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Full text of "Proposal for the acquisition and additional development of the government center garage parcel"

BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 





PROPOSAL F=OR THE ACQUISITION 
AND ADDITIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE 






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SUBMITTED TO 

THE CITY OF BOSTON 

KEVIN H. WHITE MAYOR 

THE BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

ROBERT J. RYAN DIRECTOR 

JANUARY 10. 1983 



DEVELOPER: 
ARCHITECTS 



OPERATIONS AND 
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 



CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 

536 GRANITE STREET 
8BAINTHEE MASSACHUSETTS 02184 

KALLMANN. McKINNELL & WOOD. INC 

'27 THEMONT STREET 
BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 02108 

VITOLS ASSOCIATES 

1230 STATlER OFfiCE BUILDING 
BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 02116 

SCHWARTZ PARKING. INC 

60 WASHINGTON STREET 
HARTFORD CONNECTICUTT 06106 



pa 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO.. INC. 

builders consultants developers 



January 10, 1983 



Robert J. Ryan, Director 
Boston Redevelopment Authority 
Boston City Hall 
1 City Hall Plaza 
Boston, MA 02201 



GOVERNMENT CENTER GARAGE PARCEL 



Dear Mr. Ryan: 

In response to the Request for Proposals for the Sale and Addi- 
tional Development of the Government Center Garage, I am pleased 
to offer for your consideration the following proposal from 
Center Garage Associates. The proposal contains all requested 
exhibits, a certified check for $5,000.00, of which we under- 
stand $2,500.00 is refundable if we are not designated developer 
for this parcel, and detailed information outlining our program 
for the successful transfer and development of the garage property, 

Our proposal is highlighted by an innovative economic package 
that is conservatively estimated to produce an aggregate amount 
of $41,500,000.00 in public benefits over the depreciable life 
of the project. 

Our development team reflects the demonstrated experience, capa- 
city and financial resources required to implement a development 
project of this degree of complexity. 

Center Garage Associates is a partnership whose General Partners 
are Center Garage Development, Inc. (Edward A. Fish, President), 
and Peabody Construction Co. , Inc. 

We have chosen two distinctive architectural firms, both with 
specific knowledge of the Government Center Garage. Kallmann, 
McKinnell & Wood Architects, Inc. were the designers of the 
Government Center Garage in conjunction with Glaser-deCastro 
Associates. Victor Vitols was the project manager of the 
Government Center Garage as representative of Glaser-deCastro. 



536 GRANITE STREET BRAINTREE, MASS. 02184 TEL 848-2680 



g9 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO. INC. 



Robert J. Ryan, Director 
Page Two 
January 10, 1983 



Schwartz Parking, Inc. will provide consulting services on the 
operation and management of the parking facilities. 

Robert F. Walsh Associates is providing real estate development 
consulting services. 

Aiding in the analysis of the impact of the parking traffic on 
the adjacent arteries will be S G Transportation Consultants. 

A key component of the proposal is the marketing of the proposed 
office space. The first stage of our comprehensive development 
approach will include a marketing strategy program aimed at the 
identification of the potential tenancy of the office space 
followed by an intense marketing effort. 

Our development strategy, explained in detail in other sections 
of this proposal, is guided by our desire to maximize the 
efficiency of the property as a commercial parking facility, 
produce immediate revenue to the City of Boston, capitalize 
on the potential for additional development through the intro- 
duction of office and retail uses, offer the City an opportunity 
to participate in the expanded development, and to create the 
necessary linkage between the North Station area and the Quincy 
Market area. 

The economic benefits of this proposal are essentially twofold 
in an attempt to respond to short term and long term needs of 
the City. 

(1) Center Garage Associates offers to purchase the existing 
garage facility, subject to negotiation, for the sum of 
$16,000,000.00. 

(2) Center Garage Associates proposes further to produce a 
series of innovative participatory elements that will 
result in an estimated $1,700,500.00 in public benefits. 
These elements include the following: 

ESTIMATED VALUE 

A. Substantive participation by the 
City of Boston in the income de- 
rived from an air rights lease $ 75,000.00 



M^ 



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PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO. INC. 



Robert J. Ryan, Director 
Page Three 
January 10, 1983 



ESTIMATED VALUE 



B. Reservation of 500 overnight park- 
ing spaces to City of Boston 

residents at a discounted rate $ 547,500.00 

C. Dedication of 2,000 square feet of 
retail space to a non-profit 
corporation designated by the City 

of Boston $ 28,000.00 

D. Annual Real Estate Tax Payment on 

Garage Facility $ 600,000.00 

E. Annual Real Estate Tax Payment on 

Air Rights Development $ 450,000.00 

Total Estimated Annual Value $1,700,500.00 



Total Estimated Value Over Depreciable 

Life (15 Years) $25,507,500.00 

Purchase Price for Garage Parcel $16,000,000.00 

Total Aggregate Value $41,507,500.00 

The development team, with its singular degree of relevant 
experience, has analyzed this project in great detail, mindful 
of the needs of the City of Boston and the constraints of the 
private investment market. V/e are confident that our proposal 
responds to the variety of objectives in a realistic manner. 

We are prepared to implement this proposal immediately to 
generate the necessary revenue to the City of Boston and to 
complete our Master Plan in an agreed upon schedule. 



Robert J. Ryan, Director 
Page Four 
January 10, 1983 



We look forward to working with you on this exciting venture. 



Sincerely, 

CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 



By: Center Garage Development, Inc., 
It's General Partner 




Edward A. Fish, President 



By: Peabody Construction Co., Inc., 
It's General Partner 




'. 04: 




Joseph C. Rettman 
Vice-President 



EAF/nal 
Enclosures 
(HAND- DELIVERED) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



NARRATIVES 

A. Project Summary 

B. Comprehensive Development Plan 

C. Relevant Experience 



II PROJECT PRO-FORMAS 

III GARAGE OPERATION 

IV LETTER OF INTEREST FROM LENDING INSTITUTION 

V DEVELOPMENT TEAM 

VI DESIGN CONCEPT 

A. Architectural Narrative 

B. Design Concept Drawings 

i Site Plan/Ground Floor 

ii 1st Floor Office/Health Club 

iii Roof Plan 

iv Sections 

VII REDEVELOPER'S STATEMENT FOR PUBLIC DISCLOSURE 

VIII FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



NARRATIVES 



A, Project Summary 



PROJECT SUMMARY 



This proposal is based on a comprehensive development approach 
which will allow for the immediate purchase of the property and 
a staged development of the garage improvements, site improve- 
ments, retail and office construction, which will maximize the 
financial return available to the City. 

The development program is comprised of the following components: 

(1) Upgraded parking facility, with structural and cosmetic 
improvements, providing "state of the art" equipment, 
upgraded lighting and improved operations and management 
by using the garage as it was originally designed. 

(2) 23,000 gross square feet of retail area at ground level 
to create a more active pedestrian-oriented atmosphere. 

(3) Provide site improvements that will enhance the garage 
and commercial activity and also serve as a visual link 
from North Station to Government Center. 

(4) 151,000 gross square feet of office development designed 
as "back office" space, or as an alternative prime office 
space, with direct participation by the City of Boston. 

(5) Office development will be separate from the garage/retail 
activity in terms of operation, access, and design. The 
space will be designed to accommodate market demand. 

(6) Potential for 10,200 gross square foot health club with 
an outdoor track and exercise area. 



(7) Employment objectives of 940 temporary jobs and 760 
permanent jobs. 



NARRATIVES 



B. Comprehensive Development Plan 



COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN 



Center Garage Associates proposes a staged development program 
responsive to market conditions and contingent upon a negotiated 
scheduling of the various components. 

This approach provides the opportunity for an immediate purchase 
of the parking garage with a phased sequence of additional com- 
ponents that can respond to both the City's needs and the private 
market, thereby integrating both short term and long term 
objectives in one development program. 

Our analysis of the history of the garage reveals less than 
adequate operation which is reflected in the amount of revenue 
received by the City through the years. The comprehensive 
d evelopment approach imme diately corrects this situation through 

operation and initial upgrading of the facility with the most 

I """ — — • — ^ ■ ■ ■ , _ 

modern computerized equipment, providing new lighting throughout 



the gara ge in order to incre ase the quality and intensity of the 
l ight in the structure, and identifying and correcti ng all latent 
structural and major cosmetic problems. Co ncurrently, through 
Sch wartz Associates, a major main tenance program will be enacted 
as well as t he establishment of "state of th e art" operational 
procedures. 

While the facility is undergoing the necessary physical and 
operational improvements, the marketing program for the ground 
floor retail space will be undertaken. The retail activity is 
critical both as a reinforcement to the parking facility and to 
create desired pedestrian activity and a resultant sense of 
security. 



To complement the retail activity and the overall appearance 
of the property, on-site improvement to lighting, paving, land- 
scaping, and street furniture will take place. 

Subsequently, our strategy envisions approximately 150,000 
gross square feet of office space through the construction 
of two new floors to the structure. The final design of 
this space will be determined by the results of the marketing 
program. This marketing effort will be initiated immediately 
upon acquisition of the property. 



Parking Garage 

Although the Government Center Parking Garage was designed for 
optimum utilization, there are two major reasons that have pre- 
vented this facility from achieving its economic potential: 

(1) Past operations and maintenance programs appear to have 
been inadequate. 

(2) Vehicular and pedestrian orientation is perceived as 
confusing and complicated. In fact, th e existing 
o peration fails to take advantage of circulation systems 
inherent in the original design. 

The effect is an inefficient access and egress system which 
discourages maximum utilization. 

Center Garage Associates proposes to incorporate the original 
design scheme in its operation of the facility. In keeping 
with the operating standards in effect in other locations, 
proper signage, lighting, cleaning and security measures will 
be the rule rather than the exception. 



Retail/Site Improvements 

The redevelopment of the Government Center Garage Parcel offers 
an opportunity to expand on the original design by providing 
convenience orientated retail space on the ground floor. 
Moreover, this space can be of benefit to the City by providing 
a li nk from the development activity proposed at Nor t h Station 
to the Government Center/Quincy Market districts. 

This linkage can be created through the development of retail 
space along Congress Street under the Garage at the Haymarket, 
MBTA station under the Garage, and along New Sudbury Street. 
Activating these dormant areas with retail uses that support 
the surrounding activities (i.e., newspaper stand, drug store, 
restaurant facilities) will again reinforce the pedestrian's 
sense of security and reflect a strong urban fabric. 

This retail development would be embellished through site 
improvements such as brick paving, lower scale lighting, 
landscaping where possible, and street furniture. 



Office 

The approximately 151,000 gross square feet of office space 
is designed in two separate levels above the existing parking 
structures in accordance with the B.R.A. design guidelines. 
In analyzing the office market potential, particularly for 
so-called "back office" space, G.C.A. decided to tr eat this 
component as a separate development and to propose a disposition 
agree ment with the City that incorporates n ot only the value of 
the air ri ghts but to the extent possi ble the risks involved in 
mix ed-use real estate developments. In effect, G.C.A. proposes 
to negotiate an agreement with the Citv wy^'^i^'^^i^ +ho f^itv will 



participa te in the air rights development. R a ther than sales 
proceeds, the City will receive substantive participation in 
the form of shared lease payments derived from the air rights 
development . In this way, the City can directly involve itself 
in the development. 



The air rights design is flexible and can satisfy either the 
"back office" market or, with more elaborate design approach, 
prime office space can be attained. Obviously, no matter what 
market the office space attains, it will be unique by virtue 
of its location above a 2,000 car parking structure. 

A contemplated ancillary feature of the air rights will be a 
health club with a running track open for membership to the 
general public. 



NARRATIVES 



C. Relevant Experience 



RELEVANT EXPERIENCE 

The Development Team assembled for the purchase and air-rights 
development of the Government Center Garage Parcel , combines 
substantial experience in the development, construction, and 
management of mixed-use developments, as well as in the public 
development process. 

Edward A. /Flsh^^_^resident of Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
is co-devel oper/owner , and general contractor for th e Dock 
Square garage. In its experience, Peabody has developed and/or 
constructed over 4,000 structural parking spaces and over 
175,000 square feet of mixed-use retail/commercial projects. 

Kallmann, McKinnell &; Wood Architects, Inc. were the original 
design architects for the Government Center Garage. They were 
responsible for creating the architectural language that exists 
in the key buildings in Government Center, including Boston City 
Hall. Any adaptation to the existing architecture would be 
properly translated through their sensitive insight into original 
garage design. Glaser-deCastro co-authored this building with 
Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood. Victor Vitols represented Glaser- 
deCastro as project manager. 

Schwartz Parking, Inc., headed by Michael H. Schwartz, President, 
has been in the business of parking facility management for over 
fifty years. Schwartz manages o ver 25,000 spaces in eighteen 
garages i n ten cities plus open lots for a total of sixty. locations. 

Robert F. Walsh has 15 years experience in the development field. 
Formerly Director of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, Mr. Walsh 
has extensive background in urban development and has a unique 
understanding of the complexities of a project of this magnitude. 

S G Associates have been involved in projects of a similar scale 
in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, and were instrumental in the 
transporation related issues of Boston's Downtown Crossing project. 



^ 



Brown and Rona were the origina] structural engineers for the 
Government Center Garage. Their in depth knowledge of the 
building will be invaluable in the analysis of the structure 
and subsequent repair and maintenance. 



II PROJECT PRO-FORMAS 



GOVERNMENT CENTER PARKING GARAGE/OFFICE COMPLEX 
GARAGE PRO FORMA 



PROJECTED COSTS (1983) 



Base Purchase Price 

Retail Construction and Garage Improvements 
Development Costs 



TOTAL GARAGE COST 

EQUITY 

DEBT 



16,000,000 

1,500,000 

500,000 

18,000,000 

1,000,000 

17,000,000 



CASH FLOW (1986) 



Garage Income 

Retail Income (21,000 g.s.f. X $14/s.f.) 



Garage Expenses 



I Retail Expenses (23,000 s.f. X $3/s.f.) 

Retail Vacancy (20%) 

Taxes 

Debt Service f(l4-7/8% ^ 25 Years) 




AVAILABLE FOR CONTINGENCIES & DISTRIBUTION — 



4,840,000 
294,000 
(1,633,000) 
(69,000) 

(59,000) ^^^^ 
(600,000) 
(2,560,000) 

213,000 



«/#/ 






GOVERNMENT CENTER PARKING GARAGE /OFF ICE COMPLEX 
OFFICE PRO FORMA - 2 LEVEL BACK OFFICE SPACE 
(CONSTRUCTION START 1984)- (OCCUPANCY 1986) 



Hard Construction Costs - Office 

(151,000 X $70/s.f.) 10,570,000 

Architectural and Engineering 575,000 

Surveys and Permits 135,000 

Insurance and Testing 50,000 

Legal 150,000 

Marketing & Real Estate Commissions 575,000 

Construction Interest - 13% for 2 years @ 1/2 Mortgage - 1,718,000 

Financing and Mortgage Fees 420,000 

Letters of Credit 40,000 

Accounting 15,000 

Developer's Overhead and Fee 900,000 

Project Contingency and Rentup 750 , 000 

TOTAL PROJECT COST 15,898,000 

EQUITY (3,179,000) 

DEBT 12,719,000 



INCOME 

151,000 X 85% Efficiency = 128,350 ^.s.f. /^ C^y 

1986 Occupancy: 128,350 X 21 .^^^S^^^(j^--/^- 3,465,000 

VACANCY at 5% (173,000) 

EXPENSES - $4 per net rentable square foot (513,000) 

Less : Air Rights (150,000) 

TAXES (450,000) 

DEBT SERVICE - 12,718 X 12% for 15 Years (1,822,000) 

CASH AVAILABLE FOR CONTINGENCIES AND DISTRIBUTION 357,000 



Ill GARAGE OPERATION 



i^ 




/CHLUmTZ PRRHIflG, IflC 

op&nmon/ mnmoefmnT coarumnG 



Michael H. Schaiortz, President 



December 17, 1982 



Mr. Edward A. Fish, President 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, Mass. 02184 

Re: Government Center Garage - Boston 

Dear Ed: 

Please find enclosed a pro-form Income and Expense Budget 

for the operation of the above-captioned facility. This budget 

is subject to the following notes: 

1. The garage will be open 6:00 a.m. to midnight, seven days 
a week. 

2. The parking fees will be $5.00 daytime and $4.00 evening. 

3. The entry drum will be reversible and act as an exit during 
the late afternoon. 

4. The operation of the garage will remain as it is with no 
monthly parking. 

5. Real estate taxes, depreciation, and morgage interest have not 
been considered in the budget. 

6. Security will be provided by an armed security guard on duty 
at all times the garage is open. 

7. Electrical costs are a "best guess". Feel free to change 
them if you see fit. 

8. Repairs and maintenance include maintenance contracts on a 
sweeper, 2 Cushman patrol vehicles, and the elevators. 

9. Equipment amortization is predicated upon a $450,000 cost, 
amortized five years, straight-line. 

10. The entire budget presumes that the garage will be put into 
first class shape prior to the start of operations. 



60 UJoshington Street • Hortford, G. 06106 • (203) 527-9184 



ItPS 



Peabody Construction Co.,Inc 

Page 2 

December 17, 1982 



The Rusco equipment representative is Jim Rawlinson , (617) 543-4891, 
38 Mechanic Street, Suite 5, Foxboro, Mass. 02035. 

If there are any questions, please call me. 

Cordially, 




Michael H. Schwartz 

MHS/fps 
Ends. 



Ifpi 



Government Center Garage - Boston 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 



Total Income $4,000,000, 



Operating Expenses: 




Management Fee 


150,000 


Payroll 


188,250 


Uniforms 


4,100 


Repairs & Maintenance 


80,000 


Snow Removal 


12,000 


Light and Power, etc. 


165,000 


Damage Claims 


1,000 


Tickets 


7,000, 


Advertising 


700, 


Data Processing 


12,000, 


Operating Supplies 


5,500. 


Telephone 


8,000. 


FICA Tax 


12,613. 


State Unemployment 


6,024. 


Federal Unemployment 


1,318. 


Employee Pension 


9,412. 


Employee Benefits 


9,500. 


Workmens' Comp. Ins. 


4,047. 


Garage Liab. Insuarance 


7,000. 


Fire & Theft Insurance 


1,700. 


Misc. Expense 


10,000. 


Equipment Amortization 


90,000. 


Security 


50,000. 


Total Expenses 


$835,164. 



MHS/fps 
12/17/82 



Itpi 



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/CHUURRTZ PRRHinG, IRC 

opennnon/ mnnf»G€m€nT coarumnG 

Michoel H. Schiuortz, President 



December 27, 1982 

Peabody Construction, Inc. 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Attn: Edward P. Fish, President 
Re: Government Center Garage 

We have examined the above captioned garage and the potential 
operation by our firm in the event you should purchase this 
facility. You have already received under separate cover 
our proforma Operating and Expense Budget. 

In order to bring this garage up to the standards of a first 

class facility, it will be necessary to spend a considerable 

amount of money. The items that we see immediately that are 
necessary are as follows: 

1) Replace present lighting with high pressure 
sodium fixtures. 



60 UJoshinglon Street • Hartford, Q. 06106 • (203) 527-9184 






tSl _2- 



2) Rewire said lights so that they may be switched 
during the day in a manner desired to conserve 
energy. 

3) Repair all floor areas that are presently spalled 
and cracked. 

4) Repair and upgrade existing elevators. 

5) Purchase and install state of the art revenue and 
vehicle control systems. 

6) Purchase a sweeper and two Cushman vehicles. 

7) Restripe and repaint. 

It is our intention to staff the garage to a much greater level 
than presently exists and to have all such staff properly 
uniformed and trained. We will also provide armed security 
guards patrolling the garage in Cushman vehicles at all times 
the garage is open for business. 

It is our opinion that in order for this garage to serve the 
community for which it exists and to attract more business 
than it currently enjoys, it will be necessary to operate in 



J^M -3- 



the best manner possible and to provide to the public a 
clean, well lighted, courteously staffed facility. By following 
such a plan benefits will be provided to everyone concerned 
including the patrons, the owners and the community in general. 

In order that you understand our firm, its reputation and its 
policies, please find following a description of who we are 
and what we do. 

Schwartz Parking was founded in 1928 in Hartford, Connecticut 
and has been in the business of successfully owning, leasing 
and managing parking facilities since that time. At the 
present time, we operate 60 locations including 18 garages 
in 10 cities. These locations comprise in excess of 25,000 
parking spaces. 

The parking locations we operate include garages ranging from 
200 spaces to 1,500 spaces serving employee parking, commercial, 
monthly and transient parking, hotel parking and parking for 
the general public. 



3tPS 



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Some of the surface lots that we operate are for employee 
parking as well as commercial parking, but also include facil- 
ities which serve event parking such as Milford Jai Alai and 
Bridgeport Jai Alai. As you can see, our range of experience 
in the facilities that we operate, and have operated in the 
past, covers the entire range of parking services. 

Please find following a list of references you may feel free to 
contact. We have not forewarned these people of your possible 
inquiry . 

Warren Healey, General Manager 
Constitution Plaza, Inc. 
One Constitution Plaza 
Hartford, CT 

Henry Mulhern, Chief Engineer 
Maiden Redevelopment Agency 
Government Center 
Mai den , MA 



J/W 



'0 -5- 



Richard Mulready, President 
Servus Corporation 
One Financial Plaza 
Hartford, CT 

Ron Devicino, General Manager 
Peter Savin Properties 
60 Washington Street 
Hartford, CT 

John Barber, Director of Major Properties 
Real Estate Investment 
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance 
Springfield, MA 

Brian Condon, Vice President of Admin. 
Yale New Haven Hospital 
New Ha\-en , CT 

Robert Flanagan, Director of Real Estate 
Citv of New London 



Ifpi 



'0 



-6- 



Anthony Capella, General Manager 
Bridgeport Jai Alai 
Bridgeport, CT 

Albert 0. White, President 
A. 0. White 
Baystate West 
Springfield, MA 

Our company has four key executives; Michael H. Schwartz, 
President; Sherman H. Liftig, Executive Vice President; (Mrs.) 
Francine P. Scricca, Administrative Vice President and Richard 
A. Stowell, Controller. Depending upon the subject matter to 
be discussed, any or all of us are continually available to our 
clients for whatever reason our client deems necessary. We 
consider this availability so important that we have deliberately 
limited the size of our company and the number and location of 
its operations so that such availability will exist. Unfortun- 
ately, this benefit is rarely available from the large firms 
whose intersts are nationwide in scope. 



Ifpi 



-7- 



While every parking facility may run on its own to a certain 
extent, on a day-to-day basis operational guidance and super- 
vision is supplied from the Home Office to all field personnel 
and supervisory managers. Not only do we own a substantial 
computer in our Home Office, but the size of our organization 
and the number of personnel of all types employed by us allows 
us to cover all personnel contingencies at any location at a 
moment's notice. In addition, company employed supervisors 
oversee all locations on a daily basis. All payroll and labor 
cost is handled through the Home Office computer together with 
the filing of all reports and the payment of all payroll-related 
taxes and costs. The purchase of all major merchandise and 
services, as well as payment for such, is handled from the Home 
Office unless the client directs otherwise. The Home Office 
retains both General legal counsel and counsel in such specializ- 
ed fields as Labor Law and Personnel Relations. All uninsured 
claims are handled through the Home Office and all necessary 
insurance for any facility may be provided by our blanket policies 
carried through the Home Office. In short, the Home Office is 
actively involved on a constant basis with field operations. 



Although the parking industry generally relies on a lower wage 
scale personnel to fill routine positions, we have found that 
by hiring retirees, we have been much more successful in attract- 
ing a higher level of individual to a part-time job. We feel 
that the administration of our personnel is excellent. We have 
no union involved except in one location in Bridgeport where we 
inherited the union when we took over from a prior operator. 

Generally speaking, our personnel are recruited from the Hartford 
job market. This recruitment takes place in the form of news- 
paper advertisements as well as State and Municipal agencies 
involved with the unemployed. At the present time, our work 
force is 50% minorities and women. These figures tend to remain 
fairly constant with very little fluctuation. Training is ordin- 
arily done on the job; however, this does not mean that the training 
necessarily takes place m the location to which the trainee is 
finally assigned. In most cases, the trainee recives his exper- 
ience at an established location and is then transferred to the 
new location. In your case however, it is our initial plan to 
staff your garage with experienced personnel. This is especially 
true as regards the on-site assistant manager. 



-9- 



Presently, our wage rates range from the starting wage of 
$3.75 - $4.00 per hour up to $5.00 - $6.00 per hour for main- 
tenance personnel including the sweeper operator. Managers and 
Assistant Managers salaries range from $14,000 to $36,000 per 
year depending upon responsibility, size of operation and 
experience . 



Our regard for our personnel is sensitive and extensive and we 
provide to all qualified employees company-paid health and major 
medical plans for themselves and their dependants as well as a 
company-paid pension plan. In addition, we provide generous 
vacation and personal time benefits. I am enclosing a copy of 
our Employee Handbook and Benefits Booklets for your examination. 
At the present time, our pension plan is predicated on a company- 
paid contribution of 5% of gross income per employee; however, 
foreitures which remain in the plan have brought that down to 
4.25%. Our Health and Major Medical Plan is S47.00 per month 
per employee which is company paid. The cost of dependant coverage 
is S73.00 per month additional of which the company pays halt and 
the employee pays half. These rates include life insurance for 
the employee. 



Ifp. 



-lo- 



in addition to these benefits, employees are also entitled to 
earn sick time and personal time as discussed in the handbook. 
The cost of vacation time is included in the payroll expense on 
the included budget. 

Please find following a partial representation of our clients. 

Travelers Insurance Company 

Constitution Plaza, Inc. 

City of Maiden, MA 

City of New London, CT 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Yale New Haven Hospital 

Bay state West 

Urban Investment and Development Corp. 

Servus Corporation 

Mil lord Jai Alai 

Bi-idgeport Jai Alai 



I believe the foregoin^i names speak for themselves as tar as 
size and quality are concerned. 



Ifpi 



-11- 



Reports from the Home Office are sent to clients 15 to 20 days 
subsequent to the month's end. I am enclosing samples of our 
reports for your examination. As you can see, our reporting is 
quite extensive and is supervised by our Home Office staff and 
administered through our Home Office computer. An analysis of 
the enclosed samples will indicate our ability to maintain a 
registry for our monthly parkers and to cross-foot that registry 
to monthly parking income as shown on the volume and statistical 
report. Please be aware that our computer also handles payroll, 
accounts receivable, accounts payable, daily input deposit summar- 
ies and more. We have retained our own programmer to expand our 
capabil ities . 

Reporting is handled on a consolidated and location-by-location 
basis. When all is said and done, the entire package of informa- 
tion is gathered together so as to produce a Profit and Loss 
statement for each facility as well as a consolidated P & L for 
an entire system when required. 

When we are retained as a management firm, we view our role as 
that of implementing our clients' policies and directions. 



MfPe 



-12- 



Since we do not accept the concept of blind implementation, we 
include in our role the obligation to render to the client certain 
advice predicated upon our extensive experience in parking manage- 
ment. We view our job as requiring us to bring to the attention 
of the client all the consequences which may arise our of imple- 
mentation of the client's direction and then to assist the client 
in coming to a conclusion. After the client has arrived at the 
conclusion, we then carry out directions as given. The fact that 
we may agree or disagree with the conclusion reached has no bearing. 
As long as we have given the client as much advice and information 
as is possible, we feel that we have discharged our obligation. 

There are as many methods of revenue control as there are parking 
locations and it is the level of revenue control sophistication 
that determines audit procedures. For example, your location 
with the latest computerized sel f -comput ing exit terminals together 
with electro-mechanical counters creates such a high level of 
control that auditing become almost routine. Such an obvious audit 
trail is created that the system becomes almost se 1 f -audit ing . 
We require the on-side manager to hand audit a defined percentage 
ol all tickets. 



MfPi 



-13- 



In addition, Horae Office personnel will conduct unannounced 
field audits on an irregular basis as long as the audit reports 
are satisfactory. In the event an audit report creates any 
question, then both the ongoing audit and the Home Office audits 
will be increased. We, along with a handful of operators, are 
extremely control oriented and we will invariably recommend the 
highest level of revenue control that can demonstrate a return on 
investment . 

I am enclosing a sample contract which sets out in detail the 
services which will be provided for the quoted fees. The only 
additional item, which would be charged as an expense of operation 
is electronic data processing which is not included in the quoted 
fees. I would anticipate that the cost for data processing, which 
produces the reports included with this proposal, to be S6,000 
per year. Our reasons for not including the data processing cost 
as part of our fee is that there are many clients who have, or in 
the future will have, their own computer capability. By including 
data processing as part of the operating cost rather than the 
management fee, the owner retains the option to have the data 
processing work done on his own computer by his own personnel in 
the event such a procedure saves money. 



3lPi 



-14- 



Our fees for managing your facility would be 4% of the first 
million of gross sales per annum, 2)% of the second million of 
gross sales per annum and 2% of all gross sales beyond two million 
per annum. 

In almost all of our management operations, our responsibilities 
follow the term of the sample contract. As you can see, a general 
description of the division of responsibility is that we would be 
responsible in the entirety for operating the parking system 
subject to the owner's right to determine hours of operation, 
parking rates and total cost of operating. On the other hand, 
the owner would be responsible for all direct costs of operation 
as shown on the sample P & L. In the event we should be selected 
as the management firm, it is our intention to place the parking 
system operation under the authority of an assistant on-site 
manager who would be responsible for day-to-day operations and 
some contact with the client and tenant customers of the garage. 
In turn, this assistant manager would be responsible to a general 
manager who has responsibility tor several major locations. The 
general manager will maintain closer contact with your firm and 
handle most of the tenant customer contact. 



irPi 



-15- 



In addition, the general manager will be responsible for internal 
auditing of garage activity. Because our operating philosophy 
requires top level management to be involved with the daily 
operations of every location, the four top level management 
people will be involved with your operation on a daily basis. 
This not only means that both Sherman Liftig and I will be visiting 
the locations daily, it also means that Mrs. Scricca will be 
administrating personnel and payroll at this location to be sure 
that all items remain within budget and within the operating plan. 
It also means that Richard Stowell will be checking all expenses 
and purchases and confirming delivery of all merchandise and 
services purchased. He will also be watchdogging budget vs. 
expenses . 

In the event it becomes necessary or desirable in either your 
opinion or ours, to have a higher level manager on site, then 
we could assign a different manager to your facility and dispense 
with the partial responsbi 1 i ty of the general manager. This 
would of course be done only after consulting with you and receiv- 
ing your authority. 



3tP, 



-16- 



Because of the large number of locations we operate in Hartford 
and the large number of employees, we can share employees among 
as many clients as necessary, charging to each client those hours 
the employee actually spends at each location. The actual hours 
would be indicated by the employee's timecard and I refer you 
to the labor cost printout. Any other costs which would be share- 
ed would be allocated on an actual time used basis. 

Because of the size of our overall operation, we are able to 
obtain better prices due to our bulk purchasing power. When 
such is the case, these cost savings are passed on to the client 
to whom the products or services are rendered. Such items might 
include operating supplies, forms, uniforms, repairs and mainten- 
ance , etc . 

V.'e are enclosing a sample of budget prepared through our Home 
Office computer. In almost all cases, we prepare a preliminary 
budget predicated upon our experience and knowledge. That budget 
is submitted to the owner to be reviewed. A meeting or meetings 
are then scheduled so that the owner and Schwartz Parking may 
discuss and finalize the budget on a line by line basis. 



