ; — scolaire, scolastique, 
academia = ; — s sobs^quentes, after 
years, after life; V — suivante, tJis 
next ■=. — de revolution, (astr.) (of pla- 
nets) =. Une — dans Tautre, one = 
with another. Plein d' — s, 1. in a full 
age ; 2. + full of =8. A 1'—, by the = ; 
de 1'—, 1. of the = ; 1. otf the same =. 
£tre charge d' — s, to be stricken in =«; 
Bouhaiter la bonne — hq.n.,to icish a. o. 
a happy new =. Qui se renouvelle 
chaque — ^, (bot) yearly. 

AJSTNELE, E [a-n-id] adj. 1. cwiwtt- 
lated; rvng-streaked ; 2. (of hair) in 
rimglets ; 8. (nat hist) a/ivnulate ; an- 
nviated. 

ANNELER [a-n-i«] v. a. to <yu,rl (hair) 
i/n, ringlsts. 

ANNELET [a-n-iJ] n. m. 1. ringlet; 
annulet; 2. (arch.) annulet 

AiJNELIDES [a-n«-U-d] n. m. (pi.) 
(aool.) amielides, pi. 

ANNEXE [an-n^k-i] n. £1. annex; 
appendage; 2. (of deeds) schedule; 
ruler; 3. (of churches) parochial cha- 
P*i ; chapel of ease. 

ANNEXEE [an-nfek-i4] V. 8. (a, to) to 

<lfyn««s. 

CI -annexe, annexed. 

Al^^NEXION [an-nik-aidn] n. C annex- 
Ctiofi. 

ANNIHILATION [an-ni-i-la-iion] n. t 
(lid.) annih Uation. 

ANNIHILi:, E [an-ni-i-l«] adj. (law) 
aimihilate. 

ANNIH ILER [an-ni-i-is] V. a. 1. (did.) 
to annihilate ; 2. (law) to anwihilaie. 

Qui peut 6tre annihil6, (did.) annihi- 
table. 

ANNIVEESAIRE [an-ni-vir-ii-r] a4). 

anniversary. 

A une epoque — , anniversarik/. 

ANNIVTiRSAIKE, n. m. 1. umiiver- 
tary ; 2. (Rom. cath. lit) anuimer-sary. 

— de sa naissance, o.'« birth-day. 
Ode d' — , anniversary ode; armiver- 
aary. 

ANNOMINATION [aii-no-mi-na-.i6n] n. 

t annondnation. 

ANNONCE [a-n6D-«] n. 1 1. announce- 
ment ; notice ; 2. (sing.) (of marriage) 
bans, pL ; 3. (of newspapers) advertise- 
menL 

— emphatique, puf; — de spectacles, 
play-biU. Faiseur d' — s euiphatiques, 
pujer ; feuille d'— s, advertiser (news- 
paper); frais d' — s, advertising. Par 
des — B emphatiques, pufflngly. Faire T — 
de, to announce ; to give notice of; ^ to 
give out. Faire une — , des — s, to adver- 
Hse ; faire des — s emphatiques, to p%t,ff. 

ANNONCER [a-non-.fe] V. a. (a) 1. to 
announce (to) ; 2. to annownee (a. th.) ; 
Ji> acquaint (...); to inform (...); S. to 
onnowMse (a. o.) ; 4. to give notice of 
(a. th.); to give out; 5.* to tisher ; to 
»aher in; to be the harbinger, precur- 
for, forerunner of; 6. to foreteU. 7. 
(b7 the press) to advertise. 

-q. ch. a q. n., to announce a. th. to a. f, 
I. 0. witk a. th.. to inform a. '. 
■ Im compagnie 



Personne qui annonce, a rmouncer {qf). 

8'ANNONCEK, pr. V. (F; senses of An- 
sonceb) to present one's self {make one's 
«lf known). 

Se feire — , to home one's selfamumn- 
*od ; to tmd in on^'s name. — bien. 



to promise fair ; to be of good pro- 
mise ; to be promising ; — mal, to be 
unpromising. Qui s'ann once bien, ^ro- 
misin^ ; qui s'annonce mal, vmpro- 
mising. 

ANNONCEUR [a-non-.efir] n. m. 
(theat) i performer that announces the 
pieces for the next occasion. 

ANNONCIADE [a-non-Bi-a-d] n. f. 1. 
annundade (religious order) ; 2. nun 
of the awnunciade. 

ANNONCIATION [a.n6n-.i-a-.i6n] n. t 

-\- 1. Annunciation ; 2. Lady-day. 

F6te de I'—, 1. -f = of our Lady ; .2. 
Lady-day (25 March). 

ANNOTATEUR [a-no-ta-teur] n. m. 
amnotator; commentator. 

ANNOTATION [a-no-ta-«6n] n. f. an- 
notation; commentary. 

Faiseur d' — S, awnotator. Faire une — , 
to make an annotation. 

ANNOTER [a-no-td] V. a. to annotate; 
to comment. 

ANNUAIRE [an-nn-i-r] vl. vo. an- 
nual. 

ANNUEL, LE [an-nn-el] adj. 1. an- 
ntial ; yearly ; 2. (bot) annual ; 
yearly. 

Plante — le, anrnial ; recueil — de 
jurisprudence, year-book. 

ANNUEL, n. m. (Rom. cath. lit) an- 
nual. 

ANNUELLEMENT [an-nu-i-l-man] 
adv. annually; yearly. 

ANNUITlfc [an-nn-i-t«] n. f. (fin.) an- 
nuity ; certain, term-inable annuity. 

Detenteur d' — , annuitant. 

ANNULABLE [an-nu-la-bl] adj. 1. 
(did.) defeasible ; 2. (law) reversible. 

ANNULAIEE [an-nu-U-r] adj. 1. an- 
nular; ring-shaped; 2. (astr.) an- 
nular. 

Doigt — , ring-finger. 

ANNULATION [an-nn-U-.iSn] n. f. 1. 

annulment ; 2. cancelling (of a deed) ; 
8. (law) abatemsnt. 

ANNULEMENT [an-EU-l-man] n. m. 

(nav.) signal that countermands an 
order given by a previous signal. 

ANNULER [an-nu-ie] v. a. 1. to an- 
nul; 2. to set aside; 3. to cancel (a 
deed) ; 4 (law) to frustrate ; to quash ; 
to void ; to make void. 

Personne qui annule, (law) voider. 
Qui peut etre annule, (law) voidable. 

Ankule, e, pa. p. V. senses of Annuler. 

Non — , 1. uncancelled ; 2. (law) u/n- 
reversed. 

8'annuleb, pr. y. (Y. senses of An- 
nuler) to annul. 

ANOBLI [»-no-bli] n. m. nencVy creat- 
ed nobleman. 

ANOBLIR [a-no-biir] v. a. to ennoble 
(confer a title of nobility on). 



TAnoblik must not be confounded with enno- 
Wir.] 

ANOBLISSEMENT [a-no-bli-^man] n. 
m. ennoblement. 

ANODIN, E [a-no-din, i-n] adj. 1. ano- 
dyne ; 2. (med.) paregoric. 

Breuvage — , ** anodyne ; rem6de — , 
anodyne. 

ANODIN [a-»o-din] n. m. (med.) ano- 
dyne; ^paregoric 

ANOIE ra-n«a] n. f. (med.) idiocy. 

ANOMAL, E [a-no-mai] adj. (did.) ano- 
maUyus. 

D'une maniftre — e, anomalously. 

A NOMA LIE [a-no-ma-li] n. £ (did.) 
anomaly. 

— moyenne, simple, (astr.) nMan, sim^ 
ple:=: — vraie, equated, true=: 

ANOMALISTIQUE [a.no-m»-Ii.-ti-k] 

adj. (astr.) 1. anomalistic; 2. (of the 
year) periodical. 

ANOMIE [a-no-mi] n. £ (conch.) ano- 
mia; ^beaked cockle; botcl-sheu. 

ANON [a-non] n. m. young ass; ass's 
foal ; (fish.) a upecies of cod. 

ANONNEMENT [a-no-n-mani n. m. 1. 

hemming and haicing ; 2. foaling of a 
she-a^H. 

ANONNER [a-no-D«] V. a. to hem and 
haw over. 

ANONNER. v. n. 1. to lism and haw ; 



2. to foal; to bffng forth a yovn^ 
ass. 

ANONYME [a-no-ni-m] adj. 1. anony- 
mous; 2. (com.) (of companies) joint- 
stock. 

ANONYME, n. m. f 1. anoivyinvu4 
person; 2. state of an anonymous 'j^tT' 
son; 3. (mam.) anonymous amimm. 

Sous le voile de 1"—^, anonymjnuii^: 
Garder T — , to remain anonvmowi. 

ANORDIE fa-ncr-di] n. f. (nav.)l. ffoU 
from Die north ; 2. nortnerly storm. 

ANORDIR [a-nor-dir] v. n. (iiav.) (a( 
the wind) to drato towards Uie north. 

ANOREXIE [a-no-rek-ai] n. £ (meAJ 
anorexy. 

AN0EGAN06RAPHIE [a-nor-ga-n*. 

gra-fi] a £ description of vriorgwnic 



ANOEMAL, E [a-nor-mai] adj. anor' 
mal; anomalmis. 

ANOSMIE [a-noi-mi] n. £ loss of the 
sense of smell. 

ANSE [an-«] n. £ 1. handle (round); 
2. (geog.) creek ; bay. 

— de panier, 1. 'basket-handle ; 2. 
(arch.) surbased arch; — du panier, 
servants' profits. A — , 1. mith a = ; 
2. (did.) ansated; 3. (geog.) creeked. 
Faire le pot a deux — s, to put o.'s arm4 
akimbo; garni d'une — , (did.) ansated^ 

ANSE, n. £ V. Hanse. 
ANSilATIQUE, adj. V. Hanbea- 

TIQUE. 

ANS:6RINE [an-.6-ri.n] n. £ (bot) En- 
glish mercury ; ^ goose-foot ; \ ail- 
good. 

— des murailles, wall goose-foot. 
ANSETTE [an-aJ-t] n. £ 1 1. Uttlehan- 

die ; 2. (nav.) cringle. 

ANSPECT [an-«pik] n. m. (mar.) hand- 
spike. 

ANTAGONISME [an-ta-go-nU-m] D. m. 
(anat) antagonism. 

ANTAGONISTE [an-ta-go-ni»-t] a^}. 
(anat) antagonist. 

ANTAGONISTE, n. m. L antoffo- 
nist ; 2. (anat) antagonist 

ANTALGIE [an-tai-ji] n. £ (med.) o*- 
sence of pain. 

ANTALGIQUE [an-tai-ji-k] n. m. A 
adj. (med.) anodyne. 

ANTAN [an-tan] n. m. + last year. 

ANTANACLASE [aa-ta-na-kla-x] D. t 

(rhet) antanaclosis. 

ANTANAGOGE [an-ta-na-go-j] B. t 

(rhet) antanagoge. 

ANTARCTIQUE [an-tark-ti-k] »Ay 

(astr., geog.) antarctic. 

ANT:feCEDEMMENT [an-t«-.«-d«-iniuJ 
adv. antecedently ; previously. 

ANTi;C:^DENT, E [an-t6-««-dan, t] ad) 
antecedent; precedent; precedvng , 
previous. 

:fetat de ce qui est — , antecedencs. 

ANT£C£DENT [an-t«-86-dan] n. m. L 
antecedent; precedent; 2. — s, (pi.) 
previous conduct ; 3. (did.) antecedent ; 
4. (gram.) antecedent; 5. (log.) antec^ 
dent; 6. (math.) antecedent. 

Sans — , 1. unprecedented. £tre sana 
— s, (pers.) o.'s previous conduct to &<; 
wnknoton. 

ANTECHRIST [an-tj-kri] n. m. Anti 
Christ 

Partisan, sectateur de 1'—, antichri»- 
tian. 

ANT:feDILUVIEN, NE [an-t^-dUn-Tt, 
in, *-n] adj. antedUuvial ; antedilu- 
vian. 

ANT:6DILUVIEN, n. m. NE, n.t an- 
tediluvian. 

ANTENNE [an-ti-n] n. £ 1. (ent) an- 
tenna; ^ feelers; ^ horn; 2. (nar.) 
lateen^ard. 

ANT^OCCUPATION [io-W-o-kmi4. 
•ion] n. £ {rhet.) prolepsis. 

ANTi^NORIDES [in-t«-no-ri-d] p. n 
m. (pi.) (myth.) Antenorides; descend 
ants ofAntenor. 

ANT:fiP6NULTli;ME [ia-t*-p«-B»I 
tife-ml acy. (gram.) antepenultimate. 

ANT£P:feNULTliME, n. £ (gram.1 
antepenult 

ANTi:RIEUE. B [an «-ri«ar] adj. 1. | 

(of place) fore; front; 2. § (of Ume) (a. 
to) anterior ; yrior ; previous ; t 
(v\tit) anterior ; 4. (bot) frontal. 



ANT ANT 


aNT 


oHioiite; «m jen; «m joftno; eH peur; <m pan; wi pin; 5n bon; wi bran; ♦U llq. 


*gn llq. 



ANT^EIEUEEMENT [an-W -ri-eu-r- 

■narj adv. previcnmly. 

ANT:6RI0UIT£ [an-W rio-ri-t«] n. C 

cuUsrioriti/ ; priority. 
ANTESTATURE [an a.-ta-tu-r] n. f. 

imil.) antestature (small intrencliment 
ormed of palisades or sacks of eartli). 

ANTHELMINTHIQUE [iu-t^l-min- 
a-«] adj. (med.) hehninthio ; verTni/uge. 

AN'f'Ii:6;KE [an-tfe-r] n. f. (bot.) antlier; 
5 tip ; top of vie stamen. 

ANTH:fiKIFi:KE [an-W-ri-ft-r] adj. 
(bot) antheriferous. 

ANTlli;8E [an-ti-z] n. f. (bot.) blow- 
ing of a flower. 

ANTHOGEAPHIE [iin-to-gra-fi] n. C 
art of expressing one's tJuiughts by 
flowers. 

ANTHOLOGIE [an-to-lo-ji] n. f. antho- 
logy. 

D' — , anthological. 

ANTHRACITE [an-tra-.i-t] n. m. 
(min.) anthracite ; 'stone-coal ; coal 
stone; glance-coal. 

ANTHRACOMi;TEE [an-tra-ko-m4-tr] 

n. m. (chem.) in.^trument for determin- 
ing the amov/nt of carbonic acid in Vie 
air. 

ANTHRACOSE [an-tra-ko-z] n. m. 
(sure.) anthracosis. 

ANTHRAX [in-trak.] n. m.(med.) 
nnthrasp. 

ANTHROPOGRAPHIE [an-tro-po- 
r»-f i] n. f (did.) anthropography. 

ANTHEOPOGRAPIIIQUE [an-tro- 
pc-gra-fi-k] adj. (did.) anthropographical. 

ANTHROPOLOGIE [an-tro-po-io-ji] n. 
L (did.) anthropology. 

ANTHROPOMORPHE [an-tro-po- 



'"iS 



adi. am,thropo7norphons. 
THROPOMORPHISME 



an-tro-po- 

nor fii-m] n. m. anthropomorphism. 

ANTIIROPOMORPHITE [an-tro-po- 
■lor-fl-tj n. m. f. anihropomorphite. 

ANTHROPOPHAGE [in-tro-po-fa-j] 
ad). anVvropophago^Cs ; cannibal. 

ANTHROPOPHAGE, n. m. f. an- 
V%ropophagus ; cannibal ; man-eater. 

ANTHROPOPHAGIE [an-tro-po-fa-ji] 

>,f antliropophagy : cannibalism,. 

AKTHROPOTOMIE [in-tro-po-to-mi] 

a t (anat.) anthropotomy ; anatomy, 
tUiecHon of the human body. 

ANTHTLLIDE [an-til-lid] n. f. (bot) 
1. kidney-vetoh ; 2. Jupiter''s beard. 

— vulneraire, rooimd-wort. 

ANTI [an-ti] 1. (Greeli prefl.x signify- 
ing against) anU; 2. (French prefix 
meaning before) ante. . 

ANTIAPOPLECTIQUE [ an-ti-a-po- 
plik-ti-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) antapopleo- 
tto. 

ANTI ARTHRITIQUE [in-ti-ar-tri-ti-k] 
n. m. tfc adj. (med.) antarthritic. 

ANTIASTHMATIQUE [ an-ti-a.-ma- 
li-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) anti-asthmatic. 

ANTIBAOKIQUE [an-ti-ba-shi-k] n. 
m. (anc. vers.) anti-hacchius. 

ANTIBACHIQUE, adj. (anc. vers.) 
anti-bacchiac. 

ANTIBIBLIQUE [ an-ti-bi-bli-k ] adj. 
Miscript^iral. 

ANTICACIIECTIQUE [an-ti-ka-.hik- 
tt-kl H. m. & adj. (med.) anticachecUc. 

ANTICATA'RRHAL, E r&n-ti-ka-ta-ral] 

n. m. & adj. anti-catarrhcu. 

ANTIC AUSOTIQUE [ an-ti-k6-zo-ti-k ] 
n. m. & adj. (med.) antioausotio. 

A.NTICHAMBRE [an-ti-shin-br] n. £ I. 
wntechamber ; 2. outward room. 

— dc salon, ante-saloon. Faire — , to 
dance attendance. 

ANTICHRfcSE [an-ti-krJ-z] n. f. (law) 
(Tf Immovables) pledge ; mortgage. 

Tenir en — , (law) to hold by m^ort- 
gage ; to have a m.ortgage on. 

ANTICIIR6TIEN, NE [ an-ti-krt-ti-in, 
4-«i] adj. antichristian. 

ANTICHRISTIANISME [an-ti-kri.-ti- 
a-nii-m ] n. m. antichristianiiy ; anti- 
thristtantmn. 

ANTICIPATION [an-tt<i-pi-.i6n] n. t 
L anticipation ; 2. (^sur, 07i) encroach- 
ment; 3. (rhet) anticipation. 

A r^tat d'— , in anticipation ; par — , 
1. &y = ; 2. anticipatory ; 8. in advance. 

ANTICIP:6, E [an-ti .i-p4] adj. 1. atiH- 
tipated; 2. (pk, of) anticipate ry. 



ANTICIPER, v. a. 1. <o wnMoipate ; 
2. to forestall ; .3. to antedate. 

ANTICIPER, V. n. 1. to anticipate; 
2. (SUR, ...) to anticipate ; 3. (sue, on, 
upon) to encroach ; to make encroach- 
ments. 

Personne qui anticipe, anticipator. 

ANTICOLIQUE [an-ti-ko-li-k] n. m. & 
adj. (med.) anticolic. 

ANTIDARTREU-X, 8E [ an-ti-dar- 
ireu, eu-z] adj. (med.) antiherpetic. 

ANTIDATE [an-ti-da-t] n. f. || mitedats. 

ANTIDATER [an-ti.d*-'4] Y.&.\to an- 
tedate. 

ANTIDIARRH:6!QUE [ an-ti-di-a-rt- 
i-k] n. m. (med.) remedy for diarrhoia. 

ANTIDIARRHfilQUE, adj. (med.) 
for, against diarrluva. 

ANTIDOTP] [an-ti-do-t] n. ui. I § (con- 
TRB, to) antidote. 

Comme — , antidoUcaZly. i t. «6rir 
les j.ropnetes dun — , to becoir,^ anti- 
dotal; avoir les propriotes d'un — , to 
be antidotal ; servir d' — , to be antidotal. 

ANTIDOTER [an-ti-do-ttj •,. a. (med.) 
to administer an ant'^'lote. 

ANTIDYSSENT]?}Rlyi;E [an-ti-dis- 
«an-w-ri-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) antidysen- 
teric. 

ANTI^M^TIQUE [iin-ti-«-ir«-ti-k] n. 
m. & adj. (7ned.) antiemetic. 

ANTiENNE [an-ti-J,-n] n. f. (liturg.) 



A la manifire des — s, = -^oise. An- 
noncer une — , to give out an =: ; an- 
noncer une triste, fiiclieuse, mauvaise — , 
to bring bad news ; chanter toujours la 
mfime — , to harp upon a thing ," § 1 ^) 
sing the same song over and over 
again ; entonner une — , to begin an ■=. ; 
to strike up an =. 

ANTIlfcPILEPTIQUE [an-ti-^-pi-Up- 
ti-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) antiepileptio. 

ANTl^PISCOPAL, E [ an-ti-«.pi.-ko- 
pal] adj. anti-episcopal. 

ANtll<:PISCOPAUX[a«-ti-«-pi.-ko-p6] 
n. m. (pi.) (EngL hist) anti-episcopa- 
llans, pi. 

ANTi:fcVANG35LIQUE [an-ti-«.Tan-j«- 
li-k] adj. anti-evangelical. 

ANTIFEBRILE [ an-ti-K-bri-l ] adj. 
(med.) antifebrile. 

aNTIF:6BRILE, n. m. (med.) anti- 
febrile. 

ANTIGOA, ANTIGUE [an-U-go-a, in- 
ti-g] p. n. (geog.) Antigua. 

ANTIHECTIQUE [an-ti-4k-ti-k] n. m. 
<fc adj. (med.) antihectic. 

ANTIHYPOCONDRIAQUE [an-ti- 
i-po-kon-dri-a-kj n. m. & adj. (med.) anti- 
hypochondrtac. 

ANTIHYST6RIQUE [an-ti-U-M-ri-k] 
n. m. (fc adj. (med.) antihysteric. 

ANTILLES (LES) ru-zan-ti-i*] p.n.C 
(pi.) ihe Antilles ; tlie West Indies. 

Les Grandes — , tlie Larger Antilles ; 
les Petites — , the Smaller = ; la Mer 
des — , the Caribbean Sea. 

ANTILOGIE [an-ti-lo-ji] n. t (did.) a/n- 
tilogy. 

ANTILOlMIQUE [an-ti-lo-i-mi-k] n. 
m. & adj. (med.) antiloimic. 

ANT [LOPE [an-ti-io-p] n. £ (mam.) 
antelope. 

— a bourse pouclied gazelle. 
ANTIMELANCOLIQUE [ an-ti.m«- 

lan-ko-ii-k] a m. & adj. (med.) antim^ 
lanohoUc. 

ANTIM:feTABOLE [an.U-m«-ta.bo-l] n, 
i. (rhet) antim.etabole. 

ANTIMOINE [an-ti-moa-n n. m. 

(chem., min.) antimony. 

— en plumes, plumose =. Cct-tenant 
de r — , antimonial. 

ANTIMONARCIIIQUE [an-ti-mo-nar- 
•hi-k] adj. antimonarchica' 

ANTIMONIAL, E [an-ti-mo-ni-al] adj. 
(pharm.) arMmonial. 

ANTIMONIAL, n. m. (med.) anti- 
monial. 

ANTIMONIATE >.ti-mo.i--ii.i] n.m. 
(chemj antim^oniate. 

ANTIMONlfi, E [in-U-mo^ii*] ^4]. 
(pharm.) antimonial. 

ANTIMONIQUE [ an-tt-mo-ni-k ] »dj. 
(chem. ) antimonic. 

ANTIN6PHR1!;TIQTJE [ an-ti-n«-frt. 
ti-k] B. je. &■ adj. (med.) antinephriU^ 



ANTINOMIE [an-ti-no-ml] n. £ anU' 
nomy. 

ANTIOCHE [an-ti-o-ih] p. n. Antioch. 

ANTIPAPE [in-ti-pa-p] n. m. ««M 
pope. 

ANTIPARALTTIQTTE [an-ti p. r»Jt 
ti-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) anttparaiiti-^ 

ANTIPATHIE [an-ti-p«..tifn. £ (loOH, 
to) antipathy. 

Caractere d' — , antipathetiodl/ivm 
A vec — , antvpatheticaUy ; par —,fr(rn 
antipathy. Avoir de V — , to h^ure <tn 
antipathy. 

ANTIPATHIQITE [an-ti-pati-k] a^J. 
(a, to) antijMthetic. 

ANTIPERISTALTIQIIE [ac-ti-pf-rt, 
»t.il.ti-k] adj. (med.) antiperistaltic. 

ANTIP^RISTASE [an-ti. pS-ri^a-.] n, 
f. (did.) antiperistasis. 

ANTIPESTILENTIEL, LE [an-U-pi» 
ti-lan-ni-ei] adj. 1. antipestilentiol ; 3. 
(med.) antiloimic 

ANTIPHILUCAJPHIQUE [ an-U-fl-lo- 
»o-fi-k] adj. antipMlosophical. 

ANTIPIILOGISTIQUE [ an-ti-flo-jia- 
ti-k] n. m. & adj. (med) antijjhlogistio 

ANTIPHONIER, ANTIPHONAIRS 

[an-ti-fo-ni«, nJ-r] n. m. (Rom. cath. lit) 

antiphonary. 

ANTIPHONE [an-U-fo-n] n. m. (Eoav 
cath. rel.) antiphoh ; antiphony. 

De r — , antiphonal ; arMpfionio. 

ANTIPIIRASE [an-ti-fra-z] n. f (rl et.) 
antiphrasis. 

ANTIPIIY8IQUE [ an-ti-fl-zi-k ] a^J. 
antiphysical ; contrary to nature 

ANT IPLKUR:6TIQUE [ an-ti-plca-ri.. 



ti-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) anttpleuritic. 

ANTIPODAL, E [an-t 
tipodal. 



E [an-ti-po-dal] adj. On- 



ANTIPODE [an-ti-po-d] n. m. 1. 1 an- 
tipode ,• 2. n § — s, (pi.) antipodei, pi 

ANTIPSORIQUE [an-ti-p^-ri-k] a m 
& adj. (med.) antipsoric 

ANTIPUTRIDE [ an-ti-pn-tri d J a^ 
(med.) antiseptic. 

ANTIQUAILLE [an-U-ka-i*] n. £ C> 
s.) 1. 1 antiquity ; 2. — s, (pi.) old- hern- 
b'er, rubbish; old things; curiosttifi& 

Magasin d' — 8, auriosity-shop. 

ANTIQUAIRE ];an.ii-kJ-r] n. m ana 
qtiary ; antiquarian. 

D' — , antiqiiarian. 

ANTIQUE [an-ti-k] adj. 1. antiatM, 
ancient; 2. (b. s.) antiquated; old-f» 
shioned. 

A r-, =. 

ANTIQUE, n. £ anttqvMS. 

ANTIQUIT]fc [an.ti-ki-t«] n. £ 1. I CMi. 
tiqiHty; 2. (jest) antiquity (oldnofcs) 
3. § (pers.) antique. 

Haute — , (pers.) remote,- high a/KtU 
quity; vleille — , antique. 

ANTISCIEN8 [an-ti-«i-in] n. m. (geog.J 
OMtisdans ; antisoii, pi. 

ANTI9C0RBUTIQUE [ an-ti-gkor-b* 
ti-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) antiscorbutic. 

ANTISEPTiQUE [ar.-ti..^p-ti-k] tf. m. 
& adj. (med.) antiseptic. 

ANTISOCIAL, E [ an-ti-«)-u-aI ] adj 
anti.wcial. 

ANTI8PASM0DIQUE [an.ti-.pa.-ino. 
di-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) anUspamnodio. 

ANT IS PASTE [an-ti-.pa-.t] n. m. (ana 
vers.) antispast. 

ANTI8THi)NE [an-U..t4-n] p. n, m. 
(class.) Antistlienes. 

ANTISTROPHE [an.ti-.tro-f] n. £ 1. 
(rhet) antistrophe ; 2. (Gr. ant) an**- 
$trcr '•e (stanza). 

ANTISYPHILITIQUE [ an-ti-.: fl-V 
ti-k] n. m. & adj. (med.) antisyphUitU. 
aniive7)sreal. 

ANTITIli:SE [an-U-t*-.] n. £ (rhft. 
antithesis. 

ANTITHlftTIQUE [an-ti-ti-tlk ] ai^ 
(rhet.) antithetic ; antithetical. 

ANTITRINITAIRE [an-U-tii-ni l» r] 
n. m. antitr-initarian. 

antiv:6n:6rien, ne [an-u-^#-«4. 

A-m,k-n]tnl}.'i. (med.) an tiververeal; a* 
tisyphwitic ; 2. (of medicines) venereal, 

ANTOINE [an-toe-n] p. n. m. 1. An, 
thony ; 1 Tony ; 2. (Rom. hist) Antonfi 

Marc — , Marc Antony. 

ANTONIN [an-to-nin] p. B. m 'olioa 

AntoniniiH. 
— le Pieux. = I'ius. 

89 



APE 



Al>L 



APO 



a mal; d m&le; e fee; e f6ve; 6 f8u ^ je; i il; j lie; omol; 6 mole; 6 mort; m sue; ^ sure; om jour; 



ANTONINE [Sn-to-ni-n] p. n. C Anio- 
n>tna. 

ANTONOMASE [an-to-no-ma-i] n. t 

frbet) antonomasim. 

ANTRE [an-tr] n. f. Leave; cavern; 
2. awe ; hollow ; 8. (of wild beasts) den ; 



i-i-t«] pr. V. to be 



a. S (pe.-8j (b. 8.) den. 
A2f UITEE (S') [«. 

ANUS fa-nn-s] n. Bu. (anat) antis. 
ANXIET:^ [ank-ii-«-u] n. C 1. a/naeiety; 



cmsrioush/, 
, %eiUu)utz=. 



1. Imed.) anmety. 
Avec — , with anwiety 

'!»ns r — , in ■= ; sans — , 

2. imamrious. 

ANXIEU-X BE [ank-B-efl.ea-z] adj. 
(med.) antpurus, 

AORISTE [o-rU-t] n. m. (Gr. gram.) 
aorist. 

AORTE [a-or-t] n. f. (anat) aorta. 

Crosse de 1' — , arch of the =. 

AORTlQfJE [a-or-ti-k] adj. (anat) aor- 
tic 

AOtTT [on] n. m. 1. August (month); 
2. Tiarvest. 

La mi- — , tTie middle of Augtist. 
Faire T — , to harvest. 

AOtlTE [»-ou-t*] adj. ripened iy tfie 
heat of August. 

AOCttERON [ou-w-rsn] n.m.harvest- 
man (in the month of August). 

APAGOGIE [a-pa-go-ji] n. f. (log.) 
apagoge. 

APAISER [a-pi-z«] V. a. 1. to appease 
(SL o.); to paeify; 2. to allay (ti. th.); 
lo assuage; to lay: 3. to mitigate (a. 
th.); to alleviate; 4. to soothe; 5. to 
stiU; to quiet; to lull; to hush; 6. to 
quell; 7. to make up (a difference, a 
misunderstanding) ; 8. to stay (hunger) ; 
9. to allay (thirst) ; to qu,ench ; to slake. 

I. — q. u. en colore, to appeaie, to pacify a. o. 
dot u anffry. 2. — ce qui eat violent, to allay, to 
aanutge wkat U violent, i. — la douieur ou le cha- 

e, to alleviate , 

ithe anffer. 5.'— let flots, to still tht 
nrjet; — les venta, to still, to lull the wind*. 6. — 
■1 tamnlte, to quell a tumult. 

Action d' — , ( V. senses ) 1. appease- 
Vjgni; padfieatian ; 2. allayment; as- 
magem^nt ; Qui apaise, ( V. senses ) 1. 
appeasing ; 2. mitigatime. Que Ton ne 
pout, saurait — , ( V. senses) 1. unap- 
pe'i-sable: 2. %mmitUiahle. 

Apaise, k, pa. p. F senses of Apaiser. 

Non — , 1. u/napp'iased ; unpadfled ; 
2. unaUayed; u^assuaged; 8. uma- 
bated ; 4. unmitigated ; wnaUeviated; 
5. unsoothed ; 6. unstilled ; 7. vmquel- 
rtd; 8. (of thirst) unallayed; un- 
quenched; unslaked. 

S'apaiser, pr. V. (F. senses of Apai- 
«er) 1. to svJtside ; to abate ; 2. to as- 
suage; 8. to remit; 4. to lull; 5. (pers.) 
to become calm. 

1. La teiiip^te t'apaiie, the ttorm abates, sub- 
Hides. 3. Iji fi^vri- t'apaise, the fever remits. 4 
Le vent s'afHiief, the wind lulls. 

Stm. — Apaiskr, CALMER, apaiser is said of an- 
ger, I'liry; calmer^ of emotion. Submission a/xir«« 
( /«iri/i>») us ; a ray of hopeca/>;« (ca/fM) us. The 
wind t'apaitt (.tubndet); the sea sc ealrtu (be- 
:omf, caf,u). 

APALACniNE [ a-pa-la-sbi-n ] n. C 

(bot) emetic holly ; ^ SouUt-Sea tea. 

APALANCHE [a-pa-lan-sh] n. f. (bot) 
(genus) unnter-berry. 

APANAGE [a-pa-na-j] n. m. 1 § appa- 
nage. 

APANAGER [a-pa-na-j«] V. a. <o wi- 
dow loiVi an appanage 

APANAGISTE [a-pa-na-j is-t] adj. poe- 
tossing an appanage. 

APANAG ISTE, n. m. prince endmo- 
act with an appanage. 

APARTfi [a-par t«] adv. (theat) aMde. 

APART:fi, n. m. (sing.), pL — , words 
tpoken aside, pi. 

Un — , (sing.) =, pi. 

APATHIE [a-pa-ti] n. f. apathy. 

Tomber dans 1' — , to become, to get, to 
yrow apathetic. 

APATHIQUE [a-p«-ti-k] adj. apa- 
\etic. 

Devenir — , to become, to get, to 
frow=^ 

APENNINS (LES) [l«-i^p4-nin] p. n. 
m. pi. 77ie Apennines. 

APEPSIE [8-pep-.f] a. £ (med) iy«- 
v*'psia; ind/igesUyn. 



APERCEPTION [a-per-s^p-.idn] n. f. 
(philos.) apperception. 

APERCEVABLE [a-pJr-»«-Ta-bl] adj. 
perceivable ; perceptible. 

D'une maniere — , perceivably ; per- 



APERCEVOIR [a-pJr-s«.voar] V. a. 1. 

tc perceii^e ; to see ; 2. to descry ; 3. to 
discern; to notice; to observe; tore- 
mark. 

Action d' — , perception. 

8' APERCEVOIR, pr. V. (F senses of 
Apercrvoir) 1. (de, . . .) to perceive; 2. 
^de) to be aware (of) ; to be sensible 
{of) ; 8. (de) to notice (...); to take no- 
tice (of). 

Ac'ion de — . perception; personne 
qui s'aperfoit, perceiwer. Dont on ne 
s'aperfoit pas, sans etreaperpu, 1. vnper- 
cei/ced ; 2. unoboemed ; 8. undiscerned ; 
unnoticed. 

APERQU [a-p*r-su] n. m. 1. J cursory 
■view ; rapid glance ; glance ; glimpse ; 
2. I § (SUR, into) slight i/iMght; 3. § 
vieic; idea; general idea; thought; 
perception; 4. § hint; 5. § epitome; 
compendium ; 6. estiruite atfirst sight ; 
rough estimate; estimate. 

Par — , at a rough estimate. 

AP£RITI-F, VE [a-p«-ri-tif,i-v] adj. 
(jaeA^ aperient ; aperitive; ^opening. 

APfiRITlF [a-p«-ri-tii ] n. m. (med.) 
apei-ient. 

AP:ifeTALE [^p«-ta-l] adj. (bot) ape- 
talotis; toithout petal. 

APETISSER, F. Rapetisser. 

APHiLIE [a-f«-li] n. m. (astr.) aphe- 
lion. 

APHfiRESE, E [n-f«-r«-z] n. C (gram.) 
apheresis. 

APHLOGISTIQUE [a-flo-jis-ti-k] t^. 
aphlogistic. 

APHONIE [a-fo-ni] n. £ (med.) apho- 
ny ; loss of voice. 

APIIORISME [a-fo-rinn] n. m. (did.) 
aphori«m^ 

Par — , aphorisOcdUy. 

APHORISTIQUE [a-fo-ri^ti-k] adj. 
aphoristic; aphoristical. 

APHRODISIAQUE ra-fro-di-xi-a-k] n. 
m. & adj. (med.) aphrodisiac. 

APHRO-NATRON [a-fro-na-tron] n. m. 
(chem.) carbonate of soda. 

APHTHE [af-t] n. m. (med.) 1. a/ph- 
thous ulceration, sore; 1. — s, (pi.) aph- 
<^.«i, pi. ; thrush, sing. 

APHTHEU-X, SE [af-teu, eu-i] adj. 
(med.) aphthous. 

APHYLLE [«-£-l] adj. (bot) aphyl- 
lous; leafless. 

API [a-pi] n. m. (bot) api. 

Pomme d" — , =^ 

APIQU:^, E [a-pi-k«] adj. (nav.) apeak. 

APIQUER [a-pi-ki] V. a. (nav.) to top. 

APITOYER [a-pi-toa-i#] V. a. to move 
with pity ; to excite, to move the jnty of. 

S'apitover, pr. v. 1. to be moved to 
pity ; 2. (sur, ...)io pity. 

APLANIR [a-pia-nir] V. a. 1. \to level; 
2. 1 to smooth ; 8. H to make, to render 
even ; 4. i to iinrumple (what was rum- 
pled) ; 5. § to remove (to cause to disap- 
pear) ; 6. (tech.) to float. 

5. — une difficulty, un obstacle, to remove a dif- 
ficulti/, an obstacle. 

Aplani, e, pa. p. F senses of Apla- 

NIR. 

Non — , unlevelled. 
S"aplanir, pr. V. ( F senses of Apla- 
nir) to be removed ; to disappear. 

I^a ditlicult^B ou les obstacles »^aplaniteeni, the 
difficulties or obstacles disappear. 

APLANISSEMENT [a-pla-nU-man] n. 
m. 1. I levelling ; 2. 1 making even ; 8. 
1 smoothing ; 4. 1 smoothness ; evenness ; 
5. 1 unrumpling (of what was rumpled) ; 
6. § removal. 

APLATI, E [a-pla-ti] adj. 1. \flatten- 
ed ; flatted- ; flat ; 2. (did.) obU'te. 

APLATI R [a-pla-tir] V. a. U t 
ten ; to flat ; 2. to strike flat 

S'aplatik, pr. V. 1 1. to flatten; 2. to 
become, to get, to grow flat. 

APLATISSEMENT [a-p!a-ti-.-man] n. 
m.l. Iflatte^vtig; 2. I flatness; 3. (did.) 
oblateness. 

APLATISSEUR S »ia-ti.«.iiri a. ra, 
(toch.) flatter (pert jnj. 



'flat- 



APLATISSOIR [a pU-tisoar] n. a 
(tech.)^M«er (thing). 

APLOMB [a-pl6n] n. m. 1. iperpendt 
cularity; 2. i uprtghtness ; 8. || equiM 
brium / 4 § self-possession ; self -com 
mand ; 6. § assurance. 

D'— , 1 1. perpendicular; 2. perpet^ 
dicularly; 8. upright; 4. uprightly. 
5. in equilibrium. 

APLYSIE [a-pUii] n. t (wo'.) »p?j 
sia ; 1 sea-hare. 

APN£E [ap-n«] n. £ (med.) tuspen 
sion of respiration. ■ 

APOCALYPSE [a.po-ka-iip-s] n. t «i\) 
calypse; revelatio7i. 

Cheval de 1'—, sorry Jade ; style d'— 
obscure style. 

APOCALYPTIQUE [a-po-ka lip-ti-k] 
adj. apocalyptic. 

ficrivain — , apocalyptic. D'une ma- 
ni6re — , apocatyvticaUy. 

APOCATHARSIE [a-po-ka-tar-si] n. £ 
(med.) purging. 

APOCO [a-po-ko] n. m. t ninny ; sim- 
pleton ; -i- milk-sop. 

JPOCOPE [a-po-ko-p] n. £ (gram.) 
apocope (omission of the last letter o' 
syllable). 

APOCRISIAIRE [a-po-kri-a-A-r] n. m. 
(hist) apocrisiarius. 

APOCRYPHE [a-po-kri-f] adj. apocry- 
phal. 

Non — , v/iiapocryph^d. Livres — », 
apocrypha, pL Dune mani6re — , apo- 
cryphaUy. 

APOCYlfcSIE [8-po-a-«-«] n. £ (med.) 
parturition. 

APOCYN [a-po-sin] n. m. (bot) apo- 
cynon; apocynum. 

— gobe-mouches, dog-bane; dog't 
bane. 

APODE [a-po-d] (ich.) apodal: feetleae 

APODE, n. m. (ich.) apode. 

APODICTIQUE [a-po-dik-ti-k] adj. 
(did.) apodictical. 

D'iine maniSre — , apodicticdWu 

AP0G:^E [a-po-ji] adj. (astr.)"(W iU 
apogee. 

APOGEE, n. m. 1. (sstr.) apogee; Sl 
§ zenith ; acms ; meridian ; height. 

AI'OGRAPHE [a-po-gra-f] n. m. tran 
script; copy. 

APOLLODORE [a-po-lo-do-r] p. n. m. 
(class.) Apollodorus. 

APOLLON [a-po-ion] n. m. 1. (myth.) 
Apollo; 2. (mus.) theorbo (with twenty 
strings); ^. short morni/ng gmvn. 

APOLOG^TIQUE rft-po-lo-j*-ti-k] afU. 
1. apologetic ; 2. exculpatory. 

D'une maniere — , opologeHcally. 

APOLOG:fcTIQUE, n. m. apology 
(Tertullian's Apology for the Christians). 

APOLOGIE [a-po-lo-ji] n.£ (a, to; dk, 
for) apology (defence). 

Faire I' — de, to apologise for ; to 
make an apology for; faire son — de, 
to apologise for. 

APOLOGISTE [a-po-lo-jis-t] R. m. tfj>o- 
logist. 

APOLOGU K [a-p»-lo-g] n. m. apologue. 

APONlSVROSE [a-po-n«.Tr6-j] n. £ 

(anat) aponeurosis ; fascia. 

APONlfeVROTIQU'E [a-po-n^-vro-ti-k] 

(anat) aponeurotic. 

APOPIITHEGME [a-pof-tigm] n. nv 
apothegm. 

D6biteur, faiseur d' — b, apothegma- 
list. En forme d' — , apothe^matii 
Parler par — s, to apothegmaUze. 

APOPIIYGE [a-p«-fi.j] n. £ (aich.l 
apoplvyge; apotlte^is; apophyn^i; e* 
■..ipe; scape; conge. 

APOPHYSE [a-po-fl») n. £ («jtt) 
apophysis; process. 

— coronoTde, (anat) corone. 
APOPLECTIQUE [a po-plek-ti k] »^ 

(med.) apoplectic. 

APOPLECTIQUE, a m. (med.) apo- 
plectic 

APOPLEXIE [a-po-pl*k-sl] n. f (medj 
a/poplexty. 

— fondroyante,/?tfowiwawr=; r- san- 
guine, sanguineous r^ ; — s^reuse, con- 
gestive, serous =. Attaque d' — , apu 
plectic attack, flt, stroke. D' — , aj>o- 
plectic. fitre attaque d' — , to have an 
apoplectic stroke; 6tre frapp6 d" — , tt 
be seized, ttrM^Jr. witli = : tombet en — 



Al'l' 


API' 


APF 


f>u joflte; < 


u jeu; eH jeune; eH pear; an pan ; in pin; on bon; tin brun ; *'il liq. 


*gn llq. 



lo faXt down in a fit of=^ ; to luine an 
idaek of—. 

APOPSYCHIE [8-pop-«i-ki] n. £ (med.) 
wynaope. 

APOSCHASIE [8-po.-kft-.i] n. C (surg.) 
kieiMon : marifictition. 

AP08ITIE [8-p6-xi-.i] n. f. (med.) dis- 
fust for food. 

APOSTASIE [a-po«-t»-.i] n. f. B § apos- 

AFOSTASIER [a-poi-ta.ii-«] v. n. 1 § to 
ipwtatize. 

APOSTAT [8-po.-ta] adj. m. apoUnle; 
apoHtatical. 

APOSTAT, n. m. (1, to; v-r, frorn) 



D'— apostate. 

APOST^ME, n. m. V. Apostume. 

AP08TER [a-pot-w] V. a. (b. s.) to 
place, to put, to post, to station (fi>r a 
bad purpoae). 

— des gens pour faire nne insulie a q. u., to ata- 
Cion men to insult a. o. 

k POSTERIORI Ja-po^ti-ri-o-ri] adv. 



(log.) ^' a posterioH.'' 
APOS'nLLE 



[a-po«-U-i*] n. f. 1. post- 

toript; 2. recommendation (to a peti- 
tion). 

Par — ,<««=. 

AP08TILLER [a-p<M-ti-i«*] v. a. 1. fe 
add a postscript to; %.to add a recom- 
mendation to At petition). 

APOSTOLAT [a-po6-to-l»j n. m. apos- 
Heship. 

APOSTOLIQUE [a-p<»-toX-k] adj. o- 
poetoUc. 

Caractfere, qualitS — . a^ostolicaZness. 

APOSTOLIQUEMENT [a-pono-U-k- 
man] adv. apoMoUcally. 

APOSTROPHE [a-po.-tro-f] adj.(gram.) 
apostrophio. 

S — , = «. 

APOSTROPHE, n. f. 1. apostrophe ; 
address ; 2. (b. 8.) reproach ; Z. (gram.) 
apostrophe; 4 (rliet) apostrophe. 

Av«o r — , (gram,) apostrophic; en 
Xjnne d' — , (rhet) apostrophic. 

APOSTROPIIER [a-pc-tro-K] V. a. 1. 
%i apostrophise; to addrets. 2. (jest) 
mio salute. 

^, II Vapostropfui. I'un coup de baton, ht saluted 
hm. mth a ttroke qt Sit cant. 

APOSTUME, APOSTi:ME [a^pos-tu-m, 
k-m] n. m. (med.) 1. apoateme ; impos- 
thwme; 2. apostemation. 

Formation d'un — , apostemation ; 
tmposthvmation. D'— , de la nature de 
1 — , apostemaion-s, Atteint d'un — , 
imposthvmiap'd. 

AP08TUMER [a-pos-tn.m«] V. n. 

(med.) to apostemMte; to imposthu- 
tnate. 

APOTHeOSE [«-po-t«-6.i] n. f. apothe- 
osis. 

APOTHICAIRE [a-po-ti-ki-r] n. m. 1. 
t a/potheoary ; 2. (b. 8.) a/potliecary. 

— sans Sucre, cobbler without hi-f a/icl. 
Faire de sod corps nne boutique d'— , to 
he always physickinQ o.^s self 

APOTHICAIRERIE, n. f. t V. Phar- 

MACIE. 

APOTOME [a-po-to-m] (alg., geom., & 
mus.) apotome.. 

AP6TRE [a-p6-tr] n. m. 1. 1 § apostle; 
2. (nav. arch.) knight-head. 

Un bon — , (b. s.) a pretended saint ; 
a saint. Actes des — s. Acts of the apos- 
tles ; symbole d^ — s, apostolic creed. 
Faire le bon — , to play the saint. 

APOZEME [a-po-«4-m] n. m. (med.) 

D'— , aposemiral. 

APPARAlTRE fa-pa-rt-tr] V. n. (conj. 
,ike PabaItrk) 1. | to appear (to be- 
Mcae visible after having been invisible) ; 
D. 5 to appear (unexi)ectedly). 

1. lie spectre lui avait, 6tait apparu, the sftccire 
hiKl appeareil to him. 

Faire — , 1. to make = ; 2. (de) to 
vroduce, to earhihit (o.'s powers). I! 
piffdtralt, k ce qu'il parait, it would =. 

[Apparaitrk is conj. with avoir when it ex- 
. esses tj action, and with rtre when a state.] 

APPARAT [a-pa-ra] n. m. 1. state; 
pomp ; 2. (b. s.) ostentation ; parade ; 
wow. 

D' — , L ttaU; 2. ostentaiioiis ; for 



show ; 3. solemn ; 4. studied ; set ; pour 
r — ,for ostentation, show. 

APPARAT, n. m. vocahulary. 

APPARAUX [8.pa-r6] n. m. (pi.) 
(mar.) fumitthre. 

APPAREIL [a-pa-rJi*] n. m. I. solemn, 
formal preparation ; preparation ; 
preparative; 2. attire; apparel; 8. 
(anat) appai-atus; 4. (arch.) dressing; 
5. (-.jav.) purchase ; 6. (sciences) appa- 
ratus ; 7. (surg.) dressing ; 8. (tech.) ap- 
paratus; gear; gearing. 

— Int6rieur, fitting. Lever nn — , 
(surg.t to rennove a dressing. 

Al'I'ARElLLAGE [a-pa-rj-ia-j*] n. m. 
(nav.) getting under sail. 
Faire un — , to get under sail. 

A PPAREILLEMENT [apa-rj-i-man*] 

n. m. 1. matching (of animals) ; 2. pair- 
ing. 

APPAREILLER [a-pa-r*-i«*] V. a. 1. to 
match (like tilings); 2. (arch.) to dre.^s. 

— iiial, to misinatch. 
Sappakeillkk, pr. v. 5 'o connect o.'s 

self 

APPAREILLER, v. n. (nav.) to sail; 
to set sail. 

APPAREILLEUR [a-pa-ri-ieur*] n. m. 
(ma.s.) dresser. 

APPAREILLEU8E [a-pa-ri-ieu-z] n. 

t procuress. 

APPAREMMENT [a-pa-ra-man] adv. 

apparently. 

APPARENCE [a-pa-ran-s] n. f. 1. ap- 
pearan.ce; 2. show; 8. appearance; 
Wcelihood. 

En — , 1. in appearance; appa- 
rently ; 2. in show ; 8. colorahly ; pour 
les — s, for sho^o ; selon toute — , to all 
=s ,- 2. in all likelihood. Avoir T— , to 
bear an = ; avoir une, T — de, to wear 
an = of; avoir une belle — , to look 
well; se donner une — de, to assume an 
= qf; en juger daprfes les — s, to judge 
by^s; prendre une — , to assume an 
= ; revfetir 1' — de, to put on the = of. 
II y a — , it would appear so ; II y a — , 
toute — , there is every =. 

APPARENT, E [a-pa-ran, t] adj. 1. 
apparent (visible); 2. apparent (not 
real); ostensible; 8. conJtpicwrus ; 4 
(th.) remarkable; conMderabte; 5. 
(j>ers.) important; of consequence. 

Non — , unapparent. 

A PPA RENTER [a-pa-ran-t*] v. a. to 
ally ; to settle ; to marry (dispose of a 
daugliter in marriage). 

T:iclim de bien — voire fille, try lo marry your 

dauithter Tespectahhi. 

litre bien apparent^, to belong to a 
high family ; 6tre mal api»arentA, not to 
belong to a highfam.ily. 

S'apparentkr, pr. v. (a !o) to allij 
'. ( self; to marry into a . . . fami.li/. 

aPPARIEMENT, APPARtMENT 
la-pa-ri-man] n. m. pairing. 

APPARIER [a-pa-rif] V. 8. I. to pair; 
2. to match (pairs of thines). 

— mal, to mifmatch (pairs). 
APPARIl!;, E, adj. & pa. p. V. senses 

of Apparier. 

Non — , impaired. 

S'apparikr, pr. v. (of birds) to pair. 

APPARITEUR [a-pa-ri-teur] n. ni. 1. 
apparitor; 2. (universities) beadle; 
yeoman beadle. 

Fonctions <1'~, beadlen/. 

APPARITION fa-pa-ri-sidn] n. f. 1. 

apparition ; 2. a/>^''(f/-'nw'i» (action). 

Faire son — , to make o.'s appear- 
ance. 

APPAROIR [a-pa-roar] V. n. t (law) to 
appear ; to be apparent. 

Faire — , to sTiow ; to make apparent. 
II appert, it appearn ; it is apparent. 

APPARTEMENT [a-par-t«.man] C. m. 

1. apartmemts, pi. ; sitnie if npartmrnt% 
rooms, sing. ; 2. drawing-room, (holden 
at court). 

Un — , a suite of apartments, rooms. 
Pifece d'un — . upjartment. 

APPARTENANCE [a- par-t».nan-.] n. t 
appurtenance. 

APPARTENANT, E [a-par-t8-nan, t] 

ad). (A, to) belonging ; appertaining. 

APPARTENIR [a-par-i^-nir] v.n. (conj. 
like Tenir) 1. 1 § (A, U>) U) he-ong : to 
appertain; 2. § * (iinpers.) to pet tain 



{to); to be {for); to behoove (...); U 
become ; 3. (Impers.) (a, to) to be itutt 
dent. 

II appartient k, ( F. senses) it is the 
office, business qf. A tons ceux qu'il ap- 
partiendra, (law) to aU whom it may con> 
cern ; ainsi qu'il app.srtiendra, ce qu'il ap- 
partlendra, (law) as onemay be adviseii 

APPAS ra-p4] n. m. pi. 1. attraction^! 
2. (b. 8.) altureinents ; enticements. 

APPAT [a-pa] n. m. 1. | bait; 2. |(b 
8.) bait; allurement; enticement. 

Mettre 1'— k, to bait.. 

APPAtER fa-pa-td] V. a 1 1. to bati; 
2. to feed ; to awe food to. 

APPAUME[a-p6-m6]ad). {her.) upau- 
me. 

APPAUVRIR [a-pt-Trir] v. a. | § «» 
empoverish ; to make, to render poor. 

Chose, personne qui appauvrit, emu- 
poverisher {of). 

S'appauvr'ir, pr. v. 1. to empoverish 
o.'s self; to become impoverished; to 
become, to get, to groxo poor. 

APPAUVRISSEMENT [a-pft-m-i- 
man] n. m. | § empoverishment. 

APPEAU [8-p6] n. m. 1. bird-caU; 2. 
accoy-bird. 

APPEL [a-pel] n. m. 1. 1 § caU ; 2. § (a, 
to) appeal ; 3. (b. s.) challenge ; 4 (of 
names) calling over ; call; 5. (of recruit- 
ing) levy ; 6. (com., fin.) call (for funds); 
7. (fenc.) appeal; 8. (law) appeal; 9. 
(law) calling (of a cause) ; 10. (mil.) m/us- 
ter; roll-call; 11. (mil) ruffie (of » 
drum) ; 12. (pari.) call. 

— nominal, (pari.) call, of tlie House, 
Cour d"— , (Taw) court qf appeal ; offlcier 
d' — , (mil.) mxiMer-master. Con tenant — , 
(law) appellatory; sourd k un — , d«ad, 
deaf to a ==; sujet k — , (of a cause) ap- 
pealable. A r — . (mil.) at muster ; d'— , 
1. appellate ; 2. (law) appellatory ; eiv 
— , appellant ; par — , upon appeal; 
sans — , without further appecu; nam 
— , dont on ne pent inteijeter — , unap 
pealable ; sur — , upoii appeal. Alfer 
en — , (law) (th.) to go to appeal; 6ti* 
sujet k — , (law) (of a cause) to be ap- 
pealable; fairer — , (mil.) to master ; to 
muster up; to call over the nuator- 
roll; faire T— nominal, (pari.)' to caU 
(the House) ; faire un — k, 1. to mak^e a 
= on; 2. to make an appeal to ; inter- 
jeter — , (law) to lodge an appeal ; pas- 
ser r — , (mil.) to pass muster ; r6pondi'e 
k V — , to ansicer to o.'s name. II y a 
— , (law) the cause is appealed; an ap- 
peal lies. 

APPELANT, E [»-p8-ian, t] adj. (law) 
appeMant 

APPELANT [a-p8-Ian, t] n. m. E, n. f 
1. deco7f-bird ; 2. (law) appellant. 

APPELER [a-ps-ul V. a. 1. to caU; 2. 
to call (a. o.) ; T to gzve (a. o.) a call ; 8. 
to c(dl over (a list of names) ; 4. 11 to call 
in (a. o.) ; 5. to call for (a. o.) ; 6. ^tore- 
quire (a. th.) ; to call for ; to claim ; to 
demand ; 7. (b. s.) to invoke ; to call 
d.mvn ; 8. (b. s.) to summon ; to call up ; 
9. (b. s.) to challenge ; to call out ; 10. 
to call ; to name ; to term, ; to style ; 11. 
(b. s.) to nickname; 12. (of hens) to 
chuck ; 18. (law) to appeal ; 14 (law) to 
call (a cause) ; to call on. 

4. — un m^decin, to enl\ in a ph;mcian. 5. — le 
ffiircon, U' call for tht waiter. 1. — iles nialedic 
tions, ^. call down curtes. 

— (en avant), to call forth ; — (en 
ba.s), to = down ; — (dedans), to = in ; 
— (dehors), to = out; — (en hant), to =. 
up ; — (loin), to = away ; — (a part), to 
= aside. — et rappeler, to call again 
and again; ^ to = o»«r and over 
again. — de c6t6, to = aside; — en 
duel, to ■=. out. 

Sappeler, pr. V. 1. to be calvO'l, 
nnnwd ; o.'s name to be...; 2. aodU, 
to style o.'s self. 

Comment vbns appelez-vous ? tchai U 
your name t Je m'appelle , . . , nyy 
name It .... 

APPELER, V. n. 1. 1 to call ; 2. § (dr 
from; k, to) to appeal; 8. (cf cats) U 
caterwaul; 4 (qf bens) to chuck ; 6, 
(law) {nK, from; a, to) to appeal 

En — , 1. (law) to appeal; 1. § (a, to) 
to =;. — comme d'abus, to = (to a lay 
31 



APP 




APF APP 


amal: <imMe, 


6 fee; ifdve; ^f5te; 4j« 


i U; 1 tie; o mol; 6 m61e; 5 mort; w sue; H s&re; om jour; 



HUthorlty) against an act of ecclesiaS' 
Heal autfio?'iti/, on Hie plea of an al/use 
qf power. ^ il en a appele, he has re- 
covered (from a severe illness). 

Al'PELLATI-F, VE [a-pel-la-tif, i-v] 
•4). (graui.) appellative. 

rJom — , (gram.) appellative. D'une 
.iianiere appellative, appellaUvely. 

Al'PELLATlON [a-pM-la-sion] n. f. 1. 
wtUing (action) ; 2. namiiig (of the let- 
ters) ; 8. (law) appellation. 

APPENDICE [a-pin-di-s] n. m. 1. (of a 
book) appendix ; 2. (did.) appendix ; 3. 
(sciences) appendage ; 4. (nat sciences) 
proc«««. 

APPENDRE [a-pan-dr] V. a. <o Jiang 
up (votive olferinss). 

APPENTIB [a-pan-ti] n. aupent-houae; 
tiled. 

Appbrt, ind. pros. 3d sing, of Appa- 

BOIB. 

APPESANTIR [a-p8-zan.tir] V. a. 1. I § 

to render, to make hea/vy ; 2. § to weigh, 
down; 3. § to lay heavily; 4. % to irtv- 
pair; to dmll. 

-2. Le Bommeii appesantit ses pniipi^res, tUep 
weighs down &u eije-hilt. 3. Dieii a appeganti sa 
main aur cette race inipie, (it^d hat laid kit hand 
heavily on that impious race. 

S'appbsantir, pr. v. 1. | fe become, to 
get, to grow heavy ; 2. § to be weighed 
down ; 3. § (bur, on, upon) to lie lieavy ; 
\.%tobe impaired ; to dull ; 5. § (sur, 
ov-, ii/pon) to descant ; to expaUate ; to 
dmeu. 

APPESANTISSEMENT [a-ps-zan-ti-^ 
•oan] n. m. § 1. (pers.) heamness ; 2. 
duhiess (of mind). • 

APPETENCE [a-p«-tan-g] n. £ (did.) 
appetency. 

APP^TER [a-p«-t«] V. a. (physiol.) 1. 
to ■kiditie to ; 2. to crave. 

APPilTlSSANT, E [a.p«-ti-»aii, t] adj. 
1. 1 tJuit exoites appetite ; 2. § tempting ; 
inviting. 

fitre — , 1. I to excite appetite ;2.%to 
be tempting, inviting. 

APPI^^TIT [a-p6.ti] n. m. 1. I § apipe- 
ite ; 2. 1^" y stomach (appetite). 

Bon — 1 a good appetite to you I — 
d!sprav6, deprated, vitiated =; — de 
Aeval, ravenous =. Excitant h. T — , 
appetizer. Avec — , de bon — , with = ; 
\eartily. Avoir — , de 1' — , to have an 
= ; aiguiser, ouvrir 1' — , to sharpen, to 
tchet o.'« = ; demeurer sur son — , I § to 
restrain o.'s = ; donner de 1' — , to give 
an = ; gagner de V — , se niettre en — , to 
getan=i; pour se inettre en — , by way 
of appetizer ; oter, faire passer 1' — , to 
lake away o.'s =; perdre 1' — , to lose 
o.'s =; reprendre 1' — , to get o.'s = 
again ; to recover one^s =. Bon — je 
vous souhaite 1 / wish you a good =. 
a*:^ L' — vient en mangeant, 1. 1 eating 
brings <m =; 2. § much would have 
more. ^*0 II n'est ch^re que d' — , hitn- 
ger is t/is best sauce. 

APPIEN [a-pi-in] p. n. m. (class.) Ap- 
pian. 

APPLAUDIR [a-plA-dir] V. a. 1. 1 to ap- 
plaud; 2. § to commend; 3. (pari.) to 
clieer. 

S'APPLAtmre, pr. v. (de) 1. § to ap- 
plaud o:s self(^for) ; 2. to glory (in) ; 
B. to congratulate o.^s self (on). 

3. Je m'applaaUit de nion choix, / congratulate 
myself on mi/ chnce. 

APPLAUDIR, V. n. 1. 1 to applaud ; 
%. § (a, . . .) to applaud ; to commend. 

8. — a q. u., a q. ch., Ut aniplaud a. o., a. th. 
APPLAUDISSEMENT [a-plA-di-s-man] 

B. m. 1. II § applause ; 2. J — s, (pl.)j9tew- 
tlits, pi. ; 3. § commendation ; 4. (pari.) 
cheering ; cheer. 

Bruyanta — s, Urud applause; longs 
—8, — 8 prolongf'S, (pari.) continued 
ikeers. Salve d* — s, 1. round of-=. ; 2. 
(pari.) round, of cheering. D'~, ap- 
plausive. Donner des — s (K), to bestoto 
plaudits (on) ; obtenir de grands — 8, to 
obta4n, to get great =. 

^yn. — Applaudibsemknts, louanoes. Apptau- 
dittemerUt seem te be more properly applied to 
persons ; louanget to things. One applaudit {ap. 
plautU) in public, and at the moment when the 
action takes place ; one loiu {praiaei) at all timna, 
%ad imder all circumstances. Applaudissenteiita 
■nweed > om a sansibility to the pleasure which 



tilings afford us, and may be expressed by a simple 
gesture, a clapping ot' the hands ; louanges proceed 
from the discernment of the mind, and can be 
expressed only by words. We are always flat- 
tered by applauduaementt, in whatever way they 
are manifested ; it is not so with hmanget ; they 
please ua only when they are delicate and sineerp. 

APPLAUDISSEUR [a-pl6-di-seur] n. 
m. (b. 8.) applauder. 

APPLICABLE [a-pli-ka-bl] adj. (a, to) 

1. applicable; 2. apposite; 3. relemant. 

APPLICATION [a-pli-ka-sion] n. £ (A, 

to) 1. I application (putting) ; 2. § ap- 
plication (employing) ; 3. § application 
(bearing, reference) ; 4. § application, ; 
sedulity ; 5. § intentnesa ; 6. § (did.) ap- 
plication ; 7. (gi.'d., gold.) charging ; 8. 
(theol.) application. 

Juste — , appositenesa ; mauvaise — , 
mis(xppUcation. Force d"— , intentness. 
Avec mie grande force d' — , inte/iitiy ; 
sans — , 1. witliout application ; 2. v/n- 
applied ; sans — d6termin6e, una/ppro- 
priated. Faire une mauvaise — de, to 
misapply. 

APPLIQUE [a-pU-k] n. £ (gild., gold.) 
charging. 

Piece d'— , charge. D'— , for charging. 

APPLIQU:ife, E [a-pU-k«i adj. 1. atten- 
tive ; 2. sedido^m. 

Bien — , 1. very = ; 2. apposite ; trop 
— , over-bent. 

APPLIQUER [a-pU-k«] V. a. 1. II (sur, 
to) to apply ; to put ; to lay ; to lay on ; 

2. I (8UR, on, upon) to stick ; 3. § (a, to) 
to ajyply ; ^%(k,to)to appropriate ; to 
set apart ; 5. (b. s.) ^ to gime ; to ad- 
minister ; 6. (law) to award (judgment); 
7. (mas.) to render. 

1. — des couleurs sur une toile, to lay colors on 
canvas. 5. EUe lui appliqna un souttie't, she gave 
him a slap. 

Mai — , — mal k propos §, to misap- 
ply. Personne qui applique, a]>j)ro- 
priator (of a. th.) to his use; possibilit6 
d' — , applicability. De maniere k pou- 
voir 6tre appliqu6, applicably; que Ton 
n'a pas applique, unapplied. 

S'appliquer, pr. v. 1. | (sur, to) to be 
applied, put, laid; to be laid on; 2. 
B (8UR, on, upon) to stick ; 8. § (a, to) to 
<^PPly (suit) ;_4. § (a, to) to be apposite; 

5. § (pers.) (A, to) to apply; to apply 
o.^s self; to give application ; to apply 
o.'s mind ; to make it o.'s study (to) ; to 
set o.'s self; ^]^" to take (to a. th.) ; 

6. § (pers.) (a, to) to appropriate to 

' APPOGGIATURE [a-pod-ji-a-tu-r] n. 
£ (mus.) appoggiatura. 

APPOINT [a.poin] n. m. 1. difference; 
odd money ; 2. (com.) appoint. 

Net — , (com.) appoint D'— , odd ; 
par net — , per appoint Faire 1' — , to 
give, to pay the difference. 

APPOINTEMENTS [a-poin-t-man] n. 
m. (pi.) (admin.) salary. 

— elev68, 'gros — , Jtigh = ; faibles, ^ 
minces — , low =. Recevoir, toucher ses 
— , to receive o.'s salary. 

APPOINTER [a-poin-t«] v. 1. 

(admin.) to give « salary to; i ^mil.) 
(de, tmth) to pumish. 

Iiltre appoints, to receive a salary. 

APPORT, n. m. 1. (com.) (in partner- 
ships) s/tare of capital; 2. (law) sepa- 
rate personal estate (of husband or 
wife) ; 3. (law) deposit (of documents). 

Acte d' — do pieces, (law) acknow- 
ledgment of docwments deposited. 
_ APPORTER fa-por-t*] V. a. (n^from ; 
A, to) 1. I to bring (by carrying) ; 2. 1 to 
bring (ftimish, supply); 8. § to bring 
(have in o.'s self); 4. § to bri,ng ; to 
ca-use ; to produce ; to occasion ; 5. § to 
employ ; to use ; to apply ; 6. § to ad- 
duce ; to allege ; to bring forward. 

1. — q. ch. a la main, sous le bras, sur le dos, to 
bring a. th. in o.^s hand, under o.*8 arm, on o.U back. 
4. La vieillesse apporte des infirmit^s, old age 
brings infirmities. 5. — de la precaution, to use 
precauthm ; — un remade a un mal, to apply a rem- 
edy to an evil. 6. — des bonnes raisons, to adduce, 
to allege good reasons. 

— (en bas), to bring down ; — (dedans), 
to-=.in; — (dehors), to = o^i,t ; — (en 
haut), to-=up; — (en traversant), to = 
over. 

— ensemble, to bring together. Per- 
sonne qui apport« bringer of. 



[Apporter must not be confounded with an* 

APPOSER [a-po-i«] V. a. (a, to) 1. ie 
affix; to set; to put-; 2. to append; & 
to add ; to indent 

APPOSITION [a-po-il-siOn] n. t 1 C^ 

fiadng ; setting; putting; 2. app^n/d- 
ing ; 3. addition ; inserl/ioh ; 4. (gram, 
rhet) apposition ; 5. (sciences) appM 
tion. 

Faire 1'—, to affix. 

APPRECIABLE [a pr«.si-a-U] adj. (ip 
preciable. 

APPRilCIATEUR [a-pr«-.i-a-tenfl U. 
m. II § estimator ; valuer. 

APPR£CIATI-F, VE [a.nr«-si-a-tlf,l-»] 

adj. II of estimation, valuation. 
Etat — , esUmate. 

APPRECIATION [a-pr«-si-a-M6n] n. 1 

1. II appreciation ; valtiation ; estima- 
tion ; 2. § appreciation ; esiimMtion. 

APPRECIER [a-pr^-sie] v. a. I § t<rap- 
predate; to value; to estimaie; to 
appraise. 

Apprkcie, e, pa. p. V. senses of Ap- 

PKKOIER. 

Non — §, unappreciated. 

APPREHENDER [a-pr«-an-d«] v. a. 1. 
I to cuppreliend ; \ to take up; 2. i «f 
arrest (for debt); 3. § (de, de, que, 
[subj.]) to apprehend (...); to be appre- 
hensive (of) ; to be under apprehension 
{of) ; to fear (to). 

— au corps, 1. to appreliend ; *[ to 
take up ; 2. to arrest (for debt). Falro 
— q. ch. a q. u., to render, to make t*. o. 
apprehensive of a. th. 

Apprehende, b, pa. p. F. senses ol 
Apprehender. 

Non — au corps, imapprehended. 

APPREHENSIBLE [a-pr6-an-si-bl] adj. 
(did.) apprehensible. 

APPREHENSION [a-pr«.an..iSn] n. £ 
1. § apprehension ; appreheriMvcnew ; 
fear; 2. (log.) apprehension. 

Avec — , with apprehension; apprt- 
Tiensively ; dans Y — , in = ; approMn^ 
give ; sans — , without = ; v/napprehev^ 
sive. Avoir des — s, to be under = ; to 
entertain =«; etre dans 1' — de, to &<fi 
under = qf; to be apprehensive cf. 

Apprenais, ind. iinper£ Ist, 2d sing, 
of Apprbndre. 

Apprenant, pres. p. 

APPRENDRE [a-pran-dr] V. a. Irreg. 
(conj. like Prendre) 1. 1 (de, d, to) to 
learn (a. th.) ; to m,ake o.''8 self acquaint- 
ed mth; 2. § to learn (a. th.); to un- 
derstand; to be informed of;, to hear ; 
to have ; 3. I (a, d) to teach (to) ; 4 % 
(a) to apprize (of); to acquaint (with); 
to inform (of). 

1 . — une langue, to learn a language ; — a lire, to 
leam to read. 3. Le maitre qui lui a appria c#* 

ait^ the Tnaster whrj taugh t him what he %now». 

). ;n. a q. u., to apprize, to inform a. o. of a. 
th., tf acquaint a. o. with a. th. 

— par cceur, to commit to memory ; to 
learn, ^ to get by heart Qu'on n'a paa 
appris, untaught. 

Appris, e, pa. p. v. senses of Ap- 

PRENDRE. 

N on — , unlearned ; mal — , ill-bred ; 
unmannerly ; unbred. Un mal appriu, 
an ill-bred, unmannerly person. 

Apprenions, ind. imperf Ist pL 
subj. pres. 1st pi. of Apprendre. 

Apprenne, subj. pres. 1st, 8d sing. 

Apprennent, ind. & subj. pres. 86 pL 

Apprenons, ind. pres. & impera. Ist pL 

APPRENTI, E [a-pra«-ti] adj. 1. ap 
pr enticed ; 2. (of attorneys' clerks, of 
pupils) articled. 

APPRENTL n. m. E, n. £ 1. 1 apprm 
tioe ; 2. § apprentice ; novice ; tyro. 

Obliger un — , to bind o^it an =:.• 

APPRENTISSAGE [a-pran-ti-sa-j] h. 
m. I § apprenticeship. 

Brevet d' — , (sing.) indentures of ap- 
prenticeship; indentures, pi. E&i 
en — , 1. to be in o.'s = ; 2. (chez) to bt 
apprenticed (to) ; faire son — , to sertu 
o.'s =. tdme ; faire V — , un — de, to.aerv4 
an, the=z of; mettre en — , 1. to ap- 
prentice ; to put apprentice ; to bind 
apprentice; to indenture; ^ to bind 
out ; 2. to article (attorneys' clerks, pu- 
pils) ; obliger par un brevet d' — . to kf 
denture ; oblige par un brevet d'— % *» 



n 



APP 



AFP 



APR 



ofljoftte; »ujen; eujeane; e&pexa; owpat. l«pin; on bon ; Hn bnrn ; ♦U liq. ; *gn Uq. 



dmted; sortir d'— , to be out of o:s —, 
time. 

APPRfiT [a-pr«] n. m. 1. \ prepara- 
tion; preparative; 2. § affeetaPion ; 
gtijnegs; 3. (culin.) cooking; 4. (a. & 
m.) dressing ; 5. (paint.) painting upon 
g^iss. 

Sana — |^ wnstuMed : xiMvarmshed. 
D'— , (paint) upon glass. Faire des —8 
(l»nr), to make preparations (for). 

APPRilTAGE [a-pr6-ta-j] n. m. 1. (a. 
Se m.) dressing ; 2. (tech.) /Mis/tiMgr. 

APPRiiTE, n. £ V. Mouillette. 

APPRfiTER [»-pr6-W] V. &.l.\to pre- 
pare; to get ready; 2. § (d) to afford 
matter (of); 8. (culin.) to cook; 4 (fv. 
& m.) to dress ; to prepare. 

2. a rire am autres, to aft'ord matter of amuae- 

ment to others (at one's own expense). 

Appeete, k, pa. p. 1. \% prepared; 2. 
% (b. 8.) studied. 

Non — , 1. v/nprepared ; 2. imstu- 
died. , ,^ 

8'APPRETKRj)r. V. to prepare o.'s self; 
to get ready. ^^ 

APPRfeTEU-R [a-pr«-tear] n. m. 8E 
[en-i] n. f (a. & m.) dresser. 

Appris, b, pa.j). of Apprendre. 

APPRIVOISEMENT [^a-pri-vca-z-man] 

n. m. I (of animals) domestication ; tam- 
ing. 

APPRIVOISER [a-pri-Toa..«] v. a. 1. 1 
to tame (animals); 2. § to render, to 
make sociable ; 8. (hunt.) to reclaim. 

Personne qui apprivoise, tamer of; 
qu'on ne pent — , untarrtable. 

S' APPRIVOISER, pr. V. 1. (of animals) 
to become, to get, to grow tame / 2. § to 
become, to get, to grow sociable; 3. 
(avbc) to familiarize one's self, to be- 
come fmniUar {with) ; to become accus- 
tomed (to). 

APPROBA-TEUR. TRICE [a-pro-ba- 
t»xa, tri-.] adj. approving ; of approba- 



APPROBA-TEUR;n. m. TRICE, n. t 

Ol/prover. 

iPPROBATI-F, VE [a-pro-ba-tif, i-v] 

id), approving; of approbation, ap- 
prrmal. 

APPROBATION [a-pro-ba-»i6n] n. t 

approbation ; * approval. 

Toute son — , o.'s wnqualifled appro- 
bation. Avec— , 1. &y=; 2. approv- 
ingly ; sans — , 1. without = ; 2. unap- 
proved ; sauf votre — , witJi submission. 
Avoir r — de q. u., (th.) to home, to meet 
vnth a. o.'s = ; Incliner la tete en signe 
d' — , to nod =. 

APPROCHANT, E [a-pro-shan, t] ftdj. 1. 

(de, . . .) like ; not vmZtke ; 2. If (as a pre- 
position) near ; near about ; about ; so. 
APPROCHE [«-pro-.h] n. f. 1. 1 § ap- 
proach ; coming on ; 2. (fort.) ap- 
proach; 8. ivaW.) approach ; 4. (prbt) 
space; 5. (print.) closing up. 

k V— de, aux — s de, at tlie approach 
of; a son — , on o.'s =■ ; en, par — , (asrr., 
hort) (of grafting) by approach. Greffer 
par approche, (asr., hort) to approach. 

APPROCHBR [a-pro-.W] V. a. (de, to) 
1. I to approach ; to draw near ; % ito 
approacli (a. o.) ; to come near ; 3. || to 
bring near, nearer ; 4. § to hwoe access 
to (a. o.) 

S"APPB»cnER, pr. V. 1. (db, . . .) to ap- 
proach; to com^, to draw near; 2. | 
(DE. to) to conw closer ; 3. J (de) to dra/io 
on, to advance {towards -,• to make up 
{to) ; 4. II (iiers.) (de, to ' .to stsp itp ; 5. 
§ (th.) to dra/w near, ,; 6. § (th.) to be 
near ; to be at hand. 

Ne pas — , ( F! sens« to keep of. En 
s'approchant davanta ?, (F. senses) on 
nearer approach. ai a'approche, ( V. 
■wnses) coming. 

APPROCHER, ▼ n. 1, 1 § (dk, to, . . .) 
to approach ; to c ^a/w, to come neat; 
ruigh ; 2. § (th.) (d- :,...) to approach ; 
to resemble ; to be 'ike : to come near. 

Dont on ne pen — I! §, unapproach- 
able ; dont on na point approche I %, 
unajyproached. 

APPROFONPIR [a pro-fSn-dir] v. a. 1. 
I to deepen; 2. )» to examine deeply^ 
thoroughly; to ssaroh into; to d4/ee 
^rUo. 

A.PPEOrRIATI0N [a-pio-pri-A-d8n] n. 



f. (A, to) 1. appropriation to o.'s self; 
2. (chem.) appropriation ; 3, (law) con- 
version. , , ^ . 
APPROPRIER [a-pro-pri«] V. a. (A, to) 

1. to appropriate; 2. to adapt; to 
suit. 

Approprie, e, pa. p. (a, to) appro- 
priate; suitable. 

Non — (a), 1. inappropHate {to); 
imswitable {to, for); 2. (law) disappro- 
priate ; peu — (a), inappropriate {to) ; 
unsuitable {to, for). 

S' APPROPRIER, pr. V. to appropriate 
to o.'s self; to appropriate. 

Sim. — S'approprikr, s'arrogek, s'attribuer. 
S'approprier means to appropriate to one'a Belf the 
property of another. S'arroger means to claim 
with haughtiness, insolence, or scorn what is not 
one's due : it is applied to titles, privileges, or 
prerogatives. S'attribuer means to pretend to a 
thing which would raise one in the opinion of an- 
other ; as, a successful ir.vention, a great work. 
Interest leads one to e'approprier ; audacity, to 
s'arroger ; self-love, to t'attribuer. 

APPROPRIER, V. a. 1. to clean; ^ to 
dean out, up; % to put to rights. 

APPROUVER [a-prou-vfe] V. a. 1. to 
approve; to approve of; 2. (admin.) 
to pass (accounts). 

— du regard, to look approbation. 

Approuve, e, pa. p. approved. 

Non — , sans 6tre — , wnapproved. 

APPROVISIONNEMENT [a-pro-vi- 
Mo-n-man] n. m. 1. victuoiling ; "i. sup- 
ply, stock of provisions ; 3. (poL econ.) 
supply. 

Navire, vaisseau d'--, (nav.) victualler. 

APPROVISIONNER [ a-pro-vi-iio-n6 ] 

v. a. (de, u4th) 1. to victual ; 2. to store ; 
8. to supply (with necessaries). 
Approvisionne, e, pa. p. F^ senses 

of APPROVISIONNER. 

Non — , 1. wn^tored ; 2. unswpplied. 

8' APPROVISIONNER, pr. V. (de) to stock 
o.'s self {with) ; to lay iri a store, stock 
{of) ; to take in a supply {of). 

APPROXIMATI-F, VE [a-prok-si-ma- 

tif, i-v] adj. 1. approtmmMti/v6 ; 2. rough 
(not exact). 

'2. Devig — , rough estimate, 
APPROXIMATION [;a-prok-.i-mi-Bi6n] 

n f. 1. (did) approximation ; 2. ^ rough 
guess; 3. (math.) approach. 

Determination par — , (math.) op- 
proximation ; methode des — s succes- 
sives, (math.) \nethod of approaches. 
Par — , 1. (did.) by approximation : 2. 
^ata rough giwsf,. 

APPROXIMATIVEMENT [a-prok-si- 
ma-ti-T-man] adv. 1. (did.) by approximM- 
tion : 2. ^ at a rough gtiess. 

APPROXIMER [»-prok-ti-m«] V. a. 
(did.) to approximate. 

APPUI [a-pui] n. m. 1. 1 § support : 
2. I § prop ; 8. I leaning-stock ; 4. § 
support ; prot-ecHon ; countenance ; 
5. § supporter ; prop ; staff; 6. (of 
staircases rail; hand-rail; 7. (of win- 
dows) **«,• %. {axdii.) buttress ; 9. (man.) 
appui; 10. (mech.) point of support; 
11. (mech.) (of a \e:\et),fulcrwn. 

Hauteur d' — , breast height ; point 
d' — , 1. point of support; 2. (of a lever) 
fulcrum; 3. (rail.) bearing surface; 
4. (tech.) prop. A hauteur d' — , breast- 
high ; k r — , 1. to siipport it, Viem ; in 
support of it, them ; 2. in proof; in 
corroboration ; in confirmation ; a 
Tappui de, 1. m siupport of; 2. in cor- 
roboration, confirmation of; sans — , 1. 
I § tmsupporteol ; impropped ; wns^is- 
tained- 1. % vmbefriended ; vmfriend- 
ed; 8.'% unbacked; 4. %wnurged; 5. § 
(b. 8.) unabetted. Avoir V — bon, lourd, 
(of horses) to be hard-mouthed ; n'avoir 
point d' — , to be tender-mouthed, Don- 
ner — , to give support, cau/ntenance ; 
solliciter 1' — de^q. u., to m^ke interest 
with a. o. 

The appui 



APPUI-MAIN [a-pui-min] n. m., pL — 
(paint) rest-stick ; resting-stick ; »KM*i- 
stick. 

APPUYER [a-pui-W] V. a. 1. 1 § tontip- 
port; to prop ; to sustain ; 'i.\toleaM; 
to rest; 3. **ll to pillow; 4 1 (sue, i^;*, 
upon) to press ; 5. || to recline ; Q. § tr 
support; to protect; to countenancx- , 
to give countenance to ; 7. § to ttup 
port ; to strengthen ; to enforce ; *[ i'l 
back; 8. § (sue, on, upon) tc grou.^ 
(support); to rest; 9. (of deliberation';! 
to support; 10. (of deliberations) tc 



2. — le coude sur la table, to lean o,'» elboH 
upon the table ; — q. ch. centre un mur, t^j rest a. 
th. against a wall. 4. — le genou sur la poitrine 
de q. u., to press o.'» knee on a. o.'s breast. 5. — la 
t4te surun oreiUer, to recline o.'s head on a pillow. 

Pour — . . . §,^ the support of. . . ; 

in support of — I'^peron k un che- 

val, to give a horse the spur. 

Appuyb, b, pa. p. V. senses of Ap- 

PUYEK. 

Non — , 1. 1 § unsxipported ; vmprop- 
ped ; xonsu^tained ; 2. § wnsupported ; 
unprotected ; 3. § unconfirmed ; 4. ** 
unpilloiced; 5. (of deliberations) rm- 
supported; 6. (of deliberations) vm^e- 



from the rude contact 
The soutien bears up: it is placed under an object, 
to prevent it from sinking beneath a weight. The 
aupport assista; it is Dialed at one of the ends, tn 
seiveas a support, figuratively, the appiii hns 
reference to authority and force; the satitien to 
^od standing and influence ; the support to affec- 
tion and friendship. In danger we woxild seek the 
appui of a powerful protector; in difficulty, the 
soutien of an influential person : in sorrow or afllic- 
tion. the support of a true friend. 



8'appuyer, pr. v. 1. | to support ; to 
sustain o.'s self; 2. 1 to lean ; to rest ; 
3. 1 to press ; 4 J to loll ; 6. | to recUne ; 
6. § (sur) to be supported (by) ; to rest 
(upon) ; 7. § (sur, . . .) to press ; to urge ; 
a § (sur) to rely {on, upon) ; to confide 
(in); to depend {on, upon); to trust 
(to) ; 9. § (sur, upon) to lay stress, em- 
phasis; 10. (sue, on, upon) to dwell; 
toinsisL 

4. — sur q. u., to loll upon a. o. 8. Si vous 
comptez sur lui, vr)U8 vous appuyez sur un roseau, 
if you rely upon him^ y&u trust to a broken reed. 

— fortement, 1. | to lean Tiard, fuM- 
vily ; 2. | (sur) to press down ; 8. S to 
press fiard ; to bear hard ; 4 J to lay 
great stress. — sur un rosean, to lum 
upon a broken reed ; ^ to trust to a 
rotten plank. 

APPUYER, V. n. 1. 1 (th.) to rti£ 
(lean); 2. jj to press; to lean; 8. ! (stm, 
to) to keep (go) ; 4 (sub, on., upon) Ui 
lay stress, emphasis; 5 § (sur, vn, 
upon) to dwell ; to insist ; 6. (mus.) to 
dtweU. 

APRE [i-pr] adj. 1. II rugged; uneven; 
rotigh ; 2. 1 (to the touch) rough ; harsh ; 
8. II (to the taste) Aar-**; sharp; 4 | (to 
the taste) acrid; tart; acrimonious; 
6. §(to the hearing) harsh; 6. § (th.) 
harsh ; sharp ; severe ; 7. § {th.) Jierce ; 
violent; 8. § (th.) gruff; 9. § (b. s.) ea- 
ger; ardent; greedy. 

— i la cur6e, 1. 1 (of animals) eager 
for prey; 2. § (pers.) eager f)r gain. 

APREMENT [&-pr8-man] '^V. 1. I (tO 

the touch) roughly ; harshly ; 2. I (to 
the taste) harshly; sharply; 8. I (to 
the taste) acrid; tartly; acrimomious- 
ly ; 4 § (to the hearing) harshly ; 5. % 
liarshly; sharph/; severely; 6. ^fierce- 
ly ; violently ; 7. § gruffly ; 8. § (b. s.) 
eagerly; ardenfly ; greedily. 

APRi;S [a-pr«] prep.l. (of place, order, 
and time) after; 2. f of place and order) 
after; next to; 8. aboui (doing); 4 (al- 
ter certain verbs)/or. 

'2. — le vestibule, next to the vestibule; — 1« 
president, next to the president. 8. fitre — q. 
ch., to be about a. th. 4. Attendre — q. u.., to 
wait for a. o. ; soupirer — q. ch., to long for a. iK 

Ci- — , hereafter (further on). D' — , 
1. (of time) after ; 2. from (in confor- 
mity mth) ; according to ; 8. from (i/i 
imitation of); after. — quoi, ty^W 
which, that; after; afterwards. 

APRiS, adv. 1. (of plaob and ord';l) 
after; n,exi; 2. (of time) aftitr ; after 
ward ; afterwards ; 3. about (dolbg^ 
a. th. ; 4'(interrogativelv) what next. 

Et — ? what thenf what nextt Iu»- 
mediatement — , le premier — , the need. 

Apres que, con.i. after. 

— ce sera fait, after it is done. 

fApRKS QUE, denoting luiure ume, requires li* 
future leiisc.j 

APRilS-DEMAIN [a-pri-d-min] n. n.. 
pi. — , the day after to-morrow. 

— pas86, beyond the =, 





ARA 


AKB ARC 




amai; «mfile; efee; ^fSve; «f8te; <?Je;iU- 


file; omol; dmd\e; «mort; wsnc; Msure; oujoxa; 



APRilS-DlNfi [a-pra-di-n«] a. m., pi. 

APEi:8-DlN*;E, n. f., pi. — s, 

APRi:8-DlNER, n. m., pi. — , 1. af- 
tiy-dimver ; 2. afternoon; 3. evening. 

APR:feS-MIDI [a-pr«-mi-di] n. £ m., pL 
— , afternoon. 

A.PRi:S-S0UP:6 [a-prj-wa-p^] n. m., 

"APRilS-SOUPjfcE, n. f., pi. —8, 

APRi:S-80UPER, n. m., pi. — , L 
^fter-ewpper ; 2. evening. 

APRET:6 [&-pr8-w] n. f. 1. I rugged- 
ne»8; vMevermess; roughness; 2. |(to 
(lie touch) roughness; harshness; 3. | 
(to the taste) harshness ; sharpness ; 4. 
I (to the taste) aorid/ness; tartness; ac- 
rimony; aervmomousness ; 5. | (to the 
hearing) harshness; 6. § (th.) ha/rsh- 
ness; sharpness; severity; 1. § (th.) 
fierceness; molence; 8. § gruffness; 9. 
(a, /or) ^eagerness; greediness; thirst. 

AP8II)Ej;ap-«i-d] n. £ 1. (arch.) a/psis. 

APSIDES, n. m. pi. (astr.) apsides. 

APTE [ap-t] adj. (law) {d, to) quaMfied. 

Non — , wnquaUfied. 

APTERE [ap-t4-r] adj. (ent.) apterous. 

APTilRE, n. m. (ent.) apter; — «, 
0-*.) altera, pi. 

APTITUDE [ap-ti-ta-d] n. £ (A, pouk, 
io,for) aptitude; aptness ; fitness. 

Avoir de 1' — pour, to he a^t,fitfor ; to 
have a taste, a talent for. 

Syn. — APTiTunE, disposition, penchant. Apti- 
tude has reference to the mind ; disposition, to the 
temperament ; pmehant, to the heart. Vaucanson 
had a remarkable aptitude for the mechanical arts ; 
Michael Angelo had a disposition to melancholy ; 
many a person has a religious penchant. 

APULlfiE [a-pa-l«] p, n. m. (class.) 
Apnleius. 

APULIE ilT) [la-pn-li] p. n. £ (geog.) 
ApuKa. 

APUREMENT [a-pu-r-man] n. m. (fin.) 
auditing (accounts). 

APURER [a-pu-r«] V. a. 1. (fin.) to an- 
dii (an account) ; 2. to purify (gold). 

— les comptes, to audit. 
APYRE [a-pl-r] adj. (did.) apyrous. 
APYREXIE [a-pi-rfek-.i] n. £ (med.) 

tipyreeM/, 

AQUARELLE [a-konar-4-l] n. £ (draw.) 
L aquarelle ; water-color ; 2. painting 
in water-colors. 

Pelr.dre h V — . to drato in water colors. 

AQUA-TINTA [a-koua-tin-ta] n. £, 
. AQUA-TINTE [a-koua-tin-t] n. £ (engr.) 
dquatinta ; aquatwit. 

AQUATIQUE [a-koua-tl-k] adj. 1. aqua- 
tic ; 2. (of a soil) watery. 

Plante — , (hot) aquatic. 

AQU^DUC, AQUEDUC [a-k«-duk, 
»-k-duk] n. m. 1. aqueduct; 2. (anat) 
aqueduct; 3. (engin.) covered drain; 4 
(.tech.) inlet. 

— lateral, (engin.) (of roads) side ciil- 
vert; petit — , (of roads) culvert. Pont 
— , aqueduct-hridge. — h, siphon, (of 
canals) paddle-hole. Constructeur d' — s, 
builder of aqueducts. 

AQUE'U-X, SE [a-keu, eA-z] adj. 1. (of 
2. (did) ague- 



Tood) watery; waterish; 
ous. 

AQUILIN [a-ki-lin] adj. 
aquiline; Roman. 

Au nez - 



(of 



AQUILON [a-ki-lon] n. m. 1. n(yrfh 
wind ; 2. cold toind. 
AQUIN [a-kin] p. n. m. Aquinas. 
Thomas d'—, Tf-^-"'- — 



AQUITAINE (L') [U-ki-ti-n] p. n. £ 
(aeog.) Aquitain. 

AQUOSITE [a-kono-zi-t«] n. £ (did.) 
tijuetmsness ; woieriness. 

ARA [a-raj n. m. (om.) ara. 

ARABE [a-ra-b] adj. 1. Arabian; 2. 
Arabic. 

Chiffre — , Arabic numeral, figv/re; 
5iMnmaire — , Arabic grammar. 

ARABE, n. m. 1. Arabian (person) ; 
8. Arabic (language). 

Savant veroe dans V — , Arabist A 
P — , en — , Arabically. 

ARABELLE [a-ra-bi-l] p. a. £ Ara- 
bella ; Arabel. 

ARABESQUE [a-ra-W^k] adj (paint, 
«nla} arabesque. 

ARABE8<WE, n. f (paint., sculp.) 
••raOtMijue. 

84 



ARABIE (L") pa-ra-bi] p. n. £ (geog.) 
Arabia. 

L' — D6serte, = Deserta; V — Heu- 
reuse, = FeUxe; V — Petree, = Petraia. 

AR ABIQUE [a-ra-bi-k] adj. 1. Arabic ; 
2. (geo^.) Arabian. 

Ann?e — , (astr.) Arabic year ; lan- 
gues —8, = languages; tables — s, (astr.) 
= tables. 

ARABLE [a-ra-bl] a(y. arable; till- 
able. 

Non — , wntiUable. 

ARACHIDE [a-ia-shi-d] n. £ (hot) 
earth-nut. 

ARAOHNIDE [a-rak-ni-d] n. £ (ent) 
arachnidan. 

— flleuse, wea/ver. 
ARACHNOlDE [a-rak-no-i-d] adj. 1. 

(anat) arachnoid ; 2. (did.) cobwebbed. 

ARACHNOlDE, n. £ (anat) arach- 
noid; arachnoid membrane; sermis 
coat ofths brain. 

ARACK [a-rak] n. m. arrack (spiritu- 
ous liquor) ; rack. 

ARAIGN:^E [a.rt-gn«*] n. £ 1. (ent) 
spider ; 2. cobweb ; 3. (nav.) crow-foot. 

— de mer, (ich.) wea/ver. Pattes d' — , 
1. I spider's legs; 2. § long slender fin- 
gers; toile d' — , 1. cobweb; spider's 
web ; 2. spider-work. Aux toiles d' — , 
cobwebbed; d' — , comme une — , qui 
ressemble a V — , araneous, spider-Uke; 
de toile d' — , araneous ; cobweb. Qui 
ressemble k la toile d' — , araneous; 
comme une toile d' — §, cobweb (light). 
Oter les — , to sweep owoa/ the cobwebs. 

ARAMER [a-ra-m6] V. a. to Stretch 
(cloth on tenters). 

ARAN:^EU-X, SE [a-ra-n«-eil, eA-z] 

adj. (did.) cobwebbed. 

ARASEMENT [a-ra-r-miin] a m. (carp., 
maa.) levelling. 

ARASER [a-ra-z«] v. a. (mas.) to level; 
to put on a level. 

ARASES [»-ra-z] n. £ (pi.) (m«.) l«ziel- 
ling course of masonry, 

ARATOIRE [a-ra-toa-r] adj. of hus- 
bandry; of farming. 

ARBACE [ar-ba-s] p. n. m. Arbaces. 

ARBALETE [ar-ba-lfe-t] n. £ cross- 
how ; arbalest 

— a jalet stone-bow. Fl^che d'— , 
cross-arrow. 

ARBAL£TRIER [ar-ba-l«-tri«] n. m. 1. 
cross-bowmMn ; 2. (build.) principal 
rafter; back. 

ARB:6;LES [ar-bJ-l] p. n. £ (anc. geog.) 
Arbela. 

ARBITRAGE [ar-bi-tra-j] n. m. 1. I ar- 
bitration; 2. 1 wmjpirage (judgment); 8. 
§ a/rbitralion; 4 (com.) arbitration; 
arbitration of exchange. 

— de change, (com.) arbitration of ex- 
change. Par — , by arbitration. Met- 
tre q. ch. en — , soumettre q. ch. k X — , 
to submit a. th. to =^; s» soumettre b, 
V — , (pars.) to submit to = ; s'en tenir k 
un — ,to abide by an =. 

ARBITRAIRE [ar-bi-tri-r] adj. 1. arbi- 
trary ; 2. optional. 
ARBITRAIRE, n. ra. arbitrariness. 

ARBITRAIREMENT [ar-bi-tr^-r-man] 

adv. arbitrarily. 

ARBITRAL, E [ar-bi-tral] adj. (law) by 
arbitration. 

Jugement — , sentence — e, (law) 
award. 

ARBITRALEMENT [ar-bi-tra-1-man] 

adv. by arbitration. 

ARBITRE [ar-bi-tr] n. m. L | § arbi- 
trator, m. ; arbitress, £ ; * arbiter ; 2. § 
umpire ; 8. § disposer ; ruler ; master ; 
4 (law) arbitrator; referee; 5. (philos.) 
arbitrament; will. 

Franc, libre — , 1. free will, arbitra- 
ment : 2. (theol.)/ree will ; tiers — , (law) 
um,pire. — rapporteur, (law) referee. 
Fonctions de tiers — , (pi.) (law) um- 
pirage, sing. 

ARBITRE, E [ar-bi-tr«] adj. (law) a/r- 
bitrated. 

ARBITRER [ar-bi-tr6] V. a. 1. to arhl 
trate ; 2. to a/ward. 

ARB0I8 [ar-boal n. m. (hot) cytisus. 

— h grappes, latmrnum =. 
ARBORi;;, E [ar-bo-r4] adj. (bot) ar- 
boreous. 

ARBORER rar..bo-r«1 V. a. 1. I to erect; 



to set up; 2. § to proclaim (a doctrine) , 
to declare openly for ; 8. (nav.) to fivm 
(a flag). 

ARBORESCENCE [ar-bo tinan-i] ». t 
(did.) arborescenoe. 

ARBORESCENT, E [ar-bo-riwAi, t, 
adj. (did.) arborescent. 

ARBORICULTURE [ar-bc-ri-kol-t^ 
n. f arboriculture; tree-culture. 

ARBORISATION [ar-bo-n a-3i6n] U. 
arborization. 

ARBORISfi, E [ar-bo-ri-««l adj. <ir 
borised. 

ARBORISER. v. a. to arborize. 

ARBORISTE [ar-bo-ri-st] n. m. nttr- 
sery-man. 

ARBOUSE [ar-bou-z] n. £ (bot) arlmit^ 
herry. 

ARBOUSIER [ar-boa-ri6] n. m. (bot) 
1. a/rbute ; arbutus; 2. (genus) straw- 
berry-tree ; cane-apple. 

— commun, strawberry-tree ; — tnd- 
nant trailing arbutus ; — raisin d'onrB, 
bea/r's grape. D' — , arbxitean. 

ARBRE [ar-br] n. m. 1. tree; 2. (tech.) 
arbor; shaft. 

— fruitier, i^oX..') fruit-tree ; grand — , 
(tech.) shaft ; — moteur, (tech.) driving, 
main sJutft; — nain, dwarf- =; — phi- 
losophique, (chem.) arbor Diana: — 
vert (bot) energreen ; — vertical, (tech.) 
uprigM shaft; — propre a la construc- 
tion, timber- = ; — en buisson, (hort.) 
bush ; — de couche, (tech.^ horieontal 
s?Mft; — de Diane, (chem.) arbor Di- 
ance; — en espalier, wall- =; — do 
haute futaie, forest- = ; Umber- = ; — 
de Judee, Judas = ; — de Sainte-Lncie, 
(bot) perfwmed plume = ; — sur pied, 
standing = ; — de, en plein vent (hort) 
standard. Culture des — s, (did.) or- 
boHculture ; pied d'— , =. D'— , 1. of a 
= ; 2. (did.) arboreous; sans — s, tree- 
less. Croitre sur les — s, 1. to grow on 
trees ; 2. (did.) to be arboreous ; reesMii- 
bler a un — , 1. to resemble « = ; 2. (dlri.) 
to become arboreous ; se tenir an groe 
de r — §, to adhere to the old. Propiw 
k la culture de 1' — , (did.) arboriyultunii. 
Qui croit sur les — s, 1. that grows on 
=s; 2. (did.) arboreous; qui ressemllc 
k un — , 1. that resembles a = ; 2. cr- 
boreous. Tel — tel fruit as the ■=^ is, so 
is the fruit. #*# Entre V — et I'^corce, il 
ne faut pas mettre le doigt it is best nyt 
to interfere in family quarrels. 

ARBRISSEAU [ar-bri-s6] n. m. 1. 
shrub ; 2. — x, (pi.) shrubbery, sing. ; 8, 
(bot)frutex. 

Plantation d' — x, shrubbery. W — , 
plein d' — s, shrubby. Depourvu d'— x, 
wnshrubbed. Purger d' — x, to shrub; 
ressembler ^ un — ,to be shrubby. 

ARBU8TE [ar-bu-st] n. m. shrub ; — s, 
(pi.) shrubbery, sing. 

Plantation d' — s, shrubbery. D' — s, 
plein d' — s, shrubby. Depourvu d' — s, 
wnshrubbed. Purger d' — s, to shrub; 
ressembler a un — , to be shrubby. 

ARC [ark] n. m. 1. bow (for an arrow); 
long bow; 2. (arch.) arch; arc; 8. 
(astr.) arc; 4. (build.) arch; 5. (geom.) 
arc. 

— celeste, d'Iris, ** arch of hea/een ; 
sun-bow ; — diurne, (astr.) diurnal arc; 
— nocturne, (astr.) nocturnal arc ; — 
surbaiss6, suroasecl = ; — triomphal, da 

triomphe, triumphal =; en-ciel, 

rain-bow ; I vo. Art de tirer de . — , 
archery ; coi ""e de 1' — , bow-striTig ; tl- 
reur d' — , ben ^'-r ; trait d' — , bow-ihot, 
A portfie d' — , nthin bow-shot; en — 
de cercle, (arch. skew. Avoir plusieca 
cordes k son — , . » have two sfrir.{/» io 
o.'s bow ; bander V — , to bend the bow , 
courbor — en, to urch ; d6banf ier un — 
B § to unbend a bow; d6cr're nn — > 
(geom.) to describ<' an arc ; d6teB ii< 
•' — I §1 to unbend the bvw. Voate en 
— , bow-bent. 

ARCADE [ar-ka-d' n. £ 1. (sroh.) ar- 
cade; 2. (arch.) p'aeza ; 8. (ix&t) 
arch. 

ARCADE [ar-ka-d] p. n. m. ArcadUu 

ARCADIE (V} [Ur-ka-di] p. n. £ (anc 
geog.) Arcadia. 

ARCADIEN. NE [arka-djn, i-n] a4i 
Arcadiojh. 



ARC 



ARD 



AR(I 



»<ijoute; eu jen; eujeiine; eupexu; am pan; In pin; on hon; wnbrun; ♦Uliq. ; ♦gn liq. 



ARCANE [uka-n] n. m. (alch.) ar- 
tanum. 

ARCANSON [ar-kan-9on] n. m. colo- 
pTwny ; hlack, common rosin. 

ARCA8SE [ar-ka-.] n. £ (nav. arch.) 
iternframe. 

Barre d'— , transom; courbe d' — , 
frwiaom-knee. 

ABC-BOUT ANT [ar-bou-tan] n. m..pl. 
4k»s-boutant8, 1. (axc\\.)ftying, arch^ 
HUtress ; arch-hutment; arc-boutant; 
abutment; 2. § (pers.) prop (principal 
supporter); stay; mainstay ; 8. (carp.) 
tpur; 4. (nav.) boom; 5. (nav. arch.) 
fpar. 

ARC-BOUTER [ar-bou-t«] v. a. (build.) 
to buttress. 

ARC-DOUBLE AU [ar-dou-bl6] n. m., 
pi. Arcs-doubleaux, (build.) mass'i/ve 
•v,b. 

ARCEAU [ar-.6] n. m. (build.) vaidt; 
arch. 

ARC-EN-CIEL [ar-kSn-Biii] n. m., pi. 
4.RCS-EN-CIKL, rmn-bow ; bow ; ** »w)i- 
joio ; ** bow of hea/ven. 

ARCfiSILAS [ar-.6-zi-lai] p. n. m. 
(class.) Arcesilaus. 

ARCHAlSME [ar-ka-i.-m] n. m. ar- 
chaism,. 

ARCHAL [ar-thal] n. m. $ iron-wire. 

Fil d'— , =. 

ARCHAMBAUD [ar-.han-b6] p. n. m. 
Archibald. 

ABCHANGE [ar-kan-j] n. m. archan- 
gel. 

De r — , qui a rapport 4 un — , archoM- 
jelie. 

ARCHANGlfcLIQUE [ ar-kan.j«-U-k ] 
adj. arch-angelic. 

ARCHE [ar-.h] n. f. 1. + ark; 2. § 
ark (sacred place) , 3. -f (of the taberna- 
cle) ark; 4. (arch.) arch; 5. (arch.) 
arching. 

— sainte, de Dieu, du Seigneur, 1. + 
ark of God, of the Jj)rd ; 2. % forbidden 
jrowid. — dalliance -{■,■=. of the cove- 
nant; — du temoignage -f-, = of tlie 
%f!iimcny. Ea — , cotnme une — , arc/t- 
»Lbe. Hors do 1'—, out of the pale of the 
afitti^ch. 

ARCH^OLOGIE [ar-k«-o-io-ji] n. t ar- 
tXeology. 

ARCIlfiOLOGIQUE [ ar-k«-o-io-ji-k ] 
ad|. areJueological. 

ARCHJfcOLOGUE [ar-k6^-lo-g] n. m. 
archceologist. 

ARCHER [ar-»h«] n. m. archer, m. ; 
foreman, m. ; areheress, t. 

ARCHEROT [ar-riiS-ro] n. m. t Uta« 
archer (Cupid). 

ARCHET [ar-8h&] n. m. 1. bow (of a 
Tiolin); ^fiddle-stick; 2. (of beds) 
cradling ; 3. (of cradles) top-head ; 4. 
(fcrts) bmo ; 5. (mus.) bow-hand. 

ARCHETYPE [ar-k6-ti-p] adj. (did.) 
archetypal. 

ARCHETYPE, n. m. (did.) archetype. 

ARCnEVfiCH:^ [ftr-8h8-v8.ah«] n. in. 
\.arohbighopric;'i.archbishop's palace. 

ARCIIEV^QUE [ar-.h«.v6.k] n. m. 
archhishcrp. 

ARCHICH ANCELIER [ar-.hi-8han-.8- 

li#l n. m. archchancellor. 

ARCIIIDIACONAT far-ahi-di-a-ko-na] 

n. m. archdeaconship (dignity) ; arch- 
deaconry. 

ARCIIIDIACONlS [ ar-.hi-di.a-ko-n8 ] 

n. m. archdeaconry (territory). 

ARCH ID I ACRE [a. .hi-dm-kr] n. m. 
archdeacon. 

D' — , archidiaconal. 

ARCHIDUC [ar-.hi-duk] n. m. arch- 
ittkA 

ARCHIDUCAL,E [ar-rfu-dn-kal] adj. 
arc.'iduoal. 

ARCHIDUCII6 [ar-.hi-da-.h8] n. ID. 1. 

W chdukedom (dignity, jurisdiction); 2. 
crchduchy (territory). 

ARC'HIDUCHESSE [ar-dii-du-.hi-.] n. 
f. archduchess. 

ARCIII6PI8C0PAL, E [ar-.hi-6.pi.- 
ko-pall ad), archiepiscopal. 

ARCHi:ePISCOPAT[ar-.hi-«-pi.-ko-pa] 
0. m. arctdepiscopacy. 

AECHIFLATTEUR [ar-.hi fla-tefir] n. 
m. archflatterer. 

ARCHIFOU rar-.hi.fou] n. ra 1 arch- 
fool; great foot. 



ARCHILOQUE [ar-.hi-lo-k] p. n. m. 
(class.) Archilochus. 

ARCHILUTH [ar..hi-lut] n. m. (mus.) 
archlute. 

ARCHIMANDRITAT [ar-.hi-man-dri- 

ta] n. m. archimandrite's benefice. 

ARCHIMANDRITE [ar-.hi-man-dri-t] 

L. m. archimaiidrite. 

ARCHTMtDE [ar-.hi-m^-d] p. n. m. 
(class.) Areh -/rnsdes. 

ARCHINOBLE [ar-.hi-no-bl] adj. (jest.) 
most noble; of th« highest order of no- 
bility. 

ARCHIPEL [ar-.hi-pJl] n. m. (geog.) 
archipelago. 

L' — , the Archipelago. 

ARCHIPOMPE [ar-shi-pon-p] n. f. 
(nav.) 1. well ; 2. well-^timp. 

ARCHIPRESBYTERAL, E rar-ahi- 
pr^8-bi-t8-rftl] adj. of an archpresbyter ; 
archpriest. 

arciiipresbyt:^.rat [ar-«hi-prt^ 

bi-ti-ra] n. m. archpresbytery. 

ARCHIPRilTRE [ar-.hi-pr«-tr] n. m. 
archpi-esbyter ; archpriest. 

ARCHIPR]fiTR:6 [ar-.hi-pr4-tr8] n. m. 

archpr^Jibytery. 

ARCHITECTE [ar-.hi-tAk-t] n. m. ar- 
chitect 

— des jardins, artist in gardening. 
ARCHITECTONIQUE [ ar-.hi-tJk-to- 

ni-k] adj. (did.) architectonic. 

ARCHITECTONOGRAPHE [ar-.hi- 
tek-to-no-gra-f] n. m. writer on architec- 
ture. 

ARCHITECTONOGRAPHIE [ar..hi. 
tJk-to-no-gra-f i] n. f. treatise on architec- 
ture. 

ARCHITECTURAL, E [ar-.M-tik-tu- 
ral] adj. architectural. 

ARCHITECTURE [ar-.hi-tik-tu-r] n. 
f. architecture. 

— ogiva\e, pointed =z. 
ARCHITRAVE [ ar-.hi-tra-v ] n. C 

(arch.) architrave. 

ARCHITRICLIN rar-.hi-tri-klin] n. m. 
(Rom. ant) architriclinus. 

ARCHIVES [ar-.hi-v] n. f pi. 1. ar- 
chives, pi. ; 2. records, pi.; 3. record- 
office, sing. 

D'— , des — , archival. 

ARCHIVISTE [ar-.hi.vi-.t] n. m. 1. ar- 
chimst; 2. keeper of the records. 

ARCHIVOLTE [ar-.M-Tol-t] n. f. (arch.) 
archivoU. 

AECHONTAT [ar-kon-u] n. m. (Gr. 
hist) archonship. 

ARCHONTE [ar-ksn-t] n. m. (Gr. hist) 
archon. 

ARCHOSYRINX [ar-ko-»i-rink.] n. C 
(med.) fisiu/a in ano. 

ARCHURE [ar-.hu-r] n. f. (mill.) drum. 

ARQON [ar-8on] n. m. 1. saddle-bow; 
wither-band; 2. (arts) bow. 

fitre ferme dans, sur ses — s, 1. || to sit 
firm, in o.''8 saddle ; 2. § <o be stanch 
to o.''s principles ; T to be true blue ; 
perdre les — 8, \. I to be thrown from 
o.'s horse : to be unhorsed / 2. § to be 
nonplussed, disconcerted ; vider les 
— s, I to be thrown from o.'a horse ; to 
be unhorsed. 

ARCTIQUE [ark-ti-k] adj. (geog.) oro- 
tic. 

ARCTURUS, ARCTURE [»rk-ta-ru., 
ta-r] n. m. (astr.) arotunis. 

ARDASSINES [ar-da-.i-n] n. C (pi.) 
ardassines (Persian silk). 

ARDfiLION [ar-d«-li-6n] n. m. $ med- 
dler ; ^ bumi-body. 

ARDEMMENT [ar-da-man] adv. § 1. 

ardently ; 2. fervidly ; 3. intensel/y ; 
vividly; 4 sa/nguinely ; 5. earnestly; 
eagerly; quickly; 6. spirited^/ ; 7. 
soaringly. 

ARDENT, E [ar-dan, t] adj. 1. I burn- 
ing ; * ardent; * fervid. ; 2. 1 burning 
hot (that communicates heat) ; 3. 1 hot- 
steaming ; 4. § ardent ; 5. % fervid ; 6. 
S intense ; vivid ; 7. § sanguine ; 8. § 
(POUR, for) on fire; earnest; eager ; 
quick ; 9. § spirited ; 10. * § soaring ; 
11. § longing ; 12. (of candles, lamps, 
torches, *c) lighted ; 13. (of hair) red ; 
14. (of hi>r»e') fery ; spirited ; mettled ; 
mettlesome ''' 5. (nav.) (of vessels) grip- 
ing. 

Desir — s. 1. liyiging ; 2. anxiety: 



anmousness. Non, pen —, (V. ctflx«al 
§ 1. unsangmne ; 2. tmqudck. 

ARDENT, n. m. ignisfatit,vs; ^ .Jo. « 
o' -lantern; •[ WiZl-o'-tlie-wisp. 

ARDER, v. n. + V. Brulpa. 

ARDEUE [ar-deur] n. f. 1. 1 A^ortiqaah 
ty of burning) ; arrfor ; ardency ; ftfr- 
vor ; 2. i lieat; burning; burnittA 
lieat;Z. § ardor; ardency; 4. % fur* 
vor ; fervidness; fervency; b. § in 
tensity ; vimdness ; 6. § sangvineness , 

7. § earnestness ; eagerness ; quickness, 

8. § spirit; spiritedness ; 9 (of horsob) 

Exces d' — , ( V. senses) overeagemeM ; 
manque d' — , ( V. senses) sj/iritlessneM. 
Plein d' — , ( V. senses) 1. sj/irited ; 2. Ui 
horses) high-mMtl^. Avec — , (F. 
senses) 1. spiritedly ; 2. tiioidly ; 8. ar- 
d-ently ; passionately; 4 (of horsoo) 
m,ettlesomely. 

ARDILLON [ar-di-tou*) a. m. (of » 
buckle) tongiie. 

II n'y manque pas un — , aU u com 
plete ; tliere is nothvng wanMng. 

ARDISIE [ar-di-xi] n. £ (bot) urdioUi. 

ARDOISEIar-do»-7.] n. tsla^ 

— de toiture, roof =. Carrlfire d'--, 
= -quarry ; couvreur en — , slater ; toJ 
tureen — , slating lY— slaty Convrii 
d' — , en — , to slate. 

AED0IS:6, E !ai-.K«wi6| aai nlatf 
colored ; slaty. 

ARDOISER U. uyt-iO] V. a. fosInU 

ARDOISIERK la.-dc»-eI-o-r|ii t slate- 
quarry. 

AEDRE, V. a t V. BEtruct 

ARDU, E far-«Ju] e^. ard.u,^,^ 

Nature — e, u/diufusnesit 

ARE [a-r] n. m. a»e ^119.(>«4> square 
yards). 

AREC, AE^CA [»-rik, »-r«-kaj u. it 

(bot.) arec ; areca. 

— d'Amerique, cabbage-tree ; — doe 
Indes, meridional areca. Noi-x d"— , 
1. areca-nut; betel-nut; 2. me~idio- 
nal =. 

AE^FACTION [a-rf-fak-uon] n. f (did) 
arefactum. 

xVE6NAC]6, E [a-rt-na-.*] acy. (nut. 
hist) arenaceous. 

AE:fiNATION [a-r8-n&-.i6n] n. £ (med.) 
arenation. 

AEME ra-r*-n] n. f 1. »* sand ; 2. | $ 
arena (amphitheatre) ; 3. (for cock-fight 
ing) cockpit ; 4. (geol.) arena. 

ARfiNEU-X, SE [a-r6-neu,eu-i] adj. t 
** sandy ; arenose. 

AR60LE [a-r«-o-i] n. £ (anat) 1. areo- 
la ; 2. (med.) areola. 

AREOMETRE [a-rd-o-mi-tr] n. m. 
(phys.) areometer. 

APwEOM£TRIE [a-rf-o-m«-tri] n, £ 
(phys.) areometry. 

AREOMfiTRIQUE [a-rf-o.m«-tri-k] 
adj. (phys.) areometrical. 

AE:£0PAGE [a-rf-o-pa-j] n. m. I § 
areopagivs. 

AR1?:0PAGITE [a-rt-o-pa-ji-t] n. m. 
areopagite. 

AR60STYLE [a-r6-o-.U-l] n. m. (arch.) 
areostyle. 

AREOTECTONIQUE [a-rf-o-tJk-to- 
ni-k] n. £ (sing.) areoteehtonics (attack 
and defence of fortified places), pi. 

AR:60TIQUE [a-rt-o-ti-kj n. m. & a<y. 
(med.) areotic. 

AR]fcTE [a-r«-t] n. £ 1. fish-bone, 
bone; 2. skeleton (of a fish) 3. (bot) 
awn ; beard ; 4. (build.) arris ; 5. (geog.) 
foot (of the side of a chain of mooS' 
tains) ; 6. (geom.) comer; edge; 7. (mw.) 
quoin. 

— saillante, (of prisms) edge ; vIve — ^ 
(build.) arris; draught, droved edfft 
— de poisson, 1. Jish-b(me ; 2. (arch.^ 
herring-b^-ve work. A vive — , (build,; 
sharp-edgeJ ; avec — abattue, en clsean, 
(carp.) cant; canted. 

AR1;:TIIUSE [a-^-tu-i] p. n. £ (myth.] 

Arethusa. 
ARI<;TIER [a-r6-ti8] n. m. (arch.) Ami 
ARGALA [ar-ga-la] n. xn. (orn.) hvrgU 
ARGAH [ar-ga-U] n. m. (mam.) ar 

gali. 

— de Siberie, =. 

ARGANEAU, n. m. Fi ,(>rgankaii 
AKG^E [ar-gh«] p. II. m. Arge'uc 



ARG 



ARI 



ARM 



a nuti ; d male ; e fee ; ^ f6ve ; e f&te ; ^ je ; f il ; J He ; .. jioi ; 6 mdle ; 5 mort ; u sue ; it sfire ; »m Jonr ; 



AEG^MONE [ar-j«-mo-n] n. £ (bot) 

wgemone ; ^ prtckly poppy. 

AEGENT [ar-jiin] n. m. 1. silver 
rmecal) ; 2. siteer (silver coin) ; 3. money; 
L ^ money in hand ; 5. (com.^ casA ; 
rftKfy ■n<mey ; 6. (her.) argent ; pearl. 

— battn, silver-leaf; — blanc, = ; = 
Ofiin; — comptant, cash; ready mo- 
h>cy ; — dore, = -gilt; — dormant, 
mort, uumey lying dead ; un — fou % 
lots of money; — min:non, ^ money 
toned up ; — monnaye, coiii ; coined 
money; — orfevre, wrought =; — 
rouge, (min.) = -glance ; — sec, ^ mo- 
%ey vn, hand ; vif — , — vif, quick- =. 

