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Full text of "Prosperity follows settlement in any part of Canada : letters from satisfied settlers"

PROPERTY OF MAIN LIBRARY, DEPARTMENT 
OF AGRICULTURE, OTTAWA 

UdIIo 

D »le PLEASE RETURN 

AL 32 9207- 1PM- 4)8 



PROSPERITY 

FOLLOWS 

SETTLEMENT IN 

ANY PART OF 

CANADA 



LETTERS FROM 
SATISFIED 
SETTLERS 



Published by 

the Authority of the Minister of the Interior, 

Ottawa, Canada, 

917-1 



.0212-0 



IMPORTANT 



Farmers, Farm Labourers and Female Domestic 
Servants are the only people whom the Canadian 
Immigration Department advises to go to Canada. 

All others should get definite assurance of em- 
ployment in Canada before leaving home, and have 
money enough to support them for a time in case 
of disappointment. 

The proper time to reach Canada is between the 
beginning of April and the end of September. 



\ 


/ 


CANADA 


1 



LOCATION, POPULATION AND EXTENT. 

Canada comprises the northern half of North America. Its 
southern boundary is the United States ; on the east is the At- 
lantic; on the west the Pacific, and on the north the Arctic 
Ocean. Its area is 3J4 million square miles, about the same 
as that of the United States and nearly equal to that of Eu- 
rope. The population is about sy 2 millions or nearly a fourth 
less than that of Belgium. Prom Halifax on the Atlantic to 
Vancouver on the Pacific is 3,740 miles, by rail. From Vic- 
toria on the Pacific to Dawson on the Yukon River is 1,550 
miles by ocean and river steamer and rail. From Fort Wil- 
liam, at the head of Canadian navigation on Lake Superior by 
the waterway of the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River, 
to the tidal seaport of Quebec is 1,400 miles, and from Quebec 
City to the extreme Atlantic Coast, at the Straits of Belle 
Isle, is 850 miles. Its most southerly portion is in the lati- 
tude of northern Spain and Italy, and the most northerly por- 
tion of the main land is in the latitude of Northern Norway. 

FORM OF GOVERNMENT. 

The Dominion of Canada is a part of the British Empire, 
■ and is a confederation of nine provinces. The duties of gov- 
ernment are divided between the Dominion and the provinces. 
The Dominion is governed by a legislature or Parliament 
which makes the laws. Parliament is composed of two 
houses, the Commons and the Senate ; the Commons elected 
directly by the people, the Senate appointed by the govern- 
ment. The qualification of voters for the House of Commons 
varies in the different provinces, being fixed by the Provincial 
legislatures, but it is either manhood suffrage — one man, one 
vote — or the property qualification is very light. 

The Cabinet, or Government, which administers the laws 
passed by Parliament, is composed of members of Parliament, 
who must have the support of a majority of the commons or 
elective branch in order to hold power. 

A change of policy, by reason of a change of government, 
may occur at any time, and an election to decide as to the 
views of the people on the change already made or proposed 
may be held at any time. This is the system known as re- 
sponsible government, whereby every member of the govern- 
ment is fully and entirely responsible to the people for every 

3 



administrative act of himself or his colleagues, and places the 
people in more direct and absolute control than any other 
form. The Dominion Parliament controls the criminal law, 
the militia, the post office, railways, indirect taxation by the 
tariff and excise, trade relations with other countries, and, 
speaking generally, all matters of national concern. The Do- 
minion owns and controls the administration of the public 
lands in the three Central provinces, and throughout Northern 
Canada. These provinces still contain many millions of acres 
of agricultural land yet unoccupied and available for imme- 
diate settlement. The responsibility for their development 
rests upon the Dominion Government, which, therefore, takes 
up the work of promoting immigration. 

The provinces are governed by legislatures elected by the 
people, and have responsible government on the same princi- 
ples as the Dominion. They are charged with providing the 
civil law and administering hoth civil and criminal laws. They 
provide for education and for municipal government, and for 
direct taxation in their support and generally all matters of a 
purely provincial or local nature. Primary education is amply 
provided for in all the provinces, and in nearly all the pro- 
vinces it is free. 

Although the provinces have the right to charter, aid and 
construct railways, in practice this right is chiefly exercised 
by the Dominion. 

The provinces of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia 
have vast areas of public lands which are administered by the 
governments of these provinces. Nova Scotia and New 
Brunswick have very little public lands left, and Prince Ed- 
ward Island has none. 

Respect for law and maintenance of order are very promi- 
nent features of life in Canada, as distinguished from other 
new countries. Life and property are as safe in any part of 
Canada — whether in the cities, the mining camps, the forests 
or on the prairie — as in any part of the United Kingdom, or 
the best governed country of Continental Europe. 

OTHER GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS. 

Pamphlets dealing with each of the provinces individually 
are published by the Government of Canada and may be pro- 
cured by application to any of the agents mentioned on page 
48 of this pamphlet. 

ANSWERS FROM SATISFIED SETTLERS. 

The following replies received from immigrants to circulars 
sent to them are appended herewith as showing in concise 
form the success achieved by settler's in the past and the opin- 
ion held by them of the Dominion as a place of settlement for 
British immigrants : 



Name. — Norman Morrison. 

Address. — Beauchamp, Saskatchewan. 

Last address in Britain. — Edinburgh. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— Dec. 15th, 1902. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, in any of the 
following years: 1903, $240; 1904, $360; 1905, while I work- 
ed, $30.00 per month. 

Have you entered for a homestead? Yes. 

Date of entry.— May 23rd, 1904. 

Improvements on homestead. — 50 acres broken, 10 head of 
cattle, 5 oxen, 1 horse, house, stable, granary, and all machine 
ery necessary for farm work. 

Value of your stock and implements. — Stock, $700 ; imple- 
ments, $600. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? / have greatly improved my prospects. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, certainly, if they are willing to work. 

General remarks. — My capital, when I landed at Shoal 
Lake, Manitoba, zvas $25.00. / may say that I am by no means 
rich now, but I am comfortably off, and have a home of my 
own. Although I came to Canada from Edinburgh, and was 
not then farming, I worked as a ploughman in Inverness- 
shire, near Beauly, and Fort George for some years. 

Name. — John R. Duncan. 

Address. — Box 442, New Westminster, B.C. 

Last address in Britain.— Coschen, Larbert, Stirlingshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — May l9f/», 1906. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes, 
but realized from the beginning that I had to work hard to 
succeed. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — / am not engaged in agriculture, 
but take an interest in reports available, and the aggressive, 
earnest settler generally makes good. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, in preference to almost any other class, provided 
they have an intelligent understanding of the difference in 
environments, and are impressed to adopt themselves to Can- 
adian methods. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — Be a Canadian from the very beginning. 
Don't boast too much of "the Old Country," and be continual- 
ly making comparisons. Don't invest the day you arrive, but 
wait until you have some idea as to values and locations. 

General remarks. — The Eraser Valley is admirably adapted 
to fruit growing and agricultural pursuits, and would suit 
country people from home. Discourage city youths with 
ideas to ranching. Discourage and use your influence against 



Oriental immigration. Don't pay cash for your home on ar- 
rival, but rather, if funds are not too plentiful, hold a little in 
reserve for future developments — they are sure to come. Be 
cautious, but still enterprising enough to be an asset of the 
country of your adoption. 

Name.— Robert W. Forrester. 

Address.— Hamar, Sask. 

Last address in Britain. — Haddingtonshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — June 21, 1904. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes, 
could not wish for better. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.— Our first crop, in 1906, was poor. 
In 1907 we sold $1,200 worth of wheat. In 1908 much about 
the same, but the crop did not yield as good. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, either with or without capital, as long as they have 
the experience. We had no capital, but were brought up on 
a farm and worked on it. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers.—/ would suggest that a newcomer hire out 
to a good farmer, in a good district, for a year or more till he 
gets into the ways of the country. 

General remarks. — / may say that we are between 25 and 
30 miles from a market, zuhich is a great drawback. My 
brother is at present on a visit to Scotland. He was out a 
year before me. We both worked out about 2 years. We 
have 11 head of horses, 5 head of cattle, and a full set of 
farm machinery all paid for, and 800 acres of land. 

Name.— Joseph Bell. 

Address. — Bowdcn, Alberta. 

Last address in Britain.— Belford, Northumberland. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — May 28, 1907. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Fairly 
zvell, but we have had two middling seasons. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.—/ am dairying, ranching, and 
farming 70 acres of land, broken. I rent a section, and have 
lots of range; besides I have 70 head of cattle, 20 cows, 12 
horses, pigs, etc. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Well, if they are willing to work, or have money to 
start a place, it's all right. Plenty of room here for them, but 
they will not find things as they are in F.ngland. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers.— Work or rent a farm till you learn the ways 
of the country, as things are much different here; or pay for 
your experience any way. A Britisher is green in Canada. 



General remarks.— Keep out of the hands of the real estate 
men, or they will locate you in style. Anyone landing in 
Canada with a few hundred pounds can do well, I think. It 
is a great country. The only fault I have to it is the sum- 
mers are short and the -winters long; but a very healthy cli- 
mate to live in as far as I am concerned. It does not trouble 
me in the least. I zvould never farm in the Old Country again. 

January 19th, 1909. 
Name. — Thomas O'Donncll. 
Address. — Benchonsie, Saskatchewan. 
Last address in Scotland. — Inverness. 
Date of arrival in Canada. — lune 20, 1903. 
Amount of wages you received, with board, in any of the 
following years: 1903, $200, then from $25.00 to $50.00 per 

III llll III. 

Have you entered for a homestead? Yes. 

Date of entry.— April iSth, 1905. 

Improvements on homestead.— Completed, but residential 
duties do not end till June, 1909. 

Value of your stock and implements.— $636.00. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, but a little capital is advantageous. 

General remarks.—/ only wish I had come to Canada years 
ago. 

Name.— Alex. C. Thompson. 

Last address in Scotland.— North Gask, Port Erroll, Aber- 
deenshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— Dec. 23rd, 1901. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, in any of the 
following years: 1902, $200; 1903, $250; 1904, $300; 1905, 
$300 ; 1906, $300, 1907, $300. 

Have you entered for a homestead? No. 

Have you bought or rented land? Bought 160 acres, 75 
arable, April, 1905, rented it on third shares, and kept hiring 
out myself until I had it pretty nearly paid up. 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits — 
Paid $2,500, 3 years ago, and to-day it is worth $3,500 Be- 
sides, I have got $900 for my share of the crops during that 
time. I had $300 when I landed, have been home to Scotland 
twice, and am now -worth $3,000. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes, by $3,000 in six years. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 

come to Canada? Yes. They can be their own landlords in 

2 or 3 years, that is. if they keep steady and do not run all 

over the country and give their money to the R.R. companies 

(Sgd.) A. C. THOMSON, 

Morden, Manitoba. 



Name.— Seth Copcland. 

Address. — Innisfail, Alberta. 

Last address in Britain. — 6 Gardener's Terrace, Hessle-in- 
Hull. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — January 13, 1906. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — / have only been employed as 
farm help, and like the work. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? / do not know much about British agriculture. I never 
worked on a farm until I came here. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — To be steady, willing and obliging — not to 
blow about the Old Country. 

Name. — Francis Green. 

Address. — Minncdosa, Manitoba. 

Last address in Britain. — Driffield, East Yorkshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — May 4, 1908. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Above 
satisfied. I think Canada a great country. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — / and my sons have done well, 
and I have now got my wife and family out, and we intend to 
become settlers as soon as possible. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Certainly, if they be young men who have been farm 
hands same as zve were, and mean to work. They can't help 
but succeed. There are two chances here to one there is in 
England. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — Should be placed on farms just as soon as 
they land. My advice is to hire with a farmer for a year so 
as to get into the ways of the country. 

