(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Proposed capital improvement program, 1980-1982"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/proposedcapitaliOObost 



Boston Water and 
Sewer Commission 



10 Post Office Square 
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
617-426-6046 




6/CJO&/6 



LZ 




\Ry 



Cu *«A t 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO BE HELD BY THE 
BOSTON WATER AND SEWER COMMISSION CONCERNING 
ITS PROPOSED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM. 



Pursuant to Chapter 436 of the Acts of 1977 of the 
Massachusetts General Court, the Boston Water and Sewer 
Commission will hold a public hearing commencing at 2:00 P.M. 
on Thursday, November 29, 197 9 at the Dorothy Quincy Suite 
of the John Hancock Building, 18 Berkeley Street, Boston , 
Massachusetts for the purpose of giving interested persons 
an opportunity to present data, views or argument relative 
to the proposed capital improvement program. 

Copies of the foregoing capital improvement program 
will be available for inspection on or after November 8, 1979 
at the office of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission, 8th Floor, 
10 Post Office Square, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Any individual, partnership, trust, corporation, associ- 
ation, organized group or governmental entity which may be 
affected by the foregoing capital improvement program may 
appear before the Commission, at such hearing, for the purpose 
of presenting data, views or argument relevant thereto. Data, 
views or argument may be presented orally at the hearing, or 
in the form of a memorandum which shall be filed with the 
Secretary of the Commission on or before November 21, 1979 at 
the office of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission, 8th Floor, 
10 Post Office Square, Boston, Massachusetts. 

The hearing and all continuances thereof shall be 
conducted in accordance with the Boston Water and Sewer 
Commission Rules of Procedure which may be examined at the 
Commission's office. 



John S. Howe, Chairman 




Boston Water and 
Sewer Commission 






P ^fi£JC 



U BRAR\ 



Proposed 
Capital Improvement Program 
1980 - 1982 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



Chapter I - Introduction 1 

Chapter II - Water Distribution System 3 

1. History and Physical Condition 5 

2. Program Objectives 9 

3. Residential Metering Program 11 

4. Industrial/Large User Metering Program 15 

5. Public Metering Program 22 

6. Re laying/Re lining Program 26 

7. Other Water Programs 35 

8. New M.D.C. Metered Connection 36 

9. Pressure and Flow Monitoring Program 37 
Summary of Water Capital Program Costs 38 

Chapter III - Wastewater Collection System 39 

1. History and Physical Condition 41 

2. Program Objectives 42 

3. E.P.A. Mandated Programs 44 

4. Other E.P.A. Funded Programs 60 

5. System Improvements 63 
Summary of Wastewater Collection System Costs 68 

Chapter IV - Summary of Costs, Financing Options, and 

Impact on Rates 69 



CHAPTER I 

Introduction 

PROPOSED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

1980 - 1982 



INTRODUCTION 

This document outlines Staff recommendations for a three-year 
Capital Improvement Program for the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. 
The Commission operates as a retailer of water and sewer services for 
nearly 90,000 customers in the City of Boston. Its largest capital 
asset is a distribution and recovery system to provide these services. 

In developing its proposed three-year Capital Improvement Program, 
the Commission Staff has dealt with improvements and changes, mainly to 
the underground distribution and recovery systems. Due to maintenance 
considerations, many of the proposed programs represent system renewal 
and rehabilitation efforts. 

The Commission Staff has designed its proposed Capital Improvement 
Program as a dynamic program. Thus more detail is supplied for pro- 
grams which take place in 1980 rather than for those occurring in 1981 
or 1982. The Staff feels that by using its dynamic approach to capi- 
tal budgeting, it will be able to constantly review and update its 
Capital Improvement Program based on engineering needs and financial 
resources available to the Commission. 

The Staff envisions monitoring the effectiveness of these pro- 
grams, using this information in conjunction with information from 
additional engineering investigations, to review the allocations of 
funds for capital improvements in subsequent years. 

This document contains a chapter outlining the proposed Capital 
Improvement Program for the Water Distribution System, a chapter out- 
lining the proposed Capital Improvement Program for the Wastewater 
Collection System, and a final chapter summarizing the proposed pro- 
grams, and discussion of financing for these projects and their impact 
on water and sewer rates. 



CHAPTER II 

Proposed Capital Improvement Program 

for the 

Water Distribution System 

1980-1982 



4 

This chapter provides an analysis of the various projects recom- 
mended by Staff for a proposed three-year (1980-1982) Capital Improve- 
ment Program for the Water Distribution System. A brief history and 
description of the Boston water system is presented along with a brief 
assessment of the current system, and a statement of the objectives of 
the Capital Improvement Program. An item by item description of the 
components of the Capital Improvement Program for the Water Distribu- 
tion System is presented; included with each program description is a 
summary of costs, and information of benefits to be realized. 



5 

II. l.a History of Boston Water Distribution System 

The Boston water system is composed of four major distribution 
networks: the Southern Low Service, the Northern Low Service, the 
Southern High Service, and the Southern Extra High Service. The aerial 
extent of the service levels, in general, is determined by ground ele- 
vation. Approximately 90 percent of the water consumed in Boston is 
distributed through the Southern Low and Southern High Services. 

The Commission purchases its water supply from the Metropolitan 
District Commission through twenty-eight metered connections located at 
various delivery points throughout the system. The distribution net- 
work consists of approximately 1,080 miles of pipe, 87,100 water 
accounts, and 13,300 fire hydrants. The system supplies water through 
mains ranging in size from four to forty-eight inches in diameter. 

Historically, the first major underground Boston public water sup- 
ply was put in service in 1848. Rapid expansion of the system occurred 
for approximately the next 60 years and by 1910 the Boston distribution 
system was considered second to none. By 1924 it was recognized that 
additional supplies of water were needed, and a comprehensive organ- 
ization for the planning and delivery of water in the Boston Metro- 
politan area was necessary. A solution to these problems culminated in 
the creation of a forerunner to the Metropolitan District Commission in 
1926. This organization was charged with delivery of water and re- 
covery of effluents in the Boston Metropolitan Area. Thus by 1927 the 
Boston Water and Sewer Works had evolved into a retail distribution and 
recovery operation. Currently, although under a different form of man- 
agement, the general operations remain the same, a retail water dis- 
tribution and sewerage recovery operation. 



II. l.b Current State of Distribution System 

Most of the distribution network was installed many years ago, and 
there has been some deterioration in the ability of the system to 
convey water. Due to the high resistivity of the Boston soil, the 
external corrosion of the distribution system is currently not 
considered a major problem. However, lack of capacity due to age of 
pipe and caustic water, leakage due to age of pipes, and revenue loss 
due to age of meters are considered major problems of the water 
distribution system. It is estimated that over 20 percent of the 
current distribution network was built prior to 1900. Moreover, due to 
an inadequate meter replacement program, many of the system meters are 
old and subject to underregistration. 

In both the 1979 and 1980 BWSC Capital Improvement Programs, the 
Commission has instituted a comprehensive metering program and water- 
main relay ing/rel in ing program in order to deal with these problems. 
II. l.c System Losses 

Table II - 1 gives an indication of the magnitude of unaccounted- 
for water for the last five years in the City of Boston distribution 
system, i.e. the difference between water purchased from the MDC and 
water metered to BWSC customers. 

TABLE II-l 



Calendar Year 


MDC Purchases 


Metered Water* 


Metered Water 




(MGD) 


(MGD) 


as 

MDC 


a % of * 
Purchases 


1974 


145.0 


72.7 




50.1 


1975 


147.1 


75.3 




51.2 


1976 


150.8 


75.0 




49.7 


1977 


146.1 


76.1 




52.1 


1978 


143.0 


76.0 




53.1 



* (Does not include City of Boston usage, currently estimated at 
4.36 MGD or 3% of 1978 MDC Water Purchases) 



A breakdown of system losses is useful in formulating a program 
for increasing the ratio of metered water to MDC purchases. One 
approximization is available and shown in Table II-2. 

TABLE II-2 
System Losses (MGD) 





Coopers & Lybrand(l) 


Undermetering 


31.1 


Leaks and Breaks 


25.0 


Blowoffs, Flushings, etc. 


1.2 


Firefighting 


1.9 


Unmetered Public Usage 


4.2 


Other 


1.2 



These figures do not include water system losses (i.e. water purchased 
from the M.D.C. but not billed to Commission customers) of approxi- 
mately 10% to 15%. These losses are inherent in any system of this 
nature and age and are impracticable or impossible to eliminate. (2) 



(1) BWSC 1978 Rate Hearing 

(2) Water and Sewer Facility and Financial Analysis , Camp, Dresser & 
McKee, Inc., 1979. 



I 



Factors to be considered in revenue losses from undermetering 
are: 

- unmetered consumers tend to use more water. 

- per capita consumption historically has been on the rise. 

- estimating usage from past records assumes that water needs of 
these consumers at these locations do not change, (i.e., use of 

automatic dishwashers, washing machines, etc.) 

Unmetered public usage was estimated to be 4.2 MGD by Coopers 
& Lybrand. Other system losses include illegal use of hydrants, which 
by its nature is difficult to estimate as well as control. The 
categories of system losses which are for the most part uncontrollable 
by the BWSC are blowoffs and flushings, and firefighting. 



9 

II. 2 Objectives of the Water Capital Improvement Program 

The primary objectives of outlaying capital expenditures dis- 
bursements for the Water Capital Improvement Program are: 
1) the ensurance of adequate, high quality water at proper pressures 
for BWSC customers and 2) the reduction of long-term operation and 
maintenance costs. 