— d'Allemagne, German = ; — en 
osisse, (com.) cash in hand ; — entre 
lee mains, m^yney in hand ; de T — a sa 
disposition, com,mand of cash. Affaire 
d' — , money-matter; batteur d' — , = 
beaUr ; bourreau d' — , spendthrift; 
'euilles d' — , = -leaf; pigne d' — , pena 
= ; preteur d' — , rruynsy -lender ; sac h. 
— , rrwney-hag ; sac d' — , hag of money ; 
Weur de 1' — , money''s worth. Comme 
. ' — , 1. like = ; 2. siherly. Au croissant 
d' — , (her.) argeiit-horned ; a pomme 
d' — , = -headed ; a tete d' — , = -eyed ; 
»vec la couleur de 1' — , siPcerly ; d' — , 1. 
of=^ ; 2. of money ; 3. silvery ; 4. (her.) 
argent; en — , 1. in money; 2. moneyed; 
Bans — , 1. vAthout =; 2. •without mo- 
ney; 8. unmoneyed; moneyless. Ar- 
racher de V — a q. u., to get money from, 
a. o. ; avoir de 1' — , to hame money ; to 
be worth money ; ^ to be a moneyed 
man ; en avoir pour son — , to ha/ve o.^s 
money's-worth; avoir de T — en caisse, 
to ha/ve money by o. ; avoir de 1'— sur 
•oi, to ha/ce money about o. ; etre brouill6 
•vec r — comptant, ^ never to have amy 
ready money ; convertir en — , to con- 
vert, U turn into caslv, money; etre 
tout co'asu d'— , to roll in riches ; ^ tobe 
made of money ; etre leger d' — , to be 
$hort of cash ; faire — de tout, to turn 
mery tMng into money ; faire, ramasser 
4e r — , 1 to make money; gagner de 
r— , to earn, ^ to get monkey; jeter son 

— par la fenStre, to throw away o.'s mo- 
ney ; to throw o.^s nioney into the dirt ; 
l&cber de 1'—. ^^" to 2ome down ; man- 
ger son — , (b. 8.) to spend, to squander 
o.'s money.; mettre de bon — contre du 
mauvais, to throw away good m.oney 
after bad ; monte en — , = -mounted ; 
placer de 1' — , to put money out ; to put 
money out at interest; prendre q. ch. 
pour — comptant, to take a. thfor Gos- 
pel ; rapporter de 1' — , to bHng in mo- 
ney ; to fetch money ; recevoir, toucher 
de r — , to receive money ; faire rentrer 
de r — , 1. (com.) to get in money; 2. 
(fin.) to call in money ; retirer de T — de 
la circulation, (fin.) to call in money ; 
trouver de T — , 1. to find, money ; % ^ to 
raise money. »*^, — fait tout, money 
makes the n/uire go ; ^,*4c c"est de T — en 
barre, it is as good as gold; ^^ — 
comptant porte medecine, money is a 
cure for all sores, i^*^ Point d' — point 
de Suisse, no longer pipe no longer 
dance. 

AR6ENTAL, E [ar-jan-tal] adj. (did.) 
a/rgenUd. 

ARGENTATE [ar-jan-u-t] n. m. 
(chem.) argentate. 

AEGENTI5;, E [ar-jan-M] adj. \.platea; 
tUvered; silvered over; 2. § silver; 
tUvery ; 8. * § argent 

Non — , I v/nsilvered. Des cheveux 
d'un grls — , silver^ hair. 

ARGENTER [ar.jan-W] V. a. 1. | to 

plate; tosilver; to stiver over ;. 2.**% 
to silver (whiten). 

ARGENTERIE [ar-jan-t-ri] n. t. silver- 
plate; silver; plate. 

Pieo* d' — , piece of plate. 

ARGENTEUR [ar-jan-teur] n. m. (a. & 
■I.) sUnerer. 

ARGENTED-X, 8E [ar-jan-Un, ed-i] 
^di. i^~ moneyed. 

ARGENTIER [ar-jan-ti«] n. m. t 1. 
treasurer ; 2. minister of finances. 

ARGENTIF:feRE [ar-jin-ti-ft-r] adj. 
Cdld.) argermfero^xs. 

iVRGENTlN, E ["-jan-tin, i-n] adj " 

lAlxfrii : nilver : •♦ araentine : 2. 



tUvery; silver; 



■ argentine ; 2. (of 



Bound) silvery ; silver-toned; 8. (paint) 
silvery; silver. 

ARGENTINE [ar-jan-ti-n] adj. f. (geog.) 
Argentine. 

ARGENTINE, n. f. 1. (bot) argenti- 
na ; argentine ; ^ silver-weed ; 1 wild 
tavjty ; 2. (ich.) argentina ; argentine • 
^ silver fish. 

ARGENTURE [ar-jan-tu-r] n. t (a. & 
m.) silvering. 

ARGILAC£, E [ar-ji-la-8«] adj. (did.) 
argillaceous. 

ARGILE [ar-ji-i]n. f. 1. clay; argU; 
2. clay (material part of man). 

— apyre, retTactAiTe,fire-clay ; — com- 
pacte, tenadoits = ; — endurcie, = 
-sUme ; — schisteuse, slate- = ; metal- 
stone. — a porcelaine, China- :=. Potrir 
r — , to knead, to icork =. Fait d' — , 1. 
made of= ; 2. (did.) fictile. 

ARGILEU-X, 8E [ar-ji-len, eu-»] adj. 
clayey; clayisli. 

Marne argileuse, clay-ma/rl ; schiste 
argileuse, day-slate ; terre argileuse, 
day-grovMd, land. 

ARGILli;RE [ar-ji-li-^-rJ n. f clay-pit 

ARGILIFERE [ar-ji-U-fe-r] adj. (did.) 
argilliferous. 

ARGILOLITHE [ar-ji-lo-li-t] n. m. 
(geol.) clay-stone. 

ARGO [ar-go] n. m. (astr.) Argonavis. 

Le navire — , (astr.) ■=.. 

ARGOLIDE (L') [lar-go-ii-d] n. f. (anc 
geog.) ArgoUs. 

ARGON AUTE [ar-go-nft-t] n. m. 1. 
(Gr. ant) Argonaut ; 2. (conch.) argo- 
nauta; 8. (mol.) nautilus. 

Le vaisseau des — s, (astr.) Argona/vis. 

ARGOT [ar-go] n. m. 1. cant (language 
of certain professions); 2. cant; slang. 

ARGOT, n. m. (hort) dead wood (over 
an eye). 

ARGOTER rar-go-t«] V. a (hort) to 
prune the dead wood (over an eye). 

ARGOUSIN [ar-gou-zin] n. m. conmct- 
keeper. 

ARGUE [ar-g] n. C (tech.) 1. droAo- 
bench (for wire); 5j. dram-room (for 
wire-drawing). 

ARGUER [ar-gu-«] V. a t to accuse. 

AEGUER, V. n. \.(M%,from) to argue ; 
to infer ; to draw an inference ; to con- 
clude ; 2. (de, . . .) to urge. 

ARGUMENT [ar-gu-man] n. m. 1. OT- 
gu/ment; 2. arguing; 3. argwmeTit 
(summary). 

— fort, strong argument ; — en forme, 
formal = ; = tw form ; — ad hominem, 
" argumentum ad hominem.'" Comme 
— , par — , argumsntatively. fitre un 
— pour, (th.) to he argumentative of; 
faire, presenter un — , to adduce, to ad- 
vance an =. 

ARGUMENTANT [ar-gu-man-tan] n. 

m. (schools) arguer. 

ARGUMENTATEUR [ar-gu-man-ta- 

uur] n. m. (b. s.) argxier. 

ARGUMENTATION [ar-gu-man-ta- 

sion] n. f. argumentation ; arguing. 

Comme — , argimientatively ; d' — , 
argnntental ; argimientatvve ; par — , 
by argument ; argum^ntati/vely. Dis- 
pose k 1'—, argumentative. 

ARGUMENTER [ar-gu-man-U] V. n. to 
argue ; to hold an argument. 

Dispose a — , argumentative ; se met- 
tre a — , to begin to argue ; to become 
anrgirnientatixe. 

ARGUS [ar-gu.] n. m. 1. \% Argus; 
2. (ent) argus ; blue ; 3. (orn.) argus. 

ARGUTIE [ar-gu-»ij n. t quibble. 

Faire des — s, to quibble. 

ARGUTIEU-X, SE [ar-gu-.i-eu, eu-.] 
adj. quibbling. 

ARHYTHME ra-rinn] adj. (med.) (of 
the pulse) irregidar. 

ARIANE, ARIADNE, p. n. f. 1. 
(myth.) Ariadne; 2. (astr.) Ariadne. 

ARIANISME [a-ri-a-ni-tm] n. m. ari- 
anism. 

ARICIE ra-ri-ai] p. n. f. (anc. geog.) 
Aricia. 

ARIDE I ri-d] adj. 1. | § a/rid ; dry; 
2. barren ; ^mfrii/ithd ; 3. unfe^eUng. 

ARID]fcE [a-ri-dej p. n. m. (class.) Ari- 
d<mn>. 

AxwIDITi; [a-ri-di-t«l n. f. 1. 1 S arid- 
ity; dryness; 2. 8 barrenness; un- 



fruitfulness; 8. unfeelii\gness ; hard 
ness (of heart); 4. (theol.) aridity. 

ARIDURE [a-ri-du-r] n. f. (med.) arfro 
pfiy. 

ARIE [a-ri] p. n. f. (anc. geog.) Aria. 

ARIEN, KE [a-ri-in, ^-n] adj. Aria/TK 

ARIEN, n. m. NE, n. £ (eccL htBi., 
At^n. 

ARIETTE [a-ri*-t] n. £ (mus.) «w<«rta. 

ARILLE [a-ri-i*] n. f (bot) 1. trace; 
2. aril; seed-coat. 

ARIOBARZANE [a-ri-o-bar-um] p. n. 
m. (class.) Avioharzanes. 

ARIOSTE (L') [la-ri-o-.tl p. n. m. Afi' 
osto. 

ARIOVISTE [a-ri-o-».-.t] p. n. m. Art- 
ovistus. 

ARISTARQUE [a-rinar-k] p. n. m. 
(class.) AHstrirchuJ). 

ARISTARQUE [a-ru-tar-k] n. la arie- 
torch. 

ARISTAE [a-ri.-w] p. n. m. (class.) 

ARISTIDE [a-ri»-ti-dl p. n. m. (class.) 
Aristides. 

ARISTIPPE [a-rU-ti-p] p. n. m. (class.) 
Aristippus. 

ARISTOBULE [a-rU-to-bu-l] p. n. m. 
(class.) AristohiUus. 

ARISTOCEATE [a-ri,-to.kra-t] adj. 
aristocratic (liking aristocracy). 

ARI8T0CRATE, n. m. t. aristocrat 

ARISTOCRATIE [a-ria-to-kra-ai] n. £ 

aristocracy. 

ARISTOCEATIQUE [a-rU-to-kra-ti-kl 
adj. aristocratic. 

Caractfere — , aristocraticalness. 

ARISTOCRATIQUEMENT [a-ria-to- 
kra-ti-k-man] adv. aristocraticxdly. 

ARIST0CRATI8ER [a-rU-to-knt-ti-rt] 
V. a to render aristocratic. 

ARISTOCRATISER, v. n. to proffM 

ARIST0Di;ME [a-rU-to-dA-n] p. n. m. 
(class.) Aristodemus. 

ARISTOGITON [a-ri. to-ji-vsn] pi D. re. 
(class.) Aristogiton. 

AEISTOLOCHE ra.ri..tc-lo-th] n, £ 
(bot) aristolochia ; ^ bii tti^^ort 

— serpentaire, black, VirginMb snake- 
root. 

ARISTOPHANE [a-rj-to-fa-n] p. n. nk 
(class.) Aristophanes. 

ARISTOTE [a-riiMto-t] p. n. m. (class.) 
Aristotle. 

aristot:6licien, ne [«-ru-ti-,<.ji. 

•i-in, i-o] adj. Aristotelian. 

ARIST0T1;:LICIEN [a-rU-to-U-U-ii-in] 
n. m. Aristotelian. 

ARISTOTfiLISME [a-rino-w-U-un] n. 
m. Aristotelianism. 

ARlTHMf:TIClEN [a-rit-mfi-U^iin^ 
n. m. NE \k-n\ n. £ arithmetUdan. 

ARITIIMCTIQUE [a-rit-m«.ti-k] adj. 
arithmetical. 

ARITHMliITIQUE, n. £ arithmetic. 

— universelle, universal, literal •-=', 
algehra. Cahier d"— , dphering-book. 

ARITHMI5TIQUEMENT [a-«t-m«-ti. 
k-man] adv. arithtnetically. 

ARIZARUM [a-ri-za-rom] n. m. (bot) 
friar^s cmrl. 

ARKHANGEL [ar-kan-jAl] p. n. Arch 
angel. 

ARLEQUIN [ar-l8-kin] n. m 1. harle- 
quin ; 2. (orn.) spotted redshank. 

Faire des tours d' — , to harlequ4au 

ARLEQUINADE [ar-I*-ki-n»-d] n. t 
harlequinade. 

ARMADA [ar-nia-da] n. £ armada 
(Spanish fleet). 

ARMADILLE [ar-ma-di-i*] a. £ ar-na 
dilla. 

ARMADILLO [ar-ma-di-io*] n, ir 
(mam.) armadillo ; tatou. 

ARMATEUR [ar-ma-teur] n. m. 1 <nsn 
er of a privateer; 2. (com. nav.) f» 
ter out; 3. (com. nav.) ship-owner, 
oumer. 

— propri6taire, (com. nav.) ship-<nm 
er ; orcner. 

ARMATURE [ur-tna-tfl-. I n. £ 1. (mlk' 
brace ; fencing ; 2. (tech.) tressing. 

ARME [ar-m] n. £ 1. II §— fi, (pi.) nrmi 
(offensive or defensive), pi. ; 2. | § t#«ffl- 
pon ; 3. ( — s, (pi.) troops; 4. war' 
warfare; 5. — s, (p\.)fenein(' 6. (.bot) 
weapon ; 7. — s, (pi.) (her.) arms, pi 



ARP 



AIIR 



o^ joute; eujeu; eujeune; eitpeur; ti/n pan; m pin ; d?i-bon; un hrun; ♦il liq. ; *gn liq. 



learing, sing. ; 8. — 8, (pi.) (lier.) coat- 
armor ; coat of arms ; * emblazonry ; 
9. — s, (pi.) (her.) (of persons deceased) 
hatchTnent. 

— 8 blanches, »ide-arm^s ; — 8 cour- 
t»i8«j8, = of courtesy, parade ; — s de- 
fennives, defensive ■=.; ^=. of defence; 
—6 tousses, (her.) irregular = ; nicnues 
— (8, rnnall =; — meurtriSre, deadly 
vrtbJ/pon; — offensive, offensive wea- 
Tpcn ; weapon of offence ; — s parlantes, 
t^\.) (her.) aUusivs, canting heraldry ; 
— s an bras! (mil.) support = ! — &k en- 
querre, (her.) ir!'egular=; — s a feu, 
Jire- = ; — d'hast, weapon with a staff; 
— de jet, missile weapon ; missile ; — 
dc txait, inissile weapon ; missile. As- 
saut d' — s, fencing match; capitaine 
d' — s, (nav.) master at = ; coffre d'— , 

inav.) arm,-chest ; cotte, jaque d' — s, 
her.) coat qf-=z; faisceau'd' — s, (mil.) 
pHe, circular pile of =^ ; fait d' — s, 
feat ; homme d'— , man at = ; huissier 
d' — , (pari.) sergeant at = ; maitre d' — s, 
fencing -maMer ; pas d' — , pass, pas- 
sage of-=. ; place d' — , place of-=. ; port 
d' — , 1. carrying = ; 2. slwoUng license ; 
license ; salle d' — s, 1. armory ; 1. fenc- 
ing-school; tireur d' — 9,, fencer. Haut 
les — 8 ! (mil.) lodge = ! les — s A la main, 
1. tTi = ; 2. with = in o!'s hands. A — s 
parlantes, (her.) exemplary; aux — ! to 
=s ! avec — s et bagage, ^ with bag and 
baggage; en — s, (mil.) iw =; par la 
force des — s, by force qf— ; sans — s, 1. 
unarmed ; * armless ; 2. weaponless ; 
jLmweapon»A ; sous les — s, 1. under = ; 
I. § (of women^ dressed up. :fttre au 
.•ort d' — 8, (mil.) to carry = ; 6tre bien 
sous les — , to have a soldier-like ap- 
pearance ; faire, tirer des — 8, to fence ; 
faire — de tout, to make a weapon of 
every thing ; faire ses premi6res — s, to 
^rve o.'s first campaign ; se frayor un 
chemin par la force des — 8, se frayer un 
chemin les — 8 ^ la main, to fight o.'s 
toay ; se lever en — , to rise in = ; mettre 
bas les — s, to lay down o.'« = ; passer par 
U« — s, 1. to be put to the s^cord, to the 
<Ylff« of Vie sword ; 2. to be shot ; faire 
iWMcr par les — s, 1. to put to the sword, 
to the edge of the sword ; 2. to execute ; to 
shoot ; porter les — s, (rail) to bear = ; 
portflr des — , 1. (mil.) to carry = ; po- 
ser les — 8, to lay down o.'s = ; prendre 
les —8, to take up = ; prendre les — s 
contre, (law) to levy war against ; pre- 
senter les —6, (mil.) to present = ; ren- 
dre les — b, to lay down a'« = ; reposer 
les — 8, (mil.) to ground =. Portez — s ! 
(mil.) shoulder = ! presentez — s ! f mil.) 
present = ! reposez vos — s ! (mil.) 
grou7id=.\ #*#Le8 — esontjoumaliiires 
thefortttne of war is uncertain. 

ARMJS, E [ar-m6] adj. 1. armed. ; ? 
(her.) arm^d ; 3. (phys.) (of the magnet) 
armied. 

— en guerre, (nav.) armed. A main 
' «, by force of arms. 

AEM:6e, n.'f. 1. army; 2. -f ** host; 
8. navy; sea forces; fleet; 4 (nav.) 
fleet (of 27 or more ships). 

Grande — , large army ; — navale, de 
mer, 1. na/vy, sing. ; naval, sea forces ; 
fleet; 2. (nav.) fleet (of 27 or more 
ships); — navale de Vi^tsit, I/is, Her 
Majesty's fleet; — permanente, stand- 
ing =. — de si6ge, besieging = ; — de 
terre, land force. Agent pour 1'—, = 
•agent; corps d' — , main body of troops; 
main body ; fournisseur de T — , = -con- 
ii'actor. Armer, equiper une — navale, 
lofU out a fleet ; entrer dans 1' — , to en- 
U}r the=:; 6tre k V — , to be in the = ; 
Pfire partle de V — ie... ,to serve in 
fAc army, ranks of.... 

ASMELINE [ar-m5-U-n] n. C ermms 
(sklu). 

AEMEMENT [«r-ii.«-man] n. m. 1. ar- 
vva/inenl ; 2. arm/ing ; 8. accoutrements, 
pL ; 4 stand of arms ; 5. (nav.) equip- 
ment ; fiUmg out 

;gtre en — , to be JUtimg out, getting 
ready for service. 

AEM^NIE (L') [Ur-m«.nt] p. n. C 
;tceog.) Armenia. 

AKM:6NIEN, NE [«r-iii«-iu-iii, A-n] adj. 
■*rvMivian. 



ARM:feNIEN, n. m. NE, n. f. Arme- 
nian. 

ARMER rar-mfi] v. a. (de, with) 1. | § 
to arm; 2. § to provoke; 3. § to fortify 
(with courage); to rouse; ^ to set; 4 
to heel (cocks) ; 5. to cock (fire-arms) ; 6. 
(artil.) to arm, ; to mount (a battery) ; 7. 
(ph^s.) to arm (a magnet) ; 8 (nav.) to 
equip; to fit out; 9. (nav.) to man (a 
pump). 

— do toutes pieces, to arm at all 
points. £tre arme de toutes pieces, to 
be fully accoutred; — de pied en cap, 
toz=. cap a pie. 

S'armee, pr. V. 1. i (de, unth) to arm 
o.'s self; 2. | to arm ; to take up arms 
8. § (contre, against) to secure o.'s self, 
to provide; to take o.^s precautions 
4 § (de, with) to provide o.^s self{yi\ih 
a, th.); 5. § (dk, mtli) to strengthen o.'s 
self; 6. § (de, ...)to summon up. 

ARMER, V. n. || 1. to arm; 2. (man.) 
to arm ; 8. (nav.) to embark. 

ARMET [ar-m6] n. m. t helmet; head- 
piece. 

ARMTLLAIEE [ar-mU-lA-r] ac^. (astr. 
geog.) an,Mlary. 

Sphere — , = sphere. 

ARMILLES [ar-mU-l] n. f. (pi.) (arch.) 
ann-idets; fillets. 

ARMISTICE [ar-miB-ti-s] n. m. armis- 
tice. 

ARMOIRE [ar-moa-r] n. f. 1. Cup- 
board; 2. closet. 

Grande — , closet. 

ARMOIRIES [ar-moa-ri] n. f. (pi.) 1. 
(her.) arms, pi ; armorial bearingi, 
pi.; * emblazonry; 2. (of persons de- 
ceased) hatchment. 

ARMOISE [ar-moa-i] n. f (bot) arte- 
misia ; ^ worrrvwood. 

— commune, mug/wort; — pontique, 
Roman wormwood; — des Indes, In- 
dian worm/iDOod. 

ARMON [ar-mon] n. m. (of carriages) 
fetchel. 

ARMORIAL [ar-mo-ri-al] n. m. hook 
of heraldry. 

ARMORIER [ar-mo-ri-«] v. a. to put 
o.> arms on. 

Armorie, e, pa. p. with o.'s arms. 

ARMORIQUE (L') [lar-mo-ri-k] p. n. 
£ (geog.) Armorioa. 

ARMORISTE [ar-mo-ri.-t] n. m. % ar- 
m^orist. 

ARMURE [ar-mu-r] n. f. 1. armor; 2. 
(phys.) (of the magnet) armor. 

— complete, suit of=i. — h I'^preuve, 
= in proof; — de tete, head-piece. 
Oouvrir d'une — A r6preuve, to arm in 
proof; fiter 1' — jl, to unharness ; revetir 
son — , to buckle on o.'s =. 

ARMURIER [ar-inu.ri«] n. m. 1. ar- 
morer ; 2. gwnsmith ; 8. sword-cutler; 
4 blade-smith; 5. bilbo-smith. 

ARNICA [ar-ni-ka] n. m., 

ARNIQUE [ar-ni-k] n. f. hot) arnica. 

ARNOTTO [ar-no-to] n. m. (dyeing) 
arnotto ; annotio. (FTRoucou.) 

A ROM ATE [a-ro-ma-t] n. m. aro- 
matic. 

AROMATIQUE [a-ro-ma-ti-k] adj. aro- 
matic. 

AROMATISATION [a-ro-ma-ti-za-uon] 
n. f (pharm.) aromatieation. 

AROMATISER [a-ro-ma-U-z«] v. a. J <0 
aromatize. 

AROME [a-ro-m] n. m. 1. aroma ; 2. 
fia/vor. 

ARONDE [a-ron-d] n. f. 1. J swallow; 
2. (ich.) swallow-fish. 

Queue d'— , (carp., join.) dove-tail; 
swallow-tail; assemblage k queue d' — , 
(carp., join.) dove-tailing. A, en queue 
d'— , (carp., join.) dove-tailed. Assem- 
bler en queue d' — , to dove-tail. 

ARPAILLEUR [ar-pa-ieur *] n. m. 
gold-finder. 

ARP^GE, ARP:6GEMENT [ar-p«-j, 
man] n. m. (mus.) arpeggio. 

Faire des — s, to perform =«. 

ARPfiGER [ar-p«.j6] v. n. (mus.) to 
perform arpeggios. 

ARPENT [ar-pan] n. m. acre (measure 
varying from 1 to lA acre). 

ARPENTAGE [ar-pan-ta-j] n. m. 1. 
survey ; 2. surveying ; land-msasur- 
ing ; 3. (enarin.) land-chain. 



Fairs 1' — de, to survey, to mea&uri 
(land). 

ARPENTER [ar-pan-t«] V. a. \. to sur- 
vey, to measure (land); 2. to measure; 
to walk fast, rapidly (over). 

ARPENTEUR [ar-pan-tenr] n. m. «W 

vey or : land-measurer; measurer. 

ARPENTEUSE [ ar-pan-ted-t ] n. 1 
(ent.) measure-worm. 

ARQU:6, E [ar-k#] adj. 1. arched, 
curved ; 2. bent rmtnd ; bent ; 8. croch- 
ed ; 4 (arch.) fornicate ; 5. (bot) arcu- 
ate; 6. (hot). falcate. 

ARQUEBUSADE [ar-ks-bo-o^d] n, t 
ai-quebvsade. 

Eau d' — , (pharm.) = ; =: water. 

ARQUEBUSE [ar-kg-bu-.] n. t arqw^ 
hu»6. 

ARQUEBUSEEIE [ar-ks-ba-^ri] n, 
gv/n-smit?iery. 

ARQUEBU81ER [ar-kvbu ri«] n. m. 1, 
arquebusier ; 2. gun-sm,ith. 

ARQUER [ar-k«] V. a 1. to aroh ta 
curve; 2. to bend round; to bend, 8. 
to make crooked. 

Ses jambes se sont arquees, he is bow- 
legged. 

ARQUER, V. n. 1. to cwrve; to b4 
arched ; 2. to bend round; to bend. 

ARRACHAGE [a-ra-.ha-j] n. m. (agr.) 
pulling. 

ARRACHEMENT [S-ra-i.h.man] n. m. 

1 1. j}lucking; plucking away, qf; 2 
picking ; picking off; 3. tearing ;' tear- 
ing away, off; 4 pulling; pulling 
away, off; 5. wrenching ; wringing; 

6. (of stumps) st^tbbing ; stubbing up ; 

7. (of plants) digging up; 8. (arch.) 
toothing ; 9. (hort.) grubbing; 10. (hort) 
weeding out. 

ARRACHE-PIED (D') [dA-ra-ih-pU] 
adv. witJumt intermission; together • 
all at once. 

Se mettre — a, to stick close to; 1 to 
buckle to ; travailler d'— k, to stick cloM 
to; to liammer away at. 

ARRACHER [a-ra-Bh«] v. a. (dk q. oh^ 
from a. th. ; i. q. u., to a. o.) 1. | § to 
pluck ; to pluck away, off; 2. 1 to pick ; 
to pick off; 3. 1 § to tear ; to tear away 
qf! 4 II to pull, to draw, to get away 
off; 5. II § to snatch ; to snatch awa/v 
off; 6.1% to wrest ,• 7. | to strip off; 8. 
to scratch out (with the nails) ; 9. j to 
sttib, to stub up (stumps) ; 10. § to take ; 
to take away ; 11. § to draw (obtain) 

12. §to eastort; to exact; 18. § to wring; 
14 § to save ; 15. to tear (the hair) ; 16. 
to dig up (plants); 17. to extract (& 
tooth) ; to draw ; to pull ovi ; to take 
out; 18. (hort) to grub; 19. (hort) to 
weed out 

lu. — la vie a q. n., to take, to take away o. o.'. 
life. 1 1 . — un »ecret a q. u., to draw a secret /nmt 
a. o. ]'2. — une promesso, un aveu a q. u., to ex 
uirt a vnmme, a confusion from a. o. 13. — de« 
lamies a q. u., to wring Uartfrom a. o.'a ei/et. 14. 

— q. u. a la misire, to save a. o.from mitery. 

— (en bas), to tear down ; etc. ( 
senses) ; — (en cueillant), 1. to pluck ; to 
pluck away, off; 2. to pick; to pick 
uioay, qf; — (en d6chirant), to tear ; to 
tear away, off; — (de dedans), to jjluck 
out; to pick out, etc (y. senses); — 
(en fendant d'un bout k I'autre), to rip 
off; — (par la force), ] . to force away ; 
2. to force out; — (en frappant), to beat 
out; — (en haut), 1. to pluck up; 2. to 
pull up; etc. (F. senses); — (en pin- 
f ant), to pinch off; — (avec rapidit6), to 
snatch away, off; — (en tirant), to draw, 
to pull, to get away, off; — (en tordiEt), 
1. to wrench ; 2. to wrest, to wring off; 

— (en trainant), to drag ; to drag anoay.; 

— (avec violence), 1. to wrench; 2. ie 
wrest ; to wring off. 

Arraohk, k, pa. p. F; senses of Aerj.- 

CHEK. 

Non — , (V. sensee of AREiciiKR) i | 
unphtcked; 2. unpicked; 3. untarH; 4 
umwrnrng ; 5. wnextracted. 

S'arracher, pr. v. ( V. Sfjnses of Ab 
racher), 1. 1 to tear; to tear away, off; 
2. 1 to draw away, off; to get away, off, 

8. ( to strip off; ^ \ to Hp off; 6. 
(pers.) (k.,frorn) to tear, to force o.'s se 
away ; to break away ; to break oj 
to break ; to b-urst; 6. §(per8.)(i,/r</m> 
to get a/icay. 

37 



A.RK 



MiK 



AKK 



amal; <linale; it&e; effeve; ^fDte; ^je; til; lUe; oniol; 5in61e; 5moit; wsuc; wsftre; »m Jour; 



— en bas), 1. to tear dovm; 2. to 
fra'D down; etc. (F. senses); — (de 
3edM)8), 1. to tear out; 2. to draw out, 
sic(V. senses) ; — (en hautX to tear up, 
ate. ( F. senses). 

ii'jfli.— Abracher, RA^^B. Arraeher means to 
l«U}Te or take to one'« iolf w'*h violence and liif- 
8»aJ'y OQ object which is held back by another, or 
*»ich reautj one'i efforU ; rautr »ignifieB to take, 
iBtber by artifice than by force, an object that of- 
ten little retietance itaelt, or it but feebly defended 
Jp rtberi. We would use arraeher in connection 
m-iiK tree or a tooth; ravir, with property, and 
Wags generally that are insimioiently defended. 

AREACHEUE [a-ra-sheur] n. m. % 
ii'auier. 

■ de core, corn-cutter ; — de dents, 



AEEAISONNER [4-r^-zo-n«] v. a. 1 1. 
to reason, to argue with, (a. o.) ; 2. (nav.) 
toJuM. 

AEEANGEMENT [A-ran-j-man] n. m. 

1. II arrangement ; * ordering ; 2. H ad- 
justing ; 8 1 doing up ; ^ trimming 
up; A.% arrangement; order ; 5. § ar- 
ra/kgefment; contrivance; 6. § arrange- 
ment; settling; settlement; 7. % order ; 
economy; 8. (of dlflerences) adjust- 
ment; 9. (of food) dressing ; cooking ; 
cooking up ; 10. (of houses, rooms) ^'i- 
Ung up ; 11. (of grounds) taping out ; 
12. (of lamps) trimming; 13. (nav.) 
trimmdn^. 

— k Tamiable, amicable adjustment. 
Entrer en — , 1. to make terms ; 2. (law) 
io compound ; faire des — s, 1. to enter 
into =«; 2. (avec) to make =s (with) ; 
prendre des — s, 1. to make arrange- 
ments; to arrange ; 2. to com^e to terms 
(toith a o.) ; 3. (com.) to settle. 

AERANGER [a-ran-j«] V. a 1. H fe ar- 
range ; to set, to put in order ; 1 to put 
to rights; * to order ; 2. || to adjust; 8. 
\to doup; ^ to trim ; to trim up ; A. || 
(b. 8.) to trick, to dress off, out, up. 5. || 
kt rt^air ; to r/tend ; 6. § to arrange ; 
'^ord^r; 7. % to contrive; 8. § to ar- 
range ; to settle ; 9. § to suit ; 10. § to 
aooommodate (a o.); 11. § (b. s.) to 
trsa,t (a o.) badly, ill ; 12. If § (b. s.) to 
i/ive U to (speak harshly to a o.) ; 13. to 
idjvM (differences) ; to m^ke u/p ; 14. to 
diress (food) ; to cook ; to cook up ; 15. 
to.M up (houses, rooms) ; 16. to lay out 
(grounds) ; 17. to trim (lamps) ; 18. (nav.) 
to trim. 

2, — unobjet d'habiUement, to adjust an article 
ff drets. 3. — un jardin, des habits, «" do up a 
garden, dothpa. 6. — ses id^es ou ses paroles, ti> 
ftrrange, to order o,*« ideas o» o.V ivortU. 1. — un 
plan, to contrive o p/an. 8. - ses aflaires, to ar- 
range, tosettle o.'« affain, burinesa. 9. Cola ne I'or- 
fange pas du tout, Uiat does not at a 1 suit him. lu. 
Faire q. ch. pour — q. u., to do a. th. to accommo- 
date a. o, 

— aTamiable, to mxike an amicable 
adjustment 

Arrange, e, pa p. ( F. senses of Ar- 
BANGER and S'akrangrr) affected. 

Bien — , ( F. senses) ^ ship-shape ; non 
— , ( F senses) 1. || unadjusted ; 2. || un- 
trimmed ; -S. § unregulated ; 4. § unset- 
tled; 6. § unaccom^modnted; 6. (of lamps) 
tmtrimmed ; 1. (nav.) untrimmed. 

8'aeranger, pr. v. 1. | to put, to place, 
to set o.'« self; 2. ^ | to settle o.'s self; 
to settle ; 3. || to get o.'s house in order ; 
^ to get to rights; 4. § to arrange; to 
tnter into arrangetnents ; to make ar- 
rangements ; 5.%to settle matters ; 6. § 
(avbo, with) to settle ; to close ; 7. § to 
compound ; 8. § (pour, to) to arrange ; 
to contrive; to manage; to do; 9. § 
(1>. a) to help o.'s self; to manage as 
Oft* can ; 10. § (b. s.) (de) to make 



ihift (with) ; (pour) to make shift (to) ; 
IL % (b. a) (de, with) to put up ; 12. 
(oiaa) to settle. 

V. — auprfs du feu, to set o.'s self near the fire. 
X. — iani son fauteuil, to settle o.'s self in o.'i 
i|rm-<A(Ztr. 4. II «'est arrancf''. nv^c ses cr^anciers, 
lit kat made arrangements with hit erediturt. 8. — 
pour faire q. ch., Ui contrive, to manage to do a. th. 

— chez soi, to get o.'s house in order ; 
^ to get to rigltts. Arrangez-vous ! help 
yourself! manage as you can! do 
your best or yrwr worst ! 

,^n.— Abranoir, Ranokr. Arranger meait to 
wsign to things the particular placis which cne 
lesiies them to occupy, and implies an operation 



than physical 



ange {arranges) things acconting to 

]e ( m«») them (m order) 

• to the directions which he has received. 



his fancy ; the servant range {pWs) t 



ARRENTEMENT [a-rin-t-man] n. m. 
1. renting; ^. hiring. 

Prendre un — , to rent; tenir une 
maison par — , to rent a htnise. 

ARRENTER ra-ran-t«] V. a to re^it. 

ARR6RAGER [a-r6-ra-j«] v. n. to be 
in arrears. 

Laisser — , to let the arrears run on, 
up ; se laisser — , to let o.'s arrears run 



■RR^RAGES [A-r«. 



ARRERAGE8 [A-r«-ra-j] n. m. (pi.) 1. 
arrears, pi. ; 2. annuity in arrears, 
sing. 

Laisser courir les — , to let the arrears 
run on, up. 

ARRESTATION [a-res-ta-sion] n. f 1. 

(of malefactors) apprehension ; arrest ; 
taking up; 2. (of debtors) arrest; 3. 



— illegale et sequestration de person- 
nes, (law)/afo« imprisonment. Mandat 
d' — provisoire, (law) detainer (of deb- 
tors). En 6tat d' — , under arrest; in 
custody. Mettre q. u. en — , to take 

in custody, in charge ; faire met- 
1. u. en — , 1. to give a. o. into 
custody, in charge; 2. to order into 
custody. 

ARRf;T [a-r«] n. m. 1. | (in criminal 
cases) sentence; judgment; 2. || (in civil 
ctiS,^^ judgment ; decree; decision; 8. 
§ decree; 4. * fiat; 5. arrest; 6. (of 
fire-arms) catch ; 7. (of a lance) reit ; 
bur; 8. (horol.) stop-work; 9. (hunt.) 
stop; 10. (man.) stop; 11. (mil.) — s, 
(pi.) arrest; sing.; 12. (nav.) stop; 13. 
(needl.) fastening ; 14. (tech.) stop ; 
stay; scotch. 

— s forces, de rigueur (mil.) close ar- 
rest; — s simples, (mil.) open arrest. 
Rude sur 1' — , (man.) hard-mouthed. 
Chien d' — , (hunt)^omtor ; crochet d'— , 
(tech.') catch; maison d' — , jail ; point 
d' — , 1. stickvng-place ; 2. (mach.) stop ; 
recueil d' — s, (law) decretal; robinet 
d' — , (tech.) stop-cook ; temps d' — , stop- 
page. Aux — s, (mil.) under arrest; 
d' — , (F senses) (tech.) steadying ; en 
— , (or a lance) m the rest ; sans — §, 
unsteady; Ught; volatile; etr» en — , 
(of dogs) to point ; faire un bel — , (of 
dogs) to point steadily ; mettre aux — s, 
(mil.) to put under arrest ; lever les — s 
de q. u., (mil.) to release a. o. from = ; 
mettre en — , to plac-e, to put (a lance) 
in the rest; prononcer, rendre un — , 
1. (law) to pronounce jud^/ment; 2. 
(crim. law) to pass sentence ; rendre 
un — ^ jo publish a decree; rompre les 
— 8. (mil.) to break from = ; subir ua — , 
to tie under a sentence. 

ARRftT:^ ra-r4-t«] n. m. 1. (of deliber- 
ative assemblies) resolution; 2. (adm.) 
order; decision. 

Prendre un — , to pass a resolution. 

ARR6TE-B(EUF [a-r*-t-beuf] n. m., pi. 
— s, (bot) restJuirrow; ^ harrow. 

ARRf:TE-NEF \i-rk-x-uM] n. m. pi. 
— 8, (ich.) 1 suck-fish; sucking-fish; 
sucker. ' 

AREETE-PORTE [a-rS-t-por-t] n. m., 
pi. — s, door-porter (thing to keep a door 
open). . 

ARR^TEE p-r6-t«] V. a 1. || § to stop 
(prevent the progress of); to /wld; 2. 
II § to arrest; to stay; to hold; to 
check ,- 8. I to fasten (a th.) ; to fix; 4. 
§ to put a stop to (end a th.) ; to break 
off; 5. § to quiet; to still; 6..§ to de- 
tain ; to delay ; ^ to keep back ; 7. § to 
retain; to hold back; 8. § to obstruct; 

9. § to arrest; to fix fh^ attention of; 

10. § to engage (a o. for services) ; to 
take; to hire; 11. § to Uike (obtain a 
formal promise <»f a th.): to secure; 12. 
§ to resolve ; to detemdne ; to decide ; 
13. to con^ddide, to make, to strike (a 
bargain); 14. to stanch (the blood); 15. 
to arrest (a debtor) ; to Uike into cus- 
tody ; 16. § to fasten, to fix (the eyes, 
the look) ; 17. to attach, to neize, to dis- 
train (goods); IS. to apprehenxi (a ma- 
lefactor) ; to t<ike into custody, in 
charge: to t/ike u/: : 19. to nllay. to 



alleviate dnin) ; to appoint, to fix (i 
time) ; 21. (of deliberative assembliea) to 
solve; 22. ^book-k.) to agree on tht 
anunmt of (an account) • 28. (hunt.) to 
point ; to set ; 24. (mach.) to throw out 
of gear ; 25. (needl.) to fasten,; to fasten 
off; 26. (tech.) to pin ; to jA-it. down ; 
to scotch. 

2. I — la main de q. u., to arrei t, to stay x. «.'« 
hand ; § — le progres de q. u., to srrest, to raty s. 
o. 'j progr'ts. 3. — une persieniw, une pierre, uao 
planche, to fasten, to fix a blind, a stone, a planJk. 
5. — .les murmures ou des plaintes, to quiet, to 
still murvcnrs or complaints. 6. — un courrier, <u 
delay, to detam o courier. 10. — uu domestique, 
to ..ngage, to take, to hire a servant. 11. — s» 
piace dans uue voiture, to take, to secure o.'s place 
in a coach. 1*7. — ea voiture et ses chevaux, to 
seize o.'« carriage and horses. 

Faire — ,(V. senses) to give a. o. into 
custody, in charge. — court, tout court, 
to stop short Action d'— , ( F. senses) 



Arrbtb, e, pa p. (F. senses) 1. § 
fixed; 2. at a stand; .3. (a & m.) 
idle ; 4 (j^iinSi.) fastened off. 

Non — , ( F. senses) 1. || unstopped ; 
2. II § u/nstayed; unchecked; 3. || un- 
fastened ; unfixed ; 4. § iimobstructed ; 
5. § unengaged ; 6. § untaken ; 7. § ^^n^ 
resol/oed ; undetermined • undecided ; 
8. § (of a bargain) unconcluded ; un- 
made; 9. (of the blood) unstanchsd; 

10. (of a malefactor) unappreliended ; 

11. (of pain) unallayed ; unaUeviated. 
S'aereter, pr. V. 1. £ to stop ; ^ to 

make a stop ; 2. 1 § to stand ; to come 
to a stand; to make a stand ; 8. || to 
take o.'s stand ; 4. || to stop ; to stay ; 
to remain ; 5. 1 (th.) to lodge (in fall- 
ing) ; G.\to be fastened, fixced ; 7. § to 
stop; ^ to leave off; to break off'; 
|W°° to knock off; 8. § (a, on, upon) 
to stop; tofiix,; to rest; to hover; 9. f 
to stop ; to be embarrassed ,- 1 to stick ; 
10. %to be quieted, stilled; 11. (pera) 
to engage o.'s self (tor services); to** 
Ui!cen ; hired ; 12. § (th.) to be tcJcm-, 
secured (by a formal promise); 13. (a, 
on, upon) to decide ; to detemwne ; io 
resolve ; to close ; ^ to settle ; ^ to set 
tie down ; 14. § (a, at) to scruple ; U 
/lesitate ; K^~ to stick ; 15. (a) to ?ta/vt 
regard (for); to pay attention (to); 
to mind; 16. (of bargains) to be con- 
cluded, made, struck ; 17. (of the blooil) 
to be sta/nclved; 18. (of carriages) to 
draw up ; 19. (of the eyes, tne looks) 
to be fastened ; to be fixed ; to rest ; to 
dwell; 20. (of pain) to be aUayed, aUe- 
viated; 21. (of time) to be appointed; 
fieced; 22. (of travellers) to bait (for re- 
freshment); 28. (mach.) to be throum 
out of gear; 24 (mach.) to come to a 
stand-still; 26. (needl.) to be fastened, 
fastened off; 26. (tech.) to be piimcd 
down ; to be scotched. 

15. —aux api>arences, to have regard for ap- 
pearances. II ne faut pas — a ce qu'il dit, one 
must not mind what he says. 

Ne pas — , ( F senses) 1. to keep on ; 
2. («) to pass over (...); to take no 
notice of (. . .). — devant . . . , (nav.) to 
call off. . . — en beau chemin, to stop in 
tlie middle. Action de — , (Y. senses) 
stop; stoppage; etat d'une machine 
lorsqu'elle s'arrete, staiid-stUl. 

ARRfiTER [k-rk-xt] V. n. 1. to stop; 
2. (of travellers) to bait ■ 

Arretez \. 1. stop ! 2. hold I 

ARRfiTISTE [ars-tis-t] n. m. com- 
piler of decrees. 

AERHER [a-r*] r. a to give earnest 
earnest-m^meyfbr. 

ARRHES [a-r] a f. pi. 1. J earr^tt, 
earnest-money ; 2. t § j)led\,6 ; ^ a*»i> 
ranee ; 3. (com.) deposit 

Diiposer des — , (com.) to leoM)6 a de 
posit; donner des — , to give earnest. 

ARRMIDJfcE [a-ri-d«] p. n. m. (clasa) 
Aridijeus. 

AREIEN [a-ri-in] p. n. m. (class.) A7 
rian. 

AEEli:EE [&-ri4-rl adi. (oomp.) 1. (o1 
place) AiTOrf«r,- back; 2. (of time) «/• 
ter; 8. (mil.) rear; 4t. (nav.) aft 

AEEli^RE, adv. 1. 1 (of place) behind , 
2. § (of time) behind ; beMnJ-hanil ; 8 
'exclam.) far; away; bci,.k; 4 (e» 
i!am."» (db) /ar (/»•(*/»■»• cM.ytv (^Dith^ 



AKK 



ARR 



ART 



wjoute; «MJeu; «<ijeune; *Speur; dwpan; in pin; onhon; wibrun; 'll llq.; 'gn llq. 



X (nav.) aft; abaft; 6. (nav.) (of the 
wind) leading. 

Droit — ! (nav.) right aft ! 

ABKlilEE, n. m. 1. % rear; hack 
paH 2. (nav.) *<«'■«■ ," 3. (nav.) quarter. 

Le ilernier de 1' — , (nav.^ tli^ aftermost; 
snrvtsJlant de 1'—, (nav.> xifter guard. 
D'— , (nav.) after; de 1—, (nav.) aft; 
dstern ; en — , 1. (of place) back ; 2. [ 
Ixiekward; 8. || behind; 4. (in travel- 
:3ig) with o.'s hack to the Iwrses; 5. 
' aaveJling by railway) toith o.''8 back tc 
he engin-e ; 6. (of tinie)tofe; behind- 
hand; 7. § backward; behind-hand; 
8. behind one's back ; 9. (of payments) 
in arrears; 10. (nav.) abaft; en — I 1. 
back I 2. away / 8. ^ out of the way I 
en — de, i| § beMnd; le plus en — , 1. 1 
the hindmost; the hindermotit ; 2. (nav.) 
the sternrtiost ; vers 1' — , (nav.) after- 
ward. 8e ranger de 1' — , (nav.) (of the 
wind) to veer ; rester, tomber de V — , 
(nav.) to fall astern. Venant de 1' — , 
(nav.) pooping. 

ARltliiRE, n. m. (sing.) 1. things be- 
hind-hand, pi. ; ... behind-lhand ; ar- 
rear ; arrea- v 2. (of payments) arrear; 
arrears; 8. (fin.) arrear; arrears; 4. 
(mil.) reUef. 

1 . — d'une correspondance, a eonetpondenee be- 

bind-haiid. 

Avoir de V — dans, to be backward 
with; to be behind-hand in, with; 
mettre a T — , (fin.) to be paid out of the 
arrears ; etre port6 sur 1' — de q. u., to 
he in a. o.^s arrears ; solder 1' — , topay 
up the arrears. 

AEEI:^R:6, E, adj. § 1. backward; 
behind-hand; 2. l^ undone; unexe- 
cuted; 3. due; awing; 4 (of payments) 
in arrears ; 5. (fin.) unclaimed. 

'tta.t — , bac/cwardness ; backward 
state. 

AREli;RE-BAN [a-ri4-r-ban] n. m. 
(feud) arriere-ban. 

ARRli:EE-BEO [a-riJ-r-b^k] n. m., pL 
—6, (engin.) (of bridges) 1. cut-water ; 2. 
HtarUng : 8. break-water (behind). 

AERIERE-BOUCHE [a-ri6-r-bou-ih] n. 
£, pL — 8, (sabX,.) pfiMrynxB. 

ARRIERE-BOUTIQUE [ A-riS-r-bou- 
ti-k] n. f., pi. — s, back-shop. 

ARRliEE-CHANGE [a-rii-Mhan-j] n. 
ui., pi. — 8, (fln.) compamui interest. 

AEEli:EE-CORPS [4.ri4-r-k6r] n. m., 
pL — , (arch.) recess. 

AEEli;EE-COUE p-riJ-r-kour] n. £, 
pL — s, hack-court ; bask-yard. 

AEEli:EE-D08 [a-ri6-r-d6] n. m., pi. 
— , (arcli.) altar-screen; reredos; dos- 

AERlilEE-ESSAIM [a-rii-rf-tin] n. m., 
pL — 8, after-swarm. 

ARRli:RE-FAIX [&-riJ-r-ft] n. ra., pi. 
— , (physiol.) 1. (pers.) after-birtli ; 2. 
(of animals) heam. 

AREli;RE-FIEP [4-ri6-r-fiJf] n. m., 
pi. — s, (feud.) rere-fee. 

AREli:EE-GAEDE [4-ri6-r-gar-d] n. 
£, pi. — 8, (mil.) rear-guard ; rear. 

AERli:EE-GOUT [a-ri4-r.gou] n. m., 
pi. — 8, after-taste. 

AEEIEEE-MAIN [&-ri4-r-min] n. m., 
pi. — s, 1. back-blow ; 2. (of horses) hind 
auarters. 

AERliEE-NEVEU [4-rii-r-n».veu] n. 

1., pi. — X, \. great-nepliew ; 2. * — ^x, 
(pi.) latest posterity. 

ARRli;RE-PENSEE [a-riJ-r.pan-««] n. 

t, pL —8, reservation; mental reserva- 
tion ; reserve ; mental reserve. 

AEEIERE-PLAN [a-rii r-plan] n. m. 
fnaint.) hack-ground. 
ARElfeRE-POINT [&-rii-r-poin] n. m., 
'_ —6, (needl.) 1. back-stitch; 2. sUtch- 

Mettre un — , des — s (I, to stitch. 

AERli;RE-POINTEUSE [a-rij-r-pom- 
ou-t1 n. f , pi. — 8, stitcher. 

AERI:6RER ra-ri«-r«] V. a. to defer, to 
May, to put off {a, payment). 

S'arrieber, pr. v. 1. to remain, to 
itay behind ; 2. (of payments) to get in 
■arrears. 

AEElilRE-SAISON p-rie-r.ti.z5n] n 
r, pi. — s, 1. latter end of the season; 2. 
latter end of autumn : 3. § decline (of 
\fe): ^et .u;: ** autumn. 



AEEli:EE-TEAIN [i-ri^-r-trin] n. m., 
pL — 8, Oifter carnage. 

AREIERE- VASSAL [a-rii-r-va-wl] n. 
m., pi. Arrieke-vassaux, (feud.) vassal 
of a m,ems lord; inferior vassal. 

AERI^RE-VOUSSURE [a-ri^-r-vou- 
•n-r] n. f , pi. — s, (arch.) hack-bending. 

ARRIMAGE [a-ri-ma-j] n. m. (nav.) 1. 
stowage; 2. (of the hold) trim. 

Bois d' — , fathom wood; plan d'— , 
(of the hold) tier. 

ARRIMER [a-ri-m«] V. a. (nav.) 1. to 
stow; to stow a/way ; 2. to trim (the 
hold). 

ARRIMEUR [4-ri-meur] n. m. (nav.) 
mam, employed to stow Uie hold. 

— en chef, ca/ptain of the hold. 
AREISEE \k-ri-xt\ V. a. (nav.) tofrap. 
AEEIVAGE [a-ri-va-j] n. m. (com. 

nav., nav.) arrival. 

AEEIV:6E [&-ri-v«l n. f 1. arrival; 
coming ; 2. (nav.) falling off. 

— inopin6e, 1. unexpected arrival; 
2. (did.) supervention. A Y — de, 1. (of 
place) at tlie = of; 2. (of time) on tlie 
= of; aussitot son — , immediately on 
o.'s =. 

AEEIVEE, V. n. 1. i (a, at; dans, en, 
in; VR,from) to arrive; 2. I (pers.) to 
corns (towards) ; ^ to step up (to) ; to 
come on; S. § (th.) to arrive ; to corns ; 
to corns on ; 4. (pers.^ (a, to) to gain ac- 
cess (to a. o.) ; 5. § (a) to arrive (at); to 
reach (...); 6. § (a) to arrive (at) ; to 
attain (. . .) ; 7. § (th.) to be forthcoming; 
8. (of circumstances, events) to occur ; 
to happen; to come to pass; to be 
brought to pass ; 1 tofaU out; to come 
about, round ; 9. § (b. s.) to occur; to 
happen ; to befall (to) ; to befall (...); 
10. (impers.) (a, to) to happen; to 
chance; to be incident; 11. (nav.) to 
bear away, up ; 12. (nav.) (sue, iipon) 
to bear down; 18. (nav.) to fetch; 14 
(nav.) to veer. 

1 . Uue peraoune, une voiture, ime noiivelle arrive 



vred/rc 



France, Ae wou/d have a 

3. La nuit arriva, night came, came on. 6. — ; 
fin de q. ch., to arrive at, to reach tht end of a. th. 
6. — aux honneurs, to arrive at, to attain honan. 9. 
Un accident lui eet omw, an accident hat oc- 
curred, happened to him ; an accident hat befallen 
hitn. 10. II m'est arrive de me trouver la, / hap- 
pened, chanced to be there ; U arrivera a un grand 
nombre de travailler sans recompense, to many it 
will be incident to labor mthout reward. 

— (au retour), to come, to get back ; 
— en faisant un tour, to come, to get 
round, fitre arriv6, ( V. senses) 1. (th.) 
to be at hand, ; 2. to be of actual occur- 
rence; — frequemment, (th.) to be of 
common, frequent occurrence. — en 
abondance, (th.) to flmo in; — i bon 
port, to arrive safe, in safety ; — a 
terme, to corns about S'efforcer d' — 
(k), vouloir — (a), (Y. senses) to grasp 
(at) ; faire — , ( V. senses) 1. to bring (a. 
th.) to pass ; 2. (mil., play) to bring out. 
Arrivez ^ 1 1. corns on, along ! on ! 2. 
step out ! Qui arrive, coming ; qui ar- 
rive frequemment, (th.) of convmon, of 
frequent occurrence; qui arrive tons 
ies jours, (th.) ofdaHy occurrence ; qui 
est arriv6, ( V. senses) (th.) of actual oc- 
currence ; quoi qu'il en arrive, 1. at all 
events; 2. ^ come what may, wiU. 

[Ar.RiVKR is conjugated with etre.l 

AEROBE [a-ro-b] n. f arroha (Spanish, 
Portuguese, and Brazilian weight). 

ARROCHE [a-ro-sh] D. f (bot) (genus) 
orach ; crrach ; ^ notch-weed; ^ moun- 
tain spinach. 

— cultiv6e, garden orach ; — hallme, 
sea-purslain. 

ARROGAMMENT [S-ro-g»-man] adv. 
arroganfty; haughtily; sv/percUi- 
ously. 

ARROGANCE [4-ro-gan-.] n. £ (pour, 
to) arrogance; haughtiness; superci- 
liousness. 

ARROGANT, E [4-ro-gan, t] adj. 
(vovs-R, to) arrogant ; haughty; super- 
cilious ; overbearing ; high-handed. 

Langage — , ( V. sensest brow-beating. 
fitre, se montrer — , ( V. senses) to as- 
sttm,e, to be asstiming. 

ARROGEE (SI [i4-ro-j*] pr. v. (a. to) 
to arrogate; to arrogate to o.'s self. 



1. 1 1 arrog. 



AEEOI [4-roa] 

eqmpage ; 2. § plijght (state). 

Etre en mauvais —, to be in, a oad 
pUght 

AEEONDI, E [4-r6n-di] adj. 1. 1 rormO- 
ed; 2. \rou/)id; 3. \ roundish; 4. (of 
the face)/MW ,• 5. (hot) rotund. 

— en dos d'ane, (engin.) (of roads) bar 
relied. Forme — e, roundishness. 

AEEONDIE [4-r6n-dir] V. a. 1. | J io 

round; 2. § to enlarge; to increa»ti; 
le; 8. (nav.) to weather; 
»pe); 4 (paint) to round 



dos d'ane, (engin.) to barrel (« 
senses of A%- 



to aggrani 
to double (i 
off 

— en 
road). 

Arrondi, e, pa. p. V. 

EONDIR. 

Non — , ( F; senses) unrounded. 

S'areondir. pr. v. 1. II to romid; to 
become, to get, to groir round ,* 2. § <o 
enlarge, to increase o.'s estate ; S. %io 
aggrandise o.'s self. 

AEEONDISsEMENT [a-ron-di-. man] 
n. m. 1. II § rounding; 2. } rovndnesa; 
8. (of a town) district; ward. 

AEEOSAGE [a-ro-za-j] n. m. I. irri- 
gation; 2. watering; 3. (a. & m.) 
sprinkling. 

Pompe d' — , watering -engine, 

AEROSEMENT [a-ro-.-man] n. m. 1. 
watering; 2. sprinkling; 3. (culin.) 
basting ; 4. (play.) paying all round. 

ARROSER [k-ro-z6] V. a. (de, v)Uh\ 1. 
to wafer; 2. (slightly) to sprinkle; 8. ♦ 
(plentifully) to sJiower; 4* (very slightly) 
to bedew; 5.^ to wet (a. o.) through 
(with rain); to soak; 6. to baths (witb 
tears); 7. to wet (the lips, the throat;) 8. 
(culin.) to baste (meat); 9. (agi-.) to irri- 
gate. 

Cuiller k — , basting-ladle; non ar- 
ros6, qui n'est pas arros6, ( V. senses) 1, 
vnwatered ; 2. vmsJuywered. 

AEEOSOIE [a-ro-«>ar] n. m. watering- 
pot 

AES [4r] n. m. (pi.) (veter.) 1. »«<*» -J 
the fore leg, sing. ; 2. Umh, sing. 

AES ACE [ar-sa-s] p. n. m. Arsacss. 

AESENAL [ar-»8-nai] n. m. arsenaik 

— de marine, de port, dock-yard. 
AES:6NIATE [ar-s6.ni.a-t] n. in. 

(chem.) arseniate. 

AESENIC [ar-a^iic] n. m. (chem.) ar- 
senic. 

Combiner avec 1' — , to arsenicute. 

AESENICAL, E [ar-.6-m-k«l] (ufl. 
(chem.) arnenical. 

AES:6NIQUE [ar-.«-m-k] a^j. (chem.) 
arsenic (acid). 

AES:6NITE [ar.8«-m-t] a. m. (ch«>m.) 
arsenite. 

AET [ar] n. m. art. 

— angelique, des esprits, (hist) an- 
gelic = ; beaux s, fine =«; — s in- 

dustriels, m,anufactiuring =« ; — b lib6- 
raux, liberal, polite =« ; — s manofac- 
turiers, =8 and manufactures ; — 
d'agrument, accomplishment Bache- 
lier es — s, bachelor of =« ,• maitre ee 
— s, 1. master of =8; 2. (universities) 
artist; maitre en son — , ma-iter of o.'% 
= ; ouvrage d' — , 1. work of^n ; 2. (en- 
gin.) stone-work; Ies termes de V — , 
technical terms. Avec — , 1. withrz.; 
2. artistically; plein d' — , \.full of=\ 
2. artftd; sans — , 1. artless, ur/a- 
shioned; 2. artlessly; 8. unartifoial ; 
inartificial; 4 wnartificially ; inarti- 
fUAatly. Fait avec — , 1. done, tTAxit 
with = ■ 2. artful. 

AETABAN [ar-ta-ban] p. n. in. Arta- 
banus. 

AETABAZE [ar-ta-ba-i] p. n. ni. .Ir 
tahaz^is. 

AETAXEEXE, AETAKEKCE [»» 
tag-iir-ks, e] p. n. m. Artaxo.'oees. 

— Longue-Main, = Macrochir, Loi\ 
gimanus. 

AET:fcMIDOEE [ar-ti-mi-do-r] p. n. m 
class. Artemidorus. 

AET^MISE [ar-t«-mi-«] p. n. f Atte 
mieia. 

AETilEE [ar-ti-r] n. £ (anat) arten, 

— obturatrice, pwlic =. Piquer mK 
— , (surg.) to 'open, to wound an — 

AET1i:RIEL, LE [ar-t«.ri-«l adj. (amit 
arterial. 

39 



ART 


ASC 


5 ASf 


.T mal ; d maH; e fee; i ftve it&te; i je 


ill; « He, 


omol; 6 m61e; (5 mort; m sue; H sdre: <w jour; 



Trouc — , (anat) aa>is; tonique — le, 
OocU, tmvic of an artery. 

AET^RIOLE [ar-ti-ri-o-l] n. f. (anat) 
tnuiU artery. 

AETi^EIOLOGIE [»r.t«.ri-o-lo-ji] n. C 
(did.) arteriology. 

AKT£KI0T0MIE [»r.M-ri-.-to.mi] n. 
C (8urg.) arteriotomy. 

AKTlfeRlTE [ar-u-ri-t] n. t (med.) in- 
flammation o/the arteries. 

AETfiSlEN, NE [ar-^-ri-in, 6-n] a<y. 

trte^ian. 

Pults — , = wdl. 

AETHRALGIE [ar-tral-ji] n. f. (med.) 
pain in the joints. 

ARTflElTE [ar-tri-tj n. C (med.) ar- 
antis. 

ARTHEITIQUE [ar-tri-ti-k] n. f. & 
«dj, (Died.) arthritio; arihritical. 

AETHEOCACE [ar-tro-ka-.] n. C 
{medL.larthrooace. 

AETHEODIE [ar-tro-dl] n. £ (anat) 
arOirodia. 

AETHEOSE [ar-tr6-z] n. £ (anat) ar- 
throsis; articulation. 

ARTICHAUT rar-ti-.h6] n. m. 1. (bot.) 
artioTwke; 2. spiked fence. 

— sauvage, (bot) cotton; woolly this- 
Ue; — d'Espagne, de Jerusalem, me'cm 
pompion. Fond d' — , hottom of an ar- 
tichoke ; oeilleton d' — , = sucker. 

ARTICLE [ar-ti-kl] n. m. 1. aHicle; 
8. subject; matter; thing; 3.^ matter; 
thing; concern; business; 4. (of an 
account) item; 5 t (anat) articulation; 
6. (bot) article; 7. (ent) ring ; 8. (gram.) 
article. 

— deflnl, (gram.) definite article ; — 
Indeflni, (gram.) indefinite = ; — parti- 
U^ ^am/) partiti/ve =i; — principal, de 
fond, leader; — Londtes, (London 
journals) leader; — Paris (Paris jour- 
nnis) leader. — par — , 1. = 6y = ; 2. 
orticidately ; k 1 — de, at the point of 
(death) ; sur 1' — de, on, upon the score 

r! Faire 1' — , 1. to praise up o.'s goods ; 
io persuade customers into purchas- 
Uig. C'est un autre — , thafs another 
matter, thing, concern ; c'est un — h 
port, that 8 a separate concern. 

AETICULAIEE [ar-U-ku-ife-r] adj. 
pHiAt, med.) articado/r. 

AETICULATION [ar-ti-ku-U-iien] n. 
C 1. articulation; 2. joint; 8. (anat) 
nrthrosis ; articulation ; 4 joint ; 4 
(bot) articulation; joint; 5. (law) aZ- 
Ugat'ion ; 6. (sciences) artuyiilation. 

— coxo-femorale, (anat) Jdp-joint ; — s 
Immobiles, (anat) synarthroses; ^ im- 
nuycable ar-tioiuations ; — s mobiles, 
(anat) diarthroseg ; ^ movable articu- 
lations. Defaut d' — , (of pronunciation) 
inarticndation. Sans — , witlumt arti- 
evloMon; wnjointed. 

ARTICUL:^, E [ar-ti-ku-l«] adj. 1. 
jointed; 2. (of sounds) articulate; 3. 
(bot) articulated; vertebrate; verte- 
bral^ ; jointed ; 4 (sciences) articu- 
late; articulated. 

Non — , 1. u/njointed ; 2. (sciences) 
vnarUculated. D'une manifere — e, ur- 
ticfularly. ^orme de pieces — as, (bot) 
jointed. 

AETICUL]fcMENT [ar-ti-ku-U-man] 

ndv. % aHAculately. 

AETICULEE [ar-ti-ka-i«] V. a. 1. to 
a/rticvlate; to utter; 2. to state (a fact); 
S. (law) to setforVi; 4 (sciences) to ar- 
ti<:ulate. 

S'artioulee, pr. v. (sciences) (a, aveo, 
to) to be articulated. 

AETICULEE, v. n. to articulate. 

AETICUL:i6S, n. m. (pL) (ent) artum- 
lates ; articulata, pi. 

AETIFICE [ar-ti-fi-i] n. m. 1. aH; 
oontricance ; 2. (b. s.) artifice ; 3. ( b. s.) 
qyiZe; craft; 4 (b. s.) slyness; 5. J^"^ 
(b. 8.) shuffle. 

Absence d' — , gvMelessnesa. Caisse 
d"— , (nav.) powder-cliest ; fire-chest; 
iirecteur de feu d' — , fire^master ; fen 
»1'— , (8ing.)j(?r«-worA;, sing. ; fire-works, 
pL ; avec — , (b. s.) vMh artifiae, gwile ; 
fyrafiH/y ; cwrvningly ; sans — , guile- 
less; oraftless; UMdesigning. Tirer 
'JB feu i' — , iolet,to set offjire-works. 

AETIFICIEL, LE [M.ti-fi«el] adj. ar- 
'\fieial. 



%'. 



Non — , unartifidal. ifitat — , artifi- 
ciality. 

AETIFICIELLEMENT [ar-U-fi-«J-l- 
aianTadv. artificially. 

AETIFICIEE [ar-ti-fi.«i«] n. m. jyyro- 
technist. 

AETIFICIEUSEMENT rar.«^-.i-ea. 
i-man] adv. artfully; guUefvMy ; crafti- 
ly; cunningly. 

AETIFICIEU-X, 8E [ar-ti-fi-»i-eu, eu-z] 
artful ; guileful ; crafty ; cunnving. 
on — , artless ; guileless. 

AETILLERIE [ar-U-i-ri*] n. f. 1. artil- 
lery ; gums, pi. ; ordnance, sing. ; 2. (of 
a ship) ordnance; guns. 

Grosse — , h,ea/oy artillery; gttns ; — 
legere, liorse, flying =. — de cam- 
pagne, field- = ; — k cheval, horse- = ; 
— de marine, marine- =^ : — a pied, 
foot- = ; — de siege, battering- =, train. 
Comite d' — , board of c^dnance ; direc- 
teur de 1' — , master qf the ordnance; 
piece d' — , piece of ordnance. 

AETILLEUE [ar-ti-eur*] n. m. artil- 
lery-man. 

ARTIMON [ar-ti-mon] n. m. (nav.) 1. 
mizen ; mizen-mast ; 2. m.izen-sail. 

Mat d' — , mizen-mast; voile d'— , 
m.izen-sail. 

ARTISAN [ar-ti-ian] n. m. 1. | arti- 
san ; mechamc ; operative ; *f work- 
mam,; 2. § arctjvtect (cause); author; 
framer. 

Des — s, 1. of^; 2. operative. 

ARTISON [ar-ti-zon] n. m. (ent) wood- 
fretter. 

ARTIS0NN]6, E [ar-ti-io-n*] adj. eaten 
by wood-fretters. 

ARTISTE [ar-tit-t] n. m. f 1. artist; 
2. (theat) artist; performer; player. 

— veterinaire, veterinary surgeon; 
^ horse-doctor. D' — , artist-like. 

ARTISTEMENT [ar-ti«-t6-man] adv. 
artistically ; inan artist-like manner; 
skilfully. 

AETISTIQUE [ar-ti^ti-k] adj. artist- 
like. 

AETU8, AETUE [ar-tu«, tur] p. n. m. 
Arthur. 

AETJM [a-rom] n. m. (bot.) arum ; ^ 
friar^s cowl. 

— commun, macul6, tachet6, cuckoo- 
pint; Cfuckoo-'pintle ; wake-robin. 

AEU8PICE [a-ru.-pi-.] n. m. (Eom. 
hist) aruspex; aruspice; haruspice. 

AEUSPICINE [a-ru.-pi-.i-n] n. £ (ant) 
haruspicy. 

AEYTJfeNOlDE [a-ri-W-no-i-d] adj. 
(anat.) arytixnoid. 

AEYTi:NOlDE, n. m. (anat) arytcB- 
noid cartilage. 

AEYTi;NOlDIEN [a-ri-W-no-i-diin] adj. 
m. (anat) an/tmnoid. 

ARYT^NOlDIEN, n. m. (anat)(mu8. 
cle) aryUenoideus. 

AS [as] n. m. \. (Ebm. ant) as; 2. 
(cards, dice) ace. 

AS [a] termination of 2d person singu- 
lar, preterite tense, indicative mood, of 
verbs of the first conjugation. 

As, ind. pres. 2d sing, of Avoir. 

ASARET [a-za-rt] n. m. (bot) asarvm. 

ASBESTE [a.-bJ8-t] n. m. (min.) asbes- 
tus; asbestos. 

— ligniforme, Ugniform = ; 1 rock- 
wood. 

ASCAGNE [a»-kB-gu*] p. n. m. (class.) 
Ascamius. 

ASCAEIDE [aa-ka-ri-d] n. m. (ent) 
a^oaris. 

ASCENDANT, E [a-.an-dan, t] adj. 1. 
I ascending ; 2. |i upward; 8. § ascends 
ant; ascending; 4 (astr.) a^cendoM; 
ascending ; 5. (sciences) ascending. 

ASCENDANT, n. m. 1. (astr.) ascend- 
ant; 2. (astrol.) ascendant; 8. § ruling 
passion; 4 § site, over) ascendency: 
ascendant; influence; 6. (genealogy) 
ancestor; progenitor ; ascendant; 6. 
{}a,vi) ancestor ; ascendant, 

4. Avoir beaucoup d'— .or q. u- . «o have great 
influence over a. o. 

ASCENSION [a-an-il5n] n. C 1. ascent 
(action of ascending); 2. rite; rising; 
8. + Ascension (of Christ) ; 4 + Ascen- 
sion-day; holy Thwrsday; 5. (mach.) 
upstroke; 6. (scienceo) ascent. 

Jour de 1'— +« Ascension-day ; holy 



Thursday. Faire une — , to maJix am 
ascent (in a balloon); to ascend; ttdtt 
V— de, to ascend (a mountain). Don! 
on peut faire 1' — , ascend<Me. 

ASCENSIONNEL, LE [a-.an.fiio.o411 
adj. ascensional. 

Mouvement — , (mach.) up stroke 

A8CETIQUE [a-.«-ti-k] adj. asc^ic. 

ASC:ifcTIQUE, n. m. ascetic. 

ASCJfcTlSME [a-.6-timi] n. m. atceH- 
dsm. 

ASCIENS [a-.i.in] n. m. (pL) (gecMi.) 
Ascians; Ascii,-p\. 

ASCITE ra-.i-t] n. f (med.) aaeitea ; 
^ dropsy of the belly. 

ASCLfiPIADE [a.-kl«-pl.a.d] adj. (ana 
vers.) asclepiadic. 

ASCL^PIADE, n. m. 1. p. (clas.s.) ^/». 
clepiades ; 2. (anc. vers.) asdepiad. 

ASCLI^.PIADE, n. t. 

ASCLlfePIAS [a.-kM-pi-a.] n. m. (bot) 
asclepias; ^swallow-wort 

ASER [a-zJr] p. n. m. Aslier. 

ASIARCHAl [a-M-ar-ka] n. m. (ano. 
hist) asiarchy. 

ASIARQUE [a-M-ar-k] n. m. (anc. 
hist.) asiarch. 

ASIATIQUE [a-zi-a-ti-k] adj. AsiaUc 

A8IE (L') [la-:?/ p. n. £ Asia. 

L' — Mineure, = Minor ; Lesser =. 

ASILE, ASYLE [a-zi-1] n. m. 1. ( 
asylwm; 2. 1 sanctuary; 3. I refuse, 
place of refuge ; ** concealment; 4 { 
dweUing^lace ; habitation; home; 
5. § shelter; retreat. 

— des pauvres, (of the parish) house 
of industry; poor-house; 5 work- 
home. Lieu d'— , 1. asylum ; 2. place 
of refuge; salle d'— , infant-school. 
Sans — , 1. ZBithout an asylwm; 2. home- 
less; houseless; S. shelterless. Cbtmaer 
d'un — , 1. to drive from an asylum, a 
r^ge; 2. io unhouse; donaer — k, b) 
afford an asylum, a refuge, a slidtcT 
to ; se Jeter dans un — , to take sanatu- 
ary; servir d'— , to serve a* an aun- 
lum. 

Sm. — AsrLK, kefurb. An atile ia a plwe H 
Kifety which one seeks when he fear, datgei a 
refuge is a place of security to which he ^esc Hum 
actually assailed by danger. A port i. at all tiiZMi 
an aiile ; in a tempest, it is a refuge. 

ASILE, n. m. (ent.) (genus) wa*p-fiy. 
— frelon, =. 

ASINE [a-»i.n] adj. t % of the ass spe- 
cies. 

ASMODlfeE [aa-mo-dfi] p. n. m. Asmo- 
deus. 

A. 8. P., abbrev. for accepte sotts pbo- 
TET, (com.) accepted under protest 

ASPECT [a.-pJk] n. m. 1. I ay)ect; 
sight; 2. I aspect; view; 3. | aspect; 
appearance; air; look; 4 § aspect; 
point of view ; side ; phase ; bearinf^; 
5. (astrol.) aspect. 

4. Examiner une affaire sou. ton. .e. — , *o «» 
amine a matter in all Us bearings. 

— quartile, (astrol.) square. — dn del, 
(ssXroX.'ydecumbiture. D'un — peu agt^ 
able, ( V. senses) ill-seemdng. 

St/n.—AsPScr, vue. Vue signifies the applica- 
tion'of the sense of sight to any particular object; 
aspect, the manner in which that object present, 
itself to the vue. The tiue of a charmmg landscape 
afford, us pleasure ; a precipice present, a fright. 
ful aspect. 

ASPER6E [atp6r-j] n. t (bot) head 
of asparagus; aspara., 
(pi.) asparagus, sing 

Des —6, asparagus. Botte d'— «, 
bundle of= ; fosse d' — , = -pit ; pointo 
d' — , top of an asparagus-head. 

ASPEEGEE [a.-p«r.j«] V. a. 1. *i 
sprinkle ; 2. + 4. (de, loith) to sprinkle 

ASPERGERIE [..-p«r-j.ri] n. £ (agi.) 
plantation of aspa?-agus. 

ASPERGi:S [atpAr-ji.] n. m. 1. aspei^ 
ges; asperges-orush ; spi^nkle ; holy- 
water-sprinkler; aspergill; asperto- 
rivm ; 2. time of sprinkling the holy- 
water. 

A8P:feEIT£ [a^p«-ri.M] n. £ 1. 1 aeper- 
ity; roughness; 2. § ruggedness; un- 
evenness; 3. § aspe?'ity ; harsJmes». 

A8PEE8ION [a«-pftr-M6u] n. £ 1. 
sprinkling ; 2. + + sprinkling (of holT 
water) ; 8. (did.) affusion. 

A8PEES0IE [a»-p«rHK)w1 n. m. atptir 
ges; asper ges-orush : aspergVZ; ai 



n. £ (bot) ; 
xgus-heaa; 



ASS 



ASS 



AStj 



»& joftte; *M jeu; ew jeune; e& pour; an pan; iw pin; on bon; un brun; *11. liq. ; *gn Uq. 



persorium ; Tvoly water sprinkler; 
iprinkle. 

ASP^RIILE [a8-p«-ru-l] n. f (bot) 
woodroof; woodniff. 

A8PHALTE [a»-fal-t] n. m. asphaU 
tum; nsphaM. 

— de Judee, Jews' pitcK D'— , as- 
jMoltio; asphalUte. 

ASPHALTITE [at-fai-U-t] adj. (geog.) 
Sephaltic. 

Lac — , = lake. 

A8PH0Di:LE [a.-fo-d6..j n. m. (bot) 
asphodel; ^daffodil. 

— rameux, king's »pear, rod. 
ASPHYXIANT, E [a8-fik-.ian, t] adj. 



&. 



ASPHYXIE [a.-flk-ri] n. f. (med.) as- 
'yoey; asphyxia; suspended an/ima- 



Par — , from asphyxy. Tomber en 
— , to fall into a state o,f=. 

ASPHYXIlfe, E [a.-fik-.i6] adj. (med.) 
in a state of asphyxiy, suspended ani- 
mation. 

A8PHYXIEE [a.-fik-Bi«] V. a. (med.) 1. 
to bring on, to catise, to occasion as- 
phyayy ; 2. to suffocate. 

S'asphyxier, pr. v. 1. to destroy o.'s 
$el/ by asphyxy; 2. to suffocate o.'s 

ASPIC [a«-plcln. m. 1. (erp.) aspic; 
asp; 2. § slanderer; 8. (bot) aspic; 
common lavender ; 4. ^culin.) cold fish ; 
6. (culln.) cold meat vMhjeUy. 

Une langue d' — , a viper's tongue; a 
slanderer. 

ASPIRANT, E [a^pi-ran, t] adj. (of 
pumps) Slicking ; suction. 

ASPIRANT, n. m. E, n. f. 1. (a, af- 
ter, for) aspirant; 2. (a, for) candi- 
date ; 8. (nav.) midshipman. 

— de marine, (nav.) midshipman. 

ASPIRATEUR ra.-pi-ra-teur] n, m. 
(phvs.) (of air-pumps) exhauster. 

ASPIRATION fa^pi.ra-uon] n. C 1. | 

tmjdraUon (drawing int6 the lungs) ; 2. 
I inhaUng; 8. § (i., after) aspiration; 
\i«p!ring ; 4 (of flnlds) suction ; euck- 
Uvc; 5. (of pumps) exhmistion; 6. 
(mm.) aspiration ; 7. (Gr. gram.) 
Freo thing; 8. (phys.) exhaustion; 9. 
(tneat) aspiration. 

D'— , (V. Reuses) (phys.) exhausting. 
Tuyau d'— , 1. (techl) suction-pipe; 2. 
exhavMing-pipe. ' 

ASPIRE, E [a.-pi-r«] adj. 1. (gram.) as- 
pirated; 2. (phys.) exhausted. 

Non — , 1. (gram.) unaspirated; 2. 
(phys.) imexhausted. 

A8PIR:6E, n. f. (gram.) aspirate. 

ASPIRER, V. a. I. 1 to inspire (draw 
Into the lungs); 2. 1 to inhale; ** to 
drink ; S.lto suck (fluids) ; to suck in ; 
to suck np ; 4. )| to sniff; 5. 1 to snuff in ; 
6. § (a, to, after) to aspire ; 7. (gram.) 
to aspirate ; 8. (phys.) to exhaust. 

'i. — Pair, to inhale air. 6. — aiut honneiir*, t» 
aspire tii himort. 

Personne qui aspire, {V. senses) 1. | 
inhaler of; 2. aspiring man, woman. 

S'aspirbr, pr. V. ( V. senses) 1. fo suck : 
B. (gram.)^to be aspirated; to aspi- 
rate. 

ASPIRER, V. n. 1. I to innpirc (draw 
air into the lungs); 2. § (a, to, after) to 
aspire. 

ASPRE [a^pr] n. m. asper (Turkish 
twin.) 

ASSA-F(ETIDA [&-(»-«-ti-da3 n. C 
(pharm.) assafmtida. 

A98AII.LAI8, ind. imperf 1st 2d sin?.' 

of ASSAILLIR. 

A88AILI.ANT, pres. p. 

ASSAILLANT [a-w-lan*] n. m, assr' 
anl; assaulter. 

Absaillb, ind. * suW. pi 
King, ; impera. 2d sing of A 

AfeSAILLIR [a-M-ir*] V 

A.ST; assailli; ind. pres. 
Bubj. pr€ 
fissault; 2. § 
tomeuporii. 

Qu'on «e peiit — , I § wri 

Assailli, b, pa. p. v.. 

tAILLIK. 

Non — , 1. 1 unassailed'; 
t 5 wnassaileil; unati 
tAarged. 

. - 4 



AssAiLLiT, ind. pret 3d sing, of Assai- 

tLIR. 

AssaillIt, subj. Imperf. 3d sing. 
AS8AINIR [a-8^-nir] V. a. to make, to 
render heaUhy, wholesome, saluhrUnis. 

ASSAINISSEMENT [a-.J-ni-.-man] n. 

m. 1. ( action ) making, rendering 
healthy, wholesome, salubrious; 2. 
(state) salubrity; healthiness; whole- 



assail; to 




AS8AI80NNEMENT [ a-.i.«o-n-man ] 
n. m. 1. II § seasoning ; 2. i § seasoner 
(thing that seasons). 

ASSAISONNER [a-.j!.«)-n«] v. a. 1. 1 
(aveo, loith) to season ; 2. § (de, wnih) 
to season; 8. § to give a zest, relish to ; 
to render, to make palatable, agree- 
able; 4. § to heighten; to set off; 5. $ 
(b. 8.) to temper. 

I. — de la viande avec dea Apices, to season 
nieat ivith spieei. 2. — la conversation de plaisaii 
teries, to season conversation with jocularity. 3. II 
sail Part d' — la louange, he underslatuti the art 
of rendering praUe agreeable. 

AssAisoNNK, B, pa. p. V. Mnses of As- 

8AIS0NNEK. 

Non — , II unseasoned. 

ASSAISONNEUR [a-si-wMrtir] n. m. 
T seasoner. 

ASSASSIN [a-M-tin] n. m. 1. murder- 
er, m. ; murderess, f. ; assassin, m. f. ; 
manslayer ; 2. ^hist) assassin. 

— gag6, salarie, hired assassin. En 
— , 1. = -Uke ; like an =;, a mivrderer ; 
2. murderously. A 1' — I murder 1 Crier 
a r — , to cry out murder. 

ASSASSIN, E [a-M..in, i-n] 8d(j, 1; I % 
murderous; 2. § murderous; MUing; 
slaughterous. 

AS8AS8INAT [a-ia-.i-na] n. m. 1. 1 S 
murder; assassination; 2.$ ruffianly 
act; act of a ruffian ; 8. (law) murder ; 
wUful murder. 

D' — , of murder, assa«etnaUon ; as- 
sassinating. Commettre un — , to per- 
petrate, to commit a murder. 

A8SASSINATEUR [^-MMi-na-tefir] n. 
m. X assassin (person th«t causes ano- 
ther to assassinate) ; m/urderer, 

ASSASSINER [b-m^-o*] v. a. 1. J § to 
murder; to assassinate; 2. § to assault 
in a ruffiaiily manner; 3. t § to 
plague, to tire to death; to plague a. 
o.'s l\fe out; to kill; ^ to bore to.death; 
to bore. 

ASSAUT [a-.6] n. m. 1. (mil.) OMatiU; 
2. 1 assault; onset; shock; 3. § assault; 
attack; shock j- — e (pi.) violence; 4 
(of rain) beatmg ; pelting; — b (r>!.) 
violence; 5. (of wind, storms) bff^st; 
gust; — 8 (pi.) violence; 6. (fenc.)/<WM!- 
ing-match. 

Le premier — §, t?is firs', pktnffe ; 
mde — , 1. * violent aesaul.; 2. sharp 
onset; 3. Uiffet; bx^^nr; — d'armes, 
fen<yhig-mat('h D^i^er i— , to assault ; 
to storm ; donner >'•— .i, to assault; to 
storm; einyiorter i>r ndre d' — , to car- 
ry, to tak-p ■ ar,,/ It. storm; faire — , 
faire un - < . have a fencing- 

match; tojfjht. rt. /uirea round; faire, 
livret nn — , to tr.ake an assault; faire 
— de ^, 1. to vie in; to vie with each 
oUvtrr in ,• ?; ^ to hand/t/ ; livrer 1' — , to 
storm : nreiMlre d' — , to take by assault, 
stf^-- ' r ufie — , to repel an 

f '■ r — , un — , to sta/nd the 

lit'. \ on n'a pas donn6, llvr6 

r — , •/■M,»oci»i*e<i, unattacked. 

AadK [ t m»u iination of first person 
sjn^Ur, MMrfect tense, subjunctive 
m(K)'rorv«ifc of the first coniugation. 
' '^CHIR [a-8«-»h«] V. a. (mining) to 
I mine). 
'"' 'HER, V. n. (of a rock or bank 
liecomes visible at low water) to 
•ar dry. 

MBLAGE [a-san-lla-j] n. m. 1. J 

"lage; 2. § collection; gather- 
union; 3. § (b. s.) jumble; 4 
print) gathering; 5. (carp.) 
. (join.) scarf; scarfing; 7. 
.) coupling ; 8. (nav.) (of the beams) 
blmg. 

■"sparate, (b. s.) patcTi-work. 

A88EMBL]feE [a-8an-bi«l n. C 1. 1 as- 

s/>mhly ; 2. (pers.) assemblage; 8. (of 

deliberative bodies) assembly ; meeting ; 

4 convention ; convocation ; 5. compa- 



ny ; party ; 6. (of churchee) conffrega- 
tion; 7. (hunt) Tneeting-riace ; tneetk 

— academique, convocation ; — choi« 
sie, select assembly; — constituante 
(Fr. hist.) constituent assembly ; grand€ 
— , large, numerous assembly, meeting; 
— L6gislative, (Fr. hist) Legislative as- 
sembly; — liiatioiia,\e,J^ationalAsse7n- 
bly ; — du clerge, convocation. Lien, 
place d'— , 1. place of assembly; 8. 
meeting-place; quartier d'— , (mil.) 1. 
place of assembly; 2. alartn-post; 
salle d' — , assembly-room. Convoquer, 
reunir une — , to convene a meeting; 
congedier, dissoudre une — , to dissolve a 
meeting; se reunir en — publique, to 
meet in public assembly ; rompre ime 
— , to break up an assembly, a meet- 
ing, a party; tenir son — , to receive 
one's company ; tenir une — , to hold an 
assembly, a mating. L' — se tient the 
assembly is held, holden. 

ASSEMBLER [a-.an-bi6] V. a. 1. to a»- 
semble; to bring, to call together; 2. to 
collect; to gather; to get togetJier; 8. to 
put together; 4 (book-s., print) to 
gather; 6. (build.) to trim in; 6. (carp.) 
to trim; 7. (join.) to scarf; 8. (mil) to 
m^tster. 

Assemble, e, pa. p. K senses of Asskm- 

BLEE. 

Non — , 1. unassembled; 2. uncol- 
lected; 3. (carp.) untrimmed; 4 (books, 
(print) vngathered. 

Sassemblee, pr. v. 1. to assemble; to 
meet; 2. to get together; 8. (in crowds) 
to troop; to muster; to fiock together ; 
4. (of books) to be gathered. 

— en grand nombre, = i/n, large num- 
bers ; ^ to muster strong. 

Sim. — ASSKMBLEK, JOINDRK, UKIB. AuevMtf 



faaten them together in such a way that t£e}' 
make but on* object. A carpenter ataemile (irati^\ 



ogethtr) I 
lis work. 



the pieces of which he would compo«» 
.... ..„.„, when he arranges them one after ano- 
ther in their proper order; he Joint (,jnin4) thom, 
when he places them bo as to touch ; 'le uniA 
{unitet) them by naili and screws so iaat they 
ciuuiot be taken apart. 

Ai^EMBLEU-E [a-san-bleiir] n. m. 8E 
[blel4i] n. f. 1. 1 collector; gatherer; 2. 
gatherer (of books). 

— de nuages J, cloud-compeller (Ju- 
piter). 

ASSilNER [a-8«-n«] V. a. to stHke (a 
blow) ; *i to deal. 

ASSENT [a-s] termination of 3d per- 
son plural, imperfect tense, subjunctlvo 
mood of verbs of tlie 1st conjugation. 
,ASSENTIMENT [a-sSn-ti-man] n. m. 

(a, to) assent. 

Personne qui donne son — , assenter. 
En signe d' — , as a sign of assent ; as- 
sentingly. Donner son — , to assent 
(to) ; to give o.'s = to ; to assent to. 

ASSENTIE [a-san-tir] V. n. (law, philos.) 
(a, to) to assent. 

ASSEOIR [a-soar] V. a. Irreg. (assey- 
ANT, A9SI8 ; ind. pres. assieds ; nous as- 
BEYONs; pret assis; fut assierai, as- 
SEYERAi; subj. pres. asseye)!. || to set; 2. 
I to seat (a. o.) ; 3. I! to lay ; to place ; to 
put; 4. II tofijx; 5. § to found; to estab- 
lish; 6. § to base; to ground; 7. to ««< 
tie (an annuity); 8. to sink (a founda 
tion); 9. to settle (an annuity, a pension) , 
10. to lay (a tax); 11. to pitch (a tent), 
12. (mil.) to pitch (a camp); 13. (man.) 
to train. 

S'asseoie, pr. V. 1. to sit down; to ait; 
to set o.'s self down ; to seat o.'s self; tc 
take o.'s seat ; 2. (of birds) to alight ; to 
perch. 

f;tre assis, 1. to sit down ; to be eeated ; 
2. (of buildings, towns, etc.) to stand; <f 
be situated ; faire asseoir, 1. to seat ; 4 
to give a seat to ; 3. to make (a. o.) eii 
down ; 4 to admit (to a. o.'s table); nut- 
ter assis, to keep o.'s seat ; to remain 
seated. Assisyez-vous ! be seated ! #*) 
doum ! donnez-vous la peine de vons as- 
seoir, veuillez-vous asseoir I asseyez-^ one, 
je vous prie, je vous en prie I pray be 
seated .' pray sit down I 

ASSERMENT6, E [a-air-man-t*] ftdj. 
(adm.) sworn. 

ASSERMENTER [a-sir-num-t*] V. u 

(adm.) to ' 





ASS 












ASS 










ASS 




amai 


; dmale; 


efee; 


effeve 


efgte 


'^je; 


ill; 


tile; 


mol 


«m61e; 


(Jinort 


t^snc 


^sSre; ow 


jour; 



A88EKTI-F, VE [ft-.«r-tif, i-v] a<y. 



ASSERTION [a-.4r-«dii] n. C a<,«er- 
tton. 

— tmase, false = ; v/ntruth. 
A88EEVIR [a-.6r-vir] V. a. (i., to) 1. I 

to redmoe to aervit/ude, to a state of ser- 
vitude; %\%to enthrall : to enslave; to 
9ub(lu«; to subject; 3. § to subdue; to 
mnquer; to master. 
A88BBVI, B, pa. p. V. senses of As- 

•BKTIS. 

Non — , ( F. senses of Asservik) 1. 1 § 
vmenslamed ; wnenthraUed ; 2. § imsub- 
dued ; v/ncon^uered ; wnmastered. 

A88EEVI8SABLE ra-sAr-vi-sa-bl] ad). 
that can be entkralled, enslaved, sub- 
Oued. 

A88EEVIS8ANT, E ra-.«r-vi-.an, t] ad.1. 
(th.) 1. I enslamng ; of servitude; 2. § 
alwDish. 

A88ERVISSEMENT [8-.6r.vi-.-man] n. 
DL 1. I § servitude; 2. § enthralme/iit ; 
tiamery; subdual; subjection. 

ASSES [a-»] termination of 2d person 
singular, Imperfect tense, subjunctive 
mood of verbs of the first conjugation. 

A88E8SEUR [a^ftHwur] n. m. assessor 
(Judge). 

— adjoint, co-assessor. Cour des — s, 
asseasionary court 

Absetais, ind. imperf. 1st, 2d sing, of 

ASSEOIK. 

AflSBTANT, pre& p. 

Absbtb, Asskie, Bubj. pres. Ist, 8d sirtg. 

AssKTBNT, AssEiENT, ind. & subi. prefc 
8dpL ^ ^ 

Absste 
ftitlst 

A68BYEKAI8, AflSBIBEAIB, ASSIEEAIS, 

oond. Ist, 2d sing. 

AssETONS, ind pres. & Impera. 1st pi. 

A88EZ [a-s«] adv. 1. enough; 2. suffl- 
tilenO^; tolerably; rather; pretty; 3. 
jwiio. 

1. — d» tempt e»t toujours — pen , tinu enough 
UiCAV* provt$ liule enough. 2. — bien, tolerably, 
j.iolty»««. 

— de, enough of; a sufficiency qf; 
— fde), en voiia — (de); have done 
tTFtth)! — . . . pour, so ... as; Avoir — 
0% to hace =, a sufficiency of; en 
.woir —, 1. to ha/ve =, a sufficiency of 
it, them, etc; 2.^ to be satisfied; en 
avoir plus qu' — , 1. to lume more than 
=, a sufficiency cf it, them ; 2. ^ to be 
rather nwre thoM satisfied. C'est — 1 
o'en est — I thaffs =! en voila — I 1. 
thafs = 1 that is = of it / 2. ^ tJcat vMl 
do! 



EBAi, Absbikeai, Assikeai, Ind. 



8yn. — AasKZ, 
hai reference to 



''T\ 



Assez (enough) 
have ; tnffisam- 
iploy for 



although he may have »uffi»ammerU (»u/- 



ecial purpose. The miser 
(moupi), although he may h 
fteiera) to buy a whole town. 



ASSroU, E [a-m-da] adj. 1. (a, in, to; 
ATTPRE8 DE, to) assiduous ; 2. (a, in) as- 
tidwms; diligent; industrious. 

Pen — ,(V. senses) wmndustrious. 

ASSIDUIT:^ [a-«i-du-i-t«] n. f 1. (a, in, 
V) assidmiy; 2. — , (sing.) — «, (pi.) 
(aupkes, de) assiduities, pi. ; 3. (a, in) 
assid/idby; application; diligence; in- 



ASSIDUMENT [a-«i-<j4-man] adv. 1. 

assiduously; 2. assiduously; dUi- 
yoafl/y; industriously. 

As&TBS, ind pres. 8d sing, of Asseoir. 

AssiBDS, ind. pree. Ist, 2d sing. ; im- 
pera. 2d sing. 

A8SIEGE [a-rii-jfe] n. m. besieged. 
P ASSi:fiGEANT, E [a-iii-jan, t] adj. be- 
aleging. 

A8SI15;GEANT, n. m. besieger. 

A88i:ifcGER [a^i«.j«] V. &. 1. \ to be- 
glcge ; to lay siege to; 2. § (de, vnth) to 
hesiege; 8. (de, vMh) to beset; 4. § (de, 
viith) to dun. 

AMiiRAi, Ind. fut Ist sing, of Ab- 
eooiB. 

Absiebaib. cond. 1st, 2d sing. 

A8SIETTE [a-ni-t] n. f I. | position 
(manner of lying, sitting, of being placed) ; 
2. I situation (of a house, a town, a for- 
tress); 3. I proper position, place ; 4. § 
ttiite (disposition of o.'b mind); hwmor ; 



5. (of the taxes) assessment; 6. (arch.) 
sif-o, ; 7. (man.) seat ; 8. (man.) balance 
of the body; 9. (nav.) (of the ship) trim. 

7. Perdre son — , tn lote untU seat. 

N'etre pas dans son — , 1. 1 (th.) not to 
be in o.'s proper situation, place; 2. § 
(pers.) not to feel as usual ; ^ t« be out 
of sorts ; faire I' — de, to assess (taxes) ; 
reprendre son — , to recover one's equa- 
nimity. 

AS8IETTE, n. f. 1. plate (small dish); 
2. plate ; plateful. 

— blanche, clean plate ; — creuse, 
deep =. — de dessert, dessert- = ; — k 
soupe, so^i^p- =. Piqueur d' — , piqne- 
— , parasite; ^ sponger. Piqner 1—, 
les — s, to sponge. Son — dine pour lui, 
A« mu^ pay for his dinner, though he 
does not eat it 

ASSIETTjSE ra-«iJ-t*] n. C plateful. 

ASSIGNABLE [a-si-gna-bl*] adj. as- 
signable. 

ASSIGN ANT [a-si-gnan»] n. m. Xplain- 
tiff. 

ASSIGNAT [a-.i-gna*] n. m. assignat 
(paper money of the French repiil lie). 

ASSIGNATION [a-si-gna-sion*] n. f. 1. 
assignation; 2. (of a dower) assign^ 
ment; 3. (com.) check; 4. {&n.) trans- 
fer; 5. (law) writ; 6. Qaw) summons ; 
7. (law) (of witnesses) subpoena; 8. t 
appointment; engagement. 

Donner une — a q. u., to ha/ce a writ 
out against a. o. ; signifier a q. u. une 
- -, (law) to xerve a writ u^jon a. o. 

ASSIGN ]f: [a-»i-gn«*] n. m. E, n. f. 
(law) d^endant (upon writ or sum- 
mons). 

AaSIGNER, V. a. (a, to) 1. to assign; 
2. to allot; 8. to allow; 4. (law) to as- 
sign; 5. (law) to summon; 6. (law) to 
Kubpoma (a witness). 

Personne qui assigne, assigner {of). 
f:tre assign6 sur les brouillards de la 
Seine, to bepayaUti at Aldg ate pump ; 
obtenir permission d' — , obtenir un per- 
mis d' — contre q. u., (law) to take out a 
writ against a. o. ; to serve a w-rit upon 

ASSIMILABLE [a-.i-mi-ia-bl] adj. (did) 
<M.wm;7«6fe. 

ASSIMILATION [a-«-mi-la-si6n] n. f. 
(A, to, uWi) 1. assimUdtUm; 2. (did.) 
assimilution; 3. (phjrs.) assimilation; 
4. (physiol.) appropnation. 

ASSIMILER [«-ii.-mi-U] V. a. 1. (a, io) 
to assimilate; 2. (i.) to liAen {to); to 
compare {loith) ; 8. (did.) to assimdlate. 

S' V88IMILEK, pr. V. 1. to compare o.'s 
self; ? (did.) to assimilate. 

Absis, ind. pret. Ist, 2d Bing. of As- 

BEOIB. ,r 

Absib, e ft-si, i-ij pa. p. FI senses of 
AssEoiB and S'asbboik. 

Mai — , 1. V, Htal/le; 2. unsorted ; 3. 
(of credit) wn^ou-d. 

ASSIS [a-si] n. ni. %,remoining seat^ed. 

Par — et leve, (jpi^%yMy risin-g or re- 
mainivg Kcated. , ,,i(, 

ASSISE [a-ei-z]n. f UflmJld) oom-se; 
3. {go4^,ini 



2. (geol.) layer; 



.linines) 



Cours d'— , (build.) cvmrse ; ma,f()n- 
nerie par — s, par — s r«g)^ (l>\^ii4l.) 
coursed work. Par — s, par. -^ 'ggi'<<i> 
(build.) cou/rsed; sans -> i(1>iy'^..<H|fc 
coursed. -JiMilte 

ASSISES [a-si-j] n. f pi. 1. t (hisL) 
assizes (council); 2. (law) a 
sizes. 

Cour d' — , des — ^. 1. covr 
court of jail delivery. Const . . .t . , j v^t 
de la cour d' — , 1. justice of (/»«««, ± 
justice of jail delivery; liste dee ac- 
cuses d'une session de la ooiir d'?—, 
calendar ; session de la cour d" — , .««*» 
sion of jail delivery. Juger aux — , 'o 
try at Vie assizes; renvoyer (i. vi. aux 
— , ordonner le renvoi de q. u. aiix — , 
io find an indictment against a. <l; 
6tre renvoy6 devant la cour d' — , to M 
bound over to take o.'s trial ; tenir lea 
— , to hold the assizes ; tenir ses — dans 
une maison §, (pers.) to be the oracle of 
a house. 

AssiSBE, sul^J. imper£ Ist sing, of As- 
seoir. 

ASSISTANCE r«-^-tin-.] a. £ t a*. 



sistance; aid; help; 2. (of public fkrno 
tionaries; atte^idance; 8. t audience } 
company; 4. t (of a church) congrega- 
tion. 

— aux cours de justice, (feud, law) (al 
vassals) suit Avec vctre — , unth yow 
help ; sans — , unaided. Demander r6- 
clamer 1'— de, 1. to beg, to request thfi 
assistance of; 2. to caU in; d<Min«, 
preter — , to give, to lend assistance. 

ASSISTANT, E [a-iU-tan, t] aiy. «* 
sistant 

ASSISTANT, n. m. E, n. f. 1. person 
present; * assistant; 2. bystander ; 
looker on; 3. (of priest* and religiout 
orders) assista/nt. 

ASSISTER [a-«is-t«] V. a. 1. to assist; 
to aid ; to lielp ; 2. to succor ; to be a 
sui^orer of; 3. to attend (officially). 

Etre assists de, 1. to be assisted by ; 

2. to be attended by ; se faire — de, 1. to 
procfwre, to get tlis assistance of; 2. 
(officially) to be attended by. Dieu vous 
assiste I God help you '. 

ASSISTER, V. n. 1. (a, at) to be pre- 
sent; * to assist; 2. (a, ...) to attend 
(...); 8. to stand by ; to look on ; 4 (of 
judges) to sit on the bench (at a trial). 

— a une leg on, to attend a lecture ; 
— aux cours de justice, (feud law) to do 
suit. Personne qui assiste, assister. 

Abbit, ind. pret 3d sing, of Abbeoie. 

Assir, subj. imperf. 3d sing. 

ASSOCIATION [a-so-si-a-si«n] n. f 1. 
association ; 2. (pers.) confederacy ; 3, 
(pers.) society; 4. {cova.) partnership. 

— douanifere, des douanes, (custj com- 
mercial league; — illegale, (law) con- 
federacy; conspiracy; — de secouro 
mntaels, friendly, benefit society. Con- 
trat d' — , deed of partnership ; mem- 
bre d'une — , 1. member of an associa- 
tion; 2. (b. B.) assodator. Dissoudr* 
une — , (com.) to dissolve a partnership; 
faire une — avec a. u., (com.) to enter, tc 
go, into partnership with a. o. Qui iM^ 
fait pas partie d'une — , unasiociated. 

ASSOCLfi [»-so-si-«] n. m. E, n. C 1. 
associate; companion; 2. (of learned 
societies) associate ; fellow ; member; 

3. (com.) partner ; 4. (law) copartner; 

5. (p\ay) partner. 

— commanditaire, (com.) dormant, 
sleeping partner; — gerant, mmxtg 
ing =; — principal, directeur, chief, 
principal; senior. 

ASSOCIER [a-so-si-«] V. a. 1. (a, aveo, 
to, with) to associate ; 2. (g. s.) (a) to 
admit to a participation {^) ; 3. (b. s.) 
(a, to) to make a. o. a party ; 4. to 
unite; to join; 5. to associate (ideas); 

6. (com.) to take into partnership. 
$'AB8ociBK,^pr. V. 1. (a, to) to associate 

<).'« self; 2. (a, avec, with) to associate ; 
3. (g. 8.) (a, of) to admit to a partioi- 
paMon; 4. (b. s.) (a, to) to moke a. o. a 
party; 5. (a, in) to participate; te 
take part. 

— q. u., (com.) to take a. o. into part- 
nership ; — avec q. u., to enter into 
partnership ^cith a. o. 

AssoiE, subj. pres. 1st, 8d sing, of As- 

8E0IR. 

Abboient, ind & subj. pres. 3d pi. 

AssoiKAi. ind. fut Ist sing. 

AssoiRAiB, cond. 1st, 2d sing. 

Assois, ind. pres. 1st. 2d suig. ; « pert- 
ad sing. 

AssoiT, ind. pres. 3d sing. 

ASSOLEMENT [a-so-l-mai.] n. m. (agr.) 
li.stribution of crops. 

ASSOLER [a-so-U] V. <». (agr.) to difi- 
trihide the crops {of). 

, ASSOMBRIR [a-s6n-b'.r] V. a. to rt6- 
sc^lre ; to darken. 

ASSOMBRIR, V. n. to become, to groK- 
ddrft. gloomy. 

ASS*)MMANT,E [as-so-man, t] adj.fl. 
overwhelming ; overpowering; 2 mo»\ 
££r^a^, wearisome, ted ious. 

:rSw -Tt io ^« =; 10^ to be a great 
UrK :' 

ER [a«-so-m«] V. a..l. I tofM ; 

^ to beat to death; 8. | to 

; 4. 1 to beatvnmerdfuliy; 

' ; 1 to knock about; &. 

; to owrpower ; 6. ! to 

to plague to death; l tc 




AS8 



AST 



06 joftte; «w jeu; e&ietne ; eH peur; &n pan ; ?« pin ; on bon ; un brun ; fll liq. ; ♦gn Mq. 



pltifixto o.'s Ufe out; to tire ovt; to 
teeary out; j^^ to pester; fW to 
bore. 

ASSOMMEUE [a^«>.meur] n. m.feUer 
{at cxen). 

ASSOMMOIR r«»-»o-moar] n. m. 1. trap 
{tor animals) : 2. bludgeon. 

(a up d'— , 1. I blMO loilh a hltidgeon ; 
1 1 § dreudful, terrible blow, stroke 
(overwljelmlng event). 

A8S0MPTI-F, VE [a-somp-tif, i-v] adj. 
(log.) asmimptive. 

ASSOMPTION [a-.omp-.i6n] n. f. 1. (log.) 
assumption ; 2. (rel.) Assumption ; 3. 
(Eoin. cath. rel.) Assum-ption-cfai/, 

Le jour de 1' — , Assumption-day. 

ASSONAH, V. SoNNA. 

ASSONANCE [a-.o-nan-e] n. £ (rhet) 
nssonance. 

ASSONANT, E [a-w-nan, t] adj. (rliet) 
assonant. 

A8S01tx\TH, n. m. V. Sonna. 

ASSOllTIMENT [a-sor-ti-man] h. m. 1. 

tmtableness ; match; 2. assortment; 
8. set (collection) ; 4 suit (collection) ; 5. 
(com.'* assortment. 

3. Un riche — de pieireries, a rich set of jevitlt. 

Grand — , large assortment. Livres 
d' — , ( book-s. ) miscellaneous stock. 
Faire — , to suit; to match. 

ASSOETIR [a-wr-tir] v. a. 1. to mil ; 
8. to match; S.to pair; 4. (corn.) (de, 
with) to stock ; to supply. 

A880RT1, E, pa. p. 1. suited ; sorted ; 2. 
matched; 9. paired. 

Bien — , weU =\ ma\ —,\.iU=; 2. 
wisuited; umfor-ted; 8. unpaired. 

S'assortir, pr. v. 1. to suit; to agree; 
i. to match ; 8. to pair. 

ASSORTIR, V. u. (A, AVEO, with) 1. to 
suit ; to agree ; 2. to match. 

ASSORTISSANT, E [ a-nor-ti-Ban, t ] 
•dj. (a) suitable {to) ; bficoming (...). 

ASSOTER [a-eo-tfi] V. a. (de, with) to 
infatuate; to besot. 

S'assotee, pr. V. (de, with) to he in- 
fatiuited. 

AS80UPI, E [8-8ou-pi]adj.l. drowsy; 
%. drowsy-headed. 

ASSOUPIR [a-«.u-pir] V. a. 1. II to 
make, to render drowsy ; ** to drmvse ; 
8. § to liM (pain) ; 3. § to sUU ; to hush ; 
to qidet; 4. § to hush %vp (a. tli. bad) ; 5. § 
to stop ; to put a stop to; 6.% to appease 
(a difterence); 7. § to qtiell (a disturb- 
ance). 

£tre assonpi, to be drowsy ; to doze. 

S'assoupie, pr. V. 1. 1 to be drowsy ; to 
drowse ; to dose ; to slumber ; 2. § (of 
pain) to lull; 3. § to die away, to dimi- 
nish. 

Passer k — , to doze out ; perdre h — , 
to doze amay. 

A8S0UPISSANT, E [ 8-«)u-pi-.ftn, t ] 
adj. 1. I drowsy ; * slumberous ; slum- 
bery; 2. § drowsy; sleepy; 3. (ined.) 
soporijic; narcotic. 

A8SOUPI8SEMENT [ a-.ou-pi-.-man ] 
n. m. 1. II drowsiness ; sleepiness ; slum- 
ber ; liewviness ; 2. § drowsiness ; 8. § 
Bupineness ; carelessness ; 4, (ined.) 
coma. 

A8S0UPLIE [a-tou-plir] V. a. 1. II § to 
rendsr ; to rnuke supple ; to supple; 2. 
§ to bend ; 8. (man.) to break. 

S'ASsotrPLiR, pr. v. 1. | § to become, to 
aet supple, pliant; to supple; 2. § to 
bend. 

AS80UEDIE [a-»ur-dir] V. a. 1. (of 
noise) to deafen ; 2. (of noise) to stim ; 
8. to muffle, to muffle up (a bell) ; 4 
(nav.) to muffs, to muffs up (an oar) ; 5. 
(faint) to darken. 

6ter ce qui assourdit, to unmufPs (a 
bell). 

A8S0UEDISSANT, E [a-«.ur.di-ian, t] 

sdj. (of noise) 1. deafermig ; 2. stwrv- 
tinff. 

A880L » iJtC [o-Bou-vir] V. a. (de, ynth) 
I. II § to satiate ; 2. to gorge; 8. to ghit; 
t to gratify. 

Assou VI, E, pa. p. 1 1. satiateA ; 2. gor- 
ged ; 8. glutted. 

Non — , ( V. senses^ 1. unsaiiated ; 2. 
wngorged ; ungratxjied. 

S'Assotrvi K, pr. v. (db, wUK) 1. | § to 
■«-; saiiated ; 2. to gorge ; 8. to be glutted. 



A8S0UVI8SEMENT [ a-BOu-ri-nnan ] 
n. m. 1 § 1. satiating; 2. gorging ; 3. 
glutting; 4 gratijicution. 

A880YA18, ind. Iniperf. 1st sing, of As- 
SBonu 

Absotant, pres. p. 



AssOYCws, ind. pres. & impera. 1st pi. 
ASSU^RUS [a-8u-«-ruB] p. n. m Aim- 
suerus. 

ASSUJtTIR, V. ASSTJJETTIE. 

A8SUJETTIR [a-»u-j«-tir] v. a. 1. | to 
subject;- to bring under subjection ; to 
subdue ; 2. § to subject ; to subdue ; to 
enthral ; to keep under ; 3. § (a, to) to 
bind (to oblige) ; ^toUe down ; 4. § {d, 
to) to constrain ; to compel ; to obhge ; 
to force ; 5. (tecii.) to fasten ; to stay ; 
to make fast, firm, steady; 6. (tech.) to 
iinbed ; 7. (tech.) (with pins) to wedge; 
to wedge in. 

AssujETTi, E, pa p. ( F: senses of As- 
stwetur) II § (a, to) in subjection. 

Non — , 1. II § umsubjeoted; unsub- 
dued ; 2. § unenthraUed. 

S'assujettik, pr. v. {V. senses of As- 
8UJETTIR) (a, to) § to subject o.'s self; 
to stihmit. 

ASSUJETTISSANT, E [a-.u-j«-ti-.an, t] 
adj. § (th.) 1. that keeps in subjection; 
2. confining ; f that ties down. 

fltre — , 1. to keep in stibjection. ; 2. 
to require constant attendance ; to tie 
do7on. 

A88UJETTIS8EMENT [»-.a-j«-U* 
man] n. m. 1. | Subjection; % § subjec- 
tion; enthralment; 8. § (i., to) bind- 
ing; tying down; 4. % constraint ; tie; 
5. confinement 

A8SUMER [a-«u-m«] v. n. to assume 
(the responsibility of a. th.). 

ASSURANCE [a-.u-ran-.] n. f. 1. as- 
surance; 2. assurance; confidence; 
reliance; trust; 8. safety; secwrity ; 

4. security ; warranty ; 5. (com.) inm- 
rance ; assurance ; underwritin-g. 

— maritime, (com.) marine, ship in- 
surance ; — mutuelle, contribution; 

— sur risques ordinaires, commons; 

— sur un objet d6termin6, special ■= ; 

— contre I'incendie, fire- = ; — sur la 
vie, life- =. Bureau d' — s, = -office ; 
chambre des —8, marine = -company ; 
= -office; compagnie d' — mutuelle, con- 
tribution-sodety ; courtier d' — s, == - 
broker ; en lieu d' — , in a safe, secure 
place ; livre d' — 8, =: -book ; police d" — , 
policy of-=^ ; prime d' — , premium, of-=.. 
En toute — , in perfect assurance ; in 
full reliance ; sans — , 1. unnssured ; 
2. unsanguine ; 3. (com.) uninsured ; 
v/)iassv/red. Annuler une — , to cancel 
an ■=. , avoir Y — de, que, 1. to Tuiiie tice 
assurance of, that; 2. to be, to feel con- 
fident of, that ; eflfectuer, operer une — , 
(com.J to effect an-=; faire des — s, 
(com.) to i«.SMr« ,• to underwrite; signer, 
souscrire des polices d' — , to insure ; to 
underwrite. II ny a point d' — , il n'y a 
nulla — a prendre en lui, tAere is no re- 
liaiice to be placed on him.. 

A8SUE6, E [a-.u-r«] adj. § 1. secure; 
2. S7ire; certain; positive; 3. of as- 
surance; bold; 4 (b. 8.) bold; impu- 
dent; 6. {com.) insured ; assured. 

Non, peu — , ( V. senses of Assurer) 
1. insecure ; 2. unsure ; uncei-tain ; 8. 
devoid of assurance ; 4 (com.) unin- 
sured ; unassured. Susceptible d'etre 
— , (com.) insurable. 

A88UE:6, n. 01. E, n. t (com.) in- 
jured. 

ASSUR^MENT [a-.u-r«-man] adv. as- 
sttrediy ; surely ; positively; sure; to 
be sure. 

ASSUEER [8-,u-r^] V. a. (1, to) 1. J to 
secure (render stable) ; 2. B to steady ; 3. 
t to fasten; 4 § to secure; to give safe- 
ty to; 5. § to secure ; to make sure ; 6. 
§ to secure ; to guarantee ; 7. § to assert ; 
8. § to assure ,• 9. § to give boldness, assu- 
ran^ce to; 10. (com.) to iiisure; to as- 
sure; U. (man.) to accustom to tlie bit 

1. — uu niMT,to secure a wail. 2. — q, ch. qui 
vaciHe, tu steady a. th. that vanllatet. 3. — une 
plaiiche avec un clou, to fasten aplanJc mith a nail. 

5. — sa fortune, sen pouvoir. to secure «.'« fortvti*, 
o.^ipoujer. 7. — un tait,(<^ assert a fact. h. — q u. 

le q. ch., 
^ive boldness t'l 



£tre assur6, (F. sensee) fc ^r, to roa 
assured. 
S' assurer, pr. V. 1. (of, . .) to fecwn; 

2. (db) to make sure {of) : 3. oe, . . .f 
to secure (a. o.) ; to make (a. o.) o. * ovm ; 
4. (de) to ascertain (a. th., that) ; to sa 
tisfy o.'s self {of &. th.); 6. (ue, ^ to .Vs, 
to feel assured, confident (of &. th.) ; 
6. (DAN8, en) to trust {in) ; to put o i 
trust {in) ; to rely {on) ; to place a, t 
reliance {on). 

ASSUREUR [a-su-reur] n. m. (com.) 
inswrer ; assurer; rmdertoriter. 

ASSYRIE (L') [iB-ti-ri] p. n. £ (geog.) 
Assyria. 

ASTilSME [a.-w-i»-m] a m. (rhet) 
asieism. 

ASTER [a»-t«r] n. m. (bot) (genus 
star-wort ; ^ Christmas dai^y. 

AoT^RIE [a.-t«-ri] n. £ 1. (min.) star- 
stone; 1. (zooph.) aster; asterias ; ^ 
star-fish ; sea-star. 

— petriflee, asteriatite. 

AST:6R1SME [a»-«-ri.-m] n. m. (astr.) 
asterism. 

ASTi:RI8QUE [a»-t«-ri.-k] n. m. 
(print.) asterisk ; star. 

A8TH15NIE [u..t*-ni] n. £ (med.) a*- 
thenia; ^depr-ession, of vital power. 

A8TH]fiNIQUE [a»-t^-ni-k] adj. (med.) 
ast/isnic. 

ASTHMATIQUE [aB-ma-ti-k] adj. 
(med.) asthmatic. 

ASTHME [as-m] n. m. (med.) asthma. 

ASTIC [a»-tik] u. m. polishing-stick ; 
polisher (of shoemakers). 

ASTICOT [a^a-ko] n. m. (helm.) gen^ 
He. 

ASTICOTER [88-ti-ko-t«] V. a ^ fe a»- 
noy ; to teaze ; to plague. 

A8TIQUER rani-kfe] V. a to polish. 

ASTEAGALE [as-tra-ga-l] n. m. 1, 
(anat) astragalus ; talus ; 1 anki»- 
bone ; 2. (arch.) astragal ; 8. (bot) as- 
tragal ; ^ milk vetch ; 4 crow-toe ; ^ 
(gild., pmnt.)fiUet. 

Orner d'un — , (arch.) tofUet. 

ASTRAKHAN [a»-tra-kau] p. n. (g<og.) 
Astrakhan. 

ASTRAL, E [as-tral] adj. astral. 

A8TRE [as-trl n. m. 1. (astr.) fbttxl 
star; star; 2. ||«tor (heavenly body); 

3. ** star (of day, of night) ; 4 (astroL) 
star. 

Description des — 8, astrography. 
ASTE^E [ai-tr«] n. £ 1. (astr.) astrea; 
2. (zooph.) astrea. 
AsTREiHNAis, ind. impeif. let, 2d sing. 

of ASTKEINDRE. 

ASTREIGNANT, preS. p. 

AsTREiGNE, subj. pres. 1st, 3d sing. 

AsTREiGNis, ind. pret 1st, 2d sing. 

AsTUEiGNissE, subj. impcrf. 1st sing. 

AsTREiGNONB, ind. pros, and impera 
1st pi. 

AsTREiNDRAi, ind. fut 1st sing. 

AsTREiNDRAis, cond. Ist, 2<1 sing. 

ASTREINDEE [as-trin-dr] V. a (conj. 
like Craindre) (a) to bind {to); ^io 
bind down {to) ,• H to tie down {to) ; to 
constrain (to) ; to compel (to) ; to 
oblige (to). 

S'astreindke, pr. v. (a, to) to bind 
o.'s self; to bind o.'s self do^cn. ; to ti« 
o.'s self down. 

AsTREiNS, ind. pres. Ist, 2d sing ; im- 
pera 2d sing, of Astbbindre. 

AsTREiNT, ind. pres. 3d sing. 

AsTREiNT, E, pa p. 

ASTRICTION [as-trik-Bion] n. f (n ed.) 
astriction. 

ASTRINGENCE [aB-trin-jat-s] n. f 

(did.) astringency. 

ASTRINGENT, E [a.-trin-jai;, t] adj 1. 
(did.) restringent; 2. (med) astryn 
gent. 

Peu — , substringent. 

ASTRINGENT [a.-trin-jan] n. m. 1 
(did.) restringent; 2. (pharm.) astn,n 
gent. 

ASTEOlTE [sB-tro-i-t] n. £ (zooph.) 
astroit. 

ASTROLABE [aa-tro-la-b] n. m. (astr.; 
astrolabe ; Jacobs staff 

A8TR0L0GIK [auro-lo-jf] n. £ 1. a* 
trology ; 2. (b. s.) star-gazing. 