MfP. 



's 



•17- 



The budget is then reentered into the computer with copies to 
all parties concerned. The computer adopts the budget as part 
of the Profit and Loss statement (sample enclosed). 

I have enclosed samples of our daily check-out sheets as well 
as our manual computer input sheet. Please note that all counter 
readings are included on these sheets together with the starting 
and ending ticket numbers including a breakdown showing the 
number of tickets in each price category. Computation of the 
sheet by the computer will then indicate the amount of cash that 
should have been collected. Proof of the amount due is further 
established by auditing tickets for accuracy of fee computation, 
physically checking the counter readers (the counters are non- 
resettable), and, if necessary, physically counting the number of 
cars in the location as many times a day as is necessary to 
est all 1 1 sh v-on r rnl . 



.\'cnv thai I !ui\c desv:ribeti wliai mighi appt?ar lu be a nearl>' lool- 
(irool ronTrol .s\sI(-mii, please allow me to issue a xL-vy serious 
>.'aveat: siuciles by the United States Government and interviews 
and y t a t i:Mii'.'n I s hy wi-- 1 1 fespected consultant.'- and operaiors all 



-18- 



indicate the same conclusion, to wit; the operation of a cash 
business without proper revenue control can result in the loss 
of income of 20% and more, but even with the use of the most 
sophisticated equipment available, loss of income will never be 
reduced to 0%. Please understand that this warning is not an 
"excuse in advance" but only a realistic assessment. I am sure 
any competent firm will agree. 

All receipts are deposited daily and we receive duplicate deposit 
slips which are also entered into the computer as part of the 
daily input. Using the procedures discribed above, the accuracy 
of those receipts will be determined daily. Therefore, at the 
end of the month our report will show a total amount collected, 
which is accurate, and will match exactly the total amount de- 
posited. Disbursements are handled on a monthly basis from our 
office and paid out of the monthly advance from the owner. All 
such disbursements are shown on the monthly Profit and Loss 
statement and are supported by copies of purchase orders, checks, 
vouchers, job tickets and other evidence of receipt of and payment 
for such goods and services. 



3rp, 



'B -19- 



Please find following a list of enclosures 

1. Budget 

2. Profit and Loss Statement 

3. Monthly Summary /Volume and Statistics - Individual 

4. Daily Input Print 

5. Payroll Register 

6. Labor Cost Report 

7. Monthly Parker Register - Alphabetic 

8. Monthly Parker Register - Numerical 

9. Monthly Parker Register by Employer 

10. Employer Master Register 

11. Daily Check-out Sheet 

12. Computer Daily Input Sheet 

13. Sample Contract 

14. Employee Handbooks 

15. Group Benefit Program Booklet 

16. Pension Plan Booklet 



irPi 



'B 



-20- 



It has been our policy that once we have been retained to 
operate a parking facility, it is our obligation to render 
what would ordinarily be called consulting service to the 
client as part of our contract. This would include consulting 
on new locations to be added to the system. By virtue of our 
membership in the National Parking Association and my position 
as a member of its Board of Directors, we are continually updated 
on the newest developments and operating proceedures which we 
share with our clients. We constantly analyze market conditions 
in the area and recommend changes to keep abreast of such con- 
ditions. The balance of the services that we render are contained 
in the sample operating contract enclosed. As explained before, 
another service that we provide is data processing which is not 
ordinarily included in the operating fee. 

Our business philosophy is predicated on the concept that we 
render only a service to the public. There is no product that 
our customer carries home. There is no meal that he has eaten. 
There is no entertainment that he has received. Therefore, we 
must render to that customer the highest level of service possible. 



3rp. 



-21- 



We are also extremely aware that we are handling the first or 
second most valuable possession of our customer, his car. We 
are, therefore, extremely conscious of security and attempt to 
provide the highest level possible. As stated before, our job 
is to carry out the owner's philosophy but more importantly, to 
carry out the owner's intent. That intent must be carried out 
within the realm of business ethics including, but not limited to, 
personal and corporate honesty and the old fashioned principle of 
fair play. We have never in the past, nor will we in the future, 
engage in busines practices which are less than the highest caliber 

From the practical point of view, the most major plank of our 
philosophical platform is that parking does not stand alone. 
Parking is an adjunctive endeavor that supports and is supported 
by the development of which it is a part. Parking is the first 
and last thing seen by the visitor to the development. As long as 
we are aware of this, then it is our obligation to treat that 
visitor in such a manner that he will return. That visitor, our 
customer, is the most important person in the world to both us 
and our client because without him, we do not exist. 



3fPx 



-22- 



Next to the customer, the owner of the facility is most important 
and we view it as our obligation to be sure that the owner gets 
all the income produced by the facilities. This philosophy 
encompasses not only strong revenue control but a method of 
operation which will attract customers including cleanliness, 
lighting, security and honesty. We impose equally strong sanctions 
upon an employee who overcharges a customer, although the money 
may be turned in, as we do upon an employee who undercharges. 

We believe that we will produce a better bottom line and a more 
efficient operation for our client than he could produce for 
himself. If this does not turn out to be true, we should not be 
on the job. 



Very truly yours, 




Michael H. Schwartz 



MHSrMS 



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IV 



DATE: 



SHIFT: DAY/EVE FACILITY: 



I 


TICKETS 


ISSUED 


TICKETS 


SOLD 


TICKETS 


RETTIRNP:n 


End No. 


Start No. 


End No. 


Start No. 


End No. 


start No. 














2 














3 

1 


























5 















MONTHLY PARKING 1 


Pri r.p 


No 1>fl^ H 


Tntal 

































$ Collected : 
1st Pick Up 
Deposit 



DAY 


EVENING 











Attendant's Signature 
Hours Worked: 



«AT CAIUCE C055) 



CD 



ta 





DAV|_ 1 1 FACILITY 1 


5 U 1 








COUNTERS 




OAVTIMC TICKtn 


EVINIMO TICKCTS 






ffl 




Ia*i>«fta. 


SlMUM'*^ 


eK«i>tN». 


SwUiH Ma. 























































































DAYTIME 



MMCf 

CATT 


fAlO 
JKKtJt 


VAUOATCO TICKCn 


VALIOATEO COU»<JN$ 


TICIC 


CASH 
fAlO 


ouc 


NO. 
TICK. 


NO. 

cour 


CASH 

rAio 


DUE 


■)o 


















-1.40 


















-in 6 


















Z-Bl!) 


















3. so 


















4.20 


















4.90 


















5.60 


















6.30 


















7.00 


















7.70 


















8.40 


















9.10 


















9.80 


















10. SO 
















































































































TOTAL VAL 


DOf $: 













EVENING 



.70 


















1.40 


















2.K 


















2.8C 


















1.5C 


















4.zq 


















4.9C 


















5.6C 


















6.x 


















7.0C 


















■ 7.7C 


















8.40 


















9.10 


















-9.6C 


















10.50 


















4.00 


























































TOTAL YAlJ 


WE J: • 













01 



MONTHLY PACKING 1 


MItCt 


NO. 'AIO 


60.00 




70.00 

























IB. 



I«UIIM>_ 

D>v a 

En. D 



Q 



VOLUME SUMMARY (7) End 

CATY 
N*. Oi*»lw<W Ti«bM« 
twMCJt •« Oi nw i TicfcM* 





OAT 


EVE 

































G««»< TtohM* 



(9 



Oe^OSIT SUMMARY 



COMMENTS 



List below anounts 
on (teposit si ipt 
4tC«ct>ed 



OD 





OAT 


EVE. 


SI 






SI 






SJ 






S4 






ss 






St 






%i 






St 






70 







P*M W— >■»■»*■» 






TOTAIS 



PARKING GARAGE KmAGEHEKT AGREEMENT 
AGREEMENT nude this day of . 1981. between! 



; •■■■■^■■■^■■■■■■BIBl^ hereinafter referred to as Owner, and 
I! SCHWARTZ PARKING. INC.. a Connecticut, corporation with a principal place 
ii of business at 60 Washington Street. Hartford. Connecticut, hereinafter re- 
|l ferred to as Operator. 

ji 

WITNESSETH 

Ii WHEREAS Owner will ovm a parking (■■■■■■MriiHlaiMaiMBBH* in 

ii . 

:l MHHaailMaHBHtaM, hereinafter referred to as "Garage*. ^HSBHIBHiPT 

i and 

li 

!; WHEREAS (X*ner wishes to retain the services of Operator to operate 

said Garage, and Operator agrees to be retained by Owner for the purposes 

Ii 

., of managing said Garage, 

!i • ' 

i 

' NOW THEREFORE: 

i 

I In consideration of the mutual proalses and agreements of each party 

\^ to the other herein contained. It 1s mutually agreed as follows: 

1. Ejnployment of Operator . The Owner hereby employs the Operator as 
sole and exclusive managing agent to manage and operate Garage under the con- 
ditions, terms, and compensation hereinafter set forth. 

2. Tenns of Employment . The term of this Agreement shall be for ten 
• (10) years from the date on which public parting of passenger cars in said 
: Garage is permitted by appropriate governmental authorities. 



3. Acceptance of Dnployment . The Operator hereby accepts such employ- 
toent and agrees to perform all services necessary for the care, protection, 
maintenance, and operation of the Garage Including but not limited to the 
following: 

(a) Making a thorough study of the Garage and developing a plan 
of operation and garage layout subject to the Owner's approval, to fit 
the Garage Including without llnltatlon, a system of Ugs. tickets or .; 
other Method best designed to Indicate the number of motor vehicles using 
the Garage, a suitable parking space rental system for the use of tenants 
In the building of which the Garage Is a part, a system to provide in ; 
the Garage parking facilities for guests and Invitees of the tenants 
and outside transient parkers. 

(b) Manage and operate Garage In accordance with the parking garage | 
industry standards for a first class parking facility. • 

(cL_Canect aH rental fees and other Income for and on behalf 
of the Owner. 

(d) Subject to the provisions of Article 9 of this Agreement, hire, | 

discharge and pay on behalf of the Owner, all servants, employees, or 

i 
contractors necessary to be employed In the operation of the Garage. . | 

(e) Purchase on behalf of the Owner all e<pj1p«ent. tools, appll- 

|! ances. materials, supplies, signs and uniforms necessary. for the efficient' 

maintenance and/or operation of the Garage, subject to ttir budget as 

I, approved. 

|! (4) Contract on behalf of the Owner for, and supervise, the making 

I of all repairs, alterations, maintenance, and decorations in the Garage i 

I but subject to the budget as approved. : 

j (g) In no event shall the Operator contract or purchase any one I 

item, other than payroll, which exceeds $1,000.00 in cost or any item 

i 
which cost is in excess of the amount set out on the approved budget | 

without the prior written approval of the Owner. 

ii 



-2- 



(h) Contract on behalf of the Owner at Owner's expense. If requestedj 
in writing by Owner, for Garagekeeper's Liability Coverage under blanket > 
policy of Operator Including fire and theft, and personal Injury, In ' 

the amount of at least $1,000,000.00 flat Unit for any one accident, ; 

for other services and connodltles necessary In the operation and main- ' 

tenance of the Garage and for Workmen's compensation Insurance. Contract I 
I I 

I on behalf of the Owner at Owner's expense during the ten» of this Agree- 

I 

ment a blanket position bond covering aM personnel employed by the Agent , 

In the Garage, 'such bond to be in such aonunt for each eaiployee as Owner ° 
fron time to tine re<}uire$. No person who cannot be bonded will be j 

employed by the Operator In the Garage. 

All such Insurance shall be effective under valid and enforceable | 
policies and shall be issued by insurers of recognized responsibility 
authorized to do business in the State of Connecticut and shall name 
Owner as an additional insured and contains a provision whereby the in- 
sured agrees not to cancel such insurance without ten (10) days prior 
notice to Owner. On or before the commencement date of this agreement. 
Operator shall furnish Owner with a certificate evidencing the aforesaid 
insurance coverage and renewal shall be furnished to (Xmcr within ten. 
(10) days of the expiration date of such policy. 

Notwithstanding the first two (2) paragraphs of section 3 (h), the 
Owner reserves the right at all times to obtain all insurance policies 
with respect to the parking garage and its operation, and in such event 
Owner agrees to name Operator as an additional insured on all such poli- 
cies of insurance and furnish Operator with a certificate evidencing 
said insurance, 

(1) Advertise garage space at the expense of the Owner, all such 
advertising to be first approved in writing by the Owner. 



-3- 



(J) Prepare and file all returns and other documents re<ni1red under 
the Federal Insurance Contributions Act and the Federal Unemployment 
Tax Act, or any similar federal or state legislation, and all withholding 
tax returns required for employees of the- Garage. The Operator shall 
pay all amounts required to be paid under the Federal Insurance Contribu- 
tions Act and the Federal Unemployment Tax Ace, or any similar federal 
or state legislation, and all withholding taxes from the Owner's funds. ■ 

(k) Maintain full books of accotmt with correct entries on all | 

receipts and expenditures of managing the Garage. Such books of account | 
shall be the property of the Owner and shall at all times be open to I 

the Inspection of the Owner or of any of Its officers or duly authorized | 
agents. 

(1) Subalt to the Owner or 1U designee, operating reports on forms : 
provided by the Operator for that purpose, which will show such Infonna- i 
tlon as nuober of cars In and out each day, fees collected, number of j 
parking tickets. Issued, register nunber, name of cashier, time worked, | 
ticket nuBbers, register readings, treadle readings, voided tickets, 
cash deposited, errors corrected and any other Information the Owner 
or Its designee feeli necessary or desirable for proper control or stttls-l 
tical purposes. This report shall cover the sane period as Is covered 
by the cash deposit. 

(m) Furnish monthly to the Owner a detailed statement of all 
receipts and disbursements for eacl) month, such statement to be furnished ' 
on or before the 20th day of each month for the preceding month together 
with payment to the- Owner of tfie net operating margin for the same period | 
as covered by said statement. Such statement shall show the status of { 
collections and shall be supported by cancelled checks, vouchers, dupli- 
cate invoices, and similar documentation covering all Items of income 
and expense, which shall be kept in the Operator's office and be avallablej 
for inspection by the Owner's representatives at all times. The Operator 
shall also furnish a monthly operating sUtement showing the income and 
expense for the month and year to date and for the same month of the 
preceding year. 



(n) The Omir sh«ll apply In Ov#ner's name and behalf for all neces- 
sary govemmenUl pemlts, licenses, and authoHzatlons necessary for 
the lawful operation of the Garage for public parking of passenger cars, 
and will In Owner's naaw and behalf apply for and obtain renewals of 
any such permits, licenses, and authorizations so as to keep the saute 
in effect during the ten» of this contract. The expenses of any filing 
fees, permit or license fees, and attorney's fees shall be paid by the 
Owner but the Operator shall only use attorneys selected by the Owner, 
(o) Make available to the Owner the Benefit of any quantity dls- 
coimts the Operator may receive In the purchase of supplies and equipment 
used by it in the operation of the Garage or required by the Owner and 
purchased by the Operator for the account of the Owner In connection 
with the equipping and maintaining of the Garage, 
(p) Upon the recosaendation of the Operator, 

-fH The rates to be charged for parking In the Garage shall 
be determined by the Owner and may be revised from time to time 
by the Owner. \ 

(Z) The days and hours of operation will be determined by 
the Owner. _ .. j 

(3) The Owner reserves the right froir time to time to change ; 
the rates charged for parking and/or the days and/or the hours of 
operation of the Garage. No establishment or change of rates for \ 
parking, days and/or hours of operation shall affect the compensation 
payable to the Agent under the provisions of this agreement; provid- 
ed, however, that In the event Owner shall choose to have parking 
fees paid directly to it In any manner or form, or In the event 
(Xrtier shall choose to forego or waive any such fees,, then such park- 
ing fees paid directly to Owner or waived by Ownershall beconsidered 
as income to the Garage for the purposes of determining Operator's 
fee as described in Paragraph 6 herein. 



-5- 



(q) The ntiw of the Garage shall bef 



and all of the business pertaining to the Garage shall be conducted by 
the Operator In that na«e, provided however, the Operator may affix signs 
bearing the Operator's name to the checkout booths and the Operator's 
office In the Garage, but no other place, provided further however, that 
such signs awst first be approved as to size, material, color, design, 
cost, and official. Insignia, thereon by the Owner. 

(r) Kotify the Owner forthwith of any unusual conditions which 
nay develop In the operation of the Garage or to the Garage such as, 
but not limited to, fire, flood, breakage, or casualty damage to the 
Garage, or to any person or the property of any person alleged to be 
caused by the use or operation of the Garage. 

(s) To prepare and subalt to monthly parkers all bills for such 
parking and to collect the amount thereof fnxn such parkers and deposit 
the same^ 

(t) Hake reconnendatlons to the Owner as to the kinds of equipment 
necessary for the efficient and economical operation of the Garage and 
as to Its proper maintenance. 

(u) Keep all entrance and exit ramps free of Ice, snow and de()r1s. 
4. Budget . . Th» Operator from time to time, and at least annually, shall 
prepare and suborit to the Owner a budget of expense for the Operation of the 
Garage for the coming yean however. Owner reserves the right to revoke Its 
approval of the budget or of any Item In the budget at any time, except 
Operator's fees, and; upon receipt of written notice of such revocation. 
Operator will not thereafter cause an expenditure to be made or a liability 
incurred for such Item. In this latter regard all employment contracts, If 
any, entered Into by the Operator at Owner's expense wiVl be on a week-to-week 
basis and no supply or service contracts whirh provide for the supply of equip- 
ment, merchandise or services over a period of time which exceed one month 
shall be entered into without the Owner's prior written approval. 



5, Allocitlon of Cost Rctponslbntty . Owifer shall pay and be responsible 
for all expenses and costs Incurred relating solely to the operation of the 
Garage, Including bookkeeping, reporting, and data processing subject to the 
budget, but Owner shall In no way be responsible for any of the following 
expenses of the Operator; 

(a) Operator's h6me off1ce..expen$es such as rent, secretarial help, 
salaries for office' personnel and executive salaries. 

(b) Operator shall not allcoate any of Its hcow office overhead 
costs to the Owner. 

(c) Any of Operator's personnel not permanently stationed flMHI^ 
^■■t except If Operator is required to replace Garage help temporarily 
with Operator's own personnel then Operator will be reimbursed for the 
actual tine said employee Is stationed at the Garage. 

6. Compensation . The Operator's annual fee for services hereunder shall 
be paid In monthly Installments and shall be follows: 



The phrase "gross sales" shall be deemed to Include aJT garage park1(«s 
fees paid for vehicle use. Such phrase shall not be deeacd to Include receipts 
arising out of the sale of assets, 'the settlement of fire losses and Items 
of a similar nature, -or rebates, discounts, 'or other credits received by the 
Operator Incident to purchases. -contracts or other arrangements entered Into 
under this agreement on account of the Owner. Gross Sales shall not Include 
the amount of any sales, use.-or gross receipts tax Imposed by any federal, 
state, municipal or governmental authority directly on sales and collections 
from the public. 

Operator has the right to expend from Income all those suns herein stated 
necessary for operation of the garage with limitations as herein provided, 
and to remit the balance to Owner monthly as herein stated. If after monthly 
disbursements there is insufficient monies to compensate Operator, then 



I 



Operator, shall subalt to Owner detailed disbursement data, and (Xmer. upon 
review of such subaltteddata, shall pay said sun of nioney to the Operator 
within ten (10) days. 

7. Assignment . Owner shall have the right to assign this agreement 
without the prior written consent of Operator. 

8. Waiver of Subrogation . Owner and Operator for thenselves. and their 
Insurers, hereby release. each other with respect to any liability, including 
that deriving froa the fault or neglect of Operator or (Xmer. as the case 
may be or their agents or enployees under their direct control which either 
might have for any damage to the building or the prealses, or damage to 
Operator's fixtures, equipment or other personal property caused by fire or 
other casualty occurring' during the term of this agreement which shall be 
Insured under a policy or policies of fire Insurance with or without extended 
coverage permitting- such release of liability by each party. If such waiver 
of subrogation provision Is available only at additional prenluro, each party 
agrees to give the other reasonable notice of such fact and each party shall 
then have the option to Insist upon the Inclusion of such waiver of subrogation 
in- the other party's Insurance policy; provided the party so requesting such 
waiver of subrogation provision shall pay any additional premium required * 
therefor. 

9. Non-Discrimination In Employment. 

(a) The Operator will not discriminate against any employee or 
applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, sex, or national 
origin. The Operator will take affirmtive action to Insure that appli- 
cants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, 
without regard to their race, creed color, or national origin. Such 
action shaT! include, but not be limited to. the following: Employment, 
upgrading, demotion, or transfer, recruiting or recruitment advertising, 
layoff or termination; rates of pay or other forms of compensation; and 
selection for training including apprenticesh,i,p. The Operator agrees 
to post in conspicuous places available to employees and applicants for 

employment, notices to be provided by the Owner setting forth provisions 

I 
of this Non-Discrimination in Employment clause. j 

-8- 



(b) The Operator xiU, In •ll solicitation or advertisements for 
eaployees placed by or on behalf of the Owner, sUte that all qualified 
applicants will receive consideration for employwent without regard to 
race, creed, color, or national origin. 

10. Repairs . The Owner will pay for all repairs and maintenance neces- 
sary to keep the garage In first-class condition. 

11. Status of Operator . For all purposes herein. Operator shall be 
deeioed an Independent contractor. All employees stationed at said garage 
shall be employees of Op'erator. All expenses of payroll, payroll taxes, bene- 
fits, etc.. relating to said employees shall be deemed an expense of garage 
operation and shall be. reimbursed to Operator by Owner. 

12. Miscellaneous . 

(a) This document contains the entire agreement between the parties 
hereto and the Operator acknowledges that the Owner has not made or 
caused tOLbcmade any Inducement or representation leading to the execu- 
tion hereof. 

(b) The captions of the sections In this agreement are for conven- 
ience only and shaVI not affect the meaning of any of the terns or 
provisions hereof; __ .*• 

ic) The Opera.tor lir pcrfonaanc» of Its obligations. under this 
agreement shall comply with all applicable laws, regulations, and 
ordinances of governmental authorities. 

(d) This agreement shall not be assigned by the Operator without 
the written permission of Owner nor shall the Operator permit any person 
other than Its employees to work In or from the Garage. 

(e) This agreement may only be amended-by writing executed by the 
(Xmer and the Operator. 

13. Termination . Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained 
herein, this agreement may be terminated and the obligation of the parties 
hereunder shall thereupon cease, upon the occurrence of any of the following 
circumstances: 



(a) In -the event the parking garage Is damaged or destroyed toUlly 
and Owner decides not to rebuild sane then and In that event Owner may 
tennlnate this agreeaent upon not less that 30 days written notice by 
certified jiuJJt to the Operator. 

(b) If a petition In bankruptcy Is filed by the operator or If 
Operator should make an asslgnaent for the benefit or creditors or takes 
advantage of any Insolvency act. Owner may terminate this agreement by 
giving written notice by certlflfed mall to the Operator. 

14. Notice. 

Notice hereunder shall be valid If mailed by registered or certified 
mall to. the Owner at the following addresses: 
1) 




2) Operatfer: Schwartz* Parking; Inc. 
60 Washington Street 
. Hartford, Connecticut 06106 

or such other addresses as.may froa time to tine be designated by either party. 

This Agreeaient ishal 1 be binding upon and Inure to the benefit of the 
parties hereta and their respective heirs, executors, administrators, succes- 
sors and asslgnSi 

'IK; WITNESS'' VMEREOF, Owner and Operator have signed and sealed this 
Agreement as of th* day and year first above written. 



:10- 



IV LETTER OF INTEREST FROM LENDING INSTITUTION 




BANKCF NEW ENGLAND 

January 7, 1983 



Mr. Edward A. Fish, President 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Dear Ed: 

As usual, it has been a pleasure to work closely with you and your 
development team on the proposal concerning the Government Center 
Garage. Your development team has obviously been carefully selected 
and assembled and brings a vast amount of experience and expertise to 
the transaction. Again, as in the past, your responsiveness and 
attention to detail has enabled me to carefully review the proposal 
and its obvious economic benefits to all the parties involved. 

It is my understanding the Center Garage Associates of which Center 
Garage Development, Inc. will be the General Partner, is intending to 
acquire from the City of Boston the Government Center Garage for a 
purchase price of $15 million. Additionally, you intend to invest 
approximately $2 million toward the renovation of the garage, upgrade 
existing parking systems and create approximately 23,000 gross square 
feet of retail space. Of the total space, 500 overnight parking spaces 
will be offered to City of Boston residents at discounted rates and 
approximately 2,000 square feet of retail space will be designated for 
a non-profit organization. 

Bank of New England has carefully reviewed your projections and pro 
forma budgets, and we agree substantially with the vast majority of the 
material and consider your financing request to have significant merit. 
Our relationship has been an excellent one over the years and you ob- 
viously have the financial capacity to undertake such an endeavor. 
Based upon our preliminary discussions, and subject to our normal un- 
derwriting standards , I am confident that we would be able to provide 
the financing assistance which we have discussed. As soon as you have 
been designated as the successful purchaser, we will be able to move 
quickly toward your successful financing commitment. 

Yours truly, 

John A. Sullivan 
Vice President 



JAS:sp 



(J 



BANK OF NEW ENGLAND. N A 
28 State Street. Boston. Massachusetts 02106 • Telephone (617) 742 4000 



DEVELOPMENT TEAM 



DEVELOPMENT TEAM 



DEVELOPER : 



DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT : 



Center Garage Associates 

536 Granite Street, Braintree, MA 02184 

(Tel. 848-4110) 

Robert F. V.'alsh Associates 

60 State Street, Boston, MA 02109 

(Tel. 227-3530) 



ARCHITECTS 



LEGAL COUNSEL: 



PARKING CONSULTANT: 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR: 



V. Victor Vitols, AIA 
Vitols Associates 
1230 Statler Office Building. 
(Tel. 482-1990) 



Boston, MA 



Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood Architects, Inc. 
127 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 
(Tel. 482-5745) 

Thomas E. Finnerty, Esq. 

45 Bromfield Street, Boston, MA 02108 

(Tel. 542-7575) 

Schwartz Parking, Inc. 
60 Washington Street 
Hartford, Connecticut 06106 
(Tel. (203) 527-9184) 

Peabody Construction Co. , Inc. 

536 Granite Street, Braintree, MA 02184 

(Tel. 848-2680) 



LEGAL COUNSEL: 



Peabody & Brown 

One Boston Place, Boston, MA 

(Tel. 723-8700) 



02108 



TRANSPORTATION CONSULTANT 



STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: 



LENDER : 



FINANCIAL CONSULTANT: 



S G Associates, Inc. 

316 Stuart Street, Boston, MA 02116 

(Tel. 542-1416) 

Brown Rona, Inc. 

711 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 

(Tel. 536-9800) 

Bank of New England 

28 State Street, Boston, MA 02108 

(Tel. 742-4000) 

Fowler Geodecke Ellis O'Connor 
1 Liberty Square, Boston, MA 
(Tel. 542-2530) 



DEVELOPER : Center Garage Associates 

536 Granite Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 



Braintree, ..... 
(Tel. 848-4110) 



(A Massachusetts Partnership whose General Partners are Center 
Garage Development, Inc., Edward A, Fish, President and 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc.) 




abody constftictiph co., inc. 



02 184 



COVER: 




MARKET MILL 
Lowell, MA 




Developer 

Contractor 

Architect: 

Property 

Management 


Market Mill Associates 
Peabody Construction Co , Ir 
Anderson-Notter-Fmegold, In 

Peabody Properties, Inc. 


Construction 
Cost: 


$11,000,000.00 


Completed: 


1981 



PEABODY— , 



Peabody Construction Co., Inc. has been an innovator 
and major force in building construction for over 90 
years. Founded in 1891 by Manus Fish, Peabody Con- 
struction remains a family-owned and managed busi- 
ness. The firm is presently owned by Edward A. Fish, 
keeping the family tradition of taking great pride in 
the good reputation of the Company and its high 
standards. 

During its long history, Peabody's growth has not been 
limited by traditional business concepts. The Com- 
pany has been able to conquer the challenges pre- 
sented by the latest methods of construction and 
development by grooming a nucleus of key manage- 
ment personnel qualified to solve these unique prob- 
lems as well as being completely versed in total con- 
struction methods and techniques. 

Peabody Construction has built its reputation on the 
integrity of its management team and this reputation 
has been strengthened as the Company has entered in- 
to newer fields of development. The increasing de- 
mands of the industry have prompted Peabody to ex- 
pand its base of operation from General Contracting 
to related areas of real estate development, construc- 
tion management and property management. The sig- 
nificance of Peabody's full spectrum capability is its 
singular capacity to provide total real estate services 
from initial development through the life of the proj- 
ect. 

Peabody's capabilities are a valuable asset in working 
with clients, community groups, architects and en- 
gineers in devising new and better engineering and 
construction techniques. The recommendation of 
measures resulting in cost savings have benefited 
clients by helping to resolve the paramount problems 
of a construction project. Peabody has continually 
responded to these needs by developing a working 
knowledge and expertise in current building types. The 
overview of projects contained in this brochure will 
reflect the high level of quality that has been a 
trademark of Peabody Construction. 



REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT-! 




Peabody Construction Co., Inc.'s 
Real Estate Development activ- 
ities in the past ten years has 
made Peabody an acknowledged 
leader in the industry In this 
process, Peabody has been re- 
sponsible for working in conjunc- 
tion with Federal, State and 
Local Agencies and Community 
Groups to assure that all require- 
ments are met in the develop- 
ment of feasible real estate proj- 
ects in the community 
One key factor in Peabody's suc- 
cess in real estate development is 
the close relationship with the 
General Contracting entity Pea- 
body Development takes full ad- 
vantage of the wealth of expe- 
rience offered by the construc- 
tion company in the various de- 
terminations of a feasible real 
estate project. Peabody Develop- 



ment carries into a project the 
same expertise and knowledge 
that is offered to a client as a 
General Contractor. 

Financing techniques. Federal, 
State and Local guidelines, envi- 
ronmental approvals, interaction 
with community groups and 
value engineering are all ele- 
ments in the increasingly com- 
plex business of real estate devel- 
opment Today Peabody is at the 
forefront of the real estate devel- 
opment industry with projects 
scattered throughout New Eng- 
land and into the Midwest. Pea- 
body Development has kept in 
tune with the changing economic 
times, and the Federal and State 
Funding programs and tax incen- 
tives that are prerequisites for a 
feasible real estate project. 



■REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT- 
PROJECT LIST 



n Adams Place, Quincy, MA 

Adams/Templeton, Dorchester, MA 

Auburn Esplanade, Auburn, Maine 

Bedford Towers/Townhouses, New Bedford, MA 

Bixby II, Brockton, MA 

Borden Place Apartments, Fall River, MA 

Brockton Centre, Brockton, MA 

Catherine F. Clark Apartments, Dorchester, MA 

Chelsea Village, Chelsea, MA 

Chelsea Hospital Rehab, Chelsea, MA 

Chimney Hill Apartments, Cumberland, Rhode Island 

Christopher Columbus Plaza, Boston, MA 

Cushing Residence, Hanover, MA 

Dock Square Parking Garage, Boston, MA 

Fairhaven Village, Fairhaven, MA 

Hadley West, Haverhill, MA 

Jaycee Place, Lowell, MA 

Judson House, Haverhill, MA 

Kenduskeag Terrace, Bangor, Maine 

King Village, New Bedord, MA 

Leisure Tower, Lynn, MA 

Market Mill, Lowell, MA 

Melville Towers, New Bedford, MA 

Mercantile Wharf Building, Boston, MA 

Mount Pleasant Apartments, Somerville, MA 

Olde Windsor Village, Windsor, Vermont 

Rita Hall Apartments, Lawrence, MA 

South Main Place Shopping Mall, Fall River, MA 

Victory Garden Apartments, E. Boston, MA 

Windsor Terrace, Windsor, Vermont 



CHELSEA NAVAL HOSPITAL SITE 
Chelsea, MA 



Developer: 
Contractor: 
Property 
Management 



Chelsea Hill Associates 
Peabody Construction Co , Inc. 

