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MIDDLE TN STATE UN I V 
3 3082 01573623 3 



1976 
,857 
|R931p 
.21 



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RUTHESFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 21 
Published \tj the 
RUTHERIORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
OFFICERS 



President Mr. Ernest K. Johns 

Vice-President Mr. W. H. Westbrooks 

Recording Secretary Miss Louise Cawthon 

Corresponding Secretary Vscs, Susan Daniel 

Publication Secretary Mr. Walter K. Hoover 

Treasurer Mrs. Kelly Ray 

DIRECTORS: Mr. James Matheny 

Mrs. William Walkup 
Mrs. Lalia Lester 



Publication No. a. (Limited Edition-ii25 copies) is distributed 
to members of the Society. The annual membership dues is $10.00 
(Family $11.00) which includes the regular publications and the monthly 
NEWSIfiTTER to all members. Additional copies of Publication No. 21 
may be obtained at $5>00 per copy. 

All correspondence concerning additional copies, contributions to 
future issues, and membership should be addressed to: 

Rutherford County HlstoricaJ. Society 

Box 906 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 



Library 
Middle Tennessee Statt Un)V6F§ltV 



THE FOLLOWING PDHLICATIONS ARE FOE SAI£ BI: 

The Rutherford County Historical Society 
Po8t Office Box 906 
Murfreesboro, Tttmeseee 37130 

FDBLICATIONS 1, 2, 3» U, 5, 6, 8, and 9 are out of print. 

PUBLICATION 7» Hopewell Church, Petition by Cornelius Sanders' 

for Rev. War Bmsion ------ $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PDBLICATIOM 10: 1861* Diary, i^tor Jennings, Henderson ToalnoB, Early 
Methodist Cfavorch, and Overall 
fanily ------------- $3.50 ♦ $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION lit State Capitol, Ben McCuUoch, Petition of Michael 
Loranee, Comtry Store, and Soule College 

$3.50 ♦ $1.00 postage 

HJBLICATION 12: History of Senart AFB, Goochland and Rutherford County 
WILL Index ----------- $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATKW 13: Tennessee College, Coleman Scouts, New Monument in Old 
City Cemetery and James Boles ' Revolutionary War 
Pension ------------- $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION Ihi Murfreesboro Presbyterian Church, Kirks and Montgonerys, 
Russell Hone, Jola lytle and John M. Leak's Revolution- 
aiy War Pension --------- $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

HIBLICATION 15 : John W. Childress* Home (l8U7), Whigs in Rutherford 

County, I835-I8I45 $3.50+ $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 16: Hart, Childless, MLles, Fostervllle, Cherry Shade, 

William Cocke $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 17: Jefferson I803-I813, Will Abstracts (18O3-I8II4) , 

Old City Cemetery $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 18: Railroad Stations in Rutherford County, Rion Family, 

Stones River $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 19: Footprints ... at Snyma, V. A. Medical Center, Manson 

Family, Jenkins' Homes, WLU Abstracts (Record Books 3 &. 
U), Rutherford Co. Hist. Society, Early News, Bio. Sketch 
froB Mac en Co., m., 198I in Rutherford County- - - 

$3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 20: Roads and Tun5)ikes of Rutherford Co. (includes many 

Rutherford Co. names) - - $5.00 + $1.00 postage 



«4~^/.r;:5r 



2 

FOR SAI£ 



PUBLICATION 21t Jefferson Springs Resort^ Lasoassas Baptist Cfaurch, 

John Price Buchanan, WiU Abstracts, I836 Tax Records 
of 25th District -------- $5.00 ♦ $1,00 postage 

Index of Publications 1 through 5--------- $5.00 + $1.00 postage 

HLstonr of Versailles (southvestem Rutherford Co.) in hard cover, (Seme 
families included are: Adcock, Brown, Bums, Carlton, CovLngton, 
Crick, Dyer, Farris, Garrett, Gillespie, Hendriz, Ivey, Jackscn, 
Jones, Lamb, Lawrence, Leathers, Lowe, Manier, Maxwell, MoGee, 
Morris, Nance, Plnkerton, i^e, itowers, Puckett, Ray, Ralston, Rice, 
Rutledge, Sharber, ^notheman. Tabor, Taylor, Whitehead, VH.llianis, 
Windrow, Winsett) -------------- $9.00 + $2.00 postage 

History of Rutherford County by C. C. Sims (pub. 19i*7) Reprint — 

$12.00 ■•- $2.00 postage 

l8iO Rutherford County Census with Index ----- $ 5.00 + $1.00 postage 

Deed Abstracts of Rutherford County. I803-I8IO - - $10.00 ♦ $1.00 postage 

(Hm'FlTH t Illustrated bi-oentennial publication - $ 2.00 * $1.00 postage 

CCMMEMQRATIVE FL^TESt 

No. 2 Tennessee College in >to>freesboro - - $ 5>00 + $1.00 postage 
No. 3 Rutherford County Courthouse, 1900 - - $ 5.00 -•' $1.00 postage 

CBffiTERY RECORDS OF RUTHglFOFg) COONTY ; 

Vol. 1 Northwestern third of county and part of Wilson and Davidson 
Counties, 2^6 cemeteries with index and Maps $10.00 + $1.00 postage 
Vol. 2 Eastern third of Rutherford and the western part of Cannon Co, 
2UL cemeteries with index and maps ----- $10.00 * $1.00 postage 
Vol. 3 Southwestern third of Rutherford Co., 193 cemeteries with 
index and maps --- ----------- $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

AVAILABUS FROM: WlILiam W. WaiJop, 202 Ridley St., Smyrna, Tn 37167 
1878 Rutherford County Map, shows land owners- - $ 3.50 + $1.00 postage 

AVAILABia FROM : Mrs. R. A. Ragland, P. 0. Box Shh, Murftreesboro, Tn 37130 
Marriage Record of Rutherford Co., 1851-1872 - - $10.00 + $1.00 postage 



TABIZ of CGNTENTS 



Lascaesas Bc^tist Church Aige 1 

by - Ladelle R. Craddock 

Jefferson Springs Page 19 

by - Margaret Denny Hoover 

1836 Tax Record of 25th District Page Ui 

by " E, K. Johns 

Abstract of Rutherford County Vi21a Page h9 

by •> Susan 0. Daniel 

John Price Buchanan Page 6U 

^ . Carol Hoffteann 

1982 In Rutherford Couniy Page IO6 

by - Cathy Ooode 

Rutherford Counly Historical Society Members .... Page 117 

IJidex Page 130 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication21ruth 



LASCASSAS BAPTIST CHURCH 
1883 - 1983 

by - Ladelle R. Craddock 



The Lascassas Baptist Church, located nine miles from Murfreesboro 
on Highway 96-ea8t, 22nd Civil District, Rutherford County, Tennessee 
In the midst of the unincorporated village of Lascassas, was organized 
In 1883 by S. G. Shepherd and G. A. Ogle, Ministers of the Gospel. 




The new church was dedicated on the third Sunday In June 1925 • Dr. 

E. L. Atwood preached the dedicatory sermon. The following report was 

read at the dedicatory service - 

"Your committee appointed to report the Baptist cause here, 
to subscribe the following: The records show that surround- 
ing Baptists met and after due consideration agreed to erect 
a church house, and for that purpose appointed the following 
committees to solicit funds for sane - W. A. Jones, chairman; 
B. F. Phillips, G. ^f. Burke, J. T. Saimders, C. S. Dlllcm, 

i 



Qeorge Jarman and R. E. Jarman^ who began the erection of the 
old house in the fall of 1882 and after heroic struggle > the 
sane was completed, at a coat of about $l2iO0.0O. An organi- 
zation was effected on February 25, 1883, bgr the election of 
Bro. S. Q. Shepherd, Moderator, and in the absence of Rev. J. J. 
Martin, Bro. Q. A. Ogles preached the first sermon. Brethren 
from Bradley's Creek and Republican Qrove furnished the larger 
part of the membership. Bro. J. M. Robinson, at that time, 
editor of the B«^tlst and Reflector, preached the dedicatory 
semon. 

*']ii the summer and fall of 1922, a conmittee was egppointed to 

investigate the question of repairing the old house or the 

erection of a new one. After many meetings and asking Ood's 

help and direction, the church appointed the following committee- 

R. E. Jarnon, Chainnan; C. W. Baird, R. H. Martin, Z. T. Herron, 

J. W. Owen, Frank Cason, W. T. Delay, Irvin Martin, and R. H. 

Donnell to act according to the wisdom of said committee and with 

a full assurance the endorsement of the entire church. On the 

2Uth day of May, 192U, we began taking down the old building 

and by continuous effort from day to day, and at an approximate 

estimate of l5 or l6 thousand dollars, we have the pleasure to 

present to you, the present structure, as you see it with no 

indebtedness." 

s/ R. H. Martin 

s/ R. 2. Jarman, Coomittee 

Charter members of this church included R. H. Jarman, R. £. Janun, 

T. P. Ricn, Miss Fannie Rica, Mrs. M. E. Jarman, B. F. Phillips, Mrs. 

Betty Phillips, E. W. Phillips, E. D. Phillips, W. H. Fillips, M. S. 



Phillips, H. C. Martin and Miss Maggie Martin fr«n Bradley Creek (Twelve 
Comer) Baptist Chtxrch; and W. A. Jones, P. B. Jones, G. H. Jones, Ed 
RLon, 0. W. Burk, Mrs. S. C. Burk, J. T. Sanders, Steven Owen, Jtidlth 
Owen, C. L. Owen, Miss Lucy Owen, Nathaniel Owen, Mrs. M. £. Owen, T. E. 
Owen, lira. Mattle Owen, Llllle Owen, J. W. Owen, G. 3. Janaan, Mrs. Sally 
Jaman, Calvin S. Dillon and Mrs. Mary Dillon from Republican Grove (now 
called HlUvlew) Baptist Church. 

The new church prospered spiritually and physically. Bro. Harry 
Jaman, Bro. C. S. Dillon and Bro. J. Wallace Owen were licensed and 
ordained to the gospel ministry hy this church. 

In 1939, the church building was destroyed by fire, but a new 
facility was soon erected and worship continued under the leadership of 
Bro. H. A. Russell, pastor. 

In 1955, under the leadership of Dr. L. S. Sedberry, an educational 
wing was added on the west side of the church. 

In i960, the sanctuaiy was cooqpletely remodeled and a new lifting 
system added. 

In 1962, a complete water system was installed, which Included two 
rest rooms. 

The addition of the basement-including Sunday School class rooms, a 
fellowship hail and kitchen were added in 1965* 

In 1979, the east wing educatlcaial addition over the basement was 
c<»qpleted at an approximate cost of $80,000. OU, including reworking of 
the brick and rest rooms. The dedicatory service was held on 17 June 
1979, with Bro. Bobby J. Bradley delivering the message. Bro. Henry H. 
Innran was pastor at this time. 

Bro. S. G. Shepherd was the first pastor, serving from I883 to I89U. 



Regtaar business msettns were held on Saturday before the first Sunday 
of each month. These meetings are currently held on Wednesday night 
preceding the second Sunday of each month. 

The Constitution and Rules of Decorum vere adopted Kay 1883. The 
nans given to the church vas "Baptist Church of Christ at Lascassas." 
Bro. R. E. Jarman vas elected to serve as the first clerk of the church. 

The treasurer's report for the year 1885 shows an amount received 
at $L32.iiO, and total expenditures at $132.30, leaving a balance of ten 
cents. The current budget is $l4l,6ll.76. 

The Concord Baptist Association, organized in September 1810, of 
which Lascassas Baptist Church is a cooperating church met at this church 
for the first time in August 1888. 

Deacons serving this church in the past weret C. W. Baird, 0. W. 
Burky F. M. Cason, C. S. Dillcn, Roy Dunaway, E. Byron Dement, D. Mac 
Elrod, Kenneth Florida, Z. T. Herron, R. E. Jarman, W. B. Jazman, W. A. 
Jones, E. Irving Martin, R. H. Martin, W. Henry Martin, J. W. Owens, 
Nathazilel Owens, Darrell Rhodes, Wilson Rhodes, J. T. Sanders, W. D. 
Vaught, and Y. B. Yearwood. (Darrell Rhodes was a son of Wilson Rhodes) 
Preston Cason is currently inactive. 

Those serving the church as deacons at this time are: Aiibry Arnold, 
Thomas Lee Craddock, Kelly Dement (sen of E. Byron Dement) Edwin E.Florida 
Sr., John R. Hovse Jr., William McBro<Mn (grandson of W. Henry Martin), 
Don Odom, Douglas Rhodes (son of Wilson Rhodes) and Don A. Webb. Each 
active deacon had a special place on the program for the centennial 
celebration - mentioned later. Don 14Bbb is great grandson of Z.T. Herron. 

Following is a picture of the active deacons made at the centennial 
celebration on Sunday, 27 February 1983: 




s 



•^ o "^ (u 
H- cr rr to 
« Q ^ 



tfl 



Former pastors, and the dats of their tentire are as folloKSS 



S. Q. Shepherd 


1883 - I89li 


Enoch WindyA^indes 


I89li - 1900 


E. S. Bryant 


1901 - 1903 


S. G. Shepherd 


1903 - 190U 


J. B. Alexander 


1905 - 1906 


W. J. Watson 


1906 - 1912 


W, C. McPherson 


1913 - 1919 


W. G. Mahaffey 


1920 - 1922 


E, L. Atwood 


1922 - 1923 


J. A. Kirtley 


1923 - 1929 


J. T. Barbee 


1929 - 1935 


J. D. Barbee-V) 

*> 


1936 - 1937 

1 U 





DR. JOHN D. BARBEE, 


" ■ ' ■ 


Oct 197? 




H. A. Russell 


193« - 19liO 


W. A. Idverman 


19la - 19li2 


Fred Wilstai Morgan, Sr. 


1913 - 19li6 


Allen C. Barrett 


19U7 - 1950 


James C. Wilson 


1951 - 1952 


Ernie Meyers 


1952 - 1953 


L. S. Sedberry 


1953 - 1956 


Charles LeMay 


1956 - 1958 




Dellmer Nichols 
Fairis Jordan 
Bobby J. Bradley 
James M. "Jim" McPherson 
B. B. Isley 



1958 - I960 

i960 - 1961 (Interim) 

1961 - 1965 

1965 - 1967 

1967 - 1969 




B. B. Isley ^ Sadie - as of 25 Febiniary I983 
Vance King ^ I969 - 197li 





James; Fred, Gertie 



Fred Knox James 



197 li - 1975 (Interim) 




REV. BOBBY BRADLEY 

Pastor Lascassas Baptist 

_Chureh 

1961 - 1965 





Honrj' H. Inmon 


Archie D. King 


Pastor 


Interim Pastor 


1978 - 1980 


1980 - 1961 




and wife, Mary 



David L. Elliott 
Evans B. Bowen 
Hemy H. Innon 
Archie D. King 
WiUard Karol Crawley 



197$ - 1978 

1978 (Interim) 
1978 - 1980 

1980 - 1981 (Interim) 

1981 - Present time 




WiUard Karol "WiUie" Crawley, wife-Gail, 
Daughter-Brandy and son Willard K. "Will" Jr. 

Special services were held at the chvtrch Friday evening, Saturday 
evening and Simday morning 25 - 27 February 1983 in observance cf the 
100th anniversary of Lascassas Baptist Church. The splendid program 
was prepared under the capable leadership of Bro. Van Carroll Jones with 
approval of the church. Much time, many long hours and miles were spent 
in the research and preparation of the chui^ch history for this appointed 
time. 

Bro. William A. Cox, Jr., from the Sunday School Board, Nashville, 
Tennessee, directed the singing for each service. Following is a picture 
of Bro. CoQC, also the choir that participated in the services: 




Facing the choir picture, reading 
fl:om left to right- Front row; 

Elaine Dement-organlst, Mary 
McKee, I^ynn Vaught, Kin Florida, 
Betty Florida, Qall Crawley, 
Mary Arm Odom, lynne McBroom, 
Peggy Vaught, Lena Martin, and 
Joyce Florida-pianist; 

Middle row: Edwin Florida, 
Bryan Dement, 3111 McBroom, Peggy 
Jordan, Betty Dodd, Malissa 
Arnold, Amanda Maxwell, Cathy 
Martin, and Betty Kelton 

Back row: Walter Nipper, 
James H. McKee, Jr., Darce Putnam, 
and Jerry Kelton. 



Winiam A. Cox, Jr. 



CHOIR GROUP 



o cj n 










7^ 




Bro. Donald Owen, pastor of Immanuel Baptist Church, Lebanon, Tn. 
delivered the Friday evening message; Bro. Tom Madden, ExBcutive- 
Secretary-TreasTirer of Tennessee Baptist Convention, Nashville, IVi. on 
Saturday evening, and Bro. "Jim" McPherson, a former pastor, now pastor 
of Second Baptist Church, Clinton, Tennessee on Sunday morning. 




Donald Owens, top picture; Tom Madden, lower pict»Jire 





27 February 1983 
Ministers in attendance on Stmday, 27 February 1983, for the Centen- 
nial Observance of the Lascassas Baptist Church. Reading left to 
right, facing the picture are: 

David Levd.s Elliott - Pastor 1975 - 1978 
J. Wallace Owen - Ordained son of the Church 
Willard Karol Crawley- Pastor 1981 - Present time 
Allen C. Barrett - Pastor 19U7 - 1950 
Evans B. Bowen - Interim Pastor - 1978 
James M. "Jim" McPherson - Pastor 1965 - 1967 






Bro. J. Wallace Owen, ordained son of this chiirch was present on 
Simday morning and former pastors attending one service were B. B. 
Isley, Fred Knox James, David Lewis Elliott, Evans B. Bowen and Allen 
C. Barrett. Each of these men were given an opportvnity to speak 
briefly to the congregation. 

Bro. Thomas E. Bryant, Jr., Concord Baptist Associational Missionary 

attended each service, and on Stmday morning presented to Pastor '-lllard 

K. Crawley a plaque from the Historical Society of the Tennessee Baptist 

Convention congratulating Lascassas Baptist Church on its 100 years, 

reading thus: 

THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
of the 
TEMESS2E BAPTIST CONVENTICN 
Salutes the 
LAiaC.lSSAS BAV^IST 
OtURCH 
on its 
lOOtl-i Anniversary 
1983 




A picture of Bro. Crawley holding the foregoing mentioned plaque is 
on the following page, also a picture of Bro. Bryant. 



13 





Bro. Thomas E. Bryant, Jr. 



Bro. Vftllard K. Crawley 



A bountiful oovered-vilsli dinner was served In the fellowship hall 
at the conclusion of the Sunday moming service after many pictures were 
taken by Dr. Bealer Smotheman of Murf reesboro . 

This was indeed a great experience in the life of each one who 
attended . 

Lascassas Baptist Church, cooperating with the Concord Baptist 
Association, Tennessee Baptist Convention and Southern Baptist Convention 
has a full-time program for each one, and cordially invites everyone to 
visit with us and participate. 



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I am unable to identify efexyone in the picture of the congregation 

■ade on Sunday 27 February 1983, therefore , I am listing those vrtio 

registered for one or more of the three seznrioes. The majority of these 

people listed were in the picture. 

ALLEKt Janes R. and Olivia 
ARNOIDt Anbry and Christens 

Dwain, Kitty, Malissa and Beth 

BARRETT: Allen C. 

BENNETT: Jeny, Evelyn and Qlna 

KMWi Evans B. and Elizabeth 

BREi«rHl: James, Bonnie, Ryan and Lindseyi TamBQr 

BRCMN: Kenneth, Dcnna, Robin and Brian 

BRYANT: Thomas E. Jr. and Irbyj Carol 

COAKER: Mr. and Mrs. George M. 
CRADDOCK: Thomas Lee and Ladelle 
CRAWUSY: WiUard, Gail, Brandy and Will 

DEMENT: Kelly, Glsnner, Dan and Dana} 

Paul, Elaine, Bryan, Mark and Joyj 
Harris, Joyce, Tom and Marilyn 

DeHlIEST: Robert and Mary 

DILLON: Pauline 

DCDD: Paul S. Sr., Betty and Tim K.) 
Paul S. Jr., Pat and Adam 

DUNAWAY: Sheldon and Yvonne lynn; Lucy 

ELLIOTT: David Lewis and LaVema 

FLORIDA: Phillip 0., Bet-fy, Phyllis and Brentj 

Edwin E. Jr., Kim and Jessej 

Edwin E. St., and Joyce 
nUSEMAN: James 

GBXFFlTHi Brent and HoUy 

GHOE: Russell, Judy, Jason and Cara 

HALL: William and liaogene 

HOWSI: John R. Jr., Judy, Suzanne, Paula and Rick 

ISLEY: B. B. and Sadie 

JAMES: Fred Knox and Gertrude *'Mama", also knoun as Gertie 
JONES: Van Carroll, Van Michael and PatridLaj Violet 
JORDAN: Ernest and Peggy; Charles| Randy and Peggy 



i6 



KELLTi Hugh and Janat 

KELTON: Jerry, Betty, Michael, Jill and Jason} 

Janei Klnberlle 
KBlGt Mr. and Mrs. Varia B. 
KNIGHT t Ronald P., Rosalind, Rhonda and Roljynj Ricky 



LEE: 
LESTER: 



Link and Marie 
Lalla 



MADDEN: Tom and Edna Earl 

MARTIN: San, Evelyn and Cathyj Lena; Benj Angle 

Jlminy, iMienia and Edgar 

MATHIS: F. Murray and Loretta 

MASf^ELL: Amanda 

MINGLE: Jinny, SLalne and Brooke 

MOORE: Charles, Kay, Gabriel and Daranee 

McBRO€M: 6111, I^nme, Monica and Jennifer 

McCULLOUQH: Era 

McCDRDI: Mr. and Mrs. Art 

McKEE: James H. Jr., Mary Jean, Derek, Lori Jean and Zane 

McPherson: James "Jla" R*, Carolyn, John Mark and Sara 

McVlcker: Norn and Joan 



ODOM: Marvin and Ctsna Lee; 

Den, Mary Ann, Leanne and Donna 

OWEN: Mr. and Mrs. J. Wallace 

OWENS: Donald 

PENUEL: J. D. "Jack" and Alice Brown 

PHILLIPS: Hazel; Pauline 

FOWEL: Petis and Nina Ruth 

POWELL: Kellie 

PRIEST: Mr. and Mrs. Harry 

PUTNAM: Daroe, Margaret and Darrell 

RHODES: Douglas, Karen, Greg and Brad; Rachel; Rhonda; 

Rosalind; Frances, Dawn and Mike 

ROSS: Sidney and Ola 

SMARXT: Carl and Ila 

STILL: Jennie 

TQIPLETDN: Mr. and Mrs. Rick , Rikl Lauren and Mary Beth 



VAUGHN: 
VAUGHT: 
VERBLE: 

WEBB: 

WELI2: 

WINN: 



Troy J. and "Ltl" Troy 

Melvln, Peggy and Stan; Mike, I^mn and Phillip 

Bob, Barbara and Marilyn 



Don A., Patoy, Michelle and Jeff; 
Marion, Tonmie, Any and Robert 
Bobby, Eleanor, Bill and PhilLlp 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan A. 



Pauline 



17 



Lascassas Baptist Church faces north, but with the rerouting of 
96 Highway, it now goes to the back of the church as seen in the following 
photo. The front of the church is featured on the front cover of this 
publication, courte^ of Mr. James Ifetheriy. 




JEFFERSON SPRINGS 

By Margaret Denny Hoover 

(With assistance fw>m Mrs. Effie Swain, Margaret Bradley, Martha 
Wright, Bessie Moore, Ernie Johns and Adeline King) 

For over 50 years, it was known as "Sulphur Springs," As early as 
1850, the "Black Sulphur Spring" had been discovered; and people came 
there on horseback, in wagons or buggies, on foot, to drink the water 
they believed very beneficial, to take it home with them. To them, it 
was a sort of "elixir of life" that would cure or ward off most of their 
aliments. The spring was even called a "spa" by seme, from knowledge of 
or acquaintance with healing springs of Europe. At first and for a long 
time, it was just a spring, bubbling vsp from the earth about ten feet from 
the river's edge. Later, someone blasted out the spring, laid big stones 
around it; even later, a concrete platfoim was poured. In the early days, 
access to the spring was by a slippery path sloping down the river bank. 

To get to Sulphxir Springs from Smyrna and Nashville, visitors and 
devotees of the water proceeded out Jefferson Pike tin til they came to the 
shore of the West Prong of the Stones River; at that point, the Pike con- 
tinued on to the right across a bridge (originally iron, later a concrete 
structTire), into the historic village of Old Jefferson, and on to Mona 
and Walter Hill. The Road to the Sulphur Springs turned sharp left just 
before the bridge approach and continued until it ran alongside the river 
again (this was the main stream of the Stones, after the East and West 
Prongs had merged near Old Jefferson town). The people heading for the 
north side of the river forded it here at a shallow shoals maybe a quarter 
mile or less from the spring itself. The distance from the town of Old 
Jefferson and the Springs was approximately two miles by road. 

Sometimes in the early l800's, the Rutherford County Census listed 

19 



Caleb Swain 


Age U2 


Martha Swain 


37 


Their Children: 




Fraildin Swain 


17 


Lorenzo P. Swain 


15 


Amanda £. Swain 


12 


Bluford 3. 


10 


Benjamin S. 


8 


Fountain E, P. 


6 


Juna A. V. 


3 


Wmiam T. 


1 



the "Sulphxir Springs District." Mrs. Effie Harrell Swain has related 

that her late husband LiUard Swain was the grandson of Caleb Ward Swain 

and his wife Martha, who settled in the Fall Creek District between I830 

and I81i0. According to the l850 Census, they were listed: 

Farmer Bom lii North Carolina 
Bom in North Carolina 

Bom in Tennessee 

Bom in Teimessee 

Bom in Tennessee 

Bom in Tennessee 

Bom in Tennessee 

Bom in Tennessee 

Bom in Tennessee 

Bom in Tennessee 

Fountain E. P. Swain was the father of Lillard and James Franklin 
Swain. His wife was Elizabeth Barber; they bxiilt their home on a large 
tract of land on the north side of Stones River, for a long stretch along 
the river above and below the actual Springs. The house sat on a rise 
facing west. On the south side of the river was a large farm owned by 
Rufe Johns. Bom to Franklin E. P. and Elizabeth Barber Swain In addition 
to Lillard and James Franklin (Jim^ was a child called Johnny, who died at 
an early age. In later years, Jim Swain lived at the southeast end of the 
Swain tract, and Lillard Swain at the northwest. 

On December 22, 191U, Lillard Swain was married to Effie Harrell, who 
was bom in I896 in Hillsboro, Texas. Her parents were Henry Jones Harrell 
and Nancy Bell Harrell. Her grandparents James T. and Roxanna Young Bell 
were homesick for the Harrells and the Harrells homesick for Tennessee; and 
Mr. Bell purchased the Tom Sanders farm in the northwest bend of the Stones 
River and invited the Harrells to come home to Tennessee. When they return- 
ed in 1898, Miss Effie was two years old. 

The children of Lillard and Effie Harrell Swain: 



20 



Pearl Swain (Mrs. H. Herbert Batey) Dllton, Tennessee 

Eugene Franklin Swain Smyrna, Tennessee 

Janes LllLard Swain Nashville, Tennessee 

Rachel Swain (Mrs. l&rd Lee Wri^t) Kingston, Tennessee 

The children of James Franklin (Jim) and Elizabeth Hester Swain: 

Ruth Swain (Mrs. Clarence Terry) Petersburg, Tennessee 
James Fountain Swain (died in 1982) Nashville, Tennessee 

Note: E. F. (Frank) Swain and his wife Beulah presently have their 
home on the New Jefferson Pike, on some of the original Swain property. 

Sales of land parcels began in the area of the Springs before 1900. 
These excerpts from the Records of Deeds in Murfreesboro show that Fount- 
ain P. and Alice Swain purchased a tract of land from the Qeorge Adkerson 
estate in 188U. Thereafter, they sold lots, as follows: 

In 1891 to Mrs. Virginia Nash 

In 1891 to W. H. Sanders 

In I89U to J. A. Qua, Jr., and H. L. Fox 

In 1895 to Mrs. Sallie Loid (Uoyd ?) 

In 1895 "Lot No. 1" to H. H. Hicks, Jr., and T. A. Bridges 

(the deed says "on the north bank 
of Stones River opposite the Sul- 
phur Springs; they can not do 
business such as selling goods or 
merchandise or produce," Dated 2 
February 1895) 

In 1900 to John H. King, northwest comer, 

west to Zanons (sp7), southeast to 
Charlie Ward, and north to Charlie 
Ward line. 

In 1901 to Louis Huggins 

In 1902 to J. C. and Maggie Rushing, land 

bordering on north by Swain, east 
by James Harrell and J. P. Sanders. 
This plot of land in \rtiich to be 
"situated a projected hotel b\iild- 
ing for viijitors to Sulphur Springs, 
for F. P. Swain, Sam and Hattie Reed 
Adams, C. A. Ward, and Ton Smith. 

In 1906 to M. T. Altmeyer 



21 



1 






P^tK 




r- ~f<~^ ^ 7> -^> 



Ctf^'Trt 



C«^' 



f; 



.t^ 



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A 



c<^. 



QO»l 



.-(^^ 



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t^Ar/< S-^'^^^^"^'"' 






22 




U.S. Army Engineer's map 
for property in Percy Priest 
Lake , 



22 a 



TRACT REGISTER OF ACQUISITION AFTER I JAN. 1943 



LAND OWNER 



ACREAGE 



FEE 



EASE. 



REMARKS 



? 'J / f J 
I ■ 



MRS. MOLLIE MILLFR 

MRS. )rv^;aie /wnttR 

EARL L. COLEMAN ET AL 

EARL L. COLEMAN ET AL . 

ELIZABETH SANDERS 

DORIAN E. CLARK 

MRS. MOZfLLE M. SMITH 

GEORGE W. MULLINS JR. ET. AL 

E.G. RION 

W.O. DENNY 

CLARA BELL BAKER 

EFFIE SWAIN 

EMMETT H. WEBB SR. 

E.G. RION 

MARGARET A McLURE 

OSCAR S. BASKIN 

H,G. AND SALLIE YEAR6IN 

BESSIE MAI BUCHANAN 

JESSE JULIAN WARD 

LEON GILBERT - 

C;S. AND J.T. D'.:GGER 

MARGARET A. McLURE 

JAMES F. MORRISON 

JOHN S, RIDLEY ET AL 

MARGARET A. McL RE 

JESSE JULIAN WARD 

JESSE JULIAN WARD 

MARGARET ROONEY BAREFIELD 

MAUDE A. McCANi ESS 

JAMES M. BRLNT 

MARGARET A. McLURE 

JOHN S. RIDLEY ET AL 

^■i..TX 



IU8.50 
1^.60 

30.70 

17.80 
0.10 

88.00 
0.63 
0.15 
0.58 
I .15 
0.26 

2U.30 
0.140 
I .88 
4.85 

o.m 

0.16 
0.311 
0.il5 
0.22 
O.ll 
0.141 
0.73 
I .HO 
0.50 
0.35 
0.01 
2.00 
0.08 
0.23 
0.55 
29.24 

2/ •s'.o 



n*) 



Wv*-^ 



ft ' 



\1 >Tr« i/«v ui v^*.t%<.>r 






'^ 






U. "S. Arniy Engiijifeer • s list of I LandoiAOiers' 
at Jefferson Springs when land was taken for 
Percy Priest Lake. ■ . j 

22 b ' : '*■■;::,■•* .' 



In 1906 to Charlie Ward> northwest side. He 

built a two-story house with ci^la. 
This was the first hotel. 

In 1907 to W. H. Tiniiion (Tiraraons ?) 

In 1908 to Eugene Black, property which was 

on the north fronting of public 
road> east by Swain to middle 
of the river, west by lands of 
Stoiith. 

In 1913 Eugene Black sold this to Frank Davis, "an xmnarried man," 

Davis sold it to J. J. Anderson 
and E. H. Murray, also in 1913. 
The new ownership was known as 
the "Jefferson fringe Hotel 
Company." 

In 1913, W. W. Dillon, J. J. Anderson, and E. H. Murray acqiilred 
six acres on the south side of the River from W. R. (Rufe) and J.J. Johns. 
Ttd.a transfer included the Sulphur Springs and the sand bar. 

In I9IU, F. P. and Alice Swain sold land to J. J. Martin, W. H. Martin, 
R. S. Waller, Claiborne Waller, northeasterly by Sam Adams and wife, south 
by public road, west by F. P. Swain and wife. 

