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3 3082 00527 7107 =ORD COUNTY 

HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Publication No. 20 



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Winter 1983 



Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication20ruth 



A HISTORY OF THE ROADS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY, 

TENNESSEE, 1804-1878: HISTORIC ROAD 

RESEARCH, AND ITS APPLICATIONS FOR 

HISTORIC RESOURCE SURVEYS AND 

LOCAL HISTORY 



Edward C. Annable, Jr 



A thesis presented to the 
Graduate Faculty of Middle Tennessee State University 
in partial fulfillment of the requirements 
for the degree Master of Arts 

December, 1982 



LIBRARY 

WI91>LE TEWNESSSF ITAT! BNIVIRSITT 



V, 2 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



Introduction * Page 1 

Rutherford County Public Roads from Indian 

Trails to the Civil War Page 3 

The Turnpike Era in Rutherford County I830-I86O. Page ijl 

Roads in Rutherford County during the Civil War 

and Reconstruction Page 119 

Appendix A Road References in Rutherford County 

Quarterly Court minutes l30U-l877 . . Page lUl 

Appendix B Rutherford County Road Overseers 

I80U-I826 Page 192 

Appendix C Verification of Selected Road Termini 

in Appendix A Page 219 

^pendix D Maps of Road Development in Rutiier- 

ford County l80ii-l878 Page 260 

Selected Bibliography Page 26U 



* Most of Chapter 1 and all of Chapter 5 were not published. 
These chapters discuss Benefits and Problems of Historic Road 
Research and could not be included due to space. Anyone wish- 
ing to read these chapters may find them in Middle Tennessee 
State University Library. 



83-07087 



FGR 3ALB 



THE POLLOWINQ PUBUCATIOMS ARE FOR SAI2 BTj 



Th« Rutherford County Historical Society 

Box 906 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



Publications # 1, 2, 3, U, 5, 6, 8 and 9 OUT of PRINT 

Publication # 7: Hopewell Church, Petition by Cornelius Sanders 

for Rev. War Pension— ——— $ 3.50 ♦ $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # 10: 186U Diary « Peter Jennings, Henderson Yoakum, 
Early Methodist Church, and Overall 
family ~ — — — — — — — $ 3.50 + $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # U: State CapLtol, Ben McCuUoch, Petition of 
Michael Lorance, A Country Store, and 
Soule College — — ~— ~— $ 3.50 + $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # 12: HLstoxy of Sewart AFB, Goochland and 

Will Index $ 3.50 ♦ $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # 13: Tennessee College, Coleman Scouts, New 
Monument in old City Cemetery and Rev. 
War Pension of James Boles — — $ 3.50 + $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # lU: Murfreesboro Presbyterian Chttrch, Kirks and 

Montgonerys, Russel Home, John lytle, and John 

M. Leak Revolutionary Pension-- $ 3*50 + $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # l5t WWLgs in Rutherford County, 1835 - 181*5 

$ 3.50 + $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # I6: Harts' Spring, Childress family. Gov. 
John Miles, Fosterville, Cherry Shade, 
Revolutionary Record of Vftn. Cocke 

$ 3.50 + $ 1.00 postage 

PublicaUon # 17: Jefferson I803 - 1813, Will Abstracts, 
Murfreesboro • 8 Old City Cemetery 

$ 3.50 + $ 1.00 postage 



FOR SALE 

Publication # 19: Smyrna I869 - I88I, Veterans Hospital, Manson Family, 
Jenkins Homes, Rutherford Wills, Historical Society- 
Early Newspapers abstracts, Macon Co lU from Ruther- 
ford County $ 3.50 + $ 1.00 postage 

Publication # 20: Road and Turnpikes in Rutherford Counly I8OU-I878 

$ 5.00 + $ 1.00 postage 

HISTORY of RUTHERFORD CODNTY by C. C. Sims 

A reprint of the 19h7 edition of our county history, contains 230 

pages with index and hard covers $ 12.00 + $2.00 postage 

and handling 

INDEX of Publications 1 throu^ 5 $ 5-00 + $1.00 postage 

I8U0 Rutherford County Census with Index $ 5-00 + $1.00 postage 

Deed Abstract of Rutherford County I803 - I8IO . . $ 10.00 + $1.00 postage 

GRIFFITH ; Hiustrated bi-centennial publication. . $ 2.00 + $1.00 postage 

COMMEMORATIVE PLATES: 

Plate # 2: Tennessee College In Murfreesboro . $ $.00 + $1.00 postage 
laate # 3s Rutherford County Courthouse, 1900 $ 5.00 + $1.00 postage 

AVAILABLE FROM: Mr. William Walkt?) 
202 Ridley Street 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 

Rutherford County Map 1878, shows land owners - $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

CEMETERY RECORDS of Rutherford County: 

Vol. 1: Northwestern third of cotmty and part of Wilson and Davidson 
counties, 256 cemeteries with index and maps. 

$ 10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Vol. 2: Eastern third of Rutherford and the western part of Cannon 

county, 2lil cemeteries with index and maps- $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Vol. 3: Southwestern third of Rutherford county, 193 cemeteries with 

index and maps $ 10.00 + $1.00 postage 

ALSO AVAILABLE FROM : Mrs . Fred Brigance 

1202 Scottland Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 

Marriage Records of Rutherford Coxxnty l85l - l872 

$ 10.00 + $1.00 postage 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

PUBLICATION NO. 20 

Published b7 the 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

President Mr. Ernest K. Johns 

Vice-President Mr. W. H. Westbrooks 

Recording Secretary Miss Louise Cawthon 

Corresponding Secretary Mrs. Susan Daniel 

Publication Secretary Mr. Walter K. Hoover 

Treasurer Mrs. Kelly Ray 

DIRECTORS: Mr. James Matheny 

Mrs. William Walkup 
Mrs. Tall a Lester 



Publication No. 20 (Limited Edition-U25 copies) is distributed 
to members of the Society. The annual membership dues is $10.00 
(Family $11.00) which Includes the regular publleatlons and the monthly 
NEWSLETTER to all members. Additional copies of Publication No. 20 
may be obtained at $5.00 per copy. 

All correspondence concemlng additional copies, contributions to 
future issues, and membership should be addressed to: 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

Box 906 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

Like the laborers who worked on the roads in 
Rutherford County, I, in working on this thesis, could not 
have completed it on my own. I would like to thank my 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Annable, Sr . , and my 
grandfather, Mr. Edward R. Annable, for their continuous 
support on this project. 

Many Rutherford County residents assisted me in the 
research phase of this thesis. Dr. Sam Woods provided 
insight on the location of roads in relation to animal 
husbandry. Miss Martha Wright, a staff member of the 
Rutherford County Register's Office, has done tremendous 
work in indexing the county's deed books. Without her new 
system of indexing the old deeds, there is no doubt that 
I would have had little success in locating road termini. 
Mr. William Patterson provided me with an immense amount of 
information on Rutherford County's early history and histor- 
ical sites. It is a fact that I would not have located as 
many of the road termini as I did without his help. Mr. 
Ernest K. Johns, with his vast knowledge of Rutherford 
County' s history, has added immensely to the scope of this 
thesis. Many key road termini would not have been located 
without his assistance. 



I would also like to thank Mr. Keith Smith for 
helping me construct a map board which was utilized in 
determining road locations in the county. I also appre- 
ciate the advice that Dr. James K. Huhta provided me in 
the completion of this thesis. With all the helpful 
assistance provided me by these individuals, I alone take 
responsibility for any mistakes and omissions. 



CHAPTER I 

INTRODUCTION TO HISTORIC RESOURCE SURVEYS 
AND HISTORIC ROAD RESEARCH 

The road system is an important factor in the 
political, economic, and social vitality of an area. 
Routes of transportation from the roughly cut trail to the 
superhighway have always performed an important role in 
the development of a community or region. This thesis is 
oriented towards emphasizing the importance of utilizing 
the historical development of the road system in the local 
historic resource survey of historical, architectural, and 
cultural resources. 

The research for supporting the proposition that 
the road system's development is important in planning for 
surveys and using the survey data is primarily from Ruther- 
ford County, Tennessee. The county is located in the 
central portion of the state, southeast of Nashville, the 
state capital. The years 1804 to 1878 were determined as 
the parameters for the study because 18 04 signifies the 
establishment of the county and 1878 was the year in which 
the most detailed county map was published up to that time. 
In addition to a general history of the roads in Rutherford 
County, benefits for historic preservation and local history 

1 



are addressed in this thesis. In an effort to encourage 
further research into the roads as a resource for surveys, 
the methodology used as well as problems encountered during 
the research are expressed. 

This thesis also includes four appendices primarily 
to serve as a data base and to aid individuals interested 
in the history of Rutherford County. The first appendix 
lists all references in the Rutherford County Quarterly 
Court Minutes that can possibly aid in determining the 
location of roads in the county. It does not include all 
references to the roads in the county; items such as some 
road overseer appointments and appropriations for tools 
were excluded. A table of road overseers during the early 
period of road construction is shown in another appendix. 
It is chronologically organized and attempts to trace the 
changes in road overseers. The concluding data for this 
appendix was arbitrarily determined primarily due to a lack 
of further data. The third appendix documents many of the 
road locations by tracing the land ownership of some road 
termini to the 1878 map. The final appendix consists of 
several maps showing the development of roads in the county 
to 1878. 



CHAPTER II 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY'S PUBLIC ROADS FROM 
INDIAN TRAILS TO THE CIVIL WAR 

This chapter will examine several major aspects of 
Rutherford County's roads, including the historical back- 
ground of the roads prior to the formation of the county in 
1804. Public roads built prior to 1861 will be extensively 
studied in this chapter. Major historical themes as well as 
relationships between the roads and historical events will 
be presented. This examination of the public roads will be 
oriented towards the construction process and the overall 
development of the roads rather than the specific locations 
which are presented in appendices A and D. 

There were two historical precedents to the early 
Rutherford County road system; one precursor was the Indian 
influence in establishing trails in the area, and the other 
factor was the English background in the road construction 
system and technology. At the time of the arrival of 
settlers to the area known later as Rutherford County, there 
were no permanent Indian camps, but there were trails. In 



■^Travis E. Smotherman, "Archaeological and Anthro- 
pological Aspects of the Prehistory of Rutherford County," 
Rutherford County Historical Society Publication , no . 3 
(1974) , p. 21. 



the eighteenth century the area was disputed as a hunting 
ground by several Indian tribes, including the Cherokees, 
Chickasaws, Shawnees, Creek, and possibly the Iroquois. 

Indians throughout North America were adept at 
blazing trails. Many trails were a result of Indians track- 
ing herds of buffalo or deer and were later adapted to other 
uses such as commerce between tribes. They were influenced 
in their travel patterns by the natural topography of the 
land. In level areas, they sought trails allowing both ease 
of movement and directness. In areas of rough terrain, they 
preferred to make detours around hills. Their routes were 
determined by watercourses, hills, and valleys. As Indians 
predominantly settled along streams or rivers, the trails 
paralleled them.^ 

In Rutherford County, physical evidence of Indian 
trails has probably declined over time, but several impor- 
tant Indian trails traversed the area. The "Great South 
Trail," which ran southward from the Great Salt Lick in the 
vicinity of Nashville and through Williamson County, entered 
Rutherford County west of Eagleville. It proceeded in an 
eastern and southeastern direction to the head of Wartrace 



^Ibid., pp. 22-25. 

^Caroline E. MacGill, History of Transportation in 
the United States Before 1860 (Forge Village, Mass.: Murray 
Printing Co., 1948), p. 6. 

Wheaton J. Lane, From Indian Trail to Iron Horse; 
Travel and Transportation in New Jersey 1670-1860 (Prince- 
ton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1939), pp. 15-16. 



Creek. From there it ran to the present city of Tullahoma 

and south to the Indian settlements in Alabama and 

. 5 
Mississippi. It was a: 

. . . broad beaten path made by the buffalo which came 
from the South to the French Lick (Salt Lick at Nash- 
ville's Sulphur Springs Bottom). ... It was worn 
into the earth one or two feet or more in many places. 
In some places it was three or four feet wide.^ 

Another trail passing through Rutherford County was 

the "Cisca" or "St. Augustine Trail." It was called the 

"Nickajack Trail" by the settlers of Middle Tennessee. The 

portion of the trail in Rutherford County was part of a 

longer trail network that ran from Nashville by the Stone 

Fort, possibly Cisca, in Coffee County, Tennessee, to St. 

Augustine, Florida. From the old Stone Fort the trail 

crossed the Garrison Fork near Fort Nash, not far from the 

present town of Beech Grove and into the county. The trail 

passed by Black Fox Spring and through the Murfreesboro area 

7 
to Nashville. 

The "Black Fox Trail," last of the Indian trails 

known to have passed through the county, was part of a 

longer trail known as the "Saline River Trail." The Saline 

River Trail began at the Cherokee settlements on the 



^William E. Myer, Indian Trails of the Southeast 
(Washington, D.C.: Bureau of American Ethnology, 1924; 
reprint ed., Nashville, Tenn.: Blue and Grey Press, 1971), 
pp. 116-117. 

^ The Civil and Political History of the State of 
Tennessee , 2d ed. , cited by Myer, p. 11/. 

^Myer, pp. 112-117. 



Hiwassee River in East Tennessee. It crossed the Ohio River 
at Golconda, Illinois, and the Mississippi River at Cape 
Girardeau, Missouri, and extended into Missouri and Oklahoma, 
The Rutherford County portion of the route, or Black Fox 
Trail, ran from Woodbury in Cannon County west across the 
county line near Readyville and intersected the Nickajack 
Trail at Black Fox Spring. From there it split into two 
trails, one following the Nickajack Trail and the other 
branch entering Nashville along the Murfreesboro and 
Nashville Turnpike.^ 

The importance of the Indian trails lies in the fact 
that they were present in the Rutherford County area when 
the settlers arrived. Most secondary sources consulted by 
this writer support the idea that Indian trails were adapted 
by the early settlers into traces, later county roads, turn- 
pikes, and finally modern state and interchange highways.^ 
This idea seems to be plausible as the Blackjack Trace was 
mentioned in the Rutherford County road orders. -^^ These 
Indian trails were possibly expanded into crude roads prior 
to the formation of Rutherford County, thus resulting in the 
absence of numerous references to them in the county's 



^Ibid., pp. 103-105. 

^Carlton C. Sims, ed . , A History of Rutherford 
County (Murfreesboro, Tenn.: By the Author, 1947), p. 55; 
MacGill, pp. 6, 120; Lane, p. 33. 

"Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book C, p. 167. 



quarterly court minute books. It is evident that modern 
highways parallel the old trails if they do not use parts 
of them. Part of the Black Fox Trail identifies with U.S. 
Highway 7 0S, while the Nickajack Trail correlates with the 
Manchester Pike and the Old Nashville Highway. This rela- 
tionship leads to the unanswerable questions of how much and 
where do the Indian trails impact on our modern transporta- 
tion system? 

The system of road construction and maintenance in 
nineteenth century Rutherford County had its origin in 
sixteenth century England. With the breakdown of feudalism, 
the government relied on the common law liability of the 
inhabitants of the parish to maintain the roads in good con- 
dition.-^^ This was reinforced by a statute of 1555 which 
required every parish to muster its men once a year for six 
unpaid days of labor on the highways. -^2 j^ surveyor of high- 
ways, or waywarden, was chosen in each parish on an annual 
basis. He had the authority to call out all the available 
labor of the parish to work on the roads. -^-^ 

The English system of road construction and mainten- 
ance was adapted to the different conditions of North 



■'■■^Neil Cossons, The BP Book of Industrial Archaeol- 
ogy (Oxford, England: Alden Press, 1975), p. 316. 

^^Brian Bracegirdle, ed . , The Archaeology of the 
Industrial Revolution (Ganbury, N.J.: Associated University 
Presses, 1974), p. 59. 



13 



Cossons, p. 316 



America. This thesis will examine the road system of 
Colonial North Carolina because of Tennessee's close ties 
to North Carolina prior to 1789. Before 1715, surveyors 
were appointed for districts with the counties. When 
specific roads were petitioned for, the surveyors for the 
district in which the road was to be located were called to 
clear the road. The precinct court granted the petition and 
the district's surveyors marked the road's location. But 
over time, a committee or jury of from two to three men 
replaced the surveyors and delineated the route of the pro- 
posed road. After the road was marked out, the surveyor and 
the men of the district — called a road company — opened the 
road by removing the obstacles to traf f ic. •'■'* 

After 1715, roads were laid off by a twelve-member 
jury. Surveyors were appointed by the precinct courts, and 
by law they were required to serve for one year. It was 
their responsibility to call out all male tithables or 
taxables , consisting of all free males sixteen years and 
older, and all slaves twelve years and older. By 1700 the 
term "overseer" and "surveyor" were used interchangeably, 
and by 177 5 the term "overseer" was being used almost 
solely. ^^ For a period of time between 17 34 and 17 64 the 



■^'^Alan D. Watson, "Regulation and Administration of 
Roads and Bridges in Colonial Eastern North Carolina," 
North Carolina Historical Review 45 (Autumn 1968) :401. 

^^Ibid., pp. 401-402. 



northern and southern counties in the colony split into two 
types of road administration. The northern counties con- 
tinued to use the old system while the southern counties 
adopted a commissioner system. Supervision of the roads 
was conveyed from the overseer and the road company to com- 
missioners. This group of three to five men was independent 
of the precinct courts, and they were empowered to act as • 
the courts and overseers had previously done in the con- 
struction of roads and bridges. The commissioner system 
was a failure in maintaining roads. The problem resulted 
from the death or removal of commissioners, or the neglect 
by these individuals of their duties. They could not be 
disciplined by the precinct or county courts for their 
laxness in fulfilling their duties. •^^ 

A law enacted in 1764 closed the break between the 
road systems of the northern and southern counties. All 
roads were to be twenty feet wide and laid out by a jury of 
twelve freeholders. The overseer was required to place a 
post with the direction to the nearest town or public ferry 
and the number of miles to the location wherever the road 
forked. They were also ordered to set mile markers on the 
roads. ■'■ ' 

The roads in Colonial North Carolina were important 
in trade, travel, and local convenience. The people of the 



16 



Ibid., pp. 402, 412, 413. ^"^Ibid., p. 403. 



10 



colony, in their petitions for roads, desired access to 
political, economic, social, and religious centers such as 
courthouses, river landings, churches, schoolhouses, ware- 
houses, gristmills, and ferries. The road construction 
procedure usually began with a petition to the precinct or 
county court. If the court approved the road, directions 
for the road's route were given to a jury of twelve men. 
These freeholders had the duty of marking out the road and 
assessing damages caused by the construction. An overseer 
and road company were appointed to construct the road. The 
road jury was sworn before a magistrate and told to mark 
the road's route by the next court session and to provide a 
report of its activities. Many court orders for roads had 

to be reiterated because the juries were remiss in carrying 

1 p 
out their duties. ■^° 

The overseers and road companies were responsible 

for constructing and maintaining the roads. All of the 

taxables within a road district constituted the road company. 

The courts would divide the district if the number of roads 

became too immense for one overseer to handle. Exemptions 

from duty in road companies were given to individuals who 

were over sixty years old and those physically unable to 

work. The road overseers and members of the road companies 



ISibid., pp. 403, 406, 407 



11 



were liable to fines for not appearing to work on the roads 

19 
or for keeping the roads in a state of disrepair. 

Road legislation of the state of North Carolina is 
important in understanding road development in Tennessee. 
The county courts had the power to order the laying out, 
altering, and discontinuing of public roads, and designating 
the location of bridges. All the roads were laid out by a 
jury of freeholders to the best advantage of the inhabitants. 
Roads were required to be twenty feet wide. All stumps and 
runners were required to be cut and cleared for a width of 
sixteen feet from the center of the road. If the overseer 
and members of the road company could not construct a bridge, 
it was contracted out to private individuals. To construct 
and maintain roads, all the male taxables from sixteen to 
fifty years of age were required to meet at designated loca- 
tions to work on the roads. Those individuals who had been 
excused from working had to send three slaves or three other 
hands to work in their place. Anyone who refused or neg- 
lected to work on the roads when called was fined five 
shillings per day. This money went to the overseer to hire 
other laborers. No individual was required to serve more 
than one year in three as road overseer. The overseers had 
to notify each male taxable and slave owner of what tools 
they were to bring to work on the roads. The laborers had 



l^Ibid., pp. 408, 411. 



12 



to be notified three days prior to the designated workday or 
they could not be fined. It was legal for the road overseer 
to assign equal apportionments to the workers if requested 
by a majority of them. The overseer was still required to 
set up direction posts and mile markers or face a fine of 

five pounds. No individual was allowed to turn or alter 

20 
any public road without permission from the county court. 

According to Alan D. Watson, an authority on roads 
in Colonial North Carolina, the colony "possessed one of the 
poorest transportation systems in the colonies." He attrib- 
utes this observation to several factors: the disdain for 
authority that the citizens had, physical obstacles, a 
scattered and insufficient population, and more roads 
authorized than could be sufficiently administered. Court 
orders for marking off roads were not obeyed. Overseers and 
laborers failed to complete their duties or even appear for 
work. The area of North Carolina studied by Watson abounded 
in sounds, rivers, and swamps, which hindered the physical 
completion of the roads. There were not enough men to main- 
tain the existing roads, and as more roads were authorized 



2°North Carolina, An Act to Empower the County 
Courts of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of the Several Counties 

. to Order the Laying Out of Public Roads . . . (11»^) , 

Laws . . . (1791) , quoted in Clifford K. Shipton, ed.. Early 
Amer ican Imprints 1639-1800 (Worchester, Mass.: American 
Antiquarian Society, 1969), Readex Microprint, Evans No. 
23641 (5th cont.), p. 532. 



13 



by the county courts, productivity declined, and the roads 

21 
fell into disrepair. -^ 

The importance of examining the road system of North 
Carolina prior to the statehood of Tennessee is to show the 
many similarities between the two systems. They will be 
brought out in examining Tennessee's and Rutherford County's 
road system. Several facets of North Carolina's road system 
should be considered. These include the role of the county 
court, road jury, road overseer, and those who worked on the 
roads. 

The first effort at constructing roads in Tennessee 
began in 177 8 when commissioners were appointed to mark out 
a road from Jonesboro in Washington County to Burke County, 
North Carolina. It was a very roughly cut road and at times 
was not passable for wagons. In 17 83 a road from Mansker's 

Station to Nashville was ordered to be cleared of growth 

22 

that had been permitted to grow in the road. James 

Robertson petitioned North Carolina's House of Commons in 
1784 to authorize the recruiting of troops to construct a 
wagon road from the lower extremity of Clinch Mountain to 
the Cumberland settlements. This endeavor did not begin 
until 1787 when an eighty-man battalion command by Ma j . 
Thomas Evans began cutting the road from Clinch Mountain. 
Peter Avery, a hunter, was appointed to mark out the route. 



^^Watson, p. 417. ^^j^acGill, pp. 27-28, 



14 



The soldiers cut the trees to a width of ten feet and 
occasionally leveled the road. This road, known as the 
"North Carolina Road," "Avery's Trace," or the "Old North 
Carolina Trace" was not completed until September 1788. 
After all the labor invested in the road, it still could 
not support wagon travel. Anything that could not be 

carried on horseback was shipped down the Tennessee River 

23 
and up the Ohio and Cumberland Rivers to Nashville. 

It was not until after Tennessee was admitted as a 
state that any attempt was made to construct a viable wagon 
road from East Tennessee to Nashville. In 1799 the state's 
General Assembly appointed three individuals (William Walton, 
William Martin, and Robert Kyle) as commissioners to open a 
road. The legislature also appropriated one thousand 
dollars for its construction. Construction began in 1799 
but was not completed until 1802. The commissioners marked 
out the route of the road. The road laborers had to cut 
down trees to a minimum width of twelve feet in the moun- 
tains and fifteen feet for the remainder of the route. The 
road had to be leveled by shovel and measured for mile posts. 
Bridges and causeways had to be constructed where necessary. 
The road became known as the "Walton Road" because Captain 
Walton had been the leading commissioner in surveying the road 
and overseeing the actual construction. In 1801 the General 



23 John Dawson Boniol, Jr., "The Walton Road," 
Tennessee Historical Quarterly 30 (Winter 1971) :403. 



15 



Assembly incorporated it under the name of the Cumberland 
Turnpike Company, and toll was collected to help defray the 
cost of construction. The significance of these early 
roads for the history of Rutherford County's roads lies in 
the fact that the first intrastate road that can be con- 
sidered a true wagon road was completed only two years prior 
to the formation of Rutherford County. From this it can be 
surmised that there were few wagon roads in Rutherford County 
prior to its formation. This writer believes that the 
technology used in constructing the Walton Road was not much 
different from that used in the construction of early 
Rutherford County roads. 

The first public road legislation in Tennessee was 
enacted in 17 96 by the General Assembly. The legislature 
deemed a public road to be any road that was viewed and laid 
out or altered, if the road was viewed by five to twelve 
freeholders. Any damages that resulted from the construc- 
tion of the road was paid by the county. A jury had to be 
summoned to assess the damages. In order that no individual 
be compelled to work on more than one road, the county 
quarterly court had the power to designate which road each 
individual would work on.^^ This writer believes that 



^^Ibid. , pp. 406-407. 

25 

Tennessee, An Act for Amendment of the Laws 

Respecting Public Roads and Ferries, Tennessee Session Laws, 
Acts Passed at the First General Assembly (1796), pp. 48-49. 
Hereafter cited as Public Acts. 



16 



Tennessee was at this time still utilizing the road laws of 
North Carolina because this is the first legislative refer- 
ence to road laws and it is referred to as an amendment. 

There were roads located in Rutherford County prior 
to its formation by an act of the General Assembly in 18 03. 
There are several references in the Rutherford County deed 
books to Taylor's Trace. The exact location of this trace 
is unknown, but it was in existence prior to 1794. Gen. 
James Robertson mentioned the trace in orders to Major Ore. 
His force was to march from Brown's Blockhouse and proceed 
along Taylor's Trace in the direction of the Tennessee River. 
The unit departed the blockhouse on September 7, 17 94, and 
encamped at Black Fox's Camp. Major Ore's force then pro- 
ceeded to the Barren Fork of the Duck River near the Stone 
Fort and attacked the Cherokee and Creek Indians of the 
Lower Towns on the Tennessee River. ^^ Brown's Blockhouse 
was located west of the present Hillsboro Road near the 
headwaters of Richland Creek. 27 with the locations of Black 
Fox's Spring and the Stone Fort, the route of Taylor's Trace 
was very similar to the Nickajack Trail. Major Ore's 



26a. W. Putnam, History of Middle Tennessee or Life 
and Times of Gen. James Robertson (Nashville, Tenn. : n.p. , 
1859; reprint ed . , Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee 
Press, 1971) , p. 479. 

27 James A. Crutchfield, Early Times in the Cumberland 
Valley from its Beginnings to 18 00 (Nashville, Tenn.: First 
American National Bank, 1976), p. 128. 



17 



advance into Indian territory was also known as the Nicka- 

2R 
jack Campaign. 

There were several roads in the county that probably 
were viewed and marked out while it was a part of Davidson 
and Wilson counties. These include roads from Robert Smith 
to Cummin's Mill, the forks of Stones River to the Davidson 
County line, Howell's Mill to Bird Nance's, John Sullin's 
Creek to Thomas Rucker, William Kimbro's to a ford on 
Hurricane Creek, Billingsley ' s to Stewarts Creek, the 
Garrison Road, and others. ^^ The Rutherford county Quar- 
terly Court appointed road overseers to these roads in the 
early period of county government, but the court never 
appointed a jury of view to open the road. The Quarterly 
Courts of Davidson and Wilson counties probably had 
appointed the jury of view to open the road, and Rutherford 
County's Quarterly Court assumed the responsibility of 
appointing overseers to supervise the maintenance of the 
roads. Also, references to the Chickamauga Trace and 
Taylor's Trace in land descriptions in Rutherford County's 
deed books were found. 

The road legislation, which was to regulate the 
construction of public roads in the state throughout the 
time frame of this thesis, was enacted in 1804. Minor 



^^Putnam, p. 479. ^^See appendix A. 

^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Register's 
Office, Deed Books M, p. 518, and 3, p. 694. 



IB 



amendments were enacted periodically by the General Assembly. 
This legislation is of extreme importance in understanding 
the process of road construction in nineteenth century 
Tennessee. 

All roads which had been previously laid out were 
declared public roads by the General Assembly. The county 
quarterly courts were given full power and authority to 
order the "laying out of public roads where necessary." 
The courts were also given the power to discontinue roads 
that were found useless and to alter roads to make them 
more useful to the local inhabitants. The authority to 
approve river ferries and locate bridges was also given to 
the quarterly courts. The county courts were responsible 
for calling overseers to account for money obtained from 
fines that were paid for defaulting on road labor. The 
money was to be used in maintaining the public roads and 
bridges . ^^ 

The public roads, according to the legislation, were 

to be laid out by a jury of freeholders numbering from five 

to not more than twelve individuals. Their oath upon 

appointment was: 

I, , do solemnly swear or affirm 

that I will lay out the road now directed to be laid 
out by the court of pleas and quarter session to the 
greatest ease and advantage of the inhabitants; and 
with as little prejudice to inclosures as may be. 



^• 4>ublic Acts (1804), p. 3. 



19 



without favor, affection, malice, or prejudice, and 
to the best of my skill and knowledge. ^2 

The "jury of view,"^^ as it was called in Rutherford 
County, was supposed to lay off the roads at least twenty 
feet wide, if it was practicable from the terrain standpoint. 
The overseers were directed to "completely cut and clear all 
stumps, rocks, brush and obstructions so far as practicable 
for the width of sixteen feet in the center of the road under 
their care." They were to build the necessary bridges 
through swamps and across small runs and creeks. These 
bridges were to be sixteen feet in width. If the road over- 
seer and the members of his road crew were not capable of 
constructing the bridge, the county court was empowered to 
have the construction and maintenance contracted. The cost 
of construction would come from county tax receipts. If 
the bridge crossed county lines, the construction costs 
would be defrayed by both counties in proportion to the 
number of taxables in both counties. '* A toll bridge or 
causeway was authorized for rivers and large creeks, where 
the depth, current, or width of the water obstacle would 
cause the bridge's construction and maintenance to be a 
burden on the taxpayers.^ 



32ibid., p. 4. 

^^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book B, p. 155. 

^"^Public Acts (1804), p. 4. ^Sjbid., p. 5. 



20 



Overseers of roads were to be appointed annually by 
the county quarterly court. According to the legislation, 
no person was compelled to serve as overseer for more than 
one year in five.^^ Annual appointments of overseers did 
not always hold true in Rutherford County, and many over- 
seers served more than one full year. ' The road overseer 
was to summon all white males from eighteen to fifty years 
of age and notify all slave owners to send their male slaves 
of the same age to work on a road at a certain time and 
place. The county court determined who would work on each 
road by determining the boundaries for each particular road. 
No individual was compelled to work on more than one road. 
Several exemptions from working on public roads existed: 
judges of a superior court, ministers, keepers of public 
ferries, justices of the peace, the governor, secretary of 
state, attorney general, and any free white persons sending 
three slaves or other able persons to work on the road. 
Nothing from this act was interpreted to exempt the slaves 
from working on public roads within their district. -'° This 
might seem to be a physical impossibility since all males 
between eighteen and fifty years of age had to work on the 
road. So how could a slave owner provide three slaves to 
work on the road instead of himself? This writer believes 



■^^Ibid., pp. 5-6. ^"^See appendix E. 
^^Public Acts (1804), pp. 5-6, 9. 



21 



that the slave owner might have had several tracts of land 
in the county; and, to work on a road near one tract of 
land, he would use slaves living in another district. 

There were several fines associated with public 
roads that were assessed against those eligible for work on 
public roads, overseers, and travelers. Upon notice from 
the road overseer, anyone who refused or neglected to work 
on the road was liable to fine of seventy-five cents per 
day that the individual did not work. The process involved 
the road overseer's going before any justice of the peace to 
initiate a warrant against the recalcitrant worker. The 
local constable would collect the fine and pay it to the 
overseer, who would expend the money to hire other individ- 
uals to work on the road. The road overseer had to notify 
those individuals who worked on the road of what tools to 
bring and the time and place of the work at least three days 
prior to the appointed day. If he did not, the individual 
was not held liable for the fine.^^ 

The road overseer was liable to an indictment by a 
grant jury if he refused or neglected to perform his duties, 
excused any person who failed to attend the work, or 
accepted any bribe. If any person refused to serve as a 
road overseer, he was fined fifty dollars. This money was 
recovered by the county solicitor if the individual did not 



■^^Ibid., pp. 6-7 



22 



give sufficient cause for refusing. The overseer could be 
fined five dollars for failing to set up and maintain posts 
pointing the direction and displaying the mileage to public 
places. Anyone caught knocking down or defacing the posts 
was fined fifty dollars. -^ The overseer was also required 
to measure his road, set up mile markers in a legible and 
durable manner, and maintain them in good condition. Neg- 
lecting to mark the miles or repair the markers resulted in 
a five-dollar fine. In 1819 the General Assembly required 
that the markers be of durable wood. The overseer, who 
failed to keep his road and bridges in good repair for a 

period of fifteen days, was liable for a fine of five 

42 
dollars unless he was delayed by extremely bad weather. 

No individual could turn or alter any public road 
unless approval was obtained by the quarterly court. A jury 
of view had to report the potential consequences of the 
alteration to the court. Once the road was turned or 
altered, the overseer had to certify that the new road was 
in good condition before the old portion of the road could 
be closed. Anyone turning a road from its old route without 
permission was liable for a fine of five dollars. If any 
individual believed that he had been injured by the con- 
struction of the road, he could petition the quarterly court 



40ibid., p. 6. '^llbid., p. 7. 
^^ibid., p. 8; Public Acts (1819), p. 50. 



Z3 



for a jury of view to consider the project and assess the 
damages. Either the road could be turned to solve the 
problem, or the county could pay the individual for the 
damages. The jury had to weigh the public good against the 
individual's injury. ^^ 

Evidence of the administration of early public roads 
in Rutherford County is limited to road orders and jury of 
view reports in the county quarterly court minute books. 
The process was basically the same as that stated in the 
legislation of 18 04. The quarterly court would appoint from 
five to twelve freeholders as a jury of view to mark out a 

road, usually from two designated points. Sometimes a more 

44 
involved description was given by the court. There are 

few references as to who originally petitioned to have the 

road built. This writer believes that the county court, the 

jury of view, and the road overseer were familiar with the 

road legislation of 1804, as the consistent order given to 

the jury of view was to mark the road the "nighest and best 

way." This would allow a broad interpretation of the 

court order if those involved were not aware of the state 

law. 



"^•^ Public Acts (1804), pp. 8-9. 

44 

See appendix A. 

^^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book A, p. 12, 



24 



The jury of view was ordered to report back to the 
County Court at the subsequent session with the results of 
their work.^^ From researching the court minutes, this 
writer believes that in a majority of the cases the jury 
never reported back to the court. It is also possible that 
the clerk never recorded the jury's report in the court 
minutes. Another explanation is that the jury of view never 
accomplished the task. The road orders in appendix A of 
this thesis show that the Quarterly Court often repeated an 
earlier order to view and mark out a particular road. A 
final interpretation is that the jury of view was late in 
accomplishing the marking out of the road . 

It can be ascertained if the road was constructed by 
determining when the road overseer was appointed by the 
county court to open and keep the road in repair. This 
appointment signified approximately when work began on con- 
structing the road. If the road was lengthy in distance, 
several overseers were appointed to supervise its opening 
and maintenance.^^ During the early period of the county's 
government, sometimes the overseer's workers were identified 
by name.^^ Later the county court designated the overseer's 
workers by delineating geographic boundaries. The court 



^^Ibid., Book A, p. 7. ^^See appendix A. 

^^See appendices A and B. 

^^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book A, p. 129. 



25 



also ordered those eligible to work on roads, who lived 
within one to three miles on each side of the road, to work 
under the supervision of an overseer. ^^ 

There were occasions when an individual petitioned 
the county court to turn a road more favorably with their 
own interests. ^1 The Rutherford County Court was amenable 
to discontinuing roads if they served no useful purpose. 52 
There were also instances when the county court appointed a 
jury of view to assess the damages that had resulted or 
would result from the construction of a particular road. 
One well-documented case was that of Capt . William Lytle's 
attempt to get the court to alleviate the damages of a road. 
The road began at the west end of Main Street in Murfrees- 
boro and ran in a straight direction through Lytle's land 
to the place where the Franklin Road crossed the west fork 
of Stones River. The initial court order for a jury of view 

to mark out the road began in 1819 and was not settled until 
1821.53 

In 1805 the General Assembly appointed Jesse Bean, 
John Drake, and John Gowen commissioners to view, mark, and 
survey a road from the headwaters of Stones River to inter- 
sect the Georgia Road. This was to be accomplished in 



pp. 6-9, 194. 



^°Ibid., Book A, pp. 4, 135. 

^••■Ibid., Book A, p. 136. ^^Ibid. , Book A, p. 186. 

53ibid., Book 0, pp. 86, 179, 180, 231, 324; Book P, 



26 



accordance with the treaty signed at Tellico with the 
Cherokee Indians in 1798. These coiranissioners were to 
select the most direct route under the circumstances and 
note principal water courses, mountains, and other remark- 
able places. The road had to be sixteen feet wide and 
cleared so as to allow loaded wagons to travel on it. 
It is possible that all three of these individuals owned 
land in Rutherford County. ^^ It is unknown what resulted 
from the legislative appointment, but the road was mentioned 
in a Senate report dated October 23, 18 09. George Doherty, 
Archibald Rhea, and John Dew were commissioners who had 
examined the road cut out by John and George Lowry from the 
headwaters of Stones River "through the Cherokee Nation to 
where the great road led — to the State of Georgia." The 
commissioners reported it was passable by all types of 
"land carriages." The examination of the road took the 
commissioners twenty-eight days to complete, and they used 
"chain carriers" to survey the road.^^ The importance of 
this road is that it was probably the first wagon road from 
Rutherford County to southeastern Tennessee. 



^^ Public Acts (1806), pp. 158-159. 

Henry G. Wray, Rutherford County, Tennessee, Deed 
Abstracts Vol. 1 1804-1810 (Smyrna, Tenn. : By the Author, 
n.d.) , pp. 124 130, 132. 

^^John Dew, "Report in [the] Senate," 23 October 
18 09, Folder 12, Box 9, Record Group 60, Archives Section, 
Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



27 



The General Assembly noticed in 1807 that there was 
a general shortage of the necessary tools to open public 
roads and remove rocks and other obstacles. It authorized 
the county courts to reimburse road overseers for purchasing 
a stone hammer and crowbar. These tools had to be kept by 
the overseer and not used for any purpose other than road 
work. The overseer was liable for a five-dollar fine for 
lending out the tools. The stone hammer and crowbar were 
utilized throughout the period prior to the Civil War. 
Requests for financial reimbursement for purchasing these 
tools are evident in the quarterly court minutes. The 
stone hammer is often referred to as a sledge hammer in the 
Rutherford County court minutes. ^^ Those individuals who 
worked on the roads were referred to as "hands" in their 
allotment to the road overseers of the county. ^^ 

In 1811 the General Assembly passed legislation 
requiring the county courts to appoint a suitable number of 
overseers for stage roads. The stage roads, when opened, 
had to be at least thirty feet wide, and causeways on the 
stage road had to be at least twenty feet wide. The stage 
roads were to be kept in repair according to the road 



57public_Acts (1808), p. 101. 

58 

Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book Z, pp. 94, 114. 

^^ Public Acts (1811), p. Ill; Rutherford County, 
Tennessee, county court Clerk's Office, Quarterly Court 
Minute Book A, p. 7. 



28 



legislation of 1804. The first reference to a stage road 

in Rutherford County was in 1817. An 1834 gazetteer listed 

two stage routes that ran through Rutherford County: one 

from Nashville through Mount View, Murf reesboro, Shelbyville, 

Lynchburg, Fayetteville, Hazle Green, and Meridianville to 

Huntsville, Alabama, a total distance of 117 miles; and the 

other from Knoxville to Nashville, via Sparta, Murf reesboro, 

and Jefferson. A stage coach advertisement of an unknown 

date announced that a stage coach owned by Todd and Company: 

. . . will leave the St. Cloud, Commercial, and Sewanee 
Hotels in Nashville for Murf reesboro on Tuesdays, Thurs- 
days, and Saturdays at 8 o'clock A.M. and will leave the 
Keystone House in Murf reesboro on Mondays, Wednesdays, 
and Fridays for Nashville at 8 o'clock A.M.°2 

Enclosing land of one property owner by another must 
have been a serious problem in the early nineteenth century, 
as the General Assembly passed legislation in 1811 concern- 
ing the problem. This legislation allowed property owners 
to build private roads through lands enclosed by other 
property owners who refused passage. The county court had 
to Simmon a jury of view upon a petition of the surrounded 



60 



Public Acts (1811), pp. 136-137. 



^■•■Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Off ice, Quarterly Court Minute Book L, p. 80; Eastin Morris, 
Tennessee Gazetteer (Nashville, Tenn. : W. Hasell Hunt and 
Co., 1834; reprint ed., edited by Robert M. McBride and Owen 
Meredith, Nashville, Tenn.: Gazetteer Press, 1971), 
pp. 302-303; see Appendix A. 

^^"Notice," no date. Accession Number 919, Map 
Cabinet Number 1, Manuscript Section, Tennessee State 
Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



29 



individual. It was to lay off and mark out a road so as to 
do the least possible damage to all involved individuals. 
The road was not to exceed fifteen feet in width, and the 
petitioner was to keep the road in good repair. Anyone 
obstructing the road could be fined. ^-^ The same legislation 
was reenacted in 18 69, so the problem must have been a 
recurrent one."^ 

In 1821 the General Assembly passed legislation 
designating that the public roads in Tennessee would be of 
three different classes. First class roads were stage roads 
or other roads deemed by the county quarterly court to be of 
equal importance. No width was given for this road. Since 
the road legislation of 1804 authorized roads to be twenty 
feet wide, it is presumed they were from twenty to thirty 
feet wide, the width authorized in 1811 for stage roads. 
These roads had to be maintained, indexed, marked for mile- 
age; and bridges and causeways had to be erected on them. 
Second class roads were known as wagon roads. They had to 
be twelve feet in width and cleared of all obstacles. They 
had to be causewayed and bridged where necessary to afford 
safe passage for loaded wagons. They also had to be indexed 
and mile marked. The third class roads were to be con- 
structed with sufficient width to allow the passage of horse 



^^ Public Acts (1811), p. 65. 

^^Tennessee, Statutes of Tennessee 1858-1871 (Nash- 
ville: [title page missing], 1871), p. 226. 



30 



and rider, and milling on the backs of individual horses. 
The roads had to be bridged and causewayed where necessary 
to allow safe passage. The term "index," referring to first 
and second class roads, was the building of directional 
posts at forks in the road that showed the direction to the 
nearest public place. Trees along the route were notched 
according to the class — three notches for first class roads, 
two notches for second class roads, and one notch for third 
class roads. The county quarterly court had to assign a 
competent number of hands to keep the first and second class 
roads in good repair. The third class roads were worked 
only when necessary, presumably after the other classes of 
roads were in good condition. The quarterly courts decided 
the class of the roads that were constructed. The court 
did not need a jury of view to decide on third class 
roads. ^^ For roads that the county court refused or failed 
to class would be kept in the same condition as required by 
the road laws in force. ^^ In 1823 the General Assembly made 
a reference to the first class roads as those on which the 
mail stages traveled. °' 

The General Assembly on several occasions amended 
the road legislation of 1804 regarding overseers and those 
who worked on the public roads. In 1823 the legislature 



^^ Public Acts (1821), pp. 10-11. 

^^Ibid., (1822), p. 19. ^"^Ibid., (1823), p. 19. 



31 



prohibited the appointment of a road overseer who did not 
live within the bounds of the road hands. ° This signifies 
that the overseer lived in the general vicinity of the road 
as did the hands who worked on the road. It also may be 
interpreted to mean that the inhabitants of an area, who 
were liable to work on roads, did not want outside super- 
vision. In 18 25 paper makers were no longer exempt from 
working on roads. ^^ This indicates that those who had the 
skills of making paper were highly regarded in the communi- 
ties of Tennessee during the early nineteenth century. 
Searchers and members of patrols were exempted from working 
on public roads in 1831. Those who served a term of three 
months on patrols were exempted for twelve months of road 
work. In 1860 one miller at operating grist mills and 
common school commissioners were exempted from working on 
public roads. That same year, slave owners were no longer 
exempted from working on roads. Previous road legislation 
never mentioned that female slaves were required to work on 
roads, but they were exempted in 18 60. 

In 1833 the General Assembly outlawed horse racing 
on public roads. Those who gambled on or operated horse 
racing on public roads and those who aided or abetted the 
activity were liable for indictment under the state's gaming 



^^Ibid., p. 15. 69ibid., (1826), p. 13. 

70ibid., (1831), p. 124; (1859-1860), pp. 30-31; 
(1860) , p. 13. 



32 



laws. This legislation did not affect turf racing or horse 
racing run on a track. ^ No reason was given for this 
action, but it could possibly relate to public safety or an 
attempt by the legislature to put some type of constraints 
on horse racing. There also might have been a morality 
issue involved in the legislation. 

Evidently the public roads of Tennessee had a road 
sign problem in the 183 0s, as many individuals believe the 
highways presently have the same problem. In 1835 it became 
illegal for a road overseer or anyone else to set up any 
false signs misrepresenting a road's condition, either as 
to its excellence or distance. False representations con- 
cerning a road, calculated to influence strangers to travel 
on a road, were prohibited. The individual who became lost, 
stuck, or delayed and who brought suit against the respon- 
sible person, was entitled to one-half of a twenty-five 
dollar fine. Any overseer who did not remove false signs 
from the road within ten days of observing them was liable 
for a twenty-five dollar fine.'^ 

The road overseer was responsible not only for the 
maintenance of the roadbed but also for the place where the 
road crossed a river or stream. An act passed in 1842 
required the road overseer to have his workers construct 



■^llbid., (1833), p. 6. 

''^ibid., (1835-1836), pp. 114-115, 



33 



foot bridges where the width of the stream and the condition 
of the banks allowed it. A foot log was to be built on the 
side of the ford for the passage of travelers on foot. It 
was to be constructed of well hewn durable timber, one foot 
in width and flat on the top. The foot log was to be 
"abutted on either side of said stream or run upon good 
sound abutments of stone or timber above high water mark."'-^ 
There are references made to "pole bridges" in the Ruther- 
ford County Quarterly Court minutes, and it is assumed that 
bridges of this type were constructed in the county.''* 

A law enacted in 1860 promoted the clearing out of 
fords where public roads crossed rivers or streams. At the 
April term of the county quarterly court, with a majority 
of the magistrates approving, the magistrates of each civil 
district could report which fords in the district needed 
to be cleared of obstructions. The court was to act on each 
ford separately. The approved list of fords was given to 
the sheriff, who advertised for bids for the fords' clear- 
ing. Contracts for the fords' clearing were given to 
bidders at the July term of the court. The contractor 
cleared the ford of all loose rock; all fastened rock had 
to be battered down with heavy, blunt, or square-end crow- 
bars or sledge hammers. All rubbish and other obstacles 
were cleared if the action did not deepen the ford. The 



73ibid., (1842), p. 161. "^^see appendix A. 



34 



cleared width of the ford depended on its use, although no 
ford was cleared over sixty feet in width. The contractor 
returned to the court's August term with a certificate 
signed by two freeholders who witnessed the completion of 
the clearing of the ford. It is believed that much activity 
in clearing out of the river fords was postponed until after 
the Civil War when there were perhaps more obstacles in the 
river and stream fords. ^^ 

Legislation enacted by the General Assembly in 1850 
ordered that third class roads were to be opened seven feet 
in width and that a fourth class road be authorized. Fourth 
class roads, called bridle ways, were probably those roads 
constructed in the state that were not wider than seven 
feet.?6 The extreme variance in road widths is evident in 
comparing this to earlier legislation. Prior to the Civil 
War, public roads existed in the county and state where 
widths measured from under seven feet to thirty feet. 

Research of the Rutherford County Quarterly Court 
minutes for road orders and appointments of juries of view 
did not reveal any after 1826. Only bridge building and 
repair and overseer appropriations were included in the 
minutes after 1826. A positive answer for not showing the 
information formerly given was located in the minute book 



'^Tennessee, Statutes of Tennessee 1858-1871 , 
pp. 58-59. 

"^^ Public Acts (1850), p. 294. 



35 



for 1839. Robert S. Morris, the Clerk of the Rutherford 

County Quarterly Court, was allowed: 

. . . $1.50 for one blank book to record marriage 
licenses, $2.50 for one blank book to record school 
commissioners and their reports, $1.00 for seventeen 
juries of view and thirty-nine road orders. ^^ 

This indicates that between 18 27 and 18 3 8 Rutherford County 
altered its documentation procedure by adopting separate 
road order books, but no road books were located in the 
research for this thesis. Table 1, which shows the amount 
of road orders and requests for juries of view, is helpful 
in determining the amount of public road construction in 
the county after 1827. 

That there was a large amount of public road construc- 
tion in the 1840s and 1850s is shown in Table 1. This 
in itself might indicate why the county court adopted the 
separate road books. Recording of road construction in the 
county became too cumbersome to be included in the regular 
court minutes. Another possible explanation for this change 
was that on May 22, 1828, the county court was of the 
opinion that: 

. . . some of the public roads and highways in this 
county, and particularly the stage road, are in bad 
condition, and it being the opinion of the court that 
it is of the highest importance to the public, that 
said roads should be at all times kept in good repair. '° 



^^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book Z, p. 103. 



^^Ibid., Book V, p. 203. 



36 



TABLE 1 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY JURIES OF VIEW 
AND ROAD ORDERS 



Year 


Number of Juries 
of View 


Number of Road 
Orders 


1839 


17 


39 


1840 


22 


42 


1841 


— 


— 


1842 


— 


— 


1843 


— 


— 


1844 


— 


— 


1845 


— 


— 


1846 


10 


62 


1847 


15 


58 


1848 


24 


57 


1849 


23 


73 


1850 


27 


83 


1851 


48 


93 


1852 


43 


92 


1853 


55 


75 


1854 


27 


106 


1855 


18 


102 


1856 


17 


70 



SOURCE: Rutherford County, Tennessee, County 
Court Clerk's Office, Quarter Court Minute Book Z, 
pp. 103, 163, 565, 63; Book AA, pp. 56, 135, 221, 333, 
459; Book BB, pp. 155, 326, 497; Book CC, p. 45. 



37 



As a result, the court ordered that Samuel H. Laughlin be 
appointed to assist the state's attorney general in any 

prosecutions that had been or would be initiated against 

79 
any road overseers.'-^ This might have resulted in the 

county court's altering its procedure of recording road 

information. Instead of looking through several volumes of 

court minutes to locate directors for a road, concerned 

individuals could refer to volumes that pertained only to 

public roads. 

This chapter has examined the early public roads in 

Rutherford County and, to some extent, in Tennessee. 

George Rogers Taylor, in The Transportation Revolution 

1815-1860 , refers to this type of road as the "rural road." 

These rural roads led from farms in neighboring towns, 

8 
mills, cotton gins, and country stores. Taylor states, 

. . . the fact that the years from about 1800 to 1830 
have been called the "turnpike era" has diverted 
attention from country roads, roads which were really 
much more important . . . than were the turnpikes, 
which were chiefly designed for travel between large 
towns or . . . westward across the mountains. 

He provides several reasons as to why the rural or public 

roads were permitted to continue in poor condition. Rural 

communities during this period had neither the capital nor 



"^^ibid.. Book V, p. 203. 

o r\ 

George Rogers Taylor, The Transportation Revolu- 
tion 1815-1860 , The Economic History or tne United states, 
no. 4 (New York: Rinehart and Co., Inc., 1951), p. 15. 

S^Ibid., p. 16. 



3^ 



the manpower to expend on improving the system of country 
roads. The interest of the farmer was in clearing land and 
building homes, schools, and courthouses. The second 
factor involved road building as a community responsibility, 
and for citizens to work off their highway taxes. The road 
workers assembled often in a carnival mood and at a time of 
year when farm work was slack. This was frequently not the 
best time to construct roads. The road overseers and 
workers were skilled at cutting trees and pulling stumps, 
not highway engineering. Finally, according to Taylor, 
farmers did not deem it worthwhile to expend large amounts 
of labor and expense on constructing good roads. Road 
maintenance was low priority work. Bad roads were an 
inconvenience to the farmer. °^ 

Research for information about Rutherford County 
roads seems to uphold the explanations given by George 
Taylor for poor roads. The county court authorized many 
roads to be constructed from 1804 to the Civil War, but 
there was never a sufficient labor force to keep all of 
the public roads properly maintained. This is emphasized 
when male residents had to contribute only five days of 
labor each year to road work. There were also individuals 
exempted from the potential labor pool used by the over- 
seers for work on the roads. It might be possible to test 



82 



Ibid. 



39 



this by using the census records for a district in Ruther- 
ford County and comparing the road mileage. °-^ 

Due to the simple technology used in road construc- 
tion prior to the Civil War, there was little need for a 
large amount of capital. With sledge hammers costing the 
county about $3.50 each in the 1830s and 1840s and that 
being the major expense to the county, a large amount of 
capital was not necessary. Most of the other tools were 
brought from the farm.^^ As to the lack of knowledge in 
constructing roads, the road workers had developed skills 
over time which had been tested by the environment and 
experience. Farmers became adept at building roads because 
they did not have professionals to construct roads. They 
followed common rules such as selecting the shortest and 
most direct routes commensurate with easy grades or con- 
structing the road along the southern or western slope of 

ridges so that it would be least exposed to storms and 

8 R 
would dry out more quickly. No comment on the outlook 

of those who worked on the public roads can be given as 



S^ public Acts (1873), p. 161. The amount of manda- 
tory days worked on the roads by male residents prior to 
1873 was not found in earlier road legislation. It is 
assumed that the days required of the male residents were 
approximately the same . 

S^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book Z, pp. 180, 326, 401, 566. 

Logan Waller Page, Roads, Paths and Bridges , The 
Farmer's Practical Library (New York: Sturgis and Walton 
Co., 1913), p. 64. 



40 



no eyewitness accounts of road work were located. That the 
roads of Rutherford County were not of low priority can be 
seen by observing the number of turnpikes located in the 
county that were chartered from 1830 to 1860. This road 
building mania does not identify with a society that sees 
poor roads and transportation as an inconvenience. 



41 



CHAPTER III 

THE TURNPIKE ERA IN RUTHERFORD COUNTY, 
1830-1860 

If transportation in Rutherford County during the 
nineteenth century is examined, it is most likely that two 
major developments will be noticed. One development was 
the introduction into the county in 1851 of the Nashville 
and Chattanooga Railroad. The other more pervasive trans- 
portation improvement was the construction of an extensive 
network of turnpikes from 183 to 1860. These turnpikes 
were the predecessors of many of the county's present roads. 

It is interesting to note that turnpikes, like early 
road technology and the administrative system for building 
roads, were initiated and developed in England. The 
renowned turnpike builders like "Blind Jack" Metcalf, 
Thomas Telford, and John Loudon McAdam built roads that 
were, in many respects, copied in the United States. It is 
important for later comparison between the English turnpikes 
and those constructed in Rutherford County to describe the 
methods used by Telford and McAdam. Telford's method began 
by laying a solid course of big stones seven inches in depth. 



Sims, p. 223. 



42 



On this course a four-inch layer was built up, and a two- 
inch binding layer of gravel was added. Attention was given 
to the road slope to insure that it slanted from the crown 
or high point to the sides of the road. McAdam's method 
left out the costly footing of large stones. Two four-inch 
layers of broken stone were placed on the camber or sloped 
roadbed.^ None of the stones utilized were to exceed six 
ounces in weight. To establish the size of the rocks, the 
road surveyors carried either a pair of scales with six- 
ounce weights or a two-inch-diameter metal ring. On top 
of the two layers of broken stone, a two-inch layer of one- 
inch-diameter stone was consolidated to the others by 

ramming and later by traffic. The success of these types 

5 
of roads was in their ability to drain and repel water. 

It is possible that the technology involved in con- 
structing the turnpikes came from Pennsylvania rather than 
from England. John McAdam moved to England from America in 
1789 and possibly carried with him ideas on constructing 
roads that did not deteriorate rapidly from water. The 
introduction of the turnpike as a toll road in the United 
States began with the Lancaster Turnpike built around 1792. 



^Bracegirdle, p. 72; Cossons, p. 321. 
^Bracegirdle, p. 72. ^Cossons, p. 321 



5 



6. 



'Bracegirdle, p. 72. '^MacGill, p. 52. 



43 



It was referred to as being macadamized; but, since the 
process was not invented until after 1816, that is open to 
question. The major impetus for the construction of turn- 
pikes in portions of the United States was the War of 1812. 
This impetus resulted from the need for troop movements and 
the general improvement of commerce following the war. The 
controversy over Federal support for internal improvements 
and sectional jealousy influenced the delaying of turnpikes 
and other internal improvements in the South. ° 

The first turnpike company incorporated by the 
General Assembly in Tennessee was the Cumberland Turnpike 
Company in 1801. It was the company formed to finance 
Walton's Road. The act of incorporation gave certain indi- 
viduals authority to collect tolls on the road. The toll 
receipts were allocated to pay the toll keepers and for the 
road and its maintenance.^ Besides the legislature's char- 
tering of turnpike companies, it also appointed commissioners 
to have a particular road cleared, opened, and maintained, 
much like the Georgia Road.-^^ According to Stanley Folmsbee, 
a noted Tennessee historian, the expansion of settlement, 
trade, and commerce led to the development of an increased 



'Lane, p. 143; Bracegirdle, p. 72. 

^Taylor, pp. 18-23. ^Boniol, p. 407. 

Stanley John Folmsbee, Sectionalism and Internal 
Improvements in Tennessee 1796-1845 (Knoxville, Tenn. : 
East Tennessee Historical Society, 1939), p. 24. 



44 



interest in the construction of turnpikes in Tennessee. 

This interest increased after the process of macadamizing 

became familiar. 

In Middle Tennessee, the merchants of Nashville 

encouraged the construction of turnpikes that radiated from 

the city into the outlying area. Travel on Middle 

Tennessee's roads in 1834 was described in a newspaper 

account : 

With a heavy load of cotton a strong team can not 
travel more than ten or fifteen miles a day. The mud 
is from 6 to 18 inches deep, the ruts are frequent and 
dangerous quagmires, which occur "ever and anon," are 
bridged over with logs that are often broken or 
decayed .^^ 

Gov. William Carroll in 1824 advocated the incorporation of 

turnpike companies to improve commerce in the state. In 

1827 Gov. Sam Houston argued for improving the terms of 

incorporation to promote private investment. He stated 

that promotion of private capital was necessary 

. . . because the "deep richness of the soil" in cer- 
tain parts of the state made difficult "the construc- 
tion of public roads upon the ordinary plan," and 
because "the population residing in the neighborhood 
of great and leading market roads, can not with the 
labor and time justly devoted to that duty continue 
such repairs as our present laws contemplate for all 
public highways. "13 



lllbid., p. 72. 

Nashville Republican and State Gazette , 27 Novem- 
ber 1834, cited by Folmsbee, p. 17. 

■'■■^Folmsbee, p. 72. 



45 



On January 4, 183 0, the first turnpike company was incor- 
porated to operate in Rutherford County as the Nashville 
and Murfreesboro Turnpike Company . ■'■'^ 

From 1830 to the beginning of the Civil War, forty- 
seven turnpike companies were chartered by the General 
Assembly for operation in Rutherford County. All of the 
companies did not build roads in the county, but all of them 
will be examined in this thesis. Specific information on 
the turnpikes, such as turnpike routes and those individuals 
involved in the formation of the companies which might be of 
interest to the reader, will be provided. Comparisons of 
the turnpikes will be by decades rather than as one group, 
and they will then be tied into the turnpike movement of 
Tennessee as a whole. Some turnpikes such as the Nashville, 
Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike; Murfreesboro, 
Manchester, and Winchester Turnpike; Jefferson Turnpike; 
and the Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike will be con- 
centrated on because of the availability of documentary 
evidence in the state archives. 

During the 1830s ten turnpike companies were char- 
tered by the state for operation in Rutherford County. This 
county, relative to other areas of the country, was a late 



-'•'^ Piablic Acts (1829), p. 228; Folmsbee, p. 72, 
states that the legislature chartered a turnpike company 
from Nashville to Murfreesboro in 1824, but this writer 
could not verify this. 



46 



arrival to having internal improvements within its bounda- 
ries. In 1827 State Senator Rucker of Rutherford County 
stated that: 

. . . he would be in favor of appropriating the whole 
or a part of land revenue to "the great work of inter- 
nal improvement," if he believed there was "any 
practicable plan of laying out money to advantage and 
without wasting it. Nothing can be done, because 
everything is required to be done."!^ 

Fortunately for the county there were "merchant capital- 
ists" — those individuals active in banking, commerce, and 
local industry who were willing to take a risk in organizing 
and financing turnpike companies in Middle Tennessee without 
state financial assistance. •^^ 

On January 4, 1830, the Nashville and Murfreesboro 
Turnpike Company was chartered by the General Assembly. The 
company's initial stockholders possibly included Charles I. 
Love, James H. Foster, William H. McLaughlin, David Wendell, 
James Morton, Robert Jetton, David W. Dickinson, Zachariah 
Posey, William Bowman, George Thompson, John McGrigor, 
Martin Clark, Henry Ridley, Moses Norvell, George Shall, 
Robert Weakley, and Beverly Nelson. Any six of these indi- 
viduals were considered by the state to be able to form the 
company. They were authorized to open and establish a turn- 
pike from Nashville to Murfreesboro. 



