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Full text of "Proposal: parcel to parcel linkage, project 2: park square and transitional housing"

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PROPOSAL 

PARCEL TO PARCEL LINKAGE 
PROJECT 2 



PARK SQUARE AND TRANSITIONAL HOUS 




PROPOSAL 

PARCEL TO PARCEL LINKAGE 
PROJECT 2 

PARK SQUARE AND TRANSITIONAL HOUSING 

November 6, 1987 



BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

1.00 LETTER OF INTEREST 

2.00 THE SOUTH PARK PARTNERSHIP 
A LOCAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM 

3.00 MEETING THE BRA ' s GOALS 

4.00 EQUITY PARTICIPATION/DISCLOSURE STATEMENT/ 
STATEMENT OF INTENT 

5.00 DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS 

6.00 DRAWINGS 

7.00 FINANCIAL PROPOSAL/PROJECT SCHEDULES 

8.00 EXHIBITS 



1.00 LETTER OF INTEREST 



THE SOUTH PARK PARTNERSHIP 

720 STATLER OFFICE BUILDING 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02116 

(617) 482-8925 



November 6, 1987 



Mr. Stephen Coyle, Director 
Boston Redevelopment Authority 
One City Hall Square 
Boston, Massachusetts 02201 



Dear Mr. Coyle: 

Please regard this as a formal letter of interest by The South 
Park Partnership to participate as the developer in the Parcel 
to Parcel Linkage 2 Project, which includes sites located in 
Park Square and the South End. 

The South Park Partnership is comprised of Boston-based 
individuals, who are experienced in each and every aspect 
required by this Request for Proposal. 

o Jay R. Schochet and Peter A. Lewis of Schochet 
Associates are seasoned developers of residential and 
commercial properties, including the development of low and 
moderate-income housing. Schochet Associates has demonstrated 
knowledge in project management, analyzing the financial 
feasibility of a project, project financing and property 
management . 

o Pamela G. McDermott, President of Northeast Management & 
Marketing Company, Inc. has expertise in government and 
community relations, having consulted on such matters on other 
major Boston development projects. Northeast Management & 
Marketing Company also has an impressive background in media 
relations, and the development of child care centers. 

o Charles Grigsby brings his strengths in project 
financing, community relations and transitional housing 
development to the team. Having served on numerous 
organizational boards and as a South End resident, he is aware 
of the providers of social services who could assist our team 
in providing the requisite social services to the transitional 
housing residents. 



Mr. Stephen Coyle, Director 
November 6, 1987 
Page Two 



o Joseph D. Feaster, of Feaster Enterprises, has a strong 
background in the legal aspects of real estate development, the 
Boston jobs and fair housing policies, and the development of 
child care facilities. His government and community relations 
expertise have been demonstrated by his service on numerous 
community organizationand boards, in state government, and on 
governmental advisory committees. 

o Samuel E. Mintz, of Mintz Associates Architects/Planners, 
Inc., is an architecture and planning firm with a proven track 
record of well-designed commercial and residential properties 
in the City of Boston. Having participated in numerous 
development projects in Boston, he is sensitive to governmental 
and community concerns with regards to design, open space and 
the appropriate amenities for such development projects. 

Furthermore, to strengthen our team's expertise in specific 
areas, we have engaged the services of the following 
consultants: Meredith & Grew, Inc., through Thomas Hynes and 
Kevin C. Phelan, nationally recognized for their knowledge in 
the areas of project development, financing and marketing; 
Shelter, Inc., through its Executive Director, David F. Whitty, 
and its Board President, Alison S. Lauriat, for their expertise 
in the area of building design and program development for 
transitional housing; Summa Associates, Inc., through Ann 
Vincola, a nationally-recognized firm located in Boston, for 
its expertise in developing child care facilities and programs; 
Gaston Snow & Ely Bartlett, through John Dineen and James 
Marcellino, for its legal expertise in real estate development; 
and Federal Management Co., Inc. for their extensive knowledge 
in property management. 

We have, in our proposal, more than adequately addressed all of 
the requirements of the Request for Proposal. On the Park 
Square site, we propose developing a 15-story building with 146 
units of residential condominiums occupying more than 175,000 
square feet, 90,000 square feet of office space, 22,000 square 
feet of retail space, 3,000 square feet for a child care 
facility financed by the South Park Partnership, and 265 
parking spaces. On the South End site, we propose to finance 
the development of 36 units occupying more than 40,000 square 
feet of space for our transitional housing residents, 3,000 
square feet of community service space, as well as to 
partially finance the operating budget of Shelter, Inc. There 



Mr. Stephen Coyle, Director 
November 6/ 1987 
Page Three 



will be 24 affordable condominum units occupying more than 
27,000 square feet, 30 market rate units occupying 33,750 
square feet, a child care facility financed by our team 
occupying 3,000 square feet of space, and 70 parking spaces. 



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eel confident we have assembled a qualified 
strated track record which will enable us to 
ly the requirements of the Request for 

sensitive to the social concerns and are 
them; we are sensitive to the design concerns 
to meet them; we are committed to and intend 
ively with the City of Boston's Fair Housing 

prepare an Affirmative Marketing Plan which 
ejects to reflect the diversity which exists 



We thank you for your consideration of our proposal, and trust 

that you will determine that The South Park Partnership has 

presented a proposal which exceeds the expectations of the 
Boston Redevelopment Authority. 

Very truly yours, 

THE SOUTH PARK PARTNERSHIP 




2.00 THE SOUTH PARK PARTNERSHIP - A LOCAL DEVELOPMENT 

2.10 Introduction 

The South Park Partnership development team is comprised of 
individuals and firms with long-standing histories and credible 
track records in Boston. Each Partner and consultant on this 
project knows and understands the complex and arduous development 
process in Boston, and believe that the neighborhoods and City are 
better for it. We are fully committed to neighborhood and community 
involvement . 

We believe in the involvement of minorities, women and non-profit 
organizations in the real estate development boom in Boston, and 
think that Parcel to Parcel linkage is an excellent vehicle to 
promote this equality. We have a team that is comprised of all of 
the above-mentioned groups; people who have real strengths and 
skills who can benefit from long-term, day-to-day involvement with a 
specific project, and who will spin off those financial and 
educational rewards to other minorities, women and non-profit groups, 

We believe in the parcel to parcel linkage concept. The benefits of 
tying a valuable downtown site with a neighborhood project allows 
for the development of more affordable housing and creates the 
financial pool necessary to support creative and progressive social 
service packages like transitional housing. 

We are a Boston team, committed to good development, long-term 
involvement, community and neighborhood input, education and 
financial opportunities for women, minorities and non-profit groups, 
and most of all a positive successful future for Boston. 



2.20 The Team 



PARTNERS 

Schochet Associates 

Jay R. Schochet, President 
Peter A. Lewis 

Northeast Management & Marketing Company, Inc, 
Pamela G. McDermott, President 

Charles T. Grigsby 

Feaster Enterprises 

Joseph D. Feaster, President 

Mintz Associates Architects/Planners, Inc. 
Samuel E. Mintz, President 

THE SOUTH PARK PARTNERSHIP 
DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANTS 

Meredith & Grew, Inc. 

Thomas Hynes, President 

Kevin C. Phelan, Senior Vice President 

Gaston Snow & Ely Bartlett 
John K. Dineen 
James C. Marcellino 

Summa Associates, Inc. 

Ann M. Vincola, Principal 

Shelter, Inc. 

Alison Lauriat, Chairman of the Board 
David Whitty, Executive Director 

Federal Management Company, Inc. 
Jason J. Timmons, President 



2.30 Our Boston Traditions 

* A Boston team, comprised of local individuals and firms 
with long-standing histories and involvement, as well as credibility 
and track records in the City of Boston. 

* We understand the complexities of the development process 
in Boston and believe the neighborhoods and the City are better 
because of it. 

* We are here to stay, not to develop the sites and pack up 
to return to other cities. 

* All of the General Partners are longtime Boston residents. 
All of the Partner's firms, and most of the consultant firms are 
Boston based. 

* We care about the future of Boston and believe a good 
development team must maintain a continued relationship with its 
projects. 

* We firmly believe that minorities, women and non-profit 
organizations should share in the real estate development boom in 
Boston, and consider parcel to parcel linkage an excellent vehicle 
to foster this position. Our team is comprised of all of the 
above-mentioned groups, with real strengths and skills, with an 
opportunity to benefit from long-term day-to-day involvement with 
the projects, and a chance to share in the financial and educational 
rewards which in turn can be shared with other minorities, women and 
non-profit organizations. 

* We are committed fully to neighborhood and community input 
and involvement, and have incorporated neighborhood people into our 
project team. 

2.40 The Partners 

2.41 Schochet Associates is a privately owned real estate 
development and management company headquartered in Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Its major areas of concentration are the construction or 
rehabilitation of properties for rental housing, condominiums, and 
office buildings. The Company has also developed shopping centers, 
residential communities, and multi-use complexes. 

Schochet Associates maintains the following capabilities: research 
and feasibility analysis; land or building acquisition; 
engineering/design/construction supervision; and financing, 
management, and marketing services. 

It is a diversified company, with projects throughout Massachusetts, 
Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Georgia, California, and the State 
of Washington. Its experience encompasses the construction of large 



mixed-use condominium developments, rehabilitation of historic 
buildings, and new construction of rental housing and commercial 
space. The Company has succeeded with a wide variety of projects, 
including the new construction of luxury condominiums in Newport, 
Rhode Island; government-assisted housing in Portland, Maine; the 
rehabilitation into housing units of a landmark, granite cotton mill 
in Whitinsvi lie, Massachusetts; and the reconstruciton of an 
industrial warehouse into a first-class office building in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Jay R. Schochet 

In 1973, following several years in the Boston real estate 
community, most significantly as Managing Partner and subsequently 
President of the Codman Company, Inc., Jay Schochet formed his own 
real estate development company - Schochet Associates. Under these 
auspices he has concentrated on the development and management of 
projects throughout New England, California and Washington State. 
In every instance he acts as a principal. He has had many years of 
experience in building all types of housing, from affordable 
apartments for the elderly to luxury condominiums, as well as 
industrial and commercial structures, and large office buildings. 
He is equally comfortable with rehabilitation or new construction, 
conventionally financed or government subsidized projects. 

In addition to Schochet Associates, Mr. Schochet formed Federal 
Management Company, Inc., which specializes in the management of 
commercial and residential property. Together, Schochet Associates 
and Federal Management Company, Inc. constitute a well-rounded, 
totally experienced real estate development and management team able 
to offer each project the skill and expertise so necessary in 
today's competitive market. 

In 1983, he organized JRS Equities, Inc. to act for Schochet 
Associates in the acquisition of income producing properties in 
growing markets nationwide. JRS Equities has acquired for Schochet 
Associates, properties in Atlanta, Georgia and Seattle, Washington. 

He is a member of the Greater Boston Real Estate Board, the Rhode 
Island Real Estate Board, the National Association of Home Builders, 
the National Association of Realtors, and the Chambers of Commerce 
of Boston and Newport, Rhode Island. 

Peter A. Lewis joined Schochet Associates in 1984. He is 
responsible for the company's development program and has experience 
in pre-development and project management activities involving both 
new construction and the reuse of existing structures. Prior to 
joining Schochet Associates, Mr. Lewis worked for Urban Investment 
and Development Company, and was primarily associated with the $525 
million mixed-use Copley Place development which opened in Boston in 
1984. Mr. Lewis was also involved in the planning of 900 North 
Michigan Avenue, a mixed-use tower under construction in Chicago. 



Before relocating to Boston, Mr. Lewis was employed in New York by 
Helmsley-Spear and was responsible for project management for the 
Helmsley Palace and New York Helmsley hotels. He also has a 
background as a real estate loan officer and is a Registered 
Architect. 



2.42 Pamela G. McDermott and Northeast Management & Marketing 
Company 

Pamela G. McDermott is Founder and President of Northeast Management 
St Marketing Company, a full-service marketing and public relations 
firm, and Vice President of Northeast Affiliates, a real estate 
development & consulting group. Northeast Management & Marketing 
Company has worked on numerous real estate development projects, 
such as 125 Summer Street and 125 High Street, providing government 
and community relations counsel, as well as developing creative 
linkage and public benefit packages. She recently addressed the 
Employer- Sponsored Childcare Network on developer-sponsored 
daycare. In her role as Vice President of Northeast Affiliates, she 
has been involved in the purchase and renovation of 30 residential 
units in Roxbury, and is an investor and consultant in two 
additional affordable housing projects in Roxbury. Northeast 
Affiliates is also participating in a proposal to renovate a 
building in Back Bay. Ms. McDermott is also a licensed real estate 
broker . 



Her marketing expertise reinforced by her experience as Director of 
the Boston office for D.H. Sawyer & Associates, a New York-based 
political and corporate communications firm, and as Project Director 
for the Marketing office of the City of Boston. Pamela McDermott 
has also held many governmental positions - Special Assistant to 
Lieutenant Governor Tom O'Neill, Governor Dukakis' Representative to 
the New England Governors' Conference, and Staff Coordinator to the 
Advisory Board of the Coalition of Northeastern Governors. Ms. 
McDermott was also a candidate for the Boston City Council in 1981. 

Ms. McDermott's community activities are extensive. She serves as 
an Alternate on the Boston Landmarks Commission. Ms. McDermott is 
on the Board of Directors of the Big Sister Association of Greater 
Boston and is currently Chairman of the Public Relations Committee. 
For the past two years she served as Co-Chairman of the annual 
"Celebrities Ball" for the Big Sister Association. She also serves 
on the Board of the Boston Cable Access Foundation and is active in 
many other charitable activities including the Laboure Center of 
South Boston and the Pope John XXIII National Seminary. Ms. 
McDermott is on the Board of Advisors for the International Cultural 
Exchange (ICE), a group promoting better communications between the 
U.S. and USSR through sports exchanges, and she was appointed to 
serve on the Board of Directors of Women's Enterprises. Ms. 
McDermott also serves on the Committee for the 75th Anniversary 
Celebration of the Boston Center for the Arts. She is a member of 
the Executives Club of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce. 



2.43 Charles T. Grisgsby 
Charles T 




estate projects, most of which involved low and moderate income 
housing. He provided equity and subordinated investments which 
enabled a minority developer to rehabilitate over 300 units of low 
and moderate income housing, and provided investments which resulted 
in the conversion of a surplus school building into affordable 
housing . 

Mr. Grigsby's community and program development activities have been 
extensive. As Chairman of the Board of the Urban League of Eastern 
Massachusetts, he guided policy development of the Urban League's 
employment, training and teenage pregnancy prevention and male 
responsibility programs. As National President of the United ' 
Neighborhood Centers of America, he set policy and established 
program goals for 72 affiliates throughout the United States in 
family life, skill training and job acquisition, housing placement, 
and affirmative action planning programs. As both a member and a 
Chairman of the Massachusetts State Board of Education, Mr. Grigsby 
established policy for all school committees in the Commonwealth in 
the areas of vocational training and occupational education, 
education of special needs children, adult education policy and 
regulation, and teacher certification. Mr. Grigsby is a Director of 
the ICA Revolving Loan Fund, a Steering Committee member of the 
Chamber of Commerce Boston 2000, and was a Founding Director of the 
Boston Bank of Commerce and Chairman of its Loan Policy and Review 
Committee. 



2.44 Feaster Interprises 

Joseph D. Feaster, an attorney, is President of Feaster Enterprises 
and the Assistant Director of Real Estate for the Massachusetts 
Turnpike Authority. For the past ten years he has provided legal 
representation in real estate transactions for numerous clients, and 
is the attorney for the developer for the proposed 128 units of 
housing known as Fountain Hill Square Development in Roxbury. 

Mr. Feaster has been pursuing an interest in real estate development 
for the past few years, and has been exploring development 
opportunities in Massachusetts, New York, and New Jersey. He has 
taken courses in real estate financial analysis, and participates in 
an intensive real estate development training program offered by the 
Minority Developers Association, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology's Center for Real Estate Development and the City of 
Boston's Office of Jobs and Community Services. 

He is knowledgeable on the formation of child care centers having 
served on the steering committee which created the child care center 
at the Commonwealth's Transportation Building (Transportation 
Children's Center, Inc.) and, in fact, was one of its incorporators. 



In the area of Fair Housing and Affirmative Action, Mr. Feaster, 
while serving as Assistant Secretary and General Counsel in the 
Commonwealth's Executive Office of Administration and Finance, had 
oversight responsibility for the Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination (MCAD) and the State Office of Affirmative Action. 
He directed the administration's efforts in complying with the 
Culbreath Consent Decree from 1983-1985; he assisted in preparing 
legislation revising Chapter 151B, the enabling legislation for 
governing the MCAD, and served on an Advisory Committee which made 
recommendations revising the practices and procedures of the MCAD. 
He was a co-drafter of Executive Order 237, the Governor's Minority 
Development Program, and spearheaded the drafting of the attendant 
regulations. He was co-drafter of Executive Order 227, which 
amended the Governor's Code of Fair Practices, and served on the 
Governor's Civil Rights Working Group. 




2.45 Samuel E. Mintz, A. I. A., A.I.C.P. 

Samuel E. Mintz, A. I. A. - A.I.C.P., is President of Mintz Associates 
Architects/Planners, Inc., a firm he started in 1964 after serving 
as Director of Planning and Design for the Downtown Waterfront - 
Faneuil Hall Urban Renewal Project. His background in architecture 
and planning is extensive as a result of numerous projects in which 
he has been involved in Massachusetts, particularly in the Greater 
Boston area. He designed the 381 unit Shore Plaza East development 
in East Boston, the 150 unit Knights of Columbus elderly housing in 
the North End, the 212 unit Charlesview Apartment in Allston, the 
Essex Bank Regional Headquarters office in Peabody, the Bostonian 
Hotel in Boston, the 210 South Street Office Building in Boston, the 
82 unit Courtyard Condominium housing development in Charlestown, 
and the 449 unit Harbor Point (Columbia Point) mixed income housing 
complex in Dorchester. Mr. Mintz also provided the planning for the 
Watertown Arsenal, Boston Gas (Park Square), John Hancock (Copley 
Place), and Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Massachusetts (Boston 
Financial District). 

He has been a visiting critic and guest lecturer at M.I.T, Harvard 
University, the Boston Architectural Center, Tufts University, 
Boston College, Carnegie Mellon University, and Tuskegee University. 

Mr. Mintz is a member of the American Institute of Certified 
Planners, the American Institute of Architects, the National 
Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials, the 
Massachusetts Construction Industry Council, and the National 
Council of Architectural Registration Boards. 



2 .50 The Consultants 

2.51 Meredith & Grew 

Founded in 1875, Meredith & Grew has served corporations, 
partnerships, institutions, real estate developers, and large and 
small business organizations. The firm has played an active role in 
shaping the historic and contemporary appeal of Boston. It is a 
full-service real estate organization of over forty professional 
practitioners and a total staff of approximately two hundred. 
Trust, integrity, and confidentiality characterize the firm's 
relationships. 

The primary focus of the Company is on commercial, industrial and 
institutional properties in the New England area, although 
significant work is being done throughout the U. S. on behalf of New 
England clients, through affiliation with The Office Network, the 
Society of Industrial Realtors and the American Society of Real 
Estate Counselors which are national organizations. Services 
provided include appraisal, brokerage, counselling, development 
services, property management, and real estate finance. 

Meredith & Grew services are characterized by vision, creative 
planning, and professional execution. The variables involved in the 
real estate profession are fully understood and there is pride in a 
tradition of thoroughness. 

2.52 Gaston Snow & Ely Bartlett 

Gaston Snow & Ely Bartlett's Real Estate Department includes seven 
partners, one Of Counsel, 15 associates, two rotatees, three 
paralegals and three title examiners. They represent buyers and 
sellers of all kinds of real estate, lessors, lessees, developers, 
borrowers, lenders and public authorities - anyone who deals in any 
way with real estate. 

A number of people within the Department specialize in environmental 
matters, since environmental laws and regulations play an increasing 
role in the development and use of real estate. 

Most of the firm's work is for commercial and industrial clients. 
All have special areas in which they tend to concentrate but, as a 
team, they cover all areas of real estate law and practice and take 
pride in doing high quality work in a timely manner. 

2.53 Summa Associates, Inc. 



Summa Associates, Inc. is the first national consulting firm 
specializing in corporate child care planning and management. Summa 
was formed in 1986 through a merger of three regional firms 
including, Burud and Associates of Los Angeles, Contemporary 
Ventures in Child Care of Phoenix, and Corporate Child Care 



Consultants of Boston. Ann Vincola, a principal of the former 
Corporate Child Care Consultants operated in Massachusetts since 
1982. Summa has designed on-site child care facilities for many 
corporate clients namely, Hill, Holiday, Connors, Cosmopulos; the 
Howard Johnson Company; Prime Computer, Inc.; and Bose Corporation. 
Summa has also consulted on child care proposals with the City of 
Randolph, First Baptist Church, Southwest Child Care Coalition and 
the Combined Jewish Philanthropies to name a few. Summa has 
extensive knowledge in program development, program management, 
facility design, financial assistance programs and conducting needs 
assessments/ feasibility studies in relation to child care 
facilities. 

2.54 Shelter, Inc. 

Shelter, Inc., a not-for-profit agency founded in 1974, currently 
operates two shelter facilities in Metropolitan Boston. Its 
Cambridge Shelter provides lodging, meals, counseling, casework and 
advocacy and resettlement assistance to twenty needy persons a 
night, as well as a long-term transitional unit at the Cambridge 
YWCA for single parent women and their children. Its Boston Family 
Shelter, located in the South End, is a transitional shelter which 
provides housing, meals, individual and family counseling, case 
advocacy and relocation assistance for eight to ten families. In 
1986, Shelter, Inc. founded an affiliate educational corporation 
named Family Life Education, Inc. for the purpose of providing 
educational programs designed to assist homeless families break the 
cycle of poverty. 

2.55 Federal Management Company, Inc. 

Federal Management Company, Inc., a Boston based firm, has regional 
offices in Newport, Rhode Island, Atlanta, Georgia, Los Angeles, 
California and Seattle, Washington. These offices provide 
management services for all Schochet Associates' developments and 
acquisitions. Responsibilities include leasing activities, cash 
flow projections, tenant relations, personnel administration, 
insurance and real estate tax matters, accounting functions, and 
building operations. Its residential portfolio includes all types 
of housing, from luxury condominiums to low and moderate subsidized 
rental units, new construction and rehabilitation as well as market 
rate rental apartment units. Its commercial portfolio comprises 
offices and stores, shopping malls, restaurants, and old and new 
office buildings. 



CHARLES GRIGSBY is Chairman of the Board of Directors 
of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts, is a 
Founding Director of Boston's only minority-owned 
bank, the Boston Bank of Commerce, and was National 
President of the United Neighborhood Centers of America. 

JOSEPH FEASTER is a Founding Member of the Minority 
Developer's Association, has had oversight responsibility 
for the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination 
(MCAD) and the State Office of Affirmative Action, was 
co-drafter of Executive Order 237, was on the Governor's 
Civil Rights Working Group, served two terms as Presi- 
dent of the NAACP's Boston Chapter, and is the past co- 
chair of the Greater Boston Civil Rights Coalition. 



2.60 THE SOUTH PARK PARTNERSHIP - OPPORTUNITIES FOR MINORITIES, 
WOMEN AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS 

We understand and believe in the real involvement of minorities, 
women and non-profit, community-based providers. Our team has made 
a serious commitment to the philosophy of "Building capacity" - 
providing an environment for minorities, women and non-profits to 
learn the intricacies of the development process, and to use that 
knowledge in the future to start or participate in additional 
ventures, which will enable the hiring and training of others. 

The South Park Partnership has incorporated the following 
minorities, women and non-profit, community-based organizations: 

* Two of the four General Partners are Minority Business 
Enterprises (MBE), and one of the four is a Women's 
Business Enterprise (WBE). 

* Our daycare consultant is Summa Associates, Inc., the 
first national corporate child care planning and 
management firm, and a Women's Business Enterprise (WBE). 

* Our transitional housing consultant is Shelter, Inc., the 
community-based, non-profit provider/manager of the Boston 
Family Shelter. 

* Our Property Manager for both sites, will be Federal 
Management Co., Inc., the management affiliate of 
Schochet Associates. 46% of the total workforce of 
Federal Management are women; 30% hold positions of 
authority including the Vice President, three Regional 
Managers, and 10/12 on-site Managers. Minorities 
represent 15% of the total workforce. Schochet 
Associates has made a commitment to hire and train 
minorities and women for all jobs relating to both 
sites, to provide another example of "building capacity" 
for the future. In addition, Schochet Associates has 
made a commitment to professionally train the permanent 
Manager and owners (Trustees) of the transitional housing 
program so that they are ultimately self-sufficient. 

* We have contacted over 50 non-profit, community-based, 
social service providers to determine their ability to 
provide services to the South End transitional housing 
program. 

The members of the South Park Partnership have been involved in 
promoting minorities, women, and non-profit community organizations 
for many years, as witnessed by the following examples: 

* PAMELA MCDERMOTT serves on the Board of Directors of the 
Boston Cable Access Foundatiaon (which promotes access to 
all sectors of the population), and the Board of 
Directors of Women's Enterprises, a group developed by 
the Governor's Office of Economic Affairs to develop 
employment and training programs for low-income women. 



2.70 THE SOUTH PARK PARTNERSHIP - DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES. 

As evidenced, Jay Schochet made an early and impressive commitment 
to seek out qualified individuals and organizations that could round 
out the South Park team. His goal was to involve minorities, women 
and non-profit community-based providers, who had limited experience 
in real estate development, to afford these individuals and their 
organizations an opportunity to "learn on the job." The Partnership 
is an impressive team, comprised of individuals and firms with 
differing strengths, with much to learn and the opportunity to build 
capacity. Everyone on the team will be assigned certain areas of 
responsibility, yet everyone will also be involved in all aspects of 
the job, and in decision-making. Every team member will be involved 
in BOTH sites, not the less experienced individuals in the South End 
and Schochet Associates at Park Square. All Partners will be 
required to make a capital contribution to participate in the equity 
ownership, again the significance being equality in decision-making, 
responsibility, roles, and reward. 

The following is a brief description of each Partner's role in the 
Parcel to Parcel 2 projects: 

SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 

* Developer, residential & commercial 

* Financial Proposals 

* Project Management 

* Property Management 

NORTHEAST MANAGEMENT & MARKETING COMPANY 

* Government/community relations 

* Daycare liaison 

* Media relations 

* Marketing/leasing 
Transitional housing program development 

* Social service provider liaison 

* Boston Resident Job Policy - marketing 

* Affirmative action - marketing 
Fair housing - marketing 



* 



* 



CHARLES GRIGSBY 



* 
* 
* 
* 

* 

* 



Affordable housing - financing 
Transitional housing financial plan 
Community Relations 
Daycare liaison 



ance 



FEASTER ENTERPRISES 

* Conveyancing 

* Transitional housing liaison 

* Daycare development 
Social service provider liaison 

* Affirmative action compliance 

* Boston Resident Jobs Policy compliance 

* Fair housing compliance 

* Government/community relations 



* 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS, INC. 

* Architecture/design 

* Urban planning 

MEREDITH & GREW, INC. 

* Financing 

* Leasing 

GASTON SNOW & ELY BARTLETT 

* Oversee all legal aspects of development 

* Permitting and city approvals 

SUMMA ASSOCIATES, INC. 

* Consultation on daycare facility design 

* Daycare Operator/Vendor selection 

* Budget development and identification of funding 
alternatives 

* Daycare program philosophy, curriculum and development 

* Evaluation Mechanism 

SHELTER, INC. 

* Transitional housing programming/provider 

* Owner of transitional units 

* Budget development and identification of 
funding alternatives 

FEDERAL MANAGEMENT COMPANY, INC. 

* Property management 

* Training of successor management team 



3.00 MEETING THE BRA ' s GOALS 

3 .01 Introduction 

The Boston Redevelopment Authority's Request for Proposal listed 
nine objectives and selection criteria, which each proposal should 
meet : 

1. Addressing the needs of homeless women and children; 

2. Help to provide resources to fund social services for the 
transitional housing participants, daycare and other public 
benefits; 

3. Build affordable housing and provide safeguards for 
long-term af fordability; 

4. Address the need for daycare; 

5. Undertake an aggressive community outreach effort to 
solicit input, and to fulfill the community's vision; 

6. Provide opportunities for minorities and women, as 
well as community-based organizations; 

7. Provide a quality urban design; 

8. Promote housing downtown; 

9. Comply with the design and development guidelines 
outlined in the RFP . 

We have outlined in the attached section how The South Park 
Partnership meets these objectives and selection criteria. 



3.10 ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF HOMELESS WOMEN AND CHILDREN . 

The tragic national and local statistics on the number of homeless 
women and children requires an immediate and effective response. 
While the evidence suggests that the number of homeless individuals 
will increase at an alarming rate, the response nationally has been 
less than adequate. The City of Boston has moved to stem the tidal 
wave of homelessness, which has been exacerbated by the lack of 
affordable housing, by including the development of affordable 
housing in all projects. Moreover, this proposal includes the 
development of transitional housing units and the development of a 
program for the benefit of 36 transitional families. 

The South Park Partnership shares the City's concern with the issue 
of homelessness, recognizes its responsibility to address this 
issue, and supports the City's initiative. We have identified a 
transitional housing provider with demonstrated experience, 
providing important social service assistance to individuals who are 
in search of a more stable life environment; we propose to finance, 
design and construct 36 transitional housing units; we intend to 
fund, in part, the program of the provider. Shelter, Inc. 

3.11 The Provider - Shelter, Inc. 

Shelter, Inc. a not-for-profit agency founded in 1974, currently 
operates two shelter facilities in metropolitan Boston. Its 
Cambridge Shelter provides lodging, meals, counseling, casework and 
advocacy and resettlement assistance to twenty needy persons a 
night, as well as a long-term transitional unit at the Cambridge 
YWCA for single parent women and their children. Its Boston Family 
Shelter, located in the South End, is a transitional shelter which 
provides housing, meals, individual and family counseling, case 
advocacy and relocation assistance for eight to ten families. In 
1986, Shelter, Inc. founded an affiliate educational corporation 
named Family Life Education, Inc. for the purpose of providing 
educational programs designed to assist homeless families break the 
cycle of poverty. The combined resources of both organizations make 
Shelter, Inc. uniquely qualifed to operate this transitional housing 
program. 

3.12 The Program 

The proposed program would replicate the services currently provided 
at the Boston Family Shelter, but expand them to address the needs 
of thirty-six families rather than eight to ten families. 

A. Program Objectives 

* Provide an appropriate living environment . 

This can be accomplished by placing an emphasis on 
creating a warm, supportive and empowering environment 
which encourages the formation of interpersonal 
relationships. 



* Support adults' re-entry into the community at large . 
This can be accomplished by educating adults with an 
emphasis on the development of parenting skills, and en- 
couraging the growth of self-esteem and autonomy, and by 
providing professional development for parents so that 
they can achieve satisfying careers. 

* Encourage effective family units to allow for the 
nurturing and growth of children . 

This can be accomplished by developing early intervention 
programs. Special services will be provided as needed 
for children from infancy to five years of age, with 
close follow-up for school age children. Support systems 
will be established for families to rely on when 
inevitable stressful situations arise. 

B. Program Management/Staffing 

A problem in providing services to transitional residents has 
been the lack of adequately trained staff to provide needed 
services. It is critical to emphasize here the importance of 
staffing and the necessity for creating stable connections between 
this program and appropriate service providers in the community. 
Since the Request For Proposal suggests limited on-site staffing, it 
will be necessary to depend heavily on support from available public 
and private agencies. 

The program staff will consist of a supervisor with an advanced 
clinical degree in mental health/human services and administrative 
experience, six (6) facilitators with clinical backgrounds, and a 
secretary/office manager. Beside providing on-site coordination of 
services, the program staff will coordinate and monitor the delivery 
of services to the transitional residents by public and private 
agencies, and will issue service requests for proposals and written 
agreements, with selected agencies, detailing responsibilites with 
respect to placement, assessment, service delivery, relocation and 
case management. 



C. Program Budget 

Staffing 

(1) Supervisor 
(6) Facilitators 
(1) Secretary 

Office Overhead 

Utilities, Phone, Insurance 
Staff Training 

Purchase of Services 

Support Services Purchased from 
Social Service Providers 

Total Budget 



$242,000 - $300,000 



$12,000 - $16,000 



$246,000 - $334,000 



$500,000 - $650,000 



D. Sources of Funds 



Minimum/annum 



South Park Partnership Endowment $150,000 - $150,000 
Increases in local agency budgets 

(other sources) 50,000 - $100,000 
HUD Transitional Housing Demonstration 

Program 150,000 - 200,000 

Federal and State contracts 150,000 - 200,000 

TOTAL $500,000 - $650,000 

E. Program Format 

1. Admissions Criteria 

We will attempt to ascertain the following from each client: 

a. Interest in education and career development on the part 
of parent. 

b. Interest in participating in pre-admissions programs 
(touring facility, interviews with other families, 
informational interviews, etc.). 

c. Willingness to address areas of alcohol and substance 
abuse. 

d. Interest in long-term support program. 

e. No active battering or abuse cases. 
2 . Phase I 

a. The staff and participants will work together to 
establish a reasonable set of both short (2-month) and 
long-term goals for each individual family. 

b. The participants will be asked for feedback regarding 
the rules of the housing, their initial adjustment, 
other matters, etc. 

c. Families will be referred to community agencies to begin 
work on stated goals. 

Phase II 

a. After 2 months, short-term goals will be redefined, 
other goals modified if necessary. Rules of the 
program may also be changed. Services may be added as 
needed. 

b. Referral to community agencies for mental health, career 
training, tutoring, volunteer work, and daycare will 
continue throughout this phase. 



Phase III 

Ongoing conferences will be held with the client to evaluate 
progress and make any alterations that seem needed. 

Phase IV 

This will begin the "termination phase" when it appears that 
things are going well enough for the client to begin 
looking for their own apartment and making the adjustment 
required for more independent living. 

Phase V 

Clients, now living independently, remain active in the com- 
munity aspects of the housing. Families who have partici- 
pated in the transitional program will always have strong 
support and assistance from the program through any times 
of stress. Equally important, as lives settle down and 
improve outside the program, past participants can serve as 
role models and friends for current residents. 

3 . Client Participation 

a. One weekly group meeting with residents and staff to 
review difficulties and program plans. This will also serve as a 
time to arrange for the logistics of cluster living, i.e., care of 
common space, babysitting. 

b. Training sessions in such areas as money management, 
dealing with bureaucracies (i.e., AFDC or child's school) or 
landlord-tenant rights. Meetings should be chaired alternating 
between residents and staff. 

c. Peer counseling training program. Since one of the 
major difficulties these families face is lack of support systems, 
it appears that interpersonal skill development is of major 
importance. The peer counseling program is a proven approach to 
teaching people to listen to others and learn about reciprocity in 
relationships. In addition, those trained will then be able to 
provide greater support to their peers entering the program. (See 
"Phase V") . 

Peer counseling will incude AA, Alanon, 
Adult-Children. Since one of the major areas of difficulties these 
families face is a need to continue to participate in AA , Alanon, 
and Adult Children programs, groups need to be set up to address 
these issues. 

d. Continuing participation in the transitional program 
will depend on residents participating in the community programs to 
which each family will be referred. The program will not be able to 
function without the participation of a network of community 
services and, similarly, the program cannot effectively serve its 
residents without their participation in these programs. 



F. Programmatic Concerns 

Designing a program linking existing services to 36 
transitional families, while not impossible, raises questions which 
we feel should be articulated here: 

1. How will the continually changing mix of needed 
services be purchased from existing service providers? 
Who will pay for the services? 

2. Do the community agencies have the capacity and 
willingness to service the needs of the transitional 
housing clients? 

3. Who is responsible for relocation planning for the 36 
families? How are relocation efforts coordinated with 
that of other providers involved with the families? 
Who is in charge of case coordination? 

4. Who will be responsible for placement housing needs of 
former transitional housing residents? What resources 
will be available to assist them? 

3.13 Linking Up With Off-Site Social Service Providers 

The South End site will bring a challenge and an opportunity. The 
opportunity is to build a development that gracefully weaves into 
the fabric of the South End and is a comfortable, attractive 
addition to that neighborhood. 

The challenge is to keep the human element high on the agenda, 
providing a diverse menu of social services in order to aid the new 
residents in their efforts to build better lives for themselves and 
their children. 

The Partnership is aware that the best providers of services are 
those with a working knowledge of the area, and that most agencies 
cannot expand at will, no matter how worthy the project. Additional 
resources are usually needed. The Partnership will therefore: 

* Follow-up on the surveying already done to determine a 
needed mix of services. 

* Meet with providers who have identified themselves as 
interested in servicing a portion of the new population. 

* Assist social-service providers in identifying sources of 
financing necessary to assist this new population. 

* Be a resouce to the Board of Directors in supplying alter- 
natives for the Board to consider, as it develops policy for 
the provision of both economic opportunity and social 
services to residents. 



The Partnership has already begun the process of identifying 
community-based, public and private service providers and has 
communicated with them regarding our interest in discussing further 
their ability to provide services to the expected transitional 
clients. A few of the agencies with whom we have communicated are: 

- ABCD, Inc. 