In 1916, J. J. Anderson and W. T. Young bought 51 acres from F. P. 
and Alice Swain on the north side of the river. It bordered the property 
of J. F. Baskin. 

In 1916, J. J. Anderson sold a number of lots to M. T. ^yrd, George 
W. Haynes, and others. J. J. Martin sold a lot to John H* King, northeast 
comer, formerly owned by Charlie Ward, west 150 feet to a lot known as 
Zanals (sp?) Lot. 

In May 1916, F. P. and Alice Swain sold a lot to W. G. and Margaret 
Denny (grandparents of Margaret Denny Hoover), at the southwest comer of 
the Sam Adams cottage (the lot had been purchased from WLUie Watrd (grand- 
father of Kathryn Qre&a. McClary). The Demy family had been coming to the 
Springs each summer since 1912, camping out in tents. 

In 1918 and later years F. P. and Alice Swain sold lots to the 

23 



following: 

Mrs. John Valley VJhite 

Ifrs. C. W. Webb 

C. M. Ward 

C. H. Sanborn 

F. W. Miles 

J. R. Culbertson 

Sam Cox 

Mrs. M. S. Swain 

In 1922 to W. O. Denny 

A. S. Overall 

The need for a bridge across the river at the Springs was recog- 
nized early; and, in 1908, Nashville Bridge Conqpany entered into a 
contract (with the County, we presiane) to build an iron structure a- 
cross the river a few feet downstream from the spring itself; the north- 
side exit was into what was to become the "hub" of the Jefferson Springs 
Summer Resort. Mrs. Effie Swain tells us that, although the bridge was 
begun in 1908, it was not conq;)leted, due to financial problems, mtil 
January 1913* She recalls that she and Idllard Swain were married on 
December 23, 19lU, and they had been able to cross the bridge for nearly 
a year before their marriage. In the 1960's, the bridge was taken out by 
the Corps of Qi fleers (as were several others across the Stones River in 
the area) for the impoundment of the waters of Percy Priest Lake. Through 
the efforts of local people (Everett WalLer, to name one), Adeline King, 
then employed at Nashville Bridge Company, obtained the builder's plate 
that was attached to an \:;>per truss. This plate was dated 1908; and, 
because that was the birth year of one of the builder's sons, she turned 
the plate over to the son. lliis bridge was set at right angles to the 
road approaching from the south, and its approach rstap curved gradxially 
from the road. It was a one-way structure, with a railed off walkway for 
pedestrians on one side. Its flooring was of wide, thick planks, reinforced 



24 



and double -thickness for the wheel tracks. These planks rattled loosely 
with the passing traffic, and the noise of them could be heard several 
miles away. On crowded, summer Sundays, it was filled with people, walk- 
ing back and forth, leaning against the rails, watching the boats and 
swiimers in the water below. 

As mentioned before in this record, Charlie Ward had in 1906 bought 
a small tract on the northwest side; on it, he built a two-story house 
with a cvqx)la. Later, Mr. J. J. Anderson purchased this lot and house 
from Mr. Ward, added a third story, kept the ciqwla} he added a large, 
screened-in area for dining and dancing. On a Saturday night in 1920, 
Mr. Anderson's hotel b\imed. Mr. Anderson rebviilt and, on Friday evening 
of State Fair Week in 1920, both this hotel and adjacent dance hall were 
burned, along with the Adams house (also called the WLUie Ward house). 
The fire engine from Smyrna answered the call and saved the Denny house. 
A bucket line, providing water from the lAllard Swain house about 100 
feet behind the Denny house, dance hall, and store, was also responsible 
for saving those structures. 

The third hotel was the Bob Smith house on the south side of the 
river. Mr. J. J. Anderson bought it from the Smith family about 193u. 
His son, J. J. Anderson, Jr., wife, and twin children, Jimmy and Cather- 
ine, came vop from Florida each summer for a number of years to run the 
hotel enterprise for Mr. Anderson, Sr. In this structure, there was room 
for about 30 (maybe more) people. They provided lodging and three meals 
a day to their boarders. 

The Bob Smith family, comprised of several sons and daughters, were 
talented people and very musical. They provided music for square dances, 
put en dramatic shows during the summer for visitors at the resort 
(conedies and tear jerkers like "Face on The Bar Room Floor ," etc.), 

25 



Denny? store 
W.G. Denny- 
leaning against 
post 





Anderson store 
about 1925 



Bob Smith house 
Used as hotel 
Bought by 

R.L. (Dick) McLure 
about 1926 




Oi\ 



along with regular participation In the well-remembered Toby Shows. 

The first store in the resort was operated by Mr. "Cap" Johnson. 
He provided not only food, kerosene, incidentals, but also Just about 
any item called for by a suraier caitqjer. He even offered costumes or 
materials to make them for any special occasion. Tommy Wrather also 
had a store in the eastward end of the settlement. After the store 
owned by Mr. J. J. Anderson was destroyed by fire in 1925, it was re- 
built. Adjacent to it was a bowling alley (5 pins); there was also a 
pool room adjacent to the large dance hall. This was just to the ri^t 
of the exit from the bridge on the north side of the river. 

Directly in front of the north exLt of the bridge, there was a 
large plot of ground known as The Playgroxmd. It was surrounded by a 
rock fence and was entered through a large center gate. In this area, 
were shady picnic grounds, horse show throwing facilities, a baseball 
field. There was also a popular feature known as "The Flying Jennyj" 
it would hold well over SO people at a time. With circular tiers of 
seats, it went up and down, and required six to eight boys to keep it in 
motion. Mr. Anderson had it built by John Bell Smith and Charlie Sam 
Parker about 1925. 

For many years after its discovery, and with increasing popularity, 
the spring was just that, a spring bubbling up from the ground. Qushlng 
up from the earth from a small mound about ten feet from the steep river 
bank, it was reached by making ones way down a narrow, slippery path 
diagonally down the river bank. We are told that, to enlarge it, someone 
blasted out the spring (could have destroyed it J in the early 1900 's. In 
or before 191ii, concrete steps were built strlght down the river bank 
directly in front of the spring, steep, high, narrow, dangerous steps. At 
the same time, a concrete platform was laid surrounding the spring "gumj" 



27 



the gum was about four or five feet tall and had three spigots on Its side 
facing west. At one time and for a tiioe, there was a large umbrella in- 
stalled above the "gum." 

Mr. J^erson also built a large wooden slide-chute and bath house in 
the next few years; they were on the south side of the river and were 
operated by Gene Smith and wife. The slide, a flume-like structure, was 
an exciting Innovation for the young swimmers. It was of wood; its top 
was at road level of the river bank, and its bottom at water level. The 
starting point was above and not far fW>m the "spring" site, and the chute 
curved away slightly in its downward course to mid-river. It had to be 
kept watered down so the slide boards would movej and sliders provided 
their own pails of water for the process. Climbing the long stairway to 
the top carrying board and pall of water was not easy; but the process 
went on in steady procession. The youngsters watered down the chute, got 
onto their boards, pushed themselves off, picked yip roller coaster speed, 
and went screaming to plunge into the river at midstream. Moving pictures 
were taken one lith of July of Margaret McLure ^^^ Margaret Denny making 
their speedy descent of the Slide . Later, when the reels were rolled in 
the Dance Hall; the operator showed the descent, then reversed the reel, 
and shot the girls back vp the Slide at terrific speed. 

As outlined earlier, people wei« birring lots from the Swain family 
before the turn of the century and building s\anmer houses. Two of those 
earlier residents were Willie and Charlie Ward, brothers from Stayma 
(Willie and Kate Black Ward were the grandparents of Kathryn Green, 'Mrs. 
R. W. McClary. The two large campsites of the Wards could accomodate 
25 to 30 people. In the years after 1913* the Willie Ward house was 
known as "the Adams house." It was next door to the home and store of the 
W. G. Denny family, grandparents of Margaret Denny Hoover. The Denny 

2g 




The wooden slide and the bath house above 
with people swiming: in river. About 1920 




Cars parked on sandbar on south side of the 
river near the Sulphur spring about 1920 
Pictures furnished by Wm. H, V/hite. 




reverse 

A token issued by the Jefferson Springs Co. 
furnished by E.K. Johns. "Probably dates about 1920 
Pencil tracing of Aluminum token. 



2S A 







■^.:| 


fy^ 




i' 


t 


1 


1 


S^ 


Wile 


i L: 


-. 1 • 


r^'* ,. 




^^^^^^*'^r^Bl 


1^ 



Point Veiw 
built by Smith family 
of Nashville 



Baskin's house 




Built by Charles Moore 
about 1914 



Triangle house 
Dick McLure house 



29 




Hilltop 
Home of J.J. Anderson 





Mrs. Eades in front of 
gate to park at Sulour 
(Jefferson) Springs 




\.-*''11W 



Im 




Rental house 
Building ne:<:t door v;as to 
be a T.B. Hospital but vras 
not finished. 



"//rather house 
Built before 1914 



30 




Pictures of Jefferson Springs- cnbins of Iirs. John 
V. V/liite From her .""randson V/m. H. V/}iite 



30 A 



/ 

When the hot da(Vs come, and the suffocat- 
ing •ights, everyone asks : 

Where shall -we go for a holiday. 
What change will do us the most good? 
Modern science gives the answer. 
Out among the hills and streams. 
Change of climate, change of surroundings. 
Complete change is the first condition of 
health and recreation. 



Enjoy these in 



Stiiphur Springs 

"5 Minutes from the Dixie Highway" 

Smyrna, - - Tennessee 



Boating, Bathing, Fishing, Hunting and 
Motoring. Cedar-clad mountain valleys ; Pic- 
^ turesque and historical Stone River, forcing its 
way through precipitous gorge and deep canon, 
lending a sort of awe to the wild mountain 
passes. 

Tennessee's famous blue-white sulphjii*^ 
spring water absolutely free to visitors. 

Hospitality is a striking characteristic of the 
select occupants of Mrs. White's Rustic Camp 
Cottages. Here everybody is made to feel at 
home. One cannot fail to be impressed with the 
freedv^.n from restraint and withal th si«y, 
home-like atmosphere that pervades the ^.lace. 

Two, three, and four room complely fur- 
nished rustic cottages for weekly, monthly, or 
season rentals. Make your reservations now 
for this and next summer. 



Rates and full information from, 

■*^7" MKS. JNO. V. WHITE, 

— SulphSr Springs, Smyrna, Tennessee or 
217 East Vine, Murfreesboro, Tennessee 



An Advertisement for rental cabins by Firs. John Valley 
'iiThite now ovmed by her grandson V/m. H. VThite. 



i@BB@ 



30 B 




Reverse of Advertisement of rental cabin by l-n 
John V-alley V/liite 



30 C 



store was called "The Campers Store." Also, as indicated earlier, the 
Dermys purchased their lots from the F. P. Swains in 1916, 

After tiiming left after crossing the bridge to the norti-! side of 
the river, there was located the J, J. Anderson hoxise on a hill on the 
right side of the road. N«xt to it was the Willie Ward (or Adams) 
house J then the W. J. Denny store, dance hall, and home. Across from 
the score on the river side of the road was the Vlebb cottage. Beyond 
the Denny place on the right side of the road was the LiUard Swain 
home and farm; there were many beautiful oak trees on thia property. 
On the river side here was an open lot through which 'Ar. Swgin's cow^ 
went down to the river twice a day for water. It was also Uie north- 
side end of the former x-ord used by travelers before the bridge was 
built. Also on the river side of the road ■ s a teiinis coiirt, the ".J. 
0. Baker cottage, and lots owned by C. VJ. Parker and W. 0. Derxr,-/ (these 
lots were enclosed by fences). The "Cap" Johnson store was along i:i this 
area J and then up on a rise i2i the river's bend was tha ;L=rrell home and 
farm (the Bumstts lived here at one time). The main road separated the 
river side from the farm side of the area; this road continued on past 
the Larrsll place to the Su'tnsr Sanders home and f-n'.n. Originally, this 
had been a public road, followirig ttiC river to the Jesse ;;=aidoi« pi-ci^ity, 
whei-e one could ford the rivei- ovsi- to Shai-j Springs xioad, or you oou2.d 
continue along the road back to Lamar Road, vjiiicli came from zhe norLh 
in^o Jefferson Spiir.^s. 

Back to the bridge and turr.ing right afocr c:d.tdr.g onoo the noi-th 
side of the river and moving eastward, there were on one's; rJ.gxri, or 
river side of the road, tvrc rental cottages ov:i;ed by D; -> Mc*^ ure (father 
of Margaret Mc'V-VJ-e Bradlfty); a rental house o-wned by Mi^s. John Valley 
I'Tiitej a vacan-o let; then houses rf Bud Baskin, Buddy Barefield, Mr. Doyle, 



31 



Louis Todd, Joseph Vaughn, John Dugger, Claude Dugger, two houses ovmed 
by the Ward brothers, Mr. Smith, Dr. Woodring; (all these, except Mrs. 
White and Mr. BasVdLn, were Nashville people); then a cottage of Mrs. 
Wrather. On the other side of the road, coming back from the east end 
of the settlement, was the gate leading into the farm of James Franklin 
Swain (known as Jim) and his wife Elizabeth. This place was later owned 
by J. L. and Daisy Ross. Caning back west along the road, was the Tommy 
Wrather hoiisej Mr. Wrather was a man of diminutive stature, but of person- 
ality and character to outreach his size. The VJrathers were early resi- 
dents of Jefferson Springs community. Next came the Thompson Ward house, 
built of rock; then five or six rental houses built by Buddy (E. W.) Bare- 
field, the Moore house, owned by the father of the late Herbert Moore, 
the Geny house, largest of the summer cottages; next was Mrs. John Valley 
White's log house, the John BaskLn house, purchased by R. G. McI, ure, a 
rental house, and the "Triangle House" (summer home of the Mc Lures). 
Turning right after the McL .ure house, one entered the end of Lamar Road, 
with the Playground on thje immediate left. Then came the Tom Byrd house, 
the Robert Dudley house, house of AUen Dobson, Uie Gregory Ross House 
(they were year-round residents). Gregory was the twin brother of J. L. 
Ross. Across the road was the Overall house, which was destroyed by 
fire and not rebuilt. 

With the continuing popxilarity of the sulphur water from the spring 
with the older generation, the convenience of the bridge, the enthusiaan 
of young people for summer camping, swimming, and boating, Jefferson 
Springs grew rapidly as a summer place. People came from Nashville and 
other places; they came in early svmimer after school ended and stayed 
until the first of September or school time again. Some built and owned 
cottages; other rented. They built their private ladders or steps down 



32 



the river bank from the cottages to the water below. They brought boats, 
bathing siilts, fishing gear, stocked up their cupboards and iceboxea, 
filled the oil lanqps, and were ready for the sunmer. Fathers who worked 
in Nashville or elsewhere coioauted daily to their jobs, while mothers and 
youngsters spent much time in the river, getting their bodies deep-tanned, 
their hair bleached i^hite by the sisi. They came year after year on their 
annual happy trek. The Denny family can9>ed in tents for several years be- 
fore they built a cottage. 

Bessie Wright Moore has given us some of the personal recollections 
of her late husband Herbert Moore, who as a boy spent much happy s\znner 
time at the Springs. She writes: 

"The Moores went to the 'Sulphur Springs" after their crops were 
'laid by', and they stayed several weeks each summer, leaving some of 
their older sons at home to do the milking and other chores. They and 
their camping necessities traveled by wagon from their farm seven miles 
from Murfreesboro on the Franklin Road. It was about a day's journey; 
they came from the Murfreesboro Road into Florence Road, having to ford 
streams several times, which gave the horses a chnace to drink and rest. 
One of the fordings was at the West Prong of the Stones River which passed 
between the Mann and Creech farms, off Florence Road. The Creech place 
was later owned by ray relatives Joe and Ollie Waller King. A narrow road 
frrm the ford brought one into the village of Old Jefferson and passed 
the Waller home (of my maternal grandparents). This was the house where 
they kept the buggy sheltered on the porch. 

"At Sulphur Springs (the Moores never called it anything else), the 

Moores stayed in a tent for some seasons; later Baddy Moore built a cook 

house where the meals were prepared. Many cousins and other relatives 

came to visit for a few days at a time; they usually came with full hands 
t 

33 




Tent Gamp said to be Smith and Bateys 




These camps v;ere built in li39o and 1900 



34 



of provisions, including fresh vegetables. Daddy Moore and Mrs. John 
Valley White both were owners of several cottages for rental. 

"Herbert recalled seeing Mrs. White slipping quietly through the 
trees on the lot to go swimming, attired in baggy bloomers, long black 
stockings, canvas shoes, and a bulky cap. 

"As a boy Herbert and his brother earned summer spending money by 
rowing campers across the river before the bridge was built. For a 
small fee of a nickel or dime, they ferried anyone who came to their 
canoe dock." 

On the ktti of Ju3y, the big day of the summer holiday season, 
people thronged to Jefferson Springs; they came on foot in wagons, trucks, 
cars, anyway. The summer residents and the visitors by ten a.m. haul the 
playground, parking areas, bridge, stores, sand bar, and roadways congest- 
ed. The Saturday night dances drew crowds too; there were some dances 
on week nights, but Saturday nights filled the halls. The gatherings 
were not always peaceful. After some over-indulgers began or got into 
quarrels, petty spats, fist fights, law officers sometimes had to take 
over. After one very high night, one couple greatly intoxicated, got 
into their car, roared off, and plvmged off the river bank into the water 
below. When men waded across the stream to pull the occupants out of the 
car, the giggling, pixilated girl confided, "I always did want to be in a 
wreck." 

Mr. W. G. Denny b\illt a dance hall connected to his store in 1917; 
in 1920,on each Satruday night and special summer holidays, orchestras 
were playing there, as well as at the hall of J. J. Anderson. Some of 
the good orchestras irtio came to play, chiefly out of Nashville, were 
those of Bill McDowell, Red McBwen, Beasley Smith, on at least one occa- 
sion, Fhil Harris and his band played at a Jefferson Springs dance. 



35 



'A Land of Pure Delight' 



Jefferson Springs 

ON PICTURESQUE STONE RIVER, 
RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE. 



A Restful Place to Spend a Vacation 



Swimming in sparkling water under safe conditions. 

Boating along the wide reaches of a restful river. 

Fishing for those who enjoy that fine sport. 

Rest and Recreation, helpful and healthful. 

Long walks through the cool woods. 



Come to Jefferson Springs 

Convenient and conveniences for 
those who appreciate the charms 
oj the Water, IVoods and Fields. 



Bring the Kiddies and Turn Them Loose. 



Pamphlet advertising Ilrs. John V.'./hite's rental 
cabins . Furnished by ',/m. H. V/hite her grandson. 

35 A 



JEFFERSON SPRINGS 

Everywhere, everyone loves the "good old summer 
time," but when the real hot days come, with the suffocat- 
ing, trying nights, we all ask ourselves where we can go to 
get away from the heat. (Just a holiday with change of 
environment always does us good.) Nature always fur- 
nishes the answer, "Go ro the hiils, woods, streams, and 
get acquainted with Nature, and what she has to offer you. " 

When it comes to where to go, there is only one answer 
— Jefferson Springs, Rutherford County, Tennessee, lo- 
cated twenty-three miles from Nashville and eleven miles 
from Murfreesboro, over the finest automobile roads one 
could wish to travel on. There are jitneys and a motor bus 
which run making three trips a day between Nashville and 
Murfreesboro and they can take you to Smyrna where you 
can make arrangements to be taken over to Jefferson 
Springs for a mere trifle. 

There are accommodations for those who come to Jeffer- 
son Springs. There is a hotel; there are also several board- 
ing houses and Mrs. White's famous rustic cottages. The 
beauty and actractiveness of Stone River must not be over- 
looked. On one side the rocky bluff rises to a height of fifty 
feet, while on the other side the slope is very gentle with a 
wide, clean, pebbled beach which makes it delightful for 
bathing. The water is clear and pure except immediately 
following a rain storm. The current is gentle and the river 
is not deep, nor is it full of snags, which makes it safe for 
swimmers, and for a mile or more the water is shallow on 
one side making it safe for the little folks to play in the water 
and have fun to their heart's content. There is a well 
equipped bath house near the bridge with a chute for those 
who enjoy the sport of sliding down into the refreshing 
water of the river. 



Phamplet of Mrs. V^ite page 2 
35 3 




1. Riverside Drive. 2. The Log Cabin, one of Mr^. White's Cottages. 3 and 4. 
Swimming in Stone River. 5. The Bath House, Chutes and Bridge. 



Fhamplet of Ivjr^s. I'/hite- note picture ,/ 5 



r-* MRS. WHITE'S COTTAGES 

ON THE bluff side of Stone River, more than fifty 
feet above the water, facing River Side Drive, Mrs. 
J. V. White has built and furnished a number of rus- 
tic cottages, for the accomr jdation of those who want to 
"~^ SOffiiu "atiiiic at Liira n,aiiul,-.icalt.iful rcsc; • . - -^■ 

These cottages of two, three and four rooms, are not 
mere "shacks," but comfortable, convenient homes in which 
to spend a vacation. They are completely furnished for 
keeping house, and all the necessary supplies may be pur- 
chased at the Springs as needed. 

There is entire freedom from restraint or formality. 
You are at home, to do as you please; to enjoy the abundant 
hospitality of your neighbors, mingle in the simple sports, 
and rest and recreate as the spirit moves you. It is only a 
step from your door down to the river's edge, and nothing 
is more delightful or invigorating than a plunge and swim 
in the clean, living water of Stone River. 

There are boats, which may be rented for those who de- 
light in this form of healthful recreation. There is fishing 
— real, honest sport with an abundant reward for those 
who have the patience and skill, as well as love for the sport. 

When you are tired, or think you are and do not want 
to go to the trouble of cooking, the hotel, or restaurant can 
furnish_Vou meals at a reasonable price. 

Reservations for cottages stiouIQ be rfiaut cuily, as vhcic- 
is always a waiting list. You can rent them by the week, 
month, or for the entire season. 

Rates and further information may be had by address- 
ing: 

Mrs. J .V. White, 217 East Vine St., Murfreesboro, 
Tenn. After May i§th Address Jefferson Springs, Smyrna, 
Term. 



Phamplet of Jirs. John V. VJhite page 4 
35 D 



Local imislclans also played there; some of them were Red azid Jimmy Gvyn, 
Robert Davis, Granville Harris. J. Beasley Smith was a piano player; 
with a young man named S, E. Franklin, he formed the "Dixie Novelty 
Orchestra;" they filled many engagements in Middle Tennessee, as well 
as at Jefferson Springs. Smith was a well-known, outstanding Tennessee 
musician. 

On a Saturday night in 1920, Mr. Anderson's hotel burned while many 
people were dancing at both halls. Bill McDowell was playing at the 
Denny hall. People ran, formed a bucket line from the LiHard Swains' 
well, and kept the Denny hall from being destroyed. Bill McDowell 
climbed to the roof and worked hard to help the bucket line; the heat 
was so intense that his pocket watch burned a large spot on his leg. 
Margaret Denny was about six years old at the time and watched the fire 
and flreflghting from her grandmother's house, about 100 feet behind the 
store and dance hall. 

In the era of the big dances at Jefferson Springs, Richmond Sanders 
and Jimmy Gwyn often served as "bovmcers" at the Denny Dance Hall. Scoie 
of the Smyrna regulars who were on hand for all dances were Carlos Dement, 
Bernard Mann, J. B. and Ifenry Randolph ,Sut Pulllas, Joe Harris and Bennle 
King, Frank Cheathem Ward, Everett and Bob Waller, Sanders Hibbett, Hollis 
Sanders, Walter, John, and Buddy Hoover, John "Lap" Jordan, Earl Coleman, 
Sam and Knox Ridley, Sarah and Winston Moore, and many more; also Mr. and 
Mrs. Bonner of Murfreesboro. 

Some of the songs played and sung and danced to in the heyday of 
Jefferson Springs were "Yes, We Have No Bananas," "South," "Small Hotel," 
"Stardust," "The Waltz You Saved for Me," "Make Believe," "I'm Looking 
Over a Four Leaf Clover," "Nighty Night," "These Foolish Things," "Moon 
over Miami," "The Music Goes Round and Round," "So Rare," "That Old Black 

36 



Magic," "Me and Ify Shadow," "All of Me," "Sweet Leilani," "iOle^eny 
Moon," "Peg of Ity Heart," "Good Nl^t, Sweetheart," and many more. 

Some additional items of interest related to Jefferson Springs: 
The mail boxes for the campers and dwellers were placed at a central 
point, at the intersection of the east-^west road and Lamar Road, where 
a large wheel was moxinted on a post, with a rotating hub, so the wheel 

could be tttmed by the mail carrier or the mail box owners 

In 19h3j the adjacent fields and river side were one of the local sites 
for some of the maneuvers of General Fatten 's Third Army . . . .Mr. J. 
J. Anderson, when selling any property to a prospective camp owner gave 
that owner rights to use of the river and the water from the spring. . . 
When the Corps of Qigineers projected the area to be covered by the 
waters of the Percy Priest Lake, Gil Olerud bought a log house some>rtiere 
in the area and moved it to a location behind his house on Sam Davis 
Road. In it, he found a handwritten letter in a cornerstone of that 
house. The letter, on a letterhead headed "J. J. Anderson, Nashville, 
Tenn.," undated and unsigned, reads: 

"It is with pleasure that we give this little history of Jefferson 
Springs to be placed in the comer stone of Mrs. F. I. Ward's cottage. 

"First, we wish to say that Mrs. F. I. Ward iS quite an asset to 
Jefferson Springs with her high Igrpe of character and never-ending energy 
and for more than average intellect. 

"Jefferson Springs was purchased by J. J. Anderson in 1912 for the 
purpose of making a summer and health resort becaiise of the wonderful 
stomach water for building vap general run down system. 

"At this time, there are forty-three cottages, one hotel, one large 
dance hall, and large amusement hall which contains a general store. 
Sandwich shop, pool room, and bowling alleys. Also another store owned 

37 



by Mr. W. G. Denny with bowling alley attached. The cottages are of a 
better class than most sranmer resorts have. And this one to be btdlt 
on this corner stone is equal or better than any camp here at this tine." 

Vlhen, in the 1960*s, the Corps of Engineers acqtiired property ad- 
jacent to the river and to the projected elevation of 300 feet, Jefferson 
Springs was interred by the deepened waters of the Stones River in the 
headwaters of the Percy Priest Lake. After World War II, the resort 
had never regained its former popularilgr. Cottages were disposed of, 
other resorts opened up to attract people; a few year-round residents 
remained tin til I960. The new Jefferson Pike was opened, necessarily 
created after the bridges at Old Jefferson and Mbna were removed and a 
new bridge was erected across the Lake not far f):x>m the former Jefferson 
Springs. Bven Lamar Road, turning north from the area, has few recog- 
nizable landmarks. 

Where for a number of years, many carefree simmer people came to 
drink the black sulphur water, fill their jars and jugs to take home, 
getting there by the old slippery path or the later steep concrete stepsj 
where people came to cajq> in tents or cottages or stay in one of the 
hotels; where they spent happy months swiitming, boating, bowling, dancing; 
there is now a broad, smooth expanse of water, maybe 50 feet deep at the 
site. 

The people who were there sunrier after staimer, old and young, can 
look back on good years when many fine and lasting friendships were 
made, many h£4)py and good memories inspired. To paraphrase the Sinatra 
song, "They were very good years." 



3S 



ti%^^S 





Sulphur Spring 139^- seated- I-:if,s Maybelle Gre^'^ory , Joe 21nck 
1st rov; - Mable Smith, Nannie Smit]i,Ella Black, Carlos Smith, 
Kate Searcy, Billy Smith, r-Iitchie McLaughlin,ym. Kerritt. 2nd 
■rov7- Sallie 3atey,Jack Batey, F-rs. Thida Merritt,Pete Searcy, 
"ie Batey, Lucy Rucker ,i-';iss V/att Bate-y, Charlie Batey. 




Sulphur 
Springs 
139 ' 




The Sulphur Spring before 1903, Youns boy in front Carlo; 
Smith. 




The Sulpur Spring in sunrncr of 191f^ or 1919 



40 




The Sulphur Spring .?,bout 1914 or 1915. L.-cies h^.ts 

on top of spring. Ladies "Svelyn Dickinson ?z Annie Doll 

Harris 




Steos to the Spring nut in in lite 191 'i- picture rn^dc 
about 1915 



41 




Looking north on Sulpur Springs bridge 

Notice the first dance hall building built by 

Iir. Joe Clack Cc other campers Ladies are Evelyn Diciiinsor 

and Annie De].l Harris 




The bridge at Jefferson Sorings -ibout 191> 



42 




Crossing river before I914 bridge at Jefferson Sorings 




Group at the spring -note acron at too of the "Giim" 



43 




V/m. H. V/hite 

1945 
on bridge 



I'lrs. John V. 
V/hite cabin 




Vjts. John V. 
V/hite cabin 



Dictur^ of Vto.H.V/hite 



43 A 



1836 Tax Record of the 2^th Distidct 
Rutherford Counl^y Tennessee 



Name 

Edward Adcock 
Thomas Baily 
Wilson Broyles 
John Boaz 
John Browi 
William Burkes 
Leroy Burks 
Joel Broyles 
Samuel Burkes 
Lazareth Belt 
John H. Bingham 
Thomas ? Bailey 
Jourdan Brooks 
Willis Burkes 
Brooks Brooks 
Benjamin Brothers 
Anthony Clark 
Harmon B. Culver 
Simeon Culver 
Edward Cury 
John Cates 
Benjamin Cates 
William Clark 



Acres/Worth School 
$ Land 



167 - 1,000 



172 - 1,000 

75 - loo 

153 - 1,200 

iiO - 70 

103 - 800 

30 - 100 

27U - 600 

lk9 - 1,000 

170 - 700 

220 - 100 



SlavesAorth White 
12-50 



1-600 



100 - 600 



Poll 


County 
Tax 


1 


$ .25 


1 


.25 


1 


1.05 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


1.05 




.32 


1 


.25 


1 


1.21 


1 


.25 




.32 


1 


1.37 


1 


.33 




1.28 


1 


1.05 


1 


.81 


1 


.81 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


.73 



44 



Nans 


icres/Vorth 

$ 


School 
Land 


SlavBs/Worth 
12-50 


White 
Poll 


State/ 

County 

Tax 


Reiibin Cury 








1 


$ .25 


? Caii?)bell 








1 


.25 


Izereal Gates 






• V 


, ..1 ■ 


.25 


M. T. L. CUEMAN 


7 - 200 








.Ul 


James Clark 


650 - 2,500 








2.0U 


Isham Gates 






3 -1,500 




1.20 


Mary Clark 


132 - 782 


35-35 






.65 


Soloman Gates 






1 - 800 


1 


.57 


Gardew Gaiiq>bell 


6]|0 - 5,000 








U.oo 


LoirLsa Campbell 


1030 - 6,000 








ii.80 


Bachariah Dozier 


1U5 - 800 




1 - 600 


1 


1.37 


John Dobbins 








1 


.25 


Rebecca Epps 






2 - 1,500 




1.20 


Ehoch Epps 


• -- 


U2 - 126 




1 


.35 


Amy Epps 


60 - 38U 


16 - 16 






.32 


John Espy 








1 


.25 


Richard Field 










.32 


Goodie tt 


6hP - 1*,U80 








3.58 


Washington Gibson 


200 - 1,000 






1 


1.05 


Nelson Green 








1 


.25 


Thomas Hall heirs 


60 - 300 








.2U 


Henry Hoover 


6iiO - 1,530 






1 


1.U7 


Elias Hail 


50 - 300 






1 


.U9 


James Hoover 








1 


.25 


John H. Holland 


120 - 1,000 




1 - 500 


1 


1.U9 


William Hartless 








1, 


.25 



45 



^ame AcresAorth School 

$ Land 



Mathiaa Hoover 

Samuel Hall 

Christopher Hoover 1,120 - 1*,695 

Mathlas Hoover 27-1,200 

Jacob Ham 

John B. Jones 30 - 300 

Pleasant Jacobs 

CM. Johnson 

John Jones 

Janes Johnson 

Daniel Johnson lh$ • 1,000 

Edward Johnson 65 - 500 

W. B. Jones 50 - 300 

James Jones 280 - 2,325 

Obediah M. Jones 

John H. Lawrence 25 - 300 

Earl Mayfield 320 - 1,500 

I. J. Miller 78 - 800 20-50 

Abner Marlin 

William M. Miller 102 - 600 28-100 

John McKee 111 - 230 

Alexander McCuller 

Pleasant McCiiller 

Felix G. Miller 150 - 1,000 

Isaac L. Miller 

William Miller U30 - 700 



SlavosAorth 
12-50 


Vhite 
9d11 


State/ 
County 

Tax 




1 


$ .25 




1 


.25 


h - 1,^ 




5.03 




1 


1.31 




1 


.25 




1 


.U9 




1 


.25 




1 


.25 




1 


.25 




1 


.25 




1 


1.05 

.UO 




1 


.1*9 


It - 2,000 




3.I45 




1 


.25 




1 


.U7 




1 


1.20 
.68 




1 


.25 




1 


.81 

.1^ 




1 


.25 




1 


.25 




1 


1.05 


1 - 500 


1 


.69 




1 


.81 



46 



Name 



AcresAorth School 
$ Land 



Sla-vesAforth White 
12-50 



185 - 1,300 
68 - 250 

708a- UOO 

360 - U,000 100-100 

32 - 200 

100 - 600 



Kemeal Marlin 

William Marlin 

James R. Miller 

Tolbert Mayfleld 

Isaac Miller Jr. 

