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Full text of "Publication"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication01ruth 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 1 

June 1973 



Published By 

Rutherford County Hiatorical Society 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 

1973 






RTITHERTORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 1 



FOREWORD 



People, Places, and Events make History. 

In wishing to preserve, and make easily accessible 
many facts concerning the rich heritage of Rutherford 
County, the Historical Society presents Volume I. 

Many hours of research into historical records have 
been spent in preparation for this volume, in order to 
compile and organize information concerning outstanding 
people, the marriage records from 1851-1853, and 
descriptions of places which have played an important 
part in the historical background of Rutherford County. 

This volume is presented with the hope that it will 
aid in helping individuals in research, and develop greater 
appreciation for the historical background and heritage 
of Rutherford County. 

Mary Hall 



7G-Cl;)yl 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 1 



published by the 
Rutherford County Historical Society 



OFFICERS 



President Ernest King Johns 

Vice President Mrs. Elvis Rushing 

Secretary & Treasurer. ,. .Mrs. Dorothy Matheny 



PUBLICATION NO. 1 (Limited Edition - 200 copies) is 
to be sent to members of the Rutherford County Historical 
Society. "Hie annual membership dues are $5.00 which 
includes a monthly NEWSLETTER to all members. Additional 
copies of PUBLICATION NO. 1 may be obtained at $2.00 per 
copy. 

All correspondence concerning additional copies, 
contributions to future issues, and membership should be 
addressed to 

D. M. Matheny 
li*34 Diana Street 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



CONTRIBUTORS 

■flie Rutherford County Historical Society gratefully 
acknowledges the labor and hours spent to provide material 
for our PUBLICATION NO. 1. Tlianks are extended to the 
following; 

Ben Hall McFarlin, Rutherford County Court Clerk 

Dr. Homer Pittard, Rutherford County Historian 

Henry G, Vfe*ay, Rutherford County Archivist 

Virginia Gooch Watson (Mrs. George F. Watson) 

Charter Member of Williamson County Historical Society 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

PUBLICATION NO. I 

1973 



Contents 

Page 
Rutherford County Marriage Records (1851-1853) 

Prepared by He nry Wray 1 

Bride Index (Alphabetically by Page No.) 11 

Sojourn in Murfreeaboro 

Samuel Hervey Laughlin'3 Life in Murfreeaboro 

By Henry T^ay 16 

Rutherford County Militia Commisaiona 1807-1811 

Pre pa red by He nry Wray 2U 

Union: Murfreeaboro' s Other University 

By Dr. Homer Pittard 29 

Specif ication a for the First Court Houae in Murfreeaboro 
Forwarded by Mrs. Virginia Gooch Wataon to 
Henry Wray ^8 

Rutherford County Offices and Officers (180U-1973) 
Prepared by the Rutherford County Court 
Clerk ' 3 Office 51 

Members of Rutherford County Historical Society 

(June 6, 1973) 62 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY MARRIAGE RECORDS (1851-53) 

Prepared by Henry Wray 
1851 

Adkinaon, F. M, 8; Susan G. Phillips June 23 

Anderson, Henry C. & Catharine Horton Jan. 22 

Anthony, Casper N. & Mary E. Pitta Oct. 11 

Bates, Aaron & Eliz. Hopkins June 9 

Batey, Jasper N. & Isabel N. Tassy Nov. 5 

Batey, Vfei. P. & Eliz. M. Ho skins Dec. 1 

Bell, Hezikiah & Perraelea M. Mathis July 26 

Bell, Jos. T. & Hannah H. Mathis July 8 

Beraus, Ito. S: Eliz. J. Dill Dec. 2 

Bird, \fa. & lavina C. V7illiams Sept. 17 

Blair, Geo. S. & Purlina N. Noe Dec. 20 

Bond, John & Eliz. Luster Jan. 23 

Boring, Sterling B. & Martha S. Edwards Nov. 25 

Bowen, Wh. H. & Margaret A. Dobbins Sept. 3 

Bowman, Bedford C. & Martha Benson Jan. 20 

Bradford, James & Maria Martin May 30 

Brandon, Geo N. & Eliz. McGregory Nov. 29 

Broady, Alexander & Narcissa J. Floyd Dec. 25 

Brooks, Jordan & Rebecca Johnson Jan. 28 

Brown, James & Mary M, Fleming July 30 

Brown, John W. & Eliz. McCracken Mar. 26 

Brown, Benj. & Jane Taylor June 21 

Brown, Thomas P. & Julia F. Gannon Mar. 7 

Bryant, James R. & Nancy E. Hood Jan. 15 

Burnett, Thomas & Rachel Cantrell Oct. 22 

Canon, Abram W. & Mary E. Huggins Feb. 27 

Castleman, Joseph R. & Sarah E. Pugh Feb. 26 

Charlton, George W. k Mary A. Hannah Mar. 25 

Childress, John W. & Mary E. Phillips Oct. 15 

Clopton, John A. & Lucy W. Martin Sept. 25 

Cobb, S. J. & Jane Alba Aug. 12 

Coleman, Jesse A. & Mary J. Newsom Jan. 2 

Golraan, Ivblter E. & Fanny J. Black Sept. 2 

Collier, John A. & .Susan F. Brewer Aug. 21 

Cook, Vfe. D. & Margaret J. Hunter Dec. 26 

Corder, John & Margaret J. Morton Nov. 26 

Cotton, John H. & Nancy J. McMurry Nov. 22 

Coughanour, David & Eliz, Grimes Nov. 20 

Covington, Larkin M. & Sarah E. Fagan June 12 

Crick, Richard & Martha Mangrum Sept. 11 

Corckett, Allen B. & Louisa Hall Apr.*17 

Gumming s, Alfred M. & Lucinda T. Daniel Jan.* 16 

Cunningham, George & Melissa Taylor Dec. 2k 

Gurlee, Calvin D. & Emely Lyon Apr! 25 

Daughtry, Jeremian & Eliza. Belt May* 18 

Drenon, Thomas k Raymeth 3. .Smart Sept. 2 7 

Drumwright, Alexander J. & Rhoda Ann McDowell Feb.*25 

Duncan, Robert L. & Mary Ann V^att Jan. 23 



DunLap, Jacob H. & Nancy C. Sage 
Dowling, John M. & Mary W. aaith 
Doyle, Vfa. H. & Adeline Grogan 
Ellis, Hicka & Sarah Jackson 
Evans, Peter & Phebe F. anotherman 
Earless, Obediah & Sarah V. Brook 
Farmer, Vfe. & Martha Wade 
Fears, Prier & Armenia Covington 
Finch, Adam & Gasha R. Jarratt 
Frasier, Vfa. & Eliz. Thurman 
Freeman, Joshua & Martha Cherry 
Fugett, Mathew S. & Ann Eliaz Jones 
Fowler, James B. & Melissa Tucker 
Gilbert, Charles & Eliz. Ann Tudor 
Gilchrist, Philip P. & Ellen A. Phillips 
Gooch, J. C. & Martha J. Randolph 
Green, Joseph J. & Mariah E. H. Hyde 
Guile tt, Henry & Susan Winfrey 
Gum, Alexander & Martha Wade 
Hall, Alexander & Jane M. Fletcher 
Harrell, Layman & Mary G. Harrell 
Herrod, Right & Hannah Eades 
Hill, Samuel M. & Clementine Bailey 
Hope, James W. & Clementine Burnett 
Hoover, Benf. F, & Susan J. Marlen 
Horton, John N. & Sarah Ann Fowler 
Horton, Vfa. j. & Martha A. Smotherman 
Houston, Vfa. k Eliz. C. Clark 
Jackson, John F. & Sarah C. Lawrence 
Jackson, Tliomas M. & Mary Hendricks 
James, John A. & Oliver F. D. Smith 
Johnson, Granville & Frances M. Foster 
Johnson, S. H. & Sarah A. Gum 
Johnson, Vhi. & Nancy J. Posey 
Jones, John & lucy A, Richardson 
Jordan, James M. & Sarah Petillo 
Kidd, G. W. & Martha A. Brittain 
Kirk, F. G. & Rozetta Norman 
Knight, Lewis W. & Eliza Eagle ton 
Knox, James C. & Sarah A. Ryon 
Knox, John h Manervia Vfeller 
Lane, James & Mary A. McCrea 
Lantern, Henry & Lucretia Collins 
Lee, James M. & Martha A. Blair 
Lewis, Vhi. J. & Lutha Ann Glenn 
Livings, Allen G. & Susan C. Vfeller 
Loughry, J. N. & Miss A. A. Brown 
Malone, Andrew J. & Amanda F. Peyton 
Mangrum, Joshua & Sarah Crick 
Ma this, David C. & Nancy E. Serrell 
Meredeth, Joseph & Rhuah A. Fleming 
Miles, Caswell M. & Nancy W. Gentry 
Miller, Edward 3. & Mary Miller 



Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


28 


June 


6 


Jan. 


21 


Sept. 


23 


Aug. 


20 


May 


29 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


7 


May 


22 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


24 


May 


16 


Nov. 


19 


Dec. 


16 


June 


18 


May 


29 


July 


31 


Nov. 


25 


Nov. 


17 


July 


21 


Oct. 


17 


Aug. 


21 


Oct. 


28 


Dec. 


17 


Feb. 


26 


May 


29 


June 


3 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


11 


Nov. 


24 


Sept. 


11 


Aug. 


6 


Feb. 


6 


Oct. 


28 


June 


5 


Dec. 


15 


July 


15 


May 


20 


Oct. 


6 


Jan. 


23 


June 


7 


Aug. 


29 


Oct. 


13 


Dec. 


10 


May 


28 


Apr. 


17 


Sept. 


16 


July 


22 


May 


5 


July 


3 


June 


11 


Oct. 


27 



Moorehcad, Via. & Nancy Smith 
Morgan, Vfa. & Louisa Ann Gaston 
Moore, James B. & Andromedia Grisham 
Mullins, John & Etaeline Croathwaite 
McBride, Willis M. & Malinda Holden 
McElroy, Vfe. E. & Margarett A. Neely 
McFadden, Candor & Sarah L. Stroop 
McMurray, Geo. W. & Margarett J. Clark 
McRea, Wn. B. & Frances E. Three tt 
Newman, John B. & Martha Elliott 
Northcott, John & Eliza McKee 
Odeneal, T. J. & Catharine Martin 
Overall, John W. & Mary McGullough 
Ozment, Henry H. & Mary A. Wrather 
Patterson, John & Julia A. Lytle 
Patton, Joseph G. & Judith C. Edwards 
Peyton, Thomas B. & Mary E. Sanders 
Pinks ton, Hugh & Mary McKee 
Pope, Christopher & Tabitha Lamb 
Pryor, James L. & Mary E. Winston 
Pugh, Edmund B. & He t tie A. E. McGlendon 
Ransom, Richard P. & Frances Bass 
Rich, Robert & Mary L. Neely 
Richardson, Harry P. & Nancy E. Devault 
Robertson, Green B. & Mary F. Parrish 
Rodgers, Robert & Sally Hooker 
Rodgers, Ranzel H. & Mary C. Bivins 
Rucker, Bennett & Mary Mathis 
Rucker, Samuel & Mary T. Wright 
Ruffner, John F. & Margaret T. L. Hopkins 
Rouse, Isaac & Louisa Wilson 

(free man of col. & free woman of col.) 
Rouse, Richard & Manervia Wilson 

(free man of col. & free woman of col.) 
Sanflor, Candor & Sarah J. McGullough 
Scales, Daniel R. & Susan Whigby 
Sclaes, Joseph H. & Mary E. Hickman 
Simmons, Vfa. W. & Louisa L. Thornton 
Sivily, Vfa. H. & Frances H. Lawing 
Slanter, Spencer S. & Alline Koonce 
Smith, Geo. W. & Eliz. Henderson 
Smith, Henry B. & Sarah E. Finch 
anith, James & Lavicy Todd 
Snith, James M. & Frances P. Bee ton 
anith, Jesse B. & Joicy Gavinder 
anith, John T. & America Johnson 
anotherman, Elmore & Mary aaotherman 
Stovall, Jephtha & Harriet Fields 
Summers, Lafayette & Nancy Morgan 
Summers, U. T. & Nancy A. Johnson 
^omas, Robert G. & Sarah Ann Vaught 
Thomas, Sampson & Suraney Williams 
Towns, Vh. G. & Lucinda Covington 
Vaughan, Edward J. & Mary Ann E. Thornton 



Nov. 


26 


March 1 


Dec. 


17 


Sept, 


. 23 


Sept, 


. 3 


Nov. 


23 


April 2k 


May 


10 


Oct. 


29 


March 3 


July 


4 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


25 


Dec. 


18 


July 


31 


June 


23 


Oct. 


7 


Nov. 


29 


Nov. 


11 


Dec. 


22 


Nov. 


26 


Nov. 


17 


Jan. 


27 


May 


21 


Dec. 


14 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


7 


Oct. 


10 


Dec. 


16 


March 


17 


Jan. 


2 


Feb. 


20 


Sept. 


11 


Mar. 


30 


Dec. 


3 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


8 


March 


8 


May 


15 


June 


5 


Aug. 


5 


Dec. 


16 


Sept. 


12 


Jan. 


5 


Aug. 


Ik 


Sept. 


8 


Oct. 


Ik 


Oct. 


17 


Sept. 


6 


Sept. 


30 


Dec. 


19 


Sept. 


30 



Vaughan, Thomas J. & Prise ilia Cooke 

Vernon, Mn. T. & Martha S. Floyd 

Wadley, John W. & Cynthia A. Hollowell 

Wallace, A. M. & Sarah Reed 

Walpole, Chas H. & Catherine J. Wblpole 

Warren, James & Sarah J. Cook 

Warren, Vfa. & Charloote J. May 

Watkina, Joseph & Margaret H. Linater 

Vfatkina, W. S. & Adeline W. Wilkinson 

Vfeatherly, P. W. or W. P. & Julia Bishop 

Webb, Thomas L. & Sarah A. Lee 

Vfebb, W. S. & Adelphia Wheeler 

Vfebber, Edward & Jane Green 

Williams, Henry J. & Susan E. Sumner 

Wingo, T. R. & Eliza R. Smith 

Winsett, Robert W. & Mary Crick 

Wood, Johnson & Amanda F. Claud 

Woodruff, John M. & Eliz. J, Todd 

Wood, Lafayette & Mary E. Beasley 

York, Uriah & Mahala P. Batey 

Youree, Wn. F. & Angeline T. Richardson 

1852 

Adcock, Henry W. & Margaret Odel 
Alexander, John D. & Violet L. Baird 
Anderson, Chas. W. & Martha Ann Love 
Andrews, Mn. & Nancy J. S. Nance 
Annatrong, Vfe. a. & Sarah A. Wright 
Askew, Aaron 0. & Susan C. Read 
Baricley, Samuel Y. & Catharine J. Harrison 
Barkley, Thomas C. & Nancy J. Wilson 
Barnes, Thomas F. & Siota Patterson 
Barnea, Thomas P. & Lavinia F. Coleman 
Batten, Vfa. S. & Nancy Ann Winston 
Beealey, Jamea & Sarah C. Anderaon 
Bennett, Zachariah & Lucinda Fleming 
Blackman, C. A. & Mickey W. anith 
Bowman, Francia M. & Mary E. Know 
Bracken, Richard H. & Caroline a. Tucker 
Brewer, Henry j. & Martha Ann Vaulx 
Brothera, Andrew W. & Sarah G. Crockett 
Brown, Felix & Nancy Slinkard 
Brown, Roas 0. & Mary A. Smith 
Burk, Thomas & Mary H. Wright 
Burka, Romulua & Eliz. McNabb 
Bush, Jesse W. & Melvinia Whitfield 
Bushley, James & Sarah C. Anderson 
Butler, James & Jane Stevenson 
Campbell, Josiah E. & Martha J. Macgowan 
Gastleman, James H. & Mary Gastleman 
Gates, John A. & Elizabeth Ann Benson 
Cole, John H. & Sarah C. Floyd 
Coleman, Wn. b. & Angeline E. Caldwell 



Oct. 


7 


Dec. 


7 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


23 


June 


9 


Nov. 


27 


Jan. 


25 


Dec. 


23 


Jan. 


15 


June 


18 


Dec. 


24 


March 14 


Oct. 


6 


May 


28 


July 


10 


Oct. 


15 


Sept. 


, 18 


June 


1 


Feb. 


27 


Feb. 


26 


March 


I 13 


Nov. 


18 


Dec. 


10 


Sept. 


10 


Feb. 


5 


July 


22 


Dec. 