For the present time the formulation of the BWSC CIP is based on 
the experience gained in the first two years of operation, and is 
somewhat constrained by limited historical information. However, based 
on previous experience of similar distribution networks, and general 
engineering criteria, Staff feels that its program selections are 
economically feasible to meet the set objectives. The BWSC Staff has 
formulated a three-year capital improvement program in order to reduce 
long-term & M costs. The proposed water distribution system CIP 
includes two major areas of activity: 



1) a comprehensive metering program, 

2) a relay ing/rel in ing program. 



10 



The programs for the water distribution system will be presented 
and explained in seven separate program components: 

- residential metering 

- industrial metering 

- public metering 

- main relay ing/relining 

- programs coordinated with other agencies. 

- new MDC meter connection 

- flow and pressure monitoring 

Each program component will be subdivided further into three 
sections: 

- program description 

- program costs 

- program benefits 



11 

II. 3a. Residential Metering; Program Description 

The number of residential customers served through the BWSC 
distribution system numbers approximately 75,000. The residential 
metering program supplied principally through 5/8" meters is intended 
to solve the following problems: 

- broken or non- registering meters 

- meter under registration 

- meter inaccessability 

To solve the meter inaccessability problem, the BWSC is installing 
meters with outside reading devices (ORDs) . In order to determine the 
number of 5/8" meters with ORDs to be installed on a yearly basis, the 
optimum life of these meters must be calculated. Cost considerations 
include the following: 

- meter costs 

- installation costs 

- operation & maintenance costs (0 & M includes annual 
revenue losses resulting from meter inaccuracies) 

- salvage value 

Revenue losses occasioned by meters depend on the chemical 
properties of water and quantity flow as well as the water/ sewer rate. 
Therefore, revenue losses will vary among regions which precludes the 
use of outside data. Because of the absense of meter-testing data on 
the ORD meters presently being installed by the BWSC, it will be some 
time before meter accuracy losses are determined. 

Staff recommends that the ten-year meter replacement cycle 
initiated in 1979 be continued in the residential metering program. 
This will involve the installation of 7,500 meters annually. 



12 



However, because of the large number of broken meters, unmetered 
residences, or under- registering meters, Staff proposes the installa- 
tion of 10,000 meters with ORDS for 1980 and 1981. Therefore, the 
7,500 meter annual replacement cycle will begin in 1982. 



13 



II. 3b. Residential Metering; Program Costs 



1980 
1981 
1982 



Number of 


Meter 


Installation 


Average 


Total 


Meters 


Costs 
$33.50 


Costs 


Costs 
$68.00 


Costs 


10,000 


$34.50 


$680,000 


10,000 


36.20 


37.30 


73.50 


735,000 


7,500 


38.40 


39.50 


77.90 


584,250 


;ar CIP 








$1,999,250 



Note: 

- Installation and meter costs are based on the 1979 bid price. 

- An inflation factor of 8% is assumed for 1980 and 1981, 6% for 
1982. 



14 
II. 3c. Residential Metering: Program Benefits 

As discussed earlier, the installation of residential 5/8" meters 
should be based on a replacement policy with consideration of annual 
discounted costs of investment and operation and maintenance which 
includes revenue losses and testing and repair costs. The expected 
benefit of a residential metering program is, therefore, the mini- 
mization of total long-term costs. 

There is the additional benifit of the residential metering pro- 
gram of ensuring consumer confidence that water and sewer bills are 
correct. Estimated bills from improperly functioning or inaccessible 
meters cause customer service related problems. The residential 
metering program of which the installation of ORDs is a highlight is 
perceived to substantially reduce this problem. 



15 
II. 4a. Industrial/Large User Metering: Program Description 

As stated in the 1979 BWSC CIP report losses resulting from 
industrial meter inaccuracies can range from 10 to 50 percent(l). 
Therefore, with a yearly testing program, it is the intent of the BWSC 
to check these meters at frequent intervals. The BWSC is completing 
the first year of a field maintenance and testing program of the 100 
largest meters. Initially most of the program work involves certain 
meter installation changes such as: the installation of turbine meters 
with removable parts; the installation of meter by-passes; and the 
installation of pitometer cocks; After these meter changes are made, 
the yearly field testing of industrial meters can proceed on a routine 
basis. 

The industrial/large user metering program will be examined in 
terms of average costs and revenues over a ten year period, the 
expected life of the initial installations. Determination of how many 
meters to include in the analysis will include net present value 
revenue analysis of the first 250 meters. 



(1) "Field Maintenance of Industrial Meters," Charles Alden. 
Journal of AWWA, March 1976. 




II. 4 .b Industrial/Large User Metering; Program Costs 

Below is a summary of costs to be considered in computing the 
present value of net revenue of the first 250 meters. 



1980 



Installation of Metering Equipment 
Meter Testing Costs 
Meter Maintenance Costs 



100 meters @ $4,000 = $400,000 

200 meters @ $ 150 = 30,000 

40 meters @ $ 400 = 16,000 



$446,000 



1981 



Installation of Metering Equipment 
Meter Testing Costs 
Meter Maintenance Costs 



50 meters @ $4,320 = $216,000 

250 meters @ $ 162 = 40,500 

50 meters @ $ 432 = 21,600 
$278,100 



Meter Testing costs 
Meter Maintenance Costs 



1982 



250 meters @ $ 172 = $ 43,000 

50 meters @ $ 458 = 22,900 
$ 65,900 



Notes: 

- Installation of metering equipment costs supplied by C. E. 
Maguire, Inc. in 1979 BWSC CIP report. 

- Initial meter testing costs supplied by Pitometer Associates. 

- Meter maintenance costs are based on initial repair costs 
experienced in 1979. 

- The number of meters in need of repair per year is unknown at 
this time. The number used is based on experience of the City of 
Hagerstown, MD where 20% of its largest user meters require repair.* 

- After 1981 routine meter testing and maintenance costs will be 
financed through the operating budget. 

* Law, Norman D. "Revenue Benefits Through Large - Meter Maintenance" 
Journal of American Water Works Association, August 1978. 



17 

II. 4 .c Industrial/Large user Metering: Program Benefits 

This section includes a calculation of expected net benefits from 

implementation of the Large User Program. 

Below is a presentation of the 1978 water usage and expected 1979 

revenue by user class of the largest 250 meters along with the revenue 

gain of the program(l) using a conservative estimate of a 5 percent 

accuracy increase . ( 2 ) 



User 1978 Gallonage Percent 1979 Expected 5% Expected 

Class (billions) Of Total Revenue (millions) Gain In 

Water Billed Revenue 

(000' s) 

1 - 100 7.8 26 $11,620 $ 58T H<5 £=> 

100 - 150 1.1 4 $ 5.215 $ 263- 
150 - 200 .8 3 $ 3.725 
200 - 250 .1 .3 $ .445 



TOTAL 9.8 33.3 $21,005 



The calculation of present discounted benefits is helpful in 
determining the usefulness of the program. The analysis will involve 
separately including in the program the first 100 largest meters, the 
second 100 largest meters and the next 50 largest users, respectively. 

For simplicity, constant water and sewer rates will be assumed;* 
meter testing and repair costs will escalate by an 8 percent inflation 
adjustmentfor 1980 and 1981; 6% for subsequent years. A 10 percent 
discount rate will be used to express net revenue in present day terms. 
A one year lag in revenue gain will be assumed after meters are tested 
and repaired. 



(1) based on present rates of $1.01/1000 gallons water and $0.49/1000 
gallons sewer. 

(2) in 1979, 32 meters were tested and 13 were found to be 
underregistering by an average of 20%. 




18 

NET PRESENT VALUE ANALYSIS (FIRST 100 METERS) 

Revenue Cost Net Present Value 



1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

1987 

1988 

1989 

TOTAL NET PRESENT 

VALUE (FIRST 100 METERS) 





H 

-58ireO0 


$ 391,400 
23,000 


$- 391,400 
507,270 


581,000 


24,840 


459,635 


581,000 


26,330 


417,045 


581,000 


- 27,910 


378,830 


581,000 


29,585 


342,495 


581,000 


31,360 


310,530 


581,000 


33,240 


280,900 


581,000 


35,235 


255,030 


581,000 


37,350 


230,360 


581,000 


39,590 


209,040 


) 


$2,999,735 






' 5 U^ 



Revenue 



NET PRESENT VALUE ANALYSIS 
(Second 100 Meters) 

Cost 



1980 


$ 


423,000 


1981 


447,000 H^-,^ 00 


59,700 


1982 


447,000 


63,285 


1983 


447,000 


67,080 


1984 


447,000 
447,000 


71,105 


1985 


75,370 


1986 


447,000 


79,895 


1987 


447,qoo 


84,690 


1988 


447,000 


89,770 


1989 


447, OOp 


95,155 


1990 


447,000 


100,865 



TOTAL NET PRESENT 

VALUE (Second 100 Meters) 



19 

Net Present Value 
$ - 423,000 
352,090 
317,120 
285,655 
257,465 
230,830 
207,405 
185,800 
166,930 
149,085 
133,645 



$ 3^863^025 



€> 



V. k> '■ I ► -- -' 



NET PRESENT VALUE ANALYSIS 
(additional 50 meters) 



20 



Revenue 



1981 





1982 


22,000 


1983 


\ / 

22,000 


1984 


22,000 


1985 


22,000 


1986 


22,000 


1987 


22,000 


1988 


22,000 


1989 


22,000 


1990 


22,000 


1991 


22,000 



TOTAL NET PRESENT 

VALUE (additional 50 meters) 



Cost 
$ 228,960 
13,180 
13,170 
14,810 
15,700 
16,640 
17,640 
18,695 
19,820 
21,005 
22,265 



Net Present Value 
$ - 228,960 
8,020 
6,635 
5,405 
4,315 
3,330 
2,465 
1,695 
1,020 

420 

100 



195,755 



21 



Analysis of the data indicates that inclusion of the first 200 meters 
in the large user metering program is cost effective yielding the BtfSC a 
net present value revenue gain of $4_,.862 r 760 from 1979 to 1990; incorp- 
orating the additional 50 meters results in a present value loss of 
$±^&r^&§« Therefore, Staff recommends funds be allocated for only the 
first two hundred meters. The program costs will total $446,000 in 1980, 
$My54Q in 1981, and $S9t615 in 1982. Only program costs allocated in 1980 
will be included in the capital budget; meter testing and maintenance costs 
in 1981 and 1982 will be financed through the operating budget. 