Perry McCuUer 

Isaac Miller Sr 

Robert Miller 

William Nesblt 

(L?) D. Neuman 

John Nichol 

Jesse F. Nichol 

Joshua (S) Nichol 

Barton Neel 

P. M. Oliphant 

John Ott 

Mathias H. Prewett 

Timothy Parker, (Sr.) 62- 312 

Anderson Parker 

James (R) Polndexter 

Harris Prewett 1620 - 1,002 

John Parker 

Edward Patterson 

Joseph Parker 

William Prewett 

Joel Parker 



50 - 150 

55- 350 

72 - 600 

186 - 800 



12U - 635 



200 - 800 



15-8800 



2-1600 



lite 
loll 


State/ 
Coimty 

Tax 


1 


$ .25 


1 


.25 


1 


1.29 


1 


.25 




.20 


1 


.25 




.32 




10.32 


1 


.in. 


1 


.73 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


.37 


1 


.53 




1.76 


1 


.89 




.25 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 


1 


1.03 


1 


.25 


1 


.25 




.50 


1 


.25 




.6ii 



47 



("^5C 



Name ^-^'K'M d*-.^ 


-AcrM^orth - S^oqI 


SlaTsa/Worth 
12-50 

$ 


White 
Poll 


State/ 
County 

Tax 


(Franses) M. Prewett 


131 - 


900 




1 


.97 


John B. Prewett 


320 - 


2,000 


5-2000 




3.68 


Bailey Plnkard 


320 - 


2,500 


6-2700 


1 


U.I4I 


Thomas Richardson 


129 - 


700 


1- li50 




.92 


B. J. Rowland 


5U- 


Uoo 




1 


.57 


Mathlas Rankin 








1 


.25 


James F. Richard 


53- 


500 






,Hi 


B. (T) Summers 


.-. .: 


; 




1 


.25 


Thomas Smith 








1 


.25 


James Standly 


50- 


330 






.28 


Rebecca B. Spence 


6I4O - 


5,000 






U.oo 


James Thomas 


50- 


300 






.2ii 


Barrel White 






7-ia.c» 


1 


3.53 


Stokly White 


237 - 


1,736 


U-2350 


1 


3.51 


Stephen White 


8U8 - 


6,122 


8-U600 




8.60 


Ellsha Williams 


885 - 


8,350 


lU-10650 




15.60 


Az*on WlUlams 








1 


.25 


Henry Wlggs 


50 - 


300 




1 


.k9 


Wmiam WaUcer 








1 


.25 


HartWBll Zackra 








1 


.25 



k-i 



ABSraACT of WILLS 
from 
Rutherford Comty^ Tennessee 
bjr^ Susan G. Daniel 



Other Will Abstracts in Publications Nuaber 
17 and 19« by Susan 0. Daniel 



-U9- 



ABSTRACT OF WILLS FROM RUTHERFORD CO., TN RECORD BOOKS 5 & 6 

RB = Record Book DOW = Date of Will F = Filed in Court 
R = Recorded in Record Book S = slave s = son d = daughter 
W = witness E = Executor/Executrix gs/gd = grandchildren 
N: Named but relationship not given L: Landowner mentioned 

1. RB 5, P. 10 - Obadiah Smith of Rutherford Co., TN 

DOW: 26 July 1816 F: June term 1819 Wife: not named 
S: (loan to wife) Jim, George, Aggy & Hannah s: William 
Smith "all my children" E: sons, John Smith, William 
Smith, Thomas Smith W: John Smith, Robert Smith, James 
Leatherman 

2. RB 5, P. 13 - Coleman Mason DOW: 3 February 1819 

F: June term 1819 Mother: Susannah Mason Brother: 
James Mason (not of lawful age) Sister: Susannah Mason 
Sister: Patsey Mason W: Griffin Dodd, Joseph Patterson, 
Joel Matheny, Job Matheny 

3. RB 5, P. 39 - William Still of Rutherford Co., TN 

DOW: 3 February 1819 F: June term 1819 Brother: John 
Still S: man, Jesse to brother, John Father: John 
Still, Sr. S: Joseph & Abigail to father E: Joseph 
Morton and James Morton W: Joseph Morton, Thomas Edwards, 
Nancy Edwards 

4. RB 5, P. 50 - Jesse Patrick DOW: 25 March 1820 F: June 
term 1820 Wife: Jemima Patrick N: George Songer 
Son-in-law: Joshua Vasser d: Syntha Vasser L: bought 
land from Thomas Hopkins N: Eli Harrison Children: 
John Patrick, Allen Patrick, Levy Patrick, Nancy 0. Patrick, 
Raliegh Patrick E: Joshua Vasser, Jesse Todd W: George 
Songer, Henry Cooper 

5. RB 5, P. 52 - Isaac Ledbetter DOW: 31 December 1818 

F: March term 1819 Wife: Nancy S: (lend to wife) Isa- 
bell and her children, Easter and her children, old Annica, 
Anthony, Sam, Daniel L: Benjamin McCullock 3 s: William 
L. Ledbetter, Richard R. Ledbetter, Isaac H. Ledbetter 
"children not married or 21" S: bought from Sterling 
Lankford and William' Southerland [but apparently not in 
the household] - woman, Phoebe & child L: William Lytle 
N: John M. Tilford d: Elizabeth Guardians & E: Edmund 
Jones, William L. Ledbetter W: David Ledbetter, Elias 
King, George E. Harris 

6. RB 5, P. 61 - Matthew Edwards DOW: 27 April 1820 

F: Sept. term 1820 s: William M. Edwards d: Rebecca 

Edwards Wife: Elizabeth Edwards my children: Polly 

Wheeler, Matthew, Pasha, Issabel E: wife and son, Matthew 
W: George Rutledge, Jain Pollett 



50 



7. RB 5, P. 90 - Owen Edwards DOW: 15 November 1820 F: Dec. 
term 1820 Wife: Judith Edwards s: Ewen H. Edwards, 
Arthur M. Edwards, James A. Edwards, William Edwards, 
Owen H. Edwards d: Catharine W. Loftin, Nancy F. Nelson, 
Sally M. Edwards, Judith M. Edwards, Liensarey Edwards 
S to wife: Jim & Nelly, Rose & Primas S to Catharine: 
Eady S to Arthur: woman, Fanny S to James: boy, Nimrod 
S to Nancy: Ream & Molly S to Sally: Clarisa, Henrietta 
S to Judith (daughter): Sarah, Harriet S to Owen: boy, Tom 
S to Liensary: Betsey, Winney (James Ridley owed deceased 
money) L: Murphey, Nixon E: John Nelson, Arthur M. 
Edwards, James Morton W: Jacob Payne, Zephaniah H. B. 
Anthony, James Morton 

8. RB 5, P. 93 - Mary Smith DOW: 20 Sept. 1815 Codecil: 5 
Nov. 1820 F: Dec, term 1820 s: Samuel Smith, Cunningham 
Smith, William Smith, Charles Gilliam, Jonathan's heirs 
"lawful heirs": Samuel, Jonathan, Robert, William, Cunning- 
ham, Sampson Smith, Thomas L. Hamilton, Charles Gilliam 
S: girl, Suffy to be sold; boy, Spencer whose parents 
are Tom & Lid E: Charles Gilliam and William Smith of 
Wilson Co. W: Cunningham Smith, Robert Warwick, W. Yan- 
dell CODECIL: S: Tom, deceased W: Wilson Yandell, 
Robert Smith 

9. RB 5, P. 95 - Ann Smith DOW: 20 Oct. 1818 F: Dec. term 
1820 d: Lucy Maner, Rhoda Garrett and her 3 children, 
Levi Maner, Martha Maner, and David Smith Maner gd: 
Nancy Maner E: Jordan Williford W: David Price, Samuel 
Williford, Larkin Jackson 

10, RB 5, P. 96 - Samuel Henderson DOW: 16 May 1818 F: Dec. 
term 1820 Wife: Mary Ann Henderson d: Mary McNeese, 
wife of Robert McNeese; Nancy Rodgers, wife of William 
Rodgers; Patience Rodgers, wife of Andrew Rodgers; Susannah 
Rodgers; Christian Davis; Sally King s: Richard Henderson 
gs/gd: "heirs of son, Samuel Henderson which he has by 
his present wife, Sally" (Samuel appointed guardian) 
Minerva, Abner B., Eliza H. , Samuel F., Jethro P. gs/gd: 
"heirs of James Henderson and wife, Fanny (James appointed 
guardian) - Eliza E., Samuel W. , Pleasant F. E: William 
Adkerson, and sons, James and Samuel W: Frederick E. 
Bee ton, William Bowman 

11. RB 5, P. 100 - Joseph Burrus DOW: 13 January 1819 

F: March term 1821 Wife: Sophia s: De La Fayette "land 
purchased of Groce Scruggs"; Philip Johnson; James Rucker 
(not 21 or married); William C. J.; Charles d: Elizabeth; 
Lucy Ann; Sally Woolfork L: Col. Thomas Rucker, 



Foster "owns land in Madison Co., KY" S to wife: Sawney, 
Letty, Reuben, Violet, Manda, Appleberry, Major, Harriet, 
Delilah, Austin, Nicy S to De La Fayette: John, Nelson, 
Bill, Linda, Ben and Sally (children of Linda) S to 
Elizabeth: Lewis, Yellow Nancy, Black Nancy, Caleb, Clary 
and her son, Edmund S to Lucy: Alfred, Patty, Jack (son 
of Patty), Parker, Kit, Anna, Narcissa (daughter of Lucky) 
S to Philip: Lucky, Zechariah, Jordan, Charles (son of 

^1 



(Will of Joseph Burrus cont'd) 

Violet), Esther, Henry (son of Mary) S to Sally: Polly 
(daughter of Lucky), Wyatt, Jesse, Richard, Tilda and 
her son, John Beverly S to James: Washington, Samuel, 
Eliza (daughter of Matilda), Joshua (son of Mary), Charles 
(son of Matilda), Charlotte (daughter of Letty) S to 
William: James, Armistead (sons of Harriet), Martha, Well- 
ington and Joseph (children of Nicy), Abram (son of Letty) 
E: Wife and Ebenezer McGowen, Benjamin Rucker, Samuel 
Anderson W: Edmund Jones, Sterling Orgain, Alfred Moore 

12. RB 5, P. 133 - Joseph Ship DOW: 1 May 1821 F: June term 
1821 eldest s: Joseph Ship eldest d: Mary Ship 
s: Lewis Ship, James Ship d: Lynda Johnston N: Barberry 
Rappid W: Daniel Nichols. John Earwood 

13. RB 5, P. 157 - Lewis Ashman DOW: 19 Aug. 1819 R: Sept. 
1821 N: John Smith "money left to repair Methodist 
Meeting house known as Garretts Chapel" N: Brooking 
Burnett (with whom I now live) E: Brooking Burnett and 
Robert Montgomery W: Joseph Burnett, Reuben Burnett 

14. RB 5, P. 158 - Elizabeth Whoberry DOW: 1 June 1821 

F: Sept. 1821 d: Patsey Blacketter E: Norman Blacketter 
and Patsey Blacketter W: Andrew Cuff, Susanna McCombs 

15. RB 5, P. 161 - John Yous [Hughes?] DOW: 13 June 1821 

F: Sept. 1821 Wife: Temperance Yous my 3 children: 
Elizabeth, Thomas, George "my father's estate" to be 
allotted E: Burrell Gannaway W: William Molloy, William 
Matthews 

16. RB 5, P. 173 - Thomas Pullen DOW: -4 Aug. 1820 F: June 
term 1821 Wife: Amelia Pullen eldest s: John W. Pullen 
second son: Josiah Pullen d: Elizabeth Pullen s: James 
F. Pullen youngest d: Amelia Pullen S to wife: man, Tom 
and Betty, his wife; man, Kinchen; man, Barn; girl, Nice; 
woman. Cherry; 4 children - Jack, Rhoda, Prince, Madison; 
girl, Fanny; Charity; Maria S to John: woman, Esther; 
boy, Lewis S to Josiah: boy. Squire; girl, Nice S 
to Elizabeth: girl, Fanny; boy, Prince S to James: boy. 
Jack; girl, Rhoda S to Amelia (daughter): girl, Charity; 
boy, Madison E: wife and son, Josiah Pullen W: Isaac 
Fromey, Josiah Watkins , Peter Warren 

17. RB 5, P. 185 - John Davidson DOW: 11 Oct. 1821 F: Dec. 
term 1821 Wife: Nancy "land purchased of George Beard, 
Limestone Co., Alabama" s: James Davidson d: Polly 
Kirk, Sally Belleu, Dovey Ewell, Nancy W. Davidson 
N: Major Locke S to wife: Reuben; woman, Dinah; girl. 
Creasy; child, Jerry S to Polly: girl, Alice S to 
Sally: girl, Frances S to James: man, Elijah; boy, Isaac; 
girl, Caroline S to Dovey: woman, Kodah S to Nancy: 
woman, Hannah and child, Rebecca S: boy, Joseph E: wife 
and John Davidson of Bedford Co. W: T.B.Henly, Elijah 
Cox, Sarah Cox 



18. RB 5, P. 197 - John Biles DOW: 29 Dec. 1821 R: Nov. 8, 
1823 Wife: Elizabeth eldest s: Obadiah Biles 

second s: Smith Biles s: Willie Biles s: Herbert Biles 
d: Lucy Biles, Polly Biles s: William Jefferson Biles 
d: Cinthia Biles, Sophia Biles S to wife: Sally, Solomon, 
Purchase, Mourning, Mariah, ned, Lewis, Arrena S to 
Willie: boy, Anthony S to Herbert: boy. Purchase S to 
Lucy: girl, Maris S to Polly: girl, Nice S to William 
J.: boys, Solomon and Lewis S to Cinthia: girl, Arrena 
S to Sophia: woman, Sally E: Willie Biles and Herbert 
Biles W: James Mason, John Clark, Benjamin Marable 

19. RB 5, P. 209 - Henry Robinson DOW: 16 Nov. 1821 F: 9 Nov. 
1822 E & son: Hugh Robinson d: Elizabeth Hanes , Abigail 
Moore, Jane Patten N: Andrew J. Hanes N: Thomas Woods 
L: Benjamin Ransom W: Ezekiel Murphy, John Murphy, H. 
Robinson 

20. RB 5, P. 220 - James McKnight DOW: 24 March 1817 

R: 9 Nov. 1822 Wife: Eleanor/Eleander McKnight d: 
Jane Orr s: James McKnight d: Isabel Sharp s: Alex- 
ander McKnight, Joseph McKnight d: Margaret Knox 
s: John Martin McKnight, David McKnight [David to take 
care of mother] S to wife: woman, Rachael S to David: 
man, Isaac E: James McKnight W: John Alexander, James 
Andrews 

21. RB 5, P. 237 - John Adcock DOW: 15 Sept. 1822 R: 25 Nov. 
1822 d: Levina Adcock, Polly Adcock s: Jesse Adcock 
[not of age - apparently youngest child], Willie Adcock, 
William Adcock, Marcus Adcock, Harmon Adcock, Stephen 
Adcock, Doctor Adcock, Robert America Adcock gd: Nancy 
Adcock E: William Vinson and son, John Adcock W: A. 
Pearce, Ephraim Medows , Andrew Inglis, John Adcock 

22. RB 5, P. 248 - Charles Fogg DOW: 24 Sept. 1822 R: 26 Nov. 
1822 Wife: Winiford Fogg s: Jonathan W. Fogg (not 
of age) W: William Sargeant, Nathan Chaffin, Jonathan 
Wilburn 

23. RB 5, P. 248 - David Moore DOW: 7 March 1820 R: 26 Nov. 
1822 s: David Moore, George D. Moore, James Moore 
d: Nancy Jetton, Peggy Moore gs : Samuel McClanahan 
L: Blanin (?) E: Robert Waron, James Jetton W: Jos. 
Dickson, Thos. Beavers 

24. RB 5, P. 250 - John Kirk, Senior DOW: 9 Oct. 1822 

R: 26 Nov. 1822 Wife: Eleanor Kirk d: Elizabeth 
all my children: Jane Bell, Hugh Kirk, Agness McEwen, 
Martha Montgomery, Eleanor Killough, John Kirk, Jr. 
S to wife: woman, Dinah & her 2 children S to Elizabeth: 
man. Jack E: sons, Hugh & John and wife W: Joseph 
Marlin, Samuel R. McKlroy 



25. RB 5, P. 251 - Jarret Barnet DOW: 29 June 1821 R: 26 Nov. 
1822 d: Winney s: Daniel d: Jenny Brown d: Nancy 
Underwood s: Jarret Wife: Margrett N: Joseph McCane 
of Rockingham Co., N.C. 3 youngest children: Susanna, 
Ambrose, Peggy W: John McMumemsy (?), Cornelius Sanders 
E : George Underwood and wife 

26. RB 5, P. 253 - Jesse Brashear DOW: 25 Aug. 1821 R: 26 Nov. 

1822 Wife: Betsey son's grandfather: Isaac Wright, 
deceased d: Docia Bivens, Rebecca Jarrett, Betsey Bra- 
shear, Patsey/Polly Brashear s: Isaac W. Brashear (not 
21), Nathan (not 21), Abraham (not 21), Jesse W. (not 
21) S to wife: woman, Cate (no children) S to Docia: 
girl. Bleary S to Rebecca and son Isaac: boy. Nelson 
S to Nathan: boy, Bob S to Isaac: boy, Netran S to 
Abraham: boy, George S to Jesse: boy, Aston E: Guy 
Smith, Charles Ready, John L. Jetton W: Alexander McEwen, 
William Childress, William Byers 

27. RB 5, P. 259 - Joseph Lannum DOW: 21 Mar. 1822 R: 1 Mar. 

1823 Wife: Delilah s: Green B. Lannum, Simpson Lannum 
"my 4 daughters": Sarah, Tabitha, Lucinda, Mary E: William 
Lannum, Jacob Browning W: A. Robertson, Alfred Arnold 

28. RB 5, P. 273 - Joseph Morton DOW: 29 Nov. 1822 R: 11 Mar. 
1823 Wife: Cicely s: James Morton, Joseph Morton 
d: Elizabeth V. Morton, Mary Anne A. Anthony, Martha Eliza- 
beth V. Morton, Manassa Morton, Cicely Harriet Morton 
S to wife: Sam & Tilleh, his wife; Dorcas; Lish; Jerry; 
Jesse & his wife, Trecy and Billy S to James: boy, Henry 
S to Joseph: boy, Adam S: "negroes heretofore given 
to Mary Anne" E: brother, James Morton and Thomas S. 
Anthony W: Arthur M. Edwards, John Allen, William Walker 

29. RB 5, P. 31^4 - Burrell Carter DOW: 24 Dec. 1822 R: 28 
June 1823 Wife: Sarah d: Patsey, Angelina d: Burrell 
S to wife: Tom, Batey, Jerry, Littleton, Mason E: wife, 
S. Powell and George Anderson W: Solomon Beesley, Charles 
Puckett 

30. RB 5, P. 315 - Archibald Harris DOW: 9 Jan. 1823 R: 28 
June 1823 Wife: Kiturah Harris Nephew: Archibald Aug- 
ustus Harris, son of Thos . A. Harris brothers: Augustus 
Harris, Robert Harris, Thomas A. Harris sisters: Temper- 
ance Bryant, Susan Hicks S to wife: man. Jack; woman, 
Dorcas; girl, Emily E: Thomas A. Harris and John Moseby 
W: Thomas A. Harris, John Moseby, John Nelson 

31. RB 5, P. 316 - Philip Sanders DOW: 9 Jan. 1823 R: 28 
June 1823 Wife: Elizabeth youngest child, son: Philip 
(will be of age in 17 yrs . and about a month) "next 
son will be of age in about 15 yrs" "nine last children" 

E: son-in-law, H Northcutt W: Richard Stephens, 

Sampson Stephens 



32. RB 5, P. 332 - John McHenry (being old) DOW: not given 

R: 12 Sept. 1823 Wife: Rachel d: Peggy Hall, Jenney 
Wilson s: John McHenry, Silas McHenry L: Benjamin 
Mcculloch gs: William Hall gd: Nancy Wilson sons-in- 
law: William Wilson, William Hall S to wife: girl, Lissey 
S: Lissey to Abeline Brown after wife's death S to Peggy: 
girl. Lot "which William Hall has disposes of some time 
ago"; boy, Jim S to gs : boy, Andy S to Jenney: woman, 
Pryss; girl, Eliza S to Nancy: girl, Mary S to John: 
man, Jo S to Silas: boy, Rodger; boy child, Jo 5: 
old man, Jo to be freed but taken care of by 2 sons until 
death E: Samuel McAdo , Capt. Ambrose McKee W: Henry 
Grouse, Polly Grouse 

33. RB 5, P. 336 - Nancy Morton DOW: 19 June 1820 R: July 
term 1823 d: Susannah Pea, Patsey Williams, Polly Lips- 
comb, Fanny Burleson s: John Morton N: John Strong, 
1st husband of Patsey and their children E: John Morton 
W: Joseph Morton, James Morton [in subscribing oath, 
Joseph Morton was deceased] 

3^. RB 5, P. 337 - Margaret Seat DOW: 15 Feb. 1823 R: 13 
Sept. 1823 N: Margaret Caroline Burnett, Brooking Burnett 
"with whom I now live", Fanny R. Seat S to Marg. G. 
Burnett: boy, Alfred S to Brooking: woman, Hannah and 
boy, Lym E: Brooking Burnett, Henry Seat W: Anderson 
Freeman, Robert Montgomery 

35. RB 6,P.l - Mary Warren DOW: 12 Aug. 1823 R: Jan. term 
1824 gs: Willis Snell, Hays Snell (not 21), James Snell 
(not 15) gd: Elizabeth Snell, Susan Snell (not 15), 
Mary/Polly Griffin N: Loderick Alford and Cade Alford 
of Wake Co., N.C., executors of estate of George Warren 
of Wake Co., N.C. "which I am entitled to receive some 
money fro several years" S to Willis: woman, Burchett 
and her 2 oldest children named Anderson and Darkis 
S to Hayes: boy, Nathan S to James: boy, Burrell S 
to Elizabeth and Susan: Charlotte, Harbert, Irvin and 
youngest child Burchett has at breast about 2 or 3 weeks 
old not yet named E: Willis Snell W: Thomas Montage, 
James Day 

36. RB 6, P. 3 - John Garter DOW: ^ Jan 1824 R: 1 March 1824 
Wife: Rachel children: Margaret, William, Gaty, Mary, 
Amy, John, Jr., Rachel, Jr. S:Isham kept for the family; 
Sawny and Fanny have choice of being sold or hire E: wife 
and Nathaniel Overall, William Thomas W: Neal Smith, 
Samuel S. Wilson, George Peebles 

37. RB 6, P. 18 - John Wallis DOW: 17 June 1823 F: Jan. 1824 
s: Amos S. Wallis, Mortimer Randolph Wallis, John F. Wallis 
d: Clarisa Alexander, Sophia G. Ewing, Emma W. Hall 
Wife: Isabella S. Wallace gd: Mira Alexander, Isabella 
Alexander (Mira's sister), Isabella Ewing N: John Wallis, 
son of Alfred Wallis S to Amos: man, Joe; boy, Tom 



(Will of John Wallis conf ) 

S to Mortimer: man, Sam; boy, already in his possession 
named George; woman Hannah and her child now at the breast 
S to wife: woman of colour named Jenny Hasper S to John: 
boy of colour: Aleck S to Emma: girl, Moriah S to 
Mira: girl, Jinsey (1st offspring to Isabella) S to 
Isabella Ewing: girl, Harriet S to be sold: boy, William 
"be paid to Mira Matthews in Carolina for the benefit 
of the famiy of Alfred Wallis [apparently still alive] 
E: John F. Wallis, Amos S. Wallis, Mortimer R. Wallis 
W: William Robb, Thomas J. Mabry CODECIL: 25 Nov. 1823 
d: Eliza B. Ham 

38. RB 6, P. 4-2 - Mary Gatlin DOW: 17 Dec. 1823 R: 18 May 182-4 
E: John G. Wilkins "a child I raised from his birth" entire 
estate willed to John G. Wilkins W: Lewis Sutfin, James 
Sutfin 

39. RB 6, P. 43 - William McFarlin DOW: 1824 R: April term 1824 
Wife: Sarah 2 sons not of age: Pleasant Nelson and 
Benjamin (youngest son) 5 d: Elizabeth Ann, Kasey A. , 
Nancy B., Louisa J., Sarah Mother: (living) S to sons: 
boy, Austin; woman, Nelly E: wife and Joseph Youree 
W: B.L. McFerrin, Benjamin McFarlin 

40. RB 6, P. 44 - Peter Garrison DOW: 10 Feb. 1824 R: 18 May 
1824 brother: Josinah Garrison Josinah's son: Peter 
Garrison of South Carolina (not 21) N: Serenus Garrison 
Dickson's son, Asahel Dickson (not 21) N: (left money 
to American Missionary and American Bible Societies) 
brother: James Garrison of York, S.C. James' son: Peter 
Serenus Garrison Wife (deceased): Mary E: John Martin, 
Joseph Canon W: Ephraim G. Harris, James Baker 

41. RB 6, P. 56 - Simeon Vaught DOW: 11 April 1824 R: 24 Aug. 
1824 Wife: Nancy children: Susannah, Mary, Elizabeth, 
Phebe and James (all not of age or married) L: Zadock 
Bell N: Jesse Brashear (deceased) E: Elijah Vaught, 
William Bishop W: H. Trott, William Bishop, Elijah Vaught 

42. RB 6, P. 57 - Tigner Dameron 'doW: 1 Sept. 1822 R: 24 Aug. 
1824 Wife: Nancy s: Edmund, William, Sion d: Lidia, 
Midda, Sally, Nancy, Mary, Judy E: Henry Vincent of 
Rutherford Co. W: John Dunn, Benjamin Dunn 

43. RB 6, P. 59 - Nathan Baker DOW: 10 Sept. 1824 R: 5 Nov. 
1824 E and wife: Elizabeth Baker children not named 
W: Theophiles A. Canon, James Sharpe , Robert Martin 

44. RB 6, P. 60 - Rachel Sharp DOW: 2 April 1823 R: 5 Nov. 
1824 s: James Morris Sharpe, Joseph Canon Sharpe (not 
21) d: Peggy Carlile Hibbets , Jemima A. Sharpe S to 
Peggy: woman and girl, Milly E: brother, Joseph Canon; 
son, Alfred Sharpe; son-in-law, Robert H. Hibbets 

W: Wilson Yandell, Samuel McCleary, John Canon 

56 



^5. RB 6, P. 61 - David Ledbetter DOW: 13 July 1824 R: 5 Nov. 
1824 Wife: Nelly children: Malissa R. Ledbetter, Polly 
W. Ledbetter, Martha D. Ledbetter, Benjamin Ledbetter, 
James A. Ledbetter L: land purchased of Henry Finger 
on Overalls Creek Mother (old): Jane Ledbetter E: wife 
W: Anderson James, Silas Read 

46. RB 6, P. 63 - Alexander Jordon DOW: 10 Sept. 1824 R: 5 Nov. 

1824 Wife: Nancy s: John, David, James, William, Alex- 
ander, Joseph d: Gracy, Jane Ball, Nancy S to John: boy, 
Jesse (now in his possession) S to Gracey: girl, Phillis 
S to Jane: girl. Si Ivy S to Nancy: negro not named 
S to William: boy, Benjamin S: Peter, Tabitha, Dinah, 
Tibby E: wife and son, John W: Jno. G. Murphey, Guy 
Clopton, E. Donoho 

47. RB 6, P. 87 - William G. Kimbro DOW: 4 Sept. 1824 R: 14 
Feb. 1825 Wife: Lucinda Kimbro [oldest child not 21] 

4 children: Isaac N. Kimbro, Joseph T. Kimbro, Amanda 
A. Kimbro, William G. Kimbro S to wife: man, Tom; woman, 
Nelly, and others not named E: Nathan Williams, John 
Kimbro W: J. H. Coartz , Joseph May 

48. RB 6, P. 89 - John Sharpe DOW: 22 May 1822 R: 15 Feb. 1825 
eldest d: Jemima A. Canon eldest son: James Sharpe 
s: Cyrus Sharpe, John McKnight Sharpe, Edwin Sharpe, Will- 
iam Sharpe (deceased) d: Polly Young Canon, Martha Louisa 
sons-in-law: Abraham W. Canon, Samuel Wilson 4 children 
of son William: John Christopher Columbus Sharpe, William 
Wilson Sharpe, Martha Caroline Sharpe, Sarah Jane Sharpe 
L: "tract conveyed to William Alexander by State of N.C. 
and Alexander conveyed to me : S to Jemima: yellow boy. 
Ransom; yellow woman, Harriet and child S to James: 
man. Jack S to Polly: boy. Bob N: Samuel McCleary, 
William Robb , John M. Tilford E: William Robb, Theophilus 
A. Canon W: Samuel McCleary, Joseph Canon 

49. RB 6, P. 110 - John Brothers DOW: 25 Mar. 1825 R: 8 June 

1825 Wife: Polly s: Robert, Benjamin, Burton, Thomas 
(not 21), Jackson C. (not 21) S to wife: Jim, Tiller, 
Minty S: to be hired then sold when Thomas aged 21 

5 to be sold: Peter, Sarah L: "tract of land I bought 
of John P. Smith" E: Stephen Linch, Capt. Sublett 
W: Stephen Linch, Thomas Brothers 

50. RB 6, P. 112 - John Johnston DOW: 29 May 1819 R: 8 June 
1825 Wife: Cathrine eldest d: Nancy Stubblefield 
d: Susannah Eskridge, Cynthia Banton sons-in-law: Wood- 
ruff Stubbelfield, Samuel Eskridge, Glover W. Banton 
3 grandchildren: Eliza W. Knight, Washington J. Knight, 
Cynthia C. Knight S to wife: Ede , Green S to Nancy: 
man. Bob S to Susannah: man, Dick S to Cynthia: girl, 
Mary S: Ede to Cynthia after wife's death or marriage 
E: Samuel Eskridge, Glover W. Banton W: Hezekiah G, 
Cooke, Jacob Tilman, Richard Ramsey 



57 



51. RB 6, P. 114 - Joseph Dickson DOW: 8 Oct. 1823 R: 8 June 
1825 s: James Dickson N: Elizabeth Graves and her 
daughter, Adaline d: Isabella d: Margaret Henderson 
s: John Dickson and his wife, Margaret gs: Joseph Dickson 
(son of John) gd: Peggy Dickson (daughter of John) 
s: Joseph Dickson, Robert Dickson, William Dickson, Ezekiel 
Dickson gs : William Dickson, Jo. Dickson "my large 
Bible" [unclear if left to Ezekiel or Sarah M. Dickson] 
gd: Sarah M. Dickson S to Sarah: girl, Phillis (7 yrs) 
E: sons, James and Robert Dickson W: William Bumpass, 
Robert McLin 

52. RB 6, P. 116 - John Smith DOW: 29 April 1822 R: 9 June 
1825 Wife: Jane C. Smith 5 s: William Madison Smith, 
John Smith, George Washington Smith, Robert Henderson 
Smith, James Rush Smith d: America C. Smith, Evelina 
Crockett, Carolina Matilda Johnson, Julia Granville Crock- 
ett, Jane (Sarah Jane ?), Sarah Jane Smith [apparently 
not married] L: "tract of land I bought of David P. 
Harris", "tract of land I got of General E. P. Gaines 
containing 846 acres" S to America: Cinda & her son, 
Edmund; Moriah & her son, Sanders; Buck S to Evelina: 
Flora & her child. Will; James & Gate S to Caroline: 
girl, Eliza S to Julia: Ciasar; Lucy & her child; girl, 
Mary S to wife: George & his wife, Julia "my harrican 
hill tract of land" E: wife; son-in-law, William H. 
Smith; borhter, Robert Smith, Jr. ; son, William M. Smith 
(not 18); son, John Smith (not 18) W: William R. Rucker , 
William Smith CODECIL: 8 Sept. 1823 s: born after 
making of first will 5 youngest sons: John, George W. , 
Robert H. , James L. R. and Ephraim Foster Smith 