9 


Oct. 


12 


July 


17 


July 


28 


Jan. 


19 


April 


21 


Nov. 


9 


Nov. 


3 


June 


30 


Jan. 


19 


Dec. 


15 


Jan. 


29 


July 


27 


Aug. 


22 


Dec. 


8 


July 


21 


Aug. 


13 


Jan. 


29 


Nov, 


10 


Oct. 


10 


Feb. 


13 


Feb. 


21 


Aug. 


12 


Oct. 


20 


Nov, 


24 



CoLdwell, Thomas M. & Margaret J. B. Cannon 

Cooke, John H. & Lucinda Noe 

Cooke, Vh. L, & Mary A. E. McClaren 

Cookaey, W. H. & Miaa M. A. Heater 

Couch, Isaac M. & Sarah E. Ruahing 

Coulter, Banning & Mary Sifera 

Crocker, Thomaa B. & Eliza J. Holden 

Crockett, A. 3. & Octavia Miller 

Cromer, Joseph H. & Evelina D. May 

Dal ton. Fountain & Mahulda Allen 

Donnell, John W. & Suaan Bowman 

Doyl, Patrick & Jane Vfebb 

Drake, Thomaa & Sarah J. Mierhead 

Dunaway, Drury & Caudia F. Patteraon 

Duncan, Patrick L. & Judy Ann Hall 

Elder, Wn. K. & Eveline Batey 

Fanning, A. J. & Susan P. Blackman 

Peatheraton, Prestley & Mary Blessing 

Fleming, Samuel & Jane C. Maxwell 

Freeman, Thomas R. & Margaret R. Bingham 

Fry, John & Neaty C. Moss 

FUrgaaon, Samuel D. & Margaret T. Thompson 

Galaway, John B. & Rebecca Beaaley 

Gamer, Thomas C. & Virginia Hughes 

Gibbs, James H. & Cornelia M. Vfelden 

Gillespie, Daniel J. & Amanda Willeford 

Gilliam, Richard & Emeline Cantrell 

Gosney, Richard C. & Manervia Shields 

Graham, John & Sarah Sandridge 

Cramps, John & Mai'y S. H. Smith 

Greer, Andrew & Eliz. Brown 

Greer, Thomas & Manervia A. F. Brown 

Grimes, James M. & Balsonia Patteraon 

Hall, Thomaa & Mary J. Vfard 

Hancock, Benf . C. & Sarah N. Revell 

Harpina, Patrick & Rebecca Cotton 

Harria, Elgin & Mary E. Crocker 

Hastings, Giles P. & Rhoda Ann Jarrett 

Hays, Vfa. & Martha E. Hay a 

Herrod, Rubin & Mary J. Armstrong 

Hill, Wn. & Sarah Butler 

Holden, Goodman & Dorinda S. Smothennan 

Horton, James H. & Amanda Smith 

Howland, Leroy D. & Eliz. C. Waller 

Hughes, Thomas F. & Milly E. Shockler 

Isom, Abaalum & Emeline McCaslin 

Jarratt, James A. & Caroline V. Johnson 

Jonea, James H. & Hester A. R. May 

Jones, Richard C. & Mary J. McHenry 

Jordan, M. B. & Hardenia Bumpua 

Jordan, Vfa. A. & Martha H. Crouae 

Kellough, Samuel & Margaret Williams 

Lasiter, Vfa. & Susan M. Rodgers 

Laughlin, Joseph Y. & Mary L. Sneed 



Sept. 


28 


June 


17 


Feb. 


25 


April 


12 


Nov. 


22 


July 


16 


Aug. 


17 


Dec. 


21 


Nov . 


29 


July 


12 


March 


31 


April 


25 


April 


25 


Jan. 


30 


Oct. 


9 


March 


k 


Aug. 


23 


March 


12 


April 


Ik 


March 


31 


Dec. 


28 


Jan. 


17 


Sept. 


25 


March 


15 


Dec. 


25 


June 


30 


Jan. 


23 


May 


31 


April 


22 


July 


21 


July 


3 


Dec. 


15 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


13 


Nov. 


30 


Jan. 


29 


Nov. 


15 


Feb. 


2k 


Feb. 


17 


Jan. 


2 


Feb. 


26 


June 


2 


Sept. 


9 


Jan. 


6 


Nov. 


2k 


June 


2k 


Dec. 


29 


Dec. 


1 


Jan. 


22 


Jan. 


6 


Sept. 


21 


Feb. 


9 


July 


10 


Feb. 


10 



Layne, Alfred J. & Harriett N. McRae 
Loven, James A. & Polita Ann Douglass 
Lyell, Robert B. & Eliz. Crick 
Manire, Philip H. & Homora T. Donnelly 
Mankin, Vfelcomc H. & Tabitha Deason 
Manley, VIn. R. & Malinda R. Wfelch 
Martin, Vfa. C. & Lockey J. Donnell 
Medling, Wn. A. & Eliz. M. Lasiter 
Moore, Peter W. & Margaret L. Dickinson 
Mooney, Jonathan A. & Martha Jane Seay 
Moore, Samuel & Malinda Todd 
McCaslin, Hugh R. & Rebecca Ann Youree 
McCoy, John T. H. & Sarah C. A. Swink 
McFarlin, M. P. & Emila McKinley 
McKissick, Hugh L. W. & Milbra J. McGrigor 
Newman, Anderson & Minerva Insell 
Nisbett, Ephraim & Naoma Swan 
O'Callaghan, W. A. & Frances McDowell 
Owens, James F. & Mary E. Drumwright 
Parker, Alfred K. & Margaret 3. Johnson 
Parker, John & Mary Taylor 
Patterson, R. H. & Mary Smith 
Pearson, John M. & Mary Prewett 
Phillips, Richard 3. & Margaret C. Turner 
Pinkard, Via. & Susan Halliburton 
Powell, Robert J. & Susanah B. Bingham 
Prater, Wn. H. & Mary A. Jacobs 

^l^«^«if & Susan Lassater 

Rather, Wn. & Martha Cawthom 
Robertson, Higdon J. & Martha A. ;*ller 
Rogers, Benj. F. & Louisa Lockard 
Rogers, John & Mary J. Lasiter 
Rushing, John C. & Mary Stephenson 
Russell, Newton & Eliz. Hutson 
Ryan, Newton & Sarah J. Foster 
Shelton, Geo. A. & Tabitha Eaton 
Shelton, Wn. & Sarah A. Gates 
Shelton, Wilson & Lucy Moore 
anart, Gideon & Areanah Freeman 
anith, demons M. & Marg. Dalton 
anith, Henry P. & Martha A. l^faller 
anith, Sherwood W. & Eliz. Boring 
Sneed, Charles & Ann B. Haines 
Stem, Asa L. & Eliz. M. Birdwell 
Summer, Mathew & Manerva J. Kelby 
Thomas, John A. & Mary Reed 
Thomas, John W. & Eliz. J. Thomas 
Todd, Jackson & Margaret Cox 
Trail, Valentine & Eliz. Ann Russell 
Turner, Wn. G. & Isabelah Nisbett 
Waldron, Charles H. & Ann E. Buchanan 
Wale, George W. F. & Nancy J. Wbod 



Dec. 


1 


June 


26 


June 


21 


May 


11 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


18 


April 


. 6 


Oct. 


18 


April 


- 19 


Oct. 


20 


Nov. 


20 


Dec. 


16 


Oct. 


28 


Aug. 


5 


Jan. 


4 


Jan. 


Ik 


Sept. 


28 


April 


28 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


25 


July 


7 


March 


1 


Aug. 


31 


Sept. 


29 


March 


3 


Sept. 


27 


Feb. 


3 


July 


5 


March 


16 


Feb. 


24 


April 


23 


Aug. 


2 


April 


14 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


23 


Sept. 


11 


Dec. 


3 


Aug. 


7 


Oct. 


18 


Feb. 


12 


March 


8 


Nov. 


30 


April 


5 


Feb. 


22 


Jan. 


5 


Aug. 


19 


July 


8 


June 


26 


Aug. 


18 


Dec. 


8 


June 


28 


March 


7 



Ward, Kinchen & Eliz. Barrett 
Warren, Edwin & Eliz. C. Henry 
Ifetkina, Joseph & Margaret Linater 
Webb, E. J. & Marj7 E. Daniel 
Vfendel, Robert S. ^ Eama G. James 
White, Charles T. & Viary Elliott 
Wilkeraon, B. F. ?i Mary A. E. Sanders 
Wilson, Joseph k Sarah E. Bishop 
Wilson, Washington & Ann E. Burgess 
Wimberly, Henry h Catherine E. Bowman 
I«7right, Emuel ^' Johannah Smith 
Wood, A. J. & Ann M. Beasley 
Woods, Nathan A. A Mary Jane Brewer 
Young, Wn. fk Lucinda J. Mangrum 
Youree, James F. & Harriett E. Lancaster 

1853 

Adams, John W. f?t Mary J. Murry 

A.ilor, Joseph ^j Mary Ann D. Summers 

A.lexander, Robert M. & Ananda M. F. Dennison 

Allen, Lunsford E. S- Martha Hood 

/>ndrews, A.lphonso .'^ Sallie B. Seward 

Armstrong, John J. ^ Catharine Summers 

Baird, Vhi. D. ^ Catharine 0. Ready 

Ball, Thomas W. & Mary Crou-se 

Barnes, Vfa. & Mary Williams 

Bates, Robert F. k Mary James 

Bearkley, Benj. F. & Emily Hall 

Bennett, James M. & Susanah M. Vfalden 

Bennett, Joseph M. Sf Jane K. Hall 

Blackwood, John T. & Mary E. Good 

Boring, Sterlina B. & Martha L. Edwards 

Bounds, George W. & Mary Pope 

Bov?en, James A. & Eliz. Kelton 

Bowling, Henry G. Ik Martha Parker 

Boyd, Nathan A. Si Martha A. S. Vaughn 

Bradshaw, Sandiford .^ Susa E. "Jni th 

Brown, J. B. T. & Mary J. Pukett 

Brunson, Isaac &- Harriet N. T'feakley 

Brj'ant, Emanuel A. & Eliza M. Donnell 

Bryant, Henry W. &: Margaret Cole (col.) 

Burchett, Andrew J. & Mary E. Rogers 

Burnett, Brookin J. 8i Martha 3. Perry 

Biirnett, George ^1. Sj Emily J. Elder 

Burnett, Vfa. &- Narciasa Beasley 

Burnett, Vfa. G. ?■ Mary C. McKee 

Bums, Vfa. R. X' Mary J. Evina 

Burton, James A. ^ Stacy Ann Burk 

Cain, Thomas M. & Cornelia A. Mullina 

Carter, John W. & Mary A. Todd 

Charlton, Joaeph ^ Sapronia A. Gregory 

Childress, John S; Eliza Greer 

Clay, Theordrick S. .'^ Jane E. Crutcher 

Coleman, John f^' Lucinda Blair 

Conner, Thomas W. & Palmyra A. Bethel 

Corbin, Christopher C. & Suan D. White 



Aug. 


17 


April 


I 


Dec. 


23 


Oct. 


b. 


Nov. 


3 


Dec. 


30 


Sept. 


13 


Sept. 


28 


Nov . 


22 


Dec . 


20 


May 


3 


Feb. 


3 


Aug. 


28 


Sept. 


11 


Jan. 


6 


Jan. 


25 


Aug. 


1 


Sept. 


15 


Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


20 


Sept. 


8 


June 


21 


Jan. 


8 


Oct. 


27 


July 


k 


May 


15 


June 


17 


Jan . 


10 


April 


12 


Nov . 


24 


Nov. 


16 


April 


6 


Jan- 


20 


March 


19 


Jan. 


24 


Aug. 


6 


July 


3 


Sept. 


12 


Dec. 


27 


Sept. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Jan. 


12 


July 


25 


Sept. 


3 


July 


28 


Feb. 


lU 


July 


2 7 


Nov. 


k 


March 


14 


Sept. 


24 


Nov. 


30 


Feb. 


u. 


Jan. 


12 


June 


30 



Cotton, Manaua G. & Martha Garter 
Crenshaw, John W. & Elen L. Campbell 
Curlee, Cullin & Margaret E. Lyon 
Dane, Drury & Mary J. Abbott 
Davia, Young & Queen E. Patterson 
Delbridge, Edward H. H. & Frances Miles 
Dunaway, Daniel J. & Nancy C. Kellow 
Eagle ton, Wn. G. & Mary A. Green 
Ellis, Edward N. & lucy M. McKinney 
Ewing, John A. & Caroline E. Buchanan 
Finch, James A. & Louisa R. Huggins 
Fleming, Vfa. & Eliz. A. Johnson 
Floyd, James P. & Martha W. Rion 
Freeman, Marshall & Eliz. J. Hall 
Frost, Natha A. & Galadonia C. Prichett 
Fugett, Benj. & Jane H. Becton 
Garrett, Wn. G. & Phebe Cunningham 
Gilliam, Thomas & Malissa Stone 
Grey, Joel A. & Gary Ann Winsett 
Gwin, Alexander M. & Sarah C. Crichlow 
Hailey, Wta. B. & Nancy E. Wbbb 
Hale, Joseph P. & Eliz. C. Vaughan 
Hall, John & Mary L. Finch 
Hartman, John & Eliz. Leek 
Hatfield, James & Tinzey Dicker son 
Hayes, Thomas H. & Lucy Ann demons 
Haynes, John W. & Margaret A. Batey 
Henry, Washington G. & Amanda G. Elliott 
Hickman, John H. & Milley F. Glymp 
Holden, Benj. H. & Permelia A. Vaughn 
Holden, Granville G. & Manirva Crocker 
Holden, Thomas J. & Hannah V. Nash 
Holmes, J. T. & Miss P. L. Hill 
Hooberry, Finus & Sallina A. ^-fell 
Hoover, Jasper N. & Sarah M. Dunn 
Huddle 3 ton, George M. & Eliz. J. Burk 
Hughes, James & Amanda Douglass 
Hunt, Hustus & Eliz. Winston 
Ivins, Albert P. & Martha Ann Pcarcy 
Jacobs, John W. & Amanda fiowland 
January, Joseph A. & Virginia Henry 
Johnson, James P. & Sarah J. Sikes 
Jordan, Joshua & Locky F. Vaughan 
King, Benj. S. & Mary M. Neal 
Knox, Franklin & Nancy B. Leach 
Lamb, David & Almary Westbrooks 
Lannum, Alfred T. & Melvina Mullins 
Lassiter, John & Eliz. E. Mayfield 
Leathers, Theophilus H. & Martha J. Dunn 
Lillard, Thomas W. & Mary E. P. Howard 
Lockard, Elijah & Fanny Dove 
Lomx, Wn. C. & Harriett Cowger 
Lyell, Vln. T. & Mary J. Tudor 
Lyon, John B. & Bratha M. Caffy 



Dec. 


6 


Dec. 


8 


Ffeb. 


8 


Dec. 


17 


March 


10 


Jan. 


3 


Sept. 


29 


July 


20 


Nov. 


lU 


July 


4 


Feb. 


2 


Sept. 


29 


March 


4 


Dec. 


9 


May 


2 


Dec. 


1 


Jan. 


12 


March 


3 


Oct. 


31 


Oct. 


26 


Oct. 


25 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


6 


Sept. 


1 


Jan. 


22 


March 


12 


Jan. 


18 


Dec. 


8 


April 


2 


Feb. 


16 


March 


15 


Sept. 


13 


May 


2 


Oct. 


22 


Sept. 


8 


April 


5 


Aug. 


20 


Nov. 


15 


Feb. 


21 


Jan. 


27 


Feb. 


3 


May 


2k 


June 


29 


April 


11 


Feb. 


9 


May 


30 


Feb. 


20 


Sept. 


28 


May 


9 


Aug. 


3 


Aug. 


23 


Nov. 


28 


Aug. 


11 


Oct. 


