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Full text of "Publication"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication03ruth 



NOT TO LEAVE LIBRARY 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

PUBLICATION NO. 3 

SUMMER, 1974 



THE COVER: The cover illustration is from Joseph Jones' Explorations of 
the Aboriginal Remains of Tennessee published in 1876 by the Smithsonian 
Institute. It is described as a "stone pipe from the aboriginal works 
near Murfreesboro' , Tennessee." As a matter of fact, it serves as an 
introduction to Travis Smotherman's comprehensive article on Rutherford 
County's prehistory. 



Published by 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 

1974 



V 



\i . 3 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 3 



FOREWORD 
As we approach the Bicentennial year of the founding of our nation, 
we trust that this publication along with those published and unpublished 
will help to satisfy this mounting interest we Americans have in our own 
history. Perhaps as a Society member we have a national awareness of 
the grandeur and history of America but we want to preserve our past, our 
roots, our identity, and our resources which are the bases on which our 
Country was built. We would like for Rutherford Countians to know their 
own historical heritage so we in the Society will continue giving our 
time, effort, intelligence, and money to collect, edit and publish! 



Lurlene Rushing 
President, Rutherford 
County Historical Society 



••/b-111.1-1 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

PUBLICATION NO. 3 

published by the 
Rutherford County Historical Society 



OFFICERS 

President Mrs. Elvis Rushing 

Vice President George Kinnard 

Secretary & Treasurer Mrs. Dorothy Matheny 



PUBLICATION NO. 3 (Limited Edition - 300 copies) is to be sent 
to members of the Rutherford County Historical Society. The annual 
membership dues are $5.00 which includes "Frow Chips," a monthly 
NEWSLETTER to all members. Additional copies of PUBLICATION NO. 3 
may be obtained at $3.00 per copy. 

All correspondence concerning additional copies, contributions to 
future issues, and membership should be addressed to 

D. M. Matheny 
1434 Diana Street 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



CONTRIBUTORS 

The Rutherford Historical Society gratefully acknowledges the 

efforts of those who provided material for Publication No. 3. Thanks 

are extended to the following: 

Robert McBride - Staff member Tennessee Historical Commission 
and Editor, Tennessee Historical Quarterly 

Travis E. Smotherman - A member of the Historical Society and 

of the Tennessee Archaeological Society, and Secretary - Treasurer 

of the Rutherford County Archaeological Society 

Henry G. Wray - Rutherford County Archivist and master geneologist 

Mrs. Robert W. Gwynne, Sr. of Brittain Hills Farm, Smyrna, Ten- 
nessee 

Ernest K. Johns - Past President of the Rutherford County Historical 
Society 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The marriage records contained in our first three publications 
were originally abstracted by the Hardy Murfree Chapter, Daughters of 
the American Revolution. 

The Rutherford County Historical Society greatly appreciates the 
use of this material. An index to each series of marriage records was 
prepared by Henry G. Wray, County Archivist. This series of marriage 
records will terminate with this issue. It is our understanding that 
the members of the D. A. R. intend to publish from 1851 through 1872. 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

PUBLICATION NO. 3 

1974 



Contents 

Page 
Rutherford County Marriage Records 1 

Bride Index (Alphabetically by Page Numbers) 

Prepared by Henry G. Wray 12 

The Prehistory of Rutherford County 

By Travis E. Smotherman 17 

Griffith Rutherford 

By Robert M. McBride 40 

An 1803 "Census" of Rutherford County 

By Robert M . McBri de 52 

Rutherford County Militia Records 

By Ernest K. Johns and Henry G. Viray 57 

Rock Springs Church of Christ 

By Mrs. Robert W. Gwynne, Sr 70 

Booknote 75 

Members of the Rutherford County Historical Society 

(As of July 1 , 1974) 79 



MARRIAGE RECORDS 
1857 

Louisana Dunn 

& Samantha A. Thompson 

& Eineliza Moore 
& N. M. McHenry 
& Mary Childress 

& Luvicia Jane Bethel 



Martha E. Rankins 
. V. Smith 
Mo H. Peay 
& Jane Crouse 



Brown, James & 
Brown, John G. 
Burgess, James 
Burnett, W. W. 



Acre, Levi F. & 

Alexander, H. V. 

Alexander, J. D. 

Anderson, W. L. 

Avent, James M. 

Barnes, James B. 

Batey, James & Mary Walker 

Batey, W. 0. & Mary C. Hollowell 

Bell, Benj. H. & Eliz. Richards 

Bell, Obediah & R. E. Stephens 

Bench, W. M. & A. M. Keys 

Bennett, E. G. & Jane E. Colman 

Bingham, Columbus & Jane A. Sugg 

Bivins, A. J. & Mary A. Lawrence 

Blair, Soloman & Nancy E. Gates 

Bone, Henry C. & 

Bone, Wm. D. & C, 

Bostick, T„ K. & 

Bottoms, John A. 

Bridges, Henry & Lucy ^Vhite 

Brinkley, Lewis & Sarah A. Early 

Brown, E. T. & Louiza J. Bowman 

Sarah W. Hamilton 

& A. P. Jarratt 

N. & Eliza Lovel 

& Mary Ann Graves 
Caffy, Thomas A. & Mary E. Dunn 
Carney, John L. & Amanda W. Turner 
Charlton, James H. & Virginia P. Burt 
Cobb, G. L. & Susan Clemens 
Cook, James H. & Martha A. McHenry 
Cook, Samuel W. & Mary C. Hunter 
Cosby, W. M. & Eliz. F. Ott 
Coulter, S. & A. H. Morton 
Creech, John W. & Amanda Swann 
Crichlow, W. B, & L. J. Stevens 
Crouse, H. A. & Isabella C. McCullough 
Daughtry, John & Nancy Pitts 
Davis, A. P. & Mary J. Oliphint 
Davis, W. L. & S. E. Searcy 
Delbridge, James T. & Eliz. J. Howell 
Dill, J. M. & J. P. Kelton 
Dillon, R. A. & Eliz. A. Martin 
Dobbins, B. P. & Sallie A. Rollins 
Dobrowsky, P. M. & C. H. Gilliam 
Donnell, S. C. & S, F. McAdoo 
Drennon, J. N. & M. J. Thorn 
Drenon, D. C. & Elvina M. C. Lannom 
Duglass, James J. & Francis E. Keel 
Edwards, Jarman B. & Jane Manning 
Elam, K.E^& Lucinda E. Pearcy 
Elliott, Archibald & Catharine Drake 
Elliott, Milton M. & Margarett C. Lynch 
Ellis, Zachariah W. A. & Susannah McKinney 



Jan. 20 
Aug. 29 
Jan. 14 
Jul. 16 
Feb. 24 
Apr. 11 
Sept. 5 
Nov. 25 
Nov. 29 
July 21 
Dec. 2 
Feb. 12 
Sept. 26 
Jan. 15 
May 2 3 
Sept. 7 
Nov. 2 
Sept. 21 
Sept. 23 
Mar. 18 
Jun. 2 
Jan. 5 
Oct. 4 
Nov. 2 
Jun. 28 
May 20 
Jan. 24 
May 27 
July 27 
Apr. 15 
Feb. 16 
Sept. 7 
Jan. 28 
Mar. 30 
July 2 
July 16 
Sept. 30 
Feb. 21 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 24 
Mar. 14 



Aug. 
Mar. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb, 



10 

7 

3 

8 

16 



June 6 
Dec. 15 
May 20 
Dec. 31 
Sept. 18 
Dec. 16 
Dec. 29 
Dec. 29 



1857 cont'd 



Engleman, Geo. F. & Mary W. Clay 
Espy, Samuel E. & Nancy M. Powel 
Farmer, James A. & Lucinda Bell 
Farmer, James G. & Judith E. Hicks 
Finny, G. P. & Eliza H. Robb 
Fitzjarrald, Wesley & Margarett J. Donaho 
Fleming, P. E. & Mary Shipps 
Fletcher, Thomas H. & Isabella Hall 
Ford, Henry & Margarett Vaughan 
Foster, James E. & Susan Alexander 
Foster, Wm. & Eliz. Tombs 
Gambill, John & Ann Adcock 
Gibson, W. F. & Manerva Gibson 
Gilbert, James & Mary Ann Morton 

& V. W. Kerr 

& Eliz. C. Puckett 

M. Lee 

& Margaret J. Thompson 
& Amanda H. Speer 



Gilbert, John F. 
Gillespie, W. C. 
Glimp, John H. & 
Goodlow, John W. 



Goodman, Samuel H. 

Haley, James W. & Tabitha Haley 

Haley, John Will & Fanny Mitchell (free Col) 

Hamilton, James & Laura C. Jordan 

Hart, Wm. & Sarah J. Modrall 

Haynes, John W. & Sarah E. Snell 

Helton, James N. & Susan Ann E. Johnson 

Herrell, Ruben & Mary E. Brown 

Hesbroner, Jacob A. & Julia D. Hall 

Hicks, John M. & Sarah Ann Murfree 

Hill, Wm. & Eliz. Parker 

Hooper, W. J. & M. P. Hallyburton 

Hoover, Julius & Mary Hockett 

Hunt, John P. & Luanna Hall 

Hutcherson, John & Tabitha Lamb 

Ivey, Burrell & Sallie Bryant 

Jackson, John W. & Lemiza S. Glenn 

Jakes, Geo. & Mary E. Fox 

Jamison, Wm. R. & Martha Arnett 

Jarmon, Wm. R. & Lucinda C. Grouse 

Jetton, Robert B. & Esther L. Murfree 

Johns, Wm. & Mary A. Hubbard 

Johnson, James W. & Eliz. J. McNeal 

Johnson, John S. & Martha Carter 

Johnson, Robert & Martha McDaniel 

Johnson, Wm. & Anna Jackson 

Johnson, Wm. W. & Eliza. J. Bowman 

Jones, G. M. C. & Louisa Murphey 

Kelton, Robert E. & Mary Brothers 

Kelton, Robert J. & Nancy S. Clark 

Kimbro, W. L. & Susan Sanford 

Kirk, Samuel B. H. & Louisa M. Roberts 

Ledbetter, Wm. Jr. & M. C. Lytle 

Lyon, A. M. & Martha A. Caffey 

Major, John W. & Lucie W. Harris 

Malone, R. D. & Harriett H. Major 



Jan. 1 
Feb. 2 8 
July 16 
Feb. 18 
Dec. 5 
May 27 
Nov. 23 
Apr. 11 
Dec. 21 
July 30 
Nov. 17 
Dec. 30 
June 27 
June 1 
July 22 
Dec. 22 
Nov. 23 
May 28 
Sept. 14 
Jan. 13 
Apr. 19 
Jan. 12 
Oct. 29 
Feb. 11 
Nov. 26 
Aug. 6 
June 4 
Dec. 22 
May 14 
Dec. 14 
Feb. 8 
Dec. 29 
Jan. 12 
Dec. 24 
Nov. 11 
Dec. 7 
July 29 
Feb. 9 
Jan. 27 
Aug. 19 
Jan. 20 
Dec. 24 
Feb. 11 
July 1 
Feb. 2 
Feb. 19 
May 15 
Oct. 26 
June 15 
Mar. 21 
May 6 
Mar. 19 
Dec. 2 
Mar. 4 



1857 cont'd 

Marlin, Isaac & Martha Elliott 

Marlin, John P. & Eliz. E. Knox 

Martin, Matt & Amelia E. Henkle 

Mitchell, James M. & Catherine T. Buchanan 

Mitchell, Samuel A. & Emily L. Warren 

Mitchell, W. B. & C. R. Blair 

Moore, James E. & Nancy Pickett 

Morton, Hiram, & Sarah F. Nash 

Mullins, James P. & Louisa A. Mullins 

Mullins, John & Sophia Pope 

McClanahan, E. W. & Amanda Leath 

McClanahan, John B. & Judy Ann Phelps 

McCrae, Wm. A. & Eliz. E. Edmonds 

Mcculloch, G. J. & Martha Meritt 

McDowell, David & Lucinda E. Heaton 

McGuire, John W. & Mary Jane Clanton 

McHenry, Henry & Sarah T. Dill 

McKee, Wm. A. & Margarett J. McKee 

McKnight, K. P. E. & Hannah K. Hogwood 

Nance, John W- & Julia A. Jackson 

Nash, Geo. N. & Virginia Nash 

Nealy, Wm. W. & Mary F. Sulivan 

Neely, M. H. & Nancy J. Ay lor 

Neill, James F. & Josephine A. Rucker 

Newman, Gabrial, & Mary E. Nichols 

Northcutt, Geo. N. & Margarett Miller 

Owen, E. M. & Susan A. Mason 

Owen, Nathaniel & Mary E. McNiel 

Overall, Isaac R. & Martha B. Jones 

Overstreet, John T. & Margarite C. Reed 

Parrent, Louis & Cornelia A. Brown 

Pate, Henry H. & Levina F. Dyer 

Peyton, G. W. L. & L. A. Clayton 

Peyton, John W. & Julia A. Malone 

Pope, John W. A. & Mary M Spence 

Posey, P. F. & Martha A. Speer 

Prater, David & Mary E. Moore 

Prater, John & Sarah F. More 

Price, Wilson B. & M. C. Barton 

Raines, John & Margarett Sikes 

Rainey, John W. & Margarett C. Howse 

Reed, David & Julia Ann Jones 

Reeves, Wm. T. & Mary F. Nolen 

Richmon, John B. & Mary A. E. Mathews 

Roane, J. H. & Sallie R. Holden 

Robb, W. W. & M. T. House 

Rose, Robert & Brina Batson 

Ryan, John W. & Sarepta E. Stack 

Saffill, Andrew J. & Martha J. Singleton 

Sanders, A. B. & M. A. E. Cradock 

Sanders, J. P. & America Price 

Sanders, W. B. & Nancy Ann Vaughan 

Shannon, Finas E. & Rosannah A. Hunt 

Sharber, J. M. & Isabella Trale 



May ; 


13 


Sept 


. 16 


Oct. 


15 


Sept 


. 5 


Aug. 


8 


Jan. 


16 


Sept 


. 26 


July 


23 


Feb. 


26 


Mar. 


7 


Jan. 


20 


Sept 


. 19 


Feb. 


11 


Sept 


. 7 


Dec. 


28 


Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


20 


Feb. 


7 


Jan. 


27 


Dec. 


14 


Mar. 


17 


Apr. 


8 


Aug. 


20 


Nov. 


12 


July 


13 


Dec. 


2 


Feb. 


12 


Dec. 


23 


Jan. 


20 


Feb. 


23 


Nov. 


23 


Oct. 


26 


May : 


L9 


Mar. 


4 


Nov. 


11 


June 


13 


Nov. 


24 


Jan. 


5 


Dec. 


23 


Nov. 


30 


Apr. 


21 


Nov. 


2 


Mar. 


9 


Dec. 


1 


Nov. 


30 


Nov. 


4 


Mar. 


2 


Dec. 


14 


Jan. 


7 


Jan. 


7 


June 


15 


July 


17 


Aug. 


19 


Feb. 


4 



1857 cont'd 

Sharber, Wm. C. & Mary A. Morris 

Shingleton, John W. & Sarah Guest 

Sirls, James & Nancy M. Todd 

Smith, Charles P. & Ann Morton 

Smith, Robert P. & Lizza McGill 

Smith, S. W. & Arlamissa Wetherly 

Smotherman, Uriah & Eliza R. H. Simpson 

Sneed, D. H. & Martha E. James 

Spain, Thomas & Lucy A. Davis 

Spangler, James & Martha Jane Tucker 

Spence, James D. & Eliz. J. Williams 

Stafford, John A. & Barbary Teal 

Stanton, Pinckney & Marandy E. Sanders 

Stacey, David & Louisa Travis 

Stewart, Richard & Martha Stewart (free Col) 

Taylor, Creed & Sarah L. Yearwood 

Thompson, F. C. & M. J. Sanders 

Toliver, Henry & Mary Ann Young 

Tuttle, Solomon & Violett J. Burgett 

Upchurch, James A. & Eliza A. Jourden 

Wade, Julius C. & Margaret H. Cowan 

Waldran, James W. & S. D. Guthrie 

Wallace, W. H. & Caroline Smith 

Walls, Robert & Catherine Hunt 

Warren, Joseph N. & Sarah J. McFadden 

Watts, J. H. & Nancy A. Crowse 

Welch, Thomas & M. A. Mankin 

White, John D. & Mary Allen 

Wiggs, John M. & Mary E. Rosborough 

Williams, Henry R. & Julia S. Pillow 

Williams, Samuel M. & Sarah Burnett 

Woods, Robert H. & Cicila Pinkard 

Wright, James W. & Martha A. Sanders 

Yearger, Edmon & America Jarratt 



Feb. 


26 


Dec. 


15 


Apr. 


14 


Mar. 


17 


Nov. 


17 


Oct. 


27 


Dec. 


7 


Jan. 


1 


Feb. 


10 


Nov. 


9 


Mar. 


10 


Jan. 


8 


Nov. 


11 


Dec. 


30 


Nov. 


11 


Dec. 


17 


Sept, 


. 2 


Apr. 


19 


July 


26 


Sept, 


. 18 


Mar. 


3 


July 


5 


July 


7 


Nov. 


5 


Nov. 


5 


May ! 


3 


Aug. 


20 


Nov. 


5 


Aug. 


13 


Feb. 


2 


Dec. 


29 


July 


23 


Sept 


. 29 


Dec. 


22 



1858 



Adcock, Thomas J. & Levina J. Adcock 

Alford, John B. & Martha E. Ward 

Alford, Thomas J. & Mahulda Sanders 

Arbuckel, C. F. L. & Mary I. Mann 

Arnold, C. C. A. & L. C. Kirby 

Arnold, Wm. & Jane Carter 

Barber, John A. L. & Martha A. Ward 

Barger, Isaiah & Martha E. Hayes 

Barton, T. S. & Mendozia Bivins 

Benson, W. I. & Sarah E. Wisen 

Bivens, David M. & Susan E. Johnson 

Bivens, W. B. & Mary R. Barton 

Black, James F. & N. C. Alexander 

Bomar, A. J. & L. M. January 

Bowman, D. S. & Caroline Gill 

Brothers, George & Oelvia Holder 

Bryant, Wm. H. & Sarah Baker 

Burgett, James & Eliz. Parris 

Burrows, Thomas W. & M. C. Henry 

Bush, J. W. & Martha E. Coleman 

Gates, John A. & Mary Benson 

Coleman, Daniel & Mary Hunt 

Cook, David, Jr. & Margarett Wade 

Cook, Elbert & Sarah Ann Cotton 

Cook, James P. & Cenia Ann Bailey 

Cooke, Thomas M. & Dorothy A. White 

Corben, John & Ellen E. Adcock 

Covington, T. H. P. & Malisa A. Hendrix 

Covington, Wm. & R. F. C. Hendrick 

Cowan, Joseph B. & Lucy F. Brown 

Cox, Elisah & Eliza A. Jetton 

Crawley, M. D. & M. P. Wilson 

Cunningham, John & Margarett Moss 

Daniel, Wm. R. & Sarah A. Ethredge 

Davis, A. J. & N. A. Edwards 

Doak, J. M. & Mary A. Seay 

Doughlass, Asa & Nancy J. Anderson 

Downing, Andrew L. & Sarah Hoover 

Downing, Melton & Milly W. Brooks 

Fades, Samuel A. & Edy E. McCoy 

Fades, Wm. & Julia F. Barrett 

Fads, Solomon & Nancy Pullon 

Edward, Thomas & Martha A. E. Vaughan 

Elliot, Wm. G. & Louisa F. M. Elliot 

Fergus, James L. D. E. & Susan A. F. Neely 

Floyd, B. D. & Sara J. Dyer 

Garner, Wm. & Matilda Jane Herndon 

Gay, Dempsey & Mary McKinney 

George, Wm. R. & Rebeca Mullins 

Haley, W. W. & Eliza G. McFarlin 

Hall, Drury & Eliz. John 

Harris, Elgin G. & Nancy T. Spence 

Harris, Richard O. & Martha A. Mainor 

Haynes, Abram & Rebecca E. Pope 

Henderson, Wm. P. & Louisiana Pruett 



July 8 
June 1 
Mar 25 
Dec. 2 
Sept. 2 3 
Dec. 2 3 
Dec. 28 
July 20 
Nov. 24 
Apr. 6 
Sept. 26 
Nov . 2 3 
Nov. 4 
June 22 
June 10 
Nov. 29 
Apr. 8 
Mar. 9 
Dec. 23 
June 1 
May 2 
Aug. 2 4 
Feb. 23 
Aug. 12 
Aug. 6 
Nov. 11 
Mar. 3 
Oct. 5 
June 22 
Aug . 3 1 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 9 
May 31 
Oct. 14 
July 31 
July 11 
Jan. 5 
Sept. 8 
July 27 
Feb. 16 
Jan. 8 
Oct. 13 
Mar. 28 
Jan. 11 
Jan. 6 
June 17 
Nov. 3 
Nov. 11 
Sept. 23 
Dec. 23 
Jan. 17 
Dec. 16 
Nov. 17 
Apr. 28 



1858 cont'd 



Henry, Ben j . F. & Sarah L. Pritchitt 
Herron, Frederick & L. A. (Liddie) Goodman 
Hoover, W. M. & Manerva Fox 
Huchens, John W. & Lucy M. Daniel 
Hughes, Francis W. & Adaline E. Alexander 
Hunt, E. B. & A. P. Hutcherson 
Hutcherson, Joseph & Mary E. Evans 
Insell, George & Jane Price 
Jenkins, E. M. & Nancy A. Victory 
Johnson, Albert A. & Eliz. Mayfield 
Johnson, Wm. A. & Eliza Suggs 
Jolly, John J. & Susan W. Richardson 
Jones, W. A. & V. G. Brown 
Jordan, J. R. & Susan C. Snell 
Justice, James G. & Martha Mankins 
Kellow, James M. & Martha Parker 
Kimbro, Isaac N. & Sarah A. Eskredge 
Kirby, Thomas D. & Eliz. Northcutt 
Lamb, Wm. M. & Nancy T. Lawrence 
Lanier, Geo. W. & Ameliza Jennings 
Lasiter, Wm. M. & Eliz. Witherspoon 
Lillard, James M. & Sarah Greer 
Linebaugh, B. F. & Martha V. Miller 
Lynch, M. S. & Drucilla A. Newman 
Manire, Amasa & Julia A. White 
Mason, Luke T. & Myrtilla M. Burnitt 
Manier, Lemuel & Mary N. Hendrix 
Moore, John A. & Amanda Adams 
McCrary, Arthur A. & Mary A. Gumm 
McDonough, J. P. & Ann Clark 
McKay, Silas H. & Mary R. Ralston 
McLean, Joseph M. & Temperance C. McClean 
McNabb, C. A. & Serena Burks 
McNabb, James M. & Susan F. Mayfield 
& Martha A. Coleman 
& Louisa J. Naylor 
Newsom, James R. & Mary A. Vaughan 
Nice, John W. & Jane Welch 
O'Brien, John & M. J. Fuller 
Old, John H. & Mary Noe 
Overall, L. D. A. & Lucinda J. Bates 
Powell, Joseph & Margaret E. Brothers 
Prewett, David L. & Susan Hickmon 
Puckett, Robert D. & Mary E. Palmer 
Pugh, George W. & Eliza Castleman 
Rather, Daniel & Sallie Tucker 
Reeves, Daniel L. & Mary L. Garner 
Renshaw, James J. & Mary B. Youree 
Rice, James B. & Ann Welch 
Rice, John W. & Jane Welch 
Robinson, G. W. & Nelly Jane Williams 
Rucker, B. L. & M. J. Adkerson 
Russworm, Samuel C. & Virginia C. Green 
Smith, Hiram & Eliz. Slaughter 
Smith, Joseph B. & Mary E. Alexander 



Neal, John E. 
Neely, John J. 



Oct. 


14 


Aug. 


14 


Jan. 


26 


July 


15 


Oct. 


12 


Aug. 


31 


July 


15 


Sept 


. 16 


Apri: 


1 7 


Feb. 


16 


Oct. 


15 


Apri: 


1 8 


July 


14 


Oct. 


11 


Sept 


. 7 


Oct. 


18 


Jan. 


28 


Sept 


. 9 


Jun. 


— 


Nov. 


28 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


22 


July 


28 


May ; 


19 


Mar. 


11 


June 


8 


July 


15 


Sept 


. 11 


Apri: 


L 15 


June 


3 


May ; 


25 


Mar. 


13 


Aug. 


12 


May ; 


27 


Jan. 


