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976 
.857 
R9311 
V. 39 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Contents 

The House on the Hill 7 

On the Home Front: The Effect of the Civil War 

on Murfreesboro, Tennessee 10 

Rutherford County Courthouse 18 

The Civil War letters of Henry Clay Reynolds 21 

Stones River National Battlefield Cemetary Listings 33 

Bibliography of Rutherford County historical sources found 

at Tennessee State Library and Archives 49 

Advertisements from the Courier, 

Murfreesboro 's First Newspaper (1830-32) 57 

Advertisements From the Program of the 1869 

Tennessee State Fair Held in Murfreesboro 64 

Selected Funeral Card Notices from Rutherford County, 

1898-1924 84 



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Publication No. 39 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/publication39ruth 



• Rutherford County Historical Society 

/ • ^ ' Publication No. 39 

Published by the 
Rutherford County Historical Society 



Officers 

President Dr. E. C. Tolbert 

Vice President Charles Nored 

Recording Secretary NeU Blankenship 

Treasurer Mary Cox 



Publication No. 39 is distributed to members of the Society The annual mem- 
bership dues are $15.00 per family, which includes the annual publication and 
the monthly Newsletter to all members. Additional copies of this and other 
publications may be obtained by writing to the Society. A list of publications 
available is included in this publication. 

All correspondence concerning additional copies, contributions to future 
issues, and membership should be addressed to: 

Rutherford County Historical Society 
PO. Box 906 MlSu Library 

Murfreesboro, TN 37133-0906 Middle Tennessee State University 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37132 



10^02893 



DEDICATION 

This publication is dedicated to the memory of Robert Ragland, a long-time member and 
past president of the Rutherford County Historical Society and a person who was passionately 
involved in many civic and historical projects in our community. 



The following publications are for sale by: 

THE RUTHERFORD COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

EO. Box 906 

Murfreesboro, TN 37133-0906 

All publications are $8.00 (unless stated otherwise) + $2.00 postage and handling 

Publication 1: Rutherford County Marriage Records, (1851-1853), Bride Index, Rutherford County 
Militia Commissions 1807-1811, Rutherford County Offices and Officers (1804-1973), 
and Union: Murfreesboros Other University 

Publication 2: Rutherford County Marriage Records, (1854-1856), Bride Index (continued), Ruther- 
ford County Militia Commissions 1812-1820, Mayors of Murfreesboro, and a History of 
the Kittrell Community. 

Publication 3: Rutherford County Marriage Records (1857-1860), Bride Index, Griffith Rutherford, 
1803 Census of Rutherford County, and Rutherford County Militia Records. 

Publication 4: History of Readyville, Artists Depict Batde of Stones River, and Census of 1810 and List 
of Taxpayers not in Census. 

Publication 5: The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad (1845-1872), Rutherford County Post Offices 
and Postmasters, and the Rutherford Rifles. 

Publication 6: A History of the Link Community History of Lavergne, Fellowship Church and Commu- 
nity, and The Sanders Family. 

Publication 7: HopeweU Church, Petition by Cornelius Sanders for Revolutionary War Pension. 

Publication 8: History of Bethel-Leanna Community, the Crowders of Readyville, A view of the Battle- 
field of Stones River from New York Times (Sept. 2, 1865), Record of Jordan Williford, 
Revolutionary War Soldier from Records in U.S. Pension Office, Company Roll of Major 
Hardy Murfree (Sept. 9, 1778 from the National Archives). 

Publication 9- History of DUton Community. 

Publication 10: 1864 Diary Peter Jennings, Henderson Yoakum, Early Methodist Church, and Overall. 

Publication 11: State Capitol, Ben McCullough, Petition of Michael Lorance, Country Store, and Soule 
College. 

Publication 12: History of Smyrna, Sewart Air Force Base, Goochland, Index of Some Actual Wills of 
Rutherford County 1802-1882. 

Publication 13: Tennessee College, Coleman Scouts, New Monuments in Old City Cemetery and James 
Bole's Revolutionary War Pension. 

Publication 14: Murfreesboro Presbyterian Church, Kirks and Montgomerys, Russell Home, John 
Lytle's and John M. Leak's Revolutionary War Pension. 

Publication 15: John W Childress Home (1847), XJC^igs in Rutherford County (1835-1845). 

Page 3 



Publication 16: Hart, Childress, Miles, Fosterville, Cherry Shade, William Cocke. 

PubUcation 17: Jefferson 1803-1813, WiU Abstracts (1803-1814), Old City Cemetery. 

Publication 18: Railroad Stations in Rutherford County, Rion Family, Stones River. 

Publication 19: Footprints. . . at Smyrna, VA. Medical Center, Manson Family, Jenkin's Homes, Will 
Abstracts (Record Books 3 & 4), Rutherford County Historical Society, Early News, 
Sketch from Macon County, Illinois, 1981 in Rutherford County. 

Publication 20: Roads and Turnpikes of Rutherford County includes many Rutherford County names. 

Publication 21: Jefferson Springs Resort, Lascassas Baptist Church, John Price Buchanan, Will Abstracts, 
1836 Tax Records of the 25th District. 

Publication 22: Ft. Rosecrans, Big Springs, East Main Church of Christ, Tax Records District 23 - 24 for 
1836, 1837, and 1849, Mathias Hoover. 

Publication 23: Harding House, Milton, County Stores in the Jefferson Area, Will Abstracts Book 7, Tax 
Record of Disuicts 15 and 16 (1836, 1837, and 1849). 

Publication 24: History of Medicine in Rutherford County 

Publication 25: Legends and Stories of the Civil War in Rutherford County. 

Publication 26 A Yankee in Rutherford Count)', Literary Interest Expressed by Women in Rutherford 
County Mt. Olivet and Hoovers Gap Methodists, My Years at Linebaugh Library. 

Publication 27: History of Central Christian Church, Alfred Blackman. 

Publication 28: Coleman Scouts (Henry B. Shaw, Leader; Sam Davis, Deejobe, Williams Roberts, 
WiUiam Manford Street, and others.) 

Publication 29: The Churches of Christ in Rutherford County History of the Salem Methodist Church, 
and Municipal Officers of the Town of Murfreesboro (1818-1891). 

Publication 30: History of Rutherford County Farm (including insane asylum and the pest control 
center). Architecture of Rutherford County Farm. 

Publication 31: The Rutherford County Rifles (a group of 150 young men from Rutherford County 

who volunteered for service in the Confederacy). Includes a list of these men and what 
happened to them. Article on Violence in Rutherford County 

Publication 32: A Researcher's Guide to Rutherford County Records by David Rowe; Jerry Sneak by 
Homer Pittard (discovered after his death). 

Publication 33: Census and Tax Records for First Distria. 

Publication 34: Mattie Ready-John Hunt Morgan Wedding; Dement Family; Two Gallant Leaders at the 
Battle of Murfreesboro. 

Page 4 



Publication 35: Uncle Dave Macon (biography with photographs) by Dr. Charles Wolfe. 

Publication 36: Rutherford County Tennessee, Abstracts of Record Books 1-7, 1803-1829. 

Publication 37: The Civil War in Middle Tennessee. 

Publication 38: Deed Abstracts on Stones River, 1784-1806, by Ernie K. Johns. $15.00 

The following publications are also available through the Society: 

History' of Medicine in Rutherford County, Part II (A collection Of Biographies of Physicians Who Prac- 
ticed in the area during the Nineteenth Century) Robert G. Ransom, M.D. $16.00 -f 
$2.00 postage 

Westbrooks, Williams, and Related Smothermans of Rutherford County . $20.00 -r $2.00 postage 

Brothers and Others and Fosterville $21.00 -I- $2.00 postage (OUT-OF-PRINT) 

History' of Versailles - OUT OF PRINT 

History of Rutherford County by C.C. Sims (pub. 1947) $12.00 -I- $2.00 postage 

History of Rutherford County by Mabel Pittard (pub. 1983) $12.50 + $2.00 postage 

A History of Rutherford County Schools, Vol. I (Northern section of the County) $12.00 -I- $2.00 postage 

A History of Rutherford County Schools, Vol II (Southern section of County including Murfreesboro) - 
OUT OF PRINT 

1840 Rutherford County Census with Index $500 + $2.00 postage 

Deed Abstracts of Rutherford Coufity, 1803-1810 $5.00 + $2.00 postage 

Cemetery Records of Rutherford County: 

Vol. I (Northwestern third of County and part of Wilson and Davidson Counties, 256 cemeteries with 
index and maps) $10.00 -1- $2.00 postage 

Vol U (Eastern third of County cemeteries with index and maps) - OUT OF PRINT 

Vol III (Southwestern third of Rutherford Count)' and the western part of Cannon County 241 cemeter- 
ies with index and maps) $10.00 -I- $2.00 postage 

ne History of Rutherford County, Vol. I, 1799-1828 by John C . Spence $25.00 + $2.00 postage 

ne History of Rutherford County , Vol II, 1829-1870 by John C. Spence $25.00 -I- $2.00 postage 

A Civil War Diary by John C. Spence $25.00 -I- $2.00 postage 

ne Pictorial History of Rutherford Comity by Mabel Pittard - OUT OF PRINT 



THE HOUSE ON THE HILL 

Some of the first information recorded about the Cumberland River and surrounding country was by an 
explorer by the name of Dr Thomas Walker (1). Long Hunters were also explorers, but their main mission was 
killing animals for hides (2) . "By the early 1770s, it was no longer possible for the large parties of other years to take 
skins enough to make a hunt pay" (3). 

Two names mentioned with hunting parties were Uriah Stone, whose name survives in Stones River, and 
Michael Stoner for whom Stoner's Lick was named (4). 

Kasper Mansker became better known as an Indian fighter than a Long Hunter (5). Goodlettsville has a 
replica of Mansker's Station which was originally built in 1779. Their annual Frontier Day activities demonstrate 
some of the chores performed during early times, but they cannot duplicate the everyday dangers and hardships 
which the settlers experienced. 

Before Indian hostilities subsided in the better part of the 1700s, people began settling further down the 
Cumberland. 

'Andrew Jackson arrived on the Cumberland late in Ortober, 1788" (6). While Andrew Jackson was buying 
and selling land along the Cumberland and Stone's River, the Ruckers (James, Thomas and Gideon) were doing 
the same by 1797 and 1799 on Stone's River (7, 8). 

"Sam Donelson, Jackson, and Benjamine Rucker w^ere the closest fiiends. It is said that when Benjamine 
Rucker came, the Jackson family used to consider it quite an honor, and the same was the case when the Jacksons 
visited the Ruckers. It is also said, that the garden of the great soldier, Jackson, and that of Benjamine Rucker were 
equally the same. When Rucker obtained a new plant or flower for his garden he also secured one for his fiiend 
Andrew Jackson" (9). 

North Carolina was making land grants to early settlers in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Much of this land 
was granted to people who settled along Stone's River, including both the east and west forks. The fiirst town, in 
what was to become the new county of Rutherford, was called Jefferson (10). This town was located in the fork of 
the east and west forks of Stone's River. Land that was being bought during this time was paid for in Spanish milled 
dollars, pounds, and dollars (1 1). One deed has land being paid for in 6,000 Spanish milled dollars (12). A bond 
was made between a Benjamin Josling and Thomas Williamson in 1792 for 4,000 silver dollars (13). 

The state of North Carolina granted Col. Isaac Shelby 5,000 acres for ser\'ices in the American Revolution. 
This land was located on both sides of the east fork of Stone's River. This deed was dated 1784/85. Col. Shelby and 
his wife Susanna sold this 5,000 acres to Thomas Rucker, Simon Miller, and James Rucker on February 1, 1801, for 
7,000 dollars (14). Thomas Rucker bought 1947 acres from Simon Miller and James Rucker on July 10, 1802 (15). 
I believe Thomas built a house scxjn after he bought this tract, and I beUeve he lived here during 1804. 

If this is true, then this would likely have been his second house. This part of the 5,000 acres became known 
as the northwest comer of Shelby's 5,000 acre grant. Thomas Rucker, Simon Miller, James Rucker and others 
continued to buy and sell land among themselves and others for years to come. 

"Thomas Rucker, another one of the early settlers, was one of the seven justices and lived between Murfi-ees- 
boro and Jefferson. His place came -within one vote of being made the county seat instead of Murfreesboro" (16) . 

"In 1804, the first session of the county court met, according to provisions of the Legislative Act, at the home 
of Thomas Rucker, near where the Veterans Hospital now stands" (17). This may be contrary to the fisting in 206> 
years of Ruckers in Middle Tentiessee by Mary Rucker Estes which gives the date of that house as 1809- 1 believe 
Thomas built this third house at the VA in 1809. 

The house in question is a typical house of that time with two large (approx. 22' x 18) rooms with a "dog trot" 
between. This open space between the rooms had a roof There was a separate log kitchen which was torn down 
and moved years ago. 

Thomas deeded two acres dose by for the Baptist Meeting House in 1813 (18). He sold nine and a half acres 
to Philfip Lowe in 1814 (19). The deed speaks of the South border joining that of the academy land. This indicates 
that no one lived in the house at that time unless someone fived there while the house was used as an academy 
Thomas sold 500 acres to John M. Tilford in 18 16 which included all of the northwest comer of Shelby's 5,000 acre 

Page 7 



traa except for two acres of church property, Lowe's nine and a half acres, and the twelve and a half acres of 
academy land (20). 

Tilford sold thirty acres to Joseph Newman in 1820 (21). Samuel E Black bought 464 acres through foreclo- 
sure on Tilford in 1822 (22) . Samuel P Black sold this property to Henry L. Douglas in 1828 (23) . This deed stated 
"which the said Black now lives". Samuel P Black bought the Lowe house and academy land in 1829 (24). 

Thomas Rucker retained ownership of the academy land until he sold it to Black. Samuel P Black bought the 
414 acres, which he sold to Douglas back in 1831 (25). That deed suted "it being the same track on -wiiich said 
Black now lives". 

"Dr. Black lived for a time at "Pebble Hill", the place which he and his brother Lumsford, had bought and later 
had purchased "Eveip-een", five miles fix)m Murfreesboro" (26). 

Personal history of the Black family in possession of Harold L. Beasley contains the following: 'About 1836 he 
(Thomas C. Black) removed fi-om Jefferson to Pebble Hill (near where his father died) , still engaged in a laborious 
practice". 

Dr. Black bought said house with 166 acres of land in 1838 (27). If the place was known as Pebble Hill, it 
could have been named that as an academy. 

"Indenture made August 13, 1792, for the sum of 1,000 hard dollars, David Wilson, Daniel Smith, Andrew 
Jackson, Robert Hays, Thomas B. Craighead, Ephrin McLane, James Robertson, and Lardner Clark, trustees of the 
academy established by virtue of an aa of assembly of North Carolina passed at New Bern sessions 1785, entitled 
an aa for the promotion of learning in the county of Da\idson, have sold for the use of the academy a tract of land 
containing 640 acres to John Caffrey and Col. John Callov^^y on Stones River knov^Ti as Stoner Lick traa" (28). 

In listing the many improvements in Nashville by 1814 Zadok Dramer, editor of the Pittsburgh Navigator and 
Almanac, mentioned Nashville's 200 or more houses, many of them large elegant buildings of brick. He had words 
of praise for the two churches, the courthouse, the jail, the Rrverbend Thomas Craighead's Davidson Academy" 
(29). 

The above references mentioning an academy are for additional understanding and not to be confused with 
property under consideration as being the same academy. 

Thomas Rucker may have taught here after it became an academy because Thomas was one of the board 
members of Bradley Academy (30). 

Samuel P Black was an educator, and he could have taught here as well as being the headmaster of Bradley 
Academy (31). 

A partial school record sho\^'5 that there were pri\'ate classes throughout the county as late as 1888. This 
record lists pupils at Red Oak Grove, Overall's Chapel, Fox Camp School House, and Twelve Comers. One entry 
reads as follows: "Began school at Twelve Comers the 5th of March, 1888 with only three pupils. I have alvrays 
heard it said, 'A bad beginning, a good ending", but felt somewhat discouraged at the gloomy prospects. Second 
day, eight pupils, quite an improvement on yesterday. Third day, ten pupils. I think my school v^ill be very good by 
next week if they continue to come in like they have been this week. Monday of the second week, have thirteen 
pupils" (32). 

I am satisfied with this report because I learned more than I expeaed starting out, I do defend this report as 
being as valid as a lot of published materials. Look how much more important it would have been to be exaa 
rather than to say "Thomas Rucker lived between Murfreesboro and JeSerson". I consider this an unfinished work 
because there may be more information out there, and I will continue to put the word out. 

I am grateful to those who helped in making this report as factual as possible: Martha Wright at the Ruther- 
ford County Office BuUding Register of Deeds who went above and beyond the call of duty in helping to search 
and make copies of deeds. Michael Strutt and associates at MTSU Center for Historic Preservation; Michael made 
two trips here for thorough stud}' of construction and material used. They concurred that the house was a first 
quarter 19th century structure. Harold L. Beasley made available to me all the information that he had on the Black 
femily. Ann Pickard pro\'ided me with a copy of 2(90 Years ofRuckers in Middle Tennessee by Mary Rucker Estes. 
The staff at Tennessee Historical Commission was helpful in obtaining a copy of the deed of Isaac Shelby from 
Tennessee Archives. 

Martin J. Rooker 

Pages 



BroUOGRAPHY 
The Cumberland by James McCagne 

1. Page 26 

2. Pages 30, 31 

3. Page 39 

4. Page 34 

5. Page 36 

6. Page 77 

29. Page 144 

Deed Abstracts on Stones River from Deed Books A, B, C, D, E, F, of Davidson County, Tennessee 1784 - 1806 
by E.K Johns, 1981. 

Fite, Emerson D., and Freeman, Archibald, eds. A Book of Old Maps Delineatiiig AtJierican History. New 
York: 1969. 

7. Deed Abstracts page 79 

8. Deed Abstracts page 96 

10. Deed Abstracts page 136 

11. Deed Abstracts pages 104, 105 

12. Deed Abstracts page 104 

13. Deed Abstracts page 32 

14. Deed Abstracts page 120 

15. Deed Abstracts page 124 
28. Deed Abstracts page 38 

History of the Rucker Family and Their Descendants by Edythe Johns Rucker Whitley 

9. page 67 

16. page 225 

A History of Rutherford County by Carlton C. Sims. 

17. page 24 

30. page 148 

31. page 148 

32. School record in possession of Martin Rooker 

Rutherford County Deed Office 

18. Book K, page 41 

19. Book K, page 58 

20. Book L, page 5 

21. Book M, page 399 

22. Book O, page 315 

23. Book R, page 419 

24. Book S, p^es 97, 98 

25. Books, page 359 
27. Book 8, page 57 

Hearthstoites: Tlje Story of Historic Rutheiford County Hom&s by Mary B. Hughes 

26. Page 22 



Page 9 



ON TEffi HOME FRONT: THE EFFECT OF THE CIVIL WAR 
ON MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE 

For those of us who have been blessed to live in the United States in a time of relative peace and prc)sperit>^ 
it is hard to imagine the hardships feced by those living during the Civil War era. This was a time when the people 
had very strong beliefe regarding states' rights, abolition, and secession. A neighbor might oppose secession, while 
you fevored it. A friend might be an axid abolitionist, while your brother might feel it is his God-given right to 
protect those people he feels are inferior by allowing them to live and work on his property' as slaves. These strong 
beliefe, and the emotions they generated, eventually erupted into a war so devastating that it would take the 
economy of the South many years to recover 130 years later, the emotional eflfects of the Civil War have not 
completely disappeared. 

Those men who fought in the battles of the CrvQ War had to iace ph>'sical and emotional hardships, hunger, 
and death. However, they were not the only ones who suffered, for the civilians of the South who were left at home 
on the ferms and in the towns, the suffering was intense. They might not have had to face going into battle, but 
they quite often did not know where the next meal was coming from or how they were going to pay the mortgage 
or the taxes. These same individuals also worried about their loved ones who were fighting. Family and fiiends left 
at home did not know whether thefr men would come home fixam the war. Many of them worked in the hospitals 
and saw the death, disease, and carnage of war from a very personal viewpoint. Citizens also did not know whom 
they could trust. Those who lived in federally occupied territory could be reported to the Union troops as an 
enemy by their neighbors or their slaves. Martial law ^-as in place in many areas. Schools were closed, courts were 
dosed. One could be thrown in jail for the slightest thing, and quite frequently residents were not allowed to leave 
thefr town. Life in the South would never be the same again, and the small town of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, with 
its surroimding countryside in Rutherford County is such an example. 

Murfreesboro was founded on land given to the Lytle Family as land grants for service in the Revolutionary 
War.^ By I860, the town of Muifeesboro had grown to 1,671 white people and 1,190 African-Americans. The 
surrounding Rutherford county contained 14,743 white people and 13,174 African-Americans. Most of the citi- 
zens were fermers, - with the average improved acreage of farms in Rutherford approximately 100 acres. The 
average cash value of these farms was between $5,000 and $12,200.^ Murft-eesboro was beginning to have a 
thriving business district, including a hardware store, a jewelry store, a book store, a livery stable, a carriage shop, 
and even a distillery^ This community was growing, and the years between I860 and 1870 would have been 
extremely profitable for its citizens if it had not been for the outbreak of war. 

Rutherford County \^'as originally loyal to the Union. When the question of secession arose in Tennessee, the 
county voted against it. One local newspaper, the Rutherford Telegraph, was published by a staunch Unionist, R. 
S. Northcutt. In his newspaper, Mr. Northcutt stated, "Under the drcumstances that now exist, there is no cause 
whatsoever for disunion, and he that favors it can be gailty of nothing short of treason to his country " Mr. Northcutt 
ended up leaving Murfreesboro and going North at the outbreak of war. He became a brigadier general in the 
Federal army.' The feelings of the people of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County began to change as they watched 
four of the states bordering Tennessee leave the Union. By 12 April 1861, when the first shots were fired at Fort 
Sumter, and when Lincoln ordered the blockade of all ports of seceded sutes, Murfreesboro and Rutherford 
County were ready for secession. When the matter came to a vote in June 1861, Rutherford County voted 2,392 for 
secession with 73 against. Six of those who voted against secession were from Murfreesboro. Many men were 
ready to leave immediately to join the Confederate Army Two companies of the 2nd (Bates) Tennessee Infantry 
Regiment, formed 6 May 1861, were made up of men fixam Rutherford County Three companies of the 18th 
Tennessee Infantry Regiment, organized 11 June 1861, were irom Rutherford County The colonel v^lio formed 
this regiment was Joseph B. Palmer, a fawyer bom in Murfreesboro. By the end of the war, had been promoted to 
brigadier general.'' 

Although most of the citizens' sympathies fay wth the South, there were stiU people ■w+io were very much 
opposed to secession and the formation of the Confederacy The pastor of the Baptist church in Murfieesboro, Dr. 
James Madison Pendleton, \iolently opposed sfaven^ and strongly supported the Union. His outspokenness upset 

Page 10 



many members of the church who then refused to attend services. Some of his enemies even threatened to hang 
him. By Oaober 1862, Dr. Pendleton decided that Muifeesboro was no longer safe for him, and traveling sepa- 
rately from his wife, he left town."" John C. Spence, owner of the local hardware store, bitterly opposed secession, 
however, his feelings began to change as the war continued.^ 

The excitement generated by the thought of war hit Murfreesboro immediately as men left to join the 
Confederate Army John C. Spence stated, "The boys were vigerous [sic] and stout, anxious for a fight, feeling 
satisfied they could whip five Yankees, unwilling to engage less than three at a time." Camp life, made them 
courageous, defiant and devilish. He also wrote of friends and families making frequent visits to see the boys, "like 
making trips to 'mecca'," bringing back 4 pieces of shell and cannonballs "to astonish the natives at home, as they 
may never see such things in Rutherford." How wrong Spence was when he wrote that the natives might never see 
the war and "war not such a mighty bad thing after all. Not likely lasting over ninety days at most."' 

The time had come when all had to help in the war effort and show patriotism, even if they were not 
comfortable with the war. As word arrived in Murfi-eesboro that the Confederate Army was viaorious at the battle 
of Manassas, the citizens feft excited that their "boys" were there, "helping to make the 'Bull run' in Virginia "'° They 
formed a Home Guard, and in the fall of 1861 established a Confederate hospital, using Union University for this 
purpose. The women in town formed a sewing society for the hospital, and others gathered things suitable for a 
soldier's clothing. Crops were good that season, and the town felt confident that the war would not last long, but 
things were about to change. The war would not end in three months." 

In February 1862, General Grant and the Union Army were on the move and heading into Tennessee. On 
February 5, with the use of four ironclads and three wooden gunboats. Grant landed 15,000 troops several miles 
below Fort Henry 'While flooding and heavy rain slowed Grant and his troops, the Union flotilla fired 18 guns into 
the fort. The Confederate troops could fire back with only nine guns. Realizing that the situation was hopeless, the 
fort's commander sent his 2,500-man garrison to Fort Donelson, while he remained behind with one artillery 
company as a delaying tactic against the gunboats. Before Grant's troops could airive, the fort's commander and 
his few remaining troops surrendered. After his success at Fort Henry Grant moved on to Fort Donelson. Al- 
though Fort Donelson did not fall as easily as Fort Henry the result was the same. Grant's troops captured Fort 
Donelson. Within a few days the Confederate General Johnston evacuated Nashville, making it the first Confeder- 
ate state capital to fall. Much of Tennessee came under Union military control.'^ 

On 10 March 1862, the Union Army took formal possession of Murfreesboro, lowering the Confederate flag 
and replacing it with the Union flag. The soldiers then began repairing the roads and bridges leading back to 
Nashville. The Union forces imposed martial law on the area, and began house-to-house searches to collert guns 
and ammunition. The Union forces also arrested many citizens, and according to John C. Spence, arrested them 
for some "pretended" cause. The military also stated that some residents were disloyal subjects of the United States 
and demanded that they take an oath of allegiance. Those who could avoid taking the oath of allegiance did, 
unless it was necessary in order for them to cany on their business. 

With the arrival of the Federal troops, residents of Murfreesboro and the outlying area started complaining of 
soldiers stealing food from their gardens, smoke houses and poultry yards. There were also small skirmishes in the 
country and whenever one would occur, the military government would arrest the nearest citizens and bring 
them to town. Quite often these citizens were sent to NashviUe and put in the penitentiary When they were 
released, they had to enter a bond and security for their future good condua.^' One example of this was written 
of in The Union Volunteer, a Union newspaper printed in Murfreesboro. The 20 May 1862, issue of the newspaper 
stated. 

On Saturday the 10th instant, some despicable villains [sic] attempted the assassination of 
Col. Parkhurst and Capt. O. C. Rounds by firing upon them as they were riding along a 
public street. The affair occasioned a large amount of excitement, in town and in camp, and 
culminated on last Monday in the arrest of twelve citizens, known secessionists, to be held 
as hostages for the good behavior of their fellow citizens . . . They were dispatched to 
Nashville on the cars last Tuesday noon. 

The outcome of this attempted assassination was another search of all homes and the confiscation of 200 
firearms.'-' 

Page 11 



The citizens became afi^aid to speak out or voice their opinions. One clergyman "quietly omitted at Sunday 
services the customary prayer for the Confederacy" and a week later, with numerous Federal soldiers in atten- 
dance, "preached a sermon more in accordance with their feelings than of the Southern portion of his congrega- 
tion."''' Not only were they afraid to speak in front of their neighbors, but also in front of blacks. A Murfreesboro 
giii whose family hid some escaped, disguised rebel soldiers in June 1862, confided in her diary that she felt 
obliged while in her slaves' presence to pretend that the soldiers were Yankees. In July 1862 she wrote, "I don't 
trust the negroes now They have too much of the yankees about them, to suit me."'' Not long after this, the arrival 
of Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest and his cavalry excited the townspeople who hoped that things were going to 
change. 

During the early morning hours of 13 July 1862, Forrest and his men slipped into town, galloped up East 
Main Street, and then one division veered off to attack the Union forces bivouacked at Oaklands, the Maney femily 
mansion taken over by Colonel Duffield. The Confederate troops were pushed back, but not before seriously 
wounding Colonel IXiffield. Two other Confederate battalions captured the entire Seventh Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment. Colonel Forrest then approached the courthouse, where Union forces were deployed at the windows on 
two floors. Confederate forces took the building, and other Union soldiers stationed around the town surren- 
dered. Using several tricks to convince the Union army that he had a significant number of troops under his 
command, Forrest convinced Colonel DufBeld to surrender, along with the Third Minnesota, which was holding 
its position west of Murfireesboro. Forrest then destroyed all of the nontransportable stores and several miles of 
the Nashville and Chattanooga Raifroad track. Then he and his cavalry unit, along with about 1,000 Union prison- 
ers and several hundred wagons, moved out of town. Confederate oflBcers in Knoxville accepted the Union 
prisoners and the captured supplies."' After the fighting was over, soldiers gathered the wounded and dead. They 
prepared coflBns, and buried the dead, both Union and Confederate. The Union wounded were taken to the 
hospital, but the Confederate woimded were placed in the homes of the citizens of the town. Four days later the 
Union army returned to MuiiBieesboro. '"Their quiet return depressed the white residents of the town, but had the 
opposite eflect on the blacks. 

One Ohio oflScer traveling to Murfijcesboro with his regiment wnate, 

at every plantation negroes cam [sic] flocking to the roadside to see us. They are the only 
friends we find. They have heard of the abolition army the music, the banners, the glittering 
arms. . . [and they] welcome us with extravagant manifestations of joy. They keep time to the 
music with feet and hands and hurrah 'fior de ole flag and de Union,' sometimes following 
us for miles. 

When the troops and the excitement had passed, however, the slaves returned home, picked up their hoes, 
and went back to the fields.'^The blacks of the town were realistic enough to know that things could change. Until 
the war was over and one side viras the definite dinner, they were afi:aid to accept the fi^eedom the Union soldiers 
were ofiering them. Some slaves did disappear, but most remained loyal to their masters until they were certain 
that they were truly fi:«e. 

Over the next few months. Union troops would come and go in Murfireesboro, as would Confederate 
troops. By December, Gen. Braxton Bragg and his army had established themselves outside Murifreesboro along 
the Stones River. This was a period of social activity for the wealthier residents of the town. Mattie Ready, the 
daughter of prominent citizen Charles Ready married Gen. John Hunt Morgan. Many of the Confederacy's mili- 
tary elite attended the wedding, including Generals Braxton Bragg, John C. Breckinridge, B. J. Cheatham, W J. 
Hardee, and the "Fighting Bishop" Leonidas Polk, who performed the ceremony "A wedding was a rare occur- 
rence by late 1862. 

Rutherford County went fi-om 171 marriages in 1859 to only 47 marriages in 1862. This was a decrease of 
approximately 264 percent. This trend downward continued in 1863 with only 40 marriages. With the uncertainty 
of war, most couples delayed their marriages until after the end of the war. In 1865, the year the \^'ar ended, the 
number of marriages increased to 1,739- Although many of these marriages are attributed to blacks who finally 
had the opportunity to marry, there were still a significant number of white couples who married. It was not until 
1870 that the number of weddings dropped back down to a level one would consider normal for the size of the 
county-" 

Page 12 



The wedding of Morgan and Ready and a grand ball on Christmas Eve, sponsored by the First Louisiana and 
the Sixth Kentucky regiments, were the last social events in Murfreesboro for quite a while. On 3 1 December 1862, 
the Army of Tennessee and the Army of the Cumberland began to fight one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War 
at Stones River, a few miles outside Murfreesboro. 