26 



Mallard, John W. & Parthenia Bell 
Manire, David C. & Martha Read 
Manor, James W. & Charity Hunt 
Mathews, Via. H. & Isabella M. Pasley 
Miles, John Z. & Sarah A. Tutor 
Miller, Burrel G. & Hannah E. Miller 
Miller, Daniel R. & Nancy A. Jones 
Morgan, Anderson & Eliz. Rushing 
Mullins, Radford L. & Martha E. Rowlett 
Myrick, Francis A. & Eliza Summerhill 
McClaran, Daviel & Lucinda Potts 
McGombs, John R. & Sane Stewart 
McDowell, Joseph F. & Sarah McGlannahan 
McKnight, James G. & Lucy M. Johns 
McKnight, Vfo. T. & Virginia Johnson 
McMillion, Franklin P. & Jane Robinson 
Nance, James A. & Susan C. Neal 
Neal, Thomas & Tabitha Merideth 
Northcott, Benj. F. & Mary R. Rucker 
Oden, Thomas M. & Roxana J. Sims 
Owen, Sandifer H. & Lucy J. Owen 
Page, Jesse T. & Eliz. Richardson 
Pickett, Joseph T. & Sarah Bowman 
Reynolds, Alfred & Catharine Wright 
Rhodes, Albert W. & Martha J. Crawley 
Ro bason, James M. & Mary E. Adcock 
Robinson, Alexander & Mary Brinkley 
Ross, Felix G. & Nancy E. Buchanan 
Rouse, Joseph & Matilda Watkins (col.) 
Sanders, Hiram & Margaret Brown 
Sanford, John A. & Nancy Northcott 
Settle, Seth B. & Ann Ledbetter 
Simmons, Vfa. J. & Ann M. Graves 
Smith, Daniel J. & Matilda A. Tines 
Smith, Daniel G. & Susan D. McLean 
Smothennan, Dennis W. & Ruthy G. McCoy 
Smotherman, James A. & Mary Douglass 
Snell, Thomas A. & Elvira J. Haynes 
Spann, Thomas W. & Mary McDaniel 
Spense, Abner & Lucinda Daniel 
Spence , Joseph & Margaretta D. Vfendel 
Summerhill, Norvel R. & Martha E. Mathis 
Tanner, Robert & Harriett Furguson 
Taylor, Joseph M. & Nancy 0. Iamb 
Thomas, Gideon W. & Nancy A. McEwen 
■niompson, Eli N. & Mary A. E. Zumbro 
Tucker, Nathaniel B. & Louisa Tucker 
Vaughan, Vfa. L. & Sarah Allman 
Vinson, Vfa. & Mary Ann Cogburn 
V7ard, Benj. & Malinda F. Holden 
Waters, Elisha E. & Mary D. Hamilton 
Watson, John M. & Mary Ann Haynes 
Vfeathcrly, John B. & Nelly Ann Arnold 
Vfebb, Isaac S. & Mary Ann Seay 



Feb. 


22 


Dec. 


22 


Feb. 


23 


March 


3 


Aug. 


9 


Oct. 


U 


Jan, 


3 


May 


26 


June 


30 


Sept. 


15 


Oct. 


15 


Feb. 


16 


July 


27 


July 


20 


Dec. 


14 


Sept. 


10 


Jan. 


2k 


May 


7 


Sept. 


1 


Dec. 


22 


May 


9 


Sept. 


28 


Feb. 


21 


Dec. 


27 


March 


21 


May 


30 


June 


7 


Sept. 


7 


Dec. 


15 or Apr 


Aug. 


5 


Sept. 


15 


Jan. 


19 


Oct. 


22 


Dec. 


6 


Dec. 


19 


Sept. 


1 


May 


30 


Dec. 


Ik 


Jan. 


12 


Jan. 


1 


March 


1 


Oct. 


18 


Nov. 


1 


March 


23 


Dec. 


14 


March 


9 


Sept. 


22 


April 


28 


Nov. 


15 


Aug. 


11 


Dec. 


Ik 


Feb. 


21 


April 


19 


Aug. 


15 



White, James P. & Johanna Hutaon July 9 

White, Vfa. L. & Mary Jannan Aug. 10 

Wilkinson, John H. & America Bailey April 28 

Wilson, James & Louisa Batey Sept. 27 

Wilson, Vto. J. & Nancy J. Fain June 20 

Woodruff, James T. & Lucre tia E. Ring Nov. 5 

Wright, Nathaniel & Eliz. P. Ifiwis Aug. 11 



BRIDE INDEX (by page #) 



Abbott, Marj^ J. 8 

Adcock, Mary E. 9 

Alba , Jane 1 

Allen, Mahnlda 5 

Allnan, Sarah 9 

Anderson, Sarah C. *+ 

Anderyon, Sarah C. 4 

Armstrong, Mary J. 5 

Arnold, Nelly Ann 9 

Bailey, America 10 

Bailey, Glemintine 2 

Baird, Violet L. U 

Barrett, Eliz. 7 

Baas, Frances 3 

Batey, Eveline 5 

Batey, Louisa 10 

Batey, Mahala P. 4 

Batey, Margaret A. 8 

Beasley, Ann M. 7 

Beaaley, Mary E. U 

Beaaley, Narciasa 7 

Beaaley, Rebecca 5 

Eecton, Frances P. 3 

Bee ton, Jane H. 8 

Bell, Parthenia 9 

Belt, Eliza 1 
Benson, Elizabeth Ann ^ 

Benson, Martha 1 

Bethel, Palmyra A. 7 

Bingham, Margaret R. 5 

Bingham, Susanah B. 7 

Birdwell, Eliz. M. 7 

Bishop, Julia 4 

Bishop, Sarah E. 7 

Bivins, Mary C. 3 

Black, Fanny J. 1 

Blaclcman, Susan P. 5 

Blair, Lucinda 7 

Blair, Martha A. 2 

Blessing, Mary 5 

Boring, Eliz. 7 

Bowman, Catherine E. 7 

Bowman, Sarah 9 

Bowman, Susan 5 

Brewer, Mary Jane 7 

Brewer, Susan F. 1 

Brinkley, Mary 9 

Brit tain, Martha A. 2 

Brook, Sarah V. 2 



Brown, Miss A. A. 
Brovrn, Elizabeth 
Brown, Manervia A. F. 
Brown, Margaret 
Buchanan, Ann E. 
Buchanan, Caroline E. 
Buchanan, Nancy E. 
Bumpus, Hardenia 
Burgess, Ann E. 
Burk, Eliz. J. 
Burk, Stacy Ann 
Burnett, Clementine 
Butler, Sarah 

Caffy, Bratha M. 
Caldwell, Angeline E. 
Campbell, Elen L. 
Cannon, Margaret J. B. 
Cantrell, Emeline 
Cantrell, Rachel 
Carter, Martha 
Castleman, Mary 
Caston, Louisa Ann 
Cates, Sarah A. 
Cavinder, Joicy 
Cawthom , Martha 
Cherrj', Martha 
Clark, Eliz. C. 
Clark, Margaret J. 
Claud, Amanda F. 
Clemens, Lucy Ann 
Cogburn, Mary Ann 
Cole, Margaret (col.) 
Coleman, Lavinia F. 
Collins, Lucretia 
Cook, Sarah J. 
Cooke, Priscilla 
Cotton, Rebecca 
Covington, Armenia 
Covington, I^cinda 
Cowger, Harriett 
Cox, Margaret 
Crawley, Martha J. 
Crichlow, Sarah C. 
Crick, Eliz, 
Crick, Mary 
Crick, Sarah 
Crocker, Manirva 
Crocker, Mary E. 
Crockett, Sarah G. 



5 
5 
1 
8 

3 
7 
3 
7 
2 
2 
3 

8 
9 
7 
h 
2 
i+ 

5 

2 
3 
8 
7 
9 

8 
6 
U 
2 
8 
5 

^■ 



Croathwaite, Emeline 3 

Grouse, Martha H. 5 

Crouae, Mary 7 

Grutcher, Jane E. 7 

Cunningham, Phebe 8 

Dal ton, Marg. 7 

Daniel, Lucinda 9 

Daniel, Lucinda T. 1 

Daniel, Ma ryE. 7 

Deason, Tabitha 6 
Denniaon, Amanda M. F. 7 

Devault, Nancy E. 3 

Dickeraon, Tinzey 8 
Dickinson, Margaret L. 6 

Dill, Eliz. J. 1 

Dobbin 3, Margaret A. 1 

Donnell, Eliza M. 7 

Donnell, Lockey J. 6 

Donnelly, Homnra T. 6 

Douglass, Amanda 8 

Douglass, Mary 9 

Douglass, Polita Ann 6 

Dove, Fanny 8 

Drumwright, Marj'' E. 6 

Dunn, Martha J. 8 

Dunn, Sarah M. 8 

Eades, Hannah 2 

Eagleton, Eliza ? 

Eaton, Tabitha 7 

Edwards, Judith G. 3 

Edwards, Martha L. 7 

Edwar-ds, Martha S. 1 

Elder, Emily J. 7 

Elliott, Amanda G, 8 

Elliott, Martha 3 

Elliott, Mary 7 

Evins, Mary J. 7 

Fagan, Sarah E. 1 

Fain, Nancy J. 10 

Fields, Harriet 3 

Finch, Mary L. 8 

Finch, Sarah E. 3 

Fleming, Lucinda k 

Fleming, Mar^' M. 1 

Fleming, Rhuah A. 2 

Fletcher, Jane M. 2 

Floyd, Martha 3. i+ 

Floyd, Narcissa J. 1 

Floyd, Sarah G. l\ 

Foster, Frances M. 2 

Foster, Sarah J. 7 

Fowler, .Sarah Ann 2 

Freeman, Areanah 7 



Furguson, Harriett 



Gannon 
Gentry, 



F. 



Julia 

Nancy '.,'. 
Flenn, Lutha Ann 
Glymn, Milley F. 
Good, Mpry E. 
Graves, Ann M. 
Green, Jane 
Green, Mary A. 
Greer, Eliza 
Gregory, Sanronia A. 
Grimes, Eliz. 
Grisham, Andromedia 
Grogan, Adeline 
Gum, Sarah A. 

Hainea, Ann B. 
Hall, Eliz. J. 
Hall, Emily 
Hall, Jane K. 
Ha 11 , Judy Ann 
Hall, Louisa 
Halliburton, Susan 
Hamilton, Mary D. 
Hannah, Mary A. 
}^a r re 11, Ma ry C . 
Harrison, Catharine J, 
Haynes, Elvira J. 
Haynes, Mary Ann 
Hays, Martha E. 
Henderson, Eliz. 
Hendricks, Mary 
Henry, Eliz. C. 
Henry, Virginia 
Hester, Miss M. A. 
Hickman, Mary E. 
Hill, Miss P. L. 
Holden, Eliza J. 
Holden , Malinda 
Holden, Malinda F. 
Hollowell, Cynthia A. 
Hood, Martha 
Hood, Nancy E. 
Hooker, Sally 
Honk in 3, Eliz. 
Hopkins, Margaret T.L. 
Horton, Catharine 
Hoskins, Eliz. M. 
Howard, Mary E. P. 
Howland, Amanda 
Huggins, Louisa P.. 
Huggins, Mary E. 
Hughes, Virginia 
Hunt, Charity 
Hu n te r , Ma rga re t J . 



1 

9 

2 
8 
7 
9 

8 
7 
7 
1 
3 
2 
2 

7 
8 
7 
7 
5 
1 
7 
9 
1 
2 

^■ 

9 
9 
5 
3 
2 
7 
8 
5 
3 
8 
5 
3 
9 
if 
7 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
8 
8 
8 
1 
5 
9 
1 



Huraon, Eliz. 
Hutson, Johanna 
Hyde, Mariah E. H. 

Inaell, Minerva 

Jackaon, Sarah 
Jacoba, Mary A. 
Jame a , Kmma C . 
Jamea, Mary 
Jarraan, Mary 
Jarre tt, Gasha R. 
Jarre tt, Rhoda Ann 
John a, Lucy M. 
Johnaon, America 
Johnaon, Caroline V. 
Johnaon, Eliz. A. 
Johnaon, Margaret 3. 
Johnaon, Nancy A. 
Johnaon, Rebecca 
Johnaon, Virginia 
Jonea, Ann Eliza 
Jonea, Nancy A. 

Kelby, Manerva J. 
Kellow, Nancy C. 
Kelton, Eliz. 
Know, Mary E. 
Koonce, Alline 

Lamb, Nancy 0. 
Lamb, Tabi tha 
Lancaater, Harriett 
I-aaiter, Eliza. M. 
Laaiter, Mary J. 
Laaaater, Suaan 
La wing, France a H. 
Lawrence, Sarah C. 
I^ach, Nancy B. 
Ledbetter, Ann 
Lee, Sarah A. 
leek, Eli?;. 
Lewi a, FOliz. P. 
Linater, Margaret 
Linater, Margaret H. 
Lockard, Louiaa 
Love, Martha Ann 
Luater, Eliz. 
Lyon, Emely 
Lyon, Margaret E. 
Lytle, Julia A. 



7 

10 
2 



2 
7 
7 

7 
10 
2 
5 
9 
3 
5 
8 

3 
1 
9 
2 
9 

7 
8 
7 

3 

9 

3 

7 
6 
7 
7 
3 
2 

6 
9 

i+ 

8 

10 

7 

i+ 
7 

1 
1 

R 
3 



Macgowan, Martha 
Mangrum, Lucinda 
Mangrum, Martha 
Marlin, Suaan J. 



J. 
J. 



Martin, 
Martin, 
Martin , 
Ma thi a , 



Catharine 

T-.ucy 1 7. 

Maria 

T^annah H. 
Ma thi a, Martha E. 
Ma thi a, Mary 
Ma thi 3, Fermelia M. 
Maxwell, Jane C. 
May, Charloote J- 
May, Evelina D. 
May, Heater A. R. 
Mayfield, Eliz. E. 
McGaalin, Eraeline 
McClannahan, Sarah 
McGlaren, Mary A. E. 
McClendon, Hettie A.E. 
McCoy, Ruthy C. 
McCracken, Eliz. 
McCrea, Mary A. 
McCullough, Sarah J. 
McCullough, Mary 
Mc Daniel, Mary 
MCDowell, Frances 
McDowell, Rhoda Ann 
McEwen, Nancy A. 
Mc Gregory, Eliz. 
McGrigor, Milbra J. 
McHenrj', Marj' J. 
McKee, Eliza 
McKe e , Ma ry 
McKee, Mary G. 
McKinley, Emila 
McKinney, Lucy M. 
McLean, Suaan D. 
McMurry, Nancy J. 
McNabb, Eliz. 
McRae, Harriett N. 
Merideth, Tabi tha 
Mierhead, .Sarah J. 
Mi lea, Frances 
Miller, Hannah E. 
Miller, Mary 
Miller, Octavia 
Moore, Lucy 
Morgan, Nancy 
Morton, Margaret J. 
Moaa, Neaty G. 



U 
7 
1 
2 
3 
I 
1 
1 
9 
3 
1 
5 

5 
5 
8 
5 
9 
5 
3 
9 
1 
2 
3 
3 
9 
6 
1 
9 
1 
6 

5 
3 
3 
7 
6 
8 
9 
1 
i+ 
6 
9 
5 
8 
9 
2 
5 
7 
3 
1 
5 



Mullina, Cornelia A. 
Mul.lina, Melvina 
Murry, Mary J. 

T!ance, TIancy J. S. 
Naah, Tiannah V. 
Nenl , M<'\ry M . 
TJeal, Susan C. 
Neely, TIar2arett A. 
Neelj', ■^''ary L. 
I'Tewaom, t^avy J. 
Fisbett, laabelah 
Noe, Lnc'nda 
Koe, Purlina V. . 
T'orman, Rozetta 
Northcott, Nancy 

Cdell, Jlargaret 
Owen, Lucy J. 

TarVer, Martha 
^arriah, ^■'arj'- ", 
Pauley, Isabella >!. 
Patterson, Balaonia 
Patterson, Caudia F, 
Patterson, 'jueen E. 
Patterson, 3iota 
Pearcy, t.'arthp Ann 
Perry, ITertha 3. 
Petillo, Sarah 
Peyton, Amanda F. 
Phillipa, Ellen A. 
Phillir's, rary E. 
Ph5.11iny, 3u3r.n G. 
T'itta, Mary E. 
Pope, Mary 
Posey, '\rncy J. 
Potts, T.ucinda 
Prewett, Harj' 
Prichett, Caladom'a n, 
Pugh, Sarah E. 
^nkett, Marj' J. 

Randolph, Tlartha J. 
Read, Martha 
Read, Suaan C. 
Ready, Catharine O. 
Reed, Marj/ 
Reed, .Sarah 
Re veil, Sarah N . 
Richardson, An^eline T. 
Richardson, Eliz, 
Richardson, Lucy A. 
Ring, Ixacretia E. 
Rion, Martha ■•7. 