Par r — , astrrtogicaUy. Pratiqaoi 
r — , to astrologif^. 

48 



ATL ATT 


ATT 




a mfcl; A mAle; i .'eo . i f6ve; i fete; rfje; i il; t ile; o mo. 


6 ni61e; (5 mort; u sue; ^ sftre om jonr: 





A8TR0L0GIQUE [a.-tro-lo-jl-k] «J. 

ASTKOLOGUE [«-tro-io-g] n. be. 1. 
aatrologer; 2. (b. s.) utar-gazer. 

Ce nest pas un grauu— , heiaiw con- 
furer. 

ASTRONOME [ft.-tro.no-m] n. m. 1. 
anronamer ; -i. (b. s.) star-gazer. 

ASTRONOMIE [M-tro-no-mQ n. C 1. 
atiranorny ; 2. (b. s!) Mar-gazing. 

ASTRONOMIQUE [a.-tro-no-mi-k] adj. 
iMtronomical. 

ASTRONOMIQUEMENT [w-tro-n*. 
B»i.k man] adv. astronomicuUy. 

A8TL0E [a»-tu-«] n. f. craft; guile; 
wtte; loilineas; iMimiig. 

Sans — , craftless ; guileless. 
ASTUCIEU6EMENT Ktu-»i-eu-z.man] 
»dv. craftily ; guilefuUy ; wilily ; cun- 
ningly. 

ASTUCIEU-X, 8E La.t-ta^n-.a, .A-i] 
«d.1. crafty ; gxMeful ; wily ; cunning. 

Non — , ( V. senses) uncrafty. 

ASTURIE8 (LE8) [U-uu-tu-ri] p. n. f. 
pi. (geog.) the Asturias, pi. 

ASTYAGE [a»-ti-a-j] p. n. m. A^Py- 
ages. 

ASYLE [a-zi-i]. r. AsiLB. 

ASYMPTOTE [a-timp-to-t] n. f. {gem.) 
asymptote. 

A3YMPT0TIQUE fa-iimp-to-tl-k] adj. 
(eoom.) asympototical. 

ATALANTE [a-ta-ian-t] p. n. f. (myth.) 
A^talanta. 

ATARAXIE ra-u-rak-.i] n. fl (did. 
ataraxv. 

ATAXIE [a-tak-ti] n. f. (raed.) ataxy.) 

ATAXIQUE [a-tak-«-k] adj. (med.) 
ataxic. 

ATELIER [ft-te-ii*] n. m. 1. (pl»ce) 
workshop; 2. (pers.) work-shop; 8. 
(j>ers.) gang; 4. (of atilsU) studio ; 6. 
(of printers) office ,' 6. (a. & m ) room: 
shop ; 7. (a. & m.) shed ; a (a. A m.) 
mill; manufacture. 

-de construction, (a. 3c m.) factory. 
Chat d'—, foreman, m. ; head workman, 
fa. ; fore-woman, t. ; head work-ioo- 
rtiftn, {. Quitter le» —8, (a. At m.) io 
ttrike. 

ATELLANE8 [•-t*l-l»-ii] n, £ pL 
(Kom. hist.) Atellans, pL 

Des — , qui a rapport aux — , Atellan. 

ATERMOIEMENT [a-tir-moa-mAn] n. 

m. 1. composition ; compounding witli 
o.'« creditors ; 2. (law) attermining. 

ATEEMOYER [a-tfer-moa-i^l V. a. (com. 
law) to delay the payTnent of. 

8'atermotek, pr. v. ^com. law) to 
umnpound loith o.'s creditors. 

ATHALIE [a-ta-li] p. n. £ Athaliah. 

ATHANASE [a-ta-na-z] p. n. m. Ath- 
anasin-s. 

ATH:6E [a-w] adj. atJieistical ; atlieist. 

ATH:6e, n. m. atheist. 

En — , atheisticaUy. 

ATHEISME [a-w-U-m] n. m. athe- 
■ism. 

ATH:6N:6E ra-t«-n#] n. m. athenceum. 

ATHi5NES fa-ti-n] p. n. Athens. 

ATH:6N0D0RE [a-U-no-do-r] p. n. m. 

(class.) Atloenodorus. 

ATH^NIEN, NE [a-t6-ni-in, 4-n] adj. 
Aflienian. 

ATHi:NIEN, n. m. NE, n. f. Athe- 
aia/n. 

Attachement au parti de8 — 8, (hist.) 
atticism. 

ATHLETE [at-l^ t] n. m. 1. 11 § athlete ; 
8 I § wrestler ; 3. § ohtmipion. 

ATmiTIQUE [ttt-16-ti-k] adj. ath- 

IttiC 

ATHL^TIQUE, n. £ (sing.) athZe- 

' "^A filLtTlQU EMENT [at-l«-ti-k-man] 
iilv. aiMeticaUy. 

A'FLANTE [at-lan-t] X m. (arch.) at- 
'.Aintis ; atlaf,. 

ATiIaNTIDE, ATLANTIADE [at- 
jin-ti-d, ti-a-d] p. n. m. £ ifnyih.) AUantia- 
■Lgg, defendant of AUas (patronymic 
3f Mercury and the Pleiades). 

ATLANTIDE [at-lan-ti-d] n. £ (fabu- 
ous geog.) A tlantis. 
De r— , AtUmtean. 
ATLANTIQUE [at-ian-ti-k] adj. (geog.) 
iiiamUe. 
ATLANTIQUE, n. £ (geog.) Atlantic. 



atlas; 



(rail.) '. 
ATC 



ATLAS [at-Ia.] n. 
(anat.) atlas. 

ATMOSPHi;RE rat-mo.-fi-rl n. C 1. at- 
tnospJiere ; i. (elect!) atmosphere. 

— chargfie de niagos, cloudy =. 
ATMOSPHlRlQUE f«t-moi-«-ri-k] 

adj. atmospheric. 

Pierre — , = stone; tube, tuyau — , 
vacuum-pipe. 

ATOME [a-t6-m] n. m. I § atom. 

Comme un — , comme des — s, like 
=s ; = -like. Reduire en — s, to crush 
to^^s. 

ATOMIQUE [a-to-ml-k] adj. (did.) ato- 
mic. 

ATONIE [a-to-nf] n. £ (med.) atony. 

ATONIQUE [a-to-ni-t] adj. (med.) ato- 
nic. 

ATOTJRNER [a-tcnr-n«] \. tL f % to 

dizen ; to bedizen ; to trick ; to trick 
off. Old, up. 

AT0UR8 [a-tour] n. m. (pi.) attire, 
sing. 

Dame d'atour, lady of the hed-chmfn- 
her. Avoir ses plus beaux — s, Stre dans 
ses plus beaux — s, ^ to ie dressed out 
in all o.'s finery ; j^^ to he in o.'s best 
bib and tucker. 

ATOUT Tft-tou] n. m. (cards) trump ; 
trtimp-card. 

Couper avec Y — , (cards) to trwmp ; 
faire, jouer — , to play trumps, a trump. 

ATRABILAIRE [a-tra-bi-U-rl adj. at- 
rahilar-ious ; atrabiliary ; splenetic. 

Humeur — , atrahilariousness. 

ATRABILAIRE, n. m. splenetic. 

ATRABILE [a-tra-bi-l] n. £ + (med.) 
atrabilis. 

ATRE [a-tr] n. m. 1. fire-place; 2. 
hearth ; hearth-stone ; 8. (of ovens) 
fioor. 

ATREE ra-tr«] p. n. m. (class.) Atrem. 

ATRIDE [a-tri-d] p. a m. (class.) At- 
rides; son ofAtreue (patronymic of Aga- 
memnon and Menelaus). 

ATROCE [a-tro-.] adi. 1. atrocUms ; 2. 
(th.) heinous; 8. cruel; 4 (of pain) ea>- 
cruciating ; exquisite. 

ATROCEMENT [a-tro-nnan] adv. 1. 

atrociously ; 2. heinously ; 3. cruelly ; 
4. excruciatingly, exquAsit^ (painful). 

ATEOCITlfe [a-tro..i-t«] n. £ 1. ^quali- 
ty) atrocity ; atrockyusness ; lieinous- 
ness ; 2. (action) atrocity ; 3. cruelty. 

ATROPHIE [a-tro-fi] n. £ (med.) 1. 
atrophy ; consumption ; 2. (of an organ) 
atrophy. 

— genorale, atrophy. 
ATROPHIA; E [a-tro-fi*] adj. (med.) 

atrophied. 

ATTABALLE [a-ta-ba-I] n. m. (Turk- 
ish mus.) attabal. 

ATTABLER [a-s»-b»5j y. &. to set at 
table. 

Attable, e, pa. p. at table ; sitting at 
table. 

8' ATTABLER, pr. V. to »it down to 
table. 

ATTACHANT, E [«-u-.han, t] adj. 
(th.) interesting ; engaging ; pleasing. 

ATTACHE [a-ta-.h] n. £ 1. ll tie (fast- 
ening, bond) : 2. II (for animals) tether ; 3. 
§ <ie (of t'le heart, mind); bond; attacJt- 
ment .• 4. § consent ; assent ; 5. (of dia- 
monds) cluster ; 6. (of horses) stabling ; 
7. (of porcelain) rivet ; S. (anat) attach- 
ment; 9. (build.) binder; 10. (engin.) 
(of a suspension bridge) fixture ; 11. 
(hunt) leash ; 12. (mach.) brace. 

.Cliien d' — , bandog, k V — , 1. (of ani- 
mals) tied up ; 2. (of persons) confined ; 
tied down to iyusiness. Lier par iine — , 
to tether (an animal) ; mettre a T — , to tie 
tip ; prendre h V — , to take in (horses). 

5y/l. — .\TTACHE, ATTACHEMENT. Attache %\ff[i\- 

ttes a passion ill-rt-gulated, carried to excess, or 
excited by some unworthy object ; attachement is a 
nior« tender and lasting emotion, called forth by 
wlmt is des'-rving of esteem. One entertains au 
cUa<h< 'or ^ anbling ; an attachement for his fami- 
ly, his friends. 

ATTACH:^ [a-t«-»h6] n. m. attachi 
(01 un embassy). 

ATTACHEMENT [a-ta-A-man] n. m. 
1 § ( A, PC tTR, *o) attachment ; affection • 
t'§ tie, bond (of affection); 8. (arch.) 
— s, (pi.) memorandit/Tns of work done, 
plur. 
[ S*iis — , unattached, unaffecHonate. 



Pimportance a q. ch. 



> dettin 



ATTACHER [a-ta-sh*] v. a. 1. ; (^ i, to; 
to fasten ; to make f ant ; to attach ; 2. 1 
(A, to) to tie; -3. || (a, to) (by adhesion) tc 
stick ; 4. J (by sewing) to sew on. ; 5. I 
(a) to attach {to) ; to connect {icith) , 6 
§ (a) to attach (p) ; to set (on) ; to f lac* 
(on) ; 7. (a, to) to attach (by affectloc) , 

8. % (a, to) to apply (to give applicatJm 
to) ; ». § (A, in) to interest ; 10. § toj*; 
rthe eyes, the looks) ; 11. (mil) to set Mk 
(miners) ; 12. (tech.) to stay. 

1. — une chose a une autre, tc fwten one thin$ 
to another. 2. — q. ch. avec des cordons, to tie a 
th. with atriniit. 5. — des privileges a certaines fono 
tions, to attach privilege! to certain Juncti^ 
destin^e a celle d'l ' ' 

to aiuilher't. 6. — ( 
tach importance to t _ 

a valve on a. th. ; — son bonheur a q. cTi., to place 
o.'» happintts ait a. th. 7. fitre attachi a sa famiJk\ 
a ses amis, to be attached to o.'a family, to o.^n 
friendt. 8. — son esijrit a I'^tude, to apply o.'i 
mind to study. 9. Un livre qui attache I* lecteur, j 
book that interests the rtader. 

— (avec im bouton), to button ; — (aveo 
un chainon), to link ; — (avec un olon), 
to nail; — (avec de la colle fbrte), to 
glue; — (avec de la colle de farine). '-' 
paste; — (i -"c un cordon), to tiei 
(avec une co de), i tr lash ; 2. to pinion 
down ; — (hvec une cx)urroie), to strap , 
— (avec un crochet), to hook ; — (aveo 
une 6pingle), 1. to pin ; 2. to pin down ; 

3. tofiin up ; — (sur desobjets poiutus), 
to stick. 

:6tre attach^ (k), {V. senses) to b« 
wedded (to) ; to stick on. Attacher fi.rt, 
1. I to fasten tight; 2^ to Ue fist, 
hard, tight ;S.\to stick fast, tight ; t. 
■ to sew on faM ; 5. % to attach, to (opi- 
ned strongly; 6. %to attach (by a^fei- 
tioD) much, strongly; 7. § to (ypt^ 
closely, much; 8. § to interest mm^h, 
strongly; — ins6parablement, ( F. sen- 
ses) § 1. to attach strongly/, warmly; 1 
to wed (to opinions). 

Attache, i, pa. p. K senses of A»- 

TAOHEK. 

Non — , (K senses) 1. 1 vmfaMt/ned; 
2. 1 vinHed ; wnattaehed ; 8. 1 wnsvped, ; 

4. § wnattaehed. 
attachee, pr. V. 1. 1 (a) to .fcsten 

(on) ; to attach (to) ; 2. i (1, to) to tie, 
3. I (a) (by adhesion) to stick (on, tc) ; 
to cleave (to); to stick close (to); 4 | 
' ,to)to unite; 5. | (a, to) to ding ; d. 
(a, to) to adhere; 7. § (b. s.) to be 
wedded (to opinions) ; to stick dose ; to 
cleave ; to pin o.'s 8elf(U> a. o.) ; to hold 
fast ; 8. § (a) to be attached (to) ; to be 
connected (with) ; to be incident (to) ; 

9. § (a) to be attached (to); to be set, 
placed (on, upon) ,• 10. § (a, to) to aU 
tach o.'s self (by affection) ; to devote 
one's self; io be attached, devoted ; to 
cleame ; to ding ; 11. § (a.) to se« o.'a 
heart (npon); 12. § (a) to attend (to); 
to strive (to) ; to endeavor (to) ; to ap- 
ply o.'a self (to); to make it o.'s study 
(to) ; la § (a) to set o.'s self (about, to) ; 
14. ^ (a, in) to inlei ist o.'s self; to take 
an interest ; 15. (of the eyes, looks) to 5«J 
fixed; 16. (paint) to appear; to seem; 
tototioh. 

5. Le lierre t^ attache a I'ormemx, the wy clings 
to the elm. 

— 6troitement, (V. senses) to ding 
close ; — fort, 1. B to fasten tight; 2. J to 
tie fast, hard, tight; 8. 8 to stick fast, 

fit ,• 4. § to be strongly attached, con- 
'.%to be muctb, strongly at- 
tached; 6. § to attend assiduously ; to 
strive, to endeamor hard ; to apply o.'s 
self assidu^ously ; to make it o.'s gr tat 
study to; 7.% to interest o.'s self mud!, ; 
to take a great interest. 

ATTAQUABLE [a-ta-ka-bl] t4J. L | § 

assailable; liable to attack; 2. (of do- 
cuments) of doubtful, questionable pa- 
lidity. 

ATTAQUANT [a-t»-kan] li, m. a*. 
saila7it. 

ATTAQUE [a-t»-k] n. £ 1. 1 § vOCNte^ 
on, upon) attack ; 2. H onset ; 8. (med.) 
attack ; ^fit ; If stroke ; touch ; 4 (uiU.) 
approach. 

Rude, Vive — , 1 sharp attact; a. 
sliarp onset. — oontrc les droits du t<A 
k la couronne, (law) contempt agavntH 
the king's title. 



tigh 



ATT 



ATT 



ATT 



ofi Jofite; eu jeu; e& jeune; e& peur; 3/n pan; in pin; on bon; un brun; *11 liq. ; 'gn llq. 



ATTAQUER [a-ta-k«] v. a. 1. 1 to at- 
husk; to assail; to assault; to fall on, 
upon; 2. § to attack ; to assail ; to en- 
emmt»r ; 8. § fc> attack (deteriorate) ; 4. 
g to impugn ; ^ to fall on, upon ; 5. § 
to invade ; 6. % to counteract ; 7. § (i.e, 
...)io begin ; to open ; 8. § to induce 
(fi. o.) to begin (a. tli.); to begin; to 
ijpen; 9. § to contest tlie validity of{Ao- 
uuments) ; 10. § to sue (a. o.) ; to come 
cn, upon; 11. (of diseases) to attack; to 
tuf>is upon; 12. (man.) to spur on (a 
torse); 13. (mus.) to strike (a chord); 
14 (nav.) to stand in for (a cape, an 
island, a shore, etc.). 

6. — les droits de q. u., to invade a. o.'t rights. 
1. — un sujet, <.< begin, to open a tubject. 8. — q. 
D. de conversatiijD, to begin, <o open a converaatiun 
uiih a. ... 

Qui attaque tout le monde, of general 
assault; qu'on ne pent — §, unassail- 
able. 

Attaque, b, pa. p. V. senses of Atta- 

ITTKR. 

Non — , 1. 1 unattncked ; unassailed ; 
•Mtassa/ulted ; uncharged; 2. § unat- 
Uusked ; unassadled ; 8. § unimpttgned ; 
4. $ unin/vaded. Bien — bien defendu, 
that is a Roland, for an Oliver. 

S'attaqube, pr. v. (a, . . .) 1. § to at- 
tack; to encounter; 2. to challenge; 
to defy. 

Syn.— Attaqubr q. n., s'attaquer a «. u. 
Attaquer implies a simple act of hostility, to at- 
^<wk ; a^attaquer a conveys the idea of deep-8e8t*.d 
enmity, and means, through hatred or for re- 
venge, to follow one up with atTronlg, provoca- 
tion*, insults, <kc., until satisfaction is obtamed. 

ATTARDEB (S') [.a-tor-d«] pr. v. to 
be belated, 
ttre attarde, =. 
Attarde, e, pa. p. belated. 
Attbignais, ind. imperf. Ist, 2d sing. 

of ATTEINDRa 

Atieignant, pres. p. 

Atteigne, subj. pres. Ist, 8d sing. 

Attbignis, ind. pret 1st, 2d sing. 

Attbionisse, subj. imperf. Ist sing. 

Attkgnons, ind. present tfc impera. 
TJrtpl. 

Attbindrai, ind. fut 1st sing. 

Attbindkais, cond. Ist, 2d sing. 

ATTEINDRE [a-tin-dr] V. a. (conj. like 
Ckain ore) 1. i § to reach ; * to attain ; 
T to get at; to come to; 2. 1 to strike ; 
to hit; 8. § to attain ; to arrive at; 4. 
8 (b. 8.) to injure ; to harm ;^to hni/rt ; 
6. I $ to (yvertake ; to catch; i to come 
u/p vMh ; 6. %to equal ; to reach ; to 
come up to; 1. (of diseases) to attack 
(a.0.). 

1 . I — un endroit, to reach a place ; | — q. u., to 
leach o. 0., <«get at a. o. '2. La balle I'atteignit, 
Ik.' ball struck Aim. 3. — un but, la perfection, to 
•ttain an end, perfection. 6. — ceux qui devancent, 
(o overtake those who precede. 6. — les grands 
maitres, fc. equal the great master: 

Difficile, facile h—,(V. senses) § diffl- 
oult, easy of attainment. Possibilite 
d'— , d'etre atteiut, ( V. senses) § attain- 
dbleness ; pour — , ( V. senses) § in the 
attainment of. fitre atteint (de), {V. 
senses) (pers.) to be attacked, seized 
(mith) ; ctre atteint et convaincu de, t 
to be dAily convicted of; pouvoir 6tre 
atteint, ( V. senses) to be attainable ; ne 
pouvoir etre atteint, ( V. senses) § to be 
unattainable; tacher, s'efPorcer d'— , 
vouloir — , ( V. senses) to reach after ; 
to grasp at; vouloir — toujours, (K 
senses) to grasp and grasp. Auquel on 
pent — , qu'on peut — , ( V. senses) § at- 
tainable ; que Von n'a pas atteint, ( V. 
rinses) 1. unreached ; 2. unattained ; 
fu'on ne jieut — , ( V. senses) unattain- 
able. 

Atteint, k, pa. p. FI senses of At- 
teindre. 

Non — , 1. 1 ( F! senses) unattained; 
lun/tioched ; 2. § iim,attained ; 3. § (b. s.) 
umi>4u-e(l; unharmed; imtouclied. 

ATTEINDRE, v. n. (conj. like Crain- 
3Ek) (a) 1. to reach (...);* to attain 
(...); 2. 5 to get (to) ; ^ to come (to) ; 3. 
I to attain (...); ^ to arrive (af); i to 
reach (. . .). 

Attbins, Ind. pres. Ist, 2d uing. ; Im- 
pora. 2d sing, of Attbindbk. 

Atteint, ind. pres. 3d sing. 

.4TTETNT. E. Pa. P. 



ATTEtNTE [a-tin-t] n. f. 1. J 1 reach ; 
2. II § bl.yw; stroke; 3. § injury; harm; 
hurt; damage ; prejudice ; wrong ; 4 
§ (A, of) breach ; violation ; 5. {k,from) 
derogation; 6. (of diseases) attack; \ 
^t; 1 stroke; touch; 1. (law) offense; 

8. (ii.w) outrage (on right of property) ; 

9. (man.) attaint; 10. (man.) interfe- 
rence. 

Legdre — ^, 1. II § slight blow, stroke ; 
2. § S/ight imjv/ry, hti/rt, damage, prejti- 
dioe ; little harm ; 8. (of diseases) slight 
attack ; ^ touch ; rude — ^, 1. I § heavy, 
violent blow, stroke; 2. § considerable 
injury, harm,, hurt, damage, preju- 
dice. Hors d' — , 1. i § beyond reach; 
out of reach; 2. % unassailable ; 8.| 
unassailed ; vmassauited ; sans — ,(V. 
senses) 1. \%unhu/rt; uninjured; wn- 
harm,ed ; undamaged; 2. § (ft) without 
any derogation (/> om). Avoir ime — , 



• 2. § (V. 

I to be be- 



( V. senses) (play) to hit ; to toi 
ner — a, 1. 1 to hit; to strike 
per*"!- — ) ; etre hors d' — , 1. ll _ 
yond trx. ^K, out of reach; 2. § to be un 
attainable ; 8. § to be out of danger, 1 
harm's way ; etre h I'abri de toute — , 

1. i § ( F. senses) to be unassailable ; 2. 
§ to be beyond the reach of injury, 
Juirm; porter — a, 1. § to injure; to 
impair; to hurt ; to be prejudicial to ; 
to wrong ; to do wrong to ; % to be a 
breach, violation of; to violate ; 8. to 
derogate from ; to he derogatory to ; 4. 
to infringe upon ; 5. (law) to commit 
an offense against ,■* recevoir, subir une 
— , 1. II § to receive a blow, stroke ; 2. § 
to receive an injury; to be injured, 
hurt, damaged ; 8. § to be violated ; 4. 
I to suffer no derogation. Qui porte — 
a, ( V. senses of porter — k) in deroga- 
tion of; d'une maniere qui porte — , de- 
rogatorily. 

ATTELAGE [a-t-Ia-j] n. m. 1. team; 

2. set (of horses) ; 8. (of two oxen) yoke ; 

4. (a. & m.) draw-gear. 
Barre d' — , (rail.) spreader. 
ATTELER [a-t-U] v. a. 1. to put (the 

horses) to; 2. (absolutely) to put the 
Iwrses to ; S. to yoke. 

— une voiture, to put the horses to. 

£tre attel6 de chevaux, (of carriages) 

to be drawn by ... . horses ; attele de 
. . . . chevaux, (of carriages) drawn by 
... . horses ; and 

ATTELLE [a-t4-l] n. f. 1. hame; 2. 
(surg.) splint. 

Enlever une — , (surg.) to remove a 
splitit; mettre, poser urie — k, (surg.) to 
splint. 

ATTENANT, E [a-t-nan, t] adj. ad- 
joining; contiguous ; ^ neait. 

ATTENANT [a-t-nan] adv. close by. 

ATTENDRE [a-tan-dr] V. a. 1. II to 
wait for ; to wait; * to await; 2. I to 
wait; to stay ; to stop; 8. || (b. s.) to 
dance attendance ; 4 (absol.) to wait ; 

5. ^ (APRE8) to wait {for) ; 6. ^ to ex- 
pect ; to be in eoepectation of; to look 
for ; to lookfoncard to ,• 7. § to expect ; 
to hope ; 8. § to await (to be reserved 
for) ; * to meet 

I. — q. u. qui n'arrive pas a I'heure, to wait for 
a. 0. that does not arrive in time. -2. N'allez pas si 
vite, attendez done, do not go so fast; stay, stop a 
little. 6. — ce qui arrive ordinai'rement, to expect 
what ordinarihi happens; nous n'aUenditmt pas 
cela sitfit, w« iid nvt expect that so soon. 8. — son 
sort, to await o.'s doom; — la mort, to await, to 
meet death. 

t,tTe attendu, (culin.) to be kept — d'un 
moment ft I'autre, to be in momentary 
expectation of; — sous I'orme, If to wait 
till doomsday ; faire — , to keep xoait- 
ii^O > 1^ to let wait ; se faire — , to keep 
a. o. waiting ; ne rien perdre pour — , 
to lose nothing by waiting. Attendez 1 
hold ! stay ! en "attendant, 1. waiting } 
in Vie mean time, while ; meantime ; 
meanwhile, in the interim ; 2. till ; 
v/ntil ; en attendant que, tiU ; until. 

Attendu, e, pa. p. V. senses of Atten- 
sbb. 

— ..., considering...; in consider- 
ation of. ..; on accotmt of. ..; — que, 
considering; considering that; as; 
whereas ; because. 

S'attendkk, p». v. 1, (a, a, que, [subj.]) 
to expect (. . ., to, thM) ; to lookfonoard 



(to) ; ^ to look (for) ; 2. (a, on, upon) 
to rely ; to place reliance. 

1. — a q. ch. eo expect a. th. ; to look forward tt 
a. th. ; — a v.iir q. ch., to expect fc see a. th. ; — 
que q. ch. arrive, to expect thai somtthing "ill 
happen. 

Attendez-vou8-y ! ( V. senses) (lroii.)«c 
not expect it 1 'f^~ I wish you ttuj^ 
get it ! 

ATTENDRIR [a-tan-drir] V, *. 1. | fc 

make tender ; 2. § to affect; to mor)«' 
to soften; to touch; to melt; 3. J (dM.) 
to intenerate. 



. viande, to make r 



: tender. 2. 



Attendri, e, pa. p. V. senses ;)f Attew- 

DEIR. 

Non — ,{V. senses) § unaffected; un- 
moved ; untouched; unmelted. 

S'attendrir, pr. v. 1. 1 to become, to 
get tender ; 2. § to be affected, moved, 
softened, touclted, melted ; to be moved 

to pit!/. 

ATTENDRISSANT, E [a-tan-dri-«an, l] 

adj. I affecting; moving; touching; 
meltt7ig. 

ATTENDRISSEMENT [a-tan-dri ► 
man] n. m. § 1. feeling; eensibilily; 
tenderness ; 2. emotion. 

Larmes d' — , tears of emotion. Ver- 
ser des larmes d' — , to weep with emo- 
tion. 

_ ATTENTAT [a-tan-ta] n. m. (oontbk, 
A, on) 1. attempt to co^nmit a crime ; 
attempt ; 2. crime ; 3. out/rage ; 4 (law) 
illegal attempt ; 5. (law) criminal at- 
tempt. 

Faire un — contre, to make an at- 
tempt on; to attempt 

ATTENTATOIRE [a-tin-ta-toa-r] adj. 

(th.) (a) that attempts ...; tluit tnaket 
an attempt (on). 

ATTENTE [a-tan-t] n. 1 1. 1 waUitig; 
2. 1 staying; stopping; S. § expectOr 
tion, sing. ; expectations, pL ; 4 j 
hope. 

Vive — §, sanguine expectation. 
Pierre d' — , 1. (mas.) rustic coin; 8. f 
stepping-stone ; salle d' — , waitiiiQ- 
room; table d' — , (arch.) tablet for <m» 
inscription. Au delft de son — , beyond 
o.'s =« ,• contre V — , contrary, contra- 
rily to =; dans 1' — , 1. 1 waiting; in 
waiting ; 2. %in ■=■; in the = (of) ; 3. 
§ expectingly. Frustrer son — , to f rut- 
trate o.'s =« ; to fall short of o.'s = ; 
repondre ft son — , to answer o.'s = 
tromper son — , to deceive, to disap- 
point o.''s =«. 

ATTENTER [a-tan-t«] V. n. (a) to at- 
tempt (...); to make an attempt (on). 

— ft ses jours, to lay violent fuinds on 
o.'s self 

ATTENTI-F, VE [a-tan-tif, i-v] adj. 1. 
II § (a, to) attentive ; 2. ^ (a, of) mind- 
ful ; regardful ; 8. § (a, to) studious ; 
4 § (pers.) (POUR, to) attentive (kind, 
dvil) ; 5. § ipers.) considerate. 

ATTENTION [a-tan-sion] n. f 1. I (A, 
to) attention; 2. || care; heed ; heedful- 
ness ; 3. \ notice ; 4 § (pour, to) consid- 
eratmiess (inclination to oblige) ; 5. J 
(PouK, to) attention (civility, kindness); 
6. § — s, (pi.) (pour, on) attendance. 

Forte, grande — , 1. great attention; 
2. itUentness. Force d' — , intentneso. 

— au commandement ! (mil.) attention ! 
Avec — , 1. with =; attentively; % 
considerately; avec une grande force 
d' — , intently. Attirer 1' — , de q. u., 1, 
to droM a. o.'« =; 2. (th.) tofhll itnd^f 
a. o.'s observation; avoir — (ft), to gir*. 
to pay = (to) ; avoir des — s, (pour), to 
pay = (to) ; to take notice of; domior 
son — (ft), 1. to gi/ve, to pay = to ,• 2. to 
give application (to) ; echapper ft V — , 
to escape = ; to be unobserved ; &in^ 

— (ft), 1. to give, to pay =■ (to) ; to min/1 ; 
to lieed; to give heed (to); 2. to taM 
care of; 3. to take iwtice of; faire peu — , 
pen d' — (ft), 1. to give, to pay little = 
(to) ,• 2. to lake little notice (of) ; ne pas 
faire — , ne faire aucune — (ft), 1. to give, 
to pay little, no=^to ; 2. to jxtsa by ; 3. 
to take little, no notice of; not to mind : 
fixer son — sur, to turn o.'«=, o.'s mind 
to ; porter son — (ft\ to direct o.^s = 
(to); to apply o.'s eei'' (to) ; pr6ter — a, 
to glee, to pay = (te); to take notice' 



ATI 



aTT 



AUB 



imal; dm&le; e'fee; ^fove; <3f6te; ije; til; ille; oi.iol; 6m6\e; smort; usm; ^sftre; <mJoni; 



(flf) A quDi, auquel on 
unregarded; wnhe^ed; 



fait p&s — , 
mminded ; 



n'y faites pas — ! ( F! ne pas faire — a), 
loeg you would not notice, name it! 
do not name it ! sans qu'on y f it — , vm- 
attended to ; unheeded ; unregarded ; 
ytrmdnaed ; wnattended to. 

ATTENTIVEMENT [a-tan-ti-T-man] 
adv. attentively ; icith attention. 

Fort — , 1. very attenti/cely ; with 
areat attention; 2. intently; peu — , 
Uiottentively. 

AT'r:6NUANT, E [a-W-na-an, t] adj. 1. 
\attenuant; 2. (law) extenuating; in 
omtenuation. 

ATTlfeNUANT [a-M-nu-an] n. m. (med.) 
iUtenuant. 

ATTENUATION [a-t«-nu4-.i6n] n. f. 
X. I attenuation ; 2. f debility ; weak- 
ness ; 8. § extenuation ; palliation ; 4 
(med.) attenuation. 

ATTtiiUi:, E [a-M-nu-«] adj. 1. | at- 
tenuated ; %\ iai a state of debility ; 
V)eakened ; 3. (bot) attenuated ; taper ; 
^apering ; 4. (med.) attenuated. 

ATTENUER [8-t«-nu-«] v. a. 1. || to 
attenuate ; % I to weaken ; 9. \ to 
waste ; 4. %to extenuate ; to paUiate ; 
6. 'med.) to attenuate. 

Pour — , ( V. senses) § in extenuation 

<^ 

ATTEERAGE,ATTEEAGE [a-t«-ra-j] 
n. m. (nav.) 1. making land; 2. land- 
fall. 

Faire son — , (nav.) to make the land. 

attj:eeant, attEeant, e [a-w- 

•in, t] adj. § startling ; astounding. 

ATTERREE, ATT:fiRER [a-W-rt] v. 
\.l.\to throw down on the ground ; to 
throw doton; to throw; 2. § to subvert; 
to ODeriurn ; to ruin ; 8. § to deject ; 
to cast doton; 4 § to startle; to as- 
tound ; * to tliunder-strike. 

ATTERRIR, ATTl&RIR [a-W-rir] v. n. 
(nav.) to make land, the land. 

ATTERRISSEMENT, ATTliIRISSE- 
MENT [a-t«-ri-»-man] n. m. (law) allu- 
ft'ton; aUttmum,. 

ATTERRISSAGE [a-t«-ri.w-j] n. m. 
V. Atterrage. 

ATTESTATION [a-a.-a-,ion] n. f. 
written attestation ; attestation; certi- 
ficate; testimonial. — sous serment, 
affidavit Sans — , unattested. 

ATTESTER [a-ti«-t«] v. a. 1. I § (i, to) 
to atte.it; 2. § to testify; 8. § to caU to 



3. Alt'ster le ciei, to call Heaven to witness. 

Atteste, k, pa. p. V. senses of Attbs- 
rER. 

Non — , 1. imattested ; 2. untestified. 

aTTICISME [at-ti-sis-m] n. m. atti- 
oiam. 

Employer V — , to atticize. 

ATTICISTE [at-ti-Bi.-tl n. m. Atticist. 

ATTi:^DIR [a-ti-«-<iir] V. a. 1. I § to 
nuike lukewarm ; 2. § to cool. 

8'attiedik, pr. v. 1. | to become, ^ to 
get lukewarm; 2. § to cool; to grow, 
become cool. 

ATTIfiDISSEMENT [ a-U-«-di-nnan ] 
n. m. § lukeicanwn^ss, 

ATTIFEE [ft-ti-K] V. a. 1 to disen ; to 
bedizen ; to bedizen out. 

8' ATTIFEE, pr. V. ^ to dieen, to bedieen 
p.'« self. 

ATTIFET [a-ti-ft] n. m. t head-dress. 

ATTIQUE tat-ti-k] adj. 1. J § AtMc ; 2. 
(ssrch.) attic. 

Auteur — , Attic; sel — , = salt. Don- 
ter un<> forme — k,to atti-dzs. 

ATTIQUE, n. m. 1. Attic; 2. (arch.) 
atHc ; attic story. 

ATTIQUEMENT f at-ti-k-man ] adv. 
(grauK) in the A ttic dialect. 

ATTIRAIL [a-ti-ra-i*] n. m. 1. imple- 
ments, pi.; 2. apparatus; 3. gear; 
'MJc-'.e : 4 paraphernalia, pi. ; 5. eqvi- 
vago , train ; luggage. 

— de chasse, hunting equipage; — 
dfl cuisine, cooking apparcitus ; kitcJien 
utensils ; — de guerre, implmnents of 
war ; — d'une \TapTivaene,fwmiture of 
1 primting-oMoe. 

ATTIRANT, E [a-U-ran,t] adj. § at- 
fractiDe; aUiiHn^ ; engaging. 

ATTIRER r« ti-rf] V a. (a, to) M J 
!() attract ; %\to drav r 8 $ to ineiite : 
Ad 



to allure ; to draw on; to lead on , 4 
§ (b. s.) to allure ; to entice ; to incite ; 
to draw on. 

Attire, e, pa. p. F. senses of Attirer. 

Non — , ( K senses) 1. J § unattracted ; 
2. tmenticed. Propriete d'etre — , (did.) 
attractability. Susceptible d'6tre — , 
(did.) attractable. 

8' attirer, pr. v. 1. | § to attract each 
other ; 2. ■:> obtain ; to gain ; to win ; 
8. (b. 8.) to inc^ir ; to bring, to draw on 
o.'s self; to bring, to draw down on 
o:s self. 

V.TTISER [a-ti-.«] V. a. 1. to ptd (the 
K c) together; to make up ; to stir up ; 
2. to poke (the ftie) ; to poke up. 

— le feu, ( V. senses) § to infla/me ; to 
add fuel to flame. 

ATTISOIR [a-ti-ioar] n. - 

ATTISONNOIR [a-ti-zo-noar] n. m. (of 
foundries) poker. 

ATTITE:6, E [a-ti-trt] adj. 1. ordinary 
(with whom one usually des>ls) ; usual ; 
2. (b. s.) hireling. 

ATTITUDE [a-ti-ta-d] n. f. 1. [ § atti- 
tude ; 2. § position ; 8. (paint., sculp.) 
posture. 

f;tre en — , to study o.'a attitude; 
prendre une — , to assume an =. 

Si/n. — Attitddi:, postcek. Attitude is a man- 
ner of kee_ping the body, more or less suitable to 
existing circumstances ; posture is a mode of pla- 
cing the body, more or less differing from the or- 
dinary habits. He who in attempting to walk 
assumes the attitude of a dancer, puts himself into 
a ridiculous posture. Poattiret are strange and 
furced positions, and are to the body what grima- 
ces are to the face ; attitudes are noble and agree- 
able positions, and are to the body what air is to 
the figure. Clowns throw themselves into ridicu- 
lous postures, to excite laughter ; actiirs assume 
graceful attitudes, to represent their characters. 

ATTOUCHEMENT [a-tou-sh-man] n. 

m. I touch ; feel ; feeling. 

Point d' — , (geom.) point of contact. 

ATTEAC-TEUE, TEICE [a-trak-t«iir, 
tri-s] adi. (did.) attracUle. 

ATTEACTI-F, VE [a-trak-tif, i-v] adj. 
(did.) attractive. 

"Vertjij attractive, (did.) attractiveness. 
D'rthe maniere attractive, attractively. 

ATTRACTION [ a-trak-sion ] n. f 1, 
(gram.) attraction; 2. (phys.) attrao- 



(^am 
tion. 



— mol6culaire, (phys.) contiguous = ; 
— Newtonienne, attraction of gravita- 
tion ; — oppos6e, counter-attraction. 
Par — , attractingly. Non soumis k V—, 
unattracted. 

ATTRAIEE, v. a. t FI Attieek. 

ATTRAIT [a-tr4] n. m. 1. § attrac- 
tion; allwrememt; charm; 2. + com- 
fort; consolation. 

Sans — , ( V. senses) vnalluring ; un- 
lovely. 8e sentir de T — pour, to Juii/ve a 
tastefor. 

ATTEAPE [a-tra-p] n. £ 1. ^ catch; 
trick; -7- bite; take-in; 2. — b, (pi.) 
(nav.) relieving-ropes. 

— ! caught ! you are caught. 

ATTEAPE-LOURDAUD [a-tra-p-lonr. 
d6] n. m., pi. — s, 

ATTRAPE-NIGAUD [a-tra-p-ni-g6] n. 

m., pi. — s, X.fooVs-trap ; 2. dap-trap ; 
8. catch-penny. 

ATTRAPE-MOUCHE [a-tra-p-mou-sh] 
n. m., pi. — s, (hot.) fly-trap. 

Dionee — , Venus' fly-trap. 

ATTRAPE-PARTERRE [a-tra-p-par- 

t*-r] n . m. X, pL — , dap-trap for the 
pit; clap-trap. 

ATTRAPER [a-tra-pfe] v. a. 1. 1 § to <Ml- 
trap ; to trap ; 2. | to catch ; to t ake ; 
3. § to catch ; to take by surprise ; f^" 
4 § (b. s.) to overreach; to cheat; to 
catch ; to trick; to take in; 5. || to hit; 
to strike ; 6. § to catch ; to seize ; to lay 
hold of; to hit; to hit off; 7. § to ob- 
tain ; to get ; 8. § to catch (a disease). 

S. Une pierre I'a attrapi au front, a stone struck 
him OH tKe forehead. 6. — le sens d'un auteur, to 
ca'ch thf sense of an author ; — une rcssemblance, 
to (lit off o /tiewMf. 8. — un rhume, to catch <t 
cold. 

Moyen d'— rte I'argent ^, catch-penny. 
S' ATTRAPER, pr. V. ( FI scnscs of At- 
traper) (man.) to overstep ; to clip. 
Attrape-toi cela f^~ 1 Uike that ! 

ATTRAPEUR [m-tra-peur] n. m. 1. d«- 

asirner ; delude ; 2. (dx) hunter (flfter.) 



ATTRAPOIRE, n. f. + F: Pii^m. 

ATTRA^ANT, E [a-tr«-ian, t a«y. I 
attractive; alluring; engaging. 

Peu — , unalluring ; unenga^ina, 

ATTRIBUER [^a-tri-bu-*] y. a. 1. (a, to) 
to attach ; to assign ; 2. (a, oru wpon) 
to confer ; 8. (a, to) to attribute ;toaih 
oribe ; to impute. 

1. — des privileges ou des emolum«t« i tm 
fonctions, to attach privileges or en^f^-^njetmu )n 
functions. 2. — des fonctions a q. u., to Cjttiir 
functions upon a. o. 

Pouvoir 6tre attribu6. ( V. senses) to t*" 
attrifmtable, ascribahle, imputable. 

ATTRIBUT [a-tri-bu] n. m. 1. att^ri- 
bute ; 3. emblem ; symbol ; 3. (log.) at- 
tribute ; predicate. 

Donner pour — , (log.) to predicate. 

ATTRIBUTI-F, VE [ a-tri-bu-tif,i-Tl 
adj. 1. (did.) attHbutive ; 2. (law) (d^ 
to) relating. 

ATTRIBUTION [»-tri-bu-si6n] n. C 1. 
conferring (privileges, prerogatives) ; 2. 
privilege, prerogative conferred ; .'i 
—6, {liL) powers (of public fnnctionariesX 
4 —6, (pi) functions; 5. — s, (pi.) pro- 
vince, department (of public function 
aries) ; 6. (law) cognizance. 

Dans les — s de, 1. in the province, rf* 
partme/nt of; 2. (law) in the cogni- 
zance of; cognizable by. 

ATTEISTANT, E [ a-tris-tan, t ] adi 
sad; sorrowful; mdancJioly ; afflict 
ing. 

ATTEISTER [a-tri^ti] v. a. to sadden; 
to render, to make sad, sorroxcfvl, me 
lancholy, duU; to grieve; to afflict 

S'atteister, pr. v. (de) to sadden ; to 
sorrow {for) ; to become, to get sad,, 
sorrowful, mdancholy, dmU (at); to 
gHeve (for) ; to be afflicted (at). 

ATTRITION [a-tri-.ion] n. f. 1. (phys., 
attrition ; 2. (tlieol.) attrition. 

ATTROUPEMENT [a-trou-p-mie] x 
m. 1. mob ; 2. riotous mob. 

Disperser, dissiper un — , to ii*p#r» 
a = ; rassembler, r6unir un — , to Orrf 
lect a-=^; to gather together a =:. 

ATTROUPER [a-trou-p«] v. a. to (». 
semble (a mob) ; to gather, to get toge- 
ther 

S'attrouper pr. v. 1. to troop ; io 
colled together ; 2. to collect in a mob ; 
to gather, to get together in a mob. 

AU \ti\ definite art. m. sing., pi. Arx 
(contraction of A, to, at, etc. and Le, the\ 

AUBADE [6-ba.d] n. t 1. serenade 
(about dawn) ; 2. ^ (iron.) insult; abiiae; 
rating. 

Donner r — h, to insult; to abuse; to 
rate; donner une — a, to serenade. 

AUBAIN r6-bin] n. m. t (law) alien. 

AUBAINE [6-b6-n] n. £ 1. (law) escheat 
to the crown (of the property of an alien 
deceased); 2. + (French law) aubaim; 
3. ^ § prize; God-send; vnnd-fhU, 
prize. 

Bonne — §, God-send; windfall. 

AUBE [5-b] n. f I dawn ; dawn of 
day; day-break; break; ^ peep of 
day, ^ peep. 

AUBE, n. C alb (priest's garment); 
albe. 

AUBE, n. f. 1. (of hydraulic wheel*) 
float-board ; float ; ladle-board ; 2. (fc 
steam-navigation) iOtfrfdfe-5ocrc?. 

Roue k — 8, paddle-wheel. 

AUB15PIN, n. f. X V. Aubepink. 

AUB:6PINE [«-b*-pi n] n. t (bot) haW' 
thorn; white thorn; ^ Mayblof^m; 
^ May. 

Fleur d' — , hawthorn ; tchite ih/>m ; 
May-fimi:er ; May. 

AUB*;EE [6-b4-r] adj. (of horse) yZtci- 
bitten gray. 

AUBEEE, n. m. (of horse8)^'?«o.6«toK 
gra^^ coat. 

AUBERGE [6-b4r-j] n. t tavern; inn ; 
public house. 

Descendre k X — , to put up at as=: 
Stre k r — , to stay at a=^; tenir — , 1. j 
U> keep a = : 2. § to keep open howw. 

AUBERGINE [6-b^r-ji-n] n. t (bot^ 
mad-apple ; 5 egg-plant. 

AUBERGISTE |>-b4r-ji^t] n. m t 
tavern-keeper ; inn-keeper ; jmbUcan 
2. landlord: host 



AUG AUM 


AUK 


o&iodte; «wjeu; oiijeune; <nipeur; OTipan; In pin; on boa; Mwbrun; *11 llq. 


•gnUq. 



AUBEEON [A-b8-r6n] n. m. (lock.) 
tatch (of a lock). 

AUBE-VIQNE [ft-b-Ti gn*] n. f., pi. 
—8, (bot.) virgin't-tcncer. 

AUBIER [«-bi«] n. in. 1. (of a tree) sa/)- 
v)ood; white; blea ; bleak; 2. (anat.) 
bleak; 3. (bot.) alburn; alburnum; 
Ilea; snp-^ood. 

AUBIFOIN [6-bi.foinl n. m. (bot) 
blu« -bottle. 

AUBIN [6-bm] n. m. (man.) aubin; 
Tiand oarder. 

AtiJINEK [6-bi-n6] V. n. (man.) to 
tanter. 

AUBOUKS [6-bour] n. m. (bot) oyti- 
tus ; ^ laburnum. 

AUCUN, E [«.k.-.n, u-n] adj. \. am/ ; 2. 
(with a negation) rio; 3. (with a nega- 
tion) none ; not one. 

2. Ne prendre — Boin, to take no eare. 3. — de sea 
amis ne I'a fait, none of hit friende iave.done it; 
li n'y a — de ses sujets qui ne hasardat sa propre 
vie, there it not one of Am tubjeett that would not 
tt«nture hit own life. 

[AucuN, in the 2d and 3d senses, takes n« ; fol- 
lowed by a relative pr. it often requires the subj. 
r. ex. i.] 

AUCUNEMENT [«-ku-n-man] adv. by 
no means ; on no account ; in no teise ; 
not at all ; at all. 

AUDACE [A-da-sl n. t. 1. OMdadty ; 
da/ring ; hardihood ; hardineaa ; bold- 
ness; 2. (b. &) audacity; audaoious- 
ness. 

— indomptable, dawnUess hardihood. 
Bans — , ( F. senses) jmhardy. 

Sytl. — AUDACK, HABDIBflSK, EFFRONTKRIB. 

Uardiesse implies courage and aasurant^e ; audace^ 
haughtiness and temerity j effronUrie, impudence. 
The first is generally used in a good, the last in a 
bad sense ; audace 8i>uietime8 in one, sometimes in 
the other. One displays hardiesae {hardihood) in 
danger, audace {bfudness) in his enterprises, ef- 
rtonterie (effronterij) in his propositions, his dis- 
course, his conduct. 

AUDACIEU8EMENT [6-d8-d-e4-z- 
mf*.] adv. 1. audacioivsly ; * daring- 
^rj ; hardily ; boldly ; 2. (b. 8.) auda- 
(tlomsl)/. 

ATJDACIEU-X, 8E [d-da-si-eii, eu-i] 
SfU. 1. audacious; * dariiig ; hardy; 
M*J ,• 2 (b. 8.) audacious. 

AUDIENCE [6-di-an-s] n. £ 1. hear- 
Kit/ ; 2. audience (of princes or high 
officers of state) ; 3. audience (assembly) ; 
1 (of courts of judicature) sitting ; court ; 
5. (in Spain) audience; 6. (law) aadi- 
moe. 

Nouvelle — , Qavt) rehearing; pleine 
— , fidl hearing ; — publique, public 
hearing ; — k huis clos, private hear- 
ing ; Jour d' — , (law) court-day ; re- 
turn-day; salle, salon d — , audience- 
chamber. En pleine — , in open court. 
Donner — , 1. to give, to grant a hear- 
ing ; 2. to give audience, am, audience ; 
ouvrir r — , to open the court; tenir — , 
(of judges) to sit. 

AUDIENCIER [6-di-an-ei«] adj. m. qf 
the sitting of a court. 

Huissier — , crier of a, the court. 

AUDIENCIER, n. m. crier of a court; 
crier. 

AUDITEUK rA-di-teur] n. m. 1. hear- 
er, m. f ; 2. auditor, m. ; auditress, t ; 
S. aiulitor (of accounts) ; 4. auditor (ec- 
clesiastical functionary). 

Charge d'— , (adm.) auddtorship. 

AUDITI-F, VE [6-di-tif, i-v] adj. (anat) 
auditori/. 

Conduit — exteme, (anat) cavity of 
the ear ; nerf — , aiulitory, acoustic 
nerve. 

AUDITION ];ft-d»-tl5n] n. i: 1. hearing ; 
2. (adm.) fflMC^iitMgr (of accounts) ; audit; 
8. (law) liearing (of witnesses). 

Nouvelle — , 1. other hearing ; 2. (law) 
rehearing (of witnesses). 

AUDITOIRE [5-di-toa-r] n. m. 1. au- 
ditory (place) ; 2. aiiditory (assembly) ; 
audience ; 8. (of churches) congrega^ 
Hon. 

AUGE [6-j] n. £ 1. trough; 2. water- 
ing trough; 3. (of masons) banker; 
ffOMging-board ; 4 (of water-mills) 
ypout. 

— de majon, bricklaq/er's hod. Port- 
er r — , to carry the Ivod. 

AUG:6E U>-iq n. £ hodful. 
AUGKTf»i»tn m 1 irout\{»maWy. 



2. bird's trough ; trough ; 8. (of mills) 
spout; 4. (of water-wheels) bucket. 
Roue h — s, overshot-mill, wheel, 
AUGITE [6-ji-t] n. f (min.) augite. 
AUGMENT [og-man] n. m. 1. (Gr. 
gram.) augment ; 2. (mod.) increase. 

AUGMENTATEUR [og-mOn-ta-teiir] 

n, m. augm,enter. 

AUGMENTATI-F, VE [og-man-ta-Uf, 
i-v] adj. (gram.) augmentative. 

AUGMENTATION [og-man-ta-sion] n. 

£ 1. in urease ; augmentation ; 2. ew- 
largeme,'' t ; 3. addition ; 4. accession ; 5. 
(of price) <^<)e; 6. (com.) advance ; rise. 

Sans — , 1. unincreasod ; u/naugment- 
ed; 2. unenZarged. 

AUGMENTER [og-man-t^] V. a. 1. to 
increase ; to augment ; 2. to enlarge ; 
to increase ; 3. to raise the salary of 
(a. o.) ; 4. to increase tlie wages of (ser- 
vants, workmen); 5. to raise (prices); 
6. to increase; 7. (com.) to raise; to 
advance. 

S. — q. u., to raise a. o.'a safari/. 

Personne qui augmente, increaser of; 
augmenter of; enlarger of. 
Augmente, b, pa. p. V. senses of 

AUGMBNTEK. 

Non — , 1. ^tnincreased ; vnaugment- 
ed ; 2. vnenlarged. 

S'augmbnter, pr. v. 1. to increase ; to 
augment ; 2. to enlarge. 

AUGMENTER, v. n. 1. to increase; 
to augment ; 2. to enlarge ; 3. (of 
prices) to rise ; 4. (com.) to r^e ; to ad- 
vance ; to improve. 

— de prix, 1. to increase in value ; 
2. (com.) to rise. 

AUGURAL, E [6-ga-rai] a^j. (Rom. 
ant) augural. 

AUGURE [6-gu.r] n. m. 1. (th.) au- 
gury ; omen ; 2. (pers.) augur. 

De bon — (pour), of good om«n (to) ,• 
auspicious (to) ,- de .mauvais — , of iU 
omen ; ill-omened ... ; ominous ; un- 
lucky. Charge d'— , augurship ; divi- 
nation par les — s, science des — s, au- 
g ury. Des — 8, augurial. t.tre V — de, 
to give an augury of; 6tre de . . . — , to 
bode ...; 6tre de bon — (pour), to augur, 
to bode well (to) ; etre de mauvais — 
(pour), to augur, to bode iU (to) ; to be 
o^ninous (to) ; tirer un — de, to take an 
augur)/ of. 

AUGURER [6-g.i-r«] V. a. to angur; 
to take an augury of. 

Faire — , to augur. 

AUGU8TE [6-gus-t] adj. august 

Caract^re — , augustness. 

AUGUSTIN [d-gus-tin] p. n. m. 1. Au- 
gustin; Austin; 2. (rel ord.) Augus- 
tin, Atistin friar. 

Saint , 1. p. n. Savnt Augustin; 2. 

(print) English. 

AUJOUKD'HUI [5-jour.dui] adv. 1. | 
to-day ; this day ; at, to this day ; 2. § 
at this day; at present; at the present 
time ; now ; ^ nowadays. 

D^s — , from to-day ; from this day, 
this very day ; d' — en huit en quinze, 
(future) this day week, fortnight ; dans 
un mois d' — , (future) this day a m^onth ; 
jusqu' — , jnsqu'a — , 1. \ till to-day, this 
day ; 2. % to, up to this day ; till this 
present time; wntiil now; Mtherto. 
— il y a huit jours, quinze jours, (past) 
this -day week, fortnight ; — en huit 
en quinze, (future) this day week, fort- 
night. A dater, a partir d' — , from to- 
day ; from this day ; from this day 
forward. 

AULIQUE [6-ii-k] adi. aulio. 

Conseil — , = council. 

AULIQUE, n. £ thesis (for the doctor- 
ship of divinity). 

AULNAIE, n. £ K Aunaib. 

AULNE, n. m. V. Aitne. 

AULN^E, n. £ V. Acnee. 

AU LOF [6-iof] n. m. (nav.) (order to 
the helmsman) luff.' 

AUL0F:6E [6-lo-f6] n. £ (nav.) (action 
and etfect) luffing. 



AULX [5] pi. de Aiu 

AUMONE [6-m6.ii]n. 



f 1. alms 
•gi tnn^ ; cua r, ti/ ; 
— « puree, francltoo, frank.alnu'niif. 
I'-rMtrine qui vH d'— , person that liv«* 



on alms, charity; * eleemosynary, 
tronc des — s, alms-box. Deniander 1'—, 
to ask charity; donner V — , to give 
alms ; Stre reduit h. 1'—, Stro h, 1' — , to b<i 
reduced to beggary ; faire V—, to giof 
alms, charity ; recevoir 1' — , to receive 
charity; vivre d' — , to live on alini. 
charity : * to be an eleemosynar a. 

AUM6NERIE r6-m5-n.ri1 n. f JVnwt, 
ry. 

AUM6NIER [6-mft-ni-«] n. m. 1. almo- 
ner ; 2. chaplain ; 3. (of a prison) ordt 
nary. 

Grand — , gram.d ahnoner ; second 
— , subalrtwner. — de vaisseau, na/va, 
chaplain; chaplain of a ship. Fonc 
tions d' — , chaplainship. 

AUM6NI:feRE [6-m5-ni-*-r] n. £ 1. oZ 
moner (woman) ; 2. alms-bag. 

AUMUSSE, AUMUCE [5-mu.s] n. C 
amess (fur worn by & »ons, chaplaina, 
singers). 

AUNAGE [6-na-j] n. m. 1. m^easuring 
(by the ell) ; alnage ; 2. measure (by 
the ell). 

AUNAIE [p-v.6] n. £ alder-plot. 

AUNE [6-n] n. m. 1. (bot) alder; al 
der-bush; 2. alder (v/ood). 

— noir, black-berry-bearing aider. 
D' — , aldem. 

AUNE, n. £ ell. 

Tout du long de X — ^^~, very rtmch ; 
excessively. En avoir tout du long da 
r — t^") to O^t it '^^U. i^^ Mesurer 
les autres h. son — , to judge others by 
one's self; **,|, savoir ce qu'en vaut V — 
j^^, to know by experience. 

AUN:^E [4-n«] n. £ (bot) (genus) eU- 
canvpane. 

AUNER, v. a. to measure (by the ell), 

AUNEUR [6-neur] n. m. measurer 
(by the ell). 

AUPARAVANT [6-pa-r»-Tan] adv. (of 
time) 1. before (a given time) ; 2. b^/or^ 
now, this ; ere now, this ; Z. first. 

1. Un an — , a year before. 3. Dites-nous — vi 
qu'il faut faire, telhu first what ia to be done. 

[AUPARAVANT is used absolutely; it malt ta)t 
be confounded with the prep. avarU or devant.} 

AUPRi:8 r4-pf«] prep. 1. 1 (of plaoe) 
(de) near (...); close (to) ; 2. § (dk, . . .) 
about (a. o.) ; 3. § (de, . . .) witli (a. o.> ; 
4 § (de, , . .) vyith (in the estimation of) ; 
5. § (DE, .. .) to (a. o.); 6. § (de, . ' ' 
in comparison vxith. 

1. — d'un endroit, near a place. 2. Avoir d«a 
domestiques — de soi, to have servants about one. 

3. Vivre — de ses parents, to live viiiho.'t parenti. 

4. II cherche a me nuire — du prince, ht teela la 
injtire mt with the prince. S. Ambassadeur — du 
roi de . . . , ambaasador to the king of ... . 

AUPRiiS, adv. 1. n^ear ; close ; doM 
by ; 2. at hand ; near at hand. 

AUQUEL, contraction of i. leqitku 

AtTKAi, Ind. fut. 1st sing, of Avoir. 

AiTRAis, cond. 1st 2d sing. 

AURATE [5-ra-t] n. m. (chem.) ait- 
raie. 

AUElfeOLE [ft-ri-o-l] n. £ 1. halo of 
glory ; glory ; 2. (anat, mod.) a/reol; 8. 
(paint) anireola : glory. 

AURICULAIEE [d-ri-ku-lJ-r] adj. aw 
ricitlar. 

T6moin — , ear^witness. 

AURICULE [6-ri-ku-l] n. £ 1. (anat) 
auricls ; auricula ; ^ pavilion of the 
ear; 2. (bot) auricula. 

— commune, des fleuristes, (bot) au- 
rictda ; f bear's ear. 

AUEICUL:^, E [6-ri-ku-i«] adj. (bot) 
eared. 

AURIFilRE [6-ri.f4-r] adj. (did.) au- 
riferous. 

AURILLARD, V. Orillard. 

AURIQUE [5-ri-k] adj. (nav.) in th» 
form of a ahxrulder of mutton. 

Voile — , shoulder of mutton sail. 

AUROCHS [d-roks] n. m. (mam.) w« ; 
urusj ure-ox; aurochs. 

AUEONE [ft-ro-n] n. £ (bot) southorib- 
wood. 

— femelle, lavender-cotton ; — m&lo- 
des jardins, southem^wood. 

AURORE r6-ro-r] n. £ 1. J dawn of 
day ; da/wn; day-break; break of day ; 
** mom ; **day-blush ; ** day-sprimij ; 
'I. \ da/uon ; twilight ; morning ; 8, \ 
goU'-color ; 4 ** Bast ; 5. (astr.) Auro- 
ra , 6. (myth.) Aurora. 



.)to; 



AUT AUT 


aUT 


omal;<imMo; «fee; (^feve; ef6te; <fje; ill; ti\e; omol; omo'.e; dvaoTt; um 


c; tisure, owjour; 



— ftustrab, (astr.) aurora australis ; 

— boreale, (astr.) = horeahs ; ^ North- 
ern light L' — aux dolgts de rose, ** 
^fo»y-Jingered morn. Les climats de 1' — , 
txistern climes ; les pleurs de Y — **, the 
mtoming dew. A V — , 1. 1 at dawn ; at 
day-break ; 2. § at o.^s dawn ; d" — , de 
r — bor6ale, auroral; Hds 1'—, 1. at 
dawn ; 2. § in o.'s earliest dawn ; sans 
— , 1. B without a dawn ; 2. § v/iidawn- 

AUSCULTATION [o.-kuJ-ta-Bi6n] n. £ 
/med.) auscultation. 

AUSCULTEB [o.-kul-t«] v. a. (med.) 
to auscultate. 

AUSPICE [5s-pi-»] n. m. 1. (Eom. ant) 
auspice, sing. ; auspices, pi. ; 2. g — a, 
(pi.) auspices. 

Heareux — s, 1. happy auspices; 2. 
auspiciousness ; mauvais — s, 1. unhap- 
py T=s ; 2. itiOMSpiciousness. Sous de 
Dons — 8, auspiciotisly ; sous de mauvais 
— B, innuspiciously ; sous les — s de, 
under the =« qf. Qui a rapport aux — s, 
auspicial. 

AUSSI [6-8i] adv. 1. likewise; also; 
too ; 2. so ; Visrefore ; 8. as (equally, as 
much) ; 4 so (to such a degree). 

1. Et moi -.and I too, likewise. 2. — ne I'ai- 
le pas fait, and so, therefore / did not do it. 3. 
Cette personne est — douce, — bonne et — intelli- 
ffenta que qui que ce soit, thia person is as mild, 
iind,and mteltigerU as a. o. 4. Un homnie — 
riche, so rich a man. 

— blen, the more so as ; a« ; for ; 
— ... que, as ... as. 

[Ausai preceding a verb admits of the nom. fol- 
lowing the verb ( V. Ex. 2) ; in the 3d sense it is 
ftpeated before each of the words it modifies. ( V. 
Ki. 8).] 

AUSSlilEE [«-«-6-r] n. £ (nav.) 1. 
hawser ; 2. xoarp. 

— k touer, Uno-line ; tow-rope. 
AU8SIT6T r6-8i-t6] adv. 1. immedU 

af'dy ; ^ directly ; 2. so soon as ... , 

— jne, 1. as soon as ; 2. so soon as ; 

— que ct la ne vous d6rangera pas, as 
early as oonvenient. #*^, — dit, — fait, 
no sooner said than done. 

AU8TER [ot-ter] n. m. ** avMer 
(tenth wind). 

AUSTi^liE [oi-ti-r1 adj. 1. mistere ; 2. 
amiere ; stern ; rigid ; 3. (to the taste) 
eharp ;^harsh. 

AUSTi;KEMENT [o.-t4-r-man] adv. 1. 
austerely; 2. austerely; sternly; ri- 
gidly. 

AUST^RITfi [o^t«.ri-t«] n. t. 1. aw- 
sterity ; amstereness ; 2. austerity ; 
eterrmess; rigidness. 

AUSTRAL, E [os-tral] adj. (geog.) au- 
tfo-al; southern. 

AUTAN [4-tan] n. m. ** auster ; blast. 

AUTANT [6-tan] adv. 1. (de, . . .) as 
much, sing. ; as many, pi. ; 2. so ntuch, 
sing. ; so many, pi. ; 8. as mitch ; as far ; 
4. (with a verb) as much ; the same ; 
the me. 

1 . — de m^rite et — d'amis que hii, as much 
merit and as many friends as he. 2. C'est — 
d'4pargn6, it is ao much saved. 3. Faire q. ch. — 
qu'on peut, to do a. th. as much, as far as one can, 

— ..,—, \. as mnich . .. so much ; 2. 
as ... as. Tout — , 1. qwite as much, 
many ; 2. quite so m,uch, mawy ; 8. 
alike. A charge, k la charge d'— , on 
condition of a return ; d' — , as m,uch ; 
d' — mleux, so m,uch the better, the 
more, the rather ; d' — moins, so much 
the less ; d' — plus, 1. so m,uch the more ; 
2. in so much; d' — plus que, so rrmck 
the more as, that. — que, ( V. senses) 1. 
as much as ; as far as ; 2. as good as ; 
Uw for ought ...; — que je — ,to the 
best cf my ...; d'autant que, as ; foras- 
much as; insomuch as; — vaut, a« 
good. En faire — ^,todoas much, tlie 
tame, the Uke. 

rAutant preceding a noon require* de. ( V. Ex. 



[A. 



AUTEL [6-tMl n. m. 1. attar; 2. —9, 
ft)L) altars; religion; 3. (astr.) ara; 
f. (vers.) altar. 

Grand, maitre — , grand, high aUar. 
Devant d' — ^ front ofthez=; nappe d'— , 
i= -cloth; tableau d'— , = -piece. — 
oraitre — , = againxt =. En forme d' — , 
B= ■'tatee. Dresser. 61ever un — , to raise 
4S 



an = ; servir a Y — , to attend, serve at 
the =. 

AUTEUR [6-te6r] n. m. 1. author 
(first cause); 2. author; contriver; 
framer; 3. (of book) author, m. £; a-w- 
thoress, t ; 4 writer, ra. f ; 5. author 
(book); work; 6. author; authority ; 
7. (of the fine arts) artist; master; 8. 
(of crime) perpetrator; 9. (of a disco- 
very) discoverer; author; 10. (of a 
feat) achiever; 11. (of engravings) en- 
graver; artist; master; 12. (of inven- 
tions) inventor, m. ; inmentress, £ ; 13. 
(of music) composer ; mMster ; 14 (of 
paintings) painter; artist; master; 
15. (of sculpture) sculptor; artist; 
master; 16. (of writings) writer; au- 
thor. 

— classique, 1. classical author ; clas- 
sic ; 2. standard = ; — principal, (law) 
(of crimes) principal. Droit d' — , 
copy-right ; metier d'— , (b. 8.) author- 
ship; qualite, profession d' — , autJior- 
ship. D' — , des — s, authorial. Se faire 
—, 1. to become an author ; ^ to turn 
author ; 2. to appear in print 

AUTHENTICIT:^ [6-tan-ti-«-t«] n. f 
authenticity. 

Sans — , unauthentic. 

AUTHENTIQUE [6.tan-ti-k] adj. 1. 
auilientic; 2. wnapocryphal ; 8. (mns.) 
authentic, 

Non — , unauthentique. Action de 
rendre — , authentication. Reconnsutre 
pour — , to authenticate; non reoonnu 
— , unauthentioated. 

AUTHENTIQUEMENT [ft-tan-ti-k- 
man] adv. authentically. 

AUTHENTIQUES [A-tan-ti-k] n. £ au- 
tJientics, pi. 

AUTOBIOGRAPHE [6.to-bi.o-gr»-f ] n. 
m. autobiographer. 

AUTOBIOGEAPHIE [ft-to-bi-o-gra-fi] 
n. £ autobiography. 

AUTOCHTHONE [4-tok-to-n] n. m. 
(Gr. hist.) autochihon. 

AUTOCEATE [6-to-kra-t] n. m. auto- 
crat, 

AUTOCRATIE [5-to-kra-tS] n. t auto- 
cracy, 

AUTOCRATIQUE [ft-to-kra-ti-k] adj. 
autocratic. 

AUTOCRATRICE [ft-to-kra-tri-s] n. t 
autocratrix, 

AUT0-DA-F:6 [6-to-da-f6] n. m., pL — , 
auto-da-fe. 

AUTOGRAPHE [6-to-gra-f] adj. auto- 
graphic. 

AUTOGRAPHE, n. m. autograph. 

AUTOGRAPHIE [6-to-gra-f i] n.t au- 
tography. 

AUTOGRAPHIER [6-to-gra-fi«] v. a 
to autograph. 

AUTOGRAPHIQUE [ft-to-gra-fl-k] adj. 
autographic. 

AUTOMATE [6-to-ma-t] n. m. autom- 
aton. 

AUTOMATE, adj. amtomatie; au- 
tomatons. 

AUTOMATIQUE [6-to-ma-ti-k] adj. 
autmnatic. 

Fabrique — , factory ; systfeme — ,fae- 
tory-m/stem,. 

AUTOMATIQUEMENT [6-to-ma-ti-k- 
manl adv. like an automaton. 

AUTOMNAL, E [6-tom-nal] adj. au- 
tumnaZ. 

Plante — e, = plant ; =. 

[AurrMNAi. has no m. pi.) 

AUTOMNE r6-to-n] n. m. £ 1. 1 au- 
tii/mn; fall of the leaf; ^fall; 2. § at*- 
twmn ; yellow leaf. 

De r — , ofautum/n, ; aiitti/mnal. 

AUTOM'0-TEUR, TRICE [6-to-mo- 
teur, tri-.] adj. 1. (did.) Self-acting; self- 
moving ; 2. (tech.) self-acting ; 3. (tech.) 
self-regulating, 

AUTONOME [6-to-no-m] adj. (Gr. hist) 



AUTONOMIE [6-to-no-mi] n. £ (Gr. 

hist) autonom,y, 

AUTOPSIE'r6-top-ri] n £ 1. autopsy; 
2. autopsy ; post m.oi'tem examination. 

AUTOEISATION [6.to-ri-i4-8ion] n. £ 
1. (a, to) authorisation ; 2. authority ; 
consent ; 8. (of a preacher) license ; 4 
(adm.) license ; 5. (law) toarrani ; war- 
ranty 



Sans — , imauihorized ; 2. u/nldcenscd 
Accorder une — ^ ( F. senses) (.adm.) tc 

AUTOEISER [b-to-Ti-zi] V. a. 1. (i.) to 
authorize ; 2. (d, to) to empower ; 3. to 
commission; 4 (d, to) to qualify; 5 
(d, in) to warrant ; 6. (adm.) to licentfi, 

Personne qui autorise, ( V. senses) wrr. 
ranter (of). Btre autorise (a), (^; 
senses) 1. to be authorised (to); X Ut 
IWAoe authority (to). 

Autorise, e, pa p. ( K senses of Asr- 
T0RI8EK) legitimate (authorized by U86)k 

Non — , 1. unauthorized ; 2. not em- 
powered ; 3. UMcommissioned ; Au un- 
qualified ; 5. unwarranted. ; 6. illegiti- 
mate (not authorized by use) ; 7. (adm.) 
unlicensed. ^ 

S'autoriser, pr. v. ( F. senses of Ax;- 
toriser) 1. (a, m ; de, 6y)"'(pers.) to be 
warranted; 2. (th.) to acquire, to ob- 
tain, to get, to gain authority. 

AUTOEITfi '* to-ri.t«] n. £ 1. au- 
thority; 2. contr-ol; sway; rule; 3. 
(b. s.) authoritatimeness ; dictatorship; 
4 authority ; testimony. 

— constituee, established authority. 
Air, ton d' — , 1. air, tone of-=.;% (b. s.) 
authontativeness. Plein d' — , full of 
=.; authoritative. Avec — ,l.v}ith=:; 
2. (b. 8.) authoritati/vely ; d' — , 1. of= ; 
2. (b. 8.) authoritative; 8. authorita- 
tively ; de sa propre — , de son — privee, 
by o.^s own = ; par son — , 1. by o.'s = ; 
2. at o.'« control; sous son — , 1. undsr 
o.'s = ; 2. at o.'s control. Avoir de 1'— 
sur q. u., to fta/ve power with a. o.; 
avoir, exercer T — supreme, to hold, to 
exercise supreme =; to be supreme; 
etre une — , feire — , to be an = ; exer- 
cer de r — sur, to exercise =: over ; to 
control; mettre hors de la portee de 1'—, 
(law) to eloin ; prendre de 1' — , to assvma 
= ; user d'— , to use o.'8=. Qui u do 
r — , qui marque V — , a%ithoritative. 

AUTOUR [6-tour] n. m. (cm.) gos- 
hawk. 

— ordinaire, =. 

AUTOUR, prep. | § (dk, . . .) aromui, 
round; about 

Tout — de, all = ; round about Al* 
ler — de, to go round; faire circuler, 
passer q. ch. — de, to hand a. th. round ; 
venir — de, to come, to get round. 

Toumer — de la question, to wan- 
der from the question ; toumer — du 
pot, to beat the bush. 

Si/n.—KvTovR DB, A l'entoor. These phrasej 
should be carefully distinguished. Avtaur de 
performs the part ot a preposition ; d t'erUmir, that 
of an adverb. A mother has all her daughters 
autour d'eUe {around her). A father establishee 
himself in a certain place, and all his sons settle 
d Pentour {around). 

AUTOUE, adv. around; round; 

about 

Ici — , hereabout; here dbouts; tout 
— , all around, round, about; ^ raund 
about. 

AUTOUESEEIE [ft-tonr-rt-ri] n. C 
training goshawks. 

AUTOUESIEE [6-tour-8i«] n. m./al. 
C07i«r (that trains goshawks). 

AUTEE [6-tr] acy. 1. other; 3. other, 
different; 8. else. 

Aucun, nul — , personne — , nobody 
else; nous —8..., *{we...; rien — , "j 
nothing else ; no other ; bien — . . . , n 
very different ...; tout — , 1. quite dif- 
ferent; 2. any otlier; 8. aught beside; 

vous — 8 . . . , ^ you Et d' — 8 chosea 

pareilles, semblables, d' — 8 de la mdiuc 
sorte, and the like ; un — , encore un ~, 
anoVier ; et encore d' — s . . . , 1. cmxi 
others mare ; 2. * another and another. 

[AUTRK ill the 1st and 2d senses prt^cedes the ».] 

AUTEE, pron. 1. other, sing.; otiifli^ 
pi. ; 2. else. 

Aucun — , nul — , \.no o'hsr ; none ; 
2. (pers.) no ons, nobody else; et en- 
core d' — s, and =s more ; * another and 
another; Tun, Tune Y — , les nns, le« 
unes lee — s, each =} one another; 
Tun, I'une apr6s 1' — , les uns, lea uno« 
apr6s les — s, 1. one after atwther ; 2. 
deep; I'un dans 1"—, Tun portant 1'—, 
one with another; nous —8 ^, we; 
quelqu' — , 1. some := ; 2. (pera) some 
body, some one else; tout — , any=i 



AVA 



AVA 



AVA 



joute ; eu jeu.; e& jeune ; e& peur ; an pan ; m pin ; on bon ; un brun ; *11 liq. ; *gn Uq. 



an —, anotJier; vous — s 1, you. A 
d' — e, Ml that to =s / ymt must not tell 
me that ! entre — s, among other things. 
Ne pas en faire d'— 8 ^, to do nMhing 
dse. Comme dit 1'—, cet — 1, as the 
eaying is. 

AUTREFDIS [ft-trs-foa] aciy. former- 
t^; ^ injbrmer times ; in times of yore. 

})'_, 1. of former times; of times 
nast; of yore ; 2. by-gone. 

AUTREMENT r6-tr6-man] adv. 1. 
{Otherwise (diflferently) ; 2. otherwise; 
due ; or else. 

Pas — , 1. not otheneise; 2. 1 1 very, 
much. — dit, nomm6, (law) alias. 

AUTRICHIEN, NE [6-tri-.lii-in, »-n] 
ndi. Austrian. 

AUTRICHIEN, n. m., NE, n. t Aus- 
trian. 

AUTRUCHE [6-tru-8h] n. f. (orn.) os- 
trich. 

Duvet d' — , ostrich ; estndge. II a un 
estomac d' — , c'est un estomac d' — , A« 
eats Wee a farmer, ploughman ; j^~ he 
is a good 'trencherman. 

AUTRUI [6-trai] n. m. another, sing. ; 
others, pi. 

Le bien d' — , the properli/ of others. 

AUVENT [6-van] n. m. penthouse. 

AUVERNAT [6-vAt-iia] n. va. Av/ver- 
Aat 

AUX [6] definite art m. f. pi. (contrac- 
tion of A, to, at, etc. and Lbs, t/ie). V. A 

AUXILIAIRE [6k-.i-U-i-r] adj. 1. cwftw- 
Uary ; 2. (gram^ OAjadliwry. 

AtrXILIAIRE, n. m. 1. auanUary; 
2. (gram.) aua»Mary. 

AUXQUELS [6-k4i] (contraction of A 
Lesquels). , 

AUXQUELLES (contraction of A 
Lbsqcbllbs) 

AVACHIR (S') [Ba-Ta-.hir] pr. V. 1. to 

hamg dovm ; to flag ; 2. to get flabby ; 
». to get out of shape. 
AvAis, Ind. imperf. Ist, 2d sing, of 

AVAL [ft-vai] n. m. (com.) (of bills) 
undertaking; guaranty. 

AVAL, a^.v. (nav.) down the stream, 
river. 

D'— V ionm the river ;% from doion 
the ricer; down the ryver; down; 3. 
(of the wind) westerly ; en — , down the 
ri/ver ; doton ; downward ; en — de, 
bdmjo. 

AVALAISON [a-va-14-z6n] n. f 1. 1 1 
flood; torrent: 2. (mar.) sei westerly 
wind (of more than a week's duration). 

AVALANCHE, AVALANGE [a-va- 
lin-ih, lan-j] n. f. avalanche ; snow-slip. 

AVALAS8E. n. C V. Avalaison. 

AVAL:&, E [a-vft-16] adj. 1. fumging 
down; falling down; 2. flagging. 

AVALER [a-Ta-16] V. a. 1. I to swal- 
low ; ^ to get down ; 2. (b. s.) to swal- 
low down, up ; to take of; ^^ to 
gvlp, gxdp dmm; 3. II to dnnk up 
(liquids) ; to quaff off; f to toss off; to 
swiU ; to drain (a cup) ; 4. ^ § to stoai- 
law (believe with credulity); to swal- 
low dawn ; to take down ; 5. ^ § to en- 
dure (an atfrOnt) ; \ to pocket ; 1 to put 
in o.'s pocket ; to put up wiHi ; 6. (dans, 
into) to Imoer (into a cellar); to let 
down; 7. (hort) to cut off (a branch) 
close to the trimk. 

— avidement, to swallaio greedily; 
^to = down, up ; to take off; ^^~ to 
gulp, gulp down ; to gabUe up. — la 
mer et !es poissons, f^" 1. (of hunger) 
to breed a famine ; 2. (of thirst) to drink 
the sea dry. 6tre avale de travers, to be 
uwallmoed Oie wrong way ; to go down 
the wrong way ; faire — q. ch. 4 q. u. 
i J, ( F. senses) to make a. o. = a. th. ; 
+ to cram^ a. th. dovm a. o.'s throat. 

AVALER, v. n. t to go down wiVi the 
ewrrent, stream,, river. 

8'avaleb, pr. v. 1. to hang down ; to 
faU dmcn ; 2. to flag. 

AVALEUR [a-va-ieur] n. m. (DE)per- 
wn tliat coTist^'ntly takes (...). 

— de pois gns, gormandizer ; glut- 
ton ; — de charrettes ferr6es, braggado- 
Ho ; 1 biUlu- 

AVALOIRE [a-Ta-.oa-r] n. f i^" 1. I 

Meat) stocUmo ; 2. (of harness) breech ; 
Vreeohing. 

5 



AVAN^AQE [a-van-M-j] n. m. coach- 
stand; stand. 

AVANCE [a-van-i] n. f. 1. I projec- 
tion ; 2. J space, distance in advance ; 
8. § ground gained ; work done ; 4. § 
(A, to) ad'vance (civility); 6. § ad- 
vance ; advance money ; 6. (arch.) 
bearing owt; 7. (com.) — 8, (pL) ad- 
vances, pi. ; 8. (nav.) gain. 

— , (of watches) /cMt — diurne (nav.) 
daily gain. A 1'—, d'— , en — , par — , 
l.in advance; beforehand; % before 
o.'s Um^e; d'— sur, a/iead of; before. 
Avoir r — (sur), to ha^e, to get the start 
(of) ; faire des — s, {k) 1. to make ad- 
vances (to) ; 2.^to make up (to) ; faire 
une — de . . . , to advance ..., to make 
an advance of...; prendre 1' — , to get 
the start. 

AVANCi;, E [a-van-i^] adj. 1. ad- 
vanced; 2. forward; 3. (of the hour) 
late ; 4. (of meat) tainted ; 5. (mil) ad- 
vanced. 

Bien — , (K senses) far-advanced, 
gone ; trop — , too far-advanced, gone. 
Garde — e, (mil.) 1. advance-guard: 2. 
outpost; poste — , (mil) advance. Etre 
plus — , ( V. senses) to be better off; Stre 
moins — , ( V. senses) to be the worst off. 

AVANC^E, n. £ (mil.) advance 
guard. 

AVANCEMENT [a-van-.-man] n. m. 1. 
II (a, to) advancement; 2. § advance- 
■ment; improvement; 3. § promotion; 
preferment ; advancement. 

AVANCER [a-Tan-.«] v. a 1. ! to ad- 
vance ; to move, to put forward ; to 
put ; to piish forward ; 2. \ to hold out ; 
to put out; to put; * to hold, to put 
forth ,• 3. I to bring, to droM forward ; 
to bring ; to draw ; 4. § to forward ; 5. 
§ to accelerate ; to hapten ; to hapten on ; 
to urge ; to urge on; 6. § to advance ; to 
forward; to help forward, on; to get 
on ; to push <w ,• 7. § to advance ; to pro- 
mote ; 8. to prefer (a. o.) ; to p^it for- 
ward; 9. § to advance (a doctrine, an 
opinion); to broach; to urg^f; to give 
out; to hold forth; to put forth; 10. § 
to ad'vance (pay beforehand) ; 11. to give, 
to set (a, chair) ; 12. to set, put forward, 
ahead (a clock, a watch). 

•2. — la main ou le pied, to hold out n.'» hand or 
o.h fool. 3. — tine table, to bring a table forward. 
4. — la v^gStation, to forward vegetation. 6. — an 
temps, to hasten on a time. 6. — les affaires, to ad- 
vance, to forward hutinett. 1. — les int«r^u de q. 
u., to advance, to promote a. o.'t interestt. 

8' AVANCER, pr. V. (vers, to, towards) 
1. n to advance ; to proceed ; to move ; 
to get forward, on; to come, to go 
forward, forth, on, onward ; to push 
fonoard, on, owward ; * to progress ; 
'** to career ; 2. | (vers, to) to go, to 
move, to step up; 1 to make up ; 3. i 
to stand forward, forth; 4 | (|b. s.) 
to wade (proceed with difflcnlty) ; 5. | 
(th.) to protrude ; to project ; to jut ; 
6. S (pers.) to advance ; to go ; to pro- 
ceed ; 7. § (pers.) to advance ; to pro- 
gress ; to make progress ; ^ to get for- 
ward, on; to push on; S. % (th.) to 
advance ; to progress ; to move on; to 
rv/^on. 

1. Le jour i^avance, the day is advancing. 6. — 
trop dans ses offres, to advance, to go too far in o.'t 
ofert. 7.— dans une carriere, to advance, (o pro- 
gress, to get on in a career. 8. Le temps t'avanee, 
time advances, moves on. 

— (en allant), to go forward, on- 
ward, on ; — (a cheval), to ride ti/p (to) ; 

— (en courant), to rwn up (to) ; — (peu 
h peu), to creep up to ; — (a pied), to 
step, to walk up (to) ; — (en rampant), 
to creep, to cra/tcl forward, on, up (to) ; 

— (en sautant), to J2imp up; — (en 
sautillant), to skip up ; — (en sortant), 
to come, to issue forth ; — (en venant), 
to come forward, on, up ; — (en voi- 
ture), to drive forward, up ; — (k la 
voile), to sail up (to) ; — (en volant), to 
fly up (to). 

— toujours. (V. senses) to drive on; 

— trop, ( V. senses) to overshoot o.'s self; 
^ o.'s mark ; — de force, ( V. senses) to 
thrust on. 

AVANCER. V. n. 1. I (vers, to, to- 
wards) to advance ; to proceed, ; to 
move, to get forward, on ; to come, to 



go forward, forth, on, onward; to 
push forward, on, onward, *to pro- 
gress; ** to career ; 2. B (vers, to^ <d 
go, to move, to step up ; 3. I (b. s.) to 
wade (proceed with difficulty) ; 4. | ..K 
8.) (sur, on, upon) to encroach; 8. 
(th.) to project, to stand out ; to com^ 
out; 6. §to advance; to progress; to 
make progress; to improve: to go) 
fonoard, on; 7. (of clocks and watchi'n], 
to be, to go fast, too fast; 8 (mil) ir, 
advance. 

4. — sur le terrain de q. u., to encroach upon j. 
o.\i land. 5. Une maison qui avance sur la rue, a 
house that projects in the street. 

V. S'avancer (en allant), etc. Nb pas 
— ,(V. senses) to keep off. Faire — , ( F. 
senses) 1. 1 to press, to push forward, on ; 
2. II to bring up ; 8. || § to get forward ; 4. 
8 to drano forth, wit ; 5. to call (a coach). 
Qui n'avance pas, ( V. senses) § unim- 
proving. 

AVANIE [a-va-ni] n. f 1. I molesta- 
tion (for the purpose of exaction exer- 
cised by the Turks); 2. § affront ; outrage. 

Sanglante — , gross outrage. 

AVANT [a-van] prep. 1. (of time) be- 
fore, * ere ; 2. (of time) (preceding a 
verb) (de, . . .) before ; 3. (of order, situ- 
ation) o^ore ,- 4 (comf.) fore. 

1. — dix heures, before ten o'clock; arriver — q. 
u., to arrive before o. o. 2. — de venir, before co- 
ming; before he came. 3. Mettre un ehapitre — un 
autre, to put one chapter before another. 

— tont, flr St; ^ fl,rst of all ; before 
all, all things else ; — ce jour, before, era 
now. D'— , before; preceding. — qu'll 
soit longtemps, before, ere long. 

[AvANT jnust not b« confounded with devant or 
the adv. auparavant.'] 

AvANT QUE, conj. (de ; [subj.]) before. 

— de mourir, avant qu'ou meure, before on* 
diee. 

AVANT, adv. 1. 1 (of place) far ; 2. J 
(of p\ace) forward ; 3. n (ut i>\nce) deep : 
4. § (of time) far ; far ad/vancei, ; a § 

En _, 1. 1 (of p\&ce) forward; ill ad- 
vance ; on ; 2. § forioai d ; c/r. ; .1 {> 
abroach ; 4 (mil.) forward ; 5. (nav.) 
ahead. En — ! on! toujours en — \ on 
a/nd on ! forth on I En — de, 1. | be- 
fore, in front of; 2. § in advance of; 
before, more forward than ; en — eten 
arriire, 1. before and behind ; 2. to and 
fro ; 3. (nav.)/or« and aft. Aller ea — , 

1. to go fonoard ; 2. to %t,rge ; mettre en 
— , 1. 1 § to bring fonoard ; to admjice ; 

2. § to liold forth ; to put forth ; 8. j 
to bring, to call into play ; se mettre 
en — , to stand forward, forth; to put 
o.'s self forward: 

AVANT (inseparable prep, used In 
compound words) be/bre ; fore 

AVANT, n. m. (nav.) 1. afore ; 2. (of 
the ship) /tpa(i ,• bow; entrance. 

De r— k I'arri^re, from stem to stern ; 
fore and aft. De 1'— k, ahead of Aller 
"k 1'—, to have head-way ; aller do 1' -, 
to be wnder-icay ; 6tre de 1'— (ii), to be, 
to keep ahead (of) ; gagner 1'— (de), to 
get ahead (of) ; rester sur 1'— (a), to 
bear ahead of. 

AVANTAGE [a-van-ta-j] n. m. 1. (DK, 
DANS, of) advantage ; heneflt ; 2. (qua- 
lity) advantageousness ; 3. (suk, over) 
advantage (superiority) ; 4 • advan- 
tage-ground ; vantage-ground ; 6. (law) 
voluntary gift; 6. (man.) whip-hand 
7. (nav.) weather-gage ; 8. (]>lay) odd». 

Faible, leger, mince — , slight, triflinij 
advantage, benefit A 1'— do q. u., ft 
a. o.'s ■= ; avec — , 1. with = ; 2. to - ; ; 
an plus grand — , to the best =. Avoll 
1' — sur q. u., to have the = over at. o. ; 
-r- to have the whip-hand, of a. o. ; ^ fc 
have a. o. on the hip ; faire dee — « h. q. 
u., 1. to give a. o. =s ,• 2. tofamor a. a,' 
prendre q. u. k son — , to take a. o.at:=- 
prendre de 1'—, son — , to step upon 
something (in getting on o.'s horse) ; ro- 
tirer Je 1'— (de), to reap benefit ( from) ; 
tirer — de, to take — of; to turn to ao. 
count. 

AVANTAGER [a-yan-t»je] V. a. i. it 
advantage ; to give an advantage, ad, 
vantages to : 2. (de, loith^ to favor. 

A VANTAGES SEMENT [ a-riii-U; 

43 



A\ h 



AV L 



amal; dmk]e; ef6e; ^ftve; efete: rfje; iil; Hie; omol; dmfile; ^mort; w sue; ii sure; owjonr; 



"^c 



t* -n-fnar] adv. 1. advantageously ; 2. 

5. P^tfler, penter — de q. u,, (o tptak, to think 
* HI, highly o/o.o. 

Le plus — , 1. the most = ; 2i to the 
hcst advantage. 

AVANTAGEU-X, SE [ n-vaP ta-jeu, 

*4-z"] »dj. 1. (i., to) advantageous ; bens- 

'.cixl; 1. (pers.) pre,»u/ming ; assum- 

ig ; 8 (of dress) becoming. 

?02 ~, ( V. senses) VMbenefidal. Air 

, CKmceitedlook ; position avantageuse, 
tflrr^in — , | § advantage-ground ; van- 
tage-ground; taille avantageuse, com- 
manding ^gure. Avoir une opinion, 
nne idee avantageuse de q. u., to enter- 
tain, liave a good, favorable opinion 
of a. o. ; to think well of a. o. 

AVANT-BEC [a-vin-Wk] n. m., pi. — s, 
(engin.) (of bridges) 1. starling ; 2. cut- 
water; break-water. 

AVANT-BRAS [a-van-bra] n. m., pi. — , 
fore-arm,. 

AVANT-CORPS [a-van-kftr] n. m., pi. 
— , (arch.) fore-part (of buildings). 

- - de chapelle, ante-chapel. 

AVANT-COUR [a-van-kour] n. C, pi. 
— s, fore-yard ; fore-court. 

A'VANT-COUREUR T a-van-kou-reur ] 
n. m., pi. — 8, 1. 1 (TpeT6.) forerunner ; 2. 
$ (th.) forertmner ; precursor; har- 
binger ; 3. (mil.) van-courier; 4 (Rom. 
»nt) ante-cwrsor. 

fitre r— de, 1. to he the = of; 2. § to 
■Mht,r ; to tisher in. 

AVANT - COURRIERE [ a-van-kou- 
rie-r] n. f., pL — 8, ** harbinger ; fore- 
runner. 

£tre r — de, to be the =^ of; to usher ; 
to usher in. 

AVANT-DERN-ItR, liRE [a-van- 
-l*r-ni6, 4-r] adj., pi. — 8, last but one ; 2. 
penultmiate. 

L'--e syllabe, penult ; pemdtima. 

AVANT-F AIRE-DROIT [ a-van-R-r- 

trc-i] n. m., pi. — , (law) preventive in- 
i'tnction. 

AVANT-FOSS:fe [a-van-fo-.*] n. m., pi. 
— «, (fort) advance Josse. 

AVANT-GARDE [a-van-gar-d] n. f., pi. 
— 8, 1. (mil.) van^gua/rd ; van ; 2. (nav.) 

AVANT-GOtTT [a-vSn-gofl] n. m., 
L — 8, 1. I § foretaste ; 2. § antioipa- 



£o»; 



Avoir un — de, 1. to have a = of; 2. 
toforetaste. 

AVANT-HIER [a-van-ti-«r] adv. the 
day before yesterday. 

— au soir, the evening before last 

AVANT-JOUR [a-van-jour] n. m., pi. 
— , momAng twilight ; twiligld. 

AVANT-MAIN [a-van-min] n. m., nl. 
— , \. first-hand ; 2. (man.) forehand ; 
fore-quarters ; 8. (tennis) forehand 
itroke. 

Avoir de 1' — , {va»,n.) to have fine fore- 
(fiiar-ters. 

AVANT-MIDI [«-van-mi-di] n. m., pi. 
— ,forefiwon; monvlng. 

D" — , antetneridian. 

AVANT-PfiCHE [a-vftn-pi-sh] n. f., pi. 
— «, white a^ant peach; early Anne 
peach. 

AVANT-PIED [a-Tan-pi«] n. m., pi. 
—8, l.(Hn&t) metatarsus: 2. (of animals) 
fore-foot ; 3. (of boots) vamp. 

AVANT-PORT [a-van-pOr] n. m., pi. 
— s, 1. outer port; 2. tide-dock. 

A VANT-P08TE [a-vin-po.-t] n. m., pi. 
— s, (mil.) outfjost. 

AVANT-PROPOS [a-van-pro-pfi] n. m., 
pL — , 1. (of hooks) preface ; introduc- 
tion; 2. (of conversation) pr«/ac«; in- 
trodMction ; preamble. 

D' — , prefatory. Faire nn — k, to 
'Take a preface to ; to preface. 

AVANT-QUART [a-van-kir] n. m., pi. 
— «, rtiorol.) warning. 

AVANT-SC*;NE [a-vaD-.*.n] n. f , pi. 

-, — s, \. front ofths stage: 2. events 
preceding the opening (of a drama), 
pL ; 8. (ant) proscenium. 

AVANT-TOIT [a-van-toa] n. m., pi. 
— s. prcfjecting roof. 

AVANT-TRAIlJ [a-van-trin] n. m., pi. 
— «, \. fore-carriage ; 2. (man.).^r«-;«^« 
»»d iihest (of a horse). 



A V ANT- VEILLE [a-van-ri-i*] n. f., pi. 
— 8, tfwo days before. 

AVARE [a-va-r] adj. 1. avaHcious ; ^ 
miserly ; ^ miser-like : f^" 2. stingy ; 
|^~ niggardly; ^~ niggard; 3. 
(g. 8.) (DE, of) sparing. 

3. — du ,emp», de ses dons, sparing of thru, of 
o.'a gifts. 

AVARE, n. m. 1. miser ; 2. ^ niggard. 

W — , miser-like ; m i^serly ; en — , 1. 
Hke a miser ; 2. |^~ niggardly. 

AVARICE [a-v»-ri-s] n. f. 1. avarice ; 
a/cariciousness ; 2. fW~ stinginess. 

— sordide, sordidness ; ^ niggardli- 
ness. Avec — , 1. avari&ously ; 2. ^ 
stingily; niggardly; par — , \. from 
a/oarice; 2. ^^^ from stinginess. 

A VARICIEU-X, 8E, adj. t V. Avake. 

AVARIE [a-va-ri] n. f. 1. damage (in 
the conveyance of goods) ; 2. (nav.) dam- 
age; 3. (com. nav.) —6, (pi.) average, 
sing. 

— s communes, grosses, 1. (nav.) ea-tra- 
ordinary damage ; 2. (com. nav.) gene- 
ral average ; menues — s, (com. nav.) 
accustomed,petty, small averages ; — s 
particulieres, simples, 1. (nav.) ordinary 
damage; 2. (com. nav.) particular 
average. Compte d' — s et de contribu- 
tions, (ins.) statement Franc d' — ,free 
of average. Sans — , (nav.) undam,aged. 
Causer des — s A, 1. (nav.) to damage ; 
2. to cripple (a ship) ; indemniser d'une 
— , (com. nav.) to make good an aver- 
age; pour r6parer ses — ^for repairs. 

AVARIER [a-va-ri-<] V. a. (nav., com. 
nav.) to damage. 

AvARiE, E, pa. p. damaged. 

Non — , (com. nav., nav.) wndamaged. 

AVAU-L'EAU [»-t4-16] adv. \with 
the current, stream. 

Aller a — , 1. [ to £70 = ; 2. § to eoww 
to nothing ; to fall to the ground. 

AV:fi [a-T6] n. m. ame. 

— Maria, = Maria, Mary. 

AVEC [a-v4k] prep. 1. wiOi ; 2. ^ with 
it 



D' — ,from (as differing from). — cela, 
— tout cela,/or all that; notwithstand- 
ing ; nevertheless. 

AVECQUE, t V. Avua 

AVEINDRE [a-vin-dr] V. 8. 1 (conj. 
like Craindke) (db) to take (Jrom); to 
take out (of). 

AVEINE, n. f + r. Avoine. 



AVEINT, E, pa. p. of AVEINDEE. 

"i;DE - 

acorn-cnj). 



AVELAN] 



[a-v 



AVELINE [a-T-ii-n] n. C {hot)^bert. 

AVELINIER [a-v-ii-m«] n. m. (bot) 
JUbert-tree ; filbert hazel-nut 

AVlilNAGE [a-v6-na-j] n. m. (feud, 
law) avenage (payment in oats). 

AvENAiT, ind. impert 3d sing, of 

AVENIE. 

AvENANT. E, pres. p. 

AVENANT, E [a-v-nan, t] adj. pre- 
possessing : engaging ; pleasing/. 

Mai — , unpreposses.Hing ; ti/nen gag- 
ing ; forbidding. A r — (de), 1., an- 
swerable (to) : ans7oerably (to) ; ^ all 
of a piece {zdth) ; 2. appropriate (to) ; 
appropriately (to). 

_ AV:fcNEM'ENT [a-vft-n-man] n. m. 1. 
(A, to) accession ; succession ; 2. (of 
the Messiah) coming ; advent. 

AVENIR [a-v-nir] v. n. def + (conj. 
like Tenir) (th.) to occur ; to happe^i. 

Avenant, occurring ; happening ; in 
case of. Le cas avenant, the case oc- 
curring. Advienne quadvienne, quoi 
qu'il en advienne, 1. come tcliat may, 
will; 2. whateoer may be tlie conse- 
quence. 

AvENU, E, pa. p. occurred; hap- 
pened. 

Non — , 1. not = ; 2. nuU and void ; 
nul et non — , Qa.'w) null and void. 

AVENIR, n. m. 1. future; ,future 
times : * futurity ; ^ time to come ; 2. 
after life ; Z.. future welfare ; welfare ; 
future esristence; eodstence; 4. future 
prospects ; prospects, pi. ; 5. posterity ; 
6. (law) ventre fada^s. 

— 4 comparaiitre, (law) venire facias. 
k y — , in future ; in thf, future ; ^ in 



time to come; Thereafter ; fivni tMi 
that time ; henceforth. 

AVENT [a-van] n. m. advent 

De i — , aaventual ; of a.ir>etii. 

AVENTURE [a-van-tu-r] L. f. a/tta, 
ture. 

Bonne — , 1. good = ; 2./cr\VfM 'pre 
diction) ; grossv- — . (com. nav., iwj inv? 
bottomry ( V. Grosse). Triste — , 1 (,ck 
= ; 2. mischance. Acte de prdt ti k 
grosse — , (law) bottomry-bond; oo.tnv' 
a la grosse — , pret a la grosse — , (:-v»v 
law) bottomry ; compagnon d'— , C6 od 
venturer ; diseur, diseuse de bonto — , 
fortune-Uller ; esprit d'— , adventure ; 
mal d' — , whitlgw ; voyageur ezpoet 
aux — 8, adventurer. A 1'—, 1. on = 
at a venture; 2. for a venture; 8. at 
random; d' — , par — , peradventure ; 
percMnce ; by chance. Chercher dee 
— 8, to seek =« ,• dire la bonne — ,to teli 
fortunes ; dire 4 q. u. sa bonne — , to 
tell a. o. his fortune ; se faire dire sa 
bonne — , to have o.'s fortune told ; la- 
cher a 1' — , to blurt out ; mettre a 1'—, 
to jyut to the venture ; tenter 1' — , 1. to 
make the attempt, trial ; 2. t to try o.'s 
fortune, luck. Qui dit la bonne — , 
fortune telling ; that tells fortwnes. 

AVENTURER [a-van-tu-rt] V. a. to 
venture ; * to adventure ; to put to the 
venture ; to hazard ; to risk. 

AvENTURE, E, pa- p. 1. haearded ; 2. 
hazardous. 

Non — , tmhazarded. 

8'aventurer, pr. v. (ds, to) to ven- 
ture ; to adventure ; to hazard. 

AVENTUREU-X, SE [a-van-tii.r.4, 

eu-z] adj. advemtnirous ; venturous; ^ 
venturesome. 

Non — ,not — ;unadmentiurou«. C»- 
ractere — , (th.) adventurousnesi ; eo- 
prit — , (pers.) adventurousness. 

AVENTURIER [a-viin-t».ri«] n. m. 
adventurer (man). 

AVENTURli;RE [a-van-lcr:-* j] W. t 

(b. 8.) advenPurer (woman). 

AVENTURIER [a-vaa-tu-rU] al^. 1' 
A VBNTUREUX. 

AVENTURINE [a-van-tu-ri-iij it t 
(min.J advanturine. 

AVENU. V. Avenir. 

AVENUE [a-v-nul n. f 1. 1 8 (pm, 
to, of) avenue ; 2. f avenue ; waVc ; 
vista. 

AV:fiRER [a.v«.r«] V. a. to eBinca the 
truth of. 

AV£rON [a-T«-r6n] n. m. (bot) wild 
oat. 

AVERSE [a-vJr-s] n. f. sliower. 

Forte, grosse — , hea^ = ; petite — , 
slight =. 

AVERSION [a-vir-sidn] n. £ 1. (CONTBI, 

POUR, to, for) aversion; 2. a/verseness; 
8. (CONTKK, POUR, to) disinclination; 
dislike. 

B6te d' — *[, eye-sore ; objet d' — , eye- 
sore. D' — , of aversion ; averted. Avoir 
de r — (pour), 1. to have an aversion {to 
a. o., a th.) ; 2. to 6e averse (to a. th.) ; to 
be disinclined (to) ; to dislike ; 6tre la 
bete d' — de q. n., to bean eye-sore to a. 

0. ; prendre q. u., q. ch. en — , to take an 
aversion to a. o., a th. 

AVERTIR [a-vJr-tir] V. a. 1. (DK) to 

inform (of) ; to apprize (of) ; to gi/v« 
intelligence (of) ;' 2. (formally) to give 
notice (of) ; to advise (of) ; to give ad- 
vice (of) ; 8. (b. 8.) to admonish ; 4 (U 
8.) to warn ; to give warning to. 

3. — q. u. d'une faute, to admonish a. 0. ofzfQuk, 
4. — q. u. d'un danger, d'un Dial, to wum 3. 0, if 
a danger, of an evil. 

— k Tavance, 1. to give notice ; 8. to 
give warning ; — d'avance, ( F. sonwa) 

1. to premonish ; 2. to be premoniSoryj 
— au pr6alable, ( V. senses) to w««l- 
monish. 

5;/Jl.— AVKRTIR, INFOP.MKR, TKlKKXJt ATTS. 

Arertir means to direct one's attention to a thinj; 
informer, to apprize hiiu of the details; doimm 
avis, to warn hini buw he is himself concerned is 
it. Avertir can be said of inan'raate objects* iiu 
jormer and dunner avii, o' jwrsons only Coaor, 
arerti (admoviahed) by a thousui.d circrnnstaneei 
of the conspiracy atrainst his life, w^'orme (m^ 
prized) of all its details, was the csnie of his owp 
destruction, by refining to credit the (Hendly <wi 
(^naming) which one of the conspimtors kiid (p> 
ten) him dui avail dv»mJ\ 



AVI 



AVI 



AVvi 



e«ijo(ite; eujen; «/<jeftne; edpeur; a«pan; i«pln; 6»bon; unhrun; ♦llllq. ; *gn Bq. 



AvKBTi, K, pa. p. ( F; senses of Aver- 
tiK) (man.) amH. 

Non — , 1. iMiinfot-iTved ; 2. uno/ppria- 
td ; 3. iMuidmomished ; 4. imwarned. 

AVERTISSEMENT [a-vJr-ti-.-man] n. 

m. 1. intelligence ; information ; 2. (in 
farm) notice ; 3. (in form) noUJicaUon ; 
t (b. 8.) ad/movMion; mowition ; 5. (b. 
*) toaniing ; caution; 6. (of books) 
'j.lt-trtiseiJient. 

— anterienr, prdalable, ( V. senses) 
p^ fadmorAtion ; premonition; pre- 
mondshment. — au lecteur, 1. || adver- 
fM^n-ent to the reader ; 2. § hint ; 3. 
warii ing. D' — , ( V. senses) admoni- 
ii/re ; mom-tory. 

AVEKTISSEUE [a-ver-ti-Beur] t m. 

(theat.) cnU-boy. 

AVEU [»-Teu] n. m. 1. avowal; con- 
fession ; acknowledgment ; admiti- 
tion ; 2. consent ; approbation ; 3. (law) 
acknowledgmerU ; 4 (law) avowry. 

Derniers — x, (pi.) ( V. senses) dying 
confession (of persons condemned to 
death), sing. Gens sans — , (law) va- 
grants; homme sans — , (law) vagrant. 
De r — de, by the avoioal, confession, 
admission, consent of; de son — , 
avowedly; confessedly; professedly; 
je r — general, de 1' — de tout le monde, 
confessedly. Faire un — , to make an 
avoical, a confession, an acknowledg- 
ment, an admission ; faire 1' — de, to 
make an a/vowal, a confession, an ad- 
mission of; to avmo ; to confess ; to 
acknowledge ; to admit. 

AVEUER [a-veu-«] V. a. (bunt) 1. to 
mark down ; 2. to mark in. 

AVEUGLE [a-veu-gl] adj. 1. H blind;* 
sightless ; 2. § (sub, to) blind ; 3. § blind ; 
blindfold ; ** eyeless ; 4 § deluded ; 5. 
$ (th.) im/plidt. 

V. La fi)rtur.e est —,fortune it blind ; — sur ses Ai- 
faHtK, blimi «u o.'»/au/(s. 4. Un aventurier — , o 
ieliided adveniurer. 6, Une ob^issanoe — , implicit 

Coroplotement — , completely blind; 
^ stcne blind.' — n6, nee, de naissance, 
per-itrjn bom =. Devenir — , to become, 
^toget=:. 

A.VEUGLE, n. m. f bUnd person. 

A r— , en — , 1. blindly; 2. § blindly; 
Miet.msidmr'at^y. Un — y mordrait, a 
blind wuMi could see it. C'est un — 
qui en conduit un autre, it is the blind 
leading the blind. **:„ Au royaume des 
—9 les borgnes sont rois, in the land of 
the blind one-eyed people are kings. 

Sifn. — X l'avkusle, avku<5l6mbnt. A f'aveu' 
^^« implies a wajit of intelligence ; aveuff'^itwvt.n 
total want of reas'in. He who acts a Paveuylt, 
does not st'e •, he who acts aveuglement, does not 

AVEUGLEMENT ra-yeu-glg-man] n. 

m. 1. + I blindness; 2. § (sttr, to; pour, 
to) blindness. 

'2. — siir ses d^faut«,sur I'aTenir, blindness f«o.*« 
faa'ta, V. the future. 

Frapper d' — t, to strike blind, vdth 
blindness. 

AVEUGL:6MENT [a-veu-gU-man] adv. 
§ 1. blindly ; 2. im,pU<dtty. 

AVEUGLER [a.v«u-gl«] V. a. 1. t J 
(th.) to blind ; 2. J 1 (pers.) to put out 
the eyes of; 3. 1 to dazzle ,• 4 § to bUna 
(a. o.) ; 6. § to d^rids (a. o.) ; 6. § to h,ind 
(a. th.); to obscure; to cloud; 1 -, iv.) 
to father (a leak). 

4. La pr<)sp6rit6 nous aveugle, proaperiti/ blinds 
ua. *i. — I'esprit, to blind, to obscure, to ctoud tht 
luii t. 7. — »nf voie d'eau, to fother a leak. 

S'aveuolkb, pr. v. § (stni) to be blind 
(to) ,• not to see(... ). 

AVEUGLER, v. n. | to take amay 
^ie sight. 

AVEUGLETTE (1 K) [a-l'a-Teu-gU-t] 
■dv. I *f groping Wee bUnd people. 

AVIDE [a-vi-d] adj. 1. | greedy; 2. § 
<dk) eager (for) ; thirsty (for) ; covetous 
■ -. "> ; 3. (b. 8.) eager (for) ; ^ greedy 

iof); thirsty {for); 4 (b. 8.) covetous 
miserly); ^ greedy. 

1. Dea enfants — «, greedy children, 4. — de 
floire, eager for glorij. 3. — de carnage, greedy 
v carnagt. 4. Un homme — , a covetius man. 

P^tre — (de), {V. senses § to thirst 
{forV 

AVIDEMKNT [a-vi-d-manj adv. 1. B < 
areedity ; 2 § eagerly ; covetously ; 3. § 



(b. 8.) eagerly; ^ greedily; 4 § (b. 8.) 
covetousli^. 

AVIDIT:6 [a-vi-di-t«] n. f (DE, POtTK, 

for; pour, to) 1. | avidity; greedi- 
ness ; 2. § eagerness ; 8. § (b. s.) avid- 
ity ; covetousness ; ^ greediness. 
AviENDRA, ind. fut. 3d sing, of Avk- 

NIK. 

AviENNE, Advienne, subj. pres. 3d 
sing. 

AvrEMT, in<L pres. 3d sing. 

AVILIE [a-vi-iir] V. a. 1. to debase; to 
degrade ; to disgrace ; to dishonor ; 2. 
to demean (a. o.) ; 3. to vilify (a. o.) ; ^ 
to run dmcn. 

Personne qui avilit, (V. senses) de- 
baser (of) ; disg racer {of) ; disltxmorer 
W)- 

AviLi, E, pa. p. V. senses of Avilir. 

Non — , 1. undebased; 2. unde- 
graded ; undisgraced ; vmdishonored. 

S'avilir, pr. V. 1. to M^ase; to de- 
grade, to disgrace, to dislionor o.'s 
self; 2. (a, to) to demean o.''s self; to 
stoop. 

AVILISSANT, E [a-vi-Ii-san, t] adj. de- 
basing; degrading. 

D'une maniere — e, debasingly ; de- 
gradingli/. 

AVIL188EMENT [a-vi-li-s-man] n. m. 
vileness ; debasement ; degradation. 

Tomber dans Y — , to faU into debase- 
m,ent, degradation ; to render o.'s self 
vile. 

AVINER [a-vi-n«] V. a. to season with 
wine ; to season. 

AviNT, ind. pret. 3d sing, of Avenir. 

AVIRON [a-vi-ron] n. m. oar; boat- 
oar. 

— h couple, (nav.) scvU ; — de galfere, 
(nav.) sweep. Coup d' — , stroke of an 
oar ; stroke ; jeu d' — s, set of oars, k 
. . . — s, . . . -oared. Aller k Y — , aller a 
force d'— s, to row; 6tre h V—, 1. (of 
boats) to be rotcing ; 2. (nav.) to siceep ; 
nianier 1' — , to ply the oar; to puU; 
monter . . . — s, (nav.) to be... -oared.. 

AVIRONNERIE [a-vi-ro-n-ri] n. f. 
shed, shop for making oars. 

AVIRONNIER [a-W.ro-ni6] n. m. oar- 
maker. 

AVIS [a-yl] n. m. 1. opinion ; ^ mind. ; 
2. admce ; counsel ; 8. ^ piece of ad- 
vice ; 4 counsel ; deliberation ; 5. vote ; 
6. advice; intelligence; news; 7. no- 
tice; 8. (b. 8.) admonition; monition; 
9. (b. 8.) warning; caution: 10. (of 
books) advertisement; 11. (com.) ad- 
vice. 

Bon — , right opinion ; — assez clair, 
( V. senses) broad hint; — courant, pre- 
vailing = ; — personnel, ( F". senses) 
private =. — au lecteur, 1. || adver- 
tisement to the reader; 2. 8 hint; 8. 
warning. Bonneur d' — , oficimis ad- 
viser ; feuille d'— , (post) letter-bill; 
feuille d' — negative (post) blank letter- 
bill ; lettre d"— , (com.) letter of advice. 
A son — ,\. in o.'s ■=.; ^ in o.^s mind ; 
^ in o.'s account ; du meme — , of the 
same =, ^ mind; sauf meilleur —■',with 
all due deference ; ^ under correction ; 
sans — de, (com.) toith^ut advice, fur- 
ther advice of; suivant — de, (com.) as 
j>er advice of. Aller aux — , to vote ; to 
put the voie ; avoir — de, to be in- 
formed of; to learn ; to hear ; changer 
d' — , to dltsr o.'s =, ^ /nin/l ; dire so;i 
— , to speak, to state o.'s = ; ^ to speak 
o.'s mind; donner — , 1. to give notice; 
2. to give warning; 8. to admse; to 
give intelligence ; 4 (k) to certify (...); 
5. (com.) to send a notice ; donner — i 
Tavance, to give notice ; 6mettre son — , 
to give o.'s =^, etre d' — , to be of=^; 
ouvrir un — , to broach, to start an =: ; 
prendre 1' — de, 1. to take the sense of a 
deliberative assembly); 2. to ask the ad- 
vice of (a. o.); to advise, constdt loith 
(a. o.) ; profiter de 1'—, ( V. senses) to un- 
derstand, to take a hint; recevoir — , to 
receive notice. U m'est avis, U seems to 
me ; methirnks. ^*if Autant de tStes, au- 
tant d'avis, m/my men, many minds. 

AVISife, E [a-vi-ii] adj. 1. prudent; 
drcwmspect; caMtious; 2 advised. 

Bien — , well-advised ; mal — ,ill =. 

.5v». — AvisB. pbuhent. circonspiict. The 



ery thing, I 



avise (areurrupect) man thinks of e . >. ^ g, „„ 

all the expedients to which recourse may l*e had ^ 
the prudent (prudent) man neglects nothir,g, tries 
all means of si ccess ; the ctrconapect (eaxUiuHt< 
man risks nothing, endeavors particularly to SToii 
the ditBculties which might defeat his plans. Tho 
first has quickness and penetration; the seeooit, 
judgment and wisdom ; the third, loo often, ai»- 
trust and timidity. It is well to be aviti {eirmiu. 
spect) in embarrassing situations ; prudent (vorf) 
in dangerous enterprises; circoMpetHc»rtf-it')m 
delicate affairs. 

AVI8ER, V. a. 1. t to adoise ; 2. to 
perceive; to see; to espy; to oaf ok 
sight of; 8. to inform (officially); 4 
(com.) to advise. 

S'aviser, pr. V. 1. to bethink o.'s se^; 

2. (de) to ihdnk (of) ; to consider {p/)f 
to reflect (on) ; 8. (de) to think (of) ; to 
take it into one's head (to); 4 to dure; 
to presume ; to venture. 

AVISER, V. n. 1. (a) to think (of) ; to 
consider (cf) ; to r^ect (on) ; 2. (a, . . .) 
to mind. 

AVISO [a-vi-io] n. m. (nav.) advice- 
boat. 

AVITAILLEMENT [a-vi-ta-l-man*] n. 
m. 1. victualling ; 2. stock of pro- 
visions ; provisions. 

AVITAILLER [a-vi-ta-i^*] v. a. to 
vict^M.1. 

AVIVER [a-vi-v«] v. a. 1. to brigkUni; 
to polish; 2. to heighten (a color); 8. to 
heio (timber) ; 4 (arts) to polish. 

AVIVES [a-vi-v] n. £ pi. (vet) vi^e»; 
viveglands. 

Engorgement, gonflement des — , 
(vet) =. 

AVI VOIR [«-vi-voar] n. m. (instn^- 
ment) polisher ; bwwisher. 

AV0CA8SER [a-vo-ca-s^] V. n. toptay 
tlis barrister; to pettifog. 

AVOCAT [a-vo-ka] n. m. J. | bar- 
rister; barrister at law; zounsol.; 
counsellor; 2. 1 (in Scotland) advocate; 

3. § (AUPRES de, v)ith) advocutt; de- 
fender ; intercessor. 

— consultant, chamber-cownsel ; com 
lamyer; — general, attorney general, 
— plaidant, pleader ; — principal, leadl- 
ing barrister, counsel ; — du roi, Asiw^'a 
counsel. 

AVOCATE [a-vo-ka-t] n. f § 1. advo- 
cate (woman) ; defender ; 2. intercessor, 

AVOCETTE, n. £ (orn.) a/oocet; amo- 
setta. 

AVOINE r»-voa-n] n. C (bot) 1. oai», 
pi. ; 2. — s, (pi.) stwnding oats. 

— commune, oats ; — cultivee, 1. =: ; 
2. arnuts ; — 61ev6e, oat-grass ; folln 
— , Wfild = ; — sterile, animal =. Balle 
iV — , husk of=- ; farine, gruau d'— , oat- 
ms(d; ration d' — , allowance of =. 
D' — , of-=. ; oaten. 

AV6lNERIE [a-voa-n-ri] n. £ (agr.) 
land smon tcith oats. 

AVOIR [a-voar] V. a. 1. | § to iMve ; 2. 
I to have ; ^ to get ,• 3. 1 to have (pos- 
sess) ; ^ to be worth ; 4 | to have ; to 
have on; to wear; 5. § (a, to) to have 
(have to perform); 6. § (de, to, of) to 
hu'Ve (entertain a sentiment) ; 7. § to hold 
(entertain a sentiment) ; 8. to be (enter- 
tain a sentiment); 9. § to bear (have); 
l(i. (of age with regard to the person, 
animal, etc) to be; 11. (of cold, heat, 
hunger, thirst, with regard to the person 
that feels it) to be; 12. (of illness, pain, 
uneasiness, etc.) to be die matter with 
(a. o.) ; to aM. 

