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fl T S U LIBRARY 



^3J082^0^27^7i31^pp COUNTY 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



PUBLICATION NO. 13 




Sketch By Jimmy Mathen^ 
TENNESSEE COLLEGE: 1 907 - 1946 




SPRING 1979 
MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE 37130 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication13ruth 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 13 
July, 1979 



The Cover- Tennessee College was built in 1907 
and closed in 1946. Many young women became 
teachers at this campus on East Main Street in 
Murfreesboro , Tennessee. The site is now used by 
Central Middle School. James Matheny of Murfreesboro 
did the cover using some old photographs of the 
college. 



Published by 
Rutherford County Historical Society 
Murfreesboro , Tennessee 



THANKS - To Rutherford County Executive Ben Hall 
McFarlin, Susan Jones and Mrs. Ladelle S. Craddock 
for their assistance in preparing Publication No. 1 3 
for printing. 



^''/f. 



V. r. 



ROTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 13 

Published by the 
RUTHERFCRD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



President Mr. Robert Ragland 

Vice-President Mr. William Walkup 

Recording Secretary Miss Louise Cawthon 

Corresponding Secretary and Treasurer Mrs. Kelly Ray 

Publication Secretary Mr. Walter K, Hoover 

Directors Dr. Robert B. Jones 11" 

Mrs. Dotty Pgtty 
iMiss Aurelia Holdt-n 

Publication No. 13 (Limited Edition-350 copies) is distributee^ 
to members of the Society. The annual membership dues is $5.00 
(Family-$7,00) which Includes the regular publications and '-he 
monthly NEWSLETTER to all members. Additional copies of 
Publication No, 13 may be obtained at ?3,50 per copy. 

All correspondence conceminc additional copjes, c--»ntribu- 
tions to future issues, and membership should be addressed to: 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

Box 906 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



FOR SALE 

THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATICNS ARE FOR SALE by: 

The Rutherford County Historical Society 

Box 906 

Murf reesboro, Tennessee 37130 

Publications # 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 8 OUT OF PRINT 

publication # 6: Link Community, LaVergne, Fellowship 

and the Sanders family $3.00 +$1.00 postage 

Publication # 7: Hopewell Church, Petition by Cornelius 

Sanders for Rev. War Pension $3.00 +$1.00 postage 

Publication # 9: History of Dilton $3.50 +$1.00 postage 

Publication #10: 1854 Diary, Peter Jennings, Henderson 
Yoakum, Early Methodist Church, and 
Overall family $3.50 +$1.00 postage 

Publication #11: State Capitol, Ben McCulloch, Petition 
of Michael Lorance, A country Store, 
and Soule College-- $3.50 +$1.00 postage 

Publication #12: History of Sewart AFB, Goochland 

and Will Index $3.50 +$1.00 postage 

1840 Rutherford County Census with Index $5.00 +$1.00 postage 

Deed Abstract of Rutherford County 180 3-1810 $10.00+$1.00 postage 

GRIFFITH : Illustrated bi-centennial publication — $2.00 +$1.00 postage 

COMMEMORATIVE PLATES: 

Plate # 2: Tennessee College in Murf reesboro $5.00 +$1.00 postage 

Plate # 3: Rutherford County Courthouse, 1900 $5.00 +$1.00 postage 

Available from: William Walkup, 202 Ridley St, Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Rutherford County Map 1878, shows land owners — $3.50 +$1.00 postage 

CEMETERY RECORDS of Rutherford County: 

Vol. 1: Northwestern third of county and part of 

Wilson and Davidson Counties, 255 cemeteries 

with index and maps $10.00+$1.00 postage 

Vol. 2: Eastern third of Rutherford and the western 
part of Cannon County, 241 cemeteries with 
index and maps $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Vol. 3: Southwestern third of Rutherford County, 193 

cemeteries with index and maps $10.00+$1.00 postage 

ALSO AVAILABLE from: Mrs. Fred Brigance 1202 Scottland Drive, 

Murf reesboro, Tennessee 37130 
Marriage Records of Rutherford County 

1851-1872 $10.00 — NO postage 



A NEW SPECIAL PUBLICATION 
BY THE 
RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

AN INDEX TO 
PUBLICATIONS 1-5 

by 
Dotty Matheny Patty 



The first five publications issued by the Ruther- 
ford County Historical Society were not indexed. Mrs. 
Patty compiled this index for the Society and. 100 
copies were printed. This index is for sale at $5.00 
per copy plus $1.00 for postage. 



FCRWARD 
TENNESSEE HISTORY IN JEOPARDY 

In recent months leaders of a National Association have 
made the following statement "A page of Tennessee's history 
should be torn out and thrown away". They were referring to 
the Confederate States of America and the part Tennessee and 
her people played in the War Between the States. 

These same people, since President Kennedy, have had the 
best given them, all at the taxpayers expense. They are now 
trying to dictate what history should be. 

With some of omt weaker politicians and do-gooders they 
might succeed in destroying all the artifacts, paintings, and 
sculpture that honor our great leaders of Tennessee. 

It is up to Tennesseans, lilce ourselves, to see that this 
does not happen. That history shall remain true and a building 
block for the future. That no group of malcontents, large or 
small, shall have the right to destroy any part of Tennessee's 
great history. 

ROBERT A. RAGLAND 



TABLE OF CCNTENTS 



Hallo'wed Tradition Marked Tennessee College 
by Eugene Sloan 



Tennessee College Alumnae Association 

by Eugene Sloan 31 



The Coleman Scouts 

by Mabel Pittard 46 



The New Monument in Old Cit y Cemetery 

by Julia Clarice Miller 55 



P etition of James Bole for Revolutionar y 
War Pension 

By Edna Fry 7 2 



Index of Publication Number 13 77 



List of Members of Rutherford County Historical 
Society 



HALLOWED TRADITIOt^S MARKED TENl^ESSEE COLLEGE 
by 
Eugene H. Sloan 

The third school to be established by the Baptists of 
Tennessee was Tennessee College, later known as Tennessee 
College for Women in Murf reesboro. It was authorized by 
the Southern Baptist Convention in 1905 and opened in 1907 
as a response to what was felt to be a need for a school 
for women, under Christian control, of high grade and with 
honest standards. The ideal of its founders was to offer 
the very best educational advantages under positive Christian 
influences. The site selected was property of Union University 
on East Main Street supplemented by large monetary donations 
made by the citizens of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County. 

The property on which Tennessee College was placed had 
been purchased from M. B. Murfree by the Board of Trustees of 
Union University in 1845. At the removal of Union University 
the property had, after some uncertainty, remained m the hands 
of the Union University trustees in Murfreesboro. 

By-laws were adopted for twenty- seven directors to be 
known as trustees. The officers of the board were C. R. Byrn, 
president; C. S. Smith, Vice-president: Leland Jordan, secretary: 
and R. W. Hale, treasurer. All trustees selected were to be 
members of Missionary Baptist Churches. An executive committee 
was to attend to immediate business during the year. Between 
the time of the selection of this first board and the laying 
of the corner stone on September 6. 1906, titles to property 
were cleared and a charter was drawn. 

In the fall of 1906, George J. Burnett and J. Henry Burnett 
signed a contract as president and business manager, r e^ pec*- 1 vel y 



2 

of Tennessee College. These two men came from Liberty College 
in Kentucky where they had been held in esteem. The incorpora- 
tors filed for a charter on December 18, 1905. Listed as 
incorporators were C. K. Byrn. R. Walter Hale, William, T. Hale. 
Jr., Leland Jordan. Edward S. Reeves. E. T. Rion. Gentry S. 
Smith, and John Williams. When the Board of Trustees was 
organized December 19. 1905. Byrn was elected president, C. H. 
Smith, vice-president; R. W. Hale, treasurer: and Leland 
Jordan, secretary. 

Byrn was a native of Milton, but had long been identified 
with the hardware business in Murfreesboro and was a deacon in 
First Baptist Church. He was described as an "indefatigable 
worker" for Tennessee College until his death m 1929. A 
tradition of Tennessee College was established by the Byrn 
famiily. At the time of graduation each senior was presented a 
Bible so "a graduate may leave the stage with a Bible m one 
hand and a diploma in the other." 

Gentry S. Smith was a Murfreesboro business man. for fif*:y 
years a deacon m a Baptist Church, a trustee of the Bap+-ist 
Orphanage and a Colonel on the staff of Republican Governor 
Hooper. 

Leland was a Murfreesboro lawyer who had handled r-^uch -^f 
the laborious work of clearing the land title. He also pr^^cured 
from the Federal government compensation for use of t:-.e Un:>ir. 
College property by Union troops in the Civil War. 

R. W. Hale of Nashville was a ^-rustee and trea-urer C'i t'.'e 
board from 1907 until 1927 and vice-president 1 rom 1929 ;r,* ; 1 
1938. He was a member of the committee which, locafer Ten'-.e'^ . - -■ 
College in Murfreesboro. A native of Statesville ;:£ sr.d : •. 



3 

brother, W. T. Hale, Jr., made the first donation to the college. 
R. W. Hale was a graduate of Union University and W. T. Hale 
of Vanderbilt. Both were prominent members of Immanuel Baptist 
Church in Nashville and active in a variety of activities includ- 
ing serving on the Board of the Tennessee Central Railway. 

Other members of the first Board of Trustees were all 
prominent religious leaders, many of whom had achieved distinc- 
tion in the business and professional areas. 

The Board membership in addition to the officers included: 
R. R. Acree, Lansing Burrows, E. L. Davis, E. E. Polk, P.T. 
Hale, W. T. Hale, Jr., A. J. Holt, R. E. Jarman, M. D. Jeffreys, 
Howard L. Jones, F. N. Moore, I. N. Penick, T. S. Potts, Edward 
S. Reaves, E. T. Rion, W. H. Ryalls, F. N. Smith, John W. Thomas, 
A. L. Todd, I. J. VanNess, C. B. Waller, John Williams, and 
J. S. Williams. Of these, seven were Rutherford County residents. 
Two brothers, George Jackson Burnett and J. Henry Burnett were 
members of the college staff. 

George Jackson Burnett served the institution as president 
from June 5, 1907 until June 30, 1923. A native of Auburn, 
Kentucky, he had served as president of Liberty College in 
Glasgow, Kentucky for many years and was president of the 
Tennessee Baptist Convention and vice-president of the Southern 
Baptist Convention. 

J. Henry Burnett, general manager, was also a native of 
Auburn, Kentucky. After fifteen years work with the Western 
Recorder of Louisville, he served as business manager of Liberty 
College, Richmond Virginia College, and four years as business 
manager for Mercer University. After leaving the Tennessee 

College Board in 1916. he was associated with the Calumet Tea 



4 

and Coffee Conpany, of which he became a vice-president in 
1922. Long active as a Sunday School superintendent, clerk, 
and deacon of Baptist churches he served 22 years as secretary 
of the Tennessee Baptist Convention. 

Among the trustees from Rutherford County represented a 
wide range of interest. They included R. E. Jarman, the Rev. 
Edward S. Reaves, E. T. Rion, John W. Thomas, Andrew L. Todd, 
John Williams, and James C. Williams. 

R. W. Jarman of Lascassas served as a member of the Board 
of Trustees for the organization until his death in 1936. Mr. 
Jarman was a successful farmer and business man, operating 
automobile and hardware firms in Georgia. 

Edward S. Reaves was pastor of First Baptist Church in 
Murfreesboro and the spokesman before the Baptist Education 
Commission for the establishment of the College in Murfreesboro. 
He served as a Board member until he left Murfreesboro in 1906. 
E. T. Rion, a Murfreesboro insurance man who served First 
Baptist Church as Sunday School Superintendent and deacon, was 
an incorporator of the College and served on its executive 
committee for ten years. 

John W. Thomas was a native of Murfreesboro and a graduate 
of Vanderbilt University. He began working with the N. C. and 
St. L. Railroad as an engineer in 1878 and ultimately advanced 
to the presidency and general manager of the company in 1906. 
Andrew L. Todd became a member of the Board when it was 
organized and served as chairman from 1929 until 1937. Educated 
at Union University, the University of the South, and Cumber- 
land University, he served in the House of Representatives, the 
State Senate and as a member of the State Board of Education 



5 
through four administrations. He was chairman of the Board 
of Deacons of the Murfreesboro First Baptist Church. While 
in the Tennessee General Assembly he served as Speaker of both 
the Senate (1919) and the House (1921). 

John Williams served as secretary of the Board from 1910 
until 1924. He was a Murfreesboro lumber dealer and later 
established a building materials business in Tampa, Florida 
and Nashville, Tennessee. 

The charter for Tennessee College was granted by the State 
of Tennessee on December 18, 1905. The trustees were immedi- 
ately faced with difficulties. They found the old Union 
University buildings were in such deterioration they could 
not be used. There was a lien of $3,000 on the property that 
was discharged from funds subscribed by the citizens of Murfrees- 
boro. There remained $23,159 of the subscription which was 
increased by an issue of $40,000, 6 per cent interest bonds, to 
be liquidated over a 10-year period. According to the Minutes 
of the Tennessee Baptist Convention of 1906, the trustees re- 
quested permission to raise $65,000 in funds for a new building 
and furnishings. 

On September 11, 1907, the new Tennessee College Building 
was dedicated. E. Y. Mullins, president of the Southern 
Baptist Seminary in Louisville, delivered the address. In his 
remarks Dr. Mullins stated: "The newest and most approved and 
noblest ideas of educational philosophy now accepted are nothing 
less, and nothing more than what Baptists, as a denomination, 
are pledged to endorse and to put into practice by the funda- 
mental principles of their faith." 



6 

In 1908 an $8,500 addition to the original structure was 
completed. This included a 32 by 50 gymnasium and six class- 
rooms for elementary pupils. 

The first faculty, as were subsequent additions, was chosen 
with great emphasis on Christian character, culture, and educa- 
tion. In the early years the faculty included graduates of 
Radcliffe, Mount Holyoke, Wellesley, the University of Chicago, 
Vassar, Columbia University, Oberlin College, the University of 
Wisconsin, Vanderbilt, and the University of Texas. 

In addition to the Burnett brothers, the first faculty and 
administrative staff included Miss M. E. Lindsay as "lady 
principal:" W. E. Everett, secretary: A. C. Davidson, Miss Rena 
M. Hall, Miss Winfred T. Moore, Miss Willie Tabb Moore, Mrs. 
Nellie B. Lowe, Harry Brown, Miss Lelia G. Russell, Mrs. Walter 
Drake, Mrs. J. K. Marshall, Miss Annie Strader, Henry H. Nast, 
Mrs. George J. Burnett, Mrs. Nettie Davidson Jones, Miss Corrine 
Sedberry and Miss Anne S. Davis. The impressive curriculum in- 
cluded philosophy, psychology, political science, natural science, 
classical languages, music and art. 

The first year 199 students were enrolled. Of these, 131 
were boarding students. At that time, the school had an elemen- 
tary department, a four-year "Preparatory School," the College and 
the Conservatory. 

Admittance to the college for the first year was on the 
basis of completion of two years in a high school or academy. 
Examination on entrance or a certificate from the principal of 
the school was required. 



7 
The first five years saw, not only a maintenance of stand- 
ards, but an increase in enrollment, facilities, and courses in 
instruction. 

In March 1909, the Board of Trustees passed a reolution 
that "the object or ideal of Tennessee College is the estab- 
lishment and development of a college for higher education of 
women." A canpaign for $150,000 was launched to raise an 
endowment . 

At the close of the year 1909-10, a definite change in 
the work offered by the college was recommended to the Board of 
Trustees. There was discussion of dropping the elementary 
deaprtment. More irr^ortant, however, was the decision to offer 
an additional year of college work and thereby complete the 
A. B. course. President Burnett felt this step to be urgent 
since high school principals preferred recommending a four year, 
accredited college to their graduates. As a result of this 
revised curriculum, the Bulletin of 1910-11 carried the announce- 
ment that "Tennessee College will confer the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts upon any student who satisfactorily completes the course 
of study outlined below." 

School Publications - Traditions 

One of the earliest extant publications of the school is a 
copy of the fourth edition of Volume II of the Tennessee College 
Magazine dated June 1909. This 6x9 literary effort bound in 
grey, contained 58 pages. It included: an original article on 
the Barbizon Artists, by Willie Bumpas: "A Girl of the Middle 
West," by Jural Couey, a post Victorian love vignette. Inter- 
spersed throughout the magazine were quotations from numerous 
Wordsworth's "Rustic Life in Wordsworth's Poetry." 



8 

In this issue of the magazine, an editorial reported that 
there were 19 college students and 115 preparatory students the 
first year the college operated. In the second year there were 
48 college, 139 preparatory, 50 elementary, and 13 special students. 

Students who received the Associate Arts degree during this 
second year of operation were: Winnie Bumpass, Brownsville; 
Grace Dean, Wartrace: Georgia Cunningham, Lewisburg; Mary Forgy, 
Springfield. Anne Eades of Paducah, Ky., and Sarah Byrn, of 
Murf reesboro, received the "Junior College diploma." Gladys 
Young of Watertown and Evalie George Martin of Birmingham. Ky., 
received "diplomas in music." Lemma Drake of Lewisburg was 
granted a "certificate in music." 

Each of the Associate of Arts degree winners "read an essay 
in regular morning exercises" as a partial fulfillment of the 
degree requirements. Misses Young and Martin appeared in graduate 
recital. After the recital, they "received their friends in 
parlors and were the recipients of many gift bouquets." 

It was this year of 1908-09 that May 7 was established for 
the May Day fete. A description of this initial May Day indicated 
that characters from Robin Hood dominated the pagentry that 
named Gladys Young as Queen. 

There were four major piiblications at Tennessee College — 
THE TENNESSEANN, THE DRYAD, The TENNESSEE COLLEGE MAGAZINE and 
the annual College Bulletin. 

Perhaps the one of more important publications of literary 
and lasting value was the quarterly college magazine. The major 
division of each of these editions included an editorial, "News 
Notes," and exchange critique of other college publications and 
a collection of essays, short stories and poetry. 



9 

These quarterlies are the best source of information about 
the routine activities of the College, the subtle modification 
of life style, interests, and ambitions of students. The 
TENNESSEANN carried factual stories. The Dryad recorded the 
usual memorabilia that characterizes all such yearbook 
publications. 

In 1909 the reportial enphasis was on musical concerts, 
soirees, a minstrel performance, a visit of the Fisk Jubilee 
Singers, May Day and art exhibitions. 

In the 1920' s there were more teas, buffet luncheons, 
movie parties and a visit by the Mercer University Mandolin Club. 
The report of simultaneous debates between Union University and 
Tennessee College on the United States entry into the League 
of Nations was reported. Tennessee College women (Ethel Childers 
and Mildred Dodson-negative) ; (Elizabeth Leigh and Rose Goodman, 
affirmative) were successful on both sides of the issue. 

By the late 1920 's and early ' 30 ' s more emphasis was being 
placed on sports. Thanksgiving Day attendance at Vanderbilt or 
"local college" football games, more sophisticated musical con- 
certs and variety of reports on meeting the exigencies of the 
depression were featured. 

There appeared stories of the routine observance of traditions 
of the College. The annual Christmas pageant at First Baptist 
Church, the rising at two o'clock in the morning by members of 
the sophomore class to scavenge the fields for daisies; to make 
a "daisy chain" to honor the seniors. The Valentine "key-to- the- 
heart banquet," the song contests, mission activities, and 
elaborate May Day festivities were among these treasured traditions. 



10 

The College seal was developed from a motto adopted in 
1912 by the Board of Trustees. It was designed by Frances 
Williams, instructor in art. On a conventional shield was a 
background of a valley over which the sun was rising, sur- 
movmted by a cross, a torch, and the words of the motto from 
the 18th Psalms appears — "Where there is no vision the people 
perish." This seal replaced a former design of a simple shield 
on which a T appeared surrounded by the words, "Tennessee 
College. " 

The period 1912-1917 was one of steady progress. The enroll- 
ment increased to an average of around 240. In 1914 the elemen- 
tary school was discontinued and the preparatory department was 
established as a separate unit. 