Peahodv Properties, Inc 



CONSTRUCTION-! 




Peabody Construction Co , Inc s 
prime focus has been and con- 
tinues to be the construction of 
buildings The construction in- 
dustry is continually changing 
with the introduction of new 
materials, techniques and 
methods of operation However, 
the chief concern of building 
construction is quality Peabody 
has consistently offered quality 
construction to its clients This 
quality is a direct result of over 
90 years of construction ex- 
perience. 

To complement this quality 
workmanship, Peabody keeps 
abreast of the latest construction 
methods including construction 
management and "fast track" 
construction, in addition to con- 
ventional bid or negotiated con- 
tract work These methods be- 



come a variation on a theme: a 
quality building delivered within 
the budget and on time. The var- 
iation is: the means by which 
these tasks are accomplished. 

In the building process in which 
many factors come into play, the 
prime concern of Peabody is to 
respond to the client's needs. 
These needs involve budget con- 
straints, time schedule require- 
ments, building techniques, 
materials or simply the ability to 
get the job done The product of 
Peabody's experience is the abili- 
ty to deliver quality construction 
within the project budget and on 
schedule Peabody has contin- 
ually and successfully utilized 
experience in order to deliver the 
best possible building projects to 
Peabody's clients. 



1 — CONSTRUCTION PARTIAL PROJECT LIST — 












NAME AND LOCATION 




CONTRACT AMOUNT 




DATE COMPLETED 


• Long Island Hospital 














Boston, MA 














(Renovations! 




$ 


400,000 00 






1971 


• Roxbury Comprehensive Community 














Health Center 














Roxbury, MA 














(New Construction) 




$ 


1,600,000 00 






1974 


• Corey Road Elderly 














Boston, MA 




$ 


8,400,000 00 






1977 


• Ocean Spray Cranberry 














Headquarters 














Plymouth, MA 




$ 


1,400,000 00 






1978 


• MBTA Station/Garage 














Braintree, MA 




$ 


9,661,024 00 






1979 


• Phoenix Row 














Haverhill, MA 




$ 


2,884,000 00 






1979 


• Sears, Roebuck & Co 














Braintree, MA 




$ 


5,204,52600 






1980 


• Old Town Apartments 














Cincinnati, Ohio 




$ 


6,500,000.00 






1980 


• Dock Square Garage 














Boston, MA 




$ 


5,500,000 00 






1980 


• South Mam Place Shopping Mall 














Fall River, MA 




$ 


3,202,780 00 






1981 


• Gushing Residence 














Hanover, MA 




$ 


6,471,238 00 






1981 * 


• Fairhaven Village 














Fairhaven, MA 




$ 


6,700,000 00 






1981 


• Borden Place East & West 














Fall River, MA 




$10,100,000 00 






1981 


• Market Mill 














Lowell, MA 




$11,000,000 00 






1981 


• Harbor Loft Apts 














Lynn, MA 




$13,600,000 00 






1981 


• Adams/Templeton Housing 














Dorchester, MA 




$ 


3,515,000 00 






1981 


• Bellflower Elderly 














Boston, MA 




$ 


6,500,000 00 






1981 


• MBTA Maintenance Facility 














Everett, MA 




$ 


9,007,135 00 






1982 


• Farnsworth House 














Jamaica Plain. MA 




$ 


3,304,441 00 






1982 


• Vamp Building 














Lynn, MA 




$ 


6,089,80300 






1982 


• Lamplighter Village 














Canton, MA 




$ 


2,675,000 00 






1982 


• Machine Central Tool Shops 














Portsmouth Naval Shipyard 














Portsmouth, New Hampshire 




$ 


6,110,000.00 






1983 


• Andover Schools 














Andover, MA 














(Additions & Alterations) 




$10,883,389.00 






1983 


• Tuck's Point 














Beverly, MA 




$11,100,000 00 






1983 


• Chelsea Hospital Rehab 














Chelsea, MA 




$ 


2,800,000 00 






1983 


• Chelsea Village 














Chelsea, MA 




$ 


6,200,000 00 






1983 


LEFT 






RIGHT 








MBTA STATION AND GARAGE 






ANDOVER SCHOOLS 






Braintree, MA 






Andover, MA 






, 


Owner: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority 


Owner: 


Town of Andover 




Contractor: Peabody Construction Co 


Inc. 




Contractor: 


Peabody Construction Co.. 


nc. 


Architect! 






Architect: 


Perley F 


Cilbert Associates 




Engineer: Parsons. Brinckerhoff. Qua 


de & Douglas 




Construction 








Construction 






Cost: 


$ 10.883.000.00 




Cost: $ 9.661,024-00 






Completion 




1983 


■ 


Completed 1979 












■ 



CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT-i 




Peabody Construction Co , Inc 's 
construction management is an 
efficient cost-effective way to 
approach a building project. 
Construction management is a 
method by which the Owner, the 
Architect, the Engineers, and 
Peabody form a project team at 
the inception of the project in 
order to deliver the building 
within the budget and on sched- 
ule With the atmosphere of the 
building industry in constant flux 
due to rising costs and the in- 
creasing complexity of construc- 
tion projects, it is important to re- 
tain tight management controls 
throughout the entire process 
Peabody Construction, through 
its construction management 
team, can offer over 90 years of 
experience in the formation of a 
building project. 

Input from Peabody's construc- 
tion management team from 
project inception to occupancy 
can save dollars and time This 
process can insure project suc- 
cess from the use of the latest 



construction techniques and 
methods to common sense de- 
sign input that can trim the cost 
of a construction project. Op- 
tions must be discovered and pri- 
orities established in order to 
determine the proper construc- 
tion program The establishment 
of priorities is not an easy proc- 
ess, it can only be done through 
the eyes of design and construc- 
tion personnel with many years 
of experience. It is therefore im- 
portant to have Peabody a part 
of the team as soon as feasible in 
the early decision-making proccess. 

Peabody's experience aids in the 
areas of cost analysis, evaluation 
of construction techniques, 
estimating, purchasing, schedul- 
ing and value management. By 
utilizing the construction 
management process, costly 
redesign would be avoided Pea- 
body prides itself on its ability to 
deliver a pro|ect within the 
budget and within the designated 
time frame. 



1 PARTIAL LIST OF PROJECTS UTILIZING CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 




NAME AND LOCATION 




CONTRACT AMOUNT 


DATE COMPLETED 


• n Adams Street 
Quincy, MA 




$ 4,000,000 00 


1975 


• Corey Road Elderly 
Boston, MA 




$ 8,400,000.00 


1977 


• Ocean Spray Cranberry 
Headquarters 
Plymouth, MA 




$ 1,400,000.00 


1978 


• MBTA Station/Garage 
Bralntree, MA 




$ 9,661,024 00 


1979 


• Phoenix Row 
Haverhill, MA 




$ 2,884,000.00 


1979 


• Sears, Roebuck & Co 
Bralntree, MA 




$ 5,204,526.00 


1980 


• Old Town Apartments 
Cincinnati, Ohio 




$ 6,500,00000 


1980 


• Dock Square Garage 
Boston, MA 




$ 5,500,00000 


1980 


• South Main Place Shopping Mall 
Fall River, MA 




$ 3,202,78000 


1981 


• Gushing Residence 
Hanover, MA 




$ 6,471,238 00 


1981 


• Fairhaven Village 
Fairhaven, MA 




$ 6,700,000.00 


1981 


• Borden Place, East & West 
Fall River, MA 




$10,100,000.00 


1981 


• Market Mill 
Lowell, MA 




$11,000,000 00 


1981 


• Harbor Loft Apts 
Lynn, MA 




$13,600,000.00 


1981 


• Adams/Templeton Housing 
Dorchester, MA 




$ 3,415,000 00 


1981 


• Bellflower Elderly 
Boston, MA 




$ 6,500,00000 


1981 


• Farnsworth House 
Jamaica Plain, MA 




$ 3,304,441 00 


1982 


• Tuck's Point 
Beverly, MA 




$ 11,100,000 00 


1983 


• Chelsea Hospital Rehab 
Chelsea, MA 




$ 2,800,00000 


1983 


• Chelsea Village 
Chelsea, MA 




$ 6,200,00000 


1983 


MBTA MAINTENANCE FACILITY 
Everett, MA 








Owner. Massachusetts Bas Transportation Authority 

Contractor: Peabody Construction Co.. Inc. 

Architect: Knight. Bagge. & Anderson, Inc. 

Engineers: Fay, Spoftord & Thorndike. Inc. 

Construction 

Cost: $ 9,007,135.00 

Completed: 1982 















REHABILITATION-! 




One of Peabody's prime con- 
siderations has been the dedica- 
tion to the reuse of old buildings. 
Peabody, over the last ten years, 
has been in the forefront of the 
rehabilitation of historic struc- 
tures Peabody's experience in 
dealing with the historical agen- 
cies and the federal programs has 
been invaluable in establishing 
feasible real estate projects 
These rehabilitation projects uti- 
lize, to the greatest extent pos- 
sible, the existing structure and 
unique features of the building; 
however, building systems are re- 
placed and updated to accom- 
modate the new use for the 
building. 

Building rehabilitation presents a 
challenge from a development 
and construction viewpoint. 
Often the previous use of the 
building is quite different from 
the final adaptive reuse Insight 
into potential building reuse 



stems from experience in this 
specific area The existing build- 
ing's dimensions and materials 
are important in determining the 
reuse feasibility. 

Restoration of the exterior 
building is not only done in a 
sensitive manner but must con- 
form to State and National his- 
toric preservation guidelines It is 
often desirable to obtain historic 
certification for the rehabilitated 
structures, allowing for various 
financing and fund generating 
techniques that aid in the feasi- 
bility of a development project. 
Peabody has a thorough knowl- 
edge of Federal/State programs 
and incentives that are integral in 
building reuse feasibility Pea- 
body has been involved in over 
sixty million dollars' worth of 
adaptive reuse projects Peabody 
continues to be an innovator in 
historic building adaptive reuse. 



REHABILITATION- 
PROJECT LIST 



NAME 

• Mercantile Wharf Building 

• Francis Gatehouse Mill 

• Wickford Village 

• Windsor Village 
(Prison Conversion) 

• Phoenix Row 

• Old Town Apartments 

• Fairhaven Village 

• Market Mill 

• Harbor Loft Apts. 

• Adams/Templeton 

• Daly Drug Building 

• Vamp Building 
Phase II 

• Bixby Coldthwaite 

• Chelsea Hospital Rehab 



LOCATION 


APARTMENTS 


COST 


COMPLETED 


Boston, MA 


121 


6,000,000. 


1976 


Lowell, MA 


90 


2,310,000. 


1977 


North Kingstown, 


125 


1,429,000. 


1977 


Rhode Island 








Windsor, VT 


80 


2,100,000. 


1978 


Haverhill, MA 


97 


2,884,000. 


1979 


Cincinnati, OH 


193 


6,500,000. 


1980 


Fairhaven, MA 


169 


6,700,000. 


1981 


Lowell, MA 


230 


11,000,000. 


1981 


Lynn, MA 


360 


1 3,600,000. 


1981 


Dorchester, MA 


74 


3,515,000. 


1981 


Lynn, MA 


120 


4,800,000 


1981 


Lynn, MA 


242 


6,089,803. 


1982 


Brockton, MA 


100 


3,500,000. 


1982 


Chelsea, MA 


66 


2,800,000. 


1983 



UPPER LEFT 




PHOENIX ROW 
Haverhill, MA 




Owner 

Contractor: 

Architect 


Bethany Homes Inc. 

Peabody Construction Co , Inc 

Woodman Associates Architects 


Construction 
Cost 


$ 2.884,000 00 


Completed 


1979 


LOWER LEFT: 





CHELSEA NAVAL HOSPITAL SITE 
Chelsea, MA 



Developer 
Contractor 
Property 
Management. 



Chelsea Hill Associates 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 

Peabody Properties. Inc. 



RIGHT: 

MARKET MILL 
Lowell, MA 

Developer: 

Contractor: 

Architect 

Property 

Management: 

Construction 

Cost: 

Completed 



Market Mill Associates 
Peabody Construction Co , Inc. 
Anderson-Notter-Finegold, Inc. 

Peabody Properties, Inc. 

$11,000.000 00 
1981 



■PARKING FACILITIES-n 




In the recent trend towards ur- 
banization, Peabody again has 
responded to this urban growth 
through the construction of park- 
ing facilities. Peabody has con- 
structed over 4,000 spaces in 
structured parking Whether the 
need for parking facilities is 
generated due to increases in 
housing or to accommodate in- 
creased activity in commer- 
cial/office development or as a 
part of mass transportation proj- 
ects, Peabody has become a fore- 
runner in the construction of 
such facilities The construction 



of structured parking in an urban 
atmosphere requires not only 
knowledge of the efficiencies of 
the design of the automobile 
housed in a building structure 
but also the proper pedestrian 
and automobile circulation 
requirements necessary to make 
a parking facility work Peabody 
offers this knowledge and the 
experience in choosing proper 
materials and methods of con- 
struction that are totally unique 
to the demands of the auto- 
mobile. 



•PARKING FACILITIES- 
PROJECT LIST 



NUMBER 

OF 
SPACES 



TOTAL 
COST 



• Underground Garage 
Brookline, MA 

• Winthrop Square Parking Garage 
Winthrop, MA 

• Elm Street Parking Garage 
New Bedford, MA 

• Air Rights Parking Garage 
New Bedford, MA 

• Underground Parking Garage 
Christopher Columbus Plaza 

• MBTA Station Garage 
Braintree, MA 

• Dock Square Garage 
Boston, MA 



200 Spaces 

240 Spaces 

1100 Spaces 

178 Spaces 

45 Spaces 

1100 Spaces 
600 Spaces 



$2,600,000 



$1,000,000 



$4,000,000 



$1,755,927 



$1,000,000 



$9,661,024 



$5,500,000 



1964 



1968 



1975 



1976 



1977 



1979 



1980 



TOP: 

DOCK SQUARE PARKING GARAGE 
Boston, MA 



Developer 
Contractor 
Architect 


DS Parking Trust 

Peabody Construction Co . Inc 

Desmond & Lord 


Construction 
Cost: 


i s.son.nnntw 


Completed: 


1980 



BOTTOM: 

MBTA STATION AND GARAGE 
Braintree, MA 



Owner 
Contractor: 
Architect! 
Engineer- 
Construction 
Cost 
Completed: 



Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority 
Peabody Construction Co . Inc. 

Parsons, Brinckerholf, Quade & Douglas 

$ 9.661.024 00 
1979 



HOUSING-! 




Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
has continually responded to the 
current needs of the building in- 
dustry In response to the increas- 
ing housing demands, Peabody 
has become an acknowledged 
leader in the construction and 
development of multi-family 
housing. In the past ten years 
Peabody has built over 11,000 
units of housing at a cost of over 
one third of a billion dollars. 
Utilizing Fedeial, State and Local 
incentives and programs Pea- 
body has successfully contrib- 
uted to many communities 
throughout New England Pea- 



body's full spectrum capabilities 
can offer to a housing project 
experience in development, con- 
struction and property manage- 
ment to aid in the projects suc- 
cess. Peabody has a proven 
record of responding to the 
needs of the future residents but 
also to community needs Close 
contact is maintained with com- 
munity groups and local agencies 
to ensure project compatibility 
with its environment Today's 
housing need is a vital concern 
for each community Properly 
constructed housing is of vital 
importance to Peabody 



•HOUSING 



UPPER LEFT: 

WOODRIDCE (NORTH ANDOVER HOMES) 
North Andover, MA 

Owner: Archdiocese of Boston 

Contractor: Peabody Construction Co . Inc. 

Architect: Goody & Clancy 
Construction 

Cost: $ a.oon.ntw.oo 

Completed /979 



LOWER LEFT: 

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS PLAZA 
Boston, MA 

Developer: Ausonia Homes Associates 

Contractor: Peabody Construction Co . Inc 

Architect: Mintz Associates 

Property 

Management: Peabody Properties. Inc. 

Construction 

Cost i 5,500,000.00 

Completed: J 977 



RIGHT: 




77 ADAMS PLACE, CONDOMINIUMS 


Quincy, MA 




Developer: 


77 Adams Place Company 


Contractor: 


Peabody Construction Co , Inc 


Architect: 


Smith. Sellew & Doherty 


Property 




Management 


Peabody Properties, Inc. 


Construction 




Cost: 


$ 4,000,000.00 


Completed. 


7975 



INDUSTRIAL/OFFICE/COMMERCIAL-n 




A good reason why you should 
choose Peabody for your next of- 
fice, commercial or industrial 
building project is, simply, expe- 
rience Since the Company's 
beginning m 1891 Peabody has 
encountered a range of building 
projects, the experience of which 
is continually passed on to the 
client Peabody's long history in 
fair dealings with its subcon- 
tractors has enabled the Com- 
pany to establish relationships 
that aid in the successful comple- 
tion of the most complicated 
projects 

Peabody has been involved in the 
recent upsurge in commercial/ 
office/industrial facilities in a 



variety of ways. From the con- 
struction of 204,000 square foot 
Sears Department Store in Brain- 
tree, Massachusetts to the 76,000 
square foot South Main Place 
shopping mall in Fall River, 
Massachusetts, Peabody has 
been able to contribute largely to 
the success of these commercial 
ventures through its on time and 
on budget construction. 

Peabody Construction looks for- 
ward to becoming involved in 
your industrial/commercial proj- 
ect and can offer a variety of 
methods from which to approach 
your project in order to assure 
not only feasibility but success 



r INDUSTRIAL/OFFICE/COMMERCIAL 










CONSTRUCTION 










NAME AND LOCATION 


CONTRACT AMOUNT 




DATE COMPLETED 


• North End Branch Library 










Boston, MA 


$ 260,000. 






1965 


• River City Shopping Center 










Waltham, MA 


$1,000,000. 






1967 


• Hanscom Field Hangars (2) 










Bedford, MA 


$1,000,000. 






1968 


• Standard Uniform Building 










Boston MA 


$ 450,000. 






1968 


• Fields Corner/Columbia 










MBTA Station Rehab, Boston, MA 


$2,500,000. 






1968 


• Ocean Spray Cranberry Headquarters 










Plymouth, MA 


$1,400,000. 






1978 


• MBTA Station/Garage 










Braintree, MA 


$9,661,024. 






1979 


• Sears, Roebuck & Co. 










Braintree, MA 


$5,204,526 






1980 


• South Main Place Shopping Mall 










Fall River, MA 


$3,202,780. 






1981 


• MBTA Maintenance Facility 










Everett, MA 


$9,007,135 






1982 


• Machine/Central Tool Shops Moderni- 










zation, Third Increment 










Portsmouth Naval Shipyard 










Portsmouth, New Hampshire 


$6,110,000. 






1983 


LEFT 


RIGHT 








MBTA MAINTENANCE FACILITY 
Everett, MA 


SOUTH MAIN PLACE 
Fall River, MA 






Owner: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority 

Contractor: Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 

Architect: Knight, Bagge, & Anderson, Inc- 

Engineers. Fay, Spofford & Thorndike, Inc. 

Construction 

Cost: $ 9,007.135 00 

Completed: 1982 


Developer: 

Contractor: 

Architect: 

Property 

Management 

Construction 

Cost: 

Completed: 


South Main Place Associates 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc 
Chia-Ming Sze .Architect. Inc 

Peabody Properties. Inc. 

i i. 20 2, 7 80. 00 
1981 



SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION 



NAME AND LOCATION CONTRACT AMOUNT DATE COMPLETED 

• Fort Rodman School Center 

New Bedford, MA $ 6,000,000. 1956 

• Cambridge Electron Accelerator 
Harvard University 
Cambridge, MA 

(Additions & Alterations) $ 300,000. 1961 

• Architectural Engineering Building 
University of Massachusetts 

Amherst, MA $ 350,000. 1967 

• Dormitory & Refractory 
Holy Cross Creek Orthodox 
Theological School 

Brookline, MA $ 1,000,000. 1968 

• Burrell Elementary School 

Foxboro, MA $ 1,000,000. 1968 

• Dedham Junior High School 
Dedham, MA 

(Complete Renovations) $1,300,000. 1968 

• John Marshall School 

Dorchester/Boston, MA $ 5,000,000. 1971 

• Bristol Community College 

Fall River, MA $ 9,300,000. 1972 

• Ward Seven Elementary School 

Somerville, MA $ 3,700,000. 1972 

• Middle School 

Billerica, MA $ 5,300,000. 1972 

• Classroom & Laboratory Building 
Lowell Technological Institute 

Lowell, MA $ 6,800,000. 1973 

• Andover Schools 

(High School, West Junior High 
and Doherty School) 
Lowell, MA 
(Additions & Alterations) $10,883,389. 1983 





HOSPITAL/HEALTH CARE 






FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION 




NAME AND LOCATION 


CONTRACT AMOUNT 


DATE COMPLETED 


• Hospital Renovations 






Bridgewater State Hospita 






Gardner State Hospital 






Mattapan State Hospital 






Pondville State Hospital 






Waltham State Hospital 






Worcester State Hospital 


$1 7,000,000 


1950-1960 


• Paul A. Dever Hospital School $ 1,500,000. 


1960 


• Boston City Hospital 






Additions/Alterations 


$ 5,000,000 


1960-1963 


• Boston City Hospital 






Administrative Building 


i 1,000,000. 


1961 


• Biochemistry Lab Building 






Boston City Hospital 






Boston, MA 






(New Construction) 


$ 306,000 


1966 


• Winthrop Community Hos[ 


3ital 




Winthrop, MA 






(Additions & Alterations) 


$ 2,000,000 


1970 


• Sherrill House 






Boston, MA 






(Extended Care Facility) 


$ 2,134,000. 


1970 


• Long island Hospital 






Boston, MA 






(Renovations) 


$ 400,000. 


1971 


• Roxbury Comprehensive C( 


ammunity 




Health Center 






Roxbury, MA 






(New Construction) 


$ 1,600,000 


1974 



PROPERTY MANAGEMENT— I 




Since its establishment in the 
mid-1970s, Peabody Properties, 
Inc has grown to become one of 
the major forces in the profes- 
sional real estate world Present- 
ly, Peabody Properties manages 
in excess of 4,500 units in over 30 
locations within four states. The 
reason behind our growth is sim- 
ple. Peabody Properties, Inc has 
the most qualified and experi- 
enced staff available Further- 
more, Peabody Properties, Inc 
has developed unique manage- 
ment systems and put them into 
practice. Peabody Properties, 
Inc has experienced phenome- 
nal success — be it commercial, 
subsidized housing, or conven- 
tional residential 



The properties in Peabody Prop- 
erties, Inc management port- 
folio speak for themselves If a 
real estate owner or investor is to 
survive in today's inflationary 
and uncertain economy, strong 
professional property manage- 
ment IS the key to survival And 
Peabody Properties is the key to 
improving the bottom line 
Peabody Properties has the staff 
and expertise to solve real estate 
problems Peabody Properties, 
Inc has a proven record in mar- 
keting and management. Pea- 
body Properties, Inc. is available 
in any capacity — from full turn- 
key to responsive management 
to selective projects to fit indi- 
vidual and immediate needs. 



rPROPERTY MANAGED BY PEABODY PROPERTIES, INC.. 



n Adams Place, Quincy, MA 

Adams/Templeton, Dorchester, MA 

Auburn Esplanade, Auburn, Maine 

Bedford Towers/Townhouses, New Bedford, MA 

Bixby II, Brockton, MA 

Borden Place Apartments, Fall River, MA 

Brockton Centre, Brockton, MA 

Catherine F, Clark Apartments, Dorchester, MA 

Chelsea Village, Chelsea, MA 

Chelsea Rehab., Chelsea, MA 

Chimney Hill Apartments, Cumberland, Rhode Island 

Christopher Columbus Plaza, Boston, MA 

Cushing Residence, Hanover, MA 

Dorchester House, Dorchester, MA 

Fairhaven Village, Fairhaven, MA 

Hadley West, Haverhill, MA 

Jaycee Place, Lowell, MA 



Judson House, Haverhill, MA 
Kenduskeag Terrace, Bangor, Maine 
King Village, New Bedford, MA 
Lamplighter Village, Canton, MA 
Leisure Tower, Lynn, MA 
Market Mill, Lowell, MA 
Melville Towers, New Bedford, MA 
Mercantile Wharf Building, Boston, MA 
Mount Pleasant Apartments, Somerville, MA 
Middlebury Arms, Middleborough, MA 
Monatiquot Village, Braintree, MA 
Olde Windsor Village, Windsor, Vermont 
Rita Hall Apartments, Lawrence, MA 
United Front Homes, New Bedford, MA 
Victory Garden Apartments, E Boston, MA 
Windsor Terrace, Windsor, Vermont 



lOlM UNITS 



4466 



UPPER LEFT 

MERCANTILE WHARE BUILDING 
Boston, MA 



RIGHT 

SOUTH MAIN PLACE 
Eall River, MA 



Developer: 

Contractor: 

Architect: 

Property 

Management 

Construction 

Cost 

Completed: 



LOWER LEFT 

MARKET MILL 
Lowell, MA 

Developer: 

Contractor: 

Architect: 

Property 

Management 

Construction 

Cost: 

Completed 



Mercantile Wharf Associates 
Peabody Construction Co , Inc. 
John Sharratt Associates 

Peabody Properties. Inc 

$ e.ooo/mooo 

1976 



Developer: 

Contractor: 

Architect: 

Property 

Management 

Construction 

Cost: 

Completed 



South Main Place Associates 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
Chia-Ming Sze Architect, Inc 

Peabody Properties, Inc 

$ 3.202,780 00 
1981 



Market Mill Associates 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
Anderson-Notter-Finegold, Inc. 

Peabody Properties, Inc 

$11,000,000 00 
1981 



Photography: PHOKION KARAS 

Design: DARA PANNEBAKER 

Printed By ADDISON C CETCHELL & SON, INC 



peabody construction co., inc. 

536 Granite Street Braintree Mass 02184 



DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT : Robert F. Walsh Associates 

60 State Street, Boston, MA 02109 
(Tel. 227-3530) 



Robert F. Walsh Associates 



Robert F. Walsh 

President 

~r. Walsh has 15 years 

experience in the 

development field. 

Formerly Director of the 

Boston Redevelopment 

Authority, Mr. Walsh has 

extensive background in 

urban development, 

public management and 

planning. His involvement 

in Boston and other 

municipalities include 

neighborhood 

development, downtown 

revitalization programs, 

historic preservation 

efforts, and institutional 

development. 



I 

I 

I 



RI=W 

Robert F. Walsh Associates 



In the field of development, whether public, 
institutional, or private, this firm offers the 
following: 

1 . Planning assistance 

2. Coordination of public and private 
interests. 

3. Project development and implementation. 
Robert F. Walsh Associates can save 

you time and resources and can help your 
development ideas hirn into reality. 

REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT 

Anyone involved m development today 
knows that a working partnership of local 
governments, private investors, public pro- 
grams and local communities is essential to 
success. 

Robert F. Walsh Associates specializes in 
coordination of these groups. The President 
of the company, Robert F. Walsh, and his 
associates have long experience in develop- 
ment and approach any projects with 
respect for the objectives and constraints of 
all participants. 

PUBLIC SECTOR 

Without question City and town govern- 
ments rely heavily on State and Federal 
funding sources in planning their growth 
strategies and revitalization efforts. 

Robert F Walsh Associates can identify and 
explore government funding opportunites 
and can tailor local needs to State and Fed- 
eral programs. 

Federal funding programs, from HUD, EDA 
and other agencies, are complex and ever- 
changing. Robert F Walsh Associates can 
help you understand eligibility and can 
assist you in the application and implementa- 
tion process. Their expertise in public fund- 
ing offers substantial assistance to Local gov- 
ernment for long and short range develop- 
ment plans. 



INSTITUTIONS 

Institutions planning expansion or consolida- 
tion of facilities must work witii government 
agencies, and address the legitimate inter- 
ests of local residents. 

Robert F. Walsh Associates has experience 
in this complicated and sensitive process. 
Their involvement in institutional develop- 
ment can promote a community of interest 
in projects which will facilitate approval and 
successful implementation. 

PRIVATE SECTOR 

Private developers can benefit from the 
services of Robert F Walsh Associates. The 
advice and assistance of this firm can sup- 
plement the technical services of appraisers, 
architects and engineers. Robert F Walsh 
Associates can help private investors choose 
the best possible type of project whether it is 
new construction, rehabilitation or conver- 
sion. 

Private ventures which couple investors' 
funds with government assistance can bene- 
fit from the involvement of Robert F Walsh 
Associates. Their experience in construction, 
planning, and management as well as acting 
as a liason to governmental agencies can be 
cost effective to the private investor. 



Robert F. Walsh Associates 

60 State Street 
Boston, Mass. 02109 
617-227-3530 



ARCHITECT : V. Victor Vitols, AIA 

Vitols Associates 
1230 Statler Office Building 
Boston, MA 02116 
(Tel. 482-1990) 



Vitols Associates 



Housing 



Commercial/Retail 



Transportation 



Health Care 



We are an architectural and planning firm with 
experience in a wide range of building types, 
consisting of renovation/adaptive reuse and new 
construction. Our professional staff -each of 
whom is encouraged to develop to his or her 
maximum potential - is committed to achieving the 
best solution by combining an understanding of 
each clients programmatic requirements and 
financial considerations with the most current 
design techniques and technical knowlege. 

Multifamily projects range from subsidized 
housing for families/elderly to market-rate and 
luxury apartments, condominiums. We have 
completed projects with as few as 16 and as many 
as 775 units. 

Our experience in this area includes prime office 
space complexes, corporate headquarters, 
mixed-use developments, and interior space 
planning. 

We are involved in two major areas: transportation 
centers combining rapid transit, bus, and private 
vehicle modes of transportation with structured 
parking; and parking facilities, either as individual 
structures or as a component of a multipurpose 
complex. 

To achieve a noninstitutional quality for continuum 
of care for the elderly proiects, we draw upon our 
housing experience to provide planning input and 
architectural design for these health 
care/residential facilities. 




Mission Park Housing Boston , Massachusetts 




1443 Beacon Street Apartments Brookline. Massachusetts 




Quincy Adams Transportation Center Quincy, Massachusetts 




Carleton-Willard Homes Life Care Center Bedford , Massachusetts 



Chestnut Hill Gardens Newton, Massachusetts 





Cotton Mill Apartments Whitlnsville, Massachusetts 




Brick Market Place Condominiums Newport, Rhode Island 



Fitchburg Green Housing Fitchburg, Massachusetts 





East Cambridge Parking Facility Cambridge , Massachusetts 



Perini Corporate Headquarters Framingham, Massachusetts 



Clients 

Barkan Properties 

Edward W. Brice, Jr. / Irwin J. Nebelkopf 

Edward W. Brice, Jr./ Irwin J. Nebelkopf/ 
PaulN.Varadian 

Brockton Redevelopment Authority 

Carabetta Enterprises, Inc. 



