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m .T;W n, =ORD COUNTY 
IlllllilJIIIIIII 2AL SOCIETY 

3 3082 00527 7123 

Publication No. 23 




Harding House 



Jim MatVien^ -i90» 




976 
.857 
R931p 
v.23 




SUMMER 1984 



Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37133-0906 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

PUBLICATION NO. 23 

Published by the 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

President Mr. W. H. Westbrooks 

Vice President Mr. James Matheny 

Recording Secretary Mrs. Cathy Goode 

Corresponding Secretary Mrs. Susan Daniel 

Publication Secretary Mr. Walter K. Hoover 

Treasurer Mrs. Kelly Ray 

DIRECTORS: Mrs. William Walkup 

Mrs. Lalia Lester 
Mr. Jerry Gaither 

Publication No. 23 (Limited Edition - 500 copies)is distributed 
to members of the Society. The annual membership dues is $10.00. 
(Family $11.00) which includes the regular publications and the monthly 
NEWSLETTER to all members. Additional copies of Publication No. 23 may be 
obtained at $5.00 per copy. 

All correspondence concerning additional copies, contributions to 
future issues, and membership should be addressed to: 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

Box 906 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37133-0906 

LIBRARY 

MIMIE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVMSlTf 

UUVI4Mlt&l. UNBIUCI 37139 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication23ruth 



#5 7 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

page 

The Harding House 1 

by: Ellen Snell 

A History of Milton 14 

by: Elsie Knox & Emil Hood 

Knox Memories of Milton 48 

by: Ladelle Craddock 

Furgason Memories of Milton 52 

by: Ladell Craddock 

Growing Up in Milton 58 

by: Rucker Raikes 

Will Abstracts 67 

by: Susan G. Daniel 

Country Stores on Jefferson Pike 78 

by: Adeline King 

Tax Records of District 15 & 16 for 1836-1837 & 1849. . 95 
by: E. K. Johns 

Index 119 

by: E. K. Johns & Mrs. William Walkup 



S5-0#34y 



FOR SALE 



THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATIONS ARE FOR SALE BY: 

The Rutherford County Historical Society 

P.O. Box 906 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130 

PUBLICATIONS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 are out of print. 

PUBLICATION 7: Hopewell Church, Petition by Cornelius Sanders' 

for Rev. War Pension $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 10: 1864 Diary, Peter Jennings, Henderson Yoakum, Early 
Methodist Church, and Overall 
family $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 11: State Capitol, Ben Mc Culloch, Petition of Michael 
Lorance, Country Store, and Soule College 

$3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 12: Out of Print 

PUBLICATION 13: Tennessee College, Coleman Scouts, New Monument in Old 
City Cemetery and James Boles' Revolutionary War 
Pension $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 14: Murfreesboro Presbyterian Church, Kirks and Montgomerys, 
Russell Home, John Lytle and John M. Leak's Revolution- 
ary War Pension $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 15: John W. Childress' home (1847), Whigs in Rutherford 

County, 1835-1845 $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 16: Hart, Childress, Miles, Fosterville, Cherry Shade, 

William Cocke $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 17: Jefferson 1803-1813, Will Abstracts (1803-1814), 

Old City Cemetery $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 18: Railroad Stations in Rutherford County, Rion Family 

Stones River $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 19: Footprints ... at Smyrna, V.A. Medical Center, Manson 
Family, Jenkins' Homes, Will Abstracts (Record Books 3 & 
4), Rutherford Co. Hist. Society, Early News, Bio. Sketch 
from Macon Co., 111., 1981 in Rutherford County - - - 

$3.50 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 20: Roads and Turnpikes of Rutherford Co. (includes many 

Rutherford Co. names) $5.00 + $1.00 postage 



FOR SALE 

PUBLICATION 21: Jefferson Springs Resort, Lascassas Baptist Church, 

John Price Buchanan, Will Abstracts, 1836 Tax Records 
of 25th District $5.00 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 22: Ft. Rosecrans, Big Springs, East Main Church of Christ 
Tax Record District 23 & 24, for 1836, 1837, and 1849 
Mathias Hoover $5.00 + $1.00 postage 

PUBLICATION 23: Harding House, Milton Country Stores in Jefferson area, 
Will Abstracts book 7, Tax Record of District 15 & 16 
for 1836, 1837, and 1849 $5.00 + $1.00 postage 

History of Versailles (southwestern Rutherford Co.) in hard cover, (some 
families included are: Adcock, Brown, Burns, Carlton, Covington, 
Crick, Dyer, Farris, Garrett, Gillespie, Hendrix, Ivey, Jackson, 
Jones, Lamb, Lawrence, leathers, Lowe, Manier, Maxwell, Mc Gee, 
Morris, Nance, Pinkerton, Opoe, Powers, Puckett, Ray, Ralston, Rice, 
Rutledge, Sharver, Smotherman, Tabor, Taylor, Whitehead, Williams 
Windrow, Winsett) $9.00 + $2.00 postage 

History of Rut herford County by C.C. Sims (pub. 1947)Reprint - - 
$12.00 + $2.00 postage 

1840 Rutherford County Census with Index . . $5.00 + $1.00 postage 

Deed Abstracts of Rutherford County, 1803-1810 . . . $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

GRIFFITH : Illustrated by-centinnial publication $2.00 + $1.00 postage 

CEMETERY RECORDS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY : 

Vol. 1 Northwestern third of county and part of Wilson and Davidson 
counties, 256 cemeteries with index and maps $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Vol. 2 Eastern third of Rutherford and the western part of Cannon Co., 
241 cemeteries with index maps $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Vol. 3 Southwestern third of Rutherford Co., 193 cemeteries with 
index and maps $10.00 + $1.00 postage 

Available from: William W. Walkup, 202 Ridley Street, Smyrna, Tenn. 37167 
1878 Rutherford County Map, shows land owners $3.50 + $1.00 postage 

Available from : Mrs. R. A. Ragland, P. 0. Box 544, Murfreesboro, Tenn. 37130 
Marriage Record of Rutherford Co., 1851-1872 $10.00 + $1.00 postage 



THE HARDING HOUSE 

By: Ellen Snell Coleman 

When Giles Scales Harding and Mary Hollowell Blackman married they moved 
to their two story log house. It was located in the Blackman area just off 
the Manson Pike. This house served the family well for many years. 

Sometime before the War between the States, Mr. Harding decided to 
build a fine brick home for his family. He planned his house to excel 1 that 
of his Uncle John Harding's home "Belle Meade" mansion in Davidson County. 

Mr. Harding had the brick made on his farm and all his plans were made to 
build his brick mansion, but the War started and that shattered all Mr. 
Harding's plans for building his fine brick home. 

When the Union soldiers first arrived at the Harding house, they immediately 
took all the bricks which Mr. Harding had planned to use for building his new 
home. The Union soldiers used the brick for breast work to protect their 
own soldiers. 





Giles Scales Harding married 10-7-1840 Mary Hollowell Blackman 
born 11-13-1819 Davidson County born 4-24-1822 

died 1-29-1892 Rutherford County died 8-8-1913 



One day several Northern soldiers came to Mr. Harding's home, put a rope 
around his neck and were ready to hang him on a tree, but several Union 
officers rodeup just in time to save his life. They told their soldiers to 
"turn that man loose, that he had not done anything to cause him to be hanged. " 
The soldiers obeyed their superior officers and Mr. Harding went free. 

The Union soldiers took Mrs. Harding's chickens and geese and her 
smokehouse keys. To get meat from the smokehouse she would have to ask the 
soldiers for her keys. She was a small lady and very spunky. She would fuss 
at them and tell them she had to have meat from the smokehouse for her children. 
Often they would dangle the keys over her head and she would have to jump up 
to grab the keys and argue with them. 

Before the Union soldiers came to take Mr. Hardings horses, Mrs. Harding 
went to the barn and wrapped a cloth around the ankle of her favorite horse. 
The Union soldiers came and took all the horses except the one with the wrapped 
ankle. 

Finally the Union soldiers took over the Harding house and used it for a 
hospital for their wounded soldiers. 

The Harding family was forced to leave their home, Mrs. Harding took her 
children and went to her parents home. Her parents were Alfred Blackman and 
Elizabeth Crawford Blackman. The Blackman community was named for Mrs. Harding's 
father Alfred Blackman. 

One day when the Yankee soldiers were using the Harding house for their 
hospital they made a mistake and fired a cannon ball into the parlor and 
killed several of their own soldiers who had been wounded and were lying on the 
floor around the wall. The cannon ball also hit the leg of the Harding's 
grand piano which was in the parlor. The soldiers called it the wounded piano. 

After the war was over the Harding family came back to their home. All 
the Union soldiers had gone except one. He was too weak to leave. His 



comrades left him in one of the rooms of the Harding house. None of the older 
members of the Harding family wanted to go near the Yankee soldier, but Mrs. 
Harding said she did not want anyone to starve in her house even if he was a 
Yankee. She made her daughter Ellen Amy take food and water to the soldier. 

As soon as he gained enough strength he left. When he started to leave 
he said he had a 2% dollar gold piece and he wanted to give it to Ellen Amy. 
The family said no indeed they would not allow her to accept it. After the 
soldier insisted they let her take it. The 2% dollar gold piece was dated 1851. 

When Ellen Amy became a young lady she had the jeweler in Murfreesboro set 
the 2% dollar gold piece in the center of a silver medallion which was given 
to her by her great Uncle John Harding of "Belle Meade". The silver medallion 
was from the saddle of Ellen Amy's great grandfather, Giles Harding Sr. He 
used the saddle during the Revolutionary War. His initials (GH) were engraved 
on the medallion. 

The jeweler added a pin to the medallion with the 2% dollar gold piece in 
the center. Ellen Amy used it as a pin or a belt buckle the rest of her life. 
When she died her daughter Willie May Hill, who married Thomas Blackman Snell, 
received the pin, and now Willie May's daughter Ellen Snell Coleman has it. 
She is proud to have the pin not only because it was made from a relic of the 
Revolutionary War, and a relic from the Civil War, but also because it was 
cherrished by her grandmother and her mother as long as each of them lived. 




Several years after the war was over some of the Yankee soldiers came back 
to Murfreesboro to view the battlegrounds. Some of them took pictures of Mrs. 
Harding's piano, and had the picture of the piano put on post cards and sold 
the cards. They called it the wounded piano. The post cards were made for 
them by Blumenthal and Becker, Publisher, in Murfreesboro. Many of the cards 
were sold by the merchants in Murfreesboro. 




This is one of the cards which Ellen Amy used to tell her daughter Emily 
in Nashville to be sure to come to Murfreesboro to attend the fair and see 
a cousin and his family who were visiting her. This note was written in 1906. 



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The old two story log house as well as the family went through many trials 
and tribulations during the war. The house and the family stood through it 
all until the late 1870's, when someone set a cedar bucket of hot ashes outside 
and that caused the house to burn. 

By the 1870's Mr. Harding had given up the idea of building a brick man- 
sion. Three of their daughters had married, one infant daughter had died, and 
one young son was kicked by a horse and died. 

When the old two story house burned, Mr. Harding replaced it with a frame 
house. 

Mr. Harding died in 1892, Mrs. Harding lived until August 8, 1913. 



Harding House of Later Years 




This picture was taken September 18, 1895. Mrs. Harding was sitting in 
a chair on the porch near the front door, and her daughter, Julia, was standing 
on the porch near the banisters. 



JOHN HARDING OF BELLE MEADE 




John Harding married August 1, 1806 Susannah Shute 
born 1777 Goochland County, Va. born 1785 



died 1865 Davidson County, Tn. 



died 1845 



Mr. Davis Garvin who was a Union soldier came back to Murfreesboro several 
years after the war to view the old battlefield. 

He went by the Harding home to apologize to Mrs. Harding for taking her 
chickens and geese during the war. The Hardings accepted his apology and 
showed him their southern hospitality. 

Many years later Mr. Garvin come back to Murfreesboro and courted the 
youngest Harding daughter, Julia Harding. They were married October 8, 1910. 
The Harding family liked Mr. Garvin and said he was a good man. 

Julia and Mr. Garvin lived with her mother until Mrs. Harding died in 
1913. After Mrs. Harding's death Julia and Mr. Garvin moved to Raleigh, 
North Carolina and lived there the rest of their lives. 




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Back of Mr. William Browning's letter 




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12 



The twelve children of Giles Scales Harding and Mary Hollowell Blackman Harding: 

1. Mary Harding(born 1842) married M.P.G. Allen April 19, 1870 

2. Elizabeth Harding (born 1843) married Samuel G. Patterson Dec. 19, 1866 

3. Charlotte Harding died young 

4. Ellen Amy Harding married November 9, 1871 Albert Gallatin Hill 

born Feb. 22, 1848 born March 8, 1843 

died Jan. 27, 1910 dies Aug. 18, 1910 

5. Alfred Harding (born 1850) 

6. George Harding (born 1858) was kicked by a horse and died young 

7. Giles Scales Harding married Nov. 3, 1885 Lorena Peck Ransom 

born 1854 born 1862 

died 1922 died Feb. 18, 1932 

(Lorena Peck Ransom was the daughter of Dr. Medicus Ransom 
and Temperance Crawford Peck Ransom) 

8. John Harding married March 2, 1887 Pricellar "Dee" Dickerson Self 

born Dec. 28, 1855 born Dec. 29, 1859 

died Nov. 1, 1943 died Feb. 25, 1921 

9. Julia Harding married October 8, 1910 Davis Garvin 

born 1860 
died 1958 

10. Thomas Battle Harding married Oct. 25, 1893 Mary Ellen "Mollie" Bell 

born Feb. 3, 1863 born Jan. 19, 1870 

died Aug. 31, 1957 died May 21, 1937 

11. Morris Harding never married 

born 1865 

12. William Harding married October 30, 1889 Mattie S. Hall 

born December 1, 1867 born July 4, 1869 

died May 10, 1931 died April 12, 1926 



Sources: census records, cemetery records, marriage records and oral history 
from family 



A HISTORY OF MILTON TENNESSEE 

By: Elsie Knox and Emil Hood 

Milton Tennessee is a small village located in the northeast part of 
Rutherford County Tennessee, 14 miles northeast of Murfreesboro the county 
seat. 

It is located in a beautiful valley about 5 miles wide and perhaps 10 to 
12 miles long. 

The valley begins in Wilson County Tennessee at the base of the range of 
hills known as the Solomon George Hills and extends in a southwest direction 
leading to the settlement known as Halls Hill. The greater part of this valley 
consists of tillable or cultivating land, a great deal is in Blue Grass and the 
balance is timber land. Great improvement has been made in late years toward 
improving the crop land by machinery and rotation in crops. It is strictly 
a farming community. The residents have always been of an intellegent progress- 
ive class of people. They have practiced a Religious and Educational trend for 
the past one hundred years. 

Most of the residents own their farms and some of the farms have, and 
are yet in the same families for the past one hundred years. 



Pictures of Milton courtesy of Mrs. Dana Knox Bumpass of Murfreesboro, 
and Rucker Raikes of Smyrna. 



14 



HISTORY OF MILTON, TENNESSEE 

1790 - 1800 to 1830 

The neighborhoods of where Milton Tennessee now stands, which is now 
the civic and social center, began to be settled by immigrants from North 
Carolina, Virginia, and East Tennessee about the years of 1790 to 1800. 
The first families to locate in this section of Tennessee were William Ray, 
Thomas Black, William Doran, John Young, Moses Cranor, David Baxter, George 
Peebles, Stephen Roach, Robert Mc Combs, Jesse Alexander, William Donoho, 
William Dix, Ephriam Farr, Obediah Cole, Isaac Dill, Martin Armstrong. Of 
these William Ray was given a grant of 1000 acres which was in Wilson 
County at that time, as Rutherford County did not come into existence until 
1803, William Ray's grant was east of Milton and existed in part of the Rev. 
John J. Martins farm and later years the Ike Gaither farm. East of the town 
of Milton was a tract of land which was a grant to Thomas Black. The residence 
was down in the lot some distance from the present house of the Sam Furgasons, 
there was a spring back of the old house on a small branch or creek and we are 
told that Thomas Black had a still house near the spring suppose he kept the 
neighborhood well supplied with good clean spirits. William Doran was an early 
settler about 1805 or 1806. He also had a grant of 300 acres of land from the 
state of Tennessee signed by Willie Blount Governor at that time. This farm was 
southeast of Milton and in later years became the John B. Groom farm. Robert 
Mc Combs was also an early resident and was awarded a grant of land. He 
probably lived and owned the land where Mr. Jesse DeLay now lives. Anthony Foster 
was also one of the early settlers he was on a grant of 640 acres but cannot 
locate his home. Some more of the early settlers were Gideon Thompson 
(more about him later) , Dr. M.W. Armstrong who was their physician for many 
years (he married William Doran' s daughter). The Donoho family was the owner 

15 



of considerable land in the young days of Milton, their holdings at one time were 
800 acres (they were located where Rufus Elrod now lives). He had a son-in-law 
named John W. Price, William Barton and David Barton, Rev. Jesse Alexander. 

Benjamin Knox another early settler of Milton owned a splended farm west 
of Milton of several hundred acres, where the James Pamberton family lived for 
many years. He married James Mc Knight's daughter and was the father of five 
children; Joseph, James, Frank, Ellen, who married John Dillon, Mary who married 
Thomas Vaught. 

Rev. Jesse Alexander was one of the early stttlers. He was a minister of 
the Presbyterian church and married a daughter of William Ray who entered a 
grant of land of 1000 acres just east of Milton. The Rev. Alexander was the 
organizer of the first church in, the neighborhood. It was located about one and 
one half miles north of Milton on land of Capt. Thomas Black in all probability. 
In later years the land belonged to Mr. G.J. Sneed. 

The church was Hopewell Presbyterian Church and was organized April 1st 1816** 
and the Reverend Jesse Alexander was its first pastor. The first elders were 
Ezekial Sharp, William Ray, Zachriars Alexander, Ephriam Farr, Joseph Sharp, 
Abner Alexander, and in later years there were added Dr. William Mc Knight, 
John H, Baxter, David Morrison. 

There was near the church a cemetery, which is still there in the field of 
Mr. Sneed. The church building was , we are sure, a log structure as most all 
were in those days. We understand that this church building was used in the 
early days for school purposes also, of course in those early days there was 
nothing but what was called a subscription school, many many years before the 
days of free schools as we have today. 

The only record we have of a merchandising establishment for the public 
was set up by John Young an Englishman who immigrated from Philadelphia, Pa. to 
Tennessee about 1800 and located just south of the Solomon George range of hills 

** See Rutherford County Historical Society publication # 17 
"History and Record of Hopewell Church" 

16 



in Wilson County, about 3 miles north of where Milton now stands. He erected 
a store building in the lot near his house and according to records he continued 
in business from 1806 to 1825 and maybe longer. This land was later owned by 
James Ewing, after his death, Horace Knight became the owner. The records show 
that he dealt in oats, barley, and charcoal then much later he handled some dry 
goods and notions. 

1820 



The records show that in 1820 Gideon Thompson bought forty acres of land 

which was the real beginning of Milton. This survey began at the sugar tree 

which stood for many years in the lane that leads from Milton to Mr. Jesse DeLays; 

it ran east to Woodridge land and north to Milton back to the beginning. This 

forty acres comprised what is called the Gin field and where Everett Knight 

now owns and lives, he named the road in front of Miss Elsie Knox's home Valley 

Street. It seems that he was somewhat of a promoter and in July 1820 he applied 

to the Legislature which was then convening in Murfreesboro from (1819 to 1825) 

for authority to lay out lots, street and alleys. And this authority was given 

him in an act passed July 24, 1820 as follows - Chapter 59 

AN ACT : To establish a town on the lands of Gideion Thompson in the 
County of Rutherford. 

WHEREAS : It is represented to this General Assembly that the public 

convenience will be promoted by establishing a town of the land 
of Gideon Thompson in the County of Rutherford. 

THEREFOR : 

Sec. 1: Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, 

that a town shall be, and is hereby established on the land of 

Gideon Thompson in the County of Rutherford, to include such lots, 

streets, lanes, alleys, as have been heretofore laid off, or may 

hereafter be laid off, by the said Gideon Thompson or under his 

direction, and the said town shall be called and known by the 

name of Milton. 

July 24, 1820 James Fentress 

Second session of the 13th p^u^ki H ° USe 
general assembly of Tennessee J;* weaK1 ^ v 

17 



For a short time it seems that Mr. Thompson was moving around pretty fast. 

He no doubt erected some new log houses in the new town just established. He 

also was busy with the Legislature while in extra session at Murfreesboro and 

had them to pass another act, giving the residents of this new village the 

right to cast their ballots in the election that was held. The following 

act was passed July 26, 1820. 

CHAPTER 127 

AN ACT : To establish a seperate election in the County of Rutherford and 
for other purposes. 

SEC. 1 : Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the state of Tennessee, 

that hereafter there shall be a seperate election held at the house 
of Gideon Thompson, in the town of Milton, in the County of Rutherford, 
for the purpose of electing, Electors to elect a President and Vice 
President of the United States, members of Congress, Governor of this 
State, Members of the General Assembly and Military Officers, and 
the said elections shall be held on the same days, under same rules 
and regulations, and the returns thereof be made at the same time 
and place, and have the same effect that the returns from other 
seperate election districts have in said county. 
July 26, 1820 James Fentress 

Speaker, House 
R. Weakley 
Speaker Senate 
Mr. Thompson's life as a promoter of a growing village in Tennessee was 
short lived as he sold his forty acres and two lots as designated in the plans 
of Milton as 10 and 11 toa Thomas Pomell, this transaction was dated December 
1821. We do not have much record on Mr. Pomell in his operations of building 
a town, any way, he disposed of his holdings of this same forty acres and 
same boundaries and town lots as designated in the plans of Milton as follows 
lots 20-1-3-10-11-12-18-20-22 to Benjamin Morgan February 13, 1830 of South 
Carolina who was born 1795, died 1882 in Cornersville Tennessee. He, it seems 
from the records, plunged right into the Real Estate business. He first began 
to buy all the small and large tracts he could trade for; he also dealt quite 



18 



a bit in town lot and built houses on these lots, and of course sold houses 
and lots. All houses at that date were built of logs, there was no farm 
houses and what few of those old houses that are standing today are logs 
with an outside covering of popular weatherboarding applied in later years. 
The house that Benjamin Morgan (Locust Hill, that is what the family called 
it) built where Everett Knight now lives was orginally logs. He and his 
brother Harwood Morgan, made many improvement on Milton property. Harwood 
Morgan owned and developed what at that time, and for many years afterwards, 
was called New Milton. He also laid off lots for sale, he also laid off 
the Public Square which still exists today. Harwood also built himself and 
family a nice log home, which still exists today. Harwood also built himself 
and family a nice log home, which in 1850 became the Bilbro house and still 
remains in the family. Harwood Morgan was also a native of South Carolina 
born 1798, died near Manchester, Tennessee. It is supposed that he donated 
the Public Square to the town of Milton but we have no record to that effect. 
The only two streets that we find in the old records are North Street and 
Valley Street which began at the creek and ran by the old Warren and Bottoms 
houses, store and I. 0. O.F. Hall, and late years by Miss Elsie Knox's house. 
North Street began in front of Benjamin Morgans house, (now Everett Knight) 
ran to Public Square. Harwood Morgans house (now Bilbro House) many of the 
settlers prior to this date and later were (in Milton and on farms) Benjamin 
Knox, John S. Woodridge, Robert Mc Combs, William Donoho' , Stephen Roach, 
Thomas Powell, Gideon Thompson, Dr. M. W. Armstrong, James H. Cook, Allen 
F. Gooch, John L. Moore, William Doran, Anthony Foster, William Dix, William 
Barton, Sterling H. Bottoms, David Baxter, Thomas Cranor, George Peebles, 
Isaac Johns, Robert W. Gardner, Obediah Cole, John W. Beckwood, Aden Taylor, 
Isaac Dill, Peter C. Talley, John H. Baxter, Nathaniel W. David, Dr. William 



19 



Mc Knight, Henry W. Fagan, James G. Elder, John Bryant, Dennis D. Smith, 

Dennis Haywood, James H. Cook, John C. Hood, William B. Byrn, William 

B. White, William J. Hooper, John M. Knox, James Knox, B.F. Knox, Samuel 
Vaught, Thomas Dill, George Vaught, James Vaught, Thomas Vaught, George 

Lorance, Madison Mc Knight, John Selvige, John S. Cook, Donaldson Barker, 

Frank Rankin, A.W. Crawley, and many others. 