The Confederate troops struck first, catching the Union soldiers at breakfast. The fighting continued over 
four da>'S, and when it was done. General Rosecrans and the Union Army had narrovdy won the battle, with 
General Bragg and his troops being forced to retreat. Bragg lost more than a third of his troops to death, wound- 
ing, or capture. Rosecrans was almost as hard liit with 31 percent casualties.-' With Bragg's retreat, Union troops 
occupied Murfreesboro for the rest of the war. Rosecrans's army surrounded the town for the next six months, 
and converted churches, schools and other public buildings, as well as some homes, into hospitals for the wounded 
of both armies. At this time, several leading citizens of the town fled the city with Bragg's army and Federal oflicers 
took over their homes. The Union soldiers then built Fortress Rosecrans, which served as a supply depot for Union 
operations in Tennessee and Georgia." With this last arrival of Union forces, life became even more difficult for the 
local residents. Union soldiers traveled through the county stripping all the secessionists" farms and redistributing 
the goods to Unionist femilies. Farmers did not know whether it was worth it to plant crops because soldiers 
stripped the fields dean. Farm animals also disappeared. By 1864, a group of Rutherford Count}' residents de- 
scribed their land that year as one "where crime of every grade unrebuked, runs riot at noonday where there is 
neither safety for the person or protection for the property of the citizens. "-^ Both white and black citizens suffered 
with food shortages. A Rutherford County woman wrote in 1864, "There simply was not enough food and fuel to 
go around. Times hard and tight everything sells high . . . eatables very scarce and price high."-^ Residents and 
soldiers pulled down fenceposts for fuel. Some wounded soldiers were forced to lie on fenceposts, as the hospi- 
tals had run out of cots. Soldiers died and were buried every day but now there were no coffins Soldiers were 
being buried in their blankets. The appearance of refugees made conditions even worse. John C. Spence was 
exceedingly vocal in his opinion of these individuals when he wrote, 

the tovwi was infested with a class of people fi-om different portions of the country known 
as refuges, [sic] This class were generally below the negro, but like the negro making their 
appearance, men and women half dad, with a half dozzen [sic] tow head children, having 
small bundles of dothing about the house-hold, stock, a dog or two, to make up the family 
Such making their appearance in town, telling a pitiful tale. Every thing they had was taken 
fi-om them by the Rebels, often telling their house burned, they turned out of doors. These 
like the negros, come to be fed, lie about and do nothing, claiming to be Union, and had 
come for protection. 
These refijgees, often found at the local Baptist church, received rations, cooked in the street, and slept on 
the church floor. The town was also frustrated because other so-caUed "Union refugees " were in town to avoid 
conscription. These individuals aaed as loyal informants to the Yankees, watching the local citizens and informing 
the Yankee soldiers of anything they felt would help them. The informants would often be abusive to the local 
citizens, and the local citizens would ignore them.-' 

Life continued in this manner until the end of the war, when Murfi-eesboro had to deal with other problems, 
such as the Ku Klux Klan and carpetbaggers. For the white citizens, dealing with newly-fi-ee blacks was also 
considered a problem. Another serious situation for Murfreesboro, and indeed for the entire South, was worthless 
Confederate money Former leaders of industry were now impoverished.-^' 

Confederate soldiers slowly returned to Murfi-eesboro, finding conditions in the to^Ti extremely depressed. 
They began arriving in July only to discover that Union soldiers or fi-eed slaves had torn down, burned, or taken 
over many homes. Planting had not been done, and it was now too late to plant crops for that season. Those 
buildings and homes that were still standing had been stripped dean of belongings. The difficult job of rebuilding 
the South began in earnest. 

Farmers began rebuilding their fences and trying to replace their farm animals ■with those sold by the Federal 
Government at public auction. Cattle and hogs were still scarce, due to soldiers slaughtering many during their 
occupation.-" In I860, Rutherford County had 10,308 horses, 4,348 mules and asses, 6,249 milch co'ws, 23,133 
sheep and 64,877 swine. The value of all livestock in I860 was $2,1 15,432. 00.-** Ten years later, and five years after 

Page 13 



the end of the war, Rutherford County was not able to equal these numbers. Rutherford County had approxi- 
mately 20 percent fewer horses, 20 percent fewer mules and asses, 6 percent fewer milch cows, 35 percent fewer 
sheep and 94 percent fewer swine. The value of livestock in 1870 had decreased by $595,493.00.-'' 

The war also greatly affeaed the value of real estate and personal property Although the total number of 
acres of improved land in Rutherford County was almost identical in I860 and 1870, the assessed value of real 
estate was significantly diflFerent between I860 and 1870. In I860, the census valuation of real estate for the county 
was $15,759,758.00. By 1870, that valuation of real estate had dropped to $6,020,57500, a decline of almost 10 
million dollars and approximately 161 percent Even more extreme was the diJBference in the value of personal 
property In I860, the valuation of personal property for Rutherford County was $17,835, 603. 00. By 1870, that 
valuation of personal property had dropped to $1,055,297.00. 

In comparing some individual families living in the Murfreesboro area, apparently life was so hard in Mur- 
fi-eesboro that many families left the area. Of 148 families tracked from I860 to 1870, only 69 families, less than 
one-haU^ were still in the county in 1870. Most of the families who left Murfreesboro were tenant farmers who had 
no reason to stay in an area being destroyed by war. The 69 families who remained owned 642 sfaves, real estate 
valued at $911,160.00, and 12 personal property valued at $1,019,767.00 in I860. By 1870 thefr real estate value 
improved to $922,015.00, but their personal property value had decreased to $329,550. There were a few families 
who greatly increased their real estate value during this 10-year period; however, 50 percent of the families 
decreased the value of their real estate. 

For many more years, Murfreesboro would continue to struggle with the trials of rebuilding homes, busi- 
nesses, and the town. There would be the problems of carpetba^ers coming in to make money ofi'the devasta- 
tion of war. The Kii Klux Klan created problems that had to be handled. There would be political problems for 
years as the radicals and conservatK'es fought for the Negro vote and learned to live with disenfranchisement, 
where many former Confederates were not allowed to vote. Their biggest problem, however, would be learning 
to accept that their former slaves were their equals. In The Monitor newspaper dated October 7, 1865 the editor 
wrote, 

Experience has proved that negroes are not equal to white men, and all attempts to place 
them on a footing of social and political equality vvill fail, and will prove injurious to both 
white and black.*" 

One hundred years later there were still people in the South who were unwilling to accept Afi-ican-Americans 
as their equals. 

Although Rutherford County and the rest of Tennessee avoided many of the worst aspects of the Reconstruc- 
tion period by being readmitted to the United States on July 24, 1866, it would be almost 35 years before the 
people of Rutherford County would truly be able to say they were experiencing the type of growth they had 
achieved during the prewar years.*' War is hell on all those who are involved in it, but it was especially so to those 
"on the home front". 

End Notes 

1. Mabel Pittard, Rutherford County, edited by Robert E. Corlew (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 
1984), 28-29. 

2. Population of the United States in I860 (Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1866). 

3. Steven Y Ash, Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in The Upper South, (Baton 
Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1988) 6-7. 

4. Mabel Pittard, Rutherford County, edited by Robert E. Corlew (Memphis: State University Press, 1984), 64. 

5. ibid., 66. 



Page 14 



6. Tennesseans in the Civil War: a Military History of Confederate and Union Units unth Available Rosters of 
Personnel: (Nashville: Civil War Centennial Commission, 1964) 176, 212, 434. 

7. Mabel Pittard, Rutherford Comity, edited by Robert E. Corlew, (Memphis: Memphis State Universit}' Press, 
1984) 59. 

8. John C. Spence, The Annals of Rutherford Cowity, vol. 2 (Murfreesboro: The Rutherford County Historical 
Society, 1991) v. 

9. ibid., 149. 

10. John C. Spence, Tlje Annals of Rutherford County, vol. 2 (Murfreesboro: The Rutherford County Historical 
Society 1991) 152. 

11. ibid, 153-155. 

12. James M. McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom - The Civil War Era, (New\brk: Ballantine Books, 1989) 397- 
403. 

13. John C. Spence, The Annals of Rutherford County, vol. 2, (Murfreesboro: The Rutherford County Historical 
Society 1991) 158-160. 

13. The Union Volunteer (Murfreesboro). 20 May 1862. 

14. Stephen V Ash, Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South, 
(Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1988) 102. 

15. ibid., 127. 

16. Mabel Pittard, Rutherford Count}', edited by Robert E. Corlew, (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 
1984) 68-72. 

17. John C. Spence, Tlye Annals of Rutherford County, vol. 2, (Murfreesboro: The Rutherford County Historical 
Society 1991) 177. 

18. StephenV. Ash, Middle Tennessee Society Transformed 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South, 
(Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press) 106. 

19. Mabel Pittard, Rutherford County, edited by Robert E. Corlew, (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 
1984) 72. 

20. Edythe Johns Rucker XXIiitley, with an index by Gary Parks, Marriages of Rutherford County, Tennessee. 
1804-1872 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company 1981) 149-240. 

21. James M. McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom - The Civil War Era, (New York: Ballantine Books, 1989) 580- 
582. 

22. Mabel Pittard, Rutherford County, edited by Robert E. Corlew, (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 
1984) 75-77. 



Page 15 



23. Steven V Ash, Mj<^/e Tennessee Society Tran^ormed 1860-1870: War and Peace in The Upper South, (Baton 
Rouge: Louisiana State University Press) 154, 163. 

24. ibid., 92. 

25. John C. Spence, The Annals of Rutherford County, vol. 2, (Murfreesboro: The Rutherford County Historical 
Society 1991) 191-194. 

26. Mabel Pittard, Rutherford County, edited by Robert E. Corlew, (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 
1984) 90. 

27. John C. Spence, The Annals of Rutherford Cowtty, vol. 2, (Murfreesboro: The Rutherford County Historical 
Society 1991) 252. 

28. Agricultural Census oiThe United States in 1860 (V>^hington D.C.: Government Printing OflBce, 1866.) 

29. Agricultural Census oiThe United States in 1870 (Washington D.C.: Government Printing Ofifice, 1872.) 

30. The Monitor (Murfreesboro). 7 Oaober 1865. 

3 1 . Mabel Pittard, Rutherford County, edited by Robert E. Corlew; (Memphis Memphis State University Press, 
1984) 91. 

Bibliography 

A^icultural Census of the United States in 1860. \^^hington, D. C: U. S. Government 
Printing Office, 1866. 

Agricultural Census of the United States in 1870. "W^hington, D. C: U. S. Government 
Printing Office, 1872. 

Ash, StevenY. Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1870-1870: Mir and Peace in the 
Upper South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Uni\'ersity Press, 1988. 

McPherson, James M. Battle Cry of Freedom ■ The Civil War Era. New York: Ballantine 
Books, 1989. 

TheMonitor (Mmfreesboro). 7 October 1865. 

Pittard, Mabel. Rutherford County, edited by Robert E. Coriew Memphis: Memphis State 
University Press, 1984. 

Population of the United States in 1860. Washington, D. C: U. S. Government Printing 
Office, 1866. 

Population of the United States in 1860. Washington, D. C: U. S. Government Printing 
Office, 1872. 

Spence, John C The Annals of Rutherford County, vol. 2. Murfreesboro: The Rutherford 
County Historical Society 1991. 

Page 16 



Tennesseans in the Civil War: a Military History of Confederate and Union Units with 
Available Rosters of Personnel. Nashville: Civil War Centennial Commission, 1964. 

The Union Volunteer (Murfreesboro). 20 May 1862. 

Whitley Edythe Johns Buckex. Marriages of Rutherford County, Tennessee, 1804-1872, with an 
index by Gary Parks. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company 1981. 

This article was written by Debbie Chatham in April 1996, as a research paper for a Civil Wkr History course she 
was taking at Brigham Young University She sent a copy to Gilbert J. Backland, Chief of Park Operations at 
Stones River National Battlefield here in Murfreesboro. He then forwarded a copy to our Historical Society 
along with his recommendation for its publication in our armual journal. We are grateful to both of them for 
making this article available to our Society 



Page 17 



RUTHERFORD COUNTY COURTHOUSE 

The Rutherford County Courthouse is one of only six remaining courthouses built in the state prior to the 
Civil War. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its significant architecture, political and military 
history This building was completed in 1859, at a cost of $50,000 and -^-as the third courthouse to be built in 
Murfireesboro. 

Rutherford Countyw^as formed in 1803, with Jefferson being selerted as the county seat. In 1811, the county 
seatJivas moved fixim JeflFerson to Cannonsburgh, which is present day Murjfreesboro, and the first log courthouse 
was built the next year in 1812 in the center of the Public Scjuare. This name was later changed to Mmfreesboro 
(borough) in 1817, since the site chosen was land donated by Captain William Lytle, and at his request named in 
honor of his firiend, Colonel Hardy Murfite, who had recently passed away By 1818, the first courthouse was 
declared inadequate for county fijnctions. To provide funds for the improvement and repair of the courthouse, 
the county court levied poll and property taxes in the amount of 12 1/2 cents and 25 cents, and a $ 10 tax for each 
billiard table. 

Murfi:-eesboro served as the capitol of Tennessee fi-om September 1818 until 1826, with the Tennessee 
General Assembly meeting in the Rutherford County Courthouse. The Courthouse burned in 1822, forcing the 
state legislature to meet in the First Presbyterian Church, then located on Vine Street, next to the Old City Cem- 
etery (This church ^'as destroyed during the Civil \X^kr and its bricks were used in the construction of Fortress 
Rosecrans. Its foundation is still visible.) The Courthouse was partially rebuilt in 1822 at the cost of approximately 
$5,000 and served until the present courthouse was construaed in 1859. Originally its form was square, with 
classical columns on the east and west sides capped by a pediment. Between its completion in 1859 and 1861, 
certain improvements were made, including the addition of a privy house, carpeting, and piped water to dstems. 

During the Civil War, the courthouse was a very strategic building. The cupola was used as a watch tower to 
monitor signals, and was occupied by both armies. It was in Federal hands fix)m late March 1862 until General 
Nathan Bedford Forrest's raid on Murfii-eesboro, July 13, 1862, when the courthouse was stormed and Confeder- 
ate civilians were fineed. Forrest's men tore down the courthouse doors with axes and started fires in the hallways, 
causing some damage but also forcing the Union soldiers to leave their positions. Miufeesboro remained in 
Confederate hands until their withdrawal to Shelbyville following the Battle of Stones River, December 31, 1862 - 
January 3,1863. 

In late spring of 1862, one of the neighbor's who lived just across the street on the southeast comer, a young 
lady by the name of Miss Mattie Ready was crossing the street of Federally occupied Murireesboro one morning, 
when she heard some ''i:^nkee soldiers making less than-flattering comments about General John Hunt Morgan. 
She went up to them, stomped her foot, and gave them a pretty good tongue lashing. They asked her name and 
she informed them that "It's Mattie Ready now. But by the grace of God, I hope to call m^-self the wife of John 
Morgan one day" They allow^ed her to continue on her way nev^er guessing that she and Morgan were already 
engaged, The wedding took place just across the street on December 14, 1862 and was considered by many to 
have been the social highlight of the Confederac>: There w^ much gaiety on the courthouse lawn, with music and 
bonfires burning brightly Then on Christmas Eve, a grand Christmas ball was held by the Sixth I&ntucky and the 
First Louisiana in the Courthouse. It was decorated to the hilt with greenery candles, and a chandelier fashioned 
out of the soldiers' bayonets. Dancing continued all night. This would be the last happy times seen in the Court- 
house for quite some time. 

During early 1863 with Murfreesboro under Federal occupation again, this same grand structure served as 
both barracks and a prison. When the Federals set oflf on the Tullahoma Campaign in Ma>^ of 1863, those left 
behind had orders to shell die townn and bum the Courthouse in die event of a Confederate raid. One gun at 
Fortress Rosecrans was even trained on the Courthouse as a deterrent. By the end of the war, half of the roof w^as 
blown oflf by the wind, windows and doors were broken, and plaster crumbled fi-om the ceiling. 

In 1865 the War w^as over Reconstruction begun. People were trving to get their lives back in order and get 
on with the business of living. Times were tough. Monev' was short. Repairs were slow^ It was not until 1872-78 that 
hitching posts were added around the courthouse to prevent citizens fi-om tving horses to the courthouse fence. 

Page 18 



Railing was placed over iron spikes on top of the fence to prevent damage to livestock. Finally, in the 1890's, repairs 
began in emest to improve the courthouse. It was re-carpeted and wallpapered and damaged plaster repaired. 
Water closets were added. The exterior was penciled and gutters added. 

In 1899, just before the turn of the century, the J. B. Palmer Bivouac, the Ladies Memorial Association, and the 
Sons ofVeterans were granted permission to erect a Confederate monument on the lawn of the courthouse. It was 
to be a bronze monument with Johnny Reb poised menacingly atop a pedestal in battle stance and facing down 
East Main Street. This was later moved to the northeast comer of the lawn where the infantryman was feeing the 
north symbolically poised to defend home and hearth. 

In 1906 and 1907 more extensive renovations were done. When the two story courtroom had a ceiling 
added, it created a third floor These additions resulted in changing the configuration of the roof from hipped to 
flat. It is probable that the cupola was changed from an octagonal cupola to its present appearance at this same 
time. The original cupola of the 1859 courthouse reflerted the design of the Tennessee State Capitol which was 
completed in 1854. 

In 1913, a tornado hit Murfreesboro causing massive damage along the north and west sides of the public 
scpaare. Luckily the Courthouse received only minor damage, and this was caused mainly from flying debris. 

In 1921, men's toilets were added - one for white men, and one for colored. Although women didn't get 
thefr own bathroom, a couple of years later The Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy sp)ent their money on placjues in memory of both Confederate and World War I veterans. 

In 1923 an interesting event occurred when a stranger appeared on the courthouse lawn, claiming to be the 
"Human Fly". He wasn't. But as such, he proclaimed his intention to scale the courthouse and the cupola and 
money was quickly gathered to compensate him. As the crowd watched, the Human Fly climbed both the court- 
house and the clock tower, holding to the weathervane at the top of the cupola. Unfortunately it had begun to rain 
and he lost his footing on the slippery surface, falling to his death. Men who examined him could find no trace of 
identity and he was placed in a glass casket at Sweeney's Funeral Parlor on the square, hoping friends or family 
would come forth. No one did, and the Human Fly was buried nameless in the pauper's section of Evergreen 
Cemetery with no marker 

Mmfeesboro was slowly growing between the years of 1924 and 1942; streets were widened around the 
Courthouse, cutting off several feet of the yard. The cupola columns were replaced and the Courthouse beU was 
used as an air raid alarm during World War n. 

By 1945 World War n had ended, soldiers returned home, and in the next few years once again people got 
on with the business of just living. It was not an uncommon sight to see men gathered in the Courthouse yard, 
whittling, chewing tobacco, and solving world problems aU the while. Uncle Dave Macon, a local musician and 
folklorist, among them. The monument placed in honor of General Griffith Rutherford, an Irishman and Revolu- 
tionary War veteran for whom the county was named, was also added during this period. 

In 1951, General Douglas MacArthur and his wife, Murfreesboro native Jean Marie Faircloth, visited the 
county. There was a parade and thefr motorcade cfrove them around the courthouse square. Schools let out for 
this occasion, and there was much excitement as the bands played and all the Uttle boys and gfrls stood on tippy- 
toe in the courthouse yard trying to get a good look at the war hero and his bride. 

By the mid 1950's, the courthouse had grown too small for the many county officials and a good many of our 
very progressive leaders wanted to tear this building down and build a more modem faciHty Fortunately there 
were others who cared and could appreciate the fact that this grand old dame represented Murfreesboro's heri- 
tage and fought for its preservation. After many and somewiiat heated discussions a compromise was finally 
reached, which included the additions of the two-story wings on the north and south sides of the courthouse. This 
provided much needed additional office space in 1961. Major internal renovations and repairs were also com- 
pleted, including the addition of an elevator and new electrical and plumbing work. A fi-esh coat of paint, new 
furnishings, repair to the steps, the renovation of the jury box, and the addition of new seats in the courtroom 
were completed by the early 1960's. Then in the 1970"s, restoration on the outside began wiien the cupola and 
some of the exterior was repaired. After extensive exterior reno\'ations, the Rutherford County Courthouse was 
listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1997, interior restorations were once again undertaken and 
when completed returned the courthouse to its mid nineteenth century appearance. The Courtroom reopened 

Page 19 



in its original twostory configuration, complete with period fixtures and wallpaper. 

For almost a century and a hali^ the Rutherford County Courthouse has stood a silent wimess to the evolve- 
ment of Murfi^esboro and Rutherford County She has watched our children grow and have femilies, their chil- 
dren, and their children's children. She has watched our sons go ofi"to war, some of them never to return. She has 
kept a watchful eye over us, while w^e searched many times for our footing, and all the while, accepted growth and 
change with dignity and grace. Few would argue that the Rutherford County Courthouse has been the soul of our 
community! 



This article was written by Shirley Farris Jones, a past president of the Rutherford County Historical Society 
and a prior contributor to this journal (Publication 34). She is also actively involved in the Friends of Stones River 
Batdefield, the Association for the Preservation of Tennessee Antiquities, and the United Daughters of the Confed- 
eracy 



Page 20 



THE CIVIL WAR LETTERS OF HENRY CLAY REYNOLDS CONCERNING BATTLES 
EV MIDDLE TENNESSEE, JANUARY -JULX 1863 

H. Clay Reynolds was bom in McMinnville, in 1838, but grew up in Greenville and Selma, Alabama. The 
letters printed here were written to his wife, the former Mary Jane Boyd of Selma. After the war he moved his 
young family to MontCT'allo, Alabama, where he became a merchant. When his oldest son, William Boyd, gradu- 
ated torn Howard College (now Samford University) the firm of H.C. and WB. Reynolds Company was formed. It 
was located on the comer of Main and Shelby Streets in Montevallo. 

The Reynolds &mily became prominent in their city They served their customers as bankers, since MonteN-allo 
had no organized bank until 1902. They dealt in real estate, developed a lime business and later owned the 
newspaper, the MONTEVALLO NEWS. 

It is, however, for his connection with what is now the University of Montevallo, that "Captain" Reynolds is 
most vividly remembered. (The title "Captain" is honorary and complimentary since he came out of the Confed- 
erate Army as only a lieutenant.) The Alabama Girls Industrial InstittJte was scheduled to open in Oaober 1896, 
but shortly before that date. Miss Julia Tutwiler resigned as president. The Board of Tmstees was faced with a 
dilemma: their choices were to further delay the opening, which they believed would be disastrous, or choose 
another president. After several abortive attempts to employ an educator, the Board tumed in desperation to 
Captain Reynolds, who had been the vigorous leader of the campaign to have the school located in Montevallo. 

Mr. Reynolds made no pretenses at being an educator but in addition to being a public-minded citizen, he 
was a fiiend of Govemor Wdliam C. Gates, a war comrade. The governor appointed him president on August 24 
and a few weeks later, on September 18, the Board oflBdally elected him. Let ft be said to his eternal credit, he 
moved with such speed that by October 12, 1896 (which is now observed each year as Founder's Day) he had 
hired a fciculty recruited a student body of one hundred forty-five girls (which nearly doubled before the school 
year was out), had the old "College" building reftirbished for use as a school, and had arranged for local residents 
to board students until a dormitory could be built. It was a herculean task and he deserved the praise given him 
when the dignitaries of county and state assembled to see the new institution launched. 

Mr. Reynolds was head of the school until 1899- During these years, the institution had received wide and 
favorable publicity with enrollment growing each year. He was able to get the first Federal grant and had built parts 
of main Dormitory Efibrts to have the school moved elsewhere generally had died down so that Montevallo was 
accepted as its permanent home. 

Mr. Reynolds continued to live in Montevallo imtil 1912 when he moved to Fort Myers, Florida, and later to 
Tampa, where he died on Oaober 20, 1920. 

In later years the first building on campus once called the "college building" was named Reynolds Hall. It is 
a stately white columned structure that stands as a landmark among the other buildings of red brick. It is a fining 
tribute to the man who got the place started. 

The letters are printed here as they were written — ^with some misspellings and fi:^quently without dates. 
Reynolds would firequently write a while, sign ofi^ then pick up and start again. 

Lucille Griflith provided these letters and the infomiation about Reynolds to our society several years ago. 
More details in the life of Clay Reynolds may be found in the hook,ALABAMA COLLEGE (1896-1969), published by 
Lucille Griffith ui 1969- 



My Dear Wife, 

Bmce Thomas came up with the Regiment last Wednesday and, to my great surprise and pleasure, brought 
me the only letter I have received since leaving you. I see fixjm this you have written before, but I have been so 
unfortunate as to not to receive either of the 3 you mention. I am very much pleased to hear that you are at Selma 
and that you intend going to Woodville and stay some time. I hope you will get a girl firom Uniontown to nurse 

Page 21 



Willie as I know you cannot have much pleasures with him to nurse. I was very much surprised to hear of Jim's 
coming home. How long has He been at home? And is He discharged or furloughed? And how will He stay at 
home? I hope He is in good health. You ought to have written me a longer letter than you did; it ^'as so very short. 
Jim Lapsly will come on by the cars shortly Can't you write to me by Him if He has not left yet? I -wish if you have an 
opportunity you would send be my overcoat by some safe person coming on to the Regiment as I will need it very 
much. However, I will write to Pa to dispose of it for me so I ■wiU get it. We are emcamped five or six miles from 
Murfreesboro and in twent>^-fi\'e miles of Nash\'ille, Tennessee, vdiih place is cooupied by the \&nkees. They are 
surrounded by Southern forces and will probably be starved out. Our citizens also are in a starving condition as the 
Feds will not let them out. The Yankees have treated the people in the country very rough. In some cases tripped 
of everything and burned their houses cursed the women and used insulting language of every kind to them. But 
I hope they will not have an opportunity of doing so any more. We go to assist in the capture of Nash\Tlle, and I 
ejqjea will soon have a brush with the enemy Walter Jeffries is (I understand) killed. I am sorry to hear of it. I hope 
William is recovering from His wound and that it \\'as only a slight one. Give Him by best regards and tell Him I 
hope He will not have to fight again at Manassas as He is unfortunate at that place. I wish He could be in our 
company CapL Robins speaks very highly of Him and Jim. 

Gi\^e your Ma Fannie Uncle D and Aunt Adeline my best respects. 

Dear Mary I think of you very day and wish to see you and hope soon to do so. We see a great many pretty 
girls and have had them to stand by the roadside and sing Dbde and other Southern songs for us as we would pass. 
I stopped to talk to a pretty blackeyed lass the other day while I halted in Shelby\ille and she stopped me when the 
Regiment was ready to move, ran in the house, and brought me one of the prettiest little flags I ever saw, and with 
Her own hands put it in my Horse's bridle in the head stall and bed me God speed with tears in Her eyes. I was 
tempted to get down and kiss Her by too many were looking on. I made a lettle speech to Her and galloped off to 
my company. WHte soon my dear Mary 

Clay 

'Shortly after this we men General Wheeler, and I saw him for the first time. He had lately come out of 
Kentucky, and I was very much atonished to see what a boyish looking general he was. I soon discovered that his 
men had gttat confidence in him, and I learned also that he was a graduate of West Point and well fitted for his 
position. 

We went then into regular service and soon formed a part of a line of pickets covering our fiDnt for many 
miles. In forming this line of pickets, the company to which I belonged, then under the command of Captian 
Robbins was sent off on our right to occupy an isolated position, not being in touch with our line at any point, but 
to guard a road that led out over what was known as the Chicken Pike or Molaus-ville; and w^e had orders to keep 
our horses saddled and to keep a dose watch — no man to leave camp under any circumstances until we were 
relieved. We were told that we were in an extremely dangerous position and that would not do to trust for a 
moment the people by w+iom we are surrounded as it was a 'Union nest. ' We remained there four day^ and nights, 
and in the meantime w^e had eaten up all the supplies we had; and we lived for a day or two on hickorvnuts and 
roast pumpkins, without salt or greese. We soon determined we could stand this no longer; and after holding a 
'council,' w^e sent two of our number to inquire if we still must remain and if so to get provisions. It seemed that 
we had been overlooked, and that it was never intended for us to remain so long. As we returned from this 
position, we struck a Yankee Scout; and in the skirmish which followed; we lost several of our best horses, which 
left us with numerous dismounted men. Captain Robbins, about this time, w^ sent to the rear, sick. To Laveme, 
where w^e had a picket line cropped, the turnpike lead from Nashville, to Murfreesboro. Old Fostenille was a 
deserted village; and my company had possession of a good ferm house with quite a number of stables and bams, 
where we were comfortably quartered. In the meantime, our regiment was under the command of Lieutenant 
Webb. He, being a very strict disciplinarian, gave orders that no man should leave the camp under any cfrcum- 
stances, which fit^quently worked hardship, as we had to forage largel)^ on the country to feed ourselves and 
horses. These dismounted men ha\ing lost their horses and the Government not paying for them, were obliged to 
go back to the Wagon Train. One of them was one of the Company's best soldiers, a very poor man, and he fek his 

Page 22 



loss and the disgrace of being in the Wagon Train so keenly that he mad every effort possible to secure a mount. At 
that time I had been made a Third Lieutenant, and I was in command of the Company An order reached me one 
morning which required that I should examine and see if any of my Company had in their possession a very large, 
fine black horse with a white star in the forehead, which was the support of the wife and children of a confederate 
soldier now in the Virginia Army. I read the orders which were sent to the different Company Commanders, as I sat 
before the fire with several of my men, and made my endorsement on the order 'No such horse in my camp. ' After 
the Orderly had gone out, I noticed that the boys who had heard me read this order had gone out into the hall of 
the house and were holding a little consultation which attraaed my attention. I asked what M-as the matter. 
Sergeant James Du Bose walked back into the room where I sat and said, 'Lieutenant, that horse is in our Com- 
pany' I was astonished, and asked horn who had it. He told me a man by the name of Jones, being one of the four 
that had lost their horses, had arrived from the Wagon Camp the night before, and had the horse described. He 
pointed out to me where I would see the horse, and I went down and sure enough there vs^ no mistaking the 
animal, it being one of the finest horses I had seen in many a day This man was one of the best all-around soldiers 
I ever saw, and I was very sorry when I realized all that the order had said must be done ; but in compoance v.'ith it. 
I had Jones to arrest himself together with his horse and all of his baggage to the Colonel's quarters. 

I followed and saw young McCraw, of my Company who was Acting Adjutant for the Colonel; and I told liim 
that I could not afford to lose my man. He and I went together to Colonel Webb to see if he could assist us in saving 
Jones, as I knew that he was to be sent to Virginia as a punishment. The Colonel stated that he could do nothing 
but send Jones to General Martin's quarters, as direaed. I saw that I wanted to save my man. He said, ^es, your 
man is out in the quarters under guard and will be sent to Infantry' He advised that when General Martin came in 
he would introduce men and that I make my appeal to him, which I did. After a long argument and appeal, Jones 
was brought in the meantime. I told the General that if he would let me have Jones I would mount him; he asked 
me if I had a extra horse. I told him No, that I was riding a borrowed one myself 'How then will you mount liim?' 
I said, I said, 'I will tell you in confidence.' I then told him that I was going into the enemys camp for horses, as I had 
not only Jones but other men, good soldiers, unable to mount themselves. He smiled and said, 'Under whose 
orders are you going into the enemy's camp?' I told him that I didn't think he ought to ask me such a question, but 
that if pressed I was going to say that I went under his orders. He laughed and said "Well don't let them catch up 
with you then.' So I felt I had a friend, if needed. He turned my man over to me, who was overjoyed and cried like 
a child. I was most favorable tovrard General Martin, and I never saw a more gallant soldier than he was. I took liis 
baggage on my horse, and together we went back to camp, some six or seven miles distant. The next day I went 
out on a picket line and found that the enemy's pickets were about three miles fix)m ours — the ground between 
the two lines being what he called 'debatable ground,; where the scouts of each picket roamed. I went very close 
to the enemy's one to see a man named Norcross, that I had met several times while outside of the lines when in 
command of the picket on our front. I consulted Norcross about how I might get into the enemy's camp, and I 
asked him if he would assist me. After thinking awhile, he said, "^fes,' that he could show me a vi-ay by which I could 
enter through their lines and so get into their camp. I then told him that then next evening after dark I would be 
at his house with a select squad of men, and in the meantime I wanted him to go up and spot the different points 
where the pickets stood on the left of the road that passed his house. He informed me that he sold supplies, 
vegetables, and clothes to them daily He promised to attend to it, and the more we talked the more eager he 
seemed that I should make the attempt and finally insisted that he was going with me and guide us. If it was 
necessary he would kill a Yankee or two himseff. I thought nothing of it at the time, supposing it was merely 
enthusiam on his part. 

The next evening at the appointed time I was at his house with six of my best men. Jones was amoung them. 
We called him out, and I asked him if he had amy arms. He said no.. I told him that I had brought along a gun for 
him, a handy short, double-barrel shotgun with plenty of ammunition for my men and I were armed with two 
pistols each. He faltered when I insisted on his taking the gun and said he did not dare take it, that he might be 
caught. I said, 'Well, you are going with us?' He then backed down completely; he said he would go a Httle ways 
with us, which he did. As soon as he turned back and was out of sight, I called my men up close to me and told 
them that somehow I had grown suspicious of Norcross and that I deteaed in his speech and manner something 
that made me fear him. 

Page 23 



I asked who would volunteer to go back and guard our horses and keep a watch on Norcross. Sei^eant 
Blankenship volunteered. I told him to go back to the cedar brake in which our horses were hid in a lime sink and 
take this double-barrelled gun with him and not to let Norcross see him. He was to go immediately where our 
horses were and sit down where he could watch them closely, as I feared that Norcross might make an attempt to 
steal them. Then, in place of going to the point that Norcross had sent us in his description of the enemy's line, we 
side stepped about a half mile to our left. There we found another road which led right in to the enemy's lines, 
running parallel with the one Norcross lived on, also another femily living very dose to the enemy's lines. Having 
called the man of the house out, I explained to him our situation, as he seemed to be an honest Southern man. He 
told me that I must be careftil, as the enemy w^as often wandering aroimd his place and might see us, and that he 
was aftaid of my fiiend Norcross, as he believed he was too intimate with the enemy He was afi:aid that he would 
attempt to carry our horses to them and bring out a force on us. This made me very uneasy as this ftiUy confirmed 
my suspicions; but I deteimined to go on. This was about ten o'clock at night. I calculated I would return about 
twelve. 