- Boston City Hospital 

- Boston Employment Resource Center 

- Bridge Over Troubled Waters 

- Cardinal Cushing Center 

- Casa del Sol 

- Boston Chinese Y.E.S. 

- Crispus Attucks Daycare 

- Fuller Mental Health Center 

- Horizons House 

- Inquilinos Boricuos en Accion (IBA) 

- Jobs for Youth 

- Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless 

- South End Boys Club 

- South End Health Center 

- Transitional Employment Enterprises 

- United South End Settlements 

- University Hospital 

- Vocational Adjustment Center 

- Women, Inc. 

- Women's Technical Institute 

- Youth Entrepreneurial Development Project. 



3.20 RESOURCES TO FUND DAYCARE SOCIAL SERVICES FOR THE 
TRANSITIONAL HOUSING PARTICIPANTS/ AND OTHER PUBLIC BENEFITS. 

3.21 Social Services for Transitional Housing . 

* The South Park Partnership will provide an endowment of 
$2,000,000 which will provide approximately $150,000 per 
annum, as a reliable and on-going source of funds for 
community development and social services, or as a capital 
improvement fund for extraordinary operating expenses for 
the transitional housing project. 

* The Partnership will provide free rent in the South End, for 
management of the transitional program. 

* The Partnership will also pursue federal, state and private 
funds for transitional programs. 

Federal 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
U.S. Department of Education 
Federal Emergency Management Administration 
National Institute of Mental Health 
U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development 
(Transitional Housing Demonstration Program) 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Executive Office of Communities and Development 

Department of Social Services 

Department of Public Welfare 

Department of Mental Health 

Department of Education 

Department of Public Health 

Private 

United Way of Massachusetts Bay 

Foundations 

Corporations 

Individuals 

3 .22 Daycare . 

* The South Park Partnership as part of its public benefits 
package will assume the costs of the Summa consulting 
contract, to develop, model, license, and set-up both 
daycare centers. Both centers will then be turned over 
to local, community-based vendors for management. 



* The Partnership will also pursue the following funding 
sources for daycare programs: 

Foundations 

Boston Foundation 

Permanent Charity Fund 

Godfrey Hyamns Trust 

Parker Foundation 

The Eastern Associated Foundation 

The Eaton Foundation, Inc. 

Fidelity Foundation 

Fuller Foundation 

Pierce Charitable Trust 

The Riley Foundation 

Sagamore Foundation 

Webster Foundation 

Noonan Memorial Fund 

IBM Corporate Foundation 

The Stop & Shop Charitable Foundation 

The Polaroid Foundation 

The Stride-Rite Charitable Foundation 

The Boston Globe Foundation 

New England Telephone Foundation 

Other 

Corporate donations 
Loans, i.e., MIFA 
United Way of Massachusetts Bay 

Other local corporations and daycare centers who might need 
additional space 

3.23 Other Public Benefits . 

The Partnership may use the Boston Urban Gardener program to 
maintain shrubbery, plants and landscaping around and on both 
sites, thereby providing jobs for displaced garment workers 
from Chinatown. 



The Partnership will utilize neighborhood employees 
(train and hire) for jobs on-site, thereby creating employ- 
ment opportunities. 




3.24 Relevant Experience . 

The South Park Partnership is uniquely qualified to meet this BRA 
objective, because: 



PAM MCDERMOTT has been working with other downtown and 
neighborhood developers to develop creative, responsive 
public benefits packages, to help Boston residents. She has 
recently given a presentation on developer-sponsored daycare. 

CHUCK GRIGSBY has expertise in developing creative financing 
packages for Community Development Corporations (CDCs). 

JOSEPH FEASTER served on the Steering Committee, which created 
the child care center at the Commonwealth's Transportation 
Building, and was an Incorporator of that center. 



3.3 BUILD AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND PROVIDE SAFEGUARDS FOR LONG-TERM 
AFFORDABILITY 

3 .31 Program . 

The Partnership will provide for 10% of affordable housing 
units on the Park Square site (15), and 24 on the South End site, in 
addition to the 36 transitional units. 

* The Partnership will include deed restrictions in all 
Purchase and Sale Agreements to safeguard the long-term 

af f ordability of these units. 

3 .32 Funding . 

* The Partnership will provide up to $5,000,000 from the Park 
Square site to subsidize construction of the South End site. 

* The Partnership will pursue other funding sources for 
construction to include: 

- The State's Housing Innovations Fund administered by the 

Executive Office of Communities and Development (EOCD). 

- Other programs funded and administered by EOCD which foster 

home ownership especially by first-time homebuyers. 

- Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency programs designed to 

foster first-time home ownership, for low to moderate 
income purchasers. 

- The Boston Housing Authority under section 705 or 689, if 
applicable. 

3.33 Policy on Fair Housing 

The team's commitment to a fair housing policy will be tangible and 
measurable. Team members individually have already demonstrated a 
commitment to these principles in their other projects and 
involvements. 

The Partnership's policy will include: 

* A firm commitment to comply with city, state and federal 
rules, orders or regulations barring discrimination of any person or 
group on the grounds of race, color, religion, age, sex or national 
origin. 

* A firm commitment to comply with the letter and spirit of 
city, state and federal policies requiring administration of 
programs and activities relating to housing in a manner to 
affirmatively further fair housing. 

* A firm commitment to comply with the city, state and federal 
prohibitions against discrimination, based on handicap. 

The Partnership intends to take a pro-active stance on this issue, 
as on other similar matters. In addition to steps of compliance, we 
will take the following additional steps: 



- In making known the availability of housing at both the Park 
Square site and the South End site, we will establish 
additional procedures when the usual, intended procedures are 
unlikely to reach persons of any particular race, color, 
religion, sex or national origin who may qualify for purchase 
or tenancy. 

- In conjunction with one or more local social service pro- 
viders, the Partnership will sponsor home ownership seminars 
for potential buyers, with plain explanations of the 
mechanics of home buying and the how-to of financing. We 
will seek the cooperation of local banks to participate in 
these seminars. An added benefit may be the continuance of 
such seminars by the social service agency to benefit other 
projects . 

- Again, in conjunction with one or more local service 
providers, seek the cooperation of vocational school vol- 
unteers and occupational education instructors, as well as 
home building material retailers to conduct on-site seminars 
on the basics of home repair: how to perform minor repairs 
until a professional tradesman is available or needed. 

- The Partnership will insure that events, seminars and infor- 
mation are provided in bilingual form, in order to insure 
the widest dissemination. 

3.34 Relevant Experience 

The South Park Partnership is uniquely qualified to meet these BRA 
objectives, because: 

o SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES has an established track record of 
developing high-quality, reputable, affordable housing across the 
entire country. For example: 

- Waterview Apartments, 49 units. South Boston 

- Danforth Heights Apartments, 166 units, Portland, Maine 

- Thayer Garden Apartments, 96 units, Waterville, Maine 

- Cotton Mill Apartments, 55 units, Whitinsville 

- Weldon Apartments, 105 units, Greenfield 

- West Broadway Apartments, 115 units, Newport, Rhode Island 

- Angelus Plaza, 1098 units, Los Angeles, California 

- Fresh Pond Apartments, 504 units, Cambridge 

o PAMELA MCDERMOTT, as a community relations consultant to the 
125 Summer Street project, helped to initiate Boston's first linkage 
housing creation proposal. The affordable housing will be built by 
a joint venture of the development team and the Chinese Consolidated 
Benevolent Association (CCBA), and will be constructed on Shawmut 
Avenue in the South End. 



o CHARLES GRIGSBY, as President of the Massachusetts Community 
Development Finance Corporation has supervised investments in over 
34 real estate projects, most of which entailed low and moderate 
income housing. These investments have created over 1500 new or 
rehabilitated units for low and moderate income tenants through 
CDCs. Investments have included a transitional housing site in 
Fitchburg for 8 females and their children. As President of the 
Massachusetts Venture Capital Corporation, he made equity and 
subordinated investments to enable a minority developer to 
rehabilitate over 300 units of low and moderate income housing. 
These investments were early demonstrations of the feasibility of 
converting surplus school buildings into affordable housing. 

o Mintz Associates has an established track record of designing 
high-quality, affordable housing in Boston, and Massachusetts. For 
example: 

- Charlesview Apartments, 212 units, Allston 

- Shore Plaza East, 381 units. East Boston 

- Over 200 units of rehabilitated housing in the South End 
and Worcester 

- Heritage Elderly Apartment Complex in Maverick Square, 
East Boston 

- Knights of Columbus Elderly Housing, 150 units. North End 

- Patricia Hagen White Apartments, 225 units, Brighton 

- South Cove Plaza East and West Elderly Housing, 231 units, 
Bay Village 

- Columbia Point, 449 units, Dorchester 

o Shelter, Inc., in operation since 1974, developed and 
currently operates two transitional housing facilities in 
metropolitan Boston for a total of 55 people. 



3.4 ADDRESS THE NEED FOR DAYCARE 

Child care has become one of the most important issues facing 
American familes today. Significant social, economic and 
demographic changes have placed women with young children into the 
work force and has made locating quality, affordable child care a 
considerable problem for working parents. Single-parent households 
and dual-career families have increased so dramatically that by 1990 
approximately 60% of preschoolers will have mothers who work outside 
the home. In addition, the accelerated child care needs of the 
general population further magnifies the need for high quality child 
care within any community, especially in urban localities. 

Efforts such as the Parcel to Parcel Linkage Project for Park Square 
and the South End point to the fact that the City of Boston is 
actively attempting to address the problems of the homeless and 
those in transitional housing and to provide much needed child care 
for these individuals. Child care at the downtown site directly 
impacts on the lives of working parents in the City. 

3.41 The Providers - Summa Associates, Inc. /Local Providers 

The South Park Partnershipment intends to ensure the success of the 
two daycare centers outlined in the RFP. To that end, we conducted 
an exhaustive survey of government and corporate opinion-leaders in 
Boston and Massachusetts to elicit their thoughts on potential 
service agencies, vendors and consultants. Summa Associates, Inc. 
was the overwhelming choice of a majority of those individuals we 
contacted. 

Summa Associates, Inc. is the first national consulting firm 
specializing in corporate child care. It was formed in 1986 through 
a merger of three regional firms: Burud and Associates of Los 
Angeles; Contemporary Ventures in Child Care of Phoenix; and 
Corporate Child Care Consultants of Boston. 

We have conducted an exhaustive analysis, and have already met with 
and written letters to, local community based daycare providers, to 
ensure their input and interest. 

3.42 The Program 

The proposed project for the Parcel to Parcel Linkage Project is to 
plan, develop and implement high quality affordable on-site child 
care centers for the future residents and for potential community 
members, as well, at the South End and Park Square development sites. 

The proposed approach involves facility design, program development, 
budget development, identification of additional funding sources and 
program evaluation. We will offer assistance in all phases of 
planning and development, including the recruitment of operators and 
the licensing of the centers, as well as creating an evaluation 
mechanism to insure the continued success of the program. 



Summa's approach is supported by its ability and experience in 
programs of this nature and its ability for providing comprehensive 
consultation and planning. The approach is summarized in the 
Overview of Approach on the following page and is explained in 
detail in this proposal. 

DAY CARE COMPONENT OF PROJECT 

Goals ; * To establish a model on-site child care center for the 
residents of the South End transitional housing program 
as well as potentially for children from South End neigh- 
borhood families for approximately 45 children and another 
center at the Park Square downtown development site for 
children of residents and working parents in the area. 
'This center will also be for approximately 45_-_50, 
children. 

* To provide female heads of households the daycare support 
they need for their children in order to become 
financially independent. 

* To provide quality child care that is convenient and 
affordable. 

Summa Associates' responsibilities for this project will be: 

A. Consultation on Facility Design both Interior and Exterior 

Summa Associates will evaluate the proposed site, both indoor 
and outdoor space, and make recommendations as to facility design to 
meet code requirements for Office For Children licensing, recommend 
a list of furnishings, equipment and materials required to conduct a 
quality program, work closely with the architects in all phases of 
the design process and develop a Design Guide for the architects on 
the project to use in developing plans for the centers. 

The design guide includes the following: 

1. Description of the Program goals and philosophy 

2. Review of all state regulatory requirements for child care 
facilities 

3. General design criteria for: 
Classroom space 

Outdoor play yards 

Site design and development 

Maintenance/utility space 

Plumbing 

Indoor/outdoor equipment storage 

Food preparation area 

Office/staff areas 

Laundry areas 

Surfaces 



4. Listing of all classroom furniture. 

a. Classroom composition: 
Infants - 6 weeks to 18 months 
Toddlers - 18 months to 2.9 years 
Preschoolers - 2.9 to 6 years 

The Office for Children requires 35 square feet per child of indoor 
space, excluding storage, kitchen, bathrooms and hallways. Each 
class room requires an eating area, play area, space for napping, 
storage, sink, and easy access to a children's bathroom. In 
addition, infants and toddlers require a diapering area. 

Based on the groupings described above, Summa will recommend the 
necessary square footage for each classroom. At least 50 square 
feet should be allocated for each child. Room for infants, 
toddlers, and pre-schoolers needs to be allocated. Additional 
spaces include kitchen and laundry, administrative areas, isolation 
area, bathrooms (adult and child) circulation and storage, extra 
room (quiet room or common area - optional). 

Other possible amenities would be the inclusion of (i) a large play 
area for indoor gross motor activity; and (ii) a wet room for 
painting and messy play. Multi-levels and platfoms should also be 
included in the design. 

b. Outdoor space requirements 

The Office for Children requires 75 square feet of 
outdoor space for each child using the playground at any one time. 
Parking spaces for drop-off and pick-up also need to be allocated. 
Outdoor play yards include climbing structures, sand area, bicycle 
path, shed for equipment and other areas dependent on size and 
design. 

B. Operator/Vendor Selection 

Summa Associates will assist in the process of selecting a 
potential vendor(s) for both centers. Criteria will be developed 
for operator selection, and potential operators will be recruited 
and interviewed. This necessitates being aware of and involved with 
the operators of neighborhood child care centers who provide quality 
care and would have the potential interest and capabilities to 
administer these programs. The team has already consulted with 
several area providers. 

C . Development of Budgets and Identification of Funding 
Alternatives 

Summa Associates will advise on budgetary procedures and prepare 
budgets and spreadsheets for the proposed centers. Start-up costs 
include the following: 



Capitalized Expenses: 
Construction 
Contingency 
Architectural Fees 
Equipment, including classroom, office, kitchen, outdoor 

Non-Capitalized Expenses 
Consultant Fees 
Start-up Salaries 
Materials - Classroom 
Food and Supplies 
Other Fees, i.e., legal, insurance, publicity 

D. Program Philosphy, Curriculum and Development 

Summa Associates will assist the vendor selected in operating 
this program and in program development. They will assist in 
establishing program philosophy and curriculum, and in writing all 
policies, procedures, handbooks and forms. 

E. Evaluation Mechanism 

Summa Associates will design an evaluation mechanism to insure 
the ongoing quality and success of the centers. 



PROPOSED START-UP BUDGET 

DAYCARE CENTER 
(45 - 50 children) 

Construction: 

Interior Walls $20,000 

Carpeting 17,000 

Painting 15,000 

Plumbing 25,000 
Kitchen (sink, stove, refrigerator, 

dishwasher, cabinets, washer/dryer) 25,000 

General Mill Work and Carpentry 56,000 

Lighting 20,000 

Miscellaneous 18,000 

Contingency 19,600 

Total Construction Costs $215,600 

Outdoor Play Space: 

Climbing Structures $20,000 

Fencing 12,000 

Grading and Surfacing 15,000 

Other Equipment 10,000 

Total Outdoor Play Space $ 57,000 

Classroom Equipment and Materials: (4 classrooms) 

Equipment and Furniture $60,000 

Educational Materials and Supplies 25,000 

Total Classroom Equipment and Materials $ 85,000 

Office Equipment and Supplies $12,000 

Kitchen Equipment and Supplies 5,000 

Total Equipment and Supplies $17,000 

Administrative Expenses: 

Director Salary - 3 months $ 6,000 

Fringe Benefits @ 21% 1,260 

Staff Orientation 2,400 

Printing and Copying 1,500 

Advertising 1,500 

Marketing 2,000 

Insurance Prepayment 6,000 

Other Fees 500 

Telephone and Postage 500 

Total Administrative Expenses $21,660 

TOTAL START-UP COSTS $396,260 



PROPOSED YEARLY OPERATING BUDGET 

Payroll: Salaries (4 classrooms - 48 children) 

Director ^ 25,000 

2 Head Teachers @ $18,000 36,000 

5 Teachers @ $16,000 80,000 

6 Assistant Teachers @ $13,000 78,000 
Substitutes 9,000 
Secretary/Bookkeeper - Partime 15,500 
Social Worker - Partime 16,800 

TOTAL SALARIES 260,300 

Benefits @ 21% 52,060 

TOTAL PERSONNEL 312,360 

Food 4,000 

Equipment 3,500 

Materials and Supplies: 

Classroom 2,500 

Kitchen 1,000 

Office 2,000 

Health Services 2,000 

Insurance 6,000 

Publicity 1,500 

Staff Development: 

Training 2,000 

Membership and Conferences 2,000 

Telephone and Postage 2,000 

TOTAL COSTS $340,860 



Does not include rent, utilities, maintenance 
Average cost of care per child $147.94 



3.50 UNDERTAKE AN AGGRESSIVE COMMUNITY OUTREACH EFFORT TO SOLICIT 
INPUT, AND TO FULFILL THE COMMUNITY'S VISION 

To be successful, any development project must accurately 
incorporate the vision of it's host community resulting in an 
improved community living environment for existing residents as well 
as a high quality environment for the new neighbors. 

The City, through the BRA, has succeeded in describing a project 
that will meet those objectives as well as incorporate the badly 
needed and innovative component of transitional housing. 

The South Park Partnership, upon designation, intends to complete 
the task of realizing this unique combination of innovation and 
community improvement and growth. 

3.51 Goals 

One important component of that task will be an aggressive community 
outreach program. The goals of that outreach will be twofold: 

1. To work in cooperation with the Mayoral appointed Board of 
Directors to stay close to the community vision that has shaped this 
project in a way that is beneficial to all. We would accomplish 
this by initiating meetings with abutters, neighborhood 
associations, CDC's and residents to continually stay tuned to 
concerns and advice. We will help foster the continued involvement 
of the working group of community-based social service providers who 
provided input to develop the proposal for the South End site. 
These meetings should be regular, responsive and open. 

2. To identify the services needed by the transitional 
residents of the development and to specifically identify the social 
service providers who are interested in delivering those services. 
Meetings with local agencies must be frank and decisive. Agencies 
cannot afford to immediately service a new population without 
planning, cooperation, and support and assistance in gaining new 
funding to support additional capacity. 

3.52 Community Benefits 

Through this outreach process, the Partnership will articulate 
community benefits that they will provide such as: 

* The Partnership will aggressively pursue neighborhood 

residents for all construction and permanent jobs on both 
sites, to include the neighborhoods of Chinatown, the South 
End, Bay Village and Park Square. 



* 



* 



Both daycare centers (Park Square and South End) will be open 
to neighborhood residents. 

Parking on the South End site will be FREE, in a protected, 
well-lit, underground garage. 



* The Partnership will improve and maintain the open space and 
gardens on both sites. 

* The Partnership will promote an active, safe streetlife on 
both sites, encouraging evening activities, i.e., concerts, 
retail and restaurant siting on the Park Square site, and 
prominent lighting on the South End site. 

* Because of the Park Square project's proximity to Boston's new 
Cultural District, every effort will be made to incorporate 
some cultural facility/program. 

3.53 Relevant Experience 

o The South Park Partnership is uniquely qualified to meet this 
BRA objective, because: 

* PAM McDERMOTT has been providing this level of community 
outreach to the clients of her firm for years. This 
specialized ability to seek input, capture its essence and 
respond to it is one of the trademarks of Northeast. Her 
firm has worked in this capacity with elected officials, 
community, civic, and historical groups, abutters and 
government agencies. In her role as a consultant to 125 
Summer Street, she spent considerable time researching and 
analyzing the needs of Chinatown. Her firm, Northeast 
Management & Marketing Company, has also been respon- 
sible for the development of other creative public benefits 
packages to benefit neighborhood residents. Pamela 
McDermott also serves on the Boston Landmarks Commission, 
and has oftentimes dealt with the complexities of 
protecting open space. 

* CHARLES GRIGSBY is a neighbor of the South End site and no 
stranger to community ascertainment issues and methods. His 
work in the early 70 's contributed to the development of 
citizen advisory capacity in the South End. His Chairman's 
role in the State Board of Education and the Urban League of 
Eastern Massachusetts equip him with the experience to 
design and promote community outreach. 

* JOE FEASTER has been deeply involved in both the legal 
aspects of real estate development and issues of equity in 
housing for many years. He has had to learn firsthand the 
concerns and aspirations of community people to enable him 
to co-draft the Executive Orders surrounding the minority 
development program and amendments to the Code of Fair 
Practices. Additionally, his prior leadership of the NAACP 
and the Greater Boston Civil Rights Coalition required 
listening, learning, and subsequent action based on 
community outreach. 



* 



Jay Schochet and Sy Mintz have both worked in the Park 
Square "neighborhood", and know the needs of that section 
of Boston. 



3.60 Provide Opportunities for Minorities and Women; as Well as 
Community-Based Organizations 

By definition, the Partnership is committed to the goals of 
increased access to economic opportunities for women and minority 
owned firms, and to assist community based organizations in 
providing a wider range of services as needed. The fact that the 
Partnership is comprised significantly of women and minority owned 
firms demonstrate that commitment. 

3.61 Access to Work 

There will be at least two stages of opportunity for women and 
minority firms to gain access to work. 

The first stage will be after designation and in the pre- 
construction and constuction period. Minority bidder lists and city 
and state certification programs will be used as one way to identify 
firms which may want information about these opportunities. 
Substantial outreach is needed to insure that potential bidders are 
informed in sufficient time to prepare and submit their best bid for 
the work in question. The Partnership will perform that outreach. 
Employment policies spelled out in the Policy on Employment will be 
followed and required of contractors and subcontractors. 

The second stage of opportunity occurs after construction, and 
involves the retail and business tenancy of the Park Square site, as 
well as the goods and services needed by the South End site. 
Maximum effort will be expended to insure that persons have an 
opportunity to gain access, who have been previously 
under rep re sen ted. 

3.62 Employment Policies 

The employment practices of each South Park Partnership team member 
reflects a commitment to "inclusionary hiring". The employment 
practice of seeking women, minorities, and Boston residents is a 
policy that we need only expand upon and improve for this project, 
not learn here and espouse for the first time. 

The South Park Partnership policy on employment will: 

* Observe both the letter and spirit of legal requirements 
relating to nondiscrimination, equal employment opportunity, 
contract compliance, and affirmative action. 

* Require the contractor and sub-contractors to comply with 
guidelines that the employee composition include at least 50% Boston 
residents, at least 25% minority persons, and at least 10% women. 

* Require tenants to use good faith efforts to comply with 
"Boston for Boston" guidelines that 50% of all permanent jobs be 
held by Boston residents, 25% by minorities, and 10% by women. 



* Establish a goal of awarding not less than 10% of the 
general contractor's bid price for minority and women business 
participation. 

3.63 Relevant Experience 

Members of the team have unparalleled experience at developing small 
businesses. That experience will be put to work in specific ways to 
promote minorities, women and small non-profit oranizations. 

* A project clearinghouse will be established to assist women 
and minority owned firms in locating the technical assistance often 
required in getting established initially, or for growth. 

* Financing alternatives will be outlined using the principals' 
working knowledge of how state and city lending programs work, and 
how to meet the relevant criteria. Often it is the presentation 
that loses the financing and not the facts. 

* In bringing their experience to bear, the Partnership makes 
it clear that it will, wherever possible, work with and through 
local service providers in order to strengthen their capacity to 
deliver, and avoid duplication or "re-inventing the wheel". 

* Other relevant expertise of the Partners is outlined in our 
Introduction - Section 2.20. 



3.70 PROMOTING QUALITY URBAN DESIGN 

3. 71 Park Square Parcel 

The Park Square parcel is strategically located at the confluence of 
Stuart Street, Charles Street South, and the downtown end of 
Columbus Avenue. In urban design terms, development of this parcel 
can contribute to making a comfortable transition from the 250-foot 
tall, rather massive Howard Johnson's Hotel, to the new, more 
moderate height of the Four Seasons Hotel and its Park Square Plaza 
open space, as well as, the adjacent Lincoln Statue. Development on 
this parcel can also relate to other important building 
massing-heights, such as the Park Plaza Hotel-Office Building, the 
Four Seasons Hotel, and the currently under construction Heritage- 
on-the-Common, all of which reach 155 feet as their maximum heights. 

Other important building massing-heights include the State 
Transportation Building, the stepped-down portion of the Four 
Seasons Hotel at approximately 125 feet in height, and lower scale 
buildings, such as the Motor Mart Garage, the HoJo-57 Garage, the 
stepped-down portion of the State Transportation Building, and the 
existing row of buildings at the corner of Boylston Street and 
Charles Street South. 

Our proposal responds to the mixed-use character of this 
Downtown-Park Square neighborhood with the substantial infusion of 
residential ownerships, a portion of which is affordable; and by 
placing active retail space and a child care center on the ground 
floor; with the second, third and fourth floors devoted to office 
use; and the fifth through the fifteenth being residential. The 
combination of these uses should substantially contribute to the 
life, activity and safety of this important downtown neighborhood. 

Some important building design aspects include: the integration of 
stone and brick masonry facade materials reflecting the character of 
other buildings in the Park Square area; the stone cornice banding , 
at the fifth floor reflecting a change in use from office to 
residential; as well as other stone cornice bandings at the tenth 
floor emphasizing the 95 foot break; and at the thirteenth floor 
emphasizing the 125 foot break; and finally at the roof which is 155 
feet, the introduction of bay windows, french type balconies and 
stone banding, adding to the three dimensional richness of the 
facade as well as, providing side and oblique views of the plaza in 
Park Square, the Boston Common and Public Gardens; and the 
penetration through the ground floor of the building of a 
mini-arcade connecting Charles Street South with Park Plaza, and 
vice versa. 

In addition, we have created a variety of one, two and three bedroom 
units to appeal to a variety of users, both in the market rate and 
affordable categories. The integration of below-grade parking 
discretely entered and exited from Stuart Street; and finally, the 
treatment of the ground plane, especially the 35-foot wide service 
easement between this parcel and the Motor Mart Garage, with brick 
and granite paving, street trees, lighting and benches. 



3 .72 The South End Parcels 

The South End parcels present an urban design challenge of how to 
integrate high density housing, with auxiliary parking, along with 
the special need of discretely integrating transitional housing 
within a total quality living environment that is characteristically 
"South End." 

From an urban design standpoint, the buildings are placed along the 
edges of the three streets (Washington, West Concord, and Rutland) 
and the parking is placed unobtrusively below-ground under the 
buildings, leaving the ground and first floor of the unit a half 
level up from the sidewalk. The open space created between the 
buildings is an amenity for the development's housing users, as well 
as the residents in the abutting existing housing on Shawmut Avenue. 

The scale of the building masses reflects the variety of modest 
height buildings in the South End. The slightly taller mass faces 
Washington Street, then turns at both corners, finally stepping down 
one story relating to the lower height of abutting buildings on 
Shawmut Avenue. A six-unit building fills in the missing tooth at 
the southeast corner of Shawmut Avewnue and Rutland Street, and a 
two-story child care center adjacent to the Community Gardens, with 
its outdoor play space in the rear, completes the block. 

The housing scheme we developed represents the desire to integrate 
transitional housing with moderate and market rate housing, in such 
a way as to not draw attention to the transitional housing. To 
create the kind of housing that best fulfills the needs of the 
transitional client, yet in appearance is no different than typical 
South End housing, is accomplished by creating four transitional 
housing clusters, two at the ends of the building on Washington 
Street and one building each on Rutland and West Concord Streets. 
These transitional units are walkup flats with their own entryway 
coming up directly from the sidewalk. Each of the four clusters 
also has common space. The majority of moderate and market rate 
units are duplexes and are reached by two mini-elevator cores off 
Rutland and West Concord Streets. Upon arrival at the fourth floor, 
there are short glass bridges connecting to single-hooded corridors, 
off which are the entry doors to the apartment units. There are 
also moderate and market rate walkup flats on all three streets, 
similar in appearance to the transitional units. 

The buildings are characterized by bow and bay-shaped windows, some 
in masonry, others in wood, and while we have strived to maintain 
the South End character, we have also tried to give a somewhat 
contemporary appearance to the buildings, all within the framework 
of recognizing the cost constraints of producing quality, affordable 
housing. 



3.80 PROMOTING HOUSING DOWNTOWN 

The vision of more people walking to their place of employment, and 
living near the restaurants, stores and Boston's entertainment and 
cultural centers is a vision which The South Park Partnership hopes 
to make a reality. Our proposed 146 condominium units on the Park 
Square site with 15 being low and moderate income, is consistent 
with the City's and the Boston Redevelopment Authority's efforts to 
further the revitalization of the City by establishing downtown 
neighborhoods. Auxiliary benefits derived by the creation of 
downtown neighborhoods will be: 

o less traffic congestion with people walking more rather than 
driving 

o increased usage of public transportation - less use of 
automobiles 

o expanded market for downtown restaurants, stores and 
entertainment establishments, particularly in the evenings 

o heightened sensitivity to crime resulting in the creation of 
neighborhood watches, more street lighting and cooperation with the 
police department 

o additional housing units to reverse the undersupply of 
available housing. 

The South Park Partnership has evidenced its commitment to help the 
City in its revitalization efforts by proposing to construct 
significantly more residential units than proposed in the Request 
for Proposal. 



3.90 COMPLY WITH THE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDLINES OUTLINED IN 

THE RFP ~~ 

The South Park Partnership has submitted a proposal that not only 
complies with the intent of all design and development guidelines 
outlined in the RFP, but takes many of the ideas one step further. 
As stated, we have a long-term commitment to and interest in the 
City that provides the initiative to develop top-quality projects, 
with exhaustive and aggressive community benefit programs. 



4.00 EQUITY PARTICIPATION/DISCLOSURE STATEMENT/ STATEMENT OF INTENT 

4.10 Equity Participation 



MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING 



THIS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING is made and entered into 
as of this 2nd day of November, 1987, by and among Schochet 
Associates ("Schochet"), Charles Grigsby ("Grigsby"), Feaster 
Enterprises ("Feaster"), Northeast Management & Marketing Company 
("Northeast") and Samuel E. Mintz ("Mintz") (collectively, the 
"Partners") . 

WHEREAS, the Partners have devoted, and intend to devote, 
substantial time, efforts and money to respond to a request for 
development proposals issued by the Boston Redevelopment Authority 
("BRA") for the Park Square Parcel and the South End Transitional 
Housing Parcel in Boston, Massachusetts, and more particularly 
described in Exhibit A hereto; and 

WHEREAS, the Partners desire to develop the subject land 
consistent with the development guidelines issued by the BRA; and 

WHEREAS, the Partners desire to confirm their 
understanding regarding such proposed development; 

NOW THEREFORE, the Partners, for good and valuable 
consideration, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, agree as 
follows : 



-1- 



1. Formation of Entity . The Partners hereto agree that they 
will form a partnership (general or limited) or some other entity 
(the "Partnership") which shall own the development and purchase or 
lease rights to the subject land. 

2. Ownership of Entity . The ownership of the Partnership 
shall be as follows: 

Schochet 51.00% 

Grigsby 13.07% 

Feaster 13.07% 

Northeast 13.07% 

Mintz 9.79% 

3. Capital Contributions . The Partners (other than Mintz) 
shall provide cash capital contributions to the Partnership, such 
cash capital contributions to be payable on demand, in order to 
provide funds for all of the initial engineering, architectural, 
legal, administrative, and other costs involved in securing 
appropriate governmental approvals, leasing and financing for the 
proposed development. It is the understanding of the Partners that 
each of them shall make capital contributions through submission of 
a development proposal in accordance with the following percentage 
allocations: 

Schochet 56.53% 

Grigsby 14.49% 

Feaster 14.49% 

Northeast 14.49% 

4. Other Contributions . Each Partner will contribute his/its 
time to the Partnership at no cost (through project construction 
start) with the exception of Mintz, who will be paid for his 
services consistent with the attached letter agreement (Exhibit B) . 
An outline of the Partners' responsibilities is attached as Exhibit 
C. 



-2- 



5. Withdrawal or Expulsion of Partners . In the event a 
Partner desires to withdraw from the Partnership or fails or refuses 
to perform his/its responsibilities under this Memorandum as 
determined, in good faith, by three of the other intended general 
partners (see Paragraph 6 below), then his/its interests shall 
revert to the other Partners in proportion to his/its percentage 
ownership as stated in paragraph 2. 

6. Formal Agreement . Upon official designation as Developer 
by the BRA, the Partners agree to enter immediately into good faith 
negotiations for the preparation and signing of a formal partnership 
agreement (general or limited) or other agreement which will 
incorporate the terms of this Memorandum, such formal partnership 
agreement (general or limited) or other agreement to be signed 
within thirty (30) days from such designation, unless otherwise 
extended by agreement of all the Partners. It is expressly 
acknowledged and agreed by all Partners that their present intention 
is to enter into a limited partnership agreement and that Mintz 
shall be a limited and not a general partner. 



-3- 



IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Partners hereby execute, under 
seal, this Memorandum of Understanding on the date first above 
written. 



SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 





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Jay^^^.^/^chochet 
Its Sole Proprietor 



FEASTER ENTERPRISES 



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^J^s&pfi D. Feaster, Jr. ^ 



Its President 



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:harles Grigs 




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NORTHEAST MANAGEMENT & 
MARKETING COMPANY 





■V\ uJ-ri — 



Pamela G. McDermott 
Its President 




Samuel E. Mintz 



-4- 



4.2 PUBLIC DISCLOSURE/STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS AND 
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 

We have been advised by Nancyellen Hayes that the appropriate 
forms will be provided by the BRA, for submission at a later 
date. Personal corporate financial statements will be 
furnished upon request. We appreciate the BRA holding them 
confidential. 



4 .30 STATEMENT OF INTENT 

The South Park Partnership agrees to comply aggressively with 
the City of Boston's Fair Housing and Employment Plans, and to 
prepare an affirmative marketing plan so that our projects will 
reflect the diversity which exists in the City. 



5.00 DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS 

5. 10 Project Summary 

5.11 Park Square Site 



The following tables analyze the Park Square site. We propose to 
construct a mixed-use building with approximately 300,200 square 
feet of space including 22,000 square feet of retail and a 3,000 
square foot daycare center on the first floor, 90,000 square feet of 
first-class office space on the second through fourth floors, and 
146 condominium units on the upper floors. Two below grade levels 
contain approximately 265 parking spaces. These levels are proposed 
to extend beneath the thirty-five foot pedestrian and service way 
and parkland adjacent to the re-use parcel. 



SITE flNflLYSIS - PARK SQUARE 




PROJECT DESCRIPTION - 


PARK SQUARE 








Area (SF) 


Use 




Units 


Area 

Per Unit 


Gross 


City of Boston 
Private Ownership 


25, WO 
12,400 


Building 
Area 


Office 
Retail 
Day Care 
Residential 
Parking 

Office 

Retail 

Residential 

Total 
Mechanical and Service 

Total Building Area 
Total ftrea w/o Garage 


146 

60 

15 

190 


1,200 
325 




Total Area 

Floor Area Ratio (FAR) 


37,800 
8 


90,0(K) 

22,000 

3,000 

175,200 


Total Buildable ft^ea 


302,400 












265 

= — . =r-^ 


86,060 
10,000 




386,250 
300,200 



5.12 South End Sites 

The following tables analyze the South End sites. We propose to 
construct 90 units (36 transitional, 24 moderate-income, and 30 
market-rate) plus space for Community Service and a daycare 
facility. Approximately 70 parking spaces will be located below 
grade. 



SITE WftLYSIS - SOUTH END 




PROJECT DESCRIPTION • 


-SOUTHEND 










ftrea (SF) 


Use 


Units 


ftrea 
Per Unit 


Bross 

Building 

ftrea 


City of Boston 
Private (jNner'ship 


56,000 



Residential 
Transitional 
ttoderate-ircome 
Market -rate 

Total 




36 
24 
30 


1,125 
1,125 
1,125 



40,500 
27,000 
33,750 


Total Area 

Floor Area Ratio (FAR) 


56,000 
2 


Total Buildable ftrea 


112,000 




90 


101,250 



Support Services 
Connunity Services 
Day Care 



3,000 
3,000 



Total 



6,000 



Parking 
Residential 
Suppwt Services 

Total 



63 
7 



70 



375 26,250 



Total Building ftrea 
Total Area h/o Garage 



133,500 
107,250 



CONDMINIUM BREftUKttW - PARK KXWRE 

Assumed Building Efficiency Factor 86.00* 

NuBber Unit Total Unit 

Description of Units Gross Area Gross Area Net Area 



Market Rate 

One BedrooB 32 950 30,400 836 

Two BedrooB 68 1,220 82, %0 1,074 

Three BedrooB 31 1,420 44,020 1,250 

Total 131 157,380 

Moderate Income 

Ore BedrooB 4 950 3,800 836 

Two BedrooB 8 1,220 9,760 1,074 

Three Bedroon 3 1,420 4,260 1,250 

Total 15 17,820 

Total Units 146 175,200 

Average Units i,eoo i,056 



Ten per cent of the one-, two-, and three-bedroom condominium units 
are set aside for moderate-income families. The final breakdown of 
unit sizes may be adjusted as the result of a formal market study. 
The total number of units may decrease if the market demands larger 
units or units with architectural amenities such as double-height 
spaces, study alcoves, duplexes, etc. The architectural drawings 
included in this proposal do not address these marketing issues or 
the preference to minimize corridor lengths. 