Name. — Frank Southward. 

Address. — Cupar, Saskatchewan. 

Last address in Britain. — Manchester. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — 20th April, 1904. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes, 
quite beyond my expectations. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — / started on a homestead with a 
team of oxen. I have all my land under cultivation, and have 
now bought more land, and have 10 horses and 20 head of 
cattle. . 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, in fact anyone who can handle horses, and would 
like free, healthy life, with lots of hard work. 

8 I 



Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers.— I would say, let them work with, a farmer at 
least one year before they take up land for themselves. 

Name.— Robert Shipley. 

Address. — Summerberry, Saskatchewan. 

Last address in Britain.— Little Driffield, Yorkshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— June 12th, 1903. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 

It you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, pronts, etc.— y e s, the farming in this country 
is all right. J am fanning 640 acres, and have had good success. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, by all means, as I feet sure they would do well 
out here. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers — ; would advise them to come well up the 
country, and rent a farm at Arst rather than homestead. 

General remarks.— We have been in this country for 6 
years now, and never had any sickness in the family. It is 
just the place for some good Yorkshire farmers, so they had 
better come at once, as land keeps going up in price every 
year, but wheat keeps getting better m price also. 

Name.— Henry IVilliam Sumpter. 

Address.— Ochre River, Manitoba. 

Last address in Britain.— 159 Kings Road, Reading, Berks 

Date of arrival in Canada.— May, 1906. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes 
100 golden sovereigns 'would not get me back to England to 
work again. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, pronts, etc.— Summer, I9u6, worked in city 
winter on farm for board. 1907, bought two oxen and worked 
on farm. 190S, homesteaded with 3 oxen, 2 cows, 1 pig poul- 
try, wagon, plow and sleigh. 1909— the farm contains 9 head 
of cattle, 6 pigs, 32 chickens, a new plow, 10 bags Hour ; and 
by March, when I settle up, I hope to have $50.00 in cash to 
the good. 

Would you advise British agriculturists* to come' to" Can- 
ada? Yes, they could do nothing better if they keep to the 
farm and homestead. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers.— Go farming, and don't lose heart if things 
don t seem very bright for the Arst few months; take an in- 
terest in your work, and your wages will soon rise, and plenty 
of farmers will be offering you work, which means you eft 
the best pay going. * * 



General remarks.— Why I like the farm : First, when you 
get your patent, you have a great insurance policy of at least 
$1,000, and no weekly or monthly payments attached to it. 
Second, your farm is your stock, and no lYi% per year as in 
England, but interest every week in milk, butter and eggs. 
Third, your food all comes from the farm, which makes living 
cheap. 

Name. — John Kidd. 

Address. — Queenstown, Alberta. 

Last address in Scotland.— Humbie Mill, East Lothian. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — June, 1903. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, in any of the 
following years: 1903, $235; 1904, $300; 1905, $300. 

Have you entered for a homestead? Yes. 

Date of entry.— Nov. 10th, 1905. 

Improvements on homestead. — Worth $500; also 14 head 
of horses, and 30 acres of land under cultivation. 

Value of your stock and implements.— $800.00. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? / do. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? I would. 

General remarks.— The 'Mages are better out here, and any- 
one can start for himself in two or three years. 

Name. — Matthew Ferguson. 

Address. — Ministik Lake, Alberta. 

Last address in Great Britain.— Cambelton, Argyleshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — June nth, 1906. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — What I had under cultivation last 
year (1908) did very well for a first crop. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, of a certain class. Those who arc willing to work, 
and have experience in agriculture. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — / would advise them not to believe all ad- 
vertisements, as one has to work to make money — here as 
well as elsewhere. 

Name. — John Comrie. 

Address. — Minnedosa, Manitoba. 

Last address in Britain.— 90 George Street, Paisley, Scot- 
land. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— July, 1902. 

Aro you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Very 
well. 

10 



Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Being only a learner, I am hardly competent to give 
advice. 

General remarks. — As I was employed in a weaving fac- 
tory previous to coming here, and knew nothing about farm- 
ing, you zvill understand I am satisfied when I tell you I am 
in a better position than when I came; and, with ordinary 
success, in a few years will have easily doubled my present 
property. 

Name. — George R. Ralston. 

Address.— Bullocksville, Alta. 

Last address in Britain. — Gals ton, Ayrshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — 2nd April, 1906. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — / bought an improved farm, and 
have been fairly successful. I cannot say definitely re profits, 
but consider I have kept well ahead all the time. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, all classes, but more especially those with small 
capital — too much money or too little seems to pan out badly, 
— ge/ the happy medium class. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — Do not invest capital ' too quickly. Get to 
know conditions and kind of work before homesteading. I 
have been three years here, and have just' taken homestead 
and pre-emption. 

Name. — Eric Bird. 

Present Address. — Box 12, Gladstone, Manitoba. 

Last address in Britain. — 143 Norwich Road, Ipswich, 
Suffolk. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — April 12//1, 1908. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 
A young man, if steady and determined to work, can soon 
make a home of his own. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — / have made a great deal more in 
Canada than I could have in England at the same occupation 
in the same. time. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can 
ada? Yes, if they come and are prepared to work hard and 
rough it. There are endless opportunities. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — Do not bring a lot of clothing, but only what 
is absolutely necessary. When zvorking in Canada, try and do 
as the Canadians do, and see things as they see them. Come 
in early spring. 

11 



General remarks. — / think that if Mr. J. Major had been 
sent again this year, to our part especially {Suffolk), he 
would have done a lot of good, as all those who came to this 
country by his advice are well satisfied, and others would fol- 
low, especially if Mr. Major could place them in good homes, 
and with people whom he knows to be reliable. As the aver- 
age person in England has such a vague idea of this country, 
he is glad to listen to one zvho knows. 

Name. — Donald McCoig. 

Present Address. — Trcheme, Manitoba. 

Last address in Scotland. — Southend, Argyleshirc. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — June, 1883. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? High- 
ly satisfied. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — Did not farm till 1887, and have 
always farmed more or less since. Have never had a failure 
in crops since I started. I had little or no capital when I 
came here. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? / would advise young men used to farm work to come, 
supposing they have no capital; also farmers with capital, as I 
am satisfied that they can do better here than in Britain. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — To newcomers, I zvould advise them to ivork 
out on a farm for'a year or two, as farming is considerably 
different here than in the Old Country. Even to men with 
capital it would be zvell for them to do so. 

General remarks — Since coming to this country I have 
been very successful, and feel satisfied that I could never have 
made the same success in Scotland. After 25 years of steady 
application to my duties, I am in a position to retire if I want 
to do so, and have enough to live on for the rest of my days. 
The climate seems to frighten a great many. Well, it is cold 
here in winter; but, for myself, I can say that I have enjoyed 
splendid health; in fact, better than I had in Scotland. I 
would say to the young and strong, and those willing to work, 
also to the older people who have families, — that there is no 
land on earth where one can make an independence for him- 
self easier than in the Canadian West. 

Name. — John Shields. 

Present Address. — Nook Farm, Nokomis, Sask. 

Last address in Great Britain. — Everingham, Yorkshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — March 13th, 1904. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes, 
and I feel sure that I have done far better than I could have 
done at home. 

12 



If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.— 7 landed in the country with $700, 
and ivorked out for one year, then started on a homestead, 60 
miles from a store, on railway, which was up-hill work for a 
lime, but I feel that I am more than repaid for any hardship, 
as I am within three miles of a rapidly growing town, with 
the Grand Trunk Pac. and the Can. Pacific raihvay running 
through. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? I feel satisfied that any general farm hand, who is not 
afraid of work, will have no difficulty in finding work and 
good pay, and before long will have a farm of his own. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may ha.ve to offer 
to newcomers. — I would advise all newcomers to work out 
for one or two years and learn the ways of the country, also 
to bring a good supply of the same clothes as are used on 
farms at home, as I find they are better quality than the 
clothes we buy out here. 

General remarks.—/ have got my deed for the 160 acres of 
free land that I homestcaded, which is worth $25.00 per acre. 
I also bought an adjoining quarter section for $10.50 per acre 
three years ago and have it all but 20 acres ready for crop. 
My stock and implements are worth double the capital I came 
into the country with. I have 260 acres under cultivation. I 
had 1,6(10 bushels of wheat and 1,111 bushels of oats last vear 
(1008). 

Name.— John IV. IVaincs. 

Address. — Moosomin, Sask. 

Last address in Great Britain.— Carton-on-thc-Wolds, 
Yorkshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — 1 6th May, 1884. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.— 7 have been on a farm for 24 
years. I started fanning with no money — 7 had to buy horses 
and implements and pay big interest on them. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? I would advise young men from the agricultural dis- 
tricts of Britain to come to Manitoba and Saskatchewan. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — 7 would advise two or three young men to 
come together and take homesteads near one another and all 
work together, so that one set of implements would do for 
them all. 

General remarks. — In 1884 I took up a homestead three 
miles from Moosomin — 7 can say by experience that Western 
Canada is a good country for a young man to come to. 

13 



Name.— Albert Beetsett. 

Present Address. — Virden, Man. 

Last address in Great Britain. — Barnard Gate, near Eyn- 
skaw, Ox on. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — 1st August, 1908. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Quite 
so, in every respect. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc. — / have been farming ever since I 
came out here and I am doing well — / don't wish to do any 
better. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? / would, by all means, for there are splendid openings 
here for anyone to get on, I can assure you. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers.—/ would advise young men to come out here. 
I wish I had come ten years ago — / have earned double the 
wages every week since I have been here that I did in the Old 
Country. 

Name.— Joseph Wilson. 

Present Address.— Fort Ellice, Man. 

Last address in Great Britain.— Hutton. Cranswick, York- 
shire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — July, 1887. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.—/ commenced with $5.00 and I am 
now well worth $5,000. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes. This is the country for young farm hands to 
come to. To confirm this advice, I may say that I have been 
the means of bringing out all my relations, about 20 in number. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newscomers.— Get on the land. Work out for farmers 
two, three, or five years if necessary, firstly to get a little capi- 
tal, and, secondly, to get experience before starting' for your- 
selves. 

General remarks. — / worked hard for ten years for farmers 
in Yorkshire and barely saved enough money to bring me to 
Canada. I have been here 20 years and have got a good farm 
of my own, 12 horses. 20 head of cattle, 15 pigs, poultry, and 
implements and machinery enough to work my farm. I 
may not have made money as fast as some who have been here 
the same length of time, but I have steadily built up a good 
home. 

Name. — Thomas Elder. 

Present Address.— Cecil Cottage, 7th Avenue, New West- 
minster, B.C. 

14 



Last address in Great Britain.— Over Williamston, West 
Calder, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — 22nd Dec, 1906. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 
I have not engaged in agriculture, and my sons think they can 
do better in town. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, because they can get land on easy terms here. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — Immigrants coming to this part of B.C., if 
they have more effects than what they are allowed free, should 
send what they have to pay on all the way by sea to Van- 
couver. 

General remarks. — We have a fine climate here, something 
like the south of England. I have peaches growing in my 
garden and grapes grow here. Any parties who care for 
dairy fanning might do well here, as milk, butter and eggs 
are very dear here at present, and have been ever since I came 
here. Very large crops of timothy hay can be grown, also 
clover. 

Name. — Leonard M. Hardy. 

Address. — Mannville, Alta. 