•^-' National Banner and Nashville Whig , 13 October 
1827, cited by Folmsbee , p. 77. 

^^Taylor, p. 25. ^"^ Public Acts (1829), p. 228. 



47 



In order to build the road, the Nashville and Mur- 
freesboro Turnpike Company was allowed to take all the 
necessary timber, gravel, stone, and dirt from the lands of 
adjoining property owners. If the landowner and the company 
could not agree on an equitable value of resources, the 
property owner could petition any justice of the peace to 
appoint three disinterested freeholders to value the mate- 
rials. The jury would assess a fair and reasonable value 
of the materials, and the landowner would be compensated 
for that amount by the turnpike company. This concept of 
the valuation of materials utilized by the turnpike company 
existed throughout the period focused on by this thesis. 
It was unlawful to establish any other road so close to 
this turnpike as to injure the financial interests of the 

1 Q 

company. 

Something happened to the Nashville and Murfreesboro 
Turnpike Company, because it either became insolvent or 
merged with the Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville 
Turnpike Company. On December 17, 18 31, a nine-member Board 
of Commissioners of Internal Improvements was constituted by 
the state legislature. Henry D. Jamison, Samuel Anderson, 
and Vernon D. Cowens were its Rutherford County members, and 
Davidson and Bedford counties also had representatives. It 
was the duty of these commissioners to open books of 



18 



Ibid. , pp. 229, 231. 



43 



subscription for stock in a turnpike that was to run from 
Nashville through Murfreesboro to Shelbyville. The sub- 
scribers were to constitute the Nashville, Murfreesboro, 
and Shelbyville Turnpike Company. ^ 

An extensive system of state financial aid for 
transportation was passed by the General Assembly in 18 30. 
Robert E. Corlew, in Tennessee; A Short History , states: 
"On January 2, 1830, lawmakers appropriated $150,000; 
$60,000 each was earmarked for work in East and Middle 
Tennessee, and the remaining $30,000 was designated for the 
western district. "^^ The Nashville, Murfreesboro, and 
Shelbyville Turnpike Company took advantage of this state 
aid. As soon as $20,000 was subscribed by individuals, the 
turnpike's commissioners were allowed to subscribe the 
amount allotted to Davidson, Rutherford, and Bedford coun- 
ties. When the governor was notified that $50,000 had been 
subscribed by individuals, he was to subscribe the amount 
of the common school fund of the three counties. The turn- 
pike commissioners were to pay six percent per annum to the 

board of commissioners for common schools. Work on the 

21 
turnpike was scheduled to begin on April 1, 18 32. 



^^Ibid., (1831), pp. 69-70. 

^^Robert E. Corlew, Tennessee; A Short History , 
2nd ed. (Knoxville; University of Tennessee Press, 198l) , 
p. 200. 



^^Public Acts (1831), pp. 69-71, 



49 



Turnpike construction in Middle Tennessee was still 
conducted at a slow pace. By 1834 only one turnpike had 
been completed. In November 1834, Washington Barrow became 
the editor of the Nashville Republican and State Gazette . 
He was a strong advocate of a system of turnpikes radiating 
from Nashville to combat the loss of commerce from railroads 
and the Tennessee River. ^^ More state aid was needed to 
stimulate turnpike construction. The General Assembly of 
1835-1836 authorized state subscriptions of one-third the 
total stock subscribed in railroad and turnpike companies. ^-^ 
By August 1836, the Nashville, Murf reesboro, and Shelbyville 
Turnpike Company's president reported that he had received 
from Gov. Newton Cannon $66,666 in state bonds, one-third 
of the company's total capital stock. 

By the end of 1837, completion of the Nashville, 

Murf reesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike was reported in sight 

by the company's president, R. C. Foster, He stated in 

correspondence to the state government that: 

The commissioners, aware that the propriety of any 
system of internal improvement depends greatly on the 
permanency and success of the first works undertaken , 
devoted all the energies and means in their power to 



^^Folmsbee, pp. 100-101. ^^Ibid., p. 112. 

^^R. C. Foster, receipt to State Board of Internal 
Improvements, 6 August 1836, Folder 22, Box 4, Record 
Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee State Library and 
Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



50 



the successful accomplishment of the work under their 
management. . . .25 

He said that the company had entered into contracts on the 
total fifty-five-mile length of the turnpike. At the time 
the State became a stockholder, the company had borrowed a 
large sum of money and invested it in the turnpike's con- 
struction. At this time ten tollgates had been built, and 
toll was collected at them. The final tollgate was to be 
put in operation by December 1, 1837. The President hoped 
that toll receipts would pay six percent per annum on the 
two hundred thousand dollars of capital stock. The company 
had also purchased small tracts of land at each tollgate on 
which to construct the necessary buildings. ^^ The turnpike 
was completed in 184 2.^7 Even with the state's substantial 
financial aid, the turnpike company had difficulty in meet- 
ing its obligations in completing the turnpike. In 1850 
the company was paying a 4^ percent dividend on the capital 
stock, which was not much of a return on investment. ^° 

The Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville Turn- 
pike had a problem with persons living near the road and 



R. C. Foster to Luke Lea, 11 November 1837, 
Folder 22, Box 4, Record Group 5, Archives Section, 
Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

26ibid. 27sinis, p. 220. 

^^Willis Snell to Col. W. B. A. Ramsey, 13 January 
18 50, Folder 22, Box 4, Record Group 5, Archives Section, 
Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



51 



using the turnpike for up to three miles without paying any 
toll. Beyond this impropriety, the same individuals charged 
an excessive amount of money for rock taken from their land. 
The Board of Directors hoped to get a law enacted that com- 
pelled every person who utilized the turnpike to pay in pro- 
portion to the distance used without passing a tollgate.''^ 
The company did get relief in 1858 in not having to maintain 
the turnpike within the city limits of Nashville, Murfrees- 
boro, and Shelbyville . -^^ 

The Hoover's Gap Turnpike Company was incorporated 
on January 4, 183 0, the same day as the incorporation of the 
Nashville and Murfreesboro Turnpike Company. Individuals 
who were the first stockholders of the company included 
Christopher Shaw, Jacob Hoover, Joel Smith, Joseph Carney, 
Moses Hart, John Hilton, James Arnold, T. L. D. W. Shaw, 
and William S. Watterson. They were to open a turnpike from 
Murfreesboro through Hoover's Gap to Thomas Powers in 
Bedford County. They had the opportunity to extend the 
turnpike to Winchester or as far as they thought necessary. 
The company was required to begin construction of the turn- 
pike by January 1831; however, the turnpike company either 



29ibid. 

■^ "^Tennessee, Private Acts of the State of Tennessee, 
Passed at the Thirty-Second General Assembly of the State oT 
Tennessee (1857-1858), p. 114. Hereafter cited as Private 
Acts . 

^^Public Acts (1829), pp. 231-232. 



52 



became insolvent, or it merged with the Murfreesboro, Man- 
chester, and Winchester Turnpike Company. 

The McMinnville Turnpike Company was chartered by 
the General Assembly on October 13, 1832. Individuals 
appointed by the state legislature to open books for stock 
subscription in the company included Charles Ready, Jr., 
John H. Wood, Jr., Henry Trott, Jr., Alexander Shields, 
George R. Smartt, William M. Robertson, Thomas S. Rucker, 
Isaac Hill, Henry D. McBroom, John Black, Archibald Hicks, 
Edmund Taylor, Leighton Terr ill, Lusk Colville, Jesse Locke, 
James Berkley, Joseph Youree, Daniel M. Stewart, David 
McKnight, William M. Beard, George Brandon, Christopher 
Baty, Hiram Tenison, John W. Connelly, Joshua Barton, and 
Absolom Weatherly.-^^ The route of the turnpike was from 
"Murfreesboro to the top of the Stones River Ridge in Warren 
County in the direction of McMinnville, passing by Danville 
in Warren County. "-^^ The board of directors was authorized 
to subscribe to the Warren County common school funds by 
executing a bond of $10,000 and paying six percent per annum 
interest to the commissioners of the common schools, but not 
until $40,000 was subscribed. ^^ 

In 18 37 the General Assembly granted the McMinnville 
Turnpike Company the "authority to enter upon all lands and 



32private_Acts (1832), p. 21. 

33ibid., p. 22. 34jj^i^^^ pp^ 22, 24 



53 



tenements through which they (president, directors, and 
agents) may judge it necessary to make said road." If the 
company and landowners could not agree on the value of the 
land, either party could petition the circuit court to 
appoint five disinterested freeholders to value the land. 
This jury had to take into consideration the damage that the 
landowners would sustain from the road relative to the bene- 
fits of the road accruing to the landowner . ^^^ The last 
reference that this writer could find regarding the McMinn- 
ville Turnpike Company was an amendment to its charter, 
passed on January 18, 1838, when the company was still con- 
structing the road. The General Assembly required that the 
directors proceed in locating and marking out the road and 
contracting for the construction of the road.-^^ Evidently 
the company was having financial problems, as no later 
reference was located on its progress. The company probably 
became insolvent, or merged with the McMinnville, Woodbury, 
and Murfreesboro Turnpike Company. 

Stanley Folmsbee said of the 1836 legislation which 
permitted state subscription of one-third of the capital 
stock that it put into operation a system of internal 
improvements that far exceeded the needs of the time.^^ 
Some state officials observed that the 1836 legislation was 



^^ Public Acts (1837-1838), p. 70. 
3^Ibid., p. 292. ^'^Folmsbee, p. 112 



5/f 



not advancing internal improvements at a level that they had 
intended. According to Folmsbee, there was not enough fluid 
capital in the state for any large-scale internal improve- 
ment companies to obtain the individual subscriptions neces- 
sary to qualify for state aid.^^ Middle Tennessee was the 
only area to benefit from the legislation. This was due to 
its having a larger population base, a higher level of 
wealth, and fewer natural obstacles than the other two areas 
of the state. Also, Middle Tennessee concentrated its 

attention on constructing turnpikes rather than pursuing the 

39 
illusive railroad. In 1838, an act was passed in the 

General Assembly that attempted to increase state aid for 
internal improvements. The governor was allowed to sub- 
scribe for stock in "sanded," "graded," and macadamized 
turnpikes in the amounts of $750, $1,000, and $3,000 per 
mile, respectively.^ 

The major drawback of this legislation was the 
opportunity of the turnpike companies to defraud the state. 
The law required that all individuals pay a certain portion 
of their subscription to the company before the state would 
invest in the turnpike company. The law did not specify the 
method in which these individual payments should be made. 
One of the illegal schemes perpetrated on the state was to 



2^Ibid., p. 131. ^^Ibid., p. 137, 
^°Ibid., pp. 167-168. 



55 



incorporate a company of about ten stockholders who borrowed 
the full amount to finance the road, say $7 0,000. This 
would entitle them to receive an equal amount in state bonds. 
The stockholders would then get the construction contract 
for the whole turnpike at an estimated cost of $140,000. 
They would borrow the whole fund from the board of directors 
and buy three hundred slaves. The slaves would build the 
road in one year, and once the road was completed the stock- 
holders would sell the slaves at an increase of $100 each. 
Since all the expenditures probably did not exceed $4 0,000, 
they were able to pay back the borrowed $7 0,000 and clear a 
profit of $60,000.^-'- This writer did not discover any 
similar scheme in Rutherford County. 

Governor Cannon attempted to stop the fraudulent 
activities of some of the turnpike companies by requiring 
specific information from the companies prior to granting 
any state aid. The information included the length of the 
road, its description, the number of miles constructed and 
in progress, and the nature of the contract for the turn- 
pike's construction. There was a noticeable decrease in the 
speed in which state bonds were issued after the governor's 
circulars went into effect. 

On July 4, 1836, Russell Dance, William Ledbetter, 
and Logan Henderson of Rutherford County were appointed by 



^^Ibid., p. 179. 42ibid., p. 183 



56 



the General Assembly to open books for stock subscriptions 
in the Murfreesboro, Manchester, and Winchester Turnpike 
Company. ^-^ The first reference made about the turnpike 
company in the General Assembly on February 20, 1836, con- 
cerned its capital stock, so it is difficult to determine 
the date when it was actually chartered.'*^ In January 1838, 
Henry Norman and David McGill replaced Ledbetter and Dance 
as commissioners of the turnpike .^^ The role of the com- 
missioner in the company was to observe the company's opera- 
tions in the interest of the state. William Watterson, 
the president of the company, had been one of the original 
stockholders in the Hoover's Gap Turnpike Company. ^° 

The Murfreesboro, Manchester, and Winchester Turnpike 
Company was having financial problems in 1843. The problems 
partially dealt with state aid. The company's board of 
directors made a proposition to the state in which the com- 
pany would discontinue the twenty-two miles from Manchester 
to Winchester and concentrate on the thirty miles from 
Murfreesboro to Manchester. The board resolved to macadam- 
ize twenty miles and grade ten miles. ^' Further concessions 



^^ Private Acts (1835-1836), p. 189. 

^^Ibid., p. 67. ^^ Public Acts (1837-1838), p. 291. 

"^^illiam Watterson to Newton Cannon, 19 July 1838, 
Folder 35, Box 3, Record Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee 
State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

^^A. Maxwell to F. K. Zollicoffer, 15 March 1844, 
Folder 30, Box 4, Record Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee 
State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



57 



to the state included that the road be contracted out in 
one-mile sections, that the date and place of bidding for 
the contracts be advertised in newspapers, and that the 
company guarantee the average cost of the macadamized por- 
tion not exceed $4,000 per mile and $2,000 for the graded 
portion. 

The Murfreesboro, Manchester, and Winchester Turn- 
pike Company's Board of Directors compromised with the 

4 9 
Board of Internal Improvement on June 22, 1844. The 

company's name was changed to the Murfreesboro and Manches- 
ter Turnpike Company. The company informed the Board of 

Internal Improvement of those who had the lowest bid for 

50 
each mile from Murfreesboro to Manchester. By September 

1845, six miles of the road had been completed, eleven 

miles were halfway completed, and the remainder was graded 

except for five miles. The process of road construction 

as ascertained from the reports to the Board of Internal 

Improvement consisted of grubbing, or clearing of roots 

and stumps; grading, or leveling, the roadbed; hauling and 



'*^A. Maxwell to Board of Internal Improvement, no 
date. Folder 30, Box 4, Record Group 5, Archives Section, 
Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

^^William Watterson to F. K. Zollicoffer, 22 June 
18 44, Folder 20, Box 4, Record Group 5, Archives Section, 
Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

^^illiam S. Watterson and P. W. Davis to Board of 
Internal Improvement, 9 January 184 5, Folder 1, Box 6, 
Record Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee State Library 
and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



5S 



breaking the rock into fine pieces; applying the first and 
second coats of crushed stone and gravel; and, finally, 
covering the road with dirt.^^ The contractors were still 
working on completing the turnpike in 184 9.^^ 

The state government brought suit against the 
Murfreesboro and Manchester Turnpike Company prior to 1852. 
The General Assembly authorized the attorney general to 
dismiss the suit provided the stockholders relinquish 
interest that they had in the company. Once relinquishment 
was completed, Lewis Garner, James Magill, and F. Henderson 
were to be constituted commissioners on the part of the 
state. They were to build a tollgate, hire a gate keeper, 
and collect toll. They were to use the money to repair 
additional five-mile sections of the turnpike. A suit would 
be brought against those who did not relinquish their 
stock. The suit might have been initiated because the 
road was not completed and the portion that was finished had 
fallen into disrepair, so much that the state had to inter- 
vene to keep the road maintained. In 1858, the General 



Murfreesboro and Manchester Turnpike Company, 
"Semi-annual Report," 8 September 1845, Folder 11, Box 3, 
Record Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee State Library 
and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

^^Murfreesboro and Manchester Turnpike Company, 
"Semi-annual Report," 1 August 1849, Folder 11, Box 3, 
Record Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee State Library 
and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

^^ Public Acts (1851-1852), pp. 379-380. 



59 



Assembly allowed the Murfreesboro and Manchester Turnpike 
Company leeway in not having to keep the road equivalent 

in repair to the Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville 

54 

Turnpike, but in "good traveling order." 

The state incorporated the Fosterville Turnpike 
Company on December 26, 18 37. William B. Morris, Alfred 
Nailor, and Joseph Smith were authorized to open books for 
raising capital stock of the company in Rutherford County. 
The turnpike was to run from Fosterville to Davis's Mill 
in Bedford County. ^^ No other references were found per- 
taining to this company, so it is not known if the turnpike 
was completed. 

On January 23, 18 38, the General Assembly chartered 
the Jefferson Turnpike Company. The legislature appointed 
the following commissioners to open books for subscriptions 
to capital stock of the company: Jacob D. Donelson, John C. 
Gooch, Ransford McGregor at Jefferson; James Bevins, Joseph 
B. Johns, Andrew M. McRee at Lascassas; John Moore, Benjamin 
Gooch, and Allen T. Gooch at Milton. The route of the 
Jefferson Turnpike was from the Nashville, Murfreesboro, 
and Shelbyville Turnpike in the vicinity of Hart's Spring 
to Jefferson. The commissioners had the authority to 



^^ Private Acts (1857-1858), p. 203. 
SSpublic Acts (1837-1838), p. 81. 



60 



continue the turnpike to Milton or to a point between the 
tovms according to the amount of stock subscribed. ^^ 

By July 1840, the company had constructed fifteen 
miles of road. The capital stock of the company was $90,000, 
of which individuals and the state each contributed half.^^ 
The state brought suit against the Jefferson Turnpike Com- 
pany, and the case was adjudicated in Tennessee's Supreme 
Court in 1843. The private stockholders were charged with 
fraudulently obtaining the state's subscription for one-half 
of the stock in the turnpike. The company was also charged 
with making a fraudulent representation and obtaining $9,000 
in state bonds. The state said members of the company 
obtained contracts for building the entire turnpike at 
prices greatly above the real value of the construction 
work. The state wanted the connection between it and the 
company dissolved and the value of the state bonds refunded 
or wanted an audit to occur and deductions to be made to 
bring the construction costs in line with the real value of 

CO 

the labor expended.-^ 

^^ Public Acts (1837-1838), p. 438. 

^^ "Financial Statements of the Jefferson Turnpike 
Company," 25 July 1840, Folder 8, Box 2, Record Group 5, 
Archives Section, Tennessee State Library and Archives, 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

^°State of Tennessee v. Jefferson Turnpike Company, 
no date. Folder 30, Box 6, Record Group 5, Archives Section, 
Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



61 



The stockholders denied the fraud charges leveled 
at them by the state. They replied to the charges by 
utilizing journals, receipts, and bonds as evidence. 
According to the stockholders, the commissioners opened 
books for subscription of stock in Jefferson on March 24, 
1838. Eight individuals subscribed to stock valued at 
$42,000. The stockholders appointed a committee to locate 
and lay off the turnpike. The stockholders elected a 
president and secretary on March 29, 1838. The commissioners 
stated that the capital stock should equal six thousand 
dollars per mile. On April 14, 1838, the turnpike was 
publicly let out to the lowest bidder, with a condition that 
the successful bidder was to be paid for one-half the work 
in state bonds and for the remainder he was to take stock 
in the turnpike. Those who had subscribed to the stock 
became the contractors at an average cost of six thousand 
dollars per mile. The stockholders stated that bids would 
be received for another ten days from anyone willing to 
receive stock for half the cost of construction. There were 
no individuals desiring to bid for the contract with that 
stipulation. 

On May 5, 18 38, the stockholders elected directors 
for the company, and on June 26, 18 38, the governor 
appointed directors on the part of the state. The board of 

59lbid. 



62 



directors met on July 21, 1838, and unanimously resolved 
that the laying off of the road and contracting for road 
construction be ratified. On July 28, 1838, the stock- 
holders paid ten percent of the total subscribed amount. 
Each of the stockholders, having contracted to construct 
portions of the road, tendered a receipt to the company for 
the amount of money that he would work out on the turnpike. 
The company's directors then sent a certificate to the 
governor verifying that the individual stockholder's stock 
was well secured and ten percent had been paid. The 
governor, as a result of the internal improvement act passed 
in 1838, subscribed for one-half the turnpike company's 
stock. By November 18 38, the state had invested nine 
thousand dollars in the company. 

The stockholders believed that, from all the exist- 
ing evidence, the construction of the turnpike would have 
cost four thousand dollars per mile if financed in prompt 
payments. If contractors were paid one-half in state bonds 
and the other half in money, it would cost about five thou- 
sand dollars per mile. If the payment were one-half in 
state bonds and one-half in company stock, the work could 
not have been done for less than six thousand dollars per 
mile. The contractors had an agreement among themselves 
that they were to be paid in proportion to the amount of 



eoibid. 



63 



labor and construction expense. The price was to be fixed 
at six thousand dollars per mile for all the contractors, 
with the actual price ranging from $4,618 to $7,350 per 
mile.^1 

The state's position raised the question of whether 
the subscription for stock on the state's part and the 
issuance of bonds were obtained by misrepresentation on 
the part of the private stockholders. The state said that, 
in order for the governor to make the proper decision as to 
granting aid to the turnpike company, he must see private 
individuals investing capital in it. The deposit of ten 
percent of the total amount of subscribed stock was per- 
ceived to be of sufficient evidence of the stockholders' 
confidence in the company. According to the state, this 
procedure was not followed in the case of the Jefferson 
Turnpike Company. In the view of the state, "the payment 
was the same as though there had been no payment at all." 
No obligation on the part of the stockholders was created. 
There was no bona fide payment of money as contemplated by 
the legislature when it enacted the internal improvement 
legislation. The governor was not apprised of the actual 
situation. He was under the impression that the company 
treasury had four thousand dollars in it when "in fact there 
was not one cent. 



..62 



^llbid. ^^ibid, 



64 



The stockholders insisted that, in accordance with 
the company's charter, they had the right to pay for their 
stock in work upon the turnpike. As a result of this right, 
they believed that the time to be worked out on the road was 
equivalent to the transfer of money. The state retorted 
that the stockholders might pay for their stock in work 
after the company was organized and the state's subscription 
had been obtained. The stockholder, who was also a contrac- 
tor, might then work off the cost of the stock and obtain a 

6 3 
receipt as the work progressed to completion. The result 

of the case was that the approval of the 

. . . state directors to any act within the sphere of 
their delegated powers was binding upon the state, 
since the nature of the alleged fraud charged was in 
the manner of letting contracts, which the court 
declared was entirely within the jurisdiction of the 
directors, the state had absolutely no recourse unless 
actual collusion could be proved, which was manifestly 
impossible. ^^ 

In January 1844, the General Assembly authorized the 
stockholders of the Jefferson Turnpike Company to open and 
construct a road from where the turnpike terminated to 
intersect the Lebanon and Sparta Road or the stage road 
leading from Murfreesboro to Woodbury or both roads. By 
1849, the Jefferson Turnpike had been completed, and the 
company would have distributed around five hundred dollars 



^^ibid. ^^Folmsbee, p. 243. 
^^Public Acts (1843-1844), p. 86, 



65 



had four bridges not been washed away by some "unprecedented 
freshets in the winter of 1847 and spring of 1848."^^ 

In March 18 60, the charter of the Jefferson Turnpike 
Company was amended to authorize the company to extend the 
turnpike to Lascassas to intersect the Murf reesboro, 
Lascassas, Milton, and Liberty Turnpike. The company could 
increase its capital stock to aid in the extension of the 
turnpike. Due to the Civil War and its impact on the 
county, the extension of this turnpike was probably delayed. 

The Cximberland and Stones River Turnpike Company was 
incorporated by the General Assembly on January 25, 18 38. 
Rutherford County residents Frank N. W. Burton, John Hoover, 
Joseph B. Johns, James Holmes, and James Wade were appointed 
by the legislature to open books for stock subscription in 
the turnpike company. The turnpike was to begin at Murfrees- 
boro and run to Lebanon in Wilson County. At the discretion 

of the company's directors, the turnpike could continue to a 

68 
point on the Cumberland River. 

In January 184 0, the General Assembly gave the 

president and directors permission to surrender the company's 

charter for the whole turnpike, except the portion between 

Lebanon and Hunter's warehouse on the Cumberland River. 



^^J. C. Gooch to W. B. A. Ramsey, 1 October 1849, 
Folder 12, Box 8, Record Group 30, Archives Section, Tennes- 
see State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

^^ Private Acts (1859-1860), p. 423. 



^^Public Acts (1837-1838), p. 286, 



66 



After this relinquishment occurred, four of the directors 
on the part of the company and four on the part of the state 
would be permitted to resign. The remaining directors, 
three each in the interest of the company and the state, 
would be constituted the Lebanon and Cumberland Turnpike 
Company. ^^ The Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike Company 
was still a legal entity, so the action must have been a 
separation into two companies. In 1842, Thomas Rucker, Jr., 
the president of the Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike 
Company, tried to get state bonds for the turnpike's con- 
struction.^ 

The Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike Company, 
like the Jefferson Turnpike Company, got in trouble with the 
state over the state's bonds. The turnpike company failed 
to respond to interrogatories submitted to it by a joint 
select committee appointed to investigate the internal 
improvement companies of Middle Tennessee. The committee's 
three members investigated the physical and economic condi- 
tion of all the internal improvement companies that the 
state had invested in stock.''' It was later disclosed in an 



^^Ibid., (1839-1840), pp. 187-188. 

^^Thomas Rucker, Jr., to Gov. James J. Jones, 10 
September 1842, Folder 26, Box 3, Record Group 5, Archives 
Section, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

"'Ipolmsbee, p. 247. ^^Ibid., p. 246. 



67 



examination by John W. Burton that the major portion of 
$107,000 in state bonds which the Cumberland and Stones 

River Turnpike Company had obtained had been embezzled by 

73 
its managers. 

The state brought suit against the company in an 
attempt to recover the embezzled funds. In an act passed 
on February 24, 18 52, the state took over the management of 
the Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike Company. "All 
rights, powers, franchises, and privileges originally vested 
in said company" were revived and vested in the state. The 
General Assembly appropriated twelve thousand dollars to 
complete the road. Wilson L. Watkins of Rutherford County 
was one of the three commissioners who were appointed to 
manage the turnpike company. They were required to work 
within the guidelines of the original charter to contract 
for the turnpike's construction. 

In 18 54, the state required the commissioners to 
make payment to the state of all collected tolls until the 
twelve thousand dollars plus interest were returned to the 
state. Once the money was returned, the stockholders could 

elect directors who, with directors appointed by the 

75 
governor, would manage the company. As of February 18 56, 



''^ibid., p. 247; Public Acts (1849-1850), p. 592. 
"^^ Public Acts (1851-1852), p. 635. 
''^Ibid., (1853-1854), p. 397. 



6a 



the state was still not reimbursed, but the private stock- 
holders were allowed to elect three of seven directors of 
the company. ° The turnpike was still not completed at the 
outbreak of the Civil War, as in 1867 the General Assembly 
was still investigating the reasons why the twelve thousand 
dollars had not been returned as well as the condition of 

77 

the turnpike company. ' ' 

At some point during the antebellum period, the 
Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike Company published, in 
the form of a placard, the toll rates, rules, and regula- 
tions of the turnpike. The placards were posted at the 
turnpike's tollgates. The officers of the company included 
Col. W. S. Huggins, President; Dr. G. S. Pierce, Vice Presi- 
dent; W. D. Hancock, Secretary; and B. T. Wade, Treasurer. 
Simpson Harris was the Superintendent. The Board of Direc- 
tors included J. B. McHenry, Dr. J. B. Richmond, L. P. 
Black, Jesse Collier, Ma j . Samuel Carter, T. C. Black, and 
M. T. Bennett. ^^ 

The rules and regulations of the Cumberland and 
Stones River Turnpike Company are interesting and give the 
reader some insight into the actual operation of the 



"^^ibid., (1855-1856), p. 374. 
"^"^ Private Acts (1866-1867), p. 288. 

7 R 

Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike Company, 
"Toll Rates," no date. Folder 38, Box 4, Record Group 5, 
Archives Section, Tennessee State Library and Archives, 
Nashville, Tennessee. 



69 



turnpike. Family travel rates were not required by law but 
were granted at the option of the turnpike company. The 
superintendent could withhold the lower rates from anyone 
who was "unfriendly to the efforts to restore the road." 
Every gatekeeper was required to remain at his gate at all 
times. Every gate was to be kept closed and locked from 
sunset to sunrise. This practice occurred during the day- 
light hours when the gatekeeper thought it best for the 
collection of tolls. The exact amount for each day's toll 
receipts was to be entered in the toll book without delay. 
The gatekeepers were required to refuse mutilated or frayed 
currency. The traveler was required to make change. No 
gatekeeper was to think himself or herself "too good to step 
out in the rain, moonshine or darkness to get the toll." 
If a gatekeeper failed to follow the regulations, he faced 
immediate dismissal by the superintendent. The board of 
directors hoped that "no reasonable gentleman or lady will 
take any offense at the strict rules of this road, for they 
are not intended for anyone who are [sic] willing to pay the 
legal toll."^^ 

The Franklin and Murfreesboro Turnpike Company was 
incorporated on January 27, 1838. The turnpike was to run 
from Franklin in Williamson County to Murfreesboro. A 
stockholders' meeting was to take place at Perkins 



79 



Ibid. 



70 



Crossroads for electing commissioners to manage the com- 
pany. This turnpike company might have had a false start, 

or it never materialized, as another Franklin and Murfrees- 

8 1 
boro Turnpike Company was chartered on January 24, 1850. 

The Salem Turnpike Company was also chartered on 
January 27, 1838. The General Assembly appointed John S. 
Russwurm, James M. King, William F. Lytle, Benjamin Johnson, 
and Lewis Garner as commissioners to receive subscriptions 
for company stock. The turnpike was to begin at or near 
Murfreesboro and run to Salem Crossroads. The stockholders 
had the opportunity to extend the road to Versailles, at 
that time in Williamson County, or to any point in the direc- 
tion of Columbia, depending on the level of subscriptions. °2 

There are several categories of information that 
will be compared in analyzing the Rutherford County turn- 
pikes of the 1830s: roadbed, capital stock, leadership, 
tollgates, toll rates, penalty for refusing to pay toll, 
rate of completion, and maintenance of the road. For some 
of these items no information was obtained on particular 
turnpikes. 

There were several types of roadbeds utilized for 
the turnpikes in the 18 30s. The most frequently used one 



^Q public Acts (1837-1838), pp. 283-284 
^^Ibid., (1849-1850), p. 456. 
^^Ibid., (1837-1838), pp. 284-285. 



71 



in Rutherford County was a roadbed graded at least thirty 
feet wide with sufficient ditches on each side to drain off 
water. It would gradually descend from the middle of the 
road to the ditches. It was substantially paved or graveled 
and had bridges where necessary. The graveled portion was 
twenty feet wide and six inches thick. ^-^ The Nashville and 
Murfreesboro Turnpike, the Nashville, Murf reesboro, and 
Shelbyville Turnpike, and the McMinnville Turnpike were 
patterned after this type of roadbed. Another type of road- 
bed was only twenty feet wide and paved; this was utilized 
by the Hoover's Gap Turnpike. The Murfreesboro, Manches- 
ter, and Winchester Turnpike was required to be eighteen 

8 5 
feet wide and either graveled or macadamized. The first 

twenty-mile portion of the road from Murfreesboro towards 

Manchester was macadamized, and the remainder of the road 

was graveled. ^^ The Franklin and Murfreesboro Turnpike 

initially was to be paved or macadamized at least fifteen 

feet wide. The turnpike that superseded it had a different 



^^Ibid., (1829), p. 229, and (1832), p. 27; Private 
Acts (1832) , p. 22. 

^"^ Public Acts (1829), p. 232. 

85ibid., (1837-1838), p. 291. 

^^William S. Watterson and P. W. Davis to Board of 
Internal Improvement, 28 January 1845, Folder 22, Box 6, 
Record Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee State Library 
and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



72 



87 
roadbed and will be identified later. The roadbed of the 

Fosterville Turnpike was described as macadamized.^^ 
The turnpike companies during the 18 30s were 
required not to exceed a certain amount of capital stock. 
The Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike Com- 
pany was limited to $200,000.^^ The Murfreesboro, Manches- 
ter, and Winchester Turnpike Company was limited to $100,000 
of capital stock after being decreased from $200,000.^^ The 
McMinnville Turnpike Company's capital stock was limited to 

$80, 000. ^■'- The Fosterville Turnpike Company's stock was 

9 2 
confined to $40,000. Several turnpike companies were 

limited to $6,000 per mile for constructing the roads: the 

Murfreesboro, Manchester, and Winchester Turnpike; Jefferson 

Turnpike; Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike; and the 

Franklin and Murfreesboro Turnpike.^ The dollar value of 

the stock shares was one hundred dollars per share for the 

Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike, the 

McMinnville Turnpike, and the Fosterville Turnpike. ^^ Stock 



Q'^ Public Acts (1837-1838), p. 284. 

^^Ibid., p. 81. ^^Ibid., (1832), p. 72. 

^^ Private Acts (1835-1836), pp. 67, 189. 

^•"■Ibid., (1832) , p. 24. 

^^ Public Acts (1837-1838), p. 81. 

^^Ibid., pp. 284, 285, 291, 438. 

^^Ibid., (1831), p. 72, and (1837-1838), p. 81; 
Private Acts (1832), p. 24. 



73 



of the Murfreesboro, Manchester, and Winchester Turnpike 
Company sold for fifty dollars a share. ^ Several turnpike 
companies gave their stockholders the option of paying for 
the stock in money or labor. The turnpike companies with 
this option included: the Murfreesboro, Manchester, and 
Winchester Turnpike; Jefferson Turnpike; Cumberland and 

Stones River Turnpike; and the Franklin and Murfreesboro 

q c 
Turnpike. 

The leadership of the turnpike companies ranged from 
nine commissioners in the Nashville, Murfreesboro, and 
Shelbyville Turnpike Company to three commissioners in the 
Fosterville Turnpike Company and the Salem Turnpike Cora- 

pany. Those in control of the companies in the early 

98 
period were called commissioners and later, directors. 

The individual stockholders upon the subscription of a cer- 
tain monetary level of stock would hold an election. The 

date and place of the election was required to be advertised 

99 
in a local newspaper at least three weeks in advance. The 

board of directors elected a president and other officers 

from among the board. If the state had subscribed to any 



^^ Private Acts (1835-1836), p. 189. 
^^ Public Acts (1837-1838), pp. 284, 286, 291, 438. 
^"^Ibid., (1832), p. 69, and (1837-1838), pp. 81, 284 
^^Ibid., (1832), p. 27, and (1839-1840), p. 187. 
9 9 private Acts (1835-1836), p. 189. 



74 



stock or issued any bonds, the governor had the right to 
appoint from one-third to one-half the board, depending on 
the level of assistance. The board of directors and company 
officers usually served from one- to two-year terms. 
Many of those individuals who were appointed by the General 
Assembly to open books for subscription to capital stock 
were later elected to the board of directors. 

Tollgates were permitted to be built and gatekeepers 
were allowed to collect tolls after five miles of the turn- 
pike had been completed. For every additional five miles of 
turnpike completed, the turnpike companies were allowed to 
erect another tollgate. Usually, tollgates were not per- 
mitted to be built closer than one mile from the city or 
town limits. ^^^ All of the turnpikes that had toll rates 
mentioned in their charter followed the Nashville and Mur- 
freesboro Turnpike Company's rates. The rates for this 
turnpike included: for twenty head of hogs or sheep, 20 
cents; twenty horned or neat cattle, 50 cents; every horse 
or mule not in a drove, 6-1/4 cents; every horse or mule in 
a drove, 2 cents; four-wheeled pleasure carriage, 25 cents; 
two-wheeled riding carriage, 25 cents; loaded wagon, 25 



^QQ public Acts (1837-1838), p. 81, and (1855-1856), 
p. 374. 

^°^Ibid., (1829), pp. 229, 232, and (1837-1838), 
pp. 284-286; Private Acts (1832), p. 23, and (1835-1836), 
p. 190. 



75 



cents; empty wagon, 12-1/2 cents; man and a horse, 6-1/4 

cents; cart, 12-1/2 cents; and a hogshead of tobacco, 12-1/2 

102 
cents. The Cvamberland and Stones River Turnpike rates 

are interesting in that mill wagons paid the full toll one 
way, and the return trip was free. All milling transported 
on horseback went free. Funeral processions traveled free 
on the turnpike. "-^ 

Some of the individuals who traveled on the turn- 
pikes in Rutherford County were not always honest. Various 
travelers refused to pay the toll; others attempted to run 
the tollgates. There were individuals who took advantage of 
crude roads or trails around the tollgates; these roads were 
called "shunpikes." For those individuals caught avoid- 
ing the toll, the turnpike company could obtain a warrant 

from any justice of the peace in the county and recover five 

105 
dollars for every offense. 

Usually, when the turnpike companies were chartered, 

they were given a specific deadline to complete the road or 

forfeit the charter. Initially, the Nashville and 



^Q^ Public Acts (1829), pp. 229-230, 232; Private 
Acts (1832) , p. 23. 

^^^Nashville and Murfreesboro Turnpike Company, 
"Toll Rates," no date, Folder 38, Box 4, Record Group 5, 
Archives Section, Tennessee State Library and Archives, 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

104Tayior, p. 28. 

^Q^ Public Acts (1829), p. 230; (1832), p. 29; and 
(1851-1852) , p. 636. 



76 



Murfreesboro Turnpike was given five years to complete the 
turnpike. ^^^ The Hoover's Gap Turnpike Company was required 
to complete five miles of turnpike every two years. "' The 
McMinnville Turnpike Company initially had that same 

requirement for the first five miles, but once that was 

108 
completed, the company had to complete five miles a year. 

The General Assembly was concerned that the turn- 
pikes should be maintained and not fall into disrepair. If 
a company failed to maintain a portion of the turnpike for 
ten days and an individual complained to a justice of the 
peace of the poor condition, the justice of the peace was 
required to send three freeholders to examine the turnpike. 
If the jury found the turnpike in poor condition, then the 

nearest tollgate would be opened, and the travelers would be 

109 
allowed free access until the road was repaired. In 

1836, the General Assembly enacted legislation requiring the 
county quarterly court appoint three commissioners or super- 
intendents to observe the turnpikes and to insure that they 
were kept in repair as required by law. Whenever a majority 
of the superintendents were of the opinion that a turnpike 
was in bad condition, they had the authority to open the 
gates until the road was repaired. 



l°^Ibid., (1829), p. 230. "'■^^Ibid., p. 232. 
^°^ Private Acts (1835-1836), p. 360. 
^°^Ibid., 1832), p. 24; Public Acts (1829), p. 230. 
^^Qpublic Acts (1835-1836), p. 163. 



77 



Traffic safety was also a concern of the General 
Assembly. In 18 38, the state legislature passed some 
traffic rules for turnpikes and macadamized roads. It was 
the duty of all drivers to give one-half the road to an 
approaching wagon by turning to the right. This turning to 
the right by the wagon driver was also required when another 
wagon or vehicle was about to pass. The overtaking wagon 
or other vehicle was to turn to the left and pass in a 
"quiet, orderly and peaceable manner." Cracking the whip 
or other loud noises were prohibited. No driver was to stop 
his vehicle without turning to the right and leaving at 
least half the road unobstructed. It was unlawful for any- 
one to premeditate the disturbance of animals on the road. 
For any free persons, the violation of any of these traffic 
regulations resulted in a fine of not less than ten dollars 
nor more than three months in confinement. Offenders were 
also liable for damages. Any slaves guilty of the mis- 
demeanor would receive from ten to thirty-nine lashes, and 
their owners were liable for damages. Any vehicular homi- 
cide resulted in confinement for the offender of from three 
to ten years. In order for the travelers to be aware of the 
rules of the road, the turnpike's directors or superinten- 
dent had to place the traffic laws in a conspicuous place at 
all tollgates. •'■•'■■'• 



l^^Ibid., (1837-1838), pp. 178-180. 



78 



The decade of the 1840s had few turnpike companies 
being chartered for operation in Rutherford County. Only 
two turnpike companies — the McMinnville, Woodbury, and 
Murfreesboro Turnpike Company and the Mill Creek Valley 
Turnpike Company — were incorporated. The major factor for 
the decline in incorporations was the state's tighter con- 
trol on its aid for internal improvement companies. The 
legislation enacted in 184 "attempted to surround the 
operation of the state stock system with additional safe- 
guards, in the hope that the interest of the state might be 
more carefully protected. "^^2 The ^^t also approved the 
state Attorney General's filing suits against companies that 
might have fraudulently obtained state subscriptions and 
bonds. -' The case against turnpike companies in Rutherford 
County have already been mentioned. An act passed in 1844, 
authorizing an investigative committee to examine the inter- 
nal improvement companies in which the state had stock, 
added to the climate of uncertainty. -^^^ This uncertainty 
probably affected those individuals in Rutherford County who 
could invest money in internal improvements . They saw that 
many of the turnpike companies chartered in the 18 30s were 
having a difficult time in completing the turnpikes and 
remaining solvent. 



■^^^Folmsbee, p. 242. 

^^^Ibid., p. 243. 114ibid., p. 246. 



79 



The incorporation of the McMinnville, Woodbury, and 
Murfreesboro Turnpike Company on January 30, 1844, was an 
attempt to revive the McMinnville Turnpike Company. The new 
company was to commence construction at Murfreesboro and run 
the turnpike through Youree's Gap. From that location, the 
turnpike was to continue two miles beyond the corporate 
limits of Woodbury or any location closer to McMinnville. 
The company had ten years in which to complete the turnpike. 
The stockholders were to elect five directors from their 
number to manage the company. The state legislature stated 
in the charter that the state had no obligation to subscribe 
to stock in the company. 

The Mill Creek Valley Turnpike Company was chartered 
by the General Assembly on January 21, 1846. The legisla- 
ture authorized Joseph Kimbro, William G. Roulhac, John 
Shacklett, John C. Gooch, and Charles H. Walden of Ruther- 
ford County and fifteen other individuals from Davidson 
County to open books for the subscription of stock in the 
turnpike company. The macadamized turnpike was to begin at 
the four-mile mark on the Nolensville Turnpike and proceed 
to Thompson's Mill; then it was to run up the Mill Creek 
Valley and cross the creek near Rains's Mill. From the mill 
it was to continue up the valley past Antioch Meeting House 



115public_Acts (1843-1844), p. 245, and (1845-1846), 
p. 177. 



BO 



and cross Collier's Creek. Its terminus was Bowling Green 
in Rutherford County. ^^^ 

The capital stock of the company was limited to 
thirty thousand dollars. The price per share was twenty- 
five dollars, far below the price per share of the earlier 
turnpikes. This lower price might have indicated that 
the supporters of the turnpike hoped for more involvement 
by those farmers or other investors who had been priced out 
of the earlier turnpikes. A corporate organizational meet- 
ing was to be held at the Antioch Meeting House when five 
thousand dollars had been raised. The stockholders were to 

elect seven directors, one of whom would be president of the 

lift 
company for a two-year term. 

The macadamized turnpike was required, in the char- 
ter of the Mill Creek Valley Turnpike, to be twenty-five 
feet wide and within five degrees of being level. Sixteen 

feet of its width were to be covered with fine beaten stone 

119 
or gravel and to be nine inches in depth. Utilizing the 

description of a macadamized road presented earlier in the 

chapter, the Mill Creek Valley Turnpike did not fit the 

English specifications. This turnpike was probably an 

adaptation of the macadamization process to the conditions 



^^^Ibid., (1845-1846), pp. 160-161. 
•'■■'■''ibid., p. 160. ll^Ibid. 
^^^Ibid., p. 161. 



Si 



of the area. Like the earlier turnpikes, the company was 
required to build five miles of road before it could build 
its first tollgate. Additional tollgates could be built 
at five-mile intervals. The company had five years in which 

to complete the turnpike. ^ This time limit was extended 

121 
another five years in 18 48. In 18 52, the company was 

granted another five-year extension, and the route to be 

completed was from Antioch in Davidson County through 

Mechanicsville to the head of Stewarts Creek in Rutherford 

County. ^^^ The Mill Creek Valley Turnpike Company was 

still constructing the road in 18 58, as it was given three 

123 
additional years to complete the turnpike. 

This writer, in attempting to locate the early 

public roads in Rutherford County, has noticed that many 

turnpikes in the county follow the route of these roads. 

This would be economical in the sense that the company 

would not have to pay for land for rights of way and would 

not have to enter legal battles over proposed routes. The 

companies probably did a large amount of straightening out 

of the old public roads' meandering routes. The General 



120ibid. 121ii3i(j,^ (1847-1848), p. 86. 
122ibid., (1851-1852), p. 333. 
-"•^-^Private Acts (1857-1858), p. 153. 



82 



Assembly passed an act in 1840 prohibiting the turnpike com- 
panies from building a turnpike and placing tollgates on it 

. . . whether the building of the road has been com- 
menced or not, upon part of any of the public county 
roads in this state whereby any person (s) or property 
shall be prevented from . . . using the road. 124 

The turnpike company therefore had to get a majority vote of 

the county court to obtain permission to use the public road 

as a roadbed for its turnpike. Documenting this observation 

for Rutherford County is difficult as the road books were 

not located by this writer. 

During the 18 50s, twenty-two turnpike companies were 
chartered by the state for operation in Rutherford County. 
Why was there increased interest in turnpikes, especially 
after the last decade? There were two major legislative 
acts passed in the 1850s that possibly could have influenced 
investors in Rutherford County to construct more turnpikes. 

On February 7, 1850, the General Assembly passed an 
"act to authorize the formation of turnpike companies." It 
was a very detailed piece of legislation and deserves some 
consideration in evaluating turnpikes in Rutherford County. 
Any number of individuals not fewer than five could, as a 
result of this legislation, constitute themselves as either 
a macadamized or planked turnpike company. Before they 
could conduct business, however, those individuals interested 



^^^Public Acts (1839-1840), rp- 189-190. 



S3 



in forming a turnpike company had to register a written 
memorandum in the County Register's office. This memorandum 
was to state the names of members of the company and their 
place of residence; the company's name; the road description 
which included the width of the roadbed, material, and grade 
of the road; termini and projected route of the road; amount 
of capital stock; and the value of the shares. A copy of 
this memorandum was to be filed with the Secretary of 
State's office. ^^^ This portion of the act was apparently 
ignored both in Rutherford County and on the state level. 
Only one semblance of a memorandum was found in the Ruther- 
ford County deed books, and that was regarding the Murfrees- 
boro and Liberty Turnpike. ^26 ;^n extensive examination of 
the Tennessee State Library and Archives produced documenta- 
tion on only one turnpike company in Rutherford County 
chartered after 1839. There is the possibility that later 
turnpike documentation was lost or destroyed. Why would 
documents concerning the turnpikes of the 183 0s dated after 
1850 still be in existence? 

The turnpike company had to conduct a survey to 
locate the turnpike route and begin construction within one 
year of filing the memorandum with the county register. It 



125ibid., (1849-1850), pp. 229-230. 

^^^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Register's 
Office, Deed Book 5, pp. 165-167. 



S4 



had to complete the road within five years, although the 
governor could grant up to ten years for completion provid- 
ing progress had been made. The company had to file with 
the county register a copy of the route survey and map or 
plat of the location of the road. No alteration of the 
termini or route exceeding two hundred yards from the 

original location was permitted unless the county court 

127 
approved it. 

When the turnpike's proposed route ran through the 
lands of an individual who was unwilling or incapable of 
agreeing on a price for the land, a jury of five disinter- 
ested freeholders assessed the damages of the road. The 
jury returned the verdict to the circuit court, and it was 
implemented. The company could take possession of a cor- 
ridor fifty feet wide through the land provided that it paid 
the sum assessed by the jury. The turnpike could pass 

through state-owned land and freely utilize the timber, 

128 
stone, gravel, and earth. 

Macadamized turnpikes had to have a roadbed at least 

twenty-four feet wide. The first coat of stone was to be 

sixteen feet wide and six inches thick. The second coat of 

stone or gravel had to be at least eight feet wide and six 

inches thick. The final coat of stone had to be beaten to 



^27pu]biic_Acts (1849-1850), p. 230. 
^2^Ibid., p. 231. 



^5 



129 
the size of one-half pound in weight. This specification 

for the turnpikes was similar to John McAdam's process in 
that there were layers of stone, and an attempt was made to 
keep the stones of the top layer of uniform size. The 
difference was in the number of layers and the size of the 
stone. The turnpike companies continued to have the right 
to take any timber, stone, gravel, or dirt needed to con- 
struct the road provided they paid a reasonable amount for 
it.l30 

The practice of building a tollgate after completing 
five miles of turnpike was continued. The company could 
position them as best suited it, although the gates could 
not be placed closer than four miles apart and 1-1/2 miles 
from an incorporated town or village. The turnpike company 
could purchase ten acres of land adjacent to each tollgate. 
The authorized toll rates were: each hog or sheep, 1 cent; 
each cow or horse in a drove, 2 cents; each horse or mule 
not in a drove nor employed in drawing, 5 cents; loaded 
wagon, 25 cents; each buggy, baroche, and similar two-horse 
carriage, 15 cents; two-horse pleasure carriage, 25 cents; 
and other vehicles used for transporting goods or produce, 
10 cents. Anyone who forcibly or secretly passed the toll- 
gates without paying the toll was liable for a five-dollar 
f ine.- 



131 



^^^Ibid. 130ibid.; and (1853-1854), p. 165. 
■^^"^Ibid., (1849-1850), p. 234. 



86 



If a turnpike or a portion of it developed bad road 
conditions and was out of repair for twenty days, then any 
person could complain to a justice of the peace, and he 
would send a jury of freeholders to examine the road. If 
it was found to be in a poor state of repair, the nearest 
gate or gates were opened to free traffic. When the road 
was repaired, the company could appeal to the circuit court 
to have the gates closed for collecting tolls. 

In January 18 54, the General Assembly passed some 
amendments to the act, passed in 18 50, authorizing the forma- 
tion of turnpike companies. The initial election of the 
board of directors was to occur when ten percent of the 
capxtal stock had been subscribed. ■^■^■^ The turnpike company 
could collect one-half of the toll authorized after it con- 
structed 2-1/2 miles of road. This was probably an 
attempt to raise money quickly to finance the construction 
of the turnpike. The gatekeeper could be fined up to fifty 
dollars for unnecessarily detaining travelers or demanding 
a larger toll than authorized. The turnpike company had 
to reinvest all the toll receipts into the construction of 
the road until it was completed. The company could issue 
construction bonds up to an amount not to exceed double the 



132ibid. , p. 235. 

^^^Ibid., (1853-1854), p. 164. 

^^^Ibid. ■'■^^Ibid., p. 165. 



B7 



amount of the cost of the completed portion of the turnpike 
which had tollgates. The interest rate payable was not to 
exceed eight percent per annum. The issuance of bonds might 
have been a reason for the increased incorporation of turn- 
pike companies in Rutherford County. 

Turnpike companies could construct branch lines to 
their main route, extend their main road, or change their 
route. The turnpike companies were required to erect mile 
posts with the number of miles from a noted point or place. 
The toll rates had to be painted on a board and placed in a 

conspicuous place near each tollgate. The company could not 

137 
collect tolls unless these signs were in place. 

The turnpike companies could, for the purposes of 
constructing the turnpikes, own slaves, land, and sawmills. 
The slaves were not to be employed at any duties other than 
constructing the turnpikes. The land was used for procuring 
resources such as rock and gravel for constructing the turn- 
pikes. The sawmills were to be used only for sawing lumber 
for the turnpikes. The companies were required to locate 

their roads on the shortest and most direct route avail- 
able. 138 

On January 24, 1850, the Franklin and Murfreesboro 
Turnpike Company was incorporated. This was the second time 



136 



138 



Ibid. l^'^Ibid., p. 166, 
Ibid., p. 167. 



that a turnpike from Franklin to Murfreesboro was chartered. 
The General Assembly appointed John Lytle, James M. King, 
B. W. McCulloch, Lewis M. Maney, William Spence, J. C. Moore, 
J. Leiper, B. F. Pucket , E. A. Ruble, and T. H. Crichlow of 
Rutherford County, commissioners to open books for receiving 
stock subscriptions. The route of the macadamized turnpike 
was from Franklin, passing upon the roadbed of the county 
road by McConico's Meeting House to intersect the Harpeth 
Turnpike near Archibald Lytle 's. From Lytle 's the turnpike 
was to run to Petersburg to intersect the Nolensville Turn- 
pike at a lane south of Jonathan Bostick's. The company 
was to utilize the lane as a roadbed to the Rutherford 
County line. The turnpike was to proceed to Murfreesboro 
on a route approved by the directors or commissioners, 
appointed by them to mark out the road. The commissioners, 
who marked out the road, received two dollars a day for 
compensation. -^-^^ The portion of the turnpike from Franklin 
to the Harpeth Turnpike was transferred to the Lynn Cottage 
Turnpike Company in 1854. 

The Murfreesboro and Woodbury Turnpike Company was 
incorporated by the state legislature on February 2, 18 50. 
The General Assembly authorized Charles Ready, William 
Spence, John McKnight, and William A. Read to open books in 



■■•^^Ibid., (1849-1850), p. 456. 
^"^^Ibid., (1853-1854), p. 481. 



S9 



Murfreesboro for stock subscription. John W. Hall, Enoch H. 
Jones, John D. Weatherford, William H. Gowan, and Benjamin 
Fugath were authorized to open books for stock subscription 
at Hall's Store. In Readyville, John W. Armstrong, Thomas J. 
Peay, John H. Wood, and Lewis Jetton were authorized to open 
stock subscription books for the company. The turnpike was 
to run from Murfreesboro to the top of the ridge beyond 
Woodbury in the direction of McMinnville. This was the 
third attempt at constructing a turnpike from Murfreesboro 
to Woodbury, as the state legislature had chartered two 
companies previously to complete the turnpike. Portions of 
the road had been completed prior to the chartering of the 
turnpike company in 18 50. 

A turnpike company that would not operate within the 
limits of Rutherford County at the time of its incorporation 
was the Eagleville, Unionville, and Shelbyville Turnpike 
Company. With the change of Rutherford County's boundary 
lines over the years, part of the turnpike would later lie 
within the county's boundary. The turnpike company was 
incorporated on February 7, 1850, and there were no Ruther- 
ford County residents authorized as commissioners to open 
subscription books. The proposed route of the turnpike was 
to begin on the Farmington and Fayetteville Turnpike between 
Dr. William S. Webb's land and the Big Harpeth River. From 



^^^Ibid., (1849-1850), pp. 424, 426, 



90 



there it was to run through Eagleville and Unionville to 
Shelbyville. The company was given permission in 1852 
to apply the stock that had been subscribed towards com- 
pleting the road between Unionville and Shelbyville. -^^-^ In 
18 54, the state granted authorization to the stockholders 
to vote on dividing the turnpike at Unionville into two 
corporate entities. '*'* The change in the original charter 
required a unanimous vote, which was highly unlikely. The 
directors of the company informed Gov. Andrew Johnson in 
1855 that the company had completed fourteen miles of road, 
beginning at the Fayetteville and Farmington Turnpike. 

The LaVergne and Stones River Turnpike Company was 
incorporated by the General Assembly on February 10, 18 52. 
The state legislature appointed Beverly Nelson, William 
Mason, Levi White, Moses Buchanan, and Thomas Mabry commis- 
sioners to raise capital stock for the company. The 
macadamized turnpike was to begin at a point on the Nash- 
ville, Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike at or near 
where the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad crossed it. 



^"^^ibid., p. 453. 

^^^Ibid., (1851-1852), p. 319. 

^^^Ibid., (1853-1854), p. 396. 

145 

Chisley Williams to Gov. Andrew Johnson, 3 August 

1855, Folder 19, Box 1, Record Group 5, Archives Section, 

Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



91 



about fifteen miles from Nashville. From that location, 

the turnpike was to proceed to the Stones River at or near 

146 
Buchanan's Mill. 

The General Assembly incorporated the LaVergne and 

Rock Spring Turnpike Company on the same day as the LaVergne 

and Stones River Turnpike Company. The legislature 

appointed George Betty, John Britton, A. Rushing, John Hill, 

and H. Walden commissioners to sell the stock of the 

LaVergne and Rock Spring Turnpike Company. The macadamized 

turnpike was to run from the southern terminus of the 

147 
LaVergne and Stones River Turnpike to Rock Spring. 

The Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike Company, the 
only company on which a memorandum in the county deed books 
was found, was incorporated on February 25, 1852. Those 
individuals authorized by the state to collect stock sub- 
scriptions included William Spence, L. H. Carney, Enoch H. 
Jones, A. M. Alexander, Dennis Hogwood, Jacob Wright, and 
John D. Alexander. The company's charter stated that the 
turnpike would begin in Murfreesboro and continue on the 
best route through a gap in the ridge northeast of James 
McKnight. From that point the turnpike would proceed to 

Liberty in DeKalb County. Jacob Wright's bridge on the 

148 
Stones River was to be a point on this turnpike. The 



146pu51ic__Acts (1851-1852), p. 510, 
^^''ibid. I'^^Ibid., p. 648. 



92 



turnpike, as it was described in the memorandum, began in 
Murfreesboro and passed north of Benjamin Johnson's dwell- 
ing. From that point the turnpike crossed Bushnell's Creek 
at Hartwell's foot log and the East Fork of Stones River at 
John Brown's bridge. It proceeded to intersect the route 
formerly surveyed for the Milton and Jefferson Turnpike near 
Butler's glade and followed this route to Milton. From 
Milton, the turnpike intersected the Lebanon and Sparta 
Turnpike within two or three miles of Liberty. The memo- 
randum in the deed book illustrates the fact that the 
individuals charged with laying out a turnpike did not 
always precisely follow the directives of the state legisla- 

149 
ture.-^^ 

There were seventy-two stockholders in the turnpike 
company, fifty-four of whom lived in Rutherford County. 
The stockholders either paid in money or labor for the 
stock. The monetary investments ranged from $2,250 by 
John Brown of Rutherford County to several $25 investments. 
Labor, or actually contracting for a portion of the turn- 
pike, ranged from two miles contracted by W. C. Leech of 

150 
Cannon County to numerous quarter mile contracts. An 

amendment was passed in 18 55 to the act of incorporating 

the Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike to allow an additional 



I'^^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Register's 
Office, Deed Book 5, pp. 165-167. 



150 



Ibid. 



93 



four years to complete the turnpike. Abraham Overall, 
Jarratt Cocke, and Enoch H. Jones of Rutherford County were 
added to the list of commissioners authorized to raise 
capital for the company. 

The Fosterville and Middleton Turnpike Company was 
incorporated on March 2, 1854. The state legislature 
appointed Thomas Edwards, John Patterson, R. B. McClain, 
John Jordan, A. G. McClain, William G. Hight, William 
Little, Ephraim Lytle, and Sam Winston commissioners to 
raise capital for the turnpike company. The turnpike was 
to run from Fosterville to Middleton. ■'■^^ 

The state legislature incorporated the Murfreesboro 
and Wilkinson's Crossroads Turnpike Company on March 2, 
1854. The legislature appointed William H. Smith, George W. 
Smith, George House, Giles Harding, Alfred Blackman, Ben 
Batey, and John Lytle commissioners to obtain capital for 
the company to finance the turnpike. The turnpike was to 
begin at or near Murfreesboro and proceed to Wilkinson's 
Crossroads. The company had the privilege of extending the 
turnpike to the county line.-'-^-^ In 1858, the company was 
permitted to build a tollgate east of the West Fork of the 
Stones River. ■'■^'^ 



^^I public Acts (1855-1856), p. 384. 

^^^Ibid., (1853-1854), p. 495. ^^^Ibid., p. 496, 

•'•^'^Private Acts (1857-1858), p. 203. 



94 



On March 4, 1854, the Nelson's Creek and Versailles 
Turnpike Company was chartered by the General Assembly. The 
commissioners, who were authorized to raise capital for the 
construction of the turnpike, included Newton C. Jordan, 
Archibald Wood, Johnson Wood, Samuel Perkins, Henry Pate, 
Minus Jordan, Newton McCord, John S. Claybrook, Thomas 
Pettis, William Covington, John Hailey, and William Jackson. 
These individuals were residents of both Williamson and 
Rutherford counties. The turnpike was to begin at a point 
near where the Farmington and Fayetteville Turnpike crossed 
Nelson's Creek. It was to proceed eastward through the 
lands of Newton C. Jordan, Archibald Wood, Edmund Lawrence, 
and David Graves to Versailles in Rutherford County. The 
turnpike was to be graded twenty-five feet wide within five 
degrees of level, twelve feet in width was to be covered 

with nine inches of finely beaten stone or gravel, and the 

155 
remainder was a summer road. Summer roads were the 

shoulders of the road and often preferred by the traveler 

during the dry summer months. -'■^° 

The Murfreesboro and Bradyville Turnpike Company 

was incorporated by the General Assembly on February 26, 

1855. The stockholders of the company were L. H. Carney, 

Levi W. Reeves, E. A. Keeble, William Spence, David Patton, 



•'•^^ Public Acts (1853-1854), p. 400. 

156, Tc. 
Lane, p. 154. 