The South Park Partnership suggests that the potential exists to 
coordinate this development with changes to the Motor Mart Garage. 
While we have been unable to initiate discussions with either the 
owner or lessor of this facility, it could be beneficial to review 
possible air-rights development and coordinated facade treatment. 



CONDOKINIUM BREAKDOWN ■ 


- SOUTH END 








fissumed Building Efficiency Factor 


68.00< 






Description 


Number 
of Units 


Unit 
Gross firea 


Total 
Gross ftrea 


Unit 
Net Area 


l^rket Rate 
One Bedroom 
Two Bedroom 
Three Bedroom 


2 

21 

7 


675 
1,075 
1,275 

875 
1,075 
1,275 



1,075 
1,275 
1,400 

1,125 


1,750 

22,575 

6,925 


770 

346 

1,122 


Total 

Moderate Income 
One Bedroom 
Two Bedroom 
Three Bedroom 


30 

2 

17 

5 

£4 



24 
6 
4 


33,250 

1,750 

18,275 

6,375 


770 

946 

1,122 


Total 

Transitional 
One Bedroom 
Tho Bedroom 
Three Bedroon 
Four Bedroom 


26,400 



25,600 

10,200 

5,600 




946 
1,122 
1,232 


Total 

Total Units 
Average Units 


36 
90 


41,600 
101,250 


990 



Forty-four per cent of the non-transitional units have been set 
aside for moderate- income families. Unit sizes are comparable for 
market rate, moderate-income, and transitional units. The final 
unit breakdown may be adjusted during program refinement, but the 
intent is to create as many large family units as possible. 

The Partnership feels the demand exists for a larger daycare center 
than the Request for Proposals contains. We would hope this issue 
would be open to additional discussions. 



5.20 Project Ownership 

Both project sites will be developed by The South Park Partnership 
which is a Boston based partnership consisting of general partners 
(Schochet Associates, Northeast Management and Marketing Company, 
Charles Grigsby, and Feaster Enterprises) and a limited partner 
(Samuel E. Mintz). The partnership will retain ownership in the 
commercial portions of the Park Square project and the daycare 
center to be constructed in the South End (although this facility 
could be turned over to a non-profit agency) . The residential 
components of both project components will be sold to individual 
unit owners. The transitional housing units are proposed to be 
divided between the Boston Housing Authority (which will be 
requested to purchase twelve of the units under the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Section 705 program) and Shelter, Inc. (which will 
purchase the remaining twenty-four units for $1.00 each). All 
revenues received for transitional housing units under rent subsidy 
programs shall be available to offset project operating expenses and 
debt. 

The commercial portion of the Park Square project will be managed by 
Federal Management Company, Inc., the Property Management affiliate 
of Schochet Associates. Federal Management will also initially 
manage the residential property (possibly including the transitional 
housing units), but will train a local management company (or 
companies) to manage the properties, if requested. 




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7 



7.00 FINANCIAL PROPOSAL/PROJECT SCHEDULE 

7.10 Development Budget - Park Square 

The Development Budget for the Park Square site is summarized below. 



DEVT-OPttNT KDOrr - PARK, EJJCRE 










Cost Per 




Desc-iot ion 


'ctal Cost 


fr- of Bldg 


lost Bullies 


Ore-De*lopMr,t 


S9,8fi4 


1.45 


:.5:» Cc-.it Cos: 


Lixl 








City of Boston 


50,600 


0.13 


l.OC Pe' SF /¥r 


ft-ivate (knership 


4,%C,CiOO 


12.64 


50.00 Per FSR Ft 


Sunt at al 


5,010,800 


12.97 




Corstnctiori 








Office 


6,550,000 


22.14 


95.00 Per SF 


l^tail 


1,760,000 


4.56 


80. W Per SF 


Day Care 


230,000 


0.85 


110. 00 Pe' SF 


Te'ant Iiprove S Incent 


2,250,000 


5.63 


25. » Per 5F 


Residential 


19,272,000 


49.89 


110.00 Per SF 


terVinj 


5,163,600 


13.37 


60.00 Per SF 


Mechanical and Service 


600,000 


1.55 


6C.C«J Per SF 


Subtotal 


37,325,600 


96.63 




ftrtaork art Itaenities 


373,256 


0.97 


1.00% Corst Cost 


Professional Fess 








Architect 


1,679,652 


4.35 


4.5C'< Const Ccst 


Others 


559, eSA 


1.45 


1.5C1 Cor.st Cost 


Subtotal 


2,239,536 


5.60 




Developer E»penses 


933,1*0 


2.42 


2.501 Cor.s'. Cost 


Legal and ficcounting 


'.66,570 


1.21 


1.25^ Const Cost 


Bonds, Insurance, and Pernits 


559,664 


1.45 


1.50% Const Cost 


narketirg and Leasing 








NarVet mg 


373,256 


0.97 


l.OOt Const Cost 


Sales Coaissions 


2,921,210 


7.56 


5.00% Bross Sales 


Leasing 


936, 075 


2.42 


16.00% Gross Rent 


Subtotal 


♦,230,571 


10.95 


24.00% Const Cost 


Financial 








Financing Fees 


1,381,209 


3.58 


2. COX D(v»l Cost 


Closing Costs 


345,302 


0.89 


0.5<)% Devei Cost 


Atal Estate Taxes 


373,256 


0.97 


1.00% Const Cost 


Subtotal 


2,099,767 


6.99 




Uorking Capital 


186,626 


0.48 


0.50% Const Cost 


Cont ingeicy 


3,732,560 


9.66 


10.00% Const Cost 


Itet Developnent Budget 


57,716,196 


150.99 




Intern Interest 


11,342,230 


29.36 


16.42% Devel Cost 


Operat ing Losses thru B/E 





0.00 


0. 00% Const Cost 



Total Developnent ftd?et 



69,060,426 



180.35 



Pre-Development costs are costs incurred by the development team 
prior to a formal go/no go decision on the project. 

Land costs are divided between land owned by the City of Boston and 
land in private ownership. We have assumed that city land will be 
leased to the development for a base rent of $1.00 per square foot 
of land per year to minimize costs in the initial years of the 
project and to improve the financial feasibility of providing 
affordable housing units, transitional housing units, and day care 
and other social services as part of this linkage proposal (see 
Stablized Operating Pro Forma section below for additional rent for 
the land lease). The lease term should be 99 years and the lease 
should be subordinated to project financing. The cost for acquiring 
privately-held land is assumed at $50.00 per buildable square foot. 
This cost reflects current land values downtown and in Back Bay and 
anticipated negotiations with the landowner. 

Construction costs have been confirmed with local contractors, other 
developers, and architects. Artwork and Amenities includes an 
allowance for art, public area seating, and other amenities that may 
be provided in common spaces. 

Professional fees include the cost of consulting services. Costs of 
architectural as well as structural and mechanical engineering work 
will be paid on a partially deferred basis in return for an equity 
position in the development for the architect. This helps to reduce 
up-front costs. 

Developer expenses reimburse the development team for out-of-pocket 
expenses as well as provide an incentive for the team. Legal and 
accounting costs are carried as an allowance. Bonds, insurance, and 
permits include all costs necessary to bond and insure the project, 
as well as all permit fees paid directly by the developer to the 
City of Boston. 

Marketing and leasing costs include all costs and commissions 
necessary in the sale and leasing of project components. Financial 
costs include fees to lenders, costs for closing the project 
financing, as well as an allowance for real estate taxes to be paid 
to the city during the construction period. Working capital funds 
are carried as an allowance to provide initial funds to purchase 
materials and equipment necessary for the maintenance and operation 
of the property. 

A construction contingency of ten per cent is included in the 
project. No contingency has been included for soft costs. 

Interim interest has been assumed to include all interest costs 
through project stabilization and sell-out. Therefore Operating 
Losses through Break-Even do not appear on the statement. 



7.2 Development Budget - South End 

The Development Budget for the South End sites is summarized bel 



ow. 



DtVtLOPICNT BUDG£T - SOUTH END 



Cost Per 



Descriptici 



Pre-DevslooMTit 

Und 
Transition*! 
Nc*rjte-ircc«ie 
IUrket-r«te 
Support Stnrices 



Tolil Cost 


SP of Bldn 


Cc'St Guices 


24£,250 


i.e: 


i, 5i* Cor6t Cost 






300,000 




0.00 
0.00 
2.25 
0.00 


O.Ki Siies Orjre 
10.000 /"H IMit 



Subtotal 300,000 2.25 

Ccrstrxtion 



Residential 


8,100,000 


60.67 


80.00 Per SF 


Support Services 


5*0,000 


*.o* 


90. «i Per SF 


Parking 


1,050,000 


7.87 


*0.00 Per Sr 


Subtotal 


9,650,000 


72.56 




flrt«ork and flnenities 


96,900 


0.73 


l.'JOt Const Cost 


Professional Fess 








frcSiitect 


*36,050 


3.27 


«. 50* Const Cost 


Others 


H5,350 
581, WO 


1.09 


1.50% Const Cost 


Subtotal 


*.36 




Developer Expenses 


2*2,250 


1.81 


2.50t Const Cost 


Legal ar<l Accounting 


121,125 


0.9: 


1.25t Const Cost 


fcnds, Insurance, and PtTtits 


121,125 


0.91 


l.£5» Corrst Cost 


Karketing ard Leasing 








Narket ing 


121,125 


0.91 


1.25* Corst Cost 


Sales Conissions 


369,765 


2.77 


5.00» Bross Sales 


Leasing 





0.00 


0. 00* Const Cost 


Subtotal 


490,890 


3.68 


6.25* Const Cost 


Finarcial 








Finarcing Fees 


96,900 


0.73 


1.00* Const Cost 


Closir«i Costs 


4e,»50 


0.36 


0.50* Const Cost 


kal Estate Taxes 


%,900 


0.73 


1.00* Const Cost 


Subtotal 


2*2,250 


1.81 




Working Capital 


*8,«50 


0.36 


0.50* Const Cost 


Cent ingercy 


969,000 
13,1*5,6*0 


7.26 


10.00* Const Cost 


tet >v»lopMnt Budget 


96.65 




Interii Interest 


1,625,0*9 


12.17 


11.00* Devel Cost 


Total DevelopHnt Budget 


1*, 770, 689 


108.83 



7.30 P roject Schedule 

The South Park Partnership will begin construction on both the Park 
Square and South End components on the same date. We project that 
construction can be completed within an 18-24 month period. 
Assuming that all negotiations can be successfully completed within 
15-18 months, construction could begin in early Spring 1989. This 
also assumes that an acceptable commitment or commitments for 
project financing has (have) been received and all required 
government approvals and permits have been issued. Initial 
occupancy of residential and commercial components may be as early 
as Fall, 1990 with complete sell-out and lease-up projected in 1992. 

7.4 Sources and Uses of Funds 

The following tables summarize the sources and uses of funds for the 
development, as well as operating pro formas through the year 2000 
assuming constant costs of financing and constant rates of income, 
expense, and tax escalation. The tables integrate the surplus funds 
from the Park Square project with the deficits incurred by the South 
End project. Funds invested by the development team and anticipated 
profits are indicated. 



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7.50 Condominium Sales 




For moderate-income units, the following assumptions helped 
determine potential sales prices: 

Moderate Income (Family of four) $30,000 

Per Cent of. income available for housing 28% 

Annual amount available for housing 8,400 

Less: Real Estate Taxes 1,500 

Less: Insurance 240 

Less: Maintenance Charges 1,200 

Balance available for Debt Service 5,460 

Assumed Massachusetts HOP interest rate 5.50% 

Approximate amount of mortgage 80,000 

Add: 5% down payment 4,000 

Approximate average sales price per unit 84,000 



CONDOKINIll* SfLES - PARK SQUARE 



Nuaber ftvg Price flvg Price Total 

Of Units Per Net SF Per Unit Sales 



Uriit Sales 

Market Rate Ur.its 131 350 369,600 4e,«17,600 

Moderate-income 15 80 B4,4fl0 1,267,200 

Subtotal 14& A9, 684, 600 

Parking Sales 

Karket Rate Units 175 50,000 8,740,000 

Moderate-iricurae 15 



Subtotal 190 8,740,000 

Total Sales Proceeds 58,424,800 



co^a)(»lINIUM sales - 


■ SOUTH END 












N'jmber 
Of Units 


ftvg Price 
Per Net SF 


fivg Price 
Per Unit 


Total 
Sales 


Unit Sales 
Transit iorial 
Moderate-ircoiiie 
Market -rate 


3& 
24 
30 






80 
185 




79,200 
183,150 



1,900,800 
5,W,500 



Subtotal 54 7,335,300 













Parking Sales 




Transitional 


9 


Woderate-incoBe 


24 


Market -rate 


30 


Support Services 


7 



Subtotal 70 

Total Sales Proceeds 7,395,300 



7.60 Stabilized Operating Pro Formas 

7.61 Stabilized Operating Pro Forma - Park Square - 1992 

This table summarizes a stabilized year of operation of the 
commercial portion of the Park Square project which will be owned 
and operated by the developer. The philosophy of The South Park 
Partnership is to develop quality projects and hold and manage them 
over the intermediate to long term as continuing investments. It 
has been assumed that no rent will be charged to the Daycare Center 
and that the expenses of this facility will be matched by its 
revenues (fees, government assistance, and contributions from a 
charitable endowment to be established by the development team from 
a portion of the proceeds of the sale of condominium units). The 
Partnership has no interest in receiving income from this project 
component. 

The Pro Formas also compute the amount of the mortgage that is 
supportable by this project component. This figure has been 
incorporated into the Sources and Uses of Funds statement. Note 
that the Land Lease payment includes the base payment of $25,400 
annually plus an additional payment equal to approximately 20% of 
this project component's net operating income after debt service, 
after a 13% priority return to the developer. 20% of the 
developer's profit upon refinancing or sale of the Park Square 
component will also be part of the Additional Rent Payment. 



STftBILIZED OPERATING PRO FORtW - PARK SQUARE - 1992 



CoriBtructiori Loan Interest 10.00% 

Mortgage Interest lO-OO* 

Assumed Debt Service Coverage 1.15 

Assumed Supportable Mortgage 29,000,000 



Total Per Unit 



Gross IncoHie 



Office 


3,097,875 


35. 10 Per SF 


Retail 


883,468 


40.95 Per SF 


Day Care— Grants, Fees 


382,673 


7,653 Per Child 


Residential 







Parking 


636,402 


263.22 /Space/Mo 


Total Gross Incone 


5,200,419 




Less: Vacancies (5<) 


(260,021) 




Add: Expense Reinib 


17,500 




Net Income 


4,957,897 




Less: Operating Experises 






Office 


(525,436) 


(5. 85) Per SF 


Retail (NNN Lease) 





Per SF 


Day Care 


(382,573) 


(7, 653) Per Child 


Residential (By Owner) 





0.00 Per SF 


Parking 


(201,356) 


(2. 34) Per SF 


Less: Real Estate Taxes 






Office 


(506,479) 


(5. 53) Per SF 


Retail (NNN Lease) 





0.00 Per SF 


Day Care 





0.00 Per Child 


Residential (By Owner) 





0.00 Per SF 


Parking 





0.00 Per SF 


Less: Land Lease—Base 


(25,400) 


1.00 Per SF land 



Total Experses (1,542,344) 

Income Before Debt Serv 3,315,553 
Less: Debt Service (3,075,298) 



Before Tax Cash Flow 239,255 

Land Lease - Addtl Rent 47,851 

Cash Flow to Developer 191,404 



7.62 Stabilized Operating Pro Forma - South End - 1992 

This table summarizes a stabilized year of operation of project 
components that are not sold to individual condominium unit owners, 

The Pro Forma also computes the amount of the mortgage that is 
supportable by this project component, assuming that rent is paid 
for the transitional units under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Chapter 707 program. 



STABILIZED OPERATING PRO FORKfl - SJUTH END -1992 



Construction Loan Interest 
Mortgage Interest 
fissurned Debt Service Coverage 
ftssurned Supportable Mortgage 



lO.OOX 
10.00* 
1.15 
2,000,000 



Total 



Unit Buides 



Gross Income 

Transit Hsg - Rent 405,370 

Transt Hsg - Grants 6A3,422 

Day Care—Grants, Fees 362,673 

Parking 



Total Gross Income 1,431,465 

Less: Vacarcies (SX) (71,573) 

Net IncoBie 1,359,892 

Less: Operating Expenses 

Transit Hsg - Oper Exp (84,230) 

Transit Hsg - Soc Serv (643,422) 

Day Care (362,573) 

Parking 

Less: Real Estate Taxes 

Transitional Housing 

Day Care 

Residential (By Owner) 

Parking 



Total Expenses (1,110,325) 

IncoDie Before Debt Serv 249,567 
Less: Debt Service (212,158) 



11,260 Per Unit 
17,673 Per Unit 
7,653 Per Child 
/Space/Mo 



(2, 340) Per Unit 
(17, 873) Per Unit 
(7, 653) Per Child 
/Space/Mo 



Income After Debt Serv 37,408 



7. 70 Summary of Plan for Project Financing 

The following tables summarize the mortgage amounts that can be 
assumed using commonly accepted rules for loan underwriting. The 
assumed mortgage amount plus any other sources of funds are then 
compared to development costs to determine a theoretical surplus 
(deficit) of funds for each project component. This theoretical 
surplus (deficit) will not equal the actual surplus (deficit) which 
depends on the timing of available funds. We estimate the deficit 
from the South End component at around $3.5 million (see Sources and 
Uses of funds statement). No assumption has been made regarding 
equity participation by a lender, although this alternative will be 
explored by the developer and is acceptable to the Partnership. 

It is clear from the analysis of the Park Square project component 
that $75,000,000 in borrowed funds could theoretically be obtained, 
this exceeds the total development cost of $69,000,000 and the 
project requirement of $54,000,000 in borrowed funds. Assuming that 
a lending institution would authorize assignment of these funds to 
the South End project component, we can develop this alternate 
source of money for the South End project deficit should the timing 
of available funds from the Park Square project component for the 
funding of this deficit fail to correspond to the timing of the 
deficit . 



FINflNCING SJRMORY - PARK SQUARE 



Total Sales Proceeds 58,42A,800 

Loan to Value Ratio 80* 



Loan supportable by condominium component 46,739,840 

Add: Hortgane supportable by office/retail component 29,000,000 

Total supportable loan 75,739,840 

Total development costs 69,0&0,4£6 

Theoretical funds surplus (deficit) 6,679,414 



Note: See Sources and Uses of Funds Statement for funds over tine. 



FINflNCING aimflRY - SOUTH END 



Total Sales Proceeds 7,395,300 

Loan to Value Ratio &()% 

Loan supportable by condofoinium component 5,916,240 

Odd: Mortgage supportable by rental housing 2,000,000 

Total supportable loan 7,916, £A0 

Government and Private Grants 1,560, 0()0 

Total development costs 14,770,689 



Theor-etical funds surplus (deficit) (5,294,449) 



Note: See Sources and Uses of Funds Statement for funds over time. 

A simplified return to the developer is shown in the table below. 
Profits (losses) for each project component (taken from the Sources 
and Uses of Funds statements) are listed with contributions by the 
developer into a charitable endowment to be established to provide a 
portion of the ongoing operating costs for the transitional housing 
units and day care facilities. The overall return to the developer 
based on these profits (losses) and commitments is then computed. 



RETLIRN TO DEVELOPER - TOTAL PROJECT 



Park Square Net Before Tax Profit (Loss) 12,385,696 

South End Net Before Tax Profit (Loss) (317,250) 



Total Net Before Tax Profit (Loss) before Deductions 12,068,446 

Less: EndoHwent for Transitional Housing and Day C^re (2, WO, 000) 

Total Net Before Tax Profit (Loss) 10,068,446 

Overall Return 12. OK 



In summary, The South Park Partnership intends to finance the 
project using conventional funds from local or national banks or 
insurance companies. Existing federal and state programs are 
utilized to partially defray the initial development costs of 
below-market project components and to assist in funding operating 
expenses. The City of Boston assists the project by contributing 
land it owns at a price substantially below market and minimizing 
taxes on social service facilities. Interest rate assumptions have 
been indicated in the tables and we have assumed that acceptable 
marketing studies and appraisals can be obtained. 



8.00 EXHIBITS 



8.10 Financial Institutions Letters of Interest 

We are including letters of interest for financial institutions and 
cpntinue to pursue additional funding sources. Additional letters 
will be forwarded upon receipt. 



TheTravelersT 



Ernest F. DesRochere 

General Manager 

Real Estate Investment Department 



The Travelers Companies 
200 State Street 
PO Box 812 
Boston, MA 02103 
Telephone: 617 330-1255 



Mr. Jay Schochet 
Schochet Associates 
720 Statler Building 
Boston, Ma 02116 



November 4,1987 



Dear Jay: 

Kevin Phelan of Meredith & Grew called me recently to discuss 
financing your proposed Park Square project in the South End of 
Boston. As I understand the proposal, a group which you are a part 
would like to construct a mixed-use development which will consist of 
approximately 146 condos , 90,000 sf of first class office space, 
22,000 sf of retail space, and garage parking for 265 cars. 

We would look forward to further reviewing your proposal and 
considering providing the financing for the development. The project 
is obviously compiLcated and will take a considerable amount of time to 
accomplish your objective. I know you understand that in no means is 
this letter a commitment of the part of The Travelers as all of our 
investments are subject to the approval of Travelers Investment 
Committee. However, we have enjoyed working with you and your firm in 
the past and were pleased that we were able to provide permanent 
financing for your Cambridge property earlier this year. 

We look forward to continuing our relationship with you and are 
looking forward with interest to review the project in greater detail 
as your group makes its way through the City of Boston approval 
process. Keep us informed of the status. 



I hope all is well, 
time . 



Let's get together soon at a mutually convenient 




nest F. DesRochers 



HOME OFFICE 
One Tower Square 
Hartford, CT 06183 




BANK OF NEW ENGLAND 



November 5, 1987 



Mr. Charles T. Grigsby 
The South Park Partnership 
720 Statler Office Building 
Boston, MA 

Re: Parcel Linkage #2 

Dear Mr. Grigsby: 

We were interested to learn of your plans to join a team 
consisting of Jay Schochet and Associates, Meredith & 
Grew, Northeast Management, Feaster Enterprises and Samuel 
Mintz to submit a proposal to the BRA for the second 
parcel to parcel project. 

As we understand your plans, the project consists of 
retail, offices and 146 condoir.inium units at the Park 
Square site. You are providing 265 parking units as well 
as a day care facility at that site. 

The South End location will be a mix of transitional 
units, moderate income sale units and market rate 
condominiums . 

The development process is a long one, and we would like 
to be kept abreast of your progress. When you are close 
to tentative designation, we would be pleased to discuss 
your plans in detail to learn of your financing needs. 

You appreciate that this does not constitute a commitment 
of the bank at this time. Good luck in the process. 




Sincerely, 



ames M. Sweeney 
nior Vice President 



JMS:set 



28 State Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02109 (617) 742-4000 



8.20 Schochet Associates - Financial References 



State Street Bank and Trust Company 
225 Franklin Street 

Coolidge Bank and Trust Company 
75 Arlington Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02116 

Bank of New England 

28 State Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

Bank of New York 
48 Wall Street 



Mr. Wayne Johnson 
654-3691 

Mr. John Dwinell 
556-0400 



Mr. Mark Hargrove 
722-6400 



Mr. Michael Katos 
212-530-3976 



Boston Trade Bank 

Ten Post Office Square 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Ten School Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Bank of Newport 

Ten Washington Street 

Newport, Rhode Island 02840 



Mr. John Marston 
556-2038 



Mr. Daryl S. Smith 
Mr. Jock Hosmer 
742-6000 

Mr. Peter Damon 
401-846-3400 



8.30 Development Team Resumes 



SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 



SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 



Schochet Associates is a privately owned real estate development 
ind management company headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Established in 1973, Schochet Associates offers its clients the 
liverse services necessary to complete new construction and/or 
rehabilitation of residential and commercial programs from initial 
'5ite selection through completed facilities ready for occupancy. 
I Over the years, the Company has endeavored to create 
developments of significant investment value, many of which have 
Deen retained in the Company's portfolio and are managed by Federal 
Management Co., Inc., its management affiliate. 

Schochet Associates maintains the following capabilities: 
research and feasibility analysis; land or building acquisition; 
sngineering/design/construction supervision; and financing, manage- 
ment, and marketing services. 

Schochet Associates' major areas of concentration are the 
construction or rehabilitation of properties for rental housing, 
condominiums, and office buildings. The Company has also developed 
shopping centers, residential communities, and multi-use complexes. 



Under the umbrella of Schochet Associates are operating groups, each 
with its own separate and distinct function, the combination of 
which comprises a complete real estate development and management 
company. Schochet Associates provides highly sophisticated 
development skills. JRS Equities, Inc. provides expertise in 
acquisition and financing; Federal Management Co., Inc. offers years 
of experience and expertise in commercial, retail and residential 
property management; and the Financial Services and Data Processing 
Department delivers all the financial data required to service all 
these divisions utilizing the most up-to-date computer systems and 
sophisticated software, custom-designed to integrate all of the 
company's functions. 

Schochet Associates is a diversified company, with projects 
throughout Massachusetts, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Georgia, 
California, and the State of Washington. Its experience encompasses 
the construction of large mixed-use condominium developments, 
rehabilitation of historic buildings, and new construction of rental 
housing and commercial space. The Company has succeeded with a wide 
variety of projects, including the new construction of luxury 
condominiums in Newport, Rhode Island; government-assisted housing 
in Portland, Maine; the rehabilitation into housing units of a 
landmark, granite cotton mill in Whitinsville, Massachusetts; and 
the reconstruction of an industrial warehouse into a first class 
office building in Cambridge, Massachusetts. We are proud that one 
of our projects garnered an architectural award for excellence, and 
that we are considered to be the leading real estate development 
company in Newport, Rhode Island. 



Because of the scope of Schochet Associates' projects, and the 
importance of the equity component in real estate investments, JRS 
Equities, Inc. was structured to create and administer wholesale or 
retail real estate syndications and to act as the acquisition arm of 
Schochet Associates. The Company maintains relationships with major 
regional and national investment houses and provides Schochet 
Associates with strong expertise in the continually evolving real 
estate investment market. 

Federal Management Co., Inc., has regional offices in Newport, 
Rhode Island, Atlanta, Georgia, Los Angeles, California, and 
Seattle, Washington. These offices provide management services for 
all Schochet Associates' developments and acquisitions. Managing 
these assets involves a wide range of responsibilities. These 
include leasing activities, cash flow projections, tenant relations, 
personnel administration, insurance and real estate tax matters, 
accounting functions, and building operations. 

Its residential portfolio includes all types of housing, from 
luxury condominiums to low and moderate subsidized rental units, new 
construction and rehabilitation as well as market rate rental 
apartment units. Its commercial portfolio comprises offices and 
stores, shopping malls, restaurants, and old and new office 
buildings. 



Schochet Associates, JRS Equities and Federal Management Co. are 
supported by a first-class in-house Financial Control and Data 
Processing Department. The staff consists of highly trained experts 
utilizing sophisticated computer equipment. They handle all 
financial matters generated from the development and management of 
Schochet Associates' residential and commercial properties, 
including financial analyses, cost and sales projections, contractor 
requisition payments, as well as all property management fiscal 
affairs. This Department utilizes a network computer system that 
electronically connects each property location with the main office 
providing information in "real time" to each property location and 
regional office. 



Key Personnel of Schochet Associates and 
JRS Equities/ Inc. 



JAY R. SCHOCHET 

In 1973, following several years in the Boston real estate 
community, most significantly as Managing Partner and subsequently 
President of The Codman Company, Inc., he formed his own real estate 
development company - Schochet Associates. Under these auspices he 
has concentrated on the development and management of projects 
throughout New England and California. In every instance he acts as 
a principal. He has had many years of experience in building all 
types of housing, from apartments for the elderly to luxury 
condominiums, as well as industrial and commercial structures, and 
large office buildings. He is equally comfortable with 
rehabilitation or new construction, conventionally financed or 
government subsidized projects. 

In addition to Schochet Associates, Mr. Schochet formed Federal 
Management Co., Inc., which specializes in the management of 
commercial and residential property. Together, Schochet Associates 
and Federal Management Company, Inc. constitute a well-rounded, 
totally experienced real estate development and management team able 
to offer each project the skill and expertise so necessary in 
today's competitive market. 

In 1983, he organized JRS Equities, Inc. to act for Schochet 
Associates in the acquisition of income producing properties in 
growing markets nationwide. JRS Equities has recently acquired for 
Schochet Associates, properties in Atlanta, Georgia and Seattle, 
Washington. 

Mr. Schochet graduated from Dartmouth College. He is a member of 
the Greater Boston Real Estate Board, the Rhode Island Real Estate 
Board, the National Association of Home Builders, the National 
Association of Realtors, and the Chambers of Commerce of Boston and 
Newport, Rhode Island. 

GILLIAN R. GATTIE 

Gillian Gattie has been associated with Jay Schochet since 1968, 
when she joined him at Wm. C. Codman & Son. Educated in England, 
she majored in English, French, and Business. She is President of 
JRS Equities, Vice President-Administration of Schochet Associates, 
and a Vice President and Secretary of Federal Management Co., Inc. 



PETER A. LEWIS 

Peter A. Lewis joined Schochet Associates in 1984. He is 
responsible for the company's development program and has experience 
in pre-development and project management activities involving both 
new construction and the reuse of existing structures. Prior to 
joining Schochet Associates, Mr. Lewis worked for Urban Investment 
and Development Company, and was primarily associated with the $525 
million mixed-use Copley Place development which opened in Boston in 
1984. Mr. Lewis was also involved in the planning of 900 North 
Michigan Avenue, a mixed-use tower under construction in Chicago. 

Before relocating to Boston, Mr. Lewis was employed in New York by 
Helmsley-Spear and was responsible for project management for the 
Helmsley Palace and New York Helmsley hotels. He also has 
background as a real estate loan officer and is a Registered 
Architect. Mr. Lewis holds degrees in Architecture from Harvard 
University and Illinois Institute of Technology, as well as an MBA 
from New York University. 

DAVID GROSSMAN 

David Grossman graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of 
Rhode Island in 1977, receiving a B.S. Degree in Business 
Administration, majoring in Accounting. He is a Certified Public 
Accountant. He worked with Touche Ross and Co. for five years 
becoming a Senior Auditor specializing in the construction, 
manufacturing and retail industries. In 1982, he became Controller 
of Harvest Markets Companies, a supermarket chain, in charge of all 
accounting, EDP and financial functions of seven locations. He 
joined Schochet Associates in September 1984, as Controller, and has 
full responsibility for all financial matters and accounting 
procedures for the Company. He is Treasurer of Federal Management 
Co. and JRS Equities, Inc. 

DANIEL J. MCSWEENEY 

Daniel McSweeney graduated from Harvard University in 1958 and 
continued his graduate studies in Economics at New York University. 
He began his career as a City Planner, became Director of Planning 
and Renewal for two engineering consulting firms, and eventually 
Director of Development for the City of Cambridge. Prior to joining 
Schochet Associates in 1982 he was a real estate development 
consultant for several years, specializing in the packaging of 
projects, their financing, and syndication. As Project Manager for 
Schochet Associates, he is responsible for the Company's 
developments throughout Rhode Island and Connecticut which currently 
include an office park, luxury condominiums, and a mixed-use 
downtown rehabilitation. 



CARL J. BONTA 

Carl Bonta joined Schochet Associates in 1986 as an Assistant 
Acquisition Specialist. He received his B.S. in Engineering from 
Tufts Univerity in 1980 and spent three years as an Applications and 
Marketing engineer for an international firm. He then attended 
M.I.T.'s Sloan School of Management and received an M.S. in 
Management Science after which he worked as a consultant to M.I.T. 
and IBM on international marketing of information systems technology. 

RICHARD J. HENKEN 

Richard Henken joined Schochet Associates on a permanent basis in 
1987 following an internship as an Assistant Acquisition Specialist 
during the summer of 1986. Mr. Henken received both his Bachelors 
and Masters degrees in Economics from Tufts University and an M.S. 
in Management Science with concentrations in Marketing and Finance 
from M.I.T.'s Sloan School of Management. Prior to attending the 
Sloan School, Mr. Henken worked as a financial economist for a major 
money center bank, and an international publishing company. Before 
joining Schochet Associates, he worked as a specialist in marketing 
and business strategy for a major management consulting firm. 

MICHAEL J. MAGNER 

Michael Magner joined Schochet Associates in 1987 as an Assistant 
Acquisition Specialist. He received his B.S. in Management with a 
concentration in finance from the University of Massachusetts in 
Boston in 1987. He was active as a property manager in the Boston 
area and has worked as a consultant to development and property 
management companies on optimizing management information systems 
and control. 



Key Personnel of 
Federal Management Company, Inc. 



JASON J ♦ TIMMONS 

Jason Timmons is President of Federal Management Co., Inc. and has 
overall responsibility for the operation and administration of the 
Company's portfolio of residential units and commercial 
developments. He has had many years of experience in the real 
estate field, with a broad knowledge of federal and state housing 
subsidy programs. He graduated from Brandeis University and 
attended Boston University and Northeastern University to continue 
his real estate education. He has been awarded the professional 
designation of Certified Property Manager (CPM) . He is a member of 
the Greater Boston Real Estate Board, a member of the Institute of 
Real Estate Management, a past Director of the Rental Housing 
Association, and a member of the Subsidized Housing Committee of the 
Builders Association of Greater Boston. 



BETTE J. ANDERSON 

Bette Anderson is a Vice President of Federal Management Co., Inc. 
and is responsible for the portfolio of all residential units. She 
graduated from the University of Connecticut in 1972 and commenced 
her business career with the company immediately thereafter. She 
also attended Boston College to achieve her Masters Degree in 
Business Administration. She has been awarded the professional 
designation of Certified Property Manager (CPM). She is a member of 
the Greater Boston Real Estate Board and a member of the Rental 
Housing Association. 



SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 



PROJECTS IN PROGRESS 



Long Hill Woods 
Groton, Connecticut 



595 Massachusetts Ave, 
Central Square 
Cambridge, MA 



South Park Urban 

Renewal, 

Los Angeles, CA 



324 garden apartments on a 35 acre site in 
Groton. Construction is scheduled to begin 
in late 1987. 

82 residential units with 15,000 sq.ft. of 
first floor retail, 30,000 sq.ft. of office 
space, and a 145-car garage on a one acre 
site on Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge. 
The site is assembled and construction 
should commence in 1988. 

One of three principal developers of the 
"South Park Consortium" designated as the 
preferred developer for three city blocks 
fronting on Olympic Boulevard in downtown 
Los Angeles. The program calls for 2000 
units of housing, 750,000 square feet of 
office space, 450,000 square feet of 
commercial space, 4000 parking spaces and 2 
museums, one of which will be The Children's 
Museum of LA. 



SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 



PROJECTS OWNED 



Danforth Heights 
Portland, Maine 



A 166 unit apartment project 
located on an urban renewal site in 
Portland, Maine, developed under 
Section 236 of the National Housing 
Act. The project was constructed in 
1971. 



Waterview Apts 
South Boston, Mass 



Cotton Mill Apts 
Whitinsville, Mass 



Brick Market Place I 
Newport, Rhode Island 



A 49 unit elderly housing project 
located in South Boston financed by the 
Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency 
with rental assistance payments under 
the Section 8 program. The project was 
constructed in 1975 and has enjoyed full 
occupancy since opening. 

A 55 unit apartment project generated 
from the rehabilitation of an old 
granite cotton mill in Whitinsville, 
Massachusetts. The project was financed 
by the Massachusetts Housing Finance 
Agency with rental assistance payments 
under the Section 8 program. 

84 luxury condominium units combining 
residential, retail and office space in 
three buildings on the waterfront of 
Newport, Rhode Island. This downtown 
urban renewal project was the catalyst 
for the revitalization of the water- 
front, and has received an architectural 
award for excellence. It was constructed 
in 1974. 



Brick Market Place II 
Newport, Rhode Island 



Constructed adjacent to the initial 84 
units of Brick Market Place I, it 
continued the architectural theme. The 
project consists of 8 stores, 4 offices 
and a large, high quality restaurant. 



Weldon Apartments 
Greenfield, Mass 



105 units of housing for the elderly 
generated from the rehabilitation of 
the historic Weldon Hotel. 



One Alewife Place 
Cambridge, Mass. 



A first class office building 
reconstructed from an industrial 
building which had housed a manufac- 
turing plant. The building contains 
133,585 sq.ft. located on a 2 1/2 acre 
site. 



West Broadway 
Newport, Rhode Island 



A mixed use, downtown redevelopment 
consisting of 115 elderly and family 
housing units, and 21,000 sq.ft. of 
commercial space. 