In the year of January 23,1838 the legislature passed an act authorizing 
the formation of a company to build a Turnpike beginning at Horn Spring 
(now Lavergne) to Jefferson, Lascassas, and Milton. 

The commissioners named in the act were Jacob B. Donelson, John C. 
Gooch, Ransford Mc Gregor, at Jefferson, James Bioims, James B. Johns, 
Andrew Mc Rea at Lascassas, John L. Moore, Benjamin G. Gooch, Allen T. Gooch, 
at Milton. 

In the year of 1840 the Hopewell Presbyterian Church elders, bought 
four acres of land from John S. Woodridge for $60.00 for the purpose of 
moving the church from the old location one mile north of Milton to the new 
location on the hill east of Milton the deed was made to Jesse Alexander, 
Nathanial W. David, John L. Moore, John H. Baxter, and Godfrey S. Newman as 
trustees of Hopewell church and Milton Academy and their successors in office. 
This church was brick, later years a frame building was erected with a Masonic 
Hall overhead. This building remained for many years, and in 1900 a new 
building birck veneer erected in Milton on the lot where the Cumberland 
Presbyterian church burned down in 1917. 

In the year 1850 a petition was presented to the Grand Lodge of Masons 
of Tennessee for a lodge at Milton, Tennessee and on August 31st 1850, the 
Grand Lodge issued a dispensation for its organization and the following 
officers and members were named in the dispensation. 



20 



Officers Members 

Joseph A. Knox, Worshipful Master G. M. Alsup 

John W. Sellers, Senior Warden Robert W. Gardner 

James G. Putnam, Junior Warden William Putnam 

James M. Armstrong 

S. W. Talley 

In 1853 the Trustees, Henry W. Fagan, A.B. Mc Knight, and J.B. Thomas 
of Milton Lodge Independent Order of Odd Fellows #88, bought the store building 
on the corner of Valley and North Streets as designated in the plans of early 
Milton. We are under the impression that the Lodge had another story built 
upon the store building after they became the owners and there for many years 
they met for their work in the Lodge. The lower floor was rented for merchandise 
and the upper for Lodge meetings. 

This program continued for many years, in fact until the building was 
moved intact to the business part of Milton, which in later years was the 
East side of the Public Square, about where the Milton Bank building was later 
built. 

The lodge building was destroyed by fire in 1897 and all records of the 
Lodge were also destroyed. We have appealed to the I.O.O.F. Grand Lodge for 
information on the Milton Lodge but they have informed us that their records 
became lost or destroyed and they could not give us any assistance in the 
matter. The Lodge building was moved in about 1897 to New Milton by a Mr. Roy 
from near Liberty, Tennessee. He only used for this great undertaking in those 
days, his son, a small donkey or mule, a winch, and a good supply of large 
size grass rope and plenty of blocks. He was about two weeks in completing 
the task but he made it all ok. However, it was a wonderful sight to the 
residents of the neighborhood at that time. 

In the 1830' s Gilliam and Moore were merchants in Milton and Andy M. 



21 



Alexander came to clerk for them at the age of 18 years. We are sure that 
he lived with his Uncle and Aunt, Dr. M. W. Armstrong and wife. While he was 
working for Gilliam and Moore two years and another hitch of three years 
with James L. Moore. Dr. Armstrong and wife, at this time and for many 
years, were residents of Milton and later Dr. Armstrong bought the Harwood 
Morgan home, now the old Dr. Bilbro property. 

In the early days of Milton, it seems that the first stores of merchan- 
dise were located in old Milton as it was called in the beginning. There was 
at one time a store building added on to the east end of a dwelling on Valley 
Street, which was occupied at that time in 1840's by William B. White, who 
was a tailor and merchant in Milton, (now the dwelling of Elsie Knox). 
Another store building at one time stood in the southeast corner of Miss Elsie 
Knox's garden, also a black smith shop in the plot of ground between the 
Knox garden and the corner store at Valley and North Streets. 

Later on Harwood Morgan built a store in New Milton on the corner of two 
streets, (no name) what is now the property of the Presbyterian church. 
Another store was erected across the street where Jack Mathews was located, 
but not the same building. The old one was part log and part frame. It 
was torn away and moved by Mr. Dill Spain in 1895. 

We will try to name some of the early merchants of Milton, Ben Morgan, 
W. B. White, Orsuin Alexander, James S. McFadden, P.C. Talley, Williamson 
Cosby, Cosby Marshall and Co., Allen T. Gooch, Hooper and Wilson, Gooch and 
Mc Knight, Gilliam and Moore, John L. Moore, Robert W. Gardner, A.D. and R.F. 
Marshall, A.M. Dillin, W.Y. Posey Sr., S. H. Bottoms. 

In later years Dr. Armstrong and wife bought from Harwood Morgan his 
home, which is now and has been in the Bilbro family for almost one hundred 
years. Harwood Morgan was the promoter of New Milton as it was called in the 



22 




Erskin Givins in store about 1915 
23 



olden days. He promoted the laying off of lots and streets. All lots were 
numbered in the plans of old Milton and New Milton, where Hugh Hooper lives 
was lot No. 12. Mr. Morgan built his residence on lot No. 13 and lot No. 14 
was between his home and Mrs. Hattie Sneeds' property. Lot No. 1 was on the 
east side of the square somewhere in the realm of Mrs. Sneed to the Medical 
Clinic which now stands on the east side of Public Square. Lot No. 4 was 
about where John Hogwoods' shop formerly stood. 

Some of the later merchants in Milton were (we will try to give them 
as they come) James H. Cook, W. B. Smith, Rev. James P, McKee, Morris Goodlow, 
John R. Stroop, Lewis Boos, William J. Hooper, Sam B. Cranor, James L. Byrn 
and Will Herndon, (Byrn and Herndon) James Patterson and John Rhodes, (Pat- 
terson and Rhodes) Thomas J. Duggin, Harris Baird, John E. Grandstaff, C.E. 
Robinson and James Rhodes (Robinson and Rhodes), Walter Burnett, Thomas E. 
Bell, H.P. Johns, Abner Jones, Emil Hood, Grover Sneed, (Hood and Sneed) 
Jeter Hood, William Baxter, (Hood and Baxter) A. P. Givans and son, L.E. 
Blankenship, Kennedy Bros., Jack Mathews, Charlie Cherry, W.F. Knight and 
Son 1950. 

Some of the early physicians or doctors in and near Milton were Dr. 
Mc Whirter, Dr. M.W. Armstrong, who was a son-in-law of William Doran, one 
of the early settlers. He later bought the Harwood Morgan home and in 1850 
sold this home to Dr. B.H. Bilbro. We are deeply under the impression that 
Stephen Roach also practiced medicine here. 

He bought in 1819 two hundred and two acres of the Thomas Black land 
and remained a citizen of Milton for 19 years. He moved to Indiana in 1838. 

Dr. William Mc Knight was another early physician, who also married a 
daughter of William Doran. He was one of the early elders in Hopewell church. 

Some of the early blacksmiths of Milton were James G. Elder, James Bell, 



24 



J. H. Watts, John E. Sullivan, Thomas Dill, John Selvige, R.H. Rogers, 
B. F. Witherspoon, William G. Morrison. 

Also in the early days of Milton, about the latter 1830 ' s or 1840, 
Dennis Hogwood established a very profitable business of tanning green hides 
of cows into leather. He continued in this business for many years and in 
his early days he had occasion to be a great benefactor to a young boy 10 
years old. He gave him a home in his family and taught him the trade of tan- 
ning cow hides into leather. This affinity continued for many years, until 
the boy bacame a grown man, and later he decided to go into business for 
himself. He opened himself a tan yard in Milton and later married and reared 
he and wife, quite a large family, seven girls and five boys. 

This boys' name was William J. Hooper, who was the father of the Hooper 
family of Milton. His tan yard was located on the western border of Milton, 
where Willie Bugg now resides. 

Another business man of Milton in the early days was Henry W. Fagan. 
He lived for many years and died on the corner of the Public Square, where 
Uncle Jacob Herndon lived for many later years. 

The old building burned down when Emil Hood lived there in 1913. 

In 1874 Donalson Barker, who was administrator of the estate of Henry 
W. Fagan, sold to John P. Smith a parcel of ground lying in Milton and de- 
scribed as follows: The Fagan house and lot of ground where Mr. Smiths' 
father-in-law, J. M. Weatherly, lived for several years and later Jacob 
Herndon, the lot of ground where Mrs. Claude Sneed now lives and a vacant 
lot between her house and turnpike. In 1875 Mr. Smith sold the lot where 
Mrs. Claude Sneed now lives to Morris Goodlow. Mr. Goodlow built the house 
where Mrs. Claude Sneed lives, also a store building in the front part of 
the lot, about half way between the yard gate and the large gate to drive 
into the barn. This building was torn away in 1883, by Mr. Robert L. Smith, 



25 



who bought the property from Mr. Goodlow in 1881, Mr. and Mrs. Goodlow 
planted the beautiful magnolia tree that is standing in the front yard of 
Mrs. Sneeds' home. He also included in the building a bay window, the first 
one that a great many had ever seen. 

In 1885 Milton neighborhood established a Co-Operative Beef Club of 
twelve members. The rules were to kill one beef (animal.) every Friday after- 
noon for twelve weeks, which was one for each member. After killing, the 
carcass was cut into twelve pieces, one for each member, and the cuts would 
alternate each week. Their killings would begin the first of July and con- 
tinue through the months of August and September. Uncle Jacob Herndon was 
the butcher and the rule was for one to kill a beef any larger than 800 
pounds. Uncle Jacob received one dollar for the slaughter and cutting up 
the beef. 

The charter members were: 
Dennis Hogwood William M. Byrn 

R.G. Byrn Jacob Herndon 

John P. Smith John Medling 

Dr. A. P. Mc Cul lough W. J. Hooper 

D. N. Smith J. E. Allen 

Jared Warren Moses Cranor 

In the latter part of the 1850's, Milton became very school conscious 
and began to make preparations to have better schools and also a suitable 
school building. 

Mr. William B. Byrn, the father of William Byrn and Green Byrn, learned 
through his brother-in-law, Mr. Enoch Jones, of a teacher who had come into 
that community, who was a very competent teacher and could be secured. His 
name was Jared Warren. So the contact was made, and a contract was drawn 



26 



With the Rev. Warren. One stipulation that was made by the teacher was that 
the neighborhood would build a school building in Milton, that would give 
adequate room and also be comfortable to all. 

First, a board of trustees was selected in the neighborhood, composed of 
Dr. B. H. Bilbro, Dennis Smith, William B. White, William B. Byrn, and George 
W. Furgason, who were designated as trustees of Milton male and female Seminary. 

This board of trustees proceeded to select a suitable location for the new 
school building, and after this was done the purchase was made by the board from 
George Furgason for a strip of land where the school now is located, described 
in the deed as approximately 2 acres and 32 poles. This land was deeded to the 
trustees as above stated and to their successors. The deed was dated November 
3, 1857. Purchase price was $122.50 and was registered in the County Registers' 
Office September 17, 1860. Witness, James H. Cook, Benjamin F. Knox. 

This arrangement continued for a period of three or four years until the 
outbreak of the Civil War 1861. 

We suppose the school was closed for awhile, but for how long we are unable 
to state. After the war we are sure that the board of trustees began to function 
in regular form. Up to the year that the county took over the transfer of the 
property in 1918 and it has been under County control since. 

During the battle of Milton in 1863, a cannon ball passed through the build- 
ing entering the western gable end and passed out in the eastern end. The 
remains of this episode of marksmanship remained in the building until 1883 
when the old building was remodeled and the auditorium was built on the north 
side of the old building. 

The school adjourned to the Masonic Hall, which was located at this time 
above the Hopewell Presbyterian church on the hill, east of Milton. This 
arrangement continued for about one year. 



27 



The school opened in the new building August, 1884 under the management of 
Prof. W. A. Peay and wife. 

The first building, erected in 1857 or 1858 was a frame building consisting 
of three rooms, which ran east to west. After the remodeling in 1883, there 
were three rooms with an arrangement made with sliding doors, so that an 
emergency room could be arranged if needed. This remodeled building remained 
for many years and the school passed under many principals, who were selected 
by the board of trustees. We wish we had the old records so that we could name 
the board as they came into power, but we have been unable to locate the 
secretary's record book. 

The names of the board of trustees of Milton Seminary in the year 1889 

were: 

Rev. John J. Martin, President 
Joseph P. Smith, Secretary 
R. G. Byrn, Treasurer 
Dr. A. P. McCul lough 
William J. Hooper 

This is the only record we have of the board of trustees, since 1857 - 
the date of the first board. 

A new brick veneer building was erected on the same old location in 1934, 
consisting of five rooms. This is a very modern building and has many facilities 
that progress is sure to bring about, cooking, refrigeration, drinking water, 
etc. 

In the past year the community has erected a splendid gymnasium building 
of larger and ample room for entertainments for the school, also for the great 
sport of basketball tournaments, etc. All the buildings are now heated by Butane 
Gas and are lighted with electricity, thanks to the great progress movement of 
T.V.A. by the United States Government. 

We are going to include a roster of the names of the men and women who 
were principals of this great school, as far as we can secure them. 

28 




W. H. Turney School 1894 
Milton Seminary 1894 



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Announcement of Milton Seminary 1905-1906 



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31 



Roster of Principals of Milton Seminary School, from 1858 to 1950: 



Rev. Jared Warren, 1857 or '58 

1861 to 1871 

E. G. (Donk) Brown 

H.C. (Tip) Alsup 

Rev. Enoch Windes 

J.B. Phillips 

Talley 

Jeff Ritchie 
Joseph A. Laughlin 
M rs. Sinnett Summar 
H. B. Northcutt 
W. A. Peay 
N. D. Overall 
Frank Sullivan 
E. Brookover 
Martin Carter 
W. H. Turney 
John E. Brandon 
E. Sharpe 
Walter Martin 
David Strickler 



B. R. Kennedy 

B. H. Lokey 

Miss Mary Knott 

R. A. Taylor 

W. 0. McKee 

J. E. Cook 

J. F. Pruett 

Robert Becton 

R. Y. Neel 

Clyde Howard 

Leslie J. Gould 

Miss Angie Haynes 

Donnie Baxter 

K. T. McCrary 1923-28 

Harvey Dodd 

Allen Barrett 

Alma Lannom (Knight) 

Billy Mc Nabb 

Grace Delay 

Mrs. Sam Turney 



The old building and grounds were deeded to the Rutherford County Education 
Board in 1918, and the school has been under the control of the County School 
Board, and Superintendent of Schools, since that date. The deed was made by the 
Board of Trustees and signed by William M. Byrn, W. H. Hooper, D. N. Smith, 
Charles E. Robinson, and Moses Cranor. 



32 







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Milton School - Elsie Knox and 
Principal Kenneth Mc Cary on 
right of picture 



33 




REMEMBER? sixty long years ag0 ' the five young 

ladies and five young men shcrvn 
above with their teacher composed the graduating class at old 
Milton Seminary. The year was 1890. Left to right, those 
shown are: Front row — Jim Rakes, Walter Hood, George Mc- 
Cullough; center row — Miss Fannie Maney, Miss Nettie Hoop- 
er, Miss Lou Overall; back row— George Cranor, Miss Jennie 
Hooper, Prof. N. D. Overall, Miss Bettie Elrod and Gilbert But- 
ler. George Cranor and George McCullough are the only ones 
still living. ((The photograph belongs to George Cranor). 



34 




Milton School 1908 
35 





Milton School around 1924 
36 




John F. Pruett School 1909,1910,1911, & 1912 
37 




Ewingsville School located 4 miles north of 
Milton on Greenvale Road 1911 



38 




Porterfield school 



39 



There were, at different times, three drug stores established in Milton, 
Morris Goodlow, 1875, Sam B. Cranor, 1883, Author Martin, 1894. All did a 
splendid business for many years. 

For many years Milton maintained a spring show of Breeding Stock Horses and 
Jack Stock. This exhibition was a grand affair for the neighborhood, and was 
looked forward to by the young and old. The occasion was placed on the date of 
the first Saturday in April. In later years the festivities would wind up in 
the afternoon in a real good game of baseball. 

Milton has always a \/ery progressive community in all affairs for the bene- 
fit of the people and neighborhood. 

During the days of the school under Prof. N. D. Overall a yery active 
Y.M.C.A. was organized and continued to grow and weilded a great deal of influence 
over the young men of the community. 

In 1890 the village and community organized a committee to establish a 
Public Cemetery for the benefit of the public. A small tract of 1/2 acre was 
purchased from Mrs. Fannie Cranor, who was a daughter of Dr. B. H. Bilbro. The 
committee proceeded to plot the ground for grave lots, and drew a plot of the 
ground and numbered the lots, so that there would be no confusion hereafter of 
locating a grave. 

The grounds have been enlarged two or three times since, and continue to 
grow. In late years the grounds have been under the supervision of Miss Elsie 
Knox and she has made a very beautiful place of it. 

For a period of 82 years there was but one church in Milton and that was 
Hopewell Presbyterian Church on the hill, east of the village. 

In the year 1898 the Baptists organized a church at Milton and proceeded 
to build a very neat and commodious building in conjunction with the Masonic and 
Odd Fellow Lodge. The two lodges occupied the upper story until 1937, when this 
building burned down. However, we believe both of the lodges had been suspended 



40 




Baptist Church about 1910 



41 



for the lack of required membership before the fire came. 

The Baptist congregation proceeded to erect a new building of brick 
veneer in 1939 and has become fairly strong in membership. 

The Cumberland Presbyterian also organized a church at Milton, and began 
the erection of a new church building in the year 1899. This church prodeeded 
to worship with a nice congregation for several years and in 1817 it burned down. 
However, this church and the Baptist both burned in the night from the force 
lightning from the elements on high. 

Later on in 1937, Hopewell Presbyterian Church, which stood for so many** 
years on the elevated ground east of the village, was torn away and this con- 
gregation proceeded to build a new brick veneer Church building on the lot where 
the Cumberland Presbyterian Church stood down in the heart of the village. 

In 1925 a Church of Christ was built in Milton adjoining the grounds of 
Milton Seminary School. They have a nice congregation and worship regularly 
every Sunday. 

We cannot pass this history up without some mention of the Physicians 

who served this community in their blessings and sorrows for many decades. 

We mentioned in the beginning of our history that there was in the early days 

Stephen Roach, also Martin W. Armstrong, and later Berryman H. Bilbro. There 

was also a Dr. McWhirter, who lived south of Milton about two or three miles. 

William McKnight was a physician in the early days. In 1860 Thomas King Bostic 

located in Milton. In 1870 Robert H. Martin practiced here. In 1870 Allan P. 

Mc Cul lough also came to Milton to practice his profession. In 1880 a Dr. Swann 

came to Milton and practiced for a while and moved to Auburn, Tennessee. In 

1895 James C. Kelton located in Milton to practice medicine. In 1906 J. R. Doak 

located in Milton and served the people for several years. He sold his home and 

good will to Dr. H. L. Mc Gee who preceeded to attend the sick around Milton until 

his death in 19--. 

** See Rugherford County Historical Society publication #7 
'Minutes of Hopewell Church" 

42 



A brass band consisting of 10 to 12 instruments was organized at Milton 
in the year of 1882 or 1883. They proceeded to practice very regularly for 
several years and were able to secure several engagements during this time. 
They secured the contract to furnish music at the Rutherford County Fair one 
or two years. They finally lapsed into an inactive state, but were reorganized 
by Arthur Martin and others in the year of 1892 with a fairly large membership. 
But after a few years ceased to exist by removals and lack of interest, etc. 

From the records of the U. S. Post Office at Washington, we learn that 
the post office at Milton, Tennessee was established on July 3rd, 1824, and Thomas 
Powell was the first Postmaster. This Post Office has continued to exist to 
the present time with no interferance unless it was during the Civil War in 
1861 to 1865. 

About twenty five years ago there were two R.F.D. Routes established at 
the Milton office, but later one route was discontinued, yet the office still 
has one R.F. D. route which serves quite a territory south of Milton. 



43 



BIOGRAPHY OR HISTORY OF GEORGE PEEBLES AND DESCENDANTS 

George Peebles married Thomas Blacks 1 daughter Jane Finney Black at 
Winchester Kentucky and in 1812 they came to Tennessee. 

They located on part of the Black land on the southeast section and built 
them a house there. 

Mr. Peebles was a thorough agriculturist. He brought a great variety 
of grass seed and many varieties of fruit trees with him to Tennessee. He 
and wife were the parents to two children, Martha and Albert. Martha married 
William B. White in 1850. Albert died at the age of twenty one years. 

Mr. Peebles was a spendid farmer and was quite a live stock raiser and 
dealer. 

His wife died several years before he (we don't know the date of her death). 

He died in the 1870's. 

He was honored and known as a very progressive citizen of his day. Before 
his death he was the owner of considerable land around Milton, but prior to his 
death he divided all of the land in equal shares to his children. 

He gave Hopewell church the store building and lot in Milton. But we have 
never been able to find a deed recorded for this gift in the Registers Office of 
Rutherford County. 

Mr. Peebles was the grandfather of the White descendants, who were quite 
numerous in the Milton community for many years. 



44 



BIOGRAPHY OF REV. JESSE ALEXANDER 

Rev. Jesse Alexander was an early settler in the community. We have no 
personal record of him altho we are confident that he was a native of North 
Carolina. 

He was an ordaned minister of the old school Presbyterian church and 
organized the Hopewell and Stone River churches in this neighborhood, Hopewell 
1816, Stones River --. He married a daughter (Nancy) of William Ray, who 
was one of the first elders of Hopewell church, by this union they became the 
parents of the following children: Mary (Mrs. Thomas Cranor) Martha (Mrs. 
James N. McKnight) Nancy (Mrs. James Black) Samuel Alexander (never married) 
George Alexander, Gideon Alexander. 

A great many decendents of this saintly minister of the early gospel are 
still residents of the community where he labored so many years and still worhip 
on Sundays and special occasions at Hopewell church. 



45 



BIOGRAPHY OF CAPT. THOMAS BLACK 

He was a native of Scotland, he came to America in the early days and 
first located in Pennsylvania. He emigrated to North Carolina and evidently 
married there to Martha Polk some relation to James K. Polk. We presune that 
he served there in the Revolutionary Way and in later years moved to Win- 
chester, Kentucky. From there he came to Tennessee or North Carolina and it is 
supposed he received a grant of land, just east of where Milton now stands, of 
probably one thousand acres. It included later the Furgason land, Cranor land, 
White and Peebles land, and very likely the land where Hopewell church was first 
established in 1816. Capt. Black died in the year 1816. He and wife, Martha 
Polk, were the parents of the following children. Polly (Mrs. John Doak), 
Rebecca (Mrs. Moses Cranor), Jane (Mrs. George Peebles), Samuel Pitts Black. 
(Walter Hill married Fannie Sanders), James Alexander Black married Rebecca 
Baxter. Capt. Black resided where the Furgasons now live, except in the old house 
which was torn away many years ago. It is told that he had a still house at the 
spring and in his last will he bequeathed this still and utensils pertaining 
thereto to his daughter Polly Doak and husband. 



46 



SHORT BIOGRAPHY OF STERLING H. BOTTOMS 

Two of the most comical people who ever located in Milton was said to be 
Sterling H. Bottoms and wife Matildia. They were childless, no one but them- 
selves through life. They came to Milton from Wilson County Tennessee in the 
1830's. He was an apprenticed shoe maker, and said to be a good one, he 
finally bought lots no. 7-8 and the North End of no. 9 as laid out in the 
plans of Milton and he and wife Matildia spent their days in the town of Milton 
and both died there. It has been told that Mr. Bottoms had splendid trade in 
the shoe business for many years in his later days the shoe business began to 
decline and he conceived the idea of stocking up his shoe shop with a line of 
general merchandise, but this proved a failure in a few years he was badly 
embarrassed for finances and had to entail his house and lots to his creditors 
to secure the debts made in this last business venture. He and his wife were 
worshippers and members of Hopewell Presbyterian church for many years. 