/ 
8 
1 
7 

2 
9 
'+ 
7 
7 

5 
k 
9 
2 
10 
8 



Robinson, Jane 9 

Rodgers, Suaan M. 5 

Rogers, Mary E, 7 

Rowlett, Martha E. 9 

Rucker, Mary R. 9 

Rushing, Eliz. 9 

Ruuhing, Sarah E. 5 

Russell, Eliz. Ann 7 

Ryon, Sarah A. 2 

Sage, Clancy C. 2 

Sanders, lAaxy A. E. 7 

Sanders, Mary E. 3 

Sandridge , Sarah 5 

Seay, Martha Jane 6 

Seay, Mary Ann 9 

Serrell, Nancy E. 2 

Seward, Sallie B. 7 

Shields, Manervia 5 

Shockler, Milly E. 5 

Sifera, Mary 5 

Sikes, Sarah J. 8 

Sims, Roxanna J. 9 

Slinkard, Nancy U 

.Smart, Raymeth S. L 

Snith, Amanda 5 

Smi th, Eliza R. i+ 

Smith, Johannah 7 

Smith, Mary 7 

Smith, Mary a. i* 

.Smith, Marj'' 3. H. 5 

Smith, Mary W. 9 

Smith, Mickey W, '+ 

Smith, Nancy 3 

Smith, Oliver F. D. 2 

Smith, Susa E. 7 
•Smotherman, Dorinda 3. 5 
Smothennan, Martha A. 2 

Snotherman, ^iarJ' 3 

.S.Tiotherman , ^^hebe F. 2 

Sneed, Mar^' L. 5 

Stephenson, Marj' 7 

Stevenson, Jane 4 

Stewart, Jane 9 

Stone , Malisaa C 

Stroop, Sarah L. 3 

Summerhill, Eli-^a 9 

Summers, Catharine 7 

Summers, Mary Ann J. 7 

Sumner, Suaan E. if 

•Swan, Naoma 6 

Swink, Sarah C. A. 6 

Taasy, laabell N. 1 

Taylor, Jane I 



Taylor, Mary 7 

Taylor, Melissa 1 

Thomas, Eliz. J. 7 

Thompson, Margaret T. 5 

Thornton, Louisa L. 3 

Thornton, Mary Ann E. 3 

Threatt, Frances E. 3 

Thurtnan, Eliz. ? 

Tinea, Matilda A. 9 

Todd, Eliz. J. 4 

Todd, Lavicy 3 

Todd, Malinda 6 

Todd, Mary A. 7 

Tucker, Caroline A. 't 

Tucker, Louisa 9 

Tucker, Melissa 2 

Tudor, Eliz. Ann 2 

Tudor, Mary J. 8 

lUrner, Margaret C. 7 

Tutor, Sarah A. 9 

Vaughan, Eliz. C. 8 

Vaughan, Locky F. 8 

Vaughn, Martha A. S. 7 

Vaughn, Permelia A. 8 

Vaught, Sarah Ann 3 

Vaulx, Martha Ann 4 

Wade, Martha 2 

Wade , Martha 2 

Walden, Susanah M. 7 

Wall, Sallina A. S 

Waller, Eliz. C. 5 

Waller, Manervia 2 

Waller, Martha A. 7 

Waller, Martha A. 7 

Waller, Susan C. 2 

Walpole, Catharine J. H 

Ward, Mary J. 5 
Watkins, Matilda (col.) 9 

1"feakley, Harriet N. 7 

Vfebb, Jane 5 

Vfebb, Nancy E. 8 

Welch, Malinda R. 5 

Vfelden, Cornelia M. 5 

Wendel, Margaretta D. 9 

Westbrooks, Almarj'' ;j 

^>^eeler, Adelphia 4 

Whlgby, Susan 3 

VJhite, Suan D. 7 

Whitfield, Melvinia k 

Wilkinson, Adeline W. h 

Willeford, Amanda 5 



X\^illiama, Lavina C. 1 

Williams, Margaret 5 

Williams, JApry 7 

Williams, Snraney 3 

Wilson, Louisa (col.) 3 
Wilson, Manervin (col.) 3 

Wilson, Nancy J. ^4 

Winfrey, Siisan 2 

Win sett, Cary Ann 8 

Winston, Eliz. 8 

Winston, Mary E. 3 

Winston, Nancy Ann 4 

Wood, Nancy J. 7 

Wrather, Mary A. 3 

Wright, Catharine 9 

Wright, Mary H. 4 

Wright, Mary T. 3 

Wright, Sarah A. 4 

V^att, Mary Ann 1 

Youree, Rebecca Ann 6 

Zumbro, Mary A. E. 9 



SOJOURN IN MURFREESBORO 
By Henry Wray, Rutherford County Archivist 

Samuel Hervey McLaughlin came to Murfreeaboro in 1815 and 
began the practice of law. The Biographical Directory 
(1796-1969), Warren County, highlighting members of tne 
General Assembly, recorded these terse facts about 
McLaughlin : 

"Senate, 23rd, 2i4-th and 25th General Assemblies, 
1839-45 representing Warren and Franklin Counties 
in 23rd and 24-th; Warren, Gannon, Coffee, and 
DeKalb in 25th. Born in Virginia and at 3 years 
of age to Knox County, Ky. Family back to Virginia 
in 1810. Clerked in store in McMinnville, 1811-15, 
reading law meantime. Began practice in Murfreesboro 
in 1815. Married Mary Clarke Bass. Resided on 
east fork of Stones River below the mouth of 
Bradley's Creek. Removed to Nashville in 1832. 
Appointed Recorder, General Land Office in 
Washington by President James K. Polk on March 4, 
1845. Died in Vfeshington." 

The Directory further states that McLaughlin was bom on 
May 1, 1796 and died May 5, 1850. 

Events associated with his several years in Murfreesboro 
were abstracted verbatim from a diary in a private collection 
and titled: "A Diary of Public Events and a Sketch of My 
Life." The diary was written in 1845. Henry Wray's abstract 
follows. 

"After reading Law with Maj. McCampbell, hard and 
diligently, I obtained a license, and in September or October, 
1815 removed to and settled in Murfreesboro on advice of 
Col. Mitchell and other friends. 

When I went to reside in Murfreesboro, I found a v6ry 
different condition in the state of society from which 
exists there at present. Gen. Robert Purdy, who after 
being disbanded in the reduction of the army to a peace time 
establishment, came and settled in the neighborhood on a 



16 



farm inherited by hi 3 wife, who waa a Miss Philips, a sister 
of the present Judge Joseph Philips. He was a man of moat 
liberal hospitality. His wife waa an excellent woman-- 
a perfect lady--fond of gaiety, fashion and company. 

The late Mrs. Nancy Lytle, wife of the late Capt. Vfa. 
Lytle, an old Revolutionary Officer, was and always had been 
the leader of fashion and patron of all Balls and Parties 
at Murfreesborough, as she had once been at Nashville in 
her younger days. She lived in sight of the tovm where her 
son 'I'fa. Lytle now lives. 

The late Joel Dyer, the old gambler, famous in the old 
traditions of East Tennessee and Nashville--also rich and 
whose handsome daughters had married respectably, and 
afterwards also married respectably, lived in town, having 
removed there from his farm where John Mclver now lives, 
about the time I went there to live, kept a tavern in town, 
where Col. Vfe. F. Lytle now keeps a tavern. Col. Vto. 
Mitchell also lived in town and kept a tavern in the old 
Jetton House, on the East side of the public square, where 
Col. Robert Smith afterwarda lived for many years. 

Mr. Joel Childress, a merchant, owned and lived in the 
framed portion of the tavern house, on the west side of 
the square, now owned and kept by Capt. Geo. Allen Sublett. 
Mr. Childress waa a highly respectable man and was the 
father of Mrs. Sarah Polk, the lady of James K. Polk, now 
President of the United States. 

John M. Tilford, now of Warren Co., Hiclcory Creek, was 
a prosperous merchant in Murfreesboro when I went there 



to live. He waa the 3on-in-law of Gapt. W. and Mrs. Lytle. 
Nicholas Tilford and Jame a M. Tilford, now both dead, were 
merchants there at the aame time. William Barf ie Id, James 
D. Garuthers and Joseph D. Staith were also merchants, as 
was one Jonathan Estill, now all dead. In 1816 and 1817, 
the late Jonathan Gurrin and the late David V/endel, came 
there as merchants. Gurrin from Franklin in Williamson 
County and Vfendel from East Tennessee. Old Alexander 
Carmichael and James D. Rawlings, both deceased, were 
tavern keepers. 

Dr. W. B. Butler, Dr. W. T. Henderson, Dr. Elisha B. 
Clarke and Dr. Henry Homes were all practicing physicians. 
Jiaj. Bennett anith, a remarkable man, still living, had 
removed to town to enjoy his fortune, about the time I went 
to the place to live. He pretended, however, now and then, 
especially when drunk, to engage in the practice of Law. 
The late Gen. Blackman Coleman lived in town and was Glerk 
of the County Court. My brother, John R. Laughlin, 
succeeded him in this office. 

I cannot enumerate all those who then lived in 
Murf reesboro, but of those who were then business men there, 
scarcely any remain, and most of them are dead. Gaming 
was then a most prevailing and fashionable vice and was 
carried on almost openly. Cards were played for money by 
almost everybody and billiard tables were a common resort. 

About December, 1815, was the first time I ever saw 
President Polk. He was then a very young man, a little 



older than myself, and was a student at the Bradley Academy, 
an institution which had been removed from near Col. Rucker' a 
to Murfreesborough. The old Academy House was a spacious 
log building and stood near where the brick Presbyterian 
Church now stands. The same Academy House was used on 
Sabbath days as a place of public worship, until it was 
afterwards set on fire by a deranged man from Kentucky named 
Forsyth. The Rev. Jessee Alexander, still a preacher, and 
other Presbyterian clergymen preached and held sacramental 
meetings in the House. 

At this House, about 25th December 1815, an event 
happened to me which I sliall never forget. Having heard 
that a Miss Bass, I had not heard her Christian Name, and 
several other young ladies, were staying at Maj. Bennett 
anith's, with his daughter Margaret (afterwards married to 
Uriah Cummin, and since dead) were attending a sacramental 
meeting at the place mentioned. I had heard her mentioned 
by Dr. Clarke, then a physician in Murfreesboro (a Virginian 
and Cousin of her father), and having heard Daniel Barnes, 
then a clerk in Estill's store, and \*i. M. Smith, now 
General Smith speak of her, I had gone to the meeting, not 
being well at the time, more with a desire to see her than 
any other person and more from that desire than to hear 
preaching. During the concluding prayer, Miss Bass was 
pointed out to me. I was greatly struck by her appearance. 
Although I had not seen her move, except to turn around and 
take her seat at the conclusion of the prayer, and had never 



heard her apeak, and although I withdrew and went home to 
Mitchell's Tavern without seeing any more of her, I had 
from that hour a presentiment that she was at sometime to 
become my wife. From the moment I saw her, I determined to 
ace her again. I knew Dr. aarke visited at her father's 
six miles west of Murfreeaboro, where he lived on a large 
fara on the old road from Nashville to Shelbyville. 

Three or four days, I think, after the foregoing inci- 
dent. Dr. Clarke got into one of his occasional fits or 
sprees of drinking. He was an old bachelor, of great skill 
in his profession, and was universally esteemed. He had 
become very friendly to me. His friends on this occasion 
persuaded him to take a ride into the country for exercise 
and ride back and he would be over his frollic. He said he 
would do so if I would go with him. I told him, at once, 
I would. 1 never thought, nor did he, of the place we would 
go to, or how far. We ordered our horses, and Col. Mitchell 
gave the Doctor, at his earnest entreaty, a glass of toddy 
to start on. Wfe mounted our horses, the Doctor taking the 
lead, when we started out of town, down the old Nashville 
road by Wilson Shoals, which led down on the North and 
Northwest of Squire David Dickenson's plantation. While 
riding, he spoke of a friend of his, Mr. Ambrose House, 
who had lately removed from Virginia to Rutherford County 
and near hi a kinsman, Capt. James Bass, and said we would 
turn back and come home by the house of friend Ambrose after 
we got as far down the Nashville road as he wished to go. 



Vfe dashed on until we got to old Mr. Hartwell Marable'a, 
another Virginia friend of his. Vfe stopped and went into 
the house, he introducing me to the old people. He had 
gotten nearly sober. He did not ask for anything to drink, 
but went out and up the road where we had passed a black- 
smith shop, where he got some whiskey, and presently he was 
so much intoxicated again, as to set his tongue to running. 
He refused when he went back to the house to stay for dinner, 
pretending he was in a hurry to get home and had to go by 
Mr. Houses and Gapt. Basses. Vfe set off and took the 
Shelbyville road which turned off at the corner of Mr. 
Marable's fence to the south, and crossed Stewarts Creek 
through what was Searcy's, now White's mill dam. Vfe rode 
on to Mr. House's where I hoped he would stop, as I did not 
wish to go to Capt. Bass' with him when he was drinking. 
Vfe found Mr, House and his negroes out clearing new ground. 
He invited us to stop at his house and stay till next 
morning. The Doctor refused, saying he must go home and 
call at Capt. Basses on the way. So off we went again, he 
still showing the effects of his drink and soon got to 
Capt. Basses, it being only about a mile. 

Here we got down and went in. Capt. Bass was not at 
home. The Doctor introduced me to Mrs. Bass, to her daughter 
Itemperance anith,then the wife of Thomas B. Smith, son of 
Bennett anith, and to Mary Clarke Bass, her sister, who 
afterwards in less than a year became my wife. 

The Doctor and myself went home that evening, after he 



22 

got a glaaa of toddy from Mrs. Basa. and in a few days he 

got sober. 

In 1829 I moved my parents to Rutherford County. 1 was 
living on the East fork of Stones River on an excellent 
tract of land below the mouth of Bradley's creek, opposite 
John L. Jettons, bought of James Gordon. In March 1832, I 
moved to Nashville leaving my parents and my brother Sidney 
with some negroes on my farm. 

My brother, John Randolph, wrote in the Clerk's office 
in Murfreesborough under Gen. Blackman Coleman, until he 
resigned the office in 1821 or 1822, when my brother was 
elected to his place as County Court Clerk, and he held the 
office until the change of the Constitution in 183U-5 when 
he went out of office and was not a candidate for re-election 
In 1837 my brother John R. being a candidate for the legis- 
lature in which he was defeated by the falsehoods and 
slanders of one Beverley Randolph and Alexander Blair. My 
brother just before the election, at a public meeting at 
Pace's, in July (The election was in August) took occasion 
to cane Blair in company. Just after the election, at a 
public collection of people at Maj. John Bradley's at the 
fall races, Blair took an opportunity, having been furnished 
a knife by one Henderson, his kinsman, insulted my brother 
so grossly, that he again raised his cane, when Blair ran in 
under, no one at the moment thinking of a knife, except 
those that knew his talent, and stabbed my brother in the 
groin or pelvis, and in other places before he could be 



prevented. Of the firat mentioned wound, he died in seven 
or eight days from mortification. I was then at my place 
called Runnemede in Gannon County. My brother was buried 
at the old Ledbetter place, two and a half miles southwest 
of Murfreesborough. 

My Dear Wife Mary Clarke Laughlin, died at our residence 
at Hickory Hill in !-ferren County, Nov. 11, 18U0 and is 
buried at Liberty Meeting House near McMinnville. 

I'm writing these biographical notes in my office in 
Washington City, and it is now August U, 1845. 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY MILITIA COMMISSIONS 
Prepared by Henry Wray 

From records of Commiasiona of Officers in the Tennessee 
Militia, 1796-1811, Volume 1, from a compilation by Mrs. 
John Trotwood Moore, one time State librarian. 

Under the Militia Law of 1803, the general assembly 
adopted a numerical system of identification, assigning a 
number to each regiment, in each county, again however 
these regiments were known locally as the First regiment 
of the county, etc. The two regiments in Rutherford County 
were known as 22nd and i+Sth regiments. The 2nd or 45th was 
organized in 1811. 

This list undertakes to include all the commisaiona 
issued to Militia officers during the first three terms of 
Governor John Sevier. The volume which apparently covered 
the years 1801-1806 has not been found. Thus the first 
years of Rutherford County are missing and start with 1807. 



Armstrong, James L. 
Blount, Benjamin 
Carr, Benjamin 
Carrol, Stephen 
Cooper, Zacheus 
Country, George 
Country, Isaac 
Denton, Thomas 
Doake, Robert 
Dyer, Robert Henry 

Ellis, John 
Henderson, James 

He nde r s on , Jame s 
Higginbotham, William 
Houstion, John 



1807 

Gapt. 22nd Regiment 

Ensign " 

Lieut. " 

Ensign " 

Lieut. " 

Capt. " 

Lieut. " 

Lieut. " 

Capt. " 

Lieut, regiment of 

cavalry 5th brigade 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Capt. regiment of 

cavalry 5th brigade 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Ensign " 

Lieut. " 



Oct. 