It should be emphasized that the analysis is based on current water/ 
sewer rates, interest rates, inflation factors, and cost information. As a 
result, budget considerations may change as these variables are subject to 
variations. 



22 
II. 5a. Public Metering; Program Description 

Prior to the formation of the BWSC, the City of Boston was not 
charged for water and sewer use. Legislation which created the BWSC 
mandates that the City be included in the customer billing base. This 
mandate, therefore, requires the metering of City of Boston property. 

It is estimated that the City of Boston uses approximately 4.36 
million gallons daily, about 5 percent of total water billed in the 
BWSC system, representing approximately $2.4 million annually based on 
current rates. 

In order to accurately bill the City of Boston, the BWSC is under- 
taking a program of public building metering. 

BWSC staff is presently carrying out the program based on informa- 
tion from the City of Boston Assessor's Department. So far in 1979, 
65% of the schools, 71% of the police stations, and 76% of the fire 
stations have had meters either installed or examined. 

Facility lists from individual departments are also forthcoming. 
The School, Fire, Police, Parks and Playground, and Health and 
Hospitals Departments have already responded to BWSC requests and have 
provided or agreed to cooperate with BWSC Staff in the Public Metering 
Program. 

Information is also being requested from county, state, and fed- 
eral agencies on locations of respective facilities. 



23 



Getting accurate lists are only one facet of the problem. Some 
City property such as City Hospital contain many buildings with numbers 
and locations of service connections not on record. Certain structural 
connections remain unmetered and will be completed in 1980. 

With the information obtained thus far, BWSC Staff estimates that 
300 service connections remain unmetered and will be completed in 1980. 



24 
II. 5b. Public Building Metering Program: Program Costs 

Due to the diverse sizes and problems of the facilities to be 
metered, the cost of this program is very difficult to calculate. The 
cost of meter installation varies from $4000 per installation (1) for a 
large user to $68.00 per installation (2) for a small user. Based on 
the 1978 Public Metering Program, it is estimated that the average cost 
per installation of a public meter is approximately $220. This figure 
includes materials, supplies, and meter costs. 

Installation of 300 meters @ $220 = $66,000 
Necessary distribution system 

changes (3) $10,000 

TOTAL $76,000 



(1) C. E. Maguire cost estimate of installation for large user 
including engineering, design and supervision costs. 

(2) Staff cost estimate of installation for 5/8" meter: 

Purchase $33.50 

Installation $34.50 

TOTAL $68.00 

(3) As some public buildings currently have many water inlets, it will 
be necessary to redesign parts of the distribution system to 
reduce the number of water inlets entering certain buildings. 



25 



II. 5.c Public Metering: Program Benefits 

At the present time, the City is being billed on the basis of an 
estimated consumption of 4.36 million gallons/day. Staff feels that 
the City of Boston should be billed on a metered basis, and this pro- 
gram is designed to accomplish this goal. The detailed breakdown of 
consumption should permit the City to engage in programs of water con- 
servation where it is appropriate. 



26 

II. 6. a Relaying/Relining: Program Description & Benefits 

The primary purpose of the relaying and relining program is to 
ensure a continued adequate supply of high quality water, at adequate 
pressure, for customer use and for fire protection. Specifically, the 
program is expected to: 

- Reduce the occurence of main breaks and the resulting 
inconvenience and cost. Although no precise data for the 
Commission's system is available, in New York City, where 
such pipes constitute 14 percent of the system, approxi- 
mately 31 percent of the water main breaks occur in pipes 
over 100 years old. 

- Decrease current and potential water leakage, thereby 
reducing the amount of water which must be purchased fran 
the MDC to meet the needs of the Commission's customers. 
The exact effect on water purchases could not be esti- 
mated . 

- Increase the carrying capacity of rehabilitated mains, 
thereby increasing potential flow rates and reducing 
problems of localized low pressures. 

- Reduce "red water" conditions associated with mains 
suffering from encrustation. 

- Reduce long-run maintenance costs. 

Much of the distribution system piping transferred to the 
Commission from the City is old, unlined cast-iron piping: an 
estimated 20 percent (212 miles) of the distribution system was 
built prior to 1900. Because of the problems associated with this 
piping the Commission has established a goal for the year 2000 of 
having no water mains which have been left unrehabilitated (not 
relined of replaced) for over 100 years. 



27 



lb meet this goal, the Commission has projected that same 53,500 
feet of pipe (approximately one percent of the total system) must be 
relayed or relined (cleaned and cement lined) each year. Id date for 
1979, the Commission currently has approved plans for some 41,000 
linear feet of relaying relining work. 

In order to conduct this program efficiently, the Commission has 
developed a list of system priorities based on: maintenance records, 
age records, loss-of-head tests, fire flow tests, incidents of breaks 
and leaks, and the construction work of other agencies. Commission 
policy is, to the extent possible, to tie the relaying/relining of 
water mains to other work requiring street construction: urban 
development, housing development, subway, and roadway construction. 
Coordination of projects with other agencies helps to minimize costs 
and reduce traffic flow disruption and general public nuisance. An 
initial priority list for 1980 has been developed and will be revised 
as new problems occur or additional construction information from other 
agencies become available. 



28 



II. 6b Relaying/Relining; Program Costs 

COST PER LINEAR FOOT 



1980 1981 1982 

Relaying 

(including paving charge) $100 $110 $120 



Relaying 

(excluding paving charge) $ 70 $ 77 $ 85 



Cleaning and 

Cement Reling $ 50 $ 55 $ 60 



PROPOSED LINEAR FEET OF PIPE 



Relaying 51,191 51,311 51,310 

Cleaning & Cement 

Relining 14 ,870 17,655 17,655 

66,061 68,966 68,965 



TOTAL ESTIMATED COST OF CONSTRUCTION & PAVING 



Relaying $3,737,400 $4,617,965 $5,131,000 

Cleaning & Cement 

Lining $ 743,500 $ 971,025 $1,059,300 

$4,480,900 $5,588,990 $6,190,300 



29 



Engineering, Design, and Research 

(Relaying @ 5.5%, relining @ 2.75% 

of Construction and Paving Gosts) 



1980 



1981 



1982 



Relaying 

Cleaning and 
Cement Lining 



$205,557 $253,988 



20,446 



26,703 



$226,003 $280,691 



$282,205 

29,131 
$311,336 



TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS 



1980 1981 



1982 



Relaying 

Cleaning and 
Cement Lining 



$3,942,957 $4,871,953 $5,413,205 



763,946 



997,728 1,088,431 



$4,706,903 $5,869,681 $6,501,636 



II. 6c. Relaying/Relining: Program Detail 



1980 



(i) CLEANING AND CEMENT RELINING 



30 



Beachview Rd. 
Crestway St. 
Drumlin Rd. 
Faywood Ave. 
Montmorenci Ave. 
Orient Ave. 
SeaView Ave. 
Selma St. 
Vallar Rd. 
Waldemar Ave. 



East Boston Drumlin to Orient Ave. 

East Boston Faywood to Waldemar Ave. 

East Boston Orient Ave. to Beachview Rd 

East Boston Montmorenci Ave. to Orient Ave. 

East Boston Faywood Ave. to Drumlin Rd. 

East Boston Faywood Ave. to Walley St. 

East Boston Drumlin Rd. to Orient Ave 

East Boston Galdstone St. to Orient Ave. 

East Boston Faywood Ave. to END 

East Boston Wally St. to END 

TOTAL 



1350 


ft 


500 


ft 


330 


ft 


, 3600 


ft 


980 


ft 


3000 


ft 


730 


ft 


350 


ft 


1130 


ft 


2900 


ft 


14870 


ft 



II 6c. Relay ing/Relining Program; Program Detail 



1980 



(ii) RELAYING 



31 



Adams St. 
Albion Pi. 
Allen St. 
Armory St. 
Baldwin Pi. 
Baldwin St. 
Bayswater St. 
Beech Glen St. 
Beechland St. 
Buswell St. 
Canal St. 
Cedar St. 
Cedar Lane Way 
Chestnut St. 
Common St. 
Commonwealth Ave. 
Concord St. 
Cooper St. 



Dorchester Dorchester Ave. to Richmond St. 2150 ft 

Charlestown Main St. to END 280 ft 

Hyde Park Hyde Park Ave. to Winter St. 200 ft 

Charlestown Main St. to END 310 ft 

Brighton Washington St. to END 226 ft 

Charlestown Main St. to Bunker Hill St. 640 ft 

East Boston Barnes St. to Shawsheen St. 963 ft 

Roxbury Fort Ave. to Highland St. 1142 ft 

West Roxbur Washington St. to Beram St. 100 ft 

Roxbury Park Drive to St. Mary's St. 940 ft 

City Proper Causeway St. to Market St. 390 ft 

Roxbury Washington St. to Centre St. 2270 ft 

City Proper Chestnut St. to Pinkney St. 660 ft 

Charlestown Monument Sq. to Lowney Way 415 ft 

Charlestown Winthrop St. to Adams St. 180 ft 

Brighton Brighton Ave. to Boulevard Terr. 1035 ft 

Charlestown Monument Sq. to Bunker Hill St. 430 ft 

City Proper N. Washington St. to Salem St. 670 ft 



Relaying (Cont.) 