A typical year may have been 1912. The close of the school 
year was described by a young lady in a letter as "a struggle 
between a gaggle of geese and a charm of linnets bent on a mad 
dash of lemmings, accompanied by an overindulgence in music 
and tears." 

This annual commencement period produced fetes of various 
kinds — class days, lectures, addresses, recitals, receptions, 
and the grand finale when proud graduates left the stage with 
a Bible in one hand and a diploma in the other. 

The 1912 commencement marked the first conferring of the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. Julia Elizabeth Brown, Tullahoma: 
Alice Eaton Burnett, Murfreesboro; Louise Hunter Hibbs, Mur- 
freesboro; and Ophelia Aterbum Selph, LaGrange, Ky. , were the 
recipients. Miss Burnett went on to Radcliffe for her graduate 



11 

study and returned in 1915 to join the Tennessee College 
faculty. That same year, Nannie Reeves Patrick of Winchester 
qualified for the Associate of Arts degree. Diplomas in piano 
were won by Katherine Holladay and August Kause. The scope 
of the breadth of music offering and geographic coverage of 
the College is further illustrated in the recipients of certifi- 
cates in piano awarded Janice Arnold, Wartrace; lone Jordan Butler, 
McKenzie; Helen Maurine Hillsraan, Tresevant; Jessie Josephine 
Prince, Sewanee; Louise B. Sasser, Middleton; and Sara Louise 
Wilson, Niota. 

That year the Preparatory Department graduated eight girls. 
Included in these graduates were Mac Allen Batey, Sarah Ruth 
Batey, Eula Josephine Maxwell, and Annie Vera Maxwell, of 
Murfreesboro. 

The frenzy of graduation that year began on May 20 with an 
evening musical festival climaxed with a march played by four 
girls on two pianos. There was a brief rallentando in this 
period before building to the crescendo that began May 27 with 
a post-graduate concert by Janie Hurt, assisted by Helen Winn, 
soprano. On May 30, a recital by Katherine Holladay and Susie 
Lickette was offered. In rapid succession came: an "Expression 
Recital" on May 31; the annual address by the Lanier and Ruskin 
Literary Societies on June 1; an Art Reception on June 2; a 
Preparatory School Graduation; the Glee Club concert and the 
June 4 commencement. 

By 1918, the faculty numbered 31 (including docents, those 
in the "Conservatory" headed by Henry H. Nast) . Nast held a 
medical doctoral degree and seemed to have been an unofficial 



12 

school physician. Frances Bohannon, for whom the present 
Murfreesboro music club was named, was an instructor. William 
Blake Carlton was director of the chorus, assisted by Mary Belle 
judson. Rubye Augusta Taylor (Mrs. Aultman Sanders) was instruct- 
or of violin. 

There was considerable institutional "inbreeding" of faculty. 
In 1918 Violet Gross, A. B. 1916, music; Fay Poole, A. B. 1916, 
expression; Lucile Inlow, A. B. 1917, English; Rhoda Smith A. B. 
1914, elementary teacher; and Ina Smith, A. B. 1915, bursar; were 
members of the staff. Such retention of graduates was one of the 
reasons the traditions of Tennessee College have been so well 
preserved. 

In 1918 the sophomore class "adopted" a French orphan of 
World War I - Guillanne Le Bihou. Armistice Day, November 11, 
brought the school an unexpected holiday. A Red Cross auxiliary 
on campus during the war numbered 66 members. 

That year the student body was divided into two groups, 
"Army" and "Navy", as the patriotic theme ran throughout the 
Dryad. The year following, this Army-Navy motif, was used by 
alumnae in launching a drive for $25,000 to "erect a memorial 
library to honor Alice Burnett Stevens, A. B. , 1912, who died 
of pneumonia October 21, 1918." The two student groups raised 
$2,583. 

Another drive, in 1915, was started by the girls to raise 
$1,000 in a two month period beginning on December 14, 1914 - a 
total of $1,606 was raised to aid in furnishing the school 
library. 



13 

The student handbook of 1917-18 concluded with a statement 
that seems to have been a part of the warp and woof of each 
Tennessee College student-- "Have an unquenchable enthusiasm 
for college life and let nothing daunt it." 

This "unquenchable enthusiasm" was reflected in so many ways. 

Pagentry played a prominent role in the traditions of the 
school. Fortissimo, if it could be so applied, would be an apt 
adjective for the function of music in the curriculum. 

Drama and music became such an integral part of Tennessee 
College that one year the students produced such versatile 
presentations as "She Stoops to Conquer", "Little Town of 
Bethlehem," "A Dream of the Past," "Tom Sawyer" "Alice in Wonder- 
land," and the annual May Day Festival. Much of the elaborate 
sets, costuming, and musical interludes were products of student 
effort. 

The name of the College yearbook. The Dryad, and the Maypole 
dances might have seemed a bit incongruous in an institution 
devoted to the virtues of Baptist teaching. Yet the program 
that marked the college decennial was typjcal of the blending of 
fact and fantasy that was the catalyzer of the enduring and 
unique spirit of Tennessee College. 

The massive oaks that dotted the 15 acre campus - particularly 
the stark, splintered trunk of a lighning blasted tree - was a 
fit setting for the "Dryad Dream" in which fair denizens work 
an adroit thaumaturgy on the conscious life, the intellect and 
the emotions of these gentle and dedicated Thespians. 



14 
Occasionally, the pagentry reflected the modernity of a 
period. In the February 1926 Tennessee College Magazine there 
v/as an account of the Lanier Literary Society presentation in 
which a French cabaret "The Black Cat" was featured. The guests 
were permitted to enter through the mouth of a huge replica of 
a cat's head. Attractive decorations suggested a French motif; 
however, the liquid refreshments were limited to lemonadel 

Following a "delightful hour in chapel," the midway was 
opened. Amid the attractions was: The Wild Man, the Fortune 
Tellers, the Moving Picture Show, the Animal Show, and the Merry- 
go-round. Backers made enthusiastic spiels and refreshment 
booths served sandwiches, ice cream cones, candy, punch, and 
"other delicacies." Waitresses danced and sang and then took 
orders for French wines (red, green, and yellow lemonade) . Other 
features included a roulette wheel by means of which noisy favors 
were distributed. 

This all woman's college had scores of stirring and beautiful 
songs, many of which are still sung at the annual alumnae meeting. 
Among the first of these was "0 Tennessee, Fair Tennessee." The 
lyrics were written by Frances Allen Hobgood with Elizabeth 
Braswell Stephens composing the music. 

"The Green and White" was composed by Mary Bell Judson with 
the music by Henry Nast. 

Ina Smith wrote the "College Hymn" and one of the more 
popular of several May Day songs. The arrangements for each was 
by Violet Gross. Other favorites was the Freshman song, "We were 
Green as the Summer Grass" and "Tell Me Why." 



15 

Eva Lewis Smith poetized "CXir Alma Mater" that carried 

the refrain: 

T. C, T. C, prospered may she be; 

T. C, T. C, the only one for me. 

She's the queen, East or West, 

She's the one I love best. 
Health and physical education were important roles in TCW. 
The TENNESSEE-ANN, the yearbook and promotional material of the 
college, listed a variety of athletic activities from tennis to 
field hockey. 

A 1937 Field Day record of the Tennessee College Athletic 
Association shows some remarkable track and field accomplish- 
ments. A Miss Williams ran the 100-yard dash in 13 seconds. 
Miss Noland took the 60-yard low hurdles in 9 4/5 seconds. Miss 
Pugh and Miss Boyd tied at 47 inches in the high jump. Miss 
Williams jumped 13 feet in the running broad jump and 7 feet 
2 inches in the standing broad jump. Miss Muller won the base- 
ball throw with 141 feet. Miss Judd tossed the basketball 17.8 
feet. Miss Wade placed first in both the soccer kick (88 feet) 
and the field hockey drive (156 feet) . Miss Haas was credited 
with a winning toss of 29 feet, 3 inches in the nine pound shot 
put, and she heaved the javelin 84 feet. 

There were many hallowed traditions at Tennessee College. 
The most famous of these was the May Day ceremonies which, 
for many years, began with the Y.W.C.A. hanging a little cornu- 
copia filled with spring flowers on the door of each room during 
the night of April 30. The May Day celebration attracted a large 
crowd each year. Two heralds led the parade with the May Queen 
and her court arriving in a coach as a highlight of the pagentry. 



16 
The Athletic Association usually welcomed new students in 
early September with a hike and in mid-October they were hostesses 
to a "children's party." There were excursions to Lookout Mountain 
or Mammoth Cave. On one occasion the entire faculty and student 
body spent a day touring Vanderbilt, climaxed by singing at the 
dedication of the Masonic Tertple. 

watermelon cuttings the first week of school, the fall 
outing at the Stones River Battlefield, memory books, the annual 
song contest, the "fire squad," the Christmas Pageant at First 
Baptist Church were among the continuing traditions established 
at Tennessee College. 

The period 1917 to 1923 was impeded by World War I. The 
enrollment during this period was approximately 125, the primary 
department having been discontinued. Enthusiasm ran high in 1919 
because of the "75 million campaign." Tennessee College under 
the plan of expenditure was to receive $400,000 and the Tennessee 
College Magazine for December, 1919, spoke enthusiastically of 
"No debts, a new heating plant, a new library, and a new 
dormitory. " 

In 1920 property known as the "Thomas Property" was purchased. 
In 1921 the Board took action to strengthen the college depart- 
ment by stating that "it be the sense of this Board that our 
President project the work of the college on a basis looking to 
the making of Tennessee College a standard college." 

In 1922 President Burnett offered his resignation. It was 
accepted, effective June 1, 1923, and Dr. Harry Clark had this 
to say in the Baptist and Reflector ; 



17 

"This is another case where the denomination loses the 
services of one of its strong men because burdens grew 
too heavy for him to bear . . For years there have 
been positions for President Burnett to go into business 
at twice the salary he is now receiving, but he has held 
on out of loyalty to the Baptist cause. It is therefore 
fitting that we should express our appreciation for his 
heroic efforts." 

Dr. E. L. Atwood, then vice-president of the school, was 
made acting president and on March 4, 1924 he was named presi- 
dent of the school. 

Dr. Edward Leland Atwood was born in Clinton, Kentucky, 
October 30, 187 2. He received the A. B. degree from Georgetown 
in 1901. He attended the Groyer Theological seminary and received 
the B. D. degree in 1909. In 1916 he was awarded the D. D. degree 
from Union University. He came to Tennessee College as professor 
of Bible and Religious Education in 1921. 

Dr. Atwood laid great stress on standardization, but he met 
the same economic problems which had been met previously. In 
his annual report for 1927, he openly faced the issue with the 
Board. 

In 1928 Dr. W. M. Woods was selected as field representative 
in an endeavor to raise $3 50,000 for endowment. In 1929 the 
school was admitted to the Association of Colleges of Tennessee. 
In 1930 the school was conferring the Bachelor of Arts and the 
Bachelor of Science degrees and the work was approved by the 
Southern Association of Colleges. 

Dr. James A. Kirtley was dean of the college for many years 
and was acting president for one year. 

During the depression of the early thirties, the college under- 
went severe financial difficulties. Members of the faculty and 



18 
administration received only a small per cent of their stipu- 
lated salary. The Board of Trustees issued $100,000 in bonds 
on February 8, 193 3. 

Due to high-powered student solicitation, the enrollment 
for 1935-37 was one hundred seventy, one of the largest in the 
school's history. In 1938-39 the enrollment had dropped to only 
seventy-eight and was low during the last years of operation 
of the college. 

In July, 1940, Dr. Atwood was retired by the Board of 
Trustees and Reverend Merrill D. Moore, pastor of the Baptist 
Church, Newport, Tennessee, named as his successor. Mr. Moore 
resigned the presidency in March 1942, and relinquished his work 
with the commencement exercises June 9, 1942. The enrollment 
for the last year of administration was ninety-four. The bonded 
debt was reduced by some eight or nine thousand dollars during 
the two years tenure of Mr. Moore. 

Dr. John B. Clark, former dean of Mercer University, became 
president and head of the social science department on June 9, 1942. 
He served in this capacity for four years, until the college 
closed on July 1, 1945. 

John Bunyan Clark was born in Hamilton, Alabama, and in 
1907 received the B. S. Degree from Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
He was awarded the A. M. degree by Vanderbilt University in 1910. 
He attended Harvard in 1911 and received the Ph.D. degree from 
New York University in 1926. He was principal of high schools 
in Alabama for a number of years. From 1917-1920, he was a 
member of the S':ate Department of Education of Alabama. He was 



19 
Professor of history and enonomics at Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute from 1920 - 1927, going from there to Judson College 
where he served as Dean. In 1929, he went to Mercer as professor 
of history and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

There was an indebtedness of $24,000 on the college when 
Dr. Clark took charge. Through the efforts of Dr. Clark, the 
Women's Missionary Union, and the Baptist Cooperative Program, 
by November 1945, the college was not only free from debt, but 
had on hand a cash balance of approximately $135,000. 

During the last years of Tennessee College, a great many 
improvements were made in the physical plant; additions were 
made to the library and equipment; the curriculum was revised; 
plans were approved for new buildings. But the action of the 
Baptist Executive Board and the Board of Trustees brought to 
an end Tennessee College for Women in Murfreesboro after an 
existence of over forty years. 

A Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degree program 
designed to be completed in three calendar years was developed. 
One-year and two-year secretarial courses were offered, includ- 
ing an oxymorous liberal arts- secretarial "church secretarial 
certificate" for those who wished to combine somewhat contra- 
dictory disciplines. A two-year course in music and a similar 
offering in "Expression" leading to a Certificate was offered. 
Provisions were made for the first two years work in pre-medical, 
pre-nursing, and home economics. 

Dr. Clark offered his resignation on October 19, 1945. 
It was accepted by the Board of Trustees November 6, 1945. 



20 

On November 14, 1945, at the Baptist Convention in Nash- 
ville, a committee was appointed to investigate and report back 
to the 1946 convention on the advisability of making Tennessee 
College co-educational. On December 11, 1945, the state 
executive board voted to merge Tennessee College and all its 
assets with Cumberland University at Lebanon. On January 10, 
1946, this merger was approved by a majority of the Board of 
Trustees, 

Following this action, the minority group of trustees 
filed suit to enjoin the Baptist Executive Board and the 
majority of trustees from transferring the property. The 
injunction was dissolved and the city of Murfreesboro and Ruther- 
ford County purchased the property for a high school. 

On June 20, 1946, by order of attorneys of both factions. 
Dr. Clark turned over to representatives of Cumberland University 
approximately $115,000 in cash and U. S. Bonds, and $8,000 of 
student notes receivable. 

At the Convention meeting in 1945, in the First Baptist 
Church in Nashville, Lynn Claybrook, pastor of the First Baptist 
Church in Lewisburg, brought the report on Christian Education. 
According to a History of the Tennessee Baptist Convention , 
1974, by W. Fred Kendall, this report was a strong plea for a 
college in Middle Tennessee for the training of ministers to be 
established. The Rev. W. M. Wood of Murfreesboro introduced a 
recommendation that Tennessee College be made a co- educational 
institution. 

The matter was tabled until after the college presidents 
had spoken. Vferren F. Jones, Union University; James T. Warren, 



21 

Carson-Nev/man; John B. Clark, Tennessee College for Women; and 
Roy Anderson, Harrison-Chilhowee Academy all spoke, discussing 
the schools they served as presidents. 

The matter of making Tennessee College for Women a co- 
educational institution was considered and a committee appointed 
to report to the Convention at its 1946 session. 

The media accounts of the Convention action attracted the 
attention of the trustees of Cumberland University, Lebanon, 
Tennessee. They approached Tennessee Baptists with a proposition 
to turn over the school and deed the property, located at 
Lebanon, Tennessee, to Tennessee Baptists on the condition that: 
(1) the school be maintained as a four-year co-educational 
college with university rating; (2) the name, Cumberland 
University, be retained; and (3) within a reasonable time the 
endowment of the institution be increased to not less than 
$5,000,000, to enable the institution to qualify for membership 
in the Southern Association of Colleges. This proposition was 
presented to the Executive Board in their annual session in 
December 1945. The Board did not think it wise for Tennessee 
Baptists to try to maintain two senior colleges in Middle 
Tennessee. They recommended that Tennessee College for Women, 
with an enrollment of only 7 5 students, be disbanded, its 
property sold and used for endowment for Cumberland University, 
and that 5 per cent which it received from Cumberland Program 
receipts be transferred to Cumberland University. 

Dr. Homer Pittard in his "Pillar and Ground", the history of 
the Baptist Church in Murf reesboro, records the reaction of 
this city to the consolidation with Cumberland. 



22 

"The year 1944 ended on a particularly dreary 
note since it was learned that on December 11, 
the Executive Board of the Tennessee Baptist 
Convention had voted to merge the assets of 
Tennessee College for Women with Cumberland 
University of Lebanon, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, 
Tennessee College for Women has operated 
successfully for the past forty years and whose 
graduates are now prominently identified in the 
business world, in home making and in missions, 
and WHEREAS, Murfreesboro and Rutherford County 
have contributed both moral and financial support 
to this institution over the years, BE IT RE- 
SOLVED by the deacons of the First Baptist 
Church, that we regret the committee's action in 
setting forth this merger which will deprive 
our church and community of a great asset. 
Committee on Resolutions: H. F. Cantrell, Chair- 
man; Lawrence Freeman, and W. W. McMasters. 
This was followed in April by the announcement 
that the church would become a party to the 
pending suit in Chancery Court between the trustees 
of Tennessee College and the trustees of Cumberland 
University. The minority group, nine in number, 
were all Rutherford County residents. There 
were eighteen others divided equally between East 
and West Tennessee. The participation of the 



23 
Baptist Church in the litigation proved to be a 
futile gesture, however; it did serve to register 
the indignation of the Murfreesboro community." 
After a full discussion and the presentation of the legal 
aspects of such a transfer by Andrew Tanner, attorney for the 
Executive Board, the Executive Board voted to take over Cumber- 
land University and set forth the conditions of the agreement. 
It was agreed that a four-year co-educational school of 
university rating be maintained, that the Cumberland Law School 
be maintained as a part of the school, that within a reasonable 
time the endowment be increased to permit membership in the 
Southern Association of Accredited Colleges, and that Cumberland 
University would be retained as the name of the institution. 
Such charter changes were to be made as to give the institution 
the same relationship to the Convention in the matter of owner- 
ship, supervision, election of trustees and financial support 
as that which existed between the Convention and Carson-Newman 
College and Union University, with the specific understanding 
that it was the purpose of the Convention to maintain for an 
indefinite time a standard four-year senior co-educational 
institution. 

The Executive Board recommended that Tennessee College 
for Women be merged with Cumberland University. Its records, 
including alumnae records, were to be preserved as part of the 
new institution. Traditional organizations and scholarship 
funds as far as practicable, were to be preserved. A new 
women's dormitory at Cumberland was to be named Tennessee College 
Hall to indicate the relationship of Tennessee College to Cumber- 



24 
land. All of the equipment and other properties which could 
be legally transferred to the new institution were to be 
included in the merger. 

In January 1946, the majority of the trustees of Tennessee 
College for Women voted favorably upon the merger with Cumber- 
land University. On the following day the Cumberland University 
Board of Directors transferred both the property of the 
university and their position as directors to a Baptist Board 
of Directors, elected by the Executive Board. Edwin Preston, 
from Arkansas, was elected president of the new college. 

In the report on Christian Education to the Convention in 

1945, an appraisal of this transaction was made: 

By this provision Tennessee Baptists have acquired 
without additional expense in cost or operating expenses 
to the Convention, a senior college, for the training of 
its ministry, a large body of law students, and both men 
and women in the school of Arts and Sciences ... It will 
also be noted that by this action the student body of the 
Baptist school in Middle Tennessee has been increased from 
approximately 75 students to 517 students, and its equip- 
ment has been increased from approximately $10,000 to 
$371,000. 