16, 


1807 


Oct. 


16, 


1807 


Oct. 


16, 


1807 


Oct. 


16 


1807 


Oct. 


16 


1807 


Oct. 


16 


1807 


Oct. 


16 


1807 


Oct. 


16 


1807 


Oct. 


16 


, 1807 


July 


28 


, 1807 


Oct. 


16 


, 1807 


July 


28 


, 1807 


Oct. 


16 


, 1807 


Oct. 


16 


, 1807 


Oct. 


16 


, 1807 



24 



Laughlin, Jamea 
Litton, James 

Mc Bride, Francia Enaign " 
McBridc, Samuel Second Major" 

McEwen, Alexander Capt. " 

Moore, Edward Capt. " 

Morrow, William Lieut. " 

Morton, Jamea Capt. " 

Ramaey, Robert Enaign " 

Ramaey, William Lieut. " 
Searcy, William W. Firat Major 

Stiarp, Jamea Capt. " 

Sharp, Marcua Lieut. " 

anith, Nathaniel Enaign " 

Ward, Burrel Enaign " 

Wil bourne, Jamea Lieut. " 

Wright, Richard Capt. " 



Capt. 22nd Regiment 
Lieut. " 



Abbot, David 
Barefield, Jamea 
Barr, Silas 
Blount, Benjamin 
Brown , Jo ahua 
Carty, John 
Freeman, Jamea 
Gitton, John 
Humphreys, William 
Kerr, Benjamin 
McBride, Francia 
McMicken, Andrew 
Peake , John M. 
Rucker, Jamea 



Arnold, William 
Banton, Joab 
Blair, John 
Blair, Samuel 
Boatwright, Daniel 

Bowman, William 

Canon, Robert 
Ghiaom, Alexander 
Crawford, John 
Culbertaon, Daniel 
Davis, Willie J. 
Douglaaa, George 
Fuller ton, James 
Goodman, Claiborne 



1808 

Capt. 22nd Regiment 

Enaign " 

Capt. " 

Lieut. " 

Enaign " " 

Ensign " 

Enaign " 

Lieut. " 

Enaign " 

Capt. " 

Lieut. " 

Capt. " 

Lieut. " 

Lieut. " 

1809 

Capt. 22nd Regiment 
Enaign " " 
Capt. " 
Enaign " 
Ueut. " 

Rifle Company 
Capt. 22nd Regiment 

Rifle Company 
Lieut. " 
Lieut. " 
Enaign " 
Lieut. " 
Lieut. " 
Capt. " 
Lieut. " 
Capt. " 



Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
July 31 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
June 6 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 16 



April 2 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
April 2 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
May 7 
May 7 
April 2 



1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 
1807 



1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 
1808 



May 19, 1809 
Sept. 21, 1809 

April 18, 1809 

Nov. 10, 1809 

Sept. 21, 1809 

April 18, 1809 

NOV. 10, 1809 

Sept. 21, 1809 

Sept. 21, 1809 

Sept. 21, 1809 

Nov. 10, 1809 

Nov. 10, 1809 

Sept. 21, 1809 

April 18, 1809 



Harrison, Vinson 
Height, Sion H. 
Hunter, Edwin 
Hunter, Ephraitn 
Johnson, Mathew 
Johnson, William 
Laughlin, William 

McClennahan, I-lathew 

McCree, James 

McRee, Lewis 
Martin, William 
Maxwell , John 
Moore, Robert 
Nash, George R. 

Nash, John 
Puckett, Shi ply A. 
Richmond, John 

anotherman, John 
Wynn, Peter 



Abbott, David Seco 
Camatian, Thomas 
Dyer, Robert H. 

Fuller, John 
Gilliam, John 
Gitton, John L. 
Griffin, John 

Hall, James 
Hall, John 
Henderson, James 



Irvin, Samuel 
Laughlin, James 



McClanahan, Matthew 
McEwen, Alexander 

McEwen, James 

Orr, Alexander 
Searcy, William W. 



Ensign 22nd 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Light 
Capt. 22nd 

Light 
Ensign 22nd 

Rifle 
Ensign 22nd 
Lieut. " 
Ensign " 
Lieut. " 
Ensign " 

Light 
Ensign 22nd 
Ensign " 
Lieut. " 

Rifle 
Ensign 22nd 
Capt. 

1810 



Regiment 



Infantry 

Regiment 

Infantry 

Re gime n t 

Company 

Regiment 



Infantry 
Regiment 



Company 
Regiment 



Nov. 10 
April 11 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 10 
April 11 
April 11 
April 18 

April 18 

April 18 

Sept. 21 
April 11 
Sept. 21 
Sept. 21 
April 18 

May 19 
Sept. 21 
April 18 

Sept. 21 
Sept. 21 



1809 
1809 
1809 
1809 
1809 
1809 
1809 

1809 

1809 

1809 
1809 
1809 
1809 
1809 

1809 
1809 
1809 

1809 
1809 



nd Major 22nd Regiment Dec. 27, 
Ensign " " April 23, 
Capt. Regiment of Cavalry 
5th Brigade Aug. 29, 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment April 2^+, 
Capt. " " April 2i+, 
Capt. " " April 24, 
Lieut. Regiment of Cavalry 
5th Brigade Aug. 29, 

Lieut, 22nd Regiment April 24, 
Ensign " " April 24, 
Lieut. Colonel Commandant 
2nd Regiment 

Rutherford Co. Aug. 29, 
Ensign 22nd Regiment April 24, 
First Major Aug. 29, 

2nd Regiment 
Rutherford Co. 

First Major July 23, 

22nd Regiment 

Second Major Aug. 29, 

2nd Regiment 
Rutherford Co. 
Coronet Regiment of Cavalry 
5th Brigade Aug. 29, 

Capt. 22nd Regiment April 24, 
Lieut. Colonel Commandant of 
22nd Regiment July 23, 



1810 
1810 

1810 
1810 
1810 
1810 

1810 
1810 
1810 



1810 
1810 
1810 



1810 
1810 



1810 
1810 

1810 



Scratt, Joseph 
Smith, William 
Willeford, William 



Allen, James 

Anderson, William 
Bankhead, John 

Bankhead, Elobert 

Barckly, Henry 
Bedford, George 
Bishop, Sterling 
Bobbet, William 
Borton, William 
Bowman , John 

Bradly, Robert 
Brandon, George 

Carson, Robert 
Coldwell, William 
Crawford, John 
Cummins, Richard W. 
Curie, Cullin 
Dixon, Don G. 
Eastwood, Daniel 
Frederick, Hezekiah 
Garner, Obediah 
Go ode n, James 
Haily, Elijah 
Hand, Samuel 
Hardgrove, Leroy 
Howell, VTilliam 
Jeton, Robert 
Johnson, William 
Jones, William 

Kindelj William 
Laughlm, William 
Love, Philip 3. 
McConnel, Moses 
McCoy, Amos A. 
McCoy, Robert 
McEwen, John 
Mc Fe rre n , Jame s 
McKee, William 
Matthews, John 
May berry, John 
Mayfield, Solomon 
Miller, James 



Ensign 22nd Regiment 
Gapt. " 
Lieut. " 

1811 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Light Inf. Co. 

Ensign 2nd (U5th) Reg. 

Ensign " 

Vol. Rifle Co. 

Lieut. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Vol. Rifle Co. 

Ensign 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Ensign " 

Lieut. " 

Ensign " 

Light Infantry 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Gapt. 2nd (U5th) Reg. 

Vol. Rifle Co. 

Gapt. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Ensign " 

Gapt. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Gapt. 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Gapt. 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Ensign " 

Lieut. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Gapt. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Gapt. " 

Gapt. 22nd Regiment 

Gapt. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Ensign 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Light Infantry 

Gapt. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Gapt. 22nd Regiment 

Lieut. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Lieut. 2nd (45th) Reg, 

Ensign 2nd (45th) Reg, 

Ensign " 

Gapt. 

Lieut. " 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Lieut. 2nd (45th^ Reg 

Ensign " 

Lieut. " 



April 24, 1810 
April 24, 1810 
April 24, 1810 



Aug. 22, 1811 



July 


3, 


1811 


Oct. 


^, 


1811 


Oct. 


^, 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


June 


^, 


1811 




24, 


1811 


July 


24. 


1811 


July 


3, 


1811 


July 


3, 


1811 


June 


4, 


1811 


Oct. 


i+, 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


May 


24, 


1811 


May 


24, 


1811 


Feb. 


21, 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


June 


^, 


1811 


July 


3, 


1811 


Aug. 


22, 


1811 


Feb. 


21, 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


Feb. 


21, 


1811 


July 


24, 


1811 


May 


24, 


1811 


Aug. 


22, 


1811 


July 


3, 


1811 


May 


24, 


1811 


Aug. 


22, 


1811 


July 


3, 


1811 


Feb. 


21, 


1811 


Feb. 


21, 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


, May 


24, 


1811 


May 


24, 


1811 


July 


13, 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


May 


24, 


1811 


Feb. 


21, 


, 1811 


. May 


24, 


, 1811 


June 


10, 


, 1811 


July 


24, 


, 1811 



Nance, Bird 
Naah, Travis C. 
Overall, Nace 
Parker, Daniel 
Ramsey, William 
Renshaw, Isaiah 
Reynolds, John 
Smotherman, John 
Stephens, Henry 
Tacket, David 
Thomas, Hamilton 
Vaughn, Peter 
Ward, Barrel 
Wfelton, Samuel 
White, Stephen F. 

White, William 

Wood, John 
Wright, Jeremiah 
Yardly, Thomas 



Capt. 22nd Rag. 

Capt. 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Lieut. " 

Capt. " 

Capt. " 

Capt. " 

Capt. " 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 22nd Reg. 

Ensign 2nd (45th) Reg. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 22nd Reg. 

Ensign " 

Lieut. 2nd (U5th) Reg. 

Ensign 

Light Infantry 
Capt. 22nd Reg. 
Light Infantry 
Lieut. 2nd (i+5th) Reg. 

Lieut. 

Capt. " 
Light Infantry 



Feb. 


21, 


1811 


May 


2*+, 


1811 


July 


13, 


1811 


July 


3, 


1811 


July 


13, 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


May 


2i+, 


1811 


May 


2i+, 


1811 


June 


4. 


1811 


April 


17, 


1811 


June 


10, 


1811 


Feb. 


21, 


1811 


June 


^, 


1811 


June 


10, 


1811 


July 


3. 


1811 


Aug. 


22, 


1811 


Apr. 


17, 


1811 


July 


3. 


1811 


July 


3, 


1811 



UNION: MURFREESBORO' S OTHER UNIVERSITY 
By Dr. Homer Pittard 

The Baptists generated a grand plan at their meeting 
in Nashville, Tennessee on October 13, 1839. By resolution 
it was decided that a denominational university was needed 
for educating young ministers for the gospel. Not only was 
a university essential but, in addition, were several 
smaller institutions to "feed" the mother school. It was 
envisioned that the mother campus would serve as a nucleus, 
or in the nature of a hub, with the sub-schools positioned 
in a circumference for comfortable and convenient commuting. 
Although the plan was sparse in details, there was some 
evidence that the smaller schools would operate at the high 
school level with the possible addition later of two years 
of college. The larger campus would offer four years of 
collegiate study. The prospective minister had his choice 
of entering at the lower levels and then advancing at his 
own pace to the "seminary" level. 

Minutes of this historic meeting record that the plan 
was enthusiastically received. Many of those whose voices 
were loudest in praise of the magnificent scheme probably 
occupied the impoverished pulpits of the Tenneseee and the 
Alabama hinterlands--but this was religious business and 
"the Lord would provide." 



29 



since auch an educational plan would bring together 
many diverse elements in Baptist faith and would thereby 
unify the Tennessee and Alabama denominations, it was 
decided that the then unborn principal institution should 
bear the name, "Union University." 

To administer the sterner aspects of Union, that of 
fund raising, B. F. Farnsworth, former president of George- 
town College in Kentucky was employed to initiate and com- 
plete a gifts campaign. Farnsworth reasoned that prospec- 
tive donors would be more receptive to solicitation if the 
institution, still on paper, had a charter. Therefore, 
during the next three years, his principal energies were 
devoted to preaching from many pulpits and to the details 
of organization as he put it, and to writing and petitioning. 
In 1842, the elusive charter was captured and granted. 
Thereby, Farnsworth had possibly made his only contribution 
to Union. There were scarcely any funds, pledged or cash 
in tiand, to the credit of the school. 

Nevertheless, anticipating great things from Brother 
Farnsworth, optimistic Baptists, and other S3mpathetic 
bodies, the Baptist hierarchy, in early 1840, opened a 
school in Somerville, Tennessee. Although it proudly bore 
the aegis of "Union University," it offered study only at 
the primary level and was poorly financed and patronized. 

Seeking a more central and receptive location. Union 
moved to Murfreesboro and opened on May 2, 1841. Its 
quarters were the grubby old Bradley Academy building. Hie 



Bradley trustees had long since abandoned the two- story 
log structure to homeless religious sects in the community 
and to diverse groups that needed an assembly hall. The 
structure, gaunt and unprepossessing, rested on a slight 
eminence near the southeast limits of the town. However, 
it had had its moment of glory, at least a moderate after- 
glow from former years. James Knox Polk had attended the 
institution twenty-seven years before as a young man and 
biad later married Sarah Childress, one of the town's 
several eligible and attractive belles. Polk had served 
one term as governor of the state but near the moment that 
Union moved into Murfreesboro, he had lost his bid for a 
second term. The memory of the Bradley years, however, 
assumed added if not renewed significance when, four years 
later, Polk became the eleventh President of the United 
Sta te s . 

Itie glories of the past campus did little to diminish 
the grimneaa of the task ahead for the Baptists as they 
took their first steps to implement the 1839 plan. 

The diminutive faculty corps could hardly bear the 
burden of the name "university" but, nevertheless, Union 
opened with the traditionally heavy classical curriculum 
and began advertising for students. Joseph Haywood Eaton 
was appointed the president and professor of Latin. The 
specialist in Greek was D. G. Snith. This constituted the 
full faculty with the exception of William Williams who 




UNION UNIVERSITY 
Appeared in The Tennessee Register (18721 as part of an advertisement. 





JOSEPH HAYWOOD EATON 

First President of Union University 



JAMES MADISON PENDLETON 

Controversial President of Union 

University just prior to the 

War Between the States 



was listed as a tutor. A spate of additional courses was 
taught by these men who doubled as janitors and repairmen. 

"Hie President (a pretentious title for a most unpre- 
tentious venture) was a remarkable man. Born in Berlin, 
Ohio on September 12, 1812, he was educated at Georgetown 
College in Kentucky and at Hamilton Academy near Columbus, 
Ohio. From 1837 until his emergence on the scene in 
Murf reesboro, he was a journeyman teacher with schools in 
Nashville and in Fayetteville, Tennessee. In 1843, he 
became the first pastor of the fledgling First Baptist 
Church in Murf reesboro as well as that of continuing his 
presidency of Union. Both institutions were horribly 
impecunious. Each operated on a salary schedule of a sort 
but payments were rarely in the stipulated amount which, 
if paid, usually were in arrears. This situation apparently 
did not deter Eaton in his dedication to his two awesome 
challenges. He occupied his own pulpit and supplied many 
others. He made long, arduous safaris, by houseback, into 
the hinterlands in search of students and financial support. 
His energy was unlimited for a time at least until the two 
flames at each end of his life candle burned closer 
together. 

Unwary students who happened to wander onto the campus 
during the infant years, found lodging in the town. Tuition 
was listed in three categories based on coats for each of 
two sessions: preparatory classes - $18, academic - $22 
and collegiate classes - $26. Matriculation was $2 per 



session. Generous trustees established the policy of 
granting ministerial students free tuition. 

The educator-preacher, from his citadel of learning 
near the town limits, was forever alert. In the November 
Itennessee Baptist of 1844, he made this appeal: "There 
have been two young men here within a week past to enter 
the institution who have the ministry in view, but they are 
poor in this world's goods, and they have been obliged to 
return home again. One of them resides in north Alabama 
and the other in Wilson County. There are now two here 
and two more desire to come, making six. What shall be 
done? The brethren have concluded to rent a house, fix 
it up and put them in it. Will the brethren in Nashville 
aaaiat? This church (Murfreesboro' s First Baptist) is 
willing to furnish all of the e stables, if the other 
churches will pay the rent and the servants here. It will 
not only be a shame but a sin if the churches refuse to aid 
these young men who are panting to proclaim the unsearchable 
riches of Christ to a perishing world--we leave this with 
you and your final judge." 