3. — . . . de rente, to have . . a year ; *) bo 
worth . . . a year. 4. — nn habit 
wear a blade coal. 6. — a icrire 
virKe to a. o. 6. J'ai le plaisir d 
the pleamre to tee it, of teeing it. 7. — en horr»K, 
to hold a. th. in horror. 8. — honte, — neur, -- 
rais'in, — tort, to be ashamed, to be afraid to bA 
right, to be wrong. 9. — I'air, to bear an appearanet, 
10. — ... ans, <o be . . . yeart old; to be . . . IL 
,1'at chaud, froid, faim ou soif, / am <;«/</, wat^ 
hungry or thirtty. 1'2. Qu'a»«z-vous t what ails 
you t what is the matter with you t 

En — , to meet with disappointment ; 
2. -r- to catch it ; y — , 1. tfiere to he ; 2. 
to be the matter ; — encore ^, to hof* 
left; — de quoi, 1. to have msa/ns ; 2. to 
liave wherewith; — stir sol, 1. to hf ^t 
about o. ; 2. to hnve on (a garmeut); 
faire — , ( V. senses) to help to ; fairn — 
forcement, ( F. sens<>s) to force (a th. 
Rl 



a o. u., to h 

e le voir, , 





AVR 












BAB 










BAD 


amal 


4 male; 


ef6e 


^f&ve; 


im6 


ije 


ill; 


«ile; 


mol; 


6 m61e; 


dmort; 


W8UC 


'& stare; ou Jonr; 



upon (a. 0.); voulolr — toujours, (F. 
•enees) to grasp and grasp. En a-t-U I 
what a lot of it, a number of them he 
has / il a, vous avez, ils ont q. ch., some- 
thing ails him, yon, them; Viere is 
lometMmg ih« matter with him, you, 
them; il y a, 1. there is; there are; 2, 
it it; 8. since ; ^ ago ; il y en a, there 
*re »om« ; il n'y a pas a . . ., there is no 
. . . (present participle) ; il y avait, 11 y 
ent, 1. iJiere was ; th^re were; 2. it was ; 
^a'y a-t-il ? 1. what is there f 2. what is 
U f what is the matter t what now t il 
n'y a pas de quoi ! (of tlianks) Iheg you 
would not mention, nam^ it! do not 
,tuime, mention it; je n"ai rien, il n'a 
rien, et& ; nothing ails me, him, etc. ; 
tliere is nothing the matter with me, 
him, etc. ; qu'a-t-il, qu'avez-vous ? what 
is the matter toith him, toith you t what 
ails him, yout 

Sun. — Avoir, poss4i>kr. 'Avoir (to have) is to 
have in one's band or within one's reach ; pi/sseder 
(topottet)) is to have as one's own. We are not 
necessarily masters of whit we avon» (have) ; we 
always are, of what we pouedotu (yutsfsa). Avoir 
is sometimes only temporarj ; potsider is mustly 
permanent. We avow (have) money which we 
are constantly disposing of; we poasidont (uwh) 
lands which we keep for a permanency. 

AVOIR, n. m. \. property ; ^fortune; 
luhstance ; 2. property (possession) ; 8. 
( book-k. ) credit ; creditor ; creditor- 
tids. 

2. C'est on bel — , it it good property. 

Pour tout — , as o.'s whole property. 

AVOISINER [a-voa-«.n«] v. a (of 
place) 1. to be adjacent to; to be conti- 
guous to ; to be near ; to be in the 
neighborlwod of; 2. to border upon. 

£tre bien avoisine, to home good neigh- 
bors. 

AVORTfi, E [a-vor-td] adj. 1. (of fruits, 
▼egetables, etc.) abortive ; 2. § abortive. 

1. B16 — , abortive com. 4, Dessein — , an abor- 
Ii7« dtaign. 

AVORTEMENT [a-vor-t€-man] n. m. 1. 

abortion (action) ; miscarriage ; pre- 
wmture delivery ; 2. (pers.) (b. s.) abor- 
tion; 3. aborti^eness (state); 4. (bot., 
med., zooL) abortion. 

AVORTER [a-vor-t^] V. n. 1. J (pers.) 
to mMcarry; 2. (of animals) to cant, to 
drop prematurdy ; to slip ; 3. (of fruit) 
to he abortive ; 4. § (th.) to be, to prove 
abortive. 

Faire — , \. \ to cause, to procure 
abortion ; 2. to make (fruit) abortive ; 
8. § to render (a. tli.) abortive; to frus- 
trate ; to baffle ; se faire — , (pers.) | to 
procure abortion ; to miscarry. 

aVORTON [a-vor-ton] n. m. 1. (pers.) 
abortion ; abortive child ; 2. 1 § abor- 
Hon. 

AVOUli; [a-voa«] n. m. 1. attorney; 
§olicitor; lawyer; 2. (law) attorney- 
at-law. 

Clerc d' — , attorney's, solicitor's 
clerk. ; 6tude d' — , ='s, solicitor's office. 

A VOUER [a-voa-«] V. a. 1. to avoio ; to 
con/eits ; to acknowledge ; to own ; 2. 
to acknowledge; to own; 8. to grant; 
to aUorc : to admit ; 4. to nvoio ; to ap- 
prove ; to approve of; 5. ' iw) to muke 



2. — im enfant, un ouvrage, to ac«^owledge, to 
•wn a child, a work. 

Personne qui avoue, ( V. senses) avow- 
trr. Pouvoir Stre avoue, ( F. senses) to 
b« amowable. 

Avoue, e, pa p. F senses of Avouer. 

Non — , 1. unavowed ; unconfessed ; 
unacknowledged; unowned; 2. vm^ 
granted ; tinaUo^ced ; ttnadmitted. 
D'uiie manifere — e, avowedly ; confess- 
oMy. 

S;m. — AvotTER, confesskr. We avaumt (ac- 
Imuittedgt) when we are questioned ; we eonjemvnt 
itonfets) when we are accused. We avouon* 
[meienow/edge) what we would have liked to have 
•(fncealed ; we often confettont (confett) voluutft. 
Hly. 

ATOYER [a-voa-i6] n. m. admoyer 
(Swiss magistrate) ; avoyer. 

AVRIL [a-vri-i*] n. m. April. 

La mi- — , the middle of-=- ; poisson 
d'— , 1. I mackerel ; 2. April-fool's er- 
rand; jonrdu poisson d' — , April-fooV s 
day; personne qui refoit un poisson 
d' — , April-fool. Donneran pofjaond' — 



k q. n., to make a. o. an April-fool ; re- 
cevoir un poisson d' — , to be made an 
April-fool. 

AVRON [8-TT6n] n. m. (bot) vMd 
oats. pi. 

AVUER, V. AvEtTER. 

AVULSION [a-vni-sion] n, £ (did.) 
amtision. 

AXE [ak-s] n. m. 1. oasis; 2. (arts) 
oftle ; a«le-tree ; 3. (boO axis ; 4 (ar- 
tiL) trunnion. 

— coude, (mach.) cramk, ; — prlmalre, 
(bot) (of plants) caiidex ; — toumant k 
volenti, (arts) revolving axle; axle- 
tree. — de vis, screw-arbor. De 1' — , 
( F senses) axal ; atdal. Qui a rapport 
k r — , axal. 

AXILLAIRE [ak-sil-U-r] adj. 1. (anat) 
axillary; astiUar; 2. (hot) aaillary ; 
aayillar; aacU-flowering. 

A fleurs — s, (bot) ami-flowering. 

AXIOME [ak-si-6-m] n. m. aanom. 

D' — , acdomatie. Faire un — , to make 
an aanom,. 

AXIOMi;TRE [ak-ii-o-mJ-tr] n. m. 
(nav.) tell-tale. 

AXONGE [ak-.an-j] n, £ (pharm.) ckb- 
VMge. 

AYANT, pa p. of Avoir. 

AYANT CAUSE [«-ian-k6-z] n. m., pi. 
— , Ayants cause, (law) assign. 

AYANT DROIT [6-ian.droa] n. m., pi. 
— , Ayants droit, I, (law) party con- 
cerned ; party ; 2. (law) assign. 

AZ^DARAC, AZEDARACH [»-rf-da- 
rak] n. m. (bot) azedarach; ^ bead- 
tree. 

AZEROLE [a-«8-ro-l] n. £ (bot) aze- 
role. 

AZEROLIER [a-i8-ro-li«] n. m. (bot) 
azevole-tree. 

AZIME, adj. F. Azymk. 

AZIMUT [a-«i-mut] n. m. (astr.) aai- 
muth. 

AZIMUTAL, E [ a-zi-mn-tal ] adj. 1. 
(astr.) azim/uth ; 2. (of a circle) a^mmth ; 
vertical. 

Cadran — , axdmuth dial; cercle — , 
=, vertical circle ; compas — , = com,- 
pass. 

AZOTE [a-jo-t] n. m. (chem.) asote. 

AZOTIQUE [a-zo-ti-k] adj. (chem.) 
aeotic. 

AZUR [a-iur] n. m. 1. dztire ; blue; 
sky-color ; 2. ** azure. 

— de Hollande, Dutch blite. Pierre 
d' — , (min.) lazulite; azurite; azure- 
stone. V>'—, azure. 

AZURil, E ra-«u-r«] adj. a»ure; 
azured ; sky-colored. 

Voute —e, ** azure-sky ; heaven's 
azure ; blue. 

AZURIN, E [a-zn-rin, i-n] adj. (did.) 
azure. 

AZYME [a-zi-m] adj. azymous; vn- 
leavened. 

Pain 1-, azyme ; unleavened bread. 

AZYME, n. in. X azyms ; -wnlewvened 
bread. 

rate des — 8 -\-, feast of wnZea/cened 
bread. 

B 

B [M, bs] n. m. (second letter of the 
alphabet) 6. 

6tre marqu6 an — (Stre borgne, bigle, 
bossu, boiteux), to be blind of one eye, 
to be hwmp-baxiked, to be lams or to 
squint ; ne parler que par — ou par F, 
to do nothing but swear. 

BABA [ba-ba] n. m. 1. bvM ; 2. plwnv- 
cake; 3. pound-cake. 

— marque d'une croix, cross-bun. 
BABEL [ba-b*l] n. f Babel. 

Tour de — , tower df-=. De — , de la 
tour de -^ (b. 8.) Babylonian ; Baby- 
lonish. 

BABEURRE [ha-beu-r] n. m. butter- 
milk. 

BABICHE [ba bi^h] n. £, 

BABICHON [ba-bi-shan] B. m. lap- 
dog ; shock. 

BABIL [ba-bii*] n. m. prattle ; prate ; 
chatter ; babble ; tattle ; gabble ; gab- 
Ming. 

BABILLAGE [ba-bi-U-j*] n. m. (b. s.) 



1. babbling ; chatter; tattle; gabble i 
gabbling ; 2. chit-chat. 

BABILLARD, E [ba-bi-iar, i*1 a4j. L 
babbling ; chattering ; talkative ; twat- 
tling ; 2. (of birds) talking. 

BABILLARD [babi-iar*] n. m. E,n.£ 

1. babbler ; prater ; chatterer ; talker; 
gabbler ; 2. (om.) babiUard ; babbldnt. 
fauvette; nettle-creeper. 

BABILLEMENT [ba-bi-i-man*] n. a. 
garrulity; loquacity; talkativetime. 

BABILLER [ba-bi-i«*] v. n. to prate; 
to prattle; to chatter; to babble; fti 
gabble; to ticattle. 

BABINE [ba-bi-n] n. £ (of aninuUs) 
lip ; pW chops. 

BABIOLE [ba-bi.o-1] n. £ 1. I play- 
thing; 2. § boAeble; trifle; gewgcMo; 
knicknack. 

Qui n'est qu'une — , ( F senses) boMh 
blina; trifling. 

BABOR'D [ba-b«r] n. m. (nav.) lar- 
board. 

De — , larboard. Faire feu de tribwd 
et de — §, to use eoery msans. 

BABORD, adv. (nav.) 1. larboard; 
to larboard ; 2. aport. 

BABORD A IS [ba-b6r-dJ] n. m. (pL) 
(nav.) larboard watch. 

BABOUCHE [ba-bou-8h] n. tpapooch; 
Turkish slipper. 

BABOUIN [ba-bomn] n. m. 1. (mam.) 
baboon ; 2. § (pers.) monkey. 

Faire baiser le — i q. u. 1. (of soldiers) 
to mMke one kiss the monkey ; 2. § to 
make one submit 

BABOUINE [ba-bou-i-n] n. £ (pent.) 
monkey ; htissy. 

BAB'YLONIEN, NE [ba-bi •o-ni-in, »h»" 
n. m. f & adj. Babylonian. 

BAC [bakj n. m. (nav.) 1. passage- 
boat ; ferry-boat ; 2. horse-boat 

Passer le — , to ferry. 

BACCALAURfiAT [b»-ka-l6.r«-»] n. 
m. bachelorship ; baccalaureate. 

BACCHANAL [ba-ka-nai] n. TO. Up- 
roar ; ;^- row; ipW rrnnpua. 

Faire — , to make a, an =. 

BACCH ANALE [ba-ka-na-i] n. £ (ait J 
bacchanal ; 2. § bacchanal ; • cteL 

BACCHANALISER [ba-ka-ca-U rt] v. 
n. to revel. 

BACCHANT [ba-kanl n. in. (»cc 
myth.) Bacchanaliu/n ; bacchant. 

BACCHANTE [;b»-kan-t] n. £ 1. (ana 
myth.) Bacchiinahan ; 2. § BaccTujmc^ 
Han ; 3. § termagant. 

BACCIFi:RE [bak-si-fS-r] adj. (bot) 
bacciferous ; berry-beaHng. 

BACH A fba-sha] n. m. V. Pacha. 

BACHE [ba-sh] n. £ 1. awning; 2. (ol 
carts, wagons) top-awning; 3. (o< 
carts, wagons) tilt ; 4. (of gardens) hot- 
bed frame ; 5. (of pumps) tank ; 6. 
(mach.) cistern ; tank. 

— alimentaire, (mach.) feeding-cis- 
tern. 

BACHELETTE [ba-sh-lA-t] n. £ t lass; 
damsel : maiden. 

BACHELIER [ba-shg-li«] n. m. 1. (uni- 
versity) bachelor ; 2. + (knighthood) ba- 
chelor. 

— es arts, = of arts. Se faire passer, 
recevoir — , to take a bachelor's degree. 

BAcHER [ba sh«] V. &.t) tiU (carts, 
wagons). 
BACHIQUE [ba-shi-k] adj. 1. bacehAc ; 

2. convivial. 
Liqueur — , wine. 

BACHOT [ba-sho] n. m. wherry; pass- 
age-boat 

B ACHOTEUR [ba-.ho-teur] n. m.fertv- 
man. 

BACILE [ba-«-i] n. m. (bot) (gonTJB) 
sam^phire; sea-samphire. 

— maritime, =. 
BACILLAIBE [ba-«-i»-r*] n. m, (mlE ) 

scapoUte ; pyramidal feUpar. 

BACINET, n. m. (bot) V. BAflsnnt 

bAcLEB [ba-kit] V. a 1. t I to bar 
up ,• 2. § to hurry over ; to huddle up; 
to clap up; to hammier up; to shiufp^ 
wp ; to patch up. 

BADAUD [ba-dft] n. m. E [d] n. £ 5 t 
lounger; idler; 2. sawnterer ; 8. (i)< 
London) cockney. 

BADAUD, E, actj. 1 1. lounifinff. t 
saunterina. 



BAG JBAl 


BAI 


ofijaftte; «ijeu; etiJeOne; efipeur; d«pan; i«pin; dnbon; fin bran; *U Uq. 


•gnuq. 



BADAUDER [ba-d6-d«] V. n. 1. to 
iowige; 2. to aatmter. 

BADADDERIE [ba-d6-d-ri] n. f. 1. 
Umnging ; 2. saunteHng ; 8. idle talk ; 
1 (of London) cockneyism. 

BADERNE [ta-d*r-n] n. C (nav.) dol- 
pMn; paunch. 

BADIANE [ba-di-a-n] n. f. BAD IAN 
[h'j I. m. (bot) anise-seed-tree; In- 
sf<aw, star ani»e-8eed. 

BADIGEON [ba-di-j6n] n. m. 1. (paint) 
^i'tgeon ; 2. (house paint) color. 

BADIGEONNaGE [b«-di-jo-na-j] n. m. 
Tioase paint) coloring. 

BADIGEONNER [ba-di-jo-n6] v. a. 
(Louse paint) to color. 

BADIGEONNEUR (ba-di-jo-neurl n. 

m. (.house paint) 1. colorer ; 2. white- 
washer. 

BADIN, E [ba-din, i-n] adj. 1. playful; 
tpofUve; frolicsome; 2. (by words) 
jesting ; jocular. 

BADIN [ba-din] n. m. wag. 

BADINAGE [ba-di-na-j] n. m. 1. play; 
playfulness ; spori/i/veness ; frolicsome- 
ness; 2. trifling; 8. (by words) ^'ocm- 
'Mrity; joking ; 4. joke ; jest 

4. Ceci n'eat point un — , that it tw joke. 

BADINE [ba-di-n] a t 1. switdi ; 2 
—9, (pL) ligfd tongs. 

Donner des coups de — h,to beat witJi 
1 switch ; to switch. 

BADINER [ba-di-n«] V. n. 1. to play; 
Co sport ; to frolic ; 2. to trifle ; 8. (by 
words) to jest; to joke; 4 (of orna- 
ments, wearing-apparel) to wame about. 

Par — , 1. playfully ; sporimely ; 2. 
jokingly ; jestingly. 

Enbadinant^w^'es^; in joke; in fun; 
jestingly ; jokingly. Badinez-vous ? 
are you jesting, joking f II ne badine 
pas, fie does not trifle (he is severe). 

BADINERIE, n. f. $ V. Badinagk 

BADOIS [ba-doa] p. n. m. E [z] f. na- 
tfxe of Baden. 

BADOIS. E. adj. of Baden. 

BAFOUER [ba-fou-«] V. a. 1. to baffle; 
t to mock ; to scoff at. 

8c faire bafouer, to he mocked, scoffed 
(Tl. ^ 

BlFRE [ba-fr] n. f -^ 1. stuffing (eat- 
ing); gormandizing; 2. -r- blow out 
(abui.dant repa-st). 

BAFRER [bi-fr«] V. n.-i-to stuff (eat 
greedily) ; to gormandize. 

BAFREUB [ba freiir] n. Dl. -r- gOT- 

mandizer ; guttler. 

BAGAGE. n. f. V. Bagasse. 

BAGAGE [ba-ga-j] n. m. 1. luggage; 
baggage ; 2. (of tlie army) baggage. 

Gros — , heavy luggage; menu — , 
Ught =. Chef de — , booking-clerk. 
Plier — }^~, to pack off bag and bag- 
gage ; to pack off; § to die. 

BAGARRE [ha-g&r] n. f. 1. hubbub ; 
i. brawl; squabble; icrangle. 

BAGASSE [ba-ga-«] n. f. cane-trash ; 
bagasse. 

BAGASSE, n. f. ^ -i-slut; h.asy. 

BAGATELLE [ba-ga-te-l. fc. f 1. I 
trinket (thing of little value) ; 2. + § tri- 
fle ; trifling thing ; 3. § trifle (a mere 
nothing) ; old song ; 4. (play) bagatelle. 

— ! pshaw ! never fear ! Table de — , 
fplay) bagatelle-board. Ala — ^, trifUng- 
1^. S'amuser a la — , to stand, to sit 
trifling ; to trifle o.'« time away. 

BAGNE [bk-gn*] n. m. galley; 
" iKtgne" (convict-prison). 

BAGNOLET [ba-gno-l«*] n. m. (nav.) 
tm^avUn. 

BAGD:E [ba-g] n. t. ring (for orna- 
ment). 

— 8 et joyaux, (law) jewels and oma- 
:ncnts. Jou de — , roundabout. Une 
— an doigt « feather in o.'« cap. 

BAQUENAUDE [ba-g-nd-d] n. f. blad- 
dor-vM (fruit of the bladder-senna). 

BA6UENAUDER ]:ba-g-n6.d«] v. n. to 
'rifle; to trif^ o.'s time away; -j- to 
fiildle. 

BAGUENAUDIER [ba-g-n6-di«] n. m. 
(bot) (genus) bladder-senna. 

— cominun, = ; faux — , ^ scorpion 
lenna. 

BAGUENAUDIER, n. m. 1. (pers.) 
'r^iier ; 2. (th.) ri/iig-pwKle. 



BAGUER [ba-ghd] V. a. (needl.) to turn 
down and tack. 

BAGUES, n. f. pi. V. Bagagb. 

BAGUETTE [b»-ghfe-t] n. f. 1. smaU 
stick ; stick ; 2. switch ; 3. wand ; 4. 
I'od (staff ) ; 5. rod ; 6. (for drums) drum- 
stick ; 1. (for gloves) glove-stick ; finger- 
stretcher ; 8. (of muskets) ramrod ; 9. 
(arch.) baguette; 10. — «, (pi.) (mil) 
gantlet ; gantlope. 

— divinatoire, divining wand ; — 
magique, conjuring = ; =. — de fee, 
de magicien, =; — de fus6e, rocket- 
stick; — de fusil, de pistolet ram-rod; 

— k gants, glove-stick ; finger-stretcfier ; 

— de peintre, maul-stick; — de tam- 
bour, druan-stick. Coup de — , beat of 
the drum. Commander, mener a la — , 
to rule vyith a tight hand ; donner un 
coup de — , (mil.) to ruff; to ruffle ; to 
switch; donner des coups de — k, to 
beat with a Sficitch ; to switch ; se lais- 
ser mener, obeir 4 la —, § to allow o.'s 
self to be led ; to obey submissively ; 
passer par les — s, (mil.) to run tlie gant- 
let ; passer, faire passer par les — s, (mil.) 
to flog through the line. 

BAGUIER [ba-ghid] n. m. ring-boa:. 
BAH ! [ba] mt pshaw ! nonsense ! 
hoity-toity ! 

— 1 ah — ! nonsense ! 

BAHUT [ba-u] n. m. t chest; trunk. 

En — , (arch.) ^Dith a eurced profile, 
surface. 

BAIIUTIER [ba-u-ti«] n. m. t trunk- 
maker. 

BAI, E [b^] adj. bay. 

— brun, broion, dark = ; — chatain, 
chestnut = ; — clair, bright, Ught = ; 

— miroit6, dapple =. 
BAlART, n. m. V. Batart. 
BAIE [be] n. £ (bot) berry. 

A — 8..., ... -berried. Porter des 
— 8, to bear berries ; to berry. 

BAIE, n. C 1. (geog.) bay ; »inus; 2. 
(mas.) bay. 

Degager d'une — , to disembay. 

BAIE, n. f +<rit*. 

Donner une — , la — k q. n., to play 
a. o. a trick ; to play a trick upon a. 6. 

BAIGNER [bfe-gni^*] v. a. 1. (de. with) 
I § to bathe ; 2. to steep ; 3. (of rivers, 
seas, etc.) to wash ; to bathe. 

3. La riviere baignt ce mur, the river washes that 

wall. 

i;tre baign6 dans le sang, to be wel- 
tering in o.'s blood. 
Baignk, b, pa. p. V. senses of Bai- 

GNEE. 

Non — , 1. unbathed; 2. unwashed. 

Se BAIGNER, pr. V. 1. to bathe ; to 
bathe o.'s self; to take a bath; 2. to 
welter (in blood). 

Faire baigner des animaux, to take an- 
imals into ths water. 

BAIGNER, V. n. 1. to be Steeped ; 2. 
to soak ; to be soaked ; 3. to welter (in 
blood). 

BAIGNEU-E [bJ-gnenr] n. m. SE [efl-z*] 
n. f. 1. bathsr ; 2. hathing-man, m. ; 
bathing-tooman, t ; 8. bath-keeper. 

BAIGNOIR [bfe-gnoar*] n. m. bathing- 
place (in a river). 

BAIGNOIRE [bJ-gnoa-r] n. f. 1. bath 
(receptacle) ; bathing-tub ; 2. (theat) 
corner box. 

Voiture — , bathing-machine. 

BAIL [bai] n. m., pL Baux [b6] (law) 
lease. 

— ernphyt6otique, 1. = for a long 
term of years ; 2. = for ninety-nine 
years; — verbal, fait sans ecrit^ (law) 
parole = ; — a cheptel, = of cattle ; — a 
ferme, = of ground ; — k longues annSes, 
a long terme, long lease ; =- for a long 
term of years ; — a loyer, = of house, 
tenement ; — a terme, pour un terme d'an- 
n6es, =/br years ; — a vie, =/or life ; 

— a volonte, = at will ; — de quatre- 
vingt-dix-neuf ans, = for ninety-nine 
years. Locatalre en vertu d'un — , = 
-holder ; loc&taire par — emphyteotique, 
(law) := -holder. A — ,ona-=.; par — , 
1. % = ; 2. = -hold ; par — emphyteo- 
tique, (law) = -hold. Avoir a — ,to Ivatse 
a = of; donner k—,to lease ; to let on 
a = ; faire passer un — , to mcke a = ; 
navoir pas fait de — §, to h(we iaken no 



engagement ; resilier un — , to cancel a 
=. Cela n'est pas de mon — §, 1. thcH 
does not enter into my engagement 
2, / have nothing to do with it. 

bAiLLANT [ba-ian*] adj. 1. gaping ; 
yawning ; 2. (bot) gaping. 

BAILLE [ba-i*] n. f. (nav.)»a«. 

BAILLEMENT [ba-i-m»n*] n. m. L 
gaping; yawning ; 2. gape; yavHh, 
8. (gram.) gap; hiatus. 

1 aire un — , to gape ; to yawn ; (klrs 
— , (gram.) to gape ; to have a hiatus. 

BAILLEE [ba-i6*] V. n. 1. to gape: 
to yawn ; 1 to give a yawn ; 2. § (th.) 
to gape ; to open (in fissures) ; 8. to 6o 
slack ; 4 (of doors, windows) to be ajar^ 
on ajar. 

BAILLER [ba-i4*] V. a. t (law) to da- 
liver: to gi/ce. 

— a ferme, to lease ; x let on a lease. 
La — belle, en — d'une telle a q. u. §, to 
toish, to tcant to impose upon a. o. 

B AILLERESSE [ba-i-rS-s*] n. f t (law) 
lessor. 

BAILLET [ba-iJ»] fr;y. m. (of horses) 
sorrei. 

BAILLEUL [ba-ieul*] n. m. t bone- 
setter. 

BAILLEU-R [ba-ieur*] n. m. SE [ei-ij 
n. f. gaper; yawner. 

Un — en fait bailler un autre, yawn 
ing is catching. 

BAILLEUR [ba-ieur*] n. m. (law) 
tessor. 

— de fonds, (com.) 1. money-lender ; 
2. dormant, sleeping partner. 

BAILLI [ba-i*] n. m. baUiff (magis- 
trate). , 
Grand — , high =. 
BAILLIAGE [ba-ia-j*] n. m. laili- 

BAILLIAG-EE [ba-ia-j**] ilEE, a^i. 
oftlte bailiwick. 

BAILLIVE Jba-i-v*] n. £ baiUffa w^ 

BAILLON [_ba-i6n*] XL m. gag. 

Mettre un — a, j to gag ; mettre un — 
k q. u. §, to stop a. o.'s tongue ; to shut 
a. o's mouth. 

BAILLONNEE [ba-io-n«*] V. a. 1. fc> 
gag ; 2. to wedge up (a door). 

BAILLOQUE [ba-io-k*] n. £ Tan»- 
gated ostrich feather. 

BAIN [bin] n. m. 1. bath; 2. (action) 
battling ; 3. — s, (pi.) bath-room ; batK- 
ing-room ; 4. — s, (pi.) baths ; bathing- 
eMablisliment ; 5. — s, (pi.) batfn ; wa- 
ters ; 6. Batfi (order of knighthood) ; 7. 
(arts) bath. 

— chaud, warm, tepid, hot bath ; — 

complet = with Unen ; demi , A«p- 

= ; slipper = ; — froicl, cold = ; — lo- 
cal, topique, local, topical = ; — medi- 
camenteux, medicated =^ ; — simple, = 
witliout Unen ; — temp6re, tiede, tepid 
=. — a domicile, = sent to private 
houses ; — de mains, luind- := ; — de 
nier, — d'eau de mer, salt-water = ; — e 
lie mer (pi.) sea-batfdng ; — de pieds, 
foot- = ; — de sable, sand-bath ; — sur 
place, = taken in tits establishment; 

— de proprete, = taken for cleanliness ; 
— 8 de rivifcre, (pi.) river-bathir,g; — de 
sante, = taken msdidnally ; — de siege, 
hip- = ; — de vapeurs, 1. vapor- = ; 
2. (chem.) vapor- =. Appartement dea 
— 8, chambre du — , cabinet de — , sallo 
de — , = -room, batfdng-room ; etab- 
lisseraent, maison de — s, bathing-estat- 
li'ihment ; fond de — , linen for the bot- 
tom ofa=^; salle de — s, = -room, bus- 
ing-room. C'est un — qui ohauffe 8, 
t/ie>'e is a storm breioing. 

BAIN-MARIE [bin-nm-ri] n. m., pL 
BAiN8-.MARiE,^chem.) wet-bath. 

BAlONNETTE [b»-io ne-t] n. £ (mil } 
bayonet. 

Charger k la — , 1. to charge with th« 
=^; % to bayynet ; enlever a la — , to 
carry at the point of the = ; mettro 1» 

— au bout du fusil, to fix =«. — au a- 
non 1 fix =« / 

BAIRAM, BEIRAM [bj-ran] n. m 
(Mah. rel.) bairam ; beiram. 

BAISEMAIN [bfe-i-min] n. m. 1. (feud; 
kissing of hands ; kissing hands ; % 
— st, (pi.) respects; compUtnonts. A 
belles — s ^, (£ in this phraae) with ar- 
dor and gratitude, v-iire sco — s 4 o 



BAI 



BAL 



BAj. 



a mal; d male; 4 fee; i IBve; i fete; #,ie; i 11; I lie; o mol; 6 mole; 6 mort; u sue; & sure; »i^ jour , 



a t to pay a'« respects to a. o. ; to com- | 
nt^id o^s self to a. o \ 

BAISEMENT [b4.»-man] n. w. 1. -f | 
kiafdng ; 2. kissing (of the poiie"s feet); 
B (geomj osculation. 

BAISEE [W-i«] V. a. 1. to kiss (a. a, 
A. tli.'k ; 2. to embrace (a. o.). 

— q. u. 4, 8ur la bouche, to kiss a. o.'a 
Wj 8 ; — q. u. a la joue, au front, to = 
II. ).''» (heek, forehead; — la main de q, 
■X, to=za. o.'s Iwmd. 

Baise, e, pa. p. kissed. 
Non — , ttnkissed. 

8b BAisER, pr. V. 1. to kiss each other, 
ons another; 2. (th.) to touch. 
BAISEK, n. m. kiss. 
Gros — , 1. hearty = ; 2. (b. 8.) smack ; 

— de Judas, Judas's =. Sans — , 1. 
loithout a = ; 2. imkissed. Envoyer un 

— a q. u., 1. to send <z. o. a = ; 2. to kiss 
*.'« harid to a. o. 

BAISEU-R [W-zefir] n. m. SE [eii-x] n. 
<t kisser. 

BAISOTTER [b4-a>.«] v. a. to 66 al- 
ways kissing. 

BAISSE [W-,] n. C 1. (of prices) faU; 
decline ; 2. (of water) going down. 

— 16gere, sUghtfaU, decline. Joueur 
4 la — , speculator on a = ; 2. (change) 
^~ bear. En — , (com.) on tlie =, 
decUne; jouer h la — , (com.) to specv^ 
late on a:=; subir une — , to suffer a 
decline; tendre k\a, — , (com.) to liave 
a tendency to=, to decline ; to look 
down. 

BAI88ER [U-ti] V. a. 1. I § to lower ; 
^.\to m,ove down ; to move lower ; 8. 1 
to let down ,■ 4 1 to put down ; 5 || § to 
bring down ,• 6. 1 to trail ; 1. to hang 
(o.'s ears) ; 8 to cast down (o.'s eyes) ; 
». to held d(/ion (o.'s head) ; 10. to hang 
(o.'s head in sorrow or shame) ; to hang 
down; 11. to droop (o.'s head in lan- 
ffnishing) ; 12. to lower (a tone, the 
voice); 13. to put down (a veil); 14 
(ooui.) to lower (a price) ; 15. (mus.) to 
(CKoer; 16. (nav.) to lower; 17. (nav.) 
0>-t,)to strike (o.'s flag). 

1. I — q. ch. qui est trop haut, to lower a. th. 
Una u too kiyh. § — ses pretentious, to lower «.'» 
prtttntiont. 2. — un tableau, to move down a pic- 
lure. 3. — une jalousie, un rideau. to let down a 
Uind, a curtain. 4. — oe qu'on a levis trop haut, 
ia put down what has been raised too high. 5. § — 
I'orgueil a q. u., to bring down a. o.'s pride. — la 
main a un ch^val, topiit a hirrse. upm the full gal- 
lop; — I'oreille, to look abashed, discouraged, 
nortijied. 

Baisse, t, pa. p. (V. senses of Baissek) 
(of the eyes, look) dozen-cast. 

— vers la terre, (of the eyes) down- 
cast. Aller tete — e §, to go boldly, 
bravely, fearlessly. Donner tfite — e 
dans §, to run headlong into. 

8e BAI88ER, pr. V. 1. (pers., animals) 
to stoop; 2. (pers., animals) to stoop 
down ; 3. 1 (pers.) to bow down ; 4 (th.) 
to let dotcn ; 5. (of the eyes) to be cast 
down ; e,. (of the head) to hang down ; 
T. (of the tone, voice) to knoer ; 8. (of a 
veil) to be put doion ; 9. (mus.) to lower ; 
10. (nav.) to be lowered. 

— jnsqu'ft terre, to stoop down to the 
grouwl. C'est un homme qui ne se 
hansse ni ne se baisse §. he is a man of 
«ven temper. II semble qu'il n'y ait qu'4 

— et en prendre, (iron.) (said of some- 
thing difficult which appears easy) /i« has 
vnly to •pick and choose. 

BAI88EE, V. n. 1. I to lo^cer ; 2. I to 
drop ; to fall ; 3. | to decline ; to de- 
ireage ; to diminish ; 4. II (of waters) to 
faU ; to go dmmi ; 5. § to decline ; to 
fi%U ; to go down ; 6. § to decline ; to 
jfVMw ; to he on the xcane ; ^ to fall off; 
7. 6 to lose (deteriorate) ; 8. § (pers.) to de- 
olln* ; to break ; 9. § (of the sick) to 
*i)nk; 10. (of the tide) to e&& ,• 11. (com.) 
(of prioee) to decline ; tofaU. 

i. Ub -Jdeau baisse, a curtain drops, falls. 5. La 
•/ne co-r».iience a — , the sight begins to decline, to 
fiul ; ses facult^s baissentj his faculties are decli- 
'iii 5. 6. Son influence baisse, his influence is decli- 
ainii, waning, falling off. 1. Ce vin baisse, this 
vine loses. 8. Ce vieillard baisse, this old man is 
•inclining, breaking, 

Ne pas — , {V. senses) to keep up. 
Faire — ,(V. senses) || to bent down. 

BAI88IER [b5-si«] n. in. (change) f^F' 
Uar (speculator on a fall) 
^4 



BAISSliRE [b4-siJ-r] n. f. (sing.) bot- 
tom oft/te cask (of beer, cider, wine, etc.). 

BAISURE [bj-iu-r] n. f. (culin.) kiss- 
in g-orust. 

BAJOIRE [ba-joa-r] n. £ double-head- 
ed coin. 



BAJOUE [ba-jofl] n. t. (of pigs) cheek. 

BAJOYEK [ba-joa-«] n. m. (engin.) (of 

canals) chamber-, wharf-, side-wall. 



BAL [bai] n. m., pi. — s, baU (dancing). 

— costum^, travesti, fanay =; — 
masque, m,asked = ; — par6, dress- =:. 
Donner le — a q. u. §, to rato a. o. ; to 
give it to a. o. ; fermer un — , to break 
tp a^^;to close a = ; ouvrir un — , to 
open a =:; mettre une carte au — , to 
stake money upon a card. 

BALADIN [ba-la-din, i-n] n. m. E, n. f. 
1. 1 dancer ; 2. (b. s.) merry Andrew. 

BALADINAGE [ba-la-di-na-j] n. m. 
merry Andrew's jest, joke; buffoon- 
ery. 

BALAFEE [ba-la-fr] n. f. 1. gash; 
slash ; 2. 4. scar (of a gash). 

Faire une — , to make a scar. 

B AL AFREE [ba-ia-fr«] V. a. 1. to gash ; 
to slash ; 2. to cut (a. o. ) over the/ace. 

Balafre, e, pa. p. covered with scars. 

BALAI [ba-lj] n. m. 1. broom; 2. 
brush; long brush, broom; long- 
handled brush. 

— de bouleau, birch broom ; — de 
c\\emmke, fire-brush ; — du ciel, (nav.) 
NortJi West wind ; — de crin, house- 
brush ; — de jonc, carpet--=. ; — i la- 
ver, 1. mop; 2. swab; — de plume, 
feather-^:.. Coup de — , sweep; man- 
che k — , 1. =^-stick ; 2. ■=^-hamdle. 
Donner un coup de — k,to brush a Ut- 
ile ; to brush up ; enlevw avec un — , 
to brush off; essuyer avet un — {k la- 
yer), to mop ; to mop up ; faire — neuf, 
(of servants) to do o.'s work well at 
first ; laver avec un — {k laver), to mop ; 
passer le — dans, to sweep ; rotir le — , 1. 
to drudge in obscwriiy ; 2. to lead a 
vAld life ; faire toumer un — {k laver), 
to trundle a m,op. #*# II n'est rien tel 
que — neuf, a new =: sweeps clean. 

BALAI8 [ba-16] n. m. (mln.) balas, 

Eubis — , = ruby. 

BALANCE [ba-lan-s] n. C 1. 1 balance 
(for weighing) ; 2. scales, pi. ; paM" of 
scales ; 3. § balcmce; 4 § suspense; 5. 
(astr.) Ubra ; balance ; 6. (book-k.) ba- 
lance; 7. (book-k.) balance-sheet; 8. 
(com.) balance. 

— approximative, rough balance; — 
ordinaire, 1. common =; 2. common 
scales ; — provisoire (book-k.) trial-=: ; 
— romaine, steelyard ; Roman =. — 
k bascule, weighing-machine ; — d'es- 
sai, (tr6buchet" assay-c=:; — aux let- 
tres, letter-=- — de precision, philo- 
sophical — • - pour peser, =:-'Weight. 
Arbre de — , .tech.) =-arbor; fabri- 
cant de — s, 1. =^-maker; 2. scale- 
maker; feuille de— , (com.) =-sheet ; 
plat de — , scale ; poids de — , —-weight ; 
trait de la — , turn of the scale. En — , 
§ 1. in suspense; i.flvMtuating ; 3. wa- 
vering ; irresolute ; undecided ; 4 
dmibtful. Acquitter, solder une—, to 
disehai-ge a = ; arreter une — , (com.) 
to make out a = ; 6tablir, faire la — , to 
draw, to strike a = ; emporter la — , 1. 
F (of weights) to be too heavy ; 2. § to out- 
weigh all other considerations ; entrer 
en — . "". to be compared; 2. to be in 
susp^mse ; etre en — , 1. to be in sus- 
pense ; 2. to fluctuate ; 3. to wa/ver ; to 
be irresolute, vmdedded ; 4 to he doubt- 
fid ; mettre en — , dans la — §, to weigh ; 
to poise ; faire p<?ncher la — , to turn the 
= ; to turn the scale; tenir en — , to 
keep in suspense; tenir la — 6gale 
entre. to holrl the = between. 

BALANCE [ba-lan-s«] n. m. (dance) 
balance. 

BALANCELLE [ba-Ian-se-l] n. f. (nav.) 
fdticca. 

BALANCEMENT [ba-Un-s-man] n. m. 
1 1. balancing (in equilibrium) ; pois- 
'rng ; 2. swinging ; swing ; 8. rockvng ; 
waving; 4 (in -weXVAns) waxldUng ; 6. 
(in walking) wallow ; 6. fluctuation. 

BALANCER [ba-lan-s«] V. a. 1. 1 to ha- 
lawe (hold In equilibrium); to poise; 



2. I to swing ; 8. | to rock ; 4 to wane , 
5. § to balance (consider* ; to wei^X ; tt 
poise ; 6. § to counter/icdance ; td hit- 
lance; T.% to cov/tit/ract; 8. § 5( 6a- 
lance (accounts) ; ^ to sqxiai i , 9. 
(book-k.) to balance. 

2. — ses bras, to swinj; (m«'i arms. 

Balance, e, ad;. ( V. senses cf Bai^.m 
cer) (of accoimts) 1. balanced ; aquart 

2. (of victory) § dmibtful. 

Non — , ( V. senses) 1. i nnbalanc&i, 
unpoised; 2. § vmweight.d; not cr*^ 
sidered ; 3. (of account^; mibalanc^ti. 

Se balancer, pr. v. 1. || to moing ; 2, 
II to rock ,• 3. I to wave ,• 4 | (in walking) 
to waddle ; 5.^to balance ; to be exrwrt^ 
terbalanced. 

Personne qui se balance, ( F. senses) 
swinger. 

BALANCER, v. n. § 1. {d, to) to Aew- 
tate ; to be in suspense ; 2. tofltictuate , 

3. to wa'cer; to be irresolute, undecided; 
4 (d, to) to scruple ; 5. (danc.) to bal- ■ 
once. 

Qui ne balance pas, ( V. senses) un- 
hesitating. Sans — , ( V. senses) unheal 
tatingly. 

Syn. — Balancer, h£siter. When there are 
considerations to be weighed, we balanfons (are in 
suspense); wlien there are obstacles to be ovt r- 
conie, we hesitims (hesitate). Doubt, uncertaint ;, 
make us balancer (uiatier) ; fear, weakness, inahe 
us hesiter (hesitate). He who balance (is undecided) 
holds himself between two courses for the purpose 
of selecting the better ; he w ho hesite (hesitates) 
ventures not to choose either. 

BALANCIER rba-lan-««] n. m. 1. 
(pers.) balance-maker ; 2. (pers.) settle- 
maker; 8. (of clocks) pendulum; 4 
(of rope-dancers) balancing^pole ; pole ; 
5. (of watches) balance ; 6. (coin.) covn- 
ing-engine ; coining-press ; 7. (mach.) 
beam ; working-beam ; cross-bea^n ; 
8. (spin.) flier ; 9. (of the compass and 
lamps in ships) gimbal. 

— monetaire, coining-engine ; coin- 
ing-press ; — transversal, cross-beam. 

BALANCINE [ba-lan-si-n] n. t (mv.) 

Uft. 

— 8 de come, topping-lifts; — « :le 
grande vergue, main-Ufts. 

BALANgOIRE [ba-lan-soa-r] a £ t 

see-saw; 2. swing. 

BALANDRAN, BALANDRA8 [o*. 
lan-dran, dra] n. Di. t 1. ^'' baJ,andran'" 
(cloak of state) ; 2. "■ balandran" (coarse 
great-coat). 

BALANE [ba-ia-n] n. m. (conch.) 
acorn ; acorn-fish ; acorn-sheU. 

BALAUSTE [ba-l6s-t] n. £ (phann.) 
balaualia; balaustines. 

BALAUSTIER [ba-ifts-tir] n. m. (hot 
halaustine ; wild pomegranate. 

BALAYAGE [ba-i^-ia-j] n. m. »weep- 
vng. 

BALAYER [ba-ii-i«] v. a. 1. | § to 
sweep ; 2. II to sweep ; «f to give (a. th.] 
a sweep ; 8. || to sweep along ; 4 | § to 
sweep away, off; 5. § to brush off; 6 I 
to sweep out ; 1.\to sweep up ; 8. (bj 
artillery) to sweep ; to clear. 

4. — Pennemi, to sweep off the euenit/. 6. — une 
chambre, to sweep out a room. 7, — les ordures, t< 
sweep up the dirt. 

— bien, comme il faut, to sweep clean ; 
— en t»s, to sweep up. Qvil n'est pat 
balay6, wtis'wept. 

BALAYEU-R 
[eu-: 



Sii 



[ba-14-ieur] 
] r. £ sfweeper. 
d<' rue, street-=i. 

BAIAYURES [ba-lA-in-r] n. £ pL 
sweepr nys. 

— de mer, sea-weed wash^ on atora 

BALBUSARD. V. Balbuzabd. 

BALBUTIEMENT [bal-bu-ri-iMuiJ a 
m. stammering ; stuttering. 

BALBUTIEE [bai.bu-si«] v. E. 1. 1 fc 
stammer ; to stutter ; 2. § to speck aiik- 
fusedly ; 8. (of children) to tisp (epr 6i 
imperfectly). 

En balbutiant, stammeringly ; atef- 
teringly. 

BALBUTIER, v. a. 1. 1 to stammer; 
to stanvmer out ; to stutter ; to stuttee 
out ; 2. § (of children) to Usp (speak liw 



perfectly). 
BALBU 



ZARD [bal-bu-iar] n. 

'shing-eagle. 
[bal-kdn] n. xo. htUconv 



(oni,- 





BAL BAM 






bAN 




o^ Joftte; «wjeu; eu JeftRe; ed, penr; an pan; In pin 


on bon ; un brun ; 


•11 Hq. 


•gn U<,. 



BALDAQUIN [bal-da-kin] n. m. 1. 6ai- 
2ac%in ; 2. (arch., sculp.) canopy. 

B Ale [ba-1] n. f. (bot.) boll ; glvme. 

En — , (of gram) unhttsked. 

B.VLEAKES [ba-16-a-r] a^j. (geog.) Ba- 
learic. 

BALEINE [ba-ij-n] n. f. 1. (mam.) 
^109) whale; 2. whale-hone ; 3. (astr.) 

— franche, (species) whale ; — nord- 
ij^T, ict- =. Barbe de — , =: -bone, 
t: -jn ; blanc de — , sperm ; spermaceti. 
Fvnon de — , 1. = -bone ; = -Jin ; 2. 
(«nat) baleen ; pSche de la — , = -jish- 
try; pScheur de — , whaler. 

BALEIN^ E [ba-lJ-n6] adj. tuith 
tohalebane. 

BALEINEAU [ba-lJ-n6] n. m. (mam.) 
young whale. 

BALEINIER [ba-U-ni«] n. m. 1. 
whaler (whale-flsher) ; 2. (nav.) wha- 
ler: w?iiUe-ahip. 

Navire — , (nav.) whaler ; whale-ship. 

BALEINIERE [ba-ii-ni-e-r] n. f. (nav.) 
whaler's boat 

BAL^NAS [ba-U-na] n. m. whale's 
pinde ;pizzle. 

BALE8T0N [ba-le.-t6n] n. m. (nav.) 
aprit. 

Voile k — , = sail. 

BALJfcVRE [ba-lJ-vr] n. f. 1. + under 
Up ; 2. (arch.) overplus lip. 

bALI [ba-li] n. m. P^ Pali. 

BALISAGE [ba-li-za-j] n. m. (de, in) 
1. erection of beacons ; setting up bea- 
cons ; 2. (nav.) biioying. 

BALISE [ba-U-z] n. £ (bot.) //^<« o/ 
Vie shot. 

BALI8E, n. f. 1. beacon; 2. % tow- 
path. 

Batiment — , light-ship. — de sau- 
Tetage, safeity -beacon. Droit de — , 
hea^itmage. 

BALI8ER [J.a-U-i«] V. a. 1. (nav.) to 
arect beacons t». ; to set up beacons in ; 
6. to buoy 

BALIS EUR [ba-li-Mur] n. m. 1. sup&r- 
Icitendent qf a tow-path; 2. person ap- 
fniinted to erect beacons. 

BALI8IER [ba-U-««] n. m. (bot.) shot 

— de rinde, Indian =. 
BALI8TE [ba-ii»-t] n. f. 1. ballista; 2. 

(Ich.) balistes. 

BALISTIQUE [ba-U.-ti-k] n. f. ballis- 
tics, pi. 

Qui a rapport i la — , balUstie. 

BALIVAGE [ba-U-va-j] n. m. stad- 
diing. 

BALIVEAU [ba-U-v6] n. m. staddle. 

Laisser, rdserver ses — x, to staddle. 

BALI VERNE [ba-ii-vftr-n] ^ idle talk; 
idle tale; stuf; fiddle-faddle. 

BALIVERNE'R [ba.li-vJr-n«] V. n. to 
trifle ; to fiddle. 

BALLADE [ba-la-d] n. f. ballad. 

Anteur de -^ = -writer ; composi- 
tion des — 8, = -writing. Chanter des 
—8, to sing =« ,■ mettre on — , to bal- 
ladize ; rimer des — s, to make ballads. 

BALLAGE [ba-la-j] n. m. (metal) ball- 
ing. 

BALLANT [ba-lan] adj. 1 (of the 
arms) swinging. 

Aller les bras — «, to sicing o.'s arms 
in walking. 

BALLE [ba-l] n. 1 1. baU (a. th. round) ; 
2. ball (play-thing) ; 3. (of certain grains) 
htisk ; 4. (of fire-arms) btdl ; shot ; 5. 
(of cannon) bullet; bidlet shot; 6. (of 

Eddlers) pack ; 7. (bot.) hoU ; gliime ; 8. 
)m.) bale (of goods) ; 9. (print) ball ; 
ater. 

— morte, »pent ball, shot ; — ram6e, 
liar-sli^t. — au camp, (sing.) (play) 
rf/tmders, [ I. ; — a, de feu, fire = ; — 
m po*, (sing.) roUy-pooly ; — en rond, 
play) stool-ball; — a la volee, (play) 
irap. Enfant de la - -, son who follows 
his father's profession ; personne qui 
lort la — , (play) bowler. A — s perdues, 
dt random ; de — , 1. of no*vidue ; ^ 
paltry ; 2. (of giiods) peddler's ; en — , 
(of grain) in the husk; unhmked. 
CJhorger k — , <f load with =, slwt; 
iouer k la — , to i lay at ■=■ ; juger la — , 
I. I to foresee where th^ bait will fall ; 
i.\U> foresee the result (of a. th.) ; pren- 
Uo lu - oil \*y\A. 1 I to catch the = on 



the rebound ; %%to improve an oppor- 
tunity ; renvoyer la — , 1. B ^ return 
the = ; 2. § to give tit for tat ; se ren- 
voyer la — , to refer to each other ; ser- 
vir la — , (play) to bo^ol ; to be the bmol- 
er. A vous la — ! it is your turn ! 
quand la — me viendra, wli&n my turn 
comes. 

BALLER [ba-l«] V. n. 1 1. to dance; 
2. to dance in a ring. 

BALLET [ba-ife] n. m. ballet 

Directeur des — s, = ■'master. 

BALLON [ba-lon] n. m. 1. balloon ; 2. 
foot-baU (to play with) ; 3. (chem.) bal- 
loon. 

— captif, captive balloon ; — perdu, 
= in the air. — d'essai, pilot =. Faire 
une ascension en — , mooter en — , to 
anceiid ina=.; to make an ascent in 
a =. 

BALLONN^, E [ba-lo-n«] adj. 1. dis- 
tended ; swollen ; 2. (yeter.) hid'e^bound. 
BALLONNEMENT [ba-lo-n-man] n. 
m. (med.) stoelling. 

BALLONNER [ba-lo-n^] v. a. (med.) 
to swell ; to distend. 

BALLONNER, v. n. vmed.) to swell. 

BALLONNIER [ba-lo-nife] n. m. foot- 
baU maker. 

BALLOT [ba-lo] n. m. (com.) bale. 

BALLOTIN [ba-io-tin] n. m. (com.) 
smaU bale. 

BALLOTTADE [ba-lo-ta-d] n. m. 
(man.) balotade. 

BALLOTTAGE [ba-lo-ta-j] n. m. sec- 
ond ballot. 

BALLOTTE •'ba-lo-t] n. f. t ballot 

BALLOTTE, n. C (bot) ballota. 

— fetide. black horehound. 
BALLOTTEMENT [ba-lo-t-man] tt ra. 

tossing, shaking about 

BALLOTTER [ba-lo-Wj v. a. 1. 1 to 
toss ; '[to toss about ; to shake about ; 2. 
§ to send (a. o.) about (from one to an- 
other) ; 3 § to bandy (a. th.) ; to knock 
about ,• 4 § to camvass (discuss) ; to turn 
over in every direction ; 5. to ballot a 
second time ; 6. (tennis) to toss, to ban- 
dy (a ball). 

BALLOTTER, v. n. to shake. 

BALOURD [ba-lour, d] n. m., E, n. £ 
dolt; mmiskuu; blockhead. 

BALOURD, E adj. didl; heavy; 
doltish; dull-headed; dull-brained; 
thick-headed ; blockish. 

BALOURDISE [ba-lour-di-.] n. f. 1. 
didness ; Jieamn^em ; doltishness ; block- 
ishness ; 2. stupid tt,ing. 

Avec — , doUishly ; blockishZy. Faire 
une — , to do a stupid thing. 

BALSAMIER [bal-za-mi6] n. m. F. 

BAtTMIKK. 

BALSAMINE [bal-ia-mi-n] n. C (bot) 
balsam ; balsamine. 

— des bois, touch-me-not 
BALSAMIQUE [bal-za-mi-k] adj. 1. 

balnii/ ; 2. balsamic; balsam^us. 

BAL8AMIQUE, n. m. (pharm.) baZ- 
satnic. 

BALSAMITE [bal-»a-mi-t] L f. (bot) 
(genus) costmary. 

— odorante, =. 
BALUSTRADE [ba-lus-tra-d] n. f. 1. 

balustrade ; 2. (macli.) fence. 

BALUSTRE fba-lunr] n. m. 1. (arch.) 
baluster ; 2. railing. 

BALZAN [bftl-zan] n. m. (of horses) 
white-footed horse. 

BALZANE [bai-ia-n] n. C (of horses) 
white-foot 

BAMBI 
(boy) ; babe ; §. bot/. 

BAMBOCHADE [bin-bo-sha-d] n. f. 
(paint) I. rustic, low life ; % painting, 
picture of rustic, loic life. 

BAMBOCHE [ban-bo-sh] n. f. 1. ! pup- 
pet (large) : 2. § (pers.) bit of a thing ; 
shriinp ,• 8. § -f- spree. 

— s, spectacle de — s, pnppet-show. 
Joueur de — s, = -player ; maitre d'un 
spectacle de — s, = -man ; = -mMSter. 
Faire une — , -r- to have a spree. 

BAMBOCHE, n. t awiatt bamboo; 
bamboo-cane. 

BAMBOCIIEU-R [ban-bo-dieur] n. m., 
SE [efi-z] n. f. rake. 

BAMBOU [ban-bou] n. va. (bot) bam,- 
boo: bamboo-Ciiufi 



BAN [ban] n. m. 1. ban; ?. ban (ol 
marriage); 8. eitile ; banishment: A. 
(feud). 

Dispense de — s, lPT«nae; marrioifa 
license. An —, under t?,eban. Achetoc 
des — s, se procurer une dispense de —&. 
to procure a = ; lever le — , to l&sv th^ 
ban; mettre an — , 1. | § to lay a ban ; 
2. ^^" § to send to Coventry ; publttJ 
les —8, 1. to publish the bans ; 2. to ait 
(a. o.) im, church ; faire publier ses — 8, 1. 
to have o.'s bans pubmhed ,• 2. to &c 
asked m church; rompre son — , ic- 
break o.'s ban. 

BANAL, E [ba-nall adj. 1. (feud.) m!>- 
ject to socome ; bona socome ; 2. § (perK) 
hireling; mercenary; 3. § (tht) conv- 
mon to every one; 4. § (th.) commiotv- 
place ; luickney ; trite. 

Nature — e, ( V. senses) triteness. D'an« 
maniere — e. ( V. senses) tritely. 

BANALITY [ba-na-li-w] n. £ (feud 
law) socome ; bond socome. 

Droit de — du moulin, (feud, law) thir- 
lage. 

BANANEJba-na-n] n. £ (bot) baiuma; 
plantain ; T Adam's apple. 

BANANIER [ba-na-ni^] n. m. (bot) 
banana-tree ; plantain; plantain-tri^, 
1 Adam's apple. 

BANC [b^j n. m. L bench (seat of 
wood, stone, or metal) ; 2. bank (seat of 
turf) ; 3. (of churches) peio ; 4. (of flsh) 
shoal ; 5. (of ice) field; 6. (of rivers, seas) 
«/t«//; 7. (ofsand) bank; 8. (of schools) 
bench; form; 9. (of stone) bed; 10. 
(nav.) (rowers) bank; thwart; 11. (spin.) 
frame. 

— 8 dfigamis, d6serts, empty benches; 
— s ministeriels, (|)arl.) treas^iry-bench- 
es. — des accuses, bar; —■ k broches, 
(spin.) »pindle and fly roving-fram^ ; — 
d"eglise, pew ; — "de Toeuvre, church 
wardens' pew ; — de roche, (nav.) ridg^j 

— du roi, de la reine, kin^, queen's — 
Etre sur les — s, to be a school-boy , ft 
be in o.'s pupilage ; se remettro »ur la 
— 8, to go to school again ; to retwm ^. 
o.'s pupilage. 

BANCAL, E [ban-kai] ac^. bandy-loff 
ged,. 

BANCASSE [ban-ka-.] n. £ (nav.) chem 
(used as a seat and bed in galleys). 

BANCO fbin-kol adj. (exch.) banco. 

BANCROCHE [ban-kro-.h] adj. 1 (b. 8., 
1. bandy-legged ; 2. rickety. 

BANDAGE [ban-da-j] n. m. 1. (of 
wheels) tire ; hoop ; 2. (build.) lioop ; ». 
(surg.) bandage ; belt ; fascia ; 4 truss; 
5. (surg.) employment,' use of bandages. 

— hemiaire, (surg.) truss. Porter un 
— , to wear a truss. 

BANDAGISTE [ban-da-ji-.t] n. m. 1. 
bandage-mMker ; 2. truss-maker. 

— herniaire, truss-maker. 
BANDANA [ban-da-na] n. m. bandan- 
na (silk handkerchieO- 

BANDE [ban-d] n. £ 1. B band; 2. | 
slip ; strip ; 3. 1 head-band ; 4. || shred ; 
5. II string ; 6. § band ; troop ; company; 
7. § (b. 8.) (pers.) set ; gang ; crew ; 8. 
(of a billiard-table) cushion ; 9. (of birds) 
flight; 10. (anat) tract; 11. (arch.) 
band ; girth ; 12. (astr.) fascia ; belt ; 
13. (her.) bend ; 14. (post) band. 

S. Une — de saucisses, a string (/ lansa les. 

Demi- — , (nav.) parliameni-lieel ; 
petite — , strip = : roulee, (med.) roller ■ 

— de maillot, swathing-band ; — dr 
tremie, (build.) (of chimneys) trimmer. 
Chef de — , leader of a gang. A deux 
trois — s, tioo, three-band^; a la — | 
(nav.) lying along; en — 1 amai'i 
sous — , in bands. Couper par — 8, ti 
shred; donner, plier k la — , (nav.) to lit 
along ; to heel ; to careen ; fain — i 
part, to keep a part; former en -■ §, f^ 
band. 

BANDEAU [ban-d6] n. m. 1. hetui- 
bawl ; frontlet ; 2. fiUet ; 3. bandagt 
(over o.'s eyes) ; 4 § cloud ; m,ist; dark- 
ness ; 5. (arch.) string-course. 

— royal, royal diadem. Arrachor le 
— , faire tomber le — de deesns les yenx 
de q. u., to dispel tfie mist before a. o.'f 
eyes; to open a. o.'s eyes ; avoir nn — 
8«r les yeux I %, to be blindfolded j 
couvrir d'un — , to m-i.ffle ; mettre ua - 



BAN 



BAR 



BAK 



iinnl; dm&l?; efee; «f6ve; ^IBte; ^je; ill; ll\e; omol; dmdle; dmort; msuc; ^s&re; oujont; 



i q. u, bw les yeux de q, n., <o blind/old 
a. c. : to blind a. o. ; 6ter le — de, 1. 1 to 
remoce the bandage from ; 2. i to v/n- 
nmffU , S. § to open (a. o.'s eyes). 

BANDELETTE [ban-d-14-t] n. f. 1. 
Ixmd (small); hanfi-»tring ; 2. bande- 
let; bandlet; S.Jillet; 4. (arch.) band- 
let; girth; 5. (surg. )/a«cta. 

BANDER [ban-d«] V. a. 1. I to bind 
vp ; i. I to tie -up ; S.ito putabandage 
oe«r (a. o.'s eyes) ; 4. | to tighten ,• 5. 1 to 
bend (a bow) ; 6. § to bend (the mind) ; 
I. («rcn.) to «ey in (arches) ; 8. (nav.) to 

— trop, (F: senses) to strain. — les 
yenx a I §, to bUndfold ; to blind. 

Bande, e, pa. p. ( F; senses of Bander) 
L (her.) bendy ; 2. (of the mind) on the 
ebretcK 

Non trop — , (Fl senses of Bander) 
mnstrained. 

BANDER, V. n. to be Ught. 

BANDEREAU [ban-d-r6] n. m. trum- 
pet-string. 

BANDEROLE [ban-d-ro-l] n. f. 1. shoul- 
der-belt ; 2. bandrol ; oannerol ; 3. 
(fi&y.) streamer ; small pendant 

BANDIERE [ban-dij-r] n. £ F: Ban- 

FIEKE. 

BANDIT [ban-di] n. m. 1. ruffian; 
bandit ; 2. vagrant. 

BANDOULIER [ban-dou-lifi] n. m. t 
highwayman (of the mountains). 

BANDOULMRE [ban-dou-lie-r] n. C 1. 
»hmdder-belt ; cross-belt ; 2. bandoleer. 

Porter q. eh. en — ., to sling a. th. 
over o.'s shmdder ; porter la — , to be a 



BANDUEE [ban-du-r] n. f. (bot) bam^ 
omra. 

BANIAN [ba-nian] n. m. Banian (In- 
dian idolater). 

BANLIEUE [ban-Ueu] n. f. mbv/rbs. 

BANNE [ba-n] n. £ 1. awning; 2. 
hamper ; 3. (of boats) tilt ; 4. (of carts, 
wagons, etc.) tiU ; 5. corf. 

BANNEAU [ba-n6] n. m. small hamv- 
j>eir. 

BANNER [bft-n*] V. a. 1. to cover with 
3 tUi ; 2. to tut (a boat, cart, wagon). 

BANNERET [ba-n-rd] adj. m. (feud, 
hiiit.) banneret. 

Chevalier — , knight =z. 

BANNETON [ba-n-ton] n. m. (fish.) 
am/. I 

BANNETTE [ba-ni-t] n. £ small ham- 
per. 

BANNI [ba-ni] n. m. E, n. £ exile; — s, 
(pL) esBeZe* ,• banisJied, pi. 

BANNlt;RE [ba-nie-r] n. £ 1. banner; 
S. standard ; 3. ** streamer. 

Avec sa — , ses — s, 1. with o.'s = ; 2. 
bannered. En — (vi9.\\) flying. Plan- 
ter une — , to erect a standard. 
^ BANNIE [ba-nir] V. a. 1. | § (DE,/rom ; 
A, to) to barnsh; 2. § (p-^from) to ba- 
msh ; to dismiss; to put away. 

Personne qui bannit, banisher {of). 
Be — , to banish o.'j self. 

BANNISSABLT (ba-ni-ta-bl] adj. % 
liable to banishment. 

BANNISSEMENT [ba-ni-a-man] n. m. 
bitnishm,ent. 

BAN QUE [ban-k] n. f 1. (com.) bank- 
ing ; 2. (com.) bank ; banking-hotise ; 
8 (of printers) pay-table ; 4. (play) 
bank. 

— m6re, parent-bank ; — particuli6re, 
private = ; — provinciale, eottntry,pro- 
Dincial ■=■ ; — succursale, branch ■=.. — 
par action. }(wn< «toc* =; — d'escompte, 
ZMCf iMit =. Becevable a la — , ba/)ik- 
able; descents, invasion, irruption dans 
!e§ btireaux de la — , run on the =. Ac- 
tion da la — , = -stock ; actionnaire de 
Ja — , h'lder of = -stock ; billet de — , 
^ -«tffa ; = -biU ; carnet de — , = -book ; 
OOTcmis ds — , = -clerk ; compagnie de 
— , banking -<iompany ; compte de — , 
= -account ; etablissement de — , bank- 
ing concern, establishment ; fete a la — , 
r^ -?u>liday ; garj on de — , = -porter ; 
licnre de la — , = -limir ; maison de — , 
txtnking-h/yuee ; mandat de la — , = - 

r>st-biU, post-note. De — , 1. banking ; 
(oxch.) banco. Avoir un compte en — , 
to home an account open at the =; 
«imetti e im biDct ()e — , to i»fiue a bank- 
ftfi 



note; faire la — , 1. to carry on the 
business of a banker ; 2. (of work- 
people) to be paid ; mettre a la — , to 
put inthez=; faire sauter la — , to break 
the=. 

BANQUEROUTE [ban-kg-roo-t] n. £ 
(b. 8.) bankruptcy. 

— tTa\idxi\eme,fratidulent = ; — sim- 
ple, (law) = attended with misconduct. 
En — , bankrupt. Faire — , 1. to be a 
bankrupt; 2. to become a bankrupt; 
to faU; 3. § (a) to forfeit L..); faire 
faire — k, \. \ to break ; 2. § to make 
bankrupt; mettre en — §, to make 
bankrupt. 

BANQUEROUT-IER [ban-kg-rou-tis] 
n. m. li;RE [fe-r] n. f (b. s.) bankrupt. 

— frauduleux,//'aMdMfow<=: ; — sim- 
ple, (law) = hy m^isconduct. 

BANQUET [ban-kj] n. m. 1. banquet; 
* regale ; 2. banqueting. 

Amateur de — s, banqueter; maison 
de — , banqueting-house ; salle de — , 
banqueting-haU, room; banquet-house. 
Donner, faire un — , to banquet. 

BANQUET, n. m. (man.) banquette. 

BANQUETER [ban-k-t«] v. n. J H to 
banquet ; to feast. 

BANQUETTE [ban-kfe-t] n. £ 1. cover- 
ed bench; bench; 2. (of bridges, of 
canals) banquette ; 8. (of coaches) out- 
side; 4. {of Toad&) foot-path; foot-way ; 
5. (engin.) bank; bench; 6. (fort) ban- 
quette; 7. (rail) attendant path; 8. 
(theat) bench. 

Jouer devant, pour les — 8, to play to 
empty benches. 

BANQUIER [ban-ki«] n. m. 1. banker ; 
2. (fin.) money-agent ; 3. (play) banker. 

Avoir pour — , to ba-nk with (a. o.) ; 
verser chez son — , (com.) to pay into 
o.'s hankers. 

BANQUISE [b&n-ki-i] n. £ (nav.) ice- 
berg. 

BANTAM [ban-tan] n. m. bantam. 

Coq de — , =^-cock ; poule de — , =- 
hen. 

BAOBAB [ba-»-b8b] n. m. (bot) bao- 
bab ; ^ sour gourd. 

BAPT£:ME [ba-tfe-m] n. m. 1. 1 § (pers.) 
baptism ; 2. (th.) christening ; 8. (nav.) 
duckiiig (on crossing the equator, tro- 
pics, etc.). 

— des enfants, infant baptism, ; pedo- 
baptism ; — de sang, (theol.) martyr- 
dom without =. Extrait de — , certifi- 
cate of =. De, du — , baptismdl ; ^ 
christening ; sans — ^, 1. without = ; 2. 
unbaptized. Tenir q. u. sur les fonts de 
— , to stand god-father, god-motlisr to 
a. o. 

BAPTISER rba-ti-z«] V. a. 1. B to bap- 
tize (a. o.) ; to christen ; 2. 1 to christen 
(a. th.) ; 3. § to dub (a. o.) ; to nicknamie; 
4. § to pid water into, (o.'s wine). 

Personne qui baptise, bapUzer. #% 
Voila un enfant bien difficile k —I that 
is no easy matter ! 

Baptise, e, pa. p., 

Non baptise, unbaptized. 

BAPTISMAL, E [ba-tU-mal] adj. bap- 
tis-inal ; of baptism.. 

BAPTIST AIRE [ ba-tu-U-r ] adj. of 
baptism. 

Extrait — , certificate of z=\ registre 
— , register of^^ ; church-register. 

BAPTISTAIRE, n. m. certificate of 
baptism. 

BAPTISTE [ba-ti.-t] n. m. Baptist. 

Saint Jean \-, John tlie =. 

BAPTISTERE [ba-tis-U-r] n. m. bap- 
tistery. 

BAQUET [ba-k^] n. m. 1. + tub ; 2. 
bucket; 3. trough; 4 (a. & m.) svmn- 
ining tub. 

BARAGOUIN [ba-ra-gouin] n. m. gib- 
berish. 

BARAGOUINAGE [ba-ra-goni-na-j] n. 
m. 1. gibberish ; 2. jabber. 

BARAGOUINER [ba-ra-goui-n«] v. a. 
^, 1 to murder (a speech or language, by 
poor delivery or mispronunciation); to 
tabber. 

BARAGOUINEE, v. n. 1. to jabber ; 
2. to talk gibberish. 

BARAGOUINEU-E [ ba-ra-goni-nefir ] 
a. m. 8E [e6-i] n. £ jabberer. 

BAEAQUE [bo-ra-kl n. £ 1. (mil.) bar- 



rack; hut; 2. hut; shed; 8. (b. &) 
hovel ; 4. (of fairs) standing ; booth. 

Loger dans une — , (mil.) to htif,. 

BARAQUER [ba-ra-ki] V. a. t (aiiL)fc, 
make, put up barracks ; to hut. 

Se bakaquee, pr. v. (mil) to TnaJce^ 
put u/p barracks ; to hut 

BARATERIE [b»-r»-t-rl] n. t (tniir. 
law) barratry. 

Marin coupable de — , barrator. Ett- 
tach6 de — , barratrous. Avec — , lar 
ratrously. 

BARATTE [ba-ra-t] n. £ chwn. 

3ARATTER [ba-ra-M] V. a. to chum. 

Personne qui baratte, chumer. 

BARBACANE [ bar-ba-ka-n ] n. i 1. 
(fort) barbican ; 2. (arch.) outlet. 

BARBACOLE [ bar-ba-ko-1 ] n. m. 1 
scJwol-master. 

BAEBAEE [bar-ba-r] adj. 1. barba' 
ous; 2. barba/rowi (savage); barban 
an ; 3. barbaric ; 4 (gram.) barbarous. 

Semi — , semi-barbarous. D'une ma 
niure — , barbarously. Devenir — , to 
become, to get =; to i?J barbarized ; 
rendre — , to barbarize; to make, to 
render = ; etre rendu — , to be barba- 
rized. 

BARBARE, n. m. barbarian. 

Semi — , semi-=z. Des — b, 1. of bar- 
barians ; 2. barbaric. 

BARBAREMENT [bw-ba-r-man] adv. 
X barbaroiifSly. 

BARBARESQUE [bar-ba-rea-k] adj. of 
Barbary; Barbary 

Les ifctats — s, tlie Barbary States. 

BARBARESQUE8, n. m., (pL) (geog.) 
Barbary States. 

BARBARIE [bar-ba-rt] n. £ 1. barba- 
rity; barbarousness ; barbarism; 2. 
act of barbarity ; barbarous act. 

BARBARISME [ bar-ba-ri»-in J n, m. 
(gram.) barbarism. 

Faire des — s, (gram.) to maJce =8. 

BARBE [bar-b] n. £ 1. (pers.) beard; 
2. (of animals) beard; 8. (of barley, ooi is, 
etc.) beard; a/icn; 4. {ot c&TpB) lappet : 
5. (of cats, dogs) whiskers ; 6. (of cocfaj) 
gills ; wattle ; 7. (of fishes) wattle; 8. 
(of head-dresses) pinner ; 9. (of qulllnl 
pimfier ; vane ; '{feath&r ; 10. (of tur- 
keys) icatt^; H^ (arts) rough edge ; 12. 
(bot) beard ; barb ; He ; 18. — e, (pi.) 
(veter.) beard ; barbel ; barbies. 

— bleue, blue beard ; — grise, gray 

= ; jeune — , beardless boy ; sainte , 

(nav.) gun-room.; vieille — , gray := 
(old man). — de bouc Tbot) coral club- 
top ; — de chat cat's whiskers ; petit* 
— de ch6vre, (bot) meadoto-siceet ; — 
de Jupiter, (bot) Jupiter's =; — de 
moine, (hot) dodaer. Bassin, plat 4 — , 
sluwing-dish ; barber's basin; brosse 
k — , shaving-brush; jour de — , shap- 
ing-day ; linge a — , shaving-cloth; 
manque de — , beardlessness. A la - 
de q. u., before, in, to a. o.'s face ; to a. 
o.'s beard ; under a. o.'s nose ; sans — ^ 
1. beardless; unbearded; 2. stnooth, 
Faire la — a, 1. | to sha/ve ; 2. § to beard 
(a. o.); to cut out; se faire la — , to 
sha/ve ; se faire fairo la — , to get shaved ; 
rire dans sa — , to laugh in o.'s sleeve. 

BARBE, n. m. barb (horse) ; Barbara) 
horse ; barbary. 

BARBE, adj. Barbary. 

Choval — , = hor,<te ; barbary. 

BARB:6, E [bar-b6] adj. (bot) barbate; 
barbated ; barbellate ; bearded. 

Non — ,{V. senses) wnhearded, 

BARBEAU [bar-b6] n. m. 1. (botj! 
blue-bottle; 2. (ich.) barbel. 

— commun, (ich.) barbel. Bloa — 
light blue. 

BARB:feIER [bar-b*.i«] V. a. (nav.) ((tf 
sails) to shiver. 

BARBEL^, E [bar-b»-l«] «y. (of ■^ 
rows) bearded. 

Clou — , cheviUe — e, spike-naM. 

BARBET [bar-b*,tj n. m. TE, n. t 
barbet; water-spanxd, dog. 

BARBET TE, adj. 

Chien —.barbet; water-spa'.iicl,doQ. 

BARBETTE [b«.iA-t] n. £ (mlLJ 
barbe. 

Tirer k — , (mil.) ic fire en barb«. 

BAR BEYER [b»r-b4 .«! v. n. F. Bab 

BEIEB. 



BAR BAR BAts 




oH joute ; ew jeu ; eit, jeune ; eH penr ; d« pan ; i» pin ; on bon ; un brun ; *11 llq. ; ♦gn liq. 





BAEBICHON [bar-bi-then] n. m. UtOe, 
vowng barbet. 

BARBIEE [bar-bii] n. m. barber. 

BAKBIFIEE [bar-bi-fi6] V. a. 1 to 
aha^e. 

Be faire — , to get shaved. 

8k B^KBiriKE, pr. V. ^to sho/ve o.'« 

St I// 

BABBILLON [bar-bi-ion*] n. m. 1. (of 
(xci^B) gills ; wattle; 2. (of flsh) wa(«« ; 
&- (of turkeys) watOe; 4 (ich.) little 
^trhle; 3. — s, (pL) (vet) barbel; bar- 
lim. 

BAEBON [bar-bon] n. m. gray-beard; 
dotard. 

Ealre le — , to play the old mam,. 

BAEBON, n. m. (bot) mveet rvsh. 

— odorant, (bot) ^ camel's hay ; le- 
mon grass. 

BAEBOTE [bsr-bo-t] n. f. (Ich.) 1. bur- 
bot ; eel-pout ; 2. loaoh ; loche ; grovnid- 
ling. 

BAEBOTEE [b»r-bo-«] v. n. 1. I § to 
dabble; to paddle; 2. (nav.) (of sails) 
to shiver. 

Personne qui barbote, dabbler. 

BARBOTEUK [bar-bo-teur] n. m. (om.) 
domestic duck. 

BAEBOTEUSE[bar-bo-tefi-«] n. f. (b. 
8.) prostitute ; ^^ street-^calker. 

BAEBOTINE [bar-bo-U-n] n. f (bot) 
Indian worm/wood. 

Armoise — , =. 

BAEBOUILLAGE [bar-bou-ia-j*] n. m. 
1. I daubing; 2. daub; 3. scribble; 
scribbling ; scrawl ; 4. rigmarole ; 5. 
(paint) slur. 

BAEBOUILLEE [bar-bou-i«*] v. a. 1. 
(de, wit/i) to daub ; 2. to smear ; to be- 
STUsar ; 3. to smutch ; 4 to must ; 5. to 
blot ; 6. to scrawl ; to scribble ; to be- 
ioribble ; 1. to stammer ; to stutter out ; 
8. to babble ; 9. (print.) to slur. 

Barbouille, e, pa. p. (K senses) 
mrmtty. 

— de nolr, (of coal, smoke, soot) =. 
tic moquer de la — e ©, 1. to talk absurd- 
ly, extravagantly ; 2. not to care for 
n/{vy thing. (In this expression, — e is 
na(>d ns a subst) 

8)i BARBOUILLER, pr. V. 1. H (dE, With) 

to bifsmear o.'s se^f; 2. § to injure o.'s 
telf, o.'s character. 

Le temps se barbouille, the weatfter is 
getting cloudy ; the clouds are gather- 
ing ; tite sky lowers. 

BAKBOUILLEUE [bar-bou-ieurl n. m. 

1. dauber; 2. scribbler ; scraaoler; 8. 
idle baboler. 

BAEBU, E [bar-bu] adj. 1. bearded ; 

2. (of barley, corn, etc.) bearded; 3. 
(bot) barbate, barbated; barbeUate; 
hearded. 

Non — , 1. beardless ; 2. (of barley, 
corn, etc.) unbearded. 

BAEBU, n. m. (om.) barbet. 

BAEBUE [bar-bu] n. f. (ich.) briU. 

BAEOAEOLLE [bar-ka-ro-l] n. f. (mus.) 
barcarolle (boat song). 

BAECASSE [bar-ka-.] n. f. (iron.) bad, 
shabby vessel. 

BAECELONNETTE rbar-.-lo-iii-t] n. £ 
barcelonnette (small cradle). 

BAED [bar] n. m. hand-barrow. 

BAEDANE [bar-da-n] n. f. (bot) bur- 
dock; bur. 

— officinale, burdock. 

BAEDE [bar-d] n. f. 1. ba)-be (armor 
for horses) ; 2. (culin.) bard (slice of ba- 
oon put round the breast of fowls in 
roasting). 

BAEDE, n. m. bard. 

De — , des — s, o/a=,=^; bardic; 
rardish. Science des — s, bardimn. 

BAEDEAU [bar-d6] n. m. 1. (bot) 
tfi/udy-tree ; 1 way-faring tree ; 2. 
carp.) shingle ; 8. (print) foimt-case. 

Oouvrir de — x, (carp.) to shingle. 

BAEDELLE [bar-d^-i] n. £ bardelle 
/quilted saddle for colts). 

BAEDEE [bar-d4] V. a. 1. to barb (a 
lorse) ; 2. Ij § (culin.) (dk, with) to lard ; 
i. § (dk, with) to lard ; to stuff; to cov- 
ir ; 4. to load on a hand-barrow, on a 
iart ; 5. (culin.) to cover with a bard, 
with bacon. 

Bardk, k, pa. p. ( F: senses) (of horses) 
'^ao'bed. 



BAEDEUE [bar-deur] n. m. 
laborer (that carries a hand-barrow or 
draws a cart). 

BAEDIS [bar-di] n. m. 1. (com. nav.) 
partition in the hold ; 2. water-board ; 
weather-board. 

BAEDOT [bar-do] n. m. 1. UtOe, smaU 
mule; 2. § drudge; 8. § butt; laug/i^ 
i/ng-stock. 

BAE:6GE [ba-r«-j] n. m. barege. 

BAEfiME [b»-r6-m] a m. ready 
reckoner. 

BAEGE [bar-j] n. £ (om.) godwit. 

— aboyeuse, =. 
BAE6UIGNAGE [bar-gM-gna-j*] n. m. 

wavering. 

BAEGUIGNEE [bar-gM-gn6*] v. n. ^ 
to haggle ; to higgle. 

BAEGUIGNEU-E [bar-ghi-gnefir] n. 
m. SE [eu-z] n. f 1 haggler; higgler. 

B ARIL [ba-ri*] n. m.1. barrel; 2. cask; 
8. tub ; 4 keg. 

Petit — , STnall =. A — , barrelled. 
Mettre en — , 1. to barrel; 2. to cask; 
3. to put into a tub, tubs ; 4. to pack 
(fish, meat). 

BAEILLE [ba-ri*] n. £ (com.) barilla. 

BAEILLET [ba-ri-i^*] n. m. 1. smaU 
barrel; 2. casket (in the form of a bar- 
rel); 8. (horoL) (of locks) drum; 4 (ho- 
rol.) barrel ; spring-box. 

Arbre de — , (horol.) barrel-arbor. 

BAEIOLAGE [ba-ri-o-la-j] n. m. (of 
colors) medley • motley m,iii'ture. 

BAEIOLi;;, E [ba-ri-o-16] adj. (of col- 
ors) 1. medley ; motley ; 2. party- 
colored. 

BAEIOLEE [ba-ri-o-i6] V. a to make 
a medley of (by painting) ; to make a 
motley mixcture of. 

BAEITEL [ba-ri-tJl] n. m. (tech.) 
winding-engine, machine. 

— a chevaux, Jiorse-whim; whim- 
gin. 

BAELONG, UE [bar-Ion, l6n-g] a<y. of 
unequal le^igth; longer on one side 
tha7i the oVier. 

BAENABITE [bar-na-bi-t] n. m. (reL 
ord.) barnabite. 

BAENACHE [bar-na-ah] n. f (orn.) 
barnacle. 

— k collier, brent rzz, 
BAE0M4;TEE [ba-ro-mi-tr] n. m. 1. | 

(phys.) barometer; '[ weather-glass; 
weatlier-gauge ; 2. § barometer; wea- 
ther-gauge. 

— marin, nautical barometer. — h 
cadran, wheel = ; — a tube incline, di- 
agonal =. Au moyen d"un — , baro- 
metrically. 

baeom:^teique [ba-ro-m«-tri-k] acy. 

(phys.) barometrical. 

BAEON [ba-ron] n. m. NE [o-n] n. £ 
baron, m., baroness, £ 

Dignite de baron, baronage. De h&- 
Ton, of a baron ; baronial, 

BAEONNAGE [ba-ro-na-j] n. m. 1. 
baronage (bai-ons) ; 2. (b. s.) baronage 
(title). 

BAEONNET [ba-ro-ni] n. m. baronet. 

Chevalier — , kmght =. C«rps des —6, 
baronetage ; dignite de — , baronetage. 

BAEONNIAL, E [ba-io-ni-ai] adj. ba- 
ronial. 

BAEONNIE [ba-ro-ni] n. £ barony; 
baronage. 

BAEOQUE [ba-ro-k] a(y. 1. 1 odd; 
strange ; uncouth ; 2. (of pearls) irre- 
gular (not round). 

BAEOSCOPE [ba-ro-iko-p] n. m. baro- 
scope. 

BAEQUE [bar-k] n. £ 1. | § bark, 
(boat); 2. || boat; 3. 1 barge. 

— de ceremonie, state barge ; — de 
Caron, 1 a Caron, (myth.) Charon's 
boat ; — de parade, (nav.) barge. Patron 
de — , barge-master. Conduire la — , 1. 
II to steer the boat, barge ; 2. § to be at 
the helm ; conduire bien sa — §, to ma- 
nage o.'s affairs well. — droite 1 (nav.) 
trim Hie boat. 

BARQUilE [bar-k«] n. £ boat-load. 

BARQUEROLLE [bar-ks-ro-l] n. £ 
barge (on the Adriatic sea). 

BAEEAGE [ba-ra-j] n. m. 1. barrier 
(to bar up a street or road) ; 2. toU-har ; 
toll-gate ; 3. (of a river) dam ; 4 (engin.) 
wear; weir; dough. 



— avec pertnis, (engin.) regulatUin 
wear, weir ; — k poutrellis*, gtop-gat6. 

BAEEA6EE [bi-ra-ji] n. m. toU^a- 
therer. 

BAEEE [b4-r] n. £ 1. bar (of metol or 
wood) ; 2. cross-bar ; 8. (of courts of ju- 
dicature, political assembli(«) bar; 4. 
— 8, (pi.) (of horses' mouths) bar ; 6. (ol 
rivers, harbors) bar ; 6. (her.) bar , I. 
(mus.) bar; a (nav.) bar; 9. /nar.) 
(of the capstan) bar ; arm ; 10. (nav > 
(of the helm) UUer; helm; 11. —8, (pL) 
(play) base ; 12. (writing) stroke. 

— franche, (navig.) hand-tiller. — 3o 
bvis, 1. icooden ba^^; 2. (tech.) slot; 

— de fer pour emp^cher Tecrasemen^ 
tech.) stag; — de fleuve, (engin.) eddy ; 

— de foute, caster on j rist; — de four- 
neau, de foyer, fire-bar; — de hime, 
(nav.) cross-trees ; — de jonction, (mu8.J 
tie. — dessous ! — sous le vent I (nav.) 
helm, alee /La — toute dessous ! — a 
bord 1 (nav.) hard alee ! Avoir — s sur 
q. u., to hoAoe the advantage of a. o. ; 
faire tirer une — sur, to draw a stroke 
Uirough; to strike out; jouer aux — s, 

1. II to play at base; 2. § to miss each 
otlier ; traduire sk la — , (law) to arraign. 
Mettez la — droite 1 (nav.) put the helm 
a/midship ! 

BAEREAU [b(l-r6] n. m. 1. bar (for 
closing) ; 2. bar (place reserved for bar- 
risters) ; 8. bar (barristers) ; 4 (of chairs) 
splat. 

Fr6quenter le — , to attend the courts ; 
suivre le — , to follow tita Uvw (as a bar- 
rister). 

BAREEE [ba-r«] V. a. 1. to bar; 2. to 
bar up ; 8. to fence up; 4 to obstruct; 
to stop lip; 5. to cancel; to cross off, 
out; to erase; 6. to throw obstacles in 
tlie way of (a. o.); 7. (her.) to bar; 8. 
(vet) to bar. 

Bakre, e, pa. p. V. senses of Barrkb. 

Non — , (V. senses) 1. unobstructed f 

2. uncanceled ; uncrossed. 
BAERETTE [b&-r*-t] n. £ 1. cap (tea 

men) ; 2. (of cardinals) cap. 

BARRICADE [bS-ri-ka-d] n. £ L bof' 
ricade ; 2. (play) barring out. 

BAREICADEE [b&.ri-ka-d6] v. a. to 
barricade. 

Sb barrioader, pr. v. 1. to barricade 
o.'s self; 2. § to shut o.'s self up ; 8. 
(play) to bar out. 

BARRliiRE [b&-ri4-r] n. £ L I § bar- 
rier ; 2. § (a, to) barrier ; bar ; fence ; 
8. 1 starting-post ; 4 (of inclosurea, 
liedges) stile ; 5. (of roads) gate ; 6. 
(build.) rail-fence. 

— de peage turnpike ; turnpike- 
gate. Surveillant de — , tumpike-gati 
keeper; gate-keeper. 

BAREIQUAUT [ba-ri-k6] n. m. keg. 

BAEEIQUE [ba-ri-k] n. f 1. cask; 
2. hogshead. 

Petite — , 1. small cask; 2. (nav.) 
teinger. 

BAEROT [ba-r6] n. m. (nav. arch.) 
beam. 

BAEEOTEE [bS-ro-t«l y. &. to fiU (a 
ship) to tlie beams. 

BAEEOTIN [ba-ro-tinl n. m. (nav. 
arch.) ledge (put across the deck-beam). 

BAETAVELLE [bar-ta-vi-l] n. £ (om.) 
Guernsey partridge. 

BAEYCOIE, BAEYCOlTE [ba-ri- 
ko-i, t] n. £ (med.) barycoia ; deafn^s. 

BAEYPHONIE [ba-ri-fo-ni] n. £ (med) 
baryphonia; difficulty of peaking. 

BARYTE [ba-ri-t] n. £ (min.) ba 
ryta. 

BAEYTON [ba-ri-t6n] n. m. 1. (Greo 
gram.) barytone; 2. (mas.) barytone. 

De — , (mus.) =:. 

BAS, SE [ba, .] adj. 1. I § to:c (no* 
high) ; 2. lower (not upper) ; 3. | dcwn ; 
4 § inferior; lower; 5. %mean; 6. j 
(b. s.) sordid; base; vile; 7. (of the 
clergy) inferior; 8. (of sound) low; 9. 
(of sound) base (grave) ; 10. (of tho 
weather) cloudy ; 11. (of the woriC) 
nether; lower; 12. (geog.) lower; 18. 
(mus.) low. 

2. Le — bout d'une table, tke lower erut oj a m- 
Ue. 3. La t6te — ae, o.'a Kead down ; lee oreiUeo — 
set, the earn down. 4. Leg — emploii, «*« inferior 
lower emplot/ments. 5. — ae naissance, mean hirtk 
12. Les — »ei Aliwi, ike lo^sr Alps. 



BAS 



BAS 



BAT 



amal: amiile; efee; eftve; ^ffite; ^je; til; Jile; omol; 5m61e; i5n.ort; wsuc, ^sure; om jour; 



Pays- — , (geog.) Neiherlandfi ; Low 
Countries, Lands. Maitre des — ses 
aenvres, night-man. 

BAS [ba] n. m. 1. I bottom; lower 
paH; 2. T § down; 8. (of the leg) 
inall ' ' ' ■ - - .. 



4. (of a letter, page) bottom, 



Le. 



— de la vie, the 



and 



1 -ns-/We. 

£tre au — , (of casks, liquids) to get 
riw; i3 com^ to the bottom. 

BAS, adv. II § loic. 

Bien — , 1. 1 § very low ; 2. § at an 

ebb; at a low ebb. Ici ,here-below; 

ik , 1. below ; 2. over there ; 3. * yon- 
der ; tout — , 1. in a very low tone of 
voice ; i.ina whisper. — ! J (th.) down 
with (lower) ; a — , 1. | down ; 2. 8 all 
over (ruined) ; f^~ vp ; a. — ! 1. 1 down 
(get down) ; 2. doton (demolish, subvert) ; 

8. I off with ! strike off! 4. § dotonvnth 
(cry of disapprobation) ! down vdth it / 
a — de, out of; au plus —,l.^^at the 
lowest ; 2. § at the lowest ebb ; en — , 

1. doicn; %. downward ; 8. beloio ; 4. 
down stairs ; 5. at the bottom ; 6. down ! 

7. (of a page)«</oo<,- par — , below; in 
the loioer pari. Jeter — , 1. to throw 
down ; 2. to take down ; Jeter h —, to 
tu/mble down ; mettre — , l.'to lay down; 

2. to take off{o.'s hat) ; 3. § to bring (a. o.) 
low ; 4 (of animals in general) to bring 
forth (young) ; 5. (of certain beasts of 
prey) to whelp ; 6. (of asses, maree) to 
foal; 7. (of bears, foxes, tigers, whales) 
to cub ; 8. (of dogs) to whelp ; to pup ; 

9. (of goats, sheep) to yean ; 10. (of lion- 
esses) to xchelp ; mettre a — , to pull 
down ; tenir — , 1. § to keep doxon ; 2. 
to keep under ; — le feu,(nav. command.) 
leave off firing ! 

BAS [ba] n. m. stocking. 

— bleu, blue = (a literary woman); 
bUie ; — drapes milled =s. — a cotes, 
ribbed z=; — a jour, open-icorked =. 
Metier ft — , = -frame ; tlsserand en — , 
= -weaver ; vendeur de — , hosier. 

BASALTE [ba-zal-t] n. m. (min.) ba- 

BASALTIQUE [ba-zai-ti-k] adj. (min.) 
basaltic. 

BASANE [ba-za-n] n. C 1. sheep- 
Uather ; sheep's leather; 2. (bind.) 
like^p. 

BASANlfe, E [b8-«a-n6] adj. sim-bumt; 
fwarthy, tawny. 

Un peu — , swarthish. Couleur — e, 
wwarthiness. D'un teint — , sxcarfhily. 

BASANITE [ba-ia-ni-t] n. £ (min.) ba- 
mrdte (touchstone). 

BASCULE [ba.-ku-l] n. t 1. see-saw; 
I. rocking; 3. weighing-machine ; 4. 
weigh-bridge ; weighing-machine; 5. 
(of a drttw-bri^e) plyer ; 6. (did.) recip- 
rocating m.otion ; 7. (of cradles) rocker ; 

8. (lock.) lever; 9. (play) see-saw. 
Chaise a — , rocking chair: cheva! 4 — . 

rocking horse ; pont a — . weigh-bridge, 
weighing-^nacliine. Faire la — , to see- 
aoM ; to see-sato up and down. 

BA8-DESSUS [ba-d8..u] n. m. (mus.) 
V. Desstts. 

BASE [b&-z] n. C 1. B § base; basis ; 2. 
% foundation; grov/nd^work ; ground- 
plot; 8. (arch.) ba.^.e ; 4 (arts) base; 5. 
(build.)/oo« ; 6. (build.) stock ; 7. (chem.) 
basit ; 8. (of logarithms) radix ; 9. 
(sciei ees) base. 

— des fondations, (engin.) footing. 
Constituant la — , based ; relatif h la — , 
baiai. Sans — , ( V. senses) baseless. 

BASELLE [ba-jj-i] n. Z (bot) Mala- 
y%r night-shade. 

BASER [ba-z6] V a. § (sm, on, upon) 
to base ; to ground. 

8e — sur q. ch., to take a.th.asa ba- 
tfs, grou/Tid-^Dork. 

BAS-FOND [b4-fon] n. m., pi. — s, 1. 
jtat I letd ; 2. (nav.) shallow water ; 

HAS] LA IRE [ba-zi-U-r] adj. (anat) 
t-^eilar; basilary. 

BASILIC [ba-zi-iik] n. m. 1. (bot.) ba- 
til; 2.{firp.)lamUsk. 

BA8ILIC0N [ba-o-u-ksn] BASILI- 
CIJM [kom] n. m. (pharm.) basiUcum. 

BASILIQUE [ba-zi-U-k] n. f. ., basi- 
■».■ • i.ttxil.irn ; pile; 2. (anat.) basilic, 
58 



basilica ; 8. — s, (pi.) (law) basiKc con- 
atitvMons. 

En forme de — , (arch.) basiUo ; basi- 
Ucal. 

BASILIQUE, adj. (anat.) baMlic ; ba- 
sUical. 

BASIN [ba-nn] n. m. dimity. 

BASOCHE [ba-zo-.h] n. C t basoche 
(jurisdiction of the clerks of solicitors to 
the parliament of Paris). 

BASQUE [ba.-k] n. £ skirt (of a gar- 
ment). 

fitre tonjours pendu a la — , ne pas 
quitter la — de q. u., to be always run- 
ning after a. o. 

BAS-RELIEF Jba-r8-UJ>f ] n. m., p_ -^, 
(8culi>.) basso-relievo ; hass-relief. 

BASSE [ba-.] n. £ (mus.) bass ; base, 
base-string. 

— continue, continued, thorough = ; 
contre — , double bass ; — de viole, 
(mus.) bass-viol ; violoncello. 

BASSE, n. f. (nav.) l.fiat; shoal; 2. 
ridge of sand-banks, sing. ; rocks with 
breakers, pi. 

BASSE-CONTRE [ba-.-k5ii-tr] n. £, pi. 
Basses-coktre, (mus.) base-counter ; 
lotcer tenor. 

BASSE-COUR [ba-^kour] n. £ 1. court- 
yard; 2. inner-court; 3. (agr.) poul- 
try-yard. 

BASSEMENT ri.a-.-man] adv. § 1. 
meanly ; 2. sordidly ; basely ; vilely. 

BAS8ESSE [ba-.{,-.] n. f § 1. lovmess ; 
meanness ; 2. low, mean action ; 3. 
(b. &.) sordidness ; baseness; vileneas; 
4 base, vile, sordid action. 

BASSET [ba..fe] n. m. (mam.) 1. ter- 
rier; 2. turnspit. 

— h iambes torses, turnspit. 
BASSE-TAILLE [ba-tta-i*] n. f., pL 

Basses-tailles, 1. (sculp.) basso-relievo; 
bass-relief; 2. (vocal mus.) bass ; base. 

BASSE-TERRE [ba-n«-r] n. £, pi. 
Basses-terres, (nav.) leeward coast 

BASSETTE [ba-sfe-t] n. f (play) basset. 

BASS IN [ba-8in] n. m. 1. basin (kind 
of dish) ; 2. basi7i (reservoir) ; 8. (of a 
balance) scale ; 4 (of a harbor) haven ; 
5. (ariat) pelvis ; basin ; 6. (geog., geol.) 
basin; 7. (Jewish ant) lover; 8. 
(found., glass., hat) basin ; 9. (mining) 
basin ; rejjository ; 10. (nav.) dock. 

— de depot, slime-pit ; — d'echouage, 
dry dock ; — k Sot, floating, wet dock ; 
— de radoub, graving, repairing dock. 
Droit de — , (nav.) dock-due ; vanne de 
— , (engin.) dock-gate. Converti en — , 
basing. Cracher an — , to contribute ; 
mettre dans le — , (nav.) to dock. 

BASSINE [ba-si-n] n. f. (arts) pan 
(large). 

BASSINER [ba-«i-n«] V. a. 1. to warm 
(a bed) ; 2. to wet (with warm water) ; 8. 
to foment (diseased parts); 4 (hort) to 
water. 

BASSINET [ba-.i.ni] n. m. 1. (of flre- 
irms) pan ; fire-pan ; priming-pan ; 
2. (anat) cali/x; 8. (bot) lesser spear- 
wort ; creeping crow-foot. 

Mettre la poudre au — , dans le — , to 
prime (fire-arms). 

BASSINOIRE [ba-.i-toa-r] n. £ warm- 
ing-pan. 

BASSON [ba-i»n] n. m. (mus.) 1. (th.) 
bassoon ; 2. (pers.) bassoonist. 

BASTE [bas-t] n. m. (cards) basto. 

BASTE [ba.-t«] int pshaw! nonsense! 

RASTER [bas-ts] v. n. + to srifflce. 

BASTERNE [baa-t^r-n] n. £ t bostem 
(car drawn by oxen). 

BASTIDE [bas-ti-d] n. £ 1. coimtry- 
seat (in the South of France); 2. \ for- 

'^BASTILLE rba.-ti-i*] n. £ 1. i for- 
tress ; 2. Bastille (state prison in Paris). 

BASTINGAGE [ ba.-tta-ga-j ] n. m. 
(nav.) 1. barriiading ; 2. netting. 

Filets de — , (pi.) netting. 

BASTINGUE [bao-Un-g] n- C (nav.) 
qua rter-nettin g. 

BASTINGUER [bas-tin-ghs] v. a. (nav.) 
to barricade. 

Sb BASTINGUER, pr. ▼. (nav.) to barri- 
coile. 

BASTION [b«ii-U-«n] n. m. (mlL) bas- 
tion. 

— ca'wtnste. = frith casemates. 



B ASTIONNi;, E [ba.-ti.o-n6] adj. (mtt, 
with bastions. 

BASTONNADE [ba^to-na-d] n. £ ba« 
tinado; eudgelHnj. 

Donner la — ft, to bastinado ; to cud 
gel. 

BASTRINGUE [ba.-trin.K] n. m. ^ 
ptiblic house ball. 

BASTUDE [ba^rc-d] n. £ fishing-K i 
(for salt water). 

BAT [bat] n. m. t to« (of a fish). 

Avoir . . . de — , (of fish) to be... ion',' 

BAT [ba] n. m. pack-saddle. 

Cheval de — , pack-hwse. M .ttre un 

— k, to put a pack-saddle on; 6ter ud 

— ft, to taks a %t.'!ck-saddlefrom ; sh- 
voir ou le — blessc %,^to know when 
the shoe pinches. 

Bat, ind. pres. 8d sing, of Battre. 

BATACLAN [ba-ta-klan] n. m. ^" 
luggage ; ^ things ; -j- trajts. 

BATAILLE [ba-ta-i*] n. f 1. batUe; 
2. battle-array ; array, order of bat 
tie ; 8. (cards) beggar m,y neighbor. 

Grande — , great battle; — naval« 
sea engagement, fi^ht ; naval e^igage- 
ment; — rangee, pitched =. Champ 
de —, field of =; —-field; ** war- 
■field; cheval de — , (F. Chevai.) 1. 
charger ; * war-steed ; ** battle-steed ; 
2. § T chief hope ; strong-hold ; corps 
de — , 1. (mil.) main body ; 2. (nav.) (oi 
a fleet) centre ; ordre de — , = array. 
De — , 1. o/= ; = ; 2. embattled ; en ordre 
de — , (mil.) in ■= array ; in order of 
=. Donner, livrer — , to give z= ; livrer 

— pour q. u. §, to take up the cudgels 
for a. o. ; livrer nne — , to fight a = ; 
presenter la — , to offer =; ranger en —. 
en ordre de — , to draw up in order oj 
■=.; *to embattle ; se ranger en — , en 
ordre de — , to d/raw u/pin=. array; * 
to embattle. 

5j7i.— Bataillk, combat. The bataille (baUU) 
i« a general action, nsually preceded by »ome pre- 
paration ; the eomiat {combat) i. a particular ac- 
tion, and i. often unexpected. The action, that 
took ^\t£« between the Roman, and Cartha^ni 
an. were bataillet; tot the encounter in A'hic:> 
the Herat ii and Curiatii decided the fate of Rome 



BATAILLER [ba-t^-if*] v. n. 1. f i to 
give battle ; 2. § to battle; to struggle. 

BATAILLEU-R, SE [ba-tS-iefir, «A-i«) 
adj. T disputatious. 

BATAILLON [ba-ta-i6n*] n. m. 1. 
(mil.) battalion ; 2. (mil.) squadron (ol 
infantry); 8. | * — s, ranks; squad- 
rons; army; host; 4 § (b. s.) regi- 
ment (number). 

— carre, (mil.) square. Chef de — , 
major; 6cole de — , battalion drill; 
rang de chef de — , majority. 

BATARD, E [b&-tar, d] adj. 1. I bas- 
tard; spurious; misbegotten; 2. < 
bastard ; spurious ; degenerate ; 8. (ol 
animals) of a miared breed ; 4 (of dogs) 
mongrel ; 6. (of writing) inclined ; 6. 
(bot) bastard. 

Declarer — , to bastardize. 

bATARD, n. m. E, n. £ bastard. 

En — , 1. as, like a bastard ; 2. bae- 
tardly. 

bItARDE [ba-tar-d] n. £ 1. bastard; 
2. inclined writing. 

BATARDEAU fba-tar-dft] n. m. 1. (en- 
gin.) cofer-dam; 2. (fort) batardeau. 

bATARDI^IRE [ba-tar-dlA-r] n. £ (agr.) 
cutting, slip of a grafted tree. 

BATARDISE fba-tar-di-z] n. £ bcie- 
tardism; bastardy. 

BATATE [ba-ta-t] n. £ (bot) Spank!, 
potato. 

BAT AVE [ba-te-v] p. n. m. £ Bataof 
an ; native of Holland. 

BATAVE, adj. Batavian ; Dvich, 

BATAVIQUE [ ba-ta-vi-k ] adj. 7. 

BATATOLE [ba-ta-io-l] n. £ (nnv.) 
stanchion. 

— B pour le bastingage, (pL) ba/rricadf, 
sing. 

BATEAU [ba-to] n. m. 1. boat; i 
wherry; 8. (of balloons) car; 4 (d 
carriages) /^ ame-work. 

Petit — , cock-boat; — brise-elacn 
(engin.) ic«-=; — lesteur, t(t.uist-light 
er; — pScheur, fishing-=, sma^^. 
wherry : — pllote, (nav.) p'fot-—: 



HAT 



BAT 



BAT 



tf^joiite; eitjen; eHjaiine; e&jxiui; an pun; inplu; on hon; Mwbrun; *llliq. ; ♦gn liq. 



f{a.t,Jlat ; — non ponte, open = ; — ra- 
^lie,fast, sioift = ; — traineau, ice--= ; 
— volant, car (of a balloon) ; — (l"agr6- 
ment, de piomenade, pleamire-z=.\ — de 
passage, wlierry ; — de provisions, (nav.) 
hvmf/out; — a tame, row-boat ; — de 
transport, wa/ter; — a vapeur, steamer; 
tteam = ; — a vapeur arm6 en guerre, 
(OAv.) armed steamer ; — a voiles, saii- 
UhU. Con8true*»ur de — x, =•_ iwilder ; 
ooTistruction dp — x, =z-building ; con- 
«A)1 d« —X, tram o/= ; hanger k — , =- 
hirnse. Navigable pour — , beatable. 
Ot>nune un — , Hke a = ; * :=-Uk6 ; =- 
wise ; en — , 1. f w a = ; 2. as, like a = ; 
^=.-liJce ; en — non ponte, in an open = ; 
«n forme de — , =^-shaped. Porter — , 
(of rivers), to be navigable ; remonter 
en — , to ascend in a = ; to boat up ; 
transporter par — , to convey by —\ to 
boat. 

BATELAGE [ba-t-la-j] n. m. boating. 

Frais de — , boat-hire. 

BATELAGE, a m. {juggling ; leger- 
demain. 

BATEL:feE [ba-t-16] n. f. boat-load. 

BATELET [ba-t-Uj n. m. little boat. 

BATELEU-R [ba-t-leur] n. m. SE [eu-zj 
n. f. 1. i juggler ; 2. J twmbler ; 3. § bvj- 
foon. 

Faire le — 1, to play tTie bufoon. 

BATELIER [ba-t«-U«] n. m. boatman; 
waterman. 

BATELliiRE [ba-t8-liS-r] n. C woman 
that rows a boat. 

BATEE [b4-t«] Y.fL to put a pack- 
taddle on; to saddle. 

BATI [ba-ti] n. m. 1. (arch.) light 
building; 2. (cabinet-making) /^'aw** ; 
8. {need.ytacking ; 4. (tail.) basting. 

BATIER [ba-U6] a m. pack-saddle 
maker. 

BATIFOLAGE [ba-ti-fo-la-j] n. m. 1 
romping ; play 

BATIFOLER [ba-ti-fo-W] V. n. T to 



■vnm ; to play. 
BATIFOLEUR [ba-ti-fo-Ieiir] 



m. t 



BATIME- 'T [ba-tt-man] n. m. 1. bwUd- 

*itg (edifice) ; 21 • edifice ; structure ; 
pile ; 8. (com. nav.) ship ; vessel ; bot- 
t>m ; 4 (nav.) (comp.) . . . man ; man 

—8 civils, (of dock-yards) store-houses, 
eAeds; — marchancf, du commerce, 1. 
merchant-ship ; merchant-Toan ; 2. pri- 
vate ship ; — parlementaire, (nav.) flag 
of truce ; — de guerre, (nav.) man, ship 
of war ; — de mer, sea-going ship; — 
d'observation, look-out ship ; — de pro- 
priet6 6trang6re, (com. nav.) foreign 
bottom,; — k rames, rmv-boat; — de 
servitude, dock-yard boat ; — de trans- 
port, transport; transport-ship; — h 
vapeur, steamer; steams-ship; steams- 
vessel; — a vapeur arme en guerre, 
(nav.) anned s*-eamer. Armer, equiper 
un — , to Jtt out a ship ; cong6dier I'e- 
qnipage d'un — , to pay off a ship. 

BAtIR [ba-tir] V. a. 1. 1 to build ; 2. || 
to construct ; to erect ; 8. § to build ; to 
establish ; to raise ; to rest ; 4. § to get up 
(a fable, a story) ; ^ to trump up ; 5. (of 
birds) to bidld (a nest); 6. (need.) to 
tack ; 7. (tail.) to basf,e. 

— BUT le devant, 1. § to bm'ld in front ; 
2. 1 § to grow stout, bulky. A — ,l.to 
bvMd; 2. to be built; 3. unbuilt. — k 
ehaux et a ciraent §, to = upon a rock. 

Bati, k, pa. p. ( V. senses of Batir) 
(pen.) formed ; shaped ; made. 

Bien — , ( 7! senses) (pers.) weU-m,ade; 
naal — , (V. senses) (pers.) iU-m-ade. 
Non — , {V. senses) unbuilt. Yoi\k 
oomme je suis bati ^ §, that is r/vy tem- 
per. 

BAtIS [b&.U] n. m. (arch.) Ught build- 



port ; 4. I (for attack) eudgel ; 5. J (for 
attack) club ; 6. 1 «toy(of office); wand; 
baton; " (of banners, flags) staff; 8. 
(of bishops) crosier ; 9. (of chairs) splat ; 
10. (of a field-marshal) trv/ncheon ; ba- 
ton ; 11. (of parrots) perch ; 12. (writing) 
straight stroke; 13. (nav.) staff. 

1. Coup de — , blow with a stick ; un — de cire, a 
•tick of aealing-wax. 3. Le — de la vieilleaae, the 
staff, prop of old age. 

— k deux bouts, quarter-staff; — de 
commandement, \.=^ of comma,nd ; 2. 
trtmcheon; 3. (nav.) =; ensign- ■=; 

— de d6fense, stick for defence; — 
d'enseigne, (nav.) flag- = ; — de garde 
forestier, de gardien de pare, quarter- = ; 

— de marochal, 1. \ m,arshaVs trun- 
cheon; 2. § general's truncheon; — 
de Napier, (math.) Napier's bones. 
Coup de — , blow with a stick; blow ; 
coups de — , blows, pi.; cudgelling, 
sing. ; jeu du — , cudgel-play ; cudgel- 
playing ; lol du — , club-law ; tour de 
— , secret, ti/nlawful proflt (of a servant, 
or person in office) ; volee de coups de 
— , cudgelling. A I'^preuve du — , oud- 
gel^rnof; k — s rompus, 1. desultory ; 
2. desultorily ; by fits and starts ; by 
starts; 1 on and off; en — , 1. in a 
stick ; 2. like a stick. Le — blanc k la 
main, poor ; destitute. Battre I'eau avec 
un — § 1, to have one's labor for one's 
pains ■ chasser q. u. 4 coups de — , to 
cudgel a. o. a/way ; donner un coup de 

— k, to strike with a stick; to give 
(a. o.) a blow ; jeter, mettre des — s dans 
la roue, § to put a spoke in the wheel ; 
to throw difficulties, im,pediments, ob- 
stacles in the way ; jouer du — , to han- 
dle the ^=; IScher le — de commande- 
ment, to give the staff out of o.'s own 
hands; monter k cheval sur un — , to 
ride on a stick ; faire mourir sous le — , 
to beat to death ; sauter le — , to do a. 
ih. in spite ofo.'s teeth 

BATONNAT [ba-to-na] n. m. fimc- 
tions ofbatonnier (president elect of the 
order of barristers). 

BAtONNER [bA.to-n«] V. a. 1. ! to 
bastinade ; to bastinado ; ^ to cudgel ; 
^^ to drub ; 2. § to cancel ; to cross 
off, out ; to erase. 

— d'importance, to cudgel soundly. 
Personne qui bdtonne, cudgeller. 

BATONNET [bS-to-n4] n. m. 1. small 
stick ; 2. (play) cat ; tipcat. 

BATONNIER [bA-to-m«] n. m. 1. staf- 
bearer ; wand-bearer (of a company) ; 
2. batonnier (president elect of the order 
of barristers). 

BATONNISTE [ba-to-ni^t] n. m. cud- 
gel-player. 

BAT'RACHITE [ba-tra-.hi-t] n. f. (mln.) 
batrachite. 

BATRACIEN [ba-tra-.i-m] n. m. (erp.) 
batraehian; — s, (pi.) batrachians ; 
batrachia. 

Des — s, batrachdan. 

Bats, ind. pres. 1st, 2d sing , Impera. 
2d sing, of Battre. 

BATTAGE [ba-ta-j] n. m. 1. (agr.) 
thrashing; 2. (metal.) striking; 3. 
(tech.) beating. 

Aire de — , (tech.) striking-floor. 

Battais, ind. imperC 1st, 2d sing, of 
Battre. 

BATTANT [bn-tan] n. m. 1. (of bells) 
clapper ; 2. (of doors) leaf; 3. (nav.) of 



% 



JATISSE [ba-ti-.] n. f building (with 
OMrd to the masonry). 

BAtISSEUR [ba-ti-.eur] n. m. 1[ (b. s.) 
biMder ; person that has a mania for 
bwUdimg. 

!fttro un ^ «nd — ,to have a mania for 
ending. 

BATISTE fba-t!.-t] n. f. camhric. 

De — , cambric. 

BATON [b4-toii] n. m. 1. II fMck ; 2 | (for 
snpDort; sUiff; 3. J staff; prop; tup- 



flags).%. 
A deux • 



I, (of doors) folding ; two- 
leaved. 

Battant, pres. p. 

BATTANT, E [ba-tan, t] adj. 1. (of doors) 
swing ; 2. {ot r&m) pelting ; 3. ( of loo ms) 
in employment ; ^ at work ; C^f~ go- 
ing ; 4. (nav.) (of ships).;?(f/o/- batUe. 

— , tout — neuf, ^^~ bran, span 
neto. 

BATTANT L'CEIL [ba-tan-leu-i*] n. m., 
pi. — , dishabille cap. 

BATTE [ba-t] n. £ 1. Jeflftor (thing) ; 
2. wooden stcord ; sword ; 3. washing- 
board ; 4. (hort) turf-beetle. 

— k beurre. churn-staff. 

Batte, subj. pres. 1st, 3d sing, of Bat- 

TRK. 

BATTELLEMENT [ba-ti-Umin] a m. 
(arch.) projecting/ roof. 



BATTEMENT [ba-t-m«n] n. m. 1. beat 
ing ; 2. beat ; 3. (of the arteries, heart 
pulse) t/irob ; throbbifhg ; 4. (of the ft'Ot' 
stam/ping ; 5. (of the hands) clapping ; 
6. (of the heart) panting ; pant ; 7. (o* 
wings) flapping ; 8. (cards) shuffling 
9. (dans.) battement; 10. (liorol.) t>«it 

— irregulicr, (of the pnlse) flutter. 
BATTEKIE [ba-t-i-i] n, £ 1. ^flghi i 

^^ scuffle ; 8. (of drums) beatin^t ' 4 
(of portable fire-arms) ham/mer; 5. ((»r- 
til.) battury ; 6. (artil.) park (of artli 
lery); 7. (hat) battery; 8. (mus.) beat- 
ing; 9. (elect) battery; 10. (nav.) 
battery ; 11. (nav.) broadside ; 12. (nav.) 
(of guns) tier; 13. (phys.) battery. 

— basse, premiere, (nav.) knoer tier; 
— noy6e, (nav.) lower-dfick battery. — 
a coups de poing, boxing-bout; — de 
campagne, fleld-battery ; — de cuisine, 
(sing.) coppers; coppers and tins; 
kitchen-utensils, pi. Avoir ... de — , 
(nav.) (of a ship) to carry her lowest 
g^m-deck-ports . . . above tlie surface of 
the water ; changer de — , changer sea 
— s, to change o.'s battery ; d6monter 
la — , les — 8 de q. u., to disconcert a. 
o.'s pla/ns ; to frustrate a. o.'s schemes ; 
dresser une — , to erect, plant a battery. 

BATTEUR [ba-teur] n. m. 1. be<iter ; 
2. (a. & m.) beater; 3. (hunt) beater up. 

— d'estrade 1, traveller on the high- 
road; — de fer ^, inveterate swords- 
man ; —■ d'or, gold-beater ; — en grange, 
(agr.) thrasher; — de pave 1, idler, 
lounger (in the streets) ; ^ gadaboiU. 

Battis, ind. pret Ist, 2d sing, of Bat- 

TkB. 

Battit, Inti. pret 3d sing. 

Hattit, subj. imperi". 8d sing. 

BATTOIR [ba-toar] n. m. 1. baiU^ 
door; 2. (of washerwomen) beetle; 3l 
(tennis) racket. 

BATTOLOGIE [bat-to-lo-ji] n t *JU 
tology 

Battons, ind. pres. <fc imper»- lat fl- 
of Battre. 

Battrai, Ind. fat 1st sing. 

Battrais, cond. 1st, 2d sing. 

BATTRE [ba-tr] V. a. irreg. (battant, 
BATTU ; ind. pres. bats ; nous battonb) 
1. I § to beat; 2 1 to cudgel; 1^~ to 
thrash; '^~ to drub; 3. || § to butter; 
4 II § to beat; to defeat; to worst; 5. to 
beat against ; to wash ; 6. J to beat 'J,p 
(in order to mix) ; 7. to skivffle (cards) ; a 
to beat out (corn, etc.); 9. to beat (a 
drum) ; 10. to swingle (flax) ; 11. to strike 
(a flint, a stone) ; 12. to drioe (piles) ; 13. 
to beat about, up (a forest, a plain, a 
wood) ; 14. to teio (hemp) ; 15. to churn 
(milk); 16. (agr.) to thrash; 17. (a. & m.) 
to beMt; 18. (man.) to whip (a horse); 
19. (metal) to strike; 20. (mus.) to beat; 
21. (nav.) to flag against (a mast) ; 22. 
(tricktrack) to gamimon. 

6. Les vagues baitent ce rocher, tht waves beat 
against thu ruck, 

— fort, to beat hard; — rudement, 
comme 11 faut l|, to = soxmdly ; — ■ tout 
bleu il, to = black and blue; — a plate 
couture §, to =; hollow ; to = all to n o- 
thing ; — comme pliitre |, to =, 1^^ to 
pommel to a m,ummy ; — le fer, to be 
in the practice of fencing ,• — le pays 
pour, to = up for ; — en refus, jusqu'ik 
refus de mouton, (build.) to drive homs ; 
— en ruine, 1. II to batter down; 2. § *.- 
run (a. o.) down. Commencer a — , (of 
drums) to strike up. Machine k — , 
(tech.) beater ; machine 4 — le ble, (agi.) 
ttirashing-m,ill. 

Battu, e, pa. p. (K senses of B.ttreI 
1. (of the eyes) Jieamy ; 2. (of roadv) 
beaten. 

Non — , 1. 1! § imbeaten : a. j s imbiu 
tered ; 3. § unbeaten ; uruiefeated ; ui\ 
foiled ; 4 (of a path, road) unbeater. , 
untrod ; untrodden ; unworn ; un- 
traced; untracked; ** mipathed; £, 
(build.) undriven. 

Se battre, pr. V. 1. to fight ; 2. ^ tc 
ha/veaflghl. 

— ferme, to flght hard, — a'., duel, U 
= a duel. 