Cumberland University had been operated under the auspices 
of the U. S. A. Presbyterian Church which had ceased to give 
support, and the school operated independently for a short time 
before Baptists took it over. 

The Law school, offering a one-year course, had graduated 
many successful lawyers and had enjoyed an international reputa- 
tion for many years. 

In November 1948 every effort was made to help the consol- 
idation with Cumberland to succeed. 



25 

The "Second Century" program was launched. There was a 
campaign to raise $630,000 to be used for development. Endow- 
ment was to be increased by $150,000 and $187,000 was to be 
used to build additions to "Tennessee College Hall" the 
residence center for women, and a president's home. 

But after years of struggle, Cumberland lost its famous 
Law School to Sanford University in Birmingham, Alabama, and 
the senior college at Cumberland was consolidated with Belmont 
College of Nashville in 1951. 

The final years of each of these great Tennessee educational 
institutions illustrates a thought of Thucydides. "Each presses 

its own ends which generally results in actions where 

The Common Cause decays." Fortunately the "common cause" that 
decayed in Murfreesboro and Lebanon has found growth at Sanford 
University and Belmont College. Both are Baptist institutions 
that reflect the principles of the founders of each institution-- 
quality education. 

Thus those who labored so valiantly for each school may 
reflect that they were sustaining the old classical admonition — 
"Fortiter in re suavites in modes." Each was indeed very 
gracious under pressure. 

Tommy Lowe Curtis' history of Tennessee College closes 

with a significant statement: 

"So the history, the heritage, the high ideals 
of Tennessee College for Women were given to a new 
school and to new students to be perpetuated for- 
ever. The four goals that are inscribed in the 
Seal of Belmont College are not new: Truth, Courage, 
Integrity and Service are ideals that have been 
in existence since Tennessee College for Women came 
into existence: we who carry these lamps with which 
to light the darkness are deeply indebted to those 
who lit and guarded them through the years." 



26 

A catalog published in 1940 gave the only comprehensive 
record of the physical plant as it appeared in the last decade 
of its operation. 

Tennessee College was housed in a pressed brick, trimmed 
with stone, situated in the center of an oak dotted 20 acre 
campus on the north side of East Main Street, six blocks from 
Court Square. The main building was 250 feet long, 125 feet 
deep, rising three floors above the basement. There were three 
entrances off East Main Street, each with a classic colonial 
porch. The east wing contained the dining hall, kitchen, and 
storage rooms. In the central portion of the main building, 
the offices, four parlors, the faculty room, the student 
recreation hall, the assembly hall, and the library were located. 

On the second floor of this section, rooms used by the 
Ruskin and Lanier Literary Societies, the Senior Hall, and 
the piano studio were situated. Science laboratories were 
contained in the basement. Four rooms on the third floor of 
the east wing were equipped as an infirmary. A nurse was on 
duty day and night. 

The "North Building" was originally constructed as a 
gymnasium in December, 1908. 

Additions and modernization provided for home economics 
laboratories, music, and lecture rooms. The 12,000 volume, 
W. E. Everett Library with accomodations for 50 persons, was 
also located in this area. 

Immediately to the rear of the west wing of the building 
was a 40 X 70 outdoor swimming pool. The area included a large 



27 
recreation space, tennis courts, a formal garden, and a 
hockey field. The college building was centrally heated by 
steam. There were 25 bathrooms on the second and third floors 
where domiciliary units were located. These double rooms 
were supplied with steel beds, equipped with steel springs, 
felt mattresses and feather pillows, dressers, wardrobes, 
study tables, straight chairs, and rocking chairs. 

The final bulletin in 1945 issued by the College, listed 
an accelerated program based on four quarters work provided 
for completing the requirements for admission and the cost of 
attending the college. 

Expenses for the nine months term as listed in the 1945 
catalog provided for tuition $270, Registration $2, Activity 
fee $7.50, Infirmary $6, and Library $6. The activity fee 
included subscriptions to the annual and the student newspaper. 
There were various additional fees for music instruction, the 
use of laundry room, electrical appliances, and "for all light 
bulbs in excess of one 7 5 watt bulb for each room;" Textbooks 
could be rented. Each freshman student was required to keep 
a detailed record of expenditures and to submit the record to 
the head of the commercial department for inspection and counsel. 
The College also provided a bank for a depository of small amounts 
of spending money. 

Single meals were provided at 25 cents for breakfast, 35 
cents for lunch, 40 cents for dinner, and 50 cents for the 
Sunday special dinner. 

Sionday, May 19, and Tuesday, May 21 marked the thirty-ninth 



28 

and final programs at Tennessee College for Women. At 11 A.M. 
Siinday morning the members of this last class filed down to 
the appointed area at First Baptist Church to hear the Rev. 
T. B. Milligan offer the invocation and Dr. Andrew M. Smith 
deliver the baccalaureate sermon. A classmate, Aletha Balcer, 
sang "Some Sweet Day" and the Glee Club rendition was Thayer' s 
"March On, Ye Soldiers True." 

A play was presented by members of the senior class on 
Monday evening following class day activities in the afternoon. 

The change in curriculum in the later years is well illus- 
trated in that only two musical diplomas — Aletha Waline Baker 
in voice and Peggy Schneider Havens in music were awarded. 
Yet in secretarial science, there were certificates to Dorothy 
Perdue, Evelyn Perdue Sinclair, and Dorothy Mai Evans. Certi- 
ficates in church secretarial science went to Alta Lee Grimes, 
Mary Bedford Rogers, Vaughtie B. Rowland, Effie Lee Smith Miller, 
and Lillie Dale Willard. 

Bachelor of Science degrees were awarded Rita Marie Bentley, 
Margaret Lanier Dunaway, Mary Elizabeth Smith, and Elizabeth 
Wright. The more classical Bachelor of Arts were received by 
Aletha Waline Baker, Lucy Carmine Boyd, Alta Lee Grimes, Peggy 
Schneider Havens, Dorothy Clark Hendrix, Margaret Jackson, 
Dorothy Perdue, Evelyn Perdue Sinclair, Mary Faye Pierce, 
Carol Porter, Mary Bedford Rogers, Effie Lee Smith Miller and 
Emma Anderson Towne. 

Dr. W. C. Jones delivered the commencement sermon at ten 
o'clock Tuesday morning. The Glee Club sang, Faye Pierce gave 
an organ solo, President Clark conferred the degrees and certi- 
ficates, the seniors sang The Alma Mater, O Tennessee Fair 
Tennessee and all was over. 




POISED FOR THE TRIP TO THE RAILWAY STATION 
VIA UNION TAXI COMPANY 




Posed but going nowhere: Martha Trevathan (Mrs. Dallas Ison) identified in this picture the 
members (by their college names) of the Tennessee College Glee Club and made this 
comment: "This print is a copy of the picture used for publicity purposes by the Tennessee 
College Glee Club for its concert tours and the college annual. The Dryad, for 1935-36. It was 
posed at the then rather new Sky Harbor, and the group's destination was as viewed. The 
economic situation at the time made funds for even bus fares rather difficult for our group." 
Those shown (left to right) are as follows: Director William Blake Carlton, Business Manager 
Frances George, Unidentified, Rebekah Fisher, Katherine Bass, Pres., Martha Trevathan, 
Lenora Edwards, Mary Elizabeth Duckworth, Ruth Shellenburger, Christine Johnson, 
Jeanne Roberts, Katie Bell Smith, Marjorie Cambron, Maribeth Keeling, Florence Cox, 
Lucinda Stone, Nelle Dodson, Virginia Anderson, Elizabeth Fowler, Rebecca Lax, Elizabeth 
Curtis, Edna Lynn Wayne, Helen Cambron, Dorothy Noland, Freda Atwood, Marion Brasel, 
Nona Boitnot, Vera Pearson, Edith Cron, Doris Caton Lovelace, Jean Kirtley, Jo Mitchell, 
Mildred Robertson, VicePres. Individuals on steps from top: Virginia Stone, Marilyn 
Neatherly, Sec.-Treas., Lurleen Bugg. 




Heralds Leading The Procession 
At Traditional May Day Pageant - 1 91 4 







I i iil 



Moon Over T.C. - Almost 




^^ai 




^^f^iiiagM 



"Action" On The Courts To The 
Rear Of The Building - 1 909 



31 

TENNESSEE CGLLEGE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATICM 

The Alumnae Association of Tennessee College was organized 
on Tuesday, May 31, 1910, with 39 charter members. Officers 
elected were Grace Dean, president; Katie Lowman, vice-president; 
Alice Eaton Burnett, Secretary and Lucy Alexander, treasurer. 

The second meeting of the Association was held in the College 
Chapel May 30, 1911. The following officers were elected: Mary 
Belle Judson, president; Julia Brown, vice-president; Alice Eaton 
Burnett, secretary; Lucy Alexander, treasurer. 

After much enthusiastic discussion at this second meeting it 
was decided that the Association should start an endowment fund to 
be known as the Altomnae Scholarship Fund. The fxind was to be used 
for educating worthy girls, who may use the funds interest free 
while in college. 

The purpose of the Association according to one of several 

resolutions that were passed was set forth as follows: 

"The purpose of this Association is to promote fellowship 
among the Alumnae and to advance the interests and welfare 
of Tennessee College by all means within it's power; and 
to stand for high ideals and standards, remembering that 
the College is what the Alumnae are." 

Mary Adelia Strain delivered a homecoming address entitled 
"The Warm Heart" at the May 4, 1946 meeting of the Alumnae during 
the trauma of transferring of the school to Cumberland University, 

Miss Strain reported that, based on incomplete research, 67,14 
percent of TWC graduates had married. Almost 10 per cent of the 
506 degree graduates of the College had earned graduate degrees. 
This number has been greatly increased in recent years. 



32 

A large nvunber of T}>fC graduates became teachers. Among 
those who returned to their Alna Mater to be faculy raeinbers 
were Rubye Taylor Sanders^ Violet Gross Erwln, Elizabeth Braswell 
Stephens, Eva Inlaw, Mabel Cosby, Freda Alexander Woodfln, 
Lillian Paul, Ruth Wood, Eva May Atwood and Sarah Frances Kerr. 

Social work, dietetics, medical technology, and varied 
careers in music attracted many graduates. Several served in 
the women's •uxiliary forces including the Signal Corp, the Red 
Cross and the Nxirse Corps in World War II. 

Journalism claimed the attention of several graduates. 
Lucretia Penny had short stories published by the Saturday Evening 
Post. Lucy Mai Robinson became a cartoonist. Ina Smith published 
four works on methods of teaching religion for young people. She 
also served as Jvinior-intermediate editor of the Southern Sunday 
School Board. 

Miss Strain stated, "we are proud of the preachers' wives and 
full time church workers. She listed TWC Alumnae who were in church 
work in Cuba, China, Palestine, Chile, Nigeria and Lebanon in 1946. 

Miss Strain concluded her address with these words: 

Tennessee College has as her motto, "Where there is 
no vision the people perish," and seeks to inpress 
on every young woman the ideal life. A college educa- 
tion which does not serve to create a wider interest 
in mankind and a deeper synpathy for all hxiraanity is 
not worthy of the name. We can only say, with Nicholas 
Murray Butler, "God spare us the day when sordid 
materialism shall leave no room for the inspiration 
of things of the Spirit." 

The Tennessee College for Women continues to hold annual 

meetings the third week in September of each year. Through 

diligent efforts this list of former TWC graduates have been 

conpiled. 



33 

Members of the charter class that graduated Jxine 4, 1912 
with Bachelor of Arts degrees were Julia Elizabeth Brovm (Mrs. 
Grover Russell, Alice Eaton Burnett (Mrs. E. C. St^ens) , Louise 
Hunter (Mrs. Roscoe Meadow), and Ophelia Aterbum Selph (Mrs. 
Bright Taylor) . Miss Burnett was the first to receive a 
graduate degree, the M. A. from Radcliffe. 

There were only two degrees conferred at the June 3, 1913 
commencement. They were Lillian Selph and Martha Clarice (Mrs. 
W. D. Hoover) • 

In 1914 degrees were awarded Ada Graves (Mrs. Reginald 
Doggett) ,Effle Haynes (Mrs. Will Adrendale) , Cora Dean Hibbs 
(Mrs. H. G. Grant), Eula Holt (Mrs. J. D. Knodell), Gladys House 
(Mrs. Horace N. Hoore) , Rhoda Early Smith (Mrs. Charles Holland) , 
Virginia Clayton W^^re (Mrs. W. B. Abney) , Myrtle Marguerite Ware 
(Mrs. W. L. Wharton) and Nera Varelle White (Mrs. A. C. Shacklett) . 

Gradxiating seniors in 1915 were Sarah Ruth Baty (Mrs. Charles 
Battin) , Jennie Bridges (Mrs. J. S. McClanahan) , Verna Fumbanks 
(Mrs. James Lassiter) , Frank Byrne Hoskins (Mrs. Leroy Guidry) , 
Bessie May Jones (Mrs. Newton H. Culbertson), Elizabeth Eliott 
Lytle (Mrs. Hardin Ragland) , Irene Patterson (Mrs. W, M. Haulsee), 
Ina M. smith (Mrs. O. N. Magruder) , Lucia Norwood Watson (Mrs. 
Norman Mandes), and Corinne Williams. 

Graduating seniors in 1916 were Ruth Virginia Alexander (Mrs. 
J. 0. Key), Florie Nell Broach (Mrs. Karl Adolf Warapl) , Laura 
Violet Gross (Mrs. R. H. Erwin) , Fay Poole (Mrs. Gardner Backett) , 
and Perraelia Ethyl Richardson (Mrs. Frank Dawson). 



34 

On May 31, 1917 degrees were conferred on Maude Alexander, 
Ozzie Kate Cannon (Mrs. T. H, Briggs) , Esta Davis (Mrs. R. B. 
Holt), Luclle Frances Inlow (Mrs. peilx Davis), Lois Bell Jaggers 
(Mrs. C. T. Bamhill), Mabel Frances Jaggers (Mrs. Sidney Vincent), 
Lois Monie Jarrell (Mrs. Fred Jacobs), Iroa Rebecca Lewis, Belle 
HcCandless (Mrs. William Houston Fulton), and Mary Agnes Ray 
(Mrs. Jameson Calvin Jones) • 

in 1918, the graduating seniors were Frances Elizabeth Durham 
(Mrs. C. R. Byrn) , Alna Barry Early (Mrs. Albert Abington) , Annie 
Lee Hall (Mrs. H. D. Hill), Frieda Bethroann Hays (Mrs. Graves Pate), 
Ruth Holt (Mrs. William S. Meyer), Sara Allene Johnson (Mrs. A. R. 
Lester), Emily Blanche McConnell (Mrs. Roswell Britton) , Lucile 
McSween, Edna Estelle Moore (Mrs. E. E. Tartar) , Ruth Parsons, 
Ina Pickens, Frances Stockard Sanders (Mrs. Foster Spain, Jr.), 
Hattie Margaret Sory (Mrs. L«miel Waggoner) , Vetries Elizabeth 
Tucker (Mrs. S. F. Harwood) , and Nelle Williams (Mrs. Frank Q. 
Crockett) . 

Gradxiating seniors in 1919 were Lucy Alexander (Mrs. VPlton 
Smith), Georgia Bell Gorman (Mrs. W. D. Howser) , ^falry Hamilton 
(Mrs, H, P. Kicklighter) , Ruth Hendricks Hunt, Jennie Jackson 
(Mrs. Sam Felts), Pauline McPherson (Mrs. Wheeler Woolfold), 
Margaret Anne Nolen, Annie Belle Rion, and Mary Louise Whitlock 
(Mrs. W. H. Richeson) . 

In 1920, the graduating seniors were Lena Bonner, Annie Byrn 
(Mrs. Earl Roberts), Bess Crutcher (Mrs. Herman Clayton), Mildred 
Dodson (Mrs. William McMuriry) , Bess Flowers (Mrs. W. P. Rhoads) , 



35 

Elwe Griffith, Lavinia Maney (Mrs. Leslie O. Merrell), Margaret 
Johnston, Jessie Sutherland (Mrs. W. N. Johnson) , Alice Timber- 
lake (Mrs. Vfalter J. Hills, Jr.), Hilda Tubb (Mrs. S. E. Mahon) , 
and Mattie Williams. 

Graduating seniors in 1921 vere Oneida Bass, Margaret Brevard, 
Ethel Childress (Mrs. John Clark) , Frances Clark (Mrs. W. R. 
Roraine), Agnes Ezell (Mrs. J. Wilkes Leitzell), Eva Inlow, 
Elizabeth Leigh (*%-s. S. Carroll White), Lena Martin, Loulie 
Pugh, Katherine Rambo (Mrs. C. P. Cox), Annie Mae Vandiver fMrs. 
J, W. Summers), and Tennessee Woodson, 

Graduating seniors in 1922 were Irene Bartlett (Mrs. J. A. 
Morley), Otye Brovn (Mrs. R. S. Bly) , Catherine Clark, Pauline 
Crunp (Mrs. J. Rivers Wiggins), Gene Gardner (Mrs. J. A. Rhodes), 
mry Weber Glass (Mrs. W. D. Brown), Mary Cathem Hagan (Mrs. 
Ivan Pedigo) , Marcella Hall (Mrs. James I. Laten) , Nola Hodges, 
Era House (Mrs. R. S. Brumraitt) , Marjorie Jennings (Mrs. W. C. 
Mcpherson) , Lorena Mai Martin, cna Mullins, Annette Pierce (Mrs. 
Robert Hutton) , Blanche Sandl±n, and Tossie Mae Thorpe. 

In 1923, the gradxiating seniors were Mabel Adams (Mrs. R. L. 
Searcy, Jr.), Lelya Dority (Mrs. Lester Powres) , Frances Dyer 
(Mrs. Leslie Fairfield), Lillie Mae Ford (Mrs. K. T. Edens), 
Rose Allan Goodman (Mrs. John Parker) , Ruth Gwaltney, Grady 
Hargis (Mrs. Herman Thacker) , Nannie Bell Helm, Elizabeth 
Jamison (Mrs. Leighton Ewell), Josephine Rebecca Merritt (Mrs. 
Neil Hof stetter) , Bess Mofield, Ruth Officer (**rs. C. H. Dowell) , 
Carrie Nicholls Pugh (Mrs. J. W. Ingram), Katherine Rennolds, 



36 

Ruth C. Rlngo, Ella MbI Scott, and Weaver Jane Smith (Mrs. 

B. T. Barrons). 

In 1924, the graduating seniors were Virginia Bagwell (Mrs. 
Rollo Every), Josephine Byrona (Mrs. Allen Person), Marlon Conoway 
(Mrs. J. S. Mc^tahao) , Eugenia Cook, Julia Doyel (Mrs, Galther 

C. Webb), Katherlne Haley, Margaret Hanpton (Mrs John Worley) , 
Lera Jaggers (Mrs. Joe Embry) , Elizabeth Lowry (Mrs, BUI Rowan), 
Madge Jackson Manson (Mrs. Will Man son ) , Loren »feGehee (Mrs. W. 
H, Couch), Avonia Morton (Mrs. J. B, Martin), Jessie Overall 
(Mrs, Emery Nelson), and Eva F, Woodfln (Mrs. B, W. Hawks). 

There was only one graduating senior In 1924 who received 
a Bachelor of Science degree. She was Doris Jones (Mrs. Oliver 
Brat ton) . 