Last address in Britain. — Ilford, Essex. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — June, 1904. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes. 
I am now entitled to patent of homestead, and getting into 
working order. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.— It takes tim" to get things going 
on a homestead, especially when the first crop (1907), is 
frozen, but I am now in a fair way to go right ahead. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, but some capital is necessary for starting. Single 
men, without capital, who have the desire to come out, willing 
rk and steady, should do all right. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — If intending to farm, would suggest them 
working out for a season or two, with some good farmer, get- 
ting best wages obtainable and so learning the ways out here 
and value of things. 

General remarks. — / came out about 4^4 years ago from 
England. I worked out for nearly two years, then homestead- 
ed, and first season broke about 50 acres with two oxen, crop- 
ped it next season, and also broke a further 25 acres, bought 
another team of oxen, and third season cropped 75 acres and 
broke a further 17 acres. My first crop return was 770 bush- 
els wheat and 300 bushels oats, all more or less frozen, the 
season being exceptionally late. Wheat realised 50c. per 
bushel, and oats 35c. Second crop 1,200 bushels wheat, 654 

16 



bushels oats; realized 76c. per bus. for the wheat. Next sea- 
son (1909) / am putting in 92 acres crop; have sold my oxen 
and am getting horses. 

Name. — Joseph Moore. 

Last address in Britain. — Dalby, Isle of Man. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — 1903. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, in any of the 
following years: 1903, $225; 1904, $250; 1905, $300. 

Have you bought or rented land? In 1906 / rented on 
ill u res. 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits.— 
In 1907 / had 1,800 bus. of wheat, which I sold at $1.03 per 
bus. In 1908 / had 5,000 bus. wheat, which I sold at from 
85c. to 93c per bus. 

Value of your stock and implements.—/ have 9 horses, 
for which I paid $1,700, 2 binders, 2 wagons, 2 gang plows, 
seeder, sleigh, cutter, and household effects, cost $700.00. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise agricultural laborers, without capital, 
to come to Canada? Yes. 

General remarks.—/ have rented a farm of 480 acres. 

(Sgd.) JOSEPH E. MOORE, 

P.O. Box 3, Margaret, Man. 

Name.— Thos. J. Clark. 

Address. — Virden, Man. 

Last address in Scotland.— St. Boswells, Roxburgshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— 1882, when a boy, started on my 
own account in 1898. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? / feel 
well satisfied. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.— My profits, including increase of 
value in land, would show fully $1,000 profit per annum. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, but preferably those with capital. 

Give any suggestions' and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers. — / would advise them to take a position on a 
farm for the first season, to get into the ways of the country. 

Name.— John G. Butterfield. 

Address.— Howick Farm, Tisdale, Sask. 

Last address in Britain.— Redstead, Howick, Lesbury, 
R.S.O., Northumberland. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— 1st July, 1905. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? Yes 
quite satisfied. 

18 



If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
?Zf suc " ss - Py ofi j s . etc — ■ I came into this district in April, 
1006, and was the first settler in this township. I have now 
85C * acres cleared and broken. In 1907 / had 160 acres in crop 
and my oats yielded 103 bushels per acre. The wheat was" 
also an extra heavy crop. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? I should certainly advise British agriculturists to come 
to Canada where they can, with very little outlay, make a home 
for themselves, become owners of their land, and earn a much 
better livelihood than it is possible in England 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newcomers.— / would advise newcomers to look around a 
tittle before settling, and to work for some farmer until they 
get accustomed to the ways of the country, for, by so doing 
they will save a lot of unnecessary expense in experimenting 
and finding out the peculiarities of a new country. Anyone 
with a little capital could not do better than take up land in 
this locality, which is certainly adapted to mixed farming All 
kinds of gram crops grow and yield abundantly; roots of 
every description also do well. This year I have seeded S 
acres to fall wheat, and if appearances go for anything it cer- 
tainly ought to be a success.. I have wintered cattle outside 
both last and this winter, with no other feed than the straw 
stacks to feed at, and a wind shelter for nights, which the 
cattle very seldom avail themselves of. If any immigrants 
conic into this district, I shall be pleased to let them have the 
benefit of my advice. 

Name. — lames Graham. 

Present Address.— Fort Saskatchewan, Alta. 

Last address in Ireland.— Rossnowlagh, Co. Donegal 

Date of arrival in Canada. — 6th May, 1897. 

Are you satisfied with your prospects in Canada? En- 
tirely satisfied, and have been fairly prosperous. Canada for 
mc. 

If you have engaged in agriculture, give some idea of 
your success, profits, etc.—/ have been in the blacksmith 
and implemnets business, but find that farmers who come to 
this country without, I might say, any money in a few years 
get to be well-off, with good farms and stock. 

Would you advise British agriculturists to come to Can- 
ada? Yes, if they come with the intention of bettering them- 
selves, they can make a success here in a few years. 

Give any suggestions and advice you may have to offer 
to newscomers.— / might say that sometimes newcomers ex- 
pect too much, and think they should get along without much 
work; but, if they come with the intention of making a home, 
they will surely succeed. I would advise any young man to 
come to Canada who has to work out in the Old Country for a 

17 



living for he can hardly ever have a home of his own there, 
and never can have a farm; but he can have both here in less 
than five years if he is careful. 

Name. — John Colder, 

Last address in Scotland.— Arabella, Nigg, Rosshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— Dec. 25th, 1901. 

Amount of wages received, with board: 1902, $200; 1903, 
$850 ; average since, $275. 

Have you entered for a homestead? Yes. 

Date of entry. — 19th May, 1904. 

Improvements on homestead.— House, stable, granary, one 
mile of fence around farm, and 40 acres broken. 

Value of your stock and implements.— Team of oxen 
worth $150, cow and calf worth $40, wagon $50, plow $20, and 
all other necessary implements, all paid for. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? / certainly have. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, by all means. 

General remarks.—/ go* the half of my fare advanced by 
Mr. Adamson. Now I have a WO-acre farm ivorth, at least, 

$2,500. 

(Sgd.) JOHN CALDER, 

Beckenham. Saskatchewan. 

Name. — Thos. Graham. 

Last address in Scotland.— Upper Birnie, Johnshavcn. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— 2 1st Dec., 1901. 

Amount of wages you received.— First year, $200, rising 
up to $375 with board. 

Have you entered for a homestead? Yes. 

Date of entry— 1007. 

Improvements on homestead. — House and stable. 

Value of your stock and implements.—/ value my home- 
stead and buildings at $2,500. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Most certainly, yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, but I would advise them to keep clear 
of the cities. 

General remarks.—/ worked on a farm in Scotland for 
9 years, and in that time saved as much as paid half my fare 
to Canada. I arrived in Winnipeg with the noble sum of 
$2.25. and the first three years in Canada I saved as much as 
to take a trip back to see Scotland and the old folks, who are 
Mr. and Mrs. Graham, of Fettercairn. On coming back here, 
I saved as much in two years as to make a start for myself 

18 



on 160 acres. Of course, homesteading is not all sunshine, 
but you are your own boss. 

(Sgd.) THOS. GRAHAM, 

Spalding, Saskatchewan. 

Name. — Robert McClurg. 

Last address in Scotland. — Strathmaddy, Palnure, Kir- 
cudbright. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — June 15th, 1903. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, in any of the 
following years: 1904, $275; 1905, $300; 1906, $300. 

Have you bought or rented land? / bought 160 acres. 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits. — 
/ started farming two years ago, and I have averaged about 
$800 a year, and I have not got all my land under cultivation. 

Value of your stock and implements.— $1,500. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes. 

General remarks. — / would advise all young ploughmen 
ivho have good health, and are not scared to do a little work, 
to come. I would say Canada is the Country. 

(Sgd.) ROBERT McCLURG, 

Melita, Man. 
Name. — James M. Robertson. 
Last address in Scotland. — Fauldie Hill. 
Date of arrival in Canada.— 13(/» June, 1904. 
Amount of wages you received, with board, in the fol- 
lowing years: 1904, $250; 1905, $275. 

Have you bought or rented land? / have rented and 
bought, and consider, in renting, after paying expenses, I had 
two years' wages to the good, which was expended on imple- 
ments. 

Value of your stock and implements. — Horses, $800; im- 
plements, $400. This has been gathered since 1904, so will 
give some idea of the earnings, I having landed with nothing. 
Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? By a long way. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? // some of the ploughmen in Scotland 
knew the chances there are in Canada, they would not work 
long for a farmer in Scotland, and I would say to them — come 
now. 

(Sgd.) JAMES M. ROBERTSON, 

Newdale, Man. 
19 



Name. — William Wisltart Gerrard. 

Last address in Scotland. — Bardyards, Dalgety, Turriff. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — April 16, 1904. 

Amount of wages received with board, etc. — 1904-5, $225 ; 
1905-6, $280 ; 1906-7, $230 for 7 tnos. 

Have you bought or rented land? / have bought half a 
section (320 acres) on the crop payment plan. 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits. — 
$1,000 yearly. 

Value of your stock and implements. — $1,500. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? ./ would advise all country people to come, 
capital or no, provided they are young and willing to work. 

(Sgd.) W. W. GERRARD, 

Manitou, Manitoba. 

Name. — Frank Birss. 

Last address in Scotland. — Dalbrake, Strachan, Banchory. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — Dec. 25, 1901. 

Amount of wages you received with board, etc. — 1902, 
$200; 1903, $250; 1904, $300. 

Have you entered for a homestead? / have a homestead 
and pre-emption — 320 acres. 

Date of entry.— 21st Dec, 1908. 

Improvements on homestead. — About $1,000 in buildings. 

Have you bought or rented land? / rented a farm of 320 
acres for three years. 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits. — 
/ gave one-third of all grain crops, and furnished everything, 
for rent. It takes about another third for expenses, and leaves 
one-third for profit. Profits average $600 per year. 

Value of your stock and implements. — $2,000. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes, there is no doubt al-out it. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, but they should come in the spring, 
if possible. 

General remarks. — Scotch ploughmen are second to none 
for farm form in Western Canada, provided they have a little 
push about them, and try to get into the ways of the country 
as quickly as possible. 

(Sgd.) FRANK BIRSS, 

Moose Jaw, Sask. 

Name. — Frederick William Grinnell. 

Last address in England. — Gloucestershire, Eng. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — June 15th, 1901. 

20 



Amount of wages you received, with board, in any of the 
following years: 1901, $180; 1902, $200; 1903, $250; 1904, 
$300. 

Have you entered for a homestead? No. 

Have you bought or rented land? Rented farm last 2 
years— 800 acres— on half-share profits. 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits. — 
First year had a hard year, was hailed out, but this year had 
a good one — 4,660 bus. of ivheat, 2,800 bus. oats, and 600 bus. 
barley. This was half the crop. 

Value of your stock and implements. — 7 calves, 7 year- 
lings, 2 horses valued about $600. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise ploughmen, without capital, to come 
to Canada? Yes. 

General remarks.—/ came from Gloucestershire, Eng., and 
met Mr. Adamson in Wales and came out with him. I would 
like to add that there are a lot of good farm hands in Eng- 
land who, if they decided to come out here, would do well in 
this country. I am well satisfied with it. 

(Sgd.) FRED'K W. GRINNELL. 

Box 157, Ninga, Manitoba. 

Name.— Alex. Wilson. 

Last address in Scotland.— Kindlytree, Aberdeenshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — Dec. 22nd, 1901. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, etc., in any 
of the following years: 1902, $200; 1903, $225; 1904, 
1905, 1906, 1907, $325 ; 1908, $325. 

Have you entered for a homestead? No. 

Have you bought or rented land? / bought IGO-acre im- 
proved farm and realized off crop this year $270 profit. The 
crop was put in and taken off by my employer on shares. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes. 

(Sgd.) ALEX. WILSON, 

Shadeland P.O., Manitoba. 