Chariestown Economic Development 
Corporation / E.Denis Walsh Associates 

Cambridge Community Development 
Department 

John M. Corcoran A Co. 

The Gutierrez Company 



Housing Innovations, Inc. 

Lower Roxbury Development Corporation 
Maiden Redevelopment Authority 

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority 

Mission Parte Corporation / 
Harvard Corporation 

Nahant Housing Authority 

National Corporation for Housing Partnerships/ 
E. Denis Walsh Associates 

Irwin J. Nebelkopf / Paul N. Varadian 

Perini Corporation 

Schochet Associates 



Spaulding&Co.,lnc. 
Spaulding & Slye Corporation 

State Street Development Company 
Sydney Construction Company, Inc. 
Urt)an Investment and Development Co. 
PaulN.Varadian 



Projects 

Rtchburg Green 

Olympia Square Apartments 

Brightside/Piedmont Apartments 
Worcester Historic Schools Apartments 

Mainbrook Offstreet Parking Facility 

Chestnut Hill Gardens 
Colonial Point Apartments 
Maiden Towers 

John Harvard School Housing forttie Elderly 
East Cambridge Parking Facility* 

Brockton Commons 

Bedford Farms Office Park 
Natick Executive Park 
Buriington Executive Park 

Bergen Circle 
Concord Houses 

Madison Park* 

CBD Parking Facility* 
Jackson Street Parking Facility* 

Quincy Center Transportation Center 
Quincy Adams Transportation Center* 

Mission Park* 



Wilson School Housing 
School Street Apartments 

Lynn Heritage Park Harbor Project 

Corporate Headquarters -Additions and Renovations 

Brick Market Place 

Broadway /West Broadway* 

Cotton Mill Apartments 

Portland Neighbortiood Housing Development 

Ttiayer Village Apartments 

Weldon Hotel Apartments 

Carieton-Willard Homes/ 
Continuum of Care for the Elderiy 

Devonshire West Office Building 
Wellesley Green Condominiums 
Newton Executive Office Park 

Bell Pond Apartments 

1443 Beacon Street Apartments 

Copley Place Housing 

North High Condominiums 

'joint venture projects 



Vitols Associates 

1230 Statler Office Building 
Boston, MA 02116 
617 482-1990 

315 Monticello Arcade 
Norfolk, VA 23510 
804 627-8361 



FIRM HISTORY 



Vitols Associates 



VA FIRM DESCRIPTION 



INTRODUCTION 

VITOLS ASSOCIATES, Architects-Planners, is an 
architectural and planning firm with experience 
and expertise in designing housing, 
commercial -retail, transportation, and health-care 
facilities. Our comprehensive range-of services 
includes design, project management, cost 
estimating, and construction supervision. 



HISTORY 

Vitols Associates is a former component of the 
Glaser-de Castro-Vitols Partnership. Originally 
established as Samuel Glaser Associates in 1930, 
the firm was reorganized into Samuel Glaser and 
Partners in 1968 and the name changed to Glaser-de 
Castro-Vitols Partnership in 1975. Another 
reorganization in January 1979 resulted in two 
separate firms, Glaser-de Castro and Vitols 
Associates. 

CONSULTANTS 

Depending on the specific requirements of each 
project, VA works with various consultants in 
order to achieve the optimum design. These 
consultants typically include electrical, 
mechanical structural and site engineers, 
landscape architects, energy consultants and cost 
estimators. 



SERVICES 



Vitols Associates 



TYPES OF SERVICES 

Housing 

VA has designed and supervised the construction of 
over 7,000 units of housing - new construction, 
renovation, and adaptive reuse - for private 
developers and under state and federal programs 
for subsidized housing. These projects range in 
size from 16 to 775 units and include housing for 
low - and middle-income groups, the elderly and 
students, in addition to market rate and luxury 
bui Idings. 

Some recently completed projects are 1443 Beacon 
Street Apartments in Brookline, Chestnut Hill 
Gardens in Newton, and Colonial Point Apartments 
in Wakefield (all luxury market rate); Brick 
Market Place (mixed use - luxury housing and 
retail) in Newport; The Weldon Hotel in 
Greenfield; Olympia Square Apartments in Lynn and 
School Street Apartments in Taunton (adaptive 
reuse of existing structures to housing). Current 
projects include Sidney Hill Condominiums in 
Watertown: Bell Pond Apartments in Worcester 
(elderly subsidized); Copley Place Housing in 
Boston's Copley Square - a portion of the 60 
million dollar Copley Place Development. 



Commercial -Retail 

Completed office buildings include the mixed-use 
development. Brick Market Place in Newport, Rhode 
Island; Newton Executive Park in Newton Lower 
Falls (three buildings); Wellesley Office Park in 
Wellesley; and the Devonshire Building, as part of 
the New England Executive Park complex in 
Burlington; and Bedford Farms in Bedford, New 
Hampshire. Current projects include Natick 
Executive Park in Natick and Center Plaza in 
Maiden. 



Transportation 

VA's experience in this area includes several 
major projects for the Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority, namely the Quincy Center 
MBTA Station and Parking Facility and the Quincy 
Adams MBTA Station and Parking Facility, both in 
Quincy, Massachusetts. Parking facilities include 
the Woolworth Building PF, Central Business 
District Jackson Street PF in Maiden, East 
Cambridge PF in Cambridge (as part of the 
redevelopment plan of the East Cambridge 
Riverfront-Leachmere Triangle area), in addition 
to structured parking for housing projects, 
including Chestnut Hill Gardens in Newton and 
Mission Park in Boston. 



Health Care Facilities 

VA has been involved in several continuum of care 
for the elderly projects, which include nursing 
home facilities, housing, and medical facilities 
on such projects as Mattapan Center for Living and 
Carleton-Wil lard Homes. Other projects include 
the School of Nursing and Outpatient Clinic for 
Boston City Hospital . 



RESUMES 



tols Associates 



V. VICTORS VITOLS, AlA 



Background 

1957 Bachelor of Architecture, Iowa State University 

1958 Master of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Member, American Institute of Architects 

Boston Society of Architects 

Urban Design Committee, Boston Society of Architects 

Registrations 

National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (1975) 
Massachusetts (1963), Maine (1976), Virginia (1976), 
Rhode Island (1976), New Hampshire (1976), Connecticut (1976), 
New York (1976), Vermont (1976) 

1958 Joined Samuel Glaser Associates 

1968 Partner, Samuel Glaser & Partners 

1975 Partner Glaser/de Castro/Vitols Partnership 

1979 Founder, Vitols Associates 



Housing 



Family and/or Elderly: Castle Square, Madison Park 
Houses, Concord Houses, Mission Park Houses, Bergen Circle 
Portland Neighborhood Housing, Weldon Hotel Apartments, 
Brockton Commons, Fitchburg Green, John Harvard School, 
School Street Apartments, Fitchburg Green, Olympia Square 
Apartments, Worcester Historic Schools/Brightside- 
Piedmont Housing, Bell Pond Apartments, Wilson School 




Copley __ _,, 

Crossing Condominiums 

Commercial/Retail : Auditorium Garage & Theater Complex, Devonshire 
West Office Building, Woolworth Building and Parking 
Facility, Newton Executive Park, Perini Corporate 
Headquarters, Bedford Farms Office Park, Travelers Bldg., 
Natick Executive Park, Burlington Executive Park 

Mixed Use: Brick Market Place, Lynn Heritage Park Harbor Project 

Transportation: Quincy Center MBTA Station & Parking Facility, 

Quincy Adams MBTA Station & Parking Facility, Maiden CBD 
Parking Facility, East Cambridge Parking Facility, Mainbrook 
Offstreet Parking Facility, Jackson Street Parking Facility. 

Institutional: Boston City Hospital School of Nursing, Boston City 
Outpatient Dept . , Fitchburg State College New Student 
Apartments, Carleton-Wil lard Life Care Center, Meadowlands 
Hotel/conference Center. 



BAILEY SAIGER SILBERT, AlA 
Background 



1959 Bachelor of Architecture 

1960 Master of Architecture 

Harvard Graduate School of Design 

1967 Registered Architect, Massachusetts 
1965 Registered Architect, State of Israel 
1982 NCARB License Application in process. 

Corporate Member, American Institute of Architects 
Member, Brookline Zoning Board of Appeals 

Brookline Historic District Study Committee 
Boston Society of Architects, Harleston Parker Committee 
1964 Mr. Silbert gained international experience by working in 
to Israel and Denmark on projects that included museums, schools, 
1967 town halls, and town planning schemes. Upon returning to the 
U.S., he joined the office of Hugh A. Stubbins and 
Associates, Inc. as Design Architect for various projects, 
including the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and St. Peter's 
Church in New York City (a part of Citicorp Center), and a 
design proposal for the JFK Memorial Library, Columbia Point, 
Harbor Campus, Dorchester. 

199^ Mr. Silbert established his own practice and acted as 

consultant on projects including a library conversion, office 
buildings, handicapped facilities, and private residences. 

Vitols Associates 

1958 Projects included Lowell Technical Institute Athletic 

to Facility, Fitchburg State College Women's Dormitory, and 

1964 Ulin House. 

1979 Mr. Silbert rejoined the firm. 



Projects 



ols Associates 



Bedford Farms Office Park, Bedford, N.H. - 4 buildings, 

including renovation of existing barn, into prime office 

space. 
Travelers Insurance Company - office building 
Natick Executive Park - 3 buildings, prime office space, 

including interior space planning consultation 
School Street Apartments, Taunton, MA - 75 units of elderly 

housing, adaptive reuse of existing garage and new 

construction. 
Carter Heights, Chelsea, MA - rehab of 108 housing units 
United Front Homes, New Bedford, MA - rehab of 200 housing 

units 
Mountain Road Office Building, Burlington, MA 
Coris Company, Boston, MA - office renovation 
Vikrosa Trust, Manchester, N.H. - rehab of existing 

structure into offices 
Two Wall Street Office Building , Manchester, N.H. - part of 

Financial Services Complex 



AWARDS/PUBLICATIONS 



Vltols Associates 



American Society of Landscape Architects 

Merit Award - 1975 

Devonshire West, New England Executive Park 



Boston Society of Architects 

Award for Excellence in Housing and Neighborhood 
Design - 1975 and 1981 
Madison Park Houses 



American Institute of Architects/House & Home 

Magazine 

Architectural Record Houses of 1976 Award 

Brick Market Place 



American Institute of Architects, New England 
Regional Council 

Certificate of Merit - 1977 
Massachusetts Masonry Institute - 1977 
Boston City Hospital Outpatient Department 



American Institute of Architects, New England 
Regional Council 

Honor Award - 1977 
Cotton Mill Apartments 



Boston Society of Architects 

Award for Excellence in Housing and Urban 
Design - 1979 
Mission Park Houses 



Greater Boston Real Estate Board 

First Place - 1980 

The Quad Housing Design Competition 



New Hampshire Easter Seals Society 

Handicapped Awareness Award - 1981 
Bedford Farms Office Park 



New England Architect 

March 1974 

Quincy Center MBTA Station & Parking Facility 



House and Home 

On a Small Urban Site - A Triple Use Condo 

July 1976 

Brick Market Place 



Architectural Record Houses of 1976 

Apartment of the Year 
Brick Market Place 



Urban Design 

Mixed Use - New Zoning Tool for Urban Regeneration 
Summer 1977, Volume 8, Number 2 
Cotton Mill Apartments 



Professional Builder 

The Specialty Markets 

September 1977 

Cotton Mill Apartments 



Process: Architecture 

Low Rise Housing in America - The Urban Scene 
April 1980, Number 14 
Mission Park Houses 

Contract 

Detailed Who's Who Northeast Listings 
September 1982 
Carleton-Wil lard Homes 



Vitols Associates 



COMMERCIAL/RETAIL 
PROJECTS 



Vitols Associates 



COMMERCIAL/RETAIL 



Projects designed by Vitols 
Associates include office parks; 
renovations and additions to 
existing facilities; mixed-use 
projects, that combine commercial 
retail space with housing; 
and interior space planning. 



Completed 
1965 Auditorium Garage & Theater 

Complex 
1970 Devonshire West Office 

(part of New England Execu- 
tive Office Park) 
Woolworth Building & Parking 
Faci 1 ity 
1975 Brick Market Place 

1978 Newton Executive Park 

1979 Bedford Farms Office Park - 

Bldgs. 1 & 2 
Perini Corporate Headquarters 
Additions & Renovations 

1980 Grant Gear, Inc. - Additions 

& Renovations 
Travelers Insurance Building 

1981 Natick Executive Park - Bldg. 



Construction Phase 

Natick Executive Park - Bldg. 
Bedford Farms Office Park - 
Bldgs. 3 & 4 

Contract Documents Phase 

Natick Executive Park - Bldg. 

Design Phase 

Burlington Executive Center 

Westpark 

Pinehurst Office Building 

Burlington Office Building 



Vitols Associates 



(Cormiercial /Retail Projects 



WOOLWORTH BUILDING AND 
PARKING FACILITY 
.Boston, Massachusetts 



This five-level parking facility is 
location above the Woolworth's 
Department Store building that 
contains 162,000 s.f. of office and 
commercial space. 



Parking Capacity: 900 cars 
Size: 300,000 s.f. 
Owner: Franklin-Washington 

Redevelopment Corp. 
Cost: $5.5 million (total 

project) 
Completion Date: 1969 



Vitols Associates 



Commercial /Retail Projects 



Until 1973, this historic 
seaport was known mainly as a 
naval base and summer colony, 
featuring such attractions as the 
Newport Jazz Festival and 
America's Cup Race - a sailboat 
race of international scope. 
Then the U. S. Navy decided to 
close down its base - a decision 
that motivated the town to 
stabilize itself into a 
year-round residential community 
and strengthen its business 
community. 

One component of this effort is 
Brick Market Place, a combination 
of 44 apartments, 30 specialty 
shops, and 10 offices - all of 
which were sold as condominiums. 
This approach was taken to help 
the stabilization effort and to 
ensure quality shops. 

Brick Market Place is located on 
the waterfront, next to the 
Original Brick Market building 
from which it took its name. 
Therefore, integration with the 
historical character and scale of 
the area was a critical factor. 
The response to this was not to 
line up the 4 buildings in a 
straight line, but to vary 
setbacks and rooflines for a more 
random appearance and limit 
building height to 3 stories. 
Shipped-1 apped cedar siding, 
preassembled into modular units 
as a time- and cost-savings 
factor, was chosen for the 
interior material. Brick paving, 
complementing the cobblestone 
typical to this area, was used 
for the open courtyards between 
the buildings. 

Owner/Developer: Westminster/ 

Schochet Associates 
Contractor: Reliable Homes 
Cost: $2.5 mil lion 
Completed: 1975 



Commercial /Retail Projects 



NEWTON EXECUTIVE PARK 

Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts 



This prime office space complex 
consists of three, 3-story 
buildings on a six acre site 
located at the junction of 
Routes 128 and 16. This complex 
boasts easy access to rapid 
transit and bus service, ample 
parking space and extensive 
landscaping, including a 
pedistrian plaza lined with 
trees, and shrubbery featuring a 
waterfall. Power and telephone 
lines were placed underground. 

The planning and review process 
involved the Newton 
Redevelopment Authority, the 
Lower Falls Improvement 
Association and the Lower Falls 
Project Area Committee. It 
resulted in a high quality 
project acceptable to the 
Community. 

Buildings I & II each total 
45,000 s.f. and Building III 
totals 22,800 s.f. As the 
project is for multi-tenant 
Occupation, the offices were 
designed to al low for 
versatility and maximum space 
uti litazation. Construction 
began in November 1975 and 
Building I was completed on 
schedule in August 1976. The 
remaining two buildings were 
completed by 1978. 

Materials: Steel columns and 
beams, precast concrete facade, 
solar bronze windows with dark 
aluminum frames. 



Owners: Spaulding and 
Completion Date 1978 
Cost: $3.6 mil lion 



Slye 



Vitols Associates 



Conuiercial/Retail Projects 

PERINI CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS Perini's corporate headquarters 
, Framingham, Massachusetts has been expanded and renovated 
I several times since 1931, when 

Perini moved its operations from 
Ashland to Framingham, The most 
recent work, 30,000 s.f. of new 
construction and 27,000 s.f. of 
renovation, more than doubled the 
existing facilities to 
I accommodate general and 

I administrative departments and 

the addition of several 
divisional operation centers. 

The main feature of the facility 
is a central landscaped courtyard 
that was created by the new 
addition. The court has access 
from the main entrance lobby and 
employees' cafeteria and can be 
viewed from the executive offices 
and main conference room. 

A new exterior wall unified the 
existing building with the 
addition, a stairwell was added 
to one corner for fire safety 
reasons, and the parking lot was 
reorganized and landscaped. 



Owner: Perini Corporation 
Completion Date: 1979 
Cost: $3 mil lion 



Commercial /Ret ail Projects 



GRANT GEAR, INC. 
Norwood, Massachusetts 



This project includes additions 
and alterations to an existing 
industrial building for 
production, administrative, and 
rental space including the 
addition of a truck shipping-&- 
receiving dock. 



Owner: Grant Gear, Inc, 
Completion Date: 1980 
Cost: $650 thousand 



Vitols Associates 



Projects 



PARK 



Located off Route 9, this 3 
story office building features a 
central entrance atrium and 
glass elevators. 

The structure contains a precast 
concrete panel exterior with 
aluminum/bronze-tinted glass 
windows. The building comprises 
83,000 s.f. - 27,000 s.f. per 
floor. 

Other amenities, beside the 
atrium and glass elevators, 
include a fountain and an above 
average parking allowance per 
1000 s.f. of rental space. 

The landscaping for the entire 
office park has been coordinated 
so as to integrate each 
building within the overall 
master plan. 



Owner: The Gutierrez Company 
and the Sel lew Family 
Completion Date: July 1982 
Cost: 



Commercial /Retail Projects 



TWO WALL STREET OFFICE BUILDING 
Manchester, New Hampshire 



This four story office building 
is the anchor of the Financial 
Services Complex in Manchester, 
N. H. Urban siting constraints 
were a major determinant of the 
floor plans for the 65,000 s.f. 
of office space. Existing 
buildings along the northern 
property line dictated a 
concentrated core centered 
against this edge in order to 
maximize exposure on the east, 
south, and west sides. A 
thirty-six foot setback along the 
Elm Street property line enabled 
a harmonious relationship to the 
existing Bank East, the creation 
of a landscaped plaza on the main 
city street, and eased the 
problems created by the grade 
differential along the east-west 
ax i s . 



Owner: The Gutierrez Company & 

Twigg Associates 

Completion Date: August 1983 

Cost: 



CLIENTS 



Vltols Associates 



CLIENTS 

BARKAN PROPERTIES 



PROJECTS 



Fitchburg Green 



EDWARD W. BRICE, JR. 



Broadway/West Broadway* 
Brightside/Piedmont Apartments 
Worcester Historic Schools Apartments 
Olympia Square Apartments 
Thayer Village Apartments 
Weldon Hotel Apartments 



BROCKTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



Mainbrook Offstreet Parking Facility 



;ARABETTA ENTERPRISES, INC. 



Chestnut Hi 1 1 Gardens 
Colonial Point Apartments 
Maiden Towers 



IHARLESTOWN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION John Harvard School Housing for the Elderly 
;aMBRIDGE community development DEPARTMENT W'^^East Cambridge Parking Facility* 



JOHN M. CORCORAN & CO. 



Brockton Commons 



-IRST BAPTIST BEVERLY HOUSING 



Turtle Creek Housing 



THE GUTIERREZ COMPANY 



Bedford Farms Office Park 
Natick Executive Park 
Burlington Executive Park 



HOUSING INNOVATIONS, INC. 



Bergen Circle 
Concord Houses 



LOWER ROXBURY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 



Madison Park"* 



m 



lALDEN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



N^^ CBD Parking Faci1itv*_ 
^^ Jackson btreet Parking Facility 



MASSACHUSETTS BAY TRANSPORTATON AUTHORITY 



Quincy Center Transportation Center 
Quincy Adams Transportation Center 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE BUILDING AUTHORITY Fitchburg College New Student 

Apartments 



joint venture 



CLIENTS 
Page 1 



PROJECTS 



MISSION PARK CORPORATION 
/o HARVARD UNIVERSITY 



NAHANT HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Mission Park* 



Wilson School Housing for the Elderly 



NATIONAL CORPORATION FOR HOUSING PARTNERSHIPS School Street Apartments 



IRWIN J. NEBELKOPF 



PERINI CORPORATION 



Olympia Square Apartments 
Lynn Heritage Park Harbor Project 
Brightside/Piedmont Apartments 
Worcester Historic Schools Apartments 



Corporate Headquarters - Additions and 
Renovations 



SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 



SPAULDING & CO., INC. 



SPAULDING & SLYE COPRORATION 



STATE STREET DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 



SYDNEY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. 



URBAN INVESTMENT AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 



Thayer Village Apartments 

Brick Market Place - Phase 1 

Portland Neighborhood Housing Development 

Cotton Mill Apartments 

Broadway/West Broadway* 

Wei don Hotel Apartments 



Carleton-Wil lard Continuum of Care for 
the Elderly 



Devonshire West Office Building 
Wellesley Green Condominiums 
Newton Executive Office Park 



Bell Pond Apartments 



1443 Beacon Street Apartments 



Copley Place Housing 



PAUL N. VARADIAN 



E. DENIS WALSH ASSOCIATES 
* joint venture 



North High Condominiums 
Brightside/Piedmont Apartments 
Worcester Historic Schools Apartments 
Lynn Heritage Park Harbor Project 



School Street Apartments 



REFERENCES 



Vitols Associates 



LIST OF REFERENCES 



THE BARKAN COMPANIES 
1330 Boylston Street 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 
Mel Barkan, President 
617-734-9600 



WILLIAM H. DOLBEN 
40 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02109 
Donal d C. Dolben, 
617-367-0400 



& SONS, INC, 



President 



BROOKLINE ASSOCIATES 

1 Lincoln Street 

Newton Highlands, MA 02161 

Stanley Sydney, Partner 

617-964-0280 



EDWARDS & ANGELL 

One Hospital Trust Plaza 

Providence, R.I . 02903 

Timothy T. More, Esq. 

401-274-9200 



CARABETTA ENTERPRISES 
384 Pratt Street 
Meriden, CT 06450cut 
Joseph F. Carabetta 
Chairman of the Board 
203-235-1633 



GUTIERREZ COMPANY 

2 Burlington Executive Center 

111 Middlesex Turnpike 

P.O. Caller Box 542 

Burlington, MA 01803 

Arthur Gutierrez, President 

617-272-7000 



CARLETON WILLARD HOMES 

c/o SHERBURNE, POWERS & NEEDHAM 

One Beacon Street 

Boston, MA 02108 

William V. Tripp, III Esq, (Trustee) 

617-523-2700 



GEORGE B.H. MACOMBER CO. 

Russia Wharf 

530 Atlantic Avenue 

Boston, MA 02210 

George Macomber, President 

617-451-2700 



COPLEY PLACE - BOSTON 

URBAN INVESTMENT & DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 

John Hancock Building, 45th Floor 

Boston, MA 02116 

Kenneth Himmel, Vice President 

Steve Eimer, Director of Development 

617-536-8500 



McCORf^CK g, ZIMBLE 
225 Franklin Street 
Boston, MA 02110 
Edward J. McCormack Jr. 
617-482-1400 



Esq, 



JOHN M. CORCORAN COMPANY 

500 Granite Avenue 

Milton, MA 02186 

John M. Corcoran, President 

617-696-0275 



MISSION PARK CORPORATION 

c/o Harvard University 

964 Holyoke Center 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

L. Edward Lashman, Director of External 

Projects 
617-495-1920 



LIST OF REFERENCES 

Page 2 

PERINI CORPORTATION 
73 Mt. Wayte Avenue 
Framingham, MA 01701 
David Perini, President 
617-875-6171 



SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 

720 Statler Office Building 

Boston, MA 02116 

Jay R. Schochet, President 

617-482-8925 



SPAULDING & COMPANY 
2345 Washington Street 
Newton Lower Falls, MA 02162 
Richard Spaulding, President 
617-244-5000 



SPAULDING & SLYE CORPORATION 
15 New England Executive Park 
Burlington, MA 01803 
William Whelan, Vice President 
617-523-8000 



STATE STREET DEVELOPMENT 

84 State Street 

Boston, MA 02109 

Walter Winchester, President 

617-723-8100 



ARCHITECTS : Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood Architects, Inc 

127 Tremont Street 
Boston, MA 
(Tel. 482-5745) 



<ALLMANN. McKINNELL & WOOD, ARCHITECTS. INC. 



Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood, Architects, Inc., was founded in 
1962 when Gerhard Kallmann and Michael McKinnell won the 
national competition for th e Boston City Hall. Since then 
the firm has achieved an outstanding reputation for the design 
and technical excellence of its buildings. This reputation has 
beeen recognized by numerous honors, including two AIA Honor 
Awards and, on three occasions, the Harleston Parker Medal. In 
an AIA Bicentennial poll, distinguished architects, historians 
and critics cited the Boston City Hall as one of the "proudest 
achievements of American architecture...." The City Hall 
received more votes than any other building designed by a living 
architect. 

From this beginning the firm has been continually associated 
with the Government Center. Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood has 
designed the 2000-car parking garage which serves the area 
and many of the open spaces throughout this section of the city. 
These include, besides City Hall Plaza, Pemberton Square, 
Washington Mall, and Cardinal Gushing Park, all of which conform 
to a common language of form and materials which were laid out 
in the Government Center Street Furnishings and Landscape Master 
Plan prepared by the firm for the Boston Redevelopment Authority 
in 1968. 

Other Boston Buildings which the firm has designed include the 
Boston Five Cents Savin gs Bank, another commission awarded 
through a design competition, and most recently, the proposed 
expansion of the Hynes Audit orium. 

Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood has placed first in four major 
competitions in all and has received awards in four further 
national or international competitions. 

The firm has provided full architectural services for a wide 
variety of building types and civic spaces and is the architect 
of record of building projects ranging in cost from under $1 mil- 
lion to nearly $100 million. The total construction value of this 
completed work is approximately $200 million. 



LEGAL COUNSEL : Thomas E. Finnerty, Esq. 

45 Bromfield Street, Boston, MA 02108 
(Tel. 542-7575) 



RESUME 



Thomas E. Finnerty, Esquire Born - August 12, 1935 

133 Brigantine Circle Married - Six Children 

Norwell, Massachusetts 02061 



Engaged in General Practice of law with offices at 45 Bromfield 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02108. 

EDUCATION 

Boston College Law School, Law Review 

Editorial Staff 1960 LL.B. 

Boston College 1957 B.S. 

Past member of Boston College Law Alumni Council 

EXPERIENCE 

Assistant District Attorney, Suffolk County - 1963 - 1972 
District Attorney - 1975 - 1979 
Occasional Lecturer - Trial Practice 

PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS 

Admitted to Practice before Massachusetts Bar - 1960 

Admitted to Practice before Federal District Court - 1961 

Massachusetts Bar Association 

Plymouth County Bar Association 

National Association of District Attorneys 

I have had experience in real estate development with the 
firm of E. Denis Walsh Construction Company, 73 Tremont Street, 
Boston, and Alex McNeil Associates, 420 Providence Highway, 
Westwood. 



PARKING CONSULTANT: 



Schwartz Parking, Inc. 
60 Washington Street 
Hartford, Connecticut 06106 
(Tel. (203) 527-9184) 



irPi 



/cHLunnTZ pmniOG, inc 

openffnoar frwviGejierT conAJuinG 

^A)chQel H. Sthujoftz. President 



December 27, 1982 

Peabody Construction, Inc. 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Attn: Edward P. Fish, President 
Re: Government Center Garage 

We have examined the above captioned garage and the potential 
operation by our firm in the event you should purchase this 
facility. You have already received under separate cover 
our proforma Operating and Expense Budget. 

In order to bring this garage up to the standards of a first 
class facility, it will be necessary to spend a considerable 
amount of money. The items that we see immediately that are 
necessary are as follows: 

1) Replace present lighting with high pressure 
sodium fixtures. 



60 UJQshington Street • Hartford, G. 06106 • (203) 527-9184 



f^0ar^af -2- 



2) Rewire said lights so that they may be switched 
during the day in a manner desired to conserve 
energy. 

3) Repair all floor areas that are presently spalled 
and cracked. 

4) Repair and upgrade existing elevators. 

5) Purchase and install ^tate of the art revenue and 
vehicle control systems. 

6) Purchase a sweeper and two Cushman vehicles. 

7) Restripe and repaint. 

It is our intention to staff the garage to a much greater level 
than presently exists and to have all such staff properly 
uniformed and trained. We will also provide armed security 
guards patrolling the garage in Cushman vehicles at all times 
the garage is open for business. 

It is our opinion that in order for this garage to serve the 
community for which it exists and to attract more business 
than it currently enjoys, it will be necessary to operate in 



^iPM -3- 



the best manner possible and to provide to the public a 
clean, well lighted, courteously staffed facility. By following 
such a plan benefits will be provided to everyone concerned 
including the patrons, the owners and the community in general. 

In order that you understand our firm, its reputation and its 
policies, please find following a description of who we are 
and what we do. 

Schwartz Parking was founded in 1928 in Hartford, Connecticut 
and has been in the business of successfully owning, leasing 
and managing parking facilities since that time. At the 
present time, we operate 60 locations including 18 garages 
in 10 cities. These locations comprise in excess of 25,000 
parking spaces. 

The parking locations we operate include garages ranging from 
200 spaces to 1,500 spaces serving employee parking, commercial, 
monthly and transient parking, hotel parking and parking for 
the general public. 



IFPi 



-4- 



Some of the surface lots that we operate are for employee 
parking as well as commercial parking, but also include facil- 
ities which serve event parking such as Milford Jai Alai and 
Bridgeport Jai Alai. As you can see, our range of experience 
in the facilities that we operate, and have operated in the 
past, covers the entire range of parking services. 

Please find following a list of references you may feel free to 
contact. We have not forewarned these people of your possible 
inquiry . 

Warren Healey, General Manager 
Constitution Plaza, Inc. 
One Constitution Plaza 
Hartford, CT 

Henry Mulhern, Chief Engineer 
Maiden Redevelopment Agency 
Government Center 
Maiden, MA 



Itp. 



'ff -5- 



Richard Mulready, President 
Servus Corporation 
One Financial Plaza 
Hartford, CT 

Ron Devicino, General Manager 
Peter Savin Properties 
60 Washington Street 
Hartford, CT 

John Barber, Director of Major Properties 
Real Estate Investment 
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance 
Springfield, MA 

Brian Condon, Vice President of Admin. 
Yale New Haven Hospital 
New Haven . CT 

Robert Flanagan, Director of Real Estate 
Citv of New London 



-6- 



Anthony Capella, General Manager 
Bridgeport Jai Alai 
Bridgeport, CT 

Albert 0. White, President 
A. 0. White 
Baystate West 
Springfield, MA 

Our company has four key executives; Michael H. Schwartz, 
President; Sherman H. Liftig, Executive Vice President; (Mrs.) 
Francine P. Scricca, Administrative Vice President and Richard 
A. Stowell, Controller. Depending upon the subject matter to 
be discussed, any or all of us are continually available to our 
clients for whatever reason our client deems necessary. We 
consider this availability so important that we have deliberately 
limited the size of our company and the number and location of 
Its operations so that such availability will exist. Unfortun- 
ately, this benefit is rarely available from the large firms 
whose intersts are nationwide in scope. 