On June 2, 1925, the seniors receiving Bachelor of Arts 
degrees were Louise Alexander (Mrs. Carlisle Butler), Eleanor 
Avent (Mrs, J, C, Bradford) , Ellen Burnett (Mrs Sheridan C, 
Cavltt) , Rebecca Clark, Ruth Hutchinson (Mrs, Martin Manion) , 
Flora Douglas McMahon, Nelle Pearcy (Mrs, Everette Lannhom) , 
and Mary Hannah Tucker, 

Ch June 2, 1925, the seniors receiving Bachelor of Science 
degrees were Ruth Dougherty (Mrs. G. Hughes), Minnie Fairfield 
(Mrs. Dyer), Mary Lou Gordon (Mrs. J. L. Davidson), Mary Lou 
Gossum (Mrs, Stanley Phillips), Lollie Ruth Kimbrell, and 
Elizabeth Walton, 

In 1926, the graduating seniors receiving Bachelor of Arts 
degrees were Camille Atherton (Mrs, C, W. Thomason) , Susan 



37 

Beesley (Mrs. Richard Lyle) , Ruth Boone (Mrs. Joseph Crxan) , 
Annabel Bratton (Mrs. T. J. Vfelker) , Mary Lou Derryberry, 
Mabel Hamilton (Mrs. Wallace Roberts), Sara Elizabeth King, 
Mildred Maclln (Mrs. W. D. Edwards), Jessie Officer (Mrs. 
J. W. Crowley), Clara Rennolds, Edwina Rowden (Mrs. D. W. Bruce), 
Grace Weaver (Mrs. Charles H. Stevens), Martha Williford (Mrs. 
R. C. Tlllinghast) , Ruth Wood (Mrs. Fred Boehne) . 

There were only three Bachelor of Science degrees conferred 
on June 2, 1926. They were Mary E. House (Mrs. John B. Maxwell), 
Jennie Mai Paris (Mrs. Ray Taylor), and Caroline Wingo. 

On June 1, 1927, the graduating seniors receiving Bachelor 
of Arts degrees were Frances Caldwell, Esther Carlton (Mrs. 
William W. Travis), Frances Cook (Mrs. C. M. Murdock) , Sara 
Crockett (Mrs. N. D. Ellis, Jr.), Rose Hillsman (Mrs. Graham 
Funderburke) , Adeline King, Aline Lowry, Maycon Martin (Mrs. 
J. Irwin Bell), Marjorie McMahan, Mary Parker (Mrs. E. C. Orfen Jr.), 
Lillian Paul, Mary Pulliam, Astra Belle Stark (Mrs. Walter Lee 
Cathcart) , and Ida Love Taylor (Mrs. R. H, Jones, Jr.). 

Only three gradxiating seniors received a Bachelor of Science 
degree on June 1, 1927. They were Opal Cole (Mrs. Herbert 
Scheldt), Zenobia Quails (Mrs. Leslie Grizzard) , and Cecile 
Rhodes (Mrs. Gordon Arnold) . 

Graduating seniors in 1928 receiving Bachelor of Arts degrees 
%*ere Frances Allen (Mrs. Baxter E, Hobgood) , Ida Lee Byrn (Mrs. 
E. J. Evans), Elizabeth Clark (Mrs. Hubert Coleman), Malinda 
Cooper, Jane Howard, Louise Jackson (Mrs. John C. Catlett) , 



38 

Nellie Jaggers (Mrs. Clifford N. Wade) , Frances King (Mrs. 
Frank Johns) , Dorothy Lee (Mrs. Paul Dodd), Anne Raby, 
Luzelle SisX (Mrs. Hap Babbs) , Elizabeth A. Stephens (Mrs. 
John J. Steitz) , Elizabeth B. Stephens (Mrs. Sam Stephens), 
Mary Stephens (Mrs. P. A. Danielson) , and Maurine Todd (Mrs. 
Ed, H, Cherry) . 

Graduating seniors in 1928 receiving Bachelor of Science 
degrees were Martha Evans (Mrs. Cecil Neville) , Rebecca Hancock 
(Mrs. R. N. Corley) , Elizabeth Harwood, Rachel Lewis (Mrs.), 
Mary Buford Martin (Mrs. Robert Huddleston) , Lucile McCarley 
(Mrs* A. Yakimovich) , Hortense McClellan (Mrs, Paul M. Glenn) , 
Mary Beth Morris, Kathleen Pogue (Mrs. C. G. Tranthan) , Mary 
Belle Robinson, Ola ftee Ryan (Mrs. M. F. Gardner), Louella 
Travis (Mrs. George Huber) , and Lola Mai Upchurch, 

In 1929, the seniors receiving a Bachelor of Arts were Eva 
May Atwood, Martha Elizabeth Bernard (Mrs. Samuel M. Hammond) , 
Danna Binder (Mrs. L. P. Vfhorton) , Susie Cardwell, Jean Carlton 
(Mrs. Harold C. Baggett) , Nancy Cheely (Mrs. William B. Cole), 
Buist Dement (Mrs. J. W. Smythe) , Mary Gutherberg (Mrs. Richard 
H. Denham) , Reba McClellan (Mrs. Marvin Whitley), Sadie Mai 
McMahan, Elizabeth Moss (Mrs. Bill Palmer), Lucy Mai Robinson, 
Ernestine Smith (Mrs. Frank t\. Lewis), and Lane Walker (Mrs. 
John Wilson) . 

Graduating seniors receiving a Bachelor of Science degree 
in 1929 were Catherine Boyd, Elsa Ann Butcher, Helen Elizabeth 
Caii^jbell (Mrs. Howard Kirksey) , Winnie Ruth Currey (Mrs. R. M. 



39 

Johnson), Virginia Fulghum (Mrs. Howard Holland), Sarah Hardeman, 
Sara Hawkins (Mrs Blevins Rittenberry) , Lucile Hines, Ruth Johns 
(Mrs. J. P. McCluskey, Jr.), Rosa Jordan (Mrs. Roi Cason) , 
Dorothy King, Cornelia Leatherman, Marg.-^ret .'-tetthews ( Mrs. Raymond 
Beatele), Grace Ann Moore, Christine Owen, Clarf>bel Pearcy (Mrs. 
Allen C. Barrett), Marjorie :;nith, and Verdry D. Vaaghan. 

In 1930, the seniors who received a Bachelor of Arts degree 
were Ophelia Anderson (j^s. Joe Wesl Williams), Martha Gannaway, 
Ann Gannaway, Louise Hartsf ield (Mrs. Jack Ross) , I.ura Hiygs 
(Mrs. J. Vernon Red) , Fleeta Hudson (Mrs. Russell Haskins) ,Sara 
Jackson (Mrs. John Cason), Vera Johnson (I-ir^. Ewell I ollard) , 
Ophelia Moore, Mabel Nichols (i-lrs.John S. Harris), Elizabeth 
Pyland (Mrs. Jesse Porter), Virginia Rion (Mrs. Lee Covington), 
and Dorothy Williams (Mrs. Jamt-s Boykin) . 

In 1930, the seniors v»ri'> received n P.achclor of Science degree 
were Frances Bunnell (.Mrs. R. J. DusVirk), Frances Cary (firs. 
F. W. Kittrell) , Vera Coleman, Clara '■'ae Crockett (:4rs. R. M. 
Kirkland) , Ruth Cunningham, yrances Ewlon, .^ttye Jackson, 
Fausteen Jones (Mrs. Kenneth Whitt ington) , ?j.lzabeth Lannora, 
Rachel Raby, Cleo Reed (firs. R. E. <:arpenter) , Julia Smith, 
Lanta Weaver ("r^.), and Frances Wooc. 

Graduating seniors rereivinc r. f'achelor )f Aits degree in 
1931 were Flora liaggett (Mrs, James Cox), Milured Clark (Mrs. 
A. C. Gibson), Robbie Coffey, Wendell Corban, 3essie Fetzer 
(Mrs. W. L. Williams), Margaret Jennings, .'-iary Virginia Fcvfll 
(^"Irs. Mary Virginia Morgan), Kathleen Robinson (Mrs. J. n. 
Sullivan), and Virginia Short (iirj. John Gately) . 



40 

Graduating seniors receiving a Bachelor of Science degree 
in 1931 were Lorene Ashvorth, Clara Bragg (Mrs. V. A. Conley) , 
Janet Gonce, Rebecca Jaggers (Mrs. Richard Carrigan) , Neena 
Johnson, Allie Manson, Pauline Stark. 

In 1932, the seniors receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree 
were Virginia Avey, Virginia Byrn (Mrs. Ro^er Sanders), Carol 
Cox (Mrs. George Brandon), Nettie Dillard, Helen Dunn (Mrs. 
Beckman) , Helen Hancock (Mrs. John D. Sadler, Jr.), Roberta 
Harris, Nancy Kirtley (Mrs. Fred Kerr), Theresa McCutcheon (Mrs.), 
Elizabeth McNeil (Mrs. W. L. VJhitehurst) , Frances Potter, my 
Robertson, Helen Roth (Mrs.), Corinne Stevens (Mrs. J. E. Arm- 
strong), Annie Mary Sweet (Mrs. W. R. Rollins), and Mary Alice 
Wood. 

In 1932, the seniors receiving a Bachelor of Science degree 
were Louise Clark, Frances Crocker (Mrs. Mack Savage) , Mora 
Fisher (Mrs. James Pernell) , Lizzie Sue Hampton (Mrs. Leo Brown), 
Mildred Jeffers, Lucile Morgan (Mrs. Harry Cartwright), Allie 
Lee Pearcy, and Helen Roberts. 

Graduating seniors receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1933 were Mary Anderson, Ellnar Harris, Temple Rogers Harris, 
Martha Johns, Nekoda McMahan, Naomi Rhodes (Mrs, Malcom Smith) , 
Anibel Rogers, and Geneva Springer. 

Graduating seniors receiving a Bachelor of Science degree 
in 1933 were Kitty Alexander (Mrs. Bingham) , Elizabeth Beasley 
(Mrs. R, S. Robinson), Elizabeth Farkes (Mrs. R. A. HcWilliams), 
Emily Rawlins (Mrs. Tip Allensworth) , Christine Sanders (Mrs. 
Sam Collins), Alta Thomas, and Lorene Tilford. 



41 

In 1934, the seniors receiving a Bachelor o£ Arts degree 
were Mary D. Carey, Carolyn Cook (Mrs. Eugene Holloway) , Mabel 
Cosby, Frances Davis (Mrs. Fred Castleroan) , Ada Hanlcins, Mary 
Frances Johnson (Mrs. Boyd Coleman) , Louise Kerr, Laura Lax, 
Mary Nelle Nail (Mrs. Ed Morris), Lillian Nickens, and 
Margaret Dean Robinson. 

In 1934, the seniors receiving a Bachelor of Science degree 
were Edna Ruth Davis (Mrs. Jack Bowman), Mary Kate Ladd, Frances 
Roy (Mrs. Robert Mason), Dorothy Schmidt (Mrs. Leon McCauley) , 
Martha Young (Mrs. Albert Wright). 

Graduating seniors in 1935 receiving a Bachelor of Arts 
degree were Ruth Louise Albanese, Louise Bryan (Mrs. Louis T. 
Finney) , Mary Virginia Farrar, and Freda Alexander Woodf in (Mrs. 
James Woodf in). 

Graduating seniors in 1935 receiving a Bachelor of Science 
degree were Wilmoth Dean (Mrs. Fred Clinard) , Evelyn Douglas 
Fite (Mrs. Donald Anderson) , and Leonora McKissack (Mrs. Robert 
E. Ikard) . 

In 1936, the seniors receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree 
were Niva Delores Brewer, Katherine Brooks (Mrs. James Smith) , 
Florence Cox (Mrs. T, S. McFerrin) , Nancy Lou Roth, Marguerite 
Sugg, and Martha Nancy Trevathan. 

In 1936, the seniors receiving a Bachelor of Science degree 
were Julia Mai Edwards, Margaret Fisher (Mrs, Jarris Kerr), 
Rebecca Fisher, Kate Ellen Gruver, Maribeth Keeling, Virene 
Maddox, Lurleen Bugg McMlnn (Mrs. Allan McMinn) , Pauline Neal, 
Naomi Redding, Grace Savage, and Evelyn Frank Sloan (Mrs. 
Lillard Sloan) . 



42 

There were only £lve Bachelor of Arts degrees conferred 
on June 2, 1937. These included Katherlne Lucille Bass, Ruth 
Webb Brandon (Mrs. Ray Brandon) , Mary Elizabeth Duckworth, 
Mrs. Georgia Taylor Parks, and Lillian Walker Stickney (Mrs. 
R. C. Wilson) . 

There were six Bachelor of Science degrees conferred on 
June 2, 1937. These included Anna Davant, Mary Elizabeth Davis 
(Mrs. W. C. Babbs), Elizabeth Drake, Christine Johnson, Harriet 
A. Kelley (Mrs. H. C. Bennett), and Reraa Love (Mrs, Richard Davis), 

Graduating seniors in 1938 receiving a Bachelor of Arts 
degree were Helen Canibron, Maj^orie Cambron, Mrs. Ruth Dance 
Cainbron, Majorie Roix Campbell (Mrs. Sumpter Canpbell) , 
Elizabeth Curtis, Beverlie Marcia Derminer, Lillian Edmondson, 
Lenora Edwards, Josephine Hunphrey, Iris Mae Johnson, Georgia 
Lee Lowe (Mrs. Glenn Sanderson) , Ruth Irene Merriam, Christine 
Mueller, Anna Mary Parker, Elsie Robertson, Beatrice Mary 
Schilling, and Grace Emma Williams. 

Those receiving the Bachelor of Science degree in 1938 were 
Mary Frances Cotham, Ida Lenora Davis, Jessie B. Gann (Mrs. 
Rudolph Manassco) , Jane Mayo, Christine Parker, Harriet Allen 
Peach (Mrs. Llwellen McCord) , Margaret Putman, Mary Hurt Satter- 
white and Earnestine Smith (Mrs. John Williams) . 

In 1939 seniors who received the Bachelor of Arts degree 
were Elizabeth Lynn Bingham, Nona Evelyn Boitnott (Mrs. J. C. 
Meserve) , Winifred Bumpass, Dorothy Burns, Willine Chadwick, 
Kathleen Deakins, Loretta McFadden Duckworth, Ruth Allene Evans, 
Mary Douglas Holman, Jean Kirtley, Dorothy Noland, Marion Frances 
Smith. 



43 

There vere only four Bachelor of Science degrees conferred 
in 1939. They included Mary Ellen Boyd, Maude Dev Holmes, 
Estelle Hooper, and Edvrlna Key (Mrs. Gordon Oldham). 

Members of the 1940 class were Kate Dodson, Sarah Louise 
Donaldson, Mary Alice Hall, ^fary Elizabeth Hardby, Clara Harper, 
Earllne Harris, Carole Hass, Ethel Herron, Betty Cella Jackson, 
Maurice Jackson, Nancy Malone, Edith Palmer, Rachel Sisk, 
Margaret Frances Wilson, Roseanite Faith Woolson and Louise 
Young. 

Graduating in 1941 vrere Gladys Bugg, Ellen Avery Carlton, 
Frances Davis, Mary Vicie Dillon (Mrs. John Scott) , Myrtle 
Fleenor, Margaret Groom, Sue Harrison, Mary Lou O' Bryan, Louise 
Bilbrey, Virginia Christian, Minerva Cowan, Eugenia Gaffin, 
Duerell Gray. Lorraine Tanner, Harriet Townley, Virginia Groves, 
Mary Gene Hobbs, Evelyn Howell, Billie Kuykendall, Judith Peace, 
Lorraine Porterm, Ruth Thomas, Lois Walls and Christine Young 
were 1942 graduates. 

Members of the 1943 class included Christine Hargis Parker, 
Sara Frances Kerr, Inez McBroom, Margaret Holly, Virginia Adkins, 
Marie Holman, Louise Thomas Kraus, Virginia Thompson, Mary Lee 
VanSickle, and Evelyn Floy West. 

The members of the 1944 class were Elizabeth Furgason, 
Frances Graves, Pauline Rogers, Mary Catherine Manley, May Jones, 
Nelle Smith and Rebecca Eddinger. 

First graduates in the three year accelerated degree program 
were in the class of 1946. The members of the class were Monita 
Benson, Lotta Burchfield, Barbara Jane Copeland, Ida Dunaway, 



44 

Mary Frances Hayes, Helen Helton, Miriam Jardine, Jewell Jones, 
Kathryn Kerr, Doris McCall, Mary Lucille Parchment, Frances 
Travis, and Evelyn Willard. 

Degrees awarded at 1946 final program, reproduced on page 
31 of this article included Rita Marie Bentley, Margaret Lanier 
Dxmaway, Mary Elizabeth Smith, Elizabeth Wright, Aletha Waline 
Baker, Lucy Carmine Boyd, Alta Lee Grimes, Peggy Schneider 
Havens, Dorothy Clark Hendrix, Margaret Jackson, Evelyn Purdue 
Sinclair, Mary Fay Pierce, Carol Porter, Mar y Bedford Rogers, 
Effie Lee Smith Miller, Emma Anderson Towns, and Dorothy Pxirdue. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The author is indebted to many individuals and sources for 
information and aid in compiling the history of Tennessee College 
for Women. 

Miss Ethel Herron, for many years, secretary of the Alumnae 
Association opened her files and provided yearbooks and pictures, 

Mrs. Lawrence Freeman, librarian for the First Baptist 
Church of Murfreesboro, contributed important information, 

Ida Dunaway Read provided editorial assistance. 

Mrs. Thomas L. Craddock typed the manuscript. 

Photographs were reproduced from yearbooks by Dr. Bealer 
Smotherman. 

History of Tennessee College for Women by Tommy Lowe Curtis 
was the basis of much source material, Frances Allen Hobgood, 



45 

Minerva Cowan Shacklett and Catherine Clark vere among those 
who made valuable contributions and suggestions. 

Pillar and Ground by Dr. Homer Plttard and records of 
the Tennessee Baptist Convention and Cumberland University have 
been noted in the text. 



U6 



THE COLEMAN SCOUTS 
BY lAABEL PITTARD 

In a study of the Coleman Scouts, it is well to g'.ve some attention to the 
activities of the army to which this group of men was attached. This military 
component was designated as the Army of Tennessee of thp Confederate States 
of America. It was first commanded by General Albert Sidney Johnston. 
Johnston's first concern was the fortification of Nashville, TennesFee, the 
largest and most important city south of the Ohio River. Bf:cause of itr loca- 
tion on the Cumberland River and being a railroad center, it served the southern 
arny as an arsenal and depot of supplies. Ii order to secure the Confederate- 's 
hold on this vital city, two forts were constructed near Nashville — Fort Donel- 
son and Fort Henry. Both of these forts fell to the enemy in February of 1P62. 

A series of events brought General Braxton Bragg to the command of this 
array. General Johnston was killed at the Battle of Shiloh, and after a bri^f 
temporary command by General Beaiiregard, the army was placed iLider the command 
of General Bragg. This new general, a friend of Jefferson Davis, ha.^^ been 
characterized by some as uncompromising, cruel, and fven Incompetent. However, 
the troops he trained were celebrated for their efficiency. 

Following his assumption of command. Brae;"; moved h= - troops to Tupelo, 
ydssissippi and from there to Chattanooga, Tennessee. From Chattanooga, he 
crossed the state of Tennessee and marched into Kentucky. H-^re he exper^. "^nced 
a satisfactory campaign; yet despite hln successes, he withdrew to Tennessee 
and settled at I'urf reesboro. This was in late s^^^ner and fall of 18o2. 

Following the general practice of organizing scouting operations to k<---'P 
commanders informed of enemy operations, a group of yo'i;ig mm und^.r Capiain 
Henry B. Shaw was brought together. These scouts, known interchangeaoly as 



47 

Shaw's Scouts or Colenan's Scouts, were to play an luportant part In the 
operation of Bragg 's ainQr — an amy that had and was to fight some of the blood- 
iest battles of the war — Shlloh, Stone's River, and Chickaaauga. This army 
was to caapaign over more terrltoiy than any other army on either side. Its 
men were to display courage unequaled by that of any other amy. It was to 
suffer the most conqjlete defeat of any Confederate army, but its men were 
stubbornly to refuse to admit defeat until only a few were left to fight. Its 
scouts were to suffer hardship and constant danger. Some were to be imprisoned 
and others to be tortured as they met their death. 