53. RB 6, P. 120 - Edmund Sutton DOW: 24 Dec. 1824 R: 9 June 
1825 Wife: Polly my children [apparently all unmarried]: 
Rozamiah P. Sutton, Alcy Sutton, Cholson Sutton, Alexander 
Harrison Sutton, Anne Eliza Sutton, Sally Sutton, Enoch 
Sutton, Mary Sutton, William Sutton, Elizabeth Sutton, 
Margaret Jane Sutton E: wife and Isaac Ellsberry W: 
Pleasant Henderson, Richard Tenpenny, Robert George 

54. RB 6, P. 121 - Andrew Freeman DOW: 2 April 1825 R: 9 June 
1825 "to my beloved old Gate whom I bought from Benjamin 
McCulloch and do own her as my wife" my 3 children: 
Ben, Isabel and Jack E: Lent Brown, William H. Ballew 
W: John Lyell, William Darnall 

55. RB 6, P. 122 - John Anthony DOW: none given R: 9 June 1825 
Wife: not named d: Sally Davis, Matilda Manus s: Z.H.B. 
Anthony oath to veracity of will: Solomon Beesley, Wil- 
liam Anthony, James Morton, Zepheniah H. B. Anthony 

56. RB 6, P. 149- John Chisenhall DOW: 6 July 1825 R: 10 Sept. 
1825 Wife: Rebecca Chisenhall E: wife and Hiram Cox 
W: Wm. H. Smith, E. Chisenhall 



:?o 



57. RB 6, P. 150 - Margaret Moore DOW: 28 Feb. 1825 R: 10 
Sept. 1825 3 brothers & 3 sisters brother: James Moore 
niece: Mary Moore, Letty Moore nephew: Peter Moore 
niece: Cynthia McClanahan sister: Agness Jetton niece: 
Maneria Cartwright, Susan Cartwright nephew: Rufus Jetton 
brothers: David Moore, George D. Moore sister: Letty, 
Malinda E: James S. Jetton W: James Kelton, Catherine 
Bowman, E. Jetton 

58. RB 6, P. 152 - Abner Johns DOW: 16 June 1825 R: 10 Sept. 
1825 Wife: Susan Johns d: Mary Johns, Roda Trigg Johns, 
Sarah Anne Johns, Catherine Elizabeth Johns, Susan F, 
Johns s: William R. Johns, Franklin A. Johns S to 
wife: Sam, Hannah, Joe, Isabel, Lucy S to Mary: Blackman 
& Esther S to Roda: Cesar & Little Judy S to Sarah: 
Washington & Harriet S to William: Forda S to Catherine: 
Fanny & Jack S to Susan: Patsey & Little Sam S to 
Franklin: boy, Sterline S to wife: girl, Hannah S 
to be sold: big Judy, Mary & her child E: Joseph B. 
Johns W: David Dickinson, John R. Wilson 

59. RB 6, P. 166 - Alexander McKeen DOW: 6 Aug. 1825 R: 
1 Dec. 1825 Wife: Mary McKeen eldest d: Elizabeth 
Ashbrooks second d: Sarah Warner my 2 sons: John H. 
McKeen, Alexander D. McKeen 5 youngest d: Mary D., Nancy, 
Emelina, Henriette and Jane L: farm I purchased of Mary 
Ann Pace "my interest in 4-00 acres of land lying in 
Haywood Co. as a legatee of James Doak, deceased" S 
to wife: man, Howel ; man, Harry; woman, Hannah S to 
Elizabeth: woman, Betsey & her child, Edy E: wife & 
Thomas Blair W: William D. Baird, John H. McKeen 

60. RB 6, P. 168 - Travis Marable DOW: 17 Aug. 1824 R: 1 Dec. 
1825 Wife: Martha Marable children: Mary Anne, Martha 
Jane, James Alexander, Isaac, John (youngest child not 
of age) S to wife: man, Jeffrey & his wife, Chloe; boy, 
Daniel; boy. Bob; boy, Tom; girl, Milly S divided amongst 
5 children: boy, Joe; boy, Abel; woman, Mary E: Henry 
H. Marable, Bemjamin Marable W: Amaze Jones, Carey James, 
Samuel Watkins 

61. RB 6, P. 169 - Abraham Tennison DOW: 9 April 1821 

R: 1 Dec. 1825 Wife: Jane "my children that have left 
me I have given them their share" d: wife of Cor- 
nelius Brandon; wife of Samuel Fulks ; wife of 

Hugh Carnahan s: Solomon Tennison, Edmund Tennison 

d: wife of James Hilton; Rebecca; Nancy Adams 

s: Hiram, Archibald E: Solomon Tennison (son) and Alexan- 
der Lorance W: Britton Pace, John Wilson, James King 

62. RB 6, P. 172 - Cornelius 0. Flyn DOW: 13 Aug. 1825 

R: 7 Dec. 1825 late of Newfoundland, town of St. Johns, 
a native of Ireland, county of Waterford 2 sisters: 
Elizabeth and Mary of County of Waterford, Ireland 



59 



(Will of Cornelius 0. Flyn cont'd) 

nephew: only son of brother, John niece: daughter of 
birbther John Estate owed money to: Jabez Maury of Leu- 
beck, Passaraaquody bay, Massachusetts N: Roman Catholic 
Church of Nashville; Dr. William Donnagan of Carboner , 
Conception bay, newfoundland and if Dr. Donnagan be dead 
to give to William Behen the son of the doctor's niece; 
John Elson, Carboner, Newfoundland E: Joseph Spence, 
Jonathan Currin W: L. H. Laughlin, James Vaughan 

63. RB 6, P. 174 - Ingram Blank DOW: 30 July 1825 R: 24 Feb. 
1826 Wife: Martha niece: Elizabeth Parham Sills now 

Elizabeth Parham Beaty L: King, Sherwood Green 

S to Elizabeth: Nat, Ned, Lawrence, Nancy, Dilcy N: 
Joseph Thomas Blanks Turner (not of age) S to Joseph: 
Moses & Winny, his wife and their 3 children; Edmund; 
Lucy; Jennetta; Little Ephraim; Louisa; Mary; Fanny 
"land allotted to me of the late Daniel Marshall in the 
Western district mother of Joseph: Mary Ward Sills Lytle 

5 to Mary: Joan; Tom; Aleck; Nancy and her 4 children; 
Milly; Lewis; William; Lucind; Crecy; Young Milly; Ephraim; 
Rebecca; George; Enoch; Little Moses; Little Lewis; Anaky; 
Athy N: John Devereux Lawrence, son of Jonathan Lawrence 
N: George Washington Beaty, son of William F. Beaty 
W: L. H. Laughlin, Sol. Beesley, Charles Puckett, Nathaniel 
Puckett 

64. RB 6, P. 179 - John Nash Read [a medical doctor] DOW: 15 Nov 

1825 R: 24 Feb. 1825 Wife: Mary, formerly Mary Barks- 
dale "land whereon I now live known by the name of Grove" 
s: Thomas H. Read, John H. Read, Clement (deceased), Sion, 
James Allen Read d: Harry [sic] Anne Read "specifically 
provided for in consequence of misfortune and affliction", 
Mary H. Read and her husband, Randolph Barksdale N: 
John Night (deceased) of Virginia, grandfather of James 
and Francis S to wife: Jerry & his wife, Polly; America 

6 her infant, Caswell; Lucky; man, Joe S to Harry Anne: 
girl, Polina S to Thomas: girl, Betsy - $350; boy, Dennis 
- $220 S to wife: 2 old negroes - Jack and Aggy E: 
son-in-law, Randolph Barksdale; son, Thomas H. Read; wife 
W: Peter LeGrand, David Robinson, Nathaniel Barksdale, 
Archibald H. Harris 

65. RB 6, P. 182 - Joseph Nichols DOW: 7 Nov. 1824 R: 24 Feb. 

1826 Wife: Elizabeth 4 d: Jane, Phebe , Levina, Abigail 
(all unmarried) s: Joshua d: Euphemia Tomlinson 
s: Jonathan Nichols d: Elizabeth Davis E: son, Joshua 
and wife W: William Travers , John Andrews 

66. RB 6, P. 184 - Thomas Jones Mabry DOW: 2 Dec. 1821 

R: 22 Mar. 1826 Wife: Sally children not named, under 
18 years L: John Buchanan, Robert Weakley, Peter Garret- 
son, Levi White S to wife: Lucky, Davy N: sisters* 
children E: Moses Ridley, William Robb proven will 
by oath: Theophilus A. Canon, John M. Williams, Silas 



Tucker 



60 



67. RB 6, P. 219 - James Bass DOW: 2-4 Nov. 1825 F: April term 
1826 Wife: Temperance s: Thomas Bass, Benjamin J. Bass, 
James Bass, Jr., Hartwell Bass d: Temperance W. Rucker, 
Nancy Smith, Mary C. Laughlin "daughters and daughter-in- 
law" L: Abraham Herring; William Smith; Alfred Blackman; 
James Ridgeway (deceased); Martin Clark S to wife: men - 
Nathan, Austin, Shade, Sandy; woman, Effey & her 7 children 
namely - Minerva, Chaney, William, Edmund, Julia, Doctor 
& Manuel; Sal & her 2 children - Mariah, Jerry S to 
Thomas: Bob & Biriah S to Benjamin: Champion & Phil 

5 to daughter. Temperance: Daniel, Jesse & Deli la (or 
Silla) S to Nancy: Michael, Randel , Vinea S to James: 
Abram, Jesse, Davy, Isham, Lewis, Lucy S to Mary: Clarissa 

6 Leanah S to Hartwell: man, David Trustees for Mary 
C. Laughlin & her children: John R. Laughlin, William 
Ledbetter E: sons, Thomas & Benjamin; son-in-law, Peyton 
Smith W: Claiborne Howse , Hezekiah Howse 

68. RB 6, P. 236 - Benjamin Sherwood DOW: 9 June 1826 

Wife: Polly s: Hezekiah L. Sherwood (not 21 or married) 
d: Rebecha H. Shearwood (not 18 or married) E: wife 
and William Brown W: A. Gowen, Jane Brown 

69. RB 6, P. 243 - James Stewart DOW: 23 June 1816 R: 23 
Nov. 1826 "my aged body" Wife: Margaret d: Polly 
Wallace, Jane Wallace, Hannah Gosset/Garret s: James 
W. Stewart, Daniel M. Stewart E: John Wallace, James 
W. Stewart W: Hary McCoy, Polly McCoy CODECIL: 9 Sept. 
1826 W: Daniel M. Stewart, William Webb 

70. RB 6, P. 251 - Hugh Montgomery DOW: 23 Feb. 1820 

F: July term 1826 Wife: Elizabeth Montgomery s: Joseph 
A. Montgomery d: Rebecha Kidd Montgomery, Martha Stewart, 
Isabella Montgomery, Janett McMurray, Mary P. McMurray, 
Elizabeth Moore "house and lot in town of Murfreesboro 
rented to McKiernan H. Butcher" S to wife: girl. Luff 
S to Joseph: man, Cato; boy, Lewis E: wife; son, Joseph; 
son-in-law, James Moore W: David Phillips, James Neelly, 
Robert Jetton 

71. RB 6, P. 252 - Charles Statham DOW: 4 June 1824 F: July 
term 1826 oldest son now alive: Love Statham "land 
deeded to me by William Hill" s: Thomas Statham 

L: Elijah Murf ree , Alexander McKeen S to Thomas: man, 
George (learning blacksmith's trade); woman, Betty; woman, 
Louisa d: Jane Statham L: Nicholas Woodfin S to 
Jane: man, Peter; woman, Nancy; girl, Eliza s: Richard 
Statham, William Statham (deceased) gs : Charles Statham, 
son of William son-in-law: Charles Stewart d: Sally 
Stewart S to be sold: Jesse, Bartlett E: Thomas Statham 
and W. Guy W: T.Y. Blood, Peter Arnold 



61 



72. RB 6, P. 255 - Joseph Dill DOW: 21 April 1825 F: July- 
term 1826 s: Isaac Dill, Newton Dill, Parson Dill, Martin 
Dill (not 21), Thomas, Marvel Dill (not 21) d: Lavinea 
Dill, Hannah Petty, Molly Cole, Harriet Dill, Amanda Dill 
S to Martin: boy, Moses S to Harriet: boy, Spencer 
S to Amanda: boy, Nurvy s to be freed: woman, Pat 
E: Jacob Wright, Isaac Dill W: William Bumpass, Daniel 
Maberry 

73. RB 6, P. 257 - Henry Windrow of Williamson Co., TN 

DOW: 2 Mar. 1826 F: July term 1826 Wife: Carey Windrow 
3 children: Miranda, Louisa, Cleveland, "child my wife 
now pregnant with" S t wife: boy, Sam; woman, Venus 
S to children: Isabel, Harry, Anaky, Gabreal , Edney, Nelly, 
Minerva, Chaney, Jarvis E: wife and John Windrow W: Ben 
Carr, Byars Windrow, Samuel Stewart 

74. RB 6, P. 306 - Rebecca Powel DOW: 20 Dec. 1826 F: Jan. 
term 1827 son-in-law: Jessee Eaton d: Elizabeth Powel, 
Lydia Ward, Rebecca McMurtree , Edy Powel "debt due me 
in Haywood Co., N.C. from Henry Plot" S used by Elizabeth 
and Edy for 2 yrs . then sold: man, Valentine gs : Pleasant 
Ward E: Peyton Smith W: William Pope, William Atkinson, 
Hikes [Hicks] Ellis 

75. RB 6, P. 308 - Arthur Puckett DOW: 6 Nov. 1826 

Wife: Lucy eldest s: Pleasant eldest d: Mary W. (not 
of age or married) second d: Sarah S. second s: Leonard 
(not of age or married) s: John M. , Edward youngest d: 
Betsey S to wife: Zilphy, Winny, Elin, Peter, Ned 
S to Pleasant: boy, Daniel S to Mary: woman, Nancy & 
her child S to Sarah: girls, Gilly, Livina S to Leo- 
nard: boy, Cato S to John: boy, Caleb S to Edward: 
girl, Sarah S to Betsey: girl, Barlena E: sons, Plea- 
sant and Leonard W: George Buchanan, Hiram D. Robertson, 
John Smith 

76. RB 6, P. 310 - Joseph T. Thompson DOW: 9 Dec. 1826 

F: Jan. term 1827 Wife: Isabela s: John 2 d: Ann 
Thompson, Isabela McCracken 4 grandchildren: William 
McCombs, Rosanah McCombs , Jane Thompson, Mary Thompson 
N: Elizabeth (presently sick) Kelly's son, Samuel; Jane 
Allen S to wife: girl. Mill E: Joseph McCracken, Robert 
Thompson W: Jonathan Rucker , James L. Armstrong 

77. RB 6, P. 311 - John Thompson DOW: 19 Jan. 1824 F: Jan. 
term 1827 Wife: Grizzel Thompson s: William Thompson, 
David Thompson, Jesse Thompson, Joseph Thompson 4 d: 
Jenny, married to John Lawrence; Catherine, married to 
William Warren; Sally, married to James Turrentine; Peggy 
Thompson gs : Orvil Thompson "land I purchased from 
Capt. William Lytle" S to wife: Bill; Dinah; Jeffry; 
Tim; Phillis & her 2 daughters - Bethy, Francis S to 
David: woman. Unity S to Jesse: Jack S to William: boy, 
Caesar S to Sally: girl, Anne S to Peggy: girl, Edy 

L: Cox E: wife and 2 sons, Joseph & David W: 

Samuel Anderson, Thomas Woods 



78. RB 6, P. 316 - Sarah Carter DOW: 12 Jan. 1826 F: Jan. 
term 1827 s: Burrell d: Angeline, Patsey S to Burrell: 
man, Tom; boy, Littleton; girl. Mason S to Angeline: 
woman, Jennet; girl, Margaret; girl, Sitter S to Patsey: 
woman. Petty; girl. Jama; boy, Robert E: sons-in-law - 
S.M. Powell, George W. Anderson W: Sol. Beesley, Charles 
Puckett 

79. RB 6, P. 317 - Polly Blackman DOW: 13 Nov. 1826 

"little d" : Levenia Laura Malvina Augusta Blackman (not 
21) "my part of my father's estate pending" S to d: 
girl, Lucinda Owed money to estate: Abraham Henry, Ad- 
miral Blackman E: Abraham Herring W: Devrent Beesley, 
Polly Mabry 



J < Sf r 



JOHN PRICE BDCHANiUf 
Farmer and Fblltlcian 

bgr- Carol Hoffinazm 



-6U- 



JOHN PRIQE BUOHANAN— FARMER AND P0LIII3IAN 

John Price Buchanan Is the only man from Rutherford 
Oounty ever elected governor of Tennessee. He was one of 
those basically unremarkable men who, through a strong sense 
of duty and community service, attain high office. Lacking 
the charisma of many politicians, most notably his predecessor, 
Robert L, Taylor, he nevertheless brought a consistency and 
thought fulness to his term as governor that is deserving of 
more recognition. Although his administration Is remembered as 
one of strife, if should be remembered that to a large extent 
he was a victim of the culmination of long-term problems and 
the political factionalism swirling around him, 

Buchanan was born in Williamson County, Tennessee, a few 
miles northeast of franklin, on October ^4, 18A7, His ances- 
tors were among the first settlers of the Cumberland; his 
great-grandfather was Major John Buchanan, founder of 
Buchanan's Station, an early pioneer fort. His father, Thomas, 
was a prosperous farmer and slave owner. The young Buchanan 
was educated in the common schools of the area and had to gain 
additional education by private study, an experience which pro- 
bably led to his later interest in improving the Tennessee 
public school system. 

Although his father wanted him to go to college, at the 
age of 16, Buchanan ran away from home and enlisted as a 
private in Reddy's Escort (4th Alabama Cavalry) and was 
assigned to Nathan Bedford Forrest's command, serving until 



65 



his unit surrendered at Pond Spring, Alabama, on May 17, 
1865. According to a family story, while retreating from a 
Yankee charge, Buchanan rode under a tree and cut his throat 
on a hanging branch. For a long time he had people believing 

the Yankees did it, but finally told the truth about the cause 

2 

of his wound, thus missing out on receiving a pension. 

After the Civil War, Buchanan moved to Rutherford County 
and married Frances (Fannie) McGill, daughter of James and 
Amanda (Norman) McGill, on his twentieth birthday, October 24, 
1867. In 1873 they moved to a farm on McGill family land 
which had been inherited by Mrs. Buchanan, Located on the 
Manchester Pike about eight miles southwest of Murfreesboro, 
this became known as the Big Creek Stock Farm and encompassed, 
in 1877, about l60 acres. The Buchanans had eight children 
(plus one who died in infancy): James Thomas, John Price, Jr., 
Rebecca Jane, Robert Norman, Margaret Dosia, Susan Matthews, 
Frances Louise, and James McGill,-^ 

Buchanan's political training and prominence in the 
community began early. He first served as a delegate to the 

Democratic state convention in 1876 and continued in this 

4 
capacity until his gubernatorial nomination In 1890, He 

also ran once for County Court Clerk and twice for District 

Constable, but was defeated,"^ His start in politics was 

described differently by Buchanan himself in an Interview with 

a reporter for the Nashville Dally American the day after he 

was nominated for governor. According to this story he was 

a delegate to a convention to nominate candidates for the 



66 



legislature and his name was proposed. He declined, but his 
name was put before the convention a second time and this 
time he was nominated. Having never made a speech before, he 
told two of his colleague , Mssrs. Avent and Sparks, that he 
had a good horse and buggy and would drive them around if they 
would do the talking. At the start of the trip one of the 
other men became ill and Buchanan began soeaking for himself.^ 
Actually, he probably began speaking for himself earlier than 
that since in 1881 he chaired a meeting of the Rutherford 
County Democrats to resolve that the 100-3 debt settlement 
(law to fund state debt at full face value by three percent 
interest bonds, with interest coupons acceptable as tax 
payment) was "a step toward serfdom."'^ 

However it began, Buchanan's fairly short success as a 
politician cannot be separated from the rise of the farmer 
movement in Tennessee and, indeed, in most of the U. S, Many 
of the concerns he voiced and the legislation he was involved 
with, both as a representative in the General Assembly and as 
governor, were influenced by the farmer movement and, 
naturally, by his own farm background, and he was to show a 
remarkable consistency of thought throughout his six years in 
Nashville, 

In the years following the Civil War, farmers were 
increasingly burdened with declining prices, rising costs, 
overproduction and foreign competition. In addition, they 
felt alienated from the local elites. As a result, several 
farmers' organizations were formed, (The agrarian revolt in 



67 



Tennessee was not as profound as In the Deep South because of 
a more even industrial development and less dependence on 
cotton.) The most well known of these was the Grange (Patrons 
of Husbandry) of which there were more than 1,000 chapters in 
Tennessee by the 1870 's. As the Tennessee Grange declined in 
membership in the early 1830 's, two organizations, the National 
Agricultural Wheel and the Farmers' (or Southern) Alliance 
moved in to fill the vacutim. These two groups were united in 
December of 1888 as the Farmers' and Laborers' Union of 
America, In Tennessee, the two groups were organized at 
Nashville in July, 1889 under the same name (usually called 
the "Farmers' Alliance" or simply the "Alliance") as a tax 
exempt, chartered business corporation and acted as a farmers' 
cooperative. By 1890 the Tennessee Alliance had between 
30,000 and 50,000 members.^ 

Not initially a political organization, the Alliance's 
main goal was to lessen farmers' dependence on merchants. 
Theoretically, only farmers, farm laborers and country school 
teachers, ministers, physicians, and mechanics were allowed 
to Join, but in practice some men of property and status 
became members as they enhanced the Alliance's social standing. 
(Buchanan himself was the fourth largest landholder in the 
25th District of Rutherford County.). Specifically excluded 
was anyone connected by ownership or employment with a mer- 
cantile business, lawyers and any stockholder in a bank.-"-^ 

A typical Alliance program Included the following 
points: l) Just income tax; 2) popular election of officials; 



6g 



3) regulation of interstate commerce; 4) improvement of 
patent laws; 5) pure food laws; 6) regulation of transporta- 
tion systems (and ultimate government ownership); 7) free 
silver coinage; 8) public school industrial education and 
improvement of agricultural colleges; 9) restriction of the 
liquor trade. 

Naturally, in order to articulate these goals the 
Alliance soon became a political force. Starting at the 

grass-roots level, by 1888 4l out of 132 Tennessee legisla- 

12 
tors elected in November of that year were Alliancemen, 

The next step was to recognize that execution of any political 

program depended on capturing the machinery of the Democratic 

party which had fallen into the hands of the conservative 

"court house rings" after Reconstruction, 

Buchanan Joined the Agricultural Society in 1883. He 
became the first president of the Tennessee Alliance in 1587 
and president of the combined Wheel and Alliance in July of 
1889. The real power in the Alliance, however, was John H, 
McDowell, vice president of the Southern branch of the 
Alliance and editor of the Weekly Toiler (Nashville), the 
movement's principal mouthpiece, 

Buchanan first went to Nashville as a state representative 
in 1887, As a freshman legislator Buchanan was not especially 
active but did display interest in topics that he would 
follow consistently during the next six years. They included 
Civil War veteran's pensions, the improvement of the public 
school system, economical government, the need for a new 



69 



Tennessee constitution and the betterment of conditions for 
farmers and laborers. 

In the Forty-Fifth General Assembly (188?) he introduced 
House Bill 8, To pension certain soldiers, which passed with 
amendments; authored an amendment to a road bill decreasing 
the amount allowed for use of a wagon and team (adopted 
March 24); and put forward a petition from the County Court 
of Rutherford County relative to redistricting the various 
counties into new school districts. Notably, it was left to 
N.T. Delaney, of Sullivan County, to introduce House Bill 237, 
To charter the Farmers' and Laborers' Association. He was a 
member of the standing committees on Finance, Ways and Means, 
Penitentiary and Tippling and Tippling Houses, -^ 

In the 1889 session of the General Assembly, Buchanan 
became more active. Bills introduced included: House Bill 
164 (with H,E, Palmer), To carry into effect Article 4, 
Section 1 of the Constitution (referring to qualification of 
electors); House Bill 203, To regulate the business of 
banking;- House Bill 239, To amend the law apportioning the 
State into congressional districts; and House Bill 543, To 
prevent the location of hospitals by counties and munici- 
palities within the vicinity of charitable institutions 
maintained by the state. He was also influential in the 
passage of House Bill 233, To exempt agricultural agents from 
privilege tax. 

Under the heading of "Explanations" Buchanan followed 
his party and voted to support an Appropriation Bill (Senate 



70 



Bill 456), but objected to a raise In salaries for two 
officials and to spending $4,000 for stationery; and voted no 
on a Joint resolution to adjourn sine die "because there is a 
quorum present in both Houses and there is important business 
to transact which will require an extra session, and this is 
both unnecessary and inexpedient when that business can now 
be transacted" (with H.E, Palmer and nine others). Committee 
memberships in the Forty-Sixth legislature were Finance, Ways 
and Means and Charitable Institutions (chairman).^ 

The contest for the gubernatorial nomination was not 
one of personalities so much as it was a fight among factions 
of the Democratic party which had been in disarray since the 
Civil War. Three distinct groups had emerged. The Bourbons — 
the Old South, states rights conservatives— were the strongest 
faction though they lost control of the governor's office in 
1886, Their leader was Senator Isham G. Harris, secessionist 
leader and Civil War governor. The New South group favored 
industrialization and, because of their resources, enlightened 
leadership and success in bargaining with the Republicans for 
patronage and legislation, they had an influence dispropor- 
tionate to their size. Their leader was Colonel Arthur S, 
Colyar, industrialist, lawyer, and publisher of the Nashville 
Dally American . The third group was the small farm element, 
or wool-hat boys, who looked for their leadership to Buchanan 
and McDowell (and Andrew Jackson, Andrew Johnson and Robert L, 
Taylor). ^5 



71 



When McDowell first announced he wanted Buchanan as 

governor, the urban press did not take It seriously, and also 

questioned the possible conflicts of Interest caused by 

Buchanan's association with the Farmers' Alliance, a problem 

that would continue to plague him until he retired from active 

politics In 1892. Democratic papers stressed the importance 

of party solidarity. In a short article copied from the Obion 

Democrat at the beginning of 1890, the Nashville Daily 

American wrote. 

If J. P. Buchanan really means to run for governor 
he should endeavor to escape forthwith from the hands 
of some of his alleged friends. It may be added, 
without overstepping the bounds of truth or propriety, 
that the idea of J.P, having any symptoms of a states- 
man borders somewhat on the ludicrous. ^° 

In the campaign leading to the Democratic convention of 
1890, Buchanan's relative obscurity proved attractive to 
farmers and other voters since It distanced him from the 
machine politics they were dissatisfied with. By the middle 
of May, 1890, 28 County Alliances and hundreds of sub- 
Alliances endorsed Buchanan and proved to be ready-made 

campaign organizations which were able to dominate county 

17 
conventions. In Rutherford County he carried three out of 

six wards in Murfreesboro and. In general, he was strongest 

In Middle and Western Tennessee, winning all the delegates 

from the Middle Tennessee counties of Marshall, Warren, 

Grundy, Van Buren, White, Stewart and Cannon.^® 

The Democratic state convention, which was known as the 

"Farmers' Convention," began on July 15, I890. Buchanan's 



72 



opponents were Jere Baxter, the New South candidate; Joslah 
Patterson, for the Bourbons; and John Taylor, 

The Alliance platform was tailored to avoid frightening 
delegates with radical proposals. They pointedly excluded 
mention of the Sub-Treasury Plan which they had long advocated 
and limited themselves to calling for free coinage of silver, 
a recognition that agrarian interests are the mainstay of a 
dual system of government, condemning the Republicelns for 
legislative discrimination against this class, and to con- 
demning the granting of land to corporations instead of home- 

/ V IQ 

steaders (the only true Alliance plank), ^ 

More far-reaching was the regular Democratic party 

platform. It contained the following points: l) opposed to 

Importation of pauper labor and for opening public lands for 

homesteading; 2) gold and silver coinage and ready conversion 

of paper money to metal; 3) extension of free school system; 

4) strict economy and minimum government expenses; 5) just 

and equal taxation; 6) amendment of lien laws for protection 

of farmers and mechanics; 7) establishment and development of 

good roads; 8) welcome capital and labor to the state; and 

9) modification of the penal system to eliminate competition 

20 
with free labor* 

Buchanan's name was put into nomination by Committee 

Chairman J. D, Richardson and it took 26 ballots before he 

was declared the Democratic candidate for governor. His 

victory can be seen as being more the result of successfully 

capitalizing on the enmity between the Bourbon and New South 

groups than because of personal popularity. 



73 



Patterson, Senator Harris and John Taylor threw their support 
behind him because of fear of a Republican victory (and Negro 
domination) In the fall, 

Buchanan's acceptance speech endorsed the principles of 
the Democratic party: "... as long as the power of speech 
will endure, I will be heard proclaiming to the people the 
great principle of Democracy as enunciated by Jackson, Polk 
and Johnson," He also declared himself opposed to large 

national or state government and for strict adherence to the 

21 
Constitution. 

Right after the convention, in an interview with a Daily 

22 
American reporter in his room at the Duncan Hotel, Buchanan 

expanded on the topic of his loyalty to the Democratic party 

and stated that the Interest of farmers lay with the party, 

I am making this campaign as a Democrat on a 
Democratic platform. I have never urged anybody to 
support me because I was an alliance man or a farmer; 
in fact, I have never told that I was a farmer in any 
speech I have made. It is a grave mistake to suppose, 
as some do, that I am seeking to array one class 
against another, or that I want to benefit the agri- 
cultural at the expense of other interests. I believe 
that the farmers cannot be benefited by any course 
which would be oppressive or unjust to other Interests. 
None more than the agricultural interest is benefited 
by the legitimate growth of the mercantile, manufac- 
turing and railroad interests. It is to our interest 
that the merchants with whom we deal should be 
prosperous, that manufactures should be developed, and 
that transportation facilities should be Increased and 
cheapened. We want nothing that would injure any of 
them, but we want to help all and hurt none. I want to 
be a Governor for the whole people of the State, and 
you know me well enough to know that I will be as I ^^ 
have always been a souare, clean, upper-case Democrat, -^ 

He would return to this theme over and over again in an 

attempt to avoid strong identification with the Alliance, 



74 



part of his reasoning being that many of the Alliance demands 
were national in scope and had no place in state politics. 

There was much excitement in Murfreesboro when the news 
of Buchanan's victory at the convention was received. It is 
said that the Oourt House bell was rung for nearly an hour, 

and the Murfreesboro Home Journal went so far as to put out 

24 
an extra. When he arrived back in Murfreesboro from 

Nashville on July 19» over 2,000 people met him at the depot. 

A procession had been organized which included a pleasure 

wagon carrying local society ladies and was emblazoned with 

the slogans, "Andrew Johnson from the tailor's bench; Buchanan 

from the plow," and "It is not wealth, nor pomp, nor state, 

but git up and git that makes a man great," The procession 

route started at the train station, went east on Main Street 

to the Public Square and up to Academy Street, north on 

Academy to College Street, west to Lebanon Street and then 

back to the Square, -^ 

The gubernatorial contest began in the newspapers before 

any of the candidates (Buchanan; Republican Lewis T, Baxter; 

and David Oato Kelley, Prohibitionist) hit the campaign trail. 

In the Daily American Buchanan, or "Old Buck" as he was now 

being called, was praised as a man with the courage of his 

convictions, an able leader of debate in the legislature, and 

watchful of his constituents' interests. It was pointed out, 

in an effort to reinforce his appeal to the farm element, 

that he was a self-made man, did not have much money to spend 

on politics and that his farm was not well Improved and lay in 

an indifferent part of Rutherford County. 