4 


Apri; 


L 4 


March 10 


Feb. 


9 


Jan. 


26 


May ; 


31 


Apri; 


L 22 


Nov. 


30 


Mar. 


9 


July 


22 


Aug. 


31 


Mar. 


3 


Oct. 


12 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


4 


Feb. 


5 - 


Dec. 


30 


Dec. 


14 


Feb. 


22 


Mar. 


2 


Dec. 


13 



1858 cont'd 



Vardell, John 
Wadley, C. M. 
Walden, James 
Walker, Lewis 



Snider, Wm. Riley & Nancy W. Murry 
Speer, W. S. & Julie S. Huff 
Thurman, N. F. & Lucy Wyatt 
Todd, Aaron & Milly Eads 
Toombs, James W. & Mary C. Robertson 
T. & Catherine Elliot 
& Miss Gate Garner 
A. & Rebecca P. Duncan 
& Mary Goober 
Weakley, J. P. H. & Lucy A. Muse 
Webb, Aden & Delitha Mauberry 
Welch, Nicholas & Malisa Tilford 
Welchance, Simon & Martha Barrett 
Williams, Edmond P. & Savannah Whitworth 
Williams, James A. & Ann Roberty Short 
Wilson, John ?W. & Tabitha Hoover 
Winsett, J. F. & Sarah F. Butts 
Whitson, Nathaniel & Rebecca Ann Hendrix 
Word, T. C. & Sarah E. Jones 
Wray, G. C. & Julie Ann Murphy 



Oct. 10 
May 24 
Nov. 10 
Aug. 22 
Oct. 2 2 
Nov . 2 9 
Aug. 5 
Oct. 21 
June 10 
Nov. 17 
Dec. 13 
June 30 
April 14 
July 18 
Aug. 24 
April 9 
Dec. 14 
Sept. 29 
June 23 
Aug. 28 



1859 



Brewer, Elisha & 
Briles, Wm. T. & 
Brown, Thomas F. 



Andleton, W. W. & Rebecca Eaton Jan. 6 

Ashley, John & Julia Tarlton Dec. 14 

Bain, Peter H. F. & Sarah Rose Nov. 22 

Barton, J. H. & Docia Bethshears Oct. 20 

Batey, Win. B. & Tabitha J. Searcy Nov. 28 

Batey, W. F. M. & Sophia B. Rucker Oct. 9 

Beasley, G. W. & Martha K. Neely Jan. 20 

Beasley, T. J. & Frances E. Lewis June 30 

Bedford, John N. & A. C. Smith July 12 

Bethel, R. H. & Eliz. G. House Dec. 22 

Blackman, James A. & Mary C. Richardson Mar. 15 

Blair, Joseph M. & Martha Jane Philpott Mar. 29 

Braden, Thomas J. & Nancy A. Daniel May 4 

Brady, William & Susan McGowan Apr. 27 

Susan Coleman July 24 

Thankful E. Tribble Dec. 15 

& Martha W. Wharton Oct. 6 

Bryant, Lorenzie & Stansheary Morris Oct. 13 

Bryant, Zebadiah & Sarah A. Jones Apr. 21 

Burton, Peyton S. & Lucy F. Lawrence Oct. 12 

Butler, Wm. R. & Isadora Smith Nov. 1 

Caldwell, John G. & Mary A. Holden July 21 

Carlton, Ben j . & Eliz. E. Crick Sept. 30 

Carter, James C. & Margarett Jane Smith Jan. 27 

Childress, J. K. P. & Ellen W. Avent Dec. 20 

Childress, James N. & Rebecca Greer Mar. 27 

Clark, H. W. & Miss E. R. Kelton Apr. 14 

Clark, James A. & Mary A. Clark Dec. 14 

Clinard, Andrew D. & Mary A. Wharton Nov. 10 

Cole, Geo. W. & Sarah A. Haynes Dec. 20 

Coleman, John H. & Sarah A. Shelton Feb. 7 

Coleman, Patrick H. & Elmina Jane Bone Jan. 20 

Cook, Geo. C. & Susan C. Reeves Dec. 21 

Cooke, James R. & Harriet C. Batey July 19 

Cooper, John A. & Mary E. Mason Apr. 13 

Cotter, James L. & Mary J. Hays July 7 

Craddock, G. G. & Eliza A. Jennings Sept. 4 

Crockett, Robert P. & Mary E. Watkins Oct. 12 

Cunningham, C. P. & Amanda C. Ross Mar. 3 

Cunningham, Moses & Martha Morse Oct. 6 

Daniel, R. B. & Rebecca R. M. Batey Mar. 10 

Davis, A. T. & A. E. Boring Dec. 7 

Davis, Constant H. & America Ann E. Mullins Dec. 4 

Deason, D. G. & Sarah J. Powell Dec. 6 

Dill, Thomas & Eliza Dill Sept. 10 

Dill, W. C. & Margaret J. Maberry Dec. 1 

Dill, Wm. & Nancy M. Greer Jan. 11 

Drake, Thomas & Eliz. Newman Aug. 25 

Dunn, John L. & Mary Davidson Oct. 20 

Eads, Mathew W. & Parthenia Avery Jan. 3 

Eaton, Newton J. & Sarah F. White June 16 

Elder, Levi W. & Mary E. T. McGowan Apr. 27 



(free 
col) 



1859 cont'd 

Eshredge, Vim. B. & Nancy C. Eshredge Jan. 9 

Farmer, Thomas & Mary Jane Corder Feb. 22 

Fletcher, B. D. & E. A. Alexander May 10 

Fox, Wm. & Tinnie Rowden Aug. 30 

Gannaway, R. B. & Sarah Davis Aug. 9 

Garrett, G. C. & Nancy R. Arnold Nov. 16 

Garrett, J. F. & M, C. Arnold July 27 

Garrett, Wm. & Nancy A. Lannom Aug. 1 

Gibson, Robert B. & Mary F. Miller Mar. 8 

Graham, M. V. & S. C. Puckett Mar. 28 

Graves, Richard R. & Eliz. Osment Aug. 31 

Hall, John W. & Mary Jane Shelton Feb. 7 

Hall, Wm. & America McDaniel Feb. 23 

Hancock, E. D. & Fannie D. Murfree Oct. 18 

Hallyburton, J. O. & L. M. Johnson Nov. 21 

Harel, P. Y. & Nancy Brown Oct. 22 

Harris, W. T. & E. E. Dill Sept. 12 

Henry, Fontain J. & Sarah E. Osborn May 19 

Herron, B. F. & Mecca H. Dunnaway Oct. 6 

Hill, Samuel & Clementine Bailey Sept. 29 

Hobson, H. H. & M. N. Williams Dec. 7 

Hooper, Wm. J. & Eliz. A. White Dec. 22 

Hoover, Mathias & Margarit Rollins Aug. 17 

House, J. W. & S. J. Dunn Mar. 10 

Howell, Wm. & Frances Williams Dec. 29 

Howland, Ephraim & Malinda Todd Nov. 23 

Howland, R. L. & Martha M. Baugh Mar. 1 

Howse, G. A. & Mary E. White Dec. 27 

Hughes, Thomas F. & Sarah J. Mayfield May 12 

Hunt, John & Luzanna Miers Jan. 13 

Jarratte, L. J. & Catherine Haynes Nov. 3 

Jarrell, James W. & Mary A. Nevel May 19 

Jernigan, J. W. & Mary M. Todd Apr. 3 

Johns, Paul V. & Margarett E. Pearson Jan. 26 

Johnson, J. N. & Catherine C. Faucett Feb. 17 

Jordan, E. L. & Mildred Williams Sept. 28 

Kirby, John & Nancy J. White Dec. 14 

Koger, J. M. & Lucretia Barnes Mar. 17 

Lannom, A. T. & Mary E. Clark May 31 

Leath, John W. & Mary E. Ward Nov. 1 

Lewis, J. M. & M. J. Fletcher July 19 

Lewis, M. & Mary A. Hickman Jan. 5 

Long, James & Ann Robb Jan. 25 

Lowe, Hugh K. & Virginia Green Nov. 27 

Mainor, D. S. & Eliz. Brady Apr. 27 

Marable, Fountain & Martha L. Lester Dec. 29 

Marshall, Geo. & Martha Brown Mar. 29 

Mathews, John K. & Martha E. Johns Oct. 13 

Matthews, N. J. & P. A. E. Logon Apr. 4 

Mattox, Albert & Mary C. Sanders Dec. 27 

Maxwell, J. L. & Susan C. Wood Dec. 6 

Miles, CM. & Sarah Russworm Aug. 10 

Miller, James R. & Rebecca R. Rowlett Mar. 1 



10 



1859 cont'd 

Modral, R. N. & Rody A. Tucker 

Molden, W. E. & Mary F. Fox 

Moore, John E. & Martha Ann Overall 

Moore, W. F, & Sarah Tuder 

Morton, J. B. & F. E. Cook 

Morton, Samuel T. & Rachel Jacobs 

Mullins, John & Lovy O. J. Robertson 

Mullins, W. L. & Mary M. Philpott 

McCanlis, John & Martha J. Millins 

McClain, J. H. & Lucy Wade 

McCaniel, Wm. & Lucretia Elliott 

McKee, James & Laura Pully 

McKinley, John T. & Lizzie A. Ivie 

Nance, B. F. & Nancy Hight 

Neal, J. W. & Mary A. Mobs 

Nesbit, Ephram & Susan H. Nelson 

Norman, E. A. & Mary E. Miller 

Northcott, B. P. & S. J. Thompson 

Page, John E. & Eliz. Rutledge 

Parker, John W. & Mary L. Oslin 

Parker, Joseph & Louisa M. Bailey 

Patterson, Beverly D. & Maxmilly Patterson 

Payne, Geo. W. & Ellen Watts 

Pearcy, James & Martha Howell 

Phillips, John & Lockey E, Crawford 

Pitts, James J. & A. H. Green 

Prater, Henry & Mary E. Farmer 

Prater, Phillip G. & Mary A. Fulks 

Ray, Wm. R. & Eliz. J. Covington 

Reed, T. J. & Louise J. Stitt 

Renshaw, John A. & I. C. Myers 

Rieves, Ira 0. & Mary L. Nelson 

Rutledge, Albert & Rachel Pogue 

Rutledge, Richard & Elenor Gilmore 

Ryan, C. F. & Martha A. E. Lee 

Ryan, John R. & Sarah L. Sanders 

Searcy, W. W. & Mattie Buchanan 

Sikes, W. H. & Martha T. Gooch 

Simpson, John T, & Mary J. Hood 

Sims, E. S. Sc C. P. Randolph 

Smith, James D. P. & Lockey C. Suggs 

Smith, Joseph H. & Arabella McMurry 

Snell, James H. & Louisa Y. Howse 

Sudberry, John H. & C. T. Smotherman 

Swan, Moses & Tabitha Neely 

Swanger, David & Mary M. Bowman 

Swett, Henry & Eliz. Kellow 

Spence, Beverly D. & Maxmilly Patterson 



Mar. 


9 


Dec. 


15 


Mar. 


9 


June 


5 


Dec. 


8 


Sept. 


. 6 


Mar. 


15 


Jan. 


2 


Mar. 


22 


Sept. 


. 9 


Apr. 


10 


Sept. 


, 8 


June 


9 


Dec. 


1 


Jan. 


29 


Oct. 


11 


Sept. 


. 25 


Dec. 


29 


July 


26 


Oct. 


20 


Feb. 


10 


July 


21 


July 


9 


Sept, 


. 13 


Oct. 


18 


July 


27 


Mar. 


1 


Sept. 


. 8 


Jan. 


28 


Jan. 


26 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


17 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


27 


Jan. 


12 


Mar. 


30 


Nov. 


26 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


22 


Jan. 


20 


Oct. 


13 


Nov. 


24 


Dec. 


20 


Jan. 


31 


Jan. 


23 


Aug. 


25 


Apr. 


13 


July 


21 



11 



1859 cont'd 

Tarpley, Henry L. & Arsenath L. Barr 
Thomas, Ben j . & Margaret Miller 
Thomas, James & Catharine Miller 
Tilford, Henry W. & Eliza J. Ivie 
Tribble, F. D. & Ann Kelton 
Turner, Thomas & Nanerva Haynes 
Vaughan, Richard R. & Sallie N. Cooke 
Waller, John B. & Mary E. Clements 
Watkins, James & Mary A. Nickens 
Wharton, Robert N. & Martha J.- Mullins 
White, Hugh L. & Matilda Elder 
White, Thomas D. & Lizzie White 
Williams, Thomas J. & Eliz. C. Nivins 
Williams, Wm. B. & Virginia Powell 
Wilson, W. L. & M. H. Carney 
Woolfendon, Henry & A. E. Todd 
Youree, John & Eliz. Lyon 



Jan. 


13 


July 


25 


Nov. 


18 


Jan. 


27 


Nov. 


30 


Feb. 


23 


Aug. 


14 


Sept, 


. 15 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


17 


Feb. 


23 


Mar. 


8 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


12 


Jan. 


18 


Apr. 


5 


Jan. 


27 



BRIDE INDEX (by page number) 



12 



Adams , Amanda 6 

Adcock , Ann 2 

Adcock, Ellen E. 5 

Adcock, Levina J. 5 

Adkerson, M. J. 6 

Alexander, Adaline E. 6 

Alexander, E. A. 9 

Alexander, Mary E. 6 

Alexander, N. C. 5 

Alexander, Susan 2 

Allen, Mary 4 

Anderson, Nancy J. 5 

Arnett, Martha 2 

Arnold, M. C. 9 

Arnold, Nancy R. 9 

Avent, Ellen W. 8 

Avery, Parthenia 8 

Ay lor, Nancy J. 3 

Bailey, Cenia Ann 5 

Bailey, Clementine 9 

Bailey, Louisa M. 10 

Baker , Sarah 5 

Barnes, Lucretia 9 

Barr, Arsenath L. 11 

Barrett, Julia F. 5 

Barrett, Martha 7 

Barton, M. C. 3 

Barton, Mary R. 5 

Bates, Lucinda J. 6 

Batey, Harriet C. 8 

Batey, Rebecca R. M. 8 

Batson, Brina 3 

Baugh, Martha M. 9 

Bell, Lucinda 2 

Benson, Mary 5 

Bethel, Luvicia Jane 1 

Bethshears, Docia 8 

Bivins, Mendozia 5 

Blair, C. R. 3 

Bone, Elmina Jane 8 

Boring, A. E. 8 

Bowman, Eliza J. 2 

Bowman, Louiza J. 1 

Bowman, Mary M. 10 

Brady, Eliz. 9 

Brooks, Milly W. 5 
Brothers, Margaret E. 6 

Brothers, Mary 2 

Brown, Cornelia A. 3 

Brown, Lucy F. 5 



Brown, Martha 
Brown, Mary E. 
Brown, Nancy 
Brown, V. G. 
Bryant, Sally 
Buchanan, Catherine 
Buchanan, Mattie 
Burgett, Violett J. 
Burks, Serena 
Burnett, Sarah 
Burnitt, Myrtilla M, 
Burt, Virginia P. 
Butts, Sarah F. 

Caffey, Martha A. 
Carney, M. H. 
Carter, Jane 
Carter, Martha 
Castleman, Eliza 
Cates, Nancy E. 
Childress, Mary 
Clanton, Mary Jane 
Clark, Ann 
Clark, Mary A. 
Clark, Mary E. 
Clark, Nancy S. 
Clay, Mary W. 
Clayton, L. A. 
Clemens, Susan 
Clements, Mary E. 
Coleman, Martha A. 
Coleman, Martha E. 
Coleman, Susan 
Colman, Jane E. 
Cook, F. E. 
Cooke, Sallie N. 
Corder, Mary Jane 
Cotton, Sarah Ann 
Covington, Eliz. J. 
Cowan, Margaret H. 
Cradock, M. A. E. 
Crawford, Lockey E. 
Crick, Eliz. E. 
Crouse, Jane 
Crouse, Lucinda C. 
Crowse, Nancy A. 

Daniel, Lucy M. 
Daniel, Nancy A. 
Davidson, Mary 
Davis, Lucy A. 



9 
2 
9 
6 
2 
3 
10 
4 
6 
4 
6 
1 
7 

2 
11 

5 
2 
6 

1 
1 
3 
6 
8 
9 
2 
2 
3 
1 

11 
6 
5 
8 
1 

10 

11 
9 
5 

10 
4 
3 

10 
8 
1 
2 
4 

6 
8 
8 
4 



13 



Davis, Sarah 9 

Dill, E. E. 9 

Dill, Eliza 8 

Dill, Sarah T. 3 

Donaho , Margarett J. 2 

Drake, Catharine 1 

Duncan, Rebecca P. 7 

Dunn, Louisana 1 

Dunn, Mary E. 1 

Dunn, S. J. 9 

Dunnaway , Mecca H. 9 

Dyer, Levina F. 3 

Dyer, Sara J. 5 

Eads, Milly 7 

Early, Sarah A. 1 

Eaton, Rebecca 8 

Edmonds, Eliz. E. 3 

Edwards, N. A. 5 

Elder, Matilda 11 

Elliot, Catharine 7 

Elliot, F. M. 5 

Elliott, Lucretia 10 

Elliott, Martha 3 

Eshredge, Nancy C. 9 

Eskredge, Sarah A. 6 

Ethredge, Sarah A. 5 

Evans, Mary E. 6 

Farmer, Mary E. 10 
Faucett, Catharine C. 9 

Fletcher, M. J. 9 

Fox, Manerva 6 

Fox, Mary E. 2 

Fox, Mary F. 10 

Fulks, Mary A. 10 

Fuller, M. J. 6 

Garner, Mary L. 6 

Garner, Miss Gate 7 

Gibson, Manerva 2 

Gill, Caroline 5 

Gilliam, C. H. 1 

Gilmore, Elenor 10 

Glenn, Lemiza S. 2 

Goober, Mary 7 

Gooch, Martha T. 10 
Goodman, L. A. (Liddie) 6 

Graves, Mary Ann 1 

Green, A, H. 10 

Green, Virginia 9 

Green, Virginia C. 6 



Greer, Nancy M. 8 

Greer, Rebecca 8 

Greer, Sarah 6 

Guest, Sarah 4 

Gumm, Mary A. 6 

Guthrie, S. D. 4 

Haley, Tabitha 2 

Hall, Isabella 2 

Hall, Julia D. 2 

Hall, Luanna 2 

Hallyburton, M. P. 2 

Hamilton, Sarah W. 1 

Harris, Lucie W. 2 

Hayes, Martha E. 5 

Hays, Mary J. 8 

Haynes, Catherine 9 

Haynes, Manerva 11 

Haynes, Sarah A. 8 

Heaton, Lucinda E. 3 

Hendrick, R. F. C. 5 

Hendrix, Malisa A. 5 

Hendrix, Mary N. 6 

Hendrix, Rebecca Ann 7 

Henkle, Amelia E. 3 

Henry, M. C. 5 
Herndon, Matilda Jane 5 

Hickman, Mary A. 9 

Hickman, Susan 6 

Hicks, Judith E. 2 

Hight, Nancy 10 

Hockett, Mary 2 

Hogwood, Hannah K. 3 

Holden, Mary A. 8 

Holden, Mary F. 3 

Holder, Oelvia 5 

Hollowell, Mary C. 1 

Hood, Mary J. 10 

Hoover , Sarah 5 

Hoover, Tabitha 7 

House, Eliz. G. 8 

House, M. T. 3 

Howell, Eliz. J. 1 

Howell, Martha 10 

Howse, Louisa Y. 10 

Howse, Margarett C. 3 

Hubbard, Mary A. 2 

Huff, Julie S. 7 

Hunt, Catherine 4 

Hunt, Mary 5 

Hunt, Rosannah A. 3 

Hunter, Mary C. 1 



14 



Hutcherson, A. P. 

Ivie, Eliza J. 
Ivie, Lizzie A. 

Jackson, Anna 
Jackson, Julia A. 
Jacobs, Rachel 
James, Martha E. 
January, L. M. 
Jarratt, A. P. 
Jarratt, America 
Jennings, Ameliza 
Jennings, Eliza A. 
Jetton, Eliza A. 
John, Eliz. 
Johns, Martha E. 
Johnson, L. M. 
Johnson, Susan Ann 
Johnson, Susan E. 
Jones, Julia Ann 
Jones, Martha B. 
Jones, Sarah A. 
Jones, Sarah E. 
Jordan, Laura C. 
Jourden, Eliza A. 

Keel, Francis E. 
Kellow, Eliz, 
Kelton, Ann 
Kelton, Miss E. R. 
Kelton, J. P. 
Kerr, V. W. 
Keys, A. M. 
Kirby, L. C. 
Knox, Eliz. E. 

Lamb, Tabitha 
Lannom, Elvina M. C 
Lannom, Nancy A. 
Lawrence, Lucy F. 
Lawrence, Mary A. 
Lawrence, Nancy T. 
Leath, Amanda 
Lee, M. 

Lee, Martha A. E. 
Lester, Martha L. 
Lewis, Frances E. 
Logon, P. A. E. 
Lovel, Eliza 
Lynch, Margarett C. 
Lyon, Eliz. 
Lytle, M. C. 



11 
10 

2 

3 
10 
4 
5 
1 
4 
6 
8 
5 
5 
9 
9 
2 
5 
3 
3 
8 
7 
2 
4 

1 
10 
11 
8 
1 
2 
1 
5 
3 

2 
1 
9 
8 
1 
6 
3 
2 

10 
9 
8 
9 
1 
1 

11 
2 



Maberry, Margaret J. 
Mainor, Martha A. 
Major, Harriett H. 
Malone, Julia A. 
Mankin, M. A. 
Mankins, Martha 
Mann, Mary I. 
Manning, Jane 
Martin, Elizabeth A. 
Mason, Mary E. 
Mason, Susan A. 
Mathews, Mary A. E. 
Mauberry, Delitha 
Mayfield, Eliz. 
Mayfield, Sarah J. 
Mayfield, Susan F. 
McAdoo, S. F. 
McClean, Temperance C 
McCoy, Edy E. 
McCullough, Isabella 
McDaniel, America 
McDaniel, Martha 
McFadden, Sarah J. 
McFarlin, Eliza G. 
McGill, Lizza 
McGowan, Mary E. T. 
McGowan, Susan 
McHenry, Martha A. 
McHenry, N. M. 
McKee, Margarett J. 
McKinney, Mary 
McKinney, Susannah 
McMurry, Arabella 
McNeal, Eliz. J. 
McNiel, Mary E. 
Meritt, Martha 
Miers, Luzanna 
Miller, Catharine 
Miller, Margaret 
Miller, Margarett 
Miller, Martha V. 
Miller, Mary E. 
Miller, Mary F. 
Millins, Martha J. 
Mitchell, Fanny (free 
Mobs, Mary A. 
Modrall, Sarah J. 
Moore, Emeliza 
Moore, Mary E. 
Moore, Sarah F. 
Morris, Mary A. 
Morris, Stansheary 
Morse, Martha 



1 
1 
3 
5 
1 

10 
2 
3 
3 
9 

11 

11 
3 
6 

10 
9 

10 
col) 2 

10 
2 
1 
3 
3 
4 



15 



Morton, A, H. 1 

Morton, Ann 4 

Morton, Mary Ann 2 

Moss, Margarett 5 
Mullins, America Ann E. 8 

Mullins, Louisa A. 3 

Mullins, Martha J. 11 

Mullins, Rebeca 5 

Murfree, Esther L. 2 

Murfree, Fannie D. 9 

Murfree, Sarah Ann 2 

Murphey, Louisa 2 

Murphy, Julia Ann 7 

Murry, Nancy W. 7 

Muse, Lucy A. 7 

Myers, I. C. 10 

Nash, Sarah F. 3 

Nash, Virginia 3 

Naylor, Louisa J. 6 

Neely, Martha K. 8 

Neely, Susan A. F. 5 

Neely, Tabitha 10 

Nelson, Mary L. 10 

Nelson, Susan H. 10 

Newman, Drucilla A. 6 

Newman, Eliz. 8 

Navel, Mary A. 9 

Nichols, Mary E. 3 

Nickens, Mary A. 11 

Nivens, Eliz. C. 11 

Noe, Mary 6 

Nolen, Mary F. 3 

Northcutt, Eliz. 6 

Oliphint, Mary J. 1 

Osborn, Sarah E. 9 

Oslin, Mary L 10 

Osment, Eliz. 9 

Ott, Eliz. F. 1 

Overall, Martha Ann 10 

Palmer, Mary E. 6 

Parker, Eliz. 2 

Parker, Martha 6 

Parris, Eliz. 5 

Patterson, Maxmilly 10 

Patterson, Maxmilly 10 

Pearcy, Lucinda E. 1 
Pearson, Margarett E. 9 

Peay, M. H. 1 

Phelps, Judy Ann 3 



Philpott, Martha Jane 8 

Philpott, Mary M. 10 

Pickett, Nancy 3 

Pillow, Julia S. 4 

Pinkard, Cicila 4 

Pitts, Nancy 1 

Pogue, Rachel 10 

Pope. Rebecca E. 5 

Pope, Sophia 3 

Powel, Nancy M. 2 

Powell, Sarah J. 8 

Powell, Virginia 11 

Price, America 3 

Price, Jane 6 

Pritchitt, Sarah L. 6 

Pruett, Louisiana 5 

Puckett, Eliz. C. 2 

Puckett, S. C. 9 

Pullon, Nancy 5 

Pully, Laura 10 

Ralston, Mary R. 6 

Randolph, C. P. 10 

Rankins , Martha E. 1 

Reed, Margarite C. 3 

Reeves, Susan C. 8 

Richards, Eliz. 1 

Richardson, Mary C. 8 

Richardson, Susan W. 6 

Robb, Ann 9 

Robb, Eliza H. 2 

Roberts, Louisa M. 2 

Robertson, Lovy 0. J. 10 

Robertson, Mary C. 7 

Rollins, Margarit 9 

Rollins, Sallie A. 1 

Rosborough, Mary E. 4 

Rose, Sarah 8 

Ross, Amanda C. 8 

Rowden, Tinnie 9 

Rowlett, Rebecca R. 9 

Rucker, Josephine A. 3 

Rucker, Sophia B. 8 

Russworm, Sarah 9 

Rutledge, Eliz. 10 

Sanders, M. J. 4 

Sanders, Mahulda 5 

Sanders, Marandy E. 4 

Sanders, Martha A. 4 

Sanders, Mary C. 9 

Sanders, Sarah L. 10 



16 



Sanford, Susan 

Searcy, S. E. 