Itie ardent petition for the "panting" young men in 
educational distress struck a responsive chord for on 
February 11, 1845, William H. Barksdale, a Nashville friend 
of Eaton, wrote this soaring panegyric in the Tennessee 
Baptist : "Need I say that it would be utterly vain were 
I to attempt to express the grateful, the glowing, the soul- 
cheering emotions which dwell within our hearts, when we 



3U 



contemplate the kindness and liberality of our endeared 
brethren; for where can we find language to express that 
which is inutterable? Vfe can only adapt the words of 
Samuel: 'Hitherto hath the T.ord helped us'." 

In June it was reported that Andrew Jackson "had been 
laid in the narrow house in the Hermitage garden where he 
will rest until the sound of the last trumpet." The 
trumpet for the Baptists, however, sounded loud and clear 
that June month. Bradley Kimbrough was employed to promote 
the cause of Union University by launching a gifts campaign. 
B. F. Famsworth, the previous promoter-, who had labored 
with marked deliberation in the vineyard, had now returned 
to Kentucky. Kimbrough, in addition to his travels among 
the denominations, bombarded the Tennessee Baptist with 
urgent pleas. In November, he placed the issue squarely 
on the line: "Can we do anything without proper schools? 
And can we have schools v/ithout expense? Brethren, friends, 
V7e nray you, think of this matter, pray over it, be united 
throughout the state, and when you are called upon, be 
ready to act with a liberality worthy of the great interest 
involved." Kimbrough devised a pledge system whereby 
payments could he made in four installments. His goal was 
$50,000 in endowment. He reported that Murfreesboro would 
provide $10,000 for the erection of a building. In a 
letter to the Tennessee Baptist late in 1845, he wrote: 
"Not one sister has refused to subscribe." Truly there 



were many pledges, some of a generous nature. The problem 
apparently was not the subscribing of the sisters — and the 
brethren--but collection of the pledges. Kimbrough had 
aroused the Baptists to new heights and had served one noble 
purpose, if no other: Alabama and Tennessee Baptists were 
at last aware of the existence of the little school in 
Murf reesboro. 

Meanwhile, President Eaton was expending his frenetic 
energy in keeping alive the educational institution as well 
as the Baptist church. In addition, he was siring a large 
family, moat of whom did not survive infancy. Esther, his 
wife, a granddaughter of Ihomas Treadwell, a signer of the 
Declaration of Independence, was equally remarkable as her 
husband. During the intervals when she was not delivering 
children or mourning the loss of one, she was busy with a 
school of her own. Utilizing the Fletcher schoolhouse where 
the Murf reesboro Baptists conducted services, she organized 
a small faculty and offered courses of study at the upper 
elementary and high school levels. Later she was instru- 
mental in establishing an institution of collegiate rank 
in a new building near the northern town limits on land 
purchased by the Baptists from the Oakland s estate. First 
designated in 1853 as the Baptist Female Institute, it was 
renamed Eaton College in 1859. This highly talented woman 
also found time to launch a monthly magazine. The Aurora . 
Published at the Murf reesboro Telegraph , it was designed as 
a "Monthly magazine for the Mothers and Daughters of the 



36 

South and Vfeat." It waa a kind of an early Ladies Home 
Journal . Sample articles were: "Be Just to Your Stomach;" 
"Restored Affections;" and "letters to Young Wives." 
Subscription was $2.00 per year. Devoted spouse Esther was 
ideally suited for her perambulatory educator-preacher- 
husband. It was a magnificent instrumentation that she 
reflected in holding home and fireside together, bearing 
and rearing children, writing copiously, and nurturing an 
evolving educational institution of her own. 

With the assurance of $10,000 from the City of Murfrees- 
boro and the treasury some richer from a few scattered 
pledges in various stages of payment, the Baptists decided 
to proceed with the erection of a permanent home for the 
University. The trustees at the time were William Martin, 
Robert Boyd, R. B. C. Howell, J. H. Marshall, C. G. Trabue, 
J. H. Shepard, D. W. Dickinson, Burrell Gannaway, Howard 
Maney, J. J. Whi taker, W. W. Searcy, B. F. Norfleet, 
Lawrence Reneau, Charles Watkins, and Lee Abernathy. This 
official body announced in January of 1848 that the insti- 
tution was "chartered, officered, and ready to begin." An 
eighteen -acre campus located on the Vfoodbury Pike, just 
east of the town limits, had been purchased from Matthias 
Murfree. Sale price waa $2,121.25. It was described as 
"beginning at a stake in the center of the stage road 
leading from Murfreesboro to McMinnville. " On April 9, 18W, 
the trustees "voted to invite the Masons, the Oddfellows, 
and the Sons of Temperance to assist in laying the cornerstone. 



37 

Construction proceeded slowly in a pattern proportionate 
to the reception of pledge payments. There were resurgent 
periods when President Eaton returned from reasonably 
successful financial forays into the denomination's hinter- 
lands. Early in 1850, it was announced that the building 
was partially "closed in." By Christmas of 1851, construction 
had progressed to the point to allow occupancy. Union's 
permanent home was 80 feet by 110 feet. Its three stories 
of gray brick were decorated by six wooden half columns at 
its front. Placement of the columns began at the second 

story. The two recessed wings continued the columned motif 
with two each. The structure was capped by a hip roof. A 

small yard was enclosed by a board fence and two privies 
were hidden from each other at the east and west ends of 

the building. These two stations were partially and taste- 
fully obscurred from the turnpike by cedars planted by the 
woricmen. To the north was a small hitchbam for use by 

students who commuted from their homes in the country. 

In early January, President Eaton led the one hundred 

students along with his faculty, now mushroomed to three, 

to their new home. 

Once ensconced in its new home, the University began 

to attract a large clientile. By 1855, enrollment had 

climbed to nearly three hundred. At the time, the faculty 

advertised J. H. Eaton as the teaching President along with 

faculty members David Bridenthall, 3. R. Vfestbrooks, T. W. 

Woodson, and G. W. Jarman. The curriculum was generally 



implicit in the faculty choices of textbooks which included 
Ray's Algebra , Dillaway's Cicero , Anthon's Horace , Kendrick'a 
Greek, Bullion's Caesar , Cooper's Vergil , Daviea' Surveying 
and Analytical Geometry , Mitchell's Geography , Vfeld's 
English Grammar , and Fowler's Mental Arithmetic . University 
faculty minutes nor promotional materials made any direct 
references to works of theology. It can be assumed that 
these basic course areas provided, in the vernacular of 
twentieth century pedagogy, the "general education" founda- 
tion for both the minis teral student and the disinclined. 
Doubtless, all of the emotional and academic trappings of a 
true seminary were found at Union. 

An unnamed and unheralded writer, probably a member 
of the faculty or Eaton himself, made this promotional 
assessment of the institution: "It is situated in the midst 
of rural scenery, calculated to inspire the young with the 
love of nature; sufficiently retired to invite study and 
reflection and unsurpassed in regard to health by any 
section of the Union, why may we not invite hither those 
who are in search of knowledge?" To assure that the "search" 
would be beneficient, the faculty adopted the policy that no 
student could enter any class without first being subjected 
to a rigid examination. 

Comfortably situated in a new building, delighted by 
increasing enrollments, and undergirded with what appeared 
to be a sound academic policy. Union to the casual observer 
and to the ardent Baptists, was the emerging institution that 



had been anticipated. 

But, the bright academic horizon had its detracting 
clouds. On April 9, 1855, the faculty requested President 
Eaton to inform the Board of Trustees that "the payment of 
salaries is needed." Requests of the nature became a 
recurrent plaintive plea in successive faculty minutes. 
Eaton, likewise, suffered from the casual salary program 
of the trustees. What little financial security he had came 
from sporadic payments from the governing body since he 
bad separated himself from the Baptist Church in 1849. 
Therefore, it was not a minor miracle that enabled him in 
1856 to construct a president's home on the east campus. 
A two-story brick, it was financed principally from his 
limited funds, those his wife Esther siphoned from her 
returns from the Aurora , and from a few cash gifts made by 
sympathetic Baptists in the area. 

In addition to financial problems, the students played 
their role in partially obscurring the bright theological 
atmosphere to the east of Murfreesboro . During the spring 
of 18 55, a Union student was killed in a drunken brawl on 
the public square. In the fall of the same year, a University 
disciplinary pledge: "We promise during our connection with 
Union University to obey the rules and regulations" and a 
forthright enforcement of this, led to a student strike. 
During the period of the incident, Union boys milled around 
the public square thereby causing considerable problems for 
the merchants and, in particular, the saloonkeepers. On 



July U, 1857, an altercation near a cobbler's home resulted 
in the death of one student and the wounding of another. 
David Thompson, in a violent disagreement over a shoe 
repair bill, was shot to death by John Fly, the cobbler's 
son. Another student, standing nearby, was critically 
wounded when young Fly began to fire indiscriminately. 

Aside from the catalog, the principal publication of 
the University during its relatively brief life was Itie 
Classic Union . Issued semi-monthly, it averaged twenty- 
eight to thirty-two pages per issue. It was printed at 
the offices of the Rutherford Telegraph located at the 
southeast comer of the square. Matthew Hillsman, a faculty 
member, served as the editor during the publication's 
two-year existence. Contributions from faculty members and 
students consisted principally of Baptist doctrinal articles, 
general interest stories, poems or, as it was expressed in 
its masthead: "Devoted to Religion, Literature, and General 
Intelligence." In commenting on a local event. The Classic 
Union editorialized the coming of the railroad: "The rail- 
road has been completed to this place and we hail the event 
as one highly auspicious to the commercial interests of our 
town--and yet there is one deep shade upon the otherwise 
bright picture of prosperity which the achievement of the 
work pre sent 3- -blowing of a train whistle on the Sabbath." 
The Union continued in a similar vein one issue later: 
"Vfe deeply and sincerely regret that the management of the 
affairs of the company has been entrusted to the hands of 
those who fear not God nor His Holy day." And another: 



"Are not the men who are engaged in running the railroad 
cars for pleasure trips on the Sabbath either Catholic or 
under Catholic influence?" Successive issues of the maga- 
zine carried no further references to the unholy whistle 
thereby leaving the answer in limbo as to whether the 
engineers had muted their Sabbath rousers or that Editor 
Hillsman had ceremonially washed his hands of the affair. 

An awesome tragedy struck the campus on January 12, 
1859. President Eaton died. Only forty-seven, his cause 
of death was attributed principally to exhaustion and exposure 
aggravated by long and difficult hours expended in main- 
taining some resemblance of solvency in the institution. 
His full commitment to Union carried him in search of funds 
and students to the rough hinterlands of Middle Tennessee 
and North Alabama. Frequently, he travelled by horseback 
and was thereby exposed to all of the hazards of inclement 
weather and rigors of extended hours in the saddle. Eaton 
had literally worked himself to death for Union. Probably 
in truth, whatever success had been achieved by the bright 
new theology school and whatever future the institution 
might have, lay in the casket at the president's home on the 
east campus. 

Possibly the funeral and attending obsequies, a magni- 
ficent tribute to Eaton, were the most resplendent in the 
histary of Murfreesboro. After lying in state for two days, 
the remains of the departed president were placed in the 
horse-drawn hearse which then moved to the turnpike and west 



toward Murf ree aboro. On foot inimediately to the rear were 
faculty members who served a a pallbearers. These were 
followed by the family and relatives in carriages, the 
University trustees on foot, the University students, the 
members of the Preparatory Department, and citizens of the 
town. As the long cortege entered the town limits, there 
still remained many of the citizens who had not fallen into 
line. The procession turned left at Spring Street, one 
block from the public square, and moved south two blocks 
to the Baptist Church at the comer of Sevier Street. 
After a soaring funeral sermon by James Madison Pendleton, 
a Union faculty member, the remains were conveyed to the 
City Cemetery for temporary interment. Two days later, 
the University students, faculty, and many citizens, still 
full of the tragic grandeur of the moment, launched a 
campaign to erect an imposing tomb on the University campua. 
The funds were collected in a few days and arrangements 
were made for the construction of the tomb. By June 15 it 
was completed. It was "reared in the shadow of the Uni- 
versity," lying some twelve feet to the southeast of the 
building. Constructed of native limestone, it contained 
two compartments, one for the President's remains, and the 
other reserved for his wife, Esther. Mounted atop the front 
of the tomb was a three -foot stone figure flanked by two 
urns. One June 16, the black hearse, accompanied by Uni- 
versity students as an honor guard, made its second visit 
to Eaton's grave. The body was disinterred, placed in the 
hearse again, and with much ceremony, the procession moved 



back to the campus. While the students formed a wide 
cordon around the new tomb, the undertaker slid the coffin 
into its new compartment. A flat rectangular slab, 
previously inscribed, was placed over the opening and 
sealed. The inscription was a genealogical epitaph with 
the words : 

Sept. 10, 1812 Jan. 12, 1859 
JOSEPH H. EATON LLD 

"Know Ye Not That There is A 
Prince and Great Man Fallen This 
Day in Israel" 

He was the Son of Joseph Eaton 
Who was the Son of David Eaton 
Who was the Son of John Eaton 
Who was the Son of Joseph Eaton 
Who was the Son of John Eaton 
Who Emigrated from WSales 
A.D. 1686. 

After the obsequies and the resolutions had run their 

course; after the inevitable campaign to endow a chair in 

memory of President Eaton had proved somewhat futile; and 

after the Female Institute had been renamed Eaton College, 

a more mundane problem presented itself. The moment came 

to settle Eaton's estate. This appeared to be a very 

simple matter since Eaton tiad no visible estate. However, 

the University was delinquent in salaries to the late 

President in the amount of at least $5,000. Since no 

funds were available, Esther Eaton was given a lien on 

the University property. Shortly thereafter, H. G. Scovell, 

prominent Nashville druggist and University benefactor, 

assumed the lien by payment of the $5,000 to Mrs. Eaton. 

Scovell then transferred his interests with an additional 




PRESIDENT EATON'S HOME 

Subsequently used as a residence, as housing for Linebaugh Public 
Library, and as classrooms for retarded children. 




EATON TOMB 

Constructed on the Union University Campus in 
1859, it was removed to Evergreen Cemetery in 
1907. 




DK\OTIJ> TO HfLKiH 

" MI'RKRKKSlK)m>ri;iI. AIIjIST 1 



■ of lb* pofr and 4r«tiii 






people 



I Kor «« atl lno« that .1 » f 
, wLcfi ngb( bMiM xhool txNun »nd 
>i« ^ai dim MbooU iban it ii lo •nf^port 
•nd Suu pnvn« f 
goi6 It bvi droM «b>n n 



•hi^h , 



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1 lU po«c 
••Ij lafc uiUlli^ni Bia lu M 

••d ;«t fn>p» is ite 

|ib«bwlor7o{ Um pm4 wd (b 

CLASSIC UNION 

Faculty-Student Publication at the University. 



luu iho vltiBkl* ap- 1 Ihr i^rral worth «/ bnowMg* and 
I b» MMi« on ail of U»«r urral aad tn- , tVful kDo«ln]|(r. diSuM 
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tftndaftrtlbc *tul iBUiT*(a of Khc ^crd, and ibc oaU drfi i 

aa Iliaib«Bol Um sIboM t«por- •■« a fM«t««»«ir o/ CT»r Ubrrur* Lri •*' ^ 
• tbat mM(d kftovM^ b* dtfcard frMroJ adoeatMO be *<lbb«td trtm ibaldarhi 
M^ all elMan of people. | p»opW— Wi Um nrfas |»Mnlk« fro» ^ 1 ^f b 




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lid not onlj hf the aaaw eemne of n'ai 

it would b« «hwlv pvopte abovld be 

r unr mooff. Ifw ar>fuacnt raa nrt> 

r tliripcr lu *n.»U frvfn ijfnonnK i«t 

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>i ttltt all. ai 

nparvd »iih <ri>« and rifUir ao li^nonitl pmpW. 



BAPTIST FEMALE INSTITUTE 

Renamed Eaton College in 1859, it later housed the 
Normal and Scobey's School, and still later it was a 
residence before its razing in 1965. 



$5,000 to the Baptist Educational Society. Under the 
presidency of James Madison Pendleton, the University 
continued its operation, spasmodically, until the outbreak 
of the Civil War. 