75 



The J^ public an- control led Nashville Banner , on the other 
hand, dug up Buchanan's poor political showing on the local 
level (see page 2) and once again questioned the influence 
of the Alliance on Buchanan and the Democratic party which it 
pictured ",,, kneeling down abjectly and taking upon its neck 
the yoke of a secret class political organization, whose 
pledged policy is in outright antagonism to the time-honored 
and fundamental principles of -"democracy," Also pointed out 
rfas the fact that the Republicans had had to give lip service 
to some national policies, such as the Force Bill, that were 
odious to the South, ^"^ 

Buchanan began his gubernatorial campaign in earnest 
early in September, 1390. Speaking to a crowd in Franklin, 
Williamson County, his opening speech followed Democratic 
policy closely and was a model for future speeches and for 
his legislative goals as governor. 

He went on record as being for states' rights and against 
alien ownership of land. Centralized wealth was blamed on 
the ^publican tendency toward centralized government and 
could be cured by revising the tariffs, breaking the power of 
the monopolists, free coinage of silver and creating a greater 
money supply. Economy in government was stressed and was used 
as one argument against the Force Bill (which called for 
federal supervision on Congressional elections), Buchanan 
called for the extension of school system facilities and an 
increase in the school term from four to nine months. His 
enlightened views on penal reform included separating criminal 



76 



classes and decreasing competition with honest labor. The 
establishment of good public roads and the development of 
resources were also discussed. Finally, again, Buchanan 
stressed that he was wedded to no special interests.^" 

Organized out of Democratic headquarters in Room 7 of 
the Maxwell House Hotel in Nashville, Buchanan's campaign 
schedule was a busy one, especially considering the trans- 
portation facilities of the era. Included in the schedule 
were soeeches in: 

September 5 South Pittsburgh 

September 6 Sequatchie County 

September 7 Jasper, Marion County 

September 8 Dayton, Rhea County 

September 10 Cleveland 

September 12 Sweetwater, Monroe County 

September 13 Morristown, Hamblen County 

September 23 Tullahoma 

September 29 Lebanon 

September 30 Dover 

October 1 Clarksville 

October 2 Springfield 

October 3 Gallatin 

October 4 Centreville 

October 6 Charlotte (cancelled because 

of illness) 

October 7 Pulaski 

October 8 Lawrenceburg 

October 9 Waynesboro 

October 11 Savannah 

Hia last campaign speech was delivered at the Masonic Hall in 

29 
Hashville on the day before the election, November 3. 

As in all political contests, rumors and counter- rumors 

were soon flying. To refute a report that the entire Murfrees- 

boro bar would vote against Buchanan, the Daily American sent 

a reporter to canvas the membership. He found that of the 25 

members, l6 were for Buchanan, seven were against and two 

were doubtful. 



77 



In reply to the Daily American 's claim that thousands 
took part In a procession in Murfreesboro on November 1, the 
Nashville Banner reported only 204 people, four carrisiges, 
one drag, two bandwagons, four or five buggies and 60 people 
on horseback. According to the Banner story this group 
marched around for a half hour then went to Mason's Opera 
House where transparencies were shown and Buchanan made the 
same speech as elsewhere, on which many people walked out,^^ 

Election day in 1890 was on November 4 and the results 
were as follows: 





(Dem.) 
Buchanan 


(Re pub.) 
Baxter 


(Prohib.) 
Kelley 


East Tennessee 


26,828 


39,383 


2,221 


Middle Tennessee 


53,297 
(2,381) 


22,126 
(1,197) 


6,790 
( 349) 


West Tennessee 


33.424 


14,572 


2.071 


Total 


113,549 


76,081 


11,082 


( ) Rutherford Ooun 


ty vote 




32 



The reasons for his victory were: 1) continuity of 
voting habits; 2) organized Alliance support; and 3) the 
discriminatory effect of new election laws. As was true at 
the state convention, Buchanan's strength was in Middle and 

West Tennessee. After his victory, he went to Florida to 

3"5 
recuperate, 

Buchanan was sworn in as Governor of Tennessee on 
January 19, 1891, His inaugeral address ran true to form. 
Its main points: 



lo The system of government has fallen into serious errors; 
violated the principles of equality by the undue protection of 
a favored class. It has made "dangerous strides toward 
plutocracy by submission to the power of aggregated money; it 
has centralized power until it threatens the destruction of 
popular government and the rights of the States to local self- 
government. It has by these errors fostered monopoly until 
it has placed itself within the merciless grasp of this 
relentless tyrant." 

2, Tennessee has, on the whole, a good code of laws, Oare 
should be taken to enact only needed laws and not overburden 
the statute books, Buchanan believes in the Jeffersonian non- 
interference theory of government. The weakness of the state 
does not come from inefficient laws, so much as inefficient 
execution of laws, 

3, Government should encourage the development of the 
material resources of the state. Progress should not be in 
"booms" but in growth upon a solid base of an increase in 
wealth, taxable property, resources and revenues bringing 
prosperity to everyone. His administration will welcome all 
capital and labor that are for the best interests of the 
state in the development and proper use of resources. 
Capital should be protected by the "strongest security guar- 
anteed by law," The extension and further development of the 
educational system depends on increased material prosperity; 
crime will decrease as literacy increases, 

4, Monopolies and sectionalism denounced. 



79 



In his first message to the legislature, Buchanan 
expanded on the topics covered In the Inaugeral address and 
in his previous speeches, the emphasis being on education 
and penal reform (see Appendix 1 for summary), -^^ 

At first Governor Buchanan received praise and support 
from both Democratic and Republican newspapers. The Nashville 
Banner commended him for presenting a "well-considered and 
broad-minded"message to the legislature and, quoting the 
Memphis Commercial said, "He has laboriously and intelligently 
addressed himself to his executive duties, won respect, and 
made friends every day since his inaugu^ration. "^ 

But trouble wasn't long in coming and Buchanan's admin- 
istration proved to be one of the stormiest in many years. 
His problems revolved around three issues: 1) the distribu- 
tion of patronage; 2) the Goal Miners' Insurrection in East 
Tennessee; and 5) his continued affiliation with the Farmers' 
Alliance and, especially, John H, McDowell. 

As governor, Buchanan tried to follow a pragmatic policy 
designed to build an independent base for his party. However, 
in doing this, he inevitably alienated some of the party 
regulars. Especially galling was the appointment of John H. 
McDowell as coal-oil inspector of Nashville, a lucrative Job 
($8,000 a year vs. only $4,000 for the governor) that was seen 
as payment for his work as Buchanan's campaign manager. It 
was predicted that McDowell's radical Alliance views would 
reflect badly on the governor, ^"^ 



ao 



The major event of Governor Buchanan's term of office 
was the Coal Miners' Insurrection which took place in East 
Tennessee, a revolt that had its roots in Tennessee's convict 
lease system. After the Civil War there was a general 
increase in crime in the South which the impoverished states 
were ill-equipped to handle. Like many Southern states, 
Tennessee began leasing convicts to companies in order to pay 
for the penal system, and even make a profit. During Grovernor 
Buchananfe administration the lease was held by the Tennessee 
Coal Iron and Railroad Company at #100,000 per year. The 
convicts were put to work in TO I mines and sub-leased to 
Other mining companies in East Tennessee. The convict lease 
system had long been criticized both for the deplorable 
conditions under which the convicts were kept and because 
cheap convict labor took jobs from honest laborers. 

Conditions were also poor for the honest miners. They 
were paid in scrip, sometimes at irregular intervals, were 
forced to trade at the company stores and could not trust 
the weighmen employed by the mine companies. 

These grievances came to a head in the summer of 1891 
when miners at the Tennessee Coal Company mine in Briceville, 
Anderson County, were told to sign a new "iron-clad" contract 
which would have left them little better off than slaves. 
The miners refused to sign and on July 5 convicts were 
brought into Briceville to take their place. Ten days later 
the miners took over the convicts* stockade and took the 
prisoners, their guards and officers to Coal Creek where they 



Bl 



were put on a train for Knoxvllle, The same thing happened 
on July 20, both at Brlceville and at the Knoxville Coal Oo. 
mine at Ooal Creek, To each uprising Governor Buchanan res- 
ponded with state militia — first three companies on July 16, 
then 14 companies, under (Jeneral Sam T. Games. Governor 
Buchanan's general attitude toward the miners, as he told 
them in an address at Thistle Switch, was that he had to 
enforce the laws and that they should go to court to redress 
their grievances. By agreeing to call a special session of 
the legislature to examine the problem, the governor was able 
to avoid bloodshed and he personally accompanied the convicts 
back to the stockades at Briceville and Ooal Creek on July 25o^^ 

Public opinion, in general, was sympathetic to the 
miners and Governor Buchanan was criticized for being a tool 
of the industrialists and for overreaching his powers by 
calling out the militia. Also, the problems of the convict 
lease system and the miners' grievances were only postponed, 
not really solved. 

Governor Buchanan called an extraordinary session of the 
legislature on August 31, 1B91« Twelve points were enumerated 
as purposes of the session: 

1, give executive dlspof^al of sufficient forces (civil or 
military) to execute the laws; 

2, reform penitentiary and convict lease system; 

3, prohibit use of scrip and penalties for interference 
with state convicts; 

4, amend or appeal state election laws; 



82 



5o dividing state into representational, senatorial and 
floterial districts and apportioning legislators; 

6, amend division of congressional districts so as to 
include Sequatchie County; 

7, change Judicial circuits and chancery divisions and time 
of holding court; 

8, provide for payment of expenses connected with establishing 
a law court at Cumberland Gap; 

9, consider appropriation for a Tennessee exhibit at the 
World's Pair; 

10, make laws for the encouragement and benefit of the state 
militia; 

11, amend existing revenue and assessment laws to pay for 
changes brought about by extra session legislation; 

12, make necessary appropriations to defray militia expenses 

40 
at Briceville and Coal Creek, and of the extra session. 

In his message to the session the governor talked at 
length on the penitentiary question and the problems at the 
mines and recommended: 1) repeal of the lease law; 2) imme- 
diate restriction of convicts to a few mines through changes 
in the lease contract; 3) change in the criminal law so 
counties could use minor offenders on public roads; and 
4) removal of the penitentiary to a location outside the 
Nashville city limits. ^^ 

The extra session was not a success, at least from the 
miners' point of view. Although a law was passed prohibiting 
payment in scrip, it had a limited term. Primarily, the 
extra session appropriated more money for the militia and gave 



the governor limited authority to use them in situations where 
local officials could not cope. It did not repeal the lease 
law, which shortly afterwards were upheld by the State 
Supreme Court (presided over by Chief Justice Peter Turney) 
in a test case. 

In the fall of 1891, the miners rebelled again, this 
time under the influence of a more radical leadership. On 
October 31, convicts were released at the Tennessee Coal 
Mine and the stockade and buildings burned. This action was 
repeated at Coal Creek and, on November 2, at Oliver Springs, 
Governor Buchanan was very slow to act and when he did it 
was only to reinforce branch prisons and offer rewards for 
the leaders of the miners and for the escaped convicts. With 
the convicts gone, the Coal Creek Valley miners were once 
again employed with the iron-clad contract abolished and 
their own check-weighman. 

The peace was not to last, however. On December 51 » 
1891, the convicts were returned to the Knoxville Iron Mine 
along with the militia, a stockade, trenches and a Satling 
Gun. In August, 1892, the fourth miners' revolt began, this 
time in Middle Tennessee at the Tennessee Coal Iron and 
Railroad Company mines at Tracy City and Inman. Governor 
Buchanan and the prison board issued a joint statement 
declaring the lease contract forfeit, but before it could be 
carried out there were new rebellions at Oliver Springs and 
Coal Creek, A large militia force suppressed this last 
uprising, this time not without bloodshed. 



^4 



Although over 300 people were Indicted and tried after 
this rebellion, most were acquitted or given minor sentences 
and the miners were back in the mines by the fall. The 
convict lease system was finally abolished in 1896 when the 
contract ran out, at which time the convicts went to work 

mining coal for state use only at the new facilities at 

ho 
Brushy Mountain, '^ 

Buchanan's political career was badly damaged by the 
Goal Miners' Insurrection. He was caught between the busi- 
ness element who considered the strike a crime and thought 
it his duty to enforce the law and labor and reformers 
(including the Farmers' Alliance) who considered the system 
unjust. Some blamed him for negotiating with strikers, 
others for calling out the militia. He was made to appear 
the victim rather than the master of circumstances, and 
perhaps he was. 

The Farmers' Alliance faction of the Democratic party 
was able to get into office only because of the disarray of 
the regular party; they were never fully accepted by party 
leaders and as soon as the old-line Democrats saw an oppor- 
tunity they began working against Buchanan. The Goal Miners' 
Insurrection, of course, gave them just such an opportunity 
and they used this and their dissatisfaction with his 
patronage policies to add fuel to their campaign. By late 
in 1891 Bourbon successors to Buchanan were being mentioned, 
including Ohief Justice Peter Tumey of Franklin Goimty. By 
March of 1892, 17 Democratic dailies had declared themselves 



S5 



43 
opposed to the governor's re-election, and the Bourbons 

had repudiated the leadership of Buchanan and McDowell, 

Buchanan's primary problem, however, was still his rela- 
tionship with John H. McDowell, the Farmers' Alliance and, 
by the Spring of 1892, the newly-formed Peoples' Party of 
Populists. 

McDowell was accused of fraternizing with Negroes and 
even with dining with a Negro, Jehazy Cole, which stirred up 
the always-present fear of Republican-Negro domination. 

Buchanan tried to maintain his position by reaffirming 
his loyalty to the Democrats and distancing himself from 
the Populists. He thought a third party of agrarians would 
be detrimental to the South and made a public statement of 
his views in late March, 1892: 

If you wish a declaration of principles from me, 
look at the Democratic platform of 1890, upon which 
I was nominated, by which I pledged myself to stand 
... am still standing, and expect to stand until the 
Democracy . . . shall formulate another . . . 

I am opposed to a third party or peoples' party ... 

There is need of an unbroken front in the ranks 
of the Democratic party against Republicanism and 
third partyism, and I regret to say that the radical 
elements in the party are endeavoring to array 
faction against faction. The great conservative 
masses will, however, I believe, hold in check these 
elements in accord with the spirit of the call issued 
by the National Democratic Committee, 

Memphi s Oommercial , . 
March 28, 1892 ^^ 

But the damage had been done. The Democratic party was 

again factionalized as in 1890, but this time it did not 

work in Buchanan's favor. Rutherford and Tipton Counties 



each sent two delegations to represent them at the guberna- 
torial convention of 1892 because neither Buchanan nor 
Turney men were strong enough to prevail. Many former 
Buchanan supporters joined the Peoples' Party, thus dis- 
rupting the Alliance faction. Some people said they wanted 
to vote for "Buchanan without McDowell," but the governor 
would not break with him.^ The Peoples' Party, on its part, 
tried to take strength away from both the Democrats and the 
Republicans, To make matters worse, McDowell declared him- 
self a Populist and by June 1 Bourbon control was almost 
complete. 

Realizing his situation vis-a-vis the Democratic party 
was hopeless, Buchanan withdrew from the governor's race on 
July 30, 1892, Calling his opponents "sky-blue bolters" and 
" radicals," he made a rather bitter speech in which he announced 
he was no longer a candidate for renomination in which he 
covered the following subjects: 

1, He has tried to keep the party united but it has now 
split into hostile factions. 

2, He has been true to both the Alliance and the party. 

3, An organization like the Alliance should be nonpartisan 
but must concern itself with the effects of legislation. The 
Democratic party should promote the interests of all and give 
attention and consideration to the needs of all classes since 
it claims to be a party of the people, 

4, His continued connection with the Farmers' Alliance has 
bound him by no political pledge. 



5. He has obeyed the policies and principles that were 
enunciated when elected in 1890, "Had a like obedience been 
rendered by all those who accepted its declarations, the 
party of Tennessee would have continued united and harmonious." 

6, The radical faction affected alarm because of the 
presence of Alliancemen and declared "vindictive warfare" on 
all who did not agree. They resorted to unfair means to 
secure the party machinery and coerce voters at the primaries. 
They sacrificed party welfare for factional gain. 

7. The August 9 convention will be controlled by the same 
elements which are not representative of a majority of voters, 

8, He thanked his friends for their generous and faithfvil 

support and released them from any restrictions which might 

47 
be imposed by his continued candidacy. 

Shortly after, Governor Buchanan was drafted by a 
coalition of Alliancemen, Populists and "Buchanan Democrats" 
and announced as an independent on August 15, Ihe Populists 
endorsed his candidacy on August 18, The other candidates in 
this race were Peter Turney (Democratic), George W, Winstead 
(Republican) and Edward H. East (Prohibitionist). 

As an Independent candidate, Governor Buchananfe platform 
included free coinage of silver, an increase in the currency, 
popular election of U, S. Senators, restriction in agriculture 
futures dealing, free trade, abolition of national banks and 
prohibition of alien ownership of land. The last two planks 
of the platform went beyond the ideas of the Tennessee 



88 



Populists; the whole platform was similar to the Alliance 
platform of 1890.^® 

In Southern politics In 1892 it was not unusual for the 
Republicans and Populists to cooperate against the Demo- 
crats. In Tennessee, for instance, the Republicans offered 
to withdraw Winstead in return for Populist support of 
President Harrison, Here again, Buchanan became the victim 
of his loyalty to J. H, McDowell, 

On October 23, a sensational account came out (called 
the Ivins-Hill letters) concerning a deal engineered by 
McDowell between the Republicans and Populists, According to 
this deal, the Republican national committee agreed to pay 
McDowell $15,000 for bringing Buchanan into the contest and 
for aiding the Republicans in electing legislators and con- 
gressmen, McDowell was to be further rewarded by election 
to the U, S, Senate by the Republican/Populist-controlled 
legislature. It was charged that McDowell failed to live up 
to his part of the bargain, except for the candidacy of 
Buchanan and, in addition, threatened to withdraw him from 
the race when the $15,000 was slow in coming,^ This was 
the final blow to Buchanan's hopes for a second term; 
although he was not implicated he was made to look like a 
tool of McDowell, 

The Republican/Populist fusion failed and those who 
voted for Buchanan in November represented an alienated 
element of the Democratic party, both things combining to 
seriously weaken Democratic hold of the state for several 



years to come. The total vote in the 1892 gubernatorial 
election was Tumey, 126,348; Winstead, 100,577; and Buchanan, 

29,918,^^ The Populists won only five out of 99 House seats 

51 
and one Senate seat.^ 

In spite of the large number of Alliancemen and farmers 
in the Forty- Seventh General Assembly, the legislation pro- 
duced was rather lackluster. Important acts of Buchanan's 
administration included the declaration of the first Monday 
in September as a legal holiday, the creation of a Bureau 
of Statistics and provision for inspection of mines and 
provision of assistance for Peabody Normal College. A Con- 
federate Pension Bill was enacted, first appropriating $60,000 
(raised to $100,000 in 1899 and $980,000 in 1923). Perhaps 
most important was the act to establish and maintain a uni- 
form system of public schools — the "Secondary School Law 
(Chapter 132, Acts of 1891). Also during Buchanan's term, 
interest on $469,000 worth of bonds was reduced from six to 
four percent.^ 

Buchanan's final act as governor was to send a message 
to the legislature on January 9, 1393. In this message he 
discussed at length the labor troubles and the status of the 
prison question, revision of the criminal laws and convict 
labor. He reported on state finances and expenditures and 
spent considerable time on the public school system, including 
statistical evidence of its growth and development over the 
preceding two years. Also reported on were charitable insti- 
tutions and the Farmers' Institutes, Finally, he called for 



90 



a new Constitutional Convention, amendment of the election 
laws and inspection of state banks, 53 

Buchanan probably realized from the beginning that his 
governorship might only last one term, depending as it did 
on a critical balance of Alliancemen and lack of unity among 
old-line Democrats, He followed consistent and fairly pro- 
gressive policies throughout his political career and that 
his term as governor was less than a success was not entirely 
his fault. Like so many high-ranking politicians before and 
since he became a victim of situations not of his own making 
and of the excesses of a subordinate, in this case, McDowell, 
His personal character and integrity were never seriously 
questioned, 

Buchanan had never moved his family to the Governor's 
Mansion preferring Instead to commute to the city. After 
completing his term in office he returned to farming and 
stock raising. With the exception of supporting his old 
enemy, E. W, Oarmack, editor of the Nashville Daily American. 
in the Prohibitionist campaign of 1908, Buchanan was never 
again active in politics. He did, however, retain an interest 
in politics and was eventually accepted again by the Demo- 
cratic party. 

As before he went into state politics, Buchanan retained 
an active position in community and agricultural affairs. He 
was a member of the board of the Farm ers ' Voice , a ruling 
elder of the Mt, Tabor Cumberland Presbyterian Church and a 
member of the Free and Accepted Masons, ^ 



91 



In 1925 or 1926 the Buchanans moved into a house at 
216 Fourth Street in Murfreesboro. Fannie Buchanan died on 
November 30, 1927. The governor was in ill health for the 
last six years of his life and practically an invalid for the 
last two-and-a-half years, Buchanan died on May 14, 1930 and 
was buried, beside his wife, at Evergreen Cemetery, At the 
time of his death he still owned the farm, but it was 
divided into three sections and the house was torn down in 
1953.5'^ 

The Buchanan family has remained prominent in Murfrees- 
boro, Buchanan's daught, Rebecca, taught at Middle Tennessee 
State University; the "Buchanan Dramatic Club" is named after 
her, Rebecca died in 1965. Elizabeth Buchanan Whorley, 
following in her grandfather's footsteps, is active in the 
Rutherford County Democratic party, ^° But what the governor 
would have liked best perhaps is the new John Price Buchanan 
School located not very far from the farm on which he spent 
so much of his life. 



92 



Appendix 1 

Summary of Governor John Price Buchanan's first message to the 
Forty-Seventh General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, 
February 11, 1891. (See Footnote 35) 

1, Federal Relations 

There is widespread discontent among agriculturalists, in 
common with almost every other state, ,,, result of unjust 
Federal sectional and class legislation for tVie last 30 years. 
The state legislature is powerless to remove them and also 
powerless to do anything about the short money supply, 

2, Finances 

Congratulated past legislature on the success of the 
assessment law and recommended appointment of a State Board of 
Equalizers for the purpose of more evenly adjusting taxes 
among the various counties. 

3o Educational Interests 

a. Public Schools - The duty of the state to educate 
children is no longer a debatable question. In towns 
the municipal tax has enabled public school terms 
lengthened to nine months and a course of study to meet 
lower classes of a college or university, but in the 
country the term is limited to four months on the average 
and to elementary grades. Recommends extension of the 
public school system, establishment of schools in which 
higher branches can be taught, uniform textbooks and a 
book on civil government, 

b. Remuneration for the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction should be placed on a permanent basis. 

c. $2,000 appropriation for teachers' institutes, 

d. Praise for the University of Tennessee, 

e. Agricultural College - Must assent to additional 
appropriations by Congress to land-grant colleges under 
the Morrill Act of 1890,. Request for further appropria- 
tion for Teachers' Department and scholarships. 

f. Peabody Normal College - Looking for money from 
Peabody Board of Trustees. 

4, Charitable Institutions 

Need a reformatory for youthful criminals, an industrial 
school for girls and other charities. 



93 



a. Confederate Soldiers Home is most imperative, 

b. Private Charities - Thanks and gratitude of the State. 

5» Agricultural Department 

There have been attempts to abolish the Department from 
the belief that it has no practical benefits; this is due to 
insufficient funds, 

a. The Commissioner of Agriculture should hold institutes 
for the purpose of "awakening activity of thought .o. 
bringing about an interchange of opinions and experience 
upon practical problems, and creating a professional spirit 
and pride among farmers," 

b. Increase the appropriation from $8,000 to #10,000, 

6, Geological Reports 

a. Interest in investment in mineral resources in 
Tennessee warrants publishing geological reports (last 
appeared in 1869), 

b, -Especially important if State builds an exhibition at 
the World's Pair in 1892. 

7, World's Pair 

Recommended an aporopriation for an exhibition commen- 
surate with the necessities involved and the ability of the 
State, 

8, Dairy Interests 

Should receive encouragement and such protection by law 
as will prevent adulteration of products, 

9, State Board of Health 

a. Board of Health has asked for legislation to help it 
register births and deaths, 

b. Recommended legislation concerning health of livestock. 

c. Recommended sanitary organization by counties to 
prevent spread of contagious diseases among animals. 

10, County Roads 

Can't see how a uniform law can be reached; left it in the 
hands of the Road Congress to help the legislature formulate a 
good law. 



94 



11, Penitentiary- 
Repeated arguments for new penitentiary. 

12, Convict Labor 

a. Convict labor is the best solution to the problem of 
expenses, 

b. It is injurious to criminals and unjust to taxpayers 
to keep convicts in idleness, 

c. No practical plan as yet, 

13. Corporations and Trusts 

a. Talked about the growth of trusts, 

b. Recommended "such restrictions, as amendments to 
corporation law, as to prevent the issuing of charters 
to any other than public, quasi-public, and such indus- 
trial purposes as lie beyond the field of individual 
endeavor. 

c. Recommended further restrictions to prevent forming 
of trusts, 

14, Inspection of State Banks 

15. Election Laws 

The present election laws are a success, -t^emedying any 
defects will not leave any excuse for Federal intervention. 

16. Military Affairs 

The efficiency of the State Guard should be increased and 
the duties of the Adjutant-General be restructured so he can 
devote proper time to the military. 

17, Improvement of the Capitol 

Provision should be made for maintenance and repair, 

18. Appropriations 

Should be adequate to preserve credit, sustain what has 
already been undertaken and answer other needs. 

Conclusion - It is not the number of laws enacted but their 
character and quality that will determine their usefulness. 



95 



Appendix 2 



Buchanan, James. Interview taped by Jeff Whorley (grandson) 
and Dr. James Buchanan (son), 1970 (transcribed December 14, 
1981). 

Jeff This is Jeff Whorley, With me are my uncle, 

Dr. James Buchanan of Virginia Tech and my 
grandfather, James Buchanan, of Rutherford County. We shall 
talk about my great-grandfather, John P. Buchanan who was 
governor of Tennessee from 1891 to 1393 and the only governor 
from Rutherford Oounty, 

Dr. Buchanan Thank you, Jeff. That's fine. I think we 
can have a nice conversation. Actually, I 
don't recall too much about my grandfather. I was about 13 
years old when he died. It was about 1933 as I remember, I 
remember mostly an old man with white whiskers who used to 
bump me up and down on his lap and sing something about 
"chicken foot neck and a gizzard" and a few things like that; 
a man, however, whom everybody respected a great deal even in 
his old age, I also remember as a boy about your size I used 
to wander around upstairs in the old big house which unfor- 
tunately is no longer here and find all of this literature 
about his political campaigns, all about the Farmers' Alliance 
and the Wall Street robber barons and so forth during the 
Populist period which he was the representative of in the State 
of Tennessee. I think they actually elected something like 
six governors in 1890 which was a rather strange phenomenon. 
The Farmers' Alliance party rather than the regular Democrats, 
Jeff, what I suggest is that you ask Papa what he remembers 
about the governor. 

Jeff Papa, what do you remember when your father 

was governor? Tell us about it. 

James Buchanan Well, I was most too small to know much 

about when he was governor, but something 
happened that made an impression on me about that time. You 
know the state hadn't been working prisoners in the mine up 
there up till about the time he was governor and they sent 
some state prisoners up there and the miners resented it and 
they undertook to run them off. They had to call the state 
militia and there was some bloodshed along about that time at 
Brushy Mountain, Inman. H.H, Bradley, my uncle by marriage, was 

superintendent of the mines then and had to 

and along after that when he was defeated by Pete Turney, they 
brought that all up, you know, about calling the state militia 
out to fight the people who lived there, who made a living by 
mining. That's about all I remember now, 

Jeff What about after he was governor? What about 

you taking him to the train at Rucker? 



96 



James Buchanan I went about every other day to Rucker for 
so many years, while he stayed in politics. 
And I was just a little shaver and I'd ride behind him to 
Rucker and get him on the train and I'd put on a show coming 
back. He'd tell me be sure not to ride them horses fast and 
I'd stand up in the saddle and put a regular show on. People 
would come out and say yonder come that little ole Buchanan 
boy. He's going to get killed. Lord have mercy, he's going 
to get killed. 

Dr. Buchanan Then you went back and got him at night, 

James Buchanan And I'd go and get him in the evening, you 

know, and I had to ride about five miles in 
the dark. Scared, oh, and I had to go by a church and a 
graveyard and you talk about going, I was moving on, I passed 
that graveyard and I heard somebody holler. Away I went and 
he hollered at me again a little louder and a little louder. 
Finally, he caught up with me. He'd got a train that stopped 
about halfway between Rucker and Christiana, He made them 
back up and put him off and he got a man and a buggy and 
horse and caught me over there. Like to scared me to death. 
But I made it home and I'm here now. 

Jeff Was the governor in the Civil War? 

James Buchanan Yes, he was in there the last year, run away 

from home and Joined the last year of the 
war. They went to Alabama, They fought one year in the war. 
He was only 16 years old at the time. 

Dr. Buchanan Wasn't there something about running under 
a bush and cutting his throat? 

James Buchanan Yes. The Yankees was charging and they 

were running. They had them cut off from 
the main beginning and he run under a tree with a great bamboo 
stringing down and caught him under the chin and cut his 
throat from one side to the other, and he went in first and 
told them he got cut by Yankees and had them believing it for 
a long time. If he hadn't finally told up he could have been 
drawing a pension, 

Jeff What about the Farmers' Alliance party? 

Was it an offset of the Democrat party? 

James Buchanan That Farmers' Alliance, now let me see. 

There wasn't nothing on earth but sort of a 
farmers' union and they never could get organized again. That 
was the beginning of the farmers' union. 

Dr. Buchanan After his term the Democratic party sort of 
took him back in again, didn't they? 



97 



James Buchanan 
Jeff 

Dr. Buchanan 

James Buchanan 

Jeff 

James Buchanan 



After he got beat? Yes. 

Vfhat sort of politics did the governor stay 
in after his term in office? 

Did he ever run for anything else? He 
liked to hang around Nashville, 

He was always a politician. Stayed in 
politics as long as he lived. 

Was the governor a good farmer? 



Yes, he must have been pretty good to raise 
eight children on the farm. Must have been 
a pretty fair farm. 



9B 



FOOTNOTES 

Tennessee Historical Oonunission, Historical Marker 
3D30, "John Price Buchanan;" Tennessee: The Volunteer State, 
Vol. Ill (Nashville: The S. J. Olarke Publishing Co., 1923), 
p, ; Biosraphical Directory. Tennessee General Assembly « 
1796-1967 , Rutherford County (Nashville: Tennessee State 
Library and Archives) , p, • 

^Ibid, , po ; James Buchanan, Interview taped by Jeff 
Whorley and Dr. James Buchanan, 1970 (transcribed December 14, 
1931), p. 2. 

-^ Biographical Directory , p, ; Rutherford County, Tennesee, 
County Clerk's Office, Minute Book EE, 1^66, p. 95, and Book 
DD, 1865, p. 668; Rutherford County, Tennessee, County Court 
Clerk's Office, Minute Book GG, p. 12; Mary B. Hughes, 
Hearthstones (Murfreesboro, TN: Mid-South Publishing Co., Inc., 
1942), p. 67; Rutherford County, Tennessee, Tax Records, 1877, 
p. 186. 

4 
Biographical Directory , p . 

^ Nashville Banner . 31 July, 1890, p. 2, 

^ Nashville Daily American . 20 July, 1890, p. 1, 

7 

'Roger L, Hart, Redeemers. Bourbons and Populists : 
Tennessee 1870-1B96 (Baton Rouge: State University Press, 
1975), p. 53. 

Q 

°Robert E. Corlew, Tennessee; A Short History . 2nd ed. 
(Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1981), p. 6, 

^J, A. Sharp, "The Entrance of the Farmers' Alliance 
Into Tennessee Politics," ETHSP 9 (1937): 79. 

■'■^Roger L. Hart, Redeemers. Bourbons and Populists: 
Tennessee 1870-1896 (Baton Rouge: State University Press, 
1975), p. 113 and 127. 

•''•^Daniel Merritt Robison, Bob Taylor and the Agrarian 
Revolt in Tennessee (Chapel Hill, NO: University of North 
Carolina Press, 1935), p. 137-8. 

^^Roger L, Hart, Redeemers. Bourbons and Populists : 
Tennessee 1870-1896 (Baton Rouge: State University Press, 
1975), p. 129. 

•^ Journal of the House of Representatives of the Forty - 
Fifth Assembly of the State of Tennessee (Nashville: 
Marshall & Bruce, 1887), pp. 204, 950, 191, 135-6, 



99 



^y, ^ Journal of the House of Representatives of the Forty- 
Six General Assembly of the State of Tennessee (Nashville; 
Marshall & Bruce, 1889), pp. 76, 101, 113, 310, 717, 721, 8l6, 
827, 92-3. 