De 



La Salle Condominiums 38 luxury condominium units generated 



Newport, Rhode Island 



Garfield Building 

Los Angelus, California 



from the rehabilitation 
Salle Academy. 



of the De La 



12 story office building located in 
downtown Los Angeles, listed on the 
National Historic Register. The build- 
ing was totally renovated and restored 
into a first-class office building. 
Construction was started in late spring 
of 1983 and completed in June, 1984. 



Angelus Plaza 

Los Angeles, California 



Decatur North 
Professional Medical 
Building 
Decatur, Georgia 



La Paloma Apartments 
Seattle, Washington 



Somerset Green 
Seattle, Washington 



1098 units of housing for the elderly 
located in the Bunker Hill Urban Renewal 
area in downtown Los Angeles. The pro- 
ect was acquired in 1984 after raising 
27,500,000 in equity by Private Place- 
ment managed by Drexel Burnham Lambert. 

10 story, 90,000 sq.ft. office building 
adjacent to Decatur North General Hos- 
pital in a suburb of Atlanta, acquired 
in April, 1986. The building is being 
completely refurbished and has receoved a 
new solar screen covering to upgrade its 
market quality and increase its energy 
efficiency. 

126 units of garden apartments completed 
and occupied in 1986 in a suburb of Seattle, 
Washington (Burien, WA) . 



101 luxury garden apartments 
(a suburb of Seattle). 



in Bellevue 



Fresh Pond Apartments 504 apartment units constructed in 1968 
Cambridge, Massachusetts and financed under the HUD 221{d)3 

program. This project was awarded a 
Flexible Subsidy Program in 1983. 



Riverwood Apartments 336 unit garden apartment complex 
Kent, Washington 

Lake Meridian Apartments 175 unit apartment complex 
Kent, Washington 

Chambers Creek Apts 433 unit apartment complex 
Tacoma, Washington 



DEVELOPMENT EXPERIENCE 
JAY R. SCHOCHET 



Danforth Heights 
Portland, Maine 

Thayer Garden Apartments 
Waterville, Maine 

Waterview Apartments 

South Boston, Massachusetts 

Cotton Mill Apartments 
Whitinsville, Massachusetts 



Brick Market Place I 
Newport, Rhode Island 



Brick Market Place II 
Newport, Rhode Island 

Weldon Apartments 
Greenfield, Massachusetts 



One Alewife Place 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 



West Broadway 
Newport, Rhode Island 



De la Salle Condominiums 
Newport, Rhode Island 

Garfield Building 

Los Angeles, California 



Norstin Apartments 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 



Builder/Developer 

166 unit apartment project 

Builder /Developer 

96 unit apartment project 

Builder /Developer 

49 unit elderly apartments 

Builder /Developer 

55 unit rehabilitated apartment 

project 

Builder /Developer 

84 luxury condominiums, and 

26,500 sq.ft. of commercial space 

Builder /Developer 

19,611 sq.ft. of commercial space 

Builder /Developer 

105 unit rehabilitated elderly 

apartments 

Builder /Developer 

133,585 sq.ft. reconstructed 

commercial space 

Builder /Developer 

115 elderly/family units and 

21,000 sq.ft. of commercial space 

Builder /Developer 

38 luxury condominium units 

Owner /Developer 

12 story, 100,000 sq.ft. renovated 

office space 

Owner /Developer 

32 unit rehabilitated apartments 



PROJECTS COMPLETED BY JAY R. SCHOCHET PRIOR TO THE 
FORMATION OF SCHOCHET ASSOCIATES 



The Colonial Handbag Building 
Natick, Massachusetts 



Sage Laboratories 
Natick, Massachusetts 



G. S. Pacetti Company 

North Reading, Massachusetts 



Builder /Developer 

10,000 sq.ft. of office and 

warehouse space. 

Owner /Builder /Developer 
35,000 sq.ft. of research and 
development and office space. 

Builder /Developer 

10,000 sq.ft. of manufacturing 

space. 



International Rubber Company 
Avon, Massachusetts 



New England Nuclear 
Billerica, Massachusetts 

State Street Bank Building 
Boston, Massachusetts 

The Keystone Building 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Flat Iron Shopping Center 
Manchester, New Hampshire 

60 Leonard Street 
Belmont, Massachusetts 

180 Beacon Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Westminster/Willard Place 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Builder /Developer 

60,000 sq.ft. of office and 

warehouse space. 

Builder /Developer 

10,000 sq.ft. laboratory space 

Developer /Consult ant 

800,000 sq.ft. office building 

Developer /Consult ant 

600,000 sq.ft. office building 

Developer 

80,000 sq.ft. shopping center. 

Owner/Developer 

8,000 sq.ft. store block. 

Developer /Con suit ant 
130 luxury high rise 
apartment units. 

Developer /Con suit ant 

260 units of low and moderate 

income housing. 



DEVELOPMENT EXPERIENCE 
PETER A LEWIS 



Copley Place 

Boston, Massachusetts 



900 North Michigan 
Chicago, Illinois 



The Helmsley Palace 
New York, New York 

The New York Helmsley Hotel 
New York, New York 

The Palace Condominium 
Miami, Florida 

Long Hill Woods 
Groton, Connecticut 



595 Massachusetts Avenue 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 



Developer's Representative 
$525 million mixed-use develop- 
ment including two hotels, 800,000 
sq.ft. of office space, 250,000 
sq.ft. of retail space and 100 
apartments built on turnpike and 
railroad air rights. 

Developer's Representative 

$200 million mixed-use development 

including a hotel, 250,000 sq.ft. 

of retail, 500,000 sq.ft. of 

offices and 250,000 sq.ft. of 

condominiums 

Developer's Representative 
1,200 room luxury hotel 

Developer's Representative 
1,000 room luxury hotel 

Developer's Representative 
250 unit luxury condominium 

324 unit multifamily housing 
project scheduled to begin 
construction in late 1987 

Mixed-use retail, office and 
residential building proposed 
for construction in 1988. 




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JOSEPH D, FEASTER, JR., ESQUIRE 

51 Elmore Street 
-Roxbury, Massachusetts 02119 



EDUCATION ; 

John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Senior 

Executive Program, June, 1984; 

Northeastern University School of Law, J.D. received Junp, 1975; 

Northeastern University, B.A. received June, 1972, Major: political 

science . 

Admitted to practice before the courts in Massachusetts; U.S. 

District Court, District of Massachusetts; U.S. Court of Appeals, 

First Circuit; U.S. Supreme Court. 

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY ; 

April, 1985 - Present, Assistant Director of Real Estate, 
Massachusetts Turnpike Authority . Responsible for the super- 
vision of twenty-four employees in the Patron Services Division, 
a budget of $500,000, the negotiation of leases and licenses and 
the management of the Authority's real estate holdings. 

x983 - 1985, Assistant Secretary and General Counsel, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Executive Office for Administration 
and Finance. Provided legal analysis and opinions to the 
Secretary of Administration and Finance and the staff of the 
Executive Office. Supervised three departments within the 
Sejretariat, and interacted with the Governor's staff, legislature 
and other Secretariats within the Executive Branch. 

1979 - 1983, Associate and Assistant Counsel, Prudential 
Insurance Company of America, Northeastern Home Office. 
Provided legal analysis and opinions to the various departments 
in the company. Supervised outside counsels throughout the 
Northeastern United States relative to claim litigation cases and 
provided labor relations expertise to corporate legal counsels. 
Principally responsible for legal opinions for the Group 
Insurance Department and the Agency Administration Division's 
Defalcation Unit. 

1975 - 1979, Attorney, National Labor Relations Board, Boston 
Regional Office . Conducted representation hearings and elec- 
tions, investigated unfair labor practice cases, drafted repre- 
sentation case decisions, and prepared and litigated unfair labor 
practice cases. 



-2- 

1968 - 1975, Legal Internships . 

- Bedford Stuyvesa-nt Community Legal Services, NY 

- Department of Welfare, Appeals Division, Boston, MA 

- Massachusetts Attorney General's Office, Boston, MA 

- U.S. Attorney's Office, Boston, MA 

- Goodwin, Proctor, and Hoar, Boston, MA 



AFFILIATIONS ; 

President, Boston Branch NAACP, 1980-1983. 

First Vice President, USO Council of New England, Inc. 

President, Executive Committee of Northeastern 
University School of Law Alumni Association 
Member, Corporation of Northeastern University 
Member, National Council of Northeastern University 
Member, Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association 
Member, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity 



AWARDS AND HONORS ; 

"Dean's List," 1968-1969; 

"Outstanding Young Man of America," 

"Outstanding Community Leader", George Washington Carver Grand 

Lodge #99; 

Alumnus of the Year, Northeastern University School of La.W 

Alumni Association; 
"Interfaith Award", Anti-Defamation League of B'NAI B'RITH, 
"Distinguished Service Award", Boston Chapter, National Business 

League; 
"Outstanding Community Service Award", Boston Federal Executive 

Board, Minority Opportunity Coimnittee; 
"Outstanding Alumnus for Public Service, " Northeastern 

University. 



References submitted upon request, 



in the news Joseph D. faster jr. 




Joseph D. Feaster Jr. of Elmore 
Street in Roxbury has been elected 
president of the Northeastern Uni- 
versity School of Law Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

Feaster, 37, the assistant real es- 
tate director for the Massachusetts 
Turnpike Authority, received a juris 
doctor from the School of Law in 
1975 and a bachelor's degree in 
political science from the College of 
Liberal Arts in 1972. 

He plans to increase the associ- 
ation's membership as well as the 
participation of alumni on the local 
and regional level. 

Feaster, a member of the North- 
eastern University Corporation, was 
also recently appointed to the txjard 
of overseers. 

Prior to joining the MTA in April 
1985, Feaster sen/ed for two years 
as assistant secretary and general 
counsel for the state Executive Of- 
fice of Administration and Rnance. 
He was also associate counsel for 
the Prudential Insurance Co. from 
1979 to 1983 and an attomey with 
the National Labor Relations Board 
for the Boston region from 1975 to 
1979. 

Feaster is an active member of 
the Massachusetts Black Lawyers 
Association and is on the steering 
committee of the Lawyers^ Commit- 
tee for Civil Rights Under Law. 

A former president of the Boston 
branch of the NAACP, he is also a 







is 

2 






^ 






member of the board of directors of 
the Metropolitan Area Planning 
Commission and on the board of 



the Franklin F^rk Coalition. 

Feaster has two children, Aalana, 
9, and Joseph III, 4. 



in the news 



Joseph Feaster 



Joseph D. Feaster of Roxbury, 
assistant secretary and general 
counsel for the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Executive Office 
for Administration and Finance, 
was chosen as one of six outstan- 
ding alumni by Northeastern 
University. He was honored for 
his achievements and contribu- 
tions in public service. 

Feaster earned his 
undergraduate degree in political 
science from Northeastern in 
1972 and his Juris Doctor degree 
from Northeastern in 1975. 

Formerly chairman of the 
Un versity's chapter of the Black 
American Law School Association, 
Feaster is a member of the Nor- 
theastern University Corporation 
and secretary of the executive 
committee of Northeastern's 
School of Law Alumni Association. 
In 1981, the law school cited him 
as its alumnus of the year. 

Feaster has long been a leader 
in community and civic affairs. 
From 1980 to 1983, he was presi- 
dent of the Boston branch of the 
NAACP. He is a trustee of the 
Massachusetts Cultural Alliance, 
a member of the steering commit- 
tee of the Lawyer's Committee for 
Civil Rights Under Law, and a 
member of the Massachusetts 
Black Lawyers' Association 

In 1979, Feaster was recogniz- 
ed by U.S. Jaycees as an 
"Outstanding Young Man of 
America." The George 
Washington Carver Grand Lodge 







r^ 



v-<J 



U 



No 99 and the Minority Manage- 
ment Association of New England 
Telephone Company cited him as 



"Outstanding Community 
Leader" in 1980 and 1982, 
respectively. 



easten 



W'd'from page 1 

who left the branch to 
1 ttie NAACP's national 
II, and was elected to two 
1 the office. 

er, a 1975 graduate of 
istern University School of 
serve as lawyer to the 
riat considered the most 
j| of all cabinet positions, 
^ew York City native got 

practical legal experience 
intern with the Bedford 
ant Community Legal Ser- 
orporation in New York in 
In 1974, he coordinated 
)rk of a group of Nor- 
irn law students on the 



Duke taps 
Feaster as 
A&F lawyer 



Jim JonUn 

The Banner has learned that at- 
torney Joseph D. Feaster Jr., 
recently retired president of the 
Boston branch NAACP, has been 
selected as general counsel to the 
Dukakis Administration's 
Secretary of Administration and 
Finance. 

The appointment will be an- 
nounced officially at a ceremony 
this week. 

As counsel. Feaster will have 
direct supervision of the 
Massachusetts Commission 
Against Discrimination (MCAD) 
and the state office of affirmative 

action. 

Administration and Finance 
Secretary Frank T. Keefe said 
"Joe is a splendid guy- Hes 
tremendously well-qualitied. 
Keefe said A4F covers an 
"incredibly broad spectrum of ac- 
tivity " and 'Joe will be serving as 
my chief legal advisor in all those 

Feaster, 32, is presently the 
associate counsel to the Nor- 
theast Home Office of the Pruden- 
tial/ Insurance Co. in Boston. He 
was president of the Boston 
branch from 1979 to 1982. ^ 

finished «t term fl«^"[*w™»»J 
continued to page 21 



lb 






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:2 



Boston Public Schools desegrega- 
tion case. 

Last week, Feaster said the 
Dukakis Administration made "a 
great offer" to him and that he 
was excited about working at the 
cabinet level. 

In an interview, he cited his 
"ability to establish working rela- 
tionships throughout the city" as 



the hallmark of his term as chief 
executive of the influential 
organization. 

In a Boston City Council resolu- 
tion saluting Feaster in 
December, he was lauded as a 
"distinguished attorney, com- 
munity leader, advocate and ac- 
tivist." 

Last fall, Feaster served on the 
14-member advisory committee 
that selected finalists for the post 
of executive director of the 



Massachus^s Port Authority 
(Massport). Former Governor Ed- 
ward J. King later ignored the 
committee's candidates and ap- 
pointed former state Represen- 
tative Louis Nickinello to the posi- 
tion. 

Feaster lives in Roxbury with 
his wife, Carmencita K. Feaster, a 
Digital Corporation credit 
representative, and daughter 
Aalana Radiah. They are expec- 
ting another child in July. 



CHARLES T. GRIGSBY 
29 Worcester Street 
Boston, MA 02118 



EDUCATION; 
1978 

1975 

1967 

1957-1961 
1953-1957 
EXPERIENCE: 
1982 - Present 



1974-1982 



1972-1974 



1970-1972 



1965-1970 



1963-1965 



Boston University 

Graduate Courses in Business & Finance 

Harvard Business School 
NASBIC Venture Capital Seminar 

Northeastern University 

Graduate Courses in Business, Finance & 

Accounting 

Harvard College, BA 

Phillips Academy, Andover 



MASSACHUSETTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
FINANCE CORPORATION 

President. Management of State-financed 
economic development corporation. 

MASSACHUSETTS VENTURE CAPITAL CORPORATION 
President. Managed a minority enterprise 
small business investment company. 

LEE-GRIGSBY ASSOCIATES, INC. 
Partner. Provided management consulting 
services for small business development. 
Served as interim, operating management 
for small companies. 

THE BOSTON URBAN FOUNDATION 
Executive Director. Management of small 
business portfolio and fundraising to 
capitalize a new venture capital company. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON 
International Loan Officer. Lending to 
national and international companies. 
Calling responsibilities in New England, 
Western Europe and England. 

AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
U.S. Department of State, Special 
Assistant to the Administrator. 



MILITARY SERVICE; 



1961-1963 



UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE 

Lieutenant J.C. Communications Division 

Officer on board USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) 



BOARDS & DIRECTORSHIPS ; 
1984-Present 



1983-Present 

1983-Present 

1983-Present 

1981-1986 

1982-1983 

1977-1980 
1973-1982 
1974-1976 
1973-1974 

1970-1974 

1970-1971 

1970-1972 
PERSONAL; 



Member, Steering Committee, Chamber of 
Commerce, Boston 2000 

Chair, Board of Directors, Urban League 
of Eastern Massachusetts 

Member, Board of Directors, Massachusetts 
Venture Capital Corporation 

Member, Board of Directors, ICA Revolving 
Loan Fund 

Advisory Committee, Neworld Bank for 
Savings 

Founding Director, Boston Bank of 
Commerce, and Chairman, Loan Policy and 
Review Committee 

Chairman, Massachusetts State Board of 
Education 

Member, Massachusetts State Board of 
Education 

President, United Neighborhood Centers of 
America, New York 

Member, Massachusetts Governor's 
Commission on School Redistricting and 
Collaboration 

Board Member, Circle, Inc., Community 
Development Corp. 

Member, Governor's Task Force on 
Transportation 

President, Urban League of Boston 



License: Private Pilot 

Hobbies: Tennis, jogging, flying 

Divorced 

Date of Birth; April 26, 1939 



NEWENGLANDNEWSCUP AGENCY, iwc 



Fund Provides Loon 
To Medicol Supplier 

The Thrift Institutions Fund for Eco- 
nomic Development recently approved a 
S200,00p loan to Cunningham Woodland, 
Inc. in Whitman. 

The company, which was formed six years 
ago by George Wopdland and Bruce Cun- 
ningham, prot^uces pre-packaged, sterile, 
medical dressing kits. The loan proceeds win 
be used to acq^jire sterilization equipment 
for kit contents. Sterilization is ctirrently 
subcontracted to aa out-of-state firm. 

According tO Xharles Grigsby. president , 
of the Community Development Corpora- 
tion ( CDFC)y one of four agencies desig- 
nated to act a& agents for the Thrift Fund, 
the loan was recommended because of the 
number of new jobs the loan would gener- 
ate. Mr. Grigsby explained that th« new 
equipment will allow higher production lev- 
els and result in a 25 percent increase in the 
company's labor force to a total of 65 em- 
ployees. 

The Thrift Institutions Fund for Eco- 
nomic Development is 4 $100 million eco- 
nomic development lending pool funded by 
the«tate'$ 275 savings bankr, federal savings' • 
and loan association, and co-optrative ' 
banks. Since its inception in late 1985, the 
Thrift Fund has approved nearly $29 million 
in loans and has disbursed more than SS m3- 
lion to date, . ' D 



■Ji 



BAY STATE BANNER 

DORCHESTER, ma" - 

w. 11,000 /;D^v ^-7 



Infin HousfatgLoai 



IS loaning $2S0,000 to a corpora- 
tion renovating 84 vacant Infill 
housing units in Roxbury, North 
Dorchester and the South End. 

The infill Collaborative, a joint ef- 
fort of four local community devel- 
opment corporations, is creating 
lovv-priced condominiums from the 
long-vacant infill buildings. 

The Codman Square Housing 
Development Corporation, Nuestra 
I Communidad Development Corpo- 
ration, Quincy-Geneva CDC and the 
Roxbury-North Dorchester Neigh- 
borhood Revitatizatron COTpor3tion 
- are the four participating non-profit 
agencies. 
CDFC Preside nt ChalesT Grigs- 
Jfcj^commentBd, " I his pft^ brii^ 
together four community develop- 
ment corporations with a wealth of ■ 
housir^ development experience 
behind them. 
r "CFDC's participation helps to 
maintain the affordability goals fbr 
•; low and nrxxj^gte-income families. 
The collaborative demonstrates the 
■ important role of non-profit commu- 
(,■ nity housing- developers, in the 
neighborhood revitalization." 



FEB 19 1987 

New BNGLAmNEWSCUP AGENCY ^ 



imuniw f Bonding <iuthorit){<r^w^, 

SS, BOSTON (AP) - Al^ilffii 



.. .-o IVC 

panel has approved bills providing 
$513 millioa in new bonding authori- 
ty to help finance local small 
business starts and construction of 
multi-famUy homes. 

The Housing and Urban Devel- 
opment Committee on Wednesday 
passed legislation by Rep. Saundra 
Graham, D-Cambridge, that would 
provide the Massachusetts Devel- 
opment Finance Corp. with $12 mil- 
lion in new bonding authority 

MDFC President CharlM ir,ri p>-ihv 
said $5 million wUl provide fmanciajl 
backing for minonty- and women- 
owned construction contractors. 

The remainder of the new bon- 
ding authority would go to pro- 
viding financial su^wrt to local 
communi tv development corpor a- 
tlons. 

"TCngsby said MDFC helps about 
60 community development cor- 
porations across the state provide 
capital to new businesses and fund 
y low-income housing projects. 



CDFC Lends Funds 
For Co-op Housing 

Massachusetts Community Development 
Rnance Corporation (CDFQ has made a 
5200,000 commitment to support the devel- 
opment of a 140-unit cooperative housing 
project in Lawrence for low- and moderate- 
income families. The loan was proposed to 
CDFC by Heritage Common Community 
Development. Inc. (HCCD) in Lawrence. 

Additional financing will come from 
MHFA bonds with SHARP subsidy, a fed- 
eral Housing Development Aaion Grant, 
and equity syndication. The syndication is 
expeaed to be ofTercd to investors as pan of 
an equity pool with Paine Webber. In addi- 
tion, a CDAG will pay for infrasiruaure at 
the site. 

^^^Charles Oripp;!;iY| rnpr president, noted, 
"Redevelopment of this site will generate 
new tax revenue to the city, provide badly 
needed housing and improve a vacant and 
blighted area." q 



BANKER and TRADESMAN 
10/28/1987 



I 



PAMELA GILLMAN MCDERMOTT 

201 Milton Street 
Dorchester, MA 02124 



EDUCATION; 
1975-1976 

1969-1973 

EXPERIENCE: 
1985 - Present 

1981-Present 



1981 



1980-1981 



1979-1980 



Suffolk University 

Graduate School, Masters of Public 

Administration (courses) 

University of Vermont 
B.S., Education 



NORTHEAST AFFILIATES, INC. 
Executive Vice President. Provides real 
estate services, including investment, 
development and consulting. 

NORTHEAST MANAGEMENT & MARKETING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Founder and President. Responsible for 
all operations of Northeast Management & 
Marketing Company. Northeast specializes 
in government/community relations, press, 
marketing, and special events management. 

CANDIDATE FOR BOSTON CITY COUNCIL 
Ran for citywide elective office, in non- 
partisan, multi-candidate field. Won 
Primary Election, and lost in General 
Election. 

CITY OF BOSTON 

OFFICE OF MARKETING AND DEVELOPMENT 
Project Director. Developed economic 
development marketing strategy, to 
encourage business relocation and 
expansion in the City. 

D.H. SAWYER & ASSOCIATES 
Director, Boston Office. Created, 
developed and marketed first satellite 
office for N.Y. based political and 
corporate communications firm. 



1977-1979 COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

OFFICE OF THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 
Governor's Representative to the New 
England Governor's Conference. 
Recommended economic development, 
transportation and energy policies for 
New England, totalling $7 million in 
federal aid. 

Coordinator, Northeast Alliance of 
Business, Labor & Government. Introduced 
and helped garner support from nine 
Northeastern Governors for "Alliance", to 
address economic problems of Northeast. 

Coordinator for Coalition of Northeastern 
Governors. 

1977 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Consultant. Developed educational 
training program for municipal officials. 
Helped secure $100,000 for program. 

1974-1977 NEW ENGLAND GOVERNOR'S CONFERENCE 

Special Assistant to Federal Co-Chairman. 
Represented President's policy on all 
contracts, grants, and financial 
allocations, and coordinated Federal 
activities. 

BOARDS AND DIRECTORSHIPS /MEMBERSHIPS ; 

Alternate, Boston Landmarks Commission 

Committee, Boston Center for the Arts 
75th Anniversary 

Board of Directors, Boston Cable Access 
Foundation 

Board of Advisors, International Cultural 
Exchange (ICE) 

Reception Committee, The Laboure Center, 
Inc. 

Board of Directors, "Women's Enterprises" 



Board of Directors, Big Sister 
Association of Greater Boston 

Chairman, Public Relations 
Committee, 1986/1987 

Co-chairman, Celebrities 
Ball, 1984/1985 

Member, Massachusetts Women's Business 
Development Council 

Member, Greater Boston Chamber of 
Commerce Executive's Club 



AWARDS ; 

1987 Selected for "Who's Who in Emerging 

Leaders " 

1986 Selected for "Who's Who in American 

Women" 



PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATIONS : 

Registered Real Estate Broker 



I 



INORTHEAST management & MARKETING COMPANY 



NEWSLETTER 




ssues management and strategic 
marketing expertise. A full comple- 
ment of marketing communications 
Is. An insider's knowledge of New 
^land's dynamic and highly com- 
itive marketplace and a proven 
ity to communicate effectively with 
region's policy-makers, media, and 
iness communities, 
hese are the resources you'll find at 
rtheast Management & Marketing 
Tipany-a unique combination of 
itive skills and business experience 
has made the firm a proponent of 
V England's leading businesses, pro- 
ionals, and non-profit organizations, 
ince Pamela McDermott and Gregory 
nkett founded Northeast in 1981, 
firm has successfully advised more 
1 50 clients in such diverse fields as 
estate, education, health care, law, 
ince and accounting, government, 
ism, and numerous consulting 
:ialties. Alert to the strong and 
n volatile interplay of New Eng- 
I's business, political, and social 




communities. Northeast utilizes a 
broad spectrum of contacts to achieve 
wide ranging marketing communica- 
tions objectives for its clients. 

Clients in all fields and organiza- 
tional stages look to the firm for timely 
intervention and management of crisis 
situations, sensitive public and specific 
audience issues, business seminars, 
charitable fundraisers, and promo- 
tional events. Young, growing busi- 
nesses and organizations new to the 
region rely on Northeast to structure 
their introduction to the New England 
marketplace. The firm also develops 
integrated communications programs 
for clients such as law firms, who 
traditionally have not required mar- 
keting expertise but now find them- 
selves in competitive markets for the 
first time. 

The increasingly national scope of 
the firm's marketing activities and the 
explosive growth in New England's real 
estate market has motivated Northeast 
to expand its capabilities even further. 



Northeast has broadened its advertis- 
ing capabilities through an affiliation 
with Bogardus Lowell, a full-service 
advertising agency. A recent affiliation 
with the public relations firm of Con- 
over and Company augments North- 
east's extensive national business and 
government resources with a network 
of national media contacts. Northeast 
has also enhanced its expertise in real 
estate development issues through an 
affiliation with Richard Taylor, a well- 
known Boston neighborhood developer 
Through this affiliation. Northeast in- 
terprets Boston's new linkage require- 
ments and assists developers in ftilfill- 
ing them. 

The newly expanded Northeast Man- 
agement & Marketing Company is 
stronger than ever— well positioned 
to meet the challenges a growing New 
England will surely bring. The critical 
question is: how can Northeast help 
you achieve your goals? 



Northeast provides a full comple- 
ment of communications ser- 
vices. These include: strategic 
market research and planning, publicity, 
issues and special event management, 
press, government, community and 
business relations, speech-writing, fund- 
raising, advertising, and the develop- 
ment and production of marketing sup- 
port materials. The firm specializes in 
tailoring these communications tools to 
the New England marketplace, and has 
successfully applied its broad-based 
experience in a number of business 
areas. The following is a representative 
sampling of Northeast's work for clients 
in some of the region's major markets. 



BUSINESS 



The common denominator in North- 
east's corporate communications 
work is the firm's grasp of the 
New England marketplace and the most 
effective means for communicating 
with its government, media, and busi- 
ness policy-makers. National and 
regional business clients depend on 
Northeast to interpret and evaluate the 
marketplace and to achieve their com- 
munications objectives in light of the 
firm's strong regional expertise. 

In August of 1984, Bruce Church, 
Inc. engaged Northeast to help counter- 
act the negative effects of a secondary 
boycott resulting from a campaign con- 
ducted by the United Farm Workers 
(UFW), the recognized bargaining 
agent for the employees of this lettuce 
grower. The company believed that it 
had been locked out of the New England 
market, because many food retailers 
felt pressured to capitulate to UFW 
demands to boycott Bruce Church, Inc. 
rather than incur the long-term damage 
to their reputation that was the express- 
ed aim of the UFW campaign. 

Northeast's involvement was twofold. 
First, Northeast helped organize a fact- 
finding trip to the company's headquar- 
ters in Salinas, California. A number 
of New England opinion-leaders 
participated in an educational tour of 
the Bruce Church operation to obtain 
an objective assessment of the situa- 
tion. Following the August tour, North- 
east was again engaged in October of 
1984 to assist with a public education 
campaign here in New England. The 
New England campaign was a re- 



sounding success, as evidenced by the 
presence today of Bruce Church pro- 
duce on supermarket shelves through- 
out the region. 

Prior to its merger with Connecticut 
Bank & Trust, Bank of New England 
engaged Northeast to prepare an analy- 
sis of current political and business 
activities throughout the region. The 
bank used Northeast's report to measure 
the business and political climate at ci- 
ty, state, and regional levels to ensure 
thorough consideration of all oppor- 
tunities and potential problems associ- 
ated with current operations and the 
impending business venture with CBT. 

Recently, Northeast was selected by 
the Fire Safety Committee to develop a 
full-scale, statewide press effort to sup- 
port a legislative bill that would require 
all buildings over 70 feet tall to install 
automatic sprinkler systems. Northeast 
worked with legislative lobbyists and 
the local print and electronic media to 
produce much-publicized events sur- 
rounding fire safety demonstrations and 
the first legislative hearing on the bill. 
Over the n?xt thirty days. Northeast 
continued to gamer editorial and talk 
show coverage of the issue until a success- 
ful legislative decision was reached. 



NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS 
AND COMMUNITY SERVICE 



Ultimately, a region is judged by 
the quality of life it provides for 
all residents. Northeast believes 
that by supporting the efforts of non- 
profit organizations committed to im- 
proving the standard of living for all 
New Englanders, the business, politi- 
cal, and social communities advance 
their own commitments to the region's 
long-term health. In keeping with this 
spirit. Northeast regularly assists chari- 
table organizations on a pro-bono basis. 
In 1982, financial strains threatened 
to restrict the outreach of South Boston's 
Laboure Center, which has been pro- 
viding clinical, educational, and health 
services to families in the community 
since 1907. Northeast worked with 
State Senate President Bill Bulger and 
the Laboure Reception Committee to 
develop a new forum for contributors, 
and assisted in fundraising efforts at a 
reception at Anthony's Pier Four. 
Northeast's publicity services helped 
establish a successful precedent for this 
annual event. 



\ 



Northeast is currently undertaki i , 
press campaign for International C i 
tural Exchange, Inc. (ICE), a uniqi | 
organization founded by two collej 
students to promote cooperation ai 
cultural exchange between the Uni 
States and the USSR. ICE's first n- » 
undertaking is The Hockey Proje< a 
two week summer hockey camp at' 
American university for Soviet am \ 
American hockey players. Northe; is 
maintaining press coverage for the 
organization while preparations fo 
The Hockey Project" are finalizec 

When Northeast President Pam , 
McDermott was asked to serve as r . 
Chair of the Big Sister Associatioi 
Annual Celebrities' Balls in 1984; 
1985, Northeast again stepped in t 
play a major role in the fundraisin 
organizational, and publicity effoi d- 
volved in producing these success 
events. Income from the second a A 
ball was double that of the first, g ig 
the Big Sister Association a new p t- 
dent to uphold. 



REAL ESTATE 



[I 



New England's real estate r tat 
is exploding. Real estate a .ij 
is strong in all areas of the ici 
and is directly impacting all secto i 
the economy. In Boston, this grov 
has stimulated government involv 
ment in the development process, t 
requirements of linkage and panx > . 
parcel linkage policies have made 
development more complicated tl 
ever before. In this complex and i i- 
petitive environment, identifying i 
informing the proper audiences n 
quires in-depth knowledge and a 
strategic approach. 

Northeast is currendy proxidin; 
government and communitv' relat s 
counsel to the A.W. Perry Compw 
and Jaymont Properties, Inc. , joi 
venturers in a multimillion dollar 
23-story office- and -retail de\elo 
ment/renovation project in Bostor 
South Station area. This complex 
ject affects several communities a 
terest groups, including Chinatovv 
Downtown Crossing, the Theatre 
District, and developers of nearb 
jects. Northeast is working closel 
with representatives of these coas 
tuencies and w ith elected official^ " : 
government regulatory agenc> pri 



NORTHEAST MANAGEMENT & MARKETING COMPANY 



REAL ESTATE SERVICES 



'I T" owhere is the importance of 
^1 effective communications more 
J ^ evident than in New England's 
CDloding real estate market. Real 
eate activity is strong throughout the 
r;ion, directly impacting all sectors of 
ti; economy and its continued growth. 
F)ject approval and completion involves 
a/ide range of business, government, 
ai community interests. 

With so much activity affecting so 
riny people, targeted marketing and 
cmmunications have become critical 
t'the success of any real estate ven- 
tje. Identifying and informing the 
pper audiences requires in-depth 
kowledge and a strategic approach, 
viich can be devised only by a com- 
fjnications firm that really knows the 
nl estate marketplace and its key 
iision-makers. Northeast Management 
(^Marketing Company is such a firm. 

Since its founding. Northeast has 
v'rked with more than a dozen nation- 
abd local developers and real estate- 
nated service companies. The firm 
h; advised clients involved in real 
Cite investments and land purchases 
aiA'ell as commercial, industrial, and 
n'idential development. These clients 
n/ on Northeast's proven experience, 
e:'»ertise, and wide-ranging contacts in 
Nw England's business, media, and 
giemment communities. 

Tie firm advises its clients throughout 
ti development process, from obtain- 
ir project designation and approvals 
tcnarketing completed projects to 
pispective tenants. Northeast offers a 
fii complement of marketing com- 
mnications services. These include 
g(emment and community relations 
ccnsel, press strategies, public rela- 
tias programs, assistance in develop- 
in linkage proposals and other con- 
tr^itions to the city or state, develop- 
niM and production of marketing sup- 
pc|t materials, and management of 
sptial events such as educational 
seiinars, groundbreakings, "topping 
ofl ceremonies, and openings. 




REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT 



The unprecedented growth in 
Boston real estate development 
has generated two new urban 
planning/development concepts: 
linkage and parcel-to-parcel linkage. 
For the first time, developers executing 
large-scale projects in downtown Boston 
must also insure the creation of low- 
and moderate-income residential or 
commercial units in Boston's neighbor- 
hoods. Secondly, the city is beginning 
to "parcel" a neighborhood site with a 
downtown site. The development of 
both sites must be implemented simul- 
taneously. Mayor Raymond Flynn and 
Boston Redevelopment Authority Direc- 
tor Stephen Coyle have recently artic- 
ulated rules and regulations governing 
the implementation of these concepts. 
Both of the new concepts are com- 
plex propositions. Successful linkage 
proposals depend on knowledge of 
Boston's government and community 



decision-makers as well as the location 
of appropriate sites for linkage develop- 
ment. Northeast can help. 

Recently, the firm formed Northeast 
Affiliates in conjunction with Richard 
Taylor, an experienced local developer. 
Northeast Affiliates counsels real 
estate developers on linkage options, 
assists in the preparation of linkage 
proposals, and can act as a developer 
on linkage projects. In essence, the 
firm interprets linkage requirements 
and aids developers in fulfilling them. 



GOVERNMENT/COMMUNITY RELATIONS 



Government and community rela- 
tions are an integral component 
of the pre-designation or ap- 
proval stage of the development pro- 
cess. Targeted market research and the 
effective communication of project 
benefits to key decision-makers can aid 
approvals and circumvent obstacles to 
project completion. 



Northeast advises clients in all aspects 
of the pre-designation process. The 
firm provides counsel on the political 
implications of a project, its environ- 
mental impact, and its effects on the 
surrounding community. Northeast 
assists in relations with project neigh- 
bors and special interest groups. The 
firm conducts market surveys and 
analyses to define project objectives 
and effects, and assists in the develop- 
ment of presentations to elected of- 
ficials, government decision-makers, 
and regulatory agencies. In addition. 
Northeast helps developers to design 
linkage proposals and agendas for 
contributions to the city or state. 

Northeast is currently providing 
government and community relations 
counsel to the A.W. Perry Company 
andJaymont Properties, Inc. , joint 
venturers in a multimillion dollar, 
23-story office-and-retail develop- 
ment/renovation project in Boston's 
South Station area. This complex pro- 
ject affects several communities and in- 
terest groups including Chinatown, 
Downtown Crossing, the Theatre 
District, and developers of nearby pro- 
jects. Northeast is working closely with 
representatives of these constituencies 
and with elected officials and govern- 
ment regulatory agencies to ensure 
smooth and successful completion of 
the project. The firm is also counsel- 
ling the developers on linkage options, 
and fulfilling all linkage requirements. 

This same comprehensive knowledge 
of real estate marketing led the Dallas 
Market Center Company, a Trammell 
Crow company, to engage Northeast to 
assist with their entry into the Boston 
marketplace. Challenged by an extremely 
competitive environment and seemingly 
impossible deadlines for their Boston 
Design Center project, the Dallas 
Market Center Company realized they 
needed local expertise. Northeast ad- 
vised the company as to the implica- 
tions of the project, and educated com- 
pany pnncipals on some of the poten- 
tial problem areas and political ramifi- 
cations of their decision and actions. 
The Boston Design Center was com- 
pleted on schedule. 