Name. — William Beebie. 

Last address in Scotland.— Hillock, Edzell, Forfarshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — Dec. nth, 1902. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, etc., in any 
of the following years: 1903, $200; 1904, $250; 1905, $250 

Have you bought or rented land? / rented improved 
farm 3 years ago, and have been on same place ever since. 

21 



If so, give particulars and some idea of profits. — 
$3,500 in three years. 

Value of your stock and implements. — / think that my 
stock would value about $3,000. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? / have improved my prospects a lot. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? / would advise Scotch ploughmen to come 
to Canada if they want to be their own masters in a few years. 
They can do it even if they come without capital. 

(Sgd.) W. BEEBIE, 

Box 5, Deloraine, Manitoba. 

Name. — Alex. Cumming. 

Last address in Scotland.— White Rashes, Turriff, Aber- 
deenshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— 17th Dec, 1902. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, etc., in any 
of the following years: 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907.— My 
wages averaged for the three years I worked out $260. 

Have you entered for a homestead? No. 

Have you bought or rented land? / rented a farm for 3 
years, now I have bought a half-section (320 acres). 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits.— 
/ would not like to give any particulars in regard to profits, as 
my crop zvas hailed out last year. 

Value of your stock and implements.— $1,500.00. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, I would advise Scotch ploughmen to 
come here as there are more advantages in this country. 

(Sgd.) ALEX. CUMMING, 

Medora, Manitoba. 

Name. — /. N. Edgar. 

Last address in Scotland. — Invcrpeffer, Carnoustie. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— Uth, Dec, 1902. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, etc., in any 
of the following years: 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907.— $35.00 
per month. 

Have you entered for a homestead? No. 

Value of your stock and implements.— $2,000, in a thresh- 
ing machine, etc 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes, better to live here. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, but none but ploughmen. 

22 



General remarks.—/ have been in this country 4 years alto- 
gether, and was in Scotland 2 years. 

(Sgd.) J. N. EDGAR, 

Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. 

Name. — John Mcintosh. 

Last address in Scotland.— Annbank, Ayrshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— Dec. 28th, 1901. 

Amount of wages you received, with board, etc., in any 
of the following years: 1902, $250; 1903, $275. 

For the last four years I have rented a farm— 800 acres— 
but with 400 acres in crop. After paying rent, the profits 
were about $2,000 a year, and sometimes over that amount 

Value of stock and implements.— About $3,000. In De- 
cember, 1901, / arrived in Canada, and I had a $5.00 bill. That 
ivas all the money I had. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? / do. I have 12 horses, 10 head of cat- 
tle, a number of pigs and poultry, besides all the implements 
required on a farm. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, I would for any man who is willing 
to work, I think it is the best country in the world. I do not 
see why any farmer should not make a good living. 
(Sgd.) JOHN McINTOSH, 

Manitou, Manitoba. 

Name. — John Kidd. 

Last address in Scotland.— Newport-on-'I ay. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— April 14//i, 1903 

Amount of wages you received, with board, etc., in any 
of the following years: 1903, $240; 1904, $200. 

Have you bought or rented land? / have rented land, and 
have cleared about $1,000 since 1903. 

Value of stock and implements.— $1,200. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, certainly. 

(Sgd.) JOHN KIDD, 

Darlingford, Manitoba. 

Name.— Alex. McRobb. 

Last address in Scotland.— Woodside of Dlyth, Aberdeen- 
shire. 

Date of arrival in Canada.— April 19th, 1906. 
In 1906 / received $360, with board, and in 1907, $400. 
Have you entered for a homestead? Yes. 
Date of entry.— June 3rd, 1908. 
23 



Improvements on homestead. — Buildings, $150; 15 acres 
of land broken. 

Value of your stock and implements.— Pair of horses and 
implements, value $600. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes, but a small capital would be better. 

(Sgd.) ALEX. McROBB, 

Swift Current, Saskatchewan. 

Name.— Oliver Taylor. 

Last address in Scotland.— Dairy, Kirkcudbrightshire. 

Date of arrival in Canada. — Dec. 14th, 1903. 

Amount of wages you received in 1903.— $200. 

Have you bought or rented land? / rented one section — 
640 acres — in 1903, and started with 3 horses, with 140 acres 
cultivated. 

If so, give particulars and some idea of profits.— 
This year I had 3,300 bus. of wheat and 2,000 bus. oats for my 
share, and also made $300 working out through the summer. 
Cleared over $2,000. 

Value of your stock and implements. — In seed and feed 
and ready cash, between $4,500 and $5,000. 

General remarks.—/ had only $50.00 when I landed at my 
destination. 

Do you consider you have improved your prospects by 
coming to Canada? Yes. 

Would you advise Scotch ploughmen, without capital, to 
come to Canada? Yes. It is the best thing any good worker 
can do. 

(Sgd.) OLIVER TAYLOR, 
Velma, 

Via Snowflake, Manitoba. 

THE FIRST HOMESTEADER. 

Among the farmers of Portage Plains who have attained a 
degree of pronounced success, may be mentioned John Suth- 
erland Sanderson, who is now past the prime of life, but at 
sixty-five years of age is yet hale, hearty and active, and fol- 
lows his agricultural pursuits with deep interest. 

Mr. Sanderson enjoys the distinction of being the first 
settler to take up a government homestead west of the 
Great Lakes, and the photos of himself and wife, given 
on page 25 of this pamphlet are therefore of peculiar 
interest. 

Mr. Sanderson was born in Preston Pans, East Lothian, 
one of the most historic sections of Scotland, September 27th, 

24 





Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Sanderson, of Portage La Prairie, Mani- 
toba, the first homesteaders west of Lake Superior. 




Mr. Sanderson's Barn. 
25 



1S43, and is Scotch descent of both parents for some genera- 
tions back. His earlier years he spent in that portion of Scot- 
land, and when he grew to young manhood, he went to Edin- 
burgh, and lived for a time in various parts of Scotland. 

His attention was attracted to Canada early in the sixties, 
by letters written by John McLean, in the Toronto Globe, 
and in 1867 Mr. Sanderson embarked for the Dominion. He 
settled in Ontario, first residing at Fergus, in Wellington 
County, and on the Western movement originating in 1872, 
came to Manitoba. He was before the days of the railway, 
and he came by Duluth. doing the Red River by steamer to 
Winnipeg. From that city the westward trek began, and with 
ox-cart and bovine he started out for the new Eldorado. The 
Portage Plains, now so populated and prosperous, in those 
days had few farmers or houses. 

Mr. Sanderson was impressed with the quality of the soil 
north of Portage, and took up a homestead near what is now 
known as Oakland. In 1ST:; he built a small house, which for 
quite a few years was the only white man's residence between 
the town and Lake Manitoba. 

During the first year, with his yoke of oxen and plough he 
broke ten acres and backset from year to year, gradually in- 
creasing his cultivated area. 

In 1876 Mr. Sanderson wedded Miss Jessie Green, and as 
a result of the union four children were born, three sons and 
one daughter. 

As the family grew up, all co-operated and worked together, 
more land was secured, and to-day Mr. Sanderson owns the 
160-acre original homestead at Oakland, and 320 acres on 
other parts of the Plains, which he bought. 

Mr. Sanderson started out with nothing. He had to get 
stock, machinery and supplies on credit, but plodded along. 
From the first he made progress, and although there were 
occasional setbacks, they were but temporary, and to-day he 
and his family own 480 acres of beautiful land, fine buildings, 
stock, etc., to the value of about $2. r >,000, and all absolutely 
free of debt. lie is firmly of the opinion that the man will- 
ing to work, who can stand a few hard knocks, and avoid 
drinking intoxicants, can surely make his way in this country. 
Willi regard to Mr. Sanderson, it may be stated that he 
was not a farmer in Scotland, but had worked in service, and 
was coachman for the Earl of Lauderdale. Sir George Suthie, 
and others of the nobility. He gained his knowledge by ac- 
tual experience, and by industry and desire to succeed has 
made a decided success of life in the Canadian West. 

LETTERS FROM SATISFIED SETTLERS. 

The following letters from satisfied settlers, giving, as they 
do, the actual experiences of settlers who have taken up their 

26 



homes in Canada, show what can be done by those willing to 
work and adapt themselves to the conditions existing in a 
new country. 

A WELSHMAN'S OPINION OF CANADA. 

Llewellyn P.O., Sask, January 19th, 1909. 

Dear Sir,— Replying to your letter of Dec, I beg to state 
that I came from Carmarthens, South Wales. On March 15th, 
1907, 1 left for Canada, landing at Halifax, I came to Toronto. 
Here I received an appointment as farm laborer at a salary of 
$20 a month, having at the same time $25 in my possession. 
Thinking of bettering my position, I journeyed west and came 
to Saltcoats, Saskatchewan, about the end of April, whence 
my brother and cousin, who had come out in the same ship, 
had gone before me. In two days I received an appointment 
again as farm laborer at a salary of $25 a month. I stayed 
here for four months and then went a little south where I 
stayed with a friend of mine at a salary of $30 a month. After 
working here- for about six weeks we both joined a threshing 
outfit, where I worked continuously for six weeks at $2 a day. 
I spent my winter with my same friend. 

Respecting my opinion of this country, I consider it a suit- 
able field for industrious and young people of the British Isles 
who are desirous of bettering themselves, and more especially 
to those who have a little capital, where they can have no bet- 
ter place to invest their money than by taking up a homestead 
in Canada and thus secure a home of which they will be proud 
till the end of their lives. They will thus be free from all 
anxieties and troubles through which they have to go in such 
an overcrowded country as the British Isles. 

Yours obediently, 

(Sgd.) DANIEL JONES. 

AN IRISHMAN'S OPINION OF ONTARIO. 

Rockwood P.O., Ontario, January 8, 1909. 

Dear Sir,— I am greatly satisfied with this country in gen- 
eral. It is a splendid country for any immigrant who likes to 
work to come to. 

I am an Irish young man, came here in May, 1907. I land- 
ed at Quebec and came to Carleton Junction, Ontario. The 
first place I was sent to I hired a vear for $10 a month. I 
like this country fine. This is a very nice settlement just 
here. I am earning bigger wages now. 

I am yours respectfully. 

(Sgd.) THOMAS SMITH. 
27 



NOVA SCOTIA A LAND OF OPPORTUNITY. 
Amherst Point, Cumberland County, N.S., 

February 8th, 1909. 

Dear Sir, — I have much pleasure in writing to you to let 
you know my experiences of Nova Scotia. It was in April 
last that I left "Auld Scotia'' with my wife and child and we 
did not regret the day that we landed in Halifax, where we 
received such kind attentions from all the immigration officials. 

For the first seven months I had been working on a fruit 
farm in King's County, learning as much as I could all about 
apple culture. Since then I have been on a large" dairy farm 
in Cumberland County. Our wages at first were $18 per 
month, including board and lodging for the three of us. We 
now get $25 per month. 

I must say that Nova Scotia is a land of great opportunity, 
the climate is all that can be desired, and we had no difficulty 
in adapting ourselves to new conditions. I strongly advise 
all intending emigrants from the old country to stop in Nova 
Scotia, let them take a trip up the Annapolis Valley and they 
will not think of going further west. There is plenty of work 
here for all those who are willing to work hard and steady. 
Let their motto be "Persevere and Succeed." 

For farmers, coming out to Canada, with moderate capital, 
Nova Scotia is the place for them. Mixed farming will pay 
best ; a course at the Agricultural College, Truro, or hiring 
out with a farmer for a short time will be of great benefit to 
the newcomer to learn the different ways of the new country. 