Ifp. 



-7- 



While every parking facility may run on its own to a certain 
extent, on a day-to-day basis operational guidance and super- 
vision is supplied from the Home Office to all field personnel 
and supervisory managers. Not only do we own a substantial 
computer in our Home Office, but the size of our organization 
and the number of personnel of all types employed by us allows 
us to cover all personnel contingencies at any location at a 
moment's notice. In addition, company employed supervisors 
oversee all locations on a daily basis. All payroll and labor 
cost is handled through the Home Office computer together with 
the filing of all reports and the payment of all payroll-related 
taxes and costs. The purchase of all major merchandise and 
services, as well as payment for such, is handled from the Home 
Office unless the client directs otherwise. The Home Office 
retains both General legal counsel and counsel in such specializ- 
ed fields as Labor Law and Personnel Relations. All uninsured 
claims are handled through the Home Office and all necessary 
insurance for any facility may be provided by our blanket policies 
carried through the Home Office. In sliort , the Home Office is 
actively involved on a constant basis with field operations. 



IfPs 



-8- 



Although the parking industry generally relies on a lower wage 
scale personnel to fill routine positions, we have found that 
by hiring retirees, we have been much more successful in attract- 
ing a higher level of individual to a part-time job. We feel 
that the administration of our personnel is excellent. We have 
no union involved except in one location in Bridgeport where we 
inherited the union when we took over from a prior operator. 

Generally speaking, our personnel are recruited from the Hartford 
job market. This recruitment takes place in the form of news- 
paper advertisements as well as State and Municipal agencies 
involved with the unemployed. At the present time, our work 
force is 50% minorities and women. These figures tend to remain 
fairly constant with very little fluctuation. Training is ordin- 
arily done on the job; however, this does not mean that the training 
necessarily takes place in the location to which the trainee is 
finally assigned. In most cases, the trainee recives his exper- 
ience at an established location and is then transferred to the 
new location. In your case however, it is our initial plan to 
staff your garage with experienced personnel. This is especially 
true as regards the on-site assistant manager. 



Itp. 



-9- 



Presently, our wage rates range from the starting wage of 
S3. 75 - S4.00 per hour up to $5.00 - $6.00 per hour for main- 
tenance personnel including the sweeper operator. Managers and 
Assistant Managers salaries range from $14,000 to $36,000 per 
year depending upon responsibility, size of operation and 
experience . 

Our regard for our personnel is sensitive and extensive and we 
provide to all qualified employees company-paid health and major 
medical plans for themselves and their dependants as well as a 
company-paid pension plan. In addition, we provide generous 
vacation and personal time benefits. I am enclosing a copy of 
our Employee Handbook and Benefits Booklets for your examination. 
At the present time, our pension plan is predicated on a company- 
paid contribution of 5% of gross income per employee; however, 
foreitures which remain in the plan have brought that down to 
4.25%. Our Health and Major Medical Plan is S47.00 per month 
per employee which is company paid. The cost of dependant coverage 
is S73.00 per month additional of which the company pays halt and 
the employee pays half. These rates include life insurance tor 
the employee. 



Itp, 



-lo- 



in addition to these benefits, employees are also entitled to 
earn sick time and personal time as discussed in the handbook. 
The cost of vacation time is included in the payroll expense on 
the included budget. 

Please find following a partial representation of our clients. 

Travelers Insurance Company 

Constitution Plaza, Inc. 

City of Maiden, MA 

City of New London, CT 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Yale New Haven Hospital 

Baystate West 

Urban Investment and Development Corp. 

Servus Corporation 

Mil lord Jai Alai 

Bridgeport Jai Alai 



I believe the foregoing names speak for themselves as far as 
size and quality are concerned. 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR; 



Peabody Construction Co. , Inc. 
536 Granite Street, Braintree, 
(Tel. 848-2680) 



MA 02184 



(See Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
Resume under Developer in this Section) 



LEGAL COUNSEL : Peabody & Brown 

One Boston Place, Boston, MA 02108 
(Tel. 723--8700) 



1 



PEABODY & BROWN 

A PARTNERSHIP INCLUDING PROFESSIONAL CORPORATIONS 

ONE BOSTON PLACE 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02I08 

(617) 723-8700 



CABLE ADDRESS "PEABROWN" 
TELEX NUMBER 951019 



Peabody & Brown is a law firm consisting of over 60 
attorneys and more than 100 supporting staff. The Firm 
was founded in the 1850 's and is engaged in a general 
civil practice at One Boston Place, Boston. A major 
area of the Firm's practice is real estate and real estate 
development. The Firm has been involved in a broad based 
real estate practice incorporating all aspects of the de- 
velopment, financing and ownership of real estate of all 
types, not only in Boston, but elsewhere throughout New 
England and the United States. The Firm and its attorneys 
have many years of experience in real estate development, 
including governmental relationships, financing, title, 
zoning, environmental, architectural, tax and all other as- 
pects relating to the ownership and development of real 
estate. The Firm has represented clients in dealing with 
government agencies at federal, state and local levels, in- 
cluding the city of Boston as well as with various Federal 
and State Housing Finance and Redevelopment agencies. The 
Firm is a qualified Bond Counsel and is listed in the Red 
Book. 

The Firm has been extensively engaged for many years in 
the structuring and syndication of real estate of all types 
and is nationally recognized in this area. This activity has 
involved real estate development and syndication worth 
billions of dollars. 



Approximately 30% of the Firm's attorneys perform sub- 
stantial services in the area of real estate ownership, 
development and syndication. 



TRANSPORTATION CONSULTANT : S G Associates, Inc. 

316 Stuart Street, Boston, MA 02116 
(Tel. 542-1416) 




SG ASSOCIATES, INC. 

TRANSPORTATION CONSULTANTS 

planning • operations • management • design 

316 STUART STREET . BOSTON, MA 021 16 . 617/542-1416 



December 29, 1982 



Mr. Edward A. Fish 

President 

Peabody Construction Company, 

535 Granite Street 

Braintree, MA 02184 



Inc. 



Dear Mr. Fish: 

SG Associates is plea 
consultant to the dev 
Our experience in pla 
as the Van Ness Metro 
Washington, D.C., sta 
extension of the Lind 
Crossing in Boston en 
transportation-relate 
example, we analyzed 
employees, a "kiss an 
bus terminal , and dev 
elements of the trans 



sed to express inte 
elopment team for t 
nning, design and t 
rail station joint 
tion area access an 
enwold Line in the 
sures sensitive and 
d issues. For the 
access and traffic 
d ride" parking are 
eloped pedestrian c 
it station, parking 



rest in serving as transportation 
he Government Center Garage parcel . 
raffic engineering for such projects 
development/garage/bus terminal in 
d joint development for the proposed 
Philadelphia area, and Downtown 

operationally sound treatment of 
Van Ness Station project, as an 
impacts, designed parking for 
a serving the station and a feeder 
onnections between the different 

and office/retail space. 



For this project, we will be responsible for resolving such issues as: 

• Garage management to balance use of the entrance and exit ramps 
of the garage to correspond to traffic flows on the surrounding 
streets in the a.m. and p.m. peak hour; 

t Analysis of the effects of and required geometry and signal timing 
to accommodate using the Congress Street entrance ramp as an exit 
during the p.m. peak hour, both under existing conditions, and 
given the circulation changes proposed as part of the North Sta- 
tion area redevelopment (i.e., two-way Merrimac-Lomasney Way). 
Providing an additional exit offers significant potential for 
relieving peak hour congestion at the Sudbury/Blackstone/N. Wash- 
ington Street intersection. 

• Signing, channel ization , and landscaping to improve pedestrian safe- 
ty and orientation in the bus terminal area (possible MBTA funding), 
to control illegal auto traffic and parking in the bus lanes, and 

to bring foot traffic past the retail storefronts; 



FRANK SPIELBERG, P.E. Washington. DC MARVIN GOLENBERG, P.E. boston 



Mr. Edward A. 
page two 



Fish 



Analysis of pedestrian level s-of-service and required amenities 
in the bus waiting area, given addition of retail storefronts 
and changes in the pedestrian circulation patterns; and 

Relationship of the pedestrian entrances, spaces and walkways, most 
immediately to Government Center and the State Service Center site, 
and, more broadly, to the Bullfinch Triangle commercial area on 
Canal Street, North Station, and Quincy Market, along with 
suggestions for improvements at major street crossings. 



Our firm will be repre 
Jane A1 gmin Howard , As 
experience in traffic 
the complex circulatio 
extensions of the auto 
ments to help traffic/ 
Authority. Ms. Algmin 
for the BRA, and is mo 
in Government Center, 
of traffic and parking 
project and University 
transportation section 
a new office building 
Washington, D.C. 



sented by Mr. Marvin Golenberg , 

sociate. Mr, Golenberg, with ov 

engineering and transportation 

n scheme for Downtown Crossing i 

-free-zone for Boston Traffic an 

bus flows in Dewey Square for th 

Howard worked for seven years a 

st familiar with traffic, parkin 

For SG Associates, she was proj 

impacts of the proposed South E 

Hospital expansion in the South 

of an EIS for a 45 acre mixed u 

and fifteen embassy/chancery bui 



Principal , and by Ms^. 
er seventeen years' 
planning, developed 
n Boston, and analyzed 
d Parking and improve- 
e Boston Redevelopment 
s a transportation planner 
g and pedestrian issues 
ect manager for studies 
nd Technology Square 

End, and for the 
se development involving 
1 dings in Northwest 



Resumes of key staff, project descriptions, client references, and supporting 
materials are included in the accompanying qualifications statement. 

We look forward to participating with you in this exciting development project. 



Very truly yours, 

Marvin Golenberg, P.E. 
Principal 



EXPERIENCE 
and 

CAPABILITIES 



/ ^ 



SG ASSOCIATES, INC. 

TRANSPORTATION CONSULTANTS 




TRANSPORTATION CONSULTANTS 
planning • operations • management • design 



SG is a firm of multi-skilled professionals who have been active in 
the field of transportation for more than fifteen years. Principals of 
the firm have conducted innovative research, developed and evaluated con- 
ceptual plans, estimated impacts and supervised design and implementation 
for a wide range of transportation related projects throughout the United 
States and in various foreign countries. 

Skills of the firm encompass implementation oriented planning and 
research in the areas of: 

• Transportation Systems Management (TSM) 

• Long and Short Range Transit Planning/Operations 

• Transportation Facility Impact Analysis 

t Travel Demand Model Development and Application 

• Urban and Environmental Planning 

• Financial/Economic Analysis 

• Transportation Facility Design and Implementation 

• Policy and Program Planning and Analysis 

• Railroad Planning 



Areas of Expertise/Previous Experience 
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

• Auto Restricted Zone (ARZ) -- research, plan development, design and 
implementation for several cities throughout New England. 

Ride-Sharing Program -- Statewide employer-based carpool program im- 
plementation and evaluation, design and implementation of a computer- 
based many-to-many ride-sharing program, U.S. DOT program involve- 
ment on methods for encouraging high-occupancy vehicle use, user 
matching techniques, and issues to be addressed in forming car/van- 
pools. 

• Traffic Operations -- Urban corridor and areawide signal system optim- 
ization plans and designs; preferential treatment designs for high 



I 



I 



occupancy vehicles; basic research for freeway contra-flow bus lane 
feasibility; optimization of vehicle throughput volumes in densely 
developed urban areas and capacity restricted corridors; engineering 
design, implementation and construction supervision of traffic sig- 
nal systems and urban street improvements. Corridor studies in 
Baltimore Co., Maryland, Portland, ME, and Lewiston, ME. 

• Transit Planning/Operations -- Development and planning leading to 
successful implementation of a transit service for the elderly and 
handicapped, short-range system and corridor transit planning, 
transit operations planning for high activity commercial and re- 
creational activity sites, feasibility of priority control for bus 
operations on city streets and expressways. Study of benefits of 
relocating the E. 120th St. Station of the Cleveland Rapid Transit 
System. Analysis of bus system operations including garage system 
planning, Washington, D.C. 

• Parking -- Conceptual development, planning design and basic en- 
gineering for a system of fringe parking lots to service a regional 
commuter rail system — Boston Commuter Rail Fringe Parking Study; 
CBD parking studies, parking plans development and engineering de- 
sign for high activity centers. 

TRAriSPORTATION PLANNING 

• Demand Forecasting -- Principals of SG have contributed to the evol- 
utionary development of demand forecasting methodology for transpor- 
tation planning in general and transit planning in particular. Prin- 
cipals have made major contributions in development and application 
of marginal disutility mode choice models. 

Demand jnodel ing development and application has been conducted 
for long-range and short-range transit planning for a range of urban 
area sizes -- from urban areas of 30,000 to urban regions with popu- 
lations exceeding 4,000,000. In addition to typical long-range re- 
gional demand forecasting techniques, members of the firm have de- 
veloped system sensitive demand forecasting techniques for short- 
range planning -- Fitchburg, MA and Cleveland, OH. Principals of 
the firm developed the first system sensitive auto occupancy model 
used in a major urban transportation study (Cleveland, OH) and sub- 
sequently developed a model for predicting short-term changes in 
the proportion of vehicles at various occupancy levels in response 
to implementation of freeway lanes restricted to carpools (FHWA 
Research Project). 

• Survey Methods and Analysis -- Regional transportation surveys in 
Cleveland, Ohio; Sydney and Balarat, Australia; interregional multi- 
mode survey in Northeast Corridor, including air travel and bus pas- 



senger surveys; modal surveys for Cleveland Airport Rapid Transit 
and Boston Commuter Rail; on-board transit rider surveys for several 
New England communities and Cincinnati, Ohio. 

• Transit Planning/Operations -- Development and assessment of transit 
system alternatives for over 12 major cities in the U.S. and over- 
seas. System concepts included all bus-surface systems — bus rapid, 
rail transit, PRT systems, light rail, commuter rail -- cities — 
Detroit; Cleveland; Atlanta, Boston; Washington; St. Louis; Sao 
Paulo, Brazil; Canberra, Australia; Sydney, Australia; Perth, Aus- 
tralia; Baltimore, Minneapol is-St . Paul; Lowell, Massachusetts; 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts; Dayton, Ohio; and Madison, Wisconsin. 

Demonstration Project Research -- Development of original study con- 
cept and work plan for evaluating impact of rapid transit extension 
to Cleveland airport. Development of demonstration implementation 
plans for free-fare demonstrations in Mercer Co., Mew Jersey, and 
Salt Lake City, Utah. Case study of road pricing demonstration for 
Madison, Wisconsin. 

• Network Simulation and Analysis -- Developed advanced techniques for 
simulating transit and highway networks for regional and urban areas. 
Development of system assessment evaluation process. 

URBAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING 

• Downtown Revital ization Studies -- Preparation of land use and trans- 
portation plans (circulation, parking and transit) for the explicit 
purpose of revitalizing central business districts in several older 
New England communities. Development of design concepts, implemen- 
tation plans and supervision of construction for these communities. 

• New Town Transportation Planning — Assisted in development of transit 
and highway systems plan for Reston, Virginia; regional rapid transit 
as well as local transit service for Canberra, Australia. 

• Environmental Impact Statements — Prepared the transportation element 
of the Supplementary Environmental Impact Statement for the Inter- 
national Center, Washington, D.C. 

POLICY PLANNING 

• Statewide Policy Planning -- Financial policy planning and programming 
for transportation development in Ohio. Policy and program planning 
for transportation access to State Parks in Massachusetts. 

• Road Pricing Policies — Road pricing studies as part of energy con- 
servation strategies; investigations into road pricing demonstrations 



and analysis of road pricing effects on transportation and land use 
development in new towns. 

• Demographic Studies -- For the Office of the Secretary of U.S. DOT, 
SG is conducting an analysis of the effects on transportation in- 
vestment policies of recent trends in family size, labor force par- 
ticipation rates and inter- and intraurban migration patterns. 

RAILROAD PLANMING 

Provided assistance to the Federal Railroad Administration in 
review of State Rail Planning Work Statements, including comments on 
methodology, approach and level of effort. For the Transportation 
Systems Center provided guidelines for benefit-cost studies for light- 
density rail 1 ines. 



CLIENTS' 



U.S. Government 

Federal Railroad Administration, Office of State Assistance 

Federal Highway Administration 

General Services Administration 

Urban Mass Transportation Administration, Office of Service and Methods 
Demonstrations 

Transportation Systems Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary 

U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment 

U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service 

State Government 

Maryland Department of Transportation 

Maine Department of Transportation 

Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation 

Local and Regional Government 

Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority 

Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments 

Washington Metropolitan Council of Governments 

Baltimore County, Office of Planning and Zoning, Maryland 

National Capital Planning Commission, Washington, D.C. 

Greater Cleveland Regional Transportation Authority 

Lewiston-Auburn Comprehensive Transportation Study, Auburn, Maine 

Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council, Boston, Massachusetts 

Housatonic Valley Council of Elected Officials, Danbury, Connecticut 
Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority, Cincinnati, Ohio 



Interstate Division for Baltimore City, Baltimore, Maryland 

Dane County Regional Planning Commission, Madison Wisconsin 

Transportation Coordinating Committee, Dayton, Ohio 

Department of Traffic and Parking, City of Boston, Massachusetts 

Baltimore Regional Planning Commission, Baltimore, Maryland 

Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority 

Delaware River Port Authority, Pennsylvania 

flcrtheast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency 

Lowell Regional Transit Authority, Massachusetts 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 

Office of Transit Administration, City of New Orleans, Louisiana 

Pri vate/Mon-Prof i t 

The Urban Institute, Washington, D.C. 

Transportation Research Board 

Prudential Properties 

International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, Washington, D.C, 

National Cooperative Highway Research Program 

South End Technology Square Associates, Boston, Massachusetts 

University Hospital, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts 



PROJECTS' 



1976 Analysis of a Madison, Wisconsin road pricing demonstration project 
on traffic congestion for the Urban Institute. 

Analysis of the impact of a reduced Metrorail system on patronage, 
revenue and operating costs for the Washington Metropolitan Area 
Transit Authority. 



1977 Projection of revenues to be generated by the Metrorail and bus 

system in order to complete the Phase III analysis for the Washing- 
ton Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. 

Development of a Program Manual to assist States in applying for 
and administering grants for the Federal Railroad Administration. 

Preparation of an Implementation Plan for a free fare transit ser- 
vice demonstration program in Mercer County, '!ew Jersey for the 
Urban Institute. 



1978 Development of a regional program to plan transit services for the 
elderly and handicapped for the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional 
Council of Governments. 

Analysis of access modes to Dulles Airport for the Washington Metro- 
politan Council of Governments. 

Analysis of the changes in operating costs resulting from changes 
in Metrobus garage locations for the Washington Metropolitan Area 
Transit Authority. 

Development of a free fare demonstration program in Salt Lake City, 
Utah for the Urban Mass Transportation Administration Office of 
Service and Methods Demonstrations. 

Assistance in preparation of white paper on new concepts in travel 
forecasting for the Federal Highway Administration. 

Design of a study to analyze paratransit options in individual 
communities for the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Gov- 
ernments . 

Preparation of an environmental impact statement for the Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission office relocation in Washington, D.C. for 
the General Services Administration. 



1979 Development of an air quality implementation plan for Cincinnati, 
Ohio for the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments. 

Assessment of the social and economic impacts of advanced group 
rapid transit in Washington, D.C. for the U.S. Congress, Office of 
Technology Assessment. 

Investigation of safety hazard effects upon students walking to 
school and recommendation of a safety improvement program for the 
Montgomery County, Maryland Public Schools. 

Preparation of a benefit-cost analysis for high density rail lines 
for the Transportation Systems Center. 

Analysis of the effectiveness of high-occupancy vehicle lanes and 
ramp metering for the U.S. Department of Transportation. 

Studies of travel requirements for employees and visitors to federal 
installations in Washington, D.C. for the National Capitol Planning 
Commission. 

Investigations concerning the relocation of the 120th Street Station 
in Cleveland, Ohio for the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Auth- 
ority. 

Development of a revised comprehensive transportation planning study 
in the Portland area for the Maine Department of Transportation. 

Study of design, art and architecture in transportation facilities 
for the U.S. Department of Transportation. 

Evaluation of state rail planning work statements and plans to de- 
termine compliance with requirements and adequacy of the work pro- 
gram for the Federal Railroad Administration. 

Assistance in review of submitted state rail plans for compliance 
with regulations for the Federal Railroad Administration. 

Development of a study to evaluate the state rail service assistance 
program to determine if it is currently meeting the objectives of 
Congress for the Federal Railroad Administration. 

Development of a CBD circulation plan including geometric and traffic 
control system functional design for the Lewiston, Maine Transporta- 
tion Study. 

Project analysis of the Lisbon-Lincoln Connector in the city of 
Lewiston, Maine for the Lewiston, Maine Transportation Study. 



1980 Transit alternative analysis for the Dane County Regional Planning 
Commission, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Commuter Rail Feasibility Analysis for Dane County Regional Planning 
Commission, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Transit Alternative Analysis for the Dayton, Ohio urban area. 

Project analysis and functional design for modification and extension 
of the Boston Auto Restricted Zone, for the City of Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 

Analysis of the capability of public transit to serve visitors to 
the Boston Urban Park for the National Park Service. 

Determination of transportation and parking requirements for an 
office/retail joint development on air-rights at the Van Mess Metro- 
rail Station. Performed for Prudential Insurance Company of America 
and included testimony before the Zoning Commission of the District 
of Columbia . 

Assistance to the UMTA Office of Service and Methods Demonstrations 
in developing, implementing and disseminating information regarding 
projects in the areas of price and service variation. 

Development for the Office of State Assistance, Federal Railroad 
Administration of an updated Program Manual reflecting current legis- 
lative and administrative requirements. 

Preparation for the Federal Highway Administration of a series of 
case studies illustrating approaches to and methods for analyzing 
various types of transportation problems. 

Development and calibration for the Metropolitan Washington Council 
of Governments of a direct-demand budget-constrained model for est- 
imating non-work transit travel. 

Specification of procedures for and analysis of results of travel 
demand analysis in conjunction with an Environmental Impact Statement 
for a proposed extension of the Lindenwold High-Speed Line operated 
by the Delaware River Port Authority. 

Analysis for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority 
of optimum sites for new bus depots. 

Development for the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority of 
a model to predict the short-range effects of route and service 
changes . 

Assistance to UMTA's Office of Socio-economic and Special Projects 
in the evaluation of hardware and technology demonstrations. 



Preparation for the Department of Transportation, Office of the 
Secretary of Profile of the 80's, used as part of the White House 
Agenda for the 80's, 



1981 Preparation of the transportation element of the Supplementary 
Environmental Impact Statement for the International Center, Wash- 
ington, D.C. for the International Telecommunications Satellite 
Organization (INTELSAT). 

Lowell Transit Service Study - Administration and analysis for 
the Lowell Regional Transit Authority of a systemwide passenger 
study to determine an appropriate combination of actions to reduce 
the operating deficit while maintaining the highest possible level 
of service. 

Preparation for the National Cooperative Highway Research Program 
of a research report and user handbook on simple techniques for 
evaluating low-cost Transportation System Management actions. 

Analysis for the Urban Mass Transportation Administration of public 
objectives for financial regulatory or management involvement in 
urban public transportation. 

Assistance, under contract to the Virginia Department of Highways 
and Transportation to ten local transit properties in developing 
service delivery and marketing strategies to insure reasonable 
ridership and cost recovery in light of Federal budget reductions. 

Analysis for the Boston Redevelopment Authority of alternative cir- 
culation, design and enforcement schemes to facilitate bus movement 
in and out of Boston's Downtown Crossing. 

1982 Preparation for the City of 'lew Orleans Office of Transit Admin- 
istration of a study of exclusive bus lanes in the city. 

Preparation for the South End Technology Square Associates, a 
consortium of hospitals and related institutions of a parking 
demand analysis, shuttle bus plan and site access design for a 
planned mixed use development and garage. 

Transportation planning and traffic engineering for the Howard 
Street Transit Mall in downtown Baltimore, Maryland, for the 
Interstate Division for Baltimore City. 

Study for Baltimore Regional Planning Commission of transportation 
system capacity, needs of new development, and future policy for 
providing access to downtown Baltimore. 



Management study to provide recommendations to the Southwest Ohio 
Regional Transit Authority regarding fare structure and transit 
pass pricing. 

Route restructuring analysis and commuter rail feasibility study 
in conjuction with update of the Transportation Developirient Plan 
for the Housatonic Valley Council of Elected Officials, Danbury, 
Connecticut . 

Assessment of Washington Metro "F" Line alternatives related to 
major land use development potential. 



Preparation for the Urban Mass Transportation Administration of a 
manual for the location and design of bus garages and depots. 

Development for the Urban Mass Transportation Administration of a 
microcomputer-based management system for sales of prepaid monthly 
transit passes. 



RESUMES 




SG ASSOCIATES, INC. 



MARVIN GOLENBERG, P.E. 
PRINCIPAL 

Education: Washington University, B.S. in Civil Engineering 

Northwestern University, Certificate in Transportation Studies 
Purdue University, M.S. in Civil Engineering 

Registration: Registered Professional Engineer in Maine 

Previous Alan M. Voorhees and Associates, Inc.: 1968-1973, 1975-1978 

Positions: Last Position — Senior Associate 

Dalton-Dalton-Newport: 1973-1975, Project Manager 

Cleveland Seven County Transportation Study: 1965-1968 

Experience: Mr. Golenberg has nrore than fifteen years experience in trans- 
portation research, planning, operations and engineering. He 
has served in senior technical and management positions on 
projects throughout the U.S. and on overseas assignments in 
Australia and South America. Areas of experience and expertise 
are summarized in the following: 

Transportation Systems Management (TSM) . Projects have been 
at the system-wide and site specific levels. These have included 
the traffic planning for Auto Restricted Zones (ARZ) in Boston, 
MA and Lewiston, ME. Systematic procedures have been developed ' 
to formulate and evaluate ARZ plans for implementation. System 
and corridor TSM planning and implementation designs have been 
developed for Portland and Lewiston, ME. Ridesharing activities 
have included the design of a performance evaluation for a state- 
wide ridesharing program as well as the design and implementation 
of a many to many ridesharing matching service for a large urban 
area. Transit activity has included the design of bus operating 
concepts as part of ARZ planning and for corridor and CBD service 
improvements. 

Transit System Planning -- Long Range . Served as project manager 
or principal planner on the development, evaluation and selection 
of regional transit plans. Studies have encompassed all forms of 
transit service types and operating concepts including heavy and 
light rail, bus rapid transit, PRT systems, surface bus and para- 
transit. Representative cities include Cleveland, Detroit, Lowell, 
New York City, Canberra and Perth, Australia, and Sao Paulo, Brazil. 



MARVIN GOLENBERG -- 2 



Transit System Planning — Short Range . Short range transit 
planning has included development of low capital systeirwide 
improvement plans for small and large urban areas. Typical 
projects include Fitchburg, MA and Cleveland, OH. Service 
improvements studied have ranged from conventional surface 
operation to paratransit services as well as changes in fare 
policy. Other projects have included analysis of bus garage 
systems for Washington, D.C. Metro and the rapid transit 
station relocation for the Cleveland Transit Authority. In 
addition to basic transit operation considerations, these 
studies have also pursued joint development potential. 

Transportation Planning — Regional . Has served in various 
roles from principal planner to project manager, on regional, 
multi-modal transportation studies for small and large urban 
areas. Responsibilities have included study design, data 
processing design, data analysis for planning and development, 
testing and evaluation of alternative multi-modal transporta- 
tion systems. Involvement has been with initial area studies 
and updating as part of the continuing planning program. 
Representative studies include Cleveland, OH; Eastern Massa- 
chusetts planning base update, NMAC (Lowell), MA; Ballarat, 
Australia and Lewi ston- Auburn, ME update. In addition, 
Mr. Golenberg has served as a special consultant to the Main 
Roads Departments in the States of Western Australia and New 
South Wales, Australia on urban, multi-modal regional transpor- 
tation planning. 

Transportation Planning — Local . Directly responsible for 
travel demand projections and analysis for specific project 
improvements for EIA and engineering design studies. These 
have included both transit and highway projects. Representa- 
tive projects are Canberra, Australia — oreoaration of 
functional design specifications for five busway rapid transit 
stations; Cleveland, OH -- evaluation of a proposed integrated 
busway- freeway; Eastern Massachusetts — various highway 
projects. 

Transportation Planning -- New Towns . Involvement as principal 
transportation planner in the reassessment of highway and trans- 
it plans for Reston, VA and the development of plan modifications. 
Other new town experience has been in concept plan assessment of 
regional structure and satellite town development for Canberra, 
Australia and as an advisor to state planning agencies for the 
transportation planning aspects of Campbell Town, new town in 
New South Wales, Australia. 

Policy and Financial Planning . Served as assistant project 
manager and principal analyst on the Ohio Statewide Transporta- 
tion Development Plan; plan emphasis was on transportation policy 
and financial planning changes to implement multi-modal urban, 
rural and intercity programs. Acted in the role of technical 
advisor on a study to formulate and assess policies which could 
lead to voluntary programs for reducing transportation energy 



MARVIN GOLENBERG — 3 

consumption. This was conducted for the Northeast Ohio urban 
region. As part of that study, Mr. Golenberg carried out 
research on various road pricing policies and program levels 
to assess the potential impact on energy consumption and 
mobility for the different socioeconomic groups within the 
urban area. Other projects have included the evaluation of 
High Occupancy Vehicle programs from a policy planning per- 
spective for U.S. DOT-OST. 

Transportation Demand Estimation . He has been responsible for 
demand estimation for many of the regional, subarea and local 
projects mentioned. Mr. Golenberg is knowledgeable in all of 
the U.S. DOT-FHWA and UMTA demand estimation techniques, has 
conducted research in this area and has both contributed to 
and developed approaches to long and short range transit demand 
estimation and for estimation of demand for TSM planning. 

Regional and Site Development Impact . Has conducted planning 
and analysis for site development and redevelopment. Typical 
projects have included universities, large industrial sites 
and shopping centers. Regional studies have included assess- 
ment of the number of regional shopping centers, their location 
and size, which had an economic potential within a large urban 
region. 

Transportation Data Base Development . Mr. Golenberg has designed 
and directed various transportation data base development surveys. 
Travel information data base development has included comprehensive 
regional home interview, truck, taxi and cordon surveys, systemwide 
and corridor on-board transit surveys, airport and multi-state air 
and bus corridor passenger surveys and travel surveys related to 
specific sites such as universities. Transportation system infor- 
mation programs have included physical and operating conditions, 
inventories and volume count programs for highway and transit 
systems. 

Applied Software Development and Application . He is conversant 
with transportation planning and analysis software, particularly 
U.S. DOT-FHWA and UTPS. In addition, he has contributed to the 
development of compatible software for transportation data base 
preparation and transportation planning analysis and has designed 
data processing work programs for carrying out transportation 
planning studies. 

Instruction . In his role as advisor to government planning agen- 
cies, he has conducted staff courses in transportation planning 
and evaluation. 

Affiliations: Institute of Transportation Engineers 



MARVIN GOLENBERG — PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS 



"Systematic Procedure for the Analysis of Bus Garage Locations," 
Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting , January 1980. 