Pendelton, a controversial figure in religious dogma, 
came to Murfreesboro from Hopkinsville, Kentucky on 
January 31, 1857. He ascended the pulpit of the First 
Baptist Church and doubled as a professor of theology at 
Union University. Religiously, he espoused the cause of 
the somewhat obscure principle of Landmarkism, a rigid 
theological interpretation that focused principally on 
authorized baptism and vigorously opposed the principle of 
infant baptism. The reaction of townspeople and the Uni- 
versity to this position was minimal. However, Pendelton' s 
stand on slavery quickly drew fire from the town and it 
was darkly hinted that the president- preacher would soon 
be the principal in a lynching party. Curiously, Pendleton 
styled himself as an emancipationist rather than an aboli- 
tionist. Yet, the housekeeper for the Pendleton house was 
a Negro girl, a bequest from the will of his father. 
According to Pendleton, his father on his deathbed had 
elicited the promise from his son to care for the girl 
"during her natural life." 

Sometime in January, 1861, the University closed its 
doors. Gathering war clouds had drawn most of the young 
men to the training camps. During the next four years, 
the University building was used alternately as a hospital 



by Blue and Gray troops. Several students were casualties 
of the war. A partial list of Confederate dead included 
William A. Arnold, Henry P. Halbert, Francis W. Middleton, 
Jesse Sparks, and John M. Pendleton. The latter was the son 
of the University president and this family schism ending 
in a battlefield casualty brought Pendleton many hours of 
anguish. Late in 1861, the president made a hurried exit 
from Murfreesboro just an hour or so before a mob gathered 
at his home near Oakland s. His family followed later and 
he remained as a exile in Hamilton, Ohio during the remainder 

of the war. 

During the four years of conflict, the University 
building was horribly vandalized by occupying soldiers. 
General Lovell Rousseau, commander of the garrison, issued 
at least one order late in the occupation that prohibited 
the destruction of the property but the damage had already 
run its course. All of the equipment had been destroyed and 
books had been crated and sent north. In addition, most of 
windows, doors, and much of the woodwork were converted to 
firewood. 

For some three years following Appomattox, the building 
stood bleak and unoccupied in the rubble left by the soldiers. 
In 1869, after some minimum repairs to the roof and the 
replacement of most of the windows and doors, classes were 
resumed. During the five years of spasmodic operation, 
D. F. Self, George Jarman, and Charles Manley tried brief 
stints as president. The first postwar commencement class 



in the spring of 1870 consisted of two members. 

Uien the Itennessee Baptist Convention met for organi- 
zation in Murfreesboro in April 10, 1874, there was a ray 
of hope that Union would be regenerated. The local citizens 
petitioned the visitors to resume its support of the insti- 
tution in order that it might regain and continue its 
antebellum preeminence. However, the arguments against 
such action by the Baptist were ominous. 

The enrollment had been reduced to a trickle; there 
remained locally a residue of the cholera scare; the country 
was in financial straits; and free school leaders were 
mounting their pressures. A highly important argument, 
according to the Baptist hierarchy, was the need for a more 
central location to serve the Baptist involved and a site 
in Wfest Tennessee appeared to be the most logical. Conse- 
quently, on October 1, 1875, the University doors were 
closed and the base of operations was moved to Jackson, 
Tennessee. 

During the next five years, the old building housed 
in sequence an academy of sorts and a military school. 
By 1880, its delapidated condition made it unsafe for 
occupancy and it was abandoned. Until the coming of 
Tennessee College for Wbmen in 1907, it was the habitat 
of youthful vandals and the other hazards that are plights 
of unoccupied buildings. 

For twenty- seven years, the building languished in 
the midst of sedgebrush, weeds, and briars. In 1886, Esther 



Eaton died in Louisville at the home of her son, Thomas 
Treadwell. Her remains were brought to Murfreesboro and 
interred in the tomb by the side of her husband. When 
Tennessee College was established on the old Union site in 
1907, the tomb was moved to Evergreen Cemetery. 

The trustees of Union University were predominantly 
Rutherford County citizens. In 1875, they were vehemently 
opposed to the closing of the institution and its subse- 
quent reestabliahment in Jackson, Tennessee. Consequently, 
the old Union site remained in the hands of the majority 
trustees. In 1915, the federal government finally acted 
on a claim for damages suffered by Union during the Civil 
War period. Payment of the settlement in the amount of 
$15,000 was made to the Murfreesboro trustees. Subsequently, 
this sum was transferred to Tennessee College. 



SPECIFICATTONS FOR THE FIRST COURT HOUSE 
IN WIRFREESBORO 

The notice that followa appeared in The Nashville Whig on 
V/edneaday, November 25, 1812. Mrs. Virginia Gooch Vfatson, 
of the Williamaon Countj' Historical Society, discovered the 
notice in the Tennessee State Library and Archives and 
forwarded a copy to Henry Wray, Rutherford County' Archivist. 

NOTICE 

On the 2 5th day of January next, to be let to the 
lowest bidder, the building of a COURT-HOUSE, for the county 
of Rutherford, in the town of MURFREE'S BOROUGH, the 
dimensions as follows, to wit: UO feet square; the wall of 
brick; the first story to be 15 feet in the clear, two feet 
thick; the upper story to be 12 feet in the clear, 18 inches 
thick; the foundation to be of stone, sunk two feet under 
ground, and raised two feet above, the stone above ground 
to be neatly dressed; the lower floor to be raised and laid 
with brick edge up; the joists to be 4 by 1^ inches, and 
placed two feet apart from center to center, in a girder 
through the middle of the house, 1^^ inches square, all to 
be of good durable wood; the girder to be supported by two 
neat-tumed walnut posts, and set on stone pillars of 
sufficient size, not to be seen above the floor; the under- 
edge of the joists that are over-head to be ceiled with 
poplar quartered plank, neatly planed and beeded, and 
joints broken. Three doors on the lower floor, h feet wide 
and 9 feet high, with f ron tis-pieces and circular sash, in 



48 



the .same manner of that of Franklin court-houae, Williamson 
county; with pannel shutea well lined; with a sufficient 
lock to one door, and good bolts to the other two doors; 
with sufficient hinges to each door; with sills and steps 
to each door, neatly dressed; ten windows v.ath rock sills, 
and frames of good poplar of same thickness of the wall, 
with double architrive facings on both aides; ."ash of the 
same wood; the lights to be 10 by 12 , ^ 2U lights to each 
window; the lower story to be wainscotted neatly as high as 
the window-sills, and plaistered and whitewashed above to 
the ceiling. The upper story, 13 windows, done and finished 
as below; that is 2U lights to each; the floor to be laid 
with good poplar plank, one ^ a half inches thick, well 
tongued and grooved; an entry of ten feet through the 
middle of the upper story, and partitions, so a a to make 
two rooms on each side of the passage, and a fire place to 
each room of common size; in such cage the nartitions to be 
made of plank one and a half inches thick, to be rabbeted and 
beeded; with a pannel door to each room; with sufficient 
locks and hinges; neat chair and wash boards. The upper 
joists to be 4 by 1?, supported by sufficient girders, and 
ceiled as below; box and cornished with joints and modillion 
cornish, in proportion. A hip'd or square roof, that is 
carried up from all sides, with a principal frame to support 
the same, a cupalo on the top 1^+ feet high, and floored; 
a six light window in each square; the remainder to be open, 
hand railed, and banistered; a bell roof, a steeple of 



15 feet long, with an eagle, etc. The roof to be of yellow 
poplar shingles, 18 inches in length, 4 in breadth, and 
3-U thick, and to be well shea ted with at least three-quarter 
plank; all to be nailed on with good and suitable nails. 
The staircases to run from the lower floor to the cupalo; 
the lower stair case to be bracketed and banistered. A 
neat court-bench, jury-box and bar; all to be done in the 
same manner as the court-house in Franklin. The whole to be 
painted in an alegant, durable, fashionable manner. The 
roof to be painted red; the boxing and comishing white; 
and door and window-facing a and sash also white. The whole 
work to be done and executed in a neat workman-like manner. 
The wainscot, wash-board and ceiling to be neatly painted 
of fashionable colors, and stars. 

H. ROBINSON ) 

H. HAMILTON ) p„„„,,- „a-f ,.«^t.o 

OWEN EDWARDS ) Commissioners 

JOHN THOMPSON ) 

N. B. Should the lowest bidder fail to give sufficient 

security on the day of letting, the letting will be continued 

from day to day until let to such as will comply 

H.R. 
H.H. 
O.W. 
J.T. 

November Ik 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY OFFICES AND OFFICERS 
(1804 - 1973) 



(Prepared by the Rutherford County 
Court Clerk's Office) 



COUNTY JUDGES or CHAIRMEN 



James Three t 
She 1 ton Edwards 
Hoyte T. Stevart 
Harold Earthman 
John D. Wiseman 
C. N. Haynes 
Knox Ridley 
T. R. Whitus 
W. H. Robinson 

A. L, Camahan 
W. A. Miles 

J. C. Ransom 
I. M. Floyd 
James H. Spence 
Edgar Smith 

B. M. Rucker 
T. E. Hord 

A . F . Summe r s 
Richard Ransom 
William N. Mason 
John Woods 
Joseph Lindsey 
James F. Fletcher 
William Vinson 
John Fletcher 
Logan Henderson 
A, L. Camahan 
John Smith 
Frederick Barfield 
Thomas Stuart 
William Nash 



1957- 
1950- 
1945- 
1942- 
1932- 
1926- 
1924- 
1922- 
1920- 
1918- 
1916- 
1913- 
1911- 
1911- 
1910- 
1909- 
1903- 
1902- 
1895- 
1888- 
1867- 
1850- 
1845- 
1836- 
1830- 
1828- 
1826- 
1824- 
1820- 
1812- 
1804- 



1957 
1950 
1945 
■1942 
1932 
1926 
1924 
1922 
1920 
1918 
1916 
1913 
1911 
1911 
■1910 
■1908 
■1903 
1902 
•1895 
1888 
1867 
1850 
1844 
1836 
1830 
1828 
1826 
1824 
1820 
1812 



COUNTY COURT CLERKS 



Ben Hall McFarlin 
Fount Pitts 
J. P. Leathers 



1962- 

1950-1962 

1918-1950 



51 



Al D. McKnight 
W. T. 3notherman 
G. H, Wilkinson 
Frank White 
W. D. Robinson 
James 0. Oslin 
John D. Wilson 
John Jones 
John V7oods 
Robert S. Morris 
John K. Laughlin 
Blackman Coleman 
Joseph Herndon 



1914- 

1910- 
1898. 
1890. 
1878. 
1870 
1866 
1856 
1848 
1836 
182U 
1810 
180U 



• 1918 
•1914 
■1910 
•1898 
-1890 

■ 1878 

■ 1870 
-1866 
■1856 
-1847 
-1836 
-1824 
-1810 



SHERIFFS 



G. 
W. 



Robert Goodwin 
Hall McNabb 
W. H. WLlson 
George Sharpe 
W. H. Wilson 
George Sharpe 
Earl McKnight 
J. R. Jones 

W. Thompson 

F. McCrary 
W. B. Bragg 
N . W. Powers 
C. W. Lenoir 
0. N. Mann 
J. R. Rhodes 
J. T. McKnight 
J. W. Primm 
W. R. Bragg 
J. J. lee 
W. T. Smotherman 
R. D. Dejamatt 
Ben Batey 
Aaron Todd 
Richard Ransom 
Ed Arnold 
Richard Ran son 
Ed Arnold 
Isaac P. Vfebb 
Albert Jones 
George W. Gannaway 
William H. Blanch 
James G. Taylor 
W. N . Ma son 
A. M. McKnight 



1970- 
1968- 
1964- 
1962- 
1956- 
1950- 
1946- 
1942- 
1938- 
1932- 
1928- 
1922- 
1920^ 
1915- 
1912- 
1908- 
1904^ 
1898- 
1896^ 
1890- 
1886- 
1882- 

1880- 
1876- 
1873- 
1870- 
1868- 
1866- 
1865- 



1970 
1968 
1964 
19 62 
1956 
1950 
•1946 
1942 
1938 
1932 
•1928 
•1921 

• 1920 
■1914 
■1912 
•1908 
•1904 
•1898 

• 1896 
•1890 
•1886 

■1882 
•1880 
■1876 
■1873 
-1870 
■1868 
■1866 



1861-1865 
1855-1861 
1852-1854 



James M. Tompkins 
V/illiam B. Lillard 
Wilson L. Watkins 
William B. Lillard 
Granville 3. Crockett 
Uriah S. Cummins 
Matthew McClanahan 
Richard M. Cummins 
Matthew McClanahan 
John Griffin 
0. M. Benge 
Samuel Mc Bride 



18^*6- 
1842- 
1836- 
1835- 
1832- 
1824- 
1817- 
1816- 
1812- 
1808- 
1806- 
1804- 



1852 
1845 
1842 
1836 
1835 
1832 
1824 
1817 
•1816 
■1812 
■1808 
•1806 



ASSESSOR OF PROPERTY 



Haynes Baltimore 



1968- 



TAX ASSESSORS 



R, B. Mc Bride 
Temple Williams 
M. L. Tolbert 
Mrs. J. L. Dillion 
Josh Dillion 
H. R. anothennan 
C. C. McCrary 
C. T. Lowe 
J. S. landrum 
W. M. Rucker 
Charles R, Holmes 
John B. Jones 
W. F. Holmes 
W. D, Robinson 
J, E. Butler 
Stephen A. Hill 
Albert Jones 
Leonard Sims 
William P. Lillard 
W. P. Watkins 
G. W. Crockett 
Uriah S. Cummins 
Matthew McClanahan 
John Griffin 
0. M. Benge 
Samuel Mc Bride 



1964- 
19 56- 
1946- 
1937- 
1932- 
1920- 
1911- 
1907- 
1905- 
1888- 
1876- 
1873- 
1872- 
1869- 
1855- 
1850- 
1849- 
1848- 
1842- 
1836- 
1834- 
1824- 
1812- 
1808- 
1806- 
1804- 



1968 
1964 
1956 
1946 
1937 



1907 

1889- 

1877 

1874 

1873 

1872 

1869 

1855 

1850 

1849 

■1848 

•1842 

1836 

1832 

1824 

1812 

■1808 

1806 



TRUSTEES 



Allen Stockard 
Mra. Clay Jackson 
Aubra McCrary 
Frank Hayes 
Aubrey Cook 
J. A. Given 3 
J. W. Winfrey 
G. C. Williamson 
Mrs. Almar Youree 
Almar Youree 
Joe F. Fox 
T. M. Vaughan 
Cullom Alexander 
Paul Kerr 
3. M. Crick 
J. A. Carlton 
J, W. Dejamatt 

Thomas R. Hollowell 
I. M. Miller 
J. M. Adams 
William D. Robertson 
William D. Robertson 
J. P. Abernathy 

J. J. demons 
Swinfield Barton 
M. L. Climons 
Swinfield Barton 
James A. Harrison 
Robert S. Donnell 
Randolph B. Hall 
Samuel Anderson 
Joseph Soape 
Samuel Jones 
Augustus H, White 
Abner Johns 
Alexander McCullock 



1970- 
1958- 
1955- 
19^- 
1940- 
1936- 
1933- 
1930- 
1929- 
1924- 
1920- 
1916- 
1913- 
1909- 
1905- 
1902- 
1900- 

1879- 
1877- 
1875- 
1868- 
1866- 
1865- 

1854. 
1852- 
1850- 
1849- 
1846- 
1844- 
1842- 
1836- 
1832- 
1824- 
1822- 
1813- 
1804- 



1970 
1958 
1950 
1944 
1940 
1936 
1933 
1930 
■1928 
• 1924 
1920 
•1916 
•1913 
■1908 
•1904 
•1902 

•1883 
•1879 
•1877 
•1875 
•1868 
■1866 

•1856 
■1854 
•1852 
•1850 
•1849 
•1846 
■1844 



1824 
1816 
1813 



REGISTERS 



Homer Jones 
Everett Waller 
Mra. W. L. Foutch 
Miss Myrtle R. Foutch 



1966- 
1958-1966 
1843-1957 
1947-1958 



W. L. Foutch 



1942-1943 



J. D. Roberts 



1834-1942 



H. 0. Todd 
Logan J. Nelson 
Logan J. Nelson 
Richard Holden 
Frank Vaughan 
Robert B. Jetton 

Hardy Murfree 
R. B. Jetton 
Hardy Murfree 

John H. Bar bom 
George S. Cook 
A. T. Reeves 
John Woods 



1915-1922 

1914-1915 

1907- 

1901-1904 

1887- 

1821-1887 

1881-1885 
1879-1881 
1870-1879 

1868-1870 
1864-1868 
1850-1854 
1840-1850 



Moses G. Reeves 



1824-1836 



H. 0. Todd 
John Dickson 
John Spence 

William Mitchell 



1812 
1806-1812 

1804-1806 



CORONERS 



Dr. Matt Murfree 
Charles L. Briley 
Alvis Huddle 3 ton 

J. R. Jones 

John T. Wbodfin, 3r. 