It is my intention to have a farm of my own shortly, and I 
don't think I can find a better place for a comfortable home 
than the "Land of Evangeline" or the world-famed Annapolis 
Valley. Yours truly, 

JAMES WILLIAM McCOWAN. 

HE LIKES NEW BRUNSWICK. 
St. Mary's, New Brunswick, Feb. 18th, 1909. 
The Superintendent of Immigration, Ottawa. 

Dear Sir,— It occurred to me that you might like to hear 
from an Englishman who bought a farm in New Brunswick 
five years ago and is glad that he became a citizen of this pro- 
vince. 

Though I am not able to boast of a fortune in the short 
period that I have been here, still we have always been able 
to meet all our payments and at the same time to live in com- 
fort and enjoy life, notwithstanding I pay hired help the year 
round. 

28 



June, 1903, found me with my wife and family landed at 
Rimouski, en route to St. John, N.B. 

After remaining there for 2 weeks looking around I agreed to 
purchase the farm I now own, situated in the St. John River 
▼alley, one mile from the city of Fredericton by which we are 
connected by a highway bridge, and so far I have had no 
reason to regret my choice for location, good neighbors, 
nearness to schools, churches, markets and transportations by 
rail or river. It would be a hard matter to conceive a more 
pleasant home, we have some good land and we can grow all 
kinds of produce and each year find returns improving. We 
sell our milk twice daily to a dealer in the city and grow all 
kinds of vegetables, for which there is ready sale. We also 
have a large apple orchard, and fruit growing in the St. John 
vallev is coming largely to the front in this province and bids 
fair in time to equal, if not surpass, the famous Annapolis 
Valley of Nova Scotia. We also grow potatoes and turnips 
pretty largely, for which we find a ready sale for the West- 
ern and American markets at good prices, and also hay and 
grain crops of all kinds. 

This province appeals far more forcibly to me than does any 
other part of Canada, and for sociability is far ahead of the 
Old Country, while farming conditions are very much the 
same. 

The climate is dry and healthy, and we have never enjoyed 
better health than since we came out here. More especially 
should this province appeal to the farmer in England who has 
sons to assist him, for then he has no Saturday night, and all 
they make is their own, while in the winter there is always 
work and money in the woods. Prices are good for all kinds 
of products, and farms may be bought at low prices, though in 
many localities values are increasing, and could you but in- 
terest the right class of settlers, I consider there are quite as 
good prospects for them in this province, nearer home and 
more like home, as there is for them (with greater hardships) 
in the West. Yours faithfully, 

(Sgd.) A. BOWDER. 

A SCOTCHMAN OF LAGGAN TELLS OF HIS EXPE- 
RIENCE SINCE COMING TO CANADA. 

Belwood, Ontario, January 26th, 1909. 

Dear Sir, — In reply to your letter asking for information 
about my own history while in Scotland and afterwards in 
Canada : 

I was the oldest of a large family and was hired out to far- 
mers when only nine years old, doing such work as a boy of 
that age was able to do. My masters were very exacting, 

29 



making my duties both toilsome and irksome, while the wages 
were the least part of it, only six shillings for six months 
with a little addition each season for six years. However, 
this was good experience, and I became acquainted with farm 
work, which was of great value to me on arrviing in Canada. 

We came to Canada in the year 1855, leaving the home land 
about the first of July, sailing from Liverpool on the 12th, 
landing in Quebec on the first of September, and reached our 
destination in the Township of Erin on the 7th. 

Poor wages and a large family kept my father from accu- 
mulating enough money to pay our passages out, so we had to 
depend on Canadian friends, who generously advanced part 
of our passage money. I shall never forget the kind recep- 
tion accorded us on our arrival, though but a lad of fifteen 
years of age. Positions soon opened up by farmers to as 
many of the family as were able to fill them, and by dint of 
hard labor and faithfulness to duty, we not only paid off the 
loan but in a few years paid for the first farm. By the year 
1865 we accumulated enough to buy another farm in the 
Township of Garafraxa. I lived on it for eight years and 
paid off the amount put in by the other members of the family 
who were all doing for themselves except the youngest bro- 
ther, who remained on the homestead with father and mother, 
until they sold it and retired to the town of Orangeville, and 
lived there to a good old age in comfort and ease, on the pro- 
ceeds of the farm, with all their family within reach and in 
comfortable circumstances. 

In 1873 I leased the farm for $220 per annum, made a sale, 
the proceeds of which amounted to about $1,000, while the 
surplus grain was worth over $500. Since about 1901 my 
time has been largely occupied in improving the farm, -having 
erected a good brick residence and one of the modern, barns, 
52 x 64, set on 10-foot high stone walls for stabling for horses 
and cattle, with cement floors laid all over the ground floor. 
The water is sent to the stables by a windmill from a drilled 
well 210 feet deep and is inexhaustible. Our home is our 
own, a large brick residence, large enough to accommodate a 
large family, with electric lighting, telephone, hard and soft 
water, and every convenience that is possible to have in a 
country home, and what we could never have had in Scotland. 

It was due to the earnest and continued entreaties of my 
mother, who saw nothing but incessant toil and pinching pov- 
erty to live for in Scotland, that we left the land of our fore- 
fathers and came to Canada, where we all succeeded in mak- 
ing homes that would be impossible to accomplish in the Old 
Land. We could name many families who emigrated to Can- 
ada from Laggan who were equally successful and were as 
poor as the poorest in Scotland. I care not if a young man 
has not a dollar when he arrives in Canada, if he has a little 
knowledge of farming and can handle a team, milk cows and 

30 



such like. Keep among the fanners, keep clear of the towns 
and cities, unless he is a good mechanic, and not even then is 
it wise to remain in the dumping ground, where so many re- 
main and expect employment. I made a point always to hire 
for the year with the farmers, a man has his board and if he 
can get enough in winter to prevent his using the summer's 
wages he will soon accumulate some money if he chooses. 
The highest wages I ever received working with farmers was 
$13,00 per month for the summer and from $8.00 to $10.00 in 
winter, including board and washing. To-day men get from 
$20.(io to $2",. 00 per month in summer and from $10 to $15 in 
winter. The farmer is the most independent man we have 
and the farm servant the next, if he hires by the year, and as his 
hoard is sure, he has no thought for to-morrow, his labors are 
such that he has no brain worry, such as is the case in towns 
and cities to-day. Farm work is now nearly all done by machin- 
ery, so that the first necessity is to have a man who can han- 
dle a team properly, if he can do that he will succeed, if not 
he is worth little more than his board until he can. In the 
past it required men of Strength, but to-day intelligence and 
close attention to duty are the first requisites, including the 
knowledge above stated. 

I am proud to be able to state that my second daughter is a 
farmer's wife, who has 250 acres of good land adjoining our 
village and who feeds a large number of cattle each year for 
the British market, us well as many for the home market. 
When 1 am free I go and assist in the work. Last year I cut 
all the hay on the farm with a mower, amounting to nearly 
100 tons. 

In conclusion I would say that I would recommend any in- 
dustrious person to come to Canada with families or otherwise, 
male or female, if they arc willing to make themselves gener- 
ally useful with the farmers. If people have a little money 
Oil arriving, so much the better, if they would place it in safe 
keeping in the banks and do not spend it in looking for easy 
iobs. as they are scarce here, until people have earned enough 
to make homes of their own, which does not need to take 
manv years. 

I would deem it a pleasure to correspond with anyone con- 
templating coming to Canada, from Laggan. I know they 
would be likely to make good Canadians, being an industri- 
ous people. Respectfully yours, 

(Sgd.) hugh Mcdonald. 

CANADA PLEASED HIM BETTER THAN THE 
ARGENTINE. 
Davidson, Saskatchewan, February 26th, 1909. 
Sir, — Some time ago I got your circular with regard to 
statement, or rather letters, wanted to be used in the old 

31 



country for emigration purposes. I came out in 1896 to learn 
farming, and stayed in Ontario for two years on a farm, 
after which I spent a year at Guelph College, returning to 
Scotland the last days of 1898. I was in Scotland then until 
1900 when I came out to the States on business for an old 
country firm and after finishing that went to the Argentine 
for a year for the same business. I was anxious to settle 
down, however, and came out here again in January, 1904 — 
came straight to Davidson and have been here ever since, with 
the exception of a visit home to Scotland in the winter of 
1906-7. I am a good Canadian and have induced five of my 
brothers to come to this country, where they are all doing 
well, although none of them are farming. In conjunction with 
my own business of a financial agent, I have farmed for the 
past three years and hope to increase my holding this year. 
Our local paper here goes weekly to the reading room of my 
old town in Scotland. 

Yours faithfully, 
(Sgd.) ARTHUR JAS. ROBERTSON. 

HE LIKES THE COUNTRY AND PEOPLE. 

Wallaceburg, Ontario, 7th December, 1908. 

Dear Sir, — The time of my departure from Scotland was 
24th May, 1007, on board the Donaldson Line S.S. Athenian. 
We had a splendid voyage, which occupied eight days, to Que- 
bec. Quebec seemed a beautiful city, and among our first en- 
quiries was to have the Plains of Abraham pointed out to us ; 
then a splendid run to Toronto per G. T. Railway. Time taken 
was seventeen hours. 

Three Englishmen and myself went to Guelph. I may re- 
mark here that on our arrival we counted our cash, the Eng- 
lish lads mustered four dollars, while I was considered fortu- 
nate in having forty dollars, or £8. Being on a farm at home, 
I intended taking up the same occupation here and ultimately 
I found a place to my liking near Mono Road, wages twenty- 
five dollars per month, which I considered very good pay. 
Farm work here is a great contrast to the home method, 
everything is done on the rough and tumble principle here, 
the farmer tells you, "get the field ploughed, never mind 
how," which shows that the soil is very fertile even with 
light ploughing. At home we worked ten hours in summer, 
here we worked fifteen hours. At home we had six meals 
each day, here three meals. But it is the money in which lies 
the difference, at home 16/ or $4 per week, out of that you 
paid 12/ or $3 for board, one dollar left for luxuries. In 
Canada, i5 or $25 per month, a decided difference. Naturally, 
clothing, boots, provisions, etc., are more expensive here. I 
am living in the midst of a splendid farming country, noted 

32 



for corn raising and sugar beets. To the south is a great 
stretch of marsh land which is of no value. Sugar beets are 
now extensively grown, farmers seem to favor this industry. 
The sugar factory, the president of which is Mr .D. A. Gor- 
don, M.P., is situated in town and employs upwards of two 
hundred men. A short time before leaving Scotland I work- 
ed for a large railway company, at 20/ or $5.00 per week, out 
of that I paid 12/ or $3.00 for board, here I have $1.65 per day, 
which leaves me $5 after paying board, a decided betterment. 
Personally, I have got along very well. The Canadians are 
a very kind people, and my best friends are those old settlers 
many years out from the Land of the Thistle. 

(Sgd.) THOMAS RADACK. 

HIS ACQUAINTANCES HAVE SUCCEEDED, AND SO 
SHALL HE. 

Yorkton, Saskatchewan, January 18th, 1909. 

Dear Sir, — In answer to your letter forwarded to me I send 
you these few lines: 

I was reared in the Orkneys, but for 1G years I was in 
South Africa and I came to Canada in 1905. I have taken 
three crops now off my half-section, the first, in 1906, was a 
fine crop. In 1907 my crop was badly frozen, and I did not 
half pay expenses that year. This year I got a light crop, too 
much hot and dry weather when in short blade, but still this 
year I managed fairly well so I have nothing to complain 
about. I am getting established and hope to get on, at least 
I am trying. Near Yorkton there are a lot of Orkney men 
and some of them have been here for quite a number of years 
and several of them are well off now, so I think I can't do 
better than refer you to some of them who can give you ex- 
attly what you require without any need of polish to make 
their story attractive. John F. Reid, Orcadia, is one; Peter 
Rousey, Yorkton, P.O., also his brother Robert Rousay, York- 
ton P.O. These are the most prominent Orkney farmers here 
so I think you ought to get a fine letter from each of them as 
they are well to do now and came here with nothing but will- 
ingness, and a good constitution. 