The tactics and strategy of warfare depend on information as well as on 
soldiers and guns. Spies and scouts were sent into enemy territory to gather 
news concerning movement of troops, to secure newspapers, and any other vital 
Information about enenQr resources. Both the Northern and Southern armies 
during the rfar Between the States availed themselves of this medivun of securing 
information. It was for this purpose that the Coleman Scouts was organized. 
This group of scouts was actively engaged In their duties by the time Bragg 
moved from Kentucky into Tennessee. Shaw, the captain ot the group, assumed 
the name Coleman to hide his real Identity. He was a spy. Dressed in civilian 
clothing, he operated within enemy lines under the guise of an itinerant herb 
doctor. Information secured by Shaw was passed from him to the scouts and then 
relayed to Confederate headquarters. The scouts under Shaw's command were not 
spies; they wore the uniform of the Confederate array and carried upon their 
persons credentials which were to Insure their treatment as prisoners of war in 
event of their capt\ire. Following is a copy of the pass carried by one of the 
men, Sam Davis, and Issued to him by the commanding officer of the Army of 
Tennessee: 



Headquarters General Bragg 's Scouts 
Middle Tennessee, September 25, I863 



h6 

Samuel Davis has permission to pass on scouting duty anywhere in Middle 
Tennessee or north of the Tennessee River he may think proper. 

By order of General Bragg, 
£. Coleman, Commanding Scout 

These passes served a two- fold pxirpose. Not only were they supposed to 
assure the scout of better treatment in the event of capture, but the creden- 
tials made it easier for the men to seciire food, lodging, and aid from 
Southerners who might otherwise suspect them of being Northern spies. 

Since the scouts operated mainly in Middle Tennessee, many of those detailed 
for this particular duty were from Middle Tennessee counties. The membership 
of this group was a fluctuating one—some were members for a short time until 
their capture or death and others for a longer period. So far as could be 
determined, there is no con^jlete published list of the roll that made up the 
membership of the Coleman Scouts — however, it is thought that about one hundred 
men seirved at one time or another as a member of this group. Following is a 
list of about forty-five members found in a roll published in the Confederate 
Veteran following the war. 



"We the surviving fellow scouts have met and from memory given to the 
Veteran a list of all who belonged to Shaw's Scouts: 



Captain - Henry B. Shaw 



John Davis 

Alf Douglas (Nashville) 

Tom Joplin 

Bill Robinson 

Everard Patterson 

Bill Roberts 

Billy Moore (Columbia) 

Joshua Brown (Clarksville) 

Munford Street 

Gup Kibble 

Tom Brown (Nashville) 

Dick Taylor 

Alex Gregg (Nashville) 

Sam Roberts 

Tom Hughes (Nashville) 



Pillow Humphrays 

"Kage" Everette 

Dich Dlllard 

James Patterson 

Newt Vaughn (Columbia) 

E. Grant 

Hans Carter 

Jim Carter 

Hich Kelley 

Josh Luck 

W. H. Portch (Nashville) 

R. F. Cotton (Franklin) 

George Hughes 

John Schute 

E. M. Patterson 



49 

Dee Jobe L. K. Owen 

Dan Sneed Richard Anderson 

Sam Davis Li Hard 

Tom Gvd.nn WHl Hughes 

Charley Lippingwell Ben Douglas 

Jack Coffee John Mclvey 

Bob Owens (Columbia) John Drane 

In the recruiting of young men as members of this group there were certain 
characteristics taken into consideration, aamelj: (1) preferably they were to 
be young (in their twenties) and unmarried so that family responsibilities 
would not be a deterrent in carrying out dangerous assignments; (2) they were 
to be familiar with the terrain of Middle Tennessee; (3) they were to be 
expert horse-back riders, and (4.) were to exhibit traits of intelligence, 
bravery, and unquestionable loyalty. 

Henry B. Shaw, the captain, was older than most of the scouts. Before 
the War Between the States he had been a steamboat captain. Also, before the 
war he had separated from his wife who retained the custody of their only 
child who was a cripple. Shaw had been educated at the old "Nashville Military 
Institute" now Montgomery Bell Academy. In 1856 he had taught school at 
Sn^yma, Tennessee. One of his pupils then was Samuel Davis who was later to 
be one of his scouts. 

Only brief sketches of incidents surroionding the lives and careers of 
most of the scouts were available. Rather full information was found about 
perhaps ten or twelve of these scouts. Among the scouts that came to be known 
for their exploits were John Davis, Samuel Davis, Dee Jobe, Joshua Brown, Billy 
Moore, Tom Brown, Thomas Joplin, William Roberts, R. M. Dillard, and William 
Munford Street. The very nature of the Coleman organization lent itself to 
secrecy. This secrecy, coupled with the fact that few formal reports were made, 
accounts for the fact that very little is known about many of the scouts and 
their activities. However, it is known that theirs was a perilous assignment, 



50 

acconpanled by hardship and danger, and many of then were wounded, captured, 
and some met their death in their line of duty. 

Some, who were taken prisoner and confined to one of the several prison 
o&mpa operated by the Federals, spurned the amnesty oath at the end of the war 
and chose rather to linger and die in a dreary prison atmosphere— far from home 
and friends. 

Headquarters for the Coleman Scouts was near Pulaski, Tennessee in a little 
village called Can^jbellsville. A Mr. Schuler, a farmer in this snail community, 
had offered his home as a meeting place for Shaw and his scouts. 

Much of the information carried by the scouts was written with no attempt 
at concealment by codification, while other information was sent in code so that 
even the scouts were unable to decipher it. Messages sent in code used the 
"Court Cipher" which entailed the use of a secret word or group of words that 
changed often and relayed only by word of mouth — never put into writing — and 
known by both the sender and the receiver. 

"Manchester Bluffs" was a secret word used with the court cipher in messages 

relayed by Coleman Scouts. The cipher worked this way: The entire alphabet was 

written twenty-six times upon a page in such a way as to appear alike when read 

either vertically or horizontally. The first letter of the key word is found in 

the first horizontal col\amn and the first letter of the message in the first 

vertical column. At the point of intersection of the two colimms is found the 

letter used in the cipher message. 

Exaii9)le: EHNY JEHMnFO Secret message: MANC HESTORBL 

EHNY JEHMTEFO 

Write Manchester Bluffs above secret message. Then go down column M until you 

come to intersection E— go across to first column and find letter S: 

SHAW CAPTURED 
EHNY JEHMnFO 



51 

Next go down column A to H and write H. Next go down coTuinn N to N and write 
A. Go down C to Y and across to W and we have the word Shaw. 

The secret word was changed often and it has been said that iinless one 
knew the key-word that it would be inpossible to decode a secret message. The 
division between words in the original message were not followed. The letters 
ran continuously so as not to reveal the ntunber of letters in particular words. 

COURT CIPHER 



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The scouts became so efficient in secioring vital information concerning 
Federal reinforcements and troop movements that in the fall of 1863 General Dodge 
of the Union army auid stationed at Pulaski, Tennessee, offered a reward for 
information concerning E. Coleman and the location of the scout headquarters. 

It is not known who in the community revealed this information to Dodge 



52 

but in November, 1863, a group of Union calvalry men captured Shaw at the Schuler 
home. Since no papers of inqportance were found on Shaw he was not charged with 
being a spy. However, he was placed in jail in the courthouse at Pulaski. 

On the eve before Shaw's arrest, Samuel Davis of Sinyma, Tennessee, Billy- 
Moore, and perhaps others of the scouts had net their leader at the Schuler home. 
Vital papers describine Federal fortifications aad the inovenent of Federal troops 
in Tennessee had been given to Davis to be relayed to General Bragg at Chattanooga. 
Carrying this vital information in his saddle bags and some of it hidden in the 
sole of his boots, Davis set out to follow the scout line to Decatur, Alabama and 
thence on to Chattanooga. Only a few miles from Pulaski, Davis was captured by 
the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, called the "Jay Hawkers". Davis was placed in .jail in 
Pulaski in the same room with his captain, Henry B. Shaw. Another scout, Billy 
Moore, who was making his way to the Can^jbellsville headquarters, became chilled 
and hungry and approached a farm house with the intent to ask for food. It so 
happened that a group of Union soldiers were in the house, interrogating the 
family about Coleman and his scouts. Billy Moore, realizing his iminent capture, 
chewed up his pass so as .to avoid being identified with the Coleman Scouts. He, 
too, was taken to Pulaski and placed in the same cell with Davis and Shaw. Under 
cover of darkness, Moore managed to jump from an upper story window and ran off 
into the night, making his way to Columbia, Tennessee, his home place. After 
this escape, Davis and Shaw separated. Davis was repeatedly offered his freedom 
if he would divulge the source of the information which was found on him. However, 
Davis refused life itself at the price of betraying his leader and he was sentenced 
to be hanged on November 27, 1863. Even with the noose around his neck, Davis 
was again offered a full pardon, a horse and side arms, and conveyance to Confederate 
lines if he would tell from whom he received the information. Rather than. betray 
his leader, Davis accepted the sentence. 



53 

General Dodge ordered that Henry B. Shaw be sent to Johnson's Island in 
Lake Erie where there was located a federal prison. This prison was enclosed in 
a stockade surrounded by water. Sentinels were stationed on a walkway that was 
near the top and on the outside of the stockade. A gun boat lay at anchor in the 
lake. Escape was virtually in^iossible. Here Shaw was kept prisoner until near 
the end of the war. 

Another Rutherford County scout whose death was even more tragic than that 
of Sam Davis was Dee Jobe. Dee's father Elibu C. Jobe was a cabinet maker in a 
little niral coramunity known as Mechanicsville. On August 30, 186^, Jobe was 
scouting in the vicin'ty of his home and lay down =n a thicket of trees and undrr 
brush to rest and await darkness before going to visit his parents. A party of 
Yankees siirrounded him and in an effort to make Jobe di'/uTgr information about 
his activities, the Yankee troops put out his eyes, cut out his tongue and finally 
dragged him to his death. Neighbors found his body and took word to his parents. 
An old negro servant went for the body and Jobe was buried in the family burial 
grounds near the old home place. 

Following Shaw's arrest and subsequent imprisonment. Alex Grrgg became leader 
of the Scouts. The group continued their operations but witi decreasing activltlps 
as the end of the war neared. 

Following the close of the war in April 186;,, Shaw came back to Tennessee and 
went to the home of a fellow scout, John Davis of Smyrna — a half-brother of Sam 
Davis. In the fall of 1866 the two men, Shaw and John Davis, purchased a steamboat 
called the "David ';Vhite." It was a fine, large steamer valued at 3S0,000. On 
February 17, 1867, on the Mississippi River below Helena, Arkansas, the boat was 
blown up when the boiler exploded. John Davis and :''haw both ""ost their l^vep in 
the accident. 

Sometimes between the close of the war in 186^ and Shaw's death in 1867, there 
was a called meeting of the Coleman Scouts to be held in Nashville, Tennessee . 



54 

The pttrpose of the meeting was to pay a tribute of respect to those member scouts 
who had accepted death rather than be disloyal to the Southern cause. Henry B. 
Shaw was elected to preside over the meeting. Tom Brown and Sam Roberts served 
as secretaries. They drew up a circular which they had printed, entitled, "A 
Tribute of Respect to the Dead." In this circular the scouts paid tribute to 
Sam Davis, Dee Jobe, and to R. M. Dillard— the latter chose to remain in prison 
until he died rather than take the amnesty oath. Of Davis they said, "A truer 
soldier, a piirer patriot, a braver man never lived." Of D. S. Jobe they said, 
"We can but recollect with pride how nobly he died— strangled, beaten, abused; yet 
he defied his persecutor and died rather than betray his comrades— he died rather 
than betray them, never to be forgotten by the foe, for the leader has become a 
raving maniac from contemplating his bloody deed." Of R. M Dillard they wrote, 
"A brave and true scout, where is he? The dreary prison of Gamp Morton whispers, 
he died here, within my gloomy walls— spurning the amnesty oath which was offered 
him. He lingered and died and thus passed away one of the truest spirits that 
ever blessed the earth." 

This circular was signed by Shaw and fifteen other scouts who had assembled 
to pay their respects to the dead. Uttle did Shaw and John Davis realize that 
in only a few months they too would meet a tragic death, not from a military 
standpoint— but in the explosion of the steamboat "David 'White". 



55 



The New Monument in Old City Cemetery 
by Julia Clarice Miller 

You turn the key in the rusty lock and the iron 
gates swing open. It is early spring and the young, 
green grass smells sweet as it becomes the background 
for the ancient monuments and markers of the graves in 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee's Old City Cemetery on Vine 
Street, You walk among the stones; some broken and 
cracked. The inscriptions are dim from long years of 
wind, hail, and snow. The dates go back into the 1700 
and 1800' s. Some are flat on the ground, some are tall 
columns and some are short and squat. Many vacant 
spots have no stones at all. Who could be resting 
there? 

Suddenly you come to a massive, new monument. 
Its gleaming, grey granite is in sharp contrast to 
the ancient stones around it. You stand reading the 
inscription. A mocking bird's song fills the silence. 
You read: 



56 



WILLIAM HENRY LAWRENCE 

•Husband of 

Henrietta Stanfield 

Died During Civil War 

No dates available 



HENRIETTA STANFIELD LAWRENCE 
Mother of 
Nina H. and Bertha 
Dates no available 



DAUGHTER 

NINA H. LAWRENCE 

Wife of 

Alfred Crockett Vaughan 

October 11, 1866 

March 24, 1903 

Infant Vaughan 1903 



JOHN A. STANFIELD 

Brother of 

Henrietta S. Lawrence 

Died March 10, 1880 



BERTHA S. LAWRENCE 
Sister of 
Nina H. Vaughan 
Death not available 




•r.jii.-;::* i ri i-^n ^ \ :i '".erne t ',-i'\ 



The Letter Edged in Black 



5S 




59 



Who could have placed this beautiful memorial here so 
recently that the granite looks newly polished? 

The monument was made and inscribed by the 
hand of John Lawrence Vaughan, son of Nina H. Lawrence 
Vaughan, to honor her memory. She died in 1903, when 
Lawrence was eight years old, in the birth of her 
second child. The infant was buried in the same 
grave with her. 

The monument was made and inscribed in the 
Pulaski Monument Company, Inc. (since 1938), Pulaski, 
Virginia, owned by John Lawrence and Julia Vaughan, 
who made monuments and markers in granite and bronze. 

This monument is grade AAA Longblue Georgia 
granite, and weighs approximately two tons (Julia 
Vaughan ' s approximation ) . 

There are many familiar names among the pall 
bearers at Nina's funeral, notice the Letter Edged in 
Black. It is believed that R. C. Cawthon was Louise 
Cawthon ' s great uncle. Louise is the secretary for 
the Rutherford County Historical Society. 

Lawrence and Julia Vaughan came to Murfreesboro 
from Pulaski, Virginia, in 1967 looking for his mother's 
grave in the Lawrence lot. At that time the Old City 
Cemetery was in a shambles, the result of neglect, 
vandalism and overgrown with weeds. He was broken 
hearted and discouraged that he could find no evidence 



60 



of her grave or record of the lot. After several 
visits here, Mayor W. H. Westbrooks told him that he 
could certainly place a stone in the old cemetery in 
his mother's memory. The Rutherford Co. Historical 
Society and others had been working on the cemetery, 
and Lawrence was pleased with the improvement. 

In some of his research here, a kind person 
sent him to an "old lady living in a hotel," according 
to Julia. This woman was Miss Ida Richardson who knew 
his mother, Nina Lawrence, when she was young. He 
enjoyed his visit with Miss Ida. Julia continues, 
"He went to the old cemetery and I can see him yet, 
walking to the spot where he thought the Lawrence 
square was located. But there was no marker. He was 
determined to see that a monument was placed there." 

In September of 19 76, Lawrence was working on 
the monument when he became ill and was taken to the 
hospital. He died September 9, 1976. His wife, Julia, 
shipped the nearly completed monument to the Georgia 
granite company where he obtained granite for his 
monuments, and they completed it and sent it to an 
agent near Murfreesboro , who had a Mr. Burnett of 
Smyrna set the heavy stone in concrete in Old City 
Cemetery. Mayor Westbrooks accompanied him and showed 
him where to place it at a spot that Lawrence previously 
told him he remembered as the location of his mother's 
grave. 



61 



Nina Stanfleld Lawrence was the daughter of 
William H. (Henry) and Henrietta Stanfield Lawrence, 
and the granddaughter of John the elder and Henrietta 
Stanfield, who were the first known Catholics to come 
to Rutherford County. 

A history of the Catholic faith in Rutherford 
County is found in a booklet which was used at the 
dedication of St. Rose of Lima Church in 1954. It 
reads : 



Seventy-five years or more ago, there 
moved into the Bethlehem community, a few 
miles southeast of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 
a family by the name of Stanfield. They 
Ceune from Murfreesboro, Hertford County, 
North Carolina, the place from which the 
Tennessee town took its name. The family 
consisted of the mother and father, who 
was a jeweler, and three children. Mrs. 
Stanfield was a Catholic, the first Catholic 
so far as is known, to come to Rutherford 
County. She arranged with the Bishop in 
Nashville that a priest should come out once 
or twice a year. He would be met at the 
Murfreesboro station and driven out to the 
Stanfield home where he said Mass. When the 
children grew up, the son married and moved 
away from Murfreesboro while one daughter 
married a Mr. Lawrence and continued to live 
on in the old home. She was soon left a 
widow with two little girls. A sister of 
Mr. Stanfield taught in the public schools 
in Memphis and after a few years she took the 
little girls and sent them to the Clara 
Conway school in that city. The property of 
that school was afterwards bought by the 
Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia Academy. 

Several years later a Mademoiselle 
Wuille, a Catholic, came to teach French at 
old Soule College. A Mr. Frazier, a resident 
of Murfreesboro, was converted, and this 
little group used to meet in the Odd Fellows' 



62 



Hall where Mass was said whenever a priest 
came. When Mrs. Stanfleld died, she was 
burled in Nashville, as Bishop Rademacher 
had always promised she would be. After 
her death and that of Mr. Frazler, meetings 
in the Odd Fellows' Hall were given up and 
Mass was again celebrated at the Lawrence 
home at Bethlehon. 

This was the meeting place for the 
Catholics when Mrs. S. B. Christy, who, 
before her marriage, was Miss Addle Collins 
of Nashville, moved to Mvurfreesboro about 
fifty years ago. The mission was later 
served by the priests fr«n Winchester and 
Father Kuel was in charge. Since he came 
only occasionally, Mrs. Christy and Essie 
Hancock used to meet every Sunday morning 
at Mrs. Christy's home to say the Rosary 
and read the Gospel, and after the death 
of Mrs. Lawrence, Mass was celebrated at 
Mrs. Christy's. 

Following is copied from A HISTORY OF RUTHERFORD 
COUNTY by Carlton C. Sims, 1947, p. 193: — 



CATHOLICS — Before the Civil War there 
were several Catholic feunilies in Rutherford 
County. Mass was occasionally said at the 
home of John Stanfleld. Gen. Rosecrans is 
reported to have attended Mass at Murfrees- 
boro during the war. Father Jacquet appears 
to have been the first missionary here. 

Later, Sunday devotions were conducted 
in the home of Mrs. S. B. Christy. By 1918 
a sufficient number of families were in town 
to justify the renting of a room in the 
Masonic Building, and a Sunday School was 
organized. On Sept. 15, 1929, the congrega- 
tion moved into a beautiful little building 
on Lytle Street, constructed through the 
generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman of New 
York. Miss Essie Hancock has long been one 
of the faithful members. The Federal census 
of 1926 reported 36 members, while in 1936 
the number had risen to 45. 



63 



Following is copied from PACTS, Aug. 4, 1894 
(a Catholic Weekly published In Chattamooga ) . 



MURFREESBORO , TENN.— Established by 
Pr. Jaquette early in the *40s. In 1856 
Rev. Pr. Orengo visited the mission and 
said Mass at the home of John Stanfield, 
whose children still hold the faith at 
their original home, Murfreesboro. 