J. H Singleton 

L. R. Jacobs 

John Bumpus 

B. G. Cloves 

S. H. Singleton 

R. L. Seward 

J. L. Anderson 

T. H. Wood 

James Sharp 

John T. McKinley 

E. J. Covington 
W. H. Blanch 

J. N. Clark 
John W. Quarles 



1969- 

1960-1969 

1955-1960 

1949-1952 



1926 
1910 
1900 
1898 
1896 
1892 
1890 
1888 
1887 
1886 
1885 
1884 
1879 
1873 



^1^7 
-1926 
-1910 
-1900 
-1898 
-1896 
-1892 
-1889 
-1888 
-1887 
-1886 
-1885 
-1884 
-1879 



1867-1872 
1865-1867 



E. J. Covington 
Robert 3. Northcott 
Green Clay 
E. A. Cochran 



1856-1862 
1855-1856 
1847-1855 
1844-1847 



John Chappell 
Edward Fisher 
John Bruce 
Robert P. Shapard 

Thomas G. Watkins 
William C. Qnmitt 



1840-1841 
1836-1840 
1833-1836 
1832-1833 

1826-1831 
1824-1826 



Samuel Wilson 
James Sharpe 



1812- 
1804-1812 



SURVEYORS 



Eugene Hargis 
John D. Kerr 

J. J. Doster 



1961- 
1950-1961 
1945-1950 
1937-1945 



J. R. Jackson 
Paul Campbell 
W, T. Henderson 
J. R. McKnight 
R. D. Jamison 
J. R. McKnight 
James H. Bowling 

W. R. Jones 
E. S. Sims 
John D. Kerr 
W, R. Jones 
John J. Neely 
J. R. Burtwell 
John Gum 
W. R. Jones 
William C. Blanch 
W. R. Jones 
Robert L. Sims 
P. M. Alexander 
James M. Tompkins 



1917-1919 
1914-1917 
1913-1914 
1905-1909 
1901-1905 
1897-1901 
1893-1897 



1885- 
1881- 
1880- 
1877- 
1873- 
1869- 
1868- 
1866- 
1861- 
1856- 
1853- 
1841- 



•1889 
■1885 
■1881 
•1880 
■1877 
•1873 
1869 
•1868 
1866 
1861 
1856 
1853 
1841 



RANGERS 



Henry Murfree 



1907-1909 



J. D. Nelaon 
J. W. Clark 
M. M. Henry 
M. N. Hay 
John N. Clark 
R. K. Henderson 
R. L. Clark 

James Oslin 

H. C. Carter 

Hiram Garter 

Wilson Thomas 

Bur re 11 Gannaway 



1902- 
1896- 
1894- 
1883- 
1873- 
1871- 
1870- 



19 OU 
1901 
1896 
1893 
1883 
1873 
1871 



1866-1868 

1859 

1853-1857 

1844-1846 

1813-1824 



SUPERINTENDENT of SCHOOLS 



Clifford P. Brothers, Jr. 

M. B. Brandon 

Ira Daniel 

Bealer anotherman 

W. S. Donnell (acting) 

(regular term) 
J. E. Brandon 
Miss Jeanette M. King 
W. N. Elrod 
J. Dallas Jacobs 
Andrew L. Todd 
Miss Nettie King 
N. D. Overall 
James D. Nelson 
Reese K. Henderson 
G. H. Baskette 
A. J. Brandon 
George Q. Jannen 
W. H. Wallace 



1970- 
1961- 
1950- 
1945- 
1942- 
1935- 
1927- 
1923- 
1917- 
1907- 
1903- 
1897- 
1891- 
1887- 
1883- 
1880- 
1876- 
1873- 
1869- 



•1970 
■1961 
•1950 
•1945 
1942 
1935 
1927 
1923 
1916 
1907 
1901 
1897 
1891 
1887 
1882 
1880 
1875 
1873 



ROAD SUPERINTENDENTS 



W. H. Wilson 
Edwin Todd 
Butler anotherman 
L. C. Smith 
N. W. Powers 
J. H. Dyer 
C. L. Holden 



1968- 

1951-1968 

1949-1951 

1933-1949 

1932-1933 

1925-1932 

1908-1920 



WORKHOUSE .SUPERINTENDENTS 



H. D. Thompson 
H. A. lane 
G. A. Youree 
N. W. Powera 
J. H. Dyer 
C. L. Holden 



1937-19i+2 
1935-1937 
1934-1935 
1932-1933 
1925-1932 
1908-1920 



HEALTH OFFICERS AND PHY SI CIAN S 



Dr. Robert S. Sanders 

Dr. R. D. Hollowell 

Dr. John T. Mason 

Dr. Price H. Duff 

Dr. J. G. Wfeeks 

Dr. J. B. Black 



1969- 

19^+7-1969 

1947-19i+7 

1946-1947 

1946-1946 

1929-1926 



Dr. H. S. Mustard 
Dr. S. B. Staith 



1924-1929 
1920-1924 



Dr. J. C. Kelton 

Dr. A. E. Goodloe 

Dr. George Todd 

Dr. S. C. Grigg 



1914-1920 
1912-1914 

1906-1908 
1902-1906 



JAIL PHYSICIANS 



Dr. J. B. Murfree, Jr. 
Dr. W. C. Bilbro 
Dr. J. F. Byrn 
Dr. R. S. Wbndel 
Dr. J. B. Murfree 
Dr. R. S. Wendel 
Dr. H. H. Clajrton 
Dr. J. F. Byrn 
Dr. H. H. Clayton 



1898- 
1890- 
1889- 
1886- 
1885- 
1884- 
1880- 
1878- 
1878- 



•1902 
1898 
1890 
■1889 

1885 
1884 
1880 
1879 



PUBLIC GUARDIANS AND ADMINISTRATORS 



J. P. Hale (G) 
Charles R. Holmes (a) 
P. P. Mason (G) 



1888-1892 
1883-1891 
1884-1888 



C. R. Holmes (A) 

J. 3. Webb (G) 

H. H. Norman (G) 
Frank VJhite (A) 

C. R. Holmes (A) 

R. D. Jamison (A) 

G. W. McLaughlin (A) 

E. L. Turner (A) 



1883-1887 
1881-1883 
1879-1882 

1879-1883 
1875-1879 
1872-1875 
1871-1872 



ATTORNEYS 



William Sellers 



1957- 



John D. Wiseman 
W. B. Knott 
E. L. \ihi taker 
John T. Wilson - B. 

George Gran or 
John E. Richardson 

B. F. Lillard 
H. P. Keeble 



M. Rucker 



1926-1932 
1920-1926 
1918-1920 
1907- 

1905-1908 
1903-1904 
1887-1899 
1878-1879 



CIRCUIT COURT CLERKS 

(Courtesy of Robert J. Suddarth, Circuit Court Clerk. This 
list is not complete as of now, however, we are continuing 
the research.) 



Robert J. Suddarth 
P. E. Harrison 

Murfree O'Brien 

J. Moore King 

Mrs. Blanche Huf faker 

B. M. Rucker 

N. L. Clardy 

Ellis Rucker 

J. Moore King 

Thomas M. King 

Beverly Randolph 
Thomas B. Fowler 



1962- 
1957- 
1954- 
1930- 
1929- 
1926- 
1915- 
1905- 
1898- 
1895- 
1886- 
1884- 
1880- 
1871- 



1962 
1957 
19 54 
1930 
1929 
1926 
1915 
1905 
1898 
1890 
1886 
1884 
1880 



M. L. Fletcher 



1861-1864 



AUDITORS 



LIVESTOCK INSPECTORS 



PLANNING AND ZONING DIRECTOR 



PLANNING DIRECTOR 



PUBLIC VJELFARE DIRECTORS 



CENSUS TAKER 



60 



Land W. Meryon 

D. D, Vfendle 
John Vfooda 

Samuel H. Hodge 
Richard Ledbetter 



I860-I861 
1850-1860 
18U1-1850 
1845-I8U9 

1839-1845 
1835-1839 



H. L. Fox 

C. C. Henderson 



1920-1932 
1919- 



A. G. Topmiller 

3. H. Woods 

Dr. G. B. Giltner 



1922- 
1917-1922 
1914-1916 
1898-1914 



Sam Parnell 



1969- 



VJilliam Welch 



1968- 



Wanda Leverette 
Thelma \-food 



1971- 
1965-1970 



John E. Dromgoole 



1841 



CHANCERY COURT CLERK (CLERK and MASTER) 

(Courtesy of B. B. Gracy, III. Chancery Court Clerk. Further 
research is still being done.) 



Brainard B. Gracy, III 
James R. Jetton 



1947- 
1939-1946 



61 



T. B. Cannon 1929-1939 

James R. Jetton 1922-1929 

E. D. Hancock 1916-1922 

Hickman !*akley 1886-1915 
Jamea W. Sparks -1886 

N. B. Black 1872- 

JameaN. Tompkins 1864-1872 

James F. Fletcher 1849-1864 

George Crosthwait 1844-1847 

Granville S. Crockett 1841- 



MEMBERS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
(June 6, 1973) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Mr. Don F. Adams 
Mr. John P. Adam a 
Mr a. John P. Adams 

* Mra. W. D. Adkeraon 

* Mr. Robert W. Baskin 
Mr. Robert T. Batey 

* Capt. F. W. Brigance 

* Mrs. F. W. Brigance 

Miss Louise Cawthon 

Mr. Almond Chaney 

Mra. George Chaney 

Mrs. James K. Clayton 

Mr. Louis Bush Cole 

Mrs. Louis Bush Cole 

Dr. Robert Corlew 

Dr. Vblter R. Courtenay 
Mrs. A. W. Cranker 

Mrs. Florence Davis 

Mi 3 8 Myrtle Ruth Foutch 

Mr. Vaughn L. Glasgow 

Mra. Robin Gould 



National Park Service 

Virgin Islands 

Route 4 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Route I* 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Compton Road 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

801 E. Lytle 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Route 1, Box UU 

Nolensville, Tennessee 37135 

1202 Scottland 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

1202 Scottland 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

534 E. College Street 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Sanford Road 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

P. 0. Box 114 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

525 E. College 

Murfreesboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

2815 lyne Blvd. 

Nashville, Tennessee 37215 

2815 Tyne Blvd. 

Nashville, Tennessee 37215 

Manson Pike 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Eagleville, Tennessee 37060 

305 Tyne, Murfreesboro, Tennessee 

37130 

Old Nashville Hwy., Route 2 

Smyrna, Tennessee 37167 

103 G St., S.W. 

Washington, D. C. 20024 

Box 524, MTSU 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

2900 Connecticut Avenue 

Washington, D. C. 20008 



62 



Mr3. Robert Gwynne 

* Miaa Mary Hall 

Mrs. Adelaide Hewgley 
Mrs. Eulalia J. Hewgley 

* Mr. Walter King Hoover 

* Mr. Robert S. Ho akin 3 

* Mra. Robert 3. Hoakina 

* Mr. C. B. Huggina, Jr. 
Mr. Morman F. Hutchinaon 

* Mr. Erne at King Johna 

* Mra. Buford Johnaon 
Mr. Homer Jonea 

* Dr. Robert B. Jonea, III 

* Dr. Belt Keathley 

* Mra. Belt Keathley 

* Mr. W. H. King 

* Mra. W. H. King 

* Mr. George Kinnard 

* Mra. George Kinnard 

* Mr. William C. Ledbetter, Jr 

* Mra. Dorothy Matheny 

Mra. Jamea H. Mc Broom, Jr. 

* Mr. Ben Hall McFarlin 

* Mra. Ben Hall McFarlin 
Mr. William F. McPeak 
Mra. David Naaron 



Brit tain Hi 11 a Farm 
Rock Springa Road 
Smyrna, Tenneaaee 37167 

821 E. Burton 071 on 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee J/i:JU 

Route 3 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 371 JU 

Route 3 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee J/iJU 

101 Diviaion 

anyrna, Tenneaaee 37167 

310 Tyne 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 3/lJU 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee J/iJu 

915 E. Main 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

UIO Apollo Drive 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee J/i.JW 

Jefferaon Pike 

Stayrna, Tenneaaee 37167 

109 Cheatnut St. 

Smyrna, Tenneaaee 37167 

1825 Ragland Avenue 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

2031 Sherrill Blvd. 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

1207 Whitehall Road 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

1207 Whitehall Road 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

2107 Greenland 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

2107 Greenland 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

Route 1 

LaVergne, Tenneaaee 37086 

Route 1 

LaVergne, Tenneaaee 37086 

115 N. Univeraity 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

1U3U Diana Street 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

Route 2, Box 131 

Chriatiana, Tenneaaee 37037 

51if E. Lytle 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

514 E. Lytle 

Murfreeaboro, Tenneaaee 37130 

Box 222 

Smyrna, Tenneaaee 37167 

Rock Springa Road 

Route 1 

LaVergne, Tenneaaee 37086 



Mr. John Nelaon 

* Mr. Lawaon B. Nelson 
Dr. Joe Edwin Nunley 

* Mr. S. W. Perry 

Mrs. Harvey Peyton 

* Dr. Homer Pittard 

Mr. Bobby Pope 

Mr. A. G. Puckett, Jr. 

* Mr. Robert Ragland 
Mrs. Robert Ragland 
Mr. Granville S. Ridley 
Mrs. James A. Ridley, Jr. 
Mr. Knox Ridley 

Mayor Sam Ridley 
Mr. Billy E. Rogers 

* Mrs. Elvis Rushing 
Mr. E. R. Sanders, Jr. 

* Miss Racheal Sanders 

* Miss Sara Lou Sanders 

Mr. John F. Scarbrough, Jr. 
Dr. R. Neil Schultz 

* Mr. Gene H. Sloan 
Colonel Sam W. Smith 

* Miss Dorothy Smothennan 

* Mr. Travis anotherman 

* Mr. Doug Sparks 
Mr. Roy E. Tarwater 



Route #4 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

13812 Whispering Lake Dr 

Sun City, Arizona 85351 

305 2nd Avenue 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Box 666 

Grand Marais, Minnesota 55604 

Lascassas, Tennessee 37085 

309 Tyne Avenue 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Old U. 3. 41 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

Mason Cr. 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

Box 544 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Box 544 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

730 E. Main 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Lebanon Pike 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Box 128 

Smyrna, Tennessee 37167 

Box 128 

Snyrna , Tennessee 37167 

506 Jean Drive, Route 2 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

604 N. Spring 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

205 Cumberland Cr. 

Nashville, Tennessee 37214 

1114 N. Tenn. Blvd. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

1114 N. Tenn. Blvd. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

701 Fairview 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

1811 Jones Blvd. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

728 Greenland Drive 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

318 Tyne 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

1220 N. Spring St. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

6565 Premier Drive, Apt. A-12 

Nashville, Tennessee 37209 

410 Rushwood Dr. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

815 W. Clark Blvd. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



Judge James V. Three t 
Mr. Ma8on Tucker 
Mrs. Emmet t Waldron 
Mr. Roy L. Waldron 
Mayor Veater Waldron 
Mrs. Veater Waldron 
Mr. William T. Walkup 
Mr. Robert Hatton Ward 
Mrs. George F. Watson 

* Mayor W, H. Weatbrooka 
Mrs. W. H. Weatbrooka 
Miaa Virginia Wilkinson 

* Mr. Henry G. Wray 



# Tennessee State Library 
& Archives 



Lake shore Drive 

Murf reeaboro, Tennessee 37130 

Route 6, Elam Road 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Box h 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

Route 2 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

LaVergne, Tennessee 37086 

202 Ridley Street 

anyrna , Tennessee 37176 

Route 2 

any ma , Tennessee 37167 

Executive House, B-17 

Franklin, Tennessee 37064 

305 Tyne 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

305 Tyne 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

1118 E. Clark Blvd. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

104 McNickle Drive 

anyrna, Tennessee 37167 

Mrs. Frances M. O'Dell 

State Librarjr Division 

Tenn. State Library & Archives 

Nashville, Tennessee 37219 



* Charter Members 

# Honorary Member 



DATE DUE 





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3 3082 00527 4419 

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76-01591 



AUTHOR 

Rutherford County Historical 
Society ^blication no. 1, June '73 



LIBRARY 

MIDDLE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY 

MURFREESBORO. TENNESSEE 




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