After getting all the information possible as to the enemy's picket line and their reserve picket, we deter- 
mined to follow a string of fence that this man said would carry us right up to their line and see where best to 
attempt passing it. As we were about to leave the old gentelman, he remarked that he would sit up till we returned, 
for he could not sleep; so I su^ested that he should take one of my pistols and go with us. He said Well, he 
believed he would; but we must not let any of his femily know it. He then told his wife to go to bed as he was going 
to walk up to the old place, which was in sight with us. After leaving there, we took a fence row which was fiinged 
with a dense thicket of shrubery and crawled along as he direaed, one after another, I in front. When we had 
gotten up near the enemy's picket, he tapped me with a little stick he had in his hand; and I discovered that the 
relief picket was on its round and right at us. We all lay down as dose to the fence as we could get, and they rode 
right by us with only the fence between us. They foiled to see us, however; and while they were relieving the next 
picket post, we climbed the fence and ran into the bushes inside their lines. Then we went still deeper into the 
bushes where we stopped to rest. The old man had grown greatly exdted and insisted that he must go back, saying 
that he would be usless in case of danger I went back to the line with him, and he crossed it safely; then I returned 
to my men. We soon struck an artillery camp which was so well guarded that we could do nothing with it. We then 
turned and went up the line to picket reserve near where we had expeaed to crop at first. To our surprise we 
found every horse saddle, seeming to be about 30 in all, the men with arms in their hands and apparently waiting 
to start on some expedition. We vratched them av^Me; then we continued into the enemy's camp. After going 
about a mile, we came to a ca\'alry command — seemingly a brigade or more. After watching them awhile and 
waiting for it to grow later, I decided to take two men and go inside vWth them while the others remained out to 
keep a watch for the enemy. We buttoned up our overcoats, hid our pistols, and walked directly into the camp, 
passing along between the fires just as though we were at home. We found the men cooking, eating, playing 
games of cards, and a little suspecting who we were as quietly walked through camp. 

Out near the edge I found a camp where all were asleep; I picked out the best horse they had and quietly 
unfastened him and walked oft" with him. I had gone by a short distance v^+ien I v^'aJked upon one horse tied by 
himself with a good bridle and saddled hanging by him. I immediately saddled and got on him. I then quietly rode 
back, leading the other horse, to where my men were. After waiting awhile, my companions came out with their 
horses; so then it was the turn of the other two men to go in. We explained the situation to them, and they walked 
in a diflerent place to the one we had gone in. They had been gone sometime, and the other men and I were 
beginning to grow very uneasy When all at once I discovered there was quite a commotion in the camp. I said to 
my man, 'Clark's raising a row' Clark was notorious for being one of the most fearless desperate men I ever saw, 
always wanting to fight, and never seemingly knowing v^+iat fear w^as. Sure enough I saw Clark coming with three 
or four Men after him hollowing, 'Halt,halt!' We mounted our horses and waited for him. He ran up to us, and I 
reached down and took him up behind me and we got aw^y still lea^'ing one man in the camp. After going some 
distance and seeing that we were not pursed any further, we got down and waited awhile, hoping our other man 
might come to us. About an hour later after that we heard a horse come walking through the woods; I stepped out 
in the direction of the noise and w+io should it be but my other man with a fine horse. As soon as he got up to us 
he commenced to laugh at Clark. He said "VXTiat did you want to interfere with those damned Yankees for?' Clark 

Page 24 



had secured a fine horse, took him out, and tied him in a convenient place as he thought, and then went back and 
attempted to rob the Captain. He soon got into hot water, knocking the Captain down with his pistol; and the rest 
tried to catch him, thinking all the time it was one of their own men. So he had to lose his horse and get out as best 
he could. We then started out, thinking to go out at the same point that we had come in, keeping in the woods all 
along; but when we reached that point, we saw that it was utterly impossible to escape on horseback, owing to the 
fact that a network of stone fences lay in the ^'aIley belowus. We then determined to move up to the road and make 
a dash on the picket post, capture it, and tried to make our escape. When we got in sight of the post, we drew our 
pistols; and going fi-om a trot to a gallop and them to a run, we came sweeping down on the two pickets who, 
hearing such a noise and seeing such a force coming fi-om inside their own lines, lost their heads, and broke down 
the road in front of us. As soon as we were in shooting distance, we began firing on them. One man dropped and 
the other soon halted and surrendered. Sending a horse back, we found that the first man was not hurt; so we 
brought to two with us and came on down to the old man's house. He was delighted to see us but very much 
alarmed for fear he might be found out and the enemy destroy him and his family He told us that a short time 
before a Captain with 20 or 30 men had come to his house immediately back to Norcross'; and told me that he 
feared Norcross had betrayed us and our horses. He began begging me not to go back to the place. I told him that 
I must to, that I left one of my best men there in charge of our horses; and I must go back and see what had become 
of him and get our horses, if possible. So hiding my two prisoners with two men in the woods away from the road, 
the other men and I slipped down to the cedar brake and found our horses and man there all right. But when I got 
up to him, I saw that he had a prisoner with his gun levelled on him. I said, "What does this mean?' He said, 'That 
is Norcross, and he is a damned traitor!' In response to my inquiries he told me that he had passed close to 
Norcross' house as he came back and that Norcross had betrayed us, but he felt that he could do nothing but 
follow out the orders I had given; so he went immediately to where the horses were. After an hour or so, Norcross 
slipped up to them. He waited till he came up to the one that was next to him, when he halted him and brought 
him up to where he was, with his gun levelled on him as he was Norcross was armed, grabbing his gun, when he 
had denied to us that he had any arms. He then told Norcross he inteneded to execute him on the spot, but gave 
him five minutes in which to say his prayers and make his peace. But in a moment afterwards he heard the tramp 
of horses and saw quite a number of Yankees ride up to Norcross' house and call for him. After they stayed there 
for sometime, they passed along the road not far from where he was, and that he had gotten up, walked up to 
Norcross and put his gun right in his breast, and told him that if he made the slightest noice he would kill him as 
he saw Norcross was on the point of screaming. Then they were gone for about an hour and then came back and 
finally had left. So he was then afraid to shoot Norcross for fear they might be in the neighborhood and hunt him 
up. One of my men had a strong line on his saddle, and with that we tied Norcross' hands, put him on a horse, and 
leading our other horses we went back to where our men were hiding; and while we were ready Norcross jumped 
the fence and ran down the lines. I emptied my pistol at him, and he was hit; he made his escape by cutting the 
lines. We started to our lines. 

Then I sent two of my men with one of the prisoners to another place, having left our extra horses with a man 
near the picket line until we could get out and get them, as we didn't want to let it be known that we had been in 
the enemy's camp. Just before daylight we rode in, put up our horses, and quietly retired, having first turned the 
two Yankee prisoners over to the provost guard, ridding ourselves of them entfrely My men were very much 
surprised when they saw our dismounted men had horses, and it was the wonder of the day where the horses 
could have come from. But they were cautioned to keep quiet about it. And so ended the first scout that I made 
into the enemy's lines. 

Two days afterwards I returned to Norcross' house, sending a force around, hoping to capture him. When we 
made a dash to the house, we found it empty everyone gone. I went to my old friend's house that had helped us, 
and he explained that the next morning the Yankees had sent out wagons and moved Norcross and all he had 
inside thefr lines. He then told me Norcross had been playing spy inside our lines, giving all sorts of information to 
the Yankees; and he ■^'as himself in great distress of mind, fearing lest Norcross would bring the Yankees out on 
him, should he ever suspect him of the effort he had made to assist us.' 

Shelbyville, Term. 
January 31st. 1863 

Page 25 



My dear Mary, 

I suppose you have comE to the conclusion by this time that I am either a prisoner or no longer living or that 
I have entirely forgotten that I had a dear sweet wife and Babe at home. But when I tell you all, you will, I know 
excuse me in you kind indulgent heart. In the first place I started fighting the advancing army of the \knkees on the 
26 of December (our Regiment being placed in Major General Wheeler's Brigade before that time) and since that 
time I have gone through more than I had any idea I ever could. 

February 1st. I had just ceased writing yesterday and walked out on the portico when I heard yelling and 
firing and looking across the fields saw Yankees pursuing our Cavalry who were running like a parcel of cowards 
(I have since learned that we lost about 100 of our Csvahry but leaving the Douglas and Wade Regiments in our 
Brigade). I ran into the House and waked Newt up in great haste, and we made railroad trip getting away fixim 
there and I am now with the wagons where I found a letter of yours written on the 21st of December, I was very 
glad to hear fixam you again although was so long written. I have never opened the package sent by Allen but will 
probably I would indeed be proud to wear something spun by my darling sweet wife. I fear that you do not have 
everything that you ought and that is what distresses me most. If I only knew that you was fijmished as you ought 
to be, I would be better satisfied. Tell Pa to write to me, and tell me how much com he has on hand. And how 
much land He intends to cultivate in com. Tell him I w^unt him to come up as I want to send another Mare home 
by him and probably two of them. Tell him to ride any old scmb he can pick up and come and inquire for 
Wheeler's Brigade. Tell Pa I will look for a letter from him telling me all about our aSairs and I am anxious to know 
how our af&irs are at this time. What has become of our cove's? Tell Pa to try and winter them. 

So now farewell my wife. Take the best care of my Mary and Baby, buy you some dresses if possible. All you 
want at any price as they are going to be scarce after a while. Kiss WiUie and tell him I am going to make a soldier 
of Him. I am glad of Him being such a sw^eet child. 

Clay 



On the 26th we fought and feU back all day and continued on the 27th. About twelve o'clock on the 27th we 
got cut oflFfiDm the Regiment and was left entirely surrounded by the enemy six miles torn our lines. We fought 
a while and then retreated. I carried out two \knkees I had captured. They fired-upnan us for a fourth of a mile as 
we ran through a long lane trying to make a creek Bridge before the enemy got there. But upon nearing the Bridge 
we saw the enemy posted in the lane in fi-ont of us and Lieutenant Seawell, Charlie Lavender, and ten others of our 
best men who were in the lead. They having the best horses seeing what v^^as in fix>nt, turned into a field in the left, 
and there another body of Infantry fired upon them, and I saw several of their horses mn oflFwithout riders. We in 
the rear seeing what had befallen those in fi-ont, turned into another field-they firing upon us all the time-and ran 
to the creek (which was very difficult to cross on account of high steep banks and high v^'aters there being no ford) 
all the time under heavy fire of shot and shells and jumping our horses off the banks into the creek swwn over by 
a hard stmggle puffed our exhausted horses up the bluff and so about 15 or 16 of us made our escape after a race 
of about 5 ° miles, even though the enemy being fired upon at e\'ery turn in the road and at one place for nearly a 
mffe under heavy fire. We lost two horses-kiUed-belonging to two young men in the company who escaped. They 
wer^ brothers; and one of them had his horse kffled on the Jefferson Pike, and the other took him upon his horse 
and as we ran to the creek in the field the horse carrying them both was shot through and they ran to the creek on 
foot and I helped them over We then rode away at our being very cold and wet and exhausted. I dismounted my 
prisoner (one having done on v^ith the first who crossed) and mounted the boys on his horse and turned him over 
to some of our infentry and so I made his horse bridle, saddle, blankets, pistol, and etc. The horse I sv^apped for 
the mare I sent you which is one of the best animals I ever owned. I stiff have his fine saddle and etc. - in aff worth 
$150 to me. 

After that day we fought them every day until the Battle of Murfreesboro. We were then sent to the rear of the 
enemy and burned their wagon trains. It was a rare sight to see three or five hundred wagons burning and aU the 
mules which had been hitched to them tumed loose with the hamess upon them running in every direction 
braying and kicking the Yanks who were scared to death and our men blondering and burning. It was a glorious 
time. Three different times we went to the rear of the enemy and bumed eight or nine hundred wagons in aU. I 

Page 26 



captured the mule I sent home there from one of those wagons. 

I have, also, made money enough to buy the mare I am now riding, which is very much like the one I left 
home with. After the Battle of Murfreesboro, I was on duty continually until finally we left for the Cumberland 
River, where we burned Osun Boats and transported without the loss of a man in the Brigade from \&nkees. But 
the swimming of the creek and lying out in snow six inches deep and clothes freezing on liS was terrible. I thought 
I was able to stand anything, but that rather got me. We finally came to Franklin where we stayed six days tn gocxj 
houses, rested and fed our poor horses, and saw the nicest, kindest, and prettiest ladies in Tennessee. 

After leaving Franklin, we started in die direction of Shelbyville; and after four days on the trip, we came to 
the front of the enemy once more on the Shelbyville and Murifcesboro Turnpike and are at present engaged 
picketing. After getting here, I was taken sick with the billious attack and have been sick at the house of a very clever 
family by the name of Cooper but now I am all OK once more and would return to the Company immediately but 
that S.N. McCraw who came out with me sick with chills is lying on a pallet by my side with a fever and I can't leave 
him until he can go. 

"We remained in fi-ont of Nashville for some time. We were doing picket duty When the enemy advanced on 
Nashville to fight us at Stone River, our company was under the command of lieutenant Sewell. He was ordered 
to take the company and go on a scouting expedition across Stone River, reporting what the enemy was doing. We 
started early in the morning; and by noon we had crossed the Stewart's Creek and was dose to what was called the 
"Chicken Pike;" wiiich intersects the Mmfeesboro and Nashville P^e. Hearing a great roaring noise, we stopped 
to listen and concluded to send out pickets on all sides and try to discover the enemy At the request of the 
lieutenant, I made the detail. Among them I detailed one man, Dr Hewell, to go by himself out on Chicken Pike. 
The men that we sent toward the Nashville turnpike soon returned, informing us that the noise we heard was the 
roar of the Federal Army as they marched fix)m Nashville toward Murfi^esboro; and it looked like there was going 
to be a battle. The balance of our pickets soon came in-all bringing the same report that the enemy was in motion 
in every direction. That is, all came except Dr. Hewell, who had not returned. I persuaded the Ueutenant to hold 
the company until I could call in Dr Hewell. I rode rapidly down the Chicken Pike, hoping to overtake Hewell, 
when all at once a sudden turn of the road brought me right up fronting Hewell with a Federal soldier on each side 
of him. I immediately drew both pistols that I had in my holsters, whereupon they surrendered. I made Hewell 
take their guns. I found that Hewell had ridden into their lines very unexpectedly and was captured and was being 
sent to the person in charge of these men. I saw we were almost hemmed in and tried to persuade the lieutenant 
to try a difierent route to the one we had come in on, but he could not change the dfrection. 

We started to return in a walk, which was increased to a trot, and then to a gallop and in thirty minutes time 
we had reached the neighborhood of Stewart's Creek. I was in the rear of the company trying to keep the men up 
with these two prisoners-one on each side of me-having told them that either of them should separate from me, 
I should certainly kill them. I was carrying my lai^e pistol threateningly in my hand. When we had gotten within a 
few hundred yards of the creek, we were running through a lane having been fired upon fixDm both sides by a great 
many Federal soldiers. 

They believed us to be the advance guard of a large force, so we attacked them in the rear. All at once a line 
of soldiers, who were lying down, rose and fiured upon us. I could distinctly hear the order to fire by thefr com- 
manding officer. This volley killed, crippled, and dismounted nineteen of our men before we could get out of thefr 
reach, as the lane was narrow and the men and horses were strung out in it. When we reached the creek, we found 
that we were on a bluif at least ten feet above the water; but there was nothing we could do except to plunge into 
the water, every man and his horse going entfrely out of sight under the water I made my prisoners jump ofl^ swim 
to the other side, and pull out some of the men who were in danger of being drowned. Some of the men, not 
knowing how to swim, would involuntarily pull the heads of thefr horses under the vrater After we had crossed 
the creek, there was nothing more to hinder us fix)m going on to our command." 

Front Picket Lines 

12 miles from Murifeesboro 

and 10 miles from Shelbyville 



Page 27 



April 16, 1863 

My Darling Wife, 

It is only a few days since I wrote you, but nevertheless I concluded to write you once again before waiting for 
an answer, though to tell the truth I am almost discouraged from writing any more. Only one letter of yours has 
reached me since I saw Pa, which now seems like a long while. In it you mentioned Pa's safe arrival home. I am glad 
to hear of it, as I feared he would have a spell of his old sickness before he got home. We are still at our same camps 
where we arrived on the 28th of January It seems almost like home we have been here so long. But when I look 
around and think of my sweet wife and Babe at home, it seems like anything else. I have been cjuite homesick for 
the past two or three weeks. We have so little to do, and it is so very tiresome here in camps that I get out of all 
patience doing nothing. But from all accounts, we won't have an opportunity of lying still much longer as the news 
now is that the Army Rosencrans is preparing to make a move. And I hope it is true, as he must move. And if his 
army does move against ours, I fear there will be a most desperate battle as they are very strong and our army is in 
a most excellent position. So dearest, pray for the safety of your unworthy husband, as I have not the slightest 
doubts, but that I will be in the engagement in some way and hope to bear a worthy part in the struggle for our 
liberty 

I am in command of the Company now and have been for several days, as the Captan has erysipelas and has 
gone to Camp. I can scarcely write for four of the boys who are sitting in the other comer playing a game of eucre 
and singing, "When I can wipe my weeping eyes" in a loud tone. I have just been notified that I am Officer of the 
Picket tomorrow I am not sorry to go, as it changes my duties somewhat. I like almost any change now. 

I would give $50 to start to Kentucky tomorrow morning, .... I have now come to the conclusion that there 
is no end to the war, and I do fear we have a most desolate prospect before us. I sometimes feel as though I would 
give half of my life for the war to stop immediately. I so much want to see you all. I sometimes sit and think how my 
darling sweet wife and baby look and at such times I go to thinking to m^'self how can I get off and go to see my 
darlings. Many are the plans I devise but all fail upon second thought. Quite a number of the officers have got off 
for 30 or 60 days on different pleas and are now returning to the Regiment. One of the (Lieutenant Castleberry) 
returned yesterday having been home on account of his wife's illness. She has been quite sick. You recollect I 
wrote about our boys (13 in number) being taken prisoners on the 27th of December last. Three of them got back 
a few days ^o and give a sad account of the balance. One of them was shot on the spot. Three died from exposure 
and bad treatment. One managed to get out of prison and that is the last ever heard of him. The balance of them 
were left behind (Charley Lavender among the number) sick. Charley was at Chicago and was expeaed to follow 
on the next day. I received and answered a letter from SaUie a few days ago. I wrote her a long letter, as she wanted 
me to give her a history of my adventures as it seems you had been telling her some big tales about me. 

Dearly beloved, write often, I don't think you neglea writing, but the other Boys get letters. Berry Harrison 
(my bed mate) gets from two to three every week &x3m his wife at Summerfield. Somehow I have got the blues 
today my dear, so must excuse my uninteresting letter A letter from you would give my great relief You have no 
idea how much it would help me. And now farewell, my dear wife. 

Your Husband, 
H. Clay Reynolds 

Direct your letters to me, Martin's Brigade, Shelbyville, Tennessee, as I wrote you before. Write often darling. 
Newt will take his place as 3rd Lieutenant in a few daN'S, I think. Our Regiment v^'as pronounced first in the Brigade 
on inspection a few days ago. Our new Brigade General was much pleased ■with it. Our Company horses were 
pronounced the finest in it and our men the best clothed and equipped. 

H.C.R. 

"From the time of the battle at Murfreesboro, our movements were so rapid that I did very little scouting. We 
were on the retreat with every effort being made to get across the Tennessee River with our supplies. Wheeler's 
cavalry, being continually engaged in skirmishes wth the enemy, often lost heavily at the same time, causing great 
lost to the enemy 

Page 28 



An amusing incident occurred while we were encamped at Luveme. The regiment had decided that we 
ought to have a chaplain and Rev. D.C.B. Connerly was elected. He, in connection with our quartermaster and 
assistant and one or two other ofiBcials including Jas. W Lapsley, and selected a nice place on the pike in the 
direction of Murfireesboro, a mile or so in the rear of our headquarters. There they had put up two nice wall tents 
and enclosed a yard with a light fence making a very homelike, attractive looking place. There they rested at night 
with a feeling of security, knowing that they had the command between them and the enemy But one morning as 
day was breaking, they were aroused from their slumbers by the rasping voice of a big Federal soldier who wth 
some oaths commanded them to 'come out of them tents. ' The whole of our regiment had the highest respea for 
our gifted chaplain, fully belie^^ng that if occasion offered, he would acquit himself finely in the presence of the 
ENEMY These gentlemen who were in the tents were not aware of the fact that the enemy had broken through 
our lines and captured part of the regiment below us on the picket line, and that they had scattered in various 
directions capturing all the small bodies of our troops that they could find, until they heard this raucous voice 
ordering them out. The parson hearing so much profanity and never dreaming that it could come from any except 
our own men, picked up a wash pan in the tent, intending to get some water at the same time rebuke the drunken 
wretch who was guilty of such profanity He marched boldly up to where this oflScer and his men sat on their 
horses and delivered a forcible reprimand telling them what great punishment he would have visited upon them 
for the insulting language they had used in his presence. About that time the parson concluded to take a survey of 
their countenances; and holding up his wash pan to shield his eyes from the sun, making I suppose a suspicious 
movement to the enemy when the man of raucous voice brought up his gun and a shot a hole through the pan. 
This brought to the front the balance of the officers kom the tent who rushed out to the side of the chaplain 
causing the enemy to level thefr guns on the whole crowd. It dawned upon their minds then the simation they 
were in. fri the meantime whey had informed the chaplain that these were Yankees and that he had better make 
the best terms with them that he could. So the chaplain apologized to them for his rudeness and begged that they 
be allowed to go into their tents and dress, being in their night clothes, which was granted them. About this time 
the nose of the gun the man had fired reached our camp. So quite a number of us who had heard of the disaster 
of the breaking of our lines mounted our horses, running them at full speed down the pike to this camp. Then 
they pursued the now fleeing enemy, capturing everyone of them. The description of this afiair, given by our 
chaplain and the dialogue that occurred when we had brought the cursing man back, was a source of amusement 
for many long months there after And when they parted, the man of profenity begged the parson to pray for him, 
which he agreed to do provided he'd quit cursing. The next Sunday our chaplain preached a sermon on profenity 
that brought many a snrule and wink as the whole regiment had heard of the fun. The chaplain was not long in 
removing his tent down nearer to headquarters." 

Old Fosterville 

12 miles from Murfreesboro, Term. 

May 10th, 1863 

My own sweet Mary 

I am indeed happy to state that both of your letters of the 30th and May 1st came safely to hand one day 
before yesterday and the other today I see that they were mailed at Wilsonville and via Selma. So once more I can 
have the exquisite pleasure of corresponding to one who is dearest to me than all the world contains. Oh! darling 
wife, you cannot imagine the joy I experience when the Post Master hands me a letter and especially when I catch 
a glimpse of a certain small handwriting that I have long ago learned that I am delighted to know so well! Yes, 
indeed, well do I remember the 30th two years ago-everything is indelibly written on my mind. I even recoUea the 
least particulars, how much my darling ^'as excited before as well as after the ceremony was performed, which 
made me the proteaor of one of Heavens noblest best gifts to man. Oh! Happy indeed have been the hours we 
have spent together since that night. I never before knew what happiness was. Since the day I could clasp your 
lovely form in my arms, the greatest clouds that have appeared on the horizon of my love is our happiness to 
separate from each other for so long. It is indeed a hard fate, but hope that never ftiiling star becomes me on to the 
future and I look forward to another day with oh, so much eagerness. 

Page 29 



But my love I am heart sick today. There has occurred an incident today that makes me feel so badly It is this: 
On Dress Parade day before yesterday eve, I was named as one of the officers of the picket for the next day or 24 
hours, commencing on Saturday morning at eight and ending this morning at eight. Immediately after parade two 
young men, one named D. Hill, son of Colonel Hill of Cahawba, and the other named Joe King from near 
Hamburg, came running up to me and asked me to put them on the scouting party daily sent out from the picket 
reserve in the direction of the Yankees. I readily consented as they were both noble soldiers and accordingly 
yesterday I called them out to go on the scout. On the day before the scouts went up to the Yankee pickets on the 
Yankee line and shook hands with them, they gave our men coffee and newspapers. So the scouts I sent out 
concluded they must also have a chat with the Yankees as they had professed such a sincere desire the day before 
for a cessation of picket shooting. So the boys went up the pike (they met with no difficulty yesterday and did not 
see the Yanks) and just about sunrise (this morning) they reached the hill looking over at the picket on another hill 
about a half of a mile distant. Presently, an officer of the Yanks appeared in thefr rear with a number of men, and 
immediately a large number of Yanks sprang up on all sides from behind rocks, trees, fences, and etc. completely 
hemming them in. The officer in thefr rear called out for them to halt. They were in the act of surrendering when 
the officer called to his men, "Don't fire;" but they fired three guns and shot King through the body Hill and the 
man who had accompanied them (Dunlap) were taken uninjured. King was carried into the house at hand and 
permission given for notice to be sent to our lines so we might bring a surgeon. The note came by a negro; and I 
immediately sent for Frands M. C, our regiment surgeon after waiting with great impatience for two hours he 
came. He and two of our men went forward with a flag of truce. But we had waited so long that the Yankee 
ambulance had come out and taken him away I went up to the Yankee pickets and questioned them about King 
and Hill. They did not think King's wound was a mortal one, but the people at whose house he was did. So just as 
I was recruiting the Company, I lost two of my noblest men; and it disheanens me. 

Tell Ma she had better be shy of Mr. Bums if she goes to BumsNiUe, as I have refrised to make John B. a 
Lieutenant in Company I. Although he brought me a paper v>ixh the name of every member of the Company 
(present) signed to it. The men now think I did right, though at first they did not. I happened to know the man too 
well to want him as an associate. The Colonel and McGraw, Lapsley and all wtio know him, say I did just right. 
When I refiosed to sign it, some of the men did not think I was showing proper respect for my men; so I drew up 
a paper and told them they could get my resignation by signing it, but not one would do it. So bums had to leave 
without getting the position. 1 forgot to mention that five or six days previous to that time he (Bums) had been 
detailed in the Commissary department at Tullahoma. Now, the men all say I acted right and are rejoiced that all 
occurred as it did so far as my refiising to approve his appointment. Captain Robbins came up on yesterday from 
Camp and will probably remain until his papers are heard irom. I do like C. H. Lavender, and he pretends to think 
a great deal of me. He will come on soon, and I uill be glad to receive anything you may have to send to me by him. 
I am needing some clothing now. I thought I would not send home for anything but find that I now need things 
I cannot get. However, I will write Pa about buying for me. And you know I will be proud of anything you may have 
to send me. More especially if made by your dear hands. You spoke of some shirts you v^'ere making for me. Make 
them as neat in the bosoms as you can, as you remember we have not vests to wear; and it would be best probably 
to put (if you can get them conveniently) some fance buttons and any other fancy work on them that you can. I am 
about writing to Pa concerning a uniform. I want a nice but not gaudy one, and a nice pafr of boots. I expect all 1 
want will cost near $200, but have something neat I must. I did have the misfortune to lose the mare I had when 
Pa was up here. She cost me $300. But such things will sometimes happen. I did not mention it because I hoped 
you would not hear of it, and I would try to work along and not have you grieved in any v^^ as I knew you would 
be. I have one now that cost me $350 and I have been offered $450. And as soon as I can get off will go to 
Shelbyville and get $500. As I will not have so much invested in a horse. Tell Pa I made $75 on the large sorrel 
horse. I had and used him over a month after my mare died. I want to get two neck ties when my clothes are sent, 
and I also want to have a small trunk or large valise to keep them in as if I do not have something with a lock to it 
I can keep nothing. I also want the initials of my name worked on all my underclothes, towels, handkerchiefe, and 
etc., as they steal and mix up clothing so badh^ 

May 1 1th. Since writing the above I have come to the conclusion not to go to too much expense for a 
uniform, as I find I can alway'S get tolerably kus clothing from the Qr Master I bought a nice pafr of pants on 

Page 30 



yesterday (that is common goods). I am expecting Lieutenant Sewell back soon, as I learn they are exchanging 
officers. Newt McCraw is Acting Adjutant of the Regiment and will probably be appointed Adjutant. James Lapsley 
has been appointed 1st Lieutenant in Company E. Don't the Selma Boys go in for oflScers. We have just heard that 
General Stonewall Jackson is dead. What a blow to us. I hope you have heard from WiUiam since the Battle and 
that he is safe. I never received the letter you sent me written by William. I am sorry I did not. I have written him two 
or three letters but received no answer When you write, tell him I wrote him in regards to his being transferred to 
our Company But it is a very difficult thing to get a transfer. Now that you have an office that you can send letters 
to and know that they will come s;ifely I hope you will write often my darling, for nothing gives me more pleasure 
than to get a letter from you. I will have some money in a day or two and am going to send you some. How does 
your mare do? Have you ever ridden or driven her, and do you think she is "enceinte." I hope to raise a fine colt 
from her. And now dearest I must come to a dose, as I have had no pay today and it is now nearly 9 o'clock. I rode 
out to get supper last night and had to pay $ 1 for some combread and milk and butter Provisions are growing very 
scarce and a dollar is customary price for a meal, so I cannot afford to eat many And now ferewell my darling Mary 
Write soon and may Heavens blessings rest on your dear sweet head, is the prayer of your husband. 

H.C.R. 

Captain Robbins afready begins to regret his resignation-not that his health is improving so much. He ^ill be 
glad wtien you get some new flour in, and I hope then you will all have plenty to eat. How much wheat does Pa 
think he will make? Is Pa making money by buying cotton? Give my love to your ma. I do hope she m^y marry Lyles . 
He is a nice man. TeU her I say take him by all means if she can get him. Tell Bethie I often think of her and would 
speak of her often in my letters, but suppose you would read her any news I may write. Tell her to write to me. 
What is Mack doing? How much salt has Pa on hand, and how is Mrs. Hargrove? Now darling, I have written a long 
and tiresome letter for you to read. Please write me long and often and try and answer some of the foolish 
questions I have asked you. 

Yours, 
Clay 



I would give so much to see Willie. I tell all the men and women, especially when I go to a home any number 
of times and get acquainted, about my sweet wife and baby I am proud of them. 

H.C.R. 

'After the battle of Shelbyville, wiiere we lost heavily we fell back to Elk River. There we had a severe ca\^alry 
fight and our Lieutenant Colonel Webb was killed. We were on horseback, and I was within ten feet of him and 
heard the ball strike him and saw him reel in his saddle. I quickly dismounted and with others rushed to him. We 
carried him into a nearby church building where we had to leave him as a prisoner and mortally wounded." 

Trenton, Georgia 
July 10th, 1863 

My Dear Sweet Mary, 

We reached this place two and half day's ago and are now resting after our long hard march and fighting from 
Shelbyville to Tennessee River Our Regiment \^'as engaged at Shelbyville with the rest of the Brigade and met a 
most disastrous defeat for want of diy ammunition and guns, we having been on a march for six days marching 
night and day in the rain. The Generals knew the condition of arms; still, they put us out to meet the enemy who 
were fast advancing and soon charged and drove us back. Our Regiment stood its ground till every other left it and 
consequently lost heavily Over a hundred, out of 300 carried in, were left killed, wounded, or captured. Newt 

Page 31 



McCraw, I am sorry to say -was severely wounded in the thigh-it being shattered near the body He will, in all 
probability die. (Our) Major Dye was among the missing, also. Newt is in the hands of the enemy Poor fellow, I am 
so sorry about him. Our next fight was at Elk River near a white church. We had a hot fight but did not lose so 
heavily as we had good ammunition and repulsed them. But we lost our Colonel there. He had only been 
promoted a few days by Colonel Morgan's being appointed a Brigadier General. Colonel Webb was shot within 
ten yards of where I sat on my mare-the balls flying thick all around. I saw he was mortally wounded, or I thought 
so. He was shot in the bowels and was left in the hands of the enemy. So w^e are without a Field Officer We lost two 
Captains and a number of Lieutenants. Upon reaching the Tennessee River, we found the railroad bridge planked 
over; and we crossed it about 12 o'clock at night on 4th July I thought of you while I sat there on that little narrow 
bridge, 50 yards high fi-om water (as we were fully an hour crossing some planks being displaced on this end). I 
thought of you lying asleep, and I hoped dreaming of me and ^vould have given the world to have been by your 
side. But alas! I see no chance for me to be with you soon. We have just heard of the loss of Vicksburg and Lee's 
glorious victory in Pennsylvania. Upon reaching this place we received our mail fi-om Chattanooga (direaed to 
Shelbyville), and I had the exquisite pleasure of getting two of your sweet letters. I can assure you I was delighted 
to receive them and hope to get another this evening, as I hope you have not ceased to write because I have not 
had the opportunity of writing. I have read and re-read your letters and still keep them. I generally bum them after 
reading them over and over, for fear I might be taken prisoner or killed and someone else get them. You speak of 
receiving a letter containing $40. 1 sent one also containing $20. Did you get it. I had hard work to get the sheet of 
paper to write on and don't know w+iere an envelope is to come fi-om. Dear Mar)-; I have had an idea of writing Pa 
to bring you up to see me, now I am so near, but it is doubtful about our staying here any length of time. I can't 
make up my mind to do so. I feel more sadness in relation to the fiall of Vicksbui^ than I have felt in many a long 
day It seems to me that the prospects of the war, being indefinitely prolonged, are increased a hundred fold. I try 
to cheer the Boys; but they seem dispirited, although they say they will fight now harder than ever As for m^'sel^ 
1 have concluded I am my country's and my wife's. I dread to fell on your account but were I a single man I expea 
I would have been turning to mother earth long ago. And should I be so unfortunate as to fall what is to become 
of my dear wife and Babe is the all important question to my mind presented. So for your dear sweet sake, I will 
be more prudent in future; and I hope with my former good fortune. Many are the bullets I have heard whistle of 
bullets and shells and as yet am untouched. Thanks to my own beloved darling's prayers; and now it is dark so 
farewell my own sweet one. 