Syn.— Battrk, frapi-kr. Banr^ (b) beat) im 
plies redoubled blown, /rapper (to atrike) l.i t< 
give a single blow. One canjiot be hi:tu (b*at*n 





BAV BEA BEO 




anul; <Jm41e; it^e,', ^t^ve; «©te; «fje;f il; tile; omol; 6m6lo; ^imort; wsuc; ^sAre; owjour; 



Wronger iot(6«at») the more feeble ; the most vlo- 
l«nt frappe Islriiet) first. Oiie never bat (litals^ 
' 'I with design ; one «ometime8 frappt («<riie») 



if accident. 
BATTEE, V. n. Irreg. (conj. like Bat- 

Hi. I to beat; 2. to beat down ; to 
; 8 (of the heart) to beat ; to palpi- 
; to ih/rob ; ^ to go pit-a-pat; 4. (of 
tbe hsarl.) to pant; 6. (of a horse-shoe) 
XO he loose; 6. (of the pulse) to beat; to 
Unrob; 7. (of drums) to beat; 8. (nav.) to 
fiag (against a mast). 

S. Le •oleil bat a plomb 8ur no» t^tes, ih« *un>> 
eyt fall perperuiieularly upon our heads. 

— fort, 1. to beat hard ; 2. (of the 
heart, pulse) to = high; to throb fast. 

— des ailes, (V. Aile) ; — aux champs, 
(mil.) to = a salute ; — troli a q. u., to 
he cold to a.o.; ^ to Up a. o. the cold 
rJunUder. — des mains, ( V. Main) ; — 
GO retraite, ( F. Eetraite). 

Battu, e, pa. p. of Battre, 
BATTUE [b«-tu] n. f. (hunt) baUue. 
Lieu de la — , (hunt) beat. Faire une 

— dans, to beat (a wood). 
BATTURE [ba-tn-r] n. f. 1. (arts) mor- 

dant, gold-size ; 2. {ji&v.)jiat; shallow; 



reef; sand-bank. 
BAl 



de 



5AU [b6l n. m. (nav.) beam. 

Grand, maitre — , midship ■. 
pont, deck =. 

BAUBI8 [i)6-bi] n. m. fiotmd (for 
foxes, hares, and wild boars). 

BAUD [b6] n. m. (hunt) Barbary 
hownd; stag-hov/iid. 

BAUDET [bfi-de] n. m. 1. donkey; 
jackass ; 2. § (pers.) a«s ; stwpid ass. 

BAUDIK [b6-dir] V. a. (hunt) 1. to ex- 
cite (the dogs) ; 2. (by the voice) to hal- 
loo on. 

BAUDEIER rb6-dri«] n. m. cross-belt; 
Bhinilder-belt ; belt; baldrick. 

BAUDEUCHE [bft-dru-nh] n. t gold- 

BAUGE [b6.j] n. t 1. (of wild boars) 
lijiilr ; 2. (mas.) pugging-mortar ; stuff. 

BAUGUE [b6.g] BAUQUE [b6-k] n. 
t c^a-weed (on the shores of the Medi- 
Serranean). 

BAUME [bfi.m] n. m. 1. || § balm; 
bcOsam; 2. (hot) mint; 8. (pharm.) bal- 
tarn. 

— blanc, vrai, de Gil6ad, de Jud6e, de 
Levant, de la Mecque, de Syrie, (pharm.) 
halsam of Gilea>i, of Mecca, of the Le- 
vant ; — sec, concrete ; solid = ; — vert 
(bot) spear-m4nt; — a letat raturel, 
natural =; — de copahu, = ofcapiva, 
copaiba ; — du Perou, Perit/eian =:, = 
Peru ; — blanc du Perou, (pharm.) white 
etoraee; faux — du Piirou, (bot) blue 
m,elilot. Bois de — , = wood. £tre un — 
pour, servir de — a, to balm; donner 
le — , to be balmy. 

BAUMIER [b6-mi6] BALSAMIER 
[bal-xa-mis] n. m. (bot.) balsam-shmb ; 
oalsam-tree ; balm-tree ; blue melilot 

BAUQUE [b6-k] n. f. V. Baugue. 

BAUQUli:RE [b«-ki-*-r] n. £ (nav.) 



BAVE [bi-v] n. f. 1. dri/vel; skwer; 
. (of animals) ^am ,• 3. (of snails) sHme. 
Couvrir de — , to aUwer; to slabber; 



BAVEE [bs-v«l V. n. 1. to drivel; to 
slaver ; to slabber ; 2. (sub, . . . ) to 
slabber. 

BAVETTE [ba-vi-t] n. t bib. 

fitre k \ti —, to be in one's infancy ; 
tailler des — s, to gossip. 

BAVEUSE [ba-ve&-r] n. f. (ich.) blermy. 

BAVEU-X, SE [ba-veu, ei-r] adj. 
drimelUng; slabbering. 

Omelette baveuse, soft omelett«. 

BAVEU-X, n. m. SE, n. £ drvveUer ; 
sla/eerer ; slabberer. 

BAVOCH:^, E [ba-vo-rf>«] adj. (engr.) 
vn&ven. 

BAVOCHEE [ba-To-ih«] v. n. (engr.) to 
render uneven. 

BAVOCHUKE [ba-v« «ha.r] n. f. (engr.) 



BAVAED, E [ba-yir, d] adj. 1. talka- 
Hve ; garrulmis ; loquacious ; prating; 
prattling ; tioatUing ; 2. ** blabbing. 

B A VAED, n. m. E, n. £ If 1. prater ; 
t>rattler ; 2. ^ blab. 

En —, w-atingly. 

BAVAEDAGE [ba-yar-da-jl n. m. 1. 

UUkativeness ; garrulity; (oqnacity ; 
t. t-jlkj prate ; prattle ; twatUing. 

BAVAEDEE [ba-var-d*] V. n. 1. to 
folk ; to prate ; to prattle ; to twatUe ; 
i. to blab ; to let o.''s tongue run ; 3. 
(P% . .^ to blab ; to blab out. 

BAVAEDEEIE [ba-var-ds-ri] n. £ ^ 1. 
hiikfiMaoeness ; garrulity; loquacity; 
S. talk; prate ; prattle ;'ticattle. 

BAV AEDIN fba,var-din] n. m. E [i-n] 

ttr. Bavard. 

BAVAEDINEE [ba-var-di-n6] T. n. t 

Vj talk ; to prate ; to prattle. 
BAVARDISE [ba-var-di-i] n. £ tprate; 



BAVAROIS, E [ba-va-roa, z] p. n. m. f 
k adj. Ba/oarian. 

BAVAEOI8E [b8-Ta--.»«i] n. £ ba/ca- 
roise (kind of milk -posset). 



BA VOLET [ba-yo-i4] D. m. peasant's 
head-dress. 

BAVUEE [ba-vn-r] n. £ 1. ««aht (left 
by a mould); 2. (of earthenware) SMster; 
3. (metah) chipped edge. 

BAYADi:EE [ba-ia-dfe-r] n. f. Baya- 
dere. 

BAYAET [ba-iar] n. m. hand-barrow. 

BAYEE [u-iq v. n. 1 1. II to gape ; 2. 
§ (apres) to long (/or) ; to lumker 
{after). 

— aux comeilles, aux mouches, to 
gape in th« air. 

BAYEU-E [b«-iear] n. m. SE [ed-i] n. 
£ t gaper. 

BAYONNETTE [ba-io-ne-t] n. £ V. 
Baionnette. 

BAZAC [ba-iak] n. m. baza; bazat 
(Jerusalem cotton). 

BAZAE [ba-zar] n. m. basar. 

BDELLIUM [bdi-U-om] n. m. (pharm.) 
bdelUum. 

B:6aNT, E [b«-an, t] adj. 1. gaping; 
yawning ; 2. oj)en. 

Avoir la bouche — e, 6tre la bouche 
— «, to gape. 

B:&AT [b«-a, t] n. m. E, n. 1. 1. devoid, 
piozts, reUgious person; 2. 4. (b. s.) 
sancMmonious person. 

Bl^AT, E, adi. (b. s.) soMcUmonimis. 

B:fiATIFICATION [b6.a-ti-fi-k4-.i6n] n. 
£ beatification. 

B:6ATIFIEE [b«-a-ti-fl-«] v. a. to bea- 

B^ATIFIQUE [bi-a-ti-fl-k] adj. bea- 
tific. 

D'une mani^re — , beatificaUy. 

B]fcATILLES [b«-a-ti-i*] n. £ dainties 
(for meat-pies, stews, etc.), pi. 

BlfcATITUDE [b«-8-U-tu-d] n. £ beati- 
tude. 

BEAU, BEL, BELLE [b6, Ml, bi-1] 
adj. L II %fine; beautiful; lovely; * 
fair ; ** beauteous ; 2. || § handsome ; 
3. ! elegant ; t smart ; 4. %fine ; lofty ; 
elevated; noble; 5. fine; glorious; 
lumorable ; 6. (a) fit (for) ; proper 
(for) ; becomAng (in) ; suitable (to) ; 7. § 
fine; good ; fortunate; lucky ; 8. § (b. s.) 
fine; great; good; 9. § (iron.) (b. s.) 
fine (bad) ; pretty ; 10. (of the weather) 
fine; fair; beautiful; 11. (expletive) 
. . . ; 12. (axt&)fine; 13. (comp.) step (by 
alliance). 

13. Un file, une ieWc-fille, o «tep-»on, a etep- 

daughter. 

Charles le Bel, (Fr. hist) Charles the 
Fair; Philippe le Beau, (hist) PJdlip 
the Handsome, (father of Charles V.) ; 
Philippe le Bel, (Fr. hist) PJdUp Hie 
Fair; le — monde, the fashionable 
world ; le — sexe, tiie fair sear. Bel et 
bon, very good, well. Avoir Talr — , to 
look beautiful, avoir les armes belles, 
to fence well ; I'avoir beau, belle, to have 
a favorable, fine opportunity ; 6tre — , 
to look beauUfitl ; devenir — , to become, 
to get handsome , 6tre belle an coflre, to 
have golden charms ; faire — , 1. to look 
smart ; 2. to be agreealde (to) ; 3. (of 
the weather) to be fine ; to be fine weath- 
er ; se faire — , 1. to get handsome ; 2. 
to look smart ; to make o.^s self look 
smart ; faire le — fils, to set -up for a 
beau ; se mettre an — . (of the weather) 
to get fine ; to clear up. — comme un 



jour de Paques, comme un aatre, (ie,fl^4 
as fi/ve pence. *% A — jeu, — roiour, 
one good turn deserves OAwOier. 

[Bel 18 now used before a vowel or a aileiit k 
only, and in the niaseuline singular.] 

Syn. — Bkau, joli. The beau (beautiful) i» 
grand, noble, regular, imp<i8ing ; the joH (pretty) n 
delicate, feminine, agreeable. The btav (beavii- 
/«n addresses itself to the soul ; the joK (priitf) 
to the senses. 

BEAU, BEL, BELLE, adv. 

Bien et — , bel et — , bel et Wen, en- 
tirely ; quite ; tout — , fairly and tofU 
l/y ; gently; de plus belle, 1. again; 
anew ; over again ; 2. more than ever ; 
de plus en plus belle, worse and worse ; 
en — , wnder a favorable aspect ; on 
the fair, bright side. Avoir — (. .), to 
be usel'fiss, in vain (to) ; vous avez — , 
it is useless, in vain for you (to). 

BEAU [b6] n. m. 1. II § good things ; 
2. 1 § best ; 8. (b. 8.) beau ; fop ; 4. (arts) 
beautiful. 

3. Faire le — , to play the beau. 4. Avoir I'n- 
mour du — , to love the beautiful. 

Le — ld6al, the beau ideal. 

BEAUCOUsP [bft-kou] adv. 1. (de,) 
much (...), sing.; mawy (...), pi.; a 
great, ^ good deal (of), sing. ; a great 
many (. . .), pi. ; 2. much; far. 

— de, much; many; a great d«ai 
of; ^ a great stroke of. k. — pr^s, by 
a great deal ; by far ; near ; de — , by 
much, far. II s'en faut de — , very fat 
from it. 

BEAU-FILS [b6-fl, fis] n. m., pl 
Beaux-fils, step-son. 

BEAU-FEi:EE [b6-fr*-r] n. m., pf 
Beaux-freees, 1. step-brother ; 2. bro 
ther-in-tatc. 

BEAU-Pi;EE [b6-pi-r] n. m., pi 
Bbaux-pkkes, 1. step-father; 2. father- 
in-law. 

BEAUPRfi [b«-pr«] n. m. (nav.) bow- 
sprit 

Mat de — , = ; = -ma^t. — sur porptv 
(nav.) 1. close behind ; 2. in close line. 

BEAUTY [b«-t^]n. £ 1. i § beav^y; 
2. II § finen^ess ; loveliness ; * fairn^s f 
* beauteousness ; 3. | § handsomeness f 
4. § elegance; 4 smartness; 5. % fin^ 
n^ess; agreeableness ; pleasantness. 

Eau de — , beauty-wash ; grain, tache 
de — , = -spot ; miracle de — , paragon 
of =. Etre dans touia sa — , to be in 
o.''s prime. 

BEC [bjk] n. m. 1. (of birds) beak; 
biU; 2. ^ § (pers.) (b. s.) mouth; 3. (of 
fishes) snout; 4. (of insects) snout; 5. 
(of lamps) i'wrTi*?/' ; socket; 6. (of mugsi 
spoilt; 7. (of \ieni)nib; 8. (Rom. ant; 
rostrum (of a ship) ; 9. (bot) beak ; 10. 
(chem.) rostrum (of an alembic); 11. 
(conch.) beak; 12. (geog.) point (of 
land) ; 13. (gas-lighting) burner ; 14. 
(nav.) (of anchors) bill ; 15. (orn.) beak ; 
bill. 

Blanc- — , 1. ^ beardless boy ; ymmg- 
ster; 2. t^~ (b. s.) green-horn; 8. 
(mil.) recruit; — robuste, (orn.) strong 
beak ; en ciseau, (orn.) cut-water ; 
skimmer. — a 6ventail, (gas-lighting) 
batMing-burner ; — et ongles || §, tooth 
and nail. Coup de — , 1. ) blow with 
tlie bill, beak ; 2. 1 by-stroke ; ^ fling ; 
tour de — 1", kiss, -j- buss. A — , (of 
birds) beaked ; billed ; k — court, short- 
billed; k long — , long-billed. Ann6 
de — , (Rom. ant) rostrate ; rostrated ; 
arm6, muni d'un — , beaked. Avoir In 

— bien effil6, to have a sharp tongue ; 
avoir bon — , to speak out ; n'avoir qn» 
son — , 1. B to be all beak ; 2. § (pers.) to 
be aU tongue,, talk ; avoir le — gel6 J, 
to be tongue-tied (silent) ; caufer — a — , 
to chat tete a tete ; donner un coup ds 

— a, 1. H to peck ; 2. § to gi/ve a stroke 
to ; faire le — h. q. u. ^ §, to give a. o. 
his cue; s'humecter le — , -r- to wet o.> 
whistle; montrer 4 q. il Slu — jaune, 
to show a. o. his ignorance ; passer la 
plume par le — a q. u., to frustrate a 
o.'s stroke ; percer avec le — , k conpft 
de — , to peck ; ramasser avec le — , to 
peck up ; saisir par le — , to beak ; so 
prendre de — avec q. u., to have a quar- 
rel with a. o. ; tenir q. u. le — diuis, ft 
I'eau, to amuse, ^/latter a. o. with fnlet 
hopes ; to keep a. <» »n mtspemto. 



HEii 



3hu 



BEN 



o&jodte; «Mjeu; «;ijoune; eiipeur; an pan; in pin; onUm; wmbrun; *llliq.; 'gn llq. 



BfiCABUNGA [b6-ka-b6a-g«] n. m. 
fbot) becca-hunga ; ^ Iwoer ; *{ hrook- 
iime speedwell. 

Veronique — , laver. 

BfiCAERE [bd-ka-r] a. m. (mns.) n«^ 
ural. 

B^CARRE adj. (mus.) natural. 

BAGASSE [b«-ka-.] n. C 1. (orn.) 
%ooo(t-cock ; snipe ; 2. (pere.) snipe : 
idiot. 

— de mer, 1 (ich.) t"rimpet-Jis/i ; -i. 
(orn.) curlew. Brider la — . § to r^ich 
me bird (person). 

B:6CA8SEAU [b«-ka-o6] n. m. (.oru.) 
1. young wood-coek ; 2. sand-piper. 

— brunette, variable, pigmy curlew ; 
eocorli, dimlin; pur re. 

B:6CA88INE [b«-k»-M.n] n. t (otn.) 
snipe. 

Petite — , {orn.) juddock. Tirer la — , 
1. I to shoot snipes ; 2. § to conceal o.'s 
tuperioritt/. 

BECCARD [bfe-kar] n. m. female sal- 
mon. 

BEC-CROISfi [bJk-croa-z*] n. m., pi. 
Bec9-oroi8E8, (orn.) cross-bill. 

BEC-D'ANE [bek-da-n] n. m., pi. Beos- 
d'ank, martise-ohisel. 

BEC-DE-CORBIN [bJk-de-kor-binl n. 
m., pi. Becs-de-corbin, 1. (arts) tiill- 
head; 2. t halberd ; 8. (tech.) ripping- 
iron. 

A — , (arts) bill-headed. 

BEC-DE-GRUE [bik-ds-^u] n. m., pi. 
BEC8-DE-GRUE9, (hot) stork's bill. 

BEC-DE-LIEVRE [bSk-ds-IiJ-rr] n. 
tn., pi. Becs-db-lievrb, 1. hare4ip ; 2. 
\are-lipped person. 

BECFIGUE [b^k-fi-g] n. m. (om.) heo- 
tflco ; fig-pecker ; ^ titlark. 

BEO-FIN [bJk-fin] n. m., pi. Becs- 
riNS, (a.-n.) (genus) warbler. 

— cisticole, fan-tail = ; — fauvette, 
garden = ; — philom^le. thmsh-night- 
Ingale ; ~ phragmite, sedge-bird, = ; — 
t'fneur, wood-wren ; — veloce, chiff- 
chaf; — verderolle, marsh =. 

BECHAMEL [b4-sha-mil] n. £ (culin.) 
ff^M-sauee. 

B6CHARU [b«-th8-ru] n. m. (orn.)^a- 
mdngo. 

BfiCHE [b«.ih] n. 1 1. spade; 2. (tech.) 
oi'afting-tool. 

— pleine, spadeful. 

BfiCHEB [b6-.h6] V. a. to dig; to 



B6GHIQUE [b«-.hi.k] ad|. (med.) be- 
chic ; pectoral. 

B^CHIQUE, n. m. (med.) hecMc ; 
pectoral. 

BECQUlfeE, B^QU^E [b4.k4, b«-k6] 
n. f. beakful : billfid. 

BECQUETER, B^QUETER [b*-k-w, 
M-k-t6] V. a. (of birds) to pick ; to peck. 

Oiseau qui becquete, pecker. 

Sb beoqubter, 8e bequetbr, pr. v. 1. 
to peck each other; 2. to biU. 

BEDAINE [b«-d^-D] n. C T (jest) 
paii/nch; corporation. 

Farcir sa — , to stuff. 

BfiDANE [b«-da-n] a m. mortise- 
uMsel. 

BEDEAU [b8-d6] n. m. 1. (of church- 
es) beadle; 2. + (of universities) beadle. 

B^DEGAR, [b6.d-gar] BfiD:6GUAR 
fb6-d6-gar] n. m. 1. (bot) rose-gall ; 2. 
J'pharm.) bedeguar. 

BEDON [bs-don] n. m. 1. 1 drum; 2. 
1 §,fat m<m. 

BEDOUIN [b«^on-fa] p. n. m. (geog.) 
Bed,otdn. 

BEDOUIN, E [b«.doa-in, i-n] a^j. Be- 
ioiiin. 

Ht^E [b6] adj.(of casks)opeTO at one end. 

B6E, n. m. ba (bleating); baa. 

Ciior, faire — , to ba ; to baa. 

B6ER rb6-«] T. n. V. Bayer. 

BEPFROI [b«.froa] n. m. 1. belfry; 
bsll-tower ; 2. alarm,-bell. 

b^gaiement, b:6gatement 

rb«-gh«-man] n. m. 1. 8tamm,ering ; stut- 
tering ; 2. (med.) sta/mmering. 

B:6GAYER [M-gU.i6] V. n. 1. I to 
iiamaner ; to stutter; 2. 1 (of children) 
to Usp (to begin to speak) ; 3. § to speak 
x>iigv,ely ; 4 (med.) to stammer. 

Ea b6gajran» etammeringly ; stutter- 
mi/ty. 



BifeGATER, V. a. 1. to stammer ; to 
itamrr.er out ; to stutter ; to stutter 
out ; 2. (of children) to lisp (to begin to 
speak). 

BfiGU, fi |b«-gu] acy. (of horses) that 
does not mark o.'s age. 

BilGTJE [bh-g^ a(^. stammering ; stut- 
tering. 

B:feGUE, n. m. C stammerer; stut- 
terer. 

BfiGUEDLE [b«-ghea-i] n. f. haughty 
prude. 

BfiGUEULE, adj. haughtily prud- 
ish. 

BfiGUEULERIE fb^-gheu-l-ri] n. f. 
haughty prudery. 

BfiGUIN [b«-ghm], n. m. E [ghi-n] n. C 
1. (rel. ord.) beguin, m. ; beguine, f. ; 2. 
(b. s.) person superstitiously, puerilely 
de/rout. 

BT^^GITIN [bs-ghin] n. m. liggin. 

B6GUINAGE [b6-ghi-ta-j] n. m. 1. 
convent of beguini; 2. superstitious, 
puerile, affected dsvotion. 

B:6ll:fiM0Tn [b«-«-mo-t] n. m. behe- 
moth. 

B:6nEN [b«^*n] n. m. (bot.) behen. 

— blanc, white, bladder, cucubale=:; 
white bottle ; bladder catch-fly. 

BEIGE [bA-j] adj. (of wool) of the nat- 
ural color. 

BEIGE, n. t. unbleached serge. 

BEIGNET [b«-gni*] n. m. fritter. 

— s aux poinmes, apple-fntters. 

BEIRAM [b6-ram]. V. Bairam. 

B:feJAlTNE [b«-j5-n] n. m. 1. (hawk.) 
eya4i ; 2. § (pers.) ninny. 

Montrer a q. u. son — , to shoro a. o. 
his ignorance. 



BEL [bel], r. BEAtT. 

ANDI 



f (navlg.) 



BELANDRE [bft-lan-d 
bilanrler. 

BftLANT, E [b«-lan, t] adj. bleating. 

BfiLEMENT [b6-l-man] n. m. bleat- 
ing. 

Bl^LEMNITE [b«-Um-ni-t] n. f 1. 
(fos.s. conch.) belemnite ; 2. (fos.s.) dart- 
stons. 

BftLER rb«-l6] V. n. to bleat. 

BELETTE [bs-U-t] n. C (mam.) 1. 
weasel ; 2. ^Jitchet ; fmmart 

BELGE [bil-j] adj. Belgian. 

BELGE, n. m. f. Belgian. 

BELGIQUE [bil-ji-k] a(y. Belgie. 

BfiLIER [M-m] n. m. 1. ram ; 2. bat- 
tering-ram; 8. (astr.) arie^; ram. 

— liydraulique, water-ram, ; — i la 
sonnette, bell-tcether. 

BlfeLlfeRE [b^-li^-r] n. f. nng (of the 
clapper of a bell). 

BELtTRE [bs-H-tr] n. m. rascal; 
scoundrel ; scamp. 

BELLADONE, BELLA-DONA [b4- 
la-do-n, na] n. f. (bot.) bella-domia ; 
T deadly night-shade. 

BELLATRE [b6-la-tr] ac(j. of insipid 
beauty. 

BELLATRE, n. m. vnsipid beauty. 

BELLE [b^-l] n. f 1. beauty; % fair 
lady ; ** lady fair ; — s, (pl.)/atr. 

La — au bois dormant, the sleeping 
beauty in the woods. 

BELLE-DAME [be-l-da-m] n. f., pL 

BEL1.E8-DAME8, (bot.) V. AREOCHE. 

BELLE-DE-JOUR [b6-l-d«-jour] n. f., 
pi. Belles-de-jour, (hot) convolvulus ; 
^ aspliodel ; day-lily. 

BELLE-DE-NUIT [b4-l-ds-nui] n. f., 
pi. Bellbs-de-nuit, (bot) marvel of 
Peru. 

BELLE-D'UN-JOUR [bJ-l-dfin-jour] n. 
f, pL Belles-d'un-jour, (bot) day- 
lily. 

BELLE-FILLE [b^-l-fl*] n. f., pi. 
Belles-filles, 1 step-daughter; 2. 
daughter-in-law. 

BELLEMENT [bsl-man] adv. gently 
(slowly). 

BELLE-Mi:RE [bi-l-m^-r] n. f., pi. 
Belles-meres, 1. siep-mot/ter ; 2. m,o- 
ther-in-lww. 

BELLE-SOEUR [bj-l-seur] n. t, pL 
Belles-sckurs, 1. step-sister; 2. sister- 
in-law. 

BELLlGfiRANT, E [Wl.U->«-rin, t] adj. 
belligerent. 

Puissance — e, power =. 

BELLIQUEU-X, SE [Wl-U-ked, .4-.] 



adj. 1. warlike; martial; 2. quarret- 
some. 

Non- — , xmwarlike. 

BELLIS8IME [bi U-u-m] ailj. % 1 mosi 
beautiful. 

BELLOT, TE [bA-lo, t] adj. (of chil- 
dren) /?n«; haiidsotne; pretty. 

BELV^DilRE, BELV^DER [b*l.v6 
dJ-r, d^r] n. m. (arch.) belvedere. 

B]6M0L [w-moi] n. m. (muB.) 6«n<V 
^t 

B^MOL, adj. (mu8.)/a«. 

B6MOLI8ER [b«-mo-U-i6] V. a. (mus.) 
to mark with aflat. 

BEN [bfen] n. m. 1. (bot) ben; 2. (bot) 
ben-nut; 3. (pharm.) ben-nut 

— oleif&re, (bot) horse-radish tree, 
Hnile de — , ben-oil; noix de — , 1. (bot) 
ben-nut ; oil-nut ; oily acorn ; 2. 
(pharm.) ben-nut. 

B^NARDE [b6-n»r-d] n. C mortise 
dead lock. 

B£N];]DICIT£ [b«.n«-di-.i-t«] n. m. 
grace (before meals); blessing; ben<* 
diction. 

Dire le — , to say grace. 

B^NlfeDICTIN [bfi-n^-dik-tin] n. m. B 
[i-n] n. f. (rel. ord.) Benedictine. 

Des — 8, Benedictine. 

B:6N:eDICTIN, E, adj. Benedictine 

BlfcNfiDICTION |;b6-n«-dik-.i6n] n. CI. 
blessing ; benediction ; benison ; %. 
cotisecration (making sacred). 

Maison de — , 1. house of piety ; 2. i 
house of plenty ; pays de — , country nf 
plenty. Combler de — s, to load with 
blessings ; donner des — s a, to bestote 
blessings on; to give blessings to; to 
bless ; etre en — , (tu.) to be ble-ised ; r6- 
pandre, verser des — 8 sur, to sliower 
blessings on; se ropandre en — a, .to 
pnur forth blessings. Qui n"a pas rcfii 
de — , unblest. 

B^NfiFIGE [b6-n«.fl-.] n. m. 1. boiie- 
flt ; ad/vantage ; profit ; 2. pHvilefft ; 
8. (com.) profit ; gain ; 4. (eccles.) htn*- 
fice; hving; 5. (hist of Gaul.) JS^J 
fioff; feud ; 6. (law) privilege • L 
(med.) relief of t/ie bowels ; reliej ; & 
(theat) benefit. 

— brut (com.) gross profit ; gvxxj -^ 
(com.) large ^^; —net (com.) uet=s; 

— simple, (eccles.) benefice without pa- 
rish duty ; — ayant charge d'araoe, (oo 
cles.) benefice with the cure of sovis ; 

— en commende, par interim (ecclesj 
commendam; — dinventaire, (law)(F. - 
Inventairb); possession de — , (eccLJ 
incumbency; representation a — ,(theat) 
benefit ; benefit-night ; revenu d'un — 
pendant la premiere annee, (sing.) first 
fruits ; terre atfectee aux — s, (eccles.) 
corps. A — , 1. (coul) loith a-=.\ 1. 
(fin.) at a premium ; au — de, i. for 
the benefit of; 2. (theat) for the bene- 
fit of ; sans — , (eccles.) unbeneficed. 
Avoir un — , (eccles.) to have a benefice, 
liming ; to be beneficed ; avoir un — , 
une representation i — , (theat) to take 
a benefit; avoir droit «i , (law) to be 
beneficial ; donner du — , to yield a = 
Stre en — par, to home a^=. on ; ^ to be 
in pocket by; — k faire, imaginary 
profit ; prendre un — avec les charges 
§, to take it for better for worse ; reall- 
ser un — , (com.) to realize a ■=; re- 
eueillir le — de, to take the benefit of; 
retirer, tirer du — de, 1. to derive, tf 
reap benefit from ; 2 (com.) to deri/vo, 
to reap profit from, n,*;^ Les chevaus 
courent les — s et les fines les attrapent, 
asses are laden with preferment. ^% 
II faut prendre le — avec les charg**;, 
one must take it for better or worse. 

BENEFICENCE [b«-n«-fi..iji-«] n. £ " 
beneficence. 

BENEFICIAIRE [b«-nf-fl-.i-A-r] sdj 

(law) (of heirs) liable to no debts I'eyonn 
the value of the assets. 

BEnEPIOIAIRE, n. m. f. 1 (lavr) 
hsir liable to no debts beyond the value 
of the assets; 2. i^he&t.) person whose 
benefit it is. 

BENEFICIAL, E [b4-n«-fl-»ial] fl4J. 
(eccles.) of benefice. 

BENEFICIER [b«-n«-a-ii«] n. m. (oo- 
cles.) 1. beneficiary ; beneficed clergy 
man ; 2. incwmberU. 



CER 


BKR 


BET 


amal; <imal6 


e fee; i. fev<; ^ fBte; <« je; f il ; Hie; o mol ; 


mole ; o mort ; u sue ; ^ sure ; ou joni ; 



BfiNf;FICIER, V. n. (com.) (sue, &y, 
ori) to make a profit. 

BEN^T fbe-ni] i^ adj. m. »iUy ; fool- 
ish. 

BEN:feT [bJS-ne] ^ n. m. ^ Z*ooZ/y; «i»7t- 
pleton ; fool ; numskull. 

Bl^IltfeVOLE [b6-n«-To-l] adj. 1. 1 &«- 
nevolent; kind; 2. § gratuitous (un- 
founded). 

Lecteur — t, gerttle reader. 

B:feN:i&VOLEMENT [b«-n«-vo-l-manl 
■dv. 1. t II benevolently; kiivdly ; 2. § 

gratmtously (without foundation, mo- 
ve). 

BENGALI [bin-ga-ii] n. m. 1. Benga- 
lee (language) ; 2. (orn.) hengaly. 

BENGALI, E, adi. Bengalee. 

BJfeNI, E [b«.m] adj. (of persons) hlesa- 
td ; blest 

Non — , 1. unblessed; imbUst; 2. tm- 
eonsecrated. 

B:fiNIGNEMENT [b«.m-gn-man*] adv. 
benignly. 

BfiNIGNIT^ [b«-ni-gni-u*] n. I -[be- 
nignity. 

BfiN-IN, IGNE rbfi-nin, ni-gn*] adj. 1. 

itli.) bervignani ; benign ; 2. (b. s.) 
pers.) kiTid (weak) ; 8. (med.) benign ; 
'niid. 

Caractfere — , benignity; nature b6- 
"igne, (med.) benignity. 
B]fcNIE [i>«-nir] V. a. 1. to bless; 2. to 



Dieu me b^nisse ! 1 bless me, us, my 
k«aH and soul ! 

B:6N1T, E [b4-ni, t] adj. (of things) 1. 
consecrated ; 2. Iwly. 

Eau — e, holy water. 

BfiNITIER rb6-ni-ti«] n. m. 1. (small) 
aspersorium ; fwl/y-waier baiin, bowl ; 
i. holy-water pot ; 8. (large) aspersori- 



■ font; hMy-water font. 

SNJAMIN [bin-ja-min] n. m. ^ L p. 

B. Benjamin; ^ Ben; 2. darldng ;'T)e- 



loved ; fwvorite child. 

BENJOIN [bin-join] n. m. 1. (bot) 
bet^o/niin ; benaovn ; 2. benjamin (bal- 
swn). 

BENOlTE [b»oo»-t] n.f (bot.) ben- 
nm, ; avens. 

BENZOlQUE [bin-to-Uk] adj. (cbem.) 
boneoic. 

Bi;oTIEN, NE [b«.»-ii.in, i-n] adj. 
Be<itian. 

B:fcOTlEN, p. n. In., NE, n. C Beo- 
Ua/n. 

BI<:QU:6E rb«-k«] n. f v. BEC<jtri:E. 

B^QUETER [b6-k-W] V. a. F. Beo- 

QUKTBE. 

BilQUILLAED [b«-ki-i4r*] n. m. 1. 
old person supported on a crutch ; 2. 
old cripple. 

B^QUILLE [b«.ki-i*] n. C 1. crutch; 
2. (agr.) spud. 

A — , icUh a crutch; 2. crutched. 
Marcher avec des — s, to go^ to walk on 
crutches ; soutenir avec des — s, tc sup- 
port on crutches ,• to crutch. 

B^QUILLEB [b«-ki-i«*] V. n. to walk 
on orutclies. 

B:ftQUILLEE, V. a. (agr.) to dig with 
a spud. 

BER [b*r] n m. (nav. arch.) cradle. 

BEEB:fiRIS [b^r-bi-ri.] n. m. V. Vi- 

HETTIER. 

BERCAIL [bAr-kai*] n. m. slieep-fold; 
fold. 

fBKRCAiL has no plural.] 

UERCE [b4r.»] n. C (bot) cow-pars- 
nim. 

BERCEATJ [bJr-.6] n. m. 1. 1 cradle 
fliifant's bed); 2. § cradle (place of In- 
niioy); 8. (of gardens) arbor; 4. (of 
gardens) bower (of foliage); 6. (arch.) 
vault ; 6. + (nar. arch.) cradle. 

Couchage Cc — , (sing.) cradle-clotlies, 
pL An — I %, in Vie =■; &n sortir du — 
if, CM soon as one is out ofo.''s =: d68 
Ve — , from the = ; en — , (of gardens) 
cxywery. Enfermer dans un — , to em- 
bower : fetro au — ,tobeinthe:=; ** to 
oradle ; faire, former le — , to form an 
arbor, a bower ; mettre au — , to put in 
the =z;**to cradle. 

BERCELONNETTE [b*r-i«-lo-ni.t] n. 
I barcelonnette (small cradle). 

BERCEB [birti] V. a. 1. B to rock (a 
jhtld) ; to rocx the cradle of;**to ora- 



dle ; 2. I (on o.'s arms, on o.'s knees) to 
dandle ; 3. 1 to hM (to sleep) ; 4. § (de, 
in, willC) to briMg up (a child) //•wn lii« 
cradle, infancy ; 6. % (b. s.) (de, with) 
to lull ; to deiudt 

4. Avoir f-Xk berci d'id^e» e^n^reiiB^s, to hare 
been brought up from o.'s cradle, infancy in gene. 
TMis ideas, a. — q. u. de vaines esperaiices, to lull, 
U> delude a. o. wilh vain hofies. 

**# Le diable le berce, he is possessed. 

8e bercer, pr, v. (de, with) to lull, to 
delude o.'s self. 

BERCEUSE [bfer^eo-i] n. C rocker 
(person); nurse. 

BIURET [b«.ri] n. m. beret (head- 
dress). 

BEBGAME rbir-g«-in] n. £ t bergame 
(coarse tapestry). 

BERGAMOTIER [bJr-ga-mo-ti-«] n. 
m. bergamot pear, orange tree. 

BERGAMOTTE [b^r-ga-mo-t] n. f. 1. 
bergamot (pear, orange); 2. bergamot- 
boar. 

BERGE [b*r-j] n. C 1. bank (steep); 2. 
barge. 

BERGER [b^r.i«] n. m. 1. sTiepIierd ; 
** swain ; 2. ** fncain (lover). 

Jeune — , shepTierd-boy. L'6toile du 
— *♦, (the planet) Venus. 

BERGtRE [bir-j4-r] n. f. 1. (pers.) 
shepherdess ; 2. (th.) easy chair. 

Jeune — , sheplwrd-girl. 

BERGERETTE fWir-jS-rJ-t] n. f. 1. 
(pers.) shepfierd-giA ; 2. (th.) lumey- 
vnne. 

BERGERIE [b*r.j»-ri] n. f. 1. sheep- 
fold; 2. t — s, (j>l) pastorals. 

BERGERONNETTE [b«r.j8-ro-n*-t] n. 
f. 1. shepherd-girl; 2. (om.) (genus) 
wagtail ; dish-washer. 

B:feRlL [b«-ra] n. m. V. Bebtl. 

BERLE [bir-l] n. f. (bot-) (genus) 
water parsnip ; ^ skirret ; water- 
smaUage. 

— chervl, skirret. 

BERLINE [bir-li-n] n. t herUn (car- 
riage'). 

BERLINGOT [bir-im-go] n. m. berUn 
with a single seat. 

BERLIN0I8, E [b4r-U-noa, .] adj. of 
belonging to BerUn. 

BERLINOIS, p. n. m., E, p. n. f. na- 
tive of Berlin. 

BERLOQUE, BRELOQUE [bir-io-k, 
br8-lo-k] n. £ (mil.) 1. diwner-drmn; 2. 
breakfast-drum. 

Battre la — , to beat the =. 

BERLUE [bJr-ln] n. f. dimness ; dul- 
ness of sight. 

Avoir la — , 1. I to be dim-sighted ; 2. 
S to be hUnd. 

BERME [b^r-m] n. f. 1. (of canals) 
henxih ; herme ; 2. (fort.) berme. 

BERMITDIENNE [bir-mu-di-J-n] n. f. 
(bot) bermiidiana. 

BERNABLE [bir-na-bl] adj. + 1 ffiat 
d^eserven to he la^ighed at. 

BERNACLE [bir-na-kl] n. f. (moll.) 
oamacle. 

BERNARD IN [bir-nar-din] n. m., E 
[i-n] n. f. (rel. ord.) Bernardine. 

Des — 8. ^. 

BERNE [bJr-n] n. f. blanketing (toss- 
ing). 

En — , (nav.) loith a waft ; awaft. 

BERNEMENT [bir-nj-man] n. m. 
blanketing (tossing). 

BERNER [bir-n«] V. a. 1 1. i to toss in 
a blanket; to blanket; 2. § to deride; 
to ridicule ; to laugh at. 

— dans une couverture, to toss in a 
blanket,. 

BERNEUR [bir-nefir] n. m. one that 
blankets, tosse« in a blanket. 

BERNIQUE [W^r-ni-k] adv. I^~ not 
a bit of it (not in the least). 

BEENIQUET [bir-ni-kj] n. m. -4- 
(used only in certain phrases). 

Aller, 6tre au — , to come to beggary. 
Envoyer, mettre q. u. at — , to reduce 
a. o. to=: to beggar. 

BERN0I8, E [b>- noa, z\ adj. Bernfse. 

BERN0I8, p. IV m., E, p! n. £ Ber- 
nese ; one horn in Berne. 

BERRET [b^-rJ,] n. m. V. Beret. 

B:6RYL [b«-ril] n. m. (min.) ber-yl. 

De — 1. 0/'=: 2. ^^-like. f'omme le 
— , like = ; =::-like. 



BE8ACE [bs-ia-s] n. f. wallet. 

fitre ft la — K §, to be ruined, beg 
gared ; mettre, reduire a la — '\ %, tc 
ruin ; to beggar. 

BESACIER [b8.»-ii«] n. m. (b. B.) 
wallet-bearer. 

BE8A1GRE [bj-iA-gr] adi. (of jdnr' 
tartish; sourish. 

Tourner au — , to turn sour. 

BE8ANT [bs-zin] n. m. 1. (Rom. ant : 
bezant ; byzant ; byzantine ; 2. (hf t ) 
bezant. 

BESET [b8-zJ] n.m. (tricktrark) amh 
sace. 

BESI [bs-zi] n. m. pear (of a oertali- 
kind). 

BE8ICLES [b8-«i-kl] n. t pi.) eye- 
glass. 

BESOGNE [bg-M-gn*] n. f. 1 1. work; 
2. task. 

Belie — , piece of work; rude — , 
hard, heavy task, <^ pull. Ahattre ie 
la — , \ to get through a great deal of 
work; aimer la — faite, to disUke, to 
hate work. Aller vite en — , 1. || to dis- 
patch xcork quickly; 2. § to run 
through an inlieritance ; faire de la — , 
1. to do work ; 2. to fnake work ; faire 
de belle, de mauvaiso, de triste — , to 
mMke sad work of it ; mettre a la — , to 
set to work ; se metire a la — , to go to 
work; to set o.'s self to work; tailler de 
la — , donner bien de la — a q. u., § to cut 
out work /or a. o. 

BESOGNER [b8-zo-gn«*] v. n. + to do 
work. 

BESOGNEU-X, SE [bg-M-gneii, ei-z*} 

adj. .11 necessitous ; needy. 

BESOIN [bg-Min] n. m. 1. need (priva- 
tion) ; want ; 2. need (indigence) ; want ; 
distress; 3. need; necessity; require- 
ment; 4. need; want; occasion; ne- 
cessity. 

Au — , 1. in case of need ; at=z;^ ^ 
■=be; if necessary; 2. on, upon oc<v»- 
sion, the occasion ; 8. (b. s.) at a pin^Ji : 
4. (com.) (on bills) in case of need; u: 
grand — , in an emergency ; in case of 
absolute necessity ; an moment d& so-.i 
— , at o.'s = ; dans -e — , in want; n^ 
cessitous; needy; pas — , there is n.> 
occasion for it; no=; there is no=:. 
Avoir — de, to luive occasion for ; fc 
want (to) ; to be, to stand in = of; to 
ha/ve = of; avoir bien — de, avoir grand 
— de, to be, to stand in great = of; 
n'avoir plus — de, to Mve no further =, 
use of; 6prouver, sentir un — , to feel, to 
find a want ; etre dans le — , to be in 
=, distress ; faire — , 1. (th.) to be neces- 
sary, essential; 2. (pers.) to be missed , 
mourir de — , to die of want ; pourvoii 
aux — 8 de, to provide for the wants of; 
pourvoir a ses propres — s, to support 
o.'s self; prevenir les — s de q. u., to an- 
ticipate a. o.'s wants ; satisfaire un — , 
subvenir a un — , to supply a want 11 
n'y a pas — , il n"en est pas — , t/tere m 
no occasion for it ; il n'est pas — d«. 
t/iere is no = qf; qu"est-il — de ? whnt 
occasion is therefor T qu'y a-t-il — de? 
what = is there oft 

BESTIAIRE [bfei-ti-g-r] n. m. (Rom. 
ant) bestiariua (person doomed to fight 
with wild beasta). 

BESTIAL, E [bg.-Uai] adj. besttal ; ^ 
beastly. 

Salete — e, 5 beastliness. 

BESTIALEMENT [bis-ti-a-l-mim] adv. 
bestialli/. 

BESTIALITjfc [bis-ti-ft-U-M] n. £ besti- 
ality ; ^ beastliness. 

BESTIASSE [bAs-u.«-»] n. £ f^r stu 
pid ass. 

BESTIAUX [bJ»-ti6] n. m., pi. cattU, 
stock of cattle. 

— a Tengrais, fatting cattle. Com- 
merce de — , cattle-ti'ade ; droving ; 
conducteur de — , drover ; marchand ae 
— , cattle-detder ; salesman. 

BESTIOLE [bes-ti-o-l] n. t 1. | muia 
aivimal ; 2. § (pers.) poor fool. 

BfiTA [b8-ta] n. m, -r- tom-fool; 
nijmy. 

B^TAIL [bg.tai*] n. m. 1. catOe; 8 
(agr.) live-stock. 

Gros — , black, great cattle ; beaeta ; 
menu — , small =. P16ce d.e —.head oi 



iiEU 



lillj 



ou joute ; ea jeu ; ed jeflne ; eu, peur ; an pan ; \n pin ; bn bon ; mm brun ; ♦U .Iq. ; *gn 1 



= ; troapeau de — , a drove, herd of- 
filever du — , to breed =.; pourvMr ( 
— . to stock (a farm). 

BftTAiL hiis no pi. ; or at lenst nc other th 



B^TE [i)«-t] r. t 1. animal : ^ divmb 
ereature; 2. beast ((|uadruT)ed) ; 3. 
(pcm) fool; -j- tom-fool; 1 (th.) <^e- 
*..rd (object of aversion); 5. (cards) 

— asine, cw« ; bonne — , 1. good ani- 
nuU; 2. (pers.) good-naturtd fooi ; — 
boviaa, bovine animal ; ox ; e<nc fa- 
mily ; — brute, brute beast ; — epave, 
(law) stra,y ; — epaul6e, 1. animal worn 
Wilt; 2. natural fool; taxamse,—, eg re- 
gions fool; — frnve,!. fallow deer; 2. 
(horned) deer; — feroce, wild beast; 
fine , maligne — , euwning feVoio: dog, 
m. ; cunning gypsy, f. ; grosse — , 1. 
large wnimal ; 2. (pers.) great fool ; -r- 
ivU-head ; chuekle-head ; grosse — de, 
-s- ehucUe-headed ; — puante, fetid 
animal; — sauvage, wild animal, 
beast ; sotte — , stupid fool ; vraie — , 
natural, regular fool. — de charge, 
beast of burden; — de chasse, beast of 
chase; — de compagnie, gregarious 
animal ; — %h comes, homed cattle ; — 
h Dieu, — de la Vlerge, (ent) Lady-fly ; 
lady-bird; lady-cow; lady-bug; — 
du bon Dieu, good foolish creature ; — 
i laine, (agr.) sheep ; — de somme, beast 
of burd&n; — de trait, draught ani- 
mal. EnI6vement de — fauve, (law) 
deer-stealing ; auteur d'un enlevement 
de — fauve, (law) deer-stealer. Etre la 

— noire, Taversion de q. u., to be an eye- 
tore to a. o. ; faire la — , 1. to play the 
fool ; 2. to refuse a. th. against o.'s real 
inlet ests ; 8. (cards) to beast ; remonter 
Bur fta — , to recover o.'s self, o.'s losses ; 
vlvre, mourir en — , to Uve, to die like a 
dog. II, elle, &c., est ma — , ma — noire, 
aja — d'a version, he, she is cm eye-sore 
to m^, my abomination ; ^ I hate the 
eitffU of him, her, &c. — comme nne 
oJc, as stupid as an owl. ^% Morte la 

— mort le venin, 1. dead dogs donH bite ; 
J. VMiwty should not reach beyond the 



B6TE, adj. foolish ; silly ; stupid. 

Pas si — 1 / am, was not such a fool, 
fool enough for that Ne pas etre — , to 
be no fool. 

B:6'TEL [M-th\] n. m. 1. (hot) betsl; 
betel-nut; betel-pepper; 2. betel {maa- 
tl eatery). 

Noix de — , (bot.) betel-nut; polvre 
— , (bot) betel-pepper. 

B:ftTEMENT [b»-t-man] adv. ^foolish- 
ly; sillily.; stupidly. 

BfeTlSE [bfi-ti-z] n. f. 1. folly: 1 siUi- 
ness; stupidity; -i- tom-foolery ; 2. 
piece of foUy ; foolish, silly, stupid 
thing. 

— I nonsense I -4- fddle-sUck« I 
grosse, lourde — , most, wry fooU^h, 
Hlly, stupid thing. De la — , nonsense ; 
nonsensical stuff. Dire dea — e, to talk 
nonsense; toe d'une — ..., (pers.) to 
be . . fooUsh, silly, stupid. 

Syn. — B4TISB, sottisk. Bitite is applied to 
one who has limited ideas ; t"ttise^ to one who has 
hlse ideas. The first does not see at all ; the se- 
cond sees wrong. 

B:6T0INE [b4-toa-n] n. t (bot) betony. 

— oflBclnale, liead, rDood-:=^ — d'can, 
jBater = ; f water fig-wort. 

BlftTON [M-ton] n. m. (mas.) beton ; 
eoncrete. 
BETTE [bi-t] n. f (bot) beet. 

— commune, white =. 
BETTERAVE [b^-t-ra-v] n. f. (bot) 1. 

beet-root; beet; 2. mangel-icurzel. 

— rouge, red beet. Avoir un nez de 
— , to have a red nose. 

BEUGLEMENT [beu-glg-man] n. m. 1. 
lowing ; 2. (of bulls) bellowing ; 8. § 
(pers.) beUoicing. 

BEUGLER [ben-pi*] V. n. 1. to loie ; 
2. (of bulls) to bellow ; 8. $ (pers.) to 



BEUKRE [b«u r] n. m. 1. butter ; 2. 
(chem.) butter. 

— nolr, brown =; — fort, ranee, ran- 
eid, rank =. — en livre, roll = ; — en 
wdn, printed =. Commerce do - -, —• 



trade ; lait de — , =i-milk ; mains de — , 
(play) butter-fingers ; moule a — , =- 
print, sta/mp ; rotie au — , buttered 
toast; tartine de — , slice of bread aiid 
=. Au — , 1. m = ; 2. (culin.) loith = ; 
de —,\.of-=; 2. buttery. Comme le 
— , Uke = ; =:-like. Avoir des mains de 
— , (play) to be butter-fmgered ; avoir 
les yeux poches au — noir ^ §, to have a 
pair of black eyes ; etendre du — sur, 
to spread := on; to = ; promettre plus 
de — que de pain ^ §, to make great, 
extravagant promises. 

BEUKR6 [beu-Tt] u. m. (bot) butter- 
peur. 

BEURR:feE, n. £ slice of bread and 
butter. 

15EURRER, v. a. t to butter. 

Bkiirkk, e, pa. p. buttered. 

BEURRERIE [beu-r-ri] n. £ btitter- 
dairy. 

BEURRIER [beu-ri«] n. m. 1. (pers.) 
butter-m,an ; dealer in butter ; 2. (th.) 
butter-boat ; butter-dish. 

BEURRIERE [beu.ri^-r] n. £ butter- 
woman. 

B:ifcVUE [b«-v«] n. £ blwnder. 

G rosse, lourde — , gross = ; — gros- 
slfere, egregious = ; — ridicule, 1. ridi- 
eulous = ; 2. bull. Faiseur, faiseuse de 
— 8, blunderer. Par — , blunderingly. 
Faire une — , des — s, to make a =, 
=s ,• to blunder ; relever une — , to de- 
tect a =. 

BEY [b^l n. m. bey. 

BEZET [hi-ze] n. m. F. Bkset. 

BjfeZOARD [M-zo-kr] n. m. (pharm.) 
bezoar. 

BfiZOARDIQUE [ b«.io-ar-di-k ] adj. 
bezoardic. 

B-F A-8I, n. m. (mus.) + V. Si. 

BIAIS [bis] n. m. 1. 1 slope; slant; 2. 
fold (fit stuflfs) ; &. T^ § way ; manner ; 
4. If § (b. 8.) ecppedient; shift. 

De — 1. 1 aslant ; sloping ; in a slop- 
ing position ; 2. (tech.) b&cel ; bevelling ; 
en — , I sloping; in a sloping posi- 
tion ; slopingly ; par des — 8, (b. s.) 
shiftingly. AUer en — , 1. to slope ; to 
slant ; 2. (tech.) to heeel ; d6tourner de 
— , to turn aslant ; couper, tailler de — , 
en — , to slope; prendre des — , user de 
— , (b. s.) to w?« shifts; prendre q. ch. du 
bon, du mauvais — %, to go tlie Hg/tt, 
the icrong loay about a. th. 

BIAISEMENT [bi^..-man;i n. m. $ 1. | 
slanting ; sloping ; 2. evasion ; shift 

BIAISER [bi4-i4] V. n. 1. 1 to stunt; 
to slope; 2. § (b. s.) to shift; to shuffle ; 
to double. 

Personne qui aime A — , shifter, ahuf- 
fter. 

BIAISEUR [bii-MOr] n. m. shifter; 
shuffler. 

BIANGULAIRE [bi-an-p,-U.r] adj. 
(did.) biangulate ; biangalouA. 

BIBERON [bi-b-ron] n. m. breast- 
glass ; sucking-bottle. 

!filever au — , to bring u/p (a child) by 
hand. 

BIBERON [bi-b-ron] n. m. NE [o-n] n. 
£ ^ bibber ; t bibler ; ^ idne-btbber ; 
IfW" guzzler; |^~ tippler; j^~ 
toper. 

BIBLE [bi-bl] n. £ hihle. 

— de famine, fatnily, liaU =. 

BIBLIOGRAPHE [bi-bli-o-gra-f] n. m. 
bibliographer. 

BIBLIOGRAPHIE [bi-bU-o-gra-fi] n. £ 
bibliography. 

BlBLIOGRAPHIQUE[bi-bli-o-gra-fi-k] 
adj. bihUographio ; hiUiographical. 

BIBLIOMANE [bi-bU-o-niH-n] n. m. bi- 
bUomaMac. 

BIBLIOMANIE [bi-bii-o-ma-ni] n. £ bi- 
bliomania. 

De — , bihliomaniacal. 

BIBLIOPHILE [bi-bii-o-fi-l] a. m. bibli- 
ophile; lover of books. 

BIBLIOPOLE [bi-bli-o-po-i] n. m. (jest) 
bibliopole (bookseller) ; bihf.iopoUst. 

BIBLlOTHi;CAIRE [b.-bii-u-i6-ke-r] n. 
m. librarian. 

Sous , under- =. 

BlBLIOTIli:QUE [bi-bii-o-t^-k] n. £ 1. 
library (books, room) ; 2. book-case ; 8. 
book-shMves ; 4 citnlogue (of certain 
books). 



— ambulante, vivante, living library , 

— renversee, man of confused, undi 
gested knowledge. Corps de — , book- 
case. 

BIBLIQUE [bi-bU-k] a<y. bibUcal. 

BIBLI8TE [bi-bU.-t] n. m. bibUst 

BIBUS j;bi-bu8] n. m. J tHfle. 

De — , tnMgnificant ; trifling; pa^ 
try. 

BICEPS [bi-s^ps] n. m. (anat) bi^pt. 

BICfiTRE [bi-»«-tr] n. m. 1. 1 misjbr- 
tune ; 2. + disgrace ; 8. Bicetre (asyluBB 
for old people and lunatics in the neigh- 
borhood of Paris). 

BICHE [hi-«h] n. £ (mam.) hind; roe; 
roe-buck. 

BICHETTE [bi-shfe-t] n. £ (pers.) UttU 
dear; love (child). 

BICHON [bi-shon] n. m., NE [o-n] n. t 
1. (mam.) lap-dog; 2. § (pers.) little 
dear, love (cliild). 

BICHONNEB [bi-sho-nfe] v. a. ^ to cwrl 
(the hair). 

Se BionoNNER, pr. V. to aurl o.'s hair. 

BICONCAVE [bi-kon-kn-v] adj. (did.) 
concavo-concave. 

BICOQUE [bi-ko».T Q. f 1. (vail) paltry 
town ; 2. shed ; Uttle bit of a house. 

BICORNE [bi-kdr-n] adj. (did.) bi- 
cornous; ^ two-horned. 

BIDENTi; E [bi-dan-t6] adj. (did.) bi- 
dental. 

BIDET [bi-dJ] n. m. 1. nag; bidet; 2. 
(b. 8.) tit (horse); 8. bid^t (piece of ftaml- 
ture). 

Pousser bien son — %, to make o.'« 
way ; to get on. 

BIDON [bi-don] n. m. 1. bidon; 8, 
can; 3. (spin.) can. 

BIEPJbi-^] n. m. V. Biez. 

BIELLE [bi-4-l] n. £ (mach.) crank. 

— de parallelogramme, (mach.) mo- 
tion-rod. 

BIEN [biin] adv. (comp. & sup. mieitx) 

I. well ; 2. (de, of, de, to) right; proper; 
properly; 8. (b. &.) well ; finely ; pro- 
perly ; 4 |^~ (b. 8.) vn a fine pUffht, 
pickle, mess ; in for it ; 5. comfortaMe 
(at o.'s ease); 6. weU off; 1. on goci 
terms; 8. in favor; 9. good-loobiwj ; 
10. much; 11. certainly; truly; in- 
deed ; 12. quite ; completely ; full ; la 
formally ; clearly ; eaopressly ; 14 (bo- 
fore adjectives) very; 15. (before com- 
paratives) much ; far ; 16. (before past 
participles) very much ; very well ; 17. 
(of number) many ; a great many ; 18. 
(of quantity) much; a deal (of); a 
great deal (of) ; 19. (nav.) s/idp-shftpe. 

K 11 parle — etil^crit — , he tpeak* and loritet 
well ; — parler et — ^crire, to tpeak and to mritt 
well; avoir — pari* ou ^crit, t<. have epoken or 
imden well. 2. Ce n'est pas — de sa part, it U not 
right, proper of him ; ce n'est j«s — de le faire, 
it ia mtt right, proper to doit ; il faut — faire ee 
qu'on fait, we thoutd do right, properly vhut we do 
at all. 6. fitre — q. p., to be comfortable a. xth. «. 
Etre — dans ses afiaires, to 6« well olf in pecuniary 
mattert. 1. fitre — avec q. a., «o *« on good ternit 
with a. o. 8. tin — a la cour, to be m favor at 
court. 9. Due pt^rsonne qui eat — , a pitreim who is 
good-looking. 10. Je le desire — , / desire it much. 

I I . Vous anriez — pu venir, you mvjht certainly, 
indeed have eontc. 12. 11 y a — une heure de cela, 
U it quite, full an hour nnce then. 13. II est — «n- 
tendu que . . .,it it formally, clearly, expressly 
umlertl"od that ... 14. — bon, — mauvais, very 
;/ oY, very bad. 15. C'est — mieux, pis, it it much, 
iiir httlerianrae. 16. — surpris, very much mrprited. 
\'. Voir — des choses, to tte many thingt. 18. 
A voir — de la vertu, to have much virtue, a greftt 
deal */ virtue. 

— ! 1. well! 2. right/ 8. so, sol ob 
— ! h6 — 1 well ! Fort, tr^s-bien, 1. verit 
well ; 2. full well; parfaltement — , very, 
full well ; ou — , 1. or else ; 2. or in- 
deed ; pas trop mal ni trop — , go, »o ; ii 

— que, so that; so much that; so «»mc4 
so tliat ; de, du, de la, des, nmch ; nuin^ ; 
a great deal; a great many, iltrs ~, 
1. ( r. senses) to have good accommoda- 
tion ; 2. to be on good terms (v/ith a. o.) ; 
netre pas — , ( V. senses) to be unwell ; 
se trouver — (de), 1. to derive benefit 
(from) ; to find benefit {by) ; 2. to be the 
better {for) ; valoir — , to be as good 
(w. C'est — , ( V. senses) tliat i/nll do ; 
esi-ce bien comme cela? iciU that dot 
tout \& —\ ail is right / — iul a prl* 
de . . . , 1. ^ was right to; 2. he was the 
all the bete- for. 



1K.K> 



1 simpi 



; )t proc^H^' 



BIE 



BIE 



BIH 



a mal ; d mMe ; « f§e ; ^ f^ve ; i fite ; ^ je ; ii\; ills; o mol ; b mole ; b mort ; u sue ; ^ s&re ; (m jonr ; 



nr follows them in the infinitiTti mood \ in coiii- 
pound tenses it is placed between the aux, and tlie 
Mrt. (r. Ei. 1.) In the nth and 18th senses it 
takes dt and the definite art. before a noun [ V. 
Ex. n, 18.)] 

BisN QUE, conj. (subj.) altlumgh; 
though. 

BIEN, n. m. 1. 1 § g'ootZ; 2. good; 
benefit ; welfare ; well-being ; 8. bless- 
ing ; gift ; boon ; + mercy ; 4 — 8 (pi.) 
good things; 5. endowment; gift; 6. 
— , (sing.) —8, (pi.) property; 7. ««tofe 
(lands); 8. (law) — s, (pi.) goods; chat- 
tels ; 9. (law) hereditament. 

1. La science du — et du mal, (A« knowledge of 
C^ood and evil ; leg — s et les maux de la vie, the 
goo4»an<i the evih if life. 3. Le — le plus precieux 
the mott preciuu) blessing, gift. 8. Les — »de l'.Hme, 
du corps, de I'esprit, tht endowments, gifts of the 
$oul, the body, the mtnd. 

Beau — , 1. ^ne property ; 2. fne es- 
tate ; — clair et net, liquide, vmmi&mn- 
bered estate; grands — s, great, large 
=^ ; — 8 fonciers, landed =^ ; land ; — 
immeuble, (law) real = ; corporeal he- 
reditament; chose local ; — incorporel, 
Haw) incorporeal hereditarrient ; — 8 In- 
corporels, (law) chattels real; — meu- 
ble, (law) chose fran^tory ; — s meubles, 
(law) movables; chattels personal; — 8 
mobillers, I. movables ; 2. (i&w) personal 
= ; — 8ubstltu6, entailed estate ; estate 
tail; — set effets, (law) goods and chat- 
tels ; — en rentes, funded =. Cession 
de — 8, (law) surrender of properly ; 
surrender of estate and effects. Homme, 
femme de — , a good, worthy man, wo- 
mMn ; homme, femme qui a du — , man, 
woman of = ; masse des — s, (law) es- 
tate; masse des —8 Immeubles, (law) 
real estate; masse des — s meubles, 
<law) personal estate; un pen de — , 
small =. En — , in a favorable point 
of view; en tout — et tout honneur, 
with loonorable intentions ; pour le — 
de,/b^ t!ie good, betiefit of. Avoir du — , 
1. to ha/ve = ; 2. If to be worth money ; 
avoir du — au soleil, to have solid = ; 
dire du — de, to speak higJily, well of; 
*, to give a good character of; dire 
tout le — du monde de, to speak as 
\ig/uy, a» well as possible of; ^ to give 
the best 2JOS»ible character of; doter 
q. XL d'un — , to settle an estate on, v/pon 
a. o. ; expliquer, interpr6ter, prendre en 
— , to put a favorable constr-uction on, 
v/pon; faire du — , faire le — , to do 
qood; faire du — 4, 1. (pers.) to do good 
to; to benefit; to succor; 2. (tli.) to 
benefit; to ie beneficial to; 8. (pers.) to 
do a kindness to ; faire une cession de — , 
(law) to make a surrender of-=. ; nian- 
quer de — , to have no-=^; to he without 
= ; 86 porter, se tourner au — , (pers.) to 
he well-incUned ; ramener au — , to re- 
claim, (a. o.) ; rendre le — pour le mal, to 
return good for evil ; souliaiter du — a 
q. u., to wish a. o. well; tourner au — , 
to take a favorable turn ; faire valoir 
son — , to cultivate, to farm one's own 
estate : vivre de son — , to live on o.'s 
=, m,eans ; vouloir du — a q. u., to wish 
a. o. well ; vouloir le — (de), to mean 
well (to). ,^*# Le — cherciie le — , mo- 
ney begets money ; ^:*^ abondance de — s 
ne nuit pas, store is no sore. Grand — 
lui, vous, leur fasse ! m.uch good may it 
do him, her, you, them I ^*^, nul — sans 
peine, no gain vntJwut pavns. 

BIEN-DIKE [biin-di-r] n. m. ^ fine 
tpeaking. 

]6tre, se mettre sur son — , |f^~ to 
ttand upon o.''s Ps and, Qs. 

B1E^^-DISANT, E [biin-di-ian, t] a^j. 
tfair spokex. 

BIFN-T^TKE [blin-oi-tr] n. m. 1. wel- 
ftef* , 'J, til-being ; 2. comfort ; comforts; 
S. comfortableness; 4 (com.) (th.) cor- 
rect/ness. 

BIENFAISANCE [biin-fa-zan-s] n. f. 1. 
beneficence; benevolence; bounty; 2. 
** ki ndliness ; kindness. 

Bureau de — , charitable board ; 
CBUvre de — , cJiarity ; benefaction. 
Avec — , 1. beneficently; benevolently ; 
bovmteovsly ; 2. ** kindly. 

BIENFAISANT, E [biin-fa-zan, t] adj. 
1. (A, to) beneficent; benevolent; * 
^ownUftU; bounteous; 2. ** (poue, to) 



kind ; kindly ; 8. (th.) beneficial ; salur- 
tary. 

Peu — , {V. senses) 1. unbenevolent ; 
2. * wnbounteous ; 3. ** imkind; un- 
kindly. 

BIENFAIT [biin-fi] n. m. (pour, to) 1. 
benefit; benefaction ; boon; 2. — s, (pi.) 
advantages ; utility. 

Action de conferer un — , benefaction. 
Accorder un — (k), to confer a benefit 
(on, upon) ; proflter des — 8 de, to he 
benefited by; rendre un — , to repay 
o =. Un — n'est jamais perdu, a kind- 
ness is iiever lost. 

Syn. — BlKNFAIT, GkAcE, SBKVICK, BON OFFICE, 

PLAisiR. A bienfait is a gift or a sacrifice, which 
he who has makes, in order to belter the condition 
of him who needs. A ffrace is a favor to which 
the recipient coidd lay no claim ; it also implies 
the remission of a merited penalty. A lervioe 
implies assistance which one renders in obtaining 
a desirable object. The hon office consists in the 
employment of oui- credit or our influence to ena- 
ble one to succeed, or to contribute to his prospe- 
rity. Aplaisir is one of those obligmg acts which 
we are constantly performing for one another. 
Generosity or charity leads us to confer bienfaita 
(benefttt) ; partiality distributes graces {favf^a) ; 
zeal renders tervicet (^senicet) ; kindness is the 
source of bom officet (kind tfficea) ; and friendliness 
or courtesy of plaisirs (good turns). 

BIENFAI-TEUR [biin-fj-teur] n. m. 
TFJCE [tri-s] n. £ benefactor; benefac- 
tress. 

fitre le — Ae, to be the =■ of; to 
benefit. 

BIEN-FONDS [biin-fon] n. m. pi 
B1EN8-FOND8, (law) ta/nd; lands; landed 
property. 

De — , landed ; land . . . Garantie en 
— , landed secu/rity ; succession inatten- 
due de — , land-fall; transmission de 
— par succession, (law) descent of lands. 

BIENHEUEEU-X, SE [biin-neu-reu, 

eii-z] adj. 1. hUs^ul; all-happy; 2. + 
happy ; blessed ; blest. 

Esprit — , ame bienheureuse, soul in 
hliss. 

BIENNAL, E rbi-Jn-nai] adj. biennial. 

BIENSlfeANCE [biin-s4-an-s] n. f. 1. 4. 
propriety; decorwm; becomingness ; 
seemliness ; decency ; 2. good manners; 
8. convenience. 

Avec — , toith propriety ; becom- 
ingly ; decorously ; seemly ; par droit 
de — *{, to suit o.''s convenience. Bles- 
ser, choquer la — , les — s, to offend 
against = ; 6tre i la — de q. u., to suit 
a. o.'s con/veniefice; garder la — , les — s, 
to keep loithin the bounds, limits, rtiles 
ofr=. ; se mettre au-dessus des — s, to set 
= at defiance. 

BIENS^ANT, E [biin-s«-an, t] adj. (a, 
<?/,• de, to) proper ; becoming ; deco- 
rous; seemly; decent. 

II est — aux jeunes gens de respecter la vieil- 
lesse, it is becoming, decorous, proper t» youth to 
respect old age. 

BIENT6T [bito-t6] adv. 1. (of past 
time) soon; 2. (of future time) soon; 
sliortly ; before lon^ ; * ere long. 

BIEN VE ILL ANCE [biin-vi-ian-.*] n. 
f. 1. kindness; kindliness ; 2., friendli- 
ness ; 8. good mil; * benevolence; 4 
favor (of a superior). 

Acte de — , kindness ; d^faut, manque 
de — , 1. wnMndness ; 2. unfiHendliness. 
Sans — , 1. unkind; 2. unkindly. Avoir 
de la — pour q. u., to entertain a kind 
feeling towards a. o. ; to bear a. o. 
good will ; n'avoir que de la — (pour), to 
he in charity (with); traiter avec — , 
( V. senses) to cherish. 

Sl/n. — BlENVKILLANCK, BIENFAT8ANCE. Bien- 

veilfance (benevolence) is the desire of doing gof.d ; 
bienfaisance (beneficence) is the act of doing gord. 
Many persons are full of bienveillance (benevu- 
lence), who have not the means to be bienfaisant 
(benefieeru). 

BIEN VEILL ANT, E [biin-vS-ian, t*] 
adj. (pour, to ; de, to) 1. kind ; kimdly ; 
2. friendly ; 8. * benevolent. 

Peu — , 1. iinkind ; 2. unkindly ; 8. 
ttnfriendh/ ; 4 ♦ tmbenevolent. 

BIENVENU, E [biin-v-nu] a^j. (pers.) 
welcome. 

^tre le — , to be welcome; soyez, sois 
le — ! welcome ! 

BIENVENUE [biin-v-nu] n. f. 1. (pers.) 
welcome; 2. entrance ; footing ; 8. gar- 
nish-money. 

Personne qui souhaite la — k, wel- 



comer of. Salut de — , welcome. Payor 
la — , to pay o.'s footing ; souhaiter la — 
a q. u., to welcome a. o. ; to bid a. o, 
welcome. 
BitRE [bi^-r] n. f. beer. 

— blanche, pale:=; — double, dcuble 
— , double = ; — forte, 1. strong = ; 2. 
stout; petite — , small =; mauvaise pe- 
tite — , (sing.) f^" swipes, pL — <iii 
table, table- =. D6bit de — , = -shop; 
levure de — , yeast ; pompe i — , = -.»/*« 
gine. Faire de la — , to brew. 

Bli;KE, n. f. coffin; bier. 

Faiseur de — , = -maker. Sans — , 
without a coffin ; ** tmcqfflned. Clouei 
une — , to nail down a =:; visser une 
— , to screw down a =. 

BIERRE, n. f. J beer. V. Biere. 

BIEVRE [bij-vrl n. m. t V. Castor. 

BIEZ rbi«] BIEF, n. m. 1. (of wat«r. 
mills) mtU-course ; miU-race ; 2. (build.) 
pond ; 8. (engin.) (of canals) reach. 

— de partage, (of canals) sum' Mi- 
level pond. Difference de niveau fintro 
deux — 8, (engin.) (of canals) lift. £ta- 
blir un — , des — s dans, (build.) to pond. 

BIFFER [bi-fi] V. a. 1. to cancel; to 
deface; to obliterate; 2. to blot out; 81, 
to cross off; 4 to scratch out; to strtk« 
ottt, off; to erase. 

BiFFi, E, pa p. V. senses of Bifter. 

Non — , ( V. senses) 1. uncancelled; 2. 
uncrossed. 

BIFIDE [bi-fi-d] h4j. (bot) bifid; bljl 
date. 

BIFLORE [bi-flo-r] adj. (bo*-.) bi/lo- 
rous ; ^ two-fiowered. 

BIFOLl^fe, E [bi-fo-li«] adj. (bot) two- 



BIFTECK [bif-tik] n. m. (cnlln.) be^- 
steak. 
Faux — , (butch.) rvmp-steak. 

BIFURCATION [bi-fur-ka-u6n] n. t 
bifurcation ; forking. 

BIFURQU:^, E [bi-fur-k«] adj. b^r- 
cate ; bifurcated; '{forked. 

BIFURQUER (SE) [s6-bi-fur-k«l pr. V. 

1. to he bifurcate; bifurcated; '[fork- 
ed ; 2. (of roads) to fork. 

BIGAME [bl-ga-m] adj. guilty of big' 
amy. 

BIGAME, n. m. 1. bigamist; 2. (can. 
law) bigamist. 

BIGAMIE [bi-ga-ms] n. f t. bigamy; 

2. (can. law) btgamy. 
BIGARADE [bi-ga-ra-d] n. C (bot) 

Seville orange (fraxi). 

BIGAKADIER [bi-ga-ra-di«] n. m. 
(bot.) Seville orange (tree). 

BIGARR:^, E [bi-ga-r6] adj. (b. s.) 1. 1 
party-colored; motley; medley; 2. 
freckled ; 8. streaked ; 4 § motley. 

BIGARREAU [bi-g4-roj n. m. (bot) 
bigarreau (cherry;. 

BIGARREAUTIER [bi-gi-r«-H«] n. m. 
(bot.> bigarreautier (cherry-tree). 

BI'GARRER [bi-gA-r«] v. a. 1. | to 
render, to make party-coloi'ed ; 2. to 
make a m.otley, medley of; to checker ; 
to dwpple ; 8. § (de, with) to intersperse ; 
to interlard. 

BIGARRUEE [bi-ga-ru-r] n. C 1. | 
party-color ; motley ; medley ; 2. § mot- 
ley ; medley. 

BIGLE [bi-gl] adj. % sqtiint-eyed. 

BIGLER [bi-gi«] V. n. + to squint. 

BIGNONfE [bi-gno-ni*] n. f. (bot) 
trumpet-flower. 

BIGORNE [bi.g6r-n] n. £ (tech.) 1. 
beaked anvil; 2. (ofanvils)6eaA;; beak- 
iron; bickern. 

A — , (tech.) (of anvils) beaked. 

BIGORNE AU fbi-gOr-nd] n. va. 1. 
(tech.) Uttle, small beaked anvil; i. 
(moll.) periwinkle. 

BIGOT, E [bi-go, t] adj. 1. | bigoted, 
2. (of manners) sanctimonious. 

BIGOT, n. m. E, n. £ bigot. 

En — , bigotedVy. 

BIGOTERIE [bl-go-t-ri] n. t biyolry. 

Avoc — , bigotedly. 

BIGOTISME [bilgo-tu-m] n. m. big 
otry. 

BIGOURNEAU [bi-gour-n6] U. Ui 
(moll.) periwinkle. 

BIGUE [bi-g] n. £ (nav.) sheert. 

BIIIOREAU [bi.o-r6] a. m. {oral 
nigM heron. 



BIL BIQ 




BIS 


o4 joiite; eu]ea; eAje&ne; «Mpeur; <mpan; in. pin; dnbon; wnbrun; 


*11 llq. 


*gnUq. 



— ft manteau, =. 

BIJON [bi-jon] n. m. t turpentine. 

BIJOU [bi-jou] n. m. 1. I jewel; 2. 8 
jencel; 8. 1 trinket; 4 % jewel (term of 
iffection). 

Commo un — , like a jewel; ■=z-Uke. 
Oraer de — x. tojeicd. 

BIJOUTERIE [bi-jou-t-ri] n. f. \. jew- 
elry business ; 2. jeicelry. Fausse — , 
rZated jewelry ; — en fln,^w« gold =. 

BIJOUT-IER [bi-jou-ti6] n. m. IJfcRE 



[i-r] B, f. jewdler. 
BILA^I ■ 



!IE, E [bi-la-bU] adj. (bot) Ula- 
biate. 

BILAN [bi-lan] n. m. 1. (com.) lal- 
ance-s?ieet; 2. (com. law) schedule. 

D6po8er son — , (com. law) to file o.'s 
tchedule ; to give in o.'s =. 

BILAT:6RAL, E [bl-U-w-ral] adj. 1. 
bilaterdl; 2. (law) (of contracts) reci- 
procal. 

BILBOQUET [bU-bo-k4] n. m. cm/> 
cmd ball. 

BILE [bi-i] n. C 1. I (physioL) bile; 
gall; 2. § gall; sple-en. 

— r6pandue, (med.) jaundice. D6- 
cbarger sa — , to vent o.'' a spleen ; 6chauf- 
fer la — & q. u., to sUr wp a. o.^s choler ; 
to excite a. o.^s spleen; regorger de — , 
to be full of bile; to be very bilious; 
temperer la — , to restrain, repress o.'« 
anger. 

BILIAIBE [bi-U-4.r] adj. (anat) bUi- 
ary. 

Calcul, concretion — , (med.) gall- 
stone ; conduit — , biliary-duct ; bile- 
duct; gaU-d/uct; v68icule — ,gaU-blad- 
der. 

BILIEU-X, SE [bi-li^u, e4-«] adj. 1. 
(jihysiol.) bilious ; cliolerxc ; 2. § ctMl-e- 
ric; splenetic. 

Au teint — , d'un teint — , bilums- 
looking. Fifevro bilieuse, (med.) gall- 
sickness. 

BILINGUE [bi-lin-g] adj. (nat. hist) 
hiUnguou^ ; two-tongued. 

BILL [bii] n. m. (English pari.) bill. 

BILLARD [bi-iar*] n. m. 1. billiards 
feame); 2. billiard-table; 3. billiard- 
room ; 4. (nav.) billiard. 

Bille de —, MlHard-ball ; garfon de 
— , =z-marker; jeu de — , game of=s; 
Joueur au— , =-player; partie de — , 
game of =8 ; queue de — , =:-cue ; =- 
etick; salle de — , =-room; tapis de — , 
=:-cloth. De — , bilUard. Faire une 
partie de — , to pla/y a game of=zs; 
jouer au — , to play at =«. 

BILLARDER [bi.iar-d«*] V. n. (bil- 
Wards) 1. to strike the ball twice ; 2. to 
strike the t>co balls together ; 3. (nav.) 
to billiard. 

BILLE [U-i*] n. C 1. marble (to play 
with); 2. taw; 3. (of wood) log; 4. (bil- 
liards) biUiard-bau ; ball. 

Blouser une — , (billiards) to pocket a 
ball ; coller une — , (play) to shoot a 
marble ; faire une — , f.hilliards) to hole 
a ball ; faire uiie partie de — s, to play 
a game of marbles. 

BILLEBAUDE [bi-i-b6-d*] n. £ ^ con- 
fuMon. 

A la — , in =. 

BILLER [bi-i«] T. a. 1. to pack close 
(by tightening the cords with a stick) ; 2. 
to attach (the tow-line of a boat to a 
horse's harness). 

BILLET [bi-iJ*J n. m. 1. bill ; hcmd- 
bill; 2. ticket; 3. note (small letter); 
billet; 4. circular letter; circular; 5. 
invitation (by circular) ; 6. (of lotteries^ 
ticket; 7. (bank.) biU; note; 8. (com.) 
biU. ( V. Effet.) 

— blanc, (of lotteries) blank ; — com- 
merciable, n6gocmble, (com.) negotiable 
bill; — dor.n6, (of places of public 
»musemeni) order ; — doux, love-letter ; 
oillet-doux ; — ^chu, (com.) bill due ; 

- perim6, (com.) bill over-due, past- 
<tue ; — de faire part, de part, 1. circu- 
far; 2. invitation (to a funeral, a wed- 
aing, etc); — payable a presentation, 
(com.) bill payable on demand. — de 
Manque, bank-note ; bank-bill ; — de 
Danque de province, country note : — 
de comjilaisance, (com.) accommodation 
Hlli 1 kite ; — a . . . de date, (com.) bUl 
pa/yable . . . after date ; — d'entree, ad- 



■ticket ; ticket of admission ; 

— de logement, (mil.) billet; - a ordre, 
(com.) 1. bill payable to order ; 2. pro- 
missory note ; note of hand ; — a payer, 
(com.) bill payable; — au porteur, 
(com.) bill payable to bearer ; — 4 re- 
cevoir, (com.) bill receivable; — de 
sant6, bill of health; — k vue, (com.) 
bill payable at sight. D61ivrer des — s 
de logement 6, to billet (soldiers) ; 6met- 
tre des — s, (bank.) to issue notes ; faire 
un — , to make out a bill. 

BILLETER [bi-i-w*] +. V. ttvivs- 

TER. 

BILLETTE [bUi-t*] n. 1 1. noUce (to 
pay toll); 2. (her.) billet 

BILLE VES:^Erbi-i-v6-i^*] n. f. 1. idle, 
silly stiiff, trash ; 2. crotchet (chimerical 
notion). 

Sujet aux — s, crotchety. 

iJILLIOil [bi-Uon] n. m. thousand 
millions. 

3ILL0N [bi-isn*] n. m. 1. copper coin; 
2. debased coin; 3. place for receiving 
debased coin. 

Monnaie de — , copper coin. 

BILLON, n. m. (agr.) ridge. 

Faire des — s dans, (agr.) to ridge. 

BILLONNAGE [bi-io-n»-j*] n. m. 
(agi-.) ridging. 

BILLONISIEMENT [bi-io-n-man*] n. 

m. t debasing coin. 

BILLONNER [bi-io-n«*] v. n. 1 1. to 
utter debased cowi ; 2. to deal in de- 
based coin. 

BILLONNEUR [bi-io-nefir*] n. m. 1 1. 
utter er of debased coin; 2. dealer in 
debased coin. 

BILLOT [bi-i»*] n. m. 1. block; % 
dog (for animals' heads). 

— de cuisine, chopping-block. 
BILOBfi, E [bi-io-b«] adj. (bot) bilo- 

bate ; bilobated ; ^ two-lobed. 

BILOCULAIRE [bi-lo-ku-14-r] adj. 
(bot) bilocular. 

BIMANE rbi-ma-n] a4j. (zooL) bima- 
nous ; 1 two-handed. 

BIMBELOT [bin-b-lo] n. m. <oy ; play- 
thing. 

BIMBELOTERIE [bin-b-Io-t-ri] n.tl. 
toys ; 2. toy-trade. 

BIMBELOTIER [bin-b-lo-U*] n. m. 
toy-man. 

BINAGE j;bi-na-j] n. m. 1. say- 
ing mass tivtce in one day ; 2. (agr.) 
second dressing; 3. (agr.) second 
tUth. 

BIN AIRE [bi-ni-r] adj. binary. 

Nombre — , (arith.) binary nurnber ; 
binary ; syst^me — , = scale. 

BINARD [bi-nar] n. Ta. four-wheeled 
truck; truck. 

BIN:6, E [bi.D«] adj. (bot) binate; bi- 
noted. 

BINER [bi-n6] V. a. (agr.) to dress a 
" time. 

BINER, V. n. to say mass twicein one 
day. 

BINET [bi-nJi] n. m. save-aU. 

Faire — , to use Hie :=. 

BINOCLE [b .no-ki] n. m. 1. doubU 
eye-glass; 2. binocle. 

BIN6ME [bi-n6-tn] n. m. (alg.) bino- 
mial. 

— de Newton, binomial theorem. 
BIN6ME, adj. (alg.) binomial. 
BIOGRAPHE [bi-o-gra-f] n. m. biogra- 

pher. 

BIOGRAPHIE [bi-o-gra-fi] n. m. bio- 
graphy. 

BIOGRAPHIQUE [bi-o-gra-fi-k] acU. 
biographic ; biographical. 

BIOLOGIE [bi-o-io-ji] n. f biology. 

BIP:feDAL, E [bi-p«-d8l] adj. bipedal; 
two-footed. 

BIPilDE [bi-p4-d] adj. bipedal ; ^ two- 
legged. 

BIPtoE, n. m. 1. biped; a. (man.) 
two feet. 

— antdrieur, (man.) /or* limbs ; — dia- 

fonal, the forefoot on one side and 
inder foot on the other ; — lateral, a 
fore and hinder foot on the same side ; 

— post6rieur, hinder limbs. 

BIQUADRATIQUE [bi-kouad-ra-ti-k] 

ad,1. (alg.) biquadratic ; of the fourth 
degree. 
Equation biquadratic equation; 



biq^tadratic ; equation of the fbvrOt 
degree. 

BIQUE [bi-k] n. t she-goat 

BIQUET [bi-kfe] n. m. 1. kid; 2. nu> 
ney-seales. 

BIQUETER Tbi-k-w] v. a. to weigh 
with money -scales. 

BIQUETER, V. n. (ofshe-gOhts)*>Kd 

BIEIB' [bi-ri-bi] n. m. 1. hiriU U 
game) ; 2. lot a shoe) back-lining. 

BIS, E [bi, .] aty. 1. (of bread, doupl) 
brown; 2. (pers.) very dark; tawny, 
swarthy. 

BIS rbft] adv. 1. twice; 2. (of num- 
bers of houses) and a half; 8. (at thea- 
tres, concerts) encore ; 4. (com.) bis. 

Avoir les honneurs du — , to hayve the 
honor of being encored ; crier — , to cry 
encore; crier — k, to encore; demand- 
er — a, to encore. 

BISAlEUL [bi-i»-ieul] n. m. greai 
grandfather. 

BISAlEULE [bi-«a-ieu-l] n. f greai 
grandmother: 

BISANNUEL, LE [bi-«aii-nuM] adj. 
(bot) biennial. 

BISBILLE [bU-bi-i*] n. f. jangle; 
jangling ; jar. 

Personne en — , jangler. £tre en — , 
to jangle. 

BISCAlEN [bU-ka-un] n. m. lona bar- 
relled m-tisket. 

BlSCAlEN, NE [bU-ka-iin, J-n] adj. 

1. Biscayan ; of Biscay ; 2. (of mus- 
kets) long -barrelled. 

BISCAlEN, p. n. m. NE, p. n. £ Bio- 
cayan. 

BISCHOF [bi-.hof] n. m. bishop (U- 
quor). 

BISCORNU, E [bi^ker-nu] adj. 1 odd; 
strange; outlandish. 

BISCOTIN [bi^ko-tin] n. m. sweet bi*- 
cwit. 

BISCUIT [bi^kui] n. m. 1. biscudt; 

2. sweet biscuit ; 8. sponge-cake ; 4 
(pot) biscuit; semi-vitrified porcelain, 

— au be:irre, tea-biscuit; — k\» onll- 
ler, Savoy-=; — de mer, 1. ship, mo 
= ; 2. cuttle-fish (back-bone of a cutUo 
fish) ; — de Savoie, Samoy-cake. 

BISE [bi-z] n. £ north loiml. 

Vent de — , =. U fait une — , there is 
a=. 

BISEAU [bl-it] n. m. 1. bevelUng ; 
basil; 2. {caxp.)Jeather edge ; 3. (cuUn.) 
kissing -crust; 4 (print) foot-stick ; 6. 
(print) side-stick. 

— de c6t6, (print) side-stick. Ms- 
niiire de couper en — , beveiling (wood). 
En — , bird's mouth joint Tailler eo 
— , to bevel, basil ; taillo en — , 1. bevel- 
led ; basilled ; 2. (oarp.) feather-edged. 

BISER [bi-z«] V. n. (of grain) 1. to get, 
to gron.0 brown ; 2. to degenerate. 

BISER, V. a. to dye over again. 

BISET [bi-zi] n. m. 1. coarse gray 
cloth; 2. national guard on duty in 
private clothes ; 3. (orn.) rock dxyve. 

Pigeon — , (orri.) rock-dove. En ^, 
(of national guards) in private clothes. 

BISETTE [bi-zJi-t] n. £ footing (Uce). 

BISHOP rbi-.hop] n. m. bishop (liquor). 

BISMUTH [biz-mut] n. m. (min.; bis- 
muth ; ^ tin-glass. 

BISON [bi-zon] n. m. (mam.) bison. 

BISONNE [bi-zo-n] n. £ ''■bivonne'' 
(gray cloth used for lining). . 

BlSQUAIN [bi.-k-m] u. m. sheep-skin 
with the wool on. 

BISQUE [bi.-k] n. £ (tennis) odds. 

Avoir quinze et — sur la partie, § to 
have the odds in o.'s favor ; doni)»»r 
quinze et — §, to give the odds; prendie 
sa — §, to choose o.'s time. 

BISQUE, u. £ (culin.) bisk ; culMs. 

BISSAOJbi lak] n. m. wallet 

BIriSECTION [bi-.^k-«cn] n. C (georc. 1 
bisection. 

BISSEXE [bi-s^k-.] adj. biseo-ous 

BISSEXTE [bi-84k»-tj n. m. bissea-Uii, 

BISSEXTIL, E [bi-8^k.-til, i-I] adj. bia 
seoetile. 

Annee — e, bissesrtile ; leap-year. 

BISSEXUEL, LE [bi «fek-.u-il] a^J 
bisexual. 

BISSUS [bi-iui] v. BY88IT8. 

BISTORTE [bis-tsr-t] n. £ (bot) ttff^ 
tort; ^ snake-weeU. 





BLA 












BLA 










Bl^ 




amal 


dm&le; 


<Sf6e; 


«ftye; 


^fBte 


#je; 


ill; 


ille; 


mol; 


6 mole; 


6 mort; 


M8UC; 


^sfire; ou 


jour; 



Kenou6e — , (bot) snake weed. 

bISTOETIER [bu-t6r-ti*] s. m. 
'i^haxm.) pestle. 

BISTOUKI [bU-tou-ri] n. m. (surg.) Ut,- 
toury. 

BISTOUEN:^, E [bi^tour-n^] adj. twist- 



BI8T0UENEE [bU-tour-n«] y. &.^to 
tu>i«t. 

BISTRE [bu-tr] n. m. (paint) Mstre. 

BI8TKEU-X, 8E [bin-tred, eA-z] adj. qf 
bUtre. 

BITOED [bi-t6r] n. m. (nav.) spun- 
\farn. 

BITTE [bi-t] n. f. (nav.) lit 

BITTEK rw-W] V. a. (nav.) to Ut. 

BITTON [bi-ton] n. m. (nav.)l. timter- 
head ; 2. — s, pL sheet-bits ; small bits. 

BITUME [bi-tu-m] n. m. bitumen. 

— soUde, compact =. 

BITUMm:6, E [bi-tn-mi-n«] adj. bi^u- 
mmated. 

BITDMINEE [bi-ta-mi-n*] v.&.iobi- 
tmninate. 

BITUMINEU-X, SE [bi-tu-mi-ned, efi-i] 
»dj. bitum.iiiotts. 

BIVAC [bi-vak] BIVOUAC [bUrouak] 

n. m. (mil.) bivouac. 

BIVALVE [bUval-v] adj. (nat hist) 
bivalve; bivalvous; *[ two-valved. 

BIVALVE, n. m. (nat hist) bivalve. 

BIVAQUEK [bi-va-k«] BIVOUA- 
QUER [bi-voua-k«] v. n. (mil.) to bi- 
vouac. 

BIZAERE [bi-za-r] adj. 1. wTiim^cal ; 
fantastical; 2. odd; strange. 

BIZARRE, n. m. 1. wMmMcalness ; 
fantasticalness ; 2. oddness; strange- 
ness. 

BIZARREMENT [bi-za-r-man] adv. 1. 
tnhimsically ; fantastically; 2. oddly ; 
ttramgely. 

BIZARREEIE [bi-»4-r-ri] n. f 1. whim- 
sicaMess ; fantasticalness ; 2. oddness ; 
oddity; strangeness. 

Par — , wlwmsicaUy; '\ out of a whim, ; 
par pure — , out of sheer whimMcalness, 
ixmrice. 

BLADE [bia-d] n. C tobacco-box. 

BLAFARD, E, [bia-far, d] adj. (of co- 
la/", light) 1. palish ; 2. wan ; 3 dim. 

BLAGUE Fbla-gJ n. £ 1. tobacco-box ; 
8. 1^^ (th.) humbug ; fudge. 

BLAGUEE [bla-gh«] V. n. J^" to tell 
■wonderful stones ; -i-to stretch the cam^ 

COS. 

BLAGUEUE [bla-ghefir] n. m. f^" 
(pers.) humbug. 

BLA IRE AU rbl4-r6l n. m. (mam.) 
badger ; hog, jng badger. 

A iambes fie — , badger-legged. 

BLAMABLE [bla-ma-bl] adj. blamo- 
ble ; * blameful ; censurable; ctdpa- 
ble ; faulty. 

D'une mani&re — , culpably, iltre — , 
to be blamable, ^ to blam^e ; to be cen- 
aurahle, culpable, faulty. 

BLAME [bla-m] 'n. m. 1. blame : cen- 
sure ; dispraise ; 2. r^ection ; vitupe- 
ration ; 8. obloquy ; 4. censu/re (repri- 
mand). 

Digne de — , blamable ; bUmie- 
vioruiy ; reprehensible; exempt de — , 
1. blameless ; 2. miblamed. Vote de — , 
•note of censure. De — , (V. senses) vi- 
tuperative. Aveo — , iv. senses) dis- 
pradsinghj ; reflectmigly ; sans — , 1. 
tlam^ess ; 2. unblamed ; uncensttred ; 
wnreproaclied. Attirer dn — {h), to 
draw censure {on) ; deverser du — (sur), 
to cast censure {on) ; d6ver8er le — sur 
q. u., to lay the blame upon a. o. ; de- 
verser, Jeter le — (en passant) (sur), to 
liiut, to ih'^'^^o a shir (upon) ; donner le 

— do q. eh. «» q. u., to blame a. o. for a. 
th. ; 6tre an sujet de — , to be reflected 
i/n ; Jeter le — sur, to reflect on, upon ; 
porter le — de, <o bear the blame of; 
i-ejeter le — de q. ch. sur q. u., to throve 
the blame of a. th. upon a. o. ; voter le 

- • (contre), to pass a vote of censure 
(on, upon). Oeia lui a tourne h — , he 
was, has been blam-fidfor it. 

BLAMEE [bia-ai, \ r.tLl. to blame ; 
M censwre ; to cast ct^tmtre on, upon ; 
to reprove ; to reflect on, upon ; to cast 
'o/McHona on, upon; to censvnre (re- 
•nmanai. 



Personne qui blame, blamer ; cen- 
surer. i;tre k — , to be to blame. ^ 

BlamA, b, pa. p. V. senses of Blamer. 

Non — , unblamed ; um:emsured ; un- 
reproved; vmr^ected on. 

Stm. — Blamer, cknsurer, rAprimandee. 
Blamer meana to disapprove of the actions or con- 
duct of any one ; centurer, to express that disap- 
probation in a public manner ; reprimander, (o re- 
prove any one for a fault, and at the same time 
enjoin him not to commit it again. Every virtu- 
ous man has a right to blamer {blame) him who 



the father riprimande {reprimand!) hit children. 

BLAN-C, CHE [blan, .h] adj. 1. J 
wldte ; 2. I clean (not dirty) ; 8. || bla/nk 
(not written on); 4 I hoar; 5. (by age) 
hoar; hoary; 6. %fair; 7. § clear; 8. 
(of coin) silver; 9. (print) (of type) 
open ; 10. (vers.) blank. 

1. Un cheval — , a white ht/rae. 2. Du linge — , 
clean linen ; des verres — «. clean glasses ; des 
assiettes Uanchea, clean plates. 3. Une page 
blanche, a blank page. 4. Gel§e blari the, hc&Tjnjst. 

— comme nn linge, as white as a 
sheet; — comme la neige, ^ comme 
neige, as white as snow. 

BLANC [blan] n. m. 1. white (white 
color); 2. white (person); 3. blank; 4. 
white (mark to aim at); 5. (of eggs) 
white; 6. (of the ^y^) white; 1. (culin.) 
white sauce ; 8. (print) blank ; 9. (print) 
margin; white Une. 

— sale, dirty white. — de chaux, 
{maa.) white-wash; mise an — de chaux, 
=^ -washing; — d'Espagne, Spanish 
= ; whAUng ; — de fard, pearl-powder ; 
pearl-=^ ; — de feu, candent ; — de 
plomb, white lead. Fabrique, manufac- 
ture de — de plomb, white-lead works ; 
ligne de — , (print) white Une ; margin ; 
tirage en — , (print) working the white 
paper; tirant sur le — , {hot) canes- 
cent En — , blam,k ; itnwritteti ; avec 
le nom en — , (law) (of deeds) dormant. 
AUer, tirer en — , (print) to work the 
white paper; donner un — de chaux k, 
(mas.) to =z-wash ; laisser en — , to leave 
blank ; habiller, v6tir de, en — , to dress 
in =: ; passer du — au noir, to go from, 
one extreme to another. 

BLANC-BEC [blfin-bik]. V. Bec. 
BLANCH AILLE [blan-sha-i*] n. i.fry; 
small fry. 

BLANCHITEE [blan-sha-tr] a^J. 1. 
wMtish ; 2. (did.) canescent. 

Couleur — , whitishness. 

BLANCHE [blan-sh] n. f. (muc.) mi- 
nim. 

BLANCHEMENT [blan-sh-man] adv. 

cleanly. 

BLANCHERIE [bian-th-ri] n. C F: 
Blanciiisserib. 

BLANCHET [blan-sh^] n.m.l. (pharm.) 
blanket ; 2. (print) blanket. 

BLANCHE UR [blan-shefir] n. t 1. 
whiteness; 2. (by age) hoariness ; 3. 
(of the hair) whiteness; /loariness ; 
* hoar. 

Donner de la — , to wash (the com- 
plexion, the skin) white. 

BLANCHIMENT [blan-shi-man] n. m. 

I. (of metals) washing; 2. (a. & m.) 
bleaching ; blanching ; 8. (bot) blanch- 
ing. 

BLANCHIR [blan-shirl v. a. 1. 1 § to 
whiten ; 2. || § to blanch ; 3. § to wash 
(render clean) ; 4. 1 to white-wash ; 5. || 
(in the air) to bleach; 6. (pers.) to wash 
for (a. o.) •,1.%to blanch over (to justi- 
fy) ; 8. to blanch toetals, plants) ; 9. to 
bleach (wax) ; 10. (a. & m.) to bleach ; 

II. (arts) to dress; to trim; to rough 
down ; 12. (culin.) to boil off; to scald 
off; 13. (hort) to blanch ; 14. (mas.) to 
white-wash; 15. (print) to blank out; 
16. (tech.) to whiten. 

3. — le linge, to wash linen. 6. ■ — q. u., to wash 
for a. 0. 

— bien, {V. senses) to wash clean; 

— k neu£ ( V. senses) to clear-starch ; 

— k \& chaux, au lait de chaux, (mas.) 
to widte-wash ; to whiten. Eau k — 
white-wash; machine k — , (a. & m.) 
washing-engine ; ■=. •'machine ; per- 
sonne qui blanchit ( Fi senses) whitener 
(.of)- Qui ne blanchit pas, (V. senses) 
unbleaching (in the air). 

Se BLANCHIR. pr. V. {V. senscs of 



Blanchir) 1. 1 (de, udth) to whiten ; 2, 
(th.) to wash. 

BLANCHIR, V. n. 1. 1 § to whitm; <t 
get white ; 2. J (in the air) to bleaoh ; 
3. 1 (pers.) to wash ; 4. (pers.) to grout 
gray ; 5. (th.) to fail ; 6. (a. <fc in.) to 
bleach. 

Faire — ^, 1. | to whiten: 2. | § tj 
blanch; 8. 1 (in the air) to bt^aeh: 4 
(a.&m.) to bleach; 5. (cuiln.) fc 0.4- 
off; to scald off; 6. (hort) to blaM\ 
Tons ses ettorts n'ont fjkit que - , aU hiA 
efforts have proved ineffectual, «n«tt<v 
cessful. 

BLANCHISSAGE [bian-thi-sa-j] n. m 
1. washing ; 2. wash. 

— en fin, k neuf, dear-starching. 
Envoyer au — , to send to the wash. 

BLANCHISSANT, E [blan-shi-sin, t] 
adj. 1. that whitens, grows white; 2. 
foaming ; 3. (did.) albescent 

BLANCHISSERIE [ blan-shi-^ri ] 
BLANCHERIE [bUc-sh-ri] n. f. (a. Am.) 
bleacfi-works ; hlant . ing-house. 

BLANCHISSEU-R [L.an-«hi-ieur] n. m. 
SE [eii-z] n. f. 1. washer-man, m.; 
washer-woman, f. ; 2. (a. & m.) blea^cher. 

— de fin, k neuf, clear-star cher. 
BLANC-MANGER [blan-man-j«] n. m., 

pi. — , (^TiVai.yblanc-mange. 

BLAN QUE [bian-k] n. f. lottery (pri- 
vate). 

BLANQUETTE [bUn-kft-t] n. £ 1. 
blanquette (wine); 2. (bot) blanket 
(pear), 3. (culin.) blan^quette (ragout 
with white sauce) ; 4 (ich.) white bait 

BLAQUE [bla-k] n. f. tobacco-box. 

BLASER [bi8-z«] V. a 1. 1 § to paU; 
to blunt; to vitiate (the taste); 2. § to 
surfeit ; to sicken ; 3. | Sc harden. 

1. — le gout, to pall the tatte, 

ttre blas6 (sur) 1 §, to 5« pa/lea 
{witli). 

Se BLASER, pr. V. 1. 1 § (BtTE, roifh) ic 
be palled ; 2. § to be surfeited ; eick 
ened. 

BLASON [bia-ion] n. m, 1. heraldry, 
blazon ; * emblazonry , 2. coat <jr 
arms. 

BLASONNER [bIa-zo-n«] v. a. 1. 1 fc 
blazon (explain armorial bearings) ; • to 
emblazon ; 2. || to paint (armorial bear- 
ings) ; 8. § to censure ; to criticise ; to 
r^ect on; 4 (engrav.) to direct (the 
lines). 

— partout to = over. 
BLASPIl:fcMA-TEUE [blai-f«-ma-te4r] 

n. m. TRrcE [tri-s] n. £ blasphemer. 

BLA8PH£MAT0IRE [bla»-f«-ma-to«r] 
aty. blasphemous. 

BLASPHilME [blas-f*-m] n. m. 1, 
blasphemy ; 2. blasphemous thing. 

Avec — ^1 blasphemously. Dire, pro- 
ferer un — , to speak, to utter Mas- 
phenvy ; faire un — , to commvit blas- 
phemy. 

BLA8PH:feMEE [biR.-f6-m«] v. a. | j 
to bla^spheme. 

BLASPHl&MEE, v. n. | § to UoM' 
pheme. 

BLATIEE [bla-tU] n. m. corn-chand- 
ler. 

Marchand — , =. 

BLATTE [bia-t] n. £ (ent) 1. coch 
roach (genus) ; 2. miU-moth. 

— d'Am6rique, cock-roach. 
BLAUDE [bio-d] n. £ V. Blouse. 
BL]6 [bl6] n. m. 1. com; wheat; % 

corn-fietd ; 3. (agr.) grain. 

— barbo, come, stiff wheat ; — er- 
gote, (agr^ spoiled grain ; grands — fl. 
wheat and rye; — tuqX^W., wheat miixea 
with rye ; — froment wheat ; — seigle^ 
rye ; — noir, sarrasin, buck-whMvl ; 
petits — s, barley and gats ; — dos Ca- 
naries, (bot) Canary-grass ; — d'Eo 
pagne, d'lnde, de Turquie, maiee • In 
dian corn; — de Mars, spring svm 
mer =. — en herbe, com in Vie blade 
Champ, pifece de — , corn^eld; distri- 
bution de — mensuelle, (Eom. ant) 
frumentation ; 6pi de — , ear of com . 
corn-stalk ; f^teur pour le — , com- 
factor ; feuille de — , corn-blade ; gerb« 
de — , sheaf of com ; ** com^sheaf; 
marchand de — , corn-dealer; nieiili> 
de — , (agr.) coni-stack ; nfegoclant ep — , 
corn-merchoAii^ De— , wheaten. Do- 



BLE 










BLO 












BOH 


»& loata; 


««jeu 


«MJeune; 


&& 


peur; 


an pan; In 


pin 


on bon 


MTO 


brun 


«-Uliq; 


♦gnliq. 



r.n6 de — , oornlem. Manger son — en 
rerbe, en vert, to spend o.'s money be- 
fiyre one gets it. C'est du — en grenier, 
it is as good as wheat. 

BLEIME [bl4-m] n. £ (vet.) Ueyme. 

BLlilMK [hlft-m] adj. 1. 8all(yw ; 2. (of 
tte completion, countenance) wan. 

Couleur — , saMotcness ; teint — , wan- 

BLfiMIK [bU-mir] V. n. 1. (of the com- 
p^iion, countenance) to grow wan; 2. 
Ic- turn, to g rote pale. 

BLEl.'DE [bian-d] n. f. (min.) bl«nde ; 
5 itwek ore. 

BLENNIE [bUn-n!] n. f. (ich.) hlenny. 

BLENNENT^BIE [blen-nan-W-ri] n. t 

(med.) dysentery/. 

BI.ENNOPHTHALMIE [bWn-nof-tal- 
«i] n. f (med.) blennopMhalmia. 

BLENNORRHAGIE [blen-no-ra-ji] n. 
C (med.) blewnorrhagia. 

BLENN0RRH6E [bUn-na-rS] n. C 
(med.) blenno)'rh(T,a ; ^ gleet. 

BLENNOSE [bUn-no-z] n. f. (med.) 
catarrh ; affection of a mucoiis mem- 
brane. 

BLENNOTHORAX [bUn-no-to-r»kt] n. 
31. (med.) pulmonary catarrh. 

BLENNUR:6TBIE [blen-nu-rf-W] n. f. 
med.) blennorrhagia. 

BLENNURIE [biin-nu-rt] n. f. (med.) 
catarrh of the bladder. 

BL:fePTiARITE rblft-fa-ri-t], 

BL^PHAROPHTIIALMIE, BL6- 

PHAR0TI8 [bl6-fa.rof-tal-mf, bl«-fiv-ro-tiii] 

n. f. (med.) blepharopMhalnUa ; in- 
^ammation of the eyelids. 

BLfiPHAROPTOSE [bW-fa-rop-to-i] n 
t (med.) blepharoptosia. 

BLESS ANT, E [bli-ian, t] acy (pouk, 
to) 1. offensive ; 2. shocking. 

Pas — , inoffensive. Nature —e, qf- 
fensiveness. D'une maniSre — e, offen- 
lively. 

BLESSER [bU-t«l V. a. 1. I <o hurt 
Mve pain by bodily narra) ; 2. || toinQV/r« 
?do great bodily harm \a)\ to do an in- 
yury to ; 8. (with solution of continuity) 
tfi 'jound ; to give a wound to ,• 4 § (of 
Utiit wewrlne-apparel) to pinch ; 5. ^ to 
^ll'rt ; to injure ; to be injurious, pre- 
)udi<dal to; 6. § to hurt; to hwrt the 
/eeiings of; to offend ; to be offensive 
to; 7. § to wound (offend greatly) ; to 
eut; "T to gall ; ^ to sting ; to grate ; 8. 
§ (DB, at) to offend (a. th.) ; to shock. 

1. n a'eit iUtai a la main ou au pied, he hat 
hurt kit hand or hitfmt. 1. II a t\& Uetti gri^ve- 
ment par une chute, he hat been greatJij injured 6// 
a fall. 8. — q. o. d'un coup d'ip«e ou d'un coup 
le fusil, to wound a. o. with a « 



J. u. a la tet« on au cceur, tn wound a, o. in the 
head or in the heart. B. — la reputation de q. u., 
to hurt, to injure o. o.'s reputation. 8. — la vue, 
la offend, to shock the tight, 

— grifevement, 1. to hurt grievously, 
seriously; 2. to injure severely; 3. to 
wound severely, grievously ; — par der- 
riSre, to wound behind ; — au coeur §, 
to wound to the heart ; — h mort, 1. to 
injure mortally ; to do a nwrtfil, dead- 
ly injury to; %to wound mortally. — 
au vif §, to wound to the quick. 

Blessk, e, pa, p. V. senses of Bles- 

BKR. 

Non — , 1. II unhurt; 2, J uninjured ; 
8, I unwoiinded; 4 § unhurt; unin- 
jured ; unprejudiced ; 5. § unhurt ; 
tmofended ; 6, § un/ioounded ; %m- 
gailed ; unstu/ng. — d'amour, smitten, 
captivated. Avoir le cerveau — , to be 
crack-brained. 

8b BLESSER, pr. v, 1, 1 to hurt o.''s self; 
2, I to injure o.'s self; 3. | to wound o.'s 
tdf; 4 § (OE, at) to he hurt, offended ; 
to take offence; 5, ^ § (de, at) to be 
gilicd, stwng. 

4. De quoi V'mt b!ettez-voaa ! what are you of- 
jjnde i at T 

BLES8URE [bli-su-r] n. f 1, Ihui-t; 
8. I injury ; 8. J. II (^vith solution of con- 
tinuity) wmind; 4 § (i, to) wound; 
wiounding; injury. 

— mortelle, 1. I deadly, mortal 
toound ; 2. § mortal =. — sous la selle 
(vet) flank. Certiflcat de — , (mil.) 
umart-ticket ; gratification pour — , (mil.) 
mnart-nwn«y. Sans — , 1. unhtirt ; iin- 
iTiivrot; 2. vmacarred.; 3. wonnUesa. 



Faire une — a, to give a ^=. to ; to 
wound ; fermor une — , to close a =^ 

Svn. — Bi.EssuRfi, PLAiE, The blesture is the 
mark of a blow received ; the pfaie is a breach 
made in the skin, whether by a blow or by the 
malignity of humors. The bleature is sometimes 
only a contusion; the ;)/aie always implies a divi- 
sion of the Hesh. Figuratively, bietture signifies 
loss, damage, injury done to the honor, the reputa- 
tion, the peace ; piaie is applied to more serious 
evils — to great losses, to distressing atHictions, to 
overwhelming trials. 

BLi:TE, BLETTE [blJ-t] n. f. (hot) 
blite ; strawberry blite ; ^ wild blite. 
Amarante — , wild blite. 
BLETTE, adj. f. (of fruit) mellow. 
Non — , (of fruit) tmmellotoed. 
BLEU, E [bleu] adj. 1, blue (of blue 
color) ; 2, (of the flesh) black and blue. 
Tout — , (of the flesh) all over black 
and blue; black and blue all over. 
Couleur — e, blue ; blueness. Pierre — e, 
stone blue. D'une couii>»r — e, bliiely ; 
de teinte — e,bluely. Battre q. u. tout 
— , to beat a. o. black and =. 

BLEU, n. m. 1. blue (color) ; 2. llue- 
stone. 

Beau — , true = ; demi , Waterloo 

=. — d'azur, d'empoiii, smalt; — de 
ciel, sky-=^; — de cobalt, de Thenard, 
cobalt-^=; — d'indigo, (paint) indigo 
= ; — en pate, (dy,) rzz-cake; — en 
poudre, po^Dder-=: ; — de Prusse, Prus- 
sian =, Mettre en — , (dy,) to blue ; 
passer au — , (washing) to blue; teindre 
en — , to dye =. 
BLEUATRE [bleu-a-tr] adj. bluish. 
Couleur, teinte — , blnishness. 
BLEUET [bleu-*] n. m, V. Blitkt, 
BLEUIR [bleu-ir] V. a. to blue. 
BLINDAGE [biin-da-j] n. m. 1. (build,, 
engin,) sheeting; poling ; 2, (mil,)^o^ 
ing. 

BLINDER [blin-d«] V, a, 1, (build., en- 
gin.) to sheet ; 2, (mil) to protect \m,th 
blinds ; 8. (nav,) to protect with fen- 
ders. 

BLINDES [blin-d] n. f (pi.) (fort) 
blinds. 
BLITE [bli-t] n, f, V. Blkte. 
BLOC [blok] n. m. 1. block; 2. log; 8, 
chimp ; 4 (of stone, wood) block ; stock ; 
5, stocks (instrument of punishment) ; 6. 
(mining) blea. 

Gros — , chvmp. — de bois, 1, wooden 
block; 2, (tech,) block-wood; — de 
plomb, (engr.) cusliion. Au — , in the 
stocks ; en — , in a, the lump. Prendre 
en — , to take in a lump ; to himp. 
BLOCAGE [blo-ka-j] n. m. 
BLOCAILLE [blo-ka-i*] n. f (build.) 1. 
pebble ; pebble-stone ; 2, rv^ble-stone ; 
pebble-work ; 3, (print) turned letter. 
BLOCKHAUS [bio-k6»] n. m. £ wood- 
en block-house. 

BLOCUS [blo-kus] n. m, 1, (mil.) in- 
vestment ; 2. (nav,) blockade. 

Faire le — de, 1. (mil.) to inmest ; 2, 
(nav.) to blockade ; lever le — , to raise 
the blockade. 

BLOND, E [blsn, d] adj, 1, (of the com- 
ple.xion) fair; 2, (of the hair) liglU; 
flaxen ; 3. ** golden ; 4 (of flax) light- 
colorflAl ; 5. (culin,) not brown. 

Delicat et — ^ %,particuiar ; difficult 
to please. 

BLOND, n, m, E, n. £ 1. (of the com- 
plexion) /airw<.ss ,• 2. (of the hair) light- 
ness; S. {pers.) fair person. 

— ardent, sandy color; — dor6, 
golden ; — de filasse, flaasen. D'un — 
ardent sandy. 

BLONDE [bi6n-d] n. £ blond ; figured 
blond. 

BLONDI-ER [bl6n-di«] n. m. 1:RE, 
[S-r] n. £ blond-lace-maker. 

BLONDIN [b'lon-din] n. m. E, Fi-n] n. 
£ 1. light-haired person; 2. oeau; 
spark. 

BLONDIR [blon-dir] V. n, + to assume 
a golden hite. 

BLONDISSANT, E [blon-di-san, t] adj. 
t assuming a golden hue ; ** golden. 

BLOQU^ [bio-k«] n. m. (biL) ball 
lulled with strength. 

BLOQUER [bio-k6] V. H. 1. (miL) to 
blockade; 2, (bil.) to Me (the ball) with 
strengtlt,; 3. (mas,) to block up; 4 
(print) to turn. 



BLOTTIR (SE) [s8-bio-tir" pr. v. to 
cower; to squat; to squat down. 

BLOUSE [bi«u-i] n, £ 1. .<miook-froeJb ; 
2, (for boys, gentlemen) blouse; 3, {t>t 
children) pinafore ; 4 (for womou) 
wrapper ; 5. (bil,) pocket. 

BLOUSER [biou-i6] V, a. 1. (blL) to 
hole ; 2. § to deceive ; to mislead. 

Se blousbk, pr, v. 1, (bil.) to hole c.'ii 
ovm ball ; 2, to mistake grossly; to fri 
grossly mistaken; to make a groae 
mistake. 

BLUET [biu-*] n. m. 1. (bet) com- 
centaury ; *{ blue-bottle ; ^ blu«-bon>- 
nets; ^ bottle-f^wer ; 2, (orn,) blue- 
bird. 

BLUETTE [blu-i-t] n, £ 1, 1 spark; %. 
§ spark ; flash ; 8, § light produeHoii 
(bock) of wit. 

BLUTAGE [blu-ta-j] n. m. boUino 
(sifting). 
BLUTEAU [blu-t6] n, m, V. Blutoib. 
BLUTER [biu-t«] V, a, to bolt (sift). 
Huche a — , bolting-hutch. 
Blute, e, pa, p, bolted. 
Non — , unbolted. 

BLUTERIE [blo-*-ri] n. £ boUinff- 
Tiouse. 

BLUTOIR, BLUTEAU [bh.-toar, tftl n. 
m, 1, bolter ; 2. bolting-machine, mill. 
Bn, abbreviation of B.\ron, 
Bnnk, abbreviation of Baronne, 
BOA [bo-a] n. m, 1, (erp,) boa ; 2. boa 
(for the neck), 

— constrictor, devin, constrictor; 
boa-constrictor ; buffalo-snake. 

BOBfeCIIE [bo-b«-sh] n. £ 1. sconce ; 
2. socket. 
BOB IN [bo-bin] n. m. bobbinet. 
Meti<r mecanique pour faire lo — , 
=z-frarie ; tulle — , =. 

BOBINE [bo-bi-n] n. £ (spin.) bobUn; 
spool. 

Ouvrage fait & la — , (spin.) bobMry 
work. 

BOBINER [bo-bi-n«] V. a. (spin.) to 
spool. 

BOBO [bo-bo] n. m. 1 slight ?mrt; 
hurt 

Avoir un — &, to hm)e 8om,ething Vie 
matter with. 

BOCAGE [bo-ka-j] n. m, grove; bo- 
cage. 

BOCAG-ER, iiRE [bo-ka-j«, j*-r] acy. 
**ofthe groves. 

BOCAL [bo-kal] n, m, 1. botUe (short- 
necked); 2, glass bmcl ; 8, globe; 4 
jar ; 5. (of a wind instrument) mouth- 
piece. 
' — d'etalf^e, de montre, sliow-glasa. 

BOCARD [bo-kar] n. m, (metal) 
crushing - machine ; pomiding - ma- 
chine ; mill ; stamp ; stamper ; stam/p- 
mill ; stamping-m.ill. 

BOCARDAGE [bo-kar-da-j] n, m. 
(metal,) crushing ; pounding ; stam,p- 
%ng. 

BOCAKDER [bo-kar-d«] v. a, (metal) 
to cruJih. to pound, to stamp (ore). 

BODINE [bo-di-n] n, £ (nav, arch.) 
keel. 

BODRUCIIE [bo-dru-sh] n, £ F: Bap 
druche. 

BCEUF [bcuf] n, m, 1, (mam,) ox (ani- 
mal); 2, (flesh) beef; 8, (flesh) bull; 4 
(pers,) ox ; beef-eater. 

— bouilli, boiled beef; — gras, ftti 
ox ; — marin, (mam.) sea-cow ; — rdti, 
roast = ; — sal6, salt, corned =. — de 
labor, laboring, working ox. — k \& 
mode, d la mode =; — en ragout, 
stewed =, — a bosse, (mam.) Indiaik, 
htimch-backed bull; — de tr.-jit, draft- 
ox. ]fctiiule h — s, ox-stall; flel de — 
ox-gall ; ox-bile ; mangeur de — , beef 
eater; mort aux — s, (bot) ox-bane 
piece de — , * 1. piece ofz=. ; 2. standing 
dish ; 8. § principal thing. Trou]>e«o 
de — s, herd, drove of oxen. Lourd 
comme un — , beef-witted. Comme no 
— , ox-like. 

[The y is not pronounced in the plural bcttjt, 
and in bi^nf gra8.\ 

BCEUFS [bed] pi. of BoiiL-F, 
BOOHEI Fbo-ghi] n. m, gig (light> 
BOGUE [bo-g] n. £ (bot.) (of ch«4 
nuts) hn^k. 
BOUfi [bo-«] n. ill. bohea (t«viX 
6T 



BCl 




BOI BON 


amal; dmale; 


e'fee; 


e f6ve; e fete; ^je; iU; I «.'e; omol; 6 mole; d mort; w sue; ii sfire; <m jonr ; 



boh:6a, bou,boui [bo-«-», tou, bou-i] 

n. m. bohea (tea). 

Th6 — , = tea. 

BOIli:ME [boi-m], 

BOHfiMIEN, NE [bo«-miin, ii-n] adj. 1 
Bohemian ; 2. gypsy. 

BOHi;ME, n. m. f. B0H:6MIEN, n. 
m. NE, n. £ 1. Bohemian ; 2. gyp»y. 

De — , des — 8, gypsy-Wee. Etat de — ., 
gwm/ism, ; langage des — s, gypsy. 

BOlARD [bo-iar] n. m. F: Boyard. 