32 



Dracut St. 
Dudley St. 
Ellwood St. 
Esmond St. 
Euclid St. 
Fairfax St. 
Fen wood Rd. 
Fiske Terr. 
Fort Ave. 
Fort Ave. Terr. 
Gates St. 
Gold St. 
Gust in St. 
Harrison Ave. 
Hemman St. 
Homestead St. 
Hutchings St. 
Intervale St. 
Kelley Ct. 
Knowlton St. 



Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Brighton 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

South Boston 

South Boston 

South Boston 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Brighton 

South Boston 



Dorchester Ave. to Bruce St. 1220 ft 

Warren St. to Mt. Pleasant St. 2650 ft 

Putnam St. to END 270 ft 

Blue Hill Ave. to Harvard St. 1370 ft 

Withington St. to Washington St. 460 ft 

Beaumont St. to Westmoreland Ct. 240 ft 

Huntington Ave. to Brookline Ave. 1500 ft 

Brainerd Rd. to Brookline Line 180 ft 

Highland St. to Centre St. 1100 ft 

Fort Ave. to Glenn St. 240 ft 

East 8th St. to Dorchester St. 1060 ft 

Dorchester St. to F. St. 530 ft 

Old Colony Ave. to END 150 ft 

Eustis St. to Crosstown St. 600 ft 

Highfield St. to Kittredge 650 ft 

Humbolt Ave. to Walnut Ave. 1290 ft 

Humbolt Ave. to Harold St. 290 ft 

Warren Ave. to Blue Hill Ave. 650 ft 

Western Ave., Southerly 280 ft 

Telegraph St. to East 8th St. 350 ft 



RELAYING (Cont.) 



33 



Lawrence St. 
LaFayette St. 
Lynn St. 
Lyon St. 
Marcella St. 
Monunent Ct. 
Mt. Vernon Ave. 
Mt. Vernon St. 
New Dudley St. 
Northampton St. 
North Margin St. 
Oak St. 

Old Harbor St. 
Park St. 
Parker St. 
Pilgrim Rd. 
Prescott St. 
Putnam St. 
Reedsdale St. 



Charlestown 

City Proper 

City Proper 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

City Proper 

Charlestown 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Brighton 



Austin to Union 320 ft 

Endicott St. to Prince St. 150 ft 

Cooper to Thatcher 320 ft 

Dorchester Ave. toAdams St. 700 ft 

Washington St. to Centre St. 2350 ft 

Winthrop St. to Dead End 120 ft 

Chestnut St. to Mt. Vernon St., 150 ft 

Adams St. to END 660 ft 

Washington St. to Roxbury St. 1600 ft 

Tremont to Washington 1420 ft 

Wiget to Thatcher 800 ft 

Main St. to Russell St. 450 ft 

Columbia Rd. to Dorchester St. 520 ft 

Henley St. to City Square 380 ft 

Tremont St. to Huntington Ave. 3300 ft 

Longwood Ave. to Francis St. 280 ft 

Devens St. to Washington St. 400 ft 

Common St. to Henley St. 270 ft 

Brighton Ave. to Linden St. 490 ft 



Relaying (Cont.) 



34 



Rockledge St. 
St. Botolph St. 
St. Andrew Rd. 
Seminary St. 
State St. 
Stillman St. 
Thatcher St. 
Ttorrey St. 
Warren St. 
Wales St. 
Waverley St. 
Weldon St. 
West 6th St. 
White St. 
Wiget St. 
Winslow St. 



Roxbury Lambert Ave. to Thornton St. 

Roxbury Harcourt St. to Garrison St. 

East Boston Bayswater St. to Shawsheen St. 

Charlestown Lawrence St. to Austing St. 

City Proper Commercial St. to Atlantic Ave. 

City Proper North Washington to Salem 

City Proper N. Washington St. to Prince 

Dorchester Washington St. to Wentworth St. 

Charlestown Thompson Sq. to Henley St. 

Dorchester Harvary St. to Talbot Ave. 

Roxbury Warren Ave. to Blue Hill Ave. 

Roxbury Holborn St. to Quincy St. 

South Boston Dorchester Ave. to Dorchester St. 

East Boston Meridian St. to Trentor St. 

City Proper N. Margin St. to Salem St. 

Roxbury Dudley St. to Ziegler St. 



430 


ft 


300 


ft 


780 


ft 


160 


ft 


560 


ft 


500 


ft 


620 


ft 


1060 


ft 


1160 


ft 


300 


ft 


750 


ft 


370 


ft 


730 


ft 


210 


ft 


280 


ft 


220 


ft 


51191 


ft 



35 



II 7a. Other Programs; Program Description 

Frequently, major construction activities undertaken by other 
agencies provide the Commission with an opportunity to undertake minor 
capital projects at significantly reduced costs. These economies arise 
through the reduction of overhead items such as paving costs, design 
costs and inspection costs. 

II 7b. Other Programs: Program Costs 

1980 - $500,000. 

1981 - $540,000 

1982 - $583,200 

II 7c. Other Programs: Program Benefits 

As previously mentioned, Staff feels that with these funds the 
BWSC will be able to take advantage of other agencies' grants and 
projects to significantly reduce costs. 



36 



II 8a. New M.D.C. Metered Connection: Program Description 

The Engineering Department proposes the construction of a new MDC 
meter connection at the intersection of Washington St. and Old Morton 
St. in Dorchester. The installation of this 30-inch meter will in- 
crease the flexibility of the southern high service system by 
decreasing the dependency of the existing system on the MDC's twin 
36- inch distribution lines at Morton St. 



II 8b. New M.D.C. Metered Connection: Program Costs 

1980 - $63,300 

1981 - 

1982 - 

Note: Includes Engineering, Design, and Supervision Costs of 5.5% 
or $3,300. 



II 8c. New M.D.C. Metered Connection: Program Benefits 

As noted above, the connection will increase the flexibility of 
the Southern High Service and reduce our dependency on the existing MDC 
twin distribution lines at Morton Street. 



37 



II 9a. Pressure and Flow Monitoring; Program Description 

The MDC will be undertaking a major rehabilitation of their 
metering system including the remote monitoring through telemetry of 
the 28 meters supplying water to the City of Boston. The Engineering 
Department reconmends that the Commission set aside funds to allow the 
interconnector with the MDC's central monitoring board to monitor the 
pressures and flows through the Boston Meters. 

II 9b. Pressure and Flow Monitoring: Program Costs 

1980 - $40,000 

1981 - 

1982 - 

II 9c. Pressure and Flow Monitoring: Program Benefits 

The establishment of a monitoring system will enable the BWSC to 
collect pressure and flow data and to immediately evaluate same during 
emergency conditions, such as main breaks or major fires. 



38 

PROPOSED WATER CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

1980 1981 1982 3 Year Total 



METERING 



Residential 


$ 680,000 


$ 


735,000 


$ 584,250 


$ 1,999,250 


Industrial 


446,000 




- 


- 


446,000 


Public 


76,000 
$1,202,000 




- 


— 


76,000 


Sub Total 


$ 


735,000 


$ 584,250 


$ 2,521,250 


DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM 












Relaying 


$3,737,400 


$4 


,617,965 


$5,131,000 


$13,486,365 


Relining 


743,500 




971,025 


1,059,300 


2,773,825 


Engineering, Design 
and Supervision 


226,003 




280,691 


311,336 


818,030 


Sub Total 


$4,706,903 


$5 


,869,681 


$6,501,636 


$17,078,220 


MISCELLANEOUS 












New MDC Meter 
Connection 


$ 63,300 




- 


- 


$ 63,300 


Pressure and 
Flow Monitoring 


40,000 




- 


- 


40,000 


Other Programs 


500,000 




540,000 


583,200 


1,623,200 


Sub Total 


$ 603,300 


$ 


540,000 


$ 583,200 


$1,726,500 


TOTAL 


$6,512,203 


$7 


,144,681 


$7,669,086 


$21,325,970 



NOTE: Engineering, Design and Supervision Costs have been removed from relaying 
and relining programs and exhibited as a separate line item. 

1980 
Relaying @5.5% 205,557 
Relining @2.75% 20,446 
$226,003 



1981 


1982 


253,988 


282,205 


26,703 


29,131 


$280,691 


$311,336 



39 



CHAPTER III 

Proposed Capital Improvement Program 

for the 

Wastewater Collection System 

1980-1982 



40 



The Capital Improvement Program for the Wastewater Collection 
System, presented here, defines the projects required to fulfill 
Staff's Proposed Capital Improvement Program for the system for 1980, 
1981, and 1982. 

A brief history and current assessment of the Eoston sewerage 
system is provided along with an outline of program objectives. 

Detailed program descriptions, costs, and benefits for each item 
in the proposed sewer capital improvement program follows along with a 
summary of costs for all programs. 



41 
III. l.a History of the Boston Sewerage System 

The City of Boston, from 1877 to 1884, constructed what is known 
as the Boston Main Drainage System, the principal component of the 
Boston Sewerage System. The system was designed to provide adequate 
capacity to carry the estimated dry weather flow of sanitary sewerage 
and a small allowance for storm water. Subsequent improvements to the 
system included the construction of several new intercepting sewers, 
sewer conduits and channels, and a pumping station at Union Park 
Street. 