95 



Joseph Pinkerton, and Dr. S. H. Woods. The turnpike was to 
be located from Murfreesboro to Bradyville. 

The Hoover's Gap and Christiana Turnpike Company 
was incorporated by the General Assembly on the same day as 
was the Murfreesboro and Bradyville Turnpike Company. The 
stockholders of the turnpike from Hoover's Gap to Christiana 
were Dorson Skeign, Henry Hoover, J. A. Baugh, B. G. White, 
A. H. White, Thomas Jamison, and John Miller. Both the 
Hoover's Gap and Christiana Turnpike and the Murfreesboro 
and Bradyville Turnpike were patterned after the Murfrees- 

1 CO 

boro and Woodbury Turnpike. An interesting incorporation 
was the Christiana and Hoover's Gap Turnpike Company on 
March 19, 1858. It was a second-class turnpike which was 
to be constructed from Christiana to Hoover's Gap. Some of 
the commissioners who were appointed by the General Assembly 
to raise capital for the company were the same stockholders 
of the Hoover's Gap and Christiana Turnpike Company. The 
coiranissioners of the turnpike chartered in 18 58 were J. A. 
Baugh, B. G. White, Thomas Jamison, G. W. Gibson, and Lewis 
Garner. The Christiana and Hoover's Gap Turnpike was 
patterned after the Shelbyville and Fayetteville Turnpike. 



^^"^Public Acts (1855-1856) , pp. 385-386 



ISSjbid., pp. 388-389 



96 



It was allowed only two tollgates, so the distance of the 

159 
turnpike was not much over ten miles in length. 

On February 14, 1856, the Cainsville and Pleasant 
Valley Turnpike Company was incorporated by the General 
Assembly. The commissioners appointed by the state to raise 
capital for the turnpike were Granville S. Pierce, L. P. 
Black, B. H. McAdoo, Hall Jarmon, Joseph Putnam, Erasmus 
Smith, J. N. Williams, Thomas Ward, William Arbuckle, and 
J. W. Price. The turnpike was to begin at the eastern 
terminus of the Jefferson and Stones River Turnpike and to 
proceed by way of Cainsville to Pleasant Valley in Wilson 
County. The charter of the company was amended in 18 60 to 
allow the company to build a second-class road to intersect 
the Murfreesboro, Lascassas, Milton, and Liberty Turnpike 
near Lascassas. 

The Murfreesboro and Lascassas Turnpike Company was 
incorporated by the state on February 16, 18 56. The com- 
missioners appointed by the legislature to raise capital 
stock for the company were Benjamin Johnson, John Baird, 
William H. Smith, James McCulloch, Samuel J. Rucker, Samuel 
McAdo, and Warren Moor. The turnpike was to run from Mur- 
freesboro to Lascassas to intersect the eastern end of the 



^^^ Private Acts (1857-1858), pp. 367-368. 

160ibid., (1859-1860), p. 423; Public Acts (1855- 
1856) , p. 383. 



97 



Jefferson Turnpike and the Cainsville and Pleasant Valley 
Turnpike . 

The Murfreesboro and Middleton Turnpike Company was 
chartered by the General Assembly on February 23, 18 56. 
The commissioners appointed by the state to raise stock 
subscriptions for the company were William Spencer, John 
Mallery, Samuel Campbell, Henry Hall, Henry D. Jamison, 
Madison Alexander, Robert B. McClain, and Dr. John Webb. 
The turnpike was to run from Middleton to Murfreesboro or 
to intersect the Salem Turnpike near where it crossed the 
West Fork of the Stones River. Both turnpike companies had 
to agree with the intersection of the turnpike. ^^2 

On February 15, 18 58, the General Assembly amended 
the charter of the Murfreesboro and Lascassas Turnpike Com- 
pany. The act authorized the company to extend its turnpike 
from Lascassas through Milton and cross the ridge east of 
town near Neely's Gap. It would continue upon a roadbed 
already located to the Lebanon and Sparta Turnpike near 
Moses Fite's in DeKalb County. Its final terminus was 
Liberty, Tennessee. This new turnpike would be operated by 
the Murfreesboro, Lascassas, Milton, and Liberty Turnpike 
Company. It, in a sense, seems to have been a merger of 
several turnpike companies. There must have been work 



l^^Public Acts (1855-1856), p. 300. 



162tk. 



Ibid., p. 335. 



9S 



completed on the turnpike, as the original act was omitted 
in the published legislation of 1858 and was printed in 
1860. °-^ It is assumed that if the turnpike had not been 
worked on the General Assembly would not have bothered with 
publishing the act in 1860. 

On March 5, 18 58, the Cripple Creek Turnpike was 
incorporated by the General Assembly. Its stockholders 
included Randolph Hall, Ralston Arbuckle, Jesse Brashear, 
R. C. Jones, Elihu Jones, and their associates. The turn- 
pike was to begin on the Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike 
near where it crossed the East Fork of Stones River at Jacob 
Wright's bridge. It was to proceed southwest, cross Cripple 
Creek near Jesse Brashear 's, and intersect the Murfreesboro 
and Woodbury Turnpike near Bearwood's old place. The com- 
pany was entitled to only one tollgate, so the turnpike was 
very short in length.-'-"^ 

The Williamson County and Salem Turnpike Company 
was incorporated by the General Assembly on March 5, 18 58. 
Rutherford County stockholders of the turnpike company 
included William Spence, Thomas B. Turner, William B. 
Lillard, Doctor Ransom, Joseph Ransom, L. M. Cregg, James M. 
Moore, John Price, Travis Winrow, Byas Winrow, William 
Rainey, Archibald Jordan, and Drury Floyd. These individuals 



163 pj.ivate Acts (1859-1860), p. 422, 
^^"^Ibid., (1857-1858), pp. 254-255. 



99 



were also appointed commissioners to raise capital stock for 
the company. The turnpike company was to begin the road on 
the turnpike from Nashville to Eagleville near Nelson's 
Creek. It was to proceed eastward by Windrow's Campground 
to Salem to intersect the Murfreesboro and Salem Turnpike. ■'■"^ 

The Eagleville and Salem Turnpike Company had been 
in operation prior to its incorporation by the General 
Assembly on October 29, 1859. Early in 1859, Gov. Isham G. 
Harris had appointed Thomas 0. Butler, John J. Jarrett, 
F. Jackson, Sr . , B. B. Taylor, James Haynes, and C. B. 
Harris, all of Rutherford County, to raise capital stock in 
the company. There were five other commissioners who had 
the same task in Williamson County. 

The commissioners of the Eagleville and Salem Turn- 
pike Company raised $26,000 in subscribed stock. They pub- 
lished a legal notice in the Murfreesboro Telegraph of the 
time and place of the stockholders' meeting. The company's 
stockholders assembled at New Concord Church on July 21, 
1859, to organize the turnpike company. They elected five 
of the stockholders to be directors and "locators" for a 
one-year term. These directors and locators were C. B. 
Farris, J. J. Jarrett, and Thomas 0. Butler of Rutherford 
County, and Richard C. Owen and Chesley Williams of William- 
son County. As the Eagleville and Salem Turnpike would be 



^^^Ibid., p. 255. 166ibid., (1859-1860), p. 147. 



100 



connected with the Salem Turnpike, the directors petitioned 
the General Assembly to grant them a separate charter 
patterned after the Salem Turnpike Company's charter. The 
legislature approved of a turnpike to run from Salem to 
Eagleville as was surveyed and marked out by the locators. 
The company was given the options of extending the turnpike 
three miles west of Eagleville and constructing a branch 
turnpike to Versailles if three-fourths of the stockholders 
agreed. ■'•°' Evidently the branch turnpike to Versailles met 
the approval of the stockholders as the General Assembly 
set forth the specifications for it in December 18 59. It 
was to be "bedded and graded" twenty-four feet wide. The 
first coat of stone was to be sixteen feet wide and six 
inches thick, and the second coat of stone or gravel was to 
be nine feet wide and six inches thick with four inches of 
earth on top of the road. °° 

The state legislature granted a charter to the 
Eagleville and Chapel Hill Turnpike Company on December 13, 
1859. All of its commissioners, designed to raise capital, 
were from Williamson and Marshall counties. The macadamized 
turnpike was to begin at the Eagleville, Unionville, and 
Shelbyville Turnpike near E. B. Kelley's and run to Chapel 
Hill or to a bridge at the fishing ford on the Duck River. 



■"■^^Ibid., pp. 147-148. 
-■■^^Ibid. , p. 175. 



101 



The company had the privilege of extending the turnpike to 
Farmington, Tennessee . -^"^ 

Now, for a comparison, the same factors will be used 
in the analysis of the turnpikes of the 1850s as were used 
in analyzing the turnpikes of the 1830s. There was a lack 
of information in some areas for the turnpikes of the 1850s. 
There was a considerable amount of variation in the type of 
roadbeds utilized in the 18 50s. There seem to have been 
five types of roadbeds with some variation in each. The 
widest roadbed was at least thirty feet in width. The road 
was to be graded sixteen feet in width with ditches at each 
side to remove water. The road's surface was to descend 
gradually from its center to the ditches and to be paved 
with stone or gravel. The roadbed was not to exceed five 
degrees of level, but the average grade was to be three 
degrees. This was the roadbed of both the Cripple Creek 
Turnpike and the Williamson County and Salem Turnpike which 
were patterned after the Shelbyville and Fayette Turn- 
pike. The Franklin and Murfreesboro Turnpike was also 
required to be thirty feet wide, fourteen feet of which 
could be a summer road.-'-'^-^ It could not be determined if 



l^^Ibid. , p. 173. 

^''^Ibid., (1857-1858), p. 255; Public Acts (1853- 
1854) , pp. 477, 479. 

I'^lpublicActs (1849-1850), p. 457. 



102 



those turnpikes which were patterned after others actually 
copied that turnpike. 

The Eagleville, Unionville, and Shelbyville Turnpike 
and the Eagleville and Salem Turnpike were very similar in 
the specifications for the roadbed. The Eagleville, Union- 
ville, and Shelbyville Turnpike was to be graded twenty- 
seven feet wide. The first coat of finely beaten stone or 
gravel was to be eighteen feet wide and nine inches deep. 
The second coat was nine feet wide and six inches deep. 
Ditches were to be dug on each side of the road. The Eagle- 
ville and Salem Turnpike was the same, except that nine 
feet of the first coat of eighteen feet width and six inches 
depth could be of "fine sprawled rock"; four inches of dirt 
would cover the road. The stone of the second coat could 
not exceed one-half pound in weight. The Eagleville and 
Chapel Hill Turnpike was identical to the Eagleville and 
Salem Turnpike except that the total width was twenty-four 
feet and its first coat was required to be only sixteen feet 
in width. If sufficient capital stock was raised, the width 
could be eighteen feet.-^'^ 

The most frequently utilized roadbed and the least 
described was the one required for second-class macadamized 
turnpikes. Five turnpikes had this type of roadbed: the 



174 



^"^^Ibid., p. 454; Private Acts (1859-1860), pp. 148, 



103 



LaVergne and Stones River Turnpike, LaVergne and Rock Spring 
Turnpike, Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike, Hoover's Gap 
and Christiana Turnpike, and its successor. Both turnpikes 
radiating from LaVergne were sixteen feet in width with ten 
to twelve inches of gravel. The roadbeds were to be graded 
to within five degrees of being level. The Murfreesboro and 
Liberty Turnpike was to be covered with limestone or 
gravel. ■'■'''■^ No reference to a turnpike classification system 
was located. The class system might have been patterned 
after the road classification system of 1821. 

One major observation concerning the capital stock 
of turnpike companies operating in Rutherford County is that 
the price per share of the stock had changed drastically 
from the companies incorporated in the 1830s. Of ten turn- 
pike companies for which the price per share could be 
ascertained, nine of them were selling stock at twenty to 
twenty-five dollars per share. Only the Franklin and 
Murfreesboro Turnpike Company, which had a predecessor in 
the 1830s, sold its stock at fifty dollars per share. The 
stockholders could pay for the stock with either money or 
labor on constructing the turnpikes. Capital stock limits, 
permitted by the state legislature, ranged from one hundred 
thousand dollars for the Franklin and Murfreesboro Turnpike 



l'7 3public_Acts (1851-1852), pp. 510, 649; Private 
Acts (1857-1858), p. 367. 



104 



to twelve thousand dollars each for the LaVergne and Stones 
River and the LaVergne and Rock Spring Turnpikes. '^ 

The leadership of the turnpike companies operating 
in Rutherford County during the 1850s was evenly divided 
between seven and five directors. In all but two companies, 
they were referred to as directors rather than commissioners. 
The turnpike companies with seven directors included the 
Franklin and Murfreesboro Turnpike; Murfreesboro and Wood- 
bury Turnpike; Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike; Fosterville 
and Middleton Turnpike; Nelson's Creek and Versailles Turn- 
pike; Murfreesboro, Lascassas, Milton, and Liberty Turnpike; 
Cripple Creek Turnpike; and the Williamson County and Salem 
Turnpike. Those turnpike companies with five directors 
included the Eagleville, Unionville, and Shelbyville Turn- 
pike; LaVergne and Stones River Turnpike; LaVergne and Rock 
Spring Turnpike; Murfreesboro and Wilkinson's Crossroads 
Turnpike; Cainsville and Pleasant Valley Turnpike; Murfrees- 
boro and Lascassas Turnpike; Murfreesboro and Middleton 
Turnpike; Eagleville and Salem Turnpike; and the Eagleville 
and Chapel Hill Turnpike. The directors as well as the 



^"^^ Public Acts (1849-1850), pp. 426, 453, 456; 
(1851-1852), pp. 510, 648; (1853-1854), pp. 400, 495; and 
(1855-1856) , pp. 335, 383. 



105 



presidents and other officers were elected for either one- 

1 7 R 
or two-year terms . -^ 

The turnpike companies incorporated in Rutherford 
County during the 18 50s followed the standard procedure of 
constructing five miles of roadway prior to building a 
tollgate. Depending on the company charter, the tollgates 
could not be placed closer than 1-1/2 miles, or a mile from 
a town or village on the route of the road. The Murfrees- 
boro and Woodbury Turnpike Company could not build a toll- 
gate closer than one mile from Murf reesboro. The Eagleville 
and Salem Turnpike's tollgate could not be closer than 
1-1/2 miles from Eagleville. Some of the turnpikes such as 
the Cripple Creek Turnpike and the LaVergne and Stones River 
Turnpike were so short in length that they were authorized 
only one tollgate . ■'■'° 

The toll rates of the turnpikes incorporated in 
Rutherford County during the 1850s were not uniform. Many 
charters of turnpikes operating in Rutherford County 
referred to the toll rates of companies operating outside 
the county. The toll rates for the Franklin and Murfreesboro 



l'75 public Acts (1849-1850), pp. 425, 453, 457; 

(1851-1852), pp. 510, 649; (1853-1854), pp. 400, 495-496; 

(1855-1856), pp. 300, 335, 383; Private Acts (1859-1860), 
pp. 147, 174, 422. 

^"^^ Public Acts (1849-1850), pp. 424, 454, 458; 
(1851-1852), p. 510; (1853-1854), pp. 401, 496; (1855-1856), 
pp. 301, 336, 384; Private Acts (1857-1858), p. 368; (1857- 
1858), p. 255; (1859-1860), pp. 149, 175. 



106 



Turnpike were: twenty head of hogs or sheep, 10 cents; 
twenty head of horned or neat cattle, 2 5 cents; every horse 
or mule not drawing a carriage, 3 cents; pleasure carriage 
with two or more horses or mules, 25 cents; carriage, wagon, 
or cart with one horse or mule, 10 cents; loaded wagon with 
two horses, 15 cents; empty wagon with two horses, 10 cents; 
loaded wagon with three horses, mules, or oxen, 20 cents; 
loaded wagon with four horses, mules, or oxen, 2 5 cents; 
additional draft animals, 5 cents; wagons with six horses, 
mules, or oxen, 10 cents, unless tires or wheels are four 
inches wide; empty wagon, one-half the toll rate; and man 
on horseback, 5 cents. The Cripple Creek Turnpike's toll 
rates varied with these rates in that twenty head of cattle 
were 50 cents; a horse or mule in a drove was 2 cents; 
loaded carts were 15 cents; and empty carts were 5 cents. 
This turnpike determined the toll rate based on wheels 
rather than on draft animals. The Fosterville and Middleton 
Turnpike Company did not collect a toll on persons attending 
church or conveying produce to and from a mill. The fine 
for not paying the toll, five dollars, was the same as it 
was in the 1830s. ^^'^ 

The requirement that the turnpike company complete 
the road within a certain number of years was not promoted 



•'•'^'^ Public Acts (1849-1850), pp. 458-459; (1853- 
1854), pp. 480, 49fe; Private Acts (1857-1858), p. 255. 



107 



during the 1850s, as only three companies had a time limit. 
Both the Cainsville and Pleasant Valley Turnpike and the 
Murfreesboro and Lascassas Turnpike were required to be 

completed in four years. The Murfreesboro and Middleton 

17 8 
Turnpike was required to be completed in five years. 

This lack of a completion date requirement might have been 

due to the turnpike companies of the 1850s not receiving 

state aid. 

The most significant indication of the increasing 
prominence of turnpikes in Rutherford County was the incor- 
poration of the highest number of turnpike companies in a 
single year — twelve--in 1860. There were fifteen turnpike 
companies chartered in the five-month period between October 
1859 and March 1860. This was almost a 400 percent increase 
over the previous legislative period of 1858. With the out- 
break of the Civil War and its ultimate outcome, the tremen- 
dous number of turnpikes chartered in 1860 were never built, 
or they were delayed for many years. 

The General Assembly incorporated the Christiana and 
Dug Hollow Turnpike Company on February 1, 18 60. The legis- 
lature appointed James S. Lyon, Lewis Garner, G. B. White, 
Clinton Jacobs, Felix G. Miller, Thomas H. Jamison, Alfred P. 
Lowe, G. B. Messick, and James Lawrence commissioners to 
raise capital for the company. The turnpike was to begin at 



^"^^Public Acts (1855-1856), pp. 301, 336, 483. 



lOS 



Christiana on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad and run 
east to intersect the Dug Hollow Road near the residence of 
James Lawrence of Coffee County. The community of Big 
Spring was required to be a point on the turnpike, and the 
company could make New Millersburg a point on the turnpike. 

If the turnpike stopped at Big Spring, the company would be 

179 
known as the Christiana and Big Spring Turnpike Company.-^ 

On February 1, 1860, the state legislature incor- 
porated the Christiana and Millersburg Turnpike Company. 
The commissioners appointed to raise capital for the company 
at Christiana or White's Store were John H. Baugh, G. B. 
White, Thomas H. Jamison, H. H. White, P. K. Runnels, John F. 
Rowland, Frank Prewett, Henry Prewett, and Thomas Cooper. 

The turnpike was to run from Christiana to Millersburg in 

18 
the southern portion of the county. 

The Franklin and Eagleville Turnpike Company was 

incorporated by the state legislature on February 1, 18 60. 

Fifty-four individuals living in Williamson County were 

appointed commissioners to obtain capital stock for the 

turnpike company. The turnpike was to begin on the Franklin 

and Lewisburg Turnpike near Douglas's Church and proceed to 

Peytonville and Eagleville, which at that time was located 

in Williamson County. -^"-^ 



^"^^ Private Acts (1859-1860), pp. 224-225, 227. 
ISOjbid., p. 229. ISlibid., p. 233. 



109 



The Unionville Turnpike Company was incorporated by 
the legislature on February 13, 1860. The turnpike was to 
run from the Nashville Turnpike near the old steam mill to 
Anthony's old steam mill on Stewart's Creek. The Nashville 
Turnpike was a road that ran through Williamson County, as 
some of the commissioners appointed to raise capital lived 
in that county. The commissioners from Rutherford County 
were James Jones, Charles House, and S. B. Boring. The 
company's name possibly had some relationship to a political 

conviction of the period. Most of the other turnpike com- 

18 2 
panies were named for geographic locations. 

The General Assembly incorporated the Statesville 
and Milton Turnpike Company on February 13, 18 60. The com- 
missioners appointed by the legislature to raise capital 
stock for the turnpike company were A. W. Cox, T. H. Knight, 
A. T. Strand, W. A. Witty, James Ewing, James B. Martin, 
J. T. Simpson, William Byrn, and Doctor Bilbro. The turn- 
pike was to commence on the Cainsville and Statesville 
Turnpike, near the Baptist Meeting House, west to States- 
ville. From there it was to proceed across a ridge through 
Solomon George Gap and intersect the Murfreesboro and 
Liberty Turnpike. The commissioners, or any three of them, 
were to locate the road. All of them were to aid in the 
construction of the road. °-^ 



182ibid., p. 245. 183ibid., pp. 328-329 



110 



On February 28, 1860, the Fosterville and Rover 
Turnpike Company was incorporated by the state legislature. 
The turnpike was to run from Fosterville through Middleton 
to Rover in Bedford County. The commissioners appointed by 
the legislature to raise subscriptions for stock in the 
company were J. F. McKee, J. F. Watkins, William Morgan, 
A. M. McLean, R. B. McLean, William Jackson, James Foster, 
and W. G. Hight. Any seven of these commissioners were 
required to locate the turnpike, and as many of them as 
possible were to construct the turnpike. If the company 

did not have enough capital stock to finance the turnpike 

184 
to Rover, it could terminate the turnpike at Middleton. 

The Middleton Turnpike Company was chartered by the 
General Assembly on February 28, 1860. The commissioners 
appointed to raise capital stock were Coleman Harrison, 
Henry Hall, Thomas 0. Butler, Thompson Jarratt, John P. 
Smith, Robert Boyd, J. B. Kimbro, and J. M. Leatherman. 
The turnpike was to run five miles from the Salem Turnpike 
to Mrs. Henry Jamison's land. On March 5, 186 0, the com- 
pany was given permission to extend the road from Mrs. 
Jamison's to Middleton. Seven of the commissioners were 
required to locate the turnpike, and as many as possible 

I p c 

were encouraged to help construct the turnpike. 



184 



Ibid., pp. 328-329, 



l^^Ibid., pp. 328, 364. 



Ill 



The Hoover's Gap and Bell Buckle Turnpike Company 
was chartered by the state on March 15, 18 60. The turnpike 
was to run from where the Fairfield and Shelbyville Road 
intersected the Old Murfreesboro and Shelbyville Road. It 
was to run by the Bell Buckle depot on the Nashville and 
Chattanooga Railroad, then with the Wartrace Creek to the 
Rutherford County line, near John P. Hoover's land. The 
commissioners appointed by the state to raise capital for 
the turnpike company were Nehemiah Suggs, Robert D. Rankin, 
John W. Frizzle, Joel Harris, John P. Hoover, B. G. Fields, 

A. J. Bingham, W. B. Norvell, William J. Peacock, R. C. 

18 6 
Jones, John T. Cannon, and Matt Frequitt. 

The state legislature incorporated the Murfreesboro 

and Sulphur Spring Turnpike Company on March 15, 1860. The 

commissioners appointed by the legislature to raise capital 

stock for the company included John Bell, Jr., D. D. Maney, 

Addison Mitchell, John Ewing, James Green, R. V. Johns, 

Joseph Lindsey, Julius Wade, and James E. Stockird. The 

turnpike was to run from Murfreesboro by way of the Sulphur 

Spring to Jefferson. The turnpike, according to the com- 

1 187 
pany's charter, had to be at least five miles long. 

The Junction Turnpike Company was incorporated on 

the same day that the Hoover's Gap and Bell Buckle Turnpike 

Company and the Murfreesboro and Sulphur Spring Turnpike 



IS^Ibid., pp. 418-419. ^^"^Ibid., p. 421. 



Company were incorporated. S. R. Miles, H. I. Anderson, 
M. B. Wade, Henry Wade, Richard Wade, James E. Stockird, 
Julius Wade, Campbell Gentry, Thomas C. Beach, W. L. 
Watkins, and Robert Bell were appointed commissioners to 
open books for subscription to stock of the turnpike com- 
pany. The turnpike was to run from Florence, a station on 

the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, to the Lebanon and 

1 p p 
Murfreesboro Turnpike. 

The Smyrna and Stones River Turnpike Company was 
incorporated by the General Assembly on March 24, 1860. 
The company was incorporated to build a turnpike from the 
Smyrna depot on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad 
north to the Stones River. At the river, the company was 
required to build a "good and substantial bridge." If the 
county court appropriated one-half of the bridge's construc- 
tion cost, the company was not entitled to any toll from the 
use of the bridge. If the company paid the total cost of 
the bridge's construction, it was entitled to one-half the 
toll rate for travel on the turnpike just for the use of the 
bridge. The commissioners appointed to raise capital stock 
for the company were Charles L. Davis, Jo. W. Davis, 
Robert Ralston, Hickman Weakley, William M. Sanders, 
Houston Sanders, Sumner Sanders, John Edmundson, Charles 
Dillin, and James S. Simmons. -^^^ 



l^^Ibid., pp. 421-422. ^^^Ibid., pp. 578-579, 



113 



On the same day that the Smyrna and Stones River 
Turnpike Company was incorporated, the state incorporated 
the Smyrna and Stewart's Creek Turnpike Company. The turn- 
pike was to run from the Smyrna depot south to the head- 
waters of Stewart's Creek. Individuals involved in raising 
capital stock for the company were Alfred Elliot, Silas 
Turner, Wiley Brown, Isham Peebles, L. Davis, Benjamin 
Batey, and S. B. Boring. 

Through the descriptions of the roadbeds of the 
turnpikes incorporated in 1860, it is possible to determine 
the identity of a second-class turnpike. The Christiana and 
Dug Hollow Turnpike was to be constructed as a second-class 
turnpike. It was to be graded fourteen feet wide with 
either creek, river, or hill gravel six inches deep. The 
second coat of gravel was to be eight feet wide and six 
inches deep. The road was to be cleared of timber eight 
feet on both sides of the graveled portion, which made the 
road right of way thirty feet wide. The turnpike was to 
have ditches on both sides of the roadbed to drain the 
water away from the road surface. The company was not com- 
pelled to construct bridges when it was not necessary, but 
it had to excavate the river banks and gravel the banks of 
the streams that the turnpike had to cross. The Statesville 
and Milton Turnpike was similar in that its right of way 



-•■^^Ibid., p. 579 



114 



was thirty feet, but it was graded sixteen feet wide. Its 
first coat of gravel was twelve feet wide and six inches 
deep, and its second coat of gravel was eight feet wide and 
six inches deep. Both the Smyrna and Stones River and the 
Smyrna and Stewart's Creek Turnpikes were identical to the 
Statesville and Milton Turnpike, except that they were to 
be graded to a width of twenty-five feet rather than sixteen 
feet. Both the Union Turnpike and Hoover's Gap and Bell 
Buckle Turnpike were described as second-class turnpikes . -'-^l 

The Franklin and Eagleville Turnpike's planned 
roadbed was different from the roadbeds of the other turn- 
pikes chartered in 186 0. It was to have been graded and 
bedded at least twenty-four feet wide and within five 
degrees of being level. The first coat of stone was to be 
eighteen feet wide and six inches deep. Nine feet of the 
first coat could have been of fine sprawled stone if the 
company desired. This width was between four and six feet 
wider than the second-class turnpikes. The second coat of 
the Franklin and Eagleville Turnpike was to have been nine 
feet wide and six inches deep. The stone of the second coat 
was to be broken to a size not exceeding one-half pound in 
weight. ■'■^^ 

The capital stock of the turnpikes incorporated in 
1860 was much smaller than that of the earlier turnpikes. 



■■■^^Ibid., pp. 227, 245, 251, 418, 578, 580. 
■"■^^Ibid. , p. 292. 



115 



The largest limit placed on capital stock was $35,000 for 
the Franklin and Eagleville Turnpike. The Christiana and 
Dug Hollow Turnpike Company's capital stock was limited to 
$30,000. The capital stock of the Statesville and Milton 
Turnpike was set at $15,000, more or less as needed to 
complete the construction. The General Assembly left the 
size of the capital stock up to the stockholders, with the 
only provision being that the amount be sufficient to con- 
struct the turnpike. The stockholder was still permitted 
to pay for stock with either money or labor on the turn- 
pike's construction. Twenty-five dollars was the price per 
share of the stock for those turnpike companies which had 
the amount stated in the charter . ■'■^■^ 

The leadership of the turnpike companies incor- 
porated in 186 was vested in a board of directors; and, in 
the cases of the Middleton Turnpike and Franklin and Eagle- 
ville Turnpike, leadership was exercised by commissioners. 
The directors or commissioners elected the president, 
secretary, and treasurer from their own group. The board 
of directors consisted of either five or seven members. 
The term of office of the directors and the other company 
officials was either one or two years, depending on the 
charter. In comparing the companies, given an incomplete 
representation, the board of directors with five members 



^^^Ibid., pp. 224, 229, 233, 250, 328, 578, 579, 



116 



had two-year terms while the seven-member board of directors 
had a one-year term of office. 

The turnpike companies still had to construct five 
miles of road before they could build a tollgate and collect 
toll. Since many of these proposed turnpikes would be trunk 
lines, there were fewer tollgates. The Christiana and 
Millersburg Turnpike, Union Turnpike, Smyrna and Stones 
River Turnpike, and the Smyrna and Stewart's Creek Turnpike 
were to be allowed only one tollgate. The Hoover's Gap and 
Bell Buckle Turnpike was to have only two tollgates when it 
was completed. The tollgates were still prohibited from 
being built too close to towns or villages. The Christiana 
and Dug Hollow Turnpike Company could not build its tollgate 
closer to Christiana than one-half mile. The Christiana 

and Millersburg Turnpike's only tollgate could not be closer 

195 
to Christiana than three-fourths of a mile. 

Only the Christiana and Dug Hollow Turnpike's toll 

rate was stated in the charters of companies incorporated 

in 18 60. Many of the turnpikes' tolls were patterned after 

earlier turnpikes such as the Eagleville and Salem Turnpike, 

Nashville and Lebanon Turnpike, Jefferson Turnpike, and the 

Murfreesboro and Wilkinson's Crossroads Turnpike. Four of 



194ibid., pp. 224, 229, 234, 246, 250, 251, 328, 
418, 421, 578, 580. 

195ibid., pp. 226, 230, 234, 246, 251, 329, 419, 
579, 580. 



117 



the turnpike companies chartered in 18 60 had the same toll 
rates as the Christiana and Dug Hollow Turnpike. Those 
turnpikes that copied the Christiana and Dug Hollow Turn- 
pike's toll rates included the Christiana and Millersburg 
Turnpike, Fosterville and Rover Turnpike, Middleton Turn- 
pike, and the Hoover's Gap and Bell Buckle Turnpike. The 
toll rates established for the Christiana and Dug Hollow 
Turnpike had not changed much from previous toll rates. 
The toll rates were: one hog or sheep, 1 cent; one cow, 
horse, or mule in a drove, 2 cents; one horse or mule not 
in a drove or not drawing, whether mounted or not, 5 cents; 
loaded wagon, 25 cents; empty wagon, 10 cents; loaded cart, 
10 cents; empty cart, 5 cents; buggies, barouches, carriages 
and other two-horse vehicles, 25 cents; one-horse buggies, 
10 cents; loaded two-horse wagon, 15 cents; and empty two- 
horse wagon, 15 cents. The penalty of five dollars for not 
paying the toll was still the same as it had been in 
1830.^5^ 

Three turnpike companies chartered in 1860 were 
given time limits in which to complete the construction of 
the turnpike. Both the Christiana and Millersburg Turnpike 
and the Statesville and Milton Turnpike companies were given 
five years to construct their roads. The Christiana and 



^^^Ibid., pp. 226, 230, 234, 246, 251, 328, 329, 
419, 421, 579, 580. 



lis 



Dug Hollow Turnpike Company was given seven years to com- 
plete the task of constructing the road. ^' The Civil War 
prohibited all of the turnpike companies from maintaining 
their time schedules for completing the construction of the 
turnpikes. 



1^'^Ibid., pp. 226, 230, 257 



119 



CHAPTER IV 

ROADS IN RUTHERFORD COUNTY DURING 
THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 

The roads and turnpikes of Rutherford County per- 
formed an important role during the Civil War as transpor- 
tation facilities do in any war. Both Union and Confederate 
forces marched and countermarched across the rolling terrain 
of the county throughout much of the war. The county's 
public roads and turnpikes provided these forces with 
avenues of approach and supply routes; for the defeated 
force, they allowed avenues of retreat. 

Rutherford County was the site of an important 
battle between the Confederate Army of Tennessee and the 
Union Army of the Cumberland during the winter of 1862. 
It is not the intention in this thesis to describe in 
detail the role of the roads in the maneuvering of the two 
armies prior to the battle of Stones River on December 31, 
1862, and January 2, 1863. The characteristics of Ruther- 
ford County's roads from comments of some of the partici- 
pants of the battle will be the focus of this research. 

There seems to have been a dichotomy of opinion as 
to the quality of the roads in Rutherford County among those 



120 



who fought at the Battle of Stones River. Confederate 

generals spoke highly of the road system in Rutherford 

County. Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee said of the area, 

Murfreesborough is situated thirty miles southeast of 
Nashville, in a fertile, gently undulating, and highly 
cultivated country. . . . The Chattanooga [Nashville 
and Chattanooga] Railroad, the chief line of communica- 
tion from Tennessee to the South Atlantic states, 
passes through it, and numerous excellent turnpikes 
from it in every direction. The road to Lebanon passes 
nearly due north from Murfreesborough; that to Triune 
nearly west; that to Salem a little south of west, and 
the Nashville Turnpike northwest, crossing Stones 
River about 1-1/2 miles from Murfreesborough. 1 

Gen. Braxton Bragg referred to the routes of advance util- 
ized by Union troops prior to the battle as "fine 
macadamized roads." He also stated after the battle. 

Owing to the convergence upon our depot at Murfrees- 
borough of so many fine roads by which the enemy could 
approach ... we were confined in our selection to a 
line near enough to the point of juncture to enable us 
to successfully cover them all until the real point of 
attack should be developed. 2 

The Union army's leadership did not hold the roads 
of Rutherford County in such high esteem as their Confeder- 
ate counterparts. One Union officer reported in a recon- 
naissance that the Gallatin and LaVergne Road was "narrow 



■'"Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee to Lt. Col. George W. 
Brent, 28 February 1863, War of the Rebellion, Official 
Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (Washington, 
D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1891), series 1, vol. 20, 
pt. 1, p. 772. Hereafter cited as Official Records . 

^Gen. Braxton Bragg to Gen. Samuel Cooper, 23 Febru- 
ary 1863, Official Records , series 1, vol. 20, pt. 1, 
p. 663. 



121 



and rough." Brigadier General Negley said the "Stewarts- 
borough Road is very bad; a number of wagons broke down, 
owing to the rough and rocky roads. "^ One officer reported 
that on one of the turnpikes in the southern section of the 
county in the vicinity of Eagleville and Fosterville: 

The stone of the pike, much of it recently made, cut 
up the shoes badly. I need in my brigade seven 
hundred pairs before the men can march. No doubt 
the other brigade needs as many. 5 

Even the commanding general of the Union army complained. 

In a letter dated Murf reesboro, January 16, 1863, addressed 

to the Quartermaster General in Washington, D. C, he states. 

Your dispatch received; thanks. Have no wagons to 

spare, and these are ciambersome. In these narrow 

roads [they] can't travel across the country, would 
do well on Pennsylvania Avenue.^ 

One can interpret these comments to mean that in 

comparison to other Southern road systems , Rutherford 

County's was in very good condition. On the other hand, in 

comparison with Northern roads, the roads of Rutherford 

County left much to be desired. Rutherford County's roads 



■^Col. Silas C. Toler to Lt. Theo. Wiseman, 2 Decem- 
ber 1862, Official Records , series 1, vol. 20, pt. 1, p. 27. 

'^Brigadier General Negley to Maj . George E. Flynt, 
27 December 1862, Official Records , series 1, vol. 20, pt. 2, 
p. 247. 

^Col. G. D. Wagner to Brigadier General Hascall, 16 
January 1863, Official Records , series 1, vol. 20, pt. 1, 
p. 985. 

^Maj. Gen. W. S. Rosecrans to Brig. Gen. M. C. 
Meigs, 16 January 1863, Official Records , series 1, vol. 20, 
pt. 2, p. 333. 



122 



were probably narrower and rougher than Northern roads. It 
might be said that some of the initial success of the Army 
of Tennessee on December 31, 18 62, was due to transportation 
problems that the Army of the Cumberland had on the roads 
between Nashville and Murf reesboro . Transportation problems 
of the Union army were a slow speed of movement, channeliza- 
tion of forces on the few macadamized roads due to the poor 
weather, and the breakdown of needed equipment. It can also 
be surmised that the new stone on the pike was related to 
some of the turnpikes incorporated in 186 0, or that the 
available residents maintained the roads during the Civil 
War. 

As with many other facets of Rutherford County and 
the South, the roads and turnpikes had been damaged by 
warfare. Public roads and turnpikes were not maintained 
during the Civil War. Bridges had been destroyed during 
the war. Many fords had the debris of warfare obstructing 
safe passage. The previous system of constructing and 
maintaining public roads had to be reestablished. In 1866, 
the fine for failing to work on public roads was increased 

7 
from seventy-five cents to two dollars per day. The county 

courts were given the opportunity by the state legislature 

to levy and collect a tax for the purpose of grading and 

improving public highways that intersected railroads. ° The 



"^Public Acts (1865-1866), p. 31, 



'ibid. , (1866-1867) , p. 7 



123 



law creating the office of road commissioner in the counties 

q 

was repealed in 1868. 

In 1873, the General Assembly passed a comprehensive 
law regarding public roads; and although it was repealed in 
March 1877, it necessitates some study. The county court 
was required by this act to establish road districts and to 
appoint three road commissioners per district. One of the 
duties of the road commissioners was to supervise the con- 
struction and repair of roads and bridges in the district. 
They were to lay out and alter the highways within the road 
districts. The roads which had been laid out previously, 
but not sufficiently described, were required to be surveyed 
and recorded in the county court clerk's office. The com- 
missioners were required to purchase the necessary tools 
for working on the roads. They were assigned the task of 
assessing a road tax in their district. -'■^ 

Every male inhabitant between the ages of eighteen 
and fifty was required to work on the district's roads for 
five days a year. Ministers were exempted from working on 
the roads. The road overseers were required to provide the 
commissioners with a list of the names of all inhabitants 
that were liable to work on the roads. For the additional 
days required to maintain the roads in the district, one 



^ Statutes of Tennessee 1858-1871 , p. 226. 
^^Public Acts (1873), p. 160, and (1877), p. 156. 



day of work was assessed on each five-thousand-dollar valua- 
tion of real and personal property of every inhabitant in 
the district. For example, an individual who owned real 
and personal property valued at fifteen thousand dollars 
would be required to work three days in addition to the five 
days required of every eligible male within the age limits. 
A resident could have the labor commuted in exchange for 
one dollar a day which went to the overseer to hire addi- 
tional labor. ■'■■'■ 

The road overseer was appointed by the commissioner 
for a one-year term to supervise the work on from three to 
five miles of roadway. The overseer was required to give 
two days' notice of the time and place of the work and what 
tools to bring to those who had to work on the road. The 
tools that a person assessed for three or more days might 
have to bring included a cart, wagon, or plow with a yoke 
of oxen or span of horses, and a driver to manage them. 
The individual would be credited for three days' service 
for each one day's use of these tools. ^^ The law was 
repealed in 1877 because the public welfare required it.-*-^ 

During Reconstruction, the turnpike companies 
located in Rutherford County attempted to restore the turn- 
pikes to a good condition both economically and physically. 



^^Ibid., (1873), pp. 160-162. 

l^ibid., pp. 163-164. l^Ibid. , (1877), p. 156. 



12 5 



The Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike company obtained state 
approval in 18 66 to legalize the grade of the turnpike and 
discontinue the attempt at macadamizing it. in 18 68, 
John Wood, Joseph S. Morton, R. B. Jetton, Henderson 
Anderson, and A. P. Lowe were appointed directors of the 
Murfreesboro and Manchester Turnpike Company. They were to 
control it for the state. ^^ In 1866, the governor appointed 
W. W. Goodwin, T. C. Black, and John Perkins commissioners 
to operate the Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike for the 
state. W. H. Goodwin said of the turnpike's condition in 
1866 that it "was in a very bad state and in many places 
unsafe at the time of my appointment . "^^ On the Jefferson 
Turnpike all the bridges had been destroyed by the war, but 
by 1871 the bridges had been rebuilt and new mile posts had 
been erected. There were only three tollgates on the turn- 

17 
pike at that time."^' 

The state government was trying to promote the 
development of more turnpikes. The procedure that the 
General Assembly established in 1871 for incorporating 



l^ Private Acts (1866-1867), p. 61. 
^^Ibid., (1867-1868), p. 115. 

l^W H. Goodwin to T. H. Butler, 1 May 1871, Folder 
10, BOX 4, Record Group 5, Archives Section, Tennessee State 
Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 

I'^jefferson Turnpike Company to T. H. Butler, 14 
July 1871, Folder 8, Box 2, Record Group 5, Archives Section, 
Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. 



126 



turnpike companies was more localized than previous pro- 
cedures. The petition for incorporation of a turnpike 
company had to be filed in the chancery court of the 
counties through which the turnpike was to pass. The 
chancery court was to appoint the commissioners to open 
books for receiving stock. The decree of incorporation was 

to be registered in the county register's office of each 

1 8 
county in the potential route of the turnpike. On Febru- 
ary 26, 1869, James M. Cason, Green B. Hudson, A. P. McAdo, 
H. C. Williams, John L. Huddleston, William Baird , and 

William M. Sellers were appointed commissioners to raise 

1 9 
stock for the Lascassas and Fall Creek Turnpike Company. 

The state legislature incorporated the Nolensville 

and Wilkinson's Crossroads Turnpike Company on February 2, 

1870. The commissioners appointed to raise capital for the 

company were Joseph M. Bennett, Joseph J. Green, W. K. 

Grier, W. M. Clark, T. G. Shannon, Joseph H. Murray, J. S. 

Hawlet, George Chrisman, Evans Bennett, Lemuel Newsom, 

John F. Neal, Henderson Naron, William Caldwell, E. C. Jobe, 

G. W. McLaughlin, Thomas Black, Sr., Benjamin Beatty, Sr . , 

Brown Boring, Alfred Davis, Thomas Edwards, George W. Smith, 

W. H. Smith, James E. Manson, Leonard Davis, John Love, and 

John Shelton. They were to raise thirty-five thousand 



^^ Private Acts (1868-1869), p. 152. 



19 



Ibid., p. 267 



127 



dollars to construct a turnpike from Nolensville to Wilkin- 
son's Crossroads. The price per share was twenty-five 
dollars. The organizational meeting was to be held at the 
Kedron Church in Rutherford County. At the meeting the 
stockholders would elect nine directors who in turn would 
elect one of their number as president. Nine of the above- 
mentioned commissioners were to mark out the route of the 
turnpike. The company was authorized only three tollgates 

to collect toll.^° 

On February 25, 187 0, the General Assembly revoked 
the charter of the Murfreesboro and Sulphur Spring Turnpike 
Company, approved in 1860. Instead, the legislators incor- 
porated the Murfreesboro and Jefferson Turnpike Company. 
It appointed John S. Carney, D. D. Maney, Samuel Mitchell, 
Thomas Ewing, Ferdinand Miles, William Mitchell, Julius 
Wade, and James E. Stockard commissioners to raise stock for 
the company. The turnpike was to run from a point between 
the Stones River and the corporate limits of Murfreesboro to 
Jefferson. The commissioners were to call a stockholders' 

meeting to elect five directors. Stockholders could pay for 

21 
the company's stock in money or labor on the road. 

The Rutherford and Wilson County Turnpike Company 

was chartered on February 28, 1870, by the General Assembly. 



^°Ibid., (1869-1870), pp. 612-613 
21lbid., pp. 477-478. 



12S 



It appointed W. W. McKnight, Dennis Haywood, Joseph M. Cook, 
W. B. White, and W. B. Brown of Rutherford County, and five 
individuals from Wilson County to raise capital stock for 
the company. The turnpike was to begin at a point on the 
Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike near McKnight ' s graveyard 
in Rutherford County. From there, it was to proceed as 
near as practicable with an old dirt road to intersect the 
Lascassas and Milton Turnpike at Milton and to leave the 
turnpike near the Milton Seminary. The turnpike's proposed 
route was to run due north from the seminary to the Wilson 
County line at Medlin ' s Branch and intersect the Lebanon 
Road. It was to continue with the Lebanon Road until it 
intersected the Cainsville and Statesville Turnpike near 
H. G. John's store in Wilson County. At twenty-five dollars 
a share, the capital stock was not to exceed fifteen thou- 
sand dollars. A stockholders' meeting was to be held in 
Milton to elect five directors to serve a two-year term. 

This turnpike was to be a third-class turnpike, and the 

22 

company had five years to complete it. 

The Salem and Windrow Turnpike Company was incor- 
porated by the state on February 28, 1870. Minos Jordan, 
Joseph Ransom, A. Pitts, H. Windrow, John Haly, R. W. Fain, 
and J. B. Kimbro were appointed commissioners to raise 
capital stock for the company. The turnpike was to run 



22ibid. , pp. 566-567 



129 



from the village of Salem to the Eagleville and Triune Turn- 
pike at the first tollgate south of Triune. The first 
stockholders' meeting was to be held in Salem to elect 

seven directors for a two-year term. The directors would 

23 
elect a president from one of their number. 

The state legislature chartered the Murfreesboro and 
Triune Turnpike Company on March 2, 1870. John Lytle, W. G. 
Garrett, J. Todd, H. C. Hartley, Joseph King, John King, 
James King, Jr., and Joseph Holloway were appointed commis- 
sioners to raise capital stock for the company. The company 
was to build a turnpike from Murfreesboro to Triune along 
the most practicable route. The turnpike was required by 
the state to meet any road that might be built from Franklin 
in the direction of Murfreesboro. The capital stock was not 
to exceed one hundred thousand dollars. The stock was sold 
at twenty-five dollars per share. When ten thousand dollars 
had been raised, the stockholders could elect five directors. 
The company had the option of building the turnpike entirely 
or in part on the roadbed of the road leading from Murfrees- 
boro to Franklin. This option substantiates the belief 
gained from research for this thesis that turnpikes were 
built on existing roads and, in a sense, improved them. 

In 1871, the General Assembly adopted a joint 
resolution to take steps to see that the laws concerning 



23ibid., p. 568. ^'^Ibid., (1869-1870) , pp. 612-613. 



130 



state assistance for turnpike companies had been complied 
with and the state's interest was protected. The legislators 
authorized the governor to appoint an individual in each 
grand division to the position of road commissioner. The 
road commissioner's duty was to investigate the condition and 
management of each turnpike in which the credit of the state 
had been loaned. The commissioner was authorized to examine 

all books, vouchers, and other records in each company for 

25 
fraud and mismanagement. In 1873, the General Assembly 

authorized that the state's interest in the turnpikes, and 

all claims and liens held by it against turnpikes as a 

result of the bonds issued before the Civil War, be sold to 

the highest bidder. If bids were equal, the Secretary of 

State was to give priority to the company, stockholders, 

counties, incorporated towns or cities, other corporations, 

and individuals in that order. There were several turnpikes 

in Rutherford County, mostly those incorporated prior to 

1840, to which this law would apply. ^^ 

The state government, although it was attempting to 

extract itself from the turnpike business, still encouraged 

new turnpike construction. In 1875, the General Assembly 

passed legislation promoting the construction of macadamized 

roads. Any five or more citizens of Tennessee, twenty-one 



^^Public Acts (1871) , pp. 223-224 



26 



Ibid., (1873) , p. 136, 



131 



years of age and older, could form a turnpike company. The 
individuals had to write a memorandum stating the company's 
name, purpose, and proposed route of the road. They had to 
divulge the amount of capital stock, the number of shares, 
stockholders' names, and the number of shares owned by each 
stockholder. The company could erect a tollgate after com- 
pleting 1-1/2 miles of road. The company could collect toll 
for one-fifth of the year at current rates provided that the 
net receipts went towards completing the turnpike. If the 
turnpike were located ten miles or more from a city with a 
population of five thousand inhabitants, the company was per- 
mitted to construct the roadbed fourteen feet wide and 
covered with rock or gravel ten feet wide and six inches 
thick. ^"^ This encouraged companies, because it allowed them 
to collect toll sooner than if they had to construct five 
miles of road before erecting a tollgate. The company could 
spend less money on materials and construction time by 
shortening the width of the roadbed. 

In March 1877, the General Assembly amended the Code 
of Tennessee to require every county court to appoint three 
superintendents to examine the turnpikes and toll bridges in 
the county and to see that they were maintained in accordance 
with the law. The superintendents were to report to the 
county court on the condition of the turnpike companies. 



^'^Ibid., (1875), pp. 200-202. 



The turnpike companies were required not to allow the 
macadamized or metal part of the road to be narrower than 
twelve feet. Road metal is a British term referring to the 
broken stone or cinders used in making or repairing roads, 
or another term for the macadamizing process. The superin- 
tendents had the authority to examine the receipt and dis- 
bursement accounts of the turnpike companies. If a company 
had expended the net proceeds of the tolls on the repair of 
the road, the superintendent must report this to the county 
court. It was a good defense for the turnpike company in 
the event of an indictment for failing to keep the turnpike 
in repair. The turnpike companies would not be held indict- 
able for abandoning of the road provided seven miles of road 

28 
were maintained if the comapny collected toll. 

Rutherford County's Quarterly Court appointed George 
Gum, Joseph R. Thompson, and William S. Rhodes Superinten- 
dents of Turnpikes, as required by the law. Their first 
report to the county court was in April 1878. The reports 
of the superintendents are very informative of the condition 
of the turnpikes operating in Rutherford County. They exam- 
ined the Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike 
Company in February 1878. The turnpike had twenty-nine miles 
in Rutherford County, fourteen miles in Davidson County, and 
twelve miles in Bedford County — in all, fifty-five miles. 



^^Ibid., (1877), pp. 124-125. 



133 



The company had eleven tollgates and the toll receipts for 
all the gates for 1877 was $10,605.45. The company had 
$901.20 in excess receipts over disbursements for that year. 
The turnpike between Nashville and Murfreesboro was in good 
condition except for five miles between LaVergne and 

Stewart's Creek. The Shelbyville division of the turnpike 

29 

was undergoing extensive repairs in 1878. 

The Murfreesboro, Manchester, and Winchester Turn- 
pike had formerly belonged to the state, according to the 
road superintendents. The turnpike was abandoned except for 
ten miles adjacent to Murfreesboro, and it was in need of 
repair. The state sold its interest in the turnpike to 
W. B. Huggins and Company. The company began a thorough 
repair of the ten-mile stretch southeast of Murfreesboro on 
April 1, 1877. The company expended $2,329 on labor, haul- 
ing, materials, and gate repair up to March 1878. Toll 
collections began at two gates in April 1877. The plan of 
W. B. Huggins and Company was to place the first ten miles 
in good condition before working on the remainder of the 
road. The company hoped to have a good turnpike as far as 
Beech Grove, fifteen miles from Murfreesboro. The company 
was in debt to the amount of $1,097. 



^^Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Quarterly Court Minute Book II, p. 47. 

^°Ibid., p. 48. 



134 



The Murfreesboro and Bradyville Turnpike Company had 
abandoned all of the turnpike except for ten miles adjacent 
to Murfreesboro. According to the superintendents of turn- 
pikes, the road was "well graded and has a good roadbed and 
in good repair with the exception [that] it is a little 
rough and is at present time undergoing a thorough repair." 
Two tollgates were in operation in 1878, and the company's 
financial condition was eighty-eight dollars in excess dis- 
bursements over receipts. A large amount of heavy timber 
hauling on the road caused damage to the roadbed, which had 
to be repaired repeatedly . -^^ 

The Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike which ran by 
Hall's Hill had been abandoned except for the adjoining ten 
miles from Murfreesboro. In 1878, the turnpike was under- 
going considerable repair. The company was collecting toll 
at two gates, and its financial condition was twenty-two 
dollars of expenditures over receipts. ^^ 

The Murfreesboro, Lascassas, Milton, and Liberty 
Turnpike Company had abandoned all of its turnpike except 
the sixteen miles located in Rutherford County. The portion 
of the road in Rutherford County was in good repair, and the 
company was collecting toll at three gates. The financial 
condition of the company was good in that expenditures 
equalled receipts. The company had a six-thousand-dollar 

31ibid. -^^Ibid. 



135 



judgement rendered against it in favor of the estate of 
John Brown in 1877.33 

The Murfreesboro and Wilkinson's Crossroads Turnpike 
was 5-1/2 miles in length, and it was in "tolerable good 
repair." The company's treasury had a positive balance of 
$156 in it, although the company was reducing a substantial 



debt. 



34 



Another turnpike located west of Murfreesboro, the 
Murfreesboro and Salem Turnpike, was a "first class turn- 
pike," according to the superintendents. Next to the town, 
2-1/2 miles of road were in operation, and the remainder 
needed some slight repairs. The superintendents reported 
that some of the rocks used on the road were a little too 
coarse. The turnpike was 5-1/4 miles long and had one gate 
in operation. In 1877, the company's treasury had a posi- 
tive balance of $1,135.^5 

The Eagleville and Salem Turnpike was 12-3/4 miles 
long and had two tollgates in operation in 1878. The turn- 
pike, according to the superintendents of turnpikes, was in 
some need of repair. The company was trying to reduce its 
debts gradually over time. In 1877, the company spent 
forty-one dollars more than it collected. 3° 



33ibid., p. 49. 34jj3^jj^ 35ji3i(3 
36ibid., pp. 49-50. 



136 



The Milton and Jefferson Turnpike, reported the 
superintendents, was "mostly made out of creek gravel." It 
had a serious problem in that during the wet fall and winter 
seasons, and with a very large amount of heavy hauling con- 
ducted on it, the roadbed was breaking up. The company was 
attempting to remedy the problem. The turnpike was seven- 
teen miles long and had three tollgates in operation. The 
company expended money for repairing the roadbed, bridges, 
and culverts, and for wages for the gatekeepers, superin- 
tendent, and treasurer. The company's treasury had $14 5 in 
an excess of receipts over disbursements. 

The turnpike in Rutherford County which the super- 
intendents of turnpikes reported was in the best condition 
was the Murfreesboro and Woodbury Turnpike. It was nineteen 
miles in length and had four operating tollgates. A posi- 
tive balance of $202 existed in the company's treasury in 

3 fl 
1878. The Cumberland and Stones River Turnpike had 

twelve miles in Rutherford County and three operating toll- 
gates. The road superintendents advised the county court 
that the turnpike was in "tolerable repair." The company 
had an excess of disbursements of $2,015 in 1877.-^^ The 
superintendents of turnpikes inspected eleven turnpikes and 
traveled over 17 2 miles of roadway to determine the 



^"^Ibid. , p. 50. ^^Ibid. 
^^Ibid., pp. 50-51. 



137 



condition of the turnpikes. Their examination of the turn- 

40 
pikes took twenty-one days to complete. 

The superintendents of turnpikes in Rutherford 
County reported to the county court again in June 1878. Of 
the Nashville, Murf reesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike they 
said, "We find the condition of said road to be in toler- 
able good repair from LaVergne to Nashville, the balance of 
said road is not in very good repair." They further stated 
that the Milton and Jefferson Turnpike had a disaster on 
April 23, 1878, when a freshet caused the East and West 
Forks of the Stones River to rise to a dangerous level. A 
bad storm caused many trees to fall into the river, and with 
the high water the bridge on the West Fork became destabil- 
ized. The turnpike company had to tear down the wooden 
bridge and build another one. The bridge over the West 
Fork of Stones River was swept away. The Milton and Jeffer- 
son Turnpike Company planned to replace it with an iron 
bridge. ^■'- The Wilkinson's Turnpike Company was collecting 
toll at only one gate on its 5-1/4 miles of road. The 
other turnpike companies were continuing to repair their 
roads to bring them up to the condition required by their 
charters . 



^°Ibid., pp. 51-52. ^Ijbid., pp. 152-153, 
42ibid., p. 153. 



In October 1878, the superintendents of turnpikes 
in Rutherford County reported to the county court that the 
Murfreesboro and Liberty Turnpike was "not in good repair, 
not even as good as we expected in our first report. They 
have done but little work on their road since last spring." 
The Murfreesboro, Lascassas, Milton, and Liberty Turnpike 
had deteriorated in its condition since the spring of 1878. 
They examined the Eagleville, Unionville, and Shelbyville 
Turnpike, which had 6-1/2 miles of roadway and one tollgate 
in Rutherford County. The Nashville, Murfreesboro, and 
Shelbyville Turnpike was not in good repair. The fourteen 
miles adjacent to Murfreesboro in the Nashville division 
needed a large amount of maintenance completed on the road. 
The twelve miles south of Murfreesboro were in very bad 
condition. The Murfreesboro, Manchester, and Winchester 
Turnpike had been expanded to eighteen miles of roadway 
from Murfreesboro. The third gate was put into operation 
about 11-1/2 miles from town. The Murfreesboro and Brady- 
ville Turnpike had been expanded to twelve miles from 
Murfreesboro. According to the superintendents of turn- 
pikes, the Milton and Jefferson Turnpike had a "magnificent 
iron bridge spanning the East Fork of Stones River." 

By the end of 1878, the twelve turnpike companies 
that were in operation in Rutherford County were making a 



43 



Ibid., pp. 154-155. 



139 



conscientious effort to improve their turnpikes. The 
regional turnpike links were, at this time, not present 
because of the poor condition of the turnpikes ten to 
fifteen miles beyond Murf reesboro. Both the turnpikes and 
public roads of Rutherford County were slowly being improved 
from their poor condition resulting from the Civil War. The 
old methods of working on the public roads had been reinsti- 
tuted after a very short experience with a new road district 
and road commissioner system. 



140 



APPENDIX A 

ROAD REFERENCES IN THE RUTHERFORD COUNTY 
QUARTERLY COURT MINUTES, 1804-1877 



All references cited in this appendix, unless other- 
wise noted, are from Rutherford County, Tennessee, County 
Court Clerk's Office, County Court Minute Books A through Z 
and AA through HH. An explanatory key for the abbreviations 
in the activity column is given at the end of this appendix. 



From 



Robert Smith 



Forks of Stones River 
(West Fork) 

Howell's Mill 



Thomas Rucker's 
Jesse Bean's 

William W. Searcy 

Wagon ford on West 
Fork, Stones River 

John Sullins's creek 

Cummins ' s (Cummings) 
Mill (East Fork, 
Stones River) 

Howell's Mill 

William Kimbro's 



To 

1804 y 

(John) Cummins ' s Mill 

Nashville (Davidson 
County line) 

Franklin (Williamson 
County line near 
Bird Nance's) 

Black Fox's Camp 

Ready's Mill; north- 
east county boundary 
East Fork, Stones R. 

John Sullins 

John Sullins's creek 



Thomas Rucker's 

Road from Big Cedar 
Lick at Wilson County 
line 

Hurricane Creek ford 



Activ- Refer- 
ity ence 

(vol/pg) 



ER 
OA 

OA 

VMO 
BMO 



VMO 



A:3 
A:4 

A:7 

A:7 
A:8 



TR 


A: 


;11 


OA 


A: 


;11 


OA 


A: 


;11 


VMO 


A: 


;12 



Crosses Hurricane Creek ER 
at ford; Nashville 



A:12, 24 

A:12, 
23 



APPENDIX A 



141 



From 



Thomas Rucker's 



Cripple Creek 



Howell's Mill 

Nashville (Davidson 
Co. line) 

Taylor's Old Trace 

Billingsley ' s 

Stewart's Creek 

Cummins ' s Road 

Howell's Mill 

Cripple Creek 

Garrison Road 
Captain Howell's Mill 

James Rucker's branch 
McKnight's Settlement 
Cummins ' s Mill 

Lancaster's Mill 
Howell's Mill 



To 

Black Fox's Camp 
(settlement) 

First branch above 
Garrison Rd.; east 
boundary, East Fork, 
Stones River 

Crossroad at Capt. 
Owen Edwards 

Bozel Billingsley ' s 
(West Fork, Stones R.) 



Stewart's Creek 

Wagon ford on West 
Fork, Stones R. 

Howell' s Mill; West 
Fork, Stones R. 

Hart's Spring Branch; 
Hurricane Creek ford 

First branch above 
Garrison Rd. ; east 
boundary on East Fork 



Crossroad at Capt. 
Owen Edwards 

Cripple Creek 

Cripple Creek 

Solomon George ' s ; 
Wilson Co. line 

Wilson Co. line 

Williamson Co. line 
near Bird Nance's 



Act 



OA 



OA 



VMO 



ER 



OA 



OA 



Ref , 



A:13 



A:15, 
24 



A:15 



OA 


A 


16, 
231 


ER 


A 


16 


OA 


A 


16 


OA 


A 


17 



A:17 



A:23 



A:24 



ER 


A 


24 


OA 


A 


25 


OA 


A 


27 


ER 


A 


27 


VMO 


A 


32 


ER 


A: 


32 


OA 


A: 


37 



APPENDIX A 



142 



From 

Cummins ' s Mill 
William Edwards 
Jefferson 
Squirrel Hill 

John Sullins 
Jefferson 

Frederick Barfield 
Jefferson 

Jefferson 

Thomas Rucker's 
John Price's 
Cripple Creek 

Wilson Co. near 
James McKnight ' s 

Granite shoal on West 
Fork, Stones R. above 
Samuel Wilson's 

Crossroad near Owen 
Edward ' s 

Peter Young's 
Jefferson 



To 



Act. Ref. 