In the 1840' s a minister or evangilist came to Tennessee preaching a new 
doctrine. He disolved his affiliations with the Odd Fellow Lodge and also the 
Masonic Lodge to which he had been a faithful member for years and said that 
the New Testament was all that anyone needed to live by. He died about 1870 
and Matildia became a widow for many years. Later Uncle Tommie David heard 
about her while living at Aubern, and made two trips to see Matildia and they 
became one. He, Uncle Tommie was a wood workman by trade and one of the best. 
He converted the old shoe shop into a wood shop and enjoyed a splendid trade for 
several years and he passed over the river and Aunt Matildia continued to live 
right on. 



47 



MEMOIRS of MILTON 
1978 

Miss Elsie Knox, born 10 January 1893 in the home of 
Joe Ivy and Lee James Knox in Wilson County, Tennessee, was 
a very gracious personality on the 25th of April, 1978 in 
her home in Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee. 
Four other children were born into this home, namely; 
Freece in 1884; Birdie in 1886 (Mrs. Tom A. McKee) ; Charlie 
in 1888 and Dana in 1900 (Mrs. T. J. Bumpas^ 

Miss Elsie was born xn a small community in Wilson 
County, Tennessee called Ewingsville. Mr. Knox had built 
a house in front of the Ewingsville school, where Miss Elsie 
attended her first school. It was this same school in which 
Miss Elsie taught other boys and girls in later years. The 
only nine months of school ever taught by one teacher in this 
school were taught by Miss Elsie. Prior to this, one teacher 
taught until Christmas, and then another teacher finished the 
term. Miss Elsie left this school and went to Milton for three 
years. "I saw I was going to starve" she related, and decided 
to go to Draughon's Business College in Nashville to prepare 
for a new career. Her brother insisted that she make application 
at DuPont, Old Hickory for work. In the meantime, the school 
director came to her and asked that she come back to Milton- 
the children had run the teacher off. She said "You won't pay 
•me enough to go back." He said, "just name it." Her reply was 
$85.00 , (she had never gotten that much) . He said "report to 



school Monday morningl She taught there for another four or 
five years. Miss Elsie taught several years in Wilson County 
at Commerce and Cainsville. 

In February 1927 Miss Elsie started a business schdol in 
McMinnville in cooperation with Mr. Merchant Pitts and Mr. 
Hailey F. Craddock. Classes were open for day and night sessions. 
Mr. Pitts left the organization about one year later. 

This school was in operation until about 1932-DEPRESSICN 
TIME. An opportunity to sell presented itself and Miss Elsie 
sold and returned to Murfreesboro, and began collecting for Mr. 
Craddock. 

In 1940 Miss Elsie returned to McMinnville and opened 
another business school which she operated for four and cne-half 
years. In 1946 Miss Elsie returned to Murfreesboro and bought 
out Lawson's Business College, and operated the Knox Business 
School until 30 June 1967. Three years prior to closing, the 
school had been sold to Mr. Tom Batey of Batey* s Camera and 
Typewriter Company, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, however, it 
continued operation under the name of Knox Business School. 

During her teaching career in public schools, she 
sponsored and presented in the home community and often 
carried to Neighboring communities a good play . These were 
enjoyed by those who presented them as well as those playing . 
Not only that, she also carried bo^s and their girls to ball 
games. 

Mr. K. T. McCrary, principal at Milton, also a beginner 



49 



in teaching, asked Miss Elsie "why don't you take that class 
and teach Kellogg Grammar? " This she did, and various students 
have commented to her of the benefit received. 

The Milton school building still stands at the same 
location as when it was earlier called "Milton Male and Female 
Academy." In bygone days it has been both elementary and high 
school. The building has been converted into a dwelling house 
and is occupied by the Greene family. 

Miss Elsie is a staunch member of the Hopewell Presbyterian 
Church U. S., organized in 1816, on the Burns place, now owned 
by Mr. Albert Porterfield in a grove of trees in a field. A 
cemetery was formed in the area near the church building. In 
later years the church building was erected on Milton Scrigre . 
It is believed that Joseph Knox, great-great grandfather of Miss 
Elsie Knox is buried in this Hopewell Presbyterian Church 
Cemetery, related Miss Knox, although no marker is evident. 

Benjamin Franklin and Margaret McKnight Knox, great grand- 
parents of Miss Elsie are buried at the "Cook"- "McKnight" 
cemetery referred to in the Furgason memoirs. 

Joseph Knox settled in Wilson County, Tennessee on a cedar 
glade, between Ceinsville and Norene off the main road (now) 
near the Florida Creek. Cne of our early governors, James K. Polk 
a young boy, was one of the group, when his father also settled 
here. Mr. Polk did not like the cedar glade territory and 
moved to Pulaski then Columbia. 



50 



According to tradition Joseph Knox had a grant of land 
one mile wide which started at Pemberlton House and four miles 
long which extended to Knox lane at Ewingsville. This included 
all of Milton at this time. 

Dr. Riley Vanhook, at one time a practicing physician in 
the community of Milton out of Auburn was a first grade student 
of Miss Elsie Knox. Dr. Bilbro lived at Milton while practicing 
medicine for a while. 

During the Civil War, soldiers were buried in the "Beech 
Hill" cemetery- the burial ground across the road from the now 
Milton cemetery. After the organization of the new cemetery, 
the Warrens and Smiths moved their loved ones from the old to 
the new burying area. 

Miss Elsie assumed the responsibility of caring for the 
Milton Cemetery 1 July 1933. To clear the several loads of 
briar bushes, debris etc. from the cemetery help was secured 
for 50C per day for their labor. The cemetery has been maintained 
and Miss Elsie has been instrumental in instigating the Trust 
Fund for perpetual care of this cemetery. 

Miss Elsie Knox has served these near 45 years without 
monetary pay, but the satisfaction derived from this service is 
rewarding. A "MILTCN CEMETERY" sign of iron seated in concrete 
has already been erected in her memory, by her. 

We hereby conclude the memoirs of Miss Elsie Knox 
as related to Mrs. Ladelle Craddock. 



51 



"FURGASCN" 
MEMOIRS of MILTON 
1978 

A very pleasant afternoon was spent in the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Allan P. Furgason of Milton, Rutherford County on 
April 20, 1978. 

Mr. Furgason, hereafter referred to as Mr. Allan, now 
87 years young, is the son of Sam and Lucy Black Furgason, 
and the grandson of George and Sara January Furgason. The 
George Furgasons came to Milton from Smyrna in 1851. 

Mr. Allan was first married to Miss Lizzie Dement, and 
to this union was born one daughter, Frances Elizabeth. Mrs. 
Lizzie died in 1921, and on the 8th of October 1932, Mr. 
Allan was united in matrimony to Miss Ocie Simpson, daughter 
of Tommy and Emily Hays Simpson, born in Wilson County, 
Tennessee. Two grandchildren add to the beauty of this home . 

Mr. and Mrs. Furgason chose not to relate incidents 
relative to their individual lives, but rather refer to 
Milton itself. Mr. Allan has been a lifelong resident of this 
community, and this is home to him, while Mrs. Furgason has 
shared Rutherford County with that of a neighboring county^ 
Wilson. 

The original "Milton Male and Female Academy" was erected 
on land purchased from Mr. George Furgason in 1851. Trustees 
were Dennis Smith, Bob Daugherty and Sam Erantley. Mr. Allan 
related that ''I have been told a cannon ball went through this 
building during the Civil War." 



52 




Ocie Simpson Ferguson 



53 



In 1898 the Milton Baptist Church was organized by a 
group that withdrew from the Twelve Corner, now called 
Bradley Creek, Baptist Church. There were 13 charter members. 
In 1937 this frame building, facing north, was burned by 
lightning. A new brick building was erected the same year. 

A very interesting incident was related by Mr. and Mrs. 
Furgason that occured in 1937 at the Milton Presbyterian Church. 
Bro. James Cox was the evangelist. In the winter, this church 
was heated by a pot-bellied stove, however, tMs was during 
the revival, at such time when the stove had been taken down, 
and the flu was open. A chicken snake fell from the ceiling 
at the flu site, near the choir and pulpit. Mrs. Nell Alexander, 
a widow, became so excited, she jumped up on a bench. To relieve 
the pressure and excitement, Mr. Raymond Bell picked the snake 
up by the tail, carried it outside the church and snapped its 
head off. 

Mr. Allan's great grandfather, Robert January was the first 
pastor of First Baptist Church, Murfreesboro, He later quit 
preaching and became a doctor. 

The Milton Cemetery was organized by 1892. The first 
person who died and was buried there after its organization was 
Gertrude Furgason, aged 8 years, in 1893, a sister of Mr. Allan's. 
Prior to this organization, several graves had been opened on 
the opposite side of the road. These were transferred into the 
newly organized cemetery. 

The Milton Cemetery was started with one acre of land. Lots 
consisting of ten grave plots were sold for $10 each. This 

54 



MILTON 

burial area has been extended, until there are 169 lots 
with area for 10 graves each, with two feet between each 
lot and a drive of 12 feet through the center. 

The old cemetery located approximately one and one-half 
miles from Milton, off the Porterfield road is referred to as 
the "Cook" or "McKnight" cemetery. This burial ground was in 
use before 1862. Mr. Allan has a grandmother interred there. 

The Milton community first received phone service in 
1905 through the Eell Telephone Company. This service was 
later owned and operated by different residents of the 
community. In the late 1950' s Mr. Ira Knight, owner, sold 
to the DeKalb Cooperative, ano! Mil ten is still served by this 
cooperative. 

At- one time there was a bank in Milton with a stock of 
$12,500.00. $3600.00 was spent for a building, and a vault 
was secured. Everybody was poor and there wasn't any money 
to lend. 

Some of the earlier doctors in the community were McGee, 
McCullough, Doak and Kelton. Dr. Riley Vanhook later practiced 
here out of Auburn, Cannon County. Sometime later, about early 
1950 's, Mr. Wendell Porterfield, President of the Milton 
Community Club informed the people they could have a doctor 
come to the community if they would erect a building for a clinic, 
Dr. Carl E. Adams was the first, Dr. S. C. Garrison and Dr. J. W. 
Tenpenny served this community from this clinic. 



55 



JMJ.Jj'1 UN 

The first year the Clinic was entered in the Home 
Improvement contest it was awarded second place winner, 
however, the second year it was entered in the contest, 
it took first place and won $7 50.00. 

Mrs. Furgason relates being in a play during the years 
of depression. In reading over the play she stated she would 
act any part in it except the 'man'. She was told that was 
what they wanted her to be, which she did. Mrs. Ruth Matthews 
played the part of the woman, and one of her duties was to 
churn, and she actually turned out pure butter. The Home 
Demonstration Club presented this play under the title of 
"The Butter, and Egg Woman." ■ 

The community of Milton did not have electricity until 
about 1937. A few people were being furnished electricity 
by Tennessee Power, operating by motor in an old shop. 
Misfortune came by the death of Bill Brantly when he poured 
gas on the motor. This "being in town in the country" 
appeared when Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation 
began serving rural areas like Milton. Many conveniences are 
now experienced that were never heard of before. 

Even though Milton has had electricity for a number of 
years, the ball field on the "Milton Square" hasn't always 
had electric lights-so they could play ball at night. A 
concession stand was also erected there. Many years previously, 
an annual picnic was held on the Jim Ro Vaught farm, now owned 
by Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Vaught, on Highway 96, between Milton and 



56 



MILTCN 

Lascassas. The sum of $100.00 per day was paid Mr. Vaught 
for the use of his land for the annual picnic. There were 
a number of good shade trees, with ample space in the center 
for two good ball games. Refreshments included ice cream, 
barbecue and cold drinks. , Uncle Dave Macon was always a 
featured entertainer with his banjo. 

What a contrast in today's life style and years ago. 
Mr. Allan recalls the days of 40C wages for a day of labor. 
Recalls to mind when Uncle Dave Macon used to sing "Eleven 
cent cotton and forty cent meat, how in the world can a poor 
nun eat." (And this was the last song ever sung by Uncle 
Dave, according to his son, Archie.) 

In 1944 another tragedy touched down on Milton. Two 
-men and a 14 year old boy were killed by lightning running 
in on an improperly grounded wire. The Youngblood family 
was the victim. 

Mr. Furgason stated that Mr. Ralph Jarratt was travelling 
out west one time, and when asked where he lived, he said, 
1 Murfreesboro. • He was then asked "is that anywhere near 
Milton?" This was unusual, the man knew where Milton was rather 
than Murfreesboro. 

Thus we conclude this delightful experience of hearing 
our friends reminisce. 

The foregoing was related to Mrs. Ladelle R. Craddock 

on the above date. 



57 



GROWING UP IN MILTON 

By: Rucker Raikes 

My family grew up on a farm, on Porterfield Road, edge of Milton. 
Milton was a great community to live in, everyone was everybody's 
neighbor, in sickness, death, or health. 

Here are a few names that had lots to do with my life, and many others 
feel the same. John B. Groom farmer, Herbert Jennings farmer, Dennie Black 
farmer, Dutch Bell farmer, Everett Knight farmer, Gus Raikes farmer, W.H. 
Hooper U. S. Post Office, Ira Knight of telephone system, Andy Givens 
grocery store, Rufus Williamson banker, Tom Morris blacksmith, Charlie 
Sneed wheat thresher, Jack Mathews grocery store and trader. 

Some of the great women of that day were Mrs. Delia Williamson, and 
Mrs. Maggie Blankinship both Sunday School teachers, Miss Elsie Knox school 
teacher, also Ruth Graham Mathews. Myrtle James telephone operator. Doctor 
H. L. Mc Kee delivered both of my children. James Albert Baxter was our mail 
carrier. Mrs. Meda Raikes, Nezzie Bugg, Bobbie Farny, Era Mai Jennings, Hattie 
Mae Sneed, Mrs. Margie Higgins. 

These are just some of the people that made Milton a great place to live. 

We had some great baseball players in Milton. I will name a few, before I 
started playing, Jack Mathews played in the major league, William Morris, 
Wendell Porterfield, Jack Baxter, Mark Davis, Sam Youree, Fred Black, Dewitt 
Williams, Frank Mc Knight. 



58 




This picture of the team Milton had: 

front row, left to right: Hargis Rowlett, Lynn Knight, Alton Farm, Rucker 

Raikes, Jimmy Mathews, 
back row left to right: Jack Mathews (after he came home from the majors) 

Frances Harris, Billy Rion, Frank Mc Knight, Melvin Knight. 

These ball suits came from the Nashville Vol's. 

Milton was a great place, great people, a great community, a great place to grow 
up in. Many great memories still linger on. 



59 



The Milton baseball team was made up of local boys (or men). We played 
all summer, only on Saturdays. We didn't play on Sunday. Later other teams 
did play on Sunday. 

We played places like Auberntown, Readyville, Denver in Cannon County, 
Lascassas, Walter Hill, Pochanhuntis, in Cannon County, also at picnics 
all over Middle Tennessee. 

Jack Mathis, who played in the Majors , played with us as first baseman. 
He was the father of Mary Francis Patterson, wife of the former Austin Lee 
(deceased) Frank Mc Knight, and myself (Rucker Raikes) did most of the pitching. 

Of the nine in this picture, five are deceased, Jack Mathis, Frank Mc 
Knight, Alton Fann, Lynn Knight, Francis Harris. The four now living are Hargis 
Rowlett, Melvin Knight or Murfreesboro, Jimmy Mathis, brother of Jack Mathis in 
Tullahoma, Tennessee, and Rucker Raikes of Smyrna, Tennessee. 



60 



Pictures from Milton area - early 1900 




William F. Brantley on Halls Hill Pike 




Bridge over Stones River on Halls Hill Pike 



61 




Old Stone Spring House built by William Doran 




He Mc Knight died in 1898 - born a slave of the Mc Knights 



62 




Stones River Presbyterian Church 




Clayton Wi 1 lard Store in Milton, 

Floyd Knight, Hue Hooper, James Mc Knight 

Carse Blankenship, Beecher Perry 



63 




Home place - Frank Mc Knight, Goldie Mc Knight 
Gustic B. Raikes, Rucker Raikes 




>riB 



Yw 



-«*j-Wfc. 




Rassie D. Fann & 
Jimmy Thomas in Milton 



Rucker Raikes 
in Milton 1931 



64 




Alfred & Bessie Cooper 




Frank & Goldie Mc Knight at home 



65 



Henrietta Rion Thompson 




Maggie Duff Mc Knight 
James & unknown 



66 



Abstract of Wills 

from 
Rutherford County, Tennessee 

by 
Susan G. Daniel 



Publication No. 17 contains the abstracts of wills from Record Books 1 & 2 
Publication No. 19 contains the abstracts of wills from Record Books 3 & 4 
Publication No. 21 contains the abstracts of wills from Record Books 5 & 6 



67 



ABSTRACT OF WILLS FROM RUTHERFORD CO., TN RECORD BOOKS 7 

RB = Record Book DOW = Date of Will P = Proved in Court 
R = Recorded in Record Book s = son/sons d = daughter/daughters 
W = witness Ex = Executor/Executrix gs/gd = grandchildren 
N = Named but relationship not given L = landowner mentioned 

1. RB 7, p. 83-85 - Heartwell Bass, DOW: 26 Sept. 1826 

P: Sept. 1827 "portion of my late Father and that portion of 

his estate coming to me before the death of my mother..." 
Wife: Sarah Bass d: Mary A. Bass [unmarried] "... a good 
English education" Ex: Friend, John R. Mason of Limestone Co., 
AL and "my brother in law" Stith Richardson of Rutherford Co., TN 
W: Wm. Ledbetter, Coleman Jackson 

2. RB 7, p. 93 - Andrew McCaib, DOW: 25 May 1828 

Wife: Polly McCaib "my children": Andrew, John, Nancy, Harvy, 
Alexander, Julyan, Joseph, Iby McCaib d: Polly s: James 
Exs: Wife and son, Andrew W: Jesse Stovall, John D. Stovall 

3. RB 7, p. 93-94 - James Bell, DOW: 26 May 1828 R: 1828 

s: Elisha Bell "a one hundred dollar note on Richard Burgess" 
d: Sally Deloach, Elizabeth Bell, "rest of my daughters received 
when the[y] left me", Marget Tennison, Mary Bell, Nancy Emeline 
Bell d?: Ester Hollis s: William Bell "tract formerly 
belonging to Anderson Coulter", Samuel Bell "tract .. .lying on 
north side of the east fork of Stones River late purchased of 
Nicholas Cornatzor . .also eleven acres and half which I bought of 
James Cherry lying on the same side of the river", Lewis Bell 
Wife: Susannah Bell W: Joseph Soape, Azia Coulter 

4. RB 7, p. 95 - Ransom Hogwood, DOW: 9 Aug. 1827 

"being sick" d: Martha Wife: Betsy "all my children" 
"my sons" Exs: Capt. William Smith and Fredrick Batte 
W: John Nance, William Batte 

5. RB 7, p. 100-101 - Sarah Crutchfield, DOW: 5 May 1826 
R: 1827 gs: Samuel Thomas Beavers gd: Harriet Gowen 
d: Delila Beavers, Polly Gowen s: John Crutchfield, Charles 
Crutchfield Exs: Abram Beavers, Robert Burnett W: Rb . 
Dreury, Robert Burnett, Thomas Neely, Andrew M. Johnson COD: 7 
May 182 6 [changed bequest to grandson] 

6. RB 7, p. 271-275 - William Lytle, DOW: 24 Nov. 1825 

s: William Franklin Pitt "tract of land whereon I now live NE 

corner of Col. Archibald Lytle' s large survey of 7200 acres 
running W with the commissioners line 326 poles to Stones river 
thence up the river to the mouth of Lytles Creek thence up said 
Creek untill it intersects the eastern boundary line of Col John 
Thompson's track thence with his E boundary line to the E corner 
of said John Thompson's track and the NE corner of a tract owned 
by David Williams thence S with said David Williams line to his SE 
corner thence E to the eastern boundary of the original tract 



68 



thence N to the southern boundary of Murfreesboro thence W with 
the southern boundary of the [?] to the SE corner thereof thence N 
with the western boundary of said tract to the NW corner of the 
range of lots laid off and sold by me lying along the north 
boundary of said town thence east with the northern boundary of 
said range of lots to the NE corner thereof thence S to the Bennet 
Smith lot on the eastern boundary of Murfreesboro thence E to 
Doctor James Maney line, thence N with his line to William Maneys 
and David Dickensons corner thence W with the Commissioners line 
to the beginning except two lots of one half acre each where the 
Methodist Church stands which I have conveyed to John Lytle the 
[?] William. . .also. . .Lot 53 in the town of Murfreesboro .. .brick 
house stands in which Lock and Spence now have stores... Lot 
65... Lot 83 where Sandlin now teaches school... Lot 76 where Robert 
Smith has a stable... Lot 82 which three last lots was in the range 
of lots which I sold north of Murfreesboro with the buildings 
improvements..." "also... in Wilson County [TN] granted to me by 
the state of North Carolina for my service right by grant bearing 
date the 10th day of Sept. 1787 which was originally for 3840 
acres... also in Wilson County... S of Cumberland river opposite the 
town of Cairo... 176 acres being the place originally owned by 
Richard Brewer .. .purchased at Sheriff's sale" "also to my son 
William Franklin Pitt... I now own lying in what is called Western 
district in Tennessee west of Tennessee river except one tract con- 
taining same upwards of 900 acres which I give... to my Grandson 
William Lytle Foster" Slaves to son, William Franklin Pitt: 
Jesse, Perry, Frank, Hannah, Mill, Grace and her two children to 
wit Gaston & Delia George Eriser Watsten Mariah & her child, Fanny 
Adeled & Phillis and increase d: Julia Margaret Nichols "land... 
Rutherford County [TN] supposed to contain near 600 acres... NE 
corner of a tract formerly owned by John M. Tilford thence S with 
the eastern boundary of said tract to the NW corner of the tract 
now owned by John Lytle thence E 2 56 poles to the E boundary line 
of Archibald Lytles service right survey thence N with the E 
boundary line of said Archibald Little survey so that by running a 
due W line at staik the beginning thence a direct line to the 
beginning. . .also. . .a house and lot in the town of Murfreesboro 
known in the plan of said town by Lot 9 being the brick house and 
lot on which John Watkins now lives..." Slaves to daughter, 
Julia M. Nichols: Jim Henrietta, Silva, Flora Tom Matilda and 
Minerve and. . .increase Slave to son, John Lytle: boy, Stephen 
"now in possession of John M. Tilford... of my daughter Nancy 
Tilford wife of John M. Tilford" "to my Grandson William Little 
Foster a tract... west of Tennessee river containing a little 
upwards 900 acres I am not able to describe" "to my sister in 
law, Margaret Taylor .. .negro girl, Levina daughter of Mariah and 
after the death of said Margaret Taylor I give... to my son William 
F. P...." "to Elders of the Presbyterian Church in Murfrees- 
boro... a lot of ground lying immediately N of the lot I give to 
said Church upon which the Church is erected and extending N to 
Bennett Smith's lot of ground being the piece of ground lying E of 
the town of Murfreesboro between the eastern boundary of said town 
and M. Murfrees field and Bennett Smith's lot and the Church 



69 



Lot..." Exs: my nephew, William Lytle of Nashville; my friends, 
Samuel P. Black and Saml . Anderson W: Jont. Currin, David 
Wendell 

7. RB 7, p. 277 - Philadelphia Haynes, DOW: 15 Nov. 1828 P: 
May term 1829 Brother: George Haynes "one negro boy named 
Allen... also one bond on John Haynes for $300... one half of my 
Legacy in the estate of John Haynes dec'd in the State of Virginia 
Charlotte County" N: Eliza Ann Redmand daughter of George 
Redmand and Keziah his wife "give. . .negro girl...Masy" 
N: Martha Jane Redmand daughter of George Redmand and Keziah his 
wife "give... negro boy named Neptune" N: Rebecca Susan 
daughter of said George Redmand and Keziah his wife "negro boy 
named Edmund" Exs: Creed T. Thompson and James Sanford W: 
Richard Vaughan, John B. Niscan (?) 