Today, the Boston Main Drainage System (BUDS) services approxi- 
mately 10,800 acres (during dry weather) of the 20,500 acres repre- 
senting the total sewered area of Boston. The major components of the 
BMDS are the Boston Main Interceptor, five branch interceptors, and 
outlet works. Together, these components transmit Boston's sanitary 
sewage and industrial wastes to the Metropolitan District Commission 
(MDC) Sewerage System for treatment. The total length of sewers and 
storm drains in the City of Boston is approximately 1,400 miles, in- 
cluding some 24 miles of intercepting sewer and approximately 7 miles 
of trunk sanitary sewers directly connected to the MDC Sewerage 
System. 



III. l.b Current Status of Collection System; 

A substantial portion of the BMDS utilizes combined systems which 
carry both sanitary sewage and storm water through common sewers. The 
combined systems (which are prevalent in the older areas of the system 
network) are generally the sections requiring some degree of relief of 



42 
rehabilitation due to insufficient system capacity or the high degree 
of system deterioration. Staff feels that structural deterioration has 
accelerated due to the continued deferral of required system mainten- 
ance. 

III. 2 - Wastewater Collection System: Program Objectives 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, through its National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit program, exerts a major 
influence on the wastewater collection system CIP. Compliance with the 
EPA mandated planning efforts, improvements, and implementation 
schedules defined in the BWSC's Permit dated May 31, 1979 must be given 
top priority in planning system improvements. These EPA mandated pro- 
jects represent an ambitious program which must be partially funded in 
the three-year CIP. In addition to the EPA mandated improvements, the 
three-year wastewater system CIP includes funds for other EPA funded 
additional projects which the Commission considers necessary to improve 
or maintain the collection system. This system improvements program 
includes contingency replacements, separation of combined sewers, 
reconstruction and rehabilitation, and increased system capacity pro- 
jects. 

The primary objectives of the proposed capital improvements pro- 
gram for the wastewater collection system are: 



43 



- To provide for the continued integrity of the system 
against major collapses and minor breaks and malfunctions. 

- To minimize structural deterioration of the wastewater 
collection and drainage systems and provide relief capa- 
city, whereever necessary. 

- To coordinate required projects with anticipated local, 
state or federal capital improvement projects (e.g. EPA, 
Massachusetts Division of Water Pollution Control, Boston 
Redevelopment Authority, City of Boston Public Works 
Department, Massachusetts Department of Public Works, 
Office of State Planning and Development) . 

- To minimize long-term maintenance costs. 

- To ensure the provision of sufficient system capacity for 
at a minimum, the design year 2020. 



The programs and projects which comprise the wastewater system CIP 
are described below, along with their projected costs and benefits. 



44 



III. 3a. EPA Mandated Programs: Program Description 

BWSC's NPDES Permit mandates several specific capital improve- 
ment construction projects and establishes an implementation schedule 
for each project. In addition the Permit requires submittal of 
Construction Grants Program applications for completion of a facilities 
plan and infiltration/ inflow analysis for the entire service area. The 
permit also addresses the interaction of the BWSC and the MDC Combined 
Sewer Overflow Facilities Plan (MDC-CSO) study now being conducted. 

EPA mandated construction projects include: (1) the construction 
of the MT. Vernon Street Sewer; (2) the replacement of the existing 
Boston Main Interceptor and East Side Interceptor, South Branch; (3) 
the replacement of the East Side Interceptor, North Branch, and (4) the 
construction of the Union Park Street Pump Station Overflow Treat- 
ment Project. A description of each of these projects follows. 



- Mt. Vernon Street Sewer - This will be a major branch sewer 
which will receive sanitary and institutional flows now dis- 
charged to a portion of the existing Boston Main Interceptor in 
Mt. Vernon Street. The Mt. Vernon Street Sewer will extend 
westward from near Monticello^ Avenue in the Columbia Point 
Section about 3,140 feet to a connection with the MDC Columbus 
Park Connection at Kosciuszko Circle. The sewer will have 
diameters of 36 inches up-stream and 42 inches downstream. 



45 



Boston Main Interceptor and East Side Interceptor , South 
Branch, Replacement. These two replacement projects are 
planned for construction under one contract. The Boston 
Main Interceptor Replacement will replace a large portion 
of the original Boston Main Interceptor. The 96-inch 
diameter interceptor replacement will extend 6,600 feet 
southeastward from its junction with the proposed North and 
South Branches of the East Side Interceptor Replacement, 
east of the John F. Fitzgerald Expressway, to a junction 
with the MDC Columbus Park Connection at the Columbus Park 
Headworks . 

The South Branch Replacement will replace the portion of 
the existing East Side Interceptor in Albany Street. This 
72-inch and 84-inch replacement will extend northeastward 
from Massachusetts Avenue about 3,600 feet to a junction 
with the Boston Main Interceptor Replacement. The replace- 
ment project would include conduit connections from com- 
bined trunk sewers now connected to the existing East Side 
Interceptor, with regulators at each such connection and 
outlet conduits to the Roxbury Canal Conduit. 

East Side Interceptor Replacement, North Branch. This 
project will replace the northern portion of the existing 
East Side Interceptor. The northern portion of the 
replacement will be sized to accept stormwater overflows 
from the connected combined collection system. The capa- 
city of this portion, when detention and appurtenant 
facilities are constructed in the future, will be adequate 
for run-off from the 1 - year design storm. (This is in 
accordance with EPA Region I directive issued in a letter 
to City of Boston Commissioner of Public Works dated 
September 22, 1976). 

At the downstream end of this combined conduit, a regional 
combined sewer regulator will be contructed. This regu- 
lator will connect to the suggested future detention 
facilities mentioned above and will outlet to Fort Point 
Channel or to a possible South Bay-Fort Point Channel 
Drainage Conduit. (Neither the detention facilities nor 
the drainage conduit are included as part of this replace- 
ment project) . 



46 



From the upstream combined conduit, the North Branch 
Replacement dry-weather flow connecting conduit will extend 
to the junction of the proposed Boston Main Interceptor and 
East-Side Interceptor, South Branch Replacements. 

The overall North Branch Replacement will extend about 
8,500 feet from near High Street to the junction with the 
Boston Main Interceptor. Some 4,600 feet of this conduit 
will be located in the Fort Point Channel. The replacement 
project will include conduit connections from combined 
truck sewers now connected to the existing East Side 
Interceptor, with regulators at such connection and outlet 
connections to the Harbor, Fort Point Channel, or the 
Roxbury Canal Conduit. 

Union Park Street Pump Station Overflow Treatment Project. 
This project involves the construction of treatment 
facilities at the Union Park Street Pump Station put into 
operation in 1977. Included will be fine mesh screening, 
skimming, sampling, detention and chlorine contact tanks, 
and sludge collection and disposal to the East Side 
Interceptor Replacement, South Branch. The implementation 
of Phase II of the Union Park Street Project is of major 
importance because it will: provide the required chlorine 
contact time for bacteria destruction; separate and remove 
solids and organics from the effluent flowing to Boston 
Harbor; and handle inflows of floodwater from the sewers in 
the South End. 



In addition to funds required for capital construction projects, 
consideration has been given to the funds needed to meet EPA mandated 
planning efforts including: (1) a Facilities Plan and infiltration/ 
inflow study for the entire service area, and (2) projects resultig 
from the MDC Combined Sewer Overflow Facilities Plan currently in 
progress. These planning projects are discussed below. 



47 



■ Facilities Plan and Infiltration/Inflow (I/I) Study. 
The BWSC's NPDES permit requires the BWSC's to submit "a 
complete plan of study for facilities planning for the 
entire City (BWSC service area) needed to coordinate 
ongoing activities, update previous studies, and layout an 
orderly program for capital expenditures. The facilities 
plan shall include but not be limited to investigation of 
infiltration/inflow, as applicable for the entire 
sanitary/sanitary-stormwater drainage system." This 
service areawide Facilities Plan and I/I study is included 
in the wastewater system CIP in 1980 and 1981. 

In addition, federal and state agencies have required that 
an I/I analysis be conducted for the areas which are 
tributary to the interceptor replacements described above. 
Step II (design) grant applications are now being made for 
these facilities and the applicable I/I study is included 
in the application to be donewith the Step II design. This 
program will extend to early 1981. 

Coordination with the MDC Combined Sewer Overflow 
(MDC-CSO) Facilities Planning StudyT The Commission' s 
NPDES permit includes a suggestd schedule for review of and 
comment on the current MDC-CSO study. The impact of the 
MDC-CSO facilities plan on possible future capital 
improvements projects and the BWSC's CIP cannot be 
determined until completion of that report. The lead 
consultant for the CSO study Camp, Dresser and McKee 
reports that it is too early in the project to make any 
projections regarding the final recommended plan of study. 
The recommendations from the CSO study, when available, 
will be reviewed as part of the BWSC's facilities planning 
effort. The wastewater system CIP does not include funds 
for any projects which may be required as the result of the 
MDC-CSO study. 



48 
III. 3b. EPA Mandated Programs; Program Costs 

Tables I through VII summarizes the projected costs for the EPA 
mandated projects and when these costs are expected to be incurred to 
meet the implementation schedule contained in the EvJSC's NPDES permit. 
These tables show both the total project cost and the BWSC's estimated 
share of the total cost after taking into account expected federal and 
state funding. Projects included in the three-year CIP are: design 
(Step II) and construction (Step III) of the Mt. Vernon Street Sewer; 
design and initial phases of construction of the interceptor 
replacements; construction of the Union Park Street Pump Station 
Overflow Treatment Project, and the EPA mandated Facilities Planning 
and I/I analysis (Step I) efforts. Proposed funding of the interceptor 
replacements will extend past the end of the three-year CIP and will be 
completed in 1984 . No costs for projects which may result from the 
MDC-CSO study are included. 