Searcy, Tabitha J. 

Seay, Mary A. 

Shelton, Mary Jane 

Shelton, Sarah A. 

Shipps, Mary 

Short, Ann Roberty 

Singleton, Martha S. 

Sikes, Margarett 

Simpson, Eliz. R. H. 

Slaughter, Eliz. 

Smith, A. C. 

Smith, C. V. 

Smith, Caroline 

Smith, Isadora 

Smith, Margarett Jane 

Smotherman, C.T. 

Snell, Sarah E. 

Snell, Susan C. 

Speer, Amanda H. 

Speer, Martha A. 

Spence, Mary M. 

Spence, Nancy T. 

Stack, Sarepta E. 

Stephens, R. E. 

Stevens, L. J. 

Stewart, Martha (free col.) 4 

Stitt, Louise, J. 10 



10 
2 
6 
2 

3 
3 
5 
3 

1 
1 



Sugg, Jane A. 
Suggs, Eliza 
Suggs, Lockey 
Sulivan, Mary 
Swan, Amanda 



Tarlton, Julia 
Teal, Barbary 
Thompson, Margaret J. 
Thompson, S. J. 
Thompson, Samantha A. 
Thorn, M. J. 
Tilford, Malisa 
Todd, A. E. 
Todd, Malinda 
Todd, Mary M. 
Todd, Nancy M. 
Tombs, Eliz. 
Trale, Isabella 
Travis, Louisa 
Tribble, Thankful. E. 
Tucker, Martha Jane 
Tucker, Rody A. 



1 

6 

10 

3 

1 

8 

4 
2 

10 
1 
1 
7 

11 
9 
9 
4 
2 
3 
4 
8 
4 

10 



Tucker, Sallie 6 

Tuder, Sarah 10 

Turner, Smanda W. 1 

Vaughan, Margarett 2 
Vaughan, Martha A. E. 5 

Vaughan, Nancy Ann 3 

Vaughn, Mary A. 6 

Victory, Nancy A. 6 

Wade, Lucy 10 

Wade, Margarett 5 

Walker, Mary 1 

Ward, Martha A. 5 

Ward, Martha E. 5 

Ward, Mary E. 9 

Warren, Emily L. 3 

Watkins , Mary E. 8 

Watts, Ellen 10 

Welch, Ann 6 

Welch, Jane 6 

Welch, Jane 6 

Wetherly, Arlamissa 4 

Wharton, Martha W. 8 

Wharton, Mary A. 8 

White, Dorothy A. 5 

White, Eliz. A. 9 

White, Julia A. 6 

White, Lizzie 11 

White, Lucy 1 

White, Mary E. 9 

White, Nancy J. 9 

White, Sarah F. 8 

Whitworth, Savannah 7 

Williams, Eliz. J. 4 

Williams, Frances 9 

Williams, M. N. 9 

Williams, Mildred 9 

Williams, Nelly Jane 6 

Wilson, M. P. 5 

Wisen, Sarah E. 5 

Witherspoon, Eliz. 6 

Wood, Susan C. 9 

Wyatt, Lucy 7 

Yearwood, Sarah L. 4 

Young, Mary Ann 4 

Youree, Mary B. 6 



17 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASPECTS 

OF 
THE PREHISTORY OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY 

by Travis E. Smotherman 

Rutherford County, Tennessee, when considered as a poli- 
tical entity, was organized in 1803; thus its complete and 
recorded history spans some 17 decades of time. Yet, it 
possesses an earlier, unwritten history untrammeled by arti- 
ficial boundaries, shrouded in the dim mists of time past and 
obscured by the uncertain knowledge of man's earliest antiquity. 

To quote A. W. Putnam, writing of the area in his History 

of Middle Tennessee : 

In unknown ages the heathen were here; these wild 
woods were once inhabited, or the race of man was before 
these forests. The bones of thousands rest beneath the 
very roots of our gigantic oaks. . . But again the living 
are here; tumuli and earth - works are throughout the 
land. But when came the one, or wherefore the others, 
none can tell. Our questions obtain answers obscure as 
those given by the pyramids and their builders. 

PHYSIOGRAPHY 
A brief glimpse at Rutherford County's physiography is in 
order before undertaking a purview of its prehistory. Ruther- 
ford County comprises 580 square miles, with elevations ranging 
from 570 feet to 1, 352 feet — the elevation at the courthouse 
is 617 feet. More than half the county lies in the Central 



■'■A. W. Putnam, History of Middle Tennessee (first published 

Knox^ 
^C. C, 
1929, p. 3, 



1859) Knoxville, 1971, p. 5. 

C. C. Henderson, The Story of Murfreesboro , Murf reesboro, 



18 

Basin of Tennessee, with a ring of hills almost surrounding 
the county, especially to the east and southeast. Murfreesboro 
lies in the central plain. Almost the entire county is drained 
by Stones River and its tributaries, with the Harpeth rising 
in the southeastern portion of the county, near Eagleville, 
and, with its tributaries draining a small portion thereof. 
R. S. Bassler describes the predominant geological feature of 
the county as " . . .a level plain (with) fertile brick red 
soil. 

PREHISTORIC CULTURES 

Rutherford County shares a general identity with the pre- 
historic cultures which once flourished in this region. For 
the benefit of those persons unacquainted with the anthro- 
pological classification of these cultures, a brief summari- 
zation of their most salient features will be undertaken. 

Generally speaking, the span of time covered by these cultures 

4 
is roughly from 11,000 B. C. to 1,600 A. D. 

Subsequent to the discovery by Dr. Louis Leaky and his 
associates in Tanganyika of substantial evidence to indicate 
the existence of a very ancient "pebble tool" user, the anthro- 
pologist's conception of this progenitor man as a distinctive. 



^R. S. Bassler, The Stratigraphy of the Central Basin of 
Tennessee (Tennessee Division of Geology), Nashville, 1932, p. 54 

'^Emma Lila Fundaburk and Mary Douglass Fundaburk Foreman, 
Sun Circles and Human Hands , Luverne, Alabama, 2nd Printing, 
1965, p. 9. (Unless otherwise noted, all prehistoric culture 
dates are taken from this source.) 



19 

thoughtful and designing creature was thrust back into the vast 
ages of antiquity, of fossil bone and long extinct life forms. 
And in support of Dr. Leaky and his theories, some scholars 
have cited evidence to support the existence of a new world 
pebble user. Such a man, if he ever lived in North America, 
must have lived here well before 11,000 B. C. , and perhaps as 
long ago as 50,000 B. C. 

Paleo man : The oldest generally recognized North American 
aboriginal culture is classified as "Paleo" by archaeologists. 
The epoch of paleo man would roughly encompass the span of time 
from 11,000 B. C. to 5,000 B. C.^ Paleo man coexisted with the 
extinct wooly mammoth, with his distinctive spear points being 
found in the western United States in association with the bones 
of these creatures. Paleo man was nomadic and followed large 
herds of bison, elk and deer, as well as the mammoth. He 
fashioned a large, very well made, fluted point. 

Archaic man ; Archaic man is generally dated as occupying 
the period of time from 5,000 B. C. to 2,000 B. C. He hunted 
smaller game than did Paleo man, and was less nomadic, with 
his populations tending more toward concentration. He was also 
a gatherer of seeds, nuts, fruits, berries, edible roots, fish 
and shell fish. His major weapon was the atlatl (or two-part) 
throwing spear, and his projectile points were generally smaller 
and sometimes cruder than those of his predecessor. 

Woodland man ; The culture subsequent to that of archaic 
man is described as "woodland," and lasted from about 2,000 B. C. 



Fundaburk does not assign a definitive date to the Paleo 
period's earliest beginnings; however, she considers it well- 
established by 8,000 B. C, and transitional with the archaic 
period by 5,000 B. C. 




FLINT PROJECTILE POINTS - Cripple Creek 
(Coll., F. C. Youree) 




FLINT PROJECTILE POINTS - near Smyrna 

(Coll., Ernest Johns) 





FLINT PROJECTILE POINTS - Cripple Creek 
(Coll. , F. C. Youree) 




LATE WOODLAND AND MISSISSIPPI 
PROJECTILE POINTS (Coll., Steve Maloney) 




PROJECTILE POINTS - Transitional Paleo, 
Archaic, and Woodland (Coll., Steve Maloney) 



FLINT PROJECTILE POINTS - Stewart's Creek 
(Coll. , Ernest Johns) 



^A^^- 



)OTH NECKLACE - Cripple Creek 
;on Collection at Vanderbilt 
sity) 




ADENA PROJECTILE POINT, Lavergne 
(Coll., Richard Grabowski) 




POTTERY VESSEL 
Circa 500 B.C. 
Bradley Creek 
(Coll., Randy 
Abernathy) 



PRE- HISTORY 
ARTIFACTS 




•"Nt^ 



SANDSTONE TURTLE EFFIGY, Smy 
(Coll., Richard Grabowski) 




ARCHAIC AND WOODLAND PROJECTILE POINTS 
Eagleville, (Coll., Travis Smotherman) 



CHUNKY STONE, GREENSTONE PIPE, THROWING 
WEIGHT, Cripple Creek (Coll., F. C. Youree) 



THREE STONE CELLS FOR AXES, Cripple Creek 
(Coll., F. C. Youree) 




ARCHAIC PROJECTILE POINTS - 5,000 B.C. 
(Coll., Steve Maloney) 




RUTHERFORD COUNTY PALEO IM'OJECTILE POINTS 
(Coll., Steve Maloney and James Powers) 



20 



to about 400 A. D. Lewis and Kneburg, in Tribes That Slumber 
term this culture a neolithic import from Asia centered in 
the woodlands and hardwood forests of eastern North America.^ 
These people were the first Americans to use the bow and arrow, 
to weave, and to manufacture pottery. Very likely, they also 
began the first organized agriculture in the new world, while 
continuing the gathering and collecting of food and the hunting 
of game animals. Some ornamentation and elaborate burial 
customs also characterized these people. Projectile points 
were smaller and frequently crudely fashioned. 

Mississippian man : The Mississippian culture was the 
last and most recent prehistoric North American Indian culture 
and generally covers the years 400 A. C. — 1,600 A. D. These 
people continued the refinements of their woodland predecessors. 
Agriculture became much more advanced, and artistic ornamentation 
in clothing, pottery and ceremonial objects became commonplace. 
The development of agriculture permitted sufficient leisure for 
the perfection of quite sophisticated art forms and the con- 
struction of large temple mounds. Life was more settled and 
large, palisaded villages sprang up. Very small, triangular 
points for their arrow tips typify their projectiles. (In the 
Cumberland River area, these people are frequently designated 
as the "stone box burial" people.) 



"Thomas M. N. Lewis and Madeline Kneburg, Tribes That 
Slumber , Knoxville, 1958, p. 39. 



21 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY, 1600-1780 

How did the area now comprising Rutherford County appear 
just before the appearance of the first Europeans about 1780? 
What sort of land did they survey as Rutherford County pre- 
history suddenly merged into a historical perspective ranging 
from the meager and uncertain first sources of retrospective 
narrative and secondhand accounts right down to the present 
day with its multifold and exact historical references? What 
tribes of historic Indians ranged the area prior to 1780, and 
what relation to these historic tribes bear to their prede- 
cessors, Mississippian man? Such questions, unfortunately, do 
not obtain easy answers for the historian or the researcher. 

From all accounts, however, it must appear that there were 
no permanent Indian settlements in Rutherford County in the 
middle 1700' s, and probably there had been no such settlements 
for two or three hundred years. It must also be obvious that 
the Mississippian mound builder was culturally extinct in the 
Middle Tennessee area when the first Europeans arrived. 

To quote Carlton C, Sims, in the History of Rutherford 
County , "... the Indians (did not) make settlement here (in 
Rutherford County) , though the abundance of fish and game and 
the large springs in the region make it a favorable hunting 

ground as is evidenced by the large number of arrow heads found 

7 
on or near the surface." 



^Carlton C. Sims, Editor, A History of Rutherford County , 
1947, p. 4. 



22 

Judge John Haywood, in his Civil and Political History of 
the State of Tennessee , first published in 1823, says that the 
first settlers in the Middle Tennessee region found no signs 

o 

of villages or of cleared lands. 

However, there appears to have been no logical reason why 
the area could not support a substantial population just prior 
to 1780. Henderson cites the abundance of game, including 
bear, elk and deer, which made the Rutherford County area a 

q 

frequently visited territory by wandering Indian hunters.^ 

Thus, if the Rutherford County area had no permanent 
Indian population in the years just prior to 1780 and the 
first European contacts, then under what tribal suzerainties 
did the area fall? 

James Adair's map, to accompany his 1775 London publi- 
cation of The History of the American Indians , shows the area 
of Tennessee to have been populated by Cherokees in the east, 
Chickasaws in the southwest, and the Nahchees in the north- 
west, with a void indicated in the middle Tennessee region. 
Carlton Sims says: 

The Shawnees were probably the only Indians to make 
permanent homes during the Colonial period in what is 
now middle Tennessee. It appears that part of this 
tribe, which originally lived in the Savannah River 

area, settled on the Cumberland about 1670 

Marquette, in his journal of 1673, refers to many Shawnee 



^John Haywood, The Civil and Political History of the 
State of Tennessee , reprinted Knoxville, 1969, p. 108-109. 

^Op. Cit . . p. 6, 

lOjames Adair, The History of the American Indians (First 
published London, 1775) , Nashville, 1971 reprint. 



23 



villages on the lower Cumberland, the largest having 
500 people. They are known at one time to have had 
a town in the sight of Nashville, though there is 
no evidence that they ever settled in what is now 
Rutherford County. The Cherokees and Chickasaws , 
however, expelled the Shawnee about 1714. The 
majority of the displaced Shawnees seemed to have 
settled north of the Ohio on the Wabash. •'-1 

To quote Burt and Ferguson, " (The) Cherokees and Chicka- 
saws. . . cooperated in 1715 and again in 1745 to forcibly 
expel bands of Shawnees from the rich hunting lands on the site 
that is now Nashville, Tennessee."^ 

Gentry McGee, in his A History of Tennessee agrees that 
the Shawnees once lived near Nashville, but says they "... 
were driven out by the Cherokees, Creeks and Chickasaws. The 
Uchees once lived around Nashville, but were killed out by the 
Cherokees." He says further that the Cherokees and their 
kinsmen, the Chicamaugas, and the Creeks, the Chickasaws, the 
Shawnees of Indiana and even the Iroquois of New York claimed 
hunting rights in the Middle Tennessee-central Kentucky area, 
with none daring live there for fear of attacks from rival 
claimants. -^^ 

Goodspeed's 1886 History of Tennessee offers still another 
group contending for dominion over the Middle Tennessee and 
Rutherford County areas. To quote: 



-•■^Op. Cit. , pp. 4-5. 

-'-^Jesse Burt and Robert B. Ferguson, Indians of the South - 
east; Then and Now, Nashville and New York, 1973, p. 41. 

-'-^Gentry R. McGee, A History of Tennessee from 1663 to 
1930, (Facsimile reproduction), Nashville, 1971. 



24 

Previous to 1780, the Indians had undisputed 
sway in this (Rutherford) county. The old trace 
leading -from Nashville to Chattanooga is still to 
be seen. Along this route, the Choctaws, Chicka- 
saws and particularly the Cherokees held undisputed 
sway from time immemorial.-*-^ 

Two historians mention hostilities between the Cherokees 

of East Tennessee and the Chickasaws of West Tennessee. Sims 

writes : 

. . . the land, as a result of hostilities which 
had broken out between the Cherokees and Chickasaws, 
was seldom visited by the Indian hunters during the 
middle of the 18th century. . . the Indians to the 
south would not allow the Shawnees to establish perma- 
nent settlements on their hunting grounds, and even 
fought among themselves for hunting rights.-*-^ 

And, in Robert H. White's Tennessee: Its Growth and 
Progress , we are told that the Cherokees from the eastern part 
of Tennessee disputed Middle Tennessee with the Chickasaws of 
West Tennessee, with the Creeks occupying the land to the 
south. ^6 

Thus, it may be observed that several Indian tribes are 
credited with some control over the middle Tennessee area at 
one time or another during the 17 00' s and just prior to the 
first white visitations to the area of Rutherford County, 
which Henderson dates as sometime just before 178 0, stating 
that only a few adventurous whites had prospected the section 

prior to this date, and of which visits no reliable records 

17 
are now available. 



1'^ (Goodspeed' s) The History of Tennessee , Nashville, 1886, 
p. 811. 

■'■^0£. Cit . , p. 5. 

l6Robert H. White, Tennessee; Its Growth and Progress y 
Nashville, 1936, p. 10. 

17op. Cit . , p. 10. 



25 

Then, obviously the area was largely unsettled and sub- 
jected only to the forays of various Indian hunting groups, 
frequently contending with each other. It must, however, be 
noted that most recorded incidents of Indian attacks on white 
settlers and settlements in the middle Tennessee area may be 
credited to warriors from the Creek nation to the south. 

ARCHAEOLOGY 

Having discussed the general cultural and tribal prehis- 
toric background which Rutherford County shares with its 
surrounding area, the writer will now attempt to support the 
relationship with the archaeological evidence and theory 
available. 

Generally speaking, Rutherford County does not offer the 
rich and varied archaeological sources of some of her sister 
counties. There are, for instance, no sites to compare with 
the mound complexes on the Harpeth River in Williamson and 
Cheatham Counties, nor the vast "stone box" village sites 
generally distributed throughout Davidson County, nor the 
significant Spring Creek site in Wilson County. Nor, indeed, 
is there a site comparable to Coffee County's Old Stone Fort 
nor even Cannon County's multi-component site at Short Mountain. 

Nonetheless, abundant archaeological evidence exists to 
establish that representatives of each generally recognized 
prehistoric culture once lived in and traveled over the area 
now comprising Rutherford County, although there is some diver- 
sity of opinion as to the relative value of this archaeological 
evidence. 



26 

Leroy Camp, of Lavergne, Tennessee, a former president of 
the Tennessee Archaeological Society and prominent Rutherford 
County archaeologish, considers the scarcity of important archaeo- 
logical site to be the most significant feature of any consid- 
eration of Rutherford County archaeology. Camp said that a 
two-week survey, in which he participated, under the sponsorship 
of the University of Tennessee and the Corps of Engineers could 
not find a single site worthy of excavation on Stones River, 

prior to the flooding of the area with the construction of the 

18 
Percy Priest Dam. 

Camp, of course, is not the only local archaeologist to 
have made note of this sparsity of archaeological source 
material in Rutherford County. In this connection, the writer 
wishes to advance the theory that the large number of cedar 
glades, with their thin, rocky soil and scarcity of plant and 
animal food sources may have tended to hinder the development 
of large aboriginal populations. R. S. Bassler says that in 
Rutherford County the red cedar glades occupy an area of about 
160 square miles. -'-^ In prehistoric times, these cedar glades 
may well have covered a more extensive proportion of the county's 
580 square mile total area. 

James Powers of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, also a prominent 
local archaeologish and former president of the Tennessee 
Archaeological Society, offered a more generous opinion of the 
value of the county's archaeological site, describing the county's 



1 p 

■'■"Personal interview, April 7, 1974. 

1^0£. Cit. , p. 58. 



27 

sites as old, archaeologically speaking, and primarily of the 
20 

archaic period. 

Published Archaeological References to Rutherford County 

The first important writer on the subject of Tennessee 
archaeology was Judge John Haywood. In his 1823 publication. 
The Natural and Aboriginal History of Tennessee , two references 
are made to Rutherford County and three to Murf reesboro. Judge 
Haywood describes the physical location of the county and 
mentions the abundant relics of testacious animals therein. 
Murfreesboro references relate to the presence of quartz geodes 
between Murfreesboro and McMinnville; the location of a 
quantity of charcoal ten feet below the surface twelve miles 
southeast from Murfreesboro, at a Mr. Ready's, on the bank of 
the East Fork of Stones River; and the discovery of two brass 
coins, two and one-half miles from Murfreesboro in an easterly 
direction, in a garden about eighteen inches under the surface. 2** ' 25 



^Opersonal interview, April 13, 1974. 

2 ■'-John Haywood, The Natural and Aboriginal History of 
Tennessee , (first published Nashville, 1823), Mary V. Rothrock, 
Editor, Jackson, 1959, pp. 2-3. 

22ibid. , p. 32. 

23ibid. , p. 53. 



24 



Ibid. , pp. 169-170, 



2 5 Ibid. , p. 420, footnote "k" , quotes Madeline Kneburg , 
former professor of anthropology at the University of Tennessee, 
as saying that such coins as Haywood describes were also found 
at Fort Loudon, and were used for part of the payment to soldiers 
during the 1750' s. This properly places the coin discovery in 
the context of historic archaeology. 



28 

Explorations of the Aboriginal Remains of Tennessee was 
first published by the Smithsonian Institution in 1876. Its 
author, Joseph Jones, M. D. , was health officer at Nashville 
during the years 1868 and 1869, during which time he gathered 
his relics and information. ^6 An illustration of a very fine 
pipe, from the vicinity of Murfreesboro appears in this volume. 27 
Dr. Jones describes the relic thusly: "... The large parrot- 
shaped pipe, carved out of chocolate-colored steatite, is twelve 
inches in length, and was discovered in the vicinity of aboriginal 
remains, near Murfreesboro. " ^^ 

Camp believes this artifact was most likely a trade item, 
especially considering the great distance to the nearest natural 
habitat of the parrot. The writer, however, considers it also 
likely that the aboriginal craftsman fashioned the piece as a 
stylized representation of some local bird of prey, with its 
hooked beak suggesting a hawk or eagle. 

A third important writer on the subject of Tennessee 
archaeology was Gates P. Thruston, whose The Antiquities of 
Tennessee first appeared in 189 0. A former Union general who 



26 

■''^Robert McGaw, "Tennessee Antiquities Re-Exhumed," 

Tennessee Historical Quarterly, Summer, 1965, p. 124. 

2'This pipe drawing is reproduced as the cover illustration 
for this publication. 

28joseph Jones, M. D. , Explorations of the Aboriginal 
Remains of Tennessee (first published by the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution, 1876) Reprinted Knoxville, 1970, p. 76 and p. 138. 

2^The present whereabouts of this outstanding relic is 
unknown to the writer who considers it regrettable that it does 
not grace the display case of some local museum. 