^^Robert E. Oorlew, Tennessee; A Short History (Knoxville; 
University of Tennessee Press, 1931), p, 372; J. A. Sharp, 
"The Entrance of the Farmers' Alliance Into Tennessee Politics," 

The East Tennessee Historical Society's Publications 9 (1937) : 

^_ 

^" Nashville Daily American . 20 January 1890, p, 4, 

^'Roger L, Hart, Redeemers. Bourbons and Populists ; 
Tennessee 1870-1896 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University 
Press, 1975), p. 138. 

^Sj, A. Sharp, "The Entrance of the Farmers' Alliance 
Into Tennessee Politics," The East Tennessee Historical 
Society's Publications 9 (1937); ^2^ 

IQ 
^Roger L. Hart, Redeemers. Bourbons and Populists : 

Tennessee 1870-1896 (Baton Rouge; Louisiana State University 

Press, 1975), pp. 142-3. The Sub-Treasury Plan was a scheme 

to assist farmers in which the federal government would 

receive non-perishable crops as security for farm loans, 

saving farmers from having to sell in glutted markets and 

making the money supply more flexible. 

on 
^Daniel Merritt Robison, Bob Taylor and the Agrarian 

Revolt in Tennessee (Chapel Hill; University of North 

Carolina Press, 1935), pp. 144-5. 

^^ Nashville Daily American . 19 July 1890, p. 1, 

^^ Nashville Daily American . 15 July 1890, p. 1. 

23"Mr. Buchanan Talks," Nashville Daily American . 19 
July 1890, p. 4. 

^^ Nashville Daily American . 19 July 1890, p. 1. 

^^ Nashville Daily American . 20 July 1890, p. 1. 

^^ Nashville Daily American . 19 July 1890, p. 2. 

^'^ Nashville Banner . 31 July 1890, p. 2. 

^ %ashville Daily American . 3 September 1890, p. 1. 

^^ Nashville Daily American . 2, 7, 12, 13, 28 September 
1890; Nashville Banner . 3 November 1890, p. 5, 



100 



^^ Nashvllle Daily American . 25 October 1890, p. 1. 

^■^"Buck at Murfreesboro," Nashville Banner . 3 November 

1890, p. 1. 

^^Oharles A. Miller (prep). The Official and Political 
Manual of the State of Tennessee ^Nf&shville: Tennessee State 
Library and Archives, 1890; reprint ed. , Spartanburg, SO: 
The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1974), pp. 278-80. 

■^•^ Murfreesboro Free Press . 21 November 1890, p. 1. 

^ John Price Buchanan, "Inaugeral Address" (January 19, 
1891), Appendix to the House Journal of the Forty- Seventh 
General Assembly of the State of Tennessee (Nashville; Albert 
B. Travel, Printers to the State, 1891), pp. 5-10. 

•^^John Price Buchanan, "First Message," (February 11, 
1 891 ) f Appendix to the House Journal of the Forty-Seventh 
General Assembly of the State of Tennessee (Nashville: 
Albert B. Travel, Printer to the State, 1"91) , pp. 13-30. 

5""The Governor's Message," Nashville Banner . 12 February 

1891, p. ^; 31 March 1891, p. 4. 

^"^ Nashville Banner . 7 April 1891, p. 4. 

58oartter Patten, A Tennessee Chronicle (Chattanooga: 
By the Author, 1953) i p. 251. 

^^k. 0. Hutson. Jr., "The Overthrow of the Convict Lease 
System in And. Co.," The East Tennessee Historical Society's 
Publications 7 (1935) J 121. 

^^ House Journal of the Extraordinary Session of the 
Forty-Seventh General Assembly . August 31. 1891 (Nashville: 
Marshall & Bruce, Printers to the State, 1B91), pp. 4-5. 

^^Ibid., pp. 9-25. 

^2a, C. Hutson, Jr., "The Overthrow of the Convict Lease 
System in Tennessee,", The East Tennessee Historical Society's 
Publications 8 (1936): 83-98. 

^^Roger L. Hart, Redeemers. Bourbons and Populists ; 
Tennessee 1870-1896 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University 
Press, 1975), p. IBl. 

^^Ibid., p. 184. 

^ ^ashville Banner . 4 April 1892, p. 1. 



101 



SELEOTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Primary Sources 

Buchanan, James. Interview taped by Jeff Whorley and Dr. James 
Buchanan, 1970 (transcribed December 14, 1981). 

Buchanan, John Price, "Inaugeral Address" (January 19, 1891). 
Appendix to the House Journal of the Forty-Seventh 
General Assembly of the State of Tennessee . First Session, 
1891. Nashville: Albert B. Travel, Printer to the State, 
1891. 

. "First Message " (February 11, 1891) • Appendix to 

the House Journal of the Forty-Seventh General Assembly 

of the State of Tennessee . First Session. l891o Nasbvillej 

Albert B. Travel, Printer to the State, 1891. 

"Governor's Message" (January 9, 1895). Appendix 



to the House Journal of the Fprty-Eishth General Assembly 
of the State of Tennessee . 1893. Nashville; Albert B. 
Travel, Printer to the State, 1893. 

"Buck at Murfreesboro," Nashville Banner . 3 November 1390, 
p. 1. 

The Daily American (Nashville), 20 July 1890, p. 1, 

The Daily American (Nashville), 3 September 1890, p. lo 

"He's Out-Buchanan Withdraws from the Race for Governor." 
The Knoxville Tribune . 31 July 1892, p. 1. 

House Journal of the Extraordinary Session of the Forty-Seventh 
General Assembly . Au-^ust 31. 1891. Nashville: Marshall & 
Bruce, Printers to the State, 1891, 

Journal of the House of Representatives of the Forty-Fifth 
General Assembly of the State of Tennessee . Nashville: 
Marshall & Bruce, 1887, 

Journal of the House of Representatives of the Forty-Sixth 
General Assembly of the State of Tennessee , Nashville: 
Marshall & Bruce, 1889. 

"Mr. Buchanan Talks." The Daily American (Nashville), 19 
July 1890, p. 4. 

Nashville Banner . 4 April 1892, p. 1, 

Rutherford Oovmty, Tennessee. County Court Clerk's Office. 
Minute Book EE, 1866, p. 95, 



102 



Rutherford County, Tennessee. County Court Cleric's Office. 
Minute Boole GG, 1872, p. 12* 

Rutherford County, Tennessee, Tax Records, 1877, p, 186, 

Whorley, Jeff, Telephone Interview, 25 November 1981, 

Secondary Sources 

Biographical Directory. Tennessee General Assembly 1796-1967 

(Rutherford County). Nashville: Tennessee State Library 
and Archives, 

Corlew, Robert E. Tennessee; A Short History . 2nd ed, 
Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1981. 

The Daily American (Nashville), 20 January 1890, p, A. 

The Daily American (Nashville), 15 July 1890, p. 1, 

The Daily American (Nashville), 19 July 1890, p. 1, 

The Daily American (Nashville), 2, 7, 12, 13 September 1890, 

The Daily American (Nashville), 28 September 1890, p. 10, 

The Dally American (Nashville), 25 October 1890, p. 1. 

Hart, Roger L. Redeemers. Bourbons and Populists; Tennessee 
1870-1896 . Baton Rouge; Louisiana State University 
Press, 1975. 

The Home Journal (Murfreesboro) , 16 May 1930, p. 1, 

Hughes, Mary B, Hearthstones . Murfreesboro, TN: Mid-South 
Publishing Co., Inc., 19A2. 

Hutson, A. C, Jr. "The Coal Miners 'Insurrection of 1891 in 
Anderson County. Tennessee . " i'he i^ast i'enne s see His - 
torical Society's Publication 7 (1935): 103-121. 

Hutson, A. C. , Jr. "The Overthrow of the Convict Lease System 
in Tennessee," The East Tennessee Historical Society's 
Publication 8 (1936), pp, S2-103, 

Miller, Charles A, (ed.). The Official and Political Manual 
of the State of T ennessee . Spartanburg, SO: The Reprint 
Company, Publishers, 1974. 

Moore, John Trotwood, and Foster, Austin P, Tennessee. The 

Volunteer State, 1796-1923. Vol. 1, Chicago: Thi 

^. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1923, 

Murfrees boro Free Press . 21 November 1890, p. 1, 

103 



Nashville Banner . 31 July 1890, p. 2. 

Nashville Banner . 12 February 1891, p. 4; 31 March 1891, p. 4. 

Nashville Banner . 7 April 1891, p. 4, 

The Nashville Tennessean . May 15, 1930, p. 1, 

News Journal (Murfreesboro) , 11 November 1981, p. 17, 

Patten, Oartter. A Tennessee Chronicle . Chattanooga, TN: By 
the Author, 1953. 

Roblson, Daniel Merrltt. Bob Taylor and the Agrarian Revolt 

In Tennessee . Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina 
Press, 1935. 

Sharp, J, A, "The Entrance of the farmers' Alliance Into 
Tennessee Politics." The East Tennessee Historical 
Society's Publications 9 (1937); 77-92. 

Sharp, J, Ao "The ■''armers' Alliance and the Peoples' Party 
In Tennessee," The East Tennessee Historical Society's 
Publications 10 (1938): 90-113. 

Tennessee Historical Commission. Historical Marker No, 3^30, 
Williamson County, Tennessee, 

Tennessee: The Volunteer State. 1769-1923 . Vol. III. 

Nashville: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1923. 

rtalker, Nancy Wooten. Out of a Clear Blue Sky . Cleveland, 
TN; By the Author, 1971. 



104 



THE YEAR 1982 in RUTHERFORD COUNTY 
Cathy Goode 



JANUARY 

The Parker Group of Smyrna announced plans for a $1^ million 
industrial warehouse complex. Perimeter Square will be built in 
Smyrna at the intersection of J. S. Young Rd. and Enon Springs Rd. 
The two warehouses and office building are scheduled to open in 
April 1983. 

FEBRUARY 

The practicing Veterinarians of Rutherford County have formed 
The Rutherford County Veterinary Society. The organization is non- 
profit and all Veterinarians practicing in the County are charter 
members. Officers elected are Dr. John Key, President; Dr. H. B. 
Smith, Secretary-Treasurer and Dr. George Jackson, Director. 

Corffitruction began this month in Smyrna by L & N crews for 
the installation of a grade crossing warning device at the Wash- 
ington Street crossing. The new safety equipment will include 
overhead lights, gates and motion detectors. 

United States and Nissan officials recently celebrated the 
opening of the L & N Railroad access line to the Nissan Plant. 
Five box cars loaded with production equipment entered the Plant 
through the new railroad tunnel under Highway 4lSo 



106 



The new Senior Citizens facility has opened on St. Clair St. 
in Murfreesboro. The new Center includes office space for ad- 
ministration of the facility and the nutrition program as well as 
a kitchen, dining area, recreation area and storage space. 

Bridgestone Tire Company of Japan has agreed to purchase 
Firestone Tire & Rubber Company's LaVergne truck tire plant. The 
sale will be consummated later in the year. 

MARCH 

Governor Lamar Alexander has appointed Mr. Ernest King Johns 
of Smyrna to a seat on the Board of Directors for The Sam Davis 
Memorial Association. Mr. Johns is also the County Historian. 

Hoover Universal, Inc. announced an agreement in principle to 
purchase a 1? acre site on Molloy Lane in Murfreesboro as the pro- 
posed location of its new Tennessee truck seating assembly plant. 
The new plant is being constructed in conjunction with the Nissan 
truck plant in Smyrna. 

Frank Johns Realty Company has moved into a nww office build- 
ing located near the Smyrna Square Shopping Center. 

Stones River Battlefield recovered the bronze eagle that 
had been stolen 15 years ago. The eagle was erected in 1882 to 
commemorate the Army of the Cumberland soldiers who dies at the 
Battle of Stones River. The eagle will be repaired and then put 
back in place. 

The Smyrna High School Lady Bulldogs Basketball Team won the 
Class AAA State Tournament Championship. 

107 



APRIL 

Rutherford County records dating back to 1802 were removed 
from temporary storage in an underground vault in Murfreesboro. 
They will be sent to the State Library and Archives for a fumi- 
gation process and then will be permanently stored In a room In 
the County Courthouse. 

During road excavation of the Old Nashville Highway In Smyrna, 
the remains of 21 early Inhabitants of Tennessee were discovered 
In circular burial basins. The remains date back to 3i 000-6, 000 
years and are consistent with the Late Archaic Period between the 
first and third centuries, B. C. 

Middle Tennessee State University recently premiered its own 
locally produced television show on Cable Television 12 in Mur- 
freesboro. 

Construction has begun on a second Winn-Dixie Store in Smyrna. 
It will be located near the intersection of Almaville Rd. and the 
Old Nashville Highway. The store is expected to open in July. 

The Rutherford County Commission approved industrial revenue 
bonds to allow the financing of Hoover Universal, Inc. to build a 
truck seat assembly plant in Murfreesboro. The plant will employ 
50-60 workers. 

Crosslin Supply Company recently celebrated the Grand Opening 
of its new facility on Sullivan St. in Smyrna. The new store and 
lumber yard has a total of seven buildings. The original site of 
Crosslin Supply Co. is now the Crosstle Restaurant. 



108 



The Nissan plant in Smyrna has officially been designated as 
a free trade subzone. Security of the plant is now under federal 
guidelines and U. S. Customs will control the materials in and 
out of the plant sitec 

The Tennessee Department of Employment Security announced 
that it will open a Job Service office in Smyrna on June 1, 1982. 
The office will serve job applicants and employers in the Smyrna 
and LaVergne areas of Rutherford County. 

MAY 

Rich Food Products Inc. of Murfreesboro announced plans to 
expand its facility and install new equipment. The expansion will 
double the size of the present facility and add 85 new jobs. 

Sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Council of Murfreesboro 
and Rutherford County, an International Folk Fest was held this 
month in Murfreesboro. The visiting international dance troups 
were from France, Spain, Canada and the Canary Islands. The 
Rutherford County Square Dancers and the Cripple Creek Cloggers 
also performed. A Street Festival and a Corporate Trade Fair was 
held in conjunction with the Folk Fest. 

Commerce Union Bank of Rutherford County opened a branch 
office on South Lowry St. in Smyrna. 

The Murfreesboro and Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce 
has opened an office in the Smyrna City Hall to firther serve the 
northern end of the County. 



109 



The recently re-named Tennessee Rehabilitation Center in 
Smyrna was reopened with an enrollment of JO students. The Center 
had been closed for three months for study and reorganization. 

The Murfreesboro Press announced that it will change from a 
weekly paper to a daily newpaper. The new name will be 5he Morning 
Press and will publish morning editions six days a week. The 
Morning Press will move into its new offices on South Church St. 
as soon as construction on the building is completed. 

The Nashville Catholic Diocese purchased 10 acres of land in 
the Smyrna area for the establishment of a church to serve Catholics 
in the northwest section of the County. 

Ribbon-cutting ceremonies were recently held for the opening 
of Duff's Smorgasbord Restaurant on Broad St. in Murfreesboro. 

The new K-Mart discount department store on No. Lowry St. in 

Smyrna opened this month. The store will eiiiploy more than 65 local 

residents full time and additional personnel will be hired during 
holiday seasons. 

Pic 'n Pay, a family shoe store and Captain D's Restaurant 
opened for business in the K+Mart Shopping Center in Smyrna. 

JUNE 

Hospital Corporation of America announced plans for a 30 
month lease of Smyrna Hospital and to eventually build a new 100 
bed hospital in Smyrna. Upon completion of the lease and construct- 
ion of the new hospital, the present hospital will revert to the 



110 



City for possible use as a nursing home or convalescent center. 

Middle Tennessee Christian School announced plans to open a 
satellite primary school in Smyrna » this Fall. The school will be 
held in the education building of the Division St. Church of Christ 
and will consist of only the first grade. Other grades will be 
added later and a new building will be constructed for the school. 

The United States Postal Service announced tentative plans 
for a contract station at the downtown Post Office in Murfreesboro . 
The main Post Office will be relocated at a site on South Church St, 

The Rutherford County Courthouse restoration has been complet- 
ed. The exterior restoration included refurbished windows, a 
lightning rod atop the cupola and chemically-cleaned the original 
red brick and mortar. 

Construction of a new National Guard Armory in Rutherford 
County is scheduled to begin in October I983 and should take about 
1 year to complete. The Armory will be located in the 1-24 and 
Highway 96 area. 

The Briarpatch Restaurant has been sold to owners of The 
Peddler franchise. After renovation, The Peddler hopes to open 
in July. 

The new Krogers Superstore and Super X Drug Store opened this 
month in the K-Mart Shopping Center in Smyrna. 

JULY 

Uncle Dave Macon Days was held in Murfreesboro this month. 
Grand Marshal of the festival wAs John Hartford » Several musical 

competitions and a parade was held along with a new gospel contest. 

Ill 



Suncreek Townhomes has opened on Davis Park Drive in Smyrna.. 
The 22 unit complex is a planned unit development. 

Smyrna was host city for the U. S. Slo-Pitch Softball 
Association Girls Youth State Tournament. The three day event 
drew 50 teams to participate in the Tournament. 

AUGUST 

Old Timers Day was held in LaVergne this month. The event was 
also coupled with the twinning of LaVergne, France and LaVergne, 
Tennessee. Approximately 40 residents of LaVergne, France arrived 
for a 5 day visit. Their visit will complete the twinning cere- 
monies initiated in LaVergne, France in I98I when a group from 
LaVergne, Tn. visited France. The dedication of the new 1-24 
connector was held the same day. 

The International Grand Championship Walking Horse Show, a' 
six day event, was held at the Agricultural Center in Murfreesboro. 

The Tennessee National Guard recently announced plans to es- 
tablish a permanent base for the training of Guard officer candi- 
dates. The base will utilize facilities at the Smyrna Airport, 
The school consists of classroom along with field training. 

McDonald's Restaurant opened this month in Smyrna near the 
K-Mart Shopping Center on No. Lowry St. 

Ground-breaking ceremonies were held in LaVergne by officials 
of First National Bank of Rutherford County. Construction is 
underway and will be completed by mid-November. 



112 



SEPTEMBER 

The Rutherford County Health Facilities Board approved a 
revenue bond for construction of a nursing home in Smyrna. The 
developer ris Smyrna Medical Associates and the nursing home will 
have a 100 bed capacity. 

Horner-Rausch announced the opening of a new store in the 
K-Mart Shopping Center in Smyrna. 

The State of Tennessee announced plans for construction to 
begin in October of a new National Guard Armory in Smyrna. The 
new Armory will be located at the Smyrna Airport. The facility 
will' be a two story structure containing classrooms, offices, a 
drill hall, an indoor rifle range, kitchen, storage and locker rooms, 
learning center and bathrooms. 

Richland Terrace Town Homes opened this month in Smyrna. 
The Georgetown townhouse style complex is located on Richland Ave, 
and encompasses llj acres. The complex will consist of 80 units. 

Winn-Dixie Food Stores opened its second Winn-Dixie store 
in Smyrna near the intersection of Almaville Rd. and the Old Nash- 
ville Highway. 

The General Electric Plant in Murfreesboro celebrated its 25th 
birthday. Plant executives and employees participated in an open 
house for employee families and city and government officials. 

The Tennessee Aviation Days Air Show was held this month at 
the Smyrna Airport. The Air Show is sponsored by the Smyrna-LaVergne 
and Donelson Rotary Clubs and is a mixture of military and civilian 
aircraft as well as other acts. Proceeds from the Air Show benefit 
local charities. 



OCTOBER 

Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the Southern Hills 
Estates Development. Situated near the former Fox Run Golf 'Course, 
the 285 acres were annexed into the City of Murfreesboro. The new 
development will include single-family homes, a golf course and 
clubhouse. 

Lakeshore Luxury Townhouses recently held an open house. Lo- 
cated just off Weakley Lane in Smyrna, the development will have 
65 lots on 36 acres. 

Goldstein's Department Store on the Public Square in Murfrees- 
boro announced that it will close this Fall. Odom's Restaurant in 
the Jackson Heights Plaza will also close this month. 

Parker House Child Care Center opened this month. The Center 
is located on Enon Springs Rd. in Smyrna and will care for children 
18 months to school age. 

Smyrna Hospital recently opened a detoxification unit at the 
Hospital. The alcohol and drug abuse program is geared to a short- 
stay basis with f,ollow-up on an out-patient basis. 

Walden Corp. of Chattanooga announced plans to begin construct- 
ion of a 50 unit apartment complex in LaVergneo The Kingsridge 
Village apartments will be located on Waldron Rd. across from 1-24 „ 

Albert's, a clothing store opened in the K-Mart Shopping 
Center in Smyrna. 

NOVEMBER 

The Murfreesboro City Council approved a lease agreement with 

114 



Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Cooperative that would allow 
the conversion of Walter Hill Dam into a power generator. 

Maytag Homestyle Laundry opened this month in Smyrna at the 
K-Mart Shopping Center, 

Tennessee Video II also opened and will offer movie sales 
and tape rentals. 

The Daily News Journal, published in Murfreesboro, became the 
County's first seven-day week newspaper. 

Eckerd Drugs recently opened for business in the Smyrna Square 
Shopping Center. Eckerd is the successor to Treasury Drug. 

The' Smyrna Medical Clinic opened this month. ,The Clinic is 
a subsidiary of HCA and currently has its offices in the Smyrna 
Hospital. The Clinic well remain there until a new office build- 
ing is constructed near the new Hospital and will be open on a 2^■ 
hour basis. 

Po Folks Inc. has leased the site of the former Sambo's 
Restaurant in the Stones River Plaza in Murfreesboro. Construct- 
ion will begin as soon as possible to remodel the current struct- 
ure. Opening date has been tentatively set for late December. 

1982 ELECTION RESULTS 

Eagleville City Election 

Mayor: Fred Hobbs 
Council Member: Frank S. Brent 
Council Member: Terry W. Cunningham 
Council Member: Donald E. Wilson 



115 



LaVergne City Election 



Commissioner: 
Commissioner: 



Joe Montgomery 
Jack L. Moore 



Murfreesboro City Election 



Mayor: Joe B. Jackson 
Council Member: Robert E. Corlew III 
Council Member: Mary Huhta 
Council Member: John Pittard 



Rutherford County Election 



Circuit Court Judge: 

Chancellor: 

D. A. General: 

County Executive: 

Property Assessor: 

Trustee : 

Sheriff: 

Circuit Court Clerk: 

County Clerk: 

Register of Deeds: 

Road Board, Zone 4: 

Road Board, Zone 5s 

School Board, Zone 1 

School Board, Zone 4 

School Board, Zone 5 

School Board, Zone 7 

Superintendent of Schools: 

Geno Sessions Judge Part 1 



Steve Daniel 
Whitney Stegall 
Guy R. Dot son 
John Mankin 
Thomas Sanford 
Howard Penuel 
Craig Snell 
Bob Suddarth 
Ed Elam 
Hoover Jones 
Lee Victory 
Dave Ralston 

Patsy Brown 

Fred Hobbs 

Tom Kendrick 

Thomas Swann 

Carl Buckner 
James Buckner 



Gen. Sessions Judge Part 2: James Clayton 



116 



RUTHIRFOBD COUKTT HISTORICAL SOCIETT. INC . 
MBIBKRaHIP LIST 



Dr. aad Mra. Carl Adams 
2(ILU Windsor Drive 
Morfressboro, Tn 3713U 



Mr. Bert Bar»ett 

30U East lytle Street 

^fur£ree8boro, Tb 37130 



Mr. H. F. idans 
1126 Rose Aveime 
Morfreesbore* To. 3713U 



Mrs. William C. Barron H 
5U06 Mata Drlre 
Nashrille^ Tn 37ZL1 



Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Adkerson 
Route 11, C(npton Read 
Morfreesbore, Th 37130 



Ifrs. E. M. Barto, Jr. 
2910 Qarth Road 
RcBtSTllle, Al 35601 



Mrs. Donald Anderson 
U35 North i^ri&g Street 
MurfJ*eesboro, Tn 37130 



Miss Bessie Baskette 
3205 Wingate Aveime 
Nashville, Tn 37211 



Mrs. H. 7. Amette, Jr. 
102U East Main Street 
Morfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Harry B&Uj 
336 Brewer Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37211 



Mr. J. M. Avent 
Ronte 2, Box U2 
Seiranee, Th 37375 



Ms. Margaret J. Bat^ 
3I4OI Qranoj White 
Nashville, Tn 37201* 



Mrs. AUce Bailey 

107 North Ardonne Street 

Itallahona, Th 37308 



Mr. Ten Batey 
P. 0. Box 578 
Marfz'eesbore, Tta 37130 



Mrs. W. R. Baker 

Box 2U5 

Ashland City, Ita 37015 



Mr. T. J. Bethane 
P. 0. Box 325 
Smyrna, Th 37167 



Mrs. Jackie Barnes 
12U2 Roosevelt Road 
Taylorvllla, ni 62568 



Mr. Charles B. Black 
120 North Margaret 
Carlsbad, New MbxIco 88220 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Barnes 

5 Sandlily Court 

The Woodlands, Tx 77380 



Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Belerjack 
Route hi Carter Lane 
Snyma, Tn 37167 



117 



MPfflBRSHIP LIST 



Ms. Kathy Borgen 
Route 1, Box liil 
ReadyvUle, Tta 371i49 



Mr. Stephen Broim 
UOL Marj 
StayrruLt Tn 37167 



Mrs. Adeline D. Behm 
823 Klxtarood Avenue 
NBrfreesboro, Tb 37130 



Mrs. LLda H. Bragge 
Tlli Chickasaw Road 
Mnrfreesboroj Tli 37130 



Ms. Elizabeth N. Borden 

910 S. Teonessee Blvd., j^t S-ll; 

Murfreesboroy Th 37130 



Mrs. Jane G. Buchanan 
nil Bemlck Drive 
Oak Ridge, Tn 37830 



Mrs. Ifergaret Bradley 
107-A Division Street 
Sayxnsi, Tn 37167 



Mrs. Edna M. Baciaey 
86U7 East Dnleiana 
Mesa, Arizona 85208 



Mr. John ^agg 

1127 E. Northfield Blvd 

Murfreesboro, Ta 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Burkitt 
I433 Old Kiekotj Blvd 
Antioch, Tn 37013 



Dr. and Mrs. C. M. Brandon 

Route 1 

Christiana, Tn 37037 



Mr. J. T. Buznetta 
P. 0. Box 2 
Staorma, Th 37367 



Dr. and Mrs. Fred Brigance 
1202 Scotlairi Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. C. Alan Carl 

in Bosley Springs Rd. Apt 508 

Nashville, Tn 37205 



Mrs. Charles L. Briley 
Rural Vale, Route 11 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Cates 
Route 5> Box 521 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. F. E. Brit ton 
133 KingNDod Drive 
Chattanooga, Th 37la2 



Ms. Robin Brown 

la5 Bast Main Street 

Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. J. W. Brom 
126 Sequoia Drive 
Springfield, Tn 37172 



Ifr. Steve Cates 
Forrest Oaks G-IO6 
1002 East Northfield Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Col Charles R. Cawthon 
13U. Delaware Avenue, S. W. 
Apt S-2U5 
Washington, D. C. 20U21; 



Central Middle School Library 
East Main Street 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



lis 



MBMBBISHIP LIST 



Mr. A3jBflnd Chaaej 
Sanford DriTi 
LaVer^ie^ Tta 37086 



Mr. and Mrs. nionas L. Craddock 
Route 1, Booc 89 
Lascaasas^ Tta 37085 



Mrs. Q«orge Chanej 
P. 0. Box Uh 
LaVer0&e» T& 37086 



Mrs. H. R. Crockett 
218 Cantrell A-venas 
NashvlllB, Th 3720$ 



Mr. Bo Childress 

Route 2 

Franklin, Th 37061* 



Mrs. A. W. Cranker 
305 Tjnne Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. George D. Clark 
liiiOO Basswood Lane 
B^Ualre, Tx 771^ 



Mr. H. Lee Cundiff, 
509 Mary Street 
Stagrma, Th 37167 



Jr. 



Mrs. Janes K. Clayton 
525 Bast College Street 
Morfreedboro, Th 37130 



Mr. James T. Curtis 
1510 Avon Road 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Cole, Jr. 
1209 Jftrers Drive 
Marfree«teoro, Tn 37130 



Dallas Public Library 
1515 Young Street 
Dallas, Tx 75201 



Mr. San B. Colendii 
lOU Hoover Drive 
Snqrma, Th 37167 



Mrs. Susan G. Daniel 
2103 Foxdale Drive 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Woodzvw Colenan 
1206 Belle Meade HLvd 
Nashville, Th 37205 



DAR Library 

From Stones River Chapter DAR 
1776 D Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20006 



Mrs. Martha H. Cook 
Route 1, McKaig Road 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



)to. Mary Lou Davidson 
210 Klngvood Drive 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Col. Janes S. Cox4)itt 
118 Gardner 
Martin, Th 38237 



Mrs. George Davis 
5752 Oak Cliff Drive 
EL Paso, Tx 79912 



Dr. Robert Corlew 
Route 2, Manson Pike 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. Paul Dinklns 
Chelsea Place, Apt 1202 
910 South Tennessee Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



119 



MBffiffiSHlF LIST 



Mr. Pttul S. Dodd, Jr. 
Route 2, Valley View Road 
Lascassas, Th 37085 



Mrs. E. C. nte, Jr. 
lliU8 East Main Street 
Morfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. Bin DunaweQT 
6600 Qarth Road 
Huntsvnie, Al 35802 



Mrs. John V. Freeman 
1926 Rosewood Valley Drive 
Brentwood, Tn 37027 



Ms. Maxine Dimaway 

U5U5 Soath Haxnrard Arenue 

Springfield, Mb 6580U 



Ifr. Jerry F. Galther 
1809 Richland ELace 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. AUce S. Edwards 
2000 E 2Uth, Apt 62-b 
Texarkana, Ark 75502 



Mrs. E. C. Galloway 
1502 Franklin Avenue 
Nashville, Tft 37206 



Dr. Parker D. Blrod 
110 Swan Street 
Centervllle, Ta 37033 



Miss AlUne Qlllespie 
I1II5 Outer Drive 
Nashville, Ttt 3720li 



Mrs. Moulton Farrar, Jr. 
502 Park Center Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37205 



Mr. Pollard GUlesple 
70U Rudy Lane 
Louisville, Ky ljO207 



Mrs. B« Wayne Ferguson 
2321 Colonial Avenue 
Waco, Tx 76707 



Ifr. Van GilBore 

6392 Chickerlng Circle 

Nashville, Tn 37215 



Maj. William E. Fitzpatrick 
75I1O U6th Avenue, South 
Omaha, Neb 68157 



Mr. John J. Good 
Box 263, Route 12 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Robert Fletcher 
lU President Way 
Belleville, n 62223 



Mrs. Cathy Goode 
109 Belfleld Court 
Stayma, Th 37167 



Miss M3n:''(^« Iltith Foatch 
619 North Spring Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Carl E. Goodwin 
Route U, Sanford Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Ms. Barbara Fox 
Route 2, Box 172 
Christiana, Ttt 37037 



Mrs. Nelia Gray 

U2U East Burton Street 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



120 



MaiBBRSHIP LIST 



Hrs. Jodjr L. Qreen 
12lli Coff M ATanns 
Mdrfreeaboro, Tn 37130 



Kr. T. Wayne Hewgley 
20$ Gordon Drive 
Lebanon, Tn 37097 



Mrs. Kay Page Green 
HO Rloe Circle 
Sngrma, Tn 37167 



Mrs. 6. K. Hibbett, Jr. 
2160 Old Hickory Blvd 
Nashvme, Th 37215 



Mrs. R. C. Griffitts 
P. 0. Box 1505U 
Nashville, Tn 37215 



Mr. and Mrs. Logan Hickerson 
Route 2, Rock Botton Farm 
Readjnrllle, Tn 3711i9 



Mrs. Charles E. Hailey 
12123 Old Oaks Drive 
HoostoQ, Tx 77056 



Hrs. Janes M. Hobbs 
9722 Sanford Avenne 
Garden Qrove, Ca 9261*1 



Mr. Dcnald L. Hagerman 
807 Sinset Avexxne 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. Baxter E. Hobgood 
21u Tyne Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Miss Maiy Hall 

821 East Burton Street 

Murfreertwro, Tn 37130 



Mr. Charles E. Hodge U 
505 Hazelwood Drive 
Snyrna, Tn 37167 



Mrs. Margaret Haralson 
1507 Gartland Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37206 



Miss Aurelia Holden 
115 Gayle Lane 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. Henry HarreH 
1710 East Main Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. John V. Hollar 
31*31 North 17th Avenue 
Phoenix, Arizona 85015 



)ft>8. Ann Hatcher 

Route 1 

Rockvale, Tn 37153 



Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Hooper 
202 Second Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Jack R. Herriage 

Route 2 

Pilot 1^3int, Tx 76258 



Miss Elizabeth Hoover 
IjOO East College Street 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. Olidene Harris 
Route 2, Box 3U5 
West Plains, Mo 65775 



Mr. Walter King Hoover 
101 Division Street 
Snyma, Ttt 37167 



121 



MafflBR^IP LIST 



Mr. W. R. HooTer 
U700 Awnne R 
BLmin^iaM, il 35208 



Mr. Smest K. Jotexs 
Route 1, Box 85 
SaymBL, Tn 37167 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hosldns 
310 Tyne Aveixne 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. Thonas N. Joins 
P. 0. Box 892 
Snyma, Tta 37167 



lfr» and Mrs. C. B. Huggins> Jr. 
915 East Mala Street 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. Buford Johnson 
Mayfleld Drive 
ajQrma, Ba 37167 



Dr. and Mrs. Janes K. Huhta 
507 East Norttafleld Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. R. H. Jotsison 
6l5 Webb Street 
LaFayette, La 70501 



Ms. Cherl Hunter 
2625 East Olive 
Decatur, H 62526 



Mr. Honer Jones 
1825 Ragland Avenue 
Murfreesboro, Ta 37130 



Mr. Jack I. Inman 
75 Richmeade Place 
IjOl Bowling Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37205 



Ibrs. Dallas Ison 
1019 Houston Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. David L. Jacobs 
Beech Grove, Tb 37018 



Mrs. Belt Keathley 
1207 Whitehall Road 
Murfreesboro, Ta 37130 



Dr. Robert 6. Jones IH 
81^ West Northfield Blvd 
Murfireesboro, Tto 37130 



Miss Adeline King 
Route 1, Box 112 
aBorma, Tta 37167 



Mb*. Robert T. Jacobs 
Beech Qrove, Tn 37018 



Mr. Joe R. King 
702 East Main Street 
Murfi-eesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. John Janes 

907 Bast Northfield Blvd 

Murfl'eesboro, Tli 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. W. H. King 
2107 Qrecnland Drive 
Marfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Harold Jewell 
607 Lillard Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Qeorge Klnnard 
Windsor Towers, Apt 1110 
215 Harding Road 
Nashville, Tn 37205 



122 



MBfflBSHIP LIST 



Dr. Howard Kirksej 
1015 East Bell Street 
Murfreertwro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Bill Lynch 
Route $, Halls Hill Pike 
Miirfreesboro> Th 37130 



Mrs. Lois Klinker 
3125 Salinas Drive 
Abilene, Tx 796o5 



Mrs. Gordon Lynch 
530 Santym Drive 
Sanbym Hall, kpt 119 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. John B. Lsoie 
P. 0. Box 33. 
Smyrna, Th 37167 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. LaRoche,Sr. 
Route 11, Betty Ford Road 
Murffeesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Louise Q. Igmoh 
Route 10 
Franklin, Tn 37061* 



Mrs. Susan B. Z^aa. 

U2U - 2nd Avenue, South 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. A. D. Lawrence 
225 McNickli Drive 
Sqyma, Th 37167 



Mr. and Mrs. VH-Uian C. Ledbetter, 
ll5 North Ihiiversity 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Dayton Lester 
Route 1 
Milton, Tn 37118 



Jr. 



Mrs. Fannie McClanahan 
Ervin Road 
Hugo, Ok 7lali3 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. McClary 
# 1, 107 Peyton Road 
Sinyma, Th 37167 



Mrs. Mason McCrary 
209 Kingwood Drive 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. Colenan King 
2709 Wellington Drive 
Augusta, Ga 30901; 



Mrs. LaLia Lester 

1307 West NorthfiaLd Blvd 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. T. Vance Little 
Route 1, Beech Grove Farm 
Brentwood, Th 37207 



Mrs. S. Floyd Lowe 
Route 2, Box 1|3 
Christiana, Th 37037 



Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hall McFarlin, Sr. 
Route 2, Manson Pike 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. Thomas McFerrin 
Forest Oaks H-lQl 
1002 East Morthfield Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Connie McGehee 
Route 1 , Yeargan Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. Carl McKenzie 
P. 0. Box lOli 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



123 



MaffiERSHIP LIST 



Mrs. Ellse McKoight 
2602 Loyd Street 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Ms. Margaret MUler 
1007 West Clark Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Ha 37130 



Capt. Walter L. McKhight 
2735 Haf ton 
Columbus, Ohio li320U 



Ifrs. Thomas H. Miller 
610 North Sylvan Drive 
Brandon, Fla 33511 



Mr. J. B. McNeil 
Route 2, Box UL3 
Franklin Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. Jim W. Mitchell 
223 McNickle Drive 
Srayma, Tn 37167 



Mr. and }trB. David R. Macon 
Route 1, Box 322 
Qreenbrier, Th 37073 



Mr. W. R. Mosby 
63U Knollwood Circle 
Conyers, Ga 30208 



Dr. Robert L. Mason 
Route 1, Hare Lane 
Milton, Tn 37218 



Mr. Bugaae R. MuUdns 
ItiiOO Belmont Park Terrace 
Nashville, Tn 37217 



Mr. and Mrs. James Matheny 
302 East NorthHeld Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. William David Mullins 
1010 Kirty Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37217 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. 
2007 Rosemary Lane 
Nashville, Tn 37210 



Maxifell 



Mr. John W. Nance 
Route 1, Box 3U0 
Rockvale, Tn 37153 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard Meadow 
Route 10, Manscn Pike 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. David Naron 
U59 Blair Road 
LaVergne, Ta 37066 



}frs. Alnyra W. Medlin 
Route 7, Box 50 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Dr. and Mrs. William M. Nash 
520 South Lowry Street 
Srayma, Th 37167 



Mrs. Evelyn Merritt 
Route 1, Box 77 
Newnan, 111 6I9I42 



Mr. and Mrs. James H. Neal 
311i South Tennessee Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Miss Julia Clarice MUler 
808 Wiles Court 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. C. L. Neill 

Box 103 

Pharr, Tx 78577 



124 



MaiBHtSHIP LIST 



Mr. James B. Nelson 
206 Bast Clark Blvd 
Morfreesboro, Ta 37130 



Mr. Walt Ffelfar 
BcK 1936 
Abilene, Tz 79601 



Mr. Lawson B. Nelson 
13812 >QL3pering Lake Drive 
Sun City, Arizona 85351 



Mrs. Honer Pittard 
309 Tyne 
Murfr«esboro« Tn 37130 



Mrs. Bemice Nichols 
U2h West Monterey Avenue 
Stockton, Ca 95205 



Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 0. Pittard 
Route 3> Box 13U 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. J. H. Oliver 
The Comers 
Readyville, Tn 371i*9 



Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Pltmmer 
2liL0 Riverview Drive 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. Eakin Overall 
1209 Jetton Drive 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. William 0. Pointer 

Ronte h 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mlna B. Pkxicer 

Route 1, Allison Place 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



)fr. James T. Pollard 
3I4I Lsith Avenue 
Fort Worth, Tx 76133 



Mr. Harry Fatillo 
Route 1, Box 256 
EaglovUle* Tn 37060 



Mr. Bobby Pope 

Old U. S. Highway Ul 

LaVergne, Th 37086 



Dr. John A. Patten 
221U Riley Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. John Powers 

P. 0. Box 67 

College drove, Tn 3701*6 



Dr. and Mrs. E.K. Patty 
1U3U Diana Street 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. J. Lonnie PrBStcn 
1365 Dorothy Avenue, 
Las Vegas, Nv 89IO9 



#1 



Mr. Dean Paarson 
l^h Ross Drive 
Snyma, Tn 37167 



Ms Margaret Putnam 
515 North ^rlng Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Larry Pearson 
2222 Raider Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. W. E. Rabom 

Route 1 

Smyrna, Th 37167 



12 5 



MBMBBR3HIP LIST 



Mr. and Mrs. Bob Ragland 

Box ^ 

MorfrMSborOf Ta 37330 



Ms. Jeanetta Rudy 

2730 Paimlngtoci Bend Road 

Nashville, Tta 3721ii 



Dr. Robert G. Ranaoo 
12U Whitehall Road 
Morfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. SLvls Rushing 
60li North Spring Street 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Vra, Kellej Ray 
225 North Acadengr Street 
Morfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. Thomas L. Russell 
5019 Colenont Drive 
Huntsvllle, Al 35801 



Mr. V. H. Read 

P. 0. Box nzi 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. E. Richncnd Sanders, Jr. 
205 Cumberland Circle 
Nashville, Tn 37211* 



Reviewers Clvtb 
% Dorothy Bpps 
101 Bone Drive 
Snyma, Tn 37167 



Mrs. Wilson Rhodes 
Route 2, Rhodes Lane 
Lascassas, Tn 37085 



Mrs. Frances R. Richards 
Mercury Manor Apts, Apt 51 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. James A. Ridley, Jr. 
Route 3, Lebanon Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Miss Mary Be31 Robinson 
ltl43 East Barton Street 
Murfreesboro, Tta 37130 



Vr. and Mbrs. Jesse B. Rogers 
1105 Jetton Drive 
Murfireesboro, Ta 37130 



Mr. BlUy J. Rogers 
506 Jean Drive, Route 2 
LaVergne, Th 37086 



Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Sanders 
1*. 0. Box 1275 
Murfreesboro, to 37130 

Mrs. W. D. Sanford 
811 Kingtiood Drive 
Murfreesboro, to 37130 



Mr. Bud Saenett 

Route U, Dominion Street 

Murfreesboro, to 37130 



Mr. John F. Scarbrotigh, Jr, 
701 Falrview 
Murfreesboro, to 37130 



Mrs. Ifarietta S. Scates 
1107 East Main Street 
Murfreesboro, to 37130 



Dr. R. Nell Schultz 

Box 232 

McMlnnville, to 37110 



Mr. and Mrs. John Shacld.ett 
307 South Tennessee Blvd 
Murfreesboro, to 37130 



126 



MEMBBRSHIP LIST 



Mrs. J* Kahlon Sharp 
Routo 2, AlaaTlIle Road 
Staiyma, Th 37167 



Dr. Bealer Sknotheman 
1020 East lytle Street 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. Charles E. SheXbgr 
P. 0. Box 22578 
Savannah, Ga 31i403 



Miss Dorothy Smotheznan 
1220 North Spring Street 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mr. WiUlam A. Shull, Jr. 
711 Isleton Drive 
Brandon, Fla 33511 



Ms. Madelon Smith 

Route 5, North Green Hill 

Mt. Juliet, Tn 37122 



Mr. J. A. Sibley, Jr. 
P. 0. Box 7965 
Shreveport, La 71107 



Mr 8. Jams 8 E. Snotherman 

Route 1 

College Qrove, Tn 370I46 



Mr. Don Sinnons 
Melber, Ky k2069 



Mr. R. J. S±apaaa. 
Route 2, Box 115-'A 
Dayton, Tn 37321 



Mr. Gene H. Sloan 
728 Greenland Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tta 37130 



MLss Becky Smith 
1910 Memorial Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Bettye I. Smith 
3U68 MacArthur Road 
Decatur, II 62526 



Miss Karen M. Sknith 
Route 1, Box 190 
Nixon, Tx 781UO 



Col. Sam W. Stoiith 

P. 0. Box 333 

Folly Beach, S. C. 29U39 



Mrs. Lecna Sknothennan 
P. 0. Box 35 
Rockvale, Tn 37153 



Mrs. Nell Stoiotheman 
207 Kingwood Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Ybc. and Mrs. W. B. Smothexman 

Route 1 

EaglevUlB, Th 3706o 



Hr. Travis Sbotheman 
52I1U Edmondson Fk, ^t 115 
Nashville, Tn 37211 



Mrs. E. J. SolcxQon 
936 Mountain Creek Road, 
Apt 7-221 
Chattanooga, Tti 37U65 



Mr. Hany Speier 
West Meade Manor Apts. 
6680 Charlotte Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37209 



Mr. C. Ray Stacy 
826 Willard Street 
Slkhart, Ind U65l6 



F-2 



127 



MafflBtSHIP LIST 



Col. and Mrs. E. C. Stewart 
Cliff tops. Post Office Booc 95 
Monteagle, Tn 37356 



Mrs. J. Wilbar Vauc^ian 
20U Poplar Street 
Martin, To. 38237 



)ft>s. Raymond 0. Stone 
921 Westvieir Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37205 



Mr. Lee Victory 

Route 1, EnoQ Springs Road 

anyma, Tn 37167 



Mr. Robert Love Taylor, Jr. 
1107 Whitehall 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Leo M. Wadl^ 
102.2 Harlanwood Drive 
Fort Worth, Tx 76109 



Tennessee State Library & Archives 
Nashville, Tn 37200 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Walden 
liji5 Mercury Blvd 
Murfreesboro, In 37130 



Mrs. WHLiam H. Thoo^son, Jr. 

Dry Fork Road 

White Creek, Tn 37189 



Mrs. Martha G. Walker 
909 East Northf ield Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Thurman Francis Jr. Hi School 
% Anne Odcn 
P. 0« Box 8 
anyma, Tn 37167 



Mr. and Mrs. William WaUnqs 
202 Ridley Street 
Smyrna, Tn 37167 



Mrs. Martha F. Todd 

905 East Northfield Blvd 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. Jim Wallenhorst 
Route 1, Box 119 » Link Road 
Christiana, Tn 37037 



Dr. and Mrs. E. C. Tolbert 
Route 2, Vaughn Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Ms. Mairilyn Warsham 
100 Belaire Drive 
Snyma, Tn 37167 



Mr. Mason Tucker 
Route 6, Elam Road 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. George F. Watson 
Executive House, B-17 
613 Hillsboro Road 
Franklin, Tn 37061* 



IMiversity of Tennessee 
Papers of Andrew Jackson 
Box D 
Ifennitage, Th 37076 



Mrs. Inez M. Weldon 
Route 1, Box 55U 
Alma, Ark 72921 



Mr. C. L. Van Natta 
6901 D Roswell 
Sandy Springs, Ga 30328 



Ifr. and Mrs. W. H. Westbrooks 
306 Tyne 
Murfreesboro, to 37130 



12J 



KSffiBRSHCP LIST 



Mr. Charles Wharton 
917 Crownhill Drive 
Nashville, Tn 37217 



Mrs. Selene D. Woodson 
907 West Clark Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Miss Kate Whartoo 
101 Murfreesboro Road 
Woodbury, Tn 37190 



Mr. and Mrs. James E. Woodward, Jr. 
2006 Windsor Drive 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Bart White 

506 East Main Street 

Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. F. Craig Touree 

Route 2 

Readyville* Tn 371U9 



Miss Virginia Wilkinson 
1118 East Clark Blvd 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mrs. Ailaene M. Zook 
mo5U Thacher Drive 
Largo, Fla 335U0 



Dr. Amon WiUianson 
5OU South Lowry Street 
awyma, Tn 37167 



Vice* Carrie Jane Mcl&iight 
760 85th Street, Apt U 
Miani Beach, Fla 35Lla 



Mrs. Virginia Wilson 
501 Winfr^ Drive 
Murfreesboro, Th 37130 



Mrs. Alice Wlnnette 
Route 2, Box 231 
Wartrace, Tn 37183 



Mr. Mark Womack 
3229 Westonia Drive 
Chattanooga, Tn 37la2 



Mrs. i^ullne Hartman Womack 

307 Monroe 

Greenwood, MississiHpi 38930 



Mrs. John Woodfin 
1320 Richland Flace 
Murfreesboro, Tn 37130 



Mr. and Mrs. William H. Woods 
3U28 Han^ton Avenue 
Nashville, Tn 37215 



129 



INDEX 



ADAMS House 


25, 


28 


ANDREWS: 


James 


53 


ADAMS: 


Hattie Reed 
Nancy 


a 

59 






John 


60 




Sam 


21, 


23 


ANTHONY: 


John 
Mary A. 


58 
5U 


ADCOCK: 


Doctor 


53 






Thcxnas S. 


5U 




Edward 


hh 






WnHam 


58 




Harmon 


53 






Z. H. B. 


58 




Jesse 


53 












John 


53 




ARMSTRONG 


: James L. 


62 




Levlna 


53 












Marcus 


53 




ARNOID: 


Alfred 


Sh 




Nancy 


53 






Aubry 


U, 5, 16 




Polly 


53 






Beth 


16 




Robt .America 


53 






Christene 


16 




Stephen 


53 






Dwaln 


16 




wmie 


53 






Kitty 


16 




William 


53 






Malissa 
Peter 


10, 16 
61 


ADKERSONt George 


21 












James 


51 




ASHMAN: 


Lends 


52 




Samuel 


51 












William 


51 




ATKINSON: 


William 


62 


AGRICULTURAL Soc. 


70 




ATWOOD: 


E. L. 


1, 6 


ALBSITS Clothing Store llU 




AVENT: 


Messr. 


67 


AT.ETANDER: Clarlsa 


55 




AVIATION Days Airshow 


113 




Isabella 


55 












J. B. 


6 




BAILT: 


Thomas 


hh 




John 


53 












wnnan. 


57 




BAIHD: 


C. W. 
William D. 


2, k 

59 


ALFX)RD: 


Cade 


5$ 












Loderick 


55 




BAK£R: 


Elizabeth 
James 


56 
56 


ALUEN: 


James 


16 






Nathan 


56 




John 


51* 






W. 0. 


31 




Olive 


16 




BALIEW: 


William H. 


58 


AI/mSTiS 


;: M. T. 


21 




BANTON: 


Cynthia 


57 


ANDERSON 


: Catherine 
George 


25 

53 






Glover W. 


57 




George W. 


63 




BABBKE: 


John D. 
J. T. 


6 
6 


ANDERSON Hot«l 


36 












Jimmy 


25 




BAREFIEn) 


: E. W. (Btiddy; 


31, 32 




J. J. 


23,25,27, 












28,31,35, 


BARKSDALE 


;: Mary 


60 






37 






Nath 


60 




J. J. Jr., 


25 






Randolph 


60 




Samuel 


52, 


62 









130 



BARNET: 


Andbrose 


'5U 


BILES: 


Cinthia 


53 




Daniel 


$u 




Elizabeth 


53 




Jarret 


5U 




Herbert 


53 




Margaret 


5U 




John 


53 




Peggy 


5U 




Lucy 


53 




Susanna 


5U 




Obadiah 


53 




Winnegr 


5U 




PoUy 

Smith 


53 
53 


BARRETT: 


Allen C. 


6, 12, 




Sophia 


53 






13, 16 




Willie 

Vb Jefferson 


53 
53 


BASKBTt 


Bud 


31 










J. F. 


23 


BINGHAM: 


John H. 


UU 




John 


32 














BISHOP: 


William 


56 


BASS: 


Benjamin J. 


61 










Hartwell 


61 


BIVINB: 


Docia 


5U 




James 


61 










James Jr. 


61 


BLACK: 


Eugene 


23 




Ten^erance 


61 










Ihonas 


61 


HLAUKKTTER: Norman 


52 










Patsey 


52 


BATEI: 


Mrs. H. Herbert 


21 














BLACKMAN] 


; Admiral 


63 


BAXTER: 


Jere 


73 




Alfred 


61 




Lewis T. 


75 




Lerenia Laura M. 
PoUy 


63 
63 


BEARD: 


George 


52 














BLAIR: 


Thomas 


59 


BEATY: 


Eliz. Parham 


60 










Geo Washington 


60 


BLACKSMITHS 


61 




WiUiara r. 


60 














BLANKS: 


Ligram 


60 


BEAVERS: 


Thomas 


53 




Martha 


60 


BECTON: 


Fred E. 


51 


BLOOD: 


T. Y. 


61 


EEESLEI: 


Devrent 
Solomon 


63 
5U,58, 


BOAZ: 


John 


hk 






60,63 


BONN£Il: 


Mr. and Mrs. 


36 


BEHEK: 


William 


60 


BOWEN: 


EUzabeth 
Evans B. 


16 
9, 12, 


BELL: 


James T. 
Jane 


19 
53,57 






13, 16 




Roxanna Young 


19 


BOWMAN: 


Catherine 


59 




Zadock 


56 




William 


51 


BELT: 


Lazareth 


hh 


ERADIfl: 


Bobby J. 


3, 7, 8 








BRADI£Y CREEK CHURCH 


3 


BENNETTS 


; Evelyn 


16 


: 


H. H. 


96 




nina 


16 




Margaret 


19, 28, 31 




Jerry 


16 






r><% 



ERANDCN: Cornelius 



59 



BIG CREEX Stock Farm 



66 



-131 - 



BRASHRARSt Abraham 


5U 


BaCHANAN: 


Famie 


92 




Betsey 


5U 




Frances Louise 


66 




Isaac W. 


^ 




George 


62 




Jesse 


5U, 56 




James McGill 


66 




Jesse W. 


5U 




Major John 


65 




Nathan 


5U 




John 


60 




Patsey (PoUy) 


5U 




John Arice 
John Price, Jr. 


6U, 65 
66 


BRENT: 


Frank S. 


115 




John Thomas 
Margaret Dosia 


66 
66 


BRSHER: 


Bcnnle 


16 




Rebecca Jane 


66, 90 




James 


16 




Robert Norman 


66 




Lindssy 


16 




Susan Matthews 


66 




Ryan 


16 










TaniTQr 


16 


BUCHANAN School 


90 










Dramatic Club 


92 


BRIDnES: 


T. A. 


21 














BOCKNSl: 


Carl 


116 


BRIDGESTONE 


107 




James 


116 


BROOKS: 


Brooks 
Jourdan 




BURK: 


Mrs. S. C. 


3 








BURKE: 


G. W. 


1, 3, 


BROWN: 


Brian 


16 










Donna 


16 


BURKES: 


Samuel 


hh 




Jane 


61 




wmis 


hh 




Jenny 


5U 




William 


i4U 




John 


ItU 










Kenneth 


16 


BURLESON: 


; Fanny 


55 




Lent 


58 










Pat^y 


116 


BDRNETT: 


Brooking 


52, 55 




Robin 


16 




Joseph 


52 




Wmiam 


61 




Margaret Caroline 
Re\]ben 


55 
52 


BROWNING 


ft Jacob 


$k 














BUHRUS: 


Charles 


51 


BROYLES: 


Joel 


hh 




DeLaFayette 


51 




Wilson 


hU 




El.izabeth 
James Rucker 


51 
51 


BRYANT: 


Carol 


16 




Joseph 


51 




E. S. 


6 




Lucy Ann 


51 




Irhy 


16 




Phillip Johnson 


51 




Tenperance 


5U 




Sally Woolfork 


51 




Thomas E. Jr. 


13,lU,l6 




Sophia 
William C. J. 


51 
51 


BROTHERS 


1: Benjamin 


Uii,57 










Burton 


57 


BUTCHER: 


McKiemon H. 


61 




Jackson C. 


57 










John 


57 


HXJi»S: 


W-nHfln, 


$h 




Polly 


57 










Robert 


57 


BIRD: 


M. T. 


23 




Thomas 


57 




Tom 


32 


BUMPASa: 


; William 


58,62 


CAMPERS Store 


31 


BUHK: 


Leroy 


hh 









- 132 - 



CAMPBELL: Cardew 


h$ 




CHISQIHALT.: E. 


58 






Louisa 








John 
Rebecca 


58 
58 




CANON: 


Abraham W. 


57 




CLARK: 


Anthony 


UU 






Jemlna A. 


57 






James 


li5 






John 


56 






John 


53 






Joseph 


56, 


57 




Martin 


61 






Polly Young 


57 






Mary 


1*5 






Theo. A. 


56,57,60 




Winiam 


iiU 




CArrAIN D. 


no 




curroN: 


James 


n6 




C/*HMACK: 


E. W. 


90 




CLEMAN: 


M. T. L. 


U5 




CARNAHAM 


f:Hugh 


$9 




CLDPTON: 


Ouy 


57 




CABNES: 


Gen. Sara T. 


82 




COAKER: 


Mr. & Mrs. Geo M. 


16 




CARR: 


Ben 


62 




COAL Mine 


» Insurrection 


80, 


81 


CARTl-at: 


Amy 
Angelina 


55 
5U 




COARTZ: 


J. H. 


57 






Angeline 


63 




COLE : 


Jehazy 


86 






Burrell 


5U, 


63 




Mony 


62 






Caty 


55 














John 


55 




COLMAN: 


Earl 


36 






John Jr. 


55 














Margaret 


55 




COLIAR: 


Col. Arthtir S. 


71 






Mary 


SS 














Patsey 


5U, 


63 


COMMERCE Union Bank 


109 






Rachel 


55 














Rachel Jr. 


55 




CONCORD Baptist Association 


h 






Sarah 


Sh, 


63 












Winiam 


SS 




COOKE: 


Hezekiah G. 


57 




CARTWRIOHT: Manerla 


59 




CORLEW: 


Robert E. Ill 


n6 






Susan 


59 




















COURTHOUSE Restoration 


m 




CASON: 


Frank 


2 














F. M. 


U 




COX: 


Elijah 


52 






ft-eston 


U 






Hiram 
Sam 


58 
21* 




CATES: 


Benjamin 


li5 






Sarah 


52 






I^am 


1;5 






Winiam A. Jr. 


9, 


10 




Izereal 


U5 














John 


)6 




CRADDOCK: 


Ladene 


1, 


16 




Solonon 


U5 






Thcmas Lee 


u. 


5, 16 


CATHOLIC 


of Nashville 


no 




CRAWLBI: 


Brandy 
Gan 


9, 
9, 


16 
10, 16 


CHAt'KIN: 


Nathan 


53 






Willard Kslrol 


/u: 


12, 13, 
16 


CHAMBKR 


of Conrnsrce 


109 






Winard K., Jr. 


9, 


16 


CHIIDRESS: William 


5U 




CREECH Farm 


33 





- 133 - 



CROCKETT: Evelina 58 
Julia Granvllle-58 



DAY: 



James 



55 



(HOSSLIN Supply Co 



108 



CROUSE: Hemy 
PoUy 


55 


UUJ?'F: Andrew 


52 


CUT.BERTSON: J. R. 


2U 


CULVER: Harmon B. 
Slneon 


U5 
U5 


CUNNINGHAM: Terry W. 


115 


CURIN: Jonathan 


60 


CURT: Edward 
Reubin 


li5 
U5 


DAILY News Joiimal 


115 


DAMSiON: Edmund 
Judy 
Lidia 
Mary 
Mldda 
Nancqr 
Sally 


56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 


DAMERIN: Slon 

Tigner 
Wniiam 


56 
56 
56 


DANCE Han 


31 


DANIEL: Steve 
Susan 


116 
U9 


DARNALL: Willi am 


58 


DAVIDSON: Dovsy Ewell 
James 
John 
Hsxicy 
Nancy W. 
Polly Kirk 
Sally Bellew 


52 
52 
52 
52 
52 

52 

52 


DAVES Christian 
DAVIS: Elizabeth 
Prank 
Robert 
SalOy 


51 
60 
23 
36 
58 



DBLANE7: 


N. T. 


70 




DeLAT: 


W. T. 


2 




DESCENT: 


Bryan 


16 






Carlos 


36 






Dan 


16 






Dana 


16 






E. Qyron 


hs 


10 




Elaine 


10, 


16 




Gleoner 


16 






Harris 


16 






Joy 


16 






Joyce 


16 






Kelly 


h. 


5, 16 




Marilyn 


16 






Mark 


16 






Paul 


16 






Tom 


16 




DENNY: 


Margaret 


23, 


28 




W. G. 


23, 


21*, 28, 






31, 


35, 38 


DHINY Dance Hall 


36 




DENNY House 


25, 


31 


DENNY Store 


28, 


31 


DeHlIEST: 


i Mary 


16 






Robert 


16 




DICKSON: 


Asahel 


56 






Ezekiel 


56 






Isabella 


58 






James 


58 






John 


58 






Joseph 


53, 


58 




Margaret 


58 






Peggy 


58 






Robert 


58 






Sarah M. 


58 






Serenus Garrison 


56 






Wmiam 


58 




DIUKiNSOK 


I: David 


$9 




DILL: 


Amanda 


62 






Harriet 


62 






Isaac 


62 






Joseph 


62 






Lavlnea 


62 






MarUn 


62 






Marvel 


62 






Newton 


62 






Parson 


62 






Thomas 


62 





-131* - 



DTTJXJN: Calvin S. 


1, 3, U 


EDWARDS: 


LLensarey 


51 




Mrs. Maiy 


3 




Matthew 


50 




Pauline 


16 




Nan(7 


50 




W. W. 


23 




Owen 
Owen H. 


51 
51 




DOiUCt James 


59 




Pasha 
Rebecca 


50 
50 




DOBBINS: John 


16 




Sally M. 
Thomas 


51 
50 




DOBSGN: Allan 


32 




WirLiam 
William M. 


5L 
50 




DUUD: Adam 


16 










Betty 


10 


ELAM: 


Ed 


316 




Griffin 


50 










Pat 


16 


ELLTOTT: 


David L. 


9, 


^^ 


Paul S. Jr. 


16 






13, 


16 


Paul S. Sr. 


16 




Lavema 


16 




Tim K. 


16 














ET.LT3: 


Hicks 


62 




DONNAGAN: Dr. WJliam 


60 














ELLSBERKY: Isaac 


58 




DONNELL: R. H. 


2 














ELROD: 


D. Mao 


U 




DONOHO: E. 


57 














EI^ON: 


John 


60 




DOTSON: Guy R. 


216 














EPPS: 


Ajny 


U5 




DOZlii^Kt Bacharlah 


U5 




Bioch 
Rebecca 


U5 
U5 




DUDLEY: Robert 


32 














ESKRIDGEi 


! Samuel 


57 




DUFF*3 


no 




Susannah 


57 




DUQGER: Claude 


32 


ESPY: 


John 


U5 




Jotei 


31 














BMINO: 


Isabella 


5^ 




DUNAWAY: Lucy 


16 




Sophia G. 


55 




Roy 


U 










Sheldon 


16 


FARMERS Alliance 


68, 


72, 80, 


Yvonne Lynn 


16 






85, 


86, 97 






FARMERS & Labor Iftiion 


68 




DUNN: Benjamin 


56 










Robert 


56 


FIEID: 


Rich 


U5 




EARWOCD: John 


52 


TINGSl: 


Henry 


57 




EAST: Ed H. 


88 


l-THST National of LaVergne 


-112 




EATC^: Jessee 


62 


FLORIDA: 


Betty 
Brent 


10, 
16 


16 


ECKERD Drugs 


115 




Edwin E. Jr., 


10, 


16 








Edwin E. Sr., 


u. 


5, 16 


EDWARDS: Arthur M. 


51, 5U 




Jesse 


16 




Elizabeth 


50 




Joyce 


10, 


16 


Ewen H. 


51 




Kemeth 


U 




Issabel 


50 




Kim 


ID, 


16 


Jtoies A. 


51 




Phillip 0. 


16 




Judith M. 


51 




rtjyllls 


16 





-135- 



FUN: 



POQG: 



Cornelius 0. 
Elizabeth 
John 
Mary 

Charles 
Joooathan W. 
Winiford 



FORREST: Nathan Bedford 

FOSTER: - 

FOX: H. L. 

FRANKLIN: S. E. 

FREEMAN: Anderson 
Andrew 
Ben 
Isabel 
Jack 
James 

FAUIKS: Samuel 

GAINES: Qen. K. P. 

QAHNAWAT, BurreU 

QARRET, Hannah 

QARRBTT, Rhoda 
OABRETT's Chapel Meth 
Church 

GARRETSON: Peter 

GARRISCN: Janes 
Joslnah 
Itary 
Peter 
Rater Serenas 

QATLIM: Mary 

GENHIAL ELECTRIC 

QENI HOUSE 

GEORGE: Robert 

GI6SG9: Washington 



27 

59 
59 

59 
59 

53 
53 
53 

65 

51 

21 

36 

55 
58 
58 
58 
58 
16 

59 

58 

52 

61 

51 

52 

60 

56 
56 
56 
56 

56 

56 

113 

32 

58 

U5 



GILLIAM: 


Charles 


GOIDSTEINS 


GOODLETT: 





GOSSET: 


Hannah 


GOWEN: 


A. 


(mAVES: 


Adaline 
Elisabeth 


GRF.EN: 


Kathiyn 

Nelson 

Sherwood 


GRIFFIN: 


Mary (Polly) 


GRIFFITH: 


Brent 
HoUy 


GROE: 


Cara 
Jason 
Judy 
Russell 


GTOf: J. A. Jr. 
GDM SPRING 


GUT: 


W. 