BoiUAi, Ind. fut ist sing, of Boire. 

BoiRAis, cond. Ist, 2d sing. 

BOIRE [boa-r] V. n. Irr. (buvant; bu; 
Ld. pres. B0I8 ; nous bitvons ; iifi boi- 
wsr ; pret bus ; subj. pres. boive ; nous 
BUV10N8 ; IL8 BOI vent) 1. to dHnk ; 2. 



Qkb.) to drink ; to tipple ; 3. (of paper) 
to blot; 4. (needle-work) to be puckered. 

I hotl 



. (needle 

1 . — daiiB un verre, to drink a 
»ne bouteille, to drink (rut of 
coupe de q. u., to drink of a. o.'a cap. 

— bien, dnr, fort, ^ to drink hard ; 

- copieusement. to = copiously ; * to 

carouse; to quaff; — sec, to = nsat; 

— toujours, to = away; — a grands 
traits, to drink deep ; ^ to swig. Et de 

— et de rire, and all ended in drink- 
ing and laughing; — a la ronde, to = 
round, about ; — kla, sant6 de, to = to 
(a. o.) ; to = h-ealth to (a. o.) ; to drink 
(a. o.'s) health; — 4 sa soif, to = 
toTien one is tliirsty ; — k longs traits, to 
= deep; ^ to swig; — k tire-larigot, 
oomme une 6ponge, un templier, un ton- 
neau, un trou, to = lik^ a fish. Faire — , 1. 
I to make drink ; 2. to soak ; 3. (needle- 
work) to pucker ; faire — a la ronde, to 
pM< the glass rottmd. 

BOIRE, V. a. (conj. like Boirk) 1. 1 to 
drink; ** to quaff; 2. J ^ to drink off 
up; to quaff off; Z.\*itosup; to swp 
tfjo ; 4. I (b. s.) to drink ; to tipple ; 5. § 
(th.) to imbibe ; to absorb ; to suck up ; 
*, S to pocket (an affront) ; to put up 

8. LYponge boit I'eau, tponge imbibes, absorbs 
water. 

Donner k — , 1. to give (a. o.) some- 
iking to drink ; 2. to sell drink ; 8. (k) 
to water (animals); donner pour — , to 
ffive something for o.'s self; to give 
drink tnoney ; 61ever a — , to bring up 
(i child) by hand ; voulez-vous — ? wll 



uou take a. th. i 



On ne saurait 



Wre — un ane s'il n'a soif, qui n'a soi^ 
^ou may take a horse to water, but you 
can't maks him drink; ^*^ qui a bu 
bolra, a wild goose never laid a tame 

«gg. 

— avidemcnt, to drink greedily ; fpW 
to siciU; — copieusement, to ==: copi- 
ously ; to quaff; * to carouse ; — d'un 
coup, to = off; — d'un seul coup, trait, to 
= ata draught ; — un doigt de, to = 
the least drop of; — jusqua la lie, to 
drain, to the dregs ; — son soul, to = o.'s 
fiU. Animal qui boit encore, suckling; 
chose a — , dHnkable. A — , 1. smne- 
thing to=^; 1. som^e drink; 3. (comp.) 
drinking ; pour — , 1. to = ; 2. for o.'s 
aelf; for drink-m,oney ; faire — q. ch. k 
q. u., to gi/ce a. o. a. Vi. to drink; to 
make (a. o.) drink (a. th.) 

BOIRE, n. m. 1. drinking ; 2. drink. 

— et manger, msat and drink ; le — 
8t le manger, eating and drinking. 

Bois, ind. pres. 1st, 2d sing. ; impera. 
1A sing, of BoiRE. • 

BOIS [boa] n. m. 1. 1 wood ; 2. \ tim- 
ber ;Z.% (jest) timber; 4. 1 wood-land ; 
6. + cross (of Christ) ; 6. (of certain ani- 
mals) horns; head; 1. (of beds) bed- 
utead; 8. (of fire-arms) stock; 9. (of 
knees, etc.) staff. 

— amer, (bot) 1 stawe-^cood ; — droit, 
ttraight-timber ; flott6, floating = ; — 
Jhmc, (bot) knee hoUy ; — gentil, joli, 
(bot) mesereon; daphne mesereitm ; 
— jaune, (dy.) fii«tlc; — marmenteux, 
reserved timber-trees ; — mort sur pied, 
i«ad = ; — neuf , cord = ; — noueux, 
knotty =; — odorant, — de senteur, 
odorous, scented = ; premier — , I. first 
^; 2. (hunt) tenderling; — puant 
(bot) bean trefoil; bird-cherry; — 
pmnal*. (bot) dog-=: bloody-dog-=; 
palter U'ee ; — sain, sound = ; — saint. 



guaiacum; ^ lignum vitce; — san- 
glant (a. & m.) log-=:.; — sec, dry, sear 
= ; — tendre, soft = ; vert, re'* erdi, 
green ^; — verdoyant des Antilles, 
green = ; — vif, live =. — de Bresil, 
de Fernambouc, Brazil ; Brazil-:^ ; ex- 
trait de — de Bresil, jvAce of Brazil, 
Brazil-=^ ; — de bnn, unheficn timber ; 

— a br&ler, de chauffage,^re-=:: •,fuel ; — 
de charpente. Umber ; strengtft timber ; 

— de Chypre, (bot) rose = ; — de con- 
struction, timber ; — de corde, fathom,- 
=; ; — de construction pour les vaisseaux, 
ship-building timber ; — d'6beni8terie, 
cabinet-makers' =; — d"6quarrissage, 
squared timber ; — de haute futaie, 1. 
standing-Umher ; 2. timber ; — de gar- 
nissage, (tech.) facing board; — en 
grume, round tim,ber; — de lifivre, 
(bot) cytisus; — de sant6 (V. — sain) ; 

— de Sainte-Lucie (bot) Mohalep = ; — 
de mai (bot) hawthorn; — sur pied, 
standing timber; — de refend. cleft, 
hewn, bolt timber, = ; — de Rhodes, de 
rose, (bot) rose--=. ; — de sciage, sa%cn 
timber, =. • — de teinture, dye--=. ; — de 
train, floating =. Arbre a — , de — , 
f^tel-iree; brin de — , straight piece of 
timber ; chantier de — , 1. yard ; 2. tim- 
ber yard ; cultivateur de — , ^-grower ; 
inspecteur de — , rcoodreere ; marchand 
de — , ^=i-msrchant ; marchand de — de 
construction, timber-msrcfuint ; milieu 
du — , des — , middle of the = ; ** mid- 
= ; ouvrage en — , (build.) tim,ber-icork ; 
pays de — , =-land; piece de — de 
charpente, (build.) timber; train de — , 
^fioai, raft of = ; voie de — , load of ■=. 
De, en — , wooden; sans — , woodless. 
Aller au — , (mil.) to go foraging for ^=:; 
couvert de — , wooded ; woody ; deponr- 
vu de — , woodless ; enferme par des — , 
entour6 de — , :=-bound ; faire provision 
de — , to take in o.'s =, o.'s stock qf=: ; 
peu garni de — de charpente, construc- 
tion, umtimbered ; munir de — de char- 
pente, to timber; ne savoir de quel — 
faire fleche, not to know what shift to 
make ; ne savoir plus de quel — faire 
fleche, to be reduced to shifts ; to be put 
to o.'s shifts ; faire s6cher le — , to sea- 
son =i. 

BOISAGE [boa-za-j] n. m. 1. wood- 
work ; \ (tech.) timbering. 

BOISE, E [boa-i6] adj. woody (covered 
with woods); wooded. 

Non, peu — , (of a country) wntim^ 
bered. Pays — , wood-land. 

BOISER, V. a. 1. to put the wood- 
work to: to do the wood-^cork in. 

BOISERIE [boa-z-ri] n. f 1. wainscot- 
ing ; loainscot; 2. (goth. arch.) screen. 

BOISEU-X, SE [boa-zeu, eu-z] adj. 
ligneous; woody. 

BOISSEAU [boa-s6] n. m. (measure) 
bushel. 

Droit de tant par — , bushelage. 

BOISSEL^E [boa-s-l«] n. f. bushel- 
full. 

B0I8SELIER [boa-.8-li6] n. m. white 
cooper ; bushel-maker. 

BOISSELLERIE [boa-sil-rf] n. f. white 
cooperage; bushel-making. 

BOISSON [boa-son] n. f. 1. beverage; 
drink ; 2. ^ drinkabU ; 8. (b. s.) drink ; 
drunkenness ; 4. grape-water ; 6. (nav.) 
vinegar and water. 

— d"ivrogne, tipple. Adonn6, sujet k 
la — , addicted to drinking, drunken- 
ness ; drinking, tltre pris de — , to be 
intoxicated. 

BOtTE [boa-t] n. t. 1. box ; 2. snuf- 
box; 3. (of watches) case; 4. (anat) 
box: 5. (fire-works) mortar; 6. (mach.) 
casting; 7. (nav.) (of rudders) case. 

— de carton, band-box; — de fer- 
blanc, 1. tin-box ; 2. canister ; — aux 
lettres, de la poste, letter-box. ; — k ou- 
vrage, work-box; — k perruque, vng- 
box; — a poudre, powder-box.; — de 
presse, (print) hose ; — a th6, 1. tea- 
caddy; 2. tea-canister; — k vapeur, 
(steam.) steam-chest ; — de violon, vio- 
lin-case. Levee des — s, (post) collec- 
tion. Enfermer dans une — , to shut up 
in a box ; fermer en — , to box up ; 
pourvoir d'une — , to box.. 

BOITE, n. f {oi QAttXe) foot-soren.ess. 



Avoir la — , to be foot-sore. 

BOITE, n. f. (of wine) matwr»if. 

En — ,Jit to drink. 

BOITEMENT [boa-t-man] n. m. hoM 
ing ; limj/ing. 

BOITER [boa t«] V. n. tohaU; to limp, 
to be lame ; p^~ to hobble. 

— tout bas, to limp badly. £t«t d'nD 
cheval qui boite, {vet.) spring halt, Xj> 
boitant, 1. || haltingly ; limpingly ; 2. 
§ lamely. 

BOITERIE [boa-t-ri] n. C (vet) ItiU. 
ing. 

BOITEU-X, SE [boa-teii, «u-»] adj. 1. 1 
halt ; limping ; lame ; 2. § hMU ; lame. 
3. (th.) rickety; 4. (of ribbons, shawls) 
loith a single border. 

Attendre la — , to wait for confirma- 
tion ofinteU/igence. 

BOITEU-X, n. m. SE, n. t halter; 
Umper ; lame person. 

BOtTIER [boa-ti6] n. m. box ofsurgi'. 
cal instruments (used in the hospitals). 

BoivE, subj. pres. 1st, 3d sing, of 

BOIRE. 

BOL [boll n. m. 1. (min.) hoU; 2. 
(pharm.) bohis ; bole. 

— oriental, d'Armenie, (min.) Arm^ 
nian bole. 

BOL, n. m. 1. bow^ ; i. basin; S.fin- 
ger-glass. 

BOLAIRE [bo-U-r] adj. (min.) bnlary. 

Terre — , 1. (min.) bole; 2. (p'larm.) 
bolus; bole. 

BOLET [bo-U] n. m. (bot) b(aetu8. 

— comestible, esculent =, — amo- 
douvier, touch-wood. 

BOL^TIQUE [bo-U-ti-k] 84). (chem.) 
bolet4c (acid). 

BOLIVIEN, NE [bo-U-vi-in, »-n] fc^j. ^ 
p. n. m. f Bolivian. 

BOLONAIS, E [bo-lo-n4, x] adj. ^ A>- 
logna. 

BOLONAib, f . n. m. E, p. n. t A). 
lognese; native qf Bologna. 

BOLUS [bo-ius] n. m. (pham .) WW,' 
bole. 

BOMBANCE [bon-ban-s] n. f. ^ 1. flw.rt 
cheer, living ; 2. feasting ; 8. yimJul 
ing. 

Faire -r-, 1. to Uve well; 2 to frntii 
tohmket. 

BOMBARDE [bon-bar-d] n. f 1. 1 bom- 
bard (instrument of war); 2, (muB.) 
bombardo ; 8. + (nav.) bomb -ketch, ves- 
sel. 

BOMBARDEMENT [bon-bai^ij-uuinj 
n. m. (mil) bombardment. 

BOMBARDER [b6n-bar-d«] V. «. (mil) 
to bo7nbard. 

BOMBARDIER [b6n-bar-di«] n. la, 
bombardier. 

B0MBA8IN [bon-ba-zin] n. m. t bom 
bazine. 
BOMBE [bon-b] n. t sheU; bomb. 
Caisse de — s, bomb-chest; galioto k 
— s, (nav.) =^-ketch, vessel. A repreuve 
de la — , =-proqf. ficlater, partir com- 
me une — , to go offUke a shot. 

BOMBE, E [bon-b*] adj. 1. cowvex; 2. 
bulged : 3. (engin.) (of roads) barreU^d. 
BOMBEMENT [bon-b-man] n. m. 1. 
cowveaity ; 2. bulging ; sivelling out ; 
3. jutting out ; 4. (engin.) (of roads) bar- 
relling. 

BOMBER [bon-b*] V. a. 1. to make, to 
render con/vex ; 2. to cause to bulge, to 
make bulge, swell out; 8. to make jtti 
out ; 4. (engin.) to ba/rrd (a road), 

BOMBER, V. n. 1. to be cowvex; J. H 
bulge ; to s^ceU out; 8. to jut out. 

BOMBERIE [bon-b-ri] n. C ehdlfoun 
dry ; bomh-fovmdry. 

BOMBEUR [bon-beiir] a, m. (XAHV% 
glass-maker. 

BOMMERIE [bo-m-ri] n. f t (»kii 
nav.) bottomry. 

BON, NE [bon, bo-n] adj. (comp. Mr.it,- 
leur; sup. meilleur) 1. 8 § good; 8. 
I good (to the palate); nice; 8. (peru.) 
good; benignant; benign; 4, (pera.) 
good-natured; 5. (b. s.) (pei-8.) simple: 
siUy ; foolish ,• 6. ( § (th.) right; 7. (^ 
for; DE, to, subj.) good; fit; proper; 
advantageous ; beneficial; profitable; 
8. (b. 8.) real; regular; ». (th.) goodi 
full; 10. (com.) (pers.) good; Mf/nuvt. 

%. Cette viande est tr»^a.^(,«»'i6. *^'t m*at it Mn 



BON 



BON 



BOR 



o& Joiite ; ei, jeu; e& jeune ; etc peur; dm pan ; In pin ; dw bon ; iln brun; *11 liq. ; *gn Uq. 



food, nice. 4. Cette petite fille n'eat pas bonne, 
lAat liule girl it not Kood-natured. 5. Que voua 
ftte» — , Aow simple, foolaih you are. 6. Le — oit6, 
»A» right «</« ; la 6onn« cause, (*« right cause. 1. 
Ce i'e«t pas — pourmoi, it it not good, proper, fit 
for mt: tl e«t — de faire cela, it it proper tn do 
'that ; ii eat — que vous sachiez cela, it it proper 
ran thould kuow it. 9. line bonne heure, i good, 
'nil lour i une honnt lieue, a good, full Uague. 

— 1 1. gccid I 2. HgM I 8. nonsense ! 
fuilnlment — , ** aU-hounteoua ; all- 
lountiful. — celal c'est— ! 1. tJiat is 
right I 2. good that I — homme, bonne 
teinme, simple soul. — a q. ch., =/or 
tomething ; — ii rien, r=for nothing. — 
A tlrer (print) for press ; press. Tout 
de — , 1. m earnest; 2., for = and all. 
A quol — (de) ? what avails it (to) ? 
tchat proflis f to what purpose T to 
whatpv/rpose is it (to) ? ^ what signi- 
fies f what signijies It (to) ? au nom de 
tout ce qu'il y a de — , in the name of 
good/ness. iltre — pour, 1. to be = to 
(a. o.) ; 2. to be fit for (a. th.) ; S. ^ to be 
a = hand at (a. th.); faire — , 1. to be 
acnnfartahle (to) ^i.tobe agreeable (te) ; 
juger — , to think fit ; trouver — que 
Hubj.) 1. to think i< = ; to think pro- 
per ; 2. to approve ; 3. to allow ; trou- 
ver tout — , 1. to be satined vrith every 
thing ; 2. not to be particular. Cest 
— I well and = ; qu'y a-t-il de — ? wliat 
is the best news f Quand — vous sem- 
blera, when you think proper ; si — 
vous semble, if you Hiink proper. La 
faire courte et bonne, to liame a short 
Ufe and a merry one. 

BON [bon] n. m. 1. good; 2. good 
qualities ; 3. (the) best ; 1 (the) best of 
It ; 4. fun ; joke ; 5. voucher ; or- 
der ; 6. (com.) (de, for) check ; 1. (fin.) 
bond. 

On — ft tirer, (print) a signature for 
press; le — de TafTaire, t/ie best of the 
Joke; 1« — de la farce, the cream of the 
jote; — du tresor, (fln.) 1. treasury 
bond; 2. (in England) exchequer-biU. 
D6tenteur, porteur de — , (fln.) bond- 
holder. Pour — , v/pon content. Accep- 
ter pour — , to take upon content; met- 
■^ le — i tirer k, (print) to sign for 
f/r«s» { prendre un — , (com.) to cam a 
check 

BON,int{roo<f; right 

Syn.— Bonnes actions, bonnis ouvbks. Bv 
ionMt actions (good actions) we understand all 
that is done in accordance with the principles of 
virtue, by bonnet autre* {good works) we mean 
that class of bonntt aetiont {good actiimt) that 
spring from ch»ritjr to one's neighbor. To set 
one's face against immorality, to make war on 
vice, to resist a violent temptation, are bonnet ae- 
tiont Igmd actions) ; to succor the distressod, to vi- 
(it the sick, to console the atflicted, to instruct the 
ignorant are bonnet ativret {good varies). 

B0NAS8E [bo-nA-s] adj. 1 simple; 
aiUy ; foolish. 

BONBON [bon-bfin] n. m. sweetmeat. 

BONBONNlijRE [bdn-bo-ni4-r] n. C 1. 
I sweetmeat-boas; 2. 1 § neat little 
houM. 

BON-CHK:fiTIEN [bfln-kr«-tlin] n. m., 

pi. Bon - CHRETIENS, B0N8 - CUBKTIKN8, 

(hort) bon Chretien (pear). 

BOND [bon] n. m. 1. (of animals, pers.) 
hound ; skip ; 2. (th.) bound. 

Second — , second bomid ; rebound. 
D'un —,at a = ; par — s et par sauts, 
par sauts et par — s, 1. 1 by =s and 
leaps ; 2. § by fits and starts ; 8. § de- 
nUtory ; 4. § desultorily. Aller par — s, 
to bov/nd ; to skip ; faire un — , to make 
a hound ; to bound ; to make a skip, 
to skip ; faire faux — , 1. II (th.) not to 
bownd straight ; 2. % (k) to fail (a. o.) ; 
a J (i) to disappoint (a. o.); 4. § (i) to 
forfeit (a. th. ) ; prendre au — , entre — et 
vulec I, to aitch at tlie = ; prendre la 
t>alle au — i,to improve the oppcrtu- 
niM/; to seize tims by the forelock. 

BONDE [bsn-d] n. f. 1. (of casks) bung; 
i. (pt casks) bung-hole; 3. (of ponds) 
nitHce. 

Lapher la — ,1.1 to let go the shdoe; 
2. S (a) to give vent {to) ; to give free 
course (to). 

BONDER [b5n-d«] V, a. (nav.) to lade 
fail. 

BONDIR [bsn-dir] v. n. 1. 1 (of anlnials, 
t-ers.) to bound ; to skip ; 2. | (th ) to 
S<y,vnd ; 8 { (th.) (a) to leap. 



3. Son ceeur lui bondit de joie, hit heart leaped /or 
Joy- 

BONDISSANT, E [bon-di-san, t] adj. I 
bottnding. 

BONDISSEMENT fbon-di-s-man] n. m. 

1, 1 (animals, pers.) hounding; skip- 
ping ; 2. I (th.^ bounding ; 3. § rising 
(of the stomach). 

— de coeur, rising of the stomach. 

BONDON [bon-don] n. m. (of casks) 1. 
bung; 2. bung-hole. 

BONDONNER [b8n-do-n6] V. a. to 
bung. 

BONDONNliiRE [b«n-do-nii-r] n. f. 
(coop.) bung-borer. 

BONDUC [bon-duk] n. m. (bot) hon- 
duc; beeoar; Molucca nut. 

BON-HENRI [bon-han-ri] n. m., pi. 
Bons-Henris, (bot) all-good. 

BONHEUR [bo-neur] n. m. (pour, to; 
DE, to) 1. happiness ; felicity ; 2. for- 
tune; good fortune; ^ luckiness; ^ 
luck ; 'i good luck ; 8. welfare ; good ; 
4 * § (th.) sunshine ; 5. bles-ring ; hap- 
py, forlnmate event, drcv/mMance, oc- 
currence, 1 thing ; piece of good for- 
tune. 

Un coup de — , a piece of good for- 
tune; \ a lucky hit; veine de — , run 
of luck. Au petit — , ff^^ come what 
will ; par — , happily ; fortunately ; ^ 
luckily; par un singulier — , par un 
coup de — % as luck would have it. 
Avoir du — , to be foriwnate, ^ lucky ; 
^ to have Vie luck of it ; to be lucky ; 
avoir beaucoup de — , to be very lucky ; 
6tre en — , to be in a lucky vein ; faire 
le — de, 1. to make, to render happy ; 

2. to be a source of happiness to ; to be 
a blessing to ; jouer de — , to be in the 
luck of it, in luck's way , porter — , to 
bring good luck. 

Syn.— BoNHEUR, fAlicitA, bAatitddk. Bon- 
heur {hapfyinett) properly signifies that state of 
fortune which is capal>le of ftmishing the mate- 
rial of pleasures, and of giving us opportunities of 
enjoying them. Felicite {felicitij) expresses the 
^itate of that heart which is disposed to enjoy plea- 
sure, and to find it in what one possesses. Biati- 
tiide {beatitude) implies an imagination fully satis- 
fied. The possession of property, honors, or 
friends constitutes bonkeur {kappineta) ; the judi- 
cious enjoyment of all these tnmgs, felicite {feti- 
eitti); while beatitude {beatitude) is jierfected only 
beyond the grave. Bonkeur {happiness) belongs 
to the rich ■,/elieite {felicity) to the wise ; biatituat 
{beatitude) to the pious. 

Syn. — BoNHKUR, PROSpARiri. Bonheur {good 
fortune) is the result of chance : it arrives unex- 
pectedly. Prosperite {prosperiti/) is the result of a 
judicious management of affairs ; it comes b; 
grees. Fools 
tune) ; the wi 
{prosperity). 



es by de- 
{goo<ifor- 
are not always sure of prospenli 



BONHOMIE [bo-no-ml] n. f. 1 1. good 

nature ; 2. simplicity ; credulitv. 

BONHOMME [bo-no-m] n. m., pi. Bon- 
nes GENS, ^ 1. simple, easy man ; 2. old 
man ; |^~ old codger ; 3. too« (in 
miniature); 4 + peasant; 5. (bot) 
muUen. 

Faux — , one who pretends to be a 
simple, easy man ; pet it — , little fellow; 
vieu.x — , old fellow ; ^^" old codger. 

BONHOMMEAU [bo-no-m6] n. m. t F: 

BoNHOMME. 

BONI [bo-ni] n. m. (fln.) bonu.% 

BONIFICATION [bo-ai-fl-ka-sion] n. f. 

1. improvement; amelioration; meli- 
oration ; 2. (com.) alloioance. 

BONIFIER [bo-ni.fi«] V. a. 1. I to im- 
prove (to make better); 2. to make 
good (to supply the deficiency of) ; to 
make up ; 3. (agr.) to improve (land) ; 
4 (com.) to make good. 

1. — le caf6, le vin, etc., to improve coffee, wins, 

BoNiFiE, B, pa. p. 1. I improved ; 2. 
(agr.) improved. 

Se BONIFIER, pr. V. 1. I to im,prove ; 2. 
•.) to improve. 
iNITE [bo-ni-t] n. f. (ich.) bonito. 

BON JOUR [bon-jour] n. m. good day; 
good morning. 

Dire, donner, souhaiter le — h q. n., to 
bid, to wish a. o. =z; dire un petit — a 
q. u., to look in, upon a. o. 

BONNE [bo-n] n. f. 1. servant-maid ; 
servant ; maid ; 2. nurse ; nursery- 
maid. 

— d' enfant nursery-maid ; nurse ; 
— pour tout fair maid of all work. 



'^11 



BONNE-DAME [bo-n-da-m] n. f. (bot'; 

BONNE-MAIN [bo-n-min] n. t drink- 
money. 

BOiSTNEMENT [bo-n-man] adv. 1, SMit 
ply ; with simplicity ; 2. t precisely. 

BONNET [bo-nJ] n.m. 1. cop (wo- 
man's) ; 2. cap (man's without a sLsde) 

— carre, 1. square cap ; 2. (bot) g»- 
iheridge-tree ; gros — ^^°, big wif 
(important personage). — A'&n^fooP* 
= ; — de chasse, hunting-^ ; — a cor 
nes, cocked hai^; — d'electeur, (bot) 
melon pompion ; pumpkin ; — de uxli, 
night-^^ ; — h. poll, bear-skin = ; — de 
police, foraging--=.; — ^ de prfetro, 
(fort) priest's bonnet; — de prfitre, 
(bot) gatheridge-tree ; v^elon pompion 
pumpkin. Coup de — , tou>ching o.'« = , 
coup de — tronqu6, halfz=. ; triste com- 
me un — de nuit sad ; melancholy ; ^ 
in the dumps. En — , in o.'s = ; on — 
de nuit *'"• o.'s night =;. La main au — , 
le — a la main, = i/n hand. Avoir la 
tete pr^s du — , to be p^issionate, hasty, 
1 hot-headed; ^ to take fire easily; 
coiffe de son — , with o.'s ■='on ; ** bon- 
neted ; consulter son — de nuit, to con- 
sult o.''s pillow ; etre deux tfites sous un 
— , to be liand and glove together ; jeter 
son — par-dessus les moulins, to throw 
off all sense of propriety ; mettre la 
main au — , 1. to touch o.'s cap ; 2. ^ to 
doff o.'s beaver, =: ; mettre son — de 
travers, to be out of temper ; to be cross ; 
opiner du — §, to adopt the opinion of 
another ; 6ter \e — k, to take ojfo.'s = ; 
♦ to uncap ; oter son — , to take offo.'s 
= ; ** T to doff o.'s = ; parler k son — 
^^~, to talk to o.'s self; prendre q. ch. 
sous son — , 1. to invent a. th.; 2. to tak« 
a. th.. the responsibiUty of a. th. v/pon 
o.'s self. Cest — blanc et blanc —,itis 
as broad as it is long ; ^ it is six qf 
one and half a dozen of the other ; j» 
ietai mon — par-dessus l<*smouUn8,a»»« 
there my story ends. 

BONNETADE [bo-n-u-J] n. f t ha^f 

BONNETER [bo-n-t«] v. a. 1. to tak* 
off •.'s hat; 2. {jest) to doff o.'s cap, 
header to (a. o.) ; 8. (b. s.) to cringe to 
(a. o.). 

BONNETERIE [bo-nj-t-ri] n. f. 1. ho- 
siery (goods); 2. hosiery-business; 8. 
cap-7nuking ; 4 stocking-trade. 

BONNETEUR [bo-n-teur] n. m. 1. % 
cringer-; 2. sharper. 

BONNETIER [bo-n-ti«] n. m. 1. hosier; 
2. cap-maker. 

BONNETTE [bo-n6-t] n. f. 1. (fort) 
bonnet ; 2. (nav.) bonnet ; bonnet-sail ; 
studding-sail ; water-sail. 

BONNE- VOGLIE [bo-n-voa-i'*] n. m. 
galley-rower (not a convict). 

BONSOIR [bon-soar] n. m. 1. good 
evening ; 2. good night 

Dire, donner, souhaiter le — k q. u., to 
bid, to wish a. 0.=^; dire — i la com- 
pagnie, 1. I to bid, to wish the company 
= ; 2. § to take o.''s leave of the world. 

— et bonne nuit! a good nigMs rest to 
vou ! 

B0NT£ [b6n-t«] n. t 1. (pour, to ,• (te, 
to) goodness; 2. kindness; kindliness; 
8. kindness; ^ piece of kindness; 4 
good^heartedness; 5. good-nature. 

Plein de — ,\. full of goodness ; 2. full 
of kindness ; kind ; tout de — , all gopd- 
ness ; aU kindness ; all-kind. Defaut 
manque de — , 1. unsoundness ; 2. itn- 
ki7tdness. Avec — , with = ; kindly ; 
sans — , "Mtlwut = ; vmJcvndly. Avoir 
la — (de), to have the goodnesi, kind- 
ness (to) ; to be so good, kind as (w) ; tt 
be good, kind enough (to) ; avoir de la 

— (pour), to be very good, very foinc 
(to a. o., a. th.). 

BONZE [bon-s] n. m. bonte (Chinese 
Japanese priest). 

BOOTi;S [bo-6-U.I p, n. m. (aetr.) 
Bootes. 

BOQUILLON [bo-ki-ian*] a la t 
wood-cutter; woodma/n. 

BORACIQUE [oo-ra-si-k] adj. (chom.1 
boracio. 

BORATE [bo-ra-t] a. m. (chem.) 6o 
rate. 



BOR 



BUR 



IJOS 



wmal; <im41e' «'fee; effeve; ^f£te; rfje; ill; iile; oraol; 6md\e; «5inort; wsuc; ilBflre; oujonr; 



BOBAX [b<K.rak»] n. m. (cheni.) borax. 

— brut, (chem.) 1. crude bornas ; 2. 

tir.uxa. 

BOKBOETGME [bor-bo-rig-m] n. m. 
(meA) borborygnvm. 

BOED [bar] n. m. 1. 1 border ; eoctre- 
vnUyj verge; edge; 2. § border; eav 
Iremtiy; verge; 3. | (of an abyss, a jire- 
olploe) brinJc ,• 4 § (b. s.) ^^mi* (of aan- 
gti, evil); verge; 5. (of boats, ships) 
l<<fo; 6. ^f dishes, plates) rim; 7. (of 
JWWlcs) eclging ; 8. (of garments) bor- 
der: hem; 9. (of glasses) rim; 10. (of 
h»t8) brim; 11. (of lakes, small rivers) 
margin; 12. (of rivers) bank; 13. (of 
roads) border; 14. (of the sea) slcore ; 
IS. Q)ot) margin; 16. (did.) limb; 17. 
(hort) verge; 18. (nav.) board; 19. 
(nay.) broad-side, ; 20. (nav.) tocfc 

— eflU6,^»e e(?fir« ; un rouge — +, a 
Immper ; les sombres — s, ** t/ie infer- 
nal shores. — a — , (nav.) board and 
board ; board to board ; alongside ; — 
k — de, even icith. Coflfre de — , (nav.) 
iea-chest; livrede — , (nav.) ship's jour- 
nal; mise a — , (com. nav.) shipm&iit; 
papiers de — , (nav.) ship^s papers. 
Plain jusqu'aux — s, brimful. Un — k 
terre, un — au large, (nav.) off and on. 
A — , (nav.) 1. on board ; aboard ; on 
ship board; 2. alongside; 3. (of the 
•Dehor) Jumie ; k — s, 1. vnth borders, 
etc. ( V. senses) ; 2. rimmed ; 8. (of hats) 
brimmed ; a grands — s, (of hats) broad- \ 
bHmmed ; a petits — s, (of hats) narrmc- i 
brirmned; a — de, (nav.) on board; \ 
aboard; k son — , (nav.) on board o.'s 
thigp ; au — de §, 1. on, v/pon tlie bor- 
ders, Oie verge of; 2. (b. s.) on th« 
brink of; de haut — , (nav.) (of ships) 
large: of several decks; hors le — , 
fnav.^ over-board; par-dessus le — , 
(nav.) over-board; sans — , (V. senses) 
hrimiees ; sur le — , ( V. senses) on edge ; 
odgmcise. Aller k — ,to go on board, 
ai/oard ; to go on ship-board ; aller a 
— de, (oust) to board (a ship) ; changer 
dt) — , (nav.) to weatlier-coU ; charger j 
... k — , (com. nav.) to ship ...on. hoard ; 
ooorlr — sur — , (nav.) to run on short 
tateks ; eourir meme — que . . . (nav.) to ■. 
bland on the same tack as ...: etre 
iilein J\isqu'aux — s (de), to brim (with); 
uilre un — , (nav.) to make a board ; 
Jeter par-dessus le — ,to throne over- , 
board ; mettre k — , (nav.) to ship off; 
romplir jusqu'aux — s, to fill, to fill ii/p to 
thebrim; tomber par-dessus le— , (nav.) 
io fall overboard ; venir k — , (nav.) to \ 
eoms alongside ; venir — a — , (nav.) to 
come alongside; virer de — , (nav.) to I 
tack about. Avoir Tame sur le — des 
tevres, to be dying ; to be at the last 
ga«p. . 

Sm. — BoRD, cflxB, RIVK, KiVAOE. The bord 
touches the water; the cote (coaM) ia elevat<?d 
Above it ; the rive (bank) and rivage (shore) are i 
it* limits, the nVaje being properly nothiug more 
than an extended rive. The term bord (margin, I 
tank, shore,) is applicable to all bodies of v;a'tei 
and is rendered differently in English for each 



rives (banks) belong to 

are pro]^rly en _ 

large rivers onTy ; "the c6te (cuost) belongs 
!a aloni 



(siores) are pro]^rTy employed in connection with 



to the sea alone, 

BOEDAGE [b8r-da-j] n. m. 1. (nav. 
BTch.) pUmking ; 2. (engin.) sheathing ; 
poUnff ; boarding; 8. (nav.) flat; 
plank ; poUng. 

— suppl6mentaire, (nav.) weather 
boarding ; weaih^r hoards. 

B0KD:6, E [b5r-d«] adj. 1. 1 § border- 
id ; 2. (bot) bordered. 

B0RD6, n. m. bordering. 

BORDEAUX [b«r-d6] n. m. claret; 
Bordeamr, toine ; Boraeame. 

BOEDflE [b6r-d4] n. f. 1. (nav.) broad- 
wkU ; board ; 2. § hroad-side ; volley ; 
1 (nav.) tack ; stretch ; 4 (nav.) trip (in 
lacking). 

Courir des — e, (nav.) to tack about ; 
oourlr la — de . , . , to be on the... tack ; 
Baireune — , to make a board; Mcher, 
ttrer une — , to fire a broad-side. 

BOEDEL [bSr-dJl] S n. m. brothel. 

BORDELAIS, E [oSr-dS-U, .] adj. of 
Bordeaux ; Bordeaux. 

BOEDELAia n. m. E, n. C native of 
tkudeawB. 
70 



BOEDEMENT [b6r-d«-man] n. m. (arts) 
edge. 

BOEDEE [b«r-d«] V. a (db, with) 1. | 
to border ; 2. || to hem ; 8. B to edge ; 4 ( 
to bind (with ribbon, tape, etc.) ; 5. § to 
border (extend all along) ; 6. to line (a 
road, street) ; 7. to tuck in (bed-clntbps) ; 
8. to ship (oars) ; 9. (nav.) to lay (a deck) ; 
iO. (nav.) to tally (courses) ; 11. (nav.) to 
haul aft (a sail); 12. (nav.) to gather 
(the sheets) ; to tally aft ; 18. (nav. arch.) 
to plank. 

6. La fouJe bordait le chemin, the cnmd lined the 

BOEDEEEAU [b»r-d-r6] n. m. (com.) 
memmrandum ; detailed memoran- 
dum. 

— de compte, abstract of an accovmt. 
BOED-IEE, IEEE [bfir-difi, 4-r] adj. 

(nav.) lap-sided. 

BOEDIEE [b6r-di«] n. m. (nav.) lap- 
sided ship. 

B.OEDIGUE [b6r-di-g] n. f. (fis)i.) 
crawl. 

BORDUEE [bfir-dn-r] n. f. 1. border; 
2. binding (with ribbon, tape, etc.); 8. 
(of pictures) frame ; 4 (of pavements) 
curb ; curb-stone ; 5. (build.) coping 
over ; 6. (hort) edging ; verge ; 7. (her ) 
border ; bordure ; 8. (nav.)}2a<. 

BORE [bo-r]n. m. (chem.) boron. 

B0R:6AL, E [bo-r«-al] adj. boreal; 
Northern; North. 

B0R:6E [bo-r«] n. m. 1. (myth.) Boreas; 
2. ** North wind. 

BORGNE [bdr-gn*] adj. 1. \ (of ani- 
mals, pers.) htind of one eye, of an eye ; 
one-eyed ; * monocular ; mort,oculous ; 

2. II (of animals) single-eyed ; 8. § (th.) 
obsctvre ; dark / 4 § (th.) obscure ; 5. § 
(th.) blind ; obscwre ; paltry ; 6. § (th.) 
blind (unlikely) ; lam^ ; 7. § (of accounts) 
ohs(yure ; u/ninteUigible ; 8. (of anchors) 
with one fluke. 

«*,it Au royaume des aveugles les — b 
sont rois, Hie one-eyed are kings am.ong 
the bUnd. 

B0RGNE8SE fbar-gni-s*] n. f. -^ (b. s.) 
woman blind of an eye; -7- one-eyed 
woman. 

BORIQUE [bo-ri-k] adj. (chem.) bo- 
racic. 

BOENAGE [b6r-na-j] n. m. placing, 
setting boundaries (marks). 

BORNE [b«r-n] n. f. (i., to) 1. 1 § bo^m- 
dary; 2. | § bound; 8. § limit; 4. | 
milestone; 6. | spur-poat; 6. spur- 
stone. 

— miliaire, 1. mile-stone; 2. kilo- 
metre-stone. Au delft dea — s, 1. beyond, 
tlie boundaries; 2. || out of distance; 8. 
§ beyond all bounds ; avec dea — s, ( V. 
senses) Umitedly ; sans — s, ( V. senses) § 
1. unbounded ; boundless ; umlimited ; 
* limitless ; wnconfined ; 2. unstinted ; 

3. beyond, loithout measure. Asseoir 
les — s de, mettre, poser des — s &, B to 
place boundaries to ; avoir les mfimes 
— s (que), ( V. senses) to be coterminate 
{toim) ; mettre des — s (k), % to set limits 
to ; pa.sser les — s de, ( V. senses) to 
eieeeed the limits of; se prescrire des 
— s, to limit o.'s self; reculer les — s || 
§, to enlarge, to extend Vie boundaries 

BORNlfe, E [b6r-n«] adj. 1. fl § limited ; 
contracted ; confined ; 2. || stinted ; 8. § 
(b. s.) narrow ; shalknc ; petty ; mean ; 
4 § (b. 8.) (pers.) stvMed. 

Non — , ( V. senses of — ) 1. i § unli- 



mited , ^,v^.^, ^^.^.^ , 

t unstinted. Caraet^re- 



unli- 
uncontracted ; wnconfined 

1. contracted- 
ness ; 2. § narrowness ; pettiness ; d'une 
mani^re — e, ( V. senses) narrmvly ; pet- 
tily ; meanly. 

BORNE-FONTAINE [b5r-n-fon-t*-n] n. 

I, pi. B0RNE8-FONTAINE8, water-post. 

BORNER rb6r-n«] V. a. 1. 1 to place, to 
set boundaries (ms'-ks) to; 2. % to set 
bounds to; to restrain ; 8. B § (a, to) to 
bownd ; 4 § (a, to) to limit ; to contract ; 
to confine ,• 5. § to stint. 

Personne, chose qui borne, ( V. senses) 
slinter. 

Se bornbr, pr. v. 1. to impose re- 
straint on o.y self • ^ to kesp uAthin 
bounds; 2. (a, to) to conftne, to limit 
o.'t self 



B0EN0U8E [bor-nous] n. m. bomcwst 
(Arabian cloak). 

BOENOYEE [bor-noa-i*] v. a. to too* 
at (a. th.) with one eye closed (to as- 
certain the straightness or smaotbne.1 
of It). 

BOENOYEE, v. a. to place, to un 
marks in (for foundations or plauta- 
tions). 

BOSAN [bo-ian] n. m. bosan (Turkiht 
beverage). 
BOSEL [bo-sel] n. m. (arch.) torus. 
BOSPHOEE [bos-f6-r] n. m. (geog ) 
Bosphorus. 

Du —,ofthez=; Bosphorian. 

Le — de Thrace, tlie Thradan Bos- 
pTwrus; the Strait of Constantinople ; 
le — Cimm6rien, ' Uie Cimm^erian = 
the Strait of Yewicale. 

BOSQUET [bos-kJ,] n. m. 1. grove; 2. 
thicket; 8. (hort) bosquet 

B088AGE [bo-sa-j] a m. (arch.) bos- 
sage ; embossing. 

— rustiqne, rustic ^cork. 

BOSSE [bo-s] n. f. 1. (pers.) deformity 
(In the back, chest); 2. (pers.) (In the 
back) hump ; 3. (of animals) hump ; 4 
bump ; swelling ; 5. ^ bump (protuber- 
ance of the skull) ; 6. (of metals) bruise ; 
dent ; 7. boss (ornament) ; knob ; 8. 
(anatj prominence; protuberance; 9. 
(arch.) boss (draw., paint) bust; 10. 
(gold., silver.) embossment; 11. (tennis) 
boss; 12. (nav.) stopper; 18. (sculp.) 
embossment ; 14 (sculp.) relief; re 
liet)o. 

Demi , (sculp.) demi-rdief; ronde 

— , high = ; — par devant, k la poltrine, 
deformity in the chest ; — par derri^re, 
au dos, hump ; hmnch. Ouvrage en — , 
relief; relievo; terrain plein de — a, 
uneven grotmd. D'apr^s la — , (draw., 
pamt) from the bust; en — , 1. bossy; 
bunchy ; 2. (of locks) not mortised; & 
(sculp.) in =; en ronde — , infuU-=\ 
I aUo-reUevo. Avoir une — , to he humped, 
j ne demander que plaie et — , to wish/in 
1 all sorts of mischief ; donner dans I» — . 
to fall into a snare ; to be deceived , ^ 
to be taken in ; faire — , to hwnch ; tr. 
bunch out; faire une — , to m<ikc a 
bump ; faire des —s ft, 1. to mxika 
hu/mps in ; 2. to emboss ; se faire une — , 
to get a hump ; travalUer en — , (sculp.) 
to emboss. 

BOSSELAGE [bo-»-la-j] n. m. (gold., 
silver.) embossing. 

Travailler en — , to emboss. 

BOSSEL:^, E [bo-s-i«] adj. 1. (of metals) 
bruised ; dented ; 2. (bot) bunched ; 8. 
(bot) torous; 4 (gold., silver.) em 
bossed. 

Finement — , (bot) torous. 

BOSSELEE [bo-s-l«] V. a. 1. to bruise, 
to dent (metals) ; 2. (gold., silver.) to ewi- 
hoss. 

BOSSELUEE [bo-s-lu-r] n. f 1. + bump; 
2. (bot) embossment; 8. (gold., silver.) 
embossment 

BOSSEMAN [bo-s-man] n. m. t boat 
swain's mate. 

BOSSEE [bo-s«] V. a. (nav.) to stop- 
per. 

BOSSETTE [bo-si-t] n. £ 1. (arch.) 
boss ; 2. (man.) boss. 

B0S80IE [bo-soarl n. m. (nav.) cat- 
head. 

BOSSU, E [bo-sn] adj. 1. deformed (In 
the back, chest) ; 2. (in the back) hump 
backed; hunch-backed ; ^ crook-bOiJi 
ed ; 8. deformed in the che«t. 

— par (ierrlfere, hum/p-backed ; hwnciS 
backed; crook-backed; — par d«vaiii. 
deformed in th* rhesL 

BOSSU, n. m. B, n. f. hwnp-bark; 
hunch-back ; 1 crook-back. 

BOSSUEE [bo-su-d] V. a. to hrvisc, tr 
dent (metals). 

Se B088UER, pr. v. (of metals) to be, 
get dented. 

BOSTON [bos-ttsn] n. m. 1. p. n. Bo& 
ton ; 2. boston (game of cards). 

BOSTON lEN, NE [bos-to-ni-in, i^i] ni'J 
of Boston. 

BOSTONIEN, p. n. m. NE, p. n. « 
Bostonian. 

BOT [bo] adj. t club-Jootea. 

Pled—, 1. =: 2. Onibrt) ohif>-ftvl 



BOU BOU 


BOU 


oil joute; «wjeu; ewjeune; ejipcur; are pan; m pin ; 6/ibon; wwbrun; ♦U Uq. 


•jniUq. 



Wolr un pled — , 6tre pled — , to be 
Mub-footm. 

BOTANIQUE [bo-ta-ni-k] n. f botany. 

Conformement a la — , botanicaUy, 

BOTANIQUE, adj. botamcal; bota- 
nic. 

BOTANISTE [bo-to-nU-t] n, m. bota- 
nist 

BOTAROUE, n. f. F. Boutaegub. 

BOTHBION [bot-ri-anl n. m. (med.) 
ii4hrion,- ulceration of the cornea. 

BOTTE [bo-t] n. t 1. bwidle ; 2. 
bwich; 3. (hay, straw) bundZe; truss; 
4 (of Bi'i) ham-k. 



Lier, mettre en — , to bvMch; mettxa 
en — , to put tip in a bmidle. 

BOTTE, n. f. 1. 6oo< (man's); 2. Wel- 
lington boot ; 3. cask ; 4. (of carriages) 
ftep ; 5. (of earth) clod. 

— s cirees, clean boots ; — forte, thick 
= ; — fine, lifflU, dress = ; — retrous- 
B6e, h revers, top=z; — d'homme, gen- 
tleman's = ; — a r6cuy6re, IlessioM = ; 
— de sept lieues, ogre's =. Soulier — , 
Blucher- = ; tige de — , leg of a =\ = 
-leg ; tirant de — , = -strap. A propos 
de — 8, 1. nothing, not at auto the pur- 
pose; iDithmit a cause ; '{for nothing. 
Cirer des — s, to black =« ; d6crotter des 
—8, to clean =s ; graisser ses — s, 1. | to 
grease o.'s =« ; 2. 1^ § to pack tip ; 3. 
Ei^ § to prepare for the long journey, 
for kingdom come ; mettre ses — s, to 
put on o.'« =; laisser ses — s quelque 
part, to leave o.'s bones any wltere; to 
die wny wliere; mettre du foin dans ses 
— 8, to feather o.'s nest; 6ter, tirer ses 
— s, to take, to pull offo.'s =s. 

BOTTE, n. t (fena) Virust; Iwnge. 

Porter, pousser une — , to thrust; to 
make a ii/>'ust, hmge ; parer une — , to 
parry a thrust. 

BOTTELAGS [bo-t-la-jl n. m. 1. put- 
Vng, tying up in bundles; 2. (agr.) 
Ifinding; binding 'wp. 

BOTTELEE [bo-t-l«] v. a. l.toputwp, 
loUewpim. bundles ; 2. (agr.) to bind ; 
\j bind up. 

BOTTELEUE [bo-t-leur] n. m. (agr.) 
hUider. 

BOTTEE [bo-M] V. a. 1. to make boots 
Ayr (a. o.) ; 2. to jyut on (a. o.'s) boots 
{tot him.) 

BoTTE, K, pa. p. 1. im. boots ; with o.'s 
boots on; 2. X booted; 8. (mil.) booted. 

8b botter, pr. v. 1. (pers.) to put o.'s 
boots on ; 2. to get clods on o.'s feet ; 3. 
(of horses) to ball; 4. (hunt) to carry; 
5. (mil.) to boot. 

— bien, to wear nice boots ; — mal, 
to wear nasty, ugly boots. 

BOTTER, V. n. to make hoots. 

BOTTIEK [bo-ti6] n. m. boot-maker. 

BOTTINE [bo-ti-n] n. t 1. half-boot; 
i. lady's boot; 8. (surg.) buskin. 

BOU [bou] n. m. V. Bonk. 

BOUAEI) [bou^r] n. m. (coin.) ham- 
mer. 

BOUARDER [bou-ar-d«] v. &. (coin.) to 
strike with Hie hammer. 

BOUl [bou-i] n. m. V. Bohe. 

BOUBIE [bou-bi] n. f. (orn.) booby; 
gannet. 

BOUBOU [bou-bou] n. m. bow-wow. 

BOUC [bouk] n. m. 1. (m am.) goat; 
he-goat; buck-goat; ^^ billy-goat; 
i. goat-skin. 

— femissaire | §, scape-goat. Barbe 
le — , 1. (pers.) goat's beard ; 2. (hot) 
ipoat's beard (spocies). 

BOUCAGE [bou-ka-j] n. m. (bot) bur- 
wt saadfrage. 

BOUCAN [boa-kan] n. m. 1. smoking- 
place (for meat or fish) ; 2. gridiron 
for smoking. 

BOUCANEB [bou-ka-c«] v. a. to smoke 
{mejit, fish). 

BOUCANEE, V. n. to hunt wild 
beasts for the skins. 

BOUCANIEB [boii-ka-ni«] n. m. 1. t 
tniccaneer (hunter); 3. b^tccaneer (pi- 
I ate) ; 8. buccaneer's gum,, musket. 

liUlJCARO [bou-ka-r6] n. m. boucaro 
lindian odoriferous earth). 

BOICASSIN fbo..-ka •!..] n. m. boca- 



BOUCAUT [bou-k<>] n. m. (for dry- 
goods) 1. cask ; 2. hogshead. 

BOtJCHE fbou-th] n. f. 1. I § moudi ; 
2. I mmith ; Upn ; tongue ; voice ; 3. 
victuals ; lining ; eating ; 4 cooks 
(of the sovereign) ; 5. (of canals, rivers) 
mouth; 6. (artil.) mouth; 7. (artil.) 
(of cannons) mri^le ; 8. (man.) moutli. 

— beante, with open mouth ; 1 gap- 
ing ; bonne — , tidbit; la bonne — , 
the last hit ; — doucereuse, mealy- 
mouthedness ; — close, cousue 1 keep 
counsel ! keep it to yourself ! — fendue 
jusqu'aux oreilles, =.from ear to ear; 

— friande, sweet-^. ; — impure, ,/?>?4? =; 

— toujours prete a dire des injures, § 
fovl = ; — tendre (of horses) soft, mealy 
= ; — de chaleur, opening for hot-air ; 

— k fen, jnece of ordnance; — de miel, 
m.ealy-mouthedness ; — k — , face to 
face. Ceinture de la — , (artil.) muzzle- 
ring ; flux de — , 1. (med.) rwnning 
from the —; 2. JE^ gift of the gab; 
maladie de la — , 1. disease of Oie = ; 2. 
(veter.) carney ; munitions de — , (mil.) 
provisions; officiers de la — , king's, 
queen's cooks. A — beante, ouverte, 
vnth open =; a double — , dmihle- 
mouthed ; aux cent — s, hundred-mouth- 
ed, tongued ; muni, pourvu de — , mouth- 
ed. De — , by word of=: Avoir la — 
amfere, mauvaise, to ha/ve a bitter, disa- 
greeable taste in o.'s=.; avoir la — dure, 
?man.) to be hard-moutlied ; avoir la — 
iriande, to hame a sweet = ; avoir la — 
large, to be wide-mout/ied ; 'avoir k la — , 
to ha/ve (words) in o.'s = ; avoir la — 
doucereu.se,to he mealy-mouthed; n'avoir 
ni — ni eperon, (of horses) to feel neither 
hit nor spur ; clore la — ^ ( F. Fermer 
la — k); dire tout ce qui vient A la — ,to 
say whatever comes uppermost • etre 
dans toutes les — s, to be in eneryhody's 
= : 6tre sur sa —,tohea glutton; 6tre 
fort en — , (of horses) to be hard-mouth- 
ed; falre bonne — , to lea/ve a good taste 
in the mouth ; faire la petite — , to be 
difficult to please ; ^ to be particular ; 
faire la petite — de, sur q. ch., not to 
speak freely, ^ out; ne point faire la 
petite — de q. ch., not to mince the mat- 
ter ; falre la — en coeur, to purse up, to 
screw up o.'s mouth ; fermer la — k q. 
u., 1. J § to shut a. o.'s = ; 2. | § to close, 
to seal o.'s lips ; to pose a. o. ; to run 
a. o. down, ; mettre a la — de q. u., to 
put (words) into a. o.'s = ; porter de — 
en — , to mouth about; prendre sur sa 
— , to stint o.'s self; prendre un bain de 
— , (med.) to rviise out, to wash out o.'s 
= ; se rincer la — , to rinse out, to wash 
out o.'«=; traitor q. u. a — que veux- 
tu, to entertain a. o. hospitably; to 
feast a. o. to his heart's co7itent ; faire 
venir I'eau 4 la — i q. il, to make a. o.'s 
= water. 

BOUCH]fiE [bou-.h«] n. t mouthful. 

D"une seule — , at a ■=.. Faire une — 
de, to make a = of; ne faire qu'une - - 
de q. u. §, to swallow a. o.up; to beat 
a. o. with earn, in a trice. 

BOUCHER [bou-.h«] V. a. 1. to stop; 
to stop up ; 2. to block up ; 3. to ob- 
struct; to he obstructive of; ^ to stuff 
up ; 4. (with a cork) to cork ; 5. (with a 
wall) to wall up. 

Se — le, la, les..., to stop up o.'s... 

BoucHE, E, pa. p. ( F senses of Bott- 
oher) 1. (of bottles) corked; 2. § (pers.) 
stunted. 

Non — , ( F senses) 1. unsto2)ped; 2. 
unobstructed. 

BOUCHER, n. m. I § butdier. 

Garfon — , = -boy. De — ^, || § but- 
cherly. 

BOUCHi:RE [bo.i-.iiJ-r] n. 1 1. butcher 
(woman) ; 2. butcher's wife. 

BOUCHERIE [bou-rii-ri] n. C 1. slaugh- 
ter-house ; shambles ; 2. butcher's 
slwp; 8. butcher's stall; 4 butchery 
(trade) ; 6. § shambles ; slaughter ; 
butchery. 

Aller k la — , 1. || (of animals) to go to 
the sloAighter-Jiouse ; 2. § (pers.' Co goto 
Hie butcher's ; Z.%to go to tho shatn- i 
hies ; to go to slaughter. i 

BOUCHE-TROU [bou-ih-tron] n. Til., 
pi — e (b. s.) substitute (one who tJiV«» 1 



the place of a person unexpectedly IncW' 
pacitated fi-ora attending to his duties). 
BOUCHOIR [bou-shcar] n. m. (of «D 

oven) stopper. 

BOUCHON [bou-.h6n] n. m. 1. stopper; 
2. cork; 3. t (pers.) dear; darling; 
4 (of gi-ass, hay, straw) ^Bisp ; 5. \iA 
linen) packet; 6. (of public honscsj 
bush (sign); 7. puhlic-luruse ; 8. (fish,; 
bobber. 

— de bois, plug ; — de bouteille, bot' 
tie-stopper; — de linge, rag-^; — dc 
verre, glass-stopper ; — a vis, screw- 
cap. Tailledes — s, cork-cutting. Metlno 
en — , to rumple (linen) ; mettre un — k,- 
1. to stopper ; to put a stopper in ; 2. 
to cork ; to put a cork in ; oter le — , 

1. to take the stopper out; 2. to w*- 
cork; to take the cork out; faire sau- 
ter le — , to uncork (a bottle with noise). 

BOUCHONNER [bou-sho-n«] v. a. t 
to rub dawn (a horse); 2. to ru/m/ple 
(linen) ; 8. + to caress (a child) ; to 
fondle. 

BOUCHONNIEE [bou-«l.o-ni«] n. m. 
cofk-cutter. 

BOUCHOT [bou-Bho] n. m. (fish.) 
craiol. 

BOUCLE fx" iki] n. C 1. buckU; 2. 
ring ; 3. ear-ring ; 4 ^of a door) knocker 
(round) ; rapper ; 5. (of the hair) Gitrl : 
lock ; 6. (of the hair) ringlet; 7. (arch.) 
knocker; 8. (nav.) ring; 9. (nav.) (o* 
port-holes) staple. 

1 . — lie Soulier, sAoe-biickle ; — de culotte, h%»t- 
buckle. 3. — » de diainant ou d'or, diamond or 
gold ear-rings. 

— a I'anglaise, en tire-bouchon, ring- 
let; — d'oreille, ear-ring. Lier avoc 
une — , to buckle up ; mettre en — , to 
curl, to «M^ fhair) in curl. 

BOUCLER [bou-ki«] V. a 1. to buckle; 

2. to buckle up ; 8. to rin^ (put a riiu; 
to) ; 4 to curl (the hair) ; 5. to curl th« 
hair of{&. o.) 

BouoLK, K, pa. p. F senses of Bow- 

OLER. 

Non — , 1. rmbuckled ; 2. unringod, ; 
8. (of hair) uncurled. Aux cheveux — f , 
curly-headed, curly-pated. Qui a let 
cheveux — s, curly-headed ; ourl^- 
pated. 

Sk Botjcler, pr. v. to curl o.'s hair. 

BOUCLER, v. n. 1. (of hair) to owl ■ 
2. (mas.) to swell ottt of the vertical. 

BOUCLIER [bou-kU-fi] n. m. l.|| shield ; 
buckler; 2. % shield; buckler; protec- 
tion ; defence ; 3. (ich.) lump-fish. 

Levee de — s, 1. 1 (Rom. hist) raising 
of bucklers; 2. § rising in arms. En 
— , (bot) buckler-shaped. Faire un — 
de son corps ^ q. u., to shield a. o. with 
o.'s person ; faire une lev6e de — s §, to 
rise in^arm^s; to rise. Non couv<»rt 
jw nn — , imshielded. 

B0UDDHI8ME [bou-di.-m] n. ul 
Buddhism. 

BOUDDHISTE [bou-dis-t] p. n. ii 
Bitddhist. 

BOUDEE [bon-d«] v. n. 1. (a, a£) to 
pout; 2. (coNTEE, loitK) to sulk; to bf. 
sulky ; 3. (dominoes) not to he able to 
play ; 4 (hort) to be stunted. 

— centre son ventre, to sulk, to be 
sulky toith o.'s victuals. Ne pas — , ( F 
senses) to be ready to repel an attack ; 
en boudant 1. pouting ; 2. sulkily. 

BOUDER, v. a. 1. to pout at, upon ; 
2. to sulk with ; to be sidky with. 

Se botjder, pr. v. 1. to sulk with eacl 
other; 2, to be cool Unoards each 
other. 

BOUDEEIE [bon-d-ri] n. i 1. potrt 
4ng : 2. (action) suiting : a (etate) jnil 
kiness 

BOUDF ■ -E [bou-deur, eu-i] iklj, i 
pouting • 

Hum: *ulkiness. 

BO^ ; SE, n. £ per<>c*< 

that 

F :;tort:lk. 

1. '■'■ ^. m. \. blacA 

iw'nt'iu. "t,. • jru.(Tdtnff : pudding, 
:. '.'^i\; curl • .. roU^r; 4 portman 
t:- r- ; &, ' ;«cks) bel'-i^ring ; C 
•••.^h I ' ',- V. {r.i^y ) y/udding ; f 
. .voollcn dian.- 



%' 



Tl 



Bon 



BOU 



aou 



a Dial; auii'ile; «fee; ? fcve ; efete; ^je; ill; J lie; omol; (imole; dmort; -msuc; wsfire; cut jour; 



— bUuic, wJiUe pudding; — nolr, 

BOUDINAGE [bou-di-nn-j] n. m. (spin.) 
roving; slubhing. 

BOUDINE [bou-di-n] n. C (glass.) hwni; 
hnot 

BOUDINER [oou-di-n^] V. a. (spin.) to 
rove; to dub. 

BOUDINEU-R [bou-di-neur] n. m. SE, 
^«-«] n. f. (spin.) rover ; sluober. 

BOUDINIEE [bou-di-ni6] n. m. Uack- 
fmddmg maker. 

BOUDINIEKE fbou-di-niJ-r] n. C 1. 
pUick-pudding maker ; 2. (culin.) JiU- 
er; little, fxmnel. 

BOUDINOIR [bon-di-noar] n. m. (spin.) 
rowng-frame ; dubhing-machvne. 

BOUDOIE [bou-doar] n. m. boudoir 
(private room). 

BOUE (bou) n. 1 1. mud; 2. mire; 8. 
dirt ; 4. (of ink) sediment. 

— des^ rues, 1. street-m.iid ; 2. road- 
chmg. Ame de — , ( V. Ame) ; cervelle 
de — , clay-brained; stupid; couleur 
de la — , 1. mud-color ; 2. muddiness ; 
masse de — , clod ; tas de — , heap of 
dirt. De couleur de — , z= -colored; 
muddy. Couvrir de — , to cover with 
= ; to imid ; convert de — , mniddy ; 
ensevelir dans la — , to bury in tlie =, 
mire; to mud; jeter de la — a q. u., to 
throw dirt upon a. o. ; 6ter la — (de), 
to remove the dirt (from) ; tlrer q. u. de 
U — , 1. I to take a. o. out of the =, 
mwre; 2. § to take a. o. out of tlie gut- 
ter, kennel; to take a. o. from the dirt, 
thj dwng-hill. 

B0U£E [bou-«] n. C (nav.) buoy. 

— de r:&tat, government, public = ; 
— de sauvetage, Ufe- = ; — de sauvetage 
pour la nuit, floating -light. 

BOUEUR [bou-eur] n. in. scwvenger ; 
dustm^an. 

BOUEU-X, SE [bou-en, i] adj. 1. mxid- 
dy: 2. miry; dirty; 3. bad; foul. 

Ecriture boueuse, thick writing ; 
efctampe boueuse, engraving with spots 
qf iruc; impression boueuse, foul im- 
•pression. 

BOUFFANT, E [bou-fan, t] adj. 
pwffed. 

BOUFFANTE [bou-ffin-t] n. fl t hoop; 
ftiHhingale. 

BOUFFARDE [bou-far-d] n. C "6om/- 
farde" (pipe). 

BOUFFE [bou-f ] n. m. 1. luffoon (of 
the Italian tlieatre) ; 2. — s, Italian thea- 
tre (of Paris). 

BOUFF^E [bou-K] n. £ 1. 1 puff (of 
■wind, etc.); 2. (whiff; S.fzMne; 4 %flt 
(temporary attack). 

— de vent, (nav.) gust of wind ; gust. 
Par —8, ( V. senses) by fits; by fits and 
starts. 

BOUFFER [bou-f«] V. n. 1. 1 (de, with) 
to swell ; 2. 1 W swell out ; 3. to puff; 
to puff up ; 4:. -T-to eat with avidity ; 
6. (of bread) to rise; 6. (mas.) to swell. 

Faire — , to swell; to swell out. 

BOUFFER, V. a. (butch.) to How 
(meat.) 

BOUFFETTE [boa-fi-t] n. f 1. bow 
(of ribbon) ; 2. ear-knot 

BOUFFI, E [boa-fi] adj. (de, viith) 1. 
I § swoU^n; 2. B bloated; puffed; puff- 
ed up; 8. § (of language, style) inflated ; 
turgid; 4. 0>ot) turgid. 

BOUFFIB [bou-fir] V. a (de, icUh) 1. 
I § to swell; 2. 1 to bloat; to puff; to 
pufftip ; 3. § to inflate. 

BOUFFIR, V. n. SI. to stoeU; 2. to 
hccome, 1 to get bloated ; to be puffed 
np. 

BOUFFI88UEE [bou-fl-iu-r] n. C 1. B § 
eweliing ; 2. 1 bloatedness ; puffing up ; 
B. $ (of language, style) tu/rgidness; tur- 
gidity; bombast; fustian. 

Avec — ,(y. senses) § turgii" 



BOUFFON [bou-fon] n. m. NE [o-n] 

(pers.) buffoon; fool; 2. (th.) 

buffoone)~y ; 8. (of old comedy) vice ; 4. 



(of the drama) cUncn ■ b. (of princes) 
jester; fool. 

Falre le — , to plnv the . fbon ; falre 
on — de, to make a r-^Jfoo -f; servir 
io — , to 6<» o laugh*pa-stock, X 

BOUFFON. NE, <««. 1. huj, . s^ ; 
• biffiHtn ; 2. /acetious; droli ; ^j > y. 
72 



BOUTFONNER [bou-fo-ni] v. n. to 
play the buffoon. 

BOUFFUNNERIE [bou-fo-n-ri] n. f. 1. 
buffoonery ; 2. practical joke. 

BOUGE [bou-j] n. m. (b. s.) 1. closet 
(near a room) ; 2. holt (small and dirty 
lodging); 3. (o' casks) bulge; 4. cowry 
(African & Indian coin). 

BOUGEOIR rbou-joar] n. m. 1. taper- 
stand ; 2. chamber, flat candlestick. 

BOUGER [bou-j^i V. n. (de, from) to 
stir ; to m^ove ;^to oudge ; ffW^ to wag. 

Ne pas — , not to = ; 7wt to wag a 
hair; ne pas plus — qu'ime bflche, to 
stir no more than a post. — de chez 
soi, to stir abroad, out. 

BOUGETTE [bou-j6-t] n. f t budget 



*& 



BOUGIE [bou-ji] n. C 1. waaa-candle; 
waos-light; 2. (small) wax-taper; ta- 
per ; 3. (surg.) bougie. 

— fllee, d'allume, wax-taper; taper; 
— medicinale, medicated candle. Fa- 
bricant de — s, wax-chandler ; pain de 
— , woiB-taper. Aux — s. by wax- 
lights. 

BOUGIER [bou-ji-«] V. a. to wax. 

BOUGONNEE [bou.go-n«] v. n. to 
gru/mble. 

BOUGRAN [bou-gran] n. m. | Uzk- 
ram (cloth). 

BouiLLAis, ind. Imperf. Ist, 2d sing, of 

BOUILLIE. 

BouiLLANT, pres. p. 

BOUILLANT, E fbou-ian, t*] adj. 1. | 
boiling ; 2. | boiling hot; scalding hot; 
burning ; 3. %flery; impetuous; "jf hot; 
4. § (pers.) hot-headed. 

Tout — , boiling hot; scalding hot; 
J^° piping hot. 

BOUILLE [bou-i*] n. f. fisherman'' s 
pole ; fishing-'pole ; pole. 

BouiLLE, subj. pres. 1st, 8d sing, of 

BOUILLIK. 

BOUILLER [bou-ifi*] V. a. (fish.) to 
disturb with a pole. 

BOUILLERIE [bou-i-ri*] n. f. (a. & m.) 
boilery. 

BOUILLEUR [bon-iefir*] n. m. (steam- 
eng.) boiler-tube. 

BOUILLI [bou-i*] n. m. boiled beef 

BOUILLIE [bou-i*] n. f. 1. pap (for 
children); 2. iMsty-pudding ; 3. (paper 
man.) pulp. 

8'en aller en — , (of meat) to boil 
away. Faire de la — pour les chats §, 
to labor in vain; to lose o.'s labor; 
nourrir de — , to feed with pap. 

BOUILLIR [bou-ir*] v. n. irr. (bouil- 
lant; BOUILLI ; ind. pres. bous; noits 
BOUILLONS ; subf. pres. bouille). 1. \ to 
boU; 2. (of the blood) to boil; 3. § (de, 
wiith) to bum. 

3. La l^te me bout, my head burus ; — d'impa- 
tience, to bum with impatience. 

— k gros bouillons, to boil fast; — 
doucement, k petits bouillons, 1. to = 
gently; 2. to simmer. Action de faire 
— , 1. boiling; 2. decoction (action). 
Pouvoir etre bouilli, to be deeoctible. 

BouiLLi, E, pa. p. 1. boiled; 2. (of 
leather) waxed. 

Non — , unboiled. Faire — , to make 
boil; 2. to boil; 3. to boil down; faire — 
k demi, to parboil; faire — I'eau, to 
make tlie water boil; tornake the kettle 
boU. L'eau bout, 1. the water boils; 2. 
the kettle boils. 

BOUILLIR, V. a. t to boU. 

— du lait a q. u. §, to please a. o. (by 
saying a. th. agreeable). 

BOUILLOIRE [bou-ioa-r*] n. £ 1. ket- 
tle; tea-kettle; 2. (large) boiler. 

Mettre la — au feu, to put tJie = on. 

BOUILLON [boa-ion*] n. m. 1. 1 bub- 
ble (of a liquid in ebullition) 2. 1 bubble 
(of air); 3. ripple; 4 1 soup; clear 
broth ; broth ; 5. | cup, plate of soup ; 
6. II tea (decoction of meat or herbs) ; 7. § 
ebullition; burst; transport; 8. (of la- 
dles' dresf») puff. 

1. Le» premiers — t de la colore, the first ebulli- 
tions of anger. 

— clair, 16ger, thin ioup; — coup6, 
= weakened with water; — maip'e, 
vegetable =; — pointu ^, clyster; — en 
Uiblette portable = ; — d'eau, low jet 
d'eau; — de pouict, chicken broth; 



— de veau, veal tea. Tablette de — ■ 
cake of portable =. Boire un — , 1. j 
(in bathing) to Sicallow a mouthful; 2. J 
to put up imth a loss ; etre au — , 6tro 
reduit au — , to take nothing but =. II 
n'y faut qu'un ou deux, deux oa tK^ 
— 8, it must just boil. 

BOUILLON -BLANC [bou-iSn-blan^l D 
m. (bot.) m,ullein; yellow, greatrViMtt 
mullein; cote's lu/ngwort; laili/'a jto- 
glove ; sheplierds club. 

BOUILLONNANT, E [bou-io-nin, t»] 
adj. bubbling. 

BOUILLONNEMENT [bon-io-n-min*! 
n. m. 1. I bubbling ; bubbling up; 2. | 
gushing out ; 3. § (de, ioith) boiling. 

BOUILLONNER [bou-io-n«*] v. n. L 
I to bubble ; to bubble tip; 2. 1 to ripple ' 
3. II to gush out; 4. § (de, with) to boil; 
to boil up ; H). %to boil over. 

Faire — , 1. to make =.; I.to ripple. 

BOUILLONNER, v. a. to put puffs tc 
(a lad) "<» garment). 

BouriLONs, ind. pres. & Impera. lit 

pi. of BoUILLIR. 
BOUILLOTTE [bou-i-o-t*! n. £ V. 

BOUILLOIRE. 

BOUILLOTTE, n. £ "bouillotte" 
(game of cards). 

B0UIS8E [bou-i-.] n. £ glasdngsiiek 
(of shoe-makers). 

BOUJARON [bou-ja-ron] n. m. (nav.) 
giU. 

BOULAIE [bou-W] n. £ $ plantation 
of birch. 



BOULANG-ER [bou-Ian-j«] n. m. ] 
[4-r] n. £ 1. baker; 2. baker's wife. 



BOULANGER [bou-laii-i«] 
bakers) to make bread 



D. (of 



BOULANGER, v. a. ,«> make bread. 

BOULANGERIE [ bou-lan-j-ri ] n. C 
1. bread-making ; baker's busine«a, 
trade; 2. biscuit-making; 8. bak&- 
house (of public establishment* or pri- 
vate houses) ; 4 baker's shop ; bakery. 

BOULE [bou-l] n. £ 1. ball; 2. ftoM 
(spherical body); 3. ^ scone* (head) 
pate ; 4 vote ; 5. (play) bowl. 

— noire, black ball (vote); — i. 
neige, (bot.) gelder rose; snow-iall^ 
tree; — d'or, (bot) globe-flower. Jco 
de — , 1. bowl, bowls; 2. bowling- 
green ; bowUng-grovmd. Joueurde — 
bowler. A — vue, i la — vue, precipi- 
tately; hastily. Avoir la — , (play) to 
play first ; jouer i la — , to play at 
bowls. Se mettre en — , to gather u.'e 
self up. 

BOULE AU [boa-14] n. m. (bot) birch; 
birch-tree. 

De — , birchen. 

BOULEDOGUE [bou-l-do-g] n. m. 
bull-dog. 

BOULEE [bou-U] v. n. (of pigeons) to 
pout. 

BOULET [bou-W] n. m. 1. (of cannon) 
bullet; ball ; shot; 2. (of horses) /e<toc*- 
joint; pastem-jovnt ; 3. dragging a 
cannon ball (military punishment) ; 4 
(vet) boulet. 

— coupe, (nav.) angel shot; — s en- 
chaln6s, chain =.• — mort, spent ball , 

— Tame, (artil.) 1. cross bar = ; stang 
ball; double-headed shot; 2. (nav.) 
angel shot; — rouge, red hot =, ball; 

— a deux t&tes, cha4.n bullet; double- 
headed bar =. Coup de — , bullet-:^ • 
= ; pare a — b, (nav.) shot-locker. Char 
ger a — s, (artil.) to shot; condamner mi 
— , to condemn to drag a cannon-ball ; ■ 
trainer le — , to drag a cannon-ball. 

BOULET^ [bou-l-t«] adj. (vet) (d 
horses) boulet (having the fetlock or pns- 
tern joint bent forward, out of its nat- 
ural position). 

BOULETTE [bou-lfe-t] n. £ 1. J baU 
(small ball of the crura of broad, of paper, 
of wax, etc.); 2. poison-ball ; 3. l <,cb (to 
fatten poultry); 4 1 § blunder; 5. 1 
(bot) blue, Frmtch, globe daisy (to 
fatten poultry); 6. (culin.) ball. 

— bleue, (bot) blu^e, Frenon, globe 
daisy; grosse — , 1. large ball; 2. f 
egregious blunder. — de viande, meat- 
ball ; force meat-ball. 

BOULEUX Fbou-ie ] n. ra. 1. ! \eam' 
hack: stubby horse • 2 $ (peib) ptoo 
der ; drudge. 



BOU BOU 


Bon 


OMJoftte; eujen; ^iijeilno; «*pewr; ofipan; In pin; on hon; wibrun; *11 Uq. 


•gn iiq. 



an Don — , 1. 1 a cood hack; 2. § a 
were plodder, drudge. 

BOULEVARD [bou-1-var] n. m. 1. t 
(mil.) bulwark ; rampart; 2. § buhoark 
(security) ; 3. 1 boulevard (walk). 

Fortifier par des — s, to bulwark. 

BOUL'eVART [Sou-l-var] n. m. V. 

BOULKVARD. 

BOULEVERS:^ E [bou-l-rAr-i*] adj. 
in a state of distraction. 

BOULEVERSEMENT [bou-l-rir-^ 
Luto] Tj. m. 1. I overthrow ; overtit/rn ; 2. 

XI turning upside down ; 8. § over- 
r<no ; subversion ; 4 § extreme con- 
fusion; disorder. 

Auteur d'un — , (F. senses) aver- 
thrmeer : subverter. 

BOULEVERSER [bou-l-vir-.«] v. a. 1. 
I to throw dmiyi~ ; 2. J to upset ;\^lto 
turn upside dmon ; ff^~ to turn topmj- 
twrvy; 4. § to overtlirow ; to overturn ; 
to subvert; gW" to upset; 5. § fe> %t,n- 
settle ; to throw into extreme confusion, 
disorder; 6. § to distract (a. o.); to 
drive distracted; 7. § to disturb (a. 
tn.) ; to t?'Oiible ; to agitate ; to derange ; 
8. J^S^ § to put (a. o.) out of sorts. 



BOULEVUE [boa-l-T^], 

k—,k\& — , precipitately , ,^^.^y. 

BOULIEB [boa-U6] n. m. (fish.) bag- 
net. 

BOULIMIE [bou-U-mn n. i: (med.) 6t*- 
Umia ; canine, iasatiaole appetite. 

BOULIN [bou-iin] n. m. 1. pigeon- 
hole; 2. (mas.) putlog-hole; 3. (mas.) 
iwtlog. 

BOULINE [bou-U-n] n. f. (nav.) 1. bow- 
One;^, gantlet. 

Grande — , — de la grande voile, matn- 
bmcline. — de misaine, fore-bowline ; 
— de revers, lee-boicUne. Branche de 
— , cringle. AUer k\&—,to sail close 
to the wiiul • courir la — , to run the 
<Kmtlet. 

BOULINER [bou-H-n«] V. a. (aar.) to 
.VmI (a sail) windAjoard. 

- les voiles, to haul into the wind. 
BOULINER, V. n. (nav.) to sail close 

X' the wind. 

BOULINGRIN [bon-lin-gnn] n. m. 
loAJon ; grass-plot ; green sward. 

BOULINIER [bou-U-ni«] n. m. + plyer. 

Bon — , good = ; manvais — , bad = ; 
leeward ship. 

BOULOIR [bou-ioar] n, ni.(ma8.) lorry. 

BOULON [bou-lon] n. m. (tech.) 1. 
boU; 2. pin. 

— a vis, screw-bolt Chasser un — , 
to drive a bolt. 

BOULONAIS, E [boa-io-n*, «] adj. of 
Boulogne. 

BOULONAIS, p. n. m. E, p. n. t na- 
tive of Boulogne. 

BOULONNER [boo-io-n«] v. n. (tech.) 

1. to bolt; 2. to pin. 

BOUQUER [bou.k«] v. a t 5 1. I to 
make submit; 2. § to compel; to force. 

BOUQUER, V. n. t ^ (of children or 
monkeys made to kiss a. th.) to kiss vn- 
fjoillingly ; 2. to submit; to truckle. 

BOUQUET [bou-kJl n. m. 1. bvm^sh ; 

2. nosegay; bunch of flowers; S. § ode, 
son/ret (on a birth-day or saint's day) ; 4 
$ presmtt (on a birth-day or saint's day) ; 
5. (of flowers, grass, or trees) tuft; 6. (of 
frnit not in bunches) cluster ; 7. (of hair) 



tuft; 8. (of precious stones) bouqtiet; 
(of straw) toisp; 10. (of trees) cluster; 
11. (of wine) bouquet; 12. (of feathers) 
plums; 13. (fire- works) bouquet; gi- 
rao'^^; 14 — s, (pi.) (vet.) scab; scurf 
'Qixn the snout of she«p). 

t. T/u — d« ceriies, a bunch of eherries. 

— parfalt, (Fi senses) (hot) sweet- 
wUliam. En — , (F. senses) tufted. 
Avoir — , to be racy ; diviser, ordonner, 
r6imrtir en — , ( F senses) to tuft ; Her 
en—, (F senses) to bunch; orner de 
—9, ( F senses) to tuft ; r^server q. ch. 
pour le bouquet, to reserve, to keep a. 
U>..for the last; 8em6 de — s, ( F senses) 
tufted. 

BOUQUET! EB [boti-k-ti«] n. va.flowr 
^r-ease. 

BOUQUETi:fcBE [bou-k-UJ rl n. t 



flower-girl, flower-woman (that sells 
nosegays). 

BOUQUETIN [bou-k-tin] n. m. (mam.) 
vdld goat. 

BOUQUIN [bou-kin] n. m. 1. old he- 
goat; 2. buck-hare ; 8. ^ (b. s.) old-book. 

Vieux — , old book. 

BOUQUINER [bou-ki-n«] V. n. 1. (of 
hares) to cover ; 2. 1 to hmil after old 
books ; 8. 5 to read old books. 

BOUQUINERIE [bou-ki-n-ri] n. f. 1 1 

1. heo/p of old books; 2. old-book trade. 
BOUQUINEUR [bou-ki-neur] n. m. 1 

JuuMter after old books. 

BOUQUINISTE [boa-ki-iii»-t] n. m. 
dealer in old books. 

BOUBACAN [bou-rs-kan] n. m. bar- 
racan. 

BOURBE [bonr-b] n. t mire, mud (of 
the country, or of the bottom of stagnant 
water). 

8'enfoncer dans la — , to mire. 

BOURBEU-X, 8E [bour-beu, ei-z] vV 
miry ; muddy ; spuishy. 

Non — , ( V. senses) unmiry. Dep6. 
— , {min.) peat ; ^ ^tat-moss. 

BOURBIER [boui bifi] n. m. 1. slough; 

2. mire; miid. 

8'engager dans le — ,1. to get into the 
slough ; to stick in the mire ; se mettre 
dans un — §, to get into difficulty, 
trouble ; to get o.'s self into a scrape ; 
tomber dans le — , to fall into the mire. 

BOURBILLON [bour-bi-isn*] n. m. 
(med.) (of an abscess) core. 

BOURBONISTE [bour-bo-nU-t] a4j. 
(Fr. hist) Bourbonist 

BOURBONISTE, p. n. m. C (Fr. hist) 
Bourbonist ; partisan of the Bourbons. 

BOURCER [bour-t«] V. a. (nav.) to 
brail ; to dew up. 

BOURCETTE. n. f. F Mache. 

BOURDAINE, BOURDilNE, 

B0URGJ:NE [bour-d4-n, bour-j^-n] n. £ 

(bot) black-berry bearing alder ; ber- 
ry-bearing buck-thorn. 

Bourdaine blanche, mMily-tree ; ^ 
way-faring-tree. 

BOURDALOU [bour-da-lou] O. m. 1. 
hat-band ; 2. c/upinber utensil, pot (of 
oblong shape). 

BOURDE [bour-d] n. C ^fih (untruth); 
-J- bouncer ; -j- wKapper ; -r- plumper. 

Donner une — i q. u., to tell a. o. a 
=. Donneur de — , -f- bouncer. 

BOURDi:NE [bour-dVn] n. f. F BouR- 

DAINB. 

BOURDER [bour^«] V. n. 1 to Jib; -4- 
to tell bouncers (untruths), whoppers. 

BOURDEUR [bour-deur] n. m. ^flb- 
ber; -i- bouncer. 

BOURDILLON [bour.dl-i«n*] n. m. 
oak stave-board. 

BOURDON [boar-d«n] n. m. walking 
staff; staff. 

— de pelerin, pilgrim's staff. 
BOURDON, n. m. 1. great bM; ^ 

torn bell; 2. (ent) drone; drone-fly; 
dorr-beetle; dorr; dorrer; humble- 
bee; 8. (mus.) drone; 4 (mus.) (of or- 
gans) bourdon; double diapason; 5. 
(print) out. 

Faux — , (mns.) faux bourdon. — de 
Saint-Jacques, (hot) rose-mallows. Jeu 
de — , (mus.) base of an organ. 

BOURDONNANT, E [bour-do-nan, t] 
adj. 1. (of birds) humming; 2. (of in- 
sects) hvmvming ; blitzing. 

BOURDONNEMENT [boar-do-n-min] 
n. m. 1. II § (action) humming ; buzeitig ; 
2. 1 § hiim,; buzz; btiezing noise; 8. 
(in the ears) tinkling; tingling; sing- 
ing ; noise. 

BOURDONNER [bonr-do-n*] V. n. 1. 
(of birds) to hum ; 2. (of insects) to httm ; 
to buzz ; 8. § (th.) to hum ; to buzz ; 4 
(of drones) to drone; 5. (of tops) to 
hum. 

— lentement, ( F senses) to drone out. 
Chose, personne qui bourdonne, hiwi- 
mer; buzzer. 

BOURDONNER, v. a. 1 1. II to hum; 
2. to torment ; to pester ; |ag~ to bother, 

2. — q. ch. a q. u., tu tormeut, to pester a. «. 

BOURDONNET [bour-do-ni] n. m. 

(surg.) dossil. 

BOURDONNEUB [bonr-do-nefir] adj. 



1. (of birds) humming; 2. (of InsectB) 
humming ; buzzing. 

BOURDONNEUB, n. m. 1. (of birda) 
hummer ; 2. (of insects) hwnvmer ; 
buzzer ; 3. humming-bird. 

BOURG [bourk] n. m. market-town. 

BOURGADE [bour-ga^i] n. f. 1. smali 
market-tovm; 2. long, straggling 9J2- 
lage. 

BOURGENE, n. £ F Bouedaiiti. 

BOURGEOIS [bour-joaj n. m. E [oo-.] 
n. f. 1. citizen; % f oitisens ; 3. com- 
moner (not a nobleman); 4 oiviUan 
(not a soldier) ; 6. master; mistress ; 8, 
(law) burgess; 7. (com. nav.) ship- 
owner; ovmer. 

1 . Un — de Paris, a citizen of Parit. 5. Cea 

ouvriera furent cong^dies par leur — , these work- 
men were discharged by their master. 

Bon — , bonne — e, 1. good citizen; 2. 
(b. s.) cit; petit — , 1. h/umble oU/izer.i; 

2. (b. s.) mean citizen. 
BOURGEOIS, E, adj. 1. citizen-like; 

2. homely ; 8. private (of private indi- 
viduals) ; 4 plain (fit for families) ; 
family ; household ; 5. (b. s.) common ; 
vulgar. 

Mani^res — es, manners of a eit, citi- 
zen. 

BOURGEOISEMENT [bour-joa-^man] 
adv. 1. in a eUizen-Hke manner; 2. 
homely ; in a homely manner, way ; 8. 
as a private individual. 

BOURGEOISIE [bour-joa-zl] n. C 1. 
citizenship ; 2. dtisens ; commonalty ; 
8. (po\.)freedom of the city. 

Admission au droit de — , enfranchise- 
m,ent; droit de — , 1. burghership ; 2. 
freedom of the city. Conferer les droita 
de — 4, to enfranchise; obtenir le droit 
de — , to take out o's freedom. 

BOURGEON [bour-jon] n. m. 1. (agr.) 
taier; 2. (hot) bud; 3. (hot) gem; 4. 
pimple (on the face); 5. (of vinw) 
sJioot 

— 8 charnus, (med.) proud flesh; — 
florif6re, d fleur, (bot) flower-bud ; — 
fructifure, h fruit, (hot.) flower-bud. — ii 
bois, a fbnilles, (bot) gem ; — d'ivrogne, 
(jest) grog-blossom. Pousser des — e, io 
put forth buds, gems, s/toots. 

B6URGE0NNANT, E [bour-jo-nan, i} 
adj. budding. 

B0URGE0NN:6, E [bour.jo-n«] adj. 
(of the face, forehead, nose) pimpled. 

BOURGEONNEMENT [bonr-jo-n-aiAn] 
n. m. (bot) budding ; gemmation. 

BOURGEONNER [bour-jo-n«] V. n. 1. 
(agr.) to tiller (send forth stems from the 
root); 2. (bot) to bud. 

BOURGEONNIER [b*ur-jo-Ei«] n. m. 
(om.) bulMnch. 

BOURGMESTRE [bourg-mis-tr] n. m. 



BOURGOGNE (LA) [ia-bour-go-gn«] a 
f (geog.) Burgundy. 

Vin de — , = ; = wine. 

BOURGOGNE [bour-go-gn*] n. iii. 
Burgundy; Burgundy-wine. 

B0URGU:6PINE [bour-gh6-pi-n] n. £ 
(bot) purging thorn. 

BOURGUIGNON, NE [bour-ghl-gndn, 

o-n*] adj. Burgundian. 

BOURGUIGNON, n. m. NE, n. 
Burgim,dian. 

BOURLET [bonr-14] n. m. F Bouerb- 

LET. 

BOURN OUS I boiir-nou.] F BORNOUSBS. 

BOURRACHE [bou-ra-sh] n, £ (bot) 
iorage, 

BOURRADE [bou-ra-d] n. £ 1. (huntj 
snapping ; 2 blow with the butt-end qf 
a musket. 

B0URRA8 [bou-rS] n. m. F BiniK. 

BOURRASQUE [bou-ras-kl n. f 1. 
squall of wind; squall; 2. § more vio 
lent attack (of a disease') ; 8. § vexation 
(sudden and unforeseen) ; 4 ^parovpysn^ 
Jit of anger ; 5. %fit of ill-humor. 

BOURRE [bou-r] n. £ 1. I hair (of 
beasts) ; 2. B jhck ; 8. § trash ; trutrvp- 
ery; stuff; 4 (of fire-arms) wad; wcuL 
d/ing; 5. (hort.) vine-hud. 

— lanice, de laine, flock ofwod; — 
tontisse, (cloth.) ./?oc*; — de 8ole,^io« 
vUk; lit de —,flock-beel. 

BOURRfi, E [bou.i«2 juy. atuffed. 

Non — , unstuffed, 

78 



[)T] 



BOU 



BOD 



aniAi; & mAle; e fee; efeve; ^f&te; rfje; i\\\ C tie; o mol; b mole; 5 mort; mbuc; Misfire; «ntjonr; 



BOURREAD [bou-r6] n. m. 1. 1 eo-sou- 
Koner ; Iieadmnan ; 2. || executioner ; ^ 
hangman; ^^1^ Jack ketch ; 8. § cr^iel 
ureich ; brute ; 4. § tormenter. 

— d'argent, spendthrift £tre le — de 
•oi-mfenie, to take no care of one's 
health, strength ; livrer au — , to deliver 
O'Ser to tlce ea-ecutioner. 

BOUEEi:E [bou-rt] n. t. 1. /miaUfag- 
•*,• 2. (dance) boree; 8. (nius.) baree 

" BOURRELER [bon-r-W] V. a. § to 
goad ; to sting ; to torture ; to torment. 

BocKBELE, E, pa. p. ( V. senses) (of the 
oonscience) goaded ; gangrened. 

BOUERELERIE [bour-1-rl] n. £ har- 
netts-m-aking (for cart-horses). 

BOUREELET [bour-lfe] BOURLET, 
n. m. 1. pad; 2. cushion (round, with a 
hole in the middle) ; 3. pad (put around 
windows and doors); 4. (for children) 
"bourrelet" (pad put round children's 
h eads ) ; 6. round swelling (on trees) ; 6. 
^~ swelling (on tW loins) ; 7. (tech.) 
packing, 

BOURRELIER [bou-r-li«] n. m. 1. har- 
ness-maker ; 2. (for cari-horses) saddle- 
maker. 

BOURRER rbou-r«] V. a. 1 (de, vAih) 1. 
f to «<w^(with hair or wool) ; 2. [ to u:ad ; 
8. B to crwm ; 4 I § (b. s.) to stuff in ; to 
gtuff up; 5. II to ram (fire-arms) ; 6. to 
stuff (cause to eat) ; to cram. ; 7. § to 
push (with the butt-end of a musket) ; 
8. S to strike, to beat; 9. § to abuse ; to 
tawnt. 

8e ■botterer, pr. v. 1. H (de, loith) to 
eram, o.'s self; to stuff o.'s self; 2. § to 
beat each other; 3. § to abuse each 
other. 

BOURRER, V. n. (of horses) to start; 
to bolt 

BOURRICHE [bou-ri-Bh] n. C basket 
(tor game). 

BOURRIQUE [bon-ri-k] n. f. 1. she- 
aas; ^jermy ass; 2. § (pers.) ass; ig- 
'wroMt, stupid ass. 

BOURRIQUET [bou-ri-xJ] n. m. 1. 
vowig ass ; 2. little ass ; 3. (mas.) h^and- 
oorroio ; 4. (tech.) Tiorse. 

BOURRIR [bou-rir] V. n. (of the part- 
ridge) to whA/r. 

BOURKOIR [bou-roar] n. m. (tech.) 
t'vmping-bar. 

BOURRU, E [bou-ni] adj. 1. craMed; 
testy ; pettish ; peevish; waspish ; surly; 
2. (of wine) unfermented. 

Moine — , 1. crabbed monk, friar ; 2. 
bugbear (phantom). 

BOURSE [bour-s] n. f. 1. purse (mo- 
ney-bag) ; 2. purse ; m,oney ; pocket ; 8. 
(for the hair) bag ; 4 (Turkish money) 
purse; 5. (of saddles) saddle-bag; 6. 
(of schools) scholarship ; foundation, 
king\ queen's scholarship; 7. (anat) 
sac ; if cod ; 8. (bot) volva ; t wrap- 
per ; 9. (com.) exchange (edifice) ; 
change; 10. (hunt.) purse-net ; bag-net; 
11. (mam.) powih ; 12. (surg.) s^tspen- 
tory bandage ; 13. (univ.) ea-hibition. 

— d^gamie, 16g6re, empty, Idght purse; 
— bien gamie, weU-Uned =^ ; — loiirde, 
heavy = ; — mu(juen8e, sebac^e, (anat) 
vesicular, synovial sac ; — a cheveux, 
hair-bag ; — de filet, net-work = ; — 
pour les fends publics, (com.) stock-eoi- 
change ; — a pasteur, (bot) cassweed ; 
^ sh^herd^s purse, pouch. Bulletin de 
— , (com.) course ofetechange; coupeur 
de — , cut-^= ; fllet en — , =-net. La — ! 
deliver ! la — ou la vie I your money or 
yov/r life! A — , (mam.) pouched ; k la 
—, (coin.) on change ; aprte la — , (com.) 
<;/ter duinge ; avant la — , (com.) before 
ohang«. AUer d la — , (com.) to go on 
chamge ; n'avoir, ne faire quune — , ( V. 
llalre -- commune); couper une — , to 
oick a pocket ; conper la — ^ q. u., 1. 1 
13 cut a. o.''s purse ; 2. 1 to pick) a. o.''s 
pocket; 8. § to get money out of a. o. ; 
Mnander la — , la — ou la vie, to de- 
mand o.'s money or o.'s Ufe; faire — 
commune, to keep a common = ; fermer 
sa — , to put up, to tie up o.'s = ; se 
Jaisser couper la — §, to let a. o. put his 
hand in o.'s pocket; ne pas laisser voir 
ic fond do sa — , not to let people know 
•hf> ttUite of one's affairs ; loger le diable 



dans sa — , to liave an empty = ; mana- 
ger la — de q. u., to spare a. o.'s pocket; 
mettre dans une — , to putinto a purse ; 
to purse ; to purse v/p ; mettre en — , to 
put into o.'s = ; topurse; topurseup ; 
mettre la main a la — , to put o.'s hcmd 
into o.'s :=: ; tenir la — , les cordons de la 
— , to Jiovd tlie ■=:z-strings ; tirer sa — , 
to pull out o.'s =:. Sans — dclier, witli- 
out any outlay ; witJwut spending a 
farthing. 

BOURSETTE [bour-i^-t] n. t (bot) 
cassueed ; ^ shepherd's purse, pouch. 

BOURSICAUT [bour-tiitj a. ncL 1 1. 
small purse ; 2. savings. 

Se faire un — , to lay by a trifle. 

BOURSIER [bour-.i«] n.vii.\.\ purse- 
maker; 2. {se,\ioo\&) foundatAon, king's, 
queen's scholar ; scholar on the estab- 
lisfiment ; 3. (univ.) exhibitioner. 

fitre — ,to be a=^; to be on tlie foun- 
dation. 

BOURSILLER [bour-u-i«*] v. n. 1 to 
club together. 

BOURSON [\>onT-»6ii]iLm.-fi. pocket; 
fob ; 2. purse. 

BOURSOUFLAGE [ bour-sou-fla-j ] n. 
m. (liter.) bombast; fustian. 

BOURSOUFLlfc, E [bour-.ou-fl«] adj. 1. 
swollen; 2. B bloated; puffed up; S. § 
(of language, style) iiyflated; turgid; 
bombastic ; ^ puffy. 

ifccrivain — , bombastic writer; fm- 
tianiat Parler un langage — , to talk 
fustian. 

BOUESOUFLEE [bour-.on-fl«] v. a. B 
1. to s^cell ; 2. to bloat ; to puff up. 

BOUESOUFLURE [bour-.ou-flu-r] n. f. 

1. B swelling ; 2. | bloatedness ; 8. § (of 
language, style) turgidness ; twgidity; 
bombast; fustian. 

Bors, ind. pres. Ist, 2d sing. ; Impera. 
2d sing, of Bouillir. 

BOUSAGE [bou-M-j] n. m. (a. & m.) 
dunging. ' 

BOUSCUIiER' [bou«-ku-i«] V. a. If 1. to 
turn (a. th.) topsy-turvy; 2. to husite- 
(a. o.) ; 8. to elbow (a. o.) out. 

BOUSE [bou-z] n. f. dung (of oxen). 

— de vache, coio-dung. 

BOUSILLAGE [bou-zi-ia-j*] n. m. 1. 
(build.) mud ; 2. (mas.) mud-wall build- 
ing ; -3. § botch. 

Mur de — , (mas.) mud-tcaU. A mur 
de — , (mas.) mud-walled. 

BOUSILLER [bou-zi-ife*] V. n. (build.) 
to build with mnid. 

BOUSILLER, V. a. § to botch; to 
bungle over ; to slubber. 

BOUSILLEU-R [bou-zi-ienr*] n. m. SE 
[eu-z] n. f 1. (mas.) mud-waM builder ; 

2. § botcher; bungler. 

BOUSIN [bou-zin] n. m. 1. san.dvent 
(soft surface of freestone) ; 2. I^~ noise ; 
clamor. 

BOUSSOIR, n. m. V. Bossoik. 

BOUSSOLE [bou-so-l] n. £ 1. man- 
ner's, sea compass; compass; mari- 
ner's needle; box and needle; 2. § 
guide; director; 3. (of land-measurers) 
compass ; land-compass ; 4 (astr.) com,- 
pass ; 5. (nav.) compass. 

B0USTR0PH:6D0N rbous-tro-K-don] 

n. m. (Gr. ant) boustrophedon (wTiting 
from right to left and fi-om left to riglit). 
BOUT [bou] n. m. 1. I § end ; ertre- 
mity; 2. J %; 8. B § bit; litUe bit; 4 
(of the breast) nipple; 5. (of foils) Up; 
button; 6. (of guns) m,uezle; 7. (of soles 
of shoes) piece ; 8. (of sticks, parasols, 
nn\bTe\\as)ferrule ; 9. (ptwings) pinion; 
10. t (nav.) (of the ship) bow ; 11. (nav.) 
(of ropes) fag-end; fall; 12. (tech.) 
end-piece. 

2. Im — de la laiisrue ou de I'oreille, ike tip of 
the tongue or the ear. 3. Un — de rulian ou de 
cordc, a bit of ribbon or ttring ; un — d'homme, a 
bit '/ o man. 

Bas — , lower end;>nn bon — de 
temps, a good bit of time; gros — , 
large =; bant — , v/pper =; petit — , 
tip ; de petits — 8. odds and =«; un pe- 
tit — de, a Mttte bit of; petit — d'hom- 
me, Uttle bit of a man; — s rim^s, jeu 
des —8 rlm^s, crambo; — saigneux, 
(butch.) 1. scrag ; 2. crag. — de bougie, 
cnandelle, candle-end ; — k — ^, 1. = to 
= ; 2. endwise. — de dfvant, 1. fore- 



quarters; 2. (man.)^tT«-A<v»d ; le — di 
monde, 1. B tlie — of the world; i.%fht 
utmost; — de porte, (carp.) top-piece. 
A — , Liatan = ; 2. § exhausted; 8. § 
(pers.) at the end of o.'s tether ; i — 
portant, 1. close to the muzzle ; 2. »m*9- 
zle to muzzle ; au — \e—,let the thirty 
last as it may ; au — de Tann* faut le 
drap, tJtere is an =z to every thing ; wi 

— du monde, 1. § to tfts~<^ the world; 
2.%^ out of the world (at a great dis- 
tance) ; k tout — de champ, every vtc" 
ment, instant ; ^ at every turn ; au — 
dn (^mpte, after all; considering 
every thing ; de — en — , 1. ifrom = to 
= ; 2. (nav.) from stem to stem ; d'un 

— k I'autre, l.from =z to=; from one 
= to the other ; 2. throughout ; through 
and through; S.from side to side; 
jusqu'au — , 1. to aw =; to the =; 2. 8 
out (to t;ie end). Aller jusquau — , 1. | 
% to go on to t/ie end; 2. % to go to the 
whole length, to the utmost; 8. § (b. s.) 
to rough it out; avoir, tenir le bon — 
par devers soi %, to be the right side of 
the hedge ; n'avolr q. ch. que par le bon 
— , not to get a. th. vMhout paying weU 
for it ; 6tre a — *[ §, 1: to 5e at the end 
of o.'s tether; 2. to he out of patience ; 
gamir le — de, to tip ; joindre les deas 
— 6, joindre les deux — s de Tannee. to 
make the two =smeet; to make both 
=« meet; metbe i — , to tionplus; to 
put to a nonplus ; inordre le — de, to 
bite off; to nip off; pinoer le — de, to 
nip tff; poser — ft — , to lay endwise; 
pousser a — , 1. to drive to extremities;, 
2. to put out of patience ; 3. to nonplus ; 
to put to a nonplus ; 4. to tax home ; 
prendre q. ch. par le bon — , to set the 
right way about a. Vt. ; ne pas savoit 
par quel — prendre q. u., not to know 
Iww to proceed with a. o. ; venir k — 
de, 1. to succeed in ; to work out ; ^ to 
manage in Vie end (to); to m,anag9 
(to); 2. to wade through; ^ to w»aLs 
out ; 3. to get the better of. Don); on uc 
vient pas k — , itnmanaged. 

Syn. — Bout, kxtr6mit4, fin. Bnut and fin 
may both be translated by the word end; IxAit 
meaning end as opposed to another end, and fin 
end BA opposed to the beginning. Tha 



(exiremiti/) of the kingdom ; the fin (end) ot 
life. We go from one A</u« (end) of a thing to th« 
other; we penetrate from its extriniites (extremi- 
tiea) to its centre ; we follow it from ' " 
to ittfin (end.) 

BOUTADE [bou-ta-d] n. £ 1. whim; 
freak ; 2. sally (of wit). 

Par — , by jits, starts, snatches; by 
fits a/nd starts. 

BOUTARGUE, BOTARGUE [boo- 
tar-g, bo-tar-g] n. £ botargo. 

BOUT-DEIIORS [bou-de-or] n. m., pL 
— , (nav. arch.) boom. 

BOUT:^, E [ bou-t6 ] adj. (man.) 
straight-legged. 

BOUTE-EN-TRAIN [bou-t-an-trinl B. 

m., pi. — , 1. B breeding horse ; 2. B stng- 
ing bird that excites others to sing; 8. 
§ stirrer ; life and soul (of a company^ 

BOUTE-FEU [bou-t-feu] n. m., pi. — , 
1. (artil.) Unstock ; 2. {axi\\.)field-staff; 
8. § (pers.) incendiary ; f re-brand. 

B0UTE-H0R8 [bon-t-hor] n. m., pi. — , 

1. " boute-liors" (a game) : 2. (nav.) boom, 
Jouer au — ^,1. Ito plai/ <itboute-hors, 

2. § to endeavor to supplant each othtir. 
BOUTEILLE [bou-ti-i*] n. £1. bottU; 

2. bottle; bottle-fuU; 8. bottle-case; 4 
+ bubble, 

— de cuir, leathern, bottle; — de jfrda 
«to«e-=; la — a Tencre, 1. B the ink- 
bottle; 2. § a thing impossible to bt 
seen through : — de Leyde, (electr.) elec- 
trical jar, phial; Leyden jar, phiai. 
Ami de — , =^-frien d :& m\ de la — , a 
friend to the ==; ^^" pot-man; ca- 
marade de — , ^-companion ; masamiv 
de — s, ■=.-house . mise en — , bottling ; 
ouvrier qui fait les — s, z=:-mnker • 
planchei— f' -rack. k\a,—,byu%« 
= ; en — , bottled. N'avoir rien vn qut 
par le trou d'une — , to have »een no- 
thing of the world ; boire — ,to drink a 
= ; boucher une — , to cork a — ; de- 
boucher une — , to uncork a — 6in 



BRA 



BRA 



OMjofite; eujeu; «iijeune; edpeur; a7(.p8u: mpin; onhca; unhixa; •!! liq. 



liq. 



lans la — . 1. 1 to be in t?ie=z; 2. ^ to be 
hi the plot, secret ; feler une — , faire 
hnuter une — , faire sauter le bouchon 
d'une — , to c.rm-k a = ; mettxe en — , to 
bottle ; to bottle off; payer — kq.n.,to 
treat a. o. with a ^= ; vider ^ine — , 1. to 
empty a=; 2. to drink out a =. 
BOUTKILLEK [bou-ti-ie*] n. m. V. 

aODTILLlEK. 

BOUTEIIXES [bou-ti-i*] n. £ (pi.) 
{^*»v.) roviul-Ziouse. 

BOUTEli [bou-w] V. a. i to put. 

BOUTEK, V. n. (of wine) to get thick. 

BOUTEliOLLE [bou-t-ro-l] n. f. (mil.) 
i,j( a scabbard) chape ; crampit. 

8an8 — , without a = ; chapeless. 

BOUTE-SELLE [bou-t-«J.-l] n. in., pi. 
— , (mil.) idgnal to saddle. 

Sonner le — , to give the signal to 
toddle. 

BOUTE-TOUT-CUIRB [bou-t-tou- 
kni-r] n. in., pi. — , spendthrift. 

BOUTILLlEli [bou-ti-i^*] n. m.i cup- 
bearer. 

Grand — , grand = ; =. 

BOUTIQUE [bou-ti-k] n. f. 1. slwp,; 2. 
goods in u shop : 8. implements, tools 
(of a mechanic) ; 4. § work ; doing ; 5.' 
(of fairs; sta^uding ; 6. (tish.) well-boat. 

Commis de — , shop-man ; jeune com- 
mis de — , =--boy ; demoiselle, tille de 
— , =-girl; femme de —,=^-woman; 
garfon de — , =^-bot/. Fermer — , la — , 
to shut up = ; garder une — , to atterid 
a = ; mettre q. u. en — , to set up a. o. 
in business ; se mettre en — , ouviir — , 
lever — , to begin, business ; to set up ; 
to open shop ; ouvrir la — , to open = : 
partir, sortir, venir de la — de q. u., ( V. 
senses) § to be of a. o.' a. work, dinng ; 
renverser la boutique -r-, to upset tlue 
apple-cart ; tenir — , to keep a :=. 

BOUTIQU-IER [bou.ti-ki«] n. m. lilRE 
[i*-r] n. £ 1. slwp-keeper; 2. + (l>. 8.) 



m. (hunt) rooting- 



y^etiij Hhpp-keeper. 
BOUtlS [bou-li] 1 

BOUTISSE [bou-ti-.] n. C (mas.) 
lictider ; bond-stone. 

BOUTOIK [bou-ioar] n. m. 1. snout (of 
tt wild boar); 2. (build.) buttress; 8. 
(Ikr.) butteris; purer. 

Coup de — §, cross, disagreeable cm- 
twer. 

BOUTON [bou-ton] n. m. 1. (of flowers) 
bu,tt<m; 2. (of shrubs, trees) bud; 8. 
pimple ; 4 button ; 5. shirt-stud ; stud : 
6. *• § stud (ornament) ; 7. (of the breast) 
nipple ; 8. (of bolts, doors, locks) knob ; 
f>. (of doors) handle ; 10. (artil.) button; 
11. (bot) bud ; gem ; button; 12. (cliem.) 
button ; 13. — s, (pi.) (med.) carbwncled 
face ; thrush ; 14. (man.) button. 

— fsk^onne, figured button ; — fixe (of 
doors) knob ; — uni, plain =. — a cla- 
vette, (tech.) collar-, cotter-pin ; — de 
devant, (of coats) breast = ; — dor, 1. 
gold =; 2. (bot.) crow-foot; uprigU 
crow-foot; golden cup; ^butter-cup; 
T king-cup ; — a queue, sluink = ; — 
de sein, nipple. Garniture de —8, set of 
=s ; queue de — , =-shank. Dans son 
— , (bot.) in the bud; en — , (bot.) in 
btid. Passer un — dans, to put a =: in ; 
•errer le — a q. u. §, to urge a. o. 

BOUTONNEMENT [bou-to-n-n-an] n. 
an. (bot.) budding; buttoning. 

BOUTONNEK [bou-to-n*] /. n. to bud; 
to button. 

BOUTONNER, v. a. 1. to button; 2. 
to button up. 

BouTONNE, K, pa. p. 1. buttoned; 2. 
buttwied up ; 3. § reserved ; close ; 4. 
(cf i,he nose) pimpled; 5. (surg. instr.) 
probe-pointed. 

Clseaux — «, (surg.) probe-soissors. — 
toBqu'a la gorge, jusqu'au menton §, very 
r«Kerved, dose. 

8b BonTONNER, pr. V. to button o.'« 
•iothes. 

BOUTONNERIE [ bou-to-n-ri ] n. £ 
1 (com.) button-trade; 2. buttons; 
i. button-store; button-establislimsnt; 
Vumm-factory. 

BOUTONNET [bou-w nj] n. i j. t lit- 



BOUTONNIEl 



i-ni«] n. m. bitt- 



BOUTONNIfiRE j:bou.to-ni6-r] n. £ 1. 
I button-hole ; 2. § xoide wound. 

— fermoe, false =:. Faire une — k q. 
v., to give a. o. a wide wound. 

BOUTS-RIMliS [bou-ri-m^] n. m. (pi.) 
bouts-rimes (rhymes to be filled up). 

BOUTURE [bou-tu-r] n. £ (hort.) cut- 
ting; slip. 

BOUVARD [bou-var] n. m. t (coin.) 
hammer. 

BOUVERIE [bou-v-ri] n. £ ox-staU. 

BOUVET [bou-v^] n. m. (tech.) groov- 
ing-plane. 

— a deux pieces, k rapprofondir, 
plough. 

BOUV-IER [bou-vi«] n. m. li:RE [14-r] 
n. £ neat herd ; ox-driver. 

BOU VILLON [bou-«-i6n*] n. m.(mam.) 
young bullock. 

BOUVKEUIL [bou-vreui*] n. m. (orn.) 
bullfinch; coal-hood. 

BOUVREUX [bou-vreu] n. m. FI Boi;- 

VREUIL. 

BOVINE [bo-vi-n] adj. £ bovine. 

Betes — «, cattle of the bovine race ; 
oxen ; race — , bovine race ; cow-fond- 
ly ; cmc-kind. ; bull family. 

BOWL [boi] V. Bou 

BOXER [bok-ss] V. n. to box. 

BOXER (SK) [.6-bok-.«] pr. v. to 
boa: 

BOXEUR [bok-»enr] n. m. boxer. 

Combat de — s, boiring m^atch. 

BOYARD [bo-iar] n. m. boyar. 

BOYAU [boa-ift] n. m. 1. gut; 2. lo7ig 
and narrow place ; 8. (fort.) (of trench- 
es) branch; 4. (hydr.) hose (leathern 
pipe). 

Corde k, de — , cat-gut; descente de 
— X, rupture. Avoir toujours six aunes 
de — X vides, to be always hungry ; ra- 
cier le — , to scrape. 

BOYAUDERIE [boa i6-d-ri] n. £ gut- 
work. 

BOYAUDIER [boa-i6-di«] n. m. gut- 
worker. 

BRABANgON, NE [bra-ban-ton, «>-n] 
a<li. of Brabant. 

BRABANgON, p. n. m. NE, p. n. £ 
nati/ce of Brabant 

BRACELET [bra-s-U] n. m. bracelet ; 
armlet. 

BRACHIAL, E [bra-ki-al] adj. (anat) 
brachial. 

BRACHICATALECTIQITE [bra-ki- 
ka-ta-l^k-U-k] (anc. vers.) brachycatalec- 
tic. 

BRACHIONCOSE [br».ki.6n-k«-i] n. £ 
(med.) tumor on the arm,. 

BRAOHIOTOMIE [bra-ki-o-to-mi] n. £ 
(surg.) amputation oftlie arm. 

BRACHYPN^E [bra-kip-n#] n. £ 
(med.) brachypnt»a. 

BRACONNAGE [bra-ko-na-j] n. m. 
poaching. 

BRACONNEE [bra-ko-n«] y. &. to 
poach. 

BRACONNIER [bra-ko-ni«] n. m. 
poacher. 

BRACTfiE [brak-wl n. £ (bot) bract 

Muni de — s, (bot) bracteate. 

BRACTftIFi;RE [brak-w-i-ft-r] adi 
(bot) bracteate. 

BRADYPEP8IE [bra-di-pip-si] n. £ 
(med.) sloto, imperfect digestion. 

BRAGUE [bra-g^ a f (nav.) breech- 
ing. 

BRAGUETTE [bra-gh4-t] n.t V. Bra- 

TETTK. 

BRAHMANE, BRAME [bra-ma-n, 



a-m], 

BR^ 



AMINE [bra-mi-n] n. m. Bramin. 

BRAHMANIQUE [bra-ma-ni-k] a<y. 
Branvinical. 

BRAHMANISME [bra-ma-ni.-m] n. m. 
Braminism. 

BRA I [brfe] n. m. reMn; rosin. 

— gras, sheep-smearing pitch ; — sec, 
colophony ; black, common rosin. 

BRAIE fbrJ] n. £ 1. '(napkin ; clout ; 
2. —6, {p\.ybre,eche8 ; 8. — e, (pL) draw- 
ers ; 4 (nav.) coat. ' 

Armer de — s, (nav.) to co at; en sor- 
tir, sen tirer les — s nettes |^*~, to get 
off unharmed, clear. 

Braiknt, ind. pres. 3d \)\. of Br aire. 

BRAILLARD. E [brSiar, d*] adj. 1. 
brawling; 2. s<jualhng 



BRAILLARD, n. m. E, n. £ 1. braui 
er ; 2. squatter. 

BRAILLER [bra-i6*] v. n. 1. to bratd, 
to brawl out; 2. to squall; to squaU 
aut. 

En braillant brawlingly. Abattre i 
force de — , 1. to brmcl doioa ; % U 
squall doum. 

BRAILLEU-E, SE [bra-iefir, »u-i*] a^ 

1. brawling ; 2. squalling. 

BRAILLEU-E, n. m. SE, n. £ 1. brawl- 
er ; 2. iqualler. 

BRAIMENT [brt-man] n. m. braying; 

Braira, ind. fut 8d sing, of Bbaibk. 

JJrairait, cond. 8d sing. 

BRAIRE [brJ-r] V. n. irr. de£ (iuA 
pres. iL bkait ; ils bkaibni ; fut u. 
braira) to bray. 

— bien haut, to bray out, Persoim* 
qui brait, brayer. 

[Brairk is used only in the inf., the 3d pers. nt 
th« ind. pres. and fut., and the 3d pers. of th» 
cond.] 

BRAISE [br4-«] n. £ 1. embert ; 2l 
wood,-ci,nders, 

— Vive, live embers. 

BRAISER [brA-»«] y.a,to bake (in au 
oven heated by embers). 

BRAISIER [brJ-ii«] n. m. braaie* 
(chavcoal-pan). 

BRAISliiRE [bri.zii-r] n. £ ovm 
(heated by embers). 

Brait. ind. pres. 8d sing, of Brairb. 

BRAME [bra-m] n. m. V. Brahmakk. 

BRAM:feMENT [bra-m6-man] n. m. 
(hunt) hell/ing. 

BRAMER [bra-m6] V. n. (hunt) to bell. 

BRAMINE [bra-mi-n] n. m. V. Bkah- 

MANE. 

BRAMINE, n. £ Braminess. 
BRAN [bran] n. m. 1. -i- eascrern,«nt; 
dirt; 2. i dtist 

— de scle t, »uw-d/u9t — de... ® 
ajfffor...! 

BRANCARD [bran-kar] a DO. 1. I'tliF 

(carriage) ; 2. hatid-barrow ; 8. (of cart*) 
s/uift, thill; shafts, thills; 4 (of tour 
wheeled carriages) shaft ; 6. (tech ) gioa, 

Cheval de — , wheeler; thiZler; thiiff 
horse. 

BRANCHAGE [bran-iha-j] n. m. 
branches ; bouglis. 

BRANCH E [bran-sh] n. £ 1. \ branch 
(of a tree); bough; 2. \ ahver (l>ranch 
torn otf); 8. 1 brOMch (thing like tKs 
branch of a tree); 4. § branch (cart, di- 
vision) ; 5. § branch (of a family) ; (!. (ol 
a bit) branch ; 7. (of compa.sses) hrane/t, ; 
leg ; 8. (of rivers) branch ; 9. (of lad- 
ders) t'd^-rail ; 10. (of mines) brano/i,- 
thread-vein ; 11. (anat) branch ; 12 
(arch.) branch; 13. (bot.) grain; 14 
(geom.) (of hyperbolas) leg. 

— chifFonne, half wood branch ; — 
gourmande, proud =; jeune, petite — , 

1. ticig ; ^cattle ; 2. (in embroidery) 
sprig. Mfere — ,bo^igh. Arbre, arbrisseau 
qui poiisse des — s, branch^". A — s, 
branched; sans — , branchless. S'accro- 
cher k toutes les — s, 1. to cUng to every 
= ; 2. % to leame no means untried, fu» 
ston/' untumeA ; broder des — s sur, 
orner de — s brodoes, to sprig ; diviser ei» 
— 8, to divide into z=es ; to branch , lior 
avec de petites — s, to wattle; pousser 
des — s, 1. to branch; to branch out; 

2. (hunt) to branch ; sauter de — en — , 
1. II to hop from = to = : 2. § to das\ 
go from one thing to another. 

BRANCHER [brAn-.h6] v. a. 1 1 (A, «>) 
to tie up to a bough. 

Branohk, b, pa. p. 1. I perched .n a 
branch, bough ; 2. § (pers.) perched 

BRANCHER, v. n. (sport.) to troe, 

BRANCHE-URSINE [brin-sh-ur-* tl 
n. £, pi. Branches-ursines, 

BRANCURSINE [bran-kur-i-B] a t, 
pi. — 8, (bot) brank-u,rs%ne. 

— biitarde, cow-parsnip. 
BRANCHIAL, E[braa.shi-an«lJ ;ioL> 

of the giUs. 

Opercule — , (ich.) gill-cover: ottlJae 
— , (ich.) gill-openin;;. 

BRANCHIER [btan-shi«1 adj. m.OWa! 
that flies frorr^ branch to bra/n<ik. 

Oi'seau — , brancher. 

BRANCH IE8 [brin-shn n. t (pL) (toUJ 
branchia ; 1 gill, ^ giu» 





BllA 












BRA 








PRE 


amal 


; daxdle; 


rffee; 


efeve 


iftbe 


Sie 


ill; 


ille; omol, 


6 mole; 


6 mort ; 


u sue ; 


Msure; om jonr; 



Onverture des — , gill-opening. 

BEANCHIOSTiJGE [bran-.hi-o-.tJ-j] 
»m. (ich.) branchiostegous. 

Opercule — , (ich.) gill-cover. 

BEANCHU, E [bran-.hu] adj. (bot.) 
brcmehed ; fuU of hranclieH ; ra- 
mou». 

BRAJ^DAPE [brin-da-d] n. f. (culin.) 
" brandade''' ^^manner of cooking cod). 

BRANDE [bran-d] n. £ 1. lieath ; heath- 
er: 2. heath (place). 

BEANDEBOURG [bran-d-bour] n. m. 
ginnp. 