29 

married a Nashville girl and remained in Tennessee after the 
Civil War, Thruston was an avid collector and student of Indian 
artifacts and conducted many excavations in the vicinity of 
Nashville. One reference appears which related to Rutherford 
County: an illustration of various beads contains thirteen 
drilled and strung canine-type teeth, which Thruston describes 
as being "the teeth of the wolf, or of some wild animal." In 
a footnote, Thruston says: "We are indebted to Zach. Patrick, 
of Rutherford County, for this rare string of ancient beads. ' 

In the early part of the present century, William E. Myer 
conducted several archaeological investigations in the middle 
Tennessee area and published reports on his work. His "Indian 
Trails of the Southeast" appearing posthumously in the 4 2nd 
Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, 1928, lists 
three Indian trails as traversing Rutherford County. 

The first mentioned is the "Great South Trail, "-^ which 
entered Rutherford County just above Eagleville, proceeded in a 



30 

Gates P. Thruston, The Antiquities of Tennessee (first 

published in Cincinnati, 1890) , reprint of Second Edition (1897), 

Knoxville, 1964, p. 319. 

^-"• Ibid . , p. 319. 

■^^Mrs. F. C. Youree, of Readyville, a current member of the 
Rutherford County Chapter of the Tennessee Archaeological Society, 
reports that Zach Patrick was her uncle, and according to family 
tradition, the string of beads was found on the Patrick homesite 
on Cripple Creek in Rutherford County where many other fine relics 
have been unearthed. 

^-^Haywood, in his Civil and Political History of the State 
of Tennessee , p. 217, 2nd edition, says the trail was worn down 
by buffaloes to a depth of one or two feet and to a width of 
three or four feet. 



30 



southeast and easterly direction and exited the county just 
southwest of Fosterville. This trail is shown on a map circa 
1795, drawn by General Daniel Smith. The trail began at the 
Great Salt Lick at Nashville, proceeded southward along the 
Harpeth River, then easterly to the head of Wartrace Creek (to 
which it gave name) , and then southward to the Tennessee River 
in northern Alabama. ^'^ 

A second trail described by Myer is the "Cisca" or "St. 
Augustine Trail" (or the "Nickajack Trail", as it was known by 
the whites near Nashville because it led to Nickajack Town on 
the Tennessee River). The trail entered Rutherford County from 
Davidson County, just west of Smyrna and Lavergne, passing close 
by Murfreesboro, and exited the county just north of Beech Grove, 
in Coffee County. -^^ 

The third trail is listed as the "Black Fox Trail." it 
began at the Cherokee settlements along the Hiwassee River in 
East Tennessee and entered Rutherford County at the approximate 
location of the Woodbury-Murfreesboro turnpike, then proceeded 
westward to the Black Fox Spring, near Murfreesboro. At the 
spring, it split into two trails, one joining the Nickajack Trail 
and the other continuing on into Nashville at about the location 
of the Murfreesboro-Nashville turnpike. ^6 

Rutherford County Archaeological Sites 
Certain references are made in the archaeological writings 
cited to intriguing mounds, aboriginal breastworks, corrals, etc.. 



William E. Myer, Indian Trails of the Sout heast. Nashville, 

p. llfi— 117 ■ " ' 

35 



1971, pp. 116-117 

'Ibid., pp. 112-113. 
36ibid. , pp. 103-105. 



31 

formerly located in Rutherford County and of which no traces 
can now be found. To cite an example, where was the location 
of the "aboriginal remains" near which Dr. Jones obtained his 
"parrot pipe"? Unfortunately, the records of many of our 
earliest archaeologists are inexact or even nonexistent, and 
more specific locations are not likely ever to be identified. 

A map entitled "Aboriginal Map of Tennessee," included in 
Goodspeed's History shows only "Black Fox's Camp" within the 
confines of Rutherford County. -^^ W. E. Myer's 1923 "Archaeo- 
logical Map of Tennessee," however, shows a number of otherwise 
unidentified archaeological features in Rutherford County. These 
include a burial cave near the mouth of Overall Creek; a burial 
cave at the junction of Bradley Creek and the East Fork of Stones 
River; a mound on Overall Creek about five miles north of its 
mouth; an aboriginal cemetery about three miles south of Florence 
on Overall Creek; a mound about two or three miles west of Murfrees- 
boro, adjacent to Overall Creek; and "undefined antiquities" 

about three miles north of Murfreesboro, on the West Fork of 

3 8 
Stones River. While some of these archaeological features may 

still be located, others seem to have passed into oblivion. 

Another site, possibly a natural geological formation, is 

described by Henderson, in his History of Murfreesboro , as follows: 

About two miles south of Murfreesboro was located 
one of the camping grounds of the Indians, a scope of 
land sparsely timbered, but having a luxuriant pasture 
of wild grasses. The "corral", as it has been called 
from that day, was watered by Lytle Creek. The grounds 



37 

Op . Cit . , map, frontispiece. 

^^0£. Cit . , map. 



32 



were high and rolling and the open space of the corral 
was entirely surrounded by heavily timbered lands and 
an impenetrable tangle of undergrowth and wild vines. 
The Indians could turn out their ponies here to graze, 
knowing they could not escape the natural barrier. -^^ 

This is likely the same spot described in Goodspeed's 

History of Tennessee , as follows: 

About three miles from Murfreesboro is the old 
Bradley racetrack. . . near this old racetrack is the 
old Indian dance ground, which is a circular track dug 
out of the earth and rock. Neither history nor tradition 
tells of its origin. ^°'^-'- 

Camp cited only one important site in Rutherford County, 

which he identified as a pre-ceramic site on Stewarts Creek, 

just west of the old Nashville Highway, near Smyrna. He 

described a midden composed of occupational buildup, encompassing 

42 
an area of about one acre m size. 

Powers located Rutherford County sites on Cripple Creek, 
Bradley Creek, Overall Creek, Fall Creek, Concord Branch, and 
the Harpeth River as well as a number of sites, generally dis- 
persed, on all three forks of Stones River. He described an 
important site at the confluence of the East and West Forks of 
Stones River (now under the waters of Percy Priest Lake) , and 
located another site at the juncture of Town Creek and Stones 
River at Murfreesboro, now destroyed, where some burials were 
uncovered by construction activity. 



^^Op. Cit . , p. 9. 



^'^ The Goodspeed Histories of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford , 
Wilson, Bedford and Marshall Counties of Tennessee (originally 
published 1886). reprinted from Goodspeed's History of Tennessee , 
Columbia, 1971, p. 813. 

4lThe exact location of this feature, whether man-made or 
natural, has not been determined by the writer. 



42 



Leroy Camp, personal interview, April 7, 1974. 



33 

Powers characterizes most of the Rutherford County sites 
as Archaic, with some exceptions. Pottery sherds from the 
Woodland period have been found in the southeastern portion of 
the county, and a sherd of "Wheeler Plain" pottery (which is 
the earliest known regional clay pottery, dating circa 1500 B. C.) 
was found near Murfreesboro on Stones River. Mississippian 

sites are also located near Murfreesboro on Stones River and 

43 
on Stewarts Creek near Smyrna. 

Notable Rutherford County Artifacts 
Once more citing the "parrot pipe" of Dr. Jones as perhaps 
the finest Rutherford County artifact known to the writer of 
this paper, it is possible to briefly mention other local 
discoveries. 

A very well-made Clovis or fluted point, about 3 3/4" in 
length, is illustrated in Ten Years of the Tennessee Archaeo - 
logist , and is described as having been found in the vicinity 
of Murfreesboro and from the collection of H. H. Hassler. 

This point represents perhaps the first of a number of 
Paleo projectile point finds made in the county in recent 
years, being in such quantity as to allow Powers to describe 

Rutherford County as somewhat of a center of southeastern Paleo 

4S 
man activity. 



^^James R. Powers, personal interview, April 13, 1974. 

T. M. N. Lewis and Madeline Kneburg, "Early Projectile 
Point Forms, and Examples from Tennessee," Ten Years of the 
Tennessee Archaeologist , Chattanooga (n. d.), pp. 128-129. 

'^^James R. Powers, personal interview, April 13, 1974. 



34 

James W. Cambron, in his Handbook of Alabama Archaeology , 
Point Types , assigns an approximate date of 13,000 B. C. for 
these points, ^6 which suffices to establish that the earliest 
known people ever to have lived in eastern North America were 
not strangers to the grazing lands of what is now Rutherford 
County and over which prehistoric mammals foraged. 

Other local discoveries include a number of fine relics 
located on his farm on Cripple Creek by F. Craig Youree and 
now reposing in his collection. Richard H. Grabowski , of 
Connecticut, made two remarkable finds while stationed at 
Stewart Air Force Base at Smyrna during the late 1960 's; the 
first, a large, black flint Adena point, 5" in length, and, 
the second, a small, light brown sandstone turtle effigy, 
about 2J5" in length, and of problematical usage. Both finds 
were from the west bank of Stones River, near the air base. 

Two youthful Murfreesboroans , Randy and Mike Abernathy, 
brothers, located a very well-made ceramic pot, while searching 
for fossils, underneath a ledge, in northeastern Rutherford 
County. Their find was made in 1972. 

Copper beads were recently discovered in a burial near 
Smyrna, and the major portion of a large steatite vessel was 
the noteworthy find of Steve Maloney, of Murfreesboro , whose 
collection of artifacts also includes several Paleo points 
from Rutherford County fields. 



^^James W. Cambron and David G. Hulse, Handbook of Alabama 
Archaeology, Part 1 - Point Types , Archaeological Research 
Association of Alabama, 3rd printing, 1969. 



35 

Other fine, discovered artifacts from Rutherford County, 
but unknown to the writer, undoubtedly exist. A number of 
local archaeological enthusiasts do have fairly extensive 
collections of points and other relics which certainly include 
a significant percentage of Rutherford County material; and, 
almost surely, some items are possessed as mere chance finds 
by farmers, sportsmen, and the general public. Hopefully, more 
and more of these Rutherford County relics may be located and 
recorded, so as to make the record of the county's prehistory 
as complete and accurate as possible. 

Local Archaeological Activities 

So far as the writer is aware, no major, organized archaeo- 
logical excavations have ever been undertaken in Rutherford 
County. The county abounds, however, in interested amateurs, 
ranging from the relic collector, with his uncomplicated 
pursuits, to the serious and knowledgeable activities of other 
more scientifically inclined and motivated individuals. 

In the early 1960's a group of local archaeological 
enthusiasts banded together to organize the Rutherford County 
Chapter of the Tennessee Archaeological Society. Leroy Camp, 
of Lavergne, was the first chapter president; the late Jordan 
Caldwell was named vice-president; and Mrs. Leroy Camp served 
as secretary-treasurer. Most of the early meetings were held 
at Smyrna. 

The chapter charter has been renewed every year since, 
and the chapter continues its activities in the current year, 



36 

with monthly meetings and informational programs. All interested 
persons are cordially welcomed to attend functions and to partici- 
pate in chapter activities (which have included excavations in 
years past, although never in Rutherford County.) Meetings are 
now held in Murfreesboro. 

In addition to Camp and Powers, both former presidents of 
the Tennessee Archaeological Society, the Rutherford County Chapter 
has included in its membership the following individuals, who have 
made contributions to the local chapter and to archaeology by 
reason of tenure, educational pursuit, publication, field work or 
service: Mr. and Mrs. Alfred White, Murfreesboro; Mr. and Mrs. 
F. Craig Youree, Readyville; John Dowd , Nashville; H. C. Brehm, 
Nashville; Steve Maloney, Murfreesboro; Claude King, Murfreesboro; 
and Donald Ball, Manchester. The writer of this paper makes modest 
pretension to inclusion with this worthy group, on the basis of 
longevity. 

The present chapter membership numbers 33 persons, among 
whom serious interest, dedication and a desire to promote careful 
and scientific archaeological activity are common traits. 



Thus is concluded this survey of Rutherford County's prehistory, 
It is the hope of the writer that this paper may have contributed 
in some small measure to the knowledge and understanding of the 
historically obscure people who once lived among the fields and 
woodlands and near the streams of our county. 



37 



It is further hoped that this paper may encourage more 
persons to be aware of the value of reporting and having recorded 
archaeological relics and sites from throughout the county, which 
are now rapidly disappearing under the bulldozer's tread and the 
subdivider's and road builder's proliferating activities. 

And lastly, if this paper has even slightly stirred a new 
appreciation for our county's first inhabitants and their some- 
times simple and basic life pursuits, and a corollary respect 
for their culture and artifacts, then even the common and some- 
times scorned "arrowhead" can only become a marvelous relic of a 
way of life now thousands of years extinct and scarcely to be 
understood or even imagined. 



38 



THE PREHISTORY OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY 

QUOTED SOURCES 

Bibliography 

Adair, James. History of the American Indians (first published 
London, 1775) , reprint of the Samuel Cole Williams edition 
of 1930, reprinted by the Blue & Gray Press, Nashville, 1971. 

Bassler, R. S. The Stratigraphy of the Central Basin of Tennessee , 
Bulletin 38, Tennessee Division of Geology, Nashville, 1932. 

Burt, Jesse and Robert B. Ferguson, Indians of the Southeast; 

Then and Now , Abingdon Press, Nashville and New York, 1973. 

Cambron, James W. and David C. Hulse, Handbook of Alabama Archaeo - 
logy, Part 1 - Point Types , published by the Archaeological 
Research Association of Alabama, Inc., 3rd Printing, 1969. 

Fundaburk, Emma Lila and Mary Douglass Fundaburk Foreman, Sun 
Circles and Human Hands , Luverne, Alabama, 2nd printing, 
1965. 

History of Tennessee , the Goodspeed Publishing Company, Nashville, 
1886. 

The Goodspeed Histories of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson , 
Bedford, and Marshall Counties of Tennessee (originally 
published 1886) reprinted by Woodward & Stinson Printing 
Co., Columbia, 1971. 

Haywood, John. The Civil and Political History of the State of 

Tennessee (first published 1823) , reprinted by the Tenase Co. , 
Knoxville, 1969. 

Haywood , John . The Natural and Aboriginal History of Tennessee 

(first published 1823), reprinted, Mary U. Rothrock , Editor, 
McCowat-Mercer Press, Inc., Jackson, 1959. 

Henderson, C. C. The Story of Murfreesboro , The News-Banner 
Publishing Co., Murfreesboro, 1929. 

Jones, Joseph, M. D. , Explorations of the Aboriginal Remains of 
Tennessee (first published by the Smithsonian Institution, 
Washington, D. C. , 1876), reprinted by Tenase Explorers, 
Knoxville, 1970. 

Lewis, T. M. N. and Madeline Kneburg, "Early Projectile Point 
Forms, and Examples from Tennessee," Ten Years of the 
Tennessee Archaeologist , Chattanooga, (n.d. ) . 



39 



Lewis, T. M. N. and Madeline Kneburg, Tribes that Slumber , 
University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville, 1958. 

McGee, Gentry R. . A History of Tennessee from 1663 to 1930 , 

Facsimile reproduction, Charles Elder, Publisher, Nashville, 
1971. 

McGaw, Robert. "Tennessee Antiquities Re-Exhumed," Tennessee 
Historical Quarterly , Summer, 1965. 

Myer, William E. Indian Trails of the Southeast (first published 

in the 4 2nd Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology , 
1928), reprinted by the Blue & Gray Press, Nashville, 1971. 

Putnam, A. W. History of Middle Tennessee , or, Life and Times of 
Gen. James Robertson (first published 1859) , reprinted by 
the University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville, 1971. 

Sims, Carlton C, Editor, A History of Rutherford County , 1947. 

Thruston, Gates P. The Antiquities of Tennessee and the Adjacent 
States, (first published 1890) , reprint of the 2nd (1897) 
Edition, by Tenase Explorers, Knoxville, 1964. 

White, Robert H. Tennessee: Its Growth and Progress , published 
by Robert H. White, Nashville, 1936. 



PERSONAL INTERVIEWS 
Leroy Camp, Levergne, Tennessee, April 7, 1974. 
James R. Powers, Murf reesboro, Tennessee, April 13, 1974, 



40 



GRIFFITH RUTHERFORD 
by Robert Martin McBride 

Family and Early Life 

When we consider patriots of the American Revolution, we 
should remember that — for most of them — their loyalty was origi- 
nally to British institutions, and they were largely first or 
second generation Americans — but, even so, they were provincial 
citizens of Britain, and their loyalty belonged to George III, 
rightful King of England, Scotland, Ireland, and America. Such 
a man was Griffith Rutherford, for whom this county was named. 
As the loyalties of Americans diverged from Great Britain to 
their adopted colonies, the result was a climactic event, even- 
tually resulting in the powerful force in the world that the 
United States holds today. 

The Scottish family of Rutherford was one of the most ancient 
and powerful of Teviotdale, on the border of England. They 
belonged to the lesser nobility — and Sir Walter Scott, whose 
mother was a Rutherford, was related to them.-'- One of the Ruth- 
erf ords — unfortunately, we do not know his name although one 
source states that it was John — was married, probably about 1718, 
to one Ann Griffith. She belonged to a Welsh family who were 
political refugees in Scotland. Very shortly after their marriage, 
they removed to Ireland, again apparently for political reasons, 
although the records do not indicate what they may have been.^ 



-•-Rumple, Rowan County , 105. 

^ Tennessee Historical Quarterly , V, 381-82. 



41 



Their oldest son, named Griffith Rutherford for his mother's 

family, was born in Ireland in 1720. A few years after his birth, 

when he was about nine years old, his parents took passage for 

the American colonies. Unfortunately, both parents died during 

the tedious voyage, and young Griffith arrived in Philadelphia 

as a homeless orphan. 

It is said that Griffith Rutherford arrived in 
America with fine luggage and costly silver, and that 
a German couple befriended him during his minority: 
but that he never received any of his inheritance. 

The generally accepted story is that he made his way to the 
home of a cousin, Robert Rutherford, who made his home in the 
Southside of Virginia. Still another account is that he was 
educated in New Jersey, and became a surveyor. Another story is 
that, at the age of nineteen, young Griffith took a horse and 
bridle and rode from New York southward to Rowan County, North 
Carolina, where his cousin, Robert Weakley, was then living. 
There he settled and there the authenticated story of his life 
begins. ^ 

In 1754, Griffith Rutherford took a wife, one Elizabeth 
Graham, daughter of a prominent family which included James 
Graham, a Royal Governor of North Carolina. The Rutherfords 
had ten children. The Rutherford family have may descendants 
living today, even, I think, in Murf reesboro. For the record, 
their children were: 



^ Ibid . , IV, 307 
4 



Ibid.,; Long, Rutherford and Allied Families , 64, 
^Long, Rutherford, 65, 8 0-81. 



42 



1. Jane; married James Cathey 

2. James; killed at Eutaw Springs 

3. Blanche; married Francis Locke 

4. Henry 

5 . John 

6. Elizabeth; married James Wright 

7. Alfred 

8. Newton; removed to Texas 

9. Margaret; married Elijah Chambers 

10. Griffith Weakley; married Jane Johnson 

While I cannot here go further into the genealogy of 
the Rutherford family, I would like to mention that 
Henry Rutherford was possibly the General's best-known 
son. He was in Middle Tennessee as early as 1783 as a 
surveyor and locator of land. He was the principal 
surveyor of West Tennessee, basing his surveys from a 
point known as Key Corner in Lauderdale County, where 
a Tennessee historical marker stands. The town^of 
Rutherford, in Gibson County, is named for him. 

North Carolina 

Griffith Rutherford represented Rowan County in the North 
Carolina legislature as early as 1769 and about that same time 
he was sheriff of the county. He was in the Assembly of 1770 
and 1771 and was at the same time captain of militia. He 

continued to represent his county in the Assembly in the legis- 

7 
lature of 1773 and 1774, and was a senator from 1777 to 1788. 



P. T. Glass, "Sketch of Henry Rutherford," in American 



Historical Magazine , V, (July, 1900) , 225-29. 

7 . 
Cisco, Historic Sumner County , 293. 



43 

Originally of Royalist sentiments, Rutherford became, 
possibly through the influence of his brother-in-law, James 
Graham, a leader in the Regulator movement. By 1771 Rutherford 
was joined to the struggle for American independence. "He did 
not merely join the Revolution," said the late Edward Ward 
Carmack, Jr., "he was one of those daring souls who made the 
Revolution. "8 In all his activities, Rutherford showed "marked 
abilities as a leader of men, (as) a level-headed lawmaker, and 
as a general in the field. "^ 

In 1775 he was elected a member of the Provincial Congress 
and was appointed a member of the Committee of Safety for Rowan 
County, and Colonel of Militia. 

In February of 1776, Rutherford attempted to take part in 
the Battle of Cross Creek, the first armed conflict of the 
Revolution in the South. He and his men arrived too late for 
the engagement, which resulted in a decisive defeat for the 
Tories. ■^^ 

In August of 1776 the Congress, meeting at Halifax, North 
Carolina, appointed him a brigadier general and authorized him 
to proceed as far as Chattanooga in a punitive expedition against 
the Indians. He was also to take 300 men from the Surrey 



"One wonders why. Some explanation is suggested in the 
author's Portrait of an American Loyalist , passim . 

^ THQ , V, 382. 

■•■OMcBride, Portrait of an American Loyalist. . . ; in East 
Tennessee Historical Society's Publication , II (1930), 72. 

■'■-'-Cisco, Historic Sumner County , 294; Long, Rutherford , 20-22; 
Rutherford File, Tennessee State Library and Archives. 



44 

County militia to rendezvous with Virginia troops on the Holston 
River. Rutherford complied. ^ 

General Rutherford had, however, anticipated the Council of 
Safety. On July 7, 1776, as general of the Salisbury District, 
in command of the western districts of the state, he did not feel 
warranted in taking his troops in pursuit of the Middle Towns of 
the Cherokees , who were then around and threatening action against 
the white people, his region, and asked for instructions. He 
suggested that he should watch Virginia and South Carolina 
soliciting movements against all the Cherokees by men of frontiers 
of all the western provinces. Rutherford insisted that if such 
confrontation should result, "I have no doubt of the final 
destruction of the Cherokee Nation. -^ The route he took to the 
Cherokee towns has since been known as "Rutherford's Trace. "■'■^ 

After that campaign, Rutherford was "given command of all 
American forces west of the Alleghanies , " including a contingent 
of 2,400 men to subdue an uprising of the Cherokees. "^^ During 
this time Rutherford wrote to Colonel William Christain of 
Virginia suggesting that "we center our strength. . . and pursue 
the same means in marching at once."-*-^ 



l^ North Carolina Colonial Records , XI, 333, 337; Williams, 
Tennessee During the American Revolution , 50-51. 

-'--^ N.C.C.R . , X, 651; Williams, Revolutionary War , 48. 

l^Ramsey, Annals of Tennessee , 164-65. 

l^THQ, V, 383. 

-'-^ N.C.C.R . , XIII, 65; Williams, Revolutionary War , 44-49. 



45 

With this group, Rutherford and Campbell destroyed thirty- 
six Indian towns and villages, laid waste their corn, and drove 
off their cattle. This is the affair known as the Battle of 
Island Flats- 
Rutherford's next military exploits were in 1779 when he 
marched with his brigade to Savannah to aid General Lincoln. In 
June 1780, he and his 1200 men played a decisive role in dis- 
persing the Tories who had assembled at Ramsour's Mill (near 
Lincolnton, in Tryon County) . ■'-^ 

Following the Battle of Ramsour's Mill, the army moved on 
to Camden, where the patriots suffered a bad defeat. "Though 
General Rutherford acted with distinguished gallantry, he was 
captured. . . One of the dragoons gave him a sword blow cutting 
through his beaver hat inflicting a severe wound across the top 

in 

of his head. Those captured were first confined in Camden, 
then removed to St. Augustine, Florida, where General Rutherford 
languished in a "dungeon prison" for almost a year. From lack 
of sanitation, poor and insufficient food, Rutherford came near 
dying. In August of 1781, he was taken to Philadelphia and 
exchanged. 

Rutherford returned to Rowan County ; reformed his brigade 
and marched on to Wilmington, driving the Tories before him. 
Before he reached Wilmington he heard of the surrender of Lord 
Cornwallis at Yorktown. 



-'-'Putnam, History of Middle Tennessee, 554. 

1 p 
°Cisco, Historic Sumner , 294; Long, Rutherford , 29-30; 

Tennessee Historical Magazine , IX (1925) , 103, 106. 

19 
^Account of Henry Rutherford to Lyman Draper, quoted in 

Long, Rutherford, 41. 