During the late war Rev. Prs. Cooney 
and Walsh officiated here. Gen. Rosecrams 
made this place his headquarters. He 
edified the army by attending the holy 
saccifice of the Mass. 

At present the mission is doing nicely. 
Mass being celebrated once during each 
month. The following clergymen visited 
the mission: Fr. Jaquette, Fr. Orengo, 
Fr. Host, Fr. Wta. Walsh, Fr. McNally, 
Fr. Gavin, Fr. Murray, Fr. Tiepel, Fr. 
Braun and Fr. Graham. 



Note: — The Fr, Cooney referred to above 
as officiating during the war was probably 
Pr. Peter T. Cooney, C.S.C., who enrolled 
as Chaplain in the 35th Indiana Infantry 
Dec. 11, 1861, and saw action at Stone's 
River and Chickamauga. 



It is believed the "Seventy-five years or more 
ago, there moved into the Bethlehem community a few 
miles southeast of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a family 
by the name of Stanfield ..." was written at the 
dedication of the small white mission chapel on the 
comer of College and Lytle Streets in 1929. The 
quotation from the Catholic Weekly above shows that 
the Stanflelds were here as eeurly as 1856, "when Mass 
%ras said at the home of John Stanfield." Also the 



64 

Rutherford County Census for 1860 lists John Stanfield 
as being a watchmaker from North Carolina and age 
twenty-one. 

From the Catholic Weekly quote above we also 
find that General Rosecrans, a Catholic, attended Mass 
during the Civil War at the John Stanfield home. The 
current Rosecrans Recreation Center was named for him 
and is located on part of the battlefield ground. 

In the Deed Records at Murfreesboro Court House 
is recorded the transfer of a lot in a parcel of land 
in the (then) 13th District of Rutherford County from 
John J. Lawing to Mrs. Henrietta Stanfield (Nina's 
grandmother) on August 12th, 1865. 

Deed Book #13 . p. 194: 

I, John J. Lawing, have this day 
bargained and sold and do hereby transfer 
and convey to Henrietta Stanfield a lot on 
parcel of ground for the consideration of 
two hundred dollars in hand paid to me a 
certain tract or parcel of ground in Civil 
District No. 13 County of Rutherford, State 
of Tennessee and bounded as follows: 
Beginning at a stake N.E. corner of Lot 
No. 2 running South 24 poles and 6 links to 
a stake, thence South 51 1/4° East 5 poles 
and 8 1/2 links to a stake, thence North 
27 poles 9 links to a stake, then West 4 
poles and links to the beginning con- 
taining 106 3/4 poles. Said parcel of land 
being the same that I purchased of J. F. 
Fletcher, Sr. which is duly recorded in the 
Register's Office of Rutherford County. To 
have and to hold the same to Mrs. Henrietta 
Stanfield, her heirs and assigns forever. 
I do covenant with the said Henrietta 
Stanfield that I am lawfully secured of 



65 



said land; have a good right to convey 
it and that the same is unencumbered. I 
do further covenant and bind myself, my 
heirs and representatives to warrant and 
defend the title to the said land to the 
said Henrietta Stanfield against the 
lawful claim of all persons whatever. 
Given under my hand and seal this 12th 
day of August, 1865. J. J. Lawing 
Witness: William P. Henderson 
Frank Winship 



The John J. Lawing land is shown on the 18 78 
map of Rutherford County obtained from the Rutherford Co. 
Historical Society. It is located in the 13th District 
of that date, on Salem Pike where Stones River crosses 
it, which is southwest of the town; not southeast as 
cited in the St. Rose history. It is the current home 
of the Farmers, Sterling and Tom. 

Neither the Bethlehem community nor the 
Stanfield or Lawrence names are on the map which shows 
land owners of that time. John J. Lawing and son are 
listed as undertakers. C. C. Henderson's Story of 
Rutherford County lists a Mr. S. N. Lawing. Maybe he 
was the son. 

Henrietta Stanfield purchased the Lawing plat 
in August, 1865, and marriage records in the Murfrees- 
boro Court House show that William H. Lawrence and H. 
(Henrietta) R. Stanfield (her daughter) applied for a 
marriage license on January 1st, 1866, the following 
year (p. 184, Marriage Records 1863-70). 



66 



Nina Henrietta Lawrence, their first child, 
was born October 11, 1866 (see the monument and death 
notice). She and her younger sister, Bertha, attended 
the Catholic school in Memphis (see St. Rose History). 

Later the girls attended Old Soule Female 
College in Murfreesboro , and Nina graduated with "The 
Degree of Mistress of English Literature, the third day 
of June in the year of our Lord 1886." John R. 
Thompson, President, signed her diploma. This informa- 
tion was supplied by Lawrence Vaughan's wife, Julia. 
She has the notebook of Nina's sister, Bertha, who also 
attended Old Soule that year. 

Nina was born in 1866 and graduated in 1886, 
making her about twenty years old at that time. 

Julia also said that Nina took art at Old 
Soule and taught her son, John Lawrence Vaughan, much 
that she had learned. From this early training, he 
became a designer and maker of monuments in his own 
monument company. He also painted oil pictures. 

Julia tells of an auction she attended in 
Pulaski in 1970 of an old couple who had come there 
from Tennessee many years ago. Julia and Lawrence 
collected picture frames for his paintings. She bid 
on a rather small gold frame. When J. L. (as she 
called him) saw it, he nearly fainted for it was an 
oil painting of some pansies and had been painted in 



67 

Old Soule College by Lorena Ransom. The Ransoms were 
friends of the Lawrence family. He remembered them 
very well. What a small world, was her comment. He 
wouldn't have replaced that oil painting with one of 
his own for anything. He treasured it deeply. 

While Nina was growing up, there came to 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in 1887 a family from Grayson 
County, Virginia. Mr. John Floyd Poff, his wife, 
Julia Ann Vaughan Poff, and two children, Kelley and 
Myrtle (later Mrs. Albert Bridges Miller). Mrs. Poff's 
brother, Alfred Crockett Vaughan, came later to join 
them. He soon met the young girl who completely won 
his heart, the lovely Nina Lawrence. 

Julia again tells how J. L.'s father, Alfred 
Vaughan, in his last days would sit in his rocker, 
close his eyes and tell her in great detail how he 
had won the hand of his beloved Nina back in Tennessee. 
Her first love gave her a gold plated bracelet set with 
garnets and said, "You must have this." Julia has the 
garnet bracelet in her collection today. She wore it 
one time to the University of Georgia in Athens. 
Several people commented on it. 

The marriage records in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 
show that A. (Alfred) C. (Crockett) Vaughan and Miss 
Nina Lawrence (daughter of Mrs. Henrietta Stanfield 
Lawrence) were issued a marriage certificate on 



6a 



October 15, 1894. They were married the next day, 
October 16, 1894. An article found on MTSU microfilm 
tells about the Lawrence-Vaughan marriage and was 
found in the Nashville American newspaper dated October 17, 
1894. Note the misspelled names Laurence-Vaughn, and 
Rev. W. J. Kent instead of the W. J. Keal in the 
marriage records. The article reads: 

Nashville American . October 17, 1894 

Vaughn-Laurence 
MURFREESBORO, Oct. 16 — (Special) — Mr. 
Alfred Vaughn and Miss Nina Laurence of 
this place, were married this morning at 
8 o'clock at the residence of the bride's 
mother, Mrs. Henrietta Laurence. Mr. 
Vaughn is a highly respected citizen of 
Murf reesboro, and Miss Laurence is a very 
popular young lady. The ceremony was 
performed by Rev. W. J. Kent, of 
Winchester, according to the ritual of 
the Catholic Church. The young couple 
left immediately on a short wedding tour. 

Alfred Vaughan's sister, Julia Ann, was the 
wife of Mr. John Floyd Poff , a well-known woodworker 
and cabinet maker, in Murf reesboro with the old Perkins 
Lvimber Company, later to become the Young and Ogilvy 
Company, on South Church Street. Currently the Police 
Department, WGNS , Cohens and Hargroves are in that 
location. Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Poff were the grand- 
parents of your author of this article. 

After Nina and Alfred were married, she soon 
realized she would have her first child. John Lawrence 



69 



Vaughan was born August 2, 1895. He remembered well 
the many services held in his grandmother's home as a 
child. He was Baptized a Roman Catholic in the 
Stanf ield-Lawrence home. Julia says that J. L. spoke 
of his mother, Nina, as the most devout person he had 
ever known. He remembered how she corrected him just 
by speaking to him in the voice of a teacher — with 
respect. 

He recalled quite well when his mother died, 
March 24, 1903, in the birth of her second child. He 
was eight years old at the time, and remembered the 
approximate location of the Lawrence lot in Old City 
Cemetery. 

After his mother's death, young Lawrence 
Vaughan became devoted to his Aunt Julia Ann Poff. 
She seemed to fill the vacancy when his mother died, 
according to Mrs. Poff's daughter, Gladys Poff Ellison 
of Smyrna. 

Later Lawrence accompanied his father, Alfred 
Vaughan, when he returned to the home place in Spring 
Valley, Grayson County, Virginia. Here he grew to 
young manhood. 

J. L. volunteered for service in World War I. 
He was inducted into the army at Pulaski, Virginia, 
May 23, 1918. In six weeks with no training, he was 
shipped to Europe and moved directly to the front. He 



70 



was actively engaged in the last battle that was fought 
the morning of November 11, 1918, the "Battle of the 
Argonne Forest." He often told his wife, Julia, how 
the tops of trees were falling all around him that 
morning and how lucky she was that her future sweet- 
heart was spared. 

He was an honor member of the American Legion; 
and after his death, Julia received a beautiful 
memorial card from President Ford. He came back by 
boat to the U. S. on June 21, 1918 and received his 
honorable discharge on July 1, 1919. His discharge 
papers listed him as being born in Murf reesboro, 
Tennessee, on August 2, 1895. He died in Pulaski, 
Virginia, September 9, 1976. 

When J. Lawrence Vaughan was at the wholesale 
granite place located in Tate, Georgia, he traveled 
in twenty-nine states and three foreign countries. 
Once when he came to Mur f reesboro , Tennessee, to visit, 
he was greatly surprised to have three nuns meet him 
at the train station. He never did find out how they 
knew he was coming, but they added much pleasure to 
his visit. 

Julia D. Underwood finished school at age 
nineteen and went immediately to the Vaughan Pulaski 
Monument Company in Pulaski, Virginia, as secretary. 
She and J. Lawrence Vaughan were married in Dublin, 



71 



Virginia, February 28, 193 3. They had one son and two 
grandchildren, the first of whom was born on Julia and 
Lawrence's wedding anniversary. 

When their son, John Lawrence Vaughan, II, 
married, his father-in-law was named John Lawrence 
Harter. His ancestors, too, came from Wales to North 
Carolina, as did the Stanfields. Julia wonders if 
they are related to the Lawrences of Rutherford County. 
The newspapers called to find if there was a mistake, 
there was John Lawrence Vaughan, the father, John 
Lawrence Harter, the groom's father, and John Lawrence 
Vaughan, II, the groom. 

Julia recalls many fond memories in their 
lives in Pulaski, and the heavy sorrow in his death; 
but without the sorrow she would never have known forty 
years of happiness. 

It took a long time and a great deal of work to 
complete John Lawrence Vaughan ' s dream to place a 
beautiful monument made by his own hands in Murf reesboro, 
Tennessee's Old City Cemetery to honor his mother's 
memory, but his wife, Julia, completed the necessary 
work and the stone was set in concrete in December, 
1977. 



72 



PEnnON OF JAMES BOLE OF RDTHERFORD CODNTI 
FOR i REVOLDTIONART WAR PENSION 

Pumlshed by Mrs. Edna Fry 

State of Tennessee 

Circuit CoTirt, April Term, 1832 

Rutherford County 

On this 30th day of August, 1832, personally appeared before Burton L. McFerrin 
an acting Justice of the Peace, for the County and State aforesaid. Janes Bole 
at the residence of the said Janes Bole In the County and State aforesaid, aged 
Eighty three years, three nonths and eleran days, who being first duly sworn 
according to law, doth, on his oath, nake the following declaration in order to 
obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June the 7th, 1832. 

That he entered the service of the United States under the following naned 
officers and served as herein stated. Having been drafted in the nilitia of 
Pennsylvania he entered upon duty on the 26th day of July 1776 under Captain 
Robert Elton, Janes Thonpson First Lieutenant and he thinks Jodeph Fleming 
Second Lieutenant. On the day aforesaid the company to which he belonged, 
assembled at the house of Captain Elton, then comnander, and marched directly 
to Philadelphia, where they arrived he thinks the second day after they left 
home. At Philadelphia his company joined the regiment of Pennsylvania Militia, 
commanded by Colonel Moon, who had been commonly called Squire Moon before 
entering the am^, having been a Justice of the Peace and his given name he does 
not remember. At the time he entered the service as aforesaid, he resided in 
Chester County, East Cain township in the State of Pennsylvania. His Captain 
Elton, resided in the same county of township, and Colonel resided in the same 
county, but he thinks not in the sane township. At the time he was drafted, he 
thinks there was orders to raise ten thousand militia in the State of Pennsylvania, 
to form what was called the flying camp . In about a week after he joined his 
regiment at Philadelphia as well as he can recollect, he marched with his reglneat 
to Amboy in the Jarsies, at which place the whole of the Pennsylvania Militia, met 
together and quartered. He does not remember the names of the general officers 
^o had the command of the whole of the troops; he knows he was in service under 
General Patton the next year, and he may have had command of the troops at Amboy, 
but he cannot remember so as to feel safe in stating it to have been so. He 
remembers that the other field officers of his regiment, besides Colonel Moon, 
was John Hammens First Major, John Culberson Second Major and Alexander Fleming 
Standard bearer. The name of the adjutant of the regiment he has forgotten. 
The term of service for which he was drafted was two months , which time he served 
out, dviring the whole of which time he was quartered at Amboy as was the wnole 
of the Pennsylvania Militia as well as he recollects. He was quartered immediately 
on the soiind, above the mouth of the Raritan. During the whole of the time, to 
the best of his recollection, that he was qiiartered at, or in Amboy, the British 
was qioartered Immediately on the opposite side of the sound on Statan Island so 
near to us that we could hear them beating the revilee every morning and sometimes 

in the evening we could hear the beind of . While the militia were thus 

situated there was a British vessel lay at about the distance of four miles down 



73 



the 80\md fi>om us In fxill vision. He supposed his object In being there was to 
watch our movements, amd give notice to the British troops on the Island, if we 
should make any movements like crossing over to attack them. There was nothing 
like an engagement between the British troops, and the forces to which he belonged, 
during all the time he was at kmboj, that is to say there was nothing like a 
general engagement. The British fired their cannon on the town of Amboy once or 
twice, and he understood that they kill a man in the court house, who was in the 
upper story. The troops to which he belonged, were once drawn up in line of battle, 
the artillery planted and matches prepared to fire this cannon, but there was no 
engagement and he does not remeniber to have seen any of the enemy; and he is not 
able to state what was really the object of forming the troops in battle array. 
During the time he was qxiartered as above stated he remembers an incident which 
occurred that may not be amiss to mention. Several of our soldiers went into the 
sound to bathe, and one of them kept swimming farther on towards the opposite ' 
side, returning and then swimming farther than before, \mtll at last, having 
gotten a considerable distance from his comerades, it was perceived his intention 
was to desert and cross over to the enemy. When this was discovered, our guard 
commenced firing at him, but he had gotten so far from the shore, he was in but 
little danger of being hit. Being am expert swimmer, he turned himself on his 
back and in that way swam at his leisure, watching the fire of our guard, and 
whenever he would see the flash of their guns, he would dive his head down in 
the water, and then rest and swim on, lontil in that way he reached the opposite 
side, where some of the British troops were assembled, by whom he was received with 
demonstrations of great joy. Having served out his two months as above stated he 
was verbally discharged by his 6aptain, or Lieutenant and he returned home. 

On the Ist day of January, 1777, he agiin left home as a volunteer, and 
proceeded to Philadelphia (his residence scill being in Chester County as afore- 
said) where he entered the service in Captain William Wither 's company of volunteers, 
he does not remember about the regiment to which he belongs, or that he belonged to 
any regimsnt. He thinks his commander Colonel Moon, did not tvirn out on that 
occasion, and he is under the iii^)resslon that there was no troops then at Phila- 
delphia, but such volunteers as had thought proper to turn out in their countiry's 
defense. He remembers, however, that Major Hannims was there, having volunteered, 
eind that he belonged to his command, and he also remembers Major Spears who was 
next in command to Bajor Hannims. The troops at Philadelphia were \mder the command 
of General Putman. He does not think there was at that time, any regular troops 
at Philadelphia, his best recollection is that they were all then at Morrlstown. 
From Philadelphia, General Putman marched us to Trenton, and then to Princeton, 
without making more than one night's halt at Trenton. We reached Princeton a few 
days after the Battle had taken place there, between Gen. Washington's troops and 
the British, and we were three days marching from Philadelphia there, encamping 
the first night at Bristol the second at Trenton as already stated and the third 

reaching Princeton. The troops which his regiment detached at Princeton 

by Gen. Putman. After reaching Princeton he remained there during the 

whole of the time of service, which was two months, except as hereafter stated. 
While there General Putman made a call for a con^jany of volunteers to march to 
Somerset for the pvirpose of attacking a party of the British which it was understood 
was stationed there for the purpose of foraging. About fifty volunteered, declarant 
being one of the number, and on the night of the 20th of Febrviary, we sat out and 
proceeded about thirty miles, where we halted and remained until daylight. We then 
proceeded on and reached Somerset about twelve o'clock. On that expedition we were 
commanded by Captain Boon, who had volimteered to command us. A short distance 
before we marched the town, we came upon the eneny's Sentinel, and fired at him, but 



74 



without effect. He immediately retreated to the main body of the enemy, and in 
a very short time, we saw the eneniy, advancing and forming on an eminence in front 
of the town. We soon perceived that they were too strong in numbers for us, and 
therefore retreated without coming to an engagement. The enemy, infjtead of 
piu*suing us, wheeled and marched in the other direction. For this movement, we 
were unable to account, unless they was deceived as to our niimbers, a great many 
coiontry people having joined us on horseback and went along with men from 
curiosity as he supposes, than from any other notion, and moreover, we had formed 
ourselves in a single file across an open field which made o\ir numoers appear greater 
than it really was. Being thus deceived, or otherwise, if they discovered the 
smallness of our forces, they supposed that we were only the advanced guard of 
our army, that had been sent forward to bring on an engagement and then retreat, 
and there by decoy them into the midst of superior numbers. Be this as it may 
they wheeled in the other direction which perceiving we turned and pursued them. 
On discovering which they hastened their retreat, and we were never able to over 
take them, or get sight of them after they turned the hill, on which as already 
stated, they at first fonned, although we pursued them through the town of Somerset, 
and within three miles of Brunswic at which place, the main body of troops to 
which they belonged, were stationed. When within that distsmce of Brunswic, 
night overtook us, and we halted and took up quarters. The next morning we 
proceeded on towards Brunswic and met with some American Light horse who had 
been out or who was then out on a reconnoitering expedition. We still progressed 
on in sight of Bmjnswic expecting that we should probably fall in with some of 
the eneny In small parties; but we met with none of them, and so returned back 
from there to Princeton. Declarant does not remember that there was any regular 
troops at Princeton while he was quartered there. At the end of his tour, which 
was two months, he received a verbal discharge from his Captain, and returned 
home. 