BEANDEBOUEG, p. n. m. (geog.) 
Srandenburg. 

BRANDEVIN [bran-d-vin] n. m. t 
wine-hrandy. 

BEANDILLEMENT [bran-di-i-man*] 

B. m. moinging ; shaking about. 

BRANDILLER [bran-di-i^*] v. a. to 
etinng ; to ghake about. 

PB BKANDiLLEK, pr. V. to svnng ; to 
thake about. 

BRANDILLOIRE [bran-di-ioa-r*] n. £ 

1. 1 swing ; 2. (agr.)/oo<, sioing plough. 
BRANDIR [bran-dirj V. a. 1. to bram^ 
dish; to flourish; 2. (carp.) to pin. 

BRANDON [bran-ddnj L. m. 1. wisp 

§/' stroAD Ughted ; 2. brand (stick) ; 3. 
brand (to mark seizure of crops). 

•— de discorde, cause of discord ; ^ 
mischief maker. Dimanche des — s +, 
first Sunday of Lent. 

BEANDONNER [bran-do-n^] V. a. to 
place brands in (a place to indicate the 
Beizure of the crop). 

BRANLANT, E [bran-lan, t] adj. 1. 
awiaigvag ; shaking ; 2. tottering. 

£tre un chateau — j^~, to be shaky. 

BB ANLE [bran-i] n. m. 1. H swinging ; 
^shaking; 2. § impulse; impetus; 8. 
broMl (dance, time) ; 4. (of bells) ring- 
ing ; 6. i (nav.) /i,ammock. 

Ponner le — a, mettre en — , to give 
an impulse to; ^to set going. fAre , 
60 mettre en — , to be put in motion ; 
^ to be set going ; mener le — , to set tfte 
eatam/ple; to set to work; mettre en — , 
toptUin motion ; ^ to set going ; son- 
acr ?n — , to ring in peal. 

BEANLE-BAS [bran-1-ba] n. m. (nav.) 
oLear'.ng. 

— 1 1. d^yum aU hammocks 1 2. up all 
ham/mocks ! Faire — , to clear ; faire son 
— , to turn ovt. 

BRANLEMENT [bran-I-man] n. m. 1. 
twinging J shaking; 1. tottering. 

BRANLE-QUEUE [bran-i-keu] a m., 
q>L — 8, (eny brandling. 

WRANLER [bran-i^] v. n. 1. to swimg ; j 
.2. to shake; 3. to totter; 4. to get loose; 
•■5. + to stir ; to move ; to budge ; 6. (mil.) 
4o give way. 

— au manche, dans le manche, 1. § (of 
tools) to shake in the handle; 2. § to 
reamer ; to be irresolute ; 8. § to totter ; 
^ not to be firm in o.'s seat. 

BRANLER, v. a. 1. to mmng ; 2. to 
thake ; 3. to mMke totter. 

1. — lea jambea ou les bras, to swing: o.'» lega or 
♦.'« arm. -1. — la tAte, <n«hake n.'a head. 

BRANLOIEE [bran-ioa-r] n. £ see- 
taw. 

BRAQUE [bra-k] n. m. £ 1. Dalma- 
tian Iwund; hrach-ftound; brack; 2. 
§ (pers.) VMd^cap. 

— de Bengale, Dalmatian hound; 
^ coach-dog. 

BRAQUEMART [br»-k-mAr] n. m. + 
broadsword. 

BRAQUEMENT [brak-man] n. m. $ 
pointing (of flre-arms). 

BBAQUER [bra-k^] V. a. 1. to paint 
(S:e-ftrms) ; 2. to point (a telescope) ; 8. 
^ « to direct (looks). 

Instrument a — un canon far til.) 
Ir'alce. 

BEA8 [bra] n. m. 1. J arm (of .the 
Imman body) ; 2. J arm (thing resem- 
Klng a:i arm); 3. 1 hand (person in 
3 "8 service) ; 4. I handle ; 5. § arm 
(strength); 6. ^ann; power; 7. sconce 
Vcandelabrum) ; 8. (of anchors) arm ; 
J. (of a balance) arm ; 10. (of cray-flsh) 
■law ; 11. (of levers) arm ; 12. (of lit- 
U»rs) shaft; 13. (of seats) atm; 14. (c* 
-vhales) /?«,• 15. (geog.) arm ,• 16. (horol.> 
jrm; 17. (mach.) side rod; 18. (man.) 



arm- 19. (nav.) (of capstans) arm; 20. 
(nav.) (of yards) brace. 

4. Is — d'un aviroD, tht handle of an oar. 6. Le 
— s^culier, secular power. 

Les — croises, o.'» arms folded; with 
o.'s =^ folded, across ; — droit, 1. 1 right 
= ; 2. § right hand (chief agent) ; — ex- 
centrique, (ma«h.) eccentric rod; side 
rod ; petit — , (geog.) armlet ; — des- 
sus — dessous, = i » =. Systfeme de — , 
(tech.) set of=s. A — , 1. with =« ; 2. 
by strength of =s; 3. by hand; 4. 
(com p.) hand; k — ou verts I §, vMh 
open =«,■ k pleins — , by armfuls; a — 
raccourci, vyith m,ight and tnain ; k — 
tendu, ^Dith o.'s = extended ; k — -le- 
corps, 1. under o.'« ^ ; 2. in o.'s =s ; 
au bout des — , at ='s reach ; kla. dis- 
tance des — , a<='« end, length; k force 
de — , by strengtli of—s; k tour de — , 
with all o.'s m,ight; sur les — , 1. y upon 
o.'s=:8; 2. § upon o.'s ham,ds; upon 
one. Avoir les — courts, to have short 
=« ; to be sliort-armed ; avoir les — 
longs, 1. I to have long =« ; 2. § to have 
a long = ; avoir les — retrousses, to /uive 
o.'s shirt-sleeves tucked up; avoir les 

— rompus, to ha^e o.'s =8 ready to 
drop off; avoir sur les — , 1. | (pers.) to 
lujute upon o.'s =s ,• 2. § (pers.) to have 
upon o.'s hands ; 3. § (th.) to hang up- 
on o.'s hand; couper — et jambes a q. 
u. §, 1. to reduce a. o.'s claims ; 2. to de- 
prive a. o. of his tneuns of success ; 3. 
to amuse a. o. ; to astound a. o. ; 6tre — 
dessus — dessous, 1. 1 to 6e = in = ,• 2. ^ § 
to be bosom, friends ; faire les beaux — , 
to give o.'s self airs; to assume affected 
munners ; faire les grands — , to affect 
to home power; se jeter dans, entre les 

— de q. u., to throw o.'s self into a. o. « 
=:«; croiser les — , to fold o.'s::=^s; de- 
meurer les — croises, 1. to stand, to &it 
wifli o.'s =« folded ; 2. § to look on ; 
donner le — 4, to gvve o.'s = to ,• se don- 
ner le — , to take hold of each other'a=^; 
to go — in = ; ofirir, tendre le — i, to 
offer o.'s = to; prendre, saisir q. n. i — 
-le-corps, 1. to take, to seize a. o. round 
the waist ; 2. to close upon a. o. ; rete- 
nir le — de, a q. u., to fiold back a. 
o.'s =^ ; rompre — et jambes ^ q. u. §, to 
treat a.o. most severely ; tendre les — k, 
vers, to hold out o.'s ^s to ; to ask, im- 
plore aid of; ne vivre que de ses — , to 
live by o.'s labor, the labor of o.'s hands; 
to work for a living. 

ERASER [bra-i6] V. a. 1. to solder; 2. 
(with brass) to hrazet. 

BRASIER [bra-ii«] n. m. 1. fire of 
live-coal ; 2. braaier (coal-pan) ; 8. (pot) 
fire-place. 

BRASILLEMENT [br»-zi-l-m»n*] n. m. 
(nav.) (of the sea) sparkling. 

BRASILLER [bra-.i-i«*] V, a. (nav.) 
(of the sea) to sparkle. 

BRASQUE [bra^k] n. £ (metal.) 
brfisque; dam,p charcoal. 

BRASQUER [brai^ks] v. a. (metal.) 
to cover with brusque, dmwp char- 
coul. 

BRASSAGE [bra-w-j] n. m. 1. stir- 
ring up ; 2. rakhig and stirring ; 3. 
mashing (beer) ; 4. brewing ; 5. (coin.) 
mixing. 

BRASSARD [bra-sar] n. m. brace (ar- 
mor for the arm) ; armlet. 

BR.\SSE [bra-.] n. £ 1. (measure) 
brace; brasse; i. {nn\.) fathom,. 

Pain de — , large loaf (of about 26 
lbs.). 

IJKASSl'^E [bra-.«] n. £ armful. 

A — s, by =.•<. 

BRASSER [bra-««] V. a. 1. i to stir up; 
2. II to r ike and stir ; 3. § (b. s.) to con- 
coct ; to plot : 4. to mash (beer) ; 5. to 
brew (beer) ; 6. (nav.) to brace. 

Bkasse, e, pa. p. V. senses of Brasser. 

Non — , ( V. senses) 1. | unbrewed ; 
2. § Hnconcot:teA). 

BR.VSSERIE [br«-i-ri] n. £ brewery; 
brew-house. 

BEASSEU-R [bra-sedr] n. m. SE [eii-z] 
n. £ brewer. 

BRASSEYAGE [bra-.i-ia-j] n. ra (nav.) 
(of yards) quarter. 

BRASSEYER [bra-ii-i^] v. a. (nav.) to 
bnu «. 



BRA881AGE [br«-.i-a-j] n. m. (nav.' 
\. fathoming; 2. dejjth (of water). 

BRASS liRES [bra-wj-r] n. f . || braoe^ 
(for women or children) ; 2. % leading 
strings (constraint). 

BRASSIN [br«-«m] n. m. 1. (brew) 
mash-tuh ; mashing-tub ; mush-tii/i\,' 

2. fbrew.) brewing (quantity brewed), 

3. (soap.) boiling. 

ERASURE [bra-za-r] n. f 1. solderinj 
(place soldered); 2. (with bra&s) bras 
tng. 

ERA VAGUE [bra-TB-.h] n. m. hector; 
-r- bully. 

BRAVADE [bra-va-d] n. £ bravado. 

Par — , m = ; out of, by way qf=^. 

BRAVE [bra-v] adj. 1. brave ; valiant, - 
gallant; cou/rageous; 2. (j)eTa.) honest ; 
good; 8. (pers.) /find; good; 4. \ fint 
(well-dressed) ; smart. 

— jusquku degainer, brave till U 
comes to the scratch; — comme son 
6pee, as = as a limi ; — comme uno 
noce ^, comme un jour de Paques, com- 
me un lapin, as fine asfiue-pence. 

BRAVE, n. m. 1. brave, valiant, 
gallant, cov/rageous mam,; —8, (pL) 
brave; valiant; cowrageous ; 2. hrave 
soldier ; 8. + (b. s.) bravo ; 7~uffl<m. 

Faux — , hector ; •— bully ; vieux — , 
bra/ve veteran. — a trois ptrflsy true 
blue; ^regular game; — le verre en 
main, pot-vaUant. En — , bra/cely ; va- . 
Uantly ; gaUantl/y. Faire le — , 1. to 
affect bravery, valor ; 2. to hector • 

— to bully. 

BRAVEMENT [Ua-v-man] adv. 1. 
bravely; vaUanUy ; gaUantly ; cou- 
rageously ; 2. 1 ably ; well ; finely. 

BRAVER [bra-v«] V. a. 1. to brave; a 
to set at defiance; to set at naught; ^ 
to fly in the face of. 

BRAVERIE [bra-T-ri] n. f t ^finery. 

BRAVO [bra-To] adv. bravo. 

BRAVO, n. m. bravo. 

BRAVOURE [bra.vofi-r] n. £ 1. brave- 
ry; valor; gallantry; courage; 3, — n 
(pi.) i achievements ; eaopUnts. 

Air de — , (mus.) bravura. 

BRAYER [bra-i«] n. m. (surg.) truit. 

BRAYER, v. a. (nav.) to jsay. 

BRA YETTE [bra-U-t] n. £ 1. 1 flap 
(of trowsers) ; 2. (bot.) common prim,- 
rose. 

BRAYON [brS-ion] a m. (hunt) trap 
(for fetid animals). 

BR:6ANT, ERUANT [brd-an, bru-inl 
n. m. (orn.) 1. (genus) bvm,Ung ; 2. yof 
low hammner. 

— commun, goldspink ; — jaime, yel- 
low bunting ; yellow hammer. — des 
hales, drl-bunMng ; — de neige, snow- 
bird ; snow-bunting. 

BREEIS [br6-bi] n. £ 1. (mam.) eiee; 
sheep ,• 2. + § (pers.) sheep ; 3. -\- — «, 
I^V)flock. 

— egar6e, -f stray sheep ; — galeuse, 
1. \ scabby = ; 2. § (pers.) black = ; — 
pleine, ewe with Uvmb. La — du bon 
Dieu, a meek, inoffensive person. Faire 
im repas de — , to eat a dry meal. A. 

— tondue Dieu mesure le vent, God 
tempers the wind to the shorn lamb. 

BRECHE [brJ-rii] n. £ 1. I break 
(ireaking); 2. § breach (injury); 8. j 
notch; 4. |1 § gap; 5. 1 flaw; 6. | hiatus; 
7. (mil.) breach. 

Action de battre en — , (mil.) batter- 
ing; battery. Battre en — , to batter 
i/n breach ; battu en — , (mil.) battered; 
faire — k, to make a breach in; if 
break in upon ; se mettre sur la — to 
stand in the gap. 

EEi;CHE-DENT [brA-rii-dan] adj., pi 
— s, gap-tootlied. 

BEl;CHE jrbrfe-.h] n. £ (mln.) bre<:okL 

BRECHET [br«-.h4] n. m. breast- 
bone. 

BREDI-BREDA [brg-di-brg-da] adv. 
^^ hastily ; slap-dash. 

BREDINDIN [brs-dia-diu] n. m. (nav.) 
garnet. 

BREDOUILLE [br« lou-i"] n. £ (trick- 
track) lurch. 

BEEDOUILLEMENT [br« dom-min*] 
n. m. 1. sputter (speaking hastily); 3 
4(U>bering ; jabber. 

IJRKDOUILLEE [bri-dc-i**] v. a. L 



BRE iSRI 


BRl 


o&joute; ewjen; «Ajeune; e&pem; a^pan; mpin; on hoa; MMbrun; *U liq. 


*gnliq. 



"c apvtter (speak hastily); 2. to jab- 
ber. 

BKEDOUILLEE, v. a. <o »putter out. 

BREDOUILLEU-R [brt-dou-ieur] n. 
tn.SE, [en-x*] n. C 1. sputterer ; 1. jab- 
berer. 

Bli-EF, EVE [brjf, 4-v] adj, 1. 4. short 

Sat little durat'on) ; 2. qtdok ; prompt ; 
\ ilujrt (of littl.- extent) ; 4 brief; coin- 
»w,- 5. (gram.) ^Itort; 6. (mus.) slwrt. 

Pepin le — , (hisL) Pepin t/is Slu>rt 

BEEF [brif] adv. iw sAort 

Kn - , =. 

PRFK, 1. m. 1. brief fpope's pastoral 
Witer); "/. ohurcA-caiendar. 

BREQ IN [bre-jin] n. m. (fish.) smaU 
mesh net. 

BR^HAIGNE [brf-4-gn*] adj. (of ani- 
mals) barren; sterile. 

BREHAIGNE, n. f. -f- barren, sterile 
vBonuvn. 

BRELAN [brs-lan] n. m. 1. brelan 
(game of cards); 2. gaming-Ziouse ; 8. 
(cards) three cards of the same. 

BRELANDER [br6-lan-d«] V. n. 1 (b. 

i.) to jylay cards. 

BRELAND-IER [br8-liD-di«] n. m. 
.li;RE [i^-r] n. £ (b. s.) 1. card-player ; 
t, oambler. 

BRELLE [br4-i] n. C raft. 

BRELOQUE [brs-io-k] n. £ trinket. 

BRELOQUE, n. £ V. Beeloque. 

BRELUOHE [br6-lu-gh] n. £ (ind.) 
cotton and woollen drugget. 

BREME [br^-m] n. £ (icli.) bream, 

"SftME [brA-m] p. n. Bremen. 

BRENEU-X, SE [br«-ueu, «a-z] adj. e 
dirty. 

BRiiML [brt-zU] n. m. Brazil; Bra- 
bii-wood. 

Bois de — ^, =; extrait de bois de — , 
juice of^=.. 

BR:fidILIEH, NE [bri-ii-U-in, J-n] adj. 
Bramdian. 

BRfiSILIEN, p. n. m. NE, p. n. t 
Braeilia/ii. 

BB^SILLER [br6-zi-i«*l V. a. 1. to 
l-reak mnaU; 2. (dy.) to dye with Bra- 
M-^Tood. 

BB^SILLET fbrf-il-ii] n. m. 1. Bra- 
oil; Brozii-^wooa; 2. (bot.) ^ maiden- 
f>lwn. 

— des Indes, 1. (bot) sapa; sapa- 
tree ; 2. sapa-wood. Noix du — , (bot.) 
BrazH-wut. 

BRETAILLER [brt-tAi^] v. a (b. s.) 
to fight; to tilt. 

BRETAILLEUR [br«-ta-ieur] n. nu 
(b. 6^ fighter. ^ 

BBETAUD:^, E [br«-t6-d6] adj. crop- 
eared. 

Cheval — , crop ear. 

BRETAUDER [brs-ti-d^] v. a. to crop 
badly (dogs, horses). 

BRETELLE [bi*-t4-l] n. £ 1. brace- 
band ; strap ; 2. suspender (to hold up 
the pantaloons). 

En avoir jusquaux — 8, par-dessus les 
— «, to be over head and ears in trovr 
We. 

BRETELLER rbr6-tJ-)6l, 

BRETTELER [br^-t8-i<], 

BRETTER [br6-t«] v. a. (arch.) to in- 
dent. 

BRETTE [brj-t] n. £ 1 (jest) sword. 

BRETTEUR [bri-uiir] n. m. 1 (b. s.) 
figlUer. 

BREUIL [broui*] n. m. (fore.st) thicket. 

BREUVAGE [breu-va-j] n. m. 1. beve- 
rage; ^ drink; 2. * draug/U (beve- 
rage); 3. (nav.) loine and -water; 4. 
i vet) dr e7io/u 

I'ersonne qui administre un — , 
lireneher. 

BRfeVE [brfe-v] n. £ 1. (gram.) short; 
iKort syllable ; 2. (mus.) breve. 

BREVET [br6-Ti] n. m. 1 patent; 
Mters patent; 2. brevet; 3. (of book- 
rMillers, printers) license; 4 (of officers 
in the army or navy) oommiiision ; 5. 
(ftdmia) warrant; 6. (a. & m.) patent 
(for inventi-Ji, etc); 7. (law) patent- 

- d'apprentissage, ( V. Apprentis- 
HASKi, — d'importation, (a. & m.) patent 
ft*r tmportaMon ; — d"in vention, patent 
fijr ifwmUion; — de perfectionnenient, 
itatent for innjrrov«meiU. Ai'ent pour 



les — s d'invention, eta, patent-agent ; 
autenr d'une notification de demande 
future d'un — d'invention, (law) cavea- 
tee ; description, specification de — , spe- 
(djicationof a patent; droit de —, co/>y- 
right (for the arts and manufactures) ; 
notification de demande future de — , 
(law) caveat; privilege du —, patent- 
right ; registre ae — s, (d'invention, etc.), 
patent-rolls. A — , 1. br&vet ; 2. ^Dith 
a patent. Prendre nn — , (a. & m.) to 
take out a patent; violer le prix-ilSge 
d'un — , to infringe a patent. Le droit 
de — est eteint, expir6, the copy-right 
/wM expired, is out 

BREVET:^ [bri-T.«] n. m. E, n. £ (a. 
«& m.) patentee. 

BREVETER [brj-v-ti] v. & 1. to pa- 
tent ; to grant a patent to ; 2. to license 
(booksellers, printers). 

Faire — , to =. 

BRi:VIAIRE [br«-vii-r] n. m. brevi- 
ary. 

BR:6VIT]6 [br«-Ti-t*] u. . jf syllables) 
shortness. ' 

BRIBE [br:-b] n. £ 1. 1^" B hwnk (of 
bread); 2. 1 — s, (pL) leavings (of meals); 
3. I — 8, (pi.) cold victuals • 4 § scrap ; 
odd end. 

BRIC-A-BEAC [brik-a-brak] n. m. old 
stores. 

Marchand de — , dealer in =. 

BRICK [imk] n. m. (nav.) brig. 

BRICOLE [bri-ko-i] n. £ 1. (of harness) 
breast-colUir ; 2. straps (for carrying 
sedan-chairs or litters); 8. (billiards, 
tennis) back-stroke; bricoUe; 4 back- 
stroke ; 5. — s (pj.) toils (for taking deer). 

Coup de — , (billiards, tennis) back- 
stroke. De — , par — , indirectly ; by 
indirect mean.i. 

BRICOLER [bri-ko-IA] v. n. (billiards, 
tennis) to hit a back-stroke; to hit a 
bricolle. 

BRICOLIER [hri-ko-lW] n, m. oj- 
horse. 

BRIDE [bri-d] n. £ 1. bridle; 2. bridle- 
rein ; 3. loop (button-hole) ; 4 (of bon- 
nets, women's caps) string ; 5. (of lace^ 
junction-thread ; 6. (need'.e-work) 
stitches (to strengthen an opening, slit) ; 
7. (suTg.) frenum, ; 8. strap; 9. (tech.) 
stay; 10. (tecli.) curbing ; flange. 

— sans bridon, single-curb bridle. 
Main, poing de la — , (man.) =-hand ; 
rene de la — . =^-rein. A — abattue, i 
toute — , 1 rt/uU speed, career ; whip 
and spur; 2. | § (b. s.) headlong; 3. § 
eagerly ; 4 § unreservedly ; sans — , 
tmreined. Conduire k la — , to rein; 
courir k — abattue, A toute — , to ride, 
to runfidl speed, career ; lacher la — k, 
1. (man.) to give the head, reins to (a 
horse) ; 2. § to let loose (...); to give a 
loose to ; to give toay to ; 3. § to give (a. 
o.) the reins ; to give (a. o.) rope ; pous- 
ser k toute — , (man.) to put to hi« 
fastest paces ; tenir la — courte, haute, 
serree a, tenir en — , to hold a tight rein 
over ; to keep a tight hand over : tour- 
ner — , to wiceel about. 

BRIDER [bri-d«] v. a. 1. to bridle ; 2. 
(nav.) to span. 

BRIDOLE [bri-do-i] n. £ (nav.) wrvng 
sta/ve. 

BRIDON [bri-don] n. m. snaffle-bridle. 

Rene de — , bridoon~rein. Mettre un 
— i, to snaffle. 

BRIDUliE [bri-du-r] n. £ (nav.) oross- 
turns ; seizing. 

•BRIE [bri] n. £ roUing-pin. 

BR-IEF, li:VE [bri-^f, i-v] adj. t (cf 
descriptions, narrations) shoH ; brief. 

BRIER [bri-*] V. a. to roll (paste). 

BRi:fcVEMEyT [b. J-v-man] adv. 
briefly. 

BRi[i;"VETfi [bri-4-v-t«] n. £ 1. brevity; 
shorlmess; 2. (gram.) shortness ; 8. (urns.) 
shortness. 

BRIG FbriK] n. m. (nav.) brig. 

BRIGADE [bri-ga-d] n. £ (mil.) bri- 
gade ; 2. (of workmen) gang. 

Chefde— , (of workmen) /or«nJYT'» o/' 
a gang ; foreman; colonel conmmndant 
une — , brigadier, fitre le — avec, to 
be In the same brigade loith , former i»n 
— , en — 8, to brigade. 

BRIGADIER rbri-K^wdif] u. ni. 1. (mil.) 



corporal (of cavalry); 2. (nav.) bow- 
man ; stroke»i.tan. 

BRIGAND [bri-gan] n. m. 1. | robber ; 
ruffian ; brigand; bandit; 2. ^rcbber; 
plwndsrer ; thief. 

Acte de — , ruffianly act. Do - -, rf(^ 
fian ; ruffianly ; rumanlike. 

BRIGANDAGE [bn-gan-d«-j] n. lU \ 

I robbery ; 2. U robbery ; ruffian'./ art ; 
2, § robbery ; plunder. 

Exercer des — b, to commit a Mrics qf 
robberies. 

BRIGANDEAU rbri-gin d6] a m. (o« 
agents, law3'ers) rogue ; knave, 

BRIGANDER [bri-gan-d6] V. n. 1 fc 
plunder ; to rob. 

BKIGANDINE [bri-gin-di-n] n. f bri- 
gandine (coat of mail). 

BRIGANTIN Lbri-gan-tin] n. m, (nov ) 
brigantine. 

. BR IGANTINE [bri-gau ti-nj n. £ (nav,) 
brigantine sail, 

BKIGNOLE [bri-gno-i*] n. £ (bot) 
French plum. 

BRIGUE [brig] n. t. 1. iniHgue; 2. 
cabal ; faction. 

BRIGUER [bri-gh«] V. a. 1. (b. 8.) to 
endeavor to obtain by intrigue ; 2. (g. 8.) 
to solicit ; to sue for ; 8. (g. 8.) to cam. 
vassfor. 

BRIGUEUR [bri-gl,«ur] n. m. J 1. soU- 
citor (person tliat solicits) ; 2. can/vas- 
ter. 

BRILLAMMENT fbri-ia-man*] adv. 1. 
il § brightly ; 2. 1 § brilliantly ,• 3. || § 
glitieringly. 

BRILLANT, E [bri-iin, t*] adj. 1. | § 
bright ; 2. ^ briUiant ; 3. 1 § shining ; 
4 II § glittering ; 5. (arts) bright. 

— comme le soleil, sun-briglvt ; sun- 
shiny. Devenir — , ji (V. senses) to bur- 
nish ; rendre — (de), ( V. senses) to bur- 
nish (with). 

BRILLANT Fbri ian*].n. m. l.^bright- 
ness ; 2. || § brilliancy ; 8. i $ glitter ; 4 
brilUant (diamond). 

Faux — , 1. Ifalne, imitation brilii<i-u%' 

2. § tinsel. 
RILLANTER [bri-ian-t«*] v. a, 1. 
I.) to out into a briUiant; 2. J tf 

render ^florid. 

Brillante, e, pa. p. 1. (lap.) (^t IrUo 
a brilliant ; 2. % florid. 

BRILLEE [bri.i«*] V. n. 1. 1 8 to 6<i 
bright ,• 2. S § to brighten ; 3. II | to b« 
brilliant ; 4 f § to shine ; 5. to excel ; o. 

I § to glitter; 7. 1 to glare ; 8. $ (b. 8.) to 
gUire. 

— d'un vif 6clat, 1. to blaze; 2. to 
glare. Faire — , 1. II § (de) to brighten 
(loith); 2. § to blaze; to blazon; to 
blazon foHh. 

BRIMBALE [hnn-ba-l] n.£ (hydr.) (of 
pumps) handle ; brake. 

BRIMBALEB [brin-ba-l«] V. a. 1 (b. 8.) 
to ring (bells) ; to ring a/icay. 

BBIMBORION [brin-bo-ri-6n] n. m. *1 
bawble ; gewgaw ; knick-knack. 

BRIN [brin] n. m. 1. J (of grass) blade; 
spire ; 2. | (of plants) slip ; sprig ; spray; 

3. II bit (of a. th. long and slendey ; 4 | 
bit ; morsel ; 5. § bit ; jot ; iota ; \whit; 
6. (a. & m.) staple. 

Beau — d'homme, de femme, tall and 
well-made man, woman. — I'l — , L 
blade by blade ; 2. bit by bit. A — , (a. 
& m.) stapled; a — court, (a. & ip.) 
short-stapled , a — long, (a. & m.) long' 
stapled ; de, en — , (of wood) unhetcn,. 

II n'y en a — §, there is not a bit, mor- 
sel of it. 

BRINDE [brin-d] n. £ $ ^ >xa2A., 
toast. 

fttre dans les — s, to be imtcxl^yntt^, 
^ tipsy, f drtfttk. 

BRINDILLE Lbrin-di-i*] n. £ (of plantK' 
sprig ; twig ; spray. 

BRINGUEBALE rbrii.g-b»-l] u. t 
(nav.) (of pumps) harMle ; brake. 

BRIOCHE [bri.o-.h] n. £ 1. I brlccM 
(cake) ; 2. j^" § mistake ; blunder. 

BRION [bri-sn] n. m. (bot) tree-mMm\ 

BRIQUE [bri-kj n. £ 1. brick ; 2. (C 
soap) brick ; 8. (ot tin) brick. 

— Tofractaire, fire-brick ; — vernise^e 
glazed =- ; — de seconde qualit6, stocJ^- 
— 8 pour la cuisson, damp of-=-s ; rlantji, 
de couleur de — . 1. z^-'vtlor ; 2. (med.) 

77 



(lap.) 
rende 





BRl 












BRO 










BRO 


amti 


, dm&le; 


4t^e- 


ithve- 


Smtje, 


.Jje; 


tU; 


nie; 


mol; 


Pinole, 


d mort; 


Msac 


^ sure; owjoor; 



UtUrU/iov* ; plein de — s, hricky. Con- 
etrnotion eu — 8, (art) =.-layim,g ; 6clat, 
morc^au de — , =-6a< ; fabrication 
de — «, =i-mahing; four a — s, =-kiln ; 
tna^on en — e, =^-layer ; poussiere de — s, 
=.-dM8t; tas de — 8 disposiies pour la 
cnlBson, clamp ; terre a — 6, =:-«ar<A. 
B4tlr de —8, to brick ; to build, with =; 
bAti en — s, ■=.-buiU; cuire des — 8, to 
baJke, to burn =a ; forme de — 8, 
Iricky; /armed o/= ; murer de — s, to 
trick up. 

BRIQUET [bri-k^] n. m. 1. steel v^tor 
striking a light) ; 2. tinder-box ; 8. short 
tabre (in use. in the French infantry) ; 
eabre. 

— phosphorinxie, phosphorous boas; — 
— pneumatique, a air, Jire-syringe. 
Plerr«» a — ,Jiint Battre le — , to strike 
/Ire, a light. 

BEIQUETAGE [bri-k-ta-j] n. m. (mas.) 
L brick-work ; 2. imitation brick- 
work. 

BKIQUET:6, E [brik-M] adj. 1. in imi- 
tation brick^work ; 2. bnck-colored ; 8. 
(med.) lateritious. 

BRIQUETEK [brik-M] V. a. to bHek; 
to imitate in brick-work. 

3RIQUETER1E i;bri-k-t-ri] n. C 1. 
hrick-makin^ ; 2. bnck-works. 

BRIQUETEUR [bri-k-teur] n. m. brick- 
fjayer. 

£tat de — , brick-l<iyvng. 

BRIQUETIER [bri.k-ti«] n. m. bHck- 
maker. 

BRIS [bris] n. m. (law) 1. breaking 
open (of doors, seals); 2. breach (of 
prison with violence) ; 3. wreck (part of 
Wie vessel wrecked). 

BRISANT [bri-zan] n. m. 1. breaker 
^rock); 2. breaker (wave); 3. (engin.) 
break-water. 

BBI8CAMBILLE [bris-kan-bi-i*] n. f 
V. Brusquembillk. 

BEISE [bri-z] n. f. 1. breeze; 2. (nav.) 
breeze ; 3. (nav.) turn. 

— carabinee, (nav.) stiff gale. Folle 
— , flurry ; petite — , light breeze. — 
du Ivrge, de mer, 1. sea =: ; 2. (nav.) sea- 
breeze, turn, wind ; — de nuit, (nav.) 
Umd-vrind, turn ; — de terre, 1. Uind- 
breeee; 2. (nav.) land-breeze, tcind, 
tjum ; — de terre de nuit, land-turn. 
De la — , of Hie breeze ; ** breezy ; par 
ta — , by t/ie breeze ; ** breezy. Rafral- 
chi par la — , refreslied by the breeze ; 
♦* breezy. 

BRIS:^, E [bri-i*] adj. 1. 1 broken ; 2. 
S (pers.) bowed dou>n ; 3. § (pers.) over- 
fatigued; 4. (aits) folding ; 5. (lier.) 
hrise; rompu. 

BRISE-COU [bri-z-kou] n. m., pi. — ,1. 
breakneck (place); 2. (man.) rough 
rider. 

BRIS:6E [hri-zi] n. £ (tech.) (of para- 
■ols, umbrellas, etc.) fan-joini. 

BRIS:^ES [bri-z*] n. f (pi.) 1. boughs 
vtu off; 2. (hunt) bougM broken off, 
etrewed on the road ; 8. % foot-steps ; 1 
ehoes. 

Aller, courir snr les — de q. u., suivre 
.«« — s de q. a, to tread on n. o.'s heels ; 
io walk in a. o.'s s/ooes ; reprendre ses 
—8, revenir sur ses — 8 §, to retrace o.'s 
iteps. 

BRISE-EAU [bri-z6] n. m. pL — , (of 
otubors) break-water. 

BRISE-GLACE [bri-z-gU-.] n. m. pL 
— , (eugiji.) I. ice-breaker; breaker; 2. 
(of bridges) starling. 

Bateau — , (engin.) ice-boat. 

BEI8E-LAME [bri-z-lii-m] n. m., pi. 
— «, (of harbors) break-water. 

BEISEMENT [bri-z-manl n. m. 1 I 
Irtaking (cf waves) ; 2. § breaking (of 
tiie heart) ; 3 t- contrition (of heart). 

BEleE-PlEERE [bri-z-piJ-r] n. m., pL 
— , (|nrgO litlwclast. 

BEI6ER [bri-z#] V. a. 1. I (ex, into) to 
treak (to pieces) ; to break to pieces ; 2. 
I fc shatter ; 3. | to shiver ; 4. 1 | to 
etntUh ; 5. I to break open ; 6. II to stave 
in; 7. § to break (injure extremely) ; to 
breaJk doicn; 8. § to break (afflict); 9. 
'.o bow (a. o.) down ; 10. § to make (a 
x)/(Sel tender, sore aU over. 

1.- Jii rurre, dm <» jk lerre. It- bre:lk jltu$ 
'ttnti, tfu y«>Md. S. - -ne yoTje, en •■acbet, u 



£tre bris6, (V. tenses) (pers.) to feel 
tender, sore all over. — en morceau.x, 
en pieces |, 1. to break to pieces; 2. to 
shatter; 3. to shiver; 4. to smash; to 
smcbsh to pieces ; 5. to liash ; to dash to 
pieces. 

[Briber aoust not be confounded with eatter or 

rompre.'[ 

Brise, b, pa. p. V. senses of Beiser. 

Non — , ( V. senses) 1. \ § unbroke^i ; 
2. tmshattered. 

Se briser, pr. V. 1. I to break (to 
pieces) ; to break to pieces / 2. 1| to shat- 
ter ; S. i^ to sfinash ; 4. { to break 
(burst) ; 5. § to break (sustain great in- 
jury); to break down; 6. § to break 
(be afflicted) ; T. (arts) to fold ; 8. (phys.) 
to be refracted. 

Qui se brise, qui M. ^risent, ( V. senses) 
foldiaig. 

BEISER, V. n. 1. ! (of the sea) to 
break ; 2. || (of ships) to split ; 8. § (pers.) 
to break off. 4 (aveo, with) § (pers.) to 
break. 

4. — avec q. n., to break with a. o. 

Brisons ia, la-dessus ^^" ! let us say 
no mare about Jb ! no tnore of that ! 

BRISE-EAISON [bri-z-ri-zon] n. m. ^, 
pi. — , wron^-lteaded person,/elUno. 

:fitre un — ^, to 6« a = ; to be wrong- 
headed. 

BEISE-TOUT [bri-z-tou] n. m., 1 pL 
— , person that breaks every thing. 

f;tre un — , to break every thing. 

BEISEUR [bri-zeur] n. m. 1. X breaker 
(person that breaks things) ; 2. breaker 
(of images). 

BRISEU8E [bri-zeu-z] n. fl 1. i break- 
er (of things); 2. (a. & m.) breaker ; 
breaker-engine. 

BRISE-VENT [bri-z-vin] n. m., pL — , 
(agr., gard.) screen. 

BRISI5 [brl-zis] n. m. (arch.) am^jle 
formed at the junction of the curb <md 
roof. 

BBISOIR [bri-zoar] n. m. (a, & m.) 
brake (instrument tor breaking hemp, 
etc.). 

BRISQUE [bris-k] n. f. 1. brisque 
(game at cards) ; 2. trump (in playing 
brisque). 

BRISUEE [bri-zu-r] n. C 1. part bro- 
ken ; place broken ; 2. (arts) fold ; 3. 
(her.) rebatement. 

BEITANNIQUE [bri-ton-ni-k] adj. 
British; English. 

Les ties — s, th^ British Isles ; sa Ma- 
jeste — , 1. His Britannic Majesty (the 
king of England) : 2. Her Britannic Ma- 
jestic (the queen of England). 

BEOC [bro,**brok] n. m. \. jug ; 2. 
jv^ (contents) ; jugfxiU ; 3. t spit. 

De brie et de — 1, by hook or by 
crook ; de — en bouche, liot from the 
spit. ' 

The phrase Dg bbic kt dk beoc ii here pro- 
nounced [d8-bri-k«-d6-brok.] 

BROCANTAGE fbro kSn-ta-j] n. m. 
broker's busi/ness (dealing in second- 
hand goods). 

BROCANTER [bro-kan-t6] v. n. to be a 
broker ; to deal in second-hand goods. 

BROCANTEU-R [bro-kan-tefir] n. m. 
SE [eii-z] n. f. broker (dealer in second- 
hand goods). 

BROCAED [bro-kar] n. m. tawnt; 
biting, offensive jeer ; scoff. 

BROCARDER [bro-kar-d«] V. a. to 
taunt; to jeer offensively ; to scoff at. 

BROCARDEU-R [bro-kar.deur;[ n. m. 
SE Teu-z] n. f. taunter; offensive jeerer; 
scoter. 

BROCART [bro-kar] n. m. brocade. 

De — , of^= ; brocaded. V6ta de — , 
orocaded : dressed in =;. 

BROCATELLE [bro-ka-ti-l] n. t 1. 
brocateJ, ; brocateUo ; 2. (min.) broea- 
tel; brocateUo. 

BROCHAGE [bro-tha-j] n. m. (book.) 
stitching. 

BROCHE [bro-.h] n. f. 1. sjnt (kitchen 
utensil) ; 2. needle (for knitting) ; 3. (of 
casks) spigot ; 4. (of locks) gudgeon ; 5. 
— 8 (pi.) (of wild boars) tusks; 6. (spin.) 
spindXe ; 7. (lerh.) mn ; iron-pin. 



— darret, steadying_^ pin. — 4 trioo 
ter, knitting-needle. A la — , on, upon 
tlie spit. Mettre une — a, (tech.) to pin 
Faire un tour de — , to get very n«(w 
the fire. Mettre a la — , to put wpon t/u 
spit 

BR0CH:6, E [bro-.h«] adj. 1. (of textlifi 
fabrics)^j;?^r«d ; 2. (of linen) embosind 
8. (books.) stitched. 

BROCHlfeE, n. f. 1. joint upon ft 
spit ; 2. (of candles) rod full. 

BROCIIER, V. a 1. to figure (textile 
fabrics) ; 2. to emboss (linen) ; 3 to stii.:^ 
(books) ; 4. § to dispatch ; to hu-rry ; io 
hurry over, through ; 5. (fer.) to shoe 
with a shoeing -hanvmer. 

BROCIIET [bro-.hi] n. m, (ion.> 1. 
pike ; luce ; 2. jack. 

Jeune — , 1. yovmgpike, luce ; Zjarkj 
— carreau, very large = ; — voknt T 
,''yin{/ fish. 

BROCHETER [brczh-t*] v. a. (culin.) 

BROCHETON [bro-.h-t6n] n. m. (ich.) 
pickerel; small pike; luce. 

BROCHETTE [bro-.hJ-t] n. t 1. skeu)' 
er; 2. (culin.) brocliette (meti broiled, 
roasted on skewers) ; 3. (tech.) pin. 

:^lever a la — , 1. 1| to bring up (a bird) 
by luind ; 2. § to bring up (a child) too 
delicately. 

BROCilEU-E [bro-.heur] n. m. SB 
[en-z] n. f. (books.) stitcher. 

BROCHOIE [bro-»hoar] n. m. (Jar.) 
shoeing-hammer. 

BROCHURE [bro-thn-r] n. f. 1. (booka.) 
stitching (action) ; 2. pamp/det. 

Auteur de -|-s, pamjMetesr. ficrlic 
des — 8, to virile pampJdets ; to pain- 
pldet. 

BEOCOLI [bro-ko-ii] n. m. (bot) bro» 
coli; borecole. 

BRODfi, E [bro-d«] adj. 1. enibroiAm 
ed; 2. (needl.) ■^t•or^-«c?. 

— a jour, open-xcorked. 
BRODEQUIN [bro-d-kin] a m. L t 1 

buskin ; 2. sock (of the ancient*) ; 8L § 
sock ; comedy ; 4. 1 boot (half boot woru 
principally by women and children) ; 5 
— 8 (pi.) II boot (instrument of torture). 

— a boutons, boot to button ; — d'eL 
fant, child's hoot ; — de femme, lady't 
boot. En — , 1. buskined ; 2. in OocAt. 

BRODEE [bro-d«] V. a. 1. S (with gold, 
silver, silk) to embroider ; 2. ^ § to flwi- 
beUish (exaggerate); to wmpUfy; & 
(needl.) to work. 

— a jour, (needl.) to cut. Laino a — 
crewel; machine a — , embroidering- 
machine. 

BRODERIE [bro-d-ri] n. £ 1. (with 
gold, silver, silk) emliroidery ," 2. ^ § em- 
beUi^hment; ampliJicaUon ; 3. (needL) 
work. 

— au crochet, (needl.) chavn-stitch, 
BRODEUR [bro-dear] n. m. 1. (with 

gold, silver, silk) embroiderer (man) 
2. 1 § embellisher. 

— de dentelles, lace-runner ; — en 
mousseline. muslin-sewer. Autant pour 
le — ! the tale is embellished ! 

BRODEUSE [bro-deu-z] n. £ 1. (with 
gold, silver, silk) embroiderer (woman) 
2. § embellisher; 8. (needl.) work-wo 
man. 

— de dentelles, lace-runner; — eii 
mousseline, rmislin-sefioer. 

BRODOIR [bro-doar] n. in. bobbin (pt 
embroidering). 

BROGUES [bro-g] n. £ pi. brog^tea. 

BEOIE [broa] n. £ brake (for flax o; 
hemp). 

BROIEMENT, BROtMENT [br«v 
man] n. m. 1. pounding ; 2. grindvivj 
(by pestles, the teeth) ; 3. (of colara) 
grinding ; 4 (of flax, hemp) breaking ; 
5. (did.) pulverization; 6. (snrg.) pid 
verizatian ; 7. (tech.) crushing. 

BROME [bro-m] n. m. (chem.) bromh. 

BRONCHADE [bron-idia-d] a £ (>il 
animals) stumble. 

BRONCUE [br6n-»h] n. £ (anat) brr^n 
chial tribe. 

— s (pi.) (anat.) bronchia. 

BRONCHER rbr6u-.h«J v. n. 1. I (ol 
animals) to stumble ; 2. | (pets.) to shutv- 
ble ; to trip ; %.%to err ; to do wrvitf 
a/vtiu ; ^i?" to trip. 



BRO BRU 




BRU 


o^iotkie; ewjeu; eu jedie; «ii penr; dwpan; In pin 


on bon; Hn brun; *11 liq. 


•gnliq. 



Falre — ,1.1 to make stitmhle ; 2. to 
tri}'). Personne qui bronche, stimi- 
ller. 

BEONCHIES [br6n-.lii] n. f F". Bran- 

0HIK8. 

BKOyCIIIQUE [br6n-.lii-k] adj. (anat.) 
bronchial; bronchia. 

BRONOIIITl [bron-.U-t] n. m. (med.) 
tn-ont, liiis. 

BRONCHOCfeLE [bron-ko-iJ-l] n. m. 
( lied ) bronahacele ; goitre ; ^ Derhy- 
^Mve neck. 

bRONCHOTOMIE [bron-ko-to-mi] n. t 
I "'ITS.) bronchotomy. 

BRONZE [tron-z] n. m. 1. | bronze; 2. 
S iron (insensibility-); steel; flint; 
stone ; 3. (arcli., numism.) bronze. 

BRONZ:^, E [br6.i-i6] adj. 1. 1| bronsed; 
2. (of the complexion) sun-burnt. 

BRONZER [brdn-z6] V. a. 1. 1 to bronze ; 
2. § to tan (tlie complexion) ; 8. to dye 
black. 

Bronze, b, pa. p. ( V. senses of Bron- 
eKR) § dusky. 

BROQUART [bro-kdr] n. m. (hunt) 
brocket; brock. 

BROQUETTE [bro-k^-t] n. £ 1. tUi- 
tnck ; tack ; 2. ti/n-tacks ; tacks. 

BROSSAIU^S fbro-w-i*] n. £ pL V. 

BR0U88AILU8. 

BROSSE [bro-.] n. £ 1. brush; 2. 
(jiaint) brush. 

— douce, sq/t = ; — forte, soratch-=- ; 
— rude, hard =. — h, barbe, sha/ving- 
= ; — a dents, too<A-=; — a friction, 
fl^l)rr=. ; — a nettoyer les habits, clotlies- 
= ; — a nettoyer la tfite, — k t6te, hair- 
=; ; — a souliers, — pour la chaussure, 
»Ao«-=. Comma une — , brushy ; en — , 

1. Uks a =: ; 2. (did.) :=-8haped. Donner 
uii coup de — 4i 1. to strike with a = ; 

2. to brush up ; enlever avec une — , to ' 
brush OM-ay, off; 6tre d'une belle — , 
(iiaint.) to be well painted. 1 

BROSSfiE [bro-i^J n. £ ^ brushing. 

BBOSSER [bro s«T V. a 1. to brivsh; 2. 
tv rub with afle^h-orush ; to rub. 

Pen>onne qui brosse, br usher. 

,Ss BROSSER, pr. V 1. to brush o.''8 self 
fa'B clothes); 2. t, rub o.'a self with a 
lioeh-brush. 

BROSSER, V. n. (dans,. . .) to scour. 

BROSSERIE [i>ro-»-ri] n. £ 1. brush- 
T\ahing ; 2. brush-trade ; 8. brush- 
rianufactort/. 

BROSSIER [ bro-ai« ] n. m. brush- 
nutker. 

BROU [brou] n. m. 1. (of almonds) 
shell ; 2. (of walnuts) peel. 

BROUI^IE [brou-«] n. f mist. 

BROUET [brou-i] n. m. 1. caudle ; 2. 
Mack broth. 

— noir, (of the Spartans) black broth. 

BROUETTE [brou-^-t] n. £ 1. wheel- 
barrow ; barrow ; 2. " brouette ;" ^vin- 
aigrette " (two- wheeled chaise drawn by 
ft man). 

Etre oondamn6 4 la — , to be con- 
demned to hard labor ; transporter en 
— , to carry, to convey, to take in a bar- 
roio, wheel-barrow ; to wheel in a har- 

"070. 

BROUETTER [brou-i-t*] v. a. 1. to 
wheel in a barrow; f^^ to wheel; to 
curry, to convey, to take in a barrow, 
wheel-barrow ; 2. to draw in a brouette, 
vinaigrette. 

BROUETTEUB [ brou4-teur ] n. m. 
nui^n that draws a brouette. 

BROUETTIER [brou-i-ti«] n. m. &rtr- 
rxfc-man. 

BROUHAHA [brou-a-a] n. m. 1 iqi- 
<Hir ; hubbub; hurly-burly. 

BROUIELAMINI [ brou-ia-mi-ni* ] n. 
111. 1. 1 confusion; disorder; 2. dksa- 
\» i-hment. 

BROUILLARD [brou-iar*] n. m. 1. 
f„g; mist; 2. § mist; 8. (book-k.) 
t<jDte-bnok. 

15e — , foggy ; misty. Couvrir de — s, 
V fog; faire du — , to be foggy, misty. 

BROUILLARD, adj. /or blotting. 

Papier — , blotting-paper. 

BROUILLAS [breo-ia*] n. m. ^Jbg, 

BKOUILLA83ER [brou-ia-»6*] v. imp 
to drizzle. 

BBOTTILLli [brod-i*] n. £ disagree- 
nur.iit : falling out; piqua ; (W miff 



BROUILLEMENT [brou-i-man*] n. m. 
1. ^ mingling ; 2. jumbling. 

BROUILLER [brou-i«*] v. a. 1. J to 
mingle (confusedly); to micp up; 2. to 
put out of order ; to disarrange ; to 
derange; 8. | (b. s.) to jumble; 4. § to 
embroil; to perplex; to confuse; 5. § 
to embroil (a. o.) ; to set at va rian ce ; ^ 
to make mischief between ; )^~ to set 
together by the ears. 

Mre broulUe, to ha/ve disagreed, quar- 
relled ; to be at variance, ^ at logger- 
heads; fW to be by the ears; 6tre 
brouill6 avec le bon sens, to want ami- 
man sense ; to be unreasonable. — du 
papier, § to waste paper (write useless 
or foolish things). — les gens, to make 
mischief. Action de les gens, mii- 
chief-making ; personne qui aime k — 
les gens, mischief-maker. 

Se BROUILLER, pr. V. 1. to become, ^ to 
get embroiled ; 2. (pers.) to disagree ; 
to quarrel; to he at varioAice ; ^ to fall 
out; 3. to becmne, *[ to gel corifused, 
embarrassed, perplexed. 

Le temps se bronille, the sky begins to 
be overcast, is getting overcast 

BROUILLER, v. n. 1 to blunder. 

BROUILLERIE [brou-i-ri*] a.t.^ dis- 
agreement; ^fulling out; state of va- 
riance. 

BROUILLON, NE [brou-ion, o-n*] adj. 
blundering. 

Papier — , (com.) casting paper. Par 
esprit — , blunderingly. 

BROUILLON, n. m. NE, n. £ (pers.) 
blunderhead; mar-all; mar-plot 

BROUILLON [bron-ion*] n. m. 1. 
ro^igh drauglit; draught; 2. rough 
copy ; 3. (book-k.) waate-book. 

Nouveau — , redraft. Falre un nouveau 
— , to redraw. 

BROUIR [brou-ir] v. a. (of the sun) to 
blight. 

BROtn, E, pa p. blighted. 

Non — , unbhghted. 



i-.u-r] n. £ blight 
C(pl.) 



BROUisSURE [br, 
(of buds, flowers, ffuit), 

BROUSSAILLES [brou-«a-i*] 
brush-wood. 

Fagot de — , chatwood. 

BROUSSIN [brou-«in] n. m. eascres- 
cence (of certain trees). 

BROUT [brou] n. m. browao; browse- 

•JDOod. 

BROUT ANT, E [brou-tan, t] adj. (hunt) 
browsing. 

BROUTER [broa-t«] V. 0. to browse ; 
to browse on ; to crop. 

BROUTER, V. n. to brmose. 

BR0UTILLE8 [b?mn*-t*] n. £ (pi.) 1. 
H small branches (for fagots); 2. § 
knick-knacks ; knick-knackery. 

BROYER [broa-i«] v. a. 1. to pound; 
2. to grind (by a pestle, the teeth, &c.) ; 
8. to grind (colors) ; 4. to break (flax, 
hemp): 5. (did.) to pulverize; 6. (surg.) 
to pulverize ; 7. (tech.) to crush. 

— fin, to grind down ; — menu, 1. to 
pound small; 2. to grind small. — 
dans la bouche, to craunch. Machine i 
— , (tech.) crushing-machine; orusli- 
ing mill. 

BROYEUR [broa-iear] n. m. 1. pound- 
er ; 2. grinder (by the pestle) ; 3. grind- 
er (of colors) ; 4. breaker (of flax, hemp) ; 
5. (tech.) crusher. 

BROTON [broa-ion] n. m. + (print) 
brayer. 

BRU [bru] n. £ daughter-in-law. 

BRUANT [bru-in] n. m. V. Breant. 

BRUCELLE Lbru-.S-l] n. £ 1. (bot) 
brown wort ; 2. — s, (pi.) (tech.) tweezers. 

BRUGNON [bru-gno.!*] n. m. (bot) 
nectarine; smooth peach; clingstone 
smooth peach. 

BRUINE [bru-l-n] n. £ drizzling radn. 

De — , drizzly, 

BRITINER [bru-i-n«] V. imp. to drizzle. 

BRUINER, r. &. % to spoU by the 
drizzling rain. 

[B>!i'iNKK is used in the pa. p. only.] 

BRUIRE [hru-i-r] V. n. irr. & de£ 
(brcjyant; ind. pres. il bruit; lmper£ 
iL bruyait) 1. to rttstle; 2. to roar ; 8. 
to rattle ; 4. (of the wind) to whistle. 

[Bruirk i« u»ed only in th« inf., pr. p., and iu 
the 3d pere. ind. prot. «'nd imperf.] 



BRUISSEMENT [bn-i-vauu.] Jt in. L 
rustling; 2. rattling; 8. roaring; 1 
(of the wind) whistle; 5. (med.) T-dai 
(in o.'s ears). 

— cataire, (med.) pitrring irem&r ; •[ 
thrill ; cats pur. 

Bruit, ind. pres. 3d sing, of Brutrr 
BRUIT [bnii] n. m. 1. 1 § ncnse; • ? 
noi^e (sedition); disturbance; 3, " 
noise; quarrelling; quarrel; 4 $ rr 
port; rumor; 5.% fame; renown ;i 
(of bells) g^~ ding-dong ; 7. (of coash 
es) rattling; rattle; 8. (of confliscd 
noises) din ; 9. (of great noises) roar ; 
10. (of a succession of loud, resounding 
noises) peal; 11. (of sharp and quick 
noises) rattle; 12. (by the collision of 
metallic or sonorous bodies) clatter ; 18 
(of the wings of birds) whirring. 

8. Le — de la guerre, the din of war. 10. Un — 
di! canon on de tonnerre, a peal of canntm or of 
thunder. 11. Le — des tambours, ihe rattle of 
drums. 12. Le — des assiettes et des plat*, th 
clatter of plates and dishes. 

— 6tourdl8sant 1. deafening, alun- 
ning noise; 2. din; grand — , 1. great ■=.; 

2. obstreperousness ; — public, common 
report ; — sourd, 1. hollow = ; 2. rum- 
bling = ; 8. ** chide. — en I'alr, idle 
rumor afloat Un — qui court, a cu/rrenl 
report ; a rumor abroad. — s du cceur, 
(med.) sounds of the heart. Auteur 
d'un — , author of a report, r>mtorer. 
A grand — §, tcith pomp, ostentation ; 
ostentatiously; k petit — §, 1. pri- 
vately ; 2. unostentatiously ; avec — , 1. 
1 vyith = ; 2. I aloud ; 8. § ostentatious- 
ly ; sans — , 1. 1 § noisele.'ts ; 2. S softly ; 

3. § wnostemtatiousl/y. Faire du — , 1. | 
§ to make a = ; 2. i^ § to. make afivss ; 
8. (of coaches) to rattle ; 4. (of sharp and 
quick noises) to rattle; 5. (by the col- 
lision of metallic or sonorous bodies) to 
clatter; 6. (of the wings of birdfi) to 
whir ; faire un beau — , to make a gihicct 
noise, ^flne noise (to scold) ; faire OD — 
sourd, to rwmhle ; faire courir un — •, r6- 
pandre un — , semer un — , to rwmor; to 
noise ; r6pandre le — que, to spread Cte 
report (that); to give out (that); r6- 
pandre un — au loin, to noise abroad; 
r6pandre a petit — . to buzz ab7'oad. L 
court un — (que), le — court (quo), it U 
reported, rumored (that) ; there is a re- 
port current, abroad (that) ; le — so 
r6pandait sourdement ^t was darkly 
rumored. Beaucoup de — pour rien, 
much ado about nothing ; plus de — 
que de besogne, mare noise than work. 

BRtTLABLE [bru-U-bl] adj. t tiiat it 
to be burned. 

BRtTLANT, E [bm-lan, t] adj. 1. | 
burning; '^ burning hot; glowing; 
fervid ; 2. | scorching ; 3. I (of liquida) 
scalding; 4. % ardent; furvid; fer- 
vent; ^ burning ; 5. § glowing. 



BRtTLfi [brA-i«] n. m. burning (to 
the taste or smell). 

Avoir un gout de — , to home a taste 
as if it were burnt ; sentir le — , to smett 
of burning. 

BRtTLE-GUETJLE [brA-l-gh«u-l] n. m. 
^P~, pi. — , short pipe. 

BRtlLEMENT [brii-l-man] n. m. $ 
burning. 

BRtTLE-POURPOINT (1) [a-br4-l- 
pour-poin] adv. 1. 1 (of shooting) loith o.''a 
gun, pistol dose up; 2. § to o.'« face • 
in o.'s teeth ; 3. § unreservedly; 4. § (of 
argumeuta, reasoTis) irrefutable ; ^thttt 
comes home ; ^ home. 

BRtlLER [bra-i«] V. a. 1. I to frorn; 5t 
I to bum up ; 3. | to parch ; to parti/i 
up ; 4. II to scorch ; to scorch up; 5. 1 (of 
hot liquids) to scald; 6. I to sear (to 
burn the surface of) ; 7. § to sicelter ; 8. 
I § (b. 8.) to blast ; to consume ; 9, tti 
blow out (a. o.'s brains); 10. (dlst) fcJ 
atiU-burn. 

— (cowamer), 1. to burn away ; 2. 
(par rinceadie) to burn down ; 3. (ex- 
pulser par le feu) to ^um out. — eu- 
tierement to burn up. — de fond eu 
comble, to burn down to the ground ; 
— de I'encens devant q. u., to advCaU 
a. o. ; to flatter a. o. excessveelt/. 



BRU 


BUG BUL 


a mal ; d male ; 


e fee; e f&ve; e fSte; ^je; * 11; t ile; o mol; 6 m61e; 6 mort; w sue; & sure; om jonr; 



BRti.fe, E, pa. p. ( K senses of Beulkk) 
(of liquors) burnt. 

Non — , ( V. senses) 1. wiibitmed ; 2. 
Mi8corc?ied. fitre brule, ( V. senses) to 
litrn up ; — par le soleil, eitn-burnt ; 
torrid. 

Sk bettler, pr. V. 1 1. to burn o.'s self; 
S. to parch ; 8. to scorch ; 4. to scald 
».'« self (with hot liquids); 5. to be 
reared. 

BKtrLER, V. n. 1. \to bum; 2. I to 
fc« o»^r<s ,• 8. 1 to parcA ; to parch v/p ; 
*. I to scorch ; to scorch up ; 5. J (de, 
tw tA) to 6wr« (to be very warm) ; 6. § 
(»E, with) to burn; to be inflamed 
(with passion); 7. § (de, to) to long ; to 
he ardent, eager, impatient; to burn 
tffith the desire; 8. (play) to bum. 

6. Lea mains lui hrulent, kU kanda bum ; — de 
fiivre, <o bum mih fever. 6. — de colore, to bum 
wi&l anyer. 7. — de voir q. u., to long, <o be eager, 
impatient to tee a. o. 

— bien, 1. to bum well; 2. to=zup; 
— fort, to = briskly; — vite, to = 
away ; — encore, to = stilZ ; to be un- 
extinguished ; — avec flamme, 1. to = 
ttyith aflarm ; 2. (chem.) to deflagrate. 
Brftlant sans flamme, (of coal) blitid ; 
close burning. Qui ne brflle pas, 1. 
that does not=;2. wnbuming. 

BRtTLERIE [brn-l-H] n. £ 1. + burn- 
ing ; 2. t brandy-distillery. 

BRCLE-TOUT [bru-1-tou] n. m. pL — , 
tave-all. 

BRtTLEUR [bru-leur] n. m. burner 
(of houses) ; incendiary. 

Un — de maisons, an incendiary. 
II est fait comme un — de maisons, he 
ICfOks like a blackguard, rascal. 

BRtrLOT [bru-16] n. m. 1. {na,y.)flre- 
ship; 2. § (pers.) incendiary; fire- 
brand; 3. § (th.) thing highly seasoned. 

— k vapeur, steam fire-ship. 

BR tr LURE [brd-lu-r] n. C 1. bwn; 2. 
by a hot Uquid) scald ; 3. (agr.) bla^it. 

Sans — , 1. unburned; 2. u/nscorched. 

BRIMAIRE [bm-mJ-r] n. m. Bru- 
naire (second month of the calendar of 
lie fiist French republic, from 25 Octo- 
j»« to 21 November). 

BBL MAL, E [bm-mai] a^j. X brumal ; 
vintry. 

Fetes — es, (Rom. ant) brumalia. 

BRUME [bru-m] n. £ mist (at sea); 

BRUMEU-X, 8E [bru-meu, eu-i] adj. 
misty ; foggy. 

BRUN, E [brnn, n-n] adj. 1. \ broion ; 
8. 1 (pers.) vnth brovyii hair ; 3. || (of the 
complexion) dark; 4. | dusk (in the 
evening); 5. % gloomy; melancholy; 
dull. 

Couleur — e, brofonness. Etre — , 
Cpers.) to be dark ; faire — , to get dusk 
(in the evening). 

BRUN [brnn] n. m. 1. brovm (color) ; 
2. (pers.) a dark man, boy. 

— chatain, chestrmt = ; — clair, light 

= ; demi , whitish = ; — fonce, dark 

=. ; dun ; dun-colored. Tirer sur le — , 
to border, to verge on = ; tirer sur le — 
fonc6, to be dwrmish, 

BRUNATRE [bru-na-tr] adj. brownish. 

BRUNE [bru-n] n. f 1. dusk of the 
wening ; dusk ; 2. (pers.) brunette. 

A, sur la — , in the dusk of the even- 
ing ,' at dusk. 

BRUNELLE [bra-nJ-l] n. £ (bot) 
(genus) self-heid. 

BRUNET, TE [bro-n*, t] adj. 1. brown- 
ish ; 2. (of the oomplexion) some/what 
dark. 

BRUNETTE [bm-ni-t] n. £ 1. brunette; 
S + kyve-song; 3. (hot) ^ self-heal; 4 
,'>rn.) Pigmy curlew. 

r.RUHI [bru-ni] n. m. (tech.) hwm^ 
Uii. 

BRUNIR [bru-nir] V. 8. || 1- <o brown; 
t to dorr en (the complexion) ; 8. (tech.) 
to bumisA. 

Brbnx, e, pa. p. (T: senses of Brunie) 
$ dusky. 

8e BRirNiR, pr. V. 1 1. to get brown ; 2. 
(of the ccniplexion) to get dark. 

BRUNIR, V. n. 111. to get broion; 2. 
(of the complexion) to get dark. 

BRUNI88AGE [bmni-w j] n. m. (tech.) 
hm-nishinti. 



BRUNISSEU-R [bru-ni-.eni] n. m. SE 
[eii-z] n. £ burnisher (person). 

BRUNISSOIR [bm-ni-.oar] n. m. (tech.) 
burnisher (tool). 

BRUNISSURE [bm-ni-.u-r] n. £ 1. (dy.) 
browning ; 2. (tech.) burnish ; 3. (tech.) 
(art) burnishing. 

BRUSC Fbrusk] n. m. (hot) knee-?ioUy. 

BRUSQUE [brus-k] adi. 1. (th.) abrupt; 
sudden ; uneapected; 2. sfutrp ; bhtnt; 
3. gruff. 

BRUSQUEMBILLE [bra.-kan-bi-i*] n. 
f " brusquembiUe'" (game of cards). 

BRUSQUEMENT [bms-kg-man] adv. 1. 
abruptly ; suddenly; uneapeciedly ; 2. 
sharply ; bluntly ; 3. gruffly. 

BRUSQUER [bru.-k^] V. a. 1. to be 
abrupt witlh ; 2. to be sharp, blunt with 
(a o.) ; ^ to snap (a. o.) up; S. to do (a. 
th.) briskly. 

— une place de guerre, to make a sud- 
den, vifforous attack on a place. 

BRUSQUERIE [bru.-k8-ri] n. £ 1. 
abruptness; suddenness; uneacpected- 
ness ; 2. sharpness ; blunltiess ; 3. gruff- 
ness. 

BRUT, E [brut, t] adj. 1. | raw; un- 
wrougM ; 2. § rough ; unpolished ; 8. § 
(pers.) umpoUshed ; rude ; 4 § brutish 
(deprived of reason); 5. § brute (inor- 
ganic) ; 6. (of ground) uncidtivated ; 7. 
(of stones) rough ; 8. (of sugar) broton ; 
9. (a. & m.) raw ; umwrougKt ; 10. (com.) 
gross (weight, &c) ; 11. (fin.) gross; 12. 
(metal.) coarse. 

BRUT [brutl adv. (com.) gross. 

BRUTAL, E [bra-tal] adj. 1. brutal; 
brutish; 2. brutal (rough, uncivilized); 
brute ; 3. sturdy. 

BRUTAL, n. m. brute (rough, unci- 
vilized person). 

BRUTALEMENT [bm-ta-l-man] adv. 

1. brutally ; brutisMy ; 2. brutally (vio- 
lently, roughly) ; 3. sturdily. 

Traiter — , to treat brutally. 

BRUTALISER [bru-ta-U-z6] v. a. to 
treat brutally. 

BRUTALITY [bra-ta-U-t«] n. £ 1. 6m*- 
tality; brutishness; 2. brutality (vio- 
lence); 8. brutal passion; 4. brutal 
thing (action, word) ; 5. sturdiness. 

BRUTE [bra-t] n. £ I § brute. 

De — , brutish. Caract6re de la — , 
bridishnesM. Coftime la — , en — , bru- 
ileMy. 

BRUXELL0I8, E [brn-i^-loa, x] adj. of 
Brussels. 

BRUXELL0I8, p n. m. E, p. n. £ 
native of Brussels. 

BRrvAiT, ind. Imperf 8d sing, of 
Bkuirk 

BRUTAMMENT [bm-ia-man] adv. 1. 
noisily ; 2. obstreperously ; 8. clamo- 
rously. 

Tri'S- — , very noisily, obstrepe- 
rously. 

Bruyant, pres.j). of Bruire. 

BRUYANT, E [bn.-ian, t] adj. 1. noiJfy ; 

2. obstreperous ; 8. clamorous ; 4. bliis- 
terouH. 

BRUTi:RE [brui-i^-r] n. £ 1. (bot) 
heath ; heaUier ; 2. lieath (place). 
Coq de — , (om.) V. Coq. 
BRYON [bri-6n] n. m. (bot) tree-moss. 
BRYONE [bri-o-n] n. £ (bot) bryony. 

— blanche, =. 

Bu, E, pa. p. of Boiee. 

BUANDERIE [bu-an-d-ri] n. £ 1. lawn- 
dry ; wasJv-hmise. 

BUAND-IER [bn-an-di«] n. m. li:RE 
[^-r] n. £ 1. launderer ; laundress ; 
washerman; washer-woman; 2. (a. «fc 
m.) ?)leacher. 

BUBALE [bn-ba-l] n. m. (mam.) bu- 
balus. 

BUBE [bu-b] n. £ pimple. 

BUBON [bu-bsnl n. m. (med.) bubo. 

BUB0N(5Ci;LE [bu-bo-no-»4-i] n. m. 
(med.) bubonocele. 

BUCARDE [bu-kar-d] n. m. (conch.) 1. 
(genus) cockle ; 2. (species) h^art-shell. 

— comestible, cockle. 

BUCCAL, E [bu-kal] adj. (anat) buc- 
cal. 

BUCCIN [buk-mn] n. m. (conch.) 
(genus) whelk ; crwmpet-shell. 

BUCCINATEUR [buk-.i-na-uenr] n. m. 
(anat) buccinator. 



BUCENTAUBE [bu-wn-is-r] n. m. Bu 
centaur. 

BUC:6PHALE [bu-i«-fa.i] n. m. Buoe 
plialus (Alexander's horse). 

BtrCHE [bu-.h] n. f 1. II lag of wood; 
log; billet; 2. 1 stock (piece of wood); & 
J piece (of wood or coal); 4. § (pers.) 
stock (a stupid person) ; blockhead ; loif 
gerhead. 

A — perdue, (of wood) loose ; not im i 



"tb 



trCHER [bti-rii«] n. n-.. 1. woodshed, 
wood-Jumse ; wood-zwh; 2.f>J/tveralpUc, 
pile ; stake. 

Mohter sur le — , to mouAit the pile ; 
mourir sur le — , to die, to perish at the 
stake. 

BtrCHEB, V. a. 1. (ship-build.) to 
rough-hew ; 2. to destroy (for the pur- 
pose of replacing). 

BtrCHERON [b4-ih.r6n] n. m. wooM 
cutter ; woodman. 

BtCHETTE [bd-rfiJ-t] n. £ 1. sHck(ct 
dry wood) ; 2. stick (small). 

BUCOLIQUE [bu-ko-U-k] 8(y. (liter.) 
bucolic 

BUCOLIQUE, n. £ Giter.) bucolic 
(poem). 

BUCOLIQUE, n. m. (liter.) buco>,ia 
(poet). 

BUDGET [bud-jfe] n. m. 1, (admliu) 
Midget; 2. § Swdgret (receipts andexwm- 
diture). 

Presenter le — , (pari.) to open the =. 

BU£e [bu-i] a £ t V. Lessive. 

BUFFET [bu-R] n. m. 1. cu])board; 
2. buffet; 3. side-board; 4 service (of 
plate, eta) ; 5. (of organs) case. 

— mobile, rising cupboard. 
BUFFLE [bu-fl] n. m. 1. (mam.) buf- 
falo ; 2. (skin) buff. 

Peau de — , buffi De — , de pear, de — ^ 
buff. 

BUFFLETERIE [bu-fl-t-ri] n. t (ml!) 
shoulder-belts ; cross-belts. 

BUFFLETIN [bu-fl-tin] n. m. (iiiAir.) 
young buffalo. 

BUGLE [bu-gi] n. £ (bot) bugla. 

Petite — rampante \ mMdlo cor, 
sound. 

BUGLOSE [bn-gi6-»] B. t (bot) lu- 
gloss ; ox-tongue. 

— tinctoriale, dyer's bugloss. 
BUGRANE [bu-gra-n] n. £ (bot) ( «6l- 

fiuirrow. 

' BUIS [bui] n. m. (bot) 1. box; boay 

(tree ; 2. box ; box-wood. 

— piquant, (bot) butcher's bi'ooni, 
De — , boxen. 

BUISSAIE [bui-ai] n. £ plantafion qf 
box, box^trees. 

BUISSON [bui-ion] n. m. 1. &mA; 2. 
thicket. 

— ardent, 1. -f burning-bush ; i. (bot) 
evergreen thorn ; — epineux, ti om-=. 
Battre le — , to beat tJie = ; trc aver — 
creux, 1. (hunt) to have lost Vie game ; 
2. § to find, the bird flown ; se sauver h 
travers les — s §, to back out of it (& dis- 
cussion). 

BUISSONNER [bnl-w-n«] v. n. (bot) to 
bush. 

BUISSONNEU-X, 8E [boi-io-neu. e4-i] 

adj. bushy. 

i:tat — , bushiness. 

BUISSONN-IER, ikSE. [bui^o-ni*, 
iJ-r] adj. (of rabbits) bush. 

Faire r6cole buissonnifere, to ^toy ton«- 
ant. 

BULBE [bulb] n. m. (anat) butb. 

BULBE, n. £ m. (bot) 1. butb ; 2. (rf 
orchises) ctiUion. 

BULBEU-X, SE [bnlbefi, eA-i] tO^ 
(did.) bidhoiis. 

BULBIFERE [bul-bi-ft-r] a^j. (bot) 
bulbiferwis. 

BULBIFORME [bul-bi-for-m] adj, (let) 
bulb-shaped. 

BULGARE [bui-ga-r] adj. & p. n. m. £ 
Bulgarian. 

BULLAIRE [bu-lJ-r] n. m. buUary 
(collection of popes' bulls). 

BULLE [bu-i] n. £ 1. bul>ble ; 2. (Rom, 
ant) bulla; 8. (med.) bulla; bubble,' 
blister; 4 (metal.) bead. 

BULLE, n.£ 1. 6m« (pope's); 2.C''«tl 
Mdl. 

— d'or, golden buU. 



BUS 



BUT 



CAB 



(yd joftte; eu jeu ; *& jeftne ; eH, peur; mi pan ; m pin ; on bon ; im brun ; *1. liq. ; 'gn liq. 



BULLE, adj. (of paper) whity-hrovm. 



BULLi;, E [bu-U] adj. L ■fauth»ntia; 



3. by bull (pope's), 

BULLETIN [bu-l-tin] n. m. 1. ticket 
(to certify a th.) ; 2. buUetin (official re- 
ixjit) 3. cote (at elections) ; 4.(miL)6w^ 
ictin. 

BUNIUM [bn-ni-om] n. m. (bot) (ge- 
nns) earth-nut ; pig-nut. 

BUPHTHALME [buf-ui-m] n. m (bot) 

BUPHTIIALMIE [buf-tal-mi] n. £ 
(med.) buphthaknua. 

BUPLi:VKE [ba-pU.»r1 n m. (bot) 
Hare's ear. 

— h feuilles rondes, thorough-waca. 

BUPEESTE [ba-pr4..t] n. m. (ent) 
bv/prestes ; ^ b^irn-cow: 

BUKALISTE [bu-ra-U.-t] n. m. office- 
keeper. 

BUEAT [bu-ra] n. m. drugget. 

BUKE [bu-r] n. f. 1. drugget; 2. (min- 
ing) sA^^yt 

BUKEAU [bu-r6] n. m. 1. | wHtvng- 
table; desk; bureau; 2. | § office; 8. 
^of public assemblies in France) bureau 
(committee) ; 4. (of public assemblies in 
France) bureau (president, vice-presi- 
dents and secretaries) ; 5. fof public as- 
semblies in France) seat of t/te bureau. 

Petit — , ( V. senses) (post) receiving- 
house; — restant, to beleft at the coach 
office; to be left at the coach office UU 
called for. — d'arroudissement (post) 
branch postroffi^ie ; — des finances, 
irea»wry-offl,ce. — de tabac, tobacco- 
niefs sliop. Air, vent du — §, aspect 
of affairs, things ; chef de — , (adm.) 
second clerk ; gMpon de — , porter. 
Deposer sur le — , (pari.) to lay upon t/i^ 
table; 6tre depose sur le — . (pari.) toii« 
upon the table; payer 4 — ouvert 
(com.) to pay on demand ; prendre 
1 air du — , to see how tlie land ties ; to 
aoe 'Which wa/y the vyind blows. Lea 
—X sent ouverts depuis . . . lieure jusqu'A 
... Loure, tlis offices are open from . . . 
to ... o^clock ; offlae-lioxM's from ...to 
. . . ; 'air du — 'est . . ., affairs, things 
}u.tr>e a . . . aspect. 

BUREAUCKATE fbu-rt-kra-t] n. m. 
(b. 6.) bui-eaucrut (clerk In a public 
office). 

BUREAUCEATIE [bu-rft-kra..!] n. t 
bureaucracy (inlluence of clerks in pub- 
Uc offices). 

BUEETTE [bu-ri-t] n. f. 1. can ; 2. 
cruet; 8. vase (for the wine or water for 
mass). 

BJEGANDINE [bar-gan-di-n] n. £ bur- 
g'l/u motlier of pearl. 

BUEGAU [bur-gft] n. m. (mol.) bitr- 
guu ; 1 burgau mother of pearl oyster. 

BURGEAVE [bur-gra-v] n. m. Bur- 
fira/oe. 

BUEGEAVIAT [bur-gra-vi-a] n. m. 
Burgraviate. 

BUEIN [bu-rinl n. ni. 1. grawr (tool); 
8. %pe7i; 8. || maimer of engraving. 

2. Le — dn l'hi«toire, lAe pen of hiatori/. 

An — , avec le — , iinih the graver. 
Avoir le - - . . ., to engrave. 
BUEINEE [bu-ri.n6] V. a. 1. to <w- 



arwve ; 2. to write beautifully ; to write 
Uke copper-plate. 

BURLESQUE [bur-li.-k] adj. 1. bur- 
les(jue ; 2. (of verses) doggerel. 



\ ers —6, doggerel. Eendre —,tobwr- 

BUELESQUE, n. m. bwlesq^ie. 

Personne qui fait du — , burlesquer. 
Falre du — de, to be a burlesq-uer of. 

BUELESQUEMENT [bur-U^k«-man] 
Drdv. in a burlesque mAinner. 

BURSAL, E [bur-wi] adj. concerning 
tke raisers of an, extraordinary taw. 

Bus, ind. pret Ist 2d sing, of "Boirk. 

BU8A.RD [bu-iar] n. m. (orn.) bue- 
mrd; harrier. 

— harpaye, des marais, marsh ha/r- 
ner; — Saint-Martin, hen =:. 

BU8C [buak^ r. m. 1. bii,sk (for stays); 
e. (engin.) (of locks of canals) mitre; 
mttre-sill. 

BUSE [bn-z] n. f. 1. (orn.) buzzard; 
Carrier ; 2. § (pers.) blockhe/id ; dunce ; 
(itmder-head ; 3. (tech.) nozzle (of >^ 
tows) 



— bondr6e, (orn.) honey buzzard ; — 
pattue (orn.) "ough-legged =. 

BUSQUER [bu.-k«] V. a. 1. to put a 
busk i/n (a. th.) ; 2. to mMke (a. o.) wear 
a busk. 

Se busqtter, pr. v. to wear a busk. 

BUSQUli;EE [buB-kifi-r] n. C t place 
for a busk. 

BussK, snbj. imperf 1st sing, of Boirb. 

BUSSEEOLE [bu-ni-ro-i] n. t. (bot.) 
iwa ursi; 1 bears grape. 

BUSTE [ba.-t] n. m. 1. bust; 2. bust; 
head and shoulders. 

En — , (of portraits) Tuilf-length. 

BUT [bu] n. m.,1. || butt; aim; mark; 
2. I (of a rac^) goal; 3. § aim; end; 
qbyect; ^% purpose; viefio ; intent; 5. 
Qioy/\») jack ; 6. (law) intent. 

— arrlii^, fixed, set purpose; — par- 
ticulier, prtvate end. — de tir, butt; 
aim,; end. Stranger au — , foreign to 
the purpose ; —k — , 1. (play) tcithout 
odds; 2. (of exchanges) even-handed; 
dans le — de, for Hie pv/tpose of; with 
a view to ; to the end to ; wit/i the in- 
tent of; dans le meme — , to the same 
purpose, end ; dans un mauvais — , 
with bad intent ; dans un — utile, 1. 
vnth a view to utility ; 2. to some pur- 
pose ; dans quel — ? to what purpose t 
with what view t to what intent ? de — 
en bianc, 1. | § point-blank ; 2. § ab- 
rv/ptly ; 3. § bluntly ; sans — , 1. I aim,- 
less; 2. § to MO purpose. A Her au — , 
1. (pers.) to come to the point; 2. (th.) 
to be to the point; arriver au — i §, to 
reach the goal ; atteindre, parvenir k 
son — , to attain o.''s end ; frapper au — 
B, to hit tlie butt, mark ; frapper, toucher 

uer 1« 



■ §, to hit it ; manq 
feat tlie puipose; manquer son — , 1. 



to de- 
purj)ose; manquer son — 
.'8 aim; 2. §to defeat o^s pur- 



to miss o. 

pose; rempllr un — , to amewer, to serve 

a pv/rj)ose. " 

[But i> pronounced butt at the end of a phraie, 
or before a vowel or a ailent i.] 

A'//n.— But, vuk, dessein. The biit \» more 
filed; it is where one wishes to go. The »«»» are 
more vague ; they consist in what one wishes to 
procure. The dotein is more steady ; it is what 
one wishes to execute. One »e propose (propttae$ 
to hhmdf) a but (an md) ; one a (kat) vuet 
(vieio,) ; one forme (form*) a duMin (de^gn). 
The true Cliristian has no other but than Heaven ; 
no other me than to please God j no other dettein 
than to insure his own salvation. 

But, ind. pret 8d sing, of Boirk. 

But, subj. imperf. 3d sing. 

BUTANT [bu-tan] V. Arc-boutant. 

BUTE [but] n. f. (far.) butteHs. 

BUTilE [bu-t«] n. £ (arch.) abutm^enir 
pier. 

BUTER [bu-t«] V. a. f I to m the 
mark. 

BUTER, V. a. 1. (hort) to earth up; 
2. (mas.) to buttress ; to prop. , 

Sk Butbr, pr. V. 1. § (a, on) to be de- 
termined, bent (on a. th.) ; 2. (contrk, 
, . .) to oppose each otlier. 

BUTIN [bu-tin] n. m. booty; spoil. 

Faire du — , to get =. 

BUTINER [bu-ti-n6] V. n. 1. to get 
booty, spoil ; 2. ** § to pilfer. 

BUTINER, V. a ** § topUfer. 

BUTOIE [bu-toar] n. m. cwrrier's 
knife. 

BUTOME [bu-to-m] n. m. (bot)j«<wv 
ering rush ; water-gladiole. 

BUTOR [bu-tor] n. m. 1. (orn.) bittern; 

2. § (pers.) booby ; blockhead ; dolt ; 
loggerhead. 

BUTORDE [bn-tor-dl n. £ booby (wo- 
man) ; blockliead; dolt. 

BUTTE [bu-t] n. £ 1. 1 knoU; riidng 
grownd; 2. rising ground of a butt; 

3. (in Paris) hill (of Montmartre, Chau- 
mont, &c.) 

£tre en — ii§,tobe exposed to; met- 
tre en — i §, to ea>]jose to; bo mettre 
en — k % to expose o.''s self to. 

BUTTLE [bu-t«] n. £ (arch.) abut- 
m,ent-pier. 

BUTTER [bu-t«] V. a. (hort.) to earth 
up. 

BUTTER, V. n. (of horses) to stum- 
ble (In consequence of the unevenness 
of the •rround). 

^ JTYEEU-X, SE [bu-ti-ren, eu-il «/'< 



BUTYRIQUE [bu-ti-ri-k] adj. (cbem.) 
butyric. 

BUYABLE [bu-va-bl] aAj.^drinkitble 

BuvAis, ind. imperf. Ist sin^i. ji 
BoiRE. 

BuvANT, pres. p. 

BUVANT, E [bL van, t] adj | d^tiX 
ing. 

Blen — et bien mangeant, eiiing .^yi 
drinking heartil/y. 

BUVARD [bu-var] n. m. hicUiic- 
case. 

BUVETIER [bu-T-ti6] n. in. ta/eern 
keeper (adjoiniiug courts of law). 

BUVETTE [bu-vA-t] n. t 1. bib (gar 
ment) ; 2. refreshment-room. 

BUVEUR Fbu-veur] n. m '. didnkrr; 
2. (b. 8.) drinker ; toper. 

Fort — , hard di'vtiker ; p-and — , 
great=; carouser; clnhic--!^. drink ■ 
ing -club ; — d'eau, wuter-:=^ (man). 

BUVEU8E [bu-veu-z] n. £ danker 
(woman that drinks water). 

— d'eau, water-drinker (wonit ji). 

BuvoNS, Ind. pres. & inipeia. 1st pL 

of BOIKE. 

BUVOTTER [bu-vo-t«] V. n. 1. to sip; 
2. (b.B.) to bib. 

BYSSE [bi-s] n. m. (ant) byss.ts. 

BYSSUS [bi-.ui] n. m. 1. (ai.t.) bys- 
sus; 2. (bot) byssus. 

BYZANTIN, E [bi-zan-tin, i-n] .idj. A IL 

m. £ Byzantine; Byzamtian. 



C [s«, •«] n. m. (third letter of the al- 
phabet) 0. 

C, contraction of Ok, used before « 
vowel or a silent h. ( V. Ck.) 

gA [sa] adv. t Jiere. 

— et la, 1. here a/tid there; 2. j/^ n -</ 
dmon; 3. to and fro. Qui — ^:J ii 
some here and some there; soiiio l/ih 
way and some anoOier. 

OA, int so ! come '. 

Ca, pr. (contraction of Cei.a) that. 

Comme — , 1. Uke ttiat; so; 2. (nav.) 
right so 1 

CAB ALE [ka-ba-l] n. £ 1. cab'^.l; % 
cabala; cabal. 

Homme de — , cabaUer; science de 
— , cabalism. Faire une — , d-» — s, tc 
cabal ; monter une — , to gel up a ea 
hal. 

Sj»w.— Cabai.e, complot, conspikation, co>jo- 
RATioN. A cakale is the iiitriuTie of a party oi 
faction, formed in order, by secret practio s, Us 
turn the natural course of events to its own ad- 
vantage ; the prevailing idea of the word is thai 
of assembling a number, and manoeuvring under, 
handedly with address. A ■ 'vtpiut is the olandes 
tine union of two or more pei sons for the yur\>* ise of 
overthrowing or destroying, by some blow as effi 
cacious as unexpe. -ted, that which stands in theii 
way, or is an object of envy or odium. A nutipi. 
Toiton is the association of a greater niuiiber of 
persons, to bring about some serious change, nften- 
er in public afiairs than in private, oftener for th<* 
worse than the better. A eonjitraiion is more im- 
portant and dangerous than a ctmepiratit 



CABALERJ[ka-ba-l«] V. n. to cabal. 

CABALEUR [ka-ba-leur] n. m. cabal 
ler. 

CABALISTE [ka-ba-lis-t] n. m. cabal 
int. 

En — , cabalisUcally. 

CABALISTIQUE [ka-ba-l* u i] a<y 
cabalistic. 

CABANE [ka-ba-n] n. £ 1. cMti-igc ■ 
**cot; ** cottuge-lumie ; %hi^ve!; ^ui , 
shed. 

PeupI6 de — s, ♦* cottaged. 

-Sy».— Oabank, HuiTK,cHAijMii:RE. H'ltt \>n^ 
sents no other idea than that of shelter Ir. m th» 
inclemency of the weather. t'olnine ii.i|.l<i i 
wretchedness, misery. It is in the chattr inx 
alone that we are to look for conteinmtnl. liai-pC- 
nese. We say the eabane (hovel) of the desiitute 
the hvtu (hut) of the savage ; the c/iaumUrr, (cot- 
tage, eot) of the laborer. 

OABANER [ka-ba-n«l V. a. 1. to In- 
vert; 1 to tuT'n wpside down; 2. (oi 
boats) to turn keel upwards (on si ore). 

Se cabaner, pr. v. to build, erect huti 
(for shelter). 

CABANER, V. n. 1. to Iwe in a hut 
-.-... o '^j^ - ^ ^^f boats'v to upset. 





UAb 


(JA 


U 


L/AU 




a mal; d miile; e fee; e feve A fete; ^ je; 


i il ; i ile 


o mol ; 6 nir>le ; 


./ uiorl ; w buc ; M sure ; ou jooi ; 



CABANON [k«-ba-ndn] n. in. dwti- 
j«iD«i (of certain prisons). 

CABARET [ka-ba-ri] n. m. 1. pubUc- 
Kcmse; fW Uvp-Jumae ; ^0~ poU 
\cuse; 2. cUe-houae ; 3. tea-board; 4 
Je« equipage ; tea-service ; tea-sei ; ^ 
Ua th/ingif ; , 6. «e< o/ coffee-cups; 6. 
bt t) asarum. 

— torgne, 1. hedge pot-?iouse ; 2. 
^edge ale-houge. — a the, tea-equi- 
ptige ; tea-service ; tea-set ; 1 tea- 
Stings. Bouclion de — , ale-stake ; di- 
Vit de — , chop-fuyiise dinner ; garf on 
ds — , ta/cem-drawer ; pot-boy ; pilier 
ie — , tavern-haunter ; tavern-man ; 
pet-man; ale-knight; salon de — , tap- 
room. 

.Sim.— Cabaret, TAVERNK, aubkkge, h6tklle- 
*ie1 An cabartt is an establishment where liquors 
ire B.jld at retail to all who call for them, whether 
M carry away, or to drink on the »p Jt. A taveme 
m a cabaret frequented by those who drink to ex- 
Mas, who give themselves up to intemperance. 
An auherge is an eating-house at which regular 
aaeals can be procured. An hoteUerit ia an iim, & 
oolel, where travellers are lodged as well as 

CABARET-IEB [ ka-ba-r-ti« ] n. m. 
i:fcEE [ii-r] n. t tavern-keeper ; pub- 
lican. 

Diner chez le — , to dine at a chop- 
house, an eating-house. 

CABAS [ka-ba] n. in. 1. basket (flat) ; 

9. work-bag; 3. (for figs) mat; (b. s.) 
wicker-ioork carriage. 

CABASSET [ka-ba-se] n. m. t helmet 
(small). 
CAB^LIAU [ka-b*-U-6] n. m. ^ (ich.) 

CABESTAN [ka-bA»-tan] n. m. 1. (nav.) 
capstan ; 2. (tech.) whim ; portative, 
lMni-wincf>. ; wiiullass. 

— volant, (nav.) crab. Armer le — , 
to moM the =:. 

CABILLAUD [ka.bi-i6*] n. m. (ich.) 
I. (species) cod; cod-Jish; 2. If (genus) 
koeUng. 

CABINE ['{B-bi-n] n. f. (com. nav.) 
vibin. 

CABINET [ka-bi-ni] n. m. 1. 1 closet 
Q rivate room) ; 2. \ room ; 3. 1 st^uly 
fi\)om for studyinfi) ; 4. S cabinet (room 
fcr keeping things of value ; collection of 
mch things) ; 5. | cabinet (piece of furni- 
ture); 6. § practice (of a professional 
rntleman); 7. § cabinet (government); 
(of gardens) swmmsr-Jwuse ; 9. (of at- 
torneys, barristers, and notaries) qfflce ; 

10. (of judges) chamber; 11. (of libra- 
ries) alcove. 

•i. — de lecture, rearfin.^-room ; — de toilette, 
dtttsing-room. 3. Passer tout s m temps dans Sfin 
— , ('/ npend o.'t whole time in o.'» study. 

— noir, dark closet ; — parti culier, 
I. private room, ; 2. (of taverns, coffee- 
houses) box; — d'affiiires, d'aisance, de 
le<'.ture, de toilette, etc. ( F. Affaire, 
etc.); — d'etude, de travail, study. Af- 
fiiires de — , (of a lawyer) chamber- 
practice ; homme de — , studious man. 
De — , ( V. senses) of study ; st/itdious. 
Enfermer dans un — , to closet (a. o.) ; 
prendre dans un — (pour conforer), to 
closet (a. a). 

CABLE [ka-bl] n. m. (nav.) calle. 

Grand, maitre — , sheet =. — chaine, 
e^a«4-=; — de remorque, tow-rope. 
Rout de — , 1. cable-end; l.junk; lon- 
^eur de — , ='« length. Attach6 avec 
nn — , cabled ; non attache avec un — , 
tttuyibled; commis en — , = -laid. Filer 
(In — , 1. to give more =; to pay 
•ineay, to veer inore = ; 2. § to gain 
iime 

CaSL% E [ka-bi«] adj. (arch.) cabled. 

CABLIS, n. m. cord (thick). 

CABLEAU, CAbLOT fki-blft, bio] 
a. m. (nav.) boat-rope ; cablet ; paint- 
er; warp. 

CABLER [ki-bW] V. a. to wo*e a ca- 
la^of. 

CABLl AU [ka-bU-6] u. m, V. Cabt 

I.AUD. 

CABLOT [ki-bio] n. m. V. Cable au. 

CABOCHE [ka-bo-sh] n. f. 1. 1 (b. 8.) 

muddle ; pate ; scantm ; 2. (g. s.) head- 

A... — , qui • nne...— , ...paied. 



£tre une bonne — , to home a good head- 
piece. 

CABOCHON [ka-bo-shfln] n. m. poUsh- 
ed, uncut stone. 

CABOCHON, aOj. (of rubies) poUahed 
but uncut. 

CAB08SE [ka-bo-.] n. C (bot) cacao- 
pod. 

CABOT [ka-bo] n. m. (ich.) buU-head. 

CABOTAGE [ka-bo-ta-j] n. m. (com. 
nav.) 1. coasting; 2. coasting-trade. 

Grand — , coasting from, headland to 
headland; petit — -, = close to the 
shore ; navigation de — , coasting voy- 
age ; veriflcateur de — , coast-waiter. 

CABOTEK [ka-bo-t6] V. n. (com. nav.) 
to coast. 

CABOTEUR fka-bo-teur] n. m. (com. 
nav.) coaster (sailor). 

CABOTIER [ka-bo-ti«] n. m. (com. 
nav.) coaster ; coasting-ship, vessel. 

CABOTIN [ka-bo-tan] n. m. E [in] 
n. C (b. s). strolling player. 

CABRER (SE) [s«-ka-br«] pr. v. 1. (of 
horses) to rear ; to prance ; 2. § (pers.) 
to fly into a passion; to put o.'s self 
into a passion. 

Cheval qui se cabre, prancer. Faire 
— q. u. , to pv,t a. o. into a passion. 

CABRER [ka-br6] V. a. § to put into a 
passion. 

CABRI [ka-bri] n. m. kid. 

CABRIOLE [ka-bri-o-l] n. C 1. caper 
(leap) ; 2. (danc.) capriole ; 3. (man.) co- 
priole. 

Faire ime — , to cut a caper; to ca- 
per. 

CABRIOLER [ka-bri-o-l«] v. n. to 
caper. 

CABRIOLET [ka-bri-o-U] n. m. 1. 
gig; 2. (for liire) cabriolet; cab. 

— bourgeois, de maitre, gig. — de 
place, cabriolet; ^ cab; — a pompe, 
curricle ; — de remise, job =:. Place 
de — 8, stand of cabriolet, cabs, 

CABRIOLEUR [ka-bri-o-leor] n. m. 
caperer. 

CABRON [ka-brdn] n. m. kid's skin. 

CABUS [ka-bu] adj. m. (of cabbages) 
?ieaded. 

CACA [ka-ka] n. m. -T- cock. 

Faire ^, -=- to cack. 

CACADE [ka-ka-d] n. f. -j- 1. I cack- 
ing ; 2. § miscarriage ; ill success. 

Faire un vilaine =-, to miscarry (by 

imprudence or cowardice). 

CACAO [ka-ka-o] n. m. (bot) cacao; 
cacao-nut ; chocolate-nut; cocoa-tree. 

— caraque, cacao of the Caraccas. 
Amande, graine de — , = bean; beurre 
de — , (pharm.) butter of-=. 

CACAOTIEK [ka-ka-o-ti*], 

CACAOYEK [ka-ka-o-i*3 n. m. (bot.) 
cacq,o; cacao-tree; chocolate-plant, 
tree. 

CACAOTfeRE [ka-ka-o-ii-r] n. f. cacao- 
plantation. 

CACATOA, CACATOIS [ka-ka-toa] 
n. m. (nav.) rnyal. 

CACATOES, n. m. (orn.) cockatoo. 

CACHALOT, CACHELOT [ka-sha-io, 
ka-sh-lo] n. m. (mam.) cachalot; sper- 
maceti-whale. 

CACHE [ka-sh] n. f. ^ hiding-place. 

CACHE-CACHE [ka-sh-ka-sh] n. m. 
(play.) hide and seek ; whoop and. hide. 

CACHECTIQUE [ka-kik-ti-k] adj. 
(med.) cachectic. 

CACHELOT, n. m. V. Cachalot. 

CACHEMENT [ka-sh-man] n. m. J 
concealing ; hiding. 

CACHEMIRE [ka-sh-mi-r] n. m. cash- 
mere. 

CACHEMIRETTE [ka-sh-mi-ri-t] n. C 
cashmerette. 

CACHE-NEZ [ka-sh-ne] n. m., pi. — , 
comforter (neck-kerchief). 

CACIIER [ka-sh«l V. a. (a, from) 1. | 
to conceal ; to hide ; to secrete ; ^ to 
hide away ,* 2. § to conceal ; to hide ; 3. 
§ to conceal (to abstain from mention- 
ing) ; 1 to keep in. 

1. — q. ch. a q. u., to conceal, to hide a. t\.frm 
a. 0. 2. — son ambition, Ui conceal o.'s ambition. 
3. — son nom ou son rang, tu conceal o.'s namt or 

Action de — , concealment. Cacher 
sa vie, to Uve in retir&ment, seclusion. 



fitre, se tenir cach6, ( F. senseo) 1. (t. a) 
to keep out of tlie way ; 2. (b. t) to 
lwrk;S.{h.&.)toskidk. 

Cache, e, pa. p. ( V. senses) 1 aiit oj 
the way ; 2. undiscerned ; unseen ; Mt»- 
percei/eed. 

Personne — e, ( V. senses) 1. (b. s | 
lurker; 2. (b. s.) skulker; 3. {\hL)a3 ■ 
sconder ; vie — , solitary and rettfi>: 
life. Qui ne peut etre — , uncvnceai 
able. 

Se cacheb, pr. v. 1. to conceal o.'t 
self; to hide o. s self; to hide ; to seor«if^ 
o.'s self; T to hide o.'s self away; 2. <•> 
keep in, ; to keep out of the way / 3 to 
lie snug ; 4. (b. s.) to lurk ; 6. (b. s.) (in 
order to avoid arrest) to abscond. 

— kq. u., to conceal o.'s self from a. 
o. ; — de q. ch., to conceal a. th. ; — d«? 
q. u., to conceal o.'s conduct from a. o. 
— an monde, to Ivoe in great retire- 
ment, seclttsion. Action de — , (F. 
senses) concealment; personne qui se 
cache, 1 hider ; 2. (b. s.) lurker ; 3. (b. 
s.) absconder. Qui ne peut — , wncon- 
ceaZable. 

Syn. — Cacher, di8simitlbr,d£oui8EK. Caei^r 
((0 conceal) signifies to abstain from making 
known what one wishes to keep secret ; dittimulf 
(to diateinble) means, by reserved conduct, to con- 
ceal what one does not wish to have appear ; di- 
fiiiser {to dieguite) to put on false appearances ia 
order t > escape or mislead another's penetration. 
He who cache watches over himself that he m»y 
not be betrayed into any indiscreet 



them from discovering his real feelings ; 
degiiiee assumes altogether a different appearance 
fr. m the reality, and remains secure ot escaping 
detection. 

CACHET [ka-sh4] n. m. 1. 1 seal (of 
private individuals); 2. | seal (stamp); & 
§ stamp (sign) ; 4. ticket (card with a 
seal, or name). 

3. Porter un — d'originalit*, to biir a stamg # 
originalitt/. 

— \o\fint, flying seal. — d'armeo, =» 
with a coat of arms ; — de chiflfrefl, =» 
zcith a cipher ; — de la douane, cooiri 
Lettre de — , (hist, of France) 1. letf^r 
clause ; 2. "■lettre de cachet" (arbltrwj 
warrant of imprisonment without acott- 
sation or trial). A, sous — volant, tmd^ 
a flying = ; sans — , unsealed. Briser, 
roinpre un — , to break, to break opon a 
= ; courir le — 1[ §, (of teachers) to run 
about giving private lessons. 

[Cachkt must not be eonlnunrted with sceau.] 

CACHETER [ka-sh-t«] v. a. 1. to teal 
(with wax %vith the seal of a private in- 
dividual); 2. to seal up (with wax); & 
to wafer. 

Cire k — , sealing-wax; pain k — , 
wafer ; personne qui cachette, 1. sealer; 
2. person tlvat wafers. Mettro un pain 
i — a, to wafer ; to put a wafer on. 

Cachete, b, pa p. V. senses. 

Non — , 1. unsealed; 2. vntliout a 
wafer. 

6ACHETTE [ka-sh^-t] n. f. 1. hiOing- 
place ; 2. (b. s.) lurking-place. 

En — , 1. m concealment; 2. secretly ; 
by stealth ; 3. underhanded : 4 under- 
handedly. fitre en — , to be in conceal- 
ment; to lie concealed; faire q. cIl en 
— , to do a. th. by stealth; ^ to do a. Hi. 
in a corner: 

CACHEXIE [ka-k4k-.i] n. t (med.) co- 
cJiexy. 

CACHOT [ka-sho] n. m. L dungecn; 
2. (mil.) black Itole. 

Au — , in, into the =. Mettre an — 
T, (mil.) to put into the =. 

CACHOTTERIE [ka-sho-t-ri] n. t ^ 
mysteriousness ; mysterious toav <y 
acting, speaking (about ttlfles). 

CACHOU [ka-shou] n. m. eatX o 
catechu ; Japan earth. 

CACHOUTCHOU [ka-ihounht.! am. 
V. CAOUTCHOUC. 

CACIQUE [ka-si k] n. m. cacique (Jjr 
dian chief). 

CACI8 [ka-sis] n. ni. V. Cassis. 

CACOCHTIVfE [ka-ko-shi-m] M. 1 
(med.) cocooliymic; 2. § eccemrle, 
odd ; strange ; tfueer. 

CACOCHYMIE [ka-ko-shi-mtj n. » 
(med.) cacochymy. 

CACOfiTHE [ki.%o-*-t] adj. (imxL* 
i moUgnanL 



(J AD 


CAG 




CAI 


oAjoute; «MJeu; ewjeiine 


e& peur ; an pan ; i«. pin ; 


6m, bon ; un bruc ; 


•11 liq. ; 'gn liq. 



CACOGEAPIIIE [k- io-gra-fi] n. £ 
[Mcography ; bad, inourreot spetling. 

CACOLOGIE [ka-kj-io-ji] n. £ incor- 
rect /ofm of expression. 

CACOP ATHIE jlku-ko-pa-tij n. f. (mefl.) 
oacopathia; malignant ajiction. 

CACOPHONIE [k»-ko-to-ni] n. f. 1. 
,dld,) cacophoni/ ; 2. (mus.) cacoplwny ; 
ind-ulation. 

CACOSPHTXU \a-ko-.6k-ii] n. f. 
. :>ed.) cacosphyxia. 

CACOTHYMIE [ka-ko-ti-mi] n. f. 
(aied.) cacotkymia. 

OA.CTIEE [kak-ti«J n. m. (bot.) cac- 
tus; 1 blad-apple ; T Torch-thistle. 

— cochenillitere, nopal; cochineal- 
flff, fig-tree ; — opuntia, — raqaette, In- 
dian Jig-tree. 

CACTUS [kftk-tus] n. m. V. Caotier. 

C-A-D., aboreviation for o'est-a-dike, 
that is. 

CADASTRAL, E [ka-da.-tral] adj. (pol. 
jcon.) relative to the cadastre. 

GADASTPvE [ka-das-tr] n. in. (pol. 
econ.) " cadastre (register of the survey 
of lands). 

CAUASTRER [ka-das-w] v. n. (poL 
econ.) to form Vie cadastre. 

CADASTREli, v. a. (poL econ.) to 
form the cadastre of. 

CADAVfiREU-X, SE [ka-da-v«-reu, 

eu-x] adi. cadaverous ; death-like. 

CAD'AV^RIQUE [ka-d8-v6-ri-k] adj. 
(anat.) o/'d dead body. 

CADAVRE [ka-da-Tr] n. ni. corpse; 
dead body ; dead carcass ; *♦ corse. 

— ambulant, walking gliost. Voleur 
de — 8, resiirrectio7i-m,an. 

CADEAU [ka-do] n. m. preset; 
gift; compUment. 

Sans — X, ungifted. Envoyor en — , to 
nend as a present; faire — ii q. u. de q. 
eh., to make a. o. a present of a. th. ; to 
present a. o. vyith a. th. ; to make a. o. a 
eom>pliment of a. th. ; to compHment a. 
ft iMth a. th. ; faire nn — , to make a 
jiresent. Qui ne presente pas do — x, 



■xiu/i'yir^ 



iD:6DIS [ka-d«.di.] int. emmds. 

(JADENA8 [kad-na] n. m. \. padlock; 
2. (of bracelets, necklaces, &c.) clasp. 

— de chaine, I. =^ of a chcmv; l.fet- 
Uvlock. Enfermer sous — , to padlock ; 
oavrlr le — do, 1. to open the padlock 
of; •. to unclasp (bracelets, necklaces). 

CADENASSER [ka-d-na-.«] V. a. 1. to 
padlock; 2. to clasp (bracelets, necklaces, 
Ac). 

CADENCE [ka-dan-.] n. f. 1. frt- 
dence (harmony) ; cadency ; 2. (danc.) 
cadence; 3. (man.) cadence; 4. (mus.) 
oadence; close; 5. (mus.) quaver; 
quavering ; trill. 

AUer en — , (danc.) to keep time ; faire 
ane — , (mus.) to make a cadence ; tc 
quaver ; to trill. 

CADENCER [ka-dan-.«] V. a. 1. <o ca- 
dence; 2. (mus.) to time; 3. (mus.) to 
tfuike; to quaver; to trill. 

CADfeNE [ka-dj-n] n. f. i chain (tor 
convicts). 

OADENETTE [ka-d-nj-t] n. f. tress (of 
hair worn below the rest). 

CADET, TE [ka-dJ,, t] adj. 1. (of bro- 
thers and sisters) yownger ; 2. (of bro- 
thers and sisters) ddest but one ; 3. (of 
branches of families) younger ; 4. (of the 
same company )^?«-w tor. 

CADET [ka-d^] n. m. 1. yoimger bro- 
ther ; 2. you7igest son ; 3. younger 
man; 4. ^ young fellow ; fellmo ; 6. (of 
th< same company) junior; 6. (mil.) 
xidet. 

.lenne — de haut appotit T, extra/oa- 
gjTit ymtrvj felloio. 

CADETTE [ka-dfe-t] n. f. 1. younger 
tikfor ; 2. paving-stone ; 3. (bill.) short 
Sfte (L>ho-*.*r if the two long cues^ 

CADI ri*di] n. m. Cadi (Turkish 

CADIS [ka-di] n. m. caddis (serge). 

CADISS-EN, i:NE [ka-di-tm, 4-n] adj. 
^ Cadis. 

CADISS-EN, p. n. m. i:NE, p. n. t 
native of Cadiz. 

CADMIUM [kaa-mi-om] n. m. c..<2- 



OADOGAN. a.m.V. Catoa^ 



CADOLE [ka-do-l] n. f. (lock.) latch. 
CADRAN [ka-dran] n. m. 1. dial-plate; 
dial; 2. dtot (solar, lunar). 

— inclinant, incline, (dial.) incliner ; 

— lunaire, moon-dial; — solaire, sun- 
dial; — de pierre, (M<M-«towe. Faiseur 
de — 8, dialist 

CADRAT [ka-dra] n. m. (print) qua- 
drat. 

— creux, quotation. 
CADRATIN [ka-dra-tin] n. m. (print.) 

m quadrat 

Demi , (print) « quadrat. 

CADRATURE [ka-dra-tu-r] n. t (hor- 
ol.) motion-work ; dial-work. 

CADRE rk»-dr] n. m. 1. I frame ; 2. § 
frame-work; outline; 8. § compass 
(limits); 4. (arts) border; 5. (build.) 
frame ; 6. (mil., nav.) officers ; list of 
officers; list; 7. (nav.) cot 

Faiseur de — s, f rams-maker ; ou- 
vrage fait sur nn —, frame-work. £tre 
sur les — 8, (nav.) to be on- the sick-list; 
renfermer dans un — 6troit, to reduce to 
a narrmo compass. 

CADRER [ka-dr«] v. n. (avec) to 
agree (with) ; to suit (...); to tally 
Owith) ; to square (with). 

CADU-C, QUE [ka-duk] adj. 1. decay- 
ing ; declining ; crasy ; 2. (th.) ofca- 
dudty ; 3. ('bot) caducous ; fugacious ; 
4 (law) (of legacies) lapsed. 

•2. Age —.age of Ciulncity. 

Mai — . (mei\.) falling idckness. iltre 
— , ( F! senses) (law) (of legacies) to 
lapse. 

CADUC:fiE rka-du-.«] n. m. 1. (myth.) 
caduceus; rod; 2. i caduceus. 

De — , ead/ucean. 

CADUCITY [ka-du-u-u] n. f. cadu- 
city ; decay ; decline. 

C^CUM, C(ECUM [ai-kom] n. m. 
(anat)ca?,<!WTO. 

CAFARD j;ka-f&r, d] n. m. E, n. f. can- 
ter; hypocrite. 

CAFARD, E, adj. canting ; hypocri- 
tical. 

CAFARDERIE [ka-far^d-ri] n. t cant; 

Avec — , cantingly ; hypocritieally. 
Parler avec — , to cant. 

CAFARDISE [ka-far-di-i] n. £ + cant; 
hypocrisy. 

CAF6 rka-f«]n. m. 1. coffee (berry); 
2. coffee (beverage); 3. coffee-ttme; 4 
coffee-ho^uie ; 5. (of an Inn) coffee- 
room. 

— i la crdme, coffee loith cream ; — 
k gros grains, Uirge berried =; — a petits 
grains, small berried =; — des ties. 
West India = ; — an lait, = witli milk ; 

— Moka, de Moka, Mocha, Turkey = ; 

— en poudre, ground =. Balle de — , 
bale of-=- ; baraque k — , ■=.-shop ; br&- 
loir a — , -^-roaster ; commerce des — 8, 
■=^-trads ; couleur — , =:-color ; couleur 

— au lait, creo.m-color ; f6ve de — , =- 
bean ; graine de — , ^=.-berry ; maga.«in 
ft — , =-.«hop ; marchand de — , =.-deal- 
er ; marchande de — , =-dealer ; =-^ro- 
man ; tasse de — , cup of= ; demi-ta.sse 
de — , half a rup qfz=. 

CAFfiiER [ka-re-i«] n. m. cofee-tree. 

CAFI<:itRE rka-f«-i4-r] n. £, 

CAFETERIE [ka-f-ti-r] n. £ coffee- 
plantation. 

CAFfilQUE [ka-K-i-k] adj. (chem.) 
caffeic. 

CAFETAK, CAFTAN [kaf-an] n. m. 
caftan (Persian, Turkish garment). 

CAFETIER [ka-f-ti«] n. m. coffee-man; 
coffee-hmise-keeper. 

CAFETli;RE [ka-f-tiJ-r] n. £ 1. ooffe» 
pot; 2. mug. 

— de ... tasses, coffee-pot that holds 
, . . cups. 

CAFIER [ka-fi«] n. m. (bot) coffee- 
t/ree. 

CAERE [ka-fr] J), n. m. £ Gaffre. 

CAERE, adi. (Jaffre; of Caffraria. 

CAGE [ka-j] n. £ 1. cage; 2. (for 
poultry) coop ; 8. (carp.) cage ; 4. (mach.) 
case; casing; 6. (tech.)yram« ; fums- 
ing. 

— h poulets, hen-coop. En — 1, 
(pers.) Ml durance tfile. Mettre en — , 
to put into a cage ; faire sortir d'une — , 
to uncage. 



CAGNARD, E [ka-gaar, d*] (^J. i. 
lazy ; 2. J^" skulking. 
CAGNARD, n. m. E, n. £ 1. Icav 

bones ; 2. fW~ skulker. 

CAGNARDER [ka-gnar-d^*] V. 11 ^ So 

live in idleness, laziness. 

CAGNARDISE [ka-gnnr-di-.*] n. £ 5 
laziness. 



CAGNE [ka-gn*] n. f |^- slut. 

TSU-X, SE [ka-gneu, eu-.*] sdj 

1. (pers.) crook-kneed; knock- kntMxT', 



CAGNEl 



splay-footed ; 2. (( f the legs) crooked, 

CAGOT [ka-go, t] n. m. E, n. f bigot. 

En — , bigotedly. 

CAGOT, K, adj. bigoted. 

CAGOTERIE |;ka-go-t-ri] n. £ 1. bi- 
gotry; 2. act of bigotry. 

CAGOTISME [ka-go-ti.-m] Vi. m. bi- 
gotry. 

Avec — , bigotedly. 

CAGUE [ka-g] n. £ (nav.) cague 
(Dutch sloop). 

CAHIER [ka-i6] n. m. 1. book (otmtv 
nuscript or music) ; paper-book ; 2. 
copy-book ; 8. book (of loose sheets) ; 4. 
(of writing paper) quarter of a quire ; 
5. t memorial (of a public body to the 
sovereign); 6. (bind.) sheet; T. (hist of 
France) cahier (oflicial instructions of 
the electors to the deputii-^ at the Stt.tes- 
General). 

— des charges, 1. (pub. adm.) cotidi- 
tio7is; 2. (pub. works) conditions -»/ 
contract; — d'6criture, writing-bor k , 
— d'exemples, (of writing) copy-bo jk ; 
— 8 de philosophic, de tlu'-ologie (t)L) 
cmirse of philosojihy, theology (given 
by a professor to his pupils). 

CAUIN-CAIIA [ka-iu-ka-a] adv. ^ ai 
jog trot ; so so. 

CAHOT [ka-o] n. m. jolting ; joU. 

CAHOTAGE [ka-o-ia-j] n. m.j<A kyj. 

CAHOT ANT, ^ [ka-o-tau,t] adj.^ole. 
ing. 

CAHOTER [ka-o-w] V. a. 1. ItojM; 
2. § to toss about ; to beat about. 

CAHOTER, V. n. tojUt 

Chose, personne qui cahote, .?oW«r. 

CAHUTE [ka-u-t] n. £ 1. hut; howi; 
2. (navj small cabin. 

CAlEU [ka-ieu] n. m. 1. (hort) dow); 
1. flower of a dove. 

CAILLE [ka-i*] n. £ (orn.) quail. 

Vol de — 8, be^y of=^. 

CAILL:6 [ka-i«*] n. m. curd. 

CAILLEBOTTE [ka-i-bo-t»] n. £ con- 
solidated curd. 

CAILLEBOTTER (SE) [nS-ka-i-bo-t*] 
pr. V. to curd ; to curdle. 

CAILLE-LAIT fka-i-U] n. m., pL — , 
(bot) cheese-rennet. 

— blanc, vrai, (bot) = ; — jaune, joint 
gra.<)s ; — grateron, (bot) cleavers. 

CAILLER [ka-i6*] V. a. 1. to cwrd; to 
curdle ; 2. to clot 

Caillb, e, pa. p. ( V. senses) curdy. 

Sk CAiLLBE, pr. V. 1. to curd; to cur- 
dle ; 2. to clot; to coke. 

CAILLETAGE [ka-i-ta-j*] n. m. ^ 
PtoatUing ; tittle-tattle. 

CAILLETEAU [ka-i-W*] n. m. (orn.) 
young quail. 

CAILLETTE [ka-i4-t*] n. £ rennet; 
rumiet. 

CAILLETTE, n. £ gossip; lover cf 
tittle-Utttte. 

CAILLOT [ka-io*] n. m. 1. clot (oJ 
blood); 2. (mod.) coagulum, 8. (phy- 
siol.) cruor. 

CAILLOTIS [ka-io-ti*l n. m. kelp. 

CAILLOU Fka-iou*] n. m. 1. | ,ittn» 
(stone): 2. pebble ; pebblestone. 

— de cristal, pebble-crystal. De — ; 
flinty. 

CAILLOUTAGE [k»-iou-ta-j*] n. hl L 
pebble-work ; 2. (jpot) flint ware. 

CAILLOUTEU-X, SE rka-U„.t.^ 
eu-i*] adj. 1. flinty; 2. pebbled; ptt 
bly. 

CAILLOUTIS [ka-ion-ti*] n. ni. (ea- 
gin.) (of roads) Tn^toil ,• broken static. 

En — , metalled ; stoned ; of broken 
stone. 

CAlMACAN [ka-i-ma-kanj n m. eat 
maxsan ^Turkish dignitary). 

CAlMAN [ka-i-man] n. m. (erp.) alll 
gator; American crocodile 

CAIMANDER. V. OuKMANnim 



CAL 



CAL 



CAL 



I; dmale; ^fee; efBve; efete; ^je; »il; tile; omol; 6 mole; drnort; wsuc; wsure; cw jour; 



CAlQUE [ka-i-k] n. m. (nav.) launch. ; 
iJiip'a boat ; long hoat. 

CAI8SE [kj-.] n. f. 1. case ; box ; 2. 
tth«9t ; 8. (of coaches) body ; frams ; 4. 
(for flowers, plants) bom ; 5. (for money) 
oa*h-box ; 6. (for money) coffer (of jjub- 
Uo bodies); T. (for packing) case; 8. 
drrnn ; 9. (anat) drurr, (of the ear) ; 10. 
(book-k.) cash; 11. (com.) (of counters) 
iai; t/iUer; 12. (com.) casli-office; 18. 
(faOifund; 14. (pub. adni.) pay-office. 

Groese — , big drum ; petite — , (com.) 
(of counters) till ; tiller. — d'amortisse- 
ment, ( V. Amoktissement). — a claire- 
Toie, crate ; — d'6pargne, ( V. Epargne). 
— des pensions, pension-fund ; — de 
trompe, (tech.) drwm; — h vent, (nav.) 
tnmh. Compte de — , (book-k.) caah-ac- 
cowni; jour de — , (com.) prompt day; 
llvre de — , (book-k.) cash-book; mise 
en — , packing ; packing in a case, in 
ernes. En — , (com.) m hand. Battre 
Ut — , (mil.) to beat the drum ; faire la 
— , (book-k.) to make v/p the cash ac- 
oownt; solder la — , (book-k.) to balance 
Pie caslv-book; tenir la — , to act as 
cashier. 

CAISSETIN [k6-.-tm] n. m. smaU 
deal box. 

CAISSIEK [kJ-sifi] n. m. cashier; 
oash-keeper. 

CAISSON [k*-«6n] n. m. 1. (arch.) cof- 
fiir; compartm^it ceiling; 2. (artil.) 
po^cder - cart ; 3. ( build. ) caisson ; 
chest; 4 (mil.) caisson; wagon; 5. 
(can»l-nav.) cradle. 

— k poudre, (nav.) powder-chest. 
CAJOLER [ka-jo-16] v. a. 1. to cajole; 

*{ to wheedle ; 2. tofawmi/pon ; 8. (nav.) 
fe> drive (a vessel against the wind, by 
the aid of the current). 

CAJOLEEIE [ka-jo-l-ri] n. £ 1. cajo- 
lery ; ^wheedling; i. fawning. 

Avec — , 1. with-=^\ l.fawningly. 

CAJOLEU-E [ka-jo-Ienr] n. m. 8E 
[•o-z] n. f. 1. cajoler ; 1 wheedler ; 2. 
/numer 

CAL [kai] n. m., pi. — s, 1. calhis; 
ocUovity ; T bUster ; 2. (med.) caU-us. 