1805 



OA 


A: 


:69 


VMO 


A; 


;84 


VMO 


A; 


:85 


VMO 


A: 


;90 



VMO A : 9 2 



William Edwards OA A: 50 

Wilson Co. line OA A: 50 

Howell's Mill VMO A: 55 

Robert Hunter's; big VMO A: 68, 
shoal on West Fork, 118 

Stones R. near 
Samuel Wilson's 

Thomas Rucker ' s 

William P. Anderson; 
John Sullins 

Joseph Bowen' s 

Wilson Co. line 
(road from Lebanon) 

Joseph Herndon's; William 
Gilliam's; Howell's Mill 

John Price's 

Cripple Creek 

East boundary. East 
Fork, Stones R. 

Ready's Mill; James 
Norman' s 

Black Fox's Spring 



Williamson Co. line VMO A:112 
near Peter Young's 

Allison's Mill on the ER A:112 
Harpeth Lick 

Hurricane Creek at VMO A: 112 
Brooking Burnett's Mill; 
Davidson Co. line 
towards Nashville 



OA 


A: 


;105 


OA 


A: 


;105 


OA 


A: 


:105 


VMO 


A! 


;106 


VMO 


A; 


;106 



APPENDIX A 



From 



Frederick Barfield 



Big shoals near 
Samue 1 Wi Ison ' s 



To 

Howell' s Mill or 
William Bowen's on 
Stewart's Creek 



Act. Ref, 



VMO A: 112 



Overall's Creek; Bowen's VMO A: 118 
ford; Squirrel Hill 



Frederick Barfield 's 

Davidson Co. line 
Gibson Burton's 

Wilson Co. line 

Ford on Stones R. 
below Ready's Mill 

Cripple Creek 

Francis Youree 

The big hill 

Luckett Davis 

Garrison Road 1/2 mi, 
from Garrison ford 

Jefferson 



Jefferson 



Jefferson 



1806 

Robert Smith; Bowen's RWN A: 129 
ford on Stewart's Creek 

Gibson Burton's OA A:132 

Spring on Stewart's OA A: 132 
Creek on Colonel 
Weakley's plantation 



Ford on the river 
Cripple Creek 

Francis Youree 

The big hill 

James Norman's on 
West Fork, Stones R. 



Isaac Wright's Mill; 
Garrison Road 

Simon Miller, Jr . ' s VMO A:144 
lands; Indian boundary 
line on Bushnell's 
Creek 

Wilson Co. line towards VMO A: 150 
Gallatin 

Willson Co. line towards VMO A: 151 
Lebanon 



OA 


A: 


135 


OA 


A: 


;135 


OA 


A: 


;135 


OA 


A: 


;135 


OA 


A; 


:135 


TR 


A: 


;136 


VMO 


A; 


:137 



APPENDIX A 



144 



From 

Great Shoals on West 
Fork, Stones R. 

Cummins ' s Mill 



Jefferson 



Frederick Barfield's 
on W. Fork, Stones R, 



Ezekiel McCoy's Mill 



Bennett Philips 
(head of West Fork) 



Big shoal on the 
West Fork 

Bennett Philips 

Thomas Rucker's 



Howell's Mill 



Cripple Creek ford 
near Jesse Bean's 



To Act. 

Taylor's Trace; Black OA 
Fox's Camp 

Murfree Springs; Sinking VMO 
Creek; Leadon's corner; 
McCoy's Mill; Briery 
Branch above McCoy's; 
Glade Creek; Bennett 
Philips 's; West Fork, 
Stones R. 

Intersect Barfield to VMO 
Bowen's ford road 
between Robert Smith 
and Barfield's; 
Howell's Mill 

Kinnard's ford; James VMO 
Kinnard on Long Creek; 
Crooked Creek 

Intersect road from VMO 
Barfield's to William 
Bowen's at Stewart's 
Creek; Frederick 
Barfield 

Intersect the Barfield VMO 
to Bowen Road at Robert 
Smith 

Robert Hunter; Squirrel VMO 
Hill 

Robert Smith OA 

Through the Barrens by DR 
John Henderson; Black 
Fox's Camp 

James Oliphant's; Widow DR 
Beven's; Nashville 

Up East Fork to Robert OA 
Thompson's; up E. Fork 
to Indian boundary at 
Hugh P. Brawley's 



Ref . 



A:151 



A:158, 
189 



A:159 

A:164 
A:164 

A:165 

A:177 

A:177 
A:186 

A:186 



A:187, 
B:78 



APPENDIX A 



From 



William Bowen ' s 



Charles B. Harvey 



Cuiiunins ' s Mill 

Jefferson to Howell's 

Mill Road at Joseph 
Herndon ' s 



Frederick Barfield's 

Jefferson 

Black Fox's Camp 

Jefferson 



To Act. Ref . 

Interest the Hart's OA A: 188 
Spring Branch-Howell's 
Mill Road; Charles B. 
Harvey 

County line near OA A: 189 
Squirrel Hill 

Bennett Philips OA A:189 

Passing between Joseph VMO A: 189 

Bowman's house and the 

river; Lewis Anthony's 

and Samuel Bowman's 

line; south to intersect 

the Barf ield-Bowen Road 

between Hugh Robinson's 

house and the ford at 

Overall's Creek 

County line opposite the OA A: 190 
head of Crooked Creek 

John Sullins OA A: 201 

Intersect road from OA A: 204 

Andrew Oliver's; Indian 

boundary 

the Wilson County line OA A: 216 
towards Gallatin 



Jefferson 

Bozel Billingsley 

Simon Miller 

Forks of Cripple Creek 

Briery Branch above 
McCoy's Mill 

On the Garrison Road 
one-half mile from the 
Garrison ford 



1807 
Up Overall's Creek 
To the county line 
Cripple Creek 
Robert Thomson's 
Glade Creek 



Isaac Wright's Mill; 
old Garrison Road 



OA 


A; 


:225 


OA 


A; 


:231 


OA 


B; 


:6 


OA 


B; 


;7 


OA 


B: 


;10 



VMO 



B:14 



APPENDIX A 



146 



From 

Isaac Wright's Mill 

Wright's Mill 

Cripple Creek ford 

Jefferson near Hugh 
Robinson 

Robert Smith's 

Captain Jenkins ' s 

Frederick Barfield 
Cummins ' s Mill 

Ready's Mill 

Mouth of Cripple Creek 

River ford below 
Ready's Mill 

Ready's Mill 

Jefferson 

William Bowen ' s 
William Edwards 

Colonel Rucker ' s 
Jefferson 



To 



Act. Ref. 



Intersect the Ready Mill VMO B:16 
to Francis Youree Road; 
old Garrison Road as far 
as the Indian boundary 

Cripple Creek ford 

Indian boundary line 

Samuel Johnson's 

Panther Creek 

A cedar tree marked 
with powder 

Captain Jenkins 

Drury Vaughn; Cainy 
[Caney] Fork 

James Norman 

Up E. Fork of Stones R. 
Cripple Creek 



OA 


B 


:111 


OA 


B 


111 


OA 


B 


.32 


OA 


B 


45 


OA 


B 


46 


OA 


B 


45 


TR 


B 


47, 
79 


VMO 


B 


55, 
79 


VMO 


B 


55 


OA 


B 


79 



Francis Berry on the VMO 
Barren Fork of Duck R. 



B:56 



Wilson County line 


VMO 


B 


81, 


towards Lebanon 




C 


28 


Campbell Tucker's 


OA 


B 


103 


Intersect road from 


OA 


B 


105 


Colonel Rucker 's to 








Jefferson ; Cummins ' s 








Mill 








Jefferson 


ER 


B 


105 


Taylor's Trace 


ER 


B 


72 



APPENDIX A 



147 



From 

Cuminins's Mill 

Col. William Loftin's 

Maj. Robert Smith 

County line 

The river 

Solomon George to Cum- 
mins 's Mill Road at 
Hickman's, at county 
line 

Bennett Philips 's 
Horse Mill 

Panther Creek 

James Norman's 

James Norman's 

Robert Miller's 

Road from Franklin 
at county line 



Carr's Mill 



To 



Act, 



Ref 



1808 



McCoy's Mill 



Isaac Wright's Mill 

James Morton's 
plantation 



Colonel Rucker's 

McCoy's Mill 

Opposite Hugh Simpson 

Jesse Wilson's 

0. M. Berry 

Intersect road from 
Col. Rucker's to Black 
Fox's Camp at 0. M. 
Benge ' s 

Boundary line 



OA 


B: 


;126 


OA 


B; 


;156 


OA 


B; 


:166 


OA 


B; 


:176 


OA 


B; 


:176 


VMO 


B; 


:109b 



VMO 



County line OA 

The head of Long Creek VMO 



Robert Miller's OA 

County line OA 

Ben Carr's Mill; to VMO 
intersect road from 
Frederick Barfield's 
to Nashville; Black 
Fox ' s Camp 

James Fulk's; east to OA 
intersect Nashville 
Road at Maj . Robert 
Smith's land 

James Hamilton on the OA 
ridge 

Solomon George's OA 

Southeast to intersect VMO 
Harpeth River at south 
end of Luckett Davis's 
land 



B:109b 

B:164 

B:lll, 
159 

B:154 

B:154 

B:lll, 
159 



B:159 

B:113 

B:119 
B:123 



APPENDIX A 



14S 



From 



Franklin 



To 



Act, 



Colonel Rucker ' s 



Colonel Rucker 's 



Garrison Road ford 



Jefferson 



Wright's old place 
John Hoover ' s 



Indian boundary line 
at Hugh P. Brawley's 

Hugh P. Brawley's 
Mill 



Cummins 's Mill 



Colonel James Wilson 



Cross Stewart's Creek TR 
1/8 mi. below William 
Howell's Mill; intersect 
road to Jefferson 1-1/4 
mi. north of the mill 

Francis Youree; foot of VMO 
ridge where the Garri- 
son crosses 



John Counts; Francis 
Youree; Bole Hollow 

Isaac Wright's Mill; 
Garrison Road 



OA 



VMO 



Frederick Barfield's; VMO 
intersect Nashville Road 
which passes Burnett 
Philip's; the three 
forks of Duck River 



County line 



VMO 



Capt. Peter Grayson's; VMO 
crossing Barkley's ford; 
to intersect the Rucker 
to Jefferson Road 

Ridge at Hick's old VMO 
place 

Middle of the river; OA 
east boundary of the 
county 

Crossing W. Fork of VMO 
Stones R. at Bowman's 
Mill; to intersect 
Franklin Road between 
Howell's Mill and 
Jefferson 

James Henderson's VMO 
plantation; to inter- 
sect the James Wilson 
to Duck R. Ridge Road 



Ref . 
B:124 

B:124 

B:154, 
155 

B:124 
B:155 



B:156 

B:156; 
C:15, 
16 



B:156, 
C:15 

C:15 



C:2, 
44 



C:18 



APPENDIX A 



From 



To 



Act. Ref. 



149 



Jefferson 



Intersect the Nashville 
Road which passes by 
Bennett Philip toward 
the Duck River 



VMO 



C:34 



Jefferson at Franklin 
Road entrance 



Maj. Robert Purdy's 
land; Simon Miller's; 
Samuel Wilson -s shoals; 
Abner John s; Richard 
Caswell's plantation; 
Samuel Campbell; John 
Flemming's land; Ben 
Smith's land; with the 
Nashville to Frederick 
Barfield road to Bar- 
field's plantation; 
east crossing a branch 
below Hance Hamilton's 
fence; William Smith; 
to the Nashville to Duck 
R. by Bennett Philips 's; 
to William Hanly's 



VMO 



C:34 



Cummins ' s Mill 



Sinking Creek; Widow 
Leadon's; three forks 
of Duck River 



OA C : 4 1 , 
42 



Pucker's Meeting 
House 



Jefferson 



VMO 



C:42, 
43 



West Fork of Stones 
River at Frederick 
Barfield' s 



Pole bridge west of 
Bennett Smith's planta- 
tion 



VMO 



C:49 



Jefferson 



Jonathan Hall's (Hale's) VMO 
field; opposite Henry 
Goodloe's (Goodlow's); 
Ready's Mill 



C:46 



Up the East Fork of 
Stones River 



To intersect a Warren 
Co. road; and intersect 
main Nashville Road two 
miles above Ready's Mill 



VMO 



C:43 



Cummins 's Mill 



Major Radford's; Bow- OA 
man's Mill on W. Fork of 
Stones R. ; to intersect 
the Jefferson to 
Howell's Mill Road 



C:45 



APPENDIX A 



150 



From 

Philip's Horse Mill 
Hurricane Creek ford 
Hurricane Creek ford 
Cummins ' s Mill 
Frederick Barfield 

John Sullins's house 
Peter Arnold's house 



To 



Act, 



Ref , 



John Smotherman ' s 

Davidson County line 

Zach. Shaf (unreadable) OA 

Philip's Horse Mill 

Intersect the Loftin 
to McCoy's Mill 

Peter Arnold's house 

A Wilson County road 



OA 


C 


24 


OA 


C 


24 


OA 


C 


24 


OA 


C 


27 


OA 


C 


49 


OA 


C 


66 


OA 


C 


66 



William Nash's Mill 



Main Nashville Road 
near Ready's Mill 

Noah Lilly's 



Francis Youree 



Nashville 



Robert Hunter ' s 

William Mahon's (dif- 
ficult to read) 

James Norman 

Lebanon to Franklin 
Road at Wilson County 
line 



1809 

Intersect the Jefferson VMO 
to Burnett's Mill near 
Davidson County line 



Noah Lilly's 

County line near 
Moore's Mill 

Dug Hollow; Duck River 
Ridge 

1/2 mi. north of James 
Bass's plantation; 
1/2 mi. south of James 
Bass's plantation; 
Duck River 

Stewart's Creek 

Jesse Featherston' s 



Long Creek 

Intersect a road at 
Davidson County line 
leading towards 
Franklin 



OA 



OA 



OA 



TR 



VMO 
VMO 

VMO 



C:71 



C:73 



C:73 



C:77 



C:92 



C:94 
C:103 

C:138 



VMO C:139, 
140 



APPENDIX A 



151 



From 

Robert Bradford's 
(Wilson County line) 



Jefferson 



William Nash' s 



McCoy's Mill 



West Fork of Stones 
River crossing near 
Barfield's Spring 



McCoy's Mill 



Captain Laughlin's 



Panther Creek 



To 

Between James Clemmon's 
and Capt. Goodman's 
land; Lewis Banton ' s 
ford on Stones R. ; 
Davidson County line 

Intersect the Gallatin 
to Nash's Mill Road 
having Alexander 
Mcculloch's to the west 

County line near 
Higgins ' s 

Jesse Featherston' s; 
Frederick Barfield's 

Intersect road from 
Philips' s Horse Mill; 
Bennett Smith's land; 
with Smith's road to a 
pole bridge 1/2 mi. 
west of his plantation 

Captain Perry's; John 
Jetton's; William 
Maybin's (Mayberry's) 

Intersect the Nickajack 
Trace; Bedford Co. line 

Crosspath from John 
Adcock's to William 
Vincent 



Adcock to Vincent path County line 
Forks of Stones River 



Jefferson 

East Fork of Stones 
River 



Fall Creek; intersect 
Gallatin to William 
Nash Road 

Sullins's lane 

Simon Miller; Cripple 
Creek ford 



Act, 



VMO 



VMO 



VMO 



VMO 



VMO, 
DR 



TR 



VMO 



OA 



OA 

OA 



OA 
OA 



Ref , 



C:172 



C:140 



C:140 



C:142, 
167 

C:142 



C:153 

C:167 
C:168 

C:168 
C:188 

C:81 
C:99 



Hardeman's Mill 



Jefferson 



OA 



C:113 



APPENDIX A 



152 



From 

Wilson's Shoals 
James Norman's house 
William Nash's Mill 
Stewart's Creek 



To 

Caswell's plantation 
Robert Miller's house 
Isaac Brooks 
John Brown ' s 



Act. 



Ref , 



OA C:113 

OA C:138 

OA C:175 

OA C:193 



Frederick Barfield's 



Old boundary line 



Jefferson 

Bennett Philips 
Frederick Barfield's 

Black Fox's Camp 
Cummins 's Mill 

John Coffee 
Jefferson 



1810 

Intersect the McCoy's 
Mill to William 
Loftin's Road; 
Miller's Mill; 
Hoover's Settlement 
at the county line 

Top of the ridge to 
intersect a road from 
Bedford County, to 
begin at end of road 
from Black Fox's Camp 
to James Johnston's 

Northeast corner of 
James and Samuel 
Henderson's plantation; 
Franklin 

Lower end of district 

The McCoy's Mill to 
William Loftin's Road 

Ready ' s Road 

Wilson County line 
towards Lebanon 

Lebanon Road; the 
Jefferson to Buckner's 
Mill Road 

Buckner's Mill 



VMO 



VMO 



TR 



C:237 



C:236, 
237 



C:236 



A 


C: 


;206 


OA 


C: 


;206 


OA 


C; 


;214 


OA 


C; 


:241 


OA 


C; 


:165, 
166 


ER 


C 


:165, 
166 



APPENDIX A 



153 



From 



Francis Youree 



Rock Springs 
Meeting House 



Where John Coffee 
turned the road 

Owen Edwards's 



McCoy's Mill 
Bedford County road 



Avoid bottom land of 
Jackson Wharry 

1/4 mi. south of 
forks of Stones River 



William Thomas's 

John Elliot's 
James Norman ' s 



To 



1811 



Act. 



VMO 



Intersect road from 
Brawley's Mill to 
William S. Perry on 
the Nickajack Trace 

Intersect at road at VMO 
Williamson County line 
near David Gooch's 

Jefferson VMO 



Previous farm of VMO 
Samuel C. McNeese; 
John Edwards's; 
Williamson County line 
near Mrs. Hyde's 

Wright's Mill VMO 

Black Fox's Camp; OA 
through the plantation VMO 
of James Bole 

Intersect old road at VMO 
Joshua Barton's spring 

Where John Coffee's new VMO 
road intersects old road 
above farm of Walter 
Keeble 

John Elliot's, where it VMO 
intersects road to 
Black Fox's Camp 

Black Fox's Camp ER 

Bedford County line VMO 
near Capt. Richard 
Wright' s 



Ref , 



E:57 



E:131, 
132 



E:131, 
132 

E:132, 
180 



E:132 

E:213 
179 



E:179, 
180 

E:183, 
184 



E:196 



E:196 

E:196, 
197 



Gideon Burton 



TR 



E:197 



APPENDIX A 



154 



From 

Cripple Creek where 
main road from Jeffer- 
son to Ready's Mill 
crosses 

Cummins ' s Mill 

General Dickson's 

Frederick Barfield 

John Barkley 

Brawley's Mill 

Robert Carson's house 

West of Simpson's old 
place 

Spring Creek at 
William Nash's 

Cornelius Saunders's 

Barfield 's 
Barfield 's house 

Nimrod Jenkins 
Jefferson 
Francis Youree's 
Abbott's Mill 
Black Fox's Camp 



To 

Black Fox Camp; inter- 
sect road from Jeffer- 
son to McCoy's Mill 



Act. Ref 



VMO E:197, 
198 



Murfree's Spring 


OA 


E; 


:202 


Mayberry's; Sinking 
Creek 


ER 


E: 


:202 


Widow Caswell's 
(Richard) 


OA 


E; 


:3 


Charles Ready 


OA 


E; 


:8 


Robert Carson's house 


OA 


E; 


:56 


County line 


OA 


E; 


:56 


Panther Creek 


OA 


E; 


:84 


Cornelius Saunders's 
(Sanders ' s) 


OA 


E; 


:122 


Part allotted to Lewis 
Banton 


OA 


E; 


:123 


McCoy's Mill 


OA 


E; 


:130 


McCoy's Mill to 
William Loftin's Road 


OA 


E: 


;165 


James Bass 


OA 


E: 


;167 


Peter Arnold's 


OA 


E: 


;167 


James Garner ' s knob 


OA 


E: 


:179 


County line 


OA 


E: 


;179 


Crossroads below 


OA 


E: 


:197 



Murfree's Spring 



APPENDIX A 



From 



Peter Arnold's 



Joseph McKnight's on 
Lebanon Road 

Ready's Mill 

North bank of 
Falling Creek 

Col. Thomas Rucker 



Colonel Rucker ' s 



Bradley's Mill 

Joseph Knox 
Alexander McKean's 

John Brown's house 

Glade near Stephen 
White's field 

Cripple Creek ford 



Branch above Major 
McEwen ' s 

Spring Creek at 
William Nash' s 



To 



Act. Ref, 



1812 



Forks below Thomas 
Rucker ' s 

Brawley's Mill on 
Lebanon Road 

Brawley's Mill 

Wilson County line 



Joseph Dickson; 
Murfree's (Murphey's) 
Spring 

1/2 mi. northwest of 
John Lytle's planta- 
tion; 1/2 mi. southeast 
of John Lytle's planta- 
tion; McCoy's Mill 

River at Joshua 
Neely's; Bark Camp 



Bedford County line 
to meet a road from 
Shelbyville 



OA E : 2 2 3 

OA E : 2 2 6 

OA E:256 

OA E : 2 5 6 



TR 



TR 



OA 

TR 
VMO 



Ford on Hurricane Creek OA 
Hoover's Mill; Nashville OA 



Branch above Major OA 
McEwen • s 

Charles Ready's Mill OA 



F:40 



F:2 



E:223 

E:230 
E:241 

F:3 
F:18 

F:18 

F:18 



Cornelius Saunders's OA F:59 



Widow Loftin's 



McCoy's Mill 



OA F:77 



APPENDIX A 



156 



From 

Hoover's Mill 

Cripple Creek 

West Fork of 
Stones River 

A willow tree 
Miller's Mill 

Robert Smith, Sr. 
John Brown's house 



To 

County line 

Robert Thompson's 

Burnett's Mill; 
Stewart's Creek 

Intersect a road at 
Bedford County line 

McCoy's Mill; William 
Loftin's; cedar glades 
near White's field 

Philips 's Horse Mill 



Act, 



Ref , 



OA 


F 


:80 


OA 


F: 


:84 


OA 


F; 


:117 


OA 


F; 


;119 


OA 


F: 


153 



OA 



Ford on Hurricane Creek OA 



F:153 
F:198 



Murfreesborough 



Murfreesborough 



North end of Thomp- 
son's Street in 
Murfreesborough 



Murfreesborough 



1813 

James Rucker's Mill on VMO 
E. Fork Stones R. ; to 
intersect Caney Fork 
Road so as to meet a 
road from Lebanon to 
Murfreesborough 

Franklin (Williamson VMO 
County line) 

Ford on Lytle's Creek OA 
below Lytle's Mill; 
first ford above John 
Thompson's plantation 
on the West Fork; 
Armstrong's Branch at 
dividing line between 
James and John Henderson; 
Overall's Creek at 
Cummins ' s ford; Ingram 
Blank's line; John 
Covington's; James 
Billespie's, Williamson 
County line 



Bedford County line 
(Shelbyville) 



F:211 



F:211 



F:211 



VAR F:212 
SR F:277 



APPENDIX A 



157 



From 

Frederick Barfield's 

Murfreesborough 



Robert Smith's lane 
where Frank Road 
intersects the 
Nashville Road 

Murfreesborough 



Murfreesborough 
Murfreesborough 

Murfreesborough 

Cripple Creek 

Wolf Hill 

Murfreesborough 

Murfreesborough 



VMO 


F; 


:222 


VMO 


F; 


:225 


SR 


F; 


;254 



To Act. Ref 



Murfreesborough 

Andrew Miller's; Thomas 
B. Smith's; strike the 
dividing line between 
Sarah Rutledge's and 
Robert H. Dyer's land 
where road crosses 
Stones River; to inter- 
sect the road from 
Barfield's to McCoy's 
Mill 



Caswell's Shoals; VMO F:235 
Murfreesborough 



William Estin's on 
main Caney Fork Road 

McMinnville 

Intersect road that 
runs through Hoover ' s 
Gap to Huntsville 



James Rucker's Mill; OA F:251, 
Bushnell's Creek 252 

(Bushman's Creek); to 
intersect the Caney 
Fork Road 

Rucker's Mill Road; OA F:252 
John Henry's; Wolf 
Hill; Murfreesborough 

Cripple Creek OA F:252, 

523 

Intersect Nashville VMO F:254 
Road near James Bass's DR F:308 

Sarah Leddon ' s OA F:287 

(Rutledge) ; McCoy's 
Mill; Widow Loftin's; 
gap in ridge near Henry 
Goodman's; Capt. McCain's 



VMO 


F; 


:236 


DR 


F; 


:308 


VMO 


F; 


:236 


VMO 


F; 


;242 



APPENDIX A 



15S 



From 

Williamson County 
line 



Murfreesborough 
Jefferson 

(Jefferson) 
Widow Loftin's 



West Fork of Stones 
River at Jefferson 
ford 

Murfreesborough 

North bank of Falling 
Creek 

Anthony Kinnard 

Samuel Campbell's 

Thomas Rucker 

Wilson Shoals 

Braxton Marable's 
Spring 

Murfreesborough 
Panther Creek 



To Act. Ref . 



Intersect Nashville OA 
Road at Robert 
Smith's lane 



F:289 



Intersect road from 
Murfreesboro through 
Hoover ' s Gap 

William Searcy's south 
boundary line parallel 
with a brick house; 
Colonel Rucker 's 



VMO F:300, 
301 



TR G:18, 
19 



Murfreesborough VMO G:19 

Up Long Creek to its VMO G:24 
headwaters; intersect 
the road at the top of 
Duck River Ridge 

Stewart's Creek; John OA F:240 
Wallace 



Samuel Campbell's OA F:241 
Wilson County line OA F:241 



Window Caswell's 

Crossroad towards 
Murfreesborough 

Murfreesborough 

Jefferson 



James Rucker 's Mill; OA F:289 
Wilson County line 

Crosspath between OA F:293 

Adcock's and William 

Vincent 



TR 


F; 


:251 


DR 


F; 


:253 


OA 


F: 


;274 


OA 


F; 


:288 


OA 


Fi 


;288 



APPENDIX A 



From 

James Alexander's 

Jefferson 

Murfreesborough 

Black Fox ' s Camp 
Spring 



Crossroads of James 
Norman's to Ready's 
Mill Road and road 
from Black Fox's 
Camp Spring 

Stephen White's glade 
near his field 



To 

Charles McClain's 
Horse Mill 



Act, 



OA 



Peter Arnold's old fence OA 

Black Fox's Camp Spring OA 

Road from James OA 

Norman ' s to Ready ' s 

Mill 

Big Creek (Cedar OA 
Creek) ; intersect road 
through Hoover ' s Gap 



Hoover's Mill; OA 

Nashville 



Ref . 
F:297 

F:327 

G:6 

G:6 



G:6, 
7 



G:16 



North of Isham 
Cherry's Saw Mill 

East bank of the ford 
on Stewart's Creek 



Widow Loftin's 



Robert Smith, Sr. 



Williamson County 
line 

Knobs near Archibald 
Jaratt ' s 

Murfreesborough 



McCoy's Mill to 
Lodwick Moore Road 
at the crossroad 



1814 

Intersect road near 
county line 

John Wallace's house 
and directly through 
his plantation 

Up Long Creek to its 
headwaters 

Williamson County to 
meet a road from 
Columbia 

Knobs near Archibald 
Jaratt ' s 

Robert Smith's land 



Bushnell's Creek; 
Samuel Rucker ' s Mill 

Nashville Road near 
Isaiah Webb's 



VMO G:57 

VMO G:64 

CR G:65 

VMO G : 7 7 



OA G:117, 
118 

OA G:117, 
118 

OA G:125 



VMO G:126 
CR G:199, 
200 



APPENDIX A 



160 



From 

Where the main Nash- 
ville Road crosses 
Cripple Creek 

Murf reesborough 



Widow Morton's on 
the Franklin Road 



Murf reesborough 



Wilson County line 
near George Adam's 
house 

Widow Morton's 



Williamson County 
line 



Wilson County line at 
William Gibson's on 
the Caney Fork Road 

Frederick Barfield's 



McCoy's Mill 



To 

Henry Goodloe's 



Widow Morton's; inter- 
sect the Franklin Road 

Millington Smith's; 
John Anthony's; James 
Bass's; Dickinson's 
Mill on the West Fork; 
running on Lytle ' s and 
Dickinson's line to 
the Nashville Road; 
Murf reesborough 

County line towards 
McMinnville 

Intersect a road at 
John Elliot's 



Intersect a road lead- 
ing by Gray's Mill to 
Nashville 

Intersect the new road 
from Columbia between 
John Clark's and 
William Lamb's; inter- 
sect the road from 
Murfreesboro to Shelby- 
ville at Hamilton's 

Bradley Creek; Mur- 
freesborough 



Intersect the McCoy's 
Mill to Ledwick Moore's 
(Lodwick Moore) 

Lodwick Moore; crossing 
West Fork at or near 
Kinnard's Mill; inter- 
sect Nashville Road 
near Isaiah Webb's 



Act, 



Ref . 



VMO 


G; 


:134 


DR 


G: 


;200 


VMO 


G; 


:139 


JVR 


G; 


:249 



VMO 



VMO 



VMO 



VMO 



VMO 
OA 



VMO 



DR 



G:140 



G:154, 
155 



G:207 



G:221 



G:224 
G:224 



G:227 



G:227 



Widow Morton's 



Stewart's Creek 



OA 



G:249 



APPENDIX A 



I6l 



From 

Stewart's Creek 
James Bass 



The Cherry tree on 
Howard's line 

Wilson's Shoals 



Joseph Knox's line 
Francis Youree 

Captain Bowen ' s 

Captain Bowen 's 
Murfreesborough 

Murf reesborough 

George Adkins on 
Wilson County line 

Gap in ridge near 
George Goodman ' s 

Isaiah Ross's lands 

McCoy' s Mill 

Fork in road near 
Robert Smith 

Frederick Barfield's 



To 



James Bass 



Act. Ref. 



The cherry tree on 
Howard's line 

Murfreesborough 



The falls of Overall's 
Creek or Caswell's 
Creek 

Thomas Knox 



OA 

OA 

OA 



A, 
OA 



VMO 



The old garrison so as VMO 
to cut the road through CR 
the plantation of James 
Bowie (Bole) 

James M. Bass 



Overall's Creek 

Ingram Blank's land; 
Williamson County 
line towards Franklin 

Samuel Campbell; 
Frederick Barfield 

Intersect road at 
John Elliot's 

The ridge 

Warren County line 

Widow Loftin's 

Where Thomas Nash is 
the road overseer 

Intersect the McCoy's 
Mill to Widow Loftin's 
Road 



OA 



OA 



OA 



G:249 
G:250 

G:250 

G:258 



G:269, 
270 

G:270 
H:15 



OA 


G; 


;47, 




H; 


;87 


OA 


G: 


;53 


OA 


G: 


;53 



G:62 



G:64 



G:64 



DR 


G; 


;72 


OA 


Gi 


;86 


OA 


G: 


;88 



OA 



G:106 



APPENDIX A 



162 



From 



Crossroads 



Widow Loftin 

West of Simpson's 
old place 

Thomas Rucker ' s 



Murfreesborough 

Howell's Mill 

Robert Smith, Sr.'s 
lane 

Caswell's Shoals 

Williamson County line 

Peter Arnold's 

Robert Jetton's 
Charles Ready's Mill 
Cripple Creek 
Black Fox's Camp 
Davidson County line 
Rock Springs 
Big Creek 

Frederick Barfield's 



To Act. Ref , 

Intersect Nashville 
Road at Frederick 
Barfield's 

Head of Long Creek 

Panther Creek 



Crossroads towards 
Murfreesborough 

Corner of Robert 
Jetton's field 

Intersect Taylor's 
Trace; Jefferson 

Caswell's Shoals 



Murfreesborough 

Intersect road at 
Robert Smith's land 

Forks in road a short 
distance below Thomas 
Rucker ' s 

McCoy's Mill 

Cripple Creek 

Renshaw's Road 

Murfreesborough 

Rock Springs 

Widow Morton's 

Indian camp on 
Cedar Creek 



Road from McCoy's Mill OA 
to Widow Loftin 's 



DR G:126 

OA G:128 

OA G:129 

OA G:129 

OA G : 1 3 5 

OA G:140 

OA G:179 

OA G:179 

OA G:194 

OA G;194 



OA 


G; 


:208 


OA 


G; 


:232 


OA 


G; 


:232 


OA 


G; 


:271 


OA 


G: 


:274 


OA 


G: 


;274 


OA 


G: 


;275 



G:258 



APPENDIX A 



163 



From 

Cripple Creek ford 

Murf reesborough 

Howell's Mill 

Barf ield' s 

Noah Lilly's 

Murf reesborough 

West Fork of Stones R. 

Owen Edwards 

Francis Youree 

West Fork of Stones 
River 

Fork in road near 
William Bowen ' s 

Gable's old place 

West Fork of Stones 
River at Wilson's 
Shoals 



Northeast corner of 
Murfreesborough on 
dividing line between 
James Maney and 
Mathias B. Murfree 



To 



Act. Ref. 



1815 



Branch above Major 
McEwen ' s 

Bushnell's Creek 
(Bushman's Creek) 

Bowman's Creek 

Panther Creek 

Warren County line 

West Fork of Stones R. 

Armstrong's Branch 

Williamson County line 

For three miles 

Stewart's Creek at 
Col. Weakley's Spring 

Campbell Tucker's 



Cripple Creek 

Leaving present road 
at George Douglass's 
lane; running between 
John Wade and William 
Wade; intersect the 
other road at nearest 
route to Jefferson 



Ready's Mill 



OA 



OA 



VMO 



H:14 



H:3i 



OA 


H: 


41 


OA 


H: 


;76 


OA 


H: 


:85 


OA 


H: 


;131 


OA 


H; 


:131 


DR 


H; 


:138 


OA 


H; 


:147 


OA 


H 


:172 



OA H:187 



OA H:198 

VMO H : 8 6 , 
186 



H:87 



APPENDIX A 



164 



From 

Running with dividing 
line between James 
Maney and Mathias B. 
Murfree 



To 

Murfree 's northeast 
corner; Widow Lark's; 
Double Springs; W. 
Gable's former resi- 
dence; leaving Gable's 
house on the right; 
Big Sink Spring on the 
left; Pyboss's; where 
Renshaw's and Ready's 
roads come together; 
on Ready ' s Road to 
intersect the old road 
from Ready's Mill to 
Jefferson 



Act. Ref. 



OA 



H:151, 
152 



Wilson's Shoals 



McCoy's Mill 



Corner of Captain 
Johns's fence on 
Nashville Road 



Old road from the 
shoals 



McCoy's Mill 



Cannon Street in 
Murfreesborough 

Nimrod Minifee's house 



Passing between Capt. 
Johns ' s house and the 
river; up river to the 
beginning of David 
Dickinson's lane; 
through Dickinson's 
land; Capt. William 
Lytle's land; Mur- 
freesborough 

Eldridge Loftin; Widow 
Lof tin 

Point on David Dickin- 
son's plantation; 
through Dickinson's 
land; to corner of 
Captain Lytle's field; 
the north end of 
Thompson's Street 

Murfreesborough 



Intersect road from 
Stones River to 
Frances Youree's 



VMO H : 8 6 , 
87 



TR 



JVR 



Constant Hardeman's 
Mill 



H:149 



H:188, 
189 



H:193 



VMO H:221 
CR 1:115 



Direct course to inter- VMO 1:27 
sect road to Readyville CR 1:351 



VMO 1:27,28 
QA, CR 1:160 



APPENDIX A 



165 



From 

Nash's Mill 

Murfreesborough 

Murfreesborough 



Beginning of John 
Fugatt ' s 

William Nash' s 



Robert Bradford 

Road leading out of 
Harpeth Lick Road 
near Owen Edwards 

Frederick Barfield 



Head of Long Creek at 
Bedford County line 



James Jones's house 
where road from 
McMinnville ends 

John Kimbro's lands 



Lebanon Road at 
Brawley's Mill 



Jefferson 



To Act. 

Murfreesborough VMO 

Samuel Campbell's; OA 
Frederick Barfield 's 

Campbell Tucker's old OA 
place; to the top of 
ridge between Campbell 
Tucker's old place and 
John Tucker ' s 

Duck River Ridge OA 



Stones River; Davidson OA 
County line near 
Higgins ' s 

TR 



DR 



OA 



A. M. Degraf f inread' s 
rafting grounds 



JVR 



Ref . 
1:35 
1:13 

1:13 



1:24 
1:27 

1:34 
1:35 
1:90 



Humphery Baker's; 
John Edwards 



Nimrod Jenkins 

1816 

Southeast corner of 
Overton's field; the 
Nashville Road; center 
of Long Creek; Henry 
McCoy's house; 
Murfreesborough 



River at James Watson's; JVR, 
Williamson County line OA 1:114 
near John Clark's 



VMO 1:107 
OA 1:227, 
228 



1:115 



William Binem's house; VMO 1:116 
Dug Hollow to intersect CR,OA 1:231 
Shelbyville Road 

Low water mark on West A 1:138 
Fork of Stones River 



APPENDIX A 



166 



From 



John Miller's house 



Lebanon (Wilson County 
line) near Bradley's 
Creek 

Glade near Stephen 
White's field 

Wilson's Shoals 



McCoy's Mill 

Wilson County's new 
line 

William Edwards 

Bowman's Mill 

Cornelius Saunders 

Widow Goodman ' s 
Murf reesborough 
West Fork of Stones R. 
Indian camp 

Big Creek 

Murf reesborough 

Gable's old place 

Joseph McKnight's 

James Gillespie's 

Forks in road near 
Murfree's Spring 



To 



Lower end of John 
Weather's lane; Ready's 
Mill 

Hoover's Mill; 
Nashville 

Bryan McCulloch 
(McCullock) 

Widow Loftin's 

Wilson County's old 
line near David Key's 

Wilson County line 

Abbott's Mill 

Ford of Spring Creek 
near Captain Nash's 

County line 

Forks of Stones River 

Armstrong ' s Branch 

Intersect road leading 
from Frederick Barfield's 

Indian camp 

Road from Degarrett's 
to Mayberry's old place 

Cripple Creek 

Brawley's Mill 

Williamson County line 

Southeast corner of Col. 
Robert Jetton's fence 



Act, 



VMO 



OA 



DR 



Ref . 

1:346, 
347 

K:65 



I:9i 



1:117 



OA 


I: 


:186 


OA 


I; 


:209 


OA 


I; 


:215 


OA 


I; 


:226 


OA 


I: 


:226 


OA 


I; 


:228 


OA 


I; 


:231 


OA 


I; 


:231 


OA 


I; 


:242 


OA 


I; 


:242 


OA 


I; 


:262 


OA 


I; 


:301 


OA 


I; 


:314 


OA 


I; 


:329 


OA 


I; 


:330 



APPENDIX A 



167 



From 

William Wallace 

Caswell's Shoals 

Hurricane Creek 

Murfreesborough 

Wilson's Shoals 

West Fork of Stones R. 

Thomas Nash 



Peter Arnold's 
former home 

Francis Youree's 



Banton's ferry 



Davidson County line 
where Godfrey Shelton 
formerly lived 



To Act. Ref . 

Murfreesborough 

Murfreesborough 

Davidson County line 

Beginning at the 
eighteen mile tree; 
John Fuller's; Nashville 

Ford on Overall's Creek OA 



OA 


I; 


:331 


OA 


I; 


:332 


OA 


I; 


:353 


OA 


I 


:364 



Thomas Nash's OA 

John Clark on the OA 
Williamson County line 

West Fork of Stones OA 
River 

Three miles toward OA 
the old garrison 

Davidson County line OA 
toward Franklin 

John Fuller's OA 



1:366 

K:25 

K:26 

K:47 

K:60 

K:72 

K:85 



Stones River at 
Major Abbott's 

Warren County line 

Caswell's Shoals near 
Benjamin McCulloch's 



Howard's line 



John Stockard's 

Murfreesborough 
eastward 



1817 

Wilson County line 
toward Lebanon 

Noah Lilly's 

Intersect road leading 
toward Shelbyville 
from Murfreesborough 

Intersect road leading 
to Wilson's Shoals 

Hurricane Creek 



OA 

OA 
OA 

OA 

OA 
OAR 



K:126 

K:147 
K:167 

K:168 

K:177 
K:202 



APPENDIX A 



16B 



From 



Nelson's Mill 



Nelson's Mill 



To Act. Ref ♦ 

Base of John Edwards's TR K:166 
road; a little above 
James Gillespie's; 
Harpeth Lick 

Owen Edwards's; county OA K:166 

line CR K:288 



Nimrod Minifee's 



Crosthwait's Mill on 
the Stage Road 



Not more than 40 rods 
on Matthew McClanahan's 
land; Hardeman's Mill 

Where road crosses West 
Fork of Stones River; 
near junction of East 
and West Forks; West 
Fork of Stones River 
on road leading to 
Bowman's Mill 



TR 



VMO 



K:199 



L:80 



John Elliot's old 
place 



Banton's ferry 



Crossing East Fork of VMO 
Stones River at or near 
mouth of Cripple Creek; 
Wilson County line near 
Capt. David Key's 

Intersect road from VMO 
Murfreesborough to 
Hardeman's Mill 



L:159 



L:159, 
160 



Cripple Creek ford 
where the road to 
Readyville crosses it 

Franklin 



Reading Blount's 
northeast corner of 
his tract of land 



Head of Long Creek 



Wright's Mill; inter- VMO 
sect road near Robert 
Rodgers's; Readyville 

Dividing line between TR 
lands of Elizabeth 
Furgerson and Thomas 
Nelson; Jefferson 

Turning the road with TR 
Blount's line to inter- 
sect old road at corner 
of James Rucker ' s fence 

Center of Long Creek; OA 
Henry Norman's house; 
Murfreesborough 



L:165, 
166 



L:167 



L:169 



K:255 



APPENDIX A 



169 



From 

Murf reesborough 

River at Hoover's Mill 

Lebanon (Wilson County 
line) 



Noah Lilly's 

Mile post east of 
Murf reesborough 



Cripple Creek 

House where James 
Alexander lived 

County line 

Nimrod Jenkins 

Ready's Mill 

Frederick Barfield's 

Widow Goodman ' s 



To Act. Ref . 

Readyville GJP K:268 

Bedford County line OA K:289 

North end of Capt. OA L:60 
William Doran ' s land; 
creek at David 
McKnight's still house; 
river below Ready's Mill 

Warren County line OA L:67 

William Simpson's old OA L:75 

store on Readyville 

Road 

Fork of road where it OA L:75, 
intersects old road 76 

from Jefferson to 
Readyville 

McLean's Horse Mill OA L:78 



Dawson Adcock's 

James Bass 

Brawley's Mill 

Intersect road from 
McCoy's Mill to 
Wilson County line 

County line OA L:158 



OA 


L: 


:78 


OA 


L: 


;79 


OR 


L; 


;85 


OA 


L; 


;125 



1818 

The Rutherford County Quarterly Court Minute Book M 
was not located in research for this thesis. 



Nashville to 
Shelbyville Road 



1819 

Turned to run with 
Murfreesborough Road 
until it meets with 



\7M0, 

TR N:17,18 

CR N:117 



APPENDIX 



170 



From 



To 

west end of Anderson 
Searcy's land; south 
to intersect road from 
Jefferson to Franklin 



Act, 



Ref 



Readyville 



Northwest end of VMO, 
Anderson McLean's land; TR 
intersect readyville to CR 
Lebanon Road between 
John Carter's still house 
and 1/2 mi. north of the 
still house 



N:17,l! 
N:118 



Murf reesborough 



Major Robert Smith's; 
intersect road from the 
fishing ford on Duck R. 
to Pulaski at county 
line near W. Trail's; 
Burns ' s Horse Mill; 
intersect the Columbia 
Road; Columbia 



VMO 
CR 



N:18 
N:206 



Shelbyville (Bedford 
County line) 



Leave old road near 
Lemuel Reed's Black- 
smith Shop; intersect 
old road to Nashville 
about 1/4 mi. towards 
Nashville 



TR 



N:71 



Murf reesborough 



Towards Shelbyville 
near Col. Daniel 
Marshall's; intersect 
present Shelbyville 
Road at or near 
Lodwick Moore's 



CR 



N:103 



William H. Smith 



Boiling Fisher's Mill 
on W. Fork Stones R. 



CR 



N:117 



William H. Smith 



Murf reesborough 



On Shelbyville Road to 
corner of William Bar- 
field's fence; crossing 
Henry Thompson's Spring 
Run below his plantation 

Matthew McClanahan's 
deer park; Harding's 
Mill 



CR 


N:117 


JVAD 


0:87, 




150 



VMO, 
TR 



N:218 



APPENDIX A 



171 



From 

Boiling (Boling) 
Fisher's Mill on West 
Fork of Stones River 

Shelbyville Road 
running by Henry D. 
Thompson ' s 

Goodin's point on 
Brawley's Fork of 
Stones River 



To 

Intersect Shelbyville 
Road towards Mur- 
f reesborough 



Act. 

VMO 
JVR 



TR 



Intersect new road from VMO 
Murfreesborough on the 
stone fort at plantation 
of Benton L. McFerron 



Ref ♦ 

N:231 
0:11 



N:231 



N:242, 
243 



Road from Colonel 
Rucker's to Jefferson 
near Colonel Burrus ' s 
field 



Jefferson 



Cross Stones River at 
Bible's Mill (Keeble's 
Mill) ; intersect road 
cut out in Wilson 
County at county line 

Straight direction 
through plantation of 
Luckett Davis; 
Franklin 



VMO 
CR 



VMO 



0:9,10 
0:98 



0:12 



West end of Main 
Street in 
Murfreesborough 



Murphy's land 



Through plantation of VMO 
Capt. William Lytle's; 
to where Franklin Road 
crosses West Fork of 
Stones River 

Intersect road at VMO 
Rankin's lane 



0-86, 
179,180, 
231,324 

P:6,7,8, 
9,194 

N:247 



1820 



Hardeman's Mill 

Rutherford County 
line where road cut 
from Gallatin ends 



Davidson County line 



VMO 



Towards Murfreesborough VMO 
so as to cross East 
Fork of Stones River 
at Keeble's Mill 



0:204 
0:212 



APPENDIX A 



172 



From 

End of street leading 
south by Jonathan 
Currin's in Murfrees- 
borough 



Nicholas Telford's 
Mill 



Jefferson 



Gen. Robert Purdy 



To 

Through range of lots 
sold by Isaac Hillard; 
intersect road to 
Telford's Mill at ford 
of creek 

Up the Dry Fork; 
intersect road at or 
near Williams's Mill 

Hardeman's Mill; 
intersect road in 
Williamson County 
near David Goodus 

Walter Lowe's; James 
Moore's; up ridge along 
Jacob's Wagon Road; 
intersect old Garrison 
Road; with Garrison Road 
to Bedford County line 



Act. Ref. 



VMO 
CR 



VMO 



VMO, 
TR 



VMO 



0:322 
P:104 



0:323 



P:102 



P:105 



Ma j . Robert Smith's 



Williamson County line VMO 

to intersect Columbia 

Road 



P:106 



Old Shelbyville Road 
at old M. (W.) 
Montgomery ' s 



Intersect old Shelby- 
ville Road again at 
Miller's; Henry 
Norman's Mill 



VMO 



CR 



P:122, 

516 
P:556 



West end of Main 
Street in Murfrees- 
borough 



Wilson County line 
above and near 
Edward Donoho ' s 



1821 

Through plantation of VMO 
Capt. William Lytle; 
to where Franklin road 
crosses West Fork of 
Stones River 

Rev. Jesse Alexander; VMO 
William Doran' s 



P:194 



P:517 



Murfreesborough 



Dr. James Maney's 



VMO 



P:539 



APPENDIX A 



173 



From 



William Doran's lane 



Lebanon Road just 
before it reaches 
Milton 



Andrew W. Caib' s 
(McCaib's) 



To Act. Ref . 

North passing Jesse VMO P:583 

Alexander on the 

west; Horatio G. 

Alexander's to east 

of road; intersect 

the old road from 

Readyville to Lebanon 

at Robert McKorkle's 

and Stephen Roach's 

Passing through Milton; VMO P:588 
intersect road near 
John Overall's leading 
to Murfreesborough 

Black Fox's Camp VMO Q:14 



Murfreesborough 



Murfreesborough 



Bedford County line 



1822 

Crossing Stones River VMO Q:235, 

at or near Dickinson's 236 

Mill; crossing Overall's 

Creek between John 

Smith's and Isaac 

Overall; crossing 

Stewart's Creek at 

Nelson's Mill; Davidson 

County line towards 

Nashville 

Intersect new road from VMO Q:238 

Colonel Jetton's to 

Murfreesborough so as 

to leave Mathias B. 

Murfree on the south 

side of road; Black 

Fox ' s Camp 

Intersect part of VMO R:16 
Meridian Road which is 
already cut out of the 
West Fork of Stones 
River at B. Coleman's 



APPENDIX A 



174 



From 

End of Castle Street 
in Murfreesborough 



To 

Northeast corner of 
M. B. Muffree's new 
garden; straight line 
to where the Shelby- 
ville Road meets the 
Manchester Road 



Act. 



VMO 



Ref 



R:32 



1823 



Murfreesborough 



Henry McCoy's house 



Running with the line VMO R:163 

of Dr. Maney ' s and 

M. B. Murfree's land; 

northeast corner of 

B. Smith's lot; John 

Henry ' s 

Run between the widow VMO R:170 
Norman's and Thomas Y. CR S:14 
Blood's; Norman's Mill; 
end of John Fletcher's 
lane; intersect the 
Murfreesborough Road 
near Barfield's meeting 
house 



Fletcher's lane 



Murfreesborough 



Corner of Captain 
Lytle's fence 



Corner of Captain 
Lytle's fence 



Charles Anderson's 
shop 

Wilson County line, 
a direct way to 
Statesville 

Running on the left 
side of David Dickin- 
son's and Johns's 
plantation; Wilson's 
Shoals 

Through Dickinson's 
plantation; Wilson's 
Shoals 



DR 


R; 


:170 




S; 


:14 


VMO 


F; 


;171, 
389 


VMO 


R: 


;308 


CR 


R: 


;326 



DR 



R:326 



Anthony's Mill on 
Stewart's Creek 



Bowman's Mill on West 
Fork of Stones River 



Intersect road leading VMO R:361 
through Bass's land to 
Murfreesborough 

Abbott's Mill on East VMO R:364 
Fork of Stones River 



APPENDIX A 



175 



From 

Bowman's Mill on West 
Fork of Stones River 



Ref , 



Daniel Nelson's Mill 

Murfreesborough 
Murf reesborough 



S:75 



To Act. 

Main stage road from JVR 
Murfreesborough to 
Jefferson; to the 
beginning of Gallatin 
Road; new road opened 
on line between the 
lands of John Edwards 
and Samuel P. Black; 
intersect Lebanon Road 
near Providence Meeting 
House; Abbott's Mill 

Constant Hardeman's VMO S:131 
Mill 

Gallatin OA S:3 

Telford's Mill OA S:7 



Readyville 



(Abner) Johns's 
Shoals 



1824 

South of John Weather- VMO S:223 

spoon's so as to run on 

right or north side of 

his plantation; John 

Hanes; William Doran's; 

Capt. John McKnight's 

Intersect road from VMO S:226 
Nashville to Murfrees- 
borough by way of John 
Smith's and James Bass's 



Old road from Mur- 
freesborough to 
Shelbyville at John 
Stephenson's on Long 
Creek 



Road from Bowman ' s 
Mill to Nelson's Mill 
on Stewart's Creek 



Intersect old road from VMO, 

Murfreesborough to TR S:230 

Shelbyville again at or 

near southeast corner 

of Overton's field, so 

as to avoid a very rocky 

knob on the old road 

Turned from where it TR S:281 
crosses the Nashville 
Road and along the Nash- 
ville Road; to where 
Shelbyville Road leaves 



APPENDIX A 



176 



From 



To 

it; with the Shelby- 
ville Road to road 
from Bowman's Mill to 
Nelson's Mill 



Act, 



Ref 



Murf reesborough 



David McKnight's 
land 



Through Dr. James VMO 
Maney ' s land; Franklin 



Intersect the Lebanon 
Road at David 
McKnight's house; ■ 
Jacob Wright's house; 
crossing the river; 
Thompson Wright's; 
Nashville Road 



VMO 



T:ll 



T:44 



M. McClanahan's 
plantation 

Columbia and Pulaski 
Road at county line 

Milton 



Bedford County line 
where road from Bed- 
ford County to 
McMinnville stopped; 
about one mile west 
of McLean's Horse Mill 

Main stage route 
between Murfrees- 
borough and Nashville 

John Smith's Mill on 
Overall's Creek 

Constant Hardeman's 
house and through 
his plantation 



Hardeman's Mill 



126 feet difference in TR 
a road 3/4 mi. long 



Mrs. Smith's 



JVR 



Intersect old Nashville VMO 
Road near Henry Good- 
loe ' s (Goodlow's) 



Intersect road near 
Stephen White's; 
McMinnville 



Stewart's Creek 



corner of Matthew 
McClanahan's fence; 
follow old road to 
William Bowman's 

Intersect old road 
from Jefferson to 
Nashville at Mr. 
Fawcett ' s 



VMO 



BB 



OA 



OA 



OA 



T:99 



T:100 



T:100 



T:100 



S:185 



S:225 



S:225 



S:225 



APPENDIX A 



177 



From 



To 



Act, 



Ref , 



1825 



Middle Fork, Stones R. 
where road from B. L. 
McFerron ' s to McMinn- 
ville crosses near 
George Leigh's Mill 

Best location between 
Alexander Lackey's 
and Black Fox's Camp 



Wilson's Shoals 



Tucker's Blacksmith 
Shop 

Norman's bridge on 
West Fork, Stones R. 



Up Middle Fork of VMO 
Stones River to 
Warren County line 



Intersect old Garrison VMO 
Road between Widow 
Youree and Capt. 
Nathan Lyon ' s 

Benjamin Clayton; VMO 
William Hubbard; 
Burrus ' s Meeting House, 
commonly called Asbury 
Meeting House 

Stroud's on top of JVR 
the hill 

Long Creek VMO 



T:175 



T:287, 
288 



T:359 



T:361 



T:366 



Norman's bridge on 
West Fork, Stones R. 



Top of ridge near 
John Reeves 



Through lane of JVR, 

Pritchett Alexander OA T:409 
and by his house; Thomas 
Y. Blood's; Long Creek 

David Hall's; Andrew VMO T:366 

Carnahan's; John Con- CR, 

ley's; intersect stage OA V:17 
road at John Earwood ' s 



Wilson's Shoals 



Mrs. Jones 



OAR 



T:104, 
105 



Bridge at Jefferson 
across Stones River 



RB 



T:360 



1826 



Constant Hardeman's 
Mill 



Intersect road from 
Nashville to Mur- 
freesborough near 
Wilson's Shoals 



VMO 



V:ll 



APPENDIX A 



From 

Shelbyville to Nash- 
ville Road at west 
end of lane between 
Hicks Ellis and 
William Pope 



Upper corner of Capt. 
William Powell's 
fence 



Shelbyville to Nash- 
ville Road at Peyton 
Smith's land 



To 

Run the road between 
William Pope and 
John P. James; William 
Atkinson's cotton gin; 
with Gin Road to inter- 
sect Nashville Road at 
east end of Anderson 
Searcy's field 

William Chrisp's; 
through land of heirs 
of Daniel Parker; 
Burrus's Meeting House 
formerly called Asbury 
Meeting House 



Act. Ref. 



VMO 



V:18 



VMO 



JVR 



V:17, 
18 



V:17 



Mcculloch's Mill 



Barfield's old place 



OA 



V:113 



1827 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Book for the year 1927. 



1828 



A bridge on Overall's 
Creek at Warren's Mill 



BB 



V:427 



1829 



A bridge at Dickin- 
son's Mill was 
repaired with iron 

Bridge at Dickin- 
son's Mill 



RB 



RB 



W:136 



W:136 



APPENDIX A 



179 



From 



To 



Act. Ref. 



1830 



Bridge across East 
Fork of Stones River 
at Abbott's Mill 

Dry Fork of Bradley's 
Creek 

Nashville Road at 
David M. Jarratt ' s 



Adam Simmons 's 



CB W:187 



OA W : 2 3 6 



VMO , W : 2 3 6 
TR 



1831 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Minute Book for the year 1831. 



1832 



Bridge across Stones 
River at Henry Trott's 
Mill on road from 
Murf reesborough to 
Cainsville in Wilson 
County 

Bridge across Stewart's 
Creek at Ma j . John 
Nelson' s 

Bridge across Stones 
River at Henry 
Trott's Mill 



ABB X:256, 
257 



BB 



BB 



X:432 



X:435, 
436 



1833 



Extend Main Street in 

Murf reesborough 

from the Public Square 



West through jail lot 
to meet turnpike at 
corner of Varner D. 
Cowan's lot near his 
house 



AR 



X:485, 
486 



Bridge across Stones 

River at Maj . Samuel 
Bowman's Mill 



BB 



X:484 



APPENDIX A 



From To Act. Ref . 

Bridge across West BB X:484, 

Fork of Stones River 485 

at or near McCulloch's 
Mill 

Bridge across Middle BB X:485 

Fork of Stones River 
at Norman's Mill 



1834 

Bridge across East BB Y:124, 

Fork of Stones River 125, 

at Trott's Mill 196 

Bridge across Spring BB Y:125 

Creek near William 
Sneed ' s 

Bridge across Cripple RB Y:160 

Creek 

Bridge across Stones BA Y:225 

River at McCulloch's 

Mill 



1835 

Trott's Mill and James Vaughan's house VMO Y:349 
bridge over Stones on north side of East 
River Fork of Stones River 

Bridge across Stones RB Y:264, 

River at Jefferson 265 

Bridge across East RB Y:292 

Fork of Stones River 
at Pierce's Mill on 
road from Murfrees- 
borough to Lebanon 

Bridge at Thompson BB Y:294 

Wright's Mill 



APPENDIX A 



ISI 



From 



Bridge across East 
Fork of Stones River 
at Jefferson 



To 



1836 



Act. 



BB 



Ref . 



Z:16 



1837, 1838, 1839 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Books for the years 1837, 1838, and 
1839. 



Bridge across Stones 
River at Brown's 
Mill 



1840 



RB 



Z:180 



1841 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Book for the year 1841. 



Bridge at Colonel 
Norman ' s 



1842 



BB 



Z:267 



1843 



Henry's Mill 

Fosterville 

Bridge across West 
Fork of Stones River 
at Nichol's Mill 



The turnpike 
Middleton 



OA 
OA 
RB 



Z:385 
Z:385 
Z:385 



Franklin Road from 
Armstrong's Branch 



1844 

East to W. M. Vaulx's 
eastern boundary 



DB 



Z:407, 
408 



APPENDIX A 



lg2 



From 

Nolensville Road 
from Hiram Jenkins ' s 
western boundary 

Old Nashville Road 
from Fayette Burrus ' s 
western boundary 



Windrow's campground Harpeth bridge 



To 

Fayette Burrus 's 
western boundary 



Elliot's lane 



Act. Ref 



DB Z:407, 
408 



DB Z:407, 
408 



DB Z:408 



White's Mill 



1845 



Widow Hogg's 



OA Z:525 



Bridge at Ledbetter ' s 
Mill 



1846 



RB Z:566 



Bridge at Brown's 
Mill 



Bridge across Stones 
River at Colonel 
Norman ' s 

Bridge across Stones 
River at Dr. G. S. 
Purus 

Bridge on Franklin 
Road across Overall's 
Creek 

Bridge on Franklin 

Road across Stones River 

Bridge at Brown's Mill 



1847 



1848 



RB 



RB 



RB 



RB 



RB 



RB 



Z:630 

AA:37 

AA:37 

AA:37 

AA:37 
AA:38 



APPENDIX A 



From To 

Bridge at Brown's 
Mill across East Fork 
of Stones River 



Two bridges on road 
from Jefferson to 
Philipi Meeting House 

Bridge across Cripple- 
Creek near Jarratt 
Lock ' s 



Bridge across Stewart's 
Creek above Isham 
Peeble's bridge 

Bridge at Ledbetter ' s 
Mill across West Fork 
of Stones River 

Bridge at Neal ' s Mill 

Bridge at Norman's Mill 

Bridge across East Fork 
of Stones River at 
Pierce's Mill 

Bridge at Brown's Mill 

Bridge at Lewis Garner's 
on East Fork of West 
Fork of Stones River 

Bridge at Isham 
Peeble's on Stewart's 
Creek 

Bridge across West 
Fork of Stones River 
below Dickinson's Mill 



Act. Ref. 