46 

Back in Rowan County, General Rutherford led his third and 
final campaign against the Indians, who were depredating the 
western borders. Joined by General Charles McDowell and his 
troops, he was successful in subduing the Indians without wanton 

on 

destruction. " 

For the next decade Rutherford continued his political 
career in North Carolina. At the same time he engaged in 
extensive land speculations in the western country. As early 
as 1783, William Bount wrote, "General Rutherford has agreed 
to join adventures with us in the purchase of the Bend of the 
Tennessee and I have this day given him an instrument in 
writing." ^^ On three different occasions Rutherford sent 
his son, Henry, to locate lands in the Cumberland region. 

The time was coming near for a final adventure. 

TENNESSEE 
After the Revolutionary War, Rutherford was one of the 
commissioners to survey the military land grant area in what 
is now Tennessee, in 1783-1784. For these services he was 
given a grant of 2,000 acres. Although he owned property in 
North Carolina, and held a position of trust there — at times 
being sheriff of Rowan County, a member of the North Carolina 
Senate, and a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1788 — 
he apparently was so intrigued by Tennessee that he liquidated 



20 

Long, Rutherford . 53. 

21 . 

Williams, History of the Lost State of Franklin, 15. 



47 

22 

his North Carolina holdings, and removed to Middle Tennessee. 

The exact date of his removal to Tennessee has not been 
firmly established, but it seems to have been about 1792. He 
settled in Sumner County on a tract of land located about five 

miles below Bledsoe's Lick and about two miles from the Cumber- 

23 
land River. Here he built a house and stockade. 

He immediately became prominent in Sumner County affairs. 

In 1794 he was appointed by President George Washington as 

24 
president of the Legislative Council of the Southwest Territory. 

Whether or not President Washington knew Rutherford is not 

certain, but he enjoyed the President's respect. One source 

states that Washington presented Rutherford with a silver snuff 

25 
box, which is still cherished by his descendants. 

Rutherford owned land, not only in Sumner County, but in 

Maury, Davidson, Wilson, Williamson, and in what later became 

Dyer County. In addition to his considerable land investments, 

he maintained a prosperous plantation and flour mill in Sumner 

County. When the county seat of Sumner County was laid out in 

1797, it was first called Rutherford in his honor, although the 

name was later changed, in 1801, to Gallatin. 



22 

Durham, The Great Leap Westward, 70-72. 

^^Ibid. , 63. 

Cisco, Historic Sumner , 295; Ramsey, Annals , 623, 

25 

Long, Rutherford , 67. 

y 6 

Durham, Great Leap Westward , 77-78. 



48 
General Rutherford died in his sleep at his home on 
August 10, 1805. Both he and his wife are buried in the church- 
yard of Shiloh Presbyterian Church, near Gallatin. Their graves 
are unmarked, and cannot now be identified. 

Although Rutherford was originally a member of 
the Church of England, he was a vestryman of St. 
Luke's Parish in Rowan County; he and his wife 
became charter members of the Shiloh Presbyterian 
Church in 1793 (Durham, Great Leap Westward, 159- 
60). However, most sources state that he was buried 
in Wilson County, near Laguardo, on the Sumner-Wilson 
County line, a supposition which I am inclined to 
accept. 

But the General has not lacked for monuments. During his 
lifetime, two counties were named for him. In 1779, while he 
was still living in North Carolina, the county of Tryon was 
divided into two counties, Lincoln and Rutherford, the latter 
being named for the General. Then, in 1803, the Tennessee 
legislature created from Davidson and Williamson the county of 
Rutherford, also named for the General. Although it is not 
specified in the legislative records, it is likely that the 
name of the new county was suggested by Robert Weakley, who 
was in the Tennessee State Senate at the time and who was a 
cousin of Rutherford. 

Not until more than 140 years later was further public 
recognition given to General Rutherford. On July 3, 1945, Judge 
Samuel Cole Williams, then chairman of the Tennessee Historical 
Commission, delivered an address in the James K. Polk Hotel, 
in Murfreesboro, on General Rutherford. The meeting was 

sponsored by local chapters of the D. A. R. , the U. D. C, 

27 

the American Legion, and the Rutherford County Historical Society. 



^''thq, IV, 283. 



49 

Whether or not Judge Williams' paper has been preserved, I 
do not know. 

In that same year, 1945, as a part of its plans to celebrate 
the sesquicentennial of the admission of Tennessee to the Union, 
in 1946, the Tennessee Historical Society voted $1,000 toward 
the erection of a monument to General Rutherford. 

Since three counties claimed Rutherford — Siamner 
for his residence, Wilson for his burial plot, 
and Rutherford as his namesake, the Commission 
specified that the county which contributed most to 
the cost of the monument should have the honor. 
Rutherford County was winner. 

The monument was erected at a cost of $2,000 and officially 
dedicated on October 29, 1946. 

An account of the ceremonies at the unveiling on the 
southwest corner of the public square may be of interest. 
Collier Crichlow acted as master of ceremonies and after the 
invocation was said by Dr. J. Herndon McCain of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Crichlow presented the monument to the 
county. It was accepted by Judge Hoyte Stewart. Stanley F. 
Horn, president of the Tennessee Historical Society and a member 
of the Tennessee Historical Commission, spoke briefly. The 
principal address was made by the late Ned Carmack. Carmack's 
eulogy of General Rutherford was in the fine literary and 
oratorical tradition of both his father and himself. There is 
not space to repeat it here; but it has been reprinted in the 
Tennessee Historical Quarterly , December 1946. 

Others taking part in the ceremony were Miss Libby Morrow 
Murfree, Mrs. Ben Hall McFarland, Mrs. C. F. Partee, Mrs. James 



50 

B. Patterson, Mrs. Annie Youree, and Mrs. J. J. Edwards. Among 
out-of-town guests were Mrs. John Trotwood Moore, Vernon Sharp, 
Jr., and Mrs. John H. DeWitt, of Nashville, and Mrs. Samuel 
Cole Williams, of Johnson City. 

Several descendants of General Rutherford had parts in the 
exercises. They inlcuded: Mrs. Mary Purseley Baum of Murfreesboro, 
great-great granddaughter, who unveiled the monument; the Misses 
Elaine and Elizabeth Rutherford Elliott of Nashville, who placed 
wreaths; Haynes Cooney, Jr., of Nashville, who acted as flag 
bearer; and William H. Owen of McMinnville, who pronounced the 
benediction. 

In closing, I should pershaps say something of the personal 
appearance and character of General Rutherford. One contemporary 
wrote of him: 



General Rutherford was somewhat under-sized, about 
5 feet 8 inches, but heavily and compactly formed 
would weigh about 180 pounds, thin-visaged. When he 
had formed an opinion he was not easily driven from 
it. Was of a pleasant and social turn. 



and another; 



He was an affable man and showed a friendly spirit. . . 
He has red hair, and is an active, pleasant man, 
and honest in his dealings... A man of strong character, 
resolute and determined, and of unusual capacity and 
sterling worth, he easily attained a position of 
prominence. ^° 



28 

Long, Rutherford, 66, 



51 



As a final summary of the career of General Griffith 
Rutherford, I can not do better than to quote Ned Carmack again: 
General Griffith Rutherford — immigrant, pioneer, 
frontiersman, soldier, early settler, lawmaker, — 
was one of the founders of the civilization upon 
which our nation has risen to pre-eminence. 



bZ 



AN 18 03 "CENSUS" OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY 
By Robert M. McBride 

Rutherford County, Tennessee, was established by an act of 
the General Assembly on October 25, 1803, from portions of 
Davidson and Williamson Counties, and organized on January 3, 
1804. The first census of the county is that of 1810, in which 
year there were 1,141 heads of families living in the county . 

The only known listing of residents of the county at the 
time of its creation is a petition dated August 10, 1803, from 
residents of Davidson and Williamson Counties, praying for the 
creation of a new county. Some 256 persons (plus a few others 
whose signatures are illegible) signed the petition. ^ 

This document is not, of course, a complete list of resi- 
dents. A month later, a number of other residents of Davidson 
and Williamson Counties petitioned that a new county not be 
established, as they wished to remain in the parent counties. 
However, the signers of the first petition represented probably 
at least half of the residents in what became Rutherford County. 
If those who opposed the new county, plus those who signed neither 
petition, were approximately the same number as those favoring 
the new county, then there were perhaps six hundred householders 
in the area. If the average size of a household was five persons, 
then the area included perhaps 3,000 inhabitants in 1803. 



^Rutherford County is the only county of Tennessee for 
which the 1810 census is in existence. 

2 

Legislative Papers, Division of Archives and Manuscripts, 

Tennessee State Library and Archives. 



53 



Most of the petitioners lived in the Stewart's Creek-Stones 
River area, centered around Jefferson, the oldest settlement in 
the county. Some lived at a greater distance toward the future 

Murfreesborough and as far as the present Cannon and Bedford 

3 
Counties. 

The restlessness which characterizes a pioneer and migratory 
society is well illustrated by a comparison of this list with 
the official census of 1810, seven years later. Many of the 
families listed in 1803 are still identified with Rutherford 
County; many others had disappeared, indicating that they soon 
became citizens of newer counties to the south of Rutherford, or 
removed further west. It also indicates the rapid settlement of 
the area during the decade of 1800-1810. In 1803, many families 
who are well-known in the history of Rutherford County had not 
yet made the long trip across the mountains from Virginia and 
the Carolinas, or from the older settled areas of Tennessee; 
their connection with the county began after — though only shortly 
after — the petition of 1803. 

The petition requesting the establishment of Rutherford 

County reads: 

To the Honorable, the General Assembly of the State of 
Tennessee. 

The petition of a number of the citizens of Davidson & 
Williamson Counties humbly sheweth that the vast extent 
of said counties renders it inconvenient for your 
petitioners to attend Courts, General Musters, Elections, 
etc. at the towns of Nashville & Franklin, & there 



A few were along the southern border of the state, in 
Indian territory, for example the Bean family, of the present 
Franklin County. 



54 



being a sufficiency of territory agreeably to the 
Constitution, to form a new county within the bounds 
hereafter to be described & leaving constitutional 
quantities within the bounds of the old counties. 
We your petitioners therefore pray that you will 
consider our situation & grant us a new county with 
the following boundaries, viz: beginning on the 
top of a ridge dividing the waters of Stone's River 
& Mill Creek, in the Williamson County line, & run 
southwardly with said ridge so as to leave all the 
waters of Mill Creek & Harpeth in Williamson County, 
until the ridge intersects the now Eastern boundary 
of said Williamson County;- thence continue South 
with said line of Williamson County to the South 
boundary of this State;- thence with the line of 
Wilson County North & Northwestwardly continuing 
with said county line to an Elm and white ash, the 
corner of said county, which is North East from the 
mouth of Hurricane Creek, which is four miles & 
thirty six poles; thence from the mouth of Hurricane 
Creek Southwest to the top of the first mentioned 
ridge; thence with said ridge Southwardly to the 
beginning. And your petitioners, as in duty bound, 
will ever pray. 

August 10, 1803 

The petition is in the handwriting of Constant Hardeman, the 
first signer of the document. 

The signers of the petition are listed below in alpha- 
betical order. The names of many of the petitioners are to be 
found in the first records of the county. Signatures include 
those of six of the seven members of the first Court of Pleas 
and Quarter Sessions (John Howell, Peter LeFrand, William Nash, 
Charles Ready, Thomas Rucker, John Thompson) ; the first High 
Sheriff (Samuel McBride) ; Trustee (Alexander McCulloch) ; 
Register (William Mitchell) ; and County Court Clerk (Joseph 
Herndon) . 



Andrews , David 
Andrews, James 
Andrews, John 
Anthony, John, Junr. 
Aspey, Alex(ander) 
Avery, William Isom 
Baldwell, Ruben 



Barfield, Fredk. 
Barfield, James 
Barfield, Wm. 
Bayer, Joseph 
Bean, Ahab 
Bean, Jessee 
Bean, Robert 



Bean, William 
Bedford, J. R. 
Bedford, Thomas 
Benge, Obediah M. 
Brandon, Cornelius 
Brandon, Georg 
Buchanan, George 



55 



Bulla, James 
Campbell, Saml. 
Carlisle, James 
Carlisle, William 
Carroll, Joseph 
Carter, William 
Castelman, Joseph 
Cathey, Griphy 
Clarke, Jesse 
Clarke, Robt. 
Conger, Isaac 
Cooper, Ritchard 
Corson, Wm. 
Cosbey, John 
Cothern, James 
Cummin, Jam. 
Cummins, John 
Davis, Henry 
Davis, James 
Dement, Abner 
Dement, Cader 
Donaldson, James 
Doran, Willm. 
Dyer, John 
Edwards, Ben 
Edwards, Benjamin 
Edwards, Jno. 
Edwards, Owen 
Edwards, Presly 
Edwards, Presley 
Edwards, Tho. 
Edwards, Thomas 
Edwards, Wm. 
Faver, James 
Ferguson, Daniel 
Fleming, John 
Foster, Anthony 
Frazor, James 
Gambil, Bradley 
Gambil, John 
Gambil, Jordin 
Gambill, Benjamin 
Gambrell, Aron 
Gammil, Aaron 
Gammil , J. H. 
Gammil, Milton 
Gammill, William 



Gardner, James 
Gillespie, Francis 
Gillespie, George 
Gillespie, James 
Glover, Samuel, Sr. 
Gorden, John 
Gordon, David 
Gowan, William 
Gowen, Joseph 
Greenwood, William 
Griffin, John 
Hadley, Joseph 
Handcock, Benja 
Hankins, Lewis 
Hardeman, Constt. 
harper , Edward 
harper, John 
harper, William, Sr. 
harper, William Junr. 
Harriss (?) , James 
Hawkins, James 
Hayes, Cain (?) 
Hays, James 
Herndown, Jos. 
Hill, Isaac 
Hill, James 
Hope, Wm. 
Howell, David 
Howell, Jno.^ 
Howell, William 
Jackson, John 
Jackson, William 
James, Daniel 
Jenkins, Hyram 
Jetton, John L. 
Jetton, Robert 
Johns, Jesse 
Johns, John 
Jones, John H. 
Jones, John M. 
Jones, Jos. 
Jud, C. V. 
Kelton, Robt. 
Kelton, Wm. 
Kelton, Vim. Jnr. 
Key, Sandy 
Key, Thomas 



Kimbro, Azariah 
Kimbro, William 
Kimbro, William C. 
Koonce, William 
Kyle , Ruben 
Lamb , Adam 
Lambert, Reuben 
Lasley, Elisha 
Laughlin, William 
Lawrence , John 
LeGrand, Peter ^ 
Lemmons , Abraham 
Linch, John 
Linsey, James 
Long, Samuel 
Lutfin, Jeames 
Lytle, Wm. 
McBride, Francis 
McBride, Samuel" 
McClure, James 
McCulloch, Alex.^ 
McKee, Capt. John 
McKinney, Sam 
McKnight, Jam. 
McKnight, Joseph 
McKnight, William 
McNeil, C. G. 
Magness, Jonath. 
Magness, Robt. 
Mankin, Thomas 
Mann, John 
Marble, Amos 
Marlin, William 
Martin, Alexander 
Martin, William 
Mathews, Dudly 
Mattews , Dudly 
Matthews , Robert 
Menifey, Nimrod 
Middleton, William 
Miller, Jacob 
Miller, John 
Miller, Lee 
Miller, Simon 
Mitchell, Mark 
Mitchell, Tho. 



First County Court Clerk. 
^Member of first Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 
^First High Sheriff. 
'First Trustee. 



bb 



Mitchell, Wm.^ 
More, Alex. 
Morrow, John 
Morton, Abner (?) 
Morton, James 
Morton, James, Sr. 
Morton, James, Jnr. 
Morton, Joseph 
Nance, Isac 
Nance, Bird 
Nance, William 
Nash, Francis 
Nash, Francis C. 
Nash, Wm. 
Nash, William^ 
Nelson, George 
Nelson, Thomas 
Nevins, Isaac 
Nevins, Jno. 
Nevons, Joseph 
Newman, Joseph 
Newsom, Balum 
Nichols, Joseph 
Nichols, Joshua 
Norman, Jas. 
Norman, Jno. 
Norman, Presley 
Norris, Wilm. 
Nugent, John 
O'Dean (?) , Meger 
Oldham, Hugh Rier 
Olliphant, James 
O'Neil (?) , Sim 
Ormon, Wm. 
Osburn, Luke 
Palin (?) , William 
Pepper (?) , Samuel 
Radford, Edward 
Ready, Chas. 
Reed, Harden 
Reen, Bolen 
Renick, Wm. 
Robins, Samuel 
Robinson, Moses 
Robison, Wm. 
Rodgers, David 
Rucker , Thomas^ 
Sanders, Reuben 
Sawyer s , Thoma s 



Scott, Charles 
Searcy, Wm. W. 
Sherwood, Daneil 
Sherwood, Hugh 
Ship, Joseph 
Smith, Cunningham 
Smith, John 
Smith, Robt. 
Smith, Robert F. N. 
Smith, William 
Smith, William R. 
Smothers, John Sr. 
Smothers, John Junr. 
Star, Barnes 
Steel, Arbl. 
Stockird, John, Jr. 
Sullins, John 
Sullivan, Patrick 
Tennison, Joseph 
Thacker, Jeremiah 
Thacker, Larkin 
Thompson, John 
Thompson, Col. John^ 
Thompson, Joseph L. 
Thompson, Thomas 
Tiler, Thomas 
Titus, James 
Titus, Robert 
Tucker, Silas 
Tucker, William 
Walls, Simon 
Watts (?) , Thomas 
White, C(am) G. 
Whitsitt, James 
Williams, David 
Williams, Jos. 
Wills, James 
Wilson, Samuel 
Winsett, John 
Wright, Isaac 
Wright, Isaac, Jr. 
Wright, Jacob 
Wright, Lemuel 
Young, John H. 
Young, Peter 



''First Register of Deeds. 

^Member of first Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 



57 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY MILITIA COMMISSIONS 
1821-1830 
This is to continue the Commissions listed in Rutherford County Historical 
Society Publications N. 1 & 2. The commissions following were abstracted 
from Commissions Books in State Library and Archives by Henry G. Wray and 
Ernest K. Johns. For convenience the following are listed alphabetically 
rather than by years. The spelling as it appears in the original record has 
been followed throughout, although in many cases it is obviously erroneous. 



Aaron, Wm. 
Abbot, John C. 

Abbott, John C. 



Adcocke, Wm. 
Adcocke, Wm. 
(Agmett)?, William 

Alexander, James 
Allen, Job 
Allen, John 

Allen, Matthias 
Alley, Ezekiel 
Ally, Isaac 
Anderson, Charles 

Anderson, John 
Andrews, David 

Anglin, Anderson 
Arbuckle, Joseph 
Armstrong, Knox 
Armstrong, Knox 
Arnet, William 
Arnett, William 

Arnett, William 

Arnett, William 
Arnold, Farny 
Ballow, Joseph 
Barber, John 
Barnett, Jacob 



Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 45th " 

Murfreesboro Sentinels 

1st Lieut. Murfreesboro 

Sentinels 1st Regiment 

Tenn. Volunteers Attached 

to 9th Brigade 

Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Ensign " " 

Cornet 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

Ensign " " 

Capt. 22nd 

Vol . Light Infantry Co. 

1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 
II II II II 

Ensign 104th Regiment 
Caot. 45th 

Vol. Light Infantry Co. 
Capt. 104th Regiment 
Lieut. 2nd 
Rifle Company 
1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 
Capt. 104th Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
Capt. 104th Regiment 
2nd Major 104th 
Ensign 2nd Regiment 
Vol .Light Infantry Co. 
Lieut. 9th Brigade 
Cavalry Regiment 
Capt. 104th Regiment 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
1st Major 52nd Regiment 
Capt. 22nd Regiment 
apt. 



Mar. 27, 1824 
Jan. 12, 1827 

Aug. 5, 1829 



Jan. 


6, 


1823 


May 


22, 


1829 


Jun. 


3, 


1823 


Oct. 


6, 


1821 


Sep. 


4, 


1827 


Oct. 


8, 


1821 


Nov. 


13, 


1826 


Sep. 


20, 


1829 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Jan, 


29, 


1821 


Sept 


• 1, 


1829 


Oct. 


25, 


1822 


Mar. 


26, 


1830 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Mar. 


28. 


1828 


Jul. 


23, 


1830 


Feb. 


25, 


1825 


Mar. 


11, 


1825 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Oct. 


19, 


1824 


Aug. 


6, 


, 1821 


Aor. 


7, 


, 1826 


Jul. 


21, 


, 1823 



Barton, David 
Barton, Hail 

Bateman, Evan 
Bateman, Jonathan 

Batie, Isaac 
Baxter, George 
Baxter, George 
Baxter, Samuel 
Baxter, William 
Becton, John 
Becton, John M. 
Bees ley, Nathan 
Bell , William 
Bevins, Lewis 
Bevins, Lewis 
Birdwell , Hugh 
Bishop, Joseph 
Bivens, James 
Blair, James 
Blair, James W. 
Blakely, James H. 
Blanton, William 
Blanton, William 
Booker, Genings 
Bottoms, Pascal 
Bottoms, Paskell H. 
Bottoms, Sterling 
Bowman, Alexander 
Boyd, William 
Boyles, Willie 
Boynton, James 
Bradford, David 

Brandon, Thomas 

Brashear, Isaac W. 
Brashear, Jonas W. 
Brawl ey, Levi 
Brawl ey, Levi 
Brawly, Hugh V. 
Brawl y, Pryor 
Bright, Jesse 
Brothers, Benjamin 
Brothers, Benjamin 
Brothers , Burton D. 
Brothers, Paskil 
Brown, Daniel 
Brown, Richard 

Burgess, John 



Ensign 53rd Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 2nd Regiment 
Rifle Company 
2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
1st Lieut. 2nd Regiment 
Rifle Company 
Ensign 53rd Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

" 104th 
Capt. 45th Regiment 
Ensign " " 
Lieut. 22nd 
Capt. 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 
1st " 53rd " 
Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
Capt. 

Adjutant 45th 
Ensign 53rd 
Capt. 

Lieut. 22nd 
Capt. " 
Capt. 45th 
Ensign 22nd 
Capt. 
Ensign " 
1st Lieut. " 
Capt. 45th Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 
Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Ensign 53rd " 
Ensign 53rd " 
Ensign 53rd " 
Capt. " 

Vol . Rifle Company 
1st Lieut. 2nd Regiment 
Vol . Rifle Company 
1st Major 104th Regiment 
Capt. 

Ensign 53rd Regiment 
1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
Lieut. 

2nd Lieut. " 
Ensign 104th Regiment 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
Lieut. " 
Lieut. " 

2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
Ensign 53rd Regiment 
Capt. 45th 
Vol . Light Infantry 
1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 



Oct. 


1 c 

21 


, 1829 


Aug. 


31 


, 1830 


Oct. 


21 


, 1829 


Jun. 


25 


, 1824 


Nov. 


19 


, 1827 


Mar. 


23 


, 1828 


Oct. 


6 


, 1824 


May 


22 


, M829 


Apr. 


5 


, 1824 


Oct. 


16r 


n k728 


Apr. 


29 


, 1830 


Oct. 


21 


, 1829 


Aug. 


25 


, 1821 


Oct. 


19 


, 1823 


Feb. 


10 


. 1821 


Oct. 


7 


, 1826 


Oct. 


6 


1824 


Feb. 


27 


, 1826 


Sep; 


10 


, 1830 


Jan. 


2 


, 1821 


Jul. 


19 


, 1825 


Feb. 


25 


, 1826 


May 


17 


, 1828 


Nov. 


16 


1829 


Sep. 


4 


1830 


Mar. 


23 


1828 


Apr. 


1 


1821 


Mar. 


23 


1828 


Nov. 


19 


1821 


Apr. 


5 


1823 


Oct. 


9 


1826 


Nov. 


19 


1827 


Jul. 


23 


1830 


Mar. 


23 


1828 


Aug. 


12 


1822 


Oct. 


7 


1826 


Mar. 


27 


1824 


Oct. 


7 


1826 


Sep. 


1 


1829 


Oct. 


25 


1822 


Jan. 


28 


1823 


Aug. 


30, 


1824 


Nov. 


19 


1827 


Nov. 


19, 


1827 


Jul. 


11, 


1823 


May 


17, 


1823 



59 



Burgh, John 
Burks, Arnold 
Burnett, James 
Burnet, John 
Burnet, William 
Burrus , Phi 11 ip J. 

Butcher, Solomon 
Butler, Thomas 

Butler, William S. 
Buther, Martin 
Byford, Hardy 
Cament, John G. 
Cannon, Cyrus 
Cannon, John S. 
Canon, Thomas B. 
Cantrell , Stephen 
Carrick, Martin 
Caster, William 
(Ch- — tt)?, Mattias 
Childress, Anderson 
Childress, John W. 