8. RB 7, p. 278 - James Taylor, DOW: 15 Oct. 1828 P: February 
term 1829 "weak state of body" Wife: Deborah Taylor "to my 
beloved Mother" EX: Adin Taylor W: Adin Taylor, Samuel Denny, 
C. R. Davis 

9. RB 7, p. 278-283 - James J. Maxwell, DOW: 18 Dec. 1828 
P: January term 1828 [1829] "low state of health" Wife: Jane 
"with a small exceptance to my father" Slaves to wife: Cait, 
Wax, Ned, Harry, Zed, Hetty, Mariah & her three children, Rose 
Solomon and Peter "as my wife is in a pregnant situation" 
"my brothers and sisters and the heirs of John Maxwell deed my 
brother" d: Naomy L. Maxwell "tract of land I now own in 
Bedford County containing 250 acres known by the name of the drake 
tract... also eith negroes Sandy, big Fan, Sam Little Mary, George 
Ann Harriett and Charles also the Clay bank filly and two cows and 
calves that I got from Mary Brothers..." "to William A. 
Maxwell one negro woman by the name of Mary" Brother: Robert 
Maxwell "one negro girl...Feby" Brother: Jesse Maxwell "one 
negro boy named Billy" Sister: Lidda Adcock "one negro man 
named Tomy" Sister: Nancy Maxwell "one negro girl named 
little Fan... then to Amanda Marchal daughter of a Elizabeth 
Martial which child is said to be an illigitimate child of mine" 
"my Father and mother have fifteen acres of land E of the Cave 
Spring... the land between the widow Miller's line and the Creek 
and up the creek to the fence of the old land. . .negroes Charles 
and big Fan" "to William Maxwell and his wife Elizabeth 
Maxwell..." Exs: Robert Miller and Stephen Linch Guardian: 
Azariah Kimbro "for Naomy L. Maxwell and Catharine M. Gowan 
Guardian for Wife: Robert Miller Guardian for unborn child: 
Stephen Linch W: Isaac J. Miller, Wm. W. Miller 

10. RB 7, p. 283-284 - Evander Mclver, DOW: 11 Sept. 1828 P: 
November term 1828 Wife: Matilda C. Mclver "real estate in 
Western district" d: Maria M. Mclver (not yet 14 years) "my 
plantation & tract of land known by the name of the Smith place" 
"to my dear father I give all my books and papers ... " Brother: 
John Mclver Ex: "friend and brother Daniel Graham" W: Henry 
Couper, James Read 



11. RB 7, p. 284-287 - Willson Yandell, DOW: 8 Nov. 1826 P: 
January term 1828 s: Dr. Lunsford P. Yandell "education abroad 
which has cost me much... negro man Burwell .. .negro girl, 
Caroline..." d: Eliza Becton "when she married two negro woman 
Nelly and China... a note on Littleton Williamson .. .with Tho. 
Shearwood. . .negro girl for a nurse called Mary..." Wife: 
Elizabeth "Betsy" Yandell "my children severally come of age or 
marry" Exs: "brother, John Yandell ... son, Lunsford P. Yandell... 
son in law, Dr. Fredrick E. Becton" W: William Wasson 

COD dated 19 June 1827 - s: Henry Yandell and Burton Yandell 
"receive a good English education" W: William Wasson, Edwin 
Rogers 

12. RB 7, p. 287-289 - Richardson Booker, DOW: 8 Mar. 1827 
P: July term 1827 Wife: Nancy D. Booker Slaves to wife: 
Lucy, Ralph and Henry "My four children": George R. 0. 
Booker, Efford D. Booker, Sally A. Booker, William A. K. Booker 
"my Executors restore to Jack Covirly (a free man loned to me)" 
Exs: "Friends" Walter Keeble and William P. Booker W: John B. 
Morris, John G. Keeble 

13. RB 7, p. 289-290 - Eden Donnel (verbal will), DOW: 21 Oct. 
1828 P: November term 1828 "in the presence of Jesse 
Alexander and Mary (Polly) Weatherly" "my mother" "my wife" 

"my children. . .my son have a liberal education and my daughter a 
good English education" 

14. RB 7, p. 290-293 - Thomas A. Oden, DOW: undated in his own 
hand Sworn statements by Burwell Ganaway and Samuel Campbell 
that he died 1 February 1827 Wife: Chloe Oden "eldest daughter 
of Samuel Adams of Logan County, [KY] " "my children": Katharine, 
John, Mary, Martha and Amanda Ann Oden [possibly other children, 
see: sworn statement] "I give and bequeath to Lydia R. Oden 
and her daughter Leah Oden, each of them one dollar." 

15. RB 7, p. 294-295 - Mathew Whitfield, DOW: 6 Sept. 1823 
P: April term 1827 Wife: Levina "three of my children": 
Benjamin, Mary and Mathew Exs: Wife and son, William Whitfield 
W: Hugh Robinson, Jane Robinson, Levina Robinson 

16. RB 7, p. 295-298 - Moses Bellah, DOW: 2 Oct. 1827 
P: August term 1828 Wife: Elizabeth s: John Bellah "tract 
of land I own... 190 acres... not more than 170 in the lower end of 
the tract whereon he lives .. .negroes , Jerry and Peter" d: Nancy 
Gibson "negroes, Rit and Henry" s: Samuel Bellah "negroes, 
Isaac and Ellison" gs : Moses Gibson gd: Elizabeth A. Bellah 
(daughter of son, John) "my three children: John, Nancy and 
Samuel" Exs: sons, John and Samuel W: James G. Henderson, 
Ephraim L. Jetton, John W. Jetton COD dated 2 Oct. 1827: "two 
old negroes, Harry & Lucy 

17. RB 7, p. 298-299 - Drury Vaughan, DOW: 28 Jan 1826 
P: July term 1827 s: William B. Vaughan "land and plantation 
where on I now live containing 230 acres... one negro man named 



71 



Squire and. . .Mager . . .one negro woman named Fanny also her four 
children named Nancy, Nicea, Nido and Naomi" s: Peter Vaughan 
"negro man named Thos . . . .Gabe . . .boy named Burwell" d: Betsy 
Matthews "negro man named Henry... girl named Patsey" 
d: Mildred Nelson "negro man named Squire, Jr.... woman named 
Dilcea" d: Nancy Lenoir "negro man named Sam. . .woman named 
Sillar" gs : John P. H. Lenoir "one negro boy named Guy" 
gs : William H. Palmer "one negro woman named Bittey . . .girl named 
Betsy" "my five children and William H. Palmer" Exs : William 
B. Vaughan and Peter Vaughan W: Wilson Yandell, John Hoover 

18. RB 7, p. 300-301 - Thomas Dickson, Senr., DOW: 24 Feb. 1822 
P: January term 1828 Wife: Abegail Dickson s: Edwin Dickson 
(probably the youngest), Asahel Dickson, John Dickson, William 
Dickson, Thomas Dickson, James Dickson, Ezekiel Dickson, Alexander 
Smith Dickson, Joseph Rankin Dickson d: Elizabeth Canon, 
Aramanta Canon Exs: "my sons and trusty friends, John Dickson 
and Thomas Dickson" W: Theophilus A. Cannon, Alfred Strapp, 
James Finney 

19. RB 7, p. 302 - Elizabeth Home, DOW: 5 June 1828 
P: November term 1828 "being weak and feeble" Youngest 
son: Simean Home [not yet 21 years] "negro woman Litta. . .thirty 
and one half acres of land lying in the State of Georgia on 
Commissioners Creek Jones County" Ex: son, Josiah Home 
W: Daniel W. Bantan and Jesse Bloodworth 

20. RB 7, p. 303 - William Tombes, DOW: undated P: August 
term 1829 Wife: Susannah Tombes "one sorrel mare to be well 
taken care by Emanuel Tombes" Ex: son, Emanuel Tombes 
W: Lewellan Williams, James Sanford, William Nance 

21. RB 7, p. 303-304 - Deborah Elliott, DOW: 5 March 1829 
P: August term 1829 s: James, William, John, Alfred, Stockard 
d: Eleanor, Catharine, Mary Grandchildren: Deborah and Jas . 
Elliott Stockard Ex: son, John Elliott W: John MacGowan, 
Thos . MacGowan 

22. RB 7, p. 305 - Polly Dickson, DOW: 11 January 1828 
P: August term 1828 d: Lucinda Emaline Dickson "my four 
boys": Jackson Carroll [Dickson], John Haywood [Dickson], Franklin 
Holland [Dickson] and Thomas Samuel Smith Dickson Ex: Stephen 
Roach W: Pierce G. Noland, Lewis Noland 

23. RB 7, p. 306 - Hugh Shearwood, DOW: 26 Sept. 1827 
P: August term 1829 "being weak in body" Wife and Executrix: 
Nancy Ann W: Benjamin Ransom, Deveraux Jarratt 

24. RB 7, p. 306-307 - Ann Butler, DOW: (verbal will - she died 
24 Sept. 1828) P: November term 1828 "died without heirs of 
her body" "all her property and estate being wholly personal in 
the state of Tennessee she had in possession to be given to Eliza 
M, wife of Major Andrew McKee" "...real or personal which she had 
or might have in the state of Virginia .. .to .. .namesake Ann Hodge 
of the state of Virginia" W: Thomas C. Hoskins, Jr. 



72 



25. RB 7, p. 307-308 - John Greer, DOW: 17 February 1826 
P: January term 1828 "being of an old age" Wife: Debby Greer 
d: Lotty "at the time of her removal to the western district" 
d: Polly Crouse, Elizabeth s: Stephen Greer gd: Debbyan 
Battle Ex: son, Nathan Greer W: Spill C. Haskins, M. M. 
Haskins 

26. RB 7, p. 308-312 - Daniel Elam, DOW: 1828 P: February term 
1829 Wife: Jane/Jean Elam Slaves to wife: Isham, Mary, 
Winney, Lucy and Winney's child, Lawson s: Edward Elam "a 
negro man named Davy s: William Elam "a negro boy named Harry 
s: John Elam "a negro boy named Ned" s: Robert Henry Elam 
"a negro boy named Charles s: George Foster Elam "a negro boy 
named Isaac d: Elizabeth Elam "two negroes named Jenny and 
Sarrah" "I give to my four children Lewis Wills Elam, H. 
Jetton, Emilly now Emilly Stuttings . . . " d: Nancy Molloy 
gs: "Daniel Jetton a son of my daughter Henrietta Jetton" 
Ex: son, Edward Elam W: David Wendell, Samuel Anderson 

27. RB 7, p. 312-313 - George Taylor, DOW: 11 July 1827 
P: October term 1827 Wife: Jerusha "my sons": William 
Taylor, Eden Taylor, George Taylor, James Taylor and Leonard 
Taylor d: Jane Taylor, Sally Taylor Exs : Adin [Eden?] Taylor, 
wife, Jerush Taylor W: Andrew McKee, Nathaniel Greer, John C. 
Hayse, Ephraim Farr 

28. RB 7, p. 313-314 - Thomas Beasley, DOW: 18 June 1828 
P: August term 1828 Wife: Sally Slaves to wife: Charles; big 
Lucy; "old woman named Nancy" gs : "Thomas, son of my daughter, 
Rebecca Coleman" s: William Trustees: Robert Williams and 
Joseph Burnett Exs: son, William Beesley, Robert Williams and 
Joseph Burnett W: Creed T. Thompson and Pleasant H. Mitchell 

29. RB 7, p. 315-317 - William Foster, DOW: 24 August 1825 
P: August term 1828 eldest s: James "135 acres lying in 
Bedford County on the waters of Alexanders Creek... 80 acres of 
land being the west end of a 200 acre tract lying in Rutherford 
County and a part of a thousand acre tract that formerly belong to 
David Vance..." second s: William "120 acres... east end of a 
200 acre tract lying in Rutherford County on the waters of the 
west fork of Stones River being a part of 1000 acres tract that 
formerly belonged to David Vance..." youngest s: Guynn [sic] 
"tract of land whereon I now live being 257 acres lying in 
Rutherford County on the waters of the west fork of Stones 
River... one negro boy named Frank" "to sons... James and William 
one negro man named Bob" "my four daughters": Anna, Polly, 
Nancy and Betsey "profits from my four negroes, Peggy, Buck, 
Hannah and Addison" Exs: two sons, James and William and son in 
law, George W. Mallard W: Thornton Mallard, George Clanton, J. 
Y. Mallard 

30. RB 7, p. 317-319 - William Rowtan, DOW: 22 October 1827 
P: August term 1829 Wife: Mary Rowtan "my eight children": 
John Rowtan, Polly Wood, Owney Walls, Elizabeth Hancock, William 



73 



D. Rowtan, Rody Wrather, Nancy Hunt, Peyton Rowtan Exs : wife, 
John Rowtan, William D. Rowtan, Peyton Rowtan W: Wm. W. Searcy, 
Beverly Randolph, william Smith, John Smith 

31. RB 7, p. 319-320 - William Sledd, DOW: 7 October 1827 
P: October term 1827 "all property .. .sold my negro girl Mariah 
and her two girl children Sally and Eliza excepted. . .back to 
Virginia under care of friends... my children also" Children: 
John M. Sledd and Elizabeth Sledd EX: Isaac H. Overall 
W: George L. Lachland, Richard Thomas 

32. RB 7, p. 321-322 - John Doak, Senr . , DOW: 17 May 1824 
P: November term 1828 "in a bad state of health" Wife: Peggy 
Doak d: Uppy, Elizabeth, Patsey, Mait, Isabella, Polly s: 
Joseph Doak "Nancy Weatherly is to have a dress of calico or 
bombazette, Robert Doak's daughter Nancy a dress of calico or 
bombazett . . . son, Joseph Doak's daughter..." Slaves: Harry and 
his wife, Leah to have freedom Exs: Samuel P. Black, Abner 
Weatherly W: Robert Shepherd, William Shepherd 

33. RB 7, p. 322-324 - John Thomas, DOW: 8 October 1828 
P: November term 1828 s: Peter James Thomas "tract of land 
whereon I now live purchased of Jesse Reed... negro boy Charles 
about seven years..." s: John Hartwell Thomas d: "heirs of 
deceased daughter Mildred Tyus Vaughan[,] William and George" 
s: Lewis Green Thomas d: Rebecca s: Theos . W. Thomas 
d: Ann d: Susannah d: Mary H. Harris "negroes Holland and 
Andrson. ..sold" "the following named children (to wit) Lewis 
G. Thomas, Rebecca Loyd, Theophilus W. Thomas, Ann W. Sutton, 
Susannah R. Lowe, .. .heirs of Mary H. Harris, as I expressly wish 
that John H. Thomas and the aforesaid heirs William and George of 
my daughter deed. Mildred Vaughan have no more of my estate..." 
Exs: Leonard F. Sims, Theophilus W. Thomas W: Daniel Keith, 
Lemuel Reed, Jesse Wood 

34. RB 7, p. 324-326 - Martha Penn , DOW: 23 January 1828 
P: May term 1828 "being in a low state of health" s: William 
Penn d: Franky Banks, Ruth Finny, Martha Wallise s: George 
Penn d: Luvenea Penn "one black woman slave called Sally and 
all the children she may have from this date..." "equally 
divided between William Penn, the children of Betsey Banks one 
share for she is dead, Joseph Penn, Franky Banks, Ruth Finny, 
Martha Wallese, Josiah Penn, Jacob Penn and George Penn" 
"whereas I have two small children to be sold... my children may 
purchase..." Ex: "trusty friend William Penn" W: Theos. A. 
Canon, Ota Cantrell, Thomas Dickson 

35. RB 7, p. 326-328 - James Mathes, DOW: 30 June 1826 
P: 2 April 1829 "a true full and complete copy from the record in 
Jefferson County, Kentucky [apparently P: July 1827]" Wife: 
Marium Mathes "ten children": Sarah Huchison, Caty Mathes, 
William T. Mathes, Rebecca Mathes, Anna O. Mathes, Polly Mathes, 
Rachel Mathes, Heller Mathes, James H. Mathes, Betsey L. Mathes 
Ex: wife W: Henry Mathes, Thomas Hutchison 



74 



36. RB 7, p. 329-330 - Mary Randolph, DOW: 17 March 1827 
P: July term 1827 "my two grandchildren": Peter Randolph, Sarah 
Randolph "heirs of my son, Peyton Randolph dec'd." Slaves to the 
grandchildren: Hilsey and her child, Fanny "heirs of my son 
Beverly Randolph": Mary Elizabeth Randolph, Lucy Randolph, Sally 
Randolph s: Harrison Randolph Ex: son, Beverly Randolph 
W: John McGregor, John C. Harris 

37. RB 7, p. 333-334 - Anthony Clark, DOW: 30 June 1826 
P: October term 1827 "being weak in body" Wife: Susanna 
Clark s: William Clark, Walter Clark, John Clark, James Clark, 
Robert Clark, Anthony Clark d: Franky Clark, Sarah Clark 
sons in law: William McClure, James Glenn, Robert Bigham, John 
Stephenson Exs : John Clark, James Clark, Robert Clark, Anthony 
Clark W: John Clark, Robert Bigham 

38. RB 7, p. 334-336 - James Johnson, DOW: 20 January 1826 
P: May term 1828 Wife: Arebelow Johnson Slaves to wife: 
Randal and his wife, Tenor and her child Adalina s: Joseph 
M. Johnson, "seven beloved daughters": Sintha Ann Johnson, Rhue 
Johnson, Nancy Johnson, Sarrey Rolland/Rowland [husband, Benjamin 
Rolland], Susanna Gavott, Rebecca Whight [White], Mildred Foster 
Slaves: Timothy, Cith, Edy, Darks and Alfred Exs: James 
Higgins, Larkin Johnson, Senr . W: George Her, Isaac I. Miller 

39. RB 7, p. 336-337 - Nancy Wood, DOW: 8 November 1824 
P: August term 1828 "negro boy George is to choose his master 
among my legatees" Legatees: Lucy Staton, Juriah Dixon, Samuel 
Wood, Keziah Dixon, William Wood, James Wood, Nancy Dixon, 
Elizabeth Gutridge W: Eli Bell, James W. Dickson, Lucinda N. 
Dickson, Lucretia K. Dickson 

40. RB 7, p. 337-338 - Eleanor McKnight, DOW: 3 May 1825 
P: January term 1828 Slave: Rachel "to be sold" d: Jane, 
Abby, Peggy s: James, David, John M. Sister: Jane Andrew 
Exs: sons, James and John M. W: Alexander Orr, Benjamin Knox 

41. RB 7, p. 338-341 - Catharine Morton, DOW: 22 September 1826 
P: July term 1827 gd: Mary Ann A. Anthony, Elizabeth V. Gooch, 
Martha M. Morton, Cicelia H. Morton, Catharine Lytle, Nancy Lytle 

gs : Joseph Morton, William Lytle, Curator of negroes: 
Th. S. Anthony s: Joseph Morton, dec'd d: Tabitha Lytle, 
dec'd "four children now alive": Judith Edwards, Sarah Searcy, 
James Morton, Lucinda Newsome [husband, William Newsome] Slaves: 
girl, Julia to Mary Anthony; girl, Liney to Elizabeth Gooch; boy, 
Wilson to Grandson Joseph Morton; girl, Sylvia in estate of son, 
Joseph Morton dec'd; boy, Silman to grandson William Lytle; girl, 
Rachael to granddaughter Catharine Lytle Ex: son, James 
Morton and son in law, William W. Searcy W: Jacob Payne, James M. 
Smith 

42. RB 7, p. 341-343 - Thomas Norman, DOW: 28 July 1827 
P: January term 1828 Ex: brother, James D. Norman Wife: 
Martha B. Norman "negro girl, Charity" "until my oldest child 



75 



comes of age" Slaves to be hired out: man, Isaac; boy, Lewis 
"a piece of land I bought of Daniel Taylor" W: James Jones, 
William B. Jones, Little Berry Crook 

43. RB 7, p. 343-346 - John Bowman, DOW: 12 Sept. 1824 
P: February term 1829 Wife: Margaret Bowman s: Alexander 
Bowman "tract of land on which we live containing as I suppose 
about 350 acres..." d: Peggy Bowman "tract .. .beginning at the 
bank of the Creek direct opposite the fence dividing the meadow 
from the field which Thomas Dunn rents this year running with that 
fence a SE direction .. .to the corner of the new ground next Henry 
Threats... 85 acres" d: Prisulla Freeman, Betsey Ransom 
Exs : Wife; son, Alexander Bowman; George Morris W: Ezekiel 
Hazlet, Whitcoat Tarpley, B. F. Hazlet 

44. RB 7, p. 347-348 - William Rawlings, DOW: 18 November 1826 
P: August term 1827 Wife: Sally Rawlings Children: Polly 
Fulks, Nancy Rawlings, Matthias H. Rawlings, Piety Rawling, John 
W. Rawlings, Joseph A. Rawlings, Neffee Rawlings, Lewis J. 
Rawlings, Fanny Rawlings, William W. Rawlings Exs: Wife and 
Martin Hoover, Senr. W: John Rawlings, George Uselton Jr., 
Christopher Hoover 

45. RB 7, p. 348-349 - Benjamin McFarlin, DOW: 6 December 1828 
P: February term 1829 Wife: Elizabeth L. McFarlin Slaves to 
wife: man, Alfred; girl, Nelly "my five children": Robert B. 
McFarlin, Sarah N. McFarlin, Eliza Y. McFarlin, Benjamin P. 
McFarlin, Elizabeth McFarlin Exs: Wife and John C. Berry 
W: Joseph Youree, James D. Hamilton 

46. RB 7, p. 349-350 - John Sage, dec ' d of Williamson County, 
TN, DOW: 22 May 1826 P: October term 1827 "being old and 
infirm" Wife: Polly Sage s: Jesse Sage, Thomas Sage, Travis 
Sage Exs: Wife and son, Jesse Sage W: Meriman Landrum, 
T. C. Nash 



76 



RB 7, p. 36-37 

This Indenture made the twenty second day of May in the year 
of our Lord eighteen hundred and twenty eight 

Witnesseth, that Thomas Doughlass, son of Bodham Doughlass, aged 
seventeen years ten months and twenty two days, by and with the 
consent of the said Bodham Doughlass his father hath, of his own 
free and voluntary will paced and bound himself apprentice to 
James McDowel of the county of Rutherford and state of Tennessee, 
carpenter and house joiner, to leave the arts, trad[e]s, mystery 
and occupation of a carpenter and house joiner; which he the said 
James McDowel now usith, and with him as an apprentice to dwell, 
continue an serve from the day of the date here[in] untill he has 
completed his twenty first year during all which time the said 
apprentice his master well and faithfully shall serve, his [ ] 
keep his lawful commands gladly do and obey; hurt to his master he 
shall not do nor wilfully suffer it to be done by others, but of 
the same to the utmost of his power, shall forthwith give notice 
to his said master; the goods of his said master he shall not 
wast[e] or lend to any without his consents; at unlawful games he 
shall not play, nor frequent taverns, doggerys, or houses of ill 
fame, he shall not commit fornication or contract matrimony nor 
shall he at any time depart or absent himself from this said 
master service without leave; but in all things as a good and 
faithful apprintice shall demean himself toward his said master 
during said term. And his said master for and in consideration of 
the sum of one dollar to him in the said trade of a carpenter and 
house joiner, which he now usith with all things thereunto 
belonging, shall and will teach and instruct, or cause to be 
taught and instructed af [t]er the best way and allow unto his said 
apprintice, meat, drink, washing, lodging and apparel both linen 
and woollen, and all other things fit and necessary for such an 
apprintice, during the term aforesaid. And the said master at the 
end and expiration will give unto his said apprintice a sum of 
[ ] and a suit of clothes extra of decent homespun (Janes) 
In witness whereof the said parties have hereunto set their hands 
and affixed their seals the date first above written. 

Thomas 1 ^. Doughlass (SEAL) 

James McDowell (SEAL) 

Bodham [ 1 f .Doughlass (SEAL) 
mark) ^ 

TEST 

A Fowler Done by consent, 



77 



COUNTRY STORES ON JEFFERSON PIKE 

IN THE JEFFERSON AREA 

6y: Adeline King 
There is a historical marker standing at the intersection of Jefferson 

Pike and Sam Davis Road which reads as follows: 

"William Nash opened the first store here in 1803 and the first county 
courthouse was here in 1804, following the first meeting at Thomas Rucker's 
house. It was a stopping place on the Georgia Road. It was an important 
river port and trading post. In 1811, the County Seat was moved to Murfreesboro. 
Thereafter, until 1815, the Court House housed the Jefferson Seminary of Learning. 
(The "here" and "it" referred to above referred to settlement which became 
Old Jefferson.) 