The estimated project costs for the interceptor replacements and 
the Mt. Vernon Street Sewer have been developed from the costs report 
by CDM in its 1976 report to the City of Boston. The construction 
costs of each project, including an allowance for engineering, contin- 
gencies, and land taking, have been updated based on the projected 
Engineering News Record (ENR) Construction Cost Index at the antici- 
pated midpoint of the funding period. An additional allowance equal to 
approximately five percent of the cost of consulting services 
(engineering, design, and construction inspection has been included to 
cover any expenses the BWSC may incur in providing support services on 
these projects. (It is anticipated that these costs will be 
participated in by the state and federal government. 



49 

The EPA mandated programs should be eligible for the 75 percent 
federal funding provided under the EPA construction grants program. 
This funding, which is paid as costs are incurred, was, therefore 
deducted in determining the BWSC's share of the total cost of these 
projects. 

The total costs of the EPA mandated projects are also expected to 
be eligible for 15 percent state funding. The schedule for state 
reimbursement, however, does not coincide with when costs are incurred 
and cannot be deducted directly. The state will provide 25 percent of 
all eligible costs for Step II design of these projects making the 
combined federal and state fundings of Step II costs equal to 100 
percent. However, the total state funding effort will be adjusted 
during payments made for Step III so that the total amount of state 
funds for each project will not exceed 15 percent of the total project 
cost. Therefore, the BWSC's share of Step II costs is shown as zero 
and the 15 percent state reimbursement of Step III costs has been 
reduced by an amount equal to 10 percent of Step II costs. 

The state also provides 15 percent funding of Step I project 
costs. This reimbursement, however, is not paid until the facilities 
recommended in the Step I facilities plan are constructed. Therefore, 
no state funding is included in determining the BWSC's share of the 
facilities plan and I/I analysis. State reimbursement for 15 percent 
of these costs can, however, be expected when Step III is completed as 
noted above. 

In conclusion, the three-year CIP and five-year CIP for EPA dated 
projects include a schedule of the capital funds needed by the BWSC to 
support these projects. The estimated cost of each project is based on 
the best information available. As more definite capital cost 
estimates are made available and the impact of MDC-CSO study becomes 
known, the CIP will be reviewed to evaluate the effect on the projected 
water and sewer rates. 



50 









TABLE I 

EPA Mandated Programs 

Mt. Vernon Street Sewer* 






YEAR 


PERCENT 
OF TOTAL 
FUNDING 


Step II 
TOTAL 


(Design) Step III 

(Construction) 
BWSC TOTAL BWSC 


Step II, Step III 
Total 
TOTAL BWSC 


1980 


2% 


$ 67,000 


- $ 7,000 $ 1,000 


$ 74,000 


$1,000 


1981 


90% 


- 


- 4,389,000 449,000 


4,389,000 


449,000 


1982 


8% 


- 


398,000 41,000 


398,000 


41,000 


Total 

3 -Year 100% 
CIP 


$ 67,000 


- $4,794,000 $491,000 


$4,861,000 


$491,000 



Note: 

* BWSC share does not include any state reimbursement for Step I costs. 



51 



Table II 
EPA Mandated Programs 
Main Interceptor & East Side 
Interceptor, South Branch, Replacement* 



Step II (Design) Step III Step II, Step III 
( Construction) Total 

YEAR PERCENT TOTAL BWSC TOTAL BWSC TOTAL BWSC 
OF TOTAL 
FUNDING 

1980 1% $ 299,000 - - - $ 299,000 

1981 4% 149,000 - 825,000 84,000 974,000 84,000 

1982 35% - - 9,150,000 937,000 9,150,000 937,000 



Total 

3-Year 40% $ 448,000 - $9,975,000 $1,021,000 $10,423,000 $1,021,000 
CIP 



1983 36% - - 9,150,000 937,000 9,150,000 937,000 

1984 24% - - 6,100,000 624,000 6,100,000 624,000 



GRAND 

TOTAL 100% $ 448,000 - $25,225,000 $2,582,000 $25,673,000 $2,582,000 



Note: 

* BWSC share does not include any state reimbursemrnt for Step I costs. 



52 







Table III 

EPA Mandated Programs 

East Side Interceptor 

North Branch Replacement* 




YEAR 


PERCENT 
OF TOTAL 
FUNDING 


Step II 
TOTAL 


(Design) Step III 

(Construction) 
BWSC TOTAL BWSC 


Step II, Step III 

Total 

TOTAL BWSC 


1980 


1% 


$623,000 


- - 


$623,000 


1981 


4% 


312,000 


1,599,000 164,000 


1,911,000 164,000 


1982 


35% 


- 


- 19,067,000 1,952,000 


19,067,000 1,952,000 


Total 

3-Year 

CIP 


40% 


$935,000 


- $20,666,000 $2,116,000 


$21,601,000 $2,116,000 


1983 


36% 


- 


19,066,000 1,952,000 


19,066,000 1,952,000 


1984 


24% 


- 


- 12,711,000 1,301,000 


12,711,000 1,301,000 


GRAND 
TOTAL 


100% 


$935,000 


- $52,443,000 $5,369,000 


$53,378,000 $5,369,000 



Note: 



BWSC share does not include any state reimbursement for Step I funding, 



53 



Table IV 
I/I Analysis for EPA 
Mandated Projects* 



YEAR 


PERCENT 




OF TOTAL 




FUNDING 


1980 


92% 


1981 


8% 


1982 


- 


Total 




3 -Year 


100% 



Step II (Design) 
TOTAL BWSC 



$433,000 $108,000 
39,000 10,000 



$472,000 $118,000 



Note; 



Does not allow for 15 percent state funding in determining 

BWSC share. This funding is expected to be included in Step III 

funding at the time of construction. 



54 



Table V 

EPA Mandated Programs 

Facility, Plan & I/I Analysis 

for Entire Service Area* 



YEAR 


PERCENT 




OF TOTAL 




FUNDING 


1980 


35% 


1981 


65% 


1982 


- 


Total 




3-Year 


100% 


CIP 





Step I (Planning) 
TOTAL BWSC 



$1,838,000 $ 460,000 
3,413,000 853,000 



$ 5,251,000 $1,313,000 



Note: 



Does not allow for 15 percent state funding in determining 
H-JSC share. This funding is expected to be included in 
Step III funding at the time of construction. 



55 



Table VI 

EPA Mandated Programs 

Union Park Street Pump 

Station Overflow Treatment Project* 



Step III 
(Construction) 
YEAR PERCENT TOTAL BWSC 

OF TOTAL 

FUNDING 

1980 45% $3,066,000 $320,000 

1981 45% 3,066,000 320,000 

1982 10% 766,000 80,000 



Total 

3-Year 100% $6,898,000 $720,000 

CIP 



Note: 

* Total program costs shown exclude any costs which the BWSC 
may incur as result of the current MDC-CSO Study. 



56 



Table VII 









SUMMARY ALL EPA MANDATED PROGRAMS 

PROGRAMS 

(Values in $1000) 






YEAR 


Step I 

TOTAL BWSC 


Step : 
TOTAL 


[I 

BWSC 


Step III 

TOTAL BWSC 


Total 

TOTAL BWSC 


1980 


$4,271 


$ 568 


$ 989 







$ 3,073 


$ 321 


$ 6,333 


$ 889 


1981 


3,452 


863 


461 







9,879 


1,017 


13,792 


1,880 


1982 
















29,381 


3,010 


29,381 


3,010 


Total 

3-Year 

CIP 


$5,723 


$1,431 


$1,450 







$42,333 


$4,348 


$49,506 


$5,779 


1983 
















28,216 


2,889 


28,216 


2,889 


1984 
















18,811 


1,925 


18,811 


1,925 


Total 

5-Year 

CIP 


$5,723 


$1,431 


$1,450 







$89,360 


$9,162 


$96,533 


$10,593 



57 
III. 3c. EPA Mandated Programs: Program Benefits 

The major impact of the EPA mandated capital improvements pro- 
gram will occur within the Boston Main Drainage District. Two of the 
existing major interceptors, the East Side and Boston Main Inter- 
ceptors, are scheduled to be replaced by the end of fiscal year 1984. 
These replacements will provide new, structurally reliable conduits 
designed to handle estimated peak dry-weather flows through the year 
2020. These replacements will allow the existing interceptors, which 
are known to be in poor structural condition, to be either abandoned or 
rehabilitated for some other use, as discussed previously. New regu- 
lator and tidegate structures will also be constructed as part of 
these projects. The structures will replace the existing structures 
and should ensure more dependable service. 

An additional future benefit of the East Side Interceptor, North 
Branch Replacement will be the interception of a portion of the com- 
bined sewer overflow volumes now legally, by permit, discharged, 
untreated, to the Inner Harbor and Fort Point Channel. The intercepted 
combined wastewater overflow volumes up to the 1 year, 6 hour storm 
would be carried to the tentatively proposed treatment and disposal 
facilities by the large interceptor. (These treatment and disposal 
facilities are not included as part of the interceptor replacement 
project) . 