Childress, Lawson 
Clanton, Dudley 
Clark, Adam 
Clark, Adam 
Clark, Henry 
Clark, Samuel 

Clark, Thomas B. 
Clay, Samuel 
Clements, John G. 
Clements , Lewis T. 
Coats, Payton A. 

Cochran, Edward A. 

Cocke, John J. 
Cole, Obediah 
Coleman, Blackman 

Connelly, Alford W. 
Cook, Hezekiah G. 
Cook, Hezekiah G. 

Cook, Oohn D. , Jr. 
Cook, William 
Cooper, Archil bald 
Cooper, Ar*chilbald 



Ensign 45th Regiment 

Capt. 22nd 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 53rd Regiment 
Adjutant 45th 
Vol . Light Infantry 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
Ensign 53rd Regiment 
Vol . Light Infantry 
Capt. 45th Regiment 
Ensign 22nd " 
Ensign 53rd " 
Capt. 22nd 
Ensign " " 
Lieut. " 
Ensign 45th " 
2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Ensign 53rd Regiment 
Ensign " " 
45th " 
Capt. 

Ensign " 
Vol . Light Infantry 
1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Ensign 22nd Regiment 
Ensign 45th 
Lieut. Colonel 
22nd Regiment 
1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 
Ensign 22nd Regiment 
2nd Major 22nd Regiment 
Capt. 22nd Regiment 
Ensign " " 
Cavalry Regiment 
Cat)t. 9th Brigade 
Cavalry Regiment 
Capt. 45th Regiment 
1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 
Brigadier General 
9th Brigade 

2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
Capt. 22nd Regiment 
Lieut. 53rd 
Vol. Light Ififantry 
2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Capt. 45th Regiment 



Oct. 


6, 


1824 


Mar. 


11, 


1825 


Sep. 


10, 


1830 


Oct. 


16, 


1828 


Jun. 


25 


1824 


Mar. 


10 


1826 


May 


20 


1823 


Oct. 


9 


1826 


Sep. 


4 


1827 


Apr. 


10 


1829 


Mar. 


27 


1824 


Jan. 


11 


1823 


Nov. 


19 


1828 


May 


18 


1828 


Mar. 


31 


1821 


Nov. 


19 


1828 


Oct. 


21 


1829 


Oct. 


21 


, 1829 


May 


14 


, 1827 


Feb. 


26 


1821 


Mar. 


10 


, 1826 


Oct. 


7 


, 1826 


Oct. 


19 


, 1825 


Jul-. 


31 


, 1826 


Nov. 


6 


, 1826 


Apr. 


8 


, 1823 


Oct. 


5 


, 1830 


Mar. 


20 


, 1826 


Mar. 


29 


, 1821 


Aug. 


23 


, 1828 


May 


14 


, 1830 


May 


30 


, 1825 


May 


30, 


1825 


Mar. 


26 


, 1830 


Nov. 


16 


, 1829 


Jan. 


23 


, 1821 


Aug. 


31 


, 1830 


Sep. 


15 


, 1821 


Oct. 


6 


, 1824 


Nov. 


6 


, 1826 


Jan. 


27 


, 1821 


Apr. 


1 


, 1823 


May 


20 


, 1823 



60 



Cooper, Arthur 
Cooper, John 
Copeland, George G. 
Corsey, Burnet 
Cothern, Edward H. 

Cottor, Nicholas 
Covington, David 
Covington, James 

Covington, Larkin 
Cox, James 
Cox, James L. 
Cox, Matthias 
Crane, Squire 
Crockett, Granville 
Crockett, Granville 
Crockett, Granville 



Crosthwaite, William H 

Dal ton. Lacy 
Dance, Russell 

Daniel , William M. 
Daniels, Isaac 
Davis, Benjamin 
Davis, Lucket 
Day, James 
Day, James 
Dickey, James 
Dickson, Ezekiel 
Dill, Noah 

Doak, Joseph 
Dobson, Joseph 0. 
Dodd, Gannon 
Dohan, Joseph 
Doran, Alexander 
Dunn, Benjamin 
Dunn, James S. 
Dunnaway, William 
Edwards, William 

Elam, Daniel 
Eliott, Alford 
Elliot, Alfred 
Elliott, Simon 

Elliott, Simon 
Emberson, Harrison 
Emmit, Wm. C. 

Fagan, Henry W. 



Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd 

Capt. 

1st Lieut. 45th " 

Lieut. 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Ensign 53rd Regiment 

Lieut. 22nd 

Lieut. 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign " " 

1st Lieut. 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Capt. 

Vol . Light Infantry 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Light Infantry 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Cant. 45th Regiment 

Murfreesboro Sentinels 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 45th 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Lieut. " 

Capt. 22nd 

Capt. 53rd 

2nd Major Regiment 104th 

being 4th Rutherford 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

Lieut. 45th 

Ensign 22nd 

Ensign 45th 

Lieut. 53rd 

Ensign 45th 

Ensign " 

2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Caot. 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Capt. 22nd 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Caot. 45th 

Vol. Riflemen Company 

2nd Major 45th Regiment 

Ensign 104th Regiment 

Capt. 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Capt. 2nd Regiment 

Company of Riflemen 



April 20, 1821 
Mar. 27, 1824 
Aug. 25, 1821 
May 22, 1829 
June 3, 1823 

Aug. 23, 1823 
Aug. 26, 1822 
May 25, 1822 

April 5, 1824 

Oct. 21 , 1829 

Nov. 19, 1827 

Nov. 19, 1827 

Oct. 19, 1825 

April 16, 1822 

April 5, 1824 

Mar. 10, 1826 

Oct. 16, 1828 

May 14, 1830 
Jan. 12, 1827 

July 31, 1826 

Dec. 15, 1828 

April 8, 1823 

Oct. 16, 1828 

Oct. 15, 1823 

Oct. 6, 1824 

Mar. 25, 1826 

Sept. 12, 1821 

Jan. 31, 1828 

Aug. 23, 1823 

April 1, 1823 

Sept. 19, 1823 

Aug. 29, 1821 

Nov. 3, 1821 

Oct. 6, 1821 

June 14, 1828 

Mar. 23, 1828 

July 19, 1827 

Oct. 6, 1824 

April 10, 1829 

May 17, 1828 

Mar. 26, 1821 

July 19, 1823 
Mar. 23, 1824 
Mar. 11, 1825 

Oct. 21, 1829 



61 



Fagg (Fogg), Charles 
Farmer, William P. 
Faulkenberry , James 
Faulkenberry, James 
Ferguson, D. G. 
Ferguson, Roland 
Ferrel , James 
Finney, Andrew 
Fleming, Jacob 

Fleming, Jacob L. 

Fletcher, John D. 
Ford, Edward 
Ford, Edward 
Foreman, Joel 
Foreman, William 
Foster, Allen 
Foster, James 
Foster, James 
Fowler, Absolom 
Fowler, Absolom 
Fowler, Meredith 
Fowler, Meredith 
Fowler, Milton 
Fox, John T. *• 
Fox, Matthias 
Fox, Matthew 
Fremsly, Charles A. 

Fuller, William 
Furgason, Joseph 
Gale, William H. 

Gater, Silas 
Gil lam, Henry 
Gil lam, James 
Gill am, James 
Gilliam, James 

Gilliam, Semeon 
Givens, Merritt 
Glascock, Moses H, 
Gooch, John C. 
Goodloe, Robert 
Gowan, John C. 
Gowen, Alfred P. 

Gowen, Alfred T. 
Gray, William 
Green, Nelson 
Gum, Robert E. 

Gunn, Hamilton 



Ensign 45th Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Capt. 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd 

2nd Major 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd 

Vol. Light Infantry Company 

Colonel Commandant 104th 

Regiment the 4th Rutherford 

2nd Major 45th Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 22nd 

2nd Lieut. 45th 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Ensign " " 

Capt. 

Capt. 53rd " 

Lieut. Col. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Capt. 

Capt. 53rd " 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Coronet 22nd Regiment 

Cavalry Company 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Light Infantry Company 

Ensign 53rd Regiment 

Ensign " " 

Lieut. " " 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Lieut. Colonel 104th 

Regiment the 4th Rutherford 

1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

Capt. 22nd 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Capt. 22nd Regiment 

Lieut. Colonel Commandant 

53rd Regiment 

1st Major 53rd Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Capt. 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 



Aug. 


1, 


1822 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Aug. 


12, 


1822 


Mar. 


27 


1824 


Oct. 


16 


1828 


Aug. 


31 


1830 


Jan. 


31 


1828 


Feb. 


22 


1822 


Oct. 


9 


1826 


Jan. 


31 


1828 


Jan. 


31 


1828 


Feb. 


25 


1825 


Oct. 


7 


1826 


May 


14 


1830 


April 


16 


1828 


Dec. 


15 


1828 


Jan. 


28 


1823 


Mar. 


20 


1826 


Aug. 


12 


1822 


May 


15 


1826 


Aug. 


30 


1824 


Sept. 


9 


1825 


Jan. 


24 


1826 


Nov. 


19 


1827 


Aug. 


31 


1830 


Oct. 


21 


, 1829 


Dec. 


28 


, 1830 


Feb. 


17 


, 1827 


Nov. 


6 


, 1826 


Oct. 


16 


, 1828 


Nov. 


19 


, 1827 


June 


25 


, 1824 


June 


25 


, 1824 


Oct. 


7 


, 1826 


Jan. 


31 


, 1828 


Mar. 


23 


, 1828 


Nov. 


19 


, 1827 


Oct. 


21 


, 1829 


Feb. 


27 


, 1826 


Oct. 


7 


, 1826 


Sept. 


2 


, 1826 


April 


3 


, 1824 


Sept. 


25 


, 1822 


Mar. 


27 


, 1824 


Aug. 


31 


, 1830 


Feb. 


22 


, 1823 



Sept. 20, 1829 



62 



Hague, Simon 
Haines, Burrell 
Ha ins, William E. 
Hale, Randolph B. 
Hale, Richard 
Hale, Stephen 
Hale, Zachariah 
Haley, Elijah 
Hall , Julius M. 
Hall , William 
Halloway, John 
Hardaman, Lent 
Harmon, S. 
Harris, Alsea 
Harris, George E. 
Heath, James 
Henderson, William Y. 
Henry, Fanton Terry 
Henry, James B. 
Henry, John M. 
Henry, John M. 

Henry, (Nucl terry)? 
(See Fanton Terry - 
Herington, Robert 
Hewit, Rensselart 

Hill, Hohn M. 
Hobbs, James 
Hoge? (Hodge), Samuel 
Holt, John 
Holt, John 
Holt, William 
Hoover, John, Jr. 
Hoover, John, Jr. 
Hoover, William 
Howland, Francis M. 
Howl and, William H. 
Muggins, Robert 
Hunt, Hiram 
Hunt, Jeremiah 
(Iseminger??) , Wm. R, 
Jackson, William 
James, Benjamin C. 

James, Nicholas 
Jarrett, David 
Jetton, Lackey S. 
Johns, Thomas 
Johnson, Joseph M. 
Johnson, Simon 
Jones, Ezekial 
Jones, L. B. 
Jones, Nathan 



1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 
1st Lieut. 45th 
Ensign 53rd Regiment 
Lieut. 
Lieut. 45th 
Capt. 53rd 

1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 
2nd Major 22nd Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 104th " 
Lieut. 45th Regiment 
Ensign 104th 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
2nd Lieut. " 
Capt. 45th Regiment 
Surgeon Mate 45th Regiment 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 
Ensign 22nd Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
2nd Major 104th 
Lieut. Colonel 104th 
Regiment 

Capt. 22nd Regiment 
Above) 

Ensign 104th Regiment 

Capt. 22nd 

Light Infantry Company 

2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 104th 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

Ensign " " 

1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Lieut. " 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. " 

2nd Lieut. " 

2nd Lieut. " 

2nd Lieut. 22nd 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Ensign 104th 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Cavalry Company 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 104th 

Capt. 104th Regiment 

Capt. 53rd 

Lieut. " " 

2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Capt. 104th 



Mar. 


23, 


1826 


Apri 1 


29, 


1830 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Sopt. 


12, 


18;'l 


Jan. 


28, 


1823 


Nov. 


3, 


1821 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Mar. 


13, 


1821 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Oct. 


25, 


1822 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Sept. 


2, 


1826 


Nov. 


6, 


1826 


Jan. 


6, 


1823 


Feb. 


10, 


1821 


April 


1, 


1826 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


May 


18, 


1827 


Nov. 


6, 


1826 


July 


2, 


, 1829 


July 


23, 


. 1830 



May 



Oct. 

Sept. 

April 

Sept. 

Mar. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

April 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Dec. 



17, 1828 



Nov. 16, 1829 
Oct. 16, 1828 



21 , 1829 

1, 1829 
16, 1828 

20, 1829 
26, 1830 
25, 1821 
25, 1825 

7, 1826 
31, 1830 

7, 1826 

21, 1829 

2, 1826 

8, 1825 
10, 1829 

6, 1824 

4, 1830 

28, 1830 



July 21, 1823 

April 16, 1828 

Mar. 23, 1828 

Sept. 4, 1830 

Oct. 21, 1829 

Aug. 12, 1822 

Oct. 7, 1829 

Sept. 9, 1825 

Mar. 23, 1828 



63 



Jones, Nathaniel 
Jones, Samuel 
Jones, Samuel 
Jones, Thomas 
Keatly, William D. 
Keeble, John G. 
Keeble, Robert 

Kelling, Henry 
Kelough, Isaac 
Kelton, John 
Kimbrow, Joseph 

Koonse, Wendel 
Laceter, Brinkley 
Lamb, Thomas 
Lanom, G. B. 
Laseter, Luke 
Ledbetter, David 
Liddon, William A. 
Liddon, William A. 

Limmons, Samuel 

Little, Zachariah 
Lively, James 
Locke, Goodwin 
Locke, Hugh L. 
Locke, Silas 



Locke, William 

Long, Solomon 
Long, William S. 
Lowe, William 
Lowe, William 
Lowry, William 
Lynch, John 
Lytle, William F. 



Majors, William 
Mai one, William M. 
Manchester, William 
Maner, James 

Maner, Levi 
Maney, William 



Mankin, James 
Manor, James 
Manor, Levi 
Manor, Levi 



Ensign 53rd Regiment 

Ensign " " 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 104th 

1st Lieut. 53rd 

2nd Lieut. 22nd 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Vol. Light Infantry Company 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Capt. 45th 

Ensign " " 

Quarter Master 

22nd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 45th 

Lieut. 22nd 

Ensign 53rd " 

Capt. 22nd 

Capt. 45th 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Murfreesboro Sentinels 

Coronet 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Ensign " " 

Capt. " 

Murfreesboro Independent 

Volunteers 

Lieut. Colonel Commandant 

45th Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd 

1st Major " 

1st Lieut. 45th 

Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Ensign Murfreesboro Sentinels Aug. 

1st Regiment Tenn. Volunteers 

attached to 9th Brigade 

Capt. 22nd Regiment 

Lieut. " " 

1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Vol . Rifle Company 

1st Lieut. 2nd Regiment 

Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Murfreesboro Independent 

Volunteers 

Ensign 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 

1st Lieut. " 

Capt. 



Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Oct. 


6, 


1824 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


July 


23, 


1830 


Aug. 


26, 


1822 


Nov. 


6, 


1826 


Oct. 


19, 


1825 


April 


1, 


1823 


July 


4, 


1821 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Aug. 


31, 


1830 


Oct. 


23, 


1828 


Feb. 


24, 


1826 


Aug. 


31, 


1830 


Nov. 


19, 


1821 


Oct. 


6, 


1824 


Jan. 


12, 


1827 


Sept. 


4, 


1824 


Mar. 


26, 


, 1830 


Nov. 


19, 


, 1827 


June 


14, 


, 1828 


May 


22, 


, 1829 


Feb. 


14, 


, 1822 



Oct. 19, 1824 



April 
July 


5, 
4, 


1823 
1826 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Jan. 


31, 


1828 


Nov. 


13, 


1826 


Sept. 
Aug. 


5, 
5, 


1825 
1829 


July 


31, 


1826 


Sept. 
Nov. 


12, 
13, 


1825 
1825 


June 


4, 


1825 


Jan. 


12, 


1827 


Feb. 


14, 


1822 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Sept. 
Nov. 


4, 
13, 


1827 
, 1826 


June 


14, 


, 1828 



64 



Manor, Robert 
Mason, Alek 
Matthews, James G. 

Maxey, Joel 

Maxey, Philip 

Maxwell , James 
Mayfield, Tolbert 
Meredith, James 
Miller, Isaac J. 
Miller, James R. 
Miller, William 
Miller, William 
Miller, William 

Mitchell , James 
Mitchell , William 
Mitchell , William 
Molloy, William 
Moloy, John 0. 
Moore, James 

Moore, William N. 
Morgan, William S. 
Morris, Overton 
Morris, William B. 
Morton, Francis M, 
Morton, James 

Murphey, John 
Murry, Samuel 
Myrich, Cornelius 
McClanahan, Samuel 

McClure, Wm. 
McCorkle, John 
McCoy, William 

McCulloch, Alexander 
McCul lough, Alexander 
McCully, Henry 
McCutchen, David 
McCutchins, David C. 
McCutchen, John T. 
McDowell , Franklin 
McDowell , Matthias 
McGowen, Harpeth 
McHenry, John 
McKay, Robert 

McKee, Andrew 
McKee, Andrew M. 



2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 22nd 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Vol. Light Infantry Company 

1st Lieut. Company of 

Riflemen 2nd Regiment 

Ensign of the Guard Company 

of Riflemen 2nd Regiment 

Capt. 2nd Regiment Rifle Co. 

Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 104th 

Ensign 45th 

Capt. 

Capt. 

2nd Major 45th Regiment 

Lieut. Colonel 

53rd Regiment 

Capt. 104th Regiment 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Lieut. 45th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 2nd Regiment Rifle 
Company 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 45th " 

Ensign " 

Capt. 53rd 

Ensign 22nd 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Vol . Light Infantry Co. 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

Capt. 104th 

Ensign 45th " 

Capt. 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Ensign 53rd " 

Ensign 45th 

Vol . Light Infantry 

1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 

1st Lieut. 22nd 

1st Lieut. 45th 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

Capt. " 

Ensign " 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 22nd 

Capt. 104th Regiment 

Coronet 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

2nd Major 53rd Regiment 



Mar. 20, 1826 

Sept. 4, 1827 

Jan. 4, 1830 

Oct. 21, 1829 

Oct. 21, 1829 



Oct. 


25, 


1822 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Oct. 


28, 


1823 


Mav 


14, 


1827 


Oct. 


28, 


1823 


Mar. 


6, 


1826 


Jan. 


31, 


1828 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Sept. 


15, 


1821 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Mar. 


30, 


1825 


Sept. 


4, 


1827 


Oct. 


25, 


1822 



Oct. 21, 1829 

Aug. 20, 1827 

April 16, 1828 

Oct. 21, 1829 

June 14, 1828 

Jan. 4, 1830 

June 14, 1828 

Sept. 1, 1829 

Mar. 30, 1825 

Sept. 27, 1830 



April 


4, 


1821 


Nov. 


3, 


1821 


July 


11, 


1823 


Sept. 


1, 


1829 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Sept. 


30, 


1829 


Oct. 


23, 


1828 


Oct. 


9, 


1830 


Mar. 


20, 


1826 


Mar. 


30, 


1825 


Sept. 


20, 


1829 


May 


17, 


1828 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Feb. 


22, 


1823 



Aoril 5, 1823 
April 4, 1826 



65 



McKinney, William 
McKnight, William 
McLain, Charles G. 
McLain, John 
McLean, Baxter 
McLean, Grandison 
McLeroy, John I. 
McMurray, Hugh 
McNight, (Car_i?) H. 
Nance, Drury 
Nance, Drury 
Nance, Drury 
Nations, Thomas 
Neely, Benjamin G. 

Nelson, Beverly 
Nelson, John 
Nelson, Pleasant H. 
Newgent, John D. 
Newgent, John D. 
Newgent, John D. 

Newman, George 
Newman, George 
Newman, John 
Nichols, Daniel B. 
Nichols, Levi 
Norman, Henry 
Norman, Henry 

Norman, James D, 

North, Anthony 
Northcutt, Hosea 
Oakes, Isaac 
Osborn, Philip 
Overall , James 
Owens, Jonathan 
Pace, James 
Pace, William 
Palmer, William H. 
Parish, Jesse 
Parker, John 
Parker, John 
Parker, John M. D. 
Parnell , Bird 

Parrish, William G. 
Patterson, Joseph 
Patton, Matthew 
Peak, Washington M. 

Peake, Walker 
Pearson, John 



Ensign 104th Regiment 

Adjutant 53rd 

Capt. 45th 

2nd Lieut. 53rd " 

Capt. 45th 

Ensign 45th " 

1st Lieut. 53rd " 

Ensign 45th 

Capt. 104th 

2nd Lieut. 22nd " 

2nd Lieut. 45th " 

1st Lieut. 45th " 

Capt. 53rd 

Coronet 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Adjutant 22nd " 

Ensign 22nd 

Capt. 45th 

1st Major 4Sth " 

Lieut. Colonel 

45th Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd " 

Capt. 45th 

Lieut. Colonel 
45th Regiment 

Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Vol . Riflemen Co. 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Ensign 104th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd " 

Capt. 104th Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd 

1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign " 

Capt. 104th 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Caot. 104th Regiment 

Ensign 45th 

Vol . Light Infantry 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

Lieut. 22nd " 

Capt. 53rd 

Lieut. 22nd " 

Vol . Light Infantry 

1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 



Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Nov. 


3, 


1821 


Mar. 


26, 


1830 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Sept. 


11, 


1827 


Sept. 


11, 


1827 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


Oct. 


23, 


1828 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


July 


4, 


1826 


June 


14, 


1828 


May 


22, 


1829 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Mar. 


2, 


1821 



Sept. 25, 1822 

July 4, 1821 

Oct. 16, 1828 

April 1, 1823 

Oct. 19, 1824 

Mar. 6, 1826 



Oct. 


23, 


1828 


Dec. 


15, 


1828 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


Aug. 


31 , 


1830 


Aug. 


23, 


1823 


Jan. 


28, 


1823 


June 


1, 


1827 


Mar. 


31, 


1821 


Dec. 


15, 


1828 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Dec. 


15, 


1828 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


Aug. 


31, 


1830 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Nov. 


13, 


1826 


Jan. 


2, 


1821 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Mar. 


10, 


1826 


Oct. 


24, 


1828 


June 


19, 


1824 


Oct. 


6, 


, 1824 


Oct. 


8, 


, 1821 



Nov. 16, 1829 
Jan. 24, 1826 



66 



Percy, Thomas 
Perkins, Jesse 
Perkins, John 
Perry, Jesse 
Perry, Thomas 
Philips, Isaac 
Philips, Richard 

Phillips, Davis 

Phillips, Robert 
Phillips, William 
Phillips, William 
Phillips, William 
Pollard, Joseph 
Porterfield, Charles S. 
Potts, Henry 
Powell , Thomas 
Pucket, Woodson 
Puckett, Luke 
Puckett, William S. 
Pugh, Joseph 
Rains, Moses G. 

Ralston, George 
Rankin, Thomas 0, 
Ransom, Alfred 
Ransom, Athelston 
Ransom, Athelston 
Ransom, Henry 
Rati iff, William 
Read, Harmon 
Read, Matthew 
Read, Mordecai 
Read, Solomon 
Ready, William F. 

Reeves, Willie 

Rhodes, Silas 

Ridley, John C. 

Ridley, Moses 

Right, Reuben 
Robbins, Thomas 
Robertson, B. 
Robinson, David J. 
Robinson, Samuel 0. 
Rodgers, John D. 
Rogers, Henry 
Rogers, Obediah V. 
Ross, James 
Ross, M. L. 



1st Lieut. 104th Regiment Sept. 4 
2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment Sept. 10 
Lieut. 22nd Regiment Nov. 8 
1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment Oct. 21 
Ensign 104th Regiment Mar. 23 
1st Lieut. 45th Regiment April 29 
Capt. 45th " June 4 
Vol . Rifle Company 

Ensign 2nd Regiment Nov. 19 
Vol. Riflemen Company 
Ensign 22nd Regiment Jan. 27 
Lieut. " " July 21 

Capt. " " April 5 

1st Major 22nd Regiment Aug. 23 
Lieut. 22nd Regiment July 19 
1st Lieut. 104th Regiment Sept. 4 
1st Lieut. 45th " June 14 
2nd Major 52nd " Aug. 6 
2nd Lieut. 104th " Nov. 16 
Lieut. 22nd Regiment Sept. 15 
1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment July 4 
Ensign 22nd Regiment April 7 
Quarter Master Feb. 10 

45th Regiment 
2nd Major 22nd Regiment 
1st Lieut. 45th 
1st Lieut. " 
Ensign " " 
Lieut. 
Ensign 

Capt. 53rd " 
Ensign 
Ensign 
Ensign 
2nd Lieut. 