1849 



1850 



BB or 

RB AA:59 
CB AA:100, 

360 
RB AA:154 



RB 



RB 



AA:159 



AA:132 



RB AA:266, 
270 



RB AA:191 

RB AA:191 

RB AA:191 

BB AA:241 

RB AA:241 

BB AA:241 

RB AA:241 

RB AA:264 



APPENDIX A 



la/f 



From 

Bethel Meeting House 
to Nashville Turnpike 
beginning at end of 
lane between R. and 
H. Wade, and Polly 
Wade 

Old Jefferson Road 
from Stewart's Creek 

The Chicken Road 



To 

Move road near river 
to corner of W. W. 
Ross's fence which is 
south and southeast 
of the lane 



Jefferson 



Act. Ref, 



VMO, 

TR AA:231 



OA AA:247 
OA AA:247 



1851 



Bridge at Wright's 
Mill 

Bridge at Norman's 
Mill 



BE AA:288, 
358 

BB AA:356 



1852 



Windrow's Store 

Bridge across Rocky 
Fork of Stewart's 
Creek on Harpeth Lick 
Road between Benjamin 
Batey's and Leonard 
Davis 



Big Harpeth bridge 



DB BB:46,47 
BB BB:21 



Bridge across West Fork 
of Stones River below 
Henry's Mill on Salem 
Turnpike 



1853 



BB 



BB:225 



1854 



Bridge across East Fork 
of Stones River on Lebanon 
and Murfreesborough Turn- 
pike at Pierce's Mill 
near Black's Shop 



DB 



BB:335 



1S5 



APPENDIX A 



From 

1855 



To Act. Ref 



No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Book for the year 1855. 

1856 

Bridge across West ^ CC:120 

Fork of Stones River 
on road from Murfrees- 
borough to Franklin 

Lebanon and Murfrees- DB CC:121 

borough Turnpike 

1857 

Bridge across Overall's BE CC:169 

Creek 

1858 

Bridge across Stones ^^ CC:433 

River on road from 
Murfreesborough to 
Franklin 

Bridge across Middle 
Fork of Stones River 
on road from Prater's 
Mill to White's Store, 
near Lewis Garner's 

Double Springs Y. B. Miles; Moore's GB CC:583 

Mill 



RB CC:4 31 



1859 

NO road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Book for the year 1859. 



APPENDIX A 



136 



From 



To 



Act. Ref. 



Bridge across Stewart's 
Creek at or near J. R. 
Peeble's on road from 
Murfreesborough to 
Franklin 



1860 



RB 



DD:201 



Fosterville 

Bridge across 
Overall's Creek at or 
near E. N. Dickson's 



Liberty 



GB 
RB 



DD:202 
DD:308 



Bridge at Norman's Mill 

Bridge across East Fork 
of Stones River at 
Hall's Mill 



RB 
RB 



DD:308 

DD:292, 
502 



1861-1865 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Books for the years 1861, 1862, 1863, 
1864, and 1865. 



Eagleville and Ver- 
sailles Dirt Road 
from lane south of 
Mrs. Mary A. Ralston 's 



1866 

Lane between N. Jackson VMO 
and A. M. Hut son; south 
to the original road 



1867 



EE:84 



Salem Turnpike 



COR 



EE:506 
BB:225 



1868 



Salem-Eagleville 
Turnpike 

Old dirt road from 
Murfreesborough to 
Franklin 



On dirt road to 
Jackson Ridge 

Intersect road from 
Lock's Meeting House 



DB FF:63 



DB FF:64 



APPENDIX A 



1S7 



From 

Fayetteville and 
Farmington Turnpike 

College Grove 



Eagleville and 
Unionville Turnpike 



To 



Williamson Jordan's 
old homestead 



Act. Ref, 



DB FF:64 



DB FF:64 



DB FF:64 



1869 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Book for the year 1869. 



Murf reesboro 



Manchester Pike 



1870 

Wilkinson Cross Roads DB FF:408 
Turnpike 

DB FF:452 



1871 



Bridge across Stones 
River at Norman's 
Mill 

Liberty Gap Road 

Fosterville and 
Liberty Road 

Manchester Pike 

Bedford County line 

Lascassas 

Mrs. Lytle's 

Rock Springs 

Murfreesboro and 
Shelbyville Road 



Big Springs 

Top of hill at 
Bennett Smith's 

Camsville Pike at 
Mrs. Jarman ' s 

Averett ' s 

Old Nashville Road 



BB FF:572 

RER FF:6 04 

RER FF:6 04 

RER FF:604 

RER FF:6 04 

RER FF:604 

RER FF:604 

RER FF:604 

RER FF:604 



IBB 



APPENDIX A 

From 

Donald's Store 

Rock Springs 

Hoover ' s Gap 

Murfreesboro and 
Manchester Pike 

Moore's Mill 
(Moor's Mill) 

Donald's Store 

Hoover ' s Gap 

Middleton 

Williamson County line 

Manchester Pike 

Middleton 

Millersburg 

C. W. Holden's 

Becton's Creek 

Bridge across the 
Harpeth River 



To 

Coffee County line 

LaVergne 

Bedford County line 

George Sanford 



Act. Ref. 



RER FF:604 

RER FF:604 

RER FF:604 

RER FF:604 



RER 



FF:604 



Beech Grove 


RER 


FF; 


;604 


Doctor Childress 


RER 


FF: 


;604 


Big Sink Creek 


RER 


FF: 


:604 


John Shelton's 


RER 


FF: 


:605 


Dobbin's Shop 


RER 


FF: 


:605 


Bedford County line 


RER 


FF: 


:605 


Manchester Pike 


RER 


FF: 


;605 


Middleton 


RER 


FF: 


;605 


Cross lanes 


RER 


FF: 


;605 



1872 



Bridge across Stones 
River near Garner's 
Mill 

Old Columbia Road 

Mullins Hill Road 



RB GGrlOl 

RER GG:65 
RER GG:65 



1873 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Book for the year 1873. 



1S9 



APPENDIX A 

From To Act. Ref . 

1874 

Bridge across Stewart's BB GG:534 

Creek at Black's Mill 



1875 

No road locations were reported in the Rutherford County 
Quarterly Court Minute Book for the year 1875. 



1876 

Murfreesboro and SA HH:34 5 

Manchester Pike 



1877 

Bridge across Stones JVR HH:405, 

River at Franklin ford 499 

of old Franklin Dirt 
Road 

Hall's Hill Pike J. N. Wright's Mill JVR HH:498 



190 



APPENDIX A 

Activity Explanatory Key 

A Apportionment of workers for the roads by the court. 

ABB The county court authorized the building of a bridge. 

AR Altering a road was authorized by the county court. 

BA A bridge appropriation was granted by the county court, 

BB A bridge was authorized to be built by the county 
court. 

BC A bridge was completed. 

CB Individuals were required by the county court to com- 
plete a bridge. 

COR A court order was rescinded. 

CR The road was completed by the jury of view. 

DB The road was mentioned as a district boundary. 

DR The county court ordered that a road was to be dis- 
continued . 

ER The road cited was an existing road at the time prior 
to the action considered by the county court. 

GB The county court authorized that a gate could be built 
across a public road by a land owner. 

GJP A grand jury issued a presentment against an overseer 
or overseers. 

JVAD A jury of view was appointed by the county court to 
assess damages to property resulting from a road. 

JVR A jury of view reported on the route of a road. 

OA The county court appointed an individual to become 
the overseer of a road. 

OAR An overseer appointment was rescinded by the county 
court. 

OR An overseer resigned from his position. 



191 



APPENDIX A 



RB The county court appropriated money for a bridge to be 
repaired or rebuilt. 

RWN The road workers were noted in the reference to the 
road. 

SA A superintendent or superintendents were appointed by 
the county court for a turnpike. 

SR The jury of view was ordered to stop their work on 

marking out a road and reporting its location to the 
court. 

TR An individual was authorized to turn a road through 
his property. 

VAR A jury of view was required to view and report the 
route of a road to the county court. 

VMO A jury of view was required to view and mark out a 
road. 



192 



APPENDIX B 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY ROAD OVERSEERS, 1804-1826 



The references in this appendix for the appointment 
of road overseers are cited from Rutherford County, 
Tennessee, County Court Clerk's Office, County Court Minute 
Books A through Z. The letter represents the volume, and 
the number represents the page cited. 



Forks of the Stones River (West Fork) to Nashville 

Thomas Bedford, date unreadable, (January 1804) A: 4 

Howell's Mill to Franklin 

Moses Robertson, date unreadable, (January 18 04) A: 7 

Wagon ford on West Fork of Stones River to John Sullins's 
Creek 

Robert Hancock, April 2, 1804, A:ll 
John Parks, April 7, 1806, A:151 

John Bradley, July 9, 1806, A: 187. On October 6, 1806, 
Bradley was appointed overseer of a road from 
Jefferson to John Sullins's with hands formerly 
allowed to John Parks, A: 201. Mentioned again on 
April 8, 1807, B:19. 
William W. Searcy, January 8, 1808, B:139 
Peter Arnold, April 6, 1808, B:161 
John Parks, October 4, 1809, C:189 

John Sullins's Creek to Thomas Rucker ' s 
Joseph Newman, April 2, 1804, A:12 
John Sullins, April 3, 1805, A:69. On October 6, 1808, 

John Sullins was appointed overseer of a road from 

Sullins's house to Peter Arnold's. This entry 

might refer to another road, C:66. 
Henry Killiam (name difficult to read), January 6, 1812, 

E:223 
Joseph Buruss, July 11, 1814, G:194 
Larkin Thacker , October 10, 1815, 1:28 
Matthew Haley, October 14, 1816, K:4; October 24, 1816, 

K:94 

Thomas Rucker ' s to Black Fox's Camp 

Robert Cartwright, April 2, 1804, A: 13 



193 



APPENDIX B 

Cripple Creek to the Rutherford County line on the East Fork 

George Brandon, April 3, 1804, A: 15 

Robert Boyd, October 8, 1805, A: 105. Reference is later 
made on January 8, 18 06, that Boyd was appointed 
overseer of a road from the ford of the Stones River 
below Ready's Mill to Cripple Creek, A:135. 

Nashville (Davidson County line) to the West Fork of Stones 
River; from the county line to Billingsley ' s 

Thomas Smith, April 3, 1804, A: 16 

Hugh Craig, January 7, 1807. Reference was made to 
Bozel Billingsley ' s, A:231. 

Nashville (Davidson County line) to the forks of the Stones 

River; from Billingsley ' s to Stewart's Creek 

Josiah Davis, April 3, 1804, A: 16. Reference was made 
on January 1, 1810, of a Josiah Davidson transfer- 
ring the overseer position of the road from Stewart's 
Creek to John Brown's to Henry Fuller. This entry 
might refer to another road. C:193. 

Nashville (Davidson County line) to the forks of the Stones 
River; from Stewart's Creek to the wagon ford on the West 
Fork 

Thomas Bedford, April 3, 1804, A: 17 

Howell's Mill to the ford of Hurricane Creek where the road 
from William Kimbro's to Nashville crosses the creek; from 
Hurricane Creek to Hart's Spring Branch 
James Hill, July 3, 1804, A:24 

Howell's Mill to the ford of Hurricane Creek where the road 
from William Kimbro's to Nashville crosses the creek; from 
Hart's Spring Branch to Howell's Mill 
Thomas Nelson, July 3, 1804, A:24 
Charles B. Harvey, July 9, 1806, A:188. This entry 

refers to the appointment of Harvey as overseer of 
the road from William Bowen ' s to Harvey's. Thomas 
Nelson was the past overseer. A:188 
Constant Hardeman, April 6, 1807, B:7 

Captain Howell's Mill to the crossroads opposite Capt . Owen 
Edwards 

George Buchanan, July 3, 1804, A:25 

Cripple Creek to the first branch above the Garrison Road 
John Northcut, July 3, 1804, A: 24. This was the lower 

part of the road from Cripple Creek to the ford below 
Ready's Mill, of which George Brandon was the over- 
seer. A:24 



194 

APPENDIX B 



George Tucker, January 6, 1806, A: 125. An entry on July 
9, 1806, stated that Tucker was appointed overseer 
of the road leading from the ford of Cripple Creek 
near Jesse Bean's up the East Fork of Stones River 
to Robert Thompson's. 

Henry Goodloe, April 6, 1807, 3:7. Mention is made of 
the forks of Cripple Creek to Robert Thompson's. 

General (Hunter) Smith, April 5, 1808, B:158 

Philip Saunders, date unknown, F:84 

Robert Thompson, July 6, 1812, F:84 

James Allen, October 8, 1813, G:42 

James Rucker's branch to Cripple Creek where it intersected 
a road from McKnight's Settlement 
Jesse Bean, July 3, 1804, A:27 

John Cummins (Cummings's) Mill to William Edwards 
Obadiah M. Benge , January 8, 1805, A: 50 
William Edwards, January 7, 1806, A: 128 
John Matthews, January 2, 1810, C:206 

William Edwards to the Wilson County line towards Lebanon 
Norton Gum, January 8, 1805, A:50 
James Cochran, January 7, 1806, A: 128 
Andrew M, King (name difficult to read), October 7, 

1807, B:87 
John Wright, October 6, 1808, C:62. Entry states that 

Wright was appointed overseer of the road from 

Cummings's Mill to the Wilson County line towards 

Lebanon, Tennessee. 

Jefferson by way of Joseph Herndon's and William Gilliam's 
to Howell's Mill; from Jefferson to Taylor's Trace 
Peter Leyland, October 7, 1805, A: 99 

Jefferson by way of Joseph Herndon's and William Gilliam's 
to Howell's Mill; from Taylor's Trace to Howell's Mill 

Hardy Pope, October 7, 1805, A: 99 

William Howell, October 10, 1806, A:216 

Isham Matthews, July 4, 1808, C:3 

Thomas Nelson, October 3, 1808, C:42 

Barnwell (Burwell) Ward, October 2, 1809, C:168 

Thomas Rucker's to John Price's 

Philamon G. Cothran, October 8, 1805, A:105 
Ezekiel Dickson, July 6, 1807, B:42. An entry on Octo- 
ber 4, 1808, has referred to Ezekiel Dickinson. C:54 
Allen Hill, October 4, 1808, C:54 
John Orr, January 2, 1810, C:212 
John Dickson, July 3, 1811, E:167 



195 



APPENDIX B 

John Price's to Cripple Creek 

Robert Bean, October 8, 1805, A: 105. A reference was 
made of the road continuing from Cripple Creek to 
the county line on the East Fork of Stones River 
with Robert Boyd as the overseer. 

Big shoal on West Fork of Stones River to Squirrel Hill 

William Bowen, October 10, 1805, A:118. Squirrel Hill, 
according to entry, was located between Overall's 
Creek and Bowen 's ford on Stewart's Creek. A: 118 
Robert Hunter, October 7, 1807, B:92. The entry stated 
that Hunter had the position of overseer of the road 
from Overall's Creek to a ford in the road near Wil- 
liam Bowen ' s , and that Hunter superseded Bowen. B:92 
Isham Revil, January 4, 1809, C:73 

Big shoal on West Fork of Stones River near Samuel Wilson's 
to Overall's Creek 

Nimrod Murfree, October 10, 1805, A:118. An entry made 
on July 16, 1814, stated that Nimrod Minifee was the 
overseer of a road from Wilson's Shoals to the falls 
of Overall's Creek or Caswell's Creek. G:258 
John Smith (N. C), July 19, 1816, 1:366. Refers to a 
road from Wilson's Shoals to the ford of Overall's 
Creek. 1:366 

Davidson County line to Gibson Burton's 

Brooking Burnet (Burnett), January 7, 1806, A:132 

Gibson Burton's to the spring in Stewart's Creek on Colonel 
Weakley's plantation 

Samuel McClary, January 7, 1806, A:132 

Wilson County line to ford on Stones River below Ready's Mill 
William Travis, January 8, 1806, A:135 

Alexander Orr, January 6, 1808, B:124. This road con- 
tinues from the ford on Stones River below Ready's 
Mill to Cripple Creek. A: 135 

Cripple Creek to Francis Youree's house 

Francis Youree, January 8, 1806, A:135 

Francis Youree's house to the "big hill" 
James Garner, January 8, 1806, A:135 

I. Williams (first name difficult to read), January 4, 
1810, C:236 

The "big hill" to James Norman's on the West Fork of Stones 
River 

Robert Lackey, January 8, 1806, A: 135 

Alexander Moore, April 3, 1809, C:95 



196 

APPENDIX B 

The "Great Shoals" on the West Fork of Stones River to Black 
Fox's Camp; from the shoals to Taylor's old trace 

John Johns, April 7, 1806, A: 151 

William Lytle, April 5, 1808, B:150 

The big shoal (the "Great Shoals") on the West Fork of Stones 
River to Black Fox's Camp; from Taylor's old trace to Black 
Fox ' s Camp 

Thomas Yardly, April 7, 1806, A: 151 

Alexander Lackey, October 8, 1811, E:197. Lackey v/as the 

overseer responsible for the road from Black Fox's 

Camp to the crossroads below Murfeee's Springs. 

The crossroads near Owen Edwards to the Williamson County line 
near Peter Young's 

Charles Locke, July 7, 1806, A:177 

Bennett Philips to the road from Frederick Barfield's to 
William Bowen ' s on Stewart's Creek 

Isaiah Webb and Bennett Philips, July 7, 1806, A:177 

Robert Thompson's to the Indian boundary at Hugh P. Brawley's 
Henry Davis, July 9, 1806, A:188 

Charles B. Harvey's to the county line near Squirrel Hill 
James Oliphant, July 9, 1806, A:188 

Cummins 's Mjll by Murfree's Springs to Sinking Creek 

Simon Miller, Jr., July 9, 1806, A:189 

Joseph Newman, January 7, 1808, B:126. This entry refers 
to Newman's being the overseer of the road from 
Cummins ' s Mill to Colonel Rucker's. B:126 

Tear, October 9, 1811, E:202. (The first name 

was unreadable.) Reference was made to Tear's being 
appointed the overseer of part of the road; beginning 
at the crossroads of a road from Gen. Joseph Dickson 
to Maberry's, to Sinking Creek. E:202 

Sinking Creek to Leadon ' s corner near Jetton's 

John Lawrence, July 9, 1806, A:189 

Robert Jetton, October 8, 1808, C:41. The entry refers 
to Jetton's being the overseer of the road leading 
from Cummins ' s Mill to the three forks of the Duck 
River, from Widow Leadon ' s corner to Sinking Creek. 
C:41. As of October 3, 1808, Joseph Newman was the 
overseer of the road from Cummins ' s Mill to Sinking 
Creek. C:42 



197 



APPENDIX B 



Leadon's corner near Jetton's to the Briery Branch above 
McCoy' s 

Ezekiel McCoy, July 9, 1806, A:189 

William Norman, July 6, 1807, B:42 

Isaac Barr, July 6, 1808, C:27. This entry stated that 
Barr superseded McCoy as overseer of the road from 
Cummins ' s Mill to Philips 's Horse Mill. C:27 

Jesse Featherston, July 4, 1809, C:153. This entry 
stated that Barr was superseded by Featherston of 
the road from McCoy's Mill to Robert Jetton's. C:153 

Briery Branch above McCoy's to Glade Creek 
Nathaniel Kinnard, July 9, 1806, A:189 
William Stephenson, April 7, 1807, B:10 
John Kinnard, July 5, 1808, C?16 
George Seaton (Leaton) , April 11, 1814, G:127 
Money Batton, October 14, 1815, 1:83 

Glade Creek to Bennett Philips 

Frederick Puler (Pealer) , July 9, 1806, A:189 
Moses Yell, January 5, 1807, A:221 
Lodwick Moore, October 5, 1807, B:72 
Alfred Moore, October 10, 1815, 1:25 

Frederick Barfield's to the county line opposite the head of 
Crooked Creek 

Matthew Miller, July 9, 1806, A:190 

Abel Pursel, January 5, 1807, A: 222 

Larkin Johnston, October 4, 1808, C:49. This entry has 
the previous overseer's name spelled Pusley. The 
road was from Frederick Barfield's to the intersec- 
tion with a road from McCoy's Mill to Col. William 
Loftin's. C:49 

Matthew Miller, October 5, 1812, F:153. This entry has 
Johnston as the overseer of a road beginning at the 
McCoy's Mill to William Loftin's Road passing by 
Miller's Mill to the cedar glades at White's field. 

F:153. The change of overseers is mentioned again 

on April 5, 18137 G:48 
John Brothers, January 10, 1814, G:48 
George Gresham (Grisham) , July 10, 1815, H:149 
James Miller, January 8, 1816, 1:98 

Black Fox's Camp to the Indian boundary; from Black Fox's 
Camp to where it intersects a road from Andrew Oliver's 
Sherwood Harris, October 7, 1806, A: 204 
James Neely, October 3, 1808, C:44; January 2, 1810, 

C:214. This entry has Neely listed as the overseer 
of the road from Black Fox's Camp to Ready's Road. 
C:214 



19S 



APPENDIX B 



Black Fox's Camp to the Indian boundary; from the inter- 
section of the road from Andrew Oliver's to the Indian 
boundary 

Stephen White, October 7, 1806, A: 204 

Amos Wills, October 3, 1808, C:44 

Jefferson to Gallatin, Tennessee, as far as the Wilson County 
line 

William Arnold, Sr . , October 10, 1806, A:216 

Jefferson up Overall's Creek 

Samuel Bowman, January 5, 1807, A: 225 

Simon Miller's to Cripple Creek 

David Barton, April 6, 1807, B:6 

John Dickson, April 4, 1809, C:99 

Philip Saunders, January 5, 1910, C:240 

Robert Thompson, July 6, 1812, F:86 

Joseph Allen, date unknown, G:289 

Barnett Strickland, October 11, 1814, G:289 

Frederick Barfield's to William Bowen's 

Solomon Beasley, date unknown. A: 221 

Henry Stephens, January 5, 1807, A: 221 

Christopher Elam, July 3, 1809, C:141. The entry refers 
to a ford on Stewart's Creek at the corner of 
William Bowen's fence. C:141. This road possibly 
is the one from Frederick Barfield's to William 
Bowen's on Stewart's Creek. 

Jefferson's ford on the West Fork to Stewart's Creek 
James Sharpe, date unknown. A: 221 
James Espey, January 7, 1807, A:221 
John Wallace, October 3, 1809, C:175 
Ota Cantrell, April 5, 1813, F:240. Cantrell's first 

name was difficult to read. This reference provided 

the name of the road. 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
Joseph Morton, date unknown, B:l 
Aaron Gambile (Gamble), April 6, 1807, B:l 
John Gambile (Gamble), October 3, 1808, C:42 
William Nance, July 10, 1815, H:147 

Wright's Mill to intersect the road from Ready's Mill to 
Francis Youree's and then to the Old Garrison Road as far 
as the Indian boundary; from Wright's Mill to the Cripple 
Creek ford 

Samuel House, January 4, 1808, B:lll 



199 



APPENDIX B 



Wright's Mill to intersect the road from Ready's Mill to 
Francis Youree ' s and then to the Old Garrison Road as far 
as the Indian boundary; from the Cripple Creek ford to the 
Indian boundary line 

Magness Teague, January 4, 1808, B:lll 

James Laughlin, April 5, 1808, B:158 

Jefferson to Hugh Robinson's 

John Smith, April 10, 1807, B:32. Entry stated that 

Smith was to oversee the road from where Samuel 

Bowman's responsibility ended to Hugh Robinson's. 

In this case, this road is part of the road from 

Jefferson up Overall's Creek. B:32. 
William Robinson, April 3, 1809, C:94 

Robert Smith's to Panther Creek 

Josiah Webb, date unknown, B:45 
Thomas Nash, July 7, 1807, B:45 

Capt. Nimrod Jenkins to a "cedar tree marked with powder" 
Capt. Nimrod Jenkins, date unknown, B:46 
Benjamin Carr, July 7, 1807, B:46 
Ezekiel Moore, July 5, 1808, C:10 

Frederick Barfield's to Capt. Nimrod Jenkins 
Michael Kinnard, date unknown, B:46 
Frederick Barfield, July 7, 1807, B:46 
Robert Smith, October 4, 18 08, C:49 
Benjamin Ransom, January 5, 1813, F:203. This reference 

cites Smith as a major. F:203 
Thomas Smith, January 22, 1814, G:66 
Dr. Simpson Sims, October 14, 1815, 1:90 

William Bowen's to Campbell Tucker's 
James Ross, October 8, 1807, B:103 
William Tucker, January 7, 1808, B:126 
William Bowen, January 5, 1810, C:241 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
James Stephens, date unknown, B:55 
William Granville, July 8, 1807, B:55. (Last name was 

difficult to read.) 
Ezra Jones, April 6, 1809, C:118 

Jefferson to Taylor's Trace 

Peter LeGrand (Leyland) , possible date of October 7, 
1805, A:99. The overseer's name was difficult to 
read in B:72. This road was probably part of the 
road from Jefferson to Howell's Mill. A: 99 

John W. Read, October 5, 1807, B:72 



200 



APPENDIX B 



Col. William Loftin's to McCoy's Mill 

John Johnson (Johnston), April 5, 1808, B:156 
Arthur Taylor, April 3, 18 09, C:95 

William Edwards's house to Cummins 's Mill; from Edwards's 
house to the intersection with the road from Colonel 
Rucker's to Jefferson 

William Edwards, October 8, 1807, B:105 

Ma j . Robert Smith's to Hugh Simpson's 

Nathaniel Kinnard, April 6, 1808, B:166 
Jonathan Graves, April 3, 1809, C:93 

Rutherford County line to Jesse Wilson's 
John Ferguson, April 7, 1808, B:176 

Jesse Wilson's near the river to 0. M. Benge ' s 

Jesse Wilson, April 7, 1808, B:176. Part of the road's 
name was difficult to read. Benge ' s land was on the 
road from Colonel Rucker's to Black Fox's Camp. 
B:109b 

Panther Creek southwardly to the Rutherford County line 
Bennett Philips, April 6, 1908, B:164 

James Norman's house to the head of Long Creek; from Norman's 
house to Robert Miller's 

James Norman, April 5, 1808, B:154 

James Norman's house to the head of Long Creek; from Robert 
Miller's to the county line 

Robert Miller, April 5, 1808, B:154 

End of a road from Franklin at the Williamson County line 

near Ben Carr ' s Mill to intersect the road from Frederick 

Barfield's to Nashville; from Carr ' s Mill to James Fulk's 

John Windrow, April 5, 1808, B:157. This road was 

planned by the court to extend to Black Fox's Camp. 
B:lll. Windrow was to oversee the road from Carr ' s 
Mill to James Fulk's and then east to Ma j . Robert 
Smith's land. B:157 
Matthew Robertson, January 2, 1810, C:204 

McCoy's Mill to James Hamilton's on the ridge; southern end 
James Hamilton, January 4, 1808, B:115 
Abel Pursel (Pursell) , April 3, 1809, C:95 

McCoy's Mill to James Hamilton's on the ridge; northern end 
John Dickson, January 4, 1808, B:113 



201 



APPENDIX B 

Wright's Mill to Soloroon George's 

William Thomas, January 5, 1808, B:119 
Henry Crow, July 6, 1812, F:81 
James Bell, July 10, 1815, H:148 

James Morton' s plantation to Lucke tt Davis's land ^ ^ , 

James Morton , April 4, 1808, B:147. This entry stated 

that the road ran in a southeast direction to inter- 
sect the Harpeth Road on the southern end of Davis s 
land. B:123 

Colonel Rucker's to Francis Youree's and then to the foo t 
of the ridqe where the Garrison (Fork or Ro ad) crosses; 
fr om Colonel Rucker's to John Counts 

0. M. Benge, April 5, 1808, B:154 

David Clark, July 5, 1809, C:164 

Colonel Rucker's to Francis Youree's and then to the foot 
of the ridge where the Garrison (Fork or Road) crosses; 
from John Counts ' s to Francis Youree's 
John Fulks, April 5, 1808, B:154 

Colonel Rucker's to Francis Youree's and then to the foot 
of the ridge where the Garrison (Fork or Road) crosses; 
from Francis Youree's to Dug Hollow 

James Bole, April 5, 1808, B:155 

James Bell, January 4, 1809, C:77. This entry mentioned 
that Dug Hollow was located on the Duck River ridge. 

John Hoover's to Capt. Peter Grayson's crossing the river at 
Burkley's ford to intersect the road from Colonel Rucker's 
to Jefferson 

Peter Grayson, July 5, 1808, C:16 
Robert Warnick (Warnake) , July 5, 1809, C:159 
Cunningham Smith, January 10, 1814, C:54. This entry 
stated that Smith was to oversee the road from the 
Wilson County line to where Grayson assumed 
responsibility. G:54 

Indian boundary line at Brawley's Mill to the top of the 
ridge at Hicks 's old place; from the boundary to the river 
Hugh P. Brawley, July 5, 1808, C:15 

Indian boundary line at Brawley's Mill to the top of the 
ridge at Hicks ' s old place; from the river to the east 
boundary line of Rutherford County 

Cornelius Brandon, July 5, 1808, C:15 

Jefferson to the Wilson County line so as to intersect the 
road from Lebanon to Jefferson 

Robert Smith, Jr., July 6, 1808, C:28 



202 
APPENDIX B 



Jefferson to William Hanly's on the Nashville Road leading 
to the Duck River; from Jefferson to Robert Purdy ' s land 

Robert Purdy, July 7, 1808, C:35 

Benjamin McCulloch, July 3, 1809, C:135 

Jefferson to William Hanly's on the Nashville Road leading 
to the Duck River; from Robert Purdy ' s land to Wilson's 
Shoals 

Samuel Wilson, July 7, 1808, C:35 

Jefferson to William Hanly's on the Nashville Road leading 
to the Duck River; from Wilson's Shoals to Richard W. 
Caswell's plantation 

Abner Johns, July 7, 1808, C:35 

Abner Johns, April 5, 1809, C:113 

Edmund Johns, July 4, 1809, C:154 

Abner Johns, date unknown, E:228 

Daniel Rucker, January 6, 1812, E:228 

Jefferson to William Hanly's on the Nashville Road leading 
to the Duck River; from Caswell's to Frederick Barfield's 

Bennett Smith, July 7, 1808, C:36 

Samuel Campbell, January 7, 1811, E:3 

Jefferson to William Hanly's on the Nashville Road leading 
to the Duck River; from Frederick Barfield's to William 
Hanly ' s 

Hance Hamilton, July 7, 1808, C:36 

James Holmes, October 3, 1809, C:175 

Cummins ' s Mill to intersect the road from Jefferson to 
Howell's Mill; from Cummins ' s Mill to Major Radford's 

Philip S. Lowe, October 3, 1808, C:45 

Larkin Thacker, October 4, 1809, C:189 

David Abbott, July 2, 1811, E:156 

Cummins 's Mill to intersect the road from Jefferson to 
Howell's Mill; from Major Radford's to the intersection 
with the Jefferson to Howell's Mill road 

Lewis Anthony, October 3, 1808, C:45 

James Henderson, January 2, 1810, C:212 

Henry Stevens, January 11, 1814, G:62 

Philip's Horse Mill to John Smotherman's 
George Moore, July 6, 1808, C:24 
Richard Philips, October 9, 1815, 1:5 

Hurricane Creek ford to Davidson County line 
John Hill, July 6, 1808, C:24 



203 



APPENDIX B 

Hurricane Creek to Zach. Shaf (remainder of name is 

nreadable) 

John Craddock, July 6, 18 08, C:24 

Jonathan Hale's (Hall's) field to Henry Goodloe's 
Guy Smith, January 4, 1809, C:78 

The Nashville main road near Ready's Mill to N oah Lilly's 
John Bankhead, January 4, 1809, C:73 
Alexander Cathay, January 6, 1812, E:226 
Noah Lilly, April 5, 1813, F:241 
Jackson Wharry, July 12, 1814, G:221 
Josiah Conn, July 15, 1817, L:33 

Noah Li lly's to the county line near Moore's Mill 

James Bell, January 4, 1809, C:73. It is interesting to 

note that Bell was appointed overseer of the road 
from Francis Youree ' s to Dug Hollow on the same day. 
It might be interpreted that this is the same road, 
that Bell was responsible for two roads, or that 
there were two individuals with the same name. C:77 

Panther Creek to the crosspath from John Adcock's to William 
Vincent' s 

Needham Bryant, October 2, 1809, C:168 

Samuel Wadley, January 7, 1811, E:6 

Adam Comer, July 5, 1813, F:293 

John Adcock, October 10, 1815, 1:25 

Roily Morgan, July 21, 1817, L:79 

The crosspath from John Adcock's to William Vincent's to the 
county line 

Richard Wright, October 2, 1809, C:168 
William Vincent, October 9, 1815, 1:5 

Charles McLean, July 21, 1817, L:78. This reference has 
the previous overseer's name as William Vinson and 
the road from the county line to Dawson Adcock's. 
L:78 

The forks of Stones River to the road from Gallatin that 
passes by Nash's Mill; from the forks of Stones River to 
F all Creek 

Mordecai Lillard, October 4, 1809, C:188 

Th e forks of Stones River to the road from Gallatin that 
passes by Nash's Mill; from Fall Creek to the road 
intersection 

John Arnold, October 4, 1809, C:188 

Hardeman's Mill to Jefferson 

Constant Hardeman, April 5, 1809, C:113 



204 



APPENDIX B 



Road's name is unascertainable from research 
James Wills (Wells), date unknown, C:141 
Luckett Davis, July 3, 1809, C:141 

William Nash's Mill to Isaac Brook's * 

Cornelius Saunders, October 3, 1809, C:175 

Rock Springs Meeting House to Williamson County line near 
David Gooch's 

Willie I. Davis, July 1, 1811, E:127 

Owen Edwards's plantation to the county line near Mrs. Hyde's 
James Wilburn, October 7, 1811, E:180 
road discontinued, July 10, 1815, H:138 

The Bedford Road from the county line to Black Fox's Camp 
Capt. James Johnston, January 2, 1810, C:213 
Peter Grayson, April 1, 1811, E:57 

William Nash's to Lewis Banton ' s ford on the Stones River 
and then to intersect the Franklin to Lebanon Road 

Cornelius Saunders, January 2, 1810, C:213. This is 
possibly the same road as the one from William 
Nash's Mill to Isaac Brook's as Saunders was 
appointed overseer of that road on October 3, 
1809. C:175 

Road from the McCoy's Mill-William Loftin's Road to the 
County line; from Miller's Mill to a cedar glade at Stephen 
White's field 

Larkin Johnston, January 2, 1810, C:213 

Road from the McCoy's Mill-William Loftin's Road to the 
County line; from the cedar glade to the river 
Stephen White, January 2, 1810, C:213 

John B. Prewitt, April 7, 1812, F:18. This reference has 
the overseer responsible for the road from the glade 
to Hoover's Mill and the final destination as Nash- 
ville. F:18 
William Rawlins, October 5, 1813, G:16 
Abraham Russing, January 8, 1816, 1:98 

Road from the McCoy's Mill-William Loftin's Road to the 
County line; from Hoover's Mill to the Bedford County line 
Greenberry Jacobs, January 2, 1810, C:213 
Frederick Brady, July 6, 1812, F:80 
Jonathan Warren, April 12, 1814, G:138 
Jacob Hoover, January 9, 1815, H:15 

Peter Vance, April 21, 1817, K:289. This reference has 
the overseer responsible from the river at Hoover's 
Mill to the Bedford County line. K:289 



205 



APPENDIX B 



Cummins 's Mill to the Wilson County line towards Lebanon 
John White, date unknown, C:241 
William Kincaid, January 5, 1810, C:241 

John Coffee's house to the Jef f erson-Buckner ' s Mill Road 
John Coffee, July 3, 1811, E:166 
Walter Keeble, October 8, 1811, E:183 

Capt. William Bowen's to James M. Bass's 
Christopher Acklin, date unknown, E:6 
Lewis Whitney, January 7, 1811, E:6 
Hardy Pope, January 10, 1814, G:47. This entry referred 

to the road's location. G:47 
Caleb Anderson, April 10, 1815, H:87 

John Barkley's house to Charles Ready's 
John Barkley, January 8, 1811, E:8 
John Warnick, April 3, 1813, F:251 
Henry Davis, January 14, 1815, H:61 
John Doak, July 17, 1817, L:58 

Widow Loftin's to McCoy's Mill 

Pritchett Alexander, date unknown, E:56. This road is 
probably the same as the road from Col. William 
Loftin's to McCoy's Mill. B:156 
Eldridge Loftin, April 1, 1811, E:56 
William Norman, Sr., July 6, 1812, F:77 
William Norman, Jr., January 6, 1813, F:210 

Brawley's Mill to Robert Carson's house 
Hugh P. Brawley, April 1, 1811, E:56 

Robert Carson's house to the county line 
Robert Carson, April 1, 1811, E:57 

West of Simpson's old place to Panther Creek 
Travis Nash, April 3, 1811, E:84 
Azariah Kimbro, April 11, 1814, G:129 
James Fullerton, October 10, 1815, 1:27 

Spring Creek at William Nash's to Cornelius Saunders's 
Elisha Saunders, April 4, 1811, E:122 
David Bruchin, April 8, 1812, F:59. The overseer's name 

was difficult to read; probably it is Brachen. 
Robert Freeman, April 6, 1813, F:251 
John Seratt, July 10, 1815, H:149 
Edmund Ford (Todd), April 15, 1816, 1:226 

Frederick Barfield's to McCoy's Mill 
Henry McCoy, date unknown, E:130 
John Hall, July 1, 1811, E:130 
Archibald Shanks, October 6, 1812, F:173 



206 



APPENDIX B 



Cornelius Saunders's to (unable to ascertain from research) 
Micajah Peacock, April 4, 1811, E:123 
Israel Porch, April 7, 1812, F:44 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
Richard Hill, date unknown, E:155 
James Tucker, July 2, 1811, E:155 
Ambrose McKee, July 6, 1812, F:83 
William Cotter, July 11, 1814, G:207 
John Reynolds, October 12, 1814, G:298 

Murfreesborough to the corner of Robert Jetton's field 
Robert Jetton, date unknown, E:155 
Andrew Miller, July 2, 1811, E:155 
Daniel Elam, October 6, 1812, F:173 
John Jetton, Sr., April 9, 1813, F:281 
James Montgomery, April 12, 1814, G:135. This entry 

stated the location of the road. G:135 
Robert Jetton, April 11, 1815, H:101 
David Rankin, July 15, 1816, 1:330. In this reference 

the location of the road was from the forks in the 

road near Murfree's Spring to the south corner of 

Col. Robert Jetton's fence. 1:330 
Thomas Yardly, July 21, 1817, L:74 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
William Thweatt, date unknown, E:162 
William Rowten, July 2, 1811, E:162 

Nimrod Jenkins's to James Bass's 

James Blackman, July 3, 1811, E:167 
Alfred Blackman, July 21, 1817, L:79 

Jefferson to Peter Arnold's 

Shelton Crosthwait, July 3, 1811, E:167 

John Parks, July 7, 1813, F:327 

Col. John H. Gibson, October 18, 1816, K:47 

Abbott's Mill to the county line 

Mereday Robinson, October 11, 1811, E:179 

Robinson released from position as overseer, April 8, 

1812, F:59 
Hugh Cummins (Cummings) , July 6, 1813, F:305 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
Abraham Pursell, date unknown, E:180 
Alexander McKean, October 7, 1811, E:180 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
Thomas Kellough, date unknown, E:197 
John Kinnard, October 8, 1811, E:197 



207 



APPENDIX B 



Road's name is unascertainable from research 
John Irvine, date unknown, E:198 
John P. H. Lenoir, October 9, 1811, E:198 
William Arnold, Jr., April 8, 1813, F:273 
John Martin, July 10, 1815, H:149 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 

John Matthews, date unknown, E:226 

Peter Vaughn, January 6, 1812, E:226 

William Robertson, October 10, 1814, G:275. Possibly 
this is the road from John Cummins ' s (Cummings's) 
Mill to William Edwards as John Matthews had been 
an overseer of it in 1810 and had been appointed 
overseer in January, the same month as Vaughn 
superseded him. C:206 

The Lebanon Road from Joseph McKnight's to Brawley's Mill 
John Davis, date unknown, E:226 
David Andrews, January 6, 1812, E:226 
William Smith, April 6, 1813, F:252 
Alexander Orr , July 10, 1816, 1:314 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
John Kimbro, date unknown, E:257 
Alexander McMillian, January 7, 1812, E:257 
William Kimbro, April 5, 1813, F:241 
Amos McMillian, April 11, 1814 
Thomas Hill, April 11, 1815, H:101 
James Ross, April 8, 1816, 1:186 

Fall Creek to the Wilson County line 

Levi Lannum, January 7, 1812, E:258 
John Hutton, April 6, 1813, F:251 
John Arnold, January 8, 1816, 1:97 

Bradley's Mill to the Bark Camp 

Moses McConnell, January 6, 1812, E:223 

John Brown's house to the ford on Hurricane Creek 
John Brown, April 6, 1812, F:3 
Elisha Rideout, April 5, 1813, F:242 

Cripple Creek ford to Charles Ready's Mill; from the Cripple 
Creek ford to the branch above Major (Alexander) McEwen"T 
(McEwin' s) 

Thompson Wright, April 7, 1812, F:18 

Cripple Creek ford to Charles Ready's Mill; from the branch 
above Major McEwen's (McEwin' s) to Ready's Mill 
John Barkley (Barkly) , April 7, 1812, F:18 



20S 



APPENDIX B 



West Fork of Stones River passing Brooking Burnett's Mill 
on Hurricane Creek to Stewart's Creek 
James Espey, July 7, 1812, F:117 

Robert Smith, Sr.'s to Philips's Horse Mill 
William Rutledge, October 5, 1812, F:153 

Frederick Barfield's to Panther Creek 

Thomas Hamilton, date unknown, F:208 
Anthony Kinnard, January 6, 1813, F:208 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
Thomas Knox, date unknown, F:235 
Squire Knox, April 5, 1813, F:235 

Murfreesborough to Franklin (Williamson County line) ; from 
Murfreesborough to Armstrong's Branch 

John Thompson, April 5, 1813, F:236 

John Thompson, April 15, 1815, H:131. Thompson's 

responsibility as overseer was limited to that por- 
tion of the road from Murfreesborough to the West 
Fork of Stones River. H:131 

Abner Avant, April 15, 1815, H:131. Avant became the 
overseer from the West Fork of Stones River to 
Armstrong's Branch. H:131 

William Lytle, April 15, 1816, 1:231. Lytle superseded 
Thompson. 1:231 

David Ledbetter, April 15, 1816, 1:231. Ledbetter super- 
seded Avant. 1:231 

William Whalen, April 19, 1817, K:280. Whalen superseded 
Ledbetter. K:280 

Murfreesborough to Franklin (Williamson County line) ; from 
Armstrong's Branch to Overall's Creek 

James Blackman, April 5, 1813, F:236 

Henry Windrow, July 11, 1814, G:202 

Jesse Day, January 8, 1816, 1:97 

Murfreesborough to Franklin (Williamson County line) ; from 
Overall's Creek to Ingram Blanks ' s land 
William Batey, April 5, 1813, F:236 

Murfreesborough to Franklin (Williamson County line) ; from 
Ingram Blanks 's land to the county line 

Ingram Blanks, April 5, 1813, F:236 

John Covington, January 10, 1814, G:53 

Murfreesborough by James Rucker ' s Mill to the Caney Fork 
Road; from Murfreesborough to Bushnell's Creek 

James S. Jetton, April 6, 1813, F:251 

John Henry, January 10, 1815, H:38 



209 



APPENDIX B 



Murfreesborough by James Rucker ' s Mill to the Caney Fork 
Road; from Bushnell's Creek to the Caney Fork Road 

Benjamin Rucker, William Wade, and Joseph B. Johns, 
April 6, 1813, F:251 

Cripple Creek to Murfreesborough; from Rucker ' s Mill Road 
near John Henry's to Wolf Hill 

John Bradley, April 6, 1813, F:252 

Cripple Creek to Murfreesborough; from Wolf Hill to the 
ford on Cripple Creek 

Robert McCombs , April 6, 1813, F:252 

Murfreesborough to Captain McCain's; from Murfreesborough 
to Sarah Leddon's second corner 

Daniel Elam, July 5, 1813, F:287 

Murfreesborough to Captain McCain's; from Sarah Leddon's 
second corner to McCoy's Mill 

Samuel McMurry, July 5, 1813, F:287 

Moses Swan, July 6, 1813, F:307 

Murfreesborough to Captain McCain's; from McCoy's Mill to 
the Widow Loftin's 

William Norman, Sr., July 5, 1813, F:287 

Pritchett Alexander, January 13, 1814, G:86 

Thomas Loftin, April 11, 1814, G:128 

Francis B. McCoy, July 10, 1815, H:148 

Murfreesborough to Captain McCain's; from Widow Loftin's to 
a gap in the ridge near George Goodman's 
James Johnston, July 5, 1813, F:287 

Murfreesborough to Captain McCain's; from the gap in the 
ridge near George Goodman's to Captain McCain's 
Peter Arnold, July 5, 1813, F:287 
John Montgomery, January 11, 1814, G:64; April 12, 

1814, G:139 
William Weir, October 10, 1815, 1:24. This reference 

stated that Weir was the overseer of the road from 

the head of John Fugatt ' s lane to the Duck River 

ridge. 1:24 
William Hill, April 15, 1816, 1:228. This reference 

stated that both Weir and Mill were overseers of 

the road from Widow Goodman's to the county line. 

1:228 
Enoch Arnold, October 14, 1817, L:158 

Road's name unascertainable from research 

Nathaniel Barksdale, date unknown, F:273 
Isaac Shelby, April 8, 1813, F:273 



210 



APPENDIX B 



Wilson's Shoals to Murf reesborough 
John Johns, July 5, 1813, F:288 
Walker Ganaway, April 11, 1814, G:128 

Marable's Spring to Jefferson 

Braxton Marable, July 5, 1813, F:288 

Joseph Wallace, July 11, 1815, H:172. This reference 
stated that Wallace was the overseer of the road 
from the West Fork to Stewart's Creek at Colonel 
Weakley's Spring. H:172 

Alfred Sharpe, January 13, 1817, K:126 

James Alexander's to Charles McLean's Horse Mill 
George Moore, July 5, 1813, F:297 
George W. Mallard, July 11, 1814, G:208 
George Moore, date unknown, L:78 
George W. Mallard, July 21, 1817, L:78 

Williamson County line to intersect the Nashville Road at 
Robert Smith's lane 

Ezekiel Murphy, July 5, 1813, F:289 

Abraham Prim, July 11, 1814, G:194 

Murf reesborough to Black Fox's Camp Spring 

Benjamin Yearly (Yardly) , October 4, 1813, G:6 
William Kelton, October 10, 1814, G:271 
Alexander Lackey, October 9, 1815, 1:13 
Samuel Kelton, January 13, 1817, K:123 

Bl ack Fox's Camp Spring to intersect the James Norman- 
Ready's Mill Road 

James Neely, October 4, 1813, G:6 

James Russell, October 11, 1814, G:285. This entry 
stated that Russell was the overseer of the road 
from Black Fox's camp to Hoover's Gap. G:285 
Moses Billah, April 15, 1816, 1:230 

The James Norman-Ready's Mill Road to Big or Cedar Creek 
William Mayfield, October 4, 1813, G:6 

Big or Cedar Creek to Hoover's Gap 

John Hoover, October 4, 1813, G:7 

Joel Smith, April 16, 1816, 1:242. This reference stated 
that Smith was the overseer of the road from the 
Indian camp to the intersection with a road from 
Frederick Barfield's. 1:242 

Capt. William Bowen's to Overall's Creek 

Anderson Searcy, January 10, 1814, G:53 



211 
APPENDIX B 



Widow Lof tin's to the head of Long Creek 

William Williams, January 11, 1814, G:65 

The road was discontinued on April 11, 1814. G:128 

Murfreesborough by Samuel Campbell's to Frederick Barfield's 
David Flemming, date unknown, G:62 
Bennett Smith, January 11, 1814, G:62 
Mordecai Lillard, October 11, 1814, G:284 
Albin Loury, October 9, 1815, 1:13 

Benwell Ganaway, date unknown, P:452. Ganaway resigned 
on June 25, 1821. P:452. 

Robert Smith, Sr.'s to the Williamson County line to meet a 
road from Columbia; from the county line to the knobs near 
Archibald Jarratt's 

Samuel Richardson, April 11, 1814, G:117 

Robert Smith, Sr.'s to the Williamson County line to meet a 
road from Columbia; from the knobs to Robert Smith's land 
Archibald Jarratt, April 11, 1814, G:117 

The McCoy's Mill-Lodwick Moore Road to the Nashville Road 
near Isaiah Webb's 

Anthony D. Kinnard, July 11, 1814, G:199 

Frederick Barfield's to Panther Creek 
Elijah Cox, April 11, 1814, G:129 
David Hazlett, April 10, 1815, H:76 

The Wilson County line at William Gibson's on the Caney Fork 
Road to Murfreesborough; from Gibson's to Bradley Creek 
William Gibson, July 12, 1814, G:224 

The Wilson County line at William Gibson's on the Caney Fork 
Road to Murfreesborough; from Bradley Creek to Murfreesborough 
John P. H. Lenoir, July 12, 1814, G:224 

Widow Morton's to Stewart's Creek 

James Morton, July 15, 1814, G:249 

Stewart's Creek to James Bass's 

John Anthony, July 15, 1814, .G:249 
John Anthony, April 22, 1817, K:298 

James Bass's to a large cherry tree on Howard's line 
William Smith, July 15, 1814, G:250 

Howard's line to Murfreesborough 

Daniel Parker, July 15, 1814, G:250 
John Nugent, January 15, 1815, H:59 



212 



APPENDIX B 



Road's name is unascertainable from research 
George Buchannon, date unknown, G:64 
Robert Bass, January 11, 1814, G:64 
Lawson Davis, October 2, 1815, 1:51 

George Adkins on the Wilson County line to the road at 
John Elliot's 

John Northcut, January 11, 1814, G:64 

The forks in the road near Robert Smith's to (unknown) 



John Reaves, January 13, 


, 1814, G:88 


Frederick Barfield's to the 


McCoy's Mill-Widow Loftin's Road 


David Owens, January 15, 


, 1814, G:106 


Thomas Rucker ' s to the road 


from Degarrett's to Mayberry ' s 



old place 

Joseph Dickson, date unknown, G:129 
Robert Rankin, April 11, 1814, G:129 
Benjamin Trott, April 18, 1816, 1:262 

Howell's Mill to Jefferson; from Howell's Mill to Taylor's 
Trace 

William Howell, date unknown, G:140 

Samuel Avery, April 12, 1814, G:140 

Wolf Hill to the ford on Cripple Creek 

Robert McCombs, April 6, 1813, F:252 
Ninian White, April 12, 1814, G:148 
John McCrackin, October 10, 1815, 1:27 

Robert Smith, Sr.'s land to Caswell's Shoals 
George Morris, April 16, 1814, G:179 

Caswell's Shoals to Murf reesborough 

William Warren, April 16, 1814, G:179 

Ralph Williams, July 15, 1816, 1:332 

Ralph Williams, January 20, 1817, K:167. This reference 
stated that Williams was the overseer of the road 
from Caswell's Shoals near Benjamin McCulloch's 
towards Murfreesborough until it reached the road 
leading to Shelbyville. K:167 

Robert Jetton's to McCoy's Mill 

James Moore, July 11, 1814, G:208. This road is 

probably the road from Sarah Leddon ' s corner to 
McCoy's Mill part of the road from Murfreesborough 
to Captain McCain's. 

Nathaniel Perry, July 10, 1815, H:149 



213 



APPENDIX B 



Charles Ready's to Cripple Creek 

James Johnson, July 13, 1814, G:232 

Cripple Creek to Renshaw's Road 

Samuel Washburn, July 13, 1814, G:232 

Davidson County line to Rock Springs 

John Kimbro, October 10, 1814, G:274 

Rock Springs to Widow Morton's 

Isaac Nance, October 10, 1814, G:274 

Big Creek to the Indian Camp on Cedar Creek 
Silas Barr, date unknown, G:275 
John Bean, October 10, 1814, G:275 

Frederick Barfield's to the McCoy's Mill-Widow Loftin's Road 
Andrew Hall, October 11, 1814, G:285 
Andrew Hall, April 15, 1815, H:131 
George Burnett, April 8, 1816, 1:186 

Cripple Creek ford to Charles Ready's Mill; from the Cripple 
Creek ford to the branch above Maj . Alexander McEwen's 
(McEwin' s ) 

Samuel Bell, January 9, 1815, H:14 

David Price, January 8, 1816, 1:98 

Howell's Mill to Bowman's Creek 

Noah Smith, January 11, 1815, H:41 

Noah Lilly's to the Warren County line 
James Cherry, date unknown, H:85 
Caleb McFarland, April 10, 1815, H:85 

Francis Youree's towards the old garrison for three miles 
Vincent Harrelson, date unknown, H:147 
William Youree, July 10, 1815, H:147 
Burton McFerron, October 21, 1816, K:60 

Forks in the road near William Bowen ' s to Campbell Tucker's 
William Bowen, date unknown, H:187 
James Whitsith, July 11, 1815, H:187 
James Oliphant, July 17, 1816, 1:364 
Isaac Marable, April 15, 1817, K:248 

Gamble's old place to Cripple Creek 

Jonathan Hall (Hale), July 12, 1815, H:198 
Thomas Tyler, October 21, 1816, K:61 



214 



APPENDIX B 



Murfreesborough by James Rucker ' s Mill to the Caney Fork 
Road; from Bushnell's Creek to the Caney Fork Road 

James Sharpe, July 15, 1815, H:229 

Cader Dement, October 14, 1816, K:5 

Murfreesborough to W. Gable's (Gamble's) old place 
John Davidson, July 10, 1815, H:152 

Cripple Creek to the Jefferson Road towards Ready's Mill 
John Warnack, July 10, 1815, H:152 
William Johnson, October 14, 1816, K:7 

Capt. John Johns's fence on the Nashville Road to Murfrees- 
borough 

James Lewis, July 17, 1815, H:192 

McCoy's Mill to the road from Stones River to Francis Youree ' s 
David Hannes (Haynes) , January 9, 1816, 1:115 

Nimrod Minifee's house to Hardeman's Mill; from Nimrod 
Minifee's house to William Bowman's 

Joseph Bowman, January 15, 1816, 1:160 

Nimrod Minifee's house to Hardeman ;s Mill; from William 
Bowman's to Hardeman's Mill 

Matthew McClanahan, January 15, 1816, 1:160 

Constant Hardeman, January 25, 1817, K:200 

The county line to John Adcock ' s 

Richard Wright, date unknown, 1:5 

William Vinson, October 9, 1815, 1:5. This road might 
be the same as the road from the crosspath from 
John Adcock 's to William Vincent's to the county 
line. C:168. 

Murfreesborough to the Nashville Road; from Campbell Tucker's 
old place to the top of the ridge between there and John 
Tucker ' s 

James Olliver, October 9, 1815, 1:13 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
Cederick Moore, date unknown, 1:25 
Alfred Moore, October 15, 1815, 1:25 

William Nash's to Higgins's; from Stones River to the David- 
son County line 

Burwell Perry, October 10, 1815, 1:27 



215 



APPENDIX B 



Bedford County line at the head of Long Creek to Murfrees- 
borough; from the head of Long Creek to the southeast corner 
of Overton's field 

Robert Clark, April 15, 1816, 1:227 

Bedford County line at the head of Long Creek to Murfrees- 
borough; from Overton's field to the Nashville Road 
Robert Miller, April 15, 1816, 1:227 

Bedford County line at the head of Long Creek to Murfrees- 
borough; from the Nashville Road to the center of Long Creek 
William Johnson, April 15, 1816, 1:227 

Bedford County line at the head of Long Creek to Murfrees- 
borough; from the center of Long Creek to Henry McCoy's house 

Henry McCoy, April 15, 1816, 1:227 

Henry Norman, April 15, 1817, K:255 

James J o nes's house, where the road from McMinnville ends, 
to John Clark's; from the Williamson County line near John 
Clark's to James Watson's 

John Clark, January 9, 1816, 1:114 

Capt. Allsea Harris, October 15, 1816, K:26. This refer- 
ence stated that Harris was responsible for the road 
from Thomas Nash's to John Clark's on the Williamson 
County line. K:26 

James Jones's house, where the road from McMinnville ends, 
to John Clark's; from the river at James Watson's to James 
Jones 

Aaron Webb, January 9, 1816, 1:114 

The Lebanon Road at Brawley ' s Mill to the Shelbyville Road at 
Dug Hollow; from the Lebanon Road to William Binem's house 
James Letton, April 15, 1816, 1:231 

The Lebanon Road at Brawley 's Mill to the Shelbyville Road at 
Dug Hollow; from William Binem's to Dug Hollow 
William Binem, April 15, 1816, 1:231 

Through the town of Jefferson to the low water mark at the 
West Fork ford 

Captain Parker, January 12, 1816, 1:138 

Cannon Street in Murf reesborough to Ready's Mill Road 
William Powell, July 16, 1816, 1:351 
Bennett Smith, January 25, 1817, K:202 

Road's name is unascertainable from research 
Abraham Herring, date unknown, 1:14 3 
Nimrod Jenkins, January 12, 1816, 1:143 



216 



APPENDIX B 



New Wilson County line to the old Wilson County line near 
David Key's house 

David Keys, April 10, 1816, 1:209 

William Edwards's to the Wilson County line 
John Bishop, April 12, 1816, 1:215 

Bowman's Mill to Abbott's Mill 

James Elliot, April 15, 1816, 1:226 

Big Creek to the Indian Camp 

John Bean, October 10, 1814, 1:242 
Thomas Summers, April 16, 1816, 1:242 
Samuel Jacobs, July 21, 1817, L:75 

James Gillispie to the Williamson County line 
William Spann, July 15, 1816, 1:329 

William Wallace's to Murfreesborough 

John Davidson, date unknown, 1:331 

John Wallace, July 15, 1816, 1:331. A later reference 
to the road stated that it was from a mile post east 
of Murfreesborough to William Simpson's old store on 
the Readyville Road. L:75 

Hurricane Creek to the Davidson County line 
Edward Gregory, July 16, 1816, 1:353 
Thomas Neal, July 15, 1817, L:45 

West Fork of Stones River to Thomas Nash 
John Clark, date unknown, K:25 
Travis Nash, October 15, 1816, K:25 

Banton's ferry to the Davidson County line towards Franklin 
William Griffin, date unknown, K:72 
Hezekial G. Cook, October 22, 1816, K:72 

Stones River to Major Abbott's to the Wilson County line 
towards Lebanon 

Thomas L. Woods, January 13, 1817, K:126 

Noah Lilly's to the Warren County line 

Henry Bowyer , January 14, 1817, K:147 
Isham Cherry, July 18, 1817, L:67 

Howard's Line to intersect the road leading to Wilson's Shoals 
John Smith, January 20, 1817, K:168 

John Stockard's to Hurricane Creek 

C. Cotton, January 20, 1817, K:177 



217 
APPENDIX B 



Nelson's Mill to Harpeth Lick; from Owen Edwards's to the 
county line above James Gillispie 

Thompson Fulks, January 20, 1817, K:166 

Murfreesborough to Readyville 

John Wilson, John Smith, and Anderson Searcy, April 17, 
1817, K:268. The grand jury returned a presentment 
against these overseers. K:268 

Crosthwait's Mill on the Stage Road to where the road crosses 
the West Fork of Stones River and the junction of the East and 
West Forks of the Stones River to the West Fork on the road to 
Bowman's Mill 

Walter Keeble, July 21, 1817, L:80 

Lebanon to Readyville; from the Wilson County line to the 
north end of Capt. William Doran ' s land 

William A. McLin, date unknown, L:60 

Capt. John McKnight, July 17, 1817, L:60 

Lebanon to Readyville; from the north end of Capt. William 
Doran 's land to the creek at David McKnight 's still house 
William Doran, July 17, 1817, L:60 

Lebanon to Readyville; form the creek at David McKnight ' s 
still house to the East Fork of the Stones River below 
Ready's Mill 

James McKnight, Sr., date unknown, L:61 

James McKnight, July 17, 1817, L:61 

Cripple Creek to the old road from Jefferson to Readyville 
Charles Ready, July 21, 1817, L:75 

Frederick Barfield's to the road from McCoy's Mill to the 
Wilson County line 

Andy Hall, date unknown, L:125 

Joseph Scarbro, July 25, 1817, L:125 

Boiling Fisher's Mill on the West Fork of Stones River to 
the Shelbyville Road towards Murfreesborough 
Boiling Fisher, September 13, 1819, N:231 

The west end of Main Street in Murfreesborough through the 
plantation of Capt. William Lytle to where the Franklin Road 
crosses the West Fork of the Stones River 

Gen. Robert Purdy, March 13, 1820, 0:180 

Murfreesborough to Gallatin 

Cunninghan Smith and Robert Smith, July 21, 1823, S:3 



21S 



APPENDIX B 

Murfreesborough to Telford's Mill 

H. D. Jamison, July 21, 1823, S:7 

Hardeman's Mill to the old Jefferson to Nashville Road at 
Fawcett ' s 

James Hart, January 26, 1824, S:225 

Constant Hardeman's Mill to William Bowman's 
James Henderson, January 26, 1824, S:225 

Overall's Creek at John Smith's Mill to Stewart's Creek 
Zachariah Posey, date unknown, S:225 
James B. Henry, January 26, 1824, S:225 

Tucker's Blacksmith Shop to Stroud's on top of the hill 
Jonathan Jones, October 17, 1825, T:361 

The top of a ridge near John Reeves to a road at John 
Earwood ' s 

David Hall, January 16, 1826, V:17 

Mcculloch's Mill to Barfield's old place 

Burwell Ganaway, date unknown, V:113. Ganaway was the 
overseer during 1826. V:113 



219 



APPENDIX C 

VERIFICATION OF THE LOCATIONS OF SELECTED 
ROAD TERMINI LISTED IN APPENDIX A 



The purpose of this appendix is to document the 
locations of selected road termini listed in appendix A. 
Entries are made alphabetically under individual names. 
Reference to information in the Rutherford County, Tennessee, 
Deed Books is cited as DB with volume and page number. All 
dates are indicated in numbers (month, day, year) . 