William Nash's trading post was on the hill above the junction of the 
East and West Prongs of the Stones River. The community was given the name 
Old Jefferson at a later date. William Waller married Elizabeth Nash, daughter 
of William. Her grave remained in a small burying ground in Old Jefferson 
until the 1960's, when it was moved to Smyrna because of the preparations for 
the impoundment of the waters of Percy Priest Lake. William and Elizabeth Waller 
were the parents of Ephraim, George, Bill, Ben, and James Waller. The William 
Nash trading post, established about eight years after Tennessee became a 
State, traded with trappers, hunters, and wilderness men who tied up their 
canoes, rafts, flat boats, etc., at the nearby banks of the Stones River. 

For the period between the time of William Nash's trading post and the 
latter half of the century, there is little record of other posts and supply 
stores here. In this discussion, we are covering a period of about 100 years, 
between 1870 and today in the immediate area of Old Jefferson. In that period, 
nearly every small community had a country store, sometimes more than one. 
Some are still in existence, doing business, serving their community; but 



78 



there have been changes in their wares and services. 

The country store was a community gathering place and news center, a 
town hall, a forum of the people and their opinions and ready comments. 
Every store had its "regulars" who came often and stayed long to talk 
farming, families, fishing, weather, politics, people. The store was the scene 
of elections, of personal arguments over candidates and religion. Some men 
talked best when whittling on a small or large piece of wood. Some expounded 
longest and loudest when fortified with a big "plug" of hard chewing tobacco 
wedged into their jaws and bulging out their cheeks. Taking time to walk over 
and spit was opportunity for a dramatic pause in the midst of some profound 
statement. Some just came and sat and listened; the talkers knew all the 
answers to all the problems (like how to raise children, whom to vote for, 
what was the best way to cure hams or grow the biggest watermelon or take 
care of their stint in maintaining their stretch of the County roads.) Al- 
though the participants never thought of or labeled their gatherings as such, 
most of the gatherings were also variety shows. 

The country store provided staple goods that people could not produce 
on their farms for themselves. Every child in the community on their rare 
trips to the store had his time of staring through the glass case of the candy 
counter and knew the kind of sweet goodies he could find there. One early 
kind was called "bacon candy," as it was a thin strip of folded brown and 
white striped sweetness with a marble as prize hidden inside the folds. Many 
stores had pickle barrels, and just about all had big rounds of cheese in 
a wooden container, from which the storekeeper would slice off portions 
for the customers. "Gimmee a nickel's worth of cheese 'n crackers" was a fami- 
liar order. "Coal oil" was a major necessity for lamps and lanterns and there- 
fore a big item for sale in the store. "Onion sets" and other seeds were 



79 



available in the spring for farmers who had not kept them over from the 
previous year; plow points and harness repair items and work clothes were 
frequent purchases. 

In a short area on Jefferson Pike, between Florence Road and Mona 
Road, there were a number of country stores, dating back to the early 
trading post adjacent to the Stones River at Old Jefferson. This record 
is more a reminiscent narrative than historical report. It journeys back 
into a pleasant rural era when the church, the school, and the store were 
the gathering places and fostered neighborliness and mutual exchange. This 
record has been compiled from material generously provided by a number of 
people whose families have been in the business of operating country stores, 
and we express our appreciation for their willingness to help. They are the 
J. P. Smith family, the R. S. (Sidney) Waller family, Lucille Mullins Fergus, 
Mrs. Jenny Phipps, Bob and Katherine Barrett, Everett Waller, Bessie Moore, and 
Inez Peyton Vance. 

About 1870, the Ben Wade store was built on the Jefferson Pike north of 
Old Jefferson and in the northeast corner of the front yard of what came to 
be known as the McCulloch place and the J. P. Smith place, not far from the 
bridge over the West Branch of the Stones River. This store was operated 
by George Robertson until it was destroyed by a windstorm in 1908. Bessie 
Moore recalls that on an early morning in 1908, when she was visiting Rubye and 
Lorene Waller, Walter Wade Lenoir ran across the Pike to tell the Waller family 
that the previous night's storm had "blown away" the George Robertson store. 
Ben Wade, when he had turned that store over to Robertson, moved up to 
Jefferson and began another store on the Square and in front of his house. 
After Wade's death, and the destruction of the earlier store, George Robertson 
and R.O. (Bob) Davis ran that store for several years. Davis moved to Smyrna 
and established a flour mill where he had made the well-known and widely 



80 



distributed "Sarah Davis Flour," With the departure of Davis Robertson 
and R.I. (Bob) Martin operated the store together and Martin continued it 
after Robertson's death. 

George Robertson's store was appointed as official location of the 
local post office, and he was named postmaster on November 25, 1902. 
Before him, Sal 1 i a Waller (m. Finney) and Bettie Waller (m. Wright) 
had served as local postmistresses during the administration of Presidents 
Grover Cleveland, 1893-1897, and William Mc Kinley, 1897-1901. During 
the same period, Mack Clark, brother of Wiley and Dyson Clark of Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee, ran a store on the north side of the Square in the corner of 
Ephraim Waller's property. Bessie Wright Moore recalls that the store was 
in the corner of the yard of her grandfather Eph Waller was purchased by her 
father, W. W. Wright, and moved to a location in Smyrna (the site on Front 
Street just off Wright Street where the Bi-Rite Grocery recently stood). 

John Lenoir was another store operator; his place was at the southeast 
corner of the Square. All stores in Jefferson faced onto the Square, which 
for a brief time, 1804 to 1811, was the County Seat of Rutherford County. 

Around 1910 to 1911, R.S. (Sidney) and Claiborne Waller, sons of 
Ephraim, built a store on the Square's south side. R.S. Waller's residence 
was adjacent to the store. Joe King went into partnership with the Waller 
brothers, and the business was known as "Waller Bros, and King." Later the 
Waller brothers bought King's interest; and the store was known as "Waller 
Bros." In 1918, Claiborne Waller sold his interest to Sidney who, with the 
help of his wife Margie, operated the store there until about 1930, when it 
was sold to Sam Hall. 

R. S. Waller, General Merchandise, had for sale a large variety of items -- 
coffee beans (roasted but not ground), sugar, canned goods, tobacco for chewing 



81 



and smoking, snuff, hard candy, work clothes and shoes, needles and pins and 
thread, flavorings, harness, farm equipment parts, and many other things; 
later, when the soft drink industry offered their products, the store stocked 
them. Bessie Moore says that, even if Mr. Waller had a selection of candy 
on his shelves, his daughters Rubye and Lorene liked to take their Cousin Bessie 
across the road to George Robertson's store for a favorite kind. 

Mr. Waller had a two-horse wagon with a tarpaulin cover, in which he 
made weekly trips (Wednesday-Thursday) into Nashville to sell the country 
produce he had purchased on his house-to-house market route, and to buy wares 
he needed to restock his store. His main wholesaler and supplier was Orr, 
Mizell and Company, later Robert Orr & Company. He also bought some items 
from H. G. Hill, who at that time had only one store in Nashville. Mr. Waller 
purchased his dry goods from Yeargin's. Some weeks, Mr. Waller would ride to 
early morning 7 a.m. "Short Dog" into Nashville, while his helper drove the 
wagon into the city. Mr. Waller would stay overnight with his brother-in-law 
Emmett Starkey and family, and the helper would stay with the team and wagon. 
Sometimes, Mr. Waller took his daughters Rubye, Lorene and Evelyn (son Robert 
Sidney Waller, Jr., was born later) into the city on these weekly trips. 
He would make a comfortable resting place for the girls in the back of the 
wagon so that they could, if they wanted, to sleep for much of the drive. 
They left home "before daylight", and it was a long, tedious journey. 

Mr. Waller also ordered goods from "drummers," who were regular callers 
at the country stores. One of the drummers who come regularly was J. Edgar 
Evins who sold coffee for the Arbuckle Company of St. Louis. This Mr. Evins 
was the father of former U. S. congressman from Tennessee Joe L. Evins. Other 
drummers were salesmen for medicines(standard home remedies of the time), 
and many other items. Mr. Waller often said that he had to be very careful 



82 



when these salesmen speeded up their sales pitches or he might find he had 
ordered more than he needed or wanted. Bob Lee was a well-known drummer and 
an expecially interesting one. He represented the Robert Orr Company and 
could recite rapidly and without notes all the items on his sales list. 
People of the community liked to be at the store on the days when Bob Lee was 
to be there; they watched in awe as he leaned against a porch post and 
"spieled" off a hundred or more separate items without stopping. He drove 
a T-model Ford and that created interest also; it was said he never let any 
kind of bad weather keep him from coming on his appointed day. 

From people along his "market wagon" route, Mr. Waller bought produce 
that people had for sale, like chickens, turkeys, hams, eggs, butter, all 
kinds of hides (possum, skunks, fox, coon, muskrat) , and many other things. 
He paid cash or exchanged merchandise carried on his wagon. The purchased 
produce he sold locally or in Nashville at various markets. When someone 
in the community brought a hide from a beef animal, Mr. Waller would spread 
it out on the ground, sprinkle it with salt for curing before he took it into 
Nashville on his next trip. 

Mr. Waller's "market wagon" (sometimes called rolling store) went regu- 
larly along the roads and farms on the community. People along the route 
always welcomed the arrival of the market wagon whose driver brought them 
news of other people in the community or Nashville or the world beyond; and 
so the driver's trips along the country roads moved slowly, as the conversations 
went on. One day, according to Mr. Waller's family memories, when he was 
examining a ham offered to him for sale, a large roach ran up his sleeve and 
lodged in his ear. He struggled to remove it, but it was embedded there. 
The story goes that he almost panicked, whipped up his horses, and raced down 



83 



Florence Road until he reached the home of Mrs. Ernest King, who was 
recognized for knowing what to do in cases of emergency, and asked for her 
help. Using an old home method, she went for her kettle on the kitchen stove, 
brought warm water and dripped it slowly into the occupied ear; and the roach 
crawled out, Mr. Waller was calm and could continue on his route. 

There were always "regulars" visiting at the Waller store. Some of 
them were Oscar Mann, Jim Creech, "Boots" Lenior, Ben Ward, Eph Waller. One 
of them, Jim Creech, had a habit of coming early in the day, staying much of the 
day without making a purchase; then, when the store was closed for the day, 
the Waller family had eaten their supper, and were ready to retire, Jim Creech 
would knock on their door to ask Mr. Waller to sell him what he had come for 
in the morning, maybe a "nickel's worth" of tobacco. Mr. Waller would open 
the store to get it for him. 

At Christmas time, many of the men of the town and community gathered 
to celebrate on Christmas Eve. They played pranks on each other, told stories 
imbibed considerably, shot off fireworks. One of the annual Christmas Eve 
customs was to "shoot off" an anvil. They put gunpowder on the anvil, touched 
it off with a torch, and created a loud explosion that was considered the finale 
of the celebration. It is said that, at one of these occasions, Mr. Eph Waller, 
senior of the group, dared to stand on the anvil when it was shot off. Like 
the schools that had their "programs" like churches that gave the teaching and 
preaching on religion, the country store also provided a gathering place. 

Another store in the town of Jefferson was run by the Mull ins family. 
it was located on the east side of the Pike and on the south side of the 
Square, down the hill, and not far from the toll gate farther south. Some- 
time in the early 1900 ' s, Mr. Robert D. (always known as D) Mall ins and his 
wife Vera Walden Mull ins and their family came to live in Old Jefferson. Before 



84 



that, they had lived near the West Fork of the Stones River; their house 
was near the spring house on the John Dement place. When the Mull ins family 
first moved into Jefferson, they operated a store in a small room at the back 
of their house. Later they built a store at the corner of their front yard, 
facing Jefferson Pike, and across the road from the town's blacksmith shop 
(this had been the stables for the old tavern on the hill in earlier days.) 

Mr. and Mrs. Mullins were the parents of ten children. Their names, not 
in order of birth were: Ethel, Ernest, Ruth, Lillian, R.D., Jr., Roy, Jack, 
Beatrice, Lucile, and Nell. The Mullins store offered for sale or trade all 
the items generally provided in country stores; and they also, like other store 
operators of the time, "ran a market wagon." Their son Ernest drove the wagon 
along country roads to sell goods and buy produce. Frances King Johns recalls 
an incident on a summer afternoon when she and her sister were walking along 
Florence Road on their way to visit school friends and neighbors, Lena East and 
Maggie Warpool, whose house was on the right side of the road and facing down- 
hill to the river. The road was narrow at the point when they saw Ernest Mullins 
turning his wagon. He backed too far onto the down slope of the river bank, 
and the wagon went halfway over the edge and hung there, while produce and 
eggs spilled out over the rear end of the wagon and the side of the road. 

The Mullins store could claim credit as matchmaker as it was there that 
a handsome young lady of the community, Miss Nell Holloway, who enjoyed horse- 
back riding and did it well, stopped at the store for a rest and there was 
introduced to her future husband, Mr. George Hart, salesman for Arm and 
Hammer Soda Company. 

The regular "drummers" called at the Mullins store, which carried on its 
shelves, salt, sugar, piece goods, work clothes, farm supplies like nails and 
plow points, needles and pins, candy, "coal oil" of course and other items. 



85 



At these early stores, when a customer came with his oil can to buy oil, 
the storekeeper after filling it would push a small potato over the spout to 
keep the fuel from splashing out as the customer walked home. 

Mr. Mull ins died in 1925; his family continued to operate the store for 
a time. It is not known definitely in which year it was discontinued. 

Another store on Jefferson Pike in the area was known by several names, 
such as Phipps, Martin, Smith. Mrs. Jenny Phipps, Smyrna, Tennessee, remembers 
that her husband's family lived in the old Walnut Grove School building after 
it was converted into a residence.lt stood on Jefferson Pike where the 
Stones River Baptist Church is located today, a short distance from the inter- 
section of Jefferson Pike and the Sam Davis Road. Mr. Phipps, Sr. drove a 
market wagon in the area. His mother, known by all as "Aunt Minerva", lived with 
the family and was in charge of growing and tending the chickens and the flower 
garden and was recognized for them. Mr. Phipps' son Cons (C.J.) Phipps and 
Miss Jenny Oliver were married on December 22, 1914; in 1915, they moved into 
the senior Phipps 1 home, known in the area as "the Holloway place," also on 
Jefferson Pike. In 1916, the elder Mr. Phipps and family moved into a small 
house owned by J.J. Martin, near the intersection of Jefferson Pike and 
Florence Road, and began the operation of the store, which was property of 
Mr. Martin, and across the road from the residence of the Phipps family. 
At that time, Mr. and Mrs. Cons Phipps moved to the "Macy place," at the 
intersection of Jefferson Pike and Weakley Lane, where presently a boat- 
building business is operated. Like other storekeepers, Mr. Phipps and son 
Cons operated a "market wagon," selling or exchanging for farm produce all 
the usual items carried on these rolling stores. He purchased butter, eggs, 
country lard, poultry, etc. He carried at the back of his wagon a big coop 
for the poultry he bought. Mrs. Margie Waller, before her husband opened his 



, 7, 





Old Store building on Mona Road 
about 2 miles north of Mona 

Now on Eades Farm 



87 



store, would buy for her children and visiting Bessie Wright the rare treat 
of bananas which Mr. Phipps carried on his wagon. It was a risk for store- 
keepers tobuy bananas for country sale, as they had to buy a stalk and would 
have to do a good selling job to dispose of them before they bacame overripe. 

Once a week, Mr. Phipps made an overnight trip to Nashville for selling 
and buying, as was the custom with all market wagoneers of the time. The Phipps 
family operated the store until 1920, when they moved to Nashville. The J. P. 
Smiths were in charge by 1921. Before the Smiths came to the Jefferson Pike 
location, they were for short periods in charge of stores on the Mona Road and 
at Lamar. Before he was married to Grace Estes, Mr. Smith had run a market 
wagon. 

The Smith store, as it come to be known, was composed of two rooms and a 
cellar, but the cellar was never used. They sold feed, farm items like plow 
points, nails, harness equipment, as well as piece goods, work clothing, needles, 
pins, thread, food items, "coal oil," etc. Drummers called at the Smith store 
representing suppliers of coffee, tobacco, dry goods, farm implements, candy, 
and various other things. The Smiths operated the store for 21 years, built up 
a good business, made many friends. Like other stores, they had "regular" 
visitors, customers, sitters, talkers, some of the frequent comers were Mr. 
John Dement, son Carlos Dement, the Will Martins, "Squire" Jim Martin, John 
Coleman, Jim Massey, Ernest King, brothers Frank, Rufus, Glendon Johns, Joe 
King, Dan Muse, Frank Cheatham Ward. 

The store was a gathering place, an interesting place; children liked 
to stare through the glass of the candy case and buy a "penny piece" if they 
had a penny. The store owners daughter Mary Alice wangled her father out 
of many pieces to eat and dispense at school. Mr. John Dement, the elder of 




S.ot,on on Jt«.,.on P.b. ,»«, J.H„.on School. Thli I. a will ,ho„l y b.<om. o <«d ond o (.„ h„nd.»d .ord, b.. 

, " *""• '"' """"> ' Mn * in ,h « <"«<■ O"* 1 I'm 'w 'ho» yond lh„ po.nl, bxoui. of in. .mpoundod .««, o( Poi*y 

whc I v.d Ihoro In y«an poll. Ation Iho p.k« and opproxl. Prloil Dam 
moltly 100 yoidi Eait U tho ill* whir* one* flood o tloro 



Roy King store at corner of 
Jefferson Pike and Florence Road 




Barretts store Mona 1984 



89 



the "regulars," had never heard of health-seeking "brisk walks" or "jogging" 
enthusiasts, but he generally walked from his home by the river on Florence Road 
on his visits to the store. 

The J. P. (Peyton) Smiths discontinued their operation of the store in 
1942. It was not re-opened. 

In 1947, Everett Waller built a small, modern store and service station 
at the corner of Florence Road and Jefferson Pike. It was operated by his 
brother Ernest H. (Bud) Waller for five years. In 1952, Roy and Marie King 
who lived directly across Jefferson Pike from the store and at the site of the 
former residence of J. J. Martin, bought the store and did a flourishing busi- 
ness there until 1976 or 1977, when the operation closed and the structure was 
removed. With automatic gasoline pumps, freezers for maintaining food and 
cold drinks, with large trucks delivering products at the door, the store stocked 
all items of a modern grocery. It was a stopping place for people of the com- 
munity, for men of the Corps of Engineers surveying the area of river and land 
prior to the building of Percy Priest Dam. Its services changed with the 
times, but the store was still a center for gathering and talking. 

A few miles south of the Town of Jefferson was the Mona Store, which is 
the only one of the stores covered in this study that is still in operation 
and doing good business today. The first store building, at the intersection of 
Jefferson Pike and Mona Road, was constructed by Mr. Bill Harris, father of Mrs. 
Minnie Harris Beaty of Smyrna, to be used by Elvis Rushing and Hayes Tomlin. 
They had bought an acre of land, had the store built, and opened for business 
sometime around 1896. Mrs. Charles E. (Minnie) Beaty grew up in the Mona 
community. Another Harris family, the John Harrises, were local residents; 
they were related by marriage to Bill Harris, who had moved here from Kentucky. 



90 





Bob Barrett, Rufus Barrett 
Tom Mallard and Henry Gooch 

in front at Mona Store 



91 



From 1896, there was a post office in the store; it remained there until 
1904 when the rural routes were initiated out of Murfreesboro by the U. S. 
Post Office. Mrs. Beaty says that the name "Mona" was given to the community 
when one was needed to identify the post office. Someone who was reading a 
romantic novel of the time liked the name of the heroine, Mona, suggested to 
the group deciding on a name; and it was adopted. They agreed it sounded good, 
was short and easy to spell, sent it off to Washington, and it became official. 

In 1912, Mr. Oscar Phillips purchased the store from Messrs. Rushing and 
Tomlin. During the next seven years, Messrs. Ash and Spencer Short ran the 
store and a local market wagon. They went about buying eggs, poultry, butter, 
and other farm products. Fannie Short Wright, daugnter of Spencer Short, says 
that her father carried in the wagon a "lard stand" and, as he bought butter 
along his route, he put it into the"stand" (can); later, he and Mrs. Short would 
"work" the butter and mold it into units for sale in Nashville. For a short 
time before the Shorts began operation, Clyde Rushing, son of Elvis Rushing, 
had been in charge of the store and wagon. 

About 1922, Mr. & Mrs. Brum Peyton bought the store from the Shorts. 
Mr. Peyton lived for only a few years after the purchase; and his wife Katie 
Lee Phillips Peyton, daughter of Oscar Phillips, continued the store. Her 
brother Shelah Phillips had some business of his own there, too; but lived there 
with his sister and her family and assisted them. He ran his part of the busi- 
ness from a storehouse at the back of main building; a covered walkway joined 
the two; and, in winter, Shelah Phillips hung rabbits he had bought and prepared 
for sale later in Nashville markets. (Mrs. Inez Peyton Vance, daughter of 
Katie Lee Phillips Peyton, furnished much of this material). 

In 1936, Mrs. Katie Peyton sold her interest inthe business to Mrs. 
Oscar Phillips and Bernice and White Summars. Bernice and his wife operated 



92 



the store for three years, through 1939. During World war II.it was not used 
as a store, but converted to living quarters and rented; Herbert Phillips was 
owner of the property at that time. In 1945, Mr. Walter Casteel rented the 
building and re-opened it as a store. In November 1946, Robert (Bob) Barrett 
and his wife Katherine Ward Barrett bought the property, store, and house, 
plus 2'/ 2 acres of additional land. They have been in business there ever 
since. 

The Barretts continued to use the old store building until they replaced 
it in 1958 with a new structure. During the first years, Barrett bought eggs, 
poultry, butter, and other farm products. He sold "chunks" of bacon which 
he had purchased, but for the most part eggs that he bought were sent into 
Nashville. Later, restrictions and regulations for the sale of food required 
that any meat sold by storekeepers had to be pre-inspected and approved; so, 
selling of country bacon was discontinued. Although Mr. Barrett was buying some 
produce from local farms, much of the store's stock was purchased from whole- 
sale suppliers and delivered by truck. The weekly trip into Nashville was 
no longer a part of the operation. Some of the wholesalers from whom Mr. Barrett 
bought merchandise were J. W. Fletcher and Son, the Ragland Potter Company, 
C.B. Ragland, presently most of his supplies come from and through Malone and 
Hyde. Salesmen representing various companies still make calls to the Barrett 
Grocery at Mona. 

Bob Barrett retired in 1972, but not completely. Hatton Ward, brother to 
Katherine, came into the business; and now each man works part-time duty, Bob 
in the mornings, Hatton in the afternoons, with the store closed on Wednesdays 
and Sundays. Customers of many years still come to the store; friends and 
strangers stop for gasoline, soft drinks, cigarettes, groceries, snacks. 



93 



People stop to ask directions and stay to talk; someone new comes in nearly 
every day. Times and life styles, as well as eating habits, have changed, 
and the country store has generally been replaced by big modern supermarkets 
in nearby towns that are very reachable toda>. People who once might have asked 
for "a nickel's worth of cheese 'n crackers" now can buy the makings of 
sandwiches, along with chips and cold drinks. Although the appearance and 
type of its merchandise has altered, although many former customers have gone 
to the supermarkets, the Mona store remains as a central stopping point in 
the community, where neighbors and strangers may come together. 

As indicated, the Barrett Grocery is the only survivor of a short stretch 
of Jefferson Pike between Florence Road and Mona Road. Old Jefferson itself 
is gone; so are the other stores. With the advent of cars in every family, 
installation of big market outlets, people can get to them in the time it used 
to take to walk to the country store nearest them. However, the country stores 
bowed out with usefulness and dignity, a part of our heritage from the past. 
They served their communities in many ways. Like the church and the school, 
they were community centers. Their passing ended a colorful, interesting 
era of man's contact with man. 



94 



TAX RECORD OF DISTRICTS 15 AND 16 
RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE 
FOR 1836, 1837, and 1849 

By: E. K. Johns 

The 1836 and 1837 tax records for Rutherford County were taken from microfilm 

from the Tennessee State Library. District 15 and 16 are in the Northeast corner 

of Rutherford County around Milton and Lascassas. 

For some other Districts of these tax records see Publication No. 21 for District 

25, and Publication No. 22 for Districts 23, and 24. These tax records are the 

earliest listing of the county by districts which have been preserved. The 

tax records for 1809 and 1813 are in the state library but are not divided into 

districts. 

Information found in these records is land owned and the value of the land, slaves 

12-50 and their value, carriages and their value, lots owned and their value, if 

the person named is registered voter, meaning he is a resident of that district 

and school land held and its value. School land was land not owned but under the 

use of the person listed. In the mid 1840 the school land was sold or granted 

and does not appear in 1849, school land was apparently of low value. 