22nd 

53rd 
104th " 
Capt. 2nd Regiment 
Company of Riflemen 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
Lieut. 53rd Regiment 
Capt. 22nd 
Lieut. Colonel 

22nd Regiment 
1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Ensign 22nd Regiment 
Ensign " " 
1st Major 22nd Regiment 
Capt. 

1st Lieut. " 
Capt. 

Ensign " " 
2nd Lieut. 53rd 
2nd Lieut. " 



Sept. 12 

April 16 

Oct. 23 

Oct. 28 

April 5 

Aug. 20 

Nov. 19 

Mar. 27 

Sept. 10 

Nov. 19 

Sept. 4 

Oct. 21 

April 16 

June 25 

May 18 

Mar. 14 

Nov. 6 

June 19 

Sept. 2 

Mar. 13 

May 17 

Dec. 2 

April 14 

Feb. 24 

Nov. 19 

Nov. 19 



1830 
1830 
1825 
1829 
1828 
1830 
1825 

1827 

1821 
1823 
1824 
1828 
1825 
1830 
1828 
1821 
1829 
1821 
1826 
1826 
1821 

1821 
1828 
1828 
1823 
1824 
1827 
1827 
1824 
1830 
1827 
1830 
1829 

1822 
1824 
1828 
1821 

1826 
1824 
1826 
1821 
1828 
1830 
1821 
1826 
1827 
1827 



67 



Rowland, Joseph 



Rowse, Richard 

Rowton, Phelemt 

Rozell , John D. 
Rucker, Thomas S. 
Sanders, Cornelius 



Sanders , 


Hale 


Sanders , 


Hiram 


Saunders 


, Isaac 


Saunders 


, John 


Searcy, 


Isham G. 


Seay, Lu 


ke 


Serrat, 


Higdon R. 



Sharp, Edwin 
Sharp, James M. 
Sharp, John M. 
Shepard, Robert 
Shepard, Jilliam 
Short, Theophilus W. 

Shumate, William P. 

Simpson, Peter 
Sims, Leonard 
Sims , Leonard H. 
Sims , Leonard H. 
Smith, Alexander W. 
Smith, Charles G. 0. 
Smith, Charles G. 0, 
Smith, David 
Smi th , Guy 
Smith, James 
Smi th , J ames M . 

Smith, James S. 

Smith, John 
Smith, John, Jr. 
Smith, Robert 

Smith, Robert 

Smi th , Willi am 

Smi th , Wi 1 1 i am 

Smith, William H. 

Smith, Williamson 

Smith, Williamson 



Ensign 45th Regiment 

Murfreesboro Independent 

Volunteers 

2nd Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Vol . Light Infantry 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Vol. Light Infantry Co. 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 

Capt. 104th Regiment 

Ensign 22nd " 

Lieut. 53rd 

Ensign 104th 

2nd Lieut. 22nd " 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

1st Major 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Colonel Commandant 

104th Regiment 
22nd 



Mar. 



Capt. 

Capt. 

Capt. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 



104th 
53rd 

45th 
Vol . Light Infantry 
Lieut. 9th Brigade 
Cavalry Regiment 
Ensign 53rd Regiment 
Ensign 45th 
Capt. " 
1st Major 45th 
2nd Lieut. 22nd 
2nd Lieut. A5th 
Capt. ^5th Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 
1st Lieut. 
1st Lieut. 22nd 
Lieut. Colonel 

22nd Regiment 
Capt. 

Vol. Light Infantry Co. 
Capt. 22nd Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Lieut. Colonel Commandant 
Cavalry Regiment 9th Brigade 
1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 
Capt. 22nd Regiment 
Ensign 45th " 
Lieut. 53rd " 
Ensign 22nd " 
2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 



1 la 1 . 

Mar. 


10, 


1 Ot J 

1826 


Oct. 


8, 


1821 


May 


14, 


1830 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Sept. 


15, 


1821 


Oct. 


19, 


1823 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Nov. 


6, 


1826 


Nov. 


^ 


1826 


Sept. 


24, 


1821 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


July 


2, 


1829 


Nov. 


8, 


1825 


April 


7, 


1826 


Dec. 


26, 


1822 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Aug. 


23, 


1823 


July 


11, 


1823 


Jan. 


19, 


1822 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


April 


5, 


1824 


Oct. 


19, 


1824 


Mar, 


6, 


1826 


May 


14, 


1830 


May 


22, 


1828 


Mar. 


26, 


1830 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


May 


18, 


1827 


April 


7, 


1826 


Jan. 


4, 


1830 


June 


14, 


1828 


Nov. 


6, 


1826 


Feb. 


18, 


1822 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Feb. 


24, 


1826 


Nov. 


13, 


1826 


April 


5, 


1823 


Sept. 


2, 


1826 


June 


14, 


1826 



Smotherman, James 
Sneed, John 
Snell , Hardy 
Snell, Hardy J. 
Spears , Jacob 

Stanfield, Peter 
Stathum, John 
Staton, Elijah W. 
Stewart, Daniel M. 

Stokes , Thomas M. 
Stovall , John A. 
Summars, Absolom 
(Sursa?), John 
Sutfin, Jacob 
Sutfin, Lewis 
Sutton, Golston 
Swink, I^ichael 
Tanner, Colin 
Taylor, David 
Taylor, John 
Tee! , James 
Teneson, Hiram 
Tennison, Hiram 
Tennis on, Hiram 
Terrile, James 
Thomas , John W. 

Thomas, Theodorick W. 
Thompson, George 

Thompson, James 
Thompson, James 
Thorn, Andrew 
Todd, Aaron 
Todd, Aaron 
Todd, James 
Todd , Wi 1 1 i am 
Todd, William J. 
Toiler, Richard 



Tolly, William 
Tray lor, William D. 
Trott, Henry 
Trott, Henry 
Vaden, Lemuel 
Vaughan, John 
Vaughan, William B. 
Vaughn, James W. 
Vaughn, William B. 
Vaught, George 
Vernon, John C. C. 



Ensign 45th Regiment 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 

Capt. 45th Regiment 

Capt. 53rd 

Vol , Riflemen Company 

Capt. 53rd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. ?2nd 

1st Major 104th 

being the 4th Rutherford 

Ensign 53rd Regiment 

2nd Lieut. 53rd " 

Ensign 53rd " 

2nd Lieut. 53rd " 

2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 

Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 

1st Lieut. 53rd 

2nd Lieut. ^5th 

2nd Lieut. 104th 

Lieut. ^5th 

2nd Lieut. 53rd 

Capt. 

1st Major " 

Lieut. Colonel 53rd 

Lieut. 53rd 

Capt. 9th Brigade 

Cavalry Regiment 

Ensign 45th Regiment 

Capt. 2nd Regiment 

Vol . Light Infantry Co. 

Ensign 22nd Regiment 

Ensign " " 

Lieut. " " 

Lieut. 53rd " 

Capt. " 

Capt. " 

2nd Lieut. 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 53rd Regiment 

Ensign 45th 

Murfreesboro Independent 

Volunteers 

104th Reaiment 

22nd 

53rd 



2nd Lieut. 

1st Lieut. 

Ensign 

1st Major 

Ensign 

Ensign 

2nd Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Ensign 



22nd 

104th 

22nd 



104th 
22nd 



Jan. 


6, 


1823 


Dec. 


15, 


1828 


Apri 1 


1, 


1826 


April 


16, 


1828 


Oct. 


6. 


1824 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


Apri 1 


10, 


1829 


Jan. 


31, 


1828 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Aug. 


23, 


1823 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Nov. 


13, 


1826 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Oct. 


6, 


1824 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


June 


25, 


1824 


Apri 1 


4, 


1826 


July 


2, 


1829 


Oct. 


23, 


1824 


July 


19, 


1827 


May 


22, 


1829 


Oct. 


19, 


1823 


Nov. 


19, 


1821 


Apri 1 


5, 


1824 


Sept. 


15, 


1821 


Aug. 


12, 


1822 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Oct. 


23, 


1824 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Nov. 


19, 


1827 


Feb. 


14, 


1822 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


May 


28, 


1830 


April 


5 


1823 


Mar. 


31, 


1824 


Mar. 


11 


1825 


Sept. 


& 


1830 


Nov. 


6 


1826 


Feb. 


25 


1826 


July 


31 


1826 


Sept 


4 


1830 


April 


5 


1824 



69 



Wade, John, Jr. 
Wade, Oziah 
Wade, William 
Wadley, Moses 
Walker, George 
Walker, Samuel 
Walker, William 
Walker, William 
Walker, William 
Walker, William B. 
Walpole, John 
Ward, Burwell 
Warren, Peter 
Warren, Peter 
Warren, Peter 
Warren, Peter 

Warren, Robert 
Washington, George 
Watkins, Hezekiah 



Joseph 
Thomas G. 
Wilson L. 
Wilson L. 



Watkins 
Watkins 
Watkins 
Watkins 
Webb, George 
West, John 
White, Bird 
Whitfield, William 
Whitsett, Joseph 
Whorl ey, John H. 
Whorten, Joseph 
Wilkerson, James 
Wilkerson, John 
Williams, Robert 
Williamson, George W. 
Williford, Samuel 
Williford, Samuel 
Wilson, James 
Wilson, Samuel S. 
Windrow, Byas 
Witherspoon, William 
Witherspoon, William 
Witherspoon, K'infrey 
Wood, John 
Wood, James 
Wood, Owen 
Wood, Owen 
Woods, John 
Woods , John 
Worley, John R. 
Wright, James M. 
Wright, Joseph 



Yandell , William M. 
Youree, Joseph 



Capt. 
Capt. 
Ensign 
2nd Lieut 
2nd Lieut 
Surgeon 



22nd Regiment 



45th Regiment 

53rd 

22nd 

Lieut. 45th Regiment 
Lieut. 22nd 
Capt. 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Capt. 22nd Regiment 
Adjutant 22nd " 
Lieut. " " 
Capt. 

1st Major " 
Colonel Commandant 

22nd Regiment 
2nd Lieut. 22nd " 
2nd Lieut. " 
1st Lieut. 53rd " 
Ensign 22nd Regiment 
Capt. " 

2nd Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
1st Lieut. " 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
Ensign 104th 

1st Lieut. 104th Regiment 
Ensign 53rd Regiment 
Ensign 22nd 
Ensign 53rd " 
1st Lieut. 45th Regiment 
1st Lieut. 104th 
Ensign 45th Regiment 
Ensigh 22nd 
Capt. 104th 
Lieut. 53rd 
Capt. 

2nd Lieut. 104th Regiment 
1st Lieut. 

Ensign 45th Regiment 
Capt. 53rd 
Ensign " " 



Ensign " 
1st Lieut. 
2nd Lieut. 
Ensign 
Lieut. 
1st Lieut. 
1st Major 
Capt. 
Capt. 
Ensign 



45th Regiment 
45th 



53rd 



22nd 



Youree, Joseph 



Vol. Light Infantry Co. 

1st Lieut. 22nd Regiment 
Lieut. Colonel Commandant 

52nd Regiment 
1st Lieut. 53rd Regiment 



Feb. 


19, 


1821 


Apri 1 


10, 


1829 


May 


17, 


1828 


Apri 1 


29, 


1830 


Oct. 


21, 


1829 


July 


4, 


1821 


Oct. 


6, 


1821 


April 


10, 


1822 


Sept. 


4, 


1827 


July 


23, 


1830 


Feb. 


19, 


1821 


Mar. 


5, 


1823 


Sept. 


15, 


1821 


July 


19, 


1825 


Apri 1 


7, 


1826 


Aug. 


23, 


1828 


Nov. 


16, 


1829 


Nov. 


6, 


1826 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Oct. 


16, 


1828 


Jan. 


27, 


1821 


May 


17, 


1828 


May 


14, 


1830 


Nov. 


3, 


1821 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Mar. 


23, 


1828 


Aug. 


25, 


1821 


June 


19, 


1824 


Aug. 


12, 


1822 


Mar. 


20, 


1826 


Sept. 


^ 


1830 


Nov. 


13, 


1826 


May 


28, 


1830 


Sept. 


1, 


1829 


Apri 1 


5, 


1823 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Sept. 


4, 


1830 


Sept. 


20, 


1829 


Jan. 


24, 


1826 


Oct. 


7, 


1826 


Mar. 


27, 


1824 


Mar. 


26, 


1830 


Apri 1 


1 


1826 


Apri' 


20 


1821 


April 


1 


1823 


Dec. 


15 


1828 


Feb. 


21 


1830 


Oct. 


21 


1829 


Nov. 


3 


, 1821 


Sept 


19 


1823 


Sept 


2 


, 1826 


Aug. 


6 


, 1821 



Oct. 21, 1829 



70 

Rock Spring Church of Christ 
By Mrs. Robert W, Gwynne, Sr. 

The history of the Rock Spring Church of Christ is the history of the oldest 
Church of Christ in Rutherford County. The Rock Spring Church, five miles north 
of Smyrna in Rutherford County, Tennessee was organized July 21, 1804 as a Bap- 
tist Church, and on May 5, 1832 the charter was dissolved by a membership vote_^ 
39 to 3^ to become a Christian (Church of Christ) Church, with the two faiths 
alternating use of the building. 

The first meeting place back in 1804 was under a neighboring grove of trees 
where a spring of water came up from under some sandstone, hence, the name Rock 
Spring. 

In the year 1805, Bird Nance represented the Church at the Baptist Con- 
vention and his brother Isaac Nance in 1816 deeded a plot of land for the first 
church building, a log structure. William Nance, Joseph Morton, and John Fulton 
were in charge of constructing the building. This log structure served for a 
number of years until the membership outgrew the quarters. A brick building 
was raised to replace the log structure, the bricks were made on the site, and 
the Church again made another advancement in a growth to two rooms. This building 
also served as a schoolhouse. 

Rock Spring was on the direct route from Nolensville to Jefferson. The 
stage coach would travel by her doors once each week. 

In 1832, the Brethren appointed at the August meeting of the Church the 
following: D. R. Gooch , (bishop) W. W. Nance, (deacon) George Batey, (deacon) 
James Green, and Richard Cook to go to the Tennessee Cooperation Meeting, 
which was held in Murfreesboro, for the purpose of reporting to said convention 
on the condition of the Rock Spring Church. Their report follows: "Rock Spring 
is situated in the west side of Rutherford County about 5 miles from Smyrna. 
In the year of 1832 a majority of the Baptist Church resolved to discard all 
creeds as bonds of Christian union and take the Bible alone as their rule of 



71 



faith and practice. This was done under the labors of Peyton Smith. The distri- 
bution of the Word of God, to the destitute of our own land as well as to other 
lands, is our object greatly to be desired by all Christians and we believe it 
to be the duty of all Christians to aid in this work." 

The manner of worship at Rock Spring was, expressed in its exact form, as 
follows: "The building being shared equally by the Baptist, the first and third 
Lord's days in each month, the Christians meet to worship our Lord and Master, 
read the New Testament, qive thanks to God through our Lord Jesus Christ for the 
many blessings he has conferred on us and ask the continuation of the same. We 
then break the Loaf, partake of the cup, in rememberance of his charge to his 
followers, then contribute to the Lord, by each member, male and female giving 
what he or she may please to the support of the Gospel. This service is performed 
by each person advancing to the table in front of the stand, depositing what they 
may wish in the drawer of the table. We have adopted the plan, not to sing while 
contribution is going on, supposing most in order to one thing at a time, then 
last of all we sing a song and go out. This is our best order of the Gospel plan 
of Worship. We sincerely ask the Brethren to note the errorous of the mode, if 
not according to the Gospel - - for this is what we want to learn." 

The minutes of the Church from its beginning in 1804 were kept in the 
most detailed manner. A description of the entire service, who preached, the 
number of additions, if any, amount of offering, salary of the preachers, 
description of the weather, along with other interesting facts such as the "cost 
of demijohn for carrying wine, one basket for convenience of carrying loaf 
$2.50, 10 yards of bunbiscin for immersion robes $1.25." 

The roll of the Church in 1820 showed 42 white males, 48 white females, 10 
negro males, and 20 negro females members. The negroes were the slaves of the 
whfte members. All of these worshipped together at the same hour, being seated 
in rear of the building and served the Lord's Supper after the white members. 



72 



The Church continued to grow and was the main strength of the community. 
In 1887 the church building was destroyed by a cyclone. The members met in 
homes until a new building could be built. Columbus La Fayette Brittain deeded 
to the Church in 1887 the plot of land where the present frame building now 
stands. Alice Battle surveyed this plot of ground. The building was a large 
one-room structure, 30 feet by 50 feet; 4 big windows on each side and 2 front 
doors. The men would enter from one door and the ladies form the other. The 
men would sit on one side and ladies on the other. There were benches near the 
pulpit on each side known as the "Amen" corners. The "Amens" could be heard to 
ring out loud and clear when a discourse was presented that sounded true to the 
Gospel. The building was heated by a pot-bellied stove and a dedicated member 
would arrive early to build the fire. Records show the cost of this building, 
including a fence surrounding the yard with 2 stiles and 3 horses blocks at a 
cost of $747.00. It took only 7 weeks to construct this building. Other items 
listed from records show - 43 yards of matting - $18.00; walnut tab'>e - $2.50; 
6 perf. chairs - $4.50; 7 lamps - $15.40; 2 silver waiters, 4 cut glass goblets, 
one cut glass decantor - $4.50. This was purchased October 11, 1887 from Hicks, 
Houston & Co. The first store bought benches, (earlier the members brought their 
own chairs) were purchased from William Sutherland & Co. in Nashville for 
$117.00. They were made of solid yellow poplar. Records show that Frances Matilda 
Brittain ("Miss Duck" as she was so affectionately called by those who knew and 
loved her) rode horseback (side saddle, of course) and asked for donations to help 
pay for the new pews. The donations ranged from 5 cents up, mostly under one 
dollar. Brother E. G. Sewell gave to the Church a beautiful large leather bound 
Bible and a Mr. Wharton gave an easel to hold the Bible. The pulpit stand was 
made by Edgefield and Nashville Manufacturing Col. and given to Columbus Brittain 
as a gift to the Church. It was a beautiful piece of furniture. The stoves cost 
$8.50 each, 2 shovels at 10 cents each, 2 pokers at 5 cents each, and 2 scuttles 



73 



at 25 cents each. These articles have long since passed into yesteryears except 
for the pulpit stand which still graces the church and two of the original chairs, 
having an honored place on the pulpit stand after 85 years. 

This Church has seen many events take place during her 140 years. Many 
have knelt to pray in humility to their God, many have confessed Christ as their 
Lord and many, far too many, have forsaken their vows. This Church has seen 
tears of happiness at weddings and tears of grief at the burial of her dead and 
loved ones and great joy at the first glimpse of a new bundle of life. This 
Church has lived to see some six generations enter her doors to worship their 
Master. Her hospitality is unequaled in fellowship; caring for the sick, helping 
a neighbor, whether member or nonmember, encouragement to the weary and most of 
all, to spread the Gospel to all who cared to come her way. Visitors are treated 
as her honored guests. After the bountiful basket dinners were spread on the 
ground, it seemed that there was always more left than was^atenT People came 
from near and far, on foot, horse back, spring wagon or walked just to meet and 
be met at Rock Spring on her homecoming special days. 

Some amusing stories have been handed down through the years. One such 
story goes; a certain wellknown evangelist, E. G. Sewell, was preaching at Rock 
Spring and, at the appointed time, he called on Columbus Brittain to lead the 
congregation in prayer. Brittain, a tall stately man, white hair and long white 
beard, with a most distinct voice, stood and said, "Pray yourself, you are being 
paid to conduct this service." Needless to say Brittain's children, Maggie , John, 
and Frankie were horrified. Another story: There was a big tree stump close to 
the meeting house and, at a given time, there could always be found upwards of 
ten nice size "tobacco chews" deposited until after the meeting (one wondered 
who knew which belonged to whom). Then, there was a promising young lady of the 
community who lost her slip while walking so stately down the aisle one Sunday 
morning. 



74 

This church can be most proud to have had some greats to stand in her pulpit 
such as: Randall Hall, Joshua Spears, W. G. Roulack, S. E. Jones, Tolbert Fanning, 
David Lipscomb, F. B. Srygley, T. B. Lairmore, E. A. Elam, F. W. Smith, E. G. 
Sewell, S. P. Pittman, J. A. Harding, C. M. Pullias, N. B. Hardeman, James E. Scobey, 
and Rock Spring's own native sons, Leonard Jackson and Sam Harris, and many, many 
more. 

This church has always been blessed with capable song leaders who lead the 
congregation in the old time gospel songs. Among the recorded names were: D. R. 
Gooch, Martin Cutchin, George Haynes, Nobel Naron, Andrew Jackson, Grady Haynes 
(son of the above George), Robert Gossett, and David Naron, grandson of Nobel Naron. 

Rock Spring has experienced many changes since its humble beginning. In 
recent years electric lights have replaced the oil lamps, hardwood floors the wide 
pine boards, heating system the stoves, air conditioning the trusted palm-leaf 
fans, individual communion set the decantor and goblets, silver contribution plates 
(given in memory of Frankie Brittain Carter) the hats and wicker baskets, carpets 
the straw matting, running water the everrunning "Rock Spring Branch," along with 
the bucket and dipper. The year 1945 brought another improvement with the addition 
of a much needed porch to the original building and in 1959, another addition, 4 
Sunday School rooms. During the year 1966 there was another great step forward 
with the purchase of new pews for the original benches which had served for 79 
long years and, it might be added, they served extra long and extra hard. The 
cost of the new pews was $2,600.00 which was quite a difference from the price of 
$117.00 paid some 79 years before. History repeats itself for this time a grand- 
daughter of Mrs. Brittain helped with the donations. The year 1968 brought 
another addition: the vestibule, concrete porch, walk, steps, and the most 
useful wrought iron rails made by Elder Warmuth W. Blair. 

Missionary work, financial aid, and the care of orphans always are at the 
top of the budget. The amount the Church sends to mission fields (at home and 



75 



abroad) would make any city congregation take notice. 

The roll of the Church today has dropped and dropped but the church will go 
forward. The leaders, the pastors, and the members have always been faced with 
the problem to regain the disinterested, maintain the attendance, and of competing 
with outside interest that pull members away. There may be less jubilation and 
fewer "Amens" in the Congregation today but the lamp of faith has been kept polished 
and alight in the lives of those gone on before and those who live their Christianity 
in good days and bad days. 

Those who worship at Rock Spring must remember it took hardships, heartbreaks, 
and heartaches of the early settlers to lay the foundation. 



BOOKNOTE 

The 1840 Census is a premier index to Rutherford County's past. 
It was laboriously copied from faded microfilm by Ernest K, Johns, 
assisted by Henry G. Wray, and has now been published. The modest 
price tag of $5.00 for the Census is in line with the Society's policy 
as a non-profit organization to make available historical material at 
cost. 

Copies of the Census may be obtained from 





D. M. Matheny 
1434 Diana Street 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

In ordering, please enclose .25 for each copy to assist in 

defraying mailing costs. 



Bibliographical note: Material for this brief hsitory was taken largely from the 
Record Books of the R ock Spring Church (1804-1860; 1940-1968); and from the Diary 
of Frances Matilda Batey Brittain. 