PRESS STRATEGIES 



N 



ortheast Management & Market- 
ing Company has developed and 
implemented comprehensive 



press strategies for numerous real estate 
clients. Northeast can either develop 
complete press and public relations strat- 
egies to aid in the approval process and 
augment the marketing of completed 
projects to the community and to prospec- 
tive tenants, or undertake specific press 
responsibilities for one segment of a pro- 
ject's marketing effort. In either instance. 
Northeast's services would include the 
writing and placement of articles and 
releases to announce project progress 
and ongoing media relations to generate 
public and special interest support. 

Recently, Northeast was engaged by 
Fairchild Communications Services/ 
Boston to develop a comprehensive 
press strategy to strengthen this com- 
pany's presence in the Boston real 
estate market. Together with NYNEX, 
Fairchild develops "smart" buildings, a 
revolutionary construction concept 
whereby voice, video, and data com- 
munications networks are built into a 
building's original structure. Northeast 
has gained substantial press coverage 
for two Fairchild projects to date: One 
Memorial Drive and the Carter's Com- 
plex, both in Cambridge. 

The Congress Group was also attracted 
to Northeast because of the firm's exten- 
sive regional media contacts and in-depth 
understanding of the Boston real estate 
market. Northeast implemented a full- 
scale press effort to publicize the open- 
ing of Building 149 in the Charlestown 
Navy Yard. Northeast developed and 
placed feature articles on the develop- 
ment in the Boston Business Journal, 
the Boston Ledger, the Charlestonn 
Patriot, the Real Estate Journal, and 
the Boston Globe. 



MARKETING MATERIALS 



Northeast has full creative devel- 
opment and production capabil- 
ities for all marketing materials. 
The firm works with some of the finest 
copywriters, designers, photographers, 
and audio-visual production professionals 
in the area. Projects include brochures, 
press kits, articles, newsletters, and 
audio-visual presentations. Careful at- 
tention is paid to budget considerations 
and project objectives to assure the 
most cost effective solutions possible. 
Northeast's proven ability to orches- 
trate the flow of information among 
diverse real estate audiences convinced 
the City of Lynn , Massachusetts to select 
the firm to secure additional exposure 



:pc 



for its rehabilitation and new construe 
tion projects. The city also engaged 
Northeast to produce an Annual Repc 
for the Lynn Office of Economic 
Development. 

Northeast's comprehensive know! 
of real estate marketing also led 
Torto-Wheaton & Associates to assign 
the firm responsibility for the produc 
tion of the company's first informa- 
tional brochure. This Boston-based 
consulting firm forecasts commercial 
real estate trends for more than 40 
metropolitan markets across the 
country. 



SPECIAL EVENTS AND SEMINARS 



Traditionally, real estate mar- 
keting strategies have include< 
numerous special events such 
groundbreakings, "Hopping ofT cere- 
monies, press luncheons, and open- 
ings. And while Northeast views the: 
occasions as valuable opportunities t 
maintain public visibility, the firm a 
also assist with more substantive eve 
and educational seminars directed tow- 
specific interest groups or potential 
tenants. 

Recently, when the real estate divi 
sion of Essexbank sought to increase 
lending business, the bank asked Nor 
east for advice. Northeast recommenc 
a seminar for the division's target auc 
ences: financial planners, real estate 
attorneys, developers, architects, con ' 
struction firms, and other businesses ' 
involved in real estate projects. Nortl 
east arranged for three experienced 
real estate developers to address the 
group. Essexbank gained valuable 1; \ 
visibility and credibility with man\ i . 
potential clients while providing an 
formative, much needed service to tr 
real estate community. 

In May 1984. The Gilbane Buildir. 
Company engaged Northeast to assis 
with their entry into the Boston mark 
The company had two major accompli ; 
ments to announce - the construction ' 
of Marketplace Center and the comp 
tion of "Exchange Place." Northeast 
gathered major opinion leaders from 
the city's government, media, busine' 
and real estate communities for a coc' 
tail reception at Anthony's Pier 4 
restaurant. The reception cast Gilbof 
in a favorable light for many of the cit 
key decision-makers, a valuable imtt 
ment in the company's future. 



I 



;ials to ensure smooth and successful 
;(iipletion of the project. The firm is 
}]) counselling the developers regard- 
ir linkage options, and in the fulfill- 
Ttit of all linkage requirements. 

'his same comprehensive knowledge 
3)eal estate marketing led the Dallas 
krket Center Company, a Trammell 
C'w company, to Northeast when they 
mded assistance with their entry into 
th Boston marketplace. Challenged by 
ai extremely competitive environment 
ai seemingly impossible deadlines 
fctheir Boston Design Center project, 
th Dallas Market Center Company 
re ized they would benefit from local 
ejertise. Northeast advised the com- 
p;y as to the implications of the pro- 
je , and educated company principals 
anome of the potentiaj problem areas 
ai political ramifications of their deci- 
siis and actions. The Boston Design 
Citer was completed on schedule and 
3| ned on April 30, 1986. 

Lecendy, when the real estate divi- 
>ii oiEssexbank sought to increase its 
leiing business, the bank asked North- 
■tii for advice. Northeast recommended 
1 ;minar for the division's target audi- 
oes: financial planners, real estate 
It meys, developers, architects, con- 
st iction firms, and other businesses 
njlved in real estate projects. North- 
i£f arranged for three experienced 
re estate developers to address the 
^lup. Essexbank gained valuable 
Vibility and credibility with many 
x;nti£d clients while providing a 
nph needed service to the real estate 
xiimunity. 




In recent years, increased competi- 
tion has resulted in the introduction 
of marketing to the legal profession. 
*Iivhere will this change be more thor- 
)ihly tested than in New England, 
hhome of so many established and 
Irving firms. Successful marketing 
.titegies will be those that can iden- 
il and educate the public without 
xipromising the high professional 
itidards of the legal practice being 
■eesented. 

Idett, Slater & Goldman, a large 
III] progressive firm of more than 70 
itlpieys, has recently designated 
S^heast as their first public relations 
■eesentative. Northeast has developed 
in is currently implementing an 



overall public relations strategy that in- 
cludes: extensive introduction of the 
firm to the press, trade associations, 
and industry groups, development of a 
firm brochure targeted toward existing 
and prospective clients, a complete 
press strategy including placement of 
articles hy WS&G attorneys in ap- 
propriate publications, and the develop- 
ment of a Speaker's Bureau and WS&G 
Resource Guide to promote the use of 
WS&Gd&ii legal resource for the media 
and interested business organizations. 

In 1982, Northeast had also been 
assigned full press and publicity 
responsibilities for the New England 
Law Partnership, one of the nation's 
first regional law partnerships. The in- 
itial phase of this strategy included an 
introductory publicity brochure distri- 
buted in Washington, D.C. and three 
New England states, and a media cam- 
paign to gain exposure, through which 
Northeast placed feamre articles about 
the parmership in the Wall Street Journal , 
the Boston Globe, New England Busi- 
ness, and the Boston Business Journal. 



EDUCATION 



New England, and Boston in par- 
ticular, has a long tradition as 
the capital of American educa- 
tion. In recent years, a decline in the 
number of college-age students has 
placed pressure on institutions of 
higher learning to develop innovative 
marketing methods to attract suitable 
enrollment. In Boston, fiscal attention 
has been drawn to one practical aspect 
of the city's commitment to education - 
that fully 60 percent of municipal pro- 
perty is tax-exempt, including all schools, 
colleges, and universities. Given this 
highly competitive environment and 
recent questions about the viability of 
Boston's long standing education tradi- 
tion, strong marketing and communi- 
cations strategies have become essential. 

When Northeastern University ad- 
ministrators decided to respond to the 
public debate over the equity of their 
tax-exempt status, they hired Northeast 
to manage the public and community 
relations campaign. Northeast devel- 
oped a brochure and slide presentation 
to highlight the counter-balancing 
benefits that the University provides to 
the city and its residents. Liaison work 
with community and government offi- 
cials culminated in the successful cam- 



paign "A Part of Boston, and Proud of 
it." Northeast has continued to work 
with Northeastern University on an 
ongoing basis. During the winter of 
1985, Northeast assisted in the distri- 
bution of a Public Service Announce- 
ment to publicize the National 
Committee on Cooperative Education, 
which is housed at Northeastern. 



ENTERTAINMENT AND TOURISM 



Nowhere is the whim of the con- 
sumer more evident than in the 
entertainment realm. Knowing 
which audiences to reach and accurate- 
ly timing advertising and promotional 
efforts demands a knowledge of the 
region and a constantly renewed sense 
of what residents and tourists expect 
from New England. 

When Cambridge Seven & Associates 
chose Northeast to manage 'Where's 
Boston?" m 1981, a complete media 
campaign was launched to establish a 
new image for the theatre. Northeast 
expanded the performance schedule 
with group-sales programs and a two- 
fold appeal to the daily flow of pedes- 
trian traffic: a roving mime troupe 
attracted interested spectators to the 
show seven days a week in the Faneuil 
Hall locale and a new advertisement 
display was mounted in the Quincy 
Market area. 

Northeast's extensive tourism and 
entertainment experience lead the tall 
ship Spirit of Massachusetts to select 
the firm to develop and implement a 
full marketing strategy for its 1985 East 
Coast tour. Initially, Northeast organ- 
ized a welcoming event for potential 
charter users of the ship, and handled 
scheduling to maximize use of the ship 
while in Massachusetts. Northeast also 
developed and distributed a comprehen- 
sive sales kit, which was mailed to more 
than 500 businesses across the country. 
In preparation for a full-scale tourism 
campaign in 1987, the City of Lynn re- 
cently engaged Northeast to develop the 
press strategy for a kick-off celebration 
in September of 1986. The entire city 
will take part in an all-day carnival of 
games, demonstrations, events, and open 
house tours of various Lynn industries. 



FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING 



Northeast recognizes that com- 
municating an identity to the 
Boston business marketplace 
involves more than a promotional cam- 
paign and name recognition. It requires 
innovative thinking, and marketing 
solutions that reflect an understanding 
of the critical issues affecting both the 
client and its target audience. 




Earlier this year, Baitk of Boston 
sought a forum for addressing Massa- 
chusetts business customers about the 
region's economic prospects. The bank 
hired Northeast to manage an educa- 
tional seminar entitled "77?^ Massachu- 
setts Business Boom: Can Today's Pro- 
sperity Continue?" Northeast managed 
all of the arrangements and invited 
Stephen Coyle of the Boston Redevelop- 
ment Authority; Massachusetts Secre- 
tary of Transportation Fred Salvucci; 
John Crosier, Director of the Massa- 
chusetts Business Roundtable; and 
Wayne Ayers, Senior Financial Econo- 
mist at the Bank of Boston, to address 
the group. By sponsoring this infor- 
mative event. Bank of Boston gained 
press coverage as well as exposure and 
credibility with business clients. 

When KMG Main Hurdman, one of 
the world's largest accounting and 
management consulting firms, asked 
Northeast to address its Boston client 
list and generate higher visibility, the 
firm wanted to enhance its competitive 
position within the city. Northeast 
moved internally first, reorganizing the 
firm's overall communications strategy. 
Well-attended annual receptions give 
local business executives an opportuni- 
ty to meet Main Hurdman executives in 
an informal setting. Already, the firm 
can f)oint to new clients as a result of 
these public relations efforts. 



CLIENT LIST 



Bank of New England 

Bank of Boston 

The Bay Group 

Big Sister Association of Greater Boston 

The Bostonian Group 

Boston Walkabouts 

Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company 

Bruce Church, Inc. 

City of Lynn 
City of Milwaukee 
Commonwealth Charitable Fund 
The Congress Group, Inc. 
Corporate Cuisine, Inc. 
Cramer Video Incorporated 

Dallas Market Center Company 

Hon. Edward J. McCormack, Esquire 
Energy Partners Incorporated 
Essexbank 

Fairchild Communications Services/ 
Boston 

Fire Safety Committee 

First New England Securities Cor- 
poration 

Gilbane Building Company 

Hawley Investors 

International Cultural Exchange (ICE) 
International Student Association of New 
England 

Kravco, Inc. 

KMG Main Hurdman 

Laboure Center 

Massachusetts Industrial Development 
Fund 

New England Historic Seaport/ 

"Spirit of Massachusetts" 
New England Law Partnership 
Northeastern University 

Perry/Jaymont Venture 
Pope John XXIII National Seminary 
Positions, Incorporated 
Prudential Insurance Company of 
America 

Rachwal Industries, Inc. 
Reiser & Rosenberg 
Rollert & Sullivan 

Seajam, Inc. 

Stadium Management Corporation 

Stadium Realty Trust 

Torto, Wheaton & Associates 

Trammell Crow Company 

"Where's Boston?", Inc. 
Widett, Slater & Goldman 



SERVICES 



Brochures 

Annual and quarterly reports 

Development of articles, speeche: 

presentations and news releases 

Press conferences and publicity 

Meetings, seminars and conferen 

Fundraising 

Direct Mail 

Audio/visual presentations 

Market Research 

Special events and promotions 

Advertising 

Government and community rela 

Development of strategic market 

plans 



For more information, please ca 

Pamela G. McDermott 
President 

Gregory P. Plunkett 
Chairman 

617-523-5115 



Northeast Management & 

Marketing Compan\ 

One Boston Place 

Suite 3400 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

617-523-5115 



GOVERNMENT & COMMUNITY RELATIONS, PUBLIC EDUCATION 

When the One Twenty Five High Street Limited 
Partnership (The Prospect Company [the real estate arm of The 
Traveler's], Spaulding & Slye, and New England Telephone), 
needed assistance with their multi-million dollar downtown 
office and retail development, they called upon Northeast 
Management & Marketing Company to design and implement a 
wide-reaching and comprehensive public and government/ 
community relations plan. 

Northeast's President, Pamela G. McDermott, assumed full 
responsibility as Project Spokesperson, and as liaison 
between the many diverse constituencies involved, including 
elected officials, community, civic, and historic groups, 
abutters and government agencies. In addition. Northeast 
developed an informational audio/visual presentation and 
brochure to educate the public and concerned groups; helped 
to develop a linkage package for the project; and assisted 
with the development of a progressive traffic program. 

Northeast also provided government and community 
relations counsel to the A.W. Perry Co. and Jaymont 
Properties, joint venturers in a multi-million dollar 23- 
story office and retail development/ renovation project at 
125 Summer Street. This project affected several communities 
and interest groups, and Northeast worked closely with 
representatives of these constituencies, and with elected 
officials and government agencies to ensure smooth and 
successful completion of the project. Northeast also 
assisted in the development of options to fulfill linkage 
requirements, which resulted in the City's first housing 
creation project. 

Other related real estate experience includes 
Northeast's work with The Congress Group, a Boston area 
developer who needed a comprehensive marketing and press 
strategy to reach potential lessees, and the general public. 
The firm also looked to Northeast for government relations 
counsel. Over the course of the relationship. Northeast has 
publicized Congress Group building openings by placing 
feature stories in such publications as the Boston Globe, the 
Boston Herald , New England Business and the Boston Business 
Journal . 

The Trammell Crow Company has also engaged Northeast to 
provide government relations counsel for a proposed suburban 
commercial/residential development that has encountered 
community difficulty. At present, the project is embarking 
on a massive government/community outreach program which has 
been designed to take the project through final town 
approvals. 



Northeast also serves as counsel to the Gerald D. 
Hines/The New England Joint Venture for Phase II of their 
Back Bay project, 222 Berkeley Street, and provides 
consulting services to F.D. Rich/A. W. Perry on their 
Washington Street project. 

The capabilities and resources of Northeast's principals 
to effectively address issues in Boston and its surrounding 
towns has also been enhanced by their extensive experience 
with Boston community groups through political campaigns. 
Pamela McDermott was a candidate for the Boston City Council 
in 1981 (a city wide campaign) , and more than 75% of 
Northeast's employees have direct government and political 
experience. 



She ^o6m (globe 



SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1987 



Cooperation Leads 
to smooth sailing 
for 125 High St. 



By Anthony J. Yudis 
Globe Staff 



When the Hartford-based 
Travelers Insurance Co. 
and its development 
partners asked last month 
for some zoning changes for a $200 mil- 
lion, block-long redevelopment project in 
Boston's financial district, there was no op- 
position at the public hearing held by the 
Boston Redevelopment Authority. 

The 2.5-acre, 125 High Street project 
envisions two office buildings, of 30 and 
21 stories, three renovated buildings near- 
by, and an enclosed common space con- 
necting the buildings and containing stores. 
The project would include construction of 
public facilities in the block bounded by 
High, Pearl, Purchase and Oliver streets. 

But BRA director Stephen Coyle says it 
wasn't surprising to him that there was no 
opposition. He credited the developers for 
undertaking "a good community process" 
in the last two years, during which the 
developers talked to many people. 

Coyle said he thinks the project, de- 
signed by Jung/Brannen Associates of 
Boston, is a much better product for the 



city as a result of that process and the will- 
ingness of the developers to listen. 

The BRA recently authorized a planned- 
development-area zoning designation for 
the project, which will allow the devel- 
opers to acquire a package of variances 
needed once final design approval is given. 
The designation allows a height limit of 
400 feet, which is what the city's proposed 
new downtown zoning laws would allow. 

The project now will be one of the first 
developments to be scrutinized by the new 
Boston Civic Design Commission. It then 
will go to the Zoning Commission and the 
Board of Appeal. It also will need City 
Council approval for the sale of some city- 
owned property on the site, including a 
35-year-old fire station on Oliver Street 
and a sliver of land. 

A community outreach program was 
directed by Northeast Management and 
Marketing Co. headed by Pamela McDer- 
mott, president, who said her agency con- 
tacted more than 250 neighbors and abut- 
ters over about eight months. 

"We received feedback from communi- 




F. M Constantino illuslralion 

Design for the expansive atrium. 




Drawing depicts two towers at 125 High, with revamped buildings at bottom. 



ty organizations including the Chamber of 
Commerce, the Downtown Crossing As- 
sociation and three historic-preservation 
groups. We also conducted walking tours 
of the site, sponsored luncheons and held 
approximately 100 meetings for interested 
parties," said McDermott. 

What the project had going for it from 
the beginning was a major commitment 
from a prominent Boston employer. New 
England Telephone Co., which is also one 
of the development partners. The firm 
agreed to become a prime tenant in the new 
project and take about 35 to 40 percent of 
its million square feet of office space. It 
also agreed to hire 1 ,000 Boston residents 
- 500 this year and 50O next. It plans to 
consolidate 1,850 existing jobs in the city 
into the new project and create 150 jobs. 

A third development partner, the real 
estate development and consulting com- 
pany Spaulding & Slye of Cambridge, also 
has made a commitment to move its cor- 
porate headquarters into the project from 
its present Cambridge base. 

Peter Small, president of Spaulding & 
Slye, said about 40 employees will move 



back to Boston, where Spaulding origi- 
nated. When the firm developed the New 
England Executive Park in Burlington, it 
moved its operations there. Since then it 
has developed CambridgePark, an office 
park near the Alewife Brook Parkway 
transit station in Cambridge and moved its 
headquarters there. 

But Small says most of its administrative 
staff will not come to Boston, since, "We 
have about 180 to 200 people out there 
who are not used to commuting into the 
city or dealing with the Central Artery." 

Small said he and his associates have 
worked closely with the BRA. and the pro- 
cedure was one of cooperation rather than 
confrontation. But the cooperation will 
mean the developers spend some money on 
agreed-upon areas such as: 

• They will rehabilitate three four-to-six- 
story buildings at Oliver and Purchase 
streets, something that pleases the Boston 
Preservation Alliance. 

• The telephone company plans to open 
an Alexander Graham Bell museum in the 
project area as, among other things, a field 
trip site for Boston's students. 



• The developers will build a modem 
fire station for the city within the project 
area. They also will include space for a 
two-bay ambulance facility , the first in the 
downtown financial district. 

• The developers will contribute a 
$75,000 mobile "jobstop" van. the first in 
the city, which will enable the city's jobs- 
recruiting program to reach all 17 Boston 
neighborhoods. The mobile unit will sup- 
plement the city's network of proposed per- 
manent neighborhood "jobstop" locations. 

In addition, the project should provide 
a mandatory $7.5 million in linkage pay- 
ments to the city to be used for producing 
affordable housing, and about S4.2 million 
annually in additional real estate taxes. 

De\elopers also brought in some de- 
tailed plans to mitigate transportation 
problems as well. 

Travelers is de\'eloping the site through 
the Prospect Co. of Hartford, the insurance 
firm's real estate arm. Directing the local 
development acti\ ities is Bnan Gabriel of 
Simsbury. Conn., vice president of 
Prospect. 



The Weekly Newspaper of Greater Boston 



THE BOSTON 




R 



VOL. 50, NO. 25 WEEK OF JUNE 2 7- JULY 3, 1987 NEWSSTAND PRICE 25 CENTS 



A New Way of Conducting 
Business Helps Avoid Rifts 



125 High St. builders give return favors 



By John Becker 



Development in downtown Boston is 
usually the stuff of which controversies 
are made. But the proposed 125 High 
Street project in the Financial District is 
unusual for the feathers it hasn't ruffled. 
A team of astute developers has hit on a 
marketing scheme that seems unbeatable: 
give the people what they want. 

Building a large office complex on a 
2.5-acre site next to the Central Artery 
could have been the source of a confron- 
tation with concerned citizens and in- 
terest groups. But the Prospect Company 
and Spaulding and Slye Company, co- 
owners and co-developers of the 1.4- 
mill ion-square-foot project, which will 
include a 30-story building and a 21- 
story building, sought from the first to 
adapt their design to meet the needs of 
the Boston community. 

Dave McGarry, of the Cambridge- 
based Spaulding and Slye Company, put 
it this way: "When you go in just saying 
'We're going to be building an office pro- 
ject here,' people might think 'I don't 
want another office building,' or 'If 
there's going to be one, how's it going to 
help me?' And when you say good 
things, it makes it much easier." 

Spaulding and Slye and The Prospect 
Company, the real estate arm of Tra- 
velers Insurance, which owns most of the 
site and occupies a 16-story building 
there, enlisted New England Telephone 
(NET) as the third member of the pro- 



ject team. NET agreed to locate its new 
headquarters in one of the 125 High 
Street office buildings, bringing in hun- 
dreds of new jobs and retaining or con- 
solidating several thousand others in 
Boston through consolidation. 

Throughout its history, the 125 High 
Street team seems to have 'oeen intent on 
providing something for everyone. They 
joined with the city's Office of Jobs and 
Community Services (OJCS) on the new 
Boston for Boston jobs initiative, promis- 
ing to build a new firehouse for the 



Boston Fire Department and an ambu- 
lance facility for the Health and Hospitals 
Department. They will preserve and 
renovate three 19th Century buildings 
located on the site. They reduced the 
height of the tallest building from 600 to 
400 feet after some concerns were raised, 
and are building a parking garage and 
adding a lane to adjacent Purchase Street 
to alleviate potential traffic problems. 

Add to this the lack of residential op- 
position in the largely non-residential 
Financial District and a dynamic public 




relations campaign by Northeast Man- 
agement and Marketing Company, and 
you have a project with which it is dif- 
ficult fo find fault. 

The Boston Redevelopment Authority 
(BRA) found little to fault in the project 
team's outreach efforts. The BRA's Ralph 
Memola commented. "They went out and 
met with people, made numerous presen- 
tations, adapted their project as they went 
along to the concerns that people raised 
at various points in the review process. 

And their efforts seem to have paid 
off. The BRA voted on May 7 to approve 
the project's development plan and its 
development project impact plan. The 
BRA then petitioned the Boston Zoning 
Commission for designation of the site 
as a Planned Development Area (PDA); 
such a designation, available only for 
large projects, will simplify much of the 
paperwork done in the future on the pro- 
ject. The 125 High Street development 
received its initial Planned Development 
Area approval from the Zoning Commis- 
sion in early June. 

The development team and the BRA 
are now working "cooperatively," 
McGarry said, as they continue the 
design review and approval process. 
Memola commented, "There has been 
remarkably little controversy. In fact, 
there has been rather strong support for 
the program." 

Perhaps the single most outstanding 
feature of the 125 High Street project 
public-mindedness is the "New Boston 
Jobs Program." According to McGarry, 
each member of the development team 
will contribute something to the pro- 
gram. Spaulding and Slye, by deciding 
to relocate their corporate offices at the 
125 High Street site, will bring 40 new 
jobs to Boston. New England Telephone, 
by consolidating its headquarters at the 
site with a 20-year lease, has made a 
"long-term commitment to ... . staying 
in the city of Boston," noted Robert 
Talbot, NETs District Manager for Real 
Estate Operations. As part of its commit- 
ment to the program, and to jobs for 
Boston residents, NET has agreed to hire 
1 ,000 Boston residents for new jobs in 
1987 and 1988. 

By participating in the Boston for 
Boston initiative, the developers have 



promised to hire Boston residents for 50 
percent of the jobs in their buildings — 
jobs like building technicians and engi- 
neers, security guards, and parking lot 
attendants. In addition, tenants of a 
building within the Boston for Boston 
program are entitled to the job training 
and referral resources provided by 
OJCS: Ann Donner of OJCS told the 
Ledger that developers are using the pro- 
gram "as an amenity to attract, saying 
'here is free employment referral." 

The money for the program comes, in 
part, from linkage payments. For every 
square foot in the project over 100,000 
square feet, one dollar goes to job train- 
ing and five dollars go to housing. Since 
the job training linkage payments are re- 
quired, McGarry said, it benefits the 
developer to take part in the jobs issue. 
"We know we were going to be paying 
a certain amount of linkage dollars in 
terms of housing and in terms of job 
training," McGarry noted. "We figure if 
we're going to be paying these dollars, 
let's try to have some input into what the 
money goes toward." 

For its part in the New Boston Jobs 
Program, the Prospect Company is do- 
nating to OJCS its first and only mobile 
Jobstart van, a traveling job training, 
referral, and recruitment center to serve 
Boston's neighborhoods. The mobile 
Jobstart will eventually be part of a 
seven-Jobstart system with a number of 
permanent locations around Boston. Per- 
manent Jobstarts are already planned for 
Roxbury, South Boston, and Charles- 
town. According to Donner, the donation 
of the Jobstart van "represents a real 
sincere commitment on the part of 125 
High Street to ensure that everyone in the 
city has these opportunities made 
available to them." 

But jobs are not the only asset 125 
High Street promises to bring Boston. 
The development team has agreed to re- 
place the Boston Fire Department (BED) 
facility on the site of the project with a 
'state-of-the-art' fire house, McGarry 
said. Chief Paul Cook of the BED was 
pleased with the arrangement: "What we 
have worked out between the architect, 
the developer, and the BRA will give us 
just about everything we want." He ex- 
pressed caution though, saying. "You're 



never certain on a thing like this, because 
there are so many other factors." 

As mentioned above, the 125 High 
Street plans include the restoration of 
three 19th-century buildings at the cor- 
ner of Oliver and F^irchase Streets. Two 
of the structures were built in the 1 880's 
by architect John Hall, according to 
Steve Jerome of the Boston Landmarks 
Commission. Jerome explained that the 
buildings are an excellent example of late 
Victorian mercantile architecture. One of 
the buildings will be renovated to house 
downtown Boston's first and only am- 
bulance facility. 

And to please the culturally-minded. 
New England Telephone plans to create 
a communications museum named after 
Alexander Graham Bell in the first-floor 
atrium of the project. 

All this additional public benefit comes 
on top of the public benefits built into the 
Boston development process: 125 High 
Street will contribute $7.5 million in 
linkage fees. The job training compo- 
nent, as mentioned above, will help to 
bolster OJCS programs. The housing 
component will probably go to the 
Neighborhood Housing Trust, according 
to Ted Doyle. Property taxes from the 
development will add another S5.6 
million in revenues for the city. 

The design review and community 
outreach processes continue, but from all 
accounts the 125 High Street develop- 
ment seems a sure thing. The success of 
the project sends a message to developers 
who forget to ask. "How will this help 
Boston?" If the response by OJCS and the 
BRA are any indication, projects like 125 
High Street - projects that downplay 
confrontation and emphasize the public 
benefits of their proposals - may soon 
become the standard against which others 
are judged. 

OCJS's Ann Donner made the case 
succinctly: "I think that when a developer 
comes forth and does something new . it 
signals perhaps to other people who ha\e 
projects under approval that this is a new 
way — that this is the way we do busi- 
ness in Boston. It's positive for both the 
developer and the city as a whole - and 
we hope people follow their example." 



Boston Rusiness Journal 



August 1986 



MONTHLY 



REAL ESTATE 



SUPPLEMENT 



Number TWenty-Seven 




u juitiiiii I a 
''fijllinj 



U J 



M- u U i ii J ' ; 




3 1 rii I 

i I 1 1 i' 

n 1 n 

11 !■! IIHN 

il' J 








The 

anatomy 
of an 
office 
building 



by John King 



photos by Sluan GarTidd 

The official unveiling of 125 Summer St. was perhaps the most carefully 
scripted presentation ever given to the Boston Redevelopment Authority board of 
directors. 

First, architert Arthur May showed slides of the proposed building and its sur- 
roundings, explaining how the new 23-story tower would take part in a stylistic 
dialogue with nearby South Station. An engineer followed with a description of 
the building's traffic access plan (see BBJ, Aug. 11). There was a discussion of the 
developer's intent to build affordable housing in Chinatown and letters of support 
from local developers, the Chinatown/ South Cove Neighborhood Council and 
the Boston Landmarks Commission. 

And no opposition. The board voted unanimously to let the tower be built, 
then moved to the hearing's next item. 

"We didn't want to leave any stone unturned," developer Richard Eichom ex- 
plained later. "We felt it was necessary to make sure everybody understood what 
we were trying to do." 



As much as any formal guideline, those 
words of Eichorn — who heads the Boston 
office of Jaymont Properties, co-develop- 
er of 125 Summer with A.W. Perry Inc. — 
indicate the path that future development 
in downtown Boston is likely to take. 

The July 17 approval of 125 Summer is 
significant for two reasons. It is the first 
large office building to originate in and 
emerge from director Stephen Coyle's 
BRA, with no roots in former Mayor 
Kevin White's administration. 

Also, 125 Summer could easily have trig- 
gered an acrimonious battle over growth — 
just like International Place, or the New 
England Life building, or 101 Arch or Ex- 
change Place. Like the latter two buildings, 
125 Summer involves the construction of a 
new office tower behind the facades of ex- 
isting low-rise buildings. The new and the 
old will be forcibly combined. 

The very fact that it didn't become a 
battle makes 125 Summer worthy of close 
examination. It also suggests that the BRA 
and developers might finally be learning 
from past mistakes. 

When completed in early 1989 at a cost 
of approximately $100 million, 125 Sum- 
mer will be a 23-story, 480,000-square- 
foot office tower cloaked elaborately in 
granite and glass. There will be under- 
ground parking and ground-floor retail. 

The site seems ideal. Bounded by the sur- 
face artery and Siunmer, Liiicoln and 
South streets, 125 Summer is a hub within 
the Hub, the visual terminus of High Street, 
Summer Street and the South Station area. 
The heart of the financial district is a few 
blocks away; so is Downtown Crossing. 

Difficult but desirable 

From a planning viewpoint, though, the 
block is as difficult as it is attractive. The 
presence of the 600-foot-high 1 Financial 
Center and the 415-foot Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield building argues for a tower on the 
site; however, Chinatown and a cluster of 
century-old granite buildings are also 
neighbors. The block itself contains nine 
19th-century buildings and a 70-foot-high 
Central Artery ventilation shaft. 

A few years ago, the block caught the 
eye of the Rockefeller family, which 
entered into a joint development agree- 
ment with Perry, longtime owner of the 
site's buildings. Shortly afterward, the 
ERA'S 1983 Downtown Crossing plan 
proposed a 650,000-s(5uare-foot high rise 
for the block. 

When the Rockefellers pulled out for 
personal reasons. Perry searched for a new 



partner. Early last year, it settled on Jay- 
mont Properties, a development firm that 
owns or manages more than 5 million 
square feet of commercial real estate 
across the country. 

Next, the joint venture selected an archi- 
tect: Kohn Pedersen Fox, a nine-year-old 
New York firm known for its postmodern 
style. KPF (architect for the 101 Federal 
St. building now under construction) 
prides itself on contextual designs that ac- 
knowledge their surroundings — a neces- 
sary quality in this case. 

When developers first approached the 
BRA last fall, they decided to present a set 
of alternative concepts rather than a spe- 
cific design. Each retained the facades of 
foiu- of the existing buildings along Sum- 
mer Street; each incorporated nearby 
state- and city-owned land to the Perry 
site; and each alternative was roughly 600 
feet tall. 

Too high, said the BRA. "They wanted 
to create a real 'point' building, something 
very symmetrical that called attention to it- 
self," said Victor Karen, the BRA archi- 
tect assigned to the project. "They were 
going in the right direction as far as retain- 
ing buildings of historic value and public 
improvements, but we were concerned 
about the height." 

The block borders the Essex Street Corri- 
dor, an area where the BRA is encouraging 
development of office towers, but the agen- 
cy let it be known that the definition of 
"high rise" in Boston is being scaled down 
from what was allowed in the past — or out- 
lined in the 1983 study. Except in spjecial 
cases, the new height limit was 300 feet. 

After a month or two of internal debate, 
Jaymont and Perr>' decided to go along. 

"We knew we were the first major proj- 
ect that was going to be approved by the 
Flynn administration and the new group at 
the BRA," Eichorn explained. "To fight 
for more stories didn't seem worth the 
trouble. Coyle gave us clear directions as 
to height, and we chose to follow them." 

The developers returned to the BRA in 
January with an entirely different building 
proposal. 125 Summer was now 300 feet 
high, with an as\Tnmetrical L-shaped de- 
sign. Also, the site contained no state or 
city land. The vent stayed. 

"Once we knew the height limit, it 
didn't make sense financially to pull addi- 
tional land into the design." Eichorn said. 
"The economics didn't support it." 

Another factor seems to have been a de- 
sire to get the building approved as quickly 
as possible. If the joint venture had pressed 



August 25. 1986 / Boston Business Journal 




Project manager Joseph FaDon, Jaymont partner Rkhard Eichomand A.W. Perry president S. 
Maxwell Real. To compensate for a lack of height, the developers chose an ornate design. 



the issue, it might have gotten an extra hun- 
dred feet. But the effort would have taken 
months and introduced a set of connected, 
possibly disabling issues — from the negotia- 
tions involved in purchasing government 
land to public criticism of a building felt to 
be too tall. As it stands now, 125 Summer's 
target completion date of early 1989 puts it 
in a marketable vacuum, with clusters of 
projects opening before and after 

Eichom is reluctant to say that such 
considerations were important. "We'd be 
less than true to ourselves if we said we 
didn't think about those issues and they 
weren't a factor," he said. "Timing is 
always important in any project this size. 
But what's more important than the time 
aspect is getting the project right." 

With the height issue settled, the review 
process accelerated. 

"A lot of factors go into reviewing a 
building, and any one of them can hold up 
the process," said Susan Alien, the BRA's 
assistant director for development and ur- 
ban design. "Once the debate on massing 
and height was behind us, we could move 
on to other issues." 

Some had little to do with design. The 
BRA required studies on how the building 
would affect wind, shadow and traffic 



patterns in the area — common require- 
ments, but in the past such studies weren't 
done until the latter stages of review. And 
in Alien's words, "It makes sense to do 
impact analysis in the early stages of 
review, and get environmental information 
before major massing decisions. . . . You 
can only do so much (wind protection] 
with canopies and trees." 

BRA project coordinator Pam Wess- 
ling, meanwhile, worked with the develop- 
ers on arranging a partnership with the 
Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Associa- 
tion to build housing in Chinatown using 
125 Summer's $1.29 million in linkage 
payments. 

"We knew we didn't want to just dump 
our linkage money into a fund, but we 
didn't have the expertise to do it [build 
housing] ourselves," Eichom said. "It was 
a team effort." 

Weekly meetings took place between 
BRA planners and the joint venture team, 
including senior project manager Joseph 
Fallon, KPF design partner Arthur May 
and KPF project manager Glenn Garri- 
son. Specific sections of the building were 
tackled at specific meetings; one week, for 
instance. May and Garrison brought in a 
cardboard model of the building with sev- 



era] different attachable tops to stimulate 
the discussion. Similar effort was spent 
making sure the new portions of the five- 
story base complemented the old. 

Perhaps the thorniest design question 
concerned the site's existing buildings. 
While there was agreement early on as to 
which building facades along Summer 
Street should be preserved, Lincoln Street 
was a different matter. One building of 
acknowledged merit will be demolished 
because the developers consider it incom- 
patible with the parking garage entrance 
set for that point. 

According to Garrison, incorporating 
old buildings into a new design can be diffi- 
cult. "People are much more conscious 
about preservation today," he said. "It's a 
good thing, but it makes the integration of 
new design with old buildings much more 
difficxilt. You find yourself facing the 
danger saying 'Wait a minute — this is our 
building, not an 1870s building.' " 

Grafting not always the answer 

Conversely, some preservationists re 
main opposed to the grafting of new onto 
old, a la Exchange Place, where an eight- 
story granite facade is attached to a 
40-story glass tower. 

"I don't think this is what one would 
call preservation — it is a case of trying to 
be sensitive and mitigate impacts," said 
Antonia PoUak, executive director of the 
Boston Preservation Alliance "We made 
our position known, that we supported 
full retention of the [existing] buildings. 
But we had no way to back that up." 

Other observers are happy with KPF's 
efforts. "They deserve a lot of credit for 
understanding that there is a base there to 
build upon," said Matthew Coogan, state 
undersecretary of transportation. 