To show the location of the road termini, exchanges 
of land are traced up to the time of publication of the Map 
of Rutherford County, Tennessee (Philadelphia, Pa.: D. G. 
Beers and Co., 1878); and the civil district (CD) is men- 
tioned if not included in the deed reference. 

Cemetery records cited are found in Rutherford County, 
Tennessee, Cemeteries , 3 vols. (Murf reesboro, Tenn. : Stones 
River Chapter SAR and Rutherford County Historical Society, 
197 5) ; and the volume and page number are shown. The cemetery 
name and the 7.5 minute quadrant of the USGS map are also 
given. Reference to any other source is given in full in the 
entry where it appears. 

David Abbott's Mill 

DB 2:236, Richard W. Cummins and others, including David 
Abbott to Granville S. Pierce, 10-21-1831, 700 acres. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 15, G. S. Pierce. 

Rev. Jesse Alexander 

DB 7:305, Jesse Alexander to Elias A. Elder, 2-16-1855, 
1 acre in town of Milton, CD 16. 

DB 10:95, W. B. White and Jesse Alexander to S. S. 
Alexander, 2-23-1858, lot in Milton, 

Cemetery Records 2:31, Jesse Alexander, 1-15-1784 to 
6-16-1863, Cook Cemetery, Milton Quad., USGS Map. 

Map of Rutherford County, Milton. 

Pritchett Alexander 

DB 5:577, Pritchett Alexander and others to Henry Norman, 
Trustee for Union Hill Academy, 7-17-1852, 3 acres in CD 11. 

Map of Rutherford County, Union Hill Academy in CD 11. 



220 
APPENDIX C 

Charles Anderson 

DB 17:605, Henderson Anderson, Executor for Charles 
Anderson to J. L. Miller, 5-13-1871, 45 acres in CD 20. 

Map of Rutherford County, "J. L. M. , " in CD 20. 

Lewis Anthony 

DB H364, Lewis Anthony to John Gadaway, 9-5-1812, tract 
at the mouth of Overall's Creek, north of the West Fork of 
Stones River. Deed mentions Cummins Old Road. 

Peter Arnold 

DB 3:135-136, Peter Arnold, Sr., to John Gilmore, 
2-18-1830, 50 acres. 

DB 3:373, John D. Gilmore and William H. Gilmore to 
Hiram Pearson, 1-31-1840, 39 acres in CD 20. 

DB 2:459, Peter Arnold to Thomas Arnold, 4-20-1846, 50 
acres. Deed mentions John D. Gilmore 's land. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 20, Hiram Pearson and 
John D. Gilmore. 

Humphrey Baker 

DB 0:393, Humphrey Baker to Daniel Winsett, 9-1-1822, 
100 acres on the waters of Stewart's Creek. 

DB R:411, Daniel Winsett to Franklin McClaren, 10-22-1827, 
100 acres on the headwaters of a branch of Stewart's Creek. 

DB W:21, Franklin McClaren to Donelson Sanders, 
12-22-1836, 100 acres. 

DB W:22, Donelson Sanders to Richard B. Vaughn, 1-28-1837, 
deed of trust for 100 acres in CD 8. 

DB 13:269, James Vaughn, son of R. B. Vaughn, to John A. 
Maxwell, 9-29-1865, 99 acres in CD 8 . 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 12, J. A. Maxfield. 

Frederick Barfield 

DB H:262, Frederick Barfield and Joel Dyer, processing 
survey and land plat included in the deed, 11-21-1807, 3760 
acres between the main West Fork of Stones River and the 
east fork of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB L:415, Frederick Barfield to Daniel Marshall, 
9-11-1810, 324 acres on the waters of the West Fork of 
Stones River including Marshall's Knob. (Refer to Daniel 
Marshall in this appendix.) 

DB M:221, Frederick Barfield to John Mclver, 3-1-1820, 
571 acres. 

DB 2:373, John Mclver to Alfred Miller, 1-3-1846, 647 
acres in CD 11. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, A. Miller Est. 



221 



APPENDIX C 



John Barklay (Barkley) 

DB Z:496, John Barkley and Andy Barkley to Dennis 
Hogwood, 2-21-1842, 81 acres in CD 17. Deed mentions 
Knox's Spring. 

DB 8:194, Dennis Hogwood to Adam McElroy, 5-16-1856, 
25 acres in CD 17. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 17, Dennis Hogwood. 

James Bass 

DB R:435, James Bass, division of land, 1-1827, 537 
acres divided into seven equal parts, one part to James Bass. 

DB U:566, Benjamin Bass, executor for James Bass to 
James Bass, Jr., 10-12-1835, 217 acres. Deed mentions road 
leading to Anthony's Mill. 

DB W:333, James Bass to William Smith, 12-7-1832, 230 
acres. Deed mentions a road from Murfreesborough to 
Anthony's Mill. 

DB 18:289, Miss Eliza L. Bass to A. W. Blackman, 
2-20-1872, lots 4 and 7 in division of land belonging to 
James Bass in CD 17. Deed mentions Nashville and Shelbyville 
Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 17, A. W. Blackman. 

Jesse Bean 

DB K:113, Jesse Bean to Joseph Thompson, 2-16-1813, 120 
acres on the East Fork of Stones River at the mouth of 
Cripple Creek. 

DB Q:31, Joseph Thompson to John Alexander, 5-17-1817, 
68 acres on the East Fork of Stones River at the mouth of 
Cripple Creek. 

DB S:17, John Alexander to Lemuel Reed, 2-7-1829, 100 
acres at the mouth of Cripple Creek. Deed mentions the 
main road to Nashville. 

Map of Rutherford County, the mouth of Cripple Creek on 
the East Fork of Stones River. 

Black Fox's Camp 

Map of Rutherford County, Black Fox's Spring. 

Samuel P. Black 

DB 0:315, Matthew McClanahan, Sheriff to Samuel P. Black, 
7-6-1822, 464 acres on the East Fork of Stones River. 

DB R:419, Samuel P. Black to Harry L. Douglass, 
6-21-1828, 414 acres on the south side of the East Fork on 
the tract that Black lived on. 

DB S: 359-360, Harry L. Douglass to Samuel P. Black, 
6-17-1831, 414 acres on the East Fork of Stones River, the 
same as R:419. 

DB 8:60, John A. Wilson and others, heirs of Samuel P. 
Black to Thomas C. Black, 9-10-1853, 214 acres in CD 9 on 
the East Fork of Stones River. 



222 



APPENDIX C 



DB 17:193-194, T. C. Black to W. P. Coleman, 5-13-1870, 
164 acres in CD 9 on the East Fork. 

Cemetery Records 1:9, Samuel Black, 4-27-1775 to 
8-31-1857, Black Cemetery, Walter Hall Quad., USGS Map. 

Ingram Blanks 

DB R: 49-50, Division of Ingram Blanks ' s land between 
John Lytle and Joseph T. B. Turner, 7-1826, plat of 725 
acres. 

Cemetery Records 3:74, Ingram Blanks 12-18-1775 to 
12-12-1825, Lytle-Blanks Cemetery, Rockvale Quad., USGS Map. 

Thomas Y. Blood 

DB Y:286, T. Y. Blood to John P. Sharp. Deed of gift of 
two tracts of land, 4-15-1840; first tract 221 acres and 
second tract 20 acres on the West Fork of Stones River. The 
deed mentions a main big road. 

DB 2:187, Fantleroy Henry and others to Richard D. 
McCullough, 5-5-1845, 226 acres on the east fork of the West 
Fork of Stones River. The tract was known as the old Young- 
blood tract bought from J. P. Sharp. 

DB 9:184-1825, R. D. McCullough to J. E. Hallyburton, 
2-28-1857, 205 acres on the West Fork of Stones River. The 
deed mentions a road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, J. E. Hallyburton. 

Reading Blount 

DB M:31, Division of Reading Blount's 5,045-acre tract 
of land, 7-1817; the plat of land is easily transferred to 
a modern map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 9 and 21, vicinity of 
J. Larance, west to Sulphur Spring, and A. B. Jones, north of 
T. Black. 

Samuel Bowman's Mill (two locations) 

DB S:456, Samuel Bowman to James Elliot, 8-18-1831, 43 
acres including mills on the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB W:57, James Elliot's executors to Fantleroy Henry and 
Beverly W. Henry, 1-25-1837, 40 acres including mills and a 
cotton gin on the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 2:564, Fantleroy Henry to Beverly W. Henry, 10-6-1846, 
20 acres including mill and cotton gin on the West Fork. 

DB 16:147, B. W. Henry to Medicus Ransom, 11-4-1868, 110 
acres on the West Fork. The deed mentions the bridge of the 
Salem Turnpike and the old mill dam. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, "Dr. M. R." 

(second location) 

DB 0:460, Samuel Bowman to James Richardson, 1-16-1823, 
95 acres on the east side of the West Fork beginning at the 
mouth of Overall's Creek. The deed refers to Cummins ' s old 
road. 



223 



APPENDIX C 

DB S:118, Samuel Bowman, plat of survey, 2-19-1830, 
493 acres including mill and mouth of spring branch. 

Map of Rutherford County, mouth of Overall's Creek on 
the West Fork of Stones River. 

William B owman 

DB S:234, William Bowman to Ephram H. Foster, deea or 

trust, 11-23-1830, 300 acres on the West Fork of Stones 
River where William Bowman lived. 

DB U:85-86, Ephram H. Foster to Samuel Bowman, 5-2y-lBJ4, 
acreage unknown, located near a dry branch at the Silver 
Spring. The deed mentions a schoolhouse. The Walter Hill 
Quad., USGS Map refers to a Silver Springs School on Florence 

DB U-361, William H. Bowman to James Avant , 2-16-1835, 
14 5 acres on Overall's Creek, west of where it empties into 
the West Fork of Stones River. „ ^ >, on iRd? 

DB 2:472, William H. Bowman to Thomas Hord, 4-2U-iB4^, 
35 acres "south of the West Fork of Stones River. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 6 and 9, Mrs. Hord. 

Isaac B rooks ^ • u 

DB U-59, Isaac W. Brooks to James M. KilpatricK, 

9-5-1832, 50 acres on the waters of Bradley's Creek. 

DB Y:414, James Kilpatrick to William Pyland, 4-6-1B41, 
30 acres on the waters of Bradley's Creek. 

DB 2:528, William Pyland to James Hill, 12-20-ia4b, 4/ 
acres on the north side of Bradley's Creek. 

DB 4:146, James Hill to R. J. Allen, 9-6-1849, 95 acres 

DB 11:469, R. J. Allen to James H. Matthews, 3-31-1859, 
95 acres in CD 16. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 16, J. Matthews. 

John Brown ioni«i/i -^ 

DB K-237, John Brown to William Stokes, l-20-i«i4, J 

acres on 'a branch of Stewart's Creek. The deed mentions a 

DB K:240, William Stokes to Jesse Sullivan, 7-1815, 
100 acres on a branch of Stewart's Creek. The deed men- 
tions John Brown's northwest corner. 

DB 0-533, Jesse Sullivan to Robert Burnett, 8-29-iB.:^, 
99 acres on a branch of Stewart's Creek. The deed mentions 
John Brown's northwest corner. in 9 ir77 

DB S:61, Robert Burnett to William Goodman, 10-2-iB//, 

DB 2*59, William Goodman to John Mullins, 2-18-1843, 
142 acres on the Nashville, Murfreesboro , and Shelbyville 

Turnpike. ^ , ., t i • 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 3, J. Mullins. 



224 



APPENDIX C 

Brooking Burnett's Mill 

DB K:221, Thomas Shute to A. M. Degraf f inread , 
5-27-1814, 320 acres on Stones River, Deed refers to 
Brooking Burnett's Mill at the mouth of Hurricane Creek. 

Burrus Meeting House 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 7, Asbury Church. 

Samuel Campbell 

DB W:354, Samuel Campbell, Sr., to Samuel Campbell, Jr., 
8-4-1837, 437 acres on the Little West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 23:259-260, Partition deed of Samuel Campbell, 
deceased, 1-1-1876, 467 acres divided among George E. Camp- 
bell, W. E. Campbell, D. S. Campbell, J. H. Campbell, and 
Mrs. E. H. Campbell's dower lot. The deed mentions the 
Murfreesboro-Shelbyville Road, a graveyard, and the west 
bank of Stones River. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, W. E. Campbell. 

Ben Carr's Mill 

DB R:16, Ben Carr to James Snell, 4-3-1813, 53 acres on 
the east side of Overall's Creek near the road from Franklin 
to Fox's Camp." 

DB S:40, Ben Carr to Deveraux Jarratt, 1-31-1828, 100 
acres on the east side of Overall's Creek and the west side 
of a dry branch. Jarratt had to keep open a road from the 
Murfreesboro Road leading by Widow Smith's to the present 
new mill owned by Carr or William H. Lawrence. 

DB S:410, Deveraux Jarratt to John Ransom, 12-10-1830, 
100 acres. 

DB 7:352, John R. Ransom to James B. Moore, 6-12-1853, 
54 acres in CD 12 beginning at the old Snell ford on 
Overall's Creek. 

DB 8:264, J. B. Moore to L. M. Grigg, 6-20-1856, 28 
acres beginning near the southwest corner of the old Snell 
tract. 

DB 8:579, L. M. Grigg to Joseph Ransom, 2-5-1852, 30 
acres, part of the old Snell tract. 

DB 13:64-65, L. M. Grigg to J. B. Kimbro , 10-24-1864, 
two tracts of 273 acres and 26 acres on the west side of 
Overall's Creek. ,^ 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 12, "J. R.," "J. B. K. 

Richa rd Caswell ^ . ^ 
DB G:121, Richard Caswell to William Caswell. The deed 

book is missing. 

DB S: 615-616, Benjamin McCulloch to William R. Caswell, 
2-15-1832, 260 acres on the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB W:372, William Caswell to Benjamin McCulloch, 
12-10-1833, 260 acres on the West Fork. 



225 



APPENDIX C 



DB 7:391, B. W. McCulloch to William C. Fletcher, 
4-13-1855, 249 acres beginning at Thomas Rideout's northeast 
corner. 

DB 10:615, P. A. Perkins to Sarah McCulloch, 12-27-1859, 
portion of the house tract of Benjamin McCulloch. 

DB 16:27-28, John E. Dromgoole, Administrator, 3-12-1868, 
300 acres in CD 11. Land divided into three parcels and 
allotted to Sarah McCulloch, Ellen P. Patterson, Sarah A. 
Perkins. Deed includes plat of survey. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, southeast of T. Rideout, 
the plat of survey of 16:27 fits the map. 

Benjamin Clayton (two tracts of land) 

DB 13:345, Benjamin Clayton, Executor to M. B. and Joshua 
Jordan, 11-15-1865, 183 acres except 1/8 acre for a graveyard, 

DB 15:378, Benjamin T. Clayton, Executor for Benjamin 
Clayton to M. B. Jordan, 2-26-1868, 183 acres in CD 21 on 
Bushnell's Creek. The deed mentions an old road, probably 
an old dirt road from Murfreesboro to Jones' Crossroads, 
DB 10:187. 

Cemetery Records 2:21, Benjamin Clayton, 9-1796 to 
4-1864, Clayton-Vaughn Cemetery, Lascassas Quad., USGS Map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 21, J. Jordon and M.. Jordon. 

(second tract) 

DB U:199, Benjamin Clayton to Levi S. Underwood, 
5-21-1832, 200 acres near the West Fork of Stones River. 
The deed mentions the Jefferson Road. 

DB 8:297, L. and E. Underwood to William D. Underwood, 
1-19-1854, 200 acres near the West Fork. The deed mentions 
Samuel McFadden and the Jefferson Road. 

DB 8:298-299, William D. Underwood to James M. Tompkins, 
9-12-1856, 200 acres. 

DB 15:357, James M. Tompkins to the United States of 
America, 2-10-1868, 8 acres in CD 9 in the vicinity of the 
Stones River Cemetery. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, vicinity of the Stones 
River National Cemetery, 

John Coffee 

DB L:514, John Coffee to Shelton Crosthwait, 1-4-1819, 
28 acres on the south bank of the East Fork of Stones River. 
The deed mentions Crosthwait' s Mills and Bunkley's old ford. 

DB S:95-96, John Coffee to John C. Harris, 10-27-1829, 
500 acres on the East Fork's north bank and in vicinity of 
Gum Spring. 

DB S:96-97, John Coffee to Robert D. Harris, 10-27-1829, 
414 acres on the East Fork. 

DB 2:333-334, Robert D. Harris to John C. Harris, 
11-15-1845, 420 acres in CD 5. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 5, J. C. Harris, Jr. 



226 



APPENDIX C 

John Covington 

DB 8:242-243, William F. Covington, Executor for John 
Covington to William S. F. Posey, Jr., 7-14-1856, 127 acres 
on the Murfreesboro-Franklin Road, except for 1/8 acre for 
a graveyard. 

Cemetery Records 3:150, John Covington, 2-15-1772 to 
6-21-1817, Wray-Covington Cemetery, Rockvale Quad., USGS Map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 12, R. D. Snell, reference 
DB 8:243-244. 

Shelton Crosthwait's Mill 

DB L:237, Shelton Crosthwait to John Caufield, 6-6-1818, 
40 acres lying on the east side of Stones River north of the 
East Fork and at the junction of the rivers. 

DB S: 79-84, Elizabeth Crosthwait, writ of dower as widow 
of Sheldon Crosthwait, 5-24-1826, 1,507 acres north and 
south of the East Fork of Stones River. The writ mentions 
Bunkley's old ford and the mills. It also has a plat of 
survey which matches with the map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 5 and 9, P. Creech, 0. 
Ridley, and G. Bell. 

John Cummins 's Mill (two tracts of land) 

DB E:93, Samuel McBride, Sheriff to Thomas Yardley, 
7-7-1807, an execution against the heirs of John Cummins for 
225 acres. 

DB 4:159, Thomas Yardley to Robert B. Jetton, title bond, 
8-18-1849, 184 acres on the waters of Lytle's Creek and the 
Fox Camp Branch, except for 30 square feet for a graveyard. 

DB 5:192, Thomas W. Yardley and James H. Kelton to 
Robert B. Jetton, 9-10-1851, 184 acres in CD 18 on the Fox 
Camp Branch. 

DB 14:442, R. B. Jetton to W. J. Carney, 10-11-1861, 169 
acres in CD 18 beginning near Black Fox Camp Spring Branch 
and on the Murfreesboro and Manchester Pike. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, W. J. Carney. 

(Mill Site) 

Murfreesboro (Tenn.) The Courier , 5 September 1832, p. 4. 
Cummins 's Mill was located near Abbott's Mill. The mill was 
advertised in a sheriff's sale. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, north of Dr. T. C. Black. 

Luckett Davis 

DB Z:171-172, Luckett Davis, Jr., to Samuel M. Copeland, 
3-2-1842, 270 acres near Stewart's Creek. The deed mentions 
the Olive Branch Spring and the old Nashville Road. 

DB 2:656, Luckett Davis to Thomas James, 8-20-1846, 33 
acres on the waters of Stewart's Creek. The deed mentions 
the Rock Springs Road. 

DB 15:220-221, Luckett Davis to Isaac L. Davis, 
11-18-1867, 55 acres in CD 4. 



227 
APPENDIX C 



DB 16:626-627, R. C. Noland, Trustee for Luckett Davis 
to Wiley Brown, 10-18-1869, 11 acres in CD 4. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 4, W. Brown and L. Davis. 

Abraham DeGraf fenread' s Rafting Ground 

DB K:221, Thomas Shute to A. M. DeGraf fenread , 5-27-1814, 
320 acres on Stones River in CD 1, formerly of Davidson 
County at the mouth of Hurricane Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, the mouth of Hurricane Creek. 

David Dickinson's Mill 

DB 0:185-187, David and Fanny N. (Murfree) Dickinson to 
James Maney, 1-17-1822, 708 acres on the main West Fork near 
Murfreesboro where the commissioners' old line crosses the 
river . 

DB W:127, David Dickinson to James Holmes, 3-9-1837, 
315 acres on the waters of the West Fork of Stones River. 
The deed mentions Dr. Maney ' s residence on the commissioners' 
line as the southeast corner of the tract. DB X:333 refers 
to the stage road from Murfreesboro to Jefferson and David 
Dickinson's line. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 13 and 21, Hon. C. Ready. 

Gen. Joseph Dickson 

DB H: 189-190, Joseph Dickson to William A. Sublett. The 
deed was registered 2-4-1812, 149 acres beginning on the 
southwest corner of the tract that Dickson lived on and 
north with Reading Blount's service tract. Relate this deed 
to Reading Blount's 5,045-acre tract. 

DB 0:33, Joseph Dickson to Cader Demend, 5-9-1821, 100 
acres on Bushnell's Creek. 

DB 17:311, Estate of Cader Dement to Henry B. Kirby 
(Kerby) , 7-19-1853, acreage unknown. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 21, H. Kerby and B. C. 
Reeves. 

Edward Donoho 

DB 0:374-375, Edward Donoho to Samuel Dickson and 
F, N. W. Burton, deed of trust, 8-8-1822, 688 acres on 
Bradley's Creek on line dividing Wilson and Rutherford 
counties. 

DB 10:296-298, Robert E. Donoho and others, compromise 
deed with J. W. Price and others, 1-1859; Parthenia Price, 
wife of John W. Price, was the widow of Edward Donoho, Sr . 
There was no mention of land in this transaction. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 16, "J. P." 

William Doran 

DB Y:32, Mary Doran and others to John S. Cook, 
2-10-1835, 252 acres on the waters of Bradley's and 



228 
APPENDIX C 



McKnight's Creek. The deed mentions Jesse Alexander's south 
corner. 

DB 2:508, Charolotte Cook to David M. McKnight, 
2-14-1846, 25 acres in CD 17. 

DB 2:509, Charolotte Cook to Jesse Alexander, 2-14-1846, 
12 acres in CD 17, beginning on the east and south boundary 
of Jesse Alexander. 

DB 3:458, David M. McKnight to James H. Cook, 12-27-1847, 
25 acres in CD 17. 

DB 17:268, J. H. Cook to W. W. McKnight, 9-23-1868, 7 
acres in CD 17. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 17, W. McKnight. 

Double Springs 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 18 and 21. 

George Douglas 

DB H:128, George Douglas to John P. James, 7-10-1811, 
100 acres on the waters of Stewart's Creek. 

DB 4:352-353, John P. James to John Pope, 12-27-1849, 
115 acres. 

DB 4:786-787, John Pope to Jackson Smith, 1-21-1851, 
two tracts of land including one purchased from John P. 
James. 

DB 17-447-448, Edwin Arnold, Sheriff to John Woods, 
1-7-1871, 440 acres of Henry Bridges and wife N. M. N. B. 
Bridges, widow of Jackson Smith, in sheriff sale of land, 
the property of N. M. N. B. Bridges. 

DB 17:456-457, John Woods to Thomas Batey, 1-7-1871, 
44 acres. John Woods was trustee for Mrs. Bridges. The 
land was bounded on the north by J. R. Dillin, on the east 
by Levi Wade, on the south by the lands of the late James 
Bass, and on the west by James B. Smith's heirs. 

DB 20:353, Thomas J. Batey to James J. Bass, 10-12-1874, 
154 acres in CD 7. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 7, J. J. Bass. 

Robert H. Dyer 

DB K: 204-205, Robert H. Dyer and Joel Dyer to Samuel 
Harris, 9-19-1814, 220 acres on waters of the east fork of 
the West Fork of Stones River north of the military line. 

DB L:240, Samuel Harris to Joseph Poindexter, 9-25-1818, 
220 acres. 

DB 0:133-134, Joseph Poindexter to William Henderson, 
2-2-1821, 40 acres on the waters of Lytle's Creek. The deed 
mentioned that the land was bought from Samuel Harris. 

DB S:446, Joseph and James M. Poindexter to William 
Poindexter, 2-4-1831, 90 acres on McCoy's Fork of Stones 
River, located south of tract belonging to the heirs of 
William Henderson. 



229 



APPENDIX C 



DB VJ:611, Joseph Poindexter to Abner Summers, 12-1-1837, 
10 acres near Pilot Knob on the waters of the West Fork of 
Stones River. 

DB W:600, Joseph Poindexter to Willis Snell, 2-21-1838, 
deed of trust for 237 acres. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, W. Snell and J. F. 
Henderson. 

John Edwards 

DB L:449, John Edwards to Samuel Morton, 12-25-1815, 
169 acres on the waters of Stewart's Creek in the second and 
third range. The deed mentions a tanyard. 

DB 17:479-480, John C. Bostick to William C. Wood, 
1-19-1867, 8 acres, part of a tract formerly owned by Dr. 
Samuel Morton. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 4, W. Woods. 

Capt. Owen Edwards 

DB W:60, Owen Edwards to Thomas Nelson, 2-9-1835, 130 
acres on Stewart's Creek and a branch of Stewart's Creek. 
The deed mentions a road. 

DB 5:438-439, John Nelson and Arthur H. Edwards, Execu- 
tors of Thomas Nelson, deceased, to Thomas H. Edwards, 
5-8-1851, 570 acres on Stewart's Creek beginning at an old 
mill pond of Thomas Nelson's mill, formerly Anthony's Mill. 
The deed mentions lane, branch, and a bridge below Blue 
Spring. 

DB 5:610, Thomas H. Edwards to Arthur M. Edwards, 
9-1-1852, 570 acres in CDs 4 and 7. 

DB 15:527, A. M. Edwards to Thomas Edwards, 5-16-1860, 
1 acre including the mill house. 

DB 11:411, A. M. Edwards to Nancy Edwards, trust deed, 
3-19-1860, 23 acres. The deed mentions a road and Stewart's 
Creek. 

DB 20:367, W. T. Edwards, son of A. M. Edwards, to 
J. W. Edwards, 10-23-1874, 97 acres in CD 4 , bounded on the 
east by Stewart's Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs, 4 and 7, T. Edwards, Mrs. 
Edwards, and J. W. Edwards. 

John Elliot 

DB 2:168, John Elliot to John P. Erwin, Trustee for 
Theodore Shultz, 1-1-1837, 197 acres on waters of Overall's 
Creek. The deed mentions a road from Murfreesboro to 
Nashville . 

DB 2:448-449, B. H. Sheperd , Marshal, to Theodore Shultz, 
3-6-1843, same entry as DB 2:168. 

DB 3:634, Theodore Shultz to Thomas Litoard, 6-30-1846, 
280 acres on the east side of Overall's Creek. Deed men- 
tions a road from Murfreesboro to Nashville. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, Mrs. Hoard. 



230 



APPENDIX C 



James S. Fawcett 

DB Q: 518-519, James S. Fawcett to Thomas Neal, 2-26-1825, 
15 acres on the waters of Stewart's Creek. The deed mentions 
the big road leading from Nashville to Jefferson and the old 
Taylor Trace. 

DB 4:328, James S. Fawcett to Archibald Fawcett, 
11-30-1849, 79 acres in CD 3. 

DB 13:322, A. B., William R. , and James Fawcett to John 
Gowen, 10-25-1865, 112 acres in CD 3. The deed mentions the 
Jefferson Pike. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 3, J. Gowen. 

Boiling Fisher's Mill 

DB U:498, Boiling Fisher to M. H. Fletcher and John 
Chappell, 1-20-1835, 115 acres on Stones River. 

DB Z:93, Mumford H. Fletcher's heirs to John Chappell, 
decree of title, 11-9-1840, 115 acres. Stephen A. Smith 
purchased part of the Boiling Fisher tract except for 8 
acres including the mill which was sold to Fountain S. 
Mayfield. Smith sold the land to Harrison Owen, who sold 
it to John Chappell. 

DB 1:117, John Chappell to John D. Webb, 1-2-1843, 64 
acres on the waters of the West Fork in CD 11. 

DB 2:634, John D. Webb to Robert M. Smith, 12-7-1846, 
6 acres on the West Fork. The tract began at the south end 
of Fisher's old mill dam. 

DB 20:550-551, J. D. Webb to May Cooper, 2-15-1875, 40 
acres in CD 14 on the waters of Stones River. 

Map of Rutherford County, the mill near the boundary of 
CDs 11 and 14. 

John Fleming 

DB N:44, John Fleming to Samuel Fleming, 6-3-1820, 320 
acres on the east side of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB R: 209-210, Samuel Fleming to William G. Parrish and 
Turner B. Henley, 12-22-1825, 320 acres on the West Fork 
of Stones River. 

DB W:34, William G. Parrish and Turner B. Henley, agree- 
ment to divide land, 2-1-1826, 160 acres each. 

DB W:38, William G. Parrish to Lewis Garner, 2-4-1837, 
160 acres. 

DB S:270, Turner B. Henley to Lewis Garner, 9-6-1830, 
125 acres on the waters of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 13:72, Ransom and Garner to M. L. Fletcher, 
12-15-1862, 61 acres in CD 14. The deed mentions the Mur- 
freesboro and Shelbyville Road and the Stones River. 

DB 14:130, Minas L. Fletcher to Abel Davis, 11-5-1864, 
151 acres in CD 14. The deed mentions the Shelbyville Road. 

DB 14:405, Minas L. Fletcher to Abel Davis, 12-10-1866, 
24 acres in CD 14. The deed mentions the Stones River. 

DB 15:235, Minas L. Fletcher to Abel Davis, 12-9-1867, 
43 acres in CD 14. 



231 



APPENDIX C 



DB 19:203-206, Baldy Davis, Julia Davis, Charles Davis, 
the estate of Abel Davis, deceased, to Charles R. Davis, 
P. C. F. Miller, William Whitson, C. R. Ransom, C. T. Ransom, 
and John A. Miller, 4-9-1873, 503 acres including a plat of 
survey. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 14, Mrs. Davis and B. Davis. 

John Fletcher 

DB L:535, John Fletcher to William Loftin, 4-16-1823, 
111 acres on the east side of the West Fork. The deed men- 
tions road from John Fletcher to Charles McClain's horse mill. 

DB 8:162-163, Samuel Winston to Joseph Watkins, 4-4-1856, 
385 acres in CD 11. The deed mentions the West Fork of 
Stones River and excludes 1/2 acre deeded by John Fletcher to 
Roily Morgan for a mill seat and 1/4 acre for a cemetery of 
John Fletcher and his wife. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 20, J. Watkins. 

David Gooch 

Cemetery Records 1:48, David Gooch, 4-1763 to 9-24-1831, 
Gooch Cemetery, Smyrna Quad., USGS Map. The cemetery is 
located in the 17th District of Williamson County. 

Map of Rutherford County, vicinity of Mrs. M. E. Gooch 
in CD 3. 

William Gilliam 

DB X:314, William Gilliam to George A. Sublett and 
William Ledbetter, 3-12-1839, 87 acres on both sides of 
Sinking Creek. The deed mentions the Jefferson Road at a 
hickory marked as one mile from the court house. 

DB X:476, William Gilliam to Charles Ready, Jr., 
9-27-1839, 5 acres one mile north of Murfreesboro on the 
road from Murfreesboro to Jefferson. 

DB Z:250, William Gilliam to William B. Hollowell, 
1-14-1840, 4 acres one mile from Murfreesboro on the road 
from Murfreesboro to Jefferson. 

DB 3:670, M. Spence, Administrator for William Gilliam, 
deceased, to Burrel Ganaway, 2-1-1841, 3 acres. The deed 
mentions the main road from Murfreesboro to Jefferson in 
1841, and the turnpike from Murfreesboro to Lebanon. 

DB 3:671, Burrel Ganaway to John Dalton, 12-20-1848, 
1/2 acre in CD 13. 

DB 4:291, John Dalton to Thomas L. Parrish, 12-24-1849 , 
1-1/2 acres in CD 13 on the Sulphur Springs Road and the 
Lebanon Turnpike. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, vicinity of J. H. Allen. 

James Gillespie 

DB L:271, James Gillespie to Francis Gillespie, 3-6-1818, 
200 acres on Stewart's Creek. 

DB T:365, Francis Gillespie to John Read. Deed book is 
missing. 



232 



APPENDIX C 



DB W:685-686, John Read to John J. Beasley, 9-7-1837, 
172 acres in CD 8 . 

DB Y:287-288, John J. Beasley to John H. Redd, 11-3-1839, 
186 acres in CD 8. 

DB 4:321, John H. Redd to James L. Anderson, 1-4-1850, 
150 acres in CD 8, Deed mentions a branch and Franklin Road. 

DB 7:14, James L. Anderson to Joseph M. Bennett, 
5-13-1854, 226 acres. 

DB 7:341, Joseph M. Bennett to James Williams, 9-15-1853, 
60 acres on the waters of Stewart's Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 4, Mrs. Williams and J. M. 
Bennett. 

Henry Goodloe 

DB 2:190, Henry Goodloe to T. W. Goodloe and N. L. 
Douglas, deed of trust, 10-17-1842, 400 acres on the north 
side of the East Fork of Stones River in CD 17. They con- 
veyed 40 acres to John L. Jetton. 

DB 2:902, Lewis Jetton, Trustee to Edward Adams, 
11-10-1846, Henry Goodloe conveyed in trust 300 acres on the 
south side of Stones River in CD 19. The tract included 
grist and saw mills. The deed mentions a wagon way from the 
ford below the mills on the right bank of the river, sixteen 
feet in width. 

DB 5:486, Edward Adams to A. M. Alexander, 1-29-1852, 
25 acres in CD 19, including the grist and saw mills and 
also a free and uninterrupted wagon way from the ford below 
the mills. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 19, G. Mill and A. M. 
Alexander. 

Jonathan Hall 

DB Q:91, Jonathan Hall to William McMurry, 6-28-1824, 
50 acres on the waters of Cripple Creek. The deed mentions 
a mill dam, mill branch, mill distillery, and the liberty of 
erecting water works of any description. 

DB S:424, William McMurry to Abner Weatherly and Jacob 
Wright, 10-18-1830, 50 acres, the same description as DB 
Q:91. 

DB 5:430-431, Abner Weatherly and Jacob Wright to 
Charles D. Ivey, 9-24-1831, 50 acres on Cripple Creek, the 
same description as DB Q:91. 

DB W:209, Charles D. Ivey to Benjamin Ivey, 5-8-1837, 
50 acres, the same description as DB Q:91. 

DB W:446, Benjamin Ivey to Charles D. Ivey, 11-24-1837, 
50 acres, the same description as DB Q:91. 

DB 1:410, Charles D. Ivey to John Stroop, 12-9-1843, 
50 acres, the same description as DB Q:91. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 19 and 21, G. Mill and 
Stroop Est. 



233 



APPENDIX C 



Hance Hamilton 

DB 0:456-457, Hance Hamilton to Isaac Wright, 2-2-1809, 
50 acres on the south side of the East Fork of Stones River. 

DB 5:332-333, Hance Hamilton to Isaac Wright, 5-1-1800, 
2,000 acres on the East Fork of Stones River on the Continen- 
tal Line. 

DB X:426, Hance Hamilton to Thomas Hamilton, 10-30-1810, 
570 acres on the East Fork of Stones River. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 19, vicinity of D. Parker, 
south of land owned by Isaac Wright. 

Constant Hardeman 

Cemetery Records 1:53, Constant Hardeman 1-3-1778 to 
8-27-1850, Hardeman Cemetery, Smyrna Quad., USGS Map. The 
cemetery is located east of the Gregory Mill Recreation site. 

James Henderson 

DB K:427-428, John Henderson, Administrator for James 
Henderson to Jesse Day, 10-15-1816, 83 acres on the west 
side of Armstrong's Branch and south of John Henderson's 
land. 

DB R:193-194, Jesse Day to Gurnsey G. Brown, 8-25-1827, 
68 acres on the west side of Armstrong's Branch and east of 
Charles Puckett's land. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, north of Salem and 
south of the Puckett estate. 

John Henderson 

DB X: 237-238, John L. Henderson to Willis Snell, 
1-18-1839, 40 acres. 

DB 2:693, Willis Snell to James J. Hollowell, 1-8-1847, 
68 acres on the waters of Armstrong's Creek. The deed men- 
tions the road from Murfreesboro to Franklin on John Hender- 
son's south boundary. 

DB 4:145, James J. Hollowell to William Puckett, 
9-5-1849, 68 acres, the same description as DB 2:693. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 7, Mrs. Puckett. 

Samuel Henderson 

DB K:200-201, Samuel Henderson to Ezekiel Ward, 4-29-1815, 
100 acres on the West Fork of Stones River. Located at the 
north end of a tract on which Samuel Henderson lived. 

DB 4:573-574, John W. Leath and wife, Mary E. Leath, to 
James J. Ward, 11-25-1859, 60 acres known as lot number 10, 
deeded to Mary and Martha Ward, heirs of Ezekiel Ward. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 6, J. J. Ward. 

John Henry 

DB R:292-293, John Henry to William D. Baird, 12-28-1826, 
133 acres near the head of Sinking Creek on the tract that 
Henry lived on. The deed mentions the commissioners' line. 



234 



APPENDIX C 



DB S:533, William D. Baird to James Maney, 4-11-1832, 
20 acres. 

DB 1:72, William D. Baird to Hiram Cox, 12-31-1842, 
10 acres on waters of Bushnell's Creek on the road leading 
from Wright's Mill to Murfreesboro. 

DB 3:254, Hiram Cox to N, H. Frost, Jr., 8-30-1847, 
10 acres on Bushnell's Creek in CD 21. 

DB 3:211-212, Hiram Cox to E. J. Allen, 9-17-1847, 48 
acres in CD 21. The deed mentions the road from Murfrees- 
boro to Wright's Mill. 

DB 20:364, E. J. Allen to S. M. Cherry, 10-20-1874, 164 
acres in CD 21 and on Bushnell's Creek. The deed mentions 
the northeast corner of Rev. E. J. Allen's home. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 21, Rev. Allen, and south- 
west of the geographic center of Tennessee. 

James Higgins 

DB 0:494, James Higgins to Mills Manor, 8-17-1822, 6 
acres on the waters of Christmas Creek adjacent to the tract 
on which Manor lived. 

DB U:629, Mills Manor to Montfort H. Fletcher, 9-26-1829, 
104 acres on the waters of the West Fork of Stones River. 
The deed mentions a main road. 

DB Z: 332-333, Montfort H. Fletcher to heirs, Henry D. 
Jamison and John Chappell, 3-1842, tract on both sides of 
the West Fork of Stones River and Panther Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, the junction of Christ- 
mas Creek and the West Fork of Stones River. 

Isaac Hilliard 

DB S: 89-90, Isaac Hilliard and wife to Jonathan Currin, 
8-15-1829, 247 acres south of Murfreesboro on Lytle's Creek 
and called the "Sand Spring" tract. The deed mentions that 
the property line crossed the spring branch. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 13, Murfreesboro insert. 
Sand Spring. 

Mathias Hoover's Mill 

DB Q:181-185, Order for the division of the lands of 
Mathias Hoover, deceased, October terra of the county court, 
1824, 700 acres. Jacob Hoover received lot number 5 of 8 
acres, including mill seat and mill race, six feet wide and 
190 rods long. 

DB 2:2, Jacob Hoover to Mathias Hoover, 7-24-1844, 20 
acres in CD 24. The deed mentions the mouth of the tail 
race of the mill. 

DB 2:1, Jacob Hoover to Julious Hoover, 9-9-1844, 200 
acres on the waters of Stones River in Hoover's Gap beginning 
at the mouth of the race of the mill. The deed mentions 
Fox's Branch. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 24, G. Mill in Hoover's Gap. 



235 

APPENDIX C 

Robert Hunter 

DB K: 103-104, Robert Hunter to Anderson Searcy, 3-18-1814, 
141 acres on the east side of Stewart's Creek, part of a 320- 
acre tract granted to William Bowen. 

Cemetery Records 1:115, Anderson Searcy died, 1-22-1832, 
Smyrna Quad. , USGS Map. The cemetery is located 250 yards 
east of Stewart's Creek, 1/2 mile north of an overpass 
bridge over 1-24 on Baker Road, 1.3 miles southwest of the 
Old Nashville Highway and one mile past Shirly Road. 

Hiram Jenkins 

Jenkins's home is located at the junction of 1-24 and 
Manson Pike. Reference: Mary B. Hughes, Hearthstones: The 
Story of Historic Rutherford County Homes (Murf reesboro, 
Tenn . : Mid-South Publishing Co., Inc., 1942), p. 26; here- 
after cited as Hearthstones . 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 13, J. F. Jenkins. 

Nimrod Jenkins 

Jenkins's land is located on Rucker Lane. Reference: 
Hearthstones , pp. 31, 50. 

Map of Rutherford County, Miss N. and Mrs. J. M. Jenkins 
in CD 11. 

John Jetton (two locations) 

DB K:280, John L. Jetton to Hugh Kirk, 1-8-1816, 68 
acres on the waters of Lytle's Creek above the Black Fox Camp. 

DB 11:338, J. J. Kirk to R. P. Smith, 2-9-1860, 130 acres. 
J. J. Kirk was the administrator of Jane Kirk, deceased, for 
the tract that was owned by Hugh Kirk and dower for Jane Kirk. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, southeast of Black Fox 
Camp in the vicinity of M. Kerk. 

(second location) 

DB 5:103, John Work and John L. Jetton, copy of decree 
to divide lands, vs. Harmon James, 4-22-1851, 186 acres on 
McKnight's Creek. 

DB 5:394, John L. Jetton to Jacob Wright, 2-23-1852, 
acreage unknown in CD 17 on McKnight's Creek. 

DB 17:213, J. F. Fletcher, Clerk and Master of the 
Rutherford County Court, to Lewis Jetton, 10-1859, 30 acres 
of the estate of J. L. Jetton. D. B. Barr and William 
Sullivan were mentioned in the deed. 

DB 17:233-234, Lewis Jetton, Executor of John L. Jetton, 
vs. Burke and others, 4-20-1870, 30 acres; W. Sullivan was 
mentioned in the deed. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 17, McKnight's Creek and 
W. Sullivan. 

Robert Jetton 

DB 14:168, Robert J. Jetton to James F. Fletcher, 
10-12-1865, 109 acres in CD 18. 



236 

APPENDIX C 



DB 14:442, Robert B. Jetton to W. J. Carney, 10-14-1861, 
169 acres in CD 18 near the Black Fox Spring Branch and on 
the Murfreesboro and Manchester Turnpike. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, R. B. Jetton, J. F. 
Fletcher, and W. J. Carney. 

Walter Keeble 

DB K: 315-316, Walter Keeble, Jr., to John R. Bedford, 
4-1-1815, 13 acres south of Keeble ' s Cherry Tree Bottom 
tract. The deed mentions the main road from Nashville 
through Jefferson. 

DB 0:116-117, Walter Keeble to William Brady, 7-24-1821, 
205 acres of the Cherry Tree Bottom tract. The deed men- 
tions the road from Jefferson to Nashville. 

Cemetery Records 1:64, Walter Keeble, no dates, Keeble 
Cemetery, Walter Hill Quad., USGS Map. The cemetery is 
located 1/3 mile west of Old Jefferson. 

John Kimbro 

DB H:311-312, John Kimbro to Brooking Burnett, 4-3-1812, 
50 acres on the west side of Hurricane Creek, 4,125 feet 
from Stones River. 

DB M:14, John Kimbro to William Holton, 1-1-1817, 200 
acres on the north and south side of Stones River near the 
junction of Hurricane Creek with Stones River. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 2, vicinity of Higdon and 
N. Kimbro. 

Sarah Rutledge Liddon 

DB L: 64-65, Sarah Liddon to Thomas R. Ivy and Nancy 
Perry, 5-12,1817, 520 acres beginning near wagon ford on the 
east boundary of the original tract granted to Sarah Rutledge, 

DB 0:73, Petition for the partition of the land of 
Benjamin Liddon, 6-18-1821, 571 acres on the West Fork of 
Stones River. The deed includes a plat of survey. 

DB 0:75-78, Sarah Liddon and others to Blackman Coleman, 
5-12-1821, 104 acres on the waters of the West Fork. 

DB 0:536, Blackman Coleman to George Calhoun, 10-22-1822, 
44 acres on the West Fork of Stones River. 

Cemetery Records 3:70, Benjamin Liddon 1754-1815, site 
of the Liddon marker stating that Benjamin Liddon was buried 
near this spring called Liddon Spring. Murfreesboro Quad. , 
USGS Map. The marker is located on the east side of US 231, 
south of the Murfreesboro Country Club. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, T. Hill. 

Eldridge Loftin 

DB R:330-331, Eldridge Loftin to John Sneed , 8-28-1826, 
100 acres on the Dry Fork of the West Fork of Stones River. 



237 



APPENDIX C 



DB 5:240-241, Eldridge Loftin to Jesse Sikes, 10-23-1827, 
100 acres on the Dry Fork of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 2:478, Eldridge Loftin to William Spence, 5-28-1848, 
187 acres in CD 11 on a branch of the Dry Fork to include 
the mouth of the Dry Fork. 

DB 4:74-75, Eldridge Loftin to Presley F. Batton, 
6-25-1849, 263 acres in CD 20. 

DB 4:517, P. F. and J. B. Batton to Samuel Winston, 
5-7-1850, 263 acres in CD 20. 

DB 11:64, Samuel Winston to Paul V. Johns, 1-28-1860, 
106 acres in CD 11. The deed mentions a road and the West 
Fork opposite the mouth of the Dry Fork of the West Fork of 
Stones River. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 20, P. V. Johns. 

Col. William Loftin 

DB H:174-175, William Loftin to Eldridge Loftin, 
4-18-1811, 100 acres on the West Fork. The deed mentions 
Colonel Loftin 's Spring Branch and the main spring. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 20, the land between the 
Dry Fork of the West Fork and Christmas Creek. 

Walter Lowe 

DB R: 307-308, Walter Lowe to Alfred S. Harbin and others, 
division of land, 1-1828, 700 acres. A plat of survey is 
included in the deed. 

DB S: 21-22, Hennrietta Lowe, dower's division among 
heirs, 8-12-1829, 780 acres. A plat of survey is included 
in the deed. 

DB 2:438-439, Walter Lowe's heirs to William Lowe, 
1-7-1846, 143 acres on Lytle's Creek. 

DB 17:289-290, Walter Lowe to Rufus McKee, 9-15-1870, 
53 acres in three tracts in CD 24 on Lytle's Creek. The 
deed mentions the Old Readyville Road and the Old Murfrees- 
boro and Readyville Road. 

DB 17:598, Walter Lowe to Abner Summers, 3-1871, 9 acres 
on Big Creek in CD 24. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 24, W. S. Lowe. 

Capt. Nathan Lyons 

DB Z: 562-563, Nathan Lyons to James Youree and others, 
11-9-1842, 1 acre in CD 23 for a good school. 

Cemetery Records 2:107, Rev. Nathan Lyons, 3-12-1789 to 
2-9-1857, Lyon Cemetery, Readyville Quad., USGS Map. The 
cemetery is located 1-1/4 miles south of the Cripple Creek 
Church and 1/3 mie west of the Cripple Creek Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 23, A. T. Harney, N. Lyons. 

John Lytle (two locations) 

DB R: 29-31, John and Mary Lytle to William Lytle, 
9-4-1826, 289 acres on the waters of Stewart's Creek, part 



23g 

APPENDIX C 



of a tract owned by Captain Blanks. Cain Creek is mentioned 
in the deed. 

DB R: 31-33, John and Mary Lytle to William F. Lytle, 
9-4-1826, 364 acres on both sides of the West Fork. The 
land was located on the forks, and it was sold except for 
mills and 6 acres of land. 

DB R: 33-34, John and Mary Lytle to Benjamin McCulloch, 
9-4-1826, 6 acres on both sides of the West Fork of Stones 
River, beginning 10 feet above the spring on the east bank 
of the river just below Telford's Mill. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 11 and 13, forks of the 
West Fork of Stones River. 

(second location) 

DB R: 49-50, John Lytle to Joseph Turner, division of 
land, 7-1826, 725 acres. The deed has a plat of survey. 

DB X:301, John Lytle to Joseph T. B. Turner, 3-10-1838, 
200 acres on the headwaters of Stewart's Creek. 

DB X;302, John Lytle to Joseph T. B. Turner, 5-10-1838, 
92 acres, part of the tract that John Lytle lived on. The 
deed mentions the big road from Murfreesboro to Franklin. 

Cemetery Records 3:73, John Lytle 7-9-1788 to 8-31-1841, 
Lytle-Blanks Cemetery, Rockvale Quad., USGS Map. The ceme- 
tery is located on Highway 96, .8 mile east of the intersec- 
tion with Coleman Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 7, Capt. J. Lytle. 

Lytle' s Mill 

DB R: 33-34, John and Mary Lytle to Benjamin McCulloch, 
9-4-1826, 6 acres on both sides of the West Fork including 
the mills. 

DB 16:27-28, John E. Dromgoole, Administrator to James G. 
Overall, 3-12-1868, 300 acres on the West Fork in CD 11 
including three parcels allocated to the heirs of Benjamin 
McCulloch. 

Map of Rutherford County, located north of B. W. Henry 
in CD 11. 

Capt. William Lytle 

DB H: 385-386, William Lytle to Commissioners of Murfrees- 
boro, 7-22-1812, 60 acres near Lytle' s Creek, part of the 
tract that John Lytle lived on. 

DB M: 367-368, William Lytle, Sr., to John M. and Nancy 
Telford, 4-10-1813, 364 acres on both sides of the West Fork 
at the forks. 

Cemetery Records 3:72, Capt. William Lytle, 2-17-1755 to 
9-4-1829, Lytle Cemetery, Murfreesboro Quad., USGS Map. 
Cemetery is located east of the Haynes Brothers Supply Com- 
pany on US Highway 41. 



239 



APPENDIX C 



James Maney 

Hearthstones , pp. 9, 69. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 13, L. M. Maney. 

Col. Daniel Marshall 

DB M:210-211, Daniel Marshall to John Mclver, 2-28-1820, 
830 acres on which Marshall lived. The deed mentions the 
military line. 

Map of Rutherford Counth, CD 11, Marshall's Knob. 

Matthew McClanahan 

DB U: 293-294, Matthew McClanahan to Samuel McClanahan, 
1-15-1835, 200 acres on the headwaters of Bushnell ' s Creek, 
known by the name of Double Springs, east of Murf reesboro . 

DB R:270, Matthew McClanahan to Samuel McClanahan, 
8-20-1827, 106 acres of the tract where Matthew McClanahan 
lived. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 18 and 21, vicinity of 
Double Springs. 

Ezekiel McCoy's Mill 

DB M:172, Ezekiel B. McCoy to Thomas Y. Blood, 1-2-1819, 
100 acres. 

DB U:13, Thomas Y. Blood to Charles Anderson, 12-27-1837, 
100 acres on the south side of Stones River. Refer to 
Anderson and Blood. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, vicinity of Mrs. M. J. 
Anderson. 

Henry McCoy 

DB Q:515, Henry McCoy to Edward Elam, 4-19-1826, 100 
acres on the east fork of the West Fork of Stones River on 
the commissioners' line. Property is located in the vicinity 
of Thomas Y. Blood and Charles Anderson. 

DB W:581, Edward Elam to John M. Wade, 2-9-1838, 245 acres. 

DB 4:240, John M. Wade to Paschel Yager, 9-18-1848, 245 
acres on the waters of the West Fork of Stones River on the 
east side of the turnpike from Murf reesboro to Shelbyville. 

DB 7:28, Paschel Yager to William S. Huggins, 1-6-1855, 
230 acres in CD 11 on the east side of the Nashville, Mur- 
f reesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike. 

DB 7:478, William S. Huggins to R. P. S. Kimbro , 
9-14-1855, 230 acres in CD 11 beginning on the commissioners' 
line, east of the turnpike. 

DB 7:498, R. P. S. Kimbro to Joseph W. Binford, 11-3-1855, 
116 acres in CD 11. 

DB 7:553, R. P. S. Kimbro to William S. Butler, 11-8-1855, 
130 acres in CD 11 on the commissioners' line, east of a road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, J. W. Binford, J. M. 
Wade, J. W. B. 



240 



APPENDIX C 



Benjamin McCulloch 

DB K:526, Benjamin McCulloch to Best Ward, 11-1-1816, 
462 acres on the West Fork of Stones River beginning on the 
top of the first hill below the plantation where McCulloch 
lived. 

DB 3:615-616, Benjamin McCulloch to William R. Caswell, 
2-15-1832, 260 acres including the tract where Caswell lived 
on the West Fork. The deed mentions a lane from McCulloch' s 
house to Caswell's house. 

DB 10:615, P. A. Perkins to Sarah McCulloch, 12-27-1859, 
110 acres including the portion of the house tract of the 
late Benjamin McCulloch laid off to Sarah A. Perkins, dower 
of her father's estate; property located in the vicinity of 
William Ledbetter. 

DB 7:391, B. W. McCulloch and Anna M. to William C. 
Fletcher, 4-13-1855, 249 acres. The deed mentions Thomas 
Rideout and William F. Lytle. 

DB 16:27-28, John E. Dromgoole, Administrator to James G. 
Overall, 3-12-1868, 300 acres in CD 11. This property was 
part of three tracts of heirs of Benjamin McCulloch. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, north of B. W. Henry. 

Major (James) McEwin (McEwen) 

DB 5:636, James A. McEwen to Dollarson Barker, 9-13-1852, 
133 acres in CD 17, south of McKnight's Creek and on the 
creek. 

DB 10:277, D. Barker to Andrew Hunter, 3-29-1856, 40 
acres in CD 17 on McKnight's Creek. The deed mentions 
W. Hunt being located east of Barker. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 17, W. Hunt, J. N. McKnight. 

Alexander McKeen (two locations) 

DB K: 176-177, Alexander McKeen to John Davidson, 7-6-1813, 
200 acres on the waters of Bushnell ' s Creek beginning at the 
Double Springs and including one spring. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, Double Springs. 

(second location) 

DB W: 370-801, Mary and Alexander D. McKeen to James B. 
Wood, 12-7-1836, 232 acres on the West Fork of Stones River 
on the banks of the Dry Fork. 

DB 2:392, James B. and John Woods to Robert Lawing, 
12-17-1845, 223 acres in CD 20, same description as 
W: 379-801. Lawing sold lots in Fosterville. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 20, Fosterville. 

Capt. John McKnight 

DB X: 336-337, John McKnight and others to William 
McKnight, 1-1835, two tracts; 228 acres on the waters of the 
south fork of Bradley's Lick Creek, 2-1/2 miles from Bradley's 
Lick. The second tract was located in the vicinity of William 



241 



APPENDIX C 



Doran's land, 50 acres on the south fork of Bradley's Lick 
Creek. 

Cemetery Records 2:36, John M. McKnight, 3-17-1789 to 
9-6-1844, Cook Cemetery, Milton Quad., USGS Map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 16, "Sunnyside." 

Robert McKorkle 

DB R:87, Robert McKorkle to Robert G. Cummins, 11-10-1826, 
100 acres on the waters of Bradley's Creek where McKorkle 
lived. 

DB 5:422-423, Robert G. Cummins to Harwood Morgan, 
1-27-1831, 100 acres on the waters of Bradley's Creek where 
Cummins lived. 

DB X: 641-642, Harwood Morgan to John L. Moore, 12-24-1853, 
13 acres in New Milton. Morgan sold about 13 lots in New 
Milton. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 16, Milton. 

Robert Miller 

DB 0:286-287, Robert Miller to John Miller, 8-13-1819, 
60 acres on the waters of Long Creek. 

DB 5:370, Robert C. Miller to Newton C. Miller, 
10-1-1849, 120 acres in CD 25. 

DB 5:370-371, Robert C. Miller to N. C. Miller, 
10-1-1849, 169 acres in CD 25. The deed mentions the big 
road between Stephen White and Robert Miller. 

DB 5:378-379, N. C. to John Leiper, 2-7-1852, 508 acres. 
The deed mentions a crossroads. 

DB 5:397, John Leiper to Samuel Anderson, 2-7-1852, 508 
acres with the same description as DB 5:378-379. 

DB 8:574, N. C. Miller to R. H. Wood, 3-31-1897, 120 
acres in CD 25. 

DB 8:573-574, Samuel Anderson to R. H. Wood, 3-31-1857, 
120 acres with the description as DB 5:378-379. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 25, R. H. W. , R. H. Wood. 

Simon Miller 

DB H:144-145, Simon Miller, Jr., to Robert Thompson, 
11-12-1809, 320 acres on the East Fork of Stones River. 

DB N: 321-325, Robert Thompson, procession of land, 
11-16-1820, 320 acres on Caffrey's Spring Branch. The deed 
includes a plat of survey. 

DB X:422, Survey of Robert Thompson's land, 1-4-1839, 
320 acres on the waters of the East Fork of Stones River 
including Caffrey's Spring Branch. 

Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court Clerk's 
Office, Record Book 12, p. 544, Robert Thompson, deceased, 
will, 12-22-1843, 320 acres; all land was deeded to wife, 
Ann Thompson; and children, Joseph, Mary, Moses, Ann Jones, 
Elizabeth Brown, and Robert Thompson. Hereafter referred 
to as RB. 



242 



APPENDIX C 



DB 17:228-229, A. Jones and wife, Ann Jones, to Moses 
Thompson, 1869, 1/6 interest in tract of father, Robert 
Thompson in CD 22. 

DB 17:141-142, Francis Moore and wife, Nancy Moore 
(daughter of Elizabeth Brown) , to Moses Thompson, 3-28-1870, 
1/4 of 1/6 interest. 

DB 19:383, Robert Thompson and Moses Thompson, 5-31-1871, 
53 acres. The deed mentions a big road on the boundary of 
the tract. 

DB 19:386-387, Moses Thompson, Robert Thompson, and Mary 
Thompson, partition of land by commissioners, 10-9-1873, 
267 acres, plat map included in the deed. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 22, M. Thompson. 

Nimrod Minifee 

DB K: 144-145, Nimrod Minifee to Frederick Lester, 
10-15-1814, 171 acres on both sides of the West Fork of 
Stones River. 

DB M:2, Nimrod Minifee to Roger Quails, 6-10-1817, 205 
acres on the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB L:406, Frederick Lester to William Mitchell, 10-1-1818, 
171 acres on both sides of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB P:282, William Mitchell to Samuel McFadden. The deed 
book is missing. 

DB 9:199-200, D. D. Wendel to James M. Collier, 
12-4-1852, 115 acres. The deed mentions Mrs. McFadden ' s 
dower and the West Fork of Stones River at a spring. 

DB 16:145-146, James M. Tompkins, Administrator for 
Collier, to N. C. Collier, 10-1866, 115 acres on the West 
Fork. 

DB 19:170, N. C. Collier to James T. Leech, 4-10-1873, 
115 acres on the West Fork of Stones River in CD 9. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, Leach. 

James Moore 

DB N: 83-84, James Moore to Mordaci Lillard, 6-24-1820, 
72 acres on the waters of Bushnell's Creek where Moore lived. 

DB 2:443, Mordaci Lillard to Warren Moore, 3-18-1846, 
45 acres on Bushnell's Creek in CD 21. 

DB 15:280, Warren Moore to John Pitt, 12-24-1867, 60 
acres in CD 21. 

DB 16:354, Ben W. Moore for Warren Moore, deceased, to 
John Baird, 11-4-1868, 286 acres. John Pitt's land was 
located to the north of the 28 6 acres. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 21, J. Pitt. 

Lodwick Moore 

DB L:501, Lodwick Moore to Archibald Moore, 2-17-1818, 
125 acres on the waters of the West Fork of Stones River. 



243 



APPENDIX C 



DB 0:97, Archibald Moore to Nathaniel Winston, 8-17-1821, 
125 acres on the waters of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 10:60, Samuel Winston, Administrator for Nathaniel 
Winston, to S. W. Morgan, 12-30-1858, 125 acres in CD 11. 

DB 10:61, S. W. Morgan to Joseph Watkins , 12-3-1858, 134 
acres in CD 11. The deed mentions a road on the south bound- 
ary line. 

DB 17:356-357, Joseph Watkins to Samuel B. Watkins, 
11-18-1870, 215 acres in CD 20. The deed mentions a dirt 
road leaving the Nashville, Murf reesboro , and Shelbyville 
Turnpike at the Walnut Grove Methodist Church and the Mur- 
f reesboro and Middleton dirt road. 

DB 17:357-358, Joseph Watkins to M. L. Fletcher, 
11-18-1870, 215 acres in CD 20, part of the tract on which 
Watkins lived. The deed mentions the public dirt road from 
the Shelbyville Turnpike to where Daniel Alexander lived. 

DB 17:481-482, Joseph Watkins to J. W. Watkins, 
1-13-1871, 33 acres. The deed mentions a road from Johnson's 
Mill to the Murf reesboro and Shelbyville Turnpike. 

DB 20:207, John Woods, Trustee to Margaret Watkins, 
5-19-1874, 50 acres in CD 20. The deed mentions the same 
road as in DB 17:481 and the mansion, outhouses, gin, and 
other buildings known as the Joseph Watkins homeplace. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 11 and 20, J. Watkins. 

James Morton 

DB R: 24 5-24 6, James Morton to James and Joseph Morton, 
10-11-1827, 97 acres on the Rocky Branch of Stewart's Creek. 