The construction of the Mt. Vernon Street Sewer will provide a 

separate sanitary sewer to intercept the existing local separate 

sanitary sewers from the existing Columbia Point Housing Development, 

the University of Massachusetts, the Kennedy Library, and the State 

Archives Building, as well as other future planned development along 

Mt. Vernon Street at Columbia Point. This will eliminate the unfavor- 
able condition of reverse flow at an adverse slope which now exists at 



58 
that location. Sanitary sewage will be conducted directly to the MDC 
Columbus Park Connection and could no longer accumulate and become septic 
in the lower section of the Boston Main Interceptor in Mt. Vernon Street 
below Kosciuszko Circle. Currently, under storm flow conditions, these 
accumulated sanitary wastes are pumped at the Calf Pasture Pumping Station 
ahead of mixed storm and wastewater discharges to the harbor at Moon 
Island. 

After the completion of a Mt. Vernon Street sewer, separate storm- 
water runoff would continue to be discharged to the lower portion of the 
BMI and require pumping at the Calf Pasture Pumping Station following 
rainstorms. Future planned construction by the BRA would relieve this 
condition by providing a separate storm drain in Mt. Vernon Street to 
complete the separation of sewerage works in the Columbia Point area. The 
continued use of the Calf Pasture Pumping Station would then be predicated 
only on the need for it as part of a stormwater overflow system. 

The construction of the Union Park Street Pump Station Overflow 
Treatment Project will complete another part of the BPA South End Project. 
The treatment facility to be constructed will provide detention and 
partial treatment of the combined wastewater flows discharged to Fort Point 
Channel. This construction is part of the overall BPA renewal project now 
under way in the South End. 

The facilities plan and infiltration/inflow analysis of the entire 
City (BWSC Service Area) will define a coordinated plan for the BWSC 
wastewater collection system and establish the I/I parameters to be used 
in design. The planning effort would also help integrate the 208 areawide 



59 
planning efforts of the MAPC, the MDC Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan 
Area plan of study, the ongoing MDC facilities planning within the City of 
Boston, and the planning of other City and State agencies with the planning 
of the Commission. 

The infiltration/inflow analysis of the limited areas to be served by 
the interceptor replacements and the MT. Vernon Street Sewer is also man- 
dated by the EPA. This study will provide information on the level of 
infiltration/inflow in sewers to be connected to the new sewer and inter- 
ceptor replacements. It is expected that the results of the study will be 
included in the I/I analysis for the entire service area and reduce the 
scope of that project. 



60 



III. 4a. Other EPA Funded Projects: Program Description 

Ihe BRA as part of its urban renewal program is carrying out a 
program of separation of combined systems in the South End for 1980 and 
1981. The original combined systems were designed to accomodate 
storage during storms at high tide, with subsequent direct discharges 
to adjacent waters. 

Extensive expenditures have been made already to provide local 
separation of the old combined systems in this very low area of the 
City. Most of these new sanitary sewers and storm drains still flow to 
elements of the old combined systems and during moderately heavy 
storms, contribute overflow to tidewater. Unless the intended program 
is continued, the work completed to date will have little impact in 
abating pollution. 

All of these separation projects are being carried out in 
conjunction with the Boston Redevelopment Authority. 



61 



III. 4b. Other EPA Funded Projects; Program Costs 

Below is a summary of BWSC project costs by contract category. 
The totals represent both the ten percent local share of eligible EPA 
project costs and ineligible project costs. 



Contract Number 1980 1981 1982 Total 3-Year CIP 



SDl,SD3* 


$ 


888,000 


$ 


370,000 




$1,258,000 


SD6 


$ 


437,040 


$ 


437,040 





$ 874,080 


SD-7 


$ 


320,700 


$ 


320,700 





$ 641,400 


SD-10 


$ 


509,100 


$ 


509,100 





$1,018,200 


SD-11 


$ 


417,600 


$ 


417,600 





$ 835,200 


TOTAL 


$2 


,572,440 


$2,054,440 





$4,626,880 



* This includes an additional $205,000 above the level of funding 
approved by the Commission in 1979. 



Ill 4c. Other EPA Funded Projects: Program Benefits 

The benefits of the separation of combined systems under the BRA 
urban renewal projects as stated under program description is pollution 
abatement during high tide and storm conditions. Also mentioned, was 
that benefits of pollution abatement projects already completed in the 
South End are contingent on completion of proposed work in the area for 
1980, 1981, and 1982. 





4-> 




co 


4-> 


>, 


to 


CD 




rH 


4-1 


01 


s •* 





Vj 


§ 


£ 


£ 


. 




H 


S 







4J 


4J 


. 


w 


4J 




CO 


M 




a' 




rH 




"C 


£ 


c 


-U 


6 


1 



c 

X! 




4-> x: x: 5 

to in w ro 

nj to m x; 

g£ 5 S co 





3 




T3 




C 




8 


4J 
CO 


•s 




c 


>1 


8 


X! 

3 




S 







a 


aj 





> 


4J 


< 




c 


J 


c 

CO 


CO 





>i 




ro 




• 5 




4-) • 




CO 4-> CO 


• 


• • W T3 


CD 


CD CD <D r-l 


> 


> > C C Q 


< 


< < -H Q C 


c 


son 
son 
ookl 
Newt 
Key 


8 


•H 


■H -H U 


>-l 


M 


s 


to to • jo 
i x w q s 


s 


o qq q 

4J 4-> 43 • -P 




4-1 




• • • CO • 


4J 


4J 4J 4J 4J 


in 


CO CO CO CD, CO 


c 


s 


sasso 1 


en 
c 


tTcTB8B 


•H 

x; 


• H -H Q iJ Q 

x: x: O to O 


CO 


CO CO 


rd 


m ro • • • 


£ 


5 S u a a 



4-1 




j-i 






CO 




CO 






c 




c 




4J 





CC 





in 


CO 


4-1 


rH 


4J 


rH 




rji r- 


CT«t-> 


TJ 


C 




C 




^J 


■H 


>i 


■H 


>i o 


x; 


<U 


x; 


CD 


U 


CO 


r— 1 


CO iH 


c 


1 


3 


1 


rH 
< 


8 


fl 


BSS 


w 


aJ 


<u 


<d 


a* 


s 


> 


> 


> 


> 




< 


< 


< < 


CD 
> 


c 


c 


c 


c 








c 


c 


< 


03 


to 


to 


CO 




•H 


■H 


-H 


•r-l 




rJ 

rJ 


b 




b 


CO 
[fl 



fO CD fQ CD CO 

S3 ffi ffi S3 E 



3 3 

■B-fi 



& 

3 
XI 



3 3 3 3 

■s-s-s-s 



3 3 



>1 

N 

X5 
X 



3 3 3 3 3 



fi £££ 



3 3 3 3 
X! X! X) X! 
X X X X 



4J • 
CO CD 





C < 








T3 4J 




1— 1 


C 3 




i 


9 5 


(■«■> 


CO 


CD CD 

r-l JC 


i 




U CO 


CO 



>1 




4J • 
CD • CO 4-> 




.8 


CD 

!— 1 




> 4-> CO 

< CO c 




4-> -H 

CO r-l 


CD 




CD 




.V 


a; 




4-> T? 4J ,K 

3 C > 




■38 


fl 


i£> 


E HJ 0) Ij 
Sh2£ 


r~ 


4J SJ 

CO CQ 


. 


A 


re 4J P 
x: 3 • 53 
to fx s a, 


A 


•H 


w 


CO 


co 


CQ td 



u 8 

S 1 . 



c 
• o q 

4J rH 4-1 

'Si r- en 
^ c 

CO >,T-| 

CD CD x: 



5" 



rH C H 

r- -h r- 



CD >i Cu >i-h 

u <D t3T cd x: 

U rH I— I CO 

£ < W 3 5 



63 
III. 5a. System Improvements; Program Description 

The system improvements program represents a large portion of the 
overall CIP for the wastewater system. Included in this program are 
the following elements: 



Contingency Replacement : Replacement in-kind of existing 
sewer system components exhibiting an immediate maintenance 
problem, usually following breakdown and emergency repairs. 

Separation of Combined Systems: Construction of new sewer 
lines so that sanitary sewage and stormwater will be 
carried through separate sewers. The various construction 
locations will be primarily dictated by the current year 
City and State street reconstruction programs. 

Reconstruction and Rehabilitation: Replacement in-kind 
of existing sewer system components (exclusive of 
separation of combined systems) that have maintenance 
problems and whose correction, for whatever reason, has 
been deferred. 

Increased System Capacity: Replacement or addition of 
sewer system components to provide additional capacity in 
areas where current system is not adequate to meet existing 
or projected demands. 

Other Programs : Similar to category under Water CIP where 
major construction activities undertaken by other agencies 
provides the BWSC with an opportunity to undertake minor 
capital projects at reduced costs. 



Expenditure levels for each program element for the three-year CIP 
were established by the BWSC based on a survey of existing system 
needs. Each year, the BWSC develops a priority listing of projects for 
which system improvements funds should be used. These priority lists 
will be developed taking into consideration: the facilities needs 
established in the upcoming service area-wide facilities plan; funding 
requests and construction projects of other agencies; and known system 
maintenance problems. 



64 
III 5b. System Improvements: Program Costs 

The estimated costs of each element of the system improvements program 
for 1980, 1981, and 1982 are shown on Table VIII below: 



Program Element 

Contingency 

Replacement 

Separation of 
Combined Systems 

Reconstruction & 
Rehabilitation 

Increased System 
Capacity 

Engineering, Design 
and Supervision 

Other Programs 

TOTAL 



Table VIII 

SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM 

(Values in $1000) 

1980 1981 1982 

$ 780 $1,040 $1,300 

1,561 2,080 2,600 



300 

360 

300 
100 



$3,401 



400 

480 

400 

108 

$4,508 



500 

600 

500 
117 



Total 3-Year CIP 
$3,120 

6,241 

1,200 

1,440 

1,220 
325 



$5,617 



$13,526 



Note: 



- Estimates for 1980 through 1982 provided by staff. 