Both Pollak and Coogan received pre- 
sentations at various stages of 125 Sum- 
mer's gestation. Project manager Fallon 
estimates he made roughly 70 presenta- 
tions to concerned groups and individuals. 
"We made an effort to talk to as many in- 
terested and disinterested people as possi- 
ble," Fallon said. "You have to be open 
and receptive." 

Coogan put it another way. "Joe Fallon 
is a very skillful merchant of his wares," 
he said. "What he does is talk to every- 
body and deal with problems before 
they're problems." 

One result was an abundance of sugges- 
tions on the fine points of making the 
building blend into the area. At the same 
time, because the building lacks an atten- 
tion-getting height, a strong and effective 



design became crucial to, in Garrison's 
words, move the building "A focal point. 
The level of detail and shapes and forms 
have to make it outstanding." 

Despite the difficulty of the task and the 
range of opimons, Eichorn feels KPF 
managed to keep control of the design. 
"You have to have a strong architect," he 
said, adding that the BRA deser\es credit 
for restraint. "They didn't say, 'We have to 
have this here,' or 'You have to make this 
change.' They said, 'We have these con- 
cerns.' They know that design by com- 
mittee doesn't work." 

By the time the schematic drawings and 
environmental saidies were formally pre- 
sented to the BRA in May, the building had 
taken on its current appearance. There were 
further refinements — two extra levels of 
parking were added and an inside galleria 
was angled slightly to allow for retail space 
on both sides — but the work that led to the 
July 17 vote was essentially complete. 

Final design drawings are still being 
completed, and actual building materials 
have yet to be selected (the shade of gran- 
ite, for instance). And, obviously, the 
building hasn't been built. Nonetheless, 
Jaymont and Perry are satisfied with the 
progress made so far. 

"It's an extremely attractive building," 
said S. Maxwell Beal, president of A.W 
Perry. "The size initially was somewhat of 
a disappointment, since with a larger par- 
cel we perhaps could have had something 
more prominent on the skyline, but I ha\e 
no complaints with the present scale of land 
to buildings. It should have real qualit>'." 

There's also satisfaction at the BRA — 
not just with the design, but with the way 
that a virtually untried process performed. 
"With more definite guidelines the process 
will be shorter, but developers have started 
to realize the controls we do have," Allen 
said. "They understand now that we are 
processing buildings in a design and city 
context, not individually." 

Controversy over development isn't 
about to become extinct — ask anyone con- 
cerned with the Prudential Center expan- 
sion plan or the Fan Pier project. How- 
ever, 125 Summer showed that rhetoric 
about lower heights and developer respon- 
sibility can produce results. And a difficult 
building in a delicate site can take shape 
without the influence of lawsuits. D 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 

Kevin C. Phelan 

Mr. Kevin C. Phelan, is a partner and director of Meredith 
& Grew and serves as the Senior Vice President of the Real 
Estate Finance Department 

Mr. Phelan earned his B.A. in Business Administration at 
Providence College, and his M.B.A. at Boston College. He 
joined Meredith & Grew in 1978 after an 11-year career as a 
lending officer at State Street Bank and Trust. He served as 
Loan Correspondent for Travelers in New England, contacts 
-sources of funds nationwide to find financing for developers, 
and finds properties to fit into lenders' and investors' 
portf ol ios . 

He currently serves as a member of the Mortgage Finance 
Committee, Boston Affairs Committee, and the Brokers Institute 
of the Greater Boston Real Estate Board. He is Vice Chairman 
of the Economic Development and Industrial Commission of 
Boston, and of the Clean City Commission for the City of 
Boston. He is Past President of the University Club of 
Boston. He is a Corporator of the New England Home for Little 
Wanderers and of the New England Deaconess Hospital and is a 
Member of Deaconess's Development Council and its Real Estate 
subcommittee. He is on the Board of Trustees of the Catholic 
Charitable Bureau of the Archdiocese of Boston, and was past 
President of that body, is a member of the Board of Directors 
of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston, of the Ex-Ten Club of 
the Jaycees, and of the Freedom Trail Foundation. 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 

THOMAS J. HYNES, JR. 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 
Executive Vice President, Director 
160 Federal Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02110 



Education: Boston College; Bachelor of Arts, 1961 

Employment: - 1965 to date, Meredith S< Grew, Incorporated 

Mr. Hynes has had experience in the sale, 
leasing and consulting of real estate since 
1965. Activities have included office lease 
negotiations for landlords and tenants for 
several million square feet of office 
space. Experience has included the 
purchase, sale, and leasing of commercial, 
industrial, and institutional properties in 
the United States and Canada. 

Professional Greater Boston Real Estate Board, President 
Organizations: 1984; First Vice President 1983; Clerk, 

1980-1982 
Massachusetts Association of Realtors 
National Association of Real Estate Boards 
Urban Land Institute, Associate Member 
Real Estate Round Table 

Other Pertinent Neworld Bank, Director and Member of the 
Data: Executive Committee 

Wilson Tisdale Company, Director 

Boston Ballet, Trustee 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library Foundation, 

Director 
Emmanuel College, Chairman of the Board 

of Trustees 
Marine Biological Institute, Trustee 
MASCO, Director 
Corporation Member of the Eye Research 

Institute of The Retina Foundation 
Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, 

Executives Club President 1979-1980, 

Chairman 1980-1981 
Greater Boston Convention and Visitors 

Bureau, Director 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



160 Federal Street (617) 330-8000 

Boston, Massachusetts 02110-1701 Telecopier (617) 330-8130 



November 4, 1987 



Mr. Jay R. Schochet 

Pres ident 

Schochet Associates 

720 Statler Office Building 

Boston, MA 02116 

Dear Jay: 

It is our pleasure to participate with you in the submission of 
Parcel-to-Parcel 2 at Park Square as exclusive leasing agent 
for the project. Meredith & Grew has a long history of 
successfully leasing new office buildings such as 100 Federal 
Street, John Hancock Tower, The Devonshire, Five Hundred 
Boylston Street, and 150 Federal Street, as well as many rehab 
buildings like 160 Federal Street, 400 Atlantic Avenue, 470 
Atlantic Avenue and the Stuart Building. 

Our research department tracks all leasing activity in Boston 
and the Greater Metropolitan area, and based on moving averages 
of absorption, we are confident that Boston's office economy 
will maintain a healthy absorption of office space over the 
next five years. With the combination of financial services, 
legal, accounting, advertising, and corporate uses, the core 
economy in Boston should remain strong. Our balanced economy 
which includes high technology and defense in the suburbs, the 
software industry in Cambridge, and education and health care 
throughout the Boston area, reinforce the needs of Boston-based 
tenants. The Boston area economy is very well positioned to 
withstand an economic shock or recession economy vs. the rest 
of the nation. . It is our opinion that we will weather any 
downward cycle as well as lead in any upturn cycle. 

Absorption trends combined with the downsizing of office 
projects and the initiation of the IPOD zoning regulations will 
tend to constrain the supply of office space, making approved 
projects coming into the pipeline attractive alternatives for 
Boston tenants. We think the Park Square location will 
continually be upgraded and enhanced and will be dramatically 
improved with the development of your project. 

We feel that your office component should be successfully 
leased at your pro forma rates based on our experience leasing 
mixed-use residential and office projects like The Devonshire 
and the use of an innovative marketing presentation. 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



Mr. Jay R. Schochet 
November 4, 1987 
Page 2 



I have enclosed our third quarter 1987 market overview, office 
vacancy report, absorption trend analysis for office space, and 
projected vacancy rates for various levels of absorption in the 
Financial District and the Back Bay through December 31, 1990. 

All indicators point to a positive response to your project and 
we are pleased to be part of your team. 

Very truly yours. 




Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. 
Executive Vice President 



TJHjr/kal 
Enc losures 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 

BOSTON EXCLUSIVE LEASING ASSIGNMENTS 



Meredith & Grew has been instrumental in the success of many 
real estate projects in Boston and has an unsurpassed track 
record of leasing in Boston office buildings. Meredith & Grew 
has served as exclusive leasing agent for the following 
pro j ects : 

Five Hundred Boyiston Street 

Meredith & Grew represented New England Mutual Life Insurance 
Company (The New England) in site assembly for its 1,200,000 
square foot, $300 million Boston office complex; negotiations 
with the joint venture partner, Gerald D. Hines Interests; 
negotiations with the City for development rights for the 
project; and is exclusive leasing agent for Five Hundred 
Boyiston Street, the first phase of the project. The building 
is 100% committed six months prior to completion of the project:, 

160 Federal Street 

Meredith & Grew is exclusive leasing agent for 160 Federal 
Street, The Landmark, a 24-story art-deco historic office 
building containing 340,000 square •fGe^ of rentable area. The 
Landmark was totally recycled into first-class office space. 
Major tenants include Price Waterhouse, Scudder, Stevens & 
Clark, and Meredith & Grew. 

150 Federal Street 

150 Federal Street is a 28-stGry, 520,000 square foot new 
office building scheduled for delivery in mid-1988. The 
building was masterplanned with the recycling of 160 Federal 
Street. The prime tenant is Bingham, Dana & Gould, one of 
Boston's largest law firms. 150 and 160 Federal Street 
together contain over 800,000 square feet of office space, 
30,000 square feet of retail spaces, 400 car parking. An 
enclosed pedestrian street and atrium connect High Street and 
Federal Street and the lobbies of 150 and 160 Federal Street. 
Meredith & Grew is exclusive leasing and managing agent and 
development consultant for the entire project. 

200 State Street 

200 State Street is a mixed-use development comprised of 
297,000 square feet of office space and 60,000 square feet of 
retail space. Major office tenants include Travelers Insurance 
Company, Lexington Insurance Company, Touche Ross/Braxton, and 
E.F. Hutton. By capitalizing on the State Street address, 
physically segregating the retail, emphasizing parking and the 
amenities, Meredith & Grew successfully secured these major 
tenants and other commitments ensuring a successful leasing of 
the property. Meredith & Grew also acted as consultant to the 
developer, arranged the financing, and is the management agent 
for the pro j ect . 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 

Meredith & Grew, as exclusive leasing agent for John Hancock, 
was instrumental in helping the developer overcome unexpected 
adversity in marketing non-Hancock occupied space at its 
corporate headquarters building. Meredith & Grew essentially- 
had to lease the project twice after problems developed with 
the building's curtain wall. Due to consistent performance, 
Meredith S< Grew remains as exclusive leasing agent for John 
Hancock at this 1,500,000 square foot, 60-story office tower, 
the largest in Boston, 16 years after being engaged as 
exclusive agent. 

400 Atlantic Avenue 

400 Atlantic Avenue is a rehabilitation of a waterfront 
building into 100,000 square feet of first-class office space 
adjacent to Rowes and Foster Wharf. The project was located in 
a previously unproven market location beyond the fringe of the 
financial district. As exclusive leasing agent, Meredith & 
Grew negotiated a major anchor tenancy with the law firm of 
Goulston & Storrs and successfully leased the balance of the 
project. Meredith & Grew also represented Bain & Company in 
the sale of the building to the Nortni^nd Investment Corp. 

One Devonshire Place 

Meredith & Grew represented Devonshire Associates for the 
office and retail components of this mixed-use project. 
Despite the projects perception as a residential tower, 
Meredith & Grew leased the entire 137,000 square feet to one 
user, AT&T. 

380 Stuart Street 

380 Stuart Street is a rehabilitated office building in a 
secondary Back Bay location. Meredith & Grew successfully 
preleased the entire 145,000 square feet of office space in a 
soft office market. Meredith & Grew also sold the property to 
the Northland Investment Corp., and arranged the permanent 
financing . 

470 Atlantic Avenue 

470 Atlantic Avenue is a 330,000 square foot waterfront office 
building. As in the case of 400 Atlantic Avenue, Meredith & 
Grew, on behalf of the developer, was successful in leasing up 
the project despite the perception in the marketplace that the 
project was in an unproven location. Meredith & Grew has 
represented three successive owners as exclusive leasing agent. 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 

100 Federal Street 

Meredith & Grew assembled one of the most prestigious sites in 
the City of Boston at 100 Federal Street for the Bank of Boston 
corporate headquarters. As exclusive leasing agent for the 
1,355,000 square foot, 38-story project, Meredith & Grew 
successfully leased the non-bank occupied space without a day 
of vacancy. Five years after leaseup, Meredith & Grew, in 
several complex simultaneous transactions, negotiated 
cancellations or leases for the vacated 150,000 square feet of 
Stone & Webster floors involving multiple parties including 
Bank of Boston, Stone & Webster, United Shoe Machinery 
Corporation, and Sullivan & Worcester. 

Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation 

Meredith & Grew has represented Stone & Webster Engineering 
Corporation in its real estate requirements for over ten 
years. Meredith & Grew represented Stone & Webster in its 
negotiations to acquire a site for its million square foot 
office building in Boston. Meredith & Grew also represented 
the firm in the acquisition of over half a million square feet 
of office space in Boston, subleasing of 250,000 square feet to 
Boston Edison Company, purchase of 150,000 square foot building 
for renovation to office use. Meredith & Grew has negotiated 
over two million square feet of real estate transactions for 
Stone & Webster subsidiaries, and involving many individual 
transactions, both in the acquisition and disposition of 
various space needs in Boston, the U.S. and Canada. 

51 Sleeper Street 

Meredith & Grew was exclusive leasing agent for this 150,000 
square foot rehab office building and leased the entire 
building to Blue Cross/Blue Shield. 



I 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



OVERVIEW 



The Greater Boston Real Estate Market's performance through the 
first three quarters of 1987 has been unexpectedly strong. 
Unprecedented expansion by Boston's service firms have 
contributed to what will be the strongest year ever for the 
downtown real estate market while increased activity in the 
suburban high tech market has begun to strengthen the R&D 
sector . 

Throughout the past two years, leasing activity downtown has 
been at an all time high. Analysis of 1987 transactions by 
industry indicates that law firms have been the most active, 
both in number of firms and total square feet footage, and have 
leased more than 494,000 square feet in 27 transactions. Close 
behind are the financial service firms which leased some 
450,000 square feet in 20 deals, and insurance firms follow, 
leasing 189,000 square feet in 13 deals. 

In 1986, law firms were also the most active, but only with 
regard to the number of firms in the market. There were 42 
deals executed by law firms and 34 deals executed by financial 
services firms. The expansion of financial service firms 
involved the leasing of more than a million square feet, nearly 
two times the amount of space leased by law firms. 

In Boston the vacancy rate has increased to 7.1% as more than 
3.5 million square feet of office space have been delivered to 
the market. The increase in the vacancy rate would have been 
greater had it not been for the record absorption of more than 
2.2 million square feet through the first three quarters of 
1987. There are currently 4.7 million square feet of office 
space under construction and 65.7% of that space is pre-leased. 

The vacancy rate for direct space in the suburban office market 
is currently 13.7%, a decline of 2.6% since the beginning of 
the year. The RS<D vacancy rate has also declined during the 
year and is now 13.6%, a decrease of 4.1%. While the vacancy 
rates have come down in the suburbs, the amount of sublease 
space, an important market barometer of company consolidation, 
has increased. The amount of sublease space in the suburban 
office market increased more than 100,000 square feet for a 
total of 605,000 square feet, while the amount of R&D sublease^ 
space has more than doubled to 421,000 square feet. 

On a broader scale, the outlook for the region to the year 2000 
is one of growth. The National Planning Association forecasts 
an additional 775,000 new jobs in the Boston Metropolitan 
Region, second only to the Los Angeles Metro Region. 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



OVERVIEW - CONTINUED 



Nevertheless, should a national economic slowdown ensue, 
business expansion in the Greater Boston market will be 
effected, but Boston is well-equipped to weather any storm 
given its balanced and revitalized economy. 

On the next few pages you will find market summaries for 
vacancy rates, absorption, and rental rates. They are broken 
down by office and R&D space. Combined figures are also 
aval lable . 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



FINANCIAL DISTRICT 



Despite a 6.4% expansion in supply and the migration of 
Homeowners Federal Savings, The Travelers, Cabot Corporation, 
and others to the suburbs, the vacancy rate in the Financial 
District ha- increased only .3% since the beginning of the year 
to 6.1%. It has taken more than 1.2 million square feet of net 
absorption to constrain the vacancy rate, the same amount that 
was absorbed in all of last year. The increase in demand will 
be greater -this year than in any other in the Financial 
District's history. 

The weighted average asking rental rate has increased from the 
$31-$32 per square foot level at which it hovered for nearly 
two years. The addition of One International Place, 99 Summer 
Street and Rowes Wharf caused rates to rise above $36 per 
square foot. Nationally, Boston ranks second behind Manhattan 
(Midtown) according to The Office Network's Fall/Winter 1987 
International Office Market Report. 

Increased land costs, a longer and more stringent approval 
process, and linkage payments have all contributed 
significantly to higher development costs. Asking rents range 
from the mid $30's to the high $40's per square foot for the 
bulk of the buildings under construction. 

Expected to come on line in 1988 are 101 Arch Street (373,252 
square feet), 101 Federal Street (543,000 square feet), 150 
Federal Street (518,642 square feet), 75 State Street (700,000 
square feet), and 20 and 21 Custom House (222,106 square feet 
combined). Developers of 125 Summer Street began site work 
earlier this year for their 23 story, 480,000 square foot 
project. Although actual construction of the building has not 
yet begun, it is already more than 75% pre-leased, an 
indication of the aggressive deals being offered. 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



BACK BAY 



The Back Bay vacancy rate remains in the 2% to 4% range, 
falling .8% since the start of the year to 2.5%. Market 
constraints should prevent the vacancy rate from falling much 
further. Consequently, without any significant increase in 
supply, net absorption will not increase much above the 40,991 
square feet already absorbed this year. 

The demand in the Back Bay has spawned a number of 
rehabilitation projects - there is presently more than 400,000 
square feet of rehab office space under construction. Projects 
include: 360 Newbury Street (66,800 square feet), 420 Boylston 
Street (90,000 square feet), 745 Boylston Street (100,000 
square feet) and 95 Berkeley Street (85,000 square feet). 
Pre-leasing to date has been particularly slow in light of the 
low vacancy rate in this market. 

The only additions to supply this year will be 38 and 360 
Newbury Street (110,000 square feet total). In 1988, however, 
we will see the delivery of more than a million square feet of 
office space, including more than 770,000 square feet of new 
class A space. Five Hundred Boylston (650,000 square feet) and 
Heritage on the Garden (111,000 square feet) are both due to 
come on line next spring. 

Further out on the horizon there are more than 2 million square 
feet of office space in the planning stages. Proposals 
include: Five Hundred Boylston - Phase II (480,000 square 
feet), 10 Saint James Avenue (500,000 square feet) and 116 
Huntington Avenue (250,000 square feet). 

Over the short term, vacant space may be expected to dwindle 
and spill-over demand may flow to the Financial District or, 
possibly. East Cambridge. Mellon Financial Services, Hartford 
Insurance, and David C. Babson Company are all Boston firms 
that have leased space in Cambridge. 



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Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



PROJECT: 



The Landmark Buildings 



LOCATION: 



160 Federal Street 
Boston, MA 



DESCRIPTION: 



Loan obtained was for the rehabilitation of 
this two-story red brick building that used 
to be the headquarters of the USM 
Corporation. 



OWNER; 



Federal Development 



LOAN AMOUNT: $56,000,000 



LENDER: 



Bank of Boston 



DESCRIPTION; 



A new 518,000 square foot, 28-story silver 
and grey glass office building, with a 
five-story atrium and 14,000 square feet of 
retail space. Completion expected in early 
1988. 



LOAN AMOUNT: $125,000,000 



LENDER: 



Citicorp and Copley Real Estate/New England 
Life 



Doc 3071H 



150 & 160 FEDERAL STREET 

BOSTON 




OWNER'S REPRESENTATIVE 

Meredith & Grew 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



PROJECT: Marketplace Center 

LOCATION: 200 State Street 
Boston, MA 



DESCRIPTION: A 16-Story granite and glass complex next to 
Faneuil Hall consisting of 285,000 square 
feet of office space and 60,000 square feet 
of retail space. 



OWNER: Marketplace Associates 

LOAN AMOUNT: Construction loan of $57,000,000 

LENDER: Citicorp 

LOAN AMOUNT: Permanent loan of $74,000,000 

LENDER: Aetna Life 



Doc 3071H 





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Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



PROJECT: Burroughs Wharf 



LOCATION: North Ferry Pier and the Coal Pocket Building 
Boston, MA 



DESCRIPTION: This is a construction loan on the Coal 
Pocket building, with a 97-space park 
garage, a new pier for fireboats, 10 boat 
slips, and 67 luxury condominium units 



OWNER: Kenney Associates 

LOAN AMOUNT: $47,000,000 

LENDER: Union Warren/Lloyd's Bank 



Doc 3071H 




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BlMlitil^ 




\}k ■ Hill 



Meredith & Grew, Incorporated 



PROJECT: One Alewife Place 



LOCATION: One Alewife Place 
Cambridge, MA 



DESCRIPTION: A three-story steel frame office building 

with brick and ribbon glass exterior with an 
atrium entrance and parking for 348 cars. 



OWNER: Schochet Associates 
LOAN AMOUNT: $17,100,000 
LENDER: Travelers 




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Samuel E. Mintz-Principal 



DUCATION AND HONORS 



PROFESSIONAL 
iXPERIENCE 



Lawrence Institute of Technology, Detroit Michigan 
Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Bachelor of Architecture, Cum Laude, North Carolina 
State University, 1958 

Recipient of Fulbright Scholarship, Post Graduate 
Study at the Architectural Association of London. 
Thesis was Educational Building Construction 
Program in Great Britain following World War II. 

Prior to Mr. Miritz organizing Mintz Associates 
Architects/Planners, Inc., he accumulated twelve 
years of professional architecture and planning 
experience in Detroit and Ann Arbor, Michigan; 
Raleigh, North Carolina; London, England; and 
Cambridge and Boston, Massachusetts where he 
worked in such firms as Victor Gruen and Associates 
and Sert Jackson and Gourley and Associates. In 
1961 he was engaged as the Director of Planning and 
Design for Boston's Downtown Waterfront-Faneuil Hall 
Urban Renewal Project and for approximately the next 
four years directed efforts toward developing the 
Waterfront Plan which is now nearly complete. 

Since 1964, Mr. Mintz has been Principal of his 
firm, formerly called PARD TEAM, Inc.. The firm, 
under his direction, has completed over $175,000,000 
in construction these past twenty three years. In 
1965 and 1966 the firm acted as Coordinating Planners 
and Architects for the new city of Reston, Virginia 
being built some 18 miles west of Washington, D.C.. 
The firm has been responsible for the Charlesview 
Apartments, a 212 unit development in Allston across 
from Harvard Stadium; the 1000 pupil Hennigan Magnet 
Community Elementary School in Jamaica Plain; the 
381 unit Shore Plaza East development in East Boston; 
the Roxbury Comprehensive Cormiunity Health Center In 
Roxbury; over 200 units of rehabilitated housing In 
the South End and Worcester; the 300 unit Heritage 
Elderly Apartment complex in Maverick Square, East 
Boston; the 150 unit Knights of Columbus Elderly 
Housing, in the North End; the 225 unit Patricia 
Hagen White Apartments in Brighton; the 52 unit 
Hamlet Street Housing in Newton; the Essex'Bank Re- 
gional Headquarters Office, Peabody; the Bostonian 
Hotel, Boston; the 231 unit South Cove Plaza East & 
West Elderly Housing Buildings, Bay Village; the 



Samuel E. Mintz 
Page Two 



EXPERIENCE (CON'T) 



recently completed 210 South Street Office Building, 
Leather District, Boston; Mercury International 
Headquarters Office, North Attleboro; the 82 unit 
Courtyard Condominium Housing Development in Charles- 
town; and currently under construction the 43 unit 
Pine Brook Estate Condominium Housing Development in 
Peabody; and the 449 unit Harbor Point (Columbia Point 
Mixed Income Housing Complex, Dorchester, 

In addition to these, the firm was also responsible 
for planning projects including the Watertown Arsenal 
Boston Gas - Park Square; John Hancock - Copley Sq.; 
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts - Financial 
District; the Newburyport Waterfront Waterfront 
Study; and the Downtown-North End Waterfront Study. 



TEACHING 
EXPERIENCE 



PROFESSIONAL 
AFFILIATIONS & 
REGISTRATIONS 



PROFESSIONAL 
ACTIVITIES 



Visting Critic and Guest Lecturer at M.I.T., Harvard, 
the Boston Architectural Center, Tufts University; 
Boston College, and Carnegie Mellon University, 
Pittsburg, Tuskegee University, Alabama. 

Member, American Institute of Certified Planners, 
American Institute of Architects, National 
Association of Housing and Redevelopment 
Officials, Massachusetts Construction Industry 
Council, and Citizens Housing and Planning Asso- 
ciation. 

Registered Architect, Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
National Council of Architectural Registration Boards 



Participant in Symposium on New Directions for 
Architecture sponsored by the Royal Institute 
of British Architects 

One year of travel and lecturing in twelve countries 
from France to Turkey 

Delegate to the International Union of Architects 
Conference in Moscow, Russia in 1958 



amuel E. Mintz 
age Three 



ROFESSIONAL 

iCTIVITIES (CON'T) An organizer of and presently on the Board of Dir- 

ectors of the Citizens Housing and Planning Asso- 
ciation of Metropolitan Boston. 

Member of several local and national ^ commi ttees 
dealing with the Planning-Design aspects of 
housing. 



1 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 



DATA SHEET: 



Year Established: 
Years 1n Business: 
Organizational Structure: 
Firm Officers : 



Board of Directors: 
Associates: 



Mass. Reg. Architects: 
Mass. Reg. Engineers : 

Technical Employees : 

Administrative/Clerical/ 
Accounting! 

Work Categories : 



July 1964 (originally as PARD TEAM, Inc.) 

23 Years 

Private Corporate 

Samuel E. Mintz, A.I .A. -A. I. C. P. , President 
Massachusetts Registration #2160 
NCARB Certification 
American Institute of Planners 

Samuel E. Mintz - 100% of Stock 

Tosh Kawakami , Associate 

Massachusetts Registration #2612 
NCARB Certification 

Ronald S. Thomas, Associate 
Massachusetts Registration #6465 
NCARB Certification 

Average number employed in proceding 6 month 
period (4) 

Average number of Mass. registered architects 
on payroll (5) 

Average number of Mass. registered engineers 
on payroll (5) 

Average number of technical employees (10) 

Average number of Administrative/Clerical/ 
Accounting employees (2) 

Architecture - New Work 

Renovation Work 



PI anners 



Urban Design 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 



OVERVIEW AND SERVICES: 



Mintz Associates Architects/Planners, Inc. (formerly called PARD TEAM, Inc.) was 
organized in 1964 as an outgrowth of Mr. Mintz's four previous years experience 
as Director of Planning and Design for the Downtown Waterfront-Faneuil Hall 
Urban Renewal Project. The integration of planning and architecture in achieving 
creative environmentally sound cost responsive solutions within client and 
community restraints is our firm's professional goal. 



Our work primarily has beien in Massachusetts with the majority in Greater Boston 
where skillful working with public agencies, community groups and private 
interests were prerequisites to successful development. 



In order to participate in achieving a high quality product and level of success, 
our firm provides several in-house services and they include the following: 



- Prograiming and Planning 

- Site Planning and Urban Design 

- Ar'.chitectural Design 

- Interior Design 

- Graphic Design 

- Construction Documents 

- Project Coordination 

- Construction Supervision 

- Project Implementation 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 



ASSOCIATES AND CONSULTANTS 



» 



structural Engineers 

Arthur Choo Associates 
David M. Berg Inc. 
Engineers Design Group, Inc. 
KKBNA McNamara/Salvia 
Le Messurier Consultants, Inc. 
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, Inc. 
Wayne L. Weaver & Associates, Inc. 
Zaldastani Associates, Inc. 

Civil Engineers 

Edwards & Kelcey 
H.W. Moore Associates, Inc. 
Thompson & Lichtner Co. Inc. 
C.E. Maguire, Inc. 

Geo technical -Foundation 

Goldberg-Zoino & Associates 
Haley & Aldrich, Inc. 
Geotechnical Consultants of Mass. 

Mechanical Engineers 

Environmental Design Engineers, Inc. 
C.A. Crowley Engineering, Inc. 
Shooshanian Engineering Associates, Inc. 
R.G. Vanderweil Engineers 

Electrical Engineers 

Cosentini Associates 

Vicent A. Dilorio 

Shooshanian Engineering Associates, Inc. 

R.C. Vanderweil Engineers 

Verne G. Norman Associates 

Goodal Shapiro Associates 

Will i am H.C. Wong 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 



Traffic Engineers 

Robert C. Bluiiienthal Associates 
Bruce Campbell & Associates, Inc. 
Segal, Disarcina Associates 

Landscape Architects 

Carol R. Johnson & Associates 
Mason & Frey Landscape Architects 
Weinmayer Associates 



CORPORATE DATA: 



Persons with financial interest in the firm : 

Samuel E. Mintz 
70 Mason Terrace 
Brookline, Massachusetts 

Existing contracts with public bodies : 

Boston Redevelopment Authority - Existing contract 95% complete - Fee received 
0% - Fees anticipated $100,000. 

Professional Liability Policy Certificate: 301-17-84 
Aggregate amount payable: $1,000,000 

Present policy expiration date: June 20, 1987 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS, INC. 



EXPERIENCE: 



I. a. Boston University 

b, Joseph Mercurio 

c. New 

do Feasibility 

e. - 

f. Feasibil ity Study 

g. Samuel E. Mintz 
h. yes 



II. a. Pine Brook Estates 

b. Brian Kravitzsky 

c. New 

d. In construction - 25^ complete 

e. $4,750,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami , Isaac Levy 
h. yes 



III. a. Gloucester Landing 

b. Jeff ery Cohen 

c. New 

d. 70% through Construction Documents 

e. $6,000,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz Ron S. Thomas 
h. yes 



IV. a. 267 Medford Street 

b. Jeff ery Stonberg 

c. Rehabilitation 

d. Schematic Design 

e. $8,500,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Ron S. Thomas 
h. yes 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 



EXPERIENCE: 



V. a. Rockaway at Rocky Neck - Gloucester 

b. Walter Burrage 

c. New land and Rehabilitation 

d. In construction - 95% complete 

e. $3,500,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami 
h. yes 



VI. a. Government Center Garage 

b. Gerry Viverito 

c. New 

d. 80% through Contract Documents 

e. $22,000,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami 
h. yes 



VII. a. Columbia Point (Harbor Point) 

b. Marty Jones 

c. Rehabilitation and New Construction 

d. In construction - 5% complete 

e. $43,500,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services (except for 
supervision) 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Ron S. Thomas 
h. yes 



VIII. a. Bostonian Hotel 

b. Arthur Winn 

c. New and Rehabilitation 

d. Construction completed 

e. $10,000,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami, Robert Harkness 
h. Robert Harkness is no longer With the firm 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 



EXPERIENCE: 



IX. a„ Court Yard Condominium 

bo Bart Perini 
Co New and Rehabilitation 

d. Construction completed 

e. $9,500,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Jeffery Lechter (from Jacobson Office) 
h. yes 



X. a. Mercury International 

b. Richard Sebastiao 

c. New 

d. Construction completed 

e. $3,250,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami 
h. yes 



XI. a. Franklin Institute of Boston 

b. Dean Michael Mazzola 

c. Rehabilitation 

d. Construction completed 

e. $1,000,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami 
h. yes 



XII. a. 210 South Street 

b. Richard Cohen 

c. Rehabilitation 

d. Construction completed 

e. $5,500,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services (except for 
supervision) 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Michael Harrison 

h. Michael Harrison is no longer with the firm 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 



EXPERIENCE: 



XIII. a. Green Street Station - Orange Line Southwest Corridor 

b. Daniel Ocasio 

Co New 

do Construction completed 

eo $3,400,000 

f„ Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mint:z, Tosh Kawakami , (Joint Venture wi^h The 

Uebh Bridges Company, Architects & Planners, Baltimore, MD) 

h. yes 



XIV. a. South Cove Plaza - East & West 

b. Stanley Chen 

c. New 

d. Construction Completed 

e. $10,200,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami , James Heiberg 
h. James Heiberg is no longer with the firm 



XV. a. May Hall - Framingham State College 

b. DCPO (formerly B.B.C.) 

c. Rehabilitation 

d. Construction completed 

e. $2,100,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami, Marc Margulies 
h. Marc Margulies is no longer With the firm 



XVI. a. Down town -North End Boston Waterfront Study 

b. Boston Redevelopment Authority, Stephen Coyle, 
Christopher Grace 

c. Urban Design-Planning 

d. Work completed 

e. - 

f. Planning, Urban Design, Development Feasibility 

g. Samuel E, Mintz, Ron S. Thomas 
h. yes 



MINTZ ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS/PLANNERS. INC. 

EXPERIENCE: 



XVII. a. Patricia Hagen White Housing for the Elderly, 

Brighton, Boston 
b„ Thomas Little 
c„ New 
do Construction Completed 

e. $6,500,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami 
h. yes 



XVIII. a. Bostonian Hotel 

b. Arthur Winn 

c. Rehabilitation and New 

d. Construction completed phase II 

e. $10,250,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami, Robert Harkness 
h. Robert Harkness is no longer with the firm 



XIX. a. Christopher Columbus Plaza - North End, Boston 

b. Edward Fish 

c. New 

d. Construction completed 

e. $5,100,000 . 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami 
h. yes 



XX. a. Hamlet Street Housing - Newton, MA 

b. Newton Community Development Foundation 

c. New 

d. Construction completed 

e. $1,650,000 

f. Complete architectural engineering services 

g. Samuel E. Mintz, Tosh Kawakami, Joseph Guerino 
h. Josheph Guerino is no longer With the firm 



Mintz Associates 

Architects/Planners, Inc. 



tz Associates Architects/Planners, Inc. 
moderate-size firm that since 1965 has 
pleted some thirty projects, from 
II to large scale, the value of which ex- 
ds $150,000,000. The majority of these 
dential, office, retail, hotel, commercial, 
tutional, educational and medical 
lects are located in Massachusetts. 

! firm's working process, developed and 
lied over twenty years, is to find crea- 
, responsible, innovative cost-effective 
ining and design solutions to meet 
nplex environmental, aesthetic and eco- 
nic building needs of client, community 
user. 



intz Associates 

hitects/Planners, Inc. 



Morth Street 

!ton. Massachusetts 02109 

jphone: (617) 523-3705 



; Rostonian Hotel, Blackstone Block, 

ioston 

veloper: Winn Development Company 

ntractor: Perini Corporation 



e Courtyard Condominiums, 

larlestown, Boston 

ive/oper Paramount Development 

Associates, Inc. 

mtractor: Perini Corporation 



sex Bank. Regional Headquarters, 
abody, Massachusetts 

Nner: Essex Bonk 
JDtractor hAorse Diesel 



Samuel E. Mintz, AIA-APA, Principal of the 
firm, received his architecture and planning 
education at Lawrence Institute of Technol- 
ogy Wayne State University the University 
' of Michigan and North Carolina State 
University where he received his Bachelor 
of Architecture Degree Cum Laude in 
1958. He was subsequently awarded a Ful- 
bright Scholarship to Great Britain where 
he spent a year as a post graduate student, 
assistant teacher and guest critic at the Ar- 
chitectural Association of London, partici- 
pated in a symposium on New Directions 
for Architecture sponsored by the Royal In- 
stitute of British Architects and served as 
guest lecturer and critic at Leeds University 
and the University of London. During an 
additional year in Europe, he was a student 
delegate to the International Union of Ar- 
chitects Congress in Moscow and was invit- 
ed to give a presentation on "The Modern 
Architecture Movement in America" at 
Moscow University's School of Ar- 
chitecture. 

In this country Mr Mintz has been a speak- 
er at the North Carolina Chapter of the 



American Institute of Architects, a guest 
lecturer at Carnegie Mellon University in 
Pittsburgh, Boston University and Tufts 
University a visiting juror at Harvard and 
MIT and teacher of the final year at the 
Boston Architectural Center. 

Prior to forming Mintz Associates, he ac- 
quired twelve years of professional ex- 
perience in Detroit and Ann Arbor, 
Raleigh, Cambridge and Boston, working 
for Victor Gruen and Associates, George 
Matsumoto and Associates and Sert, Jack- 
son, Gourley and Associates. From 1961 
to 1964, he was Director of Planning and 
Design for Boston's Downtown Waterfront 
Faneuil Hall Urban Renewal Project under 
the joint auspices of The Greater Boston 
Chamber of Commerce and The Boston 
Redevelopment Authority He is a founding 
member and is on the Board of Directors 
of the Citizens Housing and Planning As- 
sociation. 

Mr. Mintz involves himself in all phases of 
each project, supported by highly skilled 
associates and staff The type of projects 
undertaken are those which most effec- 




mnniiiiRiS; 



tively utilize the firm's philosophy and 
professional abilities to achieve meaningful 
results. 

Typical Projects 

The Bostonian Hote/— located in the 
historic Blackstone Block across from 
Faneuil Hall Marketplace: 155 guest 
rooms. 130 seat restaurant. 70 seat 
cocktail lounge and 100 seat meeting 
rooms. 

Shore Plaza fasf— located on the 
waterfront in the Eagle Hill 
neighborhood in East Boston: 451 units 
of family housing. 