Early in the spring, after his return home, he was elected Second Lieutenant 
in the Militia Company to which, he belonged, and then being a call upon the 
militia shortly after his election, he was drafted. The company had been classed 
in eight classes, to the second of which he belonged, and the first second 
classes were both called out. He went out on the 25th day of June, 1777, and 
commanded as Second Lieutenant in the company to which he belonged. The company 
was under the command of Captain Scott, the najne of the First Lieutenant he 
cannot remember, he having been a stranger to him before he went out; and he had 
no acquaintances with him after his return home. He has also forgotten the name 
of the ensign. His commission as Second Lieutenant, or at least a part of it . 
under which he acted as such on this tour, is hereto annexed. A part of the 
commission had been destroyed or lost by the wear and tear of time . It will be 
perceived that his name in the part of his commission is spelled Boyle, which 
spelling is sometimes adopted by those who are not familiar with his name, and 
his mode of spelling it; and he supposed the Secretary in issuing his commission 
fell into the mistake about the orthography of his name, which had sometimes 
been made by others he states that under the commission, a part of which is here 
exhibited, he acted knowing that it was intended for him, although the spelling 
of his name is incorrect. The date of the commission is gone, and although it 
is so much mutilitated he thought it best to append it to his declaration. 
Declarant states that his company marched directly to Chester in Pennsylvania, 
which is about thirty miles distant from where he resided, and thus he joined 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Hannims, who had previously been a Major, and 
is the same heretofore mention in this declaration. Major Morton commanded in 
the regiment as First Major and Major Hartman acted as the Adjutant to troops 



75 



to which he belonged when on this toiir was under the commajid of General Potter. 
He remained at Chester one month, during which time he had no action or dangerous 
duties to perform. The troops during this time was regularly drilled everyday. 
After remaining at Chester one month as above stated, he was marched across the 
Delaware river to Billingsport on the Jersey side, where the troops to which he 
belonged were engaged in building a fort and making puch fortifications as it was 
thought the safety and proper defense of the country required. He was personally 
fiuid actively engaged in this business. Having been one month at Billingsport, 
and having served upon this tour two months in the whole, that being the period 
for which he was called out, he was verbally discharged and had returned home. 

About the 15th of June, 1778, as declarant thinks, he was again drafted and 
went out a Second Lieutenant in a company commanded by Captain Ephraim Allen. 
On this tour we were ordered out by the county Lieutenant, and was quartered at 
one John Garner's in Chester County about one month; during which time we did 
nothing but drill, vie were then ordered to Philadelphia by the county Lieutenant, 
and upon our arrival there, thus being no farther use for us, we were verbally 
discharged, and declarant returned home, which ended his military services; 
except about five months, dviring which he was afterwards engaged as a waggoner 
in the army; but for this service, he is advised he is not entitled to pay, under 
the construction put upon the act of Congress by the War Department. Declarant 
had no documentary evidence of his services except the part of his commission, 
as hereto annexed, and he knows of no person, whose testimony he can procure; 
who can testify to his services. 

Declarant was born in Chester County, East Cain township Pennsylvania, near 
little Brandywinc creek on the 19th of Kay, 174-9. He has no record of his age, 
his information about his age he obtained from a record made in a bible, 
belonging to his stepfather's in Pennsylvania, which he often saw, until he was 
about 36 years of age. He left the bible at his stepfather's when he left there, 
aJid he does not know what has become of it. When he entered service at each of 
the periods as aforesaid, he resided in Chester County, Pennsylvania, as already 
stated, and continued to reside there until 1780, at which time he moved to 
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1785, at which time he 
removed to Chester County, South Carolina, where he resided about eleven years, 
thence he removed to Pendleton district where he resided until the 3rd day of 
November, 1807, at which time he started to remove to Tennessee. On reaching 
Tennessee, he settled in Rutherford County, where he has resided ever since. He 
has already stated he was drafted, each term of service, except the second when 
he volunteered. He never received a written discharge from the service. He 
was well acquainted with General Sommers, Captain Brinkley, and Lieutenant Harris 
of the North Carolina regular troops while they were stationed at Valley Forge, 
but at the time he knew those officers, he was not himself in the army. 

He is known to Francis Youree, Charles Ready Sen., Post I'^ster at Readyville, 
Richard Standrige, Nathan I^on and many other persons in his neighborhood, who 
he believes will testify as to his character for veracity and their belief of his 
services as a soldier of the revolution. 

He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension whatever, or to an annuity. 
except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the 
agency of any state. 



76 

Sworn to and subscribed the 

day and year sd'oresaid before his 

me. James x Bole 

mark 



We Francis Youree and Charles Ready Sen., Post Master at Readyville, Rutherford 
County, Tennessee, both residing in said Rutherford County, hereby certify, that 
we are well acquainted with James Bole who has subscribed and sworn to the above 
declaration; that we believe him to be Eighty three years of age; that he is 
reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resided, to have been a soldier 
of the revolution, and that we concvir in that opinion. 

Sworn to and subscribed the s/Charles Ready Sen. 

day and year kforesaid before 

me. s/Francis louree 



And I, the said Burton L. McFerrin Esq. do hereby declare iny opinion after 
the investigation of the natter, and after putting the interrogations prescribed 
by the *^ar Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier, 
and served as he states. And I, the said Burton L. McFerrin Esq. further certify 
that I am well acquainted with Francis Youree and Charles Ready who have assigned 
the foregoing certificate, and that they are residents of the county of Rutherford 
and State of Tennessee, that they are credible persons, and that their statement is 
entitled to credit. I also further certify that James Bole, the applicant who had 
assigned and sworn to the foregoing declaration is infirm, and unable on account 
of his infirmity to go to a court of record of the county, to subscribe to his 
declaration. 

B. L. McFerrin 



77 



INDEX for PUBLICATION No. 13 



Abington 


34 




Bole 


72-76 


Abney 


33 




Boone 


37 


Acree 


3 




Bonner 


34 


Adams 


35 




Bowman 


41 


Adkins 


43 




Boyd 


15-28-38-4 3-44 


Adrendale 


33 




Boykin 


39 


Albanese 


41 




Boyle 


74 


Alexander 


31- 


.34-36-40 


Bradford 


36 


Allen 


37- 


• 75 


Bragg 


39-46-47-48 


Allensworth 


40 




Brandon 


40-42 


Anderson 


21- 


.39-41-49 


Bratton 


36-37 


Armstrong 


40 




Braun 


63 


Arnold 


11- 


■ 37 


Brevard 


35 


Ashworth 


40 




Brewer 


41 


Atherton 


36 




Bridges 


33 


Atwood 


17- 


■ 18-32-38 


Briggs 


34 


Avent 


36 




Brinkley 


75 


Avey 


39 




Britton 
Broach 


34 
33 


Babbs 


38- 


•42 


Brooks 


41 


Backett 


33 




Brown 


6-10-31-33-35-40 


Baggett 


38- 


■39 




48-49-54 


Bagwell 


36 




Bruce 


37 


Baker 


28- 


■ 44 


Brummitt 


35 


Barber 


58 




Bryan 


41 


Barnhill 


33- 


•34 


Bugg 


43 


Barrett 


39 




Bumpass 


7-8-42 


Barrow 


36 




Bunnell 


39 


Bartlett 


35 




Burchf ield 


43 


Bass 


35- 


• 42 


Burnett 


l_3_6-7-10-16-17 


Batey 


11 






31-33-36-60 


Battin 


33 




Burns 


42 


Baty 


33 




Burrows 


3 


Beasley 


40 




Buskirk 


39 


Beatele 


39 




Butcher 


38 


Beauregard 


46 




Butler 


11-32-36 


Beckman 


40 




Byrn 


l_2-8-34- 37-40 


Beasley 


37 




Byrom 


36 


Bell 


37 








Bennett 


42 




Caldwell 


37 


Benson 


43 




Cambron 


42 


Bentley 


28- 


• 44 


Campbell 


38-42 


Bernard 


38 




Cannon 


34 


Binder 


38 




Cantrell 


22 


Bingham 


40- 


-42 


Cardwell 


38 


Bilbrey 
Bly 


43 
35 




Carey 
Carlton 


41 

12-37-38-43 


Boehne 


37 




Carpenter 


39 


Bohannon 


12 




Carrigan 


40 


Boitnott 


42 




Carter 


48 



78 



Cartwright 


40 






Cunningham 


8-39 


Gary 


39 






Currey 


38 


Cason 


39 






Curtis 


25-42-44 


Castleman 


41 










Cathcart 


37 






Danielson 


38 


Catlett 


37 






Davant 


42 


Cavitt 


36 






Davidson 


6-36 


Cawthon 


58- 


59 




Davis 


3_6-34-41-42-46 


Chadwick 


42 








47-48-49-52 


Cheely 


38 






Dawson 


33 


Cherry 


38 






Deakins 


42 


Childers 


9 






Dean 


8-31-41 


Childress 


35 






Dement 


38 


Christian 


43 






Denham 


38 


Christy 


62 






Derminer 


42 


Clarice 


33 






Derryberry 


37 


Clark 


16- 


18- 


19-20- 


Dillon 


43 




21- 


28- 


• 35-37- 


Dillard 


40-48-49-54 




39- 


40- 


• 45 


Dodd 


38 


Claybrook 


20 






Dodge 


51-53 


Clayton 


34 






Dodson 


9_34-43 


Clinard 


41 






Doggett 


33 


Coffee 


49 






Donaldson 


43 


Coffey 


39 






Dority 


35 


Cohens 


68 






Dougherty 


36 


Cole 


37- 


■38 




Douglas 


48-49 


Coleman 


37- 


• 39- 


-41 


Dowel 1 


35 


Collins 


40- 


•62 




Doyel 


36 


Conley 


40 






Drake 


6-8-42 


Conoway 


36 






Drane 


49 


Cook 


36- 


• 37- 


• 41 


Duckworth 


42 


Copeland 


43 






Duff 


58 


Cooper 


37 






Dunaway 


28-43-44 


Cooney 


63 






Dunn 


40 


Corban 


39 






Durham 


34 


Corley 


38 






Dyer 


35-36 


Cosby 


32- 


-41 








Cotham 


42 






Eades 


8 


Couch 


36 






Early 


34 


Couey 


7 






Eddinger 


43 


Covington 


39 






Edens 


35 


Cowan 


43 






Edmondson 


42 


Cox 


3 5- 


-39- 


-40-41 


Edwards 


37-42 


Craddock 


44 






Ellis 


37 


Crocker 


40 






Ellison 


69 


Crockett 


34- 


-37- 


-39 


Elton 


72 


Crowley 


37 






Embry 


36 


Crum 


37 






Erwin 


32-33 


Crump 


35 






Evans 


28-37-38-42 


Crutcher 


34 






Everett 


6-26 


Culberson 


72 






Everette 


48 



79 



Every 


36 




Groves 


43 


Ewell 


35 




Gruver 


41 


Ev;ton 


39 




Guidry 


33 


Ezell 


35 




Gutherberg 
Gwaltney 


38 

35 


Fairfield 


35- 


• 36 


Gwinn 


49 


Farmers 


65 








Farrar 


41 




Haas 


15-43 


Felts 


34 




Hagen 


35 


Fetzer 


39 




Hale 


1-2-3 


Finney 


41 




Haley 


36 


Fisher 


40- 


• 41 


Hall 


6-34-35-43 


Fite 


41 




Hamilton 


34-37 


Fleenor 


43 




Hammens 


72 


Fleming 


72 




Hammonds 


38 


Flowers 


34 




Hannims 


73-74 


Ford 


35 




Hampton 


36-40 


Forgy 


8 




Hancock 


38-40-62 


Frazier 


61- 


•62 


Hankins 


41 


Freeman 


22- 


• 44 


Harby 


43 


Fry 


72 




Hardeman 


39 


Fulghum 


39 




Hargis 


35 


Fulton 


34 




Hargroves 


68 


Fumbanks 


33 




Harper 


43 


Funderburke 


37 




Harris 


40-43-75 


Furgason 


43 




Harrison 
Harter 


43 
71 


Gaff in 


43 




Hartman 


74 


Gann 


42 




Hartsfield 


39 


Gannaway 


39 




Harwood 


34-38 


Gardner 


3 5- 


■ 38 


Haskins 


39 


Garner 


75 




Haul see 


33 


Gately 


39 




Havens 


28-44 


Gavin 


63 




Hawkins 


39 


Gibson 


39 




Hawks 


36 


Glass 


35 




Hayes 


44 


Glenn 


38 




Haynes 


33 


Gonce 


40 




Hays 


34 


Goodman 


9- 


• 35 


Helm 


35 


Gordon 


36 




Helton 


44 


Gorman 


34 




Henderson 


65 


Go s sum 


36 




Hendrix 


28-44 


Graham 


63 




Herron 


41-44 


Grant 


33- 


-48 


Hibbs 


10-33 


Graves 


33- 


-43 


Higgs 


39 


Gray 


43 




Hill 


34 


Gregg 


53 




Hills 


35 


Griffith 


35 




Hillsman 


11-37 


Grimes 


28- 


-44 


Hines 


39 


Grizzard 


37 




Hobgood 


14-37-44 


Groom 


43 




Hobbs 


43 


Gross 


12- 


-14 33 


Hodges 


35 



80 



Hoffman 


62 




Jones 


HOfstetter 


35 






Holland 


33-39 




Joplin 


Holladay 


11 




Jordan 


Hollowell 


58 




Judd 


Holly 


43 




Judson 


Holloway 


41 






Hoi man 


43 




Kause 


Holmes 


43 




Keeling 


Holt 


3-33- 


34 


Kelly 


Hooper 


2-43 




Kelley 


Hoover 


33 




Kendall 


Hoskins 


33 




Kent 


Host 


63 




Kerr 


House 


33-35- 


37 


Key 


Howard 


37 




Kibble 


Howell 


43 




Kicklighter 


Howser 


34 




Kimbrell 


Huber 


38 




King 


Hudson 


39 




Kirkland 


Huddleston 


38 




Kirksey 


Hughes 


36-48- 


49 


Kirtley 


Humphrays 
Humphrey 


48 
42 




Kittrell 
Knodell 


• Hunt 


34 




Kraus 


Hunter 


33 




Kuel 


Hurt 


11 




Kuykendall 


Hutchinson 


36 






Hutton 


35 




Ladd 
Lassiter 


Ikard 


41 




Lannom 


Ingram 


35 




Laten 


Inlow 


12-32- 


-34-35 


Lawing 
Lawrence 


Jackson 


28-34- 


-37-39 






43-44 




Lax 


Jacobs 


34 




Leatherman 


Jacquette 


62-63 




Le Bihou 


Jaggers 


34-36- 


-38-40 


Lee 


Jamison 


35 




Leigh 


Jardine 


44 




Leitzell 


Jarman 


3-4 




Lester 


Jarrell 


34 




Lewis 


Jef f ers 


40 




Lickette 


Jeffreys 


3 




Lillard 


Jennings 


35-39 




Lindsay 


Jobe 


49-53- 


-54 


Lippingwell 


Johns 


38-39- 


-40 


Love 


Johnson 


34-35- 


-39- 


Lowe 




40-41- 


-42 


Lowman 


Johnston 


35-46 




Lowry 



3-6-20-28-34- 
36-37-39-43-44 
48-49 

1-2-39 
15 
12-31 

11 
41 
48 
42 

20 

68 

32-40-41-43-44 

33-43 

48 

34 

36 

38-39 

39 

38 

17-40-42 

39 

33 

43 

62 

43 

41 

33 

36-39 

35 

64-65 

56-59-60-61 

65-66-67-68-69 

41 

39 

12 

38 

9-35 
35 
34 

34-38 
11 
49 

6 
49 
42 

6-42 
31 
36-37 



81 



Luck 


48 




Merrell 


35 


Lyle 


37 




Merriam 


42 


Lyon 


75 




Merritt 


35 


Lytle 


33 




Meserve 
Meyer 


42 
34 


Maclin 


37 




Miller 


28-44-55-67 


Maddox 


41 




Milligan 


28 


Magruder 


33 




Mofield 


35 


Mahon 


35 




Moon 


72-73 


Ma lone 


43 




Moore 


3-6-18-33-34. 


Manassco 


42 






39-48-49-52 


Mandes 


33 




Morgan 


39-40 


Maney 


35 




Morley 


35 


Man ion 


36 




Morris 


38-41 


Manley 


43 




Morton 


36-74 


Manson 


36- 


40 


Moss 


38 


Marshall 


6 




Muller 


15-42 


Martin 


8- 


35-36-37-38 


Mull ins 


5-35 


Mason 


41 




Murdock 


37 


Matthews 


39 




Murf ree 


1 


Maxwell 


11- 


37 


Murray 


63 


Mayo 


42 




Nail 


41 


Mc Broom 


43 




Nast 


6-11-14 


McCall 


44 




Neal 


41 


McCandless 


34 




Nelson 


36 


McCarley 


38 




Neville 


38 


McCouley 


41 




Nichols 


39 


McClanahan 


33 




Nickens 


41 


McClellan 


38 




Noland 


15-42 


McClellen 


38 




Nolen 


34 


McCluskey 


39 








McConnell 


34 




0' Bryan 


43 


McCord 


42 




Officer 


35-37 


McCutcheon 


40 




Ogilvy 


68 


McFerrin 


41- 


72-76 


Olham 


43 


McGehee 


36 




Orengo 


63 


Mclvey 


49 




Overall 


36-58 


McKissack 


41 




Owen 


37-39-49 


McKnight 


58 




Owens 


49 


McMahan 


36- 


37-38-40 






Mc Mahon 


36 




Palmer 


38-43 


McMasters 


22 




Parchment 


44 


McMinn 


41 




Parker 


35-37-40-42 


McMurry 


34 




Parks 


42 


McNally 


63 




Paris 


37 


McNeil 


40 




Parson 


34 


Mcpherson 


35 




Patrick 


11 


McSween 


34 




Patterson 


33-48 


McWilliams 
Meadow 


40 
33 




Patton 

Paul 

Peace 


72 

32-37 

43 



82 



Peach 


42 






Rion 


2-3-4-34-39 


Pearcy 


36- 


■ 39- 


■ 40 


Rittenberry 


39 


Pedigo 


35 






Roberts 


34-37-40-48-49-54 


Penick 


3 






Robertson 


40-42 


Penny 


32 






Robinson 


32-38-39-41-46 


Perkins 


68 






Rogers 


28-40-43-44 


Pernell 


40 






Rollins 


40 


Person 


36 






Romine 


35 


Phillips 


36 






Rosecrans 


62-63-64 


Pickens 


34 






Ross 


39 


Pierce 


28- 


■35- 


■ 44 


Roth 


40-41 


Pittard 


21- 


■ 45- 


■ 46 


Rowan 


36 


Poff 


67- 


■ 68- 


■ 69 


Rowden 


37 


Pogue 


38 






Rowland 


28 


Polk 


3 






Roy 


41 


Pollard 


39 






Russell 


6-33 


Poole 


12- 


■ 33 




Ryalls 


3 


Pirtch 


48 






Ryan 


38 


Porter 


28- 


•39- 


• 44 






Porterm 


43 






Saddler 


40 


Potter 


40- 


■ 74 




Sanders 


12-32- 34-40 


Potts 


3 






Sanderson 


42 


Powell 


39 






Sandlin 


35 


Powers 


35 






Sasser 


11 


Preston 


24 






Satterwhite 


42 


Prince 


11 






Savage 


40-41 


Pugh 


15- 


• 35 




Scheldt 


37 


Pulliam 


37 






Schilling 


42 


Purdue 


28- 


■ 44 




Schmidt 


41 


Putman 


42- 


■73 




Schuler 


50-52 


Pyland 


39 






Schute 
Scott 


48 
36-43-74 


Quails 


37 






Searcy 
Sedberry 


35 
6 


Raby 


38- 


■39 




Selph 


10-33 


Rademacher 


62 






Shacklett 


33-45 


Ragland 


33 






Shaw 


46-47-48-49- 


Rambo 


35 








50-52-53-54 


Ransom 


67 






Shelton 


58 


Rawlings 


40 






Short 


39 


Ray 


34 






Sinclair 


44 


Ready 


7 5- 


■ 76 




Sisk 


38-43 


Red 


39 






Sloan 


1-41 


Redding 


41 






Smith 


1-2-3-12-14-15- 


Reed 


39- 


-44 






28-33-34-36-39- 


Reeves 


2- 


•3-4 




40-41-42-44 


Rennolds 


35- 


-37 




Smotherman 


44 


Rhoads 


34 






Smythe 


38 


Rhoades 


35- 


■37- 


■ 40 


Sneed 


49 


Richardson 


33- 


■ 60 




Sommers 


75 


Richeson 


34 






Sory 


34 


Ringo 


36 






Spain 


34 



83 



Springer 


40 


Wade 


Standridge 


75 


Waggoner 


Stanf ield 


56-61-62-63- 


Walker 




64-65-69-71 


Waller 


Stark 


37-40 


Walls 


Steitz 


38 


Walsh 


Stephens 


14-32-38 


Walton 


Stevens 


12-33-37-40 


Warnpl 


Stickney 


42 


Ware 


Strader 


6 


Woo don 


Strain 


31-32 


Wool fold 


Street 


48-49 


Wool son 


Sugg 


41 


Worley 


Sullivan 


39 


Wuille 


Slimmer s 


35 


Wright 


Sutherland 


35 




Sweet 


40 


Yakimovich 
Youree 


Tanner 


23-43 


Young 


Tartar 


34 




Taylor 


12-33-37-49 




Thacker 


35 




Thomas 


3-4-16-40-43 




Thomason 


36 




Thompson 


43-66-72 




Thorpe 


35 




Tiepel 


63 




Tilford 


40 




Tillinghast 


37 




Timber lake 


35 




Todd 


3-4-38 




Tov;e 


28 




Townley 


43 




Towns 


44 




Tranthan 


38 




Travis 


37-38-44 




Trevathan 


41 




Tubb 


35 




Tucker 


34-36 




Under-wood 


70 




Upchurch 


38 




Vandiver 


35 




Van Ness 


3 




van Sickle 


43 




Vaughan 


39-56-58-59 
66-67-68-69 
70-71 




Vaughn 


48 




Vincent 


34 





15-38 

34 

37-38 

3 
43 
63 
36 
33 
33 
35 
34 
43 
36 
61 
41-44 

39 

75-76 
9-41-43-68 



84 



RUTHBIFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY . INC . 
MEMBERSHIP LIST 