"Security Considerations in Rapid Transit Station Design," Transportation 
Research Board Annual Meeting , January, 1980, co-authored with Stephen 
Andrle and Barry Barker. 

"A Demand Estimating Model for Transit Route and System Planning in 
Small Urban Areas," Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting . 
January 1979, co-authored with Stephen Pemaw. 

"A Growth Factor Estimation Procedure for Corridor and System Planning," 
Transportation Research Board Conference on Transportation Planning for 
Small and Medium Size Urban Areas , Sarasota, Florida, December 1978. 

"Factors Affecting the Number of Trips for Private and Public Transport," 
10th International Study Week in Traffic and Safety Engineering , Rotterdam, 
Netherlands, i>eptember /, ly/U, co-authored with Alan Voorhees and Gordon 
Shunk. 

"The Effect of Land Use Planning and Transport Pricing Policies in Rapid 
Transit Planning," Highway Research Record No. 305 , 1970, co-authored with 
Robert Keith. 

"An Analysis of CBD Rapid Transit Station Service Areas," presented at the 
Systems Evaluation Committee of the Highway Research Board , January 1969. 

"Transit Planning Concepts in the Seven County Study," Proceedings of the 

Modal Chnicp and Tr3n<;it Planning Tonfprp nrp, ripvplflnd, nhin, March 1966. 




SG ASSOCIATES, INC. 



JANE ALGMIN HOWARD 
ASSOCIATE 



Education; 



Cornell University, Bachelor of Arts 

Stanford University, Graduate Studies 

University of Rhode Island, Masters of Community Planning 



Previous 
Positions; 



Boston Redevelopment Authority: 1974-1980, Transportation 
Planning Officer 

Roy Mann Associates: 1973-1974, Environmental Planner 

Charles E. Downe, Planning Consultant: 1973, Assistant Planner 

Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission: 1972, Planning 
Intern 

U.S. Department of Health, Education & Welfare: 1967, Public 
Affairs Summer Intern 



Experience: Malls/Auto Restricted Zones . As part of a team within the 

City of Boston, wrote funding applications for Boston's $4.5 
million downtown Auto Restricted Zone (ARZ) demonstration 
project, conducted traffic and environmental analyses, par- 
ticipated in detailed planning, implementation and evaluation 
of the project. Responsible for supervising data collection 
and analysis of curbside use and goods movement as part of 
planning for Howard Street Transit Mall project in Baltimore, 
Md. 

Project and Program Evaluation . Was responsible for super- 
vising data collection activities during the three-year 
evaluation of Boston's ARZ, including questionnaire design 
and implementation, sampling, traffic, goods movement and 
pedestrian counts and analysis, parking surveys and counts, 
personal interviews of merchants and pedestrains. Supervised 
a crew of thirty temporary personnel in collecting data. 
Associate investigator for NCHRP Study of simplified TSM 
evaluation techniques. 

Parking Policy and Demand Analysis . Participated in the 
development and implementation of procedures for Boston's 



JANE ALGMIN HOWARD — 2 



downtown parking freeze as part of its EPA mandated Trans- 
portation Control Plan. Conducted parking demand and reve- 
nue analyses for various downtown development projects. 
Supervised several rounds of updating of a computerized off- 
street parking inventory within downtown Boston. Participated 
in development management and rate structure techniques to 
carry out Boston's parking policy. Assisted in developing 
residential sticker programs for several Boston neighborhoods. 
Project Manager for parking studies for South End Technology 
Wquare development project and University Hospital expansion 
in Boston. 

Downtown Planning and Development . Responsible for editing 
and writing a downtown plan for Boston. Participated in a 
multi-disciplinary team to develop downtown development policy 
guidelines. Involved in resolving transportation issues re- 
lated to urban renewal and private development projects in 
downtown Boston. Researched and prepared report on instituting 
a privately operated shopper shuttle bus in downtown Boston 
currently in operation. Assisted in parking element of a 
business district study in Concord, Mass. 

Neighborhood Transportation Planning . Carried out transporta- 
tion projects in Boston neighborhoods and urban renewal areas, 
such as preparing a temporary circulation plan during express- 
way construction to lessen impacts on local streets, improving 
parking and circulation in neighborhood business districts, 
planning urban systems street improvements project. 

Environmental Planning . Prepared the transportation element of 
the Supplementary Environmental Impact Statement for the Inter- 
national Center, Washington, D.C. Prepared transportation and 
parking sections of environmental impact statements for Boston's 
ARZ, Lafayette Place, and other downtown projects. Coordinated 
and edited the Shoreline Appearance and Design element of the 
Long Island Sound Study, New England and River Basins Commission, 
Which won a Progressive Architecture award in regional planning. 
Prepared testimony on various airport noise reduction proposals 
at Boston's Logan Airport. Prepared an inventory of open space 
in the City of Boston and supervised preparation of a citywide 
parks and recreation plan. 

Community Participation . Experienced in meeting with neighbor- 
hood groups in Boston. Participated in meetings with the down- 
town merchants association regarding Boston's ARZ, and the 
Howard Street Transit Mall project in Baltimore. Prepared a 
report on downtown merchant associations for the Boston Rede- 
velopment Authority, Conducted detailed personal merchant in- 
terviews regarding attitudes on the ARZ. Worked as staff to 



JANE ALGMIN HOWARD 



the Mayor of Boston's citizen task forces on developing a 
long range growth policy for the city and on developing a 
contingency plan in the event of a transit strike or shut- 
down. 

Instruction . Has conducted courses and lectured at the 
Boston Architectural Center, Harvard University Graduate 
School of Design and the University of Rhode Island. 



Affiliations: American Planning Association 
Transportation Research Board 
Women's Transportation Seminar 



JANE ALGMIN HOWARD — PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS 



"Implementing a Parking Freeze in Downtown Boston," presented at the annual 
meeting of the Institute of Traffic Engineers, 1976. 

"Boston's Downtown Crossing: Its Effects on Downtown Retailing," Transit 
Journal , American Public Transit Association, Spring, 1980. 

"Goods Movement in Downtown Crossing," 74th annual National Planning Con- 
ference, American Planning Association, May, 1982. 



DETAILED PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS 



Washington, D.C. - Transportation and Traffic Impact Studies 

Van Ness Station Joint Development 

Primary Client: Prudential Properties 

Prudential Properties, after a design competition, was selected to 
develop a building on air-rights over the Van Ness Metrorail Station. The 
site was to include not only office and retail use together with parking 
facilities but also a seven bay bus-rail transfer facility and a kiss-ride 
area. The site is in upper northwest Washington, D.C. immediately adjacent 
to the University of the District of Columbia and across Connecticut Avenue 
from the International Center being developed for foreign missions. 

SG Associates, Inc. was responsible for identifying site parking require- 
ments given the unique location of the building on top of a rail transit 
station; identifying peak-hour traffic impacts; developing an integrated 
circulation plan for buses, kiss-ride and site traffic and for recommending 
access/egress patterns compatible with the requirements of the District of 
Columbia Department of Transportation, the University of the District of 
Columbia and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. Testimony 
before the D.C. Zoning Commission was also presented. 



Client Reference: J. Richard Quigley 

The Prudential Insurance Company of America 
(202) 789-1551 







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METRO ENTRANCE 

LEVEL OF SERVICE (TRAFFIC) 

BUS SERVICE 
5fC VAN NESS UDC METRO SITE BUILDING 
— UNRESTRICTED PARKING 
-• — • RESTRICTED PARKING 1:30-4:00 

PARKING METERS 1:30 4:00 

PERMIT PARKING (2 HOUR 

PUBLIC PARKING STRUCTURE 

PRIVATE PARKING STRUCTURE 

I 1 PRIVATE PARKING LOT 



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Boston, Massachusetts - Downtown Crossing Plan Development and Options for 

Expansion 

Primary Clients: City of Boston - Department of Traffic and Parking 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 

: Downtown Boston as it entered the last third of the twentieth century 
was still faced with a street plan left over from the seventeenth century. 
As a result traffic circulation was poor and congestion was frequent. The 
success of the Quincy Market project adjacent to the Boston City Hall led 
the City to consider a similar treatment for the retail core area centered 
on Summer and Washington Streets. Establishing the shopping core as a pedes- 
trian area would stimulate foot traffic past the retail establishments and 
might enable the City to rationalize the street system. 

The initial planning of the Downtown Crossing Auto Restricted Zone was 
conducted under an UMTA Demonstration Grant. Staff of SG Associates con- 
ducted the basic traffic studies required to establish the limits of the auto 
restricted area, the alternative traffic routings, the treatment of goods 
deliveries and the public information program. 

The plan, which was implemented in 1978, created a series of pedestrian 
malls, public transportation only streets, exclusive with- flow and counter- 
flow bus lanes and improved goods movement activity. Successful implementa- 
tion of the initial Downtown Crossing plan prompted merchants and City of 
Boston agencies to consider extending auto restriction principles. SG 
Associates investigated the possibilities and opportunities to extend the 
Downtown Crossing area both to the north and south along the primary axis of 
the present area. Recommendations were developed for pedestrianization on 
several streets, narrowing of other streets to increase sidewalk space and 
minor modification to the existing circulation and traffic control system 
to accommodate traffic displaced by extension of the Downtown Crossing area. 

In a second follow-up contract, SG Associates was retained by the Boston 
Redevelopment Authority to examine design options for facilitating bus move- 
ments at the fringes of Downtown Crossing. In this study extensive analysis 
of traffic patterns of bus patterns was undertaken to determine the effects 
of various schemes for street redesign and circulation changes. The SG 
analysis and data are currently being used to prepare final design plans. 



Client References: Mr. Robert Drummond 

City of Boston Traffic/Parking Department 
(617) 725-4689 

Mr. Matthew Coogan 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 

(617) 722-4300 



Boston, Massachusetts - South End Technology Square Transportation Studies 
Primary Client - Robert F. Walsh Associates 

For a development proposed in a medical/industrial area adjacent to a major 
expressway in Boston 's South End, SG Associates was retained to conduct 
several studies related to site access and parking. The first was a parking 
demand and garage feasibility analysis for a group of employers including a 
city hospital, a university related medical center, and two private employers, 
taking into account existing parking supply and demand, future demand gener- 
ated by increased employment from the existing uses and from proposed new 
office and hotel developments on site, and various scenarios of parking supply, 
In a related study, SG performed an analysis of the impacts on parking supply 
and demand of a proposed hospital building to be constructed on the site of a 
240 space parking lot in this neighborhood. 



Client Reference: Robert F. Walsh 

Robert F. Walsh Associates 
60 State Street 
Boston, MA 02109 
(617) 227-3530 



Boston, Massachusetts - University Hospital Parking Study 
Primary Client - University Hospital, Inc. 



University Hospital , 
on the site of an exi 
assessment process re 
mental Affairs and th 
was required to prepa 
impacts of removing t 
and visitor parking d 
Associates was retain 
and demand, projected 
future parking shortf 
^ incl udi ng carpool i ng, 
metered on-street vis 



in Boston's South 
sting 240 car park 
qui red by the Mass 
e City of Boston ' s 
re a detailed park 
he 240 car lot, an 
emand on the remai 
ed to perform this 

the demand genera 
al 1 , and suggested 

transit pass subs 
itor parking on st 



End, proposed to build a new facility 
ing lot. As part of the environmental 
dchusetts Executive Office of Environ- 

zoning review process, the hospital 
ing study illustrating both the 
d the impacts of increased employee 
ning facilities in the area. SG 

study, which outlined current supply 
ted by the development, identified a 

measures for alleviating the shortfal 
idies, feeder buses to transit, and 
reets within the hospital area. 



CI ient Reference: 



Ms . Mi riam Pol 1 ack 
University Hospital, Inc 
Boston, MA 



(617) 247-5400 



Baltimore, Md. - Howard Street Transit Mall 

Primary Client - Interstate Division for Baltimore City 

Howard Street has been the traditional retail core "main street" in 
Baltimore. It is also a major transit artery. In the past decade retail 
sales have declined as two major department stores closed their Howard Street 
locations and the area suffered general deterioration. In an effort to 
stimulate redevelopment of the area, the City of Baltimore established the 
Market Center Development Corporation and has undertaken capital investment 
projects designed to attract new facilities. One aspect of the City's pro- 
gram is the implementation of a transit mall. 

The mall would not only facilitate transit service on Howard Street but, 
by reducing the amount of road space devoted to auto traffic, would permit 
the creation of pedestrian amenities designed to attract the large daytime 
population within the downtown, 

SG Associates was engaged by the Interstate Division of Baltimore City 
to conduct the traffic and transit studies required for design of the mall. 
The project involved the collection of data on existing traffic flows, exist- 
ing transit use, use of curb space by goods delivery vehicles, pedestrian 
activity and parking demand. Estimates were then prepared of future traffic 
and transit demand, given planned and programmed transportation improvements 
and new development in the CBD. With these data an analysis was done of the 
effects of closure of various portions of the street to auto traffic. An 
initial traffic plan was developed which served to guide the preparation of 
street reconstruction and urban design elements. 

In addition, recommendations for bus service levels to accommodate 
future demand were prepared and a detailed analysis of passenger destinations 
within the CBD by route was conducted to determine whether parallel routes 
could be rerouted to Howard Street. SG also analyzed the effects of various 
operating patterns and bus stop arrangements in terms of travel time, oper- 
ating costs, and bus stop design. 

As of the end of 1982, the basic circulation scheme has been adopted 
and final design is underway in preparation for a Spring, 1983 construction 
start. 



Client Reference: David Chapin 

Interstate Division for Baltimore City 
(301) 396-6130 



.Lewiston, Maine - CBD Circulation Plan and Mall Design 
Primary Client: Lewiston-Auburn Comprehensive Transportation Study 

SG Associates developed a Transportation Systems Management plan for the 
Lewiston, Maine CBD in response to a variety of deficiencies and needs within 
the downtown area of this city of 35,000 people. Due to the topographic 
barriers, a large proportion of urban area traffic was funnelled through the 
CBD resulting in traffic congestion at a number of major intersections, 
CO hot spot violations identified by EPA along the major arterial, and delays 
to bus operations on several streets. In addition to the traffic related 
problems, economic decline of commercial activity within the CBD had occurred 
over the past several years. 

After an analysis of existing traffic and projected traffic growth, 
an overall traffic circulation plan coordinated with a UDAG funded urban 
design/economic development plan was developed by SG Associates to address 
these needs. The plan consisted of a revised traffic circulation plan, 
creation of a partial pedestrian mall in conjunction with the proposed urban 
design improvements, signal system upgrading, geometric improvements to three 
major arterial s, and special pavement treatments to improve traffic flow, 
bus operations and pedestrian safety. The basis of the circulation plan was 
to direct traffic flow by a combination of priority street routing achieved 
by use of low cost geometric and traffic signal system improvements. All 
elements of the plan have been implemented by the Maine Department of 
Transportation. Under a separate contract, this plan has been fully described 
as a case study on plan development and implementation prepared for the 
Federal Highway Administration. 



Client Reference: Mr. William Eaton 

LACTS (Lewiston-Auburn Comprehensive Transportation 

Study) 

(207) 784-3852 



Cleveland, Ohio - East 120th Street Rapid Transit Station Relocation 

Study 

Primary Client: Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority 

The East 120th Street Station on the GCRTA's heavy rail rapid transit 
line is a low volume station located in an area with poor access and deteri- 
orated land use adjacent to the station. SG Associates conducted a feasi- 
bility study to determine if physical improvements could be made to the 
existing station facility, access improved and the adjacent area redeveloped 
to increase ridership such that station operations can be maintained. As an 
alternative to improvements at the present location, options for relocating 
the station to other sites along the existing right-of-way which provide 
better access opportunities and adjacent area redevelopment were explored. 
Issues addressed in the study included joint development potential, feasi- 
bility of restructuring surface bus routes to improve feeder access, modi- 
fication of existing street system for improved structure access and bus 
operations, and physical design aspects to improve passenger safety and 
security in and around the station. Also examined were related issues of 
traffic circulation improvements for each option to minimize impacts on 
existing neighborhoods. 



Client Reference: Mr. Richard Enty 

Greater Cleveland Regional Transportation 
Authority 
(216) 781-3100 



Baltimore, Maryland - Downtown Transportation Study 
Primary Client - Baltimore City Department of Planning 

The Baltimore Central Business District has experienced continued growth 
over the past decade. Further expansion, typified by the proposed three phase 
Murdock project and the Market Center redevelopment is now underway. Although 
transportation access is now adequate there is concern that highway congestion 
or lack of adequate parking could constrain future downtown growth. 

The aim of this study, being conducted for the City by SG Associates is 
to determine the capacity of the transportation system to serve added develop- 
ment, to determine future travel demands to and from the downtown area, to 
assess parking requirements and to propose strategies that the City can adopt 
to spur additional economic growth. 



Washington, D.C. - International Center Transportation Analysis (Part of 

an Environmental Impact Statement) 

Primary Client: U.S. Department of State 



As part of a supplementary Environmental Impact Statement, this project 
involved assessing travel associated with the Intelsat Headquarters and the 
International Center Chancery Complex at Van Ness Street and Connecticut 
Avenue. For this work special data were acquired and studies conducted of 
the traffic generation patterns and parking needs of chanceries and related 
offices of foreign missions. Detailed analyses of impacts on surrounding 
streets were conducted and recommendations made on measures on mitigating 
adverse impacts. Coordination with DOS, National Capital Planning Commission 
and DCDOT was part of these studies. 



STRUCTURAL ENGINEER : Brown Rona, Inc. 

711 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 
(Tel. 536-9800) 



Brown, Bona Inc. Consulting Engineers .^k , „ 

Anhur L. Brown, Jr. 

71 1 Boylston Street '^^°'^^^ ^ "°"^ 

Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Kan a Anderson 

(617) 536-9800 



BACKGROUND INFORMATION 

BROWN, RONA INC. is a consulting engineering firm 
founded in 1976 that specializes in the structural design 
of new buildings and in the evaluation of the performance 
of building materials and structural systems in existing 
buildings . 

As structural engineers, we work with Architects, 
Public Agencies, Private Owners and Developers from the 
inception of a project by developing and evaluating 
alternate structural systems and by preparing detailed 
preliminary drawings and outline specifications. 

After the technical and financial feasibility of the 
project is firmly established, we prepare detailed structural 
working drawings and specifications in close coordination 
with the other members of the project team. 

On many of our projects, construction starts well 
in advance of the completion of the final construction 
documents. On these fast track projects we work closely 
with the Construction Manager and specialized Sub Contractors 
to insure that construction schedules and budgets are achieved. 

During the construction phase, we evaluate alternate 
proposals and details to resolve field or purchasing problems, 
review the structural shop drawings, and inspect the work as 
necessary to assure chat the intent of the structural design 
is being executed properly in the field. 

Our interest in evaluating the capacity, performance 
and future prospects of existing structural systems and 
building materials has involved us in the investigation 
and repair of numerous roofing membranes, structural floor, 
roof and wall systems, and foundations, as well as a number 
of renovations, remodelling and additions to existing buildings 



Specialties 

BROWN, RONA INC, has been the Structural Engineer 
on a wide variety of parking garages, large residential, 
commercial and institutional building projects including 
educational buildings, medical facilities, libraries, 
banks, office buildings, high, mid and low-rise apartment 
structures and industrial buildings. Depending on a com- 
parative cost, availability and construction schedule, we 
have successfully designed these structures using wood, 
light gage metal, structural steel, cast-in-place and 
precast concrete and load bearing masonry. A iiumber of 
our projects in urban areas have been on difficult sites 
requiring special foundation techniques such as engineered 
fill, floating foundations and a variety of piling. 

In all of our design projects we work closely with 
the Architect to ensure the proper selection, specification 
and detailing of the roofing and exterior wall systems, as 
well as preparing the usual structural plans, details and 
specifications. We have many years of practical experience 
gained through investigation of failures and in developing 
repair schemes for these critical elements*, the result of 
which is applied to our new building projects. 

We have extensive experience in large scale restoration, 
remodelling and adaptive reuse of existing buildings. Before 
proceeding with plans and specifications for these projects 
we first evaluate the present condition and capacity of the 
existing structure to assist in determining the feasibility 
of the proposed work. 



Operations 

The Principals and Associates of BROWN, RONA INC. 
collaborate on the conceptual design of all major projects 
to develop and evaluate the full range of useful structural 
solutions. Thereafter, one of the partners becomes the 
principal engineer on the project and works closely with 
the Architect and other members of the building team 
through the design development, working drawings and 
construction supervision phases of the project. In 
this way, we maintain the close control, continuity and 
perfect coordination between the architectural and structural 
design which is essential to a successful building project. 

We utilize our own in-house computer with the latest 
software to rigorously analyse our structures for all 
expected loading conditions and to optimize the design 
of individual members. 



The Principals 

Arthur L. Brown, Jr., for six years prior to the 
formation of BROWN, RONA INC. was President of the 
Consulting Engineering firm of Weidemann, Brown, Inc. 
Before founding his own firm, he was Associate in a 
Cambridge consulting firm for eight years where he was 
the principal structural design engineer on numerous 
building projects. Prior to that he was Chief Engineer 
for Wood Fabricators, Inc., worked in the field for the 
John A. Volpe Construction Company, and served as a 
Civil Engineer in the U. S. Navy. His educational back- 
ground includes post graduate courses at MIT in Engineering 
and Material Science in 1966, an SM in Building Engineering 
from MIT in 1957 and a BSCE from Tufts University in 1953. 



Thomas Rona, prior to the formation of BROWN, RONA 
INC. was the principal of Thomas Rona Associates, Inc., 
a firm he founded in 1967. His experience as an engineer 
in the United States started in 1956 when he emigrated from 
Hungary and joined a consulting engineering firm in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. Later, he became Chief Engineer for 
one of the leading consulting engineering firms in Boston 
where he was responsible for the structural design of 
numerous institutional, educational, residential, commercial 
buildings and large parking garages. He completed his Civil 
Engineering Degree, majoring in structures, at the Technical 
Unviersity at Budapest, Hungary in 1950. From 1950 to 1956, 
while working in Hungary, he was in charge of the design of 
several large precast and cast-in-place concrete industrial 
buildings . 

The Staff 

The technical staff of graduate engineers who serve 
as project engineers all have specialized academic train- 
ing in structural engineering as well as practical office 
design and field experience. 

These project engineers are assisted in the detailed 
preparation of structural working drawings and in the 
checking of shop drawings by our staff of drafters, several 
of whom have over 20 years experience. 



Clients 

The clients of BROWN, RONA INC. includes Architects, 
Developers, Building Owners, Public Agencies and Private 
Institutions. While the majority of our work is from 
referrals and continuing work from past clients we often 
submit proposals to new clients on specific projects. We 
maintain current background information on our staff and 
experience including the widely used U. S. Government Form 
254. 



Architect Clients 

The overall high quality of our Architectural clients 
and the Award Winning work many of them have produced is 
a good indication of the highly imaginative and competent 
structural engineering designs for which this firm is known. 
BROWN, RONA INC. has well established working relationships 
with a number of the major Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts 
architectural firms as well as selected firms out of state. 
However, we are not contractually committed to any firm on 
a continuing basis and are interested in participating with 
other Architects as a member of the design team for specific 
projects. Our current major architectural clients include: 

Childs Bertman Tseckares & Casendino Inc. 
306 Dartmouth Street 
Boston, Ma 

Cambridge Seven Associates 
1050 Massachusetts Avenue 
Cambridge, Ma 

The Architects Collaborative 
46 Brattle St. 
Cambridge, Ma 

Perry Dean Stahl & Rogers Inc. 
177 Milk Street 
Boston, Ma 

Anderson Notter Finegold Associates 
77 North Washington Street 
Boston, Ma 

Vitols Associates 

1230 Statler Office Building 

Boston, Ma 

John Sharratt Associates 
121 Mt. Vernon St. 
Boston, Ma 



Shepley Bulfinch Richardson & Abbott 

One Court Square 

Boston 

Eisenberg Haven Associates Inc. 
29 Temple Place 
Boston, Ma 

Amsler Hagenah MacLean Architects 

65 Long Wharf 
Boston 

Paul Carroll & Associates 
83 Newbury Street 
Boston, Ma 

Stull Associates 
100 Boylston Street 
Boston, Ma 

Glaser/deCastro Associates Inc. 
75 Knee land Avenue 
Boston, Ma 

Kubitz & Pepi Architects Inc. 

66 Central Street 
We lies ley, Ma 

Architectural Resources Cambridge Inc, 
102 Mt. Auburn Street 
Cambridge, Ma 

Angelos Demetriou & Associates 

1523 New Hampshire Avenue, Northwest 

Washington D.C. 20036 

The Preservation Partnership 
354 Union Street 
New Bedford, Ma 

Benjamin Thompson Associates Inc. 
One Story Street 
Cambridge , Ma 

Jung Brannen Associates Inc. 
177 Milk Street 
Boston, Ma 

Halasz & Halasz Inc. 
116 Newbury Street 
Boston, Ma 



Public Agencies and Private Owners 



BROWN, RONA INC. has been retained as Consulting 
Engineer by a number of municipalities and government 
agencies, and private owners where our special expertise 
in roofing and waterproofing and in the evaluation of 
the condition and structural capacity of existing buildings 
is required. In cases where master planning, architecture 
or mechanical expertise is required, we associate with one 
of the leading firms in the appropriate discipline. While 
our clientele in this area is extensive we are always in- 
terested in serving new clients. Some of our recent clients 
include the following. 



Private Owners 

Markem Corporation 

Building 42 Associates 

Boston Urban Associates 

Sonesta Hotels International 

Hamilton Realty Company 

Knapp Shoe Company 

Turner Fisheries 

Carabetta Enterprises 

Compugraphic Corporation 

Westco Corporation 

Anderson Power Products 

Electroswitch Corporation 

Williams College 

New Hampshire Ball Bearing 

Tufts University 

Riverfront Office Park Associates 

Spaulding & Slye 

Bartlett Development Associates 

Society for the Preservation of 

New England Antiquities 
General Foods 
The Green Company 
Harvard University 
Richard Dobroth & Associates 



Keene, N. H. 
Charlestown, Ma 
Boston, Ma 
Boston, Ma 
Allston, Ma 
Brockton, Ma 
Boston, Ma 
Meriden, Conn 
Wilmington, Ma 
Boston, Ma 
Boston, Ha 
Weymouth, Ma 
Williamstown, Ma 
Peterborough, N.H. 
Medford, Ma 
Boston, Ma 
Burlington, Ma 
Boston, Ma 

Boston, Ma 
Minneapolis, Minn 
Falmouth, Ma 
Cambridge, Ma 
Concord, Ma 



Contractors 

George B. H. Macomber Co. Inc. Boston, Ma 

Carabetta Enterprises Meriden, Conn 

Sydney Construction Company Newton, Ma 

Wexler Construction Company Newton, Ma 

Perini Corporation Framingham, Ma 

Municipalities and Public Agencies 

City of Boston Public Facilities Department 

Town of Natick Massachusetts School Department 

Town of Holbrook Massachusetts School Department 

Town of Bellingham, Massachusetts 

City of Burlington, Vermont 

Town of Wellesley Massachusetts School Department 

City of Cambridge Massachusetts Public Works Department 

Town of Stowe, Vermont 

General Services Administration, U.S. Government 

City of St. Albans, Vermont 

Town of Watertown, Massachusetts 

East Ramapo Central School District Spring Valley New York 

Orange East Supervisory School District Bradford, Vermont 

Orange West Supervisory Shool Union Randolph, Vermont 

State of Vermont, Division for Historic Preservation 



RECENT STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING ASSIGNMENTS 

The consulting assignments of BROWN, RONA INC. have 
varied in size from a few hours of consulting on specific 
building problems to the structural design of multi-million 
dollar building projects. The size and variety of some of 
our representative recent structural engineering assignments 
is an indication of the quality and capacity of the firm to 
undertake major consulting assignments. 



Parking Facilities 

Framed parking facilities are a specialty of BROWN, 
RONA INC. Successful parking garages require a high order 
or structural engineering skill and imagination combined 
with a keen understanding of costs, erection time, long 
term maintenance and aesthetics. The following garages 
designed by BROWN, RONA INC. demonstrate our ability to 
blend these often conflicting requirements at a particular 
site using a variety of framing and deck systems. 



MBTA - Quincy Adams Parking Garage, Quincy , Massachusetts 

This parking facility for the MBTA South Quincy 
Station has capacity for 1900 cars. This all 
precast y prestressed concrete structure is scheduled 
for completion if 1982 at a cost in excess of $20 
million. The garage which includes a rapid transit 
and bus station incorporates all the most modern 
design features of any parking facility in the 
New England area. 

Architect: H. W. Moore Associates and 

Glaser/deCastro/Vitols Partnership 

Builder: Blount Bros. Construction Co. 



Mainbrook Parking Facility, Brockton, Massachusetts 

This 5 level continuous ramp garage for 550 cars 
is framed with precast concrete columns, girders^ 
double tees and architectural spandrels . Construction 
underway in 1982. 

■ Architect: Vitols Associates 

Builder: J. J. Welch Construction Co. 



Medical Area Servicenter and Parking Facility, Boston, Ma. 

This 600 car parking structure formed with precast 
concrete , is constructed over a two story warehouse 
and receiving area for the Affiliated Hospital Center. 
Construction completed in 1980 at a cost of $6.5 
mil lion. 

Architect: Benjamin Thompson Associates Inc. 

Builder: George B. H. Macomber Co. Inc. 



Boston Navy Yard Parking Garage, Boston, Massachusetts 

This 225 car parking garage features steel framing 
and a precast concrete plank deck system constructed 
within the existing masonry walls of a former shipyard 
machine shop. Construction completed in 1980. 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold Inc. 

Builder Sydney Construction Co. 



Maiden, Central Business District Parking Facility, Maiden, Ma 

This multi-story parking garage located on a congested 
urban site includes parking for 650 cars. It was 
de signed with post tensioned concrete slabs supported 
by composite structural steel members . The design in- 
cludes cast in place concrete high speed egress spiral 
ramp and circular stair towers. 

Architect: Vitols Associates Inc. 

Builder: J. F. White Contracting Co. 



Mission Park Garage, Boston, Massachusetts 

A 1300 oar underground garage consisting of three 
parking levels framed with precast-prestressed 
concrete supporting at the ground level S-story 
townhouses, a swimming poolj a park and a roadway 
system. Construction completed in 1976 at a cost 
of $7 million. 

Architect: John Sharratt Associates 

Builder: George B. H. Macomber Co. Inc. 



Institutional Buildings 

BROWN, RONA INC. has been structural engineers on 
a wide variety of public and private educational and 
library buildings, hospitals and churches. In all these 
projects we prepare detailed structural drawings and 
specifications and coordinate our work closely with the 
Architect and other Engineers to permit competitive 
bidding of this project and to eliminate change orders 
affecting the bid price. Some of our current and recent 
projects include: 



Boston College Library, Newton, Massachusetts 

The new central library for this expanding College 
ooaupies a prominent site on the campus and is 
framed with cast in place concrete and clad in 
granite panels. Construction is underway and 
scheduled for completion in 1983 with a budget 
of $17 million. 

Architect: The Architects Collaborative 

Builder: Richard White & Sons 



Student Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt . 

The proposed $2.7 million cafeteria and lecture 
hall unites several historic and prominent buildings 
on the campus into a unified student center. The 
preliminary designs ^ completed in 1982, are a com- 
bination of long span steel framing for roofs and 
cast in place concrete for floor systems . 