Essex Bank. Regional Headquarters 
Building— located in the North Shore 
Shopping Center in Peabody: 150,000 
square foot office building, 

Franklin Institute of Boston— located at 
Berkeley and Tremont Streets in the 
South End: classrooms and 
administrative wing surrounding a plaza, 

Patricia hiagen White Apartments- 
located at Washington and Corey Road 
in Brighton: 225 units of elderly housing. 



Roxbury Comprehensive Community 
Health Center— located on Warren 
Street m Roxbury: 33,000 square foot 
outpatient facility 

Christopher Columbus Apartments- 
located at the edge of the North End 
neighborhood across from Waterfront 
Park: 151 units of elderly housing. 

May Hall at Frammgham State College— 
rehabilitation of important historic 
building into classrooms, the Arts 
Department and faculty offices, 

210 South Street Office Building— located 
at the corner of South and Kneeland 
Streets in the Leather District: 100,000 
square foot historic rehabilitation. 

The Courtyard— located adjacent to 
Harvard Park on Harvard and Mam 
Streets in Charlestown: 80 units 
condominium housing. 

Partial Client List 

Blue Cross Blue Shield 
City of Boston 
City of Chelsea 
City of Newburyport 
Cohen Properties 



Coolidge Bank and Trust 

Corcoran Mullins and jennison 

Essex Conifer Bank 

Franklin Institute of Boston 

Hilton Hotel Corporation 

)ohn Hancock Mutual Life Insurance 

Company 
Lidapell Development Corporation 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation 

Authority 
Massachusetts Division of Capital Planning 

and Operations 
Massachusetts Port Authority 
Mercury International Trading Corporation 
Metropolitan Properties 
Peabody Properties 

Perini Land and Development Corporation 
Richard H. Rubin Management 

Corporation 
Sheraton Corporation 
United Community Development 

Corporation 
Winn Development Company 




The Rockaway at Rocky Neck, 
Gloucester. Massachusetts 

Developer: Rockaway Rocky Neck 

Corporation 
Contractor: Sugarloaf Construction 

Company 




Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health 
Center. Roxbury, Roston 

Developer: United Community Development 

Corporation 
Contractor: Peabody Construction 



Christopher Columbus Apartments, 
North End, Boston 

Developer: Peabody Properties 
Contractor: Peabody Construction 



JAMES J. MARCELLING 

GASTON SNGW & ELY BARTLETT 

Associate, 1971; Partner, 1975. 

Bar Admission: Massachusetts, 1968; United States District 
Courts (Massachusetts and Northern District 
of California); United States Courts of 
Appeals (First and Ninth Circuits). 

EDUCATION: 

Boston University Graduate School of Management, 1976 
Boston College Law School, 1968 
The College of the Holy Cross, 1965 

LEGAL EXPERIENCE: 

Litigation/Dispute Resolution : Litigation/resolution of 
technology-based disputes, with trial and appellate exper- 
ience in the areas of contract, copyright, trade secret, 
unfair competition, valuation, vendor/user and other busi- 
ness disputes. Trial counsel for prevailing party in SAS 
Institute Inc. v. SS.H Computer Systems, Inc. , 60 5 F.Supp. 
816 (M.D. Tenn. 1985). 

OTHER RELEVANT EXPERIENCE: 

Boston Redevelopment Authority, 1969-1971: Project Di- 
rector and attorney for the Downtown Waterf ront-Faneuil 
Hall Renewal Area (last position). 

Massachusetts Attorney General's Department, 1969-1970: 
Deputy Assistant and Special Assistant Attorney General in 
the Division of Health, Education and Welfare. 

Boston College Law School, 1983-current : Visiting Pro- 
fessor, High Technology Law. 



JOHN K. DINEEN 




GASTON SNOW & ELY BARTLETT 

Partner - 1970 to present Management Com- 
mittee and Executive Committee Member 
1970 to present (except 1983-84) 
Ely, Bartlett, Brown & Proctor - Partner - 1970 
to merger forming Gaston Snow & Ely Bartlett 
Weston, Patrick & Stevens, 1954 to 1966 
Special Assistant Attorney General, Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts 

Counsel to Commission to Reorganize State 
Government, 1967-68 Peabody &, Arnold - 
Partner - 1967 to 1970 

Bar Admission: Massachusetts 1954; Maine 
1954 

EDUCATION: 

University of Maine, B.A., 1951 

Boston University School of Law, J.D., 1954 

LEGAL EXPERIENCE: 

General practice with emphasis on develop- 
ment, financing and leasing of real estate. 



BUSINESS AFFILIATIONS: 



Serve on Board of Directors of Coolidge Bank and Trust Company (Executive Committee) and of 
several privately held companies including Stowell Wood Products, Inc.; The Codman Company, Inc.; 
Town & City Properties Boston, Inc. and Central & District Properties Boston, Inc. (United States 
subsidiaries of Sterling Guarantee Trust, a publicly held United Kingdom corporation); Westways 
Village, Inc.; Dingle American Properties, Ltd. (Irish corporation in County Kerry, Ireland) 

CIVIC AFFILIATIONS: 

Present: 

Boston Local Development Corporation President and Trustee Greater Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce Executives Club Member; The Waring School Trustee and Executive Committee Member; 
University Hospital Trustee, Development Committee Chairman 

Former: 

Emanuel College Trustee; 

Hebron Academy Trustee; 

Nahant Finance Committee; Nahant Historical Society Trustee'; Nahant Republican Town Committee 

Member University of Maine Alumni Association Executive Committee; Winsor School Trustee 



INTRODUCTION TO REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 



The Real Estate Department, now located on the 33rd Floor, 
includes seven partners, one Of Counsel, 15 associates, two 
rotatees, three paralegals and three title examiners. Working 
with us are seventeen secretaries, three people on the day-time 
word processing staff and five on the night word processing 
staff, a librarian, a receptionist and six people on the 
mailroom staff. The word processing staff, the receptionist, 
the librarian and the mailroom staff also serve the other 
departments on this floor; namely, health care, public finance 
and reorganization. 

Real estate covers a lot of ground, and so does the Real 
Estate Department of Gaston Snow & Ely Bartlett. We represent 
buyers and sellers of all kinds of real estate, lessors, 
lessees, developers, borrowers, lenders and public 
authorities - anyone who deals in any way with real estate. 

A number of people within the Department specialize in 
environmental matters, since environmental laws and regulations 
play an increasing role in the development and use of real 
estate . 

Most of our work is for commercial and industrial clients. 
Our residential work is largely limited to work for the staff 
of this firm and for clients for whom we do other legal work. 
We do not represent lending banks in handling residential 
loans, except in respect of large developments where we 
represent the developer or when the borrower is a member of the 
staff of this firm or a person who is a client of the firm in 
other areas. 

Among the lenders whom we represent on a regular basis are 
the Shawmut Bank, the State Street Bank, Provident Institution 
for Savings, Essexbank, the Coolidge Bank and the Eliot Bank. 

We represent the Krupp Companies, John Hancock and Dean 
Witter in major acguisitions and, in the case of Dean Witter, 
in financing. Among the developers we represent are Awdeh and 
Company, K. Hovnanian, the Flatley Company, Boston Wharf 
Company, Rose Associates, F.D. Rich Company and A. W. Perry, as 
well as the Massachusetts General Hospital in the development 
of its new replacement facilities. We have done all of the 
real estate work (as well as other work) for the Massachusetts 
Turnpike Authority for many, many years. More recently we have 
been representing the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority 
in its efforts to acquire title to the Quincy Shipyard. We are 
also counsel to the Massachusetts Government Land Bank and 
Massachusetts Industrial Finance Authority. 



We are counsel for Greater Boston Real Estate Board, of 
which Phil Lapatin is Assistant Clerk. Phil represents a good 
many Realtors and writes a regular column for the Board 
discussing recent developments in the law. 

Many people in the Department are experienced and skilled 
in dealing with zoning and other land use regulation matters 
and appear regularly before planning boards and zoning boards 
of appeals. 

We certify titles to all of the major title companies and 
are agents for Chicago Title Insurance Company, First American 
Insurance Company and Ticor Title Insurance Company.. 

All of us in the Department have special areas in which we 
tend to concentrate but, as a team, we cover all areas of real 
estate law and practice and take pride in doing high quality 
work in a timely manner. 



-2- 8124b 






Four Hub law firms 
make top-1 00 list 



JUST four Boston law 
firma took In enough In 
^OH revenues during the 
last fiscal year to be In- 
eluded in a list of the top 
100 U.S. law firms, accord- 
ing to a survey by The 
American Lawyer maga- 
sine. 

New York Oty. with U 
firms on the recently put>- 
llshed list, had three 
timet the number of com- 
panies represented In the 
Top 100 than second- 
ranked Chicago, which 
had 11. 

Washington. D.C.. and 
Los Angeles were tied for 
third with eight firms, fol- 
lowed by San Francisco 
with seven, Philadelphia 
with six. and Houston, 
which like Boston, had 
four firms Included in the 
list 

The top firm In the sur- 
vey was New Tdrk-t>ased 
Skadden, Arps, Slate, 
Meagher k Plom. with 



around $238 million In 
gross revenues In Its most 
recently completed fiscal 
year. No. 3 was FInley, 
Kumble, Wagner, Heine. 
Uhderberg, Manley. 
Myerson k Casey of New 
Tork with |1S8 million, 
followed by Chlcago- 
bised Baker * McKenxle, 
which had 1197 mllHon in 
gross revenues. 

Oaston Snow k Ely 
Bartlett grossed more 
than any other Boston law 
firm, according to the sur- 
vey. The |C7 million In re- 
venues it took in during 
Its last fiscal year put It In 
41st place on the Top 100 
UsL 

Hale and Dorr was Bos- . 
ton's second representa- 
tive, ranked S7ti) with $M ! 
million while Goodwin. ! 
Procter k Hoar, and ; 
Bopes k Oray both look in ; 
Ift3 piiUion In revenue to ' 
tie for the tsth position. ' 



5ullivan & Cromwell 
Leads Law Firm 
Ranking 

Sullivan A Cromwell placed Tint in a ranking of law 
nru that were involved with IPOs in 1986 as the counsel for the 
nderwnter. As it did in 1983 (See Tht IPO Reponer, 1/27/86). 
ullivan & Cromwell dominated the ranking, handling IPOs 
ttaling S3.8 billion, aimon twice as much as the number two 
rm. Skadden Arps Slait Meagher A Flom. 

The accompanying table lists the top 25 law finns for IPOs 
1986, as ranked by the toul dollar amount of the IPOs handled 
the firm as underwriter counsel The table also includes dau 
tout the IPOs handled by these firms as counsel for the issuer, 
rhile the dau shows that some law rums take a large pan of the 
isiness of being counsel for underwhten. issuer counsel activity 
nds to be more spi«ad out with no one fum dominating the 
liking since issuen of IPOs often use a kxal law firm. 



As it did in 1982. Sullivan A Cromwell handled many 
of the IPOs book managed by Goldman Sachs. It also was 
involved with several of the large closed-end investment company 
IPOs underwritten by Prudenaal-Bache Seeunaes, as well 
as issues for First Boston, Latard Freres and Kidder 
Peabody, among others. The fum also itntd a issuer counsel 
for seven deals totaling Sl.l billion. The issues were pnmanly 
closed-end investment companies. 

Skadden Arps served as underwriter counsel for a number of 
manager; and was one of the more prolific issuer counsels, 
handling eight deals totaling S767 million. The issues were from 
a vahety of industries ranging from drug stores to a mutual 
insurance company to a furo that intends to engage in leveraged 
buyouts. 

The number three finrv Cravath Swaine A Moore, 
handled a number of IPOs for PaineWebber and LS. 
Rothschild, among othen, while the number four firm. 
Brown A Wood, primarily handled IPOs book managed by 
Merrill Lynch. Brown &. Wood was the busiest underwriter 
counsel, working on 44 issues tooling SI. 7 billion. Davis 

(Continued on following page) 





kiYV flm 


$ 
Amt 
(Mils) 


1. 


Sullivan & CromwelJ 


3.7S3.9 


2. 


Skadden Arps Slate 


1.949.4 


3. 


Cravath Swaine & Moere 


1.889.7 


4. 


Brown & Wood 


1.740.7 


S. 


Davis Polk & Wardwell 


1.403.4 


6. 


Simpson Thacher & Banlen 


1.126.1 


7. 


Cahill Gordon & Reindal 


1.0S2.0 


e. 


Andrews i Kunh 


869.1 


9. 


Willkie Farr & Gallagher 


501.0 


0. 


Cleary GottlieO Steen 


430.3 


1. 


Hunton & Williams 


330.5 


2. 


Chadbourne Parka Whiteside 


303. S 


3. 


Kramer Levin Nassen 


300.0 


4. 


flooes & Gray 


275.4 


s. 


Mayer Brown & PlaS 


271.8 


6. 


Lairiam & Watkina 


242.2 


7. 


Fried Frank Harria 


197.6 


8. 


Piper I Martoury 


. 186.1 


9. 




,168.8 


>0. 


/Gatton Snow Beakm^it—^ 


167.5 


M. 


Shearman & Sf rlinip 


162.0 


2. 


/€ai»n Snow k Ely BartleO^ 

^acfffier 1 ally Pdevoy 


' 161.2 


3. 


160.6 


!4. 


Stroock & Stroo6( & Lavan 


153.3 


!S. 


Pinsbu7 Madison & Sutro 


137.9 



Leading Law Firma For IPOa In 1986 

Counael for Underwriter 

• Of 



Caunael for li.u.r 



26 
22 
18 
44 
27 
13 
25 
9 

16 
6 
5 
2 
1 
9 
2 
9 
5 

13 
5 
7 
4 
9 
25 
7 
9 



ote: Ranking based on total dollar amount d IPOs handled by the law firm as underwriter counsel. 



Avg 


$ 


S Amt 


Amt 


(Mils) 


(Mils) 


144.4 


1,104.1 


88.6 


767.4 


105.0 


425.6 


39.6 


85.8 


52.0 


406.4 


86.6 


101 .5 


42.1 


■ • 


96.6 


100.0 


31J 


1.397.8 


71.7 


• 


76.1 


. 


151.8 


- 


300.0 


. 


30.6 


85.2 


135.9 


71.8 


26.9 


203.3 


39.5 


164.7 


14.3 


81.1 


33.8 


14.5 


23.9 


• 


40.5 


573.5 


17.9 


907.7 


6.4 


28.5 


21.9 


118.4 


15.3 


12.0 



B< 


Avg 


uii 


J Ami 




(Mils) 


7 


157.7 


• 


95.9 


2 


21Z8 


2 


4^9 


3 


135i 


2 


50.8 



5 

4 
5 
5 

2 
2 

3 
7 
5 

3 
t 



100.0 
174.7 



17.0 
18.0 
40.7 
32.9 
40.6 
73 

1912 
129.7 

5.7 
395 
12.0 



564 



Shelter, Inc. 

P.O. Box 516 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Resume of Executive Director 



David Whitty has been Executive Director of qhon- 
1979. He has lead the transformation of Shelter Tut 7' '"°- "'""^^ «^^=h' 
low-budget effort, into an expanding and .fr I- '■°'" ^° aH-volunteer, 
organization. expanding and effective anti-homeless service 

A native of Westport, Massachusetts. Mr Whitfv h„. , . 
of non-profit organizations serving the neel; !f i ^ ""'"^^^ ''^^^ ^ "^"^^^ 

Hive., „. ,. .„ 0„.,eL"':„%LT;!:.-,-:„?-!-,-t--^C„un o. ,,X. 

K,e„.„, ..3i„n3 o. B.3.X ooLif^r^^^s^:-: zrii^:;^^^-^ 

social science and humanities: ""'='' '° ^9^^ "'»> concentrations in both 

.o.ps'ra:rirr„:j:jroMhrj?::n\VLi?fij:r^ --= - *- -- — 

Lrce?„"[\"n^d1:„.'L°;"a:Je"af::c:::\L-:^ ";• ""»- »" -erged as a 
.regularly sought by public and^r v.t° ! """ol*"- "i3 opinions are 

kectronic „efia. L! »h ty as v„ u„ta i v^selv'd'" °"' '^ '"^ f-^"* -^ 

committees, boards anri .^fni^,. voluntarily served on numerous tasks forces 

problems „f bunger'aL ho«elLfne°s"s! °°"°""'' """ '"^ "^'"^ -=i>l 



Newsletter 



NON-PROFIT CHARITABLE ORGANIZATION PROVIDING SHELTER TO THE HOMELESS SPRING 1987 



DSTON FAMILY SHELTER 267-8081 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 864-8140 CAMBRIDGE SHELTER 547-1885 



llayor Raymond Flynn 
,t Reopening of 
loston Family Shelter 

'le summer and fall of 1986 brought 
)ijor changes to the Boston Family Shel- 
ir. Extensive renovations were con- 
I cted to improve the conditions of the 
lilding as well as to improve the time 

I r guests spend with us. 

Funding for this project was made pos- 
ii)le, in large part, by the City of Boston 
;iblic Facilities Department and a Com- 
lUnity Development Block Grant. In ad- 

II ion, grants for the renovations were 
ij.o recieved from foundations and corpo- 
ijdons which enabled Shelter, Inc. to 
(Isate the finest possible living conditions 
!;■ our guests. 

|In December, Mayor Raymond Flynn, a 
I'mber of City of Boston officials and 
limbers of the media visited the Boston 
Imily Shelter to tour the newly-renovated 
l;ility. 

;In addition to the funding assistance 
fceived from the public and private sec- 
^r, Alison Lauriat, President of the 
bard of Directors, made special note of 
\i consideration and care taken by the 
infractor, Rodney Solomon - R.C. Sol- 
lon Construction Co. Recognition was 
made of the considerable contribu- 
ns to the project made by Thomas 
I dor/ID PA, architect for the project. 



"Leadership '87" 
Honorees Announced 



H 



I old the date! - Tuesday evening, 
June 16th. 

The 1987 "Leadership Awards" event 
will take place at majestic Memorial Hall, 
at Harvard University, Cambridge. 

Alison S. Lauriat, President of the 
Shelter, Inc. Board of Directors, stated, 
"Each year, Shelter, Inc. takes a hard 
look at the philanthropic community to 
determine which individual (or individu- 
als) has consistently affected positive 
change for the hungry and homeless in 
this area. This year, we are pleased to 
acknowledge the long-term commitment 
made by both the corporate sector and 
the individuals responsible." 

The recipients of the "Leadership '87" 
Awards are Samuel Gerson and Jim 
Anathan, Chairman of the Board and 
President of Filene's Basement, along 
with Maurice Segall and Stanley Berko- 
vitz, Chairman of the Board and Vice 
President of Consumer and Community 
Affairs at Zayre Corporation. 




Carol F. Anderson, Chairman of the 
Development Committee, which is plan- 
ning the event added, "The 'Leadership 
Award' is the highest honor bestowed by 
Shelter, Inc. and it is of the utmost impor- 
tance that the recipients be worthy of it. 
In the cases of the gentlemen represent- 
ing Filene's Basement and Zayre Corpo- 
ration, there is no question that they and 
their respective companies have done 
more for the hungry and homeless in the 
Greater Boston area than any other cor- 
porate entity." 

"The efforts of these men are not re- 
stricted to the assistance given to Shel- 
ter, Inc. but have also greatly helped 
other sheltering organizations along with 
a variety of other charitable endeavors, " 
added Mrs. Anderson. 

Presentation of the awards will take 
place at Shelter, Inc.'s annual special 
event to be held this year at Memorial 
Hall, Cambridge, on Tuesday evening, 
June 16th. The evening's activities will 
include the presentation of Awards in 
Sanders Theatre and a buffet reception 
in Memorial Hall. 

Please hold the date — June 16 — and 
plan to join Shelter, Inc., the Tribute 
Committee and the community in recog- 
nizing the very special contributions the 
honorees have made to help the home- 
less. Further information may be ob- 
tained by calling Shelter, Inc. 's Adminis- 
trative office at (617) 864-8140. 



1987 Walk For Hunger 
Seeks to Raise $2 Million 

Shelter, Inc. depends on the annual Walk 
for Hunger for a large portion of the funds 
needed to provide high quality meals to 
the guests at our Cambridge Shelter and 
Boston Family Shelter. This year the 
Walk will take place on Sunday, May 3rd. 

Your support of this effort — either as 
a walker or a sponsor — helps provide 
support for over 150 feeding programs 
across Massachusetts. For information 
on how to help, contact Mary Kelley at 
our Cambridge Shelter. 



"A Star is Born" 
Featuring the BFS 

Christmas 1986 will be an occasion for 
families at the Boston Family Shelter to 
remember for a long time. Barry Nolan 
and Sara Edwards, Co-Hosts of WBZ- 
TV's "Evening Magazine," and the pro- 
duction staff wanted to do something 
special for the families at the BFS and 
arrived at our door loaded down with a 
tree, decorations, wonderful party food 
and extremely thoughtful gifts for all the 
kids and moms. A number of families who 
had been relocated also came back to par- 
ticipate. 

The children — all amateur talent- 
smiled for the cameras and enjoyed a 
wonderful afternoon of fun, food and ac- 
tivity. Everyone seemed at ease in front 
of the television cameras and we are very/ 
proud of their joint debut on "Evening 
Magazine" on Christmas Eve. Imagine 
their excitement when they saw them- 
selves on the screen! 





rVA^;/vcvs:/^ 




Sharing & Caring with New Friends: 
Sara Edwards and Barry Nolan ended their Chrisfmas 
Eve show with a fine rendition of "Jingle Bells" with 
our children. 



Memorial/Honor Gifts 

Some donors designate their gifts "in 
memory" of a loved one. A memorial gift 
to Shelter, Inc. lives on in service to other 
people and perpetuates the name of a 
loved one in a way that is especially mean- 
ingful. This year the following memorial 
gifts were made: 



[n Memory Of: 



SR. 



THOMAS BARBERA, 
ay: Richard Duffy 
Jose Rodriguez 

ALICE CAHILL 
by: the Kelleys 

lOANNE DUSCHESNE 
by: Anne-Marie Meeks 

CHAZAN FELDMAN 
by: Thomas Fodor 

DOROTHY KELLEHER 
by: Robert & Jane Richards 

lOHN LORIGAN 
by: Mary A. Kelley 

RAYMOND L. McGANN 
by: the Egan Family 

MARY O'DONNELL 
by: Mary A. Kelley 

SADIE F. RIESMAN 
by: Mary Ellen Welch 

lOSEF & FRANCES SEEBAUER 
by: Mary Seebauer Schaefer 



In response to the growing number of 
people using this method of remem- 
brance for special occasions or as 
memorials, Shelter, Inc. has designed 
attractive cards which are sent to 
inform family, friends and associates 
of your gift. For more information or 
to make a gift, please contact Pat 
Egan, at the Administrative office, 
(617) 864-8140. 



In Honor Of: 

BARBARA FAUERBACH 
by: Fred & Jeanne Fauerbach 

CHAIM FRIEDMAN 
by: Thomas Fodor 

SHULEM & LEAH GESTETNER 
by: Thomas Fodor 

VERA GORDON 

by: Steven R. Gordon 

AILEEN LYNCH 
by: Betty Bardige 

DR. BEN SIEGEL 

by: Amy & Jeff Willinsky 

ADINA & BENJAMIN STEINMETZ 
by: Thomas Fodor 

ALICE & ROBERT WOLF 
by: Hans & Elizabeth Wolf 



In Memoriam 



Shelter, Inc. was saddened by the re- 
cent passing of Charles Liddell, a 
former member of our Board of Direc- 
tors. Mr. Liddell was well-knovm 
tliroughout the Boston area for his 
lifelong commitment to social serv- 
ices. His compassion and kindness will 
be missed by many. Our condolences 
are extended to his wife, Barbara, and 
his family. 



To Shelter, Inc. Endowment Fund 

In Memory Of: 

NICHOLAS VERRENGIA 
by: Mrs. Edward J. Shea 



Bequests and deferred gifts can be ex- 
tremely valuable to non-profit organi- 
zations while being quite painless, and 
even beneficial, to the donors. Con- 
tributing through bequests or deferred 
gifts helps ensure the future of charit- 
able organizations while perpetuating 
the donor's commitment to helping 
others. If you are considering this type 
of donation to Shelter, Inc., please 
contact Lois Grossman, Director of 
Development, at (617) 864-8140. 

Always consult your attorney or 
financial advisor when considering 
your philanthropic plans. 



rr 

rr 



The homeless and hungry 

need our help throughout 

the year. Please remember 

them now. 



Senator Hart Tours the 
Boston Family Shelter 

An overwhelming number of security 
people, television crews and news report- 
ers arrived at the BFS very early on the 
morning of February 17 in preparation 
for a fact-finding visit by former Colorado 
Senator Gary Hart, candidate for the 
Democratic presidential nomination. 

The tour, arranged by Mayor Raymond 
Flynn, enabled the Senator to hear 
firsthand from our guests the types of 
services available to homeless families in 
Massachusetts and what is still needed. 




During a coffee break, our visitors answered a steady stream 
of questions from reporters. Pictured left to right are Philip 
Johnston, Secretary, Executive Office of Human Services; 
Mayor Raymond Flynn, and Senator Gary Hart. 




Intently listening to the concerns of one guest are (left-right) 
Mayor Ftynn .Senator Hartand Barbara Duffy, Program Direc- 
tor at the BFS. 



Shelter, Inc. depends upon a strong 
public/private/voluntary partnership to 
support our work. In the past year the 
private sector contribution has grown 
both in numbers of supporters and 
gifts. 

Shelter, Inc. provides shelter, meals, 
social services, advocacy and referrals 
to nearly 1,000 homeless men, women 
and families each year. 

There are many items that are 
needed on a regular basis in order to 
provide a comfortable homelike envi- 
ronment. 

If you are redecorating your home 
or office, please consider the donation 
of furniture, office equipment and 
other goods to Shelter, Inc. 




One of our youngest guests enjoyed some special attention 
from these VIPs. 



tter From 

e Executive Director 



]p- Friends of Shelter: 

are looking forward with growing an- 

)ation to Shelter, Inc. 's annual special 

nt — Leadership '87. Our Develop- 

Committee, led by Chairperson 

ol Anderson, is planning an exciting 

Hgram. The committee's selections for 

orees, guest speaker, master of cere- 

Diies, and event location promise to 

rte Leadership '87 the biggest and 

B5t successful event in our history. 



nit 



T annual leadership awards event is 
nortant to us for many reasons. It is 
u)pportunity to recognize individual ef- 
c s to alleviate homelessness; an oppor- 
iity to get together with hundreds of 
:(cemed individuals and to stand in op- 
xition to growing homelessness in the 
J ted States; an opportunity to express 
iiport for solutions and for the work of 
5 Iter, Inc.; and an opportunity to raise 
i ibstantial amount of the privately con- 
luted dollars upon which Shelter Inc. 's 
31 grams depend. 

silter. Inc. must raise 25% of its operat- 
n costs from private contributions. 
Lidership '87 is a key part of our fund 
filing plan but it is also a special time 
aiJie year when a great many people 
m are deeply disturbed by the extent 
Dllhomelessness in this country will 
giher to make an important statement 
tcfeach other about their concern, their 
ciTmitment, and their understanding of 
II need to support Shelter, Inc. 

W do hope you will be able to join us 
tl. year for a memorable event. 



^l^^ 



e\ free to contact our Administrative 
ce, at (617) 864-8140 to schedule 
lur tour. 



Holidays at Shelter, Inc. 

Each year following the excitement of the 
holiday season, we look back and say "It 
can't get any better!" Well, each year 
more and more companies, churches, or- 
ganizations and individuals do more and 
more incredible things to make the 
Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays 
happy for our guests at the Cambridge 
Shelter and the Boston Family Shelter. 
Food drives have become an integral 
part of the holiday season at Shelter Inc. 
The following are just a few of the won- 
derful folks who arrived at our doors with 
truckloads, carloads, and armloads of all 
types of food: 

Faith Lutheran Church, Cambridge 

St. Mary's Parish, Cambridge 

St. Peter's Parish, Cambridge 

Belmont Day School 

Newton North High School/ 

Riley House 

In addition, Cambridge Mayor Walter 

Sullivan, and the Hotel Sonesta donated 

a large quantity of non-perishables to our 

Cambridge Shelter. Currier and Chives 

Caterers continue to provide our guests 

with some of the most fabulous meals 

available in the Boston area. 

Special thanks go to the Coppedge and 
Johnson children who, along with their 
mothers, organized a Christmas Tea to 
benefit the families of Shelter, Inc. They 
invited their friends to join them for a 
pre-Christmas party and to share their 
own good fortune with others who don't 
have as much. Thank you all - especially 
Schuyler, Walker, Luke, Sophie, Cas- 
sandra, Abbie and Lyman. 

Special thanks to everyone who re- 
membered the homeless and hungry in 
1986. Some of these who made the holi- 
days brighter at Shelter, Inc. included: 
Department of Public Welfare 
Filene's Basement of Boston 
First Church of Christ Scientist 
First and Second Church of Boston 
Franklin Sporting Goods 
Globe Santa 
Hasbro Industries 
Leading Edge Products, Inc. 

Mr. & Mrs. Alan Lewis 
Cambridge Montessori School 
Putting on the Knitz 
Rotary Club of Boston 
Reverend Tanzie 
Temple Beth El, Belmont 
Temple Emanuel, Newton 
The Timberland Company 
Women's Educational & Industrial Union 
Zayre Corporation 
A million thanks to everyone we did 
not mention but whose caring and con- 
cern made 1986 a better year for all our 
guests. 




Katrina, a former guest of the Boston Family Shelter, 
now happily relocated with her mom and baby sister, 
came back to visit at holiday time. Her expression 
shows ail the wonder and joy of discovering all of the 
surprises hidden in our very special Christmas tree, 
entitled "My Favorite Things," donated by Eliot and 
Marilyn Ravech. 



Local Organizations 
Provide New Furnishings 

Recently it became necessary to buy new 
furniture for the two living rooms at the 
Cambridge Shelter and new dining room 
furniture for the Boston Family Shelter. 

Two local groups made it possible for 
us to purchase new, attractive, durable 
furniture. 

The living rooms at the CS were fur- 
nished by a gift from the Harvard Com- 
munity Volunteer Association from pro- 
ceeds raised at a special event held by 
students at the Harvard Business School. 

The dining room furniture was pro- 
vided through the generosity of some 
longtime friends, the Beacon Hill Circle 
for Charity. 

Our deepest thanks for their kindness 
and generosity. 

If anyone has not had an opportunity 
to tour our facilities, please contact our 
administrative office to schedule a visit. 



Your support is valued 

by the Board, staff and, 

especially the guests 

of Shelter, Inc. 



The SHELTER Newsletter wiU be pub- 
lished semi-annually. Comments and 
suggestions are welcome. If you would 
like to be added to the mailing list, please 
call or write Pat Egan at Shelter, Inc. 



Board of Directors: 

President Alison S. Lauriat 

Vice President Philip R. Giffee 

Treasurer Thomas E . Kelleher 

Secretary Katherine Fitzpatrick 

Executive Director Da vid F. Whitty 

Editor and Director 

of Development .... Lois S. Grossman 



THIS AGENCY IS 
SUPPORTED BY 




United way 



BOSTON FAMILY SHELTER 
267-8081 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 
864-8140 



CAMBRIDGE SHELTER 
547-1885 



[ 



ShelterNc 

P.O. Box 516 
Cambridge, MA 02139 



Non-Profit Or 
Bulk Rate 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 
Boston, MA 
Permit #592c 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: 

.^ison S Lauriat 

Vice President: 

Philip R Giffee 

Treasurer: 

Thomas E. Kelleher 
Secretary: 
Kathenne FitzPatnci< 

Carol F Anderson 
Jonathan M. Bocklan. Esq, 
Clemmie L Cash 
Richard J Dohertv 
Imogene Fish 
Rev. James D Foley 
James M Haves 
C, Vincent Haynes 
Peter S Kurzina 
Rev Philip H Kvlander 
George F McCrav 
John H McDermott 
Paul McGerigJe 
Anne S Moore 
J. Ernest Nunnally 
Susan A. Rogers 
Dr Lenore Rubin 
Suzanne Wadsworth 
Douglas E White 

Executive Director 

David F Whitty 

Administrative Offices 

PO Box 516 
Cambridge MA 02H9 
617-864-8140 




United wa<( 

Shelter. Inc. is a private, non-profit corporation. 




i 



Shelter IS 

*^EVOLVING... 

From a small, all-volunteer organization which 
housed Hve homeless men in rented quarters in 
IT-i to today s thrivmg professional shelter svstem. 
In dignified, homelike, community-based facili- 
ties, SHELTER, INC. provides meals, lodging, qual- 
ity social services, and case advocacy to a thousand 
homeless people a year - whoever they are and what- 
ever their needs- For some - SHELTER is a short-term 
refuge meeting the most immediate life-threatening 
needs of people with nowhere to go. For others - 
SHELTER is a temporary stop on the road to a 
more stable way of life. 

TO BETTER 
CAREFOR 
THE 
HOMELESS... 

WHO ARE THEY? 

Men, women and children. 

Alone and in families. 

Some are mentally ill, others are retarded. 

Some are handicapped, others are addicts. 

Some are abused, others are ill. 

All are down on their luck. 

All have exhausted their resources and have no place 

to turn. 

They do not choose to be here. 
They are our friends and neighbors. 

They need our help. 



HOV( DID THEV BECOME HOMELESS^ 

Inemplovmeiit. loss and destruction of lou-mcome 
housing, dl-planned and poorlv executed deinstitu- 
tionalization policies, federal budget cuts and disabil- 
ity reviews have all conspired to swell their ranks to 
present epidemic proportions. 



71 



HROUGH 
OUR UNIQUE 
PROGRAMS... 

SHELTER. INC. operates two facilities in metro- 
politan Boston. Onginally a temporary stop-over 
for the chronicallv homeless male, the CAMBRIDGE 
SHELTER has been shifting focus to provide more in- 
depth care and relocation services to men, women 
and families 

Located in a lovely house on a quiet street off 
Central Square, the CAMBRIDGE SHELTER provides 
overnight lodging, hot dinner and breakfast, coun- 
seling, casework and advocaa-. and resettlement 
assistance to 20 needy people a night, as well as a 
long-term transitional unit at Cambridge WCA for 
a single-parent woman and her family 

Some of our guests are given extensions until 
other outside social service agencies can place 
them . . . like Donna, who has a safe place at 
SHELTER until Elder Services can place her in 
appropriate housing. 

Some stay on to work with our staff and social 
workers until they can find a place to live . . like the 
Lanes, who after losing their lobs and their home, 
needed a safe place to pull themselves together. 

Wtiether at SHELTER to escape the dangers of 
the streets, or waiting for housing one finds warmth, 
comfort and help at the CAMBRIDGE SHELTER. 

The BOSTO.N FAMILY SHELTER, located in a 
brownstone in the South End, opened in April 1983 to 
help families get on their feet again, .^s a transitional 



shelter with beds tor i^ people i.S-lit tamilies). the 
BOSTON K.\.\1ILY SHELTER offers 2-i hour da\ shel- 
ter. 3 meals a da\. individual and faniiK counseling, 
case advocac\. and relocation assistance 

Vtith more and more families doubling up in 
apartments, living in cars and finallv being forced 
onto the streets, the need for a special shelter which 
keeps families intact, including older bovs. and pro- 
vides support services becomes evident. 

.Adults accept responsibility for their children, save 
their income, participate in job and housing searches 
as well as assist in housekeeping and cooking. 

WHO .\RE THESE F.\MILIES? 

Families like the \egas . , a mother, father and 
3 children, who lost ever\lhing in a fire and need 
the time to save monev and start anew. 

Families like the Spencers , a mother and 2 chil- 
dren escaping an abusive husband, and thrown out of 
her sister's overcrowded apartment. 

Families like the Dalleys. . . a single-parent mother 
with -1 children, forced to leave a condemned building 
they called home. 

Because of BOSTON FAMILY SHELTER, these fami- 
lies and many others have not had to become part of 
the chronicallv homeless. Because of BOSTON E\MILY 
SHELTER, 80". of these families are relocated into 
permanent housing within 2 months of their arnval. 

Through SHELTER'S kindness and care, many 
guests from both our facilities will be able to live out 
more dignified lives. 

WE LOOK TO 

THE 

FUTURE... 

A future where despair is replaced with hope. 

A future where more people will break the vicious 
cycle of street and shelter living. 

A future where no one will live on the streets. 



This future is part of SHELTER'S plans. 

So is. , a transitional shelter for individual men 
and women. The only such program planned for the 
entire spectrum of homeless individuals in greater 
Boston, this 1-i hour a dav shelter will be modeled 
after our already successful programs. 

Our goal ..to find our guests a permanent place 
to live - whether it be a halfway house, a room in 
a super^'ised lodging house, a bed in a nursing home, 
or a small apartment or room. 

So is .. a supervised lodging house. Faced with a 
steady decline of the number of rooming houses in 
Boston, this facility would be a much needed part of 
the solution to the housing shortage for individuals. 

Our goal . to run low-cost, clean, supervised, per- 
manent living quarters for people who cannot, for 
whatever reasons, live alone. 

So is ... a long-term transitional facility for single- 
parent, female-headed families. These families are 
our most vulnerable. 