- Engineering, Design, and Supervision Costs represent 10% of 
System Improvements costs excluding Other Program Costs. 



65 



III. 5c. System Improvements: Program Benefits 

The purpose of the system improvements program is to allow the 
continued upgrading of the wastewater system, not just in the 
BMDD, but elsewhere throughout the City. The expected benefits of 
the four elements of the system improvements program are as 
follows : 



- Contingency Replacement. The primary benefit of this 
element would be the Commission's ability to respond to 
emergency situations in an efficient manner which would 
minimize temporary inconvenience to Commission customers 
and preclude further deterioration of the system. 

- Separation of Combined Systems. The primary advantage to 
providing separate sewer lines for sanitary sewage and 
combined sewer overflows during heavy storm flows is the 
long-term reduction of treatment costs due to more 
manageable sewage flows. 

- Reconstruction and Rehabilitation. By addressing known 
problems, further deterioration of the system is 
prevented. Continued deferral of such problems may also 
result in substantially higher construction costs at a 
later date. 

- Increased Capacity. This program element will eliminate 
existing capacity shortages and help avert future ones. 
This not only will enable the Commission to maintain 
adequate service but will also prevent increased wear and 
tear on system components. 

- Other Programs . Described under program description. 



* III 5d. Systems Improvement: Program Detail 



66 



(i) Contingency Replacement Projects. 

B Street Overflow So. Boston 

Parker St. Roxbury 

Rehabilitation of 
Fens Gate House 
No. 1 Roxbury 

(ii) Separation of Combined System 



Dorchester Ave. to Roxbury 

Canal Conduit 
Huntington Ave. to Field St. 



Adams St. 
Adams St. 
Albion PI. 
Armory St. 
Auburn St. 
Baldwin St. 
Chestnut St. 
Chestnut St. 
Cobden St. 
Common St. 
Devens St. 
Ellwood St. 
Fairmount St. 
Ferrin St. 
Fort Ave. 
Frankfort St. 
Homestead St. 
Hutch ings St. 
Lawrence St. 
Main St. 
Main St. 
Main St. 
Mt. Vernon Ave. 
New Dudley St. 
New Dudley St. 
Old Ruther- 
ford Ave. 
Prescott St. 
Prospect St. 



Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Hyde Park 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 

East Boston 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 
Charlestown 
Charlestown 



Winthrop St. to Common St. 
Chestnut St. to Mt. Vernon St. 
Main St. to END 
Main St. to END 
Russel to Bunker Hill St. 
Rutherford Ave. to Bunker Hill 
Adams St. to Lowney Way 
Monument Sq. to Mt. Vernon Ave, 
Washington St. to Walnut Ave. 
Winthrop St. to Park St. 
Main St. to Old Rutherford Ave, 
Putnam St. to END 
Summit St. to Leseur Rd. 
Lowney Way to END 
Centre to BeechGlen St. 
Neptune Rd. to Swift St. 
Humbolt to Walnut Ave. 
Humbolt to Harold St. 
Austin To Union St. 
Donstable 150 ft east 
Alene Ct. to Devens St. 
Henley St. to Park St. 
Chestnut to 35 ft east 
Roxbury St. to Washington St. 
Dudley St. to Bartletts 



St. 



Union St. to New Rutherford Ave. 
Washington St. to Main St. 
Lowney Way to Tremont St. 



370 ft 
208 ft 



578 ft 



230 ft 
180 ft 
305 ft 
265 ft 
180 ft 
480 ft 
110 ft 
110 ft 
Connection 
110 ft 
295 ft 
190 ft 
315 ft 
100 ft 
660 ft 
700 ft 
Connection 
Connection 
265 ft 
150 ft 
80 ft 
180 ft 
35 ft 
800 ft 
800 ft 

765 ft 
325 ft 
620 ft 



Ill 5d. PROGRAM DETAIL (Continued) 



67 



Rockwell St. Dorchester Through private land 

Stockton St. Dorchester Through private land 

Townsend St. Roxbury Walnut Ave. to Washington St. 

Walnut Ave. Roxbury Crawford St. to Seaver St. 

Washington St. Charlestown Harvard St. to Old Rutherford Ave. 



340 


ft 


340 


ft 


765 


ft 


9695 


ft 



(iii) Reconstruction & Rehabilitation 

Lafayette Ave. City Proper Endicott St. to Prince St. 

Cedar Lane Way City Proper Mt. Vernon St. to Pinckney St. 

Willow Terrace W. Roxbury From Willow St. 

Weldon St. Roxbury Holber to Quincy 



135 


ft 


365 


ft 


125 


ft 


130 


ft 



755 ft 



(iv) Increased System Capacity 

Fort Norfolk 

Pumping Station Dorchester 



" 



%* 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 



u 


HHvDWmo 


!3 


ffi (N H H H (N 


a> 


<^OH HM> 


>< 




i 


H(S rH 



<n- in- u> </> u> v> 






o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

oif^ ono 

«3> 00 VO >— I LD CM 
•sj" rH oo ro 



v> v> v> vy</> v> 



o | I 



o o o 
coo 
o o o 

03 O O 
O ȣ> CM 

i— l *»> ro 



O O o o o 
O CO O o o 
O O ^ (N (N 

co «* <-i oo m 
Ln I"- «# •— I ro 

OitOlDOffl 



to- </> t/> </> to- 



I I I I I 



u 

3 . 

Oj4-> 

S£ 

<U 0) 

C 4J T3 

(-1 C -H 

fl) M t/3 

> C4J 

• -h en 
4J <tj ro 

X. S K 



w 



en & ^ 

rH >, <C 
(C 4J O, 

< rH C 
■H 



HfcP 



o o o o o 
o ■>* o o o 
o o r- rH vc 

O I^ Offi > 

r^nNOH 
ro «a* m in ^ 



v> v> </> v> v> 



o o o o 

O "* o o _ 

o o r- iH ix> 

oo r» o on r- 

oo ro cm o 

co •** ro in 



</> </> </y </> </> 



U 

m 

Si 

t/3 

fij •» o >— I 

WHlDhHH 

o> to to to tn en 

8 



o o 
o o 
o o 

o m 
o CN 
CM CO 



o o 
o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 
o o 

O CO 

o o 

•>* rH 



o o 
o o 
o o 

o o 
o o 
ro iH 







id c 










to x: oi 










Ed) -H 








en 


4-> 55 « E en c 








4J 


C 4J \ CD (1) „ 








c 


<D to C 4-> r O-r-)tO 








CD 


Ew >i0 W >i to E 








i >, 


to o en -h >,4J »-h m 








Replac 
ation i 
bined 
struct 
tat ion 
ased S 
Capaci 
eering 
Superv 
Progr 








o 8 

rJ CD 












rH 


Ic? 


rH 




(0 


M -H 


>J E C -H QJ C >J 


fl 


J 


4-> 


4-> 


Sepa 
Co 

Reco 
il 

Incr 

Fngi 

and 

Othe 


s* 





e c 


eB 


pH 


4-> 


0) 

4J O 


P 


■S 






X! 

3 




C/j 


w 




CO 





69 



CHAPTER IV 

Proposed Capital Improvement Program 

Summary Costs, Financing Options 

and Impact on Rates 

1980-1982 



70 
In general, the Commission can finance capital improvements 
through one or more of the following sources of funds: 

1. Funds from current operating revenues. 

2. Funds from capital reserves. 

3. Funds from Federal and State grants-in-aid programs. 

4. Funds from the proceeds of bond sales. 

Each of these financing options will be available to varying 
degrees to finance the Commissions' s proposed capital improvement 
program. The Staff's view is that in the long run, the Commission 
should select a mix of financing options and a capital structure that 
reduces its cost of capital, and assures safe and adequate services to 
its customers at reasonable rates. 

The capital improvement program includes two primary types of 
investments: (1) extensions and improvements and (2) renewals and 
replacements. Following is a breakdown of the water and sewer programs 
into these two classifications: 

RENEWALS AND REPLACEMENTS EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS 
WATER SEWER TOTAL WATER SEWER TOTAL 

(000's) (000's) 

1980 $6,066 $1,481 $7,547 $446 $5,382 $5,828 

1981 $6,866 $1,948 $8,814 $279 $6,494 $6,773 

1982 $7,601 $2,417 $10,018 $ 68 $6,210 $6,278 

Extensions and improvements are capital projects that will improve 
the quality of service, add to the types of services provided, and/or 
increase the quantity of service the Commission provides. The costs of 
the extensions and improvements detailed in this CIP are projected to 
be financed by issuing bonds. This is in accordance with the 
Commission's policy, which was adopted in January of 1979, relating to 
the funding of various types of capital expenditures. 



71 



The enabling legislation requires the Comnission to determine 
rates in a manner sufficient to recover all costs. Thus, the costs of 
financing capital, as well as all other costs, must be recovered frcm 
rate revenues. The proposed Capital Improvement Program for 1980, and 
the related costs, will be included in the proposed 1980 rate schedule. 
These costs are estimated to be approximately $8 million, including 
$7.5 million for renewal and replacement projects and $500,000 for debt 
service costs. 




>1 

to 




U 
(0 

u x: 
05 to 



I 

in 
en 



c 

CP c 

■H O 

0) w 



& eg. 



•rH 3 

Vj CO 

c c 



CT 



(D