Architect: Shepley Bulfinch Richardson & Abbott 

Owner: University of Vermont 



Olin Library, Wesleyan University, Middleto\7n, Connecticut 

This $9 million addition to the central University 
Library will be framed with concrete and phased to 
permit the uninterrupted use of the existing facilities . 
Final designs are underway in 1982. 

Architect: Perry Dean Stahl & Rogers 

Construction Manager: E & F Construction Co. 



Hanscom Library, Bedford, Massachusetts 

This two story eduaational center and library 

at Hanscom A.F.B. has a steel framed structure 

that incorporates several of the latest state 

of the art passive solar systems. It is scheduled 

for construction in 1983 with a budget of $1.7 

mi llion. 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold 

Construction Manager: U. S. Army Corps of Engineers 



Art Department Building, Phillips Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire 

This $3.5 million program in 1982 for the consolidation 
of the Art Department involved the construction of a new 
gallery with a plaza above and between existing buildings 
and the construction of a new sculpture studio. While 
the exterior matched the ornate brick and granite facade 
of the existing buildings , the new floors, plaza and roof 
were framed with economical structural steel columns and 
beams and cast in place concrete slabs. 

Architect: Amsler Hagenah MacLean 

Builder: Davison Construction Co. 



Systems Building Interim Housing, Walter E. Fernald School 
Waltham, Massachusetts 

This multi-use project consisting of 5 buildings 
ranging in size from 12,000 to 20,000 sf is being 
built in phases starting in 1980 to meet the changing 
needs of this Institution for the Mentally Retarded 
in the Commonwealth. To ensure the greatest flex- 
ibility of use, these one story structures using 
maximum clear spans were framed with modular bays 
of steel columns , beams and steel joists. 

Architect: Childs Bertman Tseakares & Casendino Inc. 

Contractor: James J. Welch & Co. Inc. 



Physical Education Building, University of Massachusetts 
Boston, Massachusetts 

A $9 million project involving a swimming pool, 
gymnasium, hookey rink and administrative area 
on a difficult site over previous landfill on 
Boston Harbor. The project is framed with long 
span steel trusses supported on precast concrete 
columns . Construction completed in 1980. 

Architect: Anderson Natter Finegold Inc. 

Contractor: A. Antonellis Construction Co. 



Fitchburg State College, New Student Housing 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

The construction phase for this $2 million complex 
of townhouse style student apartments was completed 
in 1978. Light gage metal studs and joists were 
selected as framing materials , allowing maximum 
panelization for rapid erection as well as optimum 
economy . 

Architect: Glaser /deCastro /Vitols Associates . 

Contractor: Sydney Construction Co. 



Barnum Hall, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 

The front wall and portions which survived a fire 
were incorporated into a modern 3 story science 
building which included major lecture halls and 
biology laboratory . Completed in 1979 at a cost 
of $1.8 mil lion. 

Architect: Kubitz S Pepi Architects 

Construction Manager: Turner Construction Company 



Lowell Heritage Park Boathouse, Lowell, Massachusetts 

This wood framed boathouse being planned by the 
Metropolitan District Commission has facilities 
for 20 racing shells and 20 sail boats plus 
ancillary training and office facilities . 
Construction planned for 1983 with a budget 
of $1 million. 

Architect: Add Inc. 



Fletcher Library, Burlington, Vermont 

This project includes the structural stabilization 
of the foundation and complete restoration of the 
historic Carnegie Building and the addition of a 
new 2 story steel framed modern library and stack 
area. Phase I of the project was completed in 1978 
and Phase II was completed in 1980 at a cost of $2.2 
mill ion. 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold Inc. 

Contractor: Wright & Morrissey Inc. and 

Reed & Stone Inc. 



St. Anthony's Church, East Cambridge, Massachusetts 

This complex for the Portugese community includes 
a new Church and Parish Center, both framed with 
large exposed wooden gluelam beams and arches and 
an attached Parish House. The construction is 
proceeding in stages and is scheduled for completion 
in 1983. 

Architect: Glaser /deCastro Associates 

Builder: Perini Construction Company 



Watertown High School, Watertown, Massachusetts 

This $6.9 million project included the addition 
of a large gymnasium and music and science class- 
room wing and an automotive repair shop and gutting 
a section of the existing building to accomodate 
a new library. Construction completed in 1981. 

Architect: Architectural Resources Cambridge Inc. 

Contractor: Wexler Construction Company 



Scott Student Center, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Ct. 

This $2 million conversion of the existing Physics 
Building into a Student Center is scheduled for 
construction in 1983. 

Architect: Perry Dean Stahl & Rogers Inc. 

Contractor: E & F Construction Company 



Webster Junior/Senior High School, Webster, Massachusetts 

This multi-story school project with a $9 million 
budget includes an auditorium and gymnasium in 
addition to standard classrooms . A composite 
steel frame supporting composite concrete slabs 
was selected as the most efficient structural 
system. The school has been in operation since 
1980. 

Architect: Drummey Rosane Anderson Inc. 

Contractor: Perini Corporation 



Office and Industrial Buildings 

BROWN, RONA INC. has worked on a number of fast 
track commercial building projects where tight budget 
control during design and construction are combined with 
fixed completion dates to permit early occupancy. On 
many of these projects the start of foundations and 
firm contracts for structural steel on precast concrete 
are based on our structural drawings prepared in advance 
of the finished project architectural and mechanical 
drawings. Our recent projects have included: 



Riverfront Office Park, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

This 450,000 sf structure on a prominent Cambridge 
site has a commercial level, Z parking decks and 14 
office floors and is clad in traditional brick with 
an accent slot of reflective glass. This building 
on a tight urban site adjacent to Broad Canal is 
founded on deep piles and is framed with a braced 
steel structure and composite concrete floors. 
Construction expected to be complete in 1982. 

Architect: Cambridge Seven Associates 

Builder: George B. H. Macomber Co. Inc. 



Waverly Oaks Office Building, Waltham, Massachusetts 

This 4-story, 180,000 sf office building con- 
structed in 1982 is framed with an economical 
moment resisting structural steel frame and 
steel joists for floors and roof structure . 

Architect: Paul Carroll & Associates 

Builders: Emerson Construction Co. 



Electroswitch, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

This two story factory addition built on a 
fast track schedule was completed in 1980. 

Architect: Cambridge Seven Associates 

Builder: Clark & Smith Company 



Data General, Milford, Massachusetts 

This "turnkey " project has a three-story office 
building of 40,000 sf integrated with 90,000 sf 
warehouse . It was framed in 1982 with a very 
economical system of metal deck, steel joists 
and joist girders . 

Architect: Childs Bertman Tseckares & Casendino 

Builder: Wexler Construction Co. 



399 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

This IS-story office structure with 225,000 sf on 
a prime site in Boston is being designed in 1982 
with moment resisting composite and steel frame, 
composite concrete floors and is founded on a deep 
pile system. To minimize the impact of adjacent 
buildings in this historic district the facade is 
deliberately articulated with brick, stone and 
reflective glass. The upper stories are set back 
and sheathed with reflective glass. 

Architect: Childs Bertman Tseckares & Casendino 

Contractor: George B. H. Macomber Co. Inc. 



Digital Equipment, Spitbrook Engineering Facility 
Nashua, New Hampshire 

This $8.5 million R&D engineering facility was 
constructed on a difficult site utilizing fast 
track scheduling techniques to permit early occupancy . 
Structural steel and foundation design were completed 
in advance of architectural and mechanical drawings . 
Project completed in 1980. 

Architect: Cambridge Seven Associates 

Builder: Granger Bros. 



ADE Foods Company, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

This waterfront fish processing plant and pier 
was constructed on Gloucester Harbor entirely 
over water in 1979. This structure has precast 
concrete piling and a precast concrete framing 
system for optimum durability . 

Architect: Albert Costa Associates 



The Talbot's, Hingham, Massachusetts 

This project was undertaken using phased construction 
and construction management techniques to control the 
budget and permit fast tracking. The project involved 
60,000 sq. ft. of high bay warehouse space and 60,000 
sq. ft. of office space which was completed in 1980 
at a cost of $? million. 

Architect: Cambridge Seven Associates Inc. 

Construction Manager: Gilbane Building Compdny 



303 Congress Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

This 60,000 sf office building is being constructed 
on deep piles partially over the Fort Point Channel. 
The building has a fully welded moment resisting 
steel frame supporting a composite concrete floor 
and roof system. The exterior columns are exposed 
in front of a dramatic glass curtain wall. 
Construction scheduled for 1983. 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold Inc. 

Builder: Vappi Construction Company 



Housing 

BROWN, RONA INC. is well known for its many innovative 
and economical structures for large housing projects. We have 
successfully executed these buildings using steel frames, cast- 
in-place and precast concrete, masonry bearing walls, light 
gage metal and wood structural framing systems. The projects 
range from multi-building garden apartments on suburban sites 
to 40 story towers in congested urban areas. The projects 
have been designed by some of the leading Architects in the 
field and built by local contractors in a variety of areas 
from northern Main to Maryland. 



Regency Apartments, Brookline, Massachusetts 

This $10.5 million project has a fully precast 15 
story apartment structure supported on a precast 
transfer system over a two story precast concrete 
parking garage. Construction completed in 1980. 

Architect: Eisenberg Haven Associates 

Owner/Builder: Carabetta Enterprises Inc. 



Cutter School Condominiums, Arlington, Massachusetts 

This traditional 1890 elementary school was recycled 
in 198 2-198 S into 34 highly individualistic condo- 
minium units by constructing additional lofts in the 
attics and auditoriums and by raising selected floor 
areas . 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold Inc. 

Builder: Congress Construction Co. 



14A3 Beacon Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

This 120 unit FHA insured housing project has an 
economical steel framing system supporting floors 
over a parking garage. Construction completed in 
1979 at a cost of $2.8 million. 

Architect: Glaser /deCastro /Vitols Partnership 

Builder: Sydney Construction Company 



Northern Lights Housing, Berlin, New Hampshire 

This former Androscoggin Hospital was itself 
a collection of "buildings including a wooden 
hotel that had been altered and added to over 
a loo year period. This latest recycling into 
64 subsidized apartments involved alteration 
and strengthening of structural wood, concrete, 
steel and masonry construction. 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold Inc. 

Builder: R. C. Foss S Sons Inc. 



Academy Building, Fall River, Massachusetts 

This project was completed in 1980 and includes 
the conversion of a prominent historic office 
building into housing units and the construction 
of a multi-story wall bearing masonry addition 
designed to resist seismic forces. 

Architect: Childs Bertman Tseckares & Casendino 

Owner/Builder: John Corcoran Company 



Bell Pond Apartments, Worcester, Massachusetts 

This ZOO unit Housing for the Elderly project on 
a prominent site consists of two economical 9-story 
masonry wall bearing structures with precast concrete 
plank. Construction scheduled for completion in 1983. 

Architect: Vitols Associates 

Builder: George B. H. Macomber Co. Inc. 



Varney School Apartments, Manchester, New Hampshire 

In 1982 this typical turn of the century 3-story 
school building was recycled and a 5-story addition 
constructed to form 78 units of Housing for the 
Elderly . 

Architect: John Sharratt Associates 

Builder: E. C. Foss & Sons 



Viviendas La Victoria I & II, Boston, Massachusetts 

This award winning apartment complex was constructed 
in two phases in 1976 and 1980. The 18 story high- 
rise structural system is concrete plank on structural 
steel and the low-rise buildings are wall bearing 
masonry with precast concrete floors. 

Architect: John Sharratt Associates 

Builder: Barkan Construction Co. 



Farm River Apartments, East Haven, Connecticut 

This large housing complex with buildings ranging 
in height from four to twelve stories was constructed 
in 1980 on a pile foundation with load bearing masonry 
walls and 8 ft. wide pre-cast floor units. 

Architect: Eisenberg Haven Associates Inc. 

Builder: Kapetan Construction Co. 



Arsenal Apartments, Watertown, Massachusetts 

This initial phase of the commercial recycling 
of the large industrial site of the former 
Watertown Arsenal included a new six story 
masonry apartment structure and the recycling 
of two historic mill buildings into apartments . 

Architect: Arrowstreet Inc. 

Contractor: Gilbane Construction Co. 



Riverside Towers, Medford, Massachusetts 

This 12 story wall bearing masonry and concrete plank 
apartment building was constructed in 1979 at a cost 
of $6.5 mil lion. 

Architect: Eisenberg Haven Associates 

Builder: Sydney Construction Company 



Remodelling and Additions to Existing Structures 

BROWN, RONA INC. is one of the leading structural 
engineering firms in the field of evaluation of the con- 
dition, structural capacity and future prospects of 
existing buildings. Many of our projects in this area 
involve renovations, adaptive reuse and remodelling of 
buildings listed in the National Register of Historic 
Building. BROWN, RONA INC. is structural engineer for 
a number of successful large scale Historic Preservation, 
remodelling and adaptive reuse projects including: 



Wannalancit Office & Technology Center, Lowell, Massachusetts 

This National Register properly adjacent to the North 
Canal and Merrimack Fiver was the last continuously 
operating mill in the City of Lowell. The building , 
with 270^000 sf of floor area was framed with heavy 
timber and plank and the massive brick exterior walls 
are being modernized in 1982-198 3 with new lobbies , 
stairs, elevators and local strengthening to meet the 
needs of modern industry . 

Architect: Ferry Dean Stahl & Rogers Inc. 

Owner: Fichard Dobroth & Associates 



Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 

The prize winning renovation of this famous concert 
and lecture hall was completed in 1978 at a cost of 
$3 million. This project involved the strengthening 
of existing framing and adding a major glass enclosed 
lobby, stairs and elevator towers on the rear of the 
bui Iding . 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold Inc. 

Builder: F. L. Whipple Company 



Camellia House, Oyster Bay, New York 

This marvelous steel and glass greenhouse designed 
by the Olmstead Brothers at the Planting Fields 
Arboretum in I9l8 covers a priceless collection of 
camellias . Unfortunately ^ years of neglect had left 
the structure seriously decayed and unsafe. The 
complete and authentic re storation is underway and 
is expected to be complete in 1983. 

Architect: Preservation Partnership 

Builder: William Walsh Company 



The Wharf, Boston, Massachusetts 

This six story former wool warehouse on the Fort Point 
Channel in Boston was remodelled in 1979 to accomodate 
exhibit space for the Children's Museum and Museum of 
Transportation as well as commercial space and offices . 
The project involved seismic strengthening of the floors 
and the construction of a large glass enclosed exterior 
elevator . Construction completed in 1979 at a cost of 
$2.7 mil lion. 

Architect: Dyer Brown Associates 

Builder: Beaver Builders Inc. 



The Shipyard, Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts 

This $12 million project involves the conversion of 
the former Naval Shipyard machine shops and foundry 
buildings into 260 apartment units and ancillary 
facilities including a parking garage. The project 
is under construction in 1980-1981. 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold Inc. 

Builder: Sydney Construction Co. 



James Steam Mill, Newburyport , Massachusetts 

This 99 unit Housing for the Elderly project involves 
the conversion of three 4 and 5 story typical New 
England mill type industrial buildings into a modern 
apartment complex by the addition of egress stairs, 
elevators , and partitioning in 1982. 

Architect: Childs Bertman Tseckares S Casendino 

Builder: R. C. Foss & Sons Inc. 



McCulloch Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

The interior of this Harvard Business School dormitory 
was completely gutted and remodelled to provide modern 
suites in 1978 at a cost of $2.2 million. 

Architect: Perry Dean Stahl & Rogers 

Builder: Volpe Construction Company 



Lowell Memorial Auditorium, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Plans are being prepared for the renovation and 
repair of this truely monumental auditorium originally 
constructed in 1920. The project is expected to be in 
construction in 1983 with a budget of $6.5 million. 

Architect: Perry Dean Stahl & Rogers 



Shubert Theatre, Boston, Massachusetts 

The renovations of one of the largest theatres in 
Boston were completed in 1980. The work involved 
rehabilitation and remodelling of many areas of the 
building and each stage area to accomodate modern 
lighting , sound systems and staging for traveling 
shows . 

Architect: Anderson Notter Finegold 

Builder: Conviser Construction Co. 



Hotel Danville, Danville, Virginia 

This project consists of the conversion into 
Elderly Housing of the 8 story Danville Hotel 
and attached to it a 10 story new addition 
framed with structural steel and concrete floors. 
Combined budget is ±$6 million. 

Architect: Childs Bertman Tseakares & Casendino 

Contractor: John W, Daniels 



City Hall of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 

This project included the complete refurbishment 
of the City Hall including the addition of new 
floors, strengthening existing floors and other 
structural repairs resulting from an extensive 
investigation of the condition and capacity of 
the existing structure . Project completed in 
1977 at a cost of $9 million. 

Architects: Amsler, Hagenah Maclean with 

Myers and d 'A leo 

Contractors: Roy Kirby & Sons with 

Calvert Construction Corp. 



LENDER : Bank of New England 

28 State Street, Boston, MA 02108 
(Tel. 742-4000) 



Fowler, Goedecke, Ellis & O'Connor 

Incorporated 

One Liberty Square 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

(617)542-2530 



Fowler, Goedecke, Ellis & O'Connor has been in business 
since June of 1981. The company was the result of a merger 
between Fowler, Goedecke & Co., founded in 19 74 and the Leggat 
McCall & Werner Financial Corporation, founded in 1975. 

The firm acts as mortgage loan correspondents for the following 
institutions : 



Aetna Life Insurance Company 

CIGNA (formerly Connecticut General) 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 

Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company 

Knights of Columbus 

Equitable of Iowa 

Since its formation, the firm has been involved in real 
estate financing in excess of $350 million. Included in this 
financing have been: 



One Post Office Square 
Boston, Massachusetts 

399 Boylston Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Long Wharf Marriott 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Russia Wharf 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Arsenal Marketplace 
Watertown, Massachusetts 

Maine Mall 
South Portland, Maine 

Burlington Marriott 
Burlington, Massachusetts 

Fox Run Mall 
Newington, New Hampshire 

Crystal Mall 
Waterford, Connecticut 



$75,000,000 

First Mortgage Loan 

$36,000,000 

Joint Venture Financing 

$25,000,000 

First Mortgage Loan 

$11,500,000 

First Mortgage Loan 

$20,500,000 

Participating Mortgage Loan 

$41,000,000 

Joint Venture/Acquisition 

$32,000,000 

Land Purchase Leaseback Leasehold 

$35,000,000 

Joint Venture Financing 

$32,000,000 

Joint Venture Financing 



Real Estate Finance 



VI DESIGN CONCEPT 

A. Architectural Narrative 



DESIGN CONCEPT 



The opportunity to develop the Government Center Garage presents 
the chance to change and improve the design of a key element in 
the urban fabric of Boston. The Government Center Garage is 
located at the hinge point between the Government Center and the 
now to be developed North Station area. The original design of 
the building which in itself is a traffic nexus, anticipated the 
future development of the North Station area and the flow of 
traffic - vehicular and pedestrian - between the nodes of that 
development and the Government Center, Faneuil Hall, and the 
commercial towers to the south. However, at the time of the 
design of the Government Center Garage much of this development 
lay in the future and market conditions did not allow for the 
inclusion of either commercial space at the pedestrian level nor 
for the development of rooftop uses, although both of these were 
proposed. 

The subsequent growth of commercial development in the 
Government Center Garage area and the imminent revitalization of 
the North Station district now make it possible to bring to 
fruition these original ideas and with them to make those 
improvements to the public areas - pedestrian and vehicular - 
that are appropriate to the increased urban importance and 
consequent pattern of use that the Government Center Garage will 
now enjoy. 

1. Landscaping and Surface Improvement 

The proposal to extend the brick paving associated with 
pedestrian areas of the Government Center which was a 
part of the Master Landscape Plan for the Government 
Center Project should now be implemented. The 

pedestrian areas beneath the Garage on both sides of 
Merrimac Street will be brick paved between the borders 
of the concrete sidewalks. They will be furnished with 
lighting and seating apropriate to the heavy density of 
use which will continue to characterize the passage 
from North Station to the Government Center. Brick 

paving, seats and lights will make the bus waiting area 
congenial. The triangular area between the Garage and 
New Chardon Street will be developed as a forecourt to 
the office entrance. In this space the Beverly Pepper 
sculpture will be given a new and attractive setting as 
the centerpiece of a pedestrian plaza from which the 
elevators of the office development will rise 

dramatically. 

2. Commercial Space 

Commercial space will be concentrated at street level. 
14,000 square feet of shops will be located so as to 
front onto the corners of New Sudbury, Merrimac and New 



Chardon Streets. A further 9,000+ square feet of shops 
will be located beneath the spiral ramp in the area of 
the subway entrance and bus waiting area. In this way 
the new commercial areas will lie adjacent to the most 
frequently travelled pedestrian areas, thus achieving 
the two objectives of giving life, visual interest and 
protection to those pedestrian areas and ensuring the 
commercial success of the shops. 

3. Office Development 

It is proposed to build 151,000+ square feet of rental 
space on levels 10 and 11 of the structure. A deck 
over the furthest east portion of Level 10 will be used 
as the running track for a health club. The Garage 
structure is organized in 60' tracks separated by an 
interspace of nine feet. The two floors of office 

space will be organized in similar fashion yielding 60' 
wide tracks of space. These column-free tracks of 

space will be more than 480 feet long on Level 10 and 
almost 300 feet long on Level 11. The interspaces on 
both levels will be used as skylit and landscaped 
atria/galleries providing principal circulation routes 
to rental units of office space all of which would have 
daylit perimeters. Moreover the office floors thus 

provided would be very large areas of column-free space 
easily sub-divided and ideally suited as either prime 
space or "back office" use. 

The office floors will be reached by way of new 
glass-walled elevators raising dramatically from the 
new forecourt and lobby on New Chardon Street. The 
lobby and elevator towers will provide the new office 
accommodation with a memorable and unique identity. 
The wall treatment of the office structure will 
continue the theme of a delicate and lightweight facade 
which will act as a foil to the robust image of the 
garage. The roof of the new offices will be 

articulated by the long glass-roofed atria/galleries 
which will reflect light by day and glow at night. In 
this way the new roof treatment will continue to meet 
the original design directive and make attractive the 
vast roof of the complex when viewed from the 
surrounding taller buildings. 

In summary, it may be stated that the proposed development of 

the Government Center Garage will be carried out in a fashion 

that will pursue and enhance the visual objectives that 
generated the original design. 

N. Michael McKinnell, FAIA 



VI DESIGN CONCEPT 



B. Design Concept Drawings 




GOVERNMENT CENTER GARAGE PARCEL 



l/83 



SHEET 1 



CONTEXT PLAN 




1 EXISTING GARAGE 

2 GARAGE ENTRANCE 

3 EXISTING SCULPTURE 

4 COMMERCIAL 

5 ARCADE TO TRANSIT 

6 ENTRANCE PLAZA 

7 ENTRANCE LOBBY 

8 ELEVATOR LOBBY 

9 LOBBY SHOP 

10 MANAGEMENT OFFICES 

11 GALLERY ATRIUM 

12 BRIDGES 

13 SKYLIGHT ROOF 

14 POSSIBLE HEALTH CLUB 

15 ROOF DECK RUNNING TRACK 

16 SECONDARY ENTRANCE LOBBY 

17 SECONDARY ELEVATOR LOBBY 

18 RESTROOMS 

1 9 ELECTRICAL / MECHANICAL • SERVICES 

20 SERVICE COURT 



SCALE 



GOVERNMENT CENTER GARAGE PARCEL 1 /83 

SHEET 2 : PLAN : GROUND 




1 EXISTING GARA3E 

2 GARAGE ENTRANCE 

3 EXISTING SCULPTURE 
A COMMERCIAL 

5 ARCADE TO TRANSIT 

6 ENTRANCE PLAZA 

7 ENTRANCE LOBBY 

8 ELEVATOR LOBBY 

9 LOBBY SHOP 

10 MANAGEMENT OFFICES 

11 GALLERY ATRIUM 

12 BRIDGES 

13 SKYLIGHT ROOF 

14 POSSIBLE HEALTH CLUB 

15 ROOF DECK RUNNING TRACK 

16 SECONDARY ENTRANCE LOBBY 

17 SECONDARY ELEVATOR LOBBY 

18 RESTROOMS 

1 9 ELECTRICAL / MECHANICAL / SERVICES 

20 SERVICE COURT 



GOVERNMENT CENTER GARAGE PARCEL 



l/83 



SHEET 



PLAN : LEVEL 10 




1 




EXISTING GARAGE 


2 




GARAGE ENTRANCE 


3 




EXISTING SCULPTURE 


4 




COMMERCIAL 


5 




ARCADE TO TRANSIT 


6 




ENTRANCE PLAZA 


7 




ENTRANCE LOBBY 


8 




ELEVATOR LOBBY 


9 




LOBBY SHOP 


10 




MANAGEMENT OFFICES 


11 




GALLERY ATRIUM 


12 




BRIDGES 


13 




SKYLIGHT ROOF 


14 




POSSIBLE HEALTH CLUB 


15 


ROC 


= DECK RUNNING TRACK 


16 


SECONDARY ENTRANCE LOBBY 


17 


SECONDARY ELEVATOR LOBBY 


18 




RESTROOMS 


19 


ELECTRICAL , 


MECHANICAL .'SERVICES 


20 




SERVICE COURT 



SCALE 



GOVERNMENT CENTER GARAGE PARCEL 1 /83 

SHEET 4 : PLAN : LEVEL 1 1 



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GOVERNMENT CENTER GARAGE PARCEL 1 /83 

SHEET 5 : CONCEPT DIAGRAM 



VII REDEVELOPER ' S STATEMENT FOR PUBLIC DISCLOSURE 



PART I HUD-6004 

(9-69) 

REDEVELOPER'S STATEMENT FOR PUBLIC DISCLOSURE ^ 
A. REDEVELOPER AND LAND 

1. a.. Name of Redeveloper: CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 

b. Address and ZIP Code of Redeveloper: 536 GRANITE STREET 

BRAINTREE, MA 02184 

c. IRS Number of Redeveloper: 

2. The land on which the Redeveloper proposes to enter into a contract for, or understanding with respect to, 
the purchase or lease of land from 

BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

(Name of Local Public Agency) 

GOVERNMENT CENTER AREA 
in 

(Name of Urban Renewal or Redevelopment Project Area) 

in the Citv of BOSTON State of MASSACHUSETTS 

is described as follows 



A 1,865 Space Parking Garage Structure 



3. If the Redeveloper is not an individual doing business under his own ncime, the Redeveloper has the status 
indicated below and is organized or operating under the laws of MaSSacnUSettS : 

I I A corporation. 

I I \ nonprofit or charitable institution or corporation. 

53 A partnership known as Center Garage Associates which is a Massachusetts 
Partnership consisting of Center Garage Development, Inc. and 

I \ A business association or a joint venture known as Peabody Construction Co . , Inc. , It's 

General Partners 

I I A Federal. State, or local government or instrumentality thereof. 
I I Other (explain) 

4. If the Redeveloper is not an individual or a government agency or instrumentality, give date of organization: 

Partnership to be formed. 

5. Names, addresses, title of position (if any), and nature and extent of the interest of the officers and principal members, 
shareholders, and investors of the Redeveloper, other than a government agency or instrumentality, cire set forth as 
follows: 



'if space on ihis form is inadequate tor anv requested information, it sfiould be furnished on an attached page which is referred 
to under the appropriate numbered item on the form. 

2 Anv convenient means of identifying the land (such as block and lot numbers or street boundaries) is sufficient. A descrip- 
tion by metes and bounds or other technical description is acceptable, but not required. 



HUD-6004 
(9-69) 

a. If the Redeveloper is a corporation, the officers, directors or trustees, and each stockholder owning more 
than 10% of any class of stock' . 

b. If the Redeveloper is a nonprofit or charitable institution or corporation, the members who constitute the 
board of trustees or board of directors or similar governing body. 

c. If the Redeveloper is a partnership, each partner, whether a general or limited partner, and either the 
percent of interest or a description of the character and extent of interest. 

d. If the Redeveloper is a business association or a joint venture, each participant and either the percent 
of interest or a description of the character and extent of interest. 

e. If the Redeveloper is some other entity, the officers, the members of the governing body, and each person 
having an interest of more than 10%. 

POSITION TITLE (if any/ AND PERCENT OF INTEREST OR 
NAME, ADDRESS, AND ZIP CODE DESCRIPTION OF CHARACTER AND EXTENT OF INTEREST 

Edward A. Fish, President 
Center Garage Development, Inc. 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 



Name, address, and nature and extent of interest of each person or entity (not named in response to Item 5J 
who has a beneficial interest in any of the shareholders or investors named in response to Item 5 which 
gives such person or entity more than a computed 10% interest in the Redeveloper (for example, more than 
20% of the stock in a corporation which holds 50% of the stock of the Redeveloper; or more than 50% of the 
stock in a corporation which holds 20% of the stock of the Redeveloper): 

NAME, ADDRESS. AND ZIP CODE DESCRIPTION OF CHARACTER AND EXTENT OF INTEREST 



I . 



Names (if not given above) of officers and directors or trustees of any corporation or firm listed under 
Item 5 or Item 6 above: 



B. RKIDENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT OR REHABIUTATION 

(The Redeveloper is to furnish the following information, but only if land is to be redeveloped or rehabilitated 
in whole or in part for residential purposes.) 



' If a corporation is required to file periodic reports with the Federal Securities and Exchange Commission under Section 13 
of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, so state under this Item 5. In such case, the information referred to in this Item 5 
and in Items 6 and 7 is not required to be furnished. 



HUD-6004 

1. State the Redeveloper's estimates, exclusive of payment for the land, for: 

a. Total cost of einy residential redevelopment J 

b. Cost per dwelling unit of any residential redevelopment $ 

c. Total cost of any residential rehabilitation S 

d. Cost per dwelling unit of any residential rehabilitation 8 

2. a. State the Redeveloper's estimate of the average monthly rental (if to be rented) or average sale price 

(if to be sold) for each type and size of dwelling unit involved in such redevelopment or rehabilitation: 



TYPE AND SIZE OF DWELLING UNIT 



ESTIMATED AVERAGE 

MONTHLY RENTA L 



ESTIMATED AVERAGE 
SALE PRICE 



b. State the utilities and parking facilities, if any, included in the foregoing estimates of rentals: 



c. State equipment, such as refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, if any, included in the fore- 
going estimates of sales prices: 

CERTIFICATION 



I(We)l 



CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 



certify that this Redeveloper's Statement for Public Disclosure is true and correct to the best of my (our) knowledge 
and belief.* 



Dated: 



January 10, 1983 



Dated: 



January 10, 1983 



CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 

Center Garage Development, Inc., By: Peabody Construction Co., Inc., It's 
It ' s^^^^p^era^ ^^rtner General Partner 



Bv 



lose^tf C. Rettman, Vice-President 



536 Granite St., Braintree, MA 

Address and ZIP Code 02184 



536 Granite St 



Braintree, MA 02184 



Address and ZIP Code 



' If the Redeveloper is an individual, this statement should be signed by such individual; if a partnership, by one of the part- 
ners; if a corporation or other entity, by one of its chief officers having knowledge of the facts required by this statement. 

2 Penalty for False Certification : Section 1001, Title 18, of the U.S. Code, provides a fine of not more than JIO.OOO or imprison- 
ment of not more than five years, or both, for knowingly and willfully making or using any false writing or document, knowing 
the same to contain any false, fictitious or fraudulent statement or entry in a matter within the jurisdiction of any Department 
of the United States. 