Our goal ... to spend a year helping our guests find 
jobs, job training programs, to help our guests get 
their high school diplomas, to help our guests learn 
basic life skills such as nutrition, budget manage- 
ment, child-rearing, and coping with stress. 

With a decade of experience, SHELTER. INC. has 
emerged as a leading provider of community-based 
shelter programs m Massachusetts. 

A model for the future . . . 
where advocacv. counseling, networking, warmth and 
human dignity all play an important part. 



,S WE GROW 
OUR NEEDS 
'GROW 



So we iiL;.; .t>k -lu. mil frieiul: 
til help us hfln llmsc 'aIki have 



Ourn-rvici'v art far 
'■lUJ'H'rtii'f.sarfui'i'v 



Our support is as innovative as our programming. 
We have forged a strong private,' public partnership 
where government agencies, the Linited Way, founda- 
tions, corporations, and individuals all join the 
SHELTER movement. 



ANN M. VINCOLA 



Home 

161 Buckminster Rd. 
Brookline, MA 02146 
(617) 277-6642 



Office 

286 Congress St. 
Boston, MA 02210 
(617)451-6766 



7th fl 



EDUCATION 



M.ED. , 



B.A, 



Lesley College, Day Care Administration 
Emphasis - Supervision and Administration of 
Early Childhood Programs 

State University of New York, College at Cortland 
Major- Education, Secondary English 



Advanced Graduate work in Administration, Early Childhood 
Education, Reading, and Special Education 



PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES 

SUMMA ASSOCIATES, INC., Boston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, 1986 - 

present 

• Partner ; Firm develops employer-supported child care 
programs. Provides specialized expertise in conductng 
needs assessments, cost analyses, and feasibility studies. 

CORPORATE CHILD CARE CONSULTANTS, Boston, MA 1982-1986. 

• President ; Established consulting firm which offers 
assistance to corporations and institutions for the 
planning and development of child care facilities. 
Projects include on-site centers for industry; hospi- 
tal based care; school-aged child care; family day care, 
and staff development. 

STONEHILL COLLEGE, No. Easton, MA. 1979-1982 . 

• Assistant Professor of Education ; Responsible for 
program in Early Childhood Education for Education ma- 
jors and curriculum design for all Early Childhood Ed- 
ucation courses. Served as Faculty Advisor to Educa- 
tion society and Educational Resource Center Coordin- 
ator. Organized and chaired the School Advisory Coun- 
cil . 



WHEELOCK COLLEGE, Boston, MA 1983-85. 

• Instructor . Graduate School. Administration in 
Human Service Settings. 



BEACON RESEARCH ASSOCIATES, INC., Boston, Mass. 1978-1979 

• Educational Program Analyst : Responsible for the design 
and development of educational and training programs 
for various institutions and corporations. 

• Urban-Suburban Magnet Program Development Project : This 
project assisted teachers in urban and suburban schools 
in the development of collaborative programs. Partici- 
pated in all aspects of the project, including proposal 
writing, literature review and analysis, workshop de- 
sign and delivery, and technical assistance to teachers. 
Project developed for the Massachusetts Department of 
Education . 



BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE, Bridgewater, Mass. 1975-1976 

• Assistant Professor of Education ; Faculty member in De- 
partment of Education. Courses taught: Strategies of 
Teaching Elementary Education. 



■ SIMMONS COLLEGE, Boston, Mass. 1972-1975 

• Director of Child Study Center : Administrator and Edu- 
cational Supervisor of Laboratory School . Responsible 
for transition of facility from half-day program to full 
day care center. This involved: 1) writing proposal, 
devising budget and fiscal management systems and pre- 
senting to Advisory Board; 2) drafting staff job des- 
criptions; 3) supervising design and rennovation of 
facility; 4) developing funding programs; and 5) super- 
vising maintenance. Responsibilities also included 
designing the educational program and developing curric- 
ulum for a diverse population, 

• Supervisor of Student Teachers : Responsible for the 
supervision, consultation and evaluation of students 

in field placements in Boston-area pre-schools and Early 
Childhood Centers. 

• Lecturer : Conducted curriculum workshops for the Depart- 
ment of Education. 

• Teacher-Director, Child Study Center : Responsible for 
the general supervision, maintenance and administration 
of the laboratory school; served as head teacher, super- 
vising one teacher, two assistants, and four student 
teachers; managed budget and daily operation of center. 



HOUGHTON-MIFFLIN COMPANY, New York, New York 1969-1973 

• Educational Consultant : Travelled throughout New England 



and Middle Atlantic States, visiting urban and rural 
communities to work with teachers in Language Arts 
and Mathematics. Conducted inservice workshops for 
teachers, set up classroom learning centers, demon- 
strated teaching techniques and lectured to parent 
groups on materials provded by Houghton-Mifflin. 
Also advised and consulted with authors and editorial 
staff on content of texts. 



BRIARCLIFF MIDDLE SCHOOL, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 1966-69 

• Reading Specialist ; Responsible for remedial reading 
program for children in grades 5,7, and 8. 

• Teacher ; Seventh grade English and Social Studies 



HIGHLAND FALLS CENTRAL SCHOOL, Highland Falls, N. Y. 

1965-66 

• Teacher: Seventh and Eighth Grade English 



RELATED EXPERIENCES 

RUNKLE SCHOOL EXTENDED DAY PROGRAM, Brookline, Mass. 

• President ; Served as Chairman of Board of Directors for 
parent cooperative program. Responsible for overall 
supervision of program and its functioning; giving 
guidance to teachers and parent committee; and provid- 
ing continuous evaluation of program. 

CONSULTANT TO LOCAL PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND DAY CARE CENTERS 

• Pine Manor Child Study Center, Pine Manor College 

• Easton Public Schools 

• Brockton Public Schools 

• HAL (High Ability Learners) Gifted program in Easton, Mass 
ADVISORY BOARD, Easton Teachers' Center 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES COMMITTEE, Stonehill College 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS AND HONORS 



• Member, National Association for the Education of 
Young Children 

• Member, American Association of University Women 

• Elected to Who's Who in American Colleges and Univer- 
sities 

• Member, Action for Childrens' Television 

• Steering Committee, Association for Early Childhood 
Teacher Educators 



PAPERS 



• "Extending Desegregation Efforts Through Urban-Suburban 
Collaboration" Paper prepared for the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. 

• "Proposal to Provide Assistance in the Development of 
Urban-Suburban Magnet Education Program" . Paper pre- 
pared for the Massachusetts Department of Education. 

• "Day Care Rationale". Paper prepared for the Department 
of Education and Child Study ADvisory Board, Simmons 
College . 

• "Industrial Day Care". Article in review in collabor- 
ation with Elaine Heller Dunn. 

• "Maximizing Curriculum Instruction Through the Field- 
Based Component - A Developmental Approach for the Use 
of the Lab Experience for Education Students". Presen- 
tation for Association for Early Childhood Teacher Ed- 
ucators, Detroit, Michigan, 1981. 



V;ORKSHOPS AND CONFERENCES 



• Conference Coordinator and Workshop Leader ; "Part Time 
Magnet Education Program Proposal Development Workshop" 
United South End Settlement House, Boston, Mass. 

• Coordinator : Superintendent's Informational Meeting on 
Urban-Suburban Collaborative Programs, Park Plaza Hotel, 
Boston, Mass. 

• VJorkshop Leader : "The Use of Manipulative Materials in 
Teaching Mathematics to Primary Grade Children" NJEA 
Conference, Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

• Workshop Leader : "Creative Math Instruction for Inter- 



mediate Grades" NCTM National Conference, Anaheim, 
California . 



PERSONAL 



Married, two children. 



REFERENCES 



References sent upon request 



I. THE COMPANY 

Summa Associates is the first national consulting firm specializing 
in corporate child care. It was formed in September, 1986 through a 
merger of three regional firms: Burud and Associates, based in Los 
Angeles; Contemporary Ventures in Child Care, based in Phoenix; and 
Corporate Child Care Consultants, based in Boston. These office 
locations place the company in the two states with the largest 
corporate child care activity, California and Massachusetts, and in 
Arizona, the state with the fastest growing economy. 




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I. THE COMPANY 

Summa Associates is the first national consulting firm specializing 
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merger of three regional firms: Burud and Associates, based in Los 
Angeles; Contemporary Ventures in Child Care, based in Phoenix; and 
Corporate Child Care Consultants, based in Boston. These office 
locations place the company in the two states with the largest 
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Arizona, the state with the fastest growing economy. 




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• America West Airlines 

■ American Medical Interna 

• Arizona Public Service 

• Arthur Andersen & Compc 

• Bashas' Markets 

• Bose Corporation 

1- Cedars-Sinai Medical Cen 

• City of Santa Monica 

• Framingham Union Hospit 

■ Hill, Holliday, Connors, C< 

• The Howard Johnson Com 

• Los Angeles Department o 
and Power 

• Mossachussetts Metro- We; 
Chamber of Commerce 

• Mattel, Inc. 

• Medtronic Micro-Rel 

• National Association of H< 
Affiliated Child Care Prog 

• National Medical Enterpri 

• Prime Computer, Inc. 

• Providence Hospital of Ale 

• Southwest Savings and Lo 

• State of Arizona 

• State of Tennessee 

• Tronsamerica Life Compon 

• Union Bank 

• Wellesley College 
















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286 CONGRESS 

BOSTON, MA 021 10 

TELEPHONE: (617) 451-6766 


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porate Child Core Planning & Manageme 
BOSTON • LOS ANGELES - PHOENIX 
























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THE COMPANY 




Summa's guiding corporate philosophy is to be the industry leader in 
corporate child care. The primary focus of the company is providing 
consulting and planning services to employers concerned with their 
employees' child care needs. Summa seeks to design child care 
assistance programs which are most effective at addressing employee 
child care needs and improving corporate productivity. 

In response to its goal of being the premier consulting 
organization, Summa is a company of first. It has been the first to 

* develop a comprehensive system for assessing employee 
child care needs and conducting feasibility and pro- 
ductivity impact studies; 

* develop a complete system of options rather than a 
single product that may or may not meet an employer's 
child care needs; 

* develop coast to coast capabilities to meet the needs of 
multi-site corporations; 

* develop a plan to actively market the concept of corporate 
child care on a national scale; 

* develop extensive expertise in a variety of options and 
the capability to work with different types of businesses; 

* publish an exhaustive national list of companies which 
have child care programs in place. 

The services provided by Summa permit employers to acquire complete 
information on which to base a judgment, including the multitude of 
alternatives, a cost-benefit analysis, and potential risks and 
projections. The experience of Summa Associates in planning, 
designing and operating successful programs permits the client to 
benefit from this experience and avoid the mistakes others have 
made. Clients know ahead of time what works and what does not work. 



II. CORPORATE CAPABILITIES 

Summa Associates, Inc. is a full service consulting firm 
specializing in employer-supported child care. The principals of 
the company have been servicing the child care needs of business and 
industry, governmental agencies and educational institutions for 
over a decade. The firm provides clients with the information 
essential to making important decisions regarding the formation of 
child care assistance programs from the wide range of available 
options. Seminars and training for employers, employees, parents 
and providers are also provided. 

Summa offers a wide range of services including: 
* 



Needs Assessment/Feasibility Studies 

* Development of On-site Child Care Centers 

* Cost/Benefit Analysis 

* Parent Seminars 
Resource and Referral Systems 

* Family Home Care Networks 

* Program and Staff Development 

* Child Care Center Management 
Program Evaluation 



* 



* 



Summa Associates, Inc. is uniquely qualified to assist its clients, 
both large and small, in the intricate and involved process of 
establishing and managing programs for employees who are working 
parents. The firm has extensive experience in preparing studies, 
creating programs and managing child care centers. 

Ann Vincola is nationally recognized for expertise in the 
development of employer-supported child care programs, as well as 
program design and implementation. She is the designer and creator 
of on-site child care centers for two major New England corporations, 

A founding member, and member of the steering committee of the New 
England Employer-Supported Child Care Network, she has also served 
as a consultant to the Massachusetts Department of Education and to 
other institutions. 

Specializing in research, needs assessment and cost analysis, Ms. 
Vincola assisted a five-company consortium developing a child care 
needs assessment and feasibility study. She has also designed and 
developed several other child care centers, and consults on the 
on-going management of numerous child care facilities. 

Ms. Vincola has been as Assistant Professor of Early Childhood 
Education in Administration for several Boston area colleges. 

Description of Several Local Projects 

Town of Randolph, Massachusetts - Summa is working with the Randolph 
Foundation, Inc. to develop a daycare center for 100 children for 
the school system, the Town, and the business community in 
Randolph. The project is being funded through a variety of sources 
and Summa is assisting in securing this funding. 



Combined Jewish Philanthropies - Summa is currently under contract 
with CJP to assist in the development of new day care centers in the 
Greater Boston area for the Jewish community with input from Jewish 
Community Centers and Jewish Family and Children's Services. 
Consultation is also provided to other start up and currently 
operating Jewish affiliated centers. 

Greater Quincy Child Care Center - Summa is under contract with 
GQCCC to provide technical assistance in the management and on-going 
operation of the center. This center is governed by a Parent Board 
of Directors with assistance from O'Connell Brothers Management and 
State Street Bank. 

Framingham Union Hospital - Summa conducted a Needs Assessment for 
this hospital to assess the child care needs of 500 employees. This 
data collection will help the hospital make a determination 
regarding child care assistance for their 1,500 employees. 

Metrowest Chamber of Commerce - In March, 1986, Summa conducted a 
Needs Assessment for the Metrowest Chamber of Commerce, Framingham, 
Massachusetts for the purpose of assessing the child care needs of 
employees at Bose Corporation, Prime Computer, Consolidated Group 
Trust, The Middlesex News, and Integrated Genetics for the future 
consideration of an infant/toddler center located in or near the 
Framingham Industrial Park. This Needs Assessment consisted of the 
design and drafting of a questionnaire for 1,600 employees, 
interviews with company employees, tabulation and item analysis of 
results, investigation of area day care services, and 
recommendations and a final report. Summa then completed a cost 
analysis and fiscal development for the proposed center. 

Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos - Summa was under contract with 
HHCC from October 1984 through November 1985 for the design and 
development of a near-site child care center. The contract included 
design and start-up phases and technical assistance necessary for 
the successful opening of a near-site cneter. The center opened on 
October 30, 1985, licensed for 37 children aged 2 months to 6 
years. Summa continues to work with HHCC on a consulting basis for 
budgetary and staff development purposes. Summa is also developing 
a Family Daycare System for HHCC to supplement the available slots 
for infant care. 

Dunkin'Donuts - Dunkin'Donuts of Randolph, Massachusetts contracted 
with Summa in October 1984 to conduct a Needs Assessment and Cost 
Analysis for the possible inclusion of a child care facility during 
a new construction phase. The Needs Assessment consisted of the 
design of a questionnaire for 350 employees; tabulation and item 
analysis of the results, cost analysis based on finds; and a final 
report and recommendations present to management. 

Howard Johnson Company - Howard Johnson Company contracted with 
Summa m November 1983 to investigate and research the feasibility 
of on-site child care at their new corporate headquarters at Monarch 
III in North Quincy, Massachusetts. The investigation was divided 
into three phases: Phase I - Research; Phase II - Needs Assessment 
and Cost Analysis; and Phase III - Implementation. The center 
opened in August 1984 with a licensed capacity of 57 children aged 3 
months to 5 years. 



Additional clients include: 

Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School 

New England Memorial Hospital 

Wellesley College 

Babson College 

Wellesley Community Children's Center 

Resource Center for Business at Salem State College 

Bates Shoe Company 

III. SERVICES 

Summa Associates, Inc. is a specialized consulting firm offering a 
wide range of services. Summa is unique in that it is the first 
nationwide corporate child care planning and consulting management 
service especially designed for large multi-site organizations and 
firms with diverse regional needs. This capability, combined with a 
breadth of experience, allows Summa Associates to deliver a child 
care program which achieves the goals of management and is a valued 
service to employees. Summa Associates has designed, developed 
staff, and operated child care assistance programs that have set 
national standards of excellence by offering a flexible approach to 
each corporate challenge. The firm's appeal to large corporations 
is that it is highly skilled in assisting companies in the 
decision-making phase of child care planning and recommends only the 
program or solution that fits the needs of the company. Summa has 
experience developing all options and alternatives and does not 
attempt to "sell" any one option. 

The services provided by the firm are described below: 

Planning Services 

o Needs Assessment/Feasibility Study 

o Productivity Impact Study 
Program Design, Implementation and Management 

o Company Child Care Center or Consortium Center 

* center design 

* program development services 

* center management 

o Day Care Home Network 

o Sick Child Care Program 

o Financial Assistance Programs 



(Corporate C'hild(^are (Consultants 



METROPOLITAN BRIEFING 

Corporate 
day care 
spreading 



By Muriel Cohen 
Globe Staff 

Nlne-month-old Caltlln Lally and 
■ her mother. Catherine, go to work to- 
gether each morning. 

Catherine Lally begins her day at 9 
a.m. as an executive secretary at head- 
quarters of the Howard Johnson Co. In 
North Qulncy. 

Before taking the .elevator to her 
sixth floor office, she leaves chubby 
Caltlln to the growing up tasks she ex- 
pcct.s of her Infant - how to socialize, to 
drink from a cup. to eat finger food - In 
the h.mds of a certified teacher In the 
spacious new Johnson-run day care 
cenlcr on the building's ground floor. 

Caltlln and her mother are among 
the growing number of day care clients 
at corporate-sponsored centers opening 
around the country to accommodate 
parents needing reliable, quality child 
care. 

While day care used to be regarded 
as a -service for welfare mothers, today 
the clamor for reliable, quality help 
with children Is coming from profes- 
sional parents, middle management as 
well as clerical and blue collar workers. 

State data Indicates that within five 
years, there will be 10.4 million chil- 
dren under the age of six with working 
mothers: 10 years ago 34 percent of 
mothers with children under the age of 
three were In the work force: by 1982. 
the pirccntaife of working mothers 
with toddlders Increased to 46 percent. 

Massachusetts, according to child 
. care .specialists, leads the nation In the 
number of employers who. like the 
Howard Johnson Co.. run day care cen- 
ters or. like IBM, provide Information 
and referral on day care to their em- 
ploy ix^s. 

For (he first time, the governor's of- 
fice Is backing the demand by parents 
for day care. The state has Joined par- 
jent groups and other agencies In en- 
couraging business and industry to 
help Improve the quality of family life 
by sharing responsibility for their em- 
ployees' children. 

METROPOLITAN BRIEFING. P.ipe R 




Mward Nairn joins two friends as he waits for his mother at the Howard 
Johnson's child care center. photos by janet knoh 




Caitlin Lally watches as her mother. Catherine, looks over next 
week's schedule. 



UTHE BOSTON GLOBE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10. 1984 



lore companies providing day^re 



■ METROPOLITAN BRIEFING 

Continued frbmPagcl ''• ' '- 

"Wc are seeing' a tlm^ Jn the 
states economy Where we will 
have to attract more people Into 
the labor force. Including wom- 
en." said Evelyn Murphy, state 
secretary of economic affairs. 

"Day care Is a work force and 
labor force Issue," Murphy contin- 
ued, l^st week Murphy" met with 
employers In Peabody, Lawrence 
and Lowell to encourage them to 
explore day care options for em- 
ployees. 

At the present time, parents 
find there are a variety of child 
care strategies: placement In a 
home with a mother caring for up 
to six children; care In a center, 
run by an employer or a commu- 
nity agency, or a patchwork of sit- 
ters and assistance from family 
members. .' 

For the Lally family, there w'as 
no family help available, and Calt- 
Iln has spent most of her first nine 
months In the home of a warm 
and youthful grandmother at a 
cost that sometimes ran up to 
$140 a week. >. , 

But with the opening of the 
Johnson Center, Catherine Lially^ 
cut down her cost and travel time. 
On paper, fees for Johnson em- 



ployees are set at $100 for a five 
day week for infants like Caltlln. 
But by the time the tax arrange- 
ments made by Johnson are 
worked out, Lally said the actual 
cost to her is $61 weekly. 

Howard Johnson has Joined a 
number of companies with head- 
quarters In Massachusetts that 
have made day care a corporate 
concern. Among those listed In a 
new brochure Issued by the state 
are Stride Rite, with centers In 
Cambridge and Boston. Polaroid 
In Cambridge. Gillette In Boston. , 
Wang In Lowell and Zayre In Na- 
tlck. Hospitals and universities 
have also set up centers. 

Until the Johnson Center 
opened two weeks ago. Catherine 
Lally each morning washed, 
dressed, diapered and fed Caltlln, 
bundled her Into the car and 
drove 30 minutes from her home 
In Stoughton to leave her with the 
babysitter and then traveled an- 
other 30 minutes to her Job In 
Quincy. Each day at 5, Lally re- 
versed the process, driving half an 
hour to pick up Caltlln and an- 
other 30 minutes home with a 
tired, sometimes cranky Infant. 

"I used to be angry when I 
would get there and I knew the sit- 
ter was giving Caltlln lasagna or 
giving her a bottle when I specifi- 



cally asked her not to." said Cath- 
erine Lally. 

"Here they work with me. We 
discuss what I am doing at home, 
and they are helping me try her on 
new foods. They will help me with 
toilet training. 

"I wanted at-home care for 
Caltlln. but couldn't find anyone. 1 
wanted to make sure she wasn't 
thrown In a play pen all day. 

"I want her to get a lot of atten- 
tion, that she would get changed 
often and that If she refused her 
bottle, there would be a later try." 
Lally continued. 

Last Friday, Caltlln was one of 
two Infants In the nursery with 
teacher Margaret Ryans. 

Lally said she was the perfect 
candidate for the corporate center. 
Her husband Is a Boston Police of- 
ficer "with crazy hours," and her 
mother went back to school, got a 
Job and "does her own thing." Lal- 
ly said. 

For Lally the choice was obvi- 
ous, but other parents turn to the 
Child Care Resource Center In 
Cambridge, a 13-year-o!d referral 
and resource agency. 

Boston University Prof. Doro- 
thy Kelly, who lives In Allston, 
called the center for help in ar- 
ranging care for the baby she ex- 
pects this month. 



Where to call for day care information 



The Jollowing is a list of or- 
ganizations that can be called 
for help In obtaining Injorma- 
tlon on particular day care pro- 
grams: 

Administration lor Children, Youth 

and Families. HHS 

JFK Federal BIdg. Rm. 20, Boston 

02203 

(617) 223-6450 

Child Care Brokers, Ltd. 

120 Dorset rd. Newton 02168 

(617) 224-2991, 946-4577 

Child Care Circuit 

PO Box 42. Ballardvale Station. An- 

dovor 01810 

(617) 475-3602 

Child Care Information Services. Inc. 
66 Summer St.. Foxborough 02035 
(617) 543-3345 

Child Care Management. Inc. 

609 Honeywell st , Needham 02194 

(617) 444-4880 

Child Care Resource Center. Inc. 



24 Thorndike St.. Cambridge 02141 
250 Stuart St., Boston 02116 
(617)547-9861 
Child Care Systems 
51 Wendell St., Cambridge 02138 
(617)876-2329 • 
COPE 

•37 Clarendon St., Boston 02115 
(617)357-5863 

Corporate Child Care Consultants 
65 Franklin St., Boston 02110 
(617) 426-2304 

Kinder Care Learning Centers, Inc. 

P.O. Box 2151. Montgomery, Ala 

36197 

(205) 227-5090 

Mass. OKIce (or Children 

150 Causeway St.. Boston 021 14 

(617) 727-0018 

Prospect Hill Parents' and Chlldrens' 
Center 

. 100 Filth av., Waltham 02154 
(617) 890-5438 
Rodgers & Associates. Inc. 
93 Abbotlslord rd.. Brookline 02146 
(617) 566-4962 



School-Age Child Care Project 
Wellesley College, Wellesley 02181 
(617)431-1453 

South Shore Day Care Services Inc 
25 Grow av., Bralntree 02184 
(617)848-4610 

SureCare, Inc. 

PO Box 200, Beverly 01915 

(617)927-8741 

. Wheelock College Center for Parent- 
ing Studies ; 
200 The Riverway, Boston 02215 
(617)734-5200 

Work/Family Directions 

200 The Riverway, Boston 02215 

(617) 734-0001 

Work Options Unlimited 

645 Boyiston St.. Boston 02216 

(617)247-3600 

Women's Bureau. Department of La- 
bor 

JFK Federal BIdg.. Rm. 1600. Boston 
. 02203 
(617) 223-4036 



"I need part time care for the 
fall and full-time care In mid-Jan- 
uary. They have been very good In 
giving me names and suggestions 
and general psychological help," 
said Kelly. 

The center began In 1980 to en- 
courage and advise employers to 
become Involved In child care. 
Now Its former executive director. 
Ethel McGonaghy. has Joined a 
new venture. Work/Family Direc- 
tions, which recently signed a pio- 
neering contract with IBM. the 
business machines giant. 

Directions Is t)elng run by a 
Joint venture, Rodgers and Associ- 
ates and Wheelock College, which 
trains preschool educators. Head- 
ing the IBM program are two vet- 
eran child care experts. Francene 
S. Rodgers and Gwen Morgan. 

IBM Is the first employer with 
sites around the country to rc- 
spwnd to child care needs of em- 
ployees on a national basis. Rod- 
gers said last week. 

Directions will furnish IBM 
staff members with Information 
on how 1(1 locale and evaluate 
child care. In addition, the pro- 
gram will train potential child 
care providers to expand available 
.services. 

While IBM has chosen to help 
employees find services, Howard 
Johnson has opted to run Its own 
center. When at capacity, the cen- 
ter expects to have 65 youngsters, 
from three months to 5 years. 
'I'hey will be children of company 
employees. like Caltlln. or of oth- 
ers who work In the busy office 
complex or from the Qulncy com- 
munity. 

With the help of consultant 
Ann Vl nrnla a n Instruc tor ai 
Wheelock. Johnson moved swiftly 
t o take the day care proposal from 
a n Idea on paper to the four-class- 
r oom suite It now occupies . 

"One reason ibr the speed was 
the support of G. Milton Hostage. 
.president of Howard Johnson 
, Co..'" said Catherine (Cass) Wolfe, 
director of the center. Hostage, 
wlio has 10 children himself, re- 
gards quality day care as a way of 
recruiting staff and of showing 
that the company Is concerned 
about the quality of life of Its em- 
ployees, said one company official. 

"1 was a skeptic about day 
care," remarked Lally. "But now 1 
have absolutely no qualms. Calt- 
lln Is being taken care of by an- 
ollicr Mom." 




Patricia DelVal reads a story to young Patrick at child care center. 

GLOBE PHOTO BY JANET KNOn 

A list of employer-supported 
child care programs in Mass. 

Following is a list oj emplou- 
er-supported child care pro- 
grams In Massachusetts: 



Abt Associates, Cambridge 

Bank o( Boston, Boston 

Beverly Hospital. Beverly 

Boston City Hospital, Boston 

Boston University, Boston 

Brandels University, Waltham 

Bridgewater State College, Bridgewater 

Brookline Public Schools, Brookline 

Burbank Hospital in Fitchburg, Fitch- 
burg 

Cambridge RIndge and Latin High 
School, Cambridge 

Cambridge School of Weston, Weston 

Commonwealth Children's Center, Bos- 
ton 

Eastern Uniform Company, Norwell 

Federal Reserve Bank, Boston 

Fernald School, Waltham 

Franklin Square House Day Care, Rox- 
bury 

Framlngham State College, Framing- 
ham 

Friends of Hathorne Day Care, Hathorne 

Gillette Company, Boston 

Government Center Child Care, Boston 

Howard Johnson Co.. North Quincy 

The Humphrey Occupational Resource 
Center. Roxbury 

John Hancock fvlutual Life Insurance 
Company. Boston 

Lowell General Hospital. Lowell 

MASCO Childcaro Center. Boston 

MASSPOnr Goslon 



The Massachusetts Hospital School. 
Canton 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Carnbrldge 

Middlesex County Hosital, Waltham 

Nev/ England Life Insurance Company, 
Boston 

New England Memorial Hospital, Stone- 
ham 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital. Newton 

North Shore Children's Hospital, Pea- 
body 

Northeastern University, Boston 

Parker Metals, Worcester 

Polarlod Coporatlon, Cambridge 

Ring Nursing Home Day Care Center, 
Springfield 

St Elizabeth's Hospital, Brighton 

Salem State College, Salem 

Lemuel Shattuck Hospital, Jamaica 
Plain 

Southeastern Massachusetts University 
(SMU), Dartmouth 

Stride Rite Children's Center, Cam- 
bridge and Boston 

Tulls University, Medford 

University of Massachusetts/Amherst, 
Amherst 

University of Massachusets/Boston. 
Boston 

Van Brode Group. Clinton 

Veterans Administration Hospital, 
Brockton 

Veterans Administration Hospital, Ja- 
maica Plain 

Wang Laboratories, Lowell 

Wellesley College. Wellesley 

Zayre Corporation. Natick 




l^jWyy 



WEDNESDAY, june 17. 1967 



COVER STORY 

Child-care 
plans take 
1 St steps 



Controversy 
expected to 
force more 
companies 
to provide 
new benefit 



By Mark Memmoa 
USA TODAY 

Tim Townley-Wren can't 
really describe the misery 
he went through last sum- 
mer. "Awful" is the only 
word he says comes to 
mind. 

But his feelings have 

turned full circle. "Now I 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^ don't have any worries," he 

^^^^^^■■"^^^^ says, "I can go to work and 

do my job without calling 

home every time I pass a phone." 

The difference between then and now: Last summer 
Townley-Wren. a pilot for Phoenix, Aiii-based America 
West Airlines Inc., was on his own when it came to mak- 
ing child-care arrangements for his son and daughter. 
Now, the divorced father, who cares for the children In 
summer, takes advantage of something new. America 
Wesf s 24-hours-a-day, seven-dayva-week child-care pro- 
grams. 

I Whenever Townley-Wren has to fly out of town, even 
<n short notice, he takes 9-year-old Adam and S-year-old 
Sarah to the home of Joann Fane, a trained child-care 
provider. Even If that means the children must stay 
overnight. 'TU give them diimer, put them in their jam- 
mles and off they go," he says. 
f Townley-Wren's one of a lucky few. America West is 
ooe of Just 3,000 USA companies that have any type of 
Child-care policy or program. The company contracted 
with the consulting Arm Summa Associates Inc to 
icreen and train Fane and other home-based care pro- 
viders, and to organize a 24-hour care center that can 
Kcommodate up to 16 children at night 

While the number of companies Involved in child care 
b up about 50% from 1984, a USA TODAY poU of 802 
working adults found that just 4% worked for companies 
that offer day-care benefits. The most recent Confer- 
ence Board survey on child care put the number at 
17%. 

r Child care, which some say will be the "benefit Issue 
d the 1990s," is still largely left up to the parents. That's 
despite a dramatic rise in the number of working nwth- 
tn: 60.8% of women with children under 18 now work, 
the Commerce Department's Census Bureau estimates, 
«p from 34.7% in 1960. 

r Even though some companies have met the issue of 
■Ubstance abuse head-on by testing workers for Illegal 
<lrugs, many companies have decided to leave the child- 
care issue alone. Questions atxxit liability Insurance, un- 
certainty about whether productivity will pick up 
enough to warrant the cost, and complex state and local 



zoning regulations are just a few reasons 
employers give for not getting involved. 

The burden on parents can be heavy. 
"I had a list of 10 baby sitters, some of 
whom I'd only just met," Townley-Wren 
says of his day-care problems last sum- 
mer. "11 the airline called at 6 a.m. and 
said the plane goes at 7 a.m. I had to 
make a lot of calls and hope (or the best 

"That happened Just four days after 
the Wds came for the summer," Town- 
ley-Wren says. 

"I remember thinking as the plane 
took off that my kids were down there 
with someone they'd never met in a 
strange city where they didnt know any- 
one. That was really a bad feeling." 

Guilt can also build up. Judy Godfrey 
often (eels that way. Also divorced, she 
has sometimes sent her daughters 
(Heather, 10; Sara, 8; Stacy, 6) to school 
when they've t)een sick. "No baby sitter 
wants throwing-up kids," says Godfrey, 
an executive secretary at Ford Motor Co. 
in Detroit 

If she were to stay home, Godfrey 
would have to either lie cmd say she was 
the one who was sick, or take a personal 
day. Taking a day off for a sick child is 
frowned upon, she says. 

"I feel really bad sending them to 
school like that," says Godfrey. "I hope 
they get better or that if they don't the 
school calls me and says they're sending 
them home. Then at least I can tell the 
boss I've got to go." 

But the situation doesnt have to get 
that serious before a working parent 
(eels guilty. Patti Qoar of Macomb, III., 
works "t)ecause I want to. But that 
doesn't mean I dont feel some guilt" 

An office manager and controller at an 
ambulatory surgery center, she has 
missed almost every school activity her 
6-year-old son Cameron has been in- 
volved In. "I wish the schools would do 
more things in the evenings," she says. 

Things shouldn't be that tough for 
working parents, however, says America 
West President and Chief Operating Offi- 
cer Michael Conway. "These iikdividuals 
have a significant need," he says of work- 
ing parents, "and if s affordable, quality 
child care. 

"Right iww most companies are light 
years behind where they should be on 
this. We feel a program was the right 
thing to do," Conway says. "Especially if 
you want to get the best people to work 
(or you. If you've got a potential employ- 
ee and he or she sees you've got a conv 
prehensive child-care program, it sends 
that person a message — that you care 
about them" 

While America West might be the only 
company that has set up child-care pro- 
grams that can be used around the clock 
(to accommodate the unusual schedules 
of its pilots, flight attendants and reserva- 



tions derks), other companies also hav 
stgnificant programs: 

■ Campbell Soup Co. opened a da; 
care center at Its Camden, NJ., heac 
quarters and plant in 1983. It can handl' 
120 children and plans to almost tripl 
the capacity. 

■ First Bank System Inc in Minneapc 
lis started Its All's Well program in Se; 
tember 1986. It helps parents cope wit) 
the days when their children are too sicl 
to go to their regular sitters by subsidL- 
Ing their stay at one of the city's Chickei 
Soup centers. First Bank pays $30 of th. 
HO daily charge at the centers, whicl 
are designed to handle children wltJ 
such relatively mild maladies as cold 
and chicken pox. 

■ Steelcase Inc in Grand Rapld< 
Mich., is one of a numt>er of companie 
that have set up a child-care referral ser 
vice. It evaluates local day-care prt)vid 
ers and then helps inquiring parents picJ 
a service that suits their needs. 

There are some indications that busi 
ness-supported child<are program: 
might Increase from their relativelj 
small number in the next few years. Con 
sultants like Summa Associates, whict 
has offices in Boston, Phoenix and La 
Angeles, are springing up. Other child 
care related services (or businesses an 
also sprouting: ChildCare Voucher, a Mi] 
waukee-based company, just went na 
tional. It will set up programs (or compa 
nies that allow their employees to sei 
aside part o( their salaries, without pay 
Ing taxes on those amounts, (or child 
care expenses. Then they pay those bilb 
with vouchers issued by ChildCare. 

I( the number o( companies with child 
care programs does grow significantly, li 
wont be Just the working parents whc 
t>enefit says Townley-Wren. Businesses 
also will increase the number of loyal 
workers in their ranks. 

"I'd been with several small commut 
er airlines and I've only been with Amer- 
ica West a little more than a year," he 
says, "but I can guarantee I dont have 
any applications or rfeumfe out now. I'm 
extremely proud o( what this airline has 
done. Ifs a model (or the industry. 

"My kids are in a nice home that the>' 
like when I'm not here. The husband 
there's a state trooper. It's about the best 
situation I can think of. Compared to with 
last year, Ifs like day and eight" 

Conway, America West's president 
says the growth o( child care into a stan- 
dard employment benefit is almost inev- 
itable. "As more programs start up." he 
says, the reluctant companies will be 
embarrassed Into doing something." 




Qoa^ Angeled ^xaea 

Mondiy. October 29, 1984 



"Emp/oyee Benefit of the '80s' 



More Firms Providing 
Child Care Assistance 



By ELLEN FARLEY. Times Stafi WHter 



Unable to find adequate child 
care during the workweek. Ellsa 
Djenabi. 29. a claims examiner at 
Transamerica Occidental Life In- 
surance Co.. sent her 3-year-old 
daughter to live with her mother. 
50 miles away. 

"I can only see my daughter one 
day during the week." she said. "If 
I'm at home with my husband. I 
worry about my daughter. If I'm 
with my daughter. I worry about 
my husband." 

Now. however, thanks to a child 
care assistance program begun last 
week by Transamenca. there's a 
good chance that "we'll be a family 
again." Djenabi said. For the bene- 
fit of the 3.700 employees at its 
downtown office. "Transamerica 
has established a free, on-site child 
care referral and resource service 



that's available two days a week. 

Elmployees with child care needs 
are interviewed by experienced 
counselors who match families 
with selected day care services that 
have openings. Djenabi. who wanu 
■ quality" day care ofienng meals 
and health care, pronounced her- 
self "very excited" about having 
the matter handled for her at her 
workplace. "It really puts your 
mind at ease." she said. 

Child care assistance has been 
called the employee "benefit of the 
'80s" by Margaret Heckler, secre- 
tary of the U.S. Department of 
Health and Human Services. But 
the department's recently com- 
pleted study of employer-support- 
ed child care projects found only 
2.850 companies nationwide that 
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