Yours truly, 

(Sgd.) M. CLOUSTON. 

THE ORKNEY AND ABERDEEN MEN ARE HIS 
FAVORITES. 

Saltcoats, Saskatchewan, January 8th, 1909. 
Dear Sir, — You letter to hand, and enclosed find what I 
wish to say. I came to Canada twenty-one years ago and 



have been on my homestead ever since. I was farming in the 
Orkney Isles before I came out here. I have taken out a 
great many farm hands during the time I have been here and 
every one of them has proved good settlers. There is a large 
number of good farm hands in Orkney and Aberdeen that are 
anxious to come to Canada at the present time. The only 
way Canada can get the men that will make good farm hands 
and become good settlers, from Orkney and Aberdeen, is by 
sending farmers from here that the people know and can trust 
to tell them the truth and instruct them how to prepare for 
the passage. A large number of men spend a lot of money 
for clothes before leaving the Old Country; that is trouble 
and lost money for them as they can get more suitable clothes 
and as cheap here, just as they want them. I will give you a 
letter which you can send to the Orkney Press for circulation 
and put it into the Aberdeen Press. 

Yours faithfully, 
(Sgd.) CHARLES RITCHIE, Sr. 

ENGLISH FARM HANDS SHOULD SUCCEED IN THE 
EASTERN TOWNSHIPS. 

Stanbridge East, Province of Quebec, 

December 5th, 1908. 

Dear Sir, — I came to this country from England in 1870. 
from Bloxham, near Banbury, Oxfordshire. 

I came when a boy of 16 years, with one dollar left in my 
pocket, and went to work at farm labor for a number of 
years, and always found plenty of chances to hire out on 
farms. I have, by steady work, saved and accumulated a lit- 
tle property. For the benefit of anyone who is thinking of 
coming to this country who has been brought up to farm work 
in England, I think the Eastern Townships, P.Q., is a very 
good part of Canada to come to. 

There are chances for men with small capital to carry on 
farms on shares, and always farm work for young men who 
are honest and steady and willing to learn the work and ways 
of this country. Yours truly, 

(Sgd.) THOMAS HOLLOWAY. 

REGRETS HE DID NOT SOONER COME TO CANADA. 
Bradford, County Simcoe, Ontario, 

February 3rd, 1909. 
Dear Sir, — I wish to say I came to this country an immi- 
grant last July, from London, England, and wish I had come 
five years sooner. I was placed at farm work for $18.00 per 

84 



month which, considering how little I knew, was good wages 
I like the country and climate very much ; this is a fine coun- 
try for mixed farming and the soil is very productive and I 
woti d strong y advise any young man or woman who is 
healthy and able and willing to work to get here as soon as 
possible, as there are many opportunities in this country that 
are not to be had in the Old Land. I find the people very 
kind and sociable if one does his duty, but they have no use 
tor the man who is looking for soft jobs and not willing to 
work the wages for inexperienced men run as high as $10 
to ?15 per month and board, experienced men from $18 to $25 
per month There is also a large demand for domestic help 
at from $6.00 to $12.00 per month for capable servants Every- 
thing considered, I think this is one of the finest countries for 
the working man in the world. 

Very truly yours, 

(Sgd.) WM. OWENS. 

THOSE WHO ADAPT THEMSELVES TO CHANGED 
CONDITIONS HAVE EVERY CHANCE TO PROSPER. 
Eglington P.O., North Toronto, Ontario. 
12th December, 1908. 

,r'fi i ■?, nS r r '? your cirCuIar . 3rd December, 1908, I am 
satisfied with Canada as a place of settlement. I came from 
Reading, Berkshire, in April of this year, and have been h 
constant work since, until I got stopped yesterday on account 

rtL?W °t W 7 k - ¥ y generaI °P ini0 " of th » country is 
hat , is useless for a lazy man to come here, and you must 
>e able to turn your hand to anything and not stick to one 
trade alone. Another thing that struck me was, that as won 
as you arrive in Canada you have to drop the Old Country 
me hod and style of doing work and do as the Canucks wish 
it done. 

Also it is decidedly a woman's country for work, and a 
man and wife with female children has a very good chance of 
making a good living. y B ™ance oi 

In conclusion, I consider a handy man, who means to work 
and will be amenable to Canadian ways and means has every 
chance to prosper. 3 

Yours respectfully, 

(Sgd.) W. PAITSON. 

RENTED A FARM WITHIN NINE MONTHS OF 
ARRIVAL. 

Shelburne, Ontario, Dec. 18, 1908. 
Dear Sir— I came out to Canada on the Empress of Ireland 
leaving Liverpool March 20th this year, and arrived in T<h 

35 



ronto March 30th. We took a place at the Don, then we went 
to Shelburne and we are here yet. We are now renting a 50- 
acre farm and are hoping to do well. As for Canada, both I 
and the wife like it well and are pleased that we came out 
as there are better opportunities here for anyone that will 
work, and if there is anyone who would care to write me I 
shall be only too pleased to answer them. 

Yours respectfully, 

(Sgd.) JOS. E. CIELSHAW. 

HE IS PROUD OF HIS NEW HOME AND THE PRO- 
GRESS HE HAS MADE. 

Prairie Home Farm, Vermillion, Alta., 

January 15th, 1909. 
Dear Sir, — I take the liberty of writing you respecting a let- 
ter which was received by one of my brothers, T. H. Brown, 
Vermillion, asking him if he would give his experiences of 
his Canadian life, etc. He being rather reserved, does not 
care to undertake the work, but has asked me if I would write 
you on the matter, as he informed me, I have more to show, 
for the time I have been here, than he has. And that as I 
have been taking a more active part in what has been going 
on in this country, holding such positions as Councillor of 
Local Improvement, Secretary-Treasurer of our School Dis- 
trict, to both of which I have been again re-elected this year. 
I am also Vice-President of the Vermillion branch of the Al- 
berta Farmers' Association, and an active church worker. 

I came into the country in 190o, taking up my homestead in* 
December of that year, and I might here mention that I have 
made application for patent of same, S.E. V, Sec 2, To 52, 
R. 7, West 4th. 

I gather from the letter my brother received that the Gov- 
ernment is anxious to make an effort this year to consider- 
ably increase the number of emigrants from the British Isles. 
I do not propose to write you a graphic account of my ex- 
periences, but I am pleased to say that my partner and 1 have 
one of the nicest farms in this part of the country, which, of 
course, is the result of lots of hard work. I have taken snap- 
shots at various times to send home, and I may say, that after 
being shown around amongst friends, I have from time to 
time been asked to write letters to different papers, but have 
not done so up to the present. T have had enquiries at differ- 
ent times from all kinds and conditions of men and may say 
there are several of them out in this country now, and more 
to follow this spring. 

I remain, yours respectfully, 

(Sgd.) EDWIN M. BROWN. 
36 



TAKE WHATEVER WORK TURNS UP AND SUCCESS 
IS SURE. 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, 10th January, 1909. 
Dear Sir,— I just have the pleasure of answering your let- 
ter to the best of my knowledge. I was born in Longham, a 
country place near Oakham, Rutland, England, where I was 
brought up. I first started to work in the same village when 
I had just turned 12 years of age. I started to work for a 
farmer and I hired with him for 9 months, £2 10s. for the nine 
months, and I stayed on with him for two years and nine 
months, and the last year I was getting £5 10s. per year 
with board. Then I went to work for another farmer in the 
same village and this time I stayed with the farmer for 3 
years, and the wages went from i8-0s.-0d. per the first year, 
second year fll-0s.-0d., third year il4-0s.-0d. then I went to 
work for another farmer and I worked with this one nine 
months for sixteen shillings per week, and that finished me 
with farming; then I left home and went to Somercotes, and 
Riddings, two small places in Derbyshire. 

I left the old country, bound for Canada, on April 13th, 
1907. I sailed via New York, to Toronto, which is the nicest 
city I have been to yet. I was engaged as a laborer in To- 
ronto for $2.00 per day the first summer I was in the country, 
and in the fall of the year when the harvesting time came I 
made up my mind to go west harvesting, where I worked in 
harvest field for 14 days for $2.25 per day and board, and 
after that, when coming up to Winnipeg, I was engaged to 
drive a team at Lumsden, Sask., for the C.N.R. for $40 per 
month and board, and after that I went to the West for 6 mos. 
at $30 per month and board, then with the spring of 1908 being 
dull. I went out to dig trenches for some water works for which 
I got 20 cents per hour, and after being there a short time I got 
22J/2 cents per hour, and after I had been with them about 
three months they put me foreman of a job for which I was 
getting $2.50 per day until the winter stopped our work. 

Now, for giving advice, I would never persuade anyone to 
come to Canada because there are so many that come who do 
not like the country and are always running it down, but I 
myself say the country is just what they make it, by saying 
which I think rightly that Canada is far before the Old Coun- 
try for a working man if he will look after himself when he 
gets here and is ready to turn his hand to anything that comes 
along. There are a great many who come from the British 
Isles who will not do anything only what they are used to. 
Now I think that Canada is a country for anyone to get along 
in if he comes out and gets into their ways of working and 
saves a little money, then goes and takes the 160 acres of land 
for himself. It is far better than working all the time for a 
farmer, which I don't know much about myself, but I have 

37 



wi e rWnr r f ing f0f farmerS l nd *«* te " me that when you 
work for a farmer you earn the money he pays you I think 

I have told you all. this time, and if you use this fetter in .any 

way I hope you wi 11 just put it together, for you see that I 

lh,Y? 0T ^"'Tl": \ See in y° ur letter something which 
I had forgotten: I don't know just how much money I had 

dolhr, a r riVed H '" T ( ° r T ,' bu * somewhere between 30 and 40 
dollars. Canada is far before England for a working man, if 
he will only look after himself when he gets here. It is no 

t U « i™ ' "iiT 1 t0 u th u r - OW his mone y over 'hotel bar he wants 
to lose all those habits and he will soon be in a position that 
he would never be in if he stayed all his life in the Old CW 
y - t remain your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) E. G. WILLIAMSON. 

HE WANTS HIS FRIENDS TO COME TO CANADA. ' 
New Hamburg, Ontario, January 1, 1909. 
t n D ££ Sir, w a T m j" s } w "' tin S y°u a letter on what you wish 

he S ZS? I tl ] mk ? f Ca u" ada " Wel1 ' l think Cana da is 
wort w-£ r 0f Place f0r the n S ht man wll ° ; s willing to 
work. When I came out to Canada I made up my mind to 

CountVw I d / d T find T everything so easy as in I O 
Country, but I found out I was soon getting on well and I 
soon got a good name, and I am writing this le"er for those 
of my native town which I came from. g I have been in this 

toTe llVouTi^' " 0t 'r g ' f bUt , !t JS '° ng ^nonghto see Sd 
work in y Tr • COU " try f ° r the men who are willing to 

Zftl , th I • ♦ ^- n ° " T se to come to Canada ""'ess you come 

n the nlv" IZ IOn ' ! am n °^ V "W t0 tdl * ou the Wren™ 
in the pay that a man gets in England, 14 shillings a week 

Z iYW k ' tHen tlCre is ,he wet weather to lose and with 
the 14 shilhngs you have to find your own board.' I know 

T I W I'u t0 T make tW0 ends meet sometimes. Well when 
I came out here I came, as I told you before, with th-> inten- 

eTr t Si^lX £* ?' Y^ I™ ™ ei ™* "°r the first 
with IL,°„ f < d a "v. d washing, and I am staying on 

tin* to a I r" f ? r the nw ? year ' for which I am get- 
ting $200. A dollar values 4s. 2d. in English money, but of 

am telliC £"?* -° W °, rk hard f ° r Jt You must "ot'th nk I 
am telling you it is a place you get money and no work Can- 
wen " S th/rfl g IaCe /°5 bCttering y0 " rself i{ y° u want to do 
well I think I have told you as well as I can. I wish all mv 

people, who want to better themselves, would come out hw 
as here ,s plenty of room for the right kind of men. I used 
to follow farm work at home, and I had £4 when I ianded 
A- r Yours truly, 

(Sgd.) WALTER STACEY. 
38 



HE HAS WORKED HARD AND IS NOW GOING TO 
TAKE A HOLIDAY. 