95 





TAX RECORD 1836 




DISTRICT 15 


Name 


acres/value school land/value 


Arnold, John 




Arnold, Jeremiah 




Abbott, David 




Allen, Ely 


60/300 


Arnold, William, 


S. 100/300 


Bivins, James 


400/1800 


Barlow, Alfred 




Bone, James 


24/300 


Bellah, John 


42/504 


Barlow, Kendall 




Bonds, Solomon 


265/800 


Crawford, John 




Creech, Joshua 


126/1260 


Cummins, Newton 


160/640 


Dave, Booker 




Davis, Ellis 




Dunaway, Dury 




Dunaway, Nancy 


134/600 


Davis, Nicholas 




Donald, Robert 


100/100 


Dodd, Robert 




Dunaway, Thomas 


119/357 


Davis, William 


305/3030 


Dunaway, William 


97/300 


Dodd, Griffin 


180/1000 


Estes, Mathew 




Edwards, William 




Grinage, Edmund 




Gilliam, James 


48/75 


Gilliam, Isaac 




Griffin, James 


140/500 



slaves/value white polls 



1 



1/800 



4/3500 

3/1700 
3/1900 



1/400 
3/1800 

7/5100 
4/2200 



1/900 

2/1200 

6/3150 



96 



Name 


acres/value 
James 


school land/value 


slaves/value white 


poll 


Gibson, 






Gibson, 


Moses 


40/675 








Gibson, 


Matthew 


270/2700 




1/600 1 




Hoskins 


, Daniel 


212/2968 




5/3600 1 




Hunt, Hiram 


142/200 








Hall, Jacob 


273/1400 


100/600 






Hi Id, Moses, G. 










Hill, Stephen, A. 






1/500 




Harsha, 


Hugh 


43/258 








Hall, John 










Johns, 


Joseph, B. 


620/3675 




13/7500 




John, Jacob 


110/770 




4/2150 




Johns, 


Thomas 


133/780 




2/1300 




Johns, 


William, R. 


183/1480 




3/2200 




Jarmen 


Robert 


320/2620 








Jones, 


David 










Johns, 


Paul, V. 










Lewis, 


Algernon 










Mc Kee 


Ambrose 


110/4400 


208/8200 


1/600 




Mc Kee 


Andrew 


582/930 


50/300 


1/800 




Mc Ado 


Brent ley, H. 


150/1500 




8/5400 




Mc Murry, Hugh 






4/2300 




Mullins 


, , John 










Matthews, John 


77/500 




1/600 




Matthews, John 


524/3810 




13/8200 




Moore, 


J. P. 


153/1030 








Mc Ado 


Samuel 


570/5000 




12/7300 




Monday 


Thomas 


93/500 








Mathews 


;, William 


150/1500 




1/300 




Mc Daniel, William 










Merrit 


James, B. 






2/1000 




Martin 


Alfred 


20/200 








Niesbet, Joseph 










Osburn 


Phillip 


180/2460 




17/13030 




Pearcy 


Algernon 


160/750 









97 



Name acres/value 


Pully, Thomas 




Pearcy, Thomas 




Robertson, Edward 




Robertson, Izaiah 


160/700 


Rucker, James 


130/1625 


Rucker, Samuel, R. 


300/3600 


Robertson, W.B. 


616/4313 


Robertson, William 




Reeves, Michael 




Sublett, A.C. 




Stewart, Mary 


50/150 


Stewart, John 


74/200 


Smith, Robert 


80/600 


Spain, Stephen 


380/1700 


Spain, Thomas 




Sublett, W.A. 


304/4300 


Thomas, William 




Thomas, David 




Vaughan, W.B. 




Vaughan, Patsey 


8/480 


Vaughan, Peter 


470/3700 


Vaughan, Peter 




Vaughan, Peter, A. 


76/696 


Vaughan, William, B. 


580/3129 


Vaughan, John, D. 




Wade, James 


292/2500 


Wade, Plummer 


131/600 


White, Pleasant 


90/900 


White, James 




Wisener, Tilman 




Warren, Thomas 




Warren, J.H.B.C. 


100/800 


Warren, Robert, B. 


60/600 


Wrather, Roily 


100/3130 


Wrather, Baker 


227/1500 


Totals 


12,013 



school land/value slaves/value white poll 



6/2280 
3/2400 

6/4400 
13/8600 

1/600 
3/1700 



2/1400 
11/7500 

7/5150 



3/200 
12/9300 

2/1400 
11/5600 

8/5600 

1/600 
1/600 



2/1400 

4/2600 1 

4/2400 

4/2700 

358 228 78 



98 





1837 


- DISTRICT 15 - 
TAX RECORD 


VALLEY 






BY: 


ISAIAH ROBINSON 






Name 


acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value white poll 


Arnold, John, B. 










Arnold, Jeremiah 










Arnold, William, S. 


100/400 








Allen, Ely 


60/300 








Abbot, Stephen 










Bivins, James 


7/270 




4/3500 




Bond, Soloman 




250/750 






Bradshaw, Radford 










Barnes, Henry 










Bone, James 


124/800 


26/20 


3/1700 




Bellah, John 


48/300 




3/1900 




Barlow, Alfred 










Barlow, Kendle 










Crowder, Robert, T. 






2/1200 




Crawford, John 


126/1200 








Dunnaway, Thomas 


49/147 


60/180 






Dodd, Griffin 


380/1000 




3/1600 




Dunnaway, William 


97/300 








Davis, Benjamin 










Dunnaway, Nancy 


104/5700 


30/30 


1/600 




Dunnaway, Drury, Jr. 










Davis, William, S. 










Davis, Elizabeth 


303/4545 




10/7500 




Davis, Nicholas 










Davis, Ellis 










Eastress, Matthew 










Griffin, James 


120/450 


30/50 


5/2500 




Gale, John 






3/2200 




Gibson, Moses 


48/600 









99 



Name 

Gibson, Mathew 
Hall, Jacob 
Hunt, Hiram 
Hill, Stephen, A. 
Hill, Moses, G. 
Holloway, John, J. 
Holloway, Isaac 
Harshaw, Hugh 
Hoskens, Daniel 
Johns, Thomas 
Johns, Jacob 
Johns, Paul, V. 
Johns, William 
Johns, Joseph, B. 
Johns, Randal, V. 
Jones, David 
Jarmen, Robert 
Ivey, Burrel 
Lewis, Edgcomb 
Luster, William 
Mathews, John 
Mc Daniel, William 
Martin, John 
Mc Adoo, Samuel 
Mc Farland, John 
Martin, Alfred 
Matthew, William, R. 
Mc Kee, Andrew 
Mc Kee, Ambrose 
Mundy, Thomas 
Merritt, Pleasant, P. 
Mc Adoo, Brantley 
Miller, William 
Martin, Robert 



acres/value 

273/4000 
213 1 / 2 /1500 

166/400 



43/258 
212/2968 
133/782 
100/800 

194/1552 
560/3625 
340/2400 

350/2800 



524/2882 



school 
land/value 



160/500 
166/200 



32/64 



10/10 



50/50 



slaves/value white poll 



1/600 



1/600 



5/4200 

2/1300 

4/2400 

1/600 

3/2200 

13/9400 

1/800 



11/7200 



40/500 


37/150 


1/800 


375/3750 


50/150 


11/6700 


150/1500 




2/575 


36/144 


196/1594 




130/520 


205/826 


1/600 


93/500 






151/1510 




2/900 


150/1500 




8/5500 



100 



Name 




acres/value 


school 
land/value 


slaves/value 


white poll 


Mullen, 


John, R. 








1 


Osburn, 
(gua 


Glenn, G. 
rdian for Jno 


6 6'/*/ 1000 
F.) 204'/ 2 /3067 




1/1000 
14/10150 


1 


Osburn, 


Phillip 


130/2300 








Owen, Edward 










Piercy, 


Algermoon 


160/550 






1 


Piercy, 


Thomas 








1 


Pierce, 


Granville, S. 


820/8200 




2/1800 


1 


Pilant, 


Hardy 








1 


Pully, 


Thomas 








1 


Rucker, 


Samuel, R. 


300/4500 




6/4800 


1 


Ragsdal 


e, Silas 








1 


Robertson, William, B 


616/4312 




15/9100 




Robertson, William 








1 


Robinson, Isaiah 


160/800 




3/2400 


1 


Smith, 


Robert 


80/600 


100/200 




1 


Smith, 


George 


143/600 








Steward 


, John 


55/200 


69/100 






Sublett 


, William, S. 


60/900 






1 


Sublett 


, A.C. 






4/3000 


1 


Sublett 


, William, A. 


286/5000 




8/5150 




Spain, 


Stephen 


380/1700 




11/7500 




Thomas, 


William 








1 


Tarpley 


, Thomas 


56/448 




3/2100 




Vaughan 


, Patsey 


40/500 


40/200 


3/2400 





Vaughan, Patsey (guardian 

for J. J. Vaughan) 

Vaughan, Peter, T. 

Vaughan, Peter, R. 

Vaughan, Peter 

Vaughan, William, Jr. 

Vaughan, John 

Vaughan, Drury, M. 

Vaughan, William, B, 



47/600 

98/1000 
470/3600 



Sr. 981/5082 



30/100 



3/2300 
14/8400 



2/1250 
11/6000 



101 



Name 



acres/value school 



slaves/value white poll 









land/ 


value 






Wade, P: 


lummer 


131/600 








1 


Wrather. 


, Baker 


270/1500 






4/2400 


1 


Warren, 


Thomas 








1/700 


1 


White, Pleasant 


90/900 






1/600 


1 


White, James 








1/600 


1 


Wade, James 


130/2500 






8/5000 




Warren, 


Robert, B. 


116/1392 






6/4200 


1 


Wallace. 


, Hugh 










1 


Wrather. 


, Raw ley 


100/330 






4/2400 




totals 




acres 


school 1 


and 


slaves 


white poll 



11,785 



1,541 



229 



74 



Additional Information on Carriages 



Name 



Carriage/Value 



Owen Edwards 



1/300 



102 



1849 TAX RECORD 
DISTRICT - 15 



Name 


Acres/Value 


Slaves/Value 


White Poll 


Allen, Levi 


90/500 






Arnold, John, B. 


22/150 




1 


Arnold, Jeremiah 


90/360 




1 


Arnold, Shepherd 






1 


Barlow, R.C. 


175/2000 


1/500 


1 


Barlow, C.T. 






1 


Bond, Solomon 


270/800 




1 


Bone, James 








Bevins, James 


450/5860 


9/3600 




Boehma, James, A. 


100/1500 


2/1000 


1 


Burton, H. M. 








Barlow, R.H. 






1 


Becton, George, W. 




6/3350 


1 


Clayton, Benjamin 








Cox, Cosby, H. 


122/488 




1 


Crawford, Martha 


142/1200 


7/3000 




Crawford, James 


104/1000 


1/500 


1 


Casm, James, T. 


100/1400 


1/500 




Dunaway, William 


117/765 




1 


Dunaway, Thomas 


41/140 




1 


Dunaway, Drury 


74/500 


3/1150 


1 



103 



Name 


Acres/Value 


Slaves/Value 


White Poll 


Dunaway, Manny 


149/900 


1/600 




Dunnaway, Thomas 


152/456 


1/400 




Dunnaway, Jacob 






1 


Davis, Elizabeth 


103/1545 


3/1600 




Dill, Thomas 


9/500 




1 


Dement, David 


47/500 






Dickson, Enoch 


35/525 






Edwards, John, A. 






1 


Edwards, S.C. 






1 


Farris, William, D. 


160/800 


1/400 




Hall, William, Jr. 


160/800 




1 


Hill, Moses, G. 


36/250 


2/1000 


1 


Hall, Jonathan 


80/400 




1 


Hall, Drury (Sen.) 


27/54 






Hall, Sion, D. 


23/138 






Hall, Jacob, G. 


220/1100 


1/500 


1 


Hunt, Hiram 


200/600 






Hunt, William 






1 


Harr, J.W. 


34/170 




1 


Henshaw, Hugh 


43/215 






Hi 11, Stephen, A. 


316/1800 


1/500 


1 


Harper, Benjamin 






1 


Gardner, Robert 




1/500 




Do. Administrator 


247/2800 


6/3000 




Johns, William 


394/3940 


9/3500 




Johns, M.H. 


140/700 


1/400 


1 


Johns, William (Guard.) 




1/200 




Johns, Jacob 


100/800 


5/2600 




Johns, Paul, V. 


224/2200 


6/2750 


1 


Johns, Joseph, B. 


372/1860 


4/1850 


1 


Johns, John, M. 






1 


Johns, James, R. 






1 


Jenkins, Nathanial 


81/250 






Jenkins, Ben 


20/60 






Kerby, Henry 


75/150 







104 



Name 


Acres/Value 


Slaves/ Value 


White Poll 


Loughry, J. N. 








Mc Daniel , James 








Mc Daniel, William 


120/600 






Martin, R.W. 


111/1245 


7/3350 




Mc Kee, Ambrose 


303/1200 






Mc Kee, John 








Mc Kee, James 


31/150 






Marshall, Martha 


125/350 


1/400 




Matthews, William 


525/4500 


7/3100 




Marlin, John, J. 


100/600 






Mul 1 ins, John, R. 








Mathews, E.L. 


375/2800 


6/2650 




Merill, James, P. 


237/2370 


7/3500 




Mc Adoo, B.H. 


437/3582 


12/5500 




Mc Adoo, A. P. 


64/960 


4/2000 




Mc Adoo, Mary 


300/3000 


3/1050 




Mc Cul lough, Mary 


38/570 


1/500 




Mc Kee, James 


31/150 






Mc Adoo, B.H. (Guard for 
E.B. Mc Adoo) 




1/600 




Nelson, G.F. 


125/1300 


1/400 




Owins, Thomas 


412/3800 


7/3100 




Owins, Stephen 




1/600 




Owins, William, B. 




1/400 




Owins, Nathaniel 








Owins, C.F. 




1/400 




Pearcy, Thomas, Jr. 


75/500 






Pearcy, Alg. 


100/800 






Pearcy, Robert, R. 








Pearcy, W.J. 








Pearcy, John, L. 


70/420 






Pully, William, R. 








Puly, J. 








Pearcy, Sherwood 








Ragsdale, S.M. 


5/50 







105 



Name 

Rice, John 
Reeves, Michael 
Reaves, William 
Reaves, Peter, M. 
Robinson, Isaiah 
Robinson, Susan 
Reaves, Thomas, B. 
Robinson, Nelly 
Robinson, Martha 
Rucker, Samuel, R. 
Do. Trust 
Rucker, Benjamin 
Sanders, Richard 
Seebleth, Ann 
Seebleth, A.C. 
Swain, Thomas, J. 
Spain, Lucy 
Spain, Lucy,(Adm.) 
Spain, John, Q. 
Slaughter, -- 
Stewart, John, P. 
Smith, A.N. 
Thurman, Pleasant 
Thurman, Nathan 
Tarpley, Thomas 
Tune, William 
Upchurch, Abner 
Vaughan, John, D. 
Vaughan, James, N. 
Vaughan, William, A. 
Vaughan, Peter, T. 
Vaughan, James, R. 
Vaughan, Sarah 
Vaughan, Mary, A. 
Vaughan, Peter & A. A. Hill 
Wade, Levi, (Adm.) 



Acres/Value 



50/600 



78/800 
620/4000 

40/120 

198/1800 

460/6100 

753/9055 

54/150 
343/5100 

230/1840 



124/372 



68/340 
220/1668 



Slaves/Value 

1/500 
1/250 



8/4000 
13/5500 



6/2550 
10/4450 

37/14800 
1/400 

10/5300 

4/1750 
6/2750 
1/500 



3/1400 



White Poll 



180/2000 
150/1300 


4/2000 
1/600 
2/1100 
1/250 


1 
1 

1 
1 


138/1000 


3/1600 
1/500 


1 



184/1850 



106 





Acres/Value 


Slaves/Value 


White Poll 


dther, Baker 


687/2400 


12/5200 




Wrather, Enoch, B. 






1 


White, Pleasant 


90/1350 


2/1100 




Wrather, CM. 




1/400 




White, J.D. 








Warren, Thomas 








Wrather, R. 








Winston, Isaac, N. 








Wrather, W.S. 




2/900 




Totals 


Acres/Value 


Slaves/Value 


White Poll 




13,598/110,968 


262/117,850 


75 



107 







TAX 


RECORD 


1836 










DISTRICT 


16 






Name 


acres/value 


school land/value 


slaves/value 


white poll 


Armstrong, M.A. 




2/530 






1/400 


1 


Alexander, Jesse 




161/1200 




41/10 


2/1200 




Alexander, John 












1 


Armstrong, Knox 




200/1300 






1/600 


1 


Anderson, William 




160/867 






1/600 




Adams, William 












1 


Baid, William 












1 


Baum, John 












1 


Buttler, Deborah 




66/350 










Baum, Moses 




50/350 








1 


Blackwood, James, Jr. 


128/500 










Blackwood, James, 


Sr 


. 130/400 






2/1100 




Ball, William, T. 




81/500 






1/450 


1 


Buttler, James 












1 


Black, Rebecca 




109/700 




30/30 






Bolton, John 




150/450 










Brown, Alexander 














Bottom, Sterling, 


H. 












Black, J.W. 














Bottom, John, R. 














Bell, James, B. 














Cunningham, Moses 




100/800 




50/75 






Cosbey, Williamson 












Cranor, Thomas 




125/800 










Cole, Obediah 




253/1200 






1/500 




Crowse, Henry 




130/700 






2/900 




Chiles, Rowland 














Denny, Samuel 




61/500 






2/1200 




Davis, James 














Davis, Isreal 















108 



Name 


acres/value 


Davis, Elizabeth 




Dill, Pearson 




Dill, Thomas 


78/600 


Dill, William 


255/1200 


Donoho, Pathena 


352/3000 


Daniel, Mitchell 




Dement, Charles 

(for heirs 


100/700 
of A. Demei 


Farr, Ephraim 


216/1300 


Farr, William, L. 




Gilliam & Moore 




Greer, Nathan 


135/675 


Gooch, Allen, T. 


193/1850 


Hi 1 burn, Demsey 




Hooper, George 


116/950 


Hicks, John 


50/156 


Harrell, Samuel 




Harris, Nathan, T. 


56/200 


Hoskins, Thomas 


267/1335 


Jourdin, Alexander 




Jones, David 


250/1800 


Jarmen, Amos 


181/1200 


Jourdin, Nancy 


225/1575 


Jourdin, John 


100/375 


Jourdin, David 




Jourdin, James 




Jones, Levi 


32/200 


Johns, Issac 




Keys, Erazmas, S. 


100/500 


Koonce, Leonard, J. 




Koonce, Tobias 




Kilpatrick, James 


50/200 


Lasiter, Samuel, H. 


100/500 


Murphey, John, G. 


280/3000 


Milton, John 





school land/value slaves/value white poll 



124/300 



1/500 1 
6/4300 

1 



7/4700 
2/1000 

5/2500 





1 


2/1300 


1 


1/800 


1 


3/1500 




1/900 


1 


1/600 


1 


1/600 


1 




1 




1 



109 



Name 



acres/value 



Morgan, Benjamin 


133/2175 


Marshal, A.D. 




Matthew, Hiram 


250/1000 


Matthew, Keeler 




Moore, John 


331 3/4 /2500 


Mc Knight, William, 


90/800 


Matthews, William, 


T. 110/816 


Meads, Samuel, Jr. 


100/875 


Morgan, Peter 




Mc Knight, Enos 


140/1200 


Mc Kee, John, B. 




Matthews, James 




Marshal, William 




Moses, Gi 1 lead 




Morgan, Howard 


18/1200 


Mc Knight, -- 


90/1000 


Nowell, Solerty 




Nowell, Thomas 




Orr, John 




Orr, Robert 


297/2000 


Peebles, George 


199/1600 


Patterson, Penkney 




Parker, Hardy 




Rhodes, Claborn, H. 


100/645 


Ramsey, Mary 


114/950 


Rhine, Frances 


61V900 


Ramsey, Jesse 




Robertson, James 


19/200 


Robertson, Hugh 




Scroggins, -- 


270/1600 


Smith, Charles 




Stone, Parker, F. 


409/2500 


Stroud, Allen 




Thomas, William 


154/600 



school land/value slaves/value white poll 



4/2800 



4/2800 
1/600 
1/500 
3/1900 



50/50 



200/100 



116/233 



12/100 



325/650 



1/800 



1/400 



1/900 



3/2530 
3/2400 



1/400 
8/5300 



110 



Name 



acres/value 



Tolbert, James 








1 


Vaughan, James 75/800 










Vaughan, William 








1 


Weatherspoon, Ed, S. 








1 


Woolridge, John, S. 






3/1700 


1 


Woods, Nancy 80/470 






2/1400 




Wilson, Thomas 196/1200 






1/500 


1 


Wilson, William 






1/500 




Woods, Polly (heirs) 94/525 










Totals acres 


school le 


tnd 


slaves 


white pol 1 


9160 


968 




84 


83 



Additional Information on Lots & Carriages 



Name 


Lot/Value 


Carriage/Value 


Boid, William 


1/60 




Cosbey, Williamson 


1/300 




Gi 1 liam & Moore 


2/385 




Gooch, Allen, T. 




1/300 


Hooper, George 


4/523 




Johns, Isaac 


2/300 




Patterson, Penkney 


1/190 




Stone, Parker, F. 


2/329 


1/300 



Total 



13 



111 



1849 TAX RECORD 

DISTRICT 16 
BY: D. M. MC KNIGHT, ESQ. 



Name 


Acres/Value 
201/2010 


Slaves/Value 
2/900 


White Poll 


Alexander, Jesse 




Alexander, William 








Alexander, Samuel 








Anderson, Mary 


137/550 






Adams, William, B. 








Byrn, W. B. 


296/2500 


4/2000 




Black, R.D. 


111/500 






Bell, James 








Bilbro, B.H. 




1/400 




Baker, W.D. 








Blackwood, James, Jr. 


128V800 


1/600 




Bottoms, S.H. 








Ball, W.J. 








Bulling, Solomon 








Bell, John 








Blackwood, James, Sr. 


100/625 






Black, Rebecca 


50/200 






Ball, W.T. 


90/700 






Ball, Thomas, W. 








Bottom, John 


50/300 






Cole, P.H. 








Church, R.A. 








Crowley, Martha 


175/1200 


2/900 




Cranes, T.B. 


140/1000 






Cole, John 








Crouse, Henry 


200/1000 


2/900 




Crowley, Lafayette 








Cole, Thomas, N. 


254/1260 







112 



Name 


Acres/Value 


Slaves/Value 


White Poll 


Donoho, Porthenia 


352/3000 


5/1500 




Dement, David & John 


120/1200 


1/500 


2 


Donnell, Ann, B. 


273/2500 


9/4250 




Dill, Joseph 


172/1600 


3/1300 




Donoho, Edward 








Dillon, Thomas 


82/500 






Dillon, C.S. 


75/800 


2/900 




Dillon, William 


120/1000 


2/1100 




Farr, Joseph, E. 








Farr, W.L. 


67/550 






Gannaway, William 


135/500 


1/500 




Gooch, A.T. 








Greer, James 








Greer, Audy 








Greer, Thomas, C. 








Gilliam, Edward 








Hill, W.A. 


128/1000 


2/1100 




Hays, T.T. 








Hight, R.A. 








Harris, N.T. 


193/1200 


2/1000 




Hall, W.C. 


100/700 






Hays, Amos 








Hill, James 


94/600 






Hood, J.C. 


326/3200 


2/1200 




Hennington, W.C. 








Johns, Isaac 








Jinons, Jesse 


168/800 






Jinons, W.R. 








Jordan, David 


255/2000 


13/6200 




Jordan, James 


90/600 


1/600 




Jones, Henry, D. 


175/875 






Jordan, Alexander 


130/1300 


2/1000 





113 



Name 


Acres/Value 


Slaves/Value 


"White Poll 


Jarmon, Amos 


260/1600 


2/900 


1 


Jarmon, Robert 


100/1500 






Koonce, Wilely, A. 








Kelley, Shadrack 


52/130 






Knox, J. A. 


297/1500 


3/1600 




Koonce, John 








Lassiter, John, S. 