PART II HUD-6004 

(9-69) 

REDEVELOP ER'S STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS AND FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 

(For Confidential Officiol Use of tfie Locol Public Agency and the Department of Housing ond Urban Development. Do Not 
Tronsmit to HUD Unless Requested or Item 8b is Answered "Yes.") 

1. a. Nnmeof Redeveloper: CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 

b. Address and ZIP Code of Redeveloper: 536 GRANITE STREET 

BRAINTREE, MA 02184 

2. The land on which the Redeveloper proposes to enter into a contract for, or understanding with respect to, 
the purchase or lease of land from 

BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

(Ncune of Local Public Agency) 



GOVERNMENT CENTER AREA 



(Same of Urban Renewal or Redevelopment Project Area) 

in the Citv of BOSTON State of MASSACHUSETTS 

is described as follows: 

A 1,865 Space Parking Garage Structure 



3. Is the Redeveloper a subsidiary of or affiliated with any other corporation or corporations or any other firm 
or firms? Eyes I I NO 

If Yes, list each such corporation or firm by name and address, specify its relationship to the Redeveloper, 
and identify the officers and directors or trustees common to the Redeveloper and such other corporation or 
firm. 

Center Garage Associates is a Partnership whose General Partners 
are Center Garage Development, Inc. and Peabody Construction Co. 

4. a. The financial condition of the Redeveloper, as of .Tiin p 30 , , 19 8z ^ 

is as reflected in the attached financial statement. 

(NOTE: Attach to this statement a certified financial statement showing the assets and the liabilities, 
including contingent liabilities, fully itemized in accordance with accepted accounting standards and 
based on a proper audit. If the date of the certified financial statement precedes the date of this sub- 
mission by more than six months, also attach an interim balance sheet not more than 60 days old.) 

b. Name and address of auditor or public accountant who performed the audit on which said financial state- 
ment is based: 

Charles E. DiPesa & Company 

10 High Street, Boston, MA 02110 

5. If funds for the development of the land are to be obtained from sources other than the Redeveloper' s own 
funds, a statement of the Redeveloper's plan for financing the acquisition and development of the land: 

(REFER TO LETTER OF INTEREST FROM BANK OF NEW ENGLAND) 



5- 



HUD-6004 
(9-69) 



6. SourccB £ind amount of cash available to Redeveloper to meet equity requirements of the proposed undertaking: 



a. In banks: 

NAME, ADDRESS, AND ZIP CODE OF BANK 



(SEE ATTACHED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS) 
b. By loans from affiliated or associated corporations or firms: 

NAME, ADDRESS, AND ZIP CODE OF SOURCE 



c. By sale of readily salable assets: 

DESCRIPTION MARKET VALUE MOR TG ACES OR LIENS 



7. Names and addresses of bank references: John Sullivan, Vice-President , Real Estate Div, 
Bank of New England, 28 State St., Boston, MA; Josiah P. Huntoon , Jr., 
Vice-Pres. , State Street Bank & Trust Co., 225 Franklin St., Boston, MA 
John Ortiz, Vice-Pres., South Shore Bank, 1400 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

8. a. Has the Redeveloper or (if any) the parent corporation, or any subsidiary or affiliated corporation of the 

Redeveloper or said parent corporation, or any of the Redeveloper's officers or principal members, share- 
holders or investors, or other interested parties (as listed in the responses to Items 5,6, and 7 of the 
Redeveloper' s Statement for Public Disclosure and referred to herein as "principals of the Redeveloper") 
been adjudged bankrupt, either voluntary or involuntary, within the past 10 years? [^YES [X] NO 

If Yes, give date, place, and under what nsune. 



b. Has the Redeveloper or anyone referred to above as "principals of the Redeveloper" been indicted for 
or convicted of any felony within the past 10 years? LjYES 1x1 NO 

If Yes, give for each case (1) date, (2) charge, (3) place, (4) Court, and (5) action taken. Attach any 
explanation deemed necessary. 



9. a. Undertakings, comparable to the proposed redevelopment work, which have been completed by the 

Redeveloper or any of the principals of the Redeveloper, including identification and brief description of 
each project and date of completion: 

(REFER TO ATTACHED RESUME AND BROCHURE INFORMATION) 



-6 



HLID-6004 
(9-69) 

b. If the Redeveloper or any of the principals of the Redeveloper has ever been an employee, in a supervisory 
capacity, for construction contractor or builder on undertakings comparable to the proposed redevelopment 
work, name of such employee, name and address of employer, title of position, and brief description of 
work: 

N/A 

10. Other federally aided urban renewal projects under Title I of the Housing Act of 1949, as amended, in which 
the Redeveloper or any of the principals of the Redeveloper is or has been the redeveloper, or a stockholder, 
officer, director or trustee, or partner of such a redeveloper: 

(REFER TO ATTACKED RESUME INFORMATION) 

11. If the Redeveloper or a parent corporation, a subsidiary, an affiliate, or a principal of the Redeveloper is to 
participate in the development of the land as a construction contractor or builder: 

a. Name and address of such contractor or builder: 

Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 

b. Has such contractor or builder within the last 10 years ever failed to qualify as a responsible bidder, 
refused to enter into a contract after an award has been made, or failed to complete a construction or 
development contract? Qyes [^ NO 

if Yes, explain: 

c. Total amount of construction or development work performed by such contractor or builder during the last 
three years: S . ^g^^ EXHIBIT A) 

General description of such work: 
(SEE EXHIBIT A) 



d. Construction contracts or developments now being performed by such contractor or builder: 

IDENTIFICATION OF DATE TO BE 

CONTRACT OR DEVELOPMENT LOCATION AMOUNT COMPLETED 



(SEE EXHIBIT A) 



e. Outstanding construction-contract bids of sucb contractor or builder: 

AWARDING AGENCY AMOUNT 



HUD-6004 

(9-69) 

DATE OPENED 



(SEE EXHIBIT A) 

12. Brief statement respecting equipment, experience, financial capacity, and other resources available to 
such contractor or builder for the performance of the work involved in the redevelopment of the land, 
specifying particularly the qualifications of the personnel, the nature of the equipment, and the general 
experience of the contractor: 

(SEE EXHIBIT A) 

13. a. Does any member of the governing body of the Local Public Agency to which the accompanying bid or 

proposal is being made or any officer or employee of the Local Public Agency who exercises any 
functions or responsibilities in connection with the carrying out of the project under which the land 
covered by the Redeveloper's proposal is being made available, have any direct or indirect personal 
interest in the Redeveloper or in the redevelopment or rehabilitation of the property upon the basis of 
such proposal? CHyes fl^NO 

If Yes, explain. 



Does any member of the governing body of the locality in which the Urban Renewal Area is situated or 
any other public official of the locality, who exercises any functions or responsibilities in the review or 
approval of the carrying out of the project under which the land covered by the Redeveloper's proposal 
is being made available, have any direct or indirect personal interest in the Redeveloper or in the 
redevelopment or rehabilitation of the property upon the basis of such proposal? Qyes [XIno 

If Yes, explain. 



14. Statements and other evidence of the Redeveloper's qualifications and financial responsibility (other than 
the financial statement referred to in Item 4a) are attached hereto and hereby made a part hereof as follows: 



CERTIFICATION 



I (^^)\ CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 



certify that this Redeveloper's Statement of Qualifications and Financial Responsibility and the attached evidence 
of the Redeveloper's qualifications and financial responsibility, including financial statements, are true and correct 
to the best of my (our) knowledge and belief.^ 



January 10, 1983 



Dated: January 10, 1983 



By 



CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 
Peabody Construction Co. 
General Partner 



Inc. , It's 



/, 



ah . si ce-Pre s i den t 



MA 02184 



Dated: 

CENTER GARAGE ASSOCIATES 
Center Garage Development, Inc 
It's Gei^erp,! P^/Ttner 

--/^^ ^-^ 

Edward A/^^sh, President 

536 Granite St., Braintree, MA 

Ad6ieii and ZIP Code 02 184 

1 If the Redeveloper is a corporation, this statement should be signed by the President and Secretary of the corporation; if an 
individual, by such individual; if a partnership, by one of the partners; if an entity not having a president and secretary, by 
one of its chief officers having knowledge of the financial status and qualifications of the Redeveloper.. 

2 Penalty tor False Certification : Section 1001. Title 18, of the U.S. Code, provides a fine of not more than $10,000 or imprison- 
ment of not more than five years, or both, for knowingly and willfully making or using any false writing or document, knowing 
the same to contain any false, fictitious or fraudulent statement or entry in a matter within the jurisdiction of any Department 
of the United Stales. 

- O - o U. S. GOVrBNMENT PFINTINC OFFICE: 196« O - 3B6-317 (111 



By .^'Joseph C. RM;tman, 

'^ 536 Granite St., Braintree 



Address and ZIP Code 



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11.6 Contracts in Process 
Owners and Designers 



:t t!tl£ 

CAT! ON 



ne Shop - 3ri Increment 
[noucn Savai Shipyard 



\n 



PROJECT OWNER 
AND PHONE ^^0. 



ADDRESS DESIGNER ADDRESS 
AND PHONE HO. 



Oeot . of .Mavv 
Northern Division 
Naval -acilities Engineei — 
i ng Commana , 3uilaing 77L 
U.S. Naval Base 
=hi laaeiphia, ^A 19112 
:2I 5) -755-3977 



GIffeis Associates, Inc. 
25200 Telegraph Roaa 

Souchfieid, Ml ^6037 
(207)-h3°-1000 



er Schools 
,er, MA 01810 



:ea Hospital Rehab. 
;ea , '^A 



Town of An dove r 
Anaover, MA 01810 

^75-5560 



Chelsea Village Assoc. 
536 Granite St. 
Braintree, MA 0218^ 
348-"^^A2 



Per ley F. Gilbert Assoc: 
13^ Middle St. 
Lowell , MA 01.852 
^54-7776 



Boston Architectural 
18^ High St. 
Boston, MA 021 10 
U23-2030 



1 ear 



iea Elaerly 
sea , MA 



Chelsea Elderly Housing 

Associates 

536 Granite St. 

Braintree, MA 02184 

3U8-^*M2 



Chi a Ming Sze Architect 
326 A St. 
Boston, MA 02110 
^51 -2727 



'.A. Overfnaui Shop 

roadway 

itt, MA 021^9 



isworth House 

|ica Plain, MA 02130 



Mass. Bay Transportation 

Authority 

So Broadway 

Everett, MA 021^9 

722-5233 

The Charles H.Famsworth 

Housing Corp. 

South Street 

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

522-7230 



V 



Knight, Bagge S Anderson 
73 Treniont St. 
Boston, HA 02108 
227-4602 



Chi a Mfng Sze Architect 
326 A St. 
Boston, MA 02110 
kSI -2727 



Contracts in Process 
Owners and Designers 



ECT TITLE 
LOCATION 



PROJECT OWNER ADDRESS 
AND PHONE NUMBER 



DESIGNER ADDRESS 
AND PHONE NUMBER 



5 Point 

rly, MA 01915 



I1 ighter VI 1 lage 
ecoach Way 
on, MA 02021 



', Suffolk Downs 
on, MA 



.hester Senior Housing 
hester, MA 



Alfio's Villa 
•ence, MA 



ilo Menxarial Complex 
•ose, MA 



ling House 
1, MA 



'Jrd Street Housing 
ton, MA 



One Beverly Development 
ho Humphrey St. 
Swampscott, MA 01907 
26^-3A20 

Nage Housing Inc. 
1 1 Beacon St . 
Boston, MA 02108 
7^2-3772 

Mass. Bay Transportation 
Author! ty 
80 Broadway 
Everett, MA 021 Ag 
722-5233 

Dorchester Housing Associates 
536 Granite St. 
Braintree, MA 02184 
848-AAA2 

Common Street Associates 
6 Essex St. 
Lawrence, MA 
227-7870 

Floral Associates 
2A5 W. Wyoming Ave. 
Melrose, MA 02176 
665-1629 

Sterling House Associates 
175 Andover St. 
Danvers, MA 01923 
77A-OO25 

Oxford Place Associates 
31 Beach St. 
Boston, MA 02111 
482-1011 



Steffian 5 Bradley Assoc 
66 Canal St. 
Boston, MA 02114 
227-6520 

E.M.Doheny Associates 
39 Carr St. 
Duxbury, MA 02332 
837-3626 



Lozano, White 
30 Brattle St. 
Cambridge, MA 
868-6344 



and Assoc i 



02138 



Stekalovsky 6 Hoit, Inc. 
51 North St. 
Hingham, MA 02043 
749-4160 



ln( 



Gelardin/Bruner Cott, 
75 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
492-8400 

JSA, Inc. 

104 Congress St. 

Portsmouth, NH O38OI 

603-436-2551 



Urban Design Team, Inc. 
44 Burroughs St. 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 
646-9136 

John Sharratt Associates 
35 Fenwood Road 
Boston, MA 
566-3038 



T~ 






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11.8 All Construction projects completed in the past five years 
or the twenty most recently completed 



PROJECT 



NO.Andover Komat 



Winter Val ley 



■.-:4 



i.S.T.A.SrainCree 
Station/Garage 



Casa Maria 



Dock Squara Garage 



4 Blxbv GoldthtMJte 



Sears Retail SuMding 



Old Town Aoartmants 



Tov«nbrook ADartments 



OWNER 'S REPRESENTATIVE - ' 

John G. Dolan, Jr. 
Archdlocase of Boston 

25 Union St. 
Boston, MA 02108 
227-2200 

Frank W.Knowlton, Jr . 
Winter Valley Residences 
Unquity House- 30 Curtis Road 
Ml 1 ton, MA 02187 
698-3005 

R.O. Mackay 

M.3.T.A. 

500 ArtsoCway 

Jaoaica Plain, MA02130 

722-3'»98 722-3356 



Edvxard Marchant 
Greater Boston Comn.Oev. 
79 Milk St. 
Boston, MA 02109 

482-6553 

Jamas f. Sullivan, Esq. 
Ona Boston Place 
Suite 1026 
Boston, MA 02108 
7U2-0112 

Gilbert V. Boro 
Endevor , Inc. 
77 N.Washington St. 
Boston, MA 02114 
523- 7040 

Joseoh Mastra 
Sears, itoebuck s Co. 
555 E. Lancaster Ave. 
St. Davids, PA 19087 
215-293-2176 

Phil 1 1p Singleton 
CroMninshieid Coro. 
18 CroMninshield Corp. 
Peabody, MA 01960 

599-7900 - _, 

ftev. Frank J. Bauer 
Fenno House 
540 Hancock St. 
Qu i ncy , MA 
773-5483 



DESIGNER'S REPRESENTATIVE 

Edward Talanian 

Goody, Clancy S Associate: 

334 Boylston St. 

Boston, MA 021 16 

262-2760 

Arthur Hacking Assoc. Inc 
66 Long Wharf 
Boston, MA 02! 10 
272-7311 



Robert 8. Bur I in 

Parsons, Srtnckernoff .i^uaai 

S Douglas, Inc. 

177 Milk St. 

Boston, MA 02109 

426-7330* 

Mark Wllhelm 

Stephen Tise s Associates 

1330 Beacon St. 

Brook I ine, MA 02146 

731-1110 

Maarten Henkes 
Desmond & Lord, Inc. 
148 State St. 
Boston, MA 02109 
jhZ-SUUQ 

M f gue I -Gomez- i banez 

Endevor, Inc. 

77 N. Washington St. 

Boston, MA 021 14 

523-7040 

Dennis KInicki 

Wei ton Becket Associates 

200 West Monroe St. 

Ch i cago , I 1 1 i no i s 60606 

312-346-4660 

Thomas F. Cole 
2419 Bauer Road 
Batavia, OH 45103 
513-732-2227 



George Earl Ross 
375 Granite St. 
Braintree, MA 
348-3732 






iL 



I 




II. i 



AH construction projects completed 
twenty most recently completed. 



the past five years or the 



PROJECT 



OWNER'S REPR E SENTATIVE 



DESIGNER'S REPRESENTATIVE 



Borden Street 



South Main Place 



Fai rhaven VI 1 lage 



Adams/Temp I eton 



Bel I flower Apartments 



Gushing Residences 



Mt. Pleasant Apartments 



Harbor Loft 



Vamp Building - Phase II 



Phil Roderick 
Peabody Properties 
536 Granite St. 
Bralntree. HA 02184 

Phil Roderick 
Peabody Properties 

Edward J. McCormack 
McCormack S ZImble 
225 Frankl in St. 
Boston, MA 021 10 
1<82-Iii00 

Phil Roderick 
Peabody Properties 



Thomas P. Shan ley 

Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 

536 Granite St. 

Braintree, MA 02l8'i 

3'i6-2680 

John Shyne 

Cardinal Cushing School 

Old Washington St. 

Hanover, MA 02339 

826-6379 

Phil Roderick 
Peabody Properties 



Phi 1 1 Ip Singleton 
Harbor Loft Associates 
18 Crownlnshield St. 
Peabody, HA 01960 
599-7900 

Phi 1 1 ip Singleton 
Harbor Loft Associates 



Hyron Hartford 

Chi a Ming Sze Arch i rect , Inc. 

326 A St. 

Boston, MA 021 10 

'♦51-2727 

Hyron Hartford 

Chia Ming Sze Architect, Inc. 

Gerarl R. Ooherty 
Smith, Sellew & Ooherty 
1200 Hancock St. 
Quincy, MA 02169 
471-8131 

Andre Sarsone 

Boston Architectural Team 

\Sk High St. 

Boston, MA 02110 

Jeff Pond 

Charles C.HI Igenhurst Assoc. 

148 State St. 

Boston, MA 02109 

532-1770 

George Earl Ross 
375 Granite St. 
Braintree, MA 02184 
848-3732 



Gerald R. Ooherty 
Smith, Sellew & Ooherty 
1200 Hancock St. 
(Juincy, MA 02169 
47I-8I3I 

Chi Ids.Bertman, Tseckares S 

Casendino 

306 Dartmouth St. 

Boston, MA 02116 



Chi Ids, Bertman, Tseckares £ 
Casendino 



Blxby I I 



Gi Ibert V. Boro 
Blxby I I Associates 
77 N.Washington St. 
Boston, MA 02114 
523-7040 



Gilbert V. Boro 

Endevor, Inc. 

77 N. Washington St. 

Boston, MA 02114 

523-7040 



TL 



I 1. 3 All construction projects completed in the past five years or the 
twenty most recently completed. 



PROJECT 



OWNER'S REPRESENTATIVE 



DESIGNER'S REPRESENTATIVE 



Market Mill 



Phil Roderick 
Market Mill Associates 
536 Granite St. 
Braintree, MA oaiS*! 
8't8-2680 



Peter E. Bui lis 

Anderson, Notter, Finegold, 

Inc. 

77 N.Washington St. 

Boston, MA 021 lU 

227-9272 



VIII FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO. , INC. 7VND SUBSIDIARIES 
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 198 2 AND 1981 



Charles E DiPESA & Co Boston Mass (617 4.23-3555 




CIL\RLES E. D I PESA & CO. 

CERTIFIED PL-BLIC ACCOUVT.WTS 



10 HIGH STREET cr\klf.s e. i) i pe^v. < p v. 

WILLLVM F. D I PESA. < . P. A. 

BOSTON. NL\SS. 02110 J""^ f oteri. c . p a. 

617-423-3555 



October 

15 

1982 



Board of Directors 

Peabody Construction Co., Inc. 

and Subsidiaries 
536 Granite Street 
Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 



Re : Auditor ' s Report - 

Certified Balance Sheet 



Gentlemen: 



We have examined the Consolidated Balance Sheet of 
Peabody Construction Co., Inc. and Subsidiaries as of June 30, 1982 
and 1981. Our examination was made in accordance with generally 
accepted auditing standards and accordingly included such tests 
of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as 
we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

In our opinion, the accompanying Consolidated Balance 
Sheet presents fairly the financial position of Peabody Construction 
Co., Inc. and Subsidiaries as of June 30, 1982 and 1981 in conformity 
with generally accepted accounting principles consistently applied. 



Respectfully submitted, 
CHARLES E. DI PESA & CO. 

Certified Public Accountant 



ach 



CmaRlES E DiPESA&CC boston MASS I617 j 4233555 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 

BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 



ASSETS 



June 30, 



CURRENT ASSETS 

cash and Certificates 

of Deposit (Note 3) 

Investments - Cominercial Paper (Note 3) 
Accounts Receivable (Note 4) 

Contracts 

Retainages 

Trade and Other 

Unbilled Work in Process 
Costs and Estimated Earnings in Excess 

of Billings on Uncompleted Contracts 
Pre-Construction Advances - Current 
Loans and Notes Receivable (Note 5) 
Prepaid Expenses and Other Items 

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS 



1982 



1981 



$11,201,749 $ 4,156,220 
2,440,000 



6,269,005 

2,782,296 

516,477 



326,669 

61,776 

628,298 

187,993 

21,974,263 



5,766,205 

3,742,031 

510,972 

82,110 

247,974 
229,125 
629,265 
449,278 

18,253,180 



OTHER ASSETS 

Investments in and Advances 

to Affiliates (Note 6) 

Loans and Notes Receivable 
Cash Value - Officers Life Insurance 
Pre-Construction Advances and 
Other Items 

TOTAL OTHER ASSETS 

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT 
Land 

Building and Improvements 
Transportation Equipment 
Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment 

Totals 
Accumulated Depreciation 

TOTAL PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT 
TOTAL ASSETS 



307,778 
342,830 
207,950 

91,693 
950,251 

38,220 
321,319 
358,934 
179,024 

897,497 
475,174 



183,291 

648,843 
180,162 



1,012,296 

748,814 

4,784,994 

326,193 

178,610 

6,038,611 
1,693,938 



422,323 4,344,673 
$ 23,346.837 $23.610.149 



The accompanying notes are an integral part 
of these financial statements. 



Charges E D.PESa & CC Boston Mass 617,423-3555 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO. 



INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 



BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 

LIABILITIES, DEFERRED CREDITS AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY 

June 30, 



1982 



CURRENT LIABILITIES 

Mortgage Payable (Note 7) 

Notes payable (Note 8) 

Accounts Payable 

Subcontractors 

Retainages 

Trade 
Billings in Excess of Costs 

and Estimated Earnings 

on Uncompleted Contracts 
Accrued Expenses 

Income Taxes Payable (Note 9) 
Due to Affiliates 
Deferred Income Taxes (Note 11) 

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES 
LONG-TERM DEBT 



7,587.326 

2,515,546 

421,431 



2,918,178 
210,723 
609,708 
168,261 

1,093,793 



1981 

20,618 
390,000 

4,963,932 

3,763,665 

438,069 



3,277,197 
263,708 
545,831 
216,500 

1,231,569 



Mortgage Payable 
Note Payable 
Loan Payable 

TOTAL LONG-TERM DEBT 



(Note 10) 



15,524,966 15,111,089 



3,277,787 

500,700 

122,085 84,280 



OTHER LIABILITIES AND DEFERRED CREDITS 



Deferred Income Taxes 
Other Items 

TOTAL OTHER LIABILITIES 
AND DEFERRED CREDIT 



(Note 11) 



122,085 

980,505 
72,475 

1,052,980 



3,862,767 

549,062 
127,305 

676,367 



STOCKHOLDERS ' EQUITY 
Capital Stocks 
Retained Earnings 

TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY 

TOTAL LIABILITIES, DEFERRED CREDITS 
AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY 


250,000 
■6,396,806 

6,646,806 
$23,346,837 


250,000 
3,709,926 

3,959,926 
$23,610,149 





Charges E DiPeSa & Co Boston Mass (617) 423-3555 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 



Note 1 - SWLMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 

a. Principles of Consolidation - The consolidated 

financial statements include the accounts of the 
Company and all of its wholly owned subsidiaries. 
All significant intercompany accounts and 
transactions have been eliminated. 

b. Investments in Affiliates (partnerships) - The 
Company uses the equity method of accounting for 
its investments in partnerships. Earnings and 
losses are recognized as they occur, except that 
losses are deducted only to the extent of the 
Company investment. Deferred income taxes are 
provided on the excess of losses over the Company 
investment in those entities. 

c. Long-Term Contracts - Revenues from construction 
contracts are recognized on the percentage of 
completion method measured by the costs incurred 

to date to total estimated costs for each contract. 

Contract costs include all direct material, labor, 
subcontractor, and all other costs which are 
directly attributable to the contract. Indirect 
costs related to contract performance, such as 
indirect labor, supplies, tools, yard expenses, 
etc. are allocated utilizing current years revenues. 
Provision for estimated losses on uncompleted 
contracts are made in the period in which such 
losses are determined. 

The asset account, "Costs and estimated earnings 
in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts", 
represents revenues recognized in excess of 
amounts billed. The liability account, "Billings 
in excess of costs and estimated earnings on 
uncompleted contracts", represents billings in 
excess of revenues recognized. 



Cmarles E DiPESA a Co. Boston Mass (617; 423-3555 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 



d. Property and Eouipinent - Property and equipment are 
stated at cost. Depreciation is provided using 
both the straight-line and accelerated methods over 
the estimated useful lives. The estimated useful 
lives are: 

Building and Improvements 20-26 Years 

Transportation Equipment 3-5 Years 

Furniture and Equipment 5-10 Years 

Equipment 4-5 Years 

Major additions to property or equipment are 
capitalized, whereas normal repairs and maintenance 
are expensed currently. 

Depreciation for the years ended June 30, 1982 and 
1981 was $89,030 and $299,598, respectively. 

e. Allocation of Indirect Job Costs - All construction 
costs are directly allocated to the Jobs except for 
yard costs which are allocated on current years 
revenues. For the years ended June 30, 1982 and 

1981 yard costs were $86,888 and $79,895, respectively. 

f. Income Taxes - Deferred income taxes are provided for 
principally because of timing differences in the 
reporting of income and losses. 

The provision arises principally because partnership 
losses which exceeded the Company's investments are 
deducted for tax return purposes only. Construction 
contracts are reported for tax purposes on the 
completed-contract method and for financial statement 
purposes on the percentage-of-completion method. 



Charles E DiPESa&Co. Boston Mass (617; 423-3555 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 



Note 2 - CHANGES IN ACCOUNTING 

Effective July 1, 1981, the Company elected to change 
its method of accounting for its long-term construction 
contracts from the completed contract method to the 
percentage of completion method. This election was 
initiated by the Statement Of Position, Accounting For 
Performance of Construction - T^^e Contracts, v/hich 
became effective July 1, 1981. 

The comparative financial statements have been restated 
for both years. The effect of the change in 1982 and 
1981 was to increase net income by $417,107 and $599,065, 
respectively. 



Note 3 - SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS 

The Company has a cash investment program which provides 
for the investment of excess cash in short-terra investments 
Temporary investments consist of commercial paper and 
certificates of deposit. The Company investments are 
stated at cost and they all mature within ninety (90) days. 



Note 4 - ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

The accounts receivable due from construction contracts 
for the years ended June 30, 1982 and 1981 are as follows: 

Unbilled Contracts 

June 30, 1982 Work Receivable Retainage Totals 
Completed Contracts $ - $ 198,712 $1,214,164 
Contracts in Process _z 6,070,293 1,568,132 

Totals $ - $6, 269,005 $ 2,782,296 

Collections to date of this report 

June 30, 1981 

Completed Contracts $ - $2,705,427 $1,041,717 $3,747,144 

Contracts in Process 82,110 3,060,778 2,700,314 5,843,202 

Totals $82.110 $5.766.205 $3.742.031 $9.590.346 

Collections to date of last years report (9/30/81) $4_,J7 0,0J 2_ 

Charles E DiPesa a Co . Boston, Mass i617) 423-3555 



$1 

7 


412 
638 


876 
425 


$9 


051 


301 


$6. 


523 


693 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO. , INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 



Note 5 - LOANS AND NOTES RECEIVABLE 

Loans receivable are principally due from limited 
partnerships in which subsidiaries are corporate 
general partners. The amounts represent advances 
to fund cash requirements of various projects during 
the construction phase. These loans will be repaid 
at final endorsement of the project mortgage or from 
syndication proceeds. 

Note 6 - INVESTMENTS IN AND ADVANCES TO AFFILIATES 

The Company accounts for its investments in partnerships 
on the equity method of accounting. Partnership losses 
which exceed the investment balances are deducted for 
tax return purposes only, and a deferred income tax 
provision is provided for any excess losses utilizing 
the current federal and state income tax rates. 

Note 7 - MORTGAGE PAYABLE 

On July 17, 1981, the Company's 97% owned partnership 
sold its 12-story apartment building for $6,050,000. 
Subsequently, the partnership, 77 Adams Place Company 
liquidated the first mortgage with Freedom Federal 
Savings and Loan Association. The partnership received 
a $2,250,000 Note from the buyer which was paid in 
full prior to June 30, 1982. 

Note 8 - NOTES PAYABLE 

As of June 30, 1981, the Company was liable on two notes 
payable totaling $890,700. During the year, the Company 
liquidated in full both notes, one of which was due to 
the South Shore Bank for $740,700 and the other to 
Brockton Centre Associates for $150,000. 



Charles E DiPesa a Co Boston Mass (617)433-3555 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 



Note 9 - FEDERAL AND STATE INCOME TAXES PAYABLE 

The Company files a consolidated income tax return with 
its wholly owned subsidiaries. The Company's federal 
and state income tax liabilities are $457,916 and 
$151,792, respectively which are net of prepayments of 
$1,100,000 and $304,000. 

Investment tax credits are accounted for on the "flow- 
through" method which reduces the tax expense in the 
year in which the assets giving rise to the credits 
are placed in service. Investment tax credits for the 
year ended June 30, 1982 were $9,601, 

Note 10 - LOAN PAYABLE 

As of June 30, 1982, the Company has borrowed $122,085 
against the cash surrender value of the Officers Life 
Insurance. The Company is liable to the following 
Insurance Companies: 

Company 
Crown Life Insurance Company 
New England Life Insurance Co. 

Total 

Note 11 - DEFERRED INCOME TAXES 

The deferred income tax provision for the years ended 
June 30, 1982 and 1981 is $121,161 and $1,201,218, 
respectively, thereby accumulating balances of 
$2,074,298 and $1,780,631 as of June 30, 1982 and 
1981. This accumulated provision arises principally 
because partnership losses exceeded the Company's 
investment basis in those entities and the difference in 
methods used for accounting of construction contracts. 

During the year the Company acquired a new subsidiary 
which had a deferred income tax balance of $172,506. 



Charles E DiPesa & Co Boston Mass (617)423-3555 



Rate 
6% 
5% 


Amount 

$ 84,280 

37,805 




$122,085 



PEABODY CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1982 AND 1981 



Note 12 - CONTINGENCIES 



In Januaxy 1982, the Company received a report of 
an Internal Revenue Service Examining Officer 
proposing adjustments to the Company's taxalole 
income for the years 1978 and 1979. The Company 
has filed a protest to the proposed adjustments 
and is currently negotiating its position at 
the Appellate level. 



The Internal Revenue Service is also in the process 
of examining the Company's Federal income tax returns 
for the years 1980 and 1981. This examination is 
still in process as of this statement date. 



Note 13 - EXTRAORDINARY ITEMS 



During the year, the Company's 97% owned partnership 
sold its 12-story apartment building and subsequently 
liquidated the partnership entity for a net gain of 
$1,507,892 which is net of applicable income taxes 
of $554,877. 



CharlEs E DiPesa& Co, Boston Mass (617i 423-3555 



7868 U08 



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