Durban, Manitoba, 8th December, 1908. 

Dear Sir,— In the month of September, 1899, I took up a 
free grant homestead of 160 acres, the N.E. quarter of 26-34- 
29 W. 1st Meridian, in the Swan River district, for which I 
paid a fee of $10.00. At the time I was 100 miles from a rail- 
way, a post office, day schools and churches. When I started 
I had $200.00 in cash, but I have worked hard since that time, 
and although I have had many ups and downs, have had good 
health and worked on. I purchased 160 acres more land from 
the Canadian Northern Railway Company at $3.50 per acre, 
on ten years' payment, with interest at 6 per cent. I have 
made all my annual payments but the two last, which are not 
yet due. This year I had 200 acres in crop. I have seven 
head of horses, three head of cattle and twelve pigs, also good 
farm buildings, and all my farm implements and machinery. 
I have very little indebtedness, so that I am safe in saying I 
am now worth from ten to eleven thousand dollars all told 
over and above what I owe. 

I might say I have had my losses and discouragements also, 
for, during that time, I have lost twelve horses and had to buy 
others, but I am getting on very well, and I think Western 
Canada is the best place on earth for a young man to make a 
start in life. The railway and post office are only two miles 
from my farm now, and day schools and churches are close 
by. A great change in so short a time. I may say that next 
week I am going to take a holiday trip back to my old home 
and enjoy myself for the next three months. 

Yours truly, (Sgd.) DAVID SHAW. 

WISHES HE HAD COME SOONER. 

Orangeville, Ontario, December 20th, 1908. 

Dear Sir, — In answer to your letter you sent, asking me my 
opinion of Canada : I came from a little village called Sandon, 
near Royston, Hartfordshire. I was working on a farm and 
my wages were twelve shillings a week. I thought I would 
like to go to Canada, so I left England on the 18th of July 
and arrived here on the 26th of July. I had about $15.00 
when I landed. I went up to Orangeville and hired with a 
farmer for four months at $20.00 a month and board. After 
my time was up I agreed to stay all winter just helping to 
feed cattle. I then hired with another farmer on the 1st of 
April, for four months at $25.00 a month. I think Canada is 
the place for all young fellows wishing to get on and save 
money. The winters are cold, but you can put on plenty of 

n 



clothes. I only wish I had been out sooner than I was Hon 
mg this w.ll be some good in bringing out others I reS 

Yours truly, 

(Sgd.) C. TYRRELL. 

ALL WILLING TO WORK AND HAVING GOOD 
HEALTH SHOULD SUCCEED. ' 

Grenfell, Saskatchewan, 8th January, 1909. 
Uear Sir,— As you are desirous of having an account of mv 

nun" lT,n S ' V 1 ™ ^ the J> leasu re °* S wlm ?nfo n^ 
tion I can. 1 ca me from Broughton AstleyT Leicestershire 
where I was engaged on a farm at 8 shillmgs a week and 
board I came to Canada in May, 1907 I had not the least 
difficulty in securing work at 25 dollars a month and board 
Z SU T er l" d $i a ,nomh and boaf d during winter- hive 

rtffSrtuyM aat ~ r '-S 

(Sgd.) ARTHUR TURNER. 
IF WILLING TO WORK, SUCCESS IS SURE. 
S.E. y 4 16, 43, 13 W. 3rd, Ruddell, Saskatchewan, 
5J. November 23rd, 1908. 

, ' w 1 repJ y t0 vour enquiry, I beg to say I came to Can- 
ada in March, 1904, by Allan Line sfeamer*'Parb iL?' hav- 
ing booked my passage to Prince Albert, where 1 found em- 
ployment in a lumber camp for (5 weeks then a 12 
many were going to Battleforddistria seeking homesteids 1 
joined their numbers, and took the trail w, Km »me of 

SiTi m x v e * Ay , b ° Ught oxcn - There was n ° ™K a 
that time. We made our journey in 10 days. 

Arriving in Battleford, we went off in parties until we 

found suitable homesteads. I took up my homestead inh 

of June and started to work at once with a yoke of your* 

oxen on the above quarter in the Goose Lake district about 

20 miles east of Battleford. I commenced drawing logs 

which I got withm about 3 miles, and bu.lt a log shack 14 x fo' 

AlhA'f 6 P aCrCS du , ring the summer an d worked at Prince 
Albert lumber camp during the winter, which enabled me to 
buy another yoke of oxen. In 1905 I seeded my 12 a™es 8 

IZlTu^S Wh ! at - The ° ats yielded 3 T bushels and 
wheat 20 bushels to the acre, and broke 55 acres during tbe 

"re ^^M 10 ^ 1906 ' P ■' in r heat ' Elding 22 bushed 
the acre, the old 12 acres planted to oats, yielding 24 bushels 
per acre, and worked in lumber camp during w^ter, having 

40 



put my oxen out to a neighbor to winter for me. In 1906 I 
broke 42 acres which this year, 1907, was planted to wheat, 
yielding 25 bushels per acre, my old land of 67 acres was 
planted to wheat, oats and barley— 22 acres oats, yielding 1,047 
bushels; 40 acres wheat, giving 758 bushels; 5 acres barley, 
176. and broke 40 acres, making in all 149 acres broken with 
two yoke of oxen and self. 

My yield for this year was: wheat, 1,761 bushels- oats 
1,047; barley, 176; potatoes, 40 bushels; turnips, 60 bushels, 
and other vegetables. 

This following on the exceptionally hard winter and late 
spring, should be very encouraging to anyone thinking of 
starting in Western Canada. I have now completed my three 
years' homestead duties, have broken 149 acres, built a decent 
house, have sold oxen and have four horses, built stable two 
granaries and other outbuildings, dug well 15 feet and 'have 
good supply of water, and have pigs and poultry. The CNR 
now runs within 7 miles of me, my nearest station being Rtid- 
delK I started homesteading with $180, and have now a 
pretty good outfit of machinery and have had no assistance 
other than my work and produce. A newcomer must not ex- 
pect these results unless he is prepared to work, but it is 
awaiting anyone willing to work and stick to it, and success 
is bound to follow. 

I am afraid, sir, I have made a poor attempt at a letter, but 
have stated facts and hope you will be able to make it into 
readable form. 

I am, Sir, yours obediently, 

(Sgd.) H. P. VOKE, 
Formerly of East Harptree, near Bristol, 
Somersetshire, England. 

HE WILL SEE ALL PARTS BEFORE SETTLING. 
Bronte, Ontario, 22nd December, 1908. 

Dear Sir,— With reference to your letter of 5th inst., asking 
me to write an account of my experiences since arriving in 
Canada, I shall be very pleased to say what I think of the 
country— but firstly T must give you to understand that I was 
not of the working class, but the son of an English gentleman. 
My father is a member of the London Stock Exchange, and 
until recently resided in Eltham, Kent. Do not think that I 
feel in any way superior to my fellowmen, for I am not, and 
have found the Canadians very hospitable and well educated. 
I may say that the prospects in this country, not only for a 
workingman but everyone, is marvelous and the life country 
and air exquisite. I arrived at St. John on the C.P.R steam- 
er "Empress of Britain" landing at St. John, N.B., oi 
10/4 /'08, and located in St. Catharines where I remained un 



til 14th August, when I went out to Saskatchewan in order 
to see the country and intend next year to go to B.C., as I 
want to see all the different districts of Canada before I settle 
on any particular spot or any particular sort of farming. I 
cannot say enough in praise of Canada and Canadians. 

Use this letter or any passage or passages thereof as you 
think fit. Believe me, 

Yours sincerely, 

(Sgd.) KENNETH L. MASSEY. 

WORK FOR ALL. 

Mayfield Farm, Box 52, Lockwood, Saskatchewan. 

January 16, 1909. 
Sir, — Regarding your letter of December re immigration to 
Canada from the British Isles, I will state my own experience. 
T came to Canada in March, 1904, from a little town a few 
miles from Manchester, Lancashire, England. Over there I 
had done a little farming, but not much, and although I 
earned good money, I would sooner be out here by far. The 
first year I hired out with a farmer to gain experience. When 
1 came to this country I had about $500, and in 1905 I struck 
out west to homestead. I located on a homestead, bought 
three horses and a few implements and started to farm. I 
have now got just about all my 160 acres broken up and ex- 
pect a good crop next year, the last two having been very 
poor, but still I did fairly well out of them. In 1905 we used 
to go 65 miles to the nearest town and in 1906 we had to go 
40 miles. But since then the Canadian Pacific Railway and 
also the Grand Trunk have built railways through here, and 
the land that in 1905 was selling for $5.00 per acre is now 
from $15.00 to $20.00 per acre, and I am 8 miles away from 
the C.P.R. and 6 from the G.T.P. railways. I had for the 
first year or two pretty bad luck, my best broncho strayed 
away and was never found, and the other two horses I left in 
charge of a neighbor while I worked in the bush and they 
died. But in spite of that, to-day I have four horses and 160 
acres of real good wheat land, a few cattle, pigs, and hens, a 
nice comfortable house and stable and nearly all my farm 
machinery- In fact I would not sell out for 4,000 dollars. I 
don't think I could have done as well as this had I stayed in 
England, and although I have certainly worked for it all I 
have enjoyed the work. It is a free life, and what I do like 
about it is that the hired man is as good as the boss if he 
knows how to behave himself. For any man or woman (and 
we certainly lack the latter) who has lots of grit and perse- 
verance and is not afraid of work this is the country for 
tjiem. While anybody with a little capital, that capital can 
soon be doubled. I will now close, with a hope that any man 

42 



or woman earning a precarious living in overcrowded Eng- 
land will save enough to pay their passage and get to a 
country where there is at least work for all. 
Yours, etc., 

(Sgd.) JOHN ARMSTRONG. 

THE FINEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD. 