Mr, R. F. Adams 
1126 Rose Avenue 
Murfreeeboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Adkerson 
Route 3, Coropton Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Donald Anderson 
435 North Spring St. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. H. F. Arnette, Jr. 
1914 Greenland Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. W. R. Baker 

Box 245 

Ashland City, Tn 37015 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Barnes 
9234 Kenpwood Drive 
Houston, Texas 77080 

Mrs. E, M. Barto, Jr. 
2910 Gorth Road 
Huntsville, Alabama 35801 

Miss Bessie Baskette 
3205 Wingate Avenue 
Nashville, Tennessee 37211 

Margaret J. Batey 
3401 Granny White Pike 
Nashville, Tn 37204 

Mr, John Bragg 
1530 Mercury Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Dr. and Mrs. C. M. Brandon 

Route 1 

Christiana, Tn 37037 

Miss Margaret Brevard 
903 East Lytle Street 
Murfreesboro, Tenn 37130 



Dr. and Mrs. Fred Brigance 
1202 Scott land Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Charles L. Briley 
Rural Vale, Route 3 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. F. E. Britton 
133 Kingvood Drive 
Chattanooga, Tn 37412 

Mrs. J. W. Brovm 
126 Sequoia Drive 
Springfield, Tn 37172 

Miss Lucy Brown 

P. O. Box 565 

Dundee, Florida 33838. 

Miss Mary E. Bryan 
2210 Lebanon Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Lida N. Brugge 
714 Chickasaw Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Edna M. Buckley 
8647 E. Dulciana 
Mesa, Arizona 85208 

Mrs, Sara Bain Bunting 

225 North Uhiversity Street 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T, Bumette 
p, 0, Box 2 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mrs. Jean Caddie 

Box 654 

Waxahachie, Texas 7 5165 

Mrs. C, Alan Carl 
120 Ensworth Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37205 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



S5 



Preston C. Bruchard 

1230 S, California Avenue 

Palo Alto, California 94306 

Mr, Haynes Baltimoce 
Rutherford County Courthouse 
Murfreesboro, Tenn 37130 

Mr. Cecil J. Cates 
1103 Rutherford Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

James L. Chrisman 

27 28 Sharondale Court 

Nashville, Tn 37215 

Sam B, Coleman 
104 Hoover Drive 
Smyrna, Tenn 37167 

Tom Batey 

P. 0. Box 578 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Steve Cates 

Forrest Oaks-G106 

1002 East Northfield Blvd. 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Colonel Charles R. Cawthon 
1311 Delaware Avenue, SW 
Apartment S-245 
Washington, D.C. 20024 

Miss Louise Cavrthon 
Forrest Oaks-E107 
1002 East Northfield Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. George Chaney 
P. 0. Box 114 
LaVergne, Tn 37086 

George D. Clark 
3647 Undervood 
Houston, Texas 77025 

Mrs. James K, Clayton 
525 East College Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Boyd Coleman 

404 Division Street 

Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Tom G. Coleman, Jr. 
1702 Parkway Towers 
Nashville, Tn 37219 

Mr. and Mrs. VToodrow Coleman 
1206 Belle Meade Blvd 
Nashville, Tn 37205 

Dr. Robert Cor lew 
Manson Pike, Route 2 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. Robert E. Corlew III 
1611 Elrod Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Miss Edith Craddock 
1202 Kirkwood 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs, A. W. Cranker 
305 Tyne 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Martha C, Crutchfield 
1507 Maymont Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. Almond Chaney 
Sanford Drive 
LaVergne, Tn 37086 

Mrs. Susan G. Daniel 
2103 Foxdale Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Frances Helen Dark 

P. 0. Box 27 

Spring Hill, Tn 37174 

Mrs. Mary Lou Davidson 
210 Kingwood Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Florence Davis 

Old Nashville Hwy, Route 2 

Smyrna, Tn 37167 



MEHBERSHIP LIST 



36 



Mrs. George F. Davis 
5752 Oak Cliff Drive 
El Paso, Texas 79912 

Frances E, Denny 
107 Division Street 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mrs. W. H. Decherd 

5603 Greencraig 

Houston, Texas 77035 (2 Pub) 

Mrs. Paul H. Dunn 
2694 S\«ansont Vtey 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84117 

Bill Dunaway 
6800 Garth Road 
Huntsvllle, Alabama 35802 

Maxlne Dvinavay 

6828 Tulip Hill Terrace 

Bethesda, Maryland 20016 

Mrs. Constance Dunlap 
226 Grandvlew Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. A. C, Engle 

10506 Burr Oak Drive 

San Antonlon, Texas 78230 

Dr. Parker D. Elrod 
110 Swan Street 
Centervllle, Tn 37033 

Mrs. Moxilton Farrar, Jr. 
502 Park Center Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37205 

Mrs, John V, Freeman 

1936 Rosewood Valley Drive 

Brentwood, Tn 37027 

Mrs. Charles H. Fay 
Apartment One 
5403 Beverly Hill Lane 
Houston, Texas 77056 



Miss Mildred Felker 
607 East Pitkin 
pueblo, Colorado 81004 

Mrs, B. Wayne Ferguson 
2321 Colonial Avenue 
Waco, Texas 76707 

Captain William E. Fltzpatrlck 
3336 Celeste Drive 
Riverside, California 92507 

Mrs. Robert Fletcher 
14 President Way 
Belleville, Illinois 62223 

Miss Myrtle Ruth Foutch 
103 G Street, SW 
Washington, DC 20024 

Edna G. Fry 
Route 1, Box 470 
Melfa, Virginia 23410 

Miss Alline Gillespie 
4115 outer Drive 
Nashville, Tenn 37204 

Mr. Pollard Gillespie 

704 Rudy Lane 

Louisville, Kentucky 40207 

Mrs. Cathy Goode 
109 Belfield Court 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mrs. Carl E. Goodwin 
Route 3, Sanfcrrd Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Robin Gould 

2900 Connecticut Ave, NW 

Apt 324 

Washington, DC 20008 

Mrs. Nella Gray 

424 East Burton Street 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



87 



Mrs. Judy L. Green 
1214 Coffee Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

W. R. Hoover 
4700 Avenue R. 
Birmingham, Alabama 35208 

Mrs. R. C. Griffitts 
P. 0. Box 15054 
Nashville, Tn 37215 

Mrs. Robert Gvynne 
Brittain Hills Farm 
Rock Springs Road 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mr. Donald L. Hagerroan 
807 Sunset Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Miss Mary Hall 

821 East Burton Street 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. C. J. Harrell 

Route 1 

Readyville, Tn 37149 

Mrs. Henry Harrell 
P. O. Box 213 
Erin, Tn 37061 

Rev. Isham A, Harris, Jr. 
1011 Dogwood Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Jack R, Herriage 

Route 2 

Pilot point, Texas 76258 

Mr. Wayne Hewgley 

Route 1 

Milton, Tn 37118 

Mrs. B. K. Hibbett, Jr. 
2160 Old Hickory Blvd 
Nashville, Tn 37215 



Mrs. James M. Hobbs 
9722 Stanford Avenue 
Garden Grove, Ca 92641 

Mr. Charles E. Hodge II 
505 Hazelwood Drive 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Miss Aurelia L. Hoi den 
415 E. Main Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Jamev F. Hall 

512 Kings ROad, East 

Smyrna, Tn 37167 

John C. Hoover 

Route 5 

Jackson, Tn 38301 

Mrs. John W. Hollar 
3431 N. 17th Avenue 
Phoenix, Arizona 85015 

Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Hooper 
202 Second Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Miss Elizabeth Hoover 
400 East College Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Walter King Hoover 
101 Divisicm 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Claude A, Huddleston 
4205 Charlotte Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37209 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Huggins, Jr. 
915 East Main Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Dr. and Mrs. James K. Huhta 
507 East Northfield 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37B30 

Mr. Jack I. Inman 
5712 Vine Ridge Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37205 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



aa 



Mr. and Mrs. Dallas Ison 
1019 Houston Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

David L. Jacobs 
Beech Grove, Tn 37018 

Robert T, Jacobs 
Beech Grove, Tn 37018 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund James 
Route 1 

Armstrong Valley Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Amy R. Jennings 
417 Poplar Drive 
Falls Church, Va 22046 

Ernest King Johns 
Box 85, Route 1 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Thomas N. Johns 
P. 0. Box 892 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mrs. Bu£ord Johnson 
Mayfield Drive 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mrs. Edvin M. Johnson 
East Tn Historical Society 
Lawson I-lcGhee Library 
Knoxville, Tn 37902 

Mrs. R. H, Johnson 
615 Webb Street 
LaFayette, La 70501 

Mr. Homer Jones 
1815 Ragland Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Dr. Robert B. Jones, III 
819 Wrst Northfield 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs, Amy Jordan 
1700 Memorial Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Dr. and Mrs. Belt Keathley 
1207 Whitehall Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe R. King 
702 East l<!ain Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. King 
2107 Greenland Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. George Kinnard 
Windsor Towers, Apt 1110 
4215 Harding Jload 
Nashville, Tn 37205 

Dr. Howard Kirksey 
1015 East Bell Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Lawrence Klingaman 

851 NE 123th Street 

North mami, Florida 33161 

Miss Adeline King 
18th Avenue, South 
Nashville, Tn 37 200 

A. D. Lawrence 
225 McNickle 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Peter LaPaglio 
1403 Maymont 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Louise G. Landy 

1427 South Madison 

San Angelo, Texas 7 6901 

John B. Lane 
P. O. Box 31 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mrs, Dayton Lester 

Route 1 

Milton, Tn 37118 

Mrs. Lalia Lester 

1307 West Northfield Blvd. 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



39 



Mr. T. Vance Little 
Beech Grove Farm 
Brentwood, Tn 37027 

Mrs. Carrie McKnight Loffredo 

12290 NE 11th Court 

Apt 203 

North Miami, Florida 33161 

Mrs. Charles F. Lutz 
512 College Ave., S.W. 
Lenoir, North Carolina 28645 

Mrs. Gordon Lynch 
206 Dill Lane 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Louise G. Lynch 

Route 9 

Franklin, Tn 37064 

Mrs. Susan B. Lyon 
424 Second Avenue, S 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. James 1-lcBroom, Jr. 
Route 2, BOX 1313 
Christiana, Tn 37037 

Mr. W. C. McCaslin 
Bradyvillo, Tn 37026 

Mrs, Fannie McClanahan 
El Patio Motel 
Spur, Texas 79370 

Mrs. Ma?on McCrary 
209 Kingwood Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. hnd Mrs. Ben Hall McFarlin 
Route 2, Manson Pike 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Elise McKnight 
2602 Loyd Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Capt. Walter L. McKnight 
N.A.T.O Programming Center 
A. P.O. 09055 
New York, New York 09011 



Mrs. Jack R. Mankin 
4100 Old Coleman Road 
Memphis, Tn 38128 

Dr. Robert L. Mason 
Route 1, Hare Lane 
Milton, Tn 37118 

Maury county Library 
211 West 8th Street 
Columbia, Tn 38401 

Mr. James C. Matheny 
719 Ewing Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Almyra W. Medlen 
Route 7, Box 50 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Evelyn Merritt 

Rural Route 1 

Newman, Illinois 61942 

Miss Luby H. Miles 
214 Beverly Drive 
Madison, Tn 31115 

Miss Julia Clarice Miller 
808 Wiles Court 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Margaret Miller 

1007 West Clark Blvd, 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

William David Mullins 
1207 Coarsey Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37217 

Mr. Eugene R. Mullins 
2400 Sterling Road 
Nashville, Tn 37215 

Mrs. David Naron 
459 Blair Road 
LaVergne, Tn 37086 

Mrs. C. L. Neill 

Box 103 

Pharr, Texas 78577 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



90 



Mr. and Mrs. James B. Nelson 
206 East Clark Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Law son B. Nelson 
13812 Whispering Lake Drive 
Sun City, Arizona 85351 

Se. Cfoe E. Nunley, Sr. 
305 Second Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. J. H. Oliver 
The Corners 
Readyville, Tn 37149 

Mr. Harry M. Patillo 

Box 1 

Eagleville, Tn 37067 

Dr. John A. Patten 
2214 Riley Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Dr. and Mrs. E. K. Patty 
1434 Diana Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. Dean Pearson 
414 Ross Drive 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mr. Chester Peters 
2400 Robert Bums Drive 
Fort Worth, Texas 76119 

Mr. Walt Pfeifer 

Box 1936 

Abilene, Texas 79601 

Dr. and Mrs. Homer Pittard 
309 Tyne 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. William O, Pointer 

Route 4 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr, James T, Pollard 

3401 Leith Avenue 

Fort Worth, Texas 76133 



Mr. Bobby Pc^;>e 
Old U. S. 41 
LaVergne, Tn 37086 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Ragland 

Box 544 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. Kelley Ray 
225 North Academy 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. W. H. Read 
Box 311, Route 1 
Rockvale, Tn 37153 

Mrs. Frances R. Richards 
Mercury Manor, Apt 51 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. James A. Ridley, Jr. 
Route 3, Lebanon Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. Granville Ridley 
7 30 East Main Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Miss Mary Bell Robinscm 
443 East Burton Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. Billy J, Rogers 
506 Jean Drive, Route 2 
LaVergne, Tn 37086 

Mrs. Elvis Rushing 

604 North ^ring Street 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. Thomas L. Russell 
5019 Colemont Drive 
Huntsville, Alabama 35811 

Mrs. Robert M, Sanders 
Rutherford County Nursing Rome 
Route 1 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Miss Sara Lou Sanders 
Mercury ftenor Apts, A|Jt # 41 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



91 



Mr. E. Richmond Sanders, Jr. 
205 Cumberland Circle 
Nashville, Tn 31214 



Colonel Sam W, Smith 
318 Tyne 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Sanders-Dr. Bealer Smotherman 
P. O. BOX 1275 1020 Lytle Street 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. John F. Scarbrough, Jr. 
701 Fairview 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Dr. R. Neil Schultz 
220 East College Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. Jo^n Shacklett 
307 S. Tennessee Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. J. Mahlon Sharp 
Route 2, Almaville Road 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 



Miss Dorothy Smotherman 
1220 North Spting Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. James E. Smotherman 

Route 1 

College Grove, Tn 37046 

Mrs. Leoma M. Smotherman 
P. O. BOX 35 
Rockvale, Tn 37153 

Mrs. Nell Smotherman 
207 Kingwood Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. Charles E. Shelby 
P. O. Box 22578 
Savannah, Georgia 31403 



Mr. Travis Smotherman 
21 Vaughn's Gap Road 
Apartment B-28 
Nashville, Tn 37205 
Mr. William A. Shull, Jr. 

4211 Ferrara Drive Mr. C. Ray Stacy 

Silver Springs, Maryland 20906-826 Willard Street 

^ ' Elkhard, Indiana 46514 

Mr. J. A. Sibley, Jr. 

P. O. Box 7965 

Shreveport, Louisiana 71107 



Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Stelnbridge 
Route 7, Salem Pike 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. Don Simmons 
Melber, Kentucky 42069 

Miss Becky Smith 
1910 Memorial Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tenn 37130 

Mr. Gene Sloan 

728 Greenland Drive 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. J. C. Smith 
711 4th Avenue 
Fayetteville, Tn 37 334 



Colonel and Mrs. E. C. Stewart 

Clifftops 

Monteagle, Tn 37 356 

Mrs. Carl V. Stine 
Route 3, BOX 292 
Axle, Texas 76020 

Mrs. Robert M&c Stone 
921 Westview Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37205 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifton G. Smith 
824 Roseview Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37 206 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 



92 



Mrs. J. Houston Smith 
Bell BucXle, Tn 37020 

Stones River Chapter DAR 



DAR Libraxry 
1776 D Street NW 
Washington, DC 20006 

Mr. Roy Tarwater 
815 West ClarX Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. William H. Thompson Jr. 

Dry ForJc Road 

Whites Creek, Tn 37189 

Thxirman Francis Jr. High School 
P. O. Box 8 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Tennessee State Library 
ATTN: A. Ferdinand Engel 
Tn State Library &. Archives 
Nashville, Tn 37219 

Mr. C. L, VanNatta 

P. O. Box 16362 

Rocky River, Chio 44116 

Mrs. Frances H. Vaughn 
5155 Abel Lane 
Jacksonville, Florida 32205 

Mrs. J. Wilbur Vaughan 
204 Poplar Street 
Martin, Tn 38237 

Mrs. Emmett Waldron 

Box 4 

LaVergne, Tn 37086 

Mr. William Walkup 
202 Ridley Street 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Mr. Bill Walkup 
202 Ridley Street 



Smyrna, Tn 37167 



Mrs. George F. Watson 
Executive Bouse, B-17 
Franklin, Tn 37064 

Mayor and Hca, W. H. Westbrooka 
306 Tyne 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. Charles Wharton 
917 Crownhill Drive 
Hashville, Tn 37217 

Amon Williamson 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Miss Kate Wharton 
Box 156, Route 2 
Apopka, Florida 32703 

101 Murfreesboro Road 
Woodbury, Tn 37119 
NOTE: Use Fla Address during 
September-llay. Use the 
Woodbxiry address other 3 
months. 

Mr. Cliff White 
3550 Frazier Avenue 
Fort Worth, Texas 76110 

Miss Virginia Wilkinson 
1118 East Clark Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. Virginia Wilson 
507 Winfrey Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mrs. John Wtoodfin 
1320 Richland Place 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Woods 
3428 Hanpton Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37215 

Mrs. Selene D. Woodson 
907 West Clark Blvd. 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Mr. Henry G. Wray 
24367 Fir Avenue 
Sunnymead, California 92388 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 

Mr. F. Craig Youree 

Route 2 

Readyvllle, Tn 37149 

Mr. & Mrs. Joe F, Carlton 
Route 1, Box 143 
Eagleville, Tn 37060 

Stone's River DAR 
Mrs. Buford Johnson 
307 Mayfield Drive 
Smyrna, Tenn 37167 

The Reviewers Club of Smyrna 

% Dorothy Epps 

101 Bane Drive 

Smyrna, Tennessee 37167 





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AG 15 '97 




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