DB X:695, James Morton to Benjamin Batey and others, 
4-17-1840, 780 acres on the Rocky Fork of Stewart's Creek. 

Cemetery Records 1:85, James Morton, 11-25-1785 to 
4-10-1843, Morton Cemetery, Smyrna Quad., USGS Map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 4 , W. B. Batey. 

Mathias B. Murfree 

DB W:364, Mathias B. Murfree to William D. Baird, 
2-2-1827, 8 acres one mile east of Murf reesboro on the north 
side of the stage road leading to Readyville, part of a 
tract on which Murfree lived. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 13 and 21, one mile east 
of Murf reesboro. 

Murfree 's Spring 

Map of Rutherford County, Murf reesboro insert, northwest 
of the junction of the Bradyville and Manchester Turnpikes. 

Thomas Nash 

DB R:458-459, Thomas Nash to Dennis Holden, 7-13-1822, 
100 acres. 



244 

APPENDIX C 

DB R:459-460, Thomas Nash to Dennis Holden, 1-1-1825, 
100 acres on Panther Creek. 

DB 1:487, Dennis Holden and wife, Sarah Nash Holden, to 
Azariah Kimbro, 11-20-1843, 244 acres on the waters of 
Panther Creek, the same tract on which Thomas Nash lived at 
the time of his death. 

DB 5:615, Azariah Kimbro to John B. Kimbro, 9-6-1852, 
439 acres in CD 14 which included part of the old Nash tract. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 14, Kimbro Est. 

William Nash's Mill 

DB H:37, William Nash, James Jackson, and Washington 
Jackson to James Merry, 6-25-1810, 231 acres on the south 
side of Spring Creek beginning where a part of Falling Creek 
entered into Spring Creek, and one acre on the north side 
of Spring Creek beginning near the old mill dam. 

DB H:66, William Nash to John Johnson, 11-16-1809, 100 
acres. The deed mentions the old road leading from Stones 
Lick to Cummins 's Mill, and the road from McBride's ford to 
the sink hole spring. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 1 and 5, G. Mill on Spring 
Creek. 

Maj. John Nelson 

DB X:660, John Nelson to Amizi Jones, 12-26-1839, 80 
acres on Stewart's Creek. The mill was located on Nelson's 
northern boundary line. 

DB X:661-662, John Nelson to Aquilla Davis, 12-26-1839, 
175 acres on Stewart's Creek, except for 1/4 acre including 
the family graveyard. The deed mentions a road and bridge 
on Nelson's southern boundary. 

DB X:658-659, John Nelson to Jackson Smith, 12-26-1839, 
136 acres on Stewart's Creek. The deed mentions a bridge 
located on Nelson's southern boundary line. 

Cemetery Records 1:96, Nancy T. Nelson, wife of John 
Nelson, 11-14-1799 to 12-3-1840, Nelson-Peebles Cemetery, 
Smyrna Quad. , USGS Map. The cemetery is located 3/4 mile 
south of 1-24 and Almaville Road overpass on Mile Lane on 
the west side of Stewart's Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 4 and 7 in the vicinity 
of Stewart's Creek Seminary and J. Brown's Mill. 

Nelson's Mill 

DB X:660, John Nelson to Amizi Jones, 12-26-1839, 80 
acres on Stewart's Creek including the mill. 

DB Z:458-459, Amizi Jones to Samuel Hogg, 4-5-1842, 184 
acres on Stewart's Creek. The deed mentions mill dam of 
H. White. 

Map of Rutherford County, possibly CDs 4 and 7, J. A. 
Dillin, "Riverside." 



245 
APPENDIX C 



Henry Norman and Norman's Mill 

DB 2:312, Henry Norman to William Poindexter and others, 
11-10-1845, 7 acres in CD 18 for a Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church on the stage road from Murfreesboro to Manchester. 

DB 5:577, R. D. McCullough, Henry Norman, Pritchett 
Alexander to Henry Norman, R. D. McCullough, J. L. Miller, 
Trustees of the Union Hill Academy, 7-17-1852, 3 acres in 
CD 11. 

DB 15:188, Henry Norman to S. H. Miller, 10-25-1867, 
281 acres in CD 18. The deed refers to William Snell, Mrs. 
Malissa Snell, J. F. Henderson as being on the boundary of 
the tract. 

DB 18:194-195, Norman heirs to Dr. T. J. Elam, 12-29-1871, 
133 acres on the east fork of the West Fork of Stones River 
and one acre reserved for a graveyard. 

DB 20:458-459, E. A. C. Norman and others, heirs of Henry 
Norman, Sr., to Henry Norman, 12-29-1871, 79 acres in CD 18. 

DB 21:172, E. A. C. Norman and others to Logan J. Nelson 
and Robert L. Norman, 9-19-1875, quit claim right to the mill 
seat known as Norman's Mill. The heirs received the mill 
from Henry Norman, who did not execute a deed to Nelson and 
Norman including a blacksmith shop. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, church southeast of 
tollhouse, H. Norman, Union Hill Academy, Dr. T. J. Elam, 
and Norman and Bro. Grist Mill. 

James Norman 

DB H: 242-243, James Norman to Thomas Lane, 3-13-1812, 
100 acres on the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 1:110, Thomas Lane to Samuel Gillispie. The deed 
book is missing. 

DB N:406, Samuel Gillispie to Hugh Kirk, 9-20-1819, 75 
acres. Hugh Kirk on 2-17-1817 purchased a tract of land on 
the west side of the West Fork of Stones River from James 
Norman and John Johnston. Gillispie to Kirk, quit claim. 

DB 7:27-28, B. Templeton and wife to John J. Kirk, 
6-15-1854, 82 acres of the estate of Hugh Kirk. 

DB 11:338, J. J. Kirk to Robert P. Smith, 2-9-1860, 
130 acres consisting of the dower of Jane Kirk, deceased. 

DB K:163, James Norman to James Jones, 2-7-1815, 91 
acres on the east side of Stones River adjacent to tracts of 
land of Pritchett Alexander. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 18 and 25, R. P. Smith, 
and refer to Pritchett Alexander in this appendix. 

Isaac H. Overall 

DB L:293, Isaac H. Overall to John Smith, 6-17-1818, 100 
acres on both sides of Overall's Creek. 

DB 0:132, John Smith to Thomas Johnson, 1821, 54 acres 
on Overall's Creek, part of the tract granted to William 
Overall and transferred to Isaac H. Overall. 



2^6 



APPENDIX C 



DB S:555, Thomas Johnson to William Clark, 8-12-1830, 
107 acres in the waters of Overall's Creek. 

DB X:206, William Clark to George W. Becton, 8-1-1838, 
105 acres on the waters of Overall's Creek. 

DB 2:376, George W. Becton to Levi Wade, 1-12-1846, 
105 acres on the waters of Overall's Creek. 

DB 14:547, Levi Wade to Alfred Miller, 2-26-1867, 36 
acres in CDs 7 and 9 and on Overall's Creek. The deed men- 
tions the Asbury Meeting House Road. 

DB 16:382, Levi Wade to John L. McGregor, Joseph D. 
McGregor, William A. McGregor, and Ransford P. McGregor, 
5-24-1869, 111 acres in CD 7, bounded on the south by Asbury 
Church. The land was purchased by Wade of Isaac Overall's 
estate. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 7 and 9, Asbury Church, 
R. McGregor. 

John Overton 

DB 0:232-233, John Overton to Isaac Miller, 2-17-1822, 
two tracts — 320 acres and 50 acres on Long Creek, waters of 
the east fork of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 2:180-183, Isaac Miller, deceased, division of land, 
3-22-1845. Lot 1 to heirs of Jane Johnson, deceased. The 
deed mentions the Nashville and Stone Fort Road as being the 
west boundary of Overton's 82-acre survey. Lot 2 to Albert 
Kelly, 18 acres. The Stone Fort Road and the southwest 
corner of Overton's survey are mentioned in the deed. Lot 3 
to Mary Ann Miller, 8 acres. The deed mentions a branch on 
the southern boundary of the Overton survey. Lot 5, James 
Nichol was deeded 160 acres. The deed mentions Long Creek 
and Overton's southern boundary. 

DB 5:211, James Nichol and wife to J. P. Miller, 
9-20-1851, 50 acres in CDs 20 and 25 on Long Creek at the 
mouth of Henry's Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 20 and 25, J. P. Miller 
and F. G. Miller. 

Capt. Nathaniel Perry 

DB 0:78-80, Nathaniel Perry and Nancy Perry to Thomas R. 
Ivey and H. Holmes, division of land, 3-1821. Both Perry, 
Ivey, and Holmes were joint tenants of land claimed under a 
deed of Sarah Liddon. Sarah Rutledge Liddon was the mother 
of Nancy Perry and Thomas R. Ivey, 5-12-1817, 505 acres on 
the West Fork. The deed mentions a wagon ford, house where 
Nathaniel Perry lived, and a road on the east boundary of 
the Liddon Survey. 

DB X:345-346, Nathaniel Perry and wife to John P. Heare, 
4-5-1839, 164 acres on the waters of the east fork of the 
West Fork, part of a tract that Perry lived on. The deed 
mentions an old road from Perry's house to Murf reesboro. 



247 



APPENDIX C 



DB 2:514, Nathaniel Perry to William H. Hallyburton, 
5-12-1846, 6 acres. 

DB 2:602-603, Nathaniel Perry to William H. Hallyburton, 
3-14-1845, 81 acres on the east fork of the West Fork. 

DB Y: 156-157, John P. Heare to Thomas N. Wendel , 
11-10-1840, 162 acres on the east fork of the West Fork. 

DB 1:389-390, Thomas N. Wendel to William H. and R. 
Hallyburton, 11-11-1843, 162 acres on the east fork of the 
West Fork. 

DB 7:583, R. P. Hallyburton and John E. Hallyburton to 
James M. Avent, 11-13-1855, 228 acres in CD 18 on the waters 
of the main West Fork of Stones River. The deed mentions 
the Murfreesboro and Millersburg Road and the Ivie tract. 

DB 8:507, James M. Avent to W. W. Ransom, 2-7-1857, 283 
acres in CD 18, having the same description as DB 7:583. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, Dr. Ransom, T. Hill. 

Bennett Philips 's Horse Mill 

DB Q:99, Bennett Philips to Benjamin Davis, 7-24-1823, 
9 acres. The deed mentions a road from Charles McLean to 
Murfreesboro . 

DB 8:602, Samuel Philips to R. B. McLean, 10-7-1853, 
194 acres. Samuel Philips was an executor for Bennett 
Phillips. The acreage was located in CD 14 on the west bank 
of the West Fork. The deed mentions the Columbia Road and 
the Nashville Road. 

DB 9:91, Robert B. McLean to John W. Wadley, 8-19-1857, 
124 acres in District on the West Fork, The deed mentions 
the Old Nashville Road. 

DB 13:326, John W. Wadley to A. G. Whitman, 11-1865, 124 
acres in CD 14 on the West Fork. The deed mentions the Old 
Nashville Road. 

DB 14:122-123, Albert G. Whitman to John Wadley, Trustee, 
11-1865, 124 acres in trust for Wadley's wife. 

DB 17:127-128, Copy of the decree of the chancery court 
vesting title in B. B. Spence and Felix G. Miller, Adminis- 
trators vs. John W. Wadley, 12-1-1869, 249 acres in CD 14. 
The deed mentions a road from Shelbyville to Nashville. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 14, B. Spence, H. Hoods. 

Gen. Robert Purdy 

DB K:479-480, Robert Purdy to Alpha Kingsley, 7-15-1813, 
1,184 acres between the East and the West Fork of Stones 
River, 3 or 4 miles south of Jefferson, including houses, 
outhouses, buildings, and ways. 

DB K:537, Alpha Kingsley to Ebenezer MacGowen, 3-14-1817, 
1,184 acres between the East and West Fork of Stones River. 

DB V:407, Ebenezer MacGowen to Thomas MacGowen. The 
deed book is missing. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, L. H. Martin, B. Ridley, 
W. H. Adams. 



24S 



APPENDIX C 

Lemuel Reed's Blacksmith Shop (two locations) 

DB S; 242-243, Lemuel Reed to William S. Butler, 6-16-1830, 
140 acres on the waters of the West Fork of Stones River. 
The deed mentions a road from Nashville to Shelbyville. 

DB 3:355, William S. Butler to Henry Hall, 1-10-1848, 270 
acres on the waters of the West Fork in CD 11. Land included 
except for 1/2 acre for a church of the Baptist Society. 

DB 19:587, Rutherford County Court to W. R. Butler and 
others, 1-5-1871, dower of Nancy Butler, widow of W. S. 
Butler in CD 11. The deed has a plat of survey. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, vicinity of Mrs. N. 
Butler. 

(second location) 

DB 0:56, Lemuel Reed to Azariah Kimbro, 1-18-1821, 117 
acres on the waters of Panther Creek. 

DB S:254-255, Lemuel Reed to Benjamin Belt, 7-31-1830, 
103 acres on the headwaters of Armstrong's Branch. 

DB 5:285-286, Lemuel Reed to Daniel Keith, 7-31-1830, 
175 acres on Armstrong's Branch. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, T. B. Snell, T. B. S., 
C. Kimbro. 

Charles Ready's Mill 

Map of Rutherford County, Cannon County, vicinity of 
B. C. Talley. 

Isaiah Renshaw 

DB K:42, Isaiah Renshaw to John Renshaw, 3-3-1814, 116 
acres on the waters of the East Fork of Stones River where 
John Renshaw resided. The deed mentions a road from 
Renshaw 's to Charles Ready. 

DB S:37, George Uselton to Christopher Hoover, 10-18-1828, 
116 acres on the East Fork of Stones River, same description 
as K:42. Acreage was part of land granted to Isaiah Renshaw. 

DB Z:427, Christopher Hoover to Simeon Peck, 7-14-1842, 
116 acres. The deed mentions a road from Readyville to 
Shelbyville. 

DB 2:395, Simeon Peck to T. T. Peay, 11-30-1845, 116 
acres with the same description as DB Z:427, 

DB 8:582, T. T. Peay to James H. Dickins, 4-6-1857, 110 
acres in CD 19 on Charles Ready's southern boundary. The 
deed mentions a road from Readyville that ran in a southerly 
direction and the Hall of Independence Order of Oddfellows. 

DB 9:579-580, J. H. Dickins to A. D. McKnight, 5-11-1857, 
173 acres in CD 19 and the East Fork. The deed mentions the 
old Murfreesboro and Readyville Stage Road. 

DB 21:7-8, J. H. Dickins to Samuel Arnett, 11-21-1874, 
60 acres in CD 19. The deed mentions the Old Stage and 
Wilson Hill Road and the Old Jefferson Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 19, S. Arnett, Dr. J. H. 
Dickins, J. D. McKnight. 



249 



APPENDIX C 



Stephen Roach 

DB W:229, Stephen Roach and wife to Robert Orr , 3-2-1837, 
204 acres on the waters of Bradley's Creek. The property was 
located northeast of Robert McKorkle. 

DB 4:168, Robert Orr to Joseph A. Knox, 12-13-1845, 204 
acres in CD 16. 

DB 4:169, Joseph A. Knox to John Selridge, 10-1-1849, 
297 acres with the same description as DB 4:168, as there 
were two tracts. 

DB 5:325, John Selridge to George Furguson, 1-8-1852, 
404 acres including 204 acres mentioned in DB 4:169 in CD 16. 

DB 11:405-406, G. W. Furguson to D. D. Smith and others, 
11-3-1857, 2 acres on a turnpike near Milton in CD 16. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 16, vicinity of Mrs. S. J. 
Furguson. 

Hugh Robinson 

DB M:191, Hugh Robinson to Thomas Butler, 9-13-1819, 100 
acres on the west side of Overall's Creek. 

DB 10:599-600, Thomas Butler to T. 0. Butler, 12-20-1859, 
286 acres in three tracts in CD 12. The deed mentions a road 
from Salem Crossroads to Windrow's Campground, the Salem 
Turnpike, and the Columbia Road. 

DB 15:267, 0. H. Butler to W. A. Ransom, 12-19-1867, 140 
acres, the real estate of Thomas O. Butler. The deed men- 
tions the Nashville and Shelbyville Dirt Road. 

DB 18:373, William Butler vs. Thomas 0. Butler and 
others, 2-6-1872, W. L. Butler's share of the estate. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 12, vicinity of Mrs. B. 
Ransom, W. North, A. Pitts. 

Rock Springs; Rock Springs Church 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 4, Rock Springs Church. 

Robert Rogers 

DB R:232-233, Robert Rogers to John Andrews, 1-18-1827, 
72 acres on the northeast bank on the East Fork of Stones 
River. 

DB R: 227-228, John Andrews to Thurston Daniel, 7-28-1827, 
with the same description as DB R: 232-233. 

DB 1:349, Thurston Daniel to Peyton Shepard, 8-24-1843, 
45 acres in CD 19 on the East Fork of Stones River. 

DB 16:25, R. L. Parkinson and wife to George A. Daniel, 
5-5-1868, 196 acres in CD 19 bought at the sale of Thurston 
Daniel's land. 

DB 16:440, James M. Tompkins, Clerk and Master, to B. R. 
Bivins, 7-5-1869, 82 acres in CD 19, land of Thurston Daniel. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 19, B. A. Bivins. 



250 
APPENDIX C 

James Rucker 

DB M:6, James Rucker to Wilson Yandell, 9-19-1816, 300 

acres on the East Fork of Stones River near the Bear Branch. 

Cemetery Records 2:167, James Rucker, 12-25-1788 to 

9-27-1850, Rucker-Pitts Cemetery, Lascassas Quad., USGS Map. 

The cemetery is located 1-1/2 miles east of US 231 on 
Veterans Hospital Road. 

Samuel Rucker (possibly two individuals; Colonel Rucker on 
Sinking Creek and Samuel Rucker ' s Mill) 

DB U:19, Samuel R. Rucker to Christopher Acklin, 3-1834, 
15 acres south of Reading Blount's large survey. (Refer to 
Reading Blount.) 

DB U:358, Samuel R. Rucker to Willis Barker, 10-8-1835, 
7 acres south of Reading Blount's large grant. (Refer to 
Reading Blount.) 

DB W:370, Samuel R. Rucker to James S. Jetton, 8-28-1837, 
4 acres south of Blount's survey. (Refer to Reading Blount.) 

DB 1:305, S. R. Rucker to Mordicai Lillard, 7-17-1843, 
9 acres south of Blount's large survey on Bushnell's Creek. 

DB 8:219, John S. Wright and others to John Baird, 
6-23-1856, 100 acres. Wright was trustee for Mary T. Rucker, 
wife of Samuel Rucker. Land was located on Bushnell's Creek. 
The deed mentions the Readyville Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 21, Mrs. A. Johnson, Spence 
estate. 

DB 14:106, Samuel J. Rucker to James F. Neil, 3-5-1866, 
180 acres in CD 22 on the East Fork of Stones River. 

DB 14:382, James F. Neil to William F. M. Betty, 
11-27-1866, 180 acres in CD 22 on the East Fork. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 21, Mrs. S. Rucker, J. Neil 
estate; CD 15, William F. M. Betty. 

Thomas Rucker 

DB K: 41-42, Thomas Rucker to the Deacons of Baptist 
Church, 5-8-1813, 2 acres for a church near Cummins ' s Mill 
on the East Fork of Stones River. The deed mentions that the 
church was near Abbott's Mill and a public road. 

DB K:76, Thomas Rucker to Philip S. Lowe, 7-10-1814, 
9 acres near Cummins ' s Mill on a bluff. 

DB L:5-6, Thomas Rucker to John M. Tilford, 12-31-1816, 
500 acres on the East Fork of Stones River excluding land 
for a Baptist Meeting House. 

DB R:194, Thomas Rucker to Edmund Rucker, 2-10-1826, 400 
acres on the north side of the East Fork at the mouth of a 
spring branch. 

DB S:97-98, Thomas Rucker to Samuel P. Black, 1-3-1829, 
12 acres on the south side of the East Fork. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 9, 5, 15, W. F. T. Coleman, 
A. Overall, A. Searcy, Mrs. S. A. Anderson. 



2 51 



APPENDIX C 



Anderson Searcy 

DB R:472, Anderson Searcy to John Nelson, 12-26-1828, 
7 acres on Stewart's Creek. 

Cemetery Records 1:115, Anderson Searcy, 1780 to 1832, 
Clifford Cordell's farm, Smyrna Quad., USGS Map. The 
cemetery is located 250 yards east of Stewart's Creek, 1/2 
mile north of the overpass bridge over 1-24 on Baker Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 6, J. W. R. estate. 

William W. Searcy 

DB W:463, William W. Searcy, Sr., to Josiah Ferriss, 
Sr., 12-6-1837, 100 acres between the East and West Forks 
of Stones River. 

Cemetery Records 1:116-117, Col. William W. Searcy, 
1-1-1769 to 1-8-1846, Searcy Cemetery, Walter Hill Quad., 
on the East Fork of Stones River across from the Mona Boat 
Ramp. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, J. Louis, Mrs. L. Hunt. 

Bennett Smith 

DB E:81, William Lytle, Jr., to Ben Smith, 12-9-1805, 
670 acres. The land adjoined Samuel Campbell and Frederick 
Bar field on the West Fork. The deed mentions a road from 
Frederick Barfield to Nashville. (Refer to Samuel Campbell 
and Frederick Barfield in this appendix.) 

DB K:351, Bennett Smith to William H. Smith, 3-1-1816, 
350 acres on the West Fork of Stones River adjoining lands 
of Frederick Barfield and Samuel Campbell. 

DB K:337, Bennett Smith to Joseph D. Graves, 3-21-1816, 
105 acres on the West Fork adjacent to the lands of William 
E. Smith and Samuel Campbell. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, J. McCullough, R. D. 
Jamison. 

John Smith (two locations) 

DB 20:118, B. L. Rucker to J. P. McCulloch, 3-3-1873, 
168 acres in CD 5 on the waters of Fall Creek. This land 
was the dower of Mary McCulloch (formerly Mary Smith) , widow 
of John Smith. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 5, J. P. McCulloch. 
(second location) 

DB R:443, John Smith, deceased, division of land to John 
Smith and others, 12-3-1828, 1,494 acres on Overall's Creek 
and Armstrong's Branch. John Smith's heirs included John 
Smith, George W. Smith, R. H. Smith, L. R. Smith, E. H. F. 
Smith. A plat of survey is included in the deed. 

DB 2:278, Ephraim F. Smith to George W. Smith, 9-25-1845, 
315 acres on Overall's Creek known as the John Smith tract. 
The deed mentions John Smith's Springfield tract, the 
parsonage tract, and Fayette Burrus . 



252 



APPENDIX C 



Cemetery Records 3:125, John Smith, 1806 to 3-11-1825, 

and John Smith, 1-3-1810 to 5-9-18 , Washington Cemetery, 

Murfreesboro Quad., USGS Map. The cemetery is located on 
Manson Pike west of Overall's Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 7, G. W. Smith, F. W. 
Washington, G. W. Howse. 

Robert Smith (two locations) 

DB S: 172-173, John Smith to Samuel and Robert Smith, 
9-7-1829, 154 acres on John Coffee's north boundary. (Refer 
to John Coffee in this appendix.) 

DB M:332, Robert Smith to William Smith, 6-20-1818, 
451 acres on Falling Creek. 

DB R:167, Robert Smith to John Smith, 7-31-1826, 450 
acres on Fall Creek. The deed mentions the Jefferson Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 5, J. P. McCulloch. 

(second location) 

DB W: 344-345, Benjamin Johnson and the heirs of Robert 
Smith, Sr., deceased, division of land, 5-1835, 250 to 300 
acres located south of Nimrod Jenkins's land. (Refer to 
Nimrod Jenkins in this appendix.) 

DB K:417, Robert Smith to Swepson Sims and others, 
6-1-1816, 1 acre for a Methodist Episcopal Church on the 
road leading to Carr ' s Mill. It possibly was Salem Church. 

DB 2:247-248, Benjamin Johnson to William B. Lillard, 
8-5-1845, 250 acres. The deed mentions Mrs. Smith's grass 
lot and plantation as part of the land sold by Robert Smith 
to Henry Batts, DB 0:111. 

DB 2:610, Benjamin Johnson to Samuel B. Robinson, 
11-6-1845, 8 acres at Salem Crossroads. The deed mentions 
that the land was located north of the crossroads and the 
Murfreesboro and Columbia Road. The land was sold except 
for 1 acre for the Salem Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Cemetery Records 3:110, Robert Smith Cemetery, Murfrees- 
boro Quad., USGS Map. The cemetery is located 400 feet 
northeast of the intersection of the Eagleville Pike and 
Rucker Lane. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 11 and 12, Mrs. Smith, 
W. Lillard, and the Salem Church. 

Thomas B. Smith (three locations) 

DB S:278, Thomas Smith to James Avaret, 10-22-1830, 200 
acres on the west side of Overall's Creek at its mouth on 
the West Fork. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 6, vicinity of Florence 
Station. 

(second location) 

DB W:269, Thomas Smith to James F. Fletcher, 10-20-1830, 
40 acres on the West Fork of Stones River. The deed mentions 
the mouth of Kinnard's Creek. 



253 



APPENDIX C 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, vicinity of J. F. 
Fletcher, Jr. 

(third location) 

DB K:165, Thomas B. Smith to Joel Childress, 1-14-1815, 
186 acres where Thomas B. Smith lived on the West Fork of 

Stones River. -, ^^ • -, o 

DB 0:336, Anderson Childress, Executor of Joel Childress 
to Daniel Elam, 12-17-1821, 87 acres. The deed mentions 
Sarah Liddon's western boundary. (Refer to Sarah Liddon in 
this appendix.) 

DB R:302, State of Tennessee, Supreme Court errors and 
appeals, 1-1826, Enoch P. Connell and Silden Betts, com- 
plainants, heirs of Zachariah Betts, vs. Anderson Childress, 
Executor of the last will and testament of Joel Childress. 
The deed includes a plat of survey for Archibald Lytle, 
Joseph Rhodes, A. Miller, John Butler, John Elam, Daniel 
Elam, Lawrence Jetton. , . . 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 11, 13, and 18, vicinity 
of A. Miller, Mrs. M. B. Childress, J. W. Childress, and 
R. H. 

Will iam H. Smith 

DB R:360, William H. Smith to Charles Puckett , 8-20-1B2B, 

100 acres on the waters of Overall's Creek. 

DB W: 207-208, William H. Smith to Thomas Rideout, 
5-3-1837, 8 acres on Overall's Creek. 

DB 2:400, William H. Smith to Thomas Rideout, 2-2-1846, 
4 acres on the waters of Overall's Creek. The land's 
boundary passes through a graveyard. 

DB 5:461-462, William H. Smith to George W. Smith, 
3-27-1852, 47 acres in CD 7. The deed mentions the Spring- 
field tract and Overall's Creek. 

DB 5:462-463, William H. Smith to F. W. Washington, 
3-29-1852, 31 acres on Overall's Creek. 

DB 17-180, F. W. Washington and Theodore Smith, Executors 
of William H. Smith to L. J. Smith, 12-16-1871, 203 acres on 
Overall's Creek. The deed mentions the Murfreesboro and 
Wilkinson's Crossroads Turnpike and the southern boundary of 
the Springfield tract. 

Cemetery Records 3:125, Gen. William Hunter Smith, 
12-25-1797 to 9-26-1871, Washington Cemetery, Murfreesboro 
Quad., USGS Map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 7, 11, 13, L. J. Smith, 
Puckett estate, T. Rideout, J. E. Manson. 

Willi am Smith 

DB K:224, William Gill to William Smith, 9-13-180y, 

1,280 acres on both sides of the West Fork of Stones River 
on the Military or Continental Line. 



254 

APPENDIX C 



DB 1:242, Stephen W. Malone to Young Davis, 5-1-1843, 
3.27 acres on the West Fork on the commissioners' line. This 
property was the same land conveyed by William Gill to 
William Smith. 

DB 10:432, Young Davis to M. H. Alexander and B. D. 
Fletcher, 9-2-1859, 327 acres on the commissioners' line on 
the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB 14:80, M. H. Alexander to Elizabeth Alexander 
Fletcher, deed of gift, 12-9-1865, 327 acres in CD 11 on the 
West Fork of Stones River. The deed mentions Samuel Patter- 
son's boundary line. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 11, Miss M. J. and B. F. 
Alexander, B. D. Fletcher. 

William Thomas 

DB S:253-254, William Thomas to John B. McKee, 3-20-1829, 
100 acres. 

DB W:220-221, John B. McKee to James McKee, Sr., 
1-10-1836, 100 acres. 

DB 8:279-280, James McKee to William A. McKee, 6-16-1856, 
164 acres in CD 17. 

DB 5:726, William Thomas and others, heirs of William 
Thomas, to G. W. Thomas, 11-6-1852, 260 acres in CD 16, 
south of Bradley's Creek. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 17, W. A. McKee, G. W. 
Thomas. 

John Thompson 

DB L:331, John Thompson to John D. Newgent, 3-1-1817, 
10 acres on the west side of the West Fork of Stones River, 
south of David Dickinson. 

DB L:355, John D. Newgent to Joshua Haskell, 3-5-1817, 
12 acres with the same description as DB L:331. 

DB 0:51, Joshua Haskell to David Dickinson, 10-14-1819, 
12 acres with the same description as DB L:331. (Refer to 
David Dickinson in this appendix.) 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 13, Dr. N. Barclay. 

Robert Thompson 

DB N: 321-325, Robert Thompson, procession of land, 
11-16-1820, 320 acres. A plat of survey is included in the 
deed. 

DB X:422, Survey of Robert Thompson's land, 1-4-1839, 
320 acres on the waters of the East Fork of Stones River. 

RB 12:544, Robert Thompson, deceased, will, 12-22-1843, 
320 acres. All land was deeded to his wife, Ann Thompson; 
and children, Joseph, Mary, Moses, Ann Jones, Elizabeth 
Brown, and Robert Thompson. 



255 



APPENDIX C 



DB 17:228-229, A. Jones and wife, Ann Jones, to Moses 
Thompson, 1/6 interest in the tract of father, Robert 
Thompson in CD 22. 

DB 17:141-142, Francis Moore and wife, Nancy Moore 
(daughter of Elizabeth Brown) to Moses Thompson, 3-28-1870, 
1/4 of 1/6 interest. 

DB 19:383, Robert Thompson and Moses Thompson to Mary 
Thompson, 5-31-1871, 53 acres. The deed mentions a big 
road on the boundary of the tract. 

DB 19:386-387, Moses Thompson, Robert Thompson, and 
Mary Thompson, partition of land by commissioners, 10-9-1873, 
267 acres. The deed includes a plat of survey. 

Cemetery Records 2:176, Robert Thompson, 3-9-1774 to 
1-16-1844, Thompson Cemetery, Lascassas Quad., USGS Map. 
The cemetery is located 1/4 mile on Compton Road from 
Lascassas Road. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 22, M. Thompson and J. Pitts 

William Trail 

DB U:353, William Trail to George Comer, 12-22-1834, 5 
acres on the headwaters of Overall's Creek and on Trail's 
Spring Branch. 

DB 4:533, William Trail to F. G. and W. Trail, 5-29-1850, 
107 acres in CD 10. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 10, G. Comer. 

Henry Trott's Mill 

DB U:ll-12, Henry Trott via. Granville S. Crockett, 
Sheriff to Charles Anderson, 2-1834, 828 acres including 
Trott's Mill on the East Fork of Stones River. 

DB W:659, Charles Anderson to Isaac W. Bradshear and 
David M. Jarratt, quit claim, 4-21-1838, 828 acres including 
the mill seat where the grist and saw mill stood. 

DB W:673, David M. Jarratt and Isaac W. Bradshear to 
John Brown, 5-2-1838, 680 acres on the East Fork of Stones 
River. 

DB 11:27, John Brown to Ripps 0. and George A. Brown, 
6-3-1859, 207 acres and mill in CD 22. The deed refers to 
a road. 

DB 14:3-4, Ripps 0. Brown to J. N. Laughry, 12-2-1865, 
207 acres and the mill in CD 22. 

DB 15:365, J. N. Laughry to John Brown, 2-22-1868, 1/3 
interest in 207 acres and a mill. 

DB 17:252, George A. Brown to John Brown, 1869, 1/2 
interest in 207 acres in CD 22. 

DB 17:265, John Brown and others to Robert F. Brown, 
8-17-1870, 207 acres including mills and fixtures. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 22, F. G. and R. F. Brown, 
G. Mill. 



256 



APPENDIX C 



Dr ury Vaughn -, i c i o n t i c n 

DB L:170, Drury Vaughn to Peter Vaughn, 3-15-ibl/, ^'°^ 

acres on the south side of the road from David Abbott's Mill 
to the Cainy Fork and on the north side of the East Fork ot 

Stones River. ^ r,j • ,v 

DB X- 275-276, Peter Vaughn to John Hoover and Edwin A. 
Keeble, deed of trust, 2-12-1839, 470 acres on the north 
side of the East Fork adjoining the lands of William Matthews 
and Pleasant Merritt on the south, and the lands of Granville 
S. Pierce on the west, north, and east. 

DB Z:283, John Hoover and Edwin A. Keeble to James M. 
Murrell, 5-9-1842, 407 acres on the north side of the East 

Fork. ^ „ .^. 

DB 3:118, James M. Murrell to James P. Merritt, 

5-26-1847, 84 acres in CD 15. 

DB 3:119, James M. Murrell to Thomas Owen, 5-2-i»4/, 

126 acres in CD 15. . ^ „ w -3 q tqat 

DB 3-158, James M. Murrell to Isaiah Robinson, 3-9-l»4/, 

6 acres on the south side of the road from Pierce's Mill to 

Statesville and the turnpike. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 15, J. P. Merritt, W. B. 

Owen, and N. Owen. 

John Wade -, r, j lo loyin 

DB Y-204-205, John M. Wade to Richard Wade, 12-1840, 

interest in part of a tract of 351 acres on which John Wade, 
Sr., lived on the West Fork of Stones River. The deed men- 
tions a road. lo tt lo-rn 

DB 17-423-424, R. W. Wade to Henry H. Hicks, 12-il-ib/u, 
title bond for 94 acres in CD 9 on the Old Salem and Jeffer- 
son Road. u- V 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 6, 7, 9, H. H. HicKS, 
R. W. W., and R. W. Wade. C. M. Miles in CD 9. 

William Wade , ^ t, u ^, r, T^-iam 

DB 5:807 , William Wade and others to Rebecca 0. Eiara 

(Miller), 3-16-1839, 315 acres beginning on the northern 
boindary of the old Blount survey. (Refer to Reading Blount 

in this appendix.) ^ ^ tt i ^^r, 

DB 5:809, I. J. Miller and wife, Rebecca 0., to Wilson 

L. Watkins, 1-31-1853, 315 acres in CD 9. 

DB 14:516, John M. Tompkins, Executor of Wilson L. 

watkins, to W. A. and G. H. Wilkerson, Trustees for Mrs. 

Adeline W. Watkins, 12-22-1866, 180 acres in CD 9 on Dr . 

T. C. Black's boundary line. ^ ^ t7 t w:,-(-winQ 

DB 15:155, James W. Tompkins, Executor for W. L. Watkins, 

to M. B. Wade, 9-23-1867, 15 acres in CD 9 . watkins 

DB 16:577, James M. Tompkins, Executor for W. L. Watkins, 

to Julius C. wade, 1-26-1869, 187 acres in CD 9- The deed 

refers to a road from Neal's Mill to Pierce's Mill. 



257 



APPENDIX C 



Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, Dr. T. C. B., Mrs. A. 
Watkins . 

William Wallace 

DB U:107, William Wallace to Christopher Acklin, 
11-9-1833, 150 acres on the waters of Bushnell's Creek, 

DB 2:632, Christopher Acklin to Spotswood Black, 
10-30-1839, 110 acres on the road from Murfreesboro to James 
Fleming ' s Mill. 

DB 5:4, Spotswood Black to William J. Philips, 1-20-1851, 
110 acres in CD 21 on the road from Murfreesboro To Warren 
Moore's Mill. 

DB 5:431, William J. Philips to Ephraim F. Smith, 
3-23-1852, 292 acres on the road at James Fleming's south- 
west corner. 

DB 5:810-811, Ephraim F. Smith to Samuel Anderson, 
2-3-1852, 500 acres on the waters of Cripple Creek and the 
south bank of the East Fork of Stones River. The deed men- 
tions a road from Murfreesboro and the junction of two roads. 

DB 9:556-557, Samuel Anderson to William J. Anderson, 
8-2-1858, 425 acres on the south bank of the East Fork of 
Stones River. The deed mentions a road leading to Murfrees- 
boro, the junction of two roads, the road from the mouth of 
Cripple Creek to Murfreesboro, and the Old Jefferson Road. 

DB 10:109-110, William J. Anderson to John A. James, 
1-5-1859, 425 acres in CD 22 with the same description as 
DB 9:556-557. 

DB 16:324-325, John James to E. B. and J. R. Fathera , 
3-21-1869, 425 acres with the same description as DB 9:556. 

DB 19:76-77, E. B. Fathera to J. R. Fathera, 2-22-1873, 
1/2 interest in 425 acres in CD 22. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 22, J. R. Fathera. 

Col. Robert Weakley 

DB 9:110-111, A. M. McKnight, Sheriff, to E. H. Child- 
ress, 9-19-1857, 580 acres. An undivided interest in the 
tract of land in which Robert L. Weakley's mother's dower 
was transferred. The land was in CD 6. It was adjacent to 
the lands of Mrs. Ralston on the south, Mrs. Muse on the 
east, J. H. Charlton on the north, and John Monson on the 
west. It was the tract on which Robert Weakley died. 

DB 14:1, Moseph W. Davis and wife, Mary Jane Weakley 
Davis, to Hickman Weakley, 12-11-1865, interest in 800 acres 
in CD 2 on both sides of Stewart's Creek with the dower of 
Enlosa Weakley. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 2 and 6, H. Weakley, 
S. Weakley, F. Weakley, and J. Davis. 



25a 



APPENDIX C 



Stephen White 

DB 8:369-370, Stephen White to Burrel G. White, 2-5-1831, 
several tracts of land — 550, 100, and 24 acres. 

DB 4:446, Burrel G. White to John F. Rowland, 8-19-1846, 
100 acres on the waters of the east fork of the West Fork of 
Stones River. 

DB 5:140-141, Burrel G. White to Burrel P. Johnson, 
2-22-1851, 111 acres in CD 25 on a road. 

DB 13:167, B. G. White to B. N. White and Franklin White, 
7-8-1865, 70 acres in CD 25. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 25, F. White, B. M. White. 

Col. James Wilson 

DB L: 389-390, James Wilson's executors to Logan Hender- 
son, 8-25-1818, 635 acres on Lytle's Creek. 

DB T:305, Logan Henderson to John Lawrence. The deed 
book is missing. 

Cemetery Records 2:102, Edgar Pearson, infant son of 
James and A. M. Wilson, 1844-1849, Kelton Cemetery, Dilton 
Quad. , USGS Map. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 18, J. F. Henderson and 
J. Lawrence. 

Samuel Wilson 

DB H:241, Samuel Wilson to Wilson Kerr, 4-7-1812, 128 
acres on the west side of the West Fork of Stones River. 

DB H:54-55, Samuel Wilson to Samuel McFadden, 3-15-1819, 
16 acres on the west side of the West Fork. 

DB R:260, Samuel Wilson to Samuel McFadden, 8-29-1826, 
42 acres on the West Fork. 

DB S:380, Samuel McFadden to John Covington, Jr., 
10-1-1828, 33 acres on the west side of the West Fork. 

DB X: 574-575, John Covington to Varner D. Cowans, 
2-12-1840, 131 acres on the West Fork of Stones River north 
of the Nashville, Murf reesboro, and Shelbyville Turnpike. 

DB 21:144, J. W. Sparks, Clerk and Master of the county 
court, for R. D. Jamison, Executor of V. D. Cowens, deceased, 
to the United States, 5-5-1875, land for the Hazen Monument. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 9, National Cemetery. 

Isaac Wright's Mill 

DB H:417-418, Isaac Wright to Jesse Brashear, 2-14-1810, 
176 acres on the south side of the East Fork of Stones River 
including the dwelling house and improvements. The deed 
mentions a road from Isaac Wright to Brashear ' s and a road 
from Isaac Wright to the Old Jefferson Road. 

DB 7:259, Isaac Wright to Gideon B. Hall, 1-11-1855, 10 
acres in CD 19 with all the machinery and property belonging 
to the mills on the south side of the river and the cotton 
gin on the north side. 



259 



APPENDIX C 



DB 7:440, Gideon B. Hall to John W. Hall, Trustee, 
7-9-1855, 10 acres on the East Fork including the mills and 
gin in CD 19. 

Map of Rutherford County, CDs 17 and 19, J. W. Hall and 
G. Mill . 

Capt. Richard Wright 

DB M: 264-265, Richard Wright to Nathaniel Winston, 
11-16-1819, two tracts--137 and 50 acres on the Rutherford 
and Bedford County lines and the waters of the West Fork. 

DB N: 56-57, Nathaniel Winston to George Clanton, 
5-27-1820, 137 acres on the waters of the West Fork on the 
Rutherford and Bedford County line. 

DB U: 35-36, George Clanton to Francis A. Houchner, 
12-16-1831, 111 acres on the waters of the Little West Fork. 

DB W: 52-53, Francis A. Houchner to Hicks Ellis, 
1-18-1837, 111 acres with the same description as U:35-36. 

DB 14:154, Hicks Ellis's executors to James J. Winsett, 
3-1-1866, 132 acres. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 14, J. Winsett. 

Francis Youree 

DB L:495, Francis Youree to George McDonald, 5-15-1819, 
100 acres on Cripple Creek and the military line. 

DB L:505, Francis Youree to William Neely, 5-13-1819, 
100 acres on the military line. 

DB 3:451-452, Francis Youree to John Neely, 12-13-1838, 
32 acres on the waters of Cripple Creek. 

DB 8:597-598, F. A. McKnight to Silas M. Youree, 
5-23-1855, tract located in CD 23 and was the one on which 
Francis Youree lived at his death. 

DB 19:209, S. M. Youree to B. M. Becton, 4-8-1873, 5 
acres in CD 23. 

DB 14:273, S. H. McKnight, A. B. Witherspoon and others 
to J. H. Neely, 1-30-1857, 161 acres in CD 23 on which John 
Neely died. The deed mentions the thirty-first mile tree 
of the military line as being on this property. This tree 
was also located on the property of DB L:505. 

DB 14:277, J. H. Neely to J. A. E. Neely, 1859, 161 
acres with the same description as DB 14:273. 

Cemetery Records 2:100, Elizabeth, wife of Francis H. 
Youree, 9-13-1828 to 1-16-1874, Youree Cemetery, Readyville 
Quad., USGS Map. The cemetery is located 1-7/8 miles west 
of the Cripple Creek Church. 

Map of Rutherford County, CD 23, S. Youree, B. Becton. 



260 



APPENDIX Q 

MAPS OF THE ROAD DEVELOPMENT IN 
RUTHERFORD COUNTY, 1804-1878 

In this appendix, road development in Rutherford 
County from 1804 to 1878 is shown by color coding on maps. 
One map depicts the county's public roads from 1804 to 1839, 
while another shows the turnpikes from 1830 to 1878. 

A third map, published by D. G. Beers and Company 
in 1878, depicts roads and lanes of Rutherford County. 
These roads and lanes are not documented by this thesis. 



26l 



APPENDIX D 



A MAP OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY'S PUBLIC ROADS, 
1804 TO 1839 




MAP LEGEND 



1809 
1810 - 1819 
1820 - 1829 



1830 - 1839 



APPENDIX D 



A MAP OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY'S TURNPIKES, 
1830 TO 1878 



262 




MAP LEGEND 



1830 - 1839 
1840 - 1849 
1850 - 1859 
1860 - 1869 
1870 - 1878 



263 



APPENDIX D 

A MAP OF ROADS ON THE 187 8 MAP OF RUTHERFORD 

COUNTY, PUBLISHED BY D. G. BEERS & COMPANY 

AND NOT DOCUMENTED BY THIS THESIS 




MAP LEGEND 



ROAD 
LANE 



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Executive Order 11593, Protection and Enhancement of the 
Cultural Environment . U. S. Code , Vol. 16, Supp. 1, 
(1971) . 

Map of Rutherford County, Tennessee . Philadelphia, Pa.: 
D. G. Beers and Co., 1878. 

Morris, Eastin. Tennessee Gazetteer . Nashville, Tenn. : 
W. Hasell Hunt and Co., 1834; reprint ed . , edited by 
Robert M. McBride and Owen Meredith, Nashville, Tenn.: 
Gazetteer Press, 1971. 

Murfreesboro (Tenn.) The Courier , 5 September 1832, p. 4. 

Nashville, Tennessee. Tennessee Historical Commission. 
Historic Preservation Survey of Rutherford County, 
Tennessee. Summer 1980. 

Nashville, Tennessee. Tennessee State Library and Archives 
Archives Section. Record Group 5. 

Nashville, Tennessee. Tennessee State Library and Archives 
Archives Section. Record Group 30, Box 8, Folder 12. 
J. C. Gooch to W. B. A. Ramsey, 1 October 1849. 

Nashville, Tennessee. Tennessee State Library and Archives 
Archives Section. Record Group 60, Box 9, Folder 12, 
John Dew, "Report in the Senate," 2 3 October 18 09. 

Nashville, Tennessee. Tennessee State Library and Archives 
Manuscript Section. Map Cabinet Number 1, Accession 
Number 919, "Notice," no date. 

National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 . U. S. Code , 
Vol. 16, sec. 470 (1966). 

North Carolina. An Act to Empower the County Courts of 

Pleas and QuaFter Sessions of the Several Counties in 
this State to Order the Laying Out [of] Public Roads 
and to Establish and Settle Ferries and to Appoint" 
Where Bridges Shall Be Built, and to Clear Inland 



265 



Secondary Sources 

Baskin, Robert W. , Sr. "1810 Census of Rutherford County, 
Tennessee." Murf reesboro , Tenn. , 1977. (Mimeographed.) 

Boniol, John Dawson, Jr. "The Walton Road." Tennessee 
Historical Quarterly 30 (Winter 1971) : 402-412 . 

Bracegirdle, Brian, ed. The Archaeology of the Industrial 
Revolution . Ganbury, N.J.: Associated University 
Presses, 1974. 

Corlew, Robert E. Tennessee: A Short History . 2nd ed. 

Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1981. 

Cossons, Neil. The BP Book of Industrial Archaeology . 
Oxford, England: Alden Press, 1975. 

Cowles, Calvin D. The Official Atlas of the Civil War . 
Washington, D.cTl Government Printing Office, 1895; 
reprint ed.. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1958. 

Crutchfield, James A. Early Times in the Cumberland Valley 
from its Beginnings to 1800 . Nashville, Tenn.: First 
American National Bank, 1976. 

Derry, Anne; Jandl, H. W. ; Shull, C. D. ; Thorman, J. Guide- 
lines for Local Surveys: A Basis for Preservation 
Planning ^ Washington, D.C. : Government Printing Office , 
1977. 

Folmsbee, Stanley John. Sectionalism and Internal Improve- 
ments in Tennessee 1795-1845 . Knoxville, Tenn.: East 
Tennessee Historical Society, 1939. 

Hughes, Mary B. Hearthstones; The Story of Historic 

Rutherford County Homes . Murfreesboro, Tenn.: Mid- 
South Publishing Co., Inc. 1942. 

Iroquois Research Institute. Archaeological and Historical 
Investigations for Energy Facilities; A State of the 
Art Report . Washington, D.C: Federal Power Commission, 
1977. 

Lane, Wheaton J. From Indian Trail to Iron Horse: Travel 
and Transportation in New Jersey 1670-1860 . Princeton, 
N.J. : Princeton University Press, 1939. 

Lay, K. Edward, and Pawlett, Nathaniel Mason. "Architectural 
Surveys Associated with Early Road Systems.: APT 
Bulletin, no. 2 (1980), pp. 3-36. 



266 



MacGill, Caroline E. History of Transportation in the United 
States Before 1860 . Forge Village, Mass.: Murphy 
Printing Co. , 1948. 

Myer, William E. Indian Trails of the Southeast . Washington, 
D.C.: Bureau of American Ethnology, 1924; reprint ed., 
Nashville, Tenn. : Blue and Grey Press, 1971. 

Newton, Milton B. , Jr., and Raphael, C. Nicholas. "Relic 
Roads of East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana." Geographic 
Review 61 (April 1971) : 250-264 . 

Page, Logan Waller. Roads, Paths and Bridges . The Farmer's 
Practical Library. New York: Sturgis and Walton Co., 
1913. 

Putnam, A. W. History of Middle Tennessee or Life and Times 
of Gen. James Robertson. Nashville, Tenn.: n.p., 1859; 
reprint ed. , Knoxville, Tenn. : University of Tennessee 
Press, 1971. 

Quinn, Yancey J., Jr. "Jackson's Military Road." The 

Journal of Mississippi History 41 (November 1979) : 335-350. 

Sims, Carlton C, ed. A History of Rutherford County . 
Murfreesboro, Tenn.: By the Author, 1947. 

Smotherman, Travis E. "Archaeological and Anthropological 
Aspects of the Prehistory of Rutherford County." 
Rutherford County Historical Society Publication , no. 3, 
(1974) , pp. 17-39. 

Taylor, George Rogers. The Transportation Revolut ion 1815- 
1860 . The Economic History of the United States, No. 4. 
New York: Rinehart and Co., Inc., 1951. 

Watson, Alan D. "Regulation and Administration of Roads and 
Bridges in Colonial Eastern North Carolina." North 
Carolina Historical Review 45 (Autumn 1968) : 399-417 . 

Wray, Henry G. Rutherford County, Tennesse e, Deed Abstracts 
Vol. 1 1804-1810 . Smyrna, Tenn.: By the Author, n.d. 

Wright, Russell. A Guide to Delineating Edges of Historic 
Districts . Washington, D.C.: Preservation Press, 1976. 

. Te chniques for Incorporating Histori c Preservation 

Objective's into the Highway Planning Process . Washington , 

D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1972. 



267 



Rivers and Creeks (1784), Laws of the State of North 
CaFolina (1791) , quoted in Clifford K. Shipton, ed . , 
Early American "imprints 1639-1800 (Worchester, Mass.: 
American Antiquarian Society, 1969) , Readex Microprint, 
Evans No. 23641 (5th cont.), pp. 532-533. 

Rutherford County, Tennessee, Cemeteries . 3 vols. 

Murfreesboro, Tenn. : Stones River Chapter SAR and 
Rutherford County Historical Society, 1975. 

Rutherford County, Tennessee. County Court Clerk's Office. 
Quarterly Court Minute Books A through Z, AA through II, 
1804 through 1878. 

Rutherford County, Tennessee. County Court Clerk's Office. 
Record Book 12. 

Rutherford County, Tennessee. County Register's Office. 
Deed Books A through Z and 1 through 21, 1804 through 
1878. 

Tennessee. Private Acts . 1832-1878. 

Tennessee. Public Acts . 1796-1878. 

Tennessee. Statutes of Tennessee 1858-1871 . Nashville, 
Tenn.: title page missing, 1871. 

True, J. C; Jackson, W. C; Davis, E. P.; Wharton, C. P.; 
and Sprouse, 0. G. Soil Survey of Rutherford County . 
Washington, D. C: Soil Conservation Service, [1977] . 

U.S. Department of the Interior. National Register of 

Historic Places Guidelines. "Criteria for Comprehensive 
Statewide Historic Surveys and Plans." Federal Register 
42, no. 183 (21 September 1977) , 47658-47665 . 

U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, 
Quadrangle Maps of Rutherford County, Tennessee. 

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Confederate Armies . Series 1, Volume 20, Parts 1 and 2. 
Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1891. 

Woods, Sam. Woods Veterinary Hospital, Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee. Interview, 26 May 1981. 





- 268 - 








INDEX 






ABBOTT: David 


202,219 


ARBUCKLE: Ralston 


98 


Major 


167 


wmiam 


96 


ABBOTT* 3 Mill 


I66,17li, 


ARMSTRONG: John W. 


89 

2U8 
228 


175,179,206, 216,226, 


ARNETT: Samuel 


250,256, 




ARNOLD: Edwin 


ACKLIN: Christopher 


205,250, 


Enoch 


209 




257 


James 


51 


ADCOCK: Dawson 


169 


John 


203,207 


John 


151,203, 
21h 


Peter 


150,15U,155, 
159,162,167, 


ADCOCK 's 


158 




192,206,209, 


ADAMS: Edward 


232 




210, 


George 


160 


Thomas 


220 


W. H. 


2U7 


wmiam, Jr. 


207 


ADKINS: George 


161,212 


Wimiam, Sr. 


198 


ALEXANDER: A. M. 


91,232 


ASBURY Meeting House 


177,178 


B, F. 
Elizabeth 


25Ii 

25U 


ATKINSON: ^. Cotton Gin 


22li,2U6 
178 


Horatio G. 


173 


AVANT: Abner 


208 


James 


159,169, 


James 


223 




210 


AVARET: James 


252 


Jesse 


172,173, 


AVENT: Janes M. 


2U7 




219,228 


AVERETT: — — — 


187 


John 


221 


AVERY: Peter 


13 


John D. 


91 


Samuel 


212 


M. H. 


25U 


AVlRY's Trace 


lU 


Miss M. J. 


25U 






Madison 


97 


BAIRD: William 


126 


Pritchett 


177,205, 


William D . 


233,23l*,2li3 




209,219,2ii5 


John 


96 


S. S. 


219 


BAKER: Hunqjhery 


165,220 


ALLEN: Rev. E. J. 


23U 


BANKHEAD: John 


203 


James 


19U 


BANTON: Lewis 


I5l,l5ii 


J. H. 


231 


BA-NTON's (Lewis) Ford 


20li 


Joseph 


198 


BANTON »s Ferry 


157,168,216 


R. J. 


223 


BAPTIST at Abbott Mill 


250 


ALLISON'S Mill 


lli2 


BAPTIST Society Church 


2li8 


ANDERSON: Caleb 


205 


BARCLAY: Dr. N. 


251i 


Charles 


239,255 


BARFIEID: 


lUi,2l8 


Charles' Shop 17U,220 


Frederick 


II12-II46, 


Henderson 


125,220 




Ili8-152,l5ii, 


H. I. 


112 




157,160-163, 


James L. 


232 




165,169,178, 


Mrs. M. J. 


239 




196-200,205, 


Samuel 


U7,2la,257 




208,210 


Mrs. S. A. 


250 


BARFTELD Meeting House 


17U 


William J. 


257 


BARFIEID 's Spring 


151 


William P. 


1U2 


BARFIEID: William 


170 


AI©RE^: David 


207 


BARK CAMP 


155,207 


John 


2U9 


BARKKH: Dollar son 


2liO 


ANTHONY: John 


160,211 


Willis 


250 


Lewis 


1U5,202,220 


BARKLEY: Andy 


221 


ANTHDNY's Mill 


17li,221,229 


John 


l5U,20li, 


ANT:-X)NY's Steam Mill 


109 




207,221 


ANTIOCH Meeting House 


79, 80 


BARKI£Y's Ford 


lii8 



- 269 - 



BARKSDALE: Nath 


209 


BERKI£Y: James 


52 


BARR: 


D. B. 


235 


BKKRY; Francis 


11*6 




Isaac 


197 


0. M. 


11*7 




Silas 


213 


BETHEL Meeting House 


I8U 


BARRENS; 


.. 


Ihh 


BETTS: Henry 


252 


BARRCW: 


Washington 


U9 


Silden 


253 


BARTON: 


David 


198 


Zachariah 


253 


BARTON: 


(Joshua) Spring 153 


BETTY; Qeorge 


91 




Joshiia 


52 


BEVEW: Widow 


lUi 


BASS: 


Benjamin 


221 


BKVINS; James 


59 




Miss Eliz. L 


221 


BIBLE'S Mill 


171 




James, Jr. 


221 


BIG CEDAR LICK 


llfi 




James J. 


228 


BIG SPRINGS 


108 




James M. 


150,1511,157, 


BILBRO: Doc 


109 






160,161,169, 


BILLAH: Moses 


210 






175,205,206, 


BILLESPIE: James 


156 






211,221 


BILLINGSIEY: 


17,193 




Robert 


212 


Bozel 


lla,lU5,193 




...... 


171* 


BINFORD; Joseph W. 


239 


BATEY: 


Ben 


93,113, 


BINEM; William 


165,215 






18U,2U3 


BINGHAM: A. J. 


111^ 




Thomas 


228 


BISHOP; John 


216 




W. B. 


2li3 


BIVINS: B. A. 


2U9 




William 


208 


B. R. 


% 


BATY: 


Chris 


52 


BUCK: John 


BATON: 


Maney 


197 


Samuel P. 


^- 175,221, 


BATTON: 


Presley F. 


237 




222,250 




J. Bo 


237 


Spotswood 


257 


BAUGH: 


J. A. 


95 


L. P. 


68, 96 




John H. 


108 


Thomas, Sr. 


126 


BEACH: 


Thomas C. 


112 


Thomas C. 


68,125, 


BEAN: 


Jessee 


25,lli0,lliU, 




221,222,226 






19U,221 


T. 


222 




John 


213, a6 


BLACK'S Shop 


18U 




Robert 


195 


BLACK FOX Camp 


Ili0,lia,ll4li, 


BEARD: 


William M. 


52 




11*5,11*7,152- 


BEARWDQE 


I's old Place 


98 




151*,162,173, 


BSASLEY: 


John J. 


232 




177,192,196- 


BEATY: 


Benjamin, Sr 


126 




198,200,201* 


BEG TON: 


B. B. 


259 




221,235 




George W. 


2U6 


BLACK FOX Spring 


16,159,210, 




Creek 


188 




221,226 


BEDFORD: 


; John R. 


236 


BLACK FOX Trail 


5- 7 




Thomas 


192-193 


BLACKJACK Trace 


6 


BEECH GROVE 


133 


BLACKMAN: Alfred 


93,206 


BEESLEY; 


Solomon 


198 


A. W. 


221 


BKT.T. BUCKLE Depot 


111 


James 


206,208 


BELL: 


James 


201,203 


BLANKS: Ingram 


156,161, 




John 


111 




208,222 




Robert 


112 


BLUE SPRING: 


229 




Samuel 


213 


BOLE; James 


153,161,201 


BELT; 


Benj 


2U8 


Hollow 


1U8 


B^GE: 


0. M. 


1U7,19U, 


BORING: Brown 


126 






200,201 


S. B. 


109,113 


BffllNETTi 


: Evans 


126 


BOS TICK: John C. 


229 




Joseph M. 


126,232 


Jonathan 


88 




M. T. 


68 


BOWEN's Ford 


ll*3,ll*U,195 



- 270 - 



BOVEN: 



Captain 

Joseph 

William 



BOWMAN: Joseph 

Maj Samuel's 

Samuel 

William 
Creek 

VJilliam H. 
bowman's Mill 



BOWLING GREEN 
BOWYER: Itenry 
BOYD: Robert 
BRACHEM: David 
BRAGG: Gen Braxton 
BRADFORD: Robert 
BRADLEY: John 
BRADLEY'S Mill 
BRADY: Frederick 

William 
BRIERY BRANCH 
BRANDON: Cornelius 

George 
BRAS 'EAR: Isaac W. 

Jesse 
BRITTON: John 
BROOKS: Isaac 
BROTHER: John 
BROWN: Elizabeth 

F. G. 
George A. 
Gumsey G. 
John 



Ripps 0. 

Robert F. 

W. B. 

Wiley 
BROWN'S (John) Bridge 
BROWN'S (J.) Mill 
BROWN'S Mill 

brown's Blockhouse 
BRUCHIN: David 
BRAWLEY: Hugh P. 
BRAWLEY's (Hugh P.) 
Mill 



161 

lli2 
1U3,11i5,11a6, 
163,176,193, 
195,196,198, 
199,20^,208, 
210,213,235 

lU5,2lU 

Mill 
179,222,223 

lli5,198, 

199,2i;3 
U6,2lli,223 

163,213 

223 

Ili8,lii9,l66, 

l68,17li-176, 

216,217,223 

80 

216 
110,193,195 

205 

120 

151,165 

192,209 

155,207 

20h 

236 
lUi;,lU5,197 

201 
52,193 

255 

98,258 
91 
I52,20li,223 

197 

2la,2U2, 

25U,255 

255 
255 
233 

135,152, 
155,156,193, 

207,223,255 

255 
255 
128 

113,2k!7 

92 
2142; 

180,182, 
183,255 
16 
205 
lWi,lli8,205 

lli8 ,153-155, 
contd 



BRAWLEY's Mill 



BRYANT: Needham 
BRYN: William 
BUCHANON: George 

Moses 
BUCHANAN'S Mill 
BUCKNER Mill 
BUNKLEY Ford 
BURNETT: Brooking 

George 

Robert 
BURNETT'S ( Brooking )Mill 

BURNS Horse Mill 
BURRUS: Col 

Fayette 

Joseph 
BURRUS Meeting House 
BURTON: Frank N. W. 

Gideon 

Gibson 

John W. 
BUSHNELL CREEX 
BUTLER: John 

Nancy 

Thomas 

Thomas 0. 