Findlay, Manitoba, 25th January, 1909. 
Dear Sir,— In reply to your letter I received the other week, 
I am pleased to give a little account of myself, from the time 
I left the Old Country up till now. On the 9th of May, two 
years ago, I left my native village of Langham, near Oakham, 
Rutland, to set out to Canada and better my position. I was 
at home a house boy in a grammar school ; received the small 
wage of £8 per year for my work. Although I was rather 
young to leave home and strike for a fresh country, I deter- 
mined with my small earnings to set sail for Canada, which 
place I had heard very favorable accounts of. At my arrival 
in Quebec and having a few dollars in my pocket, I took the 
train to Toronto, and was not very long before I procured 
employment. After being down east for about four mouths I 
struck for the western part of Canada, arriving in Winnipeg 
in September. Threshing having just commenced, I easily 
got employment on a threshing outfit, in which I drove a 
stook team and received $2.25 a day and board. I had a run 
of this of about twenty days, so it brought me in a few dol- 
lars. After threshing I took the train for Winnipeg again, 
and immediately got a position of driving a team. The win- 
ter I spent in the bush, where wages are pretty high in the 
winter months. On coming out in the spring I thought I 
would like to see life on a farm; there is always lots of work 
to be easily found there, and it was not long before I got work 
with a farmer at Findlay, which I am still at, gaining all the 
experience I can in this branch of farm industry. I like this 
western country of Canada first rate. I am not sorry for 
coming out here, the climate I consider healthy and bracing, 
the winter, although a trifle long, which is the only drawback, 
but it is very invigorating if a man is warmly clothed. Read- 
ing Old Country papers on the subject of the unemployed in 
England, it is a thousand pities that the government or some of 
the great labor unions of England could not give some of them 
every support to emigrate to Western Canada, where they 
would find all kinds of work for eight months of the year. 
At any rate, wages are just double of what they could get in 
England. There is lots of room for employment out here. 
There are men whom I have met in my travels in this coun- 
try who give in and go home and say the country is no good, 
but I should say the men are no good, and not the countr<- 

43 



as there is no doubt this is the finest country in the world for 
the man who wants to make a comfortable home for him- 
self if he is of an industrious turn of mind. 

In a couple of years from now it is my intention to go back 
to my parents in England before settling down for good. I 
will when at home give this country a good name, as it is 
worth it. I advise all I can at home if they want to better 
their position in life comparatively easily, strike for the west- 
ern part of Canada. 

I remain, yours truly. 

(Sgd.) J. O. CONDER. 

HIS CHUMS WOULD COME IF THEY KNEW WHAT 
CANADA IS REALLY LIKE. 

Clear Lake Farm, Claresholm, Alta., 

January 17th, 1909. 
Dear Sir, — Writing in reply to your letter of a few days 
ago, I shall be pleased to give you the information you re- 
quire. I came from Glastonbury, in the County of Somerset, 
where I had been working for nine years, my home was at 
Evercrcech, a village about ten miles from Glastonbury, but I 
left home as soon as I was able to leave school. I was one of 
a family of ten and my father a farm laborer ; I had to leave 
school when I was eleven years old. When I started work I 
was earning 2 shillings a week and my board, having to pay 
15 pence a week for lodgings and find my own clothes. In 
the nine years I was working my pay rose to 9 shillings a 
week and my board. My work was to take care of grazing 
cattle and sheep and do what was wanted on the land. I 
made up my mind to come to Canada. I knew another man 
that was coming out. and also an older brother; we left Eng- 
land on the 15th of March, 1907. We were just two weeks 
on the road and when I got here I had just 5 dollars left. I 
got work a week after on a farm at 30 dollars for the first 
month and 35 dollars a month afterwards, and I have stayed 
at the same place ever since. I had the misfortune to take 
typhoid fever towards the end of the first summer, but I 
don't blame the country for that as I would have been just as 
likely to have got it anywhere else, and although I wtas 
almost a stranger to everybody here I had the best of care 
and several came to see me. I was lucky enough to get a 
homestead not far from Claresholm and shall have to get on 
that in April. I have earned enough money to buy three 
horses, a wagon, and most of the stuff I shall need on my 
homestead. The man I came out with went back after the 
first summer and my brother went back last fall, but I have 
made enough friends since I have been here, so I don't miss 

SO' 

44 



them. My father was killed in an accident 9 years ago and 
my brother and I have to keep our home together, between 
us, and I find I can help them a lot more since I have been 
nut here than I could there. My idea of the country is that 
it is the only place for a young man, and if a lot of my old 
chums in England only knew what it is really like out here 
they wouldn't stay there another week. The work isn't hard 
and there is lots of it, and the pay is so much better than it 
is back there. I am afraid I have made this letter rather long, 
but still it is the best I can do to give my opinion of the coun- 
try. I am yours truly, 

(Sgd.) WM. J. GRIFFIN. 

NEVER REGRETS HE LEFT ENGLAND. 

Chauvin, Alberta, January 26, 1909. 
Dear Sir,— In reply to yours, to hand, dated Dec, I am 
pleased to give you a small account of my experience here. I 
am a farmer's son and came from Northamptonshire. I sail- 
ed from Liveprool May 3rd, 1906, arrived here May 20th, and 
filed on this quarter May 21st, which was then 55 miles from 
town. I hired myself out for $25 per month, with the under- 
standing that the man was to haul to my homestead every- 
thing needful on the same, help build a house and dig a well. 
Also hired him to break me 30 acres, and put up 18 tons of 
hay, and I came with him in the summer to do it. After that 
1 was working around until the end of Oct., when T came to 
my homestead where I have been living since that time, with 
the exception of a few weeks in the summer, during which 
time I was out breaking for other boys, earning from 6 to 7 
dollars per day, with my four oxen. In the meantime I have 
taken 2 crops off, first 30 acres realizing $12 per acre, second 
37 acres, at $14 per acre. I have 00 acres now under cultiva- 
tion and all ready for seed in the spring, my quarter is fenced, 
good buildings, all machines I require, ten head of cattle be- 

my oxen. I started with $600, but have had two bits of 
hard luck for my house was burnt down with everything in 
it. which was worth $300, and a man last Jan. ran off with 

which I don't suppose I shall ever get. This country is, 
in my opinion, very healthy and a good field for young men 
now in the British Isles who wish to better their circum- 
stances. I myself have never regretted the day I left home, 

itrli 1 was very comfortable there, but had such a great 

^to see this country. I intend going home for a trip 
next fall, if I have a good harvest, and I shall do my best to 
bring some of my friends back. 

I remain, yours faithfully, 

(Sgd.) A. PERKINS. 
P.S.— I am now V/ 2 miles from town. 

45 



GOOD OPENINGS FOR THOSE WITH ilOO CAPITAL. 

Baldur, Manitoba, December 15th, 1908. 

Dear Sir,— Yours of 5th instant received, and note what 
you say. Well, I will just write you a few lines which I think 
will give you a better idea than filling out your form. The 
last place I worked in Scotland was Home Farm, Troup, 
Banffshire, and I arrived in Winnipeg 23rd December, 1901, 
worked for $10.00 a month for the winter, and $30.00 per 
month for the summer. Then I bought a farm of 320 acres, 
which I have done very well on. I sold it this fall, and con- 
sider I have made $2,500, besides having $1,200 worth of 
stock and machinery. I have now taken a homestead and pre- 
emption in Saskatchewan, which I will move on to next 
spring. Now, I am not much on advising ploughmen without 
capital, to come to Canada, although some of them might do 
well ; but anyone who has £100 or over I consider is foolish to 
work on any farm in Scotland. My objection to advising 
ploughmen, without capital, to come to Canada is this,— there 
is lots of work for everybody from 1st April to 1st Novem- 
ber, at good wages; but the difficulty is, no work in winter 
for such class. What Canada wants is farmers and farm ser- 
vants with a little capital to open up the good country. A 
farm servant coming to Canada with some capital should take 
employment with some good practical farmer for one year to 
get experience, then get a homestead of his own. He wants 
to come here with his mind made up to stay, ready to take 
hold and do anything. He must forget all his old ways, and 
make himself acquainted as well as possible with the methods 
of the country. I will say, in closing, any farm servant with 
flOO, as I know lots of them are, and a will to work, can- 
not do better than come to Canada by 1st April; but the 
man who is not wanted at home is not wanted in Canada. I 
shall be very glad to give any of my old friends reliable ad- 
vice on application. 

You are at liberty to use my name and this letter to any 
advantage you wish, as this is my truthful opinion. 
Yours truly, 

(Sgd.) R. G. BROWN. 

REACHED CANADA WITHOUT CAPITAL, NOW 
LIVING RETIRED. 

Moosomin, Sask, 11th January, 1909. 
Sir, — I came from Garton-on-the- Wolds, Yorkshire, and ar- 
rived in Canada May 15th, 1884. I am well satisfied with my 
prospects, in this country. I have been engaged in farming 
since 1884, and have been, I think, fairly successful. I may 
say that when I landed here I was almost entirely without 

46 



means. I sold my farm of 640 acres about a year ago and am 
now living retired in very comfortable circumstances. 

I certainly would advise British agriculturists to come to 
this country, preferably those who have had practical experi- 
ence in the agricultural districts of England and Scotland. 

My advice to newcomers would be to work on a farm for 
one season to enable them to get an idea of the methods 
adopted in this country, and also to give them experience as 
to the selection of a district wherein to begin operations for 
themselves. But, after all, I would like to say to the farmers 
and farm laborers of the Old Country, that there never was a 
time as good as the present for coming to Canada. The man 
with a little capital can either homestead or buy an improved 
farm, and make money right from the start; or the man with- 
out means can get a free grant of 160 acres, and will have no 
difficulty in getting work part of the time at good wages, 
without going far away from his own homestead. 
Yours truly, 

(Sgd.) WILLIAM WAINES. 



HOPES TO OWN HIS OWN FARM SOME DAY. 
Saintfield, Ontario, 1st March, 1909. 

Dear Sir,— I feel it my duty to write these few lines to 
say how glad I am that I came to Canada. I arrived in this 
country on the 3rd August, 1907, and worked in Toronto all 
that fall and winter, starting farming in the spring. I worked 
for 7 months and a half for 70 dollars, which was not very 
large wages, but I wanted to learn farming and took the first 
chance that came. After those seven and a half months I 
hired with James Baker for 12 months for 160 dollars. It is 
a good farm, with a new barn upon it and everything up-to- 
date. I hope to own one myself some day. My age is 21. 
I only wish I had come to this country before I did for I have 
wasted many years that would have given me a great deal 
more benefit. I am very grateful for your immigration De- 
partment which has put me into such a healthy and money- 
making business. 

I must now conclude, hoping that every fellow may be as 
well satisfied as I am. 



I remain, yours obediently, 

(Sgd.) PERCY L. BARNARD. 



47 



Canadian Government Agents. 

Intending emigrants would do well, before deciding upon 
the particular locality to which to go, to consult one of the 
Canadian Government agents in the United Kingdom, who 
will, without charge, gladly give, either personally or by letter, 
full and reliable details regarding any point upon which in- 
tending emigrants desire information. The following is a list 
of Canadian Government agents in the United Kingdom: 

England. 

Mr. J. Obed Smith, Assistant Superintendent of Emigra- 
tion, tl-12 Charing Cross, London, S. W. 

Mr. A. F. Jury, Old Castle Bldgs., Preeson's Row, Liver- 
pool. 

Mr. H. G. Mitchell, 139 Corporation St., Birmingham. 

Mr. H. M. Murray, 81 Queen Street, Exeter. 

Mr. L. Burnett, 1G Parliament Street, York. 

Scotland. 

Mr. Malcolm Mclntyre, 35-57 St. Enoch Square, Glasgow. 
Mr. John McLennan, 26 Guild Street, Aberdeen. 

Ireland. 

Mr. John Webster, 17-19 Victoria Street, Belfast. 
Mr. Edward O'Kelly, 44 Dawson Street, Dublin. 
No fees charged by Government Agents. 

NOTE. 

The Canadian Immigration Department desires 
emigrants and booking agents, to distinctly under- 
stand that it is not responsible for any statements 
made by employment bureaus or others in the 
United Kingdom, or elsewhere, apart from those 
contained in printed pamphlets or circulars of the 
Department. 

Farmers, Farm Labourers and Female Domestic 
Servants are the only people whom the Canadian 
Immigration Department advises to go to Canada. 

All others should get definite assurance of em- 
ployment in Canada before leaving home, and have 
money enough to support them for a time in case of 
disappointment. 

The proper time to reach Canada is between the 
beginning of April and the end of September.