193/1800 


2/1000 




Lehew, James 


) 






Lasiter, Thomas 








Lehew, William 








Mc Knight, William 








Morgan, Benjamin 








Mc Tire, Hugh 








Mathis, W.T. 


115/920 


1/600 




Mc Adoo, Samuel , L. 


233'/ 2 /3000 


8/3950 




Mathis, J.H. 


87V460 






Murphy, Cicero 


160/1500 






Marshall, R.F. 


63/900 






Marshall, A.D. 


60/^50 


1/400 




Miller, William 








Morrison, W.G. 


50/450 






Matthis, Rachael 


107/780 






Morse, Gilbert 








Mc Knight, J.L. 








Mc Knight, D.W. 


150/1200 






Overall, J.W. 


120V 1300 


2/900 




Overall, James 


90/900 






Patterson, A.C. 


150/1200 


3/1400 




Pyland, Jno.D. 


33/150 






Peebles, George 


315/3000 


1/500 




Peebles, A.D. 








Price, Wilson 








Patterson, Horace 


150/1500 


2/950 




Parks, William 









114 



Name 


Acres/Value 


Slaves/Value 


White Poll 


Parker, Hardy 






1 


Rea, William 








Roberts, R.S. 








Robertson, J. W. 








Ramey, Jesse 




1/400 




Rucker, William 








Rains, John 








Stephens, Catherine 


14/30 






Swink, James 








Swarner, Richardson 








Smith, D.D. 


200/2000 


3/1400 




Guard, for Smith 








Smith, (Guard, for Ford) 








Sullivan, J.E. 


6V300 






Thompson, William 








Talley, P.C. 


409V2600 


7/3000 




Tailor, (Adm.) 


150/450 


1/400 




Thompson, J.M. 








Vaught, Jno. 


70/450 






Vaught, Thomas 


75/750 






Wilson, Thomas 


200/1500 


1/500 




Wooldridge,J.S. 


107/840 


1/450 




White, W.B. 








Witherspoon, A.B. 








Witherspoon, B.F. 








Total 


9015V68430 


96/45200 


89 



115 



1837 - DISTRICT 16 - MILTON 

TAX RECORD 
BY: A. S. BUTLER 



Name 



acres/value 



Alexander, Owen 




Acuff, Fielding 


100/500 


Armstrong, Knox 




Alexander, John, D. 




Armstrong, M.W. 


2/600 


Alexander, Jesse 


160/1200 


Adams, William 




Anderson, William 


160/567 


Bottoms, Sterling, H. 




Baum, Moses 


50/350 


Blackwood, James, Sr 


130/400 


Butler, Adam, S. 


66/600 


Bottoms, John, R. 




Black, Robert 


111/700 


Bottom, John 


150/450 


Blackwood, James, Jr. 


128 1 / 2 /500 


Butler, James 




Ball, William, T. 


83V600 


Bell, James, B. 




Cosby, William 




Chiles, Rowland 




Crawley, Lemuel 


200/1600 


Crouse, Henry 


135/700 


Cranor, Thomas 


120/1000 


Cole, Obadiah 


253/1200 


Cunningham, Moses 


100/800 


Davis, Elizabeth 




Dillon, Edmund 





school slaves/value white poll 
land/value 



40/10 



50/75 



1/600 

1/600 

1/600 
2/1200 



2/1100 



1/600 



1/600 
2/900 



1/700 



116 



Name 

Dill, Thomas 

Dillon, William 

Donoho, Parthenia 

Dillon, John 

Dill, Parson 

Davis, James 

Denny, Samuel 

Daniel, Mitchell 

Davis, Israel 

Fagan, H.W. 

Farr, Ephraim 

Fouch, John 

Farr, William 

Greer, Nathan 

Gooch, Allen, T. 

Harris, Nathaniel, T. 
Harrel, Samuel 
Hix, John 

Heirs of A. Dement 
Hoskins, Thomas, C. 
Hooper, George, S. 
Hooper, Wilson 
Higdon, Elijah 
Jarmen, Amos 
Jordon, Alexander 
Jones, Sarah 
Jordon, William 
Jordon, Nancy 
Jordon, John, Jr. 
Jones, David 
Jordon, David 
Jordon, James 
Koonce, Tobias 
Knox, Samuel 



acres/value 

78/800 
250/1200 
352/3500 
193/1875 



61/500 



216/1200 



145/725 

5/100 

181/800 

54/108 
100/700 
360/2160 
154/625 



181/1200 

50/500 

32/200 

82/800 

225/1575 

230/1800 



14V56 



school slaves/value white poll 
land/value 



1/500 
6/4700 

1/600 



124/500 



2/1200 



1/1200 



6/3000 
1/700 



4/2400 
2/850 



1/800 



3/1500 

1/900 

2/1300 

1/600 

1/600 

2/1200 



117 



Name acres/value 

Koonce, John 

Lasiter, Samuel, H. 100/500 

Lemay, James, H. 

Lemay, Lewis, A. 

Moore, John, S. 346/2700 

Moore & Gilliam 

Morrison, William, G. 

Marshall, A.D. 

Mathias, William, T. 50/300 

Moss, Charles, D. 

Mathis, Miram 250/1000 

Mc Adoo, Samuel, Jr. 200/2000 

Moss, Gilbert 

Mc Knight, Enos 140/1200 

Mathis, Keller 

Murphey, John, G. 298/3000 

Mc Knight, William 90/1000 

Morgan, Benjamin 133/2550 

Mathis, James 

Morgan, Peter 

Orr, Robert 297/2000 

Orr, John, M. 

Orr, James, H. 

Overall, Robert 60/600 

Peebles, George 315/1635 

Parker, Hardy 

Pi land, Robert 

Rhodes, C.H. 101/645 

Rion, Francis, P. 

Robinson, Hugh 

Ramsey, Mary 84/800 

Robinson, James 19V200 

Ramsey, William (heirs) 40/200 



school slaves/value white poll 
land/value 



50/100 



72/200 



5/3000 

1/600 

4/2800 
1/800 



2/1000 
4/3200 



324/650 



1/900 



3/2400 



3/2350 



118 



Name 


acres/value 


Reeves, M. 




Rainey, Jesse 




Stroud, Allen 


100/500 


Sanders, Elisha 




Smith, David 




Scoggins, John 


276/1600 


Scoggins, David 




Stuart, Grief 




Thomas, William 




Vaught, James 


75/800 


Wooldridge, John, S. 


111/900 


Wilson, Thomas 


146/1000 


Wood, Nancy 


82/475 


Wilson, William 




Wilson, B.F. 




White, William, B. 




Total 


acres 



school slaves/value white poll 
land/value 



1/400 



8,224 



21/42 



school land 
681 



1/40 



3/1600 
1/700 
2/1400 
1/500 



slaves 



77 



white pol Is 
80 



Additional Information on Lots & Carriages 



Name 
Alexander Owen 
Sterling H. Bottom 
William T. Gooch 
Wilson Hooper 
Moore & Gilliam 
William Cosby 



Lot/Value 


Carriage/Value 


1/600 




1/300 




1/550 


1/300 


2/175 




2/535 




1/300 





119 



INDEX FOR VOLUME 23 



by: E. K. Johns and 

Mrs. Wi 11 iam Walkup 



Name 

Abbott, David 
Stephen 

Acuff, Feilding 

Adams, Dr. Carl 
Samuel 
William B. 

Adcock, Lidda 
Alexander, Abner 
Andy 
George 
Gideon 
Rev. Jesse 



Jesse 

John 
John D. 
M.A. 
Nell 
Osuin 
Owen 
Samuel 
Zachrias 
William 
Allen, Ely 
J.E. 
Levi 
M.P.G. 
Alsup, G.M. 
Anderson, Mary 
Samuel 
William 
Andrew, Jane 
Anthony, Mary Ann A. 

Thomas S. 
Arbuckle Co. 
Arm & Hammer 
Armstrong, James, M. 
Knox 
Martin 
Dr. M.W. 

Arnold, Jeremiah 
John 

Shepherd 
William, S. 



Page 



Name 



Page 



96 


Baid, William 


108 


99 


Baird, Harris 


24 


116 


Baker, W.D. 


112 


55 


Banks, Franky 


74 


71 


Betsey 


74 


108,112 


Ball, Thomas, W. 


112 


116 


W.J. 


112 


70 


William T. 


108,112, 


16 




116 


22 


Bantan, Daniel, W. 


72 


45 


Baptist Church 


41 


45 


Barker, Donelson 


20,25 


15,16,20, 


Barlow, Alfred 


96,99 


45, 108, 112 


C.T. 


103 


116 


Kendall 


96,99 


71 


R.C. 


103 


108 


R.H. 


103 


116 


Barnes, Henry 


99 


108 


Barrett, Allen 


32 


54 


Bob 


80,91, 


22 




93 


116 


Katherine Ward 


80,93 


45,112 


Rufus 


91 


16 


Barton, David 


16 


112 


William 


16,19 


96,99 


Bass, Hartwell 


68 


26 


Mary A. 


68 


103 


Sarah 


68 


13 


Batey Camera&Typewriter 


Co. 49 


21 


Minnie Harris 


90 


112 


Tom 


49 


70,73 


Batte, Frederick 


68 


108,116 


W i 1 1 i am 


68 


75 


Battle, Debbyan 


73 


75 


Baum, John 


108 


75 


Moses 


108,116 


82 


Baxter, David 


15,16 


85 


Donnie 


32 


21 


Jack 


58 


108,116 


James Albert 


58 


15 


John H. 


16,19,20 


15,19,22,24 


R.M. 


30 


42,116 


Rebecca 


46 


96,99,103 


William 


24 


96,99,103 


Beasley, Sally 


73 


103 


Thomas 


73 


96,99 


William 


73 




Beavers, Abram 


68 




Delila 


68 




Samuel Thomas 


68 



120 




ij i 

iff; 

lilt 

IP If %l 

iilil 



mm i 



Name 


Page 




Name 


Page 


Becton, John, W. 


19 




Blackwood, James, Jr. 


108,112, 


Becton, Elizabeth 


71 






116 


Fredrick 


71 




James, Sr. 


108,112, 


George, W. 


103 






116 


Robert 


32 




Blankenship, Carse 


63 


Bedford County Tenn. 


70,73 




L.E. 


24 


Beech Hill Cemetery 


51 




Maggie 


58 


Bell, Dutch 


58 




Bloodworth, Jesse 


72 


Eli 


75 




Blount, torn. Gov. 


15 


Elisha 


68 




Blumenthal & Becker 


4 


Elizabeth 


68 




Boehma, James, A. 


103 


James 


24,68 




Boid, William 


111 


James, B. 


108,112,116 


Bolton, John 


108 


John 


112 




Bonds, Solomon 


96,99, 


Lewis 


68 






103 


Mary 


68 




Bone, James 


96,99, 


Mary Ellen "Mollie" 


13 






103 


Nancy Emeline 


68 




Booker, Efford, D. 


71 


Raymond 


54 




George, R.0. 


71 


Samuel 


68 




Nancy, D. 


71 


Susannah 


68 




Richardson 


71 


Telephone 


55 




Sally, A. 


71 


Thomas, E. 


24 




William, A.K. 


71 


William 


68 




William, P. 


71 


Bellah, Elizabeth 


71 




Boos, Lewis 


24 


Elizabeth, A. 


71 




Bostic, Thomas, King 


42 


John 


71,96 


,99 


Bottom, John 


116 


Moses 


71 




John, R. 


108,112, 


Moses II 


71 






116 


Nancy 


71 




Sterling, H. 


19,22,47, 


Samuel 


71 






108,112, 


Berry, John, C. 


76 






116,119 


Bigham, Robert 


72 




Bottoms House 


19 


Bilbro, B.H. 


22,24. 


,27, 


Bowman, Alexander 


76 




40,42, 


,51,112 


John 


76 


Bilbro House 


19 




Margaret 


76 


Bioims, James 


20 




Peggy 


76 


Bivins, James 


96,99, 


,103 


Bradley Creek Baptist 


54 


Black, Dennie 


58 




Bradshaw, Radford 


99 


Fred 


58 




Brandon, John, E. 


32 


J.W. 


108 




Brautley, Bill 


56 


Mrs. James 


45 




Sam 


52 


James Alexander 


46 




William F. 


61 


Jane Finney 


44 




Brewer, Richard 


69 


R.D. 


112 




Brookover, E. 


32 


Rebecca 


108,112 


Brothers, Mary 


70 


Robert 


116 




Brown, Alexander 


108 


Samuel, Pitt 


46,70, 


74 


E.G. 


32 


Thomas 


15,16, 


24, 


Browning, William 


10,12 




44 




Bryant, John 


20 


Blackman, Alfred 


2 




Bugg, Nezzie 


58 


Elizabeth Crawford 


2 




Willie 


25 


Mary Hollowell 


1,13 




Bulling, Solomon 


112 



\ 



121 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Bumpas , Dana Knox 

T.J. 
Burgess, Richard 
Burnett, Joseph 
Robert 
Walter 
Burns Place 
Burton, H.M. 
Butler, A.S. 

Adam, S. 
Ann 

Deborah 
Gilbert 
James 
Bryn and Herndon 
Green 
James, L. 
R.G. 
William, M. 

Cainsville 
Campbell, Samuel 
Cannon, Aramanta 

Elizabeth 

Theophilus, A. 
Cantrell, Ota 
Carter, Martin 
Casm, James, T. 
Castell, Walter 
Charlotte Co., Va. 
Cherry, Charlie 

James 
Chiles, Rowland 
Church, R.A. 
Clark, Anthony 

Dyson 

Franky 

James 

John 

Mack 

Robert 

Sarah 

Susanna 

Walter 

Wiley 

William 
Clayton, Benjamin 

George 
Cole, John 

Obediah 

P.H. 
Thomas, N. 



14 


Coleman, Ellen Smith 


1,3 


48 


John 


88 


68 


Rebecca 


73 


73 


Thomas 


73 


68 


Commerce 


49 


24 


Cook, J.E. 


32 


50 


James, H. 


19,20,24, 


103 




27 


116 


John, S. 


20 


116 


Cooper, Alfred 


65 


72 


Bessie 


65 


108 


Cornatzor, Nicholas 


68 


34 


Cosby, Marshal & Co. 


22 


108,116 


Williamson 


22,111 


24 


William 


116,119 


26 


Coulter, Anderson 


68 


24 


Azia 


68 


26,28 


Couper, Henry 


70 


26,28 


Covirly, Jack 


70 




Cox, Cosby, H. 


103 


49 


James 


54 


71 


Craddock, Hailey, F. 


49 


72 


Ladelle 


51,57 


72 


Cranes, T.B. 


112 


72,74 


Cranor, Fannie 


40 


74 


Cranor, George 


34 


32 


Land 


46 


103 


Moses (Mrs.) 


46 


93 


Moses 


15,26,32 


70 


Rebecca 


46 


24 


Sam, B. 


24,40 


68 


Thomas 


19,108,116 


108,116 


Thomas, (Mrs.) 


45 


112 


Crawford, James 


103 


75 


John 


96,99 


81 


Martha 


103 


75 


Crawley, A.W. 


20,108 


75 


Lemuel 


116 


75 


Creech, Jim 


84 


81 


Joshua 


96 


75 


Crook, Little Berry 


76 


75 


Crouse, Henry 


108,112, 


75 




116 


75 


Polly 


73 


81 


Crowder, Robert, T. 


99 


75 


Crowley, Lafayette 


112 


103 


Martha 


112 


73 


Crutchfield, Charles 


68 


112 


John 


68 


15,19,108, 


Sarah 


68 


116 


Cummins, Newton 


96 


112 


Cunningham, Moses 


108,116 


112 


Currin, Jont 


70 



122 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Daniel, Mitchell 


109,116 


Doak, J.R. 


42 


Daugherty, Bob 


52 


John, Mrs. 


46 


David, Nathaniel, W. 


19,20 


John, Sr. 


74 


Davis, Benjamin 


99 


Joseph 


74 


C.R. 


70 


Mait 


74 


Elizabeth 


99,104,116 


Nancy 


74 


Ellis 


99 


Patsey 


74 


Israel 


108,116 


Peggy 


74 


James 


108,116 


Polly 


46,74 


Mark 


58 


Robert 


74 


Nicholas 


99 


Uppy 


74 


William 


96 


Dodd, Griffin 


96,99 


William, S. 


99 


Harvey 


32 


Dekalb Cooperative 


55 


Donelson, Jacob, B. 


20 


Delay, Grace 


32 


Donnel , Eden 


71 


Jesse 


15,17 


Donnel, Ann, B. 


113 


Deloach, Sally 


68 


Donoho, Pathena 


109,113, 


Demen, Lizzie 


52 




116 


Doment, A. 


109,117 


William 


15,19 


Charles 


109 


Doran, William 


15,19,24, 


David 


104,113 




62 


John 


113 


Dreury 


68 


Denny, Samuel 


70,108,116 


Duggin, Thomas, J. 


24 


Dickenson, David 


69 


Dunnaway, Drury, Jr. 


99,103 


Dickson, Abegail 


72 


Jacob 


104 


Alexander Smith 


72 


Manny 


104 


Asahel 


72 


Nancy 


99 


Edwin 


72 


Thomas 


96,99,103, 


Enoch 


104 




104 


Ezekiel 


72 






Franklin Holland 


72 


East, Lena 


85 


Dickson, Jackson Carroll 


72 


Eastress, Matthew 


99 


James 


72 


Edwards, John, A. 


104 


John 


72 


Judith 


75 


John, Haywood 


72 


S.C. 


104 


Joseph, Raukin 


72 


William 


96 


Lucinda, Emaline 


72 


Elam, Daniel 


73 


Polly 


72 


Edward 


73 


Thomas 


72 


Elizabeth 


73 


Thomas, Sr. 


72,74 


George, Foster 


73 


Thoma s , Samue 1 , Sm i th 


72 


JangJean 


73 


William 


72 


John 


73 


Dill, Isaac 


15,19 


Lewis Wills 


73 


Joseph 


113 


William 


73 


Pearson 


109,116 


Elder, James, G. 


20,24 


Thomas 


20,25,104, 


Elliott, Alfred 


72 




109,116 


Catherine 


72 


William 


109 


Deborah 


72 


Dillon, A.M. 


22 


Eleanor 


72 


C.S. 


113 


James 


72 


Edmund 


116 


James, Elliott 


72 


John 


16,116 


John 


72 


Thomas 


113 


Mary 


72 


William 


113,116 


Stockard 


72 


Dix, William 


15,19 


Elrod, Bettie 


34 


Doak, Elizabeth 


74 






Isabella 


74 


123 





Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



El rod, Rufus 
Estes, Grace 
Matthew 

Evans, J. Edgar 

Joe, L. 
Ewingsville School 



Fagan, H.W. 

Henry, W. 
Fann, Alton 
Farney, Bobbie 
Farr, Ephraim 

Farris, William, D. 
Fentress, James 
Fergus, Lucille Mullins 
Ferguson, S.T. 
Finney, James 

Ruth 

Sallie 
Fletcher, J.W. 
Foster, Anna 

Anthony 

Betsey, 

Guynn 

James 

Mildred 

Nancy 

Polly 

William 
William, Jr. 

William, Lytle 
Fouch, John 
Fowler, A. 
Freeman, Prisully 
Fulks, Polly 



Gale, John 
Ganaway, Burwell 
Gunnaway, William 
Gardner, Robert 
Gardner, Robert, W. 
Garrison, Dr.S.C. 
Garvin, Davis 
Gavott, Susannah 
Georgia Road 
Gibson, James 

Matthew 

Moses 

Nancy 
Gillaim and Moore 

Gillaim, Edward 
Isaac 
James 



16 


Givins, Andy 


88 


A. P. & Son 


96 


Erskin 




Glenn, James 


82 


Goock, Allen, F. 


82 


Allen, T. 


38,48 






Benjamin G. 




Elizabeth, V 


117 


Henry 


20,21,25 


John C. 


59,60 


William, T. ' 


58 


Gooch & Mc Knight 


15,16,73 


Goodlow, Morris 


109,117 


Gould, Leslie, J. 


104 


Gowen, Catharine, M, 


17,18 


Harriet 


80 


Polly 


30 


Graham, Daniel 


72 


Green Family 


74 


Greer, Andy 


81 


Debby 


93 


Elizabeth 


73 


James 


15,19 


John 


73 


Lotty 


73 


Nathan 


73 


Nathaniel 


75 


Stephen 


75 


Thomas, C. 


75 


Griffin, James 


73 


Grinage, Edmund 


73 


Groom, John, B. 


69 


Guthrie, Elizabeth 


117 




11 




76 


Hall, Drury, Sr. 


76 


Jacob 




Jacob, G. 




John 


99 


Jonathon 


71 


Mattie, S. 


113 


Sam 


104 


Sion, D. 


19,21,22 


W.C. 


55 


William, J. 


9,13 


Halls, Hill Bridge 


75 


Hamilton, James, D. 


78 


Hancock, Elizabeth 


97 


Harding, Alfred 


97,100 


Charlotte 


97,99 


Elizabeth 


71 


Ellen Amy 


21,22,109, 




111 




113 




96 


124 



58 

24 

23 

75 

19 

20,22,109, 

111,117,113 

20 

75 

91 

20 

119 

22 

24,25,40 

32 

70- 

68 

68 

70 

50 

113 

72 

72 

113 

72 

72 

72,109,117 

73 

73 

113 

96,99 

96 

15,58 

75 



104 

97,100 

104 

97 

104 

13 

81 

104 

113 

104 

61 

76 

73 

13 

13 

13 

3,4,10,13 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Harding, George 


13 


Hogwood, Betsy 


68 


Giles Scales 


1,10,13 


Dennis 


25,26 


Giles, Sr. 


3 


John 


24 


John 


3,4,8, 


Martha 


68 




10,13 


Ransom 


68 


Julia 


7,9,13 


Hoi brook, Alfred 


31 


Mary 


13 


Hoi 1 is, Ester 


68 


Morris 


13 


Holloway, Isaac 


100 


Thomas Battle 


13 


John J. 


100 


William 


13 


Nell 


85 


Harper, Benjamin 


104 


Home Demonstration Club 


56 


Harr, J.W. 


104 


Hood and Baxter 


24 


Harrell, Samuel 


109,117 


and Sneed 


24 


Harris, Bill 


90 


Emil 


14,24,25 


Francis 


59,60 


Jeter 


24 


John 


90 


John C. 


20,113 


John C. 


75 


Walter 


34 


Mary H. 


74 


Hooper and Wilson 


22 


Nathan, T. 


109,117,113 


George, S. 


109,111,117 


Harsha, Hugh 


97 


Hooper, Hue 


63 


Hart, George 


85 


Hugh 


24 


Haskins, M.M. 


73 


Jennie 


34 


Spill, C. 


73 


Nettie 


34 


Haynes, Angie 


32 


W.H. 


32,58 


George 


70 


William, J. 


20,25,26, 


John 


70 




28 


Philadelphia 


70 


Wilson 


117,119 


Hays, Amos 


113 


Hoover, Christopher 


76 


T.T. 


113 


John 


72 


Hayse, John, C. 


73 


Martin, Sr. 


76 


Haywood, Dennis 


20 


Home, Elizabeth 


72 


Hazlet, B.F. 


76 


Josiah 


72 


Ezekiel 


76 


Simeon 


72 


Henderson, James, G. 


71 


Hoskins, Daniel 


97,100 


Hennington 


113 


Thomas, C. 


109,117 


Henshaw, Hugh 


104 


Thomas, C. Jr. 


72 


Her, George 


75 


Howard, Clyde 


32 


Herndon, Jacob 


25,26 


Huchinson, Sarah 


74 


Will 


24 


Thomas 


74 


Hicks, John 


109,117 


Hunt, Hiram 


97,100,104 


Higdon, Elijah 


117 


Nancy 


74 


Higgins, James 


75 


William 


104 


Margie 


58 


Hyde 


93 


Hight, R.A. 


113 






Hi 1 burn, Demsey 


109 






Hill, A. A. 


106 


Ivey, Burrel 


100 


Albert Gallatin 


10,13 






H.G. 


82 






James 


113 






Moses, G. 


97,100,104 






Stephen, A. 


97,100,104 






W.A. 


113 






Walter, 


46 






Willie May 


3 






Hodge, Ann 


72 







125 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Jackson, Coleman 


68 


Jourolin, Alexander 


109,113,117 


James, Maggie Duff McKnight 


66 




David 


109,113,117 


Myrtle 


58 




James 


109,113,117 


January, Robert 


54 




John 


109 


Jarmen, Amos 


109,117,114 




Nancy 


109,117 


Robert 


97,100,114 








Jarrett, Deveraus 


72 








Ralph 


57 


Keebl 


e, John, G. 