H. C. Reynolds 



Page 32 



STONES RIVER NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD CEMETARY USTINGS 

This information was compiled by Nell Blankenship, past president of the Rutherford County Historical 
Society and currently its secretary She is an experienced benealogist and did the research on the Stones River 
National Battlefield Cemetary that appeared in Publication 37. 



ADAMS 


JUDTTH 


SHELDON 


10-01-1943 


05-29-1967 


Q-6767 


DAUGHTER OF WILLIS J. ADAMS 


AHNS 


NAMON 


NONE 


03-21-1905 


05-18-1963 


Q-6547 


WWn VETERAN 


ALDRED 


TOMMIE 


W. 


08-11-1896 


11-10-1956 


P-6384 


WWI VETERAN 


ALEXANDER 


JOHN 


0. 


0405-1924 


03-10-1958 


P-6407 


WWn VETERAN 


ALEXANDER 


ROBERT 


LEE 


03-06-1916 


04-30-1966 


Q-6707 


WWn VETERAN 


ALFORD 


ROBERT 


LEE 


0412-1919 


034)3-1964 


Q-6675 


WWn VETERAN 


ALLEN 


JOHN 


M. 


00-004)000 


07-13-1949 


P-6318 


VETERAN 


ALSUP 


SIMON 


TAYLOR VANESS 


11-05-1916 


05-22-1966 


(^6711 


WWn VETERAN 


AI5UP 


wn,i,iF, 


PAUL 


0607-1941 


02-17-1964 


Q-6607 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY 


ANDERSON 


GUY 


NONE 


06-12-1947 


064)7-1967 


Q-6251 


VETERAN 


ANDERSON 


JOSH 


NONE 


09-07-1895 


09-29-1962 


Q-6531 


WWI VETERAN 


ANDERSON 


SAMUEL 


JOSEPH 


01-20-1895 


104)7-1971 


R-6929 


WWI VETERAN 


ANDREWS 


PAULINE 


REEVES 


05-18-1921 


05-15-1967 


(^6746 


WIFE OF MARSHALL LEE ANDREWS 


APOTHAKER 


JOSEPH 


NONE 


01-07-1891 


104)3-1967 


(^^758 


WWI VETERAN 


ARBUCKLE 


BUEL 


NATHANIEL JR 


0408-1926 


08-24-1973 


T-7109 


WWn, KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


ARMSTRONG 


GARNER 


B. 


05-05-1929 


124)6-1953 


P-6362 


KOREA VETERAN 


ARMSTRONG 


WILLIAM 


S. 


07-03-1893 


08-20-1972 


T-7082 


WWI VETERAN 


ARNEIT 


JAMES 


D. 


10-08-1873 


07-30-1957 


P-6391 


WftR WITH SPAIN VETERAN 


ARNOLD 


TIM 


NONE 


06-30-1889 


03-13-1966 


0^709 


WWI VETERAN 


ATKINS 


WILLIAM 


L 


05-05-1889 


06-141965 


P-6513 


WWI VETERAN 


ATKINSON 


JAMES 


W. 


11-25-1920 


01-19-1965 


P-6510 


WWn&KOREA VETERAN 


ATWOOD 


RALPH 


NONE 


00-004)000 


054)6-1942 


P-6198 


VETERAN 


AWfT 


MADIE 


OPHELIA 


02-05-1900 


094)9-1974 


Q-6507 


WIEE OF ROBERT AWff 


AVANT 


ROBERT 


NONE 


05-28-1894 


06-20-1948 


(^6506 


VETERAN 


AVARTTT 


M 


E 


12-31-1925 


10-17-1966 


(^728 


WIFE OF GEORGE a Awmr 


AVENT 


CLEVEIAND 


NONE 


004)04)000 


034)7-1934 


Q-6159 


VETERAN 


BABSON 


MARK 


A.JR 


03-17-1946 


10-14-1969 


0^34 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


BAILEY 


HERB 


NONE 


114)0-1892 


11-29-1971 


S6974 


WWI VETERAN 


BAILEY 


JOSEPH 


D. 


12-10-1937 


10-20-1965 


P-6517 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY - VIETNAM 


BAIRD 


WILLIAM 


MMS 


05-21-1923 


06-27-1951 


P-6337 


WWn VETERAN 


BAREHELD 


G^REY 


E 


12-15-1893 


084)2-1944 


P-6207 


VETERAN 


BARKER 


ANDREW 


CAREYLE 


05-21-1959 


05-2^1959 


P-6439 


INFANT SON OF JAMES J. BARKER 


BARKER 


JAMES 


J 


01-13-1930 


084)1-1992 


P-6439 


FATHER OF ANDREW C BARKER 


BARNES 


ERNECT 


B. 


10-22-1907 


12-31-1944 


P-6294 


DIEDONACnVEDUTY-WWU 


BARON 


CHARLES 


MARK 


104)8-1924 


114)7-1965 


Q-6689 


WWn&KOREA VETERAN 


BARRETT 


ANDREW 


THOMAS 


01-12-1913 


10-15-1970 


Q-^3 


WWn VETERAN 


BARRETT 


LENA 


E 


03-30-1910 


014)3-1969 


(^6806 


WIFE OF SHELWT BARRETT 


BARRETT 


SHEIAH 


NONE 


06-22-1881 


09-11-1989 


Q-68O6 


WWI VETERAN 


BASKIN 


JESSE 


T 


054)7-1904 


09-29-1986 


S6978 


WIFE OF WADER E BASKIN 


BASHN 


OSCAR 


S. 


09-19-1991 


07-26-1960 


P-6472 


WWI VETERAN 


BASKIN 


THOMAS 


ALLEY 


004)04)000 


10-12-1941 


P-6192 


KILLED ON ACnVE DUTY - AU\SK\ 


BASKIN 


raoMAS 


H.JR. 


05-17-1921 


ll-25-194i 


P-6263 


WWI VETERAN 


BASKIN 


THOMAS 


HOUSTON 


034)5-1897 


08-20-1955 


P-6268 


WWI &WWn VETERAN 


BASKIN 


WALTER 


E 


01-26-1890 


12-25-1971 


S^978 


WWI VETERAN 


BASS 


CHARLIE 


GREEN 


014)4-1905 


074)8-1957 


0^577 


WWn VETERAN 



Page 33 



aVTEY 


AUCE 


S. 


06-12-1911 


04-19-1990 


Q-6656 


WIFEOFMTTBATEY 


mm 


WATT 


NONE 


03-12-1895 


07-07-1961 


Q-6655 


WWI VETERAN 


aoTUitim) 


MARY 


ANN 


04-26-1959 


04-26-1959 


P-6436 


DAUGHTER OF CARL R BATTLEFIEID 


BA7H1, 


ERA 


THOMAS 


02-24-1894 


06-10-1966 


0^716 


WWI VETERAN 


BEAM) 


OAIBORN 


NONE 


03-27-1890 


084)3-1963 


Q-6606 


WWI VETERAN 


BEAIRD 


QOEEME 


MAI 


02-18-1881 


07-15-1982 


Q-6606 


WIFE OF OAIBORN BEAIRD 


BEASLEY 


ALFRED 


NONE 


02-18-1881 


08-30-1948 


Q-^501 


VETERAN 


BECK 


AUCE 


M. 


07-27-1892 


02-11-1975 


P4S46U 


WIFE OF CHARLES G. BECK 


BECK 


CHARLES 


G. 


02-16-1892 


05-23-1962 


P-646l\ 


WWI VETERAN 


BEDFORD 


ALBERT 


NONEJR 


0(MXW)000 


07-21-1934 


0^162 


VETERAN 


BENNETT 


CODE 


JAMES 


09-05-1931 


10-30-1969 


0^848 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY - VIETNAM 


BENSON 


ANDREW 


JACKSON 


02-13-1921 


07-19-1960 


P-6469 


WWn VETERAN 


BENSON 


CHARLES 


NONEJR 


12-22-1922 


094)1-1968 


(^6793 


WWn VETERAN 


BENSON 


MAY 


DELL 


05-02-1916 


01-01-1985 


P-6470 


WIFE OF ANDREW JACKSON BENSON 


BENSON 


SAMUEL 


THOMAS 


11-30-1911 


11-09-1959 


P-6452 


WWn VETERAN 


BENTON 


ROBERT 


R 


01-08-1895 


08-24-1964 


P-6505 


WWI VETERAN 


BENWARD 


HORACE 


A.in 


05-24-1931 


02-23-1966 


0-6700 


DM) ON ACTIVE DUTY-SEWART AFB 


BERNIER 


GEORGE 


EDWARD 


06^)6-1935 


09-19-1982 


T-7120 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


BESHEARSE 


BERTHA 


JOHNSON 


04-28-1907 


09-07-1973 


T-7121 


WIFE OF LIVEY BESHEARSE 


BESHEARSE 


UVEY 


NONE 


044)1-1896 


02-01-1985 


T-7121 


WWI VETERAN 


BESS 


DANIEL 


WASHINGTON 


11-05-1905 


02-21-1968 


0-6775 


VETERAN 


BETTY 


ANNIE 


E. 


02-25-1900 


02-04-1963 


(^509 


WIFE OF ROBERT W.BETTY 


BETTV 


ROBERT 


W. 


05-19-1895 


12-19-1948 


Q-6508 


VETERAN 


BEWS 


WILLIAM 


E 


12-22-1883 


05-04-1952 


P-6349 


WWIVEIERAN 


BINGHAM 


JAMES 


LELUOT 


03-23-1912 


09-03-1967 


Q-6754 


WWn VETERAN 


BLAKE 


WALTER 


N. 


12-27-1886 


01-27-1968 


0^771 


WWIVEIERAN 


BUNSETT 


CHARLES 


RAYMOND 


10-041914 


05-01-1971 


R-6902 


WWn VETERAN 


BIY 


FRED 


D. 


00-00^)000 


01-18-1937 


P-6169 


VETERAN 


BIY 


JESSE 


AIIEN 


04-12-1921 


05-15-1972 


S^973 


WWn VETERAN 


BOUN 


BEUUH 


H 


09-11-1929 


10-09-1996 


P-6495 


SEE ALSO JONES, BEULAH 


BOUN 


JAMES 


T 


03-12-1922 


04-13-1963 


P-6495 


WWn VETERAN 


BONDS 


ELMO 


NONE 


04-06-1880 


034)5-1964 


0-6676 


SPANISH AMERICAN WR VETERAN 


BONDS 


JESSIE 


NONE 


1004-1881 


074)6-1969 


0-6676 


WIFE OF ELMO BONDS 


BONDS 


NONE 


JACKSON 


12-10-1888 


054)3-1947 


<^574 


WWIVEIERAN 


BONHAM 


BETTY 


MISHLER 


02-24-1923 


04-13-1970 


(^59 


WIFE OF LEONARD HALE BONHAM 


BONHAM 


WILLIAM 


a 


10-23-1945 


12-16-1967 


0^764 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY (LEAVE) 


BONNfflLLE 


JOHN 


LEONARD 


09-07-1871 


074)9-1950 


P-6265 


WWIVEIERAN 


BOONE 


OAUDE 


E 


7-13-1898 


0420-1961 


P-6485 


WWn VETERAN 


BOSnCK 


LEONARD 


B. 


07-07-1917 


07-18-1943 


P-6271 


RETURN OF WWI DEAD PROGRAM 


BOWERS 


R 


HORACE 


OOOO-OOOO 


07-17-1948 


P-6296 


WAR WITH SPAIN VETERAN 


BOYD 


ROBERT 


H. 


09-08-1894 


01-29-1957 


P-6275 


WWIVEIERAN 


BOYD 


viaa 


JEAN 


08^5-1965 


084)5-1965 


0^686 


DAUGHTER OF SULLE J. BOYD 


BOYD 


WEBER 


NONE 


12-23-1920 


064)8-1970 


0^864 


WWU& KOREA VETERAN 


BOYEA 


THEODORE 


E 


06O2-1893 


03-11-1965 


P-6511 


WWIVEIERAN 


BOYLE 


ANDREW 


NONE 


07-16-1895 


0420-1958 


P-6413 


WWIVEIERAN 


BRACEY 


JESSE 


S. 


10-22-1950 


06-29-1972 


S-7007 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


BRADI£Y 


JAa 


ALLEN 


03-03-1924 


06^7-1970 


0-6863 


WWn VETERAN 


BRADLEY 


JAMES 


R 


07-10-1904 


O8-22-I944 


P-6209 


VEIERAN 


BRANDON 


JAMES 


NATHANIEL 


08-28-1927 


10-21-1966 


(^725 


KOREA VETERAN . 


BRANNON 


CLAUDE 


W. 


0428-1916 


054)5-1945 


P-6297 


VETERAN 


BRATTON 


LEONARD 


DAVID 


10-22-1923 


05-25-1968 


0-6783 


WWn j(OREA, VIETNAM VETERAN 


BREWER 


GILBERT 


T 


05-12-1898 


07-19-1967 


0-6750 


WWIVEIERAN 


BREWER 


JOE 


E. 


12-22-1889 


11-10-1968 


043800 


WWIVEIERAN . 


BRODY 


SAMUEL 


NONE 


02-24-1891 


01-20-1960 


P4S459 


WWIVEIERAN 


BROOKS 


GEORGE 


W. 


01-21-1905 


11-15-1973 


T-7110 


WWn VETERAN 



Page 34 



BROOKS 


IRA 


NONE 


04-17-1896 


11-27-1968 


Q-6802 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


BROWDER 


WELL 


NONE 


OCMKMXKX) 


11-16-1937 


(^6171 


VETERAN 


BROWN 


CHARLEY 


W. 


10-09-1894 


06-18-1971 


R-6899 


WWI VETERAN 


BROWN 


HIGGINS 


NONE 


10-10-1890 


114)3-1946 


P-6244 


WWI VETERAN 


BROWN 


LOUIS 


MCKINLEY 


08-30-1896 


124)6-1959 


P-6458 


WWI VETERAN 


BROWN 


PEARLIE 


W 


11-13-1896 


02-20-1961 


P-6482 


WWI VETERAN 


BROWN 


RALPH 


WINNEL 


01-12-1924 


04-27-1969 


(^6822 


WWn VETERAN 


BROWN 


SAM 


NONE 


00-004)000 


03-28-1933 


Q-6158 


VETERAN 


BROYLES 


ELMER 


A. 


05-10-1919 


05-23-1966 


Q-6712 


WWU VETERAN 


BROYLES 


RUBY 


L 


02-10-1921 


07-26-1997 


Q-6712 


WIFE OF ELMER A, BROYLES 


BR^NT 


OTHE 


L 


11-18-1903 


04-26-1961 


P-6486 


VETERAN 


BUCHANAN 


JAMES 


PAUL 


10-24-1930 


01-22-1971 


R4)885 


KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


BUCHANAN 


STEWART 


HALL 


08-25-1898 


10-28-1966 


Q-6726 


WWI &WWn VETERAN 


BUIIARD 


JAMES 


ANDREW 


06^8-1890 


11-30-1965 


Q-6693 


WWI VETERAN 


BURKE 


THOMAS 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


054)1-1942 


P-6196 


VETERAN 


BURNS 


JAMES 


BURLEY 


12-14-1920 


03-24-1966 


Q-6702 


WWn VETERAN 


BURTON 


LEVEREIT 


NONE 


084)4-1890 


034)7-1952 


Q-6520 


WWI VETERAN 


BUSH 


ARUE 


NONE 


10-18-1891 


07-26-1947 


P-6253 


WWI VETERAN 


BISH 


FRANCES 


ELEABEIH 


00-00-0000 


094)5-1939 


P-6152 


WIFE OF LEROYP BUSH 


BUSH 


LEROY 


E 


004)0-0000 


034)2-1930 


P-6152 


VETERAN 


BUSH 


ROBERT 


D. 


05-23-1925 


05-19-1957 


P-6274 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY 


BUHER 


HORACE 


L 


09-18-1912 


03-13-1969 


0^16 


WWn VETERAN 


BYNUN 


DIBRELL 


NONE 


07-07-1927 


104)8-1973 


T-7086 


KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


CALDWELL 


ADRL\N 


BEfpWIN 


03-28-1918 


03-22-1971 


R-6893 


WWII & KOREA VETERAN 


OLDWELL 


BILUE 


G. 


09-20-1918 


11-17-1991 


R-6893 


WIFE OF ADRIAN B. CALDWELL 


CAMPBELL 


HARRY 


R. 


02-04-1929 


064)8-1971 


R-6921 


WWn, KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


CAMPBELL 


JAMES 


W 


10-08-1891 


074)3-1962 


P-6329 


WWI VETERAN 


CANDLER 


DARREN 


J- 


03-09-1962 


12-15-1962 


P-6462 


SON OFJOHNNYM. CANDLER 


CANDLER 


GLENDA 


LEE 


04-17-1958 


03-28-1960 


P4S462 


DAUGHTER OF JOHNNY M, CANDLER 


CANTRELL 


HERBERT 


E. 


08-21-1925 


004)(M)000 


P-6285 


RETURN OF WWH DEAD PROGRAM 


CAPSHAW 


CLIFFORD 


H. 


04-17-1924 


104)9-1944 


P-6257 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY -WWn 


CARDWELL 


MALCOLM 


R 


02-20-1935 


054)6-1964 


P-6502 


KOREA VETERAN 


CARDWEIl 


ROGER 


G. 


03-07-1944 


03-25-1967 


0^741 


VETERAN 


CARLSON 


JAMES 


OASK 


09-14-1947 


11-23-1968 


0-6801 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


CAROTENUTO 


JOHN 


NONE 


09-29-1893 


08-22-1971 


R-69O8 


WWI VETERAN 


CARROLL 


REX 


NONE 


06-19-1923 


044)8-1968 


0^777 


WWn VETERA 


CAKIEK 


DAVID 


NONE 


00-004)000 


06-24-1947 


Q-6253 


VETERAN 


CAKl'EK 


EDMOND 


ALLEN 


03-14-1919 


09-30-1963 


P-6247 


WWn VETERAN 


CATE 


CECIL 


B. 


064)9-1896 


07-23-1948 


P-6283 


VETERAN 


CATER 


AGG 


NONE 


06-21-1921 


10-30-1970 


0^753 


WWn VETERAN 


CATES 


FRANK 


NONE 


01-14-1897 


044)1-1968 


Q-6776 


WWI VETERAN 


CHAMBERS 


JASPER 


N. 


11-25-1875 


014)3-1961 


P-6481 


WWI VETERAN 


CHARLTON 


ALUE 


W. 


034)5-1890 


02-27-1964 


(^6636 


WWI VETERAN 


CHARLTON 


FLORA 


B, 


044)3-1901 


06-22-1978 


Q-6636 


WWI VETERAN 


CHESNEY 


JOHNNY 


V 


11-12-1922 


07-22-1949 


P-6320 


RETURN OF WWH DEAD PROGRAM 


CLARDY 


LEARIY 


NONE 


09-26-1917 


084)41965 


Q45674 


WWn VETERAN 


OARK 


BENME 


M. 


084)7-1888 


11-18-1959 


(^6614 


WWI VETERAN 


CLyRK 


EMMA 


NONE 


05-12-1900 


09-12-1963 


Q-6626 


WTFE OF SAMUEL OARK 


OARK 


SAMUEL 


NONE 


09-17-1896 


12-10-1979 


Q43626 


WWI VETERAN 


CLEVELAND 


BENTON 


HAROLD 


054)8-1899 


08-15-1966 


Q-6720 


WWU VETERAN 


CLEVELAND 


MAMIE 


HOPKINS 


104)6-1896 


014)5-1982 


Q-6720 


WWn VETERAN 


COFFEY 


RALPH 


EDWARD 


07-28-1946 


03-22-1972 


S-6971 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


COLEMAN 


WILLIAM 


W. 


044)3-1921 


05-13-1969 


Q-6827 


WWH VETERAN 


COLUNS 


DRLOUA 


A. 


06-30-1930 


04-11-1971 


Q-6875 


WIFE OF JAMES HENRY COLLINS 


COLLINS 


JAMES 


HENRY 


084)6-1921 


10-10-2000 


Q-6875 





Page 35 



COLUNS 


JONAS 


NONE 


03-21-1888 


03-20-1959 


Q-6602 


WWIVEl'ERAN 


COLLINS 


JONAS 


NONE 


03-21-1888 


03-29-1959 


(^6602 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


COMER 


HENRY 


M. 


05-30-1923 


07-26-1944 


P-6270 


RETURN OF WWI DEAD PROGRAM 


COMPTON 


ROBERT 


LEE 


08-15-1925 


01-19-1968 


Q-6770 


WWn VETERAN 


COOK 


THOMAS 


LOYD 


04-28^)000 


104)3-1941 


Q-6191 


SPANISH AMERICA WAR VETERAN 


COOPER 


DAVID 


H. 


11-28-1895 


11-30-1963 


P-6168 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


COOPER 


HAROLD 


D. 


10-30-1886 


04-29-1958 


P-6il4 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


COOPER 


WILLIAM 


G. 


01-25-1888 


12-27-1951 


P-6205 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


COPELW© 


VICTOR 


HUGO 


08-29-1893 


10-21-1972 


T-7112 


WWIVETEKAN 


CORNELIUS 


GILBERT 


D. 


064)2-1894 


034)8-1967 


(^6736 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


COVINGTON 


JOHN 


WARNER 


12-24-1922 


05-15-1949 


P-6314 


VETERAN 


comN 


HERBERT 


W. 


10-10-1922 


084)3-1963 


P-6496 


KOREA VETERAN 


CRANE 


BELLE 


NONE 


06-19-1881 


01-16-1955 


P-6343 


VEl'EKAN 


CRAWLEY 


PERCY 


H. 


10-15-1892 


10-20-1959 


P-6450 


WWIVEl'ERAN 


CUNNIFF 


PEARL 


BENSON 


03-21-1898 


12-10-1972 


0^12 


WIFE OF WALTER P CUNNIFF 


CUNNIFF 


WALTER 


R 


04-10-1897 


02-26-1969 


Q-6812 


WWI VETERAN 


CUNNINGHAM 


ALONZO 


C. 


004)04)000 


02-23-1948 


P-^267 


WAR WITH SPAIN VETERAN 


CURD 


wnuAM 


NONE 


03-141891 


03-27-1972 


S^972 


WWI VETERAN 


CURREY 


ANDREW 


LEE 


08-14-1924 


04-29-1969 


0^24 


WWn VETERAN 


CURUSS 


JAMES 


OAY 


10-16-1934 


024)8-1957 


P-6248 


KOREA VETERAN 


cuRnss 


LOYD 


NONE 


034)4-1931 


104)8-1969 


Q-6843 


KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


CUKTISS 


RICHARD 


LOYD 


12-24-1965 


12-21-1973 


0-6843 


KORE\& VIETNAM VETERAN 


DAGES 


DONALD 


W. 


104)1-1896 


12-22-1973 


T-7093 


WWI VETERAN 


DANIEL 


JOHN 


HENRY 


044)1-1903 


014)8-1951 


P-6332 


WWn VETERAN 


DAVENPORT 


WALTER 


I. 


06-28-1922 


04-17-1945 


P-6298 


VETERAN 


DAVIDSON 


DAN 


NONE 


02-16-1892 


074)3-1958 


Q-6584 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


DAVIDSON 


IDA 


LEE 


014)1-1902 


094)8-1972 


Q-6585 


WIFE OF DAN DAVIDSON 


DAVIS 


EVA 


LEE 


09-26-1914 


044)3-1978 


P-6212 


WWI VETERAN 


DAVIS 


HENRY 


NONE 


05-24-1894 


08-11-1963 


P-6212 


WWIVETEKAN 


DAVIS 


JAMES 


T 


10-27-1917 


014)4-1974 


T-7117 


WWn VEl'EKAN 


DAVIS 


LOL\ 


MAI 


12-19-1909 


08-15-1987 


Q-6526 


WIFE OF ROY LEE DAVIS 


DAVIS 


ROY 


LEE 


09-12-1898 


08-13-1952 


(>6525 


WWn VETERAN 


DAVIS 


WILLIAM 


LEE 


054)9-1916 


02-16-1964 


Q-6627 


WWn VETERAN 


DAWSON 


FRED 


NONE 


074)5-1908 


11-10-1965 


Q-6690 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


DAiTON 


PHULIP 


M. 


044)3-1955 


094)2-1955 


P-^242 


INFANT SON OF HARRY W. DAYFON 


DEffON 


GRADIS 


VADEN 


084)9-1921 


014)4-1968 


(^796 


VETERAN 


DEES 


BnUE 


NE\L 


04-20-1928 


12-17-1968 


0-6804 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


DEGRAW 


WILLIAM 


E 


04-22-1920 


07-17-1959 


P4S445 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


DE[ARNEIT 


DANIEL 


MAN 


054)3-1897 


034)3-1966 


0^701 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


DEMENT 


ERNEST 


JORDAN 


04-23-1893 


094)6-1972 


T-7094 


WWIVEl'EKAN 


DICKSON 


JAMES 


HERMET 


12-27-1907 


06-22-1967 


0^748 


WWn VETERAN 


DONOWI 


JOHN 


JOSEPH 


004)04X100 


03-19-1947 


P-6249 


WAR WTTH SPAIN VETERAN 


DOZER 


ANDRA 


C. 


014)7-1966 


014)7-1966 


(^96 


SON OF WILLIAM EDOZIER 


DULWEY 


HERBERT 


E 


104)7-1895 


02-25-1959 


P-6432 


WWIVETEKAN 


DUNAWAY 


COY 


H. 


05-26-1916 


014)2-1944 


P-6295 


DIED ON ACnVE DUTY -WWn 


DUNN 


SETH 


L 


114)5-1907 


124)9-1967 


0^763 


VETERAN 


DUNNAWft' 


WILLIAM 


THEODORE 


04-10-1945 


04-11-1968 


0^779 


VETERAN 


EARI5 


lARRY 


D. 


024)6-193r» 


014)2-1967 


0^733 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


BDDINS 


GRACE 


TRUMAN 


044)4-1910 


12-25-1973 


T-7099 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


EDDINS 


JAMES 


J- 


044)9-1908 


05-26-1965 


P-6512 


VETERAN 


EDDINS 


MARYM. 


NONE 


04-13-1913 


024)6-1972 


P-6512 


WIFE OF JAMES J. EDDINS 


EDMONSON 


WILLIE 


T 


09-30-1890 


11-19-1950 


0^513 


WWIVETEKAN 


EDMUNDSON 


ROBERT 


NONEJR 


004)04)000 


054)1-1942 


0^197 


, VETERAN 


EILFRS 


CHARLES 


JOHN HENRY 


114)9-1872 


07-19-1951 


P-6255 


VEl'EKAN 


ELUOTT 


JOHN 


W. 


07-23-1895 


11-21-1960 


0^640 


WWIVEIERAN 



Page 36 



ELUOTT 


JULIA 


NONE 


0409-1895 


12-28-1961 


(^6641 


WIFE OF JOHN W. ELUOTT 


ELuorr 


PAUL 


EMMET 


04-16-1897 


07-20-1964 


P-6503 


WWI VETERAN 


FTTTSON 


JAMES 


EDWARD 


10-28-1918 


084)1-1968 


(^6788 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


EMERT 


RAY 


WILLIAM 


12-14-1896 


01-08-1948 


P4S259 


WWI VETERAN 


ENDSLEY 


JOHN 


WESLEY 


08-28-1912 


11-19-1965 


(^W)l 


WWn VETERAN 


ENSLEY 


RONALD 


JJR 


01-01-1948 


11-03-1967 


(^6760 


DM) ON ACTIVE DUTY - VIETNAM 


ESPY 


JESSE 


LEE 


10-25-1913 


07-31-1964 


Q-6673 


^'Wn VETERAN 


EUBARD 


CHARLES 


NONE 


02-07-1894 


01-16-1963 


P-6401 


WWI VETERAN 


EULES 


MINES 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


08-11-1937 


(^6170 


VETERAN 


E\GAN 


WILL 


NONE 


0409-1892 


12-12-1953 


(^548 


WWI VETERAN 


EWIEY 


MICHAEL 


FRANCIS 


03-26-1885 


09-15-1967 


Q-^756 


WWI VETERAN 


E\MBROUGH 


DAVID 


A. 


08^5-1940 


084)7-1940 


P-6181 


VETERAN 


E\RRA 


OTTO 


H. 


03-05-1891 


08-30-1955 


P-6286 


VETERAN 


E^RRELL 


MERLE 


C 


10-08-1894 


07-19-1989 


P-6474 


WIFE OF R HUGH EM?RELL 


E\RRELL 


P 


HUGH 


05-22-1879 


10-27-1960 


P-6473 


SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR VETERAN 


BORROW 


CHARLIE 


HOMER 


09-12-1883 


06-23-1951 


P-6208 


WWI VETERAN 


FELDMAN 


BENJAMIN 


NONE 


12-16-1893 


04-15-1951 


P-6334 


WWI VETERAN 


FERGUSON 


JOHN 


E 


01-09-1892 


06-11-1959 


P-6441 


WWI VETERAN 


FERRELL 


ROBERT 


LSR. 


07-01-1889 


07-21-1970 


(^6868 


WWI VETERAN 


FIELDS 


DABNEY 


SWAN 


09-28-1877 


05-04-1957 


P-6399 


WWI VETERAN 


FIELDS 


LEONARD 


G. 


00-00-1892 


09-25-1958 


(^6509 


WWI VETERAN 


FIGGS 


HARRY 


C 


02-20-1890 


03-26-1967 


(^740 


WWI VETERAN 


FINCH 


CHARLIE 


NONE 


0402-1889 


034)6-1961 


Q-6648 


WWI VETERAN 


FTITGERALD 


CATHERINE 


NONE 


03-10-1925 


104)9-1971 


R-6930 


WIFE OFmETER A. FITZGERALD 


FTIZGERALD 


HUGH 


JERELS 


01-12-1899 


01-14-1957 


Q-6567 


VETERAN 


FITZGERALD 


JOHN 


A. 


07-04-1897 


10-29-1967 


Q-6765 


WWI VETERAN 


FITZGERALD 


MAGGIE 


JERELS 


01-25-1889 


05-19-1977 


Q-6568 


WIFE OF HUGH JEREI5 FTIZGERALD 


FITZGERALD 


WALTER 


A. 


08-19-1918 


014)3-1981 


R-6930 


WWn VETERAN 


FIOYD 


AUCE 


NONE 


12-24-1890 


08-22-1974 


(^6815 


WIFE OF JAKE FLOYD 


FLOYD 


JAKE 


NONE 


08-16-1896 


034)9-1969 


Q-6815 


WWI VETERAN 


FLOYD 


JIMMIE 


L 


06-30-1936 


08-11-1955 


(^6559 


VETERAN 


FLOYD 


LODIE 


B. 


01-03-1879 


01-141968 


Q-6166 


WIFE OF THOMAS FLOYD 


FLOYD 


THOMAS 


NONE 


00-004)000 


014)4-1936 


Q-6166 


VETERAN 


FORRISTER 


EUGENE 


GORDON 


09-24-1905 


124)4-1955 


P-6379 


WWn VETERAN 


FORSYTHE 


WEUAM 


M. 


11-08-1920 


08-19-1962 


P-6493 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY -WWn 


FOSTER 


OARA 


L 


07-26-1903 


10-15-1963 


P-6428 


WIFE OF WnUAMH. FOSTER 


FOSTER 


WILLIAM 


H. 


01-25-1889 


10-23-1958 


P-6427 


WWI VETERAN 


FOWLER 


EDTTH 


WINCKLER 


04-04-1899 


07-27-1989 


P-6476 


WIFE OF EDWIN KEEN FOWLER 


FOWLER 


EDWIN 


KEEN 


07-04-1897 


11-11-1960 


P-6475 


WWI VETERAN 


FOWLER 


JAMES 


ALBERT 


03-19-1917 


08-25-1968 


0^792 


WWn&KOREA VETERAN 


FOX 


LWRENCE 


FRANOS 


02-18-1900 


02-21-1971 


0-6869 


WWI VETERAN 


FOX 


MARY 


C. 


05-12-1903 


07-25-1907 


(^6869 


WWI VETERAN 


FOX 


SAMME 


NONE 


02-20-1895 


05-22-1961 


Q-6654 


WWI VETERAN 


FRAZIER 


JAMES 


BRYWT 


01-10-1862 


124)4-1935 


Q-6165 


VEIERAN 


FRAZIER 


JOHN 


EDWARD 


10-11-1931 


104)9-1955 


0^560 


VETERAN 


FREEMAN 


WnUAM 


PRESTON 


06-23-1897 


03-11-1970 


Q-6856 


WWI VETERAN 


FRIEL 


MORRIS 


NONE 


12-26-1888 


05-17-1969 


Q-6828 


WWI VETERAN 


FURGUSON 


RICHIE 


W 


10-27-1891 


0404-1993 


P-6442 


WIFE OFJOHNE FERGUSON 


GAMBLE 


MATILDA 


M 


05-10-1915 


0609-1993 


P-6497 


WIFE OF WYMAN A. GAMBLE 


GAMBLE 


WYMAN 


ANDERSON 


01-14-1915 


08-12-1963 


P-6497 


WWn VETERAN 


GARRARD 


WILLIAM 


NONE 


03-19-1922 


07-24-1955 


(^6557 


VETERAN 


GARREn 


ETHEL 


S. 