Membership of the Rock Srping Church 
(From an early entry) 



Male, Colored 
Boss 
Andy 
Jarete 
Harny 
Babe 
Unazean 
Sam 
Wash 
Joseph 
Jessy 
George 
Guy 

Marshall 
Aaron 
Andy 



Female, 


Colored 


Lide 


Jane 


Mariar 
Phi lies 


Margarett 
Esther 


Carl in 

Ginny 

Celia 


Mary 

Polly 

Cilia 


Linda 
Nancy 
Mati 1 do 


Myra 
Mary 


Dolly 
Nancy 
Charlote 




Emily 
Judeth 




Cilia 





OFFICERS OF ROCK SPRING CHURCH OF CHRIST 
1832-1972 



Peyton Smith (B) 
Nathan Williams (C) 
James S. Smith (D) 
Henry Williams (D) 
David R. Gooch, Sr. (B) 
William W. Nance (D) 
Beverly Nelson (C and D) 
John Hill (B and C) 
Nathan Garner (D) 
John Garner (C) 
George Batey (D) 
Columbus L. Brittain (C and 
George W. S. Haynes (S-T) 
David R. Gooch, Jr. (S-T) 



(B) Bishop 

(C) Clerk 

(D) Deacon 

(E) Elder 

(S-T) Secretary - 
Treasurer 



S-T) 



H. A. Alexander (S-T) 
John M. Gooch (S-T) 
Joe Potts (S-T) 
J. W. Mullins (S-T) 
John W. Brittain (S-T) 
Nobel Naron (C) 
Warmuth Blair (C) 
Grady Haynes (C) 
Warmuth Blair (E) 
Grady Haynes (E) 
Tom Irvin (E) 
DeWitt Williams (D) 
Andrew Naron (D) 
W. E. Wood (S-T) 



Ministry Record 
Rock Spring Church of Christ 



Year 
1843 

1844 
1845 
1848 
1849 

1850 
1851 
1875 

1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 





Amount Paid 


James S. Smith 


$ 


,5.00 


Randall Hall 




5.00 


William G. Roulack 




2.56 


Tolbert Fanning 




7.00 


J, C. McQuiddy 




~ 


L. E. Jones 




— 


Tolbert Fanning 




~ 


L. E. Jones 




— 


L. E. Jones 




— 


F. H. Davis 




10.00 


W. F. Todd 




— 


F. H. Davis 




9.95 


John Morton 




6.75 


Elisha Waldron 




4.85 


James Harding 




8.35 


J. W. McGuffey 




7.00 


J. M. Tanksley 




2.90 



77 



1882 B. C. Young $ 6.00 

1883 B. C. Young 8.75 

1884 Elisha G. Sewell 4.35 

1885 J. C. McQuiddy 5.75 

1886 - - Jackson 4.00 

1887 - - Bryant 7.00 

1888 - - Jackson 9.00 

1889 - - - 11.60 

1890 David Lipscomb 8.00 

1891 John Cayce 5.00 

David Lipscomb 50.00 

1892 F. W. Smith 60.00 

1893 James E. Scobey 

David Lipscomb 7.00 

1894 J. C. McQuiddy 5.00 

1895 S. P. Pittman 4.00 

1896 J. A. Harding 7.00 

1897 David Lipscomb 3.45 

1898 Hiram Hooten 3.95 

1899 S. R. Logue 9.00 

- - Ridley 40.00 

1916 Andy Ritchie 40.00 

F. B. Srygley 

1917 Leonard Jackson 

Charlie Taylor 61.00 

1918 F. B. Srygley 63.00 

1919 Dr. J. S. Ward 

L. B. Jones 80.00 

1920 T. Q. Martin 80.00 

1921 Price Billings ley 

H. W. Wrye 78.04 

1922 Clyde Cleaves 

L. B. Jones 65.00 

1923 L. B. Jones 90.00 

1924 L. B. Jones 100,00 

1925 J. S. Batey 

F. B. Smith 70.00 

1926 Ed Cullom 

J. S. Batey 60.00 

1927 Clyde Gleaves 

J. S. Batey 70.00 

1928 J. W. Grant 90.00 

1929 Leonard Jackson 90.00 

1930 Leonard Jackson 125.00 

1931 H. M. Phillip 115.00 

1932 H. M. Phillips 82.81 

Warmuth Peebles 

1933 H. M. Phillip 55.00 

1934 Gilbert Gibbs 65.00 

1935 Gilbert Gibbs 61.00 

1936 Gilbert Gibbs 68.00 

1937 John Rainey 60.00 

1938 J. P. Sanders 90.00 

1939 Ellis Walker 85.00 

1940 Gilbert Gibbs 65.04 

1941 T. W. Brents 100.00 



78 



1942 J. S. Batey $100.00 

1943 Charlie Taylor 117.00 

1944 Gilbert Shaffer 110.00 

1945 Buford Holt 150.00 

1946 Buford holt 165.00 

1947 Gilbert Shaffer 150.00 

1948 Buford Holt 160.00 

1949 Charlie Taylor 150.00 

1950 Gilbert Shaffer 150.00 

1951 Clyde Gleaves 

1952 Gilbert Shaffer 155.00 

1953 Leo Snow 225.00 

1954 Leo Snow 175.00 

1955 Gerald King 

1956 Neal Clevanger 150.00 

1957 Milton Irvin 200.00 

1958 Charlie Taylor 175.00 

1959 Gilbert Shaffer 150.00 

1960 Larimore Austin 150.00 

Lloyd Gaw 

1961 Milton Peebles 150.00 

1962 Leo Snow 150.00 

1963 Gilbert Shaffer 175.00 

1964 J. Garvin Smith 150.00 

1965 Leo Snow 150.00 

Albert Banning 

1966 Gilbert Shaffer 150.00 

Vincent Doan 

1967 Milton Peebles 175.00 

1968 Milton Irvin 

Bart Laws 

1969 Larimore Austin 

1970 Mi Xtonv Peebles 

Freeman Crowder 

1971 Leo Snow 

Freeman Crowder 



ine Church Roll 
1804 - 1832 - 1860 



Male charter 
mem bers of 
(lie church in 
1804 included 
John Fly. 
James Hill, 
William Nance, 
Bird Nance. 
Isaac Nance, 
Balsam Ncw- 
som, A n n a ( 
Philips. James 
Gambel, Rob- 
ert Burton, Jo- 
« h u a Philips, 

William Kjmbro. Jessey Mor- 
ton, Guy McFadden. Wiley 
Harmon, Ezna Jones, David 
Gooch, Nathan Williams. John 
Wiihams, Joseph Williams 
Frederick Oliver. Enoch Davis 
and John Morton. 

Charter female members. 
1804, were Sallv Flv, Nancy 
Nance, Polly Nance, Janie 
Nance, Sussanna Hill. Sussan- 
na Ganibrill, Ann Davis. Eliza 
Harden, Eliza Newsom. Polly 
Harper, FranWey Anthony 
Hanna Philips, Mary Philips 
Nancy Philips, BeUy Burton' 
Polly Smith. Peggy Jones. 
Eliza Kimbro, Mary Williams 
and Rebecca Sect 

Antj. the 111!^ '^TsJ?. mn-^ 
utes include the vote on the 
proposal to dissolve its associa- 
tion with the Baptist Associa- 
tion. Those casting "yea" votes 
were E. G. Courts, S. W. 
Goodman. M. A. McFarren, M. 
D. Goodman. A. E. Courts, 
Jane Gooch. Frances Williams. 
Sentha Sanders. Mary Hamil- 
ton. Mary Smith, E. Sand- 
ford, Sarah Rice, Martha 
Gooch. Tabitha Harmon, E. 
Morton, Sallie Sandford. Ann 
Nevens, B. Hamilton, E. J. 
Todd, Henley Guthers, Eliza- 
beth McFadden, Eliza Mc- 
Fadden. Aclnith Blair. Sisley 
Williams, James Smith, Wil- 
• liam B. Goodman. Nathan 
Williams, William Hamilton. 
John Hall. Jeps Morton. J. H, 
Courts. J. M. Williams, W. L. 
Williams. Wyley Harmon. Wil- 
liam Trenary, William W, 
Nance Jr., R. A. Yancy, C. D. 
Thompson and Crafford Ellis. 
Those casting "no" votes were 
John Gamble. William Nance 
and R. Blair. 

The last meeting recorded in 
this book was in June, 18.36, 
with Nathan Williams as the 
church clerk. 



ChrisLl The membership reus 
for 1836-18K0 will follow here, 
using these abbreviations: 
rbl-reccived by letter; ilbl- 
dismissed by letter; 
i-inimersed, and d-deccased 

The list includes. Jessey 
Motoii, Wm. W. Nance, deacon 
(dbl Nov. 
)8.")0>. Jessey 
Williams. 
James S 
.Smith (dbl 
Nov. 1850 1 . 
John Brittnn 
Sr. (d 18541. 
Wm. P. Book- 
er, Jackson 
Coving ton. 
Samuel Phil- 
pot e . Wm. 
Ross, Geo. Ba- 

tey. John Cooke Sr. (d 1854), 
John W. Richardson. John M. 
Nolan (d?i, W. A. Harvey. 
Joseph Boz, Rufus Bethell 
Payton S a n f o r d. James M. 
Green. Richard Cook' (dbl. 
Oct. 25. 1851), John Briiton 
.Jr., Asa Phelpes, John Dickev, 
Samuel Newsum, Wm. Waldcn, 
C. T. Love (dbl 1848), William 
Coleman (d?i, Svel Walden 
'rbl Sept. 11, 1856), Wm. Ro- 
lach, Henry Williams, David 
R. Gooch, bishop (d March 3, 
18541. 

JOHN HALL, bishop (d?). 
Beverly Nelson, deacon (rbl 
June. 1855). C. Richard David- 
son (rbl 1843), John Garner 
mote from Pete Nance: this is 
grandfather of John Nance 
Garner, former vice president 
of the U.S.), Jackson Oliphant 
(dbl Dec. 3, 1850), Wm. 
Rogers, Robt. Cadwell. David 
Garner, Cary Hill (i 1843), 
Jashway Phelpes, Nathan Gar- 
ner, Wm. W. Britton. Wm. 
Whiteman (dbl June 7, 184fii. 
Richard Savage. — Davis, 
John Hill, Wm. J. Williams. 
John H. Cooke irb! Nov. 1, 
1852), Thos. Cooke (rbl Nov. 1, 
1852), John H. Read. Wm. 
Caldwell. Madison Ross, Jesse 
(Dleman, L. (". Waldcn. Henry 
Britton, Tabitha Gooch, Lucy 
Smith idbl 1850). Hannah M. 
Nelson (rhl 1855). Malinda 
.N'cvins, Patsy Brilloii, Polly 
-Smith 'd?i, Klizabctli Ridlev 
I rbl Nov. 3, 18551, Syrtha 
?^,Tnriprs (d Dec. 31— V Ann 
\ e r n n, Klizabclh Morton, 
.l;ine K Raldride 'dlil Dec. 3. 
III.'iflM. I.iu-inil.i llrmlruh ui/i, 
Elizabrlli N.ince Ul '.'i. 

M.iry Cuokf id Dec 26, 
IHtiOi, N.incy (ircpnin>. Mary 
Oliphant mI'i, l,u<cy Cncik 
M.iry (', M.ilhurs, Lucuid.'i 
( lilcinan, Agu.sta Hichanlsun, 



Polly Nolin. Cisiley Smith, 
Elizabeth Balhell (d Aug. 
1858 1. Darindd Sanford, Lucy 
Gambill, Elizabeth Green. 
Nancy C. Austin, Unity Cook 
(dbl Oct. 25, 18.',] I. Sarjh Ann 
Phelpes (rbl Oct. 27, 1857', 
Francis Newsum. Nancy Wal- 
den, Elizabeth Rolach, Conne- 
Icy Walden, Marth.n Crocetter 
(rbl Nov. 3, 18551, Nancy 
Phillpot, Cyrcna i'hcphcard, 
Judy Pursele (rbl 1845), — 
Conley. Rebecca Ncusum, Co- 
line Hall (d Dec. 1844). 

LUCENDA BOZ, Jane Hill (i 
1843), Dclcla Mah^in 'rbl J846, 
Sarah Oliphant irbl Dec. 3. 
1850), Nancy Mitchell 'd?). 
Polley Garner. Margarete Da- 
vidson. Mrs. Joshway Phclph. 
Mary Gin^avy. Harritc B. 
Booker, Marthey Ann Britton, 
Mary Ann Nance, Mary Jane 
Britton. Theodica B. Nance 
(dbl 1850), Eliza Smiili (dbl 
Dec. 1850). Margaret Freeman 
(dbl Jan. 19, 18.50), M. P. lliil, 
Lourany Cooke (dbl Dec. 20. 
185L), Susan P. Smith (dbl 
Nov. 3, 1850), Elizabeth P. 
Garner, Ann C. Ross, .Marv A. 
Booker. Ester Williams. M'. D. 
Cooke (dbl Dec. 20. 1851). 
Lucinda Austin, Elizabeth Lov- 
cl. Paralee Walden (rbl Sept 
11, 1856). Louisa Batey idbl 
Oct. 1853;, Adelia Lillard. 
Mary H. Hardin. Louisa Conly. 
Frances M. Hazelwood. Emi- 
Jv Caldwell, Alinira Roberli 
.dbl Nov. 3, 18.50', .Mari^recia 
Savage, Lucinda Nance irbl 
Nov. 3. 1850). Elizabeth Harris. 
Elizabeth Bennett. Eliza J. 
Harris, Elizabeth Coleman, 
Elizabeth Smith idbl Nov. 3, 
1850), S. Cooke. E. Cooke irbl 
Nov. 1. 1852). L. Ann Havnes, 
Fran B. Beaty, — Hill, Pricilla 
Mitchell li Oct. 8. 1851), M«ry 
Elder (i Oct. 1851', .Margare! 
Hazelwood (i Aug. 2. 1852), 
Miss Perry li Aug. 2, 185-.;), 
l\Iiss Eskridge (i Aug. 2. 1852), 
Leak Mullins. Kliza Ca\itt •! 
Oct. 3. 1852), Elizabeth Leak 
(rbl Nov. 18.521, Marv E. 
Gooch, Elizabeth Leak Jr. (rbl 
May 8. 18,53.'. Marsaret Mul- 
lins I rbl May 8 1853). Sarah 
Dove (rbl 1853), Louisa Mullins 
irbl 1853), Virginia Burl (rbl 
18,53), Nancy Walden uhl 
18531. Ann McQucddy ubl 
18.53). 

MARV BRKWKR 1 1 bl 18.3', 
M.nriha g. Phillpul irbl Oct ;3, 
18.531, Isadora H. Wnlrion, 
Domariiis H, W.ilde MV'aldcn ' i. 
Ann L. Womiiulf, uhl March. 
111541. E Konne.v irbl 1K,>;)|. 
Emily Cook ii Aug , ;h.i4i, 
Margaret .Spear Mbl !)(»c 24. 
18.54'. S>!irab K. Narin rl>' July 
IH. 1H.55I, Marth.i A. Culeman 
III)! July 18, 18.5,5 . and ^. A. 
Spoer (rbl March 26, l«.55i. 



79 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEMBERSHIP LIST 
AS OF JUNE 30. 1974 ' 



1. Mr. John P. Adams 
Route 4 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

2. Mrs. John P. Adams 
Route 4 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*3. Mrs. W. D. Adkerson 
Compton Road 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

4. Mrs. W. R. Baker 
Box 245 

Ashland City, TN 37015 

5, Mr. Haynes Baltimore 
302 Haynes Drive 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*6. Mr. Robert Baskin 
801 E. Lytle 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

7. Mr. Robert T, Batey 
Route 1, Box 44 
Nolensville, TN 37135 

*8. Mr. Fred W. Brigance 
1202 Scottland 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*9. Mrs. Fred W. Brigance 
1202 Scottland 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

10. Mrs. Lida N. Brugge 
714 Chickasaw Road 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

11. Mr. J. D. Carmack 
1707 Herald Lane 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

12. Mrs. J. D. Carmack 
1707 Herald Lane 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

13. Mr. Steve Cates 
1417 Poplar Avenue 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



14. Miss Louise Cawthon 
534 E. College 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

15. Mr. Almond Chaney 
Sanford Road 
LaVergne, TN 37086 

*16, Mrs, George Chaney 
P.O. Box 114 
LaVergne, TN 37086 

17. Mr. James L. Chrisman 
2728 Sharondale Court 
Nashville, TN 37215 

18. Mrs, James K. Clayton 
525 E. College 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

19. Dr. Robert Corlew 
Manson Pike 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

20. Mrs. A. W. Cranker 
305 Tyne 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

21. Mrs. Florence Davis 

Old Nashville Hwy., Rt. 2 
Smyrna, TN 37167 

22. Mrs. R. V. Dixon 
321 Haywood Lane 
Nashville, TN 37211 

23. Mrs. Moulton Farrar, Jr. 
502 Park Center Drive 
Nashville, TN 37205 

24. Mrs. James D. Ford 
2143 Emily's Lane 
Falls Church, VA 22043 

25. Miss Myrtle Ruth Foutch 
103 G Street, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20024 

26. Mr. John H. Fox 

1018 Northfield Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



80 



27. 



28. 



29. 



30. 



*31. 



32. 



33. 



34. 



35. 



*36. 



*37. 



*38. 



*39. 



Mr. Ken L. Goad 
717 N. Church St. 
Murfreesboro, TN 



37130 



Mr. Robert T. Goodman 
202 N. Academy Street 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mrs. Robin Gould 

2900 Connecticut Avenue 

Washington, D.C. 20008 

Mrs, Robert Gwynne 
Brittaln Hills Farm 
Rock Springs Road 
Smyrna, TN 37167 



Miss Mary Hall 
821 E. Burton 
Murfreesboro, TN 



37130 



Mr. John L. Heath 

Box 146 

LaVergne, TN 37086 

Miss Adelaide Hewgley 

Route 3 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mrs. Eulalia J. Hewgley 

Route 3 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mrs. B. K. Hibbett, Jr. 
2160 Old Hickory Blvd. 
Nashville, TN 37215 

Mr. Walter King Hoover 
101 Division 
Smyrna, TN 37167 

Mr. Robert S. Hoskins 

310 Tyne 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mrs. Robert S. Hoskins 

310 Tyne 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mr. C. B. Huggins, Jr. 
915 E. Main 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



40. Dr. James K. Huhta 

507 E. Northfield Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

41. Mr. Norman F. Hutchinson 
410 Apollo Drive 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

42. Dr. Ralph Hyde 
Box 234, MTSU 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*43. Mr, Ernest King Johns 
Jefferson Pike 
Smyrna, TN 37167 

44, Mr, Thomas N. Johns 
501 Mary Street 
Smyrna, TN 37167 

*45. Mrs. Buford Johnson 
109 Chestnut Street 
Smjnma, TN 37167 

46, Mr, Homer Jones 

1825 Ragland Avenue 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*47. Mr, Robert B, Jones, III 
819 W, Northfield Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*48, Dr, Belt Keathley 

1207 Whitehall Road 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*49, Mrs. Belt Keathley 
1207 Whitehall Road 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

50. Miss Adeline King 

Cambridge Apartments 
1506 18th Avenue, South 
Nashville, TN 37212 

*51. Mr. W, H, King 

2107 Greenland Drive 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*52. Mrs. W, H. King 

2107 Greenland Drive 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



81 



*53. Mr. George Kinnard 67. 

Route 1 
LaVergne, TN 37086 

*54. Mrs, George Kinnard 68. 

Route 1 
LaVergne, TN 37086 

55, Mrs, Louise G. Landy 

1427 South Madison 69. 

San Angelo, Texas 76901 

56, Mr. Albert D, Lawrence 

225 McNlckle Drive *70. 

Smyrna, TN 37167 

*57. Mr. William C. Ledbetter, Jr. 

115 N. University 71. 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

58. Mr. T. Vance Little 

Beech Grove Farm 72, 

Brentwood, TN 37027 

59. Mrs. Louise G. Lynch 

Route 5 73. 

Franklin, TN 37064 

*60. Mrs. Dorothy Matheny 

1434 Diana Street #74. 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

61. Mr. T. Edward Matheny 

102 Park Circle 75. 

Columbia, TN 38401 

62. Mrs. James H. McBroom, Jr. 

Route 2, Box 131 *76. 

Christiana, TN 37037 

*63. Mr. Ben Hall McFarlln 

514 E. Lytle 77. 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*64. Mrs, Ben Hall McFarlln 

514 E. Lytle 78. 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

65. Mrs. Luby H. Miles 

Monroe House, Apt. 601 *79. 

522 - 21st St., N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20006 

66. Mr. Donald E. Moser 80. 
1618 Rlvervlew Drive 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



Mr, Eugene R, Mull Ins 
2400 Sterling Road 
Nashville, TN 37215 

Mrs. David Naron 
Rock Springs Road 
Route 1 
LaVergne, TN 37086 



Mr. John Nelson 
Route 4 
Murfreesboro, TN 



37130 



Mr. Lawson B. Nelson 
13812 Whispering Lake Dr, 
Sun City, Arizona 85351 

Dr. Joe Edwin Nunley 
305 2nd Avenue 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mrs. James L. Parsley 

Route 1 

Muiffreesboro, TN 37130 

Mr. Charles C. Pearcy 

LaVergne 

TN 37086 

Mr. Dean Pearson 
414 Ross Drive 
Smyrna, TN 37167 

Mr. Walt Pfeifer 
633 Glenhaven 
Abilene, Texas 79603 

Dr, Homer Pittard 

309 Tyne 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mr. Bobby Pope 
Old U.S. 41 
LaVergne, TN 37086 

Mr. A. C. Puckett, Jr. 
Mason Circle 
LaVergne, TN 37086 

Mr. Robert Ragland 

Box 544 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

Mrs. Robert Ragland 

Box 544 

Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



81. Mr. Sam Ridley 
Box 128 

Smyrna, TN 37167 

82. Mr. Knox Ridley 
Box 128 

Smyrna, TN 37167 

83. Mr. Granville S. Ridley 
730 E. Main 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

84. Mrs, James A. Ridley, Jr. 
Lebanon Pike 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

85. Mr. Billy E. Rogers 
506 Jean Drive, Route 2 
LaVergne, TN 37086 • 

*86. Mrs. Elvis Rushing 
604 N. Spring 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*87. Miss Racheal Sanders 
1311 Greenland Drive 
Apartment D-1 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*88. Miss Sara Lou Sanders 
1311 Greenland Drive 
Apartment D-1 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

89. Mr. John F. Scarbrough, Jr. 
701 Fairview 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

90. Dr. R. Neil Schultz 
1811 Jones Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

91. Mrs. J. A. Sibley, Sr. 
2007 Cloverdale Avenue 
Baton Rouge, LA 70808 

92. Mr. William A. Shull, Jr. 
4211 Ferrara Drive 
Silver Springs, MD 20906 

*93. Mr. Gene H. Sloan 

728 Greenland Drive 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



82 
94. Colonel Sam W. Smith 
318 Tyne 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*95. Miss Dorothy Smotherman 
1220 N. Spring Street 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

*96. Mr, Travis Smotherman 

6565 Premier Drive, Apt A-1 
Nashville, TN 37209 

97. Mrs. E. C. Stewart 
4200 Old Mill Road 
Alexandria, VA 22309 

98. Mr. Allen J. Stockard 
1330 Franklin Road 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

99. Mrs. Robert Mac Stone 
921 Westview Avenue 
Nashville, TN 37205 

100. Stones River DAR 
Smyrna 

TN 37167 

101. Mrs. Doug Stroop 
Hidden Acres, Apt 1 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

102. Mr. Roy E. Tarwater 
815 W. Clark Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

103. TN State Library & Archives 
Nashville 

Tennessee 37219 

104. Mr. Mason Tucker 
Route 6, Elam Road 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

105. Mrs. Einmett Waldron 
Box 4 

LaVergne, TN 37086 

106. Mr. Roy L. Waldron 
Route 2 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

107. Mr. Vester Waldron 
LaVergne 

Tenn. 37086 



83 



108. Mrs. Vester Waldron 
LaVergne 
Tenn. 37086 

#109. Mr. Bill Walkup, Jr. 
202 Ridley Street 
Smyrna, TN 37167 

110. Mr. William T. Walkup 
202 Ridley Street 
Smyrna, TN 37167 

111. Mrs. P. H. Wade 

1700 Murfreesboro.Road 
Nashville, TN 37217 

112. Mrs. George F. Watson 
Executive House, B-17 
Franklin, TN 37064 

*113. Mayor W. H. Westbrooks 
305 Tyne 
Murf reesboro , TN 37130 

114. Mrs. W. H. Westbrooks 
305 Tyne 

Murf reesboro, TN 37130 

115. Miss Kate Wharton 
101 Murfreesboro Road 
Woodbury, TN 37190 

116. Miss Virginia Wilkinson 
1118 E. Clark Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 

117. Mr. W. H. Wilson 
1011 Sawyer Drive 

Murf reesoboro , TN 37130 

*118. Mr. Henry G. Wray 
104 McNickle Drive 
Smyrna, TN 37167 



* Charter Members 

# Junior Members 



DATE DUE 



V 





DATE DUE 




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M T S U LIBRARY 



3 3082 00527 4575 

976.857 

R931p 

V.3 



75-11514 



Rutherford County Historical 



Society Publication N. 3 
Summer 1974 



\ 



LIBRARY 

MIDDLE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY 

MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE