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n T S U LIBRART 



>RD COUNTY 

3 3082 00527 6901 ^. OOr^lCTV 



Publication No. 22 





IVIajor-General William S. Rosecrans 



WINTER 1984 



Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37133-0906 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication22ruth 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
PUBLICATION NO. 22 
Published by the 
RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
OFFICERS 



President Mr. W H. Westbrooks 

Vice-President Mr. James Mathey 

Recording Secretary Mrs. Cathy Goode 

Corresponding Secretary Mrs. Susan Daniel 

Publication Secretary Mr. VJalter K. Hoover 

Treasurer Mrs. Kelly Ray 

DIRECTORS: Mrs. William Walkup 

Mrs. Lalia Lester 
Mr. Jerry Gaither 



Publication No. 22^ (Limited Edition-500 copies is 

distributed to members of the Society. The annual member- 
ship dues is $10.00. (Family $11.00) which includes the 
regular publications and the monthly NEWSLETTER to all 
members. Additional copies of Publication No. 22 may be 
obtained at $5.00 per copy. 

All correspondence concerning additional copies, contri- 
butions to future issues, and membership should be addressed 
to: 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

Box 906 

Murf reesboro , Tennessee 37133-0906 



MIDOLE TIHNESSIt STATE UKlTfJflTT 
UU8reiltS»R». HXItlSEI 37iai 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 



History of Fortress Rosecrans 

by - David Russell Wright page 1 

Big Springs 

by - Margaret M. Powell page 28 

East Main Church of Christ 

by - Carol Roberts page 52 

Tax Record of Districts 23 and 24 
Rutherford County for 1836, 1837, & 1849 

by - E. K. Johns page 69 

Mathias Hoover of Hoover Gap 

by - Walter K. Hoover page 99 

Index page 105 



^'l-0^jJ2f> 



FOR SALE 



THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATIONS ARE FOR SALE BY: 

The Rutherford County Historical Society 

P.O. Box 906 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

PUBLICATIONS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 are out of print. 

PUBLICATION 7: Hopewell Church, Petition by Cornelius Sanders' 

for Rev. War Pension ------- $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 10: 1864 Diary, Peter Jennings, Henderson Yoakum, Early 
Methodist Church, and Overall 
family $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 11: State Capitol, Ben Mc Culloch, Petition of Michael 
Lorance, Country Store, and Soule College 

$3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 12: Out of Print 

PUBLICATION 13: Tennessee College, Coleman Scouts, New Monument in Old 
City Cemetery and James Boles' Revolutionary War 
Pension $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 14: Murfreesboro Presbyterian Church, Kirks and Montgomerys, 
Russell Home, John Lytle and John M. Leak's Revolution- 
ary War Pension ------ $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 15: John W. Childress' home (1847), Whigs in Rutherford 

County, 1835-1845 $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 16: Hart, Childress, Miles, Fosterville, Cherry Shade, 

William Cocke $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 17: Jefferson 1803-1813, Will Abstracts (1803-1814), 

Old City Cemetery $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 18: Railroad Stations in Rutherford County, Rion Family 

Stones River $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 19: Footprints ... at Smyrna, V.A. Medical Center, Manson 
Family, Jenkins' Homes, Will Abstracts (Record Books 3 & 
4), Rutherford Co. Hist. Society, Early News, Bio. Sketch 
from Macon Co., 111., 1981 in Rutherford County - - - 

$3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 20: Roads and Turnpikes of Rutherford Co. (includes many 

Rutherford Co. names) ------ $5.00 + $1.00 postage 



FOR SALE 



PUBLICATION 21: Jefferson Springs Resort, Lascassas Baptist Church, 

John Price Buchanan, Will Abstracts, 1836 Tax Records 
of 25th District $5.00 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 22: Ft. Rosecrans, Big Springs, East Main Church of Christ 
Tax Record District 23 & 24, for 1836, 1837, and 1849 
Mathias Hoover $5.00 + $1.00 Postage 

History of Versailles (southwestern Rutherford Co.) in hard cover, (Some 
families included are: Adcock, Brown, Burns, Carlton, Covington, 
Crick, Dyer, Farris, Garrett, Gillespie, Hendrix, Ivey, Jackson, 
Jones, Lamb, Lawrence, Leathers, Lowe, Manier, Maxwell, Mc Gee, 
Morris, Nance, Pinkerton, Pope, Powers, Puckett, Ray, Ralston, Rice, 
Rutledge, Sharver, Smotherman, Tabor, Taylor, Whitehead, Williams, 
Windrow, Winsett) $9.00 + $2.00 postage 

History of Rutherford County by C.C. Sims (pub. 1947) Reprint - - 

$12.00 + $2.00 postage 

1840 Rutherford County Census with Index $5.00 + $1.00 postage 

Deed Abstracts of Rutherford County, 1803-1810 $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

GRIFFITH : Illustrated by-centinnial publication- - $2.00 + $1.00 postage 

CEMETERY RECORDS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY : 

Vol. 1 Northwestern third of county and part of Wilson and Davidson 
Counties, 256 cemeteries with index and maps $10.00 + $1.00 postage 
Vol. 2 Eastern third of Rutherford and the western part of Cannon Co, 
241 cemeteries with index maps -------- $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Vol. 3 Southwestern third of Rutherford Co., 193 cemeteries with 
index and maps ---------------- $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Available from : William W. Walkup, 202 Ridley St., Smyrna, Tenn. 37167 

1878 Rutherford County Map, shows land owners -$3.50 + $1.00 postage 

Available from : Mrs. R.A. Ragland, P.O. Box 544, Mur^reesboro, Tenn. 37130 
Marriage Record of Rutherford Co., 1851-1872- -$10.00 + $1.00 postage 



HISTORY OF PORTRESS ROSECRANS 

Chapter V 

from a thesis for MTSU 

titled 

"CIVIL WAR PORTIFICATICN" 

by- David Russell Wrl^t 



The roads to Tiillahonia, Tennessee, were overflowing with Con- 
federate soldiers, filled with the emotions of another retreat, as 
they headed south with their wagons and guns on the cold night of 
January 3, 1863. Their counterparts in blue, unsure of the Confeder- 
ate plans and whereabouts, proceeded with caution as they slowly 
entered Murfreesboro with two advanced brigades, later, on the 5th, 
followed by the amy. Rosecrans followed the retreating Southerners 
with patrols and deployed pickets before placing his array at rest. 

Both amies had brought on a severe battle along the banks of 
Stones River, ana each needed time to lick its wounds and reorganize 
before atteo^tlng another stren\xous campaign. Though placed in a 
large camp surrounding Murfreesboro for the winter, Rosecrans did not 
allow his amy to lose face with discipline and become exposed to the 
evils of idleness, a major problem encountered when an amy retired 
for a rest. He put his encamped army into motion by ordering the men 
to resume drilling and to transport supplies to the front from Nash- 
ville. He ordered sufficient nvunbers of hatchets, axes, and shovels 

1 
to stgjply the troops for future use. 



General Order No. 3, January 9, I863, photocopy of the original 
order from the National Archives, Washington, D. C. Riotocopy in 
possession of Stones River National Battlefield, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. 



- 2 - 

The Army of the Cumberland was 215 ndles from its main base of 

STjpplies at Lovdsville, Kentucky, and over thirty miles from its main 

2 
depot at Nashville. The anny was dependent upon military rations and 

supplies that trickled southward over a single railroad line which was 
easily broken by the enemy raiders and by flash floods . Rosecrans saw 
that the thin line of supplies could not feed and clothe his army for a 
long period of time, and he remembered the e3q)ectations and failures of 
the same line in an atteoftt to si?)ply Buell six months earlier. Rose- 
crans was planning a forward movement toward Chattanooga which would 
require large stockpiles of supplies to be distributed in secondary 
depots along the railroad. Copying Buell 's idea of detached depots, 
Rosecrans decided on using only one or two depots, instead of a depot 
in every railroad town, and fortifying them more thoroughly. 

Murfreesboro would fulfill the needs of a secondary depot. Its 
proximi-tgr to Nashville added to its secTirity, and the amy was 
already encamped in the vicinity of the town, which provided a ready 
work force. Rosecrans had to reorganize the army after the battle, wait 
for reinforcements, and construct a sufficient cavalry force to be 
congjatible with that of tne enemy. In the meantime, he would occupy 
the troops with building the depot to erase the idleness of the army 
and also to provide the new troops with a taste of field service. 
Finally, Murfreesboro, if fortified and stockpiled with supplies, 
would be a good point to fall back on and regroip if the army were 
forced to retreat. The town was centrally located in the state and 

provided flanking capabilities with the Tennessee River on the right 

3 

and the Knoxville mountain passes on the left. 

The site location and fortification design for the depot was 

2 Merrill, 3:390, 392. 

3 Nejf York Times, 12 Jantiary I863. 



- 3 - 

assipied to the Chief aigineer of Rosecrans' staff, Capt. Janes St. 
Clair Morton. The criteria governing the selection of the depot site 

required it to be adjacent to the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, 

U 
to be large enough to protect an army of about fifty thousand troops, 

and to maintain a stockpile of supplies that would feed the army for 
sixty to ninety days. The site chosen by Morton (fig. 79, appendix A) 
encorqjassed a range of rolling hills and ridges that s\irrounded the 
Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad bridge over Stones River and the 
junction of the Wilkinson and Nashville turnpikes. The location was 
chosen for its defensive qualities, as it ccxnmanded the surrounding 
country and the town of Murfreesboro, one-half of a mixe away. 

As time was important and the size of the depot called for a large 
area to be fortified, Morton quickly got down to business and surveyed 
the site that he had chosen and began desigaing the depot fortifications, 
He decided upon using an enclosed work that would surround the depot 
and would be capable of protecting an army during a siege. His fort 
or, as it was called, fortress, measured roughly 1,2$U yards north 
and south by 1,070 yards east and west, enclosing about 20u acres of 
land.^ On January 23, I863, the fort, officially named Fortress Rose- 
crans in honor of the commanding general, >fej. Gen. William Starke 
Rosecrans, was established, and construction began immediately after- 
ward. 



General Rosecrans began his Tullahoma march from Fortress 
Rosecrans in June I863, his army nvimbering 50, 617 and the Confederates 
under Bragg U6,665j Gilbert C. Kniffin, "Maneuvering Bragg Out of 
Tennessee," in Johnson and B\iel, 3:635-3G. 
c 

Rosecrans to Haileck, February 13, I863, in OR, vol. 23, pt.2, 
p. 59j Tower to Thomas, April 28, 1865, in OR, vol71i9, pt. 2, p. 502. 

"Militaiy Posts," Section R, p. 371. 



-u - 



To carry out his architectural plans of the fort, Morton relied 

7 
on his coninand, the Pioneer Bsrigade, a brigade of engineer troops 

which specialized in fortification and railroad construction and 
also perfonned the duties of coiranon soldiers. The role of the Pioneer 
Brigade was to supervise the construction crews made up of soldiers. 
Inportant features such as magazines, blockhouses, and buildings were 
built \jy the Pioneers and other soldiers ^o were capable of perform- 
ing the special skills needed for those assignments. 

Construction of Fortress Rosecrans was given top priority from 
January until raid-April when work slackened and finally became piece- 
meal by Jime. During January and the early part of February, many of 
the Pioneers were on detached service rebuilding railroads and construct- 
ing blockhouses. Morton put his available Pioneers to work on the fort 



The Pioneer Brigade was formed in December 1862 and commanded by 
Capt. James St. Clair Morton, Corps of Ehgineers and Chief Engineer of 
the Array of the Cumberland. The brigade was composed of three battal- 
ions, whose members were specially chosen from the regiments that formed 
the three corps, and one battery of artillery. The First Battalion 
was formed from the Right Vftjig (McCook), the Second Battalion from the 
Center (ThcmasJ, and the Third Battalion from the Left Wing (Crittenden). 
The Chicago Board of Trade Illinois Battery comprised the artillery 
battery until March I863, when it was transferred to the Second Brigade, 
Second Division of the Army of the Cvnnberland and replaced by Bridge's 
Illinois Battery, which had previously been the newly organized Ca75)any 
G, 19th Illinois Infantry Regiment. Bridge's Battery remained with the 
Pioneer Brigade until October I863, when it was assigned to the Third 
Division of the Fourth Corps. In June I863, the Fourth Battalion was 
formed from Gordon Granger's Reserve Corps. Not counting the Fourth 
Battalion, the Pioneer Brigade numbered about two thousand troops, and 
in the spring of I863 the 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics under 
Col. William P. Lines were attached to the brigade, bringing the total 
of troops to about three thousand. In January I86U, General Morton 
was transferred to Washington, D. C, and Col. George P. Buell, command- 
er of the 58th Indiana Infantry Regiment, was named commander of the 
Pioneer Brigade. In June I86U, the Pioneer Brigade was disbanded, and 
its members became the 1st U. S. Veteran Volunteer Ehgineers. The 
engineer regiment was mustered out of service on September 26, l86$. 
Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendim of the War of tiie Rebellion , 3 vols. 

(New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1959), 1:U65, 2h$i OR, vol 22, pt. 2, 
page 285j pt. 1, p. l82j vol. 23, pt. 2, pp. 298, 580. 



- 5- 



and recalled the remainder of the brigade to Murfreesboro after vork 

8 
was conq)leted at the various points. Construction began with clear- 
ing pathways for the raniparts throu^ forests on the east and north- 

9 
west sides of the fort and two or three houses. The soldiers and 

engineer troops weire required to work day and night in eight-hour 

shifts for seven days a week until Aprils averaging four thousand 

laborers each day. All work on Sundays was aboli^ed beginning on 

the Uth of April, followed by the termination of labor on Saturdays 

for all troops except those constructing magazines. By the 20th, the 

necessity for night work had ceased, and construction of the fort was 

trimmed down to include only the daylight hours. The work hours were 

reduced In )^rll as the fort neared completion, and In J\me efforts 

were caice again stepped up to complete the project before the can^jaign 

10 
began at the end of the month. 

The type of work initiated on the fort between February and May 

varied. Outside the routine ditch excavation, special squads of 100 



o 

"Morton to Davis, January 30, I863, "Records of the Office of the 
Chief of Engineers," Record Groi^) 77, National Archives, Washington, 
D. C, vol. 173, p. 11 (hereafter cited as "Engineer Records";; Morton . 
to Huntington, Febnjary 3, I863, and Morton to Donnahugh, February 12, 
1863, "Engineer Records," vol. 173, pp. l5, 16. 

9^ Atlas, plate XXXII, map 1; plate CXXI, map 3. 

•'■^Rosecrans to Halleck, March 20, I863, in GR, vol. 23, pt. 2, 
p. l5Uj Order from Morton, April k, I863, "Engineer Records," 171*: 17; 
Morton to Dodge, April 17, I863, and April 2o, I863, "Engineer Records," 
173s37, 39j Morton to Clark, June 19, 1863, "Engineer Records," 
vol. 17U, n. pag. 



- 6 - 

to 250 men constructed fascines for the revetments during the period 
of at least three months. This shows that the parapets were prob- 
ably not begun until late February and neared coTi5)letion by May or 
June. Hi^ly skilled and specialized work such as the construct- 
ion of magazines, blockhouses, and railroad spurs were conpleted by 
the First Michigan aigineer and Mechanics Regiment and the more 
skilled members of the Pioneers and other troops. Other priorities 
within the scope of the fort-st^jply depot included the construction 

of railroad switches and spurs, large warehouses for coiranlssary and 

13 
quartermaster goods, and a field hospital. 

During the construction of Fortress Rosecrans, not all of the 
men of the Pioneer Brigade were eIt^)loyed yspon the work. Platoon and 
company-size sections were used in the construction of railroad block- 
houses and bridges while other sections delivered pontoons, a floating 
bridge 
/svapport, to the front. Other Pioneers found themselves employed In 

common brigade drills, skirmish drill, and sapper and miner duty, 
practice of constructing earthworks under enemy fire. Morton placed 



"Norton to Laniberson, March 8, I863, "Qigineer Records," 17li:8l; 
Morton to Stokes, May 6, I863, "Engineer Records," vol. 17ii, n. pagj 
Morton to Stokes, March 29, I863, I7li:10. 

^^Morton to Dodge, April 17, 1863, "Engineer Records," 17307. 

^Amandus Sllsby to father, March 23, I863, l^rpescript copy in 
possession of Dr. James Huhta, Historic Preservation Program, Middle 
Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, transcription by 
Ms. Inez Bums, Maryville, Tennessee; Moi^ion to Laniberson, March 8, 
1863, "Engineer Records," 17U:8l. 

^^rton to Moore, March 1, I863, "Engineer Records," I73:l8j 
Morton to Lamberson, March 8, i863, 17U:81; Morton to Jiikes, February 
22, 1863, 173:17; Circular from Morton, April 7, I863, i7U:22; Morton 
to Cianents, April 27, 1863, vol. 17U, n. pag.; Morton to Clements, 
April 6, 1863, 17U:18; and Morton to Stewart, April 19, I863, vol. 
17U, n. pag. 



- 7 - 

the training sessions vcpaa a revolving drill and practice 87sten for 
the coiopanles and battalions of the Pioneer Brigade to attend. When 
a company conpleted several days of drilling in the skirmish formation^ 
it was then sent to stiidy sapping and mining, pontoon bridge building, 
or to resme its former occupation of earthwork or blockhouse construct- 
ion. These drills and field practices helped train and maintain a hig^ 
level of efficiency in the various duties of the Pioneer troops. Later, 
when the three battalions were divided between the three army corps, 
the Pioneers, after receiving the training sessions, were able to pro- 
vide their respective corps engineering services with speed and pre- 
cision during the sunmer campaign of maneuvering Bragg out of southern 
Tennessee . 

As Fortress Rosecrans neared con5>letlon in April, the summer 
campaign was in the making. Stockpiles of supplies were transported 
to the Nashville warehouses from Louisville, Kentucky, and the second- 
ary depots at Franklin and Murfreesboro, the latter containing enough 
food substances to last aliaost six months and forage for three 

months. ^^ By mid-June the fort had received its garrison, 2,391* 

16 
convalescent troops. Convalescent soldiers were used as a garrison 

to free able-bodied soldiers to be sent to the front where they were 

needed. Once the convalescents had reciqjerated from their woTinds or 

sicknesses, they were returned to active duty at the front. However, 



''Frederick D. Williams, ed.. The Wild Life of the Army ; Civil 
War Letters of James A. Garfield (East Lansing, Mich.: Michigan 
State Ihaiversity Press, 1961i;, Garfield to Secretary, April 12, 
1863, p. 256. 

16 

Garfield to Rosecrans, June 12, I863, in OR, vol. 23, pt. 2, 
p. U23. 



- 8 - 

the average number of convalescents for garrison duty was insuffi- 
cient, at one point nvunbering only 926 men, nine-tenths of whom were 

17 
unfit for duty. 

The duties of the convalescent garrison ranged from the monot- 

otis functions of military life to the labors of the carpenter and 

farm hand. The duties Included preparing logs and the operation of 

the four saw mills, altering embrasures and building carpenter and 

blacksmith shops, commissary buildings, and housing for the troops. 

as late as ;^ril 3, l865, buildings were erected for the chaplain 

and livestock. In the winter, the artillery pieces were winterized 

by placing tarpaulins or wooden sheds over the cannons and limbers. 

On the other hand, routine duties of the troops were drilling, 

cleaning cait?>, and guard duty for the blockhouses and construction 

crews on the railroads. Maintenance was also required for the 



■"■^Houghtaling to Goddard, November 2, 1863, in "Fort Rosecrans, 
Tennessee, Post Records, l863-i86$," "Records of U. S. Army Continent- 
al Commands, 1821-1920," Record Groi?) 393, National Archives, Washing- 
ton, D. C, p. 8 (hereafter cited as "Arrry Records";. The convales- 
cent garrison was supplemented periodically with active duty troops 
during the r-emaining two years of war. In January l861i, the 1st Ken- 
tucky Battery helped garrison the fort, and in March i86U, one company 
from the 31st Wisconsin Volunteers and the ll5th Ohio Volunteers were 
sent to the fort. By March 1865, the fort contained only three 
artillery coii5)anies, and the infantry force guarded the town and depot. 
The sipply depot was not contained within the fort but remained near 
the town. Mendenhall to Brannan, January lU, 186U, in OR, vol 32, 
pt. 2, p. 93; Special Orders No. 72, March 12, lb6U, "Arny Records," 
p. 332; Tower to Thomas, April 28, i865, in OR, vol U9, pt. 2, p. 503. 
For a review of the Confederate cavalry raids on the railroad defenses 
around Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and how the garrison of Fortress 
Rosecrans coxmtered these movements, see Edwin C. Bearss, The History 
of Fortress Rosecrans (M\irfreesboro, Tenn.: Stones River National 
Military Park, i960;. 



- 9 - 

fortress such as euttdng the grass on the parapets j dunging reftise, 
storing ammunition 9 and maintenance on the cannons and linibers (for 

a review of the guidelines for defense and maintenance of Fortress 

18 
RosecranSj see appendix B). 

Before the war terminated, a period of less than twenlqr-foTir 
months from the time the fort was conpleted. Fortress Rosecrans had 
suffered severe deterioration. Di seven months' time after the main 
amy advanced from Mxirfreesboro in June I863, evidence of deterior- 
ation began to appear in areas that were exposed to the elements of 
weather. Some of the magazines were damp after long periods of rain, 
and parts of the traverses were eroding, althou^ the garrison had 

already rebuilt <Mie traverse. The scarps of the redoubts had fallen, 

19 
and the galleiy, a covered passageway loopholed for defense, around 

the main magazine had begun to fall in. The scarps of the redoubts 

were giving way because thsy had been left in an unfinished condition 

awaiting the garrison to construct galleries. However, plans for the 

inclusion of the galleries had been deemed unnecessary and were phased 

out. Even the blocldiouses were not immune to the destructive elements 

20 
of the weather, as they all leaked badly. 



Special Orders No. U, October lU, I863, in "Army Records," p. 
318; and other references in "Amy Records": Houghtaling to Russell, 
August 3* 1863, p. 5; Special Orders No. kt January h, 1865, p. 206j 
Special Orders No. U9, April 3, l865, p. 227 j Special Orders No. 10, 
January 13, l86$, p. 209j Lawrence to Daxi^ty, September 2, l861i, p. 
l83j Special Orders No. 65, August 2li, l861i, p. 179; Lawrence to 
Stiles, August 17, 1861^, p. i5j Houghtaling to Jeffers, Atigust 5, I863, 
p. 5} Circular, April 2, I863, p. 29U. 

19 

Mahan, pp. lOU-05; Scott, p. 320. 

^endenhall to Brannan, January Iht 1861^, in OR, vol. 32, pt. 2, 
pp. 93-91. 



- 10 - 

By the end of the war, the large fort was deteriorating at an 
accelerating rate despite the efforts of the garrison. The scarps 
and exterior slopes of the parapets of the redoubts had lost much of 
their original slope, settling to a forty-five-degree slope. The para- 
pets of the main line had begvm to fall, assisted tty the freeze-thaw 

cycle of winter. Lxmette Thomas had about thirty feet of fascine 

21 
revetment lying on the ground. The fort, considered surplvis, was 

finally put to rest In i^ril 1866, when it was abandoned by the United 

States Army. 

Fortress Rosecrans (fig. 80, appendix A), over two hundred acres 

In size, was an irregular, semipermanent work composed of lunettes 

connected by curtains and abatis forming a series of bastion fronts. 

The outer line or body of the place contained eleven lunettes that 

performed as independent forts providing both direct and flank fires. 

Between the lunettes were curtains and numerous sally ports with 

their fronts protected by abatis. Beyond the ditches of the fort were 

three detached works, two demi-lunettes and one redan, located on 

prominent hills that commanded the Interior of the fort. Within the 

interior of the fort were four redoubts and one lunette which functioned 

as keeps to the defense. The outer line was designed to provide cross 

fires from the lunettes to the flanking Ixmettes, and the indented 

lines were capable of delivering cross fires to the flanks of the 

adjacent limettes and direct fires to the front. The gorges of the 

lunettes and rear of the curtains were left open for the interior 

works to fire into if overrun by the enemy. 



2lTower to Thomas, April 28, l865, in ^ vol. k9t pt. 2, 
pp. 502-03. 



^^"Military Posts," Section R, p. 371. 



- u - 

Lunettes Thcnas and MoCook and Redoubts Johnson, T.J. Wood, 
Schofleld, and Brannan contained cross-shaped blockhouses that pro- 
vided a final stron^old in the event the works were overrun. 
Rectangular blockhouses were placed in the interior work Lunette 
Sheridan and outer works Lunette Negley, Lunette Stanley, which 
contained two blockhouses, and Battery Mitchell. However, sane maps 
show Lunette Palmer and Lunette Reynolds each containing a rectangular- 
shaped blockhouse and Ltmette Stanley without any blockhouses (figs. 
bO and tJl, appendix A). Every limette and redoiibt contained one anall 
magazine except for Lunette Granger and Lunette Crittenden, neither of 
which had a magazine, and Redoubt Brannan, which had a large 
magazine. 

The interior arrangements of the fort (figs. BO and Bl, appendix 
A) contained warehouses full of military sipplies and food for the 



■T'he lunettes, demi-lunettes, batteries, and redoubts of Fortress 
Rosecrans were named after brigade, division, and corps commanders of 
the Army of the Cumberland: Redoubt Brannan, Brig. Gen. John M. 
Brannan; Lunette Crittenden, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Crittenden; Battery 
Cruft, Brig. Gen. Charles Cruft; Demi -Lunette Davis, Brig. Gen. Jeffer- 
son C. Davis; Demi -Lunette Garfield, Brig. Gen. James A. Garfield; 
Lixnette Gordon Granger, Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger; Redoubt Johnson, 
Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson; Lunette McCook, Maj.Gen. Alexander 
McDaniel McCook; Battery Mitchell, Brig. Gen. Robert B. Mitchell; 
Lunette Negley, Brig. Gen. James S. Negley; Lunette Palmer, Brig. 
Gen. John M. Palmer; Lunette Reynolds, Brig. Gen. Joseph J. Reynolds; 
Lunette Rousseau, Maj. Gen. Lovell H. Rousseau; Redoubt Schofield, 
Brig. Gen. John M. Schofield; Lunette Sheridan, Brig. Gen. Philip H. 
Sheridan; Lunette Stanley, Brig. Gen. David S. Stanley; Lunette Thcnas, 
Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas; Redan Van Cleve, Brig. Gan Horatio P. 
Van Cleve; Redo\ibt Wood, Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Wood; Battery Turchin 
near the depot. Brig. Gen. John B. Turchin; Fortress Rosecrans, Maj. 
Gen. William S. Rosecrans. 

^^lendenhall to Brannan, January lli, I863, in OR, vol. 32, pt. 2, 
p. 93; Tower to Thomas, i^ril 28, l865, in OR, vol.l^, pt. 2, p. 502. 



- 12 - 

embattled amy at the front. The depot-fort was funaiahed with 
three coimnlssary depots , a qtiarter-naster depots two ordnance 
depots, an engineer warehouse and depot, and a large ell-shaped 
magazine. Timber for railroads, buildings, and blockhouses was 
prepared at the fort by fo\ir steam-powered sawmills. War materials 
and st^Ues were brou^t into the fort and shipped out by the rail- 
road with loading accessories connected to a railroad spur and two 
side tracks. 

The site of Fortress Rosecrans has changed drastically since 
the Iftiited States government abandoned the fort following the close 
of the war. The pop\ilation and economic growth of Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee, has fostered widespread growth of both industry and 
stiburbia over the old fortified grounds of the two-hundred-acre 
svpply depot (fig. 82, appendix A). The once-enclosed earthen fort- 
ress has become a victim to the urban sprawl which has taken grip 
throughout the nation since World War II. Of the approximately four- 
teen thousand linear feet of parapets which formed the perimeter of 
Fortress Rosecrans, only about three thousand feet of parapet and one 
redoubt have survived the phenomenon of progress. The remaining para- 
pets are confined to three areas; the city-owned Old Fort Park (fig. 
83, appendix A) containing Lunette Palmer, Curtain No. 2, and portions 
of Lunette Thomas j Redoiibt Brannan owned by the Naticmal Park Service; 
and sections of Limette Negley along Manson Pike vhLch are privately 
owned. One other section of earthworks is still extant but not included 
in the above figures because it was never completed and was soon 
abandoned after initial construction by the army. Approximately 1,025 
feet of parapet were partially constructed from the salient of 
Ltmette Thomas and in front of its right face. This line, except for 



- 13 - 

alx>ut 225 feet ^^ilch were destroyed "by a park road. Is located 
in the city park. 



14 



APPENDIX A 








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APPENDIX A 




- 20 - 

APPaJDIX B 
DEFENSE WiAN OF FORTRESS ROSECRANS 

MEMOIR 

E^qplaining the Situation and Defense 

of 

FORTRESS ROSECRANS 



Illustrated By 
PLAN OF WORKS AND MAP OF VICINITY 



Prepared for the use of the Commandant. According to Art. 

8U2, Rev. Reg., by Order of MaJ. Gen. W. S. Rosecrans, 

U. S. Army, Ccxnd'g Army of the Cumberland 



By J. St. Clair Morton Brig. Gen., and Chief Engineer, 
Army of the Cumberland 



Fortress Rosecrans 

Printed at the Pioneer Press 

1«63 



- ZL - 

APFQIDIX B 

MEMOIR 



1st. At no time of day or night, is any one of the Blockhouses 
to be occ\5)ied by less than hO effective men, the doors being habit- 
ually kept closed and barredj not less than half a regiment should be 
constantly witMn each Lunette of the outer line, day or night. 

2nd. The regiment or compaxxy designated for the garrison of any 
particular Lunette or Redoubt should continue to garrison that partic- 
ular work throughout. Exception may however be made of the garrisons 
of the exterior detached wo lies (see table) idiich being furnished 
from regiments permanently posted close at hand, may be occasionally 
changed in ordinary times, and even during a siege or blockade every 
night. The artillery troops will habitually canip within the works 
to which their pieces respectively belong. 

This article and the preceding one are of more importance to be 
observed than all the rest. 

3d. The pickets, scouts, videttes and mounted patrols are to be 
furnished out of the reserves; the pickets should be stationed not less 
than a thousand yards from the works. 

iith. The sortie passages of the main line of fortifications are 
designed to admit, or give exit to, large masses of our own troops, 
in case of a general engagement taking place i^jon or near the position; 
and, in case of more than two divisions forming the garrison, to 
enable the defence to assume an active character; therefore, the 
garrison being of but one division, all the sortie passages should be 
carefully closed with abattis, or otherwise obstructed: at the points 
where the railroad and pike enter and leave the works, barricades of 
some description, such 3.3 wagons loaded with stone or earth, should be 
kept handy to close the gaps. 

5th. Each Lunette and Redoubt should be considered a fort in 
itself, and its commander be held responsible that it offers a vigorous 
resistance to the enerty; which means that the garrison hold their 
ground, \mder all circximstances, except being overpowered in hand to 
hand conflict with the bayonet. 

6th. It is presumed that any one of the main Lunettes will not 
be surrendered, or evacuated, until its artillery fire and that of the 
collateral Ltmettes has been completely over-powered and silenced by 
that of the enemy, and their parapets so rained by the enemy's bom- 
bardment as to cease to afford shelter except for sharpshooters. Even 
then new parapets, traverses and merlons should be constructed by the 
garrison, which ought to labor at night, assiduously, to that end. 
When, notwithstanding the utmost efforts of the garrison to keep one 
or more pieces of artillery in the Lunette of attack and the collateral 
Lunettes (so as to be enabled to fire grape and cannister at the 
enemy's columns of attack), th^ are reduced to a musketry defence, it 
must be understood that an obstinate resistance can yet be made, and 
much loss inflicted upon the enemy before he can enter the Lunettes of 



- 22 - 

APPffllDIX B 



attack. A vigilant watch is to be kept vipon his movements when affairs 
have come to this pass. When his colionn of assault ^>pears his 
cannonade must shortly cease the disposable reserves of the fortress 
are si^jposed to be massed under shelter, as near as circumstances will 
permit to the Lunette of attacks— the moment the cannonade ceases on 
the part of the enemy, they are to be marched out with the utmost 
dispatch, so as to arrive at the contested point in time to reinforce 
its garrison. The troops thus accumulated are e:q)ectad to resist the 
enemy with the bayonet, and, even if driven out, should return to the 
charge once or oftener, and attenqjt to regain possession. 

7th. By disposable reserves, in the preceding article, is meant 
all the troops designated as reserve of the garrison of the fortress; 
the commandant may, if he sees fit, increase these reserves by such 
troops as can safely be spared, for the time being, from such of the 
works as are not likely to be assaulted simultaneously with the 
Lunette of attack. 

8th. It may happen that the commandant can dispose of a larger 
force as reserves than can advantageously be assembled at the contested 
point to meet the enemy's assaultj in that case, the troops in ex- 
cess will be held in readiness, in some sheltered place close at hand, 
to charge the enemy with the bayonet on his flank, at an opportune 
moment during the assault, sallying without the works for that purpose; 
or otherwise to charge him within the contested work, should he 
succeed in driving out its defenders. 

9th. It is probable that at this period of the siege the 
artillery of the Lunette of attack will be in a raised condition, and 
the ammunition mostly e;q>ended; of course, should any pieces remain 
serviceable, they should not be permitted to fall into the enemy's 
hands, but must be spiked if they cannot be removed; and such powder 
as remains should be removed or blown up. It may happen thei^ is 
enou^ powder to spare to form a mine in the salient of the work, or 
•under the breach; in which case the Chief Engineer should see that one 
is prepared, and a Commissioned Officer detailed to explode it when it 
may do most damage to the enemy. 

10th. If, notwithstanding every exertion on tte part of the 
defenders, the enemy gain and retain possession of the Lunette of 
attack, its def aiders, and in some cases, the reserves, according to 
the judgment of the Comriiandant, should retreat to the collateral 
lunettes. The rear of the Lunette of attack having thus been \anmasked 
by our troops, the Redovibts and Limettes of the inner line will, with- 
out loss of time, open fire upon it from an the guns they can bring 
to bear, and endeavor to dislodge the enemy before he can construct 
his lodgement, and shelter himself from their view. (It is probable 
that the enemy would have directed his artillery against the said 
Redoubts and retired Lunettes for some days before making the assault, 
but it is supposed that the Commandant of each has kept one piece in 
reserve, having removed it from its platform to the most sheltered 
part of the parade, and that at the moment of assault he has caused it 
to be run into position.) Sijpposing that a Lunette is taken by regular 



- 23 - 



APPENDIX B 



approaches, some five weeks must have elapsed since the commandant 
ascertained it would be selected as the point of attack; this inter- 
val should be employed by hhn^^bly in the construction of intrench- 
ments within it, but also in coistructing batteries and rifle-pits 
in its rear, or in strengthening the collateral Lixnettes and the 
inner line of works, so as to oblige the enemy to take two Lunettes 
at least l^y siege, and coiTq>el him to silence the artillery fire of 
at least two more before he can attack the inner line, and reduce 
hira to the necessilgr of planting his batteries in the captured 
Lunettes and approaching the inner line by the double sap. 

nth. The enemy cannot well make an open assault, much less an 
attack by regular approaches, without first making himself master of 
the exterior detached works. These will therefore be regarded as 
obstacles In his path, and should be held, with more or less obsti- 
nacy, according to the jTidgment of the commandant; who will not main- 
tain them at too great a loss of life, or send out too many troops 
to resist the enemy's attack on them: he should however require 
their garrisons to sustain the assault once at least, seeing that 
they have a strong profile, and are flanked from the Lunettes of the 
outer line by artillery; for which reasons the enemy will sustain a 
considerable loss in the assault, and the garrisons will be enabled 
to retreat without being pxirsued . As the interior of these works is 
exposed to the view of tiie said Lunettes, the enemy will find it very 
difficult to hold them; it may therefore happen that the garrison 
may reoccvpy them once or of tener, and the enemy be obliged to make 
repeated sacrifices before they fall permanently in his hands. 

12th. The Commandant sho\ild carefully instruct all the commission- 
ed and non-commissioned officers in the elementary principles re- 
lating to the defence of the works from assault, as follows; that 
whichever Lunette is attacked by the enemy, should be immediately 
reinforced from the reserve; the collateral Lunettes, namely those on 
the right and left of it, together with such others as have a view 
of the ground over which the enemy must approach must likewise be 
reinforced; the curtains connecting Lunettes Thomas and McCook, 
Lunettes Thomas and Palmer, Stanley and Negley, will be manned also 
from the reserve, with a line of skirmishers, or with one or more ranks 
of infantry, according to the judgment of the commandant, and according 
to their bearings on the point threatened to be attacked. 

13th. The Lunette attacked repiases the enemy by its direct 
fire of musketry and artillery; the collateral Lunettes and curtains 
cross their fire in front of it. In case the eneny attack one of the 
curtains, such curtain is to be strongly reinforced, as well as the 
collateral Lunettes, and the enemy is met by the direct fire of the 
cxirtaln, and cross fire from the said Lunettes; should a Lunette or 
c\irtain be taken by surprise, or by night attack (owing to want of 
vigilance or proper precautions^, the troops belonging to it should 
retreat to the right and left, unmasking the captured work, so as to 
permit the works of the inner line to open fire into it and to clear 
the way for the reserve. Both the gunners and the infantry troops 
should be carefully instructed to fire low, and to reserve their fire. 



- 21; - 
APPaiDIX B 



in resisting an assatilt, till the eneny arrives in force within 600 
yards of the point of attack. To this emd, marks will be establish- 
ed in frcxit of each Lunette on a circumference 600 yards distance 
from it; and the enemy should not be fired i^n except by sharp- 
shooters, isitll the chief part of the assaulting column has approach- 
ed within these marks. 

The Block-^iouses cannot be taken by surprise, and will prevent 
the surprise of the Redoubts and Lisiettes in which they are seated; 
they will also be a security for the heavy artillery, which is not 
posted habitually in any work not provided with a Block-house. 

li^th. The Comnandant must chiefly apprehend, and guard against, 
surprises and night attacks, by a proper system of pickets, scouts 
and patrols. He must give the garrison confidence that the works 
cannot be carried by assault, even by an amy, if the attack is 
properly anticipated, and if it should ever happen that the Fortress 
is cut off from its communications and invested by a powerful amy, 
he should cause it to be understood that the place can hold out a 
month or so, and that reinforcements can reasonably be expected with- 
in that time. 

15 th. It is estimated that the Fortress, garrisoned and provided 
with an armament as above specified, is capable of holding out eight 
weeks at least, against a force of thirty thousand men, equipped with 
a heavy siege train; and double that period against an army of sixly 
thousand men, unprovided with a siege train. These estimate will 
serve as a basis upon which to calculate, approximately, the resist- 
ance that should be ejq>ected of garrisons exceeding one division. 

l6th. The squadron of cavalry supposed in the estimate to be- 
long to the garrison, of one division, is desigied to furnish patrols 
and videttes. By its means the Commandant can keep himself informed 
of the positions and movements of the enemy. When the Commandant can 
do so with perfect security, he may send out small foraging expedi- 
tions, guarded by the squadron only, and with not more than two 
con5)anies of infantry (with their arms J to load the wagons. 

17th. The horses and mules belonging to the garrison, if of one 
division, will consist of the cavalry horses, horses of officers en- 
titled to be mounted, and sitfficlent animals for fifty teams, viz., 
three to each regiment. These will suffice for the ordinary require- 
ments of the garrison. The Post Quarter Master's teams are, of course, 
in addition to the garrison teams. The Post Quarter-^^aster will be 
expected to reduce them to the minimum capable of doing the work. The 
Post Quarter-Master teams, and such teams as may have arrived from 
the rear or front, for the purpose of bringing up or carrying forward 
siQ)plies, will be parked between the pike bridge and Murfrees' house, 
near the river: the regimental teams, viz., three teams to each 
regiment, and a proportionate allowance to the artillery, will park 
according to regulation. 



- 25 - 
AP^aUDlX B 

18 th. It may happen that the Coranandlng General, upon marching 
forward with the an»cr, will station a Ught division at the Fortress, 
with Instructions to prevent cavalry raids upon the communications of 
the amy with Nashville, and the Fortress itself. It is recommended 
that such a division habitually encamp on the west side of Stone s 
River, and nearly it, on the high grounds between the Wilkinson and 
Franklin roads. 

loth. The Cowraandant should cause his officers to study the 
Revised Regulations of the Am^jr, Articles 793 to 850, relating to 
sieges and the defence of fortified placesj also the following; 

Extracts from "Regulations for the Care of Field 
Works and the Government of their G.irrisois." 

1st. It will be the duty of the Commanding Officer of each work 
to provide for the care of the armament, and the safety and service- 
able condition of the raagazdnes, ammunition. Implements, and equip- 
ments; and, by frequent personal Inspections, to secure the observance 
of the rules prescribed for this purpose. 

2d. The Conmanding Officer will make himself acquainted with 
the ^jproaches to his work, the distance to each ground between them 
and his post, and the most probable points of attack \qx>n it. 

TABLES OF RANGES or DISTANCES for each point, and the correspond- 
ing elevations In each case, according to the nature of the projectile, 
with the proper length of time of the fuse when shell or case shot 
are used, wiU be made out for EACH GUN, and furnished to the officer 
and non-commissioned officer serving it. As these tables differ for 
different kinds of guns, the same men should be permanently assigied 
to the same piece. 

3d. The projectiles should be used in their proper order. At a 
distance SOLID SHOT; then shells or case-shot, especially if firing 
at troops IN LINE. CANISTER OR GRAi-E IS ONLY FOR USE AT SHORT RANGES. 
When columns are approaching, so that they can be taken in direction 
of their LENGTH, or VERY obliquely, SOLID SHOT is generally the best 
projectile, because of its greater accuracy and penetrating power. If 
the COLUMN consists of cavalry, some shells or case-shot will be useful, 
from the disorder their bursting produces among the horses. As to the 
ABSOLUTE distances at which the projectiles must be used, they vary 
with the description and calibre of the gun, and can only be ascertain- 
ed by consulting the TABLE OF RANGES. The prcminent parts on the 
approaches to the works should be designated, their distances noted, 
and directions drawn up for the different kinds of ammunition to be 
used at each gun when the enemy reaches them. D\inng the drills the 
attention of the chiefs of pieces and gunners should frequently be 
drawn to this subject. 

Uth. Commanding Officers will pay special attrition (sic) to 
the police and preservation of the works. AH filth will be pronptly 



- 26 - 

APt«©IX B 



removed, and the drainage be pariicularly attended to. No one sho\ild 
be allowed to walk on the pargets, nor move or ait upon the gabioxis, 
barrels or sand bags that may be placed iqxjn them. When injuries 
occur to the earth works, they shovild be repaired as quickly as 
possible by the garrison of the work. If of a serious nature, they 
should at once be reported to the Qngineer Officer in charge of the 
work. ALL INJURIES TO THE MAGAZINES OR i-LATFORMS OF THE GUNS WILL 
BE i'ROIieTLY REK)RTED AS SOON AS OBSERVED. 

5th. No persons not connected with the garrison of tl-ie field 
works will be allowed to enter them except such as visit them on 
duty, or who have passes signed by conqiet^nt authority; nor will any 
person, except commissioned officers, or those whose duty requires 
them to do so, be allowed to enter the magazine, or touch the guns, 
liieir inqjlements or equipments. 

6th. The garrison can greatiy improve the work by sodding the 
si^jerior (upper; slope of the parapet, and also the exterior or 
OUTER slope, or by sowing grass seed on the si^jerior slope, first 
covering it with surface soil. The grass covered or sodded portions 
of the parapets, traverses, magazines, <Scc., should be occasionally 
watered in dry weather j and the grass kept closely cut. 

7th. The armament of a fort, having been once established will 
not be changed except by the authority of the Commander of the District, 
geographical department or anny corps. 



APPQIDIX B 



- 27 - 




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BIG SPRINGS 
By: Margaret M. Powell 

Big Spring is located in the Central Basin of southeastern Tennessee 
nine miles from Murfreesboro and one and one half miles east of U. S. High- 
way 41 south. In 1776 this basin was Indian territory known as far back 
as 1100 A.D. by the Greek Indians - and that these Indians were once here 
is proven by the artifacts left by them. Other tribes such as Chickasaws, 
Choctaws.and Cherokees moved in and in 1776 the Chickasaws and Cherokees 
were still here. 

The territory was claimed and annexed by North Carolina in 1776, then 
returned to national government in 1784. The people resented being changed 
about and were easily led to rebel and follow John Sevier in a revolt against 
the government and set up the - State of Franklin - with John Sevier as 
governor. This state only lasted about six months and Sevier was arrested 
for treason; was never tried. Then it was again claimed by North Carolina, 
then back to national government in 1790. It remained so until 1796 when 
Tennessee became the sixteenth state of the Union. Tennessee was one of the 
last to secede; and the first to rejoin the Union after the Civil War. 

The years between 1776 and 1790 were action filled, chaotic in a way, 
but definitely formative. This was the wrap up of the Revolution, the 
French and Indian War, and constant skirmishes with the Indians - plus 
political intrigue. 

Everyone wanted a piece of territory. It was known as the - "Land be- 
yond the Mountain" and the "Dimple of the Universe" and to the Long Hunters 
a "Hunter's Paradise". They came alone or in groups, walking or on horse- 
back. Most were looking for a future home as well as pelts. The hunters 

28 



were often led by such notables as Blgfoot Spencer and Daniel Boone. Big- 
foot was killed near Castalian Springs by Renegade Indians after the terri- 
tory was open for settlement - leading a band of settlers. 

It was a rich and savage land so Fort Nash, named for Abner Nash, a 
North Carolina politician interested in investing in the new territory, was 
built in 1783-84 to protect travelers in the basin. Fort Nashboro had been 
built in 1778-79 on the banks of the Cumberland River - named for Elijah, 
brother of Abner, but really established by James Robertson and John Don- 
aldson. 

It is not known exactly where Fort Nash was built. The marker at Beech 
Grove says on Douglas Ridge in 1784-1810. A Historian in Coffee County places 
it further south at Fugearound. Fort Blount was also built in 1784 on 
Clinch Mountain - roughly forming a protective triangle around the basin. 
With the erection of Forts, roads became a necessity. These roads were 
built at least partially by soldiers who were given four hundred acres of 
land of their own choosing as payment for their efforts. The roads had to 
be at least ten feet wide and possible for military reasons. In some places 
the so called "corduroy roads" were built. This meant they used cedar logs, 
mainly, to build up low places so the coaches and army wagons would not get 
stuck. Some remnants of these cedar logs have been dug up on the two roads 
that went around J'i lot Knob.) These roads usually followed Indians or animal 
trails. Travel was slow, dusty, and hazardous. Water was a necessity for man 
and beast. Big Spring was between the coach roads and its crystal clear, 
cool limestone water was impossible to pass up and soon became a favorite 
stopping place. 

An Inn was built to accomodate the timid souls who did not wish to travel 
at night. As need grew - so did the village, better housing and stores to 
supply the travelers needs. I rather think an intrepid young hunter helped 

29 



the idea along. He had spent the winter of 1783 in a cave above the spring 
and he discovered, in this cave, the underground stream that surfaced one 
half mile below a spring. He built the first log cabin in the settlement. 
Where Mr. Green came from or where he went, it is not known but the remains 
of his cabin is undeniable proof he had been there. 

By 1790 the Forts were erected, roads were built, the Indians dealt with 
and the territory was declared open for settlement. Who is to say who was 
first or last, it really doesn't matter, except to be glad they came. 

It is recorded in family records that William Summers left North Caro- 
lina in 1811 and settled in Big Spring on a couple of sections of land. 
Some of that land. Pilot Knob included, is still owned by the 6th and 7th gene- 
ration of Summers. 

The Mankin family owned several hundred acres including the Elam Hollow 
and were active in many of the industries, etc. as were the Lowe's of Virginia. 
The Newman's brought in a saw mill and soon everyone had a real plank floor. 
The logs were dragged to the mill by oxen. The first mill burned and a larger 
one was built nearer the spring. It, too, burned in early 1900 and was not 
rebuilt. Beside housing materials, the mill sawed cedar rails for the pencil 
mill at Christiana. Wire fences were the in thing and cedar rails sold quickly. 

Big Spring was divided into lower Big Spring and upper Big Spring by Big 
Creek. Lower Big Spring had more on its business. Mr. Newman had a store and 
a big scale behind the store so people could weigh their stock before driving 
them to market. As roads improved and trucks introduced, these fell into dis- 
use although still there. Mr. Newman died and his widow not wishing to run 
the store, rented it to others then eventually closed it. You can see in the 
rise and fall of the industries, how and when needed they were instigated and 
how the changing needs also changed and then discontinued. The Blacksmith 
Shop for instance, there were four at one time and kept busy, keeping the 

30 



horses, mules and oxen shod and making repairs on wheels, rims, and many 
other things for the home and work. As cars took over, horses faded and so 
did the shops. 

Mr. Pirtle owned a blacksmith shop in Upper Big Spring and also the 
only water mill. It was powered by channeled water from a spring in Elam 
Hollow but as packaged flour and meal began to be marketed, grist mills 
went out. The one in lower Big Spring was run by Mr. Week Haithcock and 
powered by a gasoline engine. This lasted until 1930, when he closed it to 
help build Red Fox Tourist Camp. 

The Woolen Mill and Tannery built in Upper Big Spring filled a real 
need in the early days, for everyone needed their linseys for the winter. 
The wool was spun into hanks which could by bought and knit spun at home. 
The pelts, hides and skins were tanned and made into all sorts of garments 
from hats to shoes, but change crept in here, too, and soon the store bought 
clothes, bolt material and real leather shoes were sold over the counter. 
So the Mill and Tannery faded away. 

The Inn that was first built in Big Spring burned and a larger one, 
two-storied, was built on the corner of Cobb Road across from the spring. 
It also housed two doctors offices - Dr. Dill and Dr. Hubbard and the upper 
story the - Woodmen of the World and Masons held their meetings. 

SCHOOLS 

Lower Big Spring boasted a Saloon, Barbershop, Methodist Church and a 
school. The first school was built on the left side of the road as you 
entered Big Spring. A larger one was built later on the right side on land 
given by W. M. Lowe. The third school was built on that site and closed in 
1931 consolidating with Buchanan School. 

Upper Big Spring had a school, too, but it was almost impossible for 

31 



for the children to go to school in the winter months because there were no 
bridges. This was the only time they went to school. This ground was given 
by W. D. Mankin. The following is a partial list of the teachers. I do not 
know when they taught or in which school. 



Mathias Parker 

Beulah Parker 

Jim Lowe 

Bud Lowe 

Kate Love 

Alice Ensey 

Ike Ensey 

Ina Love Jernigan 

Soule Ewell 

W. J. Edwards 

Olga Hoover Ellis 

Jessie Shelton Mason 

Effie Hoover 

Ruth Dement 



W. H. Robinson 

Grace Gilly 

Halloween McNabb Harney 

Will Newman 

Altie Orren Brown 

Blanche Holland Jacobs 

Eugene Hoover 

Allie McKnight 

Mary Robinson 

Sue McKee 

Grady Biggers White 

Mamie Tilford 

Maude Robinson Jacobs Chrisman 



Attendance fell, a bridge was built so the upper school closed. Mr. 
Robinson was the last instructor. Years went by, consolidation was the big 
thing for schools, so since Big Spring had become a one teacher school it 
was consolidated with Buchanan School. Old Buchanan out grew its shell and 
a new school was built further down the highway, known now as John Price 
Buchanan School. 

Maude Robinson Jacobs Chrisman, daughter of W. H. Robinson, had the 
honor of closing that school in 1934. The land on which it stood reverted 
to the Lowe family who had given it. Walter Lowe bought the building and 
ran a store from 1943 to 1945. So that ended the educational facilities of 
Big Spring. Buses now take the little ones to Buchanan and the older ones 

32 



to Riverdale. 

Mr. Carlock from North Carolina owned quite a bit of property, too 
much it seems and had to have a sale. 

From the Tennessee Telegraph, Murfreesboro 
May 2, May 9, May 6, Sept. 12, Nov. 21, 1840. 

Valuable Real Estate at Sherriff's Sale 
On Saturday the 17th of October next I will sell to 
the highest bidder for cash the following described 
LAND AND LOTS lying in said county of Rutherford and 
in the 24th district. 

One tract of land containing 120 acres lying on Big 
Creek, it being residue of the tract of land conveyed 
to Epenitus Carlock by Charles F. Lowe, and adjoining 
the land of John Mankin, Abner Summers, and others. 
Also one lot of ground on which the Wool Factory stands 
including said wool factory. 

Also - one lot near said Big Spring, now occupied by 
Dr. Hubbard. 

Also - One lot on which Epinitus Carlock now lives 
including the Store house. Big Spring and all other 
improvements, containing about two acres, more or less, 
bounded on the north and east by William Summers, on 
the south by Clinton Jacobs and others, and on the west 
by William Daniel, and the lot on said William Daniel 
now lives bounded on the north by William Daniel and 
the factory lot, on the east by the lot on which 
Epenitus Carlock now lives, on the south by Lewis Herrell, 
and on the west Perry Ellis, containing about one and 
a half acres. 

Also - One lot unimproved near said Big Spring containing 
about one acre, bounded on the north by Basil Summers 
and others, on the south by Lewis Herrell, on the east 
by John Jacobs, and on the west by William Dejarnett. 

33 



Levied on as the property of Epenitus Carlock to satisfy 
two Executions, one in favor of the Union Bank, and 
the other in favor of Nichol & Brothers, surviving 
partners of Nichol, Dance & Co. vs said Epenitus Carlock. 

Sale Within the usual hours. 
Sheriff of Rutherford County 
Also at the same time and place one bay mare and one wagon. 
Levied on for the purpose above specified. 

Although Mr. Carlock sold most of his holdings, he retained a home in 

Big Spring until his death in 1860. He was Post Master in 1852. 

Abner Summers bought the store and hired Mr. Robinson, the 
young teacher, as clerk when school was not in session. Mr. Robinson 
fell in love with his boss's daughter and they were married. He con- 
tinued to work in the store and on Mr. Summers retirement he bought 
it and ran the store until 1931, when he built a brick house and the 
Red Fox Tourist Court on the highway. 

This was the last industry in Big Spring, except Walter Lowe 
bought the school house and ran the store from 1943 to 1945. Mr. 
Robinson ran his Tourist Court until his death in 1948. Eventually 
it sold and the Court was soon torn down. The house burned in 1982. 
Mr. Robinson was a very versatile man other than his teaching - busi- 
nesses, he served 2 terms in legislation. 

It is interesting to note that Frank Robinson followed in his 
father's footsteps and entered the grocery business at an early age. 
He introduced l.G.A. to Murfreesboro and since his death in 1980, his 
sons, Wayne and Woody Robinson, his grandson, Phillip Robinson, are 
very successfully carrying on their family tradition with a bigger 
and better l.G.A. 



34 



The Cumberland Telephone and Telegraph service begun in Murfrees- 
boro in 1901 to 1903. Big Spring, Christiana and others started their 
own telephone service combined. Christiana sold out to Bell in 1941. 
I do not know when Big Spring sold out, but F.A. Mankin started the 
line and Miss Trudie Frizzell was our last service board operator. 

The house still stands, wearily, on its last legs just above the spring 
where "Miss Trudie" kept her milk, butter, and other perishables cool 
in the cold spring water. 

Mail was bought irregularly by a post rider who heralded his 
coming by blowing a horn. As the town grew, a need for a Post Office 
became apparent. So in 1848, one was established with Lewis Harrell 
as Postmaster and the mail being delivered by stage coach. 

The town had no real name, but became necessary to have one for 

the Post Office. It was named Carlocksville for one of the earlier 

settlers, Epenetus Carlock, and remained so until the Post Office 

closed in 1904. Then the town was renamed Big Spring. 

Others serving as Postmasters were: 

Epenetus Carlock 1852 

W. P. Jacobs 1866 

Ephraim Jacobs 1867 

Postal Service was discontinued in 1868 and reopened in 1876 with 
Robert Lowe as Postmaster. 

John Hobson 1877 

John T. Kelton 1878 

Newton Mankin 1879 

N. B. Mankin 1881 

William A. Kelton 1884 

Walter Mc Nabb 1888 

35 



Joel Brewer 1889 

N. B. Mankin 1890 

William Newman 1893 

T. J. Owen 1894 

N. B. Mankin 1895 

W. H. Robinson 1902 

Mr. Robinson served until it closed in 1904, and mail was brought 
from Christiana by Rural Carriers. Some of them were: 

Bill Walker 

Robert Comer 

Walter Clark 

Fred Kelton 

Tom Covington 

J. G. Suggs 

Buford Holman 
At persent Frances Suggs Becton and Lanier Lowe are Carriers. 

BLACK COMMUNITY 

By 1878 the population was 1,163 of which two hundred were blacks, ^ 
who came and quickly formed a community of their own. It is located 
slightly west of Big Spring between the coach road and the turnpike. 
Their village was on the hill sloping down to the pike where the school 
and church was. The church was in the center of present Red Fox Camp- 
grounds. The old dug well that supplied some of the families with 
water is there today and its walls are still intact. The well was 
near Monroe Green's house. 

A few homes were built and among them were the Green's, Smith's, 
Reddy's, Whitside's and many others. They had big families - were 
strong and hard working and blessed with many talents. Aunt Lucy 
was the Matriarch, advisor and doctor. Doctors were scarce and Aunt 
Lucy doctored all on sundry with her herbs and potions, very success- 

36 



fully. Uncle Alex did make salve for eyes. 

Mr. Green had a way with rocks and was soon in demand for chimneys. 
He said a chimney he built never smoked. J. B. Reedy picked up rocks 
and built fences for twenty-five cents a yard. Others were versatile 
at blacksmithing, logging or whatever came to hand. Gradually the 
young drifted off to wider fields and better opportunities. Homes were 
deserted and fell into decay. The school went as the students did and 
was torn down when the pike was widened in 1936. 

A Mr. Haliburton from Rucker was the last to teach there. The 
cemetery has grown over and few traces remain of their colony today. 
A bit of history that I hope is not forgotten by some decendants who 
might have a desire to know of their forefathers first home in Tennessee. 

HOMES 

There are many pre-war homes left in and around Big Spring. One 
in particular interest me. Its windows and doors, etc. are hand planned 
and pegged - no nails. Twas built near 1850 and is in excellent condi- 
tion. Another home suffered a similar incident as to New Hope Church. 
The people would heardoors open and close, chairs would rock, footsteps 
were heard - nothing seen. They concluded they had build over a grave, 
and so they moved the house and the ghost was exorcised. That house 
still stands untenated by ghosts. 

Another home pictured here is that of Dr. G. W. Robinson. He came 
from North Carolina ait married Mary Elizabeth Mankin, daughter of John 
Mankin. Dr. Robinson served as captain in the War of Rebellion, was 
wounded and captured but not imprisoned. He helped in the hospital - 
his wound became infected and he died in 1863 in Kentucky. His body 



37 




Dr. Robinson house built in 1848. Located near Big Spring 
and U.S. 41. Picture made about 1895. William, Isaac, and 
Margaret Summers in picture. This is now the Tom Jackson place. 



38 




Mr. W. H, Robinson, his wife Ethel Summers Robinson, Daughter 
Mary N. Robinson, and Son Frank Summers Robinson. 
Was a member of the state legislature. 



39 





Two views of Big Springs 



40 




41 



V \' 



II 




: ri 





i9 



u 



l*'?i 



Big Springs school, 1920, Eugene Hoover was principal. 

beginning with top left: 1. Buelah Newman Summers, 2. Ozelle Haithcock 
3. Mattye Sue Rowland 4. Pearl Newman Todd 5. Margaret Mc Knight Powell 
6. Aileen Kelton 7. Mattye Sue Prater Newman, 8. Ashley Newman 9. Maude 
Robinson Jacobs Chrisman 10. Calvin Lowe, 11. James Redmon 12. Willie 
Bogle Messick, 13. Frank Robinson, 14. Henry Fox, 15. Buford Newman 
16. Allie Mc Knight Hoover (teacher) 17. Hershel Prater 18. Evelyn 
Fox Messick Evans, 19. ? , 20. Boyd Stewart, 21. ? 22. ? 
24. Flora Lee Stewart Todd, 25. ?, 26. Paul Summers, 27. 
28. Walter Lowe, 29. Frank Messick, 30. Wiley Messick, 31 
32. Alberta Newman, 33. Louise Redmon, 34. Anna B. Sumars, 35. ? 
36. Stanley Mc Nabb, 37. ?, 38. Tod Summers, 39. Claude Robinson, 
40. Hall Mc Nabb 



23. ? 
Cecil Prater, 



42 




House on Claude Robinson's place, where the grist mill 
once stood, Mr. Haithcock ran the mill. 




Old house in Big Springs 



43 




Old house pegged together 





Old telephone office above the spring 



44 





Robinson house, where Glen 
Brewer now lives 



W. H. Robinson 




Big Springs Store 
about 1920 
Wiley H. Robinson 




Big Springs Store 
Wiley H. Robinson 
operated store in 1930 

pictures by Mary N. Robinson 



45 




Big Springs school , 1926-29, building stood near 
Walter Lowe's barn, Lenior Lowe , Walter Lowe's son, 
now lives near site. 




Asa Todd's baby hearse 



46 



was brought as far as Lebanon under military escort, then turned 
over to his wife who brought him home in a wagon. He was buried in 
the family cemetery in front of his home, later moved to Evergreen 
Cemetery. A bit of geneology here - He and Mary had a daughter, 
Jenny, who married Luther Rice Jacobs. They had a daughter, Beulah, 
who married John Woodfin, Sr., who was a mortician, beginning was 
Woodfin and Moore. Then later the partnership dissolved and became 
"Woodfin's". John, son of John Sr., took over and ran it until his 
death and now "Bubba" or the third John is carrying on his father's 
work. 

I slightly degressed, but the Robinson home is of personal inter- 
est to me as it became my grandfather's home. The old log smoke house 
in the back brings memories of cured hams, homemade lye soap, and barrels 
of molasses. 

CHURCHES: 

The New Hope Baptist Church was erected about 1814 on the left 
side of the road in upper Big Spring. It was a community effort and 
they were justly proud of it and decided to have a revival. One night 
the house was crowded as usual, the churchyard filled with saddled 
horses, buggies, wagons and such, the preacher had warmed to his subject 
and was going strong - when a hush fell over the congragation. It seemed 
a plate of coins fell in front of the pulpit. Almost at the same time 
a sound was heard in the ceiling, described by some as though a barrel 
of chains was rolling across the ceiling. It reached the back of the 
pulpit and fell to the floor and slowly rolled down the aisle, paused 
briefly, then rolled into the yard. All this was heard not seen. All 



47 



chaos resulted as horses squealed, kicked and reared to break loose. 
You cannot imagine such a scene. Buggies were entangled, wagons over- 
turned and bridles were hanging as the horses ran away. Parents were 
frantically trying to get their families together - twas a mad house 
so to speak. Most of them had to walk home and hunt the runaways the 
next day. You can assume what the topic was for quite awhile. 

A church council was called and they concluded that some ill gotten 
money had been given to the building fund. A pack peddler had disappeared, 
never found, and known to have had money, gold, mostly. The plate of 
coins symbolized this stolen money to them. What to do - the answer 
was debatable but they decided to move the church across the road, 
which they did. It stands there today completely modernized and free 
from ghost or malicious spirits. 

Evidently the Methodist Church was built about the same time. 
It was moved from Big Spring in the 1850 's to the Turnpike. It remained 
there until 1935 when it burned to the ground. It was not rebuilt. 
The congregation was divided - some going to Hoovers Gap others to 
Cedar Grove and uniting with those churches. That situation still exists. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Mankin deeded land to the Big Creek Baptist 
congregation on which to build a church and school. This deed was 
dated 1878 stating in love and affection to members of the Big Creek 
Baptist Church. Mr. E. A. Bowman has a copy of this deed. The church 
was organized before 1946 and met in homes until a building could be 
constructed. It, too has been remodeled and is well attended. 

Near the church is a well tended cemetery. Head stones bearing 
names of our settlers. Incidentally, there are at least twenty-seven 
cemeteries in and around Big Spring. Most are family only and many 



48 




Modern Big Creek Baptist Church 





New Hope Baptist Church 



49 



have been forgotten. Head stones are gone and vines and bushes have 
lovingly hidden them from viewing eyes. 

The Alexander Campbell movement reached Tennessee about 1853 
according to . A Church was built in Lower Big Spring and in the 
late thirties - forties the congregation united with the Midway 
Church. When a road was built in 1859 the churqh building was moved. 

There are no industries as such left in Big Spring, but for the 
last three or four years the population has visably increased. 

The spring has continued on its placid ways through the years 
while the trees, vines, and bushes screened it from view. The Home 
Demonstration Club ladies took the reclamation of the spring for their 
community project and have at least brought it into view. Much has 
been done and much more needs to be done. We have had spendid coopera- 
tion in those with extra credit due - Robert Allman, Floyd Bowman, Wal- 
ter Lowe, Ernest Winfrey, and Marion Simpson. With the reclamation 
of the spring came the desire to know about the village. Nothing had 
been written about it so, hence this story which is mostly family history 
or passed down by word of mouth. 



J. W. Cullen, Warm Hearts and Saddle Bags 



50 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Goodspeeds 

Ghost of the Garrison K. Jamison 

Short History of Tennessee Robert Corlew 

History of Rutherford County Dr. C.C. Sims 

Warm Hearts and Saddle Bags J. W. Cullen 

Encyclopedia Britannica 

The Rebels 



51 



EAST MAIN CHURCH OF CHRIST 
LOCAL HISTORY 
DECEMBER 12, 1983 
CAROL ROBERTS 

East Main Church of Christ has for many years been an active group 
in the Murfreesboro community. The congregation has been helpful in 
establishing other congregations in the area. The East Main congre- 
gation was one of the original groups developing out of the Restoration 
Movement of the early 1800 's. The Movement was an effort to bring 
Christians back to a closer relationship with New Testament teachings. 
Using no creeds but the Bible, this simplified form of worship first 
developed on a large scale in Kentucky. Barton W. Stone was one of the 
first preachers to emphasize only the New Testament teachings rather 
that specific laws of the Presbyterian church. Because of this he 
was censored like many other preachers of the time. As a result Stone 
was one of the first Restoration preachers to come into Tennessee from 
Kentucky. 

The earliest Christian Church in Rutherford County was on the 
banks of Overall's Creek near the Beesley Primative Baptist Church.^ 
Alfred Blackman, a prominent elder of East Main Christian Church during 
the 1860's, and his wife worshipped with this congregation after being 
baptized by Barton W. Stone in the fall of 1812.^ This shows that the 
Restoration Movement came to Rutherford County sooner that originally 
thought. Some thought that the Church originated with Alexander 
Campbell's work in Middle Tennessee, but by the time Campbell came to 



52 



Tennessee the Rutherford County congregations were well established. 
The congregation worshiping at Overall's Creek merged with a group 
worshiping in Murfreesboro. This congregation began worshiping to- 
gether sometime in April of 1832. 

One of the earliest preachers in Rutherford County was Fred E. 
Becton, Jr. He carried on correspondence with Walter Scott, the editor 
of The Evengelist . a journal devoted to discussion of Restoration 
activities. Two letters in particular explain the earliest beginnings 
of the congregation. The letter of May 5, 1832 says, "We were opposed 
by the Presbyterians with a sacramental occasion; the Methodists locked 

us out of their building after having first given us permission to 

5 
occupy it." A letter of April 30, 1832 explains where they worshipped. 

"The sheriff of this county. Col. Crockett, kindly offered to us the 

spacious room of the courthouse." The congregation also met at King 

College, when the college was located at the present site of Middle 

Tennessee Electric Company. By August of 1832 the congregation had 

doubled in membership from eleven to twenty-one worshipping in the 

Q 

courthouse. 

The congregation wanted a permanent place of worship so they began 

looking for another meeting place. In the early months of 1833 a lot 

numbered 59 was purchased in Murfreesboro by Fred Becton for fifty 

9 
dollars. The land was deeded to the elders of the congregation, 

Peyton Smith, George Morris, William Smith, and others. The building 

was on the west side of the West Main Street Bridge on the banks of Lytle 

Creek. Meetings or week-long revivals were held in larger halls 

usually in surrounding schools such as King College and Union University. ^^ 



53 



Prior to the Civil War feelings were strong for or against slavery. 
Another preacher during the early 1830's was Tolbert Fanning, a young 
man 22 years old. Fanning was strongly opposed to slavery. At that 
time slaves and slave owners worshipped together at the Christian 

Church. The slaves usually sat in the back of the building and some 

12 
of the household slaves sat with the families. One week a prominent 

member of the Church sold a slave, and member of the church, at public 

auction; the slave was sold, taken to Mississippi, and never heard from 

again. The sale of the slave angered Fanning to the point that his 

next sermon was a condemation of the slave owner for selling his 

13 
brother away from his family. 

Fanning 's sermon caused enough conflict in the group that the elders 

fired Fanning, and the slave owner had him arrested for inciting slaves 

to revolt. Charles Ready, a prominent lawyer of Rutherford County, 

14 
volunteered his services to Fanning, and won the case for Fanning. 

However Fanning was not rehired by the congregation, and never preached 

in the area again. Yet he went on to become a very famous Restoration 

preacher in the Nashville area, and also was the State Secretary of 

15 
Acriculture for several years. 

In 1860 plans were made to develop a new building. To begin they 

bought the house and lot on the corner of East Main and South Academy 

from Mr. Robert McLane and Mr. W. W. Ross for $1800.00.^^ The trustees 

of the property were the elders at the time, among them Alfred Blackman, 

one of the earlier church members in the county. Mr. Blackman paid 

the majority of the cost of the land. In the August 1860 Millennial 

Harbinger Alexander Campbell made mention of a handsome brick meeting 



54 



house in Murfreesboro that was 78 feet long and 45 feet wide, a build- 
ing built in "good taste and speaks well of the Brotherhood." The 
congregation did not use the building on East Main for very long be- 
fore the Civil War came to Murfreesboro, and the church would be very 
involved. During the battle of Murfreesboro and afterward the building 

was used as a Confederate hospital as were other building along East 

18 
Main, thus causing services to occasionally be interrupted. 

The Civil War is the base for various memories for members of 

East Main. The most common memory was that among several Federal troops 

worshipping with the congregation, James A. Garfield attended services 

quite regularly, and often participated in them. Garfield tended to 

sit near the front during services. As a little girl Mrs. Ben Johnson 

remembered that anytime he spoke or led the singing, he left his gun and 

sword on the pew. The girls were fascinated by the weapons and would 

peek over the back of the pew at the sword and gun as if there was a 

19 
magical spell on them. Also the girls' parents always warned the 

children to be friendly, but not to be too friendly because he was a 

Yankee. After all, the Yankees were responsible for the mess and problems 

around Murfreesboro. 

As a result of Garfield making acquaintances with the congregation 

20 
members, he sent the church a communion set as a gift of appreciation. 

This set consisted of a silver decanter and four silver goblets, and 

was for several years a point of disagreement. Some members appreciated 

the gift, some felt that it was very inappropriate to accept a gift from 

a Yankee who had helped govern their city. Thus strong disagreement 

continued for several years. So rather than disagree over a gift from 

21 
a Yankee, the set was given to a congregation in Christiana. The 



55 



set has passed on through several congregations then to Mr. A. N. 
Miller. Mr. Miller then sold the set to Dr. George DeHoff in 1954.^^ 
As a result of several transfers, the set now consists of the decanter 
and two goblets. 

Before the Civil War there were not enough preachers to fill all 
the jobs, so many congregations had to share preachers, but as the 
churches grew there were more men becoming preachers. After the Civil 
War the East Main congregation grew so much that it felt it could 
afford to hire a full-time minister. It also tended to be on better 

financial terms so in 1866 the Christian Church paid $2,000.00 to Alfred 

23 
Blackman for full title to the deed of the Property. According to 

wills filed by Blackman, he planned to will the property to the church, 

but the church felt it was obligated to Mr. Blackman to repay the debt 

rather than leaving it unpaid. Blackman' s executor was his son-in-law, 

24 

William B. Lillard, who was also an elder at the Christian Church. 

In 1900 the congregation felt the need for a larger building, for 
which it would need more land. The elders were able to buy from Mr. 
and Mrs. T. B. Fowler a 10 foot section on the west side of the build- 
ing.^^ The old building came down and a new more modern building was 

built in its place. The new building was very attractive and had Roman- 

?fi 
esques Revival characteristics popular in the late 1880's and '90's. 

The displayed characteristics were semicircular windows and door openings, 
brick corbeling around windows, elaborate barge board designs in the 
brick along the gables of the building, finials on each gable, and a 
bell tower with unique corbeled chimney stacks. Some of these chara- 
cteristics can be seen on the building today. 

The new building had impressive stained glass windows on each 



56 



side of the building. Each of the stained glass windows represent a 
Bible event; for example, the sheaves of grain represent the story of 
Ruth, and the lillies represent the Resurrection. Each window is 
different, no two are alike with the exception of the colors used, 
those colors being rose, yellow, blue and shades of green. 

The building itself was built in a rectangular shape, and was 
made of bricks fired in the county. The main entrance of the building 
was below the bell tower on the east corner. Its design was solid up 
to the roof line, then it changed into four corbeled chimney style 
stacks to create the bell tower. 

On the interior of the building, the podium and pulpit were on the 
south end facing towards East Main Street. There is evidence that the 
floors were flat with pews running east-west and facing south. 

This building well served the purpose of worship of the Christian 
Church for 20 years. In the early 1920's several things led to necessary 
changes. The main reason being that the congregation wanted to add a 
baptistry to the building. For some reason the baptistry would not fit 
on the south end where the original podium was, so plans were made to 
add it onto the west side of the building. There seems to be no dis- 
agreement over the new placement of the baptistry. 

Renovation plans started in 1920 by purchasing the Fowler house 

and property on the west side of the building from the Fowler relatives 

28 
for $10,000.00. On the new property a wing of approximately 15 feet 

in width and the same length as the original building was built. The 

exterior was built in brick to match the original brick. The addition 

changed the roof line, and the bell tower was removed to make the 

entrance area flush with the main wall. In the new wing another 



57 



entrance was built giving two entrances on East Main Street, making the 
facade look balanced on each corner. 

On the interior the stained glass windows were removed from the 
original west wall and built into the new exterior west wall. The open- 
ings left by the windows were made into doors into the new wing. In 
the center of the new wing a baptistry was built. The baptistry had 
a movable rear wall for seating in sight of the pulpit for overflow 
crowds. The west wing has often been used for overflow crowds simply 
by opening the doors and raising the rear wall of the baptistry. As 
a result of the change in the baptistry and extra seating space, the 
pews were rearranged in a semi-circle to face west with the pulpit 
being in the front of the baptistry. Thus the changes were basically 
necessary for the growth of the congregation rather than building another 
building so soon after the original building was built. With growth 
came the need for easy access to a place for baptism. 

The building has changed very little since the remodeling of the 
'20's. Additions have been made behind the church for an educational 
wing. This additional was made in 1958. The house bought from the 
Fowler's in 1920 was made into a home for the minister and his family. 
Minor changes were made in 1950's in the matter of electric lights and 
the additional of air conditioning. 

The electric lights were simple light bulbs hung from the ceiling. 

on 

They were part of the building in 1900. In 1951 the preacher, Dr. 
George DeHoff, had visited Germany. He bought back pictures of German 
churches, and in the pictures were ideas for new light fixtures. Mc- 

Fadden's of St. Louis took the pictures and made light fixtures for the 

30 
auditorium. These lights have added to the character of the building, 

and remain as part of the building to the present. 

58 



It was also during the 1950 's that East Main became the second 

31 
church in Murfreesboro to install air conditioning. Dr. DeHoff re- 
members that where other changes and renovations did not cause conflicts, 
the air conditioning caused some real problems. Many members told DeHoff, 
"Why it's the Lord's weather and we shouldn't do anything to mess with 

such things." To which DeHoff replied, "What about the heating system 

32 
in the winter?" "Oh well, that's different," they said. Thus air 

conditioning was soon added and made the 1900 building a new and up-to- 
date building. 

The building has changed very little in appearance since 1920's. 
It still can be recognized by the pictures from the early 1900' s. Yet 
the building has taken on new characteristics as each new generation 
worships together there. Many famous preachers have worked with the 
East Main congregation, as well as famous visiting preachers. Alexander 
Campbell was a guest speaker on several occasions during the 1830' s. 
He admonished the group for not meeting every Sunday. The preacher of 

the time was concerned with this problem simply because they did not have 

33 
a meeting place in which to worship. Other famous preachers during 

the early years were David Lipscomb, J.W. Mc Garvey, T.B. Larimore, and 
J. Petty Ezell. These men preached throughout Middle Tennessee, establish- 
ing many other congregations as well as helping strong congregations 

-54 
such as East Main." 

David Lipscomb, who came down from Nashville to conduct meetings, 

came quite ofter despite the fact that he was a close friend of Tolbert 

Fanning, a former preacher of the Christian Church. J.W. McGarvey once 

considered the East Main congregation as one of the strongest groups in 

35 
the Middle Tennessee area. T. B. Larimore was a very powerful preacher 



59 



of the early 1900' s whc stressed strict Biblical direction to the 
congregation, J. Petty Ezell will always be remembered for his 
remarks in a sermon not long before his death. "The Bible is the book 
I lived by, loved and preached by, and am ready to die by." Mr. Ezell 
died in a bus accident returning to Murfreesboro from Crossvile, Tennessee, 
where he had baptized a friend. 

The history of East Main has not always been pleasant. Besides 
being locked out of meeting places in the 1830's, there were problems 
in the very early 1900' s. These problems were the same type of those 
throughout the congregations of Christian Churches in the South. The 
most prominent problem concerned centralized authority over local con- 

07 

gregations. Some congregations wanted to work through a centralized 
missionary society, while others wanted to support missionaries by indiv- 
idual congregations. This is when the congregation at East Main and 
Academy assumed the name of East Main Church of Christ rather than 
Murfreesboro Christian Church. 

According to several different preachers' correspondence, East Main 
has a strong influence on society in Murfreesboro, with prominent citi- 
zens as faithful members of the congregation. Such compliments were 
given to the congregation by preachers such as Barton W. Stone, Alexander 
Campbell, Fred Becton, J. W. McGarvey, B.D. Goodpasture, and George DeHoff. 
Many of these men had the opportunity to compare East Main with other 
congregations where they had previously worked or held meetings. 

The congregation has always been willing to help other congregations 
become established in other neighborhoods. In 1929 it helped the Westvue 
church of Christ build a building, and approximately 50 members from 
East Main began worshipping there. In 1939 East Main built a building 



60 



on State Street, at that time segregating the congregations in Murfreesboro. 

Then in 1947 East Main helped North Boulevard church build a building on 

38 
Tennessee Boulevard. It has become a sort of tradition that whenever 

East Main becomes overcrowded it helps local neighborhoods that do not 
have a congregation to establish a new congregation. It seems to be 
more effective than building a new building every few years at East 
Main and South Academy. 

The church has always had its main goal of letting God's work show 
in their lives as a result of their actions. The congregation functions 
in many ways to help the community, from teaching the Bible, to quilting 
quilts for those who might need them. They also help in the local nurs- 
ing homes and have study classes for men who would like to be better 

39 
preachers and teachers of the Bible. 

The East Main congregation has also helped in foreign lands such 

40 
as Poland and Ghana helping to feed the hungry of those lands. They 

hope always to continue these programs of the church as best possible 

for the benefit of those less fortunate. 

East Main has had a long and full history. The change in properties, 

evolution of the building, and stories of many members all lead to an 

interesting study. The congregation has always put special effort into 

helping the community of Murfreesboro, and it strives to follow the New 

Testament as it did when it was established in the early part of the 

1830' s in the Restoration Movement. The East Main church is also very 

proud of its distinguished history in the Murfreesboro community. 



61 




East Main Church of Christ from 1920 's to the present 



62 




« i »ws»«" — " ' ii'ii mig^ ff^^* _^ 



East Main Christian Church Circa 1910 

photo furnished by Mrs. Homer Harris 



63 



ENDNOTES 

1 

B.W. Stone and John Rogers, The Biography of Barton Warren Sto ne. 
(Cincinnati: J. A. and M.P. James, 184/j p. 67. 

2 
History of Beesley Primative Baptist Church, "(Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee. ) 

3 
William Lipscomb, "Death Notice," Gospel Advocate , (July, 1872). 

4 

Walter Scott, "Correspondence," The Evangelist, (August, 1832), 
p. 189. 

^Scott, (May, 1832) p. 142. 

^Scott, (April, 1832) p. 140. 

Interview with George W. DeHoff, DeHoff Enterprises, Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee, 22 November 1983. 

^Scott, (August, 1832) p. 189. 

9 

Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford, and Marshall 
Counties of Tennessee , (Nashville: Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1887) 
p. 837. 

1 1 
Alexander Campbell, Millenn ial Garbinger, Louisville: (March, 1855) , 
p. 145. 

^ ^DeHoff. 

^^Ibid. 

14 
Bill Lewis, "Church's History Reflects Serious and Lighter Moments, 

Murfreesboro: Daily News Journal , Murfreesboro, (May 29, 1983), p. 8. 

^ ^DeHoff. 

1 fi 
Rutherford County Deeds, Deed for East Main Christian Church, 
November 5, 1860, Book 11, p. 476. 

^^Campbell, (August, 1860), p. 478. 

^^Goodspeed, p. 837. 

19 
'^DeHoff. 

20 

^Lewis, p. 8. 

21 
^'DeHoff. 



64 



23 

Rutherford County Deeds, Deed for transfer of title from Alfred 
Blackman to the Chirstlan Church, 5 December 1866, Book 14, p. 388. 

24 
Esquire Alfred Blackman, "Last Will and Testament", 25 November 1870, 

25 

Rutherford County Deeds, Deed for transfer of land from Sally J. 
Fowler to the Christian Church, 4 May 1901, Book 1,p. 421. 

John J. C. Blumenson, Identifying American Architecture , (Nashville- 
American Association for State and Local History, 1982), p. 43. 

^''oeHoff. 

28 
Rutherford County Deeds, Deed for transfer of title from Mr. & Mrs. 
George Cranor to East Main Church of Christ, 20 October 1920, Book 64 
p. 255. 

29 
Sanborn Map Company, Murfreesboro Tennessee June, 1907, p. 13. 

30 
■^*^DeHoff. 

^^Lewis, p. 8. 

32 
"'^DeHoff. 

33 
Campbell, (February 1833), p. 90. 

34 
Robert Hooper, A Call to Remember, (Nashville: Gospel Advocate, 
1977) p. 6-7. 

^^DeHoff. 

3fi 

Russ Shelley, "Ministers' Children Recall Memories", Daily News 
Journal, Murfreesboro: (29 May 1983), p. 9. 

37 
Robert Hooper, Crying in the Wilderness , Biography o f David 
Lipscomb , Nashville: David Lipscomb College, 1979, p. 85. 

38 

"East Main As a Landmark", Daily News Journal, Murfreesoboro: 
(April 1952). 

39 
Russ Shelley, "East Main Ministers With MANY Programs," Daily 
News Journal : Murfreesboro (29 May 1983) p. 7. 

Ibid. 



65 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Blackman, Esquire Alfred. "Last Will and Testament." 25 November 1870. 

Blumenson, John, J.G. Identifying American Architecture . Nashville: 
American Association for State and Local History, 1982. 

Campbell, Alexander, ed. Millennial Harbinger . (February 1833). 

Campbell, Alexander, ed. Millennial Harbinger . (March 1855). 

Campbell, Alexander, ed. Millennial Harbinger . (August 1860). 

DeHoff, George W. DeHoff Enterprises. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Interview, 
22 November 1983. 

"East Main As A Landmark." Daily News Journal . Murfreesoboro:April 1952. 

Henderson, C.C. The Story of Murfreesboro. Murfreesboro: Murfreesboro 
News Banner, 19^9. 

"History of Beesley Primative Baptist Church." Murfreesboro Tennessee. 

Hooper, Robert E. A Call to Remember. Nashville: Gospel Advocate, 1977. 

Hooper, Robert E. Crying in the Wilderness, Biography of David Lipscomb . 
Nashville: David Lipscomb College, 1979. 

Lewis, Bill. "Church's History Reflects Serious and Lighter Moments." 
Daily News Journal . Murfreesboro: 29 May 1983. 

Lipscomb, William, ed. "Death Notice." Gospel Advocate. Nashville: July 
1872. 

Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford, and Marshall Counties 
of Tennessee. Nashville: Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1887. 

Rutherford County Deeds. Deed for East Main Chirstian Church. November 
5, 1860. Book 11. 

Rutherford County Deeds. Deeds for transfer of land from Sally J. 
Fowler to the Christian Church. May 4 1901. Book 41. 

Rutherford County Deeds, Deed for transfer of title from Alfred Blackman 
to the Christian Church. December 5 1866. Book 14. 

Sanborn Map Company. Murfreesboro, Tennessee. June 1907. 

Scott, Walter, ed. The Evangelist. 



66 



Shelley, Russ. "East Main Ministers With Many Programs." Daily News 
Journal . Murfreesboro: 29 May 1983. 

Shelley, Russ, "Ministers' Children Recall Memories." Daily News 
Journal . Murfreesboro: 29 May 1983. 

Stone, B.W. and Robers, John. The Biography of Barton W. Stone . 
Cincinnati: J. A. and M.P. James, 1847. 



67 



SOURCES USED FOR ADDITIONAL STUDY BUT NOT CITED 



Atkisson, Ed. Architecture and Significant Structures in Murfreesboro 
Between Court Square and Academy on Main Street . Tennessee 
Architecture: March 1983. 

Sims, Carlton, ed. A History of Rutherford County . Carlton Sims: 1947. 

Murfreesboro Newspapers: Central Monitor and Daily Rebel Banner 



68 



TAX RECORD 
OF DISTRICT 23 AND 24 
RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE 
FOR 1836, 1837, & 1849 

by: E. K. Johns 

The 1836 Tax Record is from a copy in the Tennessee State 
Library. District 25 of this record was published in Publication #21 
of Rutherford County Historical Society. District 23 and 24 are in the 
Southeastern part of Rutherford County. The 1878 map of the county 
show District 23 (Donnell Chapel) and District 24 (Carlockville and 
Hoover's Gap) have many of the same surnames. 

The 1830 and 1840 census have many of these persons named. Some 
of the names are difficult to read and some differences do appear 
between the names in the census and the interpretation of this hand- 
written tax record. 

The tax records of Rutherford County from 1809 to 1813 are avail- 
able at the state library. The 1836 and 1837 tax records and the 1849 
tax record are the only other tax records which have been preserved 
until 1867. 

The school land category can not be explained at the present. 
The land was apparently of little value. In 1849 school land does not 
appear in the tax record. 



69 



DISTRICT 23 - 1836 



Name 



school white 

acres/value land/value slaves/value poll 



Acres Merridith 


117/500 


30/30 


Anderson, Jackson 






Ashlin, John 






Brown, Robert 


85/365 


45/45 


Benson, Washington 






Boles, James 


106/600 


15/45 


Benson, John 




82/100 


Bowen, Abner 






Carter, Robert 


124/500 




Carter, Thomas 


53/212 


50/212 


Cummins, Jonathon 


643/2600 




Cornahan, James 


267/100 




Cornahan, William 






Carney, Sanders, R. 


265/925 


188/188 


Cock, Clay 


306/800 


298/500 


Dunn, John P. 


90/350 




Donald William S. 


163/450 


23/50 


Donald, Frances 






Dunn, William 




91/600 


Daniel, Walter 


200/600 




Flemming, Jackson 


139/300 




Fatheraly, Frederick 


120/400 




Fulks, John 


260/800 


100/100 


William Gonen 


420/1000 


100/100 


Goodloe, Morris 


38/300 




Good, Henry 


270/750 




Good, Mary Ann 


100/400 




Good, James, 0. 






Gumm, Robert E. 


120/120 


163/163 


Gowen, Elizabeth 




83/100 



2/700 



5/2000 
/800 

/600 
/1 900 



70 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Herroll, Henry 




130/500 






Herroll, William 










Herroll, John 


3/17 








Herroll, Miles 




93/300 






Hardeman, Thomas 






2/1200 




Herroll, Henry 










Hall, William 


190/1000 




2/1000 




Herroll, Reuben 




134/300 






Herroll, Isaac 


87/100 








Hall, William 










Henry, Thomas 


180/600 








Ivans, David 




170/170 






Ivans, Samuel 










Ivans, Joseph 










Jones, Walter 


405/1500 


75/50 






Jones, John 










Jones, Pinkney 










Kirk, Jane 




130/200 






Laseter, Herrod 


100/400 








Lyon, Elijah 










Lyon, Thomas, B. 










Lyon, James 










Lyon, Nathan 


540/1700 




9/480 




Laughlin, Chukan 


125/600 


40/20 






Lambert, Edmund 










Lawrence, Jermiah 




125/250 






Lorance, William 






1/500 




Lock & Abbott 


50/350 








McMury, William 


368/2500 


132/30 






Mc Elroy, Adam 


609/1600 








Mc Elroy, John 










Mc Elroy, Adam 










Mury, William, H. 


320/1000 




5/2400 




Mc Elroy, Arthur 










Mc Clary, Matthew, S. 










Mathews, Samson 










Mc Knight, Samuel F. 


353/1000 









71 



Name 

Mc Clary, John 
Mc Crary, George 
Moore, Larry 
Mc Cracken, Joseph 
Mc Canls, Mary 
Meadley, James 
Mc Farland, Elizabeth 
Nesbitt, Alexander 
Nesbitt, Alexander Sr, 
Nichols, Daniel 
Norman, Allen 
Nichols, D.B. 
Neely, John 
Omahundro, William 
Omohundro, Thomas 
Peek, Simeon 
Parker, Donelson 
Pumphrey, Lewis 
Paterick, William 
Parker, Rachael 
Parker, Doctor 
Parker, Melver 
Reed, Sarah 
Reed, Peter 
Renshaw, Nathan 
Standridge, Richard 
Stacy, Aaron 
Stacy, Elizabeth 
Smoot, Thomas 
Stacy, William 
Thompson, Meredith 
Todd, William 
Thompson, John 
Todd, Benjamin 



acres/value 
300/1000 



school 

land/value 

80/50 



150/200 



250/800 




25/200 


100/300 


150/1000 


7/5 



140/800 
165/1000 

250/1000 

100/500 

90/700 

765/400 



35/200 

81/700 
84/400 

60/250 



15/20 



50/100 



20/100 



100/400 



125/400 




150/600 




280/1000 


160/240 


129/816 


233/49 


96/500 


50/200 



white 
slaves/value poll 



3/2200 



1/600 



2/1000 



1/500 



2/1000 



72 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Todd, Robert 


30/100 


50/200 






Tucker, Wesley 


80/150 








Vardell, John 










Weatherspon, Thomas 


100/500 








Watson, Jones 










Whitfield, Thomas Y. 


162/500 








Youree, Joseph 


800/3200 








Youree, Thomas A. 










Youree, Joseph 










Youree, Frances 


470/1800 


30/200 


1/500 




Youree, James 


339/2300 


/200 


2/1000 




Yardly, Benjamin 


547/1000 








total 


11,849/-- 


3409/- 


43/- 


73 



73 



1837 TAX RECORD 
DISTRICT 23 RECORDED BY 
THOMAS A. WEATHERSPOON 



Name 

Acres Meredith 
Benson, Washington 
Brown, Elisha 
Benson, John 
Brown, Robert 
Beavers, Nelson, T. 
Bolls, James 
John Bruer 
Bowen, Abner 
Carter, Thomas 
Clay & Cox 
Carnehaw, James 
Carnahan, William 
Carney, Sanders 
Carter, Robert 
Cantrell, Adam 
Cummings, Jonathan 
Daniel, Walter 
Dunn, William, A. 
Donnell, William 
Dunn, John, P. 
Espey, Alexander 
Fleming, Jackson 
Fatherly, Fed K. 
Fulks, John 
Gordon, George, H. 
Good, Henry 
Good, Mary Ann 



acres/value 



117/500 



87/400 

106/600 
27/50 

55/300 

306/800 

100/500 

162/500 

265/925 

124/500 

643/2600 
200/800 

162/450 

140/750 

82/250 

149/300 

140/500 

160/900 

270/800 
100/400 



school 
land/value 

41/50 



82/500 
47/50 

15/45 



50/200 
268/500 



165/165 



191/700 
23/50 

35/150 



100/100 



slaves/value white 
poll 



1/500 



3/1050 



5/2500 

2/1000 
3/1900 



74 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Good, James 








1 


Gilly, Peterson 


162/500 






1 


Goodloe, Morris 


38/300 






1 


Gum, Robert E. 


10/10 


50/50 




1 


Gowen, William 


420/1000 




1/800 




Gowen, Elizabeth 




83/100 






Herrold, John 


3/18 






1 


Herrold, Miles 




120/500 




1 


Herrold, Henry 








1 


Hill, William 


190/1200 




2/1000 


1 


Herrold, Reuben 




80/400 






Herrold, Isaac 




57/200 




1 


Hill, William 








1 


Harney, Thomas, W. 


180/600 






1 


Herrold, Henry 




130/500 






Herrold, William 








1 


Ivins, David 




170/500 






Ivins, Samuel 








1 


Ivins, Joseph 








1 


Jones, Pinekney 








1 


Jones, John 








1 


Jones, Willis 


405/1500 


75/50 






Kirk, Jane 




180/200 






Lee, Osburn 








1 


Laughlin, Christian 


120/550 


40/50 






Lawrence, Jeremiah 




125/250 






Lyon, Nathan 


400/2000 




9/4900 


1 


Lyon, Elizabeth 






4/2200 


1 


Lyon, Thomas, B. 








1 


Lyon, James, B. 








1 


Lasenter, Herrod 


100/400 






1 


Lowe, John 








1 


Lorance, William 








1 


Lambert, Edmund 








1 



75 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Loven, William 




94/700 








Mc Crary, George 












Mc Crary, Arthur 












Mc Farland, Pleasant N. 


50/300 








Mc Murry, William 




362/2500 


132/30 






Mathews, Sampson 












Mc Cabe, John 












Mc Farland, Elizabeth 


250/800 




1/600 




Mc Cabe, Mary 






150/600 






Mc Crakin, Joseph 








4/3000 




Moore, Leroy 












Mc Elroy, James 












Mc Knight, Samuel , 


T. 


353/1500 








Mc Elroy, Adam 












Mc Elroy, Adam, C. 




609/1600 








Mc Gill, Robert 












Mc Crary, John 




300/1000 


50/100 






Mc Elroy, Matthew 












Meadly, James 




50/125 








Murry, William, H. 




320/1000 




4/2100 




Nesbitt, Alexander, 


Jr. 










Nesbitt, Alexander, 


Sr. 


25/200 


100/300 






Nichols, Daniel 




150/1000 


7/5 






Norman, Allen 












Nichols, D.R. 












Neely, John 




140/975 


15/25 






Omohondro, William 




164/1500 








Omohondro, Thomas 












Parker, Rachel 




165/400 








Parker, Dollison 












Parker, Doctor 












Parker, Mabry 












Pace, John 













76 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Patrick, William 


87/600 


50/100 






Pomphrey, Meredith, T. 








1 


Pomphrey, Lewis 


100/600 








Peak, Simmons 


254/1000 




3/2100 




Renshaw, Nathan 


80/900 








Read, Peter 










Read, Sarah 


35/200 








Ricks, Exum 


275/900 








Standridge, Richard 


84/400 




2/1000 




Stacy, Aaron 






, 




Stacy, Elizabeth 


60/250 








Smoot, Thomas, B. 




100/400 


1/500 




Stacy, William 


125/400 








Summers, Leven 










Thompson, Meredith 


150/600 








Thompson, John 










Todd, William 


300/1000 


150/300 


2/1100 




Todd, James 










Todd, William 










Todd, Pinkney 










Todd, James 










Todd, Benjamin 


96/500 


50/200 






Thompson, Jesse 


120/800 


200/200 






Todd, Robert 




70/300 






Vardell, John, T. 










Weatherspoon, T.A. 


50/300 








Watson, Jones 










Youree, James 


340/2300 


36/200 


3/1400 




Youree, Thomas, N. 










Youree, Joseph 










Youree, Francis, A. 










Youree, Francis 


450/1700 


30/300 


1/500 





77 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Youree, Joseph 


600/2900 


100/100 






Yardley, Benjamin 


250/725 


n^ms 






Total 


acres 


school land 


slaves 


white polls 




11,911 


3,668 


57 


89 



78 



1849 TAX RECORD 
•DISTRICT 23 RECORDED BY 
THOMAS B. LYON, ESQ. 



Name 

Anderson, Garland 
Ashley, Alexander 
Allman, James 
Briant, James 
Bruce, Thomas 
Brlnkley, Amos 
Beavers, David, C. 
Beavers, Plnkney 
Burks, Herod 
Bowman, Benjamin, E. 
Brewer, John 
Bowin, William 
Bowman, Daniel 
Bruce, John 
Bradfield, David 
.Baker, Hiram 
Burnet, Alexander M. 
Baker, Hampton A. 
Bowl in, Matthew 
Bowl in, Henry 
Bowl in, Andrew 
Bowl in, Joseph 
Benson, Washington 
Brown, William, S. 
Brown, Robert 
Brown, James, M. 
Brown, Edmun 



acres/value 

27/125 
100/200 



207y2/650 
I7OV2/I6OO 



I22V2/IOOO 

159/1000 
127/650 



slaves/value white polls 



1/500 



130/300 

15472/500 

197/500 

7/50 



1/400 



79 



Name 



acres/value 



slaves/value white polls 



Benson, Silas 
Baltimore, John 
Carnahan, James 
Carnahan, Preston 
Carnahan, William 
Carnahan, Andrew 
Caffey, Medford 
Caffey, Thomas, A. 
Caffey, James, N. 
Carter, Robert 
Carter, Armstead 
Carter, Thomas 
Curlee, Calvin 
Crowder, George 
Daniel, Walter, W. 
Dunn, William, J. 
Dunn, Jno. P. 
Donnell, William, S. 
Dunn, Jno. W. 
Elder, Anthony, H. 
Elder, James, G. 
Evans, Elizabeth 
Evans, James 
Espey, Jno. W. 
Eades, Solomon 
Elliott, Martin 
Fulk, John 
Fatherly, Frederick 
Fleming, Frederick 
Fleming, Elihu 
Fleming, A.M. 



50/300 
50/300 
85/400 
97/400 
364/2000 



425/1500 
200/1000 
100/400 
111/600 

200/1000 
100/700 
209/1200 
312/1500 



190/400 



1210/3600 
343/800 



1/350 



2/800 



1/500 



6/2050 



80 



Name 

Goodman, Jethro 
Gil ley, Patterson 
Garner, Hezekiah 
Garner, Walter, F. 
Garner, Learner, B. 
Garner, William, N. 
Gray, Samuel, M. 
Gunn, John 
Good, John, D. 
Good, Robert, N. 
do, Administ. 
Green, Nelson 
Gordon, John 
Harrell, Edward 
Hall, William 
Harney, Thomas, W. 
Harney, George 
Harrell, Reuben, Sr. 
Harris, Alsee 
Harrel, Reuben, S. 
Harrell, Franklin 
Harrell, Thomas 
Harrell, Reuben, Jr. 
Harrell, William 
Harrell, Calvin 
Harrell, Henry 
Harrell, Isaac 
Harrell, William, K. 
Harrell, Miles 
Harrell, Lewis 
Hoover, John 
Hill, William 



acres/value 


slaves/value 


white 


polls 


100/500 


4/1900 


1 




162/800 








100/250 









23/100 



66/ 

155/600 
100/500 
100/500 

228/2000 
160/700 

145/425 
79y2/500 
60/200 



200/800 
62/500 

175/800 
1/100 



1/500 



6/2400 



81 



Name 



acres/value 



slaves/value 



white polls 



Hoover, Mathias 


250/1400 






Hoover, Jno. W. 








Hoover, James, P. 








Hamilton, James 


145/200 






Harris, William 








Jones, Willis 


658/1000 


2/900 




Jones, Charles 








Jones, Mathew 








Jetton, Isaac 


280/300 






Jones, James (guardian) 








Bedford, Jones, est. 


100/600 






Jacobs, Alfred, M. 






1 


Jacobs, William 


227/1248 




1 


Jacobs, Houston 


124/350 




1 


Keath, William 






1 


Lyon, Nathan 


450/2500 


9/3700 




Lyon, Elizabeth 




6/2800 




Lyon, Elijah 


125/500 


1/500 


1 


Lyon, Thomas, B. 


279/1000 


2/800 


1 


Lyon, Nathaniel 


84/550 


1/500 


1 


Lyon, John, B. 






1 


Lyon, Anderson, M. 






1 


Lovin, William 






1 


Love, William 


765/1500 


4/1550 




Lusk, Samuel 


131/800 






Lusk, Burton, L. 


195/600 




1 


Laughlin, Christian 


120/700 






Laughlin, Joseph, Y. 






1 


Lancaster, Dabney 


180/800 




1 


Lewis, Andrew, J. 


70y2/300 




1 


Murray, W. H. 


520/2500 


9/3400 




Murray, Hiram, W. 


400/2500 


3/1350 


1 



82 



Name 

Mc Elroy, Newton, A. 

Mc Elroy, Nathaniel, L. 

Mc Elroy, Adam 

do Guard, Mc E. Est. 

Mc Elroy, Violet 

Mc Daniel, John 

Mc Crary, George 

Mc Crary, Arthur, Sr. 

do. Adm Mcgill Est. 

Mc Crary, James, F. 

Mc Crary, John 

Mc Crary, Arthur, Jr. 

Moore, Leroy 

Mc Farlin, Elij., L. 

Mc Farlin, Benjamin, P. 

Mc Farlin, Robert, G. 

Mc Cabe, John 

Mc Cul lough, Geroge, W. 

Neeley, Mary(guardian) 

Neisbet, Ephrain 

Nichols, Daniel 

Nichols, Daniel B. 

Newman, Joseph, M. 

Prater, John 

Peck, Walker 

Patrick, William 

Petty, Charles 

Parker, Doct. 

Parker, Rachel 

Parker, Mallroy 

Perry, Jesse 

Pitts, William 



acres/value 


slaves/value 


white polls 


127/500 




1 


102/1250 


1/ 


1 


48V2/4OO 




1 


272/1000 


1/400 




41/150 






42/150 






275/2000 


1/500 


1 


152/1000 






130/400 






360-/2/2000 


2/750 


1 



250/1000 



203/1600 

125/750 

203y2/800 

23/50 

50/250 

47/200 

225/1000 

159/700 

165/500 



38/400 



4/1650 



1/500 



83 



Name 



acres/value 



slaves/value 



white polls 



Re id, Peter 


120/550 


Reid, Sarah 


35/200 


Rensiiaw, Nathaniel 




Smoot, Thomas, B. 


100/500 


Summers, William 




Stacy, Aaron 


60/250 


Stacy, David 




Ship, Joseph 




Todd, Robert 


84/300 


Todd, William, Sr. 


464/1800 


Todd, Levy 




Todd, William, Jr. 




Todd, Walker 




Todd, James, A. 




Todd, Benjamin 


147/600 


Thompson, Eli, N. 


50/250 


Thompson, Jesse, T. 




Thompson, Jesse 


600/2000 


Thompson, Azariah 




Wright, Jacob 


700/3500 


Whitfield, Willis, E. 




Wherry, Legrau, C. 


137/600 


Woods, Stephen, H. 




Yardley, Benjamin 


500/1000 


Yardley, Thomas, W. 




Youree, Francis 


500/2500 


Youree, Francis, A. 




Do. Gdn S.F. Mc Knight heirs 


359/1500 


Youree, Francis, 0. 




Youree, James, A. 




Youree, Silas, M. 




Youree, Dorothy 


425/3300 



1/500 



6/2400 



5/2100 



84 



Name 




acres/value 


slaves/value 


white polls 


Youree, 


Francis, H. 






1 


Youree, 


William, F. 






1 


Youree, 


Thomas, N. 






1 


Youree, 


Joseph 






1 


Total 




acres 


slaves 


white polls 






18, 587-/2 


83 


136 



85 



1836 TAX RECORD 
DISTRICT - 24 



Name 


acres/value 


school 

land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Belt, Arthur 




64/134 




1 


Belt, William 




54/125 




1 


Burks, George 


169/900 






1 


Burks, Herold 


100/800 








Bland, Charles 








1 


Broils, Mathias 


100/600 




2/800 




Bellah, John 




50/250 






Bingham, William 


92/400 






1 


Carlock, Eppenetus 


72/250 






1 


Crowder, Nathaniel 




100/250 




1 


Carroll, Daniel 








1 


Cobb, Amber 








1 


Dougherty, Jeremiah 








1 


Dunaway, Elizabeth 








1 


Daniel, Henry 








1 


Ellis, Perry 








1 


Eweil, Jesse 








1 


Eaton, William 








1 


Fox, John, D. 


150/1500 




3/1800 


1 


Fox, John 


600/1000 








Fox, Andrew 


145/450 






1 


Fox, Elizabeth 


85/1144 








Fox, Mathias 


I44V2/IOOO 








Fox, Joseph 








1 


Fox, Mathias(guardian 


) 135/700 








Green, John 










Hoover, John 


150/1000 






1 


Haslewood, John 








1 


Had ley, James 








1 



86 



Name 



acres/value 



school slaves/value 
land/value 



white 
poll 



Herrell, Reuben 
Hoover, Jacob 
Hoover, Jacob (for heirs 
Hoover, Mathias 
Hoover, Mathias, Jr. 
Hoover, Martin, Jr. 
Hoover, Martin, Sr. 
Howland, Lewis 
Hill, Burrell 
Jacobs, John 
Jacobs, Clinton 
Jacobs, John(Guardian) 
Jacobs, Richard 
Jacobs, Ephrain 
Jacobs, Jeremiah 
Jacobs, Samuel 
Johnson, William, J. 
Kelton, Samuel, B. 
Lowe, John, Sr. 
Lowe, Walter, Jr. 
Lowe, Charles, F. 
Lowe, James 
Lowe, John, Jr. 
Lowe, William 
Lowe, Samuel 
Lowe, Mary 
Lowe, Walter, Jr. 
Lowe, Walter 
Lowe, James 
Mankin, Jesse, Jr. 
Mc Gill, Robert 
Maxwell, Walker 
Mankin, John 
Mankin, James 
Mayfield, Thomas 
Mayfield, Jesse 



700/3500 
I 260/1500 
125/350 
280/1500 
376/300 
400/96 



65/600 

2/180 

14/84 



604/1812 

50/400 

15/100 



50/1000 
286/140 



418/2564 
350/2500 
250/1500 



75/200 



70/200 
100/60 
50/50 



310/475 
25/35 

87 



3/1500 



2/1400 



2/1000 



312/2000 


50/50 


1/400 


484/300 


5/100 




300/1300 


50/200 


2/1200 


230/800 




1/600 


140/700 






600/600 







2/800 
2/1500 



Name 

Mc Gill, John 
Miller, Felix, G. 
Mankin, Bedepeak 
Marshal, Thomas, B. 
Mankin, William 
Mankin, Celia 
Mc Laughlin, Jesse 
Mc Gill, David 
Marshal, Thomas, W. 
Newman, John, Jr. 
Newman, John, Sr. 
Patterson, Robert 
Prater, Thomas 
Prater, Phillip 
Prater, Jeremiah 
Pointer, John 
Poindexter, Joseph 
Prater, Aaron 
Rushing, Abraham 
Stafford, Samuel 
Summers, William 
Stinson, Archibold 
Summers, George, D. 
Summers, Alfred 
Summers, Leven 
Sullevan, James, D. 
Summers, Thomas 
Summers, Benjamin 
Summers, Abner 
Stevinson, Robert 
Summers, David 
Taylor, Edward 



acres/value 



80/400 



400/1000 
370/1850 



school slaves/value white 
land/value poll 



30/60 



440/144 


50/200 


15/150 




232/1500 




52/410 


11/89 


50/400 


22/66 


237/1200 




50/500 




40/160 


50/100 


160/1200 


75/6 


150/860 






57/300 


1219/7376 


656/1480 


81/1000 


75/75 


82/500 


55/224 


160/800 





2/1200 
6/3600 



6/2700 



1/300 



2/1200 



6/3200 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Todd, Reuben 


55/300 


75/200 






Todd, Benjamin 










Todd, Fielding 










Todd, Jeffrey 


65/200 








Taylor, James 










White, Robert, G. 


100/300 


50/150 






Warren, John 










Warren, Marman 










Worley, Price 






1/1500 




White, Franklin 


120/-- 




2/160 




Total 


acres 


school land 


slaves 


white polls 



4300y2 



2830 



46 



62 



89 



1837 TAX RECORD 
DISTRICT 24 RECORDED BY 
JOHN JACOBS 



Name 







land/value 


Blann, Charles 






Bingham, William 


92/400 




Broyles, Mathia 


100/600 


300/400 


Bowman, Samuel 




18/30 


Bates, 






Belt, William 






Belt, Arthur 


15/30 




Burkes, George 


180/100 




Burkes, Herrold 


225/950 




Belt, Benjamin 






Bates, Robert 


150/750 




Cobb, Ambrose 






Crowder, Nathaniel 




100/250 


Carlock, Epenetus 


282/2000 




Cooper, Micajah, S, 






Carter, William 






Dunnaway, Elijah 






Daniel, Henry 






Ewell, Jesse 






Eaton, William 






Ellis, Perry 






Fulks, John, D. 


150/1200 




Fox, Joseph 






Fox, Mathias 


143/100 




Fox, Mathias, 6. 


120/700 




Fox, Elizabeth 


80/1000 




Fox, Andrew 


120/800 





poll 

1 
1 



1/400 



90 



Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Fulkes, John 


600/1000 








Green, John 


114/1000 


20/60 






Hoover, Mathias, Jr. 


280/1500 








Hoover, Martin, J. 


376/3000 








Howland, Lewis 










Haley, James 










Hoover, John 


150/1000 








Herrod, Reuben 










Hoover, Jacob 


700/3500 




3/1500 




Hoover, Mathias, Sr. 


125/350 


175/200 






Hoover, Jacob(for heirs 


) 260/1500 








Hoover, Martin, Jr. 


400/1500 








Jacobs, John 


65/600 








Jacobs, John 


14/84 








Jacobs, Ephraim 










Jacobs, Samuel 


50/400 


70/200 






Jacobs, Clinton 


1/300 








Jones, Mathew 










Jacobs, Jeremiah 


604/1812 




2/1400 




Jacobs, Richard 










Jacobs, Bassell 










Johnson, William, Jr. 


20/130 








Keel, Thomas 




7V«/125 






Kelton, Samuel 




100/600 






Lowe, John, S. 










Lowe, Waiter 


200/1000 


50/100 


1/700 




Lowe, John, S. Jr. 


101/303 








Lowe, Walter, Jr. 


230/900 




5/3200 




Loew, James 


41/250 








Lowe, James, W. 










Lowe, Samuel 


32/200 








Lowe, Wesley 


22/150 


50/150 


1/450 




Lowe, Henrietta 


49/200 








Lowe, Charles, F. 








1 



91 



Name 




acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white 
poll 


Lusk, Samuel 


98/500 






1 


Lowe, Mary 


132/1000 




1/800 




Lowe, William 


318/2000 


50/50 


1/400 


1 


Mankin, 


William 


483/1275 






1 


Mankin, 


Celia 


300/1500 








Mankin, Charles 


75/302 








Mankin, 


John 


793/2564 


310/475 


2/800 


1 


Mc Gill, 


David 


393V4/2700 


125/300 


6/3600 




Mc Gill, 


John 


# 






1 


Mc Clure, Franklin, E 


i. 






1 


Marshall 


, Thomas, B. 




30/60 






Marshall 


, Thomas, W. 








1 


Mankin, 


James 


285/1500 


25/33 




1 


Mayf ielc 


1, Hance 








1 


Mankin, 


Jesse, Sr. 








1 


Miller, 


Felix 


80/400 








Mayf ielc 


1, Thomas 


200/1300 




2/1200 




Mayf ielc 


1, Jesse 








1 


Messen, 


Christy 


50/100 








Mankin, 


Jesse, Jr. 








1 


Newman, 


John, Sr. 


440/1800 


50/200 


6/2700 




Prater, 


Jeremiah 


52/410 


11/89 




1 


Poindexter, Joseph 


237/1200 






1 


Praiter, 


, Phillip 


232V2/1500 




1/300 




Prater, 


Thomas 








1 


Prater, 


Aaron 


50/500 






1 


Painter, 


, John 


50/400 


22'/4/66 






Patterson, Robert 


13 3/4 /150 








Rushing, 


, Abram 


40/160 


50/100 






Stafforc 


j, Samuel 








1 


Summers, 


, Benjamin 


123/700 


55/212 






Summers , 


, George, D. 


150/900 








Summers. 


, Thomas 


81/1000 


82/200 






Summers. 


, James, J. 








1 



92 



Name 



acres/value 



white 





167/800 


land/value 




poll 


Summers, Abner 




Summers, William 


164/1200 


75/75 






Summers, Ely 










Summers, Alfred 










Todd, Jefferson 


65/200 








Todd, Aaron 


130/1000 


55/200 






Todd, Feilden 




36/50 






Todd, Hiram 










Todd, Reuben 


55/300 


75/200 






Vincent, Alex, A. 










White, Benjamin, F. 


125/1000 




2/1500 




White, Robert, G. 


100/300 


50/150 






Worley, Price 






1/150 




Wallace, John 










Watterson, William, S 


164/164 








Warren, Marrion 










Warren, John 










Total 


acres 


school land 


slaves 


white polls 



11,737 



1991 



36 



71 



93 



1849 - DISTRICT 24 
TAX RECORD 
BY: LEWIS HARRELL, ESQ. 



Name 


acres/value 


slaves/value 


white poll 


Allmond, Thomas, Sr. 






1 


Allmond, Thomas, Jr. 






1 


Armstrong, Joseph, H. 






1 


Allison, Daniel 


50/250 






Ashley, Freelin 






1 


Brolles, Mathias 






1 


Birks, George 


170/1000 






Brothers, Mary 


25/200 






Bowerman, Michael 


300/1200 






Beth, Arthur, H. 






1 


Beth, Dotson 






1 


Bowerman, Milton 






1 


Beth, Ophrey 






1 


Bland, Joshua 






1 


Bland, Charles 






1 


Carnahan, Francis 






1 


Cates, Solomon 




1/500 




Daugherty, Jeremiah 






1 


Daniel, Virginia 


110/250 


1/650 




Duncan, William 






1 


Elliott, Hiram 


20/100 






Ellittt, Margaret 


20/200 


1/450 




Fox, John, W. 






1 


Fulks, John, Sr. 


200/1500 






Fox, Mathew 


350/4200 


1/650 


1 


Fox, Andy 


175/2000 




1 



Fox, Elizabeth 



80/1000 



1/500 



94 



Name 


acres/value 


slaves/value 


white polls 


Fox, Jackson 


245/1200 




1 


Guest, Jno. D. 


100/700 






Gill, George 








Gowen, Alfred, P. 


125/200 






Hoover, Mathias, Jr. 


280/1200 


2/800 




Hoover, Jno. L. 


230/2000 


2/1000 




Harrell, Lewis 


80/500 


2/950 




Hoover, Mary 


376/4500 






Hoover, Abraham 


237/700 






Hoover, Julia 


200/2500 






Hoover, Jacob 


170/800 






Hoover, Mathias, Sr. 








Hoover, Martin, Sr. 


200/1000 






Hoover, Ephraim 


800/3000 


1/450 




Higgenbotham, Jno. 








Howland, Lewis 








Hamilton, William 








Hazelwood, William 








Jacobs, William 








Jacobs, John 


100/500 






Jacobs, Ephraim 








Jacobs, Clinton 


212/2120 


3/1600 




Jacobs, Jeremiah 


460/2760 


2/1530 




Jacobs, Bazel 








Jacobs, Pleasant 


168/840 






Ireland, Jonathan 








Ireland, George 








Knox, Franklin 








Knox, John 








Knox, William 


200/1400 






Kelton, Samuel 


87/400 






Kelton, James 


80/600 






Kelton, Rachel 


36/300 


2/900 





95 



Name 



acres/value 



slaves/value white poll 



Kelton, George 




100/1300 




Lowe, Calvin 








Lee, Asa, S. 








Lowe, Mary, B. 




123/600 




Lowe, Robert 




70/560 




Lowe, Wesley 




75/250 




Lowe, Samuel 




40/300 


1/400 1 


Lowe, William, S 


r. 


310/1500 




Lowe, William, J 


r. 


100/900 




Lowe, Alfred, P. 




100/1400 


1/450 1 


Mc Bride, Pleasant 


125/ 




Mc Kee, William 








Mc Daniel, Charl 


3S 






Mankin, William, 


D. 


100/700 




Mankin, Charles, 


Jr. 






Mankin, Charles, 


Sr. 






Mankin, John 




1827/10235 


2/1100 1 


Mankin, James 




229/1600 


1/600 


Mankin, Celia 




200/1200 




Mankin, Jesse, W 




1/100 




Mason, Jno. E. 




100/600 




Morrison, Jesse, 


M. 


25/150 




Marshbanks, Joseph 






Mc Gill, James 




240/1440 




Marland, K. L. 






1/500 1 


Miller, John 








Mankin, William, 


H. 






Newman, Allan 




158/632 




Newman, William 








Pearson, William 








Pearson, David 








Pearson, Richard 








Pearson, Joseph 




20/200 





96 



Name 



acres/value 



slaves/value white polls 



Painter, Jno. 
Painter, Jacob 
Preston, Thomas 
Prator, Phylis, Sr. 
Penuel, Tilford 
Philips, James, W. 
Pemberton, Jno. 
Pinkard, Baily 
Rushing, Bartley 
Rushing, Patrick 
Rawlings, William 
Rawlings, Jos. 
Rawlings, Baker 
Runnels, Calvin 
Roberson, George, W. 
Summers, Uriah, T. 
Summers, David 
Scrath, Allen 
Summers, Thomas 
Summers, Abner 
Summers, George, D. 
Summers, Ivey 
Summers, Alvin 
Sadler, Peter 
Summers, Davidson 
Starnes, Caleb 
Simpson, David, M. 
Sutton, John 
Todd, Fealton 
Todd, Fealton, Adm. 
Todd, Aaron 
Todd, Reuben 



72/500 

260/2600 
150/1400 

76/350 



50/300 

165/800 
230/2000 
172/1300 
15/295 



50/150 



230/1200 
45/350 
115/700 
188/500 



2/100 



1/350 



1/650 



97 



Name 

Williams, Jno. P. 
White, Charles 
White, Rebecca 
Waterson, William 
White, Robert, G. 
Woodfin, Richard 
Wooten, Henderson, C, 
Wooten, James, G. 
Yardley, Jno, W. 

Total 



acres/value 
640/4000 

130/1040 

164/820 

335/2000 



slaves/value white polls 



2/1000 



acres 
12,781 





1 


1/500 


1 


1/500 






1 


slaves 


white polls 


45 


93 



98 



MATTHIAS HOOVER OF 
HOOVER'S GAP 

Taken from the book Hoover Huber Ancestry and 
Family Record by Edwin Francis Hoover Sr., 1954. 
Information furnished by Walter K. Hoover. 

"The name Huber originated from an old German work "Hube", pronounced "Hubay" 
meaning the possessor of a tract of land or small farm. In the German dia- 
lect the name is invariably pronounced "Huver" as if spelled with "v" instead 
of "b", which accounts for the many variations in the English tongue. From 
the original name Huber, Huver, Hoover, and Hoober. The descendants of Hans 
Huber, with the exception of one branch, have changed the name to Hoover." 
"The first of the Huber clan to leave Lancaster County (Pa.) was Matthias Huber. 
He and his younger brother, Jacob Huber, jointly inherited the Huber homestead 
in Martic, now Providence, Township, which was willed to them by their father. 
Jacob Huber (son of Hans Huber). In 1776 Matthias transferred his interest in 
the homestead to his brother, Jacob, the transfer being signed by his wife, 
Maria, which proves that he was married at that time" (Note by Edwin Hoover, 
Information from the records of my father, Rufus Archibald Hoover, states that 
Matthias Hoover's wife was named Barbary Statler, and that they were married 
at Appomattox Court House in Virginia. It may be that this information 
concerns a second marriage of Matthias Hoover). 

The date of this transfer without doubt fixes the year in which Matthias Huber 
with his family, left Lancaster County for the southland. In August, 1904, 
a (great) great grandson of Matthias Huber, Rufus Arthur Hoover (brother of 
Edwin Hoover) of Bell Buckle, Tenn., visited the writer (Harry M. Hoover, in 
Philadelphia) and told him that his grandsire stayed a short time in Virginia, 
then went to Middle Tennessee where he took up a large tract of land, also 
that he brought a German Bible with him from Pennsylvania, being a very 
religious man and a member of the Methodist Church. 

First Generation 
"Hans Huber was born in Switzerland probably between 1670 and 1675, and died 
in Earl Township, Lancaster County, Pa., October, 1750. His wife, Margaret 



99 



Koch (Cook) was born in Switzerland and died in Earl Township. The exact date 
of her death is not known. She was living when Hans Huber transferred his land 
to his son, Jacob, on Sept. 21, 1745, as her name appears on the transfer. They 
were Mennonites and without doubt are buried at Graffdale, as there is no 
private burying ground on the Huber homestead. 
Issue: Jacob, Catharine, Magdalene, Margaret, Christiana, and Anna." 

Second Generation 
"Jacob Huber, born in Switzerland or in the Palatinate prior to 1700 and died 
in Martic, now Providence, Township, Lancaster County, Pa., July 9, 1759. 
(Note: There seems to be an error here, as Jacob Huber 's will bears the date 
of July 29, 1759. On September 12, 1792, this will was "duly proven and re- 
corded"). He was married twice. There is no record of his first wife, she 
having died in Earl Township. The second wife's name was Anna, and she was 
living when he made his will in 1754 (?). We have no further record. 
Mennonite, farmer, residence Martic Township, Lancaster County, buried in a 
private graveyard on the homestead, Providence Township, (then a part of 
Martic Township). Issue to first wife: Anna, married Yost Kendrick, no record; 
Barbara, married Philip Stetzler, who lived in Earl Township, and died before 
1754, two miles south of New Holland; Maria, married Jacob Eberly, no record; 
John; Martin; Margaret, married John Winter. No record. 
Children to second wife: Christian; Magdalene, married Adam Gefeller; 
Catharine, married Abraham Ladshaw, no record; Matthias; Jacob. Jacob Huber 
son of Hans Huber, came to Pennsylvania with his fathers' family and most 
likely was married after he came. His will, written in 1754, shows that 
his children to the second wife were then under age". 

Third Generation 
"Matthias Huber was born in Lancaster County, Pa., and died in Rutherford Co., 
Tenn., married Maria ? in Lancaster County; went to Tennessee (first to 
Virginia, E.H.) in 1776; Methodist, farmer, residence (Hoover's Gap) Ruther- 
ford County, Tenn. 

Issue: Martin, married Sallie Bradford; Christian (Christopher); Jacob; 
John; Nancy, married John Glase; Elizabeth, married Joseph Allison; Sallie, 
married William Rawlins; Polly, married John B. Pruett. 



100 



Matthias Huber was the first of the clan to leave Lancaster County or to join 

another church (than the Mennonite)." 

Here ends the material taken from the Huber-Hoover History, which brings the 

record down to that of my father as recorded on pages 3 to 5 of this book. 

It will be noted that Matthias Huber and his children appear in both records. 

While there seems to be no doubt that the Matthias Huber of the Huber-Hoover 

History and the Matthias Hoover described by my father as his great grandfather 

are identical, yet a few differences in the two records are noted here: 

Huber-Hoover History Record of Rufus Archibald Hoover 

Matthias Hoover married Maria ? Matthias Hoover and his wife were 

in Lancaster County, Pa., prior to natives of Germany. Her name was 

1776, the year in which he left Penn- Barbary Statler. They were married 

sylvania. at Appamattox Court House, Va., and 

went to East Tennessee, thence to 

Childred of Matthias Huber: Middle Tennessee. (Perhaps this was 

, ., ^ . -J r 1 1 • n ^*- ^ a second marriage). 

1. Martin, married Sallie Bradford children of Matthias Hoover: 



2. Christian 

3. Jacob 



1. John H., wife's name unknown 

2. Jacob, married Miss Broils 

:• t°^^ • ^ 1 ^, PI 3. Martin, Married Miss Bradford 

5. Nancy married John Glase ^ Christopher, married Miss Lotspeech 

6. Elizabeth, married Joseph Allison 5^ H. married John Prewett 

7. Sa y, married Wm Rawlins g^ ^^^\ ^^^^.^^ ^^^ R3^1i^3^ 

8. Polly, married John B. Pruett 7^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^.^^ j^^^ ei^^^^ 

It. is reasonable to conclude that Christian and Cristopher were the same 
person. Elizabeth was evidently omitted from R.A. Hoover's list. Polly and 
Mary were the same person as indicated by husband's name, Pruett (Prewett) it 
is not known if either list is in the order of their ages. 

DEED 

From records in Office of Register, at Court House at Murfreesboro, Rutherford 

County, Tennessee. Book B. Page 225) 

Guilford Dudley to Deed 5000 Acres 

Mattias Hoover. No. 264 

This instrument made the ninth day of August in the year of our Lord, one thousand 
seven hundred and ninety-three, between Guilford Dudley, of the County of Cum- 
berland and State of North Carolina, of the one part, and Matthias Hoover, of the 
County of Greene and the Territory of the United States South of the Ohio, of 
the other part, witnesseth; that the said Guilford Dudley for and in considera- 
tion of the sum of five hundred pounds current money of North Carolina, to him 



101 



in hand paid by the said Matthias Hoover at and before the sealing and signing 
of these presents, the receipt and payment of which is hereby acknowledged, and 
the said Guilford Dudley for himself and his heirs doth hereby bargain and sell 
a lien thereof and confirm unto the said Matthias Hoover, his heirs, executors 
and assigns forever a certain piece of land in the County of Davidson, formerly 
Greene County, situated, lying, and being as follows: On the waters of the 
Duck River, beginning at the said Dudley's southwest corner of the survey of 
1456 acres at a hickory, thence south six hundred and forty poles to a sugar 
tree, thence west twelve hundred and fifty poles to a walnut, thence north six 
hundred and forty poles to a stake, thence east twelve hundred and fifty poles 
to the beginning, containing five thousand acres, which said piece or parcel of 
land with all ways, woods, waters, and every other appurtenance thereunto be- 
longing or appurtaining the said Guilford Dudley for himself, his heirs, execu- 
tors, and administrators hath hereby sold, set over, conveyed, released and 
confirmed in open market to the said Mattias Hoover, his heirs, executors, ad- 
ministrators, and assigns and he, the said Guilford Dudley, for himself and his 
heirs, executors, and administrators doth hereby consent and promise to and with 
the said Matthias Hoover, his heirs, executors or assigns that he, the said 
Guilford Dudley, his heirs, executors, and administrators shall and will warrant 
and forever defend the said piece or parcel of land with all and every of its 
members and appurtenances free from all lawful claim of any person or persons 
whatsoever unto the said Matthias Hoover his heirs, executors, and administrators, 
sets his hand and seal this day and year above written. 

Guilford Dudley 
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of J.M. Lackey and Isaac Burklace. 
James M. Lackey, a subscribing witness to the within instrument of writing made 
oath before me, David Campbell, one of the judges for the Territory of the 
United States south of the River Ohio, that he saw Guilford Dudley, sign, seal, 
and acknowledge the within instrument as his act and deed for the purpose within 
mentioned. 

David Campbell 
Feb. 3, 1794 
State of Tennessee, 
Davidson County Register's Office. 

The within deed of conveyance and probate is duly registered in Book D, page 154, 
May 9, 1797. Thomas Mai lory. Register 



102 



Christopher Hoover inherited the old homestead where he lived to be about seventy 
years of age, meeting his death by a fall from a load of hay, (Died about March 
22, 1844) breaking his neck. His wife, Elizabeth Lotspeech . was of a wealthy 
family, her father owning many slaves all of whom he set free, believing it 
wrong to hold them in bondage. The family was very religious, being Methodist. 
One son was a preacher, three other sons were exhorters and would lead in 
public prayer. My grandmother conducted family worship, leading in the prayers 
herself, using many scripture quotations in her prayers. She died March 31, 1838 
being fifty-five or sixty years of age. She aied of dropsy of the heart. 
Her husband afterward married Martha W. Dillard, (who died March 7, 1861) whom 
he left a widow, dying as above stated. 
Christopher and Elizabeth Hoover's children were as follows: 

1. Matthias, born Oct. 20, 1795, married Nancy Warren. They moved to Texas 
where they both lived to be old, and died in a few hours of each other. 
They had eleven children. 

2. Sally Hoover was born Feb. 16, 1797, married John Rawlins. They lived and 
died in Hoover's Gap, she being left a widow with ten children. She died 
aged about fifty years of age. 

3. Jacob Hoover was born Oct. 10, 1798. He was drowned in the Garrison River 
near Fairfield, Tennessee, being about sixteen years of age. 

4. Catherine Hoover was born Nov. 24, 1800, married George Uselton. They 
lived in Rutherford County at various places. She died at about fifty-five 
years of age, leaving ten children. 

5. Martin L. Hoover, born March 29, 1802, married Mary Holland of Shelbyville, 
Tenn., They lived in Hoover's Gap, where he died at about 45 years of age, 
leaving his wife with seven boys (one record says "Died June 20, 1840"). 

6. John L. Hoover, born Aug. 4, 1804, married Thankful Murfree. They lived in 
Hoover's Gap, where he died aged 76 years, leaving his wife and one son. 

7. Mary Hoover, born Sept. 29, 1806. Died young. 

S.Nancy Hoover, born April 26, 1808, married Allen Blankenship, a methodist 
preacher of West Tennessee. She was thirty-eight or forty years of age 
when married. They lived in West Tennessee, where she was left a widow 
with one son. 
This record follows the family of: 

9. William Hoover , born March 23, 1810, married 1st wife Sarah A. Lingo of 
Beech Grove, Tenn., August 3, 1832. Settled in Bedford County, Tenn. 
where his wife died having borne him four daughters and two sons. On 
March 21, 1850, he married 2nd wife, Sarah E. Clark, who born him two sons 

103 



and two daughters, she died - - - " (The manuscript of Rufus Archibald 
Hoover ends here. He was evidently preparing it from pencil notes in his 
handwriting, which are in my possession, and from which this record is 
completed through the fourteen children of Christopher and Elizabeth Hoover) 
- - - Dec. 3, 1858. Afterward he married 3rd wife, Ursula Jane Orr, who 
born him one son. Died Nov. 4, 1895 - 4:30am. 85 yrs, 7 mo., 11 days. 

10. Barbary Hoover, Born Jan. 11, 1812. In her twenty-fifth year married Dr. 
Joseph Walker of West Tennessee, where theylived, she being left a widow 
with one son. 

11. James Hoover, born July 29, 1814, married Susan Moore of Beech Grove, Tenn. 
She died leaving him ten children (Another record says nine). He then 
married Minerva Winn, of Unionville, Tennessee. He died at about seventy 
years of age, leaving his wife with eleven children. 

12. Susannah Hoover, born March 7, 1818, married Jamed L. Hawkins of West 
Tennessee. She died in West Tennessee, leaving her husband with four children, 
three boys and one girl. 

13. Matilda Hoover, born Jan. 9, 1820, died young. 

14. Benjamin Sewell Hoover, born March 26, 1822, married Sarah Elizabeth 

Oil lard. To them were born ten children. They settled at the old Hoover 
homestead in Hoover's Gap where they now (1898) live. 

Benjamin Sewell Hoover died July 30, 1902. Sarah Elizabeth (Dillard) Hoover 
was born Oct. 20, 1823, died May 29, 1905. 



104 



INDEX - PUBLICATION 22 



Acres, Meridith 


70,74 


Bradfield, David 


79 


Allison, Daniel 


94 


Bradford, Sal lie 


100,101 


, Joseph 


100 


Bannen, 6n. John M. 


11 


Allman, James 


79 


Brewer, Glen 


45 


Robert 


50 


Joel 


36 


Allmond, Thomas, Sr. 


94 


John 


79 


Thomas, Jr. 


94 


Briant, James 


79 


Anderson, Garland 


79 


Bridges, Illinois Battery 


4 


Armstrong, Joseph, H. 


94 


Brinkley, Amos 


79 


Ashley, Alexander 


79 


Broils, Miss 


101 


Freelin 


94 


Brothers, Mary 


94 






Brown, Altie Orren 


32 


Baker, Hiram 


79 


Edmun 


79 


Baltimore, John 


80 


Elisha 


74 


Bates 


90 


James, M. 


79 


Bates, Robert 


90 


Robert 


70,74,79 


Bearse, Edwin, C. 


7 


William 


79 


Beavers, David, C. 


79 


Boyles, Mathias 


86,90,94 


Pinkney 


79 


Bruee, John 


79 


Becton, Fred, E. 


53,60 


Bruer 


74 


Beesley Primitive Baptist 


52 


Buchanan School 


32 


Bellah, John 


86 


Buell, Col. George P. 


2,4 


Belt, Arthur 


86,90 


Burkes, George 


86,90,94 


Benjamin 


90 


Herrold 


79,90 


William 


86,90 


Burklace, Isaac 


102 


Benson, John 


70,74 






Silas 


80 


Caffey, James, N. 


80 


Washington 


70,74,79 


Medford 


80 


Beth, Arthur, H. 


94 


Thomas, A. 


80 


Dotstin 


94 


Campbell, Alexander 


50,52,54 


Ophrey 


94 




59, 60 


Big Springs School 


46 


David 


102 


Bingham, William 


86,90 


Cantrett, Adam 


74 


Blackman, Alfred 


52,54,56 


Carlock, Epenitus 


33,34,35 


Blankenship, Allen 


103 




86, 90 


Blann, Charles 


86,90,94 


Carlocksville 


35 


Joshua 


94 


Carnahan, Andrew 


80 


Boles, James 


70,74 


Francis 


94 


Bowen, Abner 


70,74 


James 


70,74,80 


Bowerman, Milton 


94 


Preston 


80 


Bowin, William 


79 


William 


70,74,80 


Bowl in, Andrew 


79 


Carroll, Daniel 


86 


Henry 


79 


Carter, Armstead 


80 


Joseph 


79 


Robert 


70,74,80 


Matthew 


79 


Thomas 


70,74,80 


Bowman, Benjamin, E. 


79 


Gates, Solomon 


94 


Daniel 


79 


Chicago Bd. of Trade 




E.A. 


48 


Battery 


4 


Floyd 


50 


Chrisman, Maude Robinson 




Samuel 


86,90 


Jacobs 


32,42 



105 



Christian 


55 


Espey, Alexander 


74 


Clark, Sarah, E. 


103 


John W. 


80 


Walter 


36 


Evans, Elizabeth 


ftO 


Cobb, Abner 


86 


Evelyn Fox Messiah 42 


Ambrose 


90 


James, G. 


80 


Comer, Robert 


86 


Ewell, Jesse 


86,90 


Cook, Margaret 


100 


Ezell, J. Petty 


57,60 


Corduroy Roads 


29 






Corlew, Robert 


51 


Fanning, Tolbert 


54,59 


Covington, Tom 


36 


Fatheraly, Frederick 


70,74,80 


Crockett, Col. 


53 


First Mighican Eng. & 




Crowder, George 


80 


Mechanic Rept. 


6 


Nathaniel 


86,90 


Flemming, A.M. 


80 


Cruft, Gn. Charles 


11 


Elihu 


80 


Cullen, J.W. 


50,51 


Frederick 


80 


Cummins, Jonathan 


70,74 


Jackson 


70,74 


Curlee, Calvin 


80 


Fowler, T.B, 


56,58 






Fox, Andrew 


86,90,94 


Dill, Dr. 


31 


Elizabeth 


90,94 


Daniel, Henry 


86,90 


Henry 


42 


Daniel, Virginia 


94 


Jackson 


94 


Walter 


70,74 


John 


86 


Walter, J. 


80 


John D. 


86 


William 


33 


John W. 


94 


Daugherty, Jeremiah 


86,94 


Joseph 


86,90 


Davis, Gn. Jeff C. 


11 


Mathias 


86,90 


Dejarnett 


33 


Mathias, G. 


90 


DeHoff, Dr. George 


56,58,59,60 


Matthew 


94 


Dement, Ruth 


32 


Frizzell, Trudie 


35 


Dillard, Sarah, Elizabeth 


104 


Ft. Blount 


29 


Donald, Frances 


70 


Ft. Nash 


29 


William, S. 


70,80 


Ft. Nashboro 


29 


Donnell, William 


74 


Fugearound 


29 


Douglas, Ridge 


29 


Fulkes, John 


91 


Dudley, Guilford 


101,102 


John Sr. 


94 


Duncan, William 


94 


John D. 


90 


Dunn, John, P. 


70,74,80 






John W. 


80 


Garfield, Gn. James A. 


11,55 


William, A. 


70,74 


Garner, Hezekiah 


81 


Dunnaway, Elijah 


90 


Learner, B. 


81 


Elizabeth 


86 


Walter, F. 


81 


Dyer, Fred, H. 


4 


William, N. 


81 






Gefeller, Adam 


100 


Fades, Solomon 


80 


Gill, George 


95 


Eberly, Jacob 


100 


Gil ley, Peterson 


75,81 


Eaton, William 


86,90 


Gilly, Grace 


32 


Edwards, W. J. 


32 


Glase,John 


100,101 


El am, Hollow 


30 


Goodard 


8 


Elder, Anthony, H. 


80 


Good, Henry 


74 


James, G. 


80 


James, 0. 


70,75 


Elliott, Hiram 


94 


John, D. 


81 


Margaret 


94 


Mary Ann 


70,74 


Ellis, Olga Hoover 


32 


Robert, N. 


81 


Perry 


33,86,90 


Goodloe, Morris 


70,75 


Ensey, Alice 


32 


Goodman, Jethro 


81 


Ike 


32 


Goodpasture, B.D. 


60 






Gordon, George, H. 


74 



106 



Gordon, John 


81 


Gowen, Alfred, P. 


95 


Elizabeth 


71,75 


William 


75 


Granger, Gn. Gordon 


11 


Gray, Samuel, M. 


81 


Green, John 


86,91 


Monroe 


37 


Mr. 


37 


Green, Nelson 


81 


Green's 


36 


Guest, John, D. 


95 


Hadley, James 


86 


Haithcock, Ozelle 


42 


Week 


31,42 


Haley, James 


91 


Haliburton, M. 


37 


Hall, William 


71,81 


Hamilton, James 


82 


William 


95 


Hardeman, Thomas 


71 


Harney, George 


81 


Halloween McNabb 


32 


Thomas, L. 


75,81 


Harrell, Calvin 


81 


Edward 


81 


Franklin 


81 


Henry 


81 


Isaac 


81 


Lewis 


81,95 


Miles 


81 


Reuben, Jr. 


81 


Thomas 


81 


William 


81 


William, K. 


81 


Harris, Alsea 


81 


Harris, William 


82 


Hazelwood, William 


95 


Haslwood, John 


86 


Hawkins, James, L. 


104 


Henry, Thomas 


71 


Herrell, Lewis 


33,35 


Reuben 


87 


Herrod, Reuben 


91 


Herrold, Henry 


71,75 


Isaac 


71,75 


John 


71,75 


Miles 


71 


Reuben 


71,75,81 


Reuben S. 


81 


William 


71,75 


Higgenbotham, John 


95 


Hill, Burrell 


87 


William 


75,81 


Hobson, John 


35 


Holland, Mary 


103 



Holman, Buford 


36 


Hoover, Abraham 


95 


Allie McKnight 


42 


Benjamin Sewell 


104 


Barbary 


104 


Catherine 


103 


Christopher 


100,101, 




103 


Edwin Francis 


99 


Efrie 


32 


Ephraim 


95 


Elizabeth 


100,101, 




103 


Eugene 


32 


Harry, M. 


99 


Jacob 


87,91,95, 




100,101,103 


James 


104 


John 


86 


John H. 


100,101 


John P. 


82 


John L. 


95,103 


John W. 


82 


Julia 


95 


Martin 


87,100,101 


Martin Sr. 


95 


Martin J. 


91 


Martin, L. 


103 


Mary 


95,103 


Matilda 


104 


Matthias 


82,87,95 




99,103 


Nancy 


100,101,103 


Polly 


100,101 


Rufus, Arthur 


99,104 


Sally 


103 


Susannah 


104 


Walter, K. 


",99 


William 


103 


Houghtaling 


8,9 


Howland, Lewis 


87,91,95 


Mattye Sue 


42 


Huber, Anna 


100 


Catharine 


100 


Christina 


100 


Hans 


99,100 


Jacob 


99,100,101 


John 


81,100 


Magdalene 


100 


Maria 


99,100 


Margaret 


100 


Martin 


100 


Mattias 


91,96,99,101 


Huhta, Dr. James 


6 


Hubbard, Dr. 


31,33 



107 



Innes, Col. William F. 


4 




Lanca 


ister, Dabney 


82 


Ivans, David 


71 




Larimore, T.B. 


59 


Joseph 


71 




Lasenter, Herrod 


75 


Samuel 


71 




Laughlin, Christian 


71,75,82 


Ivins, David 


75 






Joseph, Y. 


82 


Joseph 


75 




Lawrence, Jeremiah 


71,75 


Samuel 


75 




Lee, 


Asa, S. 


96 


Ireland, George 


95 






Ozburn 


75 


Jonathan 


95 




Lewis 


i, Andrew, J. 


82 








Lilla 


ird, William, B. 


56 


Jacobs, Alfred, M. 


82 




Lingo 


1, Sarah, H. 


103 


Bassell 


91, 


96 


Lipscomb, David 


59 


Beulah 


47 




Lock 


& Abbott 


71 


Blanche, Holland 


32 




Lotspeech, Elizabeth 


101,103 


Clinton 


33, 


87,91,96 


Love, 


William 


82 


Ephraim 


35, 


87,91,96 


Loven 


, William 


76 


Houston 


82 




Lovin 


, William 


82 


Jeremiah 


87, 


91,96 


Love, 


Kate 


32 


John 


33, 


87,91,96 


Lowe, 


Alfred 


96 


Luther, Rice 


47 






Bud 


32 


Richard 


87, 


91 




Calvin 


42,96 


Samuel 


87, 


91 




Charles, F. 


33,87,91 


W.P. 


35 






Henrietta 


91 


William 


82, 


96 




James 


87,91 


Jamison, K. 


51 






James, W. 


91 


Jernigan, Ina, Lowe 


32 






Jim 


32 


Johns, E.K. 


69 






John 


75 


Johnson, Mrs. Benjamin 


55 






John Sr. 


87 


Gen. Richard W. 


11 






John Jr. 


87 


William, J. 


87 






John S. 


91 


William, Jr. 


91 






John S. Jr. 


91 


Jones, Bedford 


82 






Lenior 


46 


Charles 


82 






Mary 


87,91 


John 


71, 


75 




Mary B. 


96 


Matthew 


82, 


91 




Robert 


96 


Pinekney 


71, 


75 




Samuel 


87,91,96 


Wa Uer 


71 






Walter 


32,34,41,42 


Willis 


75, 


82 




Walter, Jr. 


46,50,87,91 
87,91 


Keath, William 


82 






Wesley 


91,96 


Keel, Thomas 


91 






William 


87 


Kelton, Aileen 


42 






William, Sr. 


96 


Fred 


36 






William, Jr. 


96 


James 


95 






W.M. 


31 


John, T. 


35 




Lusk, 


Burton, L. 


82 


Rachel 


95 






Samuel 


82,92 


Samuel 


91, 


95 


Lyon, 


Anderson, M. 


82 


Samuel, B. 


87 






Elijah 


82 


William, A. 


35 






Elizabeth 


75,82 


King College 


53 






James, B. 


75 


Kirk, Jane 


75 






John, B. 


82 


Knox, Franklin 


95 






Nathaniel 


82 


George 


96 






Nathan 


82 


John 


95 






Thomas, B. 


75,82 


William 


95 










Lackey, James, M. 


102 


1 








Lambert, Edmund 


71, 


75 









108 



Mc Bride, Pleasant 


96 


Mankin, John 


33,37,87, 


Mc Cabe, John 


76,83 




92,96 


Mc Canis, Mary 


72 


Mary Elizabeth 


37 


Mc Clary, John 


72 


N.B. 


35,36 


George 


72 


Newton 


35 


Matthew S. 


71 


W.D. 


48 


Mc Clure, Franklin, B. 


82 


William 


88,92 


Mc Cook, 6n. Alexander 


4,11 


William, D. 


96 


Mc Cracken, Joseph 


72,76 


William, H. 


96 


Mc Crary, Arthur 


76 


Manson Pike 


12 


Arthur, Sr. 


83 


Marland, K.L. 


96 


George 


76,83 


Marshbanks, Joseph 


96 


James, F. 


83 


Marshal, Thomas, B. 


88,92 


John 


76,83 


Thomas W. 


88,92 


Mc Cul lough, George, W. 


83 


Masons 


31 


Mc Daniel, Charles 


96 


Mason, Jessie Shelton 


32 


John 


83 


Jno, E. 


96 


Mc Elroy, Adam 


71,76,83 


Mathews, Samson 


71,76 


Adam, C. 


76 


Maxwell, Walker 


87 


Arthur 


71 


Mayfield, Hance 


92 


James 


76 


Jesse 


87,92 


John 


71 


Thomas 


92 


Nathaniel, L. 


83 


Mead ley, James 


72,76 


Newton, A. 


83 


Messen, Christy 


92 


Violet 


83 


Messick, Frank 


42 


Mc Farland, Elizabeth 


72,76 


Wiley 


42 


Pleasant, N. 


76 


Willie Bogle 


42 


Mc Farlin, Benjamin, P. 


83 


Middle Tenn. Electric Corp. 53 


Elijah, L. 


83 


Miller, A.N. 


56 


Robert, G. 


83 


Felix 


88,92 


Mc Garvey, J.W. 


59,60 


John 


96 


Mc Gill, David 


88,92 


Mitchell, 6n. Robert, B. 


. 11 


James 


96 


Moore, Larry 


72 


John 


88,92 


Leroy 


83 


Robert 


76,87 


Susan 


104 


Mc Kee, Sue 


32 


Morris, George 


53 


Wiriiam 


96 


Morrison, Jesse, M. 


96 


Mc Knight, Allie 


32 


Morton, Capt. James St. 


Clair 3,4,20 


Samuel, F. 


71 


Murfree, Thankful 


103 


Samuel, T. 


76 


Murray, Hiram, W. 


82 


S.F. 


84 


W.H. 


82 


Mc Lane, Robert 


54 


William, H. 


76 


Mc Mury, William 


71,76 






Mc Nabb, Hall 


42 


Nash, Abner 


29 


Stanley 


42 


Elijah 


29 


Walter 


35 


Nashville & Chattanooga 


RR 3 


Mai lory, Thomas 


102 


Neely, John 


72,76 


Mankin Family 


30 


Mary 


83 


Bedepeak 


88 


Negley, Gen. James, S. 


11 


Celia 


88,92,96 


Neisbitt, Ephraim 


83 


Charles, Sr. 


96 


Alexander 


72 


Charles, Jr. 


96 


Alexander Sr. 


72,76 


James 


87,92,96 


Alexander Jr. 


76 


Jesse, Sr. 


92 


New Hope Church 


37,47 


Jesse, Jr. 


87,92 


Newman, Alberta 


42 


Jesse, W. 


96 


Allen 


96 



109 



Newman, Ashley 


42 


Powell, Margaret, M. 


28,42 


Buford 


42 


Prater, Aaron 


88,92 


John Sr. 


88,92 


Cecil 


42 


John Jr. 


88 


Hershel 


42 


Joseph, M. 


83 


Jeremiah 


88,92 


Mattye Sue Prater 


42 


John 


83,88,92 


William 


96 


Joseph 


88 


Will 


32,36 


Phillip 


88 


Newman ' s 


30 


Phylis, Sr. 


97 


Nichols, Daniel, B. 


83 


Thomas 


88,92 


D.B. 


72 


Preston, Thomas 


97 


Daniel 


72,76,83 


Pruett, John, B. 


100,101 


D.O. 


76 


Pumphrey, Lewis 


72 


Nichols & Brothers 


34 






Nichols, Dance & Co. 


34 


Rawlings, Baker 


97 


Norman, Allen 


72,76 


Joseph 


97 






Rawlins, John 


103 


Old Fort Park 


12 


Wil Ham 


100,101 


Omohundro, Thomas 


72,76 


Ready, Charles 


54 


William 


72,76 


Red Fox Tourist Court 


34,36 


Orr, Ursula, Jane 


104 


Reddy, J.B. 


37 


Owen, T.J. 


36 


Reddy ' s 


36 






Reed, Peier 


72,77 


Pace, John 


76 


Sarah 


72,77 


Painter, Jacob 


97 


Redman, James 


42 


John 


97 


Louise 


42 


Palmer, Gen. John, M. 


11 


Reid, Peter 


84 


Parker, Beuleh 


32 


Sarah 


84 


Doctor 


72,76,83 


Renshaw, Nathan 


72,77,84 


Dollison 


76 


Reynolds, Gn. Joseph, J. 


11 


Donelson 


72 


Ricks, Exum 


77 


Mabry 


76 


Roberson, George, W. 


97 


Mai lory 


83 


Roberts, Carol 


52 


Mathias 


32 


Robertson, James 


29 


Melver 


72 


Robinson, Claude 


42,43 


Rachel 


72,83 


Ethel Summers 


39 


Paterick, William 


72,77 


Frank Summers 


39 


Patterson, Robert 


88,92 


Frank 


34,42 


Pearson, David 


96 


Dr. G.W. 


37 


Joseph 


96 


Mary 


32 


Richard 


96 


Mary N. 


39,45 


Wi lliam 


96 


Mr. 


34 


Peck, Walker 


83 


Phillip 


34 


Peek, Simeon 


72,77 


Wayne 


34 


Pemberton, Jno. 


97 


W.H. 


32,36,39 


Penuel, Tilford 


97 




45 


Perry, Jesse 


83 


Woody 


34 


Petty, Charles 


83 


Rosecrans, Gn. William, 


S.I, 2, 3, 11 


Philips, James, W. 


97 


Ross, W.W. 


54 


Pilot, Knob 


30 


Rousseau, Gn. Lovell, H. 


11 


Pinkard, Baily 


97 


Rushing, Abraham 


88,92 


Pioneer Brigade 


4 


Bart ley 


97 


Pirtle, Mr. 


31 


Patrick 


97 


Pitts, William 


83 


Runnels, Calvin 


97 


Poindexter, Joseph 


88,92 






Pointer, John 


88,92 






Pomphrey, Lewis 


77 






Meredith, T. 


77 







110 



Sadler, Peter 


97 


Sawmills 


12 


Schofield, Gn, John M. 


11 


Scrath, Allen 


97 


Scott, Walter 


53 


Sevier, Gn. John 


28 


Sheridan, Gn. Phillip H. 


11 


Ship, Joseph 


84 


Silsby, Amandus 


6 


Simpson, l^^yjg^ M. 


§2 


Sims, Dr. C.C. 


51 


Smoot, Thomas 


72 


Thomas, B. 


77,84 


Smith 


36 


Peyton 


53 


William 


53 


Stacy, Aaron 


72,77,84 


Elizabeth 


72,77 


William 


72,77 


Stafford, Samuel 


88,92 


Standridge, Richard 


72,77 


Stanley, Gn. David, S. 


11 


Starnes, Caleb 


97 


Statlee, Barbary 


99,101 


Stevinson, Robert 


88 


Stetzler, Philip 


100 


Stewart, Boyd 


42 


Stinson, Archibald 


88 


Stone, Barton, W. 


52,60 


Suggs, J.D. 


36 


Sullivan, James, D. 


88 


Summers, Abner 


33,34 


Alfred 


88,93 


Alvin 


97 


Anna, B. 


42 


Basil 


33 


Benjamin 


88,92 


Beulah 


42 


David 


88,97 


Davidson 


97 


Ely 


93 


George, D. 


88,92,97 


Isaac 


38 


Ivey 


97 


James, J. 


92 


Leven 


77,88 


Margaret 


38 


Paul 


42 


Thomas 


88,92,97 


Tod 


42 


Uriah, T. 


97 


William 


30,38,84 


Sutton, John 


97 



Taylor, Edmund 


88 




James 


89 




Telephone Office 


44 




Thomas, Gen. George, H. 


4,11 




Thompson, Eli, N. 


84 




Jesse 


77,84 




Jesse, T. 


84 




John 


72,77 




Meredith 


77 




Tilford, Mamie 


32 




Todd, Aaron 


93,97 




Asa 


46 




Benjamin 


72,77, 


,84 


Fealten 


989 




Fielden 


93 




Fielding 


89 




Flora Lee Stewart 


42 




Hiram 


93 




James 


11 




James, A. 


84 




Jeffrey 


89 




Levy 


84 




Pearl Newman 


42 




Pinkney 


11 




Reuben 


89,93. 


,97 


Robert 


I'iJl. 


,84 


Walker 


84 




William 


13,11. 


,84 


William, Sr. 


84 




William, Jr. 


84 




Turchin, Gen. John B. 


11 




Union University 


53 




Uselton, George 


103 




Van Cleve, Gen. Horatio 


11 




Vardell, John 


73 




John T. 


11 




Vincent, Alex, A. 


93 




Walker, Bill 


36 




Dr. Joseph 


104 




Wallace, John 


93 




Warren, John 


89,93 




Marrion 


93 




Marman 


89 




Nancy 


103 




Watson, James 


73 




Jones 


11 




Watterson, William, S. 


93,98 




Weatherspoon, T.A. 


11 




no Thomas 


73 




Wherry, Legram, C. 


84 





111 



White, Benjamin, F. 




Charles — 


yo 


Franklin 


89 


Grady Biggers 


32 


Rebecca 


98 


Robert, G. 


89,93,98 


Whitfield, Thomas, Y. 


73 


Willis, E. 


84 


Whitside's 


36 


Wilkinson & Nashville Turnpi 


ike 3 


Williams, Fred, D. 


7 


Jno, P. 


98 


Winfrey, Ernest 


50 


Winters, John ', 


100 


Woodfin, "Bubba" ' 


47 


John Sr. 


47 


Richard 


98 


Woodmen of the World ' 


31 


Woods, Stephen, H. 


84 


Gen. Thomas, J. 


11 


Wool Mill 


33 


Wooten, Henderson, C. 


98 


James, G. 


98 


Worley, Price 


89,93 


Wright, David, Russell 


1 


Jacob 


84 


Yardly, Benjamin 


73,78,84 


Jno. W. 


78 


Thomas 


84 


Youree, Dorothy 


84 


Frances 


73 


Francis 


77,84 


Francis A. 


77,84 


Francis, H. 


85 


Francis, 0. 


84 


James 


73,77 


James, A. 


84 


Joseph 


73,77,78,85 


Silas, M. 


84 


Thomas, A. 


73 


Thomas, N. 


77,85 


William F. 


85 



3744 88S5 

81/26/05 , 7 



112 





DATE DUE 




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JY 9 '10