09-05-1906 


11-14-1995 


(^755 


WIFE OF LUTHER GARRETT 


GARRETT 


LUTHER 


NONE 


03-02-1910 


094)9-1967 


Q-6755 


WWn VETERAN 


GELLEY 


OARENCE 


JESSIE 


02-27-1924 


094)9-1952 


P-6350 


WWn VETERAN 


GLWrON 


JOSEPH 


TYREE 


04-16-1919 


074)3-1963 


Q-6572 


KOREA VETERAN 



Page 37 



GL\SS 


MARJORIE 


NEEIY 


05-14-1910 


01-28-1973 


P-6331 


WWn VETERAN 


GLASS 


SYDNEY 


HERBERT 


04-11-1898 


11-26-1950 


P-6330 


WWn VETERAN 


GLENN 


msD 


NONE 


01-26-1921 


084)9-1971 


R-^923 


WWn VETERAN 


GOODWIN 


EDNA 


R 


04-28-1910 


0403-1996 


P-6283 


WIFE OF ELEY W.GOODWIN 


GOODWIN 


ELEY 


WAVEREY 


12-23-1888 


064)8-1948 


P-6282 


VhTERW 


GOWLAND 


AM 


I. 


O8-25-I929 


01-23-1972 


S-6968 


KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


GOWLAND 


FREDERICK 


WnUAM 


11-24-1924 


O8-3O-I969 


0^38 


WWn VETERAN 


GREEN 


JOHN 


wnuAM 


0405-1902 


08-10-1978 


R-6922 


WWn VETERAN 


GREEN 


RUBY 


ACTON 


064)6-1912 


07-29-1971 


R-6922 


WIFE OF JOHN WEUAM GREEN 


GREEN 


SAMUEL 


C. 


01-13-1896 


02-25-1958 


Q-6579 


WWI VETERAN 


GREEN 


WILLIE 


WASHINGTON 


02-22-1904 


10-29-1966 


(^6729 


KOREA VETERAN 


GREENE 


MARY 


ANDERSON 


09-01-1900 


12-141986 


Q-6578 


WIFE OF SAMUEL G.GREENE 


GREGOKi' 


I£ROY 


NONE 


05-03-1910 


06-29-1964 


Q-6679 


WWn VETERAN 


GREZARD 


ROMIE 


P 


07-26-1881 


04241968 


Q-6778 


WWI VETERAN 


GUILL 


ELEABETH 


MILES 


01-16-1893 


12-30-1980 


P-6484 


WIFE OF EUGENE G.GUni 


Guni 


EUGENE 


G. 


02-23-1890 


03-11-1961 


P-6483 


WWI VETERAN 


GUNNESON 


EDWARD 


HENRY 


03-23-1888 


024)3-1969 


0-6826 


WWI VETERAN 


GUNNESON 


HAITIE 


LEE 


11-12-1891 


03-23-1979 


(^26 


WIFE OF EDWARD HENRY GUNNESON 


GUNTER 


PARMER 


R. 


01-17-1922 


12-17-1944 


P-6260 


WWn VETERAN 


GURLEY 


ROBERT 


D. 


07-01-1889 


10-19-1971 


R-6909 


WWI VETERAN 


G[JSE\FSON 


GEORGE 


MM 


01-10-1929 


11-26-1962 


P-6401 


KORE\ VETERAN 


HAGAN 


OVERTON 


H. 


12-09-1889 


05-30-1947 


P-6251 


WWI VETERAN 


HALE 


WnUAM 


ALFRED 


OO-OO^XXX) 


084)7-1942 


P-6200 


VETERAN 


HALL 


AMS 


L 


07-10-1913 


09-19-1966 


0^724 


WWn VETERAN 


HAIi 


JOHN 


WESUEY 


OOOOOOOO 


014)8-1935 


0^163 


VETERAN 


HALL 


MCK 


NONE 


12-29-1882 


06-18-1958 


0^581 


WWI VETERAN 


HANES 


ROBERT 


WILKSJR 


05-08-1934 


094)3-1971 


R-^924 


KOREAS VIETNAM VETERAN 


HANLON 


JOSEPH 


A 


03-19-1898 


024)2-1971 


R-^886 


WWI VETERAN 


HARDIN 


FREDERia 


OYDE 


04-24-1958 


04241958 


P-6411 


INEWT SON OF MARVIN C. HARDIN 


HARDIN 


MOSE 


NONE 


10-29-1901 


104)6-1956 


Q-6564 


VETERAN 


HARDIN 


OLLE 


MAY 


12-10-1894 


0412-1965 


Q4S565 


WIFE OF MOSE HARDIN 


HARDLSON 


CYMTDA 


ANN 


11-14-1959 


11-141959 


P-6454 


DAUGHTER OF ROBERT D. HARDISON 


HARGROVE 


CL\RINCE 


E 


11-25-1921 


08-141961 


P-6487 


WWn VETERAN 


HARRELL 


ADA 


JANE 


04-27-1903 


09-13-1952 


P-6351 


WIFE OF HARVEY H. HARRELL 


HARRELL 


HARVEY 


H. 


06O4-1895 


0418-1961 


P-6352 


WWI VETERAN 


HARRIS 


BARNEY 


CUFTON 


01-17-1906 


03-28-1969 


(^6818 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


HARRIS 


EMMA 


NONE 


05-08-1897 


0408-1978 


0-6818 


VETERAN 


HARRIS 


JAMES 


L 


05-03-1909 


114)2-1968 


0^799 


WWn VETERAN 


HARRIS 


TOMME 


NONE 


07-17-1924 


10-21-1970 


0^799 


WIFE OFJAMESL HARRIS 


HARRISON 


BENME 


JAa 


02-08-1917 


034)9-1996 


0^553 




HARRISON 


REDORE 


B. 


12-28-1888 


084)2-1945 


0^224 


VETERAN 


HASTY 


JAMES 


C 


08-13-1893 


01-29-1952 


P-6342 


WWI VETERAN 


HATCHEIT 


DAVID 


NONE 


10-27-1888 


12-21-1960 


0-6643 


WWI VETERAN 


HATCHEIT 


HOUSTON 


NONE 


0407-1923 


11-141953 


0-6546 


WWn VETERAN 


HAYES 


JAMES 


JEFF 


03-19-1909 


114)1-1964 


P-6507 


WWn VETERAN 


HAYES 


JESS 


HORTON 


0602-1915 


06-12-1948 


P-6284 


WWn VETERAN 


HAYES 


JESSIE 


B. 


02-26-1909 


09-21-1984 


P-6507 


WIFE OF JAMES JEFF HAYES 


HAYES 


RILEY 


W. 


02-20-1923 


03-11-1944 


P-6291 


RETURN OF WWH DEAD PROGRAM 


HAYNES 


ETHYL 


B. 


10-25-1931 


07-30-1950 


0-6519 


KORM VETERAN 


HAYNES 


ROBERT 


NONE 


01-22-1914 


05-23-1973 


T-7114 


WWn VETERAN 


HENDRICKS 


WnT.IF, 


L 


1001-1907 


014)3-1968 


0-6768 


WWn VETERAN 


HENRY 


ARTHUR 


NONE 


064)5-1894 


094)1-1945 


0-6502 


VETERAN 


HICKMAN 


ADA 


NONE 


00-004)000 


01-10-1941 


0^175 


VETERAN 


HICKMAN 


JAMES 


NONE 


004)04)000 


09-12-1938 


0^175 


VETERAN 


HICKMAN 


WILLIAM 


TURNER 


014)7-1888 


114)6-1947 


0-6263 


WWIVEIERAN 



Page 38 



racKS 


JOHN 


H. 


01-11-1915 


11-22-1944 


(^6262 


VETERAN 


HILL 


JERRY 


NONE 


09-24-1900 


07-28-1959 


(^6611 


WWI VETERAN 


HEl 


JESSE 


BILLY 


07-09-1917 


11-15-1964 


Q-^3 


WWn VETERAN 


HELL 


MARY 


LEE 


05-05-1909 


094)9-1974 


(^6683 


WIFE OFJESSIE B.HILL 


HEL 


PERRY 


NONE 


084)3-1922 


04-29-1973 


T-7108 


WWn VETERAN 


HODGE 


WILLIE 


E 


09-28-1907 


034)7-1967 


(^6745 


WWn VETERAN 


HOLDEN 


WILLIAM 


HARRLSON 


02-15-1913 


094)2-2945 


Q-6225 


VETERAN 


HOLLADAY 


FREDERICK 


N 


05-12-1927 


06-12-1945 


P-6312 


RETURN OF WWn DEAD PROGRAM 


HOLUNS 


JAMES 


HAMPTON 


06-11-1919 


04-14-1956 


0^533 


WWn VETERAN 


HORSLE\' 


ROBERT 


C. 


02-05-1895 


01-16-1963 


P-6347 


WWI VETERAN 


HORTON 


JAMES 


FRANCIS 


OI-O8-I926 


03-12-1969 


Q-68I9 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


HORTON 


WmiAM 


R 


03-17-1923 


05-20-1971 


R-69I8 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


HORVATH 


FEUSIA 


jxm 


12-09-1967 


034)8-1968 


Q-6749 


DAUGHTER OF STEVEN G. HORVATH 


HORWH 


STEVEN 


GABRIEL JR. 


12-20-1966 


07-12-1967 


Q-6749 


SON OF STEVEN G. HORWH 


HOSHNS 


EARLY 


H. 


08-26-1887 


014)41955 


Q-6555 


WWI VETERAN 


HOSHNS 


ELIZABETH 


JARRETT 


06-01-1905 


074)4-1964 


Q-6556 


WIFE OF EARH'H. HOSHNS 


HOSS 


EUIAH 


E. 


09-15-1903 


11-25-1960 


P-6479 


WWn VETERAN 


HUFEMON 


ALEX 


H. 


07-21-1895 


054)9-1963 


Q-6542 


WWI VETERAN 


HUGHES 


OSL 


EDWIN 


11-19-1921 


06-25-1972 


S-7006 


WWn, KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


HUGHES 


FRED 


DOUGUSJR. 


12-07-1945 


044)5-1967 


0-6742 


VETERAN 


HUNT 


JESSE 


NONE 


10-11-1894 


0^25-1973 


T-7115 


WWI VETERAN 


HUNT 


MILDRED 


NONE 


11-04-1927 


11-15-1971 


R-6935 


WIFE OF THOMAS J. HUNT 


HUNTER 


EUGENE 


R 


05-02-1927 


044)5-1970 


(^6858 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


IMPSON 


BETIIE 


M. 


11-13-1933 


024)9-1988 


T-7118 


WIFE OF BnJY DALE IMPSON 


IMPSON 


BILIY 


DALE 


03-19-1931 


10-24-1972 


T-7118 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


ISOM 


BETTY 


J- 


07-26-1943 


064)9-1968 


0^784 


WIFE OF MEIVINT ISOM, JR 


JACKSON 


ALLIE 


C. 


01-18-1894 


12-23-1959 


Q-6615 


WWI VETERAN 


JACKSON 


STONE 


WALL 


09-17-1901 


094)9-1968 


0^794 


WWn VETERAN 


JACOBS 


WILLIE 


NONE 


10-31-1884 


07-11-1953 


0^544 


WWI VETERAN 


JAMES 


CHARLES 


ADAM 


11-24-1890 


044)8-1971 


R-6897 


WWn VETERAN 


JAMES 


WALTER 


NONE 


02-02-1896 


114)8-1963 


0^558 


WWI VETERAN 


JARED 


CLIVE 


C. 


02-18-1894 


06-11-1949 


P-6315 


VEl'LRAN 


JARED 


VELMA 


M. 


12-18-1896 


12-16-1993 


P-6316 


WIFE OF CUVEC. JARED 


JARRETT 


MARIE 


A. 


03-05-1909 


06-16-1986 


S-7009 


WIFE OF MCHNNLEY' JARRETT 


JARRETT 


MCKINLEY 


NONE 


08-26-1901 


08-10-1972 


S-7009 


WWn VETERAN 


JENNINGS 


PAULINE 


FLEMING 


08-30-1912 


064)2-1966 


(>6697 


WIFE OF SAMUEL JENNINGS, JR 


JENNINGS 


RAMONA 


D 


01-29-1929 


07-11-1996 


T-7105 


WIFE OF ROBERT E.JENNINGS 


JENNINGS 


ROBERT 


E 


07-23-1918 


12-29-1973 


T-7105 


WWn VETERAN 


JENNINGS 


SAMUEL 


NONEJR 


064)6-1918 


01-23-1966 


(^6697 


WWn VETERAN 


JEIT 


HAROLD 


C. 


03-30-1937 


12-10-1964 


P-6509 


DM) ON ACTIVE DUTY - KOREA 


JETTON 


JOHN 


H. 


004)04)000 


064)6-1938 


Q-6174 


VETERAN 


JOHNS 


A. 


J- 


02-15-1923 


11-26-1971 


R-6937 


VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


ACLEN 


NONE 


004)04)000 


01-23-1939 


Q-6176 


VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


ABTN 


C. 


05-22-1896 


124)8-1956 


P-6388 


WWIVEIERAN 


JOHNSON 


ANDY 


C. 


044)7-1932 


104)4-1952 


P-6341 


DIED ON .ACTIVE DUTY - KOREA 


JOHNSON 


BEATRICE 


L 


08-27-1913 


124)2-1990 


(^6797 


WIFE OFJOHNH. JOHNSON 


JOHNSON 


BEVIS 


0. 


074)1-1927 


04-26-1966 


Q-6706 


VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


CHARLIE 


NONE 


094)5-1896 


024)7-1953 


0^532 


WWIVEIERAN 


JOHNSON 


ELLA 


MAE 


04-19-1906 


09-13-1981 


P-6403 


WIFE OF ROBERT E. JOHNSON 


JOHNSON 


GEORGE 


NONE 


034)7-1891 


05-19-1959 


0-6608 


WWI VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


JOHN 


H. 


01-25-1915 


104)4-1968 


0-6797 


WWn VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


LLOYD 


S. 


124)7-1892 


084)6-1969 


0^36 


WWI VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


LULA 


NONE 


034)8-1895 


12-24-1978 


0-6176 


WIFE OF ACKUN JOHNSON 


JOHNSON 


NANCY 


BETTY 


11-28-1902 


06-15-1981 


P-6389 


WIFE OF AMNC. JOHNSON 


JOHNSON 


ROBERT 


NONE 


07-29-1893 


08-23-1958 


0-6588 


WWI VETERAN 



Page 39 



JOHNSON 


ROBERT 


E. 


01-23-1892 


11-27-1957 


P-6402 


WWI VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


SHIRLEY 


NONEJR 


01-25-1920 


01-04-1954 


0^550 


WWn VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


SOUE 


NONE 


11-17-1894 


09-08-1971 


R-6925 


WWI VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


THOMAS W. 


W. 


05-10-1922 


06-07-1953 


Q-6543 


WWn VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


VKGE 


A. 


08-15-1898 


03^1963 


P-6494 


WWI VETERAN 


JOHNSON 


WILLIAM 


H. 


01-12-1891 


12-02-1945 


Q-^229 


VETERAN 


JONES 


BEUMH 


H 


09-11-1929 


10-09-1996 


P-6495 


SEE ALSO BOLIN.BEULAH 


JONES 


GEORGE 


NONE 


03-16-1893 


10-13-1969 


0-6844 


WWIVEIEKAN 


JONES 


GORDON 


M. 


01-06-1920 


11-20-1967 


Q-6762 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


JONES 


JIM 


NONE 


O602-I888 


07-26-1962 


0^3226 


WWI VETERAN 


JONES 


NONA 


EWE 


08-19-1930 


06-30-1996 


(^6792 


WIFE OF GORDON M. JONES 


JONES 


R 


E. 


07-25-1912 


10-21-1971 


R-6933 


WWn VETERAN 


JONES 


ROBERT 


KERRY 


07-28-1927 


05-17-1956 


P-6380 


VETERAN 


JONES 


RUBYE 


L 


11-23-1907 


4-13-2000 


(^6844 


WIFE OF GEORGE JONES 


JONES 


SAMUEL 


NONE 


05-02-1896 


10-09-1964 


(^6682 


WWI VETERAN 


JONES 


WnUAM 


E. 


06-20-1921 


11-11-1973 


T-7104 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


JORDAN 


HENRY 


NONE 


08-25-1934 


02-23-1973 


T-7084 


VIETNAM VEIEKAN 


JORDAN 


JOSEPH 


NONE 


OOOOOOOO 


11-25-1930 


0^153 


VETERAN 


JORDAN 


MOSES 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


10-12-1947 


Q-6260 


VETERAN 


JORDAN 


ROBERT 


K. 


08^1896 


07-22-1945 


P-6214 


WWI VETERAN 


JORDAN 


METER 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


03-15-1938 


(^6172 


VETERAN 


JORDON 


ANNA 


NONE 


OOWOOOO 


12-20-1930 


0^153 


WIFE OF JOSEPH JORDAN 


KEE 


WILLIE 


E 


10-14-1917 


12-01-1950 


P-6299 


KOREA VETERAN 


KEEBLE 


SAM 


H.J. 


11-07-1891 


07-30-1955 


Q-6534 


WWI VETERAN 


KEEN 


HERBERT 


LEON 


07-31-1879 


12-01-1959 


P-6456 


WWI VETERAN 


KEUY 


JIMMIE 


LT 


08-07-1911 


09-19-1965 


(^6687 


WWn VETERAN 


KELTON 


GEORGE 


E 


02-07-1920 


04-19-1970 


0^861 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


KERR 


DUKE 


NONE 


07-04-1891 


04-24-1965 


Q-6684 


WWI VETERAN 


KEY 


EDmRD 


NMN 


03-08-1921 


01-26-1996 


P-6468 




HMBRO 


GUY 


HOYT 


10-10-1885 


06-19-1947 


P-6252 


VETERAN 


KING 


FRANHE 


LEE 


12-30-1952 


10-24-1989 


(^6244 


VETERAN & EMPLOYEE OF BFIELD 


KING 


LEE 


ARTHUR 


09-23-1927 


11-26-1970 


(^6631 


WWn VETERAN 


KING 


LLhWhLlIN 


H. 


10-01-1899 


12-20-1973 


T-7087 


^Wl&WWn VETERAN 


KING 


LORRAINE 


L 


02-22-1904 


03-06-1981 


T-7087 


WIFE OF LLEWELD'N H. KING 


KING 


WALTER 


LOTON 


0607-1910 


02-02-1972 


S^969 


\(Wn VETERAN 


KING 


WILLIAM 


T 


12-11-1923 


07-30-1944 


P-6266 


WWn VETERA 


KITCHEN 


LOUB 


E. 


05-05-1889 


11-09-1956 


P-6382 


WWI VETERAN 


KITCHEN 


PEARLE 


EMMEUNE 


02-09-1898 


05-27-1985 


P-6383 


WIFE OF LOUIS EKTTCHEN 


KNIGHT 


FRANK 


S. 


06-04-1889 


0407-1953 


0^537 


WWI VETERAN 


KNIGHT 


JAMES 


A. 


0&O1-1889 


07-26-1954 


Q-6551 


WWI VETERAN 


KNOX 


ARTHUR 


NONE 


OO-OOOOOO 


11-30-1944 


0^211 


VETERAN 


KOCH 


RICHARD 


EARL 


06-30-1921 


03-06-1951 


P-6335 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY 


K0\«U5KI 


JOSEPH 


NONE 


03-27-1893 


09-23-1968 


(^6651 


\SW1 VETERAN 


LAMB 


LEVIN 


E 


06-21-1891 


0&fl7-1954 


P-6273 


WWI VETERAN 


IME 


JAMES 


A. 


02-09-1924 


11-30-1963 


P-6213 


WWn VETERAN 


lAWRENCE 


LOTTIE 


MAE 


02-01-1896 


06-12-1979 


0^562 


WIFE OF PERCY lAWRENCE 


UWRENCE 


PERCY 


NONE 


05-05-1889 


04-19-1956 


0^561 


WWIVEIEKAN 


lAWRENCE 


TOMMIE 


FRANKLIN 


02-08-1944 


03-07-1970 


0^55 


VETERAN 


lAWS 


MARTIN 


NONE 


05-25-1888 


05-28-1951 


Q-6515 


WWIVEIEKAN 


LEAGUE 


CHBJA 


M. 


07-28-1909 


01-09-1981 


0-6671 


WIFE OF MAJOR LEAGUE 


LEAGUE 


MAJOR 


NONE 


11-15-1898 


12-17-1961 


0-6670 


WWI VETERAN 


lEAfflERS 


JOSEPH 


ALLEN 


07-03-1898 


06-29-1966 


(^6718 


WWIVEIEKAN 


LEISTER 


ESTON 


BLAIR 


03-22-1916 


05-30-1969 


Q-6830 


WWn&KORM VETERAN 


LEMEEUX 


ANDREE 


PETTT 


07-28-1902 


08-01-1953 


P-6358 


WIFE OF LWRENCE J. LEMMJX 


LENNON 


CARRIE 


MAUDE 


02-11-1882 


10-15-1963 


P-6323 


WIFE OFJOHNW. LENNON 



Page 40 



LENNON 


JOHN 


WMERSMTTH 


11-27-1877 


09-12-1949 


P-6322 


VETERAN 


LKSIEK 


JAMES 


E. 


11-07-1918 


10-24-1971 


R-6934 


WWn VETERAN 


LEWIS 


CAUSBY 


C. 


(XHXMXKX) 


124)4-1941 


P-6194 


VETERAN 


LEWIS 


MARGARET 


K 


8-26-1901 


02-18-2000 


P-6465 


WIFE OF ROBERT L LEWIS 


LEWIS 


RAY 


M. 


08-16-1909 


054)8-1966 


Q-6708 


WWn VETERAN 


LEWIS 


ROBERT 


L 


12-25-1900 


044)4-1960 


P-6i64 


WWI VETERAN 


LEWIS 


STEPHEN 


J- 


00-00-0000 


11-17-1942 


P-6241 


WWI VETERAN 


LEWIS 


WILLIAM 


CARSEY 


06-11-1906 


094)3-1966 


(^723 


WWn VETERAN 


LIDDLE 


GEORGE 


D. 


03-14-1908 


024)8-1973 


T-7113 


WWn VETERAN 


ULIARD 


ANME 


FRANCIS 


01-02-1927 


05-13-1989 


Q-6653 


WU-EOFWnJUAMD.LILIARD 


LHiARD 


GEORGE 


NONE 


10-26-1873 


09-19-1952 


(^6528 


WAR WTTH SPAIN VETERAN 


UUARD 


HOMER 


NONE 


084)7-1892 


114)7-1963 


Q-6517 


WWI VETERAN 


LnJARD 


Il/'/lh 


MAY 


11-12-1896 


07-19-1951 


Q-6516 


WIFE OF HOMER LttMRD 


miARD 


LUA 


NONE 


03-22-1884 


03-27-1955 


Q-6529 


WIFE OF GEORGE ULLARD 


miARD 


NATHAN 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


11-12-1931 


0^155 


VETERAN 


ULURD 


wnuAM 


DAVID 


07-18-1924 


054)6-1961 


0^52 


WWn VETERAN 


LOCKWOOD 


CLARENCE 


STEVEN 


02-03-1927 


05-28-1969 


(^6829 


WWn VETERAN 


LOFTUS 


PATRICK 


NONE 


03-12-1892 


124)9-1971 


S^76 


WWI VETERAN 


LOONEY 


HERBERT 


lYNN 


07-23-1935 


02-26-1972 


S^70 


KOREA VETERAN 


LOUIS 


ALBERT 


NONE 


08-30-1891 


05-20-1960 


Q-6622 


WWI VETERAN 


LOVORN 


ROBERT 


E. 


07-17-1895 


12-25-1963 


P-6499 


WWI VETERAN (LOWORN) 


LOWE 


HENRY 


NONE 


01-03-1894 


12-28-1956 


P-6390 


WWI VETERAN 


LOWERy 


HENRY 


NONE 


11-22-1909 


124)8-1964 


P-6508 


VETERAN 


LUSCINSKI 


JAMES 


TIMOTHY 


01-01-1939 


104)8-1969 


Q-6845 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY - VIETNAM 


n-ONS 


WILLIE 


NONE 


03-10-1907 


024)3-1971 


R-6887 


WWn VETERAN 


EHIE 


ARCHIE 


NONE 


10-01-1920 


074)7-1973 


T-7097 


WWn VETERAN 


DTLE 


DEMPSEY 


C 


06-21-1895 


12-29-1959 


(^6617 


WWI VETERAN 


DTLE 


EDMOND 


NONE 


03-30-1887 


03-21-1964 


(^6677 


WWI VETERAN 


EiTLE 


MATILDA 


W. 


02-12-1906 


01-15-1983 


(^6677 


WIFE OF EDMOND EYTLE 


MACARTHUR 


BRUCE 


E. 


06-13-1925 


02-23-1968 


Q-6774 


WWn& KOREA VETERW 


M^ORS 


PRINCE 


NONE 


09-16-1922 


024)7-1959 


0^593 


WWn VETERAN 


MAUARD 


JIM 


NONE 


10^5-1893 


04-29-1959 


P-6438 


WWI VETERAN 


MALONE 


JAMES 


R 


12-28-1928 


104)8-1997 


0-6610 




MALONE 


SALIY 


E 


09-08-1933 


07-15-1959 


Q-6609 


WIFE OFJAMESR MALONE 


MANEY 


LUKE 


NONE 


OO^XMKXX) 


11-20-1932 


(^6157 


VETERAN 


MANEY 


MATTHEW 


M. 


034)5-1897 


03-31-1957 


(^563 


WWI VETERAN 


MANNS 


DONNIE 


NONE 


044)3-1911 


074)1-1966 


Q-6719 


WWn VETERAN 


MARCHESOM 


SAMTORE 


ALFRED 


06O7-1932 


09-27-1967 


^757 


VETERAN 


MARLIN 


WHTT 


NONE 


06-17-1891 


014)3-1957 


P-6400 


WWI VETERAN 


MARSHALL 


MALCOLM 


Y 


09-14-1889 


08-28-1957 


P-6397 


WWI&WWnVETEKAN 


MARSHALL 


RUBY 


S. 


06-11-1910 


06-24-1967 


P-6396 


VETERAN 


MARUN 


CHARLIE 


NONE 


00-00-1893 


07-19-1973 


T-7103 


WWI VETERAN 


MARTIN 


CHESTER 


R 


11-02-1918 


11-20-1997 


P-6289 




MARTIN 


FLORENCE 


H. 


04-04-1922 


084)2-1970 


Q-6871 


WWn VETERAN 


MARTIN 


MATTIE 


MARIE 


11-16-1899 


074)8-1982 


T-7103 


WIFE OF CHARLIE MAREN 


MARTIN 


WILBURN 


NONE 


004)04)000 


05-31-1932 


P-6156 


VETERAN 


MARim 


WILLIAM 


B. 


044)7-1927 


06-22-1981 


06871 


WWn VETERAN 


MARTIN 


WILLIAM 


B. 


07-27-1927 


06-22-1981 


0-6871 


WWn VETERAN 


MATUSKOWTK 


ANDREW 


R. 


114)2-1896 


12-23-1966 


0^730 


WWI VETERAN 


MCADOO 


WALTER 


NONE 


014)5-1890 


07-30-1954 


0-6552 


WWI VETERAN 


MCBRIDE 


PATRICK 


H. 


04-16-1943 


08-11-1969 


0^37 


VETERAN 


MCOAIN 


ALF 


NONE 


05-23-1924 


044)4-1973 


T-7096 


WWI &WWn VETERAN 


MCOAIN 


THOMAS 


NATHAN 


07-17-1917 


01-3M969 


0-6808 


WWn VETERAN 


MCOFITAN 


HUBBARD 


scon 


12-30-1908 


03-20-1973 


T-7090 


WWn VETERAN 


MCCOLLUM 


ERIC 


WALKER 


04-15-1966 


06-15-1966 


(^6717 


SON OF JAa RICHARD MCCOLLUM 



Page 41 



MCOJLLOUGH 


BAUARD 


NONE 


08-18-1918 


05-02-1959 


Q-6603 


WWn VETERAN 


MCCULLOUGH 


CAIMN 


FRANK 


10-08-1911 


10-14-1968 


Q4S798 


WWn VETERAN 


MCCULLOUGH 


CHARLES 


LORENCE 


01-27-1918 


10-28-1951 


P-6540 


WWn VETERAN 


MCFERRIN 


JOHN 


HOUSTON 


11-01-1921 


12-26-1960 


Q-6644 


WWn VETERAN 


MCGEE 


CHARLES 


HADDEN 


06-17-1914 


084)8-1972 


S-7008 


WWn VETERAN 


MCKEMON 


AUCE 


EVYE 


09-04-1971 


09-04-1971 


Q-6876 


DAUGHTER OF RICHARD MCKENNON 


MCXENNON 


RICHARD 


E. 


03-03-1932 


12-17-1975 


Q-6876 


KOREA VETERAN 


MOaNNEY 


ARCH 


CLINTON JR 


04-23-1925 


08-15-1970 


Q-6873 


WWn VETERAN 


MCKNIGHT 


MORRIS 


WILES 


05-16-1913 


084)4-1980 


T-7091 


WWn VETERAN 


MCKNIGHT 


ROBERT 


LEE 


11-06-1912 


114)2-1961 


0^598 


WWn VETERAN 


MCKNIGHT 


SIM 


THOMPSON 


06-27-1911 


064)1-1973 


T-7091 


WWn VETERAN 


MCKMGHF 


TEENY 


NONE 


05-10-1910 


114)6-1958 


Q-6599 


WIFE OF ROBERT MCKNIGHT 


MCKNIGHT 


THOMAS 


NONE 


11-16-1893 


014)4-1967 


Q-6732 


WWl VETERAN 


MCKNIGHT 


TOM 


CURTIS 


02-27-1919 


02-15-1947 


P-6246 


WWI VETERAN 


MCNEILL 


JOSEPHINE 


NEWELL 


05-11-1911 


01-21-1969 


(^6807 


WWn VETERAN 


MCNEILL 


WnjJAM 


M. 


04O5-1908 


094)6-1981 


0-6807 


VEl'EKAN 


MCQUmY 


EUGENE 


NONE 


OOOGOOOO 


07-12-1947 


Q-6256 


VETERAN 


MCTYRE 


HARRY 


E 


01-30-1910 


11-11-1961 


P-6357 


WWn VETERAN 


MCTYRE 


MARGARET 


C 


11-25-1906 


064)6-1953 


P-^356 


WIFE OF HARRY E MCTYRE 


MERCER 


CLIFFORD 


NONE 


03-15-1891 


08-28-1965 


P-6514 


WWI VETERAN 


MERRELL 


ROBERT 


D. 


06-19-1882 


04-15-1950 


P-6326 


VETERAN 


MILES 


JOHN 


L 


04-15-1914 


064)7-1969 


(^6832 


WWn VETERAN 


MILES 


TOM 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


064)6-1934 


0^160 


VETERAN 


MILES 


vauER 


NONE 


03-22-1895 


08-13-1964 


0^680 


WWl VETERAN 


MULER 


Bniy 


lEE 


10-15-1949 


104)5-1969 


Q43846 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY IN VIETNAM 


MnjJ^R 


G. 


D. 


10-19-1934 


104)6-1963 


P-6247 


KOREA VETERAN 


MULFR 


GEORGE 


H.SR 


04-26-1921 


08-27-1955 


P-6309 


WWn VETERAN 


MHIFR 


HATTIE 


H. 