William 

W. L. 

W. R. 

W. S. 
BUTLER'S Glade 



165,166,169, 
201,205,207 
215 
203 
109 
193,212 

90 

91 
152 
226 

195,236 
213 
223 

Iii2,l50, 
156,208,22U 
170 
171 

182,251 
192 
177,1 78, 221; 

65,227 
153,195 
lli3 

67 

92,163 
253 
2ii8 
2li9 
99,100, 2U9 
2li9 
2U9 
2i;9 
239,21*8 

92 



CAIB: Andrew W. 
CAINSVILLE-Pleasant Valley 
Turnpike 

CAINSVILIE-Statesville 

Turnpike 
CAIDWELL: William 
CALHDUN: George 
CAMPBELL: E, H^Mrs. 

D. S. 

George E. 

J. H. 

Samuel 



158 
202 



w. w. 

CAflNON: Johra T. 

Gov. Newton 
CANNON Street 
CANTRELL: Ota 
CARNAKAN: Andrew 



173 

96, 97, 
I01i,107 

109,128 

126 

236 

22ii 

221; 

22li 

22li 
97,lU9, 
,161,165, 
,22U,251 

22U 

111 

U9, 55 
16U,215 
198 
177 



- 271 - 



CABNEST: 



CARR: 
CARR»8 



John S. 
Joseph 
L. H. 
W. J. 
Benjaraln 
(Ben) Mill 



CARROLL: 
CARSON: 
CARTER: 
CARTER' s 



Gov. William 
Robert 
MaJ. Samuel 



127 

51 

91, 9h 
226,236 
199 

1147,200, 
22U,252 

kh 
15U,205 

68 



CARIWRIGHT: Robert 
CASON: James M. 
CASTLE STREET 
CASWELL: Rich 
Widow 



(John) Stillhouse-170 
192 
126 
I7I4 
lli9,l5U,22U 
158 



William R. 

William 
CASWELL Creek 
CASWELL Plantation 
CASWELL Shoals 



CATHAY: Alex 
CAUFIEID: John 
CEDAR Creek 
CFJtfPELL: John 
CHARLTCW; J. H. 
CHERRY: James 

S. M. 
CHERRY'S (Isham) SavMlll 
CHICKAMAUGA Trace 
CHICKEN Road 
CHEIDRESS: Anderson 

Dr. 

E. H. 

Joel 

J. W. 

Mrs. M. B. 
CHRISMAN: George 
CHRISP: William 
CHRISTIANA 
CHRISTIANA Big Springs 

TTimplke lOB 

CHRISTIANA Dug Hollow 

Turnpike ^107,113,115, 

116,117,118 
CHRISTIANA Millersbtxrg 



202 
2UO 
22U 
161 
152 

157,162, 
167,212 
203 
226 
159 

230,23li 
257 
213 
23U 

159,216 
17 
18U 
253 
188 
257 
253 
253 
253 
126 
178 
108 



ClbCA 

CLANTCN: 

CLARK: 



Turnpike — 



George 

David 

John 

Robert 
Martin 



108,115, 
116,117 

5 
259 
201 

160,167, 
215,216 
215 
U6 



CLARK: William 

W. M. 
CLAYBROOK: John S. 
CLAYTON: Benjamin 
COCKE: Jarratt 
COCKRAN: James 
COFFEE: John 
COLEMAN: B. 

Blackman 
W. P. 
W. T. F. 
COLLIER: James M. 
Jesse 
N. C. 
collier's Creek 
COLONIAL North Carolina 
COLUMBIA 
COLVILLE: Lusk 
CCMER: Adam 

G. 
COMMERCIAL HOTEL 
CONN: Josiah 
CONNELL: Enoch P. 
CONNELLY: John W. 
COOK: Charolette 
Hezekial G. 
James H. 
John S. 
Joseph M, 
COOPER: May 

Thomas 
COPELAND: Saraufil M. 
CCKDELL: Clifford 
CORLEW: Robert 
COTHRAN: Philamon 
COTTER: William 
GOTTEN: C. 
COUNTS: John 
COVINGTON: John 
John, Jr. 
William 
William F. 
COWENS: Vamer D. 
COX: A. W. 
Elijah 
Hiram 
CRADDOCK: John 
CRAIG: Hugh 
CREGG: L. M. 
CRICHLDW: T, H. 
CRIPPLE Creek T\impike 

CRIPPLE Creek Mouth 
CROCKETT: Granville S. 

CROSTHWAIT: Elizabeth 

Shelton 
CROSTHWAIT' s Mill 



2ii6 
126 
9U 
177,225 

93 
19li 
153,205,225 
173 
236 
222 
250 
2U2 

68 
2U2 

80 
8, 9 

70 

52 
203 
255 

28 
203 
253 

52 
228 
216 
228 
227 
128 
230 
108 
226 
251 

U8 
19U 
206 

a6 

1U8,201 
156,208,226 
258 

9li 
226 
1*7,179,258 
109 
211 
23U 
203 
193 

98 

88 

98,101, 

10U,105,106 

IkS 

255 

225 

206,225 
168,217,225 



- 272 - 



CROW: 


Henry 


201 


DBGRAI-yiNREAD (A.,M)^ 
rafting ground 


I65,22li,227 


CUMRKRLAND Presby Church 2U5 




CUMHILANII 


i: Stone's River 


DEGARRETT 


166,212 




Turnpike — 


65, 66, 


DEMENT : Cader 


?1J|,227 






67, 68, 72, 


DEW: John 


26 






73, 75,136 


DICKiNS: Dr. James H. 


2U8 




Turnpike 


15, 1*3 


DICKINSON: David 


U6,16U, 


CUMMIN: 


Richard W. 


219 




17li,227,251|. 




Robert G. 


2ia 


DICKINSON'S Mill 


160,173, 


CUMMIN'S 


(John) Mm 


17,lirf)-lli2, 




178,183,227 






Iiai-I50,l5l4, 


DICKSON: E. N. 


186 






19U,196,197, 


Ezekiel 


191; 






200,202,205, 


James 


200 






207,226,2lili, 


John 


19li,198 






250 


Joseph 


I55,a2 


CUMMIN'S 


Ford 


156 


Gen. Joseph 


15U,196,227 


cummin's 


Road 


1 111, 222 


Sam 


227 


GUMMING: 


Hugh 


206 


DILLIN: Charles 


112 


CURRIN: 


Jonathan 


172 


J. A. 
J. R. 


2hh 
228 


DANCE: 


Russell 


55, 56 


DISTIT.TERY 


232 


DALTON: 


John 


231 


DOAK: John 


205 


DANIEL: 


George A. 


2U9 


dobbin's Shop 


188 




Thurston 


2U9 


DONAID's Store 


188 


DANVIT.TK 




52 


DOHERTY: George 


26 


DAVIDSON: 


John 


2lU,2l|0 


DONKT.SON: Jacob D. 


$9 




Josiah 


193 


DONOHO: Edward 


172,227 


DAVIS: 


Abel 


230,231 


DORAN: Mary 


227 




Alfred 


126 


Capt. William 


169,172, 




Aquilla 


2hh 




217,227,2la 




Baldy 


231 


DOUGLAS: George 


163,228 




Benjamin 


2U7 


Harry A. 


221 




Charles 


231 


N. L. 


232 




Charles L. 


n2 


DOUGLAS' Church 


3D8 




Charles R. 


231 


DRAKE: John 


25 




Henry 


205 


DROMGOOLE: John E. 


225,238,21^0 




Isaac L. 


226 


DUG HOLLOW 


150,165, 




J. 


257 




201,203,215 




John 


207 


DYER: Joel 


220,228 




Josi^,h 


193 


Robert H. 


228 




Jo. v;. 


112 








Julia 


231 


EAGLEVIT.T.R 


ii,ia 




L. 


113 


EAGLEVILLE-Chapel mil 






Lawson 


212 


Turnpike 


100,101* 




Leonard 


126,l8U 


EAGLEVITiTE-Salem Turnpike 


99,102,10U, 




Luckett 


226,11,3,11^7, 
171,201,20U 


EAGLEVIU,E-Uni onvi 1 1 e- 


105,115,135 




Mary Jane Weakley-257 


Shelbyville 






Moseph W. 


257 


Turnpike 


89,102,10li 




William I. 


20U 




138,187 




Young 


25U 


EARWOOD: John 


177,218 


DAVIS Mm 


S9 


EDMUNDSON: John 


112 


DAY: 


Jesse 


208,233 


EDWARDS: Arthur H. 


229 


DEER PARK 


(Matthew 




ArthTor M 


229 




McClanhan) 


170 


J. W. 


229 



- 273 - 



EDWARDS I 



ELAM: 



EIDER: 
ELLIOT: 

ELLIOTT: 



John 

Nancy 
Owen 

Capt Owen 

Thomas 
Thomas H. 
Williain 



W. T. 

Christopher 

Daniel 

Edward 

John 

Rebecca 0. 

T. J. 

Ellas A. 

Alfred 

James 

John 



ELLIOTT'S Lane 



ELLIS 
ERWIN 
ESPSY 
ESTIN 
EVANS 
EWING 



Fdcks 
John P. 
James 
William 
Maj. Thomas 
James 
John 
Thomas 



FAIN: R. W. 
FAIRFIEID -'c Shelbyville 

Road 
FARMINGTON-I-Iiddleton 

Turnpike 
FARRIS: C. 3. 
FATHERA: E. B. 

J. R. 
FAWCETT: 

Arch 

James S. 
FAYETTEVILIE 

FEATHERS TON: Jesse 1^0, 
FERGUSON: John 
FERRISS: Josiah 
PISID; B. G. 
FIS!^ER»s (Boiling) Mill 

FITE: Moses 
FLEMMING: David 
John 



153,168, 

175,229 

229 

153,163, 
165,168,217 
lla,lU2,193, 
196,20li,229 
93,126 

229 

1U2,1U6, 
166,19U,200, 
207,216 

229 

198 
206,209,253 

239 

253 

256 

2U5 

219 
113 

216,222 
153,160, 
161,165,168, 
212,229 
182 

178,259 
229 

198,208 
157 
13 
109 

ni 

127 

128 



111 

89,10U 

99 
257 
257 

176,218 
230 
230 

28 
151,197 
200 
251 
111 

170,171, 
217,230 

97 
211 
11+9,230 



FLEMMING: Saimiel 
FLEMMING 's (James) Mill 
FLETCHER: B. D. 

J. F., Jr. 

Janes F. 

John 

M. L. 

Minas L. 

Mvmford H. 

William C. 



FLOODS 
FLORENCE 
FLOYD: 
FOLMSBEE: 



Drury 
Stanley 



FOHD: Edmund 

FOSTER: Ephraim 
James 
James H. 
R. C. 

FOSTERVILLE 

Fosterville Turnpike 

FOSTERVXLLE-Rover 

Turnpike 
FOX Branch 
FRANKLIN ROAD 
FRANKLIN-Eagleville 

Turnpike 
FRANKLIN-Lewisburg 

Turnpike 
FRANKLIN -Murfreesboro 

Turnpike 



FRENCH LICK 
FREEMAN: Robert 
FREQUITT: Matt 
FRIZZLE: John W. 
FROST: N. H. 
FT. Nash 
FUGATH: Benjamin 

John 
FUIJCS: James 

John 

ThOTipson 
FULLER: Hsnry 

John 
FULLERTON: James 
FURGERSON: Elizabeth 
FURGUSON: George 

Mrs. S. J. 



GABLE: ■ 

W. 
GAD AWAY: John 
GAMBILE: Aaron 



230 
257 
25U 
253 
235,236,252 
17U,231 
2lv3 
230 

230,23U 
225, 2U0 
137 
12.2 

98 

U3, 53 
205 
223 
HO 

U6 

li9 
121, 2 UO 

59, 71, 
72, 73 

110,117 
231 
25 

108,llli,ll5 

108 

69, 70- 73, 
87,101, 
103-105 
5 

205 

111 
in 

23U 

5 

89 

165,209 
1147,200 
201 
217 
193 
167 
205 
168 
2U9 
2U9 

166 

l6U,211i 
220 
198 



- 27ii - 



GAM3ILE: 


George 


198 


GREAT SALT LICK 


h 


^lAMBLE: 


... 


213, 21U 


GREAT South Trail 


h 


GANAWAY: 


Benwell 


211 


GREAT Shoals 


llOi 




Burwell 


218, (220), 231 


GREEN: 


James 


m 




Walker 


210 




Joseph J. 


126 


OARNER: 


James 


195 


GREGORY: 


Edward 


216 




Lewis 


58, 95,107 


GREGORY Mills 


233 






183,185,230 


GRESIIAM: 


George 


197 


garner's 


(James) Knob 


I51i 


GRIHl: 


W. K. 


126 


GAR!JER«3 


M-ill 


188 


GRIFFIN: 


William 


a6 


GARRETT: 


W. G. 


129 


GRirSGi 


L. M. 


22U 


GARRISON 


Ford 


1U5,1U8 


GUM: 


George 


132 


GARRISON 


Road 


17,lla,lU3, 




Norton 


19U 






1U5,1U6,1U8, 


HAILY: 


John 


9h 






167,172,193, 


HAIMES: 


James 


65 




198,199,201,213 


HALEY: 


Matthew 


192 


GE?vITRY: 


Campbell 


112 


HALL: 


Andrew 


213 


GEORGIA Road 


25, U3 




Andy 


217 


GIBSON t 


G. W. 


95 




David 


177,218 




Col. John H. 


206 




Gideon B. 


258,259 




William 


?M 




Henry 


97,110, 2ii8 


GILL: 


William 


253,251i 




John 


205 


GILLIAM: 


William 


1U2,19U,231 




John W, 


89,259 


GILLISPIE: Francis 


231 




Jonathan 


203,213,232 




James 


166,216, 




Randolph 


98 






217,231 


HALL'S Rill 


131;,186,232 




Samuel 


21;5 


HALL'S Store 


89 


GILMORE: 


John 


220 


HALLYBURTON: J. E. 


222 


GIN: 




2i^3,259 




John 


2U7 


GLADE Greek 


lUU,lii5,197 




R. P. 


2li7 


GOOCH: 


Allen T. 


^9 




William H. 


2li7 




Benjamin 


S9 


EALY: 


John 


128 




David 


153,20U,231 


HAMILTON: 


Hance 


lii9.202,233 




John C. 


59, 79 




James 


li;7,2O0 




M. E. 


231 




Th(xaas 


208,233 


GOODIN's 


Point 


171 


HANCOCK: 


Robert 


192 


GOODLOE: 


Henry 


160,176, 




W. D. 


68 






19U,203,232 


HANLY: 


William 


lii9,202 




T. W. 


232 


HANNES: 


David 


?lii 


GOODMAN: 


Capt. 


151 


HARBIN:: 


Alfred S. 


237 




George 


161,209 


HARDEE: 


Gen. William 


J. 120 




Henry 


157 


HARDEMAN: 


Constant 


193,21U,233 




Widow 


166,169,209 


HARDEMAN' 


s Mill 


I5l,l57,l6ii, 




William 


223 






168,171,175- 


QOODUS: 


David 


172 






177,203,?lli,2l8 


GOODWIN: 


W. H. 


125 


HARDING: 


Giles 


93 




W. W. 


125 


HARDING'S 


Mill 


170 


GOWAN: 


William H. 


89 


HARNEY: 


A. T. 


237 


QOWEN: 


John 


25,230 


HARPETH Lick 


217 


GRANITE Shoal 


lli2 


HARPETH Turnpike 


88 


GRANVILTE: William 


199 


HARRELSON 


: Vincent 


213 


GRAVES: 


David 


9U 


HARRIS: 


Capt. Allsea 


215 




Jonathan 


200 




C. B. 


99 




Joseph D. 


251 




Isham G. 


99 


GRAY'S Mill 


160 




Joel 


111 


GRAYSON: 


Capt. Peter 


-lU8,201,20li 




John C» 


225 



- 275 - 



HARRIS: Robert D. 
Samuel 
Sherwood 
Sinpson 

HARRISON: Coleman 

HART: James 

Moses 

HART'S Spring 

HARTLEY: H. C. 

HARTWELL's Footlog 

HARVEY: Charles B. 

HASKEL: Joshua 

HAWLET: J. S. 

HAYNES Bros Supply Co. 



HAYNES: 

HAYWOOD: 

HAZLE: 

HAZLETT: 

HEARE: 

HENDERSON: 



ffiJILY: 
HENRY: 



HENRY'S 
HERNDONi 
HERRING! 
HICKS: 



HICKMAN' 

HIODON: 

HXGGIN: 

HIGHT: 
HILL: 



David 

James 

Dennis 

Green 

David 

John P. 

F. 

James 

J. F. 

John 

Logan 

Samuel 

William 

Turner B. 

Beverly W. 

Fantleroy 

James B. 

John 

Mill 

Joseph 
Abram 

Arch 
Henry H. 



HTLLARD! 

HILTON: 

HOGG: 



James 

William 0. 

Allen 

Isaac 

James 

John 

Rich 

"Hiomas 

T. 

William 

(Isaac) Lots 

John 

Samuel 



225 
228 
197 

68 
110 
218 

51 

59 
129 

92 

1U5,193,196 

25U 

126 

238 

ail 

99 
128 

28 
211 
2U6,2U7 

58 
1U8,152, 
156,218,233 
229, 2U5 
114i,l56,232 

55 
152,233 
228 
230 
222,238,2UO 
222 

a8 

157,1724, 
208,209,233 
181,18U 
ll|2,lli5 

a5 

201 

52 
256 
1U7 
236 
15l,l65,2lU 
23U 

93,110 
19U 

52 
193,2:^3 

91,202 
206 
207 
2U7 
209 
172, 23U 

51 
2hh 



Widow 

Dennis 

C. W. 

Dennis 

Sara Nash 
HDLLOWAY: Joseph 
HOLLOWELL: James J. 

William B. 

H. 

James 

William 

H. 



HOGG; 

HOGWOOD: 

HOIDEN: 



roiMES: 



HDLTON: 

HOODS: 

HDOVER: 



Christopher 
Henry 
Jacob 
John 



John P. 
HOOVER'S Gap 
HOOVER'S (Mathias) Mill 
HOOVER'S Mill 

HOOVER'S Settlement 
HOOVER'S Gap Turnpike 



HOOVER'S Gap-Christiana 
Turnpike 

HOOVER'S Gap-Bell Buckle 
Turnpike 



182 

91,221 
188 

2h3,2hh 
2Uh 
129 
233 
231 
2U6 

202,227 
236 
2li7 
2li8 

95 
5l,20l4,23l4 

65,1U8, 
201,210,256 

111 

210 
23U 
155,156,159, 
166,169, 20U,23U 
152 
51, 56, 
71, 76 



95,103 



HORD: 

HDUCHNEE; 

HOUSE: 



HOUSTON: 
HOWARD: 



Thomas 
Francis H. 
Charles 
G. W. 
George 
Samuel 
Gov. Sam 



HOWELL: William 
HOWELL'S (William) Mill 
HDWELL's (Capt.) Mill 



HOWLAND: John F. 
HUBBARD: William 
HUDDLESTON: John L. 



HUDSON: 
HUGGINS: 

HUGHES: 
HUNT: 

HUNTER: 



Green B. 

W. B. & Co. 

Col. William S. 

Mary B. 

Mrs. L. 

W. 

Andrew 

Robert 



111,11U, 
115,117 

223,229 

259 

109 

252 
93 

198 
hk 

161,167, 

211,216 

19li,212 

1U8 
17,lliO-llA, 
me ,1149 ,162, 
163,192,193,199, 
202,212,213 

108,257 

177 

126 

126 

133 
68,239 

235 

251 

2U0 

2I4O 

1U2,1U4, 

150,195,235 



- 276- 



HUNTKH's Warehouse 


65 


JET'im: 


Lewis 


89,232,235 


HUNTSVILLE 




28 




Robert 


U6 ,162 ,166,196, 


HURRICANE Creek Ford 


Ili0,1)i1 






206,212,235 


HUTSON: 


A. M. 


186 




Robert B. 


125,226,236 


HUTTON: 


John 


207 


JOBE: 


E. C. 


126 


HYDE; 


Mrs. - 


153, 20U 


JOHNS: 


Abner 


16U,17U 
lli9,202 


IRVINE; 


John 


207 




Edmomd 


202 


IVEY; 


Benjamin 


232 




John 


210,?1li 




Charles D. 


232 




Joseph B. 


59, 65,209 




Thranas 


236,216 




Paul V. 

R. V. 


237 

m 


JACKSON: 


F. Sr, 


99 


JOHN'S 


(Abner) Shoals 


1 17li,175 




James 


?Uh 


JOHN'S (H.Q.) Store 


128 




Washington 


2hh 


JOHNSON: 


Gov. Andrew 


90 




William 


9li,110 




Benjamin 


70, 92, 


JACOBS; 


Clinton 


107 






96,252 




Greenberry 


20U 


JOHNSON; 


Barrel P. 


258 




Samuel 


216 




Jane 


2U6 


JACOB'S Wagon Road 


172 




John 


200,2l4li 


JAMES: 


John A. 


257 




Mrs. A. 


250 




John P. 


178,228 




Samuel 


lli6 




Thomas 


226 




Thomas 


2U5,2U6 


JAMISON: 


H. D. 


218 




wmiam 


21Ii,2l5 




Henry D. 


hi, 97,23U 


JOHNSON '6 


i Mill 


2li3 




Mrs. Henry 


no 


JOHNSTON: 


Capt. James 


I52,20li,209 




R. D. 


251,258 




John 


2U5 




Thcmas 


95 




Larkin 


197, 20U 




Thomas H. 


107,108 


JONES: 


A. 


2li2,255 


JARMEN: 


Han 


96 




A. B. 


222 




Mrs. 


187 




Amizi 


2lili 


JARRATT: 


Arch 


159,211 




Ann 


2Ul,2ij2, 




David M. 


179,255 






25U,255 




Deveraux 


22U 


JONES Crossroads 


225 




John J. 


99 




Elihu 


98 




Thcjmpson 


110 




Enoch H. 


89, 91, 93 


JEFFERSON: 




28, 61. 




Ezra 


199 




m 


,1U2-Ii+6,151;, 




James 


109,165, 




180,181,183 ,18U, 






215,2U5 




19U,199,202,215 




Jonathan 


218 


JEFFERSON 


Turnpike 


59, 60, 6> 




R. C. 


98,111 






65, 72, 73, 


JONESBORO 


1 


13 






97,115, 


JORDAN; 


Arch 


98 


JENKINS; 


Captain 


lii6 




John 


93 




Riram 


182,235 




B. Joshua 


225 




Nimrod 


15Ii,l65, 




M. B. 


225 






169,199,206, 




Minas 


9U,128 






215,235,252 




Newton C. 


9U 




Mrs. J. M. 


235 




William 


187 




Mrs. N. 


235 


JUNCTION 


Turnpike 


m 


JETTON: 


Col. 


173 


JURY of View 


19 




James L. 


250 










James S. 


208 


KEDRON Church 


127 




John 


151,235 


KEEBLE: 


E. A. 


9U,256 




John L. 


232,235 




Walter 


153,205, 




Lawrence 


253 






a7,238 



- 277 - 



KKKHLE: 


Walter, Jr. 


236 


LANCASTKH'r Min 


lU 


KSSBUB's Min 


171 


LANCASTKH's Turnpike 


U2 


KEITH: 


Daniel 


2li8 


LANE: Thonas 


2U5 


KET.TDUGH: 


Thomas 


206 


LANNUM: Levi 


207 


KET.T.T: 


Albert 


2U6 


LARK: Widow 


I61i 




E. B, 


100 


LARANCE: William H. 


22U 


KELTON: 


James H. 


226 


LAaCAStJAS-Fall Creek 






Samuel 


210 


Turnpike 


126 




William 


210 


LASCAiiSAS-Milton Turnpike 


128 


KERR: 


Wilson 


258 


LAUGHLIN: Capt. 


151 


KEYSTCNE House 


28 


James 


199 


KEYS: 


David 


166,168,216 


Samuel H. 


37 


KILLIAM: 


Henry 


192 


LAUGHRY: J. N. 


255 


KILPATRICK 


:: James M. 


223 


LaVERGNE Road 


120 


KIMBRO: 


Azariah 


205,2Ui,2ii8 


LaVEHCaiE^ock Springs 






C. 


2U8 


Turnpike 


91,103,10U 




John 


165,207, 


LaVERGNE^Stcnes River 








213,237 


"Turnpike 


90, 91, 




J. B. 


110,128, 22li 




103,10li 




John B. 


2Ux 


LAWRENCE: James 


105,107,108 




Joseph 


79 


William H. 


22U 




N. 


236 


LAMING: Robert 


2U0 




R. P. S. 


239 


LEADDON: Widow 


196 




William 


17,lU0, 


LEADDON's Comer 


lliJ»,196,197 






193,207 


LEATH: John W. 


233 


KING AID: 


William 


205 


Mary 


233 


KING: 


Andrew M. 


19U 


LEATHERMAN: J. M. 


no 




James M. 


70, 88 


LEBANON-Cumberland Turnpike 66 




James Jr. 


129 


T.RBAN0N-*4urfreesboro 






John 


129 


Turnpike 


112 




Joseph 


129 


T.EBANON-Sparta Turnpike 


97 


KINGSLEY: 


Alpha 


2U7 


LFT BETTER: David 


208 


KINNARD: 


Anthony- 


158,208,211 


Wmiaiti 


55, 56, 




James 


1l|)i 




231, 2U0 




John 


197,206 


LEDBETTER's Mill 


182,183 




Michael 


199 


T.FDDON: Sarah 


157, 209, a2 




Nathaniel 


197,200 




236,2U6,253 


KINNARD»s 


Ford 


Mik 


LREHH: Jame T. 


2U2 


KINNARD 's 


Mill 


160 


W. C. 


92 


KIRBY: 


Henry B. 


227 


LBGRAND: Peter 


199 


KIRK: 


Hugh 


235,2U5 


LEIGH'S (George J Mill 


177 




Jane 


235 


LEIFHl: J. 


88 




J. J. 


235 


John 


2la 




John J. 


2U5 


LENOIR: John P. H. 


207, ?n 


KNIGHT: 


T. H. 


109 


LESTER: Frederick 


2U2 


KNOX: 


Joseph 


la 


LETTON: James 


a5 




Joseph A. 


2li9 


LEWIS : James 


ziU 




Squire 


208 


LEYLAND: Peter 


19U 




Til anas 


161,208 


LIBERTY Gap Road 


187 


KNOX'S Spring 


221 


LIDDON: Benjamin 


236 


KNOXTHTf. 




28 


UDDON Spring 


236 


KYLE: 


Robert 


lU 


LILLARD: Mordecai 


203,211, 
2U2,250 


LACKEY: 


Alexander 


177,195, 


WllHam R. 


98,252 






196,210 


LILLY: Noah 


150,163,167, 


LAMB: 


Wmiam 


160 


169,203,213,216 



- 278 - 



LINDSEY: 


Joseph 


m 


MANEY: 


Doc 


17U 


LITTLE; 


William 


93,171 




Dr. James 


163,16U,172, 


LOCKE: 


Charles 


196 






176,227,231; 




Jarratt 


183 




Lewis 


8 




Jessee 


52 




L. M. 


239 


LOCKE'S Meeting House 


186 


MANOR Mills 


23U 


LOFTIN: 


Eldridge 


16U,205, 


MANSCER's 


Station 


13 






236,237 


MANSON: 


James C. 


126 




ThamaiS 


209 


MARABLE: 


Braxton 


158,210 




Col wmiaiu 


-1147,152,15U, 




Isaac 


213 






156,197,200 


MARABLE Spring 


210 




20l;,205,231,237 


MARSHAL: 


Col Daniel 


170,220,239 




Widow 


155,157,158, 


MARSHAL'S 


Knob 


220,239 






159,161,162, 


MARTIN; 


James B. 


109 






16U,166,205, 




John 


207 






209,211,212, 




L. H. 


2U7 






213 




William 


lU 


LOUIS: 


J. 


251 


MASON: 


William 


90 


LOURY: 


Albin 


211 


MATimrS: 


Isham 


191* 


LOVE: 


Charles I. 


U6 


MATTHEWS; 


James H. 


223 




John 


126 




John 


1914,207 


LOWE; 


Alfred P. 


107,125 




William 


256 




Henrietta 


237 


MAXFIEDD: 


J. A. 


220 




Phillip S. 


202,250 


MAXWELu: 


John A. 


220 




W. S. 


237 


MAYBERRY; 


- - 


I51i,196, 




Walter 


172,237 






212,21*0 


LYNCHBURG 




28 


(Mayberry)Wil.l.iam 


151 


Lynn Cottage Turnpike 


88 


MAYBIN: 


WQliam 


151 


LYON: 


James S. 


107 


MYFIEID: 


Fountain A. 


230 




Rev. Nathan 


177,237 




William 


210 


LOWRY: 


George 


26 


MacGOWEN: 


Ebenezer 


2ii7 




John 


26 




Thomas 


2U7 


LYTLE: 


• • 


160 


McADAJ-IS: 


John L. 


la, U2, 85 




Archibald 


88,253 


McADO: 


A. P. 


126 




Ephralm 


93 




B. H. 


96 




John 


88, 93,129, 




Samuel 


96 




155 


;,222,237,238 


McBRIDE: 


Samuel 


226 






2U0 


McBRIDE'a 


I Ford 


2UU 




Mary- 


238 


McBROOM: 


Henry D. 


52 




Mrs. 


187 


McCAIB; 


Andrew W. 


173 




Wniiam 


70,237 


McCAIN: 


Captain 


157,212 




Capt. wniiam 2^,l6k, 


McCains : 


Capt 


209 






172,17U, 


McCLAIN: 


A. G, 


93 






208,217,238 




R. B. 


93, 97 




William F. 


238, 2U0 


McCLAlN's 


1 (Charles) Horse 






William, Jr. 


251 




Mill 


159,210,231 


LYTLE's Mill 


156 


McCLANAlIAN: Matthew 


I60,176,21ii, 












2^,iJ39 


MABRY: 


Thomas 


90 




Samuel 


239 


?^HON: 


William 


150 


MoCLANAHAN's (Matthew; 




MAIN Street 


25,171,172 




Deer Park 


170 


MALLARD: 


George W. 


210 


McCLAREN: 


: Franklin 


220 


MALLSRY: 


John 


97 


McCLARY: 


Samuel 


195 


MALONE: 


Stephen W. 


25U 


McCOl-IBS: 


Robert 


209,212 


MANCHESTER i^ke 


7 


McCONICS Meeting Hotise 


88 


MANEY: 


D. D. 


111,127 


McCONNELL: Moses 


207 



- 279 - 



McCORD: Newton 
McCOYt EaeteLel 

Francis B, 
Hanry 



9k 
197 
209 

165, 17U, 
205,215,239 
McCOT's (EzekLel) Mill ll4U,lU5, 

lli7,l50-l5U, 
156,157,159- 
162,166,169, 
197,200,20U, 
205,2n-2lU, 
217,239 
McCOY's Glade lUU 

McCRACKIN: John 212 

Mcculloch's mhi 178,160,218 

McCULLOUaH: Alex l5l 

Anna M. 2hO 
B. L. 88 

B. Wo 2UO 
Benjaitdn 167,202,212 
22li,225,238,2UO 

Bryan 166 

J. 251 
James 9 

J. 0. 251 

J. P. 252 

Mary 251 

R. D. 2U5 

Richard D. 222 

Sarah 225, 2U0 

McDonald : George 259 

McEIilOY: Adam 221 
McEWEN: Maj. James A. 155,163, 

207, 2U0 
McFADDEN: Samuel 225,2U2,258 

McFARLAND: Caleb 213 

McFERRIN: Benton L. 171,177 

Burton 213 
McGILL: David 56 

James 58 

Mc<GREC30R: John L. 2l|6 

Joseph D. 2U6 
Ransford P. 59,2U6 

vailiam A. 2U6 

McGRl;X)R: John U6 

Mc HENRY: J. B. 68 

McIVER: John 220,239 

McKean: Alex 155,206, 

213, 2U0 
McKEEN: Mary 2Uo 

McKEE: Ambrose 206 

James, Sr. 25U 

John B. 25U 

J. F. 110 

Rtifus 237 

William 25U 

W. A. 25U 



MCKNIGHT: A. D. 2U8 

A. M. 257 

David 52,169,176 

David M. 228 

F. A. 259 

James, Sr. 217 

James 91,lU2,217 

J. D. 2ii8 

J. N. 2liO 

John 88 

Capt. John 175,2l40 

John M. 2ia 

Joseph 155,166,207 

S. M. 259 

William 2U0 

w. w. 128,228 

Mcknight Graveyard 128 

Mcknight settlement 19U 
Mcknight (David) Stillhouse 217 

McKORKLE: Robert 173,2la,2U9 

MCLAUGHLIN: G. W. 126 

William H. U6 

McLEAN: Anderson I69 

A. M. 110 

Charles 203 

Robert B. 110,2U7 

McLean's Horse Mill 169,176 

McLIN; William A. 217 

McMILLIAN: Amos 207 

Mcl-HNNVILLE Turnpike 52, 53, 

71, 72, 76 
McMINNVILLB-Woodbury-M'boro 

Turnpike 53, 78, 79 

MURRY: Samuel 209 

William 232 

McNEESE: Samuel C. 153 

McREE: Andrew M. S9 

MECIIANICSVILLE 8I 

MHDLIN's Branch 128 

MENIFEE: Nimrod l6U,l68, 

(195)21U,2U2 

MHIIDIAN Road 173 

MERIDIANVILLE 28 

MERRITT: James F. 256 

Pleasant 256 

MHIRY: James 2Uli 

MESaiCK: G. B. 107 

METCALF; Blind Jack Ul 

MIDDLETON HO 

MIDDLETON Txumpike 110,115,117 

MILES: C. M. 256 

Ferdinend 127 

S. R. 112 

Y. B. 185 

MILL Creek Valley Turnpike 78, 80, 

81 



- 280 - 



MILLEK: Alfred 220,2^6 

Andrew 1^6,206 

A. 253 

Felix G. 107,2li6,2U7 

Isaac 2U6 

I. J. 256 

Janes 197 

John 95,l66,2l4l 

John A. 231 

J. P. 2li6 

J. L. 220,2U5 

Mary Ann 2U6 

Matthew 197 

Newton C. 2Ul 

P. C. F. 231 

Rebecca 0, 256 

Robert 1117,152, 
200,a5,2la 

S. H. 2li5 

Simon lii5,ll*9, 
I5l,198,2la 

Sljiion,Jr. 1^3,196, 2la 

MILLER'S Mill I52,l56,20li 

MILTON- Jefferson Turnpike 92,136, 

137,138 

MILTON Seminary 128 

MITCHELL: Addison 111 

Samuel 127 

William 127,21*2 

MONSON; John 257 

MONTGOMERY: James 206 

John 209 

M. (W.; 172 

MOORE: Alex 195 

Alfred 197*211i 

Arch 2U2,2U3 

Ben W. 2U2 

Cederick 211* 

Ezekiel 199 

Francis 2U2 

George 202,210 

James 1*6,212, 
21*2,213 

James 6. 221* 

J. C. 88 

James M. 98 

John L. 2la 

Joseph S. 125,198 

Lodwick 159,160, 
170,197,211 

Nancy 2l*2 

Warren 96,21*2 

MOORE'S (Warren; MUl 257 

MOORE'S Mill 150,185, 

188,203 

MORGAN: Harwood 2la 

Roily 203 



MORGAN: RoILy Mill seat 


231 


S. W. 


2U3 


William 


110 


MDRRIS: George 


212 


Robert S. 


35 


VttlHam B. 


^9 


^RTON: James 


1*6,11*7, 




201,211,21*3 


Joseph 


2U3 


Dr. Samuel 


229 


Widow 


160,162, 




?n ,213 


MULLINS: John 


223 


MUTJ.TNS Hin Road 


188 


Mt. VIEW 


28 


MURFREE: Ezekiel 


210 


Mathias B. 


163,161*, 




173,171*, 21*3 


MURFREE' 3 Spring 


11*1*,151*,155, 


166,196,206,21*3 


MURFREESBORO 


28 


MURFREESBORO-Bradyville 




Txirnpike 


9U, 95, 




13i*,138 


MURFREBSBORO-Jefferson 




Turnpike 


127 


MURFREESBORU-Lascassas 




Turnpike 


96, 97, 




10l*,107 


MURFREESBORO-Lascassas- 




Milton-LLberty 




Turnpike 


65, 96, 




97,101* 


MURFREESBORO-Liberty 




Turnpike 


83, 91, 92, 




103,10i*,125, 




128,135,138 


MURFREESBCEO^anchester 




Turnpike 


125,133 


MURFREESBORO-^^Ianchester & 




Winchester 




Turnpike 


52, 56, 




57, 58, 71, 




72, 73,138 


MURFREESBORO-Middleton 




Turnpike 


97,101*, 




107,21*3 


MURFREESBORO-Salem Turnpike 99 


MURJREESBORO-Sulphur Springs 


Turnpike 


111,127 


MURFREESBORO Telegrs^h 


99 


MURFRKKSBORu-Triune Turnpike 129 


MURFREESBORWiTilklnsan 




Crossroad 


93,101*, 




115,135 



- 281 - 



MURFREESBORO-Woodbury 
Turnpike 

MURPHY: 

MURRAY: Joseph H, 

MURRELL: James M. 

MUSE: Mrs. 

NAILOR: Alfred 

NANCE: Bird 

Isaac 
WLlliam 

NARON: Henderson 

NASH: Capt. 

Thomas 

Travis 

NASH'S (Wm.) Mill 

NASHVILLE 

NASHVILLE ec Chattanooga 
Railroad 

NASHVILLE-Murfreesboro 
Turnpike 

NASHVILLE-Murfreesboro- 
Shelbyville 
Turnpike 



88, 95, 98, 
102;,105,136 
171 
126 
256 
257 

59 
17,11*0,1141 
213 
198 

126 
166 
161,167,199, 
216,2U3,21U+ 
205,216 
151,15^4, 
155,205,2li4 
150,152,165 
203,20U,2UU 
13 

ia, 90,108, 
111,112,120 

U5, 1^6, 
hi, 71, 76 



NASHVILI£ 4 
NEAL: 

NEAL's Mill 
NEELY: 



Stone Fort Rd 
John F. 
Thomas 



NEELY 's 
NETLEY: 
NEI^GN: 



nap 



James 
J. N. E. 
John 
Joshua 
William 

Gen 

Beverly 

John 

Logan 

Major John 

Nancy T. 

Thomas 



NEI^ON's Mill 

NELSON'S (Daniel) Mill 

NELSON'S Creek 

NELSON'S Creek-Versailles 

Turnpike 
j»JiEELY: .T. H. 



hi- 50, S9, 
71,72, 90,132, 
137,138,239,2^3 

2U6 

126 

216,230 

183,256 

197,210 

259 

259 

155 

259 
97 

121 
U6, 90 

251 

2ii5 

179,2101 

2UI4 

168,193, 

19i4,229 
168,173,176, 
217,229,2aii 

175 

99 



NEWGENT: John D. 
NEWMAN : Joseph 
NEHSOM: Lemuel 
NEW MILLERSBURG 
NEW MILTON 
NICHOL: James 
NICHOL's Mill 
NICKAJACK Trail 

NOLAND: R. C. 
NOLANSVILtiE Turnpike 
NOLENS VILLE-Wilkerson 

Crossroad Turnpike 
NORMAN: E.A.C. 

H. 

Henry 



251; 

192,196 
126 
108 
21a 
2h6 
181 
- 5- 7. 
16,151,153 
227 
79, 88 



9U,10J4 



James 

Robert 
William 
William, Jr. 

NORMAN's: Col. 

NORMAN'S Blacksmith Shop 

NORTON'S Bridge 

NORMAN's (Henry) Mill 



NORTH: W. 

NORTI'CUT: John 
NUGENT: John 
NOR^/ELL: Moses 
W. B. 

ODD-'ELLOWS HALL: 
OLD NASITILLE liwy 
OLD STONE Fort 
OLIPPANT: James 
OLIVER : Andrew 
James 
Maj 
Alex 
Allen 
Robert 
A. 
Abram 
Isaac H. 
James G, 
John 
William 
OVERALL Creek Falls 
OVERTON : John 
0';ER TON'S Field 
OWENS: David 

Harrison 
N. 
Rich C. 



ORE: 
ORR: 



OVERALL: 



126 

2li5 

2U5 
56,168, 

215,219 
lli2,li43,U6, 
1U7,150,2U5 

2U5 

205 
197,205,209 

181,182 

2U5 

177 

172,17li, 
180,183,1814, 
186,187, 2ii5 

2I49 

193,212 

211 
h6 

m 



2U8 

7 
5 
ll4li,196,213 
lli5,197,198 
211; 
16 
195,207 
19u 
2I49 
250 
93 
173,2l45,2li6 
238,2l|0 
173 
2li5 
195 
2I46 
165,175,215 
211 
230 
256 
99 



- 282 - 



OWEN: 


Thomas 


256 


POINDEXTER: William 


228,2ii5 




W. B. 


256 


POLE Bridges 


33 








POPE: 


Hardy 


19U,205 


PARKER: 


Capt. 


215 




John 


228 




D. 


233 




wmiam 


178 




Daniel 


178,211 


PORCH: 


Israel 


206 


PARKINSON: 


R. L. 


2h9 


POSEY; 


William S. F. 


226 


PARKS: 


John 


192,206 




Zach 


Ii6,2l8 


PARRISK: 


Thomas L. 


231 


POWELL: 


Win 1 am 


215 




wmiam G. 


230 




Capt. wmiam 


178 


PATE: 


Henry 


9ii 


POWERS: 


Thomas 


51 


PATTERSON: 


Ellen P. 


225 


PRATER' s 


Mill 


I83,l81i 




John 


93 


PREWETT: 


Henry 


108 




Samuel 


25U 


PREWITT: 


John B. 


20U 


PAT TON: 


David 


9h 


PRICE: 


David 


a3 


PEACOCK: 


Micajah 


206 




Prank 


108 




Win 1am J. 


m 




J. W. 


96 


PEAT,KR: 


Moses 


197 




John 


98,lli2,195 


PEARSON: 


Hiram 


220 




John W. 


227 


PEAY: 


Thomas J. 


89 




Parthenia 


227 




T. T. 


2I48 


PRIM: 


Abraham 


210 


PEEBLES: 


Isham 


113,183 


PROVIDENCE Meeting House 


175 




J. R. 


186 


PUBLIC SQUARE 


179 


PEEK: 


Simon 


2U8 


PUCKETT: 


B. F. 


88 


PERKINS: 


John 


125 




Charles 


233,253 




P. A. 


225,2U0 




William 


233 




Sarah A. 


225 


PULER: 


Moses 


197 




Samuel 


9h 


PURDY: 


MaJ. Robert 


1U9,172,202 


PERKIN's Crossroads 


69 




Gen. Robert 


217,217 


PHIRY: 


Burwell 


?1)i 


PURSEL: 


Abel 


197,200 




Capt. 


151 


PURSELL: 


Abraham 


206 




Nancy 


236,2U6 


PURUS: 


Dr. G. S. 


182 




Nath 


212,2U6,2li7 


PUSLEY: 


- - 


197 




William S. 


153 


PUTMAN: 


Joseph 


96 


PETERSBURG 




88 


PYBASS: 


- - 


16U 


PETTIS: 


Thomas 


9h 


PYLAND: 


William 


223 


PHILIP Meetint^ House 


183 








PP3LIPS: 


Rich 


202 


QUAILS: 


Roger 


2U2 


PHILLIP: 


Bennett 


1UU,11;5,1U9, 












152,196,200 


RADFORD: 


Major 


1U9,202 




Burnett 


1U8 


FJON's Mm 


79 




Samuel 


2U7 


RAINCY: 


William 


98 




wniiam J. 


257 


RANKIN; 


David 


206 


PHILLIP'S 


(Bennett) Horse 




Robert D. 


111,112 




Mill 


1U7,150,151, 


RANKIN'S 


Lane 


171 




156,197, 208, 2U7 


RALSTON: 


Mary A. 


186 


PIERCE: 


Granville S. 


,. 96,219,256 




Mrs. 


257 




Dr. G. S. 


68 




Robert 


112 


PIERCE'S Mill 


180,183, 


RANSOM: 


- - 


230 






18U,256 




Mrs. B. 


2l|9 


PINKER TON: 


Joseph 


95 




C. R. 


231 


PITT: 


John 


2U2 




C. T. 


231 


PITTS: 


A. 


128,2i;9 




Dr. 


98 




J. 


25ii 




John 


22U 


POINDEXTEK 


: James 


228 




Joseph 


98,128, 22U 




Joseph 


228,229 




Dr. Medicus 


222 



-283 - 



RANSOM: 


W. A. 


2lt9 


ROSS: 


Isiah 


161 




W. W. 


2U7 




James 


199,207 


RAWLINS: 


William 


20U 




W. w. 


18U 


READ: 


John 


231,232 


ROULHAC: 


William G. 


79 




John W. 


199 


ROVER 




no 




William A. 


88 


ROWTEN: 


William 


206 


READY: 


Charles 


15U,205, 


RUBLE: 


E. A. 


88 






213,217,2U8 


RUCKER: 


Benjamin 


209 




Charles Jr. 


52, 88,231 




Col. 


ll46,lU7,lli8,l58 


READY'S Mm 


,lliO,lli2, 






171,196,200,250 






lli3,lii6,lU9, 




Daniel 


202 




150, 


1511,155,159, 




Edmund 


250 




I62-I6U, 166,169, 




James 


19li,209,250 




193, 


195,198,199, 




Mary T. 


250 




203, 


207,210,213- 




Samuel J. 


96 




2l5,217,2li8 




Samuel R. 


250 


READY'S Road 


152 




Sen. 


U6 


REDD: 


John H. 


232 




Thomas 


17,lUO,ll4l, 


REED: 


Lemuel 


221 






lU2,ll4i4,l55,l58, 


RF.ra)«s (Lem'l) Blacksmith 






i92,19U,212, 




Shop 


170,2U8 






250 


REEVES: 


B. C. 


227 




Thomas Jr. 


66 




John 


178,238,212 




Thomas S. 


52,162 




Le%ri W. 


9U 


RUCKER's 


(James) Branch 


II4I 


REMSHAW: 


Isaiah 


2U8 


RUCKER 's 


Meeting House 


lli7,lU9 




John 


2U8 


RUCKER 's 


(James) Mill 


156,157,158, 


RENS HAW '3 Road 


162,213 






208,209,217 


REVIL: 


Isham 


115 


RUCKER* 3 


(Samuel) Mill 


159,250 


REYNOLDS: 


John 


206 


RUNNET.S: 


P. K. 


108 


RHEA: 


Arch 


26 


RUSHING: 


A. 


91 


RHODES: 


Joseph 


253 


RUSSING: 


Abraham 


20U 




William S. 


132 


RUSSKT.T.: 


James 


210 


RICHARDSON: 


: James 


222 


RUSSWURM 


: John S. 


70 




Samuel 


m 


RUTHERFORD-Wilson County 


RICHMOND: 


Dr. J. B. 


68 




Turnpike 


127 


RIDEOUT: 


Elisha 


207 


RUTLHDGE; 


; Sarah 


157,236 




Thomas 


225,2UO,253 




WllHam 


208 


RIDLEY: 


B. 


2U7 










Henrj"- 


U6 


SAT.?M Methodist Church 


252 


ROACH: 


Stephen 


2h9 


SAT£M Turnpike 


70, 73, 97, 


ROAD Metal 




132 






100,101,110 


ROBERTSON: 


James 


13, 16 


SATKM-^;indrow Turnpike 


128 




Matthew 


200 


SALINE River Trail 


5 




Moses 


192 


SAND Spring 


23U 




Wmiam 


207 


SANDERS: 


Houston 


112 




William M. 


52 




Summer 


112 


ROBINSON: 


Hugh 


Iii5,lii6, 




William M. 


112 






199, 2U9 


SAUNDERS 


: Cornelius 


15U,155,166,20U, 




Isaiah 


256 






205,206, 193,199 




Mereday 


206 




Donelson 


220 




Samuel B. 


252 




Kllsha 


205 




Wmiam 


199 




Philip 


19U,198 


ROCK SPRINGS 


162,213 


SCARBO: 


Joseph 


217 


ROCK Sprljigs Meeting Hse 153, 


SEARCY: 


Anderson 


170,178,210, 






20U,2U9 






217,235,251 


ROGER: 


Robert 


I68,2li9 




William W. 


1U0,158,192,251 



- 28U - 



SEATON: 


George 


197 


SMITH: 


Joseph 


59 


SETT.fRS: 


William M. 


126 




L. J. 


253 


SELRIDCE: 


John 


2li9 




L. R. 


251 


SERATT: 


John 


205 




Mary 


251 


SEWANEE Hotel 


28 




Millington 


160 


SHACKLETT: 


John 


79 




Noah 


213 


SHALL; 


George 


Ii6 




N. M. N. B. 


228 


SHANKS: 


Arch 


205 




Peyton 


178 


SHANNON: 


T. G. 


126 




R. H. 


251 


SHARPS: 


Alfred 


210 




Robert 


17,liiO, 




James 


198, 21U 






lU]i,lU6,lli7,l56- 




John P. 


222 






159,161,162,170, 


SHAW: 


Christopher 


51 






172,199,200,208, 




T. L. D. W. 


51 






210-212,217,252 


SHELBY: 


Isaac 


209 




Robert Jr. 


201 


SHKr.BYVTT.TF.-T^ayet,t^vm e 






Robert M. 


230 




Turnpike 


101 




R. P. 


235 


S HELTON: 


Godfrey- 


167 




Robert P. 


2U5 




John 


126,188 




Samuel 


251 


SHEPHffi: 


B. H. 


229 




Stephen A. 


230 




Peyton 


2U9 




Theodore 


253 


SHIEIDS: 


Alex 


52 




Thomas 


193,199 


SHULTZ: 


Theodore 


229 




Thomas B. 


157,252,253 


SHUNPIKES 




75 




Winiam 


1U9,207,211, 


SHUTE: 


Thomas 


22U,227 






221,252, 253,25U 


SIXES: 


Jesse 


237 




William E. 


251 


SILVER Springs 


223 




William F. 


93, 96,126, 


SIMM3N: 


Adam 


179 






170,251,253 




James 3. 


112 




Gen. Wm Hunter 19U,253 


SIMPSON: 


- - 


205 


smith's 


(John) Mill 


176,218 




Hugh 


1U7 


SMOTHERMAN:John 


150 




J. T. 


109 


SMYRNA-Stewarts Creek 




SIMPSON'S 


(Wm) Store 


169 




Turnpike 


113,1111,115 


SE-IS: 


Dr. Simpson 


199 


SMYRNA-S tones River 






Swepson 


252 




Turnpike 


112,11U,115 


SKEIGN: 


Dor son 


96 


SNEED: 


John 


236 


SMARTT: 


George R. 


52 




William 


180 


SMITH: 


Ben 


lii9,25l 


SNELL: 


James 


22li 




Bennett 


151,187,202, 




Mrs. Malissa 


2li5 






211,215,251 




T. 3. 


2U8 




B. 


17U 




Willis 


229,233 




Cvinningham 


201,217 




William 


2U5 




D. D. 


2U9 


SNELL's 


Ford 


22U 




E. H. F. 


251 


SOLOMON 


George Gap 


109,lia, 




Ephraim F. 


251,257 






1U7,200 




Erasmas 


96 


SPANN: 


William 


216 




G. W. 


252 


SPARKS: 


J. W. 


258 




George W. 


93,126, 


SPARTA 




28 






251,253 


SPENCE: 


B. B. 


2U7 




Guy 


203 




M. 


231 




Jackson 


223,21^4 




William 


88, 91, 9U, 




James B. 


228 






97, 98,237 




Joel 


51,210 


SPRINGFIEID Tract 


251,253 




John 


173,175,195, 


SQUIRREL Hill 


11;2-1U5, 






199,216,217, 






195,196 






2U5,251,252 


St. Cloud Hotel 


28 




John P. 


no 


STAGE Road 


28 



- 285 - 



STATEVn.Tfi-Midland 


109,113, 


THOMPSON: Henry D. 


170,171 


Turnpike 


llli,ll5,117 


John 


i56,2D8,al4,25U 


STiiPHENS: Henry 


198 


Joseph 


221,2la,25U 


James 


199 


Joseph R. 


132 


STEPHENSON: John 


175 


Mary 


2la,2li2,25U 


Wmiam 


197 


Moses 


?la, 21+2, 25U 


STEVENS: Henry 


202 


Robert 


114;,l56,19ii, 


STEWART: Daniel M. 


52 




198,2la,2li2 


STEWARTSBOROUGH Road 


121 




251i,255 


STEWARTS Creek Seminary 


2Uh 


THDMPSON Street 


156 


STILLHOUSRS 


169,170 


THOMPSON'S Mill 


79 


STOCK ARD: James E. 


111,127 


TCOD: Edmund 


205 


John 


167,216 


J. 


129 


STOKES: William 


223 


TOLL Rater 


7U, 85, 


STONE Fort 


16,171 




105,115,117 


STONES RIVER Cemetery 


225 


TOMPKINS: James M. 


225,2li2,2U9,256 


STOAND: A. W. 


109 


TRAIL: F. G. 


255 


STRICKLAND; Barnett 


198 


TRAIL: Spring Branch 


255 


STROOP: John 


232 


W. 


255 


STROUD: 


177,218 


William 


170,255 


SUBLETT: George A. 


231 


TRAVIS: William 


195 


William A. 


227 


TROTT: Benjamin 


212 


SUGGS: Nehemiah 


111 


Henry Jr. 


52 


SUT.T.TNS: John lli0.lU2aU5, 15 


TROTT 's (Henry) Mill, 


179,180,255 


SULLINS Creek (John) 


17,lUO,192 


TUCKER: Campbell 


Ili6,l63,l65, 


SULLINS Lane 


151 




199,213,21U 


SULLIVAN: Jesse 


223 


George 


19ii 


William 


235 


James 


206 


SUMMERS: Ataier 


229,237 


John 


165 


TTnomas 


216 


win lam 


199 


SWAN: Moses 


209 


TUCKER'S Blacksmith Shop 


177,218 






TURNER: Joseph 


238 


TAT.T.EY: B. C. 


2U8 


Joseph T. B. 


222,238 


TANYARD 


229 


Silas 


113 


TAYLOR: Arthiir 


200 


Thomas 


98 


B. B. 


99 


TURNPIKE RULES 


77 


Edmund 


52 


TWEATT: William 


206 


George R. 


37, 38 


TYLER: Thomas 


213 


TAYLOR'S Trace 


16, 17,1UU, 








11*6,162,1914, 


UNDERWOOD: Levi S. 


225 




196,199,212 


William D. 


225 


lEAGUE: Magness 


199 


UNION fflll Academy 


219,2142* 


TEAR: 


196 


UNION TTimpike 


115 


TELFORD: John M. 


238,250 


UNION'/n.T.K Turnpike 


109 


Nancy 


238 


USELTON: George 


2I48 


Thornas 


la 






TELFORD'S Mill 


238 


VANCE: Peter 


20I4 


TELFORD'S (Nicholas) Mill 


172,175,218 


VAUOKAN: James 


180 


TELT.TCO Treaty 


26 


VAUGHN: Drury 


1146,256 


TEMPLETON: B. 


2li5 


James 


220 


TENISON: Hiram 


52 


Peter 


207,256 


TERRILL: Leighton 


52 


Richard B. 


220 


THACKEE: Larkin 


192,202 


VAULX: W. M. 


181 


THOMAS: G. W. 


251i 


VERSAIT.T.RR 


70,100 


WiUiam 


I53,201,25ii 


VINCENT: William 


151,158,203,2114 


THDMPSON: Ann 


2ia,25U 






George 


U6 







- 286 - 



WiU)E: 


B. T. 


68 




H. 


leu 




Henry- 


112 




John 


163,256 




John M. 


239 




J\i1i,us 


111,112, 
125,256 




Levi 


228,21^6 




M. B. 


112,256 




Polly 


181; 




R. 


181; 




Richard 


112,256 




R. W. 


256 




William 


163,209,256 


WADLBY: 


John W. 


2li7 




Samuel 


203 


WAIDEN: 


Charles H. 


79 




H. 


91 


WATJACE: 


John 


158,198,216 




Joseph 


210 




William 


167,257,216 


WAI2IUT Grove Meth Church 2U3 


WALTON: 


Capt. van -Jam Ik 


WALTON'S 


; Road 


Hi, 15, h} 


WARD: 


Best 


2hO 




Burwell 


I9I4 




James J. 


233 




Ezekiel 


233 




Martha 


233 




Mary 


233 




Thomas 


96 


WARNICK: 


John 


205,211* 




Robert 


201 


WARREN: 


Jonathan 


20U 




William 


212 


WARREN'S 


i Mill 


178 


WASHBURJ 


[: Samuel 


a.3 


WASHINGTON: F, W. 


252,253 


WASHINGTON CemBtery 


252,253 


WATKINS: 


Adeline W. 


256,257 




J. F. 


no 




Joseph 


231,2l;3 




J. W. 


210 




Margaret 


2U3 




W. L. 


112,256 




Samuel 6. 


2U3 




Wilson L. 


256 




Wilson S. 


67 


WATSON: 


Alan D. 


12 




James 


165 


WATTERSON: WHUam 


56 




William S. 


51 


WEAKLEY! 


: Enlosa 


257 




F. 


257 




Hickman 


112,257 




S. 


257 




Col. Robert 


1;6,257 



WEAKLEY'S (Col) Spring 


11*3,163, 




195,210 


WEATHER: John 


166 


WEATHERFORD: John D. 


89,175 


WEATHERLY: Abner 


232 


Absolum 


52 


WEBB: Aaron 


215 


Isiah 159,160,196,211 


Dr. John 


97 


John D. 


230 


Josiah 


199 


Dr. William S. 


89 


WKLK: William 


209 


WELLS: James 


201* 


WENDEL:David 


U6 


D. D. 


21*2 


Thomas N. 


21*7 


WEST Fork Wagon Road 


la 


WHALEN: William 


208 


WPARRY: Jackson 


153 


WHITE: A. H. 


9S 


B. G. 


95 


B. N. 


258 


Burr el G. 


258 


Franklin 


258 


G. B. 


107,108 


H. H. 


108 


John 


201* 


Levi 


90 


Stephen 155,198, 2la, 258 


W. B. 


128,219 


WHITE'S Field 


156 


WHITE'S Mill 


182 


WHITE'S (H) Milldam 


21*1* 


WHITE'S Store 


108,185 


white's (Stephen) CTlade 


158,166, 




176,201* 


WHITMAN: A. G. 


21*7 


WHITNEY: Lewis 


205 


WHITSITH: James 


a3 


WHIT SON: William 


231 


WTT.BURN: James 


201* 


WILKERSON: G. H. 


256 


W. A. 


256 


WILKERSON Turnpike 


137 


WILLIAMS: Chesley 


99 


H. C. 


126 


James 


232 


J. N. 


96 


I. 


195 


Mrs. 


232 


Ralph 


212 


William 


211 


WILLIAM'S Mill 


172 


WILLIAMSON County-Salem 




Turnpike 


98,101* 


WITJS: Amos 


198 



- 287 - 



WILLS: James 

VIILSON: Col. James 
Jesse 
John 
John A* 
Samuel 



WILSON'S (Samuel) 

Shoals 
WILSON Shoals 



2QU 
ll;8 
1U7,200 

a? 

221 

lU2,lli3, 
195,202,258 



WILSON Fill Road 
WINDROW: Byas 
Henry 
H. 

John 

Travis 
WINDROW'S Campgroxmd 
WINDROW'S Store 
WINSETT: David 

James J • 
WINSTON: Samviel 

Nath 
WITTY: W. A. 
WOLF: Hill 
WORK: John 
WOODS: Arch 

James B. 

John 

John H. 

John H., Jr. 

Johnson 

Dr. S. H. 

R. H. 

Thomas L. 

William C. 

Jacob 



1U9,151,152 
158,161A63, 
16U ,166,167 ,17U, 
177,195,202,210 
2U8 



98 
208 
126 
200 

98 
2h9 
18U 
209 
259 
93,231,237,2U3 
2U5, 25 
109 
157,209,212 

235 

9U 

2U0 

228,2i;D,2U3 

89 



52 
9U 
95 

2ia 

216 

229 

91,176, 
232,235 
19U 
250 
203,211i,259 
153 

176,207 
91, 98 
189 

lU3,lli5, 
1146,11^8,153, 
168,233,258 
WRIGHT'S (Thompson) Mill l80 



WRIGHT: 



John 
John S • 
Richard 
Capt .Richaixi 
Thompson 
WRIGHT's(Jacob)Bridge 
WRIGHT'S (J.N.) Mill 
WRIGHT'S (Isaac) Mill 



YAGER: Paschel 


239 


YARDLY;Thomas 


196,206, 
aO,226 


YOUNG: Peter 


1U2 


YDUNCBLOCD: Thomas 


177,222,239 


YDUREE: Elizabeth 


259 


TranctB 


lii3,lli6,lU8, 




150,153,15U, 




161,163,16U, 




167,195,198, 




199,201,203, 




213,2lU,259 


James 


237 


Silas M. 


259 


William 


213 


Widow 


177 


YOUREE's Gap 


79 



DATE DUE 






M' 



m^w 



f£l3 9? 
FE08'9y 

C£l 5 '9/ 

/^0 20 -g? 

.MAR S 



Min 1 1 2«g 



^ n 



nn? 



f'ii? 



^ta_ 



ToSsMn 



7109 981L