CALABROIS, E [ka-la-broa, z] adj. & 
|>. n. m. f. Ca.abrian. 

CALADE L^ft-ia-d] n. t (man.) ca- 
Icuie. 

CALAISIEN, NE [ka-U-ri-in, A-n] adj. 
qfGalais. 

CALAISIEN, p. n. m. NE, p. n. f. na- 
tive of Calais. 

CALAISON [ka-U-zon] n. f. (nav.) Une 
Iff floating ; load water Une. 

CALAMBAC [ka-lan-bakl, 
CALAMBOUC [ka-lan-bouk], 
CALAMBOUE [ka-lan-bour] n. m. ca- 
lambac (wood). 

CALAMENDRIER [ks-U-inan-dri«] n. 

m. (hot.) comtnon wall-germander. 

CALAMENT [ka-la-man] n. m. (bot) 

oalamint. 

CALAMINAIRE [ka-la-mi-n^-r] adj. t 
(ifcalamine. 

Pierre — t, calamine. 

CALAMINE [ka-i«-mi-n] n. f. (min.) 
vaiarmne. 

CALAMITE [ka-la-mi-t] n. C (mln.) 
oalamite. 

CALAMITY [ka-U-mi-t«] n. t (of clr- 
comstances) calamity. 

Dans la — , (pers.) calamitous ; plein 
de — 8, calamitous ; sous le poids de la 
— , under thepresswe of calamity. 

8i/n. — CalamitA, malheue, infortunk. A 
ciilumiii is a positive evil, only in relation to the 
uiUM ; it may menace individuula, without actually 
a/»ntikmg them. The malheur ia the evil re- 
M-iv^ ; the in/ortune ii the evil felt. The ca/a- 
miti ;»the thing iuelf; the nMlhettr \» the blow 
Witt K-bich it afflicta U8 : the infonunt i« the effect 
which it produces ui>on us. The plague ia a eala- 
WnUt {cainfrMy) which depopulates a city, but 
whieh some may escape ; he who beholds his son 
tell n Tictim to it, experiences a malheur (afflic- 
tion) f the situation in which he ia placed by this 
c^ la his infortuTU (muiffrriune). 

OALAMITEU-X, SE [ka-U-mi-teii, efl-x] 
to^. (of circumstances) calamitous. 

CALANDRAGE [ka-lan-dra-jl n. m. (a. 
fc m.) calendering. 

CALANDRE [ka-lan-drj n. C 1. (ent.) 
jDeevil; cakmdre; 2. (om.) calandra. 

— dn ble, (ent) com-iceevU. 

t ALANDRE, n. £ (a. & m.) caZender. 



CALANDEER [ka-lan-dr*] V. a. 1. to 
mangle ; 2. (a. & m.) to calender. 

CALANDREUR [ka-Un-dreur] n. m. 
(a. & m.) calendrer. 

CALAO [ka-la-o] n. m. (orn.) (genus) 
horn-biU. 

CALATRAVA [ka-la-tra-va] p. n. m. 
Oalatrama (Spanish military order). 

CALCAIRE [kai-k^-r] adj. 1. (chem., 
geol., mip.) calcareous; 2. (chem., min.) 
calo. 

Depcit, encroiitement — , (min.) sinter ; 
pierre — , (min.) lime-stone; pierre — 
hydraulique, hydraulic limestone ; 
spath — , (min.) calc-spar ; tuf — , (min.) 
calc-tuff. 

CALCAIRE, n. m. (min.) limestone. 

— hydraulique, hydrauUc = ; — in- 
termediaire, de transition, transition =. 

CALCANfiUM [kal-ka-n«-om] n. m. 
(&xiat.\calcaneimi; heel-bone. 

CALC£D0INE [kal-.«-doa-n] n. t 
(min.) chalcedony. 

0ALC]6D0NIEU-X, SE [kaI-s«-do-ni- 
en, eu-z] adj. (jewel.) chalcedonic. 

CALCI^ABLE [kal-n-na-bl] adj. (did.) 
calcvnable. 

CALCINATION [kal-si-na-sion] n. £ 1. 
(action) ignition ; 2. (did.) calcination ; 
3. (tech.) calcining. 

Four de — , (chem.) oalciner. 

CALCINER [kal-si.n«] V. a. (did.) to 
calcine. 

Se CALCINER, pr. V. (did.) to calcine. 

CALCIUM [kal-ai-om] n. m. (chem.) 
calcium,. 

CALCOGRAPHIE [kal-ko-gra-fi] n. C 
calcography. 

CALCUL [kal-kul] n. m. 1. ! § calcula- 
tion; ^ reckoning; 2. ciphering (a.nth- 
metic); 8. (math.) calculus; 4 (med.) 
calcul/ua ; concretion ; 1 stone. 

— approximatif, rough calculation ; 
— arthritique, (med.) gouty calculus, 
concretion ; — diflferentlel, (math.) dif- 
fer enMal calculus ; ftuxdons ; fiuadonal 
analysis; — exact, accurate =; faux 
— , erroneous =. Erreur de — , error in 
= ; mathematicien vers6 dans le — dif- 
fer en tiel,^wa;io«'Mfe Au dela de tout—, 
beyond =, account; de — , 1. of ■=■; 2. 
calculati/ce ; de — fait, emery thing caU 
ctdated ; du — differentiel, (math.) 
fiweionary. Faire un — , to calculate ; 
to compute ; se tromper dans son — , to 
be mistaken, 1 out im. o.'s =. 

CALCULABLE [kal-ku-la-bl] adj. col- 
eulable. 

CALCULATEUR [kal-kn-la-teur] n. m. 
calculator ; reckoner. 

Commis — , (com.) ntimberer. 

CALCULATEU-R, SE [kal-ku-la-tetir, 
en-z] adj. calculating. 

CALCULER [kal-ku-l«] v.fLl. I to cal- 
culate ; to compute ; to reckon ; 2. § to 
calculate. 

— bien, mal, to = weU, badly ; tobea 
good, a bad reckoner. Calculi k... 
pres, calculated, reckoned to tlie near- 
est... Qui ne calcule pas, wncalculat- 
ing. 

Calcule, k, pa. p. V. senses of Cal- 

CXTLER. 

Non — , 1. wncalculated; vmreckoned; 
umMtmmed ; 2. unscawned. Qu'on n'a 
pas — , 1. uMcalculated ; mvreckoned; 
unsummed ; 2. wnscanned. 

CALCULER, V. n. to calculate; to 
cipher ; to reckon. 

CALCULEU-X, SE [kal-ku-leu, ed-z] 
adj. (med.) calculous. 

Affection calculeuse, = disease ; con- 
cretion calculeuse, concretion. 

CALCULEU-X 1- m. SE, n. t. person 
attacked unth calculus. 

CALCULIFRAGE [kal-ku-U-fra-j] adj. 
(med.) Uthontriptic. 

CALE [ka-l] n. f. 1. (of quays) slip; 2. 
(nav.) hold (of a ship); 8. (nav.) chock 
(wooden wedge) ; 4. (nav.) (jiunishment) 
keel-hauling ; keel-raking ; ducking ; 
'5. (ship-build.) stock; slip; 6. (tech.) 
block ; wedge. 

— de construction, (ship-build.) .noc/C ; 
slip. Extrcmite de la — , (nav.) rung. 
Gens de la — , (nav.) holders ; matelot 
de la — , (nav.) holder; profondeur, 
creux de la — , (nav.) depih of the hold. 



Arrimer la — , faire !''arrimage de la — , 
(nav.) to stow, to irtm the hold ; donnoi 
la — , (nav.) to keel-liaul; to keel-raka. 
to duck. 

CALEBASSE [ka-l-ba-s] n. f. L (bot) 
calabash ; gOurd ; bottle gou/rd ; oroob- 
neck ; 2. calabash (empty). 

CALEBASSIER [ka-i-ba-sis] n. m. 
(bot) (genus) calabash ; calabaeK4rct ; 
gourd-plant, tree. 

CALECHE [ka-W-rii] n. t 1. oaicui?^,; 
carriage ; 2. open carriage ; 3. t oalatA 
(hood). 

— decouverte, open carriage. — fi 
bateau, sociable. 

CALEOON [ka-i-rtn] n. m. dratoert; 
pair of drawers. 

— de bain, bathing drawers; — dc 
nageur, gwimmting ==. En — , in o.'« = 
with o.'s drawers on. 

CALlfiDONIEN, NE [k»-W-do-min, h-m] 
adj. Caledonian. 

CAL^DONIEN, p. n. m. NE, p. n. C 
Caledonian. 

CAL]fcFACTEUE [k»-U-fek-teur] n. vx 
it^mi-kitchen. 

CaLEMBOUE [ka-Un-bour] n. m. pun; 
paragram. 

Faiseur, faiseuse de — s, paragram^ 
matist. Engager q. u. par des — s i q. 
cb.. to pum, a. o. into a. th. ; faire un — , 
to make a pun ; faire des — s, to make 
puns ; to pun ; parler par — s, to pun. 

CALEMBOURISTE [ka-lan-bou-ria-t] 
n. m. punster. 

CALEMBREDAINE [ka-lan-brt-di-n] 
n. f. ^ subterfuge ; shift. 

CALENDER [ka-ian-d«] n. m. caUn- 
der (Persian, Turkish monk). 

CALENDE8 [ka-lan-d] n. C (pi.) 1. 
(Rom. ant) calends; 2. assembly (of 
country vicars). 

Aux — grecquea, w/ien the Cfreek^* 
arrive. Renvoyer aux — grecquoB; ft 
put off for ever. 

CALENDRIER [ka-lan-<iri«] n. tn. L 
calendar ; almanac ; 2. (ecct bist) <M 
lendar. 

Nouveau — , corrected, reformed oa 
lendar. — de Flore, du jardinler, hortu- 
lan =. 

CALENTURE [ka-lan-t4-r] n. f. (med.) 
calenttire. 

CALEPIN [k»-l-pin] n. m. mem^oran- 
dwmbook ; scrap-book ; common-place 
book. 

CALER [ka-i«] V. a. 1. to wedge; to 
wedge up; 2. to wedge in ; 8. (nav.) to 
lovier. 

<JALER, V. n. (nav.) to sink low in the 
water. 

CALF AIT [kai-ft] D. m. (nav.) caUc 
in.g-iron. 

CALF AT [kai-fcl n. m. (nav.) caOcer. 

Maillet de — , calking-maUet ; moussi^ 
de — , (navj oakwm-boy. 

CALF AT AGE [kal-fa-u-j] n. m. (nav.) 
calking. 

CALFATER [kal-fa-t*] v. a. (nav.) tc 
calk. 

Maillet a — , calktng-mallet 

CALFATIN [kai-fa-tin] n. m. (nav.) 
calker's boy. 

CALFEUTRAGE [kal-feu-tre-j] n. m. 
stopping up of chinks. 

CALFEUTRER [kal-feu-trt] v, ». to 
stop up the chinks of. 

8b oalfeutrer, pr. v. to stop up the 
chinks ; to ^hut out the vdnd, air. 

CALIBRE [kai-i-br] n. m. 1. | (of fli* 
arms) caliber; calibre; bore; size; S, 
(of shot) caliber; calibre; size; 8. | in 
terior diameter; size; 4 1 § calibft, 
stamp; kind; 5. (arch.) calibre; ft 
(artil.) caliber; calibre; 7. (instruiiusit) 
cuUber-rule ; 8. (mach.) bore. 

Compas de — , (artil.) calipers ; colt- 
per-eoTtipasses. Donner le — , to g-itM 
the calibre ; etre du — de q. n., to be of 
a. o.^s calibre ; tc be a match for a. o,; 
trouver q. u. de son — , to fmd a. o 
ofo.'s calibre; ^ to meet o.''8 matdu 

CALIBRER [ka-u-v«] V. at 1. to giv* 
the calibre; 2. to measure, take tht 
calibre. 

CALICE [ka-U-s] n. m, 1 chalUyi' 
commu/nioTu-cvp ; cup ; 2. (bot) calAfc, 
flower-cup, cfuv. 



CAU 










CAM 












CAM 


<wjoute; 


eujeu; 


«zl jeune; 


cwpeur; 


On 


pan ; In pin ; 


owbon 


un 


brun 


*11 


_llq. 


; 'gn iiq. 



Voile du — , (Eom, cath. relig.) ani- 
m-etta. Avalar, boire le — , to drink the 
twp ; %1 to swallow tlis pill ; boire le 
— jusqu'^ la He, to dnnk of the owp of 
bitterness to th« dregx. 

CAI JOINAL, E [ka-U-«-nal] adj. (bot.) 
oalyciae. 

CA] J COT [ka U-k»] n. in. 1. calico ; 2. 
fV" ihopman. 

DALIFAT [kal-i-fa] n. m. caUphate. 

CALIFE [k»-ii-f] n. m. caUph. 

OALIFORNIEN, NE [ka-li-for-ni-in, 
Ui] adj. Californian. 

CALIFOENIEN, p. n. m., NE, p. n. f. 
Califomian. 

CALIFOURCHON (A) [a-ka-U-lour- 

9hon] adv. astride ; ^ astraddle. 

8e mettre a — , to stride; to get 
astride; to straddle; se mettre k — 
BUT, to straddle ; se teni' k — , to stride ; 
to be astride. 

CALIFOURCHON [ka-li-four-.hon] n. 
m. § hohby (favorite pursuit). 

CALIGO [ka-U-go] n. m. (med.) ca- 
ligo. 

CALIN [ka-lin] n. m. E [i-n] n. f. 1. 
booby ; ninny ; 2. ^ + cajoler ; wheed- 
ler. ^ 

CALIN, E, adj. cajoling ; wheedling 

CALINER (SE) [.J-ka-U-u«] pr. v. to 
■■^imge ; to idle. 

CALINERIE [k4.U-n-ri] n. f cajolery ; 
wheedUng. 

CALIOENE [ka-U-oT-o] n. £ (nav.) 
ttock-tactle. 

CALLEU-X, 8E [ka-lefl, eu-zl adj. | 
callous (hard). 

Corps — , (anat) " corpus calloswm.^^ 
D'une maniore calleuse, callously. 

CALLIGEAPHE [kal-U-gra-f] n. m. 
good penman. 

OALLIGRAPHIE [kal-li-gra-fi] n. f. 
calligraphy ; good penmanship. 

CALLIGRAPHIQUE [kal-li-gra-fl-k] 
aril. caUigraphio. 

CALLOSITJfc [kal-lo-M-M] n. f. 1 1. cal- 
losity; callousness; 2. callosity (hard 
t>-irt). 

Avcc — 1, callously. 

OALMANDE [kal-man-d] n. f. 1. 
meting; cala/manco; 2. {ych.) whiff. 

CALMANT, E [kal-man, man-t] adj. 

(nied.) composiMg; soothing; appeas- 
hig ; quieting. 

CALMANT [kal-manl n. m. (med.) 
anodyne ; composing draught. 

CALMAR [kai-mar] n. m. 1. t pen- 
ease ; 2. (moll.) calama/ry. 

CALME [kai-m] adj. 1. \ § caVm; ** 
ealmy ; 2. § quiet ; still ; undisturbed ; 
8. 8 wrwmpassioned ; 4. § dispassionate; 
aomposed ; unruffled ; 5. § collected ; 6. 
(com.) daiM^at. 

Feu — , ( F, senses) wncollected. 

CALME, n. m. 1. 1 § calm, ; calmness ; 
2. % quietness ; stillness ; ** stiU ; un- 
distnirbedness ; 8. § composedness ; 4. 
(nav.) calm. 

— plat, (nav.) dead, flat calm. Avec 
— , 1. 8 § with =, calmness ; calmly ; 2. 
I qvAeMy ; sUUy ; 8. § dispassiomdely ; 
comiposedly. fitre pris de — , (nav.) to 
be becalm.ed. 

CALMER [kil-mfe] V. a. 1. 1 § to calm ; 
%%to qidet ; to sUU ; ** to hush ; 8. § 
to compose ; to ease ; to allay ; to 
soothe; 4. § to pacify; to soothe. 

Chose, personne qui calme, 1. calmer; 
i. quieter; stiller; 8. composer; al- 
kM/er ; soother. Qu'on ne pent — , ( V. 
tenses) 1. wnappeasable ; 2. unaton- 
able. 

CALMi, K, pa. p. F. senses of Cal- 

Non — , ( FI senses) 1. ttncahned ; 2. 
Uiiqmeted ; unstUled ; ♦* un/mshed ; 8. 
o-.ncomposed ; vmsased ; tinaltayed ; 
'jnsoothed; 4. unappeased; impacified ; 
5. unatoned. 

8k oaij<kr, pr. V. 1. I § to calm o.'s 
tt^f; to become, ^ to get calm ; 2. %to 
become, ^ to get quiet, stiU ; 8. § to com- 
pose o.^s self; to becoTne, to be, ^ to get 
iosed, allayed, soothed ; to be p '• "elf 
j^OMn; ^ % to wwmfflt, X,. ^ (th.) to 
'fl^/w over. 

CALMER, V. n. (nav.) tofaU calm. 

CALM 11? [kal-mll n. t {nAv.)hiU. 



(phy^s 



CALOMEL [ka-io-mel] n. m. (pharm.) 
calomel. 

CALOMNIA-TEUR [ka-Iom-ni-a-tenr] 
n. m. TRICE [tri-»] n. f. calumniator ; 
slanderer ; tradncer ; detractor ; de- 

CALOMNIE [ka-lom-nf] n. t calumny; 
slander. 

CALOMNIER [ka-lom-ni«] V. a. to ca- 
lumniaite ; to dander ; to traduce. 

Action de — , caliimniation ; slander- 
ing ; traducing. 

CALOMNIER, v. n. to calumniate; 
to slatider. 

CAL0MNIEU8EMENT [ka-lom-ni-«n- 

i-man] adv. calumniously ; slanderous- 
ly ; traducingly. 

CALOMNIEU-X, SE [ka-lom-ni-eu, eu-r] 
ac^. calumniousj sla/nderous. 

C ALOMN lOG RAPHE [ ka-lom-ni-o- 
gra-f ] n. Di. X writer of yMhurnny. 

CALONlfeRE [ka-Io-m4-r] n. C pop- 
gvAi. 

CALORIFi:RE [ka-lo-ri-ft-r] n. m. air- 
stove ; hot air-stove. 

— d'eau, calorifere of water. 
CALORIFICATION [ka-lo-ri-fl-ka-«ST.l 

n. f. (phys.) calorification. 

CALORIFIQUE [ ka-lo-ri-fi-k ] adj. 
(physj calorific. 

CALORIMfeTRE [ka-lo-ri-mj-tr] n. m. 
.) calorimeter. 
ALORIQUE [ka-lo-ri-k] n. m. (phys.) 
caloric. 

De — , caloric. 

CALOTTE [k«-lo-t] n. f. 1. Cof priests) 
calotte ; 2. cap (for men) ; 3. |^~ § box 
on the ear ; 4. (of sergeants at law & 
judges) coif; 6. (anat) upper ludf of 
the skull ; 6. (arch.) calotte ; 1. (phys.) 
cap ; 8. (snrg.) skull-cap. 

— des cieux, § cartxypy of heaven ; — 
du crane, (anat) skuU. CoifTer de la — , 
to CO*/ (sergeants at law <fe judges). Non 
coiff6 de la — , (of sergeants at law <& 
jud ges) uncoiffed. Donner des — s k q. 
u. ^W, to box a. o.'« ears. 

CALOTTER [ka-lo-w] v. a. |^" to 
box tlie ears of. 

CALOTIER [ka-lo-tl«] n. m. 1. ca- 
lotte-maker ; 2. cap-maker; 8. coif- 
maker. 

CALQUE [kal-k] n. m. 1. (draw.) 
counter-drawing ; 2. § transcript ; im- 
itation; copy, 

CALQUER [kal-k«] V. a. 1. (draw., 
engr.) to trace ; to counter-draw ; 2. § 
(8UR, from) to imitate; to copy ; to 
make out. 

— ^ la pointe, to counter-draw 
with a point; — & la vitre, to = on, 
glass. 

Calquk, b, pa. p. F; senses of Cal- 

QUER. 

Non — ^, (draw.) untraced. 
CALUMB:6, n. m. F Colombo. 
CALUMET [ka-lu-mi] n. m. calumet; 
pipe. 

— de paix, jripe of peace. 

CALUS [ka-lus] n. m. 1. J calhis ; cal- 
losity ; 1 blister ; 2. § callousness ; ob- 
duracy ; 3. (med.) callus. 

Se faire un — contre §, to be callous 
to ; to be obdurate to. 

CALVAIRE [kal-v4-r] p. n. m. Cal- 
vary. 

CALVILLE [kai-vi-i] n. m. calviUe 



i-n] 



(apple). 

CALVINIEN, NE [kai- vi-ni-m, 
adj. Caloinistic. 

CALVINISME [kal-vi-nis-m] D. m. 

Calvimism,. 

CALVINISTE [kal-Ti-ni8-t] adj. Cal- 
vinistic. 

CALVINISTE, n. m. f. CaMnist. 

CALVITIE [kal-vi-«i] n. £ baldness. 

CAMAlEU [ka-ma-ieu] n. m. 1. comeo ; 
2. (paint) cameo ; brooch. 

CAMAIL [ka-mai*] n. m., pi. — s, 1. 
caTnail (of a catholic bishop) ; 2. camail 
(garment); cardinal. 

CAMARADE [ka-ma-ra-d] n. m. 1. + 
companion ; 2. associate ; * compeer ; 
8. ^ comrade ; mate ; fellow ; 4. (of 
children) play-fellow; play-mate; 5. 
(of engineers) felloto-engineer ; 6. (of 
sailors) comrade; mate ; 7. (of servants) 
■'ellow-servant ; comrade; 8. (of sol- 



diers) comrade ; 9. (of workmen) /eitow* 
laborer ; 10. {comp.) fellow. 

— de la bouteille, bottle-companifm, , 
— de chambre, 1. chamber-fellow, ~ ; !4 
(schools) chum ; — de elasse, I. class 
fellow ; 2. school-fellow ; — de coUego; 
felknu-collegian ; — d'ecole, schooi- 
fellow; — d'etude, fellow-student; — 
de jeu, play-fellow ; pla/y-mate ; — dc* 
lit bed-fellow; — de malheur, = if 
misfortune ; fellow-sufferer ; — de ser- 
vice, feUaw-servant ; — de table, L fc*- 
ble-— ; 2. (mil.) messmate ; — de voy- 
age, fello^o-traveller. Traiter en — , 1, 
to treat like a =; 2. to brother. 

CAMARADE, n. C 1. femAile conv- 
panion ; com,panion ; 2. associate ; 8. 
(of children) playfellow ; 4 (of servants) 
feUmo-seroant ; 5. (comp.) compamion; 
feUxnjD. 

CAMARADERIE [ka-ma-ra-d-ri] n. f 

1. companionship; 2. inMmacy (of 
companions, associates) ; 8. (b. s.) clan ,- 
coterie. 

CAMAED, E [ka-mar, d] adj.^1. (per8.> 
Aat, snub-nosed; 2. (of Qoses)Jiat. 

CAMARD, n. m. E, n. £ i (pern) 
Aat, sntd) nose. 

CAMARINE [ka-ma-ri-n] n. £ (bot) 
crow-berry. 

CAMBISTE [kan-bia-t] n. m. (com.) 
cambist. 

Place — , exchange market. 

CAMBOUIS [kan-boui] n. m. coom 
(cart-grease). 

CAMBRE [kan-br] n. m. cambering. 

CAMBR:^, E [kin-bri] adj. Cambered; 



CAMBRER, V. a. 1. to camber; a. 
(arts) to sweep. 

Se oambker, pr. v. 1. to camber; 2. 
(arts) to take a sweep. 

CAMBRIEN [kan-brlin] n. m. NE rt-nj 
n. £ Cambrian (ancient inhabitant oi 
Wales). 

CAMBRILLON [kan-bri-iSn*] n. K 
stiffetier (of a shoe). 

CAMBRIOLEUE [kan-bri-o-leur] n. JX 
(cant) flash-man. 

CAMBRURE [kan-bri-^] n. i 1, cam- 
bering ; 2. (arts) sweep. 

CAMBUSE [kan-bu-z] n. £ (nav.) stew- 
ard's room. 

CAMBUSIEE [kan-bu-a«] n. m. (nav.) 
stetcard's mate. 

CAME [ka-m] n. £ 1. (conch.) chama; 
yW heart-cockle; 2. (tech.) cam ; pog 
cam,; cog. 

A — «, (tech.) cogged. 

CAME, n. E F. Chame. 

CAM£e [ka-m«] n. m. camna. 

Q,^Mi^Sk^ [ka-m^-l^] n. £ (bot) uid^ 
ow-wail. 

CAM:6L]fc0N [ka-m«-16-6n] n. m. L 
(erp.) c/uimeleon ; 2. § (pers.) weather- 
cock ; 8. (astr.) chameleon. 

CAM^L^OPARD [ka-m6 I«-o-par] n. 
m. (mam.) camelopard ; girafe. 

CAMELINE [ka-m-ii-n] n. £ (botj 
Caroline ; ^ gold-pleasure ; gold of 
pleasure. 

CAMELOT [ka-m-l5] n. m. camlet. 

— onde, watered = ; — ttl retora, — k- 
gros grains, coarse =. II est comme Is^ 
— , il a pris son pli, he is incorHgible. 

CAMELOTE [ka-m-lo-t] n. £ trash; 
stuff; rubbish. 

CAM:i&RIER [ka-m«-ri«] n. m. cham^ 
berlain (of the pope.) 

CAMfiRISTE [k«-m6-Tis-t] n. £ wait- 
ing woman (at certain courts). 

CAMERLINGAT [ka-mir-lin-ga] n. IP 

cam^rf-^'^.gate. 

CAMERLINGUE [ka mir-lin-g] n. «., 
camerlmgo (olHcer of the ccurt of 
Rome). 

CAM:6R0NIEN, ne [ka mS-ro-nl-fc. 
A-n] adj. (hist, of Scotland) Cameronia^ 

CAMlfeEONIEN, p. n. m, NE, p. n. < 
(hist of Scotland) Cam,eronian. 

CAMION [ka-mi-6n] n. m. 1. dray; 
dray-cart; truck; '2. (of pins) mini- 
kin. 

CAMIONNAGE [ka-mi-o-na-j] n, la 
carting (in a dray). 

CAMIONNEUE [ka-mi-o-ncar] n. m 
dra ii-mfin. 

CAMISAED [ka-mi-zAr] n. m. (hist o# 



CAM 



CAN 



CAW 



d male; 6 fee; e fSve; & f5te; rfje; » 11; i Oe; o mol; 6 mole; 6 mort; u sue; u sure; w* jour; 



FrO Ccumisard (insurgent in the reign 
of Louis XI VA 

CAMISOLE [ka-mi-m-l] n. f. short 
nlffht-dress, gywn. 

— de forws, strait jacket; strait 
waktcoat. 

CAMOMILLE [ka- mo-mi*] n. f. ]. (lot) 
(gfxv^) camomile; 2. (pixarm.) camo- 

— od ■ rsnte, romaine, common =. — 
WnSthrd, £paniHh =; pellitory of 

CAMOUFI^T [ta-mou-fle] n. m. 1. 1 
itnoke of Uffhied paper (intentionally 
Mown into a o.'s face); 2. {^- § a/- 
yront ; rap over the knuckles. 

Eecevoir un — t^", 1. to receive an 
iOjffront ; to yet a rap over the knttck 
•tes ; 2. to catch a TarUir. 

CAMP [kan] n. m. 1. (miL) camp; 2. 
■eomhat. 

— retrancli6, (mil.) intrencliM quar- 
ters; — volant, flying cmnp. — de 
manoeuvres, manmvwring camp. As- 
«eoir, mettre, poser un — , to pitch a 
camp ; lever un — ,to break u p a c amp ; 
:prendre le — , to decamp ; g^»g~ to be 
'Off; ^P~ to turn out. 

CAMPAGNAED, E [kan-pa-gnar, d*] 
i*4j- !• cowntry ; 2. (b. s.) rustic. 

Gentilhomme — , country gentleman. 

CAMPAGNAED, n. m. E, n. f. 1. 
■«nintryman; countrywoman; 2. (b. s.) 
rvMc. 

CAMPAGNE [kan-pa-gn*] n. C 1. ( 
champaign (flat country) ; 2. I country 
(extent of land); 3. j country ;fl,elds; 4. 
•♦ % field; plain (of the air); 5. J cown- 
try (not town) ; 6. \ covmtry-house ; 
f»wniry-seat; seat ; 7. (mil.) campaign; 
8, (mil.) field (war) ; 9. (nav.) voyage ; 
\t)k (pub. works) season. 

Dame de la — , country lady; gens 
de la — , 1. =-people; 2. peasantry; 
Iiomme do la — , country man; pifece 
drt — , (mil.) field-piece ; proprietaire 
dp — , ^=:.-geivtieman. De — , 1. of the = ; 
3t champrngn. A la — , 1. inthe=.; 2. 
V tte = ; en — (^mil.) iM the fi-tld ; en 
a!oId 3,9n rase — ,ina/n open champaign. 
Aller a la — ,to go into the country ; 
Iwttre la — , 1. | to scour the = \%\%to 
beat the bush ; 3. § to be delirious ; to 
"o/ve; to be light-headed, ^flighty; 4. 
{ to wander; to wander from tlie 
point; etre en — , 1. (mil.) to be im. the 
field; 2. § (pers.) to be travelling; faire 
in — , (mil.) to campaign ; faire une — , 
(mlL) 1. to serve a campaign ; 2. (nav.) 
to serve a voyage; mettre en — , 1. 
(mil.) to bring into the field ; 2. to set 
(a. o.) to work ; se mettre en — , 1. (mil.) 
to take the field ; 2. § (pers.) to set to 
%oork; ouvnr la — (centre), (iniL) to 
take the field (against) ; tenir la — , (mil.) 
to keep the field. 

CAMPAGNOL [kan-pa-gnol*] n. m. 
(mam.) (genus) vole; 1 m^ad-ow-nuyuse. 

— aquatique, water vole. 

CAMP AN E [kan-pa-n] n. f. \. fringe 
(of silk and silver thread, vfith small 
bell-shaped ornaments) ; 2. fsculp.) orrM- 
mental tuft ; 8. (arch.) beU. 

CAMPANELLE [kan-pa-nJ,-l] n. C, 
CAMPANETTE [ kan-pa-ni-t ] n. C 
(bot) bulbocodium. 

CAMPANILE [kan-pa-ni-l] n. m., 
CAMPANILLE [ kin-pa-ni-i* ] n. C 
(wch.) campanile. 

CAMPANULE rkan-pa-niL-I] n. f. (bot) 
cvunpanula; ^ bell-fioiver. 

— gantelee, throat-wort; — raiponce, 
muipion bell-flower ; — a feuilles 
wcdes, hare-bell. 

CAMPANULA, E [kan-pa-nu-W] adj. 
(hot) ca/nvpanukite. 

CAMPfiCHE [kan-p6-thl n. m. (bot) 
iMnpeachy; log -wood; blocd-acood. 

Bois de — , campeachy wood; log- 
VMod; blood-wood, 

OAMPEMENT [kan-p-irin] n. m. 
(mil.) :c/mping ; ^ncamptr^ent. 

CAMPEE [kan-p*] v. a. (mil) to 
mmp ; to encamp. 

— la q. u. 8, to lea/De a. o. in the lurch. 
8b camper, pr. v. 1. to place, to put 

^'« self; 2. to seat o.'s self. 
CAMPEK, V. n. 1. (mil.) to camp; 



to encamp; 2. to make but a short 
stay. 

CAMPHORATA [kan-fo-ra-ta] a. £ F. 

CAMPHOEIQUE [ kan-fo-ri-k ] adj. 
campltoric. 

CAMPHEE [kan-fr] n. m. camphor. 

CAMPHE:^ E [kan-fr«] adj. campho- 
rate. 

CAMPHE^E, n. t (bot) campho- 
ronma. 

CAMPHEEE [kan-frf] v. a. to cam^ 
phor. 

CAMPHEIEE [kan-fri«] E. m. (bot) 
camphor-tree. 

CAMPINE [kan-pi-n] n. C (culin.) 
campine (fat young hen). 

CAMPOS [kan-pA] n. m. 1. ^ ( lu)U- 
day {m schools); 2. § holiday {relaxA- 
tion). 

Donner — , to give a —; prendre — , 
to take a =. 

CAMUS, E [ka-mu, .] adj. 1. fiat- 
nosed; 1 S7iub-nosed; 2. | (of noses) 
fiat; 3. § disappoi^ited ; 4. § dum- 
foundered. 

CANADIEN, NE [ka-na-di-in, 4-n] adj. 
Caimdian. 

CANADIEN, p. n. m. NE, p. n. f 
Canadian. 

CANAILLE [ka-na-i*] n. f. 1. rabble ; 
mob; 2. rascal; scoundrel; 3. brats 
(children). 

CANAL [ka-nai] n. m. 1. | channel 
(bed, course of a river) ; 2. 1 canal (arti- 
ficial course of water) ; 3. i channel (na- 
tural issue in the earth) ; 4 § channel 
(of a. th.); medium, (of a. o.); Tnsans 
5. (of aqueducts and water works) pipe 
conduit; tube; 6. (anat) canal; duct 
tube; 7. (bot) du,ct ; channel; tube 
8. (geog.) c/uinnel ; 9. (mach.) spout 
10. (water-mills) water-course. 

— alimentaire, (anat) alimentary ca- 
nal, duct ; — lateral, lateral = ; — roy- 
al, d'Irlande, (geog.) Irish Channel ; — 
thorachique, (anat) thoracic duct; — 
de cheminee, dvimney-fiue ; — de d6- 
rivation, lateral, side drain ; — dirri- 
gation, = for irrigation ; — de Saint 
Georges, (geog.) *St George's Channel; 
— de navigation, =/or navigation ; — 
de niveau, dead = ; — 6 point de ja&r- 
tage, = with a dividing ridge. Con- 
struction de canaux, z=-making; navi- 
gation par canaux, =^-navigation. Par 
le — de ( V. senses) % by the clian/nel of; 
through the medium of. Coup6, entre- 
coupe de canaux, intersected with =^ ; 
ctablir un — , to form a =; faire — , 
(nav.) (in the Mediterranean) to cross a 
channel. 

CANAL (LE) [i6-ka-nai] p. n. m. (geog.) 
the British Channel ; Qve Channel. 

Les lies du — , tlve Channel Islands. 

CANALICUL:^, E [ka-na-U-ku-l«] adj. 
(bot.) cltanneUed. 

CANALISATION [ka-na-li-M-uon] n. £ 

canalization. 

CANALISEE |;k»-na-ii-r«] V. a. 1. to 
fill (a country) with canals; 2. to con- 
vert (a river) mto a canal. 

CANAMELLE, [ka-na-mJi-l] n. C (bot) 
su^ar-cane. 

CANAP:^ [ka-Da-p«] n. m. sofa. 

CAN APSA [ka-nap-ia] n. m. + 1. knap- 
sack; 2. person that carries a knap- 
sack. 

CANAED [ka-nar] n. m. 1. (orn.) dmik 
(male or female); 2. (orn.) (male) drake; 
3. \ (pers.) duck (term of endearment) ; 
ducky ; -^hick ; 4 § (th.) lioaoi ; 5. (nav.) 
pHe-dri/ver (bad ship). 

— musque, (orn.) Muscovy duck ; — 
ordinaire, (species) mallard ; petit — , 
(t«rm of endearment) duck ; ducky ; 
jeime — sauvage, (orn.) flapper ; — 
prive, 1. I tame =; 2. § dMoy-duck 
(person) ; — eider, (orn.) eider, Cuth- 
bert = ; — garrot, siffleur, (orn.) wid- 
geon. Chasse aux — s, ^=-shooting ; 
Chasser aux — s, to shoot =«; donner 
des — s a ^ §, to luiax. 

CANARD, E [ka-nar, d] adj. t for 
ducks. 

Batiuient — , vnav.) pile driver (bad 
ship); clnen—, water spaniel for duck' 
shooting. 



I CANAEDEAU [ka-nar-d6] n. m. (orn., 
, 1, duckling ; 2. young drake. 

CAN AEDEE [ka-nar-d*] V. a. ^ to fir 
at (from a place when one is shcltcrci) 
to slioot. 

CAN AEDEE, v. n. 1. ^ (mus.) to ir»l. 
tate the cry of the duck; 2. (nav.) Iv 
pitch deep. 

CANAEDli:EE [ka-nar-di* r] D. C 5, 

placefor catching wild ducks ; 2. dvai> 
yard; 3. dv;ck-gum, ; 4. t toop-tMt (b 
fortifications). 

CANAEI [ka-na-ri] n. m. (om.) ccir«* 
ry ; canary-bird. 

CANCAN [kin-kan] n. m. 1. two»*i,- 
pother ; 2. 1 — s, (pi.) tittle-tattle ; 8 
— 8, (pl.) tale-bearing. 

Faire des — s, to tittle-tattle. 

CANCANEE [kan-ka-n«] V. n.-i-tofU- 
Ue-tatUe. 

CANCAN-IEE [kanka-ni*] n. m. liEE 
\h-T] n. £ 1 lorei of tittle-tattle. 

CANCEL [kan .M] n. m. 1 1. chancel; 
2. place where t/ie great seal is kept. 

CANCELLEE [kan-ti-W] v. a. J fc 
can^iel. 

CANCEE rkan-^r] n. m. 1. (astr.) can- 
cer; the crab; 2. (med.) cancer. 

— des ramoneurs, (med.) soot-wart 

CANCi:EEU-X, SE [kan-.4-reu, en .J 
adj. (med.) cancerous. 

:6tat — , cancerousness ; tumeur cau- 
c6reuse, scirrhosity ; ulceration canci>- 
reuse, canceration. De venir — , to cof *- 
cerate. 

CANCEE [kan-kr] n. m. (carcin.) crab ; 
crab-flsh. 

De — , (did.) cancrine. 

CANCEE, n. m. 1. % poor-fellow; 8. 
(in schools) dunce; 3. miser; churl; 
skin-flint. 

CANDfiLABEE [kan-d«-I»-br] n, m. 1. 
sconce ; 2. candelabrum ; 8. (vck) 
candelabrum. 

CANDEUE [kan-deur] n. f 1. purlijf : 
2. candor ; fairness ; openness ; ffuJi 
ness. 

Avec — , candidly; fairly; saj'K — 
l.wicandid; unfair; 2. uncandiiiy } 
wnfairUj. 

CANDI, E [kan-di] acy. candied. 

CANDI [kan-di] n. m. 1. candy; n> 
gar-candy ; 2. candied frmt. 

CANDIDAT [kan-di-da] n. m. oandl- 
date. 

Personne qui pr6sente, propose un — , 
(law) nominator; personne presenter 
proposee comme — , (law) nominee. Sc 
porter — , se presenter comme — (pour), 
to present, to offer o.'s nelfas =^.for; to 
stand = (/or); to put up (Jbr) ; to 
stand (for). 

CANDIDATURE [kan-di-da-tu-r] n. t 
candidature ; candidateship. 

CANDIDE [kan-di-d] adj. 1. pure; 2. 
+ candid ; fair ; open ; frank. 

Non, peu — , uncandid. 

CANDIDEMENT fkan-di-d-man] adv. 
1. purely ; 2. + candidly ; fairly ; open^ 
ly ; frankly. 

CANDIE (SE) [.8-kan-dir] pr. V. to 
candy. 

Faire candir, to candy. 

CANE [ka-nl^n. f. (om.) duck (female). 

CANi^FICIEE [ka-n«-fl-.i6] n. m. (bot) 
v. Casse. 

CANEPETlfiEE [ka-n pitii-r] n. C 
(orn.) UtUe bustard. a 

CANi:PHOEE [ka-n«.fo-r] n. C (Gr. ' 
ant) canephore. 

CANEPIN [ka-n-pin] n. m. L fint 
lamb-skin; 2. fine kid. 

CANESCENT, E [ka-ni-aan, t] a<y. 

(bot) canescent. 

CANETON [ka-n-t6n] u n\. (urn.) 
duckling (male). 

CANETTE [ka-ni-t] n. f. 1. dusHUiq 
(female) ; 2. little dude ; 3. (her.) dwci 
without legs. 

CANEVAS [ka-n-vA] n. m. 1. 5 ean/cai 
(for tapestry, etc.); 2. § grotmd-work. 
sketch ; outlines ; 3. (of an air or piooa 
of music) canvas. 

CANEZOU [ka-n-wu] n. m. jfuJret 
(woman's); spencer. 

CANGEi:NE [kin-gri-n] y. Gaw- 

GEKNE. 

CANICHE rk«-ni.h] n. m. (ui*»j.» ». 



CAN 


vJAN 




CAP 


a&iodu 


*MJeu; ewjeilne; <«ipeur; dwpan; wipln; wibon; i 


In bran ; 


•11 liq. ; 'gn Uq. 



poodle; poodle-dog; 2 water-dog; 
[gaterspoMi^. 

CANICULAIKE [ka-ui-ku-U-r] adj. ca- 
nicular. 

Jours — B, =, dog-days. 

CANICULE ^ka-ni-ku-n n. f. 1. (astr.) 
temicida ; camoule ; ^ dog-star ; % 
itfQ-days. 

Ptuis la — , in the dog-days. Etre k 
A—, to be in the =. 

CAN IF [ka-mf] n. m. pen-knife; 

CANIN, E [ka-nin, i-n] adj. 1. $ cwiiine ; 
& (anat, rnedT) canine. 

Dent — , ( V. Dent). 

CANINE [ka-ni-n] n. f. 1. (pers.^ ca- 
tviaie, dog toott.; 2. (of animals) fang; 

*U4k. 

CANIVEAU [ka-m-v6] n. m. (arch.) 



CANNAGE [ka-na-j] n. m. mea»uring 
by the cane. 

CANNAIE [ka-ni' n. f. cans-hrake. 
Add. 

CANNE [ka-n] n. f. 1. (bot) cane 

Sreed); 2. cane; walking cane, utick; 
\. cane (measure). 

— de jonc, Malacca cane ; — a epee, 
iword-stick; — d'Inde, des Indes. In- 
dian =. — a sucre, sugar-^= ; »u;;ar- 
reed ; — k vent, air-^. Coups de — , 
1. blows tcith a stick; 2. canitig ; jus, 
Buc de — , =.-juiee, liqxior ; moulin a — s 
a sucre 1, sugar-mUl; ouvrage de — , 
z^-work ; pomme de — , tiead of a-=.; 
rebut de — , =::-trash, De — , ( F! senses) 
eaMu. Donner des coups de — 4, I. to 
Itrike with a =; 2. to cane; to give 

a. o.) a caning ; lever la — sur q. u., to 
Uftv/p o.'s := at a. o. ; recevoir des coups 
de — , 1. to be struck with a = ; l.tobe 
caned ; to get a caning. 
CANNEBERGE [ka-n-bJr-j] n. f. (bot) 

van-berry; moor-berry. 

— ponctu6e, cow-berry. 
CANNELAS [ka-n-la]n. m. cinnamon 

mgar-phi/m. 

CAfrNEL:^, E [ka-n-i«] adj. 1. chan- 
"Med; 2. (&Tc\\..)Jluted. 

CANNELER [ka-n-l«] v. a (arch.) to 
/tute; 2. (tech.) to groove. 

Machine a — , key-groove cuttiyty ma- 
oKine. 

CANNELLE [ka-ni-l] n. C (bot) dn- 
nofhon ; cinnamon bark. 

— blanche, camella; — fausse, base 
eirmamon; — girofl6e, clove cinna- 
mon, ilcorce de — , =-bark. 

CANNELLE, CANNETTE [ka-n44, 
it] n. f. faucet ; tap. 

CANNELLIER j;k»-n8 li«] n. m. (bot) 
oinnamon-tree ; ctnna7..07i. 

— de Ceylan, =. 
CANNELURE [ka-n-lfi-r] n. f. \..flut- 

•/ng; 2. (p.Kh.) flate, fluting ; 3. (bot) 
fiuting ; 4. (tech.) key-groove. 

Bemplir les — s d'ornements plus pe- 
Hts, (arch.) to cable theflutings. 

CANNETILLE [ka-n-ti-i*] n. C wire- 
ribbon. 

CANNETTE [ka-nJ-t] n. f. faucet; 
tap. 

CANNIBALE [ka-ni-ba-i] n. m. canni- 
bal; Tnan-eater ; (pi.) cannibals; 
man-eaters ; anthropophagi. 

De — , cannibal ; en — , like canni- 
bals, anthropophagi ; cannihaUii. 

CANON [ka-non] n. m. 1. (artil.) can- 
non, gtm ; 2. (artil.) (collectively) can- 
non ; guns ; 3. (of bellows) nose ; snout ; 
i (of drawers, trowsers) leg ; 5. (of fire- 
inns) barrel ; 6. (of horses) canon ; in- 
step , snank; 7. (of quills) barrel; 8. 
(artH) pipe; 9. (man.) canon-bit; 10. 
'^.rlnt) ccncr.. 

Gios — , (print) canon; petit — , 
print) two lines English ; — rubane, 
rordn, ik rubans, twisted barrel ; — do- 
char^ de minute en minute, (artil.) mi- 
nuto gvm, ; — ray6, rifle barrel ; — de 
funte, cast amnon ; — de fusil, gtvn- 
harrd; '— de retraite, (nav.) stern- 
ohase. AfFih/ de — , (artil.) gim-carri- 
%ge; ame le — , gun-barrel; boulet 
le — , canMi/n ball, shot ; cheville, bou- 
.«u qui traverse I'affut du — , bed-bolt; 
»un de — , gv/n-shot ; gun ; coup de — 
lo dlane, giw-fire (In th« iii rnlnfi) — 



de retraite, (mil.) gun-fire (in the even- 
ing) ; instrument k braquer un — , (ar- 
til.) brake ; portee de — , cannon, gun- 
shot, k — , (of fire arms) barrelled ; k 
— double, double-barreUed ; k — ray6, 
(of fire arms) rifle-barreUed ; k I'epreuve 
du — , cannon-proof; k portee de — , 
within gun-sfiot ; hors de la portee du 
— , out of gv/n-shot. Braquer un — , to 
level a cannon, gun ; decharger un — , 
to fire off a cannon, gun ; enclouer un 
— , to spike a cannon, gtm; Stre k la 
portee du — , to be within cannon, gun- 
shot; 6tre hors de la portee du — , to be 
beyond the range of cannon ; fondre le 
— , to cast cannon ; tirer un — , to dis- 
charge, to fire, to fire off a cam,non, 
gun. 

CANON, n. m. 1. (eccl.) ca7ion; 2. § 
canon (law, rule) ; 3. canon (books of 
scripture admitted as divine) ; 4 canon 
(catalogue of saints) ; 5. canon (of the 
mass); 6. (chron.) canon; 7. + (law) 
rent; 8. (mus.) canon. 

— emphyteotique, (law) ground-rent. 
Droit — , canon law. Chanter en — , 
(mus.) to troU. 

CANONIAL, E [ka-no-ni-al] adj. 1. X 
canonical; i.prebendcd. 

Heures — es, canonical hours; vie 
— e, = life. 

[Canonial ha« no m. pi. J 

CANONICAT [krv-uo-ni-ka] n. m. 1. | 
canonioate; oanonship; canonry ; 2. 
§ sinecure. 

CANONICITfi [ka-no-m-.i-t«] n. t ca- 
nonicahiess. 

Non — , uncanonicalness. 

CANONIQUE [ka-no-ni-k] adj. canoni- 
cal. 

Non — , uncanonical. Livres — 8, ca- 
nonical books. 

CANON IQUEMENT [ka-no-ni-k-man] 

adv. canoni-cally. 

CANONISATION [ka-no-ni-M-aiSn] n. 
£ canonization. 

CANONISER [ka-no-ni-i«] v. a. L to 
canonize; 2. to consecrate. 

Canonise, k, pa. p. V. senses of Cano- 

NISBR. 

Non — , 1. micanonized ; 2. unconse- 
orated. 

OANONISTE [ka-no-nu-t] n. m. cano- 
nist. 

CANONNADE [ka-no-na-d] n. t can- 
nonade. 

CANONNAGE [ka-no-na-j] n. m. gun- 
nery. 

CANONNER [ka-no-n«] v. a. to can- 
nonade ; to batter with ordnance. 

Se CANONNER. pr. V. to cunuonade. 

CANONNIEE [ka-no-m«] n. m. gun- 
ner. 

— servant, (nav.) matross. Apprenti 
— , gunster ; maitre — , master-gunner ; 
second maitre — , gunners mate. — de 
mer, ship's gunner. 

CANONNIi:RE [ka-no-nij-r] n. £ 1. t 
loop-hole (in walls) ; 2. t gunners' tent ; 
3. pop-gv/ii ; 4. (nav.) gun-boat. 

CANOT [ka-Do] n. m. (nav.) 1. ship's 
boat; boat; cutter; 2. barge. 

Grand — , long boat ; grand — du ca- 
YiitaXnfi, pinnace ; petit — , (naw.)joUy- 
=. — de ronde, guard-— ; — de parade, 
barge ; — de sauvetage, lije-=z. Gardien 

CANOTIER ika-no-ti«] n. m. (nav.) 1. 
boat-keeper ; 2. bargeman ; 3. barger ; 
rower. 

CANTABILE [kan-ta-bi-l«] n. m.(mus.) 
cantabiie ; cantab. 

CANTABRE [ kan-ta-br ] adj. (anc 
geog.) Cantabrian. 

Monts — s. (geog.) = Mountains. 

CANTABRE, p. n. m. £ Canta- 
brian. 

CANTAL [kin-tal] n. m. cantal (Au- 
vergne cheese). 

CANTALABRE [ kan-ta-la-br ] n. m. 
(build.) casing. 

CANTALOUP [kan-ta-lon] n. m. (hort) 
cantaloup (melon). 

CANTATE [kan-ta-t] n. £ (mus.) caw- 
tata. 

CANTATILLE [ kan-ta-ti-i* ] n. £ 
(mus<.) ca.ntotillii. 

CANTATRICE [kSD-t«-tri-.l n. £ pro- 



fessional, public singer (female singu 
by profession) ; singer. 

CANTHARIDE [kin-ta-ri-d] n. t 1 
{ent) cantliar-is ; Spanish fly; blister- 
fly, beetle ; blistering fly ; 2. (pharm.; 
— s, (pi.) cantharides; Spanish flies. 

CANTlIUS [kin-tu.] a m. (anal) ca« 
Otus. 

CANTILilNE [kan-ti U-n] n. £ (mar.; 
cantilena ; melody. 

CANTINE [kan-ti-n] n. £ 1. lotOo 
case ; 2. (mil) canteen^ 
lN-1 



CANTIN-IER [kan-U-ni^] n. m. lERB 
[*-r] n. £ sutler ; canteen-woman. 

CANTIQUE [kin-ti-k] n. m. -i- canti- 
cle; song. 

— des — 8, canticles ; Solomon's song, 
song of songs. 

CANTON [kan-ton] n. m. 1. canton ; 
2. canton (in Switzerland) ; 3. (in Walesi 
cantred ; 4. (her.) canton. 

Diviser en — s, 1. to canton ; to can 
tonize ; 2. (mil.) to canton. 

CANTONADE [kan-to-na-d] n. £ X 
(theat) interior of the slips. 

I'arler a la — , to speak to a. o. behind 
the- sceries. 

CANTONAL, E [kin-to-nai] adj. cofi. 
totiai. 

CANTONNfi, E [kan-to-n6] adj. 1. 
(arch.) cantoned; 2. (her.) cantoned: 
8. (mil.) cantoned. 

CANTONNEMENT [kan-to-n-man] a 
m. (mil.) cantonment. 

CANTONNER [kin-to-ni] v. a. (mlL) 
to canton. 

Se cantonnbr, pr. v. to fortify o.'t 
self. 

CANTONNER, v. n. (mil) to be oan- 
toned. 

Faire — , to canton. 

CANTONNIER [ kaii-to-.i* ] u si. 
road-laborer. 

CANTONNli:RE [.an-to-BiA i] tj. 1 
valance (of bed or windows). 

CANULE [ka-nu-i] n £ L (of C8c>i 
broached) /a Mc«t,- 2. ^of syrlngce) dlyt, 
ter-pipe; 8. (surg.) canula. 

CANZONE [kan-Eo-n] n. £ (mTM ) <Mn 
zone. 

CAOLIN [ka-o-iin] n. m. F. Kaolin. 

CAOUTCHOUC [ku-out-ahou] n. m. 1 
eaout<:houo; India rubber; 2. (bot; 
caoutchouc-tree; gum-tree. 

CAP [kap] n. m. 1. + liead ; 2. (goog.) 
cape; head-land; 8. (nav.) head. 

Le — Lezard (geog.) Lizard Point 
De pied en — , cap a pie. Avoir, portei 
le — a . . . , (nav.) to bear, head to, to- 
wards .... Ou est le — ? (nav.) hmt 
witids t/ie ship ; how is the head t 

CAPABLE [ka-pa-bl] adj. 1. capable ; 
able ; 2. (de, of) capable ; 3. (de) capa- 
ble (of) ; qualified (for) ; 4. (de, to) qua- 
Ufied; able; 6. (th.) (de, to) likdy ; 1 
calctilated; 6. (law) capable; quali- 
fied. 

1. Ouvriers — », able Kmrkmen. 2. fltre — de 
tout, to be capable of ani/ thing. S. Cette chambri- 
cents personiies, this ruom 
Kt kunared ptfr^vim. 4. — d* 
renst th' 
violence of the wavet. 

Avoir, prendre I'air — , to have, to as- 
sume an air of^ ability ; faire le — , to 
pretend to ability ; rendre — , 1. to 
make, to render = ; 2. (de) to capaci- 
tate (for. to). 

CAPABLEMENT [ka-pa-b!«-n.an] adv. 
X capably ; ably. 

CAPACITY [ka-pa-.i-t«] n. £ 1. (tli.) 
capacity (space); capaciousness; fc 
(pers.) capacity; capability; suffloi 
ency ; 3. (com., nav.) burden ; 1 (dlL I 
capacity ; 5. (geom.) capacity ; 6. (lawr* 
competency ; 7. (nav.) byZk. 

Dofaut, privation de — lega.'*, (low) 
incapacitation. Qui a la — vo'iliie, 
(law) sufficient. 

CAPARAgON [ka-pa-ra-i6n] n. at (JO- 
parison. 

CAPAEAgONNER [ka-pa-r«.«Mi«] v- 
a. to caparison. 

CAPE [ka-p^ n. £ 1. cloak with a 
hood; 2. riding -Jiood ; 8. (nav.) try- 
sail ; 4. (nav.) (of anchors) stock. 

N'avoir gue la — et I'epee, 1. (pert) to 
have noth/Cno hut o.'s nobility ; 9. (tlaj 



ble of 
nir deu 



GAP 



CAP 



CACi 



amal; <imale; efee; efcve- e fete ^je;ill; lile; omol; 6m6le; (!iiuort; wsue; 6 sure; oujoxa; 



to heflimay. £tre a la — , (nav.) to try ; 
Jtre a la — h sec, (nav.) to be ahull. 

CAP:6ER [kft-pi-«] V. n. (nav.) to try. 

CAPELAN [ka-p-lan] n. m. 1. t sorry 
pri^jC ; 2. (ich?) capeuin ; power cod- 
fikh. 

CAPELET [kft-p-ii] n. m. (vet) capd- 
Itt: capped hod: 

CAPELINE [V« p U-n] n. £ t broad- 
irrinmied hat (for women). 

CAPENDU [kn-pimdj] n. m. capender 
^rt of apple). 

CAPEKON [kR-p-r«n] n. m. F: Ca- 

CAPfiTlJnsr, NE [kft-pi-Min, J-n] adj. 
OapeUan (descended from Hugh Capet). 

CAPILLAIRE [ka-pil-l^-r] aty. 1. /lair- 
shaped ; 2. (did.) cajkllary. 

Vaisseau — , (anat) capiUary. 

CAPILLAIKE, n. m. 1. (anat.) capil- 
lary; 2. (bot) (genus) rrmiden-hair ; 
mmide7i's hair; 8. (bot.) Vemts's hair. 

— du Canada, (bot.) Canadian mai- 
dtmr-hair ; — de Montpellier, (bot.) Vet 
iMM's hair. Sirop de — , capiUaire. 

CAPILOTADE [ ka-pi-lo-ta-d ] n. £ 
(culin.) hoHh of cooked meat. 

CAPITAINE [ka-pi-ti-n] n. m. 1. cap- 
tam; 2. (mil., nav.) captain. 

— general, captain general ; — mar- 
chaiid, (nav.) master of a merchant- 
ihip. — d'armes, (nav.) master oiarwM,- 

— ae cavalerie, captain of horse ; — de 
ooiTette, (nav.) = and com,m,ander ; — 
»u long cours. (nav.) =: of a merchant 
num going to foreign parts, to the East 
lit'Ues, to t/ie West Indies; — de fre- 
g:>-o, (nav.) inaster and comm<inder ; 

— tl'infanterie, = of foot ; — de pavil- 
Vxs (nav.) ^(7-=; — de port, harbor- 
tiutster ; — de vaisseau, (nav.) post =. 
1". MM de —, captaincy ; captainship; 
i.iJc'it de grand — , captainship. 

CAPITAINEEIE [k»-pi-ti-n-ri] n. t 
liiif.taincy. 

CAPITAL, E [ka-pi-tal] adj. 1. capi- 
tal; principal; chief; 2. (of crimes, 
/inishment) capital; 8. (of enemies) 
•nurtal ; deadly ; 4. (of letters) capital 

Passible de la peine — e, capital. D'un 
Trimc — , capitally; de la peine — e, 
Oipitally. Mottre q. u. en jugement 
jvjur crime — .to try a. o.for a capital 
orime^for hik. life. 

CAPITAL, lu m. 1. capital point; 
principal Udn^ ; 2. (com.) capital; 
vrinoi/pal; 8. (com.) capital; 4. (com.) 
(of companies or partnerships) capital- 
utock ; 5. (book-k.) stock ; 6. (fin.) capi- 
tal ; 7. (poL econ.) capital. 

Capitanx, 1. (com.) capital ; stock; 2. 
(fin.) capital; 8. (pol. econ.) capital; 
aes capitanx abondants, de grands capi- 
taux, (com.) a large capital ; — clrcu- 
lant, roulant, (com.) circulating, float- 
ing = ; — mort. = lying dead ; de pe- 
tits capitanx, (com.) small = ; — social, 
(com.) =-stock. Mettre, placer un — a 
fonds perdu, perdus, en viager, to sink a 
— ; perdre des capitanx, (com.) to sink 
=■ ; rembourser le — , to reinibwrse, to 
pay qffthe =, principal. 

CAPITALE [ka-pi-ta-i] n. £ 1. capi- 
tal; capital, chief city; 2. capital; 
eapttal letter. 

Grande — , large capital ; petite — , 
»maU =. Dans la — , in the-=.; in town. 
Aller k ]& — , to go to t/ie =^ to town ; 
^ to go tip to town. 

CAPITALISTE [ca.pi-ta-ii.-t;] n. m. 1. 
eapitalist; m^meyed indvoidtial; 2. 
fwnd-h,older. 

Lit^rSt des — e, m,oneyed interest. 

CAPITAN [ka-pi-tin] n. m. 1. hector; 
-#. bully; 2. BraeiUan governor and 
idmiral. 

CAPITANE [k»-pi-ta-n] n. £ t first 
foUey of a fleet. 

CAI'ITATION [ka-pi-ta-.i6n1 n. £ 1. 
iin England) poll-money ; poll-tax ; 2. 
(in France) capitation; capitation- 

CAPIFEU-X, SE [ka-pi-ten, eu.«] adj. 
(c.f spirituous liquors and wines) Keady. 

P.Xxe —,tobez=;to get into o.'« head. 

CAl'ITOLE fka-pi-to-l] n. m. 1. (Kom. 
hi<rt.) Capitol ; 2. (of the United States) 
Ooi-Uol 



CAPITOLIN [ka-pi-to-lin] p. n. m. 
(Rom. hist) Capitoline ; CapitoUnvs. 

CJPTTON [ka-pi-ton] D. m. (com.) 
capi)ai(ine. 

lUPlTOUL [ka-pi-tooi] n. m. t capi- 
to'il (municipal officer of Toulouse.) 

CAPITOULAT [ka-pi-tou-la] n. m. of- 
flc,f ofcapitoul. 

C.VPITULAIEE [ka-pi-tu-lJ-r] adj. ca- 
pitulary. 

Letti^ — , chapter. 

CAPITULAIRE, n. m. 1. capitulary 
(laws of an ecclesiastical council); 2. 
(hist of France) capitulary (laws in 
chapters.) 

CAPITULAIREMENT [ka-pi-tu-li-r- 
man] adv. capituifwlv. 

CAPITULANT [£> pi-tu-lan] adj. ha/v- 
ing a vote in a chapter. 

CAPITULANT, n. m. capitulary 
(member of a chapter.) 

CAPITULATION [ka-pi-tu-la-.i6n] n. 

£ 1. (mil.) capitulation ; articles of con- 
dition ; 2. § capitulation ; 3. (German 
hist) capitulation. 

Dresser une — , dresser les articles 
d'lme — , to draw up a capitulation ; 
to draw up articles of=i ; tenir une — , 
to observe a =. 

CAPITULE [ka.pi-tu-1] n. m. 1. (bot) 
capititlmn ; 2. (lit) capitule. 

CAPITULER [ka^pi-t^-l«i V. n. 1. 
(mil.) to capitulate ; 'to make articles 
of condition ; 1.%to capitulate. 

— avec sa conscience, to compromise 
with one's conscience. 

CAPLAN [k»-plan] n. m. (ich.) V. Ca- 

PELAN. 

CAPON [ka-p6n] n. m. 1. $ hypocrite ; 
2. -r- cheat (at play) ; 3. pW coward. 

CAPON, n. m. (nav.) cat; stock- 
tackle. 

CAPONNER [ka-po-n«l V. n. 1^" 1. 
to cheat (at play) ; 2. to show o.'s self a 
coward ; to show the while feather. 

CAPONNER, V. a. (nav.) to cat (the 
anchor.) 

CAPONNlfeEE [ka-po-nii-r] n. £ (fort) 
caq)onmiere ; covered lodgment. 

CAPORAL [ka-po-ral] n. m. 1. (mil.) 
corporal (of infantry) ; 2. (nav.) corpo- 
ral. 

— de consigne, (mil) = who gives out 
the countersign; — de pose, = wha 
places the sentinels at their post 

CAPOT [ka-po] adj. 1. (play) capot; 
2. %/boUsh (confused.) 

Demeurer, 6tre — , to look foolish ; to 
be balked ; faire — , 1. (nav.) to cant ; 
2. (nav.) (of boats, vessels) to upset ; to 
capsize ; 3. (play) to capot. 

CAPOT, n. m. (nav.) (of ladders, 
pumps) flood. 

— d'6chelle, (nav.) companion. 

CAPOTE [ka-po-t] n. £ 1. capot ; cloak 
with a hood ; 2 cloak (women's) ; man- 
tle; 8. close bonnet; 4. (of carriages) 
hood; 5. (mil.) frock-coat; 6. (mil.) 
guard, watch-coat. 

CAPRAIRE [ka-prJ-r] n. £ ;bot.) ca- 
praria ; goat^weed. 

— theiforme, sweet-^oeed. 
ClPRE [ka-pr] n. £ (bot) caper. 

— capucine, pickled nasturtium. 
Sauce au — s, caper sauce. 

CAPRICE [ka-pri-.] n. m. 1. capHce; 
caprice; ^ whim; ^ freak; 2. (fine 
arts) caprice; 8. (mus.) vokmtary. 

CAPRICIEUSEMENT [ka-pri-.i-en.^ 

man] adv. capriciously; ^W' whimsi- 
cally. 

CAPRICIEU-X, SE [ka-pri-ai-eu,.] adj. 
capricious ; ^ whimsical ; ^freakish. 

Caractdre — , humeur capricieuse, ca- 
priciousness ; 1 whimsicalness ; ^ 
freakishness. 

CAPEICORNE [ka-pri-k8r-n] n. m. 1. 
(ent) Capricorn ; capricorn-beetle ; 
goat-chafer ; 2. (astr.) Capricorn. 

CAPRIER [ka-pri«] n. m. (bot) ca- 
per.; caper-bush; caper-tree. 

Faux — , fabago. 

CAPRIS ANT [ka-pri-ian] adj. m. (med.) 
(of the pulse) capriza/nt ; violent ana 
irregular. 

CAPRON, CAPERON [k»-prtn] n. m. 
large strawberry. 

CAPSELLE Lk»y-rt 1] n. £ (bot) cass- 



weed; ^ shepherd's pouch; *\ thep- 
herd's purse. 

CAPSULAIEE [kap-.u-ij-r] adj. 1 
(anat) capsular; capsulary ; 27(bct1 
capsular; capsulary. 

CAPSULE [kapHiu-i] n. £ 1. (anhtj 
capsula ; capsule ; 2. (bot) capsule ; & 
(chem.) capsule; 4. (offlre-*rms) oop 
sule; cap. 

— darme k feu, primiTig oapnls ; 
— de ftisil a percussion, percussion C(*p. 
Enferm6 dans une — , capsulated. 

CAPTAL [kap-tal] n. m. t (hisu cf 
France) captal (chief). 

CAPTATEUR [kap-ta-uur] n. m. T 
law) person wlio uses undtie influence. 

CAPTATION [kap-ta-«6n] n. £ (law) 
mdtie influence. 

CAPTATOIEE [kap-ta-toa-r] adj. (law) 
relating to a testamentary aispom.1ion 
colorahly made infmor of a party, cm 
an inducement to such party to make 
some testamentary disposition in fa- 
vor of Vie person or his relations. 

CARTER [kap-t4] V. a. 1, (b. s.) to 
captivate; 2. (law) to exercise undue 
influence over. 

Capte, b, pa. p. 1. (b. 8.) captivated; 
2. (law) unduly irfluenced. 

Non — , uncaptivated. 

CAPTIEUSEMENT [kap-ti-efi-^min] 
adv. captioiisly. 

CAPTIEU-X, SE [kap-ti-e6, i] ac|j. cap- 
tions. 

CAPTI-F, VE [kap-tif,i-v] adj. |§ccp- 
ti/ve. 

Faire — , 1. 1 § to take captive; 2. j to 
captivate. 

CAPTI-F, n. in.VE, n. £ (DK, to) 
captive. 

Faire un — , to take a =. 

CAPTIVER [kap-ti-v«] V. a. J 1. eo 
captivate ; to take captive ; 2. to ouj?** ■ 
vate (to charm) ; & to subject; to brivj 
tinder sid^ection. 

Vouloir'— q. u., {V. senses) ^ (,< 
women) to set o.''s cap at a. o. 

Captive, e, pa p. | captivated. 

Non — , uncaptivated. 

Sb captiveb, pr. v. to bring o,''o ee^ 
u/nder stiMection. 

CAPTIVlT]fe [kap-ti-Ti-t«] n. £ I i cap- 
tivity. 

Compagnon, compagne de — , fellow- 
captive, -prisoner. Sortr do — , to be 
released from, captivity. 

CAPTURE [kap-tn-r] n. £ I capture. 

Auteur d'une — , captor ; faire — do^ 
tocaptiire; to catch; to seise; to ap- 
prehend ; to arrest; fiiire une — , U> 
make a capture. 

CAPTURER [kap-tu-r«] V. a. 1. to op. 
prehend (a. o.); to arrest; ^ to take 
up ; 2. (mil.) to capture. 

CAPUCE [ka-pu-.] n. £, 

CAPUCHON rka-pu-.ii6n] n. m. L 
hood (covering for the head); 2. (<i| 
monks) cowl; hood; 8. (bot) cotM; 
hood. 

A — , 1. with a = ; hooded ; 2. cowled, 
hooded; en — , 1. in a=; 2. hooded; 
cowled; 8. (bot) cowled; hooded; sang 
— , unlwoded ; uncowled. Couvrir d"!! 
— , to hood. 

CAPUCHONN:^, E [k»-pu^ho-n«] a^J 
(bot) cowled ; hooded. 

CAPUCHONNER [ka-pu-Ao-ni] r. a 
(man.) to arch o.'s neck. 

CAPUCIN [k8-pa-.in] n. m. (reL ord,) 
capuchin ; capuchin friar. 

CAPUCIN ADE [ka-pu-u-D«-d] n. £ tit«tf 
sermon,. 

CAPUCINE [ka-pu-«n] n. £ 1, (rol 
ord.) capuchin nv/n ; capttchin; & 
(bot) nasturtium; Indian cress; 9. 
nos"- smart ; 8. (gun.) ring (of muskets^ 

Bouton, graine de — , nasturtium. 

CAPUClNli;RE [^pu-u-ni4-r] n, t 
(b. 8.) capuchin friary. 

CAPUT-MORTUUM [ka.pnt-«or .!.-(«] 
n. m. t (chem.) caput-ntortuAmu 

CAQUAGE [ka-ka-j] n. m. 1. otirino 
(offish); 2. barrelling (of powder). 

CAQUE [ka-k] n. £ 1. keg; 2. barrM 
(of powder). 

La — sent toujours le hareng pF" 
what is bred in the bone wiU nettt 
ctmie ovt of the flesh. 



CAR 



CAR 



CAR 



<«i,io(ite; ewjeu; eujetne; eipeur; dn^m; tropin; on ton un hTua; *\\ llq.; *gn Uq. 



CAQDER [ka-k«] V. a. 1. to cure 

fftsli): 4. to barrel (tish, powder). 

OAQUET [ktt-ke] n. m. 1. ((of hens, 
eeese) cackle ; 2. % (pers.) prate ; prut- 
Ue; chit-chat; 8. — s, UttU-tatlle. 

— boil bee, 1. t^^ magpie; 2. irfi^ 
gonsir (woman). N'avoir quo du — , to 
be ail UUk ; avoir trop de — , to talk too 
imuih ; rrtbaisser, rabattre le — de q. u., 
V^^ to make a. o. lower his tone. 

C4 i'JKTAGE [kft-k-ta-j] n. m. 1. II (of 
ItDj) cackling; 2. § (pers.) prating; 
.irate ; prattling ; prattle; twattling ; 
3. § (pers. ) tittle-tattle. 

CA(iUETE [ka-k^-t] n. t carp-tub. 

CAQUETEE [ka-k-t«] v. n. 1. I (of 
hens, geese) to cackle ; 2. § (b. 8.) (pers.) 
to cackle: to prate; to prattle; 3. 
(pers.) to tittle-tattle. 

Poule qui caquette, cackler. 

CAQUETEKIE [ka-kj-t-ri] n. C i; 
(pers.) 1. prating; prate; prattle; 
chit-chat : 2. Uttle-tatUe. 

CAQUETEU-R [ka-k-tefir] n. m. 8E 
[en-i] u. f. 1 prater ; prattler. 

CAQUEU-Pv [ka-keur] n. m. SE [ofi-i] 
n. f. pernon that barrels fish. 

CAIi [karj conj./or; because. 

CAEABE [ka-ra-b6] n. DO. yellow am- 
ber. 

CARABIN [ka-ra-bin] n. m. 1. t sUr- 
mis/tsr ; 2. § skirmisher (player that 
plays and quits the game) ; 3. ^^ (b. 8.) 
saw-boiies (medical student). 

CARABINE [ka-ra-bi-n] n. C 1. car- 
bine ; carabine; 2. (mil.) rifie. 

CA RABIN:^, E [ka-ra-bl-n«] a(y. (nav.) 
(of a gale of wind) «<ti;^ 

CARABINER [ka-ra-bi-n6] V. a to ri/le 
(a gun-barrel). 

CARABINER, v. n. 1. + to skirmish; 2. 
§ to skirmish (to play and quit the game). 

CARABINIER [ka-ra-bi-m«] n. m. 1. 
carabineer; 2. rifleman; (pi.) '"ifle- 
men ; rifles, pi. 

— h, pied, riflema/n; (p].) riflemen ; 

CXB\CO [kn-ra-ko] a m. t caraco 
I yomau's dress). 

CARACOLE [ka-r«.ko-l] n. £ (man.) 
ouraeoib. 

Faire des — 8, (man.) to caracole. 

CARACOLER [ka-ra-ko-i6] v. n. (man.) 
.'o caracole. 

CARACOULER [ka-ra-kou-16] v.n. (of 
male pigeons) to coo. 

CARACTi:RE [ka-rak-ti-r] n. m. 1. J 

character (mark, figure); 2.1 character 
(letter used in writing): 8. i hand- 
voritMig ; loritAng ; ^\ charm; spell; 
B. $ character ; quality ; capacity ; 6. § 
characteristic ; 7. § character (distinc- 
tive qualities of manners or mind) ; 8, § 
character (representation of personal 
qualities); 9. § temper; 10. § spirit 
(ardor, courage); spiritedness ; deci- 
sion; 11. (of the features, physiognomy) 
expression; expressive air ; 12. (arith.) 
digit; 13. (print) type; print; 14. (sci- 
ences) character. 

8. Lfs — s de La Bruy^re, Ih* characters of La 

— d6cid6, decision of character ; — 
6gal, even temper ; — neuf, 1. new type ; 
2. (print.) silver type ; — propre, char- 
acteriitic; temper. Fondeur de 



(printing) letter founder ; homme de — , 
man of decision. De — , ( F! senses) o/ 
spirit ; high-spirited ; dans son — , ( F. 



tenses) in = ; par — , consUtutionalty ; 
sans — ,( V. senses) {pers.) mean-spirited. 
Avoir du — , to be spirited ; 2. to ha/ve 
deuision, firmness, resolution; avoir de 
Ift roideor dans 'e — , to be of an un- 
bending = ; avoir le — bien, mal fait, to 
tf jood, ill tempered ; prendre le — de, 
!c OMume; reconn^tre soi — , to re- 
OC\>nize o.'s hand-writing; writing; 
inth de ."on — , to los* o.'s tstnper ; ^ to 
js! out of temper ; ne pas sortir de son 
— , not to lose o.'s temper ; to be in the 
".arne temper ; faire sortir q. u. de son 
— , to put a. o. out of temper. 

CARACTfiRISER [ka-r»k-W-ri-»6] V. a. 

^o characterize. 

CARACT:6EISTIQUE [ka-rak-W-rU- 



!-k] adj. characteristic. 
uettrc 



ttrc — , (gram.) characieHstic. , 



signe — , = ; trait — , =. D'une manidre 
— , characteristically. 

CARACT:6RISTIQUE, n. f. 1. (gram.) 
characteristic; 2. (math.) character- 
istic; 3. (math.) (of logarithms) index. 

CARAFE [ka-ra-f] n. £ decanter 
(bottle). 

CARAFON [ka-ra-fSn] n. m. 1. cooler 
(vase) ; 2. decanter (in a cooler) ; 8. (at 
eating-houses) quarter of a bottle. 

CARAGNE [ka-ra-gn*] n. f (com.) ca- 
rawna. 

CARAGNE, adj. J ofcaranna. 

Gomme — , (com.) caranna. 

CARAIBE, p. n. m. £ CaHb. 

CARAlTE, n. m. Caraite (Jewish sec- 
tary). 

CARAMBOLAGE [ka-ran-bo-ln-j] n. m. 
(bil.) camion. 

Faire un — to cannon; to make a 
cannon. 

CARAMBOLER [ka-ran-bo-l«] v. IL 
(bil.) to cannon ; tc make a camion. 

CARAMEL [ka-ra-mil] n. m. caramel. 

Cerises au — , candied cherries; 
odeur de — , caramel. 

CARAMELISER [ka-ra-m«-liJ»«] v. a. 
to reduce (sugar) to caramel. 

CARAPACE [ka-ra-pa-.] n. £ (of tor- 
toises) carapace ; callapaah ; callapee. 

CARAQUE [ka-ra-k] n. £ (nav.) carac. 

CARAT [ka-ra] n. m. 1. (gold., jewel.) 
carat ; 2. (gold) carat (part of fine gold) ; 
3. small diamonds sold by weight. 

CARAVANE [ka-ra-va-n] n. £ 1. I 

cara/van (persons travelling in the East) ; 
2. § body ; troop ; band. 

Faire sos — §, to lead a dissipated 
life ; to play o.'s pranks. 

CARAVANIER [k»-ra-vn-m«] n. m. 
leader of a caravan. 

CARAVANSlfeRAI, CAEAVANS:^- 
EAIL [ka-ra-van-i«-rai*] n. m. caravan- 
sary. 

CARAVELLE [ka-ra-vJ-l] n. £ (nav.) 
carvel; caravel. 

CARBATINE [kar-ba-ti-n] n. £ 1. 
green skin ; 2. green hide. 

CARBON ARO [kar-bo-n«-ro] n. m. car- 
bonaro. 

CARBONATE [k»rbo-na-t] n. m. 
(chem.) carbonate. 

CARBONCLE [kar-b«n-kl] n. m. + 1. 
(min.) carbuncle ; 2. (med.) carbuncle. 

CARBONE [kar-bo-n] n. m. (chem.) 
carbon. 

CARBONfi, E [kar-bo-n«] a^j. (chem.) 
carbonated. 

CARBONEU-X, 8E [kar-bo-neA, e4-«] 
adj. (chem.) carbonaus. 

CARBONIQUE [kar-bo-m-k] adj. 
(chem.) carbonic. 

CARBONISATION Jkar-bo-ni-id-BiSn] 
n. f. (chem.) carbonization. 

CARBON I8ER [kar-bo-ni-z«] V. a. 
(chem.) to carbonize; to char. 

CARBONNADE [kar-bo-na-d] n. £ 
(culin.) carbonade. 

CARBURE [kar-bd-r] n. m. (chem.) 
carburet. 

CARCAN [kar-kan] n. m. 1. carcan 
(punishment) ; 2. carcanet (necklace). 

CARCASSE [kar-ka-.] n. £ 1. carcass 
(of a dead animal) ; 2. |^~ (b. s.) (jest) 
carcass (of tlie human body); 3. (of 
poultry) body ; 4 § skeleton (lean person 
or animal); 5. (arch.) shell; 6. (arts) 
frame-work ; 1. (build.) shell; 8. (nav.) 
carcass. 

CARCINOLOGIE [kar-ii-no-lo-ji] n. £ 
(did.) cdrcinology. 

CARCINOMATEU-X, SE [kar-si-no- 
ma-teu, z] adj. (med.) carcinomatous. 

CAECINOME [kar-u-no-m] n. IB (med.) 
carcinoma. 

CARDAGE [kar-da-j] n. m. <^a A m.) 
carding. 

CARDAMINE rkar-da-mi-n] n. f (bot) 
cardami/ne ; \ lady''s smock. 

— des prds, cuckoo-flower; cuckoo- 
flower cress. 

CARDAMOME [kar-da-mo-m] n. m. 
(bot) cardamom ; cardamom-tree. 

CARDASSE [kar-da-.] n. £ F. Nopal. 

CARDE [kar-d] n. £ 1. (a & m.) card; 
2. (bot.) chard. 

— mecaniqne, (a. Sc m.) card-engine ; 
carder. 



CAEDE-P0IR:6E [kjir-d-po«.rt] n. 1, 

pi. — s, (hort) chard of^"* 



M. — s, (nort) cnara oj oeei. 

CARDER [kar-d«] V. a. (ft. & m.) to 
card. 

Machine k — , card-engine ; carder. 

CARDi:RE [kar-d4-r] n. £ (bot) 
(genus) teasei. 

— cuHiv6e, k bonnetler, k for Jon, =. 
CARDEU-R Kar-deur] n. m. SE [e**] 

n. £ (a. & m.) carder. 

— en fin, (spin.) Jmish.er, 
CAEDIAL6IE [kar-di-ui-ji] n,£ (med.) 

cardialgia ; *[ heart-burn. 

CARDIAQUE [kar-di-a-k] adj. 1. (ansit) 
cardiac ; cardiacal; 2. (med.) cardiae; 
cardiacal. 

CARDIAQUE, n. m. (med.) cardiac. 

CARDIER [kar-di6] n. m. (sta.) card- 
paper. 

CARDINAL [kar-di-nal] n. m. L car- 
dinal ; 2. (orn.) cardinal. 

CARDINAL, E, adj. 1. cardinal; 2. 
(astr.) cardinal; 8. (geog.) cardinal; 
4. (gram.) cardinal. 

CARDINALAT [kar-di-na-U] n. m. 
cardinalate ; cardinalship. 

CARD IN ALE [kar-di-na-q n. £ (bot) 
cardinal-flower. 

CARDINE [kar-di-n] n. £ (ich.) whiff. 

CARDIORHEXIE rkar-di-o-rJk-.i] n- f 
(med.) rupture of the neart. 

CARDIPfiRICARDITE [kar-di-p^-ri- 
kar-di-t] n. £ (med.) inflamMiaiion qftha 
heartand pericardium, 

CARDITE [kar-di-t] n. £ (med.) car<«- 
tis. 

CARDON [kar-d6nj n. m. 1. (bot) car- 
doon ; 2. (crust) shrimp. 

CAEDONNETTE [kar-do-ni-t] n. £ F. 

CHARDONNKTriB. 

CAEflME [k« rt-m] n. m. lent. 

La mi , mid-^=. Arriver commo 

maree en — , to come very apropoe; 
faire, observer le — , to keep = ; mettre 
le — bien liaut, 1. to require what is dif- 
ficult; 2. to promise what is disla/M^ 
rompre le — , rompre — , to cease ketm- 
ing ■=■ ; vi nir comme Mars en — , to 68 
s:u,re to cume in due time. Le — cot 
bas, = begins early ; le — est hant, -^ 
begins late. 

CarEMK-PRBNANT [ka-r«-m-pr6-nan] n. 

m., pi. — , 1. Shrove-tide; 2. Shrowy- 
Tuesday ; 3. Shrove-tide reveller. 

CARENAGE [ka-rt-n»-j] n. m. (nav.) 
careening. 

CARENCE [ka-ran-.] n. £ ^ Caw) ab- 
sence of assets. 

CARilNE [ka-r6-n] n. £ 1. (nav.) keel; 
bottom; 2. ^nav.) careen; careening; 
8. (bot) carina ; 1 keel. 

En — , en forme de — , keel-shaped. 
Abattre, mettre en — , (nav.) to careen ; 
to lay on careen; donner la, uue — &, 
donner — k, (nav.) to careen ; to lay on 
careen. 

CAR:6N:fe, E, carin:6, e [ka-r«-ii«, 

ka-ri-n6] adj. (bot) carinated ; ^ keeled ; 
1 keel-shaped. 

GARDNER [ka-r«-n«] v. a. (nav.) to 
careen. 

CARESS ANT, E [ka-ri-ian, t] adj. 1. | 

§ caressing; 2. 1 (of animals) /atWiMic ; 
8. (b. s.) {t^qk.) fawning. 

D'une manitire — e, 1. caressingly; 2, 
fawningly. 

CARESSE [ka-rJ-i] n. £ 1. 1 J caress; 
2. § endearment; 8. § (of animrJs) 
fawning; 4. § (b. s.) (^t6,) flwrniatg ; 
faion. 

Faire — , des —a, to caress ; feire doe 
— 8 a, to caress. 

CARESSER [ka-rt-rt] v. a. 1. 1§ to oo 
ress ; 2. | to caress, to strcke (aninuilf) 
8. I (of animals) to fawn; 4 1 (b. ».) 
(pers.) to fawn ; 6. $ (b. s.) to pamper. 

En caressant, 1. caressingly ; 2.jmon 
ingly. 

CARET fka-r*] n. m. (erp.) inibrieal- 
ed, hawk's bill turtle, tortdee. 

CARET, n. m. rope-maker's reel. 

Fil de — , rope-yam. 

CAREX [ka-rik.] n. m. (bot) (geireo) 
sedge. 

De — , sedged. 

CAEGAISON [Ur-ghi-i«n] n. f. 1, 
(com. nav.) cargo ; fi-eight; 2. ihip 
load. 



CAR 



OAR 



CAR 



amal; dmale; « f6e; ithve; «fSte; i jn; til; iUe; omol; 6m6\e; dmort; it sue; w s&re ; o^u jour ; 



— de Taller, outward cargo; = oirf; 
— en plein,/MW = ; — de retour, Aow«- 
zoard, home, return =. Livre de — , =- 
book. Debarquer une — , to discharge, 
Umd a = ; eniharquer, recevoir una — , 
to take in a =.. 

CARGUE [kar-g] n. £ (nav.) braU. 

CAKQUKK [k«r-gh«] V. a. (nav.) 1. to 
'aiil; to hrau up; to clue up ; %. to 
ftxrtha; to spill 

CAEIATIDE [ka-ri-ati-d] n. f F. 

liAtYATIDa 

■ CARIBOU [ka -ri-bon] n. m. (mam.) 
oariboo. 

CARICATURE [ka-ri-ka-ta-i] n. £ ca- 
Seatwe. 

Aatenr de — s, caricaturist Faire 
ane — de, tourner en — , to carica- 
ture. 

CARICATUEEE [ka-ri-ka-tu-rt] V. a. 
to caricature ; to turn into ridicule. 

CARIE [ka-ri] n. f. 1. (agr.) bro^on 
rust; smut ham; 2. (hot.)Jire-blast; 8. 
(med.) caries; cariosity. 

CARl£, E rk"-ri«1 adj. 1. rottm; 2. 
(agr.) smutty ; 3. (did) carious ; rotten ; 
4. (med.) carious. 

Non — , unrotten. 

CARIEE [ka-ri6] V. e \. w rot; 2 
<agr.) to smut; 3. (did.) to make, to ren- 
der carious. 

8b cakier, pr. v. 1. to rot ; 2. (agr.) to 
tmMt; 8. (did.) to become, to get ca- 
rious. 

CARILLON ^[ka-ri-i-6n*] n. m. 1. || 
ehdm^ of bells; 2. chim^ (inui5ical bells) ; 
8. S potlier; racket; 4. (of clockk, 
wishes) music. 

A — ^1 (of clocks, watches) miisical. A 
double, triple — , 1. 1| double, treble peal; 
2. § (b. 8.) several tim^. Soiiner le — , 
to ring a peal ; sonner a double, a triple 



— , to ring a double, a treble - 

CARILLON] 
ii. m. chiTning. 



!ARILLONNEMENT [ka-. 



TARILLONNEE [ka-ri-io-n«*] v. n. 1. 
(v ring a peal ; 2. to cldme. 
, OARILLONNEUR [ka-ri-io-neur*] n. 
a. chimer. 

CAEI2!J:fi, E, V. Carene. 

CARISTADE [ka.ri.-ta-d] n. f. t alms. 

CARLIN [kar-lin] n. m. car Hit (an 
I teiitaa coin). 

CARLIN, n. m. pug-dog. 

CARLINGUE [kar-lin-gh] n. f. (nav.) 
I. carUne ; carlmig ; 2. (or masts) step. 

CAKLISTE [kar-li.-t] n. m. £ Carlist 
(jKUtisan of Charles). 

CAKLISTE, adj. Carlist. 

CARLOVINGIEN, NE [kar-Io-vin-Ji-in, 

\-u] adj. (hist of France) Varlovingian 
(of Charleinaene). 

CARMAGNOLE [kar-ma-gno-I*] n. £ 1. 
carmagnole (jacket); 2. carmagnole 
(revolutionary song of 1790); 8. carmag- 
nole (revolutionary dance). 

CARMAGNOLE, n. m. carmagnole 
(violent -lacobin). 

CAItME [kar-m] n. m. (rel. ord.) car- 
melite (friar). 

— dechaus86, dochaux, bare-footed =z. 
De — , cai"inelite. 

CARMELINE [kar-m«-li-n] n. £ car- 
m^vne-wool. 

CARMELITE [kar-m«-li-t] n. f (rel. 
ord.) Carmelite (nun). 

De — , Carmelite. 

CARMES [kar-m] n. m. (pi.) (trick- 
track) two fours. 

CARMIN [kar-min] n. m. carmine. 

Des levres de — , ruby tips. 

CARMINATI-F, VE [kar-mi-na-tif, i-v] 
»\J. (med.J carminaM/ve. 

CARMINATIF [kar-mi-na-tif] n. m. 
(inod.) carminaMee. 

CARNAGE [kar-na-j] n. m. 1. car- 
'Uiffe ; slaughter ; 2. carnage (flesh of 
diilnialM killed). 

Faire ca — , to make a =. 

CAENAS8-1ER, lilRE [kar-na-.i6, i-r] 

(xfl. J. (zool) ferine ; ^ftesli^-eatkig ; 2. 
(poiu)/07Mi of meat 

Sirn, — Carnassibr^ carnivokk. Carnaasier is 
mid of animaU that live on fle«h alone ; cart nort 
it tuch a< eat flt»n and other thingi aUo. Thb 



CARNASSli:RE [kar-na-wJ-r] n. £ 

shooting -pocket; game-bag, pouch. 

CARNATION [kar-na-.ifn] n. £ 1. car- 
nation ; flesh-color ; 2. (^/ainL) carna- 
tion. 

CARNAVAL [kar-na-val] n. m., pi. —6, 
carnival. 

CARNE [kar-n] n. £ corner (of a ptone, 
table, etc.). 

CARNE, E [kar-nfi] BjSi. flesh-colored. 

CARNET [kar-nfe] n. m. (com.) 1. me- 
morandwm-book ; note-book; 2. (comp.) 
hook. 

— alphab6tique, fcom.) ind«e. — 
d'6ch6ances, ( F. ^chkance). 

CAENIFICATION [kar-ni-fi.k4-d6n] n. 
£ (med.) camiflcation. 

CARNIFIER (SE) [ij-kar-ni-fid] pr. v. 
(med.) to carnify. 

CARNIVORE [kar-ni-TO-r] a^j (did.) 
carnivorous. 

CARNIVORE, n. m. (did.) carnivo- 
rous animal. 

CARNOSITi [kar-no-a-t«] n. £ (surg.) 
carnosity. 

CAKOGNE [ka-ro-gn*] n. £ e hag. 

CAKOLIN, E [ka-ro-liii, i-n] adj. (hist.) 
qf Cluirlemagne. 

CAROLINGIEN, NE [ka-rolin-ji-in, A-n] 

adj. V. Carlovingien. 

CAK0LU8 [ka-ro-lu.] n. m. carolus 
(old English . ■)in). 

CARONAPE [ka-ro-na-d] n. £ (artil.) 
carronade. 

CARONCULE [ka-ron-ku-l] n. £ 1. 
(anat) caruncle; 2. (bot) caruncle. 

CAEOTIDE [ka-ro-ti-d] adj. (anat) 
carotid. 

CAROTIDE, n. £ (anat) carotid. 

CAROTIDIEN [ka-ro-ti-di-in] adj. m. 
(anat) carotid. 

CAKOTIQUE [ka-ro-ti-k] adj. (med.) 
carotid. 

CAKOTTE [ka-ro-t] n. £ 1. (bot) car- 
rot ; 2. (of tobacco) roll. 

Couleur de — , (of hair) carroty. En 
— , (of tobacco) rolled. Tirer une — a q. 
u., to get (obtain) a. th. out of a. o. ; ne 
vivre que de — s 1, to live upon a Tnere 
nothing. 

CAROTTER [ka-ro-t*] v. n. ^ to play 
for a mere nothing. 

CAROTT-IER [ka-ro-ti«] n. m. itRE 



[4-r] n. £ X. 
CAROT 



iioniuc 

OAENA88IER [kar-na-iii] n. m. {too 
^iliif, ^fleah-eaUr. 
90 



AROTTEU-R [ka-ro-t«ar] n. m. SE 
[oa-«] n. £ ^ mean player. 

CAEOUBE [ka-rou-b] n. m., 

CAROUGE [ka-rou-j] n. m. (bot) ca- 
rob, locu^ ; ^ sweet-pod. 

CAROUBIER [ka-rou-bie] n. m., 

CAROUGE [ka-rou-j] n. m. (bot) ca- 
rob-tree ; locust-tree ; Saint Joh/rCs 
bread-tree ; sweet-pod tree. 

CARPATHES [kar.pa-t] adj. m. pi. 
(geog.) Carpathian. 

Les Monts — , Vie = Mov/ntains. 

CARPE [kar-p] n. ni. (anat) wrist. 

CAEPE, n. £ (ich.) carp. 

— doroe. goM-jish. 

CARPEAU [kar-p6] n. m. {\ch.)young 
caip. 

CAEPIEN, NE [kar-pi-in, 4-n] adj. 
(anat) carpal. 

Os — , wrist. 

CAEPILLON [kar-pi-i6n*] n. m. (ich.) 
very young carp. 

CAEQUOIS [kar-koa] n. m. quiver. 

Arrae d'un — , armed with a =; ** 
quivered. Dans son — , ina-=:; ** qui- 
vered. Vider son — , 1 § to empty o.'s 
quiver ; to shoot all o.'s bolts. 

CAEEARE [ka-ra-r] n. m. Carrara 
marble. 

CARRE [k«-r] n. £ 1. (pers.) hack and 
shoulders ; 2. (of coaus) hack atid shoul- 
ders ; 3. (of hats) crown ; 4 (of shoes) 
square toeji. 

Avoir une bonne — , (pers.) to be broad 
shouldered. 

CARR£, E [ka-r«] adj. 1. square; 2. 
(math.) square ; quadrate ; quadratic ; 
3. (mil.) sqjiare; 4 (nav.) square; 6. 
(sta.) printing demy ; demy ; 6. (rhet) 
(of sentences) ftdl ; flowing ; welU 
twmed. 

Non — , unsquared; k peu prtis — , 
nearly square; squarish. Bols — 8, 
timber ; nscnn — «, 1. square figure ; 2. 



quadratria- ; forme — e, squixreti<w , 
muscle — , (anat) '■'■ quadiatus ;" paiti* 
— , party oftico men and two iwm&,i 
racine — e, sqtiMre root ; — d^s ei>aul *i 
broad-shouldered. Brassor — , (nav.) U. 
square (the yards). 

CARR:^, 6 In. 1. square (square 
figure); 2. landing-place; 8. (of mut 
ton) breast; 4. (of paper) square pie^ , 
5. (anat) "■ quadratus ;'' 6. (aritL i 
square ; 1. (arch.) Mlet ; 8. (gard.) bed , 
9. (geom.) square; quadrate; 10. (mil.) 
square ; 11. (sta.) printing deir^ , 
dem/y ; 12. (sta.) medium: v 

Petit — , (sta.) short demy. — d«« 
oflBciers, (nav.) ward-room ; — de tol 
lette t, dressing-case (for ladies). Formt 
en — , range par — , squadroned. 

CARKEAU [ka-r6] n. m. 1. sqwir, 
(of a series of squares) ; 2. square, pav 
tng-tUe ; 8. pamng-brick ; 4 tile-floor , 
floor ; 6. (of a churoli) cushion ; 6. (of 
CTjrMons) Ottoman foot-xtool; 1. (of 
fabnjs) square; g. (of files) rubber; 9 
(of glass) paw* of glass; pane; 10. (of 
tailors) goose ; tailor^s goi^-: • 11. (cards^ 
diamond; 12. (mas.) stretcher. 

1. Plii 



dt^Bsin a — X, drawiu; W/* squares 
valet de — , itiiy, i/vten, jaek i^ 



— d'arbalete, holt; quarrel-shot; — i 
de la foudre, thvmder-bolts ; — de Hol- 
\bs^A^ Dutch tile. Valet de — , 1. (cards) 
knave of diamonds ; 2. § (pers.) con- 
temptible, pitiful fellow, wretch. Sant* 
— X, (of windows) wit/tout any pcm^e 
of glass ; * paneless. Avoir tovnours 
garde a — ,to be aVwoAjs prepared for 
every emergency ; coucher sur le — , to 
lie, to sleep on the hm-e grownd ; cou- 
cher, Jeter, laisser q. u. sur le — , 1. to 
strike a. o. to the grownd ; ^^ to lay 
a. o. sprawUng ; 2. to kill a. o. on tht 
spot ; demeurer, rester sur is — , to b( 
killed, killed upon the spU j Jeter RiU 
le — , (of game) to kill. 

CARREAU, n. m. (med.) " tahet mt 
senterica." 

CARREFOUR [ka-r-four] n. in. 1 
cross-road ; 2. (of towns) public plac 
(where several streets end). 

— des auteurs, Grub-street. De - 
(jeeX.) Grub-street. Poeme de — , ^raft 
street poem. 

CARRELAGE [kA-r-la-j] n. m. 1 
brick-paving; 2. brick-pavement. 

CAIiRELER [k8-r-i«] V. a. 1. to part 
with He; 2. to pave with brick ; 8. fe 
cobble (old shoes). 

CAEEELET [ki-r-U] n. m. 1. (ich.) 
plaice ; ^ flat-fish ; flounder ; 2. 
square fishing-net ; 8. shoemaker^e 
aid; aid. 

CAEEELETTE [ka-r-U-t] n. £ four 
sided, Jour-squareflle. 

CAERELEUR [ka-r-leiir] n. m. L 
paver for brick pavement; 2. travel- 
ling cobbler. 

CARRELIEE [ka-r«-li«] n. m. 1. 
square, paving-tile maker ; 2. pavinq- 
brick maker. 

CAREELUEE [ka-r-ld-r] n. £ nou 
soles (put to old boots or shoes). 

Mettre une — a, to sole, 

CAEEi:MENT [ka-ri-man] adv. | 
squarely (in a square). 

CAEEEE [ka-r«] V. a. 1. I to square ; 
2. (arith.) to squar-e; 3. (geom.) to 
square ; 4 (mil.) to form into a equara 

Se career, pr. V. 1. to strut ; S. (bovJl- 
lotte) to double the stake. 

Personne qui se carre, strutter. En 8# 
carrant 1. strutting ; 2. struttingly. 

CAEEICK fka-rik] n. m. bote-ooat. 

CAEEIEE [ka-ri«] n. m. quarry-mutt 

CAEEIEEE [k«-riA-i] n. £ 1. B car«»r ■ 
2. I race-course; race-ground; 3. j 
career ; race ; course ; walk ; 4 Sptoj, ' 
scope ; 5. quarry (place whence stone 
is extracted); 6. (man.) career. 

Libre — , 1. free, full, play, 8copt>. 
Bout de la — , goal ; extraction de la — 
quarrying; lit de — , quarry-bed; 
pierre de la — , quarry. Avoir litir">. 
pleine — , II § to have free, fuU play 
scope ; creuser, fouiller une — , to di^ < 
quarry ; debufcjT dans one — . | to » v 



OAll 


CAR CAS 


»& jodte; eu jen; eu jetan 


eftpeur; dnp&n; Inpin; dnbon; Ufibrun; *11 llq. ; *gn llq. 



a career; donner 



1-S 



ler upon 

(roan.) to ^i«« rem to; % to vent; to 
gite vent to ; donner libre, pleine — a, 
S to give ample, free, fuU scope ; se 
doiuter — §, 1. to ha/vefree,fuU scope; 
i. to run out; 8. to indulge o.'s fancy ; 
m itrer dans la — , to enter the lists ; ex- 
piolter une — , to mine, to work a quar- 
ry ; /aurnir la — , to run over the 
Otmrae ; fournir la — au pas 1, to walk 
tD*r tfin course ; fournir une — , 1 §, to 
»s» o.'s race ; ouvrir une — 4 q. u., 1. 
io «yen a field for a. o. ; 2. to give a. o. 
tcope; parcourir une — §, to ruM a ca- 
reer, race ; remplir sa — II §, to run o.'s 
length; suivre une — , to pursue a ca- 
reer ; to run a race. 
• CARRIOLE [ka-ri-o-i] n. f. tUUd cart. 
CARROSSE [ka-ro-sj n. m. coach ; 
carriage. 

— h. deux fonds, double, double-seated 
=; — de louage, hxickney -coach ; hAick. 
A^voir — , to keep o.'s = ; to ride in a 
sz ; rouler — \to keep o.'s =. 

CARROSS:i&E [ka-ro-t«] n. f. coach- 
fuU. 

CARE0S8IER [ka-ro-.i«] n. m. 1. 
c%>aoh-maker ; 2. coacMiorse. 

CARROUSEL [ki-rou-zM] n. m. 1. tilt 
(tournament) ; 2. carousal (tournament 
In France); 8. tilt-yard. 

CARROUSSE [ka-rou-.] n. f. carouse ; 
^ drinking-bout. 

Falre — , to carouse. 

CARRURE [ka-ru-r] n. C breadth of 
back at the shovlders. 

D'une belle — , broad-shouldered. 
fitrolt de — , (of coats) narrow, tight 
across the shoulders ; large de — , (of 
touts) imd€,fidl across the shoulders. 

CARTAHU [kar-ta-u] n. m. (nav.) 
v)hip; girt-Une. 

CARTAYER kar-a-i«] v. n. to drUoe 
with the rut between the wheels. 

CARTE [kar-t] n. t 1. card; %toard; 
playing card ; 8. pasteboard ; 4. tick- 
it ; 6. (of eating-houses and Inns) biU of 
fiire ; 6. (of eating-houses and inns) biU ; 
account ; 7. (geog.) map ; 8. (geog.) 
oliart. 

— ajust^e, prupar6e, marked card ; 
lee basses — s, the snuiU =« ; — blanche, 
1. \ blank = ; 2. § carte blanche (un- 
limited power); — enlnminee, colored 
map; fausse — , (play) odd = ; — g6n6- 
Uogique, genealogical chart, table ; — 
t:6ographique, de guographle, m^ip ; — 
g6ographique, de geographie enlumln6e, 
colored mMp ; — glacee, glazed •=. ; — 
marine, (geog.) chart; — payante, A 
payer, bUl, account (at an eating-house 
or inn) ; les — s peintes, the court =« ; 
— plane, plate, (geog.) plane chart ; — 
tarotoe, spotted = ; — d'adresse, trades- 
man's ■=z; — a jouer, playing = ; — de 
porcelaine, enamelled = ; trois — s de 
la m6me sorte, pair royal; — s sur table 
§, above-board ; — de visite, visiting 
=. Chateau de — , 1. H card-house ; 2. 
§ ginger-bread house ; le dessous des 
—9, the face of the =s ; 6tui k — , =- 
case; jeu de — «, 1. card-playing; 2. 
pack of^=s; joueur,joueuse de — s, =- 
player ; partio de — , game of=.s. Sans 
— , (K senses) ** charUess. Amener 
one — , to bring out a =; avoir — 
blanche, to lia'ce a carte hlamche ; bat- 
tre, meler les — s, to shuffle the ^s ; brou- 
iller les — s § \ 1. to sow dissension ; 
to enibroil matters; 2. to make m,is- 
-iiief; connaitre, voir le dessous des — s 
J, to be in th^ secret ; coupfer les — s, to 
out the =zs; demander — , (cards) to 
propose buying; demander une — , 
(onrds) to 6t*y a = ; dessiner, tracer sur 
niie — , une — geographique, to map ; 
uonner, faire les — s, to deal the =s ; to 
ileal; donner ik q. u. — blanche §, to 
gite a. o. a carte blanche ; 6carter une 
— , to throw away a ■=. ; gtre le premier 
on — s, to have the lead ; faire des cha- 
teaux de — s, to btdld with =« ; faire 
anu partle de — s, to play a gains of-=.s ; 
iaire des tours de — s, to perform tricks 
tAih =3 ; jouer aux — s, to play =s ; 
louer —8 BUT table, to deal above board ; 
^winter la — , (nav.) to prick the chart; 
tfiw les - -e. to tell fortunes upon =«. 



Dont on n'a pas de — , ( V. senses) ** 
charUess. A qui est-ce a donner, faire 
les —6? whose deal isitf 

CARTEL [kar-til] n. m. 1. challenge ; 
chaUmige to fight ; cartel ; 2. dial-case 
(for a clock) ; 8. clock (with a dial-case) ; 
4. (mil.) cartel; 5. (nav.) cartel; cartel 
ship. 

Auteur d'un — , d'un — de defl, elial- 
lenger. — de d6fi, cMUenge ; challenge 
to fight ; cartel. Eegler le — d'echange, 
(mil.) to arrange, settle terms for tlt^ 
exchange of prisoners. 

CARTERIE [kar-t-ri] n. £ 1. card- 
milking; 2. card-factory. 

CARTERO [kar-ts-ro] n. m. (small) 
pocket-book. 

CARTERON [kar-t«-r6n] V. QUAETE- 
EON. 

CAETi:SlANISME [kar-M-iU-ninn] 
n. m. (did.) cartesianism. 

CAKTiSIEN, KE [kar-t«-»i-in, i-n] a(y. 
(did.) cartesian. 

CART^SIEN [kar-t«-ii-in] n. m. (did.) 
cartesian. 

CARTHAGINOIS, E [kar-ta-ji-noa, z] 

adj. Carthaginian. 

CARTHAGINOIS, p. n. m. E, p. n. C 
Carthaginian. 

CARTHAME [kar-ta-m] n. m. (bot) 
carthamus; ^ safitower. 

— des teinturiers, sajftower ; dyer's 
saMoioer ; bastard, m,ock saffron. 
rleuron de — , (chem.) safflower. 

CARTIER rkar-ti«] n. m. card-maker. 

CARTILAGE [kar-U-la-j] n. m. 1. gris- 
tle ; 2. (anat) cartilage. 

CARTILAGINEU-X, SE [kar-ti-la-ji- 
cea, eu-z] adj. 1. gristly ; 2. (anat.) carti- 
laginous ; 3. (bot) cartilaginous. 
\CARTILAGmiFICATION [kar-ti-la- 
ji-m-fi-ka-«6ii] n. f. (med.) con/version into 
cartilage. 

CARTILAGINIFIEE (SE) [sS-kar-ti- 
la-ji-ni-fi^] pr. v. (med.) to turn^ to be 
converted into cartilage. 

CAETI8ANE [kar-ti-»a-n] n. f corti- 
sane (card-pai>er). 

CARTOGRAPHIE [knr-to-gra-fi] n. f. 
V. Chaetogeaphie. 

CARTON [kar-wn] n. m. 1. paste- 
board; 2. card; 8. pasteboard-box, 
case ; 4 hat-box ; 6. band-box ; 6. bon- 
net-box ; 7. (for drawings) portfolio ; 8. 
(book -bind.) ooard; 9. (draw.) cartoon; 
10. (paint) cartoon; IL (print) fowr- 
page cancel; cancel. 

— fin, card; card-paper; grand — , 
(print) octavo-part (of a duodecimo 
sheet) ; — Iu8tr6, polished pasteboard ; 
petit — , (print) off-ffut ; — refait, (print) 
four-page cancel ; cancel ; — a cha- 
peau, 1. twit-box; 2. bonnet-box; 3. 
band-box ; — de pftte, mill-board. 

CARTON-PIERRE [kar-ton-pii-r] n. 
m. statuary pasteboard. 

CARTONNAGE [ kar-to-na-j ] n. m. 
(book-bind.) boarding. 

CARTONNEU [k«, -o-n*] v. a. (book- 
bind.) to put in boards. 

Cartonne, e, pa. p. (book-bind.) in 
boards ; boards ; bo". 

CARTONNERIE [ kar-to-n-ri ] n. t 
pasteboard manufactory. 

CARTONNEU-R [kar-to-neur] n. m. 
SE [eu-i] n. f. binder that boards books. 

CARTONNIEE [kar-to-ni«] n. m. 1. 
pasteboard-maker ; 2. mill-boards 
maker. 

CARTOUCHE [kar-tou-.h] n. C 1. (of 
cannon) cartouch ; 2. (of fire-arms) 
cartridge ; 8. (mil.) cartouche (dis- 
charge or furlough). 

Papier — , (sta.J cartridge-pa/per. 
D6chirer la — , (mil.) to bite the =. 

CARTOUCHE, n. m. 1. case (for fire- 
works) ; 2. (arch.) modillion ; cartouch. 

CARTOUCHIER [kar-tou-.lii«] n. m. 
(nav.) cartridge-boxj. 

CARTULAIRE [kar-tu-U-r] n. m. car- 
tulary. 

CARUS rka-rus] n. m. (med.) earns. 

CARVI [kar-vi] n. m. (bot) cara- 
way. 

CARYATIDE [ka-ri-a-ti-d] n. f. t. (G" 
hist) caryatid : 2. (arch.) caryatid. 

CARYOPHYLLibE, E [ ki-r • f-1 
adj. (M* > <"!'-'•■ ^hyllemis 



CARYOPHYLL^ES [WH-o-B-Wl u 

f. pi. fbot.) caryophyllem. 

CAS [ka] n. m. 1. case (event); % 
case (circumstance) ; 3. case (qnestlou) 
4. case (cause, suit in a court) ; 5. valuoj 
esteem ; 6. 1 needs (excrement) pt. ; 7, 
(gram.) case; 8. (math.) case, 9. (moij 
case. 

— doutenx, 1. doublfvl cam ; fi. 
(math.) ambiguaus = ; — fortuit, mar* 
chance ; — en question, dont il s'agil, 
= in point. Au — que..., (hubj.) ir, 
=:...; auquel — , in 'which =: ; dans U< 
— de, 1. in = of; 2. able to ; dans le — 
ou, (Indlc.) in ■=...; dans tons les — , 
in any =; 1 in any and every =• 
en parell — , in such a = ; en — de, in 
= of; in the event of; en tons — , in 
any=' at all events; en — que... t, 
(subj.) m = . . . Un en — , anytlcing to 
serve vn=.of need. Changer le — , to 
alter th« = ; Stre dans le — de . . ., to t« 
able to...; faire — de, to value ; to set 
a value on, upon; ^ to make account 
of; faire son — ^,todo o.'s needs ; faire 
grand — de, 1. to set a great, high value 
on, upon ; to value hig/Uy ,• 2. § to make 
much of; ne pas faire — de, ne fairo 
aucun — de, to set no value on ; to be 
regardless of; ^ to make nothing of; 
to pass by ; to make no account of; 
faire pen de — de, 1. to value bid UtUe ; 
to set little value on; to make little of; 
to t/dnk slightly of; 2. to set at naught ; 
falre trop peu de — de, to undervalue ; 
poser le — que, (subj.) to put the=; to 
suppose. Dont on fait — , valued ; dont 
on fait grand — , higJtly valued ; dont 
on fait peu de — , unvalued ; ^ Utile 
valued; le — avenant, 6cheant if the 
= occur, should' occur ; should the = 
occur; si le — y 6chet, if there beocca- 
sion ; if the occasion require it 

CAS, SE [ka, .] adj. + (of the tory-, 
voice) broken. 

CASAN-IEE, liiIRE [kaza-nii, »-rJ 
adj. 1. (pers.) domesticated ; dom^Mo ; 
home-keeping ; 2. (th.) domesticated; 
domest/io. 
Rendre — , to domesticate. 
CASAN-IER, n. m. liiRE, n. t do- 
mesticated person, dharacter. 

CA8AQUE [ka-«a-k] n. C cloak; cao- 
sock. 

Toumer — , to turn round ; to change 
sides ; ^ to turn over ; ^ to be a turn- 
coat ; ^ to rat. V6tu d'une — , cos- 
socked. 

CA8AQUIN rk»-za-kiii] n. ra. l.f short 
casxock; 2. jacket {short gown). 

Donner, tomber sur le — & q. u. t3S", 
to beat, to thrash a. o.; -r-to trim a. o.'t 
jacket ; to curry a. o.'s hide. 

CASCADE [k(w-ka-d] n. f. ]. I cascade ; 
water-fall ; 2. || (of fire) cascade ; 8. II 8 
fall; leap; bound; 4. ^ § doionfaU. 
(blunder) ; fall ; sUp ; 6. irregularity. 
De — en — , 1. f-om = to =; 2. ' § 
from one event, thing to another ; par 
— 8, 1. 16?/ leaps, bounds ; 2. § by fits 
and starts; 8. § desultorily; uncon- 
neetedly ; 4 § oy hearsay ; discours 
plein de — s, desultory, unconnected 
discourse. Faire une — , 1. || to make, 
to form a cascade, waterfall ; 2. § to 
have a downfall, fall. 

CASCARILLE rka.-ka-ri-i*] n. t 
(pharm.) cascarilla-bark. 

CA8CA TELLE [kaa-ka-a-l] n. £ ca» 
cade {of TixoU). 

CASE [ka-i] n. £ 1. t house; 2. hvi 
(negro's); 8. compartment; dicUiioti.; 
box ; 4. box (for animals) ; 5. (of resrift/eisl 
square ; 6. (for papers) pigeAyn-hole , 1 
(backgammon) point; 8. (chess, draft?, 
square ; 9. (nav.) berth. 

— pour les chevaux, (rail.) horse-tor. 
I'atron de la — , moster of the hou4o 
iltre k une — , (chess) to stand upon (« 
square. 

CAS:6EU-X, SE [ks-««-ea, «a-.j adj. 
(did.) caseous. 

CASillQUE [ka-rt-i-k] adi. (chemj 
caseic. 

CASEMATE [ka-i-mn-t] n. f (fort) 
rasemate. 

CASEMAT:^, E [knz-ma-t*] adi (t.<it: 
. ,/ba8tions> with casemates. 



CAS 



CAS 



CAT 



I; dm&le; «fee; ef6ve; IfBte; rf je; ill; tile; omol; 6 mdle; *mort; wsuc; wsilre; om jour; 



CA8EE |;ka-z«] T. n. (backgammon) to 
mai« a povnL 

CASEE, V. a. 1. I to placs (a tb.); 
ti> jtw< away; ^ to «<«>«; away ; 2. | to 
3n«*e room for (a. tb., a. o.); 3. J § to 
find a situation, a place, ^ a berth/or 
(a. o.). 

Sk oaber, pr. V. 1. (tb.) to be, to get 
placed ; to he put away ; 1 to be stow- 
ed away; 2. | (pers.) to find room; 3. 
I (pera.) to e'*^ settled ; to fi/iid, to get a 
wnuiUon, a place, \ a berth. 

CA8EKNE [ka-zfer-n] n. £ (mil.) bar- 
rae/ka. 

Intendant de — , barrack-master; in- 
tcndant general des — s, =^-master gen- 
oral ; ration de — , barrack-allow- 
ance. 

CA8ERNEMENT [ks-zir-n-man] n. m. 
(mU.) putting into barracks. 

Eflfets de — , barrack-baggage. 

CASEKNEK [ka-zftr-ofi] V. n. (nilL) to 
"be in barracks. 

Faire — , to put into barracks. 

CASERNEK, v. a. (mil.) to put into 

CASIER [ka-zi«] n. m. 1. (of a bureau, 
ecCTetary) set of pigeon-Mies ; pigean- 
liotes ; 2. pedestal-case. 

CASILLEUX [ka-zi-ieu*] adj. m. (of 
glass) brittle. 

CA8IMIR [ka-zi-mir] n. m. cassimere ; 
eingle-miUea cassimere. 

— double, douhle-mUled =.. 
CASINO [ka-zi-no] n. m. casino ; dub. 
CASOAR [ka-zo-ar] n. m. (orn.) (genus) 

oassowary. 

CASPIEN, NK [kaz-pi-in, J-n] adj. Cas- 
pian. 

La Mer — ne, the Caspian Sea. 

CASQUE [k«.-k] n. m. 1. JieUnet; ** 
oteque ; 2. (bot) galea ; helm ; helmet ; 
hood; 8. (conch.) helmet-s/iell ; 4. (her.) 
hOmet. 

Avoir le — en t6te, to ha/ve o.'« helm,, 
hotmet on; to be helmed; helmeted; 
OoaTrir d'un — , to helm ; to cover with 
n helmet ; convert l"un — , portant un — , 
hrlmed ; helmeted ; oter le — a, to un- 
*«i7J», A qui on a ote le — , qui n'a plus 
soil — , unhelmed. 

CASQUETTE [ka*.k4-t] n. f. cap 
<l')y'8, nan's). 

— d voyage, tro/velUng =. 
CASdADE" [h»-i«i-d] n. £ t He ; ^flb. 
Donner une — , to tell a ■=.. 

' CASSAGE [ka-M-j] n. m. (did.) break- 
f/ny. 

CA8SAILLE [kiU-sa-i*] n. C (agr.) 
breaking up. 

CA88ANT, E [ka-sSn, t] adj. 1. || bHt- 
tl^; 2. (of motals) brittle; 8. (of pears) 
breaking. 

CASSATION [ka-.a«on] n. f (law) 1. 
amvulm^nt; 2. appeal; 3. reversion 
(of a. lodgment). 

Cow de — , ccvH of appeal ; de- 
mande, pourvoi, recours en — , 1. pro- 
ceedings in error ; 2. petition of ap- 
peai; moyen de — , 1. plea ofproceed- 
vngs of error ; 2. plea of petition of 
appeal. Aller en — , (tb.) to appecU; 
Be pourvoir en — , 1. to sue for a writ of 
error; 2. to appeal; to lodge an ap- 
peal. 

CA88AVE fka-ea-v] n. £ cassa/oa; 
oaseavi. 

CA8SE [ki-z] n. C 1. (bot) cassia; 
French guava ; 2. (pharm.) cassia. 

— aromatique, odorante, (bot) bastard 
cUmamon ; — vraie, en batons, des bou- 
tiques, (pharm.) purging cassia. — en 
bni«, 1. (bot) bastard oimiamon; 2. 
(pharm. )cassia-bark. 

CAS8E, n. f 1. (com.) breakage ; 2. 
nlL) cashiering. 

CA88E, n. £ (print) case ; letter-case. 

Bas de — w Imcer case ; haut de — , 
=. Mise en — , laying a =; 
t de — 8, set of=^s, letter-cases. Ap- 
prendre la — , to learn the boxes ; met- 
tre en — , to lay a =. 

CA8SEAU [k4-z«] n. m. (print) Jiaif- 
oia-! ; drawer. 

OA88E-COU [ka-»-kou] n. m., pi. — , 
L break-neck ; 2. (man.) rough^rtd^r. 

CASSE-CROtTE [ka-^krou-t] n. ul, 
pL — , oruKt-breaker. 
»2 



'"Ss 



CASSE-LUNETTE [kA-z-lu-nJ-t] n. m., 
pi. — s, (bot) eye-bright. 

CASSEMENT [ka-nnan] n. TO. J | 
breaking. 

— de tSte 8, head-breakvng ; anxiety; 



CA8SE-M0TTE [kd-z-mo-t] n. m., pL 
— s, (agr.) brake. 

CASSE-NOISETTE [ka-.-noa-z^-t] n. 
m., pi. — s, nut-crackers. 

CA8SE-N0IX [ka-z-noa] n. m., pi. — , 

1. wut-crackers ; 2. (orn.) nut-hatch; 
nut-cracker. 

CA8SEE [k4-.«] T a. ]. I to break (by 
striking an unelastlo body); 2. ( {k,of) 
to break (a limb, a part of the body) ;