GWYN: 


Red 
Jimmy 


HALL: 


Ellas 
Samuel 
E^a W. 
Eknogene 
Peggy 

Thomas heirs 
W. M. 


HAM: 


Jacob 


HAMILTON: Thomas L. 


HANE3: 


Andrew J. 
Elizabeth 


HARRELLl 


t Effle 
House 

Henry Jones 
James 
Nancy Bell 



51 

nu 

U5 

61 

61 

58 
58 

28 
U5 
60 

55 

16 
16 

16 
16 
16 
16 

21 
28 

61 

36 

56 

U5 
U6 
55 
16 
55 
U5 
16, 55 

U6 
51 

53 
53 

19 
31 
19 
21 
19 



-136- 



HAERICAN Hill tract 

HARRIS: Arch 

Arch. Augustas 
Arch H. 
Augustus 
David P. 
Ephraim G. 
George E. 
Granville 
Isham G. 
Kiturah 
Phil 
Robert 
Thomas A. 

HARTFORD: John 

HARTLESS: William 

HAINES: George W. 

HENDERSON: Ahner 6. 
Eliza H. 
Eliza E. 
Jethro P. 
Margaret 
Mary Ann 
Minerva 
Pleasant 
Pleasant F. 
Richard 
SaiBuel 
Samuel F. 
Samuel W. 

HENLETt T. B. 

HENRY: Abraham 

HERRING: Abraham 

HERRON: Z. T. 

HIBBETT: Peggy Carlile 
Robert H. 
Sanders 

HECKS: H. H. Jr., 
Susan 

HILL: William 

HULVIElif Baptist Church 

HILTON: James 



58 

5U 
5U 
60 
5U 
58 
56 
50 
36 
71 
5U 
35 
51i 
51i 

111 

U5 

23 

51 
51 
51 
51 
58 
51 
51 
56 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 

52 

63 

61, 63 

2, h 

56 
56 
36 

21 

5U 

61 

3 

59 



HOBBS: 
HOFFMAN: 


Fred 
Carol 


115, 116 
6k 


HOLLAND: 


John H* 


U5 


HOOVER: 
HORNSl: 


Buddy 

Christopher 

Heiuy 

International 

Janes 

John 

Margaret Deanny 

Mathias 

Rausch 


36 

U6 

U5 
107 

U5 

36 

19, 23 

U6 
IL3 


HOSPITAL Corp. of America 


no 


HOWSE: 


Claiborne 

Hezekiah 

John R., Jr. 

Judy 

Paula 

Rick 

Suzanne 


61 
61 

U, 5, 16 
16 
16 
16 
16 


HOGGINS: 


Louis 


21 


HUGHES: 





52 


HUHTA: 


Mary 


116 


INDIAN Burials 


108 


INGLTS: 


Andrew 


53 


INMON: 


Hflnry H. 


3, 8, 9 


DPTBRNATIONAL Folk Fest 


109 


ISLEY: 


B. B. 
Sadie 


7, 13, 16 
7, 16 


JACKSON: 


Andrew 
Joe B. 
Larkln 


71 

116 

51 


JACOBS: 


Pleasant 


Ii6 


JAMES: 


Anderson 
Carey 
Fred 
GerUe 


57 
59 

7, 13, 16 

7, 16 


JARMAN: 


George 
G. S. 
Harry 


2 
3 
3 



-137 - 



JARMAN: Mr8. M. E. 2 

R. E. 2, h 

R. H. 2 

Mrs. Sally 3 

W. 0. U 

JARRETTt Rebecca Sh 

JEFFERSON^ 19 
JEFFERSON Spg Hotel Co 23 

JETTON: Agness $9 

E. $9 

James 53 

Janes S. 59 

John L. ^ 

Nancy 53 

Robert 6l 

Rufos 59 

JOHNS: Abner 59 
Catherine Ellz. 59 

Ernest K. 19> 107 

Frank 107 

Prariiain A. 59 

J. J. 23 

Joseph 6. 59 

Maiy 59 

Rhoda Trigg 59 

Rufe 19, 23 

Sarah Ann 59 

Susan 59 

Susan F. 59 

William R. 59 

JOHNSON: Andrew 71, 75 

"Cap" 27, 31 
Caroliiia Matilda-58 

CM. U6 

Baniel U6 

Edward lt6 

Dr. George 106 

James U6 



JOHNSTON: Cathrine 


57 


John 


57 


lynda 


52 


JONES: Amaze 


59 


Edmund 


50, 52 


G. H. 


3 


Hoover 


116 


James 


U6 


John 


I46 


John B. 


U6 



JONES: Obediah M. 
P. B. 
Patricia 
Van Carroll 
Van Michael 
Violet 
W. A. 
W. B. 

JORDAN: Alexander 
Charles 
Ernest 
Farris 
David 
Gra<^ 
James 
John 
Josqph 
Nan^ 
Peggy- 
Randy 
Wlllian 

KELLT: David Cato 
Hu^ 
Janet 

KEI/rON: Betty 
James 
Jane 
Janet 
Jason 
Jerry 
Jill 

KimberUe 
Michael 

K9IDRICK: Tom 

KEI: Dr. John 

KILLOUGH: Eleanor 

KIMBRO: Amanda A. 
Isaac N. 
John 

Joseph T. 
William 0. 



KINO: 



Adeline 
Archie D. 
Bennie 
Elias 
James 



lt6 

3 

16 

9, 16 
16 

16 

1, 3, U 
ii6 

57 
16 
16 
7 
57 
57 
57 

36, 57 
57 
57 

ID, 16 
16 
57 

75 
17 
17 

17, 10 

59 

17 

17 

17 

10, 17 
17 

17 
17 

116 

106 

53 

57 
57 
57 
57 
57 

60 

19, 2U 
8, 9 
36 
50 
59 



-138 - 



KING: 


Joe 


33 


LAWR£VCE: 


Jenny 


62 




Joe Harris 


36 




John 


62 




John H« 


21, 23 




John Devereux 


60 




Mary 


8 




John H. 


U6 




0111 e Waller 


33 




Jena then 


60 




Sally 


51 










Mr./Hrs.Varla B 


-17 














LEATHERMAN: James 


50 


KENQSRIDQE -Village Apta- 


UJk 














TiFJ) BETTER 


: Benjamin 


57 


KIRK: 


Eleanor 


53 




David 


51, 57 




EllTinheth 


53 




James A. 


57 




Hugh 


53 




Jane 


$7 




John 


53 




Elizabeth 


50 




John Jr. 


53 




Isaac 
Isaac H. 


50 
50 


KIRTLEI: 


J. A. 


6 














LEDBETTER 


: Mnllssa R. 


57 


K MART 




no 




Nancy 
Nolly 


50 
57 


KNIGHT: 


Cynthia C. 


$7 




Polly W. 


57 




Kll7Abeth W. 


57 




Richard R. 


50 




Robyn 


17 




Williara L. 


50 




Rhonda 


17 




WilUam 


61 




Ricky 


17 










Ronald F. 


17 


LeGRAND: 


Peter 


60 




Rosalind 


17 










Washington J. 


57 


LeMAY: 


Charlie 


6 


KNOX: 


Margaret 


53 


LESTER: 


TflllA 


17 


KROOERS 




111 


UiBCOMB: 


PblOy 


55 



LAKESHQRE Tovnhouses llU 

LANKFORD: Sterling 50 

LANNUM: Delilah 5U 

Green B. Sh 

Joseph 5U 

Lacinda $h 

Mary 5U 

Sarah 5U 

Siiqpson 5U 

Tabitha 5U 

William 5U 

LAUGHUN: John R. 61 

L. H. 60 

Mary C. 6l 

LaVERCaiE Old Timers Day- 112 



LINCH: Stephen 57 

LIVSIMAN: W. A. 6 

LOCKE: Major 52 

LOFTIN: Catharine W. 51 

LOID (Uoyd):Mr8. Sallie 21 

LORANCE: Alexander 58 

LYELL: John 58 

LITLE: Maiy Ward Sills 60 

Capt. William 62 

MABSmY: Daniel 62 

MABRY: Polly 65 

Sally 60 

Thomas Jones 56, 6o 



-139 - 



MACON: Ifticle Dave day HI 



MAEDEN: Edna Sari 
Tom 

HAHAFFET: W. G. 

MANSl: David Smith 
Levi 
Lucy 
Martha 

MANKIMt John 

MANN: Bernard 

MANUS: Matilda 

MARABI£: Benjamin 
Henry H. 
Isaac 

James Alex. 
Jane 
John 
Martha 
Martha Ann 
Travis 

MARLIN: Ahner 

Kemeal 
James R. 
Samuel 
William 

MARSHAL: Daniel 

MARTIN: Angle 

Baijamin 

Cathy 

Edgar 

E. Irving 

Evelyn 

H. C. 

Irvln 

Jlmrny 

J. J. 

John 

Lena 

Maggie 

R, H. 

Robert 

Sam 

W. Henry 

Xamenla 



17 
11, 17 



51 
51 
51 
51 

116 
36 

58 

53, 59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

U6 
U7 
U7 
53 
U7 

60 

17 
17 

10, 17 
17 

h 
17 

3 

2 
17 

2, 23 
56 
10, 17 

3 

2, U, 
56 
17 

U 
17 



MASON: Coleman 
James 
Patsey 
Susannah 

MATHBNI: James 
Joel 
Job 



MATHIS: 



F. Murray 
Loretta 



MATTHEW: Mira 

William 



MAURY: 
MAT: 



Jabez 
Joseph 



MAIFIEID: Earl 

Tolbert 

MATTAQ Laundry 

KAJOJELLi Amanda 

MEADOWS: Ephraim 

MBYEBS: Ernie 



50 
53 
50 
50 

18 
50 
50 

17 
17 

56 
52 

60 

57 

1*6 
U7 

115 
10, 17 

53 
6 



MIDDLE Tenn Christian School-Ill 
MIDDLE TN State Univ TV 108 



MILES: 
MILLER: 



MINGIE: 



F. W. 

Felix 0. 
I. J. 
Isaac L. 
Isaac L. Jr. 
Isaac L. Sr. 
William 
William M. 

Brook 

Elaine 

Jimmy 



MOLLOY: William 

MONTAGE: Thomas 

MONTGOMERY: Elizabeth 
Hugh 

Isabella 
Joe 



2U 

kS 

U6 

k6 

U7 

U7 

U6, kl 

U6 

17 
17 
17 

52 
55 

61 

61 

61 

116 



- 11*0 - 



MONTGOMERY: Joseph A. 


61 




MDRRAI: E. H. 


23 




Martha 


53 










Rebecca Kidd 


61 




Mcja)0: Samuel 


5$ 




Robert 


52, 


55 


McBROCM: *Bill (William) 


17 




MOORE: Abigail 


53 




Jennifer 


17 




Alfred 


52 




I^ynne 


10, 


17 


Bessie Wright 


19, 


33 


Monica 


17 




Charles 


17 




»WnHam "TMn« 


u. 


5, 10 


Daranee 


17 










David 


53, 


59 


McCANE: Joseph 


5U 




Elizabeth 


61 










Gabriel 


17 




McCLANAHAN: Cynthia 


59 




Jack 


116 




Ssmvil 


53 




James 


53, 


59,61 








Kay 


17 




McCLARY: Kathryn Green 


23, 


28 


Letlgr 


59 




Mrs. R. W. 


28 




Malinda 


59 










Margaret 


59 




McLEARY: Samuel 


56, 


57 


Mary- 


59 










George D. 


53, 


59 


McCOHBS: Rosanah 


62 




Herbert 


32, 


33,35 


Susanna 


52 




i^ggy 


53 




Wmiam 


62 




Peter 


59 










Sarah 


36 




McCOY: Henry 


61 




Winston 


36 




Polly 


61 




MORGAN: Fred Wilson,Sr. 


6 




McCRACKM: Isabella 
Joseph 


62 
62 




MORTON: Cicely 


5ii 










Cicely Harriet 


Sk 




McCUIJOCH: Benjamin 


50,55,58 


Elizabeth V. 


5U 




Era 


17 




James 


51, 


5U, 










55, 


58 


McCULLER: Alex 


U6 




John 


55 




Perry 


U7 




Joseph 


5o,51i,55 


Pleasant 


kS 




Manassa 


5U 










Martha Eliz. V. 


$h 




McCUHE: R. G. 


31, 


32 


Nancy 


55 




McCURDY: Mr ./Mrs. Art 


17 




MOSEBI: John 


5U 




McDONAIDS 


112 




Mt. TABOR C.P. Church 


91 
















MCDOWELL: Bill 


35. 


36 


MURFREB: Elijah 


61 




John H. 


69, 
86, 


80, 
68 


MURFREF^BORO Lot 


61 




McELROY: Samuel R. 


53 




MDRFREESBCRO Press 


no 




McEWEN: Agness 
Alex 


53 
5U 




MDRPHI: Ezekiel 


53 




Red 


35 




John 


53 










MURPHEY: John G. 


57 




McFARLIN: Benjamin 

Elizabeth Ann 


56 

56 





-iia- 



McFABLIN: Kasey A. 


^ 


McHIERSONt Carolyn 


17 


LoTilsa J. 


56 




James M. 


7,11,12 


Nancy B. 


56 




James R. 


17 


FLeasant Wilson- 


>.56 




John Mark 


17 


Sarah 


56 




Sara 


17 


wnnam 


56 




W. C. 


6 


McFBiRIN: B. L. 


56 


McVICKER: 


Joan 
Norm 


17 
17 


McGILLt Amanda 


66 








Francis 


66 


NASH: 


Mrs. Virginia 


21 


James 


66 












NASH7n.T.R Bridge Co. 


2U 


McGOWEN: Ebenezer 


52 












NAT'L ACHilCUUURAL Wheel 


68 


McHENRY: John 


55 




Grange 


68 


Rachel 


55 




Guard Armory 


in, 113 


Silias 


55 












NEEL: 


Barton 


U7 


McKSEt Capt. Ambrose 


55 












NEELLY: 


James 


61 


Derek 


17 








James H. Jr. 


10, 17 


NETSON: 


John 


51, 5U 


John 


U6 




Nan<^ F. 


51 


Lori Jean 


17 








Mary 


10, 17 


NESBITT: 


William 


U7 


Zane 


17 












NEWMAN: 


(L.) D. 


U7 


McKEEN: Alex 


59, 61 








AlexD. 


S9 


NICHOL: 


Jesse F. 


U7 


Elizabeth 


59 




John 


U7 


^e11na 


59 




Joshua S . 


U7 


Henrietta 


59 








Jane 


S^ 


NICHOLS: 


Abigail 


60 


John H. 


59 




Daniel 


52 


Mary 


59 




Delimer 


7 


Mary D. 


59 




Elizabeth 


60 


Nancy 


59 




Jane 
Jonathan 


60 
60 


MCKNIGHT: Alex 


53 




Joseph 


60 


David 


53 




Joshua 


60 


Eleanor 


53 




Levina 


60 


James 


53 




Phebe 


60 


John Martin 


53 












NIGHT: 


John 


60 


McLIN: Robert 


58 












NlFPHl: 


Walter 


10 


McMURRAI: Janett 


61 








Mary P. 


61 


NISSAN 




106,109 


McMURTREK: Rebecca 


62 


NORMAN: 


Amanda 


66 


McNSBGE.: Mary 


51 


N0RTHCUT7 


': H. 


$h 


Robert 


51 









- Ili2 - 



ODGM: 


Cuma Lee 


17 




PATRICK: 


Allen 


SO 




DCQ 

Dodona 
Leanne 


U, 
17 
17 


5,17 




Jemima 

Jesse 

Join 


50 
50 
50 
50 




Marvin 


17 






Levy 




Mary Ann 


10, 


17 




Nancy 0. 
Raleigh 


50 
50 


GDGM's Restaurant 


Ilk 








U7 










PATTERSON: Edward 


OQLB: 


G. A. 


1, 


2 




Joseph 
Jonlah 


50 
73 


OIERUDi 


Oil 


37 




PATTON: 


General 


37 


OLIPHANT: P. M. 


U7 






Jane 


53 


ORGAIN: 


Sterling 


51 




PAYNE: 


Jacob 


51 


ORRt 


Jane 


53 




PSA: 


Susannah 


55 


OTT: 


John 


1*7 




FEARCE: 


W. A. 


53 


OVJjltALL! 


A. S. 

Nath. 


2U 

55 




FiiDULKR 




111 




House 


32 




PEEBI£S: 


George 


55 


OWEN: 


C. L. 


3 




PElfUEL: 


Alice Brown 


17 




Don 

J, Wallace 


n, 

2, 


17 
3, U, 




Howard 

J. D. "Jack" 


116 
17 




Judith 


12,13,17 
3 


PETTY: 


Hannah 


62 




Lmie 


3 












Lucy 


3 




PIC 'N' PAY 


HO 




Mrs. Mattle 


3 












Mrs. M. E. 


3 




PHILLIPS: 


B. F. 


1, 2 




Nathaniel 


3, 


1* 




Mrs. Betty 


2 




Steven 


3 






David 


61 




T. E. 


3 






E. D. 
E. W. 


2 
2 


PACE: 


Brltton 


59 






HaxnT 


17 

4% 




Mary Ann 


59 






M. S. 
Pauline 


3 
17 


PAIMER: 


H. H. 


70 






W. M. 


2 


PAKKiilR: 


Anderson 

Charlie Sam 


U7 
27 




PINKARD: 


Bailey 


U8 




C. W. 


31 




PITTARD: 


John 


116 




Joel 


U7 












John 


U7 




PLAYCfflOUND 


27 




Joseph 


1*7 








• ** 




Timothy Sr. 


U7 




PLOT: 


Henry 


62 


PARKER GroTB) 


106 












House Child Care- 




PO FOLKS 




115 






JLU* 




POINDEJCl'KK: James (R.) 


U7 



-11*3 - 



K)LLBTT: Jain 


50 


RANKIN: 


Mathias 


U8 


POFBt Villiam 


62 


RANSOM: 


Benjamin 


53 


POMEL! Elizabeth 


62 


RAPPED: 


Barberry 


52 


Edy 


62 








Nina Ruth 


17 


READ: 


Clement 


60 


Feti3 


17 




Harry Anne 


60 


Rebecca 


62 




James Allen 
John H. 


60 
60 


PCMELLs Ke111e 


17 




John Nash 


60 


S. 


51i 




Mary 


60 


S. M. 


63 




Mary H. 
SHas 


60 

57 


PREMBTT: (Francis > M. 


U8 




Sion 


60 


Harris 


Ii7 




Thonas H. 


60 


John B. 


U8 








Mathias H. 


li7 


READY: 


Charles 


5U 


WnHam 


U7 












REDDY's Escort 


65 


HUGE: David 


51 












REPURT.TCAN GROVE Church 


3 


HIIEST: Mr./Hrs. Hanry 


17 












RHODES: 


Brad 


17 


PUCKKTT: Arthur 


62 




Darrell 


U 


Betay 


62 




Davn 


17 


Charles 


5U,60,63 




Douglas 


U,5, 17 


Edward 


62 




Frances 


17 


John M* 


62 




Greg 


17 


Leonard 


62 




Karen 


17 


iMcy 


62 




Mike 


17 


Mary W. 


62 




Rachel 


17 


Nath. 


60 




Rhonda 


17 


Pleasant 


62 




Rosalind 


17 


Sarah S. 


62 




Wilson 


k 


PUT,T,EM: Amelia 


52 


RICH FOODS 


109 


Elizabeth 


52 








James F. 


52 


RICHARD: 


James F. 


U8 


John W. 


52 








Josiah 


52 


RICHARDSON: J. D. 


73 


Thomas 


52 




Thomas 


U8 


POLLTASs Sut 


36 


RICHLAND Terrace To«nhouses-11 3 


PUTNAM: Darce 


10, 17 


RIDGEWAY: 


James 


61 


Darrell 


17 








Margaret 


17 


RIDLEY: 


James 
Knox 


51 
36 


RAISTON: Dave 


116 




Moses 
Sam 


60 
36 


RAMSEY: Rich 


57 












RION: 


Ed 


3 


RANDOLPH: Henry 


36 




Fannie 


2 


J. B. 


36 




T. F. 


2 



-lliii- 



ROBB: 


Winiam 


56,57,60 


SARGBANT: 


Winiaa 


53 


ROBERTSON: A. 


5U 


SEAT: 


Faiuiy R. 


$$ 




Hiram D. 


62 




Henry 
Margaret 


55 
55 


ROBINSOK 


f: David 


60 










Heniy 


53 


SH)B&RRI: 


L. S. 


3, 6 




Hugh 


53 










J. M. 


2 


SENIOR CITIZENS 


107 


RCDGERS: 


Andrew 


51 


SHARP: 


Isabel 


53 




Patience 


51 




Rachel 


56 




Susannah 


51 














SHARPS: 


Alfred 


56 


ROMAN CathoUc of Nashville- 




Cyrus 


57 






60 




Edwin 
James 


57 
56, 57 


ROSS: 


Daisy 


32 




James Morris 


56 




Gregory 


32 




Jemdna A. 


56 




J. L. 


32 




John 


57 




Ola 


17 




John Christopher 






Sidney 


17 




Columbus 
John McKhl^t 


57 
57 


RCMLANDt 


B. J. 


1»8 




Joseph Cannon 
Martha Caroline 


56 
57 


RUCK SI: 


Benjandn 


52 




Martha Louisa 


57 




Jonathan 


62 




Sarah Jane 


57 




Ten^Mrance 


61 




William 


57 




Col. Thonas 


51 




Wmiam Wilson 


57 




WiniamR. 


58 














SHEPHERD: 


: S. G. 


1, 2, 


RUSHING: 


J. C. 


21 










Maggie 


21 


SHERMDQD: 


Benjamin 
Hezeklah L. 


61 
61 


RUSSELL: 


H. A. 


3,6 




PbUy 
Rebecca H. 


61 
61 


RUTI£D(S: George 


50 














SHIP: 


James 


52 


SAMBO'S 




115 




Joseph 
Lewis 


52 
52 


SANBORN: 


C. H. 


2li 




Mary 


52 


SANDERS: 


Cornelius 
Elizabeth 


5U 
5U 


SIT.T5: 


Elizabeth Pturham 


60 




Hollis 


36 


SUVE Balckarolth 


61 




J. T. 


3, U 


SLAVE as 


wife 


58 




Jesse 


31 










J. P. 


a 


SMARTT: 


Carl 


17 




Hiilip 


5U 




na 


17 




Richmond 


36 










Sumner 


31 


SMITH: 


America C 


58 




Tom (farm) 


20 




Ann 


51 




W. H. 


21 




Beasley 
Bob 


35 
25 


SAN70RD: 


Thomas 


116 




Cunnln^am 


50 



-1U5- 



SMITH: Ephralm Foster 


58 


STANDI^: 


James 


ii8 


Gene 


28 








Oeo. Washington 


58 


STATHAMt 


Charles 


61 


Ouy 


5U 




Jane 


61 


Dr. H. B. 


106 




Love 


61 


J. Beaaley 


35 




Richard 


61 


Janes L. R. 


58 




Thomas 


61 


James Rush 


58 




William 


61 


Jane C. 


58 








John 


50,58,62 


STBGATiT.t 


Whitnsy 


116 


John BeU 


27 








John f. 


57 


STEPHEUS: 


Richard 


Sh 


Jonathan 


50 




San^son 


5U 


Mary 


50 








Nanoy 


61 


STEWART: 


Charles 


61 


Neal 


55 




Daniel M. 


61 


Obadlah 


50 




Jaioes 


61 


Peyton 


61,62 




James W. 


61 


Robert 


50 




Margaret 


61 


Robert Jr. 


58 




Martha 


61 


Robt Henderson 


58 




Sally 


61 


SamaaL 


50 




Samuel 


62 


Sanpson 


50 








Sarah Jane 


58 


STILL: 


Jimnie 


17 


Thomas 


U8 




John 


50 


Tom 


21 




John Jr. 


50 


Willi am 


50, 58 




John Sr. 


50 


William H. 


58 








William Madison 


58 


STONES RIVER Battlefield 


107 


SMDTHERMAN: Bealer 


5AU,15 


STRONG: 


John 


^S 


SMIRNA Hl£^ Basketball 


107 


STUBBLEFIEIi): Nancy 


SI 


SMZRNA Hospital 


110,lU 




Woodruff 


57 


SMYRNA Medical Clinic 


115 








SMXHNA Nursing Home 


113 


SUBTiETT: 


C|Q)t. 


57 


SNELL: Craig 


116 


SQDDARTH] 


; Bob 


116 


Elizabeth 


55 








Hays 


55 


SULPHUR SPRINGS 


19 


James 


55 








Susan 


55 


SUMMERS: 


B. (T.; 


U8 


Willis 


SS 












SUNCREHC 


Townhouses 


112 


SONGHl: George 


50 












SUPER X Drugs 


lU 


SOUTHERLAND: William 


50 












SUTFIN: 


James 


56 


SOUTHERN H111s Estates 


UU 




Lewis 


56 


SHARKS: Mr. 


67 


surroN: 


Alex Harrison 
Aley 


58 
58 


SPEMCB: Joseph 


60 




Anna Eliza 


58 


Rebecca B. 


60 




Cholson 


58 



-lli6 - 



SUTKSRt Edmund 

EUzabetfa 
Ehoch 

Margaret Jane 
Mary 
Polly 

Rozaniah P. 
Sally 
William 

SWAIN: AUce 

Amanda F. 
Benjamin S. 
Betaah 
Bluford 
Caleb Ward 
Effie H. 
Elizabeth 
Etigene Franklin 
Fountain E. P. 

Franklin 
James Franklin 
James Fount 
James Lillard 
Johnny 
Julia A. V. 
LiUard 

Lorenso D. 

Mrs. M. S. 

Martha 

Pearl 

Rachel 

Ruth 

William T. 

SWANN: Thonaa 



TAYLOR: 



Join 
Robert L. 



TEMPLETON: Mary Beth 
Mr ./Mrs. Rick 
Rlkl Lauren 



TENNISON: Abraham 
Archibald 
Edmund 
Hiram 
Jane 



58 

58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 

a,23 

19 

19 

21 

19 

19 

19,20,21* 

32 

21 

19,21, 

23,31 

19 

20,32 

21 

21 

20 

19 

19, 20, 2U, 

25, 31 

19 

2U 

19 

21 

21 

21 

19 

116 

73, 7U 
65, 71 

17 
17 
17 



TENN NAT'L Guard 112 
TENN REHABILITATION Ctr 110 
Tfflm VIDEO II 1L5 



59 
59 
59 
59 
59 



TENNISON: 


Rebecca 


59 




Solooon 


59 


TENPENNY: 


Richard 


58 


TERRY: 


Mrs. Clarence 


21 


THOMAS: 


James 


ii8 


THOMPSON: 


Aim 


62 




David 


62 




Qrizzel 


62 




Isabela 


62 




Jane 


62 




Jesse 


62 




John 


62 




Joseph 


62 




Joseph T. 


62 




Mary 


62 




Orvil 


62 




F»ggy 


62 




Robert 


62 




Wmiam 


62 


TILFORD: 


John M. 


50, 57 


TIIMAN: 


Jacob 


57 


TIMMON: 


W. H. 


23 


TODD: 


Doyle Louis 


32 


TOMT.TNSUN 


1: Eiq>hemia 


60 


TRAVEKS: 


Wmiam 


60 


TRKASURY DRUGS 


115 


TRCTT: 


W. H. 


56 


TUCKER; 


Silas 


60 



TURNER: Josph Thos Blanks -60 
TURNEY: Peter 85,88,96 



TURRENTINE: James 
Sally 

UNDERWOOD : George 
Nancy 



62 
62 

5U 

5U 



U.S. POST OFFICE, M'boro Ul 



-11*7 - 



VASUifiRt 


Joshua 
Syntha 


50 
50 


WALLIS: 


Mortimer Randolph 


55 










WALTER HILL Dam 


115 




VAUQHAN: 


James 


60 
















WARD: 


Charlie 


21, 


2^ 


VAUGHN: 


Joseph 


31, 32 






25, 


28 




"T.n" Troy 


17 




C. M. 


2U 






Troy 


17 




Frank Cheatem 
Mrs. F. I. 


36 
36 




VAUGHT: 


Elijah 


56 




Kate Black 


26 






Elizabeth 


56 




lyxila 


62 






Janes 


56 




Pleasant 


62 






Ijrnn 


10,17 




Thonpson 


32 






Melvln 


17 




Willie 


23, 


25, 




Maxy 


56 






28, 


3L 




Mike 


17 












Nancy 


56 


WARON: 


Robert 


53 






^ggy 


10,17 












Fhebe 


56 


WARREN: 


Catherine 


62 






Phinip 


17 




George 


55 






Simeon 


56 




Mary 


55 






Stan 


17 




Peter 


52 








56 




Sarah 


59 






W. D. 


U 




WUllam 


62 




VERBLE: 


Barbara 
Bob 


17 
17 


WARWICK: 


Robert 


51 






Marilyn 


17 


WATKINS: 


Joslah 
Samuel 


52 
59 




VICTORY: 


Lee 


116 


WATSON: 


W. J. 


6 




VINCENT: 


Henry 


56 


WEAKLEY: 


Robert 


60 




VINSON: 


wmi«m 


53 


WEBB: 


Mrs. C. M. 


2U 




WAIKER: 


WUllam 


liB,5U 




Don A. 

Jeff 


u, 

17 


5,17 


WAUQNG Horse Show 


112 




Michelle 


17 












Pat^ 


17 




WALLACE: 


Isabella S. 


55 




Pauline 


17 






Jane 


61 




WllUflm 


61 






John 


61 


WEBB Cottage 


31 






Polly- 


61 
















WEEKLY Toller 


69 




WALLER: 


Bob 


36 












Claiborne 


23 


WELLS: 


Any 


17 






Everett 


2U, 36 




Marlon 


17 




WALLER House 


33 




Robert 


17 






R. S. 


23 




Tonnle 


17 




WALLTS: 


Alfred 
Amos S. 


55 


WHEELER: 


Polly 


50 






John 


SS 


WHITE: 


Burrel 


U8 






John F. 


55 




Mrs. John Valley 


2U, 
32, 


31, 
35 



-U»8 - 



WOTS: Levi 


60 


WOODS: 


Thonas 


53, 62 


Stephen 


U8 








Stokly 


U8 


WOOL HAT 


Boys 


71 


VHOBERRY: Elizabeth 


52 


WRATHER: 


Mrs. - - 
Tcnrny 


32 
27, 32 


WHGRLEIi Eliz. Buchanan 


92 








Jeff 


96 


WRIGHT: 


Isaac 
Jacob 


5U 
62 


WIQGSi Henry 


U8 




Martha 
Ward Lee 


19 
21 


WILBURNt Jonathan 


53 












YANDELL: 


Wnson 


51, 56 


WIUONSt John G. 


56 












YEARICOD: 


! Y. B. 


h 


WILLIPOHD: Jordan 


51 








Sanmel 


51 


YOUNG: 


W. T. 


23 


Wnj.TAMSt Aaron 


US 


YOTOIEE: 


Joseph 


56 


EUeha 


U8 








John M* 


60 


YOUS: 


Elizabeth 


52 


Nathan 


57 




George 


52 


Patsey 


55 




John 
Tenqperanoe 


52 

52 


VILSON: Dan E. 


115 




Thomas 


52 


James C. 


6 








Jenney 


55 


ZACKRA: 


Hartwell 


14S 


John 


59 








John R« 


59 


ZANALS: 


.... 


23 


Nancy 


55 








Samuel 


59 








Samuel S. 


55 








WnHam 


55 








WINDROW: Byars 


62 








Carey 


62 








Cleveland 


62 








Henry 


62 








Louisa 


62 








Miranda 


62 








WINDES: Ehoch 


6 








WINN: mn 


17 








Bobby 


17 








Eleanor 


17 








amip 


17 








WINN-DIXTE 


108,113 








VKX3DFIN: Nicholas 


61 








WOODRING: Doctor 


32 









-11*9 - 



DATE DUE 



F£Q8'97 
SEP 2 8 19j6 



JUL i 3 fey^ 



!lt-?- 



^ 



/\PR Q 3 ?Q 9t 



^w*-4 



6 :_K3 ' 



"rTT!;^;, 



i 



jHBis 



^*«/ 



APP 8 OT 5 



WOl/27 



lOQ^UGT: 



\.'j 3* 



MAY 7 200* 



HIGHSMITH # 45220