71 


Jefferson Co. Kentucky 


74 




Walter 


71 


Jenkins, Ben 


104 


Keith 


, Daniel 


74 


Nathanial 


104 


Kelley, Shadrock 


114 


Jenning, Eva Mai 


58 


Kelton, James, C. 


42 


Jennings, Herbert 


58 


Kennedy, B.R. 


32 


Jetton, Ephraim, L. 


71 




Brothers 


24 


Henrietta 


73 


Kerby 


, Henry 


104 


John W. 


71 


Keys, 


Erazmas, S. 


109 


Jinons, Jesse 


113 


Kilpatrick, James 


109 


W.R. 


113 


Kimbro, Azariah 


70 


John, Jacob 


97,100,104 


King, 


Ernest 


88 


Johns, Abner 


24 




Mrs. Ernest 


84 


E.K. 


96 




Frank 


88 


Frances King 


85 




Joe 


88 


Glendon, 


88 




Marie 


90 


H.P. 


24 




Ray 


89,90 


Isaac 


19,109,111, 




Rufus 


88 




113 


Knight, A.B. 


21 


James, B. 


20 




Everett 


17,19,58 


James, R. 


104 




Floyd 


63 


John M. 


104 




Horace 


17 


Joseph, B. 


97,199,104 




Ira 


55,58 


M.H. 


104 




Lynn 


59,60 


Paul V. 


97,100,104 




Melvin 


59,60 


Randal, V. 


100 




W.F. & Son 


24 


Thomas 


97,100 


Knott 


, Mary 


32 


William 


100,104 


Knox, 


B.F. 


20,27,50 


William, R. 


97 




Benjamin 


16,19,75 


Johnson, Andrew, M. 


68 




Birdie 


48 


Arebelow 


75 




Business College 


49 


James 


75 




Dana 


48 


Joseph, M. 


75 




Ellen 


16 


Larkin, Sr. 


75 




Elsie 


14,17,19,22, 


Nancy 


75 






33,40,48,50, 


Rhue 


75 






51,58 


Jones County, Georgia 


72 




Frank 


16 


Jones, David 


97,100,109, 




Freece 


48 




117 




J. A. 


114 


Jones, Enoch 


26 




James 


16,20 


Henry, D. 


113 




John M. 


20 


James 


76 




Joseph 


16,50,51 


Levi 


109 




Joseph A. 


21 


Sarah 


117 




Margaret McKnight 


50 


William, B. 


76 




Mary 


16 


Jordan, John, Jr. 


117 




Samuel 


117 


William 


117 


Koonce, John 


114,118 



126 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Koonce, Leonard, J. 109 

Tobias 109,117 

Wilely, A. 114 



Lackland, George, L. 74 

Landrum, Meriman 76 

Lannom, Alma 32 

Lasiter, Samuel, H. 109,118 

Lassiter, John, S. 114 

Thomas 114 

Laughlin, Joseph, A. 32 

Lawson Business College 49 

Ledbetter, William 68 

Lee, Austin 60 

Bob 83 

Lehew, James 114 

William 114 

Lemay, James, H. 118 

Lewis, A. 118 

Lenoir, "Boots" 84 

John 81 

John, P.H. 72 

Nancy 72 

Walter, Wade 80 

Lewis, Algernon 97 

Edgecomb 100 

Limestone County, Alabema 68 

Linch, Stephen 70 

Little, Archibald 69 

Lock 69 

Logan County, Kentucky 71 

Loughry, J.N. 105 

Lowe, Susannah, R. 74 

Loyd, Rebecca 74 

Luster, William 100 

Lytle, Archibald 68,69 

Catharine 75 

John 69 

Nancy 75 

Tabitha 75 

William 68,70,75 

Lytle' s Creek 68 



McAdo, Brentley, H. 97,100 

Samuel 97,100 

Mc Adoo, A. P. 105 

B.H. 105 

E.B. 105 

Mary 105 

Samuel, Jr. 114,118 

Mc Caib, Alexander 68 

Andrew 68 

Andrew (Jr.) 68 

Harry 68 

I by 68 



Mc Caib, James 
John 
Joseph 
Julyon 
Nancy 
Polly 
Polly(dau] 
Mc Cary, Kenneth 
Mc Clure, William 
Mc Comb, Robert 
Mc Crary, K.T. 
Mc Culloch 
A. P. 



Mc 



George 
Mary 
Daniel, 



Mc Dowel 1, 
Mc 

Mc 
Mc 



James 
William 
James 
Fadden, James, S. 
Farland, John 
Farlin, Benjamin 

Elizabeth, Y. 
Elizabeth L. 
Robert, B. 
Sarah, N. 
Mc Gowan, John 

Thomas 
Mc Gregor, John 

Ransford, 
Mc Iver, Evander 
John 

Maria, M. 
Matilda, C. 
Kee, Ambrose 
Andrew 

Elizabeth, M. 
Dr. H.L. 
James 
James, 0. 
Mrs. James 0. 
Rev. James P. 
John 
John B. 
Mrs. Tom A. 
W.0. 
Mc Knight, Abby 
D.M. 
D.W. 
David 
Eleanor 
Enas 
Frank 



Mc 



127 



H.C. 
J.L. 
James 



68 

68 

68 

68 

68 

68 

68 

33 

75 

15,19 

32,49 

80 

26,28,30, 

42 

34 

105 

105 

97,100,105 

77 

22 

100 

76 

76 

76 

76 

76 

72 

72 

75 

20 

70 

70 

70 

70 

97,100,105 

72,73,97,100 

72 

42,52 

105 

30,31 

30,31 

24 

105 

110 

48 

32 

75 

112 

114 

75 

75 

110,118 

58,59,60, 

64,65 

62 

114 

16,63,75 



Name 

Mc Knight, Mrs. James 
Jane 
John M. 
Madison 
Peggy 
William 
Dr. William 

Mc Murry, Hugh 
Mc Nabb, Billy 
Mc Rea, Andrew 
Mc Tire, Hugh 
Mc Whirter,Dr. 
Macon, Archie 

Uncle Dave 
Macy Place 
Mallard, George, W. 

J.Y. 

Thornton 

Tom 
Malone & Hyde 
Maney, Fannie 
James 
William 
Mann, Oscar 
Marlin, John, J. 
Marshal, A.D. 
R.F. 
William 
Marshall, Martha 
Martial, Amanda Marchal 

Elizabeth 
Martin, Alfred 

Arthur 

Author 

J.J. 

Jim 

John 

Rev. John J. 

R.I. (Bob) 

Robert 

Robert H. 

Will 

William 
Mason, John, R. 
Masonic Hall 
Massey, Jim 
Mathes, Anna, 0. 

Betsey, L. 

Caty 

Heller 

Henry 

James 

Marium 

Polly 

Rebecca 

William 



Page 

45 

75 

75 

20 

75 

110,114,111 

16,20,24, 

42 

97 

32 

20 

114 

24,42 

57 

57 

86 

73 

73 

73 

91 

93 

34 

69 

69 

84 

105 

22,110 

22,114 

110 

105 

70 

70 

97,100 

43 

40 

86,90 

88 

100 

15,28 

81 

100 

42 

88 

32 

68 

27 

88 

74 

74 

74 

74 

74 

74 

74 

74 

74 

74 



Name 

Mathews, E.L. 
Jack 

Mathias, William, T. 
Mathis, J.H. 

Keller 
Miriam 
Rachael 
Matthew, Hiram 
James 
Keller 
William, R. 
Matthews, Betsy 
Jimmy 
John 
Ruth 
William 
Maxwell, Elizabeth 
James, J. 
Jane 
Jesse 
John 
Nancy 
Naomy, L. 
Robert 
William 
William, A. 
Meads, Samuel, Jr. 
Medical Clinic 
Medling, John 
Merill, James, P. 
Merrit, James, B. 
Merritt, Pleasant, P. 
Methodist Church 
Miller, Isaac, J. 
Robert 
William 
William, W. 
(Widow) 
Milton, John 
Milton Bank 

Cemetery 
Community Club 
Seminary 
Mitchell, Pleasant, H. 
Molloy, Nancy 
Monday, Thomas 
Moore, J. P. 

James, L. 
John 
John L. 
John S. 
and Gilliam 
Morgan, Benjamin 

Harwood 

Howard 

Ann Peter 
128 



Page 

105 

22,24,58, 

59,60 

114,118 

114 

118 

118 

114 

110 

110,118 

110 

100 

72 

59,60 

97,100 

56,58 

97,105 

70 

70 

70 

70 

70 

70 

70 

70 

70 

70 

110 

24,55,56 

26 

1C5 

97 

100 

69 

70,75 

70 

100,114 

70 

70 

109 

55 

51,54,55 

55 

27,28,30,31 

73 

73 

97,100 

97 

22 

110 

19,20,22 

118 

118,119 

18,19,22, 

110,114,118 

19,22,24 

110 

110,118 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Morris, Tom 


58 


Oden, 


, Amanda, Ann 


71 


William 


58 




Chloe 


71 


Morrison, David 


16 




John 


71 


Morrison, William, G. 


25,114,118 




Katharine 


71 


Morse, Gilbert 


114 




Leah 


71 


Moses, Gil lead 


110 




Lydia 


71 


Moss, Charles, D. 


118 




Martha 


71 


Gilbert 


118 




Mary 


71 


Mullins, Beatrice 


85 




Thomas, A. 


71 


Ernest 


85 


Oliver, Jenny 


86 


Ethel 


85 


Orr, 


Alexander 


75 


Jack 


85 




James, H. 


118 


John 


97,100 




John 


110 


John, R. 


105 




John M. 


118 


Junior 


85 




Mizell & Co. 


82 


Lillian 


85 




Robert & Co. 


82 


Lucile 


85 




Robert 


110,118 


Nell 


85 


Osbui 


"n, Glenn, 0. 


101 


R.D. 


85 




Jno, F. 


101 


Robert, D. 


84,85 




Phillip 


97,101 


Roy 


85 


Overall, Isaac, H. 


74 


Ruth 


85 




J.W. 


114 


Vera Walden 


84,85 




James 


114 


Murfrees, M. 


69 




Lou 


34 


Murphy, Cicero 


114 




N.D. 


32,34,40 


John G. 


109,118 




Robert 


118 


Muse, Dan 


88 


Owen 


.Alexander 
Edward 


119 
101,102 






Owin 


, C.F. 


105 


Nance, John 


68 




Nathaniel 


105 


William 


72 




Stephen 


105 


Nash, Elizabeth 


78 




Thomas 


105 


T.C. 


76 




William, B. 


105 


William 


78 








Nashville Vols 


59 








Neel, R.Y. 


32 


Palmer, William, H. 


72 


Neely, Thomas, 


68 


Parker, Hardy 


110,115,111 


Nelson, G.F. 


105 


Park 


s, William 


114 


Mildred 


72 


Patterson, A.C. 


114 


Newman, Godfrey, S. 


20 




Horace 


114 


Newsome, Lucinda 


75 




James 


24 


William 


75 




Mary Frances 


60 


Nichols, Julia, Margaret 


69 




Penkney 


110,111 


Neisbet, Joseph 


97 




Samuel, G. 


13 


Niscen, John, B. 


70 


Patterson, and Rhodes 


24 


Noland, Lewis 


72 


Payne, Jacob 


75 


Pierce, G. 


72 


Pearcy, Algernon 


97,101,105 


Norman, James, D. 


75 


Pearcy, John, L. 


105 


Martha, B. 


75 




Robert, T. 


105 


Thomas 


75 




Sherwood 


105 


Northcutt, H.B. 


32 




Thomas 


98,101 


Nowell, Solerty 


110 




Thomas, Jr. 


105 


Thomas 


110 




W.J. 


105 






Peay 


, W.A. 


32 



129 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Peebles, A.D. 114 

Albert 44 

George 15,19,44, 

110,114, 

118 

Mrs. George (Jane) 46 

Martha 44 

Peebles Land 46 

Pemberton, James 16 

Pemberton House 51 

Penn, George 74 

Jacob 74 

Joseph 74 

Josiah 74 

Lurena 74 

Martha 74 

William 74 

Perry, Beecher 63 

Peyton, Bram 92 

Katie Lee Phillips 92 

Phillips, Herbert 93 

J.B. 32 

Oscar 92 

Shelah 92 

Phipps, Cone. (C.J.) 86 

Jenny 80,86 

Minerva 86 

Pierce, Granville, S. 101 

Pi land, Robert 118 

Pilant, Hardy 101 

Pitts, Merchant 49 

William, Franklin 68,69 

Polk, James 46 

James, K. 50 

Martha 46 

Pamell, Thomas 18 

Porterfield, Albert 50 

Wendell 55,58 

Porterfield School 39 

Posey, W.Y. 22 

Potter, Ragland Co. 93 

Powell, Thomas 19,43 
Presbyterian Church M'boro 69 

Price, John W. 16 

Wilson 114 

Prior, Mrs. Allen 54 

Pruett, J.F. 32,37 

Pully, J. 105 

Thomas 98,101 

William, R. 105 

Putman, James, G. 21 

William 21 

Pyland, Jno, D. 114 



Ragland, C.B. 
Ragsdale, S.M. 

Silas 
Raikes, Mrs. Meda 

Gus 

Rucker 

Rainey, Jesse 
Rains, John 
Rakes, Jim 
Ramey, Jesse. 
Ramsey, Jesse 
Mary 
William 
Randolph, Beverly 
Harrison 
Lucy 
Mary 

Mary Elizabeth 
Peter 
Peyton 
Sarah 
Rankin, Frank 
Ransom, Benjamin 
Betsey 

Lorena, Peck 
Dr. Medicus 
Temperance Crawford 
Rawlings, Fanny 
John W. 
Joseph A. 
Lewis, J. 
Matthias, H. 
Nancy 
Neffee 
Piety 
Sally 

William, W. 
Ray, William 
Rea, William 
Read, James 
Reaves, Peter, M. 
Thomas, B. 
William 
Redmand, Eliza Ann 
George 
Keziah 
Martha Jane 
Rebecca Susan 
Reed, Jesse 
Lemuel 
Rhodes, Claborn, H. 
James 
John 
Rice, John 



93 

105 

101 

58 

58,64 

14,58,59, 

60,64 

117 

115 

34 

115 

110 

110,118 

118 

74,75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

20 

72 

76 

13 

13 

13 
76 

76 

76 

76 

76 

76 

76 

76 

76 

76 

15,16,45 

115 

70 

106 

106 

106 

70 

70 

70 

70 

70 

74 

74 

110,118 

24 

24 

106 



130 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Richardson, Stith 
Rion, Billy 
Ritchie, Jeff 
Roach, Stephen 

Roberts, R.S. 

Edward 
George 
Hugh 
Isaiah 
J.W. 
James 
W.B. 
William 
Robinson & Rhodes 
Robinson, C.E. 
Isaiah 
Jane 
Levina 
Martha 
Nelly 
Susan 
W. Hugh 
Rogers, Edwin 

R.H.. 
Rolland, Benjamin 

Sarrey 
Rowland, Sarrey 
Rowlett, Hargis 
Rowtan, John 
Mary 
Peyton 
William 
William, D. 
Roy, Mr. 

Rucker, Benjamin 
James 
Samuel, R. 
Thomas 
William 
Rushing, Clyde 
Elvis 



Sage, Jesse 
John 
Polly 
Thomas 
Travis 

Sander, Elisha 
Richard 

Sanders, Fannie 

Sandlin,-- 

Sanford, James 

Scroggins, -- 



68 


Scroggins, David 


119 


59 




John 


119 


32 


Searcy, Sarah 


75 


15,19,24, 




William, W. 


74,75 


42,72 


Seebleth, A.C. 


106 


115 




Ann 


106 


98 


Self, 


Pricellar "Dee" 




80,82 




Dickerson 


13 


110,118 


Sellers, John, W. 


21 


98,101,106 


Selvige, John 


20,25 


115 


Sharp, 


, Ezekial 


16 


110,118 




Joseph 


16 


98,101 


Sharpe, E. 


32 


98,101 


Shearwood, Hugh 


72 


24 




Nancy Ann 


72 


24,32 




Thomas 


72 


99 


Shepherd, Robert 


74 


71 




William 


74 


71 


Short, 


Ash 


92 


106 




Spencer 


92 


106 


Shute, 


Susannah 


8 


106 


Simpson, Emily Hays 


52 


71 


Simpson, Ocie 


52,53 


71 




Tommie 


52 


25 


Sims, 


Leonard, F. 


74 


75 


Slaughter, - 


106 


75 


Sledd, 


Elizabeth 


74 


75 




John M. 


74 


57,60 




William 


74 


73 


Smith, 


A.N. 


106 


73 




Bennett 


69 


74 




Charles 


110 


73 




D.D. 


115 


74 




D.N. 


26,32 


21 




David 


119 


106 




Dennis, D. 


20,27,52 


98 




George 


101 


98,101,106 




J. P. (Peyton) 


80,88,90 


78 




James, M. 


75 


115 




John 


74 


90 




John P. 


25,26 


90,92 




Joseph, P. 


26 






Mary Alice 


88 






Robert 


69,98,101 


76 




Robert L. 


25 


76 




W.B. 


24 


76 




William 


68,74 


76 


Smiths 




51 


76 


Smyrna 




52 


119 


Sneed, 


Charlie 


58 


106 




Claude 


25 


46 




G.J. 


16 


69 




Grover 


24 


70,72 




Hal lie, Mae 


58 


110 




Hattie 


24 



131 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Snell, Thomas, Blackman 
Soape, Joseph 
Spain, John, R. 
Lucy 
Stephen 
Thomas 
Spence, — 
Starkey, Emmett 
Staton, Lucy 
Stephens, Catherine 
Stephenson, John 
Stewart, John 

John, P. 

Mary 
Stone, Parker, F. 
Stones River Presbyterian 
Stovall, Jesse 

John D. 
Strapp, Alfred 
Strickler, David 
Stroop, John, R. 
Stroud, Allen 
Stuart, Grief 
Stuttings, Emily 
Sublett, A.C. 

W.A. 

William, S. 
Sullivan, Frank 
J.E. 
John E. 
Summar, Mrs. Sinnett 
Summars, Bern ice 

White 
Sutton, Ann, W. 
Swain, Thomas, J. 
Swann, Dr. 
Swarner, Richardson 
Swink, James 



Tailor, -- 

Talley, Peter, C. 

Talley, — 

Tarpley, Thomas 
Whitcoat 

Taylor, Aden 
Adin 
Daniel 
Deborah 
Eden 
George 
James 
Jane 
Jerusha 
Leonard 
Margaret 



3 


Taylor, R.A. 


68 


Sally 


106 


William 


106 


Tennessee Power 


98,101 


Tennison, Marget 


98 


Tenpenny, Dr.J.W. 


69 


Thomas, Ann 


82 


David 


75 


J.B. 


115 


Jimmy 


75 


John Hartwell 


98,101 


Lewis, Green 


106 


Peter, James 


98 


Richard 


110,111 


Theophilus, W. 


63 


William 


68 




68 


Thompson, Creed, T. 


72 


Gideon, 


32 




24 


Henrietta Rion 


110,118 


J.M. 


119 


John 


73 


William 


98,101 


Threats, Henry 


98,101 


Thurman, Nathan 


101 


Pleasant 


32 


Tilford, John, M. 


115 


Nancy 


25 


Tolbert, James 


32 


Tombes, Emanuel 


92 


Susannah 


92 


William 


74 


Tomlin, Hayes 


106 


Tune, William 


42 


Turney, Sam 


115 


W.H. 


115 


Twelve Corners 




Upchurch, Abner 


115 


Uselton, George, Jr. 


19,21,22. 


,115 


32 




101,106 


Vance, David 


76 


Inez, Peyton 


19 


Vauhook, Dr. Riley 


70,73 


Vaughn, Drury 


76 


Drury M. 


70 


George 


73 


J.J. 


73 


James 


70,73 


James, N. 


73 


James R. 


73 


John 


73 


John D. 


69 


ioo 



32 

73 

73 

56 

68 

55 

74 

98 

21 

64 

74 

74 

74 

74 

74 

98,101,110 

119 

70,73 

15,17,18 

19 

66 

115 

68 

115 

76 

106 

106 

69 

69 

111 

72 

72 

72 

90,92 

106 

32 

29 

54 



106 
76 



73 

80,92 

51,55 

71 

101 

74 

101 

111 

1-6 

106 

101 

98,106 



Name 



Page 



Name 



Page 



Vaughn, Mary A. 


106 


Weakley, R. 


17,18 


Mildred Tyus 


74 


Weatherly, Abner 


74 


Patsey 


98,101 


J.M. 


25 


Peter 


72,98,101, 


Mary(Polly) 


71 




106 


Nancy 


74 


Peter, A. 


98 


Weatherspoon, E.S. 


111 


Peter, R. 


101 


Wendell, David 


70,73 


Peter, T. 


101,106 


Wright, Rebecca 


74 


Richard 


70 


White, — 


44 


William 


74,111 


White land 


46 


William, Jr. 


101 


J.D. 


107 


William A. 


106 


James 


98,102 


W.B. 


98 


Pleasant 


98,102,107 


William B. 


71,72,98, 


William, B. 


20,22,27, 




101 




115,119 






William, T. 


30 






Whitfield, Benjamin 


71 


Wade, Ben 


90 


Levina 


71 


James 


98,102 


Mary 


71 


Levi 


106 


Matthew 


71 


P 1 ummer 


98,102 


Matthew, Jr. 


71 


Wallace, Hugh 


102 


William 


71 


Waller, Ben 


78 


Willard, Clayton 


63 


Bettie 


81 


Silliams, David 


68 


Bill 


78 


Dewitt 


58 


Clairborne 


81 


Lewellan 


72 


Elizabeth 


78 


Robert 


73 


Ephraim 


78,81,84 


Williamson, Delia 


58 


Ernest, H. (Bud) 


90 


Littleton 


71 


Evelyn 


82 


Rufus 


58 


Everett 


78,90 


Wilson, B.F. 


119 


George 


78 


Thomas 


111,115,119 


James 


78 


William 


111,119 


Lovene 


80,82 


Windes, Rev. Enoch 


32 


Margie 


82,86 


Winston, Isaac, N. 


107 


R.S. (Sidney) 


80,81 


Wisener, Tilman 


98 


Robert Sidney Jr. 


82 


Witherspoon, B.F. 


25,115 


Rubye 


80,82 


A.B. 


115 


Sal 1 ie 


81 


Wood, James 


74 


William 


78 


Jesse 


74 


Wallise, Martha 


74 


Nancy 


74 


Walls, Owney 


73 


Polly 


73 


Ward, Ben 


84 


Samuel 


74 


Frank Cheatham 


88 


William 


74 


Hatton 


93 


Woodridge, John, S. 


19,20,111, 


Warpool, Maggie 


85 




115,119 


Warren House 


19 


Woodrige, — 


17 


Warren, J.H. B.C. 


98 


Woods, Nancy 


111,119 


Jared Rev. 


26,27,32 


Polly 


111 


Robert, B. 


98,102 


Wrather, Baker 


98,102,107 


Thomas 


98,102,107 


CM. 


107 


Warrens, -- 


51 


Enoch, B. 


107 


Wasson, William 


71 


R, 


107 


Watkins, John 


69 


Rody 


74 


Watts, J.H. 


25 


Roily 


98,102 






W.S. 

133 


107 



Name Page 



Wright, Bessie 


81,82,88 


Bettie 


81 


Fannie, Short 


92 


W.W. 


81 


Yandell, Burton 


71 


Elizabeth (Betsy) 


71 


Henry 


71 


John 


71 


Lunsford, P* 


71 


Wilson 


71,72 


Yeargin, — 


82 


Young, John 


15,16 


Youngblood family 


57 


Youree, Joseph 


76 


Sam 


58 



134 



M T S U LIBRARY 



3 3082 00527 7123 

y7b.S57 

R931P 
v.25 

35.01131+7 



Rutherford County Historical Society 

AUTHOR 

Publications 



- 



LIBRARY 

)LE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY 

MURFREESBORO. TENNESSEE 





DATE DUE 




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NOVO 


5 2004 






































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2811 
















































































DEMCO 38-2 


7