10-18-1918 


02-17-1982 


P-6310 


WWn VETERAN 


MIMER 


JOHN 


EDWARD 


02-28-1934 


024)1-1969 


0^809 


KOREA VETERAN 


MMIOW 


SAM 


JOE 


06-11-1921 


04-28-1962 


Q-6605 


WWn VETERAN 


MITCHELL 


SHIRLEY 


NONE 


06O6-1922 


094)3-1950 


0^518 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


MONIMO 


EMRA 


NONE 


06-15-1959 


06-15-1959 


P-6443 


DAUGHTER OF VICTORY MONEWO 


MOONEYHAM 


T 


J- 


07-08-1920 


12-23-1944 


P-6317 


VETERAN 


MORGAN 


JOHN 


E 


07-041898 


024)9-1970 


Q43851 


WWl VETERAN 


MORRIS 


KilE 


NONE 


04-05-1966 


044)3-1966 


0^705 


SON OF WnUAM R MORRIS 


MORRIS 


QTE 


NONE 


044)3-1966 


044)3-1966 


(}^705 


SON OF WnUAMR MORRIS 


MORRISSON 


JOSEPH 


E 


08^1-1891 


074)3-1962 


P-6183 


WWI VETERAN 


MIIFII.FR 


CHARLES 


R 


09-05-1905 


11-25-1970 


Q4S633 


^^^WnS KOREA VETERAN 


MULLINS 


BEATRICE 


NONE 


11-24-1893 


12-12-1958 


Q-6600 


WIFE OF GRANT MULLINS 


MULLINS 


GRWT 


NONE 


12-25-1890 


024)7-1968 


0-6773 


WWI VETERAN 


MULLINS 


JhSSb 


NONEJR 


03-03-1922 


05-24-1971 


R-6903 


WWn VETERAN 


MURPHY 


TROY 


WINFRED 


01-25-1925 


05-30-1947 


P-6250 


WWn VETERAN 


MURRAY 


DOUGLAS 


Mcam 


03-12-1951 


01-10-1973 


T-7089 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY - VIETNAM 


MUSTACCHIO 


GUISIEPPA 


NONE 


004)0-0000 


10-26-1940 


P-6182 


WWIVETERW 


NESBY 


EETE 


NONE 


05-28-1898 


03-10-1959 


0-6536 


WIFE OF WILL NESBY 


NESBY 


WILL 


NONE 


08-29-1888 


024)8-1953 


0^535 


WWI VETERAN 


NEWMAN 


CODE 


L 


04-22-1912 


014)5-1948 


P-6272 


WWn VETERAN 


NEWMAN 


GEORGE 


VERNON 


08-10-1909 


05-13-1970 


Q4S860 


WWn VETERAN 


NEWMAN 


RICRARD - 


DEE 


03-07-1922 


07-13-1969 


0^33 


WWn VETERAN 


NOBLE 


KENNETH 


A. 


05-28-1928 


12-26-1970 


R-6884 


KOREA VETERAN 


NORMAN 


BErT\' 


USH 


04-29-1884 


024)7-1976 


P-6339 


WWI VETERAN 


NORMAN 


FRANK 


L 


03-24-1886 


08-29-1951 


P-6339 


ViWIVElERAN 


NORRIS 


CECIL 


PRIMM 


08-29-1905 


04-22-1952 


P-6348 


WWn VETERAN 


NORTH 


ELMER 


ROY 


09-12-1890 


07-23-1969 


(^6834 


WWI VETERAN 


NUaOLS 


LOREN 


E 


03-06-1900 


09-27-1971 


R-6928 


WWI VETERAN 



Page 42 



NUNN 


ALPH 


ERVIN 


06-23-1928 


07-29-1970 


Q-6870 


WWn VETERAN 


ODELL 


FRANK 


MniFR 


07-12-1873 


094)5-1953 


P43360 


WWI VETERAN 


ODEN 


HOWARD 


NONE 


01-18-1919 


09-22-1954 


Q-6554 


Vi'Wn VETERAN 


ODOM 


JOHN 


B. 


12-31-1893 


01-10-1949 


Q-6505 


WWI VETERAN 


OFFICER 


MURMAN 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


104)3-1939 


Q-6178 


^'V^tVfl'hRAN 


OSBORNE 


EDMON 


ALLEN 


06-23-1919 


08-21-1960 


Q4S639 


WS'U VETERAN 


OSBORNE 


FRANKLIN 


DELANO 


12-17-1936 


09-10-1965 


P45516 


PEACE TIME VETERAN 


OSBORNE 


GEORGE 


D. 


03-18-1948 


104)4-1968 


Q-6795 


VETRAM VETERAN 


OWEN 


ARLO 


NONE 


05-03-1912 


10-20-1971 


R45932 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


OWEN 


BIRL 


NON-E 


08-28-1890 


104)8-1959 


F4S449 


WUT VETERAN 


OWENS 


CLARA 


NONE 


08-04-1893 


024)4-1968 


Q45618 


WIFE OF RAMSEY OWENS 


OWENS 


RAMSEY 


NONE 


03-25-1893 


03-23-1960 


Q45619 


WWI VETERAN 


PADGETT 


FRANK 


A. 


00-00-0000 


02-12-1941 


P45125 


WWI VETERAN 


PARRISH 


JONES 


R 


00-00-0000 


05-22-1941 


P-6187 


WWIVEIERVN 


PARSON 


GLENN 


HOWU® 


10-28-1914 


074)3-1960 


P-6467 


\)iWn VETERAN 


PATTERSON 


ANNIE 


FLEMING 


04-15-1932 


01-29-1987 


R-6926 


WIFEOrWILL.VP.aTERSON 


PATTERSON 


BLIENA 


V 


01-22-1887 


044)8-1972 


Q-6814 


WIFE OF J.AMES R RATTERSON 


PATTERSON 


CHARLES 


L 


10-05-1895 


044)6-1973 


T-7102 


WWI VETERAN 


PAl'TERSON 


GABRIE 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


09-14-19^5 


Q-6226 


SPANISH .AMERICAN WAR VEltRAN 


PATTERSON 


JAMES 


R 


12-22-1887 


034)6-1969 


Q-6814 


WWI VETERAN 


PAl'TERSON 


wni 


A. 


01-19-1928 


09-23-1971 


R4S926 


ViWH VETERAN 


PENDLETON 


HARRY 


PHILLIP 


06-23-1924 


10-17-1972 


T-7106 


WWn& KOREA VETERAN 


PENDLETON 


THOMAS 


N. 


00-004)000 


084)5-1877 


H-6247 


OML WAR VETERAN 


PERRY 


LELA 


R 


06-18-1895 


04-28-1969 


P-6434 


WIFE OF OSCAR E PERRY 


PERRY 


OSCAR 


E 


02-06-1887 


044)4-1959 


P-6433 


WWI VETERAN 


PERRY 


THOMAS 


ALLEN 


01-27-1921 


03-22-1969 


Q-6817 


\VWn VETERAN 


PERRYMAN 


EDTTH 


LUREN 


02-22-1921 


01-14-1996 


R-6927 


WIFE OF THURMAN PERRYMAN 


PERRYMW 


THURMAN 


NONE 


06^8-1919 


09-26-1971 


R45927 


WWH VETERAN 


PHARR 


WADE 


H. 


10-30-1912 


09-11-1965 


P-6515 


V;'WnVElLRAN 


PHTTTIPS 


KE 


NONE 


044)3-1896 


02-25-1969 


0-6813 


WWIVElhKAN 


PHILLIPS 


ROY 


W 


10-31-1924 


114)6-1944 


P-6387 


WWnVElhRAN 


PHILUPS 


WILLIAM 


G. 


07-02-1943 


084)3-1967 


Q-6751 


VIETNAM VTHERAN 


PIERCE 


EARL 


JR 


04-22-1935 


01-22-1971 


Q-6850 


DIEDONACTOEDUn- 


PIERCE 


RITA 


FAYE 


02-03-1970 


024)3-1970 


Q-6850 


MANT DAUGHTER OF EARL PIERCE 


PIERSON 


THOMAS 


CHARLES 


08-11-1941 


03-13-1964 


P45501 


PEACE TIME VETERAN 


PILBIN 


CHARLES 


LEE 


08-07-1914 


02-12-1952 


P-6344 


WWn\'EIERAN 


PILLOW 


ANNIE 


LEE 


084)1-1900 


10-15-1986 


Q-6630 


WIFE OF BENSON PILLOW 


PILLOW 


BENSON 


NONE 


02-13-1894 


IO-I8-1963 


Q-6630 


WWI VETERAN 


PTTCHER 


HENRY 


R 


06-23-1887 


03-30-1963 


P-6195 


miwmm 


PITTS 


CHARLES 


L 


07-30-1905 


10-15-1961 


P4S4S9 


WWn VETERAN 


PTTTS 


ELLEN 


F 


09-16-1916 


074)6-1998 


T-7123 


V^IFE OF OmER PITTS 


PTTTS 


OLIVER 


H. 


09-17-1908 


01-25-1974 


T-7123 


WWUVEiiiRAN 


PLEMENS 


HERBERT 


NONE 


03-23-1918 


10-18-1970 


Q4S635 


WWUVtlERAN 


POCUS 


IDA 


MAI 


10-04-1906 


014)7-1997 


P-6578 




POCUS 


JOSEPH 


R 


05-11-1879 


09-22-1955 


P-6377 


WAR WITH SPAIN VETERAN 


POLK 


FRANK 


NONE 


11-14-1912 


05-13-1968 


Q-6781 


^'Wn VETERAN 


PORJhRFMD 


VESTAL 


FRANKLIN 


03-12-1912 


06-17-1968 


Q43785 


WWUVEIERAN 


POSEY 


GEORGE 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


054)1-1935 


Q4il64 


Vi'M VETERAN 


POSEY 


SAM 


HENRY' 


044)4-1916 


094)5-1953 


Q4S545 


W\S'nVElERAN 


POSEY 


WILLIE 


MAE 


124)4-1898 


02-21-1990 


Q45164 


WIFE OF GEORGE POSEY 


POWELL 


LON 


HENDRICKS 


08-29-1897 


09-29-1945 


P4d228 


miWYERi^ 


PRADOS 


BERNARD 


JOSEPH 


084)3-1897 


01-20-1967 


Q43734 


miWIERi^ 


PRICE 


JAMES 


D. 


08-19-1886 


09-16-1951 


P43203 


WWI VETERAN 


PRICE 


JESSIE 


K 


01-26-1894 


02-21-1966 


Q-6699 


Vi'^^'I VETERAN 


PRICE 


mUAN 


HNG 


07-14-1907 


11-11-1967 


Q-6699 


WIFE OFJESSm KING PRICE 



Page 43 



PUCKEIT 


MELBOURNE 


LELAND 


05-31-1918 


064)2-1966 


0^714 


WWnVETERW 


PYLE 


FRANK 


M. 


09-10-1902 


1003-1969 


0-6841 


WWI VETERAN 


RADCUFF 


wnuAM 


NONE 


OO^XMXXK) 


044)6-1942 


P-6195 


WWI VETERAN 


RAGIAND 


WILLIAM 


C. 


11-27-1918 


03-24-1945 


P-6264 


WWI VETERAN 


RAMSEY 


OJEO 


NONE 


12-29-1899 


06-21-1968 


0-6786 


WWn VETERAN 


RAMSEY 


WAITER 


NONE 


06-08-1920 


114)3-1972 


T-7083 


WWn VETERAN 


RANDOLPH 


ISHAM 


NONE 


00-00^)000 


06-26-1941 


0-6189 


WWIVEIERAN 


RAPER 


CHARLES 


JOYCE 


07-27-1907 


094)6-1971 


R-6888 


WWn VETERAN 


RAWLINGS 


EMORY 


C. 


O3-2I-I9I8 


104)1-1972 


T-7100 


WWn VETERAN 


RAY 


JAMES 


W. 


12-11-1963 


12-16-1963 


P-6498 


SON OF LESLEY L RAY 


REWY 


HORACE 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


05-17-1941 


0^186 


SPANISH AMERICAN WAR VETERAN 


REASONOVER 


MASON 


M. 


10-17-1892 


10-20-1958 


0^590 


WWI VETERAN 


RBCKLEY 


GORDON 


H.,SR 


05-10-1897 


094)4-1966 


0^727 


WWnVEl'ERAN 


RECKLEY 


SALLE 


BOHANNAN 


05-10-1889 


04-24-1982 


0-6727 


WIFE OF GORDON H. RECKLEY', SR 


REDDEN 


MARY 


JANE 


11-28-1924 


01-18-1973 


T-7107 


WIFE OF CMMN THOMAS REDDEN 


REED 


CHARLIE 


NONE 


04-02-1895 


07-23-1950 


P-6328 


WWIVEIERAN 


REED 


HERBERT 


B. 


10-26-1914 


03-25-1945 


P-6255 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY 


REED 


JOSEPH 


W. 


10-25-1923 


064)5-1972 


S-7005 


WWn VETERAN 


REEVES 


HOWARD 


W. 


02-15-1914 


10-16-1971 


R-6931 


WWn VETERAN 


REMMERT 


MEMN 


C. 


01-19-1919 


10-19-1973 


T-7092 


WWn VETERAN 


RENFROE 


JOHN 


F 


10-21-1922 


11-11-1999 


0^721 


HUSBAND OF MILDRED RENFROE 


RENBROE 


MILDRED 


L 


10-19-1931 


08-22-1966 


0^721 


WIFE OFJOHNE RENFROE 


REVELL 


THOMAS 


R 


10-12-1926 


05-17-1962 


P4S460 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY' 


REYNOLDS 


EUGENE 


NONE 


03-25-1930 


124)9-1968 


045803 


KOREAN WkR VETERAN 


RICHARDSON 


ANDREW 


JACKSON 


05-29-1933 


11-21-1971 


R43936 


KOREAN WAR VETERAN 


RILEY 


THEODORE 


J- 


08-16-1877 


12-30-1955 


P-6306 


WAR WTTH SPAIN VETERAN 


ROBBINS 


CHARLES 


FINLEY 


03-26-1889 


08-1 1-1962 


P-6275 


WWIVEIERAN 


ROBERTS 


ZEPHANIAH 


L 


OO^XMXXX) 


104)5-1943 


P-6206 


SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR VETERAN 


ROBERTSON 


JMVnE 


M. 


00-004)000 


094)2-1943 


P-6204 


WWn VETERAN 


ROBIN 


PHILIP 


D. 


01-03-1888 


01-24-1955 


P-6308 


WWIVEIERAN 


ROBINSON 


BURDEITE 


W. 


10-22-1909 


044)9-1959 


P-6435 


WWn VETERAN 


RODDEN 


JASPER 


A. 


10-09-1919 


01-28-1970 


0-6849 


WWn VETERAN 


ROGERS 


OAUDE 


JACKSON 


09-22-1892 


03-13-1949 


P4.300 


WWIVEIERAN 


ROMAN 


BERTHA 


IDELLV 


08-12-1889 


114)6-1969 


P-6387 


WIFE OF JOHN ROMAN 


ROMAN 


FELK 


J. 


03-31-1898 


094)2-1959 


P-6447 


WWIVEIERAN 


ROMAN 


JOHN 


NONE 


08-10-1887 


11-25-1956 


P-6386 


WWIVEIERAN 


ROSS 


JOSEPH 


M. 


04-13-1922 


01-23-1945 


P-6262 


WWn VETERAN 


ROSS 


WILLIAM 


NONE 


00-004)000 


04-16-1949 


0-6510 


SPANISH AMERICAN WAR VETERAN 


ROWAN 


FRANK 


CROCKETT, JR 


09-25-1922 


05-16-1963 


P-6211 


WWn VETERAN 


ROWLAND 


JOHN 


D. 


05-25-1914 


034)6-1970 


0-6854 


WWn VETERAN 


ROWIAND 


PAUL 


NONE 


08-12-1932 


04-16-1968 


0^780 


KOREAN WAR VETER\N 


ROWLAND 


THELMA 


L 


06-18-1933 


124)5-1997 


0^780 


WIFE OF PAUL ROWUND 


RLICKER 


HATTIE 


NONE 


01-06-1897 


06-25-1969 


06694 


WIFE OFJOHNW. RUCKER 


RUCKER 


JOHN 


W. 


04-14-1894 


124)5-1965 


0-6694 


WWIVEIERAN 


RUCKER 


WALTER 


NONE 


00-004)000 


05-24-1942 


0^199 


WWIVEIERAN 


RUSSELL 


JAMES 


L 


01-25-1947 


04-23-1967 


0^737 


VIETNAM VETERW 


SANDERS 


JOE 


NONE 


03-05-1893 


094)9-1948 


0^503 


WWIVEIERAN 


SANFORD 


EDWARD 


NONE 


04-15-1880 


12-26-1946 


06243 


WWn VETERAN 


SANFORD 


FRANCES 


NONE 


O8-I6-I9II 


10-15-1989 


06243A 


WIFE OF EDWARD SANFORD 


SANFORD 


JAMES 


ROBERT 


05-02-1932 


01-24-1974 


T-7122 


KOREAN WAR VETERAN 


SAUNDERS 


JAMES 


W 


10-01-1930 


05-21-1966 


06710 


KOREAN WAR VETERAN 


SCOTT 


JOSEPH 


NONE 


11-25-1894 


04-14-1962 


P-6363 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY (SLOTT) 


SCOTT 


ROY 


NONE 


004)0-0000 


09-23-1945 


0-6227 , 


WWIVEIERAN 


SFTJE 


ALLEN 


GEORGE 


074)7-1910 


044)8-1971 


R-6896 


WWn VETERAN 


SHIVERS 


ADD 


NONE 


08-18-1892 


03-28-1966 


(^703 


WWI &WWn VETERAN 



Page 44 



SHOFNER 


JAMES 


NEWTON 


09-06-1902 


014)1-1972 


S-6979 


WWn VETERAN 


SHURIG 


ARTHUR 


WILSON 


07-09-1890 


07-17-1960 


P-6471 


WWI VETERAN 


SIGLER 


MAJOR 


NONE 


11-25-1888 


10-12-1956 


P-6210 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SnVERS 


SEPH 


E. 


07-20-1888 


04-23-1967 


(^743 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SIMMONS 


LEONARD 


D. 


01-30-1924 


12-26-1944 


P-6254 


WWnVEl'ERAN 


SIMPSON 


ELDRIDGE 


NONE 


09-02-1905 


04-15-1958 


P-6409 


PEACE TIME VETERAN 


SIMPSON 


ESIELLE 


BELL 


064)7-1900 


074)1-1993 


P6410 


WIFE OF ELDRIDGE SIMPSON 


SIMPSON 


JAMES 


amn 


02-14-1898 


044)9-1952 


P-6346 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SKIPPER 


JOSEPH 


w. 


05-07-1922 


04-29-1969 


0^825 


WWnVEI'ERAN 


SLOAN 


ROBERT 


LEE 


04-03-1888 


08-17-1962 


P-6311 


WWI VETERAN 


SMITH 


A. 


J. 


07-17-1895 


08-21-1962 


(^6538 


WWI VETERAN 


SMITH 


AUCE 


NONE 


08-27-1896 


01-22-1984 


0-6177 


WIFE OF DEE SMTTH 


SMITH 


ANNIE 


L 


07-12-1930 


03-29-1988 


(^6662 


WIFE OF WnUAMB. SMTTH 


SMITH 


CAIUE 


EUZABETH 


06-05-1917 


05-241970 


0^862 


WIFE OF COMMODORE SMTTH 


SMITH 


COMMODORE 




3-16-1917 


11-29-1999 


Q-6862 


HUSBAND OF CALUE SMTTH 


SMITH 


DEE 


GREEN 


05-27-1900 


014)7-1992 


Q6613 


WIFE OFJOHNH. SMITH 


SMITH 


DEE 


NONE 


00-<KMK)00 


04-15-1939 


Q-6177 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SMITH 


GEORGE 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


01-22-1936 


0^167 


WWI VETERAN 


SMITH 


GEORGE 


NONE 


01-15-1892 


05-20-1957 


(^6575 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SMHH 


HORACE 


NONE 


12-12-1887 


09-241965 


(^6688 


WWI VETERAN 


SMHH 


INEZ 




08-05-1903 


11-19-1999 


Q-6179 


WIFE OF JAMES SMTTH 


SMITH 


ISABEL 


E 


07-23-1903 


05-10-1958 


P-6415 


WIFE OF WILLIAM H. SMTTH 


SMITH 


JAMES 


A. 


00-004)000 


024)1-1940 


0^179 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SMITH 


JASPER 


B. 


01-09-1876 


03-27-1958 


P-6406 


PEACETIME VETERAN 


SMITH 


JESSE, JR. 


NONE 


01-17-1895 


03-13-1951 


0^514 


WWI VETERAN 


SMITH 


JOHN 


H. 


02-07-1925 


09-11-1944 


(^511 


WWI VETERAN 


SMHH 


JOHN 


w. 


04-26-1913 


10-25-1959 


P-6451 


KOREAN mR VETERAN 


SMTTH 


JOHN 


R 


09-01-1890 


104)9-1959 


(^6612 


WWI VETERAN 


SMHH 


JOHN 


T.,JR. 


05-06-1924 


10-19-1944 


P-6258 


WWn VETERAN 


SMHH 


M//IK 


W. 


01-06-1895 


09-26-1980 


Q-6190 


WIFEOFTOMSMini 


SMHH 


LUOIIE 


NONE 


IO-I8-I9O8 


024)9-1981 


(^6538 


WIFE OF A. J. SMHH 


SMITH 


MAXEE 


NONE 


O8-I6-I916 


014)9-1973 


T-7095 


WIFE OFJOE LEE SMTTH 


SMITH 


PAUL 


A. 


02-04-1888 


104)7-1958 


P-6426 


WWI VETERAN 


SMHTi 


PERCY 


LEE,JR 


09-09-1947 


02-11-1969 


0^10 


VIETNAM mR VETERAN 


SMITH 


REUBEN 


J. 


00-00-0000 


03-16-1947 


P-6240 


W\R WITH SPAIN VETERAN 


SMITH 


ROBERT 


NONE 


09-07-1918 


064)7-1970 


H-6865 


STONES RIVER NB EMPLOYEE 


SMITH 


ROBERT 


K. 


04-22-1925 


004)04)000 


P-6303 


RETURN OF WWH DEAD PROGRAM 


SMITH 


ROY 


FINNELL 


08O4-1910 


104)2-1967 


Q-6766 


WWn & KOREAN W\R VETERAN 


SMira 


SAM 


FRANKLIN 


09-24-1918 


10-30-1952 


Q-6530 


WWn VETERAN 


SMHH 


SAMUEL 


R 


10-26-1894 


104)8-1950 


P-6234 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SMHH 


TOM 


NONE 


07-04-1895 


08-18-1941 


Q-6190 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SMITH 


TOMMIE 


LEE 


09-07-1920 


08-27-1952 


0^527 


WWn VETERAN 


SMHH 


VffiGMA 


B. 


104)3-1921 


05-19-1977 


Q-6766 


WIFE OF RAY FINNELL SMTTH 


SMITH 


WnUAM 


H. 


10-19-1899 


114)1-1989 


P-6416 


WWn VETERAN 


SMITH 


WILLIAM 


H. 


00430-1899 


004)0-1989 




VET'ERW 


SMHH 


WILUAM 


BELL 


074)4-1918 


09-27-1970 


(^6662 


WWn VETERAN 


SMITH 


WILLIE 


NONE 


09-11-1914 


O8-I6-I968 


Q-6789 


WWU VETERAN 


SMOTHERMAN 


WILLIAM 


A. 


10-14-1894 


10-30-1953 


P-6361 


WWI VETERAN 


SMYTHIA 


HOUSTON 


V. 


08-18-1908 


08-11-1970 


Q^72 


WWn VETERAN 


SNEED 


CHARLES 


C. 


02-28-1922 


11-141943 


P-6305 


RETURN OF WWU DEAD PROGRAM 


SNEED 


OAUDE 


ADTS 


09-25-1894 


01-141968 


0^769 


WWIVEI'ERAN 


SNEED 


MARION 


D. 


05-21-1935 


0417-1969 


Q-6821 


DIED ON ACnVE DUTY 


SOUTHAM 


JOHN 


A. 


11-30-1878 


014)2-1964 


P-6500 


WWI &WWn VETERAN 


SPENCE 


WARNER 


lAEVYbTTE 


07-21-1919 


09-26-1949 


P-6324 


WWn VETERAN 


SPIERS 


L0N70 


NONE 


094)8-1896 


01-241957 


Q-6573 


WWIVEI'ERAN 



Page 45 



ST. JOHN 


GEORGE 


E 


09-12-1879 


114)7-1954 


P-^333 


WWI &SPANAM. MR VETERAN 


STmEV 


JUUA 


ANN 


OCMXMXXX) 


034)3-1945 


G-6212 


WIFE OF JOHN ESTWEY 


STEVENSON 


WILLIAM 


AUGUSIA 


04-23-1921 


014)8-1962 


Q-^72 


WWn VETERAN 


STEWART 


KENNETH 


EDWARDS 


11-07-1908 


10-16-1970 


Q-6664 


WWn VETERAN 


STEmRT 


lAURA 


R 


12-17-1919 


034)8-1986 


Q-6664 


WIFE OF KENNETH E. STEWART 


STIDHAM 


CLINTON 


NONE 


12-19-1906 


014)3-1955 


P-6247 


WWn VETERAN 


STONE 


IFORD 


H. 


12-07-1896 


11-22-1958 


P-6431 


WWIVtThKAN 


STONES 


JAMES 


L 


08-28-1890 


014)2-1966 


Q-6695 


WWI &WWn VETERAN 


STROTHER 


JOSEPH 


A. 


07-13-1893 


12-18-1957 


P-6406 


WWI VETERAN 


STUART 


JOHN 


J. 


08-04-1958 


084)5-1958 


P-6417 


SON OF JOSEPH STUART 


TARTER 


GLEN 


DOYLE 


01-01-1922 


04-25-1957 


P-6336 


WWn VETERAN 


TARTER 


MELROE 


NONE 


00-00-0000 


10-19-1948 


H-6304 


SPANISH AMERICAN mR VETRAN 


xmoR 


BEE 


NONE 


10-25-1912 


07-16-1970 


0^7 


WWn VETERAN 


TfffLOR 


HENRY 


MORRIS 


03-26-1911 


1029-1964 


P-6506 


WWn & KOREAN WAR VETERAN 


TffLOR 


HOYTE 


R 


09-29-1925 


04-25-1951 


P-6353 


KOREAN mR VETERAN 


■EffLOR 


JAMES 


C 


004)0-0000 


024)1-1941 


P-6194 


WWI VETERAN 


imoR 


JAMES 


WESLEYJR 


05-11-1937 


04-10-1969 


<^6820 


VhTEKAN 


imoR 


JAMES 


D. 


06-18-1922 


12-24-1944 


P-6292 


RETURN OF WWU DEAD PROGRAM 


rnim 


JESSE 


J. 


08-11-1892 


03-22-1962 


P-6492 


WWI VETERAN 


TMOR 


LESLIE 


R 


10-25-1920 


06-14-1944 


P43290 


RETURN OF WWH DEAD PROGRAM 


TAYLOR 


LLOYD 


DAVIS 


084)3-1900 


124)7-1960 


P-6480 


WWn VETERAN 


TAYLOR 


MARGARET 


NONE 


02-02-1914 


01-29-1967 


Q4S738 


WIFE OF BEE TAYLOR 


mim 


ROBERT 


J- 


12-25-1918 


02-22-1971 


R4S890 


KORBV, WWn, VIETNAM VETERAN 


THOMAS 


JOHN 


H. 


00-004)000 


074)8-1934 


H-6161 


aVIL WAR VETERAN 


THOMAS 


LEROY 


NONE 


11-19-1919 


054)7-1967 


(^6744 


WWn VETERAN 


THOMAS 


OSCAR 


W. 


04-28-1926 


04-30-1945 


P-6307 


RETURN OF WWH DEAD PROGRAM 


THOMPSON 


SAM 


EDmRD 


11-13-1918 


08-31-1972 


T-7088 


WWn VETERAN 


THURMAN 


JOHN 


BUSTER 


09-06-1911 


07-16-1970 


Q-^660 


WWII VETERAN 


IITTLE 


JOE 


B. 


04-12-1924 


12-23-1968 


(^6805 


WWn VETERAN 


TOOMBS 


BESSIE 


D. 


02-15-1904 


12-30-1995 


T-7101 


WIFE OF EMERY TOOMBS 


TOOMBS 


EMERY 


NONE 


044)5-1894 


01-20-1973 


T-7101 


WWI VETERAN 


TOOMBS 


JESSE 


P 


004)04)000 


08-23-1943 


P-6202 


WWI VETERAN 


TRAVIS 


BEN 


a 


034)3-1911 


09-19-1944 


P-6293 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY 


TRAVIS 


BOBBY 


Eiyis 


04-12-1942 


06-24-1968 


Q-6787 


VIETNAM W\R VETERAN 


TROTIER 


A. 


R 


004)04)000 


03-23-1863 


0-5825 


CML MR VETERAN 


TROTTER 


JAMES 


NONE 


004)04)000 


04-23-1863 


F-2465 


aVIL WAR VETERAN 


TUCKER 


ROBERT 


L 


014)9-1894 


02-15-1969 


(H811 


WWI VETERAN 


TURNER 


JACKSON 


NONE 


02-14-1894 


104)4-1961 


Q4i657 


WWI VETERAN 


TURNER 


lAURA 


ILENE 


04-23-1900 


04-18-1982 


(^6658 


WIFE OF JACKSON TURNER 


TURNER 


LOUIS 


NONE,SR 


12-25-1917 


114)1-1958 


0^591 


WWn VETERAN 


UNDERBILL 


PERCY 


ELMO 


02-22-1909 


05-21-1973 


T-7085 


WWn VETERAN 


UNDERWOOD 


JOHN 


EARL 


04-30-1907 


034)9-1945 


P-6313 


RETURN OF WWD DEAD PROGRAM 


UNKNOWN U.S. SOLDIER 


NONE 


004)04)000 


004)04)000 


P-6154 


INTERRED 01-22-1931 


UNKNOWN U5. SOLDIER 


NONE 


004)04)000 


004)04)000 


P-6168 


INTERRED 104)3-1936 


UNKNOWN U.S. SOLDIER 


NONE 


004)04)000 


004)04)000 


P4S188 


INTERRED 064)5-1941 


TOLEW 


HOWARD 


S. 


06-21-1876 


10-29-1952 


P-6345 


WAR WTTH SPAIN VtTERW 


WJSCOY 


ROBERT 


NEIL,JR 


11-15-1965 


11-15-1965 


(^6691 


SON OF ROBERT N. VANSCOY, SR 


VAUGHAN 


ISAAC 


HurroN 


07-15-1896 


114)7-1966 


(^739 


WWI VETERAN 


VAUGHAN 


MARY 


FRANCES 


06-26-1895 


094)7-1976 


Q-6739 


WIFE OF ISAAC HUTTON mUGHAN 


VAUGHN 


AUBREY 


G. 


004)04)000 


124)3-1941 


P-6193 


WWI VETERAN 


mUGHN 


BOBBY 


WALKER 


05-24-1928 


124)5-1971 


S^975 


WWn VETERAN 


mUGHN 


CAKl'ER 


NONE 


03-28-1895 


02-26-1970 


(^6852 


WWI VETERAN 


VAUGHN 


OAYTON 


NONE 


044)8-1895 


014)7-1961 


Q-^646 


WWI VETERAN 


mUGHN 


ELIZABETH 


P 


04-301906 


03-20-1997 


Q-6647 


WIFE OF OAYTON VAUGHN 


mUGHN 


MYRTLE 


POTTS 


05-22-1927 


094)7-1984 


S^75 


WIFE OF BOBBY' WALKER VAUGHN 



Page 46 



mUGHN 


SIDNEY 


A 


08-26-1892 


08-16-1958 


P-6425 


WWI VETERAN 


VAUGHTER 


ALBERT 


WILLIAM 


04-22-1917 


09-25-1964 


0^3681 


WWn VETERAN 


VAUGHTER 


JAMES 


E. 


03-28-1922 


03-17-1955 


P-6372 


WWn VETERAN 


Via 


GEORGE 


W. 


10-04-1920 


06-26-1970 


(^6661 


WWn VETERAN 


VICTORY 


GRACE 


BELL 


03-04-1898 


01-241973 


P-6430 


WWI VETERAN 


VICTORy 


JAMES 


C. 


02-03-1916 


O8-26-I96I 


P-6385 


WWn & KOREAN WAR VETERAN 


vicroRy 


TOM 


L. 


03-21-1896 


11-08-1958 


P-6429 


WWI VETERAN 


VINCENT 


CHARLES 


D. 


07-17-1892 


O8-2I-I968 


0-6791 


WWI VETERAN 


WADE 


ERNEST 


I. 


02-14-1911 


10-30-1961 


Q-6666 


WWn VETERAN 


WADE 


JAMES 


EDWARD 


04-12-1932 


084)2-1969 


(^6835 


PEACETIME VETERAN 


WADE 


JOHN 


CAIVIN 


02-24-1893 


01-31-1968 


0-6772 


WWI VETERAN 


WADE 


LEWIS 


NONE 


07-21-1895 


02-08-1987 




WWn VETERAN 


WADE 


PEARL 


NONE 


03-28-1902 


05-27-1965 


0-6685 


WIFE OF LEWIS WADE 


WADE 


RICHARD 


E. 


12-24-1936 


11-04-1967 


0-6761 


VIETNAM WAR VETERAN 


WADE 


RLTTH 


LOOPER 


05-04-1912 


084)9-1993 


0-6772 


WIFE OF JOHN CAIVIN mOE 


WAGGONER 


JOHN 


W 


00-00-0000 


044)2-1940 


P-6I8O 


VETERAN 


WAIDRON 


MEDRED 


SEITZINGER 


02-05-1916 


07-01-1985 


0-6759 


WIFE OF PAGE BAILEY WALDRON 


WAIDRON 


PETE 


BAILEY 


04-23-1914 


10-30-1967 


0^759 


WWn VETERAN 


WAIDROP 


CAROL 


H. 


12-25-1923 


05-17-1972 


S-7004 


WWn, KOREA & VIETNAM VETERAN 


WALKER 


EUGENE 


NONE 


08-31-1905 


02-25-1963 


0^59 


WWn VETERAN 


WALKER 


ROSE 


LEE 


044)4-1909 


08-29-1986 


0^59 


WIFE OF EUGENE WVLKER 


WALLACE 


AUEX 


A. 


03-02-1898 


014)3-1974 


T-7111 


WWI VETERAN 


WUIS 


DAN 


OAXTON 


06-16-1922 


034)3-1971 


R-6891 


WWn VETERAN 


WARD 


IRA 


EARTHMAN 


07-09-1888 


124)2-1947 


P-6261 


WWI VETERAN 


WARFMD 


WESLEY 


M. 


12-09-1896 


064)8-1969 


0^31 


WWI VETERAN 


WASHINGTON 


AUCE 


CLEORA 


09-09-1912 


01-25-1995 


T-7119 


WIFE OF JOHN C. WASHINGTON^ 


WASHINGTON 


JOHN 


CHEERS, SR 


01-01-1908 


02-22-1973 


T-7119 


WWn VETERAN 


WASHINGTON 


SAMUEL 


DONNELL 


08-26-1958 


08-26-1958 


0^586 


SONOFBENLSTEEIF 


WAIKINS • 


JESSIE 


T 


10-23-1892 


05-22-1977 


0-65O4 


WWn VETERAN 


WATHNS 


ROBERT 


NONE 


07-11-1894 


11-20-1961 


0-6668 


WWI VETERAN 


WAnONS 


ROBERT 


LEE.IR. 


04-28-1925 


05-26-1962 


0-6504 


WWn VETERAN 


WATSON 


IVY 


MITCHELL 


04-12-1910 


01-21-1962 


P-6491 


WWn VETERAN 


WATSON 


JOHN 


NONE 


08-17-1891 


034)9-1970 


0^57 


WWI VETERAN 


WATSON 


LERA 


BMNS 


10-06-1901 


08-16-1988 


0^713 


WIFE OF LUTHER WATSON 


WATSON 


LUTHER 


NONE 


09-16-1906 


05-29-1966 


0^713 


WWn VETERAN 


WAYMAN 


CECIL 


LWFAYETTE 


02-05-1877 


014)4-1958 


P-6406 


WWI VETERAN 


WAYMAN 


JEWELL 


D. 


08-27-1891 


064)1-1984 


P-6405 


WIFE OF CECIL LWVYMAN 


WEAVER 


JOHN 


OTIS 


02-10-1913 


02-21-1971 


0-6874 


WWn VETERAN 


WEISZ 


CARL 


ALBERT 


11-16-1913 


10-22-1973 


T-7098 


WWn & KOREAN WAR VETERAN 


WESSON 


CARL 


NONE 


02-11-1888 


04-28-1953 


P-6354 


WWI VETERAN 


WEST 


ALBERT 


LEE 


12-14-1923 


04-26-1970 


0-6866 


WWn VETERAN 


WEST 


WILL 


NONE 


06-14-1904 


09-29-1969 


0-6840 


WWn VETERAN 


WESTMORELAND CHARLES 


EDWARD 


084)6-1916 


03-21-1971 


R-6892 


W WU & KOREAN WAR VETERAN 


WETZEL 


ROSS 


NONE 


09-03-1896 


05-18-1974 


0-6839 


WWI VETERAN 


WETZEL 


VIVIAN 


lACY 


09-07-1903 


094)1-1969 


0-6839 


WWI VETERAN 


WHTIMER 


LLOYT) 


R 


06-12-1955 


06-18-1973 


T-7120 


DISINTERRED 1 V13^4TO NVILLE 


WHITE 


JESSE 


JAMES 


08-14-1932 


12-28-1969 


P-6256 


VETERAN 


WHITE 


TOMEY 


NONE 


03-25-1896 


124)6-1960 


0-6642 


WWI VETERAN 


WILEY 


JOHNNIE 


NONE 


02-15-1892 


03-11-1963 


0-6665 


WWI VETERAN 


WILKES 


HAZEL 


FOSTER 


05-15-1908 


11-24-1986 


0-6582 


WIFE OF JAMES WILKES 


WILKES 


JAMES 


NONE 


01-02-1903 


06-26-1958 


0^583 


WWI VETERAN 


miASD 


S\M 


LEE 


12-16-1907 


11-27-1970 


0^32 


WWn VETERAN 


WELETT 


EDDIE 


L 


05-27-1895 


11-19-1960 


P-6477 


WWI VETERAN 


wniEn 


EVEQ'N 


G, 


03-08-1893 


02-13-1997 


P-6478 


WIFE OF EDDIE LWniBIT 


WILLIAMS 


ANDREW 


NONE 


09-20-1920 


014)1-1967 


0-6731 


WWn VETERAN 



Page 47 



WnUAMS 


EVEDffJ 


HAZEL 


12-12-1914 


09-01-1966 


0^722 


WIFE OF JAMES awnUAMS 


WILLIAMS 


JAMES 


HUBERT 


11-20-1910 


11-07-1992 


Q6722 


HUSBAND OF EVEIYN WILLIAMS 


WILLIAMS 


mOER 


NONE 


0O-O(HX)O0 


0&O3-1947 


Q-^250 


VEIEKAN 


WnUAMSON 


HARRISON 


a 


10-19-1892 


12-12-1971 


S^977 


WWI VETERAN 


WILLIS 


ISALUL 


W. 


01-01-1902 


04-25-1969 


(^6823 


WWn VETERAN 


WILLOUGHBY 


JAMES 


L 


0407-1939 


12-28-1957 


P-6376 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY 


WILSON 


CORNELIUS 


NONE, JR. 


OO^XHXXK) 


05^3-1938 


P-6173 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY 


WILSON 


HORACE 


JACKSON 


05-08-1912 


06-04-1967 


Q-6747 


WWn VETERAN 


WII50N 


HUGH 


L 


Oi-04-1895 


10-31-1957 


P-6236 


WWI VETERAN 


WILSON 


JOHN 


E 


07-31-1893 


104)5-1969 


Q-6842 


WWI VETERAN 


WILSON 


MARY 


LEE 


08-18-1903 


08-29-1992 


(^842 


WIFE OF JOHN EWII50N 


WILSON 


MARY 


GENEHAYNES 


05-05-1919 


06-04-1966 


Q-6715 


DIED ON ACTIVE DLTY 


WILSON 


WOODROW 


NONE 


12-20-1912 


02-13-1966 


Q-6698 


WWn VETERAN 


wmr 


JOHN 


W. 


08-14-1946 


03-26-1966 


(^6704 


VIETNAM WAR VETERAN 


WINDROW 


BUD 


BYRNS 


11-30-1917 


05-29-196^ 


Q-6678 


WWn VETERAN 


WINROW 


ANNA 


NONE 


01-01-1893 


01-22-1974 


0-6638 


WWI VETERAN 


WINROW 


EPHRAIM 


NONE 


03-10-1888 


08-16-1960 


(^6637 


WWI VETERAN 


WK 


EARL 


WAYNE 


12-25-1948 


0JO6-1970 


(^6853 


DIED ON ACTIVE DITTY - VIETNAM 


WOLFE 


JOHN 


SPENCE 


10-15-1892 


04-11-1948 


P-6269 


WWI VETERAN 


WOMACK 


Ey^NIE 


NONE 


03-23-1904 


03-16-1976 


Q-6629 


WWn VETERAN 


WOMACK 


HORACE 


NONE, JR. 


03-12-1909 


07-31-1960 


Q-6628 


WWnVETERW 


WOOD 


WnUAM 


GARSWELL 


02-25-1906 


02-07-1967 


Q-6735 


WWn VETERAN 


WOODS 


HERSCHEL 


GREENE 


05-07-1918 


04-19-1960 


(^6620 


WWD VETERAN 


WOODS 


KENNETH 


H. 


08-29-1909 


10-21-1974 


Q-6752 


^Wn VETERAN 


WOODS 


LLhWELIYN 


MANHN 


07-28-1917 


08-13-1967 


Q-6752 


WWn VETERAN 


WOODS 


RALPH 


S. 


OOOOOOOO 


12-25-1949 


P-6325 


VETERAN 


WOODS 


WILLIE 


E 


04-25-1930 


05-16-1968 


(^6782 


KORE\ & VIETNAM mR VETERAN 


WOODSON 


EUGENE 


M.,in 


09-12-1945 


OSO8-1968 


Q-6790 


DIED ON ACTIVE DUTY - VIETNAM 


WOODSON 


FRED 


NONE 


12-24-1892 


05-30-1950 


P-6327 


WWI VETERAN 


WOODW\RD 


J^MES 


w. 


OOOOOOOO 


05-19-1945 


P-6501 


RETURN OF WWU DEAD PROGRAM 


WOODWVRD 


MARGARET 


ARNOLD 


06^1-1917 


08-26-1992 


P-6302 


WIFE OF JAMES W. WOODWARD 


WOOTEN 


JAMES 


ROBERT 


02-24-1931 


09-19-1955 


P-6375 


VETERAN 


WORKS 


FELK 


GRUNDY 


12-25-1896 


12-30-1973 


T-7116 


WWI VETERAN 


WORLEY 


wmiAM 


D. 


10-28-1908 


06-17-1960 


P-6466 


WWn VETERAN 


WORNER 


RICHARD 


LEE 


09-26-1889 


12-02-1949 


0^512 


WWIVEIERAN 


WRIGHT 


AARON 


NONE 


08-16-1896 


03-15-1961 


Q-6650 


WWI VETERAN 


WRIGHT 


JOHN 


D. 


10-12-1927 


O8O4-I943 


P-6321 


RETLIRN OF U'WH DEAD PROGRAM 


WRIGHT 


JOHN 


G. 


08^1917 


06-11-1975 


P-6504 


WWn VETERAN 


WRIGHT 


MARY 


E 


10-13-1919 


07-30-1964 


P-6504 


WIFE OFJOHN G.WRIGHT 


YEARGIN 


HERMAN 


NONE 


OOOO-OOOO 


11-19-1940 


(^6183 


\!i'WI VETERAN 


ZACHARY 


ENOS 


NONE 


06-22-1907 


06-16-1958 


(^6580 


WWn VETERAN 


2ACHEro' 


MAE 


L\RIS 


09^1922 


03-06-1996 


(^6847 


WIFE OF ROBERT LEE ZACHERY, JR 


ZACHERy 


ROBERT 


LEE,JR 


03-19-1932 


10-26-1969 


0-6847 


VIETNAM VETERAN 


ZIMMERMAN 


MELCHIOR 


NONE 


12-31-1862 


12-31-1862 


F-2235 


avn. WAR VETERAN 



Page 48 



BIBUOGRAPHY OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY fflSTORICAL SOURCES FOUND AT 
TENNESSEE STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES 

Historical and Genealogical Information 

BIBUOGRAPHY OF TENNESSEE LOCAL mSTOKY SOURCES : RUHTERFORD COUNTY 
Ruthetford County in General 

Baskin, Robert W History of Blackman community. Mur&Teesboro, the author, 1986. 132 pp. 

Baumstark, Michael E Recreational demand study for Rutherford County. MTSU thesis. 1971. pp. 

Biographical directory, TN General Assembly, 1796-1969 (Rutherford County, Preliminary #6). Nashville, 
TSLA, 1968. 63 pp. 

Borden, Elizabeth. "Blacksmith lore: Joe Hansberry, master blacksmith." TN Folklore Sac. Bull 50 (1985), 
pp. 10-21. 

Davis, Charlene J. The geology of the LaVergne quadrangle, TN. Vanderbilt U. thesis, 1959. 32 pp. 

Dowden, M.L Seasonal costs of producing & marketing cream in Rutherford County, TN, 1947-48. 

Knoxville, TN Ag. Exp. Sta., 1949- 35 pp. (its Rural research series monograph #250) 

Dowden, M.L. Seasonal costs of producing & marketing fluid milk in Rutherford Countv-, TN, 1947-48. 
Knoxville, TN Ag. Exp. Sta., 1949. 35 pp. (its Rural research series monograph #242). 

Downen, M.L. Seasonal costs of producing & marketing milk for manufecturing purposes in Ruther- 
ford County, TN, 1947-48. Knoxville, TN Ag. Exp. Station, 1949- 38 pp. (its Rural research series monograph 
#246) 

Flood insurance study: Rutherford County, TN, unincorporated areas. "Washington, D.C., FEMA, 1983. 40 
pp. 

Flood insurance study: Rutherford County, TN, unincorporated areas (rev Oa. 17, 1989). Washington, 
D.C., FEMA, 1989. 42 pp. 

Frow Chips. Vol. 1, Sept. 1971-. (monthly) Rutherford County Hist Soc. 

Galloway, Jesse J. Geology & natural resources of Rutherford County, TN. Nashville, TN Di^: Geo!., 1919. 
81 pp. (its Bulletin #22) 

Geoige Peabody College for Teachers. Division of Surveys & Field Services. Public schools of Rutherford 
County, TN; a survey report. Nashville, 1958. 223 pp. 

Glass, ET "Sketch of Henry Rutherford." .4/iM 5 (1900), pp. 225-229. 

Goodspeed's history of TN (Rutherford County, pp. 810-940, 1019-1076). Goodspeed, 1886. 



Page 49 



Goodwin, Sarah J., et al., comps. Westbrooks, WiHiams & related Smodiennans of Rutherford County 
TN, with histories of Midland Conununity, Oak Grove School, Old Leb Church. Murfreesboro, Ruther- 
ford County Hist. Soc., 1984. 306 pp. 

Greene, Samuel. Availability of education to Negroes in Rutherford County, TN. Fisk U. thesis, 1940. pp. 

Hankins, Caneta S. Hearthstones: the story of Rutherford County homes. Murfreesboro, Oaklands Associa- 
tion, Inc. in cooperation with the Center for Historic Preservation at MTSU, 1993- 107 pp. 

A history of Rutherford County schools to 1972. Murfreesboro, Rutherford County Retired Teachers Assn., 
1986. 2 vols. 

Hoflfechwelle, Mary S. "Organizing rural communities for change: the Commonwealth Fund Child 
Health Demonstration in Rutherford County, 1923-1927." THQ (Fall, 1994), pp. 154-164. 

Houston, Gary B. A survey of the legal needs of the poor in Rutherford & Cannon counties, TN. N.p., 
1967.29 pp. 

Hughes, MaryB. Hearthstones: the story of Rutherford County homes. Murfreesboro, Mid-south, 1942. 68 
pp. (reprinted, I960, 69 pp. ;fifteeri additional homes are added in the second edition) 

Hughes, Travis H. The geology of the Gladeville qpiadrangle, TN. \^derbilt U. thesis, I960. 35 pp. 

Intercultural contact: the Japanese in Rutherford County, TN [videocassette]. Knoxville, UT, 1986. (1 
videocassette, 29 min.) 

Ivey, John B. Geology of Cedars of Lebanon State Park & vicinity, Wilson & Rutherford counties, TN. 

VanderbUt U. thesis, 1950. 52 pp. 

Jacobs, Ludle F. Duck River \^ey in TN & its pioneers. N.p., 1968. 124 pp. 

Jarman, Brenda S. "Ailin' animals: folk treatments collected in Rutherford County, TN." TN Folklore Soc. 
Bull 4i (1978), pp. 55-65. 

Jarmon, Laura C. Arbors to bricks: a hundred years of African-American education in Rutherford 
County, TN, 1865 to 1965. Murfreesboro, MTSU Div Cont. Studies & Pub. Ser, 1994. 144 pp. 

Mrkeminde, Patricia B. 'The confessions of YWllis Mayberry." TN Folklore Soc. Bull 30 (1964), pp. 7-21. 

Laniers, Doris, ed. "Mary Noailles Murfree: an interview." THQ 31 (1972), pp. 276-278. 

Lokey James L. History of dairying in Rutherford County, TN. Geoige Peabody College thesis, 1937. pp. 

Lowe, Ma^e J. "The murder of Manroe Bynvun." TN Folklore Soc. Bull. 20 (1954), pp. 9-13. 

Lowe, Maggie J. "An old ballad composer of the nineties." TN Folklore Soc. Bull 19 (1953), pp. 83-94. 

Luebke, B.H. Farm real estate situation in five areas of TN, 1941-1944. Knoxville, TN Ag. Exp. Sta., 1945. 
52 pp. (its Rural research series monograph #185) 



Page 50 



Middle TN State College. History of Rutherford County. Murfreesboro, MTSC, 1939- 52 pp. 

Miller, Clarice. Central Christian Church early history. Muifreesboro, Rutherford County Hist. Soc., 1986. 
Ill pp. (Rutherford County Hist. Soc. Pub. #27) 

Miller, Julia C. The status of women in industry in Rutherford County. MTSU thesis, 1969. pp. 

Mooers, Charles A. The soils of Rutherford County. Knoxville, IN Ag. Exp. Sta., 1924. 27 pp. (its Bulletin # 
130) 

Muse, Luda S. Salem Methodist Church, Rutherford County, TN, 1812-1975. Nashville, TN Societ)^ 
NSDAR, 1976. 51 pp. 

Mustard, Harry S. Cross sections of rural health progress: report of the Commonwealth Fund Child 
Health Demonstration in Rutherford County, TN, 1924-1928. NX Commonwealdi Fund, 1930. 23 pp. 

Nashville MSA, 1980-1987: an economic analysis. Nashville, TN Dept. Emp. Sec, 1988. 55 pp. 

Ordanbadian, Reza. Rutherford County: a study in onomastics. Auburn U. dissertation, 1968. 250 pp. (place 
names) 

Kttard, Homer P Legends & stories of Civil "W^ Rutherford County. George Peabody College thesis, 1940. 
132 pp. 

Pittard, Mabel, comp. A history of Rutherford County in pictures. Murfreesboro, Rutherford County Hist. 
Soc., 1990. 128 pp. 

Pittard, Mabel. Rutherford County. Memphis, MSU Press, 1985. 137 pp. 

Puckett, Liz. "Stories firom the tack room." TN Folklore Soc. Bull 46 (1980), pp. 45-83. 

Ransom, Robert G. The history of medicine in Rutherford County, TN. Murfreesboro, Rutherford 
County Historical Society, 1985. 5 vols. (Vol 1: Introduction & overview of the history of medicine in the 
county; Vol 2: Biographies of nineteenth century physicians; Vol 3: Biographies of twentieth century physi- 
cians; Vol 4: History of Rutherford Hospital (now the Middle TN Medical Center) ;Vol 5: History of Rutherford 
County Health Dept.) 

Ross, Robert M. Grade A milk producers in Rutherford County, TN. Problem A; Characteristics of Ruther- 
ford County Grade A milk producers & their farms; problem B; Management practices of Rutherford County 
Grade A milk producers; problem C: Factors influencing dairy management practice adoption by Rutherford 
County Grade A milk producers, (three related problems in lieu of thesis. UT, 1966. 155 pp.) 

Rutherford County Historical Publication. Vol. 1, 1973-. (quarterly) Rutherford County Hist. Soc. 

Rutherford County home demonstration: plan of work, 1940. Murfreesboro, Home Demonstration 
Clubs, 1940. 39 pp. 

Salmon, Lourene. "The tale of the mysterious barrel & other 'haint' tales collected in Big Springs." JN 

Folklore Soc. Bull 37 (1971), pp. 59-72. 



Page 51 



Sims, Carlton C, ed. A history of Rutherford County. Murfreesboro, n.p., 1947. 236 pp. (reprinted, 1981) 

SoU survey, Rutherford County, TN. \X^hington, DC, US GPO, 1977. 95 pp. 

Southern Assoc, of Colleges & Schools. Visiting Comm. Evaluative study made in Rutherford County 
Central High School, Murfireesboro, TN. Murfreesboro, 1951. 106 pp. 

Spence, John C. The annals of Rutherford County. Murfreesboro, Rutherford County Hist. Soc. (vol. 1, 1799- 
1828 (1991), 265pp.; vol. 2, 1829-1870 (1991), 306pp.) 

Spence, John C. A diary of the Civil War. Murfreesboro, Rutherford County Hist. Soc., 1993. 164 pp. 

Stanfield, Eli2abeth P "Selected social correspondence of Miss Eleanor Hardin Jackson of Rutherford 
County, 1861-1865." TN folklore Soc. Bull 41 (1975), pp. 9-18. 

TN Dept. Transportation [county maps] issued periodically 

US Geol. Sunney [topographic maps] issued periodically Quadrangles: Lavergne, Gladeville, Vme, Smyrna, 
\(^terhill, Lascassas, College Grove, Rockvale, Murfreesboro, Dalton, Readyville, Chapel Hill, Rover, Fosterville, 
Webbs Jungle, Beech Grove, Deason. 

US Soil Conservation Service. Soils interpretations, Rutherford County, TN. Nashville, Mid-Cumberland 
Council of Governments, 1977. 37 pp. 

^Jf^ker, Watson E Ten years of rural health work, Rutherford County, TN, 1924-1933. NX Commonwealth 
Fund, 1935. 82 pp. 

Walker, "Watson E & Caroline R. Randolph. Influences of a public health program: fifteen years in Ruther- 
ford County, TN, 1924-1938. NX Commonwealth Fund, 1940. 106 pp. 

Weeks, Terry Heart of TN: the story & images of historic Rutherford County. Murfreesboro, Rutherford 
County Chamber of Commerce, 1992. 205 pp. 

West, Carroll V "The money our fathers were accustomed to": banks & political culture in Rutherford 
County, TN, 1800-1850." Wm. & Mary College dissertation, 1982. 245 pp. 



EagleviHe 

Dyer, Minnie E The history of Eagjeville. Eagleville, n.p., 1972. 158 pp. 

Griffiih 

Rutherforcl County Bicentennial Comm. GriflSth: a bicenteimial publication. N.p., the commission, 1976. 60 
pp. 

LaVergne 

Flood insurance study: city of LaVergne, TN, Cheatham County. ^X^hington, DC, EEMA 1983 19 pp 



Page 52 



Miihtte Tennessee State University 

MTSU. BuUetin. Vol. 1-12, June 1911-1923; NewSer., Vol. 1-2, Aug. 1923- Apr. 1925; [3rd sen] Vol. l-,June 
1925-. Frequenq' varies, (flumes for 1911-25 issued by the university under its earlier name-. Middle TN State 
Normal School; 1925-30, Middle TN State Teachers College; 1930- 43, State Teachers College; 1943-65, Middle 
TN State College; 1965- , Middle TN State University) 

MTSU magazine. Vol. 1, no. 1, Mar. 1993-. (monthly). MTSU. 

Nunley, Joe E. The Raider forties. NX Vantage Press, 1977. 115 pp. 

Kttard, Homer. The first fifty years. Photography by Dr. Bealer Smotherman. Murfreesboro, Middle TN State 
College, 1961. 273 pp. 

Pittard, Homer P Middle TN State College: its historical aspects & its relation to significant teacher 
education niovenient.Geoige Peabody College dissertation, 1957. 471 pp. 

Woodmore, Thomas B. Up the winding stairs. Murfreesboro, the author, 1984. 168 pp. 

Murfreesboro 

Amette, Charles B. From Mink Slide to Main Street. Murfreesboro, the author, 1991. 244 pp. 

Amette, Charles B. The history of the East Main Church of Christ. Murfreesboro, the author, 1988. 436 pp. 

Bell, Ed. The lonely people & their strange ways. Selections compiled & edited by Robert Lasseter. Mur&iees- 
boro, n.p., 1951. 166 pp. 

Donaldson, John G. Murfi-eesboro annexation study. Knoxville, MTAS, 1958. 42 pp. 

Edwards, Charles D. & Lin2y D. Albert. Master plan for recreation, Murfi-eesboro, TN. Nashville, n.p., 1952. 
56 pp. 

Flood insurance study: city of Murfreesboro, TN, Rutherford County. Washington, D.C., FEMA, 1983. 18 
pp. 

Flood insurance study: city of Murfreesboro, TN, Rutherford County, (rev. June 2, 1994). Washington, 
DC, FEMA, 1994. 1 v 

Henderson, C.C. The story of Murfi-eesboro. Murkeesbotx), News-Banner, 1929. 145 pp. 

Howse, Elisabeth O. Flowers for Grace. N.p., Mrs. Granville S. Ridley, Jr., 1972. 152 pp. 

Llewellyn, Ralph M. "Others have labored" : a sesquicentennial address on the early history of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Murfi-eesboro, TN, Sunday, Apr. 29, 1962. Murfi-eesboro, n.p., 1962. 25 pp. 

Murfiieesboro Regional Plan. Comm. School survey & plans for city of Murfreesboro, TN. Murfi-eesboro, 
n.p., 1948. 31 pp. 



Page 53 



Mutual Realty & Loan Company: Handbook of Murfreesboro & Rutherford County, TN. Murfteesboro, 
Homejoumal Print, 1923- 128 pp. 

Pitcard, Homo*. Pillar & ground. Photography by Archie King, et al. Murfreesboro, First Baptist Church, 1968. 
166 pp. 

US Army Corps of Engineers. Flood plain information study, Murfreesboro, TN, West Fork Stones River, 

Lyde & Sinking Creeks. Main report Prepared for the dty of Murfr-eesboro & Rutherford County Plan. 
Comm. by the US Army Engineer District, Nashville, Corps of Engineers. N.d., 1965. 32 pp. 

Weatherford, Sally E. "Profile of a Murfreesboro quilt maker & her craft." TN Folklore Soc. Bull 44 (1978), 
pp. 108-114. 

White, Robert H. 'TN's fovir capitols." ETHSP 6 (1934), pp. 29-43. (reprinted in TN old & new, vol. 1, pp. 319- 
332.) 

Oaklands 

Hemdon, Joseph L & Mary L. Oehriein. Historic structures report, Oaklands Mansion, Murfreesboro, TN, 
for the Oaklands Assoc., Inc. ^W^hington, D.C., Building Conservation Technology, 1978. 57 pp. 

McBride, Robert M. "Oaklands: a venerable host, a renewed welcome." JHQ 22 (1963), pp. 303-322. 

McConnell, Vii^inia, et al. Oaklands, a look at its past. N.p., 1987. 33 pp. (in partial fulfillment for the 
requirementsfor Historic Preservation 433, TSU) 

Sam Davis Home 

Baird, Mary R., comp. Home of Sam Davis, Smyrna, TN: a state shrine of a southern scout, under man- 
agement of the Sam Davis Memorial Association, Smyrna, TN. Smyrna, the compiler, n.d 48 pp. 

Meredith, Owen N. "The Sam Davis home." THQ 24 (1965), pp. 303-320. 

Smyrna 

Baird, Mary, comp. A history of the First Baptist Church of Smyrna. N.p., 1954. 22 pp. 

Coleman, Nell E., comp. A history of the Smyrna Methodist Church, 1872- 1955. N.p., 1955. 88 pp. 

Flood insurance study: town of Smyrna, TN, Rutherford County. V^hington, D.C., FEMA, 1982. 17 pp. 

Floods in Stewart Creek & Harts Branch, Smyrna, TN. Nashville, US Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, 
1976. 32 pp. 

Hoover, \^ter K A history of the town of Smyrna, TN. Nashville, McQuiddy, 1968. 559 pp. 

Nissan Corporation 

Egerton, Jolin. Nissan in TN. Smyrna, Nissan Motor Manufecturing Coip., USA, 1983. 127 pp. 

Page 54 



Hammer, Joshua. "Stretching their productivity as well as their limbs, auto- workers in TN go Japanese. 
(Nissan truck assembly plant in Smyrna.)" People Weekly 66 (Oa. 24, 1983), pp. 38-41. 

Springs, Ricardo. Pilot case study: the decision by Nissan Motor Manufecturing Corp. USA to build a 
light truck assembly plant in Smyrna, TN. Washington, D.C., US Dept. Transp., 1981. 78 pp. 

Tokyo in TN. [videocassette]. NX Caroiosel Films, 1983. 1 videocassette, 16 min. (a segment from the television 
program 60 Minutes) 

Woods, Mike. "A look at Smyrna: the Nissan impact." A/&. Man. 66 (fune 1984), pp. 3-5. 

Battle of Stones River/Stones River National Battlefleld 

The Batde of Stones River. N.p., Eastern Acorn Press, 1987. 55 pp. (articles originally appearing in Civil War 
limes Illustrated) 

The Batde of Stones River. Jamestown, \A, Eastern Acorn Press, 1991. 55 pp. 

Bearss, Edwin C. "Cavahy operations in the Batde of Stones River." THQ 19 (I960), pp. 23-53, 110-144. 

Bickham, William D. Rosecrans' campaign with the fourteenth army corps, or the Army of the 
Cumberlands: a narrative of personal observations with official reports of the Batde of Stone River. 

Cincinnati, OH, Moore, Wilstach, Keys & Co., 1863- 467 pp. 

Byrne, Stephen C. An archeological survey of the visitor center addition & parking lot expansion. 
Stones River National Battiefield, Rutherford County, TN. Tallahassee, FL, National Park Service, Southeast 
Archaeological Battlefield, 1990. 12 pp. 

Comstock, Rock L. Museum prospectus for Stones River National Military Park. N.p., 1959- 119 pp. 

Cozzens, Peter. No better place to die: the batde of Stones River. Chicago, U. EL Press, 1990. 281 pp. 

Fitch, John. Annals of the Army of the Cumberland: comprising biographies, descriptions of depart- 
ments, accounts of expeditions, skirmishes, & batdes; also its police record of spies, smugglers, & 
prominent rebel emissaries. Together with anecdotes, incidents, poetry, reminiscences, etc. & official 
reports of the battie of Stone River. By an officer Illustrated with steel portraits, word engravings, & maps. 
Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott & Co., 1863. 671 pp. (various editions) 

Hascall, Milo S. Personal recollections & experiences: concerning the Batde of Stone River. Goshen, IL, 
Times Pub. Co., 1889. 22 pp. {a paper read by request before the Illinois Commandery of the Military Order of 
the Loyal Legion of the US, at Chicago, R., Feb. 14, 1889) 

Horn, Stanley F. The Batde of Stones River. N.p., Eastern Acorn Press, 1983. 15 pp. (first published in Civil 
War Times Illustrated) 

Logsdon, David R. Eyewitnesses at the Batde of Stones River. Nashville, the author, 1989- 82 pp. 

McDonough, James L. "The last days at Stones River: experiences of a Yank & a Reb." THQ 40 (1981), 
pp. 3-12. 



Page 55 



McDonough, James L. Stones River: bloody winter in TN. Knoxville, UT Press, 1980. 271 pp. 

Murfnee, Mary N. [pseud. Charles E. Craddock]. Where the battle was fought. Boston, Osgood, 1884. 423 pp. 
(fiction) 

Phisterer, Irederick. The regular brigade of the Fourteenth army corps, the Army of the Cumberland, in 
the batde of Stone River, or Murfireesboro, TN, from Dec. 31st, 1862, to Jan. 30, 1863, both dates 
inclusive. N.p., 1883. 30 pp. 

Rosecrans, William S. Report on the Battle of Murfireesboro, TN. Washington, DC, US GPO, 1863. 571 pp. 

Stevenson, Alexander F. The Batde of Stones River near Murfireesboro, TN, Dec. 30, 1862-Jan. 3, 1863... 

Boston, MA, J.K Osgood, 1884. 197 pp. 

Taylor, Martha S. Shiloh, again!: the story of Stones River & the Batde of Murfireesboro, TN. Huntsville, 
AL, the author, 1989. 50 pp. 

Thruston, Gates P Personal recollections of the batde in the rear at Stone's River, TN. Nashville, Brandon, 
1906.21pp. 

US National Park Service. Denver Services Center. Draft general management plan & drafit development 
concept plan for Stones River National Batdefield & Cemetery, Murfireesboro, TN. Denver, CO, National 
Park Service, US Dept. of the Interior, 1979. 145 pp. 

Vance, Wilson. Stone's River, the turning-point of the Civil ^^. NX Neale Pub. Co., 1914. 72 pp. 

Willett, Ann W A history of Stones River National Military Park, MTSC thesis, 1958. 155 pp. 

Womack, Bob. "Stone's River National Military Park." THQ 21 (1962), pp. 303-317. 

Versailles 

Nance, R Fred & John W Nance, comps. The history of Versailles, tenth district, & its people. 

Murfreesboro, Rutherford County Hist. Soc., 1983. 303 pp. 



Page 56 



ADVERTISEMENTS FROM THE COURIER, MURFREESBORO'S FIRST 

NEWSPAPER (1830-32) 

In 1980, Rita Frost Lynch and her husband purchased the historic Ezra Jones house in MurfJreesboro. 
They later found in the attic many rare, intact copies of the Courier from the years 1830-32. She later 
pubUshed A Glimpse of News Past which contained news articles and advertisements from those pa- 
pers. She graciously provided these ads for this issue of the Society's journal. 



Page 57 



NEW FAiJ.k. VViN'rEK. 
d vIL^ © ID ^^ o 

.^ p H I J S 11 i; s c r i i ) o rs i a li e ' t h e ill-) c. v ( y o f i i > - 
^a. t'oriiiing- tlieji' (Vioncl.^; ami lliepnMic 
g~(Mierall3' , iliat tliciy have removed IVcun 
(lieirold liUun) io the INrw Building' lalcly 
creeled by Al a,j LedboH(n\ en the West 
side of lh(> S(niarev het.vveen MrSpen-y's 
St.oi'e and the Printiiir'; Ollice, wliorc llu y 
arc; new opening alari^a^ am! splendid assorl- 
ineul el" Gv)()DS ol'twei'y deseriplien, late- 
ly i)nreiiaseel in Plnladelphia, RailiivHire ^.l 
l^i! (s!>uroii, whieh they will sell as l^nv a.s 
(;an be l)euQ;hl. ni I he jViaee. 

We (eel o-rateCiil (o our friendr, fer pant 
I'af i'ona[;"e and hope to merit a <u)n! innance. 
SCRATE & ELDER. 

Nov. '20. 1830—11'. 



Page 58 



\ p 




% ^% 1^»- '. Ja ^^ -1^% '7y 



^:^ 



"AND DEALER IN 



Plantation Supplies 



C/0 



CD 



arranted {[garden $eeds, 




e the most Reliablo and Ponv 

in 'he Souihern and Vv''e3te?-'ia%' ... Q.-pgr,-- 

IIRFREESBORO, TU ^ " 



"s:^ 



''''-ms 



Page 59 



R K M O V A L . 

^~pIIE Subscriber iias removed bis eslab- 
4A lisbmeot on the Public Squai-e, a lew 
doors south of the ?Fasbington Hotel, in Ibe 
building recently occupied by Mr R.Spence, 
where, he ilatters himself, be is and will at 
all times, be prepared to accommodate bis 
friends and customers, and all others who 
maybe di^jposed lo visit him, witii every 
necessary arlicle — tliat too of the most ex- 
cellent — to be found in similar establish- 
ments in the western country. In addition 
to his w-ell .selected assortment of CON* 
FECT10NAR1E3, he will constantly keep 
on baud a handsome supply of 

tic^j' -<:t/ "xfc? ^ 1:2? V4. 9O ul^ '^aJ^ mXoS ^^ ^ 

manufactured of good materials, which be 
'•vili dispofie of on good terms for cash, or to 
P'unciual custouiers on a liberal credit. He 
is grateiui for the former liberality of thr^. 
public, and would be^gratined to cxperieofjc- 
a contiouaoce of it. 

WILLIS HARKER 



A r> r r 



mo 



Page 60 



. Washin.^'too Motel. ' 

'%^3^; h VS^ ^ inff^M'nis i't}e public ihal \\r 
Mf:;'|^8 ^iasa2:ain taken possession o( 



•^^'^^^^la this wolikuowtjsiaiuJ From 
tlie encoiiraupfnent he rct^eived when for- 
niei'l)' lie had llje ni;iriH!;a-^iii'jnt of i).iis liniiKe, 
hefiaders hiinaelf. ttial he will ho lihorally 
palronized—parlicniarly a.s he k (Id^tevmin- 
M.1 lo use overy Rxerlioii lo render genei'al 
.sal i^hietioD to Ihoscrvvlio may call upon him, 
i'^reqiienl visiUs from his old friend^s and 
■palj'uiiS will he very ao-reeahle. 

' llOBKRT SMri'H. 
jan '26, 1831 -4t _^_ 

N. U. '{M)0s.'^;;ihd<^lvjfid In thC'. snl)S<i;fn)cr 
■>^' ill pi c a s o cull 4 1 k1 111 a k e p ■.< y meat, farf 'W'i^ 
ciinuot live on t^^ie wind. :v K. S./ 



Page 61 



mi AV ID S H EPIIRRD & G..W. SHANK - 
4.^*^ LIN, liavin'r purchased Uie TAJV- 
V A R D S.I S ( c k o i\ 1 1 A n cl , h c r e t o fo r e b e i o n «- 
ing: to i\!r James Bone, respecli'iiljy ini'urrn 
the piibJic thru tliey sre prepared to cavr'?- 
on the TANNIiNG BUSIIMEbS in all itcj 
various branches; arjcl froiD their experience' 
in the busiLicss, and a viisposilion to aecom- 
fnodate customer, they feel sanguine in 
g"iviiTf]^ i?;cnera^ satisfaction, and liope tc 
merit a pcn'ti'on ofthe patronat^e oftlio pub- 
bic. One o)' other of the firm may be always 
ibnnd at the Yard. 

Oct. 9thv 1830— if 



Page 62 



S W A 1 M ' S 

lji:i h) Subscribers Iraving' beeu appoirited 
. Agnnls for I ()e sale, of (.his moyl valua-i 
!i i e ' P /\ N M'E A , b y M r \ 'v i 1 ! i a i rj bi w a i ni , | 
foel it Ujcir eliiiy, tcj \.{vi) aflliclod .|)a/'l. oflliej 
cuiiumiuily, Ibus publicly io aiinoiince it] 
Tije nrany cui'cs it bas perfccled, and l\\c\ 
inatiy ceruri(:'.alesc)i)l,aii]ed froni (bemos;{. 
ski! f 1 1 1 P b y y.) c i a 1 1 s of- tb e K \i s 1 , a s well ix h i 
otbcr parts of tlie Union will, witbont a; 
floiibt, ostiiblisb its cxcellont qtialitics. — '; 
i'oi'baps no AlBdjcinc ba.-! fjvor y et appeared 
ir. tbe ivlcdical An nabs \v:!lb nio.re success, 
ai'id luiiversal (.yi;)od. We call Ibo attcrition 
of the public, and add — fry aiul he convinced. 
i.>y cidlin^j on tlu^ .subscribers, certificates 
of tb<^, many wonderful cures can 1)C obtain.- 
Q(\ , viz: — 

SCIlOFUf.,A. KLh'G'S EriL,' syPE- 
JLlTiC ^ MhyRCifniAL BISEASES, 

nin^LfMjrriSM. ulcerous sohes. 

WHITE SlVELLl^fGS. JJISEA^ES: 

ofi/ir LIVER and SKlJ^r. G B.N' ERA L 

'OEBiLJTY, aUdt'^ease.^ arWuii^ from LH. 

j PURE BLOOD A.QO tedious to-enniner- 

late. LEINAU & CARiVE^''. 

I J3n.l9th, 1831 — tf 



Page 63 



ADVERTISEMENTS FROM THE PROGRAM OF THE 1869 TENNESSEE 
STATE FAIR HELD IN MURFREESBORO 

The ads shown here are from the printed state fair program owned by Rita Frost Lynch. The fair 
was held one mile south of the Courthouse Square on Church Street. 



Page 64 



ADTERTISEMEKTS. 



C^r^XT^L STOCK, siocooo. 



OF MURFEEESBORO, TENN., 

Does a General Banlcing Business of Discount & Deposit, 

DEALS IN ALL CLASSES OF BONDS, 

Mates Collections on all accessible points in Middle Tennessee 

STOCKHOLDERS. 

J. B. KiMBKO, A. M. Alexander, John W. Richaedson, 

J. M. Havnes, M. C. Jordan, W. B. Lillaed, 

J. B. Palm Ml, J. E. DroMGooLic, Jos. Ransom, 

W. N. Doughty, J. R. Fekkell, Jno. G. Phimm, 

W. P. Henderson, M. Pitts, C. B. Huggins, 

M. H. Alexander, Jos. R. Dillin, M. L. Fletcuek, 

W. B. Hill, James D. Pichaedson, J. M. Baird, 

W. A. Ransom, S. II. Miller, J. A. Collier, 

I. B. Collier, S. H. Singleton, R. C. Blackman, 

Travis Winrow, HENKi' R. Kekby. 

J, B. K-IItSBItO, President. \V. N. »OC«HXYi Ticc-fresidciit. 

1. K. COI>ME«£, Cashier. 

DR. R. S. & 'WM. WENDBL, 

DRUGGISTS km PRESCRIPTIOmSTS, 

East Side Public Square, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN., 

Have DOW in store a full and Select Stock of 

BHOGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, PATENT MEDICINES, 

Glass, Pesfumerj', Fancy and Toilet Articles, Lamps, etc 

To which they respectfully invite the attention of their friends and the public gene- 
ral! v. 

ES^ Our prices shall be as lo-iv as any house in this city Our Coal Oil is to the 
standard required by law. Pi-escription« accurately compounded night or day. Terms 
cash, or thirty davs time to punctual dealers. 

E^" SUPERIOR bAKING POWDER MADE BY US. 



E"WINa & A-LLEN, 




Vine Street, between Cliurch and Spring Streets, 

MURFREESBORO, TENNE.5SEE. 



Page 65 



ADVERTISEMENT S'/ 



JOSEPH E. PALMER. JAS. D. RICHARDSON. 



MrRFREESBORO, TERfN. 



J". L. CA.NNON, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 

Admitted November Term, 1SC9. 



:EI. N. RA.NSOM, 

DEALER IN 

FAMILY GROCERJES AND COUNTRY PROOyCE, 

Keeps on hand a g^ood assortment of 

TEl^NESSEE IR02sT, IT AILS, CASTINGS, &c. 

EAST MAIN STREET, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 



CandieSj Fruits, Nuts, Cigars, Tobacco, 

"^^ ' AND 



AT 

One door SoutJvoftJie Postoffice^ Murfre-es'boro, Tenn. 



Also, Baggage Barrows, Wai-ehouse Trucks, Copying Presses, etc. 

F^^IJbiBA.NKS, MORSE & CO- 

139 Waluut Street, Cincinnati, Obio. 

A. W. CADY, Asrent, Nashville. 



Page 66 



10 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JOHN IXT. BURTON, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 

Will Practice in the Counties of Rutherford, Bedford, Cannon, and in the Su- 
preme Court. 



Aff OEllT Af lAW,' 

31URFREESBORO, TENN., 

"Will Practice in Rutherford, Bedford and Cannon Counties, and in the Su- 
preme Court. 

Strict Attention Paid to the Collection of Debts. 



F. R. B U R R U S , 

iffiiiif iii iiiisiiiii if iiWb 
RICHARD BEARD, 

ATTORNEY & COrXSELLOK AT LAW, 

MURFBEESBORO, TENN 
Attends to the Collections of Claims^ etc.? etc. 



MURFREESBORO, TENN. 

Page 67 



12 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



MURFREESBORO SAVINGS BAS^K, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN- 
(Organized Oct. 1 , 1S6S,) 

CA.PIT^A.L STOCK , ^100,000. 
Does a General BankinirBusiiies!^. 

BUYS AND SELLS 
EXCHANGE, GOLD, SILVER, UNCURRENT MONEY, STOCKS, and 

GOVERNMENT BONDS. 

Sight Checks for any amount on all the principal Cities of Europe, for sale. 

Bein^ supplied with aPire Proof Vault aud Burglar Proof Safes, we are prepared 
to receive money on Depcsit subject to .sight cliecks. 
It^" Special Depo.sits received from regular depositors free of charge. 

€oIIection<i made on all Accessible Points, and Proceeds Prompt- 
ly Remitted or Held Subject to Check as Oirected. 

„ ^ -' £ L, JORDAN, President. 

E. D. REED, Cashier. 



STOCKHOLDERS: 

E. L. Jordan, J. W. Cliildress, J. M. Jompi^ins, Ches. Williams, John Jones, Clerk, 
Bcnj. Beaty, W. G. Garrett, R. D. Reed, W. Y. Elliott, H. H. Williams, J. AT. Avt-nt, 
Gen. W. H. Smith, Thomas A. Elliott, Anderson Jones. E. D. Hancock, J. E. 
Fletcher, Sr., E, .Mathews, Chas. Ready, W. C. Burt, John Woods, M. E. 
C. Beasley, J. A. -Moore, Joseph W, Nelson, Wm. Barton, Dr. T. 
C. Black, W. R. Butler, E. Rosenfield, Mrs. Sallie J. Fow- 
ler, Jonn W. Thomas, Miss Adelaide Smith, Jas. 
McCulloch, A. Van Hoos, John Baird. 



DICKSON'S COTTON SEED, 



DAVID DICKSON, OF GEORGIA, 

With his improved and selected seed, makes from 

TWO TO FIVE THOUSAND P0OTD3 PER ACRE, 

And the Farmer on the rich limestone lands of Middle Tennessee, can do as well by 
using his early maturing heavy boiling Cotton Seed. I have procured from Mr. Dick- 
sou his select seed, and have acclimat~ed the seed to tiiis climate, and as 1 wish to ois- 
tribute the seed through Middle Tennessee, I will All a limited number ol orders for 
the seed in small quantities of two bushels to each purchaser at half the price Mr. 
Dicksou sells his seed for. 

On receipt of $5 I will forward to any address two bushels of the seed, selected and 
warranted genuine, put up in good sound sacks. The seed will be ready for delivery 
after the loth ol September. 

Full Directions for Cultivating the Cotton will be sent -with each Sack. 

MURFREESBORO, 

TENNESSEE. 



Page 68 



14 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



DR. SAMUEL EC. BEA]RE, 

I> E: TV T I « T, 

Graduate of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 

Office Up Staiks Over Savings Bank, 

MURFREESBORO, TEIVW. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW AND SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 



B. L. KIDLEY. J. M. AVENT. 

JRIDIuEY & AVEJ\T, 

A.TTOEIsrEYS A_T EA.'VSr, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 



.A. T T O IR n>T E -"^ A^T IL. A. -^i;^ , 
OFFICE EAST MAIIV STREET, 

IMURJB'tiEEISaSOlio. XEJVJSr. 

1^^ Collection of Claims promptly attended to. 



For 8ale, Valuable City Property, 

WELL LOCATED IN MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE, 

CONSISTING OF 

Fine and Taluable Dwelling^ and Business Houses. 

Also, Thiriy nice UDimproved Lots near Union University, just outside the corpo- 
rate limits of the city. Apply to 

■:S!- r3R MS TO SUIT PURCHASERS. 



Page 69 



16 A D VEKTISEMENT S. 



J^ O O iT S E I^^T J^ T" I "V^ E 1= ^ IP E I^. 



DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY. 



THE IIURFREESBORO NEWS. 



^2 I=»©r .^a^ixix-ULixi ; $1 for- S±:x. TWIoxLtlajs. 



OEFICE: Corner of Church and College Streets. 



THE NEW8 JOB PRirVTIlVG OFFICE. 



We have an entire new stock of Job Type, of the most approved kinds, and we re- 
Rpectfully announce to our patrons and friends that we are prepared to execute every 
description ot 

Plain and Fancy Priating upon tbe Most Reasonable Terms. 



Bill Hea.ds, Letter Heads, Business Cards, Prog-rammes, Circulars, "Way 
Bills, Invilatioa Cards, Cbecks, Hand Bills, &:c., 

JEXECUTED NEATLY AND WITH DISJPATCET. 



It is our determination to spare no exertion to deserve the patronage of this county, 
upon which we shall rely confidently for success in onr enterprise. 

HENDERSON A: PRITCHETT, 

inurlreesboro, Tenn. 



J. H. ELLIOTT. ' E. 0. COX. 

ELLIOTT & cox:, 
GROCERS ^ DEALERS IN PRODUCE, 

COKIVER SqrARE AIVD CHURCH STREET, 

TE IST 3Sr. 



Page 70 



18 ADVEKTISEMENTS. 

IsT. C. OOXjI_iIE:R., 

NORTH-EAST CORNER OF PUBLIC SQUARE, 

MFRFREESBORO, TERTIV. 

AND DEALER IN 
SUGAR, COFFEE, FEOUR, MEAE, BACOJV, EARD, SAET, 

STA.PL1^] DRY aOODS, 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

"^VHICH ^VILL OBE SOLD --^T LO^V KA-XES. 

V^IImIm buy COUlffTRY PRODUCE 

AT THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE. 



p. S.— WILL REMOVE THIS FALL, TO THE 

NORTH-WEST CORNER OF THE SQUARE, 

At the old and well-known COLLIER STAKD, where I shall have 

.A-Iv^FLE E,OOlvr TO SXOK,E COTTOlSr, ETC, 

GIVE ME A CALL. 



Page 71 



20 



ADVEBTISEMENTS. 



MURFREESBORO TIN FACTORY. 



69 



09 
C9 



C^ 



Si 
CO 

6*5 



MANUFACTURER OF 

Tii, raPPiiB, AH© SHiif«m©fl WAii, 

WHOLESALE A'ST) RETAIL DEALER IN 

STOVES, CRATES AND KITCHEN WARE. 

C^P- GUTTERS, PIPES and TIN-ROOFING, in the city and country, contracted 
for on the most liberal terms. 




IB. :E^;Os:E]I^^:E^E^l.I^, 



DEALER IN 



FANCY, STAPLE AND DRY GOODS, 



SHOES AND BOOTS, 

mm^ mmE oLifHiiic, hats mu oapi, 

And a Fine Assortment of 

QUEENSWARE AND CLASSWARE. 

JUARANTEES TflE LOWEST PRICE IN THIS MARKET FOR ALL GOODS 



Invites old friends to call and examine his stock before purchasing elsewhere. 

East Side Public Square, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 



Page 72 



23 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



P. C. MOSBY. 



SAM. MOSBY. 



GET THE BEST. 




MANUFACTURERS OF 

SAIBJLIS Al© lAEHISS, ALL SIIIS, 

ALSO, DEALERS IN 
TlitllNKS, VAI^ISES AIST© TRAVELING BAGS 

OF ALL STYLES AKD SIZES, 

HORSE-CANES, WHIPS, SPURS, BRUSHES, HALTERS, 

In fact, everything that is kept ia a first-class Retail Saddle and Haekess 

Manufactort. 

^LL OK-DKR-S FTi03MI='TJL,"5<^ j^TTKNDKD TO. 

Eeferench. — Auy reliable Business House in the city. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, BOOKS, STATIONERY, 

JfBllSICAIi IIVSTRtJMEiVTS, .fcc, 

HAS NOW ON HAND A LARGE AND WELL SELECTED STOCK OF 

Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, Books, Stationery, Pianos, Organs, 

Etc., ICtc. 
M.4NUFACTURERS OF SOLID SILVER WARE, GOLD JEWELRY, Etc. 



THIS REPAIR OF FINE JEWELRY, WATCHES AND CLOCKS SOLICITED. 

E^" All work done by co-Tipctent workmen, and warranted, or money refunded. 
Call and see this mammoth stock on the 

MURFR.EESBOEO, TENN. 



Page 73 



24 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




JESSE A. COLLIER, 

I»EAt,EK IIV 

\LL KINDS OF FURNITURE, 



LOOKING GLASSES, 



HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS, 

N. B.-— Goods Delivered to any part of the city free of charge. 

JV. W. Corner Public Square, 

MURFREESBORO, - - - TENNESSEE 

ALSO, 

COMITILSSION inERCHAIVT A]¥D DEALER IX 

Iron, Castings, Iron Axle Springs, Anrils, Bellows, Tices, Chains, Domestics, 
Osuaburgs, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, Lead, Paints, Bacon, Lard, 
Wheat, Flour, Corn Meal, etc. Dealer in Oroceries, Hard- 
ware, and all kinds of Produce. 

On the BTorthwest Corner of the Square. 



A^, SIMITH cfe CO. 

DE.4.LERS IN 

FAWIIJLY GROCERIES AND PRODUCE, 

BootS;, Shoes^ Hats, Hardware^ etc. 

Next Door to the Sayings Bank, 



CARPEIMTER AND BUILDER, 

One Door East Methodist Church, 
Will construct and superintend buildings of all kinds. Guarantee satisfaction in every 



JOH[>^ BELL, Jr., 
GENERAL INSURAIVCE AGENT, 

]M U K F R E E S B K O , TENNESSEE. 

Represents iSStna Life Insurance Go. 

-AuSSETS OVER. SIO, 000,000, 

Also Reliable Fire Cortipanies. 



Page 74 



26 



ADVERTISEMENTS- 



JAMES A LEIPER, 

MURFREESBOItO, TEHIfESSEE. 



H. H. CLAYTON, M. D. j. 3. MURFREE, M. D. 

3D O O T O I^ S 

CLAYTON & MURFREE 

Offer their services to tlie citizens ot Murfreesboro and vicinity, in the practice Of 
Medicines and Surgery. Office on Main Street. 



E.H.EWING. , E. D.HANCOCK. 

E WIBMG 6l HANCOCK^ 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW & SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY, 

MUKFREESBORO, TENN. 



JOHN PATTERSOItf, M. D., 

PHYSICIAN" Sd SURaEOIsr, 

(OFFICE OYER P.. D. POADS' BOOEI STORE,) 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE, 

MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE. 



DR. GEORGE D. OROSTHWAIT, 
PHYSIOBAN AND ACCOUCHEUR, 

Office on ITIain Street 



"5 
MURFREESBORO, TENN. 



Page 75 



28 A D V E K T I S E M E N T S . 

S. H. HODGE. C. M. SMTIH. 

HODaE & SMITH, 

FOPiWARDING AND COMMISSION 



AND DEALERS IM 



ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE AND GROCERIES. 

Corner Wareroom, Jones & Collier's New Block, 
MURFREESBORO, ----- TENN- 



^v\^. A.' REED, 

NO. 7, NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE, 

I^XJI^rB,EESBOE,0, TEISriTESSEE- 

Dealers in 

HARDWARE, 

CROCKERY WARE, 

GLASS WARE, 

CARPETS, 

OIL CLOTHS, 

MATTINGS, <StC., 

WHICH WILL BE SOLD 

AT THE LOWEST CASH PRICE- 

Respectfully, 

■WT. A. REED. 



Page 76 



30 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



]Mrs. Isl. J^. McDOXIGA-L, 

WLMKIEY 41© »1ISS MMM' 

EAST SIDE OF PUBLIC SCfclJARE, 



jivo. J. iiA'wiiva & soiff, 

UNDERTAKERS,. 




ETO., ETC. 

WILL FURNISH 

Fine Metalic and all ottaer Burial Cases. 

We keep a supply of TINE COFFINS always on hand, and will attend burials in the 
City or elsewhere, upon short notice. 

OLD STAND, CORNER OF COLLEGE AND CHURCH ST3., 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 



FASHIONABLE MiLLINEBY AND DRESS-MAKING STORE, 

ONE DOOR NORTH OF THE POST-OFFICE, 

MTJRF'IiKESBOR.O, XEJSjNJ". 



SOULE FEMA_LE COLLEaE, 

]>i:Ul?i3riiEESBOIiO, TEHVN. 

This Institution will commence its next Collegiate Year on MONDAY, the 30th 
AUGUST, 1SC9, with a complete corps of ihe mo-^t experienced and competent Teach- 
ers in the State, and the must inoroufi;h course of instruction fuund in any Female 
College in the aouth. Charges as low as such schools can afford. No extra charges 
for either Latin or Greek. Boarders treated as daughters in the family. At least one 
hundred can obtain boarding in the College on good terms. Rooms large, well fur- 
nished, well warmed, well ventilated. Location beautiful and healthful. For lurther 
particulars send for catalogue. Address 

REV. D. D. MOORE, President. 



Page 77 



32 ADYERTISEMEJfTS. 

J. P. RICE. n. C. WRIGHT. 

DEALERS IN 

FANCY AND STAPLE DRY GOODS, 



We keep constantly on hand a complete assortment of 



Boots, Shoes, Hats, Readj -made Clftthing, 

TRAVELING BAGS, FINE TRUNKS, 

UMBRELLAS, OIL WINDOW SHADES, 
''OtNUINE'' LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S UNDERWEAR, 

Lot of colored and •n hite Table Damask, ToTiels, Napkins & Doylies, etc. 
ALL OF THK BEST QUALITIES, 

WHICH WE SELL AS 

Cheap as the Same Quality of Goods can be Bought in this Mareet. 



WE call special attention to our 

I.ABIES' AIVD CHII.DRE?f'S FIIVE SHOES, 

VVhicli we have maile to order, aud every pair warranted If they do not prove as rep- 
resented the money will be returned in every instance. 

All Goods Sold by us are Warranted to prove as Represented. 
Call and examine for yourself. We are always ready and willing to show our goods. 

RICE <fc WRIGHT. 



Page 78 



ADVEBTISEMEKTS- 



BUTLER & oo. 

GENEPtAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 



IK THE LARGE 



FIRE PROOF WAREHOUSE, ALONG SIDE RAILROAD TRACK, 
MURFREESBORO, - - - - TENNESSEE. 



Possessing superior facilities to any honse in this city or on this line of Railroad, 
for all heavy handlings. The damage and expense incident to drayage all avoided. 

AMPLE FIRE PROOF STORAGE ROOM FOR ALL CONSIGNMENTS. 

And the locality well adapted for the exhiliition of the same. Consignments of Im- 
proved Lavor Saving JNIachines and Agricultural Implements solicited. We are also 
agents lor the 



CES^EBKATED NORTVAY OAT, 

A specimen of which is always at our office. To be convinced of the greatly superior 
qualities of this Oat, you only have to see it. The yield is three times that of the best 
Tennessee Oat. 

CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELVES. 



Corn, Wiieat, Rye, Oats and Barley Bought all the time for Cash. 

Also request all planters to carefully save all their 

COTTONSEED AND SELL THEM TO US. 

— ALSO— 

ACJE?iT,S FOR THE FIXE IVOOBBtJRY MIEES, 

AND GENEEAL BUTEP.S OF ALL THE 



Page 79 



36 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JOSEPH W. INELSON, 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE, 

MURFREESBORO, . . . - TENNESSEE. 

DEALS IN 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, OILS, PAINTS, DTE STUFFS, 

WINDOW GLASS, SURGICAL AND DENTAL INSTRUMENTS. 

FINE TOILET SOAPS, FINE HAIR & TOOTH BRUSHES, 

Pure Brandies and "Wines for Medicinal Purposes. 

TBUSSES, SUPPOBTERS AND SHOULDER BRACES, 

LAMPS AND LAMP CHIMNEYS, 

And all of the most 
A- ]> p !• o >' e d. I? a t e n t 31 edicine and Bitters- 



I J. C. HAYNES, 

GROCER AND PRODUCE DEALER. 

ALL KINDS OF 

PRODUCE AND FAULT SUPPLIES KEPT CONSTANTLY ON HAND AND FOR SALE, 
SPIRIT UO US LIQ UORS EXCEPTED. 

East Side of Public .Square, Corner ITIain Street, 

MURFREESBORO, - - - TENNESSEE. 

Page 80 



38 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



L. M. MANEY. N. B. BLACE. E. L. TDRKER 



MAIMEY, BLACK $c CO., 



DEALERS IN 



FANCY AND STAPLE MY GOODS. 



HOSIERY, ]\OTIOI^S. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 



ilSfllli. lAElWlI 



C3rI=tOOE;JFMESS, oto. 



NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE, 



MURFREESBORO, - - - - TENNESSEE. 



Page 81 



40 • ADVERTISE MKNTS. 



TTECnE T^ JS^TyiJBlf^ ^TOIi^E: 



Mrs. MARY S, IRTYGAItfT^ 

THE LATEST STYLES OF 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

MURFREESBORO, - - - - TENN. 

JEAST SIDE JPUBLIC SQUARE. 



MANUFACTURER OF 

MILLS, COTTON GINS, THRESHERS, HORSE POWERS, ETC. 

SATISFACTIOIV GUARA7fTEEI> IX ETERY CASE. 

"West street, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. 



THE NORTHWESTER MIITCIL LIFE mumi CO.; 

The Largest Lite Insurance Company West oe the Seaboard Cities. 

HjVS the: L-'VRGrEST ^SSKXS,: 

And pays tbe LARGEST DIVIDENDS. Insures upon all approved plans. ALL 

POLICIES NON-FORFEITING. 

Gr. H. BA^SBZEXTE, .Agent, 

MURFREESBORO, TENN. 



L, H. iyBOO^RF'S SAL®®!!. 

ElEEPS ON HAND 

ALL KINDS OF LIQUORS, ALE, WIIv'ES, ETC., 

ALSO, : 

EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUAKE, 

MURFREKSBCRO, TENN- 



Page 82 



42 A D V E Jl T:I S E M.E K T S . 



J. MicDBRMOTT, 

Bl«i®SST 11® PliSGlillFTIiMST, 

East Side Public Square, 

M:UJEiinK,3£;E;SB0R,0, TENrv. 

KEEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND A LARGE STOCE OF - 

PRESH DRUGS, OILS, PAINTS AND DYESTUFFS, 

ALSO, A riNE ARTICLE OF , 
Which will be sold LOW FOR CASH. 



FRANK W. WASHINGTON. THEODORE SMITH, 

'm & iiiif H, 



DEALERS IN- 



STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, 

• BOOTS, SHOES, HATS AND CLOTHING. 
KORTH SIDE SQUARE 



CITY HOTEL, 

Soutli Side l?iit>lic Squai'e, - ]>i;iuL'freest>or-o, Teiua. 

JOHN li. CROCKETT, PROPPJETOR. 

Fare as Cheap as any first-class Hotel South. Give me a call. 



WIOLESALi AND RETAIL BAKER & CONFECTIONER, 

Northeast Corner Public Square, 

Has constantly on hand a complete stock of 

CANDIES, CAKES, NUTS, CHEESE, CEACKERS, 

FRUITS, Caimed and Fresli, PICEXES, OYSTERS, 

And everything that you may find in a FIRST-CLASS CONJECTIONERr. Also, 
keeps a fine assortment of 

TOBACCO, CIG-ARS, PIPES AND SNUFF, 

INICE NEW TOTS FOK THE CHII.WKEN, CHEAP. 

PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO THE FILLING OF WEDDING 4ND 
PARTY ORDERS. 

Will be on hand at all the Fairs given at the Grounds of the Central Agricultural 
and Mechanical Association, with a coraolete stock of evervthinc- in iii« linp 



Page 83 



SELECTED FUNERAL CARD NOTICES 
FROM RUTHERFORD COUNTY, 1898-1924 



Page 84 



SMITH. 



BouN OcTOHKit 2(), 1832. 
DiKi) AiiuusT 24, 1808. 



ThB friends and acquaintanc of 

). LAFAYETTE SMITH, 

are iuuiUid to attend his funeral lo-morrou/ [Thursday] 
morning at his late residence, corner Main Street 
i^nd Maney Ruenue. at 9:30 o'clock. 

Seiumehy Dr. H. C. Fleming. 

Burial at Evergreen Cemetery. 



PALL BEARERS 



A UOCK, 
J H ALLEN. 
S. H. HODGE, 
B. L. RIDLEY, 



JOE SHELTON. 
JAS. F. FLETCHER 
W. Y. JONES, 
R N. RANSOM. 



Miirfri'tBl»uru. T, 



Page 85 




Page 86 




Page 87 




Page 88 




Page 89 



BOWERS. 



Mdkn, Mauch 2fi. 1K7!I. 
[)iKip, May 5, li)OG. 



The Jriends and acqiiainlances of Mrs. L. L. 
Bowers are iiwiled lo attend Ihe funeral of her 
daughter. 

DELLA M., 

(// her residence at 222 Seuier Street, this 
(Sunday) afternoon at 4 o'clock. 

Services conducted by Reu. G. A. Morgan. 

Burial at Euergreen Cemetery. 



PALL BEARERS. 

IIOMKK JaCOIIS. 

T. J. l{UAi;(;. 
Coy Wade. 

Miirfit-ebboro, Tcnn., May G. lIKKi. 



Tom FKKUt;i.i.. 

K. J. liKIl). 

h. H. Tkavis. 



Page 90 




Page 91 




Page 92 



mim NOTICE. 



Iloni Nov, iiil)ri- II, \HMl. 
Oiud DecciulKT 11, ISIUll. 

Tt'ic- friends and acquaintances of 

Mrs. Maria Dromgoole Beard, 

are respectfully invited to attend l^er funeral at 

tier lale residence on East Main Streer at 2:30 

o'clock tl)is afternoon- 
Services will be conducted by Rev I^ 

Siowe, assisted by Rev. T. fl. Kerley. 
Burial at Everareen Cernelery. 

PALL HhlAUMiS: 



15. L. iilDIJOV. 

llicuAia) Uansom. 

li'. U. liUKUUS. 



H. H. NOKMAN. 

H. H. Keuu. 

Dif. J. B. Mui:i.-i;r;K, Sk. 



Muifiv(;>ilii)i-(i, 'I'cnii ., DitcmhIici- 1l', liKill. 



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HUNT 



Died, Tlnirsday morning, January 10, 1924, at 7 
o'clock at his residence, 740 North Spring, 

SAM G. HUNT 

A<e 78 years 9 luonlha 2» days 

rr;i}'ers al llic giavc Saturday afternoon, January 
12. 1924, at 2 o'clock, hy Dr. T. C. Ragsdale. 

Interment in Evergreen, 

Tiie following will serve as Pall Rearers: 
Honorary 

J H. Peyton, Fr.nk Overall, S. H. Mitchell, H. C. Moore, Sr. 

Dan Brown, Wm. Roberta, Capt. Richard Beard, 

Calvin Carnahan, A. J. Patterton, D. P. Perkini 

Active 

Je»e Alexander, John W. Alexander, D. W. Butler, J. H. 

Campbell, W. B. Miller, W. G. Wood, Judge J. E. 

Richardion, G. H. Al.up 

Wocpdlm & Moore in charge 
Mur(rccslK>ro, Tennessee, January, II, 1924 



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DATE DUE 




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